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^ypj^i u* uSp 


backs down 
in MI5 case 


by Michael Evans* Whitehall Correspondent 

. 31 e £^ rnm ? ni ^ backed After advice from Sir Mi- Iished to ask for copies to be 

down yesterday m the MIS chad Havers and Sir Patrick sent to Mis Thatcher. 

<Murt hearing m Sydney after Mayhew, the Solicitor-Gen- Sirf 


4 l&e-jism f- 


court hearing in Sydney after 
legal advice and decided to 
show the judge, “for his eyes 
only", certain crucial sensitive 
documents, which the defence 
counsel claim are relevant to 

• fltffc pqrA inn/ilm««ii vKa ft 


ty service officer, Mr 
Wright. 

The documents, which in- 
clude memos and letters be- 
tween Sir Michael Havers, the 
Attorney General, and Sir 
Thomas Hsiheriiigton, the 
Director of Public Prosecu- 
tions, will be shown to Mr 
Justice Powell in the New 
South Wales Supreme Court 
today, to enable him to make a 
judgement on the 
Government's position. 

The documents all refer to 
the decisions made by Gov- 
ernment legal officers in 1981 
not to serve injunctions to 
stop the publication of two 
books on MIS by authors, Mr 
Chapman Pincher and Mr 
Nigel West. 

In the Australian court, Mr 
Malcolm Turnbull, the de- 
fence counsel, has demanded 
to see the documents because 
he claims that the Govern- 
ment has been inconsistent in 
its attitude towards these ear- 
lier books and Mr Wright's 
book. The Spy Catcher. 







Mayhew, the Sohdtor-Gen- Sir Robert wrote in his letter 

the Government has to Mr William Armstrong, 
decided to embark on a new managing director of Sidawick 


ve legal argument, that these and Jackson: “I under- 
ce documents should not be stand your and wish to 
to made available to the defence protect the confidentiality of 


“public interest immunity.'* 
Government legal sources 
explained yesterday that this 
phrase covered not just mat- 
ters of national security but 


date. I can assure you that, if 
you are able to comply with 
my request, that confidential- 
ity wS] be strictly observed, 
that the copies will not go 


Tomorrow 

Free my 
people 


also co nfidentiality and it was outside this office and the 

Prime Minister's office—” 

EFV -V rW Apart from the sensitive 
S‘4V I 1 '- /Jp% ‘ W documents to be shown to the 

I. ■ -1 judge, the Government has 

* also decided that a few other 
1 ones can now be handed over 
to the defence counsel. They 
also relate to the decisions 
about the books by Mr 
Pincher and Mr West but do 
not contain anything which 
would damage national 
security. 

The Government’s case is 
that there are now three types 
For his eves onto- fata. of documents in the Wright 
■ M * ge af&in Those that are relevant 
Justice rareu ^ nQt se^ye and can be 

B*ven to the defence counsel* 
h* those that are covered by legal 
- One source said: If he profcssionaj privilege Sd 
deades against us, then we g*^ ^ ^ <^^nment 

.believe should be covered by 
to make next. ■ public interest immunity. 

According to sources, the Yesterday, Mr Turnbull 
documents to be shown to the 5^^ on e 0 f the documents 
ju^e conjsus 1 certain dements he ^ ^ ^ fflc on 

that would damage national ^ pind,^ whom he daims 



Tory attack on Thatcher’s 
plan to cut food mountain 


By Richard Evans, Political Correspondent 

Mrs Margaret Thatcher's ning to launch a savage attack set a 
radical plan to rid the Euro- on the Community's out of dam 
pean Community of its £8.7 control spending and the factoi 


security if made public. 


was used by official sources to 



Ittesatea^becnadmitted S^^info^tion 
that Sir Michael Havers made 0 rwasanagentofMI5. 
the decision not to serve an ^ Wn y ^ yes teniay 
injunction to nop the pubhea- h e had never been a {4id agent 
of Mr PiMbo’s hot*, ^ although thenTwas 
Jnol r Trade ts Treachery, in g ne occasion for about two 

months when a KGB officer 
As The Times revealed was trying to recruit him, and 
yesterday. Sir Robert Arm- he had an MIS controller who 
strong, the Cabinet Secretary, he took out to lunch to teD 
wrote to the publishers of the him what had passed between 
book, Sufgwick and Jackson, them. “But I always paid for 
three days before itwas pub- -the lunch; "be said. 


pean Community of its £8.7 control spending and the 
billion food mountains by CAP. the 71-strong Conser- 
taking farming land out of vative European Reform 
production was dismissed as a Group said the “set 
“cosily nonsense" by an in- aside"proposals would not 
fluential group of Conser- cure the problems of 
vative MPs at Westminster overproduction, 
last night. Alter an emergency meeting 

As disclosed in The Times of the group, the MPs said in a 
yesterday, the Prime Minister statement“We regard such a 
will propose at an EEC sum- scheme as a costly nonsense 
mh in London next month " 


that farmers in Britain and the 
rest of Europe should reduce 
the land they use for growing 
food by 20 per cent in an 
attempt to end the food 
surplus ■ crisis, which is 
underming the Common Agri- 
cultural Policy and is threaten- 
ing. to bankrupt tbe 
Community. 

But on the eve of a Com- 
mons debate last night on next 
year's EEC budget, during 


Tariff war 9 

Soar mQk 14 

and a device to run away from 


the problem of overproduc- bound to continue to increase, 

:« . t.«r - 3 .1 on 


tion instead of solving it. • 
“For a start, it is difficult to 


“within a brief period the 80 
or more per cent of remaining 


see how spending of public land will be producing sur- 
money could be justified for pluses once again." 


paying formers for producing 
nothing unless there is some 
proof that tbe resources might 
be needed some day. 

“If anyone was to suggest a 


Mr teddy Taylor, Conser- 
vative MP for-Southend, East 
and the group's secretary, said 
the only way to save British 
Continued on page 28, co!6 


Released Soviet : 
human fights cam- 
paigner Yuri 
Orlov argues that 
the West must 
make public and 
persistent its 
determination to link 
arms control 
progress to greater 
freedom ih the 
Soviet Union 


r mM± 


— t'&old — 

• The Times Portfofio 
Gold daily competition 
prize of £8,000, 
double the usual 
amount because no 
one won on Saturday, 
was shared 
yesterday by five 
readers. Details, 
page 3. 

• Portfolio fist, page 
33; how to play, 
information service, 
page 28. 


’times business j 


D„, „Xi__ _ lm - . ... J , . , _ . ° : o BVlIM.UWiWlULUUJ. — — — — — “J IU Ul 

touiink Swri«i!>clSSg whlchinan y Toneswerc P lai1 - “If anyone was to suggest a Continued on page 28, 

to examine training methods, Plea for a real common market 


. . By Sheila Grom, Pofitical Staff 

The Government is pre- hooligan measures by the 
pared to bringin legislation to Football League, which is 
force football dobs to allow campaigning strongly against 
entry to games by member- compulsory membership 
ship card only. which, it aigties, could kill off 

This is likely to be done by professional football in Eng- 
adding new powers to the Fire land. 

Safety and Safety of Places of Much of the credit for better 
Sport BQI, due to be in- behaviour on the terraces is 
troduced in the Commons being attributed to installation 
early in December.- which of dosed-diarit television at 
brings in tbe recommends- vulnerable grounds. 


tions of the Popplewdl In- 
quiry into the Bradford fire. 


Mrs Thatcher, Mr Douglas 
Hurd, the Home Secretary, 


It is not yet been decided and Mr Richard Tracey, the 
whether tbe 100 per cent Sports Minister, are said to 


four trips to the United Stales, 
to examine training methods, 
1986, his first year, was nota- 
bly unsuccessful for Mr 
Dickinson and Mr Sangster, 
the leading owner for five of 
the last 10 years. 

They had only four wins 
from more than 40 horses. 

Mr Dickinson, who had 40 
two year-old horses in the 
stable, needed at least one 
season to develop their ability 
and, in spite of numerous 
Tumours and denials, it comes 
as a surprise to the racing 
world that he has been sacked 
so quickly. 

Mr Sangster said earlier this 
year.“ Michael's brilliant 
record speaks for itself. I am 


wtiemer tne iw per ceni opqns iwmisrer. are sma m nol worried about the trainer 
membership schemes should- fed strongly about the conti- or establishment 
be run on a national basis or nuing threat to public order **j ^ bin, to get the 

by tbe clubs. from football hooligans on 


by tbe dubs. from football hooligans on 

The Prime Minister has public transport and in town 
been closely involved in the centres which ties up thou- 
rampaign to dean, up English sands of police officers every 
footbaflsince the Heysd Sta- week. / 
dium disaster in May 1985 Officially the Government 
and is believed to be con- is still considering the 
cerned about the effect of boo- League's report and talks are 
liganism on England’s reputa- continuing between the two. 
tion abroad. But tbe League is proposing 


liganism on England’s reputa- continuing between the two. 
tion abroad. But tbe League is proposing 

Government ministers are club s^emes which will nxan 
known to be worried by recent 5JSSI? 


outside stadiums 


Shrewsbury, Darlington, Tor- “H 1 
quay and Middlesbrough. Te j^ 
They are also disappointed 
by the lack of adequate anti- Ci 


will be members — so that cas- 
ual spectators will not be bar- 


Mr Tracey has admitted 
Coatimied on page 28, cd 2 


“I just want him to get the 
best horses — without the 
ammunition be cannot be 
expected to fire winning 
salvoes." 

But staff were also said to 
have been unhappy at 
Manton, which was run like 
an army camp with security 
guards and strict discipline. 

Mr Dickinson worked his 
staff and himself incessantly 
and was trainer, estate man- 
ager and building manager, 
simultaneously, as he tried to 
produce a successful stable. 

He has a meticulous atten- 

Continiied on page 28* col 5 


Profits double 

News Corporation, the film, 
television and publishing 
group, which includes The 
Times, The Sunday Times , 
News of the World and the 
Sun, more than doubled pre- 
tax profits to £49.56 million in 
the quarter to September 30 
Page 29 

What’s in a name? 

How much is a computer 
project manager worth? The 
title can be misleading 
Computer Horizons. 19-21 


TIMES SPORT J 


Council anger 

John Stmtivthe chairman of 
the Sports Council, has broken 
with tradition and written a 
letter of complaint to Mrs 
Thatcher over the decision by 
the Government nol to in- 
crease grants in line with 
inflation Page 56 


Biira&4eatn. 
manages 27 
Boshtesx 29-34 


Croswfds.K.28 


Baker gets tough with the teachers 


■ By Nicholas Wood 
Political Reporter 

A trial of strength between 
the Government and the big- 
gest and most militant of the 
teaching unions over pay was 
looking increasingly likely last 
night after Whitehall sources 
made it clear that Mr Kenneth 
Baker, the Secretary of State 
for Education and Science, is 
in no mood for substantial 
concessions. 

He will spell out his pos- 
ition tomorrow at a meeting 


with Mr John Pearman, leader 
of the Labour-controlled local 
authority employers. 

If, as expected, Mr Pearman 
stands tty the Acas agreement 
signed by four of the six 
unions last Friday, Mr Baker 
is likely to go to Cabinet on 
Thursday and gain approval 
for imposing a settlement. 

Such a move is fraught with 
legislative difficulties and will 
be bitteriy opposed by the 
Opposition. Almost certainly, 
it trail coincide with strikes in 


schools and strong action by 
the biggest union, the Na- 
tional Union ofTeachers. 

Yesterday, sources dose to 
Mr Baker discounted reports 
that he was ready to make a 
counter offer* 

Instead, he will ask Mr 
Pearman why the employers 
and the unions have not 
responded to his plea last 
week for them to “think 
again" and meet his criteria 
covering overall cost and 
differentials. 


From Andrew McEwen 
Diplomatic Correspondent 
Brussels 

The Prime Minister has 
written to tbe heads of govern- 
ment of Britain’s 11 EEC 
partners asking them to help 
her transform it into a genuine 
common market 
Her letter, revealed yes- 
terday at a meeting of the EEC 
foreign ministers in Brussels, 
asks each government to drop 
objections to a package of 13 
internal market measures. 

Mis Thatcher's hope is that 
the London EEC summit on 
December 5 and 6 will strip 

Early birds 
in British 
Gas sale 

The first completed applica- 
tions for British Gas shares 
have started to arrive, al- 
though the prospectus was not 
published until today. 

Almost a million copies of 
tbe mini prospectuses were 
delivered in Saturday’s post to 
customers who had registered 
for the guaranteed allocation. 

National Westminster, the 
leading receiving bank, said 
that more than 12 completed 
forms bad been returned to its 
main London branch yes- 
terday: 

More than one million Brit- 
ish Gas shares changed hands 
yesterday in tbe “grey" mar- 
ket, with a price of 61 p quoted 
, for the SOp partly-paid shares. 

Meanwhile, the Stock Ex- 
change said that eight City 
firms have so for registered to 
make a market in British Gas 
shares when dealings start on 
December 8. 

Prospectus, pages 35-50 
Quick response, page 29 
Market report page 31 


away some of the barriers 
preventing the 12 from trad- 
ing freely. 

If successful, the package 
would be an important initial 
step towards the EECs objec- 
tive of 300 such measures by 
1 992 — the self-imposed dead- 
line: 

Although individually un- 
draraatic, ranging from com- 
mon standards on testing 
medicines to safety criteria for 
the construction of industrial 
trucks, tbe measures would 
help remove the stigma that 
the EEC is a common market 
in name only. 

28 years’ 
jail for 
drugs boss 

By Stewart Tendler 
Crime Reporter 

One of Britain’s biggest drug 
traffickers began a record 28- 
year prison sentence last night 
taking with him the secrets of 
the fortune he is thought to 
have earned leading a £200 
million heroin ring. 

Paul Dye was sentenced at 
the Central Criminal Corn! 
yesterday to two consecutive 
sentences of 14 years apiece. 

He had made vast profits 
from an organization which 
smuggled 40 to SO kilos of 
heroin from Pakistan over two 
and a half years. 

Judge Rant. QC, told Dye. a 
company director and former 
secondhand car salesman, that 
he was “devious , greedy and 
utterly unscrupulous ". 

The judge also fined him 
£200,000. Customs investi- 
gators believe that other 
money is buried in untiaced 
Swiss bank accounts. 

Full report* page 7 


The 13 measures were cho- 
sen because each has wide 
support with only one or two 
countries objecting. 

Mrs Thatcher's appeal is 
that as no country is being 
asked to sacrifice any vital 
interest, the time to trade off 
concessions has come. 

Early in Britain's presidency 
a coordinating group of senior 
officials was set up. but now 
time is running out with for 
less achieved than had been 
hoped. 

Whitehall's analysis is that 
the problem is a lack of 
political will. 



Sinking below die waves: Only the forehead mast and superstructure of the stricken Kowloon Brfogeremafo^above the 
water yesterday while the iron ore carrier was being potmded on the Stags Rocks off the west coast of Ireland. 

Sangster’s 
trainer out 
after bad 
season 

By Michael Seely 

Mr Michael Dickinson, tbe 
most successful National 
Hunt uainer in recent years, 
has been sacked by Mr Robert 
Sangster, the owner and foot- 
ball pools millionaire, after a 
disastrous flat racing season 
when the stable had only four 
winners. 

Mr Sangster last night de- 
scribed the break-up as “the 
end ofa dream. You could say. 
it was a personality dash, an 
irretrievable breakdown in 
relations. He and I just do not 
see eye to eye any more.” 

Mr Dickinson, aged 36, who 
in March 1983 trained the first 
five borne in the Cheltenham 
Gold Cup, took over foe 
lavish Manton stables ip/Wfit- 
shire in 1984 to prepare to 
repeat his success on the fiat 


set aside scheme for redun- 
dant shipyards, engineering 
factories or coal mines, they 
would be accused of being flat 
earthers or Scargill-type 
wreckers.” 

Where such schemes of 
taking land out of use had 
been tried, they had not solved 
the problem of over- 
production. the statement 
cominued.“We see it as a 
device to spend billions on 
paying people to do nothing 
which will buy, at best, a 
respite of overproduction for 
only a very few years. 

"With production yields 


By Philip Webster 
and Richard Thomson 

Conservative MPs yes- 
terday launched a strong at- 
tack on the decision by 
Barclays Bank to pull out of 
South Africa, one of them 
calling it an act of moral and 
commercial cowardice- 

As the opposition parties 
welcomed foe move, the criti- 
cism from the Conservative 
backbenches went beyond 
those MPs wbo have been 
most vociferous in opposing 
economic sanctions. 

Mr Teddy Taylor, MP for 
Southend East, suggested that 
people banking with Barclays 
should consider withdrawing 
their accounts in protest 

Barclays is tbe first big 
British company to divest its 
domestic South African busi- 
ness. It is set to realize a book 
loss of more than £40 miDion 
on foe sale of its holding in 
Barclays National, foe South 
African Bank. 

Sir Timothy Be van. Bar- 
clays's chairman, announced 
yesterday that foe sale was 
worth £80 million. But ex- 
change rate adjustments mean 
that foe holding is valued at 
millions of pounds less than it 
was at the end of last year. 

Barclays's bolding in Bamat 
is being sold to the South 
African bank's other main 
shareholders — Anglo-Ameri- 
can, De Beers and Southern 
Life Association. 

Mr Michael Grylls. chair- 
man of the backbench in- 
dustry committee, said that it 
was a disappointing develop- 
ment because Barclays had a 
good record of encouraging 


Sale loss 29 


foe training of blacks and 
encouraging black entrepren- 
eurs through foe banking sys- 
tem. “The anti-apartheid cam- 
paigners have shot themselves 
in foe foot over this." 

Mr .Anthony Beaumont- 
Dark. MP for Birmingham 
Selly Oak* said: “The saddest 
thing is that a bank of Barclays 
distinction has allowed itself 
to be blackmailed by bullies. 
Those bullies will do more 
harm to foe black population 
than anything else ." 

Mr John Carlisle, secretary 
of foe all-party British-South 
Africa parliamentary group, 
said: “It bodes ill for the future 
of multi-racial society in 
South Africa." 

Mr Taylor said it was an act 
of “appalling moral and 
commercial cowardice". He 
went on: “Those concerned 
about foe fiiture of South 
Africa and the ending of 
apartheid should now seri- 
ously think about removing 
their accounts from Barclays." 

The Prime Minister was 
said yesterday to regard 
Barclays' decision as a com- 
mercial one. She may be 
pressed by Tory MPs in foe 
Commons today to condemn 
it, but is unlikely to do so. 




faing 

&Cruickshank 


An i-rnmm/ 1 iinjffnkta Straw UJ 


More than just a 
Stockbroker 


Dial-a-debate could clear Commons backbench 



lg 




3B| 




**•■"«( roe**/ 


By Martin Fletcher 
Political Reporter 

The . back benches of foe 
House of Commons, already 


sible introduction of what 
would amount to a Dial-a- 
Debaie service, available to 
both MPs and the public. 

Tbe move comes in the 


conspicuously empty during wake of the committee's fail- 
all but the most important qh> jq secure backing for the 



debates, could in the future be 
practically bare. 

Moves are afoot which 
would enable MPS to listen to 



debates from tbe comfort of telephones. 


idea of a system which would 
allow MPs alone to listen to 
debates from their offices 
through their internal 


their offices. 


The proposal was pin to foe 


According to the minutes Commons Services Commit- 
released yesterday of a private last February, and rejected 


Sound Broadcasting Select 
Committee meeting in May, 
.. Sir, Philip Goodhart, foe 
committee chairman, has 
1 been authorized to discuss 
with British Telecom foe pos- 


on foe easting vole of the 
chairman, Mr John Biffen, 
Leader of the House. 

The members themselves 
were split between those who 
argued .that such, a system 


would empty the chamber stiff 
further, and those who aigued 
that it would do the opposite 
by alerting MPs to interesting 
developments. 

Sir Philip yesterday refused 
to disclose what progress he 
had made with British 
Telecom, merely advising The 
Times to “keep in touch". 

It is understood, however, 
that considerable obstacles 
would have to be overcome 
before a Dial-a-debate system 
could be made available to the 
public. 

At present any outside 
broadcast unit that wants to 
record all or pan of a debate 
has to first set oermission 


from tbe Sound Broadcasting 
Committee. 

Were anyone able to record 
a debate, control on its uses 
would disappear and MPs 
might find their words of 
wisdom being regurgitated in 
such undesirable contexts as 
satirical television shows. 

The question would arise of 
whether British Telecom, 
which would be making a 
profit from foe service, should 
have to pay a fee either to the 
Commons itself which pro- 
vides foe material, or to foe 
BBC. 

MPs are now informed of 
what is going on in foe 
chamber through dosed-cir- 
cuii television screens. 


Alexanders 
Laing & Cruickshcmk 
Holdings Ltd. 

rue i\:ePKAUC*j*i S 


For further information abouf our 
investment services pteoss contact 
Anthony Cronin at 

PERCY HOUSE 
7 COPIHALL AVENUE 
LONDON EC2R 7BE 
TEL 01-588 2800 


■..i i i'ii mu t / 










NEWS SUMMARY 


Three held after 
PC falls to death 

Detectives fannriigti a murder inquiry yesterday after a 
police constable plunged SO feet to bis death as be 
s&^cd with a suspect at a block of flats m Stoke-on- 
Trent 

PC John Taylor, aged 26,smashed through a plate gtos 
partition of a stairwell on foe fifth floor of the flats as be 
grappled with the man. 

PC Taylor, who married his wife, Angela, a woman 
police constable only a year ago, died from multiple 
injuries. It was revealed last night that bis wife is expecting 
their first child early in the New Year. _ t 

Yesterday, detectives woe waiting at the hospital to 
question the other man who felL Two other men were ar- 
rested at the scene are are expected to be charged today. 

Wapping action call 

Leaders of four print onions yesterday urged the powerful 
inner cabinet of the TUC, the Finance and General 
Purposes Committee, to conform to a decision taken by the 
annual conference in September and re-open disciplinary 
moves against the electricians' union whose members work 
for News International at Wapping. 

The meeting, at which tbe anion representatives said they 
were armed with “fresh evidence** about the role of the Elec- 
trical, Electronic Telecommunication and Pfmnbing Union 
in the dispute, «"» as the £58 milHo n offer of termination 
payments to 5,140 former News I n tern ati onal employees 
expired. Parliament, page 4. 


Leyland 
cuts jobs 

Leyland Vehicles are to 
make 100 of the UOO 
workers redundant at 
Multipart, its parts opera- 
tion plant at Choriey in 
Lancashire, by next Feb- 
ruary. 

The company made a net 
loss of more than £100 
million last year, and film' 
d pi demand, particularly 
from Africa, is continuing 
to fan. 

Leyland Vehicles said 
that it was hoped that the 
redundancies would be 
mainly voluntary. 


Bamber 

appeal 

Jeremy Bamber, aged 
25, who was given five life 
sentences last month for 
the murder of five members 
of his family yesterday 
lodged notice of appeal 
against his convictions with 
the Court of Appeal in 
London. 

The appeal papers al- 
leged misdirection by Mr 
Justice Drake at the 
Chelmsford Crown Coort 
triaL They will be consid- 
ered by a High Gmrt judge, 
sittin g in private, n fro will 
decide whether an appeal is 


Best’s 

diaries 

It was agreed in the High 
Coart yesterday that 
£10,000 of the estimated 
£30,000 which George 
Best, aged 40, of Oakley 
Street, Chelsea, London, 
the former Manchester 
United and Northern Ire- 
land football international, 
is to be paid by Tbe San for 
his diaries should go to his 
trustee in bankruptcy. 


Women’s sea plunge 

Two women drove off a ferry tinkspan into the sea de- 
spite being told that they had just missed a sailing, an in- 
quest beard today. 

The hearing at ftyde, on the Me of Wight, was told that 
Mrs Efleen Bond, aged 42, and Mrs Deborah Emmcrton, 
aged 23, missed the departing car ferry, from Fishbourne, 
by between six and eight feet. 

PC Kevin Gsard said tbe women, both from Twick- 
enham, south-west London, were told to wait for the next 
ferry. The inquest was adjourned until January 27. 



Couple win ‘hollow’ island home victory 


A couple won the right to 
live in their own home yes- 
terday rix yeare after they sold 
it when prosecuted for foiling 
to leave (Our Legal Affairs 
Correspondent writes). 

The European Court of 
H uman Rights ruled that 
Guernsey's rigid housing laws 
had been too harshly applied 
on Mr Joseph Gillow and his 
wife Yvonne. 

But the victory nilmg 
against the Government was 
hollow! the court did not 
criticize the housing laws as 
such and the couple will only 
regain the residence qual- 
ifications they originally had. 

The court also accepted a 
last-minute submission by the 


Government that one of the 
Gillows’ main claims could 
not be brought because tbe 
relevant protocol has never 
been applied to the Chan nel 
Islands. 

The oversight, discovered 
by government lawyers in the 

ESSSS&SS* rish* 

to respect for property has 
been violated cannot be 
brought 

Mr Gillow said: “We are 
relieved to get a ruling but 
disappointed that the court 
supported a law which is 
archaic and unfair ". Tbe court 
had in practical terms done 
“exactly what Guernsey 


wanted" and would help no 
one, be said. 

On the second claim, which 
has been found defective, be 
said that Britain was “in the 
business of denying people 
human rights." 

“Both claim s had been up- 
held uaaninunousfy before 
the European Commission on 
Human Rights, before the 
technical loophole was spot- 
ted, and they would have won 
'hands down' if protocol one 
applied to the whole of Great 
Britain." 

Mr Gillow said that he and 
his wife still had criminal 
convictions; and so for as 
many people in Guersey were 
concerned, were treated as 


“public enemy number one. 

He said that they would 
now consider-if they wanted to 
return to Guernsey as licensed 
residents and spend the req- 
uisite number of years before 
they had permanent resident 
qualifications. 

They would also consider 
compensation for the cost of 
bringing the case, which they 
have done alone, and for the 
sale of their house fo&owfrig 
their criminal prosecution for 
£33,000, which tbeydaim was 
below the market price. 

The couple moved to 
Guernsey in 2957 and built a 
house. In I960, they went 
abroad because ofMr Gillow** 
job with the United Nations 


and did not return for 20 
years. During that time tire 
housing law was changed and 
they lost their rigto, - 

Yesterday the Home Office 
said that u was consulting 
. with foe Channel Islands and 
the Isle of Man to see if they 
wished that protocol one of 
-the European Convention on 
Human Rights should be ex- 
tended to them. 

A spokesman said that it 
was “extremely unfortunate” 
that it had been discovered 
too late in the proceedings that 
the protocol did not cover 
Guernsey; but once discov- 
ered it had been the 
Government's duty to point ix 
out to the court. 


Diplomat 
wins sex 
bias claim 
against FO 

By Frances Gibb, Legal Affairs Correspondent 


A woman diplomat who 
started legal proceedings .for 
unlawful discrimination 
against the Foreign Office has 
won her claim that the min- 
istry was wrong to deny her a 
High Commission post in 
Zambia her because it was a 
“male-dominaifid society”. 

Mrs Sue Darling Rogeison’s 
claim under the Sex Discrim- 
ination Act 1975 was brought 
after a decision by the Foreign 
Office last April to withdraw 
her proposed posting to Lu- 
saka as deputy high commis- 
sioner in foe political section. 

Tbe reason given, according 
to her solicitors, Bindmans, 
was that the second secretary 
was already a woman and 
that, “an aD-female political 
section would be operation- 
ally ineffective in the con-, 
ditions of a male-dominated 
society, which the Foreign 
Office considered Zambia to 
be”. 

Tbe job has since been 
given to a man. But in terms of 
settlement released yesterday 
the Foreign Office admits that 
while acting in good faith its 
decision to abandon Mrs 
Rogerson’s proposed posting 
to Lusaka was mistaken and 
cannot be reconciled with foe 
Sex Discrimination AcL - 

It expresses regret for “foe 
distress suffered by her as a 
result of the abandonment of 
foe posting to Lusaka” and is 
re-examining its procedures 
for posting officers abroad, in 
the light of the experience 
gained in the present case, to 
ensure breaches of the Act do 
not occur. 

Last night, Mrs Rogerson, 
aged 44, who has since taken 
up foe offer of a post of equal 


_ as consul general in 
h. Western Australia, wel- 
comed the settlement. “It is a 
very satisfactory and 
constructive outcome.” 

The terms of settlement 
state that Mrs Rogerson, who 
had backing from the Equal 
Opportunities Commission, 
accepts it was Foreign Office 
policy as an equal opportunity 
employer to develop the ca- 
reer of each member of the 
diplomatic service on foe 
basis of individual merit ir- 
respective of sex 

She also accepts ft rec- 
ognized it had an obligation to 
ensure her career did not 
suffer because of foe decision 
not to post to Lusaka. 

But both sides acknowledge 
that tbe employment pro- 
visions of foe Sex Discrimina- 
tion Act “may not be easy to 
apply to the special circum- 
stances of foe diplomatic 
service”. 

Miss Felicity Crowther, her 
solicitor, said that she be- 
lieved foe case was tbe first of 
a diplomat c himing unlawful 
discrimination. In general foe 
Foreign Office was aware of its 
responsibilities and was not 
“inherently discriminatory”. 

But evidence from a num- 
ber of people both in Zambia 
jmd in foe United Kingdom 
demonstrated that ft was “a 
forward looking society where 
woman play an important 
role”. 

Woman were represented at 
Cabinet level to a greater 
extent there than they were 
here. Miss Crowther said. 

In view of the Foreign 
Office's admission of its 
“mistake” Mrs Rogerson is 
withdrawing her complaint to 
the industrial tribunal. 


Labour law needs 
stability, CBI says 

By Edward Townsend, Industrial Correspondent 


Tbe Confederation of Brit- 
ish Industry has again openly 
criticized the proposed labour 
law reforms of tbe Opposition 
parties. There is nothing in 
Labour, Liberal or Social 
Democratic Party policies that 
give comfort to employers, it 
saySb 

In its latest employment 
affairs report, the CBI 
emphasizes foe view of com- 
panies that a period of stabil- 
ity is most favoured, with no 
fresh legislation or rescinding 
of existing laws. 

CBI leaders made it clear at 
their annual conference earlier 
this month that employers 
were united in particular 
against foe Labour Party's 
proposals. Sir Terence Beck- 


ett, foe director general, said 
that a Labour Government 
would mean a return to “foe 
slit trenches” of the 1970s. 

The report says that Labour 
Party proposals would involve 
a radical shift in foe balance of 
power in industrial relations. 

The CBI is also worried 
about foe SDP and Liberal 
parties' ' proposals to 
“institutionalize” worker 
involvement Participation 
deals would have to conform 
to law and be ratified by an 
agency. 

The report adds that the 
CBI has consistently endorsed 
the Government’s step by step 
approach towards industrial 
relations legislation. 


Woolworth plans 
children’s stores 


The High Street shopping 
giant F W Woolworth is 
pfenning to open a of 

more than 100 stores catering 
specifically for children. 

The shops, to be called Kids 
Store, will aim to sell every- 
thing required by a child, from 
clothes and confectionery to 
toys and prams, from birth to 
early teenage years. 

Mr Malcolm Parkinson, 
Woolworfos' chief executive, 
said yesterday that the first of 
foe shops would open next 
Spring, and that all would be 
in town centre locations. At 
foe moment the company is in 
foe process of revamping its 
image. 

Boots, another familiar re- 
tail name, is planning a simi- 


By Alan Hamilton 

lar nhnin under the name 
Children's World, but- has 
opted for suburban superstore 
sites. 

By offeriiK a comprehen- 
sive range of merchandise, as 
well as attractions like res- 
taurants and soda bars. Wool- 
worth believes it can compete 
strongly with established 
names in that growing special- 
ist market, sudn asMothercare 
The shops will offer parents 
the chance fully to kit out their 
children all under one root 
Mr Parkinson said The plan 
is part of an aggressive 
marketing strategy adopted by 
Woolworth after the company 
fought off a takeover bid from 
Dixons, the photographic 
group. 



Dr Saleem Goohunali with some of tbe patients* files that form part of an ever-growing 
hospital waiting fist (Photograph: Mark Pepper). 

Rest day goes to aid patients 


“It’s like the oM Japanese 
trick of keeping plates ha the 
air. Yob jast joggle with 
patients to try to fit them all 
in,” -says Dr Saleem 
Goolamali, a consultant 
dermatologist at Noorthwkk 
Park Hospital, in north-west 
London. 

Yet as foe wafting fist for 
National Health patients with 
routine sltin ailments in his 
hospital has grown longer and 
longer, he has come up with a 

novel idea to cat it at a stroke. 

On Saturday, December 6, 
he and his team of doctors and 
nurses wifl forego a day’s well- 
earned rest and fit ia aa extra 
120 patients. 

“Afthoagh I have already 
increased foe mmnber of 
weekly sessions at foe hospital 
from four to six, this has not 
made a major impact on foe 
waiting-fist,” he says. “So I 
thought ‘Lets have a special 


By David Cross 

day when we see people with 
all the roatine complaints — 
people with acne, children 
with warts and those worried 
about losing their hair.' 

“These are not life and 
death cases but to foe individ- 
uals c onc erned they are of 
peat importance.” 

Dr Goohunali has agreed to 

work from 9am to 5pm mi 
December 6 without pay. As a 
private consultant he amid 
earn 9 to £40 fin- a single 
consultation in Harley Street. 
“It is a gesture to tbe commn- 
aity to show that there are 
National Health co n su lt a nt s 
who will pot themselves out to 
help non-urgent cases,” he 
explains. 

The other members of the 
team — four GPs with training 
in dermatology, four nurses 
and a registrar in foe accident 
and emergency department — 


wifl be paid for their services if 
they so desire. 

There will also be a pharma- 
cist on hand to give od 
prescriptions and foe plan is 
that patients seen that day wifi 
not need to retam ibr any 
foDow-gp treatment 

No extra ancflUary staff wiH 
be required as the hospital is, 
in any case, open on 
Saturdays. 

Dr Goolamali would like 
other specialists to follow his 
example- But be recogprizes 
that dermatology is a special 

case- “We have a lot of routine 

cases which can be dealt wfth 
on foe spot,” he says. This is 
not foe case with many other 
illnesses, he points out 

Yesterday .Dr Goohunali 
dealt with 21 patients daring 
Ins morning clink and another 
17 during . die afternoon 
session. 


None for the road this Christinas 


The Government launches 
its Christmas drink-drive 
campaign tomorrow with an 
uncompromising appeal: if 
you are going to drive, do not 
drink. 

The campaign, to be initi- 
ated by Mr Peter Bottomley, 
Minister for Roads and Traf- 
fic, will be in marked contrast 
with a previous one which 
attracted criticism. . 

That showed a glass with 
drink at the bottom and urged 
drivers to “stay low”. Critics 
thought ft incited people to 
drink. 


By Peter EvaHs, Home Affairs Correspondent 

This time foe message is 
unequivocally that drinking 
and driving is dangerous. It 
ties in with demands which 
will be made by a new affiance 
of concerned bodies. Action 
on Drinking and Driving, that 
Britain’s 80mgs limit be re- 
duced to 50mgs. 

In a policy statement yes- 
terday, tbe alliance said that 
most laboratory studies show- 
ed impairment occurred by 
70mgs, but others had shown 
ft to happen at still lower 
levels, between lOmgs and 
40mgs. 


Tbe affiance also wants fiiOy 
random testing. Its chairman. 
Professor Brian Prichard, 
professor of clinical pharma- 
cology at University College 
Hospital, London, said: “Ev- 
ery year the Government ex- 
presses concern about road 
safety by running a Christmas 
drinking campaign. Every 
year another 2,000 people die 
in drink-related road 
accidents. 

“Random breath testing has 
been tried and tested abroad 
and shown to work.” 

Christinas shopping, page 7 



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School breakfast attracts 200 pupils 


By Mark Dowd 
Education Reporter 

More than 200 pupils from 
Bracknell, Berkshire, were in a 
hurry to get to school early 
yesterday morning. 

Tbe magnetic attraction for 
students at Garth Hill Com- 
prehensive was not algebra or 
even foe sonnets of Shake- 
speare. but foe launch of a new 
restaurant with foe prospect of 
breakfast before their first 
academic engagements. 

Mr Stanley Goodchild, foe 
headmaster who pioneered 
foe new scheme, said that ft 
was foe first school in foe 
county and possibly in- foe 
country, to offer breakfast 
before lessons. 

Why was be pushing this 
nutrition revolution?“Many 
parents these days go off to 
work earty in foe morning and 
leave foeir children to gee their 
own breakfast 

More often than not chil- 
dren don’t bother and prefer 
to stop at foe sweet shop on 
foe way to school,” he said. 

During several previous 
years as a inspector, Mr 
Goodchild said he had con- 
cluded that schools often in- 
sulted pupils by both the 
presentation and content of 
the food they provided. 

“A school needs to be run as 
a business, using business' 



Kevin Fowtes, aged 14, getting a taste of the restaurant at Garth HOI Comprehensive. 


techniques and that indudes 
catering,” he said. 

The service had to be self- 
financing and hence the new 
restaurant, to puO in foe 
numbers. 

Garth HtU, which has 1,200 
students in the 11-19 age 
bracket, already boasts a 
£200.000 industry-sponsored 
computer centre. 

Anticipated demand for 


breakfast meant that tickets 
for the 212 seats had to be 
distributed at the end of last 
week. They were snapped up 
within an hour. 

A quick glance at tbe menc 
s u ggested healthy eating at a 
reasonable price. 

No fried foods, wholemeal 
rolls, with a typical spot of 
petit dejeuner being_ 
egsson toast with i 


“It’s a really nice treat for 
us. It looks a bit like one of 
those burner bars,” was the 
opinion of Lisa BetteU, aged 

Lee Bryant, a first former, 
thought it was '‘smashing”. “It 
gives you a chance to chat to 
your friends instead of bring 
out in foe cold in foe 
playground," he. said. 


Warning 
on spray 
snowflakes 

By AngeHa Johnson 

Cans of artificial “snow 
flakes” aerosol sprays, being 
sold for decorating Christmas 
trees, could be lethal if sprayed 
near a naked flame, the British 
Safety Council said yesterday. 

The council said tire green 
cans of Snow Flakes, pin©- 
scented, which were marketed 
last year by Porth Decorative 
Products of South Wales, are 

highly flftmmahlft. 

The product is still for sale 
in shops, despite foe introduc- 
tion of a new burgundy- 
coloured can which is labelled 
non-flammable. 

Mr James Tye, chairman of 
foe council, said: “The 
marketing company has with- 
drawn green cans, but unfortu- 
nately we have already found 
foal some stores have kept 
their old stocks for this year. 

“I would advise . anyone 
buying these .novelty sprays 
only to purchase the new 
burgundy cans, which are 
manufactured using a non- 
flammable propellant.” 

The council said it was 
delighted by the small number 
of complaints about toys 
which have been made dus 
year. 


Child case 
judge tries 
informal 
approach 

. Counsel, court offickak 
and 'ushers were ordered to 
remove all legal apparel yes- 
terday, in an attempt to create 
a relaxed atmosphere at an 
indecency trial involving two 
girls ages seven and right. 
(Our Legal Affairs Correspon- 
dent writes). 

As lawyers left wigs and 
gowns outside, prison officers 
and police removed foeir tu- 
nics and Mr Justice McNeill 
stepped off the bench — mi- 
nus wig and robe — and sat at 
a desk normally occupied by 
foe derk in foe smallest of 
Cardiff’s crown courts. 

Minutes before the trial was 
doe to start the defendant, a 
park keeper, aged 31. changed 
his plea to guilty but the judge 
requested that the jurors, 
nevertheless, be brought into 
court. 

The judge told them: “You 
may have been surprised 
when you came into court to 
find yo ur sel v es expected to try 
a criminal case in an at- 
mosphere that lacks foe usual 
formalities of such pro- 
ceedings. 

“You may have heard of the 
public concern about young 
children in a case like this - 
nowadays called a form of 
child abuse — having to give 
evidence in circumstances of 
formality in a trig public court. 

“I decided, in this casar ft 
would be right to put aside as 
much formality as porible ” 

He said tbe two little girls 
had been shown the empty 
courtroom a week ago and he 
had intended that they should 
have given their evidence 
alongside him. 

The judge, referring to pro- 
posals for making changes in 
the law to allow children to be 
questioned in recorded inter- 
views to be shown to the jury, 
said other countries were try- 
ing to see that children could 
give evidence in a more 
relaxed atmosphere. 

He hoped the method he 
was adopting would be a 
useful contribution to public 
discussion on the matter. 

The defendant, Derek Phil- 
lips of Ely, Cardiff, was sent to 
prison for seven years for what 
foe judge described as a 
thoroughly disgusting series of 
offences. 


Call for 
physics 
teachers 

By Ora Education 
Reporter 

Britain needs 2^00 more 
physics teachers immediately 
to alleviate growing shortages 
in foe sciences, a conference 
on the crisis in higher educa- 
tion was told yesterday. 

Professor Paul Blade, foe 
president of foe Association of 
Science Education, was speak- 
ing to representatives from 51 
universities, polytechnics and 
colleges. 

. The conference in London 
was in response to a consul- 
tative document issued by foe 
Department of Education in 
foe summer which highlighted 
foe grave problems affecting 
schools. 

A total of 359 vacancies 
existed in physics at foe start 
of this year compared with 
252 for 1982. In craft design 
and technology, foe number of 
vacancies rose from 114 in 
1982 to 201 at foe start of the 
year. 

The conference was told 
that many science teachers 
have no relevant qual- 
ifications. Professor Black 
said that 18 per cent of physics 
teachers now fell into that 
category. Fewer teachers led to 
poorer work in schools, 
declining numbers of science 
graduates, and hence even 
fewer teachers. 

Sir Peter Swinnerton-Dyer, 
chairman of the University 
Grants Committee, said that 
foe committee welcomed 
universities’ efforts to en- 
courage entrants to math- 
ematics and physics courses. 
He was responding to fears 
that the committee might 
penalize institutions which 
considered lowering entry 
requirements in those subjects 
for prospective teachers. 

He said: “I want to make it 
dear that universities which 
act in this way will not be put 
at any disadvantage by doing 
so.”He added that the 
committee, starting in the 
academic year 1987-88, would 
be setting aside £1 million a 
year fra increasing the supply 
of science teachers in schools 
and would be inviting bids 
from foe universities in foe 
near future. 


Polly Toynbee . 

In our report on the Maxwell - 
Private Eye libel case on Sat- 
urday, November 22, we in- 
advertently named Polly 
Toynbee as one of a number of 
journalists who had written 
stories for Private Eye. 

Miss Toynbee asks us to mate 
dear that sbe has never at any 
time written for, or supplied 
information to, the 
add we apologize to her : 
error. 


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Shopkeepers deny 
selling solvents 


THE TIMES TUESDAY NOVEMBER 25 1986 


that killed boy, 14 


■ Two- shopkeepers were in 
.court in London yesterday 
feeing what was Believed to be 

the fist case under a new Act 

forbidding the sale of solvents 
to children aged under )8 
knowing they were Kkdy to 
inhabit. 

Chandrakant Patel, aged 35, 
and SoreshWiai Patel, aged 23, 
both of St Stephen's dose, 
Southall west London, denied 
the charges, which arose after 
the death ofa boy aged 14 who 
inhaled and swallowed a type- 
writer correction fluid. 

‘ The two men were moved 
from the dock in Tower Bridge 
Magistrates' Court so that an 
interpreter could hear the soft- 
spoken words of tf te first 
witness, Robert Walker, aged 
12. He said he was with his 
friend, Lee Kendall, wheat Lee 
bought the fluid thinner in the 
Patels' shop only days before 
Leeched. 

Mr Chandrakant Patel 
pleaded not guilty to supply- 
ing Lee with the fluid between 
July 27 and August 6 knowing 
that be was under 18 and 
having reasonable cause to 
believe be was likely to rahafe 
it. ‘Tor the purpose of 
intoxication''. 

Fie denied a charge of 
supplying the boy with the 
fluid on August 6. 

Mr Sureshbbai Patel, de- 
scribed as a relation, pleaded 
not guilty to supplying the 
fluid to Lee on August 4, with 
reasonable cause to believe he 
was likely to inhale h. 

He also denied a charge that 
not being a British citizen, he 
disobeyed his permission to 
stay in the country, which 
expires next February, by 
entering into employment. 

The solvent charges are 
brought under the Intoxicat- 
ing Substances (Supply) Act 


1985. A court official said it 
was understood it "was the first 
prosecution before a court 
under the Act, which affects 
England and Wales. 

Robert Walker said he and 
to went to the Patels’ shop in 
Dunton Road, Southwark, 
where L^e bought three bottles 
of the fluid. 

Robert, of Conway Drive, 
Banbury, Oxfordshire, who 
said he was visiting his grand- 
mother in Bermondsey, east 
London, at the time, described 
how he watched as Lee and 
“his mates" sat in the Spa 
Park near by and miflfed the 
fluid. 

“They tried to get me to 
take it, but I would not ut* 
it,” he said. “They were taking 
it They were acting strange. 
They were like all wobbling. It 
went on for about 10 
minutes^" . 

He had returned from going 
' to his grandmother’s for lunch 
to fin d Lee and his friends 
sitting in an old hut miffing 
the fluid, he said. 

“I went and sat on one of 
the park benches. 1 waited half 
an hour and then Lee and his 
friend Crispin went to get 
some more fluid.” 

It was when they returned 
that he watched them 
“wobbling”, Robert said. 

Later that day after doing a 
shopping errand for Mrs Ma- 
ria Kendall, Lee’s mother, 
they were at Lee's home, and 
left after Lee had been upstairs 
to his bedroom. 


Lee; “What have you got for 
me today?” 

Lee had replied: “I have got 
a good radio, it is good for 
listening to the cricket”. 

A price of £3 had been 
agreed, and the cash was 
h an d ed to to who then 
“pretended to look around the 
shop before selecting three 
bottles 1 of the fluid . thinner, 
a nd also asked for a single 
cigarette. 

“Lee put the fluid in his 
pocket and went round the 
corner and .smoked the 
cigarette,” Robert said. 

Mr Lindsay Born, for the 
prosecution, said one of the 
reasons why boys went to this 
particular shop, known as 
Tern's, was because they sold 
the fluid at 55p a bottle, which 
was cheaper than other shops 
in the area. 

The feet that a tran sisto r 
radio bad been accepted eff- 
ectively as payment for the 
three bottles bought on one 
occasion was “unusual", he 
added. A Walkman tap* re- 
corder had been tatrrn to the 
shop on another occasion. 

Mr Born, said it must have 
been apparent to both defen- 
dants that with Lee Kendall 
they were dealing with some- 
one obviously under the age of 
18. 


“He had something under 
his jumper. He showed me: it 
was a red transistor radio. He 
bad got it out ofhis bedroom,” 
Robert said. 


Because of the quantities 
purchased, and exchanging 
goods for thefluid, thelikdi- 
hood was that the boy wanted 
the product for inhalation and 
clearly did not want it for 
legitimate use, Mr Burn said. 


He said the shop was 
crowded but when most peo- 
ple had left the smaller of the 
two men in the shop said to 


On August 8 Lee Kendall 
died and the cause of death 
was the inhalation of the 
chemical from the fluid, Mr 
Bum said. 


The hearing continues 
today. 


Tug of love 


Father jailed for 
kidnapping girl 


Boy sentenced 
alter £80,000 
DHSS blaze 


A father who kidnapped Ms 
daughter and flew her out of 
Britain in a tug-oWove cus- 
tody case was jaded at South- 
wark Crown - Court, south 
London, yesterday . 

Her mother and her two 
brothers finally managed to 
snatch her bade. But although 
the mother and her d au g ht er, 
aged five, got away safely her . 
two brothers were jailed und. 
tortured in Egypt. 


operation to reunite the girl 
and her mother. 

; The m other rang the bell of 
iier former husband’s parents’ 
home in Chirp and screamed 
out her child 's hmm, 

. A car, driven by a friend, 
was waiting outside with the 
engine running and when the 
dau g h t er dashed out they 
picked her up and sped away. 

They dumped the car and 
die mother hired a taxi and 


. One of two boys aged 14 
who admitted setting fire to 
the Department of Health and 
Social Security in Stanley 
Road, Liverpool, last March, 
causing £80,000 damage was 
sentenced to two and a Half 
years’ detention yesterday. 

Liverpool Crown Court was 
toMby Mr Ian Trigger, for the 

prosecution, that the fire was 
started deliberately on the 
ground floor by people cutting 
up strips of card after breaking 
in through a fire door. 

The second boy was re- 
manded on bail for reports. 


The Egyptian father had she and her daughter were . . . 

fled to Cairo wilh thcgiii after driven across the desert to { AWflTQS for 


his wife, born in the Irish 
Republic, was given custody. 
The father, an arehaeotogist 
32, was jailed for 18 
months, 14 of them sus- 


Israd, at a cost of £180. 

Meanwhile her two brothers 
were set upon by hex former 
husband’s neighbours. Police 
were called and the two men 


nature work 


pended, after admitting werefrnown in jail, strung up 
abducting his daughiw on by thor hands and whipped. 


February 18, 1985. 

The court heard that when 
the couple’s marriage of four 
years broke up the- girl's 
mother, aged 32, was granted 
custody ami the father was not 
allowed to see his daughter. 

But the mother took pity on 
her former husband and let 
the child stay overnight with 
him at his home in Maida 
Vale, north-west London. 

After three days she had not 
seen or beard from other him 
or her d aughter and finally 
rang his parents' home in 
Cairo. 

Mr Georges Khayat, for the 
prosecution, said: “She spoke 
to him and could hear her 
daughter in the background. 

“The mother contacted an 
organization . called .Hnd A 
Child which funded her and 
her two brothers to snatch the 
child back.” 

They flew to Cairo and then 
carried out a carefully planned 


Finally they were thrown 
out of prison and made their 
way to the Irish Embassy 
which arranged for them to fly 
home. 

When the child's father 
returned to Britain he went to 
Harrow Road police station in 
west London and asked for 
help to get his daughter back. 

Hie officers knew he was a 
wanted man and arrested hhn 
on the spot, Mr Khayat said. 

Mr Khayat takt the court 
that the girt was living happily 
with her mother and had 
recovered from her ordeaL 

Judge Anwyl-Davies, QC, 
told the father: “To invoke 
love as you did is entirely 
against the interests of the 
child”. 

He ordered that the girl 
should not be identified. 

The court was told that in 
February last year the father 
was Sited £150 for three 
offences of indecently expos- 
ing himself 


Out st a nding conservation 
achievements are to be rec- 
ognized by a new national: 
awards scheme, Mr Nicholas 
Ridley, Secretary of State for 
the Environment, announced 
yesterday. 

Under the scheme, the 
Royal Society for the Protec- 
tion of Birds Awards, spon- 
sored by Esso UK, will honour 
contributions to wild bird and 
countryside conservation by 
individuals, industry and the 
media. 


Driver killed 


by foiling tree 


Ad dm tree blown down by 
a freak gnst of wind, crushed a 
car killing Mr Anthony 
Marsh, aged 43, of Dams 
Farm, Wretton, Norfolk. His 
daughter, Emma, aged 10, was 
in hospital yesterday, serious- 1 
ly ill with head injuries. 

Villagers in MetirwoRL, Nor- 
folk, worked with chainsaws 
to nee them from the wreck- 
age. The tree, one of an avenue 
on the B1I06, was due to be 
cut down this week. 


‘Jogging rapist’ given 
18 -year jail sentences 


‘Be detectives’ 
parents urged 


Winston Messam was sen- 
tenced to 18 years in jail at the 
Central Criminal Court yes- 
terday for four sex attacks on 
women in West London. 

Judge Lowry said that 
Messam, of High Street, Ac- 
ton, west London, had “in- 
fected grave emotional scars** 
on his victims, whose homes 
were selected as he jogged .at 
night through residential 
areas. 

Three of Messam ’s victims 
never went back to their, 
homes, the judge sakLOne 
victim had gone abroad and 
another had been forced to 


directed the sentences to run 
concurrently. 

Messam was also given a 
total of 10 years for burglaries, 
also to run concurrently. 

The jury which convicted 
Messam were told he chose 
women who were cat lovers 
and who left their windows 
open. 

His victims, aged between 
24 and 45, were attacked 
between September 1984 and 
January this year. Judge 
Lowry said that Messam had 


Parents have been urged to I 
turn detective on their cfrfl-l 
dren by Mr Barry Price, 
Constable of Cumbria, as part 
of a drug campaign.. 

Mr Price, who has promised 
an amnesty for young addicts 
reported by parents, said: 
“Searching a child's belong- 
ings is better than letting the 
dangerous habit continue” 


Diabetic to 
get award 


of being alone with strangers. 

“Anyone who watched 
those women refiving their 
ordeal in the witness box 
realised -there must be grave 
emotional scars infected on 
theuu Each of their lives has 
been gravely affected by what 


you md, r the judge : 

He added: main con- 

cern must be the jwbHc, and in 

particular women. There has 
been no sign .of remorse and 
anyone who knows of this case 
is tearfid of crimes you might . 
commit ’ in * the . future.” 
Messam; aged 20, was given 

as 1 g-yearsenieiHtefpreach of 
the four rapes. Judge Lowry 


he was only 18. A skilful 
burglar, he selected targets 
while out training. : 

“You were not only looking 
.for opportunities for theft, but 
diagnosing where there were 
defenceless women alone in 
their homes. 

“AD these were extremely 
grave aggravated crimes of 
rape: a woman alone in her 
home surmised by an in- 
truder.' time you were 
masked to evade detection. In 
three cases you were armed 
with a knife.- - I 

The judge said that Messam 
stole from his victims and 
added to their fear and 
degradation by. such com- 
ments as: “Are you enjoyihg 

ItV’" ■' - - - 


Harry Pearson, aged 73, one of 
the first diabetics to be gives 
insulin, after its discovery in 
1922, is to be given an award 
after injecting himself with the 
drug 38,000 times. 

Mr Pearson of Daricy Ave- 
nue, Matlock. Derbyshire, 
wfe be presented with a medal 
by the British Diabetic I 
Association. 


Youth accused 


A teenager appeared before 
magistrates ni Lowestoft Suf- 
folk. yesterday accused of 
abducting a woman aged 34 
and her two sons, aged three 
and II , at knifepoint. 

Steven Cyprus, aged 19, of I 
the Fyffe Centre, Lowestoft, I 
was remanded in custody for 
eight days chained with kid- 
naoorna and robbery. . 



NEWS 



— 


Artist 
draws a 




Four readers share 
yesterday’s Portfolio Gold 
prize of £8,000. 

Mrs Phyllis Murray, aged 
53, a part-time artist from 
Eastbourne, has played the 
Portfolio Gold game since it 
started in The Times. 

*1 am absolutely thrilled,** 
she said. “I could net believe 
my lock. It is quite fantastic”. 

She plans to spend most of 


*** Wallace ^ Field School Epsom, Storey, rebearshigyesterda 
Proms. She is one of 1,200 young rnnswaans piaymg this week at fee Albert HaS; London < 


^ou her cornet for the Schools 
iph: Peter Trievnor). 


General Medical Council 


highly addictive 


The drag used to make 
“Jaffe juice”, a concoction 
with which a hypnotherapist 
allegedly injected a wealthy 
businessman up to five trm« 
a week, would have virtually 
turned him into an auto- 
maton. 

That was alleged yesterday 
at a resumed General Medical 
Oumril disciplinary hairing 
in London where Dr Joseph 
Jafie is accused of serious 
professional misconduct. 

The hearing was told that 
the drug was so addictive it 
made a dog used for experi- 
ments with it put up its paw to 
ask for more. 

The hearing, which was 


By Michael Horsneil 


adjourned in August, has been 
tola that Dr Jaffa, a Manches- 
ter doctor, gave Mr George 
Waterson five years of drug 
treatment and hypnotherapy 
for which he paid up to 
£60,000 after being referred by 
his own doctor. 

In that time Mr Waterson’s 
bicycle business which had 
bean malting £800,000 a year 
was rained. Dr Jaffe put in 
charge his own accountant 
who reduced the former 
owners salary to £100 a week. 

Dr Jaffa, a former mayor of 
Salford, allegedly treated Mr 
Waterson, aged 49, who was 
suffering from anxiety and 
depression over his family and 


business affairs, with a 
barbiturate drug. 

The drug, used by dentists 
and in hospitals as an initial 
anaesthetic, was described as 
addictive and potentially dan- 
gerous by Professor John 
Robinson, a consultant 
anaesthetist from West Mid- 
lands Health Authority, who 
has contributed to two medi- 
cal papers on the drug. 

Dr Jaffe, aged 60, denies 
five charges of serious pro- 
fessional misconduct relating 
to his treatment of Mr 
Waterson. 

The hearing continues 
today. 


Solicitor is 


accused of 


stealing 


Ian Wood, the solicitor who 
faces a double murder charge 
and one of attempted murder, 
was yesterday accused of steal- 
ing £84,800. 

Mr Wood, aged 37, of I 
Ughill Hall, Bradfieki, Shef- 
field, was remanded in cus- 
tody for seven days by 
Sheffield Magistrates' Court. 

He was accused of two 
charges of stealing. 

Mr Wood has already been 
charged with the murders of I 
Danielle Lloyd, his girl friend, 
and her daughter Stephanie, 
and the attempted murder of | 
her son Christopher. Report- 
ing restrictions were not lifted. 


ner prize money on improve- 
ments to her new DaL 
Mr George Benbow, aged 
49, a schoolteacher from Up- 
per WooUuunptnu, Reading, 
said he would spend ms 
ownings on a new car. 

Mr Allan Charieswarth, 
aged 6L, a retired airline 
administrator, from Bol- 
lington, Macclesfield, said he 
would spend some of the prize 
money on “household things” 
and invest the rest. 

The other winner is Mrs 
Anne Preece, aged 30, the 
director of a medical efinic in 
Bournemouth. 

Readers who wish to play 
the game can obtain a Port- 
folio Gold card by sending a 
stamped addressed envelope 
to: Portfolio Gold, 

The Times, 

PO Box 40, 

Blackball, 

BB1 6AJ. 



Mrs Phyllis Murray 



THE REAL STAR OF YOUR TRIP TO NEW YORK 


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HOME NEWS 


i ^gJJ^gJ i jygg2^2y22VE^^25 i 1986 


November 24 1986 


PARLIAMENT 


Oil and gas 
industries 
‘in great 
difficulty’ 


OIL INDUSTRY 


The ail industry was going 
through one of its most difficult 
periods since oil and gas were 
first discovered off Britain's 
coast. Mr A lick Bochanan- 
Smxth. Minister or State for 
Energy, said in moving the 
second reading of the Petroleum 
BilL Despite these problems it 
was important not to become 
too obsessed with the immedi- 
ate problems. 

It was also necessary to look 
to the future of this industry and 
the challenges and problems it 
would have to face in the years 
ahead. 

The industry was still very 
much in business. New develop- 
ments were still coming forward 
and he had considerable con- 
fidence of continuing activity 
for many years to come. 

When no more oil or gas was 
economically recoverable from 
a field the installations used to 
recover that oil and gas would 
still be in situ and it was 
necessary to make provision for 
what was to happen to them. 
This was the main matter 
tackled by the Bill. 

The opportunity had also 
been taken to deaf in the Bin 
with a number of other im- 
portant issues. 

Abandonment was not in any 
practical sense an immediate 
problem. It would probably not 
be until the early 1990s that the 
first installation or structure 
came to the end of its life and 
actual steps had to be taken to 
remove it. 

There were some ISO oil and 
gas installations on the United 
Kingdom continental shelf at 
present. As the industry would 
continue to develop for many 
decades to come that number 
would be likely to be added to 
over the years." 

There was a wide variety of 
different installations to con- 
sider. Some were fairly small 
and lightweight while others 
were giant, particularly the h uge 
steel and concrete structures 
placed in water depths of up to 
185 metres. 

The heavy ones were mainly 
in the northern North Sea. In 
the southern basin were the 
smaller structures, weighing as 
little as 300 tonnes. 

Steel structures weighed up to 
58,000 tonnes and the concrete 
ones, of which there were some 
10 in the North Sea. weighed up 
to 630.000 tonnes. 

“This does illustrate the scale 
of the challenge which the 
industry and the Government 
has to face and which we 
endeavour' to address ourselves 
to in this BDL” 

Costs of removal could in- 
volve huge sums of money. 
Estimates made in co-operation 
with the oil industry in 1984 had 
shown that, in broad terms, total 
removal of structures in place 
would cost around £6 bUHon, a 
very large sum indeed. 

Deep water only contained a 
third of the structures yet it was 
estimated that it might involve 
more than three quarters of the 
total cosl 

There was existing legislation 
which required the removal of 
structures in very general terms 
to the satisfaction of the Sec- 
retary of State. What was lack- 
ing under present legislation was 
any detailed framework to deal 
with the abandonment of plat- 
forms and installations. 

There was no provision to set 
standards, to deal with sub- 
mission and approval of re- 
moval plans, or to prevent 
default from removal obliga- 
tions. The Bill sought to enable 
action in those general areas. 

The interests of the oil com- 
panies, the taxpayer, the ship- 
ping industry and fishermen had 
to be taken into account and the 
Government had sought to 
strike a balance between them. 
Over the past year, a number of 
consultations had been under- 
taken. 

They had to ensure that the 
Bill’s provisions were consistent 
with international obligations. 
Cerlain obligations under the 
Geneva Convention of 1938 
had been laid down when the 


North Sea was not developed as 
it was now, and international 
law was not related to such 
structures. . 

The situation was evolving 
and would continue to do so 
while the Ml went through. 
That was one reason why the 
Government had chosen the 
flexible framework of the Bill 
The Bill would control the safe 
and orderly abandonment of 
installations, but did not itself 
set standards. That would be 
done by regulations. 

There bad been some ques- 
tion about what international 
law at present required. The 
fishermen believed that it re- 
quired total removal of installa- 
tions no longer used, but that 
was not the Government's view. 

The onus for removal of the 
installations rested with the 
owners, but using regulations 
made it easier to vary what 
might be required, in the light of 
experience and of any changes 
in international law. 

The Secretary of State would 
have power to draw up a 
programme for removal where 
the owner was unable or unwill- 
ing to do it. and could recover 
the costs incurred. The Govern- 
ment had a responsibility to 
ensure that the interests of the 
country and the taxpayer were 
protected. 

He was aware that some oil 
companies believed that the 
provisions of the Bill were too 
severe. They would consider, 
with the oil companies, whether 
there was a better way of 
achieving the objective, but the 
objective itself was a fair one. 
One provision being considered 
was that there might be a 
common fund to which the oil 
companies would make the 
major contribution. 

They had been discussing 
such proposals, but as no spe- 
cific programme had been 
brought forward, the Govern- 
ment had introduced its own. 

The Bill also dealt with the 
question of royalties, up-dating 
the royalty regime and 
rationalizing procedures for roy- 
alty accounting and arbitration. 
It also provided an enabling 
power to allow repayment of 
royalties to make allowances for 
abandonment costs. 

Power would also be given to 
the Secretary of State to prohibit 


the use or testing of any pipeline 
until specific steps had *■ 
taken by thi 


steps had been 

the owner of die 

pipeline to ensure that funds 
were available to discharge any 
liability for loss or damage. 

Putting these matters on the 
statute book would provide the 
necessary legislative framework 
as well as concentrating die 
minds of everyone in the oil 
companies, supply industries, 
and the international sphere, to 
the problems. 

By a flexible approach, the 
Government would be able to 
react to changes in views, poli- 
cies and decisions, particularly 
at international level, as they 
evolved over the years and the 
first abandonment became 
closer. 

Mr Edward Rowlands, an 
Opposition spokesman on en- 
ergy, said that the Opposition 
understood the enormous and 
awesome implications of 
abandonment: technical, fiscal, 
finanral, as well as the profound 
concern felt by many earning 
their living out of the North Sea. 

This had to be considered 
against the search for a new 
internationally agreed set of 
standards and criteria, not only 
in relation to the North Sea but 
arising from major decisions 
made during the Law of the Sea 
Conference tn 1982. 

Abandonment involved not 
merely the installations, but 
vast tracts of pipeline on the 
seabed. That created an addi- 
tional challenge. 

There were about 6,000 in- 
stallations scattered around the 
seas of the world, but the 
majority stood in waters less 
than 40 metres deep. Only 360, 
including 90 per cent of those 
on the united Kingdom conti- 
nental shelf, stood in waters 
greater than 75 metres in depth, 
so it was right and responsible to 
address those problems as early 
as possible. 



Mr Waiter (left* Derision as soon as possible. Mr Gtodiad: Meter trial promised. Mr Hunt Investment level is justified. 


Investment 
in coal 
is queried 

A Labour MP questioned 
changes in the accounting prac- 
tice of the National Coal Board 
after the announcement of 
record levels of investment in 
the British coal industry by this 
Government during Commons 
questions. 

Mr Alexander Eadk (Midlo- 
thian, Lab) asked whether two 
changes in accounting practice 
had been taken into con- 
sideration. 

Sir David Hunt, Under-Sec- 
retary of State for Energy, said: 
What he has foiled to appreciate 
is that, even if you look at the to- 
tal amount of investment under 
the previous Labour Admin- 
istration, it is less than envis- 
aged under (Labour’s) Phot for 
Coal and considerably less in 
real terms than under this 
Administration. 

We have seen a record level of 
investment which this Govern- 
ment believes is fully justified 
and which the Iasi Government 
did noL 

Earlier he tokl Mr Andrew 
Stewart (Sherwood, Q that 
£3 billion had been invested in 
the coal industry since 1979. In 
real terms the rate of in vestment 
had been more than 33 per cent 
a year higher than under the 
previous Administration. 

Mr Stewart said that the rate of 
investment had made the coal 
industry competitive. Would he 
deny the allegation that all that 
this Government had done had 
been to dose collieries. 

Mr Hut said that he was 
correct. The miners’ strike had 
lost nearly half a billion pounds' 
worth of potential investment 
Under this Administration, and 
excluding the year of the miners’ 
strike, there had been almost 
50 per cent higher investment a 
year in real terms than tinder 
Labour. 

Mr Ronald Davies (Caerphilly, 
Lab) asked if he would ensure 
that British miners had access to 
the best and most up-to-date 
mining equipment 
Mr Hunt said that be had seen 
in his visits to collieries some of 
the finest equipment and some 
of the finest miners in the world. 
Mr Peter Hardy (Wentworth, 
Lab) said that investment in the 
coal industry in the past decade 
Stemmed from the Plan for Coal 
for which the last Labour Gov- 
ernment was responsible. 

Would he maked sure that 
there was further efforts to 
secure greater markets for Brit- 
ish coal in Europe? Would be 
take steps to see that South 
African coal ceased to come into 
this counfry? 

Mr Hunt: I am surprised he 
should mention the discredited 
Plan for Coal. Investment under 
this Government has been for 
for higher in real terms than was 
ever envisged under Plan for 
CoaL 

Mrs Ann Clywd (Cynon Valley, 
Lab): There have been four 
deaths m South Wales in the 
past financial year and there is 
an upward trend in reports of 
accidents. Increases in pro- 
ductivity are being achieved by 
unacceptable safety levels, to the 
danger of people working in the 
industry. 

[ u Mr Hunt: That is one of the 
most disgraceful insults I have 
heard in the House. It is an 
insult to all who work in the 
industry. Pit safety is always 
paramount. 


Walker will not commit 
himself on Sizewell 


Mr Peter Walker, Secretary of 
State Car Energy, nfased to 
commit himself, despite several 
requests, to publish the in- 
spector's report on SfaeweU 
before coming to a deris i on «a 
whether or not to build a 
pres su ri ze d water reader there. 

He said that the respecter. Sir 
Frank Layfield, expected to 
deliver the report at the end of 
this month or early next 

“1 shall decide on the publica- 
tion date when I have seen and 
Considered it.” 

Mr David Heathcoat-Amory 
(Wells, Q asked for an under- 
taking that there would be an 
urgent Cammoas debate into tbe 
situation ia which pr o j ec ts were 
bring bdd np by the mquhy 
having taken more than four 
years. 

Mr Walker agreed that de- 
cisions mast be reached as 
quickly as possible. 

Mr Simon Hughes (So uth w a rk 
and Bermondsey, L) suggested 
that if Mr Walker was so keen to 
privatize electricity supply, he 
should offer the private sector a 
PWR. He would then find that 
there was no economic case for 
it 

Mr Walker premised to con- 
sider the suggestion carefhUy. 
Mr Anthony Speller (North 
Devon, Cp Tbe public is prob- 
‘ on the 
or otherwise of the 


ENERGY 


continuation of the undear in- 
dustry. WB1 the B anis t er under- 
take that we may first have a 
discussion before there in an 
answer? 

Mr Walker I have said that I 
wish to see and consider the 
report before making ap my 
mind on those matters. 

Mr Bernard Conlan (Gateshead 
East; Lab): The tong delay has 
created havoc to the industry. It 
zis imperative for him to make 
an early derision. 

Mr Walker replied that there 
had been no way to w h i c h he 
could hasten the inspector, al- 
though aH the services he needed 
had been provided. 

He told Mr Stanley Onne, 
chief O pp osition spokesman on 
energy, that he wished to see the 
report before making a derision 
on its pufcficatton. 

• The discharge level from 
Seflafidd into the Irish Sea was 
now a tenth what it was to the 
year before the Conservative 
Government came to office to 
1979, Mr Walker said daring 
question time in the Gramms. 
Mr Dale CampbeU-Savours 
(Workington, Lab): Not only is 
it down to a tenth, but by 1991 
die discharge into tbe marine 
environment from SeOafield will 


be almost zero, an important 
objective of every green 
organization with tite United 


British Nuclear Fuels m 
developing the Thorpe re- 
processing riant will have sport 
£1,500 mimon by 1990 and 
created thousands of jobs. 

Mr Walker said that his re- 
marks showed the difference 
between those to the Opposition 
who knew what was gomg on and 
those who did not “I am grateful 
to him for painting out there will 
be feather major redactions by 
1991.” 

Mr Eric Heifer (Liverpool, Wal- 
ton, Lab): People an Merseyside 
ami In Ireland and Northern 
Ireland are very concerned about 

what is happening to tbe Irish 
Sea. There has to he something 
better than what is happening at 
the moment- The Irish Sea is 
becoming a unclear wastepool 
(Conservative shouts of 
“Rnbbfsh”)- 

Feople on Merseyside are so 
scared ofwhat is happening they 
refuse to go fishing in the area. 
Mr Walker: I am s urp ri sed at 
his comments became he was a 
mink ter in the Department rf 
Trade and Industry during the 
period when podntien to the 
Irish Sea was 10 times what it is 
at present. 

Mr HefleK 1 was not responsible 
for that. 


Cumbersome Act 
used in papers 
move, Luce agrees 


Mr Richard Luce, Minister for 
foe Arts, told foe Commons that 
Lord Justice Watkins, who bad 
given judgment on the banning 
of News International pubtica- 
nous from some public libraries, 
had said that the Public Librar- 
ies and Museums Act, 1964, 
involved “a cumbersome proce- 
dure which is wholly unsmted to 
meet the requirements _ of a 
necessarily swift resolution of 
the issue arising out of the ban”. 
Mr Loce said that be had started 
proceedings under this Act, but 
in July News International de- 
cided to take court action. 

Mr John Cartwright (Wool- 
wich, SDP) had said that the 
High Court judgment against 
three London boroughs made it 
dear that all the authorities that 
had banned News International 
publications in support of 
prin workers sacked in the 
organization's move to 
Wapping had acted Illegally. 
Would Mr Luce confirm that be 
had statutory powers to uphold 
the law in these matters. 

"Why has he not followed the 
advice of the Libraries Associ- 
ation given in March and used 
his powers to require those 
authorities to drop the ban 
forthwith?" 

Earlier, Mr Loce said that 
following their successful High 
Court action against three 
London boroughs, News Inter- 
national had indicated that they 
might institute proceedings 
against the other ami 

Welsh authorities operating 
similar bans if these were not 
lifted quickly. 

"I am watching the situation 
dosefy. Meanwhile, I note the 
news that 14 authorities have 
lifted the ban as a result of the 
High Court judgment. 

He had written to the chair- 
man of the Audit Commission 
drawing attention to the fact 
that the councillors of Camden, 
Ealing, and Hammersmith and 
Fulham bad mam tam ed their 
ban in defiance of what Lend 
Justice Watkins described as 
“impeccably sound advice” that 
they were acting unlawfully. 

Mr Harry Greenway (Ealing 
North, Q said that it was 
outrageous and unacceptable for 
ratepayers of Ealing and other 
areas to have to pay the heavy 
legal costs of Labour councillors 
involved in this illegal ban 
against The Times arm other 
News International 

publications. 

"Should not those expenses 
be met by those councillors or 
from party funds, but not from 
ratepayers and taxpayers?” 


WAPPING 

asfissssssssssss 

Mr Lace said that it was because 
of the reasons Mr Greenway had 
given that he had written to foe 
chairman of the Audit 
Commission. 

“It is open to any elector in a 
borough main t aini ng, or which 
has maintained, such a ban to 
make a formal objection to foe 
district auditor on foe conduct 
of foe councillors involved." 
Mr Eric Hefltr (Liverpool. 
Walton, Lab): Whether it is legal 
or illegal is it not clear that many 

people who are councillors fed 
upset because Murdoch could 
sack 6,000 workers without 
giving a damn about what 
happens to them? 

Is it not dear also foot 
Conservative MPs are hiding 
behind foe tow in order to cany 
out policies contrary to foe 
interests of working people? 

Mr Look He seems to ignore 
that these particular authorities 
have been found to have contra- 
vened the 1964 Act in withdraw- 
ing newspapers to make a 
political or industrial poinL 

If he believes in following the 
law he should support foe 
decision which has been taken. 
Sir Anthony Grant (South West 
Cambridgeshire, Q said that the 
Act did seem a somewhat 
cumbersome way u> deal with 
this censorship problem- A sim- 
pler solution, m view of Mr Nefl 
Ki n nock’s desire to improve the 
image of his party, would be for 
him to write to these loony 
councillors and teD them to 
behave themselves. 

Mr Nonnan Buchan. an Opposi- 
tion spokesman an foe arts, said 
that in his new-found zest for 
the lack of censorship, can he 
say how frequently he had 
intervened with some of the 
Tory councils, particularly 
county councils, who bad re- 
fused to carry out their full 
statutory duties in the provision 
of books in the libraries? 

How many libraries in the 
home counties stock The Sun, 
or stock, say. Tribune or Labour 
Weekfyi Had the minkiw tried 
to ensure that they did? 

As the minister responsible 
for the arts and culture, just 
what had The Sun contributed 
to human civilization? 

Mr Luce: I find it astonishing 
that he should not once say that 
this action by these authorities 
was unacceptable. Not once has 
he condemned this action, and 
this is what the country will 
note. 


Coal sell-off is not 
beyond possibility 


The possibility of privatization 
in the coal industry could not be 
ruled out, Mr Peter Walker, 
Secretary of State for Energy, 
said during question time in the 
Commons. 

His reply came during a 
question when Mr Peter Rose 
(Erewash, Q asked: When win 
British Coal management and 
miners be given tbe opportunity 
to follow British Gas employees 
by becoming shareholders in 
their enterprise as a reward for 
the excellent progress the in- 
dustry has made in recent 
months and provide a further 
motivation for improved pro- 
ductivity and profitability in the 
industry? 

Would he find Sid’s brother 
and tell him? 

Mr Walker: There are no plans 
for privatization. Those operat- 
ing tbe National Coal Board and 
the miners have benefited from 
the improvements that have 
taken place. 

Mr Roy Mason (Barnsley Cen- 
tral, Lab): In the proposed 
structural changes for British 
Coal, will he give an undertak- 
ing that none of those plans wifi 
enable the privatization of Brit- 
ish Coal? 

Mr Walker: l have always said 
to the House that of course I 
would not rule of tbe possibility 
of foe privatization of coal; it 
would be absurd if I did. 

Mr Geoffrey Loftfaosse (Ponte- 
fract and Castleford, Lab): Does 
he support an increase in the 
private sector of the British cool 
industry? 

Mr Walks: The arrangements 
that have taken place in deep 
mines and open cast mines have 
been practical and sensible and 


have been to the benefit of foe 
coal board and the industry. 
There is no problem so for as 
that is concerned. 

Mr Stanley Orate (Salford East, 
Lab): Was Sir Robert Hasfam 
(chairman of British Coal) 
speaking on his own behalf or 
foe Government’s when be 
spoke of privatization and 
preparing the industry for 
privatization? 

Mr Walker: I have read whai he 
said to a select committee of foe 
House concerning tbe position 
of British CoaL They were 
perfectly reasonable comments 
for the chairman to express. 

• There were promising 
developments in remote meter- 
reading technology for electric- 
ity users, Mr Atastafr Goodflad, 
Under-Secretary of State for 
Energy, said during Commons 
question time. 

The Electricity Council had 
received a report recently on tbe 
field trials of remote reading 
systems, he said, and as a result 
was now planning to proceed 
with the next stage of develop- 
ment which was expected to 
lead to the installation of a large- 
scale pilot scheme. 

Mr Gerald Bowden (Dulwich, 
CL Does he recognize the bene- 
fit which such a remote meter- 
reading scheme might have for a 
place such as London, where 
many people are not in when tbe 
meter reader calls? 

Mr Goodtod: He is correct about 
the potential value of remote 
meter readings. He will be 
pleased to know it is intended 
that the proposed large-scale 
-'lot scheme involving 200,000 
i will be in London. 


Attack on 
lobby 
system 

The lobby system came under 
attack in the Commons from 
Labour MPs when Mr Dale 
Campben-Savovs unsuccess- 
fully sought an emergency de- 
bate. The whole of the press was 
perplexed and at a loss to 
understand why Parliament 
could not discuss the MLS case 
taking place in Australia, Mr 
CampbeU-Savours 
(Workington, Lab) said. 

It was being said that while in 
medieval times kings debased 
the coinage today the Govern- 
ment was unde rmining the flag. 

The Government was abating 
tbe Civil Service and Mr Ber- 
nard Ingham, the Downing 
Street press secretary, and Mr 
James Coe, his deputy, would 
do well to consider their pos- 
ition. A civil servant was being 
used not only to attack MPs but 
to scatter the seeds of division 
between the Prime Minister and 
the Attorney GeneraL In a 
shabby betrayal of a Cabinet 
colleague the Prime Minister 
was inducing civil servants to 
attack foe Attorney GeneraL 
who was instructed and guided 
by her in all his actions. 

The Prime Minister was the 
head of Britain's security ser- 
vices. These decisions were her 
decisions and she could not 
deny her responsibility. 

“The trade of a Prime Min- 
ister who lades the courage to 
admit failure and then uses the 
scalpel remorselessly to incise 

the reputation of a par- 
liamentary friend and colleague 
of 25 years is one of treachery", 
he continued. 

A courageous decision was 
needed from the Speaker- 


Cash scrutinies 
still going on 


The scrutiny process of foe 
efficiency of Whitehall depart- 
ments begun by Lord Rayner 
continued to prove its worth, 
Mr Richard Lace, Minister for 
the Civil Service, said during 
Commons questions. 

He said that savings already 
made as a result were now 
running at the rate of £300 
million a. year, aid further 
annual savings of £100 million 
were expected to be made. The 
scrutinies had also fed directly 
to improvements in service to 
tbe public. 

He was responding to Mr 
Gerald Bowden (Dulwich, Q, 
who then asked ff the Rayner 
scrutinies could be extended to 
other aspects of the public 
sector. 

Mr Luce said that efficiency 
scrutinies had not suddenly 
sterpped. There would continue 
u> be a relentless drive to ensure 
that the taxpayer got tbe best 
value for money and that the 
civil service was as professional 
as possible. The number of 
scrutinies would continue 
roughly at the rate of 30 a year. 
Mr Sintra Hoghes (Southwark 
and Bermondsey, L) if foe 

scrutinies 'would extend to con- 
sider whether it was value for 
money to send the bead of the 
civil service to Australia to mkw 
pan in court proceedings. 

Mr Loce said that there was 
nothing useful that be could add 
on this poinL 


t Key 
in his 


said that in bis constituency 
company directors sometimes 
under foe scrutiny arrangements 
had to choose in manpower 
terms between a PhD and an 


apprentice and that this was 
surdy not sensible. 

Mr Luce said that there were 
important training schemes run 
by central Government and by 
individual Government depart- 
ments to cope with these 
problems. 

Mr Edward Taylor (Southend 
East, Q asked if the Rayner 
scrutinies would extend to cover 
services to the public. In 
particular, they should take a 
look at foe unreasonable waiting 
times m DHSS offices. 

Mr Luce said that he had 
touched on an important point 
Tbe purpose of the scrutinies 
was not just to achieve better 
value for money but also to 
ensure that they worked towards 
a better service to the public 
There were examples of im- 
proved services as a result of the 
scrvtiiniesv such as reducing foe 
time taken to deal with planning 
appeals from 21 weeks to 11 

Dr Oonagb McDonald, an 
Opposition spokesman on Trea- 
sury affairs, said that the 
Opposition agreed with the 
objectives of the Rayner scruti- 
nies in improving tbe efficiency 
and wellbeing of the civil ser- 
vice 

But those objectives could not 
be achieved when the Govern- 
ment misused its senior dvfl 
servant. Sir Robert Armstrong, 
by placing him in such an 
invidious position in tbe 
Australian courts and requiring 
him to be ‘economical with the 
truth’. That was the responsibil- 
ity of minivers. 

Mr Loce very much welcomed 
foe Opposition's support for tbe 
policy of scrutinies. 


Row over 
Militant 
candidate 

Correspondent 

Labour leaders are fighting 
to stop a Militant supporter 
bang elected to the key 
committee which is to be in 
charge from the new year of 
moves to expel Militan ts from 
the party. 

Mr Neil Kinnock and his 
colleagues are angry at the 
decision of the Transport and 
General Workers’ Union, with 
its 1.25 million votes, to 
nominate Mr Alan Quinn to 
serve on tbe new 1 1-member 
National Constitutional Com- 
mittee. 

It was set up at the party 
conference in October to lake 
the business of throwing out 
Militant Tendency supporters 
in the constituency parties 
away from the spotlight of the 
national executive committee. 

Voting for the new commit- 
tee finishes at the end of next 
month. Mr Ron Todd, leader 
of the TGWU, has been left in' 
no doubt by Labour leaders 
that the election of Mr Quinn 
would not be welcome. Few of 
the other big onions are likely 
to back him. 



‘Loony left 9 dispute 


Cunningham strikes back at Tories 


By Nicholas Wood 
Political Reporter 

Mr John Cunningham, 
Labour's shadow Secretary of 
State for foe Environment, hit 
back yesterday in the fitter 
political dogfight over “loony 
left'' councils by accusing the 
Conservatives of resorting to 
the “big lie technique* to 
smear his party. 

He said that foe real ene- 


werc the “extremists" in the 
Government — Mr Norman 
Tebirft, Mr Nicholas Ridley 
and Mr Nigel Lawson — 
responsible for catting White- 
hall grants by £17.7 billion 
since 1979 and so almost 
trebling rate Nils. 

The Tory Party chairman 
had moraited a “massive and 
scurrilous divershnary ex- 
erase" to distract attention 
from these losses and min- 
isters’ “unprecedented 
assault" on local democracy. 

But foe shadow environment 
secretary’s rebuttal was under- 
mined by an outspoken inter- 
vention by Mr Simon Hughes, 
the Liberal focal government 
spokesman, who etarniwl font 
Labour was panicking because 
its “halo was slipping” and its 


“town ball tyrants” had been 
exposed. 

“Jack Cunningham's coun- 
ter-attack will cut no ice with 
those forced to live under foe 
regime of such councils, nor 
wiD Neff Kiunock’s attempt to 
pass them off as a handful of 
extremists. They are a wide- 
spread and deeply rooted 
symptom of the c or r u pti on 
brought about by the present 
electoral system.” 

Mr Camringham’s robust 
defence came after last week’s 
mttUawght fat which the Sec- 
retary of Stale for foe Environ- 
ment likened La bom control Of 
many town halls to 
“totalitarian” rale by fear. 

Mr Tehbit chimed that the 
“loony left" regarded Mr Neal 
Kinnock as "just another ex- 
fiiture Labour prime Hamster” 
and said they were poised to 
seize control of the par- 
liamentary party after the 

election. 

As first disclosed in The 
Times, a carefully orchestrated 
campaign by Conservative 
Central Office toy behind the 
attempt to portray Labour's 
antics in places such as Brent 
and Hamngey as a foretaste 
of bow the party would govern 
the country. 



ill 


Mr Cunningham: Onslaught 
on Tory ‘meanness’, 

Tory strategists judge that 
their rivals are as vulnerable 
on local government as defence 
and are determined to press 
home their perceived 


But yesterday Mr Cunning- 
ham sought to turn foe tobies 
by challenging Mr Tebbit to 
"cl ean up foe appalling state 
of Tory local government” 
before lashing out 
He named five authorities 
chosen at random, which, he 
said, were indicative of a 
“shameful" performance in 
which council business was 


subject to a “ruthless gnj- 
Uotiue" and there were cuts in 
services to chfldren, foe dis- 
abled, stodents and the men- 
tally and physically hand- 
icapped. 

However, Mr Ctammgham 
did acknowledge that foeTory 
attacks were damaging his 
party's electoral prospects by 
echoing his leader's denunri- 
atioo of foe town ban 
“zealotry" 

Pointing out that Labour 
now controls above 150 coon- 
rib — more titan any other 
party — he said: “Mfilioos of 
people have placed foe duty of 
providing and improving their 
community services in foe 
bands of nearly 9,000 Labour 
councillors. 

“In this process, political 
zealotry and gesturing fay a 
tiny hanilfhj q an absolute 
irrelevance. It has no place in 
Labour's plans for enhancing 
local democracy and giving 
local people a greater say hi 
the naming of their com- 
munities.” 

He cited the London bor- 
oughs of Merton and Enfield, 
Berkshire and Dudley and 
Sefton (Tory-controlled until 
tost May) as examples of 
Conservative arrogance and 
meanness. 


Sale of BR 1 24-hour drinks scheme 
proposed for restaurants 
by Tories 


By Martin Fletcher 
Political Reporter 
Conservatives on tbe Com- 
mons transport select com- 
mittee are to press for an 
inquiry into the feasibility of 
privatizing British RaiL 
They fed that the commit- 
tee, chaired by the Labour MP 
Mr Gordon Bagier, has foiled 
to challenge tbe status quo 
during its investigation into 
British Rail finances. 

In particular, however, they 
were disappointed at the ev- 
idence given earlier this 
month by Mr John Moore, 
Secretary of State for Trans- 
port, who appeared to rule out 
the possibility of the privatiza- 
tion of anything in the foresee- 
able future but British Rail's 
more peripheral activities. 

Tbe pnvamers on the 
committee envisage a system 
srmiliar to the derq$ulated bus 
routes. 

British Rail would become a 
leasing organization owning 
the track and infrastructure. 
Private companies would be 
invited to submit tenders to 
ran the various services. Sub- 
sidies would be paid to the 
private sector to run the less 
lucrative routes. 


By Sheila Gran, Political Staff 


Restaurants will be able to 
serve drinks with meals at any 
time of the day or night if a 
BUI introduced in the House 
of Lords becomes law. _ 

The Government is ex- 
pected to back foe measure, 
which is one step towards 
relaxing the licensing laws. 
But detenniued opposition 
from a small group of peers or 
MPs would be enough to 
defeat it. 

Lord Montgomery of Ala- 
mein, honorary president of 
the Restaurateurs Association 
of Great Britain, introduced 
the Licensing (Restaurant 
Meals) Bifl after foe Govern- 
ment made cfear that it is 
reluctant to bru$ in its own 
reform of licensing tows this 
session after the demise in foe 
last session of the Shops BilL 
Lord Montgomery, who 
succeeded to foe title of his 
father, the first Viscount 
Montgomery of Alamein, 10 
years ago, said: “This is a 
modest reform which will do 
away with the tow which 
restricts the sale of alcohol in 
restaoranto to certain boors. 
At present we are out of step 
with the rest of Europe. This 
BiD -will help tourism and, 
hopefully, create more jobs.” 



r 

Lord Montgomery- Bill will 

not promote alcoholism. 

Recent debates in the Lords 
have shown there is general 
all-party support, 

“This Bill in no way pro- 
motes alchotism. It will allow 
bone fide restaurants to serve 
drinks with meals, which is a 
normal practice in other 
countries”, Lord Montgomery 
added. 

“At the moment there is an. 
anomaly in the tow. For 
instance, if. you happen to 7 
arrive in this country at 3pm 
and go into a restaurant for a 
meafyoo cannot get a drink.” 


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- n 1 


The Governnient gave 
warning to employers yes- 
terday not to discriminate 
against sufferers or carriers of 
acquired immune deficiency 
syndrome (Aids). 

Ministers are worried that 
the inevitable spread of the 
disease could soon bad to 
many victims being treated as 
outcasts at work. 

More than 400,000 employ- 
ers are being sent a booklet 
which cautions them that they 
could be called before indus- 
trial tribunals for dismissing 
workers who have been ex- 
posed to the disease. 

Refusing to hire a job 
applicant because of Aids risks 
would also be “unreasonable”, 
according to the government 
advice. 

Mr Kenneth Clarice, die 
Paymaster General and Min- 
ister for Employment, has 
told the employers that “un- 
necessary fears” about Aids 
could lead to “quite needless 
discrimination in the work- 
place”. 

That in turn could result in 
Aids carriers concealing their 
infection in offices or factories 
and not getting medical ad- 
vice, he said. 

“Shunning Aids carriers 
could drive this disease under- 
ground aitd help it spread 


Sister may 
hold clue 
to murder 

By AngeUa Johnson 

A woman police officer is 
waiting at the hospital bedside 
of a badly injured woman aged 
80, to see if she can give 
detectives any dues as to who 
murdered her sister, aged 78. 

Miss Ethel Stubbs was killed 
after being dragged from her 
bedroom and suffocated when 
a gang broke into her house in 
Albany Road, Walworth, 
south-east London. 

Miss Dora Stubbs is in 
King's College Hospital, 
south-east London, with a 
broken nose, ribs, arid injuries 
to her wrists. She is severely 
shocked but has already said 
that two. white men were 
involved. 

Two teenage girls may also ' 
be implicated. Police say they 
are members of a gang which 
has been preying on elderly 
people living alone in the area 
and may have been respon- 
sible for this attack. 

The gang has carried out 
three aggravated burglaries on 
women aged 80, 85 and 90, all 
within a mile of each other 
recently. In all cases the 
women were gagged. 

One victim aged 80. who is 
still in hospital, described one 
of her attackers as an attrac- 
tive brunette, aged about 18, 
who was wearing a black and 
while polka dot dress. 

This latest incident occ- 
urred in the early hours of 
Saturday morning. 


more rapidly,” Mr Clarke said 
yesterday. “We are very anx- 
ious not to have people made 
outcasts at their place of 
wort" 

The booklet, Aids and 
Employment, has been 
because of government con- 
cern that discrimination could 
become widespread in the 
months and years ahead. 

At least 30.000 people arc 
believed to be infected and. a 
third or more are likely to 
develop the disease in the next 
few years. 

Almost all of them are likely 
to be of working age. The 
booklet, which is also being 
sent to general practitioners, 
employers' associations and 
trade unions, calls for better 
understanding of the risks of 
Aids infection. 

The facts must be under- 
stood before someone at a 
workplace is thought to be 
infected, “by which time the 
dimate is likely to have 
become emotionally 
charged", the booklet says. 

“If employees refuse to 
work normally with an in- 
fected individual an employer 
would need to respond, as he 
would to other forms of 
industrial action, and seek a 
resolution through normal 
procedures. 

“Dismissing individuals 


Attacker 
at riots 
sentenced 

Kuomba Balogun, a Bristol 
community leader, was given 
a suspended prison sentence 
yesterday for assaulting two 
police officers. 

In September, poticecarried 
out a raid in the St Paul's area 
of the city. Two nights of 
rioting followed and Balogun, 
chairman of St Paul’s 
Community Association, was 
arrested afro 1 trying to step die 
police filming -the 
disturbances. 

- Balogun was found guilty in 
October of assaulting the two 
officers. Yesterday, Bristol 
magistrates sentenced him to 
three months' imprisonment, 
suspended for two years. 

Jarrett son is 
remanded 

The son of Mrs Cynthia 
Jarrett, whose death sparked 
off the riots in Tottenham, 
north Londonb, appeared on 
remand at Bow Sbeet . Mag- 
istrates Court, London, yes- 
terday. 

Michael Jarrett, aged 22, a 
painter and decorator, of 
Thorpe Road, Tottenham, 
and Sarah Ariff, aged 22, a 
receptionist, of Elsden Road, 
Tottenham, are accused or 
attempted theft at Leicester 
Square Underground station 
on November 8. They were 
both remanded on bail until 
December 8. 


Militants accused 
of Stalinist tactics 

By Peter Evans, Home Affairs Correspondent 


The Militant leaders of 
Liverpool City Council were 
accused of “Stalinist tactics" 
against the city's black com- 
munity in a report published 
yesterday. 

The authors, the Liverpool 
Black Caucus, accuse Militant 
of character assassination, 
crushing of dissent and of 
concentrating enormous 
power in the hands of a few 
key figures, such as Mr Derek 
Hatton as “public figure- 
head". 

They denounce “the control 
and manipulation by various 
gerrymandering devices of the 
party machine , whose meet- 
ings were increasingly de- 
scribed as Nuremberg, rallies 
because of the intimidation 
and physical menace lying 
behind calls for “unanimity" 
in the “working class strug- 
gle", . . • 

The document is endorsed 
by the Roman Catholic Arch- 
bishop of Liverpool, the Most 
Rev Derek Woriock,. and the 
Anglican Bishop of LivopooL 
the Rt Rev David Sheppard w 
a joint foreword- _ 

They say Black Caucus 
members render a great ser- 
vice by providing a well 
documented account of 
relationships with Liverpool 
City Council and of events 
which have been hidden from 
the public. . ... 

The caucus criticizes the 
“fixed" appointment of Mr 
Sampson Bond, a London 
building surveyor and Miu- 


ness of Labour’s local leader- 
ship to use the repertoire of 
racist language and emotion in 
this way as part of their 
political project has been one 
of the most shameful aspects 
of titis 1 issue. 

“It is this continual use of 
all the classical features of 
Stalinist politics that. stand out 
in analysing the approach 
adopted by Militant to the 
black community in Liver- 
pool." 

The authors say: “The cur- 
rent Militant-dominated La- 
bour leadership of Liverpool 
Gty Counci) have dem- 
onstrated their total indif- 
ference with their policies of 
malign neglect". 

In retrospect it seemed an 
extraordinary decision by 
Labour's ruling inner circle to 
take the risk of embarking on 
such a struggle with the black 
community in Liverpool, they 
say. 

“But this short-sighted 
political approach of being 
determined to crush all politi- 
cal opposition at whatever 
cost and by whatever means 
necessary, however damaging 
or disreputable, has been the 
hall mar k , of Militant’s period 
of office. ’ - 

“Ultimately tins greed for 
control and total power to be 
exercised by the inner circle of 
the ruling party alone, or by 
their trusted and proved crea- 
tures, proved their undoing," 

After referring to die Liver- 
nool violence of 1981 and the 


supporters regai » uibu 

attack on Liverpool’s black 
community at the special 
District Labour Party by their 
concerted vilification of bock 
community groups as .‘vio- 
lent’, - ‘unrepresentative, 

■criminal', . and ’self- 
interested*' •• ' 

“The nnscrupaiois willing 


there can be no prospect for 
peace in this city." 

The churrfc leaders say: “As 
far as we know the account of 
these events is a fair one. It 
merits widespread attention 
and .whole-hearted response." 

The report is published by 
the Ruhhymede Trust . - 


who are infected, or thought to 
be infected, simply because of 
pressure from other employ- 
ees would in many cases 
expose the employer to a 
claim for unfair dis mis s al ," 
dre booklet gives wanting. 

“There is generally no 
obligation on individuals to 
disclose their infection or to 
submit to medical tests for the 
virus. Anything which can be 
interpreted as an inquisition 
into an employee’s personal 
life-style should be avoided." 

The booklet says that there 
is no risk of Aids u nle ss there 
is direct contact with blood, 
semen or other body fluids of 
infected individuals. 

The National, Children's 
Home charity said yesterday 
that 18 boy prostitutes in- 
fected with the Aids virus 
were deliberately spreading 
the infection in London. 

The youths, identified in a 
voluntary screening exercise, 
were seeling revenge because 
most had been sexually 
abused as children, the charity 
said. 

A special unit is being set up- 
to treat the boys, who were 
adopting “a kind of destruc- 
tive bravado, but were also 
terrified of dying so young," 
Mr David Pithers, the char- 
ity's director of child care 
studies, said. 


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Mr CUve T^arii (left), Mr Cyril Flint (centre) and Mr Frank Brazier at work on the bomber (Photograph: John Rogers). 

Bomber R for Robert needs a nose 


By Tradi McIntosh 
The restoration of Welling- 
ton bomber N2980, R for 
Robert, recovered last year 
from Loch Ness, is well under 
way at Weybridge, Surrey, but 
for a nose. 

The lower part of the 
aircraft's nose, whkh orig- 
inally supported the forward 
gun turret, still lies buried in 


two feet of mud at the bottom 
of the loch, where the aircraft 
ditched during a snow storm 
on New Year’s Eve in 1940. 

The WeUingtoa project has 
only enough money for one 
more salvage attempt this 
month to recover the bomber's 
forward gun turret. A separate 
diving expedition is needed to 
raise die nose. 


“Unless we find a benevo- 
lent millionaire or company 
sponsor to donate £5,000 by 
Christmas, the Wellington's 
nose will probably have to 
remain buried is the mod," Mr 
Robin Holmes, chairman of 
the Loch Ness Wellington 
Association, said. 

Teams of volunteers at 
Brooldands Museum in Wey- 


bridge, and companies 
throughout Britain are grad- 
ually restoring the airframe. 

Mr Clive Leach, a former 
Royal Air Force pilot who flew 
Wellington bombers in the 
Middle East during the Sec- 
ond World War, estimates 
that it wfli take a decade to 
recreate the bomber. 


Nuclear 
reactors 
shut down 
by fault 

Trouble has again hit 
Hinkley point nuclear power 
station, where three out of 
four reactors were out of 
action yesterday. 

A “temporary fault" closed 
down the two reactors of its B 
station after a long-planned 
inspection had closed one at 
Hjnkley point A 

The Centra! Electricity 
Generating Board empha- 
sized: “There is no question of 
a radiological hazard,” and 
added that there was no 
damage to the plant at 
Bridgwater Bay, Somerset 

The board said yesterday 
that it hoped one reactor could 
be working again within hours 
and another today . 

The extra cost of generating 
replacement electricity was 
thought to be about £300,000. 

The cause of the B station 
shutdown was a fault in the 
instruments in the turbine ball 
affecting pressure valves in the 
boiler feedwater system. 

Incidents which have led to 
questions about the plant’s 
safety in the House of Com- 
mons have plagued Hinkley 
Point since the Magnox A 
station was built 25 years ago. 

In August the B station was 
shut down for the fifth time in 
two months when a reactor 
was tripped out automatically 
by a safety circuit. 


British Gas 

Prospectuses And Application 
Forms Are Available Today. 

You’ll Find One In This Paper. 


If you have registered with the Share Information application form you will find in this paper. 
Office you will automatically be sent a prospectus Postal applications must be received by 10am 
together with a personalised application form, which next Wednesda y December 3rd Use first class post 
should arrive soon. and allow at least 2 days for delivery 

You should use this form if you decide to apply Alternatively, hand in your application at any 
for shares and must use it to apply under the UK branch of NatWest, Bank of Scotland ^ iC 
Customer Share Scheme. or Ulster Bank before close of business «!i|j 

If you have not registered, you can use the next Tuesda y December 2nd. B||i|P 

Hurry if you want to apply for a share of the shares. 

•ISSUED BY N M ROTHSCHILD & SONS LIMITED ON BEHALF OF H M GOVERNMENT. 



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THE TIMES 


IDAY NOVEMBER 25 1986 


H.M.S. ROLLS-ROYCE. 


Actually, it’s H.M.S. Ark Royal. 
But we feel there may be some justi- 
fication in granting her the above title. 
For virtually every major engine 


aboard this powerful lady has been made 
by Rolls-Royce. 

We’re not only referring to the four 
Olympus gas turbines that propel her 


ROYCE 


so effortlessly through 
the waves. 

Her Sea Harriers rely 
on our unique Pegasus 
engines to get them off 

the deck. LROYCEJ 

Her Sea King helicopters depend 
on our Gnome gas turbines. 

Even the Sea Dart missiles use our 
ram jets. 

ROLLS-ROYCE RULES 
THE WAVES. 

Not that H.M.Si Ark Royal is the 
only ship to rely on Rolls : Royce. 

We have a range of engines to run 
a complete fleet on. 

Right down to providing power for 
the Royal Navy’s nuclear submarines. 

So far, we’ve supplied twenty -five 
Navies with nearly 900 gas turbines. 
And together they’ve clocked upwards 
of two million running hours. 

WE’RE MAKING WAVES 
ELSEWHERE. 

Rolls-Royce gas turbines have other 
applications. 

They generate electricity in places 
as far apart as the sunny Caribbean 
island of Martinique and the storm- 
lashed North Sea oil rigs. 

While natural gas has been pumped 
by our engines across the wastelands of 
Siberia for seven years; and across 
Canada for twenty. 

In all, 179 customers in fifty -two 
countries use Rolls - Royce gas turbines 
for industrial purposes. 

Combined with our Marine oper- 
ation, sales amounted to £143 million 
in 1985. 

And that’s only part of the story. 

Overall turnover reached £1.6 
billion last year, the major part of which 
was aero -engine sales, yielding a record 
pre-tax profit of £81 million. 

At Rolls-Royce, we’re proud to say 
we run a very tight ship. 


ISSUED SY SAMUEL MONTAGU. & CO. LIMITED ON BEHALF OF HM GOVERNMENT AND BY KM ROTHSCHILD &: SONS LIMITED ON BEHALF OF ROLLS-ROYCE pic. 

-RollL-Rovce - and ihc logo are registered trademarks of Rolls-Royce pie. 


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Heroin-ring leader 
jailed for 28 years 
and fined £200,000 


THE TIMES TUESDAY NOVEMBER 25 IQftfi 


HOME NEWS 



Plaul Dye, head of a 
£200 million international 

heroin smuggling ring, was 
sentenced to a record 28-year 
prison sentence and £200,000 
fines at the Central C riminal 
Court yesterday after convic- 
tion in one. of the higy« 
customs investigations ever 
mounted. 

He was found guilty with 
five members of bis organiza- 
tion last Friday for their roles 
in a British drugs ring which 
smuggled between 40 and 
50kg of heroin into the United 
States from Pakistan in girdles 
swapped in the transit lounges 
of Heathrow airport. 

Yesterday the five received 
sentences ranging from seven 
to 17 years. 

Judge Rant, QC, told the 
men their offences were “evil 
' and callous in the extreme”. 
Heroin was a scourge causing 
misery, degradation, crime 
and sometimes death. 

It took little thought to 
realize what havoc had been 
caused by the men in the dock 
who had acted for money, the . 
judge said. 

The COUrtS WOUld malr» 
heroin-peddling worth not 
even the large profits 
available. 

Passing sentence on Dye. 


By Stewart Testier, Clime Reporter t 
a aged 42, a company director traces 
al from Tver, Buckinghamshire, prison 
as the judge told him he was a Dye's 1 
ar “devious, greedy and utterly a couri 
X) unscrupulous man”. The 

al Thejudge said that ifhe had “signi 
c- had. the power Dye, a small- machh 
si time crook whomade millions Pete 
er from heroin, would have been bread 
given a lift sentence without Londo 
th hesitation. David 

a- Dye received the longest emplc 
2 S sentence ever given in a boroug 
b British court for a drug Paul I 
id offence. emplot 

d Convicted on three charges was gi 
is of conspiracy, he was given Grahai 
X consecutive sentences made reader 
up of two 14-year sentences south-i 
d and a further four years. seven j 
n Ifhe foils to pay the fines he The 
will serve another two years as taking; 
e well. which ^ 

Q Dye and the others were two yer 
*. arrested a month before the . 
g Criminal Justice Act took in 
e effect allowing for a life sen- onjamz 
tence for a drug offence. neighbi 

o Dye was fined £150,000, the *5? 

□ value of his home, and 
k £51,000 found in his safe. ^ o 
e- The rest of his assets are fiSm it 
thought to be still hidden in to then 
e Switzerland or the United Four 
ft States. victed 

s Clive Wjffiamson, aged 29, were to 
an electrician from Northoh, lantictt 
« west Loudon, was given sen- him. 


traces adding up to 1 7 years in 
prison. Williamson, one of 
Dye's lieutenants, had acted as 
a courier and minder. 

The judge said he was a 
“significant cog in ■ the 
machine” 

Peter Davies, aged 30, a 
bread salesman from north 
London, was riven 12 years; 
David Millard, aged 37, un- 
employed, from Peter- 
borough, was given 10 years; 
Paul Murphy, aged .30, un- 
employed, of north London, 
was given eight years; and 
Graham Ellis, aged 31. a meter 
reader, of Twickenham, 
south-west London, received 
seven years. 

The six were convicted for 
taking part in an organization 
which operated for more than 
two years. 

Dye began smug gli n g dr ugs 
in 1980 and buut up bis 
organization through friends, 
neighbours and contacts. 

when customs officers 
struck last year for the first 
time they captured an entire 
drug organization stretching 
from the supplier in Pakistan 
to the main American dealers. 

Four of Dye's recruits con- 
victed in the United States 
were brought across the At- 
lantic to give evidence a gain** 
him. 



BCal in legal fight 
over link-up plan 
to beat US rivals 

By Harvey Elliott, Air Correspondent 


Mr. Douglas Hurd, tire Home Secretary, being driven around Parliament Square, London, 
yesterday in a 1901 Mors led by a man with a red flag. It is 90 years since Parliament abol- 
ished the warning procedure. Mr Jeffrey Rose, dnhSim of the RAC was at the wheel and 
Mr Ne3 Thome, MP, (left) chairman of the Commons motor dub, and Lord Strathcarron, 
chairman of the Lords motor dob, rode in the bach (Photograph John Manning). 


Christmas shopping: 2 

Children tempted 
by the £60 toy 


Plans by British airlines to 
compete with their giant 
American rivals by linking up 
with other carriers iu Europe, 
could be ruled illegal after a 
bitter legal battle being fought 
at the Civil Aviation Auth- 
ority. 

British Airways yesterday 
tried to prove that a deal 
between British Caledonian 
and Sabena, the Belgian flag 
carrier, to operate a joint daily 
service to Atlanta, Georgia, 
was based on a “mis- 
conception”. 

It argued that the service, 
which involves a Sabena 747 
flying with joint crews from 
Brussels to Gaiwick and on to 
Atlanta, was not a British 
operation and therefore could 
not be licensed by the CAA. 

BCal should be removed 
-from the licence which should 
be awarded to British Airways 
instead, it argued. 

The CAA’s decision, which 
could come before the end of 
the year could have significant 
impact on future operations of 
a similar kind. 

For BCal, together with a 
□umber of airlines, believes 
that only by linking with other 
European carriers can it be- 
come sufficiently powerful to 
mount a counter-attack on the 
few large American airlines 
now threatening to dominate 
the Atlantic routes. 

Mr Timothy Walker, QC, 


for British Airways, argued 
that BCal was not using its 
licence to operate to Atlanta 
because the aircraft being used 
belonged to Sabena which was 
also legally responsible for all 
its passengers, including those 
picked up at Gatwick on BCal 
tickets. 

His basic argument was 
accepted by the CAA panel, 
chaired by Mr Ray Colegate. 
“1 have little difficulty in 
accepting British Airways’ 
argument ou the narrow point 
that BCal is not currently 
using its licence.” Mr Colegate 
said. But he added that the 
panel would have to consider 
wider questions. 

BCaJ is arguing strongly 
against the accusations and 
claims that British Airways is 
using “spoiling tactics fuelled 
by the arrogance of mono- 
poly". 

The hearing, which is sched- 
uled to Vast for one more day 
but could be extended, is 
regarded as having great 
significance for future co- 
operative ventures in Europe 
and could even affect the way 
BA seeks links with other 
airlines on the Continent -once 
it is privatized early next year. 
• Air France yesterday an- 
nounced a new service be- 
tween Bristol and Paris, 
starting on January 5. It will 
operate five times a week, 
Monday to Friday. 


The most coveted toys tins 
Christinas seem to have one 
thing in common — a £59.99 
price tag. Spend any less and 
you may risk resentful glares 
from disappointed young peo- 
ple. 

The toy shops are still not 
sure what will be this year’s 
equivalent of the BMX-bike, 
the home computer, the Cab- 
bage Patch doQ, and die 
Optimus Prime transformer, 
necessities of past Christmases 
probably now languishing in 
the attic or a comer cupboard. 

Favourites so fir this 
Christmas are talking bears of 
which no fewer than three— 
Teddy Ruxpin, Gabby Bear 
and Smarty Bear — are vying 
to catch the children's ear at 
£59.99 each. 

Teddy Ruxpin is the vet- 
eran of the genre. Gabby Bear 
moves his mouth and eyes to 
give his conversation more 
expression, and Smarty Bear 
is computer-programmed 
with 16 different responses. 
Tickle him and he giggles. 

There is a talking doll for 
little girls whose tastes do not 
run to teddy bears, mute or 
chatty. Her name is Baby Talk 
and her repartee includes 
phrases such as “I love yon" 
and “Feed me”. Stick a bottle 
in her mouth and she makes 
sucking noises. She costs, -of 
course. £59.99. . 

For children with less 
domestic preoccupations than 
baby-talking bears and dolls, 
there are radio-controlled 
cars. This year's most popular 
models are frame buggies with 
gears to cope with variable 
terrains and obstructions. On 
the road: £59.99. 

People to whom such sums 
sound like Monopoly money 
will be pleased to know that 
the world’s best-selling board 
game is still going strong this 
year, as is its veteran rival. 
Scrabble. 

Trivial Pursuits, is now 
seeing its fifth Christmas, and- 
among the newcomers the 
most fancied are a personality- 


In the second of two 
articles, Robin Young re- 
ports on seQrout gifts in 
the stores 

testing exercise called Semples 
and a game named September, 
devised by the people who 
swept the board with Kensing- 
ton a few years ago. 

This year's essential stock- 
ing filler is Riflnk Magic, 
successor to the infuriating 
Rubik Cube, 150 million of 
which have been sold round 
the world since 1977. 

That second invention by 
Professor Emo Rubik, the 
Hungarian puzzlemaster, con- 
sists of eight flat panels of 
plastic connected by an in- 
genious serious of hinges. 

The object of the game is to 
rearrange the graphics on the 
panels into three intertmldng 
rings. The panels are hinged 
for Matchbox Toys by nimble 
Chinese fingers in a factory in 
Canton, and will almost cer- 
tainly unhinge Western minds 

Matchbox's estimates for 
Rubik Magic sales tins year 
lav e leapt from five miltioD to 
10 mini™ by Christmas. 
“Retailers have just gone 
crazy for it, and the workforce 
in Canton has been increased 
from 2,000 to. 5,000 to keep 
pace,” it said. - . - 

The rush to buy Christmas 
gifts and goodies is about to 
begin in earnest, though retail- 
ers say that the wet weather 
1ms caused a late start 

The 21 stores in the John 
Lewis Partnership reported 
that sales in the week which 
ended November 15 were 8.8 
per cent up on the equivalent 
week last year. 

The Financial Times- 
Confederation of British In- 
dustry survey of trends in the 
distributive trades suggests a 6 
per cent increase in volume 
sales overall for the year. 
Christmas shoppers will have 
to get their skates ou soon. 

Concluded ' 


Teamwork in Construction, 
Property and Homes Worldwide 


LONDON 

The A406 South Woodford to Barking relief road (Contract No. 2) is being built by Taylor 
Woodrow Construction Limited for the Department of Transport: 


NORTHUMBERLAND 

Butterwell opencast coal mine celebrated its 10th anniversary this yean Operated by Taylor 
Woodrow Construction Limited for British Coal die site produces in excess of 1 million 
tonnes annually and is one of the largest opencast sites in Western Europe. 


Print men Anger at 
freed after demolition 
court plea of cottage 


Two print workers who 
were jailed for six months for 
attacking a newspaper van 
after it left News 
International’s plant in 
Wapping, east London, were 
freed by the Court of Appeal 
yesterday. 

Although the judges agreed 
with the trial judge that wtott 
happened was “a disgraceful 
piece of street hooliganism , 
they reduced the sentences to 
60 days to allow the men to be 
freed immediately. 

David Payne, aged 43, a 
Southwark councillor, of St 
Matthew House, Phelp Street, 
Wandsworth, south London, a 

n . !l_ -r. i )_ - — fnr 


33, a former copy rescer on 
The Times, of Doridng Cres- 
cent, Clacton-on-Sea, Essex 
were both convicted of caus- 
ing actual bodily harm by 
Southwark Crown Court. 

They had followed a van 
after it left Wapping and when 
it stopped on Tower Bridge, 
Tetaur opened the rear and 
started scattering papers. A 
fight broke out between the 
two print men and the van 
driver and his. mate, raj™ 
used a saucepan to attack tire 
van driver. , 

Payne had his apphcation to 
appeal against conviction dis- 
missed by Mr Justice Taylor; 
sitting.. with the. Lord CTticf 
Justice, Lord Lane, and Mr 
Justice Rose. 


Demolition men moved in 
yesterday and started taking 
the roof off Rose Cottage, the 
home of two elderly brothers 
who wine evicted last week. 

Mr Gordon Howards, aged 
75, and his brother, Billy, aged 
66, lost their three-year fight 
to stay in the house, in Cope 
Street, Barnsley, West York- 
shire, and were forced to move 
out last Tuesday. • 

But friends and .supporters < 
believed demolition work 
would noi take place after they J 
held folks with Barnsley i 

council. 

The house and four acres of 
land are wanted for the build- 
ing of 71 new homes, more 
than half for the elderly, and 
were compulsorily purchased 

On December 1 an appeal 
by the European Court of 
Human Rights was due to be 
beard. 

Mrs Dorothy Shaw, a friend 
of the brothers, said: “You 
can't trust- anything Barnsley 
council has told us. I am just 
sickened at the speed of the 
demolition, .it’s totally 
unnecessary.” 

Mrs Rita Wood, another 
friend, said: “The council gave . 
us an assurance that the work 
would not begin until all their 
property bad. been removed**. . 

The council said the matter 
was now out of its hands. . 

DemoUton is being handled 
by . foe - Yorkshire Metrppoli-’ 
tan Housing Association. . - 



1 Taylor Woodrow have a proven track record in all aspects 
of Construction, Property and Homes. 

Today there are thousands of team members worldwide, 
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and expertise that has enabled Taylor Woodrow not only to 
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To satisfy our clients’ requirements and to 
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Our successful philosophy of free enterprise and team- 
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both large and small in which Taylor Woodrow team members 
are currendy involved in all five continents. 

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8 


OVERSEAS NEWS 


TWF TIMES TUESDAY NOVEMBER 25 1986 


Barclays Bank withdrawal raises fear of others to follow 


Sale seen as first move 
by British firms in 
trek from South Africa 


The sale by Barclays Bank 
of its remaining 40.4 per cent 
share in Barclays National, 
South Africa's biggest com- 
mercial bank, is seen as prob- 
ably only the first of a number 
of moves for British disinvest- 
ment 

Britain is by far the biggest 
foreign investor in South Afri- 
ca, accounting, it is estimated, 
for about 45 per cent of all 
foreign investment There are 
about 130 companies here in 
which British interests have 
holdings of more than 50 per 
cent and about 45 with hold- 
ings of less than 50 per cent 

The value of British invest- 
ment in South Africa is put by 
British sources at some £6,000 
milli on- Two years ago, it was 
estimated at £11,000 million, 
but the decline is mainly due 
to the depreciation of the 
rand. By contrast American 
in vestment now stands at only 
$1,300 million (£896.5 mil- 
lion). 

Barclays is the first major 
British company to withdraw 
from South Africa and bank- 
ing and Government sources 
expressed concern yesterday 
that its example could encour- 
age other companies to follow 
suit 

If that were to happen, it 
would follow the pattern of 
American disinvestments 
which increased sharply after 
General Motors announced 
last month that it was selling 
its operation in South Africa 
to load interests. 

The main concern is that 
further significant disinvest- 
ment by British companies, 
coming on top of the growing 
American corporate retreat, 
would increase the drain of 
foreign capital from South 


From Mkbtsel Hornsby, Johannesburg 

Africa. Historically, foreign National. The bank's _ 
capital has provided about 20 ing director, Mr Chris 
per cent of net fixed invest- insisted yesterday that there 
Sait was “no threat” to the jobs of 

Without foreign capital, 

economists consider South 
Africa has little chance of gen- 
erating the real economic 
growth rate ofbetween 3.5 and 
4.5 per cent a year that is need- 


its 25,000 employees, 5,238 of 
whom are Mack, mixed-race 
Coloured or Asian. 

The most immediate 
change the bank wiB undergo 
is a of name. It was 


ed just to contain unemploy- agreed last year, when Barc- 
ment at its present level, ^ R gn ir allowed its holding 

in South Africa to fell from 50 


estimated at more than 30 per 
cent among blacks. 

“I think disinvestment 
slows down the rate of (politi- 

Thirfeen Mack rumens were 
frille d and more than 20 
injured in fighting at the Vaal 
Keefe gold mute, it was dis- 
closed yesterday by the mine's 
owners, the Anglo- Americaa 
Corporation (Michael Horns- 
by writes from Johannesburg). 
The fighting broke oat when 
miners fried to enforce a boy- 
cott of a min etarem. 

cal) chang e , and I think h af- 
fects the creation and reten- 
tion of jobs in the country. 
There is less money available 
to do the things that need to be 
done. It is a matter for 
concern,” Mr Basil Hersov, 
the chairman of Barclays Na- 
tional, said yesterday. 

Barclays Bank has sold its 
remaining 40.4 per cent hold- 
ing to a local consortium con- 
sisting of the Anglo-American 
Corporation, South Africa's 
biggest mining and industrial 
conglomerate, and two of its 
affiliated companies, De Beers 
Consolidated Mines Limited 
and The Southern Life Assur- 
ance Limited. 

Anglo, De Beers and South- 
ern Life now hold 55 per cent 
of the shares in Barclays 


per cent to 40.4 per cent by 
waiving its entitlement to a, 
rights issue, that the name 
should be by 1990. 

This will now be done next 
year. 

