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No 62,625 



TIMES 


WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 26 1986 


North and Poindexter in slush fund for Contra rebels scandal 


Reagan aides go 


arms deal row 


In an astoitishujg disclosure 
that added to the furore in 
America over the Iran affair. 
President Reagan announced 
yesterday that Admiral John 
Poindexter, his National Sec- 
urity Adviser, had resigned, 
and Colond Oliver North, the 
shadowy military adviser in 
the NSC had been sacked, 
followinga secret operation in 
which money from arms sales 
to Iran was diverted for the 
Nicaraguan Contra rebels. 

- No successor to Admiral 
Poindexter has yet been ap- 
pointed; and Mr Reagan said a 
full. commission would now 
undertake a “comprehensive 
review" of the role and proce- 
dures of thcNatiooal Security 
Council staff in the conduct of 
foreign arid national security - 
policy. 

Mir Edwin Meese, the Attor- 
ney-General, promising to 
give full and immediate de- 
tails to Congress, said that 
between $10 million (£7.1 
milli on) and $30 million was 
taken by representatives of 
Israel, who sold the US-made 
weapons to bran, put into 
Swiss bank accounts estab- 
lished by supporters of the 
Contras, and diverted to Cen- 
tral America. 

No one in the US Govern- 
ment knew about this apart 
from Colonel North, though 
Admiral Poindexter was 
aware for some time that 


From Michael Binyou, Washington 



Admir al Poindexter: Aalrad 
to be posted back to Navy. 


on. A full 
is now under way to 

criminal charges 

be laid, and against 


see 

should 
whom. 

President Reagan, tense and 
grim, said in a hurriedly 
convened press conference, he 
had not been fiiDy informed of 


this transaction, which “raises 
serious questions of 
propriety”. - 

Over the weekend a Justice 
Department investigation had 
shown that one aspect of the 
President’s Iran policy was 
“seriously flawed”. 

He said: “I'm deeply trou- 
bled that the implementation 
of a policy aimed at resolving 
a truly tragic situation in the 
Middle East has resulted in 
' such controversy." 

He added: “While I cannot 
reverse what has happened. 
I'm initiating steps to assure 
that the implementation of all 
future foreign policy and na- 
tional security policy initia- 
tives wfll proceed only in 
accordance with my 
authorization.” 

The disclosure of the slush 
fund for tire Contra comes as a 
bombshell as the Administra- 
tion struggles to regain 
credibility. 

The Swiss accounts were set 
up at a time when official US 


Government aid to the 
Contras was banned by Con- 
gress. AD the arms were sent 
after January 1986, but the 
$100 million in military and 
humanitarian aid voted by 
Congress this year tee only 
just begun to be transferred to 
the Contras. 

The evidence of a Contra 
link came to light when Justice 
Department investigators 
found an apparent dis- 
crepancy between what the 


Man in the news 8 

The Israeli role 8 

National security 
botseat lo 


Shadowy world of 
disgraced colonel 


Tomorrow 


The ear of 
Die President 



In the troubled 
White House: Nancy 
Reagan is no 
ordinary first Lady. 
A profile ofiha most 
influential adviser of 
them all. 



• The Times Portfolio 
Gold daily competition 
prize of £4,000 was 
won yesterday by Mrs 
J.W. Smith of 
Femdown, Dorset 
Details, page 3. 


• Portfolio list, page 
27; how to play, 
information service, 
page 20. 


TiMES BUSINESS 


Dollar falls 


The dollar fell below two 
marks, hit by a sharp drop in 
US factory orders and loss of 
market confidence in the 
Reagan Administration after 
the Poindexter resignation 


Barclays slide 

Shares in Barclays Bank slid 
I0p to 477p after rising 
sharply on Monday when tire 
company announced it was 
selling ns stake in Barclays 
National Bank of South Africa 
Page 21 




Higgins’ fate 

Alex Higgins, the former 
snooker wortd champion, to- 
day faces the possibility of a 
long suspension after allegedly 
butting a tournament director 
in the face Page 42 


Calls to Bar 


Calls to the 
Michaelmas term 
fished today 


in the 
are pub- 


Home News 2-7 
Overseas 8-12 
Apple 28 
Am 13 

BirthMeaths, 
“■rages 19 
Business 21-28 
Cowl 18 
CnamnkI4^ 
May 18 
Events 28 
Features 14-M 


Law Depart 
Leaders 
Letters 


28 
17 
17 

. 18 

Rutiuaent 4 
property 3Q£1 
Safe Boom 5 
Sdeoce 7 
Sport 37-4M3 
Taodm^fic / 12 
TV A Radio 41 
Weather 28 


St 


By Philip Jacobson 

If half tire rumours about tary Affairs 
Iientenant-Colond Oliver L, 

North that have been doing 
the rounds in Washington are 
true. President Reagan was 
employing a combustible 


a 

combination of “gung-ho” ad- 
venturer and deep-thinking 
p ro fe ssi onal soldier. But as 
befits the man said to have 
been running the Administra- 
tion's most sensitive clandes- 
tine operations for tire past 
five years, North was a dis- 
tinctly shadowy and . elusive 
figure, _ ... ‘ 

. Journalists investigating his 
reported involvement at -the 
cense of tire White House’s 
Controversial -weapons-for- 
Ameri can hostages negotia- 
tions with lean soon found the 
National Security Council, 
where North worked as Dep- 
uty Director of Political-Mili- 


had even for- 
bidden the release of his 
previous record with the Ma- 
rine Corps. 

Former comrades from the 
43-year-old North's days in 
counter-insurgency warfare in. 
Vietnam were hardly more 
communicative about allega- 
tions that Ire hadbeen respon- 
sible for recruiting and 
supervising aprivate network 
of Vietnam veterans to para- 
chute military supplies to tire 
Nicaraguan Contras after the 
1984 vote in Congress to cut 
off all US military aid. 

It was no more possible to 
confirm seemingly wefl-ip- 
formed reportslhal North had 
been . involved in advance 
planning of the American 
invasion of Granada in 1983 
and subsequently in the 
. Continued on page 8, cel 4 


aims should have cost and 
what was actually received 
from the Iranians. Precise 
details are still being sought, 
and Mr Meese was unable to 
say whether any US citizens 
bad broken tire law in tire 
transactions. 

The Administration has 
told Congress that the value of 
the US arms supplies to Iran 
was about $12 million. All of 
this was received by the 
Department of Defence. 

It appears that the Israelis - 
who, Mr Meese insisted, were 
acting on their own and not as 
government officials - were 
paid far more for the arms by 
the Iranians than anyone 
knew. They then, with the 
presumed encouragement of 
Colonel North and Contra 
supporters, paid the balance 
into the Swiss accounts for the 
Contras to draw on. 

Mr Mt*se, under a barrage 
of questions, said that Mr 
George Shultz, tire Secretary 
of State, who strongly advised 
a gainst the arms sales to Iran, 
would stay a his post. So also 
.would aD the other Admin- 
istration officials, including 
■ Mr Donald Regan, the White 
House chief of staff 

He refused to criticize Mr 
Shultz's public distancing of 
himself from the Administra- 
tion over the affair and he 
denied that he had recom- 
mended with other California 


Continued on page 8, col 4 


Fowler 
backs free 
needles 


DjPhffipWebste 
Chief Political 
Correspondent 

The Government is dose to. 
a decision to issue free needles 
to drug addicts as part of the 
campaign against /rids. 

Mr Norman Fowler, the 
Secretary of State for Social 
Services, supports the idea 
ami a decision will be taken 
shortly by Lord Whitdaw*s 
Cabinet committee, which is 
co-or dinating government ac- 
tion against the disease. 

Mr Fowler, and Mr Tony 
Newton, tire Minister of 
Health, are expected to pre- 
vail, despite the opposition of 
several ministers, who believe 
free needles might encourage 
drug abuse. 

Mr Fowler believes free 
needles would discount ad- 
dicts! from re-using infected 
ones — a prime factor in the 
spread of Aids. 

In the Commons yesterday 
Mr Fowler said latest es- 
rfmat es enggpeteri there would 
be 3,000 new cases of Aids in 
1988. ' 

-He promised government. 
help for telephone Hires for 
bodies Hke the Terence Hig- 
gins Trust, which provide 
counselling on Aids. This is 
because of tire steep increase 
in calls following . the 
Government's publicity 
campaign. 

WHO criticized, page 3 
parliament, page 4 


Attempt to limit 
trial waiting times 


By Frances Gibb, Legal Affairs Correspondent 
The Government is to brmg the system and curb the worst 


in statutory limits next spring 
on the time defendants can be 
held in custody before triaL 
They will mean that defen- 
dants will be released on bail 
when prosecutors foil to bring 
their cases to trial within a 
specified number of days, 
although they wifi still face 


The time Kurils, which are 
aimed at cutting the long 
waiting times for defendants, 
wifi initially apply to three 
police force areas — Avon and 
Somessei, the West Midlands 
and Kent They will be ex- 
tended to the rest of the 
country in 1988. 

Mr David MeIlor, Mnnster 
of State at the Home Office, 
told MPs yesterday that the 
time Emits were intended to 
‘introduce a discipline into 


delays. 

The Government estimates 
that 10 to 15 percent of cases 
.will foil to meet the time 
limits. 

Courts wifi have power to 
grant the prosecution an 
extension of time if satisfied 
there is good reason. 

Unlike in Scotland, which 
already has statutory time 
limits, cases will not be struck 
off the lists. 

The new limits will be 56 
days from first appearance 
before magistrates to sum- 
mary trial, or 70 days to 
rommhtaL In the Crown 
Court the limi t will be 112 
days from committal to taking 
of plea. 

At present waiting times for 
the crown court average 18 
weeks in London and nine 
weeks elsewhere. 


Falklands vote carried 

FromZoriami Pysariwsky, New York 

tided with Argentina to sweet- 


Britain suffered a crushing 
diplomatic defeat yesterday 
over its Falklands policy as 
the United Nations General 
Assembly voted 116 to four,' 
with 34 abstentions, to sup- 
port Argentina's demand that 
negotiations over sovereignty 
be a key dement in any Anglo- 
Argentine recouciliatioii. 

, The defeat was further com- 
pounded as an intensive Brit- 
Ish lobbying effort to prevent 
further European faded to 
bear fruit as the Netherlands 


en its diplomatic victory. 
Dutch 


The Dutch decision to 
change to an affirmative vote 
from an abstention had the 
effect of bringing closer the 
British Government's isola- 
tion over the Falklands 
Only three countries. Belize, 
Oman and Sri Lanka, sup- 
ported Britain unequivocally 
while 34 countries, including 
six from foe EEC, abstained. 
The United States supported 
the draft. 



Colonel North: Shadowy military adviser sacked from the National Security CoundL 


MPs agog at MI5 
man’s claims on 
role of Rothschild 


By Robin Oakley, Political Editor 
Whitehall's latest security not to prosecute people in- 
volved with previous books 
dealing with security disekv- 
contrast to the 


row brought growing signs of 
severe Government 
embarrassment in the Com- 
mons yesterday. 

MPs were agog at the latest 
claims from former MI 5 em- 
ployee, Mr Peter Wright, 
about the role played by Lord 
Rothschild, a former head of 
the Downing Street Think Ta- 
nk, in persuading Mr Wright 
to pass information to author 
Mr Cltapmap Pincher in 1980. 

They wanted to know 
whether he was acting with the 
connivance of No 10, the 
agreement of the security ser- 
vices or merely offltis own bat 
in persuading Mr Wright to 
make his revelations that way 
rather ihan by passing them 
direct to the Prime Minister as 
he had first wanted to do. 

In the Commons yesterday 
Mrs Thatcher sought to turn 
foe attack on Labour, with the 
implied complaint that Mr 
Neil Kinnock and his col- 
leagues had abandoned the 
traditional bi-partisan policy 
on security issues. 

This brought angry protests 
at the end of Question Time 
from ’Mr Neil Kinnock who 
insisted that foe only question 
he had raised related to the 
derision of Sir Michael Ha- 
vers, the Attorney General, 


sures. in 

Government's efforts to sup- 
press the memoirs of former 
MI5 employee Mr Wright . 

All foe traditional symp- 
toms of a contrived Commons 
row were there. In a barrage of 
points of order Labour M Ps 
claimed that the Prime Min- 
ister had managed to get foe 
Commons Table Office to put 


Whitehall accused 
Leading article 


12 

17 


Murders 


suspect 

arrested 


By Our Crime Reporter 


a gag on effective questioning 
about foe Wright afiair. but 
was able to raise it selectively 
herself. 

Mr Dale Campbell-Savours, 
foe Labour M.P. for Work- 
ingtonjast night tabled a 
Commons question to the 
Attorney-General asking, “If 
he will prosecute Lord Victor 
Rothschild under Section 7 of 
foe Official Secrets Act 1920 
for soliciting Mr Peter Wright 
by means of offering money to 
pass documents known or 
believed to contain official 
secrets relating to foe security 
services to Mr Chapman 
Pincher and if he will make a 
statement". 


Detectives investigating foe 
murder of a schoolgirl, and 
two young women, in attacks 
over foe past year in London, 
Hertfordshire and Surrey, 
were last night questioning a 
man arrested on Sunday. 

The suspect is being ques- 
tioned about the death of 
Alison Day, aged 19, whose 
body was found in a canal last 
January, Maartje Tamboezer, 
aged 15, who was attacked 
near Guildford in April, and 
Anne Lock, a recently married 
television worker who van- 
ished last May. 

Her body was found six 
weeks later. 

All three victims were as- 
saulted and strangled . 

The man behind the killings 
has also been linked to a long 
list of rapes and attacks, in 
London, under investigation 
by Operation Hart, a special 
Scotland Yard unit 


Chelsea 


barracks 


bomber 


gets life 


By Stewart Tendler 
Crime Reporter 

Patrick McLaughlin, sen- 
tenced to life for an INLA plot 
to bomb Chelsea barracks, 
went to prison last night 
leaving behind a terrorist trail 
linking the Irish terrorist 
group to Action Directe in 
France. 

McLaughlin , aged 26 . 
unemployed from London- 
derry, was told by Mr Justice 
Kenneth Jones at foe Central 
Criminal Court. “There is 
only one sentence appro- 
priate, prison for life." 

Part of the 4CHbs of explo- 
sives planted by McLaughlin 
and his unit last November is 
thought to be from a cache 
stolen by Action Directe. 

The explosives left outside 
the barracks included French 
material called Gelsuirite and 
used by Action Directe. A 
consignment of foe explosive 
was stolen in France in 19S4. 

The left wing French terror- 
ist group was held responsible 
last week for foe killing of foe 
head of Renault, in France. It 
is known to have shared 
explosives with foe Com- 
munist Fighting Cells in Bel- 
gium and foe Red Army 
Factions in West Germany 

Members of the INLA unit 
travelled to London last year 
in a Ford camper van which 
was taken from Northern 
Ireland to France and Bel- 
gium. The man who bought 
foe camper in Ulster was held 
in June this year at Le Havre 
with four others when French 
police halted what they alleged 
was a major INLA gun smug- 
gling operation. 

The camper was the trans- 
porter for an explosives 
consignment intended to 
mark the return of the INLA 
to the British mainland. The 
INLA has been dormant on 
foe mainland since its first and 
only attack in 1979 which 
killed Mr Airey Neave, foe 
Conservative spokesman on 
Northern Ireland. 

The target for the attack by a 
unit of up to half a dozen was 
to be Chelsea Barracks and the 
total explosives, twice the 
amount used at Hatreds, 
would hove created carnage. 

The plan may have been to 
explode one small device, 
leading police and soldiers 
towards larger devices, packed 
with nuts and bolts, to creme 
lethal shrapnel. The unit may 
also have planned a series of 


Continued on page 20, col 6 


Sangster appoints Hills 


Baity Hills will today suc- 
ceed Michael Dickinson as 
trainer at Robert Sangster’s 
racing establishment at 
Manton in Wiltshire. The deal 
was sealed at a restaurant in 
London’s West End yesterday. 

Hills, a lifelong friend of 
Sangster, will also continue to 
run his South Bank stable in 


Lam bo urn for the next year. 

The trainer, 50 in April, has 
gained classic victories with 
Enstone Spark (1,000 Guin- 
eas) and Tap On Wood (2,000 
Guineas) and won foe Ptix de 
1 ’Ajc de Triomphe in 1973 
with Rheingold. 


Charles Benson, page 42 


Britain is 
back in 
the black 


By David Smith 


Britain’s balance of pay- 
ments edged into surplus last 
month thanks to an increase 
in foe estimated overseas 
earnings of the City and other 
service industries. 

But foe underiying trade 
position was weak. Last 
month’s trade deficit of £835 
million was just better than 
foe September deficit of £885 
milli on, in foe past three 
months, the value of exports 
has been flat, while imports 
have risen by 8 per cent. 

Last month, imports 
climbed above £7 billion and 
exports were £6.2 billion. 
Government officials said 
there were indications that 
export growth was increasing 
and that growth in imports 
was slowing down. 

Invisibles revised, page 21 
Comment, page 23 


Heavenly rain lets Sudan live again 

J -f_ “ — V_ 1 _n .Til 4 m £gl] ¥ inf DaltnkTtttAKAfi 


From Charles Harrison 
Khartoum 

Rains from the heavens and 
charity from the world have 
led to bumper harvests in 
many parts of Sudan allowing 
foe country to export 200,000 
tons of soighum to Saudi 
Arabia. 

. It is a marked contrast to 
the. situation early this year, 
when international aid agen- 
cies ^ were appealing for help to 
fight a fam ine which threaten- 
ed two million people. 

Millions of pounds of aid 
from various channels, 


Fund, which at one time was 
feeding thousands of malnour- 
ished; children. is closing down 
its operation. 

The Belgian section of 
M&ferins sans Frontteres has 
turned its attention from nu- 
trition and famine projects to 
an operation designed to re- 
vive and rehabilitate health 
services in foe Darfur region — 
supplying drugs ‘ to govern- 
ment dispensaries, repairing 
buildings and training Suda- 
nese health personneL 

Darfur now has enough 
food from its own resources 
mid grain prices have dropped 


including faming relief events ’ ip a tenth of those obtaining 
organized by foe Irish, rock lasiyear. 


en 


star Bob Geldot have he: 
to revive ihe siric 

economy. V 

In Nyalai 600- miles to the 
west, foe Save foe Children 


.Jaricet prices for cattle, 
goats and camels have increas- 
ed sharply because livestock 
owners want- to replace the 
-herds they lost in foe drought 


and are unwilling to 
animak for slaughter. 

This part of western Sudan 
has additional problems caus- 
ed by foe civil war in Chad, 
with 126,000 Chadian refu- 
gees living in overcrowded 
reception centres. 

The guerrilla war still causes 
widespread malnutrition in 
southern areas where fanners 
have been displaced or where 
normal communications are 
cul But foe arrival of foe dry 
aawp has given government 
forces an advantage over foe 
Sudan People's Liberation 
Army rebels and surface com- 
munication has been re-estab- 
lished with many areas which 
were cut off when foe rains 
ham pered road transport and 
provided foe rebels with am- 
bush cover. ' 

■ The Commissioner for Re- 


lief and Rehabilitation, Mr 
Sayed Kamal Shawld, says 
there could still be a million 
people in need of food in foe 
country's south. 

His organization is building 
up food stocks now, but does 
not want people to become 
dependent on food handouts. 
“It is better to encourage them 
to feed themselves," he says. 

One of the greatest chal- 
lenges is to expand local food 
production and to increase 
storage in good crop years. 
The EEC is supporting large- 
scale development projects in 
foe Nuba Mountains and the 
Jebd Mara highlands. 

Farmers who foHow foe 
advice are getting bigger crops 
and there is a steady increase 
in the numbers enrolling in 
the two schemes. 


CID chief 
talks 
to Brady 


By Ian Smith 
Northern Correspondent 


Ian Brady, foe Moors mur- 
derer, spent two hours clos- 
eted yesterday in a hospital 
ward with the senior detective 
leading a new search for 
graves on desolate Saddle- 
worth Moor in Greater 
Manchester. 

The unexpected confronta- 
tion took place in Newman 
Ward of Park Lane special 
hospital on Merseyside, 
shortly after Del Chief Supt 
Topping, joint bead of Greater 
Manchester CID, arrived for a 
meeting with hospital officials 
and Brady’s solicitor to ar- 
range a visit with the con- 
victed murderer. 

After less than an hour’s 
discussion he was ushered into 
foe room where Brady was 
waiting and for foe next two 
hours foe two sat huddled in 
conversation, watched by 
Brady's solicitor Mr Benedict 
Bimberg. 

As he left Dei Chief Supt 
Topping refused to disclose 
what new information had 
been supplied and would not 
speculate on the likelihood of 
his seeing Brady again. 

Special arrangements for 
the visit were made in the 
hope that Brady would break 
his 22-year silence and dis- 
close what other bodies he 
buried on foe moorland and 
where they might be 
unearthed. 

According to Mr Bimberg, 
who arrived at the hospital 
with letters exchanged be- 
tween Brady and Hindley 
during their first six years in 
detention, his client was deter- 
mined be would not be used as 
a scapegoat by his former 
accomplice. 

After the meeting, Mr 
Bimbera said that he aid not 
expect Brady to visit the moor 
within foe’ forseeable future, 



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NEWS SUMMARY 


Bill aims to curb 
pro-gay councils 

A 631 to slop left-wing councils actively promoting 
homosexuality in schools was unexpectedly introduced in 
th« House of Lords last night 

Lord Haisbnry, president of die National Comal for 
Christian Standards in Society, brought in the short BOl 
with the support of many other peas, who have been horri- 
fied at the anti-heterosexual policies of councils snch as 
Brent and Haringey. 

Ministers and many MPs will sympathize with the aims, 
bat without toll government backing it stands tittle chance 


Shipyard cuts jobs 

Harbtnd & Wolff, the state-owned Belfast shipbuilders, 
will start paving off 800 workers in February - wW 
pe rmane nt employees and 200 short-term contract workers 
— because of toe shortage of merchant ship orders. 

Even with the cut-back to about 4200 employees the 
company will have the largest single shipyard workforce ■» 
western Europe, Mr John Parker, chairman and chief 

executive, said yesterday. ^ . tn _ 

During the past four years the yard has switched from to- 
tal dependence on the depressed merchant ship market. Its 

order book comprises 57 per cent naval wont and 3< po 

cent oil-related work. It is about to deliver its last merchant 


Cautions rise 


High-rise Australia 

flats call year 

jijs&kb aSSSSh 

JSSSiaaSR* 

of the 22- u. 1787 of the 

szrssftss; 3* iviSttz 

mV Niwl Snea^inc. MP chairman of the Bntain- 
for NSn sS' ^ Australia B.centennhU 

written to Mr Ridley after rfScWhf^n^ 

»£ sc®a*S5£ TSESSSSSSd s 

fortheborongh. prepared a sdSlmiwhi** hS 

detaSed 1st of new bolts me d-e sehooo er, 

discovered doriog de- 

molidoo. BntBhgrit 

Language 
lesson 

Kelly Greene, aged 11, 
has been asked to leave a / 
school at Leytonstone, in 
east London, because she 
refused to do an Urdn ; 
language “taster'* course. 

Her mother, Mrs Pat 
Greene, of Leytonstone, | 
said her daughter's refusal 
to learn the language came 
after she had been assured, 
at a parent-teachers' meet- 
ing, that the course was not 
compulsory. She was asked 
to transfer Kelly last 
Thursday; the course fin- 
ishes today. 

Convoy ambushed 

More than 150 anti-nuclear protesters ambushed a 
Cruise missile convoy three times before dawn yesterday as 
it returned from a Salisbury Plain exercise to the United 
States Air Force base at Greenham Common, Berkshire. 

Protesters formed three human blockades at Ameslmry 
and Beacon Hill, Wiltshire, and at the Parkhonse A303 
roundabout in Hampshire. 

A man was arrested after ctimbing on to a missile 
launcher at Amesbnry and two others were arrested for 
obstruction and breach of the peace. The three men 
appeared before Salisbury magistrates and were released 
on unconditional bail .A Ministry of Defence spokesman 
said an airbrake hose was cot at Amesbnry. 


Print discipline 
demand renewed 

By Tim Jones 



Print union leaders will 
today renew their demands for 
the electricians' union to be 
disciplined for allowing its 
members to work at the News 
International plant at Wap- 
ping when they meet the 
genera] council of the Trades 
Union Congress in London. 

On Monday, when the 
TUCs “inner cabinet" — the 
finance and general purposes 
committee — voted by two to 
one against re-opening disci- 
plinary proceedings against 
the elec tricans, it was accused 
by Mr Tony Dubbins, general 
secretary of the National 
Graphical Association of 
“mounting the biggest cover- 
up since Watergate”. 