The political pressure that 
Barclays fomfr was under to 
quit South Africa is reflected 
in the feet that it was prepared 
to accept a (nice of only 18 
rand (£5.2) for each of the 
29,276,070 shares it held in 
Barclays National, well below 
their current price on the 
Johannesburg Stock Exchange 
of 23.50 rand. 

In addition, the sales pro- 
ceeds of some 527 million 
rand— nominally worth about 
£165 mini on at the current 
commercial exchange rate — 
can only be taken out of the 
country at the special “finan- 
cial rand” rate which is de- 
signed to discourage disinvest- 
ment. At present, the value of 
the financial rand is about half 
that of the commercial rand. 

One effect of channelling 
capital flows through the fin- 
ancial rand pool is that they 
have no immediate impact on 
South Africa's balance of pay- 
ments or foreign exchange re- 
serves. The sales proceeds will 
remain in the pool until Barc- 
lays Baltic can find buyers who 
wish to invest in South Africa. 



The managing director of Barclays National, Mr Chris Ball, amKHmring the sale yesterday. 

Lobbyists claim a victory 


Anti-apartheid groups and 
pro-sanctions church organiz- 
ations yesterday claimed that 
the decision by Barclays to 
withdraw from South Africa 
amounted to a significant 
victory for foe disinvestment 
lobby in Britain. 

The president of the Anti- 
Apartheid Movement, Bishop 
Trevor Huddleston, claimed 
die Barclays decision was 
largely the result of 17 years of 
active lobbying against die 
company, the largest British 
investor in South Africa. 

“It is an event of great 
si gnificanc e and I think other 
companies are certain to 
follow,” he predicted. He said 
efforts would now be directed 
against other multinational 
companies, especially BP and 


By Nicholas Beestan 

Shell. He also warned Barclays 
that it would continue to be a 
target for anti-apartheid ao- 
tivists because of its loans to 
South Africa, which amount- 
ed to £766 milli on last year. 

“2 would advise all public 
bodies to indicate very dearly 
that , although they are re- 
lieved by the Barclays de- 
cision, they are still not 
prepared to use their services 
until it has withdrawn 
completely.” 

S imilar reaction is expected 
from other pro-sanctions bod- 
ies, such as Oxfem, the End 
Loans to South Africa cam- 
paign, the Catholic Fund for 
Overseas Development, Chri- 
stian Aid and the British 
Council of Churches. 

A spokesman for the British 


Man Friday. 
Saturday, Sunday 

Mondayjuesday, 

Wednesday, 


Thursday. 


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Council of Churches claimed 
that the Barclays move was 
the “response to that lengthy 
mmpaign for disinvestment” 
and anticipated that the lobby- 
ists would now focus on mom- 
nationals with investments in 
South Africa who were vulner- 
able to a consumer boycott 

In spite of the Barclays 
decision, a spokesman for the 
UK-South Africa Trade Ass- 
ociation said that bilateral 
trade appeared to have in- 
creased in the last few months. 

Its executive director, Mr 
Nicholas Mitchefl, said: “I 
don't think that there will be 
any great movement towards 
dian vesting in Britain be- 
cause of the Barclays derision, 
because it is slightly different 
from the others.” 


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Argentina 
denounces 
fish zone 

From Zoriana Pysariwsky 
New York 

Britain's imposition of a 
150-mile fisheries protection 
zone around the Falkland 
Islands was a thinly veiled 
attempt to gain dominance 
over foe South Atlantic, pos- 
ing serious risks to the stabil- 
ity of foe region, Sedor Dante 
Caputo, the Argentine Foreign 
Minister, told the United Na- 
tions General Assembly yes- 
terday. 

Senor Caputo said foe Octo- 
ber 29 declaration was in 
keeping with Britain’s “expan- 
sionist logic” which sought to 
extend, whatever the cost, “its 
illegal occupation of the mari- 
time and insular territory of 
my country”. 

The minister accused the 
British Governmentof 
pandering to the electorate by 
seeking to create friction and 
pro volte armed incidents. 

He called on foe assembly 
to support, once again, a draft 
resolution urging foe two sides 
to negotiate all outstanding 
issues over foe Falkland 

hlanih. 


WORLD SUMMARY 



for Palestinians 


Sates - Patesthrian guerrillas yesterday cajrtnred a 
Strategic hilltop village from tbeShfeMnsfira Amal nrilitia 
after fierce fighting m wind some 40 people were kffied 
(Job Carlos Gumndo writes). 

The assault launched from foe Miyeh-Miyeh and Em el 
Hflweh refugee camps gare foe gaevrilbs control of 
Magdonshe, just snfo of Stfon, from where Aural 
artiflMTnien had been bombarding the camps since Friday. 

Bat a$ foe guerrillas strengthened their position, Mr 
Wafld JnmWatt, the Druze leader of foe Progressive 

Socialist Party, sided wifo Amal and tewed to prevent foe re- 
turn erf Palestinian forces to Lebanese soil. 

“The road to the Iteration of Palestine does not go 
through Magdonshe,” be declared angrily. 

• Damascus— Mr Janfolatt's derianrtwra came after he met 
Syrian fffnrfai*, nchfeg Vice President AJbdul-Haiim 
KhaAiaiH, Syria's main expert on Le b a non , m Damascus 
y esterd a y (AP reports). 

England in chess lead 

Dotal — By crushing Bofearia 3-1, England has retained a 
lead after nine roads of foe World Chess Olympics 
here (Raymond Keene writes). 

John Nans drew with SM Gear mrev; Nigel Short beat 
Ven&dav Inkkrr; Moray Chandler drew with Peter Velikov 

Esgfendaowhits a tremaidira^Sof 26% points, ahead 
of foe US on 24% prints pins oae adjourned game; foe Soviet 
Union has 24% point*, while Hungary has 23% paints pins 
one adjourned game. In foe HHngsry-US match the 
American top board Seirawsn has ajoraned with foe 
advantage against Lajos Portisch. 

Of the top twain, Fwgiand now only has to meet 
rwWim lM. With at least none want trod ad only five 
rounds remaining to be played, England's chances of a first- 
ever team gold medal have substantially increased. 


Long jail 
terms call 

Bonn — A prosecutor at 
West Berlm yesterday de- 
manded long sentences for 
two Jordanians accnsed of 
a that they 

said was sup ported by Sy- 
ria (John England writes). 

The prosecutor, Herr 
Detiev Mehfis, called fin- 
14 years tor Ahmed Hasi, 
aged 35, the brother of 
Near Hrudawi, foe Heath- 
row El A1 bomber, and 13 
years for Farak Sahtmtb, 
aged 40. Both are charged 

With a tte m p t e d m urder in 

bombing the German-Arab 
Friendship Society's ce nt re 
in West Berlin on March 
29, injuring nine people. 


Briton to 
leave 

Delhi (Renter) — Mr 
David Bergman, a Briton 
arrested while working to 
rehabilitate child victims of 
last year's Bhopal gas 
disaster, has agreed to 
leave India by December 
38 to avoid prosecution, the 
Press Trust of India said 
yesterday. 

It said David Bergman, 
2L gdie foe andertalon^ at 
a Supreme Court hearing 
on life petition to gnash 
charges against him nnder 
India's Foreigners Act and 
Official Secrets Art. Ear- 
lier this year Mr Bergman 
cycled 9,000 mites to India 
to raise money for Bhopal 
victims. 


US delays $300m aid 

San Josfc - Four US allies in Central America are annoyed 
by the Reagan Ad mini s tra tion's failure to deliver a £300 mil- 
lion (£212.7 million) economic aid package, promised as a 
trade-off for their acqaiescence to new American foods for 
the Nicaraguan rebels (Martha Honey writes). 

After several moths of confusion. State Department 
officials and congressiona] aides hare confirmed that the 
extra money, pledged to Costa Rica, Ho nd uras, Guatemala 
and El Salvador, is no longer available. 

The Administration had proposed, and Congress en- 
dorsed, tire £300 nuURm aid package as a tadanceto the S100 

millww in militar y and aid tO foe 

Nicaraguan Contras. 

Crewmen 


rescued 

Madrid — The British 
captain of a two-masted 
yacht, foe Kometea, and 
his crew of three arrived 
safely but eihansted at foe 
Spanish port of Alicante 
yesterday after an ordeal in 
huge seas in which then- 
vessel was damaged and 
eventually sank {Harry 
Dehelms writes> 

Captain John Hand, 
aged 39, and his crew, all 
from Chichester, were 
picked up by a Spanish tog 
boat off the Aticante coast 
after they sent out distress 
signals. 


Protest at 
shooting 

Bonn — The West Ger- 
man Government has con- 
demned the shooting of a 
young East German who 
tried to escape over foe 
Berlin Wall early yes- 
terday (John England wri- 
tes). 

The West Berlin Senate 
also protested and said foe 
East German guards' nse of 
firearms had readied a 
“new, tragic high point”. 

An East German man, 
aged 36, escaped early 
yesterday by swimming in 
foe Baltic until picked np 
by a West German ship. 


Oil slick exposes East bloc 
failure on river pollution 


From Roger Boyes 
Warsaw 

A lame, potentially dan- 
us oil slick, oozing up the 
river from Czecho- 
slovakia into Poland, has 
new flaws in the 
ution control system of 
the Soviet bloc and irritated 
relations between Prague and 
Warsaw. 

Special anti-pollution units 
have managed to rid the river, 
which flows some 80 miles 
through the Czechoslovak 
industrial -heartland into Po- 
land, of the most damaging 
waste, scooping up the old fed 
oD and burning it in cannisters 
on foe banks of the Oder, 
known as foe Odra in Poland 

Bui there is a nagging risk to 
water supplies. It would, of- 
ficials admit, be disastrous if 
the heavilly polluted waters 
entered die rood production 
cycle. 

Workers built barriers — 
compressed hay supported by 
empty barrels — around a 
sugar plant and at several 
other points in foe river which 
feeds into foe Silesian -indus- 
trial centres and runs into the 
Neisse (Nysa in Polish) form- 
ing the Polish-East Ge rman 
bolder and from there into foe 
Baltic. 

But foe same kinds of 
questions that followed the 
Chernobyl nuclear accident 
earlier (life year are being 
posed again, this time with 
considerably more candour. 

Why did the Czechs take so 
long to inform the Poles of foe 
spillage? Why were so few 
precautions taken? Why can- 
not Comecon, the Soviet trad- 
ing bloc, not agree on a system 
of compensation for cross- 
frontier pollution? 

The Oder crisis has signifi- 
cant parallels with foe recent 
ecological disaster in foe 
Rhine, but with one important 



difference; there are no dead 
fish floating np the Oder. 
Marine Hfe was killed long 
ago, destroyed by spillage after 
spillage. 

The chronology of cross- 
frontier pollution is revealing 
as an example of how poor 
communications can be be- 
tween two Soviet bloc alfie*. 
On November 1 1. foe water 

The Hague (Renter) — Add 
weedkiller leaked into the 
Rhine in West Germany fis 
expected to reach The Nether- 
lands today and scientists win 
conduct tests to see if water for 
drinking can be safely drawn 
from the river, a waterways 
spokeswoman said yesterday. 

Two tonnes of herbicide 
entered the river on Friday 
after a breakdown in a cooling 
system at a chemical plant at 
Lodwigshafen. Two West Ger- 
man states told waterworks to 
stop using foe Rhine to pro- 
cess drinking water. : 

supply expert of the Katowice 
province in Silesia received a 
cable from the Institute of 
Water Economics in Ostrava 
on foe Cfcecb side of foe 
border. 

It said foal there had been a 
spillage but it. was being 
brought under control; a rou- 
tine message. But by noon foe 
next day Polish waters were 
black and sticky. The Polish 
Consul in Ostrava has still not 


been informed of anything, 
though foe Czech press and 
Weston radio stations were 
broadcasting the news. 

The spillage had come from 
a cement works in Ostrava on 
November 9, but foe Poles 
were not officially informed 
until almost a week later. The 
Poles calculate that the slick 
contains some 50 tonnes of 
fael o£L 

The Czech side of the 
botder is heavily indus- 
trialized with a steelworks and 
mines, and foe pollution is so 
intense that foe Poles have 
problems developing their 
own industry. 

Tire Czechs have promised 
to build water-purification 
plants, but poflntiondoes not 
seem to be a top priority for 
foe Czechs. Care of shared 
rivers within foe Soviet Hoc 
has been defined by a network 
of' legislation, including a 
treaty with Prague in 1958, 
with Moscow in 1964 and 
with East Berlin foe following 
year. 

But though the matter has 
been taken up at Cabinet level, 
neither Czechs nor Poles can 
reach an agreement on how 
these treaties should be im- 
plemented- The Czechs refuse 
to take daily samples of water, 
saying that monthly ones are 
sufficient, and have not estab- 
lished automatic sampling sta- 
tions because of foe cost. 

Poland wants Comecon to 
draw up rales which would 
provide for compensation, 
arbitration of disputes and 
lists of forbidden emissions. 
The Czechs have opposed 
these moves. 

The result of this deadlock 
could be seen last weekend. 
Firemen and civil defence 
workers clustered around fouT 
smeQiug cannisters burning 
o$ pound fay pound, ton by 
ton, the latest gift from 
Poland’s neighbours. 






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Hutto 1 


THE TIMES TUESDAY NOVEMBER 25 1986 


OVERSEAS NEWS 


>^2. * 

'’5 ' 

•> ^ 



Reagan aide denies changes at top 1 I ^ 1 4 • , 

^ O i K/aan omr cann •niut 




Geoffrey Smith 


The other day I went to see 
Governor Michael Dukakis of 
Massachusetts, ow of the 
most successful Democratic 
governors. He is considerate 
naming for President in 1998 
and told me he win mafcf a 
definite decision by abort the 
end of next February. 

At this stage be cannot be 
regarded as more than a tong 
shot. He is interesting, how- 
ever, not only for what be 
might become tort also for 
what he represents in the 
Democratic Party today. 

He was elected earlier this 
month by a massive majority 
to his third term as Governor. 
After his first term, from 1974 
to 1978, he was defeated in the 
primary by a fefiow-Democrai 
— possibly for being too liberal 
and almost certainly for being 
too nonchalant — before recov- 
ering the office to 1982. 

But the Dnkaltis of his 
second term is apparently a 
different po litician from the 
earlier Governor. The reflex 
liberal has evidently given way 
to the pragmatist, to the man 
whose deeds are more arrest- 
ing than his words. It is a 
progression that reflects the 
movement of opinion within 
the party. 

The more the Reagan Ad- 
ministration becomes embroil- 
ed in the Iranian arms deal the 
better chance the Democrats 
ought to stand of recovering 
the White House in 1988. But 
they are a party to transition. 

They had to Walter Mon- 
dale a candidate in 1984 who 
represented the old politics of 
a coalition of interest gratis 


From Michael Binyon 
Washington 

Despite the mo unting pres- 
sure on President Reagan 
from his friends, especially iris 
wile, to sack several of histop 
aides over the ban affair, Mr 
Donald Regan, the White 
House Chiefof Staff 
yesterday that he would not 
resign, and said be did not 
think there would be any 
changes in President Reagan's 
top staff this week. 

Mr Regan said on tele- 
vision: Tm not considering 
resigning. 1 serve at the plea- 
sure of the President. When 
it's time fix' me to go, well talk 
about iL But 1 dont think this 
is the time.'* 

Criticism continued to 
mount yesterday of Mr Regan 
and also of Mr George Shultz, 
the Secretory of State, whose 
aloofness is being described as 
failure to support the Presi- 
dent a t a time of crisis. 

White House officials insist 
that Mr Shultz knew more 
about the arms shipments 
than be acknowledged, but 
decided not to tight against the 
President’s decision and al- 
lowed senior State Depart- 
ment officials to remain in the 
dark. 

In an unusaHy sharp attack 
on Mr Shultz, Senator Robert 
Dole, the outgoing Senate Re- 
publican majority leader, said 
he* was having difficulty aip- 
porting Mr Reagan's derision 
because “ifs fairly difficult 
when the Secretary of State is 
not doing any thing” 

An aide suggested that Pre- 
sident Reagan might be losing 

Brussels 
braced for 
tariff war 
with US 

From Andrew McEwen 
Diplomatic Correspondent 
• Brussels 


Party struggling 
to be bom 

and liberal causes, of labour 
unions and big government. It 
looked like the last fling of the 
Democratic Party of Roose- 
velt. Truman, Kennedy and 
Johnson. 

Bat there was at the same 
time another Democratic Par- 
ty straggling to be town, 
represented by Gary Hart 
This is a party whose core 
group consists of young pro- 
fessional people, fwabfing for 
the future rather titan cele- 
brating the past, eager far 
opportunity and impatient 
with traditional ties. 

.Mr Hart failed then partly 
because he was not adequately 
prepared, and therefore failed 
to articulate their asphations 
sufficiently precisely, tort also 
partly because he was before 
his time. The constituency to 
which he appealed is fonport- 
ant, but it was not then and 
probably is not now enough by 
itself. 

To be successful the Demo- 
crats need to retain the loyalty 
and enthusiasm of their tra- 
ditional support while reach- 
ing oat to those voters who 
pride themselves tm not bring 
traditional. 

The claim made for Gov- 
ernor Dukakis is that he 
straddles these two wings of 
the party. Listening to him 
saying that he stoo d, above all, 
for economic opportunity liar 
every American citizen, I was 
not impressed. It was too 
vague, too generafized. He- ; 
said little to disttogirisJi him 
from any other potential 
presidential candidate in ei- 
ther party. . 

One notable 
exc eption 

The one notable exception 
was on trade protection, which 
be claimed that be would resist 
more strongly than the presort 
Administration, wh3e con- 
centrating tm policies to de- 
velop the competitive eff- 
iciency of American i ndustry. 
As the Reagan Administration 
has rather a good record in 
this field and as there is a 
strong protectionist tide flow- 
ing in the Democratic Party, 
this was a significant com- 
mitment. 

Bat if be does decide to ran 
for President he will need to 
develop more themes in 

greater depth. Otherwise he 
wifi be in dagger of being 
written off as one of nature’s 
vice-presidents. 

But Governor Dukakis has 
a number of advantages as 
weU. Prosperity to Massachu- 
setts has increased dramati- 
cally under his governorship. 

A Democrat who speaks, 

even if imprecisely, of opportu- 
nity hi the language of the 
young professionals and can at 
the same time claim to epjoy 
good relations with the ontoas 
should have attractions for 
both wings of the party. 

He looks younger than us 
55 vearsL is personable and 
energetic. He should come 
over well on television once he 
has worked out more dearly 
exactly what he wants to say. 

If there is to be a sur prise m 
the first Democratic primary 
of 1988 to New Hampshire, 
the Governor of 
bearing stole ofMassaam- 
setts should be jb abe|ter 

posafara than m<^ to spring it ■ 

gad what a s pringb oard that 
ctmid b?. 


Pessimism dung like Brus- 
sels fog yesterday to the man 
charged with keeping Europe 
out of a tariff war with the 
United States. A sombre Mr 
Willy de Qercq, the EEC 
Trade Commissioner, briefed 
the foreign ministers of the 
Twelve on what be called 
“painful and difficult nego- 
tiations' 1 ’ with the Reagan 
Administration. 

Washington will block EEC 
. exports worth $500 million 
(£352 million) next year if the 
talks faiL 

“Success” would consist of 
a formula to buy off American 
complaints that its formers 
lost exports to Spain and 
Portugal as a . result of prot- 
ectionist EEC form policy. 

:• The US has demanded 
compensation fix $500 mil- 
lion worth of sorghum and 
com which it exported an- 
l nuafiy to the two countries 
before they joined the EEC 

“It is a very difficult situa- 
tion and we cannot exclude 
the possibility that the talks 








Mr de CTerap some difficult 
negotiations ahead. 

will end in failure,” Mr de 
Clereq said. Washington had 
made it quite dear that the 
December 31 deadline was 
finn, he added. 

While, still hoping for suc- 
cess, all member s tates had 
agreed on a contingency plan 
far failure. 

The EEC would match any 
American sanctions with 
counter-action. 

Mr de .CIercq said that 
Britain had indicated its sup- 
port for such measures. 

The foreign ministers, 
under the presidency of Sir 
Geoffrey Howe, the Foreign 
Secretary, gave Mr de Clereq 
fall backing to keep talking. 

A top US delegation, 
including probably Mr George 
Shultz, the Secretary of State, 
and three other Cabinet mem- 
bers, is ! due to visit the 
Commission on December 12. 

If agreement looks possible, 
the formula is likely to be 
approved at the last foreign 
minis ters' meeting under UK 
presidency on December 1 5. ■ 

The US has based its claim 
on the fact that the tariffs that 
Spain and Portugal applied to 
American agricultural exports 
were fixed under the rules of 
the General Agreement on 
Tariffs and Trade (Gan). 

The tariffs increased auto- 
matically to the higher EEC 
levels when the two countries 
joined the European Commu- 
nity. Washington contends it 
is entitled to compensation 
under the Gatt rules. 

American officials in Brus- 
sels said yesterday the Comm- 
ission had indicated h would 
not pay direct compensation, 
but would indirectly achieve 
the «rme result by adjusting 
tariffs on a range of US ind- 
ustrial and form exports. 

. The principle of indirect- 
compensation bad been ad- 
mitted. and the question was 
how it should beachieved. 




• nr • *W 





President Reagan and Mrs 

patience with Mr Shultz over 
his attitude. Mrs Nancy Reag- 
an is reliably said to be furious 
with the way her husband's 
top officials have foiled to 
protect him 

. Loro influential in the selec- 
tion or senior White House 
staff; she is said to be pressing 
for the dismissals of Mr 
Shultz, Mr Regan, and Admir- 
al John Poindexter, the Na- 
tional Security Adviser. 

Mrs Reagan's press sec- 
retary said she was “troubled” 
and “hurt”. A family friend 


Sainst 

prices 


Nancy Reagan arriving at the 

said: “They feel betrayed and 
stunned. This was supposed to 
be the light team of loyalists, 
and instead of taking the bul- 
let for the President, they left 
him out dangling.'* 

Senator Cole, echoing the 
calls for White House dismiss- 
als. said: “Right now they 
ought to circle the wagons — 
either that or let a couple of 
the wagons go over the cliff.” 

Congress has particularly 
criticized statements by Mr 
Regan in which he compared 
his job to that of a “shovel 


ifFsr 


White House after spending the weekend at Camp David. 


brigade” cleaning up after a 
parade. 

Congressmen and the press 
have accused him of foiling to 
understand the seriousness of 
the situation, and treating 
policy as a public relations 
exercise. Mr Regan also said: 
“Who was it that took this 
disinformation thing and 
managed to turn it? Who was 
it took on this loss in the 
Senate and pointed out a few 
facts and managed to pull 
that? I don't say we'll be able 
to do it four times in a row. 


But here we go again, and 
we’re trying.” 

The Democrats, sensing the 
public anger over Iran, drew 
up a fiercely worded resolu- 
tion at the weekend, accusing 
the Administration of duplic- 
ity. cover-up and “dangerous 
double-speak”. The party's 
national committee said: 
“Our position in the world has 
been weakened, our credibility 
on the issue of terrorism is 
now virtually non-existent, 
and other American lives have 
been put at risk.” 


keep any 
deals with 
Iran secret 

From Ian Murray 
Jerusalem 

Only a special sab-commit- 
tee will be given to secret any 
details there may be of Israeli 
arms dealings with Iran, Mr 
Shimon Peres, the Foreign 
Minister, told the Knesset’s 
foreign affairs and defence 
committee yesterday. 

Summoned before the com- 
mittee to explain what the 
Government was doing in rela- 
tion to any deals, Mr Peres 
refused to give any evidence. 
But he did give a strong 
pointer to the fact that deliv- 
eries had been made. If there 
were any deals, he said, they , 
were so small that they could 
have had no possible effect on 
the Gulf War. 

In refusing to give any 
details to the committee, Mr 
Peres was foHowhqg the secret 
line already laid down by Mr 
Yitzhak Shamir, the Prime 
Minister, who has stock reso- 
lutely to the traditional Israeli 
government position that it 
never discusses arms deals. 

If deliveries have bees made 
to Iran, it is probably only 
known within die Cabinet to 
Mr Shamir, Mr Peres and Mr 
Yitzhak Rabin, the Defence 
Minister. 

Meanwhile, there is growing 
concern here that grassroots 
opposition to the United 
States to the Iranian arms deal 
will rebound against Israel's 
interest. 


send ‘ring 
of light’ 
into space 

Paris (Reuter) — European 
space authorities are planning 
to put a ring of light visible 
throughout the world, into 
orbit in 1989 to mark the 
centenary of the Eiffel Tower. 

The half-tonne package will 
be launched from an Ariane 
rocket. It will inflate in space . 
to form a string of 100 
reflectors linked by narrow 
plastic tubes and will have a 
circumference of 15 miles. 

Spain boom 

Madrid (Reuter) - Foreign 
tourists spent £6.4 billion in 
Spain during the first nine 
months of this year, an in- 
crease of almost 50 per cent 
over the same period of 1985. 

Priests held 

Maputo (AFP) — Rebels of 
the Mozambique National ■ 
Resistance have kidnapped ; 
three Portuguese Jesuit mis-- 
sionaries and 18 children. 

Demirel clear 

Ankara (Router) — Mr ; 
Suleyman DemireL the former - 
Turkish Prime Minister, was ' 
acquitted of defying a ban on 
involvement in party politics. ' 

Sikh shooting 

Chandigarh (Reuter) — Sus- . 
peeled Sikh extremists shot 
dead the son of a Punjab 
police chief on a university < 
campus to Amritsar. 





s present Scrooge-like 
iscuits and chocolate. 


Not humbug) 



8.55 


£ b ?5 o.o; 

Quaky Street5lb Tin 
(including wraps) 




Sainsbuiy 's Continental Snack 
Assortment 150g 

39p 

Sainsbury’s Beanies 170g 

59p 

Rowntrees After EightMints 206g 

95p 

Sainsburys Milk Chocolate Balls 160g 

99p 

Ferrero Rocher 200g 

£1.49 

j Sainsburys Family Selection 454g £1*85 ‘£175 

Salisbury's Plain Chocolate 

Apricot Creams 22 7g 

£1.95 1 

| Petits Fours by Sainsbury 's 240g £1.89 

| Sainsbury 7 s Biscuits for Cheese 1kg tin 

£ 2.55 

J Rowntree§ Black Magic 454g £2^9 £2.49 j | 

Cadbury's Milk Tray 454g 

£2.49 

Huntley and Palmer Luxury 
SelectionBiscuitslkgtin , .. 

£3.95 


m r 75 p 

After Dinner Mints by 
fe w Sainsburyk 150g 




H 


£ 2 . 09 ' 

Sainsbmyfc Assorted 
Biscuitslkgtin 








2.35 

kSainsburyfe Chocolate 
jk Biscuit Assortment 4G0g 


75 p m i 

Sainsbuiyfe Lebkuchen 300g 
















*115 


Good food costs (ess at Sainsburyls. 

EESUB*cno«suiABajTv saauNiSflteflm«i£CjUOTBRAKWE5fflax ^jrTM^^ cF^ wiiyFOBftpfFiODCTXrifAgTfflDaYsmHiNTrgLjgrBynKTws 







Ex-minister plays waiting game after Philippine ‘coup* attempt 


Spokesmen for Aquino 
and Enrile trying to 
keep lid on latest crisis 


Filipinos were treated to the 
spectacle yesterday of the 
presidential spokesman des- 
cribing in some detail a plot 
cooked up by men with links 
to the former Defence Minis- 
ter, Mr Juan Ponce Emile, to 
take over the Batasan Pam- 
bansa, or Parliament, and dec- 
lare an acting President of the 
Philippines, while the new De- 
fence Minister. Mr Rafael De- 
to, declared that there was no 
evidence of a plot 

Both were partly right and 
both were trying to put the lid 
on yet another Philippines 
crisis to prevent it boiling 
over. 

The official spokesman, Mr 
Teddy Benigno. was trying to 
depict President .Aquino, folly 
in control of events, parting 
company with her Defence 
Minister on the warmest 
terms. Mr Ileto, the new De- 
fence Minister, was mindful of 
the fact that the Government 
cannot start investigating doz- 
ens of reformist officers be- 
hind Mr Enrile without pro- 
voking severe problems in die 
military. Nor could Mr Enrile 
be prosecuted for trying to 
overthrow the Government, 
said Mr Ileto. because he was 
no longer in the military. 

The weekend’s bizarre ev- 
ents had their roots in a series 
of demands put to the Presi- 
dent by Mr Enrile via General 
Fidel Ramos, the armed forces 
chief, who had the support of 
many officers in the reform 
movement which helped bring 
Mrs Aquino to power last 
spring. 

The demands included the 
removal of several Cabinet 
ministers the military consid- 


From David Watts* Manila 

ers to be communist, incom- 
petent or corrupt, a tougher 
stance on insurgency , removal 
of some regional officials, ab- 
andonment of the new consti- 
tution and its replacement 
with a document to be drawn 
up and approved by the Bata- 
san, recalled with the same 
personalities as under former 
President Marcos and with its. 
former Speaker, Mr Nicanor 
Yniguez, as acting Presidrat- 

These demands were de- 
bated back and forth over the 
telephone during Mis Aqui- 

The new Philippines De- 
fence Minister said yesterday 
that his country is lucky to 
have American bases on its 
sofl (AP reports from Manila). 

Mr Rafad Ileto said the 
issue of conthmed US use of 
the facilities must be decided 
by the political leadership. 

no’s visit to Tokyo but the 
murder of Mr Rolando Olalia, 
leader of the left-wing People’s 
Parry, and the kidnapping of a 
Japanese executive, Mr Nobu- 
yuk) Wakaoji, caused the let- 
ter to be at least temporarily 
pigeonholed by the President 

Faced with these demands 
from the reform officers and 
combined with a Defence 
Minister enjoying strong sup- 
port in the regions, the Presi- 
dent had the backing of her 
Cabinet and the public in 
Manila in seeking the removal 
of Mr Enrile. 

By Saturday it appears a 
deal had been struck with 
General Ramos, no longer 
purely playing the role of 
middleman, and other mili- 
tary figures around him, press- 


ing Mrs Aquino to mak e 
changes. 

No one is saying in public 
what the agreement is, but Mr 
Enrile appears to be playing a 
waiting game to see if Mrs 
Aquino will satisfy the de- 
mands the reformists and 
many of the middle class are 
now making of her. If she does 
not prove capable of grasping 
the nettle, Mr Enrile is well 
placed for a future return. 

The change from a purely 
revolutionary Cabinet was 
bound to come sooner or later, 
but Mrs Aquino seems to have 
been incapable of seeing the 
need until it was pressed on 
her in the strongest terms by 
the military. It is understood 
that the reformers want the re- 
moval of five members of the 
present Cabinet who are a 
mixed bag in terms of compet- 
ence, their single unifying 
quality being their opposition 
to theformer President 

The removal of Mr Enrile is 
being depicted not only as the 
surmounting of a crucial test 
for Mis Aquino but by her 
spokesman as an end to what 
he called the “hijacking” of 
the country by a small group 
of military officers. Mr En- 
file’s removal is like that of a 
bone from Mrs Aquino’s 
throat, said Mr Benigno. 

But the political economy of 
the Philippines is considerably 
more complex than that, and 
Mrs Aquino’s most demand- 
ing test is yet to come: whether 
she is capable of removing 
personal associates from the 
Cabinet, not only in the cause 
of peace in the short term, but 
better government in the 
longer term. 



Armstrong will tell dosed 
court about KGB defector 



xua si*#’ 



Jn&im irz 



Mr Nicanor Ydigaez, former Speaker of the Philippines 
National Assembly* answering questions yesterday. 

Bomb in bus kills two 


Manila (AFP) - Two peo- 
ple were killed and 13 were 
wounded when a bomb explod- 
ed in a bos In the southern 
Philippines on Saturday. 

The driver and a passenger 
were killed when the bomb 
exploded as the bos was about 


to leave the bos terminal in 
Tagnm town* Davao del Norte 
province, 546 miles south of 
Manila. 

Investigations were being 
conducted to determine 
whether the bomb was the 
work of communist insu rg ents. 


• The MIS book case is 
expected to go into dosed 
session today after Sir Robert 
Armstrong, the Cabinet Sec- 
retary. declined yesterday to 
ans wer questions in open 
court on information pro- 
vided by a top Soviet defector 
on Sir Roger Hollis, former 
head ofMI5. 

At the same time, counsel 
for the British Government 
foreshadowed that they would 
cite grounds of ^public in- 
terest i mm unity” in continu- 
ing to resist producing back- 
ground documents on Mrs 
Thatcher’s 1981 Commons 
statement in which she cleared 
Sir Roger of bring a Soviet 
mole. 

Allegations against Sir Ro- 
ger made by Mr Peter Wright, 
whose book is the subject of 
the present injunction hearing 
m the New South Wales 
Supreme Court, were raised 
late cm the sixth day sprat by 
the Cabinet Secretary under 
cross-examination. 

Mr Malcolm Turnbull, 
counsel for Mr Wright, bad 
re f erred to the defection in 
1985 of Mr Oleg Gordievsky, 
then the KGB station head in 
London, who Sir Robert 
agreed was a man of “power 
and influence” in the Soviet 
intelligence service. 

Mr Turnbull asked: “Given 
the uncertainty surrounding 
Sir Roger HolUs, given your 
concern about him, why has 
your Government not re- 
leased the information Gor- 
dievsky gave you about 
Holiisr 

Sir Robert replied: “I am 
not prepared to answer any 
more questions about this in 
open court.” 

Mr Justice Powell and coun- 
sel for both rides then agreed 
that the court would go'into 
closed session today and pos- 
sibly tomorrow, in which time 
Mr Turnbull is expected to 
wind up his gruelling cross- 
examination of Sir Robert 



BRITISH COAL. 
THE RIGHT CHEMIST 

FOR ICI 


1 


V, 



The giant Id company has recently embarked on an imaginative 
conversion to coal programme in the UK When completed, ICI will bum 
well over one million tonnes of steam coal per yeai; opening up new 
markets for British Coal 

The bulk chemical plant at Instock in Cheshire was the first 
plant to go on stream and was closely followed by it’s 
sister site at Winnington These installations have been 
followed by more recent conversions to coal 
firing at Huddersfield and the massive 
petrochemicals and plastics complex at 
Wilton, Tfeessida 

Id attaches a great deal of 
importance to flexibility in its purchasing 
of fuels, and this investment in coal will 
ensure it can select the lowest cost 
sources of energy. The price of fuel 
oil is likely to be volatile for the 
foreseeable future while the price 
of coal will be much more stable 
for many years, thus offering cost 
savings which increase as the 
price of oil products escalates 

10 run a business like Id 
you need to plan ahead for a 
decade or more Id is confident 
that its investments in coal 
represent sound long term planning. 

British Coal is confident that it will be 
able to meet this demand at fully 
competitive prices. 


A Government Qant Scheme currently supports 
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_ I 


From Stephen Taylor, Sydney 

Earlier. Mr Turnbull sug- 
gested thar foe “treachery or 
otherwise of Sir Roger Hollis 
is likely to be one of those 
great historical conundrums 
which are forever debated and 
forever unresolved.'' 

Sir Robert replied: “As the 
Prime Minister said (in the 
Commons statement), it is 
impossible to prove inno- 
cence. It is possible further 
information wfli come to light 
which would prove guilt It 
has noL If there was more 
information (the- investiga- 
tion) would have to be 
reopened.” . . 

Was it not time, Mr 
Turnbull asked, for the Hollis 
issue to be put on the shelf of 
history, like another one-time 
sensitive subject — the Bletcb- 
ley codebreaking operation of 
world War U— and “to let the 
participants speak their 
minds, in thrir own names.” 

Sir Robert “They are under 
a duty of confidentialily not 
to” 

A 1 the start of the day's 
hearing Mr Turnbull returned 
to the subject of Mr Chapman 
Pin cher. whose book, Their 
Trade is Treachery ; was writ- 
ten with Mr Wright’s assis- 
tance, and which foe defence 
maintains was secretly au- 
thorized by foe Government. 

Mr Turnbull said among the 
documents he would be Ail- 
ing for under an authorizing 
court order was the MI5 file 
on Mr Fincher, who foe 
defence claims was used by 
official sources to release sen- 
sitive information. 

An earlier book by Mr 
Fincher titled Inside&oryvzs 
produced by Mr Turnbull, 
who said it listed eight in- 
stances in which Mr Fincher 
had cooperated with intelli- 
gence or official sources, either 
as an agent of MI5 or by acting 
as a conduit for putting 
information into the public 
domain through his news- 
paper reports. 


Mr Turnbull asked Sir Rob- 
ert ifhe knew anything abonra 
meeting late in 1980 between 
Mis Thatcher and Lord Roth- 
schild, a senior Tory Party 
adviser said by the defence to 
have been involved in the 
publication of Their Trade is 
Treachery. Mr Turnbull 
claimed the meeting took 
place at Lord Rothschild's St 
James’s Square fiat and con- 
cerned intdiigpnee matters. 

Sir Robert said he had no 

knowledge of such a meeting. 

Of the investigations an- 
nounced by Sir Michael Ha- 
vers, the Attorney-General, 
into disclosures node by a 
number of former MIS offi- 
cers in breach of their duty of 
confidentiality, Mr Turnbull 
put it to Sir Robert that it was 
“a great hypocrisy” to take 
action now when nothing had 
been done in the past four 
years. 

Sir Robert replied thar he 
did not know foe cheum- 
slances of individual cases. - 

MrTheo Simos, QC for the 
Government, produced a list 
of the documents which foe 
defence may claim access to 
under an order granted by Mr 
Justice Powefl two weeks ago, 
and which was the subject of 
an unsuccessful application to 
the Appeal Court test week. 



Mr Malcolm TnrnbaQ: he is 
“appalled” by objection. 


Contradictions of Saodi Arabia 

Nation of stonings 
and space travel 

By Alan Hamilton 

Last week’s visit by the years, and may even have 


Prince and Princess of Wales 
to Saodi Arabia hMifighted 
the contradictions of this se- 
cretive giant, torn between the 


become more restricted, an 
imficatioa of the powerful 
influence of the religious lead- 
ers of the Wahabis, the Sunni 


tenets of Islam and the hue of Muslim religions sect which 
the 2 1st centnry, a country dominates the country. 


which can produce the first 
Arab and put adul- 

terers to the mediaeval death 
of stoning. 

The paradox is both social 
and political; the first tflas- 
trated by the treatment of the 
Princess in being exdnde d 
from all official banquets, and 
the second by the strange 
affair of foe missing Crown 
Prince Abdullah* who was to 
have been the royal couple's 
official host 

Women remain severely re- 
pressed by Western standards. 
They are not allowed to drive, 
and may not even get into a cor 
with a strange man unless 
chaperoned. - 

Although they can freely 
take np higher education and 
follow professional careers, 
they cannot attend a university 
lecture given by a man and are 
obliged to watch it on dosed- 
rircnit television. 

Many women still leave 
their booses veiled entirely in 



Prince Abdullah: known as a 
traditionalist 

black, making crossing the 
road hazardous as they peer 
through the material. Others 
go with their heads uncovered, 
but any suggestion of a bare 
aim or leg is likely to earn 
them a seme reprimand from 


King Fahd is dearly astute 
enough to pay close heed to foe 
religious lobby and its desire 
that the country should not be 
cast adrift from its traditional 
refigioiis anchor. 

To pacify and reassure foe 
ttlana, die religious scholars 
who are guardians of the dd 
Islamic ways, the King spends 
several hours each week ia 
disrasshm with them, and has 
channelled large sums of oil 
wealth towards religious pro- 
jects. 

They include new Islamic 
universities, a spectacular 
terminal for pilgrims arriving 
at Jiddah airport, and a new 
read, known as Christian By- 
pass, around the city of Mecca 
to keep the infidels away from 
one of Islam’s holiest shrines. 

King Fahd’s formal tide is 
Custodian of die Two Holy 
Mosques (Mecca and Me- 
dina); be does not call himself 
“His Majesty”, that prefix 
being so potent that it can refer 
only to God. 

Official documents also 
take care to state that the 
cornerstone of foreign policy is 
the eventual recovery of the 
third tody shrine of Jerusalem. 

Contrasting cultural back- 
grounds are evident even 
within foe inner circle of foe 
ipynl family of al-Saud* who 
rule foe country as an absolute 
but relatively benevolent mon- 
archy, King Fahd being his 
own Prime Minister, Crown 
Prince Abdullah, first in fine 
to foe throne, is a traditional- 
ist who spends mast of his time 
in foe company of his Bedran 
cronies. 

His absen c e last week* sup- 
posedly at a Swiss dink until 
he was unmasked ia a luxury 
Las Palmas hotel, may have 
been a subtle diplomatic mes- 
sage to Syria that Saadi 
Arabia was not fawning over 
British royalty. Abdallah has 
a Syrian wife and is King 
Fahd’s principal messenger to 
Damascus. 

But he is said to be one of 


a^religiog poto. ZTbTfe said to he ooe of 

Western residents of Ri- the less sophisticated and less 
” y _ ^ aithon g hex£aK ahlerffo2»^Seaheisof 


bras are now rare, there are 
occasional reports — never 
published in the newspapers— 
of stonings for adultery, the 
victim being whichever party 
to foe liaison was the married 
one. The fornicator is buried in 
the earth opto the waist The 
first volley is with pea-sized 


the royal family, and alto 

suffers from a stammer. Prince 
Sultan, the Defence Minister 
and second in fine, . is by 
contrast American-educated 
and an excellent speaker of 
colloquial English,. 

Saudi Arabia has to achieve 


pebbles, gradually inrwwrag a delicate balance of maintain- 


to deadly rocks. 


lug die unify of foe Arab 


The guilty party is permit- *«ld, while _ keeping good 
ted to try to escape by wrig- relations with its oil cnshmitoS 


gling free from the pit* and if 
successful — it is said that very 


and its suppliers of high 
technology in the West Ode 


few are -k pardoned, for it is experienced Western Arabist 
then regarded as the will of based m Riyadh said last 


Allah that they should go free. 

Kissing between men and 
women m public, however 


week: “They may be the 
Syrians* paymasters, but they 
like to keep them at arms* 


chastely. 2 $ still regarded a$ length.” 

highly offensive. Yet it is The same Arabist costin- 


perfectly common and accept- 
able for men to kiss each 
other, with an intensity that is 
highly embarrassing to any 
heterosexual Westerner. 


ned: “It would be wrong to 
assume that there is any kind 
of open feud fn the royal family 
between foe traditionalists and 
the progressives. They are 


The position of Saadi Ara- very good at sticking together, 
bmn women appears not to This is one ofthe most stable 
have progressed in the last 1G regimes in the region.”' 














s s / ' 5 




-+t 


C7U0<? 


“Good Luck” 

Sid Hunt, 
Driver, 

Bury St. Edmunds. 


“Good Luck” 

Sid Barry, ' 
Driver, Ipswich. 


“Good Luck : 

Sid Young, 
Chargehand. Neath 


“Good Luck” 

Sid Williams. 
Driver, King s Lynn. 


Good Luck 

Sid Cherry, 
Driver, Uxbridge.-. 


“Good Luck” 

Sid Pearce, 

Calor Centre Assistant. 
Cardiff. 


From all the Sids at Calor. 


In terms of scope, however, we’re pretty 
much the same (whatever your domestic or 
industrial needs). 

Sharing, moreover, the same virtues as a 
fuel: clean and controllable, versatile and 
immediate. 

As any one of our Sids * ^ 

will tell you. BWBMjBj 

THE GAS beyond the mains. msIIhUI 


N ot TO MENTION all the other Tom. 

Dick and Harriettes who work to bring 
you the gas beyond the mains. 

3,500 of them, to put a round figure on it 
Mind you, it’s pure coincidence that so 
many Sids happen to be tanker drivers. 
Though not inappropriate. 

We have, after all, the larges/ LPG dis- 
tribution fleet in the country. 


Our apologies if you’ve ever been stuck 
behind one of these transporters. 

But at least it means our customers are 
rarely stuck for supplies. 

Our dealers aren't exactly thin on the 
ground, either (1,400 at your service). 

Still less Calor stockists (a handy 8,500). 

Of course, we’re not quite on the scale 
of our good friends, British Gas. 


PART OF THE 1C CAS CROUP. 





12 


OVERSEAS NEWS 


Militant PLO 
slogans mark 
funeral of Arab 
moderate 

From lan Murray, Jerusalem 


The body of a great 
Palestinian moderate. Mr 
Anwar Nusseibeh. was borne 
in sorrow and triumph 
through the streets of the Old 
City of Jerusalem yesierday to 
chants of support for tile 
outlawed Palestine liberation 
Organization (PLO). 

In his life he had been a 
great advocate of dialogue 
between Israelis and Arabs. In 
death he became a symbol of 
the militant Palestinian cause. 
His plain wooden coffin was 
carried through the streets of 
the city where he was once 
governor by young men chant- 
ing: “Israel, ho. PLO, yes." 

Israeli police, who had bat- 
tled in the narrow streets only 
the previous evening against 
extremist Jews shouting 
“Death to the Arabs", kept 
discreetly out of the way. 
“With blood and spirit we will 
save Palestine, we will save Al 
Aqsa,” chanted the youths as 
the coffin was carried up to the 
sacred enclosure where the 
Dome of the Rock and the Al 
Aqsa mosque crown the hill 
where Solomon's temple once 
stood 

Inside were gathered many 
friends and relatives of the 
dead man, who was a former 
Jordanian Defence Minister, 
ambassador to London and 
leading citizen of Jerusalem. 
Several had crossed over Jor- 
dan to pay their last respects 
before the coffin was lowered 
into the ground of the nearby 
Muslim cemetery. 


Mr Shimon Peres, the Is- 
raeli Foreign Minister, paid 
his respect in a message to the 
family praising a man who 
recognized that “the future of 
our region lies in coexistence 
and peace". 

Mr Teddy KoDek, the 
Mayor of Jerusalem, told the 
city council that be bad seen 
Mr Nusseibeh only last week, 
and he had then topically 
condemned the angry violence 
which has torn the city for 
over a week, following the 
arrest of three Arabs for the 
murder of a student from a 
militant bibJe college, built 
provocatively in the Muslim 
quarter of the Old City. 

That violence reached a 
peak on Sunday evening when 
hundreds of supporters of the 
extreme nationalist Kach 
movement marched to the 
scene of the murder, demand- 
ing revenge and hurling abuse 
and stones at anyone they 
suspected of being an Arab. 

As a result of the violence, 
several Arab families have 
fled from the Old City, while 
some near the bible college 
have been burnt out of their 
shops and apartments. An 
inter-racial fund has been set 
up to try to rebuild the 
damaged property and to sup- 
ply food and blankets for 
those who have been chased 
away. The fund would doubt- 
less have pleased Mr Nus- 
seibeh more than his funeral 
procession. 



The Pope kissing a baby after his 
arrival in Australia yesterday. The 
Pope, who is on a six-day visit, 
received the warmest welcome so 
for of his six-nation tour of Asia 
and the South Pacific (Reuter 
reports from Canberra). 


At a government reception later, 
the Pope warmly praised Austral- 
ia's achievements, but said that the 
countiys four million Catholics 
must use their political influence 
to protect human rights. 

“I hope that all Catholics, and all 


your fellow-citizens, will invite you 
by their voice and by their votes to 
ensure that nothing is done by the 
legislature to undermine these 
values,” he told Mr Bob Hawke, 
the Prime Minister, and other 
political leaders. 


Jews muzzled by fear of anti-Semitism 


‘Arafat’s daughter’ to 
get out of Sweden 

From Christopher Mosey, Stockholm 

The deputy head of the As the row over the activ- 
Palestine Liberation Organ- ities in Sweden of the PLO 
ization office in Stockholm, deputy came to a head, it was 
Miss Hala Saiameh, aged 27 revealed that a senior Swedish 
and known as “Arafat’s diplomat, Mr Bemt Carisson, 
daughter” because of her dose had travelled to Tunis for 
links with Mr Yassir Arafat, several secret meetings, 
the PLO leader. Iasi night It is believed he confronted 

agreed to leave Sweden before Mr Arafat with Sapo intelli- 
the end of the month. gence, including a report that 

Miss Saiameh had at first Miss Saiameh had helped Abu 
refused to leave the country, Nidal terrorists by providing 
denoudng as “a campaign of them with false identity pa- 
liber claims by the Stock- pers and passports and that 
holm Government that infer- Abu Nldal«had established 
mation collected by Sweden's numerous “cells” in Sweden 
security police (Sapo) linked to carry out operations against 
the PLO office with suspected US and Israeli interests dse- 
terTOrists living in the country, where in Europe. 

Miss Saiameh. however. The journey to Tunis was 
changed her mind after talks an attempt by the Socialist 

Government — which has 
always had good relations 
with Mr Ararat — to sum 
Sweden being used as a “safe 
base” by Arab 'terrorists. 


last night between Dr Eugene 
Makhlouf, the PLO office 
chief, and Mr Pierre Schori, 
the Foreign Ministry’s Perma- 
nent Under-Secretary. 


Concluding The Times ‘s 
examination of South Africa - 
Israel relations, Michael 
Hornsby, in Johannesburg, 
looks at the moral and politi- 
cal dilemma faced by South 
African Jewry. 

At its last National Con- 
gress in June 1985, the Sooth 
African Jewish Board of Dep- 
uties adopted a resolution 
explicitly rejecting apartheid. 
Hardly a revolutionary ges- 
ture, it might be thought, but 
for the Jewish community here 
h was a historic milestone. 

“Some may well argue that 

fltebwd itedoa^utf- 
estab&hed policy of not enter- 
ing the political arena,” Mr 
Aleck Goldberg, the board's 
executive director, commented 
at the time, picking his words 
carefully. 

Bat, he mahrtained, ‘“ap- 
artheid' ao longer has the 
same political connotations,” 
and “although . . . the board 
came closer to the dmdmg line 
between politics and morality, 
it is very doubtful if it was 
crossed.” 

What he was saying, in 
effect, was that, as Pretoria 
itself now claims to have 
abandoned or to be moving 
away from apartheid, the Jew- 
ish community coaid safely 
risk being a little bolder in its 
criticism of what, at least 
formally, is no longer govern- 
ment poUcy. 

The very tentatrveness of 
this approach says much about 
the curious position of Jews in 
South Africa — socially and 
economically a privileged 
caste within an already privi- 


leged rad al minority, yet still 
banted by ancient fears of 
pogrom and persecution. 

Most Jews bare are uneasOy 
aware of the paradox that a 
community which itself has 
been the victim of racial 
oppression for centuries, 
should be seen by most South 
African blacks is happily 
acqniescrag in the mainten- 
ance of an overtly racist state. 

Yet those who speak out are 
not popular. Rabbi Ben 
Isaacson has seen attendance 
at his synagogue in Johannes- 
burg's wealthy Hmghtoa sub- 

South Africa 
and Israel 

Part 2 


nrb dwindle sharply since he 
accused his co-religionists of 
regarding “racism as kosher 
so tong as it does not apply to 
Jews”. 

Late last year, a smaD group 
of concerned, mainly younger, 
Jews met in a Johannesburg 
synagogue to lunch Jews for 
Social Jnstice, wife a mani- 
festo opposing racism, police 
brutality and the use of the 
Army in Mack townships. 
Black groups welcomed the 
initiative, but feBow-Jews 
showed little support. 

The number of Jews enu- 
merated at the last census in 
1980 was 117,963, represent- 
ing 26 per cent of the 
country’s 4^51,068 whites, 
who in turn accounted for 16.4 
per cent of a total population 
then estimated at 27.709.000. 


Emigration is Hkdy to have 
cut Jewish numbers somewhat 
since then. 

Eighty per cent of South 
African Jews are Lithuanian 
in origin, a legacy of die mass 
exodus of Russian Jewry be- 
tween 1881 and the First 
World War. There was a fresh 
tnflmr from Germany in the 
3930s, untQ further Jewish 
fanmforatkm was banned in 
1937. 

As a group they are close- 
knit, endogenous, ami over- 
whelmingly English -speaking 
and urbanized (60 per cent live 
in Johammesbmg alone). 
They are strongly Zionist, and 
more than four-fifths are 
Orthodox in their synagogue 
affiliation. They are prom- 
inent in commerce and the 


Many indlridaal Jews, al- 
though mostly secular ones, 
have always opposed apart- 
heid vigorously. They include 
today fee tikes of fee opposi- 
tion MP, Mrs Helen Suzman, 
and the civil rights lawyer, Mr 
Sydney Kentniie, as well as 
sack figures as Mr Joe Sidra, 
of the outlawed South African 
Communist Party. 

As a community, however. 
South African Jewry remains 
extremely cautious politically. 
It is often unkindly said of 
Johannesburg's Jews feat, 
while most ®r them vote out of 
habit far Mrs Suzman's 
Progressive Federal Party, 

they would be horrified if their 

votes actually pat it into 
power. 

Chief Rabbi Bernard Cas- 
per, who was boro in Britain, 
is almost unknown outside the 


Jewish co mmunit y and is 
never seen on pubfic platforms 
alongside the Tutus and the 
Boesaks, or white c h urc hmen 
like the Catholic Archbishop, 
Mgr Denis Hurley, de- 
nouncing apartheid. 

One reason for feat is the 
absence of any Mack, Col- 
oured (mixed-race) or Indian 
Jews m South Africa, whereas 
the Christian missfouary chur- 
ches have millions of am* 
white members who have 
exerted grass roots pressure 
for greater nritibmcy. 

Older Jews also remember 
that in the 1930s many of fee 
founders of the present rating 
National Party were open 
Nazi sympathizers. They fear 
that if they “rock the boat” 
politically they will arouse 
latent anti-Semitism, particu- 
larly among the sew far-right 


In the 1960s there was a 
period of tension after Israel 
voted in favour of economic 
sanctions at the Untied Na- 
tions. Pretoria retaliated by 
suspending for five years the 
transfer of Jewish monetary 
donations to Israel, and qnes- 
tions were raised abort Jewish 
loyalty. 

Since tile Yam Kippar war 
fa 1973, relations between 
Pretoria and Israel hare been 
increasmidy dose. Israel bas 
helped Pr et o ria keep abreast 
of devetopements hi mfltiary 
technology. Many Afrikaners 
admire brad's efforts to pre- 
serve Jewish culture and, as 
they see it, racial parity 
agafast an Arab majority. 

Co n c lu ded 


Jail ships 
setup as 
drug crisis 


vTfi KM I £ 


From Christopher Thomas 
New York 

The “crack” crisis has 
brought New York's judicial 
system to the point of col- 
lapse. Two ferry boats are 
wring converted into jails and 




in, but with at least 6CU crack- 
related arrests a month it will 
hardly make a difference. 

Prosecutors are handling as 
many as 60 cases at once. The 
scenes in courtrooms are 
chaotic, with lawyers’ desks 
buried beneath swaying 
mountains of wiawift* folders 
stamped with large black let- 
ters “Grade”. Prisoners sweat 
for hours in airless court cells 
awaiting their turn. 

But, despite the purge, the 
epidemic rages from strength 
to strength, deariy out of 
control. 

The drive against crack is 
different from anything else 
the police have tartded. Hun- 
dreds, perhaps thousands, of 




seeking the dabbler who works 
from his own apartment. Mr 
Robert Sobering, chief assis- 
tant to Mr Stoning Johnson, 
New York’s special narcotics 
prosecutor, said: “Trying to 
break a crack ring is tike 
dealing with thousands of 
little ants.” 

A new anti-crack unit estab- 
lished last May has so for 
made 3,700 ar rest s . On a typ- 
ical day in the state Supreme 
Court, defence and prosecut- 
ing attorneys scuxxy from , 
court to court, juggling trial 
dates with each other under 
the bored gaze of judges and 
clerks. Delays axe intermi- 
nable; defendants can lan- 
guish in jail for months. 

New York police have been 
forced to release hundreds of 
suspects in recent weeks be- 
cause the police laboratory 
could not produce an analysis 
in time for the required grand 
jury heating. Plea bargaining 
as rampant, resulting in minor 
sentences for serious offences. 
“Everybody is engaging in 
plea baigaming at a relatively 
early stege,” Justice Leslie 
Snyder of the State Supreme 
Court said. 

Several hundreds of mil- 
lions of dollars are being spent 
by New York state to expand 
and improve its prisons and to 
build two new jails. New York 
City’s prisons are at 104 per 
cent ofcapacity and there were 
riots lart week at Rikkefs 
Island prison on the East 
River. : 

Governor Mario Como has 
increased the number of crim- 
inal court judges and, with 
tittle effect, and the anti-crack 
police unit has just been 
increased to 200 officers. 


People’s s 

k * ■ ■ -m • / 


scapegoat 

from Richard Bapsett 
Vienna 

A coafifem between fee 
Sodafists and fee conservative 
People's Party was fa donbt 
y esterday as speculation gift, 
ered feat Herr Alois Mock, 
fee PeepltY Fatly leader, 
wooU haw to resign. 

A nrther shaken Herr Mock 
emerged from Ms party head- 
quarters after party bosses 
looked for a scapegoat for 
their party’s &ja*ro« perfor- 
mance fo Sunday’s Aastriaa 
general dcctibn. 



► 'per cent over fee 



IfihSSt 


IH"*] 


■rrWyE 






Herr Jferg Haider, whose 
ability to attract ftitioa a Ksi 
right-wing protest voters from 
both main parties to Us Free- 
dom Party was woefaBy an- 
dci estimate d by Hear Mode. 

Herr Haider's success 
proved feat many Aastriaas 
remain disturbingly suscep- 
tible to fee charisma of a 
young right-wing demagogae. 
Voters flocked to his tmtt- 
sbe campaign, tenting a Wad 
eye to tire fact feat Ins pub, 
idler few years m office wife 
the Sedafists, carried mack of 
foe responsibility for fee con- 
try’s problems. 

Bat in an eteetkw in which 
party programmes were virtu- 
ally non-existent, personality 
carried fee day. 

Fran Freda MefonerJHoa, 
the leader of the Grecos, also 
ben efi ted. Her party raters fee 
Austrian Parfiameat for the 
firs t tine. 

According to provfefoaal re- 
salts ytMmiml yesterday, fee 
Socialists won 4333 percent 
of fee vote and 80 seats (47,6 
per craft and 90 seats fa 1983). 
The People's Party won 4139 
per cent sad 76 seats (433 per 
cent, 81 seals). The Freedom 
Party received 9.72 per cent 
and won 18 seats (438 per 
cent, 12 seals). 


cent and 9 seate (130 per cent 
no seats). 



Herr Haider, his charisma 
drew mgjor party votes. 



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Mining 
matters 

\ 

WorU a Actio, 
(ITV) turned its attention (0 
Sooth African mining 
St ry. S potfe Africa camtn* 
■ understood without a knew- 

*geof its lucrative mines, bed 
1 rainfis* unfortunately, ran. 
be understood is a baif- 
r programme. Although 
iriiauifmed itself to a single 
t, the harsh treatment of 

workers by one of the 

great m i n in g booses. Consoli- 
dated Gold Fields of South 
Africa, there was no time to 
place its few vignettes m any 
tat the sketchiest context. 

World in Aetna is accused, 
in a recent survey by a newly 
established outfit called the 
Media Moaitoring Unit, of 
Mas. The report oa 
Gold Fields was biased to the 
leftj as one which selected 
node but the most estightened 
aspect of the Anglo-American 
Corporation's treatment of 
Mack miners would be 
to die right Bnt it was so short 
that it was likely, however ft 
was IRftdfj, to miaivafl in < nmy 
direction, if only by 


TELEVISION 


For example, we were toU 
that “the architects of apart* 
held took the mining industry 
as . their model”. The im- 
pression given was that the 
Boer Nationalists riHflW 
themselves ob British capital- 
ists. In reality, they hated the 
capitalists, not least for trying 
to break down the cofour bar in 
the mines. This was originally 
e s tab lish ed by w hite nrfww , to 
stop workers of other races 
from taking their jobs. Apart- 
heid might, in d eed , be de- 
scribed as the political ex- 
pression of white trade 
nawnion — a system of restric- 
tive labour practices taken to 
extreme lengths - bnt, if the 
makers of World ia Actum 
meant that; they helcxi room 
to say so. 

The chairman of Gold 
Fields, Lord Emil of Hale, 
was quoted as saying “oar 
miners have better wiwWimh 
than I had at public school”, a 
far from reassuring remark. 
For {imposes of corapjnisoa, 
die series should indbnfe an 
accumt not jut of conditions 
in oOercamtriei’nU mines, 
bat at OumQe, c. 1928, iudad- 
ing the number of fcnl ac- 
cidents, and the length of time 
spent underground. 

Andrew Gimson 



again to the Sixties 


1966 and All That 
Whitworth Art Gallery, 
Manchester 

Make or Break 
City Art Gallery, 
Manchester 


T he Sixties evidently con- 
tinue to excite renewed 
interest: presumably we are 
just passing that ovdal 
stage where what has- been 
looking dated, dowdy and boring 
suddenly starts to look period, trendy 
and fun. This. summer I saw mafor 
exhibitions in Paris and Cologne 
which attempted to take a steady and 
not uncritical look ax the arts and 
their effects 20 years ago. Now it is 
Britain's tarn. And the great advan- 
tage 1966 and AO That, at the 
Whitworth Gallery, Manchester, un- 
til December 6, has over its conti- 
nental rivals is that for once London, 
in that decade, was a much more 
interesting place to be than Pam, 
Cologne or perhaps anywhere else in 
the worid— at any rate until 1968 and 
San Francisco. 

“Swinging London”: for anyone 
over 30 the very words must summon 
up a host of images. Miniskirts, of 
course, though as the show points out 
they (fid not reach their ntimimum 
-until the end of the decade Carnaby 
Street, psychedelic colours. Union 
Jacks on everything. Beatles music; 
flared trousers, kipper ties. Habitat 
and Biba and fan Pupa We might 
not so immediately remember the 
period as the heyday of the tower- 
block, or spell out all the economic 
implications of the never-hsd-it-so- 
good ethos. And we are probably not 
quite sure when it all really stinted, 
when exactly Elvis Presley gave place 
to the Beaties. Or, for that matter, 
whether it all really happened, or was 
merely another creation of the PR 
apparatus which also came into its 
own at around that time. 

The organizers of 1966 and All 
That are quite tough on the mythic 
aspects of tiie Swinging Sixties. It is to 
be noted that the principal organizer 
and author of^ the accompanying book 
(Trefoil, £8.95), Jennifer Harris, was 
17 in 1966, which should have been 
about the right age to experience an 
alleged explosion of youth culture. 
But 1 cannot help feeling that she and 
her co-authors are somewhat un- 
idiomaticin their recollections, or too 
inclined -to see things through the 
blinkered eyes of the Eighties. 

They point out, for instance, that 
the new women's clothes of the 



vf 

REVOUER 



Imperishable images of the Sixties: Klaus Voorman’s Beaties record sleeve and John McConnell's Biba logo 


Sixties were supposed to be liberat- 
ing but in foci imposed their own 
form of constraint: concerning the 
skeletal Twiggy they observe '‘dimin- 
utive in size, the woman is also 
diminished in consequence”, and the 
implication seems to be that mature 
women dressed in Iittie-giii styles are 
bound therefore to behave like little 
girls. Surely this is a confusion of the 
image with the actuality: a big point 
of the Sixties was theamount of irony 
involved in knowing misquotation of 
styles and motifs: women in Mary 
Quant's babywear “slrinnyrifabed” 
sweaters did not necessarily find 
themselves behaving like babies, any 
more than women in ankle-length 
skirts and granny-glasses behaved 
like grandmothers. The fun was in the 
discrepancy. 

In other respects the show tends to 
be a bit solemn and sociological. But 
one has only to join the dozens of kids 
in school parties wandering round h, 
sketchbooks in hand, to sense that 
for all the it»m disapproval 
admonitions that we must be serious 
about all rhig the fun of the 
does come out. Of course the new 
enthusiasm for Victoriana, Art Nou- 
veau and Art Deco revival spawned a 
lot of kitsch, eclecticism ran riot, and 
even today, after a more than decent 
interval, some of the dayglow colours, 
indiscriminately applied, are decid- 
edly hard on the eyes. But the feeling 
of dynamism, and the sense that 
something was happening all round, 
remain irresistible. 

The. Whitworth show is primarily 


about design, though there is an 
annexe of art from the period which 
happens to be in the gallery's collec- 
tion, and the early examples of British 
Pop An and such do not look at all 
bad. I am not so sure about the 
discreet “modernization” of the 
Whitworth's own buildings — low- 
ered false ceilings, lots of plain 
varnished wood — which dates from 
just that time and is carefully 
documented m a photographic dis- 
play. It would be ironic if; just at the 
point when we are pulling down 
tower-blocks and and opening up 
again Edwardian vistas in our muse- 
ums, we should find ourselves torn 
between returning to the original 
proportions and preserving the Six- 
ties decor which has already, perhaps, 
become a pan of the environment, 
worthy of conservation on its own 
account. 

I f we want to see the sort of thing 
that the Sixties dragged us out 
of; Manchester at the moment 
offers a useful point of reference 
in the Make or Break show, 
which began its life at the Royal 
College of Art in London and has now 
arrived (until December 7) at the 
Athenaeum section of the City Art 
Gallery. If 1966 and All That lakes os 
back 20 years. Make or Break takes us 
back 20 years before that, to the 
Britain Can Make It exhibition at the 
Victoria and Albert in 1946. The 
point of that was to signal, if not the 
end of wartime rationing and restric- 
tions — they hong on for some time 


afterwards, really up to the Festival of 
Britain in 1951 — at Least the 
possibility that the quality of life was 
going to improve and that designers 
might at lain be given their heads 
again. 

Though 40 years is a long time, it 
seems longer. Hie main notion of 
Britain Can Make It appears to have 
been that everything was going to go 
back to just where it had been before: 
things that had not been available 
“for the duration” would come back 
again nnchang pH , and people would 
be wearing the same clothes, living in 
the same houses, eating off the same 
china, and using the same domestic 
appliances they had in 1939. No hint 
here of any radical change there might 
be in the balance of society or the 
tastes of individuals, let alone in the 
technology which governed it alL And 
it must be admitted that, despite 
Teddy Boys and skiffle in the Fifties, 
nothing very radical did happen, in 
design at least 

It is fair enough that 1966 and All 
Thai raises the questions it does 
about the whole swinging decade, and 
where exactly it was swinging us to. 
But comparing the contents of the 
two shows does make it very clear 
that in the early Sixties, when we 
finally realized that we had lost the 
Empire and gained the Beatles, 
something happened in Britain and to 
Britain, after which British design. 
British music and British life could 
never expect to be the same again. . 

John Russell Taylor 


ROCK 


! Alice Cooper 
Wembley Arena 


Before the excesses of 
WAS.P, Iron Maiden, The 
Damned, The Tubes, Kiss and 
even The Rocky Horror Show 
there was Alice Cooper, the 
man most singularly respon- 
sible for the catalogue of 
miscreant entertainment that 
has become so pronounced 
since his foH from prom- 
inence. But Cooper has not 
been forgotten, and his malign 
pantomime routines, now 
! seem more than ever an 
apposite representation of fan- 
tasy horror at a time when 
- video nasties and “ sp l at te r ” 

1 movies have become some- 
1 thing of a norm. 

The magnificent stage set 
was a Gothic cross between 
Frankenstein's junkyard and 
the wreck of the Hesperus, and 
Cooper, wielding a variety of 
whips, swords and canes, 
strode like Billy Smart in a 
circus of tenors through a 
litter of disembodied model 
legs and heads, pausing to 
fondle his python during “Be 
My Lover”, engage in a whip- 
ping duel with a leather-dad 


dominatrix during “Go to 
HeD" and impale baby dolls 
on the end of a sword while 
singing “Billion Dollar Ba- 
ines”. Lest this should sound 
alarming, such antics are 
probably best explained as the 
behaviour which once in- 
spired Salvador Dali to make 
a cream-cate sculpture of tire 
singer's brain. ■ 

The music, most of it as old 
as-tbe routines, also had an 
unlikely heavy metal contem- 
poraneity and, although the 
man ringing “I'm Eighteen” 
with such bravado was in feel 
38, the majority ofthoseinthe 
audience p unching the air in 
response were probably not fer 

off that magical age- 

Whiie the notorious guillo- 
tine climax of “I Love the 
Dead” was the highlight for 
most people, my favourite 
moments were the appearance 
of a sweet tufty-haired mon- 
ster during “Teenage Frank- 
enstein” and the unexpected 
pathos of “The Ballad of 
f>vightFiy”when,botmdma 
straightjacket. Cooper sar~ 
plaintivdy “See my lonely li 
unfold". 

Poor Cooper. The papier 
madfe villain has found a new 
generation of trash-rock lovers 
to send him ravmgall the way 
to the bank. 

David Sinclair 


CONCERTS 


LSO/Abbado 

Barbican 


There are few conductors who 
can match Claudio Abbado’s 
sophistication in the tricky 
business of delineating and 
refining Debussy’s textures. 
Perhaps Ibis was not the most 
exciting performance of Ib&ria 
imaginable: the outer sections, 
in fact, were rather sedate and 
too obviously painstaking. 
But hearing how Abbado bal- 
anced these gorgeous sounds, 
coaxing some particularly 
breathtaking fragrances in 
“Les Parfums de Ia nuit”, was 
an education in the subtler 
orchestral aits. And one could 
not wish to hear a riBoer, more 
naturally shaped account of 
ibcPrmtded tapres-midi (tun 
fiatne. 

The London Symphony 
Orchestra’s prehide to De- 
bussy’s early cantata La 
Damoiseile Hue was also 
sensuously wrought, prepar- 
ing the ground admirably for 
those rather drippy images 
that prop up Rossetti’s poem: 
lilies, ripe corn, eternal 
womanhood. To this the 
fresh-toned ladies of the 



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Claadio Abbado: coaxing 

breathtaking fragrances 

London Symphony Chorus 
and the mezzo Claudia Eder 
grafted on a weD-poinied 
narrative. 

The central scene, however, 
is for the blessed damozd 
herself, and here the soprano 
Maria Ewing took us into a 
different emotional league, 
displaying much firm, cul- 
tured tone especially in quiet, 
low-lying passages. She was, 
however, sometimes over-pas- 
sionate where a certain degree 
of limpid resignation is re- 
quired. After all, the lady 
might be waiting at the bar, 
but it is the golden bar of 
Heaven, and the waft could be 
extensive. 

Br ahms sat a trifle nneasOy 
amidst all this Debussy, but 
his Violin Concerto sits with 
perfect ease on Viktoria 
Mullova’s fiddle. To hear this 
work, such an epic challenge 
to technique and tempera- 
ment, played with infallible 
intonation and scrupulous 
fidelity to the composer's 
markings is surely a joy in 
itself These are achievements 
that have been known to elude 
violinists with more vaunted 
“personalities”. 

Richard Morrison 


RPO/Dorati 
Festival Hall 

Brahms was in his heaven on 
Sunday night and all, or so ft 
seemed, was right with the 
world Antal Dorati was back 
with the orchestra of which, at 
80, he is conductor laureate; 
the Royal Philharmonic pla- 
yed trustingly and honestly for 
him; and the audience re- 
sponded with warm and gen- 
erous applause. It was the sort 
of atmosphere one could well 
imagine being generated at 
next Thursday’s concert, in 
which Dorati and the RPO 
turn to a more benevolent 
Brahms. This programme, 
though — the Tragic Overture, 
First Piano Concerto and Fust 
Symphony — announced the 
composer as tragedian; and 
that it foiled to deliver. 

The Piano Concerto was a 
schizophrenic affair. There 
was Dorati, standing at a 
tasteful distance from the 
work’s emotional trauma, 
turning hs rhythmic corners 
firmly and gracefully, feeding 
each burgeoning melody with 
discretion and restraint, and 


keeping the rondo finale on a 
tight rein. And then there was 
Stephen Bishop-Kovaccvich, 
with a performance which 
sounded as if it had just been 
removed from a hurriedly 
packed suitcase, strangely dis- 
passionate, and with a patina 
of aggression to prove there 
was life in the old score yeL 
Just such a performance must 
have caused the work’s first 
critics to condemn it as “a 
symphony with piano obb- 
ligato”. 

The C minor Symphony 
itself won through by Doran's 
judgement of tempo alone. 
One longed for harder light 
and sharper shadow in the 
balance of orchestral parts; 
one waited in vain for melodic 
line to triumph over harmonic 
block in the second move- 
ment The compensation lay 
in the effortless control of 
pulse in the Andante soste- 
nuto. the balm of a third 
movement balanced perfectly 
between speed and grace, ana 
a finale whose ringing allegro 
theme needed only a longer 
perspective to rise from re- 
assurance to affirmation. 

Hilary Finch 


The Lasf 

Soho Poly 

Asa National Ser. iceman. rr.y 
strongest iscmor* of Sasiibc-- 
is of an exercise in whic.i :'n 
city had been blown :c s~.il:. ■ 
ere:ns anc ihe P : ^n c.*d 
become a ruge lire 
Suilwaier Mere. T d .uc!:-: 
from Gillian Ri-.'imcno j 
play, the Army is s.l:N 
its wicked way w;tn nrx. 

The Last 'jJ‘z chronicle; i 
friendship between Arrr : 
wives in ert environment 
where siaole re!ai:or.:.t:ps are 
under consul:: three: fro:? 
posting, promotion ar.d "r- : * 
nancy. Frarn :ne s: s.r.rt j? 
Denise bailing ir.io the 
wed Christine’s iiv> 5 -rco:v. t 
snooping derisively 
her trinkets and ni-dn: c:Tis 
soon as she has esinc:.'d i 
subscription for a wf.es' 
ing, there seems sisal 1 c'-ance 
of ice two making r-tr.is. 
However, the hare-?:::?" 
Denise takes the inscce:.: 
year-old under her wi-ri 

Ten years later, the rtls'.'.-: r.- 
ship has reversed. Now. Caro- 
line is comforting u;e rear:-.’ 
Denise, approaching -0 ar.i 
dreading the prospect of an- 
other posting. As 3 
present, she offers Dsr.;w ? 
day trip to Boulogne, re; 
cancels it on. rec?!"!^ •. r. 
invitation from the color e 1 ’-* 
wife. After 3 !!. her husaard ; 
promotion comes first. e-:r. 


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FESTIY. AL 

I dare say that ncsic fciricric-s 
written in the ne:,t ceunry \ T.l 
talk of Huddersfield's Ccz- 
teraporary Marie Fesr"' 
with some a?je. ii>ery yiir 
sees a lively u" 

composers established z r .d \i~~ 
known, of perfcire>*rr ^ 
and foreign, of s-rcier*?? 1 ; 
young acd old. The 
bond is a boundless ecf-v- 
siasm for a Ifvicg ert 
although no! a:: of the rati z 
may be momentous, there is no 
better place at wticb j ir, 1: 
ont than this friendly r-’C. 
shop. 

Last year the accent --as 
▼eiy much on things 
this year the organisers 
opted for a mere varied pro- 
gramme, though die prbclr:: 
focus is a major resale in* * 
of the music cf Lev,.-* 

The composer bins?;; :~ 
active attendance. SoisTo.-; 
themes, however, icctij-e C .-r- 
marc, Swiss, Kucs&rins 
Soviet music, and crr.onc £ 
groups there is Ifctiedeuk :™ 
the figure who has crcwn tee 
most enthusiastic atteatfrr so 
far is the Soviet composer 
Sofia Gubaidueiaa. wits ti.- 
seven works scheduled :zt it-z 
course of the festival. 

The BBC's Russian Sr.^ss 
hg<! already given ts .1 tsf(: 
her talents, acti to jeeps fr^re 
Detto II (1972). wfcici ’.tie 
excellent West Gennuz con- 
temporary susic greu? as- 
semble Modern played cir-J-ir 
Heinz Holliger's dfreiti"*-". in 
their concert at tee I T.y- 
technic on Sunday eveuir;. 
she can be reckoned I’ar.c: :' i 
the likes of Sclnince z.zd 


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SPECTRUM 



The day the milk turned sour 

Britain’s dairy "" ' r * iJ ”' '"'" “■"* "’ ‘ *' Jm ~~ '* *"'" 



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farmers face massive 
fines from Brussels 
for breaking milk 
quotas. Meanwhile 
backbench MPs 
revolt against plans 
to take land out of 
production. In the second of our series on 
the Common Agricultural Policy we look at 
the varying fortunes of the British farmer 


Part 2: A bitter pill 
for British farmers 


W hen Britain finally* 
joined the EEC in 
1973, farmers could 
hardly believe their 
luck. Instead of tar' 
get prices being set annually by the 
Ministry of Agriculture, under the 
niggardly direction of the Trea- 
sury, they were negotiated at a far 
higher level by ministers from 
nine countries. And because the 
proportion of fanners was much 
higher in the rest of Europe, most 
ministers took a far more benevo- 
lent attitude towards agriculture 
than the British Government. 

For the Republic of Ireland, 
where farming and farm-related 
industries still dominated the 
economy, the effect was even 
more dramatic. Throughout the 
1970s incomes and expectations 
reached undreamt-of levels with 
drastic effects upon the national 
economy, for which the Irish are 
now paying the price. 

Dining this time there were 
siren voices, warning of the dan- 
gers of setting intervention prices 
at levels far above world market 
rates, of declining export markets, 
and of the prospect that surpluses 
would sooner rather than later 
become unmanageable. 

The warnings went unheeded. 
Farm ministers entered into each 
annual round of price fixing 
apparently with a complete dis- 
regard for the feet that agriculture 
was taking an ever-increasing 
share of the Community budget. 

In Britain the Ministry of 
Agriculture was exhorting farmers 
to increase production and entic- 
ing expansion with offers of 
generous grants. The banks, too, 
were happy to lend on the oldest 
collateral of all — the land. 
Meanwhile the butter piountain 
reached lte million tonnes and 
warehouses were bursting at the 
seams with 1 million tonnes of 
skimmed milk powder. Some- 
thing had to go. 

For thousands of British farm- 
ers milk turned sour almost 
overnight At 3am on Saturday, 
Match 31, 1984 ministers agreed 
on a blanket policy which would 
cut total milk output in each 
country back to 1 per cent above 
that produced in 1981. 

There was no time for second 
thoughts. The quota was brought 
into force 48 hours after half- 
asleep ministers had made their 
compromise decision. 

in France, where dairy produc- 
tion plays a comparatively minor 
role in the agricultural commu- 


nity, output had to be reduced by 
only 1.7 per cent In Britain the 
effect was traumatic an immedi- 
ate cutback of 6.5 per cent was 
demanded. 

During the last two yean; the 
shock effects of this have been felt 
in every farming community in 
England and Wales. On the day 
the quota was agreed in Brussels, 
the Milk Marketing Board had 
39,287 members; today the figure 
has dropped to 36.769. The board 
blames the quota system. 

On the face of it, the situation is 
absurd. Dairy farmers have been 
driven out of business or fined for 
producing too' much milk. Yet 
millions of pounds' worth of 
cheese and butter have to be 
imported because Britain does not 
produce enough milk. 

To meet home demand at least 
16.000 million litres (3,520m gal- 
lons) is needed every year, but 
Brussels has decreed that its 12 
member nations' fanners must 
produce only 12,377 million litres 
(2,723m gallons). So French, Ger- 
man. Dutch, Irish and New Zea- 
land butter and cheese are bought 
in to stock supermarket shelves. 

The situation will get worse: by 
April 1988 farmers must cut bade 
to 12,000 million litres and pro- 
posals for an additional 5 per cent 
reduction are under discussion. 

Last year the Milk Marketing 
Board was fined £827,000 by the 
EEC for over-stepping the quota 
limits by 0.4 per cent and they had 
to recoup the money Scorn those of 
its members who flouted the quota 
role, in some cases because finan- 
cial ruin was the bleak alternative. 
A penalty of I3p was imposed on 
every rule-breaking litre. 

There are now just two options 
open to small miry farmers — 
either quit fanning or gamble. To 
the Brussels burgermeisters all that 
matters at the end of each finan- 
cial year is whether member 
countries have stayed within their 
allowed quotas. “The gamble 
taken by farmers is that their over- 
production will be offset by a 
neighbour’s under-production,” a 
board spokesman explained. 

“It is not until the end of the 
milk year on March 31, when we 
add up the total milk yield and 
know whether we are above or 
below the allowed quota, that they 
learn whether they have won or 
Iosl 

“For farmers who have every- 
thing to lose and very little to gam 
it is rather like betting blindfolded 
on a band of cards.” 



Squalls ahead: but Cambridgeshire farmer Oliva- Walston and his dog Mosel are not in serioe 

Riding the subsidy seesaw 




Some farmers have grown rich 
from the Common Agricultural 
Policy. Oliver Walston, son of an 
SDP peer and former Laboar 
minister, took over the manage- 
ment of his father's 3,000 acre 
form in Cambridgeshire IS years 
ago. The turnover is ahont £1 
million and “I honestly don't know 
what the profit is". 

The EEC restrictions, however, 
are starting to bite and be is 
making some modest economies. 
Four mouths ago he sold his 
Porsche and he now drives a 
Volvo. The farm now employs nine 
people compared with 14 eighteen 
months ago. “But don't get me 
wrong. We are art in serious 
tronMe.Touseasafliuganalogy,if 
yon see squalls ahead it is only 
prudent to make adjustments. 

“We as arable farmers enjoyed a 
greater level of prosperity between 
1972 and 1983- than 1 suspect any 
former has ever enjoyed,” he says. 
“It was impossible to lose money. 
Eves bad formers made some 
money, good ones made a lot and 
excellent ones made fortunes.” His 
holidays, taken with his American 
wife, have varied “from Beanjolais 
to Tibet". 

During tbe good years wheat 
yields doubled, he points out The 
reasons were tbe development of 
new varieties, new intensive tech- 
niques “rather like those of a 
market gardener growing lettuce", 
and the availability of chemicals 
“which killed diseases we never 
even knew we had". 

“The only thing that makes me 
angry was that formers were so 
HBgratefal. They continued to 
whmge. Each and every year they 
told a gullible public dud unless 
prices went up formers would go 


bankrupt I suppose in * way it was 
brilliant campaigning.” 

During the boom years Walston 
was able to re-equip the fora 
completely with new and expen- 
sive machinery, some of which he 
admits was qmte unnecessary. He 
cites tbe example of a £2yS00 grant 
for a £25,900 lorry which he would 


Hu case Otastrates foe difficulty 
of devising a fair subsidy system. 
There are more than five million 
formers in Europe. Three mOtion 
are very small, with no income, 
about two millio n are small but 
productive and 110,000 are big, 
24,000 of them in Britain. 


“The intervention system, which 
was meant to be a safety net, has 
tamed foe CAP into a lunatic 
asylum," Walston says. “The floor 
is oow the ceiling. I have sold 
wheat into intervention in pref- 
erence to selling it to my local 
merchant" 

He believes that politicians and 
consumers have finally sen the 
light and realized die folly of 
continuing to pay subsidies to 
produce wheat bailey, sugar and 
oil seed rape for which there is no 
demand. Bed he thinks that form- 
ers will remain a protected species 
because of their influence in foe 
rest of the community. 





He’s got bottle: once Vic Mbarton filled them, now he defiras them 

A curdled career 


Seduced by Common Market 
promises, dairy former Vic Mor- 
ion took oui a bank lean and sank 
his life savings into improving 
milk production. In four months’ ' 
time, instead of collecting his 
retirement pension, he will leave 
home each day at dawn on a milk 
float to deliver. the bottles be can 
no longer afford to fill. 

It is a bitter pill to swallow. 
Morton, a blunt-spoken 
Yoricshireman of 64, stalled life as 
a form boy with modest -am- 
bitions, then cautiously ventured 
into a form business which he 
presumed would keep himself and 
his wife Irene comfortable in their 


PAYING IN AND PAYING OUT: HOW BRITAIN FARES IN THE EEC STAKES 


£ 

BILLION 



Spam and Portugal <Bd not join untt Jan 7 19B6 



DO YOU 
. DESERVE -4 
A MEDAL? 

More to the point, has 
someone you know done 
something tor wild bird and 
countryside conservation? If 
so, the Royal Saciefy for the 
Protection of Birds end Esso 
want to hear about it. 


ana foi 

organisations who hove made an 
outstanding contribution to wild 
bird and countryside conservation 
m the following award categories— 

Individual: tor the person who has 
made the roost sgnificonJ indivKkid con- 
tribution. 

Industry: tor an outstanding com- 
pany, worn force, trade group, trade 

union. 

Media: far an mdhriduaf, publication, 

programme or organisation reporting 
on wild bud and countryside conserva- 
tion issues. 

Europeon: for on i«Ev»Ai<d or 
organisation working in Europe, outside 
the UK. 


in addition o cash award of £2,000 
will be made by Esso to one of the 
recipients of me above awards 
who, judged by Esso, has made the 
most positive contribution to bird 
and countryside conservation. 

Presentations wftl be mode at 
a luncheon in London. Celebrities 
from the world of politic^ industry, 
showbusiness and conservation will 
be there to demonstrate their con- 
cern for our countryside- Wifl You? 

for yaur R5PB Birds and Country- 


Price 0767 80551 ' or write to 

RSPB Binfoand Countryside 
Awards, RSPB, The lodge, 
Sandy, Beds SGI 9 2DL 


RSPB 

! BSOSANOOTUMreYSW I 

AWARDS 




spowowdwehoiahc 


Fears on the hillside 



Aberdeenshire 
beef and sheep 
, former Eric Ste- 
phen has little 
hesitation in 

naming a major 

CAP success 
story. At a time of plummet- 
ing form profits in Scotland — 
75 per cent down last year - 
the CAP has allowed sheep 
fanners to stay on the hills 
with a guaranteed level of 
support, through the sheep 
meat regime. 

This has helped Stephen 
expand his flock to 600 bead 
on his 680-acre mixed unit in 
foe heart of rural Aberdeen- 
shire, but he dreads to think 
what would happen if the 
Commission “pulled tbe 
plug". 

After foe first boom years of 
the CAP in Scotland, the rise 
in interest rates in the Seven- 
ties knocked foe wind out of 
formers like Stephen. Now he 


fears that the variable beef 
premium will be scrapped, 
removing £13 million in sup- 
port from the hard-pressed 
beef producers. High demand 
for good-quality malting bar- 
ley — he grows 250 acres of 
cereals — has helped equalize 
the picture, however. 

Profits have not been high. 
In 1975 the form yielded 
£16,000 on a gross output of 
£65,000. The bulk was re- 
invested and he drew £4,800 
to provide for his wife Nora 
and four children. Last year he 
made the same profit on a 
gross output of £120,454. He 
took £7,000 for himself and 
thinks he is worth more. 

Ten years ago Stephen 
drove a new Mercedes; now he 
drives a 1977 Rover. Like 
other Scottish formers, he 
realizes that the days of full- 
blown production are over. 
What they need now is guid- 
ance from the Government 



CONCISE CROSSWORD NO 1 1 15 


ACROSS 

1 Blistery disease (6) 

5 Subtle point (6) 

8 Dned grass (3) 

9 Upper Elbe region (6) 

18 Line of approach (6) 

11 Eye inflammation (4) 

12 Straw roof worker (8) 
14 Bauhaos founder 

(6,7) 

17 Equity(8) 

19 Curved opening (4) 
21 Tinned (6) 

23 Hang freely (6) 

24 French water (3) 

25 Torpor (6) 

26 Earliest word form 
(61 

DOWN 

2 Precise (5) 

3 Dissenter (9) 

4 Unethical lawyer (7) 

5 Malawi lake (5) 

6 Billiard stick (3) 



7 Farmer liberal Ca- 
nadian PM (7) 

13 Vessel command (9) 
15 Unyielding (7) 


16 Left over (7) 
IS Down dock (5) 
29 VioiinceBo (5) 
22 Dose (3) 


SOLUTION TO NO 1114 

ACROSS: I Square 5 Boil S Ivory 9PkuXtit IlBrabazoa 13 
Wail i5Baredona 18 Reap l9Svengah 22 Balance 23 Betel 24 
Lynx 25 Suture 
DOWN: 2 

10 

21 Onyx 


Bilbo 

After 


: 2 Quota 
I Toll 12 Aura 


3 Any 4 Exploded views 5 Boar 6 Indiana 7 

14 Boon 15Bnmky ltiDrab 17 Silly 20 

23 Bit 


Shoulders 
hunched 
against foe icy 
wind, Welsh 
sheep farmer 
Bill Lloyd 
climbs the 
bleak hillside where his flock 
nose oat tofts of grass ami 
gazes anxiously seaward. His 
future and foot of his sons Jim, 
aged 21, and Bill Junior, 19, 
liriH he decided in Brussels, 
and he cannot hope to in- 
fluence tbe outcome. 

AD BflTs lambs go direct to 
foe abbattoir where be is paid 

a guaranteed price of £2 per 
bin rnidw foe variable guar- 
antee scheme instead of foe 
average £1.50 per kflo at 
which bis lambs are valued at 
market prices. Over foe past 
12 Booths BS1 has received a 
CAP subsidy of £12JW0. The 
abbattoir da has hack its loss 
throagh foe Ministry of 
Agriculture. 

At BflTs local cattle market 
last week rumours were rife 
that foe premium on heifers 
was about to be cut. As a result 
cattle that wwH normally sefl 
for between £350 and £370 
woe auctioned off for just 
£330'. Next mouth foe variable 
premhan ernes up for annual 
review. Any change hi it could 
send B31 into bankruptcy. 

He bought hb 212-acre 
farm near Aberystwyth in 
1974 and added 140 acres in 
1977. Hewas one of foe tacky 
ones whose sheep were not 
affected by the Chernobyl 
disaster, although housewives 
boycotted foe local butchers 
for three weeks. 

He is anxious both to di- 
versify and to regulate a 
income which ebbs and 
between £40,000 and £60,000 
each year, and phamnets to 
about £10,000 after overheads 
have been paid. He res an 
ageing Yoho and hofidays are 
usually a weekend in London 
or foe Lake District with Iris 
wife Lynne. In North Wales 
rich fanners are a myth. 


• Member states' contribu- 
tions to the EEC are fi- 
nanced partly by VAT 
receipts and partly by ex- 
ternal levies and refunds 
from the European Agri- 
cultural Guidance and 
Guarantee Fund. The latter 


Tones reporting 
team: John Young, 
Richard Owen, 
Bill Lockhart, 
fan Smith 


are not payable until inter- 
vention stocks are sold; 
while they remain in s tot- 
age, they are national res- 
ponsibilities. These unsold 
“mountains" explain why 
only Greece and Ireland 
appear to be beneficiaries. 

C tomorrow) 

Why the CAP 
won’t fit . 
the world 


old age. Now he feds betrayed. 

“Tenant formers me relics of 
bygone years,” says Morton, 
shaking off his weflmgtoa boots 
and walking wearily into foe 
kitchen of his farm near Sheffield. 
“An old fanning friend arid me 
two years ago that it was time to 
get out azxl even foe bank manager 
said the same: I didn't fisten and 
my God how wrong I was.” 

Since the Common Market 
introduced a milk quota two and a 
halfyeara ago, Vic has metaphori- 
cally drowned in an ocean of the 
unwanted liquid. His herd of 70 
daily cows produces bet we e n 80 
and 100 gallons every day and 
when Government grants 
. abounded five years ago for farm 
expansion, Vic seized foe opportu- 
nity to build arctirement nest egg. 

With professional guidance he 
compiled a comprehensive five- 
year farm projection which was 
approved. It produced a £15,000 
grant to add to foe £40,000 which 
.came out of Vfcfs savings and a 
bank loan to fund a sophisticated 
milking parlour . 

But three years ago Sheffield 
Council, which owns his land, 
increased the annual rent to 
£4,000; then the savage milk quota 
was introduced, which meant only 
330 gallons — less than half his 
weekly total — was wanted. 

Even after the quota came into 
force, Morton was able to dispose 
ofabout 50 gallons of excess milk 
daily by bottling it and distribut- 
ing it on the mdk round which he 
and Irene have run for two 
decades. But now, like every other 
dairy former who exceeds the 
quota, Morton is fined 13p by the 
Ministry of Agriculture on every 
litre above the allowance. 

Two yean ago Mortem tried 
diversifying into beef production, 
but high feed costs wiped out slim 
profit margins. “Yet again I got 
my fingers burnt," he says wryly. 
“It seems every time I try a new 
venture I get lacked in the teeth. 

“Farming has changed from 
when r was a boy. Now there is no 
place for tenant fanners, it's only 
big businessmen who can make a 
fat living from the* land. There 
must be something wrong when I 
get up at 530 every morning to 
milk my cows and then have to 
spend four hours on a milk round 
to subsidize their existence.” 


Christmas 
showT 


7 


#7 


So don't miss 
the last airmail 
posting dates - 
they start 
December 1st. 


Bn. 


’ <y 

Hi* 






j' 


* 


'&-1 




Your cards and gifts will make Christmas even 

happier for fnendsmd relatives overseas 

posting dates for Christmas start on December 1st] 


*4* *** / 4 wssrjir 

**of/Vte 8- post office. 


up a copy | 


i- - 

















THE TIMES TUESDAY NOVEMBER 25 1986 






15 


FASHION by Suzy Menkes 


6 Not since Norman Parkinson created fairytale pictures of Princess Anne 
in 1971 has a photographer conveyed the magical quality of royalty 5 


T he exhibition at the Na- 
tional Portrait Gallery to 
celebrate the Queen's sixti- 
eth birthday is filled with 
ima g e s, domestic and maj- 
estic, by painters of our time. It also 
includes photographs commissioned 
by the royal family themselves for 
official distribution. 

Artists use licence and imagina- 
tion and are aiming to please 
patrons, from the Fishmonger’s Hail - 
to the Reader's Digest. Their work 
must be judged according to 
aesthetic and artistic standards. 

Photographers are called to the 
Palace to gild the royal image 
although some portraits may be 
more graceful or more technically 
effective, we must assume that the 
the Queen and her family and aD 
their advisors have some general 
aim in view. 


iSSEffiK* ( FASHION EDITOR’S COM MENT ) 

I P4nnnf it aitUai* m 


Z cannot find it either in the 
current exhibition or in recent 
portraits taken of the Princess of 
Wales and the Duchess of York. 

Disparate photographers doff 
their lens caps in the royal 
presence. Apart from Snowdon, 
who is primarily a fine portraitist, 
and Tim Graham, whose tr aining 
was in news reportage, the photog- 
raphers royal are mostly grounded 
in fashion. Sarah Ferguson and 
Prince Andrew deliberately sum- 
moned two fashion photographers, 
Terry Donovan and Albert Wat- 
son, to present them as a regal 
couple. 

Yet something funny happens to 
fashion photographers on the way 
to the Palace. All their training and 
experience in creating a striking 


visual image seems to desert them. 

Not since Norman Parkinson 
created romantic fairytale pictures 
of a surly Princess Anne for her 
twenty-first portraits in 1971 has a 
photographer succeeded in con- 
veying the magical 
quality of royalty. 

This was done in a 
sugary way in the 
1940s by Marcus Ad- 
ams and by Studio 
Lisa, whose portraits 
of the little princesses 
plopped in frills and 
flowers make Lisa 
Sheridan the Crawfie 
of royal photograph- 
ers. Such pictures had 
a particular, definite 



The Qaeen by Beaten, 1956 


purpose: to show a misty-eyed 
vision of family life in a Britain of 
the Blitz. 

The late, great Sir Cecil Beaton, 
whose royal portraits are a mirror 
image of his baroque and whim- 
sical fashion pictures, 
is the only photog- 
rapher to have created 
an image for the 20th- 
century monarchy. 
His pictures of Queen 
Elizabeth in ethereal 
tulle taken for the 
state visit to France in 
1939 established a ro- 
mantic style which the 
Queen Mother has 
carried with her for 
half a century. Both 



the photographs and the dresses 
were inspired by Winterhalter, the 
19th-century court painter who is 
himself the subject of a major 
exhibition at the National Portrait 
Gallery next year. 

hat we have today is a 
series of banal pictures 
taken in the royal back 
yard, punctuated by 
the occasional Snow- 
don portrait designed to give 
historia! depth and gravilas. There 
is a place for candid camera shots 
to humanize royalty. It is charm- 
ing to see the Queen beaming 
broadly at the Duke of York's 
camera or the little Prince William 
on horseback. But these should be 
matched by pictures that set 
monarchy as a race apart, in the 
context of our history and with all 
the accoutrements of majesty. 


The great royal portraits were 
produced in a more confident age. 
Now the photographs, like the 
events themselves, lack the ele- 
ment of theatre necessary to make 
the symbolic side of the monarchy 
impressive for the subjects. 

Our royal family are, to an 
extent, beached in a Europe once 
over-populated with their species. 
The grand clothes and jewels are 
also left as an island of splendour 
from which the rest of society has 
receded. Instead of trying to 
underplay the glamour and the 
glitter, official photographers must 
play it up. As a women's magazine 
so succinctly put it: “Are the royals 
royal enough?" 


of 


Menkes discusses the Royal Image 
1986 at the National Portait GaBery 
at 6.30pm. "Elizabeth II, Portraits 
■ Years runs until March 22. 






Graphic patterned smoky blue, grey and Hack sweater. 

£1 19. Charcoal ami blue check brushed wool troussrs. £79, both 
from Malcolm Levene, 13-15 Chfllem Street, W1 


Knitting up 


new mood 


That indefinable 
look of the English 
gentleman: classic 
elegance and 
understated class 


Muted burgundy, blue and green argyte slip-over, £49.50. Green 
and white cotton shirt, E4Z50. Navy corduroy trousers, £65. Afl 
from Mulberry Company, 11-12 Gees Court, W1. TortoisesheS- 
rimmed spectacles, £34 J5 from DoHond and AftchJson 


. . h«HidkJ patterned sweater, £40. Fine 
st of arms by French Connection 

ipecrinkled^J^Sb^ DWdnsand Jones, 
*n Lewis’s. Manchester 

DAWES 


Ever since Sebastian Flyte 
strolled on to our television 
screens hi Bridnheod Boris* 
tied ’ t men's fashions have 
emphasized the kind of sar- 
torial elegance of which 
Aloysioss Bear weald have 
been prenL The winter's knit- 
wear for men contfawes the 
look for yoang English gentle- 
men comhinrri with a more 
American fed for rfllhg hte 
stripes and Gatsbystyle 
argyfes. 

Young fogeys, stfll hang up 
on Nanay’s plea for warmth 
and practicality, win End rep- 
licas of their pdriic school 
games swe a ters in thick pey 
wool gracing the windows of 
high street meoswear shops. 
They may even fed their 
family coat of arms em- 
blazoned across the front or 
embroidered on to a pocket 
George Pedes of Barrie 
Knitwear in Hawick, Scotland, 
cottoned on to this heraldic 
lode and have transferred a 
design based oa Hawick High 
School Mazer badge on to their 
perennial car ^ g y*- 

This season it comes in cherry 
red and forest green trimmed 
with collegiate stripes for a 
schoolboy preppy look. 

Young fogeys will 
find replicas of 
school sweaters 


Jeremy Hackett has cap- 
fared the yonag fogey market 
by selling the real thing: 
grandfather's cyntip an . com- 
plete with mulligatawny stain 
for authenticity. He has two 
shops in F alham and has just 
taken over m a n age m ent of 
those dtra-refined establish- 
ment outfitters, Cordings of 
Piccadilly. 

Roger Sad of Mulberry wfll 
appeal to a more label con- 
ations country weekender. His 
shop in Gees Conrt, W1 may 
not smell of dd leather and 
mothballs but the fed is my 
much P. G. Wodehonse, hunt- 
shooting and fishing, 
y’s argyte sweaters 
are in ranted shades of autumn 
and ofled fishing sweaters are 
knitted in deep burgundy, 
brown and charcoal grey. 

A wintry idea bra Jaeger is 
a kunbswod scarf gives away 
with every sweater boaght 
from their meoswear depart- 
ments. To qaaiiiy for this 
freebie muffler yon can choose 
from chunky wool sweaters in 
raspberry red or cream to 
heavyweight cable-knit Nordic 
patterned polo-necks. 

The feel is very 
much that of 
P. G. Wodehouse 


Malcolm Levene’s shop in 
Chntern Street, W1 is decid- 
edly more yuppie than fogey. 
Levene describes this season’s 
knitwear, which is mostly 
commissioned from Italy or 
France, as “New Classic”. 
The designs ant based on old 
im itri w g traditions. Fate Isle 
and Ann, bet the colours are 
totally unexpected. Petrol Mne 
and metallic grey blend in 
more with the streamlined 
rails of Malcolm Leveoe’s 
shop, and the lighter-weight 
sweaters and waistcoats fit 
more neatly over tailored boa- 
sere or raider structured jack- 
ets for townies. 

A new shopptag stop for 
men opened in London test 
week. Zy at 59 Soath Molten 
Street promotes the American 
preppy styles tbat go so well 
with a FQofox and exeentive 
swivel chair. For £3195, 
aspiring professionals can 
pick op a sportif V-neck 
cardigan complete with go* 
foster stripes. 


Rebecca Tyrrel 


Softest wool pate green cardigan, ! 

Make-up: Debbie Bum. Hair Jaffa for Pietro Alexandre, 17 North 


i from Browns, 27 South Melton Street, W1 
Street, W1. Photograph by MIKE OWEN 


Spanish 
hat trick 

Is milliner Graham Smith, whose 
clients include the Dnchess of Kent, 
Princesses Alexandra, Margaret and 
Diana, giving away some royal secrets? 
Graham, whose designs for Kangol 
have include the chirpy sailor bat for 
the Princess of Wales, designed to wow 
the Italian navy on her visit to Italy 
with Prince Charles, unveiled his latest 
collection last week It was filled with 
Spanish ole matador hats in striking 
scarlet and black as well as Infanta 
confections in black tulle. 

Diana is confidently expected to pay 
an official visit to Spain next year, as 
guest of the Wales's close friends Joan 
Carlos and Qaeen Sofia, and to boost a 
major British fashion promotion in 
Spain. 


O Also turning heads is Kirsten 
Woodward, star spotted by Karl 
Lagerfeld two years ago and creator of 
Diana's Paddington Bear sou'wester 
for the wedding of the Duke and 
Duchess of York. Kirsten, who studied 
millinery on a four-year course at the 
London College of fashion, has agreed 
to share her secrets with us at Liberty 
next Tuesday for the Times shopping 
evening. Couturier Victor Eddstein 
has also taken up Kirsten Woodward, 
who might reflea that after designing 
cream -p u ff-an d -eclai r hats for Karl's 
famous Patisserie collection, her career 
has been a piece of cake. 

• I hear that British fashion students, 
who have given Jean Paul Gaultier 
some of his best ideas, have pulled off a 
coupe royals. Gaultier will brief students 
with his Ideas for fabric design for this 


r’s Courtage Award scheme. The 
Frisian designer, many of whose ideas 
were inspired by avant-garde student 
fashion, flies into London next week. 

Pats on the back 

Energy minister Peter Walker in pin 
stripes, old school tie and Cb arch's 
brogues, lived op to his title with a 
vibrant and rousing speech to the 
fashion establishment last Tuesday. 
The assembled throng, gathered to- 
gether in the Hilton ballroom for the 
annaal convention of the Bpdsb Cloth- 
ing Industry Association, was predomi- 
nantly male, overwhelmingly bnsmess- 
s nired, and pleased to be patted on the 
back by the government for creating 
jobs In mfWHfactarmg. Breaking the 
sartorial mood was Jean Muir in 
houndstooth check, sitting with Royal 
College of Art rector Jocelyn Stereos 
representing art among the 
industrialists. 


Long and classic 
or oversize and 
fluffy: woollens 
are in tune with 
today’s fashion 


Knitwear is quick to pick up a 
fashion stitch. The new mood 
— gentle, graceful and femi- 
nine — is best expressed in 
knit. The naked nape rises 
swan-like from a boat-neck 
sweater or a V-front cardigan. 
Attenuated woollens flow into 
soft skirts for a look that goes 
from day through to the quiet 
of the evening. 

Romeo Gigli in Italy is the 
author of the fashion feel for 
the long, the grave and the 
plain. His dusty colours, sim- 
ple shapes and flat wools are 
setting a style for classic knits. 
These are in contrast to the 
fluffy sweaters with padded 
shoulders that were Milan's 
earlier contribution to fashion 
knitwear; to cheery oversize 
sweaters in bright knitted 
cotton; to winter woollies 
relying on unusual yams or 
stitchcraft to give surface 
interest 


The most recent 
work is colourful 
and abstract 


Knitwear is for ail seasons 
and aD reasons, with many of 
the styles co-existing in the 
fashionable wardrobe. A 
newly opened exhibition at 
the Crafts Council emphasizes 
the “common art” of knitting, 
bur the garments on display 
also show a continuous thread 
of fashion. 

From the delicately stitched 
green and gold 17th-century 
jacket to the Edwardian 
woolly with its fashionably 
bulbous leg-o’-mutton sleeves, 
knitwear has adapted to the 
mode of the moment. 

The exhibition is designed 
to provoke. Photographs and 
reportage from the past prove 
that knitting was often 
women's work rather than art 
or craft. 

The large modern section 
should inspire Britain’s II 
million hand-knitters. It in- 
cludes tapestries of colour by 
{mining's guru Kafft Fassett, 
bold flowers from Susan 
Duckworth, and Patricia 
Roberts's evocative South Sea 
Island fruits. The most recent 
work is colourful, abstract and 
sometimes experimental, like 
Susie Freeman’s nylon fila- 
ment knitting with sequins 
trapped in tiny pockets. 

Designer knits is also the 
theme of a new book, joining 
the crowded shelves of imagi- 
native pattern books. Designs 
from America's Perry Ellis 
and Joan Vass, as well as knits 
from our own Bill Gibb, are 
included in Exclusively Yours. 
a colourfully illustrated book 
by Frances Kennett, £12.95 
from Grafton Books. 

"Knitting: A Common An"£y 
at the Crafts Council Gallery . 
Waterloo Place. London Wl. 
until January II, and then at 
Shiplev Gallery. Gateshead. 
Yorkshire Museum, York. 


SPECIAL EXHIBITION OF LATEST 
COLLECTION OF JEWELLERY AND 
EXCLUSIVE WATCHES 
From Paris 

18th November — 5th December, 1986 


Van Cleef & Arpels 

LONDON 


153 NEW BOND STREET 
TEL: 01-491 1405 TELEX: 266265 













When the hassle got too much 


m 


THE TIMES 
DIARY 


30 years 
hard 


The saga of hamster Nernone 
Lethbridge and convicted mur- 
derer jimmy O'Connor has taken 
a new turn. The couple, whose 
marriage in the early 1960s cost 
Lethbridge her job, are to go 10 the 
European Court of Human Rights 
in January to try to clear his name. 
O'Connor, who won a last-minute 
reprieve from the gallows in 1942, 
served ten years in jail fora crime 
he says he -did not commit. Now 
67, he has received a letter from 
the Home Office saying that 
although his conviction was 44 
years ago. the file on his case 
covers the period 1941 to 1971 
and under the 30-year rule cannot 
be released until 2001. “1 want the 
Court of Human Rights to force 
the Home Office to release the 
papers now," O'Connor tells me. 
Though the couple divorced in 
1974, Lethbridge — who returned 
to the Bar in 1981 — says she will 
back him all the way. 


Cahoots, mon 


Following in father Patrick’s foot- 
steps, Bernard Jenlan has just 
been adopted asa Tory prospective 
parliamentary candidate. Not 
much hope of making it to 
Westminster after the next elec- 
tion, though: the seat is Glasgow 
Central, a Labour stronghold. 
Why has Jenkin, who sounds as 
English as they come, taken on the 
challenge? U I want to illustrate 
that people is the South-east 
haven’t forgotten about Scotland. 
After alL toe captain of Glasgow 
Rangers is an En g li shman too," 
Jenkin tells me optimistically. 


•Trust Lloyd’s to do it la style. 
For the official opening beano* foe 
organizers bought op the entire 
stock of 1979 Veuve Qiqaot — 
5,600 or so bottles. Appreciative 
guests downed the lot 


Taken off 


It doesn’t pay to offend BA. Paul 
Maurice, aviation correspondent 
of the London radio station LBC, 
wrote a critical piece in this 
month’s issue of Executive Travel 
casting doubt on the airline’s 
ability to sad from privatization 
into profit. He ended with die 
comment that the chairman. Lord 
King, and the chief executive,* 
Colin Marshall, “should call it a 
day after privatization and hand 
over to a new breed of dynamic 
management’’ BA replied by to- 
tally grounding Maurice, dedaring 
him “’beyond die pale", and 
withdrawing all press facilities. 
Nonetheless, Maurice says he 
intends putting the ban to the test 
by turning up at BA's Christmas 
party. 


BARRY FANTON1 



‘But the rumour is they’re stiD 
opening on Saturday mornings’ 


Barclay backlash 


Harry Phibbs tells me that the 
Federation of Conservative Stu- 
dents is to boycott Barclays Bank. 
The reason, of course, is Barclays’ 
withdrawal from South Africa, 
deemed “gutless” by far-right 
Tories. Hasn't the FCS been 
abolished? Not until March. I am 
told — and there are still hopes 
that the Tebbit interdict can be 
lifted. A campaign to save the FCS 
is in the offing, with funds from 
wealthy sympathizers now being 
channelled through the right-wing 
pundits Sir Alfred Sherman. 


Telling 


The Bristol company Signs on 
Wheels, which displays advertise- 
ment hoardings mounted on 7W- 
ton trucks, will be glad that the 
British Gas campaign is finally 
over. When not on hire, the trucks 
bear the company name and the 
slogan “Telephone Martin or 
Sid.” Needless to say, hundreds of 
Bristol wags blocked the telephone 
lines with a message for Sid — so 
much so that the trucks were 
locked away in the garage. Man- 
ager Martin Fawcett offered them 
to Peter Walker, the Energy Sec- 
retary , as pan of the BG campaign 

“but he didn’t want to know." 


On the mark 


I am about to blow the final 
whistle on goalkeepers’ nick- 
names. Only the most unstop- 
pable of your mailshots will lead 
to extra time. I particularly en- 
joyed the appellation of a goalie 
for the Plymouth polytechnic side 
whose surname was Jacobs; his 
team mates called him “Crackers” 


since you have to be mad to play 
in that position; I also liked 
“Teflon" for the man whose hands 
were non-stick, and the now 


defunct soubriquet for the young 
P«er Shilton (England’s Number 
Onek Dracula. for the reason that 
he did not like high crosses. 



PHS 


Barclays Bank’s announcement 
yesterday that it was withdrawing 
from South Africa is the result of 
several factors, including the long 
anti-apartheid campaign against 
Barclays for being such a major 
investor in the apartheid economy 
for so long. 

This campaign has included the 
withdrawal by many students, 
municipalities and charitable 
funds of their accounts from 
Barclays over the past seven years, 
and has undoubtedly constituted 
an important part of what Ameri- 
can corporations call “the hassle 
factor” in dealing with South 
Africa. In terms of this factor, 
when the financial returns from 
South Africa are outweighed by 
the related losses in other areas, 
the hassle isn’t worth it 

Ultimately, however, the basic 
reason for the withdrawal of 
Barclays is that there are today 
some 44 million blade Americans 
whose political leaders have 
adopted the anti-apartheid cause 
for the first time as a priority in 
American domestic politics. In- 
evitably this has been reflected in 
Congress, because there is no seat 
anywhere in the United States that 
is unaffected by the black vote. It 
has also been reflected in cor- 
porate policy, because no major 
American corporation can ignore 
the sensitivities of 44 motion 
black American customers. 

These developments have in 
turn affected American foreign 
policy: witness the quiet crema- 
tion of the “constructive 


Donald Woods explains the significance of 
Barclays 9 withdrawal from South Africa 


engagement” policy and die new 
readiness in Washington to do 
business with the African National 
Congress. 


aware of the pitfalls of such a 
course. 


A further factor encouraging 
this tendency to drop South 
African business involvement is 
the fact that more than two-thirds 
of the world’s people are “black" 


and are increasingly aw 
angry about apartheid. 


Barclays’ decision follows ear- 
lier withdrawals from South Af- 
rica by such American 
corporations as Polaroid, General 
Motors, IBM, Coca-Gala and 
Kodak. It will inevitably cause a 
flutter among the otter British 
companies involved there. 


this affects relationships among 
the Commonwealth countries as 
well as the wider relationships 
among member states of the 
United Nations. 


In short, the United States and 
the EEC can no longer afford to 
affront most of the Third World 
for no worthwhile gain, and as a 
major bank with strong American 
and European relationships 
Barclays would have been foolish 
and unbusinesslike to continue 
swimming against the growing 
tide. 


Withdrawal from South Africa 
will therefore take a lot of pressure 
off Barclays provided that is 
genuine and seen to be genuine. It 
wifi not be seen to be genuine if 
past tending patterns or loan- 
structuring services to South Af- 
rica are continued by Barclays 
under some other dispensation, 
but no doubt the bank's chairman. 
Sir Timothy Bevan, wifi be frilly 


The tegument that involvement 
by foreign concerns in the South 
African economy is for the benefit 
of Mack South Africans has never 
been supported try Mack leaders 
there who are financially am! 
politically independent of the 
government. AQ of the indepen- 
dent mMs movements — the 
African National Congress, the 
Pan-Africanist Congress, the 
United Democratic Front, the 
Blade Consciousness Movement 
and, in Namibia, the South West 
Africa Peoples' Organization — 
have long and consistently op- 
posed such involvement 


In these circumstances it has 
been seen as arrogant of non- 
victims of apartheid, such as white 
South Africans and conservative 
pohticans abroad, to brush Made 
opinion aside and dan n to know 
more about what is in the interest 
of blacks than the Mads do 
themselves. 

It has also been noted that 


South African government repre- 
sentatives and their supporters 
abroad who cfr»*n the blades trill 
be the worst sufferers from dis- 
investment arc not generally 
known to be persons long con- 
cerned with issues of black wel- 
fare. 

As most black South Africans 
see h, according to these of their 
leaders who appear to have most 
support, they are in what appears 
to them virtually a war situation; 
that anyone who helps their 
enemy hamw them, and that those 
most helped by foreign invest- 
ment and participation in the 
South African economy are the 
whites who benefit most in terms 
of dividends and, in the case of the 
South African government, from 
corporate tax revenue. 

When there is dispute about 
who their leaders are. Made South 
Africans are entitled to say that 
until they are allowed to prove this 
openly by voting, the western 
world should assume what it does 
about such countries as Poland — 
that in a society which forbids 
most of its citizens to vote 
democratically, those leaders long- 
est in prison or most persistently 
persecuted must be taken to rep- 
resent the wishes of the majority. 

In Poland’s case that mans 
Lech Walesa; in South Africa, 
Nelson Mandela. And Mandela is 
for more titan di sinv estment He 
is for foil mandatory sanctions. 

© 71— W wp a p w. -m*. 

The author was formerly editor of 
the Daily Despatch, East London. 


GlanviUe Williams on the flaw in plans to video child abuse evidence 


More humanity, Mr Hurd 


The Criminal Justice Bill proposes 
live video links to enable children 
to give evidence in child abuse 
cases without the distress of 
testifying in open court and in the 
presence of the alleged abuser. The 
abuse will frequently have been 
sexual but may be purely physical. 

After the number of cases of 
abuse which have been brought to 
light by the BBC’s Chilawatch 

team — Some «m«itig mental 

lan guish well into adulthood — we 
must give one cheer for that. 
Under the measure, as outlined by 
Douglas Hurd, the Home Sec- 
retary, at the Conservative Party 
conference, the principal courts 
will be equipped with video 
screens to enable all to watch and 
hear the child's evidence. Hurd’s 
cautious proposal will save the 
child from going into the court- 
room but lacks the important 
further advantages that would 
follow from a system of recorded 
evidence for child witnesses. 

The live-link interrogation 
would still mean another grilling 
for the child whose evidence 
would still be elicited in court by a 
lawyer and video-finked to the 
child who is in some other place. 
Questions wifi be asked by a 
prosecuting lawyer on a screen, 
perhaps in his full regalia- a highly 
insensitive way of extracting ev- 
idence from a child, particularly in 
a case of sexual abuse within the 
family. 

Doubtless it is part of the plan 
that defending counsel will be able 
to cross-examine the child from 
counsel’s place in court. A wise 
judge wifi allow counsel to shed 
his robes for the purpose, but 
other objections to formal cross- 
examination by this method will 
remain. The child should be 
questioned by one person seeking 
to arrive at the truth, not by two 
people, one trying to elicit his or 
her story and die other to dispute 
it Moreover, a defendant is 
entitled to conduct his own de- 
fence: will he be entitled to cross- 
examine the child? The idea is 
preposterous. 

The proposed procedure would 
operate only at the trial, which 



Esther Burizcn’s ChDdwxtch 
interviewers have drawn attention 
to the scale of the problem; 
Douglas Hnrd has plans to make 
a child's testimony in court 
less of a trauma. Bat he does not 
go nearly for enough 


may be long after the incident, 
when the child has forgotten some 
of the details. Not only will die 
child's evidence lose some of its 
sharpness through the lapse of 
time, but it is highly undesirable 
that the child should be required 
to remember the incident longer 
than absolutely necessary. 

By the time of the trial the child 


will have been questioned by 
various people, perhaps in a highly 
unsatisfactory way. The rules 
forbidding leading questions in 
court may be nullified by assidu- 
ous leading questions asked before: 
the trial, all of which would be 
revealed in a recorded interview. 

The recorded interview could 
then be made available to the 
defence. In contrast, the live-link 
procedure would not enable the 
defendant to see for himselt 
before the trial, the fiifl force of the 
child's evidence, and so would not 
induce him to admit bis guilt and 
save the trial, as American experi- 
ence shows that video recordings 
do. On the admission being made, 
the prosecutor may be satisfied 
that alternative arrangements will 
justify the charge being dropped. 
Even if it proceeds, the court 
hearing wifi be greatly shortened 
by a plea of guilty, and the 
necessity for much dis tre s sing 
evidence avoided. 

The video recording may enable 
the defendant to investigate and 
perhaps disprove the child’s 
allegations. Professor Arne 
TrankeU, in his book The Reliabil- 
ity of Evidence, described a Swed- 
ish case in which the sensitive 
examination of a boy complainant 
gave the questioner a lead that, 
when followed up, proved that the 
boy’s evidence was mistaken. If 
the details of the child’s evidence 
had come out for the first time in 
court, there would have been little 
opportunity to avoid a mis- 
carriage of justice. 

The proposed procedure would 
not save the child from having to 


repeat the evidence if a new 
defendant was subsequently 
added to tire proceedings, whereas 
the video recording retains its 
value in these circumstances. 

In short, the Home Secre tary’ s 
proposal foils to offer most of tire 
significant advantages of video 
recording. Hurd’s rejection of 
video recording was perhaps due 
to the unfavourable publicity 
given to recent remarks by a judge 
and a banister, but these remans 
may be understood as having been 
directed rather against the way 
particular interviews were con- 
ducted than against the practice of 
video recording itself 

Under a system of video record- 
ing the child’s evidence is taken by 
a properly qualified and specially 
trained person (empha ti cally not 
in a ponce station). This person 
(who should always be a woman 
when tire sexual abuse of girls is 
involved) may be tire doctor 
(perhaps a police surgeon) who 
performs a physical examination 
of the child, or it may be a 
psychiatrist, paediatrician or other 
doctor, or a child psychologist or 
social worker; but the interviewer 
should in any case have consid- 
erable interviewing doll and the 
experience needed to understand 
the mental condition of the child 
complainant She should also 
receive specialist instruction. She 
must, for example, know that 
leading questions have generally 
to be avoided. 

This procedure should be used 
for all evidence by children for or 
against other persons, whether the 
child is the complainant or not 


The defendant (ifhe has then been 
arrested or charged) could be 
enabled to attend with his lawyer 
and to sit behind a one-way 
mirror. The interviewer would be 
wearing a miniature ear-phone, so 
that the defendant’s lawyer could 
suggest s up plementary questions 
that he wished to put to tire child. 
These requests would be included 
in the record for tire court at the 


trial, so that the jury (or mag- 
istrates) would be able to check 
that the interviewer dealt as well 
as could be expected with the 
requests she received 

If the defendant has not been 
arrested at the time of the inter- 
view tire defendant must be 
allowed to request a supple- 
mentary interview with the child, 
at which his questions are put to 
the child by tbe same interviewer, 
the whole being recorded in the 
same way as the first interview. 

The proposal for recording tbe 
child's evidence which I put before 
the Criminal Law Revision 
Committee, unsuccessfully, many 
years ago (before video recording 
was invented), has never gained 
professional acceptance, because 
it would make a considerable 
departure from traditional proce- 
dures. But this is an occasion 
when the lawyers must shake 
themselves free from tradition. 
There is no valid objection to tbe * 
video recording of evidence, and 
everything to be said for it 

The author, a Fellow of Jesus 
College, Cambridge, was formerly 
Professor of English Law at the 
University of Cambridge. 


Tribal rivalry adds to Kabul disarray 


The circumstances and tuning of 
President Babrak Karmal’s sud- 
den departure from office last 
week shed some light ou the 
internal ^problems feeing tbe 
Soviet-banted regime in KabuL 

Karma! effectively lost power in 
May when his younger colleague. 
Dr Najib, took over as secretary- 
general of the ruling PDPA 
(People’s Democratic Party of 
A fgh a ni sta n ). Najib was angered 
by. the series of pro-Karmal 
demonstrations in the capital and 
suspected Karmal of encouraging 
his supporters to voice their 
resentment of the changeover. 

Since May latent rivalry be- 
tween supporters of opposed 
PDPA factions has erupted into 
open confrontation in Kabul, with 
many gunfights and bombings, 
most by tbe Khalq faction of the 
PDPA rather than the Afghan 
resistance. One recent car bomb 
almost killed a Soviet VIP. 

The small Marxist party, 
formed more than 20 years ago, 
divided into two factions, Khalq 
(masses) and Barchan (banner), 
largely because of the rivalry 
between the Pushtun or Pathan- 
based Khalq and the more sophis- 
ticated. wider based Parchaa 
grouping. After tbe 1978 coup that 
overthrew President Daoud tire 
Parchan faction soon lost power to 
its Khalq rivals under President 
Taraqi and Hafiz Ullah Amin . 
The Khalq taction has not for- 
given the Russians for the 1980 
invasion and imposition of the 
Parchan-dominsted regime led by 
Karmal. 


Moscow’s replacement of 
Karmal should come as no sur- 
prise. As a veteran Afghan left- 
wing MP and politician of some 
standing since the 1960s, he had 
served his purpose in lending 
some credibility to the puppet 
regime formed immediately after 
the Soviet invasion. 

But Karmal proved unable to 
achieve major Soviet goals. He 
failed to beal the sharp divisions 
wi thin the ruling party and, after 
almost seven years, had made 
little progress towards winning 
international recognition of tire 
regime or in getting a peace 
settlement satisfactory to Mos- 
cow. 

As for the anti -guerrilla war, the 
Afghan army's performance has 
been so poor that unless morale 
and discipline improve the Kabul 
regime will' remain dependent 
indefinitely on a heavy Soviet 
military involvement at present 
the 115,000, Soviet troops out- 
number Afghan regular forces. 

Dr Najib. former director of 
Khad, the powerful KGB-trained 
Afghan secret police, is a very 
different type from KaimaL He 
has the confidence of the Soviet 
advisers who pull most of the 
strings in KabuL as well as ‘the 
backing of Khad. 

He has proved to be fer more 
energet i c it»w the ailing KaimaL 
flying to many provincial centres 
to rally support, and has tried to 
put new vigour into the task of 
crushing the guerrillas. 

During his work with Khad, Dr 
Nqjib learned a lot about the 



Nafik a tricky balance 

techniques of counter-instngency 
and tbe infiltration of Afghan- 
istan's tribal and rural society. A 
Posbtim from the border province 
of Paktya (feting Pakistan's 
North-West Frontier province), he 
has had some success in winning 
over Pashms (Paihan) tribes on 
both sides of tire frontier. 
Pushtuns form the biggest na- 
tionality or ethnic grouping in 
Afghanistan and have long pro- 
vided the rulert in this land of 
diverse races and languages. 
Above aB, Pushtun tribes control 
the crocial Afghan border region 
with Pakistan. 

Increased tribal co-operation 
and Soviet air surveillance has ■ 
either blocked or made very 
dangerous some of the key bonier 
routes into Afghanistan. It has 
sharply increased lire logistical 
difficulties of tire guerrillas in 


sending in arms and supplies to 
continue fighting. . 

Under Dr Najib there are signs 
of a- distinct shift towards 
emphasizing tire Pushtun nature 
of tire regime. This is seen in its 
propaganda and greater use of the 
Pashto' language in the official 
media. Promotions to senior party 
posts have gone mainly to 
Pushtuns, some of them dose 
allies of Dr Najib, while some 
important figures have lost out 
recently: notably the former de- 
fence minister. General Abdul 
Qader, a Tajik from Herat, who 
roll has stong military links. In 
October he became ambassador to 
Poland. 

These changes may be desfened 
to appeal to alienated members of 
the party’s Khalq taction, as well 
as some Pushtun nationalists; 
both trends arc well represented in 
the Afghan armed forces. 

At tiie same time; this heavy' 
Pushtun emphasis seriously risks 
upsetting tire many non-Pushtvn 
members of the PDPA: Tajiks, 
Uzbeks, Hazaras and others. Al- 
ready feeing strong; opposition 
from the resistance, and with a 
claimed party membership of only 
155,000, tire PDPA can scarcely 
afford further internal divisions, 
but this seems to be the most likely 
result of upsetting the delicate 
balance of ethnic power within tire 
party. 


of America 


Anthony Hyman 


The author’s book. Afghanistan.' 
Under Soviet Domination 1964- 
83, is published by Macmillan. 


New Orleans , . 

“Here they have to bury foe drad 
above pound. It's the wt. The 
ground’s so soaked with tain and 
Mississipi water that if you bury 
them below, the dead literally rise 
again, their coffins bobbing back 
to the surface. Someone pointed 
oat you could bury them below if 
you made holes in the coffins, but 
it never caught on. The relatives 
didn't take to tbe idea.” Tfctere are 
ap par ently conventions in decay. 

Should you, after the recent 
elections, pompously ask Ameri- 
cans what their main concerns 
currently are, they wifl do their 
best to imitate a newspaper and 
talk of the failing public schools 
and functional illiteracy, the de- 
population of the Midwest, of 
drugs, uncontrolled Hispanic im- 
migration and the Middie East. 
But there is another way - and a 
very easy one — to get an idea of 
real American concerns. In a 
country where many people talk 
very loudly and dearly to one 
another m public you simply, 
eavesdrop: there is no need even 
to stretch or lean. 

There's much talk of tire 
weather but it is different weather 
talk with a generous sprinkling of 
fpfhwifai -terms about highs and 
basins and fronts. It’s more dra- 
matic — the wettest since dot and 
at incredible miles an hour and is 
vividly illustrated — that's how I 
heard the coffin tale. 

But private matters are also 
available and at the same volume. 
The man at Memphis airport, 
delayed because of the biggest 
storm since dot ignored it en- 
tirely. He was warned about bis 
relationship. His wife refused to 
have a home help to dean the 
house; she needed one but always 
said no; why, she wouldn’t even- 
have one in once or twice to try iL 
This indicated she wasn’t relating 
to him so he had gone to a seminar 
on relating and come back burst- 
ing with new ideas. She wouldn’t 
discuss them. Just read the Sun- 
day paper. 

He had even brought back some 
tapes from the seminar on relating 
to play on the car stereo when they 
were driving to Nashville but she 
wouldn't let him put them on. Sire 
didn't seem interested in deep- 
ening thrir relationship. He was 
faurnng badly and so, he thought 
was Susie. He wondered if his 
business colleague, to . whom he 
was relating this saga, would care 
to accompany him to the next 
seminar. He would be glad to. 

Urey both should have taken up 
marathoning. The man m tire 
airport shuttle at New Orleans did 
20 miles every Sunday and after 
the first three hoars did he feel 


A.N. Author 


Knife twist with 


a difference 


I want to tell you today about my 
enemy, GR- Ittick. who over the 
years has delighted in doing to me 
and my work what 1 am now about 
to do to him. I have thought long 
and hard about the merits of 
dignifying- him through the means 
of public abuse. I have debated the 
matter with my best friend. AN. 
Other-Author, who counselled me 
against such a course, but I have 
ignored his advice. 

GR. Ittick first came into my 
life when he delivered 854 words 
(I counted them all out and' I 
counted them all back) of sus- 
tained damnation on my first 
novel. The Soul of Mrs Saxby \ a 
“torrid chronicle of amorous fan- 
tasy in the suburbia of the late 
1970s” (Sucker and Windbag, 
£5.95 - remaindered copies still 
available from AN. Author for 
the price of a pint) in one of the 
“quality” dailies: 

Other-Author’s argument was 
that in the very act of deprecating 
a critic, you do obeisance to his 
influence. I take the point, but you 
see. this man Ittick is such an out 
and out swine that these niceties 
become academic. 


I happen to know that Ittick 
himself had attempted a novel 
along similar lines; this much -I 
gathered from one of his many, 
disaffected girl friends, who prom- 
ised that roe would filch, the 
manuscript for me. from the 
bottom drawer of his desk, where 
it presumably still languishes like 
a completely un viable wb ale. It is 
one of the peat chagrins of my life 
that she has not jet delivered. 

in punishing me for my admi t, 
tedly modest initiative Ittick was 
at the same time atoning for his 
own frustrations, and for this! will 
never forgive him. I have his 
review in front of me now, which 
is 'suitably yellow with age: 
“Author's portrayal of middle-age 
desire beats the stamp of one for 
whom all positive impulses have 
been subsumed by cynicism.'’ He 
should know. 

The greatest irony of. all this is 
that I should now be writing about ■ 
a man whose failure as an author 
was tile single tiling most respon- 
sible for his power over foeiikes of 
me. One of the reasons for which 1 
ignored Other-Author’s advice 
was that everyone in the business 
seemed to be so aflected by Ittick’s . 
judgements. He had merely to 
touch his forelock in tbe direction 
of an embryonic Amis and the 
young man’s reputation was 
made; he had but to dismiss the 
meanderiogs of a late Kingsley 
and the old man's standing lay in 
shards. 

One result of this has been to 


engender a really terrible duplicity 
in. Other-Author: if he receives a 


about it mightily; ifhe gets a bad 
one, he dismisses it as the 
ramblings of an inconsequential 
and vindicative hack. I think it is 
quite wrong for Other-Author to 
have it both ways. 

But that is not tbe point. I 
wanted to describe GR. Ittick to 
you, with a view to causing him 
pain, and I shall now do so. He has 
the nearest condition that a man 
can acquire to pregnancy, which 
has been brought about by a lavish 
expense account He has to pull 
his shoulders back as a counter- 
weight to the burgeoning belly, 
and hold his feet at an angle often- 
to-two in order to make the whole 
assembly roadworthy. 

Tbe other thing about him is 
that he is the most dreadful 
scrounger. I believe that he regards 
life as a train in which he enjoys 
the prerogative of the first-class 
compartment The diesis runs as 
follows: I (Ittick) represent the 
licensed sampler of excellence in 
ail its forms. Accordingly, I shall 
travel first-class to every literary 
junket however distant, that in- 
vites me: above all, I wfli turn out 
of an evening to ingest critically 
tbe latest servings of the Roux 
Brothers; but all this 1 wiU do in 
order to service the trickle-down 
theory, which dictates that the 
quality of goods enjoyed by the 
rank and file depends on the 
quality of those at the top end of 
the market — in the same way that 
the family saloon is affected in due 
course by the development of die 
Formula One raring car. the onlv 
constant principle is this: if lux- 
ury, or hedonism, or any of their 
related gifts, are on offer, I 
demand the right of first refusal. 

The other day I put this theory 
to a fellow-sufferer at GR. Buck's 
hands. His first reaction, like' that 
of Other-Author, was to wonder 
why on earth I was spending all 
this breath on tbe denunciation of 
someone who was unworthy of 
- such attention. I then expatiated 
on the theory of the train-as-tife, 
ris-d-visGR. Ittick. and my friend 
replied, as quickly as you please: 
“Maybe, ANT., but he didn't have 
to take the entire Goach. did he?” 

1 suppose that a creature such as 
Ittick never really 'deserved the 
space which I have accorded him 
here, until i think of the number of 
words that he has spent on me. 

I await with interest ;Olher- 
Aul hort; reactions to wharf have 
juft written. I suspect he will be ■ 
foil of magnanimity towards GR. 
Ittick and his dubious functions, 
mid very ready to attribute the 
basesi of motives to me. However, 
once Other-Author's next novel 
comes out (if ever it does) and 
Ittick gets bis hands on it. 1 expect 
all ihats will change. - 


good notice from Ittick. he preens Miles Kington is in Burma. , ,. 


'K\» c 


1 A 


good. No. ho didn't actually s* 1 - a 
high but be did tael gcod. 


high but be did foe 1 gcod. 
Marathoning was one of die four 
bases of a healthy life, the others 
being dean air. uncoaiantiDafed 
nutrients and frost in God. He was 
in town for tbe ophthalmology 
co nfe re nc e. There were, someone 
else said, 18,000 ophthalmologists 
- loose. There , certainly were a lot 
and you could watch as well as 
hear them: in St Louis cathedral 
listening » die archbishop 
explaining what the faithful 
should shout at the Pope on his 
visit next year (“Long five foe 
Pcpe'l; in foe souvenir shops 
buying aprons emblazoned “Cre- 
ole food — hot peppers make hot 
to vers”; is sober blazers, red ties 
and Mack trousers gazing in at the 
jazz bars on Bourbon Street their 
long vented bottoms twitching 
restraraedly to foe beat 

Pairs of senior ophthalmologists 
who had managed to swing free 
trips for thrir wives, foe ladies 
squeezed into shorts and ati four 
trying to maintain conversation 
and p ro gress post tap dancing 
. Made boys and a lady touting for 
restaurant customers in a vast but 
ele gant ann otate, ^ from the beta of 
which protruded equally vast but 
very duty jrumifig shoes. 

■ - One knew they were 
ophthalmologists because they 
hdjtiuny kept on their badges, 
each with name and conference 
designation. Some, it is true, were 
not foil ophihahnotogisis. One 
complaining about the spicy Ca- 
jun food in a restaurant was 
labelled not “doctor” but “health 
professional”. Boy, that shrimp 
was so spicy she couldn’t finish it 
Bat she was gad she had chosen it 
and not the crayfish. At least she 
could- have eaten it if it hadn’t 
been so Qticy but goodness knows 
how yon eat a crayfish in its shelL 
“Could I have another Diet Coke 
with my shrimp?” 

Are you booed with the health 
profcssmnaTs c o ncern to eat at 
exotic restaurants without actually 
eating anything exotic, the deep- 
ening of relationships to fit the 
designs of cassette counsellors and 
the running obsessions of aging 
ophthalmologists? Then turn your 
chair a tittle: the lady at the next 
table is describing her operation. 
Tfo back and there is a 2tLmmuie 
saga about career trajectories and 
divorce with full personal details, 
and someone, unseen, has just 
bought his 47th home in 20 years. 
His wife says if he moves again, to 
send a forwarding address — she'll 
' leave him. Why anyone should 
need to ask what America is 
thinking, I wouldn't know. ■ 

The author is Director of the Social 
Affairs Unit. 


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THE TIMES TUESDAY NOVEMBER 25 1986 


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1 Pennington Street, London El 9XN Telephone: 01-481 4100 


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“The Eagle Has Landed” was 
the somewhat unfortunate 
logo of a recent Barclays Rant- 
advertising campaign in South 
Africa. It is safe to assume that 
in Johannesburg yesterday Sir 
Timothy Sevan's decision to 
sell off British interests in the 
bank at a bargain basement 
price to South Africa’s giant 
Anglo- American Corporation 
was dismissed as “the rhirfr «i 
has run”. 

South Africans have become 

innured to the growing ten- 
dcncy of American-led multi- 
nationals to depart in response 
to a combination of inter- 
national hostility and Sooth 
African recession. But Band- 
ays is in a different category to 
General Motors, IBM and 
Eastman Kodak. 

As the biggest bank, and one 
of the oldest, in South Africa, 
it has played a long and vital 
role in the country's economic 
development. Even today it 
remains the largest financier of 
South African agriculture. But 
the shock goes deeper than 
that There was always a sense 
in Johannesburg that British 
businesses, because of their 
greater understanding of the 
country through political and 
financial ties stxetdiing back to 
colonial times, would be 
among the last to quit the 
South Afiica. 

That illusion has been shat- 
tered not by a sudden onset of 
virtue in the City, but because 
of the international character 
of banking today. Barclays is 
deeply involved in the - 
competitive world of Ameri- 


can fi n an ce where its South 
African ties have not been 
helpful Third World pressure, 
too, meant that it paid for its 
South African presence with 
the loss ofkrge and si gnificant 
intematicraaMoaiu. It is a price 
which the bank was no longer 
prepared to pay. So Barclays, 
Hire its American counterparts, 
has turned an ^^Anomic neces- 
sity into a political virtue. 

Just how virtuous it should 
feel, however, is open to 
question. True, it is withdraw- 
ing its funds at the derisory 
financial rand rate while sac- 
rificing dividends at the much 
higher commercial rand. It is 
equally true that the financial 
assistance given by other 
divesting mul tinationals to en- 
able South African manage- 
ment to purchase their comp- 
anies has meant the short-term 
inflow of foreign capital And 
the purchase of assets at 
bargain basement prices will 
mean invisible savings for the 
South African economy. 

But the inflow of capital will 
be short-lived. As a developing 
country, South Africa needs 
access to foreign capital in the 
long term if it is to grow at the 
rate essential to employ, house 
and feed its growing w»dr 
population and to introduce 
greater economic equity 
through both the marketplace 
and government welfare. 

If these are . losses over the 
longterm, however, it will take 
only a short while before hlacfc 
employees in formerly multi- 
national companies begin to 
fed the loss of agresrive 


TO FIGHT ANOTHER DAY? 


• • •• • 




■ - 


■ "t*’ 


President Corazon Aquino’s 
action in dissolving her cabi- 
net and dismissing her defence 
minister is being hailed as a 
turning point in her admin- 
istration. The myth is abroad 
that she has passed her first 
and greatest test and is now 
virtually unassailable. Little 
could be further from the 
truth. 

Mrs Aquino has, it is true, 
shown political strength of an 
order which has been lacking 
in her government in recent 
months. She has also shown an 
instinct for personal snrvrvaL 
But she had earlier allowed an 
atmosphere of uncertainty to 
develop marked by rumours of 
coups and counter-coups. 

Before the weekend, ele- 
ments in the army had become 
restless as President Aquino 
persisted in her attempts to 
talk to the communist and 
Muslim insurgents. The mur- 
der and mutilation of a senior 
trade union leader brought 
left-wing sympathizers on to 
the streets in force. The killing 
of a respected Muslim leader 
threatened increased violence 
on the southern island of 
Mindanao. And the kidnap- 
ping of a Japanese business- 
man posed a threat to 
potential foreign investment 

Domestic and foreign con- 
fidence in the Aquino 
government’s ability to pre- 
serve law and order, let alone 
pursue policies that would 
foster stability and future 
prosperity, was being under- 
mined. There was need for 
strength. Whether in showing 


that strength at the weekend, 
President Aquino was leading 
events, or merely reacting to 
them, however, is open to 
question. 

In removing her Defence 
Minister and chief rival , for 
power, Juan Ponce Enrile, she 
has conceded that the consen- 
sus which brought her to 
power is beginning to break 
down. She may have elimi- 
nated a host of potential 
problems. Mr Enrile’s hand 
was seen behind many of the 
adverse developments of re- 
cent weeks. But she may also 
have stored up difficulties for 
thefoture. Mr Enrile now owes 
no allegiance at all to the 
Aquino government He may 
prove more dangerous outside 
the government than within it 

.President Aquino still has 
much running in favour of her 
administration. The tide of 
popular goodwill on which she 
rode to power has not abated. 
That much was apparent from 
the reception she was given 
when she announced her move 
against Mr Enrile. The Catho- 
lic Church, a powerful in- 
fluence in the Phifippines, is 
still on her side — though less 
unqnestioningly perhaps than 
before — and she has ju- 
diciously cultivated it 

Most important, she contin- 
ues, to command the sympathy 
of most of the aimed forces. 
They had a dear choice at the 
weekend between Defence 
Minister Enrile and President 
Aquino. General Ramos, the 
Chief of Staff came down on 


«S* 




, ■ 


\ 


Prison policy operates within 
severe restraints. At a time 
when crime rates and the 
prison population are rising, 
resources are limited by many 
other claims on public money 
which are a great deal more 
attractive and certainly have 
more weight with most citi- 
zens. To place spending on 
prisons above spending on the 
classroom or the hospital ward 
is, understandably, not most 
people’s instinctive reaction. 

But as a result, we now have 
overcrowding in antiquated 
prisons which operate on stan- 
dards well below what most 

*** '+%*. people would regard as reason- 

ably humane. This is closely 
linked with an unresolved 
argument about what the ob- 
ject of prisons should be, and 
how it should be achieved. 

In the 1960s and 1970s 
there was a fashionable Denef 
that foe major part of the 
function of prisons was the 
treatment of offenders with a 
view to curing them of their 
propensity to crime. The 
prison service was seen as in 
some way comparable to a 
medical procedure by jvmcn 
prisoners could be enabled re 
lead a useful life when they 
returned to society. Tftatfesn- 
ion has now waned ana re- 
formed opinion has recreas- 
ingty tended to he that 
whatever is provided in pnson 
(as distinct from the feet o 
? ' — 'xramenl) makes little 
:nce. 


PRISONS AND POLITICS 


the side of Mrs Aquino and 
effectively kept her in power. . 

The price for this support 
remains to be seen. If it 
includes, as it appears to, a 
pledge by the President to 
break off talks with the com- 
munists unless they produce 
results, foe army’s misgivings 
about compromising with the 
insurgents will have been par- 
tially answered. The attraction 
of Mr Enrile’s position will be 
diminished, and bored soldiers 
whose attention might other- 
wise be diverted into politics 
will be dispatched once more 
on counter-insurgency mis- 
sions. 

Abroad, the Aquino 
government’s fortunes are still 
mixed. In granting additional 
aid to the Philippines, the 
United States has expressed its 
confidence in the new govern- 
ment. It has also given politi- 
cal support to Mis Aquino in 
carefully timed disclosures 
about Mr Enrile’s financial 
dealings. But Mrs Aquino’s 
recent visit to Japan yielded 
little financial assis tanc e and 
little political assurance. The 
most important economic 
power in foe region seemed to 
be unwilling — as yet — to in- 
vest too heavily in a govern- 
ment still feeling its way. 

The removal of Mr Enrile 
means that President Aquino . 
has one less obstacle to pursu- 
ing the policies on which she 
came to power and one less 
excuse for departing from 
them. The future of the Phil- 
ippines is now, more than 
eyer, her responsibility. 



iior$ 

i n 1 - 


I 




.. 41 




To the extent that this is 
true, it leaves a kind of moral 
vacuum, which is dispiriting to 
prison officers who wish to be 
more than operators of the 
mechanics of keeping people 
locked up. It is comparatively 
easy to manage a regime for 
long-term serious offenders. 
But it is much harder in 
overcrowded local prisons 
with medium and short-stay 
prisoners, some of whom are 
only there for a matter of 
weeks, to cater for the wide 
variety of offenders, with, for 
instance, training. 

Attention has been focussed 
on all these matters in a report 
by Mr Ian Dunbar, director of 
the Prison Department’s 
South-West region, which 
emphasises the need to define 
its functions and tasks. “If 
rehabilitation is one major aim 
of the prison system, then the 
functions of the prison service 
must be defined to make it 
abundantly dear how to pat 
rehabilitation into practice ... 
Similarly, if punishment is 
another major aim of the 
prison system, then definition 
of foe Amotions must include 
practical directives as to how 
best this is to be achieved, 
making it dear that the con-, 
ditions of incarceration are not 
intended as a means of fulfill” 
ing foe aim of punishment.” 

Overcrowding and bad con- 
ditions have deariy contrib- 
uted to the increase of riots in 
prisons and .foe refusal of - 


prisoners to accept pnson 
discipline. Yet too many peo- 
ple who are rightly concerned 
to ensure prison discipline are 
prone to speak as if they were 
indifferent to the conditions 
which undermine it Similarly, 
advocacy of reform too often 
carries overtones of reluctance 
to accept the deterrent and 
punitive purpose of prison. 
Answers to overcrowding 
must indude seeking a much 
greater clarity about who 
should be sent to prison, what 
for, and for how long. 

A much dearer sense of 
objectives and moral values in 
the prison service, with a 
practical code of standards to 
implement it, is essential if 
imprisonment is not to be 
counter-productive. Unfortu- 
nately, government thinking 
seems restricted to trying to 
make thing s as they are work 
better. This latest report, one 
in a line of many, invites them 
to go back to basics. There is 
little sign that they will do so. 

The Home Office reaction is 
that Mr Dunlop’s is a personal 
report (true enough) to be fed 
into the policy - making ma- 
chine for due consideration, 
-which, alas, is probably all it 
will get But for this the 
machine is not good enough, 
like all important questions, it 
is a political matter and min- 
isters would be wise to bring 
their political zhinkisg to bear 
on it 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Awacs merits in airborne warning 


promotion schemes, fair 
employment codes and even- 
tual jobs. South African 
management, relieved of the 
need to follow expensive social 
responsibility programmes, 
win now be likely to trim staff 
and wages in search of high 
productivity and profits. 

Barclays has Jong been one 
of the better employers in 
South Africa, actively training 
and promoting black workers 
to senior positions. It has also 
taken substantial profits out of 
the country. If its fair employ- 
ment practices are not to be 
seen with hindsight as hypo- 
critical conscience money paid 
to soothe world opinion, it 
could acquire a little real 
virtue by plowing back some 
of those profits into aweietiwg 
the Made workers who will be 
hurt by its departure. 

Taking a leaf from the bode 
of those multinationals which 
have elected to remain, it 
could do worse than establish a 
trust fund to be used in the 
critically important areas of 
non-segregated housing, 
teacher training, private non- 
segregated schools and blade 
advancement in the wrinrmai 
business sector. 

It was probably inevitable 
that the bank's international 
exposure and vulnerability to 
pressure would compel it, in 
the interests of its sharehold- 
ers, to cut its South African ties 
eventually. But if the Barclays 
eagle has flown, a true concern 
for the interests ofblack South 
Africans requires that it leaves 
something more behind than a 
barren nest 


From Mr Ben P. Pamptin 
Sir, The key point Sir Woodrow 
Wyatt missed in his article, “Why 
it most be Nimrod” (November 
15), is that an airborne early 
warning (AEW) system should 
provide the earliest possible warn- 
ing of attack. The E-3 Awacs 
(airborne warning and control 
system) flies higher, stays longer 
and looks further than any other 
airborne warning system. The 
resulting extra 10 minutes of 
warning is absolutely critical in air 
defence: 

The key to this capability is the 
aircraft’s powerful and accurate 
Westinghouse radar, with its large 
antenna and ability to see targets 
dearly at very long range and to 
discriminate between targets and 
dutter. 

Boeing’s 707 airframe was cho- 
sen so the radar and operating 
system design need not be com- 
promised by airframe size and 
weight limitations unlike compet- 
ing AEW systems. Continued 
performance improvements can 
be easily accommodated by the 
707. 

GECs interest in the Lockheed 
Hercules for export sales is noted.' 
But use of the Hercules airframe 
would entail very large further 
potent costs ana the pros- 
pect of viable export business on 
this basis most be very remote. 

By contrast, Boeing’s 130 per 
cent offset commitment to the 
British Government would be a 
contractual requirement to place 
high technology work throughout 


a broad spectrum of British in- 
dustry. Boeing and Westinghouse 
have demonstrated their capabil- 
ity consistently to meet and often 
exceed their onset commitments. 

Through the offset programme 
British industry will be given die 
most competitive and favoured 
entree ever into the US defence 
and high-technology markets. 
Boeing will share with its British 
associates further export opportu- 
nities for the Awacs, some of 
which are already well advanced, 
with three other governments 
currently discussing the purchase 
of Awacs. 

Rather than selling Britain’s 
birthright, as Sir Woodrow Wyatt 
suggests, the proposed new Anglo- 
American techni cal partnership 
will give a powerful stimulus to 
Britain’s technological base. The 
Plessey/Westinghouse relation- 
ship, for example, is likely to set 
new standards in world radar 
technology. 

A similar pattern will be re- 
peated with many UK manufac- 
turers throughout the country. 
This will soonbe reaffirmed by the 
thousands of new jobs created by 
the offset progr am me should the 
Government choose the E-3 
Awacs with its proven perfor- 
mance and reliability. 

Yours faithfully, 

BEN P. PAMPLEN, 
Vice-President, London, 
Westinghouse Defense 
International, 

26 St James's Square, SW1. 
November 21. 


Role of warships 

From Mr Hugh Hanning 
Sr, Today's excellent letters by 
Lord Hill -Norton and Mr P. J. 
Freeman (November 18) stand 
well together. With luck, we could 
be on the brink of an overdue 
debate about not only the best 
kind of ships few the Royal Navy 
butalso precisely what the Navy is 
for in the 1990s. 

That debate surely belongs to 
the Foreign Office; but its defence 
department is too busy with arms 
sales and related matters to dis- 
cuss strategy. ’These ambassadors 
expect a frigate over every bloody 
horizon”, one head of the Ministry 
of Defence complained to me. He 
meant that they give the Armed 
Forces 10 minutes notice in a 
crisis instead of 20 years. 

My own belief is that in an era of 
ist-West miscalculation outside 
Europe, there is a global role for 
Royal Naval ships in dispelling 
that miscalculation wherever it 
may arise. The Endurance showed 


m the Fahdands that one warship 
can make the difference between 
-war and peace, and h could 
happen almost anywhere. For this 
political role the traditional blue- 
water escort is not particularly 
suited, but the shortest vessel 
could be, especially if it is cheaper. 

It may be that onto the North 
Atlantic makes sense for the 1 
Navy; but it is surely a terril 
waste of an opportunity to con- 
duct this expert controversy with- 
out identifying a peacetime as well 
as a wartime strategy into which to 
fit h. 

Some in the Ministry of De- 
fence Marne the Navy for this lack 
of dear thinking . 1 personally 
don’t, because defence should be; 
the servant of foreign policy. But 
can we just have some agreement* 
on whose job it is? 

Yours etc, 

HUGH HANNING, 

18 Montpelier Row, 

Blackbeaih, SE3. 

November 18. 


Reactor safely 

From the Managing Director of 
the Central Electricity Generating 
Board 

Sir, In the light of your report 
tvember 19) that the Select 
aunittee on Energy is to inquire 
into allegations, made in The 
Times of November 6, about the 
safety and costs of the Magnox 
nuclear power stations, your read- 
ers should know that work is now 
well in hand on developing equip- 
ment and procedures to remove 
and replace the two standpipes 
seted by corrosion in Reactor 
No 1 at Hinldey Point A, should 
that prove necessary. 

In a statement published on 
June 13 last the Central Electricity 
Generating Board said it had the 
agreement of the Nuclear Installa- 
tions Inspectorate to continue 
operating the reactor, provided 
the two standpipes were inspected 
again before the end of the year. 


That inspection is now in 
progress. 

As regards Reactor No 2, an 
inspection of all the standpipes 
during its statutory two-yearly 
overhaul, completed in October, 
showed that only one had very 
slight distortion, not sufficient to 
affect its operation and probably 
not related to corrosion. 

Since this corrosion problem 
affects only two standpipes out of 
some 450 at Hinkley Point A, and 
our other seven Magnox stations 
are unaffected, the real situation is 
a very far cry indeed from the 
alarming picture you portrayed in 
your lead stray about a threatened 
shutdown of all the Magnox 
stations. 

Yours faithfully, 

JOHN BAKER, Managing Director, 
Oaitral Electricity Generating Board, 
Sudbury House, 

15 Newgate Street, ECJ. 

November 24. 


Fight against Aids 

From DrR. P. Break 
Sir, The model counselling and 
screening service suggested by Mrs 
Ramb us (November 17) has been 
nmning in Edinburgh fra the last 
12 months. Whilst the majority of 
patients attending have been con- 
cerned wifo drag abuse, at least 20 
per cent are not and have obvi- 
ously chosen to attend such a 
dime. 

One of the original aims of this 
clinic was to divert individuals 
away from the Mood transfusion 
service. Edinburgh also ha* a 
separate genito-urinary medicine 
dune which provides a full range 
of services together with a 
co unselling and screening clinic 
for the Aids virus. 


Both services are being utilised 
and there is obviously a place for 
both such services in most large 
dties, especially if there is any 
degree ora drug-abuse problem. 

Whilst the urgency for establish- 
ing such a clinic in Edinburgh was 
the problem amongst drug abusers 
I would urge other centres to 
consider setting up similar dirties 
before the virus becomes a prob- 
lem in thdr drug abusers since this 
is an important educational mea- 
sure for “at-risk” individuals. 
Yours fa ithfull y, 

R.P.BRETTLE, 

City Counselling and Screening 
Clinic, 

City Hospital, 

Gneenbank Drive, 

Edinburgh. 

November 18. 


Records on tape 

From Mr R. /. M. Paring 
Sir, Mr Patrick Isherwood 
(November 17) has done us all a 
service in pointing out the risk 
that Bernard Levin’s latest book 
(7n These Times, by the way, not 
In These Days) may be subject to 
illicit photocopying. Surety the 
logical way to prevent Mr Levin 
and other owners of copyright 
from suffering the deprivations 
brought about by such piracy is to 
impose a levy on the sale of an 
aper, to be paid over to foe 

exaefy of Authors. 

WhDe we are about it, should we 
not also have a levy cm all tods 
and implement s winch might be 
used in housebreaking, to be paid 
to the insurance companies? 
Yours etc, 

R. J. M. PERRING, 

27 Park Drive, 

Iagatestone, Essex. 

November 17. 

From the General Secretary of the 
British Evangelical Council 
Sir,! have no doubt that the music 
industry is losing- revenue by 
illegal copying of recording tapes 
as other correspondents have in- 
dicated in response to Mr Bernard 
Levin (November. 10). 

No one, however, has drawn 
attention to the extensive use of 
these cassettes by churches for 
recording Sunday services. They 
are then listened to at home or 


used as a teaching medium for the 
Christian faith in house groups. 

_As presently envisaged churches 
would be required to pay the levy 
on blank tapes and then reclaim it 
on proof of innocent use. They 
will be lending their money to the 
levy agency until such time as they 
.deem fit to return ft, with any 
interest presumably £oing to the 
music industry. But if designated 
organisations like churches can be 
authorised to reclaim the levy, 
surely they can be authorised not 
to pay it in the first place: 

Or perhaps the levy agency is 
p lann ing to include preachers like 
me alongside Andrew Lloyd 
Webber and Madonna as those 
who will benefit from foe money 
raised? 

Yours hopefully, 

ALAN F. GIBSON, 

General Secretary. 

British Evangelical Council, 
lHYicicm Street, 

St Albans, Hertfordshire. 

From Mr Jim McCue 
Sr, David Best (November 15) is 
right to complain of foe quality of 
pre-recorded cassettes. 

Does foe record industry object 
to those who, having bought an IB 
for its quality, transfer the music 
to cassette for listening to in a car? 
Yonrs faithfully, 

JIM McCUE, 

32 Holmewood Ridge, 

Laiuton Green, 

Tunbridge Wells, Kent 


History lesson 
to bear in mind 

From Dr Moulin S. Alexander 
Sir, I am interested in the new 
Institute of Contemporary British 
History mentioned in your leading 
article of November 3. 

Initiatives intended to 
strengthen history's provision and 
status in school and university 
curricula, as well as providing a 
fresh forum for exchange of 
information or interpretation, 
widen access to the discipline and 
deepen understanding. 

Two additional remarks seem 
necessary at this stage. First, I 
should wish to sound a cautionary 
note about excessive further 
specialisation in the recent history 
of this country in isolation. As xt 
is, worrying evidence exists that 
school and university depart- 
ments and sy llabuses are already 
predominantly concerned with 
British history (even if this is far 
from exclusively contemporary 
British history). 

Measures which serve only to 
underline this existing emphasis, 
to the detriment of the study of foe 
affairs of continental Europe and 
the wider world, would cause deep 
disquiet in much of the historical 
profession at a time when comput- 
erised communications, easier 
and faster travel, and the “shrink- 
ing globe” point to the value for us 
all to enhance our understanding 
and sympathy with histories, soci- 
eties and cultures beyond these 

itlanrtg 

Secondly, your leader asserted 
critically that the contemporary 
past (which you defined as stretch- 
ing from the day before yesterday 
to 30 years ago), is “ill served by 
historians . . . and ill considered 
by history students”. The pro- 
fessional and responsible historian 
must object that the great bulk of 
primary sources on this “twilight 
zone” is hidden from him by the 
curtain of the “30-year rule” 
inhibiting out access to the Gov- 
ernment archives on which we 
shall depend in substantial mea- 
sure for “objective and balanced” 
studies of the kind you exhort us 
to produce. 

There is, to my certain know- 
ledge, no shortage of scholars hard 
at work researching and writing on 
the 1950s. To this, I wager, the 
queues at the Public Record Office 
seeking Suez crisis papers next 
January will amply bear witness. 

To hasten scholarly studies of 
times more recent still you should, 
I submit, direct your strictures not 
at the historians but at the office of 
the Lord Chancellor, ministerial 
custodian of policy towards 
“public” records. 

Yours faithfully, 

MARTIN S. ALEXANDER, 
University of Southampton, 
Department of History, 
Southampton. 

November 23. 

Financing the NHS 

From Dr MJ Weston 
Sir, The politicians tell us that 
doctors and nurses control 63 per 
cent of NHS costs and that a 1 per 
cent reduction in this would give 
another £70 milli on per annum; 
on the other hand, the cupboards 
in the Guy’s casualty department 
are empty of slings (reports, 
November 5). How much more 
Mood does the Government think 
can be squeezed out of the NHS 
stone? 

The Mid Essex Health 
Authority is trying to find ways of 
financing centralization of its 
hospital services on one site at 
Broomfield, and a year ago I made 
a proposal to purchase the 
Chdmsford and Essex Hospital, 
giving the authority the extra 
fends that ft needs and the chance 
for a proper sharing of buildings 
and manpower. 

A year later, still nothing has 
happened. Morale in the Chelms- 
ford and Essex Hospital has fallen 
with the uncertainty about its 
future, and talented and trained 
nurses have drifted away. 

Opportunties to inject capital 
into the NHS from outride must 
not be lost. There is nothing 
further to be squeezed out of the 
service as ft now stands without 
further reduction in patient care. 
Yours faithfully, 

M. J. WESTON, 

Chelmsford & Essex Hospital, 
London Road, 

Chelmsford, Essex. 

November 5. 

Diplomatic immunity 

From Mr J. G. W. Thrirtg 
Sir, Last night's BBC2 programme 
highlighting abuse of diplomatic 
immuni ty in London, CD - Be- 
yond the Law. demonstrates again, 
should that: be. necessary, the 
ineptitude of the Foreign Office. 

To suggest that the community 
at large may have to suffer for tire 
. benefits bestowed by foe principle 
of diplomatic immunity is pos- 
siMy so, but to expect individual 
citizens to bear the brunt is grossly 
unfair. 

A solution to the effects might 
be that foe British Government be 
financially responsible for foe 
results of the appalling behaviour 
of some foreign diplomats. Should 
a foreign diplomat or government 
not be prepared to surrender to foe 
jurisdiction of foe British courts, 
then they should be tried in 
absentia and if found guilty any 
damages awarded should paid by 
the British Government. This 
might make the.. Foreign Office 
wake up to the problem and take 
action. 

It would be interesting to know 
if British diplomats violate their 
host governments’ laws around 
the world- 
Yours faithfully. 

J. G. W.THRING, 

Rossi yn House. 

DormanslandL Surrey. 

November 15. 



NOVEMBER 2$ 1791 

The marriage was between 
Frederick, Duke of York, the 
second of George Ill's nine sans, 
and Fredema. daughter of 
Frederick WiUiamlT, King of 
Prussia (1744-1797). 


DRAWING-ROOM. 

As we predicted, the DRAW- 
ING-ROOM yesterday at St 
James’s was crowded with aD the 
Nobility, elegance, beauty and 
fashion in town, and appeared not 
at aH inferior to the most brilliant 
assemblage we have ever witnessed 
there. 

The cause certainly justified the 
magnificence of the scene. The 


marriage of one of the expectant 
heirs to the British Diadem, with 
the consent of the Court, and the 
universal approbation of the pub- 
lic, was something new in the 
pr esent reign, and as their MAJ- 
ESTIES have every domestic rea- 
son to rejoice in the event, and the 
public consider the near relation- 
ship, by which the interests of this 
country are now connected with 
those of Prussia, a most happy 
circumstance, it is but natural to 
suppose that all parties would unite 
in paying their compliments of 
congratulation to the Sovereign 
and his family. 

The Ladies, it being the 
RIGHTS OF WOMEN so to do, 
decked themselves out on this 
bridal occasion, in aS that could 
tend to captivate the surrounding 
circle, and gain the attention of 
their new made Ohistrious fellow 
subject, 

“By «t of elegance and polished shew". 

Nor did this attention pass 
iwihwpdflH- Her Highness looked 


round with astonishment, but not 
with envy, at a selection of female 
beauty not to be paralleled in any 
other Court of Europe . . . 

THE DUCHESS OF YORK 
. . .The Princess is below the 
mirMlmg stature; her complexion 


delicate and pure dear; her person 
rather inclined to the en bon point, 
but perhaps this is owing to her not 
wearing such tight stays as the 
English Ladies; her countenance, 
though not regularly beautiful, is 
animated and interesting, and she 
has good eyes. Her manners appear 
to be very amiable, and she shims a 
great share of good-nature in aD 
her actions. 

Her Royal Highness's dress was 
extremely costly, and she was 
profusely ornamented with, dia- 
monds. The body and train were of 
white sattin, embroidered with 
silver spangles and trimmed with a 
silver fringe and deep point lace 
The petticoat was of white cr.!?* 
s imply embroidered, with ii'-er 
.spangies and foil stones in ‘■isr* 
and sheila, and trimmed with a rich 
silver tasaelled fringe round the 
bottom. Over the petticoat was a 
drapery embroidered the same as 
the petticoat 'Hie dress was fur- 
ther ornamented with festoons of 
white sattin roses and silver oak 
leavesLarge bouquets of white 
roses and silver wheat-ears hung 
over the drapery, and were tied up 
with silver cord and tassels. 

On the whole, her Royal 
Highness’s dress was more magnif- 
icent than tasty, for it appesmed 
over-loaded with embroidery. 

The jewellery worn by her Royal 
Highness was extremely costly. It 
consisted of a very superb necklace 
of pearls in large festoons, elegantly 
fastened together in three places 
with large brilliants of great value; 
her Royal Highness wore likewise a 
large bouquet, composed wholly ofi 
diamonds, which we understand 
Mr. Jefferies, the jewefler, sold to 
the KING OF PRUSSIA.. 

LADY ASC ILL l 

Was by far the most e'egii.r. :;vi j 
best dressed Lady at Court; ah*.' 
wore a while sattin dress. A' : 
ornamented with gold and * 
velvet. Over the petticoat hung ■ 
wreath of oak leaves and acorn* 
and the bottom was trimmed with 
a rich tassel fringe — 

(We have only noticed those 
Ladies’ dresses which appeared 
new to us. and made up for the 
occasion. There were but very few 
new suits of cloaths, though the 
Ladies were, in other respects, 
dressed in a very splendid manner, 
and went to Court in the full state 
of a Birth Day. Coquelicot, or 
poppy, was the colour most worn; 
the caps were of white and black 
velvet, in the shape of a helmet, 
and ornamented with feathers and 
coquelicot coloured flowers . . ] 


Competitive sport 

From the Headmaster of Queen 
Mary's Grammar School, Walsall 
Sir, Your leader, “A question of 
sport” (November 17), failed to 
mention that success in compet- 
itive teamgames is not possible 
without cooperation and un- 
selfishness. These are educational 
benefits which the anti-team 
sports lobby would do well to 
ponder. 

Yours faithfully, 

K. G. HOWARD. Headmaster, 
Queen Mary’s Grammar School, 
Sutton Road, 

Walsall, West Midlands. 

Murky waters 

From Mr Val Shannon 
Sir, It would seem foal England is 
more fortunate than Germany in 
the matter of river pollution (Dr J. 
J. Grant's letter, November 1 5). 

In my junior geography class of 
yesteryear in Lincolnshire we were 
made to chan t foe following ditty: 
The William, the Welland, foe 
Neue, Ouse and Glen 
Are five British rivers that flow 
through foe Fen. 
They are, we are told. 

As dean as can be. 

Since they go through the Wash 

Before reaching foe sea. 

Not perhaps up to the standard 
of Mr Coleridge, but we do seem 
to have an advantage over foe 
unfortunate Rhine dwellers. 

Yours faithfully, 

valsharman, 

1 19 Manor Road, 

Mitcham, Surrey. 


THE TIMES TUESDAY NOVEMBER 25 1986 




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OLIVETTI'S ENHANCED RANGE OF PERSONAL COMPUTE 
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Whatever position you’re in, Olivetti has a personal 
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To start with were offering a range of four very different 
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We add flexibility by offering each model with a wide 
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TOE TIMES TUESDAY NOVEMBER 25 1986 


19 


COMPUTER HORIZONS/1 


Edited by Matthew May 




Desktop 
finally 
comes 
of age 


be 


This month oonU weO 
remembered as the one in 
which desktop publishing, or 
DTP as it has been dabbed by 
the industry, moved from die 
world of fed to an established 
sector of the computer 
industry. 

DTP is generally nnder- 
stood to be the hnsiness of 
getting people to prodnce en- 
tire business reports and 
newletters using a" personal 
computer, special software and 
a high-resohitiba laser printer. 

Big microcomputer hard- 
ware and software firms such 
as Apple, Apricot, Microsoft 
and Dataproducts hare been 
failing over one another in 
recent weeks to make dear 
their commitment to this grow- 
ing niche market 

Numerous seminars and 
desktop publishing shows 
have resulted. 

The British firm Apricot is 
the most recent entry with its 
desktop publishing systems 
based amend the Apricot Xen- 
i PC Apricot believes so 
heavily in the importance of 
DTP that it has established a 
new division devoted entirely 
to packaging and selling such 
systems. 

“The PC desktop publish- 
ing solution will revolutionize 
document production in the 
same way spreadsheets revolu- 
tionized finanAl pfenning a 
few years ago,” claims John 
Leftwfch, director of the new 
division. 

Apricot’s system - Eke 
those from Apple and others— 
starts at about £6,000 for a 
setup that includes a Xen-i 


A standard for professionals 


TRAINING 


By Eddie Conlter 


A new initiative, aimed at 
providing a formal training 
and career development pro- 
gramme for computer services 
staff, is being finaiimri by the 
Computing Services Industry 
T raining Council, COSIT. 

The move has been dis- 
cussed with the British Com- 
puter Society, the Institution 
of Electrical Engineers and the 
Engineering Indnstxy’s .Train- 
ing Board. 

Its aim is to provide a 

S I unification standard of pro- 
essional status in information 
technology s imilar to that of a 
chartered e ngineer . 


A draft report outlining the 
studied by 


scheme is being studied by a 
COSIT working party consist- 
ing of senior representatives of 
the computing services in- 
dustry. After refinement, the 
recommendations will be cir- 
culated to the 200-s tro ng 
membership of COSIT with 
the aim of official adoption by 
early next year. 

It could prove to be a 
valuable standard for data 
processing as a whole, steered 
by the high quality software 
sector of computer services. 
Leading organizations are 


Jaguar 
sells its 
jobs at 
the fair 


There was an odd sight among 
all the usual industry sates fafir 
and hype that surrounded the 
recent annual Compec trade 
fair at Olympia, writes Geqf 
Wheelwright 


By Ceof Wheelwright 


computer with laser computer 
printer and desktop publish- 
ing software. 

Despite the excitement 
desktop publishing has gen- 
erated among manufac turers 

and software companies, it is 
not dear yet whether there is 
the same degree of interest 
among the general oompoter- 
buying business comm unity. 

Some in the computer in- 
dustry — notably those adopt- 
ing a cautious approach to 
DTP — suggest that desktop 
publishing will be a very short- 
term market, until companies 
traditionally involved in the 
word-processing software 
market get round to putting 
DTP-style features in their 
applications. 

To some extent that has 
already happened, with Lotas, 
Microsoft and Micropro all 
announcing laser-printing and 
DTP-style support for all their 
new word-processing 
packages. 

But some, such as 
Microsoft, are hedging their 
bets by supporting DTP as 
wvH as new high-powered 
•* ord - processors. 

Microsoft last week an- 
nounced a deal with Aldus UK 
to try to estabBsh 8 desktop 
publishing standard for the 
IBM PC and fookaUfces, such 
as the Amstrad PCI 51 2. 

The centrepiece of the 
agreement is to promote the 
use of Microsoft’s Windows 
picture-oriented operating sys- 
tem with the PC version of 
Aldus Pagemaker desktop 
publishing software. 

“We estimate that over the 
next 12 months, no fewer than 
20 different manufacturers 
will announce DTP systems,” 
says Microsoft marketing 
manager Fiona Kelly. 

Ironically, the biggest com- 
petition Microsoft will face is 
the Apple Macint osh hn- 
pie men cation of Pa gemak er 
which has, so far, virtually 
been a runaway success for 
both Apple and Aldus, helping 
to restore financial health to a 
once- troubled Apple and mak- 
ing a name for Aldus as the 
software leader in the DTP 
market 


Amid the likes of Apricot, 
Siemens and other traditional 
computer industry players was 
a small stand for Jaguar Cars. 


But unlike almost every 
other display at the show. 
Jaguar was not trying to sell 
anybody either computer 
hardware or software Instead, 
it was peddling the idea offaow 
nice it is to work for one of the 
country's oldest sports car 

manufac turers. 


In a brochure distributed at 
the exhibition, the company 
made it quite clear just how 
keen it is to find the right 
people from the computer 
industry to help run its new 
Advanced Engineering Centre 
at Whitley in Coventry. 


When fully completed at the 
end of 1987, the new centre 
will handle Jaguar’s product 
engineering functions and a 
corporate data centre . for 
Jaguar’s IBM mainframes. 

‘The demand for manufac- 
turing engineering, as a result 
of- our future model pro- 
gramme, will increase as excit- 
ing product designs are turned 
into cars for the customer,” 
said the company. 

Jaguar even went so far as to 
enclose information about a 
selection of recent homes for 
sale in the Coventry area — 
extolling the virtues of 
cheaper living outside 
London. 

The fact that the company 
has gone this far just to get 
computer staff points to the 
desperate demand for quali- 
fied systems experts. 

At Jaguar that demand will 
largely involve those' in the 
development and manufac- 
turing processes of its latest 
line of luxury cars. 

Robotics-based computer 
aided design and computer 
aided manufacturing systems 
are used at Jaguar, along with 
statistical process control to 
monitor the production of 
various components. 

Jaguar is obviously hoping 
its glamorous image will hdp 
to attract the often young 
breed of computer pro- 
grammer and systems expert 
that they need to remain 
competitive. 


Events 


Micros in Design, Design 
Centre, Haymarket; London 
SW1. now untU December 
19(01-639 8000) 


High Technology in 
Education, Barbican, London, 
January 21-24 (01-608 
1161) 


People and TochiwIofBfi 
Queen Elizabeth 11 conference 
Centre, Westminster, 

London, today until Thursday 
{01-727 1929) 


Videotex User Show, 

Barbican. London. January 28- 
30 ( 01 - 6081161 ) 


CIMAP - Factory 
automation, National 
Exhibition Centre, 
Birmingham, December 1-5 
(01-8913426) 


Dexpo Europe, Olympia 2, 
London, March 3-5 (01-436 
1951) 


Computerem Retailing, 
National Exhibition Centre, 
Birmingham, March 11-13 


Interactive Video, 
Metropole Hotel, Brighton, 
December 9-1 1 (01 -347 
1847) 


Cadcam 87, Metropote 
Hotel, NEC, Birmingham, 
March 24-26 (01 -6W 1161) 


™ mostonu— e ° N 



easy it is to _ 

this infonnxlion — *t the 10 th 
International Online Information 
Meeting 

Novotel London. Hjmnwnmith, London 
W6BOK . ' • 

2 Dec it 00-18.00. 3 Dec 1O.30-1S.00 
4 Dec T0JXM5.00 


Learned inloraulton Lid. 
Woodstde. Hiftlsey Hill, 
QtlotdOX I 5AU 
Td. 0865 73027? 




computing centres it employs 
90.000 people. 


The new training standard 


proposes a combination of 
formal and informal trainin' 


coaching and related 
experience. 

The scheme will be open to 
entrants of organizations 
which, in COSIrs opinion, 
provide the necessary 
environment to enable partici- 
pants to receive the desired 
standard of training. 

No specific educational 
q u al ific a ti ons will be needed, 
lough the recommended 


Tve fad it all 


qualifications and CV and all it comes up 
s an endless list of dole offices!* 


programme is aimed to pro- 
vide a certified standard at the 
end of four years considered 
achievable by participants of 


represented through COSIT 
such as British Airways, 
Olivetti, CAP, the Corpora- 
tion of Lloyd’s. Coopers & 
Lybrand, Digital Equipment, 
GEC, Logics, Ptessey, STC, 
Thoro-EMl and the Trustee 
Savings Bank. 

Adoption of a new formal 
business qualification provid- 
ing letters after an individuaTs 
name has been sought for 
information technology staff 
for a number of years. 

The nearest recognized 
qualifications that exist — 
membership of the BCS or the 
IEE — do not reflect the 


mainstream activities of many 
of today's computer services 
people, particularly in soft- 
ware development and tire 
associated management skills 
needed. 

‘The computing services 
sector has recognized the need 
to stimulate immediate 
recruitment and establish ca- 
reer standards far staff,” says 
Gordon Ewan, director of 
COSIT. 

Computing services is one 
of the fastest growing sectors 
of the economy generating 
£1.5 bflfion in revenue in 
1985. Including autonomous 


graduate level ability. 
Technically, everything 
computer languages 


from 


through communications and 
data bases to expert systems 
and structured methodology, 
will be covered. Progress win 
be monitored by COSfT with 


approved supervisors in com- 
panies and the maintenance of 
detailed working log books by 
participants. 

Already operating a pilot 
gram-aided training pro- 
gramme backed by the Man- 
power Services Commission, 
COSIT hopes that the new 
professional programme may 
also attract MSC grant aid 


Wang the 
younger 
becomes 
top man 


bttrV Jtet:*; V.v. 


Wang Laboratories has an- 
nounced that Frederick Wang, 
the 36-year-old son of its 
founder, had been named 
president of the US maker of 
computers and office automa- 
tion equipment 
An Wang, 66, the 
company's chairman and 
executive, has been serv- 


ing as president since last year 
afie 


Cunningham 


after John 
resigned. 

Mr C unningham was said 10 
have left because he feh he had 
no chance to become chief 
executive since the younger 
Wang was widely viewed as 
his father’s successor. 

An Wang said he had no 
plans to retire and would 



Frederick Wang; strategy and products in line 


PEOPLE 


continue active participation 
in the company as chairman 
and chief executive. 

His son has been with the 
company for 14 years, most 
recently serving as treasurer, a 
post he will t wain, and exec- 
utive vice-president 

Wang Laboratories has 
been under pressure in the 


hotly competitive computer 
business. During the last quar- 
ter it reported a £20 million 
loss. In the current quarter, 
Frederick Wang said; “We 
continue to see the quarter as a 
tight-demand marketplace, 
but it’s a little to early far us to 
comment on results.” 

He added; “The key thing 
right now is that we've got our 
strategy in line and our prod- 
ucts in line.” 

The younger Wang will take 
responsibility for all principal 
line functions, including 


world-wide marketing, sales, 
service and support opera- 
tions as well as manufac- 
turing, treasury and research 
and development, the com- 
pany said. 

He is a graduate of Brown 
University and has held a 
number of management po- 
sitions with Wang since he 
joined in 1972. He has been a 
director since 1981. 

In its last fiscal year, Wang 
had revenues of S2.64 billion. 
But it dreams of becoming a 
55 billion company. 


Tandon’s 



; When it comes to A level exams, 
Thndon passes with flying colours. 

Wfe have four computers in our 
class of IBM AT compatible 
systems - that's twice as many as 
most of our competitors. 

And as 

Thndon, all models. offer you a 
choice of green or amber 
monochrome screens or the option 
of a crisp colour display. 

That’s the kind of attention to 
detail you would expect from one of 
the world's longest established 
computer companies. 

We’ve been in the computer 
manu facturing business for over 
ten years. In fact it may surprise 
you to learn that the vast majority 
of installed IBM PCs are fitted with 
Thndon disk drives. 

And its because we manufacture 
more of the components for our 
computers that we can offer such 
value for money prices. 


Typically, Thndon PCs are priced 
around 40% 


1% below the equivalent 
offering from IBM. 

And whether its our 4 A level 
computers that interest you or our 
3 PCX systems, all are IBM 
liable. 


compatit 


So you have immediate access to 
the world's largest library of 
business software, 

And to set you on the right course 
with your Thndon computer, we’re 
offering you a free copy of the 
Thndon in Action Software Guide- a 
44-page prospectus packed full of 
detailed information about today’s 
powerful software packages. 

Tb learn how your business can 
benefit from lhndon's A level 
successes, send off the coupon or 
call Thndon. Isn't it time you added 
some Thndon A levels to your PC 
qualifications? 

W 0527 46800. 


I need to enrol wttt ftnton. Please 
send me the Ihndon ituormatlDn 
pack and my rnesof i ware prospect us. 
The Headmaster. Tjndun Computer tUKI 
LHL Freepost. ReddJtdt. 897 4BR 


Nomr 


Position 


Address 


TW- 


WMUft of Bmingna 


Kant Employee* [ | Naof wsmlfcd PG» f [ 



tBMUatQdaB^ott»aeriatio«i«IBaHness MiirMiirT Cdrperaocial»ncwqBaed ; uetet oiuuHn» a fr lma>lpwco.e«Hi<Ut^}VAT Colour manner ti 
an addtDoead juice option lor $295 


j^Less manefyjmore micro. J 






7 


' 1 mimi.it iiiiimmumim 






. . . 






DAY NOVEMBER 25 lQftrt 


COMPUTER APPOINTMENTS 




COMPUTER SALES 


fiaini/SfoiafraBse 

OTE £401 + car 


One of the big five American manufacturers 
requires well educated & successful sales 
professionals used to ctosinglarge value sales 

to the Distribution, Manufacturer & Retail 
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months. ST 10/1 


IBM Leasing OTE E50K + BMW 

You have successful sales experience to the 
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over £80K! ST 10/3. 


Macro Sales Basic £25K 


Big Bang Sales C20K/0TE £55K 

A market leader in Banking and Telecomms 
software solutions has sales vacancies in 
LONDON & NEW YORK. With the coming of 
de-regulation of the Stock Exchange oppor- 
tunities are exceptional. ST 10/4 


This solid 20 year old British computer service 
organisation had a £50 rmffion T/O last year 
and is urgently seeking additional PC sales 
types. The ideal candidate would be a part 
quaSfied accountant with Network mini & 
multi-user commercial sales experience. 
However, success is their overriding priority. 
ST 10/2. 


Sales Manager OTE £35K +++ 

Two successful London Micro Dealers now 
require two Brench/Safes Managers with 
staffing responsibffitles. You must have a good 
employment/sales track record. Manufacturing 
Control experience an advantage. ST 10/5. 


The Sales Recruitment Specialists 

UNIVERSAL COMPUTER ASSOCIATES LTD 

Trafalgar House, Grenville Place, London, NW7 3SA 
Telephone: 01-959 1198/3611 (958 3131 eves/weehends). 


McroeJFopDe'& 
Cnns Kraus nave 
120 other sates 
& support vacancies 


SALES PROFESSIONALS - AIM HIGH 


SOLUTION SALES SURREY BASE 

C A Q/C AM /PRODUCTION CONTROL 
BLUE OH? COMPANIES 

funder The wan esaa^ m i wn a wa l 5 tocaom 

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£40,060 OTE h 
BASE £ NEG ~ 
GUARANTEE £ 
eanuhtfilMitf U 


career pogittsoa 


REF: TH 2318 

MINI SOLUTION SALES VARIOUS £35,000 OTE 

IBM SYST 36/3 S LOCATIONS £20,000 BASE 

FINANCIAL/MANUFACTURING SOFTWARE 

Ftaqwa: EitfflKirti <i 1582. ttns consrfbpcy and softne (use o ons o* Bk kadn& OU agents «i the IK. An atpcssw npansw 
nop j mir r tea la) a a nsa» nl eomooa ftr mw W xai sotaben Sates branwa. 


Prauaw.- P»a! £ »e canary's new npml offices e»e m the South. Mends cr Hcnli Eafl. joo mil be teamd to sri CM BSD 
tartmrc 5ta fcucccl am msnutettmng scftnaa Ho Mh new M ensttsa nans. 

To cetf, for itvse «c3uns casadars sOocM tor a namnon of ore jean s*x*ssfel «h swmoxx. antf i knortadgn at 


moo*. Asttunon aw-’nr mxMbctwn WO l w Tie aS*v u prate a tusmess prapose nfleiftgdienB a MX tartan and 
Httrac aauoon a a twreanSte RMUAniY WITH THE IBM SYSTEM 3C/38 IS W ESSENTIAL 



o 


N 


Httfcxc semm a a percqgate FMflUAMTY WITH THE BM SYSTEM 35/38 IS NOT ESSE 
CL scr Tbs s a pound fur urpcnmy (a an«*nis Sate Ehxhms to me km M find id I 
p ng issw c and ppacdia^ ap na a MP . In wean ftr yar dwteeai and hadwk fte awpwiy a 
genaas manssen pawgt 


Hsu seMm sales wkti a 
M pmdnct tmang and a 


SNR SALES LONDON £35.000 + OTE 

IBM 6150 + PEG SOFTWARE £18400 BASE 

TIMES TOP 1000 6 MONTH GTEE 

Pmpea: Tbs iwaUt and snadul enemy n me Md a mao soMan As las twenty been wanted to Mfl the DM 6i50l he anaat teams km been nccessMy 
resnud and Be norcoy now setts an emertemd Sales EemBae. 

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implementing a complete new set of business 
solutions (based on IBM IMS technology) to carry the 
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a series of exciting new career opporturuties-the 
sort that don t come on to the open market every day 
The Midland are looking tor seif-motivated and 
achievement-orientated people to work at a variety of 
levels on the complex development and migrattonal 
projects involved In the transition from old to new 
technology 


Programmers 

From Junior through Senior to Chief 
Programmer levels, ideally you will have experience 
of working in either interactive COBOL or Assembler 
(any IBM IMS experience a plus). 



Analysts and Project Leaders 

You will be involved in the development and 
implementation of new systems to give better 
business solutions in tomorrow's high street banks. 
You will ideally have experience of large financial 
systems to an IBM environment and reEsh this 
opportunity to expand your career potential. 
Alternatively you will have a sound understanding of 
systems development in a networking environment 


The ability to develop... 


IMS Specialist 

The successful applicant will play a critical role 
in the development and implementation of the 
new systems. Training in FASTRATH will be given 
if necessary. 


Technical Writers 

Working with the project teams and assisting in 
the important documentation tasks. 


Our objective is to appoint high calibre 
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package can include a preferential mortgage, profit 
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become apparent to successful applicants. Rest 
assured, you win get the relocation assistance 
you need. 

So' if the idea of fresh air and a fresh challenge 
appeals and you think your capacities match our 
needs, apply now by ringing one of our Independent 
Recruiters on either 01-994 3478, 01-995 6167 or 
01-9402303. Alternatively write to Derek Miers at the 
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■x»" 














. 4 ' i 


COMPUTER HORIZONS/2 


Britain is lost without MAP 


British machine tod makers are in 
danger of losing out to American 
products because their equipment is not 
compatible with differing high-tech de- 
vices, according to a report by the 
National Computing Centre and Amtec. 

The survey of 700 companies reveals a 
disturbing lack of knowledge of MAP 
(manuiacturing automation protocol) 
throughout industry. 

In America, General Motors, faced 
with the difficulty and expense of 


• A survey just completed j>y 
die National Computing Centre 
and Amtec of 700 companies 
has revealed a disturbing lack of 
knowledge of MAP 
(manufactnring automation 
protocol) throughout British 
industry. Ahtsttdr Guild reports 


students are to be able to help industry 
use such standards in the futuri?. 

Another protocol] TOP tiechn.-ral 
office protocol), is now coming on to the 
scene. Initiated by Boeing, it is two yeore 
behind MAP in development but tire I S 
is trying to bring together TO? and 
MAP. 


brands of factory devices, initiated a 
system railed manufac turin g anrntna rinn 

protocol (MAP). 

The system is ganring rapid acceptance 
in the US and tire corporation makes it a 
condition of business that suppliers of 
parts adopt such technology for their 
machines. 

The specification is based on the 
concepts of the Open Systems Inter- 
connection (OSI) seven-layer model the 


STANDARDS 


subject of continuing development by 
International Standards Org aniz ation 
(ISO) committees. 

These interfaces are widely available 
from such companies as Intel and 
Motorola. When fitted, they add rel- 
atively little to the cost of a machine tool 
costing, say, £500,000, while greatly 
increasing the product’s export potential. 

According to the survey, many suppli- 
ers say they are waiting until MAP 
becomes “a stable product”. 

But the picture is not universally 
gloomy. Some of Britain's larger manu- 
facturing companies are already in- 


volved in developing the MAP s t an d ar d 
and many of the new technology 
companies are implementing tL They 
have developed products now appearing 
on US data bases of MAP products. 

- Nevertheless, the general MAP picture 
is just as worrying among users — those 
companies which are, or should be, using 
computer-based manufacturing tech- 
niques to remain internationally 
competitive. 

Management responsibility tends to be 
split between manufacturing and data 
processing. MAP cuts across both. 
Individual departments should abandon 
the isolation attitude it has developed 
over the years, says the NCC 

“It is a luxury that industry can no 
longer afford," claims Dr Peter Scott of 
the NCC He points to the demonstrable 
cost savings from integrating networks, 
both in the office and on the shop floor. 

MAP can be incorporated into existing 
networks u s in g gateways, but this needs 
to be done within tbe framework of a 
corporate communications plan. With- 
out this, he says, companies could end up 
buying equipment which turns out to be 
totally useless in a few years' time. 

Hie survey report concludes that 
training in implementing ISO standards 
has become a national priority if today's 


Details: For more information cn 
CIMAP contact Independent Ex- 
hibitions, 154 Heath Road, Twickenham . 
Middlesex TWl 4BN. Tel. 01-891 1426. 


Drawing a blank on protection 


By Frank Brown 
Proponents of the proposed 
levy on blank music tapes 
were not the only ones dis- 
appointed with the omission 
of new copyright legislation 
from the Queen’s Speech at 
the recent opening of Par- 
liament The Federation 
Against Software Theft 
(FAST) was also dismayed, 
but for different reasons. 

Even the Information Tech- 
nology minister Geoffrey Fat- 
tie, the sponsorship minister 
for copyright, expressed his 
regret in & letter to the 
Confederation of Commu- 
nications Industries (Cld) 
the industry-backed organiza- 
tion which liaises with the 
Government on copyright 
matters. 

One of the 28 trade associ- 
ations which belongs to CIC1, 
FAST is opposed to the. tape 



Roger Tnckett warning 
on UK jobs 


PIRACY 


levy, but strongly believes that 
proposed copyright legislation 
contains much of vita! im- 
portance to the computer 
industry. 

FASTs chairman, Roger 
Tackett said: “Intellectual 
property rights are crucial fin: 
the development and protec- 
tion of UK high technology 
industries. Without effective 
copyright protection, UK 
jobs, investment and innova- 
tion will suffer,” he warned. 

The proposed blank tape 
levy would not solve the 
problem of software piracy, 
Mr Tuckett contended, be- 
cause home computer users 
would be unlikely to distin- 
guish between audio and com- 
puter tapes and would regard 
it as a licence to copy 
programs. 

Many of the measures nec- 
essary to provide copyright 
protection for software are 
embodied in the Copyright 
(Computer Software) Amend- 
ment Act 1985. 


It prescribes unlimited fines 
and up to two years’ imprison- 
ment for software piracy and 
counterfeiting, but requires 
further changes to make it 
more effective, says FAST. 

Further measures were pro- 
posed in a recent White Paper, 
and the federation would like 
to see five of them become law 
during this Parliamentary ses- 
sion. They are: i 

• A ban on rental software. J 

• The burden of proof of] 


FAST wants the burden of 
proof shifted to ihe defendant 
in criminal law because prov- 
ing copyright can be a long, 
tedious and costly process 
involving identifying the peo- 
ple that actually wrote the 
programs. This often means 
going back to tbe country 
where it was written, usually 
the US. 

In law, the fact that a 
company puis a piece of 
computer software on the 
market does not in itself prove 
that the company owns the 
copyright to prove copyright 
it has to identify each of the 
individual programmers, and 
prove that they were company 
employees at ihe time. 

The copyright position of 
computer generated output 
like documents, drawings, 
programs and other works 
produced by computer, needs 
clarifying because present 
copyright law gives protection 
only to human authors. 

A. computer generated share 
listing,- or a crossword puzzle 
produced entirely by a com- 
puter, for example, cannot be 


said to have a human author. 

The computer generated 
output issue also affects soft- 
ware packages, because arti- 
ficial intelligence techniques 
may generate things that are 
valuable, and fourth and fifth 
generation programming lan- 
guages may themselves pro- 
duce computer programs 
without human intervention 
other than feeding in applica- 
tion requirements. 

Tbe need for copyright 
protection of microchip de- 
signs, says FAST, has been 
made necessary by the rapid 
development of technology. 
Hitherto they have been diffi- 
cult to copy, because the 
actual chips are so tiny and. 
being encased in plastic, are 
virtually impossible to get az. 

But now etching techniques 
are being used to overcome 
this difficulty 

Although FAST sponsored 
the 1985 Act, it is collaborat- 
ing with the Confederation of 
Communications Industries 
to press for tbe copyright 
legislation it' wants. 


copyright shifted to the 
defendent in criminal cases. 


defends nt in criminal cases. 

• Customs’ seizures extended 
to pirated software. 

• The protection of computer 
generated output 

• The protection of 
microchip designs. 

Rental is a major problem 
in the US, where user dubs 
and others rent copies of 
complicated programs at 10 or 
20 per cent of the full price for 
a day or so. 

In Britain, rental is a prob- 
lem which affects computer 
games, but it could spread to 
business software, particularly 
if libraries start to offer soft- 
ware rental services. They 
have not done so as yet but 
only because they do not have 
tbe funds. 


Wright Air 




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Fail-safe 
features 
keep the 
ball rolling 


By Richard Sarson 


The ex-Burroughs side of 
Unisys, the nearly merged 
Sperry-Ranoa gh s company, 
has announced two fault-tol- 
erant features on their A 
Series mainframes. 

One they call the 
MGnorDisfc, which writes all 
data on up to four disk units 
continuously, so that if one 
fails, the others take over 
automatically. 

The other new feature 
makes it possible to ch a nge 



IJW'M 


manages 
real life data 


Data is rarely as neat as most 
database management packages 
would like. Things come in all 
shapes and sizes - only Superfile 
has the flexibility to cope with the 
messiness of real life informatioa 
Made and supported in Britain, 
Superfile runs under MS-DOS. 
PC-DOS, MUCCP/M, Xenix, Unix, VMS. 
Send for brochure or ring 




Soutiidata Ud 166 Portobeilo Road, London WU 2EB 
M 01-7277564 & 01-229 2724 




Easy installation 
is new feature 


network, while the network is 
in use. Thus, new te rmin al s 
can be ftwrafad wi thout d os- 
ing down the while system. 

The A Series is directed 
largely at financial markets, 
and the last few weeks in die 
CUy of Loudon have dem- 
onstrated how important 
GPfaons reaming is to the 

financial winmi wiitlly . 

Unisys has also ammraced 
two low end models in the A 
Series, the A2 and AS, The 
range was originally an- 
nounced in 1984, and new 
gives a range of power, hi IBM 
terms, from the System 36 op 
to the 3096. 

• Unisys has sold the 
Sperry Aerospace Group to 
Honeywell for over a billion 
dollars subject to government 


has a tranover of 
miHkra per year and employ- 
ees over SW0 people* 


EXPERT SYSTEMS 86 

BRIGHTHNUKliria DECEMBER £386 


The Sxth National Conference tbof provides Tutorials for newcomers. Refereed 
Papers hr experienced practitioners and cm Exhibition fen- everyone. 


1) Building Your first Knowledge Bose 

2) DP Update on Expert Systems Applications 

3) Building larger Knowledge Bases 

— Fee £172£0 inc. VAT 


Conference Tues 16 - Thurs 18 DecemBeri 


Themes: "Hands-on" Woricshops/Suppfiers Presentafions/Comprehensive 
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To book for ehher orbdh telephone 
Expert Systems 86 - (0273) 69581 1/698079 


ir 


MAP has also become an important 
element of EspriL the European-wide 
information initiative. Participants m 
the computer networks for manufac- 
turing applications project - including 
f&ti&ltoispaa, Peugeot, GEC, Sie- 
mens, Nixdorf and the Fraunhofer 
Institute in West Germany - are 
developing a working manufacturing 
system, based on MAP, to be shown ai 
tbe Hanover Fair next year. 

They are also planning to build such a 
system into tbe British Aerospace plan: 
at Preston. 

More imminent is the CIMAP even 
being held next month (December 1-5 5 at 
the National Exhibition Centre in Bir- 
mingham. The conference and ex- 
hibition programme wifi for the first 
time, in the UK, emphasize tbe rele- 
vance and place of advanced technology 
in tbe manufacturing and office 
environment. 

Participants will include GEC. 1CL, 
British Aerospace, Tube Investments, 
Ferranti, British Telecom and the NCC 
together with a number of UK subsid- 
iaries of US companies such as IBM. 
DEC and Motorola. 


«! > »■ * 


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nc* 


Tt' 

■\ '.-**■* 






• •: -**rr 
■■-c *14* 

-.M-l It 













THE TIMES TUESDAY NOVEMBER 25 1986 


UK 

Computer 

Rress 

Ruuards 

aponeora d bu 

HEWLETT-PACKARD 

■and 

THE TIMES 



Important sounding titles can mislead 


The winners of the UK Com- 
puter Press Awards, jointly 
sponsored by The Times and 
Hewlett-Packard, will be an- 
nounced tomorrow night at 


Finalists for the seven cate- 
gories with prizes worth a total 
of £10,000 are; 

Com pater Journalist (News): 
fV Stephen Arkell, Computer 
News; Charles Brawn, PC Bust- 
ness Worhk Jane Lawrence, PC 
Bonnets World. 

Computer Journalist (Features): 
Mai? Keenan, IBM Computer 
Today, Jim Leanox, What MU ; 
eras Richard Sarson, freelance, i 
Com pater Columnist: Rob Con- 
don, PC Business World i Lynne 
McTaggart, Which Computer, 
David Tebbutt, freelance. 
Computer Photographer: Philip 
Habib, Chris Stevens, David 
Timm is. 

Compoter Jonrnal: 

Microdecision (VNU), Network 
(VNU), Which Computer 
(EMLAP). 

Best Designed Jonrnal: 
Communications Management 
(EMAPX Computing (VNU), 
DEC Today (CW 
Commnnications). 

Technology Programme: 
Microlire (BBC2o, Nerves of 
Silicon (Radio 4), Tomorrow’s 
World (BUBO). . 


Beware the job title. It fe becoming 
increasingly known for some com- 
to create bogus but important 
sounding titles — or prospects of tides 
— m order to attract staff. 

,, Tho HS h . b y oo means applicable to 
uie majonty of jobs in the computer 
industry it is particularly true for one 
particular job title description ad- 
vertised — that of the project 
manager. 

R#»nt recruitment advertisements 

for this elusive animat ituliratf ju£{ 
how much the master of data 
processing disguise a project manager 
must be. 

Salaries indicated are from £12,000 
to £35,000 per year or more. Even 
allowing for regional and size of 


JOBSCENE 


By Eddie Coulter 

company-responsibility differences, 
why such a disparity for what seems 
to be the same type of job? 

A glance at the requirements stated 
for such posts, reveals the answer. 
Take some hypothetical advertise- 
ment typical of those appearing 
recently. 

1. Project manager to lead a small 
team of young programmers develop- 
ing applications for *X* computer in a 
progressive distribution company. 
Three years of knowledge of X system 
programmings and analysis plus 
some supervisory experience needed. 


Protest looms 
over chip prices 


; .COMPUTER BRIEFING 


B Under pressure from US govammerrt officiate, the 
Japanese government has ordered Japan's semiconductor 
makers to raise sharply the price of chips they sefl to Europe, 
Southeast Asia and South America. Already this week several of 
Japan's semiconductor manufacturers have raised their 
prices between 10 per cent and 50 per cent depending on the 
type of component 

The move seems likely to raise protests among users of 
chips, both in Europe and the US. European officials have 
complained that their countries should not be forced to pay 
higher prices for the components — simply to help US industry. 
The US, they argue, has attempted to enforce a worldwide 
price Increase by insisting that Japan not sefl components at 
market prices to third parlies. 

Electronic yellow pages 

M For years, computer manufacturers have been taBdng 
about the imminent arrival of CD-ROM. compact discs that can 
hold more than 540 mHlion ch ar acters of data in "read-only'' 
memory. GroUer Publishing has already put an encydopearfia 
with 30,000 entiles on one disc, but other consumer 
applications are rare. Now Sony has encoded the four-volume 
Tokyo yeflowpagesontoaswiqtet hro e- a nd-a-hatf-inchdiSG. 
"Less than that, really," said mteeJti Arilwb, manager of the 
company's CD-ROM sates dvfsion. "It raafiy takes up about a 
quarter of the disc." Asked to provide a Hsting of sushi 
restaurants in foe city, the CD-ROM took about a second to 
come up with 9.170. In most cities the search ooukl be Knitted to 
a restaurant on a specific street 


Professor Donald McNa, 
left, is one of the gurus of 

--gift nlnf ihl—I F — — fctfvjs U n Sa 

vnnciBi imemgence. no is . 
ateoco-fowtderaf intoBgent 
Terminals, a so ftw a re 
house specializing bi Ai 



l u i ffiiM lp o i* w 


la iBBMM 


products available to protect them, 
bombs exploded at IBM's Hejdetoa 


mo nth three 
i plant with more 


L i .>/» 

- JUK 


than £1 mafon worth of damage. Now the Berkhamsted- 
based Camor is importing a West German buflet-proof roller • 
shutter that can stop machine gun buflets, screwdrivers, 
jemmies and hammers to prevent unauthorized access and, says 
,Mha company, meets Germany’s testing standards “for 
, protection against fire from class Ml weapons without bullet 
penetration' . 

Crossing wires at Kodak 

■ A newly hired Eastman Kodak worker In the state of New 
York has been accused of using a computer in his home to 
disable nearly 4.700 telephone fines feeding the compaiy s 
largest manufacturing plant Robert Versaggi, 30, pleaded 
innocent to a charge of second-degree computer tampering. 

Mr Versaggi aflegealy used a compiler at hte h«ra to gam 

access to me taiacommunications system at the Kodak Park 
manufacturing complex and shut down the telephone a ccess 
lines. The incident happened just rtine days after a new state 
law designed to prosecute pewpie who tampwwrm computer 
systems went into effect Under the new statute, Mr Versaggi 
faoes six months in jaH if convicted. 


Wii.M-jm 





per annum becomes a pawaga warm more 
E1&000 par annum. 

Co nt act Maggie B re c h ar 

— OFFICE— 

— SYSTEMS — 
RECRUITMENT 
— SERVICES— 


Vmenr(H.a.W400i 


motivated PEOPLE 

supplying atnovetiva auttwun » 

a. *** . . p<^'5s£ 6awrata ’ 

•mb the potential to bs a maAst MOB. 
cwnpwqr. 

41 C 


Knowledge of distribution beneficial 
but not essential. Salary £12,500 pa. 

Z Project manager for teles and 
marketing department of leading *Y* 
manufacturer. You will apply the 
latest technology using an T system 
to develop and' manage systems to 
produce information in support of 
the sales function. A sales background 
would be heipftiL Salary £60,000. 

3. Project manager in major insur- 
ance company responsible for defi- 
nition, scheduling, budgeting and 
leading the development of informa- 
tion systems requirements. 

You will need to be a graduate who 
hnc had formal training in business 
disciplines and project management 
A track record of team leadership and 
successful implementation of projects 
is required. 

A good understanding of data 
processing and information technol- 
ogy is also needed, but is less 
important than proven management 
skills and knowledge of the insurance 
business. Salary £35,000. 

Three jobs for three entirely dif- 
ferent salaries and roles, yet ah with 
the same title. Which is the project 
manager? The third job is without 
doubt The second, maybe — or could 
equally be manager of marketing 
information systems. The first job 
seems unlikely and may be better 
described as systems and program- 
ming team leader. 

Yet in a sense ah three jobs require 
the management of projects. So is the 
title right or wrong? 




A 



Mike Cordingley, Director of Per- 
sonnel Resources Hoskyns Cranr 

“In our view, project management 
is very much a management disci- 
pline in' its own right” explained 
Richard Smith, a managing consul- 
tant with Price Waterhouse. “The 
principle can be applied equally to 
data processing as to any other area. 
Computer requirement advertise- 
ments are often incorrect What they 
usually mean is that they want a 
systems manager or a technical 
manager. 

“Real project management re- 
quires special skills to define the 
objectives then complete projects on 
time and within budgets. Data 
processing people are more con- 
cerned with technical details than 
with driving projects through. 


Rea! project management involves it appears therefore that the level of 

defining the objectives of a project, responsibility is whal determines a 
and its effect on, and operation project manager's salary. Thus with 
within, the organisational structure of several years of DP experience and 
a company. project management training you 

Each project outside then requires ma y find . yourself as a project 
a detailed plan which must establish manager (or leader on a larger 
the work principles and people supervising, i 5ay three or four 

involved, the schedules of im- *“"■ J 1 )J5 A 1 5, vel j you earn 
piemen ta tion, structure of resources around £15,000 (London rates), 
and facilities and also the costs of With four or five years project 
each activity leveL management experience you may be 

** sssfa sfts 

t 5^IL n f Between £24.000 and (more likely in 
consultancy) £35,000 you could find 
fC cs ? te * yourself as project manager with up 
IBM to^lItio^SmsScS?’^ ° r more P~P Ie inv0,ved ‘ 
race of IBM main frames will be 0lher hand you could go 

valuable. from project manager one moment to 

n^, ■ „ • . . ... . being pan of a project team the next 

Beanng in mind that project and su]| earn a high salar y 

management is a discipline within „ .. y c 

itself it becomes a fimetion of E *P™? in S on the type of project 
responsibility within a job or the job * ork ' D v p ex P enence 15 important 

itself the management discipline 

. ... ... experience of project management. 

W Th iir^K°^TIS r ^ UI ? ** Likewise knowledge of particular 
a Project. says Michael Cordingley, indust ries can be viable. Ills worth 
director of personnel resources at while for any computer person, who 
H^-ns. tits a function of whatever w^es to progress, to £in project 
grade a person is at. You can, for management experience, 
example, be one person managing __ 

your own project Training in project management is 

. r . a- possible as pan of a grant-aided 

All of our professional staff are scheme operated for computer services 
given formal training in project companies through COSIT (Comput- 
m a na g em ent and may well be project jpg Services industry Training Coun- 
managing whether they are a tech- cil). Victoria House. Vernon Place. 
meal consultant, principal consultant London WC1B 4DP. Tel: 01-242 
or director of the company.” 5049 . 


A cheaper 
way to spin 
a disc 


A West German maker of 
compact discs said today it has 
developed a process which 
would slash the relatively high 
cost of making the records. 

But demand for compact 
discs, which reproduce music 
and are increasingly being 
developed to store computer 
data, is outstripping supply so 
there is little chance that 
prices will fall soon. 

Teidec Schallplaiten said its 
new Direct Metal Mastering 
technique meant that compact 
discs could now be made at 
traditional cutting studios and 
record plains. It said it did 
away with a need for dean 
room conditions, like those in 
an operating theatre, needed 
until now. 

Compact discs have in- 
volved investment in process- 
ing plant ten times higher than 
for conventional black vinyl 
records. 

A compact disc stores sound 
or information as a digital 
signal which is then decoded 
by a laser beam in a compact 
disc player. The signal can 
give exact reproduction of the 
original recording and is not 
affected by scratches to the 


surface. 


WHATEVER YOUR DP BACKGROUND - CALL US 


ANALYST PROGRAMMERS/ 
COMPUTER AUDfT 


TO £18.000 
+ BANKING 
BENEFITS 


TRAIN M 4GL 

RELATIONAL 

DATABASES 


LONDON 

+ 


TO £20.000 
MORTAGE 
SUBSIDY 


CM»aE,0na of Hm «mUs taring tanks wth Moatve bMMemH m « upcas of mttrrBdoral *«J 
roenfanl iunkno. Tie large DP tMparmmi enmasa erf a vanoy at lanware - IBM TAHOBt CL uc. 
■ ftutf n r T wo Compafer Auditors am mMmd to ovtapua in the team anas of compoter systems 
a™**™* tar general uM grants wntin rite lank. Tne work M inahe pradueng aeaud 
specActtOH. ttewtoptng ana nvvnerang pograms and fcestng between DP and audtt teams. It writ te 
amide ntae and sflwi to the rak dinsu wed regard to luranra nod saltwgre 


necessary B provide edyica and sqwvt to the axil dinaon wtt negsd to lurm 
tacdoes. 

Eiintara- ft sound ta im iUdpe of a oosMoettan of data nracessing tecMoies 


m a n — ra: n sound m maage « a atm-sxoan ot ana nracessfeig tedrans - pragramnwg. 
parttcuany GD00L or PL-1 and system analysis bemg of speaaf rarest Expenence of contpuer him 
w9 he at Bdvaraage. hmever canMates Mh onur ratewm state are asked to and*. 
GjMmfc.Tbese poseions wri be of lantf to computer professionals tootang (n an feiumnaine teange in 
tETSoer. They provide a galaan epoormdy to gan expmsnce m many aspects oi utue process. A 
ny amattnre satuy package is i 


ID gai expnnence in many aspects i 
Hog die usual tailing benefits. 


ure progress. A 
REF: TD 2290 


tem* leartng aaporaoon an) nan of the financial tabnc ot the My. are expanding ramfly and 
wgraang aw IBM nstailaoon wide imroteong kxxtb generaooo languages. 

Pastime Two Programmers and one Systems Aualya ki ton a team ol Ex One Programmer to wnta and 
rrarian DUS /Oil programs, 95% of the work wB be aewoomeirt. The other wfl be a Senior 
PnKjsinnw to toad a small team and to be respeneMe lor on dewnopnieni and Bn p m n c uiuu n of 
systems. An Analysl is also sougm te producing a new fimoto system. 4 6L reBonni daauses heng 
nsoteiL 

bpmtacrl From a mmuum of 2 years to sweraJ yean tor Ihe seninr vacancy, gamed m a COBOL/CtCS 
oiDnrfflB enwonmea. Whera uvhcaM snuameo Systems Analyos at required. Experience of any 
4a (TOTAL. FOCUS. NMBAS. MATORAL MOMdOL RAMS. SAS. ADR.D82. ORACLE. HteESS. Stymll 
be a dtsancM adtrantago. Canduaes wah oner saiBs should aso apply as iranng is grnn. 
C aa oiat The axooraboi altars eneUad on and all the fob tnmng pha a substantial benrffls scheme 
mauang non onntuuiy pemno scheme, season ticket nan. iVs. navel subsdy. PPP am mortgage 
sutady. 

Rff: TM 2437 


SYSTEMS ANALYSTS LONDON TO £1BJ500 

RETRAIN TO IBM + BENEFITS 

AND RELOCATION 

Hajor BM oatafrane user band m Ihe City uHsing ftp latest technology tar both technical 
ss nfutkaB. 

ptemAoalysB to be rasfnnribto for Om development of oo-lme and database systems - 
, accounting and finanoaL Confidant and professoral people an reqwed who cat develop 
systems succosstuCy In a busatass enwo aiat d. 

L 0p»arts id three wars oommena) eapon n ge gained ret profeds rang any minis or 


LONDON 


EXPERIENCED GRADUATES 
ANY HARDWARE/SOFTWARE 


LONDON 
Oft OTHER 
SITES 


£12k-£23k 
+ GAR 


Farantm ie r a wn re three years commertw emen re ia gamed m promn osmg any mms or 
raanraraas. A nr qpamin i xi bnagrauirl Is not raanBd. twever fetalya Programmers wishing tn move 
tether into Anreires ree aMd to qtply. For canduatos wthott IBM expenence, lull cross-nmng wdl os 


prowled at the BM enwomant mdudng IMS dmmx™, OCS. etc. 
r ra reit- IMs Is an oppomaaty to kqect new He tato yoor career Dy aegw 
oereng bsbng security tar yoiasaSL Bentfts mdude ■ generous retocanon 
eto. 


tetor state, thus 
bonuses, meals 

REF: TD 2251 


CmbuokA most mccesstof International Computor Services Coraaiy with a varied Client base m the 
faancoL lechracal. Induseol and Crenmeroal fields m dus Counny and Overseas. 
FestoeecPflOGRAlMStS. ANALyST/PROGRAUMERS and PROJECT LEADERS to desmn.devekJD and 
aiUah a broao rage ol tteabase systems. These weans am in the Tedmeal and Devektpmeni 
Dmsxmis. 

Eroretaaere Y OU MUS T BE A GR ADUATE or hold a sunite ouafifiedion wth a last dase record and 
practical IDMlffitOAL EXPER&MCE m reiy ol the leading Hardware ranger mantramei. matis or iracros. 
Upwards of IS months (Ire the Jdmor Positions) of pio gunna n g oi COBOL. C' or PASCAL Unix 
expenence b an added bores. 

tant' These possons are for EXCETOBWAL MDlVlDliALS who wB onwy excephnte rewards. Aged m 
you mat twenties to late thanes you wdl be mured to demonsnie annanw. energy and good 
comnuacaonn sUB as well as mnoanue Ins. Benefits mdude pansm seneme, Ms assurancs. bonus 
and cv for Scaur Ptasaaa. 

REF: IM 2248 


BB1KSHBE 


BERKSHBS . TD £19X + 

ANALYST/PROJECT HIGH MARKET 

LEADS) SUBSIDY + 

ANY HARDWARE RELOCATION 

C—wr O ne of the World’s rogest Mb ta wn TO er Manufacturers showing consistent growth and 
oflcOTg sfibtey and ntelenl career oppottmpu In Vim with abdtty. 

PoiHw T o wort wdtei a fuB Arafwt/Proiact Laadar role from ntte conc e obon through an stages to M 
anpionroraiairL Tte wwk wil rocrereass Cewmpxig boto commarete and financal reeas uMang West 
DEC aoupmed ato uotees. 

taelrere A irwvrawn of 2 years in Data Proces sin g Idealy from wdhm a DEC VAX environment, 
amugn anar mra exoenrace wdl be cerefuHy crewdered. Both pragreremreg and anaiysa state are 
reqrered but mere enponanUya **»ng peretateSy and good meerperjoiBl sute are wseneM. n the mree 
Sereor tawL ream leading expenence wared oe « advantage. 

Berarofc , B retons wit sut candtdaes looking to broaden tner skills and fiortzons wodho in a oura 
WWrefiem anvnnmero wnch otters creweeraDta user haom and passra tren abraoci Satanes are 


RmPM envnmm wtteft otters creweeraDts user Irosrei and 
exto boW and at me more Senior level mere ■ a market sure 
COMTOBfT/CAPABLE MM0UALS ONLY! 


C/FORTRAN 
PROGRAMMERS 
ANY HARDWARE 


1 Horizons woratng ai a nae 
m tups abroad Satanes are 
Fist dass tranng oHered. 


BUSINESS ANALYSIS CITY TD £1BJ»8 

BANKING + BANKING 

BENEFITS 

Ceomnr World renowned subsidroy of a fetufing In tema docal banking corporation. The DP dapartmerd 
tBSSTBE latest IBM matframe ttermoiogy wdh a network of BM PCs. Recent expanreon of mre 
da iu nnw t las readied m the need tv addflknal Gremuer pndesreorals to jaai me team. 
Pmaonc B usmess Analysts are required to work atongsde taetmsans to desmn. produce and rest a 
range re tmanoal ankcanons ism 4th genenDon methodology and advoe technol soft on the 
requnwnems of usere warmthe two. The wnk wiU oe laqjely dewtopmem ire when structured aratyas 
kd w rent wdl be emproyod. 

L roertera c i deahv a good tanhng background, akhough apobcanls wNh good svsiems analysis sWs 
wn orgnanon and memoas are asked to aredy Busmess awareness w more important tor these 
txwams Wot recnocai mowtadge. thougn the abdity m kaso won reenmewe 6 essential 
Bunt Hie bank often, rap*) promotion a & Ihr mired for the protessroratem and inregnty a seeks In 
■dddion to an anracove saary, benofits mount irempp suosary, nans etc 

REF: TS 1874 



. Tbeworkynlloe Ivgely dewiopmem ire when structured aratyas 


£13k-£17V + 
BENEFITS 


rpg n/iii 

PROGRAMMERS 


SURREY 
+ HERTS 


TO £20k + CAR M 


CwMcOnt of the largest and most successful p it vate ly hMd security trading ferns emptoyfng the mast 
afajfcto'reid Btfleca wtaalkin and »Mbig me tto doto gto . Heal Office is bead in Chicago wdh offices 
on all major exchanges. 

P^fi^ProgramoMr to develop femcai oysfemo ntasamtho West dtedass tactatens rod local area 
network wondng as rei mregral part ot a stral Dam. ms could evoimany bad no mamgemera. 
Ex—riawoc A mmnam of 18 moofta C/FORTRAN experience gamed on mrts or aa ewniems hum any 
roptcakon oackreosmd. Koowtodgn of unk and Sun Mtoo systtnis would he' an adwidage a would 
database toc ta wyj es . M trarang wdl be fevan where raqund. 

fiwn* IWs pcabon would suK Kmon who ■ seff motinted and with Ihe mentol agity to «nrk In ■ 
M'nwvmg envkonmoiit, whore the rewads are mvanabty Mgh. 

REF: TF 1889 


Gromri Our Cienl is a dynamic and raptaly rerpandng Compider Consatency and Sretware House, with 
ceusA new Q'lfaes m Sumy reid Hens CansatetaMe gnrwh m pfeonad tor 198/ mdudaig dewtopmani of 
the teas! snroHhe«t coremrecabia systems n the System 38/38 range 
MfieKPmgrammres are reairad lor a wide yaraty ol aopteareins devetopmenjon BM System 36/38 
rtSSBTkstimireoP amt manuf aau nng. 59* of die worn wil he on Ghent s»a. 50* m- house, wtacherf 
prowdB a dHdenging and anresimg wrekmg enwonmenL 

FiwHtoa c r AookcanB should nave opwanls ol 18 mwshs RPG B re RPG ■ programming expenence, * 
gaol dAramunxaoon sbfts and a prafessuxial and conamttrd approacn. RPG tl Programmas may be 
senousiy oomteed tar ronaMig to RPG DL 

Gcwerat Proinnoonal prospects m UNUMTED and earty proye s snm into fid consultancy is a dfetmd 
possSHy. In uttem, fee confident professamM wdl be rewaraed wdh an eroefient salary rod benefits 
metudng a car. 4 «ete haway. tree BUPA etc. 

REF: TO 1056 


EVE TEL NOS: 
03727 22531 
Ol 311 8444 

H yon da not see a position that is 
ideally staled to yon. please eaH as 
we haw found suitable positions for 
previous c and idates with is Z weeks 
of teem contacting us. Can our sales 
team today, we wi9 endeavour tn tad 
yon Die rigid JOB! 

Returning to Brftsia? 

We are specialists in assisting Brit- 
ish Nationals working overseas and 
wishing to return to the UK. 


6th Floor, Empire House, 175 Piccadilly, London W1Z 9DB Telephone: 01-409 2844, (24 hours) 


raid 






ip 





PROJECT MANAGERS/ CITY £★★★■** + CAR 

CONSULTANTS INTERNATIONAL S BANKING BENEFITS 

BANKING PORTFOLIO INVESTMENT MANAGEMENT 

October 27th 1986, signalled the most radical changes the City of London has ewer witnessed. Already ii 
is reafced that systems are going to need continual development well into W7 and beyond. To cater for 
this work, several Project Managers. Consultants and Business Analysts are desperately required by a 
number of Intemational/Mefthant Banks. They wlH probably provide the most important function to both 
non tedhrfcai. but demanding users and to pure D.P. ‘technocrats:. IdeaBy. candidates wffl be well educated, 
possess exceSent comm\mlcatians skills, both written and oral, and be able to liaise with very senior 
.managers. Attend erf technical and applications knowledge is a pre-requ isite, a s the 'd onning' of two hats 
wffl be port and pared of the work. Most sought after appficadon areas are: SECURITIES. GILTS &EQUmES 
EUROBONDS. FOREX. MONEY MARKETS and PORTFOLIO INVESTMENT MANAGEMENT. Such 
experience Is hard to find and thus remuneration will be euellem with basic salaries totally open ended 
ana carry superb peris such as cars, mortgage subsidies, bonuses and profit share. REF: TR 14761 

Id- ANALYST? CITY OF LONDON TO £18,000 

PROGRAMMERS + FULL TRAINING 

MONEY BROKERS + EX. PROSPECTS 

Foflowrtng recent developmerts, this Money Broking subsidiary of an IntemationaQy renowned Holdings 
company are currently seeking several spedalists in the ICL Held, to embark on some of die most varied 
and exciting projects developing in the Money Markets today Applicants will be Involved from initial 
conception through to final Implementation in applications areas, which Indude Brokerage Transactions 
covering GILTS. FOREX and SECURITIES. In order to apply for these highly demanding posts, you should 
have atleasi 2 yeans Cobol experience on either KX MEM or TANDEM with DD5. TPM& IDMSOU and TAL 
being* distinct advantage.^ The selected individuate wiH enjoy varied opportunities, an excellent salary and 
real career progression. REF: TT 14996 


ANALYSTS/ CITY OF LONDON 

PROGRAMMERS 
KX 

Due » continued expansion, this company, who are ft 
require young (CL professionals to utilise their anal: 


ON TO 15.000 

+ CHEAP HOLS- 
WORLDWIDE 
est Property development concern In the UK. 
and development skills in a wide variety of 


aammerdal a ppficarions IndutflngThwel/Leisure related areas. Mxi need at least I years Cobol programming 
. experience on KXVMEm order to cpiaUfy. Ftersooailty and aptitude are also of the utmosr importance This 
company are now part erf one of the largest internationally renowned "four Operators, so can offer the 
successful candidates M concessionary rates on world wide travel, as well as a good salary, profit bonus. 

free fundies and long term career development opportunities. REF:TK 14960 

PROGRAMMERS TO CITY TO £25000 

PROJECT MANAGERS (ILK. SUPPORT) + CO CAR 

lbcater for the increased demands placed on the National Support team . additional IT. sk3s are required 
by tills leading computer manufacturer. A wide range of skflls are required from 18 months 
programnungjfsupport experience to many years D.P. experience in the Support of financial applications. 
. out rf the kxuryctey offices, the appoimeeswiBlnManyrecehregmarntra ta dtrairong and nation 

on various topics sudi as: pre and post sate support and structured design. Programmers wffl be Involved 

with the development of specffic software to meet the requirements of many ol the maior banks whSst the 
Systems Analysts. Project Leaden/Managers wffl be responsible for ascertaining these requirements and 
: also for following these through from design to implementation. A0 support worfcwHl Involve trevdlmg to 
die efients site this may include occasional overseas travel. A background In International finance 
fganking/btsunnceMccountsiStocidMOkteg etrt wdl be a dteinaadvanta^ particularly at the more senior 
end. The work id guaranteed to be varied and interesting with a very flexible and self determined career 
path. Company cars are given at most levels of support position whilst other benefits befit those of a Urge 
international concern. Salary to totally open to negotiation REF: TP 15457 


BUSINESS PEOPLE IN THE PEOPLE BUSINESS 


RECRUITMENT CONSULTANTS 
21 CORK STREET. LONDON WlX 1HB 


VOICE COMMS 

MARKET DATA ANALYST LONDON ENEG 

VOICE COMMS ANALYST 

Atop global investment bank wishes to fill two positions withm itsCommunications Sernces department. The 
Market Data Services Analyst shaS be responsible for the succesrful performance oi systems such as Reuters 
Rich, lhlerate etc This wB bidude ensuring aandards/ire adhered to a fufl awareness of system enhancements 
and new products and provision of users requirements The \*»ce Communications Analyst shall ideally have 
an exceSent knowledge of investment banking PBX. dealer board systems and the "Hoot n Hofler" open 
tratflng network However candidates lacking this precise experience but from an Information Services 
Provider will also be genuinely considered. Both of these positions require excelent presentation and 
communication skills and a degree education, though not essential, would bean advantage.REF': TC 15133 

SALES 

SALES EXECS LONDON BASED UNLIMITED EARNINGS 

NETWORK SOLUTIONS REALISTIC £34.000 OTE 

EXECUTIVE CAR 

As one erf the major IBM recommended dealers sp eci alising In networking and total business solutions, this 
Company's reputation is now generating substantial repeat and referral business. Consequently they are 
recruiting successful sales executives to join their established ream. The ideal applicants wfA be ambitiously 
building on their existing experience in networked micro-based hardware and wifi be capable of quickly 
generating a high level of new business. Their dient companies are impressive and indude many national 
names. The high achievers earn in excess of £70.000 last year. With an unusually high ratio of sales to 
support, this approach enables the sales team to concent raw on the commercial Issues. Demonstration 
and technical implementation: Indudmg bespoke, are the responsibility of the relevant support personnel. 
This is a superb opportunity id loman established company who have gained nationwide credibility in the 
total solutions safes arena. Euelleni company benefits include high earnings incentives and choice of 
executive car. REF. TJ 14680 

DATA COMMS BUCKINGHAMSHIRE OTE £35,000 BASIC £1 7,000 

SALES EXECUTIVES BASED CAVAUERCAR 

One of the most outstanding Computer Groups In Great Britain Is enlargng Its impressive Communications 
Division. Retaining their extensive dent base, consisting of many large Multi-National companies, the 
organisation seeks successful sales executives to sei their renowned range of muti-tost single-terminal 
systems. Average order value is cT I ‘>0.000 The targets set are very achievable and sales people are 
recognised and generously rewuded far their efforts. Ideally canddates wffl have gamed experience with 
a major manufacturer and will possibly be looking for their next career challenge wtth a dynamic, fcast- 
meving company. Knowledge of Daoommixn Nations hardware and software is highly desirable and 
negotiation experience at board level would also be a great advantage in addition to an unlimited salary 
and Company Car. the group also oflers free BUM and extensive holiday entitlement REF: TX 14946 

SENIOR ACCOUNT MANAGER CITY EARNINGS UP TO £60.000 

BANKINGfFlNANCE £30.000 GUAR 

The company is a world leader hi super computes and has used Its technologies to estabfish a unique 
position in the world of high tedmology.^ The Financial Information Systems division offers a unique range 
of products and has an impressive and prestigious ckent base of Mator International Banka. Brokerage Firms, 
Insurance Companies and Fortune 1 000 companies throughout the world. A senior Account Manager is 
befog recruited tn Join this grewing and profitable area Ideally, current eicperlenreshouW involve successful 
sales taco the dry within Foreign Exchange. Money Market Dealing Systems and Financial Information 
Distribution Systems Thteisa superb opportunity to move tn a very well respected operation which craoys 
a leadership position at die forefront of information distribution technology. Earnings potential is high and 
company benefits are ewcenetu. REF. TL 14436 



24 HRS (JO LINES) 


EVENINGS & WEEKENDS 


01 439 8302 
01 437 5994 


{0B9282* 2882 
10232 i 27703 








THE TIMES TUESDAY NOVEMBER 25 1986 



HORIZONS 


I 


A guide to 
job opportunities 


And the forecast tonight... 


They could have arranged better 
weather for my visit. It was pouring with 
rain when I arrived at the Meteorological 
Office in Bracknell Berkshire. 

The Met Office is a Ministry of 
Defence establishment, part of the Air 
Force Department - not because it does 
work for the Armed Forces — but for 
historic reasons. As the RAF expanded 
immediately prior to the Second World 
War. a bigger meteorological service was 
required. 

Bracknell is Che headquarters, employ- 
ing about 1,000 staff, with a further 1,500 
scattered throughout the UK, as for 
afield as the Shetiands and Cornwall 
Most people think of the Met Office in 
terms of weather forecasting, but it has 
two roles: forecasting and research - in 
meteorology, geophysics and int o be tter 
methods of retrieving and interpreting 
information. 

One example I was given was that of 
the much improved pictures now avail- 
able on TV weather forecasts, due to 
computer enhancement of pictures. 

Weather — and the problems it can 
cause are international It must be one of 
the few topics on which international 
cooperation is readily given and one area 
of research to which several countries 
contribute expertize and expense rather 
than duplicating effort 
To provide forecasts, accurate 
observations at both ground and at- 
mospheric levels are essential. Some are 
made by eye: others by the latest 
technology. The Met Office has varied 

One of the few areas of true 
international cooperation 

sources: automatic weather stations, 
manned land stations, four thunder- 
storms tracking centres and ocean 
weather ships. 

The Merchant Navy, coastguard ser- 
vice, civil and military aircraft too. relay 
information to the Mel Office. Then 
there are radiosondes (packages of 
instruments carried to a height of 20 or 
30 kilometres by balloon). All the data is 
sent to Bracknell for analysis and 
interpretation. 

That is in the UK. Cooperation is truly 
international In the Worid Meteorologi- 
cal Organization, Washington, _ Mel- 
bourne and Moscow are the primary 
data centres. Bracknell and Washington 
are the primary forecasting centres. 

Bracknell as an "important regional 
hub on the main trunk circuit of the 
metereological system" is also respon- 
sible for coordinating data from several 
European countries and weather ships 
and for relaying information between the 
USA and other European “hubs." 

Information is exchanged in a stan- 
dard international code — and very 
quickly. An observation taken at 
Heathrow can be round the worid in 
minutes. Costs are spread Satellites — 
polar orbiting or geostationary (at fixed 
points 36,000 lakometres above the 
equator) are paid for largely by the 
American and European space agencies. 


Weather, and the many 
problems it can cause, 
are international. The 
climate is one of the 
few areas where there is 
real cooperation between 
nations. Beryl Dixon 
examines a career at the 
Mete orological Office 

Our Met Office college has students 
from all over the world and one Chinese 
meteorologist is on secondment at 
Bracknell 

Who is afi this information for? A 
surprisingly wide range of customers use 
the UK Met Office. It is the state 
meteorological service and as such is 
responsible for providing a service to 
government departments. 

The RAF has remained one of its 
folding users, as is the Army, although 
the Navy has its own meterologists, 
using Met Office-supplied information. 
It is fairly well known that the BBC 
weather men and women are Met Office 
staff 

ITV companies in contrast employ 
their own forecasters, but many of the 
presenters seen daily on the screen have 
Met office backgrounds. Though the Met 
Office has remained part o f the MoD, it 
has been under orders from a par- 
liamentary committee to become more 
commercial. 

As a result it is no longer simply a 
spending department but recoups a 
proportion of its budget in foes. Tailor- 
made services are provided for in- 
dustries for which long and short range 
weather forecasts are crucial: aviation, 
shipping, building, agriculture and gas 
and electricity. 

You might not consider gas as a 
particularly weather sensitive industry 
until you think of the operation and 
safety of off shore platforms in the North 
Sea or the advance information needed 
to coordinate gas supplies in cold 
weather. 

Other clients include local authorities 
who need to know when to grit roads, 
fanners whose entire livelihood is af- 
fected by weather, builders with schedul- 
ing problems and the transport 
industries. 

The public, of course, has access to 
general forecasts through radio. TV, 
Press and now Teletext The weather 
people, incidentally, are proud of their 
record. They know they are remembered 
for the occasions when they get it wrong, 
when it did rain on the day of the fete, 
but they claim an 85 per cent success rale 
in short-term forecasting, so good in foci 


that some American airlines use the 
British Mel Office in preference to their 
own services^ 

The Met Office has to be competitive. 

It doesn't have a monopoly. There are a 
few commercial competitors, particu- 
larly in providing forecasts for the off* 
shore industries, and one recently started 
national newspaper buys its weather 
charts from another organization. In 
view of this, the Met Office now has a 
marketing department charged with 
expanding existing services and develop- 
ing new ones. 

What qualifications are needed to join 
the weather people? A good scientific 
background is the answer. I asked 
whether candidates tended to believe 
geography was the open sesame. 

“Please," was the heartfelt reply “do 
all you can to scotch that one. In our eyes 
geography is not very appropriate. If it is 
combined in a degree course with maths 
or physics, it may be acceptable, but not 
alone." 

Professional meteorologists are mem- 
bers of the Scientific Civil Service, and, 
graduate entrants should therefore hold a 
degree in maths, physics or meteorology, 
(usually combined with maths or phys- 
ics). Certain environmental science 
syllabuses which contain modules in 
hydrology and climatology may be 
acceptable. School leaver entrants need 
A levels in physics and maths. 

Graduates are recruited by the Crvil 
Service Commission, normally in the 

Graduates normally start 
working on research 

spring term. Thirty vacancies a year is 
the average but in summer 1987 the ; 
target will be 50. Some recruits will have ; 
first degrees; others may have taken 
MScs in meteorological or atmospheric 
sciences. 

Whatever their discipline, they are i 
unlikely to start in forecasting. That : 
comes with experience. Graduates nor- 
mally begin in research, usually quite i 
happily, since the projects, currently ; 
including the effect of hills on airflow, 
sulphur concentration in rain and the 
development of numerical models of the 
atmosphere, to name but a few, are of 
considerable interest. 

School leavers are normally recruited 
at a minimum age of 18: because of shift 
work and because if they have A levels 
they can commence studying for BTEC 
Higher Certificate in maths and physics 
or m maths, stats and computing. They 
are recruited direct by the Met Office, 
adverts appearing in the national press. 
The Met Office is strong on training and 
has its own college near Reading as well 
as links with several universities. 

• Information, including a comprehen- 
sive booklet, can be obtained from the 
Civil Service Commission, Science Di- 
vision, Alencon Link. Basingstoke RG21 
1JBN, and die Meteorological Office. 
Room 615. London Road, Bracknell 
RG122SZ. 


Town Clerk’s and Chief Executive Department 

CONTRACT COMPLIANCE OFFICER 

Salary scale 6 
(£9,513 - £10,164) 

This te a new post within the legal section ol the Town Cleric's and CWet 
Executive Department The successful applicant wH implement and 
develop the council contract cump fia nce policy. She/he wffl also Balsa 
wtft other authorities and organisations an contract compliance. Kay 
taste wfl include setting up Central List ot Tenderers in oonsuitation with 
other Council Deportments and monitoring and Worcing contract 
complance requiremen ts . 

The appficanr wfl preferably have experience of wortdng in a contract 
compliance unit, knowledge of tendering procedures, contract 
administ rati on and legal and cortiradural requirements for tire Building 
and CM Engineering Industries is required. 

App B ceUan term and tetter parU ntere are avaNaMe from the Town 
Clsrfc and Chief Executive, Town Ha^ Hoee HBl Chesterfield 340 1LP 
or tel epho ne 216313, to be rationed no tear than the 12 
1S66. 

Canvassing in my form w* tfsquaBfy ana candUttes must 
disclose if they sru related to any Member or Senior OMcer of 
the Counat 




AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER 


TteHdfJeti Director 

ibiutecknkL' £34,008 

The Governors of the Polytechnic invite 
applications or nominations forthe post of Director. 

The two principal campuses, at Hatfield and 
Hertford, are on green field sites in attractive 
countryside, within easy reach of London and the 
main communications routes. 

Further details and application forms may be 
obtained from the Clerk to the Governing Body, 

The Hatfield Polytechnic, PO Box 109, Hatfield, 
Hertfordshire ALIO 9AB, to whom applications 
should be submitted no later . ,, ... 

than 15th December 1986. (3) £$$5™, 

An Equal Oppotiumy Emptoiw 


Electricity Consumers’ Council 
Brook House 2-16 Torrington Place, 
London WC1E 711 
Telephone 01-636 5703 

Deputy Director 

(£16,854 - £20,474 iuL L.W.) 


The EEC is the national watchdog for electricity 
consumers in England and Wales. The post 
becomes vacant on 1 Februaty 1987 following 
the appointment of the present Deputy as head m 
another organisation. 

The Deputy must be able to deputise fully for the 
Director as the Council’s chief executive and be 
able to make a contribution to tire complete range 
of the Council's interests. These include the 
generation and distribution of electricity and all 
matters affecting the provision of services and 
supplies to domestic, commercial and industrial 
consumers. 

AppBcations are invited from persons with wide 
experience though their background may be in 
industry, commerce, the public sector or finance. 

The dosing date for applications is 11 December 
1986 and further details are available on request 




WARMINSTER SPORTS 




SQ2 {aD inclusive) E11,604-£12£97 

A suitably qualified and experienced person is 
required to manage and develop this joint 
provision Sports Centre which has recently 
been extended and which comprises: 

25 metre swimming pool, 5 court sports hall, 2 
squash courts, fitness room/activities haH, 
solarium, lounge and licensed bar. 

A Manager with considerable drive and 
enthusiasm is wanted to lead a new young team 
in the day to day management of the Centre. 
He/She wil be required to take on an 
occasional regional managerial role - providing 
support and advice to Managers of other 
Leisure FacSties in the South of the District. 


AppraDon iwh» ana joo o owf i p uoiis 
avattabto from the Personnel Section, Cotmcfl 
Offices. BraSey Road, Trow br idge, Witts BA 14 
ORD. Telephone: Trowbridge 63111 Ext 211. 

doting dates 11 December 1986. 7-LA/32 



THE NATIONAL TRUST 
WISHES TO APPOINT 

ADMINISTRATORS 

for Beaingborough Hall, 

8 miles North East of York. 

This is ■ jowl appoiOKaefli and applications are invited from 
married couples <riuj win adopt sad energetic approach And 
can demonstnic proven managerial skills co u pled whh the 
ability io promote and market Has devetapfag properly (63 jOOO 
vtsitOQ pa-L A comprehensive man propamine baa bees 
established for 19SZ 

The appointment is residential and the salary is on the scale 
tt.345 - £11735. 

For tether deads and ami cation form, 
please send targe SAE la 

The AdnaMratha Asafatad. The Notion* Ttet. ■CodtedsT 
27 Tartrate RM4. Orfrjhnmn. Vart 102 2 QG 

Oaten Are for te m pl t tt d appBat&x i teres; I7J2M 




Social Werker 

CSSP are tookbig (bran 



CHILD CARE (BESfflERT POST] 


To complete fully resident imdU-disoplirary team of 
experienced, quamad staff working to provide a high 
standard of individual, unmstihithxia care for 12 children 
jajjes 11 - 18 ) ter whom fostering is impractical or has 

An attractive salary reflecting SENIOR RESPONSI- 
BILITY is offered- 

Considerable understanding of the special needs of 
children who came into ‘care’ is requred. Applicants 
must hold an appropriate qualification and have more 
than four yews experience of residential work with 
children. To mairtain the balance tjf staff team this 
post would be best fitted try a female. 

Driving licence essential Non smoker preferred. Good 
single accommodation. 

Further mfo r mati on available. Informal visits strongly 
encouraged: 

Peter Jenrings, Warns, Steostead Attrotts, Herts 
SG12 8BX. Ware (0S20) 870858. 


team of 


SG12 8BX. 


PUBLIC APPOINTMENTS 



££3m is continuing to de monstra te flat dramatic improvements in performance ran 
odRcvod. 

Project Leaders jaWng CAMS wffl find ft difficult to match the wide vanety of 
cftaBenginfl projects fat we at Warwick can provide - a real test tor your professronai 
computing and managerial skiti& 

Current initiatives nchxto:- 

• an extensive office services project using D1S0SS 

• a major c om ma n en t to 4GLs 

• a policy of moving dose to our customers by decentrafisalron 

One particular post is in the area ot finance and Personnel where the Project Leader 
appointed win. with a teem of computing professionals, be responsWe for 
rec om mgraSnp, developing and rmpfementing effective systems to meet dearly oennefl 
and specific objectives. 

Applicants should preteraMy be 'mthw fate twsmfes/earty thirties, have a struc tured 
career in computing and ideally have relevant appJcatkm experience. Your 
c om petence aid interpersonal strife must be such that you can manage, lead ana 
motivate a team and develop your career tcwgtts senior management. Above all yo u must 
be capable id co m municating positively with efients at all revels and of presenting a 
cogent and decisive case tor change. 

Experience of IBM instaBatons would be a (fisttoct advantage. 