But if past precedent is a 
guide, Mr Dubbins and his 
colleague. Miss Brenda Dean 
ofSogat '82, wifi fere no better 
at today's meeting as the 
general council usually en- 
dorses derisions taken by the 
committee. 

At Monday's meeting, Mr 
Norman Willis, TUC general 
secretary, told the print union 


leaders that as the electricians' 
union bad already been disci- 
plined this year it could not 
wain be tried for the same 
offence. 

Miss Dean, who accused the 
committee of foiling to stand 
by union principles, said it 
had totally ignored the de- 
rision taken in September by 
delegates to the TUC Congress 
who voted in favour of action 
against the electricians' union. 

Miss Dean has also been 
disappointed by thousands of 
her own members who help to 
distribute the company's na- 
tional newspapers. 

In a separate development 
yesterday in Mid Glamorgan, 
the Labour controlled Cynon 
Valley district council's librar- 
ies committee decided to end 
its ban on News International 
newspapers being displayed in 
its public libraries. 

The decision follows a High 
Court judgment which ruled 
that some London boroughs 
should also drop their refusal 
to make the newspapers avail- 
able to the public. 



Les Octuors” 

de C hau me i 

‘ . t Si ■ !>•- : 





Us 




l' ■ y 


CHAUMET 

|v.vffln **m t IfftfJ 

178 New Bond Street London WlY 9PD 
Tel. 01-493 5403/01-629 0136 
Paris -Brussels - Geneva - New York - Tokyo 


A revolution in the treat- 
ment by police of drunkenness 
is disclosed by official figures 
yeste rda y (Our Home Affairs 
Correspondent writes). 

Cautioning, instead of 
prosecutions, increased to 

26.000 in 1985 from 21.000 ! m 
19S4 and only 2,000 in 1983- 
In eat* year between 1975 and 
1982, there were fewer than 

1.000 cautions. 

The change follows a lead 
from the Home Office which 
in June 1984 circulated a 
consultative document on 
cautioning by police. A cir- 
cular was issued in February 


1985 giving guidelines on 
cautioning offenders. 

The Home Office Statistical 
Bulletin on offences of 
drunkenness in 1985 said 
yesterday that about o&Mhiid 
of the increase in cautioning in 
1985 was accounted for by the 
Metropolitan Police District 
compared wfrh 90 per cent of 
toe rise in 1984. 

Other large increases occ- 
urred in Northumbria, 
Thames Valley and South 
Wales. 

The number of findings of 
guilt fell to 56,000 in 1985 
.gpm 69,000 in 1984. 

Between 1 984 and 1985, the 


number of findings of guilt 
and cautions fell in all age 
groups except for persons aged 
IS and under 21. 

Cautions are given by pol- 
ice, at home if people arc 
infirm, elderly or suffering 
stress. 

Most offenders would be 
cautioned formally at a police 
station by a uniformed officer 
of a rank not normally below 
Inspector. 

The offender is asked to sign 
a form confirming his consent 
to the caution and it is 
countersigned by a police 
officer. 

Publicans have joined 


forces with Sussex pohee m 
their campaign against drink- 
driving over the Christmas 
period. Mr Roger Birch, Chief 
Constable of Sussex, has asked 
landlords to help by display- 
ing posters on the dmgeis of 
drinking and driving; 
encourage the use of “drive 
you home" schemes; and to 
persuade any one driver in a 
group tostay sober. 

• Magistrates are strongly 
opposing proposals from gov- 
ernment officials to appoint 
more stipendiary magistrates. 

They say tost toe move 
would lead to the “ demis e of 


the fey magistracy and the 
jury*. 

The Magistrates’ .Associ- 
ation says in its response to a 
government consultation pa- 
per that' the proposals would 
“take toe lay dement away 
from much criminal jurisdic- 
tion and could lead to the 
eventual demise of the jury.*’ 

The response, agreed at a 
recent council meeting of the 
association, makes dear that it 
would “resist the appointment 
of stipendiary magistrate" to 
help relieve toe workload of 
courts unless a bench specifi- 
cally requests it 


Rothschild 
accused of 
corrupting 
MI5 author 

By Michael Evans, Whitehall Correspondent 


Allegations that Lord Roth- 
schild and the author, Mr 
Chapman Pincher, colluded to 
persuade the former MIS offi- 
cer. Mr Peter Wright, to help; 
with the book on the security) 
service. Their Trade is Treach- 
ery , were strongly denied 
yesterday. 

Mr Wright claimed in Syd- 
ney yesterday that he had been 
drawn into an authorized but 
deniable operation “to bring 
the Sir Roger Hollis affeir and 
other M15 scandals" into the 
open. 

It was also disclosed yes- 
terday that Mr Malcolm 
TurnbulL Mr Wright’s solic- 
itor, in an extraordinary tele- 
phone call from Australia, 
accused Mr Pincher and Lord 
Rothschild of corrupting the 
former M15 officer by offering 
him money to help with the 
book. 

Mr Pincher said yesterday 
that be received a call from Mr 
Turnbull on Saturday at his 
home in Berkshire. 

Mr Pincher said :“He told 
me that toe British Govern- 
ment was playing a dirty game 
and he intended to play it 
dirty too. He said it was his 
opinion that 1 and Lord 
Rothschild had corrupted 
Wright. That's complete 
rubbish. 

“I never knew of the exis- 
tence of Wright until I met 
him in August 1980 at a 
private house. When we 
talked about the possibility of 
a book, he said he wanted me 
to sign a contract there and 
then to ensure that be was 
paid 50 per cent of the 
royalties. He said if I didn't 
agree to pay 50 per cent, he 
would go to someone else.” 

Mr Pincher said that during 
the conversation with Mr 
TurnbulL the Australian law- 
yer admitted that he was 
feeding private letters that he 
had written to Mr Wright to a 
British journalist so that 
! information would get back to 
the Labour Party in Britain. 

Mr Pincher said: “He told 
me he expected the Labour 


MP defies 
whip over 
Coal Bill 

A veteran Labour MP de- 
fied his party leadership last 
night and voted in fevour of 
government moves to recog- 
nize the breakaway Union of 
Democratic Mineworkers 
(Our Political Correspondent 
writes). 

Mr Don Concannon, MP 
for Mansfield, told the Com- 
mons that clauses in the 
Government's Coal Bill, 
which give toe UDM equal 
rights to the NUM on char- 
itable and similar bodies, were 
necessary to bring “some kind 
of sense and harmony to my 
area as well as a sense of 
fairness”. 

• The Union of Democratic 
Miners has rejected as 
“derisory" a £6.25 a week two- 
year pay offer made by British 
Coal (Tim Jones writes). 

• British Coal announced yes- 
terday record output levels in 
the North Yorkshire coalfield. 


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Tel: 021-421 6527, quoting 
reference DT20. 


Party to demaud that both 
Lord Rothschild and 1 should 
be prosecuted for corrupting 
Wright Yet it was Wright who 
had demanded to be paid 
royalties" 

Mr Wright described the 
royalties as “a helpful in- 
cidental benefit" in a state- 
ment in Sydney. 

Yesterday Mr Pincher, who 
spoke to The Times about the 
SO pa- cent royalties agree- 
ment on Sunday, rejected Mr 
Wright's claim that it was the 
Government which leaked de- 
tails of the financial deal to 
The Times. 

Lord Rothschild was un- 
available to comment 

The Times understands, 
however, that the meeting 
between Mr Wright and Mr 
Pincher in 1980 took (dace in 
Lord Rothschild's home. 

Mr Wright has said that 
Lord Rothschild had paid for 
a first class air fore to bring 
him to Britain. 

After the agreement was 
reached about toe 50 per cent 
royalties, it is understood that 
Lord Rothschild made the 
necessary arrangements for 
toe money to be sent to him, 
via toe publishers, Sidgwick & 
Jackson. 

Man in the news 
knew Wright well 

Lord Rothschild, whose 
role in the Wright affair is now 
the focus of attention in the 
New South Wales supreme 
court was once, quite in- 
correctly. rumoured to be the 
“fifth man” in the famo us 
Cambridge spy ring 

As a former distinguished 
member of MI5 himself Lad 
Rothschild knew Peter Wright 
well when Wright was serving 
in the MI5 in London. 

Nathaniel Mayer Victor, 
third Baron Rothschild, was a 
brilliant undergraduate at 
Trinity College, Cambridge. 

Today be lives in Cam- 
bridge and remains, in spite of 
his dazzling, varied careers, a 
very private man. 



iirnFiiim 


By Mark Dowd 

Education Reporter 

Independem schools on 
Mereeyade have embarked 
upon a political campaign to 
want parents of foe dangers of 
voting for toe Labour Parkin 
foe next general election. 

' is conjunction wfrh a 
parents* support -scheme 
which has been set up by foe 
Independent Schools Inform- 
ation Service, the region's 38 
schools, cater for si 
estimated ISjOOOpopfls, have 
established three action 
committees in central Liver- 
pcoi,Wirral and Scfion whose 
yob wiB be to organize rallies 
involving parents and mem- 
bers of foe public. 

Mr Frank. Crowley, chair- 
man of the Sefttra area 
committee, said: “Each school 
will be calling me eti ng s of its 
parents to explain the ednea- 
tional policies of the pofitiesd 
patties. We are hoping to 
persuade them not to support 
candidates whose parties ad- 
here to a policy which wifi be 
frjmwfai to foe' future of foe 
independent sector JT 

Mr Crowley predicted yes- 
terday that foe latest, to be 
held at St Edward's College in 
Liverpool later in the day, 
would attract more than 600 
parents and said there were 
plans to hold a mass rally of 
.sane 2,000 parents in the 
city’s Philhar monic Hall early 
next spring. 

The Labour Party con- 
ference in September passed a 
resolution calling - for the 
“planned public ownership of 
the private school system . 

However, it seems unlikely 
that ft will be xodnded in the 
party's election manifesto be- 
cause it foiled to attract the 
support of two thirds of the 


Mr Tony Midbeara (left) with Mr Ti 
deputy leader of liverpt 


By roe and Mr Dock Hatton, who resigned as 
oundTs Labour grotto* yesterday. 


Hatton warning to Kinnock 


By lan Smith, Northers Correspondent 


Derek Hatton, the Labour 
Militant, was yesterday reeling 
on the canvas under a succes- 
sion of political body blows, 
yet still the former amateur 
boxer refuses to be counted 
out and retired to obscurity in 
the city be claims to 
champion. 

Only 24 hours after resign- 
ing as deputy leader of Liver- 
pool city council Labour 
group, the specially-in- 
troduced political post which 
; has given him the most power- 
ful voice in local politics for 
foe past four years, Mr Hatton 
still bobbed and weaved and 
refused to concede defeat. 

His resignation decision, he 
: claimed, was taken to save 
! non-Mflitant colleagues suf- 
fering in a Labour leadership 
purge, not because his 
popularity had waned. 

Looking subdued, but still 
talking loudly, Mr Hatton 
dealt his own counter-blow to 
the Labour leadership and 
warned; “We will be around 
when Neil Kinnock moves 
further towards his leaning to 


Tory dissent 


the right than Ramsay Mac- 
Donald did in foe 1930s". 

Leaving centre stage with 
Hatton are avowed Militant 
supporter Tony Mulheam, 
chair man of foe council's 
camp ai g n committee and 
Felicity Dowling, deputy 
chair man of the authority's 
education committee. 

“We felt it would be wrong 
to sacrifice other members of 
the group tty remaining, but 
fix- every one of us that goes at 
least 10 and sometimes 100 
will appear to take our place," 
Mr Hatton predicted. 

The general secretary of the 
Labour party, Mr Lany 
Whitty, said Hatton's actions 
showed he had, at long last, 
recognised foe effect of his 
expulsion from the party. 

Liverpool city council 
Liberal leader. Sir Trevor 
Jones, was not as optimistic. 

He dismissed the resigna- 
tion as “meaningless” and a 
mere front to mask Hatton's 
continuing orchestration of 


ity council and constituency 


“I do not think, by any 
stretch of the imagination, 
that we have seen the end of 
Militant 

“The only thing we wit- 
nessed is Derek Hatton look- 
ing after Derek Hatton, who 
sees one gravy train come into 
the station and leaps off to get 
onto another.” 

What toe future holds for 
Mr Hatton ' is unknown; { 
branded by Labour leaders as . 
a mischievous trouble-maker, 
dismisssed from his job as an 
£2 1.500-a-year community li- : 
aisen officer, with neigh- 
bouring Knowsley borough 
council, and now shunned by 
moderate colleagues on his 
own authority. 

Many believe his outlook is 
bleak. 

Certainly money will be- 
come a problem tor foe man 
who was, at one time, claim- 
ing over £11,000 a year, in 
attendance expenses, to fulfil 
his role as deputy leader. 


Moreover, Mr Giles Radice, 
Labour's education spokes- 
man, has said that talk about 
public ownership of private 
schools is “nonsense". 

Nevertheless, he has em- 
phasized that Labour’s srn- 
egy isto phase out feejpaymg 
through the ending of char- 
itable status. 


Flexibility 
hope from 
new exam 

The Government yesterday 
launched a guide on the 
Advanced Supplementary 
level which will be sent to 
schools and colleges in Eng- 
land, Wales and Northern 
Ireland. 

Advanced Supplementary 
levels are to be taught for the 
first time from September 
1987. The new examination is 
intended to lake only half the 
study time of A levels. 

The Committee Of Vice- 
Chancellors and Principals to- 
gether with tire Standing 
Conference on University En- 
trance have published a leaf- 
let, AS levels and University 
Entrance ; in which all appear 
to accept, in principle, that 
two AS levels should be equal 
to a third A level far entrance 
purposes. 


Left seeks backbench coup 


Safeguards on forest 
planting promised 


By Philip Webster 
Chief Political 
Correspondent 

Conservative left-wing MPs 
are to attempt tonight to 
unseat the right-wing chair- 
man of the party’s key 
backbench committee on 
education. 

In a move which springs 
from growing unease on the 
Conservative liberal wing 
about the attempts by the right 
to influence the contents of 
foe general election manifesto, 
the left will be trying to replace 
Mr James Pawsey, MP for 
Rugby and Kenilworth, with 
Mr Malcolm Thornton, MP 
for Crosby. 

Mr Pawsey took the post 
last year from Mr David 
Made! in a right-wing coup, 
and the left are anxious to get 
it back. 

Mr Pawsey. a dose political 

sccnriqfo nf Mr DhA>4ac 


Boyson. the former education 
minister who continues to 
have considerable influence 
on the party’s thinking on 
education, is held to be too 
right-wing. 

Mr Thornton, who is 
considered to lie of toe centre, 
is being backed by toe left 
because of his experience in 
education, including a spell as 
a member of the Burnham 
negotiating committee. 



The Government would 
prevent any large-scale af- 
forestation schemes which 
posed a significant threat to 
the countryside. Sir David 
Montgomery, chairman of the 
Forestry Commission, said 
yesterday (Our Agriculture 
Correspondent writes.) 

Sir David, speaking at toe 
launch of a commission book- 
let, British Forestry, marking 
Industry Year, said people 
would not be allowed to plant 
trees anywhere they liked. 


But he said that the industry 
contributed about 3 per cent 
to the gross domestic product, 
employed tens of thousands of 
people and was becoming 
increasingly important to toe 
balance of payments. Britain 
consumed about 10 times the 
amount of limber it produced. 
• Retail prices for Norway 
Spruce, die traditional Christ- 
mas tree, should be between 
£2.50 and £2.00 a foot this 
year, but about £1-20 from 
plantations or form shops. 


Rivals, Mr Malcolm Thornton (left) and Mr James Pawsey 
The education committee vative Centre Forward, tire 


chairmanship is one of only a 
few targets selected this year 
by the Tory left in toe annual 
backbench elections. The polls 
are considered important bo- 
cause office-holders have 
ready access to ministers, but 


to rock the boat too much in a 
possible election year. 

In spite of toe feet that one 
of their champions, Mr 
Kenneth Baker, is the Sec- 
retary of State for Education 
and Science, the left fears that 
toe right is attempting to have 
undue influence on toe 
Consemtive manifesto group 
which is at present drawing up 
policy for toe next election. 

In another move Conser- 


left-wing group run by Mr 
Francis Pym, is to invite Mr 
Ba k er ana other Cabinet min- 
isters beading the manifesto 
groups to a series of meetings 
starling next week in the hope 
of ensuring that the left's case 


uui gu uiuKsuu in me 

manifesto process. 

The backbench elections 
have developed into an an- 
nual trial of strength between 
the right-wing 92 Group ran 
by Mr George Gardiner, MP 
for Reigate, and the left-wing 
Lollards organized by Mr Fred 
Silvester, MP for Manchester 
Withington. 

There will be no contest this 
year for the chairmanship of 
the key finance committee. 


TO GET A SYSTEM AS 
EFFICIENT AS OURS 
YOU’D HAVE TO PUT ONE OF 
THESE IN EVERY ROOM. 



Thatcher’s sports defence 

By John Goodbody, Sports News Correspondent 


The Government's record 
on sports funding was de- 
scribed as outs tanding yes- 
terday by the Prime Minister, 
in spite of disagreement about 
her use of statistics. 

Mrs Margaret Thatcher was 
responding to a question 
about the grant to the Sports 
Council, the first time its grant 
had been raised in Parliament. 

Mr Terence Lewis, Labour 
MP for Worsley, wanted to 
know whether she would re- 
consider toe decision to freeze 
the grant for 1987-88 at 
£36.984 million. 


Mrs Thatcher said that be- 
tween 1979 and 1986 its grant 
has gone up by 67 per cent in 
real terms. “It received an 
increase of £6320,000 in 
1986-87, an increase of 16 per 
cent in real terms over toe 
previous year.” 

The Prime Minister's fig- 
ures mystified the Sports 
Council, which insisted that in 
real terms toe grant ' from 
1979-80 to 1987-88 has only 
gone up from £26.796 million 
to £35.874 million; £5 million 
of this was transferred from 
other government accounts 


with the abolition of the 
metropolitan counties and 
£700,000 from the Association 
of Children's Play and Re- 
creation. 

Mr John Smith, chairman 
of the Sports Council, has 
described the Government’s 
grant as “very disappointing". 
“This is a real cut in our grant 
aid of 3.5 per cent” 

Mr Denis Howell, a former 1 
Labour minister for sport,, 
feiled to secure an emergency 
debate on the freezing, of toe 
grant. 


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THE 


WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 26 1986 


HOME NEWS 


U wen calls lor less TV 
violence in attempt to 
reduce horrific crimes 



yiotence cHi tdevisiaa sfr- had increased by 7 per cent to 

122,000 «« Si Awhile 
ponied offences erf r^jeitKe 
tomataDyby29per,*mia 

The^M^erttwpiedto “We cannot go on like this, 
p k? to the BBC and IBA with We risk c onditionin g our- 

legaate agamst the sale and part erf our dawto-daylives. 

» a iSKSoL r is 



The SDP leader coupled his 
plea to the BBC and IBA with 
a demand for TaSanent to 


weapons inducting battle kni- 
ves, knuckle dusters,' and 
crossbows — many of which 
are bought by teenagers after 
jftgjqg them u s e d on tele- 
vision. . 

He predicted the two- 
pronged move would help 
promote an anti-violent soci- 
ety. “We might not see any 
benefits for 15 years in the 
crime statistics, bat surely toe 
time .has come when tt is 
worth a try.” 

Dr Owen, who was speaking 
to the British Society of 
Magazine Editors in London, 
said violence against people 


tune we acted across a wide 


knives, and sakt “Why should 
we go on accepting wise sort 
of advertisemests? 

“Parliament lwnwd tire 
Aide lmife, but has not yet 
legislated to stop the safe, and 
advertising of a whole range of 
weaponry that cannot be jus- 
tified many civilized society.” 

Turning to violence an 
television screens, he said the 
experts had concentrated too 
much on whether there was a 
causal link between particular 
incidents of violence and 
watching television. . 

Although the BBC was ax 
last going to talk to the IBA 




Dr Owen’s plea came a 
week after he a muc “ on wh eth er tber 

com m unity m«^; near Ins hetweenj^ 

home in east London, when a ™gdqtts of yiokgit 
family bandied a campaign wat *** n 8 tdevisoa 
to prevent young people from . Although the BBC 
canyxng offensive weapons. last gomg to talk to t 
It came after the of about programme sdu 
Mr John Dennison, aged 17 it was still possible, by 
who was rtabbffd to mg c hannels to i 
while on the way home with substantially the con: 
friends. ' ' violence in any one 

JDr Owen fnghfigfated the viewing -and tire p 
Christmas issue of Gunman, was. made worse by 
advertising various weapons na f’5 es *, ... 
snch as dosoqoartear battle ^roy the tune hs 


BBC insists it can 
repel f 57m claim 


By Jonathan Miller, Media Correspondent 


A £57 millioa legal chum 
against the BBC broagfat by 
British Aerospace and GEC fa 
iikeb to ft3” and no finan- 
cial ^orishre is to be made to 
cover it, the ouporatioo said 


The chum arises from tire 
BBC’s decision not to go 
forward with a direct broad- 
cast satellite scheme. 

British Aerospace and GEC 
- are seeking compensation for 
work they performed on the 
project befpte it was canceled. 
The com pa nies have 
tint the BBC is legally re- 
quired to pay them tor wok 


m a li ce and coercion by a 
woman, now a resident of Los 
Angeles, who that tiie 
BBC threatened to expose her 
as a lesbian if she did not 
recant testimony she had green 
in the crimhial case. 

“The litigation is at a 
pidnuary stage and as a 
result the anperation’s legal 
advises are at this stage 
unable to form a view as to 
either the merits of the action 
or tiie eventual outcome. How- 
ever, any damages resalting 
from the action are Ukrfy to be 
covered by the general pro- 

TWMd inriadtH in fh y f fy mrinl 


mg channels, to increase 
substantially the content of 
violence in any one day’s 
viewing — and tire problem 
was made worse by video 
nasties. 

“Surely tire time has been 
readied when our society 
should say that though there 
may not be proof in so- 
dofogical terms and there may 
not be an absolute causal tink, 
common sense trfi« ns that to 
allow this pollution to go on is 
to take too great a risk,” he 

said 

“Surely when the crime 
statistics, and any normal 
observation of human behav- 
iour, points to an ever increas- 
ing level of violence, it is time 
to act” 

-Just because violent pro- 
grammes were put on after tire 
“watershed” time of 9pm, it 
did not meat) childre n ynnld - 
not be exposed. Many of tiie 
most vulnerable children were 
likely to watch television late 
at mgfat 



Dr Jaffe 
man ‘did 
not need 
treatment’ 


By Mike Horsnell 


giving service far Sir Robert Heftmaim at StPanTs in Covert Garden, London (Photograph: 

James Gray). 


Boy weeps in sniffing case 


performed raider the terms of a - s ta tem e nts ,” the BBC said. 


preliminary contract called a 
“beads of agreement”. 


Much af the annual report 
was concerned with the vari- 


The BBC’s assessment of oas other c ont roversies in 
tiie case wascurtainediu its which the BBC has found 


Prices of 
shares 
by radio 


annual report, published yes- itself sn the past year, fndad- 
terday, covering, toe 1986 &« the Rodina programme 
financial year. mA hhM iw wSttdh the bomd flf gOVCSItarS 
March 31. held «m at the request of the 

“The BBC has been in- Government Tbe programme 
formed by its lead advisers contained an interview with 
♦hat on the basis of tiie Mr Martin MicGuianess, 
inform ati on wind they have reputedly a leadin g %ne to 
so tor been given, foflowing n . tire Dish Republican Army, 
detailed tovest^pitioo of the Then is ’no doubt tint the 
tiens, Ae dates are ~ affair “ pr o voked serfoas ama- 
to fitiL In these . dremn- eties am o n g those who value 


The Independent Broad- 
casting Authority yesterday 
named two companies to op- 
erate Radio Teletext in 
London, a co mmunicati ons 
service that win allow exec- 
utives to monitor tire stock 
market on portable data 
displays. 

The companies are Tetemet 
Case and Independent Radio 


stances, no proridwtiis been 
made in these accounts to 
cover all or any part «f tins 
chum,” the BBC report said. 

The report aba reviewed toe 
states of a £12.7 mflSon cfafca 
against the BBC broiq^t m a 
California court, resetting 
from a broadcast of the pro- 
gramme, Rough Justice. 