WanrataWre is a superb ptaca to Eve and work with excellent houses, e ducational 
and recreational tadkties - we believe you can enjoy a higher quality of Ide here compared 
to the crowded and expensive South East 

If you would See to 


Adress 


know more and/or obtain an 

application form just fill in QUICK RESPONSE COUPON 

the quiefc response coupon f 

and send it to Martin * Name -Age 

Greenwood, Systems I Adress 

Send ees Man ner CAMS, } — 

cS^BSsXr.k* Telephone (If you wish to sale) 

or telephone 0926 493431 | Current employer (if you wish to state — 
(Extension 2399) ter an I salary 

'e mBl ‘ SsaES0 "' 


ckshire 

Council 


KfigiTi 

An i.-cj opportunities employer. 




i Selby District Council 

JSPSse/by District ... a thriving community of 
85,000 in the beautiful Vale of York ... an area with 
vast natural reserves of coal and electricity generation 
capacity of major national significance. 

Chief Executive and Clerk 

£25,159 to £27,675 

This is an outstanding career opportunity arising from 
a forthcoming retirement Candidates - with strong 
leadership and motivational skills - will be professional 
officers with substantial local government experience 
at a high managerial level. A legal qualification will be 
a distinct advantage. 

The Council operates a relocation scheme to this highly 
attractive area with reasonably priced housing. An 
essential car user allowance is payable. 

Please apply with full details of education and career 
to date to our advisor: 

A L Brown, ref 62118, MSL International, 

Oak House, Park Lane, Leeds LS31EL 

Offices mi Europe, the Americas, Ausirahuaa and Asia Pacific 


international 

Executive Search and Selection 





22is353 






DRCA tons m HefMsd 

project tram remartad range 
premises on a high denrty 
estate in North Ba&rsea. 

Mtrajog a rec cB nor- 
g w i Mh oti of stoffmg shtirat 
atari a irormtng tin 
project's re**rowness to tte 
needs Of the local omnuaty. 
DRCA to no. at**, 
Wfoto n i for tte post of 




acrtoc 


=5£Ba 


■ M SENIOR WORD 
PROCESSOR 
will I a OPERATOR 
(ICL DRS 8801) 

AppfrcMio n s are invited from experienced WP" Operators to 
lead a small team of operator*. 

Applicants should possess sxcefent written and ore! 
communication sfdBs, a very high Standard of typing, 
parttodarfy of lengthy documents and the abi&ty to organise 
the typing requirements tor tte Company. 

Knowledge of the CL 8801 would be a distinct advantage. 

Preferred age range 32*. 

Salary circa £ 8 . 000 . 

Benefits far the above position indude profit-sharing, LVs, 
interest free season ticket loan, 22 days hofiday. 





London SWIM OCX. Telephone 01-222 3433 exta 127. 

(No Agencies) 


cm OF LOIDfiS P 0 LYTECHHC 
SEU 0 R LECTlffiER/LECHlRER GRADE H (PERUAREIT) 
LECTHER GRABS V (TEMPORARY) 

Applications he invtted for those two posts in the Facutty of Law to 
teach manly on decree, CPE ms taw Society final courses. 
Parfarenoa w* be tpw to candidates ottering ail or some of Crenktf 
Law. Mmms&a&w law. Consunar/Cormwcal Law. Labour Law. 
Saftay Scales: Senior Lecturer- £f3,7ffl pa. to 1(5330 pa (bar) - 
El 6583 pa. 

Lutorer Grade t| - £9,705 pa. to £14,758 pa 
Salanes indude London Weighting. 

For further detdfe «id m auJ&cation form phase write on apostean! to 
Deputy Personnel Officer (Becrutmenfi. CBy of London Pojytodmic, 
1t7 Houndsditn, London EC3A7BU quoting lefoan number 86/172. 

THE POLYTECHNC B AN EQUAL QPfWTUOTK EMPLOYER 






■ V ! . A " I , ■ 



PRINCIPAL OFFICER 


FINANCE FOB INDUSTRY 

STAFFORDSHIRE CX12.000 

A unique opportunity wrists to jon 9» 
res&ocared Ba not ni c Conetopreant C«isafl Gi c® 
CcMtfjr Planning and Dewtopmert Depsrtrcern. 

Your responsEbMos w?8 toduds: 

it Esta M shmant of Busrtaa Capital Ccraedicn 


it investigation and identification of effeewe 
of finance avafla&to tic* from the Futifc and private 
sector, induding SC tending. 

* Giving general business advice to new znd 
developing business wares wttfc the wxffiy. 

The successful candidate i*3 possess aRSSpiate 
< r ntar« u nr M and preferably be eqaertanee d jn tte 
negotiation of financad assistance Balters raising D 
Hie requirements of smsS businesses and start up 
ventures. A commercial or irmsSRert Banfcng 
background worid be particufiuty useful. 

Furttor dets2s and an form am avalabte 

front- 

Mr. 1 Shryane. County Warning and De refocmatf 
Officer. County Pfenning arxl Davafopnant Department, 
Martin Street, Stafford, ST1S ELE. 



Stae a d ri rtraOaro fo pnM ra .to rcf i dB n 


MENDIP DISTRICT COUNCIL 
TOURISM OFFICER 
£11,952 - £12,894 

As part of our commitment to promote 
and market tourism throughout the 
district applications are invited from 
suitably qualified persons for this newly 
created post which wfll be based within 
the Directorate of Planning and 
Amenities. 

We are looking for an enthusiastic person 
who has the initiative to develop exisiting 
policies aimed at increasing the number 
of tourists visiting the district which 
includes parts of two areas of outstanding 
natural beauty as well as a wealth of 
historic towns and villages. 

Application forms and further details 
from the Personnel Section. Council 
Offices, Wookey Hole Road, Wells. BA5 
2NN. TeL Shepton Mallet (0749) 3399 
Ext 2221. 

Dosing date; 2nd December, 1986. 

Mendip District Council is an equal 
opportunity employer. 


WEST LAMBETH HEALTH AUTHORITY 

SI Thomas’ Hospital, London SE1 7EH 

Senior Assistant Treasurer - 
Trust Funds 

£15,326 - £20,242 p.a. inc. 

The Special Trustees for St Thomas' Hospital 
are seeking an ambitious and enthusiastic 
accountant with good communication skills and 
initiative who will support the Finance Officer ir 
providing financial services, financial control and/} 
financial management and advice to the Special , 
Trustees. 

You should be a professionally qualified 
accountant with extensive managerial and 
accounting experience gained at a high level. 

This vacancy has arisen due to the promotion of 
the present postholder. 

Informal enquiries should be addressed to Mr 
KD. Morgan, Finance Officer, on 01-928 9292 ext 
2130. 

Please send fufl c.v. with names and addresses of 
two referees to Personnel Department or 
telephone our 24 hour answering service on 01- 
261 1185 quoting appropriate job title and 
reference P/82. Closing date wilt be 5th 
December 1986. 

AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITIES EMPLOYER. 


4 ^ADMINISTRATIVE 
SECRETARY 

^1 Environmental and 
Public Affairs 

We are tooWng for a committed and creative person 
to head i*} our environmental and public affairs 
departmen t, whose main functions are to keep M 
manner s Infonitad on currant issues and to 
promote wt poScies to government end other 
The Administrative Secretary ts 
•* •* 

Tiff Buceessftdeanri date is Scety to be a graduate 
comi w g ie a U o | 1 sWBs and familiarity 
y? 1 a *we. range of social and e n vironment^ 

g*”,*™*^ combined with accuracy and attention 
ro adrr M feUatlve dete fl. Experience of co mmi ttee 
Jjf ?? ** 81 familiarity with poBcy 


form (to be 

fSZSSLS* Pe cwnbeq from Person* 
J^pamnent Maternal Federation of Women's 


9NT. Tefc 01-730 7212. 



£13,653 to £14,862 


providing the M 
s ® vte8S *w 1-MO CM8W Staff aowstt* 





















jii LJ* \&P 


THE TIMES TUESDAY NOVEMBER 25 1986 


PUBLIC APPOINTMENTS 


DORTON HOUSE SCHOOL 
SEAL, SEVENOAKS 

HEAD OF CHILD CARE 

Dorton House is a residential school far appratimatelv 
1t0 ^handicapped ctttWren. somewSToSS 
hancfcaps, between the ages of 5 and 17 year?. 

We are seeking a competent professional person with 
n^gementexpenenca to coordinate the wort of the 
CMJ Care Stan. 

He « to demonstrate a considerable 

knowledge of Child Care practice in a similar position 
be prepared to reside at me School and take an active 
interest m its future development. 

Recognised quafificatfans in Chfld Care are a 
prerequisite for ths position. 

An _ excellent salary will be paid accordinq to 
qualification and experience. 

Fbr appScation forms and further details, please 
write or tetotona Personnel Department. Royal 

aSS S5M *“ Bm ® 

Telephone: 01-624 8844. 


HOUSING AND BUHJHNG SERVICES 

TRAINEE QUANTITY 
SURVEYOR 

An ^opportu nity to train for a professional 
qualification and obtan valuable experience in a 
cpiantity surveying section of m architecturai 
services group. 

‘A’ level required for direct entry to 5 yea- BSc 
Quantity Surveying course at a London Polytechnic 
one day per week. General financial assistance with 
training costs. 

Starting salary negotiable based on qualifications, 
experience and present earrings. 

pr^re^ based on progress wift Degree 
Studies and Office performance. 

For appficagea form ml totter defafls coctact 
Personnel Department, Lewes tense, 32 Ktab 
»e§L Lew^ East Sassn. Tet (8273) 471606 
ext 313 (24 bow answering sendee). 


ARTICLED CLERK 

Safety: Wilton £5*80 - 0458 pa. 
This post offers an excellent opportunity to 


IV l lu.r. 1 1 1 i i -M 1 1 1 r-'i: r- i I ' 1 1 





— "—j wwiwoti w iwm i mmi triwi w wi M ■ 

Lane, Norwich NR1 2DR Td: Norwich 
(0603) 6LU22 at 5337. Bor informal oqanks 
Aphmw Mr. T. D. W. Molander, County Sotidlor, 
321. Closing date: 15th December 1986. 



BB 

T^iIiinA~.ii rT?TWT 


SOUTH MITCHAM 
COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION 
reqUres > 

COMMUNITY 

CENTRE 

MANAGER 

1 o manaqa al upucbi of n 
centre wnhn a housing estate. 
Orqanoabon and communcalDn 
skis and a general (iterant n 
people BssemuL Salary EBJOMI 
53000 pa 

Fbr U delals and application 
form, write IK The Secretary, 
South Mitcham Community 
Association, Ha atemare Aw, 
Mitcham. Surrey CB4 3PR 
Cluing dale: iztft December, 
1986. 


MUSCULAR DYSTROPHY GROUP 
of Great Britain & Northern Ireland 

PATIENT SERVICE 

Information/Advisory Officer 

Hie Muscular Dystrophy Group requires an 
LifonnatfcuVAdvisozy Officer, to act as 
Assistant to. the Patient Services Director, to 
provide advice to sufferers and their farrriliwtL, 
and to produce and up-date relevant 1 
literature. I 

The successful applicant will have a ! 
qiecialist knowledge of benefits and 
ent i tlem e nts for the disabled, together with a 
refevent qualification e g. Paramedical or 
Social Worker. 


Breadth of interest, previous experience with 
the disabled, good verbal and written 
communication rfrilh are also most 
important. 

Salary will be related to 
professional scales and 
experience . 

FIGHT 

w m. .2 Please write to : 

? m John Gilbert 

£ £ 35 Macaulay Road, 

LONDON SW4 OQP 

MUSCULAR Giving details of 
DYSTROPHY experience and 
■ww— present salary. 


T*«n 


FSwflr Ibmpi Ml 

Safthtorough, Thatford, 
Nr Htogtan requra a 
Quaified/Experienced 


hr- : - 'V J 


For cUfcm rath wuotomf aid 
adurartnral awfak who ire in 
ctoH re tra ct raft Her famies. 
3D born i weak. Non reddoni 
BJsBpinq in bn a rati bads). 
Eq«At[to leads drift key wate 


L^j 



LEGAL APPOINTMENTS 


T mimmm v 


tfhiel Duffy Cons\ 

TOWN & COUNTRY 
PLANNING ■■■■:■ 


LONDON £18,000 

A young latrgiaxaon lawyer is requrred by our Client, a 
major City practice, lo cover a wide range of cases 
relaxing lo Town and Country matters C cx du dxn g 
kmdkmi and tenant work). As the vacancy exists 
within a targe firm the benefits and beck-up facilities 
arc excellent. 

BRISTOL . . £AAE 

Our Client. a substantial practice ra Bristol is 
recruiting a young property Solicitor with an app- 
reciation of Planning to handles caseload of appeals 
and property wort rotating to development, together 
with some more general commercial property work. 

A fim class opportunity for an intelligent and adap- 
table candidate to p rogress with the development of 
this Department, in a lively and attractive provincial 
City. 

For junker details please contact 

CLAIRE WISEMAN 
LEGAL DIVISION 

GABRIEL DUFFY RECRUITMENT CONSULTANCY 
31 SOUTHAMPTON BOW 
LONDON WC1B 5HJ 

Daytime Telephone N amber: 014B1 2288 
Evenings A Weekends: 01-740 0289 


Meredith Scott 

COMMERCIAL PROPERTY to &£35J)00 

Laatfing ECS practice requires yotfig aoSdtore wtti at 
knot 2 yaws expenenca gained in or out of London. 

BANKING cX2 0-30,000 

Larger EC2 praetka watesolctor. JdMK rupto Wa 
yarns qutaBted wilh expwtanca o* asset manes ana 
cor pu r a m banking law. 

PENSIONS cJE19-30,0i0. 

Major EC1 practice requires lawyer at toast 2 years 

rotated experience. 

EWLT/BECEHTLY ADM. to >=.£16,000 

COMMERCIAL CONVEYANCING med umsto SW1 Ann. 
(XMfW/CamBiaAL-- WBrnafional cortani w» sbt 
partner Cfry Pracbca. 

7AVTWSrw«ft inns practice. 

COMMERCIAL LITIGATION madtara stea EC4 practice. 
DOMESTIC CONVEYANCING wfe (Standing NW1 Srtn. 

Mer tf£J£ , Z£%!?>Z ta '\ s 

Of -533 MSS or 01-S4I S09 7 (rfuraffierko* 


Assistant 
Solicitors 
(2 Posts) 

County Secretary’s 
Department 

£1 1,952 to £14,475 (consistent with 
experience). 

Applicants must be Solicitors preferably with 
some Local Government or advocacy experience 
since qualification. Newly qualified persons 


Both posts Involve a substantial amount of child 
care work but wiH include other advocacy, and 
legal work of a general nature in die 
Department's Personal Services, and Economy 
& Environment Sections respectively. 

The departments offices are in Carlisle which is 
well situated for the Lake District National Park, 
the Cumbrian Coast and the Scottish Border 
Country, 

Removal expenses and lodging allowance 
available in appropriate cases. 

For informal discussion please telephone the 
Senior Assistant County Secretary. 

Mr. lohn Morris (0228) 23456 ext 2230. 
Fratiierpartkxtarsattd application forms 
from County Secretary and SoBdtor. 

The Courts, Carlisle CA3 8LZ. 

Teh (0228) 23496 ext 2212. 

Oasiiigdate for applications E2th December 
1986. 

Porta open to both men aod women. 


[Cumbr 


Tax planning lawyer required 
with up to two years post 
qualification experience. 
Responsibilities will include 
corporate Mid private client 
work and assistance with 
wilts trusts and probate. 

Please send full c.v. to 
G Laurence Harbotfte 
34 South Molten Street 
London W1Y 2BP 

¥ r — HARBOTTLE 

& 

«— I LEWIS 


College of Estate 
Management 

Patron: HM The Queen 

TUTOR IN LAW 

Owing to continuing expansion of Its work, 
the CDHege wishes to appoint a Tutor in Law 
to complement its existing academic staff. 
' The College is the premier body for the 
teaching of students on a part-time baste for 
the professions of the land and property. 
Founded to 1919 the College was granted a 
Royal Charter in 1922 ana Her Majesty the 
Queen gradousiy consented to become its 
Patron in 1977. 

The College currently has over 4,000 
students world-wide and awards its own 
Diploma as well as providing tuition for 
professional societies. An active programme 
of post-qualification short courses is 
provided and a considerable amount of 
research Is undertaken. 

The duties of the Tutor in Law will be many 
and varied, servicing both the pro- 
qualification - and -. the post-qualification 
market The salary wiH be within the scale 
for Lecturers in Universities (£8,020-£1 5,700 
per annum, under review), with membership 
Of the Universities Superannuation Scheme. 
For an appScation form please write to Mrs 
P Reynolds. For an informal discussion 
.about the. post pedase contact toe Vice- 
Principal, Mr P. E- Goodacre, .telephone 
Reading (0734) 881101. -• 

WHTTBQflQfrS RfJUMNB HfiG 2AW (3734) 861101 


UNIVERSITY OF 
GLASGOW 

ARTHUR YOUNG CHAIR OF 
ACCOUNTANCY 

Applications arc invited for appointment to the 
Arthur Young Chair of Accountancy following a 
benefaction by Arthur Young, Chartered 
Accountants. The successful applicant will have 
leaching and research interests in any area of sludv. 
with particular reference to the practice of the 
profes s ion. The Department currently fosters interests 
in: 

Accounting Theory and Financial Reporting 
Accounting History 
Auditing and investigations 
Managerial Accounting and Control 
Accounting Information Systems 
International Accounting and Financial 
Management 

Social and Behavioural Accounting 
Public Sector Accounting 

Applications (3 copies: I copy in tire case of overseas 
applicants), should be received by the Academic 
Personnel Office, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, 
GI2 SQQ, >un later than 9th January, 1987. from 
whom farther particulars can be obtained. 
Testimonials are dot requ it ed, but the names and 
addresses should be given of three persons to whom 
reference may be made. 

In reply please quote Re£NaS840E 


HAVANT BOROUGH COUNCIL 
Borough Treasurer's Department 
PRINCIPAL ACCOUNTANT 

POST NO- BT ISO 
Scale PO(7-J0) 

Salary £14,100 - £15^243 per annnm 

Applications w invited from prisons, pi efru ably 
possessing a fafl KSMratmg. for die above post wiitun 
“s Accoswncv Section principally responsible far 
the pnrparaiion of lb: accounts and budgets of the 
Council's Dura Labour Organisation. 

The posthahter win be expected to nuke a significant 
eamnfauuofl to the efficiency sod efiectivcnew of the 
Direct Labour Ofganbauoa by monhonog ibe 
acbKVRnan of rates of reran and competition 
rajmtcmeca ifcnmghoai each year, assisting unit the 
preparation offenders on t schedule of rales basis and 


effectively with senior members of other departments 

is Huportaia. 

The Ceasd! often a g enerous relocation package, 
flexible working hours and tern pory housing 
acoMft m odi t ioa m appropriate areumstances. \ 
mongage subsidy is actively under consideration fbr 
early implemcnuiioji. Trawras will be provided on 
the use of a Honeywell DPS6 nuni-com purer. The 
cast of train in* anuses wifi be recovered if the 
appointee leave the Conxft*s service within two yean 
alter training, 

Disabled persons may apply as appropri a te. 

As ap plication form nd a copy of the job 
description can be obtained by telephoning 
OTBS 474174 wfttai o a 218 or by writing to the 
Borongh Treasurer, Crric Offices, Civic 
Centre Road. Havant. Hants. PQ9 2AX. 
Appticatioa forms mast be it li ne d by 8th 
December, 1986. 


Solicitor 

upto£13.8K 

Rumytrate is an attraamety saunad Groan Bob borough 
on Qw Gounwn banks ot tea Rmar Thamaa vMrti OMcaflent 
road and raUhnire write London andL via M3 grM26, M 
test ol tea Counuv- Tha Couneri’* legal work io w*od and 
atan daowndais. uupaaek a eapsbte fokenor hoan on 
dawrtopiAg a rorow w toevl ooronvnoni. who k 

— ooromnod » aorwig Councii and public » a hkpt 
standard 

— prapand to nandte a high uartdoad 

— riria u adwEa Cornmnaea ctearty and aoundta 
during public debata 

— realty m m nitwnc legal worti wah the bagnntnyu of 
manaBamam and admaustranw rwpenoMity. 

Ilia aueeeasfkri oapkeant wriD gw: 

— a post rsmteg second m s aecdon of nwen 

— an enaritera varnty ot want 

— ptaray at advocacy 

— tea chane* ta eantnUila te dec i sion matung at a 
roreortavai 

— a eompantm satary write easuai uasr car attoMonea; 
aro i la b ili i y of loan far ear purenaae and ganarowa 




For Brtar dusult and an appi cad iin fawn pl aa— 
eonr aut tea Kw a na n a l Officar. CMc Offices. Station 
Road. A d dl aa tp na , Wtay hrirt gBi Swiwy KTt5 ZAH fTbfc 
VWavbfidga 45EOa «tt 21SJ. Ctehg dmre 12th 
Dae— bar. 198fi. ^ ^ja ct roim a sh aiy of applfcaana. 
hilaavla i s a n d fi bahald an 19 Dsc wi te^ tana, ht 


LEGAL APPOINTMENTS 


CHIEF EXECUTIVE AND TOWN CLERICS DEPARTMENT 
Banwt Legal Division 
WHERE PROFESSIONALISM COUNTS 

Most people are suprfsed to team that Barnet, is, in fact, the 
second largest borough of the capitaL 

Not'supriangjy, therefore, the borough's size is reflected in the 
complexity and variety of toe workload of toe Legal Division. And, 
over the years, the professionalism and decfication of the Division 
has been recognised and valued. 

Currently, we are seeking an experienced professional fbr a key 
post in toe Utigatkm and Financial Services Section of the recent- 
ly reorganised Division. Someone who will see this appointment 
as an important step in their career. 

Principal Assistant Solicitor 

Litigation 

Working cSrectfy under the Principal Solicitor, you will be manag- 
ing a team of seven admitted and unadmitted staff responsible for 
a wide and interesting range of Litigation matters. 

You tmfl be a soScttor, with a Rvety approach and confident 
personality unafraid of management responstoility. A commitment 
to public service is essential 

Salary is on a scale to £18,654 per annum inclusive. 

To (fiscuss Ms position with Leonto Cowon, Barnet's Chief 
SoBcftor, please contact, in the first Instance, 01 202 8282, ext 
418. 

Wo offers good r e location package which includes assistance 
wflh removal expenses in approved cases, and loans for 
season tickets, wa may also bo able to offer temporary housing 
ac co mmo da tion to approved cases. 

Closing date 18to December, 1988. Ref. 600/PAS 

For app te a B on forms and further particulars contact toe 
Recruitment Officer, London Borough Ot Barnet, 16/17 Sentinel 
Square, Brent Street, Hendon, London NW4 2EN. Telephone 01 
202 8282, etx. 424 (01 202 6602 outside office hours). 


AN AUTHORITY COMMTTED TO EQUAL OPPORTUMTES 




LOftDOn BOROUGH 


CENTRAL SOMERSET 

We are an old established but progressive and expanding firm 
with offices in two towns in central Somerset We are seeking:- 

!. . A solicitor with enthusiasm and commitment to look after 
commercial clients - dealing with a variety of business law 
matters both contentious and non contentious, this 
provides an excellent opportunity to nurture and expand a 
sound existing base and to practise in an attractive country 
setting. 

2. A young solicitor with experience and ability to handle a 
variety of conveyancing and other non contentious work 
but with particular emphasis on all aspects of residential 
and commercial development including land acquisitions, 
associated taxation questions, the law and practice relating 
to Town & Country Planning and the services provided by 
Statutory Undertakers and Local and Water Authorities. 

3. A young litigation solicitor - with emphasis on matrimonial 
work. This post could suit a newly qualified person. 

Our intention is to find people who will feature prominently in 
the fixture of oar practice. There are therefore definite prospects 
carried with each post 

Please apply in writing to Micheal Evans, Gould & S wayne, 
31 High Street, Glastonbury, Somerset, BA6 9HA. 


INNER LONDON MAGISTRATES’ COURTS SERVICE 

Deputy Chief Clerks 

Applications are invited from BARRISTERS AND 
SOLICITORS called or admitted in England, for 
employment as Deputy Chief Clerks in the Inner 
London Magistrates* Courts Service. Previous 
experience in a Magistrates’ Court will be taken into 
account but is not essential 

The starting salary at 1.4.87 will be £1 3,286 pa rising by 
eight annual increments to £18,422 pa (under review). 

In addition a London Weighting of £1395 pa is payable. 

For an application form and further particulars write to: 

The Principal Chief Clerk (DCC) 

Inner London Magistrates’ Courts Service 
Third Floor, North West Wing 
Bush House, Aldwych WC2B 4PJ 

Completed application forms must be received by 31 
December 1986. 

We are an equal opportunity employer. 



Lawyer/Execudve 

(2 posts) c£H600* £17,000 p4. 

The Crown Agents is a public corporation providing 
commercial, financial and professional services to 
governments and public bodies overseas. 

We are looking to fill two vacancies in our Commercial 
Department based in Sutton, Surrey. This department 
provides legal and commercial services to all divisions of die 
Corporation. 

Both positions will entail drafting, vetting and negotiation of 
contracts for the export of a wide range of goods and services. 
Experience of export finance and contractual work gained in 
a Banking Industrial or Commercial environment is 
essential. 

Candidates for the Commercial Lawyer vacancy should be 
newly qualified Solicitors with a p p r opriate experience in an 
age range of 25-29 years old. Candidates for the Commercial 
Executive post should be graduates in a business related 
subject with legal and commercial experience. 

Please send C.V. to Mrs F. Marsh, Personnel Dept. 

Closing date: Monday 5th January 1987* 


Crown Agents 


The Grown Agents for Oversea Governments 
and Administrations, Personnel Division, Sl Nicholas House, 
St Nicholas Road, Sutton, Surrey SMI 1EL. 

Crown Agents are an equal opportunities employer. 


Construction 
Contract Drafting/ 
Litigation 

Because of continuing growth our Client a progressive 
eminent City firm of Solicitors now needs to create an - 
appointment within a small but rapidly expanding 
team for an articulate Solicitor or Barrister; who has 
experience in advising on and drafting construction- 
related documentation and in dealing with 
construction litigation, has a keen eye for detail, 
works well under pressure and sees his/her career 
developing within this area of law 

This is a stimulating and rewarding position which 
offers excellent career prospects in a friendly and 
progressive working environment coupled with a 
highly competitive salary. Please contact James Davis 
in complete confidence. (Ret V102) 


LEGAL SELECTION 


ME S 

TW5 

imms 


160 New Bond Street 
London W1Y OHR England 
Telephone 01-629 4226 
Fax 01-491 74S9 
Telex 298942 


SOUCTTCRS JJ 


PROBATE AND TRUST 
SPECIALIST 

required by leading firm of South Hampshire Solicitors with 10 
offices, including one in London. The successful applicant will be a 
specialist in the above subjects as well as WlD drafting and Capital 
Transfer Tax planning nnri will be required to head the Probate 
and Trust Department within one of our larger offices with a view 

to equity partnership- 

Xf you have the energy ent h |W! Pff Bm to succeed within the 
dedicated professional structure which we have established; if you 
wish to have a measure of control over your own professional 
destiny; if you are fed up with the City and would prefer to enjoy a 
fthnilar practice on the south coast- within shouting distance of the 
Hamble, Downs, a™! New Forest; or if you already practise in the 
country, but would benefit from a change, apply in writing with 
C.Y. to Michael Wilks, Managing Partner, Bratton & Co, 288 
West Street, Fareham, Hants P016 OAJ or telephone 0329 
236171 









LEGAL APPOINTMENTS 


Badenoch & Clark 


COMMERCIAL LITIGATION 

ECl 


PROPERTY LAWYER 

WC2 


Further expansion in this busy department has created 
an excellent career opportunity for young solicitors 
seeking to work In a demanding environment with a 
leading City firm. With up to 3 years pqe. candidates, 
who will have good academic and relevant post 
admission experience, can expect top quality work for 
substantial ciien ts and a hfc^ily competitive salary. 


This weO respected medium sized firm currently offers 
partnership prospects for a motivated senior property 
lawyer Ideally with up to 5 years post admission 
experience, the successful candidate will enjoy a range 
of first class work and excellent working conditions. 
Personality and drive are essential qualities. 


COMPANY/COMMERCIAL 

EC4 


CAPITAL MARKETS 


Highly respected medium sized practice seeks 2 qualified 
lawyer? with up ro 3 years relevant experience, gained 
preferably in a London or substantial provincial 
practice The successful candidates will become 
involved in a range of quality corporate work and will 
enjoy a competitive remuneration package. 


From £20~£35.000 + Bonus +Bens 

Top US financial institution seeks several highly 
qualified, motivated lawyers to join its transaction 
management group at varying levels of seniority Good 
academic credentials, a top City firm training and 
relevant experience are prerequisites. These positions 
cany an excellent remuneration package together with 
good prospects for career development 


For details of these and other positions, contact Jwfitb Fanner or John CoBen. 


Legal and Financial Recruitment Specialists 
16-18 New Bridge St, London EC4V 6AU Telephone: 01-583 0073 


Corporate 

m * . # 


taxation 


Newly Qualified: upto 2 years. 
£ ATTRACTIVE 


Our Client, a resourceful and highly motivated 
medium sized City Firm, with a broadly based 
commercial practice, offers an outstanding 
opportunity to work as Personal Assistant to the 
Senior Partner who specialises in Tax. 

This opportunity offers a wide range of 
challenging and intellectually stimulating taxation 
work, which requires a business sense as well as legal 
ability. 

This unrivalled opportunity might well suit those 
wishing to expand their experience where future pros- 
pects look very good Candidates are asked to contact 
James Davis in complete confidence on 01-629 4226 or 
write to the address set out below (ref: V103). 


LEGAL SELECTION 


1 


m 


160 New Bond Street 
London WIY 0HR England 
Telephone 01-629 4226 
Fax 01-491 7459 
Telex 298942 


[mm 


DEACONS 

OF 

HONG KONG 


Deacons is a large but friendly firm established for over 100 


iasi-moving commercial aria financial a (strict, uontmumg expansion 
demands tne appointment of two able Commercial Laywers to work in 
a busy department which handles a wide variety of domestic and 
international commercial work for a substantial corporate client base. 



THE REQUIREMENTS 


Post A - A Solicitor who has one to two years post-quafification 
experience with exposure to financial and comm e r c ial 
matters. 


Post B - A Solicitor with four years sound and varied experience 
of corporate and commercial matters. 


THE REWARDS 


• A unique opportunity exists for you to widen your experience 
and stretch your ability in this dynamic city. 

• Salary for Post A wHl be negotiable above £24,000 p.a. while for 
Post B it will exceed £32,000 p.a. dependent on ability and 
quality of experience. 

• Low level of personal taxation. 

• Generous gratuity and provident fund. 

• Subsidised accommodation during settling -in period. 

• Annual travel allowance. 


• BUPA plan. 

• Assisted dub membership. 

Interviews will be conducted in London in January. Applications and 
resume which will be treated in strict confidence should be sent to> 


James Finch LLJL, Personnel Man 
3rd-7th Floors, Alexandra House, 


er, Deacons, 
long Kong. 


HILL DICKINSON 
& CO. 


MARINE AND NON- 
MARINE INSURANCE 


City Solicitors, HILL, DICKINSON & CO. seek an 
able and keen Solicitor to work closely within a team 
deriving its demanding work from the Marine and 
Non-Marine Insurance Market An interest in Product 
Liability would assist 


You should be at least 1 year qualified with an 
enthusiasm for, and experience of, commercial 
litigation. 


Language abilities will also be valuable. 
Send full C.V. to:- 


David Taylor 
Managing Partner 
Hill, Dickinson & Co 
Irongate House 
Dakes Place 
London EC3A 7LP 



TOWNSENDS 


SWINDON 

COMMERCIAL SOLICITOR 
The continued expansion in the 
Company/Commercial Department has 
created a vacancy for an Assistant 
Solicitor. 


and able to work on occasions under 
pressure on a wide variety of commercial 
matters. The ideal applicant will have 2-3 
years post-qualification experience, but 
recently qualified solicitors with relevant 
experience in articles will be considered. 
A competitive salary will be offered to 
reflect the experience and abilities of the 
successful applicant. 

This vacancy provides an opportunity to 
pursue a career in one of Europe’s fastest 
growing towns. 

Applicants should apply in writing 
with a C.V. to Julian George, 
Townsends, 42 Cricklade Street, 
Swindon, Wilts. SN1 3 HD. 


Computer Industry 

Commercial 


Lawyer 


Competitive salary + car 


Logica, a leading computer software and services company, seeks 
an able and enthusiastic lawyer to join its young and expanding 
c or por a te Legal Department Logica has enjoyed co n ti n ued growth 
since il was founded in 1969 and now employs approximately 2,400 
staff worldwide. Logica's activities range from the provision of large 
turnkey systems to the manufacture and marketing of a variety of 
products. 

The Legal Department has a key and challenging role within 
Logica. providing a comprehensive legal service to the co mpany and 
its subsidiaries, located both in die UKand overseas. The work 
covers a wide variety of issues, with particular emphasis on drafting 
and negotiating complex software-related agreements, intellectual 
property law, general corporate and company secretarial matters, 
and employment law. 

The successful applicant, who may be either a solicitor or a 
barrister; will possess the ability to provide practical advice to all 
levels of management and will enjoy woddzig as part of a teem. He or 
she is likely to have at least four years' experience of commercial law, 
some of which may have been gained in a computer-related 

environment. 

Based in Central London, the salary will be competitive and 
benefits include a company can 

Please write with full CV, quoting reference H/FC tor Mary Crowley, 
Personnel Officer; Iiogka International Limited, 64 Newman Street. 
London W1A 4SE. Telephone 01-637 9111 ext 2644. 


*0 


ca 


Seeking wider experience? 


CONVEYANCING LAWYER 


Our expanding property workload demands addition to our 
property team. Excellent opportunity to broaden experience and 
rapidly develop responsibility and diem contact with a small team 
dealing with good mixed property work. 


COMMERCIAL LAWYER 


Our commercial department is a dose knit team committed to the 
highest standards and working dosdy together to achieve them. 
Our vaired clients generate every conceivable kind of commercial 
work and respond to high calibre lawyers with. a positive and 
flexible contribution to make. Join an enjoyable but challeng in g 
environment 


Both positions would ideally suit an applicant newly qualified to 
two years, seeking to broaden and deepen his experience. 


Laytons is a predominantly commercial practice with excellent 
resources and working conditions of every kind. We enjoy working 
together in meeting whatever the client demands. Employmnet 
rewards are commensurate with our objective of selecting the best 
applicants and helping them to positively develop their career. 


Apply in writing with full c.v. in complete confidence to Miss D.C. 
Jefferis, Laytons, 16 Lincoln’s Inn Fields, London WC2A 3ED or 
telephone 01-404 5177. 


SHIPPING 

Financing -Sale and Purchase 


Our Shipping Department has an exceptional 
opportunity for a recently qualified solicitor with 
some previous experience, whether during or 
after articles, in shipping finance/sale/purchase 
and chartering. The successful applicant would 
become involved in a wide range erf work covering 
international shipping activities with emphasis on 
ship financing for both borrowers and lenders and 
on the sale, purchase and chartering of ships. 
Some travel will be involved. 


The prospects are excellent in this City firm for the 
right person, who will receive a very attractive 
salary and benefits package. 

-If you are ambitious bright and energetic and are 
interested in joining us, please apply (with full cv) 
to: David Robinson, Berwin Leighton, 

Adelaide House, London Bridge, 

London EC4R 9HA (01 -623 3144). 


BERWIN LEIGHTON 


Career opportanfties ibrjaing 


LAWYERS 



private clients. Our growth, combined with lire increased demand for sfxria&t services 
has created new opportunities for ambitious young Lawyers in Ae foflowmg areas. 


INSURANCE RELATED LITIGATION 


This opportunity is ideally suited to a Solicitor or Barrister with between 1 and 3 years 
relevant experience preferably gained within a specialist environment. He/she will be 
involved in servicing Insurance Companies, Captives, Lloyd's Underwrites, Loss 
Adjusters, Brokers and business clients and must be capable of consistently high standaids 

of performance. 


INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY & COMPETITION LAW 


To work closely with a Partner specialising in Intellectual Property and the legal problems 
associated with the development and exploitation of high technology, particularly in die 
computer and related fields. Experrenceisckarablein thehcensi^arKl trari^erof 
intellectual property, inch iding computer software, and t he dra fting of trading 
agreements. Although not essential, a working knowledge of hfcL. and UK com pe titi on 
and restrictive practices law would be most helpfuL This is a fast growing area of the legal 
profession and provides exceptional scope for gaining valuable expertise in the new 

technology environment. 


COMPANY & COMMERCIAL 


The type of work involved ranges from general advice to dknte on company and 
commercial matters through to dealing with Rill Stock Exchange listings and U-S.M. 
flotations. In addition thee will be opportunities to deal with take-overs, management 
buy-outs, banking and corporate finance, venture capital funding and joint ventures. This 
is an extremely varied and stimulating area that will offer the right person career 
development whilst broadening their experience and responsibilities. 


Applicants should preferably have at least one year's post qualification experience in 
private practice. However, we are also keen to hear from more recently qualified 
Solicitors ivho could play an important part in our future growth plans. 

We offer very attractive salaries toith excellent prospects and assistance with rdoa&ion to 
this surprising^/ pleasant part of the country toill be given. if appropriate. 

If you wish to meet us for an initial informal discussion, please write, with career details 

and current salary to.- 

CW. Hughes, Wragge & Co., Bank House, 8 Cherry Sheet, Birmingham 82 5JY. 

021-6324131 


Wagge&Co 




Y< 



INTERESTED IN 


CORPORATE TAX 




Our corporate tax department is looking to recruit 
solicitors who are newly qualified or about to qualify and 
who are interested in developing a career in high quality 
corporate tax work. Previous tax experience is not 
essential. 

The department, which consists of six partners and 17 
other solicitors, specialises in all aspects of company and 
commercial taxation, including corporate finance, capital 
markets, asset financing., international taxation, employee 
benefits, financial products and energy taxation. 

The work is extremely demanding and we are seeking 
those with high academic qualities and an ability to get on 
well with clients and colleagues. 

Long term career prospects and conditions of 
employment are excellent. . 

Please write, in confidence, quoting CT/T to:- 
D.E. Ranee, Freshfields, Grindall House, 

25 Newgate Street, London EC1A 7LH. 








f- 


A 




■unity to 

^1 firm 


TRENT POLYTECHNIC 


DEPARTMENT OF 
LEGAL STUDIES 


LECTURER ll/SENJOR 
LECTURER IN LAW 
(£8595 - £15873 pj) 


Partner Designate 

S. Leics - Up to £20,000 


Appficants should have a 
good Honous (tepee in Law. 
A higher deoree and a record 
of successful research aid 
piMcation would be added 
advantages, as would 
experience of legal practice, 
preferably as a sofiertor, and 
teaching experience. 


This medium-steed established practice to Leicestershire is looking for 
an experienced Solicitor to run one of it's long established branch 
offices. 


TJwjwWo^ h« a Conveyancing bias but indudes Probate. 
Matomonjal and Advocacy. The successful applicant can expect an 
^ty^tnership and. In the meantime, rewards commensurate with 


Further details and form of 
application are available from 
the Staff Officer. Trent 
Polytechnic. Burton street 
Nottingham NG1 4BU. Closing 
dale 8tb December 1986. 
Please quote Ref. No. H0281. 


Phone today for detaBs and action quoting Ref. 118 


... 


Legal Opportunities 


45 Station Road London N 2 I 3 SH 


BIRMINGHAM 

PERSONAL INJURY LITIGATION 




Excellent opportunity for Legal Executive/ 
newly qualified SoBcrtor to specialise in Trade 
Union related Personal Injury and 
Employment cases. Large firm require such a 
person to join a young busy office under the 
supervision of a senior fee earner. Some 
previous experience required, together with 
interest in Trade Union work. Salary ; 
depending on age and experience. Apply to 
Box NO BOX B03 . 


ENTERTAINMENT 

LAWYERS 

£ 15 - 40,000 p a 




MU 


We kaw severs! vacancies m both industry 
jmdi pmstss practice (at senior and joanr 
tew) for entertainment lawyers - especially 
these with experience in film, TV andrifeol 


JW ameer kicked Chambers or 
Sanya Raynor. (Roc. Consults.) 


Chief Executive & Clerk's Department 

Articled Clerk 

C7.311-SB.172 

Graduate holding a mod honours degree preferably In law: 
and who has passed the Law Societies final Examination 
remitted. You wiU be articled to the Solicitor to tfteCoimat 
and have hri opportunity tor framing and experience in 
Council's legal functions. 

Assistance mav t» given with relocation expenses. ■' 

§S7\ Application toms, ratnmablB 10/12/86, from Chief 
I Executive & Cterfc. County Han, Northafleitoo. North 
YmksMre DU BAD. Tel: PS69) 3123 ext 2815. 


74 Long Lane, London ECl Tel: 01-606 9371 

CH AMBER*; 

— AlttRTNERS-M 


CAMBRIDGE 

SOLICITORS 

hav* a vacancy tor an 


LACETS 


5MQ legal wyprwat* 
Good salary tor the 

right person. 

Peter Soar, 170 MB RokJ, 


tang Sofcaar am openem m 
Istpfa® rawed by ott csBUBUl 
But Mnod toning few m 
Bnwrt OtfeB. S»ry e £121*0 D* 
annum. 


Hrb ta 

GSURD WVUYS 




8 Pa* Rsad. hmm 
rat 882-Z7&S 












THE TIMES TUESDAY NOVEMBER 25 1986 


LEGAL APPOINTMENTS 


Lincoln’s Inn 
£ EXCELLENT 


Our Client, a well established medium sized firm 
which is resourceful and highly motivated with a ' 
Broadly based commercial practice needs to 
appoint at least two lawyers of calibre to deal 
with a varied workload of Private and Public 
Company work. 

Emphasis is placed on the highest level of 
professional competence whilst retaining a 
friendly atmosphere. 

If you feel your skills and ambition 
match the challenge of this expanding City 
practice, then contact James Davis in the 
strictest confidence or write to him at the 
address set out below. (Ref V104) 


LEGAL SELECTION 


FUMES 

Jim 

JAKflfRS 


160 New Bond Street 
London W1Y0HR England 
Telephone 01-629 4226 
Fax 01-491 7459 
mac 296942 


ViM///Mli„ 1986 


Two centuries strong and building 


Regional Solicitor 

Bristol 



We are a major national housebuilder operating through 
six autonomous regional subsidiaries. The growth of our 
business gives rise to further career opportunities for 
lawyers. 

As a first step we wish to appoint a Regional Solicitor 
to manage a hew Legal Department for LoreH Homes 
Western Limited. The Department will be based in Bristol 
and provide a full legal service to a regional company 
having a current turnover of approximately £30 mfllion. 
The person appointed will participate generally in the 
running of the business asa member of the regional 
management team. This is a senior position calling tor 
the ability to supervise staff as weH as bread professional 
experience of property development conveyancing. 

A fully competitive salaryiMiU be offered according 
to age and experience supported by ancfllary benefits 
such as an executive car, contributory pension and life 
assurance scheme, and 26 days annual holiday 

For further d^aSs please contact Mi: G.C. Lean, . 
Personnel Manager, Lovell Homes LfeL, Prospect House, 
Crendon Street; High Wycombe, Bucks HP13 6LT. 
Telephone High Wycombe 443751. 


Lovell Homes 


Opportunity to join 
WC1 firm 


An opportunity exists to join an expanding Department serving a 
number of substantial house building companies within a growing 
central London commercial firm. We are looking for 2 or 3 Legal 
Executives and also have vacancies for trainee Legal Executives. 
Ideally applicants wffl have had experience within the legal 
department of a major house buikfer but able persons with 
afi-round conveyancing experience win be considered. 

The work wifl involve afl legal aspects associated with residential 
developments, house sates, and house exchanges aid the 
applicants should have the ability to work under pressure and 
carry responslbffities of the position with a positive and 
enthusiastic attitude. 


This is an excellent opportunity to broaden a nd e xtend 
conveyancing abilities from a commercial angle and offers good 
scope for assuming greater responatoffity aUted to the support of a 
large conveyancing team. 

An extremely attractive salary/benefits package is ottered and 
applications including fuH C V should be sent as soon as possible 
to Ur C A Sharpies, Saunders SotoeH Leigh ft Dobm, 39/40 Eagle 
Street, London WC1R 4AE. 


PROPERTY W.l. 
PARTNERSHIP 


We are a taMJartaer West End prartwe with a strong 
entertainment bias. FoDowing expansion of our chentT»seu« 
require a personable energetic Solicitor with not less than two years 


comprising commercial am* 

variety of diems including property comjHniK, 
pension funds, mortgage documentation for tanking andfo^e 
company clients, landlord and tenant, devdopmen te, planning, 
licensing etc. demands both meticulous attention to detail as weu as 
a friendly and positive approach. 

A very attractive remuneration package with usual fringe benefits is 
offered with immediate partnership for the right person. 

Please write in confidence with foil c.v. to Steven Fisher at 25/27 
Oxford Street, London W1R IRF. 

STEVEN FISHER & CX). 



Legal Resources 
Employment Agency 
LOCUMS 

- ; needed now ..... 
for assignments 
: country /wide. 

Tefc 01- 405 4885 


SENIOR SUB 




Butterworths, the leading UK law 
publisher, is looking tor a Senior Sub- 
Editor tor the Encytopaedia of Forms and 
Precedents. The position is in the 
department which provides an updating 
service to both the fourth and fifth editions 
of th8 Encyclopaedia and involves writing 
and editing material for all sections of the 
Encyclopaedia. 

Applicants should be solicitors with 
experience in practice which, although It 
need not include specialisation in any 
particular area, should include the 
preparation of documents of the type 
found In the Encyclopaedia. Previous 
publishing experience is not necessary but 
the ability to identify and assimilate 
changes In the law, to express legal 
concepts dearly and concisely and to work 
quickly and accurately is. 

Salary a£t 2,700 pa; Terms and ConcStions 
in acoorctence with NUJ Agreement 

Please reply with full CV, not later than 8th 
December 1986 to: Rosalind Miller, 
Personnel Officer, Butterworth & Co 
(Publisher^ Ltd, 88 KIngsway, London 


w 





Technically Qualified? 


LEGAL EXECUTIVE 


Required by Property Company W.9. to 
specialise in residential/teziaiMy Htigataon. 


Salary up to £20,000.00 jxa. for right 


Fed you can do better? Why not contact us? 

We have vacancies for solicitors with suitable 
te chni cal qualifications who wish to specialise in 
PATENTS, TRADEMARKS, COPYRIGHT, 
CONSTRUCTION and other technically related 
fidds and we are offering pr emium salaries. 


Write to: P.L. IochnerB.Sc. (Chem) Stephenson Harwood, 
Saddlers ’ Hall, Gutter Lane, Cheapside, London EC2 V 6BS 

Telephone: 01-606 7733 


Ring 

01-289 4703/01-289 4704 



ASHURST 
MORRIS CRISP 


Due to the continued expansion of the Trust Department the following 
vacancies exist 


1. Corporate/Commerdal tax assistant with at least two years experience of 
CHy work required to join very active department advising on all taxation 
aspects of a wide variety of business transactions. 


2. Versatile trust lawyer who should be able to deal personally with tax 
planning for senior executives and other wealthy individuals. The right 
person should have (or will acquire) a good working knowledge of 
pensions and employee benefit arrangements and be able to advise on 
the trust law aspects of commercial transactions. 


Please apply with full c.v. to 


C.J. Amos Esq. 
Ashurst Morris Crisp 
Broadgate House, 

7 Eldon Street, 
London, EC2M 7HD. 


LEGAL ADVISERS 


The Legal Protection Group Limited is the UK’s 
foremost independent legal expenses insurance 
organisa tion and also provides a wide range of le^al 
advisory services. Due to rapid expansion of ns 
Telephone Advisory Sendee the Group now 
require to recruit wo qualified solicitors to join its 
pr o fes siona l t e am. 


Candid ates mint have a thorough grounding in all 
aspects of commercial and personal law. The 
service is offered, on a 24 hour basis and candidates 
wiD therefore have opportunities to work flexible 
working patt ern s from the Group’s Sutton 
Headquarters. 


Salary is dependant upon age and experience but 
will reflect die high level of professionalism 
required and the commitment to providing a 
round-thc-dock service. 


Please forward c-v. tee 


TJL ABLETT, 

The Legal Protection Grasp Limited, 
31/35 St. Nicholas Way, 



mwm 


Tmnnr 


COMPANY LAW 
TAXATION 

INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY 
PLANNING LAW 


Such is the demand for high calibre 
lawyers in the City and Central London that- 
our client practices are eager to interview 1 
Barristers with above average academic 
backgrounds and substantial pupfflage 
and/or post pupilage experience. 
ExceUsnt salaries and prospects 
are available. 


1m Tli i mini f fl| 

Staff Cnerlalictc to Hia lannl nmlf ninn runrlriuMiin 


Safi specialists to (tie legal profession worldwide 
95 AUwycb. London WC2B 4JF. Tel: 01-242 1291 
horn afar office hours) 


r IAL ; 


mm 


jiTiiB-'TF'ii 



1) Assam _ Sofic to to 
Lidfl il H m Partner required 
fur am an) Wgabon. At 
Hast IB ffloadis espenero 
of adman essential. 


2) Assistant sofctor lor 
mannonaai and doraesUc 
wort A) lean 12 norths 
oeoltn mpmL 


Good srtoy n) pleasant oSce 
to busy dty. Real tmpeos tar 
the npt person. 


tato j. E. Psr riagag Esq. 
Ctowta. 

an ipr. 


Eminent CHy praebca seeks a YeUaw Book speckdst ol 
Dim to five ysara POE lor top dower wxttoad end 
ucafa* prospects. 


COMMERCIAL 

MANAGER 


Solicitor or barrister. 
International law, 

leaning, knowledge of 
hi gh tech. Aged 35 to 


phs benefits. 
Arran 

Employment 
Agency Ltd, 
Harrow. 

Tel 01 868 0044. 


unumefl c. £2sx 

Expanding Contra) Union practice in superbofficre neks 
. energetic aoNciior of the to seven years POE to head the 
LMpajBon Department with Ohn l and Commenttl wertdoad. 
Definite partnership praepects. 


l&v 'Personnel^ 

Cto.IV ■- a twi lM.1 usirJrUile 


S^specallststottreleg^pfolesskjnworidtride 
95 AUwydi, London WC2B 4JF. Tet 01-242 1281 
{annplionfl altar office hoars) 


■ ^4 ' 1 ^ ' - ^ -i f i M i . * ■ 1 1 ‘ Js 4 9 ■ P r - i‘T ^i > j > J 



s&taHH-ireiL 


ARTICLED 

CLERKS 


Required to commence 
articles in September 
1987. Ten partner firm 
offers good training and 
a competitive salary. 
Apply with CV. before 
1st January 1987 to: 


Patrick High, 
Redfcra A Sugaiit, 
9 Railway Street, 
Chatham, Kent. 
ME4 4BZ 


CONVEYANCER, mainly Rut 
tJwdUU with raw CmiiukiubL 
■tor a Liverpool maw. con- 
Met «w Personnel: oi 242 
1281. aik afler bus Ms. 


imUTWH saunter Tonuy. 
Broad ***** ol work. iBSk 
wanes CMWIBM* 0906 

sates. 



U Executive re- ! 


TWTFfT 



Scod Rem 
0055. 

Wmol 01-683 

(ENOK. UteROon SoHcmr Un- 
der 30 Wen Midlonfe uiduv 
imt town nrm. 13k- Wosex 
Conwrtteiis. OM6 25183. 


THREE 

ASSISTANT 

SOLICITORS 


Stafford Clark & Co. require Three Assistant Solicitors, one for 
their City Office and Two for their New Cross Office. 


Experience preferred but newly qualified applicants will be 
considered. Salary negotiable. 

City Office: Residential Conveyancing with possibility of some 
Commercial Conveyancing. 

New Cross Office: One post in the Commercial Conveyancing 
Department and One for the Litigation Department. 

Please apply to: 


Stafford Clark & Co., 

28 Bush Lane, Cannon Street, 
London, EC4R 0AE 
Tel: 01-692 7161 (Ref:JJ) 


THE BUILDING SOCIETIES ASSOCIATION 


TWO 

SOLICITORS/BARRISTERS 


Required to work with the Head of Legal Services and other 
qualified members of the Department on a wide range of matters 
of concern to building societies - including the absorbing task of 
implementing the radical new Building Societies Act 1986. 


The first, more senior job envisages a solicitor or barrister in the 
late twenties with 4/5 years’ experience in private practice and/or 
with a local or public authority and who can demonstrate a track 
record of achievement in terms of initiative and the ability to 
supervise. 

The second post (an addition to the establishment) would best 
suit a lawyer of 24 or 25 with one or two years’ of the requisite 
experience. 

The salaries would be in the region of £16,000 p.a. and £12,250 
respectively (the figures offered will depend on age and 
experience) and both posts carry good pensions and mortgage 
interest allowance. 


For further details write to the Head of Legal Services at 3 
Savile Row, London W1X 1AF. 


SOLICITORS 


We have 
permanent 
vacancies in 
Litigation 
Company/ 
Commercial 
and Conveyancing 
country wide. 
Contact 

Legal Resources 
Employment Agency 
18 John Street 
London WC1N 2DL 
Tel: 01-405 4985 


ASA LAW 

LOCUMS 

Urgently 


Required in 
all areas 


01-248 1139 



ADVOCATE 




Young enthusiastic 
solicitor required to assist 
with criminal litigation in 
fast expanding busy 
department 

Our practice in North 
West Surrey has offices 
in Esher, Cobham and 
Ciaygate. 

Preferably newfy qualified 
- two years' experience. 
Please apply to 
Partnership Secretary 
Mrs Sheila Shackei 
0372 67272 


TRAINEE 

NEGOTIATORS 


Central Londons' leading Estate Agents require 6 
trainee negotiators aged between 18 & 24 years. Must 
have sound educational background, be presentable, 
energetic, and want to became one of Central Londons' 
top residential property negotiators. Driving licence 
essential. Salary throughout training period £8,000 per 
annum plus company car- thereafter earnings between 
£15-40,000 per annum + VW GTL 

Telephone 01 727 0530 Reference JMH 


LEGAL LA CREME 


FVtM OF SOLICTORS 'London 
SW1 nttiir* retenib- admitted 
colldlor. Could sun grrun who 
has hod good inirah pauibiy 
outMM London and who wt^hes 
la ao genera I work ui Cmiral 
London with an emphasis on m- 
ter wi up company 1 / 

co m ma ual work Salary rrooo- 
liable in rrvxxi of LiSooo 
Please wrue wtm cv to Antho- 
ny hui *a MorrKju street, 
UmUn SW|V 2PB. 


MOM MframMUe SoHcflw un- 
do* 1 30. Eoanlnned Herts 
country town ON ire u isk. 
Wessex COnMUUDO. 0935 

26185 


Nahmhb souenw bu*m 

P**tt»c* seeks newly auaUUed 
or emenenred Lawyw^tl !• 

Cl&OOX ndemaui scon 
RwnjummL 01-583 fiSfiS 


LEGAL EAGLES 
for the 
NEW YEAR 
£ 10,000 


Ewenenced legal weU n sa 
ae reauKd by the aiituM/cOJ 
CHtrtyaftMM and cwtfwiy 
commercai aw uraimaB 
d ms presugiiBB west fna 
law tom. 

For more data* * e#B Jo * 




The Berlitz 
School of 
Languages 

ne«te university graduates ■ 
BA dagm - to work m 
Somn. Plesfla write 



CHRISTMAS FARE 


KUCimiG to Liverpool or 
Manchester?, uusdion unwa- 
ry rewjtrrd lor hoOi cities, 
coated Uw Pcrtorumci OJ 
242 1281. Ant after ous ms 


INFORMATION AaOUanlS 

U 1,000 tar aa Sodciwra. 
Typtow. sauna education M 
nmune. nwnmn amoM. 
Would vuu A'levei/eraduaie 
bwrrtane*. Ol 657 &ZT7 Man 
Cr«« Bet cons 






















■sssa-’t 


26 


THE TTMES TUESDAY NOVEMBER 25 1986 



COURT AND SOCIAL 


COURT 

CIRCULAR 

BUCKINGHAM PALACE 
November 24: The Queen and 
The Duke of Edinburgh visited 
Harrow School (Headmaster. 
Mr Ian Beer) this afternoon. 

Her Majesty and His Royal 
Highness were received upon 
arrival by the Chairman of the 
Governors (the Right Reverend 
Michael Mann. Dean of Wind- 
sor) and the Vice-Chairman 

(His Honour Judge Vemey). 

The Queen was subsequently 
received with a Royal Salute 
an d inspected a Guard of Hon- 
our found by the School's 
Combined: Cadet Force. 

The Queen and the Duke of 
Edinburgh (hen drove to The 
Copse and. having been re- 
ceived the Mayor of Harrow 
(Councillor Miss Christine 
Bednell). Her Majesty laid the 
Foundation Stone of the new 
Craft, Design and Technology 
Building. 

Afterwards, The Queen and 
The Duke of Edinburgh met 
Masters and pupils in Shepherd 
Churchill Hall and attended 
Churchill Songs in the Speech 
Room. 

The Countess of Airtie, Mr 
Kenneth Scott. Mr John Par- 
sons and Lieutenant-Com- 
mander Timothy Laurence. RN 
were in attendance. 

The Duke of Edinburgh. Se- 
nior Fellow of the Fellowship of 
Engineering, this evening at- 
tended the New Fellows' Dinner 
at Apothecaries’ HalL Black- 
friars Lane. EC4. 

His Royal Highness was re- 
ceived by the President of the 
Fellowship (Sir Denis Rooke). 

Major Rowan Jackson. RM 
was in attendance. 

The Princess Anne. Mrs Mark 
Phillips this afternoon visited 


Marling and Evans Ltd, Goth- 
ing Mu! at Storehouse where 
Her Royal Highness was re- 
ceived by the Vice Lord- 
Lieutenant for Gloucestershire 
(the Earl St Aldwyn) and the 
Managing Director of the com- 
pany (Mr Iain Gegg). 

Mrs Timothy Holdemess 
Rod dam was in attendance. 

CLARENCE HOUSE 
November 24: Queen Elizabeth 
The Queen Mother, accompa- 
nied by The Duchess of York, 
Princess Alexandra, the Hon 
Mrs .Angus Ogjlvv and the Hon 
Angus Ogilvy, was present this 
evening at a Variety Perfor- 
mance given at the Theatre 
Royal. Drury Lane, in aid of the 
Entertainment Artistes’ Benevo- 
lent Fund. 

The Dowager Viscountess 
Hambleden and Sir Martin 
GiUiat were in attendance. 

KENSINGTON PALACE 
November 24: The Prince of 
Wales, CoIonel-in-Chief. The 
Parachute Regiment, arrived in 
Cyprus this afternoon where His 
Royal Highness will visit the 3rd 
Battalion. 

Lieutenant-Colonel Brian 
Anderson and Surgeon Com- 
mander lan Jenkins. RN are in 
attendance. 

KENSINGTON PALACE 
November 24: The Duchess of 
Gloucester, as Patron, this eve- 
ning attended the Annual Gen- 
eral Meeting of Cot Death 
Research and Support, The 
Foundation for the Study of 
Infont Deaths at IS Belgrave 
Square, London. SW1. 

Mrs Michael Wigley was in 
attendance. 


A service of thanksgiving for the 
life of Sir Robert Helpmann will 
be held at St Pauls, Covent 
Garden, London, WC2. at 12.15 
pm today. 


Harrow School 

The Queen and the Duke of 
Edinburgh visited Harrow 
School yesterday. After inspect- 
ing a guard of honour from the 
Combined Cadet Force and 
listening to the concert band, the 
Queen laid the foundation stone 
of the new craft, design and 
technology building. Tea was 
taken with masters, their ladies 
and pupils before they attended 
Churchill songs when the Queen 
addressed the boys. 

The headmaster and Mis Beer 
gave a reception afterwards and 
those present included the Dean 
of Windsor and Mrs Mann. 
Lady Soames and the other 

B vemots and their ladies, the 
ayor and Mayoress of Har- 
row, Sir John Page, MP. and 
Lady Page and Mr Winston S. 
Churchill, MP, and Mrs 
ChurchilL 


Birthdays 

today 

Lord Devlin, 81; Mr Francis 
Durbridge. 74: Sir Cosmo 
Haskard. 70; Professor A. M. 
Honeyman, 79: Miss Daisy 
Hyams, 74; Mr Dickie Jeeps, 55; 
Mr Wilhelm Kempffi 91; Mr 
Imran Khan, 34; Sir Fergus 
Montgomery, MP, 59; Mr Tony 
Neary. 38; Lord Richardson of 
Duntisbourne, 71; Major-Gen- 
eral Sir Peter St Clair-Ford, 81; 
Mr R. Seifert. 76; Sir John 
Sumraerson. 82: Lord Tweeds- 
muir, 75; Mr Bernard 
WeatberilL MP, 66; Mr Peter 
Wright. 60. 

Bobbin Ball 

The Royal School of Needle- 
work Bobbin Ball will take place 
on Wednesday , December 17, 
1986, at the Empire Suite, 
Tottenham Court Road. Tickets 
are available from the Chair- 
man, 217 Kings Road. London. 
SW3. Tel 01-352 1940. 


Memorial services 

Sir Godfrey Llewellyn 
The Lord Lieutenant of South 
Glamorgan and the High Sheriff 
were present at a memorial 
service for Sir Godfrey 
Llewellyn held yesterday at the 
Church of St John the Baptist. 
Cardiff. The Rev J. Buttimore 
officiated, assisted by the Rev R. 
Davies. Sir Michael Llewellyn. 
soil and Mr Nicholas Hackett 
Pain read the lessons. Mr Nicho- 
las Edwards. Secretary of Slate 
for Wales, gave an address and 
the Right Rev Denick Childs 
pronounced the blessing. 

Professor N. Cool son 
A memorial service for Profes- 
sor Noel Coulson was held at the 
University Church of Christ the 
King. Gordon Square, yes- 
terday. Deaconess Linda Mary 
Evans, Chaplain of the School of 
Oriental and African Studies, 
London University, officiated 
and Professor C.D. Cowan and 
Mr Nicholas Gerrard read the 
lessons. Professor A-N. 
AJIoppgave an address. 


Comfortable win 

Ninety-two teams entered the 
British Bridge League’s Annual 
Congress at Llangollen over the 
weekend (a bridge correspon- 
dent writes). After 13 matches. 
J.D. Baker’s team had a 
comfortable win, but only one 
victory point separated second 
and third. 

RESULTS 

i. J D Baker. D F HuowtL S Pmton. 
D L Parry. 184: a. j Y PoOjgr. A M G 
TTronuMon. a J Waiertow. I nolo. 
17S: 3. J Salisbury. G Needham. Mm 
M Pitts. D Debbage. 174. 


Appointments 

Latest appointments include: 
Professor W. Taylor, Vice- 
Chancellor of Hull University, 
to be Chairman of the Univer- 
sities Council for Adult and 
Continuing Education, in 
succession to Dr A. Etonian. 


Forthcoming 

marriages 


Mr TX. Bell 

and Miss E. Fitzalan Howard 
The marriage has been arranged 
between Timothy, younger son 
of Mr and Mrs John Bell, and 
Fii7a younger daughter of Lord 
and Lady Mark Fitzalan 
Howard. 

Mr JA. Likiermau 

and Mrs M. Thompson 

The engagement is announced 
between Andrew, son of Mr A. 
Lildemtan. of Maidenhead, and 
the late Mrs O. Likiermau, and 
Meira. daughter of Mr and Mrs 
J. Gruenspan, of Haifa, Israel 

Mr T.W. Matthews 
and Miss H.C. Morgan 
The engagement is announced 
between Tim. son of Mr and 
Mrs B.R. Matthews, of Chich- 
ester. and Helen, daughter of Mr 
IJ_ Morgan and Mrs JJ. Mor- 
gan. of Worcester. 

Dr WJVf. McCrae 
and Miss J J. Graham 
The engagement is announced 
between w. Monice McCrae, of 
Edinburgh, and Jennifer J. Gra- 
ham. of Aberdour. Fife. 

Mr B.O. Roxburgh 
and Miss F.E. Fancoart 
The engagement is announced 
between Bruce, eldest son of Dr 
and Mis LO. Roxburgh, of 
Goldsithney. Penzance. Corn- 
wall, and Fiona, only daughter 
of Captain and Mrs R. Stl. 
Fancourt. of Winchester, 
Hampshire. 

Mr N. Sethia 
.and Miss SLA. Webstar 
The engagement is announced 
between Narendra. son of the 
late Mr B. Sethia and of Mrs J. 
Sethia, of Barbados, and Sally, 
daughter of Mr and Mrs BJ4. 
Webster, of Cambridgeshire. 

Mr M. Trafford 
and Miss SJ.L Binns 
The engagement is announced 
between Martin, son of Mr and 
Mrs Harold Trafford. of 
Headington. Oxford, and Sheila, 
daughter of Mr and Mrs Peter 
Binns. of Holland Park. 
London. 

Mr R.W. Wade-Smith 
and Miss KJVf. Smith 
The engagement is announced 
between Richard William, el- 
dest son of Mr A. Wade-Smith, 
of Newark, and Mrs M. Ablett, 
of Leighton Buzzard. Bedford- 
shire. and Katrina Margaret, 
youngest daughter of Mr and 
Mrs J.B. Smith, of Harrogate, 
North Yorkshire. 

Mr R.V. W illiams 
and Miss N. Snook 
The engagement is announced 
between Robert, eldest son of 
Dr Roger Williams, of Kensing- 
ton. and of Dr Lindsay Elliott, of 
West Kingsdown. Kent, and 
Nicola, daughter of Mr Patrick 
Snook and the late Mrs Joan 
Snook, of Salisbury. Wiltshire. 

Marriages 

Mr K.W. Chetwood 
and Mrs W.G Densem 
The marriage took place at St 
Thomas' Church. Winchelsea, 
on Saturday, November 8, 1986, 
between Mr Knigbtley 
Chetwood and Mrs Mary 
Densem, widow of Guy 
Densem. A family reception was 
held afterwards. 

Mr D.G.B. Kinderaley 
and Miss l_H. Lopes Cardozo 
The marriage took place in 
Cambridge, on Monday. 
November 17. of Mr David 
Kindersley. youngest son of the 
late Major and Mrs Guy 
Kindersley. and Miss Lida 
Lopes Cardozo, younger daugh- 
ter of Professor Dr Paul Lopes 
Cardozo and Ottoline Barones 
van Hernen tot DmgshoL 


Sale room 


Now Indian art 
breaks records 


OBITUARY 

SIR GEOFFREY AGNEW 

Successful leader of a family art firm 


By GcnWaoNonHa, Side Boom Correspondent 

In an aut umn of record auction teenth cents? with 
prices, the e nth us ias m spread to 


In d i an art yesterday when an 
En g l ish prime coDector spent 
£145,200 (tmpubfished estimate 
£80,066-106,008) on an Indian 
bronze statuette of the dancing 
Siva Natargja da tag from the 
twelfth er thirteenth centary. It 
sets a new auction price record 

far Indian sculpture. 

The image of the dancing 
Sira, Us three arms carrying 
symbols of creation, mainte- 
nance auf destruction white bis 
fourth points the way of release, 
is coe of the most famous in 
Indian ait. He daaees on die 
demon of jgnaranrr and is 
enclosed ia a ring of flames 

symbolizing the transcendental 
fight of knowledge. 

The bidding in the sale of 
Indian, Himalayas and South- 
East Asian art was highly 
selective with the best lets 
running beyond estimates and 
many others failing to sdL A 
seventh centiny bronze figore of 
a BodUsatva fruled to find n 
buyer and was bought in at 
£3&OO0 (estimate £60-80,000), 
while a Khmer sandstone figure 
of the tenth century made 
£2&460 (estimate £8-16,000). 

The morning sale 
£264^72 frith 26 per cent left 
unsold. 

Sotheby's glass sale made 
£267,860 with 8 per cent unsold. 
The top p ri ces were for conti- 
nental glass with a beaker 
deliciously painted ia 
Naremburg hi the late seveo- 


a sepia 
landscape of oue ry ow ii rams 
and fondfid buftdines, at 
£41,886 (estimate £15-2$M6). 

Among the Engfish 

colour twist 
famous among collectors, under- 
freed the post-war spiral in 
prices. La the Appkidulle-Ab- 
bot sale of 1952 ft made £116, ia 
the Smith sale of 1968 £1*350 
and ia yesterd a y’s safe ft 
readied £13,750, going to an 
American coDeeSoc. 


A fine' BeSby 
armorial wine glass did not 
make its price in the sale room 
and was boeght in at £19,566 
(estimate £28-36,600) but 
buyer was fond immediately 
after the sale at £22^00. 

Sotheby’s sale of Old Master 
p ainti ng s in Amsterdam yes- 
terday wMwuhqr ran into, dftfi- 
calttes oversh&iting the i _ 
lots and 39 per cent was left 
unsol d, though a total of 
£727,232 was achieved. 

The most expem 
was an ornamental still Be of 
fruit, flowers and aberware 
which Sotheby’s had sttribnted 
to Jan Davidsz At Been; at the 
last aoaaent the de EEeem expert 
had decided that ft was by Ms 
sea with the result that ft was 
left unsold at 3604)00 gaQderg. 

The tap price in foe sale was 
483406 guOden (c 
66(1000 guilders) or £141,642 
for a river landscape by Jacob 



Sir Geoffrey Agnew, doyen 
of London an dealers, died on 
November 22- He was 78. 

Bom on July 11, 1908, 
Geoffrey William Gerald Ag- 
new was educated at Eton, 
where he was later atempo- 
rary history master during die 
Second World War (being 
unfit for military service), and 
later still an honorary fellow. 
From Eton he went to Trinity 
College, Cambridge, where he 
graduated in 1930. 

The following year he 
joined the family firm ofThos 
Agnew & Sons, fine art deal- 
ers, with which he remained 
actively associated - apart 
from the war yens - for more 
than half a century. In 1937 he 
became a managing director, 
and from 1965 to 1 982 he was 
c hairman. He represented the 
fifth of six consecutive genera- 
tions to have worked in the 
firm. 

When be took charge the 
firm was in a trough, mainly 
as a result of the world 
depression. Despite its good 
name, it was reduced to selling 
water-colours at about ten 
pifoeas each. Under his con- 
trol the prosperity of Agnerw’s 
ramp once againj to match its 
prestige. 

Though not an outstanding 
scholar or connoisseur, he had 
a very good eye for pictures 
and great shrewdness in the 
business of dealing. Expert 
advice was always available to 
him, and be knew how to 
weigh it up. But he kept the 
firm essentially a famil y affair, 
and when be retired as chair- 



man was succeeded by his 
kinsman by marriage, Mr 
■ Evelyn JoIL 

Agnew gave assistants to 
the national art collections, 
either gratuitously or on 
favourable terms. The knight- 
hood awarded to him in 1973 
must have been partly in 
recognition of his public-spir- 
ited efforts behind the scenes. 
He also befriended the 
Courtauld Institute and. out- 
side London, was particularly 
helpful to Eton College, the 
Fitzwilliam Museum at Cam- 
bridge. and the Whitworth Art 
Gallery at Manchester 
University. 

He had a sentimental inter- 
est in Manchester, because it 
was there that Agnew’s had 
begun, originally selling scien- 
tific instruments. For the 
same reason he acquired an 
early barometer for the firm's 
Bond Street gallery, but this 
was unfortunately stolen. 


In 1967 he published a 5 
irisiorv of the fir®- Agaev's 
W7-1967, to mark its 150* 
anniversary, ft was dear that 
the masterpieces which, over 
the yeais. had passed through 
the Ann's hands wouftk b y 
themselves, have constituted 
one of the world's fine st art 
galleries. 

To a sequel, A Dealer's 
Record 1967 - 1981. he con- 
tributed a more personal es- 
say, "The one that got away", 
describing how he faile d to 
secure the Velazquez portrait _ 
of Juan de flareja. Such fail- 
ures were not common raids 
career, and it was afl the mote j , 
sporting of him. therefore, in* J 
tell the story against himself 

fat addition to his wade for 
galleries, he was for many 
years a vice-president of *e 
Artists’ General Benevokan 
Institution, president of the 
Hire Art Provident Institu- 
tion, and chai rman of the 
Evelyn Nursing Home at 
Cambridge, which was named 
after his mother. 

Agnew rasa fine figure of a 
sum, of athletic buud and 
with a confident voice and 
surging pr esence that seemed 
to command success. Yet for 
aQ his bluff exterior, he was a 
man of rare searibffity and 
instinctive taste, as he 
showed, for instance, in his 
ha qg j n g of the Dilettanti pic- 
tures at Brooks’s Club. 

He married, in 1934, the 
Hon Doreen Maud Jessd, 
who survives him with their 
two sons and daughter. 


SIR ROGER JACKLING 


Sir rmra«m»pl Jakobovits (left) ud Sir Edward Pickering. 

University news 


City 

The City University wfll confer 
honorary degrees on the follow- 
ing on December I: 

Sir David Rowe-Ham, the new 
Lord Mayor of London, who 
becomes Chancellor of the 
University (Doctor of Letters). 
Sir Edward Pickering, Executive 
Vice-Chairman of Tunes News- 
papers (Doctor of Letters). 

Mr A R N Ratcliff Director and 
Chief General Manager of the 
Eagle Star Company (Doctor of 
Letters). 

Professor L B Archer, Head of 
Department of Design Re- 
search, Royal College of Art 
(Doctor of Science). 

Sir Godfrey Messervy, Chair- 
man and Chief Executive of 
Lucas Industries (Doctor of 
Science). 

Professor Abdns Satan. FRS, 
Director of the Internationa] 
Centre for Theoretical Physics, 
Trieste (Doctor of Science). 

Sir Immanuel Jakobovits, Chief 
Rabbi of the United Hebrew 
Congregation of the British 
Commonwealth (Doctor of 
Letters). 

Appointments 

Professor C D Harbcry has been 
.appointed a Pro- Vice-Chan- 
cellor from October 1. 

Dr KSVndi has been appointed 
Head of the Department of Ovfl 
Engineering. 

Mr C P Mayer has been ap- 
pointed to the Price Waterhouse 
Chair in Corporate Finance. 


Personal chain 
Dr J R Chaplin (hydraulics); Dr 
P E Osman (computer systems); 
Dr R J TaffierODteazdea Farrow 
chair of accounting finan- 
cial analysis); Dr F H Capie 
(monetary history); Mr G E 
Wood (economics). 

VbtUng irnft ■nri- 
Professor A O WBBf OnamemaOcO: 

Mr J M Brypq- < m*nn-nm B cU- Profea- 

NTRD Miner ttoftwara jrttsbOUy): 

Or H J Ihiwi ( U m nn aytOrH P 

Townsnd [<3i«nisiryk Mr B P n 

Denver-Green oegal stucOesX Mr P H 

While (property valuation and 
nianaDenienO: Pro f e sso r B Archer 

(etectnad Brineertm aid applied 
phyUCS); Professor M D FttzgedraM 


mmmm c mamprma Tt c B: Pro ( 

E OR ffQ U (computer sde&cetm- — 

sor A aw na w amlaw i sctiooO. 


Dr N KAresmtas (control i _ 

Dr B A KUchenbam (software L ._ 
tty): Dr J L Barbur (optometry and 
vfanai science). 


SENIOR LECTURESHIPS 
Dr M R Barovs (Ovfl enraneertnefc Mr 
C R Haloes cmatbaMttaO: Mrs J s 
Rennie Onformahon science): Dr M 
Hammer Mta policy ami manase- 
namuc Mr M J ftwe) property 
valuation ana management). 

LECTURESHIPS . 

Mr C F G Morrison unaBwmal 
G J Prtea (dnnbtry): MrGL 
(social sdoKC and ftununtUes): Mre T 
A Haines Outran acboop: Mr P P C 

ad» qmsteess acbooD: ate N S Fr iend 

(property vaf irattnn and j 

MrTEM 
Mr J C 


Grants 

BP kderaaltaHt: £146^00 to Prqtes- 
sor J H Atkinson to st udy frtc tku 
B et ween rate driven and ra taaed two 
^jr h un a fo jnlK ami roefttt- 
EEC/ Mineral Industry , R e sea t 
Organization: £97.239 to Profes sor A 
C Tseooo 10 rescarcn no vel add 
mUHm oxygen evotvtng electrodes. 


Sir Roger Jackhng, British 
Ambassador to the Federal 
Republic of Germany from 
1968 to 1972, died on Novem- 
ber 23, at the age of 73. 

Roger William Jadding was 
bom on May 10, 1913, and 
educated at Felsted School 
After leaving school he took 
articles and was admitted 
solicitor. While r e pres enting 
his firm in New York he was, 
in 1939, co-opted by the 
British consulate-general to 
serve as acting vice-consul. In 
1942 he went to Quito where, 
as commercial se cret ar y, he 
did work for the Ministry of 
Economic Warfare. 

In 1943 he became second 
secretary at the Washington 
embassy, again working on 
economic warfare. In 1946 he 
was permanently established 
and, after a secondment to the 
Cabinet Office and a stint as 
commercial counsellor at The 
Hng np^ had the first of his 
appointments to West Germa- 
ny. 

He was in Bonn from 1953 
to 1957, and did much to 
stimulate commercial rela- 
tions between Britain and 
Germany at a time when the 
latter was emerging from regu- 
lation by the Control Com- 
mission and embarking on the 
path of the "economic 
miracle’'. 

Jackling combined the jobs 
of economic adviser to the 
High Commission with that of 


commercial representative, 
and built up die consulates 
and consulates-general for 
promoting commercial activi- 
ty in what was soon to be 
Britain's second largest export 
market When the Bonn Hi$h 
Commission became the Brit- 
ish Embassy in 1955 he was 
made Minuter (Economic) 
there. 

In 1957, he was offered the 
post of Counsellor and Head 
of Chancery in Washington, 
an appointment which did not 
appear to reflect his seniority. 
However, his discharge of the 
first role in what was Britain’s 
largest market for exports, and 
his performance as what is 
virtually chief of staff of 
Britain's most important em- 
bassy, greatly enhanced his 
prospects. Already an ac- 
knowledged expert on trade 
matters, he also gained valu- 
7ble political experience. 

This stood him in good 
stead when, after a period in 
charge of economic affairs as 
an assistant under-secretary at 
the Foreign Office, he went to 
'the United Nations in 1 963, as 
Britain's deputy permanent 
representative. He was known 
for his forthright speeches and 
from 1965 had the personal 
rank of ambassador. 

His appointment to the 
embassy in Bonn acknowl- 
edged his expertise in econom- 
ics and provided him with an 
eventful few years. It was an 


economically far mote power- 
ful . Germany rh»t • to 

which he had been posted 15 
years before. After the return 
of a Conservative government 
m 1970 negotiations for 
Britain's entry to the EEC 
woe earned on with new 
urgency and h was the 
ambassador's task to ensure 
West German support for 
British entry. 

He returned to this country 
on occasion to remind leaden 
of a sluggish British industry 
of the economic prizes to be 
won in tire German market if 
and when Britain were a , 
member of the EEC 

After Bonn he was, from 
1973 to 1975, leader of the UK 
delegation to the UN Confer- 
ence on the Law of the Sea, a 
job in which his legal training 
was invaluable. But he re- 
tained his interest in Germany 
as chair man of the board of 
trustees of the Angjo-German 
Foundation for the Study of 
Industrial Society. 

Jackling was a man of 
immense epthusiasm for his 
work, and his mind produced 
a torrent of ideas. But he also 
encouraged his subordinates 
to have their say, and was the 
most approachable, as well as 
the most stimulating, of 
bosses. 

He married, in 1938, Joan-;} 
Tustin. She and two sens’ 
survive him. 


PROFESSOR ALEXANDER OSTROVSKI 


Marriott Hotels 
Christmas and 
New Year Sale. 


Weekends: £ 49.00 a night. 
Weekdays up to 50% off. 

PARIS, Avenue George V: LONDON, Grosvenor Square: 
AMSTERDAM, Leidseplein: ATHENS, Syngrou Avenue: VIENNA, Parkring. 


Take advantage of our seasonal offers 
to tie up business, visit family and friends or 
celebrate Christmas and the New Year in a 
luxurious 5-star setting. 

Conveniently located close to Europe’s ’ 
leading stores, Marriott hotels are ideal if 
you’re shopping for presents or looking for 'Weekday rate applies Monday through to 
bargains in the sales. With our warm, relaxing Thursday, inclusive. 


•Prices subject to local tax and law. Offer 
available from 15 November 1986 until 31 
January 1987. 

•Reductions may vary from hotel to hotel 
and are subject to availability. 


atmosphere and special prices, we're ex- 
tending the season of goodwill to everyone. 

For details and reservations, ffwifact 
your travel agent or 'phone; 

London 01-439 0281 


•Weekend rate applies Friday through to 
Sunday, inclusive. 

•Maximum of three persons to a room. 

No groups. 

•Offer does not apply to TWA (BGO) 
programme. 



AVarriott. 

HOTE LS*R ESORTS 


Institution of 
Mechanical 
Engineers 

The Institution of Mechanical 
Engineers is pleased to an- 
nounce that the following have 
been admitted to the class of 
fellow: 

Mr GW B artley. Quebec; Canada: Mr ■ 
CJ. Brt feUfora . canterbury. Kent: Mr 

aiU-QMonei P J G Carp, HEME: Mr R 
J Crawford. Belfast. NorUwrn Ireland: 
Mr P J Dolan. Brentwood. Essex: Mr 


Professor Alexander S. 
Ostrovski, gifted mathemati- 
cian, died m Switzerland on 
November 20. He was 93. 

In 1918, at the age of 25, be 
wrote his now celebrated pa- 
per, Acta Mathematica. It was 
a landmark in valuation the- 
ory, one of the sharpest tools 
modern mathematics has de- 
veloped for the local analysts 
of complicated structures, and 
its effectiveness in many 
mathematical disciplines may 
well be compared with the 
application of ejection mi- 
croscopy in the sciences. 

Ostrovski was born at Kiev 
on September 25, 1893. He 


changed early in his studies 
from engineering to mathe- 
matics, leaving Russia after 
the revolution and malting a 
rapid career in the scientifical- 
ly fruitful climate of the 1 920s. 
His first work, on the Galois 
theory of algebraic equations, 
was published when he was 19 
years old. 

After a short period of 
inspiring teaching and re- 
search at Hamburg Universi- 
ty, he became professor at 
Basel in 1 923 and taught there 
until his retirement in 1961. 

He wrote so me 4,000 pages 
of works on different areas of 
mathematics, including alge- 


bra, geometry and calculus. 
Three textbooks that he wrote 
in the 1940s are still widely 
used to train mathematicians 
and other scientists. 

In his later years he became 
interested in the development 
of effective constructive meth- 
ods in numerical analysis, 
helping to pave the way for 
integrating calculus and com- 
puter science. 

Ostrovski was a man of iron 
will, a resolve which was 
reflected when, at the age of 
85, he broke his right arm but 
continued to write equations 
with his left hand. 




FATHER ANTHONY MULVEY 


M R Drifts. 

U n it e d States: Mr J A H Ford. 
Inverness, scodand; Mr DE Gardner. 
Hove. East Sussex: Mr AG 
Mr P C MHO. S _ 

_ j Le ecft- Swansea: Mr D B 
Lowe. BrooMxxusa. Lancaster: Mr S J 

MadrtejLSoOimn. west Midlands: Mr 

I H ManhaB. NeOstno. Renfrewshire: 

Mr L C Martin. Port of Spain. 
Trinidad. West Indies: Dr J 
McCaDoorai. KHraaco& n. Renfrew- 
shire: Mr D M e o roedama. Mourn 
Lavlnta. Sri Lanka: Mr J R Mlchaetts. 
Watford. Hertfordshire: Mr A A J 
Miner. Gravesend. Kent; Mr S j 
Monaghan. Putney Scotland; MrB R 

Noton. ColumDus, Ohio. Untied Stales: 

Mr O Pfowd enT SurOtton. surrey: Mr 
K c Raw* - “ ' 

Mr HAH I 

w Sander: 

Australia: Mr F s yfces. Q5twy» Bay. 

CJwyd: Mr p Turner. M 

P nu y slilre. Mr J D C varoan. 
FarnBm. Surrey: Mr F A WaBts. 

Kon9> 


Father Anthony Mnlvey, 
Roman Catholic parish priest 
in Strabane, co Tyrone, whose 
condemnation of violence 
won him admiration from 
both sides of Northern 
Ireland’s co mmunal divide 
died on November 1 1. He was 
60. 

Anthony Vincent Mnlvey 
was bora on May 24, 1926, 
and educated at St Cohimb’s 
College, Derry, St Patrick’s 
College, Maynooth, and at the 
Irish College in Rome. After 
his ordination in 1950 he was 
appointed curate to St 
Eugene's Cathedral, Deny, 
working in the pre dominantl y 

nationalist Bogside district. 


He was a founder member 
of the Deny Credit Union in 
I 960. He also founded the 
Derry Housing Association, a 
non-political group set up to 
solve some of the city’s chron- 
ic housing problems. 

In 1978 he became parish 
priest of Melmount, Strabane. 
His opposition to violence 
regularly (nought him into 
conflict with para- militar y 
organizations. 

In 1981, after he had criti- 
cized tile IRA's hunger strike 
campaign, the walls of his 
church were daubed with in- 
sulting slogans. His parishio- 
ners immediately removed 


them and applauded him for 
his stand. 

In 1 982 he drove away a car 
with a suspect bomb inside it 
from the Ballycoieman hous- 
iire estate. During riots he was 
often seen on the streets urging 
the rioters to stop. 

Father Mulvey was a de- 
lightful man with a disarming , 
boyish smile. His churchman- 
ship was conservative, and he 
described himself as “rather 
an old fogey.” ' 

His funeral was attei wM by 
over 2,000 people, among 
them a representative of the 
Republic’s Prime Minister, Dr 
FitzGerald, as well as senior 
Church of Ireland leaders. 


S.: 


f 


Luncheon 






Royal Orer-Seas League 
The Nigerian High Commis- 
sioner and Mrs Dove-Edwin 
were the guests of honour at a 
dinner given by the Royal Over- 
Seas League last night at Over- 
Seas House, St James's. Mr 
Manecfc Dalai, chairman, and 

members of the ce n t ra l council 

of the league, were the hosts. 

Lecture 

Carlton Club 

Lord Home of the Hired deliv- 

ered the Carlton lecture last 
□ight at the Carbon Cub. Mr 
Enc Koops. chair man of the 
dub, presided and the guests 
induded high commissioners 
and European ambassadors. 

Dinners 

HM Government 
Mr Malcolm Rifkind. QC Sec- 
rciary of State for Scotland was 
host at dinner held at Edinburgh 
Castle yesterday for tele vision 
and radio executives. 

Bakere' Company 

( The Lord Mayor and the Sher- 
iffs attended a dinner given by 
the Bakers' Company at the 


... t . 


Mansion House yesterday. The 
Master, Mr J ohn D. Copeman, 
presided, assisted by his War- 
dens, Mr R.B. They, Mr FJ. 
Bentley and Mr JJE. Knhy. Lord 
Justice Lawton was the prin- 
cipal guest and the other speak- 
ers were the Lord Mayor and Mr 
Alde rman Raul NewalL The 
Znher guests included the Bishop 
of Winchester, the President of 

Reunion de$ Gastron omes, the 
President of the National 
Association of Master Bakers 
and the Deacon of the Incor- 

poration of Bakers of Glasgow. 

City of Loudon SoSdtars* 
Company 

Sir Max Williams, Master of the 
City of London Solicitors’ Com- 
pany, presided at a dinner held 


Fellowship of 1 

The Duke of Edin burghT 

Fellow, attended the dinne r of 
the Fellowship of Engineering 
heid last night at Apothecaries’ 
Hall, London, to welcome the 
honorary- fellows, foreign mem- 
bers and new fellows elected in 

1986. Sir Denis Rooke presided 
and Professor PA. McKcown 
replied to the toast to the new 
fellows. 

OM Salopian Club 

A dinner to celebrate the cen- 
tenary of the Old Salopian Club 
was held at the Institute of 
Directors. 116 Pall Mall, 
London. SW 1 , on Friday, 
November 21. The president of 

the dub, Mr M.L. Chartesworth, 


Kenneth _BemIl, Chairman of Hnmi>nfTh^Hircai i nM i 


the Securities and Investments 
Board, Sir Edward Evdeigb and 
Mr KJS.G. Hindis,. Junior War- 
den, also spoke. The guests 
included: 

OjBcT of Hie 

ffltiSbmfffl'Siyaf 
WoUMMiar Law SocfeOes. the te- 
teraof Uw gg aw*. cutters’, 

C^ranerecf 

A£gr% f ca i& 

Society. 


Home of the HirseL Lord Home 
proposed the toast of “The 
Schools" to which the Head- 
master of Shrewsbury School, 
Mr S J.B. Langdate, replied. 

Asglo-Belgtai Society 
The Anglo-Bejgian Society held 
their annual dinner, to celebrate 
Belgian Dynasty Day. at the 
Angio-Belgian Club yesterday. 
Viscount Hood was in the chair 
and Viscount Tonypandy also 
spoke. 


Institute of Cost and Manage- 
ment Accountants 
The President of the Institideof 
Cost and Management Accoun- 
tants. Mr Peter Lawrence, was 
host at a dinner held Iasi night at 
Merchant Taylors' Had, by 
permission of the Master and 
Wardens, riven in honour' of 
Lord CockfiekU Vice-President - 
of the Commission of the Emor 
pean Communities, who earlier 
in the evening had delivered the 
first AntfaonyHowitt Lecture on 

the subject of “The changing 

face of Europe - Britain’s 
opportunity to ‘rouse and bestir* 
Among the guests were; 

lady CKkneM. Lord and Lady 
Mr and Mrs a w Howm. strMJcnscl 
and Lady Caiman. Sr Jonn and Lag 
Hoskyns. Mr am Mrs i C R Byao. Mr 
C W Donovan. Mr and Mrs Bated* 
Farann. Mr R Eiphtck. Mr and MtaP 
C Fasrflrtd-Mr j Jc Maurar. p rofcgor 

wVw Non**** “OWadirn 



Service dinner 

I4th/20th King's Hnssars 
The annual oflic&s dinner of 
the 14th/20tfa King's Husssis 
was held last night arihe 
Cavalry and Guards Club. Ma- 
jor-General Sir Michael Fainter^ 
Colonel of the Regiment, : 
presided. " 


. fj v ; 


1 W ' 


3V": . 







THE TIMES TUESDAY NOVEMBER 25 1986 


BIRTHS, MARRIAGES, DEATHS 
AND IN MEMGRIAM 


PERSONAL COLUMNS 


And Mmd B W. wimmw aball not tai 


BIRTHS 


] 




- "I <i 


.t*. 


FOItnt - On November Slat, to Lon- 
aon. id Robin amt Jay. a son. 
T? . Matthew Marta." 

-.1 • On November 19th. at Wcst- 

It mWter !*'»<“- toSeeha (nee Wan) 
. L giid t&gei. a -son. Adam E dwa rd. 

,• dum . on November 25nL 
pSwwy Hosptlst TunbrUor Wens 

- oeorgum Cfare. -A “*■ 

Katherine. 

H[OHA— - em Nnvernfarr 2g»L tn Bun 
i, gnd David. anoUier daugfner (Teresa 

. Frances! 

'Jtoun - On November 22nd. at 
-? TJ>JA-H- AKToUrt. u Canine fate 
hmm wife of Mtoor -Room Jeouler 
RJUV a son. Frederick Robin 
Charter 

.r, HBMN ■ On November 22nd. to Mar* 
i. sanTtnfie FttabeoM) and Derek, a 
7 ton. Bn WiW. . 
il i ipcriT. On November lom 1986. to 

- y»~na and Peter, a eon. Douglas 
f)£ Edmund, a toother for Duncan. 


W1DW - On Nm-amber lath, sud- 
denbrbm oeacefoOy at home at the 
s>d of atomy day. Dm fnfie Brock) 
m tor 72nd year, beloved wife of 
ftck. mother or Michael and David. 

- Funeral Sendee at Beckenham ere- 
matortiBii. EtTnere End. on Tuesday 

.. 3td December at zso nro. No flow 
giiuea se. but aooMRms if desired to 

■-sfanssnasr 

GOODWIN - On November i 

PwoNUBy at home. 8 LNtooi Road. 
Seteey. alter a long flint** tamely 
horae.Janet Audrey (nee SeweiB. 
wow* wtfe Of Geoffrey, devoted 
and oenerou* mother of Lom*. NJgd 


m^Fbnnerfe. or Oerktos. Etaem w* 
Headley. Funeral Service and Requl- 
mi Massat SL Pete's. Seisey. near 
CMetwsJer on Monday December 
IN- at 2 tun., fallowed By private 
cremation. No dowers mease, but do- 
«f desired to st. Wtlft*rs 
Broytr 


' : Ti~ 


■jOTERUaWI - on November 60 l to 
«awbi aid FMertco. a son. Marc 
. Christian. 

- ' SUM - (hi Novaneber 22nd. at Uw 
Portland HospitaL WI. to GnBan 
*■ Reed) and Michael. 

JW Alexander Edward. 

; atcFAU- - On November 19. to Molly 
^ and Humphrey, a son. Haldane 
- Michael Ryan. 

PRESTON - Oa November 20th. to 
-Jane and Maes, of Btackheath. Lem 
* don SEA a dangMer. Georgina 
dare, a 

- HOONCV 1 On November 2l£L tan Nbr- 
wir m FeneHa (toe Ksndenttote) and 
Patrick, a sen. Jemma, brother to 




«k 


- ST JOHN - Oa November 23rd. lo 

- vanS. tote MraoJ and Robert, a 
7 datMhier. MeUasa. a sister tor 

O piina- Eriwnrd and Laura. - 
'TRUEMAN ■ On Eld November, to 
■4 jane tote Warstow) and Peux. 

- son. Charles Oliver, a brother to 
' Matthew. 

“ NEHMUSOH - On November 22nd 

* 1986. to Sarah and Gavin, a daugh- 
ter. Henrietta Anne. 

WHMtM D - On November 18th. to 
•’ New Vork- to Christine (toe PbUHns) 
and Stoian. a son. thigh Francis 
Allen. 

- x XDMKIt - On Novembers lth 1986. 

* to EBzobetti tote Bro wn ing) and 
'* Mictuto. a son. Dtraltrte Edwin. 


MATHS 


*f*.e 

i : I* 


:her 


£; 


ASKEW - On 22nd November. Sir 
- Geoffrey wntlam Gerald, devoted 
husband of Doreen, much loved fa- 
too* of Jomlftr. Jonathan i 
■ joiian and tkar grandfather. and for 
' 56 years Director and Chairman of 
" Thin. Atoiew & Sons. Private funer- 
. ah Memorial Sendee to be 
1 announced lata*. 

ATKINSON - On November 2«h. 
_ Bstcen Ann Curnaw. aged S6. Dear 
.. wife, mother and Olend. Private cre- 
madon. No ftowoa. Donanons pie 
% ' to The Hospice. SI Bamabus Home. 

* Worthing. 

* B O UHBNS - On November 2lst 1986. 

peacatoBy ai home. Gay owe Crop- 
per) adored wife of Richard and 
motber of Rebecca. GUes. SopMa and 
V ' rroaiiPth anir le a ndmoHiar of HuSl 
M ark and Louisa. Funeral private. 
No Rowers, please. A Service or 

* Ttanbafdvtoa for her Kfr win take 

- place at St James' Church. Oapham. 
J Yorkshire on Friday 5th Decembo- 

at 4pm. at which an who knew her 
, wU he watconw. 

BKITTAM-On Zlst November 1986. 
peacefltfy while asleep at borne. 

- John, much loved husband of Kate 
. and father of Michael and Andrew. 

* Funeral Service at Tunbridge Weils 

_• Crematorium on Friday 28th at 12 
. noon. Family, flowers if Do- 

s' nations to the Kent and Sussex 
. Scanner Appeal, c/o Ord - Home. 
’■ Funeral Service. 33A Quarry Hm 

* Roto. Tonbridge. TN9 2RS. Tel: 

* 0732 363746. 

■ IN LOCK *' On Smxtay November 

23rd 1986. peacefully at borne. 

* Sedge EWt lymtogtotk Captain PbB- 

* ip enteben O.BX~ Indian Csvaby. 
aged 86. beloved husband of Nicky, 
father of Peter ad grandfather of 
Richard and Geofftw. Funnt to be 

: heUatStJQlmibeUptM.BNdre.at 
. 12 noon on Saturday November 
29th. FamBy Bowers oniy. 

CLARKE -On November 22nd, peaco- 
r tuny at home, fbrttfledhy the rites of 
the Church. Motor General Desmond 

* Alexander Bruce (Bunny), beloved 
7 husband of Madeleine, father of Des- 
mond. Antoinette. Dominic. Amide 
and Damian and dear grandfa th er to 

. Ms 11 yanchfldren. Reqnfem Maos 
Navemher 26th at St CuthtwiTS. 
wtgton at 10-30 pjn~ followed by 
burial at CaUbeck. 
da SMBMM2 - On Saturday No- 
vonber 22nd. cecfl HavUland de 
Sammarex. at Sauamarez Manor 
Gnernstf. In Ms 80th year. Funeral 
Thunday November 27th at 2 pm. at 
St Martin*. Gnernesy. ' 

B UWOmiHi - On November 
22nd 1966. peacefully at borne after 
a long Bines. Rachel, much loved 
wife of Richard, dearly loved modwr 
of Rupert. Edmund and Charles and 
loving ynndroother. Funeral Service 
to beheld at GouereGresi Oeraato- 
riton (west Qhapeo on Friday 28th 
November at 2 pm. FamQv Dowers 
only. 

FRENCH - On 21st November 1986. 
peacefully, Frank John French. 
O.BX., D.F.C.. AJ-.C.. Wing Qndr. 
RJAF. (RttO. Dearly bekrato hus- 
band or Vera, loving father of V^erte 
and eon in law DavM and very dear 
Bandto of John. Anthony and Rob- 
ert. Funeral service at Sl John* 
Church. FeHxBtowe on Thursday 
271hNoventteral II am followed fay 
cremaUan- Fondly Dowers only, do- 
nations to RJLF. Benevolent Fund. 
No letters please. 


HALL • on November 22nd 1986. af- 
to- a loos Alness. Michael Howard 
Spencer Mas. beloved husband of 
.Anne and much loved father of 8u- 
sap- JuBa and Catherine- Private 
creruBtloa. Faulty flowers only. Do- 
nations. if desired, to St Francis 
Hospice. Havertag-Atte-eower, Es- 
*»■ Memorial Sendee SL John* 
Church. Longfaton. 12.00 nooq Fri- 
hav 28 th November. 

HNITON - On November 2tsL AUda 
Mary, hi Nuntborpe. Ctovehmd. 
Peacefully, aged 81 years. Beloved 
wife of the late KUUand and much 
loved mother of Jane. Patrick. David 
and Jobnm. Funeral at. Nuntturpe 
Parish Church on Thursday 27th 
November at 2.15 pm. Family flow- 
era only: donations If dashed to 
Teeside Hosptoe Care Foundation. 
Registered Offlce. 285 Acktam Road. 
MddkAorough. Cleveland 
HOBART - On November 22nd 1986. 
Patrick and Susan together to a mo- 
tor accident. Parents of Christian. 
Pentfto. Henrietta. CatoraMiw and 
Ntcotette. Funeral private. Service of 
Thanksgiving lo be arranged. 

HOLT -On 22nd November, pe a cef ul ly 
but unexpectedly in her sleep at her 
borne in Ampney Cruris, in her 82M 
year. Ruth younger daughter of 
Grape and Mary KoaofKnu&fonL 
and stiter of the late CMhertne Holt. 
Funeral Service at CMtenham Cre- 
matorium. on Thursday 27Ut 
November at 39m. Enatdries to: 
Amos WQsan & Son. Funeral Dtoec- 
tora. OtettaUnni 614457. 

HOOKER - On November 21 st .1986. 
the Honourable Margaret Hooker, 
much loved mother of Jane and Lov- 
ing grandmother of John and Susie. 
The funeral win take place at 12 
o'clock on Thursday November 27th 
ai SL Peter* Church. The OW Town. 
BexbUtoo-Sea. 

10 - On November 23rd- to London. 
Hb ExceBenty Dr Eddie Guao Um 
HO. MAAS.. F.R.CJP™ Hkto COD- 
ndssioner. for the Republic of 
Singapore to the Comt of SL James, 
beloved husband et ©id HoL and fa- 
ther of Peter and At Leen. Fur 
funeral arrangements contact Singa- 
pore High ComnUsslou. totopbone 
235 8315. pending later announce- 
ment Family flowers only ptoaso. 
but donaUons. U desired, to The Roy- 
al Mandril Hospital Cancer Fund. 
tVBW ■- On November 2lsl 1986. 
peacefully in bospttaL Enid Marga- 
ret aged 82 years of Hayes Cottage. 
Broad Windsor. Dorset Dear wife of 
Aubrey and dear mother of Jane and 
Katherine and much loved grand- 
mother. Funeral Service at Yeovffl 
Crenrtorium. on Thursday Novem- 
ber 27Ui at il ant No dowers by 
request donations U desired for Port 
Bredy AmnUy Fund, c/o AJ. 
Wakety A Sons. 91 East Street 
Brktoort Dorset 

KEPPEL - On Novembo' 200» 1986. 
suddenly- LL Cdr~ The Hon WbUer, 
Ktopet DSC. RN.. befoved hus- 
band of Lucy and father of Judith. 
Grtsptan and CoOn- Funeral at SL 
Andrew* Church. Meonstoke. an 
Friday 28th Novonber at l2Jioon. 
Family Down only. 

■ULOOUir - On Thursday 20th Novem- 
ber 1986. peacefully after a short 
Illness. at-Daraet Couniy HomBel 
Dorchester. Victor Ernest aged 71 of 
Brtmley House. Stoke Abbott. Dor- 
set totting and beloved husband of- 
Georgina, dearly loved father of 
Mergnref and GflUad and fpnndpn of ; 
CsraL Usa. Jes sic a . Tom and Nicky 
aid father -totow flf .Ntcbobs and 
PMBp. Flmaiat Servlm at 8L Mary* 
Church. Beomtottsv Dorset al 24on 
On Thursday 27lh November, fbh 
lowed, tay tniamenL Fk»w«n or 
donation If desired, for The British 
Heart Foundation, may be sent to. 
AO. Down Funeral Directors. 66 
South Street Brtdpttrt. Tet 0308 
22643. -. . 

LANE - On X2th November, peacefully 
ai WesteBff-ooSea. aged 95. 
Frederick Harold John, formerly of 
Paris, daar fother of Wtnton and 
much loved by Ms grandcbfldren.. 
YVeOe. Andrew and Jamie. 

WiL EO O - On 2001 Novonber 1966. 
suddenly. Roderick George- bom 

2Rh Aprs 1892 at Calliope. Queens- 

land: ; AustraUa. Father of Pamela 

Wrts. grandfather of OUver. Simon. 

Catbome and James. Great grandfa- 

ther of Rochet SaakU,- Hannah. 
Martin. Rosie and Tom. .Funeral at 

Woking Crematorium 3 pm Friday 

28th November. 


- On 22nd 
Novemher.peacBflffly. ABce Eadora. 
at home aged lot. wife or (he late 
Arthur Mortimer O.RE~ Private one- 
manoo. No flowers please. Further 
enquiries to Philip Blatchiy & Son. 
Funeral Directors Ltd. Hghcrofl 
House. Woolaston. Lydney. Gtos. 
Telephone Netoerend 34a 
MONTON - On November 2 1st 1986. 
peacefully. Joyce (Sandy), in her 
97th year, formerly oC Rudgwtck. 
DaugMe-oTthe itoe Mr ad Mrs PJt. 
Morton, of Wlxenfont Loved aunt 
and great aunt. Cremation private. 
Service of Thanksgiving al SL 
James’ Church. Share on Friday No- 
vember 28 U> at 2J50 pm. No Bowers 


MCHOLSON » On November 23rd 
19B6. peacefully to hospaaL Surgeon 
Capt C B Nfrtxttson CBE- MB. BS.. 
MRGS- LRCP., DLO-. RN iRtrdl. De- 
voted husband of Peggy. limch loved 
folher and grandfother. Funrral 9er 
vice at Eastbourne Crematorium, on 
(today November 28th at S^Opm. 
Family Dowera only please, dona- 
tions tr desired, to r u k.b a.. 6 
Avonmore Read. London W14, 
NBO80 - On 22ud November 1986. 
peacefully. Una Kathtan MAE.. 
J-P . wuow of Henry Ninuno. 
C.B.E,, MAE.E. Cremation family 
only; Memorial Service at SL 
Mary*. Matching, on Friday 19th 
December at 2 JO P*P- Donations, if 
desired, tn lieu of dowera. u 
SL Mary's Church. 

PAmrm - - See Woodburn. 
PETERSffll- On November 18th. John 
LeUfe. Much loved and mused. Fu- 
neral Service at 1 pm. on Thursday 
November 271h ai Hoty Trinity 
Church. Mattock Bath, followed by 

cretnauou at Markesum. 
MCHARDSON - On November 23nL al 
his home in Marlow. Bucks. Austen, 
dearest husband of Paddy and father 
of Pam. David and Charles. Funeral 
Chmern* cretnatortura Ttrarsday 
November 27th. liJio am. FantAy 
flowers only. dwiMtiom to Marie cu- 
rie Memorial Foundation, c/o 32 
West street Marlow. Bucks. 
RtSDOtf ■ On November 21st. very 
suddenly and peacefully. - at 

Stoneyirows. WateheL Fraik Perd 
vaL (Chubb), son of the late Mr. and 
Mrs. Frank Rbdon. of Willi Ion. 
Much loved and loving husband of 
EDeen. father of Roger and Ms wife, 
and Jan (Edwards) and. greatly 
nttmed by Ms four grandchUdren- 
Funerai- Service at Taunton Deane 
Crematorium, ca Thursday Novem- 
ber 27th at 2 pjn. Family dowers 
only. DonaUons If wished to St. 
Margaret* Somerset Hospice, c/o 
F.H. wnhcnmbe & son. Funeral 
Directors, wanton 32420. 

SHAW - On Sunday November 23rd. 
PoOy (nle Ivy RussellL betoeed wflb 
of John Shaw, of Gweteamow, Piaa 
Sands. Penzance, peacefully tn the 
Edward Hato Hospital. St Ives. Cre- 
mation 3.00 pjm. Thursday 
November 27th. Kento ChapeL 
PemoounL TTuro. No flowera. no let- 
ters please. 

STACEY -On November 21 1986. Da- 
vid Henry of Newcourt. Sandwich, 
husband of Gwen and father of Jill. 
Nicolas and Tom. Service of Thanks- 
giving. St Ctemeuts Church. 
Sandwich. 12 noon on Monday De- 
cember l. Please no dowers. 
Donations if desired to The Pilgrims 
H ospice . 56 London Rfl. Canterbury. 
STUNS - On November 22nd. peter 
of Dauntoey Park. Wttls. Ftmeral pri- 
vate. Memorial sendee 11 am 
Tuesday 2nd December at Datmuey 
Church. 

SU8DCH • On 23rd November Jn Not- 
tingham. at the untimely age of 36. 
Jooetyne - Jo - (nee Schwab then 
Stamm), wife of Dr Brian Sugden. 
mother of EBen. Kale and Luke, si*- 
ler Vyvlan and only dautfiter of Aim 
and Raymond Slmson. 78. Pork Rd 
B ec ke nham. (Cent 
THACKER - On Sa tur day November 
22nd al Tyndale. Preston Road. 
Yeevfl. Gilbert Dae Dwyer Way. 
Husband of the late Judith, deafly 
loved father of Arthur. Shirley and 
Michael and grandfather of (heir 
children. Funeral Service at YeovB 
C rema tori um , on Friday 28th No- 
vember at B3a DonaUons to Water 
Aid. c/o GH. Cook & Son. Bond 
Street. Yeovffl. 

WEEDS - On November 24th 1986. 
at Nairobi HomitoL after a short Ill- 
ness. Lieutenant Co mm ander Hugo 
Edward Forbes. 1X5. C.. Rjg. retired, 
beloved husband of Prudence and 
much lo ved fattier and vand-falher. 
WARREN -On 2iat November, after a 
abort fflness. Frank Harold Larner. 
aged 9a Dear brother of Dorothy, 
father-in-taw of Claire and grandfa- 
ther of Julian. Susan. Fiona. Lucy 
apd Toe. C rema t i on at Hay combe. 
Rath, on Thursday 27th November 
1220 . family flowera only. 
WOODBURN - On November 19th. al 
Sumner Lodge Nursing Home SL 
Aimes. Oorowatt. Elizabeth, a piano 
teacher of great tttsttnrtfon. much 
loved and missed by pupils' and 
Mends. Funeral Service at West 
Hsits. Crematorium. Garshm on Fri- 
day November 28th at 1.45 tun. No' 
flowera please. Donations ff desired 
for EttZBbetti Parfltt Memorial Fund, 
should be sent to Director of Music. 

SL Paul* Gbls School. Brook Green. 
Hanuneramfth. London W5 7B8 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


WHY HOT HELP US lo help unwanted 
don. lobe waned into imim mnn by 
brtbon Pine RklsK Dog Soanuan'. Pno 

ry Rd. AxM. BlfMirt SiL6 WD Trt 
nft 0WM8268 1 ). The Urgnt nMMte- 
structlM Dog Sanctuary tn Gccal 
Bnutn to Mp uii> mere dooi HHtus 

Hm- Bya Wont n TuhiUy roOunul Dtera 

tore maHabie on rtwuii xnw cards 
HM. 


BIRTHDAYS 


CooBrausanons on your eotn 
btrtMAy ‘Vou wear n welir 


MARK ANDREW El Vo^a TbrOTTMrth- 
day smug. Lose Anne 


ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 


_ a . . __ - — The fMnWn of 

Ruth ant Tim are most oreatfol for the 
man4 i 2 , 5 ,,B * 5 ® r and ftou-era 

rwtvrt since the acckkM. Each will be 
•dweMM * soSrStosiBilr. 


SERVICES 


CXMMdmhol 
HiroosBoM LK lor mm 


nave. Heart » Heart. 32 London Rd. 
Twickenham. Mtddx 01-892 3051 



Fori 


I DeskTop PubusUdb and do- 

lenttes can MtfUaCen ID JO 

Ltd. Tet 01-93T-9S58. 

Fat IHf CVS Lid profrmiona] cvmn- 
hmt mar d ocum e ms . Details: 01-631 
S38B- 

nuwnar, low or Mamasc. An 


areas. DateUnr. Dart UJ161 23 Abmodan 

i w& Td: oi-ne ion. 


IUK Debt* recovered by Sottatan. Na- 
Uonwklr Tet 01 272 8201 
CAPITAL CVa prepare man aaawy amr- 
mtNTI vtucs. 01-607 7900. 
COHVEVANraM By tuny qusllfled Sottcf- 
tom £180 + VAT and uanthi 
dbbursenunts rtno c >244 3193%. 

NEOKTMttE* FOR AKWIttn 6 
Designers Permanent ft temporary 
muons amsa spectattn Recnmoeni 
Consultants. 01 734 0532 


WANTED 


U wunra Large Me 

chain. exhndUig 

desIcs.tioakea9es. Mrais ft oil patnUngs 
etc. 01 946 76BS day.Ol 789 0471 eves. 

ROYAL ASCOT - Private tmx mrolred 
June. 1987 any day. Pteose tetephonc. 
Ol 938 1664 

COM Com. saver. Mnoe/ooBecOon. Pur- 
chase cash. Prtvut Ol £06 1168 

WANTED Edwardian. Victorian ana an 
pauiM furniture so Aihson Ol 947 
0946. 6674069 Gazzan Lane. Earaucid. 
SWI7 


FOR SALE 


MEMORIAL SERVICES 


- A Memorial Service wfB.be 
heM for Mrs. Frances Gore at SL 
Mary* ChunSt. Barnes on Saturday. 
Decembo- 6tb at 11.16. 


IN MEMORIAM -PRIVATE 


DRAKE - Nick, remembered always 
with love. 

UER - John. 25Qi November 
1972. A much loved fattier and 
grandfather ‘Primus biter tees' 
Margaret and David. 


ORTHS, MARRIAGES 
HEATHS AID H MEHMUAM 
£4 a Km + 15% VAT 

(minimum 3 lines) 
Anoouncements. authenticated by 
the name and permanent address 
of the sender, may be sent la 

THE TIMES . 
PO BOX 464 
Virginia Street 
London El 9XS. 

or telephoned (by telephone sub- 
scribers only) ta 81-481 3028.. . 


Science report 

Frozen blood clue in 
fight against cancer 

From Tooy Samstag, Oslo 

■ Norwegian doctors are ex- from the patients who faler 
cited about preliminary re- developed cancer has quite a 
•suits of a cancer research different structure", Mr 
project involving samples of Thomson added. “The prob- 
blood which have been frozen lem is that we do not know 
for 10 years. precisely why". It was possible 

. . Blood from 100,000 appar- that the findings would allow 
ently healthy people was put preveotatfve treatment, 
into cold store during the He pre liminar y findings, 
1970s. When the specimens which are to be published next 


were checked against the sub- 
sequent beaJth records of the 
donors, the samples from 
some of those who had devel- 
oped cancer showed signifi- 
cant changes, yearst before any 
clinical symptoms had be- 
come apparent 
The study, code-named the 


year in the Norwegian Medi- 
cal Association journal, are- 
confined to cases of thyroid 
cancer, of which 50 developed' 
out of 3,000 cancers in the 
group. 

IX frocydis Langmajk, 
head of the cancer register. 


Janus nmiecL was devised bv *3* patients who 

,L. UAnu'tai; n ncir. roid cancer were touno to 


the National Hospital in Oslo, 
who died before the prelimi- 
nary results were known. 

The researchers who carried 


have had higher levels of 
thyroid gobuim in -their early 
samples of Mood. In retro- 




mil flTSnS Dr sSS spect at least, that was not 
Hr Evsiein totally surprising. It was to be 
that pathology 

«i Raster in hope that pnsgmig the development of 
SiiSimi^ po^tlhe an endocrine tumour might 


way to an early warning 
system that could save mil- 
lions of fives. 

Four hospitals have contrib- 
uted to die study, which the 


generate changes in hormonal 
secretions. 

■ The challenge for the future 
was to extend the findings to 
the more common, and less 


UHU W IUB hlUUJ, ffUIUI „iA. 

National Society against Can- easily treatable, cancers ot tne 

cer says is the first of hs kind brrast, intes^ ^ 

.v- — u um- e i Norway, s3k added, was 

interesting not only in the 
scale and expertise of its 
cancer register but' also in 
population patterns of thyroid 
cancer. That form of. tumour 
was &r more coxntnon in .tbe 


in the world. “We found 
significant changes - in the 
blood taken 10 years' before 
the cancer broke out", Dr 
Thomson sakL **On average il 
looks like the changes develop 
five to six" years before cancer 


could * 'normally - be 'north of the country than m 
diagnosed'''. The study team ihe sputh eas^ atonathe coast 


suspects that there may be a 
dieimy tink.-- 

“It turns out that the Wood 


rather than inland, and. three 
to four times : more "common 
gpheranyiir women. - 


Church news 

Appointments 

The Rev W Btfdwtn. Vicar. St 
Thomas- HaMwrt. 
dtHter. to 



Mary. Henoury. diocese of Ms uu. to 
he Team View. SI Agnes " ~ 

Simon wtoi St, Werhurgh 

Mlnimy. same diocese. 

_Ttv- R«r M C BCtttw, Curate. 



View. Ostngion^ — — 
Tlie B?vP NWGrara&on. Asststmul 
Curate. St. Raul..' waneden Mooq 
diocese of Manchester, to be- Vicar. St 
Andrew. Raddiffe. same dlooese. i 
The Rev R M Giles, recently 

—— Priest -tn-efaarae. SlUpkjyTa 


. diocese of CWct 
r^nuor for the 
xf Education., sa 


of 

The- S* 7 W Hartley, vicar. 
Barrowford. Netecm. dioceseof Black- 
Kint. to be Vicar. St Peter. Satestmry. 
Btackbuni. same diocese. 

The Rev A F Homer. Vicar. H eeley. 
diocese of Sheineu. lo be vicar, 
wooddtttan with Saxon Street, and 
KtitDnu. and Priest- tortiarge^ Astuey 
with SUvertey. and aieveiay. diocese- 

The ' fiw S C KMer.l Curate. 

5fiES?-A.: 

vicar ut toe 
UtncbamMan and 

The Rev s H MasJen. Team Rector, 
gt BartooIapFw wiui Sl Francis and. 




of 


Wilfred Team MtaHiry. diocese of 
Southwark, to be also Rural Dean of 

R T?w‘RGv J p > H MjS^Chaplain. 

to be Vicar. Milan, dtocra 

U 8»b G Murphy.. Rector. San- 
i .diocese of Norwich, and a' 

■ outetm to the Queen, to be 

Christ Qustti cabana. 

Tlteltev^C^rtU. assistant Curate. 
Birch with F&Uowftdd. dtoccae of 
Mmctiwter. to be Rector. St am 
Morion, same diocese. 

The RctJ Orate. View. AD Salob 
with -a Peter. Luton, moons of St 
Vicar. St Matthew, 


dam st Aiwtrew. aa dSey. a 

Of Manchester, m De Asstoant 

trior. 81 Peter. HaUlwdL sun 


Rawlings. As dstanr 

■M in- 

■dl- 


P.J 


The Rev l „Renwlck.. Vicar. 
Cuvertev with TuekhilL dtocsse of 
HerefortL to be Rector, St Mugsm. 
Whatley Range, dtocrae .ef Mancnes- 

^The Rev D Ridley.. Teem Vicar. 
Penrtoi wim Newton nmnu and 
Ptumoton Wall, cttocese of taraste. to 
m -vicar, s ufaty toe Wsw. 

odMwML fMoceoc of Manchester. 

Retirements and resignation . 

The Rev R M Firth. Vicar. Marion. 
lji-Ctev«i tod. dtocesc of Ywk. to retire 

™Vj*fSv M J Kelley. Hec tor . Sl toe 
wHh QuHtooclt. diocese of Truro, has 

re TS^The Rii‘ E N/StatoK, Vicar of 
Rotttngde&n. diocese of Chichester. 
nUmfon . November 1. 