Two BBC employes were 
reprimanded for their role to 


Features, owned by LBC and a 
joint venture of Associated 


resulted in tbe release of a man 
c o nv i cte d of robbery. How- 
ever, Laid Lane, Lorn Chief 
Justice, critic is e d the methods 


1 by toe pn^xauuneHnak- 
ers and a BBC inquiry found 
toat unjustifiable means had 
been used to secure an 
interview. 

In the Cafifontia case, the 
BBC is accused of fraud. 


the BBCi independence,” tbe 
BBC report said. 

tounection of tire report on 
ftfisvsF iimgnmrran ^ Mr Alan 
nothoo^ tire assistant dnec- 
to r general, said toe qoestions 
srarorating the Real Ewes 
affair “should not bt allowed 
to obscure toe fact that tire 
BBC’s comatitarent to toe 
pro m t of rigorous jownafisra 
is nncfcttged”. 

The report indicated that 
one employee, ahnost certainly 
Mr Atosdafr Mflne, toe dfrec- 
torfesenl of the BBC, was 
paid a salary df between 
£7(1000 and £75,000 to toe 
1986 financial year. Three 
BBC executives were paid 
between £55-60,000. The num- 
ber of BBC employees making 

more than £30,000 increased 
to 124, from 70 to 1985. 


joint venture of Associated 
Press, Dow Jones and Tele- , 
rase. Both pten broadly similar ! 
services, concentrating on 
share and commodity prices. 


A boy of 13 cried in com! 
yesterday as he recalled the 
moment his best friend col- 
lapsed and died after miffing 
typewriter correction fluid. 

Crispin Sandford broke 
down white giving evidence at 
Tower Bridge Magistrates’ 
Court in London in a case 
against two shopkeepers ac- 
cused of selling typewriter 
correcting fluid to Lee Ken- 
dall aged 14, who died in a 
park in Bermondsey, south- 
east London. 

Chandiakant Patel aged 35, 
and his cousin, Sureshbhai 
Patel a&d 23, deny supplying 
Lee Kendall with the fluid, 
knowing he was under 18 and 
having reasonable crtis c to 
believe He washkdy to inhale 
ft. 


Mr Lindsay Burn, for tbe 
prosecution, asked Crispin 
what had happened to his 
friend after their miffing 
session. 

Crispin said: “Lee had a 
heart attack. He foil to the 
ground.” He then began sob- 
bing and was led from the 
court which was adjourned for 
five minutes. 

Earlier, he said he and Lee 
began miffing the fluid during 
the summer holidays. 

Crispin, now living at 
Bullick Rectory, Bullick, near 
Corby, Northamptonshire, 
said he had known Lee for 
nearly four years and had been 
at the same sdtooL In August, 
when Lee (tied, the two had 
lived in the same street 

He said they had discovered 


they could buy the fluid 
cheaply at the Patels’ shop in 
Dunton Road, Southwark, 
south London. 

In the week leading up to 
Lee’s death they had been into 
the shop to buy the fluid four 
or five times — and on one 
occasion Lee had traded a 
personal cassette player for 
three bottles of the fluid 
Mr Chandrakant Patel 
(deads not guilty to two 
charges of supplying Lee with 
the fluid, and Mr Sureshbhai , 
Patel denies one charge. j 
Mr Sureshbhai Patel also ; 

denies a char ge nfhraalring the 

terms of his permit to stay in i 
Britain by taking employ- 
ment 

The hearing continues 
today. 


A Harley Street psychiatrist 
said yesterday that a patient of 
Dr Joseph Jaffe was given a 
five-year course of hypnother- 
apy and drugs costing up to 
£60,000, although he did not 
need any treatment. 

Dr David Thompson told a 
General Medical Council 
disciplinary hearing, where Dr 
Jaffe is accused of serious 
professional misconduct that 
ail tbe patient needed when be 
saw him in hospital last year 
was a little support for 
tension. 

The committee has been 
told that Dr Jaffe, a Manches- 
ter hypnotherapist, fed a drug 
concoction called “Jaffe 
Juice” to Mr George Water- 
son, aged 49, a wealthy 
businessman, for extortionate 
fees and wrecked his bicycle 
business in the process. 

Dr Jaffe, aged 60, a former 
mayor of Salford, denies five 
charges of serious professional 
misconduct relating to his 
treatment of the patient be- 
tween 1978 and 1983. 

Dr Thompson cared for Mr 
Walerson, a married man with 
four children from Alt- 
rincham, Cheshire, for three 
weeks in a London hospital in 
1985. 

He told the hearing that he 
was concerned about the 
injections of the barbiturate 
metfaohexitome which Dr 
Jaffe had given Mr Waterson, 
and which the patient knew as 
“Jaffe Juice”, together with 
injections of Valium. 

And he added that he could 
not accept a report by Dr Jaffe 
about the patient’s alleged 
“over emotional symptoms”. 

Dr Thompson said: “I don’t 
think he had overtly hysterical 
features and 1 could find no 
evidence of a personality de- 
fect He required no medica- 
tion and was psychiatrically 
normal but in need of 
support” 

Dr Thompson said that the 
late Sir Desmond Pond, for- 
mer president of the Royal 
College of Psychiatrists, 
agreed that the patient «t*ed*»d 
. no treatment 

Asked by Mr Anthony 
Ariid^, QC, counsel lor Dr 
Jaffe, if ft were possible for a 
doctor to have brainwashed a 
man so (hat he was effectively 
his puppet Dr Thompson said 
that a patient regularly given 
addictive injections would be 
“enormously influenced” by 
the doctor. 

. The case continues. 


— (Qcld — 

Woman to 
invest part 
of her win 


A woman is the sole winner 
of y esterd a y* PurtfoBo Gold 
prize of £4,000. 

Mrs Jessie Sta t ft from 
Wimbonie, Dorset, has played 
toe Portfolio Gold game since 
it started in The Toner. 

“1 am obviously delighted,” 
she said. 

When asked host she in- 
tended spending the prize 
money, Mrs Smith said: ‘Til 
invest some and spend some”. 

Readers trito wish to play 
the game can obtain a Port- 
folio Gold card by sending a 
stamped addressed envelope 
toe 

Portfolio Gold, 

The Times, 

PO Box 40, 

Blackburn, 

BB1 6AJ. 


Two in court 
after PCs 
death fall 


Two men appeared in aunt 
yesterday charged with steal- 
ing from a home in tiie Mock of 
flats in Stoke where PC John 
Taylor, aged 26, fell SKt to his 
death on Sunday. 

Detroy Gooden, aged 26, of 
Brookfield Road, Hockley, 
and Junior Carnegie, aged 25, 
of Oval Road, Enfington, both 
Birmingham, appeared at 
Fenton Magistrates’ Court, 
Stoke-on-Trent, Staf- 
fordshire, and were remanded 
in custody for seven days. 

A third mao, Terence 
Butcher, who is also accased of 
stealing, did not appear. He is 
to North Staffordshire Royal 
Infirmary with serious injuries 
after foiling from toe flats with 
PC Taylor. 


Free advice to 
elderly on 
keeping warm 


Help the Aged iatensfied its 
campaign yesterday to heft) 
the elderly keep warm daring 
the winter months by issuing a 
free advice leaflet. 

The leaflet. Keep Warm 
This Winter, gives details of 
how to save heat and advice on 
large heating bills. 

The charity also launched a 
Freephone Heating Hotline, 
an information service on 


Pirate radio 
ship set to go 
back on air 


Criticism 
on Aids 
campaign 


Radio Laser, the pirate ship 
winch last year claimed to be 
Britain’s most popular radio 


By Thomson Prentice 
Science Correspondent 


The World Health Organ- 
ization has been strongly aiUr 


n ~^n slow response to the global 


back at sea and will reportedly 
resume broadcasting on 
Friday. 

The station, on a Pana- 
manian-registered ship, had 


epidemic. 

The organization has failed 
to provide an accurate picture 
of the international spread of 
tbe disease, according to a 


Furnishing materials of style 
and substance 


limped into port in November report published yesterday. 


last year with mechanical 
difficulties and was seized by 
the authorities. 


.Revolution I Killing blamed on tapiSS 
m P? terrorist backlash SSs.ss .2 


Its figures are “extremely 
flawed”, partly because many 
countries do not report their 
growing numbers of cases, and 
it has no organized informa- 
tion on a range of prevention 
and control measures, the 


servicing 

By Dtavid Sapsted 


A man who wanted to end Later a neighbour told Mm Aids, its co-or din a ting office 
the Marxist regime in the that Mr Hoarau was lying consist s of one doctor and a 
Seychelles was murdered in outride on the pavement secretary, the report by the 


The motorist’s long-cher- 
ished but oft-frustrated dream 
of lowcost, fixed-price car 
servicing may soon be real- 
ized. 


“the evil backlash of terrorist 
activity”, a coroner said 
yesterday. 


“He had received a letter Panos Institute, an inter- 
telling Mm the president was national information and pol- 


Det Insp Christopher Burke received threats against his life 
told an inquest at Hornsey, in telephone calls. He said it 


out to lpll him. He also studies group, said, 

received threats against his life It added: “A strong feeling 

in telephone eatls. He said it undoubtedly exists among 
was nothing and didn’t take it Aids experts that the WHO 


National Tyre Service and 
utomotive Products have 


Automotive Products have 
launched a joint venture to 
establish more than 200 cen- 
tres in Britain offering single- 
cost servicing for most famfly 
cars. 

Tire move, against com- 
petition from rarer groups 
indnding Kwik-Ht and Hal- 
fords, is likely to mean the 
biggest dteke-up the garage 
industry has known. 

A 6,000-mile service for 
cars up to 2,00Qcc will cost 
£31.50, inclusive oT labour;, 
parts and VAT, and a foil 
12,000-mile service £12 more. 
Cars in. that category include ; 
tbe Austin Maestro, the 
Vauxball Cavalier, tbe Ford - 
Sierra and some . . BMW | 
models. 

The chain, operating under 
the name of National Auto, 
win set up its first five centres 
early next year in Newcastle 
upon Tyne, Southport, Brad- 
ford, Rocfafbrd and Asbwn- 
under-Lyne. Other centres wifl 
be established in the South 
and Midlands between now 
and the early 1990s. 

Competition foe tire car 
servicing market has in- 
creased- greatly in - rece nt 
weeks. 

The Kwflfc-Fit group ispten- 
ning a netwmt of 750 centres 
offering everything from stan- 
dard exhaust «nd tyre ser- 
vices, to dutch and gearbox 


north London, that the mnr- was nothing and didn’t lake it Aids experts that the WHO 
der of Mr Gerald Hoarau, seriously” Mr LaportesakL should now be playing a far 
a yd 35, was the work of a Professor David Bowen, a more effective role”, 
p mfewintnal assassin. pathologist, said that death Tbe organization has called 

He believed tire mm who was from gunshot wounds for an Aids budget of $200 
shutdown Mr Hoamn outside which included three bullet nnQkm next year, rising to $2 
Ins in Greencourt Ave- wounds to the chest. billion by 1991, but depends 

nue, Edgwarc, north London, Dr David Rud, the coroner, on voluntary contributions 


billion by 1991, but depends 
on voluntary contributions 


on November 29 last year was recorded a verdict of unlawful 1 from individual countries. 


now out of tbe co 
. Mr Hoarau was 


kflfing. He sakt “This was the 
'toe evil backlash of terrorist activ- 


Seychdles National Move- ity which involved people 
ment, which wanted to over- firing in this country but was 
throw the Manristrled regime not the concern of citizens of 


of President Albert Rene. 

Mr Burke said the Sc ot la nd 


this country.” - 
After the bearing Mr Owen 


Yard anti-terrorist branch had Hoarau, aged 43, of Bum 
not been aware of any threats View; Castor, Peterborou^i, 

• -- tl. fT - *- life . . . . wiH m Ap t n nmt a nm m in 


against Mr Hoarau’s fife. - 
Mr Willy Laporte, who was 


said m tire event of a coup in 
the Seychelles his brother 


living at Greencourt Avenue would nave beat president, 
at the time, said in evidence with an “ultimate plan” to 


that he heard a sound fils a restore democracy. 


machine-gun. 

“It was a crack rol l was 
scared. I' didn’t move,” he 
said. 


The movement is now being 
fed by a distant cousin, Mr 
Gabnie Hoarau, who lives in 
Belgium. 


'The criticisms of the 
organization were raised at a 
seminar in London yesterday 
to discuss tire report. Aids in 
the Third World, published by 
the institute. 

Tbe WHO Aids programme 
has. been set up in Geneva by 
Dr Jonathan Mann, an Ameri- 
can expert on the disease. The 
report grid that he had made 
“considerable progress” and 
that the WHO global strategy 
on Aids is “good”. 

Aids in the Third World (Panos 
Institute, 8 Alfred Place, 
London. WOE 7EB; £5 JO). 

Parliament, page 4 



Rotherham joins the resorts 


Rotherham and Islington 
s e em unlikely to figure high on 
toe fist , of potential holiday 


had stands alongside more Brae Norton with a brief stop 
traditional names such as the over in Ascension Island. The 


Halfords wants to e st a bli s h 
at feast 100 parts, accessories 
and serynqg mutes; and * 

B&Q hypermarkets, as ^ell» 
hi^K l are pfanning sdmfer 
ventures. \ ■ 


destinatio ns when Britain 1»- jorca and France. 
gm< to plan for tiie lazv days of Isl ing t o n e ven 1 

jammer in the hazy days after page advertisem 
Christmas (Harvey . Elliott official brochure describing 
writes). itself as the “home of 

Bnt with to urism now big EastEnderS”. - 
.business, and therefore a No one was frying harder 
potential source of income, than the Fal 
neither Islington nor Roth- Iands-“Wc are sea 
erham can afford to be teft out. Mr Steve Green 
So when toe. World Travd . well see us getting 
Market was opened at Qtyo*- 50 to 100 people | 
pia fey the Duchess of Stanley this year.’ 

Gloucester yesterday both , Theywfllofcw 


Bahamas, the Seychelles, Mar World Travd Market has 
jorcaand Fiance. - grown greatly since it first 

Islington even took a whole opened in 1980. Then there 
page advertisement in the werejust 350 exhibitors, 7,753 


trade visitors and 4,610 mem- 
bers of the public who are 
admitted on toe last day. 

This year there are 2J250 


No one was trying harder This year there are 2^50 
than the Falkland Is- exhbftors. 

Iand$.“Wc are really excited,” • Bingo has finally taken off 


For producers of modem furnishings 
and furnitures, good looks must go hand in 
hand with functional performance. 

EniChem. one of Europe’s largest 
producers of chemical and plastics raw 
materials, has an array of useful products 
at the service of the furnishing industry. 

In furniture, EniChem plastics and latex 
are vital ingredients allowing modem 
styles to combine with durability. And 
EniChem synthetic fibres offer the fabric 
designer great flexibility together with the 
practical advantages of washable, colour- 
fast materials. 


For soft furnishings. EniChem fibres 
provide vivid colour and patterning 
possibilities. And in household goods such 
as telephones, television and radio. 
EniChem engineering polymers 
provide the raw material for aesthetic 
design and high quality gloss and colour 
finish. 


Mr Steve Green said. “I can 
well see us getting as many as 
50 to 100 people going to Port 
Stanley this year.” . 


Passengers on Slade Leisure 
Groupholidays will be able to 
play bingo wink flying to 
Malaga, Tenerife, Alicante, 


They will ofcouxse. have to Faro and Palma over the 

11 ^ ' -* — - V f‘ J 


these unlikely holiday spots travel fry RAF TriStar jet from Christmas holidays. 


EniChem (UK) Dd. Central House. Balfour Road. Hounslow Middlesex TW3 1JX 
Tel |0i| 5771100. Telex 92S343. Fax (On 5721850 
Regional ofhees in Manchester and Dublin 






T " TALK - 





November 25 1986 


MI5 secrecy 
must be 
upheld, says 
Thatcher 


The Government was • con- 
cerned with upholding the prin- 
ciple of confidentiality and the 
obligations of staff without 
which there could be no eff- 
ective security services. Mrs 
Margaret Thatcher, the Prime 
Minuter, said when questioned 
in the Commons about the M15 
court hearing in Sydney. 

She added, in a phrase that 
she was to use several times 
during question time: “1 believe 
that these principles have been 
upheld by successive prime 
ministers and home secretaries 
of both parties*'. 

Mr Robin Squire (Hornchurch. 
C). who began the exchanges, 
said that many people viewed 


PRIME MINISTER 


with distaste the picture of ^ been case in previous 
someone who had taken a vow administrations. 


of secrecy now agreeing, in 
return it seemed for a large sura 
of money, to break that vow. 
Mrs Thatcher: I can say nothing 
about the conduct of this case, i 
can only say that Mr Wright, 
like all present and former 
members of the security ser- 
vices. owes a life-long duty of 
confidentiality to the Crown. 
The unauthorized publication 
of bis manuscript would violate 
this obligation. 

He served in the security 
services from 1955 to 1976 and 
his service therefore relates to a 
period before this Gov- 
ernment's term of office. 

Mr David Steel. Leader of the 
Liberal Party: How does she 
explain the difference between 
allowing Mr Chapman Pincher 
to publish his book, based on 
information supplied by Mr 


Laier. Mr NeQ Kinnock. 
Leader of the Opposition, rais- 
ing a point of order with the 
Speaker, said: In the course of 
questions, the implication ex- 
isted that somehow the well 
established and entirely nec- 
essary bi-partisan attitude to- 
wards national security has 
somehow been breached. 

Can 1 put it to you that this is 
a matter of order not only 
because of the implication it has 
for the conduct of government 
in this country. It is also because 
of the way in which it conveys 
implications of the attitudes of 
honourable members. 

No government which does 
absolutely nothing to impede 
the publication of a book, 
knowing it to have been pub- 
lished with information . . - (the 
rest of the sentence was lost in 
noise). 


Wright and with half the pro- noise). 

ceeds going to him. and her The Speaker May 1 ask Mr 


attempt now to stop a book on 
the same subject being pub- 
lished under Mr Wright's own 
name? 

Mrs Thatcher: The principle we 
are upholding is the obligation 
of staff to the security services, 
without which there could be no 
effective services. I wish to 
uphold the efficiency and effec- 
tiveness of the services. 

Mr Antony Marlow (Northamp- 
ton North, Cy. Since she has said 
that the events being scrutinized 
by a court in Australia arise in 
circumstances which took place 
before she was Prime Minister, 
would she agree that she has no 
vested interest whereas the 
Leader of the Opposition in his 
goings-on is indulging in low. 
nasty, dirty party politics? (Pro- 
longed Opposition protests.) 

Mrs Thatches: I have made it 
clear that the Government is 
concerned with upholding the 
principle of confidentiality and 
the obligations of staff without 
which there can be no effective 
security services. 


Kin nock to direct his point of 
order io me. please. 

Mr Kinnock: The bi-partisan 
attitude is not best sustained by 
ensuring that that which the 
Prime Minister is not prepared 
to say in this House is said by a 
civil servant in secret briefings 
outside this place (Conservative 
protests). May I further say . . . 
The Speaker How can I pos- 
sibly hear if this shouting goes 
on? 

Mr Kinnock: A Government 
which puls the Cabinet Sec- 
retary in a very exposed position 
but ensures that attention is 
drawn to disclosures that are 
harmful to national security is 
not in a position to lecture. 

The only question that I have 
raised or would raise is one 
relating to the derision of the 
Attorney General. The explana- 
tion I have asked for has no 
implications for the national 
security of my country. 

The Speaker I am sure that 
nobody in this House would 
impugn the integrity of Mr 
Kinnock. 


Kinnock anger on 
Iran arms deal 


On the very day when Admiral 
John Poindexter (United Stales 
National Security Adviser) had 
been speaking out against the 
sale of arms to Iran. Mr Robert 
McFarlane (former United 
States National Security Ad- 
viser) had been delivering arms 
to Iran and doing so covertly, 
Mr Neil Kinnock, Leader of the 
Opposition, said during Prime 
Minister's question time. 

Had she, he asked, raised the 
point with Mr Reagan during 
her visit io America and had sbe 
asked for an explanation or 
apology for that apparent lapse 
in the special relationship? 

Mrs Margaret Thatcher, the 
Prime Minister, said that it was 
government policy not to give 
ransom of any kind for hostages. 
The American President had 
made dear his policy in several 
television appearances. 

“1 do not answer yet for the 
United States." 


Mr Kinnock: Can she tell us how 
she can justify the dropping of 
bombs on a source of terrorism 
in .April and the giving of cut 
price gifts of arms to a source of 
terrorism in May? 

Mrs Thatcher: I will not answer 
for the United States of Amer- 
ica, nor am I expected to. If he is 
referring to our policy over 
Libya, that was fully justified. 
Miss Betty Boothroyd (West 
Bromwich West, Lab) asked if 
in the light of Mr Reagan's 
admission that there had been 
limited arms sales to Iran the 
Prime Minister stood by her 
original statement that she be- 
lieved implicitly in the integrity 
of the President in this matter. 
Mrs Thatcher It is not for me to 
answer for United Stales policy. 
President Reagan said in a 
television statement that the US 
does not give mason io money 
or arms for hostages. That is our 
policy. That is his policy. 


THF. TIMES WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 26 1986 


PARLIAMENT 


NHSis 

growing, 

Fowler 

insists 


Mr Nicholas Soanes (Crawley, 
C): If the security services are to 
retain the respect and con- 
fidence of this House and the 
public, then the Government 
should establish forthwith a 
committee of senior and emi- 
nent privy counsellors to pro- 
vide parliamentary oversight 
Mrs Thatcher: This has been 
raised before and rejected. The 
reasons for the rejection were 
the same as now; one has to trust 
both ihose in charge of the 
security services and ministers 
for the discharge of their duties. 


Last year. National Health Ser- 
vice Hospitals in England 
treated one million more in- 
patient cases. 400.000 more day 
cases and almost 3.5 million 
more out-patient cases than in 
197 8, Mr Norman Fowler, Sec- 
retary of State for Social Ser- 
vices. said during Commons 
question time. 

The figures for 1985, he said, 
were 6.3 million in-patient, 
960.000 day and 37.4 million 
out-patient cases. 

Mr David Knox (Staffordshire, 
Moorlands. Cy These figures 
more than any others show the 


Health Service since the present 
Government came to office. 

Mr Fowler: They are among the 
figures that do that. They show 
the rec or d amount ofbealth care 
being provided and other figures 
that establish the same point are 
in the capital building pro- 
gramme which show a record 
number of hospitals being built 
by this Conservative Gov- 
emment- 

Mr WjUtam Hamil ton (Central 
Central, Lab); These figures are 
a further example of how the 
Government fiddles figures. Is it 
not the case that where a patient 
is prematurely discharged from 
hospital and subsequently has to 
go back, it counts as two.? 

Mr Fowler: These figures are the 
exact measurement used by 
Lord Ennals, the former Labour 
Secretary of State for Social 
Services. Why should it not be a 
fiddle when he used them, but a 
fiddle when we do? 

Mr Geoffrey Dickens (Little- 
borough and Saddleworth, CJ. 
The winter of discontent added 
to the waiting lists of hospitals 
throughout the United King- 
dom and was it not the Conser- 
vative Government which 
shortened these waiting lists and 
is it not a Conservative Govern- 
ment which has a drive on now 
to shorten the waiting lists 
more? 

Which is the Government 
with compassion, which is the 
Government that cares? (Op- 
position laughter and protests.) 
Mr Fowler: I entirely agree with 
everything he said, in particular 
his point that m 1982 the 
waiting lists went up because of 
industrial action and that that 
industrial action was never con- 
demned by the official Op- 
position. 

• The Government was com- 
mitted to the development of 
the health service in the North 
of England, Mr Anthony New- 
ton, Minister for Health, said 
during Commons questions in 
response to charges of neglect 
from Labour MPs. 

Tbe report. Inequalities in 
Health in the Northern Region, 
was commissioned by the Re- 
gional Health Authority which; 
would no doubt take it into 
account in its planning, he said. 
Mr Jade Dorrnand (Easington. ; 
Lab), who had asked what ! 
action the Government pro- 
posed to take on the report, said 



Mr Nonnas Fowler making the most of his new tune. 


More telephone advice 
for Aids inquirers 


Aids telephone help and advice 
lines were attempting to deal 
with a mass of inquiries, es- 
pecially since die Government's 
publicity programme began, Mr 
Norman Fowler, Sec retary of 
Stale for Sodal Services, said 
during question time. More lines 
would become available within 
the next few weeks. 

“If there are things we can do 
to keep foe lines open by 
providing more Imes, we shall do 
that." 

Mr Fowler said that the latest 
predictions by the Commu- 
nicable Disease Surveillance 
Centre estimated that in the 
United Kingdom there would be 
550 new cases of acquired 
immune deficiency syndrome di- 
agnosed this year, 1,300 next 
year and 3,000. in 1988. In- 
evitably the estimates involved a 
Urge degree of uncertainty. 