Citnreb ia Wales 

Canon l LI navies, vicar of Hay. 

and CapeFy-Ffln. to &£Viear 
m and Norton, Powys. 
Swansea and Brecon. - 


credit 

1 year (APR tV 6 i. Lew Intcmi 
rates over 2 yeaniAPR 9.64ki ft 3 yean 
I APR I 2 J* 0 ) Written duouttaw. Free 
Catafofisw: 30a HUnade Roan. Nwa. 
0T$67 7671 

STEAriVAV Grand. S' to-. Rosewood. 
Cxced knl condttMu. CUBOO. TeL- 01 
SS 6 4981 . 

■Ham of Netdcbefl Cbriatmas deitver- 
fea stm avsaaMe oa numerous uinw, 
sane* tn Use CNppendtfe^ Henclewtalte 
and Sheraton styles and Qsqttsli oak. 
Hu ndreds or Hems or «««-«< form- 
tor*. Saeoe of Use OneH reaHca (imtorr 
in tototand. Neaebed. mar Healey an 
Thaaea KM91) 641115. BaurnemouUi 
10202} 293SBO. Toostam 1039207] 
7443. Berkeley. Ctos 104631 810962. 
FOR Mda Mr Auction 3/12/86. A art 18 
HesoiewMM style mahnoany carver 
duln ad a mahogany 3 pour dJstina 
note laMe ivtr tans <m «*» now at 
MALI AMB. Bocardo «ouml Tet Ox 
font 24LSSIL 

(1814-19851 Thh Xttas tfve 

someone ai an oftatnal taue dated tbs 
very date they were barn. Dl.WWUi 
free 1870’s aewsimiiern Yesterday* 
News. 45 rxmdnnaaa Road. Oolwyn 
Bay- Tet 0492 SSI 195/631303. 

OLD VOW FLACSTOKC*. cobble seta 
NaOenwkla Wtu. daUveries. 
TOjOaO) 880039 

fhesit (mauty woor carnets.' At trade 

Driers and under, ateo avaUatrie 100 * 
eora. Lara* room sue rtmoanis under 
naif normal arice^Cbanoery Carpets Ol 
406 0463 

SANTA’S BALE at. Tods- Nat wdy 
- imreaeatotite video and TV prices but 
unbeatable part-exrttanve aUoviances. 
9t Lows' Slaane SL SWt. TO. 730 
0935 

SEATTMDBXS. Best tickets for an said - 
'out events- Our dents Indnde mat 
malar companies. OvdU canto aaoeptM. 
01-828 1678. 

THE TIMES 17SS-18B6. Other UUcs 
avail. Hand bound ready for presenta- 
tion - a ISO “Sundays’*. Cl 2-60. 
Remember When. 01688 6323. 
TKKEIS FOR ANY EVENT, rials. Star 
USN Exp. Chess. Les MR. AD theatre 
’ and BtartaTei: - 821-6616/826- 
0996A.EX / visa / Dtters. 

AES. Neff. Gtewmau ovens, hobo, dbbh 
wastiers. fridges, etc Fhsl delivery. Try 
us - We are unfaooiaMri Rebate 40403. 
GATS, CHESS, Les Mtaand Ptummn. AH 
theatre and span. Tel 439 LT63. ar mar 
jre cred i t etto. 

fUMj / HttHM L cookers, etc. Can 
you buy cheaper? B ft S Ltd. 01 229 
1947/8468. 

LYNX COST FUB tonga. CxreUent condi- 
tion. £2.500. £4.600 new. Kt mink cool 
N ever warn. £t JXXL Tet 079 373466. 
S TE OH FAY MMUam grand 00 87243. Ed- 
. wardian roeewood case. Good 
condition. £3.600. .0293 22ZTB 
USED WHISKY maturing barreto for sale 
in quantity- Pham (03377) 333 for 
tnformauao. 


FOB SALE 


YOU’LL BE FLOORED BY 
OUR PRICES AT 
RESISTA CARPETS 

WicandenastuWWnatw'aiMrkutcs. 
Csiri-nMy hard wrarum tot- oeu mon- 
ey can buy £8.96 gn M N t ua 
Merakakm ven« pile carpel 14 ptetn 
coloan. Bata in under lay 12* um 
from Mach. 7 year wear quarantre tor 
nocne or oHKP. £4.7S a or *q yd * val. 
Ptuo U«e largest sriretton ol pUrin cor- 
priu>9 in London 

646 Fulham Road SV6 
207 Kavmtorft Hilt Hammtead NWS 

TcWI-794-0139 

free Esumates- Expert Fitting 


WEDDING SUITS 

□tamer StnK 
t wwm Tail Sui ts 
aurntm to lure 

BARGAINS FROM £30 

UPMANS HIRE DEPT 

7a Charms emu m 
London wes 
Nr Mcnw Sa mho 
01-240 2510 


RENTALS 


HOLLAND PK WU 

(n oitranne quin cd tic sc. a folh 
fimohol inicnor ttrat^xed mnoonte 
<{7d £ In floor. 1 Large uning room 
mifa hskonj.aiuaniie drams/ mom- 
10 s room. Fua> fitted kucfum/ 
bicaiC.-y rm. : bats. 2 baths. Co Let 
1-2 jean pnrf OOO PW. 

Home 01 603 3461/ 
Office 01 409 2299 


For nip brat 
rents} -urlectton M 
OL'Airrv 
FLATS ft HOUSES 

Hi prune London arm 

QURAISHI 

CONSTANTINE 

270 Earb Coart Road. SWS 

01-244 7353 


OVERSEAS TRAVEL 


ITS ALL AT 
TRAILFINDERS 

WocMwide low com nrabto 
Tito belt - and wr car prove it 
19&OQO cltonb since 1970 

AROCKD Tut WORLD FROM £760 


SYDNEY 

PERTH 

AUCKLAND 

BANGKOK 

SINGAPORE 

HONG KONG 

DCLHI/80MBAY 

COLOMBO 

NAIROBI 

IOBLRG 

LIMA 

LOS ANCEUS 

NEW YORK 

WASHINGTON 

BOSTON 

HONOLLLU 

GENEVA 


O/W RTN 
£374 £660 

LA 03 £600 
£390 £703 

£209 £360 

£209 £418 

£Z4B £496 
£231 USDS 
CM2 £420 
£248 £396 
£270 £454 
£776 £606 
CIVS £308 
£ 99 £198 
£137 £274 

£137 £774 
£281 £437 

£ 73 £ 89 


CALMS COMMON. FamOv tta. Three 
44<*te taedroop ta Large 

lorrjn ion/ <u nmo Cnstral heium 

Waunnq machine. Tctopbew. Trim 
aon. Car park Garden. £180 per wrek. 
Pnvutoiv owned. Him. Ol 286 3774. 


FLATSHARE 


ASHMAN LAWYEX IM. 271. non Hnoker. 
in London, tram January lo June 87. on 

8nhUi CQtteS Feilowsrap. arete com- 

torUMp ramp, in private house 

paying pmi Hunpitoaa area l 
lamL Kuufly write: Suwion 
W ON . Hgtabtaytriae 25. 6941 
AtbMMCti 1- west Germany. 


SUCXHUTn Prof female for ssall 
mod douse In nice area- Own room. £37 
pw Inc. TctOI-882 8707. 


FULHAM Female to share rater ground 
floor naUo flu with 1 other £225 nan 
Inc TW Ol 361 6105 after 6JO pm. 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


THE SLOANE CLUB 

YQUSUMOfflfADBReSS 


Ctos* to Stoana square and 
KBUMSHUm; tha Stataw CU> to 
BaMf stoatoO tar vans lo 
foKtoo^no Rstoea. Sm Housasof 
Praia™™. HMBtratand and Uw 
Of. UM appoHM twiroents . <M 
affi colour tNMtfona. radto. Owa 

OH totaphano. One untsvai 

wcknmlv tor MteftEwatont 

psoMfod duagraatn anti to 
ana on AsricS EngBsti austss. 

FscBdM tor bustoato meedngs. 


hSSSSo 


j«MiOWr90 



■rSaesE 


ti-nagtn. 

OoctoSaLT. 


Arthritis: 

Seriously affects 
over 6 million 
people in the UK 


Pietae.adu*atamtohttpusnow. 
AtegatytoiuipuauiOie future. 

THE ARIHimiS AMD RHEUMATISM 
COUNCIL FOR RESEARCH 
<1 Eagle street. London WC1R 4A8 


Taocer 

To gafa w we cko bcat iL 

We flaul o*er one dmd of afi 
n a n gch into the giCT cn ttoo and. 
an of cancer io the UK. 

He^> to by Mxfim ■ donation 
or nake i legacy vx 

Cancer 


Carapace 


2 Cariton Boose Teenee, 

Ttpsrn LosdmSVIY SAIL 



W M SOM TOM Pro fes sio n al m/f . 3040. la 
share luxury owner occisoera flaL 
non SIMM A Ken Htgh Tube. Braattoiny 
rumtoned. dM bednn. with exceptional 
view,, own BaUmm poU roo* terrace 
garacn. Share housekeeper for fun 
cleaning A laundry. 24 hr phone an- 
swering service :Ql-957-7838 
MEWS House off Frnuman Rd SWS. 3 
bed. 2 bom. I garage, suitable for 4 fe- 
male sharer*. £42 per pen p/w Td Ot 
682 8673 alter S pm. 

FLATMATES Selective Sharing Wen 
esuto introductory service ptx td for 
apoL 01689 3491. 313 Bromdon 
Road, sws 
FULHAM WB Prof M/F SO*, on*. In 
Matoooenr dose lobe, share 2 others. 
£171 pan end + deposit irenanablei. 
Ted- Ot 388 6526 after 6-300-10. 
HMMBATE 3rd fowl p e tal rsqidre d to 
share spactom flat nr Hampstead Heath. 
Age mid 20*. n/s. £140 pm. Tel; Ol 
348 7 690 after bom 
CHOHHCK Prof p aged 28-38. targe O/R 
In house. Nr T/Green tube. £170 pern 
end * deposit. Td. 01 747 0012 teves) 
LAFHAM Prof F SO'o. N/S lo vftare llaL 
O/R. Lge doable room. £40 pw and 
Tel: 01 228 3058 after fi.OOpm- 
C LAP H AM 4th Prof N/S. 234-. lo share 
large house. £170 pan Exri. Td: Ol 
407-0709 tot or 01-6764481 (Hi 
FULHAM Prof F. 22-28 yn. N/S, O/B. tn 
ranted home, garden, nr Tut*. £200 
pan exd. TetOI- 486-7344(ofncrl 
mtfZ CM. own roam hi luxury flaL TV, 
CM. Video. Conumtal £46 pw 

Tet 01-461-6841 
SWI 8 Prof n/*. m/f to share lge? bed e/b 
ItaL o/r. Avail now. £40 pw End. Tel: 
01-437-1019 (Ol or 01-870-7862 (Ml 
SWfc Pieman! room in ten- house. N/s. 
Near tube. Fulham Br oa dway end bus- 
es. £250 OOO pan Inc. Teh73l-3668. 
SWS, Twin bedded room in atiradtoieCH 
noL Very close lobe. Soft 2 gats- £60 pp 
pw. Td: 491 7696 (Dior 373 881 3 (EL 
*8 3rd prof. F. 30's. n/s. o/r. in house. 
£176001 inctustve Tet 01-748 5791 af- 
ter sxxjpm 

SW18 Prof M. lge O/R. Nr Sr Waterloo 
10 mins, city 16 rains. £40 PW. Ol 946 
6889 after 6pm 


RENTALS 


EXECUTIVE Seeks hm 
flat/hoose: up ta £800pw. Usual fees 
red. PMBtps Kay ft Lewis. South of foe 
Pork. Ctietoca office. 01-362 Blit or 
North ot the Pork- Regent's Park office. 
01-686 9882. 

PUTNEY SW1S. Lovely nu M a nU t r . 
bright ft spacious rime to an amenUea. 
3 bednns. lge lounge, fully (Id Ut/bfal 
area, bathrm ft 2 WCS. Ffeosaot tana 
(ram veranda, gdn. Co let only- £160 
pw. &«raishi C on sta nt ine 244 7363 
SWISS COTTAGE. AhMtaleO- b ea ut l fMI 
to Hr flat cxunpteuly r e f u rnished- 8 
badrras. toumge. if lot wutt insrt i litos . 
bntfinn with shower Avail immediately 
for long ca leL Only £160 pw. Qnraldu 
Constantine 244 7353 
■ARNES S/C fum flaL t dbto bedrm. dt- 
una na. uu. bam. paUo. CH. £480 pan 
aH ud. suu iwi nem coapta. Tah Ol 
876 6002 

EATON PLACE, Ml Newly refumtahed 
paUo flat to foe heart of Brlgnivta. 2 
Dble Beds, ensulte Shwr. Bath, fteccp- 
Dining HaU. New UL Patio £27Spw. 
fjWm B28 8251. 

MULAMS PARK Wll. Superb 2 bed Oat 
surrounded by gdra. AnratUve Kto open 
Plan recep/dtottig. styttstuy itestowrd kU 
ft both. Avail iiwnedlaiety Co led- £200 
pw. QuraUM Constanlfne 244 7353 
BMMHTDH WB. Mognlftcatt views, 
luxury unfUm Interior deshmed 5 bed. 2 
recep. 2 bath flat tn porter ed Mock. 
Avan now on tarts tet. £476 pw lad 
H.W. ft CJH. Buchanans: 361 7767. 
(WUfO sm. Very attractive nuHan- 

ene nose to Victoria ft Hyde Pk. 3 

' Dedrms. 2 bMlofl ensuile). bright recep. 

H ptoe kU with machines. Co tel £230 

pw. OuraMd CoratanHnr 244 7383 
SMI Very spadous 2nd Door flat with 2 
large excellent sunny Rectus. Master 
Bod with ansufle Baih/Shower dm. 2 
ftbr Dbtes. 2nd bath. KU/BfW. £4O0pw 
V. Neg. Cootes 828 8261. 

SW3. stunning interior decorated 2 bed 
ftei on 4fo noofto p owerad Meek- Good 
location. Avail now on tone let- £300 
pw tori CH. ft H.W. Buchanans- SSI 
77S7. 

WESTVOURNE TERRACE W2. Newty re- 
(urU&hed nuommeffe. 2 (fine brdrms- toe 
recast/ dining, hath with shower, many 
rtn. ff kit Co Id £160 PW. Qorafchl CWi ■ 
riontlite 244 7363 

AMEfllCAM BANK utgenOy reomres lux- 
ury fUb/butises. ettefaea. KMghes- 
bridue. Betoravta areas. £200 - £2.000 
pw. Burgess Estate* Agents 681 6X36 
BEHSABUTCHOFFrer luxury nronerites 
bt SI Johns Wood. Regents Park. Makla 
vale. Swim Oott ft Hampstead 01-G86 
7S61 

CH E LS E A SBT3. Cnanning 2 bed flat to 
poguM; wnck oft Kings SUL Avail now 
oa long M. £200 pw. Bucftanans: 331 
7767. 

El Really -saner malmuiffte. 2 dbte bod. 
well turn/ unfUm. owtiesUng Boatn. 
gdns. Pking. £lEOpw. Tet S65 0070. 
KEHSMQ1QM WB malsopeite wito style, 
lust ref ur Mailed. Recep. 2 dM beds. K ft 
B. wmtwr / dryer, turbo shower eft. 
£240 pw. 937-3964 / <07221 72639. 
KENStMCTON ft Surrounding areas. 
WMe constantly cbantfng cobecOan of 
runtlobed flats ft houses on our camml 
uw. Benham ft Reeves 938 3602- 
■OBCHT UtVW 
Uon of (lari ft 

kntoMsondoe. Ki 
and other 

KEKSiKSTOM LnlUrn. aurer large flaL 
1/2 recep. 3/4 beds. 2 bin. nit/umer. 
newly dec . carper ed. Co. teL £38000 
DW ot 727 4721 / O! 831 T466 
SOUTHFMLDX SWU S/C fundslted fttL 
I bedroom for professional couple. S 
mins. tube. Ct» to shops. £95 pw exd. 
tails. Tel 01 878 8B90. 

937 9881 The n um ber to remember 
when Seeking best rental properti e s to 
central and Mima London areas 
£!50/£2.000pw. 

ALUM BATES ft Co have a large wlec 
Uon of flats ft houses avail for long / 
short tet rm £160 00 p w . Ot 499 1668 
HELSEA swat 1 bedroom flaL Using 
rm. kiL hath. Excellent location. Long 
let. £780 pan exd. Tetut se 1-2562 
OHFltHEA WMNMF Charming 2 bed flto- 
tel. use of kitchen, patio. Cos CH £120 
pw tod. Tel: 01- 531 1130 levcsj. 
C HFIW A Stunning designer studio flat 
off klnos Bd SWS dose excellent ammi 
Ur. £165 ow Buchanans 551 7767. 
CHELSEA SW3. Luxury 4 bed botor. 2 
ttatns. touooc. dlntaig room, kliabsiaml 
toilHy £290 p w ot 788 2504 m 
DOCHLAMBS FWa and houses to tef 
tnrouBtHmi iite norttmuto area, moi- 
790 9S60 

mi WB Excellent laf floor t bedroom nat 
close tube + shops. £8Spw. S.Ctobnd 
221 261B. 

ED6WAHE ROAD 2 nuns ttoto 5 dM bed 
fum flat, suit fondly or ta snare. 01 437 
8 443 iworfci/ 09278 3443 after & pm. 
KMtGHTSBMDGE Excepuanal basement 
flat. I bedroom, nano, dining- receeUon. 
£tfiS pw. No agents. Tet Ol 408 1019 
Ufaimv COmCID FIATS, central Uin. 
don iron £326 pw pigs VAT. Rtl* 
Town House Apartments 575 5433 
Ihayfair wi lux lom maisonette. 3 
beds, t rec. new k ft B. new decor ft 
carpets. £39Snw Tef 0343 7)2617 
TJBH IH Nr sL t Bed lux ftaA. New dec. 
CSTv. £160 pw Co tot pref. Tel 01 221 
13&9.1DI. 

SWll-Comfortabte ream to Large tenter 
for non emoting female £200 tocluslve 
Tel Ql 360 0199 

A WEST END Flat and Houses List to f dr 
Sate/Lrt. Davis wootte. 01 402 7381- 



OF WALES BOVL SWU 

Q-locaing Park. Brand newty turn and 
Jtoc dote bed flat, dbte recep. hath, exc in 
tai * washer, avan now. £130 pw 
F WGapp Oi 221 8838. 


EDW OB’ CWLSEA BrieM 2 bed- garden 
OH. new tonvenko. gas CH. d/wasimr. 
t/drver. wash ra/c. m/wove. fr/freew 
K- EiSSpw Tel: 
OI 302 1690 or Ol 681 0500 


Wtt Near Hyde Barit. Luxury 2 OMto bed 
flat, for 3 io 12 months, odour TV. 
phone, double glazed serviced. In exert- 
tou reufobon. . £200 pw neg. Td: Ol 
884 7215 anytime 1 . 


*» Lid re 

outtp properties in Central. EouUi ami 

west London Arras for watting appli- 
cants |rl oi 221 8838. 


42-48 EARLS COURT ROAD 
LONDON W8 6 EJ 

Curope/L’?* HKAU 01 937 5400 
Lom Haul n«n 01 aos 1515 

1 si/ Bus! nets doss 01 138 3444 
GoiC-rnmenl Ltrmsed /Bonded 
ABTA I AT A ATOL 1458 


★ALL FLIGHTS BONDED* 
★ ★SAVE Ts Tj Cs** 
★★TOURIST CLASS** 
★★CLUB CLASS** 

★ ★1ST CLASS** 

★ ★CONCORDE** 


* S> ONE! 

* PEFTM 

* HOBART 

* WBURO 

* ll'CKLAND 

* mi 

* BANGKOK 

* SINC4FORE 

* Dl'BM 

* MID EAST 

* LLS4K4 

* TOSONTri 

* L \NCELES 

* C1RXB8E4N 


MELBOURNE * 
BRISBANE 
ADELAIDE * 
S AFRICA * 
WELLINGTON * 
PT MORESBY * 
TOKYO * 
MANILA * 
BAHRAIN * 
NAIROBI * 
Harare * 
VANCOUVER * 
MIAMI * 
S FRANCKCD * 


I^UEMOUSC Ubfunmnra. Hereford 
Rd. W2. 5 Bed. 3 rec. S w lacing Gdn. 
Atanura. £500 pw ior £620 pw with I 
bed stair flan Td Ol 727 21 10 


AVAILABLE MOW Luxury ffats ft houses 
£200 - £1 jOOO per week Tel: Burgos- 


Bfl SRAVU 2 bra fu. tmraac cornu, 
min 6 moults. Com p a n y leL £325 pw 
Tef OI 454 9779. 


SWi Etocepuopaay 
anon rial in Mfc. BeaubfuUy (urn to toe 
lugtiesi standard. 2 dble beds. 2 baths 1 
e/s. superb kit. V spar recep 4 dtamg 
cm- ideal for entertaining m Senior Ex- 
ccumr lever £S60 pw. Asrol 
PraocrUes Ol 486 6741 
At M ACOfT Montag u e Square WI SRdi- 
nlng newly refurnished nub. 3 BedmL 
2 baths 1 e/a knrefy bright recep * excel 
U-5 Ui. Avail unfumiwd for long let. 
£338 p.w. neg. Dnl valuer AKM Prap- 
erflas 01 486 3741 


OVERSEAS TRAVEL 


TRAVEL 
WORLD WIDE 

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ndDced ions tad tend case. 
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Mexico. Bogota. Caracas. 
Eurape. ft The Aoutfera, 

Flamingo Travel, 

76 Shaftesbury Avenue 
London wiv 7DG. 

01-439 0102/01-439 7751 
Open Saturday 10.00-13.00 


AH TOOTS Spectatbtx N York £249. 
LA/San Fran £529. Svdncy/Mefbaixtte 
£769. All direct daily Okfots Duruir 130 
Jermyn StamLOl 839 7144 


COSTCWrVCHS ON BUO/NAi to Di- 
raae. USA ft most d am nations. 
Ototamat Travel: 01-730 2201. ABTA 
IATA ATOL 


MSCOUMTIS ft Qna Fbres Worldwide. 
Tel U.T.C. 107651 867036. 


STD /MEL £635 Doth £566. An raatar 
camera lo AtxUNZ. 01484 7371 
ABTA. 


CHEAP FBgMB WortdwMe. 
01900 1666. 


Haymaram 


fascowrr fares wonaw Me : 01-434 

0T34 Anfifor Travel 


FUCHTBOMOras DtoBOU W I Fares world- 
wide. 1 M/economy. 01-387 9100 


MALAGA. feANARKS. 01 
Travelwtoe AUa. AloL 


■O R OC C O BOUND. Regent SI. WI. OI 
734 6307. ABTA/AlQi. 


. AFRICA From £468. 01-684 7371 
ABTA. 


UAflt Portugal. Cheapest fans. Btggfco. 
Ol 736 8191. ABTA ATOL. 


or to Kyrerda North 

Cyprus. ConwratMiutwe range of s/c vO- 

las. b un g a l ow ft beactatete hot ate ol 

down to earth prices. Grand Universal 

Services ITftTI. 20 Stoke Newtngtau 

Church a. London Nlfi Teh 01-249 

0721. 


IMPLY Crete Summer 1987. 

Greek family offer nrsHfnl private 
\-tnas/iOndtae. some with pools Please 
ring for mo- yuan fnenffly broch u re. 
Ten Ol 994 4462/8226. 


IBBtAt Wkte Cheapfes. wi wflf paver tea 
you m are too cnnptd on air fores lo 
any d estin a tion , we wot straw you. Tet 
Ol ST9 777S ABTA. 


** SOITH 4MERILA ** 

» USA * U54 * I rju *l>&4 * 

SUN WORLD TRAVEL 

lEn'd |QM| 

*4 Suotb Sl. EpUitti . Sunn 
(037271 ^S1S;’»31V:7I17H,' 
^'3iv:48j:.iao47 


DISCOUNT FLIGHTS 


Sjdnev 

O/W 

<420 

Rtn 

£764 

Auckland 

£420 

£775 

Ltn Aitgrlfv 

£178 

two 

Joluii* 

£24h 

«SS 

Bangkok 

£220 

£360 

Rm. 

£282 

£504 


LONDON FLIGHT 
CENTRE 
01-370 6332 


DISCOUNTED FARES 

J0BURG/HAfl*£4§| DOUALA R *E420 
NAIROBI £380 SYDNEY C760 

CARO EZ30 AUCKLAND F7B5 

LAGOS £380 HONG KONG £S50 

DEUBOUBAY £350 MIAMI £330 

BANGKOK £350 AND MANY MORE 

AFRO ASIAN TRAVEL LTD 

162/lOH RUM SL WI 
TEL m-437B25W7ffl 
Late S Group Bookxioi Wnkmu 
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MALAGA 

ISTANBUL 


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MORROCO 


TEL: 01-995 3883/4/5 
SIMPLY FLY 

ATOL 19 


LOWEST FARES 

Parte £69 N YORK £276 

Frankfurt cao la/sf £366 

Lagoa £220 Miami £320 

NoroM £326 Singapore £420 

JoTMirg £460 Bangkok £330 

Cara £206 Katmandu £440 

Dei/Sem £336 Rongoeu £350 

Hong Kong £610 Calcuta £426 

Huge DUCOinri Avail on UU ChJh dm 

SUN & SAND 

21 Bwaflnw St London WI 
01-439 2100/437 0637 


NEW LOW FARES 

AMMAN £233 KUWAIT £356 

BOM/DEL £366 NEW YORK £266 

CAIRO £206 BALTIMORE £278 

DAMASCUS £243 ROME £106 

DUBAI £346 SEOUL £606 

FRVFURT £ 65 S1N/KUL £420 

HONG KONG £490 SVD/MEL £590 

ISTANBUL £170 TA1PAI £570 

KARACHI £286 TOKYO £690 

SKVLORD TRAVEL LTD. 

2 DENMAN STREET. LONDON WI. 
TEL. 01-439 3621/8007 

AIRLINE BONDED 


WINTER SPORTS 


SKI WHIZZ 

10O HOLIDAYS TO WI I AT... 
KNOCKED DOWN PRICES u 
CHRISTMAS NOW.. .£169 
1 week 20 Dec catered dipctt 
inchBftc of flight 

MERISEL. VERBtCS. COURCHEVEL. 
MECFVE ft CHAMONIX 

OPEN TODAY.-DONT 
MISS OUT...BOOK NOW 
01-370 0999/0256 

ATOL 1620 ACCESS/VISA 

121. HtoM Rood. London SWIO 


SKI * FLY * SKI * FLY 

MANCHESTER ft 
CATWICK TO ANDORRA 

1 WK BY AIR FROM £119 

2 WK BV AIR FROM £165 
PLUS FREE cTtlklrena noaaays. FREE 
Ltn Fanes or free insurant* on 
many dale, me. Xnun/NY. 

FREEDOM HOLIDAYS 
The Andorra Experts since 1972 
oi 741 4ee6/447i (24 nrat 
Manchester 061 236 0019 
ATOL 432 IATA AITO 


SKI SUPERTRA VEL 

CHRISTMAS SPECIAL OFFERS 
Selected catered 


DCPS 20 DECEMBER 
ONLY £199 In Mertbel. Vernier 
ft val cTteere. 

ONLY £249 in CouroieacL 61 Anton 
A Tlpm. 

Li m ited offers - ring nowt 

01-584 5060 


LC MU CourciwracL Chalet, for an sea- 
sons i By at. coach or cor For a 
broenure call 0484 648996. 

SfUWOftLD Top Ski Resorts. Lowest 
Putts, tram £39 ABTA Brochure: Ol 
607 4826. 


DOMESTIC AND CATERING 
SITUATIONS 


RELIEF MAMMY MMOL 2S* with experi- 
ence. 2 children 13 yejri, and 6 monthsl 
In Hampstead home. Nursery dimes 
only, os uihrr stair kepi Two days a 
wee*, and one wee* end per month Fim 
class references rssmiiai. Reply to BOX 
JU 


MATURE MANNY To accompany fondly 
ta Florida . far one year, care (ax one 
year old grl. References and experience 
reo Hired. Call Monday la Friday 01 486 
59as 


Chef reautrra. Experience to 
tadottetUn/Malayttan cutotaie: mux 
have anility to organise Uw known: 
stocktaking and naff management. The 
rmoiarani to aiiuatra in Henley - Salary 
negotiator. Contort Mr Ting on 01-734 


CHALET Girts Required lor SL Anton. 
mu=a he Cord on Bleu cooks. Please ring 
0342 27272 or 01-274 9009. 

KXF Coons reg Ski Seasons small hotel 
CMML France (nr Geneva) Ol 731 

GREECE. Mother's help. Foamy rewire 
roflnra Britten lady -20 * ■ lo help look 
after 2 yr OW girl Tef Ol -409-2662 


SmiAnONS WANTED 


LADY Barrister with consldcraote expert- 
cnee m setting up a preoedenl library 
and/or information retrieval system, 
seeks pootuon on a pan-tone bools ova-, 
say. 3-6 months, and Bwreaftrr to keep 
n up to date. Would suU soitettors wtttv 
log to organise and todale Ihelr 
property deplete. Payment on an hour- 
ly hosts Is envisaged- Plume Ol 907 
4882. 


LEGAL NOTICES 


ALGARVE ALTERNATIVE. 

The flnatt houses for rental. 73 
James SL SWI Ol 491 0802. 


TAKE T8UE OFF to Parts. Amsterdam. 
Brussels. Bruges. Genera. Berne. Lau 
sanne. Zurich. The Hague. Dublin. 
Rouen. Boulogne ft Dieppe- Time Off 
2s. CWder dose. London SWixtbq. 
01-236 8070. 


ONE CALL (or some of the hesl deals In 
flMritts. apanraenu. hotels and car Mr*. 
Tel Lmuwn 01 636 5000. Manchester 
061 832 2000. Air Travel Advisory 
Bureau 


TRAVEL CENTRE specialising In First and 
dub dam travel wortwide. Budget 
Fares Aussie. NZ. & Africa. USA and 
Portugal with aernm- TeiOl 656 lioi. 
ABTA 73196. 


EURO PE /WORLD wide lowest tores on 
charter /scheduled (Us. Pilot FUgM 01 
631 0167. Agl AIM 1893 
HOLLAND. Dally flights £35 O/W. £66 
Rtn. Frankfurt rrom £69. Miracle Jet. 
Ol 379 33SS? 

H OME KOIM £488. BANGKOK £369. 
Singapore £457. other FE dues. 01-584 
6 514 A BTA. 

LOWEST Air Fares. Europe and world 
wide. 01 836 8622. Buckingham 

Travel 


WINTEH SPORTS 


JUST France - Super value sew catering 
ski hoUdoya In toe best French resorts. 
Ring lor new brochure now. 

Tel Ol 799 2692. 

ABTA 69266 A to! 1383. 


XMAS. Wmler. Summer. Algarve. Tener- 
ife. Greece. Turkey. Spain. Egypt. Sri 
Lanka and many more bots/fttgblx. 
Ventura: 01 261 5466. ATOL 2034. 


AMERICA Utahn with Manchester depar- 
tures ft also South Africa A New 
Zealand. Tel Travel Centre. Bla ckbu rn 
102641 532S7 ABTA 73196 


Air Fares. Caribbean. 

AunraHasla- LTtA. Africa. F*r East. In- 
dia. GtobecmL. 01-737 0669/2162. 
ABTA 


CUMS1MA5 CYPRUS. 1st Clara, hotel oa 
undv beach rrom H/row. X wic £299. 2 
wu £365 Ring Pan world Holidays oi 
734 2562- 


LATM AMERICA. Low cod nights eg. 
Rio £485. Lima £495 rtn. Also small 
Grout Holiday Journeys/ eg Peru from 
£3501 JLA 01 -7*17-3108 


LOW FARES WORLDWIDE - USA. N/S 
Amenta. FSr EasL Africa. AliUne Apr* 
A« Trayvate. 48 Margaret Street. WI. 
Oi 580 2928 'Visa Accepted! 

NEW YORK, L A.. USA. Worldwide ftesU- 
naUons. For toe cheapest (ares, try us 
I6L Richmond Travel. I Dow* Street. 
Richmond Surrey. ABTA 014404073. 
MfKBUDI Seal uie to USA-Caribbean- 
Far East-AmtraUa. Cm the 
prafcsskmals ABTA IATA rt rttaW . 
Tel 0! 2Sd 5788 

VAI.EE AMBER. Christmas aiaUabUtty 


British Heart Foundation 

The heart research charity. 


102 Gloucester Place, 
London W 1 H 4 DH. 




CarwKJi/Faro 18 Dec £179 Malaga 22 
December. £179. Ol 723 6964. Abu 

AM Accesa/Vm. 

WINTER SUN Stweiab prices io Cyprui. 
Mafia. Morocco, Greece. Malaga ft Te- 
nerife Nov & Dk Pan World HaBdayt 
01 734 2S62. 

ALICANTE. Faro. Malaoa Me. Dtorand 
Travel ATOL 1783. 01 -HI 4641. 
Horenam 68541 . 

BEST Fares. Ben FIMMsl Beet hefidayc 
anywhere. Sky Travel. <31 654 7426. 

ABTA 

CABBSEAM C on corae. Jan/Fbb 87 lo 
Barbados, Antigua or. Special prices- 
0244 41131. 

lowest Atr Fares. Schoduira curep* & 
woridwtdo. Mad Star TravaL Ol 928 
3 200 

LOWEST WORLDWIDE FARES. CM- 
corn Travel Tel Ol 730 6216. ABTA. 
TUMBU. For your holiday where tte i|||| 
sutiimo'. Can Mr our brochure now. Tu- 
nisian Trav el Barron. 01-373 4411. 

ffs cn m Lowesi lares on nvuor 
stheduted carrion. 01-5B4 7371 ABTA 


IKI WEST - NEW! Soectol offere on 
groups RING FDR A DEAL! Also other 
amazingly tow prices starling at £59. 
ask lor a copy of our bumper brochure. 
'OH 786 9999 AMa 69256 AKM 1383. 


£50 Ml Caurdimrl Christmas chalets. 
For iidi detaus can Le Sid 0484 648996. 


SKI Tracer Bonanza It Tlgnrs. LB Ragne 
ft Dren Alpea. SteM catering apartmeiM 
6 Dec . . I wk £69 (inn. rtn coach) 13 
Dec ... i wk £89 ibici. coach out/nt 
barki CHRISTMAS FROM ... £89f RING 
01 370 0266 (24 bra) ATOL 1820 
CHRISTMAS Otter,. Fully catered chains 
with all Kmas extras Only £197. Con 
Le Ski 0484 548996. 
fTlIiiTWHS In CourcfimrL Have a fun 
packed irwuwmaJ Aimw Cftrtstnus 
wlLh ALL the Irttnmbigs far duty £i69. 
Ring Ski Bonne Netgr. oi 244 7333. 


W THE MATTER OF 
LIFE SAVERS iLI K ) LIMITED 
AND 

_ INTHE MATTER OF __ 

THE COMPANIES ACT 1985 
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Uvd foe 
creditors of toe anmc named Corajamy. 
whtclt Is being solunlarily wound up. are 
required, on or before toe 31st day of 
December 1986 to send tn inetr foil 
Christian and Surnames, their addresses 
and descriptions, foil Nitiaiiin of their 
debts or riabus. and toe names and 
addresses of iiteta- SoficH on >if onyL to toe 
understaned R.J. NEWTON, of 121 Kings 
Road. Reading Berkshire. RGI 5EF. toe 
Liquidator of toe said Company, and. If so 
required by notice to wnnng from the said 
Liquidator, are. personally or py mar 
Solid tors, lo come In and prove their debts 
or claims al such tone and place as shall be 
specified In such notice, or in default 
thereof they win be excluded from toe 
benefit of any Otatntxiuan mane before 
such debts are proved. 

Dated UUs I9th day of November 1986 
RJ. NEWTON 
LIQUIDATOR 
M B TWs nonce ts purely formal. AO 
known creditors have bran, or win De paid 
In full 

BEAUMONT SUMMER CAMPS UM7TH) 
(lit Voluntary Lknudallon) 
and The Companies Act 1985 
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the 
Creditors of toe abase named Company 
are reautrra on or before Friday. 19 
December 1986 to stand toeir names and 
addresses and pantniters of toeir debts or 
claims to toe unaerawnra David Julian 
Buchter FCA of Arthur Andersen ft Co. 
P.O Box No. 55. 1 Surrey street. London 
WC2R 2NT. tne Liquidator of toe EUd 
Company and U so required by nonce m 
writing from the sun Liquidator are lo 
come in and prove thetr ssdd debts nr 
rial mi al such tone or place as shall be 
raecuird in such nonce or in default there- 
of they wm be excluded front toe benafU 
of any distribution made before such deba 
arc proved. 

Dated tote torn day of Nowemuer 1986 
DAVID JULIAN BUCKLER 
LIQUIDATOR 


CAMP BEAUMONT LIMITED 
itn Voluntary Liquidator) 
and The Companies Act 1985 
NOTICE 15 HEREBY COVEN WU toe 
Creditors of the above named Company 
are required on or before Friday. 19 
December 1986 lo send toeir names and 
addtestes and particulars ot toefr debts or 
dalttKi lo the uoderslgnra David Julian 
Bitchier FCA of Arthur Andersen ft Co. 
P.O Box No. 66. i Surrey Street. London 
WC2R 2NT. toe Liquidator of tor said 

Company and tf so required by notice In 

writing from the saM Liquidator are to 
come In and prove toefr said Mb or 
rlaimsi al such hme or place as snaU be 
speed led fit such notice or in default there- 
of they wm be excluded from too benefit 
oi any distribution matte before such debts 
are proved. 

Dated tote 10th day of Novcmver 1986 
DAVID JULIAN BUCHLER 
LIQUIDATOR 


NOTEWORTHY ENGIN EERS (SALES! 

LIMITED 

NOTICE IS HEREBY- GIVEN pursuant to 
Section 588 of toe Companies Act. 1985. 
Uval a MEETING of tor CTedllora of the 
above named Company will be field at toe 
Oiflccs of LEONARD CURTIS ft CO- SttV- 
alrd at 30 EASTBOURNE TERRACE 
I2ND FLOOR' LONDON W2 6LF on 
Friday me 2ist day of November i486 at 
10 15 o'clock In tor lore noon, for the 
purposes provided for In Sections 509 and 
SM. 

Dated the 6to day of November 1986 

A.R. COLLINS 
DIRECTOR 


IN THE MATTER Of 
MARIDAN CATERtMO LIMITED 
By Order of the High Court dated toe 
1 5th day of October 1986, Norman Austin 
Weriira of 296 Regent arret. London 
WlR 5MB has. been appointed Ltautdatar 
o* [he above-named Company wun a Com- 
muter of (rumetion. 

Dated tote torn day of November 1986 


WINTER SPORTS 


) 


JOIN BLADON LINES THIS 
CHRISTMAS AND SAVE ££££‘S 

LOOK AT THESE AMA3NC OTTER S FOR 7 NIGHT HOLIDAYS 
ceps 20tti/2isi December 

VAL ETISEJK 
Chain Hotel Savoie 
Chain Ham Blanche Ncigr 
Cham Lr Petaou Blanc 
COUR MAY EUR 
Chalet Moiconl 
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ST ANTON 
Kaue kmdi 

BLADON UNES THE B1CGEST CHOICE ON SKIS 
Offering Hotel sen Catering ft Chalet Parties in 47 of Europe* top mom 


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March Decs. 
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LOOK OUT FOR 
ANTIQUES & 
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ANTIQUE FAIRS 

These sections mil be appearing on Wednesday 26ih November. 





28 


THE TIMES TUESDAY NOVEMBER 25 1986 


Hospital 
cleaners 
opt to go 
private 

By Jill Sherman 

Geaners employed in some 
National Health Service hos- 
pitals are now voting to work 
for private contractors to gain 
redundancy payments. 

In some cases. NHS staff are 
choosing not to submit in- 
house tenders because they 
can get substantial redun- 
dancy payments if the clean- 
ing contracts are awarded to 
private firms. Most are then 
employed by those firms on 
their old NHS pay rates. 

The cleaners are getting 
redundancy deals equal to two 
weeks’ pay for every year of 

service. 

Health service unions, 
which traditionally had been 
adamant in their opposition to 
contracting out work, are now 
telling their members they will 
gel a better deal with private 
firms. 

Staff at Clatterbridge Hos- 
pital in WirraL Merseyside, 
recently decided not to submit 
a tender for the £800,000- 
deaning contract at the hos- 
pital because it would have 
meant a 25 per cent drop in 
their take-home pay. resulting 
from the hospital dropping its 
bonus scheme in order to 
become more competitive. 

The lender, which is being 
awarded later this week, will 
now be decided between three 
private companies — Medi- 
clean. Exclusive and 
Mediguard. 

Mr Lew Swift, the Wirral 
health authority head of 
personnel and administration, 
said because of the NHS ban 
on bonus payments, the 
hospital's equivalent of 127 
foil-time stan would have had 
to take a 25 per cent cut in 
salary if the NHS had won the 
contract 

Mr John Davis, Nupe 
branch secretary. said that 
under the contract arrange- 
ments staff who had been 
employed for more than 10 
years and were aged between 
41 and 49 could get up to 
£3,600 as a lump sum redun- 
dancy payment 

Hie three firms bidding for 
the contract have all agreed 
informally that most staff 
wanting jobs with the firms 
will get them, although exact 
staffing levels have not been 
revealed. 

Mr Davis said that at the 
neighbouring Arrowe Park 
Hospital where the cleaning 
contract was awarded in- 
house, staff suffered a 25 per 
cent cut in wages with no 
Saturday or Sunday pay- 
ments. 


Today’s events 


Kew plays nurse to rarest bush 




• ■ .:MSt 




Mr Martin Staniforth checking the growth of the Cafe matron bush yesterday (Photograph: Stuart Nicol)- 

By Kenneth Gosling 


Royal engagements 

The Queen bolds an Investi- 
ture, Buckingham Palace, ! I. 

The Duke of Edinburgh 
presents the Britannic Assur- 
ance County Championship 
Trophy to the Essex County 
Cricket Club, Buckingham Pal- 
ace. l(k and attends a reception 
for young people who have 
reached the Gold Standard in 
the Duke of Edinburgh's Award. 


Whitehall 
ready to 
force card 

Continued from page 1 

that he had to “register some 
dismay that the League had 
not gone further down the 
road to 100 percent member- 
ship schemes”. 

The results of the member- 
ship-only experiment by Lu- 
ton Town will be treated as a 
test case to see if it deters 
hooligans and attracts spectat- 
ors. Luton was not allowed to 
operate its membership 
scheme in the League's Little- 
woods Cup knockout compe- 
tition. 

Mr Michael Fallon, the 
Conservative MP for Darling- 
ton, said h was rubbish for the 
League to argue that com- 
pulsory membership would 
deter spectators. Attendances 
slumped at Darlington after 
the riot early this month when 
hooligans aimed with knives 
ran amok. 


St James's Palace. 1 1.30 and 4; 
later he attends a reception for 
the Friends of the Duke of 
Edinburgh's Award Scheme, 
Buckingham Palace, 6; as Pa- 
tron. the London Federation of 
Boys’ Gubs, be then attends a 
fund raising dinner, Claridge's 
hoteL 7.30. 

Queen Elizabeth the Queen 
Mother opens the Royal Vet- 
erinary College Small Animal 
Referral Hospital. Hawkshead, 
North Mymms, Hertfordshire, 
2.45. 


The Cafe marrou bush, said 
to be the world's rarest bee, is 
struggling for survival in spe- 
cially- controlled atmospheric 
conditions at the Royal 
Botanic Gardens, Kew, west 
Loudon. 

The plant, from the Mau- 
ritian island of Rodriguez in 
the Indian Ocean, is the 
subject of an international 
rescue attempt in which the 
Swiss-based Internationa] 
Union for Conservation of 
Nature and Natural Resources 
asked Kew to accept cuttings 
of the plant, which had been 
thought to be extinct, and was 
last seen in 1940. 

. The Mauritian Government 
has also joined in the efforts to 
save the plant Until last year, 
when the shrub was fenced off 
on Rodriguez, animals had 
browsed on If and it was under 
attack from insects. 

Mr Hans Ftiegaer, assistant 
curator in charge of the tem- 
perate department at Kew, 
said that only one cutting had 
been propagated from pieces 
Down bade from Mauritius in 
March. 

“We used a proprietary 
rooting compound and so Ear 


the plant has a dozen leaves 
and is 4m to 5m high” he said 
The plant a member of the 
coffee family, is almost a 
complete mystery to the bota- 
nists at Kew. “It might grow 
into a small tree, perhaps 
resembling the croton, we 
don't know yet**, Mr Fliegner 
said. 

So rare is the Cafe marron 
that putting a guard on it was 
considered when a conserva- 
tion officer from Mauritius 
first discovered its plight. 

A worry for the experts at 
Kew is that while the tiny 
plant is being kept under what 
they consider the most appro- 
priate conditions, Beneath a 
sheet of polythene, and treated 
with an intermittent mist 
spray, they are not sou how 
mud light it needs. 

“I like to be an optimist, but 
while yon can simulate natural 
conditions, it can never really 
be foe same under artificial 
ones”, Mr Fliegner said. 

If it can get thro^h the 
winter, there is a good chance 
that Ramosmamia heterophyUa 
will survive and may even- 
tually be returned to its orig- 
inal habitat. 


Sangster’s 
trainer 
is sacked 

Continued from page 1 
turn to detail -in the Direc- 
tory ofTurf his hobby is listed 
as “work” — and this had 
proved very successful during 
his spell as a National Hunt 
Trainer. 

The challenge of the switch 
to flat racing excited him- 
“It was saddling the first 
five at the Gold Cup that 
started it. After an, I could not 
start thinking about having 
the first six. But when I was 
first approached, I doubled 
my ability to do it on the flat 
Mr Dickinson has admitted 
to being obsessed by Iris 
profession. “I am a very 
boring man. 1 have got no 
hobbies and I think holidays 
are a complete waste of time. 
But I am a happy man, and 
that at the end of the day, that, 
is what life is all about" 

Until today that is. 

Romance went wrong, page 56 


Tories hit 
at plan 
to cut food 
mountain 

Cou tamed from page 1 

farming was to repatriate agri- 
cultural policy to member 
states. 

He served wanting that the 
CAP, like tin and oil, was 
heading for an explosion in 
which British agriculture 
could be devastated “because 
any emergency plan would 
discriminate against Britain 
because of its historically high 
yields.” 

With Britain now due to 
make a record net contrib- 
ution of £1 ,090 million to EEC 
coffers this year, a number of 
backbenchers were lining up 
last night to use the opportu- 
nity of a Government debate 
to criticize the EEC's planned 
budget for next year which is 
set at almost £25 billion. Two- 
thirds of the money will be 
taken by the Common Agri- 
cultural Policy to support food 
surpluses. 

Although a move by Sir 
Edward du Cann. MP for 
Taunton and president of the 
European Reform Group, to 
halt further consideration of 
the EEC budget fell foul of 
parliamentary procedure and 
thereby denied several Tories 
the chance of rebelling against 
the Government, some 
Conservative backbenchers 
were planning to abstain at the 
end of last night’s debate. 

What has particularly 
infuriated Conservative critics 
of the EEC is that promises of 
stricter budgetary discipline 
and tighter control of the CAP 
gained at the FontainWeau 
summit by Mrs Thatcher in 
return for allowing spending 
to increase gradually over a 
number of years, have been 
ignored. In the meantime, 
spending has rocketed and 
next year’s EEC but^et will 
almost certainly exceed of- 
ficial limits. 

Sir Edward said last night 
“The European Community is 
on the verge of bankruptcy 

and its financial manage ment 

is a scandal It amazes even 
the most ardent supporters of 
the Community. My coQeages 
and I are determined on 
reform.” 

• BRUSSELS^ ir Geoffrey 
Howe, the Foreign. Secretary, 
last night reaffirmed the 
Government's determination 
to take the CAP by thehoms 
(Andrew McEwen 

writes) After a meeting of the 
12 foreign ministers here he 
said that the British Govern- 
ment was committed to 
achieving agreement to curb 
agricultural over-production. 


Frank Johnson at the Copikiobs 

Curling up with 
a point of order 


The resumption of the 
House yesterday brought an- 
other episode of what has 
become the cull series of spy 
points of order written by Mr 
Dale CampbeU-Savours. the 
Labour member. . for 
Workington. 

The unique, disturbing 
world created by Mr Gnnp- 
beH-Savours is matched only 
by that of his rival and only 
equal, Mr John Le Carre. 
Each has his passionate 
followers. Mr Kinaock is said 
to like nothing better than to 
curl up ai night with a 
Campbell -Savours point of 
order, apart of course from 
curling up at night with Mrs 
Kinnock. 

Some of us are addicts of 
both Mr CampbeU-Savours 
and Mr Le Carre. In seeking 
to equal Mr CampbeU- 
Savours as a raiser of points 
of order, Mr Le Carre is 
somewhat handicapped by 
not being an MP. Otherwise, 
there is Little to choose in 
technique between the two 
authors. 

The action moves raster 
than in Le Carrd, and is more 
complicated. In CampbeU- 
Savours Country nothing is 
as it seems. Political 
correspondents have hurried 
conversations with the Mem- 
ber far Workington at dusk in 
gloomy, endless mock- 
Golhic corridors. In the dis- 
tance can be heard the rumble 
of London traffic in unceas- 
ing procession around West- 
minster Square. 

In Sydney, a senior British 
civil servant suddenly tdUs a 
courtroom that the British 
secret service does not exist 
Back in Whitehall the B ritish 
spies and spy-catchers are 
immediately worried. In that 
case, they ask one another, 
what happens to our pen- 
sions? Before long, Mr Camp- 
beU-Savours is rising again in 
the House with a new point of 
order. 

Unlike Mr Le Carr6 in his 
works, Mr CampbeU-Savours 
is a character in his own 
stories - always the cool 
- meticulously-questioning 
Englishman. During his 
points of order, he is always 
confronted by a man called 
WeatheriU who has a wig. Is 
that a cover? Certainly. For 
this WeatheriU is the bead of 
Westminster Centre. He has 
powers of life and death over 
all points of order. He is 
always referred to solely as 
Mr Speaker. 

And some of the characters 
whom Mr CampbeU-Savours 
has created have entered the 
English language: Sir Robert 
Armstrong, Sir Michael Ha- 


vers. Peter Wright, Sir Roger! 
Hollis. Chapman Fincher, 
and a writer cage d Nigel West 
who is re ally a prospective 
Tory candidate caBed 
Allason. 

But Mr. CampfceH-Savours 
knows that by now even we 
addicts might be getting a 
little bored by them. We feel 
that we know them a httieioo 
well. So yesterday he in- 
troduced a completely new 
character: Jim Coe. 

Yesterday's point of order 
consasted of the author and 
hero demanding aa emer- 
gency debate about this Jim 
Coe, a press officer at No 10, 
having allegedly suggested to 
a meeting of Westminster 
lobby journalists that, be- 
cause Jte kept on asking in the 
House about the Wright case 
in Australia, Mr Kinaock was 
nnsuited to be . Prime 
Minister. 

Also, according id Mr 
Ctenpbell-Savoura, this Jim 
Coe had made out that Sr 
Michael Havers, the Attorney 
General was to blame for 
things going wrong with the 
Government’s court action in 
Sydney; not the Prime 
Minster. 

Mr CampbeU-Savours said 
a civil servant had therefore 
been used to “scatter the 
seeds of division between the 
Prime Minister and the 
Attorney General”. Bat the 
Attorney General had been 
'instructed and graded by her 
in aU his actions. 

- The Prime Minister had 
“used the scalpel remorse- 
lessly to incise the leputatxm 
of a parliamentary friend and 
colleague of25 years” he said 
in a characteristically florid 
passage, as well as an un- 
characteristic burst of con- 
cern for Sir Michael Haven. 

A “courageous derision” 
was needed by the Speaker, 
he concluded, to allow the 
emergency debate and assert 
the authority ofParfiament 

Tbe Speaker failed to come 
up to the standard required of 
CambeU-Savouxs heroes. He 
refused the debate. Other 
Labour members rose to 
demand that the Speaker do 
something about No 10 press 
officers who do what Jim CotJ 
allegedly did. 

“I am not responsible for 
Mr Crow,” the Speaker re- 
plied. Coe, actually. But per- 
haps the Speaker is oik of the 
old-style authority figures , in 
wigs who a point of 
getting wrong the names of] 
people known to the masses, 
as he who is Dale Sampfe- 
Flavours? A famous thriller 
writer, mlud. Much obliged. 


THE TIMES INFORMATION SERVICE 


The Times Crossword Puzzle No 17,212 





2 Sir Lucius loses nothing, 
content to be blazing away 
regardless (7-5). 

8 Ham's finished performance 
(7). 

9 Transfers ancient copper to- 
kens (7). 

21 One lesson worried Elsa (7). 

12 State of scholar outside on 
beat (7). 

13 Court day - not a descrip- 
tion of the teddy bears’ pic- 
nic scene (S). 

14 Oriental girl is carried 
shoulder-high (9). 

16 The insolence of office Oli- 
ver suffered (9). 

19 How this river flowed from 
its source (5). 

21 Terse description of section 
that follows the French style 
(7). 

23 Vessel for sprinkling sugar 
or shifting sUt (7). 

24 Unter den Linden so exalted 
a thoroughfare? (7). 

25 Opening in dome needs 
stopping material — catch in 
this (7), 

26 Works of one lacking choice 
entertainment (7.5). 


DOWN 

1 The musical effect of qua- 
vers? (7), 

2 Pictures boy put up in one 
month (7). 

3 He staged a new production 
Concise Crossword 


in town (9). 

4 Domain of the true French- 
man (5). 

5 The Gunners’ magazine (7). 

6 “Like this insubstantial — 
faded. Leave not a rack be- 
hind (T empest) (7). 

7 Rumblings abdominal mak- 
ing sheepdog unsteady, we 
hear (12). 

10 Nag (Kipling's) control- 
lable this piper? (5-7). 

15 Creature going crazy in a 
little stream, love (9). 

17 Carriage cuts Tom Pfearse's 
mount in half — gruesome! 
(7). 

18 Ending of either kind of 
flight (7). 

19 Banquo’s boy. to run away, 
can change into this (7). 

20 Events which could provide 
a target for yachtsmen? (7). 

22 A man of honour always de- 
serves this acclamation (5). 

Solution to Puzzle No 17-211 



The Princess of Wales, Pa- 
tron, the British Lung Founda- 
tion, attends a gala concert. 
Merchant Taylors' HaH, 7.45. 

Princess Anne, President, the 
British Olympic Association, 
attends a lunch, I Wandsworth 
Plain. SW18, 12.30; and later 
attends a boll organized by St 
Loye’s College for toe Disabled, 
Huriingbam Gnb, 8.10. 

Princess Alice, Duchess of 
Gloucester, as Patron, attends 
the general meeting of the East 
Africa Women’s League, Holy 
Trinity Church House, Bromp- 
ton Road. 2.50. 

The Duke of Gloucester 
opens the Curver Consumer 
Products Factory, Corby, 
Northamptonshire, 1230; and 
later, as Coloocl-in-Chief, Royal 
Pioneer Corps, attends a dinner, 
Simpson Barracks, Northamp- 
tonshire, 7.15. 

The Duchess of Gloucester 
opens the World Travel Ex- 
hibition, Olympia, W14, 11.15. 

The Duke of Kent, Vice- 
Chairman, the British Overseas 
Trade Board, opens toe tenth 
Interpbex exhibition and con- 
ference, Brighton, 10.15; and 
visits Singer Link-Miles, Lanc- 
ing. West Sussex, 12.30: later, as 
President, the Britain-Australia 
Bicentennial Committee, at- 
tends a reception, the Mansion 
House, 6.25; and then, as pa- 
tron, attends a concert given by 
the London Philharmonic Or- 
chestra, Festival Hall, 720. 

Prince Michael of Kent un- 
veils a plaque at Laing Homes, 
East Quay, Wapping, 12 noon. 

Exhibitions in progress 

The Etchings of Sir Alfred 
East; Museum and An Gallery, 
Priestgate, Peterborough; Tues 
to Sal 12 to 5 (ends Jan 3). 

Paintings, sketches and etch- 
ings by Alexander Charies- 
Jones, Charlie-Mackcsy and 
Harold Saver, Niccol Centre, 
Brewery Court. Cirencester; 
Mon to Fri 9.30 to 420, Sat 10 
to 12.30 (ends Dec 31). 

Music 

Concert by the Brodsky String 
Quartet; New County HaH 
Treyew Rd. Truro, 730- 

Organ recital by Andrew Ev- 
ans; Bangor Cathedral 1.15 

Oudiff Festival of Music: 
Organ recital by John Fussefl; St 
David's Hall, 1.05: Concert by 
Musica Varia (Salzburg) Uni- 
versity Ensemble; Reardon 
Smith Lecture Theatre, 7.30. 

Talks, lectures 

Edinburgh and the Romans, 
by Gordon Maxwell The Old 
Edinburgh Club, William 
Robertson Building (Room 8), 
George Square, Edinburgh, 
7.15. 

Crisis in the Welfare State, by 
Prof Peter Kaim-Caudle; Sir 
James Knott HaH Trevelyan 
College. Durham. 8. 

Lady Roihnie: Ambassadress 
at Large, Victoria Hall. Grange- 
over-$auds, Cumbria, 7.15. 


Parliament today 


Commons (2.30): Coal In- 
dustry BUI, second reading. 

Loras (2.30); Pilotage BilL 
second reading. Debate on Brit- 
ish art market 


TV top ten 


NattonriiratantBlmialanprogranHnKin 

the week ending November Iflc 


B0C1 

1 EastEnders fTfturs/SUi) 21 .45m 

2 EastEnders (Tues/Sun) 21.05m 

3 Twenty Yeare of the Two Ronnies 
14.70m 

4 HkJa-N 1235m 

5 Brash Strokes 12.60m 

6 Howards Vfay 12.15m 

7 News, Sport and Weather (Sat 
21:05) IlSim 

8 Looter 1 1.55m 

9 News and Weather (Sun 20.51) 
11.05m 

10 Just Good Friends 1130m 
ITV 

1 Coronation Street plan) Granada 
17.05m 

2 Coronation Straat (Wed) Granada 
17.00m 

3 BBnd Data LWT 1&40m 

4 The Equalizer tTV 1330m 

5 Bufaeye Central 1335m 

6 Mss Wtorid 1886 nV1330ni 

7 The A-team fTV 13.15m 

8 Executive Stress Thames 13.10m 

9 Safixday Gang UVTIlOOni 
10 This Is Your Life ' 


i Thames 1230m 


1 Fawtty Towers 1030m 

2 Just Another Day 730m 

3 Victoria Wood - As Seen On TV 
7.15m 

4 Night Moves 6.40m 

5 California Dote 535m 

6 Star Trek 430m 

7 No Limits (EriySui) 4.1 5m 

8 Nurses 4.05m 

9 Food and Drink 3.70m 

10 Gardeners' World 330m 


Charnel 4 


540m 

635m 


BrocfesrdeH^ 

GokJen 

SLEfcawtssre a40m l__ 
Who Dares Wins 3 .35m 

Seven Days to May 3-2ftn 

Chance In A Mfflfon 3.15m 

American <=ooflMl 3.15m _ 

Countdown (Tubs) 3-TOrro | 


10 Countdown 


$£$. 


235 


weekly figures lor audta n ces at peek 
times (with figures in parenthesis 
showing the rearm - the iwrtwr of people 

who viewed for at least three minutes): 

BSC1: Bnaaktast TfmK Man to FH 

13m (73m) 

TV-am: Good Morning Britain Mon to Fri 
Z7mJ10 £m) Sat 3.1 m (7JSm) 

Sun 2.4m 

Broadcasters' Audience Research Board. 


The pound 


Bank 


AmtniPt $ 
Austria Sch 
Belgium fir 
Canutes 
Denmark Kr 


France Ft 
Germany Dm 
Greece Dr 

Hong Kora* 

Intend Pt 
ttstyUn 
Japan Yen 
Netherlands Old 
Norway Kr 

n. Cu 

rUlWfll CSC 

South Africa Rd 
Spain Pta 
Sw ede n Kr 
SwftzettendF* 
USAS 

Yugoslavia Dnr 


21.20 

SSL70 

2JM 

1130 
74T 
9.74 
330 

23430 

1138 

1-103 

smmrsi 

24530 

3375 

1131 
23030 

185 

19930 

1030 

231 

IMS 

85030 


Bank 

Sells 

2.145 

2030 

59.10 

135 

HL70 

637 

024 

233 

21430 

1046 

1043 

196030 

23130 

3.195 

10.71 

20830 

335 

18930 

9.75 

237 

1315 

70030 


Roads 


The Midlands: Ml: Contra- 
flow cleared but lane restrictions 
near junction 28 (A38 Mans- 
field). M54: Lane closures due 
to carriageway repairs between 
junctions 2 and 7. A4S6: Long 
delays due to bypass construc- 
tion between Bewdley and 
Hereford. 

Wales and West: M4: Contra- 
flow between junctions 16 
(Swindon) and 17 (Chippen- 
ham). MS: Contraflow near 
junction 14 (Thombury) with 
northbound entry slip road 
dosed. A5: Resurfacing at Tan y 
Maeas, Bethesda. 

The North: Ml: Mayor repair 
work between junctions 31 and 
33 (A57 Worksop/Rotherham). 
M6e Contraflow between junc- 
tions 29 and 32 (A6 Preston / 
MSS). M53: Closed between 
junctions I and 2 over Bidston 
Moss viaduct, Merseyside. 

Scotland: M8: Contraflow be- 
tween Paisley and Erskine and 
lane closures at Whitecart via- 
duct near Glasgow airport. A82: 
Roadworks and lane closures on 
toe eastbound carriageway be- 
tween Erskine Bridge and 
Douglass roundabout M90: 
Two contraflows on. the Edin- 
burgh to Penh road between 
Halbeath and Cockfaw and 
between Gurney Bridge and 
Ariary interchanges. 


Anniversaries 


Births: Lop® de Vega, Madrid, 
1562; Andrew Carnegie, indus- 
trialist and philanthropist, Dun- 
fermline; 1835; Gut Benz, 
pioneer of auiomobflea. Karls- 
ruhe, Germany, 1844. 

Deaths: Isaac Walls, hymn 
writer. Stoke Newington. 1748; 
Sir Augustas CalJcott, landscape 
painter, London, 1844: Henridb 
Barth, explorer, Berlin, 1865; 
Lilian Beylis, founder of the Old 
Vic, London. 1937; Johmtess 
Jensen, novelist, Copenhagen, 
1 950; Dame Myra Hess, pianist, 
London, 1965; Upton Sinclair, 
Bound Brook, New Jersey, 
1968; Yaldo Mfehima, writer, 
Tokyo. 1970. 

President PapadopcmJos was 
deposed in a military coop, 
Greece. 1973. 


c 


HIGH TIDES 


TODAY AM 

Lowten Bridge 6.48 

“ - — 7.37 


435 


career 

Dmnxd 

Dover 


SSET 

I Inhihaad 

sr - 


1032 

433 

1022 

8.11 

436 

4.17 


11.43 
LeM 838 

Liverpool 4,48 

Lowestoft 233 

5.18 

I to wn 

1130 
•1231 
1007 
11.45 
534 
439 
430 


Tea 936 

WTtaFwm-ta 447 
Tide measured In 


HT PM 

5.7 7.42 
33 733 

12.18 

2.7 5.13 
1233 

43 1139 
5 A 5.19 
43 1139 

43 838 
35 5.42 
4 2. 435 

12.17 
63 

44 837 
73 5.13 
23 4.14 
43 007 

1231 
S3 11.49 
23 12.19 
43 1056 
13 

33 533 
43 5.10 
33 533 
1233 
4.1 939 
04 5.42 3.4 

1m-3380HL 



( LIGHTING-UPTIME ) ( YESTERDAY 


( AROUND BRITAIN ) 


BrtdangWR 

Cromer 

Lowestoft 

Clacton 

Southend 


Hastings 


IlfnaBihna 

worming 


Wsyteojd h 

TeiguiuotiBi 


SdOyMas 

Guernsey 


Rates for small denominotion banknotes 
onty « wppSed by Barclays Bank plc. 
Different rates apply to travellers’ 
cneques ano other raragn currency 


Retail Price Endec 3884 

London: The FT Max closed up 34 at 
1282.5. 


Tower Bridge 


Tower Bridge will be raised 
today ai 10,45 am. 



-<8M- 


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Tenby 
AbarewM 
EtMtoreh 
Eek d aiwmir 


Sun Bain 
hr* In 

- 33 
13 32 

0.1 39 

1.7 .11 
23 .10 
03 .08 

13 32 
1.4 39 
1.4 .15 

14 .14 

2.6 .14 
43 .12 
43 .03 
3.1 .11 
2:7 .10 
23 .10 
2J JOB 

3.8 .05 
S3 31 
13 .11 

1.6 .11 
23 39 

■ .16 
33 .11 
1.7 .13 
53 35 
23 ;13 
13 33 
* 32 
0.1 .37 

- 35 
0.7 .07 
23 .15 
13 36 
03 37 


0.1 


.11 

36 


KMoaa 

Lerwick 

rWKTOCK 

Stor no w a y 

lira* 

Wicfc 


33 
0.1 .15 
0.4 .06 
03 38 

1 A 32 
03 32 
33 31 
03 M 
23 .10 

- .15 

- U 
13 37 
13 .19 
0.9 .17 
0.4 37 
13 30 


Max 
C F 
10 50 
10 50 

9 48 

8 46 
10 50 
10 SO 
10 50 
10 50 

9 48 
W 50 
10 50 
10 50 
10 50 

9 48 
9 48 
10 BO 
10 50 

10 50 

11 52 
9 48 
9 48 

9 48 
9 48 

10 50 

9 48 

11 52 
11 52 

10 SO 
10 50 

9 48 
9 48 

8 46 

9 48 
9 48 
9 48 
9 48 
8 48 

10 50 

8 46 

9 48 

8 46 

9 48 

9 48 
9 48 
7 45 

10 50 

6 46 

7 45 
9 48 

9 48 

10 GO 

8 48 
8 46 


sunny 

cloudy 


London 430 pm to 738 am 
Bristol 430 pm to 7.16 am 
Edktt m rgh <21 pm to 7.40 am 

tor 439 pm to 734 am 

1 437 pm to 732 am 


Temperatures at nridday yesterday: R 
cloud; I, fain r. rain: s, sun. 

C F 



c 


LONDON 


Ye ste rday: Temp: max 6 an to Bpm, 14C 

min 6 ora to 6 am,7u (45F) 


d 1855 
Canfifl d 1254 
BSnbuqji c 11 52 
Gteagow r 1152 


Ml 52 
r 1254 
c 11 52 Jersey 


3 ora _ _ 

y: fi pm. 84 per cam. Rata: 

6 pm. A ins Sum'24 hr to 6 pm. 0 Bar. 
mean Bea (aval. 6 pm, 1010.1 mHars, 


CF 
c 1254 
c 

dlSSS 
c 1355 
til 52 
ri355 
r 1152 


735 am <130 pot 

Moon sett: MoooriM* 
134pm 1231am 

tomorrow 
New moon: December 1 




ABROAD 


ctoudy 

ano w ara 

showers 

showers 

showers 

showers 

showers 

showers 

showers 

showers 


M30A.Y: e, cloud; d, debate; f, fair, fgu fog; r, rakr s, sun; sa snow. L lluidsfc 

C F C F C F 

c 8 48 MMerea 6 16 61 Unas f If « 

c 8 46 Manga s 19 68 Satzbun c 4 39 

f 18 64 Malta 
d 13 55 Mato'me 
r 14 57 Master C* 
s 17 63 lEamT 
1 13 55 Mton 
1 9 48 Wotnrea f 
c 18 64 Moscow 
a 7 45 Manldi 
s 17 63 Nairo bi* 


Afaccto 

Akrotai 

Atertdria 

AMws 

AffiSftfcH 

Athens 

Bahrain 

Batbads- 

Bmcetao 

Bebtri 


C F 

s 15 59 Cato^ia 
s 20 58 Cabaret 

1 22 72 Corfu 
c 15 59 Unite 
d 8 46 P teno nwft 
s 18 64 Faro 

Florence 
Frankfort 
s 18 59 Atnohal 


These are Sunday's figures 


Bermuda* 

Biarritz 

Bonteto 

BooTne 


3 87 Naples 
I 25 77 NDeM 
1 . 7 -45 N York* 
S 15 59 Mce 
s 30 86 Oslo 


NEWSPAPERS LIMITED. 

. Printed by London rat (Print 

era Limited of 1 Virata la Street. 

London El 9XN and by News 
Scotland Lid- 124 Portman street, 
retailing Parfc, Gb*eow 041 1EJ. 
Tuesday. November 2S. 1988. 
Kgggared as a newspaper at tbe Post 


B Aires* 
Cabo 
CspeTn 
CUanca 


O V criurc h 


! 13 55 Gibraltar 
C 8 48 HdsMri 
I 22 72 HomK 
c 13 55 Ima& rck 

e 13 55 latanbiil 

c 12 54 Jeddah 

d 7 45 Jo 

r G 43 

9 26 79 L Palmas 
S 22 72 Lisbon 
8 26 79 Locarno . . 
c 17 63 L Angsts' $ 22 72 
e 4 39 Ltmo&g c 5.41 
e 19 66 Madrid-, s 12 54 




C F 

6 16 61 fl«M 
s 19 68 Sabring 

r 14 57 SPritCO* 

17 63 Saratoga* 

5 Panto* 
Seam 

10 50 

3 37 
-5 23 Staring 

f 5 43 Sydney 

f 25 77 Tangier 
c 14 57TdlaMiv 
3 23 73 Tenerife 
e 11 52 Tokyo 
S 17 83“ 
r 6 41 
c 8 48 
s 0 32 VancW 
s 24 75 Venice 

4 39 Wane# 


s 14 g 

s as 77 

c 2&H 

r 9 S 

r 28 ® 
6 5« 
f 9<g 
S 21 70 
e 17 63 
s 22 72 
e 2t W 

* lig 

r 14 g 

M»g 

C 9 43 

r 541 


* denotae.SwKtey'cftgunifi ana Otast avaKabto 


f so 68 m mm w * 22 2 

Wanton c 14 57 
S 22 72 Zurich s 7 » 


,• % 


( WEATHER ^Pressure will be low to the N, and huh to the S of the 

v -'British Isles, resulting m a strong SW flow over all 

parts. Scotland will have dear or bright intervals and showers. Northern Ireland 
will have some bright or dear intervals and only scattered showers. N Wales and N 
En g l an d will start doody with outbreaks of rain or drizzle. The remainder of Eng- 
land and Wales wffl be doudy with outbreaks of rain or drizzle. Temperatures wffl 
be near normal in tbe for N and NW, but mild or very mfld elsewhere. Winds will 
be strong in many places, and locally gale force in the extreme N and NW.Outiooh 
for tomorrow and Thursday: Continuing changeable in most areas with rain or 
showers at times, though becoming dry in the S and SE. 


. 7 . 


































i CM \&C> 


% 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


THE 



TIMES 


29 . 

SPORT 51 
TELEVISION AND RADIO 55 


TUESDAY NOVEMBER 25 1986 


Executive Editor 
Kenneth Fleet 


FT 30 Share 
1282.6 (+8.4) 

FT-SE 100 
1636.5 (+11.6) 


Bargains 

27792(34762) 


(+0.57) 


US Dollar 
1.4175 (-0.0020) 

W German mark 
2.8605 (-0.0048) 

Trade-weighted 
68.2 (+0.3) 

Confusion 
claim over 
T&Nbid 

AE the beleagured en- 
gineering group, said last night 
that legal action being taken 
by hostile bidder Turner and 
Newall “is a desperate 
attempt'* to confuse 
shareholders. AE has agreed to , 
merge with the Hollis Group. , 
Turner and Newall is taking 
■ legal, action against AE, its 
merchant bank HiH Samuel, 
and broken Cazenove, for 
costs arising out of their 
breach of the Takeover Code. 

Hollis, a subsidiary of Mr 
Robert Maxwell's company, 
Pergamon Press, says it will 
raise the cadi alternative pan 
of its offer from 260p to 280p a 
share if h gets substantial 
support from shareholders in 
AE. The deadline runs out 
tonight . 

US mints the 
silver eagle 

. (AP-Dow Jones) — The 
American Eagle gold coin, 
which has soared in popularity 
since it was introduced tot 
.month, was joined yesterday 
by a .silver coin. 

Dealers m America were 
able to buy the ose-omtce 
Silver Eagle for the first tune 
yesterday. There were 1.4 
million coins offered for spfe 
Each has a face value of $1 
(71p). but its actual price will 
be determined by fhf market 
price of silver.. • 

Profits ahead 

Marshalls Halifax, the : 
Yorkshire building materials 
and engineering company, an- 
nounced profits for the half 1 
year to foe end of September 1 
up from. £4.1 million to £52 
million. Turnover rose 27 per 
cent m £462 million. An ] 
intahn dividend of 1.75p was < 
declared. Tempos, page 32 J 

£400m offices 1 

Prudential Portfolio . Man- j 
agers, part of the Prudential 
Corporation, the insurance 
company, is planning to de- 1 
vdop a £400 million, 900,000 ' 
sq ft office baflding in the City ] 
of Louden. The Prudential ; 
has owned the freehold of the J 
three acre site since 1970. j 

No referrals < 

Reckht & Cofman's ac- ■ 
quisition of Durkce Famous 
Foods is not being referred to 
the Monopolies and Mergers * 
Commission. Also cleared are J 
the acquisition by Ddbron : 
Investments of Guildford In- 1 
dustries and by Granad Group * 
of Hardman Radio and 
SetvkepoinL 


Commercial reasons for abandoning South Afr ican bank 

£42m loss on 
Barclays sale 


Barclays Bank’s sale of its 
re mainin g stake in Barclays 
National Bank of Sooth Africa 
for £80.3 million took die City 


Sir Timothy admitted that 
the stake would have been 
worth considerably more in 


nrnnon xooK me c^y staling terms befmb the sharp 
by suipnse as the British bank fell in the rand about a year 
is realizing considerably. less ago. Bui be added that this 


than it would have done two 
or three years ago. 

Sir Timothy Bevan, the 
chairman, said yesterday that 


rave done two was partially offset by a rise in 
BO- Barnat's share price over the 

r Bev y ^ same period., 

yesteday that Barclays wiD, however, re- 


Bandayated been dfccmsmg 

the disposal swet fast May. sures to South Africa worth 
The sale was justified on £766 million at the the end of 
commercial grounds because tost year. Of this, £538 million 


Je outlook for tte South STtaHk 
African economy had become ' Baniat 
extremdy uncertain and Bar- Barclays is selling most of 
nat no longer fitted into the hs 40.4 per cent holding to 
panics strategy of expansion , 

into Far Eastern, European \t_ r ■ ,,, , 

and American markets. INO 01016 T trfflS 

“Geariy it is better to make . ■* 

an investment in the US than SCt tO ICciVC 

in South Africa, which is Tho™ ^ 

by the rest of the world. Sir British companies with SoiSh 


Timothy said. 

The way was cleared for the 
sale in the last ret of interim 
accounts in August, when the 
Baraat holding was revalued 


British companies with South 
African interests were about to 
fbHow Barclays’ toad. 

Standard Chartered Bank, 
which will now have the largest 
banking exposure in South 


from a commercial rand rating Africa of any British Bank, said 
to a financial rand rating, ^ 39 

the British Industry Committee 
million - a paper loss of £48 on South Africa, which has 50 
m Vr < ? n - . . members, said: ‘There is no 

Unless the proceeds of the reason to suppose that 
sale are taken in financial Barclays’ move wal encourage 
rands they cannot be repalri- other companies to pull put of 
a ted to Britain. South Africa.” 




_ rc wimuiawai or Mmnai uo mura- 

tekmg the adjustment into Kodak. The smaH British bulU- 
financial rands mio account, it ing company Marshals Halifax 
is sustaining a book loss of £42 yesterday also put its South 
milli on overall. African subsitiary tip for sale. 


Barnat's three other ferae 
shareholders — Anglo- Amen- 
can, De Beers ana Southern 
Life Association. 

Sir Timothy said the price 
of R18 (£5.66 at the commer- 
cial rand rate) per share 
represented a 20 per cent 
discount to Barnat's present 
market value but was 40 per 
cent above the net asset value 
of the South African bank. 

Barnat's contribution to 
Barclays' post tax profits 
slumped to 2.7 per cent in 
1985, despite the increasing 
risk of operating in South 
Africa. The adverse publicity 
caused by its South African 
investments also helped to cut 
Barclays' share of the im- 
portant student hank account 
market from 25 per cent to 
around 17 per cent in recent 
years. 

• Shares in South African 
gold mines were pushed lower 
yesterday by news of the 
Barclays withdrawal and a 
sharp drop in the gold price, 
which hit a three-month low 
of $378.75 an ounce in New 
York on Friday. 

The financial rand, which 
has to be used for all invest- 
ment transactions in South 
Africa, fell by US2 cents in 
early trading to 21.75 cents 
before recovering to about 
22.13 cents on investment 
demand and a stronger gold 
price of $381 after New York 
trading opened 
Leading gold mine shares 
fen as much as £3, with Vaal 
Reefs dropping from £57 JOto 
£54.50 and Randfontein mar- 
ked down from £62.50 to 
£59.50. 



Early birds in 
the great 
gas sell-off 


Applications for shares in Trading, and the marfcet-mak- 
British Gas began to arrive ing arm of Hoare GovetL 
yesterday with the first trickle Wood Mackenzie would not 
of completed forms from comment but hs market-m ak- 
customers. ing operation is understood to 

Although the prospectus is have registered. At feys t 10 are 
not published until today , needed for British Gas to 
about a million mini- qualify as an alpha stock and 
Saturday's post to gas users more maiket-makers are ex- 
who had registered for their peeled to come forward before 
guaranteed allocation. A for- Thursday's 
ther 6.5 million will be dehv- Mr Brian Winterflood, 
ered to homes by Thursday. managing director at County 

A spokesman for National Securities Trading, said he 
Westminster Bank, the lead- expected up to 20,000 bar- 
ing receiving bank, said more 
than a dozen completed forms 
had arrived already at the 
bank's main London office. 

“Some customers have lost no 
time but we expect the real 
flood to start on Tuesday,” he 
added. 

On the “grey market”, 

Cleveland Securities were 
quoting a price of 61p for the 
50p partly-paid shares. More 
than a milli on shares changed 
hands through Cleveland yes- _ 
today with the hugest buying . _ 

older for 250,000 shares. Bams a day for 




MJ 


To buy 
shares in 
British Gas, 
the full 
prospectus 
is on 
pages 35-50 


Tondhe Ross, the accoun- 
tants, will be policing the issue 
and have already identified 
more than 1,000 multiple 
registrations from people who 
will be under special scrutiny 
when their applications are 
received. 

Eight firms have so fer 
registered with the Stock Ex- 
change as market-makers for 
British Gas, including Smith 
New Court, County Securities 


gains a day for his own firm 
when dealings start on 
December 8, compared with 
5,000 for Trustee Savings 
Bank. 

There has been concern that 
the expected high volume of 
small deals would deter some- 
market makers, particularly 
after tire experience of TSB. 
One said that his firm had 
been approached by two in- 
stitutions who were concerned 
that their own jobbers would 
not be able to cope.. 


Sr Timothy Bevan: ‘disposal discussed since last May’ 


UK bid to tighten £105m bid Profits double to £50m 
up on insider deals for Norecot at News Corporation 


........ .. ffyCoffiiNailmmgh 

•Britain hopes- to bring to- Switzerland, however. 


getber rcgolatorsfrom Europe, 
the United States and Japan 
next month to try and widen 


whose penchant for secrecy in 
the financial sector is well- 
known, will not participate 


the internati onal inform atio n owing to special problems 
net aimed at preventing fraud linked to rules applied by the 
and malpractice in tire finan- Swiss universal fenh 
rial sector. Government of- 
ficials said yesterday. 

The move comes amid merit generally regards 
mowing concern that insider Switzerland as “relatively 


d e aling and. related abuse of cooperative” where cross-bor- 
zhe securities xnaikets fie- der wrongdoing is under in- 


quently involve complex 
international deals intended 
to cover the trades of the 
wrongdoer. 

The Trade and Industry 
Department has an accord 
with two US statutory bodies. 


vestigation, DTI officials 
noted. 

Free to trade in securities 
alongside other banking busi- 
ness, the secretive Swiss banks 
axe widely perceived as a 
channel for financial trans- 


the Securities and Exchange actions that might not bear 
Commission andtbe official scrutiny elsewhere. 


Commodity Futures Trading 
Commission, providing a 
framework for swapping 


And it is signed that with- 
out information from Switzer- 
land, any international 


confidential information be- information net would be 
tween regulators to help severely flawed. 


investigations. 


The Bank of England is, 


This understanding enabled however, understood to be- 
the SEC to pass on informa- lieve that tire highly devd- 
tiontotbeDTIamceramgthe oped, albeit fairly informal, 
British dimension of the activ- web of contacts between the 
ities of Mr Ivan Boesky, the central banks in the industrial 
disgraced American financier, world provides the meaiw for 
The DTI relayed it to the extracting cooperation from 


Arrow sale 

Blue Arrow has sold its US 
contract cleaning subsidiary, 
IMS/Kayward of Boston, 
Massachusetts, for $1.2 mil- 
lion (£85 1 million) cash. 


WiO Street 30 
CmmeM 31 
Stack Marked 
Teonas 32 
Co News 3032 
Money Mi*b32 


Stock Exchange. 

Mr Michael Howard, tire 


the Swiss. 
Furthermore, 


Minister for Consumer and have no monoploy on rules 
Corporaie Aflairs responsible concerning banking 
for Britain's financial services confidentiality, which are a 
legislation for tire post-Big barrier to the free exchange of 
Bang era, is the man trying to information between many 
set op the wider meeting on countries, including Britain. 


information. 


Hotels 

By Derek Harris 
. Industrial Editin' 

Pteasarama, the cosmos and 
Insure group, has offered 
£KQL5 ramioa for Norscot Ho- 
lds., the USM-quoted hotel 
group with most of its prop- 
erties in Scotland. 

The deal, on agreed terms 
but subject to Norscot share- 
holder approval, wiB add 12 
hotels to Pleasunuua’s 
expanding drain finked to 
coadang holidays. With the , 
purchase earlier this year of : 
National Holidays from Na- 
tional Bas this is foe biggest 
coaching holidays operation in 
Britain. 

Although the Norscot deal 
wffi add 1,032 bedrooms and 
will brmg the number of hotels 
in the Pteasnrama chain to 36, 
the group is seeking farther 
hotel aeqaisitions in the 
South, South-west and Scot- 
land to dovetail with the 
coaching holidays operations, 
Mr Barry Hardy, a Pteasnr- 
nmn director, said. 

Fart of the Norscot deal is 
an offer by Mr Peter Boss, 
Norscofs executive chairman, 
to bay back the Stooefield 
Castle Hotel at Tarbert on the 
shores of Loch Fyne. 

Pteasnrama is offering 184p 
a share for just over 50 per 
cent of Norscot ordinary 
shares. 

Interim resalts at Norscot 
out recently showed an in- 
crease in profits from 
£341,000 to £552,000. 


Pretax profits at News 
Corporation, the film, tele- 
vision and publishing group, 
which includes The Times , the 
Sunday Tones , the News of the 
World and the Sun, more than 
doubled to Aus$109.95 mil- 
lion (£49.56 million) in the 
quarter ended September 30 
from Aus$43.8! million in the 
same period last year. 

The results reflected im- 
proved trading profits in both 
the United States and Britain. 

Pre-interest trading profits 
in America, where Twentieth 
| Ontury Fox Film Corp and 
Fox Television Stations have 
become subsidiaries over the 
past year, rose from AusSl 1.5 
million to Aus$96.8 million. 
The acquisitions helped 

Midland rejigs 
venture arm 

Midland Bank has restore-' 
tured its investment manage- 
ment and venture capital 
activities, bringing them 
under one organisation and 
has formed a new holding 
company for its investment 
management business. Mid- 
land Montagu Asset 
Management. 

It will operate through three 
companies — Midland Mon- 
tagu Fund Managers, 
Green well Montagu stock- 
brokers and Samuel Montagu 
and Co (Jersey) — with over 
£4 billion of funds under 
management. 


world-wide turnover rise by 
83 per cent to Aus$l,323 
million. 

British profits increased 
from Aus$39.1 million to 
A us$50.2 million. The com- 
pany's four British newspaper 
titles moved to a new high- 
technology printing plant in 
Wapping, east London, in 
January. 

Foreign exchange earnings 
and investment income also 
rose, although profits fell in 
Australia, the company's 
‘home base. Interest arid pref- 
erence dividend payments 
were higher to finance the 
acquisitions. 

Shares in News Corpora- 
tion, which recently obtained 
a listing on the London Stock 
Exchange, fell iOp to 725p. 


NatWest to offer 
dealing service 

By Peter Garthmd 

British Gas shareholders Lord Boardman, chairman 
will be able to sell their shares of NatWest, says the entire 
through branches of the Na- operation has cost £3 million 
tional Westminster Bank as and win be able to handle up 
part of an instant dealing to 20,000 deals a day. 
service announced yesterday. NatWest eventually hopes to 
Shareholders, who are ex- expand the service, 
pected to receive their accep- The scale of commission 
tance letters in the week charges for selling British Gas 
beginning December 15, can shares through NatWest bran- 
present these letters at any dies will range from a mini- 
NatWest branch throughout mum of £3 for deals up to 
Britain. They need not be £1 50 to 1.5 per cent of the sale 
NatWest customers. value on deals of £500 and 

Any number of shares from more. The spread between 
50 to 5,000 can be sold in this buying and selling prices is 
way and a cheque for the share likely to be between Ip and 2p. 
sale will be issued imme- • Hoare Govett, one of the 
diately. four stockbrokers to the Offer 

The service will initially for Sale of British Gas shares, 
only be available for British has opened its own share shop 
Gas shares, until February 6, in a British Gas showroom at 
by which time NatWest jrfans 319 High Holborn, central 
to offer a similar scheme for London, 
the British Airways flotation. Prospectuses will be avail- 
County Securities, Nat- able from the share shop from 
West's share dealing subsid- today. After December 15, 
iary, will operate the service, investors will be able to sell 
which is available for buying the shares at the shop and 
as well as selling British Gas receive immediate payment. 


New York 

Dow Jones 

Tokyo 

Nikkei Dow 

Hoag Kong: 

Hang Seng 

Amsterdam: Gen 

Sydney: AO 

Frankfort 
Commerzbank .... 
Brussels; 

General 

Paris; CAC 

Zurich: SKA Gen . 
London: FT. A ..... 

FT. Gdts 

Closing prices 


2343.99 {+69.61 

2855 (+2.9 

— 1337.6 MLS 


INTEREST RATES 


London; Bank Base: 11% 

3-montti Interbank ll^is-HK* 

3-morrtti dtg&to ttBsiltW-IO 1 '** 

buying rotn 
U& Prime Rate 7%% 

Federal Funds S n n.%r 
3HHonfhTreaairy BAs 5J35-5J33%’ 


CURRENCIES 


London; 

& 81.4176 

£ : DM28605 
£: SwFr2.3920 
£.- FFr9.3590 
E. Yen232.54 

£ 'ndax-693 



SIB holds clearers to polarization 


Curbing the bank manager 


39693B (+14.01) 

392.4 (+4.4) 

_ 559.20 (+6. 1> 


._. 81.32 [ 


Mew York: 

?; ft .4170* 

4: DM2JD195* 
J:SwFf1^890* 

$:FFr6.eiHr . 
S: V'fln16*.lZ i 
S-Mlhim.fi 


I a a d tHt Bri ne 
AM $380.46pm-$38Q.5D 
dose 5381 50^00(22 
2BSL5D) 

NewYodc 

Comex S381. 70-382^0- 


NORTH SEA OIL. 


ECU £0.726538 SOR 0X847617 


By Lawrence Lerer 

The dealing banks have 
lost their battle to persuade 
foe Securities and Investments 
Board to drop restrictions on 
selling their own life assurance 
and nttif tr u sts through their 
branch networks. 

The decision by the SIB, 
announced yesterday, to stand' 
firm on so-called 
“poferizatiOU” Wtfaiw that 
banks win have to make 
substantial changes in the way 
in which they sell these prod- 
ucts throagh their branches. 

The banks had been op- 
posed to pobrizatum— an idea 
introduced by the SIB stipul- 
ating that those selling finan- 
cial products must be either 
independent intermediaries 
selling a. range of prod nets or 
company representatives seU- 
ing one company’s products 
alone. 

The banks have been 

Sffitenrempt them from the 
effects of polarization. They 
say that it woald restrict the 
broad advisory role of the 
branch bank manager who ■ 
often provides general finan- 
cial advice encompassing 
recommendations of in-hoese 
and outside products. 


trM 



. > £ — .-.y . : ’ 

: " - r 


Sir Kenneth: concern 
for customers 

This would be particularly 
acute in provincial areas where 
cust om ers relied heavily on 
their bank branch fer advice. 

The SIB'S decision came in 
a letter by Sir Kenneth Benin, 
the chairman of the SIB to the 
Committee of London and 
Scottish Clearing Banks. 

“The Board remains con- 
vinced that in the area of the 
retail selling of life assurance 
and mi r trusts tire policy of 
polarization is essential to 
secure the n ec essary clarity of 
status of the salesman or 
intennediaxy in the minds of 
the consumer, ” Sir Kenneth 
says. 

The SIB’s decision means 


that bank branch managers 
wifi have to act as independent 
intermediaries or simply sell 
the in-boose products. 

Those branches acting as 
intermediaries will only be 
able to recconunend the in- 
boose product in limited 
drcamsfances. 

According to Sir Kenneth's 
letter these are “when not to 
do so would be demonstrably 
to the disadvantage of the 
custome r." 

The SIB’s insistence on 
polarization means that where 
a bank owns an independent 
intermediary or has an in- 
dependent intermediary unit, 
then that intermediary will 
also only be aide to recom- 
mend the bank's products in 
the same ihnited circum- 
stances. 

Sir Kenneth said that bank 
portfolio managers — man - 
agers of investments on behalf 
of customers — would be able 
to select the bank's own unit 
trusts. 

The customer, he said, most 
be told that this wiD be done in 
a client agreement letter ami 
the selection of in-boose prod- 
ucts by the portfolio manager 
mast be in the customer's best 
interests. 




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WITH I.G.INDEX 


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Betting with LG. is simple: Telephone the dealing desk, get 
a quote from one of our dealers then place your bet quoting 
your dealing card number. 

To find out more about betting on Traded Options or about 
betting on I.G.'s many other contracts including Gold. 
Platinum. Coffee and T-Bonds send in the coupon below or 

telephone 01"828"7233 


Please note: 


Prices of Options move 
up and down very 
rapidly indeed. 
NEVER speculate 
with money you 
cannot afford to lose. 



PimcchJc 


Dav Tel: 










. 30 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


THTF. TIMES TUESDAY NOVEMBER 25 1_9M 


WALL STREET 


NOV 

21 


NOV 

20 


AMR 

ASA 

AKed Signal 
Allied Sira 
AHfaCWmra 
Aiwa 

Amax tnc 
Am'rdaKs 
Am Brands 
Am Gan 
AmCyran'd 
Am ElPwr 
Am Express 
Am tame 
Am Motors 
AmSt'md 
AmTeteph 
Amoco 
ArmcoSted 
Asvco 
Ashland Od 
AlRcWieH 
Avon Prods 
BkrsTstNY 


Bkcri Bston 
Bank of NY 
Beth Steel 
■ Boeing 
BseCascde 
Brden 
Bg Warner 
Bnst Myers 
BP 

Burton md 
BurrtonNm 


CommaC 
CPC Ml 


Sfis 

35ft 

4tHi 

2’i 
3651 
12 
22*i 
435* 
85 V* 
79% 
29 

sn 

7S\ 

3ii 

41% 

nr*iy 

cXtf* 

6B* 
4 V: 
15% 
56% 
50% 
28% 
42 
15% 
42 
37% 
5* 
50% 
60% 
49% 
38% 
77% 
40% 
36% 
6254 
80 
59% 
11 % 
39% 
242% 
34% 
32% 
35% 
44% 
47 
37% 
50% 
20 % 
36% 
40 
132 
43% 
33.4 
34 
46% 
33% 
15% 
25% 
53% 
77% 
36% 
52% 
54* 
23% 
48% 
17% 
103 
447. 
59 
19% 
47% 
89% 
9 
69 
75% 
85% 
70% 
66 % 


59% 
35 ’J 
40% 
65V.- 
2 % 
35% 
12 % 
22S 
42* 
85% 
78ft 
28% 
55% 
74 
3% 
41% 
26% 
67% 
4% 
15% 
56 
58% 
28% 
42 

15* 

40% 

37% 

5% 

51 

59% 

47% 

37% 

76% 

38% 

39% 

62% 

79* 

58* 

11 % 

38% 

241% 

33* 

31* 

35% 

43% 

46% 

37* 

49% 

20 % 

36 

40 

131% 

42% 

32% 

33% 

47% 

32% 

15% 

25 

53% 

75* 

35% 

52% 

54 

23% 

471'* 

17% 

100 % 

42* 

57* 

18* 

46* 

67% 

9 

67% 

74 

84% 

68 % 

86 % 


NOV 

21 


NOV 

20 


Firestone 

fctCfcseaga 

FstlntBrap 

FstPermC 

Ford 

FTWaehva 

GAFCorp 

GTEGOrp 

Gen Cop 

Gen Dy'mcs 

GanSactno 

Gen inst 

GenMfls 

Gen Mows 

GnPOUiny 

Genesco 

Georgia Pac 

Gfflata 

Goodrich 


Inc 

Grace 

GtAtt&Tac 

Gr’hnd 

GrumanCor 

GuK&west 

HemzHj. 

Hercules 

H’lat-Ptad 


IBM 
INCO 
mt Paper 

IntTelTel 

Irving Sank 
Jhnsn&Jtm 
KaoerAIum 
Kerr McGee 
Kmb'hr CMt 
K Mart 


LT.V.Corp 

Litton 

Lockheed 

Lucky Sirs 

ManH'mw 

MamnfleCp 

Uboos 

Manns Mid 

Mrt Marietta 

Masco 

McDonalds 

McDonm* 

Mead 

Memfc 

MtnstaMng 

MoWCH 

Monsanto 

Morgan J-P. 

Moure*- 

NCHCcxp 

NLIndstre 

NatDistlra 

Nat Med Ent 

NatSmcndt 

NortokSth 

NlVBarap 

OcddntPet 

Ogaen 

OfinCarp 

Owens-ifl 

Pac Gas El 

P8n Am 

Penr.ay J.C. 

Permzofl 


27 

31% 

53% 

9% 

58% 

37 

40 

59% 

60% 

72% 

79* 

17% 

41% 

73% 

23% 

3ft 

38ft 

S6ft 

44ft 

42% 

18ft 

52% 

24ft 

33* 

28% 

85ft 

41ft 

567a 

43 

68 % 

25% 

56* 

20 

123ft 

12ft 

75 

54ft 

50% 

69ft 

15ft 

30ft 

81* 

46ft 

30ft 

1* 

BOft 

517. 

32ft 

44ft 

27. 

54* 

46% 

41ft 

27S 

63% 

79ft 

56ft 

110* 

110 * 

40 

76* 

83ft 

36ft 

46 

4ft 

44ft 

25ft 

11 

84% 

38* 

28% 

45% 

43% 

43K 

25ft 

5ft 

80% 

72% 

28% 


27ft 
31ft 
53* 
SK 
58% 
37* 
38ft 
58% 
79% 
72* 
77% 
17 
39% 
72* 
23% 
3% 
38 
58 
44 
42% 
IBS 
51% 
23% 
33* 
27% 
64% 
40% 
55% 
41* 
69* 
24% 
55% 
18ft 
123ft 
12 % 
72% 
53 
49* 
67% 
14ft 
28% 
80% 
48V. 
29* 
1* 
79ft 
48ft 
32ft 
44ft 
2* 
54ft 
46% 
40% 
26ft 
Sift 
80 Vi 
55% 
106 
108 
39* 
75% 
82ft 
36% 
45!! 
4* 
43ft 
25* 
10 % 
84* 
37% 
27ft 
45 
43 
41% 
24% 
5% 
80ft 
72% 
28 


Nor 

21 


Nov 

20 


Pfizer 

pmtfpsDge 

PhWpMra 

PhKpsPet 

Polaroid 

PPGbtd 

PrctrGtnW 

PbSFJG 

Raytheon 

RynUaMflt 

Rodmtflm 
Dutch 


SaraU» 

SFESopac 

ScWbergsr 

Scott Paper 

Seagram 

Seats RWt 

SMHTrans 


BJc 

ith^aiEd 
STVstn Baa 
Sid Oil 


Stevens. 
Sun Comp 
Teledyne 
Temaco 


Texas E Cor 
Texas Inst 
Texas UMs 
Textron 
TravfesCor 
TRW me 
UAL me 
OnBeverNV 
LXi Carbide 
Ur Pac Gw 
Utd Brands 
liSGCorp 
UMTecmor 
USX Carp 
Unocal 
Jim Walter 
Wmar Lmbt 
Wafts Farm 
WstghseS 
Hfeyerfi'sar 
Whrtpool 
Wootwonh 
Xerox Corp 
Zenith 


61ft 

19% 

70ft 

10* 

69ft 

70* 

78ft 

42% 

65* 

46 

43* 

91% 

61% 

69% 

34 

32% 

62% 

62ft 

43% 

54% 

40% 

85ft 

22% 

34% 

110ft 

49* 

44* 

34% 

56ft 

313% 

39% 

34% 

29% 

117ft 

34* 

63 

44K 

92 

57ft 

221 % 

23% 

62% 

34 

42 

44ft 

21ft 

28ft 

48 

57ft 

107ft 

58% 

39ft 

69ft 

42% 

58ft 

21 


60* 

19% 

89% 

10 % 

67* 

69% 

73 

42ft 
64% 
44* 
42ft 
91 K 
62 
66 * 
33* 
31% 
61 
61 % 
42* 
54* 
39* 
85 
21* 
34ft 
107* 
47ft 
43% 
33ft 
57 

311% 

38% 

34% 

29 

116% 

34ft 

62* 

43% 

91% 

57* 

220 % 

23% 

60* 

33* 

40* 

44* 

21 % 

25% 

47% 

56 

105% 

57ft 

39% 

69% 

41% 

58ft 

20 % 


Dow goes 
higher 
at start 

New York (Agencies) - 
Wall Street share prices, 
turned higher yesterday in 
early moderately active tra- 
ding. 

Hie Dow Jones industrial 
average was up 3-23 palate at 
1,896.79. 

Advancing shares led de- 
dines by a narrow margin, on 
a votmne of about 25 raiOkMi 


CANADIAN PRICES 

AotcoEag 
AunAhjm 


Agora S8 
Can Pacific 
Comlnco 
GoiBathrst 
Hkr/SMCan 
HdsnBMin 
toasco 
lenaiQd 
In Pipe 
RylTrustco 


5ESPr6ucSmEBrKnnBESnESi55K9m3aniaSvlBpiM 


Co 

TtansnN'A’ 

Weston 
T75 


25% 27ft 
43ft 42* 
tlH 11* 
15% 15ft 
13ft 13X 
27* 27* 

27% 27% 
23% 23* 
32* 32% 
47% 46% 
39ft 39% 
29% 29% 
87 ft 85% 
19% 18% 

28% 28* 
2-70 2£5 

13 13% 

30% 30% 


Mrs Christine Calltes, of 
Dean Witter Reynold, said: 
“The market is probably going 
to try to preserve its gains, but 
it will no into trouble almost 
immediately. 

“The technical underpin- 
nings of this market are not all 
that strong at these levels, its 
leadership since the second 
week of September has not 
extended much beyond the 
takeover stocks. 1 * 

Coca-Cola Enterprises led 
the active shares, down Vt to 
163/s. AT&T, at 26%, was 
unchanged, IBM was np % to 
124, Chevron was np % to 
47%, General Motors was np 
% at 73 s /» and FPL Group, at 
32%, was unchanged. 

Redman Industries was up 1 
at 8%, Zale, at 48%, was op 
5% and Rexnord was up 2 at 
20%. LTV Corporation was 
down V* at 2% and USX, at 
21, was down *4. 

May Department stores, at 
387*, was np 1. 

The transportation average 
was down 0.13 at 838.75, 
utilities, at 211J4, were down 
034 and stocks added 030 to 
748.09. 

Meanwhile, the Standard 
and Poor’s 100 index was up 
031 to 234.19. 



Another year of 
excellent results and 
record achievements 

In the past year investments in the UK and USA amounted to ap- 


“ln looking ahead, lam compelled to reflectonourcompan/s 
significant achievements to date. They surely promise well for our 
continued resourceful expansion.” 



YEAR ENDED 

YEAR ENDED 



31fUUn986 

3?/ulyl9S5 

% INCREASE 

Turnover 

£56,423,000 

£35,488,000 

+59% 

Profit before taxation 

£7,414,000 

£5,168,000 

+43% 

Profit after taxation 

£5,943,000 

£3,335,000 

+78% 

Earnings per share 

14.80p 

10J54p 

+40% 

Dividend net per share 

5-Op 

4.0p 

+25% 


Attwoods pic is the parent company of a group of companies 
engaged in the waste management and quarrying industries, with 
operations in the United Kingdom and the United States. 

Copies o/ the Report and Accounts are available from 
The Secretary Attwoods pic. The Prckeridge. Stoke Common Road. Fulmer. Bucks SL36HA. 


Rank Xerox leads move to 
curb Japanese imports 


By Edward Townsend 
Industrial Corespondent 
Rank Xerox, the British 
associate of Xerox Corpora- 
tion of the United States, is 
spearheading a new attempt 
by European photocopier 
manufacturers to curb Japa- 
nese imports. 

winning the Euro- 


pean commission's approval 
for anti-dumping measures. 
Rank Xerox and other Euro- 
pean producers say that Japa- 
nese copiers are still Hfcrty to 
be sold unfairly in the EEC 
because of Japanese moves to 
set up “screwdriver” factories 
which are merely assembly 
operations based on the im- 
port of Japanese components. 

In a move led by M Roland 
Magnin, the French-born 
chief executive of Rank Xe- 
rox, the European producers 
are lobbying the commission 
to impose a local content 
requirement on the Japanese. 

The European group — 



Polan d Magnin: ‘Sveare not 
being protectionist” 
which itself the Commit- 

tee of European Copier Manu- 
facturers (CECOM) - wants 
xo see a minimum EEC con-' 
tent of 55 per cent imposed on 
Japanese manufacturers. 
This, it says, woald protect the 
European industry and force 
the Japanese to set prices at 
market rates. 

The issue of Japanese 
dumping in the multi-million 


pound European copier mar- 
ket — restricted until now to 
die low-volume desk-top mar- 
ket — and local content, has 
become z cause c^lebre in EEC 
trade discussions. 

The commission has agreed 
already with local producers 
that the Japanese have been 
guilty of dumping and it 
intends to impose an import 
duty which M Magnin hopes 
will be ai least 20 per cent 
when it is set by the Council of 
Ministers earfy .next year. 

But M Magnin and others 
say that the time taken by the 
commission to reach a de- 
cision over the CECOM com- 
plaint has allowed the 
Japanese producers, whose 
leaders include Canon. 
Toshiba and Minolta, to 
establish so-called manufac- 
turing bases while at the same 
time building their stocks of 
copiers 

Rank Xerox, derived, from 
the American company that 


invented photocopying and 
which remains the world lead- 
er, now feats char in Europe 
the Japanese will try to repeat 
their success in the low vol- 
ume sector with an attack on 
the new laser-priming ma- 
chine sector and the market 
for high volume office copiers. 

Japanese copiers have won 
about 80 per cent of the 
European desk-top market but 
CECOM says their prices have 
been lower than Japanese 
domestic selling prices. 

The latest moves to force 
the Japanese to agree to local 
content in 'their machines 
match the campaign of the 
motor industries of Europe to 
win commission acceptance of 
local content proportions in 
imported vehicles. 

M Magnin said: “We are 
not being protectionist If the 
Japanese played by the same 
rules as us there would be no 
reason why we should not 
compete equally.” 


Free glass 
offers 
hit Crown 

Millions of glasses banded 
to motorists as part of a 
giveaway campaign by the 
petrol companies drained 
profits of the Crown House 
engineering and tableware 
group in the first half of this 
year. 

Sales of quality glassware 
were also hit by the rail in the 
number of American tourists 
visiting Britain. 

Pretax profits fell from £1.6 
million to £663,000, on turn- 
over slightly ahead at £95 
million. 

The tableware business saw 
a reversal from profits of 
£803,000 to a loss of£941,000. 

The chairman, Mr Patrick 
Edge- Partington, said: “It is 
only in the last month or so 
that we have started to see any 
improvement” 

“We estimate that nearly 
150 to 200 million glasses 
have been given away by the 
petrol companies over the last 
1 5 months, so clearly many of 
the shops decided there was 
no point stocking up with 
glasses from us or anyone else 
- at least until people started 
breaking all the glasses they 
had collected.” 

Crown House had to rely on 
its engineering contracting 
activities to save the day, with 
profits during the latest six 
months advancing from less 
than £800,000 to £1.5 million. 

The company is again pay- 
ing a 3p interim dividend. 


• 1C INDUSTRIES INC: The 
company has declared its regu- 
lar quarterly dividend of 20 
cents a share on the common 
stock, payable in January. 

• MOORGATE GROUP/- 
POULTER: Negotiations for 
the acquisition of the Pbulier 
Tenneson Co have been ter- 
minated by mutual agreement. 

• BRITANNIA SECURITY 
GROUP: The company has 
issued 863,020 new shares of 
which 784314 were deferred 
consideration for White Group 
Electronics and 78,706 deferred 
consideration for Audio Educa- 
tion. The new shares will not 
rank for the final dividend for 
the year to June 30 1986. 

• JF PACIFIC WARRANT 
CO SA: Net asset value per 
ordinary share as at November 
21 is US$51.2] (£35.80). 

• OCEAN WILSONS 
(HOLDINGS): Results for the 
six months to June 30. Turn- 
over in Brazil in GanSOOOs 
(cruzados 000s) 790,725 


Son of white knight is 
accused of bank fraud 


From Stephen Leather, Hong Kong 


A £400 milli on banking case 
in Brunei is threatening the 
standing of Tan Sri Khoo 
Teck Puat, one of the three 
white knights who earlier this 
year rescued Standard Char- 
tered Buik from the clutches 
of Lloyds Bank. 

Mr Khoo’s eldest son, Khoo 
Ban Hock, appeared in court 
charged with conspiring to 
defraud the National Bank of 
Brunei and with false acc- 
ounting. 

No pleas were taken from 
Khoo Ban Hock or two of the 
bank's auditors. 

The Rank is 70 per cent 
owned by the Khoo family 
and after a five-month in- 
vestigation the Brunei Fi- 
nance Ministry has discovered 
that 90 per cent of the bank's 


loans are to Khoo-ntiafed 
companies, more than Sin$ 1 .3 
billion in all (£400 million). 

Khoo Ban Hock, who is in 
his late fifties, also feces 
charges of malting false profit 
statements to directors of the 
bank and of allegedly falsify- 
ing the bank's annual report 
for 1985. 

The affair puts Khoo Tecfc 
Puat under immense pressure 
and raises the possibility of 
the sale of his £62 million 
stake in Standard Chartered. 

The financier, who was 
invited to join the Standard 
Chartered Board along with 
fellow white knights. Sir Y K 
Pao, the Hong Kong shipping 
entrepreneur, and the Austra- 
lian Mr Robert H (rimes a 
Court, has not been personally 


identified as involved in the 
alleged conspiracy. 

But the impact on his 
reputation as a banker could 
be catastrophic. 

The statement issued by the 
Brunei Finance Ministry re- 
fers to “good faith negotia- 
tions with the KJhoos” and 
talks about “Khoo-related 
loans”. 

The government obviously 
the matter as a family 


And the major hanks in 
Singapore lave been asked by 
the regulatory authorities to 
provide details ofloans to the 
Khoo family, which is a snub 
to the Singaporian financier. 

A warrant has been issued 
for fee arrest of Chen Ping 
Fang, one of the Bank's exec- 
utive directors. 


ABPH may buy Sealink ports 


(302). Profit before tax of Brazil- 
ian operations 2,656 (1,395). 
Pretax profit 2,754 (1,554). Tax 
1.523 (745% Earnings per share 
3.10p (2_Q3p). Net asset value 
58.26p (52p% 


CR0MA CONTRACT HIRE. 



THE PROFITABLE WRY TO MIX BUSINESS WITH PLEASURE 


Choose the new luxury 2-fitre Croma on 
Fiat company contract hire and: 

H=You pay only 3 months advance rental, 
then a pre-planned monthly sum that could 
be as little as £258.56 4- VAT 
% No extra charges for scheduled servicing, 
repairs, replacement parts, or even road fund 
licence, so your company benefits from better 
forward budgeting. 

* In the event of accident or malfunction, 
you’ll get rapid roadside assistance and a 
replacement vehicle after 24 hours - at no 
extra cost. 

% And your company may benefit from cash- 
flow and tax advantages. 

Croma contract hjre - designed to offer all 


the pleasure of driving a luxury car without the 
risks of ownership. To find out more, phone the 
Croma Fact Line on 0800 521581 or complete 
the coupon today. 

To Fiat Information Service 1 DeDt FIX 0? 36. Freepost. 
P0 &o< 39. Windsor Berks SL4 3BS. I would like lo know 
more about }fie profitable way to nix business with pleasure 

Mr Mrs- Miss 


Company 
Address _ 


BUBO fleet 

A BETTER BUSINESS DECISION 



.‘•■■y hlo ■/ 


■ • isp". :-z>\ Ci.-z - ivj-.a, "v re.,. 


Associated British Puts 
Holdings (ABPH) is to decide 
within the next few weeks 
whether to buy some of 
SeaEnk's six parte. 

Sealink is part of Mr James 
Sherwood’s I©ss-«aEri®g Sea 
Containers group. Price 
Waterhouse, the company of 
accountants, is making a dose 
study of tire Sealink ports for 
ABPH. ABPH will make its 


COMPANY. NEWS 


• SPRING RAM COUP! The 
company has acquired Balter ley 
Bathrooms, a Stoke-based man- 
ufacturer of vitreous china sani- 
tary-ware, for £700,000 cash. 
Balterlcy had net tangible assets 
of £415,000 at October 31 1985, 
and made pretax profits of 
£78,000 for the six months to 
October 31 1986 

• TOWNGRADE SECURI- 
TIES: The board meeting fixed 
for today to approve the 
preliminary announcement of 
results for the year to June 30 
has been postponed. 

More company news 
is on page 32 


• THOMAS BORTHWICK ft 
SONS: The company is to 
receive a refund of surplus from 
its United Kingdom pension 
scheme. The Inland Revenue 
has agreed to a formula which 
will amount to £6.9 million 
gross or £4.2 million net after 
deduction of the 40 per cent 
special tax. The fimd will retain 
an amount equivalent to 105 per 
cent of actuarially calculated 
liabilities. 

• DOWTY GROUP: Dowty 
Rotol, a subsidiary, has received 

.orders worth more than 1 £30 
million for aerospace 
equipmenL 


By Judith Huntley 
decision when Price 
Waterhouse completes its re- 
port, expected in the next 
three weeks. 

It' is bettered that Sea 
Containers has rained its six 
ports at £100 million, but 
ABPH says it has no intention 
of paying that figure. 

Sir Keith Stuart, fee chair- 
man of ABPH, said yesterday 
tire company would boy only 


some of the Sealink ports on 
tire basis feat they were 
operationally sound 

He said: **We would not bay 
any ports that did oot improve 
our earnings per share apd we 
would not buy on tire basis of 
promises of performance." 

ABPH was approached by 
Sea Containers to see whether 
it was interested in baying fee 
Sealink ports. 


win £ 106 m 
contracts 

By Teres* P&ote 
Business Correspondent 

Four British companies 
have been awarded contracts 
worth a tool £106 nuUkm for 
work- on the Sanoanalawewa 
hydro-electric project in Sri 

lanb. 

Balfour Beatty, the con- 
struction arm of BICC, fee 
cable anti wire manufacturer, 
is leading a consortium of 
seven British and Japanese- 
funded contractors chosen to 
build fee £288 million dam. 

The project, one of fee 
largest undertaken in Sri 
Lanka, wifi mean almost 
10.000 man-years of work for 

British companies. ■ 

Balfour Beatty's £83 million 
contract indudes tire civil 
engineering work for fee Ska 
tunnel, the power station, 
roads, infrastructure and con- 
struction vxQage. 

GEC Turbine Generators 
will design, supply and install 
the two 60MW generators 
under a £16 million contract 
and Sir Alexander Gibb and 
Partners, is- association wife 
EPDC ofSkfcup, is 
out £7. nti&ion of < 
for fee whole project 
Britain is contributor £70 
miUion, including £16.5 mil- 
lion from fee Aid and Trade 
Provision and a £15 minion 
loan from fee Commonwealth 
Development Corporation. 
Lloyds Merdmat Bank b 

provide the baiance^of fee 
British element, backed by tire 
Export Credits Guarantee 
Department, 

The Ceylcm Electricity 
Board and fee Government of 
Japan wifi supply the remain- 
ing finance. Japanese finance 
will account for 60 per cent of 
fee total cost, compared wife 
Britain's 40 per cenL 
Work b dire to tfart in 
January and should be com- 
pleted by July 1991. 

China in £70m 
medical spend 

China is ready to boast its 
imports of medical equipment 
dramatically in an attempt to 
modernize its outdated hos- 
pitals. It plans lo spend up to 
USJI00 million (£70.4 mil- 
lion) fete year. \ 

The intention is to replace 
existing medical equipment 
which m some cases is more 
than 20 years old and fee 
spendingis likely to increase in 
com mg years, said Mr Guo 
Jiangxmg, a section chief of 
the State Bureau of Materials 
and Equipment 
He said that x-ray and 
diagnostic equipment are at 
the lop of his shopping hsL 


• TYZACK TURNER: Final 
dividend 3p, making 4p (same) 
forthe year to July 31. Figures in 
£000s. Turnover 8,988 (7,873). 
Gross profit 1,175 (975). 
Operating profit 401 (51 1). In- 
terest payable and similar 
charges 202 (170). Pretax profit 
199 (341% Tax 93 (1). Extraor- 
dinary debt 289 (ml). Earnings 
per share 12p (10.6p% 

• CHAMBERLAIN PHIPPS: 
Figures for fee half year to 
September 30 in £000. Interim 
was 1 J2p ( 1 . 1 p), turnover was 
50222 (47,292% pretax profit 
was 2,409 (2,107) and tax was 
958 (990% Earnings per share 
were 3.72p (2,74p% The chair- 
man, Mr Frank Chamberlain, 
said the general industries di- 
vision increased profits in 
Britain and overseas. The adhe- 
sive businesses now contribute a 
third of group trading profit. 

• SHER ATON SECURITIES 
INTERNATIONAL:- Figures in 
£000 for six months to Septem- 
ber 30. Interim was 0.375p. 
Property sales were 5,710 
(2^75) and net property income 
was 1,928 (703% Pretax profit 
was 1,725 (661), tax was 200 
(nil) and earnings per share were 
L6p(0.8p% The chairman hopes 
to recommend an increased 
final dividend. The half-year 
results show a further improve- 
ment and reflect the continuing 
pro gres s of the group. 


s&YFtt 




Rothschilds International 
Money Funds 

The efficient alternative to a deposit 
account in any major currency. 


For further information and the current prospectuses, 
please complete and return this coupon to: Robin Fuller, 

' N M Rothschild Asset Management (C.I.) Limited. 
P.O. Box 242, St. Julian's Court, St. Peter Port. Guernsey. 
Channel Islands. Telephone: Guernsey (0481)26741. 


I 
I 

| Name 


| Address 

I 

I 


j A?7 


I 

I 

^NM ROTHSCHILD ASSET MANAGEMENT J 


Penningtons Wtoi Bowie 



SOLICITORS 

The Partners of Penningtons Ward Bowie 
are pleased to announce that they have acquired 
the practice of Cardales (City Office) and 
that Mr Cecil Benzecry of Cardales has joined 
them in Partnerehip. 

Penningtons Ward Bowie also announce 
the opening on 24th November 1986 of their 
City Office at 57-59 London Wall, London EC2M 5TP. 
Telephone: 01-242 4422. 


The 43 partners of the firm will continue to serve 
clients through their existing offices in London, Basingstoke, 
Bournemouth. Godaiming. Newbury and Poole. 





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,urt\ - _ 


THE TIMES TUESDAY NOVEMBER 25 1986 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


FUTURES AND 


31 


STOCK MARKET REPORT 


OPTIONS 



clear the decks 


COMMENT Kenneth Fleet 


Farmers 

hope for for British Gas debut 


Tax reforms with an 
interest rate bonus 




By Mi chael dark 
and Carol Leonard 


WOOJLWORTHS- STILL WARY ▲ OF BfO 


When 'M Louis MaDe, 
Frcndrfibn director, went to 
Glencoe, Minnesota, in 1979 
to make God’s Country , a 
sympathetic documentary of 
He irnhe American heartland, 
he found a community erf 
fermm wholoved their land 
almost _ as much as ' their 
families. 

As a postscript to the film, 
M Malle returned to Glcncoc 
six years later to find the 
farmers depressed by filling 
erain prices, enormous loan 
burdens and stubbornly high 
crops at home and abroad. 

One firmer said he would 
be doing everything he could 
to dissuade his eight-year-old 
sou from taking over 
— if there were still a firm to 
take over. Another of M 
Malle's interviewees spoke 
ominously ofbands of farmers 
who were starting tax strikes. 

The reasons behind the. 
malaise - of the American 
firmer have also had severe 
repercussions for the futures 
markets, which trade grata 
contracts, principally the Chi- 
cago Boatd of Trade (CBoT). 

Futures fell 


It was all systems go for 
ritish Gas m the stock 
marketyesterday, with dealers 
already predicting a warm 
reception for the £5.6 billion 
start on 

I December & 

The prospectus is published 
today and with so much 
money now earmaxked for the 
flotation, business in the rest 
of the market Ires been hit. 
Turnover among other lead- 
ing shares was reduced to a 
trickle. 

Mr Paul Spedding, 
ofl analyst at Klemwort 
Grievesoo, adviser to British 
. is already predicting that 
institutional investors will 
have their applications scaled 
down. 

He says: “They are already 


BQ 

COMET 

W001W0RTHS 



Apart from reducing me 

number of pnxluting, con- sr ._ 

siiming and other industry J ket, Cleveland Securities, foe 
playexs, low _ prices have } BcmaH dealer is already. 


and Shell to maintain their 
weighting in foe sector,*’ he 
says. 