AIDS 


that no fewer than two thirds of] Mr Charles Kennedy (Ross, 


the 678 local wards in the Cromarty 


Northern region had levels of Given the one certainty, that the 
permanent sickness above the problem will not go away and 


average for England and Wales, i 
Mr Newton said there was 
considerable academic debate, 
about the linkages between 
some of the statistics to which 
Mr Dorrnand had referred. 

Within the total of NHS 
resources, Northern region re- 
sources had risen from less than 
£3 million in 1978-79 to well : 
over £6 million in 1985-86. 
Eleven big capital developments 
had been completed. 

Mr Roland Bayes (Houghton 
and Washington. Lab) said that 
foe report only added to foe data 
showing foe relationship be- ! 
tween unemployment and ! 
health. Only government min- 1 
isters were ignoring that data. 
Why would foe Government 
not bring forward resources 
instead of leaving it to private 
capital? 

Mr Newton said there was no 
question of leaving h to private 
capital to build new hospitals. 
There were nine schemes under 


will get significantly and ex- 
ponentially worse, will he clarify 
his plans, in particular, about 
foe future of the public health 
laboratories. 

“Can we take it that there will 
be no reduction In their number 
or their funding?" 

Mr Fowler said that there were 
no plans to cat the service and 


there was no question of allow- 
ing Aids work to be held op. 
Mrs Renee Stunt (Wolver- 
hampton. North East, Lab) 
asked what resources would be 
provided in regions which had to 
deal with the majority of cases. 
Mr Fowjen Clearly we shaD 
take account of special needs. 
Some regional health authorities 
face particular problems and the 
need for services by Aida victims 
will be taken into account 

In a later reply he promised 
that foe department woald do all 
it could to achieve better co- 
ordination between voluntary 
organizations, which were doing 
important work. 

Mr Max Madden (Bradford 
West, Lab) said that on Sat- 
urday night he had telephoned 
Bradford Aids line to get 
information. 

He had bear referred by a 
recorded message to the Terence 
Higgins Trust and had rung 
every 10 minutes from 630 to 
930 until be got through. The 
publicity campaign would gen- 
erate a Brass of inqairies which 
present arrangements were inad- 
equate to deal with. 

Mr Fowler agreed that there had 


Custody limits soon 


consideration at 


The Horae Office is to introduce 
statutory time limits in three 
police areas ou the period for 
which an accused person may be 
kept in custody before trial. Mr 
David MeUor, Minister of State, 
Home Office, made the an- 
nouncement in a written Com- 
mons reply. 

He said that the decision 
came after field trials. From 
April I next year, in Avon and 
Somerset, Kent, and West Mid- 


£31 million and three more 
schemes costing £27 million 
due to start. 


of] lands, varying limits will apply 


to the length of time an accused 
person may be held in custody. 
The limit will be 56 dsys 


before the first appearance be- 1 
fore a magistrate for summary 
bearing; 70 days before commit- 
tal proceedings and, in the case 
of Bristol, Maidstone and Bir- 
mingham Crown courts, 112 
days from committal to foe 
taking of pleas. 

Mr MeUor said: “In the light 
of experience there, we shall go 
on to apply custody limits 
throughout England and Wales. 

“We have no immediate 
plans to exercise the powers to 
apply limits to periods when the 
accused is not m custody. These 
will come later.” 


Transport 

policies 

defended 


‘Double standards’ accusation 


Government attacked over ‘sham’ CAP budget 


The following is a summon ■ oj 
yesterday 's debate on the bud- 


erday's debate on the bud - 
of the European Economic 


gets or me European Economic 
Community. 

The Government was attacked 
from all sides in the Commons 
daring the debate. 

Sir Edward dn Cann accused the 
Government of doable standards 
and described the budget as a 
sham. Dr Oonagh McD^saeM, 
from the Labour benches, said 
that it was an obscenity that 
millions of tonnes of snrplns 
food went to waste in storage 
while the poor in the EEC found 
It difficult M pay the prices of 
some of these foods and people 
in the Third World starved. 

She said that storage costs 
continued to rocket. That 
obscenity would create a crisis 
on die Community. 

Dr McDonald, an Opposition 
spokesman on tn aisary and 
economic affairs, was speaking 
for the Opposition after Mr 
Peter Brooke, Minister of State, 
Treasury, had moved a motion 
taking note of nine sets of EEC 
documents on the budget proce- 
dures for 1986 and 1987. 

He referred to the European 
Court judgment that the Euro- 
pean Parliament had exceeded 
Its powers in adopting foe 1986 
budget and that foe budget 
procedure was incomplete mH 
should be completed is ac- 
cordance with the Treaty. He 


Parliament today 

Commons (2.30): Debates on 
Opposition motions on bus 
deregulation and on foe dispute 
at J.E. Hanger & Co, 

Lords (2.30): Debates on foe arts 
and on foe state of academic 
medicine. 


recalled that the Council of 
Ministers and the Parliament 
had reached agreement on a new 
budget hi July. 

“we are only half way 
through foe budget procedure 
for 1987”, he said. 

There were big problems on 
the 1986 budget because of the 
prospective revenue shortfall 
and on the 1987 budget, in 
particular because of tbe big 
overrun of common agricnltraal 
policy spending. 

“The negotiations ah e a d are 

likely to be time-consuming and 
difficult Bat a good start h as 
been made.” 

Dr McDonald moved an Op- 
position amendment viewing 

with concern the increase in 

agricultural spending and noting 
that the 1986 budget exhausted 
the Comm unities* own resources 
income. The amendment called 
on foe Government to restrict 
the spending of foe Commmuty 
in 1987 to sources of income 
already approved by foe House. 

She said that foe 1986 budget 
bad been a force. The difficulties 
of 1986 would cany over into 
1987. The 1987 budget coaid 
best be described as stopgap. 

As for foe British presidency 
of the Council of Ministers, The 
Times had said of the CAP today 
that as foe end of that six-month 
presidency came near “we have 
little to show tor this opportu- 
nity of carrying oat any sort of 
reform". 

It was not surprising that that 
should be the assessment. 

The Prime Minister had said 
on her return from Fontaine- 
Mean in June 1984 that she had 
secured budgetary discipline. 
The Opposition told her that 
budgetary discipline could not 


EEC BUDGET 


work without reform of foe CAP. 

“We have been proved right 
already in 1986. We will be 
proved right again in 1987." 

Sir Edward do Cann (Taunton, 
C) said that the the bndget was 
bogus and a sham. “Everyone 
knows that this budget will not 
be kept to. It is common 
knowledge that there will be an 
overran. What is dear is that the 
pressure is always upwards. 

“This is not a bndget in the 
ordinary sense. It is misleading 
so to describe it- The spending 
side is oat of controL” 

They would have to come back 
for more money. The European 
Parliament was not going to do 
anything to prevent that process. 
It was no watchdog. 

“Even these high levels have 
only been achieved by account- 
ing adjustments. Creative ac- 
counting is the professional term 
for it Fiddling the books is foe 
vulgar term.” 

The truth was that so sunt 
had been made on reform. The 
whole nation knew it. 

The Government was practis- 
ing doable standards- la his 
autumn statement, the Chan- 
cellor had been priding himself 
on bk ability to control public 
expenditure. When it came to 
control of EEC expenditure, 
there was only apparent in- 
difference. 

In his bndget statement, the 
Chancellor said that the Scare 
for 1986-87 of the UK net 
contribution would be about 
£600 million. In the antamn 
statement, foe figure was revised 


upwards to something more than 
£1,000 million. 

“For all foe talk, for all foe 
understandings and aO the 
boasts and all the promises, our 
payments are at cm all-thne high 
ssM the House has again been 
misled." 

The CAP represented mis- 
management on the grandest 
possible scale. If there was no 
reform of this sacred cow, it had 
been said, foe cereal snrplns 
would doable by 1991. 

“Year after year this sov- 
ereign Parliament is expected to 
acquiesce supinely in this state 
of affairs and is expected to write 
another blank cheque. It is high 
time to say: No, we have had 
enough of this," be said. 

There were no proposals for 
recoupment and none for any 
sort of bodgetry controls, both of 

which had been promised. It 
would be right, therefore, to say 
that this Part lament would not 
approve the budget until the 
undertakings it had been given, 
were kept 

Sir Russell Johnston (Inverness, 
Nairn and Lochaber, L) said 
there was no doubt foe Commu- 
nity was faring its gravest crisis 
winch, if not resolved within a 
year or two with at least 
guidelines for reform, could lead 
to the break-up of the Com- 
munity. 

The Government wag open to 
the greatest criticism because 
not until the dramatic story in 
The Times that morning had it 
taken a lead in looking for ways 
to bring production down and 
deal with the soaring costs of 
intervention. 

Mr Eric Dealdns (Waltham- 
stow, Lab) said that the present 
CAP system was absurd because 


h was open-ended. It was even 
more abssrd considering that 
the Council of Ministers bad 
derided recently that any excess 
agricultural expenditure in otto 
year should be clawed back in 
subsequent years. 

Mr Edward Taylor (Southend 
East, C)z This is a pretty useless 
debate because whatever we 
agree tonight will not have the 
s Lightest effect on EEC spen- 
ding. 

The crucial point is that what 
we are discussing is a wholly 
bogus budget- There Is not the 
slightest chance of foe budget , 
being kept to the legal maximum 
declared in the budget." 

Common Market spending 
was totally out of control and 
there was absolutely nothing foe 
Government, ou present policies, 
could do about it. The Common 
Market was now spending more 
than £100 mflfion every week on 
storing, dumping or deatrsffeeg 
foodstuffs. The average British 
family was having to spead £13 a 
week because of foe cost of the 
CAP. 

The only hope of containing 
EEC expenditure aod improving 
the Common Market, and the 
only hope for British agri- 
culture, was tor the Government, 
instead of trying to fiddle foe 
figures with its European friends 
and come up with devices to get 
through the legal limits, to 
repatriate agriculture from the 
Common Market. 

Repatriation of agriculture 
would improve the Common 
'Market, not wreck ft. 

The Opposition amendment 
was rejected by 174 votes to 
82 - Government majority, 92, 
and foe Government motion 
agreed to. 


By Sheila Gunn 
Political Staff 

Mr John Moore, Secretary 
of State for Transport, de- 
fended bis policies yesterday 
against complaints that lack of 
government strategy led to 
orders for British transport 
systems going abroad. 

He conceded that Britain 
may be “a little slower" in 
getting new projects under 
way, but that was because of 
the democratic processes of 
inquiries which were some- 
times frustrating. 

This different attitude - 
and public opposition to 
major infrastructure pro- 
jects — had been brought 
home to him when sitting 
across to the table from his 
European counterparts and 
discussing such issues as the 
Channel tunnel, he said. 

Giving evidence to a House 
of Lords sub-committee in- 
vestigating innovation in sur- 
face transport, Mr Moore 
assured peers that his depart- 
ment took a long-term view 
and was not confined by foe 
three-year public spending 
circle. 

Companies have com- 
plained to foe sub-committee 
about foe department's lack of 
strategy over foe sort of 
research and .development 
they should be carrying out. 

Mr Moore accepted that 
there had been allegations 

about poor communications 
between the department, local 
government and industry, but 
consultations were going on. 

In written evidence to the 
peers, the department set out 
the advances which will dic- 
tate foe future of transport in 
Britain, mainly through the 
use of information technol- 
ogy. Alternatives to sted, for 
example, will mean lighter, 
more fuel-efficient vehicles. 

It added that the recent 
collapse of oil prices has 
meant it is unlikely that any 
alternative to foe internal 
combustion engine will be 
found before the end of the 
century. 


inquiiy to 
be considered 


The Government would con- 
sider opening a fonnal in- 
vestigation into the loss ot foe 
Derbyshire, which sank without 


TRANSPORT 


trace during a typhoon m 1980 
with foe loss of 44 lives, rf any 
ovvtam was found of a link 


evidence was found of a link 
with foe break-up of her swer 
ship the Kowloon Bridge, Mr 
Mkhari Spicer, Under-Sec- 
retary of State for Transport, 
said in a Commons statement. 

MPs from all sides of foe 
House pressed him to agree to 

SH He^idtfiath^ would publish 
the reports of the iwo seperale 
mvesugpnons involving foe 
Hong Koag-registered vessel, 
Kowloon Bridge, one of which 
was expeoed very soon, awl 
consider what actios needed to 
betaken. ■ . 

The first wasa mu investiga- 
tion into the damage to the 
vessel, conducted by a Depart- 
ment of Transport insp ec t or , 
who boarded the vessel on 
November 20 at same personal 
risk in Bantry Bay, where she 
had put in for repairs. Early 
indications were that the dam- 
age was entirely consistent with 
the severe weather encountered 
during her voyage across foe 
Atlantic. 

The second was an investiga- 
tion by inspectors from the 
Department of Transport on 
behalf of the Hong Kong admin- 
istration into the vessd breaking 
free from her anchor, the toss of 
steering and the subsequent 


drifting for 24 hours in severe 
weather conditions. She had 
since broken her back between 
number two and number three 
holds. 

Mr Roger Stott, an Opposition 
spokesman on transport, said 
that the Kowloon Bridge — for- 
merly the English Bridge — was 


one of six ships fault by Swan 
Hunter in the eflriy 1970s. 

One -of those, the merc han t 
vessd Derbyshire, sank without 
trace in the Sooth China Sea in 
19ft). Anotte. the Tyne Bridge, 
suffered severe struc t ural dam- 
age in the North Sea in 1982 and 
her crew had Co be taken by 
helicopter to safety. 

An inquiry by Lloyd's Reg- 
ister found that the ship had not 
been farift according to the 
designer's (dans and all other 
ships in that class were substan- 
tially modificd. 

Sioce 1980 the families of 
those who died on foe Derby- 
shire had been fighting a cam- 
paign to persuade foe De- 
partment of Transport to have a 
formal inquiry into foe tragedy. 

Could foe minister confirm 
that when the surveyor exam- 
ined the Kowloon Bridge in 
Ban try Bay be instructed foe 
captain that it would be unsafe 
to proceed? Would, foe repeat of 
the investigation into her struc- 
tural damage be compared with 
the structural faults in foe Tyne 
Bridge? Would foe remaining 
ships is foe class be inspected? 

In view of foe concern felt by 
MFs on all sides of the House 
and by relatives of those who 
died on the Derbyshire, was it 
not now time io fay foe matter 
to rest? 


been a steep increase in foe 
number of calls and gave his 
assurance of gpvermnent help 
with new fines, if need be. 

Mr Roger Sims (GUsleburst Q 
said foal there bad been trials in 
the United States of ATZ which, 
it was suggested, while not 
coring Aids, coaid delay its 
progress. 

The WeUcome Foundation 
was patting great resources into i 
the development work, and de- 
spite contrary reports, there 
were adequate supplies for clini- 
cal trials in Britain. Any delay 
was to ensure foal the trials were 
property set up. 

Mr Fowler agreed that ffinkal 
trials were being set up. ATZ 
was not a core hot it amid 
prolong life and alleviate 
symptoms. 

In earlier exchanges, Mrs 
Marion Roe (Braxtamnie, Q 
asked whether any progress bad 
been made in development of 
needles for drag addicts which 
amid net be reused. 

Mrs Edwina Currie, Under- 
secretary of State for Social 
Services, said that it a matter of 
considerable concern that Aids 
and other diseases amid be 
passed on by reusable needles. It 
was nnder consideration else- 
where and an announcement 
aught be made shortly. 


His department had been 
advised of reports of structural 
Hamag p to foe Kowloon Bridge 
fate on November 1 8. In view of 
the possible connection whh the 
less of the Derbyshire, the 
department agreed with foe 
Hong Kong authorities that the 
department's inspectors should 
investigate ou their behalf 

Late on November 22 foe 
vessel broke away from her 
anchor. The master deckled to 
put out to sea. She then suffered 
a loss of steering and a may day 
call was put ouL The House 
would wish io acknowledge the 
■drill and bravery with which the 
crew were taken off by RAF Sea 
King helicopters with no loss of 

life. 

The vessel eventually drifted 
on to rocks near Baltimore after 


Mr Spicer said that in the case 
of foe Derbyshire there was 
simply no evidence to go on 
.because she had sunk without 
trace. But there had been a 
derailed investigation into foe 
sinking of tfae Derbyshire. There 
had been no whitewash. 

The issue now was whether 
there was anything more to find 
out- Fonnal investigations were 
elaborate and expensive proce- 
dures and there had to be good 
reason to have them. 


Worries in Nato 


over ships loss 


Concern about foe defence im- 
plications of the sharp drop in 
merchant tonnage among mem- 
bos of Nato has. led to a 
decision to devote part of an 
early meeting of Nato ministers 
to discussing the issue. 

The North Atlantic Council, 
the Nato ministerial body, 
meets on December 12, but the 
agenda was said by a Nato 
spokesman yesterday to be 
confidentiaL 

Mrs Margaret Thatcher, the 
Prime Minister, said in a written 
Commons reply that foe ex- 
pected an earty discussion of the 
matter in the North Atlantic 
Council. 

Sir Edward do Cans (Taunton, 
C) had asked the Prime Minister 
four questions reflecting con- 
cern about the defence implica- 
tions of the reduction m the 
British and Nato merchant 
tonnage. 


Mrs Thatcher laid him that last 
year foe total tonnage of the 
Nato merchant fleets fell by 30.7 
miflion deadweight tonnes. 

“The Nato Planning Board 
for Ocean Shipping has drawn 
foe attention of the North 
Atlantic Council to the implica- 
tions lor the Alliance of this 
tread, and indicated possible 
remedial measures. 

“There are sufficient vessels 
to meet Ministry of Defence 
requirements The ability of the 
fleet to meet those requirements 
is monitored closely by the 
Ministry of Defence and foe 
Department of Transport" 

As the Affiance had a tong- 
standing agreement to pool 
merchant shipping in time of 
war. the availability of merchant 
shipping to meet civil supply 
needs had to be assessed in 
terms of foe capability of Nato. 


Defence ‘will be 
the main issue’ 


By Robin Oakley, Political Editor 


The Labour Party is fully 
prepared to let defence be- 
come the central issue of the 
next election, as Mrs Margaret 
Thatcher intends, despite the 
party's drubbing on the issue 
at the 1983 election . 

Labour’s Director of Com- 
munications, Mr Peter Man- 
delson, said at the launch 
yesterday of a book on the 
1983 election that foe issue 
would not be fought in the 
same way next time and set 
out Labour's strategy for 
countering the Tory on- 
slaught, a strategy that will be 
given a dummy run on the 
visit to the United States this 
coming weekend by the party 
leader, Mr Neil Kinnock. 

In 1983, Mr Mandelson 
said, foe electorate were in a 
war-happy mood after the 
Falklands and were receptive 
to the Government's setting 
the agenda on defence. 

The Labour Party were 
disunited on the issue and its 
opponents were able to give 
foe impression that the choice 
was between one party offer- 
ing to defend Britain and 
another offering no defence. 

Next time it would be 
different It would be a choice 
between two versions of patri- 
otism, with the Conservative 
Government willing to spend 
money on the Trident missile 
system while forced to cut 
tack on conventional arms 
spending and Labour dismiss- 
ing the nuclear deterrent as 
obsolete and preferring to 
spend the money on frigates, 
fighter planes and new weap- 
onry for foe Army. 

In a candid appraisal of 
Labour’s disaster in 1983, Mr 
Mandelson agreed with foe 
opinion of the former Conser- 
vative Party chairman, Mr 
Cecil Parkinson, that the most 
remarkable feature of the cam- 

nOirm nmr tW« a _ . ■ 



Mr Mandelson: A different 
strategy this time. 


than it had been when the last 
election started. 

It had professional advisers 
to match foe Conservatives' 
Saatchi and Saaichi, it was 
already filming its party politi- 
cal broadcasts for the cam- 
paign and the party leader’s 
movements bad already been 
plotted. 


to In foe new book, Mr 
Parkinson claims that stories 
of a £20 million Conservative 
war chest at the last election 
were a myth. “In tact we 
started the campaign with 
£200,000 in one account and 
an overdraft in the other." 

He says that the party spent 
very little more than the 
Labour Party and at yes- 


terday’s press conference Mr 
Ivor Crewe, Professor of Gov- 
ernment at Essex University, 
said that the Conservative 
advantage in money terms 
was really “quite stight". 

In the book, Mr Michael 
Pinto-Duschinsky, senior lec- 
turer in government at Brunei 
University, puts the central 
election spending totals at 
£3.8 million for the Conser- 
vatives, £2.3 infflion for La- 
bour and £1.95 million for the 
Alliance parties. 

Political Communications: The 
General Election Campaign of 
1983, edited bv Ivor . Crewe and 
Martin Harrop (Cambridge 
University Press; £25). 


paign was the “ineptitude and 
fundamental muddle" of the 
Labour campaign effort 

Labour was already further 
advanced with its election 
campaign this time around 



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Tfffi TIMES WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 26 1986 


HOME NEWS 


Student grants so poor 
that youngsters opt for 
training, MPs are told 


By Martin Fletcher, Political Reporter 


Student grants are so inad- 
equate that 16-year-olds are 


opting for the ready cash of the 
Youth 


Training Scheme 
rather than higher education, 
MPs were told yesterday. 

The present grants system 
was so inadequate, uncertain 
and complex that higher 
education was becoming the 
preserve of the middle and 


Some students on courses 
were so poor that they were in 
danger of vi tamin deficiency, 
while university and poly- 
technic hardship funds were 
“close to exhaustion”. 

In evidence to the education 
select committee, university 
and polytechnic teachers and 
vice-principals continued 'the 
litany of criticisin of the 
Government’s grants' policy 
tha t bad been begun in pre- 
vious hearings by the National 
Union of Students and by the 
local education authorities. 


Alm ost without exception 
the 20 per 


they have deplored the 
cent cut in real terms in 
student grants tince. 1979. 
They have emphasized that 
that cut has-been worsened by 
increases in costs ofbooks and 
accommodation well above 
the inflation rate, by the 
failure of parents in nearly 
50 per cent of cases to pay 
their parental contributions in 
part or in fhH, by effective cuts 
m the social security benefits 
and travel grants payable- to 
students, and by the lack of 
vacation jobs. 

Mr Paul Cottrell, assistant 
general secretary of the 


Association of University 
Teachers, said yesterday that 
there was now an “unpre- 
cedented” level of student 
hardship. “The situation is 
quite critical,” he said. 

A colleague. Dr Bin Ste- 
phenson, a member of the 
AUT executive; cited ev- 
idence of 16-year-olds prefer- 
ring the inmiediate cash grants 
available on the YTS rather 
than the “long slog” of two 
more years at school followed 
by the financial ha rdshi p of 
being a student ' 

In its submission to the 
committee, the AUT argued 
that the inadequacies rathe 
grants were “terriers to ac- 
cess, and particularly to those 
groups which have tradition- 
ally not taken up higher 
education — the working cl- 
ass, women, ethnic minorities, 
mature students and the 
disabled”. 

That was substantiated by 
Mr Fred Holliday, Vice-Chan- 
cellor of Durham University, 
who said that the present 
complex system was frighten- 
ing away low-income femihes. 

If we can bring in the same 
proportion of students from 
the working classes as the 
middle classes this country 
would have a marvellous res- 
ervoir of talent,” he said. 

Mr Holliday, representing 
the Committee of Vice-Chan- 
cellors and Principals, spoke 
of students approaching wel- 
fare officers and tutors in 
increasing numbers with fin- 
ancial problems, of rising 
levels Distress. and of students 


being too poor to eat properly. 
“Vitamin deficiency in stu- 
dents is not now beyond the 
bounds of possibility,” he 
said. 

“Students have begun to 
turn to the banks for support. 
An informal loan system ap- 
pears to operate already as it is 

commonplace fra students to 
have overdrafts, often running 
at an average of £300 to £560. 
There are cases of overdrafts 
as high as £2,000 to £3,000 by 
the completion of the course-” 

The Committee of Direc- 
tors of Polytechnics said that 
polytechnic students were 
particularly badly affected and 
that “in some cases hardship 
funds are dose to ex- 
haustion”. Polytechnics were 
legally restrained from sub- 
sidizing food, and accom- 
modation. 

Up to 70 percent of parents 
with children at polytechnics 
were to pay their 

parental contributions, com- 
pared with under SO per cent 
of university parents, while a 
“derisory” 1 1 percent of poly- 
technic students were drawn 
from the lowest soda! classes. 

Dr Raymond Rickett, Di- 
rector of Middlesex. Poly- 
technic; said that polytechnics 
were no longer able to attract 
“a sizeable chunk” of the 
population from backgrounds 
where higher education was 
not traditional and where 
there was pressure to start 


earning as early as possible. 
The Dei 


ipartment of Educa- 
tion is to give evidence to the 
committee next Tuesday. 


Pay rethink at Civil Service 


By Hm Jones 


High-flying Civil Servants 
who earn between £14,318 
and £62,000 a year are to be 
given performance related in- 
crements to prevent them 
being tempted to jobs in the 
private sector. 

The change, which will at 
first affect the 7,617 members 
of the Association of First 
Division Civil Servants, is 
also in line with the 
Government's philosophy 
that pay should be related to 
profit performance and pro- 
ductivity. 

The Government denies 
that there is anything like a 
“flood” ofhigb achievers leav- 
ing the service but concedes 


that some particularly tal- 
ented people have left for 
higher salaries elsewhere. 

It is understood that the 
Prime Minister has agreed 
that the top" grade two and 
three Civil Servants should 
have their pay linked to- 
performance; after a recom- 
mendation last year by the 
Top Salaries Review Board. 

Although the mechanics of 
the system have yet to be 
worked out and agreed with 
the unions. Cabinet and Trea- 
sury ministers are considering 
finking incremental pay rises 
more to performance, en- 
abling better talents to jump 
stages in the pay scale. 


An indication of govern- 
ment thinking was given re* 
cently by Miss Anne Mueller, 
second permanent secretary to 
foe Management and Person- 
nel Office of foe Gvil Service: 


She said: “Motivation is 
partly about pay , and the Gvil 
Service has to address that 
issue: We have begun to relate 
pay to petfonnance.bat have 
still a long way to go in 
shaping the pay system so as 
to reward the good performers 
suitably more than foe less 
adequate.” 


Miss Mueller added: “This 
is a major cultural change. It 
wfll take time." ' 



Mr Michael Broad bent, head of Christie’s wine department, with foe 1784 Chateau d’Yqnem (Photograph: Nick Rogers). 

Rarest 


wine for 


auction 


The world's rarest nine is to 
be auctioned in London next 
week and is expected to fetch 
at least £50,000. 

The 1784 Chateau d’Yquem 
was one of three bottles discov- 
ered in Paris last year and is 
foe oldest known wine from 
this femoas vineyard in foe 
Sauternes region. 

It is also the oldest ever to 
be offered for sale and bidding 
is expected to be intense at 
Christie’s on December 4. 

The bottle, which bears foe 
initials TH J, was bought by 
Thomas Jefferson in 1787, 
when he was US ambassador 
to Paris. Wines were not 
labelled and he insisted his 
initials were cut into foe 
bottles to identify them. 

The world record for a bottle 
of wine was achieved last 
December, when a Thomas 
Jefferson engraved 1787 Cha- 
teao-Lafite fetched £120,000, 
but the wine Is now useless as 
the cork slipped into it while 
on exhibition. 


Other lots in foe sale of’ 
d g hteeath and nin eteen t h c en - 
tury wmes include an 1832 
Chatean-jtefite, expected to 
raise £ 2 , 000 , 


Saleroom 


Greek goddess’s £923,000 


By Geraldine Norman, Sale Room Correspondent 


Brancusi, Picasso and com- 
pany made the clear, clean 
lines of primitive sculpture 
fashionable. With a 50- 
yeardelay the market has 
enthusiastically endorsed 
their taste by running an 8in 
neolithic sculpture foam foe 
Greek islands to an unheard of 
$1,320,000 (£923,000). 

Sotheby’s in New York 
offered the little crosslegged 
marble goddess for sale on 
Monday with a pre-sale es- 
timate of $40,000-$ 60,000. 
The bidding soared beyond 
their dreams, setting a new 
auction price record for any 
art work of antiquity. 

The little goddess does not 
have much in foe way of 
features. Her arms stick out at 
right angles and her crossed 
legs are indicated by grooves 
in the rounded base. 

Sofoeby's date ber to about 
5000 - 3500BC and describe 
her as Cycladic while admit- 
ting that she may have come 
from foe Peloponnese. She is 
thought to depict the Great 
Mother. 

There are said to be only 
eight or nine images of this 
size known and Sotheby's 


estimate was probably out by 
a factor of eight or nine. 

The statuette came from the 
collection of James Johnson 
Sweeney whose superb mod- 
ern pictures broke records at 
Sotheby’s in New York last 
week. Two private collectors, 
one American and one Euro- 
pean, fought for possession, 
steadily capping each other’s 
bids. America won. 


The winning bid is believed 
to have come from Mrs Leon 
Levy, wife of a leading Wall 
Sheet finan cier who has a 
distinguished collection of 
antiquities. The under bidder 
is thought to have been Mr 
George Ortiz, a wealthy collec- 
tor in foe same field. 


The other big^price in foe 



The little sculpture that 
reached a record price 


sale was the $451,000 (es- 
timate $75,000-$ 125,000) or 
£31 5,000 paid by a European 
dealer for a two-foot Assyrian 
gypsum relief fragment depict- 
ing a winged guardian divinity 
with an austere countenance 
and massive beard. The sale 
totalled £1,892,711 with 5 per 
cent unsold. 

At Christie's in London 
yesterday foe ‘Breadalbane’ 
Amen glass sold for £28,600 
(estimate £12,000£1 5,000) to 
a private collector. 'Amen’ 
glasses, engraved with foe 
national anthem are foe most 
famous Jacobite memorials. 

This example is thought to 
have been bought in the early 
nineteenth century by foe 
Second Marquess of Breadal- 
bane. The morning glass sale 
made £192,41 7 with 1 percent 
unsold. . 


Tax plea 
to save 
art for 


nation 


By Gavin Bell 
Arts Correspondent 


A broad strategy is urgently 
required for safeg uardin g 
works of an for the nation. 
Professor Brian Morris, chair- 
man of toe Museums and 
Galleries Commission, has 
said. 

In his report pub- 

lished yesterday. Professor 
Morris welcomed government 
decisions to scrap foe ceiling 
for acceptances of works of art 
in lieu of tax, and to allow 
companies to offset large char- 
itable donations against tax. 

However he said that more 
should be done in that 
direction. 

“There is a need, if casual- 
ties are to be minimiz ed, for 
better co-ordination and plan- 
ning, dearer objectives and 
more systematic inform- 
ation,” Professor Morris said. 

He called specifically for a 
quicker response to oners in 
lieu, for related tax and VAT 
changes, and fra tighter export 
controls. Together, these 
changes would have a dra- 
matic effect, and could be 
achieved at relatively little 
cost. 

Two further incentives were 
required to enable public 
collections to compete with 
overseas buyers: 

• Single donations to a mu- 
seum. gallery or art charity 
should qualify for tax relief, in 
the same way as donations by 
companies: 

• National and independent 
museums should be able to 
recover VAT on their ac- 
quisition purchases; the effect 
of foe present system was to 
encourage contemporary art- 
ists and dealers to sell abroad. 

Professor Morris also called 
for increased funding for the 
Area Museum Councils, to 
provide local institutions with 
foe advice and specialist ser- 
vices they needed to develop 
as centres for education and 
recreation, as well as tourist 
attractions. 

“We are not crying for foe 
moon, we know foe minister 
does not carry it in his pocket, 
only for 20 per cent more, say 
£400,000, next year.” 

Last year the commission 
made 645 grants, tolalling£1.7 
million, to museums and gal- 
leries throughout foe country 
for purchases, conservation 
and maintenance. Its alloca- 
tion from next year's arts 
budget is expected to be 
announced next month. 


There’s d new symbol of tourism. 

It’s on exclamation point. And it says Lombardy. 


We’ll be using it to let you know what Lombardy's been getting 
ready for you for the last 3,000 years. To let you see at once that you 
haven't got away from where you planned to be. 

Come and visit us. You'll find a region as sweet as a smile. And then 
there's our promise that the days will be the ones you’ve always 
dreamed of. Dreamed of - to find only here. 

! : if s a strong symbol, decisive and enthusiastiefor all things bright 
and beautiful. If s a sign of love. A sign for mountains, lakes, for spas 
and the countryside. For history and art of old. Or for the people and 
culture of today's faster times. For a land that has always loved the 
knowing traveller whether before or after a visit: the chosen way and 
then the memories. 

There. Nowyou knowwhere you have togo when you put an exclar 
mation point at the end of a wish. 



Visit the Lombardy stand at the“ltalia”pavi!ion 
of the World Travel Market. 


S Reg ione Lombardia 




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aged 
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ab- 
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able 

lord 


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new 

here 


sub- 

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had 

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Durt 


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TTTF TIMFS WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 26 1986 



,■> "A 4 : J 


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-A- 






I t’s true more men than women have AIDS. 

But this does not mean it is a homosexual 
disease. It isn’t. 

Anyone can get it, gay or straight, male or 
female. Already 50,000 people are infected. 

At the moment the infection is mainl y 
confined to relatively small g roups of people 
in this countr y. 

But the virus is spreadin g. 

It is spread during sexual intercourse. 
Infected men have the virus in their semen. 
Infected women have it in their vaginal fluid. 

But you can’t tell who has the virus just 
by looking. Most infected people don’t know 
they are themselves. 

So the more sexual partners you have, 
the greater the risk. 

Make sure you always use a condom. 
It’s safer. 

People who inject drugs face the added 
danger of infection if they share needles 
or equipment. 

So don’t inject. But if you do, never share. 
For more information, phone the con- 
fidential Healthline. Or write for more 


information to Dept A, PO Box 100, Milton 
Keynes, MK1 1TX. 



N 

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1 

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- 


1 


ISSUED BY THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND SOCIAL SECURITY 


X 







THE TIMES WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 26 1986 


HOME NEWS 


Bradford FCsays it did not receive adequate warning of fire hazards 


Club’s' plea for .fair §8il§lllS“ 

ri'-ss 

• 




Bradford City Football dub 
yesterday pleaded far an 
impartial and dis passiona te 
apportionment of the Marne it 
must shoulder for the worst 
disaster in British football 
history. 

Being given its first public 
opportunity to outline its 
version of the events at Vattey 
Parade in Bradford on May 
1 1, 1 985, was more important 
to the dub than the multi- 
milli on pounds pay out in 
damages it may face, the High 
Court sitting in Leeds was 
told. 

An impassioned plea that 
the chib whose directors and 
members still lived receive the 
same judicial fairness as the 56 
spectators who burnt to death 
was made by Mr Edwin 


By lan Smith 


Glasgow, counsel rep- 


resenting the dub. 

His defence of the dub’s 
part m events leading up to the 
disaster came on the eleventh 
day of the hearing to deteav' 
mine liability for the deaths in 
a test case brought by Mrs 
Susan Fletcher whose hus- 
band, John, aged 34, son 
Andrew, aged 1 1, brother-in- 
law Peter and his father, 
Edmund, aged 64, died in the 
fire. 

Bringing a similar ehwm for 
liability against the football 
dub, the Health and Safety 


Executive and the now do- 
th net West Yorkshire County 
Council is Police Sergeant 
David Britton who was in- 
jured in the foe while trying to 
rescue victims. His case is 
being supported by the Police 
Federation. . 

Summing , up for the dub 
Mr Glasgow admitted it could 
not be seriously disputed that 
all three defendants were at 
feuhL Tbe only issue was what 
legal liability should be at-, 
tached to each defendan t and 
what proportion of the Marne 
they should cany. 

Mr Glasgow said that had 
proper warning been given to 
the football dob about the 
potential hazard present in its 
grandstand it would have 
acted; instead it had been 
actively lulled into a false 
sense of security and therefore 
both public bodies made a 
substantial contribution to 
what occurred. 

Tbe Government’s Health 
and Safety. Executive, Mr 
Glasgow saidbad behaved in 
an extraordinarily 

uncharacteristic way and al- 
lowed a misleading im- 
pression to be given about the 
liaison which existed between 
them and tbe county council 
who were also the local fire 
authority. 

In evidence Mr John Laird, 


area principal inspector for 
the the Health and Safety 
Executive, had admitted that 
’ the hazard at the sfa«imm had 
first been recognized in 1980 
but m the succeeding four 
years nothing bad been done 
about it, Mr Glasgow said. 

He added: “Mr Laird said 
he did not trust the dub 
because they had not done 
what they had said they would 
do but he does nothing be-' 
cause he trusts to fate and 
ignoring elaborate liaison with 
the fire brigade just presumes 
they will act”. 

That Mr Laird had judged 
that became of the thickness 
of timber in the stand there 
was ho serious risk showed a 
serious adjudgement or dem- 
onstrated him unfit for his job, 
Mr Glasgow said- 

Also letters sent to the dub 



Chief Iosp Charles Mawsou with his wife, Jane, at Buckingham Palace. 


Palace honour for heroes 


in 1984 did nothing to ring 
mg chib " 


direc- 


alann bdls among 
tors- - 

West Yorkshire County 
Council was also criticized by 
Mr Glasgow who described its 
reaction to the situation at 
Valley Parade as similar to tbe 
stable door being repeatedly 
slammed shut after the horse 
had already bolted. 

“We are not hying to say 
that anyone owed the dub a 
duty, we are merely saying the 
duty owed by the dub to its 


Ten men whose 
saved scores of lives at 
Bradford City fire disaster 
collected gallantry awards 
from the Qaeen yesterday at 
Buckingham Palace. 

Recipients at the ceremony 
who received the Queen’s Gal- 
lantry Medal - were: Police 


Sergeant David Britten; Mr 
Richard Gough, an installa- 
tion engineer from Shipley; 

Mr David Hastier, aged 47, an 
assistant supermarket man- 
ager, also from Shipley; Police 
Constable Richard Ingham, 

Chief Inspector Charles Maw- 


son and Chief Inspector Ter- 
ence Socambe. 

The Queen's Commenda- 
tion for Brave Conduct was 
presented to: PC Peter Bar- 
rett; Mr Michael Bland, aged 
27, an asbestos remover from 
Bradford; Mr Timothy Leigh, 
and PC David Midgeley. 


visitors is reflected by the duty 
owed too by those public 
bodies. 

“Both tbe Health and Safety 
Executive and local authority 
are creatures of statute and 
their negligence must be re- 
lated by their failure to per- 


form their statutory duties” 
Mr Glasgow spoke scath- 
ingly of the “magic wand of 
policy wielded with great 
dexterity by the county 


council's fairy godmother”, a 
: to Mr Keit 


reference 
dard, QC, 


Keith God- 
representing the 


county council, and said that 
“those whose eyes were cur- 
rently blinkered will now have 
them forced open by the 
amount of damages which 
they would be ordered to 
pay.” 

The case continues today. 


£62,000 damages 
against police 
after man’s death 


■ The widow of a man whose 
body was found frozen in the 
snow a week after the police 
took him from his home after 
a domestic dispute was 
awarded £62,537 in damag es 
yesterday. 

Lord McCluskey was told at 
the Court of Session in Edin- 
burgh that the police failed to 
lake reasonable care of Mr 
Anthony Wilson, aged 26, a 
sea fib Id er, and exposed him to 
unnecessary risk. 

Mrs Jennifer Wilson, aged 
30, of Jubilee Avenue, Deans, 
Livingston, had sued the chief 
constable of Lothian and Bor- 
ders police and two of his 
constables for £135,000 for 
herself and her three children. 

She claimed the police 
should have known that in her 
husband's intoxicated state, 
and with the cold weather, he 
would have difficulty in find- 
ing his way home. 

Mr Wilson was taken from 
their home, formerly in 
Broomhouse Drive, Edin- 
burgh, at 5am, on January 5, 
1982, but was released from 
the police car on a lonely 
country road on the outskirts 
of the city. He died from 
hypothermia and was later 
found in a snow-covered field. 

Lord McCluskey said he 
concluded that death was 
caused by a breach of com- 
mon law duty. There was no 
evidence to suggest that Mr 
Wilson had been deliberately 
released in a remote area to 
“teach him a lesson”. But the 


two constables failed to ex- 
ercise reasonable care. 

The police denied at the 
hearing that they were neg- 
ligent during the incident. 

it was plain from the ev- 
idence, Lord McCluskey said, 
that PC James Halliday, aged 
38. had taken chaipe of the 
incident and the judge ab- 
solved the second officer, PC 
Ian Deas, aged 32, of blame. 
Both men are still serving 
constables in the force. 

A spokesman for Lothian 
and Borders police said yes- 
terday: “The chief constable 
has received a copy of Lord 
McCluskey’s opinion. 

“Our legal representatives 
are considering it, with a view 
to determining whether there 
should be an appeal. 

“The two officers were sub- 
jected to formal disciplinary 
proceedings in 1982.” 

The family of Mr Michael 


Burdon, a Scottish properly 
after a 


executive, who died 
road accident in Northumber- 
land in August 1984, were 
awarded £255,000 agreed 
damages in the High Court 
yesterday. 

His widow. Mis Gail 
Burdon, aged 30, of Rockwell 
Grove, Manse Road, Linlith- 
gow. l-nthian, will receive 
£180.000. The other £75,000 
will be added to an existing 
trust fond for the couple’s 
daughter, Caroline, aged four. 
Mr Burdon died in a head-on 
crash on tire Alnwick bypass. 


‘Blackmail 


of Harrods 
owner’ 


By a Staff Reporter 


Mr Ali Al-Fayed. the owner 
ofHarrods, has been named as 
the victim of an alleged 
H5QQJOOQ blackmail attempt 
Yesterday Mr Abbas Al- 
Bassan, aged 28, an Iraqi 
electronics student at Lough- 
borough College, was charged 
at Horseferry Road 
Magistrates’ Court with mak- 
ing an unwarranted demand 
in a letter to Mr Al-Rtyed- : 

He was reteased on hail, 
with a condition that he 
deposited £5,000 at thecourt 
Mr Al-Bassan was also or- 
dered to surrender his pass- 
port and any other travel 
documents to police ad taild 
to live at his home in Epping 
Walk. Hufane, Manchester. 

Harrods was taken over by 
the Al-Fayed Investment 
Trust in November 1984 from 
House of Baser in a £1 38 mil- 
lion deal 

The company is controlled 
by Mr Ali AI-Fayed and Ms 
brother, Muhammad, who 
come from one of tbe wealthi- 
est families in Egypt 


Doctors 


accused 
of fraud 


A husband-and-wife team 
of doctors was accused yes- 
terday of recesving cash for 
fictitious treatment . 

Dr Susan Opeushaw, a 
Somerset county councillor, 
faces three changes of dis- 
honestly rlairniijg a total of 
£18 for canymg out smear 
tests for cervical cancer on 
three women. 

Her husband. Dr Wflfiam 
Openshaw, medical officer at 
MiHfield School in: Street, 
Somerset, was charged with 
obtaining £60 m the name of a 
patient through a falsified 
maternity services claim. 

The couple, from Bove 
Town, Glastonbury, Somer- 
set, also faced three joint 
charges of o b t aini ng a total of 
£165 for maternity services in 
the names of three patients. 

It was aQeged that the two 
GFs, who work at Glaston- 
bury Health Qfrric, have de- 
frauded Somerset Family 
Practitioners Committee of a 
total of £250. 

Magistrates at Glastonbury 
adjourned the case, which was 
beard in the couple’s abse n ce, 
until December 23. 


Science report 


Doctors discover 


why people snore 


By Pearce Wright, Science Editor 


Docfims at a sleep research 
laboratory have food tint 
people who snore can be 
divided Into different cate- 
gories. 

They have farad that dif- 
ferences between people’s Im$ 
capacity and the shape of their 
pharynx explain why some 

snore — it is similar to the way 
the power and resonance of a 
musical organ depends on die 
size of its beQows and the 


men of average 


_ke researchers measured 
the effect of va ri ations in foe 
shape and size of the cavity at 
the back of foe nose and the 
mouth, which forms the phar- 
ynx and found the pharynx 
was smaller in snorers than in 
non-snorers. 

Tbe investigation by doctors 
from three hospitals and foe 
Un i v e rs it y of Toronto in Can- 
ada showed how snoring be- 
came a medical c on dition in 
sane mdrridnals, because it 
interfered with breathing and 
disrupted sleep. 

The 25 volantews examined 
by a *»m working with Dr 
Douglas Bradley, off Toronto 
General Hospital, were all 


healthy 
weight 

There were 10 whose sleep 
was disturbed because of 
obstructions to breathing 
when they snored. Another six 
snored, b«t suffered no restric- 
tion in breathing. 

A third control group offline 
non-snorers was used in foe 
comparisons. 

The doctors’ findings are 
described in foe latest isswe of 
New E ng la nd Journal of 
Medicine. 

The presence or absence of 
snoring was established first 
by monitoring each person in 
overnight stays at foe sleep 
laboratory. The patten of 
their breathing and hrag vol- 
ume doing sleep was 
sored at foe same tme. 

Later m easu rements 
made when the individuals 
woe awake. 

Those who snored woe 
d itKiignkiiwl from those who 
did not by a narrowing of the 
pharynx while breathing. 

The New England Journal of 
Medicine. Volume 31 S. P 1327- 
1331. 1986. 


EVERY PENNY HELPS 


Do you know what it is like to be really cold, with no 
way to get warm and nobody to turn to? We know 
Friendsof the Elderly have been helping the old and 
lonely for over eighty years. Every penny hdpsat 
such stark m ome nts. These are proud old people 
who want to stay to their ownhomes despite 
everything. - - 

Please be a friend and send a donation —today 
You can be sure it will be used efficiently to provide 
for theaM and needy wherever they arc. •- 
Friends of the Elderly can onfy rape 
with a fraction of these sad cases. With 
yourhe^weeandosomndtmore . 

to make oldagea happy and - 
dignified time -but we urgently . 
need tbe funds. . 


Please send donafiens tifc- 
The General Secretary 

Friends of foe Elderly IDepL 
. 42: Ebary Street . . 

LONEX3»SWIV?,0LZ. • . 

lilfl 



3 no' 


You Have Only 7 Days 


lb Get Your Application Tn 


For British Gas Shares. 


You’ll Find An Application Form Over The Page. 


If you have registered with the Share Infor- 
mation Office you will automatically be sent a 
prospectus together with a personalised applica- 
tion form which should arrive soon. 

You should use this form if you decide to 
apply for shares and must use it to apply under 
the Customer Share Scheme. 


Postal applications must be received by 10am 
next Wednesday December 3rd. Use first class 
post and allow at least 2 days for deliveiy. 

Alternatively, hand in your application at 
any UK branch of NatWest, Bank of 
Scotland or Ulster Bank before close of 
business next Tuesday December 2nd. 

British Gas 



Hurry if you want to apply for a share of the shares. 


ISSUED BY N M ROTHSCHILD & SONS LIMITED ON BEHALF OF H M GOVERNMENT. 


O F F I C 


UP AGAINST TIME by Jeanne WiIJis and Trevor Melvin 













r-pi 


^ ® ZT/V :T~ ~S»svssss?T3Bsr 







--Z- .L.„ . -1 .-£ i 




OVERSEAS NEWS 


TTF7F. TTMES WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 26 1986 


.WORLD SUMMARY 


British TV dominates 
US Emmy awards 

Britain toot three of the fire 1986 International TV Emmy 
Awards announced in New \ork yesterday (Chrsitopher 
Thomas writes). Japan and Canada took the other two. 

The award is presented by the US Academy of TV Arts 
and Sciences. ShaZow&uuts, the BBC production about 
writer C S Lewis, took the drama award. The programme, set 
in 1950, centres oaafan letter the author received from an 
Americas woman who transformed his life. . 

The documentary prize went to Channel 4s production of 
Chasing a Rainbow: the Gfe of Josephine Baker, which 
reassembled from film photographs and pointings the lue of 
the cabaret star, French resistan ce fig hter, cml rights 
activist and friend of the rich and powerful. ^ 

Independent Central Television's Spitting image, the 
satirical show using puppets to lampoon prominent people, 
won the popular .4ns category. 

Canadian Broadcasting Company s The Kids of Degrassi 
Street : Griff pas a hand won the children’s dhrision. The se- 
ries follows the adventures of a group of children from East 

End Toronto. w *_. • 

The Japan Broadcasting Corporations Bejart-s Kahnki 
Ballet received the performing Ails Award. 


Diplomat 

defects 

Bonn — A first secretary 
at the Chinese Embassy in 
Bonn and his wife have 
asked for political asylum 
in West Germany, it was 
disclosed yesterday (John 
England writes). 

Early reports said the 
couple had a preached the 
International Society for 
Homan Rights, in Bonn, 
and said they were dissatis- 
fied with the communist 
system in China. 

" The diplomat was said to 
have been in charge of the 
embassy's economic affairs 
department. 