BP has risen more than 20p 
in foe past couple of weeks 
and yesterday it gained a 
further 8p to 70 ip while Shell 
dimbed lQpto 968pi 
“The feeling in foe market is 
that British das will go 
Mr Spedding says,“but 
investannhouM see foe shares 
go to a good premium they 
wiD not double their money 
overnight.” 

la tire uno fficial grey mar- 


chain, was one of foe first to 
benefit, cfimbtng 8p to 222p, 
Es talked abort a ro- 
tes shares. 

have had a bad ran 
over the past month, ” says 
leading retail analyst Mr Paul 
Aynsiey, at Wood Mackenzie; 
foe broker, “because people 
are worried about doll trading 
in its womenswear division. 

But womenswear only ac- 
counts for about 20 per cent of 
group profits and the com- 
pany has now developed two 
distinctive ranges for its Nest 
Collection and Next Too 
shops, which should help." 


Shares in Woohrorth Hold- 
ings responded to foe news 
that the group is applying for a 
American quote, with an 18p 
rise to 663p. The group has 
applied to foe New York Stock 
Exchange for an American 
Depository Receipt facility 
and dealings should begin in 
the new year. 

Next week, Woolworth 
directors, including Mr Geof- 
frey Mukahy, chairman, fly to 
foe US to meet a number of 
fund managers and brokers. 

’ MrMuIcahy and foe rest of 
the Woolworth board are o 
too aware of bow vulnera 
they remain to a bid after the 
abortive £1.9 million assault 
Mr Stanley Kahn? Dixons 


The US tax reforms now passed 
into law could provide a model for a 
third Thatcher Government At a 
stroke. President Reagan and Con- 
gress have reduced the number of tax 
rates to two — a 28 per cent top rate 


and 15 per cent; broadened the tax 
£ shifted 


He says that by January 
1988 Next will only be on a 5 
per cent premium to the 

market, whereas, for such a . „ 

hi gh g ro wth company, he 5® ?, Wool wort h, 

fhmbe it (km>>c tnivxmaV) ibr which it paid an average- 

price of 670p. At Woolworth 


Dixons still retains a near 5 


Urinks it deserves to be on a 30 
percent premium. 

Brewers would also benefit 
from a consumer spending 
spree and most of them 
showed phis signs. 

Amid speculation as to 
which small regional firm will 
be foe next to be taken oat by 
one of the brewing companies, 
Moriand, where Whitbread 
has a large holding, gained 17p 
t©397p. 


to 


ALPHA STOCKS 


These prices are as at 6.45pm 


driven away the speculator, 
mostly to exciting new mar- 
kets, notably financial fixtures, 
which have come on stream 
with fir greater volume and 
price volatility. 

If agricultural futures have 
not declined in absolute 


terms, their fin relative to 
other contracts has been enor- 
mous. In 1976, some 16 
million, or about 85 percent 
of the 19 minion contracts 
traded on the CBoT were in 
agricultural goodw- 
ill the first nine months of 
this year, exchange members 
shook hands on almost 62 
nriQion fixtures contracts of 
which only 15 million kits, 
about a quarter, were in 
wheat, com and the three 
soyabean markets. 

In an attempt to revive the 
old noth foe new, foe CBoT is 
in foe midst of an agricultural 
options prog ramm e which by* 
next February wifi have 
matched each of the five 
futures contracts with a deriv- 
ative option. If it appears that 
the exchange should have 
thought of dnbg this long ago, 
the answer is it did, but was 
only allowed to proceed when 
a 48-year-old ban on firm 
options was lifted in 1984. 

So fir foe exchange 
pleased with the progress 


quoting the pertly-paid 50p 
British Gas shares at 63p, a 
13p premium. 

be FT-30 share index, 
helped by an early rise on Wall; 
Street, dosed at its highest 
level of the day, 8.4 higher, at 
12816 and foe FT-SE 100 
index gained 11.6 at 1636.S. 1 
The stronger pound boosted 
gihs, which showed rises of up 
to £% at the longer end. 

Among blue chins h—mi 
T rust finned 5p to 2Q2p pn 
renewed American support. ■ 
Spondex, foe. sjgnwriter 


IMS 

Hgto Lot Onwpaay 


Price 


Grow 

A 


Offer Cfc-Qa pwn 


VM 

« 


Volume 


P/E HOD 


383 283 AEM-Lyons 
174 126 ASDA-MR 
488 278 BTR 
BAT 


491 881 
572 449 
B40 680 
450 S56 
728 526 
383 293 
289 170 
BOB 423 
709 530 
280 
198 


384 258 
369 277 


-BMCtom 
Hue Cbcto 
BOC 
Boots 

Br Aerospace 
Or Patataum 
177*2 Br Telecom 
98 Britt* 


315 320 
156 180 
200 28S 
488 483 
408 475 
736 748 
422 427 
643 648 


+7 

46 

-5 

+3 


Baton 

CBUtlWMn 


225 22B 
488 493 
898 703 
195 199 
158 100 
274 278 
328 335 


45 

+1 

-1 

+2*i 

43 

43 

43 

-1 

+6 

+10 


135 

45 

93 

184 

281 

21.7 

17.1 
300 

14.1 
103 
2X4 
488 
10l7 

93 

81 

73 


43 

23 

35 

4j0 

80 

23 

45 

45 

43 

4.7 

45 

89 

84 

53 

23 

23 


145 1.100 
173 2,400 
19.7 1500 

125 747 
83 4500 

153 08 

17 J* 2300 

93 955 

126 622 

143 2300 
103 436 

77 3,100 
115 8406 
43 8100 
155 2500 


• PUkhratua, foe glass 
maker, dippad 13j» to 610p, 
taking it doscr to BTR’s 
Sg^dfer.B miwrt 
GrievesmsaysRTZismt- 
fikdy to Jan foe£l^ USun 
■act ion, because of its - 
‘"lowly-rated paper and frugal 
approach,’’ bat **it coaid be 
iaterested to hayin g parts of . 
FSkfu^sn.*’ Jnn foil 6p 
to 282 p. 


196 158 Cadtoy Schwppn 181 

184 


+2 

87 

43 

21A 

24M 

336 257 Cora Union 

261 

264 


+2 

17 A 

6-6 


977 

704 409 Cons GokBMtte 

656 

663 

• 

-9 

35JJ 

53 

189 

738 

327*7252 CourtaufcJs 

322 

325 


-2 

as 

2-9 

109 

1|5DD 

438 SIS Dixons Grp 

324 

328 


+2 

43 

13 

232 

668. 

BSD 408 FtolU 

554 

559 

• 

+1 

8L4 

ts 

243 

1.100 

954 7D1 Gen Accident 

798 

805 

• 

+6 

34J3 

43 

ana» 

56 

226 158 C£C 

182 

166 


+4 

6.1 

33 

112 

6300 

11', 756*7 Glaxo 

910 920 


+5 

200 

22 

iai 

753 

462 328 Grand MW 

458 

481 


+6 

136 

29 

154 

1200 

.11*7721 GUS’A 

S85 

995 

• 

-14*8 

300 

ao 

133 

388 

954 720 GRE 

765 

772 

• 

46 

426 

53 

»a 

59 

385 235 G(KN 

263 

286 

41 

45 

17S 

as 

89 

1900 

355 275 Gnfenro' 

325 

330 


4S 

103 

ai 

124 

2,100 


they would not be 
see Dixons come 
back with another bid in the 
summer. 

Also being mentioned as a 
possible predator is Sir Ralph 
Halpern’s Burton Group. It is 
unlikely that either ride will 
make a move until after the 
full-year figures are an- 
nounced in March. But do not 
be surprised if Woolworth 
deckles to hit foe acquisition 
trad itself soon. 

Standard Chartered fin- 
ished the day 2p higher at 

806p. 

The rest of foe bag dealing 
banks finished the day with 
small gains after the news that 
Barclays Bank had decided to 
pull out of South Africa. 
Barclays ended l Op dearer at 
482p. 

The group's decision to 
sever its connections with 
South Africa could also start 
renewed American support for 
foe shares. The group has 
enjoyed an ADR fidlity cm 
Wall Street for some time. 

But its South African 
connection has forced New 
York investors to give the 


is 


made by the options, although 
no one is about to boast of 
their howling success. Soya- 
bean options, the fust on foe 
floor in October 1984, traded 

693.000 contracts in the first 
10 months of this year while 
com, introduced fort months 
later, was not fir behind with 

497.000 lots. 

As CBoT officials admit, 

the numbers are pitifully small 


Treasury Bond options, which 
have traded more than IS 
million lots this year. The 
revival effect on foe fixtures 
contracts they serve has also 
been minimal — com futures 
volumes are 2 per cent down 
on last year while soyabean 
business is off 12 per cent 
The markets only really 
sprang to life at abort the tune 
of the Chernobyl disaster, 
which sent speoifators' minds 
racing with visions of eastern 
European plains foreverbfigh- 
ted by midear fallout 
The exchange takes more 
comfort from the feet that the 
options are beginning to be 
taken seriously in the grain 
trade — not M Malle's mis- 
erable family farmers, but 
what the CBoTs Mr Peter 
Donnefly calls ‘'corpo ra te 


farms” — Im y wndwtalrmp 
owned by co mpa ni e s rather 
than individuals. 


Fixed price deals 


Mr Donnefly. who heads 
the CBoTs new London of- 
fice, also says foe options are 
being used by grain storage 
companies which buy the com 
and beans from farmers. By 
chaigmgfoe firmer for the put 
option, and giving him the 
payoff if prices move in the 
right direction, store owners 
are now in a better position to 
offer fixed price deals. 

According in Mr Donnefly, 
there are ako moves to institu- 
tionalize foe options, at least 
in a pilot pro gramme , in the 
latest farm legEShnon. 

The third CBoT firm op- 
tion m wheat started fart week 
and the final two contracts in 
soyabean ofl and meal wiH be 
posted next F ebr ua ry, with 
hopes particularly high for foe 
op contract because of foe 
high overseas interest in fob. 
area. 

Even if they never prove to 
be a howling success, the 
agriadtmal options are un- 
likely to be cast aside in 
Chicago with the haste that 
other quiet contracts are dis- 
posed of. if prices do not start 
improving soon, the options 
could well outlast the formers 
ofGfencoe. \ 

Richard Lander 


which started dealings on the 
Unfitted Securities Market 
yesterday, went to 20Sp, a 35p* 
premium over its 170p placing 
price. ‘ 

Virgin, the record and pop 
music empire ran by Mr 
Richard Branson, however, 
was stifl struggling to stay 
above its 140p striking price. 
The shares ended the day ltep 
bdowitat 13SVip. 

Stores were one of the high 
spots of foe stock market as 
market men grew increasingly 
confident that the ■ Govern- 
ment wiH, after all, be able to 
afford a fiifl 2p in the pound 
ait in income tax. 

Next, the fast-growing mens 
and womenswear . fashion 


215*3 141 Hanson 
828 483 Havttr SfckJtay 
11 % 734 knp Chum M 
583 335 Jajpusr 
20 1 312 Udbrota 
348 276 Land Secuttss 
288 133 togal* On 
484 293 Uoytta 
. 283 . 183 Lontaro ■ 


an 20Q 

416 422 
10‘r 10% 
507 512 
382 367 
937 340 
225 230 
423 430 
240. 242 


+5 

+2 


+2 

-12 

-2 

-*6 


87 

214 

486 

127 

188 

145 

123 

280 

17.1 


25 

81 

45 

25 

45 

45 

84 

55 

7.1 


180 

82 

118 

105 

17.4 

227 

298 

89 

118 


6500 

206 

646 

802 

389 

948 


Costain fell lip to 491p 
after a downgrading by Chaw 
Manhattan Securities from 
£70 mflfion to £63 million for 
1986. Chase was worried 
abort recurring geological 
problems at Pyro Mine in 
the US. Cestein’s own broker, 
BZW, is sticking to its 
forecast of £65.5 million, and 
believes the problems at 
Pyre were solved last month. 


the burden from persons 
to corporate taxpayers; and simplified 
the system by obliterating most of the 
tax shelters. 

The same reforms may provide also 
an uncovenanted bonus if they help to 
move interest rates lower. The US 
Treasury is expecting some downward 
pressure when tax relief on personal 
borrowing is removed on January 1. 
Raising the price of something nor- 
mally reduces demand for it and 
removing tax relief should reduce the 
demand for bank finance. 

Nobody is expecting the effect to be 
enormous. For cure thing relief on 
mortg ag e interest on first and second 
homes remains, and some of this 
money will undoubtedly be applied to 
other areas of consumer spending. 
Personal borrowing other than for 
homes is only one area of the market 
The best guess is that the effect on in- 
terest rates will be rather less than 1 
per cent, but any downward pressure 
on rates in the new year will be 
welcome internationally, not least in 
Britain. 

Highly significant for the long term 
future of tax reforms are the possible 
effects of the tax changes on growth 
and employment Speaking at a 
conference yesterday organized by the 
Institute for Fiscal Studies, John 
Wilkins, a senior adviser to the US 
Treasury on tax policy, estimated the 
supply side effect of the changes as 
O.2-0.3 per cent a year on economic 
growth and about the same on 
employment — say, 2 million jobs. 

These estimates are fragile. But they 
underline that the purpose of tax 
reform is not just ease of administra- 
tion or votes but the better working of 
the economy. 

It may be true, as the institute's new 
director, Mr Bill Robinson, suggested, 
that Britain started from a slightly less 
rhanrir. tax structure than that of the 
US and that this country has made 
some worthwhile reforms already. 
The present fashion for gloom about 
Britain's efforts at tax reform is 
overdone. But we certainly have more 
to learn from the reforms now under 
way not only in the US but in most of 
the developed countries of the world. 


Crucial trade figures 


615. 


371’ 

506 


shares a wide berth. Midland 
Bank, lp firmer at 555p, and 


231 

163 

Marks 8 Spsncer 

194 

197 

• 

+8 

59 

39 

234 

2900- 

599 

417 

Mctanc! 

550 

557 



37.1 

57 

209 

183 

693 

426 

Nat Watt 

490 

487 



279 

59 

52 

1.100 

578 

428 

P40DM 

506 

513 

• 

+6 

S9 

49 

149 

304 

248 

162 

Pfessoy 

168 

172 


+2 

72 

42 

129 

1700 

942 

718 

Prudential 

798 

805 


+10 

38.6 

49 

529 

168 

234 

148 

Racai Beet 

166 

172 


+2 

43 

29 

189 

2300- 

900 

605 

BecMt Gobnsn 

800 

807 

• 

+5 

23-9 

39 

174 

188 

562*i345 

Routers 

542 

547 


+12 

54 

19 

413. 

284 

791 

511 

RTZ 

688 

873 

• 

-2 

314 

47 

89 

213 

967 

782 

Royal to* 

810 

817 

• 

+2 

389 

47 

667 

322 

426 

344 

Salisbury (J> 

412 

*16 



84 

29 

249 

543 

148*7102 

Sears 

137 

138*7* 

+10 

59 

39 

179 

1300 

415 

321 

Sedgwick Gp 

360 

365 



17.1 

4.7 

173 

218 

970 

863 

She! 

865 

970 


+10 

514 

53 

99 

1,100 

168 

96 

S7C 

159 

163 


+3 

2.1 

13 

149 

2700 

772 

520 

Sun Attancu 

618 

625 

• 

46*7 

279 

44 

589 

660 

81*. 76*4 758 P/P 

76*2 78 







420 

265 

Tesco 

380 

385 


-2 

89 

23 

219 

1300 

529 

374 

Thom &S 

473 

480 


+8 

259 

53 

349 

no 

349 

248 TWMoa House 

288 

281 


-2 

189 

69 

79 

654 

209 

139 

Trusthouse Forte 

169 

172 



79 

49 

169 

3900 

20*8 13*« Unlinvar 

20*4 20*7 

• 

+*• 

60.1 

29 

18.7 

226 

289 

216 

Utd Biscuits 

239 

242 

■ 

49*7 

139 b 59 

139 

807 


have both just returned from 
giving investment seminars in 
the US. National Westminster 
Bank hardened 4pto498p. 


The pound has managed to compose 
itself ahead of the October trade 
figures, due this morning, helped by a 
tittle dollar nervousness about US 
trade data, to be published tomorrow. 
The market has decided that Britain's 
balance of payments was so bad in 


August and September that things are 
bound to have improved last month. 
If the market is wrong, then sterling is 
feeing the firing squad without a 
blindfold. 

By happy coincidence, the pound 
has settled at a level which, according 
to a report launched yesterday by the 
Public Policy Centre, called Exchange 
Rate Policy for Sterling, is an appro- 
priate long-run equilibrium level The 
report is the product of the delibera- 
tions of a distinguished committee 
under the (foairmanship of Lord 
Croham and inclu ding John William- 
son of the Institute for International 
Economics in Washington, and Mar- 
cus Miller of Warwick University. 

The committee believes that a 
sterling index of 68, albeit with a 
sterling mark rate of 2.75-2.80 against 
the mark (ten pfennigs below the 
current rate), is likely to deliver a 
rough balance on the current account 
and a steady reduction in unemploy- 
ment to something like the “natural” 
or non-accelerating inflation rate of 
unemployment (Nairu). 

The problem is, having got the 
pound to this rate, how do we keep it 
there? It will be no surprise to those 
who have followed the sterling debate, 
and indeed the committee’s prelimi- 
nary report, that the recommendation 
is lor mil British membership of the 
European Monetary System. 

However, there is an important 
variation in the Public Policy Centre 
proposal. It comes with the suggestion 
that Britain could use the current 
political uncertainties to obtain more 
favourable terms for EMS entry than 
would otherwise be the case. There is 
evidence that the markets are already 
applying an election discount to the 
pound. Can the election also be 
brought into calculating the range in 
which the pound is allowed to 
fluctuate? 

In the current atmosphere of un- 
certainty over Britain's economic and 
poltical prospects, even France might 
agree on an Italian-style plus or minus 
6 per cent band for sterling, against the 
+/- 2.25 per cent bands for the other 
currencies. The committee's 
presumption is that the wider bands 
would be phased out as sterling gams 
credibility as a stable currency. 

There is another suggestion, which 
emerged at yesterday’s conference 
launching the Croham report, which 
might make the Prime Minister sit up 
and take notice. This is that British 
entry into the exchange rate mecha- 
nism of the EMS could be part of a 
general package to foster stronger 
growth in Europe, with perhaps even 
the Germans, after the January elec- 
tions, persuaded to loosen the reins a 
little. A Prime Minister who could 
deliver both currency stability and 
fester growth would really be on an 
election winner. 


IN THE MARKE' 


Why fund managers 
find oil compelling 


The London equity market 
is now gearing itself for its 
greatest test - foe flotation of 
British Gas. Eariy next month 
roughly £2 feBfim needs to he 
paid over to the Exchequer as 
foe fonts go eaa offer. 

Tins is an important test of 
foe depth of foe London 
market, indeed of any stock 
market. For old fesads, what is 
h app e nin g over British Gas is 
manemmitj rentiatiSCBBt Of foe 
mSd-Sevesties, when foe feat. 
(A price shoot obliged the 


hand over fist. 

Sane 30 years later, they 
are setting a different product 
- hot foe amounts 
lost as huge. And foe 
Motivation remains foe 
the Government needs foe 


hydro-carbons wffl encourage 
switching tote foe cheaper 
source of energy — and cm- 
Tersely, ff foe ofl price 
tumbles. 

The taHbb argument fis foe 
most straight forward. 

The Sand! move to prop up 
Opec wffl be sacces sM . An 
acceptable quota deal ever 
Fnfocfifl wffl be hammered 
oat in Opec meetings ahead of 
foe g rand rn imnn eaiiy next 
n iatii- Ofl wifl go bade to $18 
a barrel and foe oil majors are 
a bay. 


oH-Opec-and-Saadi buffs see 
foe price of ofl faffing quite 
quickly to $3 a barrel, driven 
down by foe Saudis’ 


In view of foe recent c 
forced departure of Sheikh 
Yamam as Saadi ofl minister, 
fob is a most sm p t bl a g fine of 


foe oil sector has bees one of 
foe top performing sob-sec- 
tbns ® foe FT-Actnaries in- 
dex so far fob year. Both BP 
and Shell are within right of 


s to r tin g point far the 

$3o4nnri scenario b foe 
smprise visit to Sand Arabia 
of Mr Geotge Bosh, the US 
Yice-PvesideQt, earlier tins 
year when foe ofl price was 
down to £9 a barrel. No (me 
oodd fathom why Mr Bosh 
had paid foe Sanfis a call. 

Bnsh-men now opine that 
the Vke-President toU the 


The auth o riti es have 
wefl to get foe bsae into foe 
starting Mocks in quite the 
shape it b and with investor 
more than just fafoe- 


Like Venice, the Texas 
indn st ry wffl be preserved and 
the British Gas flotation 
sbdald be 


World equity i 
are not exactly to foe 


__ _ best of 

shape. They are hardly faffing 
out of bed, but on foe ether 
hand, they are faffing to score 
advances to foe way the 

aut h orities wobM prefer aherf 

of such a flotation. 

Fund m a nagers are cur- 
rently fixated by the oil sector. 
It cortd be foe cheapest sector 
to foe market, to wfafch case 
peitfeGos should be 
overweight to BP, Sbefl 

foe other ml majors. 

Conversely, foe SE shares 
on arix months’ view may took 
very dear indeed. The to- 
of foe British Gas 
flotation is highly pertinent to 
fend managers’ cafcriatioas 
about foe ofl sector. 


But there b a. mere subtle 
rtgin r nfif This holds that 
when cartels collapse they do 
so absolutely; there b no 
second chance. Hence the 
Saadi Md to shore vp Opec b 
do ome d to fitifere. In dne 
course, ofl prices should start 
faffing again, perhaps dev- 
astating foe British Gas issue 
to foe process. 

Faffing ofl prices equal 
lower British ofl renames, 
equal a sterling crisis, equal 
tighter fiscal and wm&ary 
pottcy as taxes and faterest 
rates are farced np to defend 


prices continued to fafl, the US 
bank deposits would be frozen. 
The Soffis took the Bush 
threat seriously but viewed it 
as an msolL Allegedly, they 
have now withdra wn their 
bflfioo (£424* bfflian) deposits 
from foe US banking system 
during the period m Germu 
and Japanese support for the 
dollar. The Saadis are now 
wfllfag to respond positively to 
any further dessastiatioRs of 
US provocative behaviour. 

Clearly, President Reagan’s 
admission that he snppfied 
Iran with arms comes to fob 
category. So, too, will any 
move by Israel to attack Syria, 
foe Saudis refnrsrag to believe 
font the Israefis would attempt 
such a move without covert US 


make 

«*r 


gas moaop- 
more. 

more 


The British Gas issue b left 
with the voters who take their 
revenge far losing money at 
the ballot box. 

There is a farther dtaeasioii 
to the faffing oil price argu- 
ment, quite apart from pos- 
sible British political 
icpscnssium. A number of 


moves to slash foe 
price of oil coaid come very 
shortly. Some pamfits see war 
between Israel and Syria 
breaking out before foe end of 
tbe K irti. Keep a dose eye on 
the Bent crude spot-rates, 
now mat below Si 5 a barrel. 


Christopher Dmm 



JMaoer The new Adler SE300 
Series electronic typewriters all have amazing 
memories — np to 38,000 characters on the 
SE320 model. That is equivalent to approxi- 


You'll find lots of other advanced features 
too, making them an ideal choice for the 
modem office. 

• 40 character display 

• Menu assisted operation 

• Correction memory (4000 characters on 
theSE320) 

• Justified ted. 

Other features of the SE300 range include 


boldface, automatic underlining, word expan- 
sion and graduated spacing. 

What’s more, Adler SE300 series type- 
writers can be linked to an OEM Screentypist to 
expand into an easy-to-use VDU and disc based 
word processing system, giving menu-assisted 
operation with all functions and commands 
controlled fay the typewriter keyboard. 

The new Adler SE30O series. Top value, 
top specification typewriters from OEM - the 
only name you need to commit | 
to memory. 


Please send me more information about the 
new Adler 300 series. 


Name. 



Address. 


Company. 


□□ Simply a better idea 
jyf A* Tot business 


Telephone. 


Office and Electronic Machines pic 


To: Office and Electronic Machines pic, 
140-154 Borough High Street, London SEl 1LH. 
Tel: 01-407 3191. 


TUA 


..V 


p 










ri ‘ » v . ajo/sitJlhy:.' r'Tv-^rf — tiGT 







LONDON TRADED OPTIONS 




Cafia 


Pute 



SoriM 

Jsn 

•EL. 

Jrt 

Jan 

*E_ 

Jrt 


300 

330 

27 

12 

37 

2? 

42 

27 

6 

23 

13 

27 

18 

32 


360 

2 

10 

a— 

48 

52 

— 

BP 

m 

115 

127 

_ 

2 

B 

— 

nog 

650 

70 

37 

105 

8 

23 

30 

700 

34 

S3 

68 

23 

43 

SB 

Core Goto 

550 

127 

145 


3 

10 

— 

rest) 

600 

87 

110 

125 

11 

24 

32 

650 

a 

80 

92 

32 

4/ 


Counauids 

260 

70 

79 

_ 

1 

3 

— 

r325) 

280 

50 

61 

74 

2 

6 

9 

300 

.VI 

•» 

57 

5 

11 



330 

15 

26 

35 

13 

19 

28 


260 

17 

24 

33 

10 

14 

IS 

1-261) 

280 

300 

8 

3 

IS 

9 

23 

14 

24 

40 

27 

42 

45 

Cabla&Wire 

300 

"45 

58 

73 

4 

13 

22 

r3351 

325 

350 

375 

26 

11 

4 

40 

25 

- 

14 

24 

44 

22 

35 

wm~ 

GEC 

160 

29 

28 

42 

2 

4 

8 

H84) 

180 

200 

14 

2 

20 

9ft 

28 

17 

20 

24 

26 


330 

107 

114 

— 

1 

3 

— 

(■■*58) 

390 

420 

77 

52 

BS 

65 

78 

7 

6 

13 

5i 


480 

2S 

40 

S3 

22 

30 

35 


950 

IS? 

143 



4 

11 

— 

noai) 

1G00 

1050 

85 

47 

103 

73 

132 

102 

90 

24 

22 

42 

28 

48 


1100 

24 

50 

77 

52 

72 



300 

43 

51 

59 

IK 

4 

9 

(■338) 

330 

360 

18 

4 

29 

13 

38 

17 

8 

25 

14 

28 

16 

32 

Marks &5pen 
FIBS) 

180 

2C0 

220 

14 

44, 

1ft 

23 

13 

5 

31 

IS 

9 

3 

15 

33 

5ft 

16 

34 

9 

21 

35 


850 

133 

150 

167 

3 

14 

20 

C967) 

9CQ 

950 

87 

52 

108 

73 

127 

93 

10 

25 

45 

53 

Trafalgar House 
CKO) 

260 

280 

300 

35 

20 

10 

42 

30 

18 

52 

39 

27 

2 

10 

23 

9 

16 

27 

13 

19 

30 


70 

10 

13 

15ft 

1ft 

3 

4 

(•77) 

80 

4 

7 

10 

4ft 

6 

TVi 

90 

1ft 

3ft 

6 

14 

15 

15ft 


Sartos 

Doc 

Mar 

Jun 

Pec 

Mar 

Jun 


380 

65 

78 



1 

2 

— 

r«2> 

350 

35 

51 

70 

2 

7 

15 

420 

14 

35 

48 

14 

20 

31 


460 

2H 

16 

28 

40 

43 

50 


200 

30 

39 

45 

1 

4 

7 


220 

1? 

26 

31 

6 

10 

13 


240 

2ft 

15 

19 

17 

19 

26 


230 

10 

24 

31 

7 

12 

18 

(*282) 

300 

307 

2ft 

14 

21 

SO 

2b 

30 


650 

103 

115 

132 

2 

5 

10 

C744) 

7C0 

58 

75 

55 

5 

13 

25 

750 

25 

43 

83 

23 

35 

50 

BhreCfrde 

600 

58 

77 

90 

5 

12 

20 

rws) 

650 

25 

53 

65 

23 

32 

38 

700 

9 

— 

— 

58 

— 

— 


650 

105 

135 



5 

22 

— 

(*740) 

700 

75 

110 

1?5 

18 

43 

55 

750 

48 

80 

105 

40 

60 

75 


900 

22 

55 

80 

75 

85 

110 


300 

28 

42 

56 

2ft 

6 

10 

C325) 

330 

10 

72 

38 

15 

16 

21 

360 

2 

12 

24 

38 

40 

42 

GKN 

240 

29 

41 

48 

3 

8 

10 

C264) 

260 

IS 

?7 

34 

10 

13 

IB 

£80 

5 

17 

21 

22 

K 

29 


300 

1 

a 

— 

38 

40 

— 


SCO 

35 

80 

110 

15 

35 

47 

F915) 

950 

1? 

52 

82 

45 

60 

72 

1000 

3 

33 

60 

90 

100 

107 


1050 

2 

21 

— 

140 

140 

— 


160 

42ft 

44 



ft 

1ft 



1*201) 

160 

23 

27ft 

33ft 

1ft 

4 

5 

200 

6 

15ft 

22 

6ft 

10ft 

13 


220 

154 

7 

lift 

21 

24 

25 



Sartos 

DOC 

Mar 

Jen 

Poc 

Mar 

Jan 

Jaguar 

(*510) 

500 

550 

COO 

27 

6 

1 

55 

24 

IS 

67 

37 

14 

47 

90 

30 

55 

93 

35 

58 

Thorn EMI 

r«TO 

420 

460 

500 

560 

60 

30 

9 

2 

70 

45 

29 

11 

90 

62 

43 

2ft 

12 

3S 

80 

5 

22 

40 

8S 

9 

27 

50 

Tosco 

f384> 

230 

350 

390 

420 

60 

30 

B 

3 

47 

30 

13 

58 

38 

23 

ft 

3 

13 

38 

10 

20 

45 

15 

25 

50 


Sartoa 

Fob 

“w *°P 

Fab 

SP-** 

Brit Aero 
(*492) 

«2Q 

480 

500 

88 

53 

32 

95 

65 

43 

78 

53 

8 

15 

SO 

9 

20 

38 

23 

45 

BAT mis 

r«s) 

350 

3S0 

420 

460 

115 

82 

57 

33 

90 

65 

40 

77 

55 

1 

2 

4 

21 

4 

10 

25 

is 

32 

Barclays 

1*481) 

460 

50) 

SO 

50 

25 

6 

62 

35 

18 

75 

37 

9 

27 

72 

20 

37 

77 

27 

45 

Bnt Tetettxn 

nasi 

180 

200 

220 

22 

10 

4ft 

29 

IB 

10 

37 

24 

4 

15 

28 

a 

17 

31 

12 

22 

CadttuyScftwpps 160 
(*1791 JM 

200 

28 

13 

6 

32 

21 

12 

37 

25 

5 

10 

22 

7 

12 

25 

11 

18 


300 

43 

45 

57 

7 

11 

15 


330 

22 

28 

3b 

IB 


30 


360 

11 

14 

23 

4b 

48 

50 



330 

47 

55 

S3 

4 

fi 

12 


360 

71 

37 

42 

15 

21 

25 


390 

14 

20 

27 

3b 

41) 

43 

LASMO 

130 

SO 

36 



4 

7 

— 


140 

23 

79 

34 

a 

12 

14 


160 

14 

19 

22 

20 

23 

25 


500 

77 

95 

105 

5 

14 

22 

(*555) 

550 

40 

Mi 

fab 

20 

30 

37 


600 

14 

23 

3b 

bb 

fat) 

82 

P&O 

480 

63 

75 

90 

7 

10 

13 

(-507) 

500 

38 

48 

tiU 

15 

27 

30 


SO 

12 

23 

33 

53 

bO 

8b 


160 

72 

30 

38 

8 

11 

13 

(-168) 

180 

10 

IB 

2b 

17 

20 

24 


200 

b 

12 

— 

32 

34 

— 

RTZ 

600 

100 

117 

_ 

10 

19 




SO 

(SO 

80 

95 

28 

3/ 

SO 


700 

3t> 

48 

67 

47 

52 

85 

vaai Hurts 

70 

14ft 

17% 

19 

5 

6ft 

8 


SO 

7 

11 

13ft 

Oft 

lift 

13ft 


90 

3 

7 ft 

9 

18 

18 19ft 


Sottas 

Mar 

Job Sap 

Mar 

Jon 

&£. 


200 

46 

49 

_ 

2 

7 


(*237) 

220 

2a 

33 

36 

S 

13 

16 


240 

14 

21 

25 

18 

24 

26 


260 

7 

11 

““ 

33 

37 



Sortas 

Nov 

Fob May 

Nov 

fabjtav 

Tr 11%% 1991 

100 

1ft 

2 

2'ro 

*10 


1% 

(-£105) 

102 

'u 

Jl o 

I'm 

I'n 

**n 



104 

'to 

ft 

®SJ 

3 

3'w 

3ft 

Tr1lft% 03/07 

104 



3ft 

4ft 

— 

“M 



1C6 

3 >» 


3' in 

ft 


3ft 


106 

'M 

1ft 


•'» 

4 



110 

'M 

*10 

»'«■ 

4ft 

5ft 

8ft 


112 


i*r 

1’ui 

6ft 

7ft 

7ft 


114 


•n 



8ft 



Nov Dec 

Jon' 

Feb 

Nov 

Doe 

Jan 

Fab 

FT-SE 1525 

125 — 

_ 

— 

1 

— 

— 

— 

Index 1550 

87 90 

sa 

— 

1 

6 

15 

— 

1*1634) 1575 

60 70 

78 

— 

2 

13 

22 

■— 

1600 

35 52 

6? 

72 

4 

20 

30 

37 

1625 

16 37 

48 

57 

12 

33 

42 

48 

1650 

7 23 

35 

45 

23 

43 

55 

62 

1675 

2 14 

22 

35 

4b 

60 

70 

77 

1700 

1 9 

_ 


70 

80 




Nowmtar 24, 1986. Total eonburta £206 i. Cota 18 103. PrtaBlja . 

FT-SE Max. Cattatf 148 ■ Put*2082 


• Un dai l y lug aac wtly p rtr a- 


FOREIGN EXCHANGES 


STERLING SPOT AND FORWARD RATES 


Marital rates 
day 1 * range 
Hav*n**r24 
N York 1.4145-1.4200 
Montreal 15827-1 9683 
Amg'B3m3-2286-3^>5S6 

Brussels 53.4f-S9.S7 
Cpngen iaao80-io.B432 
DuMn 1.0482-1.0537 
FfgnJdlrt 28581-28731 
Lisbon 211. 0S-2123Z 
Madrid 19257-19129 
Man 1978.13-199050 
Oslo 10.7933-103432 
Parts 93573-9.4001 
STkMRi 9565245059 
Tokyo 232.18-23134 
Vienna 2007-2024 
Zurich 23912*4035 


Mart* rates 
cta» 

NsMBteoraa 

1 .4170-1 .4180 

15627-15555 

12288-3-2330 

59.44-59.56 

meiir-ULB2W 

1 .0521 -15531 

28681-26822 

211.18211.99 

19257-192B5 

197S.13-1983.78 

108046-105193 

9.3533-9.3758 

9.8652-93792 

2323923276 
20.1820.18 
2.391 2-2335G 


1 1HWltfl 
062-aSOprera 
0L51-O.42pram 
1 %-lftprem 
22-l7prora 
ft- ft pram 
283849 
JS-lYjcrwn 
70-1KMS 
14-32&9 
4wam-i«a 
3ft-4KdlS 
3ft-2ft0rem 
Ift-farert 
1%-iXBnm 
lOK-SKpram 


3 nwKitht 
1.7S>1.77prent 
13B-123pram 
4!4-4ftprem 
57-4Spcen> 
Ift-ftprem " 
70-88cfc 
4%-*»c 


Slating Max compared triOr 1975 1 


lA-IXpram 
q>riSU(dqni«9«aMI4. 


40-8749 
hurpwi 
nfc-IIJWs 
7V7prem 
4X-5HAS 

28ft-25ftp ran 
4%-4ftpram 


OTHER STERLING RATES 


DOLLAR SPOT RATES 


Argentna austral* 

Austraha doter 

Bahramdnar. 


Brazil cruzado * . 

SS5SSE- 

Fnsno marxa - 


1.6460-1.6535 

21982-22016 

.05310415350 

19-89-20.02 


Ireland 


- 0.73000.7400 
.. 7JXI6&-7.0465 

Graeasdradima 15720-1S9£0 

Hong Kang doBar 1UJS85-1 1-0671 

India rupee iB.40-iafio 

Iraq dinar — ... n/a 


Ausvafia 

Canada. 


Kuwait dear KD 

Malaysia dottar 

Mexico peso. 


0.4140-0411 
28900-3.7 ICO 

11900-1240.0 

New Zealand dnoar 2J393-27520 

Saudi Arabia rival 5290081300 

Singapore dotar 3.1T47-3.1184 

South Africa rand 12031-12200 

UAEtman S.18S32 

UoydsBank 


Sweden 

Norway 

Denmark 

West Germany 
Switzerland _ 


11430-11460 
. 2.1950-2.1960 
. 21050-26070 
0.6450-0.6455 
11B55-11860 
61675-617S 
7.S75-7.6326 
7.8300-7.6350 
10201-2.0217 


France 


Hong Kong 

Portugal. 


Austria. 


1.6905-1.6915 

22820-22830 

6H25-6H75 

164.15-16425 

13991-13101 

41184213 

7.7832-7.7337 

14910-150.10 

! 35.80-135.90 

1422-1414 


Rates soppSed by Barclays Bank KOFEX and ExtaL 


MONEY MARKETS AND GOLD 


BnoRamft 

Clearing Banks 11 
Finance House 11 


EURO MOTCY DEPOSITS % 


Overnight Htah; 11 Low 10 
Week feed.- 10X-K 
Ttaaswy BMa (Discount %) 

Buying SeBng 

2 mirth 10°i? 2 mntn 10 ,, m 

3 ninth 10"ia 3mnth 10»ia 


7 days 5K-6'w 
3 mntti 6'»5 4 m 


7 days 4 "i*4»i» 
3mrnt 4 ^.►4"* 


tat* GKs (Discount 1U 

1 mntti I0 l3 m-l0k 2mnth lB*a-VF*x 
3 mntti 10*-1Q"» 6mnth 10K-10*>a 

Trade BBs (Discaunt %) 

1 mnth ll’is 2imth 11 I3 b 

3mnth IIS 6 mntti lift 

Interbank pt) 

Ove rni g ht open 10ft dose 13 
1 week 10 IS W-10» 6mnth 11%-11*» 

1 mntti 11-1054 9 mntti 11ft-11*ia 

3 mntti 11*,»-m 12mtt| lHt-11 6 »e 

local Auttioitty Deposits (%) 

2 days IQ Vi 7 days 10ft 

1 mntti 1QK 3 mntti 11 

6 mntti lift 12mth lift 


7 days 7ft-7ft 
3mrfll 8-7ft 


7 days 7ft-6ft 
3 nsm 41ft 
Yen 

7 days 4»*-4 7 w 
3 mntti 4K-4ft 


cal 
1 mntti 
6 mntti 
caB 
1 mntti 
6 mntti 
call 
1 mnth 
Smith 
call 
1 mntti 
Bmnth 
can 
1 mntti 
6 mnth 


6K-5M 

64ft 

6'w5"’- 

5-4 

4 , <i«-4>it 
4 U »"» 
7V6ft 
714 -7ft 
914-8 ft 
Ift-ft 
2*w- ,5 w 
41ft 
4ft-3ft 
4"te-4»» 

4" 


GOLD 


Authority Bonds (ft) 
h lift-lift 2 mntti 


I firth lift-lift 
3 mnth 11ft-11 
9 mnth 1114-11 
Staffing CDs {%} 

1 mnth lOft-IOft 
Bmnth 1114-lift 

Dotar CO* pM 

1 mnth 6.00-5.95 3 mnth 595320 

6 mntti 520-595 12mth 610326 


2 mntti lift-lift 
6 mnth 1114-11 
12mtti 1114-11 

3 mnth IPw-II'm 
12mth 11**-1i '» 


G0W2381 .50-382.00 
Krogarrarer (per coirifc 
S 37100^8210 {£26725-26920) 
Sovaratans’ IneM 
S 89.7S90.75 (£6325-64.00 ) 
Platinum 

$47230(233225) 

'Excludes VAT 


ECGD 


Fixed Rate Staffing Export Finance 
Schema IV Average reference rata tor 
interest period October 8, 1986 to 
October 31. 1986 industva: 11237 per 
cant 


TRADITIONAL OPTIONS 


First 

Oct 20 Oct 31 ~ Jan 22 

Nov 3 Nov 14 FebS 

Now 17 Nov 28 Feb 19 

OUT options were token oat arc 24/11/86 Pfessey. 

Amstrad Consumer D ec t ronlc a . Marks A Spencer. Ofiver 


Fab 2 
Feb 16 
Mar 2 

NMC investments, 
Henson Trust 


KsJocfc Trust Aran Energy. Ken&are. Status, j. wnams, Blacks Leism. RMn. 
MercartSo House. Bristol Ctannej. TricantroL Control Securities. AG Stanley, Rea- 
brook. Tozer Kemsiey. Sears Engneering, CadSurys, Lucas, Sound Dttfusion. FH 
Tomkas. 



Forward 


Interim profits rise by 
over 30% for second, 
successive year. 

In the first half of 19S6/87, Unigate’s pre- 
tax profits were £47. lm; an increase of 37% on 
the previous year. 

Which means that they’re currently very 
nearly double the level of three years ago. 

The success of our highly disciplined 
approach to corporate development is now beyond 
doubt. 

We’ve shown our ability to stay ahead of the 
competition by anticipating market trends. (Like the 
move towards healthier eating that has taken St Ivel 
brands like Gold, Shape and Real to new heights in 
the market) 

We’ve proved the value of our strategically balanced 
approach to acquisitions and investment (Four companies 
acquired in the last six months give us new strengths in fresh 
chilled vegetables, in animal feed and grain, in vehicle auctions, 
and in restaurants in the Southern USA, and we’ve committed 
major investment to extend our lead in a number of key business 
areas as well.) 

We’ve demonstrated strong financial management skills. 
(Finance charges are down by 54% for the half year, for example.) 

For our interim results in detail, and a copy of the accompanying 
Chairman’s statement, please write to the Secretary, Unigate House, 
Western Avenue, London W3 OSH. 

They’ll show you a company with the muscle to meet today’s 
challenges. 

And with stamina for the future, as well. 


Unigate 


FOOD TRANSPORT - 
INDUSTRIAL SERVICES 


l 


\ 


TEMPUS 


Fashion is name of the 
game in food market 


It will surprise no one to tern 
thm real spending on food in 
Britain is broadly static. 
However, the food manufac- 
turers need not despair. Now- 
adays, people are eating less, 
but they arc paying more for 

it . . . 

The average price paid per 
ounce of food stems to be 
increasing in real terms. In a 
study of the food manufac- 
turing industry, sector spec- 
ialists Robert Brand and Les 
Pugfa at the stockbroker, 
Wood Mackenzie, conclude 
that food is increasingly 
becoming a fashion market. 

They argue that changing 
eating habns and changing 
social and economic con- 
ditions have created real 
opportunities for growth. 

Greater health conscious- 
ness, for example, has stimu- 
lated a growing demand for 
low fat and additive-free 
products. , , 

Working mothers, and the 
decline in the importance of 
family meals, has led to a 
growing demand for portion- 
controlled products. Rising 
ownership of microwave 
ovens has changed the way in 
which many foods are 
packaged 

While the food manufac- 
turers are responding to these 
trends, they are becoming 
more active in terms of new 
products and more careful in 
identifying their target 
markets. 

Co-operation with the 
retailers can help the manu- 
facturer to meet fashion 
requirements. 

Growing demand for dri- 
lled and fresh foods and foods 
free from additives and 
preservatives, means that 
shelves have to be replen- 
ished more often. 

Consequently, significant 
opportunities have arisen in 
the still-fragmented food dis- 
tribution business. 

If there are winners who 
are taking market share m a 
market which is not growing, 
there must be losers. 

Wood Mack believes the 
losers will be the small trad- 
ers. 

The winners will include 
Haziewood, Tor which the 
study projects 53 per cent 
earnings growth over the next 
two years, and HUlsdown, 
where the market rating is ai 
odds with a dynamic manage- 
ment and the strong impetus 
for growth in earnings per 
share. 



NOV DEC JAN FEB MARAPR MAYUUN JUL AUGSEPQCTNOV 


Unigate 

The City has long been 
cautious about Unigate. An- 
alysts have tended to describe 
its constituent businesses as 
“sound” rather than exciting. 
Yet they are worried that 
Unigate will .mate 30 
judicious acquisition, despite 
some shrewd purchases re- 
cently. 

The interims posted yes- 
terday should have helped to 
improve sentiment, but the 
share price fell 7p to 31 lp- 
The market fail ed to be 
impressed with a pretax prof- 
its rise of 37 per cent to £47.1 
million for the half-year to 
September 30, on turnover 
up 3 percent to £951 million. 

Profits were boosted by a 
one-off property gain of £2.5 
million. Interest costs were 
lower by £3.5 million at £3 
million and profitability im- 
proved through the sue of 
Unigate Australia, 

Liquid milk sales were 
disappointing. Milk volumes 
were down 3 percent because 
of radiation fears from 
Chernobyl, the poor summer 
and lack of tourists. 

Analysts are upgrading 
their forecasts to about £98 
million pretax, putting the 
shares on a prospective mul- 
tiple of 1 1, a discount of 14 
per cent to the market The 
share price is underpinned by 
the 5 per cent gross yield. 

Marshalls 
Halifax . 

Pedestrian precincts are good 
news for Marshalls Halifax. 
More architects are specify- 
ing concrete-block paving m 
their designs because it is 
practical and is aesthetically 
pipping Marshalls has a 40 


per cent share of the market 
and the market is growing by 
about 30 per cent a year. 

Trading profits from con- 
crete have grown steadily 
over the past five years and 
margins are widening, helped 
partly by steady but modest 
price increases. 

Marshalls’ mark e ti ng and 
product innovation have 
helped make the industry 
more glamorous, while a 
steady stream of capital 
investment has secured the 
company's market position 
and profitability. External 
factors, such as buoyant DIY 
and garden-relaxed demand, 
have Ixen contributory fac- 
tors. 

The millstone around 
Marshalls' neck has been the 
engineering division. Ratter 
ironically. Alliance Mercury, 
a problem area in the past, 
fared well. Losses of £190,000 
at Marshalls Hard Metals and 
Fidden Engineering . were 
responsible for halving di- 
visional profits to £185,000. 
Redundancy costs were taken 
above the line and trading is 
now healthier. 

Marshalls announced yes- 
terday the imminent sale of 
its South African business. 
There mil be a £100,000 
writeoff. 

Group profits for 1986-87 
should increase to £9 million. 
this gjves gsmmg c per share 
of 14.9p. The shares are 
valued fairly on this baas, 
but do not include much m 
the way of takeover 
premium. 

MarehaSs would be a juicy 
morsel for a predator hungry 
for high margin, value-added 
niche businesses. Although 
the director’s holding is less 
than 10 per cent, friends and 
relations could raHy round to 
bring the lidding to 30 per 
cent. However, there must be 
predators prepared to pay up. 


COMPANY NEWS 


• PROPERTY PARTNER- 
SHIPS: Figures in £000 for the 
half year to September 30. 
InteriiD was 3p (2J>p). Gross 
rental income from investments 
was 533 (466). pretax profit was 
7 1 5 (593) and tax was 250 (237). 
Earnings per share were 8.7p 
(6.7pX The group is confident 
that results for the year will be 
satisfactory. 

• JAMES CROPPER: Interim 
dividend was 4.4 per cent (3.4 
per cent) for the six months to 
September 27. Figures in £000. 
Turnover was 13,698 (13J2I5), 
net profit was 952 (830) and tax 
was 18 (15). Profit after tax was 
934 (81 5) and earnings per share 
were 23 

• SARASOTA TECHNOL- 
OGY: Interim dividend was 
0.8p (0.7p) for the six months to 
September 30. Figures in £000. 
Sates were 4.914 (4,538), trading 
profit was 803 (718) and pretax 

It was 855 (752). Tax was 


SSfc 


were 3.06p (2_55p). Sarasota 
reports a 13.7 per cent increase 
in first-half profits. 

• ARGYLL STORES: The 
board of Argyll Stores, a subsid- 
iary of Argyll Group, intends to 
submit proposals to holders of 
tbe 6 per cent unsecured loon 
stock for the immediate repay- 
ment of the outstanding 
amounts of each of tbe stocks. 

• HARRISONS MALAYS- 
IAN PLANTATIONS BER- 
HAD; Figures for six months to 
September 30 in MalSOOO. 
Turnover was 262,950 
(447,171), profit before tax was 
30,653 (76,317), less depreci- 
ation of 1 1.800 (10.929). Earn- 
ings per share were 4.7 (10.7). 


EQUITIES 

Avia Europe (250p) 232’z -fib 

BCE (38p) 42*i -’z 

Baker Harts Sndr (170p) 196 

Blenheim Exhto (gsp) 140 

BSston&Battersea (103p) 149 

Brake Bros (12Sp) - 153 +1 

CJtygrova (I00p) 91 +1. 

Dartsl Cs (Itop) 155 

Gordon Busses (190p) 205 

Great Sottthem fJ35p) 155 -1 

Gatftrte Com <150p) 167 

Hantson (ifop) 162 +1 

Interlink Express (185p) 207 -1 

Lon ASSC mv Tat (14p) 6 


APPOINTMENTS 


Nissan Motor Manufac- 
turing (UK): Mr lan Gibson 
becomes deputy man a g i ng 
director. Mr Peter Widens, 
personnel director, joins the 
main board. 

Accounting Standards 
Committee: Mr John OuM 
becomes vice-chairman. 

Televirion Services Inter- 
national: Mr Mike Murphy 
joins tbe board as a non- 
executive director. 

Daniel J Edelman: Mrs 
Debbie Carberry and Mr Nick 
Gordoo-Bromijoin the board. 

IML Air Services Group: 
Mr Darid Tanner becomes 
managin g director. 

Pickfords Travel: Mr Rich- 
ard LoveB has been made 


manag ing director of the busi- 
ness travel division. Mr Roger 
Waymont joins tin division's 
board. 

Countryside Properties: Mr 
Christopher Creek and Mr 
David Doig become directors 
and Mr Anthony Chambers, 
Mr Stephen Stone, Mr Roger 
Thompson and Mr Michael 
Hill associate directors. 

Hill Samuel Life Assurance: 
Mr Craig Bennett has been 
made managing director. 

European Miss Trida Wal- 
ters is made key account 
executive, hotel industry. 

Sentry (UK) Insurance: Mr 
Val Olson becomes managing 
director. 

New London Oil: Mr Pari 
Kesterton is made a director. 


LONDON FINANCIAL FUTURES 


Throa Worth Starting 

OC 86 

M«r 87 88.78 

Jun87 89.15 

Sep 87 89.15 

Dec 87 : 89.06 

Mar 88 HfT 


an 

Lew 

8tL64 

Cloaa 

88458 

Eat Vo) 
1071 

88.79 

88.74 

88.78 

686 

89.17 

89.15 

89.15 

119 

89-22 

80.15 

88.18 

93 

sons 

89.06 

894)6 

1 



8884 

0 


Previous 

Three 

Dec 86 
Mar 87 
JunS7 
87 


US Treasury Bend 

Dec 86 

Mar 87 

Jun87 


1 1nterest 15061 

9404 
94.12 
9403 
9380 

99-12 
88-16 
N/r 


Previous tisy*» total open Interest 2S013 
04.07 93.04 0407 5*7 

94.15 94.12 94.14 1836 

9404 9403 94.04 231 

9301 9380 9381 89^ 

Previous day's total open inssrast 3829 
1004)1 99-ft 89-28 3732 

99-08 98-16 99-02 103 

98-06 0 


Start SR 
Dec 86—. 
Mar 87. _ 
**187.-- 


Previous day ‘state! open interest 1ST 
95-39 96-48 9S-3S 95-44 94 

Sff = = 


9548 


Doct 
Mar 87 — 
J»*i87 — 

Sap 87 

FT-SE 100 

Dec 86 

Mar 87 — 


107-03 

107-13 

w/r 


16250 

185.16 


Previous day's wal open interest vazn 
107-25 107-02 107-12 18383 

T07-28 107-12 107-18 999 

107-18 0 

165.75 185.15 16585 12 


RECENT ISSUES 


Lloyds Chsnttst (1<&P) 130 4-2 

LonA Motropoftan fi45p) 171 


RIGHTS ISSUES 


Mecca Leisure (1 
Moor & Santhouaa 
Plum Hktas 
Quarto (115 
Rotunda 
Sanded Parkins ( : 
Scot Mtgs 10Q% 
TSB Group prop 
Thames TV prop 
Virgin p4Gp) 
Wntrwey Mai 
Woottons Better 
Yefcarton (38p) 



1494+14 
05p) 178-2 



ure fu 

& 

N/P 


Blacks Lataura N/P 
Blue Arrow FfT 
Br. Benzol 
Cook Cwm 
Bswtck F/l 
Norfofic Cap F/P 
Petrocan FTP 
RetSand F/P 
Sec ”■ 


44 -'i 
388+5 
2+14 
13 +§ 

13 

25 

*S 

13-3 


(Issue price In brackets). 


How much money 
will you make in 
British Gas? 

GcaasBy vedBBff fit* private mveatox almost ahnya makes 
money m new bases. Bat jes bow much depends on having the 
rigid information and gening foe appheanon we ig ht e d “dead 
right", and these is a secret hate. Thousands of people already 
malm good steady profits investing in new issues and often- 
nahing else . . . year after yeat They're not especially dever or 
anything like that jw wril interned and m the right place a the 
right ante. The New issue Share Guide is foe c ountry's only 
specialist publication devoted exclusively to new issues. 

Drop usaline today and we will send yon FHEEdetails. then you 
too can enjoy the simple secret that already enabler* hundreds of 
xnvsstnxs to nraxmase those profits. . .safely. . .mdusexcuingarea 
of the stock market. 

F.S.&wpr rill tv port oa British Caa and all jtspQeslfrflWgstefe 

the c ur r en t nre oflfrir lane Share Cniiift. 


I Tb:lfcwBteae Share Gelds l8d.3HeciS te ti et,l4in«hm E04T IBP 

I NaP* 

I Address 


L — .... Postcode.. n a/iij 


BASE 

LENDING 

RATES 


ABN_ 


fcfam & Gorapaiy 

BCG 

QSbank Samgst 

Consolidated Crds 


11.00%- 

„„n.oo% 

_.12.45% 
11 . 00 % 

C. Mas £ Co 71 JO* 

fang fang & Shanghai 11.00% 

LLorfs Bank — : 11.00% 

NR Westmtester 11-00% 

Bank oi Scotland 11.00% 

. 11 . 00 % 


CBbs* HA. wh 


11jQD% 


- T _ - — 




S,' 1 



jil t VS/P. 



^Stcld— 

From yoiir. portfolio caret check your 
sagM stare pnot movements, on this pace 
onfy. Add tbem up TO give you your 
overall total and check this uw 

daily dividend figure, if d you 

have wop outright or a share of the iota] 
daily pro* money sated. If you are a 
winner follow the claim procedure: on the 
backuf your card. \ou must always have 
your card available when gbnmwig 


THE TIMES TUESDAY NOVEMBER 25 1986 


STOCK EXCHANGE PRICES 


Confident start to account 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 



ACCOUNT DAYS: 


Dealings began yesterday. Dealings end December 5. §Contango day December 8. Settlement day December 15. 
§Forward bargains are permitted on two previous business days. 


Where stocks haw only one price quoted, these are middle prices taken daily at 5pm. Yield, change and P/E ratio are calculated 

on the middle 'price 

Where fttocfca ho ve onl y o n e price quoted, tteaa ara mkkflaprioua taken dagy at Spm-Ytetd, change and 



— fjdd — 

© Tines Mempapen Limited 

DAILY DIVIDEND 
£4,000 

Claims required for 
+34 points 

Claimants should ring 0254-53272 


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CD 540 545 -2 127 23 1H 

280 300 ft+1 115 as SO 


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Please take account of any 
minus signs 


Weekly Dividend 


Please make a note of your daily totals 


Saturday’s newspaper. 


BRITISH FUNDS 



Pora Gnst 

(Mu »mna»g 

5 26 4.1 U U 

9 72 .2 .... J87 

V S’. +4 

II MS ft+9 25 13 12S 

a 283 *-i iB7 an mb 

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56 17 2!U> 

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25 09 205 

23 55 U2 
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84 24 102 
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45 84 02 

806 20 172 


285 

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INSURANCE 


218 177 Alter Us 
20 I84AB5AIW 
BM £28 MnVM 
2 94 23 'mAoi Sea 
415 273 toraan* 

DM 635 aurar 
338 357 Comitate 
304 220 fort t tea 

m m m 

£ M* 0 ** 

J88 427 HtebCE 


190 199 a+b 103 52 

193 .. 1001 51 

775 - 

V - *H 990 33 


760 262 
295 360 
340 360 j 


275 . 200 7Jt W.1 

78 ft+b 75b 17 117 

H 20 

420 +3 29 07 U5 

152 -1 48 25 .. 

22 • . . 07b 13 100 

* • .. 575 60 .. 

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255 02 13 120 

TO +1 12 40 00 

170 +1 72 o m 

1S0 35 It T3J 

170 +i 43 "25 ns 

125 ft+b IS 20 214 

Kfl .. 3ZS 5.1 120 

454 +3 &7 15 113 

TO +b II U 147 

114 +5 00 11 2|.| 

50 -1 17 12 14.1 


35B4ZB7 fora tenon 
200 133 Lm 3 4 Gen 
72* ns l«®» f. Hn 
455 25 7 Lop in te 
8BV 29'. Uni 5 UcLn 
305 220 UH9 


310 243 Eteon fod 305 315 ft+2 143 40 70 S % gg 1 

221 IBB £nuo 165 170 -3 l£L7 B4 Hi) ^ £5 

295 278 ES 265 270 • 90 37 14.7 SS..S K? 

434 3440M1 41 42 +1 23 £0 145 S2 ’?£ 

1S3 50240*0 CD 12S • 70b 04 11.1 

3*4 244ttaomte (AQ V 334 ■ . 4 . 

» 61 64 GO • . . 43 08 150 JfSJ 

2»S21i «0ten 234 . +*. B9 M . •w'm S3 

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T« m FnarlJo 142 143 -4 7.1 50 22.4 *2.(2 SlJ 


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273 

447 

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174 

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340 

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201 

425 

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291 

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263 190 PBCM ZM 

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224 Gl Tow temte 
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17? 174 

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258 263 -2 


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265 52 SI 
250 54 384 

17b 50 120 
17.1 72 117 

35 43 140 

93 13 72 

93 33 72 

75 43 33 

723 10 130 

.. .. 48.1 

107 4.1 121 


PAPER, PRINTING, ADVERT'D 


189 M Etmpta* Ftam IIS 1164 »+i 
141 1C Do KM IS - 
3c VST Em ran i« .. 

214 174 Emma 158 TO 

423 312 ben 380 402 # 

55 22 Takm 384 374 


795 600 +6 385 40 S27 


42 3 FtUB AnU 
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414 ZTifato Bnw HJV X 

243 157 Fsttetfl 5 tew 233 
67 40 French (Item) SE 

131 84 GB U 0 J 

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200 9B GBSkmi T7t 

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is? a mm to 

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290 230 Item ST 

574 234Bhboh» M S3 1 . 
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291 56 Hate TO 

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120 R HhMHo 85 

325 S Hvnng Aswc 310 

128 38 teaao Groop 105 

TO 2074>kn>Ki Item 383‘j 
Ml 110 M IB? 

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295 210 jjrtsocs Bom 240 

197 964Jate* HO 1954 
6t5 473 joMsoa Donas 490 

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444 2P;Joma &m 344 

345 235 Jubsih 3S 

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132 07 JotAbn (ItaBEss! 105 

2B 21 tent 254 

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155+1 01 53 127 

425 -2 43 10 250 

241 +3 113 55 70 

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275 +5 mi 44 113 

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FINANCE AND LAND 


2C 205 Abhvteft 223 227 +1 

177 IS Malln IS IS 

157 125 AflteteMi 125 135 

ZD IQ Bwttey Taft 227 232 • . 

22 M Cm 104 04 

2B3 223 Cnot* 221 226 -1 

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207 153 Abate 196 199 *~3 

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417 365 CWteTO 
52 27 GOUM 




340 178 HIV H/V 
477 203 LWTIta 
363 IBS Scot TV 
278 M9 7TC . 0/V 
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3*1 223 Haas TO 
228 156'iTV-AM - 
151 104 UMs TV 
Ml 144 10800419 


47 48 •-! 

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353 355 ft-1 


UL9 44 «7 

20 01 00 
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250 50 TO0 

150 *5 110 

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201 60 90 


223 105 HmftawGbdb 200 213 .... 

FfaHDcW Trasts ippaor oa Pbqb 34 


03 

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28 

38 

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60 

580 

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305 

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37 

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318 

318 

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330 

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234 

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54 59 +1 5.0 80 105 
565 557 • .. 04 10 247 


772 528 Sot Aflance 
927 772 Su LB 
12'« 120 TWMNft 
494 m WUKFabH 


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BIO Bis •+! 
3G2 365 +1 

455 478 B +4 
412 417 +2 

bib are a+2 


4 »4 41 

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+1 17.1 47 173 

• *4 157 14 ISO 

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74 77 *1 

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220 1» Ran & Hate* 178 in -7 


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8-2 79 20 187 

D -2 132 54 I2J 

e+f 21.4 51 92 

•->* 27 20 04 

•+5 54 34 280 

-'j ffl.9 57 154 
• +4 1 ! 6.1 38 m 

+0 4.7 23 103 

558 

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271 138 Brad tear 209 212 ft . 

125 42 caan 103 108 +0 

225 158 Carte*. ISO 183 

«1Q 325 Rm Lam 365 367 ft . 

62>j 49 GRA 51 55'j 

90 00 HmOnftrBmta 85 95 

138 93 foam Trad 135 137 

131 94 bt man 129 133 

MB 32 JuhBB'i HUW A 51 

3M 137 LalDfl 166 KB 

1£S 130 Mmnate 150 160 

391 278 Ptotsuzm 313 3i5 


129 130 + 1 r 
A 51 ft-t 
166 KB ft 


. • . 274 

70 37 t&J 

14 10 SI 

00 42 115 

93 25 108 

462 

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71 55 120 

10 30 105 

30 2J 158 


215 3B AMMO ted 
T53 108 AOdtei Cm 
57 45 Adam ft) 

258 225 Asm tea 
151 W Bmb (Cfina) 
2*8 153 tei w at 
3ffl 2 C Bow Mean 
310 230 BPCC 
IS MS friaao 
era i» Bmn 
95B no coftta Cero 
225 TO Dwna 

ssgar w “» 

171 130 Gramm Ram 
790 390 Easons Pmp 
281 172 Franco! M 
4SS 318 fiff Dmgn 
217 53 Con Don 
3Z7 173 Gold Sntessa 
277 05 tad RdaoB 

xn us fonpmi 
(32 110 Loan 
495 173 Immi 

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155 123 HnwOura 
3 17'sOWqr E IM* 


714 

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211 

115 

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174 

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147 

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m 

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187 

185 

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150 160 ft +8 09 5 7 04 
313 315 +4 111 35 120 


iy« TfUlM Com 690 

155 XZS taraiOira 121 

3 iT'iOafty B IM* 18 

68 28 aEmPaw 07 

885 513 Stint Gb 845 

985 570 Sara & Sacra (a 

ISO SB Do 6J* Cm M W 
293 124 SawU Urf) 280 

■220 200 UQ* *££, 237 

216 125 Van Pate 147 

75 40 ha 70 

335 113 WMftnftB (JJ 187 

100 230 WnmmW 297 

565 320 WOG 505 


295 305 

143 148 ft . 
690 740 -W 

127 132 

18 - ft«t 

07 89 +1 

845 855 

GGG 075 +25 

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43 4.4 26.4 

I. 4 Q8 177 

70 5 0 230 

390 11 112 

07 40 . . 

96 Zi 33.? 

II. 4b 10 150 

51 42 104 


388 385 ft . 101 42 154 


164 165 +•: 0G 40 130 

ISO IS +2 14 22 82 


HI 119 soon LOOM TO TO 46 29 

7* 51 Imuran HOW 65 67 . « . 120 

IK TO'jZwm 180 M3 *1 71 30 107 


9*. 3"rAno tana* CM 
1IV530 Aag So 
S3 31 Am Cold 
50 iS'.MUT 
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30 S 0»V 


110 30 120 I 425 


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2~ 

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21 10 190 563 314 Oh Ban 

00 06 182 2«8 105 fecund 

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304 en |37 IT. 7 Dndnani 

18 1.7 MJ 9 Z'B&SffiBI 

.. .. 174 S90 ISO E DftHB 

110 10 120 SM 258 Etedsad 


05 01 M.4 

•A 1.4 54 BUS 

+<1 10 50 221 

+5 114 44 125 


3U (DO E (tea GaU 
5 1 . ZUE RMRte 
9*. (ftFSCaw 


07 44 140 J 213 83 R ta. 


♦2 21* 80 210 
-2 06b 30 22J 


4M „ ft+ft 201 «fl 
307 310 ft -7 BO 40 

2T1 2J5 ft-2 04 30 

149 ISO ■>* 50 50 

TO 112 -5 .. .. 


HOTELS AND CATERERS 


155 133 FMtetfcftdi 740 142 •+!■» 10 07 <00 

462 39 Brand Mid . 495 459 +5 T15 20 154 

305 » Ksseslr Snxta 288 298 ft-2 24 05 149 

W 312 LMtmto 380 383 +1 W0 49 S7J 

*5 447 (job Prat fodt 465 410 ft-2 143 XI 142 

W0 7B'ilinA QadcBe 01 ‘i 92V +1 11 U 152 

110 87 Pmm 01 W Haft 188 m +1 11 10 195 

B jWitaBH IftH m 6 t 23 IB" 159 

405 195 5*o> HoW IT 302 385 +1 50 14 143 



DRAPERY AND STORES 


SI 50 Safai 
IDS 139 TMdmneFnra 


89 +2 10 20 150 


SAMCS DISCOUNT HP 


- 

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ZED 190 AM hub 
85 re AusiHeftn nraan 
2» 185 Aid. Hera 2 
NUmia * 
320 103 S+M U hand 
IT? 6 Bte l<te tel 
250 23) BmUumgP 
*Sl m Dam V5CMBM 
B2 ud B rau n • 




OJ 218 •+1‘j 
80 82 +1 
H4 H -t 
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<88 193 *+7*: 

101 ‘a .. 

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288 TJS'jDaatrta Bte 
.14 17 f*w4Gn 
71 ; ms h» He irate 
291 2C3 SraiM U 
m as GraaaM 
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m aa wasewe 
K !& BLShW 

sc 310 Jfefl51*ni0 

’36 IX Mjtag B 

454 H3 UopB 
83 68 Lon baf . 
Ct’ifto nionia 
TO 10B OiA a 
M 9 4]7 .imM 
405 m h w m ftrtdt 


1 


30 54 220 

25 U 252 
08 40 122 
23 25 270 

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171 2.T M0 

01 ZB 154 
12 22 129 

01 08 204 

12.1 20 .170 

170 19 00 

H54 47 H7 

07. 40 100 
HU1 20 80 

U LB 170 
*3 10 HI 

00 10 155 
m « ra 
no 22 23.4 

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&3 10 MB 

23 02 8B 
57 374 87 

S3 47 03 

100 20 175 
1.4 22 02 

U 41 W 
11.4 40 517 

300 TO 200 
300 2S 1*3 
70 35 170 
23 75 90 

11 J* 12S 

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1.1 25 322 

73 19 23.7 

S3 21 12B 

1LI IS 220 
HU 42 170 
50 33 220 
GO IS IS* 
84 15 || 

43 10 307 

70 22 »0 

00. 03 142 
300 

50 19 .193 

00 12 159 
17 3* 102 

42 51 130 

51 01 158 
110 27 * 157 - 

170 


32 42 09 

. ■ . 223 


INDUSTRIALS 

A-D 


1 


Ml 285 AAH 237 235 .. 11.1 47 112 

229 144 AGBfftmcb 175 182 90 9.4 260 

U185A0I HI 117 +1 62 U 121 

675 316 AW 503 585 -I 25.7b 41 U0 

no rewraraam n n so 73 -* 

258 MS Admit 222 224 +1 122 55 

318 278 AtaoMra trranr 370 375 ft +3 93 20 

IK (44 Abram 191 184 

55 MS Ante ftd 285 ISOS ft-3 124 42 

SSS .158 MfedOK ® 7» 80 4.1 


« * jnraw 
3P» 23 Ante 
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4K 2re^35 , ABW , *^ , TO 390 * 

37B m BHWDB 3 TO ft 


191 184 -- .. TZ3 

285 309 ft-3 124 42 07 

205 210 +2 U 41 IIS 

47 50 ft +3 10 33 51 

s a » js » is 

40 42 .... a.. 380 

aas 220 ^5 114 54 .. 

17 73b ft-'. 14 19 114 

377 2SD -1 00 23 156 

40 a +1 14 z7 53 

120 123 +1 34 20 158 

43 428 +1 243 57 153 

re si • +2 20 as ms 

SSJ 333 -1 HI U Bl 

TO 283 -0 9* SS 147 

161 IB ralb 114 00 120 

17 17b 570 

362 385 ft+lb «3 60 12B 

24Z 244 +1 107 44 80 

m TO 938 80 120 

HD TO ft +2 08 24 170 

M2 296 -21 .. . . .. 

39 41 00 90 90 

350 TO m*K 3141 04 20 

a 27 10b 73 .. 

175 ibo ra-e 1-ar &» 1x2 

S5 60 ft+3 30 07 70 

IM 186 ft .. 67 36 111 

421 423 ft+3 171 4.1 IU 


10 36 358 

-lb 

Mb 54 51 

+1 61 57 270 

-5 80 10 127 

+5 29 10 

. 110 40 121 

34 10 358 

+6 53 54 112 

+ 11 U HI 

50 61 102 

-1 75 44 114 

+2 21 1.1 155 


323 IM Od Z09 211 

75 42 Iran 4S 50 

78b X Ua (tattoo Kb 64 

173 89 I Bn rift sSS T65 

m m SB 72 

73 03 Utaid (Rfl 65b 68 

35b S3 UkUi IT) Z7 28 

240 17B Lm ItaUd IM MS 

145 85 DO DM 1» 1» 

113 59b laa t Hba 87b 0b 

m 159 Lm M 235 236 

263 15) b LOW t Baa 238 242 

467 308 M.W9I 44D 450 

119 M MSH 84 85 

49 31 HY fouragn 38 40b 

3B3 255 Uartqr 338 3D 

HO 171 ItacMfll ID 138 

78 43 UBddbn (P8W 42 45 

TO 186 IfcKMtea 276 228 

IS 78 Hngmta » MR 

713 495 MucMHar Sbp 680 £95 

79 52 Hum Bm 65 67 

88 51 Mifiv ® 83 

1*3 65 Mated H6 

IM HB Mm Drat 175 178 

IM 128 IW Ctranas 173 177 

91 » Undo* 19 81 

70b 45 MbTOCbb 58b 59 

(Z7 aa mm Sanaa u9 w 

109 153 llw 197 TO 

325 20 Hmbi Cnm 312 317 

TO fBbSSIS te* 205 210 

<2 abNeoMBd Kb 37 

216 as Nrai i4 m7 152 

41 39 NBambdi 35 37 

153 92 tend Ta*J 157 152 

ID 0> IWB0LU B0 9* 

65 V TOM 46b Si 1 ? 

283 186 fool* 247 249 

195 50 foSwdlHdl TDD 184 

258 173 Utca But Heft 173 178 

440 W fol* «»■ 'A' 413 430 

» JbPrandi JT 285 295 

£03 303 Fora 573 5)5 

51 11 fot 40 

153 88 PMoas 143 

£74 332 Pcgrar-Khtratey 805 

520 140 itiSadM 4H 

M 775 PHtaMl 13 

691 311 RMnpto 610 

JB 51 nmeCndr 78 

965 IQS Pot* 240 

S as Ponra cum aa 

238 nmOalBya 280 

K4 SZ Ptete* HUBS 181 

no m wp is 

156 123 BadanMM ire 

589 4J1 Rm Org 495 

228 m tasam Sins in 

TO n RdUdS {K Bnw S3 

«D 80S RKteE Cftnu 802 

»B m Hadban Gran 277 

*53 m Herd Eaarane TO 

TO VSTjAhAM TO 

190 75'iFBtjcn 181 

91 48 Ram 03 

725 K tara 110 

£fi2bM5 fonts 538 

«b 21 foam 38 

160 110 forto Eng 132 

80 53 foted RftU) 70 

18 8 S' 

^ T« gtetefUram To 

JSD T« taocr 183 

MG ■ .Bor 09 

3 Db Cam 001 2b 

162 IW tea* 130 

m w ftjite mi - m 


00 

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39 

30 

93 

44 

29 

60 

33 

52 

32 

20 

36 

51 

54 

82 

19 

69 

142 

70 


V 180 
ZT 01 02 

IAS SJ HL7 

50 54 03 

80 13 233 

*0 70 80 
23 30 00 

57 53 50 

7.8 40 . . 

90 55 M2 
13 4.1 116 

51 W.4 201 

55 40 130 

110 57 MU 
120 40 170 

or 

s 

39 
68 


75 15 tarn Trn 
8b 4'^rate 
10b 6 Get Mtwig 
Ub SbCFSA 
713 3n CM Kdpntt 
B3 a Gopraft 
im 85 Gnaw* to 
37 5 IK Own* 
i5B 91 KBnpni Atm 
9b 4T«Haraw 
408 175 foto 
07b 47‘iJwwS 
«b SbMnrass 
6b PfKknl 
160 65 Lena 
13b 8VUm 
475 (ID Um 

157 64 mi 

44 15 tow Mag 

ID to Umar 

S MbMMt E« 
SbUaoftn 
10b 4bfote mt 
655 450 Umorca 
5b 2bfor was 
142 73 Mb Mm Hi 

57 2DbMi Uni 

Mb WbOratoTm 
128 85 Pwfig 
3ii 20* Ptetetsand 
25 CbRnd Km Ud 


9b 10 -‘s 5«0 5* 

47‘* W. -j’. *45 92 

50 5« ft 271 52 

27 31 -J M2 43 

f 3 -3 M2 45 

15a ira • 475 a: 

311 Ml -1* 790 242 

85 95 -22 K 0 36 

Ug» ttb -£ 2D 218 

662 T£S *-5 350 53 190 

512 517 -11 KO 35 

ID a? -U 40 21 

7‘. 7S -b 920 C.5 
BJb 10b -b 126 121 
7b 8 -b 

m ™ 120 23 . 

208 213 ft 66 31 M7 

IE) 175 140 83 

2*1 321 -12 200 aa 

B Jb -b .. .. 

0b +b 

140 » -15 .. . 


fib 7 EGO 89 

«». 9b 870 95 

5b 9b -b 460 50 

605 (CD -20 

M 9 200 377 

156 160 

2M 244 -19 540 230 

144 MS 54 3 7 328 

6b IP. -b 825 95 

315 348 -21 178 5t 

72 75 1 3*5 47 

9 9b -b SSJJ 96 

4b 5 a -b 40B 02 

65 95 -5 2S8 322 

Mb Mb 115 99 

a SI -28 .. 

B9 102 -3 

31 31 ft-2 

75 K 770 21.3 

37 40 .2 

6 8 

Bb rob 

935 565 -11 WO 18 

4 4b 210 54 

115 118 -2 

•» 41b -lb .. 

19 a -1 

80 118 ..a 

277 282 -5 


17D foe Kan fop 260 28S ft-IS 120 4.4 


73b 15 foresaw 
427 225 Ham 
791 511 HTC 
8b (bftWMug 
Wb Mi HOB* 

168 68 SAlftd 
31 Kb5radHnd 

S OT iUwn 

)0 SwgnBnra 

ui 73 Tan* 

568 300 LkWl 
62b 31b Ad Rods 
658 233 ItaarasMd 
135 9D VWfcMM 
SS 35 ltao* 

17 tSbimra Cotoy 
636 2H Ufeam 
313 128 team mat 
30b 15 terata Deep 
2fi 114 Mtaan teg 


070 6)5 ft+1 31.4 43 &S 

6b Mi -b WO 40 490 

r. Bh -b 125 154 

95 115 18J 17 1 

28 29 -tb 118 4.1 

3)0 TO -39 .. 

75 95 .. a .. 

95 115 . .. a .. 

446 488 -K CD 90 

54 5S -3 558 102 

489 519 -48 540 3117 

115 U8 150 02 . 

45 55 43 50 55 

13b Mb 

481 505 -39 870 U0 

TO 738 -18 230 1D1 

28b Z7b ~b 171 83 


2B8 108 Wen foe Can 215 230 


230 DO ten Craft 
IP. 7b tens 

S6 20 iw foa 

16b robzme Capper 
71 X 2Maoi 


IK 19Q -T 

’Jf® 1 
11 12 
*7 B? -6 


175 M4 
1.1 33 



MOTORS AND AIRCRAFT 


335 168 AC 
278 138 AE 

193 119 ’tateiart 

141 fO. tanamg 
X MbBSfi 

. Bund Bat 
314 269 Brranft (CD) 

8Q8 423 or Aswan 
in 116 & C* han 
273 176 cams 
215 161 Comm 
U2 99 Dam «0OMy) 
241 177 Dtey 

115 41 EOF 

357 253 FRGmm 
213 123 FM Hour 

116 51 BKdm Lranen 
iu H HohmU 

TO MS 322 

142 72 Jesara 

101 44 R rtft 


320 330 -3 . . 

277 2)9 +11 1070 18 134 

Mb 15b -’5 294 

153 158 BDb 55 73 

131 132 ra+lb 3D 10 128 

52b 53b ft 17 32 IU 

OT 280 ft . 112 40 153 

400 433 *4 234 40 )ft« 

176 178 +4 6* 15 15.7 


63 2*8 Awk B> Ports 
386 2>3 B> G ra nro u we m 
355 R8 cum 
94 61 FsratUamt) 
m m tap 
76 54'rtactm tJ) 

12b 4bL* 

41 76 Usm Dodo 

255 ISO Oca* Tmoott 
576 428 P A 0 DM 
173 K Rtwtuiuu (Wdrat) 
3£D 1?) Tft* 

TO 360 Tmad Scon 


+1 58b 20 W4 

ft+8 816 25 210 

• +( 74 20 504 

*1 48 7* 110 

•-? ?14 40 415 

51b 51 Cl 
-b . . a 05 

19 

-1 I20D 54 109 
ft +2 250 49 10 

• +2b 71 4? ?ti 

+5 51 18 225 

-5 120 45 510 


IK 197 70 40 

IK (89 *1 57 30 80 

119 W +2 54 53 HU 

TO 212 +3 79 SJ 145 

7Z 77 +2 

TO 295 ft+3 40 1J 

m ■ »+2 70 34 

«B Wb +3 43 *1 


97 102 ... 

75 78 ft . 38 40 R.4 

5*1 - +9 30 07 . . 
San 512 +5 127 25 105 

110 113 ft . 54 57 85 

87 89 S . 27 31 155 

3® 312 +1 Bl 40 178 

30 n +1 76 37- 131 

*53 457ft+i2b1B0 41 U 
110 122 ft+1 54 53 ill 


+1 250 97 


MB 113 
TO 112 +1 

475 485 -5 

IB IK +5 
250 200 

W a 

K 180 ft+C 
TO 126b -b 


1)0 M Sent 8 RM 
IM 122 Sacnraor 
156 106 Da *• 

164 99 GnnqiSft 
53b 29 Sow Eng 
TO 75 SUO 
153 JB Stew 
972 600 Saba 
66 32 iterate 
334 180 SOB Eng 
M9 B3bS*t Nona 


23 Mb .. a* 17 SI 

is? 2® ft-1 HD 51' M.7 

39 102 +1 18 10 28 7 

i(J) 41 « t+b 10 43 145 

345 2&5 55 14 110 

n 151 8* ft+1 50 13 153 

142 MS +1 46 33 120 

ten MO MS • . 40 20 144 


653 4)2 Local 453 

141 111 tan B 110 

,!3 ^!ST JB 

43 28 Row * 

77 43 Son 65 

110 55 mra o rae 8? 

103 X Wrattaod (Jonra) 86 


SHOES AM) LEATHER 


» TO « __ TO 30 ft . . 00 27 U4 

206 I*S font BlMfe 170 17* ft . Ml 83 10.7 

« 32 Hanna Sara 43 re +5 07 10 .. 

2TB IBS Lwnbert Hawratt <95 200 80 45 »8 

.£ MbforaaB 0 font TO 74 44 61 2lJ 

'S ^ 2 aai1 . 138 M2 ft . 55 33 96 

157 118 Shed 8 Fed* I* IM <20 93 64 

ZT1 IS5 Stfta 222 227 -3 64 U 51 


TEXTILES 


54 50 128 

43 10 (58 

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TTTF. TIMES TUESDAY NOVEMBER 25 1986 


THE times unit trust INFORMATION SERVICE 


httstness and finance 


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FINANCIAL TRUSTS 



COMMODITIES 


Q W Jaymon and Co (apart 
SUGAR (From C. Cxamlanv) 

FOB 


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151 £-51 X 

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□□□□□□□□□□□□a 


British Gas pic continued I 2 


□□□□□□□□□□□□a 


The Directors or the Company are responsible for the inforn^on contained in this document othtf mofS/droMent^aebest oT the Knowledge and 

which the Secretary or State is responsible. The Secretary of Store is document for winch they are respectively 

^^Ma2?ista l SSScewiSS«6cBMd^« h notcIm^M^h!ng^^^te^ AetaportS^StaSnSwL The Directors and the Secretary of Seato accept respoBsaa^ 


British Gas pic 

Offer for Sale 

by 

N M Rothschild & Sons Limited 

on behalf of 

The Secretary of State for Energy 

Under the Offer for Sale in the United Kingdom and separate offerings in 

the United States, Canada, Japan and Europe 
4,025,500,000 Ordinary Shares of 25p each are being offered at 135p per share of which 
50p is payable now, 45p is payable on 9th June, 1987 and 40p is payable on 19th April, 1988. 

The Offer for Sale in the United Kingdom has been underwritten by 

N M Rothschild & Sons Limited Kleinwort Benson Limited 

Barclays de Zoete Wedd Limited Baring Brothers & Co., Limited Charterhouse Bank Limited 
County Limited Robert Fleming & Co. Limited Hambros Bank Limited Hill Samuel & Co. Limited 
Lazard Brothers & Co., Limited Lloyds Merchant Bank Limited Samuel Montagu & Co. Limited 
Morgan Grenfell & Co. Limited J. Henry Schroder Wagg & Co. Limited S.G. Warburg & Co. Ltd. 


A copy of this document, which comprises the listing particulars in relation to the Company required by The Stock Exchange (Listing) Regulations 1984, 
has been delivered for registration to the Registrar of Companies in England and Wales in accordance with those Regulations. 

App licatio n has been to the Council of The Stock Exchange for the whole of the ordinary share capital, issued and to be issued, of the Company to be admitted to the Official List 

This document is not for distribution in the United States or Canada. 


The following information should be read in conjunction with thefiiU text of 
this document. 

THE BUSINESS 

British Gas is the largest integrated gas supply business in the western 
world, providing over 99 per cenL of the natural gas used in Great Britain. It 
supplies over half of the energy used in British households and about a third 
of the energy used by British industry and commerce, after excluding fuel 
used for transport It has nearly 17 million customers. 

The primary activity of British Gas is the purchase, distribution and 
sale of gas, supported by a broad range of services to customers and by the 
marketing of gas appliances. British Gas supplements the purchase of gas from 
third parties by its own exploration and production activities. 

More than half of the gas sold by British Gas is used by domestic 
customers, whose main point of contact with British Gas is provided by a 
network of nearly 800 showrooms. Industry, particularly the chemicals and 
engineering sectors, uses over a quarter of the gas sokL Commercial customers, 
such as schools, offices and hospitals, account for the remaining gas sales. 


British Gas has an impressive record ofbusiness performance, of which 

the key features are: 

• the total number of therms sold was nearly 40 per cent higher in 
the year ended 3 1st March, 1986 than in the year ended 3 1st March, 
1976 and 14 per cent, higher than in the year ended 31st March, 
1981, despite some reduction in total United Kingdom energy 
demand since 1979 

• overall market share in terms of energy supplied to final users 
' (excluding transport) reached 44 per cent in 1 98S compared with 

28 per cent in 1 975 and 39 per cent, in 1 980 

• significant improvements in productivity were reflected in the 
number of therms sold per employee increasing by nearly 32 per 
cenL, and customers per employee increasing by more than 25 per 
cent-, over the five years ended 31st March, 1986 

• the level of profits in the last five financial years enabled a £3.6 
billion capital expenditure programme, including the major 
developments of the South Morecambe and Rough gas fields, to 
be financed entirely out of cash generated from operations, while 
the cash resources increased by more than £600 million over the 
period. 


In the past the affairs of British Gas were significantly influenced by 
government controls and constraints, in particular by the application of 
financial targets. Under this regime, which will cease to apply when the 
Company leaves the public sector. British Gas achieved in the five years ended 
31st March, 1986 an average annual pre-tax return on net assets of 4.8 per 
cent on a current cost basis and of 19.5 per cent on an historical cost basis. 

In preparation for the move into the private sector; the business of the 
Corporation was transferred to the Company in August 1986, and the capital 
structure has been changed by the introduction of indebtedness and the 
creation of share capital. In addition, a new regulatory regime has been 
established which places limitations on gas prices charged in the tariff sector 
(mainly domestic sales) but not in the contract sector (mainly industrial sales). 

The Directors consider that there is potential for further steady growth 
in sales to customers in the domestic and commercial markets where British 
Gas has a strong position. In the industrial market there has been a substantial 
reduction in turnover this year, although the recent modest recovery in oil 
prices has enabled British Gas to recover some sales. The reduction in turnover 
should be offset by the benefit of lower gas costs in the current financial year 
and there is expected to be a further reduction in gas costs in the next financial 
year as a result of the delayed effect of the overall fall in oil prices in 1 986. 

The Directors recognise that the ending of government controls and 
constraints following the move out of the public sector will provide wider 
commercial opportunities than have been available in the past, and believe 
that there are good prospects for the future development of the business. 


^ KEY INFORMATION 

OFFER FOR SALE STATISTICS 

Offer for Sale price (payable by instalments) 135p 

Market capitalisation at the Offer for Sale mice £5,602.5 million 

Price earnings multiple based on pro forma HCA 
earnings of 13.9p per Ordinary Share forecast for the 
yearending 31st March, 1987 9.7 times 

Gross dividend yield at the Offer for Sale price based 
on notional net annual dividends of 6.5p per Ordinary 
Share 6.8 per cent 


FINANCIAL INFORMATION 

British Gas prepares its accounts under the current cost convention so 
as to give due regard to the long life of its capital assets. The accounts include 
historical cost financial information in order to facilitate comparisons with 
publicly-quoted companies. Set out below are the unadjusted and pro forma 
results for the year ended 31st March, 1986 and the forecast results for the 
year ending 3 1st March, 1987 on a current cost and on an historical cost basis: 


Current cost 


Historical cost 

Year 

ended 

31st 

March, 

1986 

Forecast 
for year 
ending 
31st 
March, 
1987 


Year 

ended 

31st 

March, 

1986 

Forecast 
for year 
ending 
31st 
March, 
1987 

£ million 

£ million 

Unadjusted 

£ million 

£ million 

688 

787 

Operating profit 

1,006 

1,030 

782 

836 

Profit before taxation 

1,100 

1,071 

402 

442 

Profit after taxation 

720 

677 

£ million 

£ million 

Proforma 

£ million 

£ million 

559 

671 

Profit before taxation 

831 

.884 

287 

362 

Profit after taxation 

559 

575 

6.9p 

8.7p 

Earnings per share 

13.5p 

13.9p 


Notes: 


1. The profit forecast described in Part E of Section I is made by the 
Directors on the basis of the assumptions set out in Section V. In particular; 
the results for the year ending 3 1 st March, 1987 would be affected if the 
weather were to vary significantly during the remainder of the year from the 
seasonal normal pattern. 

2. In arriving at the unadjusted profit before taxation forecast for the year 
ending 31st March, 1987 £86 million has been charged in respect of inter^t 
on the debenture issued to H.M. Treasury. 

3. Pro forma figures have been set out above in order to give an indication 
of the profit ofBritish Gas for the year ended 3 1st March, 1986 and the forecast 
profit for the year ending 3 1st March, 1987 as if the new capital structure had 
been in place throughout the two years (see Part B of the accountants' report). 

4. British Gas charges foe cost of replacing certain categories of fixed assets 
against the profit and loss account The effect of this policy over the last five 
years is set out in Pan D of Section L 

5. Financial information on British Gas for the five years ended 31st 
March, 1 986 is set out in the accountants’ report (see Section TV). 


t 

STRUCTURE OF THE COMBINED OFFER 

Under the Combined Offer KM. Government is now offering for sale 
4,025.5 million Ordinary Shares, representing 97 per cenL of the ordinary 
share capital, issued and to be issued, of the Company. This number includes 
up to 795.5 million shares which are the subject of separate offerings in 
the United States, Canada, Japan and Europe, all of which have been fully 
underwritten. 

Under the Offer for Sale in the United Kingdom certain institutional 
investors are being allocated 1,615 million shares. A further 1,615 million 
shares are being made available to the general public (the “U.K. Public Offer”), 
including eligible British Gas customers, employees and pensioners. If valid 
applications under the U.K. Public Offer are received for more than 3,230 
million shares, the allocations to institutional investors and to the overseas 
offerings will be reduced by 40 per cent (964.2 million shares in aggregate) 
and the number of shares available for the U.K. Public Offer will be increased 
accordingly from 1,615-million to 2,579.2 million. 

By 14th November, 1986 about five and a half million people bad 
registered as customers with the British Gas Share Information Office. Each 
customer who is eligible has been guaranteed, on application, a minimum 
allocation of 200 shares; up to ten per cenL of the U.K. Public Offer has been 
set aside to give greater allocations to such customers who apply. 

The Secretary of State is excluding from the Combined Offer 124.5 
million shares, representing three per cent of the ordinary share capitaL Of 
these, 38 million shares are being offered separately by the Secretary of State 
to eligible British Gas employees and pensioners under the Free Offer; the 
Matching Offer and the Pensioner Free Offer (as defined in Section IX). In 
addition, eligible British Gas employees and pensioners will be given priority 
in allocations under the U.K. Public Offer. Of the ordinary share capita], 
issued and to be issued, of the Company five per cenL is being reserved for 
eligible British Gas employees and pensioners under these offers. 

The balance of the shares excluded by the Secretary of State from the 
Combined Offer (not less than 86.5 million shares) is being retained by him 
to meet share bonus entitlements. If this balance is insufficient to meet the 
maximum entitlements to bonus shares arising from applications under the 
U.K. Public Offer, the Secretary of Stale will withdraw from the U.K. Public 
Offer such number of shares as is required to meet these entitlements. If it is 
sufficient, then any remaining balance of the retained shares will be reserved 
for entitlements to the share bonus under the overseas offerings. The Secretary 
ofState will, if necessary, retain out of the overseas offerings any further shares 
required to meet overseas share bonus entitlements. 

SPECIAL INCENTIVES: 

BILL VOUCHERS OR SHARE BONUS 

Individuals buying shares under the U.K. Public Offer may be eligible 
to receive free of charge from KM. Government either bill vouchers for use 
against gas bills from British Gas or a share bonus of one share for every ten 
held continuously for three years, subject to a maximum bonus of 500 shares. 
The bill vouchers will be issued over a period of three years on the basis of 
£1 0 for every 100 shares held continuously up to the relevant qualifying dates, 
subject to a maximum value of £250. Further details are set out in Section 
vm. 

INSTALMENT ARRANGEMENTS 

The Offer for Sale price is I35p per Ordinary Share, of which 50p is 
payable on application, 45p on Tuesday, 9th June, 1987 and 40p on Tuesday, 
19th April, 1988. 

Until payment of the final instalment the Ordinary Shares sold on 
instalment terms will be registered in the name ofNational Westminster Bank 
PLG In the first instance they will be represented by renounceable letters of 
acceptance, which will be superseded in due course by interim Certificates 
issued by National Westminster Bank PLC 

The expected timetable for the issue of documents is set out in Section 
DC On registration ofa renunciation or transfer, the liability to pay instalments 
will pass to the renouncee or transferee. Following payment of the final 
instalment, the Ordinary Shares will be transferred, free of stamp duty or 
stamp duty reserve tax, into the name of the last registered holder. A summary 
of the instalment Agreement is set out in Section VII. 

SPECIAL DEALING ARRANGEMENTS 

Special arrangements have been made to facilitate and reduce the cost 
of dealings in small numbers of shares. Details of thse arrangements are set 
out in Section IX. 







to 







\ 


a 


v* 




THE TIMES TUESDAY NOVEMBER 25 1986 


37 


□□□□□□□□□□□□□ 



British Gas plctcontinued I 3 


□□□□□□□□□□□□a 


DIRECTORS AMD ADVISERS 


Directors of the Company 



SHARE CAPITAL AND 
INDEBTEDNESS 



DEFINITIONS 


Chairman 
Chief Executive 
Executive Directors 


Non-executive Directors 


Company Secretary' 


Sir Denis Rooke, CBE FRS FEng 
Robert Evans 

Christopher Wadsworth Brferley 
Charles Edward Donovan 
William George Jewers, CBE 
James McHugh, FEng 
William Ronald Prabert 
Allan Sutcliffe 

Roger Humphrey Boissier 
Richard Green bury 
Sir Martin Wakefield Jacomb 
Sir LesDe Smith 

Gilbert Charles Hogg 

all of Rivermilt House, 

London SW1V3JL 


Share capital following the Combined Offer 


Authorised 

£1,375,000.000 

£1 


Ordinary Shares of 25p each 

Special Rights Redeemable Preference 
Share of£I 


Issued and to be 
issued . and fully 
paid or credited 
as fully paid 

£1,037,500.000 

£1 


152 Grosvenor Road, 


Advisers 


Financial advisers to 
H.M. Government 

N M Rothschild & Sans limited, 

New Court, Sl Swithin’s Lane, London 
EC4P4DU 

Financial advisers to 
the Company 

BJeinwort Benson Limited, 

20 Fencburch Street, London EC3P 3DB 

Solicitors to the 

Offer for Sale 

Slaughter and May, 

35 Basinghali Street, London EC2V 5DB 

Solicitors lo the 
Company 

Herbert Smith, 

. VVatling House, 35 Cannon Street, 

London EC4M 5SD 

Solicitors to the 
underwriters 

UaHatwi & Paines, 

Barrington House, 59-67 Gresham Street, 

London EC2V 7JA 

Brokers to the 

Offer for Sale 

Cazenove & Co^ 

12 Tokenhouse Yard, London EC2R 7AN 


Hoare Govett Limited, 

Heron House, 319-325 High Holbom, 

London WCIV7PB 


James Capet & Co-, 

James Capel House, 6 Be vis Marks, 

London EC3A 7JQ 


Wood Mackenzie & Co. LtL, 

100 Wood Street, London EC2P 2AJ 

Auditors and 
reporting accountants 

Price Waterhouse, Chartered Accountants, 
Southwark Towers, 32 London Bridge Street, 
London SE19SY 

Reporting petroleum 
consultants 

ERC Energy Resource Consultants Limited, 

1 5 Wei beck Street, London W1M 7PF 

Accounting advisers to 
H.M. Government 

Touche Ross & Co, Chartered Accountants, 

Hill House. 1 Utile New Street, 

London EC4A 3TR 

Registrars and 
custodian bank 

National Westminster Bank PLC, 

Registrar’s Department, Caxton House. 

PO. Box 343, 

Reddiffe Mead Lane, Bristol BS99 7SQ 

A 

SECTION 1 


The Ordinary Shares now offered for sale will rank in full for all 
dividends declared or paid on the ordinary share capital of the Company after 
the date of this document; special arrangements apply to capitalisation and 
rights issues and non-cash dividends during the instalment period. 

Indebtedness 

At the dose of busi ness on 1 0th October, 1 986 British Gas had a secured 
short-term borrowing of £1 million, a secured loan of £5 million and finance 
lease commitments of £10 million. At that date British Gas had cash, bank 
balances and short-term investments amounting to £1,580 million. 

Save as disclosed above, at that date British Gas did not have any 
loan capital outstanding or created but unissued, term loans or any other 
borrowings or indebtedness in the nature of borrowing, including bank 
overdrafts and liabilities under acceptances (other than normal trade bills) or 
acceptance credits or hire purchase or lease commitments, mortgages, charges 
or any material guarantees or other material contingent liabilities. 

On 20th November, 1986 a £2,500 million unsecured debenture was 
issued by the Company to H.M. Treasury as part of the overall change made 
in its capital structure. Except for this debenture British Gas has not, since 
10th October; 1986, incurred any material indebtedness. 


Wm TIMETABLE 

<*%>& 


“Authorisation" 

the authorisation to supply gas granted to 
British Gas and described under 
“Regulatory Environment" in Section 111 

“billion" 

one thousand million 
“British Gas' 

British Gas Public Limited Company and 
its subsidiaries and/or. as the case may be. 
their respective predecessors in business 
or any of them 

“BscT 

billion standard cubic feet measured at 60 
degrees Fahrenheit and 14.7 pounds per 
square inch (standard temperature and 
pressure) 

"CCA" 

financial information prepared under the 
current cost convention (as explained in 
die accountants' report in Section IV) 

“Combined Offer" 

the Offer for Sale and the separate 
offerings in the United States. Canada, 
Japan and Europe referred to herein 

“Company" 

British Gas Public Limited Company 

“contract customer" 
a person who is supplied with gas by 
British Gas under a contract which 
provides for a minimum supply in excess 
of 25.000 therms per annum or which is 
entered into incircumstanceswhere tariffs 
are not appropriate 

"Corporation" 

British Gas Corporation 

"Gas Act" 
the Gas Act 1986 

"HCA" 

financial information prepared under the 
historical cost convention 


“Interim Certificates" 
the ceni ficaies evidencing rights to and 
obligations in respect of Oidinary Shares 
to be issued pursuant lo the Instalment 
Agreement pending payment in full of the 
Offer for Sale price 

"lbf/in 2 " 

the pressure at a point measured as a force 
in pounds weight on every square inch of 
area 

"MMbW" 
million barrels 

"Offer for Sale" 

the offer for sale of up to 3.548.2 million 
Ordinary Shares being made by N M 
Rothschild & Sons Limited on behalf of 
the Secretary of State and described herein 

"Ordinary Shares" . 

Ordinary Shares of 2Sp each m the 
Company 

“petroleum" 

a range of naturally formed fluid 
substances consisting mainly of 
hydrocarbons, including gas, condensate 
and oil 

"Secretary of State" 

the Secretary of State for Energy 

"Special Share" 

the Special Rights Redeemable Preference 
Share of £i in theCbmpany 

“tariff customer" 

a person who is supplied with gas by 
British Gas otherwise than under a 
contract which provides for a minimum 
supply in excess of 25.000 therms per 
annum or which is entered into in 
circumstances where tariffs are not 
appropriate 


Completed application forms to be 
received by 

10 a.m. on Wednesday, 3rd 
December, 1986 

Basis of allocation expected to be 
announced by 

Monday, 8th December, 1986 

Dealings expected to commence in 
London at 

2.30 p.m. on Monday, 8th December, 

1986 

Despatch of renonnceable letters of 
acceptance expected on 

Monday; 15th December, 1986 

Last dale for registration of 
renunciation 

Friday, 20th February, 1987 

Payment of second instalment 

Tuesday, 9th June, 1987 

Payment of final instalment 

Tuesday. 19th April, 1988 


"Instalment Agreement" "UKCS" 

the agreement summarised in Section VII United Kingdom Continental Shelf 

References to the supply or provision of gas are, unless otherwise stated, to the 
supply or provision of gas through pipes, and references to gas suppliers should be 
construed accordingly. 

A therm isone hundred thousand British thermal units where one British thermal 
unit is the quantity of heat required to raise the temperature of one pound of water from 
58 s Fahrenheit to 59” Fahrenheit One therm is approximately equivalent to 100 cu. ft 
of natural gas. 


The statistics for market share and therms of gas sold, which are illustrated in 
the graphs in “The market for gas" in Pan B of Section 1. are derived from the 
Department of Energy Digests of United Kingdom Energy Statistics. Such statistics are 
shown on a calendar year basis. In the case of gas, unless the context otherwise requires, 
figures refer to the total sales and market share of gas in the United Kingdom (whether 
or not the gas was supplied by British Gas). However, British Gas provides over 99 per 
cent, of the natural gas used in the United Kingdom. The proportion of the total energy 
market held by each fuel is measured in therms on the basis of beat supplied to final 
useis and calculated after excluding fuel used for transport. In accordance with the 
general practice in the Digests, the energy market excludes oil for uses other than energy 
but includes all uses of gas, since statistics on its non-energy use are not available. 


THE BUSINESS OF BRITISH GAS 




REVIEW OF ACTIVITIES 


6 


HISTORICAL BACKGROUND 


Gas has been used as a source of energy in Great Britain since William 
Murdock made gas from coal in 1 792 to light his home in Redruth, Cornwall. 
The first public supply of gas was made under a Royal Charter granted in 1812 
to the Gas Light and Coke Company for street lighting in London. Street 
lighting continued to be the main application for gas for many years and by 
1 850 the number of gas suppliers had grown to nearly 700. Thereafter the use 
of gas in the home and in industry increased to such an extent that by the 
mid-J 930s there were about eleven million gas customers. 

In those early days gas was supplied by both private companies and 
municipal undertakings. However; the Gas Act 1948 resulted in the 
nationalisation of ail 1,046 gas companies and undertakings in Great Britain 
and these were amalgamated into 12 largely autonomous Area Boards. At the 
same time the Gas Council was established to advise the Minister of Fuel and 
Power and to assist the Area Boards, for example by borrowing money and 
carrying out research on their behalf. 

Until the 1950s gas was produced mainly from coal but sharp increases 
in coai and labour costs led to a stagnation in gas sales and prompted the 
search for more economic means of producing gas. The main technological 
advance achieved in the late 1 950s and early 1960s was the production ofhigh 
pressure gas through the gasification of oil uring tight petroleum distillates. 
This advance led lo cost reductions, and gas sales increased significantly in 
the early 1960s. 

Natural gas was first introduced ona commercial scale into Great Britain 
in 1964 when it was imported by British Gas in liquefied form from Algeria. 
This gas was landed at Convey Island and distributed in a high pressure 
pipeline extending to Leeds and supplying eight of the Area Boards. At that 
time natural gas had to be processed to make it suitable for use in existing 
appliances. 

The importance of natural gas grew as substantial quantities were 
discovered in the North Sea in the mid-1960s. Within two years of EM 
Government issuing the first North Sea production licences in 1964, it was 
decided that all gas appliances should be converted to use natural gas and that 
a national high pressure gas transmission system should be constructed. At 
this rime and until 1 982 all natural gas production from the UKCS had to be 
offered for sale to British Gas unless used for certain industrial purposes. The 
main conversion operation started in 1967 following the first landing of 
natural gas from the North Sea. Within little more than ten years the operation 
was completed and a total of about 35 million appliances used by more than 
1 3 million customers had been converted to natural gas. The availability of 
abundant. low-cost supplies of natural gas enabled British Gas to achieve 
rapid growth: the number of therms of gas sold increased nearly four-fold in 
the twelve years ended 31st March, 1980. 

Under the Gas Act 1 972 the Gas Council was renamed the British Gas 
Corporation and took over the operations of the 12 separate Area Boards. 
This Act gave the Corporation increased power to search for and obtain 
supplies of gas and introduced the objective of profitability. Ii also continued 
the obligation contained in the Gas Act 1948 to supply premises within 25 
pros of a gas main upon request; this obligation to supply was subsequently 
restricted lo requests for supplies not exceeding 25,000 therms per annum. 
During H83 and 1984 the Corporation disposed of the majority of its oil 
interests, for which it was not compensated, pursuant to directions from the 
Secretary of Stale. 

In May 1985 H.M. Government announced its intention to sell shares 
in British Gas lo the public and the necessary legislation (the Gas Act 1986) 
refer ved Ro;. a! Assent on 25lh July; 1 986. This provided for the business of the 
Corporation to be transferred to the Company and established the regulatory 
regime (described in detail in Section III) which now applies to British Gas. 


1 . Introduction 

The primary business of British Gas is the supply of gas to domestic, 
industrial and commercial customers in Great Britain. It is an integrated 
business extending from gas fields to customers' premises by way of extensive 
transmission and distribution systems. Its activities range from the 
exploration for, and production of, natural gas to the sale, installation and 
maintenance of gas appliances. 

British Gas reports its revenues and costs by reference to five separate 
profit centres of which by far the most important is the gas supply business. 
The turnover and operating results of these profit centres for the financial year 
ended 31st March, 1986 are set out below: 


British Gas has nearly 17 million customers in England, Scotland and 
Ufeies and provides over 99 per cent, of the natural gas used in the United 
Kingdom. A breakdown of its sales and customers by market is shown in the 
following table: 

Year ended At 



31st March, 1986 

31st March, 1986 


Therms 

Sales 


Market 

sold 

value 

Customers 


% 

% 

% 

Domestic 

53.7 

61.2 

96.5 

Industrial* 

31.6 

24.6 

0.5 

Commercial 

14.7 

14.2 

3.0 


100.0 

100.0 

100.0 


Profit centre 

Turnover 

Operating results 



CCA 

HCA 


£ million 

£ million 

£ million 

Gas supply 

7,109 

703 

1,006 

Installation and contracting 

275 

11 

13 

Appliance trading 

278 

12 

17 

Exploration subsidiaries 

94 

(43) 

(39) 

Other activities 

21 

5 

9 

- 

7,777* 

688 

1,006 


*£7.68? million after excluding £90 million of intra-group sales. 

2 . The market for gas 

British Gas is the leading supplier in the United Kingdom energy market 
(excluding transport) and, as shown in the graph below, gas provided over 44 
per cent of energy supplied to final users in the year ended 31st December. 
1 985. If the non-energy uses of all fuels were included, its share of the wider 
market (again excluding transport) would have been 41 per cent for the year. 

During the period covered by the graph total annual energy demand in 
this market declined by six per cent., while annual consumption of gas 
increased. The success of gas owed much to its price relative to competing 
friels, its attractiveness as a clean, controllable and reliable fuel, which unlike 
oil and solid foel does not have to be stored by the customer, and to the 
marketing efforts of British Gas. 


* Includes very smalt quantities supplied lo ponvr stations. 

An analysis of the market for gas and of the activities of British Gas 
within that market is set out below. 

fa) The domestic market 

As illustrated in the graph, the number of therms of gas sold in the 
domestic market increased by more than 60 per cent, from 1975 to 1985. 
During this period the total demand for energy in the home increased by over 
1 3 per cent and the proportion held by gas rose from 40 per cent, to 58 per 
cenL, mainly at the expense of solid fuel and, to some extent, oil and electricity 

Gas is used in the domestic market for home heating, water heating and 
cooking where it is in competition mainly with electricity. Competition in the 
domestic market is limited, at least in the short term, to the extent that 
most domestic customers cannot economically change their source of foel, 
particularly for central heating which accounts for more than half of domestic 
gas sales. 


4 


u 


Fii 


*■ 



Cdndaiyear 

*See definitions for an explanation of market statistics. 

Source. Department of Energy Digests af United Kingdom Energy Statistic published bv 
H.MS.0 





British Gas has increased sales in the domestic market by three main 
methods: first, by encouraging more householders within the area in which a 
gas supply is already available to have a gas supply connected: secondly, by 
laying mains to extend this gas supply area; and thirdly, by promoting the use 
of gas in preference to other fuels, primarily by persuading existing customers 
to extend the range of gas appliances which ttiev use. 









38 


THE TIMES TUESDAY NOVEMBER 25 1986 


□□□□□□□□□□□□□ 

Of the 20.S million households in Great Britain, some 17.8 million are 
within the existing gas supply area and. of these, more than 16.2 million are 
gas users. The number of households connected with gas has increased by 
nearly 1.3 million in the five years ended 31st March. 1986. New housing, 
which has been a significant source of growth, accounted for over half of this 
number. Over SO per cent, of new homes built in Great Britain in the five 
years ended 3 1st March, 1986 have been connected with gas. 

An important factor in the rise in domestic consumption in the five 
years ended 31st March. 1986 was the increasing use of gas for central healing. 

Of all central healing systems installed in this five-year period. 76 per cent, 
were gas-fired. The number of households in Great Britain with gas central 
heating is approximately 10.4 million. 

Research and development are used extensively to support the domestic 
market. New materials and pipelaying methods have helped to reduce the 
costs of connection, enabling the gas supply area to be extended more 
economically. In addition, co-operation with manufacturers in the 
development of high-efficiency domestic boilers and of improved designs for 
cookers and fires has encouraged the wider use of gas appliances. 


(b) The industrial market 

Gas has a major share of the industrial energy market. Although the 
number of therms of gas sold declined as a result of the decrease in overall 
industrial demand for energy in the United Kingdom since 1979, gas was less 
affected than other fuels. The graph shows that gas increased its share of the 
industrial energy market excluding transport) from 23 percent, in 1975 to 36 
percent, in 1985. If the non-energy uses of all fuels were included, its share of 
the wider market (again excluding transport) would have increased from 19 
per cenL to 29 per cent, in the same period. 



In the current calendar year there has been a reduction in the number 
of therms sold and market share. While industrial sales by British Gas in the 
first quarter of 1986 showed little decline, a significant reduction took place 
in the period from April to August, when the number of therms of gas sold 
was nearly 20 per cent, lower than in the comparable period in 1985. This 
reduction resulted partly from lower sales of gas as a chemical feedstock caused 
by difficult conditions in the international fertiliser and methanol markets 
and, following the sharp fall in oil prices, partly from some customers with an 
alternative fuel readily available switching from gas. However, the recent 
modest recovery in oil prices has enabled British Gas to recover some sales. 
The total number of therms sold in the industrial market for the full calendar 
year is expected to be around 13 per cent, lower than for 1985. 

The industrial market is highly diverse and is characterised by the large 
volume of gas supplied per customer, for the most part under individually 
negotiated contracts. Gas is used by many different types of customer for a 
wide range of processes, which can be divided into two principal categories. 

In the first category, gas is used as a “premium*’ fuel, competing 
principally against gas oil and. in some sectors, liquefied petroleum gas and 
electricity. In this category gas is used primarily by customers who require a 
fuel which is clean, readily controllable and does not have to be stored. These 
customers normally enter into “firm" contracts with British Gas (that is, 
without provision for interruption). Examples of the industrial uses of gas as 
a premium fuel are direct drying in the food industry, heat treatment of metals 
and the manufacture of glass and ceramics. 

In the second category, gas is .used as a '‘non-premium" fuel, competing 
against heavy fuel oil and coal where crude bulk heat is required. British Gas 
usually sells such gas under terms which give it the right to interrupt supplies 
in order to assist in matching overall supply and demand. This right to 
interrupt supplies to certain industrial customers reduces the need for 
expensive peak supply facilities and is reflected in the lower prices charged 
under interruptible contracts. 

In addition to the two principal categories, significant quantities of gas 
are supplied for use as a chemical feedstock in the manufacture of fertilisers, 
although there has been a substantial reduction in sales volume in the current 
year. Gas used as a chemical feedstock is supplied in bulk at somewhat lower 
prices than in other categories, mostly on an interruptible basis. 

In the year ended 3 1 si March. 1986 about 55 percent of the number of 
therms sold by British Gas in the industrial market were on an interruptible 
basis, representing some 12 per cent, of its total gas sales revenue. All 
customers supplied on this basis are responsible for having an alternative fuel 
available and can therefore readily switch from gas to the alternative fuel and 
vice versa. A fall in the number of therms sold to interruptible customers has 
been the principal reason for the reduction in industrial gas sales volume in 
the current year. 

In the year ended 3 1 st March. 1 986 the three largest industrial customers 
of British Gas together accounted for 10 per cent, of total therms sold in all 
markets. The largest customer was Imperial Chemical Industries PLC, which 
accounted for 7 per cent, of total therms sold by British Gas in that year. 

British Gas co-operates with manufacturers and its customers in the 
development of gas-burning equipment in order to enhance fuel efficiency, 
product quality and productivity and to strengthen the competitive position 
of gas in relation to other fuels. Advanced burner systems, which recycle waste 
heat by taking advantage of recuperative and regenerative techniques, have 
been developed to support sales into the industrial market- 


(c) The commercial market 

The number of therms of gas sold in the commercial market nearly 
doubled from 1975 to 1985, and gas increased its market share from 19 per 
cent, to 34 per cent, in the same period. 

In the commercial market the average level of consumption per 
customer is lower than in the industrial market. No single ty pe of user is 
dominant, the largest being the educational sector which accounted for about 
20 per cent, of the number of therms sold by British Gas in this market in the 
year ended 3 1st March. 1986. Other users include shops, offices, hospitals, 
public buildings, hotels and restaurants. The commercial market, which 
predominantly comprises service industries and the public sector, has been 
less vulnerable than the industrial market to the level of activity in the 
economy as a whole. 


British Gas pic continued 





About half of the gas supplied by British Gas to commercial users is 
sold on a tariff basis with the remainder sold under individually negotiated 
contracts, of which only a few are interruptible. More than two thirds of the 
gas consumed in the commercial market is used for space heating with water 
heating and catering accounting for most of the remainder. In space and water 
heating, gas competes mainly with oil and electricity, while in catering it 
competes mainly with electricity. 

(d) Pricing 

For pricing purposes customers are divided into two categories: in 
genera), customers taking less than 25,000 therms per annum are charged 
according to published tariffs, while prices for customers taking greater 
quantities are individually negotiated with British Gas. 

The table below shows the number of therms sold, sales value and 
average price per therm in the tariff and contract sectors for the year ended 
31st March, 1986: 




Average 


Sales 

price 

Therms sold 

value 

per therm 

millions 

£ million 

P 


Tariff sectorm 

Domestic^) 

9.898 

4,234 

42.8 

Industrial 

313 

118 

37.7 

Commercial 

1,464 

557 

38.0 

Total tariff sector 

11.675 

4,909 

42.0 

Contract sector 

Industrial^) 

5,603 

1,604 

28.6 

Commercials 

1,423 

486 

34.2 

Total contract sector 

7,026 

2,090 

29.7 

Total gas sales<4) 

18,701 

6,999 

37.4 


( 1 ) The effect of spreading the standing charge over different numbers of therms sold per customer 
accounts far the variations in average price per therm sold in the tariff sector. 

(2) The commercial contract sector includes ! 48 million ihenns of domestic contract sales. 

(3) Includes very small quantities supplied to power stations. 

(4) Total gas sales exclude £1 10 million ofincome. primarily in respect of essential service revenue 
and gas used for own purposes, which is included in the turnover of the gas supply business. 


(i) Tariff sector 

In the year ended 31st March, 1986 tariff sales accounted for 
approximately 70 per cent of the gas sales revenue of British Gas. The great 
majority of tariff customers are domestic customers but there are some 480,000 
commercial and 76,000 industrial tariff customers. Prices paid by tariff 
customers consist of a standing charge and a rate per therm (which is generally 
uniform throughout Great Britain). In recent years, while British Gas was a 
nationalised industry, tariff prices were set in order to take account ofa number 
of factors but they were particularly influenced by financial targets agreed with 
H.M. Government Competition with other fuels has also been a factor but 
in general gas prices in the tariff sector have been below those of competing 
fuels with the exception of coaL 

Under the regulatory regime established by the Gas Act, British Gas is 
subject to a system of price control covering the tariff sector and is required 
to take all reasonable steps to ensure that the average price charged to tariff 
customers (including the standing charge) does not exceed a maximum 
determined by a price formula. British Gas is not subject to profit control and 
prior regulatory approval for price increases is not required, provided the 
maximum determined by the formula has not been exceeded. The formula 
governs changes in the maximum price (whether increases or decreases) from 
the level applying in the year ending 3 1st March. 1 987 and its broad effect is: 

(a) to allow the cost per therm of gas purchases, changes in which are largely 
affected by factors outside the control of British Gas, to be passed on in 
full to tariff customers; and 

(b) to encourage operational efficiency by limiting the element of the tariff 
price not represented by gas purchase costs by reference to the annual 
rale of change in the Retail Price Index less two percentage points 
CRPI— 2"). 

The price formula comes into effect on 1st April, 1987; umil'then tariff 
prices may not be increased. The terms of price control provide for the formula 
to remain in force until at least 1st April, 1 992: the details of the price control 
system and the circumstances under which it can be modified are explained 
in Section III. 


00 Contract sector 

The contract sector, which covers some 24,000 premises (mainly in the 
industrial or commercial markets), accounted for approximately 30 per cent, 
of the gas sales revenue of British Gas in the year ended 31st March, 1986. 
The prices charged to contract customers are individually negotiated with 
regard to a number of factors, including whether the contract is oi^a firm or 
interruptible basis. Although many contract customers are of long standing, 
they are able to suspend or discontinue supplies at relatively short notice. 
Generally contract prices have taken into account competitive market 
conditions as well as the costs of supply but in the past they have also taken 
account of financial targets agreed with H.M. Government The targets in 
recent years were achieved without the need for the price of gas to rise in line 
with the price of oil (its principal competitor) with the result that gas prices 
were, in general, significantly lower than the prices of competing fuels other 
than coal. 

There was a rapid foil in crude oil prices from over U.S.S25 per barrel 
towards the end of 1 985 to about U.S.S 10 per barrel by the end ofJ une 1 986. 
This led to a red union in the prices ofcompeting oil products and put pressure 
on British Gas to lower its prices, particularly under interruptible contracts. 
British Gas responded to these lower oil prices by, where appropriate, 
reviewing contract prices more frequently, often on a monthly basis for 
interruptible customers and on a three-monthly basis for firm customers, and 
reducing prices. However, following the modest recovery in oil prices, selling 
prices for gas have firmed, consistent with market conditions. 


The contract sector is not subject to price control, but British Gas has 
published the maximum prices which it will, until farther notice, charge in 
the contract sector British Gas has also indicated its intention, subject io 
certain qualifications, to limit increases in published maximum firm contract 
prices for a period of three years to about die rate of inflation. 