The defection is the first 
by a Chinese diplomat in 
West Germany. 


Captain 

guilty 

Tel Aviv (Renter) — An 
Israeli sea captain accused 
of forcing a Kenyan stow- 
away onto a makeshift raft 
off the East African coast 
in 1982 was acquitted yes- 
terday of endangering hu- 
man life bat convicted on 
lesser charges. 

A Haifa District Court 
found Captain Avner 
GQad, aged 59, guilty of 
aggravated assault and 
transporting a man in a 
dangerous vehicle. 

The court said Captain 
Gilad did not intend to 
harm the Kenyan seaman, 
whose fate is unknown. He 
faces up to nine years JaiL 





Police free family 

Lisbon - Two escaped prisoners held a Portugese family 
hostage near Louie, in the Algarve, for more than a month- 
and-a-half before being captured by the police on Monday 
(Martha de la Cal writes). _ . 

The Cavaco cousins, Jose and Vitor, were i n a ba nd of six 
prisoners who broke out of Portugal's high security Pinheiro 
da Cruz prison on July 28, kflling three guards and wounding 
two others. 

After evading police for nearly three months the Cavacos 
broke into the home of Senhor Rogelio de Brito, a municipal 
gardener in Louie, and held him and his French wife, their 
sfe-year-old daughter and his 73-year-old mother hostage 
under pain of death for more than six weeks. 

On Monday police surrounded the house, pie Cavacos, 
o utnumb ered, surrendered and turned over their guns. 

Galvin 
"v for Nato 

Washington — US Army 
General Bernard Rogers is 
expected to retire as Nato 
Supreme Commander next 
year and to be replaced by 
General John Galvin, left, 

' v C-in-C US Southern COm- 
i-Ak&x*' ■ mand in Panama, (Mohsin 
1 - ** 

f • ' «588 A Pentagon spokesman, 
** however, declined to con- 

firm a report that General 
Galvin would take over 
next summer. 

Job for tragedy ship 

Oslo — The cruise liner that survived the disastrous 
collision with the Andrea Doria in 1951 may end its days as a 
hostel for refugees (Tony Samstag writes), 

Norwegian officials confirmed yesterday Chat negotiations 
were in progress for purchase of the American-owned 
Stockholm, renamed Volker after the tragedy, which claimed 
more than 50 lives. 

The ship, currently at Southampton, would accommodate 
600 people, relieving pressure on another vessel used for the 
purpose u the harbour at Drammen, southwest of Oslo. 

like its Scandinavian neighbours Denmark and Sweden, 
Norway lias been reefing under a recent influx of refugees as 
other European countries tighten up on immigration policies. 
More than 3,000 refugees — mostly from Iran, Eritrea and 
Chile — have entered the country this year: 

It can take up to six months for a political asylum 
application to be heard and, in a country that prides itsetf on 
its tradition of hospitality, most are accepted in any case. 


White 


Poindexter resigns 


Jerusalem’s role 


Israel acted two years ago 


Man in the News 


By Mkhad Evans 

Whitehall Correspondent 

As Washington was rocked 
by the resignation of Admiral 
John Poindexter over the Iran 
arms deal fiasco, new details 
emerged of the Israeli connec- 
tion in the affair . 

According to authoritative 
sources yesterday, the US Ad- 
ministration asked the Israeli 
Government about two years 
ago if it would support a pro- 
Iranian policy in the Gulf War 
between Iran and Iraq. 

Israel had already decided 
that it made both strategic and 
economic sense to try to keep 
links with Iran and backed the 
pro-Iranian school in 
Washington. 

According to the sources, 
the Israeli Government had 
three key reasons for its deci- 
sion to sell arms to Iran and to 
barter with Ayatollah Kho- 
meini’s regime. 

The first was fear for the 
lives of 50,000 Jews in Iran. 

Although a number had man- 
aged to leave the country, the 
rest were considered by the 
Israeli Government as poten- 
tial hostages and it was de- 
cided to do everything pos- 
sible to get them out oflran. 

This included the sale of 
weapons to Iran, not directly, 
but through intermediaries. 
The sources said yesterday 
that all the arms deals carried 
out by licensed Israeli arms 
dealers were first approved by 
the Defence Miniary in Israel 
and then by Washington. 

The sources said: “The 
proper officials within the US 
Administration were inform- 
ed of all the arms deals with 
Iran. No such deals could 
have taken place without the 




invisible man 

From Michael Bhayoa, Washington 


Admiral John Poindexter, 
for tong the ‘invisible man” in 
the Nufional Secu ri ty Cancfl, 
has been at the ce nt r e of the 
crisis over the Jnut aims 

shipment As the public furore 
grew, his exposed pootioo 
became increasingly mtot- 
— Mo, He . left yesterday, 
reqoestag a transfer bark to 
die Navy, with no su cce sso r, 
with complete dismay in the 
NSC and with new and 4w- 

astatlng ac cusation s of iflegti- 
ity hanging over him. 


President Reagan, faring the biggest stonn of his presidency over cl andestin e arms ship- 
ments to Iran, which have fo rced Admiral John Poindexter’s resignatio n. 


nu lvcogou aiura gv m Iran 

arms deal money scandal 

= a i ino his dismissal from the Mr Wright said Presi 


Mr Y itzhak Shamir, the Is- 
raeli Prime Minister, said 
yesterday that Israel had a 
policy of not selling arms to 
Iran, hot was w illing to make 
an exception to help a friend 
(Renter reports from Jeru- 
salem). His remarks were the 
closest Mr Shamir has come 

to publicly admitting Hint 

Israel was involved in the 
arms-for-bostages deaL 


approval of the US. The 
trouble is that one hand knows 
what is going on and the other 
hand doesn't.” 

Israeli officials bartering 
with Iran in an attempt to 
safeguard the lives of the 
50,000 Jews and in the hope 
that one day they might win 
approval for their enugratitnr 
to Israel. 

The second reason was 
economics. The sources said 
that the total cost of the Iran- 
Iraq war was about $100 
billion (£71.4 billion) and the 
market for aims deals was 
enormous. 

The sources said it was “the 
hottest weapons market in the 
world” and Israel could not 
ignore the opportunity. 

The sources said that deal- 
ers were off-loading hundreds 
of tons of spare parts, from 
Phantom tyres to screws for 
fuselages. 

The third reason was the 
American connection. The Is- 
raeli Government realized 
that President Reagan could 
not make up his mind in 1983- 
84 whether to go for the pro- 
Iranian school in Washington, 
represented by the National 
Security Council or the anti- 
Iranian school, represented by 
the State Department. 


Continued from page 1 
friends of the President that 
Mr Shultz be sacked. But he 
added pointedly: i think ev- 
ery member of the Admin- 
istration owes it to the 
president to stand shoulder- 
to-shoulder with him. 4 

The US sent over 2,000 
TOW anti-tank missiles to 
Iran, as well some 500 Hawk 
anti-aircraft missiles and it is 
not known what they paid, or 
who legally owned the money 
that was transferred to the 
Contras. 

President Reagan, who is 
leaving today for his Califor- 
nia ranch tor the Thanks- 
giving holiday, has ordered an 
interim Justice Department 
report by Monday. 

No one in the Administra- 
tion other than Colonel North 
knew of the siphoning off of 
funds for the Contras. Colonel 
North, who was. questioned 
extensively by the Justice 
Department over the week- 
end, is now expected to retire 
from the Marine Corps follow- 


ing his dismissal from the 
NSC ’ 

Admiral Poindexter, who 
resigned after Mr Meese was 
told of the Contra connection, 
is returning to the Navy. 

Mr Reagan was told about 
this latest twist in the affair as 
soon as Mr Meese found out 
The President refused to an- 
swer reporters’ questions yes- 
terday, except to say defiantly 
“No” when asked again 
whether his Iran policy had 
been a mistake. 

Initial congressional 're- 
action was one of shock and 
outrage. Mr Jim Wright, the 
Democratic majority leader in 
the House of Reprentatives, 
said Congress would insist on 
investigating the matter and 
“bring it all out into the 
open”. 

He said that between $3 
million and $4 million from 
the arms sale was not ac- 
counted for. It “defies 
credibility” that Colonel 
North was acting on his own 

jn handling the deal, he added. 


Mr Wright said President 
Reagan told him he knew 
nothing about the operation 
until Monday afternoon. 

The President’s professed 
ignorance of the whole affair 
and lack of full control over 
the actions ofhis NSC staff are 
now fikdy to be a principal 
issue. 

Earlier disarray in the Admin- 
istration deepened with an 
extraordinary, attack by the 
State Department on the Na- 
tional Security CounriL . 

Mr John Whitehead, the 
deputy Secretary of State, was 
accused of “an act of open 
rebellion” against the White 
House after flatly contradict- 
ing the President 

He denied the President’s 
riaim last week that there was 
no evidence of Iranian Gov- 
ernment complicity in 
terrorism. 

“I don't like to differ with 
my President, but I believe 
there is still some continuing 
evidence of Iranian involve- 
ment with terrorism,” be said. 


p ublic career came amid dm 
worst crisis foe 

Ad m inist ra tion has freed. And 

Admiral Poindexter, like the 
loyal naval officer lie is, 
accgrted respons ibi lity to pro- 
tec t the President from the 
devastating fl |air g g * that are 
now bemg made. 

Mr Reagan hhnsdf admit- 
ted th a t be ~bad not been 
“directly involved**. The Presi- 
dent ifid, however, admit two 
weeks ago Oat he may have 
wbnmhe 

coaid trust in Inn. The ad- 
mission came after acress- 
iagiy bitter criticism from 
Congress and the press at the 
way the NSC was nn d aring 
his 11 months in office. There 
were charges tint the body 
had abased its power, by- 
passed the regrifar accountable 
government agencies, and en- 
gaged in a n umber of high- 
risk, hare-brained operations, 
ranging from secret hrro he- 
ment with A me rican merce- 
naries fighting Nicer- 
agm to the “tiismfbnnatfoB” 
campaign against Libya. 

Is all this. Admir al Poin- 
dexter, a nnm who preferred to 
work in the backgrou nd and 
who rarely gave press inter- 
views, counselled a poficy of 
not disclosing the details of the 
Iran operation. Bat it was too 
late. Even his predecessor, Mr 
Robert McFariane, called on 
him to speak oat. And the 
latest disclosure of tire illegal 
siphoning off of money fertile 
Nicaraguan rebels, organized 
with the faQ knowledge ofhis 
chief adviser. Colonel Oliver 
North, made Iris d ep art n re 
inevitable. 

Admiral Poindexter, aged 
50, was the 14th National 
Seairily Adviser since the past 


was established is 1953. He 
gndittfed from the US Naval 
Academy after coming top in 
his dassaad in 1964 breamed 
a PhD in endear physics from 
the GsfiTanria fa™** 1 of 
Technology. 

In Iris otvad career, to which 
he now retena; be commanded 
a grided mssfle cruiser and a 
destroyer squadron and In 
1971 became an aide to the 
Secretary of the Navy. la 
1978, hie served as deputy 
chief of naval education and 
chief of naval operations, be- 
fore moving to the NSC three 
years later. 

He was n surprise choke 
when he took over from Mr 
McFuhmew b ecau s e of Ms 
low-key approach and Iris lack 
of political weight, considered 
essential to resolve the chronic 
conflicts between the Penta- 
gon and the State Department. 
Bat nay inside the NSC were 
pleased with Ms mflhary prag- 
matism, his noKHidteotogical 
approach, his rangy and h» 
mtrtWt. 

However, he failed to estab- 
lish a political base in his 11 
months m office. 

Congressmen said, that *u- 
fike McFariane, be rarely 
consulted them or explained 
White Hone thinking. The 
. press fboad Urn derive. And 
betid not ptoy a big role m the 
vital question of arms coated 
poficy, or s uccee d in stop p ing 
the fendag between factions m 
the Admmstration. 


Behind the scenes he 
masterminded several speeta- 
soccesses: the intercep- 
tion of the Egyptian anfiner 
carrying the Adrifie Lun 
hqackm and, more recently, 
the strike against Libya. 

Bat Jeter operations back- 
fired. He was Mamed for 
gnmg poor advice on Sooth 
Africa. Efis mtmoraadma id 


the Libyan leader, caused a big 
row because of Iris apparent 
readiness to engage la a~ 

of Afahtftwirarimi- 

Asd finally, tin disastrous 
-cobbccdob Between esc in- 
man arms sale and toe Segal 
fending of toe Contras la 
Nicaragua was what has 
prompted a fhB-scaie Presi- 
dential inquiry into toe body 
beheaded. 



m 


Colonel’s shadowy world 


Continued from page 1 
Reagan Administration's de- 
cision to force down an Egyp- 
tian aircraft carrying the Arab 
terrorists who hijacked the 
Achille Lauro cruise ship last 
year. 

In Washington circles, all 
that was really known about 
Colonel North amounted to 
cocktail circuit gossip, press 
speculation and some sketchy 
biographical background 

Bom in Texas, Oliver North 
— "OUie” to friends - had 
graduated from the US Naval 
Academy in the late 1960s. 
opting for the Marines and the 
certainty of front-tine duty in 
Vietnam. He emerged from 
the lost war with the scars of 
two wounds, America’s third 
highest combat decoration 
and a tight circle of fallow 
officers who shared his pas- 
sionate belief that Com- 


munism must be confronted 
wherever it showed its head. 

According to insiders, one 
of North’s first assignments' 
with Marine Corps head- 
quarters in Washington was to 
lead a detatachment of US 
troops into the mountains of 
Eastern Turkey in case they 
were needed in the bid (ul- 
timately aborted) to free the 
captives in the American em- 
bassy in Teheran. 

A year later, be was whisked 
away from routine desk duties 
by fellow Marine and Vietnam 
veteran Robert McFariane, 
then serving as the Reagan 
Administration’s National 
Security Adviser. That 
{articular wheel turned full 
circle with the revelation that 
McFariane and North were 
working together again in 
attempts to use Iranian in- 
fluence to secure the release of 


Americans held hostage in 
Le b an o n. 

Those who have worked 
with the slender, bespectacled 
Colonel North insist that de- 
spite his considerable aeper- 
tise on the sound, he is the 
antithesis of the “knuckle - 
dragging” school of covert 
operators. A quiet but articu- 
late speaker, green to working 
back-breaking hours in his 
modest quarters next door to 
the White House, he is de- 
scribed as a decent, un- 
ashamed patriot (even if he 
does claim to be a descendant 
of Lord North, British Prime 
Minis ter of toe day when 
America- won its independ- 
ence). 

On the other hand, it seems 
clear that he believed, heart 
and soul, in Ronald Reagan’s 
crusade against Communism 
abroad. 


Bahrain (Reuter) — Iraqi 
jets yesterday attacked six 
targets in western Iran and 
flew a 1,560-mile round trip to 
attack toe Larak Island oil 
terminal at toe month of the 
Gulf for the first time. . 

Gulf stripping sources sod 
two Cypriot-registered super- 
tankers were on fire at Larak 
and an Iranian tanker had also 
been hit. Iranian helicopters 
lifted casualties from toe ves- 
sels, one source said. 

a Baghdad High Command 
commuxuqud, catting toe raid 
“a miracle and unique” said 
targets destroyed included 
“terminal buildings, storage 
tanks, oil tankers, equipment 

and men”. 

Another renwinimifp iA said 
54 jets simultaneously at- 
tacked an army base, an air 
base, training .camps and a 
Hawk anti-aircraft irrigate bat- 
tery in and around Dezful in 
western Iran where officials 


said 30 civilians were kilted. 

Iraq said one of toe Dezfal 
raiders was toot down. 

All tiie planes which took 
part in toe Larak raid were 
reported to have returned 


to base. The high com- 
mand did not say how many 
were on that mission. 

Analysts said the distance 
flown suggested toe Iraqi jets 
may have been refuelled in the 
air. 

Larak is crucial to Iran's 
export strategy, which relies 
on tankers to shuttle oil down 
the Guff to terminals at or 
near its mouth. 

Terminals near the mouth 
of the Gulf were thought to be 
out of Iraqi range until August 
12, when a devastating raid on 
Sirri Island, some HO nautical 
mites farther inside the Gulf; 
forced a shift of operations to 

Tjirafr- Since I ranian bfl 

exports have been signifi- 
cantly reduced. 




Battle rages in town captured by PLO 



Sidon (AP) — Street fighting 
raged in a strategic hilltop 
town in south Lebanon on 
Tuesday as Shia Muslim 
militiamen tried to dislodge 
PLO guerrillas from highlands 
captured a day earlier. 

At least one Palestinian was 
killed and 24 others were 
wounded, police said 

Themainstream Shia Amal 
militia of Mr Nabih Bern, the 
Justice Minister, broke into 
the eastern part of Magdoushe 
and recaptured at least one- 
third of the town from Mr 
Yassir Arafat’s PLO guerrillas, 
they said 

.Amal claimed ft had re- 
captured toe town, ab out three 
miles south-east of the port 
city of Sidon. 

Reporters and photograph- 
ers were unable to get into 
Magdoushe, but said they 
could see smoke billowing 
from several parts of the town. 

Police said thousands of 
Shia militiamen mounted toe 
counter-offensive from toe 
coastal town of Ghazieh and 
toe inland village of Anqoun. 

They said Israeli helicopters 
flew several reconnaissance 
missions overnight, appar- 
ently to monitor toe fighting. 

In Damascus, representat- 
ives of the warring groups met 
again yesterday. Mr George 
Hawi, the Lebanese Com- 
munist Party leader, who at- 
tended the meeting, said they 
were “about to reach a 
settlement” that could end the 
hostilities. 

At least 40 people were 
killed and 85 wounded in toe 
PLO’s thrust from Sidon Y 
refugee camps of Ein el- 
Hilweh and Miyeh-Miyeh on 
Monday. It was toe largest 
offensive in south Lebanon by 
Mr Arafat’s PLO fighters since 
Israeli invasion of 1982 . 



Palestinian guerrilla helping to load machine-gun miwmniiim Into belts near 
Bshe yesterday as Amal nnlitifl fought to recapture the strategic L eban e se town. 

Muslims call for UN protection 


■VIW 


From Ian Murray - 

Jerusalem 

The worried leader of 
Jerusalem's Islamic commu- 
nity called yesterday for an 
international peace-keeping 
force to be sent into the Old 
to restore order. 

Sheikh Sad KJHin aL Ahmi 
used his authority as chairman 
of the Wakf, toe Higher 
Islamic Orandl, which con- 
trols toe Mnsfim holy places, 
to call in the small corps of 
consols serving ht East Jeru- 
salem. iflnHnw those of 
E, tSuSted States, 
France, Belgium and Spam, to 
ask them to pass on his 
message to their governments. 

He toad his statement to toe 


consols before a oews coa-' 
ference he called' fat a little 
b uilding in the comtyard of the 
Domed 1 toe Rode. 

Fear had beat created in toe 
hearts of the citizens, be told 
toe consols. His people feared 
for their fives ami their prop- 
erty because they werethreat- 
ened by extremist Zionists, 
especially the Kadi Party. 

Supporters of Kach stormed 
through tiie Old City on 
Sunday evening shouting 
“Death to Arabs” in what was 
supposed to be.a memorial 
service for a young Jewish 
Bfljfe student stabbed to death 
m the Mostim quarter a week 
earlier. Scores of Jews have 
since beea azresfati for attacks 


non Arahf or theft property. 

“*We beg the whole world” 
to bring security back to the 
Arab citizens of Jerusalem, be 
sard. Not only were the living 
in danger, hnt graves in an old 
Mnsfim c emet er y w ere now 
“subject to the wheels and the 
bulldozers of different ma- 
chines which seek to install 
sewerage pipes'*. 

He also drew attention to 
the treatment of Arab pris- 
oners in Israeli prisons. 

-For all these reasons, 4 ^ 
are in need of toe effects of a 
UN force to protect ns," be 
said. Bat his advisers had 
altered the wonting of his 
original statement, whkh di- 
rectly asked for a UN force. 


Courtroom 
trial for 
Bokassa 

Bangui, Central African 
Republic (Reuter) - The for- 
mer Emperor Jean-Bedel 
Bokassa wall go cm trial today 
in a court, not in a sports 
stadium, the Information 
Minister, Mr Joaquim da SB- 
va-Nzengue, said yesterday. 

He said the Central African 
Republic had never officially 
announced that the trial 
would be held in & converted 
basketball stadium and ac- 
cused international rep o rter s 
of mani p ulating information 
about toe triaL 
Mr Bokassa, aged 65, will be 
tried on charges including 
killing children, concealing 
corpses, assassination and 
embezzlement before he was 
toppled with the help of 
French troops in 1979. • 

Scores of television journal- 
ists and photographers who 
have descended on Bangui 
would not be allowed to film 

the trial. . 

“I do not think that in 
France, in England, in the 
United States, in Germany .or 
in Spain . . . that there would 
be an army of cameras tofilm 
a case, especially if the room is 
small,” the Information Min- 
ister said. 

He said more than 100 
international journalists had 
so far flown m to the trial, 
whkh would be covered live 
by the republic^ radio and 
television in a room which 
could hold 300 people. 

He said reporters would be 
allowed to-take notes during 
the triaL Mr Sflva-Nzengue 
said toe Government had not 
decided where to bold the trial 
until yesterday. . ■ £-) 


Exercise in Oman 


Tornadoes display 
Britain’s rapid 
deployment power 


From Fetor Da 1 


Six RAF Tornado aircraft, 

landing throu g h a shimmering 
heat hare aro und fHi» idanri air 

base of Masirab in the Arataan 
Sea, yesterday marked a spec- 
tacularly successful phase of 
the important United King- 
dom-Omani military eiK iri«, 
SaifSareea. 

They had taken off from 
bases m England more than 10 
hours earlier and tow 4,200 
miles non-stop, with each air- 
craft being refuelled up to 
seven times by Tristar tankers. 

It was the longest non-stop 
flight ever made by toe Tor- 
nadoes, and its sucoess was a 
key dement in achieving the 
main aim of the exercise, to 
demonstrate Britain’s capa- 
bility. for a rapid strategic de^ 
ployment out of a Nato area. - 

For the pilots and navi- 
gators it was a demanding, ar- 
duous flight, strapped into- 
their seals in G-suito To hdp 
pass the hoars through toe 
night they played music tapes 
over cockpit sound systems. 

" Wing ■ Comman der -Rick 
Peacock-Ed wards, command- 
ing officer of 229 Operational 
Con version Unit based at 
Coningsby, was tired ’ and 
nursing aching muscles when 
he climbed out ofhis cockpit, 
but said: “It was a loz$ night 
fait everything went excep- 
tionally welL The aircraft are 
ready to gp back into action 
almost straight away.” . 


Oman 

Exercise Saif Sareea (Swift 
Sword) has been designed to 
test lessons learned during the 
Eafklands campaign. Follow- 
ing the conflict in the South 
Atlantic, the- cbiefs'Of staff 
within the Ministry of De- 
fence decided that, future op- 
erations outside the Nato area 
should be conducted by a joint 
force headquarters. 

The tasks envisaged for 
forces assigned in the future 
might range from the evacua- 
tion of British natio nals to 
providing assistance In re- 
sponse to a request from a 
friendly country. Hie exercise 
senario. is based around a re- 
quest from the Sultan of Om- 
an's forces for help in repelling 
an incursion by invading 
forces -from toe imagined is- 
land of Fantasa. 

Abont 5,000 men from all 
three British services are-tak- 
and the British in- 


peak with a planned amphibi- 
ous landing - and parachute 
drop today. 

Among ..toe Royal Navy 
ships involved is toe carrier 
HMS/Bhstrions. Early this 
year, at toe start of a round- 
ihe-wodd voyage^ a fire in. a 
gearbox 'sent the ship bade to 
dock for three months and 
yesterday it was teams that a 
further problem now meant, 
she was only' operating on 
thfee of her four engines. 


Snags for 
Austrian 
coalition 

' From Richard Bassett 
Vienna. 

Dr Franz Vranitzky, the 
Austrian Chancellor, formally 
presented the resignation of 
bis Government yesterday af- 
ter the weekend's general 
election. 

As Dr Vranitzky only 
adneved-a relative majority, 
he must attempt to forma new 
coalition Government. He has 
made it dear that he would 
favour a “grand coalition” 
between Ms. Socialist Party, 
and toe conservative People's 
Party. 

. But at a press conference 
given fey Herr Alois Mode, the 
leader of toe People's Party, 
yesterday the chances of such 
a coalition seemed to have 
riimrnishHl 

Herr Mode has survived for 
toe moment despite calls for 
his resignation after his party’s 
disastrous showing at toe 
polls. As' be continues to. 
refuse serving as Vice-Chan- 
cellor under Dr Vranitzky,. 
speculation increases flat he 
may be prepared for a co- 
alition with tiie Freedom 


there is no other solu- 
tion, it must come to that 
though it is not my favourite 
model,” Herr Mode, said 
yesterday. 

Should such a coalition 
emerge over the next few 
weeks, it is unlikely that 
Austria would move politi- 
cally significantly to toe right. 

RNAL RESULTS 
nn bracket 1983 
C o ei tt n .;.. — 43.13 
People's ^4129 
Freedom 973 

fimflpft iS7 










THE TIMES WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 26 1986 


9 





British Gas pic 


Share Offer 

by 

NM Rothschild & Sons Limited 

on behalf of 

The Secretary of State for Energy 

Under offers in the United Kingdom, 
the United States, Canada, Japan and Europe 
4,025,500,000 Ordinary Shares are to be sold 
at 135p per share payable in instalments of 50p now, 
45p on 9th June, 1 987 and 40p on 1 9th April, 1 988. 


£j?£i c 2? 30n nwde to the Council of ‘ The Stock Exchange for the whole of the ordinary share capital, issued and to be 

be J ^?? m SP d 10 the Offiaal List. The following information should be read m conjunction with the foil text 
Particulars dated 2 1st November; 1986 relating to British Gas pte, copies of which are available at BritishGas showrooms, 
clearing Dank branches and post offices. You are advised to read iha l jstfng Particulars **»fore rearming yr».r application farm 


APPLICATION AND INSTALMENT 
ARRANGEMENTS 


(a) Applications 

Applications 

3rd December, 1986 (or before dose i 


10 ajn. on Wednesday, 
on Ihesdaft 2nd 


December. 1986. if the farm is taken hy hand many l I.K, b ranch 

L Bank of Scotland or Ulster 


of National Westminster Bank PLC, 

Bank Limited). Photocopies of application forms will not be 



(b) 


Allocations of shares 

The basis of allocation of the shares is expected to be 
announced by Monday; 8th December, 1986. 

If you are successful, in whole or in part, you will be 
a temporary document of title (a letter of acceptance) foi 
shares allocated to you. 


sent 
for the 


If there is heavy demand for the shares, you may receive 
fewer shares than you apply for m; in some cases, none at alL 


If your application is not accepted or is only 
in part, you wilf receive (without interest) 


, aD money paid on 
application or a refond cheque for the balance of the money paid 
on application. 


(c) 


Deafings 

It is expected that rfMjwy on The Stock 
commence at 230p.m. on Monday; 8th December 1986. j 
of acceptance are expected to be sent to successful applicants 
on Monday. lSlh December 1986. Applicants who deal before 
receipt of a letter of acceptance wffl do so at their own risk. \bn 
should also note that some dealers in shares may insist on seeing 
your letter of acceptancebefore purchasing your shares. 

%u will not be liable for stamp duty or stamp duty reserve 
tax on your application for shares. If yon sell yonr shares, the 
purchaser will be liable to pay any stamp duty or stamp duty 
reservetax. . i 


Id) 


Further instalment* 

Ybu win be sent reminders in advance of the dale s when 
the second and third instalments become payable. A1 the time foe 
reminder is sent for the second instalment (tfoe by 9th luce, 1987) 
you will also be sent an Interim Certificate to replace the letter of 
acceptance despatched following the Offer After you have paid 
your final instalment (due by l$th April, 1988) yon will be sent 
ificat&ffvQ " 


vour final share certificate, n you do notpay any tnstalments for 
which you are liable, your right to the shares may be cancelled. If 
you sell your shares, the purchaser will become liable for any 
further instalments due (once the transfer has been registered). 


SPECIAL INCENTIVES 


If you apply for shares in the Offer; you may be eligible to 
receive from the Govern mem. free of charge, EITHER vouchers 


for use against gas bills from British Gas OR a share bonus. The 
special incentives are only available ifyo'n buy shares in the Offer 
and not if they are bought sut 


(a) 


Eligibility 

To be eligible to apply for these special incentives, yon 
must be an individual investing solely for your own benefit (or 


investing jointly with not more than three other individuals, 
solely for the ben 


: benefit of one ormore of you). Applications made 

by individuals on behalf of drDdren may also qualify for the 
special incentives. Companies, partnerships, firms, trusts, 
associations and dubs are not eligible for these special incentives 
but they may apply as nominees tot eligible individuals. 


(b) Bill vouchers 

For every whole multiple of 100 shares you buy in the 
Offer and bold continuously until certain qualifying dales, you 
can receive £10 worth of vouchers (up to a maximum entitlement 
of £250). The way in which the voucher scheme will work is 
illustrated in the table below : 


Number of 
shares bdd 
continuously 

ENTITLEMENT TO VOUCHERS 

ON THE QUALIFYING DATES 

30th 31st 30th 31st 30fo 31st 

June Dec..- June Dec Jane Dec 

1987 1987 1988 1988 1989 1989 

Total 

too 

£10 








— 

£10 

200 

£20 

. 

’ — 

' — 

— 

— 

£20 

300 

£30 

— 

• — 

— 

. — 

— 

£30 

400 

£40 

— 1 

— 

_ — 

— 

— 

£40 

500 

£40 

£10 

• — 

— • 

— 

— • 

£50 

600 

£40 

£20 

— 

— 


— 

£60 

700 

£40 

£30 

— 

— 

— 

— 

£70 

800 

£40 

.£40 

— 

— 

— 

— 

£80 

900 

£40 

£40 

£10 

— 

— 

— 

£90 

1.000 

£40 

£40 

£20 

— 

— 

— 

£100 

1.500 

£40 

£40 

£40 

£30 

— 

— 

£150 

2JOOO 

£40 

£40 

£40 

£40 

£40 

— 

£200 

1500 • 
ormore 

. £40 

£40 

£40 

£40 

£40 

£50 

£250 


EXAMPLE: If you receive 500 shares in the Offer you win be 

entitled to a voucher of £40 on 30th June, 1987 and a voucher 
of £10 on 31st December; 1987, provided you holdlhe shares 
until 31st December, 1987. If you only hold the shares until 
November 1987, you will only be entitled to a voucher of 


On qualifying date you will be entitled to one 
ucher. worth £1 0 for every whole multiple of 100 shares bought 
the Offer and held continuously until then, less the. value of 
: vouchers already received. However foe maximum voucher 
iueon any qualifying date will be£40(£50 on the last qualifying 


The voucher" will be posted to yon about two weeks after, 
h qualifying date. 

Yonr vouchers can be used when malar® any payment 
: to British Gas. if that payment includes charges for gas 
rolled (or standing charges) for your use or benefit, m your 
tie. Details of these artangemems win be issued with the 
ichers. ■ - 


k bonus 

l will be entitled to one additional share forevery ten 
cfa you buy in the Offer and continue to hold tip icr 

ing 31st December, 1989- The maximum number of 
: :, cnn TIum uiill lv nrv riotw In 


ing 4i5i ucccnrao, * •***“*'*■■ 

stales you can receive is 500. There wifl be no right to 

hods of shares. 


The additional Shares will be transfenied to 
g| wm bh > practicable after 31st December; Ifl-.- - — 

ih a it pphic BTtaetimg to ihdsc shares at the date of transfer). - 

>rtHty reserve laxoriorinrespeci of the 


r Government 




TERMS AND CONDITIONS 


1. Acceptance of appEcaiions will be conditional on 0) the Ordinary 
Shares, issued and to be issued, bring admitted to the Offiaal List ofThe 
Stock Exchange hot liter dan 31st Dec ember; 1986. and ( 5 ) the provisioDS 
rotating to termination of the U.K. Underwriting Agreement refared to in 
Pm G of Section VH of the fall Pr os pec tus dated 21st November 1986 
comprising the listing particulars triatisg to British Gas pic (the 


a gen t s to pre sen t for payment and otherwise process all cheques and 
bankers' drafts received and to have fidl access to all information rotating 


to. or deriving from, w* rh w pi f s bankers* * »ih «nd the m *K» «n «n 
thereof Ther nght is also reserved to treat as valid any application not in 
all respects completed in accoidaiice with the instructions accompanying 
the refevam application form. 


2. Acceptance of an application by an 


Vcceptanc 

for the share bonus er the bCD vouchers snD entitle that investor to the 
share bonus or hill vouchers (as the case may be) on the terms, and subject 
to the conditions, set oat in Section VIQ of the Prospectus. 


3. A valid application made hyor on behalf of a person who is eligible 
“ _ ‘ “ tion form 


for the Customer Share Scheme on a green customer application 

delivered to that person by or on behalf of the British Gas Share 


to the extent described in paragraph 2(b) of Part A of Section IX of the 
ftot peBB, 


By completing and delivering an application form, you: 

rof 


g) offer to purchase fro 
Shares specified in yon 
which the application i 


from the! „ 

yonr application form (or such snaBer nmnhw for 
application is accepted) on the terms o£ and snfiiect so the 

tfauti 
ion of 



I agreeio become a party to and be bound by aO relevant 
f the Instalment Agreement; 


(b) as a collateral contract between you and the Secretary of State which 
win become tending on despaflefa to or receipt by a recovmg bank of yonr 
application and in m i w Ji Vra tuinnf tin* Secretary of State ■ g i wi iig »mi he 
win not, prior to 1st Janaary; 1 987 offer any aftbe Ordinary Shares to any 
i other by ■" « »*» of <w of the procedures to in the 


1987; and 


that yonr application cannot be revoked prior to 1st January; 


(a) warram that yonr uHnittnnrw wiD be honoured on first p re s enta t i on 
and agree that any tetter of acceptance and any moneys returnable may be 
teld pending clearance of your payment; • 


(e) (ifyon complete a bos to apply firr bill vouchers or the share bonus) 
thereby; 


(i) 


seloutin Part AofSectHMfVIII oftheProspecms; 

(S) agree that, if yon elect for teD vouchers, you w£D comply with the 
condmonsofnse thereof set oot in paragraph l(b)ofPanBofSectionVIII 
of the Prospectus; and 

(£) a g ree tint if you complete both boxes, you will be deemed to have 
elected for the share bonus only; 


(d) (ifyou make an application underthe Customer Share Sdjemejthcreby 
warrant that 


(t) 


or if yon are a no mine e, all persons for whose benefit the 

ion is made, are dtgfoie for the Customer Share Scheme in 

acc o rd a nce with the provisions set out in par agr ap h 2(a) of Pan A of 
Section Kofthe Prospectus; and 


i are aware, no other 


ter Share Scheme in respect 
supply as that in respect of which 5K* 


has been made under the 
the same separatel y metered gas 
yoar applica ti on is made; 


(e) declare that yon are not a US. or Canadian person and yon are not 
applying oa behalf of any sucfcpenmn, “UiLor Omadan jpenra" haring 
themeaniz 


: meaning set oat in paragraph 4ofPaztA ofSeetioo DCofthe Prospectus; 


(f) agree that all applications, ac c ep t anc es of applications and contracts 
— ’ efrom under this Offer shall be governed by and construed 
! with the laws of England; 


(g) warrant that 


(i) Off this a p pli c a t io n is made for yonr own benefit) go otter application 
is bom made for your benefit by you or by anyone applying as yow agent 
. ok so tar as yon are aware, by any otbar p ers o n; 


(u) (if the application is made by yon as agent for or for the benefit of 
another petson) no other application for the benefit of that person is being 
made by you or; so far as yon are aware, by that person or by any other 
person; and 


(iff) 

dne 


to do so on bebaif of dot 
(b) agree that, in respect of those 


for someoue else; you have 
person; 


- Shares for which your 

b not rejected, acceptance 

at the election of the Secretary of 


I your i 

Spw, er _ 

allocation (in which case such acceptance shall be on that basis) or fii) by 
notification of acceptance thereof to the rele v ant receiving bank; 


— . (0 by notification to The Stock Exchange of the bans of 

aDocation fin which i 


bank and the Cusmcfian Bank to send 
States for which your 


authorise the relevant; 

_ tner of acceptance for the nt 

application is accepted and/ora t _ . . .... 

at yonr risk to the address of the person (or die first-named person) named 
in. the application form and to procure that your name (and the name(s) 
ofany other joint applicants)) is placed on the register ofholdenofiiitoran 
rights in respect afsucb Ordinary Sbares the entitlement to which has not 
been effectively renounced and thereafter to procure that your name (and 
the name(s) of any other joint applicants}) is placed an the register of 
members of the Company in respect of such Ordinary Soares, foe 
entitlement to which is evidenced by Interim Certificates and the right to 
which has not been effectively tr an sferred: and in these t erm s and 
cond i tions references to rights bang effectively renounced mean the 


G) 


: rimr nil documents in connection with the share boons or tall 

arrarwanents may be sent by post at yonr risk to foe person (or, 

in the case of joint applicants, foe first person) named in the appbeanoa 
form to bis or her address set out therein or such othe r add ress as may 
from time to time appear in the register ofholders of interim rights or foe 
regster of members of the Company against the name of soefa person; 


(k) agree that time of payment by ypo shall be of the essence of each 
contract mncrit m ul hy aii«^p» anr * rir ynor appHfariflO and undertake to 
toy foe second instalment b& and for value not taler than, 3 pm. on 9th 
June, 1987 and foe final instalment by; and for value not later than, 3 pjtn. 
on 19th ApriL 1988 for foe Ordinary Shares in respect of wtucb yonr 
application is accented and the right to which has not been effectively 
renounced or transferred in accordance with foe Instalment Agreement for 
you priono the relevant time and date; 


(1) agree that, without prejudice to any other rights to which you may be 
entitled, yon will not be entitled to exercise any remedy of rescission for 
- — — — — — »■ — — — *=— acceptance of your 


innocent m is re presen tation as any time 
application; and 


(ml c onfir m ihai,in making L ytmr applicmOT^yoa arenot 


fonnatioo orrejffesentation in rehtioo to British Gas w the O^r other 
than information and r ep r es e ntations contained in tbe Proreeetus or m 
rhr mini Mospectns published in connection with the Overtaken loftier 
with the Prospect us (foe “prospectuses**) and accordingly yon agree foal 
t» person responsible for the prospectuses shall have acy habihry for any 
ion on 


- No person receiving ibis application forra m any territory other 
*Tinn foe UjL, foe Channa Mywfc 


or the Iile of Man may treat it as 

maiim ii^ BB inviuiimi in him or ho; nor should he or she in any event 
use h, unless in foe rdevani lemloty such an invitation could lawfully be 
nvnfe to him or her without compliance with any un f ul fil led registration 
or other teal requirements, ft is the responsibility of any person outside 
the 13.1C, the Channel Islands and the IsleofMan receiving this apptica lion 
■ferornod wistiitmio make an application hereunder to satisfy hrmself or 
boseifas to foDobservance of the laws of the relevant territory and to pay 
arty transfer or other taxes requiring to be paid is such territory a respect 
off the shares acquired by him or her under this Offet . 


INSTRUCTIONS FOR RETURN OF YOUR APPLICATION FORM 


SEND COMPLETED APPUCATtON FORM BY POST (OR DELIVER IT BY HAND) TO ARRIVE RIOT LATER THAN 

10.00 A.M. ON WEDNESDAY, 3RD DECEMBER. 1986 at the appropriate address below according to the first letter of your 
siwname (or corporate name) inserted in Box 1. 


A to Cg Beak of Scotland 

New Issues Department, 
Apex House, 

9 Haddington Place, 
Edinburgfi EH7 4AL 


or, by hand only, to 


CfctoF Barclays Bank PLC 
New issues. 

RO. Box 123. 
Flectway House, 

25 Farringdon Street. 
London EC4A4HD. 


G to J Lfoyiis Bank Pic 

Registrar's Department, 
Goriro-by-Sca, Worthing, 
West Sussex BN 1 2 6DA 


38 Threadneedle Street. 
London EC2. 


Nn$ Nadaaal W a t miaa tcr 
Bank PLC 

New Issues Departm ent. 
BO. Box 79. 

2 Princes Siren. 

London EC2P2BD. 


or. by hand only to 

Registrar's Department. 
Issue Section, 

II Bisboc 
London I 


KtoM MuOaad Bank pk 

Stock Exchange Services 
Department, 

Mariner House. 

Pepys Street. 

London EON 4DA. 


SktoZ The Royal Bank of 
Scotland pic 
Registrar's Department. 
ROTBox 435. 

8 Bankhead Crossway North. 
Edinburgh EH 11 4BR 


USE FIRST CLASS POST AND ALLOW AT LEAST TWO 
DAYS FOR DELIVERY 


or. by hand only to 


New Issues Department. 
24 Lombard Street, 
London EC3. 


OR TAKE THIS FORM BY HAND TO 
ARRIVE BEFORE CLOSE OF BUSINESS ON 
TUESDAY. 2ND DECEMBER. 1986 
at any U.K. branch of National Westminster Bank PLC, 
Bank of Scotland, or Ulster Bank Limited. 


Adfotional r ecoi v in q ca n oes are open for de fi wnr i a * by hand umfl 10 o.m. o*> Wednesday 3rd December. 1986. These are set out on the 
beck of the app l ication farm in the mini pro sp ect us and in the Ifeting Particulars. 


GUIDE ON HOW TO COMPLETE THE PUBLIC APPUCATION FORM 


If you wish to apply under the Customer Sham Schema, you 
must complete the GREEN FORM senttoyou by the British Gas 
Share I nfo r ma tion Office. 

Or, if y ou hav e received a personalised ORANGE FORM, you 
should complete that farm. 

Otherwise, please use the APPUCATION FORM below 

ONLY ONE APPLICATION MAT BE MADE FOR THE BENEFIT 
OF ANY PERSON. 


Using the table in Note 2. put in Box 3 (in figares) the amsopt 
yea pay Bom 

Payment is in three instalments. The second instalment of 45p 
per share is payable by 3 p-m. on 9th June, 1987 and foe final 
instalment of40p per share by 3 p.m. on 19th April, 1988. 




Pnt la Box 1 yoar fid! name and address 
(please use block capitals). 

Applications most not be made by anyone under 18, but a 
parent, grandparent or guardian ofa drild under 1 8 may apply 
for tbe benefit of that child. To do this, yon should put your 
own name in Box 1, and after your su rname write “A/C* 
followed by tbe foil names of tbe child. \bu are not thereby 
precluded from making a single application for yonr own 

b enefit 


Far bill voechers, pat “YES” m Box A. For the share boons, 
pet “YES” in Box B. COMPLETE ONE BOX ONEE 
If yon complete bofo boxes yon win be deemed to have applied 
for the share bonus only. If yen do not complete either box. 
you will not receive bfll Teac h er s or foe share boms. Before 
making your choice, you should read tbe details of the special 
incentives set out opposite. 


Once foe application form is submitted your choice may not 
be changed. 


If you wish to apply jointly with another adult, see Note 7. 



Pat in Bex 2 (fat figures) the somber ef shares for which yon 
axe applying. Mob may only apply for one of foe numbers of 
shares set eat below. Applications for any other «wm»tnT of 
shares wiD be rejected. 


Sign and dale the form in Box 5. 

The application form may be signed by someone else on your 
behalf if be is duly authorised to do so, but he must enclose 
his power of attorney. 

A corporation most sign under the band of a duly authorised 
official, whose representative capacity must be stated. 


Number 
of shares 
you are 
applying for 

jw«r 

nomfftp 

pmkmir) 

Ybar total 

investment 
(I35p pa- 
Share) 

Nnmber 

of shares 
yooare 
applying 6* 

Anmnr 

yonpgy 

mam(S0, 

psrsfarel 

Mmrtoal 

investuieut 

(13Spper 

tbare) 

100 

£50 

£135 

1,000 

£500 

£1350 

200 

£100 

£270 

1,500 

£750 

£2,025 

300 

£150 

£405 

2,000 

£14)00 

£2,700 

400 

£200 

£540 

2,500 

£1^50 

£3375 

500 

£250 

£675 

3.000 

£14500 

£4,050 

600 

£300 

£810 

3^00 

£1,750 

£4,725 

700 

£350 

£945 

4,000 

£24)00 

£5,400 

800 

£400 

£1,080 

4,500 

£2,250 

£6,075 

900 

£450 

£1,215 

5,000 

£2^00 

£6,750 

Above 5, 
denonrim 

Appi 
5,000 to 
10,000 to 
50.000 to 

000 shares, applications most be in the following 
toons: 

ications Multiples qf 

i n.nnn shares 1 non share* 



over 100,000 shares 50.000 shares 


WARNING 

Only one application maybe made for the benefit of 
any person. Criminal proceedings may be instituted 
against anyone knowingly making or authorising 
more than one appScation for the benefit of any 
persop. 


W 


Fie to Box 6 a chape or bankers* draft for the exact amount 
job have entered m Bax 3. Yaar cheque or bankers* draft mnst 
be made payable to ‘‘British Gas Share Offer”. Please ensure 
that it is crossed and write on it “Not Negotiable”. 

Tfonr payment must relate solely to this application. No receipt 
wiO be issued. 

\bur cheque or bankets* draft mnst be drawn in sterling on an 
account at a bank branch is the United Kingdom, the Oumnd 
Islands or foe Isle of Man and must bear a United Kingdom 
bank soil code number in tbe top right hand comer. If you do 
not havea cheque account, you can obtain a cheque from yonr 
buikftng society or a bank branch. 

An application may be accompanied by a cheque drawn by 
someone other than the applicants), but any moneys returned 
trill be sent by cheque crossed “Not Negotiable A/C Payee 
Only” in favour of the applicants). 


JOINT APPLICANTS 

Iba may apply jointly with op to three ether people, provided 
each applicant is aged 18 or over. They should complete and 
sign Box 7. 

Powerfs) of attorney must be enclosed if anyone is signing on 
behalf of any joint applicant^). 


British Gas pic 

PUBLIC APPUCATION FORM 


To The Secretary of Stale for Energy 
N M Rothschild & Sons limited 


National Vfestminster Bank PLC 
British Gas pic 


Before completing tins form, please read 
carefully foe accompanying guide. 


fieme use sum CAPmtS 



FORomoALUSE 

ONLY 


Z9uR»aarpKd 


3 'MnOUftl RKMd 


■i. Annul iboUc 

£ 


S Anoam raumed 


Bill vouchers 


Share bonus 


I/We wish to receive 


A 


or 

B 


PLEASE WRITE “YES“ IN ONE 80X ONLY 


kCbeqan. 


I declare that to my know! _ 
persons) for whose benefit J am applying). 


Dare 

Signature 

1986 



□ . Pin here your cheque/bankers’ draft for tbe amount in Box 3, payable to 
“British Gas Share Offer” and crossed “Not Negotiable”. 



JOINT APPLICANTS 


The fire applicant dxwld sgn Box 5. Usmg BLOCK CAPITALS, insm bdow tbe names of ibe other join! apphonis. who must sgo in (he nght fond column. 


Me. Mrs, Miss or title 

Forenamcfs) fin foil) 

Surname 

Signature 

2nd joint 
appticam 





3rd joint 
applicant 





4tii joint 
applicant 






FOR OFFICIAL USE OMiy 

ThOK eUuiiag commission or reaHcwance of commission AwjM samp bod) boxes ajjptaWc id dtem. 


Sane oTpcnaa dnoiat 

Samp of ort»rf m.rmf dun cturmne 
mtoaic ofcMMiiMi ad *VT t » 

Sunp of cenoa cbimiv 

inirmiiHum and \ATnc. ml 

SunuuT-nnrt inicmoluB? dunui 
nUgHKrodnniimnwWiisu 

(If on imaani fcr vat poi -aonel 

(trim miart fcr tint pm -mel 

(If MM OBBLIlJ bt VVL PM 

(IV MM I *T M m nnne‘ ~l 

Afccptmcc do. 

ftwiawvi 

^nrplww 


CmBaBalnM 

faBfMUKaKOlfJjKd 


i 


*•' T aSSESewMBr- 












i 

f 






m i 




mW. 

tL‘ 




Sainsbury's Vm de Ictys 

i 

£1.75 

del’Ardeche 70d 

Sainsbury’s Portuguese 

£L93 £1.88 i 

Rose70d 


Sainsburyfe Niersteiner 
Gutes Domtal 70d 

Sainsbury’s Vino 
Spumante 70cl 



gas £2.15f fe 

j SAJNSBUfWS 

S2S5 £2.25ibftt©r 


Sainsburyfc Chianti 


Classico75d 

£2.39 


WSfik 


L# I — 


6.25 


Sainsbury’s Vin de Pays 
du Mont Bouquet 3 ltr 


Sainsbury's Vin de Pays 
des Cotes de Gascogne 3 ltr 


Skona Lager 4 x 440ml 


Farrier Bitter 4 x 440ml 


Sainsbury^ Italian 
Vermouth 75d 


£6.95 


£6.95 


£L 35T £1.15 


£1.15 


£L99 £1.79 





Samsbuiyfe Mixer Drinks 1 ltr 


Samsbury^ Gin 

Sainsburyfe Blended Whisky 7 5cl 


^7.59 

Teachers Whisky 75d 











Bailey § Irish Cream 70d 

£645" £5.89 

Smirnoff Vidka 75d 

£739 £6.95 

SainsburykVSOP 

£9.95 

r 

Cognac 70d 


Sainsbury’s 12 ^ear Old 
Highland Malt Whisky 75d 

£10.25 

k - 












'■afs 


SAINSBURY’S 

MEDIUM DRY 







AMOXTILL \L>< i 

SHERRY 

produce or Spain 





SAINSBURY’S 

T 



■X: v.i 




PradqceomwcB 

70 d e . 