(e) Market support 

British Gas attaches great importance to the activities which support its 
gas marketing efforts. In the domestic market, showrooms are the main point 
ofcontact with the publicand the principal support aai vities mcludeappliance 
retailing and customer service. In the industrial and commercial markets, 
British Gas provides a technical consultancy service which assists customers 
in making a more efficient and cost-effective use of gas. 

(i) Showrooms 

British Gas has a network of almost 800 showrooms, mainly in high 
street locations or in shopping centres. A large number of customers pay their 
bills through these showrooms. In addition, showrooms are used for the sale 
of domestic gas appliances and heating systems, dealing with customer service 
work, giving energy conservation advice and handling applications for gas 
supply as well as general enquiries. 

British Gas seeks to make profits from its appliance trading activities 
while aiming to maximise sales of appliances in support of the wider use of 
gas in the domestic market. In the year ended 3!si March, 1986 British Gas 
sold about 100,000 central beating systems, 700,000 space heaters, 500,000 
cookers and 100.000 other appliances, primarily from the showrooms, but 
also directly to trade and wholesale customers. As part of the support to the 
sale of both gas and gas appliances British Gas uses its own service engineers 
to install appliances sold through its showrooms and offers a high level of 
maintenance and spare parts service, covering almost 3,900 different models. 

Appliance trading is accounted for as a separate profit centre and its 
results are stated after deducting a proportion of showroom costs. Other 
showroom costs are charged to the gas supply business and to the installation 
and contracting account in order to reflect the extensive support provided by 
the showrooms to these activities. 

British Gas carries out a continuous review of its network of showrooms 
— opening, modernising, relocating or dosing as appropriate. Rationalisation 
of the showrooms has resulted in a ten per cent reduction in their number 
since 1982. 

(if) Customer service 

British Gas offers a broad range of customer services in two main 
categories, “essential service" and “installation and contracting". 

Essential service, which is accounted for within the gas supply business, 
includes dealing with gas escapes and other emergencies, installation and 
repair of meters, request servicing of appliances and basic safety checks on 
spedfic appliances or for customer groups such as the elderly and the disabled. 
British Gas has established strict targets for speed of response to emergency 
raii$ and well defined standards of service for other work, and considerable 
resources are provided to ensure that customers can report emergencies easily 
and quickly. British Gas has given a written assurance to the Secretary of 
State that a range of services now available to domestic customers will be 
maintained while the current system of price control continues. 

Installation and contracting has been developed on a commercial basis 
to counterbalance the highly seasonal nature of essential service work. In 
recent years service contracts for central heating and gas appliances have 
provided a significant growth in work load and have assisted in maintaining 
safety. During the year ended 31st March, 1986 service contracts covered 
more than 3.5 million appliances, representing an increase of 22 percent over 
the last five financial years, and British Gas installed over 100,000 central 
beating systems and 1.6 million other gas appliances. All these activities are 
accounted for under the heading of installation and contracting. 


3. Matching gas supply and demand 

Demand for gas varies markedly from season to season as illustrated in 
the graph below. On a very severe winter’s day it can be five times that on the 
warmest summer’s day and almost twice the daily average for the year as a 
whole. 


m 


m 


Gas supplied by British Gas during the year endad 
3Ut March. 1886 (waakty average) 



go Gas supplied during the second six months of the year ended 31 st March, 
$1 1986 accounted for 67 per cent, of gas supplied during the year as a whole. 




Much of the seasonal change in demand is met by varying the amount 
of gas taken from producing fields by British Gas under its gas purchase 
contracts. Most contracts contain provisions for- varying the offtake from 
fields at different times of the year within specified ranges. The extent of this 
variation is referred to as the “swing factor” which is the ratio of the maximum 
supply contracted to be available each day to the average daily contracted 
supply forthe whole year. The higher the swing factor, the greater the flexibility 
in meeting seasonal demand. 

If peak demand were to be met from variations in offtake alone, an 
overall swing factor of about 2.3 would be required. Flexibility at higher levels 
of demand can often be achieved more economically in other ways and 
therefore British Gas has negotiated gas purchase contracts which, taken as a 
whole, currently have a swing factor of only 1.5. Contracts for the supply of 
gas from the Southern Basin of the North Sea generally have a swing factor of 
1.67, while those for the Northern Basin have a swing factor of 1.3 or less. 

In order to supplement gas purchased under contract and to help meeL 
winter demand, British Gas uses both seasonal supplies and peak Storage- 
Seasonal supplies are those which can be operated for extended periods during 
the winter and comprise the specially developed South Morecambe, Rough 
and Sean gas fields. Peak storage has been developed to meet exceptionally 
high peaks in demand for gas which occur for short periods in severe winter 
weather. For this purpose British Gas uses gas from liquefied natural gas 
facilities and gas from underground storage cavities. 

In addition to increasing supply during the winter through the use of 
these facilities, British Gas may also limit the overall level of demand which 
needs to be satisfied by interrupting supplies to certain large industrial and 
commercial customers. Interruptible contracts give British Gas the facility to 
suspend supplies typically for up to an aggregate of 63 days within a year, 
although in practice little or no interruption takes place in milder winters. 

As well as seasonal variations in demand there are variations during the 
course of the day when maximum hourly demand may be as much as four 
times tiie minimum level. To meet daily variations in demand, gas is stored 
in local gas holders and within the transmission system itself. 

Since the introduction of natural gas from the North Sea in 1 967 British 
Gas has been able to satisfy increased demand during peak winter periods and 
has not been forced by peak demand to suspend supplies to its tariff or firm 
contract customers. 

The negotiation of new gas purchase contracts and the construction of 
new supply or storage facilities have long time scales. An important feature 
of the business is therefore the need to plan these future sources of supply 
and facilities several years in advance to meet forecast annual and peak gas 
demand, while retaining flexibility to help meet new developments in the 
market 






THE 


TUESDAY NOVEMBER 25 1986 




British Gas pic continued 


□□□□□□□□□□□□a 



4. Gs supplies 

(a) Gaswrchase contracts 

Alturreni natural gas production from the UKCS is either purchased 
or owneiby British Gas, with the exception of very small quantities used by 
other prducers in the manufacture ofchemical feedstocks. In the year ended 
31 si Mah, 1986 approximately 75 per cent, of the total gas supplied by 
British fas came from United Kingdom sources and the remainder from the 
Norwegm sector of the North Sea. Approximately 95 per cent, of total 
suppliesvas purchased by British Gas from third parties and the balance was 
product from its own interests. Currently there are some 27 fields or groups 
of fieldsmder contract to British Gas. 

reduction of UKCS gas began in 1 967 from the West Sole field in the 
Soothes Basin of the North Sea. By 1 972, four more Southern Basin gas fields 
wre inproduction and virtually all the gas from these first five fields (the 
“Early buthern Basin Reids") was, and continues to be, purchased or owned 
by Britih Gas. 

Acontinuing increase in demand for gas, particularly following the 
dramati rise in the price of oil in 1 973/74, led British Gas to contract for the 
purcfaasofgas from the Frigg field (the majority of which lies in the Norwegian 
sector othe North Sea) and the Brent field. The Frigg contracts were the first 
gas purfiase contracts under which the price varied solely as a result of 
energy -rial ed escalation factors. In consequence, changes in oil prices have 
had a mtch greater effect on the cost of supplies from Fri gg than on the cost 
of supples from the Early Southern Basin Fields. 

A f irthei increase in demand fbr gas during the late 1 970s and the 
beginning of tl e 1980s and the expectation that supplies from the Early 
Southern fiasis Reids vould start to decline led British Gas to enter into 
contracts hr tip purchase of gas from other UKCS fields, which were in 
general sigmjic ntly mort expensive to develop than the Early Southern Basin 
Reids. The nrires initial!: paid for gas from these recent UKCS fields were of 


the same onjeJas prices tren being paid for gas from Frigg. 

The proportion of gas taken from the Early Southern Basin Reids 
relative to die proportiontaken from other fields has declined over the years. 
In the yea r ended 31st Much, 1 982 61 per cent of total supplies came from 
the Early Southern Basin Fields. In the year ended 31st March, 1 986 the figure 
was 44 per cent, but h isnot expected to fall below 30 per cent of projected 
total supplies within the next five years. Supplies from Frigg accounted for 
approximately 31 per emt of total supplies in the year ended 31st March, 
1 986, but they are estimated to fell to less than 10 per cent of projected total 
supplies within the nex five years. 

\ 

\ Most British Gis purchase contracts provide for an initial term of 
\ approximately 25 yens, although they can terminate earlier if there are 
\ insufficient econom tally recoverable reserves in the field or if the relevant 
.government produrion consent should expire and not be renewed. 
.Production from a teld usually increases rapidly to a plateau lasting for a 
number of years. It aen declines progressively towards the.end of the field's 
Ife alihough, following re-negotiation and possible extension rtf' a contract, 
^jditioaal facilities nay be installed to offset declining production. 

i 

L The price paable for the gas is generally determined for the whole 
leigfo of the contret by reference to a base price and the operation of price 
vacation provision In addition, each contract commits British Gas to pay 
forWnnual or dailyiuantilies, whether the gas is taken or not However, there 
is flexibility in mot contracts fbr gas paid for, but not taken, to be taken or 
credited in later yeas. Take or pay balances due after one year increased from 
£36 million at 31s March, 1982 to £152 million at 31st March, 1986. No 
. balances carried frward under take or pay provisions have been written off 
and, on the basis /f its supply and demand projections. British Gas has no 
expectation of an write-offs in the foreseeable future. 

Prices pai/by British Gas under its gas purchase contracts vary widely. 
While the oven* average price. paid in the year ended 3i$t March, 1986 was 
1 7.2p per therr, the average price paid in that year for gas from the Early 
Southern Basi/Helds was very substantially below this level and the prices 
paid for gas frtn Frigg and recent UKCS fields were very substantially above 
this level. Frfrwing the Gas Levy Act 1981, UKCS gas purchased by British 
Gas under alcontracts entered into before 1st July, 1975 (and accordingly 
exempt fronilmted Kingdom petroleum revenue tax) has attracted a levy 
payable by Irtish Gas to ELM. Government, which currently stands at 4p 
per therm. 'tis took the overall, average cost of gas for the year ended 31st 
March, 198 to 19.9p per therm when the levy applied to approximately 65 
per cent, of il gas purchased. Under the Gas Act the levy may not be increased 
before lsi<pril 1992. 

The resent effect of price variation provisions under contracts for the 
Early Souiern Basin fields and under most other UKCS field contracts 
concludecbefore 1980 results in prices being determined largely by the rate 
of Unitec Kingdom general inflation, as measured by the Producer Price 
Index. Irthe case of other contracts, price variations are determined by 
referenceo the prices of competing feels, such as heavy feel oil, gas oil and 
electririt as well as (in some cases) the Producer Price Index and other price 
indicate*- In most contracts, price, variation occurs annually, so that prices 
in a give period reflect the level of the relevant indices in an earlier period. 
This mens that the effect of changes in the indices takes some time to work 
througho gas purcbasecosis, so that, for example, only pan of the fell in oil 
prices i the first half of 1 986 will be reflected in gas costs for the year ending 
31siMrch, 1987. 

he effect on overall gas purchase costs of changes in the price of 
oil depuds on a number of factors. Any explanation therefore involves 
assumtions and can be broadly indicative only. On this basis and taking the 
actual nix and quantity' of supplies to British Gas during the year ended 3 1st 
Marc! 1 986, a reaper cent, general movement in oilprices (from their average 
level ver the period from April to June 1986) would eventually lead to a 
movement of approximately four per cent in total gas purchase costs, 
assuirog exchange rates and all other factors remained unchanged. If the 
chang occurred at the beginning of a financial year; only a small proportion 
of xhi movement would occur in the first year, with most occurring in the 
secon year and the remainder in the third year. 

\1 though gas purchase prices are denominated in sterling, they are 
affeetd by changes in exchange rates. This effect is direct in cases where the 
variaion provisions include an indicator denominated in a foreign currency 
but cmverted into sterling, such as the price of crude oil, and indirect where 
a Uiaed Kingdom indicator which is itself sensitive to an exchange rate, such 
as havy fuel oil, is included. There is a further direct effect in the case of 
the kigg contracts because the price provisions include adjustments, which 
oper-te monthly, to take account of changes in the value of sterling against 
othe major currencies. Again only a broad indication of the impact of 
exchnge rate changes can be provided; on the basis of the ac tual mix and 
quaitiiy of supplies to British Gas during the year ended 31st March, 1986, a 
(en ier cent weakening of sterling against afl other currencies (from the 
avenge level over the period from April to June 1986) would lead to an 
jicnase of approximately six per cent in total gas purchase costs, assuming 
is collar oil prices and all other factors remained unchanged while on the 

! mi basis a ten per cent strengthening of sterling would lead to a reduction 
arproximatelv five per cent If the change occurred at the beginning of a 
lanrial year, well over half of the movement in gas purchase costs would 
cur in that year and almost aB the remainder in the following year. 

j 

l) Exploration and production 

J British Gas has been involved in exploration for petroleum since the 
d-i 950s and now has the largest single share (approximately I S per cent) 

_ proven and probable gas reserves in the UKCS. In the early years the 
iiolvement of British Gas was confined to joint venture arrangments, with 
<Aer companies as operators. Its first joint venture wefl in the North Sea war 
^h«ed in 1966: subsequently British Gas became an operator and drilled its 
offshore well in 1 974 when iheSomh Morecambe gas field was discovered, 
interests of British Gas in producing gas fields accounted for about five 
cent, of its total gas supplies in the year ended 31st March, 1986, These 
vines are accounted for under the heading of exploration subsidiaries. 

British Gas owns brteresis in 65 licences. » vering 55 blocks on tbe 
li CS 14 blocks off the coast of the Republic of Ireland, 10 blocks off the 
cck of Denmark (awarded in 1986) and a number of areas in Great Britain. 

U i operator for 22 of these licences. 


In the five years ended 31st March, 1986 British Gas was involved in 
drilling a total of 1 1 3 exploration and appraisal wells including 38 as operator. 
In this period 89 exploration weUs were drilled, 36 per cent, of which flowed 
petroleum on test. Past successes include a number of significant oilfield 
interests, notably the discovery of a major onshore oil field at Wytch Farm. 
Dorset in 1974 with British Gas as operator. However, in 1981 British Gas 
was directed under the Gas Act 1972 to dispose of its 50 per cent, interest in 
the licence covering the Wytch Farm oil field: this was completed in May 
1984. Under the Oil and Gas (Enterprise) Act 1982 British Gas was directed 
to dispose of its interests in five offshore oil fields and its interests in 20 further 
offshore blocks considered to have oil-bearing potential or where oil had 
already been discovered. These disposals were completed in 1983 and formed 
the initial assets of Enterprise Oil pic, although no British Gas staff were 
transferred to that company. The loss of these oil interests, for which British 
Gas was not compensated, means that the exploration and production 
achievements of British Gas are not felly reflected in the current level of 
petroleum reserves or in the profit record. 

The existing petroleum interests of British Gas have been reviewed by 
ERC Energy Resource Consultants Limited CERCT), independent petroleum 
consultants, whose report (including relevant definitions) is set out in Section 
VL Their analysis of the remaining petroleum reserves attributable to British 
Gas at 30th June, 1 986 is summarised below: 

Proven + Probable reserves Gas Oil and Condensate 

Bscf MMbbl 

Commercial 5,385 25.79 

Potentially Commercial 1,4 66 6.02 

Technical 802 43.70 

Tbe Commercial Reserves of British Gas are held in seven developed 
fields. Two of these, the South Marecambegas field, which represents about 80 
per cent of these reserves, and the Rough gas storage field, are wholly-owned 
interests of British Gas and are of strategic importance, being used as sources 
of supply to meet winter demand. The other commercial fields in which 
British Gas has interests are the Leman and Indefatigable gas fields in the 
Southern Basin of the North Sea and three small onshore oilfields in Great 
Britain. 

The Potentially Commercial Reserves are contained in ten petroleum 
discoveries. Seven are dry gas discoveries on the UKCS. including the North 
Morecambe discovery, and three are small onshore oil discoveries. 

The Technical Reserves are contained in 14 petroleum discoveries, 
mostly of gas and condensate. 


UOFCCAU8E FIELD 


5. The supply network rn__rt 

The supply network consists of pJ""r ,1 J 

high-pressure pipelines for bulk [” j 

transmission of gas and low-pressure P l — H ,-J~ 

mains forlocal distribution, together with _ri J 

seasonal supply and gas storage facilities. [“ U~ fjfr 

(a) The transmission and *-CT JJn r 

distribution systems H j? 

Natural gas is delivered by 

producers to five coastal terminals where, i* rp u '/_ Tl 

after treatment and measurement it —Tpl jU jL, JlfcfiL 

passes into the national transmission IJjjrJ 

system. The ' national transmission J IfS J | 

system carries the gas, in large volumes u p* V 

and at high pressure, from these coastal J 

terminals to over 100 locations spread 1 rt p 

around Great Britain, where il passes into “ H*** 

the regional transmission and j-* l \ 

distribution systems. [j- 1 

/ HryAVr 

The national transmission system “ 3Bec * t * EF * t0 Ln u 

consists of some 3,300 miles of pipeline liw f \ 

in sizes of up to 42 inches in diameter, 

operating at high pressure (up to 1,100 [ -* W tnnmtt mf _1 

Ibf/in 2 ). Fifteen compressor stations have Gr-r > 

been constructed at various points in the j 

system to restore pressure losses during I ****** 

transmission, thereby increasing the j — * 

capacity of the pipelines. The EJ 

compressors are driven by industrial. £ .J? J 

derivatives of high-powered aircraft gas 

turbines such as Rolls-Royce Avons and p — a — j'j 

RB-21 Is. Gas then passes into the p* 

regional transmission system, which . J / 

comprises approximately 7,650 miles of r-* \-J L jj- x J 

high-pressure pipelines. These convey | pw 

the gas to the main centres of demand. Lr^j“ 

At these centres gas passes from This map is provided f 

the regional transmission system to the and should not be taken as t 

distribution systems through pressure position or description of any 

reduction stations. The pressure is then 

reduced progressively until the gas 

reaches customers’ meters through individual service pipes, normally at 
around 0.4 Ibf/in 2 . The distribution systems consist of some 135,000 miles of 
low-pressure mains ranging from 2 inches to 48 inches in diameter and there 
are individual service pipes to nearly 1 7 million customers. 

British Gas attaches particular importance to the safety and security of 
supply of the transmission and distribution systems. It applies standards and 
codes of practice to cover the engineering procedures and activities of the 
system such as design, materials, methods of construction, testing, 
commissioning, inspection and maintenance. These standards and codes are 
based on British or international standards as appropriate and include codes 
published by the Institution of Gas Engineers. 

The transmission and distribution systems are also inspected regularly 
and routine maintenance is carried out to ensure safe, reliable and economic 
operations. An increasing number of transmission pipelines are inspected 
periodically from the inside using on-line inspection units developed by 
British Gas. A service is maintained 24 hours a day to deal with any plant or 
mains failures, public reports of gas escapes or other emergencies. British 
Gas believes that the transmission pipelines and distribution mains are in 
satisfactory condition and adequate in all material respects. 

In order to ensure that the distribution mains remain in satisfactory 
condition, British Gas is carrying out a programme to replace certain 
categories of these mains. Until the 1 960s distribution mams were 
predominantly made of cast iron. While many of these mains remain in 
good condition, a high and increasing proportion of new and replacement 
distribution mains laid in recent years has been made of medium density 
polyethylene and virtually all service pipes are now laid using this material. 
The replacement programme has mainly involved the replacement of cast 
iron mains in higher risk locations and was accelerated in the ten years ended 
3 1 st March, 1 986. In this period a total of 1 9.300 miles of cast, iron mains was 
replaced. Cast iron currently accounts for approximately 58 per cent, of 
distribution mains in use and polyethylene for 22 per cent The continuing 
programme is expected to result in a farther 8.700 miles of distribution mains 
being replaced over the next five years. 

In order to reduce costs and to improve efficiency, British Gas has in 
recent yearn introduced new techniques and equipment designs, several of 
which have been developed in its own research stations. The costs of 
excavation and surface disturbance have been reduced by the introduction of 
narrow trenching techniques for mains-laving and pneumatic “moles", which 
pull service pipes and small diameter mains either through the ground or 
through existing pipes. “Live insertion" techniques have also been developed 
by which smaller pipes can be inserted into existing mains without 
interruption of the gas supply. In addition, easily replaceable modules are used 
to regulate the gas flow in distribution mains. These modules are small enough 
to be installed underground, thereby reducing maintenance costs, the impact 
on the environment and the likelihood of equipment damage. 

(b) Seasonal supplies arid storage of gas 

The large volumes of gas needed to meet peaks in demand are provided 
by the following range of facilities: 


PROW SftENT HELD 

FBOM FWGG F«LD 

mCMFUUMttFCU) 

eon 


0) Seasonal supplies 

These facilities are designed to be operated for extended periods during 

the winter, when large quantities of gas can be drawn at short notice. 

• South Morecambe gas field 

This field is one of the largest gas discoveries made on the UKCS 
and is a wholly-owned interest of British Gas. Located some 20 
miles off the Lancashire coast, the facilities have been specially 
engineered to provide supplies of gas, initially during the winter 
only, fbr at least 40 years, instead of the more usual 20 to 30 years. 
The costs of producing ga s from this relatively shallow field have 
been reduced by adopting, for the first time on the UKCS, a “slam" 
drilling technique, which increases the reservoir area capable of 
being drained from each platform. Production of gas commenced 
on schedule in the winter of 1984/85 and maximum gas production 
capacity of about 1,200 million cu.fr per day (equivalent to about 
ten per cent of anticipated peak demand) is planned to be achieved 
by 1990. following completion of the second stage of the 
development. The construction of these additional facilities is 
scheduled to commence in 1987. 

• Rough gas storage field 

The Rough gas field, which is located in the North Sea less than 20 
miles from the Humber estuary, is now used for gas storage. The 
field first came into production in 1975, when British Gas held a 
50 per cent, interest. I n 1 980, when a large portion of the recoverable 
reserves had been extracted, British Gas purchased the remaining 
interest in the field In order to develop its use for gas storage, new 
facilities have been installed by British Gas, both ofishore and 
onshore. During periods of low demand gas is drawn from the 
national transmission system and compressed into the field at a 
pressure which, when the field is fully developed, is planned to rise 
to some 3,700 Ibf/in 2 . Gas can be withdrawn from the field for use 
in winter and il is planned that tbe maximum output rate will rise 
to about 1 ,000 million cu.fr per day (more than six times its original 
peak daily rate) by 1 988 when tbe development is completed. 

• Sean gas fields 

In addition to tbe seasonal supplies from the South Morecambe 
and Rough gas fields British Gas has contracted for the provision 
of seasonal supplies from the Sean fields, situated in the Southern 
Basin of the North Sea. The Sean fields are planned to supplement 
seasonal supplies, starting with the 1986/87 winter. 

On the day of greatest demand for gas in 

the 1985/86 winter the South Morecambe 
and Rough fields produced 690 million 
cu. ft, contributing 7.5 per cent, of the 
total supply for that day. 




British Gas: 

Simplified National Gas 
Transmission System 
Key 

■ CompressorSiaUn 

jm. LNG Storage 
Liquefaction Plan! 

m. Undergra/id Storage 
(SahCauayi 

A Producers Expomng 
& BG Recepoon Termnat 

Mainland and 

SutHnarrePpetae 


wdL. — w»we Gourm i 

J£s£-=f£ld Kpn I 

-EaunCIUi / / WDEPOTGAHtE 


•tv*;.. 





/ '"“I 

r u 

un afty 

P' 

•• Un>»» L>=-| 


/ 



This map is provided for the purposes of illustration only 
and should not be taken as giving any indication of the precise 
position or description of any pan of the transmission system. 


(ii) Peak storage 

These facilities are designed to meet 
exceptionally high peaks In demand for 
gas, which occur for short periods in 
severe winter conditions, and to 
maintain supplies in the event of a 
pipeline or other supply disruption. 
British Gas has built six major liquefied 
natural gas storage installations in 
strategic positions. Gas is liquefied and 
stored at atmospheric pressure and at a 
temperature of minus 160°C. under 
which conditions it occupies l/600th of 
its gaseous volume at standard 
temperature and pressure; it can then be 
re-gasified when extra supply is needed. 

Gas is stored fbr the same purpose in salt 
cavities, which have been hydraulically 
excavated nearly 6,000 ft below ground 
level at a site in North Humberside. Gas 
is compressed into the cavities at 
pressures of up to 4,000 Ibf/in 2 at periods 
of low demand, to be stored at about 
l/250lh of its volume at standard 
temperature and pressure, and released 
when needed. Four cavities are in use and 
three more are under development 

(Hi) Daily storage 

In order to satisfy peak customer 
requirements during the day, it is 
economical to have storage available as 
close as possible to the point of demand. 
Nearly 1,000 local gas holders, filled 
mainly at night, fulfil this function, 
while farther storage can be provided by 
using spare capacity in the transmission 
system. 


(c) Control of the supply network 

The transmission system is controlled at two levels. Central control of 
the national system is Headquarters-based, with one control room in London, 
concerned primarily with overall supply strategy, and another in the Midlands, 
responsible for balancing supply against demand for the wfaole country on a 
day-to-day basis. At the second level there are twelve separate regional control 
centres, each directly connected to the Midlands control room and responsible 
for meeting demand within its own Region. 

The control room in London is responsible for managing the offtake of 
gas from the fields. It also has responsibility for ensuring that contractual 
obligations are met and that planned contract quantities are taken. Projected 
demand for each day is based on estimates of demand made by the Regions 
which take account of forecast weather conditions. British Gas is normally 
required to give producers twelve hours' notice of its requirements for the 
following day. 

The national transmission system is monitored continuously from tbe 
Midlands control room by telemetry using an extensive microwave network 
owned by British Gas and supplemented by other telecommunications 
facilities. The control room collects data from about 200 points on the national 
transmission system and is able to control valves and some compressor 
stations by remote operation. 

Regional control centres are responsible for meeting the wide variations 
in demand experienced during the day. These centres have their own telemetry 
systems and operate in a similar manner to the Midlands control room. They 
monitor and control a large number of remote points on regional transmission 
systems, and can draw on gas stored in gas holders and in transmission 
pipelines. They also work closely with the Headquarters* control rooms in 
arranging for interruption of supply under sales contracts when necessary. 

6. Research and development 

British Gas undertakes research and development in three main areas: 
gas utilisation; gas transportation; and gas production and manufacture. 
Expenditure on research, development and testing in the year ended 31st 
March. 1986 amounted to £76 million. The main effort is deployed in five 
research stations and other specialist sites owned by British Gas. Work is 
also carried out in collaboration with universities and industrial concerns, 
including other energy companies, both in the United Kingdom and overseas. 

Research undertaken by British Gas has led to many important ad vances 
in gas-related technology, often with export potential Prominent among recent 
advances, foe most important of which are described above under “The 
market for gas" and “The supply network", have been the on-line inspection 
systems, developed to scan high pressure pipelines from foe inside for defects, 
using magnetic techniques and involving new micro-electronic technology. 

For the longer term British Gas has developed technology for producing 
substitute natural gas from a variety of feedstocks. Current work is 
concentrated on coal using a sla g gin g gasifier, which also has potential for 
chemical feedstock production and for electricity generation. 







40 


THE TIMES TUESDAY NOVEMBER 25 1986_ 



□□□□□□□□□□□□a 

7. Consultancy services 

British Gas offers a wide range of technology, products, expertise and 
services Tor sale overseas through its international consultancy service (“ICS"), 
which produced revenues of £2.5 million during the year ended 31st March, 

1986. ICS provides consultancy services covering all aspects of the gas 
business, including licensing of gas manufacturing and purification processes, 
and marketing the products of research. ICS operates on a commercial basis 
but does not take on the financial risks or funding of overseas projects. Since 
1 984 ICS has actively sought to exploit opportunities overseas, particularly in 
those countries where major gas developments are planned. 


British Gas pic continued I 6 


□□□□□□□□□□HDD 


# 


MANAGEMENT AND EMPLOYEES 

British Gas operates under the overall direction of an experienced 
Board. The Chairman is supported by a Chief Executive, a further six executive 
Directors (five of whom are Managing Directors, each with responsibility for 
specific business functions) and by four non-executive Directors. Mr. Jewers, 
one of the five Managing Directors, will retire from the Board in December 
1986 and will be replaced by Mr. Sutcliffe, who is already an executive Director 
of the Company. 

1. Directors of the Company 

Sir Denis Rooke, CBE, FRS, FEng (aged 62) has been Chairman of 
British Gas since 1976. He joined the gas industry in 1949; after bolding 
a number of engineering appointments he became full-time Member for 
Production and Supply of the Gas Council in 1966 and Deputy Chairman in 
1 971 He served on the National Economic Development Council from 1976 
to 1 9S0 and was a part-time Member of the British National Oil Corporation 
from I976to 1981 

Mr. R. Evans (aged 59) has been Chief Executive of British Gas since 
1 983. He has worked for British Gas since 1 950 with the exception of six years 
between 1956 and 1962. when he was employed by Burraah Oil Company 
Limited. In 1977 he became Chairman of the East Midlands Region and in 
1 982 Managing Director, Supplies, at Headquarters. 

Mr. C. VK Brierley (aged 57) is Managing Director, Economic Planning. 
He was appointed to this post in 1982 and became a Corporation board 
member in January 1985. Prior to this he was Director of Finance and then 
Director of Economic Planning at Headquarters. He joined British Gas in 
1970 from EMI Records Limited. 

Mr. C. £. Donovan (aged 52) has been Managing Director. Personnel 
since 1981 following his appointment as a Corporation board member in 
1981. He joined British Gas in 1966 from Richard Costain Limited and held 
a number of executive positions at regional level before being appointed 
Director of Industrial Relations at Headquarters in 1 977. 

Mr. w: G. Jewers, CBE (aged 65), who is a Certified Accountant and a 
Cost and Management Accountant, is currently Managing Director, Finance 
but is due to retire from the Board in December 1986. He was appointed to 
this post in 1 981 having been a Corporation board member since 1976. Prior 
to this he had been Director of Finance since 1 969. He entered the gas industry 
in 1,938. 

Mr. J. McHugh, FEng (aged 56) is Managing Director, Production and 
Supply. He was appointed to this post in 1982. having been a Corporation 
board member since 1979. He joined the gas industry in 1946 and held a 
number of executive positions at regional level before his appointment as 
Director (Operations) at Headquarters in 1975. Mr. McHugh is currently 
President of the Institution of Gas Engineers. 

Mr. VV R. Probert (aged 52) is Managing Director, Marketing. He was 
appointed to this post in 1982 and became a Corporation board member in 
January 1985. He joined British Gas in 1957 and held a number of regional 
and headquarters executive positions before his appointment as Marketing 
Director in 1 975 and then as Director of Sales in 1 977, both at Headquarters. 

Mr. A. Sutcliffe (aged 5QX who is a Cost and Management Accountant, 
will become Managing Director, Finance in December 1986, having been 
appointed a Corporation board memberon 1 si August, 1 986. He joined British 
Gas in 1970 from British Rail and has held a number of executive positions 
at regional level, being appointed a Regional Deputy Chairman in 1980. 

Mr. R. H. Boissier (aged 56) was appointed a non-executive Corporation 
board member in 1981. He is Deputy Chairman of Broadgate Holdings 
Limited (part of the Edward Lumley group), a Director of Pressac Holdings 
P.LC. and was an executive Director of Whessoe PLC from 1975 to 1983. In 
October 1 986 he was appointed a non-executive member of the Severn-Trent 
Water Authority. 

Mr. R. Greenhury (aged 50) was appointed a non-executive Corporation 
board member in 1976. He is Chief Operating Officer of Marks & Spencer 
P.LC and a non-executive Director of Metal Box P.L.C 

Sir Martin Jacomb (aged 57) was appointed a non-executive 
Corporation board member in 1982. He is a Deputy Chairman of Barclays 
Bank PLC and Executive Chairman of Barclays de Zoete Wedd Limited, 
having previously been a Vice-Chairman of Kleinwort Benson Limited from 
1976 to 1985. He is also a Director of Christian Salvesen PLC, Commercial 
Union Assurance Co. pic. The Daily Telegraph pic and is Deputy Chairman 
of The Securities and Investments Board. He became a Director of the Bank 
of England in May 1986. 

Sir Leslie Smith (aged 67) was appointed a non-executive Corporation 
board member in 1982. He is a non-executive Director of The BOC Group 
pic. having previously held the position of Chairman and Chief Executive of 
that company. He has been a non-executive Director of Cadbury Schweppes 
p.I.c. since 1977. 

2. Organisation and management 

British Gas is organised into a Headquarters and twelve Regions. 
Headquarters is responsible for formulation of policies, for co-ordination and 
for the direct management of centralised operations such as gas purchasing, 
exploration, bulk transmission of gas, negotiation of major industrial sales 
contracts, and research and development. Regions are largely responsible for 
customer-related activities, including the distribution and sale of gas, the 
retailing, installation and servicing of gas appliances, meter-reading and 
collection of accounts, and the maintenance of emergency services. 

The management structure of British Gas reflects the integrated nature 
of the business. The management of the Company is controlled by the 
Executive, comprising the Chief Executive and Managing Directors. There is, 
however, significant delegation of authority to the twelve Regions for the 
conduct of day-to-day business within a framework of central planning and 
control. 

Headquarters is organised into seven divisions covering production 
and supply, personnel, marketing, economic planning, finance, resources and 
external affairs, and research and development The first five of these are led 
by Managing Directors; the Chief Executive takes responsibility for the other 
two divisions. In addition there is a secretariat, led by the Company Secretary, 
which covers legal services, administration, property management and public 
relations activities. 

The Managing Directors and the Company Secretary are supported by 
twenty Headquarters Directors, who are not members of the Board. The 
Headquarters Directors head major segments of the seven divisions and the 
secretariat, some being responsible for centralised operations and others for 
policy formulation, planning and co-ordination of regional activities. 

Each of the twelve Regions is headed by a Regional Chairman and 
Regional Deputy Chairman, who are responsible for managing regional 
operations within national policy guidelines, operating against performance 
targets agreed annually with the Executive. Regional management structures 
follow a similar pattern to that of the Headquarters divisions. Regional 
Chairmen meet regularly with the Chairman and the Executive to Hwire 
policy matters. More detailed co-ordination of policy is achieved through a 
scries of national committees, reporting ultimately to the Executive. These 
committees cover specific functional activities and include representatives 
from Headquarters and each of the Regions. 

3. Employees 

At 3 1st March. 1986 British Gas had 89,747 employees of whom 4, 198 
were part-time. This total comprises 4,032 management and professional staff, 
9.582 technical and supervisory staff, 19.901 craftsmen and apprentices and 
56.232 clerical and other employees. In order to provide flexibility to cover 
fluctuating workloads, the work force is supplemented throughout the year by 
employees of outside contractors who are principally involved in laying mains 
and service pipes. At 31st March, 1986 this supplementary work force 
represented an equivalent of about 1 3.000 full-time employees. 


The number of British Gas employees has reduced in the past five 
financial years by about 16,000, while the average number of contractors’ 
employees has remained fairly constant The reduction in direct manpower 
has been achieved during a period of sustained business growth and reflects 
the attention paid to improving operational efficiency and the investment by 
British Gas in new technology. Despite the scale of the manpower reduction, 
a commitment to resource planning has enabled the majority of the reductions 
to be achieved by natural wastage, redeployment and control of recruitment. 

Approximately 90 percent, of the employees ofBritish Gas are members 
of trade anions recognised by the Company. Negotiation and consultation 
with these unions has been conducted formally for many years within National 
Joint Councils, whose constitutions provide for a reference to external 
arbitration by management or trade unions should they fell to agree. This 
facility has been used very rarely but is viewed by British Gas as important 
in a service industry where continuity of supply is of considerable significance. 
British Gas has indicated to employees and trade unions its intention to 
continue tbe personnel policies it has developed over the years in support of 
the business objectives of tbe Company. These policies relate principally to 
resource planning, training and development, the maintenance of appropriate 
reward systems and reliance on its well-established industrial relations 
arrangements. 

Manual employees received an increase of 6 per cent in basic wage rates 
plus improvements to other terms and conditions from 19th January, 1986. 
They have submitted a claim for 1987 and British Gas expects the negotiations 
to take their normal course. Annual negotiations in respect of salaries and 
terms and conditions of employment for staff and senior officers, and for 
higher managers, have still to be concluded. 

Over the last ten years significant national industrial action has been 
confined to a one-day strike in 1981 called by all the trade unions in protest 
against the possible disposal of the showrooms following the Monopolies 
and Mergers Commission Report on Appliance Retailing. Less extensive 
industrial action occurred in the same year in a number ofRegions when some 
shift-work staff took unsuccessful action in support of a pay claim. 

4. Employee share schemes 

The Company has established an employee profit-sharing scheme which 
will initially be operated in conjunction with the Offer for Sale. It has also- 
adopted an employee savings-related share option scheme. Details of these 
schemes are set out in Part E of Section VII. 

5. Pensions 

The large number of pension schemes which existed prior to 
nationalisation and those set up after nationalisation have in more recent 
years been progressively absorbed into the British Gas Corporation Pension 
Scheme (“BGCPS") for manual workers and the British Gas Staff Pension 
Scheme (“BGSPS") for all staff including management. Both provide for men 
and women at age 65 to receive a pension of l/60th of pensionable pay 
for each year of pensionable service. Annual pension increases in line with 
movements in the Retail Price Index have been paid consistently for many 
years. Should this practice cease at any future time, the roles of the two pension 
schemes require the scheme assets to be applied, to tbe extent necessary to 
meet all accrued benefits in respect of service then rendered (including future 
pension increases), before they can be used for other purposes. 

'Valuations of both schemes as at 1st April, 1 985, which were carried out 
by their actuary, R. Watson & Sons, confirmed that on the assumptions made 
(which included allowance for future salary and pensions increases) tbe assets 
of the schemes were sufficient to meet the past service liabilities by September 
1985 in the BGCPS and will be sufficient to meet the past service liabilities 
in the BGSPS by March 1987. British Gas pays contributions, as certified by 
the actuary, which together with members' contributions of 6 per cent, of 
pensionable pay are sufficient to maintain the solvency of the schemes. From 
1st April, 1986 the contribution of British Gas as a pe rc entage of total 
pensionable pay is 6.0 per cent, (rising to 8.4 per cent, from 1st July 1988) for 
the BGCPS and 23.4 percent (reducing to 12.6 percent, from 1st April, 1987) 
for the BGSPS. 

^ FINANCIAL SUMMARY 

1. Introduction 

Financial information on British Gas for the five years ended 31st 
March, 1986, the date to which the latest audited accounts were drawn up, is 
set out in foil in the accountants’ report (Section IV). Throughout this period 
British Gas has prepared its accounts under the current cost accounting 
convention. The objective of preparing current cost accounts is to ensure that 
tbe profits reflect the surplus arising from the operations of the business after 
allowing for the impact of price changes on the resources needed to continue 
the existing business and particularly after allowing for a depreciation charge 
which represents the cost of maintaining the operating capability of the 
business. The Directors regard this as particularly important for British Gas 
because its principal assets have long lives and accordingly replacement costs 
greatly exceed original historical costs. However, to facilitate comparisons 
with publicly-quoted companies, full historical cost financial information has 
also been included in the accountants' report. 

It is the intention of tbe Directors that British Gas should continue to 
prepare its annual accounts under the current cost convention and to include 
audited historical cost financial information in the annual accounts in line 
with its current practice. 

As a nationalised industry British Gas was significantly influenced by 
H.ML Government in its financial affairs. The pattern and level of its profits 
and cash flow in recent years are of limited relevance since they have been 
materially affected by the application of financial targets agreed with H.M. 
Government and since results will in the future be affected by the new capital 
structure. The targets specified a rate of return on capital employed to be met 
and operational efficiencies to be achieved over a period of years as well as 
annual levels of funds to be generated from operations. The pricing policy 
adopted by British Gas reflected these financial targets. 

The target rate of return agreed for the four-year period ending 3 1st 
March, 1987 was an average annual current cost operating profit of four per 
cent on average total assets less current liabilities at current cost Over the 
first three years the average annual return achieved was slightly in excess of 
this target The second target was a twelve per cent reduction in net trading 
costs per therm of gas sold in the year ending 3 1st March, 1987 as compared 
with the year ended 31st March, 1983. For this purpose, net trading costs 
comprised operating costs of the Corporation except depreciation, 
replacement expenditure and current cost adjustments; costs were measured 
in constant prices using the Producer Price Index and the volume of gas sales 
was measured at seasonal normal temperatures. This target was met within 
three years. The third target was an annual level of cash generation and this 
was attained in each of the last five financial years. 

All financial targets agreed with H.M. Government will cease to apply 
when British Gas leaves the public sector: 

2. Assets 

At 31st March. 1986 the net assets of British Gas amounted to £18.183 
million on a CCA basis and £7,467 million on an HCA basis. Of these amounts 


fixed assets accounted for £16,765 million and £6,050 million respectively. 

made up as follows: 

CCA 

HCA 


£ m illion 

£ million 

Land and buildings 

1,190 

363 

The pipeline system 

13,778 

4,t 1 1 

Gas and oil fields 

1,609 - 

1,420 

Other 

188 

156 


16.765 

6,05G 


fa) Land and buildings 

British Gas owns some 1 2,000 acres of land (approximately 4,400 acres 
of which are used in connection with the national transmission system) and 
a wide range of properties throughout Great Britain. Land and buildings are 
subject to regular revaluation and the results of the most recent revaluation 
were incorporated into the current cost balance sheet at 31st March, 1986. 
This revaluation was carried out by professionally qualified surveying staff of 
British Gas. ... 



British Gas has two principal categories of 
properties: non-specialised properties, which consist crar °* 
showrooms, warehouses, workshops and residential urns; 3d specialised 
properties, which are predominantly service depots and operaifeal sues. The 
net book value of non-spcdalised properties at 31st March. 1 56 «*s W20 
million on a CCA basis, equivalent to their open market va e, and £162 
million on an HCA basis; the net book value of specialised prteroes at the 
same dale was £734 million on a CCA basis, equivalent to tiM act current 
replacement cost, and £200 million on an. HCA basis. No si Je property 
accounted for more than five per cent of the aggregate bool ralne (on a 
CCA basis) of all British Gas properties. Surplus property acc ints for the 
remainder of land and buildings. 

(b) The pipeline system 

The pipeline system indudes not only transmission and istribmion 
mains and service pipes but also meters, plant and machinery mch as gas 
reception terminals and compressor stafionsX nod storage feci lit ; (including 
Rough). The net book value of this system ax 31s* March, 1936 nounted to 
£1 3,778 million on a CCA basis and £4,1 11 million on an HCA tsis. 

(c) Gas and oH fields 

Tbe net book value of the gas and ofl field installation! was £1.609 
million on a CCA basis and £1,420 million on an HCA basis at list March, 
1986. Of these, the installations at the South Morecambe field, deluding the 
related offshore and onshore support fertilities, accounted for £1533 million 
and £1,366 million respectively. ! ■ 

i / 

(d) Capital expenditure 

The capital expenditure of British Gas ovef : 

is summarised below: 

1982 
£ 

million 


years 


Land and buildings 
The pipeline system 
Gas and oil fields 
Other 

Total 

Tbe above includes 
expenditure on South 
Morecambe and 
Rough of 

Total excluding 
expenditure on South 
Morecambe and 
Rough 


28 

272 

84 

59 


443 


117 


326 



Capita] expenditure of approximately £500 liliion (including 1140 
million for South Morecambe and Rough) is projected W tbe current financial 
year. Capital expenditure for the next few years is prcected to continue at a 
similar level, including a total of approximately £400 liliion on the second 
stage of the South Morecambe development. Future apital expenditure is 
expected to be financed primarily from internally genelied funds. 

3. Cashflow 

In each ofthefest four financial years British Gas s achieved a positive 
cash flow notwjthstandiz® the high level of capital exp iditure and over the 
last five financial years taken as a whole it has generaldan aggregate 
surplus in excess of £600 million. A large number of iisustomere are billed 
on a quarterly cycle, accounting for over 50 per cent. € revenue from gas 
sales, which compares with its obligations to make montL payments under 
gas purchase contracts. In addition, during tbe course of Jch year cash flow 
is particularly affected by the seasonal nature of the busina.. British Gas has 
generally met these additional demands for working caps] arising in the 
second half of the financial year (particularly from Janua- to March), by 
using its cash resources and by borrowing in the short-term jpney markets. 

4. Capital structure 

During the five years undo* review the business of fitish Gas was 
financed mainly by retained reserves. As a consequence of tbAransferofihe 
business of the Corporation to the Company on 24th August] 986 changes 
have been made to the capital structure. These include the insfer of the 
liability for the then outstanding £214 million British Gas 34 Guaranteed 
Stock, 1990-95 to H.M. Treasury and the issue to H.M. Goerament of 
ordinary share capital and an unsecured £2,500 million debemtf (for which 

no cash was received). The net effect of these changes has been tAicrease the 

indebtedness of British Gas by £2,286 million. Further details^? given in 
Part B of the accountants’ report. 

5. Profit record 

The profit record of the Corporation for the five years ended 3kt March, 
1986 is set out below on a CCA basis and on an HCA basis. This fcord has 
been restated to take account of the divestment of certain oil inttests (see 
Part A of the accountants’ report) but has not been restated to taiqacoount 
of the new capital structure of British Gas. 

Years ended 3 1st March 


Number of therms 

1982 

1983 

1984 

1985 

1986 

sold (millions) 

16,876 

16,463 

17,281 

17,744 

1,701 

CCA 

£ 

million 

£ 

million 

£ 

million 

£ 

million i 

£ 

llion 

Turnover . 

5,106 

5,833 

6395 

6,914 

',687 

Cost of sales 

(2,719) 

(2,947) 

(3,387) 

(3,984) 

,598) 

Gross profit 

2,387 

2,886 

3,008 

2,930 

,089 

Operating costs 

(2,003) 

(2,142) 

(2,173) 

(2,279) 

,401) 

Operating profit 

384 

744 

835 

651 

688 

Net interest receivable 

46 

59 

74 

61 

94 

Profit before taxation 

430 

803 

909 

712 

5782 

Taxation 

087) 

(231) 

(154) 

088) 

B80) 

Profit for the year 

243 

572 

755 

524 

402 


HCA 

Turnover 
Cost of sales 

Gross profit 
Operating costs 

Operating profit 
Net interest receivable 

Profit before taxation 
Taxation 

Profit for the year 


•t 

million 

£ 

million 

£ 

million 

million 

5,106 

(2,641) 

5,833 

(2,888) 

6395 

(3,352) 

6,914 

(3,918) 

2,465 

(1,768) 

2,945 

0,898) 

3,043 

0,932) 

2,996 

(2,065) 

697 

46 

1,047 

59 

1,111 

74 

931 

61 

743 

087) 

1,106 

(231) 

1,185 

054) 

992 

(188) 

556 

875 

1.031 

804 



i ; 


i:ooi 

9- 

UO 

(3») 


elements tanggascosefwhicii are sensitive to movements in Sus X 
oil pace and the staling exchange rate) and the weather Howevff 
the movements in profits over the five yearn was an'um^d ? r l? eriy ? 
number of therms sold by British Gas. P trend m 




•i !. 






4 : 






tj* \Sp 


□□□□□□□□□□□□ 


THE TIMES TUESDAY NOVEMBER 25 1986 


British Gas pic continued 


□□□□□□□ 


{ 


' ! T1 operating profils for the years ended 3 1 si March, 1982 and 1983 
35 a direct result of substantial increases in tariff prices in 1 980. 
7 | 31 This was in line with a government policy of increasing 

: omestjas prices by 1 0 per cent, per annum in real terms over the three-year 
enod lorder to ensure that prices reflected the economic cost of supply. In 
- nbsequt years British Gas kept tariff price increases at or below the rate of 
iflatiodespite significant rises in gas costs, since it was on course to meet 
' ie fineial targets. The effect of these two factors on operating profit in the 
ear end 3 1 st March, 1 984 was counterbalanced by volume increases in the 
omest and commercial markets (largely as a result of the weather being 
3 o« er 1111 |5revlous winter). However, in the year ended 31st March, 
?85 joss profit was reduced by a significant increase in gas. costs, due 
arucurly to the general depreciation of sterling in that year. In the year ended 
1 st Mth, 1 986 the severe winter weather gave rise to volume increases in 
ie dorrstic and commercial markets. This led to an increase in profitability, 

: artiall offset by an increase in the cost of gas purchased which was not 
■flectein tariff prices. In the five years ended 31st March, 1986 British Gas 
rhievfl an average annual pre-tax return on net assets of 4.8 per cent, on a 
OAbsis and of 19.5 per cent, on an HCA basis. 

I I feather 

"he turnover and profits of British Gas were affected by particularly 
witters in the financial years ended 31st March, 1982 and 1986 and by 
njd walher iq the winter of the year ended 31st March, 1983. Abnormal 
sc;ond temperatures have a direct effect oh turnover, but the effect on 
pi fitabliiy is raore complex because of the resulting changes in costs. In cold 
w thei the add ional demand from tariff customers is met by supplies from 
th low-cost Ea y Southern Basin Fields fts weD as the seasonal and p eak 
st< ige facilities while the increase in revenue from that additional demand 
m e than offset the reduction in sales to interruptible customers. It is difficult 
to ssess the eflfi :t of weather on profits in any partic ular year because of its 
int action with e venal factors such as the mix of supplies, the pattern of sales 
am consumer tphaviour. However; it is estimated that in the year ended 3 1 st 
Me ch, 1986 tn operating profit increased by about £100 million as a result 
of tie cold ueaftiei; both on a CCA and on an HCA basis. 


fcf\ Turrwpr 

Tots turnover showed year-on-year growth of 1 4, 10, S and 1 1 per cent. 
. dising lb five years under review. In each of those years the gas supply 
busi ness ccounted for more than 90 per cent of turnover and annual increases 
in the tunover of the gas supply business of 1 5, 10, 8 and 1 1 per cent, were 
I. achievet Increases in the average price per therm of gas sold accounted for 
\ 18. 5, 5and 6 per cent, respectively, while the difference was attributable 
\ - primary to changes in the number of therms sold. 

\ (i) (as prices 

\ Paring the period under review there were year-on-year increases in 

\ weragp domestic prices per therm of 25, 5, 4 and 4 per cent In the 

industrial market increases in average prices of 7, 5, 10 and 8 per cent. 
~ \ vere recorded, while in the commercial market they amounted to 14, 

1, 5ancij5 percent. 

'• \ Therms of gas sold 

‘ \ The number of therms of gas sold increased by 1 1 per cent, during the 
\ five yetrs under review. After falling by approximately 2 per cent, in the 
\ year eided 31st March, 1983 the number of therms of gas sold rose by 
\ approimaiely 5, 3 and 5 per cent, in the following years. However, 
\ Britisi Gas estimates that, if sales are adjusted to seasonal normal 
-■ . uempratures, year-on-year growth of approximately 1. 3, 3 and 4 per 
~ 'cent was achieved. During the five year period the number of therms 
Wdrtcreased by 1 3 per cent, in the domestic market (accounting for 
\2 p* cent of the total increase), 4 per cent, in the industrial market 
\nd- 1 per cent, in the commercial market 


; (d) costs 

leverage cost per therm of gas purchased (including gas levy) rose 
from lii per therm in the year ended 31st March, 1982 to 1 9.9p per therm 
in the yr ended 3 1st March. 1986, an increase of 62 per cent The annual 
increase this period were 14, 12, 16 and 10 percent 

Cages in the mix of supplies, largely resulting from the decline in the 
proportf) of gas taken from the Early Southern Basin Fields relative to the 

• proponn taken from other fields, accounted for approximately one fifth of 
•' • this tot increase in gas costs, equivalent to an increase of approximately 14 
- per renin the average cost per therm purchased over the period under review. 

On theasis of the current projections of British Gas, however, it is expected 
. t hat chigcs in the mix of supplies over the next five years involving reductions 
in qualities of g3S purchased from the Early Southern Basin Fields and from 
... Frigg til increase the average cost per therm purchased by less than half this 
... percerage. 

he remaining four fifths of the increase was principally attributable to 
the opntion of price variation provisions m gas purchase contracts. Through 
these >rice variation provisions, general inflation (as measured by the 
‘ Prqduer Price Index), increases in oil prices and the decline in the value of 
steriiig against the US. dollar and European currencies contributed 
; signifrantlv to the increase in gas costs. As a result of the time lag inherent in 
the oje ration of the price variation provisions, foe very substantial fall in oil 
price* in the first quarter of 1986 had a negligible impact on gas costs for the 
year aided 3 i st March. 1 986. 

(e) Operating costs 

These comprise distribution costs and administrative expenses and 
prinepaily include payroll costs and depreciation. They increased in total 
from E2.003 million in the year ended 31st March. 1982 to £2,401 million in 
the yiar ended 3 1st March.' 1986 on a CCA basis, an increase of 20 per cent 
On an HCA basis, operating costs increased from £1,768 million to £2,142 
million, an increase of 21 percent. The year-on-year percentage increases were 
7. 1. 5 and 5 per cenL on a CCA basis and 7, 2, 7 and 4 percent on an HCA 
basis. 

Payroll costs in total, including the element charged to cost of sales, rose 
bv only 15 per cent over the five-year period white the number of employees 
Tell by some i 6.000 to 89,747 at 3 1 st March, J 986. 

Depreciation charges showed a steady increase during the five year 
eriod. primarily reflecting the expansion of the supply network. 

During the five-year period British Gas achieved operating efficiencies 
id volume increases which are reflected in the movement in operating costs 
■r therm sold in the gas supply business. On a CCA basis the percentage 
rrcases/! decrease) were 8, (2), ! and 1 and on an HCA basis the percentage 
/ :reases/(decreases) were 8. (1). 3 and (1). These compared with the 
/ rcemage increases rn the Retail Price Index over the same period of 7. 5, 5 
! aj t>. The price formula applicable to the tariffsector under the new regulatory 
nime will give British Gas a particular incentive to continue to reduce 
o;rating costs per therm in real terms in the gas supply business. While the 
pit success of British G3S in reducing these costs may be relevant to an 
asrssment of the possible effect of the price formula, it cannot necessarily be 
regrded as a guide to the future. . 

(f) Replacement expenditure 

British Gas charges replacement expenditure as a trading cost although 
a mmber of companies capitalise such expenditure. Since 1st April 1975 
Sritsh Gas has charged the cost of replacing certain categories of fixed assets 
rprircipalk mains, services and meters) against the profit and loss account, 
capitalising onlv that expenditure which represents an extension to. or a 
.igni fleant increase in. the capacity of those assets. The table below illustrates 

* hat the effect would have been on the HCA operating profit and fixed assets, 
fall replacement expenditure had been capitalised and subject to depreciation: 

Years ended 3 1 si March m 

?9S? I9S3 J9S4 1985 J986 

£ million £ million £ million £ million £ million 

nercase in operating • 

profit 186 2 1 3 230 238 243 

umuJative increase 
in net book vaiue of 

ftvcdaL:, ' ' 2» 502 732 970 1.213 


In the current cost accounts foe capitalisation of replacement 
expenditure would not affect the total depreciation charge nor the book value 
of fixed assets. 

(g) Exploration and production 

The exploration and production activities incurred losses in recent years 
as a result of the decision to continue with a full exploration programme after 
the divestment of the oil-producing interests of British Gas. 

(h) Taxation 

British Gas is subject to United Kingdom corporation tax, the statutory 
rates of which for the last five financial years were 52 per cent, for the years 
ended 31st March, 1982 and 1 983, 50 per cent. for the year ended 31st March, 
1984, 45 per cent, for the year ended 31st March, 1985 and 40 per cent for 
the year ended 31st March. 1986- The rate for the year ending 31st March, 
1987 has been set at 35 per cent The rates of capital allowances have *ten 
been reduced in recent years. For capital expenditure incurred on eligible 
plant and machinery, the capital allowances available in the year of acquisition 
were 100 per cenL up to 13th March, J984. 75 per cenL up to 31st March. 
1985 and 50 per cent in the year ended 31sl March, 1986. The current rate is 
25 per cent 

During the earlier years of the period under review the effective rates of 
corporation tax payable by British Gas on HCA profits (the basis on which 
corporation tax is assessed) were substantially less than the statutory rates. 
This was because there was significant capital expenditure during this period 
when the rates of capital allowances were high. As referred to in Note 1 3 of 
Part A of the accountants’ report no provision for tax deferred by capital 
allowances was required. With foe reduction of rates of capital allowances and 
lower levels of capital expenditure, the effective tax rate on profits increased 
in foe year ended 31st March, 1986 and, on foe basis of current expenditure 
plans, it is expected that the effective rate will now continue at approximately 
foe statutory rate. Nevertheless, timing differences on accelerated capital 
allowances are not expected to crystallise, and therefore no provision for 
deterred tax is required. 

United Kingdom petroleum revenue tax (“PRT") at a rate of 75 per 
cent is chargeable on a field-by-field basis on profits from production of 
petroleum from United Kingdom and UKCS fields, after royalties (up to 12.5 
per cent) where applicable, and after various costs, production allowances 
and other adjustments. British Gas has not been liable to PRT to date in 
respect of production from its existing petroleum interests. Petroleum from 
its producing fields, apart from South Morecambe and certain small onshore 
fields, is exempt from PRT because foe gas is sold to the Company under 
contracts entered into before 1st July. 1975. Expenditure on South Morecambe 
has prevented a PRT liability arising on that field to date and foe first PRT 
liability on South Morecambe is not expected to arise until foe late 1990s. 
although some provision for deferred PRT may be required in the early 1 990s. 


^ OUTLOOK FOR THE FUTURE 
1. Profit forecast 

(a) Background to the profit forecast 

In view of the seasonal nature of its business, British Gas normally 
generates all of its annual operating profit during the winter months and the 
results of foe first half of its financial year usually show a loss. 

The unaudited operating results of British Gas for the first quarter of 
foe current financial year show a higher profit than for foe same period of foe 
previous year, but foe 1986 results were affected by a number of exceptional 
factors (see Section V). However, when the performance of the business since 
30th June. 1 986 is taken into account, it is expected that foe operating results 
for foe first half of the current financial year will be broadly in line with those 
for foe same period of the previous year and are expected to show a small loss 
on an HCA basis and a larger loss on a CCA basis. Both turnover and gas costs 
were lower than for foe same period in the previous year. The fell in turnover, 
which was more marked in foe second quarter, was almost entirely due to a 
substantial reduction both in the number of therms sold and in selling prices 
in foe interruptible contract sector. Turnover in the firm contract sector was 
comparable with that for foe previous year while turnover in the tariff sector 
was higher, largely as a result of colder weather. 

The profit forecast for the full year reflects an expected reduction in 
turnover compared with the previous year. The turnover in foe tariff sector is 
projected to be slightly higher than that of the previous year. For the year as 
a whole there is expected to be a very substantial reduction in the turnover of 
the interruptible contract sector and some reduction in the firm contract 
sector, although a modest recovery in the number of therms sold in foe 
interruptible contract sector is expected during foe second half of the financial 
year. 

The profit forecast also reflects an expected significant fall in gas 
purchase costs (principally as a result of more favourable exchange rates and, 
to some extent, lower oil prices) which should offset foe loss of turnover in 
the interruptible contract sector. 

In comparison with the previous year, the operating results will benefit 
from expected higher production from the South Morecambe field. Operating 
costs will increase broadly in line with inflation after allowing for this year’s 
reduction in pension fund contributions and despite foe costs associated with 
the flotation. Additionally, the fall in gas purchase costs will result in the 
current cost working capital adjustment being a credit (thereby increasing 
CCA operating profit); in previous years foe adjustment has been a charge 
(thereby reducing CCA operating profit). For this reason foe forecast envisages 
an increase in CCA operating profit greater than foe increase in HCA operating 
profit 

# ' 

The forecast includes the effect of colder than average temperatures 
experienced in the first part of this financial year but it is based on the 
assumption that seasonal normal temperatures will prevail for foe remainder 
of the year. In comparing the forecast with the results for foe previous year 
foe increase in operating profit in that year resulting from foe colder than 
average winter should be noted. 

(b) Profit forecast 

The Directors consider that, in foe absence of unforeseen circumstances 
and on the assumptions set out in Section V (in particular that there will be 
average weather conditions in foe coming winter), the operating profit, ibe 
profit before taxation and the profit after taxation for the year ending 31 st 
March. 1 987 are unlikely to be less than foe amounts set out in foe table below: 


CCA 

£ million 
787 
836 
442 


Profit forecast for the year ending 31st March, 1987 


Operating profit 
Profit before taxation 
Profit after taxation 


HCA 

£ million 
1,030 
1.07! 
677 


The forecast profit before taxation includes interest charges (payable 
from 8th December. 1986) of £86 million on foe debenture issued to H.M. 
Treasury. 

(c) Pro forma profit and earnings per share forecast 

If foe new capital structure had been in place for foe whole of the year 
ending 3 1st March, 1987 (see Part B of foe accountants’ report) the related 
interest charges for the year would be £269 million. On this basis the pro 
forma profit before taxation, profit after taxation and earnings per share would 
be as follows: 


CCA 

£ million 
671 
362 
8.7p 


Pro forma forecast for the year ending 31st March, 1987 


Profit before taxation 
Profit after taxation 
Earnings per share 


HCA 

£ million 

884 

575 

13.9p 


Subsequently, foe Directors expect to rccorr.mcr:; Ir. 
financial year an interim and a final dividend which w.'u .'.cr-r. :> 
in March and October respectively. Ir. foe absence <>.' , 
circumstances, the Directors intend to tie ic -".foe- 
reference to the profit after tax at current cost. 

If the Offer for Sale had taken place at she b.-grTfori 
year and foe new capital structure had been irt . mrow.N. • • 
Directors would have expected, on the basis <v the pr.'-.l- ' 
above, to recommend dividends totalling 6.5 iv-.a- per C r : • 
(equivalent to 9.2 pence per Ordinary Share inc;u:i.J < . 

notional dividends represent .? gross yield, as O 
approximately 6.8 percent. Compared with the nr:.- Crn-’i re 
per Ordinary Share, they would have been co-. ered : . ' J i~re- . r.. : 
cost earnings of 8.7 pence per share and 2.15 b. . 
earnings of 1 3.9 pence per share. 

3. Business prospects 

British Gas has always sold gas in com petit :c-n ■: r ’.. 

Directors are confident that it w:ii continue iO •'jrrrr.r 
future. 

fa) Domestic market 

British Gas has built up a very strong costlier- ;r t.t-: -• - - . r 
market and in the foreseeable future it expects :o rer*--. 
supplier of natural gas to this market. British G_j has ^ : r 

250.000 domestic customers in each of foe .: si force i . 1 : 
Directors arm to expand the market for gas fun r.e:. bvfo > '• . 
houses, by active marketing. A rr ijor consent of *.>■; - 

come from new installations of gas centra! I rearing [• 

will continue to use its appliance tracing ccti v i:y tr. pro.rec 1 v 
domestic customers buying new- or replacement equipme.-- ' -. . 
heating. The main competition in foe domestic msri..: : r. • - 
electricity, but foe Directors expect that o-er foe nev: fe-. 
maintain its competitive edge and that gas sales in ;r.e cjr;c- :v - 
continue to show steady growth after atlu-.vfog tor the eCfec ■; .? •' • • 

(b) Commercial market 

In the commercial market the expect i . 

consumption of energy as a resal: o' g-re -fo o .'r.c s>.n :c 
economy. !□ this market, where there ~ on - -y- . . . 
the Directors believe that gas prict-s ufo. jrer-.-re!. be co - .v 
there is good potential for further saies £- o -v.i. 


(c) Industrial market 

In foe industrial market competitive pres *:■ res to:;: 
response, particularly where customers are ac*;e to 
and an alternative fuel. In foe non-premium ccr.irec: tec*.:: c- 
market British Gas responded to the reduci •: r, fo cr. 
by lowering prices to interruptible comrxc. e vt.v 
substantial fell in therms sold; however, to!' Z"*v: 6 .• ~ 

prices, some sales volumes have been rev, ■ c':t. 
non-premium market are closely linked io hto * , r. L . ?: . ; 

which cannot be predicted with any cer:t ; r.;>. ofo ’ Gjs ~ 

adopt a responsive position in this sector w-.'th i;-. : — 

profitable business. In this it wi'.l be /si.r.cd r; 

gas costs resulting from the fail in o.i pr ce>. t r ' 

not be realised unlit the year er.-i: r • « 5 st - st-: • 


In the premium coniraei wen.r of r : : 
over foe last year has increased competition L-c- 
maintained its volume of sales with so*: r.e reave cj r ■ 

believe that the premium- qualities of £^s as a fuel 
compete effectively and that there are good prc-c . 
sector in the medium term. 




(d) Competition in gas sxpp y 

In addition to competitor: with -r . ; 
potential since 19S2 fer competition frer. ^ .*;* . : . 

“common carriage” provisions *vh ; :h aii av. : v:.- : . 

foe British Gas supply network although ro fore r .- :..v. ! . s 
of these common carriage rights. The provisi..--.i ,v 
rights to third panies but retain certain ss;cg j^r^s V.r r ' 


289 502 732 970 1.213 


2. Dividend forecast 

For the current financial year foe Directors expect to pay a single 
dividend which, in the absence of unforeseen circumstances, is expected to be 
4.0 pence per Ordinary. Share pet (equivalent to 5.6 pence per Ordinary Share 
inclusive of tax credit), payable in October 1987. 


The Directors are unable to assess ib? c ter: 
will take advantage of the faciiir-. to sell d. 
Britain. Existing contracts for foe pi. re;; :?e of z .-.i 
new contracts to replace existing supplied t 

assumption foal the Company w:i.‘ cc-nrin 1 --: : o rr\ ;\ 
for gas. If a substantial proportion c : ir.c r_s cc.~. 
sector were to be lost as c result oi suopj.. 
would be a significant adverse crec: or. pr- ft 
requirements to meet the lovJer derr. 3 nd>. T “.f -c •. . : 
effect arising from downward pre>;L:.r on ~..'j “ 
However, it is unlikely that common c, • : . : 

before 1 990 because of the lead time .. j.i'.d :c o- 
and British Gas intends to compete .e ? in . • : 

(e) Future gas supplies 

British Gas has supplies under con -;.:: w 
years. The Directors believe that supplies under 
contracts currently at an adxanced su?: of n."... 
producers should be sufilcient to meet eas dertii-.::. 
some five to seven years ahead. During '.-.v: r : e.L f •. 
continue to negotiaie for foe further supvtics c." : ••= 
demand forecast for foe mid and ia:e Iv-I.i. 7,.-; 
potentially available to Europe with subsic^ii^i 
already discovered but unde\eicped or> thv J. t 
the North Sea and further e field. Subject to re:.-. ..-.: 
British Gas intends to rrfeei its further sup; re: . • ; ' 
sources. 


ff) South Morecambe 

British Gas has recenfo. started :: 
development of the Sou-h Morecambe !V_. 
strategic significance as a source of :• ; 
Notwithstanding the initially low levels ;Tr . . . 
a growing level of profits and cash flow .i . * 

(g) Other business sc tkrhS&s 

The Directors recognise that there be •; 
Company’s activities by building on its existing si 
will be wider opportunities io use i-.s evp:r:'.i> ■> 
production, where British Gas already h;«? sr, 
interests, and it plans to extend its sci!v.:,c> 
opportunities arise. British Gas wj!i 
opportunities in areas where i'.scxjstirg techr.c ■ . - 
can be more widely exploited. 

(h) Regulation 

British Gas is not subject \o pr-.-: : ■ 
of its current turnover, li is *•- 

under the formula j; can retiif tre f. r 

the extent that it is abie to Pv.'l.t ; -I ' . 
the achievement cf further c is; r-: . 
time, foe Directors «;!' aim c . 
over foe next ils e >ear^. 

(i) Conclusion 

The Directors recogr.ru.' :r.zi l c re - :• a ; 
constraints, which will follow the m? ; :v ; 
wider commercial oppcru,n ■;!£.•> i:\-~ 
believe that there are good prc^pec: - . 
business. 




THE TIMES TUESDAY NOVEMBER 25 1986 


□□□□□□□□□□□□a 


Bntrsh Gas pic continued 


□□□□□□□□□□□do 


# SECTION II 

RELATIONSHIP WITH 
H.M. GOVERNMENT 

A. REMAINING government interest 

Shan»c^ 0 ^ OW,1D ® ^ or Sale H.M. Government will retain sufficient Ordinary 

retainLt«i? 1CU Sharc t l onus entitlements. Where H.M. Government has more shares 
thnspiL* 211 ^ Pe ? u ' re ^ 10 satisfy outstanding bonus share entitlements, it will sell 
anH r vwf* ,ls discretion after consultation with N M Rothschild & Sons Limited 
does n f ■ 35 to ^ timing and the manner of the disposaL The Secretary of State 

ni L ' ntend ,0 exercise any of the voting rights attaching to the bonus shares 
^though he reserves the right to do so. 

he S fT yUu ^' of State will also hold a Special Share. This share, which may only 

rionf ° ^ 3 ™' n i sler or 0, her person acting on behalf of the Crown, does not carry any 
gnts to vote at general meetings but entitles the holder to attend and speak at such 
"teeUngs. Certain mailers, in particular the alteration of specified Articles or Association 
1 the Company findjdtng the Article relating to limitations which prevent a person 
owning or having an interest in 15 per cent or more of the Ordinary Shares in British 
squire the prior consent of the holder of the Special Share. Further details relating 
l o the Special Share are set out tn Section vu. 

. Th® Company has issued to H.M. Treasury an unsecured debenture of £2.500 
minion repayable in tranches from 1987 to 1991 This debenture is not transferable 
.trom ine Crown. Further details of the debenture are set out in Section VII. 

B. COMMERCIAL RELATIONSHIP 

Following the Offer for Sale the commercial relationship between British Gas as 
supplier and H.M. Government as customer will continue to be on a normal customer 
and supplier basis. In the year ended 31st March. 1986 purchases of gas from British 
Gas by H.M. Government and otherCrown bodies totalled approximately £1 50 million. 

C. PETROLEUM LICENCES 

Licences to search for and produce petroleum onshore and from the UKCS are 
granted by H.M. Government. Normally each licence details specific work obligations 
to be carried out by the licensee and contains provisions requiring periodic payments 
(and. where appropriate, royalties), controlling assignments of any rights under the 
licence to thini parties, and giving H.M. Government the power to revoke the licences 
in pertain circumstances, for example where a licensee has failed to observe the terms 
and conditions of the licence. The development of a discovery is subject to approval by 
the Secretary ofStatcofa development and production programme including maximum 
and minimum rates of production for various periods. H.M. Government has power 
under the licences to control the rates of production. In the event of British Gas deciding 
to acquire or apply for further licence interests. H.M. Government would treat it on the 
same basis as any other private sector exploration company. 

D. GAS IMPORT/EXPORT POUCY 

In 1985. while British Gas was a nationalised industry. H.M. Government 
decided not to endorse a draft contract negotiated by the Corporation for the purchase 
of gas from the Norwegian Sleipner field. Subsequently the Secretary ofStaic announced 
on 6lh March. 1986 that British Gas would in future be able to import gas subject to 
the normal requirement for consent under the Petroleum and Submarine Pipe-lines Act 
1975 for the Iqying of pipelines across the UKCS and. in appropriate cases, the 
conclusion of inter-governmental treaties. British Gas has given an assurance to the 
Secretary of State that it will consult H.M. Government about its import plans as these 
develop. 

Under the terms of UKCS licences all petroleum produced from the UKCS has 
to be landed in the United Kingdom unless the Secretary of State consents to landing 
elsewhere. On 6th March. 1986 the Secretary of State also announced that H.M. 
Government was prepared to consider applications for waivers of Lfae landing 
requirement for gas on a case-bv-case basis. In doing this it would take imo account 
considerations relating to the security of the United Kingdom's gas supplies without 
any presumption that exports should not lake place in present circumstances. 


ATTITUDE OF OPPOSITION PARTIES TO PUBLIC OWNERSHIP 

The policies of Opposition parlies are the responsibility of the parties concerned. 
Set out below is a summary of recent developments and public statements which H.M. 
Government believes may be relevant in this context. 

In its 1983 manifesto, the Labour Party stated that it would “return to public 
ownership the public assets and rights hived oftby the Tories, with compensation of no 
more than that received when the assets were denationalised". When the Gas Bill was 
debated in the House of Commons on 10th December. 1985. the Rl Hon. Stanley 
Orme MP. speaking from the Opposition Front Bench, indicated that a future Labour 
Government would reacquire the assets of British Gas. On 2nd October, 1986, the 
Labour Party Conference agreed a resolution endorsing a policy statement by the 
National Executive Committee. Inter alia this statement included references to the 
intention that the next Labour Government should take public utilities fully back into 
“social ownership". It also said that Labour would establish a British Gas and Oil 
Corporation. The statement included detailed information about the strategy for 
bringing British Telecom into full social ownership: British Telecom shareholders would 
be required to exchange their voting shares for marketable non-voting securities, or 
accept a return of no more than the flotation price. A resolution to acquire shares in 
privatised companies without compensation was rejected. No resolutions on public 
ownership of British Gas were adopted by either the Liberal or Social Democratic 
parties at their recent conferences, but in debates in the House of Commons on the Gas 
Bill. Mr. Malcolm Bruce MP indicated that Alliance policy would not be to seek 
^nationalisation but to promote competition and introduce Lighter regulation. 


SECTION III 

REGULATORY ENVIRONMENT 


A. INTRODUCTION 

The supply of gas through pipes is subject to a regulatory regime, established 
under the Gas Act. which is designed to ensure that all reasonable demands for gas are 
satisfied when it is economical to do so and that gas suppliers are able to finance 
the provision of gas supply services. Under die regulatory regime there are detailed 
provisions to protect the interests of gas customers. With certain minor exceptions, the 
regulatory regime docs not apply to the business activities of British Gas other than its 
primary activity of the supply of gas through pipes. 

The Gas Act incorporates, with some modifications, many of the statutory rights 
and obligations which previously applied to the Corporation and. in some cases, its 
predecessors. The main new features introduced by the Gas Act are the appointment of 
a Director General of Gas Supply (the “Director General"), who is responsible for 
operating and enforcing the regulatory regime, and a system for authorising the supply 
of gas. subject to regulatory conditions. Unlike the statutory rights and obligations, the 
conditions of an authorisation can. in general, be modified without further legislation, 
so ensuring a degree of flexibility to cater for changing circumstances. Modifications of 
conditions may be made by the Director General with the consent of the gas supplier 
or following a reference to the Monopolies and Mergers Commission (“MMO. 

The regulatory regime as applied to the Company distinguishes between the larifT 
and contract sectors of the gas supply market. In view of the relatively limited scope for 
competition associated with gas supply to consumers who take small quantities of gas. 
the tariff sector has been made subject to certain regulatory requirements, particularly 
a astern of price control. In the contract sector the Company is required io publish 
certain information on pricing, but otherwise is free to negotiate contracts, subject to 
general competition law. 

B. THE GAS ACT 

Under the Gas Act an authorisation is required to supply gas. except for supplies 
to premises using more than two million therms per annum. There arc two categories 
of suppliers of gas to whom an authorisation may be granted. One category comprises 
those authorised by the Secretary or State to supply gas through pipes to premises in a 
defined geographical area, such suppliers being known as “Public Gas Suppliers"; the 
Companv falls within this category and is the only Public Gas Supplier although there 
are procedures to authorise other Public Gas Suppliers within Great Britain. 4n the 
second category, the authorisation is restricted to the supply of gas to specified premises 
or classes of 'premises. 

The Gas .Act sets out a number of obligations for a Public Gas Supplier. Such a 
supplier must develop and maintain an efficient. co-ordinated and economical system 
of gas supplv and. subject to this, must comply with any reasonable request fora supply 
of gas where this is economical. A Public Gas Supplier also has a specific obligation to 
supplv upon request, any premises within 25 yards of a distribution main (subject to a 
maximum rate of 25.000 therms per annum i These obligations are similar to those 
imposed on British Gas under the Gas Act 1 972 but the Gas Act 1986 extends the 
specific obligation to supply to premises already connected to a distribution main 
(subject to the same maximum rate). 

In addition.a Public Gas Supplier is required to meet certain safety requirements, 
tn complv with prescribed standards of gas quality, and to charge tor gas according to 
the number of therms supplied, in general, for supplies of 25.000 therms per year or 
less, there an; requirements for the use of published tariffs as a basis tor charging 
and these tariffs must not show undue preference or undue discrimination in their 
application. There are also requirements limiting conneciiun charges for a gas supply. 
In addition to these obligations, a Public Gas Supplier must comply with a statutory 
Public Gas Supply Code, which includes detailed provisions relating to gas escapes, the 
maintenance of service pipes and ihe supply and maintenance of meters. A Public Gas 
Supplier must also comply with any directions given by the Secretary of Slate on the 
criming 0 fan authorisation which prohibit the unfair commercial use of information 
obtained by H in the course or negotiations for any supply of gas to n. Such directions 
have been given to the Company. 



The Gas Act also gives a Public Gas Supplier certain powers similar to those 
conferred on the Corporation by the Gas Act 1 972. These include powers in appropriate 
circumstances to break up streets for the purpose of laying pipes, to purchase land 
compulsorily and to enter premises, as well as procedures for disconnection. 

The Gas Act continues provisions to enabl? third parties to use gas pipelines 
owned by a Public Gas Supplier (“common carriage"}. The Director General may 
specify- the terms on which a Public Gas Supplier may be required to convey gas for 
another supplier when it has spare capacity, or increase the capacity o£ or otherwise 
modify, a proposed or existing pipeline to accommodate another supplier's gas. Any 
terms of charge for common carriage specified by the Director General must entitle the 
Public Gas Supplier to recover the proportion of its costs and return on capital, which 
reflect the use made of its pipeline system. The Gas Act also enables the Director 
Genera] to specify the terras on which a Public Gas Supplier must make gas available 
to third party suppliers with common carriage rights, but this is only required when 
third party suppliers are temporarily unable to obtain gas from other sources and when 
the Public Gas Supplier can make gas available without prejudicing its own statutory 
and contractual obligations. 

C. THE DIRECTOR GENERAL 

The first Director General, James McKinnon, was appointed by the Secretary of 
Slate on 1 8th August, 1986 fora three-year period. He was previously Finance Director 
of Imperial Group PLC and is a former President of the Institute of Chartered 
Accountants of Scotland The Director General is supported by a staff of about 20 at 
the Office of Gas Supply. 

The Director General is responsible for enforcing both the conditions of a Public 
Gas Supplier’s authorisation and the principal obligations imposed on it directly by the 
Gas Act. For this purpose he may make an order requiring compliance, which is 
enforceable in the Courts. Contravention .of such an order by a supplier can result in 
liability for damages to third parties suffering loss. The Director General is also 
responsible for initiating modifications to the conditions of a Public Gas Supplier's 
authorisation, which relate to the tariff market, and for monitoring developments in 
the gas supply market. 

Both the Director General and the Secretary of State have a duty to carry out the 
functions assigned to them by the Gas Act in a manner best calculated to secure that 
authorised gas suppliers satisfy all reasonable demands for gas where it is economical 
to do so and that they are able to finance the provision of gas supply services. Subject 
to this duty, the Director General and the Secretary ofState must exercise their functions 
in a way which protects the interests of gas consumers (in respect of the prices charged 
and the other terras of supply, the continuity of supply and the quality of the gas supply 
services provided;-, promotes efficiency and economy in gas supply, encourages the 
efficient use of gas; protects the public from danger; and enables effective competition 
for supplies exceeding 25,000 therms per ann urn. They m ust also take particular account 
of certain needs of the elderly and the disabled in respect of the quality of the gas supply 
services provided. 

The Director General is independent of the Secretary ofState. In certain limited 
circumstances the Secretary ofState may give general directions to the Director General, 
who may only be removed from office on grounds of incapacity or misbehaviour. 

D. THE GAS CONSUMERS' COUNCIL 

The Gas Act also creates a new Gas Consumers’ Council which replaces the 
former National and Regional Gas Consumers' Councils. The new Council is an 
independent body, whose main function is the investigation of complaints; it may also 
give advice to the Director General on matters relating to tariff customers. 

E. THE AUTHORISATION 

Since 24th August, 1986 the Company has been authorised as a Public Gas 
Supplier to supply gas to any premises within Great Britain. The Authorisation, which 
is publicly available, imposes the requirements mentioned below, in the form of 
conditions. 

The Company is required to take all reasonable steps in setting its prices for tariff 
customers to secure that in each financial year the average price does not exceed a 
maximum determined by a price formula. The price formula, which is summarised in 
Part F below, comes into effect on 1st April, 1987. Until then tariff prices may not be 
increased. 

Although standing charges for tariff customers are part of the maximum average 
price subject to control by the price formula, the Authorisation also requires that 
standing charges should not be increased by more than the cumulative percentage 
increase in the Retail Price Index from the base level in December 198S while the price 
formula is in operation. 

The Company is required by the Authorisation to publish separate accounts for 
its gas supply business. The basis of allocation of any revenue, costs, assets and liabilities 
between gas supply and the other business activities must be reported to the Director 
General and his approval sought for any changes. 

The Company is also required to publish certain other information. This indudes 
publication of a schedule of maximum prices for gas supplied in the contract sector and 
of a statement relating to its pricing policy in that sector information concerning the 
arrangements for common carriage and back-up supplies, giving examples of the prices 
which would be charged for common carriage; codes of practice for tariff gas supplies 
and payment ofbills; a summary of the principles by which charges for new connections 
are set; and information on the efficient use of gas. 

Other requirements of the Authorisation cover the provision of an emergency 
service to receive reports of gas escapes; special services for the elderly and the disabled; 
the provision of information to the Director General and Gas Consumers' Council; and 
payment of an annual foe to the Secretary ofState to cover the costs of regulation. 

The conditions of the Authorisation may be modified at any time by agreement 
between the Company and the Director General, unless the Secretary ofState objects. 
The Director General may also refer to the MMC at any time matters relating to Ihe 
supply of gas to tariff customers and may propose modifications of the conditions of 
the Authorisation which, in his opinion, could remedy or prevent the effects specified 
in the reference which are or may be adverse to the public interest. The MMC is then 
required to determine whether these matters operate, or may be expected to operate, 
against the public interest and in so doing the MMC must have rcgaid to the duties of 
the Secretary ofState and the Director General If the MMC considers that such a matter 
may operate against the public interest and proposes modifications to the conditions 
of the Authorisation, the Director General must then make the modifications which he 
believes to be necessary to remedy or prevent the adverse effects identified by the MMG 

The Company does not have any right to require a modification of the conditions 
of the Authorisation. However, it can request the disapplkation of the price control 
condition with effect from a dale not earlier than 1st April, 1992. If it does so, the price 
control condition will cease to apply unless a reference to the MMC is mqde by the 
Director General and the MMC concludes that the cessation of the condition in whole 
or in part would or might be expected to operate against the public interest. 

The Director General does not have the power to refer to the MMC matters 
relating to gas supply lo contract customers. The contract sector is subject to general 
competition law. If any reference to the MMC under that law results in an order being 
made by the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry in relation to the supply of gas 
to contract or tariff customers, he may also modify the conditions of the Authorisation 
to give effect to the order. 

The Authorisation runs fora minimum period of 2 5 years and may be terminated 
thereafter by the Secretary of State, provided at least ten years’ prior notice has been 
given. The Authorisation could, however, be revoked before its expiry on various 
specified grounds including insolvency, cessation or business, non-compliance with 
enforcement orders made by the Director General and non-compliance with orders 
issued by the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry under certain provisions of 
general competition law. 

F. PRICE FORMULA 

The price formula, which only applies in the tariff sector, is set out below; 

RPI, -2 

M, =U+ io6““ ) * P '-‘ + Y, - K, 


maximum 

average 

price 


non-gas component 

calculated from: 


factor to adjust the 

previous 

previous year’s x 

year's 

non-gas component 

non-gas 

by the change in the 

Retail Price Index 
less two percentage 
points 

component 



negative 

correction 

factor 


where 

M, «= the maximum average price per therm in year t; 

RPI, = the percentage change in the Retail Price Index between that 

for October in year t and that for the preceding October; - 

Ph = the non-gas component of the price per therm in the prior ■ 
financial year, t-1: 

Y, - the gas cost per therm in year t; 

Kt * the correction factor per therm to be made in year t (the 

correction factor will be positive if in year t-l the actual price 
charged exceeded the maximum detennined by the formula, 
negative if the actual price was lower than the maximum); 

and where t represents the relevant financial year. 



The broad effect of the formula is lo divide the maximum pnee per therm in w key 
components, one relating to the cost of gas. and the other a non-gas comport! 

The gas component (denoted by Y in the formula) is effectively the av ».■ cos 
in pence per therm to the Company of obtaining gas. The major pan comprises merit 
by the Company to its suppliers. For gas produced by the Company itself trance » 
deemed to be the market price as determined by the Inland Revenue foroatioi 
purposes. The Authorisation also provides for certain other costs to be incltm suet 
as the gas levy and capacity charges. Prepayments under take-or-pay arrangerfits ar 
generally included in the gas costs component in the year in which delivery ods. 

\ 

The non-gas component (denoted by P in the formula) is an amount in dee pc 
therm, changes in which arc limited Lo the change in the Retail Price Indexes tw» 
percentage points (RPI— 2). The starting point for the non-gas component usjin th 
determination of the maximum price for the first year of the formula's opera n. th 
year commencing 1st April. 1987. will be equal to the average tariff price in th^rren 
financial year less the average cost of gas in the current financial year. 

An important feature of the price formula is that it sets the maximum | ce fo 
each financial year by reference to the gas cost and the Retail Price Index in ti l yea 
In setting its price, therefore, the Company needs to forecast the component of lb 
price formula for the year ahead. Because forecast and out-turn are unlikely to bt xaeff 
the same, the price formula incorporates a third component, the correctio factr 
(denoted by K in the formula). The correction factor allows for any u$er ir 
overcharging in one year to be corrected subsequently. After the end of each ljanctl 
year, if the average price actually charged by the Company in that year differs f m k 
maximum calculated according to the price formula, a correction correspond ir to w 
difference is made in the calculation of the maximum for the next year after hakng 
two adjustments. First, there is an addition to the correction representing yer’s 
interest on the amount of the correction, at a market rate, in the case where ihcprit is 
less than the maximum, or at three per cent, above the markeL rate in the cast wire 
the price is in excess of the maximum. Secondly, an adjustment is male to takcicccnt 
of any change in the number of therms supplied from one year to itu next 

The Authorisation provides for involvement by the Di recur General if tere 
‘ are significant errors in forecasting. If the average price actually clargedcxceediihe 
maximum determined by the formula by more than four per cent, of the max mi m 
price, the Director General must be given an explanation by the Company and mui be 
satisfied that a further excess is not likely before the Company is alloved lo inerca? its 
prices in the next yean If the excess in one year added to the excess in', the next ear 
comes to more than five per cent- of the maximum average price in the Vecond olthc 
two years, the Director General may intervene to set prices in the third ytarat a level 
which in his judgement would be unlikely to exceed the maximum averageyricc in that 
year Finally, if the average price actually charged is lower than the maximum by lot 
per cent, in each of two successive years, the Director General may limit thejorreclidi 
carried forward to the following year to ten per cent. \ ; 


SECTION IV 

ACCOUNTANTS' REPORT 


The following is the text of a report from Price Waterhouse, the reporting accountants: 

The Secretary of State for Energy 1 

The Directors, British Gas pic < 

The Directors, N M Rothschild & Sons Limited i 

The Directors. Klein wort Benson Limited 

Southwark lav’s 
32 London Bridge Si* 1 
Utfon SE1 -Y 
21st November, 86 

Gentlemen. \ 

British Gas pic (the “Company") was incorporated on 1st April. 1% and nec 
that date has not prepared any financial statements for presentation to harehders 
and has not declared or paid any dividends. The Company did not trail unti24th 
August. 1986. at which date the property, rights and liabilities (other thafthc ritrsfa 
Gas 3% Guaranteed Stock, 1 990-95) of the British Gas Corporation veedn the 
Company. \ 

We have audited the financial statements of the British Gas Corporatjrand its 
subsidiaries (the “Group") for the five years ended 3 1st March. 1986. Thftancial 
information set out in Fart A below has been based on these financial state nils after 
making such adjustments as we consider appropriate and has been prepai under 
two conventions: the current cost convention described in Statement ofandard 
Accounting Practice Number 16 and the historical rest convention. OurworMs been 
carried out in accordance with the Auditing Guideline "Prospectuses and the jorung 
accountant" ; 

In our opinion the financial information set out in Part A gives a trucid fair 
view of the profit and source and application orfunas of the Group for each five 
years ended 31st March, 1986 and of the state of affairs of the Group at the end - each 
of these years under the current cost convention and the historical cost convenjn. 

No financial statements of the Group have been audited for anyferiod 
subsequent to 31st March, 1986. j 

The pro forma financial information for the year ended 31st March. 1 9S6.hich 
incorporates the effect of implementing the new capital structure of British Gasjc. is 
set out in Part B below. In our opinion this pro forma financial information hasten 
properly prepared on the basis set out in the notes thereto. [ 

A. FINANCIAL INFORMATION | 

Hie information in this Part has been prepared using the accounting pdcies 
adopted currently by British Gas pic and by the Group in its financial statement for 
the years ended 31st March, 1985 and 1986. These policies differ in certain resjects 
from those which were applied by the Group in financial statements of earlier 4ars. 
Adjustments have been made to the profits and net assets shown by previously publlhed 
financial statements in order to apply policies consistently throughout the five jars 
ended 31st March, 1986. In addition, adjustments have been made to eliminate the 
results, assets and liabilities (other than certain residual balances) of the oil interests 
which were divested in 1983 and 1984 without compensation. Hie adjustments which 
have been made to the results are summarised in Note (21). I 

Accounting policies j 

The information in this Pan has been prepared under thecurrem cost con venjion. 
in accordance with Statement of Standard Accounting Practice Number 16. and uider 
the historical cost convention. | 

Under the current cost convention, provision is made in the financial 
information for the effects of specific price changes on the resources necessary to 
maintain the operating capability of the business. 

The principal accounting policies adopted for current cost purposes are noted in 1 
paragraphs (a) to (i) below. These accounting policies apply equally to the historical cost 
financial information except as described in (b), (c) and (g) below. . 

i; 

(a) Basis of consolidation 

The financial information consolidates the financial statements of the British 0 
Gas Corporation and each of its subsidiaries for each of the five years ended 3 1st March 3 
1986. ’ -j 

rj 

(b) Tangible fixed assets j ! 

Current cost valuation: Fj 

Tangible fixed assets are stated in the current cost balance sheet at their value to : * 
the business, being current replacement cost less accumulated depreciation. Additions^ 
are included at actual cost, after deducting grants and capital contributions fromy 
customers. I: 

Expenditure on the field development of gas and oil reserves is that expenditure-! 
incurred on tangible fixed assets following a decision to develop such reserved 
commercially. ’•'] 

The value to the business has been assessed on the following bases: ■'! 

(i) land and buildings— valuation by the Group's professional surveying staff on 3 

continuous basis; * 

(ii) regional mains, services, meters and storage — application of calculated rndusri' 
average unit replacement costs to the physical distances or quantities in use; ar 

(iii) all other tangible fixed assets, including the national transmission system ant 

field development of gas and oil reserves— indexation of historical costs using 
appropriate indices. j 

_ The assessment of value to the business involves certain estimates being made. . 
These estimates may be subject to continuing revision in future years as more 
information becomes available. 

Depreciation: 

The assets refereed to in sub-paragraphs fi) to (iii) below arc subject to straight ■ 
line depreciation, while the assets referred to in sub-paragraph (iv) below are subject to * 
throughput depreciation. 

(i) Freehold land is not depredated, but the gross value to the business of buildings * 

standing thereon is depreciated over varying periods, depending on the type of j 
construction, with a maximum of fifty years. . I 

(ii) The gross value to the business of leasehold premiums is depreciated over the ^ 
period to the next rent review. Specialised leasehold buildings arc depredated' * 

• over the term of the lease or fifty years, whichever is the shorter. . fe 










(iii) 


The disiribution systems anH «n L 

ra «* sufficient to write off ^ “*** ”* <kP«**ied at 

estimated useful lives. Tbp F 051 of individual assets over their 

Hows: P 1100 P eri ods fbr the principal categories of 


estimated useful uvt 
assets areas follows: 


British Gas pic continued I 9 


Consolidated historical cost profit and loss accounts 

Years ended SJsr Starch 


□□□□□□□□□□□□a 


(3) Operating profit 

Operating profit is stated after charging: 




. t 

. ~i 

,/ri 


-i 



4 

; i 

■ \ 
i 

i 

"4 

t 

J 

i 

■■ t. 


i 


55 >‘3rv— distribution mains 

48 yeais— transmission pipelines 
43 years national transmission system 

40 holden and brick orcoacr** aorage 

30 years— service pipes 

20 years— meters, metal storage tanks and plant and machinery 
10 years— electronic and electrical control equipment 

5 * furniture, fittings and office machinery 


,,V) OTtiTsuchlime as ° f 635 oU reserves k not depreciated 

production hascommeirari 1 ^" CQmmenc ^ s fr om the fields concerned. When 
including estimated fieW develo P tneDls ’ 

dMreciated on the rhr*v,SI!!\. l if e - ,0 L oor !! p,etJOn ,n current cost terms, is 
produced each year fro^'fh^r 5 ^ reference to the v oiume of gas and oil 
referable reLr^f, «“"!»»«* with the total estimated 
^ fields Both the estimates of recoverable reserves 

and to ™=sofd c p^l^S'^^ Pm,!n,S an "“ ally 

Replacement expenditure: 


of tamuW,i5tStVrnri 5 r^ e S£? up ! iascha, *e4*e *»* of repiaringcerlaio categories 

^ddtton TStp'S S SSSSS 

1 expendlture ’ historical cost depreciation and supplementary 

SSmrarv dSlS t ^ epr ? se ? 1 * e total current cost depreciation char^t. 
Sufptanentary depreciation is that additional sum necessary to bring the aaregateof 

CW?SIS 30(1 0051 depredation up to a full SSm? cost 

y - 10 ^ tevel «f wpbeeroeart expenditure is 

compensated by a movement in supplementary depredation. 

Historical cost: & 


Tangible fixed assets in the historical cost balance sheet are stated at actual cost, 
after deducting grants and capital contributions from customers, leas accum ulated 
depreciation (except as noted below) provided to write off cost over the estimated useful 
Me of eacb asset. 

Depredation is not provided on certain categories of tangible fixed assets 
(principally mams, services and meters) acquired prim* to 1st April, 1975 because 
replacement expenditure, which represents the renewal of such assets, is written off 
when incurred. The asset lives outlined above have been applied rn preparing fri«nvrirai 
cost financial information. 


fcj Stocks 

Stocks are stated in the current cost balance sheet at current cost less provision 
for deterioration and obsolescence. In the historical cost balance sheevstocks are stated 
at cost less provision for deterioration and obsolescence. 

(d) Site restoration costs 

Licensees of United Kingdom Continental Shelf oD and gas fields are required 
to restore the sea bed at the end of the producing fives of the fields to a condition 
acceptable to H.M, Government. Provision is made for site restoration costs, raimiaipri 
field by field principally on a throughput basis similar to that used for depreciation. 
Estimates of such costs (based on price levels at the balance sheet date), which are 
subject to considerable uncertainty, are reviewed annually 

(e) Deferred taxation 

Deferred taxation, in respect of accelerated capital allowances and other timing 
differences, is provided only to the extent that it is probable that a liability orassei will 
crystallise. 


(f) Turnover 

Turnover represents the value of gas sold (less standing charge rebates) which 
includes an assessment of gas consumed but not yet invoiced to customers, together 
with the value of appliances sold and services rendered. 

(gi Current cost working capital adjust men ts 

The cost of sales adjustment is the difference between the current cost at the date 
of sale and the historical cost of stocks sold. It is calculated by applying appropriate 
indices, to reflect changes in input costs, to average stocks of gas, appliances and 
installation materials. 

The monetary working capital adjustment represents the movement in working 
capital attributable to changcsm input pricesdnring the year, 1 1 has been calculated using 
appropriate indices and average monetary working capital during the yean Monetary 
^working capital comprises debtors and payments in advance, accrued revenue for gas, 
hire purchase and deferred payment accounts and sundry stocks, less trade and sundry 
creditors. 

fhf Research and development expenditure 

Expenditure on research, testing and development is written off when incurred. 



Notes 

1982 

im 

1984 

ms 

1986 



£m 

Cm 

Cm 

Cm 

Cm 

Turnover 

(1) 

5,106 

5.833 

6.395 

6.914 

7.687 

Cost of sales 


(2.641) 

(2J88) 

(3.352) 

(3.9 IS) 

(4.539) 

Gross profit 


2.465 

2,945 

3.043 

■>996 

3.148 

Disiribution costs 


(1.257) 

(1.328) 

(1.340) 

(1.421) 

(1.494) 

Administrative expenses 


1511) 

(570) 

(S92) 

(644) 

(648) 

Historical cost operating 







profit 

(2bW3) 

697 

1.047 

1.111 

931 

1.006 

Net interest receivable 

(4) 

46 

59 

74 

61 

94 

Historical cost profit before 







taxation 


743 

1.106 

1.185 

992 

1.100 

Taxation 

(5) 

(187) 

(231) 

(154) 

(188) 

(380) 

Historical cost profit for the 







year 

<14b) 

556 

a— .a— s 

875 

1.03 1 

804 

- : 

720 

Consolidated historical cost balance sheets 







.41 31a March 



Notes 

1982 

1983 

1984 

1985 

1986 



Cm 

Cm 

Cm 

Cm 

Cm 

Fixed assets 







Tangible assets 

(6b) 

3.439 

44)45 

5,002 

5,665 

6,050 

Current assets 


• 





Stocks 

(7) 

158 

180 

181 

187 

175 

Debtors 

(8) 

1,310 

1.566 

1.730 

1.905 

2.086 

Investments 

(9) 

511 

708 

739 

758 

939 

Cash at bank and in hand 


24 

17 

33 

30 

25 



2.003 

2,471 

2,683 

2.880 

3.22S 

Creditors (amounts felling 







due within one year) 

(10) 

(1.014) 

(1,216) 

(1,364) 

(1,429) 

0.556) 

Net current assets 


989 

1.255 

1.319 

1.451 

1.669 

Total assets less current 







liabilities 


4.428 

5,300 

6,321 . 

7,116 

7,719 

Creditors (amounts felling 







due after more than one 







year) 

00 

(372) 

(366) 

(353) 

(340) 

(217) 

Provisions fbr liabilities and 







charges 

(12) 

(19) 

(22) 

(25) 

(29) 

(35) 



4,037 

4,912 

5,943 

6,747 

7,467 

Reserves 

(14b) 

4,037 

4,912 

5,943 

6,747 

7,467 


Consolidated statements of source and application of funds 

fears ended 31a March 



1982 

1983 

1984 

1985 

1986 


Cm 

Cm 

Cm 

Cm 

Cm 

Source offends 

Current cost profit before taxation 

430 

803 

909 

712 

782 

Supplementary depredation 

Current cosl working capital 

242 

248 

248 

221 

269 

adjustments 

7! 

55 

28 

59 

49 

Historical cost profit before taxation 

743 

1.106 

L185 

992 

1.100 

Historical cost depredation 

96 

107 

117 

139 

162 

Provision for site restoration costs 

2 

3 

3 

4 

6 

Funds generated from operations 
Proceeds from disposal of: 

841 

ljl6 

1,305 

1.135 

1,268 

tangible fixed assets 

7 

7 

12- 

10 

24 

oil field mieresi (Note (9)) 

— 

— 

— 

85 

— 

Total funds generated 

S48 

12123 . 

1.317 

1.230 

1.292 

Application of fends 

Taxation paid 

13 0 

173 

235 

131 

262 

Additions to tangible fixed assets 
Increase/(decrease) m working 

443 

719 

1.088 

812 

571 

capital (Note (16)) 

321 

97 

(46) 

93 

267 

Total fends utilised in operations 

894 

989 

1.277 

1.036 

1.100 

Movement in investments/borrowings 
Investments— increase 

91 

197 

31 

19 

181 

Bank loans and shorMerra 

• 





borrowings— (increase)/decrease 
Creditors (amounts felling due after 

(146) 

31 

(4) 

162 

(112) 

more than one year)— decrease 

9 

6 

13 

13 

123 

Net funds genera ted/(absort>ed) 

(46) 

234 

40 

194 

192 


(if Exploration expenditure 

Expenditure on exploration for gas and oil is written off when incurred. 


Notes to the financial information 


Consolidated current cost profit and loss accounts 

tears ended 3 la March 



Notes 

1982 

1983 

1984 

1985 

1986 



Cm 

Cm 

Cm 

Cm 

Cm 

Turnover 

Cost of sales 

(!) 

5,106 

5,833 

6J95 

6.914 

7,687 

(2.719) 

(2.947) 

(3387) 

(3,984) 

(4,598) 

Gross profit 

Distribution costs 


2.387 

2.886 

3,008 

2,930 

3,089 


<1,470 

(1.545) 

(1,552) 

(1,607) 

(1.711) 

Administrative expenses 


(532) 

(597) 

(621) 

(672) 

(690) 

Current cost operating profit 

(2aU3> 

384 

744 

835 

651 

688 

Net interest receivable 

(4) 

46 

59 


61 

94 

Current cost profit before 
taxation 

Taxation 


430 

803 

909 

712 

782 

<5> 

(187) 

(231) 

(154) 

(188) 

(380) 

Current cost profit for the 
year 

(14a) 

243 

572 

755 

524 

402. 


(1) Turnover by activity 

Turnover, which is substantially all in respect or sales to United Kingdom 
customers, is attributable to the following activities: 

leers ended 3 la March 



J9S2 

1983 

1984 

1985 

1986 


Cm 

Cm 

Cm 

Cm 

Cm 

Gas supply 

4,678 

5,379 

5.919 

6,396 

7,109 

Installation and contracting 

182 

211 

229 

236 

275 

Appliance trading 

227 

226 

229 

247 

278 

Exploration subsidiaries 

42 

44 

41 

58 

94 

Other activities 

31 

17 

18 

31 

21 


5,160 

5.877 

6,436 

6.968 

7,777 

Less: intra-group sales 

(54) 

(44) 

(41) 

(54) 

(90) 


5.106 

5.833 

6395 

6,914 

7,687 


(2) Operating profit by activity 

Operating profit is attributable to the following activities: 

a Current cost : 


Consolidated current cost balance sheets 


i 

Fixed nsets 
Tangible assets 

Current asset* 

• Stocks 
Debtors 
Investments 

Cosh at bank and in hand 


] Creditors (amounts falling 
I due witiun one year) 

• Net rarresf assets 

1 Total assets less current 
liabilities 

Creditors (amounts falling 
due after more than one 
‘ year) 

1 Prn» ideas far IfehSities and 
charges 


Semes 


At 3 la March 


.Votes 

1982 

Cm 

1983 

Cm 

19S4 

Cm 

1985 

Cm 

1986 

Cm 

(6a) 

12363 

13.679 

14.943 

15.546 

16,765 

(7) 

(SI 

(9) 

159 
1310 
51 1 
24 

181 

1,566 

70S 

17 

182 

1.730 

739 

33 

188 

1,905 

758 

30 

176 

2.086 

939 

25 


2.004 

2.472 

2.684 

2.881 

3326 

(10) 

(1.014) 

(1316) 

(1364) 

(1.429) 

(1356) 


990 

1.256 

1.320 

1.452 

1,670- 


13353 

14.935 

16363 

16.998 

18.435 

(in 

(372) 

(366) 

(353) 

(340) 

(217) 

iI2) 

(19) 

(22) 

(25) 

(29) 

(35) 


j 2.962 14.547 13,885 16.629 18,183 

(I*.) ~i^S85 16.629 1*10 


Years ended 31a March 



1982 

1983 

1984 

1985 

1986 


Cm 

Cm 

Cm 

Cm 

Cm 

Gas supply 

406 

786 

852 

690 

703 

Installation and contracting 

(21) 

(9) 

2 

7 

n 

Appliance trading 

(ID 

(6) 

5 

9 

12 

Exploration subsidiaries 

— 

(30) 

(27) 

(61) 

(43) 

Other activities 

10 

3 

3 

6 

5 


384 

744 

835 

651 

688 


b Historical cost: 

Years ended 31a March 



1982 

1983 

1984 

1985 

1986 


Cm 

Cm 

Cm 

Cm 

Cm 

Gas supply 

698 

1.074 

1.118 

95 S 

1.006 

Installation and contracting 

(19) 

(7) 

3 

8 

13 

Appliance trading 

4 

4 

9 

14 

17 

Exploration subsidiaries 

2 

(29) 

(25) 

(58) 

(39) 

Other activities 

12 

5 

6 

9 

9 


697 

1.047 

1,111 

931 

1.006 


Income and costs are allocated specifically to the activity to which they relate 
wherever possible: however, because of the integrated nature of the Group's activities 
it is also necessary to apportion certain costs between activities. 


Ian ended 31st March 



1982 

1983 

1984 

1985 

1986 


Cm 

Cm 

Cm 

Cm 

Cm 

Gas prime materials" * 

1,739 

1.847 

2,261 

2,830 

3J76 

Gas levy*" 

394 

524 

527 

504 

520 

Salaries, wages and associated costs 

1.042 

1,104 

1.147 

1,179 

1.202 

Replacement expenditure" 1 

230 

264 

287 

303 

318 

Historical cost depreciation 

96 

107 

117 

139 

162 

Research, testing and development 12 ' 

64 

67 

70 

69 

76 

Exploration expenditure 

20 

39 

30 

60 

38 

Leasing rentals 






Plant, machinery and equipment 

22 

16 

M 

17 

27 

Other assets 

14 

22 

24 

33 

21 

Provision for site restoration costs 

2 

3 

3 

4 

6 


as follows: 


The additional charges made in arriving at current cost operating profit are 


Supplementary depreciation 
Cosi of sales adjustment 
Monetary working capital adjustment 

Difference between current cost and 
historical cosl operating profit* 31 


Cm 

Cm 

Cm 

Cm 

Cm 

142 

248 

248 

221 

269 

13 

11 

4 

9 

5 

58 

44 

24 

. so 

44 

313 

303 

276 

280 

318 


1 1 * These are the principal components of cost of sales. Cost of sales represents direct 
costs of product ales. Other categories of expenditure identified above are primarily 

charged to distribution costs and administrative expenses. 

Incorporates ail costs categorised as replacement expenditure and research, testing 
and development, including an element of the salaries, wages and associated costs 
shown above. 

As a nationalised industry, the Group was not required to include a gearing 
adjustment in the current cost profit and loss accounts for the five years ended 3|st 
March, 1986. 

The Directors’ remuneration amounted to £0.4 million in each of the years ended 
31 st March. 1 982 to 1 985 and EOS million in the year ended 3 1st March, 1 986. 

Salaries, wages and associated costs comprise: 

Years ended 3 la March 



1982 

1983 

1984 

1985 

1986 


Cm 

Cm 

Cm 

Cm 

Cm 

V&ges and salaries 

783 

835 

878 

910 

929 

Social security costs 

78 

72 

71 

66 

65 

Other pension costs 

181 

197 

198 

203 

208 


1,042 

1,104 

1,147 

1,179 

1.202 


Number Number Number Number Number 
Average number of employees 1 05.800 1 1 03.300 99.300 95,600 9 1 .900 


The auditors' remuneration amounted to £0.4 million in the year ended 3 1 si 
March, 1982. £0.5 million in eacb of the years ended 3 1st March, 1983 to 1985. and 
£0.6 million in the year ended 3 1st March, 1 986. 


(4) Net interest receivable 


Interest receivable 
Interest payable 
Loans wholly repayable within 
five years 

Loans not wholly repayable 
within fire rears 


years ended 3 la March 


1982 

Cm 

1983 

Cm 

1984 

Cm 

1985 

Cm 

1986 

Cm 

81 

102 

108 

93 

120 

(29) 

(37) 

(28) 

(26) 

(20) 

(6) 

<6)_ 

(6) _ 

(6) 

(6) 

46 

59 

74 

61 

94 


(5) Taxation 

The charge for lava lion comprises: 

Years ended 3 1st March 



1982 

1983 

1984 

1985 

1986 


Cm 

Cm 

Cm 

Cm 

Cm 

United Kingdom corporation tax 

187 

231 

154 

18S 

380 

Statutory rate of corporation tax 

52% 

52% 

50% 

45% 

40% 


United Kingdom corporation tax is chargeable on the basis of historical cost 
profits. No provision for deferred taxation has been required in the five years ended 
3 1 st March. 1986. The net effect of these two factors, other than in the year ended 31st 
March. 1986. has been to reduce the effective rate of tax. when measured against current 
cost profits before taxation, below the statutory rate, as shown below: 


Corporation tax at statutory rates on 
current cost profits 
Effect on tax charge of current cost 
adjustments 

Corporation tax at statutory rates on 
historical cosl profits 
Effect on tax charge of: 

Accelerated capital allowances and 
other timing differences 
Prior year and other adjustments 

Taxation charge 


(6) Tangible fixed assets 
a Current cost: 


Current replacement cost 
Land and buildings 
Mains 
Services 
Storage 
Meters 

Plant and machinery 
Field development of gas and 
oil reserves 


Accumulated depreciation 
Land and building 
Mains 
Services 
Storage 
Meters 

Plant and machinery 
Field development of gas and 
oil reserves 


Net current replacement cost 
Land and buildings 
Mains 
Services 
Storage 
Meters 

Plant and machinery 
Field development of gas and 
oil reserves 


tews ended 3 la March 


1982 

Cm 

1983 

Cm 

1984 

Cm 

1985 

Cm 

1986 

Cm 

223 

418 

455 

320 

313 

163 

157 

138 

126 

127 

386 

575 

593 

446 

440 

(HD 

(28) 

(315) 

(29) 

(493) 

54 

(228) 

(30) 

(86) 

26 

187 

231 

154 

188 

380 


.4i 3 la March 


1982 

1983 

1984 

1985 

1986 

Cm 

Cm 

Cm 

Cm 

Cm 

1.540 

1.497 

1.539 

1.593 

1,678 

13,898 

15.033 

15.149 

15.106 

16,294 

3.263 

3.453 

3.557 

3,363 

3,430 

1.314 

1,511 

1.621 

1,691 

1.892 

723 

827 

1,062 

1,095 

1.135 

1,588 

1.840 

1,998 

2^229 

2J96 

266 

496 

1.208 

1,580 

1,901 

22.592 

24.657 

26.134 

26,657 

28.726 


532 

443 

475 

486 

488 

6.246 

6.777 

6.848 

6.761 

7J47 

1.509 

1.574 

1.593 

1.494 

1,506 

871 

929 

753 

671 

772 

330 

389 

505 

508 

518 

586 

690 

809 

950 

1,038 

155 

176 

208 

241 

292 

10.229 

10.978 

11,191 

11.111 

11.961 


* 


LOOS 

1,054 

1.064 

1.107 

1.190 

7.652 

8.256 

8 JO! 

8.345 

■8.947 

1.754 

1,879 

1.964 

1.869 

1,924 

443 

5S2 

868. 

1.020 

1.120 

393 

438 

557 

587 

617 

1.002 

1.150 

1.189 

1.279 

1.358 

111 

320 

1.000 

1.339 

1,609 

12,363 

15.679 

14.943 

15.546 

16.765 


44 


L □□□□□□□□□□□□□ 


THE TIMES TUESDAY NOVEMBER 25 1986 


British Gas pic continued 


□□□□□□□□□□□ 


The net current replace men i cusl of land and buildings comprises: 


- 1 / 3 hi March 



/vafr 

m3 

/w 

198: 

WS6 


On 

On 

On 

On 

On 

Freehold 

937 

961 

U73 

1.012 

1.093 

Long leasehold 

61 

s: 

80 

85 

84 

Short leasehold 

10 

11 

II 

10 

13 


1.008 

1.054 

1.1564 

1.107 

1.190 


The lolai cuirem cost depreciation charge for The year ended 3 1st March. 1986 
comprised the following: 


Land and buildings 

33 

Mains 

316 

Services 

110 

Storage *> 

45 

Meters 

54 

Plant and machinery 

159 

Field development of gas and oil reserves 

32 


749 

Comprising: 

162 

Historical cost depreciation 

Replacement expenditure 

318 

Supplementary depreciation 

269 


749 


b Historical cost: 


A; 3 hi March 



1982 

1983 

1984 

1985 

1986 


On 

inr 

On 

Oil 

On 

Historical cost 

, Land and buildings 

285 

344 

367 

393 

445 

, Mains 

1.987 

2.CI7Q 

1150 

2.275 

1350 

Scrv ices 

364 

390 

418 

445 

475 

Storage 

232 

383 

620 

756 

823 

Meters 

139 

152 

175 

199 

227 

Plant and machincrv 

749 

910 

970 

1.076 

1.138 

Field development of gas and oil 

reserves 

157 

371 

986 

1.333 

1.550 


3.913 

4.620 

5.686 

6.477 

7.008 

Accumulated depreciation 

Land and buildings 

51 

57 

65 

74 

S2 

Mains 

143 

172 

202 

234 

269 

Sen ices 

21 

30 

36 

43 

51 

_ Storage 

5 

6 

8 

9 

25 

Meters 

8 

12 

16 

20 

’26 

— Plant and machinerv 

r? 

219 

270 

329 

375 

Field development of gas and 

oil reserves 

69 

79 

87 

103 

130 

' 

474 

57 5 

684 

812 

958 

Net book amount 






Land and buildings 

234 

287 

302 

319 

363 

Mains 

I.S44 

I.S9S 

1.94S 

2,041 

2.0S I 

Sen ices 

343 

360 

3S2 

402 

424 

Storage 

227 

377 

612 

747 

798 

Meters 

131 

140 

159 

179 

201 

Plant and machinery 

572 

69 J 

700 

747 

763 

Field development of gas and 

• oil reserves 

88 

292 

899 

1.230 

1.420 

4* 

3.439 

4.045 

5.002 

5.665 

6.050 

The net book amount of land and buildings comprises: 

■ Freehold 186 222 238 

257 

300 

Long leasehold 

43 

59 

59 

57 

58 

Short leasehold 

• 5 

6 

5 

5 

5 


234 

287 

302 

319 

363 


The total historical cost depreciation charge for the year ended 3 1 si March. 1 986 
comprised the following: 


Land and buildings 

10 

' Mains 

36 

Services 

9 

Storage 

16 

Meters 

6 

Plant and machinery 

78 

Field development of gas and oil reserves 

-* 

27 


182 

.. Less: profit on sale of tangible fixed assets 

(20) 

162 


; (7) Stocks 

At 3 1 si March 



1982 

1983 

1984 

1985 

I9S6 


On 

I'm 

On 

On 

On 

Raw materials and consumables 

79 

87 

84 

80 

80 

Work in progress 

7 

8 

7 

13 

8 

Finished goods and goods 
for resale 

73 

86 

91 

95 

88 

Current cost 

159 

181 

182 

188 

176 

Less: current cost uplift 

(1) 

(1) 

(l) 

0) 

(1) 

Historical cost 

158 

ISO 

181 

187 

175 


: (8) Debtors 


At 31st March 


1 

1982 

1983 

1984 

1985 

1986 


On 

On 

On 

On 

On 

Amounts felling due within one vear 

■ Trade debtors 

507 

587 

619 

711 

747 

Accrued revenue for gas 

578 

758 

881 

953 

1.050 

■ Other debtors 

29 

33 

31 

33 

17 

Prepayments and 

accrued income 

63 

120 

91 

62 

87 

b 

1.237 

1.498 

1.622 

1,759 

1,901 

Amounts felling due after one year 

Trade debtors 

30 

24 

22 

23 

25 

Other debtors 

7 

8 

To 

9 

8 

Prepay merits and 

accrued income 

36 

36 

76 

114 

152 


1.310 

1.566 

1,730 

1.905 

1086 


Prepayments and accrued income falling due after one year are amounts in 
respect or gas paid for but not yet taken. Maturity dates are not currently determinable 
as this depends on the demand for gas in future periods. 


(9) Investments 

/Vi\? 

.4/ Sis March 
m3 1984 

19S: 

1986 

Deposits with the National 

Loans Fund 

On 

On 

£m 

On 

On 

300 

300 

300 

384 

313 

Certificates of tax deposit 

210 

400 

435 

235 

210 

Money market investments 

1 

S 

4 

139 

416 


511 

70S 

739 

758 

939 


Other deposits with the National Loans Fund were for a period of 10 years, 
maturing at various dates in 1989 and 1990, with interest rates varying from 12.625% 
to 1 5.375%. The deposits, together with the accrued interest, were repaid to the Group 
on 23rd August, 1986. 


(10) Creditors (amounts falling due within one year) 

At Sis March 



1982 

J9$S 

1984 

1985 

1986 


On 

On 

£m 

£m 

£m 

Bank loons and overdrafts 

200 

169 

173 

11 

4 

U.S.S promissory notes (Note (ID) 

— 

— 

• — 

— 

119 

Trade creditors 

287 

356 

541 

669 

5% 

Gas lew payable 

140 

194 

199 

203 

198 

Taxation and social security 

2P 

266 

179 

297 

409 

Other creditors 

27 

32 

35 

42 

49 

Accruals and deferred income 

143 

199 

237 

207 

181 


1.014 

1.216 

1,364 

1,429 

1,556 


(1 1 } Creditors (amounts falling due after more than one year) 




.-tr Sis March 




1982 

1983 

1984 

198 5 

1986 


£ni 

£m 

On 

£m 

£m 

British Gas 3% Guaranteed 






Stock, 1990-95 

214 

214 

214 

214 

214 

U.S.S promissory notes 

124 

119 

121 

119 

— 

Foreign loans 

34 

20 

8 

— 

— 

Other loan (secured) 

— 

13 

10 

7 

3 


372 

366 

353 

340 

217 

Loans outstanding are repayable 






as follows: 






Within one year 

124 

119 

121 

119 

— 

Between one and two years 

14 

15 

. 11 

4 

3 

Between two and five vears 

20 

18 

7 

3 

— 

After five years 

214 

214 

214 

214 

214 


372 

366 

353 

340 

217 


The U.S.$ promissory notes matured within one year but, in years previous to 
the year ended 3 1st March, 1 986. further notes were issued for the following year.Tbese 
promissory notes were guaranteed by H.M. Treasury as to payment of interest and 
principal and were subject to special exchange cover arrangements whereby H.M. 
Treasury insured the Group against exchange rate fluctuations. Accordingly, the loans 
were slated in the balance sheets at the amount of their original sterling proceeds. 

The U.S.S promissory notes were repaid in June 1986 and the guarantees and 
exchange cover arrangements with H.M. Treasury’ were cancelled at that time. 

On 24tb August, 1986 the liability for the British Gas 3% Guaranteed Stock. 
1990-95 was transferred to H.M. Treasury — see Note (20) for events subsequent to the 
balance sheet date. 


(1 2) Provisions for liabilities and charges 


At 3 IS March 



1982 

1983 

1984 

1985 

1986 


£m 

On 

£m 

£m 

£m 

Provision for site restoration costs 

19 

22 

25 

29 

35 


(13) Deferred taxation 

Timing differences are not expected to crystallise and therefore no provision has 
been required. The potential deferred taxation liabilities, computed at 35 percenL. are 
as follows: 


At SIS Month 



1982 

1983 

1984 

1985 

1986 


On 

£m 

On 

. £m 

On 

Accelerated capital allowances 

1.047 

1.239 

1,592 

1,772 

1.854 

Other timing differences 

(19) 

1 

(6) 

(9) 

(16) 


1.028 

U40 

1.586 

1.763 

1.838 

(14) Reserves 






a Current cost’ 








At Sis March 



1982 

1983 

1984 

1985 

1986 


£m 

£m 

£m 

£m 

£m 

(i) Profit and loss account 






Current cost profit for the year 

243 

572 

755 

524 

•402 

Balance at the start of the year 

1,485 

1.728 

Z300 

3,055 

3,579 

Balance at the end of the year 

1.728 

2300 

3,055 

3.579 

3,981 

(ii) Current cost reserve 






Revaluation surplus for the year 

708 

958 

555 

161 

1.103 

Working capita] adjustments 

71 

55 

28 , 

59 

49 

- 

779 

1.013 

583 

220 

1.152 

Balance at the start of the year 

10.455 

1 1334 

12347 

12.830 

13,050 

Balance at the end of the year 

11,234 

12347 

12,830 

1 3.050 

14302 

Total reserves 

12.962 

14.547 

15,885 

16,629 

18.183 


The revaluation surplus arises from the revaluation of tangible fixed assets and 
slocks from an historical cost to a current cost basis. No provision has been made for 
any tax liability which would arise if these assets were disposed of at their revalued 
amount. Working capital adjustments represent the effect of the cost of sales and 
monetary working capital current cost adjustments which are reflected in the profit and 
loss account. 


b Historical cost: 


(i) Profit and loss account 

Historical cost profit for the year 
Transfer to asset maintenance 
account 

1982 

£m 

556 

(313) 

At Sis March 

1983 1984 1985 

£m £m - On 

875 1,031 804 

(303) <276) (280) 

I9S6 

£m 

720 

(318) 

• 

243 

572 

755 

524 

402 

Balance at the start of the year 

1.485 

1,728 

2300 

3.055 

3,579 

Balance at the end of the year 

1,728 

2300 

3,055 

3.579 

3,981 

(ii) Asset maintenance account 






Transfer from profit and loss 
account 

313 

303 

276 

280 

318 

Balance at the start of the year 

1.996 

2309 

2,612 

2,888 

3.168 

Balance at the end of the year 

2.309 

g 

2,888 

3.168 

3.486 

Total reserves 

4.037 

4.912 

5.943 

6,747 

7,467 


The purpose of the asset maintenance account is to identify the reserves retained 
within the business to maintain the asset base. 


National Loans Fund included £84 million and £1 3 million at 
3 1 st March. 98s and 1986. respectively: held in a non-imeresl bearing account, which 
.related to tne payment of £85 million received for the disposal of the Wylcb Farm oil 
field and l 'vU ch was lo ** used to meet the tax liabiliiv and other costs arising 

from the disposaL the taiancc remaining after meeting these costs has been paid to the 

SeC ^^j “^S!f ( ,^ EnerEV - fmiilar amounts (£34 million and £13 million) were 
included in creditors (amounts falling due within one year). 


(15) Subsidiaries 

The principal subsidiaries are listed below. These companies are all wholly owned 
and. unless otherwise stated, are incorporated in Great Britain. 

Gas Council (Exploration) Limited 
Hydrocarbons Great Britain Limited 

Hydrocarbons Ireland Limited (incorporated ip the Republic of Ireland) 


(1 6) Changes in working capital 

The changes m working c=piiai arose aa reflow* 


• 

On 

I,...- r-.v» 

Or . O ' - ’■ 

Slocks— tncrease/'ldeerease) 

Debtors— increase 

fV}gh at bank and in hand— increase-; 
(decrease) 

Creditors (amounts falling due mlhtn 

one year)— (increase )/dccrca« 

8 

262 

«2 

. * *. . 1 «' 

256 . I"". ■ ' 

i;! ir 

:i-4j ?::•> ■■■-'» 

Total increase/! decrease) 
in working capital 

323 

97 .a-i 

m 

(17) Borrowing facilities 




At 31st March, 19S6 the Group had available £i.42S? ats&tm -r.c :_ : .S.5242 
million in unused credit facilities from several ftnapcij! intuitions. ificlut.'ii 
fori lilies was a U.S.S7S million standby credit Ijt.liiy w.tfc ripest to the Grout 1 > •-■■b 
commercial paper borrowings, on which comm itmcni fees payable on u.tdm-.’-n 
funds. This facility was terminated in June I486 wfira the L .S.S promissory arts - ere 
repaid. With respect to all other facilities, there arc on corr.miiir.&nt fees payr.bic on 
undrawn funds. 


(18) Commitments and contingencies 
Capital expenditure 

At 3 1 st March. 19S6 capital expenditure authonsi-o and contract jo for 
to £117 million: capital expenditure authorised bur hr: animated for amour.tec tr» 
£229 million. 

Future well costs 

Certain petroleum licences granted to the Group cammed a: 3I« March. IvVj 
outstanding obligations to drill exploration wwK some of which were firm 
commitments and ethers contingent. Tne cos: to the Group of drilling such v-A'.- was 
estimated at ^sl March, i 956 to be aboui £57 mlifior. 

Leasing 

Commitments under finance leases amounted vo £?2 mdl/.w 21 3 1st March. 

1986. 


(19) Pension arrangements 

Pension schemes for stalTand manual workers, vhich provide de.Tn*i benefits 
by reference to final salary and are self-administered. are ’untied :c»cov cr tufon: sension 
liabilities including expected pension increases. They arc subject :o a foil r-iependcr,; 
actuarial valuation at least every three years on the basis o .'‘which the actuary vJriitu's 
the rates of tbe employer's contributions which, isaetrsr u::si coriribirii.jos puycbic ?_.• 
the employees, are sufficient to maintain the solvency ol'tha schemes. 

The actuary carried out a full valuation cf facth pccsofl schemes as a: Sr Aonl. 
1985. On the basis of the assumptions made, the unfunded rust scr\ ice iubi’oy ,r" she 
British Gas Staff* Pension Scheme amounted to £{40 million. Cun triburrc-r.s is: excess- 
of the employer’s basic contributions, amounting loibfc million, were made in lK* year 
ended 31st March. I486 towards the unfunded past serv kv - fahilily and the haia'ce will 
be ftmded during the year ending 3 Is: March. 19S“ On tl.e basis of the as-.-empLons 
made, the unfunded past service liability of the British Gas Corporal; on Pension Scheme 
amounted to £15 million and this was forded daring :hc year ended 3 1st March. Har*. 


(20) Post balance sheet events 

On 24th August. 1986 the property, rich is and liabilifo-r- iwher lium the fe-:':*h 
Gas 3% Guaranteed Stock. lWCi-95) of foe British Gas Corpuralion vested m 
Gas pic. Since its incorporation on 1st April. 19Sf, there iitve been major changes :r. 
the capital strueture of British Gas pic. These charges arc descr.hciL together u ;;.i foci- 
effccL in Part B. Pro Forma Financial Information. 


(21 ) Summary statement of adjustments 

The following statement summarises ;iic adjustments made :r- prcvirusly 
published profit for the year is arriving at the amounts included ir. die consolidated 
current cost profit and loss accounis. 



Xcics 

1982 

On 

Yrar* enAc 

ms ■ 

in; ■ 

as:?; 

1*54 

On 

Mrr’h 
/•a?5 
Ok ■ 

t»v 

Current cost profit for the year, 
as previously published 


544 

»x>8 

4 

524 


Effect on depreciation of 
extending asset lives 

■a) 

!5! 

;56 

is: 



Deferred tax provisions 

no longer required 

(bf 

ft 

i\2) 

I>2 

— 

— 

Elimination of divested 

oil interests: 

Profit after taxation 

tej 

(58) 

(55* 

D2» 



Extraordinary losses 

• on divestment 


— 

:c5 

3 

— 

— 

Current cost profit for the year, 
as stated in this report 


243 

57: 

755 

524 

40: 


Notes: 

(a) The estimated useful lives of certain categories of fixed assets were e\ tended i r. the 
year ended 3 1st March, 1 985. 

(b) In the year ended 31st March. 1985. and following the change in asset lives noted 
in (a), the Group reviewed its method of calculating deferred taxation. On the new 
basis the timing differences were not expected to reverse within the foreseeable 
future. Accordingly, adjustment has been made above to release deferred luxation 
provided for the three years ended 3!st March. 1 9S4. 

<c) Pursuant to directions made -under Acts of Parliament, the Group disposed of 
certain oil interests in 1 983 and 1 984 without compensation. Adjustment has been 
made above to eliminate the results of, and losses arising from the disposal of. 
these oil interests in order to set out in the financial information a consistent 
presentation of only tbe continuing activities of the Group. 

(d) Historical cost information was. not included in the published financial statements 
for the four years ended 31st March. 1985. There are no adjustments to the 
published historical cost profit for the year ended 3 1st March. 1 936. 


B. PRO FORMA FINANCIAL INFORMATION 
Introduction 

On 1st April. 1986 British Gas pic was incorporated as a public limited comps nv 
The Gas Act 1986 provided for the vesting in British Gas pic of the property, rights and 
liabilities of the British Gas Corporation, other than the British Gas 3®o Guaranteed 
Stock, 1990-95 amounting to £214 million, the liability for which was transferred lo 
H.M. Treasury. The vesting took place on 24ih August. 1986. although for accounting 
purposes it is deemed to have taken place on 1st April. 1986. Following the transfer 
changes have been made to the capital structure of British Gas pic in rjspecL of the 
capitalisation ofpart of reserves into ordinary share capital and the issue cf on unsecured 
debenture in favour of H.M. Government. 

We set Out below pro forma financial information showing the results for ’he 
year ended 3 1st March. 1986 and the balance sheet at that dale. Tne adjustments made 
to tbe results reflect tbe position as if the new capital structure had been in place 
throughout the year and the adjustments made to the balance sheet reflect the dom* ion 
as if the new capital structure had been in place immediately prior to the vear end. ’ 


Pro forma consolidated profit and loss accounts for the year ended 
31st March, 1 986 


Unad- 

justed 

CCA 

Adjust- 

ments 

Pro 

forme ■ 


Unad- 

justed 

HCA 

Adjust- 

ments 

Pro 

J'onna 

On 

On 

£m 

• Ko:es 

On 

On 

Cm 

688 

94 

(269) 

46 

688 Operating profit* . 

Net interest receivable/ 
(175) (payable) 

46 Gearing adjustment 

(2) 

(3) 

1.006 

94 

1269) 

1 .006 

(175) 

782 

(380) 

(223) 
ios • 

S59 Profit before taxation- 
. (272) Taxation 

(4) 

f. 100 
(380) 

(269) 

108 

831 

(272) 

402 

(H5) 

. Profit attributable to 

287 shareholders, ■ ■ 


720 

(161) 

559 

IS.5p 



Pro forma caniings per 
6.9p Ordinary Share ' 

(5) _ 




X V — 1 


\ 


THE TIMES TUESDAY NOVEMBER 25 1986 


45 


□□□□□□□□□□□CO 


British Gas pic continued 111 


□□□□□□□□□□□□a - 


Unad- 

justed 

CCA 

Adjust- 

ments 

Pro 

forma 

£m 

£m 

£m 

16.765 

— 

16.765 

3,226 

— 

3,226 

0.556) 

(750) 

(2,306) 

1.670 

(750) 

920 

18,435 

(750) 

17.685 

(217) 

(1.536) 

(1,753) 

(35) 

— 

(35) 

18.183 

G286) 

15.897 


1.038 

1.038 , 

18.183 

(3.324) 

14,859 

IS. 183 

11 

ill 


HCA 

Unad- Adjust- Pro 
justed merits forma 


Notes 


1W-I1 OW.O 

Creditors (amounts falling 
due within one year) (6) 


920 Net current assets 


Total assets less current . 
liabilities 

Creditors (amounts falling 
due after more 


Provisions for liabilities 
and charges 


(7) 


Capital and reserves 


( 8 ) 

(9) 


£m 

£m 

£m 

6,050 

— 

6,050 

3,225 

— 

X225 

(1,556) 

(750) <2306) 

1,669 

C75QJ 

919 

7.719 

(750) 

6.969 

(217) 

(1,536) (1,753) 

(35) 

— 

(35) 

7,467 

0286) 

5,181 

7.467 

1.038 

(3.324) 

1,038 

4,143 


7,467 (2J286) 5,181 


Notes to the pro forma financial Infor m ation 
P) Basis of preparation 

TT» figures in ifae column headed “Unadjusted" have been extracted from the 
financial information for the year ended 3 1st March, 1 986. presented in Part A above. 

Since 3! st March, 1986 the capital structure of the British Gas Corporation, and* 
subsequently British Gas pic, has changed as follows: 

(a) on 1 9 th August, 1986 8.000,000 Ordinary Shares off! and the Special Share 

were issued for cash at par to the Secretary of State, increasing the ordinary share 
capital of the Company to 8,050,000 Ordinary Shares of £1 each; 

(b) on 24th August, 1986 the liability for the then outstanding £214 million of British 
Gas 3% Guaranteed Stock, 1990-95 was transferred to RM. Treasury, which 
assumed liability for the service and redemption of the Stock from that Hat<- 

(c) on 24th August, 1986 the property, rights and liabilities of the British Gas 
Corporation, other than the indebtedness in (b) above, vested in British Gas pic; 

(d) on 20ih November, 1986 an unsecured debenture in the amount of £2,500 million 
was issued by British Gas pic to H.M. Treasury, fin* which no cash was received. 
The rales of interest and repayment dates are shown in Note (6) below* and 

(e) on 20th November, 1986 the 8.050,000 Ordinary Shares of £1 each were 
subdivided into 32^00,000 Ordinary Shares of 25p each, 17,800,000 Ordinary 
Shares of 25p each were issued, credited as fully paid, to the Secretary of State, 
pursuant to a direction given by him under section 51 of the 1986 Gas Act and, 
conditionally on the whole of the ordinary share capital, issued and to be 
being admitted to the Official List by The Stock Exchange not later than 31si 
December, 1986, a further 4.100,000.000 Ordinary Shares of 25p each were 
allotted, credited as fully paid, to the Secretary of State by way of capbalisation 
of pan of the sum standing to the credit of the Company’s reserves. 

In addition, as discussed in Note (3) below, a gearing adjustment has been 
included in the pro forma current cost financial information. 


(2) Net interest neceivable/fpayable) 

The adjustments to the previously reported amount are as follows: 

Elimination of interest payable in respect of British Gas ^ 

3% Guaranteed Stock 1 990-95 £ 

Interest payable on unsecured debenture (Note (6)) (275) 



The interest charge eli mina ted above was tbe amount actually charged to profit 
and loss account in the year ended 3lst March, 1986 in respect of the British Gas 3% 
Guaranteed Stock, 1990-95. 

(3) Gearing adjustment 

It is the intention of the Directors to prepare the accounts of British Gas pic 
under the current cost convention, in accordance with Statement of Standard 
Accounting Practice Number 16fSSAP 16"). Under this convention, provision is made 
in current cost accounts to allow for the effect of price changes on tbe funds needed to 
maintain the net operating assets. These current cost adjustments comprise 
supplementary depreciation and working capital adjustments. A proportion of the net 
operating assets of British Gas pic undo- its revised capital structure is financed by 
borrowings; the gearing adjustment, which is required by SSAP 16, reduces tbe effect 
of these current cost adjustments to allow for the benefit to shareholders of financing 
the business partly by borrowings. The adjustment is based on the ratio of average net 
borrowings to the total of average shareholders’ funds and average net borrowings. For 
this purpose, net bonowingseomprise not only indebtedness but also all other monetary 
liabilities and provisions except those included in the monetary working capital 
adjustment, less investments and other current assets, other than those included in the 
cost of sales and monetary working capital adjustments. 


(9] Reserves 

CCA HCA 


Asset 


Current 

Profit 

Profit 

main- 

cost 

and loss 

and loss 

tenance 

reserve 

account 

account 

account 

£m 

£m 

£m 

£m 

14,202 

3,981 As reported at 31st March. 1986 
Transfer of liability for the British 
Gas 3% Guaranteed Stock, 

214 1990-95 

Issue of unsecured debentures and 
(3.538) ordinary share capital 

3,981 

214 

(3.538) 

3.486 

14.202 

657 

_ 657 

3.486 

14.859 

4,143 


Yours faithfully, 

PRICE W\TERHOUSE 
Chartered Accountants 



SECTION V 


INFORMATION RELATING TO 
THE PROFIT FORECAST 


1. Assumptions underlying the profit forecast 

' The profit forecast set out in Part E of Section I indudes results shown by the 
u n audited financial statements for the three months ended 30th June, 1986 and the 
unaudited management accounts for the thirteen weeks ended 28th September, 1986. 

The profit forecast is made on the basis of the following principal assumptions 
. for the remainder of the year ending 3 1st March, 1987: 

(a) seasonal normal temperatures will prevail; 

(b) there will be no significant variation in tbe current selling prices in the United 
Kingdom of heavy fuel oil and gas oil; and 

(c) there will be no significant variation in tbe sterling exchange rate fl ga»n«a those 
currencies which affect the cost of gas under the Frigg contracts. 

In addition, the following general assumptions for the remainder of the year ending 3 1 st 
March, 1987 have been made: 

(d) there will be no major interruption in the supplies of gas to British Gas or major 
damage to its pipelines or other facilities; 

(e) there will be no industrial disputes or political or other disturbances which would 
materially affect the operations of British Gas; 

(0 there will be no significan t chang e in the currently prevailing economic 
conditions in the United Kingdom; 

(g) there will be no change in United Kingdom l egislatio n or regulations »w4 no 
actions by tbe Director General which wifi have an unexpected effect on the 
business of British Gas; and 

(fa) there will be no material change in the current basis or rates of United Kingdom 
taxation. 


2. Letters 

The following letters relate to the profit forecast for the year ending 31st March, 

1987. 


[a] Letter from Price Waterhouse 

Tbe Directors, 

British Gas pic, 

RivermiU House, 

152 Grosvenor Road, 

London SW1V3JL 

21st November; 1986 


Gentlemen, 

have reviewed the accounting policies and calculations for the profit forecast 
of British Gas pic for the year ending 31st March, 1987 set out in Part E of Section I of 
the Offer for Sale document dated 2 1st November; 1986. The forecast, for which the 
Directors are solely responsible, includes the results shown by the unaudited financial 
statements for the time months ended 30th June, 1986 included in Section V of the 
Offer for Sate document and the unaudited managem e n t accounts for the thirteen weeks 
ended 28th September, 1986. 

In our opinion the forecast, so fig as the accounting policies and calculations are 
concerned, has been properly compiled on the basis of the assumptions made by the 
Directors set out in Section V of the Offer for Sale document and is presented on a basis 
consistent with the accounting policies previously adopted by British Gas Corporation 
and now adopted by British Gas pic. 


SSAP 16 requires that nationalised industries, in view of the special nature of 
their capital structure, should not make a gearing adjustment in their profit and loss 
accounts. Accordingly a gearing adjustment is not included in the financial information 
in Pan A since tint information relates to (he Corporation and its subs i dia ri es. 


■Yours faithfully, 

PRICE WVTERHOUSE 
Chartered Accountants 


(4) Taxation 

Tbe adjustment to taxation comprises the tax relief on the adjustment to net 
interest receivable/(payable) outlined in Note (2). As with the other current cost 
adjustments, the gearing adjustment is not subject to taxation. 

(5) Pro forma earnings per Ordinary Share 

Tbe pro forma earnings per Ordinary Share have been calculated by dividing the 
pro forma profit for the year attributable to shareholders of £287 million and £559 
million on a current cost and an historical cost basis respectively by the 4,1 50 million 
Ordinary Shares in issue and to be issued (see Note (.8)). 


(6) Unsecured debenture 

The repayment and interest rates attaching to the unsecured debenture are 
as follows: 


Interest rate 

Assumed date of maturity 

Amount 

"o 

31st March * 

£m 

10s 

1987 

750 

u 

1988 

250 

iii 

1989 

400 

Hi 

1990 

400 

HVk 

1991 

350 

HA 

1992 

350 



2J>00 

Amounts foiling due within one year 

750 

Amounts foiling due after more than one year (Note (7)) 

1,750 



2300 


•The date of repayment ofinstalments of the unsecured debenture will be between 20th 
March and 20th April m each year, at the option ofH-M. Government. Forthe purposes 
of the pro forms financial information, it is assumed that repayment occurs on 31st 
March each year, commencing with the first instalment on 31st March, 1987. 


(7) 


Creditors (amounts falling due after more than one year) 
The adjustments to tbe previously reported amounts are as follows: 

£m 


Elimination of British Gas 3% Guaranteed Stock, 1990-95 
Unsecured debenture (Note (6)) 


(214) 

1,750 

1.536 


(8) Share capital . 

If tbe Offer for Sale becomes effective, the ordmary share capital of British Gas 

pic »ill be as follows: 


Authorised 

5.500 million Ordinary Shares of 25p each 


£1375 million 


Issued and fully paid or credited as folly paid 
4. 1 50 million Ordinary Shares of 25p each 


£1,037.5 million 


One Special Redeemable Preference Share ot£l has been issued » 

H.M. Government, credited as fullv paid. 


(b) Joint letter from NM Rothschild & Sons Limited end Kleinwort 
Benson Limited 
The Directors, 

British Gas pic, 

Rivemufi House, 

152 Grosvenor Road, 

London SW1V3JL 

21st November, 1986 


Gen t le m en, 

We refer to the profit forecast for the year ending 3 1st March, 1987, which is set 
out in Part E of Section 1 oftbe Offer for Sale document dated 2 1st November; 1986. 

We have discussed the forecast, together with the bases and assumptions upon 
which the forecast is made, with officials of tbe Company and with Price Waterhouse. 
Wi have also considered the letter dated 2 1 st November; 1986, addressed to yourselves 
by Price Waterhouse, regarding the accounting policies and calculations underlying the 
forecast 

On the basis of the foregoing, we consider that the forecast, for which you as 
Directors are solely responsible, has been made after due and careful enquiry. 

"fours very truly, fours faithfully 

For and on behalf of For Kleinwort Benson limited 

N M Rothschild & Sons Limited 

Michael Richardson Rocktey 

Anthony Alt David Clement! 

Directors Directors 


3. Supplementary unautfited financial inform a tion for the three 
months ended 30th June, 1 985 and 1 986 

Set out below are the unaudited consolidated results for the three months ended 
30th June,' 1985 and 1986: 

CCA HCA 


Three months Three months 

ended 30th June * ended 30th June 


ms 

1986 


1985 

1986 

£m 

£m 


£m 

£m 

1,537 

1,549 

Tmover 

1,537 

1,549 

(991) 

(852) 

Cost of sales 

(976) 

(880) 

546 

697 

Gross profit 

561 

669 

(398) 

(406) 

Distribution costs 

(341) 

(349) 

(152) 

(155) 

Administrative expenses 

(141) 

(»45) 

(4) 

136 

Operating profil/Ooss) 

79 

175 

20 

30 

Net interest receivable 

20 

30 

16 

166 

Profit before taxation 

99 

205 

(34) 

(72) 

Taxation 

(34) 

(72) 

(18) 

94 

Ptufit/Ooss) for the period 

65 

133 


Set out below are the unaudited consolidated balance sheets at 30th June, I98S 
and 1986: 


s 


CCA HCA 


At 30th June 

- 

At 30th June 


1985 

1986 


1985 

1986 


£m 

£m 

Fixed assets 

£m 

£m 

1 

15,847 

16.670 

Tangible assets 

5.762 

6,100 

ex- 



Current assets 



the 

198 

188 

Stocks 

197 

187 

negr 

1306 

1.389 

Debtors 

1.306 

1.389 


1,025 

1,342 

Investments 

1,025 

1,342 

ev- 

13 

9 

Cash at bank and in hand 

13 

9 

said. 

2,542 

2.928 


2.541 

2,927 

aged 
the 
ab- 
. PC 

0,121) 

(1,174) 

Creditors (amounts foiling due within one year) 

(1.121) 

0.174) 

1,421 

1.754 

Net cmreot assets 

1,420 

1,753 

une. 

ving 

17368 

18.424 

Total assets less current liabilities 

Creditors (amounts foiling due after more than 

7.182 

7.853 

hian 

yes- 

(340) 

(217) 

one year) 

(340) 

(217) 

(30) 

(36) 

Provisions for liabilities and charges 

(30) 

(36) 

Ja rd 

16,898 

18,171 


6.812 

7,600 

ives 


1 


— ■ 

■■ 

new 

16,898 

18,171 

Reserves 

6,812 

7,600 

here 


sob- 

Commentary 


The unaudited results forthe three months ended 30th June, 1985 and 1986 set 
out above show that profit before taxation increased by £1 50 million on a CCA basis 
and by £106 million on an HCA basis. 

The increase in profit was mainly attributable to a lower cost per therm of gas 
purchased and to higher sales in the domestic and commercial markets, largely caused 
by colder weather. The lower cost of gas primarily resulted from reductions in gas 
supplies from Frigg (following industrial action at the field), which were temporarily 
replaced by supplies mainly from the lower cost Early Southern Basin Fields, and from 
the effect of more favourable exchange rates. These lower gas costs also affected the 
current cost working capital adjustments, contributing £43 million to the improvement 
in CCA profit before taxation. There was an appreciable reduction in turnover in the 
industrial market but turnover overall was slightly higher than for the same period in 
the previous year. 

The results for the first quarter cannot be regarded as a guide to the year's results 
as a whole. 


had 
perty 
er a 
ber- 
vere 
reed 
ouri 

Gafl 

well 

Ihh- 

eive 

.000 

iting 

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our. 

1-on 



SECTION VI ~ 

PETROLEUM CONSULTANTS' REPORT 


The following is the text of a report from ERC Energy Resource Consultants 
Limited, reporting petroleum consultants: 

15 Weibeck Street 
London WIM7PF 

21st November, 1986 

Tbe Secretary of State for Energy 

The Directors, British Gas pic 

The Directors, N M Rothschild &. Sons Limited 

Dear Sirs, 

We have reviewed the petroleum exploration and production interests of British 
Gas pic (“British Gas") as at 1st November. 1986 in connection with the offer for sale 
of Ordinary Shares in British Gas dated 21st November, 1986. 

1 Professional qualifications 

ERC Energy Resource Consultants limited (“ERC") is an independent 
consultancy specialising in petroleum reservoir evaluation. Except for the provision of 
professional services on a fee bass, ERC has no commercial arrangement with any 
person or company involved in the offer for sale. 

2 Introduction 

We have relied solely on information made available to us by British Gas 
which comprised details of its licence interests, basic exploration and engineering data, 
interpreted data, technical reports, development plans and reviews of the performance 
of producing fields. 

In estimating petroleum in place and recoverable petroleum we have used the 
standard techniques of petroleum evaluation. There is uncertainty inherent in the 
measurement and interpretation of basic data. Wfe have estimated the degree of this 
uncertainty and have used statistical methods to calculate the range of petroleum 
initially in place or recoverable. 

3 Definitions 

“Proven", in relation to quantities of petroleum, means the amount thereof 
which geophysical, geological and engineering data indicate to be in place or recoverable 
(as the case may be) to a high degree of certainty. For the purposes of this definition, 
there is a 90 per cent- chance that the actual quantity will be more than the amount 
estimated as Proven and a lQperoeaL chance that it will be less. 

“Probable" in relation to quantities of petroleum, means the amount thereof 
which geophysical, geological and engineering data indicate to be in place or recoverable 
(as the case may be) but with a greater dement of risk than in the case of Proven. For 
the purposes of this definition, there is a SO per cent chance that the actual quantity 
will be more than tbe amount estimated as Proven + Probable and a 50 per cem. chance 
that it will be less. 

“Possible", in relation to quantities of petroleum, means the amount thereof 
which geophysical, geological and engineering data indicate to be in place or recoverable 
(as tbe case may be) but to which a substantial element of risk must be attached. For 
the purposes of this definition, there is a 10 per cent chance that the actual quantity 
will be more th a n the amount estimated as Proven + Probable + Possible and a 90 per 
cent chance that it will be less. 

“Commercial Reserves" are those quantities of petroleum which we consider, on 
the basis of information currently available and present economic conditions, to be 
commercially recoverable by present producing methods from fields currently in 
production or with government approval for development. 

“Potentially Commercial Reserves" are those quantities of petroleum which 
we consider, on the basis of information currently available and present economic 
conditions, to be commercially recoverable by present producing methods from 
discoveries for which no firm development plan exists. 

“Technical Reserves” are those quantities of petroleum which we consider, on 
tbe basis of information currently available and present economic conditions, to be 
recoverable by present producing methods, so that production of such reserves would 
be expected to cover operating costs at all times but would not necessarily provide a 
commercial return on development costs. 

(Forthe purposes oftbe last three definitions above, present producing methods 
are limited to primary depletion or secondary recovery by water or gas injection and 
do not include enhanced petroleum recovery techniques.) 

“bbT means banel(s). 

“stb” means stock tank barrel(s) measured at 14.7 pounds per square 

inch and 60 degrees Fahrenheit. 

“scT means standard cubic feet measured at 14.7 pounds per square 

inch and 60 degrees Fahrenheit. 

“M", “MM", “B” mean thousands, millions and thousands of millions 
respectively. 

“condensate” means liquid hydrocarbons which are sometimes produced with 

natural gas and liquids derived from natural gas. 

“ultimate" when stating reserves of petroleum, means the total amount of 

petroleum that would be produced from the start of production 
to the end of commercial production. 

“remaining" when stating reserves of petroleum, means the total amount of 

petroleum which is expected to be produced from the reference 
dale (30th June, 1986 in this report) to the end of commercial 
production. 

In this report gas, condensate and oil Commercial and Potentially Commercial 
Reserves and production forecasts are confined to those quantities which are estimated 
to be available for sale. Technical Reserves are stated after appropriate deductions for 
fuel consumption. 

4 Commercial fields 

The following table sets Out our estimates of total petroleum initially in place 
and total ultimate and remaining Commercial Reserves at 30th June, 1986 by field and 
in aggregate and our estimates of remaining Commercial Reserves attributable to British 
Gas by field and in aggregate, on the basis of its percentage interests (shown to two 
decimal places) at 30th June. 1986. 




n 


is 


it 




THE TIMES TtJESDAY NOVEMBER 25 1986 


□□□□□□□□□□□□□ 


British Gas pic continued 


□□□□□□□□□□odd 


PETROLEUM IN PLACE AND ULTIMATE AND REMAINING COMMERCIAL RESERVES 


ONSHORE 

SOUTH ISDEFOIG IBLf. _ . OIL 

ItOKLl AUBE LEMiMELUUH (A/GC <JROl Pi H, RlWill >> . _ TOTAL FIELDS lit 



ltd* 

tBsnil 

Condmsalr 

i.u.um 

Cm 

IBkII 

Condcwic 

fnlf 

iBxn 

Ctintfi'swh' 

I.IMIWI 

(Ij* 

lB*.h 

t'.wJiiiwir 

■.l/.l/AM 

Shu 
iBsoi _ 

CMdtaUK 1 

f.V.UMfj 

Oil 

IMMaN 

Petroleum initially in place 












Proven 

4.590 

— 

6.690 

— 

2,700. 

— 

327 


14307 

— 

42.34 

Proven* Probable 

5.410 



7350 

— 

2.920 

_ 

389 

— 

16,069 

— 

55.86 

Proven+Probable* Possible 

6.3b0 

— 

7.940 

— 

3.160 

— 

438 

— 

17.898 

— 

75.08 

Ultimate Commercial Reserves 











Proven 

3.647 

10.94 

5,265 

3.S8 

1584 

5.43 

297 

115 

11.793 

2140 

839 

Proven* Probable 

4.371 

17.48 

5.784 

4.24 

1795 

5.82 

354 

146 

13.304 

30.00 

1338 

Proven* Probable* Possible 

5.215 

26.08 

6,248 

4.57 

3,025 

6.25 

400 

2.71 

14.888 

39.61 . 

18.43 

Production to 30th June, 












1986 

20 

0.08 

3.961 

2.95 

1,795 

3.95 

156 

137 

5.932 

835 

0.66 

Remaining Commercial Reserves 
Proven 3.627 

10.86 

1304 

0.93 

789 

1.48 

141 

0.78 

5.861 

14.05 

7.63 

Pro ven+ Probable 

4351 

17.40 

1,823 

1.29 

1,000 

1.87 

198 

1.09 

7.372 

21.65 

1172 

Proven* Probable* Possible 

5.195 

26.00 

2387 

1.62 

1330 

230 

244 

1.34 

8.956 

3236 

17.77 

British Gas Interest (%) 

100 

28.98 

30.77 

100 



various 

Remaining Commercial Reserves 











attributable to British Gas 












Proven 

3.627 

10.S6 

378 

037 

243 

0.46 

141 

0.78 

4.389 

12.37 

3.81 

Pro ven * Probable 

4.351 

17.40 

528 

037 

308 

0.58 

198 

1.09 

5.385 

19.44 

6.35 

Proven + Probable+Possible 

5,195 

26.00 

663 

0.47 

378 

0.71 

244 

1.34 

6,480 

28.52 

8.86 


(1) Amounts staled are those attributable to the East Lenurn Unit (“ELU") and the Amoco/Gas Council Group (** A/GC group") 

on! v. as explained below . . , „ , , rtoe 

(2) Production for Rough is to the daze of commencement of injection into the field on i4ih July, ivsx 

(3) Welton. Nottlebam and Farleys Wood. 


There are also four dry gas discoveries 
in Rotiiegendes sandstones in the Southern 
Basin of the North Sea. One discovery 
comprises extensions to the Amethyst 
structure into Blocks 47/Sa, 47/9a and 47/1 5a, 
where the reservoir is in thin, variable quality 
sandstones. The remaining three discoveries 
are situated in Block 49/29, where good quality 
sandstones have been discovered in two 
separate, small, fault and dip closed structures 
and also in the Wfefland discovery, which 
extends into the block. 

In addition there are two dry gas 
discoveries in the Irish Sea in the Triassic 
Sherwood Sandstone Group: a domal 
structure in Block 1 1 3/2 6, where the reservoir 
comprises sandstones and shales and is 
affected by platy illiie which reduces primary 
permeability, and a domal structure, fault 
bounded to the east and west, in Block 1 10/7a 
which has been penetrated by two wells and 
where the reservoir comprises sandstones and 
shales and permeability is high. 

5.2 Oil discoveries 

British Gas has interests of 25 to 50 per 
cent, in three small oQ accumulations in the 
East Midlands. 


4.1 The South Morecambe field 

The South Morecambe field is a faulted anticline. The reservoir contains a dry 
gas entirely underlain by water and comprises the Triassic Sherwood Sandstone Group, 
which is several thousand feet thick. Porosities are moderate to good. Primary 
permeabilities are generally high but the presence of illiie severely' reduces permeability 
in approximately^ per cent, of the reservoir. The field is to be developed in two stages. 
At present Stage 1 is under way. By 30th June. 1 986 the central proces$irig platform and 
three drilling platforms had been installed and 1 1 development wells had been drilled. 
First production occurred in January 1 9SS. 

4.2 The Leman field (ELU) 

The Leman field is a large faulted anticline. The reservoir contains dry gas in 
Lower Permian Rotiiegendes sandstones, which vary in thickness between 550 and 930 
feet. Porosities are moderate to good: permeabilities are poor to moderate. British Gas 
has an interest in Block 49/27 which is a pan of the ELU. The ELU covers that pan of 
the field underlying Blocks 49/27. 49/28, 53/ la and 53/2. A total of 91 development 
wells had been drilled in the ELU area from nine platforms by 30th June. 1 9S6. The 
field is now producing at declining rates. The reserve estimates other than at the Proven 
level are based on the assumption that additional compression facilities will be installed 
in the field. 

4.3 The Indefatigable field (A/GC group) a 

The Indefatigable field is a heavily faulted anticline. The reservoir contains a dry- 

gas in Lower Permian Rotiiegendes sandstones, which vary in thickness from 50 to 420 
FeeL Two satellite structures are also included within the field area. Porosities are 
moderate to good permeabilities are poor to good British Gas is a member of the A/GC 
group which has interests in the western area of the field in which a total of 32 
development welts had been drilled from three platforms by 30th June. 1986. The field 
is still producing at plateau production rates. The reserve estimates other than at the 
Proven level are based on the assumption that six additional development wells will be 
drilled 

4.4 The Rough held 

The Rough field is a fault bounded anticline. The reservoir contains a dry gas in 
Lower Permian Rotiiegendes sandstones, which vary in thickness from 80 to 1 17 feeL 
Porosities are moderate: permeabilities are moderate to good In 1980 British Gas 
purchased its co-venturers' interests in the field in order to use it for gas storage. 
Injection first began in July 1985 bn which times total of 156 Bscf or about 44 percent, 
of the ultimate recovery had been produced Since that date, production from the field 
has been restricted to peak demand periods only. Net injection from July 1985 to 30th 
June. 1986 was 1 1.3 Bscf 


6 Other petroleum discoveries 

Or the petroleum discoveries in which British Gas has interests, we have 
identified 14 which we consider contain Technical Reserves. Nine are dry gas 
discoveries, of which two are in Great Britain, six are on the UKCS and one is offshore 
the Republic of Ireland Four are gas condensate discoveries on the UKCS and one is 
a conventional oil discovery in the East Midlands. 

The following table sets out in aggregate our estimates of total petroleum initially 
in place and total Technical Reserves at 30th Jane, 19S6 and our estimates of the total 
Technical Reserves attributable to British Gas on the had* of its percentage interests at 
30thJune. 1986. 


TECHNICAL RESERVES 

Proven 

Proven* 

Probable 

Proven * 

Probable* 

Passible 

Total petroleum initially in pbee 

Gas 

Oil 

(Bscf) 

(MMstb) 

1,697 

5.30 

3,056 

730 

4,986 

9.70 

Total Technical Reserves 

Gas 

Oil and condensate 

(Bscf) 

(MMbbl) 

1,033 

61.73 

1,914 

106.83 

3,144 

17130 

Total Technical Reserves 
attributable to British Gas 

Gas 

Oil and condensate 

(Bscf) 

(MMbbl) 

427 

24.63 

802 

43.70 

1342 

72.04 

7 Undrilled prospects 






We have reviewed all the undrilled potentially petroleum bearing structures 
proposed to us by British Gas and as a result, we have identified 22 undrilled prospects 
which, on the basis of geological and geophysical interpretations, we consider warrant 
drilling, as they potentially contain sufficient petroleum to justify development under * 
present economic conditions. 

We have identified one undrilled prospect in the Northern North Sea, seven in 
the Southern Basin of the North Sea, one in the English Channel, three in the Irish Sea, 
three offshore the Republic of Ireland and seven in Great Britain. 

Yours faithfully 

ERC ENERGY RESOURCE COltSULTANTS LIMITED 

DC Wilson 
Technical Director 


4.5 The Welton. Nettieham and Farleys Wood fields 

These oil fields are situated in the East Midlands. The Welton reservoir comprises 
up to 250 feet of Carboniferous fluvial sandstone and shales with discontinuous 
secondary- reservoirs. The structure is fault bounded to the east and dip closed elsewhere. 
Reservoir characteristics are good in the south of the field where oil flows naturally, but 
only moderate in the north where oil has to be pumped. All 18 development wells have 
been drilled. The Nettieham field is a dip closed structure situated southwest of the 
Welton field and has the same, good quality reservoir sands and similar light oiL The 
field will be developed by one well connected to Wilton. The Farleys Wood field is 
situated immediately north of the mature Eataingofl field. The Carboniferous reservoir 
sands are of moderate quality and a light ofl is pumped from two wells. 

4.6 Forecast production 

The following table summarises our forecasts of production of gas, condensate 
and oil attributable to British Gas by field and in aggregate on the basis of its percentage 
interests at the Proven + Probable level. The forecasts for gas are based on assumed 
delivery patterns and. for the South Morecambe field m particular, these may vary 
significantly according to the severity of the weather during the periods of peak demand. 
The Rough field has been excluded from the table because only production of injected 
gas is expected in the foreseeable future. 



SECTION VII 


STATUTORY AND 
GENERAL INFORMATION 


A. INCORPORATION AND VESTING 

The Company was incorporated in England and Wiles on 1st April, 1986 under 
the Companies Act 1985 as a public limited company with registered number 2006000. 
On 31st July, 1986 a certificate to do business was granted to the Company under 
section 1 17 of that Act On 24th August, 1986 the property, rights and liabilities of the 
Corporation (other than rights and labilities in respect of British Gas Stock refined to 
below) vested in the Company under the Gas Act 


B. 

1. 



FORECAST PRODUCTION ATTRIBUTABLE TO BRITISH GAS 






LEMAN 

INDEFATIGABLE 



ONSHORE 


SOUTH MORECAMBE 

IELVI 

f A/GC GROUP} 

TOTAL 

OILFIELDS 






. Gas 


. On 


. Oil 

w 11 

(Bstfawl 


(Bxffxai 

MbWttar) 

(Bsd/yeat) 

IMM/mrl 

( Bvf/ynri 

IMbblfyear) 

(Mab/mtrl 

1985/M' 1 

18 (-J 

72 (-) 

54(7) 

36 (SI 

37(3) 

69(6) 

109(10) 

179(11) 

207(79) 

1986/87 

31 

124 

53 

37 

36 

67 

120 

228 

519 

1987/88 

71 • 

284 

50 

35 

34 

63 

155 

382 

505 

1988/89 

69 

276 

43 

30 

28 

52 

140 

358 

492 

1989/90 

88 

352 

42 

30 

38 

71 

168 

453 

483 

1990/91 

88 

352 

35 

25 

31 

59 

154 

436 

473 

1991/92 

131 

524 

38 

27 

28 

52 

197 

603 

466 

1992/93 

131 

524 

32 

23 

22 

42 

185 

589 

463 | 

1993/94 

131 

524 

28 

20 

18 

34 

177 

578 

443 

1994/95 

131 

524 

25 

18 

15 

29 

171 

571 

388 

Average for tbe years 
1995/96 to 1999/2000 

184 

735 

18 

13 

9 

16 

211 

764 

240 

Average for the years 
2000/01 to 2004/05 

253 

1.013 

10 

7 

2 

4 

265 

1.024 

122 

Average for the years 
2005/06 to 2009/10 

152 

610 

7 

5 



159 

615 

45 

Average for the years 
2010/11 to2014/15 

66 

262 





66 

262 



Average for tbe years 
2015/16 to 2019/20 

33 

132 

__ 


_ 

_ 

33 

132 


Average for the years 
2020/21 and 2021/22 

20 

80 





20 

80 



(1) Annual rates (appropriately rounded) of production are given for contract years, from 1st October to 30th September. | 

| t-) ine figures in brackets represent production from 1st July to 30th September. 1986. 





SHARE AND LOAN CAPITAL 
Share capital 

The Company’s authorised share capital on incorporation was £50,000, divided 

into 50,000 shares of £1 each, of winch two 
were subscribed at par by nominees of the 
Secretary of State. The remainder were issued 
to the Secretary of State for cash at par on 25th 
July, 1986. 


5 Potentially Commercial petroleum discoveries 

W; have identified ten petroleum discoveries in which British Gas has interests 
and where drilling has demonstrated the existence of Potentially Commercial Reserves. 
Seven are dry gas discoveries on the UKCS and three are conventional oil discoveries 
in the East Midlands. 

The following table sets out in aggregate our estimates of total petroleum initially 
in place and total Potentially Commercial Reserves at 30th June, 1986 and our estimates 
of the total Potentially Commercial Reserves attributable to British Gas on the basis of 
its percentage interests at 30th June, J 986. 


On 19th August, 1986 the authorised 
share capital of tire Company was increased to 
£8,050,001 by the creation of 8,000.000 
ordinary shares of £1 each and the Special 
Share, all of which were issued for cash at par 
on that date to the Secretary of State. 

On 20th November; 1986: 

(a) the 8,050,000 ordinary shares of£l cadi 
were subdivided into 32^00,000 
Ordinary Shares of 25p each; 

(b) the authorised share capital of the 
Company was increased to £1 2^00,00 1 
by the creation of 17,800,000 additional 
Ordinary Shares and the Directors were 
authorised and empowered, in 
accordance with the Companies Act 
1985, to allot such Ordinary Shares to 
the Secretary of State; 

(c) 17,800,000 Ordinary Shares were 
issued, credited as folly paid, to tire 
Secretary of Slate pursuant to a 
direction given by him under section 51 
of the Gas Act; 

and, conditionally on the whole of the ordinary share capital, issued and to be issued, 
being admitted to the Official List by The Stock Exchange not later than 31st December, 
1986: 

(d) the authorised share capital of the Company was further increased to 
£1.375,000,001 by the creation of 5,450,000,000 additional Ordinary Shares: 

(e) the Directors were generally authorised, in accordance with section 80 of the 
Companies Act 1985, to aflat relevant securities (as defined in that section) up 
to an aggregate nominal amount of £1,362,500,000, such authority to expire an 
19zh November 1991; 


POTENTIALLY COMMERCIAL RESERVES 




Proven 

Proven* 

Probable 

Proven* 

Probable* 

Passible 

Total petroleum initially in place 

Oif 

(Bscf) 

(MMstb) 

2,378 

2.10 

3.050 

5.24 

3,808 

13.82 

Total Potentially Commercial Reserves 
Gas 

Condensate 

Oil 

(Bscf) 

(MMbbl) 

(MMstb) 

1.703 

6.98 

0.42 

2J213 

10.43 

1.07 

2.801 

14.70 

3.01 

Total Potentially Commercial Reserves 
attributable to British Gas 

Gas 

Condensate 

Oil 

(MMbbl! 

(MMstb) 

1,174 

3.4S 

0.18 

1.466 

5.S4 

0.48 

1.797 

8.16 

1.26 


5.1 Dry gas discoveries 

The wholly-owned North Morecambe reservoir in Block 1 10/2a contains a dry 
gas in sandstones and shales of the Triassic Sherwood Sandstone Group. The structure 
^th Morecambe gas field by a graben structure and is about a 
Closure is completed to the east north and west by faulting and dip. 

8e , neralIy h, '8h *»“ ^ presence of platy illiie severely reduces 
permeability in approximaidy45 per oral, of the reservoir: 


(f) this Directors were given power; pursuant to section 95 of the Companies Act 
1985, to allot equity securities (as defined in section 94 of that Act) for cadi, 
pursuant to the authority re fe rred to in sub-paragraph (e) above, as if section 
89(1) of that Act did not apply to the allotment, but the power was limited: 

(i) to the allotment of equity securities in connection with a rights issue in 
favour of the holders of Ordinary Shares (subject to such exclusions as 
the Directors may deem necessary to deal with problems arising in any 
overseas territory or in connection with fractional entitlements or 
otherwise howsoever); f 

(ii) to the allotment (otherwise than pursuant to (I) above) of equity securities 
up to an aggregate nominal value of £68,750^)00; 

and, in the case of (ii) above, foe power was expressed to expire on the date of 
the first annual general meeting to be held after 3 1st December 1986; and 

(g) 4,100,000,000 Ordinary Shares were allotted, credited as fully paid, to the 
Secretary of State by way of capitalisation of part of the sum standing to the 
credit of the Company’s reserves. 

2. Loan capital 

On 26th August 1986. pursuant to a direction given by the Secretary of State 
under section 51 of the Gas Art, the Gompany issued a debenture to the Secretary of 
State acknowledging indebtedness in the principal amount of £8 million, repayable on 
31st December, 1986 or, if earlier, on demand. The amount outstanding under this 
debenture was repaid on 27th August, 1986. 



3. British Gas 3% Guaranteed Stock, 1990-95 

Under section 50of the Gas Act, on 24th August !986a!i n der 

to which the Corporation was entitled or subject im mediately 1 ' ‘ ■ H »» 

the tarns of issue of the British Gas 3% Guaranteed Slock. i950-95 
Treasury and accordingly were excluded from the property, rights and lwbtiu.es 
Corporation which vested in the Company. The Suck was JLI* ,, ttat 


C. MEMORANDUM AND ARTICLES OF ASSOCIATION 

The Memorandum of Association of the Company indicates that tic Com pan ; s 
principal objects are to succeed to the property, rights and liabilities o! the Corporation, 
to carry on, expand and extend the businesses of the Corporation and to carry-on 
energy-related activities. The objects of the Company are set out in foil in clause ■* of 
its Memorandum of Association. 

On 20th November; 1986 new Articles of Association were adopted by ihc 
Company conditionally on the whole of the ordinary share capital issued and to be 
issued, being ^ to the Official List by The Stock Exchange not later than 31st 
December, 1986. The effect of certain provisions of these Articles is suranunsrd in 
paragraphs 1 to 6 below. 


1 . Special Share 

The Special Stare may only be held by or transferred to the Secretary of Slate, 
another Minister of the Crown, the Treasury Solicitor or any other person 3Cimg on 
• behalf of the Crown. The registered holder for the time being of the Special Share ithe 
“Special Shareholder") may. after consulting the Company; require the Company to 
redeem the Special Share at par at any time. 

The Special Shareholder is entitled to receive notice of and to attend and speak 
at, any general meeting or any meeting of any class of shareholders, but not to vole at 
such a meeting. The Special Share confers no right to participate in the capital or profits 
of the Company, except that on a winding-up the Special Shareholder is entitled to 
repayment off I in priority to other shareholders. However, each oflfte following matters 
is deemed to be a variation of the rights attaching to the Special Share and is only 
effective with the consent in writing of the Special Shareholder 

( a \ the amendment, removal or alteration of the effect of certain definitions ( relating 

primarily to the Special Share) in the Articles, of the Special Share Article, or of 
the limitation on shareholdings (referred to in paragraph 3 below fc 

fb) the creation or issue of any shares with voting rights, not being fi) shares 
comprised in the relevant share capital (as defined in section 198(2) of the 
Companies .Act 1985) of the Company or (ii) shares which do not constitute 
equity share capital and which, when aggregated with all other such shares, carry 
the right to cast less than 15 per cent, of the votes capable of being cast on a poll 
at any general meeting; or 


(c) the variation of any voting rights attached to any shares. 

2. Ordinary Shares 

(a) Dividends 

The holders of Ordinary Shares are entitled to the profits of the Company 
a vailaWe for dividend and resoN ed to be distributed, in proportion to the number 
of Ordinary Shares held by them and the amounts paid up on the shares. 

(b) Return of capital 

On a winding-up, the balance of the assets available for distribution, after 
deduction of any provision made under section 719 of the Companies Act 1985 
and repayment of the amount paid upon the Special Share and subject to any 
special rights attached to any other dass of shares, shall be applied in repaying 
to the holders of Ordinary Shares the amounts paid up on those shares, and any 
surplus assets will belong to the holders of Ordinary Shares in proportion to the 
numbers of shares held by them and the amounts paid up os the shares. 

(c) Voting 

Subject to the restrictions referred to in "Restrictions on Voting" below, on a 
show of hands every bolder of Ordinary Shares who is present in personal any 
general meeting shall have one vote and on a poll every such holder who is 
present in person or by proxy shaU have one vote for every share of which he is 
the holder. 

3. Limitation on shareholdings 

The limitation on interests in voting shares of the Company, set out in Article 
40 of the Articles of Association, is described briefly beiow. 


(a) For the purpose of these provisions, the expression “inierest"is widely defined. 
It generally follows, but is more extensive than, the definition used in deciding 
whether a notification to the Company would be required under Pan VI of the 
Companies Act 1985 and wifl generally include the interest of a holder of an 
Interim Certificate. Any pe r so n who has an interest in voting shares of fi ve per 
cent, or more is required to notify the Company of that interest and is otherwise 
obliged to give notices in relation to interests in voting shares as currently 
provided in Part VI of the Companies Act 1985. 

(b) Ifany person ba* orappears lo the Directors to have; an interest in shares which 

cany 15 percent or more of the total votes attaching to the relevant share capital 
(as defined in section 198(2) the Companies Art 1985) of the Company oris 
deemed to have mch an interest (in a case where the Directors resolve that they 
are unable to ascertain the position), the Directors shall give notice io all persons 
(other than persons referred to in (e) below) who appear to them to have interests 
in the shares concerned and, if different, to die registered holders). The notice 

will set out the restrictions referred to below and win cafl for the interest concerned 

to be reduced to less than 15 per cenLty disposal of shares within 21 days of the 
notice being given to the registered holders) (or such longer period as the 
Directors consider reasonable). No transfer of the shares to which the interest 
relaxes may then be made except for the purpose of reducing the interest to less 
than 15 percent. 

(c) Ifsuda a notice is given and is not complied with in all respects to the satisfaction 
of the Directors and has not been withdrawn, the Directors sha ll themselves 
effect such a disposal on snch terms as they may determine, based upon advice 
obtained by them for the purpose. 


(d) A registered bolder to whom such a notice has been given is not, until the notice 
has been withdrawn or complied with to the satisfaction of the Directors, entitled 
m respect of any of his shares to which the interest concerned relates to attend 
or vote at any general meeting of the Company or meeting of the holders of 
voting shares, and those rights will vest in the chairman of any such meeting 
who may exercise them entirely at his discretion. 


eifojhis identity or to address. The absence of.nSkt h, suSZ ZeJnTZy 
acadentti error m orfaflure to give any notice to any person to whom notice is 
reqmred to be given will not prevent the implementation of or invalidate any 
procedure under; the relevant Article. * 

^ Any ^tonwd«OTmiiatiou of or decision or exercise of any discretion or 


win* miihv uuAM urn 

of a trustee or fiduciary nature. 


(b) 



(ii) 

(iii) 


dass meeting or to exercise any other right conferred by m 
relation to meetings of the Company if he or any other oersdU . 
to be interested in dte duires has been given a notice under*£i 
the Companies Act 1985 and fails to give the Company an?S 
required by the notice within 28 days from the date ofthTnoric 

A member shall also not be entitled to attend or vote in the rire., 
described in paragraph (d) of “Limitation on shareholdings"^ 

In addition, a member shaO not be entitled, in respect of am, 
vote at any general meeting or separate class meeting unw ,ii 
presently payable by frim m respect of the shares have beenpak 

Record dates and unclaimed dividends 

Tbe Company or the Directors may fix a date as the record date hv 

which a dhndend will be declared or paid, whrther or not h is before Vh 

which the declaration is made. Any dividend unclaimed for a nerirJf 
years after having become due for payment will, if the Director* 
forfeited and cease to remain owing by the Company. No divided " 
will bear interest against the Company unless tbe rights attachedm 
provide otherwise. M 




4 . 




£ 


V. 


* 




* 




THE TIMES TUESDAY NOVEMBER 25 1086 


47 


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British Gas pic continued 1 13 


□□□□□□□□□□□□□ 


(C) 


(d> 


(e) 


5. 

(a) 


Variation of rights 

22522 p-i-s- Act 19SS. the rights attached to any 

ot S* tte mann «-as may be provided by those righto 

of th? issued shares !S ?Ii hree q ?* nB ? in nomi ^L vaIue 

TesohirionTwiMaMaTLlLr® 1 class ’ w w,th ^ sanction of an extraordinary 
SSTothSS? « I !3 ar " e ? eet, °S oflhe holders of the shares of that dass. 

j P !^ y L? OV!ded ** ,he ri 8 hts attached to any dass of shares. 
JSSJ reduction ofcapiiaJ iid upon those 
for ca vmem^r a h ^ ^ or issue ^ Irl ^ r shares ranking in priority to them 
voliSriSIs Cnd S re ? aymeTJl of capital or which ronfa-on the holders 

hSS v O«niMe than **>0* conferred by the fust-mentioned shares. 

?£ ^ ** 0,6 cre8lion or issue °f fttnher shares ranking 

pan passu with them or subsequent to them. 

Transfer of shares 

2S2E.S2* may **, waasferrcd by an instrument in any usual form or in 
SJ25E STLrwJEiJ* lh t2 ,rectors - The Directors may refuse to register 
8 “frf rf * 0) °f Ordinary Shares which are not fully paid, (ii) not stamped 
and dub- presented For registration together with the shareoertificatc and suS 
°r ®V h f P 1 !* CU)rs reasonably require, (iri) in respect of more 

than one class of share, (iv) in favour of more than four transferees or (v) made 
in the circumstances referred to in paragraph 3(b) above. 

Alteration of capita! 

T**® $°® par W may- by ordinary resolution, increase its share capita], consolidate 
S °S ,ls sh ? res imo shares of larger amount, subdivide all or 

an y or ns shares into shares of smaller amount, and cancel any shares not taken 

by , a n o y r p £ rsoQ * Th e Company may, subjea to the provisions 
of the Companies Act 1985, by special resolution, reduce its share capital, any 
capital redemption reserve and any share premium account 


Directors 

Each Director shall be paid a fee for his services as a Director of such an amount 
as the Directors may determine, not exceeding £25.000 per annum or such larger 
amount as the Company may by ordinary resolution determine. The Directors 
may also be paid ail expenses properly incurred Try them in connection with the 
discharge of their duties as Directors. 

A Director who holds an executive office under; or who is employed by, the 
Company or who provides it with services outside the scope of the ordinary 
duties of a Director, may be paid such extra remuneration as the Directors think. 
fiL 


The Directors may provide benefits, whether by the payment of gratuities or 
pensions or by insurance or otherwise, for any Director who has held but no 
longer holds any executive office or employment with British Gas and for a 
member of his family or other dependant. 

(b) Subject to the provisions of the Companies Act 1 985, and provided that he has 
disclosed to the Directors the nature and extent of any material interest of his, a 

.. Director is not by reason of bis office disqualified from being a party to, or 
otherwise interested in, any transaction or arran ge m e nt with the Company, or in 
which the Company has an interest, or with a body corporate in which the 
Company has an interest, or disqualified from being an officer or employee of 
any such body corporate, or liable to account to the Company for any benefit 
thereby derived; and no such transaction or arrangement is liable to be avoided 
on the ground of any such interest or benefit. 

Except as otherwise provided by the Articles, no Director may vote or be counted 
in a quorum at a meeting in relation to any resolution concerning a matter in 
which he has a material interest (other than an interest in shares, debentures or 
other securities of, or otherwise in or through, the Company). The prohibition 
will not apply to: 

(i) the giving ofany guarantee, security or indemnity to a Director in respect 

of money lent to or obligations incurred by him for the benefit of the 
Company or any of its subsidiaries; 

(fi) the giving of any guarantee, security or indemnity to a third party in 
respect of an obligation of the Company or any of its subsidiaries for 
. which the Director has assumed responsibility in whole or in part under 
a guarantee or indemnity or by giving security; 

(iii) the participation of a Director in the underwriting or sub-underwriting of 
an offer of shares or debentures or other securities of the Company or any 
of its subsidiaries for subscription, purchase or exchange; 

(iv) any proposal for a retirement benefits scheme which has been approved 
or is conditional upon approval by the Board of Inland Revenue for 
taxation purposes; 

(v) any arrangement for the benefit of employees of the Company or any of ‘ 
its subsidiaries which does not accord to tire Director as such any privilege 
or advantage not generally accorded to the employees to whom die 
arrangement relates; or 

(vt) any proposal concerning any other company in which the Director is 
interested, whether as an officer; creditor or shareholder provided that be 
is not the holder (other than as bare trustee) of or beneficially interested 
hi one per cent, or more of any class of the equity share capital of the 
company (or ofany third company through which his interest is derived) 
or of the voting rights of members of such company. 

The Company may try ordinary resolution suspend or relax the provisions 
prohibitinga Directorfromvoting at a meeting of the Directors. 

(c) The provisions of section 293 of the Companies Act 1985 (relating to the 
appointment and retirement as Directors of persons who are aged 70 or more) 
do not apply to the Directors. 

(d) At each annual general meeting, one third of the Directors who are subject to 
retirement by rotation (or, if their number is not three or a multiple of three, the 
number nearest to one third) shall retire from office by rotation. The Chairman 
of the Directors, the Chief Executive Director and one other Director bolding 
such executive office as the Directprs may determine; are not sulgMro retirement 
by rotation. 

6. Borrowing powers 

The Directors, who may exercise all the powers of the Company to borrow money 
(with or without security), must restrict the borrowings of the Company and exercise 
all powers of control exercisable by the Company in relation to ixs subsidiaries so as to 
secure (as regards its subsidiaries, so for as by such exercise they can secure) that tire 
aggregate principal amount outstanding of all borrowings by the Company and its 
subsidiaries (the “Group") (excluding amounts borrowed by any member of the Group 
from any other member of tbe Group), shall not without the previous sanction of an 
ordinary resolution of the Company exreed an amount equal to 0-7 times the aggregate 
oflhe amount paid up on the share capital of the Company and the total of tbe capital 
and revenue reserves oflhe Group, as shown by the latest audited cons o li d a t ed accounts 
of the Group. The borrowings restriction will be calculated by reference to the CCA 
balance sheet but the Articles provide for the multiple of 0.7 referred to above to be 
replaced by am ultiple of two if the latest accounts of the Group include an HCA balance 
sheet but no CCA balance sheet. The Articles also make provision for certain liabilities 
to be treated as borrowings, for the compulation of borrowings and for the adjustment 
of share capital and reserves. Until the firsiaudiied accounts of the Group are published, 
the amount of the said limit on borrowings will be £10 billion. 


7. Attendance at meetings 

If at any time tbe Company has a very large number of shareholders it may 
need to seek authority to restrict or regulate, where appropriate, attendance at general 
meetings on a basis as fair as possible to all members and without prejudice to voting 
rights. 

D. DIRECTORS' INTERESTS 

Save as disclosed in this Part, none oflhe Directors has or has bad any interest 
in any transactions which are or were unusual in their nature or conditions or significant 
to the business ofthe Croup and which were effected by ibe Company or the Corporation 
since 3 1st March. 1 985 or were effected fay the Corporation before that date and remain 
in any respect outstanding or unperformed. 

No Director has any interest in the share capital of the Company or its 
subsidiaries; executive Directors may participate in the employee share schemes 
described in Part E of this Section and in the special arrangements for employees 
applying for shares, and Directors may apply like any other member ofthe public under, 
the Olfer for Sale. 

It is estimated that on the basis of the arrangements in force at the date of the 
Offer for Sale the aggregate remuneration («dusive of 

benefits in kind) of the Directors during the year ending 31st March, 1987 would be 
£422.800 ( 1 986-£376.500V 

All the executive Directors have entered into service agreements with the 
Company. The expiry dates of such agreements are as follows: 

_ Dote 

£22- Rooke 30111 June ’ 1989 

Mr 30111 September, 1988 

Mr r wnJLtev 31st Decamp 1989 

f!r‘ r P V SSvSn 28111 February. 1 989 

Mr- C. E. Dom** 11 1?lh December, 1986 

Mr' l\?eH SST 3 1 51 D**® 1 ** 1 988 

is Sri 3 1 51 December; 1989 

2SUj Juftt 1989 

Under the service agreement for Mr. Evans the Company may. by notice, vary 
Under irwservicc^J dd—minable bv not less than three years notice served 

“Si— in pm** 5(d) of C of to 

™ L™* jnif^^Strgniive Directors and the Chairman and the Chief Executive, 
compnsmg all the i non remuneration and Other terms of employment of the 

a^mptmeredto^^nwihere^^ 0 ° fmanagemOTt below the Board. Having 

the^^t^have dedded that following the 

admission of the Ordinary Shares to the Official List 


(i) notice should be given under Me Evans' agreement varying it, as indicated above, 
so as to make it determ inabk: by not less than three years* notice; 

(ii) the agreements for the other executive Directors, with the exception of Sir Denis 
Rooke and Me Jewers, should be amended so as to be determinable by not less 
than three years' notice, such notice to expire not earlier than the relevant expiry 
date shown above; and 

(iii) the annual remuneration of tbe executive Directors should be increased to the 
following rates: 


Director 

Remuneration 

Sir Denis Rooke 

£175,000 

Mr. R. Evans 

£115,000 

Mr. C W Brieriey 

£85,000 

Me. G E. Donovan 

£85,000 

Mr. W G. Jewers 

£95,000 

Mr. J. McHugh 

£93,000 

Mr. W R. Probert . 

£83,000 

Mr. A. Sutcliffe 

£68,000 


The remuneration of the executive Directors stated above is inclusive of 
Directors' fees. 

Tbe fees for each of tbe non-exeentive Directors -will, with effect from the 
admission of tbe Ordinary Shares to the Official List, be at the rate of £10,000 per 
annum. 

Had the increased remuneration described above been in force with effect from 
1 st April. 1986, the aggregate remuneration of tbe Director (luring the year ending 3 1st 
March, 1987 would be £789,800. 

Sir Martin Jacomb, a non-executive Director of the Company, is also Executive 
Chairman of Barclays de Zoete Wedd Limited, one of the U.K. Underwriters referred 
to in Pan G of this Section. 

E. EMPLOYEE SHARE SCHEMES 

The Company has established a profit-sharing scheme and a savin gs-relaicd 
share option scheme. Certain provisions of these schemes may be amended by the 
Directors with the approval of the Inland Revenue, but their basic structure (and in 
particular the limitations on participation and an the number of shares that may be 
. issued under them, indicated below) cannot be altered without the prior sanction of the 
Company in general meeting. 

Employee profit-sharing scheme (the "Profit-Sharing Scheme”) 
The Profit-Sharing Scheme, which has been approved by the Inland Revenue 
under the provisions of the Finance Act 1 978 (as amended), will be used in conjunction 
with the Offer for Sale as described in paragraph 3 of Part A of Section IX below. It may 
also be used to acquire shares in future years for eligible employees of the Company 
and to participating snbadian^ to bepaid for out of profits. In this event, the Company 
and die participating subsidiaries wifi make payments to the trustees of the Scheme 
who will use the funds either to buy shares in the market or to subscribe for them. The 
subscription price will be the greater of the nominal value of a share on the date of 
subscription and the market value of a share which, so long as the shares are listed on 
Tbe Stock Exchange, will be the middle market quotation derived from the Daily 
Official list for the second dealing day immediately preceding the date of subscription. 

The Directors win decide whether the Profit-Sharing Scheme is to be operated 
In any year and, if so, the proportion ofBritish Gas profits of the relevant financial year 
to be allocated for the Scheme, which may not exceed five per cent, of the profits of 
British Gas (before tax and e xt raordinary items) attributable to its operations in the 
United Kingdom. It is not intended to operate the Scheme after it has been used in 
coqjunction with the Offer for Sale until 1 988 in respect of the year ending 3 1st March, 
1988 at the earliest. 

Tbe maximum value of shares appropriated to any participant under tbe 
Profit-Sharing Scheme in any year may not exceed the greater of £1,250 and ten per 
cent of salary (subject to a maximum of £5,000). 4 

The Finance Act 1978 requires that shares appropriated pursuant to the 
Profit-Sharing Scheme must beheld by the trustees for a minimum period of two years 
after appropriation, during which they may not be dealt with in any way except in 
certam circumstances such as death, reaching statutory pensionable age or redundancy. 
For the following three years the trustees must retain the shares unless a participant 
instructs them otherwise and thereafter the shares may be transferred to the participant. 

AH shares approp riate d under the Profit-Sharing Scheme will rank pari passu in 
all respects with afl other ordinary shares then in issue. Application will be made to the 
Council of The Stock Exdiange for listing on The Stock Exchange of the shares issued 
pursuant to the Profit-Sharing Scheme. 

While a participant’s shares remain held by tbe trustees a participant will be the 
beneficial owner of his shares and be entitled to receive dividends and, through the 
trustees, to vote and to participate in rights and capitalisation issues and elect to receive 
scrip dividends in substantially the same way as other shareholders. 

Saving-related share option scheme (the "Sharesave Scheme”) 
The Company has adopted a Sharesave Scheme which has been submitted to, 
and is expected to be approved by, die Inland Revenue under the provisions of the 
Finance Act 1980. To join the Sharesave Scheme, eligible employees of tbe Company 
and ofits participating subsidiariesmnst enter into a Save-As-'Vbo-Earn contract (“SAYE 
contract") with Nationwide Building Society to make 60 monthly contributions of not 
less than £10 nor more than £1 00 (or such greater amount, not exceeding £1 50, as may 
be permitted by statute) and may use those savings to subscribe for ordinary shares in 
the Company on the maturity of their SAYE contracts (five yean after they commence 
saving). 

Each eligible employee so joining will be entitled to apply for an option at a price 
per share ("Option Price") which will be fixed by the Directors but which wifi be not 
less than the greater of (0 the nominal value per share and (ii) 90 per cent, of tbe average 
market value of a fully paid share over the three dealing days immediately preceding 
tbe invitation to take up options. While the instalments are outstanding on shares sold 
in the Offer for Sale, market value wifi have to be agreed with the Inland Revenue. 
Thereafter; it will be determined by reference to the middle market quotation on The 
Stock Exchange. Each option granted will be over such number of shares as have an 
aggregate Option Price not exceeding the total monthly contributions, plus tbe bonus 
payable on maturity ofthe SAYE contract 

An option may only be exercised by the person to whom it was granted, or his 
personal representatives, mid is not transferable. 

In normal circumstances options may only be exercised within six months of the 
fifth anniversary of the starting date of the SAVE contract and while the participant 
remains an employee. Where, however; a participant ceases to be an employee of 
British Gas in certain arcumstances such as injury, redundancy or reaching statutory or 
contractual pensionable age, be wQl have six months from the date of leaving within 
which to exercise his option. Where a participant dies before the fifth anniversary, the 
option can be exercised within twelve months ofhis death. If he dies within six months 
after the fifth anniversary, the option can be exercised within twelve months from that 
anniversary. In the event of the take-over; reconstruction, amalgamation or voluntary 
winding-up ofthe Company, options may be exercised within six months ofthe relevant 
event. In all cases of early exercise the participant will only be able to exercise his option 
over shares having an aggregate Option Price equal to tbe contributions made and 
interest (if any) received under his SAVE contract at the date of exercise. 

Shares issued pursuant to the Sharesave Scheme wifi rank pari passu in all 
respects with ordinary shares then in issue, but they will not participate in any dividend 
or other rights attaching to shares by reference to a record date preceding the date of 
exercise. The Company will apply to tbe Council of The Stock Exchange for listing of 
the shares issued pursuant to the Sharesave Scheme. 

The Directors intend to issue the first invitations under the Sharesave Scheme 
in early 1987. Thereafter invitations may only be issued in the 30 day period following 
tbe announcement of the yearly or half yearly results. 

Share scheme limits 

The Profit-Sharing and Sharesave Schemes are subject to the following limits on 
the number of shares that may be subscribed for. 

(a) not more than 550 million shares, representing ten per cent of the authorised 
ordinary share capital of the Company on admission of the Ordinary Shares 
to the Official List of The Stock Exchange, may be issued pursuant to the 
Profit-Sharing Scheme using funds provided by the Company and its 
participating subsidiaries; 

(b) not more than 550 million shares, representing ten per cent, of the authorised 
ordinary share capital of the Company on admission of the Ordinary Shares to 
the Official List of Tbe Stock Exchange, may be issued id the ten-year period 
ending on 1 6th September, 1996 pursuant to options granted under the Sharesave 
Scheme; 

(c) .in any yeaq not more than oae percent, ofthe issued ordinary share capital of 
the Company may be subscribed for by the trustees of the Profit-Sharing Scheme 
using foods provided by the Company and its participating subsidiaries; 

(d) in any three-year period, not more than three per cent, of the issued ordinary 
share capital may in aggregate be so subscribed by the trustees or placed under 
option under the Sharesave Scheme (save in tbe five-year period following the 
Ktabtishment of the Schemes, when five per cent, of such issued ordinary share 
capital may be so subscribed or placed under option); and 

(e) in any ten-year period, not more than ten per cent, of the issued ordinary share 
capital may in aggregate be so subscribed for by the trustees or placed under 
option. 

The limits referred to in (a) and (b) above, but not the percentages, may be 
adjusted in the event of a capital reorganisation. 

. Approved Share Option Scheme 

The Remuneration Committee comprising all the non-executive Directors, 
which is referred to in Part D of this Section, will give consideration to the introduction 
of an Approved Share Option Scheme under the terms of the Finance Act 1984 for 
executive Directors and senior management- Any such scheme, if approved by the 
Remuneration Committee, would be put before shareholders for their approval. The 
grant of options under the scheme would be dealt with by the Remuneration Committee 
and no grams would be made, at the earliest, until after the Annual General Meeting in 
1988. 


F. WORKING CAPITAL 

The Directors consider that, taking account of available facilities, British Gas has 
sufficient working capital for its present requirements. 

G. UNDERWRITING 

(a) Tbe following arrangements have been made for underwriting tbe Offer for Sale: 

(i) invitations to apply under the Offer for Sale for. in aggregate. 3,230 million 
Ordinary Shares, (the “U.K_ Offered Shares") are being made on 2 1st 
November; 1986 to certain institutions (who may include U.K. 
Underwriters referred to below). Each such institution will be invited to 
apply (or procure that applications are made by or on behalf of funds 
under its management) for a number of Ordinary Shares in respect of. 
which it (or each such fond) (a “Priority Applicant") will ( I ) be guaranteed 
an allocation of 30 per cent, of such Ordinary Shares (“Firm Placing 
Shares"), (2) be provisionally allocated (subject to recall as set out in ' 
paragraph (c) below) 20 per cent, of such Ordinary Shares (“Provisional ■ 
Placing Shares"), and (3) undertake to purchase the balance of such 
Ordinary Shares (“Commitment Shares") if they are not otherwise 
allocated in the U.K. Public Offer. Priority Applicants will receive from 
the Secretary of State a commission of 0.5 per cent, of the aggregate value 
at the Offer for Sale price of their Firm placing Shares and 1.25 per cem. 
of the aggregate value at the Offer for Sale price of their Provisi onal Placi ng 
Shares and their Commitment Shares; and 

(ii) an agreement (the “U.K. Underwriting Agreement") dated 2 1 si 
November, 1986 has been entered into between ( 1 ) the Secretary of State 
(2) the Company (3JNM Rothschild & Sons Limited and tbe underwriters 
named therein (the “U.K. Underwriters") and (4) the Directors of the 
Company, pursuant to which the U.K. Underwriters agreed to apply as 
Priority Applicants for such ofthe U.K. Offered Shares as are not applied 
for by Priority Applicants. Tbe agreement provides for the Secretary of 
State to pay underwriting commissions to N M Rothschild & Sons Limited 
on behalf of the U.K. Underwriters and a commission to N M 
Rothschild & Sons limited for arranging the underwriting amounting in 
aggregate to 0.275 per cent, of the aggregate value at the Offer for Sale 
price of the UX Offered Shares. In addition the Secretary of State has 
agreed to pay fees to the Broken to the Offer for Sale. 

(b) On 21st November, 1986 tbe Secretary of State and the Company entered into 
the following separate agreements (the "Overseas Underwriting Agreements") in 
respect of offerings to be made m the United States, Canada, Japan and Europe 
(the “Overseas Offerings") in respect of an aggregate of 795.5 million Ordinary 
Shares; 

(i) an agreement with Goldman, Sachs & Co. and others as representatives 
of a syndicate of U.S. Underwriters (the “U.S. Underwriters") pursuant 
to which the U.5. Underwriters severally agreed io purchase (subject to 
reduction as provided below) 285.5 million Ordinary Shares (in the form 
of American Depositary Shares each representing ten Ordinary Shares 
( u AD5s")and evidenced by first interim American Depositary Receipts). 
The amount payable by the U-S. Underwriters in respect of the first 
instalment will be the equivalent of £5.00 per ADS together with 7.5p in 
respect of United Kingdom stamp duty reserve lax (“SDRT"), translated 
into U.S. dollars at a rate determined by reference to the spot market 
selling rate for pounds sterling in London on or about 8th December. 1 986; 

(ii) an agreement with Wood Gundy Inc. and others (the “Canadian 
Underwriters") pursuant to which the Canadian Underwriters severally 
agreed to purchase (subject to reduction as provided below) 170 million 
Ordinary Shares (in the form of ADSs and evidenced by first interim 
American Depositary Receipts). The amount payable by the Canadian 
Underwriters in respect of the first instalment will be the equivalent of 
£5.00 per ADS together with 7.5p in respect of SDRT translated imo 
Canadian dollars at a rate determined by reference to the spot market 
selling rate for pounds sterling in London on orabout 8th December, 1986; 

(iii) an agreement with The Nomura Securities Co.. Ltd. and others (the 
“Japanese Underwriters") pursuant to which the Japanese Underwriters 
jointly and severally agreed to purchase (subject to reduction as provided 

* below) 1 70 million Ordinary Shares at the Offer forSale price. The amount 
payable by the Japanese Underwriters in respect of the first instalment is 
to be translated into Japanese yen at the forward exchange rate ruling in 
Tokyo on or about 5tb December, 1986, for value ou 1 2th December. 
1986; and 

(iv) an agreement with Swiss Bank Corporation International Limited and 
others (the “European Underwriters") pursuant to which tbe European 
Underwriters jointly and severally agreed to procure, as agents for the 
Secretary of State, applicants for, and foiling which to apply and pay for. 
170 million Ordinary Shares (subjea to reduction as provided below) (the 
“European Offering Shares") at the Offer for Sale price. 

As compensation to the Underwriters for their obligations puisuam to each of 
these agreements the Secretary of State has agreed to pay commissions to them 
(or, in the case of the European Offering, to intermediaries procured by or through 
the Underwriters) amounting in aggregate to 1 .65 per cent, of the aggregate value 
at the Offer for Sale price (translated, where appropriate, at the relevant rate of 
exchange) for the U.S. Offering Shares, the Canadian Offering Shares, the Japanese 
Offering Shares and the European Offering Shares respectively (together, in the 
case ofthe European Underwriters, with United Kingdom VAT payable thereon). 
In addition, the Secretary of State has agreed to pay to the U.S. Underwriters, the 
C an a d ia n Underwriters and the Japanese Underwriters amounts equal to interest 
on the aggregate amount of the first instalment of the shares to be purchased by 
them respectively. Such interest is to be calculated for periods of eight days (in the 
case of the U.S. and Canadian Underwriters) and four days (in the case of the 
Japanese Underwriters), at rates to be agreed between tbe Secretary of Suite and 
the relevant Underwriters. The Overseas Underwriting Agreements also provide 
for the payment by the Secretary of Sate of certain expenses incurred by the 
Underwriters. 

Each of the Overseas Underwriting Agreements will become unconditional if the 
U.K. Underwriting Agreement becomes unconditional. 

(c) The arrangements with the Priority Applicants and the Overseas Underwriters 
provide that, if valid applications under the U.K. Public Offer are received in 
rrapect of more than 3,230 million Ordinary Shares, tbe Pro visional Placing Shares 
will be recalled from Priority Applicants and 40 per cent, of the Ordinary Shares 
comprised in the Overseas Offerings will be withdrawn from those Offerings, and 
the Ordinary Shares so recalled and withdrawn will be added to Ordinary Shares 
available for the U-K. Public Offer. Arrangements have also been made with the 
Overseas Underwriters under which Ordinary Shares may be withdrawn from the 
Overseas Offerings to meet estimated requirements for share bonus entitlements. 
Tbe U.S., Canadian, Japanese and European Underwriters have agreed 
respectively to provide the Secretary of State with Ordinary Shares at the Offer for 
Sale price for such purpose should their estimates of the number of Ordinary 
Shares required be insufficient. 

(d) The U.K. Underwriting Agreement and the Overseas Underwriting Agreements 
contain certain warranties and indemnities in favour of the Underwriters by the 
Secretary of State. The U.K. Underwriting Agreement contains, inter alia, certain 
conditions and provisions for termination in the event of a material change in 
relevant arcumstances; if it is terminated the Overseas Underwriting, Agreements 
will also terminate. In this event the U.K. and Overseas Underwriting Agreements 
mate certain provisions relating to fees, commissions and other expenses. 

(e) In respect ofthe Offer for Sale and the Overseas Offerings the Company has entered 
into an agreement dated 2lsi November. 1986 with the Secretary of State and the 
Directors and certain employees of the Company whereby (i) the Directors have 
given to the Secretary of State warranties relating to the Offer for Sale and the 
Directors and certain employees have received an indemnity from the Secretary 
of State in relation to certain liabilities under the Offer for Sale and the Overseas 
Offerings and (ii) the Company has given to the Secretary of Slate a warranty in 
relation to those parts of the offering documents to be used in the Overseas 
Offerings which relate to the Company and has received an indemnity from the 
Secretary of State in relation to the Offer for Sale and tbe Overseas Offerings. 

(f) The Secretary of State, tbe U.K. Underwriters and each of the Overseas 
Underwriters have entered imo an agreement for the purpose of ensuring the 
orderly marketing ofthe Ordinary Shares under the Combined Offer, ft prorides, 
inter alia, that the UiL, Canadian. Japanese and European Underwriters will 
(subject to limited exceptions} confine iheir offers and sales until the end of the 
initial distribution of Ordinary Shares pursuant to the Combined Offer to U.S„ 
Canadian, Japanese and European Persons (as defined therein) respectively. 

H. SELLING AND DISTRIBUTION COMMISSIONS 

I . Selling commission 

Selling agents (namely members ofThe Stock Exchange, licensed dealers, members 
of the Financial Intermediaries. Managers and Brokers Regulatory Association 
(“FIMBRA’T and exempted dealers, but not members of Cheque and Credit Gearing 
Company Limited, their retail banking subsidiaries and certain other designated banks 
(“U.K. Clearing Banks**)) are eligible to receive selling commissions from H.M. 
Government Only shares allocated to successful applicants applying on yellow, orange, 
newspaper or green forms (excluding shares which represent a guaranteed allocation 
under the Customer Share Scheme described in paragraph 2(bj(i) of Part A of Section 
DC below) will qualify for such selling commission. The amount of selling commission 
payable to each sellingageni will be whichever is tbe lower ofthe two aggregate amounts 
cal cul ated by applying, the applicable rates mentioned below to: 

(i) the value of each allocation of such shares (calculated on the basis of (he Offer for 
Sale price) resulting from successful applications made on such forms submitted 
to the receiving banks bearing such selling agent's stamp and VAT registration 
number; and 

(ii) the value of cadi allocation of such shares (calculated as in (i) above 1 resulting 
from successful applications shown on the requisite claim forms submitted by that 
selling agent to National Westminster Bank PLC New Issues Department. P.O. 
Box No. 79, 2 Princes Street, London EC2P 2BD. on or before 3 1 si December. 
1986. 

Such selling commission will be payable to selling agents and, where applicable, 
reallowable to financial intermediaries, on the relevant allocations at the following rates: 
(a) on any such allocation with a value of up to £10,000: (.75 per cent, of The 
Offer for Sale price (of which I per cent, ofthe Offer for Sale price will be 
reallowable to the financial intermediaries mentioned below); and 



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lb) on an\ such allocation with a value g f more than £ 1 0.<Xi0: !.? 5 per cent- of 
the Offer :br Sale price on the lirsi £10.000 (of u-hkh I percent. of the Offer 
for Safe pr.ci wi!! be so realign abk*'i and 0.5 percent, on the balance, subject 
;o a ntzMmum pa - , men l of £375 (of which 0.25 per cent, of the Offer for Sale 
price uili be so rrallowabfe subject to a maximum pavmcm of £2001. 

The financial intermediaries which arc eligible for reallowance of such selling 
commissions are recognised banks and licensed deposit takers (within the meaning of 
the Banking Act l^ bat excluding U.K, Clearing Banks), solicitors of the Supreme 
Court, members of ihe institutes of" chartered accountants, members of (he Chartered 
Association of Certified Accountants, insurance brokers registered pursuant to the 
insurance Brokers (Registration I Act 1977 and members of the British Insurance 
Brokers' Association, in each ca^e in the United Kingdom, the Channel Islands and the 
hie of Man. Commissions must not be realigned to any other person, in each case, 
such financial intermediaries must submit applications bearing their stamps and also 
the stamps of the soiling agent by whom commission will be reallowed. and should also 
submit to that reliir.g agent the requisite claim forms completed for all applications 
bearing their stamp. Where an application form has been stamped b> a U.K. Geanng 
Bank claiming distribution commission, no selling commission will be payable. 

Selling commission* v. ill not be payable on applications which are. or arc believed 
lo he. muluple applications. Cnmrnal proceedings may be instituted if selling 
commissions or reallowances are knowingly claimed in respect of multiple applications. 
Those claiming selling commissions or reallowances must adopt adequate procedures 
to prevent multiple applications being made through them and must keep adequate 
records of the procedures they operate and of the application forms they distribute or 
submit. H.M. Government has appointed Touche Ross & Co, to review the procedures 
adopted and records kept by those claiming commission and. for such purpose. H.M. 
Government reserves the right for Touche Ross & Co. to be given access to claimants* 
premises and records and. if H.M. Go-.ernmem sees fit. to cam- out an audit of 
commissions that may be payable. H.M. Government further reserves the right not to 
pay selling commission to any selling agent whose stamp appears on any application 
which is or is belies ed to be a multiple application, or who fails to satisfy- Touche Ross i 
Co. that adequate procedures have been adopted and followed. Commissions payable 
by H.M. Government will be rounded down to the nearest 50pand will be paid together 
u’nh VAT on them. No selling commission will be payable by H.M. Government to any 
person who would other* iso be entitled to a pay ment of less than £10. 

2. Distribution commission 

Distribution commissions (plus VAT ifapplicable) will be payable to U.K. Clearing 
Banks fj-i defined above i on :i;e viJue of each allocation of Ordinary Shares (calculated 
on (he basis of the OiTer for Sale price) resulting from successful applications made on 
yellow public application forms distributed by them and bearing, their stamps and their 
\ AT registration numbers i ii any ) a; the rate of0.375 per cent, of the Offer for Sale price, 
vubjeef to a maximum of £3“.50 per application. Distribution commissions will not 
be payable on applications which are. or are believed to be. multiple applications. 
Commissions payable by H.M. Government will be rounded down to the nearest 50p 
and will be paid together "with VaT on them. No distribution commission will be payable 
by H.M. Goa eminent :o any person who would otherwise be entitled to a payment of 
less '.nan £ i 0. 

I. SUMMARY OF 7 Ac .INSTALMENT AGREEMENT 

1 . Introduction 

The Ordinary Share* being sold arc w be paid fer over some 17 months (the 
“Instalment iVnou 'i. To enable purchasers to sell freely without prejudicing the 
interests of the Secretary ofStaie. an Instalment Agreement dated 2 1 si November. J9S6 
hits been entered into between the Company. National Westminster Bank PLC (the 
“Custodian Bank'*) and the Secretary of State to which every purchaser will also be a 
party. In this Pan. a “purchaser" means a person whose application to purchase Ordinary- 
Shares is accepted or in whose favour renunciation of a letter of acceptance is registered 
or taller 3. ft) p.m. on 20s n February. I^i'y a person lin this Par., a “registered holder**) 
who is registered in the register of interim rights provided for in the Instalment 
Agreement un this Part, the "register" i. An “interim right’ means a purchaser's rights 
and obligation* in relation to an Ordinary Share. A “related share” means the Ordinary- 
Share the subject of an tnierm right. The Instalment Agreement will prevail if 
imcnsisicm with this summary. Copies arc available for inspection as stated in 
paragraph 1 3 of Part \ of this Section and until 30th June. I 98$ at the Custodian Bank's 
office at Caxion House. PO. Box 343. Redd i lie Mead Lane. Bristol BS°9 7SQ. from 
where copies may also be obtained on payment of a reasonable fee. The Instalment 
Agreement does not apply to Ordinary Shares allocated under the Free Offer or Matching 
Offer lo employees or the Pensioner Free Oiler described in paragraph 3 of Pan A of 
Section !\ below. 

2. Principles cf the instalment Agreement 

The Ordinary Shares subject to the Instalment Agreement will be registered in the 
Custodian Bank's name ur.sil lull} paid for. interim rights will initially be ev idenced by 
letters of acceptance, which will be superseded in due course by Interim Certificates 
issued by the Custodian Bank in accordance with the timetable set out in P3rt D of 
Section i\ below. Registered holders of interim righis will be registered as the holders 
oft he related shares ; n accordance with such timetable after all the instalments have been 
duly paid, i he Instalment A tree men: is designed, subject to its terms and paragraphs 3 
to 14 {inclusive* Mew. to confer and impose on purchasers righis and obligations 
substantially similar to those conferred and imposed on the Company’s shareholders. 
Only the purchaser of ar. interim right is entitled to be recognised as the owner of that 
interim right, and no trust need be recognised, subject to any court order to the contrary 
and paragraph 1 J below. 

3. Default in payment 

If a purchaser fails to pay when due any instalment of the price for any Ordinary- 
Share. the agreement by the Secretary of State to sell that Ordinary Share may (without 
prejudice to the Secretary of State’s other rights) be avoided and the Ordinary Share 
sold to someone else. The defaulting purchaser w ill receive a sum equal to the amount 
of the insialmemtsi previously paid or treated as paid for the related share without 
interest after deduction of the expenses of sale and any loss sustained by the Secretary 
of Stale. If the Secretary of State in his discretion accepts late payment, he may do so 
on the basis that the purchaser pays default interest as set out in the Instalment 
Agreement. If any pay mem is insufficient to satisfy the instalment in respect of an entire 
holding of interim rights, it will be applied so that the instalment is satisfied in respect 
ofas many interim righis as possible. 

4. Cash dividends 

Registered holders will receive in respect of their interim righis the benefit of any 
cash dri idend declared by the Company in respect of the related shares. Cash dividends 
will be sent by cheque or warrant to registered holders (to the address of the first named 
in the register, in the case of joint holders) at their risk. 

5. Capitalisation issues 

If there is j capitalisation issue of new' shares ranking pari passu in all respects 
with the existing Ordinary Shares, the Secretary of Slate and the registered holders will 
be deemed to have agreed to sell and purchase them on the following basis: subject to 
provisions for dealing w iih fractional entitlements, the price agreed to be paid for the 
existing Ordinary Shares will be proportionately distributed over the existing Ordinary 
Shares and the new shares attributable thereto and the instalments already paid and 
remaining to be paid will be similarly distributed, so that a registered holder will be 
obliged to pay no less and no more for his increased holding than for his original holding 
and the Secretary of State's right to receive further instalments in respect of each share 
will be proportionately distributed over the increased holding. 

S. Rights issues 

Registered holders will be able to participate in respect of their interim rights in 
any nghis issue made by the Company substantially to the same extent and effect as if 
they were the holders of the related shares.The Instalment Agreement contains 
provisions for determining 3 price per share below which righis issues may not be made 
during the Instalment Period without the Secretary ofState's agreement 

7. Other distributions and issues 

Subject id provisions dealing with fractional entitlements, any securities (other 
than Ordinary Shares) issued pursuant to a capitalisation issue, and any non-cash 
distribution made, by the Company to the Custodian Bank as the holder of any related 
shares will normally be retained by the Custodian Bank and transferred by it to the 
relevant registered holders after the Instalment Period, subject to the registered holder 
paying any stamp duty or stamp duly reserve tax in connection with such transfer. 
Registered holders at the time when such an issue or distribution is made to the 
Custodian Bank may as a result have to satisfy a tax liability before they receive the 
transfer. 

8. Transfers 

After the renunciation period, interim righis will be transferable in the same way 
as fully paid shares. No transfer will be registered without delivery to the Custodian 
Bank of a duly completed and siamped instrument of transfer supported by the relevant 
document of title (which may be required in accordance with the timetable set out in 
Pan D of So. non IX below to be duly receipted as to. or accompanied by payment of. 
ihe next instalment and. if so demanded, default interest if late payment is accepted!. 
The Custodian Bank may call for further evidence to prove title or the right lo transfer. 
On registration of renunciation or transfer, the renounce? or transferee becomes the 
new registered holder of the relevant interim rights and a party to the" Instalment 
.Agreement and emit led and subject lo the righis and obligations conferred thereby 
uneluding the obligation to pay instalments) to the exclusion of any predecessor in 
title. The person tendering any documents) for registration is deemed lo warrant his 
authority to do so as. and/or on behalf of. the rcnouticee(sl or transferees) named 
therein. The instalment Agreement contains further provisions dealing with transfers 
of interim nghts and transmission on death, bankruptcy and menial incapacity and 
Winding transfers in favour of persons who arc not of full capacity or to more than 
Jour persons joins Jy. 

3. Meetings 

Registered holders (or the first named m the register, in the case of joint holders) 
wjj] receive notices of meetings of shareholders of the Company and may attend, speak 
and 'Ole in respect of their related shares to a similar extent and subject to similar 
resuic tions as if they » ere shareholders. Provision is also made for meetings of registered 
holders, which may K* convened by the Custodian Bank, the Company or the Secretary 
of State, or. if the Custodian Bank receives such funds, indemnity and security as it may 
require, by registered holders together holding one tenth or more of all the interim 
rights, an-j any resell:! ion passed at such a meeting binds all registered holders. A 
registered holder ■•■.hose registered address is outside the United Kingdom and wrho 
tshes to recet'-e notices of meetings of the Company or of registered holders must give 
tne C usicdiar. Bank an address « ithin the United Kingdom to which they may be sent. 


10. Reports, accounts etc. 

Registered holders (or the first named in the register, in the case of joint holdersi 
will receive copies of all reports, accounts and circulars which the Company sends to 
its shareholders generally. 

1 1 . Limitation on holdings 

The provisions of file Articles of .Association which limit the size of shareholdings 
as described in paragraph 3 of Part C of this Section are applied to interim rights in 
substantially the same way as they apply to related shares and any disposals required 
under those provisions will, in so far as they relate to related shares, generally be of 
imerim rights, raiher than ihe relaird shares. Any registered holder of interim rights by 
virtue of which any person is (or appears to ihe Directors, or is deemed, to be) interested 
in related shares who does not dispose of ihose interim rights when required to do so 
under those provisions and ihose of the instalment Agreement may be prevented from 
receiving the related shares, or exercising voting righis in respect of or transferring those 
interim righis (otherwise than for the purpose of reducing his interests in accordance 
with such provisions), and some or all of those interim rights may be sold on his 
behalf. If imerim rights are so sold, the proceeds of sale, without interest and following 
deduction of the expenses of sale, will be paid to the former registered holder upon 
surrender to the Custodian Bank of the Interim Certificareft) in respect 'of ihe interim 
righis so sold. 

1 2. limitations on duties and liabilities 

The Instalment Agreement contains limitations on the liabilities and duties of the 
Custodian Bank, the Secretary of State and the Company and provisions indemnifying 
the Custodian Bank and relieving if from responsibility in certain circumstances. 

1 3. Amendments 

The Custodian Bank, the Company and the Secretary of Sate may amend the 
Insialmem Agreement without the consent of the purchasers in order to cure any 
ambiguity, defect or manifest error or in any manner (including, without limitation, to 
facilitate dealings or settlements on The Stock Exchange or any other securities market) 
which would not in their opinion materially prejudice the interests of the purchasers. 

14. Taxes etc. 

Purchasers may be required to execute or furnish documents in order to comply 
with tax or other requirements in respect of their interim rights or the related shares. 
Except as specified in the Instalment Agreement, each purchaser is responsible for all 
taxes, duties and government charges and expenses which may become payable in 
respect of his interim rights or the related shares. Therefore, if any of the same are paid 
or pay-able in the first instance by the Custodian Bank as holder of the related shares, 
the purchaser must pay the same to the Custodian Bank upon request. Failure to do so 
may result in the sale of some or all of the purchaser’s interim rights or the related 
shares. 

J. UNITED KINGDOM TAXATION OF DIVIDENDS 

When the Company pays a dividend it also accounts to the Inland Revenue for 
advance corporation tax (’.ACT*). The rate of ACT is fixed by reference to the basic 
rate of income tax and at present equals 29 per cent, of the aggregate of the dividend 
and of the related ACT 

A bolder of an Interim Certificate or Ordinary Share wbo is resident (for tax 
purposes) in the United Kingdom and who receives a dividend from the Company will 
be entitled to a tax credit of an amount equal to the related ACL A company resident 
in the United Kingdom will be able to treat any dividend received and the related tax 
credit as franked investment income. An individual will be taxable upon the total of 
the dividend received and the tax credit, but the tax credit will discharge his liability to 
basic rate income tax and if the tax credit exceeds his liability to tax on the dividend 
he will be able to claim the excess. 

Subject to certain exceptions for Commonwealth citizens, citizens of the Republic 
of Ireland, residents of the Isle of Man or the Channel Islands and certain others, the 
right of a holder of an Interim Certificate or Ordinary Share who is not resident in the 
United Kingdom to Haim any part of the tax credit will depend upon the existence and 
terms of any double tax treaty between the United Kingdom and the country in which 
he is resident. Persons who are not resident in the United Kingdom should consult their 
own tax advisers concerning their tax liabilities on dividends received, whether they 
are entitled to claim any part of the tax credit and. if so, the procedure for doing so. 

K. MATERIAL CONTRACTS 

The following contracts, not being contracts entered into in the ordinary course of 
business, have been entered into within the period of two years immediately preceding 
the publication of ibis document and are. or may be. material: the. £2,500 million 
debenture referred to in paragraph 2 of Part B of this Section; the underwriting 
agreements referred to in Part G of this Section; and the warranties and indemnities 
agreement referred to in paragraph (e) of Part G of this Section. 

U LITIGATION 

British Gas has not been engaged in any litigation or arbitration which may nave, 
or has had within the last twelve months, a significant effect on the financial position 
(including results of operations) of British Gas and no litigation or claim which may- 
have such an effect is known to the Directors. 


M. SUBSIDIARY COMPANIES 


Details of the Company's principal subsidiaries, which are all wholly owned, are 


as follows: 

Name Of subsidiary Activity 

Gas Council (Exploration) Limited Exploration 

Hydrocarbons Great Britain Limited Exploration 

Hydrocarbons Ireland Limited Exploration 


Share capital 
(issued and fidly paid) 
£100 
£100 
IR£100 


Gas Council (Exploration) Limited and Hydrocarbons Great Britain Limited are 
incorporated in England and Whies and the registered office of each is at Rivermiil 
House, 152 Grosvenor Road. London SW1V 3JL. Hydrocarbons Ireland Limited is 
incorporated in the Republic oflreiand and its registered office is at Gardner House. 
Wilton Place. Dublin 2. 


N. MISCELLANEOUS 

1 . On admission to the Official List, the Ordinary Shares will be “wider-range 
investments" within the meaning of the Trustee Investments Act 1961. 

2. Rating: except with respect to certain premises (such as office premises not situated 
on operational land and showrooms) which are subject to normal rating, the Company 
is not liable to be rated in the normal way, but is instead rated in accordance with 
formulae specified in orders made by virtue of the Local Government Act 1974 and the 
General Rate Act 1967 (and equivalent Scottish legislation). Rates amounted to 5.8 per 
cent, of non-gas costs of the gas supply business in fixe year ended 3 1st March, 1986 on 
a CCA basis and 6.6 per cent on an HCA basis. Following the publication of the Green 
Paper “Paying for Local Government" in January 1 986. the basis of rating all ratepayers, 
including all statutory undertakers such as British Gas, is to be reviewed although the 
Government does not expect to implement the outcome before 1990. If such a review 
were to lead to a substantial increase in the level of rate payments by British Gas there 
could be an adverse effect on profit unless the price formula under the Authorisation 
were modified to allow for an increase of this aature. 

3. Planning: under the Town and Country Planning General Development Order 
1 977 (and an equivalent order in Scotland) the Company, as a gas undertaker, is exempt 
in certain respects from the requirement under the Town and Country Planning Act 
197 1 (and equivalent Scottish legislation) to obtain planning permission. These respects 
indude the laying of underground mains, pipes or other apparatus and the canying out 
of certain other developments. 

4. Compulsory purchase: by virtue of the Gas Act the Company, as a Public Gas 
Supplier, may be authorised by the Secretary of State after consulting the Director 
Genera] to purchase compulsorily any land or rights over land (other than land or rights 
held by the Crown). Any such acquisition will be subject to established procedural 
requirements and provisions for compensation under the Compulsory Purchase Act 
1965 and the Acquisition of Land Act 1981 (and equivalent Scottish legislation); and 
any land or right so acquired may not be disposed of except with the consent of the 
Director General 

5. Save as disclosed in this Section VII: 

(a) no share or loan capital of the Company since its incorporation or of any of its 
subsidiaries within the three years before the date of the Offer for Sale has been 
issued or agreed to be issued (except, in the case of subsidiaries, to the Company 
or the Corporation) or is now proposed to be issued, fully or partly paid, either for 
cash or for a consideration other than cash; 

(61 no commissions, discounts, brokerages or other special terms have been granted 
by the Company since its incorporation or by any of its subsidiaries within those 
three years, in connection with the issue or sale of any share or loan capital of any 
of those companies: and 

(c) no share or loan capital of the Company or any of its subsidiaries is under option 
or agreed conditionally or unconditionally to be put under option. 

6. No material issue of shares in the Company (other than to shareholders pro rala 
to their existing shareholdings) will be made within one year of the date of the Offer for 
Sale without the prior approval of shareholders in general meeting. 

7. Under the Gas Act the Secreiary of State is required to specify' a “target investment 
limit**, which sets a ceiling on the proportion of issued voting shares held by H.M. 
Treasury and the Secretary of State or their nominees. The Gas Act requires the limit 
to be set. at the level of H.M. Government's shareholding at the time the limit is 
established, as soon as expedient (and not later than six months) after the sale of shares 
to the public. The limit may be reduced, but not increased, by further orders. 

8. The Directors have been advised that the Company is not expected to be a dose 
company, as defined in the Income and Corporation Taxes Act 1970. immediatdy 
following the Offer for Sale, 


9. Save as disclosed in Pan E of Section i. there has been oo siyiifiaBt charge it: 
the financial or trading position cf British Gas since 3 1st March, .-ob. 

1 0. The expenses of and incidental to the Combined Offer and ^rT3n£C“Tvn.s 
for employees and pensioners described in paragraph 3 of Phrt A Q* Scc.ion . % ooe 
borne by ihe Company arc estimated to amount to £18 million {exclusive o* ■ .uc 
added tax). The balance of such expenses (including underwriting commissions 3..C 
preliminary expenses of the Company) will be boroe by the Secretory o. Sate. 

11. N M Rothschild & Sons Limited and KJciawon Benson Limited ia« ^ 

have not withdrawn their written consent to the issue of this document with u»inciu»:an 
of their fetter m the form and context in which it is included. Price Vtaumivi&c nave 
given and have not withdrawn their written consent m the issue of this document uil. 
the inclusion of their report and their letter and with the references thereto acu to s«.eir 
name in the form and context in which each is included. ERC has given and us not 
withdrawn its written consent to the issue of this document with the inclusion o. its 
report and the references thereto in the form and context in which each is rnc.ua^- *. 
Watson & Sons have given and have nor withdrawn their written consent lo ifce issue 
of this document with the references to their name in the form and context in ’'nich 

they are included. 

12. Any person (including any natural person, company, government or por.tiral 
sub-division thereof) which becomes the -beneficial owner" (as defined in the Undid 
States Securities Exchange Act 1934. as amended) of more than five per «»*- o. 'x 
Ordinary Shares becomes subject, under the terms of that Act. to an obligation to tife 
prescribed repeats of beneficial ownership (and reports of changes in such ownersaipj 
with the United States Securities and Exchange Commission (xhc**S£C”j. the New Y.:r\ 
Stock Exchange and the Company on a form prescribed by the SEC. Any person 
(including anv individual, partnership or trustee) or company that becomes the 
beneficial owner of more than ten per cent, of the Ordinary Shares becomes subject, 
under the terms of the securities legislation in certain provinces of Canada, to an 
obligation to file prescribed reports of beneficial ownership (and reports of changes in 
such ownership) with the Quebec. Ontario. Manitoba, Saskatchewan. Alberta and 
British Columbia securities commissions and with The Toronto Stock Exchange, m a 
prescribed form. 

1 3 Copies of the following documents may be inspected at the offices of Herbert 
Smith, Witling House. 35 Cannon Street, London EC4 during usual business hours or. 
any weekday (Saturdays excepted) for a period of fourteen days following the date of 
the Offer for Sale: 

(a) the Memorandum and .Articles of Association of the Company- 

lb) the Gas Acs and the relevant statutory instruments, directions and orders 
thereunder. 

(c) the Authorisation granted to the Company under the Gas Act 

(d) the statements made pursuant to the Authorisation and the assurances referred to 
in Sections I and HI above; 

(el the audited accounts of the Corporation for the two years ended 31st March . ' 9yy. 

<f ) the accountants* report set out in Section IV above together with the statement 
setting out the adjustments made in arriving at the figures contained in the repurv 

(g) the letters from Price Waterhouse, N M Rothschild &. Sons Limited and Klein -a ort 
Benson Limi ted relating to the profit forecast and set out in Section V above. 

(h) the report of ERC Energy Resource Consultants Limited set out in Section vj 
above; 

(i) the Directors' service agreements referred to :n Part D of this Section. 

(j) the trust deed constituting the Profit-Sharing Scheme and the roles o: -he Sfaanrsa v e 
Scheme referred to in Pan E of inis Section: 

(k) the Instalment Agreement referred to in Part 1 of this Section: 

0) the material contracts referred to in Part K of this Section: and 
(m) the written consents referred to in paragraph i 1 of this Part 


SECTION Vili 

SPECIAL INCENTIVES 


A. ELIGIBILITY 

if ycu apply for shares in the Offer for Sale, you may be eligible tc receive fre-n 

H. M. Government, free of charge. EITHER vouchers for use against gas bdh. f-«n 
British Gas OR a share bonus. The special incentives are orjy available if you buy ;ix* 
shares in the Oifer for Sale and not if they are bought subsequently. 

To be eligible to apply for these special incentives, you must be ar imhv.duai 
investing solely for your own benefit (cr investing jointly with not more than three 
other individuals, solely for the benefit of one or more of you). Applications made by 
indi vjduals on behalf of children may also qualify for the special i ncec&i vcs. Com pan ;es. 
partnerships, firms, trusts, associations and dubs are not eligible for these special 
incentives but they may apply as nominees for eligible individuals (see paragraph 4 of 
Plan C of this Section). These special incentives are not available under the “ Free Offer- 
or “Matching Offer** or the “Pensioner Free Offer** (all as described in paragraph J of 
Part A of Section IX), or to institutional investors applying under the arrangements 
described in Pan G of Section VII. 

B. THE INCENTIVES 

I . Bill vouchers 

(a) \fatue and entitlements 

For every whole multiple of 100 shares you buy in the Offer for Safe and hold 
continuously until certain qualifying dates, you can receive £ 1 0 worth of vouchers < ap 
to a maximum entitlement of £250). The way in which the voucher scheme w:!I work 
is illustrated in the table below: 

ENTITLEMENT TG VOUCHERS 1 

ON THE QUALIFYING DATES 


Number of 
shares held 
continuously! 

30th June 31st Dec. 30th June 3 1st Dec 30th June 3 1st 
1987 1987 1988 1988 19S9 

Dec. 

1 9o9 Tool 

100 

£10 

• — 




_ 

— £10 

200 

£20 

— 

— 


_ 

— £20 

300 

£30 

— 



_ 


— *30 

400 

£40 

— 

_ 

— 


— £40 

500 

£40 

£10 





— { £50 

600 

£40 

£20 

_ 




— ' £6C 

700 

£40 

£30 






— £70 

800 

£40 

£40 





— £80 

900 

£40 

£40 

£10 




— - £$0 

1,000 

£40 

£40 

£20 




— £109 

1,500 

£40 

£40 

£40 

£30 


— £]SG 

2,000 

£40 

£40 

£40 

£40 

£40 

— £200 
£50 £250 

1 

2,500 
or more 

£40 

£40 

£40 

£40 

£40 


EXA 5 flP ^f-tfy° u recede 500 shares in the Offer for Sale, you will be entitled ro a 
voucher of £40 on 30th June, 1987 and a voucher of £10 on 31 st December 1 98“ 
provided you hold the shares until 3 1 si December. 19S7. If you onlv hold the shares 
until say. November 1987. you will only be entitled to a vouched of £40 

On each qualifying date you will be entitled to one voucher, worth £ 1 0 for ever 
whole multiple of 100 shares bought in the Offer for Sale and held continuously U nn 
then, less the value of the vouchers already received. However, the maximum vourhe 
vrdue on any qualifying date will be £40 (£50 on the last qualifying date) ThU vS 
will be posted to you about two weeks after each qualifying date. 

(b) Conditions of use 

Ybur vouchers can be used when making any payment due to British Gas if iha 

f ° r Bas . sup P*! ed lor standing charges) for vour use or bench 
m your home. A declaration to that effect (on the reverse of the voucher! w iil have i< 
be signed when you use a voucher. 1 “ ‘ 

m h, When W* 1 ** current method which continue 

to be available at the ume of payment. If you nave a cornroperaied meter emptied b- 
Bnush Gas. you will be able to use your vouchers to obtain a refund If sou use : 
voucher against gas charges which are less than the value of the voucher you ran 

3 ^ t -° r -S C ^ in J ,,n,,ed u C,Tajn,Slan ‘ :es ' a refill Details 

will be issued with the vouchers. arrangem*-™ 

Your vouchm may be used even if ,1k bill is not issued i„ vour uume provide, 
Ihe eas hwi iwd Of supphed. „l ieusl m part, for your beuefi, In vour home w Th' 
case you will need the person named on the gas bill to agree to vour vouch.™ h,-,r 
used 10 pay that bill and. as appropriate, recompense you^ou are a terum ^ are i 
similar aicumuans. and you are not sure that suchan arrangement can be ™de o 
may wish to consider the share bonus instead of the vouchers. J 

joint names, but addressed to the person named first on ihe register^ vimS u 
a person acting as a com, nee Tor an md.v.dual may only be used by iteuSiS 

If you lire in Northern Ireland or any other area not served by British G-s . o, 
may not be able to use vouchers and may wish to consider applying forSelterchonV 

Ail vouchers will cease to be valid for use after 30lh September. 1 Mta 



□□□□□□□□□□□□□ 


British Gas pic continued 




2. Share bonus 

i„ ,„c 

\ shares you rraive is *» •"«* "o 

fter l i^aDMnS^igSSni Wi, !i? e tra . D f ferred to you as soon as reasonably practicable 
? ?? ,pgelher WITh aH "e* 115 attaching to those shares at the date 
S ™ ^H.Kovt^? n,P d “' y " :SCTve lax on or in respect of.hr nonsfer 

10 ohlahi'wrttlui^EJeiil lo^^sha^bonu*"*^ 6 ' nveslors unt * er ^ Overseas Offerings 

C - and I share™nSs ,: the b,ll vouchers 

1 . Disposals of shares 

qualifying ^te you dispose or any of your shares 
bought m the Oner for Sale, your entitlement to bill vouchers or the share bonus may 
be lost or reduced (whether or not you later acquire more shares). In the case of joint 
investors, a disposal by any of them will be treated as a disposal by all. 

A transfer will not result in loss of entitlement if it is made after 20th February. 

, ^ 1 987 on a special transfer form provided that the Secretary of State is that* 

V (a) the transfer involves the registration of the shares, following the death of the 
original owner, m the name of an individual entitled to such shares under 
original owners will or on his intestacy (in which case any vouchers already 
issued but unused by the original owner may, on application, be reissued in the 
name of such individual); or 

(bl the transfer will not involve any change in the beneficial ownership of the shares 

and the beneficial owner is, on registration of the transfer; the sole or joint holder 
ora person under 18 years of age for whose benefit the transferor held the shares; 

(c) the shares are transferred by joint holders into the name(s) of one or more 
individuals of then- own number without the addition of any other person(s). 

The special transfer forms will be obtainable from National Westminster 
PLC. Registrar's Department, Cax ton House, P.O. Box 343, Redcliffe Mead Lane, Bristol 
BS99 7SQ. 

2. Loss of and changes In entitlement 

Ybu will lose all rights to bill vouchers or the share bonus if you make a multiple 
application or if you apply in breach of the declaration on your application form. Ybu 
will not receive Bill vouchers so long as any instalment due on your shares remains 
unpaid, and you will lose all rights to bill vouchers or the share bonus if some part of 
your entitlement to shares is cancelled or proceedings are commenced to recover the 
instalment. The number of shares which will be taken into account in calculating 
^ enlillenjems to bill vouchers or which will qualify for the share bonus (and the maximum 
-i number of bonus shares) will be amended pro rata {ignorin g fractions) if there is any 
capitalisation issue or any consolidation or subdivision of the: Company's share capital. 

3. United Kingdom tax position 

Under current law and Inland Revenue practice you wiU not pay lax on bill 
vouchers. The value you obtain from your bill vouchers is deducted (for tax purposes) 
from the amount which you paid for your shares, although this will not matter unless, 
in the tax year in which you dispose of your shares, your taxable gains (when added to ' 
those of your husband or wife) exceed the exempt amount for the year (currently £6,300). 
You will not pay tax on the share bonus, but you will be treated fra* tax purposes as if 
you had paid for it an amount equal to the market value of the shares received on 31st 
December. 1 989. These rules do not, however, apply to dealers in 

4. Applications by nominees 

Nominees may only apply for bill vouchers or the share bonus on behalf of 
eligible individuals, and in such cases the nominee must apply jointly on a single 
application form with no more than three such individuals) by entering die nominee's 
own name in Box l on the application form and the name(s) of such individual(s) in 
Box 7. The nominee should sign Box S on the application form. Box 7 should be signed 
b> the individual(s). or by the nominee on behalf of such individual^), if be is duly 
authorised todoso. but powers) of attorney must be enclosed forinspection. A nominee 
means a person who retains no beneficial interest in the shares nor any right to acquire 
< such an interest from the beneficial ownerfs). 

5. Definitions 

Where the context permits, references to shares in this Section include references 
to entitlements to Ordinary Shares evidenced by fetters of acceptance or Interim 
Certificates. References to holding Ordinary Shares or Interim Certificates are references 
to being the beneficial owner of those Ordinary Shares and. as the case may be, being 
(during the renunciation period) the addressee of the letter of acceptance relating to 
those Ordinary Shares or being (thereafter) the registered bolder thereof in the register 
of the Custodian Bank or of the Company. Entitlements at any qualifying date will be 
determined by reference to the relevant register as at 3 pjn. on that date. 

- . • 

# SECTION IX 

APPLICATIONS AND DEALINGS 

A. APPLICATIONS 
1 . General 

Special personalised application forms with fell details on bow to use them are 
,&ing sent by the British Gas Share Information Office to those who registered their 
Interest by 14th November; 1986. There are also special arrangements for British Gas 
employees and pensioners. 

Others wishing to apply for shares should complete a public application form, 
such as the form at the end of this document. 

ONLY ONE APPLICATION MAT BE MADE FOR THE BENEFIT 
OF ANY PERSON. If you make or authorise anyone else to make an application 
for your benefit under the Offer for Sale on any one of the forms mentioned above, 
you cannot make or authorise any other sach application for your benefit. Criminal 
proceedings may be instituted against anyone knowingly malting or authorising more 
than one such application for the benefit of any person. Multiple applications or 
suspected multiple applications are liable to be refected. Photocopies of application 
forms will not be accepted in any circ um s t a n ces. 

2. Customer Share Scheme 

(a) Eligibility 

If you registered as a customer with the British Gas Share Information Office by 
14th November. 1 9S6, you will have been sent a green application form which you may 
use only if; 

fti) you currently use gas from British Gas for your own domestic purposes in your 
. home through its own separately metered gas supply; and 
(ii) your application is the only application made under this Scheme in respect of 
that supply; and 

(iii) you are an individual investing solely for your ^nbwrftforiteva^ngjotofy 
with not more than three other individuals, solely for the benefit of individuals 
living in your home). 

Ybu do not have to be the person named on the gas bill, provided that you meet 
all three conditions set out above. 

Companies, partnerships, firms, mats, associations and clubs may not appfy 
under the Customer Share Scheme, unless they are acting as nominees for individuals 
who would themselves be eligible. 

(b) Guarantee and preference 

If you are eligible and make a valid application under this Scheme, then, subject 
to the Terms and Conditions set out in Section X: 

(i) your awrfication will ( 3 ) be accepted m full (if you apply for 100 or 200 shares) 
or^bfbeaKeptcd to the extent of at least 200 shares (if you apply for more than 

(ii) you will be given preference on a basis to 

if heavy demand for shares results in applications being scaled down. 

$ Dp to ten per cent, of the shares in the U.fC Public Offer has been reserved to 

provide ^ppliSntTJnS the Customer Share Scheme w,th greater 

than they would have received had they apphed successfully on public application 

forms. 

3. Special arrangements _fOr ^mptoyees 
and pensioners of British Gas 

lb ’ OK"-, „.**»»* 

. Qfa for Safe prior I payable 1 J STpSSi t-Shari ns Scheme. H.M. Government 

W share so purchased and ccU under the T*rof _5 ng . c ^ aj _ c shares 

Hill transS-T So trustees of the Profit-Sharing Scheme, fore ot cnaige. two awn 

to be held for the benefit of that employee. ,. R 

« 0«r. “ oSK 

apply for (i) up to 1.48 1 snares at a d.scoimi equal* per number 

Sjte Priori lo be given on the final date on which the final* 

of such shares held ckihm^ * J- hasten* in priority over 

maialmeftr is payable i and < » ) «P 1 described below, 
public applications, but to snhttg dowti as 


<d) i he "Pensioner Free Offer", under which any person with an address in fee 
United Kingdom who on 13th November. 1986 was in receipt of a pension or 
pension benefit which he is entitled to be paid pursuant to cither the British Gas 
Staff Pension Scheme or the British Gas Corporation Pension Scheme, and who 
applies, will be given by H.M. Government, free of charge. 56 shares: and 

(e) the “Pensioner Priority Offer", under which any person with an address in the 
United Kingdom who is eligible for the Pensioner Free Offer or who was on 1 3ih 
November, 1986 entitled to receive, from a date later than that date, a pension 
pursuant to either of the pension schemes mentioned above, may apply for up 
to 1 8.5 J 9 shares in priority over public applications, but subject to scaling down 
as described below. 

All valid applications received in the above offers will be met in fuIL except for 
applications under the Priorit