AK»hanifl%W«»»w 

8ttWedn FrBn»ft*dSrt*j|»K& 
$Wmtord Street London S61 


Produce of Portugii 

70 cl 

Alcohol 20 “c bv vol'jrr 


ysx-m. 



Ap ^6a07«3064« 

m **$SSa38SS8£&' 


*** V! ?Lt ¥iT«r Irxfcrn ud‘ 



fife.: 


2.19 


Martini ^5cl 


^ 5 £ 2.69 ^ 9 £ 2.19 

Sainsbury's Sherry "fld Emva Cream Cyprus Sherry DOml 


. Sainsbury’s Claret ^Od Samsbury h LebEraumilch 1 hr 


* » Wf NF*fl»tAvA *9 Efl- APGEOBPANCHesoiV * fl..ADVER T SEDPfiOOuC^SHA^BEE^ONSA^E^ iWANl^WO^^ROA SW8A TT «E toFv O^S^klESSHOfl/N B ^O^hiECESSAR ^TORAPERODOFATiiASTZewwS^^iNTMEiASrBMONT-fi 

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Teamsters 
election fraud 


Font leading crime bosses 
have been charged with carry- 
ing out a fraudulent scheme to 
ensure the election of Mr 
Jackie Presser as head of the 
Teamsters’ union in 1983. 

The charges are another 
breakthrough in the FBI’s 
intensive drive to dear the 
American labour movement 
of Mafia influence. Most of 
the attention is focused on the 
Teamsters and Mr Presser is 
■ himself a prime target. fstKt 
May a Federal Grand Jury in 
Cleveland indicted him fbr 
embezzlement and racketeer- 
ing, charges he denies. 

FBI agents have . been 
dissecting the Teamsters' 
books for 32 months in its 
search for mobster HnW 
which the Justice Department 
believes date back to the 
1950s. One ofthose charged in 
the latest scandal is Anthony 
“Fat Tony" Salerno, con- 
victed boss of the Genovese 
crime group, who was among 
eight peopte found guilty last 
week of operating a “commis- 
sion” that ruled the Mafia in 
the United States. 

The others named in the 
indictment are Milton (Mai- 
sbe) Rockman, John (Pea- 


nuts) Tronolone, and Vincent 
(Fish) “ " “ ‘ ' * 


. a) Cafaro. Federal author- 
ities have identified Mir 
Caiaro as captain of the 
Genovese crime group; Mr 
Tronolone, aged 75, as a 
member of the Cleveland 
: crime gronpr and- Mr Rock- 
1 man, aged 73, as an associate 
of both groups. 

The US Justice Department 
is backing the drive against the 
mob in trade unionism. Four 


Was hi n gto n 

other unions are atw hwnp 
investigated - the Inter- 
national LoMshn r Mw «n > A 
odaticHo; the Hotel and 
Restaurant' . Employees’ 
Union; the Bartenders’ Inter- 
national Union, and the 
Labourers’ International 
Union of North America. All 
face the possibility: of being 
pm under court supervision. 

The latest charges say that 
in 1983 the four mobsters 
intervened in the Teamsters 
election process and devised a 
scheme “to obtain money and 
other thfng t; of value through 
control and influence of Jackie 
Presser as President of the 
Teamsters International”. 
The charge . carries a maxi- 
mum sentence of 20 years. 

The indictment stated that 
the crime was part of apattem 
of activities that the Gcaovese 
Group conducted in violation 
of the federal racketeering law. 
The defendants were accused 
of influencing certain. Team- 
sters officials to support the 
election of Mr Presser by the 
union's executive board to 
replace Mr Roy Williams, who 
is serving a 10-year sentence 
for trying to bribe a senator. 

The indictment alleges that 
one of the defendants met the 
heads of organized crime fam- 
ilies m Chicago and Cleveland 
to seek their approval for the 
selection of Mr Presser. A key 
prosecution witness will be 
Angelo Lonardo, former un- 
derboss of the Clev eland 
crime family, who also tes- 
tified in the commission trial 
and at a trial oforgarrized 
crime figures in Kansas CSty. 


Teachers 
seek 


Paris students protest at reform 



blacks 


FVem Michael Hornsby 
r ;.:' Jduuuesbng 

There are 205^000 unused 
places in whites-only schools 
in South Africa w h ic h could 
be filled by blade pupils if the 
- education system - was de- 


segr 


report by the 
i Teachers* As* 
has re- 


African 

soristiou .(SATA) 
vealed. 

The findings of the repent, 
which also calls for state 
schodb'to' be opened to chil- 
dren of all' races, have been 
approved unanimously by 
SATA’S membership, which 
represents mere than 3,000 

wwik j En gfehrspcaking tmoh. 

as in. Gape province. 

The Government, mean- 
while, was accused yt 
of “hijacking” and ‘Trying to 
bury” a report by the 
Presidenfs Council, a multi- 
racial advisory body which 
would have . recommended 


relaxation of the Group Areas 
Act' This is the fegudation 
which enforces segregation of 
residential areas, hospitals 
and schools. and is one of the 
chief remaining pillars of 
apartheid. 

According - to - informed 
sources, the report would have 
advocated a “local option”, 
whereby those white munici- 
pal councils which wished to 
do so would be allowed to 
throw the areas under their 
jurisdiction open to all races. 

The report would normally 
have been adopted after for- 
mal debate by the full council 
this week. But the council’s 
steering committee, on w hich 
‘ has a 



Burst of activity as 
Britain tries to 


finalize EEC plans 


From Richard Owen, Brussels 


An “end-otterm” spate of 
activity is underway in Brus- 
sels in an attempt to finalize as 
much as possible of Britain’s 
programme before it hands 
over the Presidency of the 
EEC Council of Ministers to 
Belgium next month. 

The farm spending crisis, 
the budget overrun and comp- 
letion of the internal market 
are at the top of the agenda. 

Mrs Lynda Chalker, Mm- 
ister of State at the Foreign 
Office, said in an address to 
the English Speaking Union in 
Brussels that agricultural 
over-production had ted to 
half of the EEC budget _ 
for the disposal or storage 
surplus products, and this 

Thermal ru&h'to complete 
business starts today with a 
meeting of EEC budget min- 
isters chaired by Mr Peter 
Brooke, Minister of Slate at 
the Treasury ami President of 
the EEC Budget Council. 

There is also to be a final 
Internal Market Council 

meeting next Monday, jnst be- 
fore the EEC London summit, 
and a marathon Farm Council 
ion December 8 and 9, 
with Mrs That- 
cher’s address to the European 
Parfiament in Strasbourg. 

The budget ministers have 
to tackle the draft 1987 Budget 
before its second and final 
reading by the European Par- 
liament next month. 

The Parliament has de- 
manded extra spending of 


unexr 


re- 


ferred foe report back to the 
constitutional committee for 
further study, a procedure 
which could mean a delay of at 
least ax months. 


Irene heon- wielding policemen watch- 
ing a protest march by thousands of 
high school students in the Latin 
Quarter of Paris yesterday against a 
Bdl to reform the university system that 
has triggered strikes at universities 
around France (AP reports from Paris). 
They converged on Bontemd St Mi- 


chel, demanding tihe resignation of M 
Alain Devaqnet, the Minister of Higher 
Education and Research and the author 
of the controversial Bill which is to be 
debated in the National Assembly 
tomorrow. Police broke np the 
demonstration without incident after 
half an hoar. 


some £2 billion, partly to meet 
the cost of disposal of the sur- 


pluses. 

But the ministers also have 
to deal urgently with a dra- 
matic shortfall in the 1986 
budget, much of it due to the 
soaring costs of form spend- 
ing, the fen in the <wiar — 
which affects the prices the 


EEC gets for farm products on 
the world market — and a fell 
in revalues from customers 
oiid tariffs. 

In September the Commis- 
sion warned the ministers that 
die 1986 shortfall would be 
around half a billion pounds, 
but officials say that fignre is 
now a conservative estimate. 

Mrs Chalker acknowledged 
that progress on the internal 
market and cheaper air feres 

hart been ttiarn iyyinfi mr . 

She said achievements of 
the British Presidency in- 
cluded progress on a jo int EEC 
strategy for job creation and 
raring the burdens placed on 
businesses, and promess in 
tanWing terrorism ann drugs. 

These would be among the 
them es of the EEC London 
summit next week. 

There had also been “pro- 
gress in adapting the Common 
Agricultural Policy to the 
world of the 1980s and 
1990s”. 

“Taxpayers, consumers and 
even farmers in the EEC in 
other producer countries and 
in the developing world are 
saying enough is enough — or 
more precisely, more than 
enough is too much,” Mrs 
Chafer said. 

“When you get to the point 
where calves are being fed sur- 
plus milk at a cost to the com- 
munity of 113,000 Bedpan 
francs (£1,883) per tonne, it is 
not surprising that even the 
calves are starting to say no.” 

Mrs Chalker said Britain 
had full confidence in Bel- 
gium's ability to handle unre- 
solved issues in 1987, but on 
farm policy “we cannot afford 
to wait”. 

Offi cials said there was 
concern that the budget over- 
ran would damage research 
and technology funding. 



dashes 


*11)1 


in hope 


From Jnhn ftn gfcmri 
• ■ ' Bona 


The shooting of a young 
East German vrao tried to es- 
cape to the West over the Ber- 
lin WaH on Monday has dash- 
ed Bonn’s hopes that the order 
for East Ge rman bolder 
guards to me tfadr 'gou. 
against escapers lwi been 
relaxed. 

A number of escapes since 
August in which border gnaxds 
fired no shots had led to 
speculation in the West Germ- 
an press that the guards might 
have turned a Wind eye . on 
orders from East Berlin. 


The most spectacular recent 
escape was that of an Eart 
Berliner, aged 32, his woman 
companion, aged 28, and their 
daughter, aged eight months, 
who smashed through the 
barriers at Checkpoint Ch a rlie 
in a seven-ton lorry. Guards 
fired three shots but the 
occupants were unhurt. 


A few days later a family of 
four escaped by swimming the 
Wackenitz River after making 
their way through the border 
“death strip”. 

Three East German men 
swam Berlin’s Teftow Canal 
on September 23 after nego- 
tiating bonder barriers on the 
eastern h»mk- East German 
guards did not see- them or did 
not fire at than. Ten East 
Germans by then had escaped 
to West Germany by swim- 
ming waterways- at night 
within only five weeks. None 
were fool at 


The Government has made 
a strong protest to tire East 
Germans over Monday’s 
shooting and Herr Hehmdi 
Windeten, the West German 
Minister for Inter-German 
Relations, yesterday described 
the shooting as “murder at the 
Wall". • 


Five die in 


attack 


on 


Abu Dhabi (Renter)— Five 
oil-rig workers were killed and 
at least 20 injuredfa an attack 
by unidentified aircraft on 
Abu Dhabi's offshore Abu al- 
Bukhoosh oflfiddin the Gnlff 
yesterday. 

• Ofl industry sources said 
two missiles hit the field’s 
mam terminal 100 miles 
^north-west of Abu Dhabi, 
damaging hying quarters and 


an ofl production platform. 

Oil production was halted 
and the. rite evacuated. In- 
formed sources said foe total 
number of casualties could be 
ashigh as 50. . 


Robbers flee 


Tokyo (AP) — Robbers hit 
an armoured car driver in the 
bead and sprayed his face with 
a chemical in Tokyo on 
Tuesday, escaping with 330 
million yen (£13 million) in 
Japan's biggest cash jobbery. 


Cocaine haul 


Geneva (AP)— Police have 
seized a record 44b of pine 
cocaine in an unclaimed suit- 


case arriving at Geneva air- 
port from Peru. 


Poison charge 


Belgrade (Reuter) — . Mr 
Nedri Berisa, a. director of a 
smelting firm in southern 
Yugoslavia has been charged 
with allowing poisonous waste 
to pollute two local rivers. 


Pastures new 


Stockholm — One thousand 
reindeer were moved yesr 
today by fairy from winter 

M rii i w ! m tin* iwwtt wim SmvL 


ish province of Jamtfemd, 
made radioactive by fall-out 
from the Chernobyl nuclear 
accident, 300 m iles so uth to 
nnconfenunwted grating. 


Polish farmers revive 
Rural Solidarity 


From Roger Boyes, Warsaw 


The Fafish farmers’ protest 
movement, the harmed Rs™ 
Solidarity anion, has an- 
nrnmrwi its rebirth hi the fona 
of a “temporary council” 
which wBT fight for peasants’ 
rig hue Mid, fat tire words ®ST3s 
founding statement, “try to 
save Poland from a. food 
catastrophe”. . - 

The statement was swaed 
by only three activists, mdrid- 
ing Mr Joxef Tefiga, the 
veteran dissident, who helped 

to establish Rnral Sobdanty m 

July 1981. The new “tem- 
porary amnaT said that it 
would -also incorporate mae 
efoer activists who raid stty 
Anonymous to than to work m 
the andergnmnd. •_ ■ ... • 
After the Fofish a atbunfa es 

released all poQtkal pnsora 
- wan ting such leading Stu- 
Marity fignre* as Mr Zbigniew 
Btfrk - SeMarity » 
work wit a way. fa wh«* a 
could function opeofa as a 
pressnre group on the Govern- 
ment while, at the same ffag- 
k poptng afire some of theoM 


and co-ordinate what was left 
of the mrian protert amromen^ 

So for they have been rather 
quiet, pardy because of argu- 
ments about strategy. Com- 
munist Party souces say that 
temporary Solidarity ombcDs 
have tried to register, them- 
selves officially fa at least 1® 
Warsaw provinces, presestfag 
their statutes and abas, to the 

local authorities. - 

Usaally the hoards fadnde 


ground 0 PP©riti« and^aTO 
regarded with saspichm hy the 
authorities, who have yet .to 


.... The c an e a t debate fa the 
Solidarity opposition is how 

for one should co-operate wan 

the authorities fa adriernag 
desirable goris,. snAjs an 


nBpnnww " --- 

idles or the redaction of poll* 
tion, • or more ' ' obvfcaMy 
political ambitions flke orion 
rights. The issae has hear 
crystallized fa the ament 
attempts by th* GoverMte® 1 to 
gsuftgfli social cousaltotife 

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12 


OVERSEAS NEWS 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 26 1986 


The M15 spy book hearing in Australia 

Whitehall accused of inconsistency 


From Stephen Taylor 
Sydney 

Whitehall's policy of res- 
training confidential informa- 
tion is inconsistent, the New 
South Wales Supreme Court 
was told yesterday. 

Mr Malcolm Turnbull, 
counsel for Mr Peter Wright, 
tendered a number of books 
and exhibits in support of this 
contention. He argued that 
information in The Ties Thai 
Bind, a book published last 
year without hindrance from 
the British Government, was 
in topicality and by nature far 
more sensitive than anything 
in the Wright book which the 
Government is seeking to 
suppress. 

Mr Turnbull said the book 
contained "eye-glazing detail” 
of the British intelligence ser- 
vices, including recent heads, 
structures, addresses and in- 
formation on sabotage and 
demolition schools. 

When Mr Turnbull put this 
to Sir Robert Armstrong, in 
his fifth day under cross- 
examination, the Cabinet Sec- 
retary said he had not read 
The ties That Bind and could 
not compare the two books. 

Told of its contents, he said: 
“I would certainly regret the 


publication of British inform- 
ation in such a book." He 
agreed, however, that nothing 
had been done to stop it 

Mr Turnbull said that al- 
though the British Govern- 
ment would still not officially 
confirm the existence of M16, 
the book. The Ties Thai Bind, 
gave the organization's head- 
quarters at 100 Westminster 
Bridge Road, London SE1. 

Jhe book, by Jeffrey 
Richelsoit an American, and 
Desmond Ball, an Australian, 
fliw listed similarly detailed 
information on the security 
services of the United Stales, 
Australia, Canada and New 
Zealand, including signals 
intelligence, code-names and 
detailed technical informa- 
tion, be added. 

.Another book. Conspiracy 
of Silence, published in Britain 
last week, contained many 
direct quotations from mem- 
bers of the security services. 
Mr Turnbull said. 

Sir Robert replied that those 
involved had been reminded 
of their duly of confidential- 
ity. Asked why the Govern- 
ment bad not sought to 
restrain publication, he added: 
“The view was taken that, 
though the breach of the duty 
of confidentiality was repre- 


hensible, the actual material 
was not sufficiently d am a gin g 
to warrant the extreme mea- 
sure of seeking an injunction.” 

The material was either 
already in the public domain 
or was trivial, he added. 

The Wright book, on the 
other hand, was considered by 
the nature of its disclosures to 
go far beyond that 

In argument against the 
Government’s contention that 
it had never allowed publica- 
tion of writings by an 
“insider” from the security 
services, Mr Turnbull cited 
four examples which be said 

fell into that category- 

They were: Cloak Without 
Dagger, by Sir Percy Siltitoe, 
head of MIS in the 1950s; The 
Philby Affair, by Hugh Trevor- 
Roper, a wartime member of 
MI 6; The Cambridge Com- 
intern \ an essay by Robert 
Cecil, another former MI6 
officer; and Handbook for 
Spies, by Alexander Foote, 
who was said to be a Russian 
agent but was actually an MIS 
man writing under a 
pseudonym. 

Mr Turnbull also submitted 
a series of articles published in 
the He*’ Statesman and The 
Guardian covering such sub- 
jects as GCHO, phone-tap- 
ping and MIS structure, which 


Sir Robert acknc 
Whitehall had made no 
to restrain. 

Faced with this volume of 
material to read, Mr Justice 
Powell remarked to Mr 
Turnbulk “Please remember 
that in 13 years, 11 months 
and 14 days, I reach the 
statutory age of judicial 
senility” 

Nearing the end ofhis cross- 
examination of Sir Robert in 
open court, Mr Turnbull re- 
ferred to a tetter to Mrs 
Thatcher from Mr Jonathan 
Aitfcen MP, in January 1980, 
shortly after she disclosed the 
treachery of Anthony Blunt in 
the Commons. 

Mr Turnbull said the tetter 
had called fora full statement 
to restore public confidence in 
the security services, along 
with an ann^wnranc nt on a 
major reorganization. What 
consideration had been given 
to these suggestions? 

Sir Robert: “The Prime 
Minister decided there should 
not be a statement of that 
kind. She made that decision 
and informed Mr Ailken and 
he accepted it” 

Later Mr Turnbull asked 
whether, since 1979, the Gov- 
ernment had given “serious 
consideration” to changing 


the policy of disclosures of 

intelligence matters. 

No, Sir Robert replied. 

Mr Turnbull put it to him 
that Sir Michael Havers, the 
Attorney-General, had not 
sought an injunction against 
Mr Chapman Fincher's book. 
Their Trade Is Treachery, 
because he had given an 
assurance that “there was no 
ongoing problem of penetra- 
tion of the security sendees, 
which assurance (fid not agree 
with the opinion of bis prin- 
cipal source, Mr Wright.” 

Sir Robert denied it. 

Mr Turn bolt “There has 
been a number of matters 
(covered in cross-examina- 
tion) where you were unable 
to give the court substantiated 
answers. X have invited you to 
make further inquiries. Have 
you sought any -such further 

Sir Robert: “I have not 
sought any further informa- 
tion.” 

The cross-examination of 
Sir Robert is due to go into 
closed session today after legal 
argument in which the British 
side is expected to argue that it 
is not obliged to produce 
certain documents ordered by 
the court on the ground that 
they are covered by a “public 
interest immunity” clause. 


Wright says Government tried to discredit hi 


From Stephen Taylor 
Sydney 

Mr Peter Wright the figure 
at the centre of the MI5 spy 
book trial emerged briefly 
from seclusion here yesterday 
to counter what he said was an 
attempt by the British Gov- 
ernment to discredit him 
through the columns of The 
Times . 

Looking frail and unwell, 
the former MIS mole hunter 
admitted receiving royalties 
for his collaboration with Mr 
Chapman Pincher on the book 
Their Trade Is Treachery, bur 
said Mr Pincher was mistaken 
when he told The Times that 
be had not been involved in 
the payments. 

“I can prove, and will prove 
n court, this is not true,” Mr 
’right said. 

his first public appear- 
o far during the court 
-re over his own book, 
iht said that as the 
Lent had “selectively 
parts of his evidence 
imes “in an effort to 
me in advance”, he 
choice but to make a 
statement containing 
s Jie testimony he is to 
wen he goes into the 
-box next week. 

it was addressing a 
ce at the offices 
"alcolm Turnbull his 
■fter issuing a similar 
earlier in the day. 
ght, who is 70 and 
; t ailment read the 
Element in a faltering 
rfe stopped on a couple 
.occasions, apparently as a 
result of difficulty with read- 
ing, and would not answer 
questions. 


The following is the state- 
ment made by Mr Peter 
Wright in Anstralia yesterday: 

“As yon wfl] no doubt be 
aware, I have been preparing 
for my appearance in court 
next week, and in particular 
preparing a foil disclosure of 
the- drcnmstances of the 
publication of Their Trade Is 
Treachery. 

However, the Government 
this weekend has selectively 
leaked parts of my evidence to 
the Whitehall correspondent 
of The Times in an effort to 
discredit me in advance. 
Accordingly, I have no choice 
bnt to make a public statement 
which will of necessity contain 
the information which will be 
part of my testimony. 

In the summer of 1980, I 
received a letter and a first- 
class air ticket from Lord 
Rothschild inviting me to come 
to London to discuss the 
Impact of the Blunt disclo- 
sures, disclosures with which I 
-was not involved in any way. 
This approach came totally 
oat of the blue. 

When I arrived Lord Roth- 
schild explained that he had 
recently met Mrs Thatcher, 
and that she was inexperi- 
enced in intelligence matters. 
We discussed the Hollis affair, 
as we had many times before. I 
expressed concern that the 
true farts of the Hollis case be 



Mr Wright an authorized 

but deniable operation. 

placed in front of her, and 
showed Lord Rothschild a 
paper I had begun to write on 
the subject I asked him if he 
would be prepared to use his 
influence to place the docu- 
ment in Mrs Thatcher's 
hands. 

Lord Rothschild said this 
approach would not work, as 
Mra Thatcher would feel 
obliged to refer any official 
approach direct to MIS. He 
told me that the best way to 
procure a proper investigation 
of the HoBis affair was to write 
a book. 

He told me that the book 
would have to be written by 
someone else and he suggested 
Harry Pincher. He telephoned 
Mr Pincher and shortly after- 


wards be appeared. I had the 
distinct impression this meet- 
ing had been pre-arranged. 

I was terrified of getting into 
finable. Lord Rothschild as- 
sured me it was going to be all 
right. He told me that he 
would arrange for his Swiss 
banking facilities to pay me 
half of the royalties from the 
book. He knew I was in fin- 
ancial difficulties and I was 

r fid for this assistance. 

Pincher has told The 
Times that he was not involved 
in these payments. I can prove, 
and will prove in court, this is 
not true. 

I knew Lord Rothschild to 
be an intimate confidant of 
successive heads of British 
intelligence establishments. I 
could aot conceive of him 
on barking on such a project 
without knowing it had die 
sanction, albeit unofficial of 
the authorities. I sensed I was 
being drawn into an author- 
ized, hot deniable operation 
which woald enable the Hollis 
affiaiT and other MI5 scandals 
to be placed in the public 
domain as the result of an 
apparently inspired teak. 

AH I know about Lord 
Rothschild, and the ease with 
which Their Trade Is Treach- 
ery was published, leads me to 
the inescapable conclusion 
that the powers that be ap- 
proved of the book.” 


Their Trade Is Treachery 
had come about, he said, 
through Lord Rothschild, who 
he knew to be “an intimate 
confidant of successive heads 
of British intelligence est- 
ablishments”. 

In the summer of 1980, Mr 


Wright said, he had been 
approached “totally out of the 
blue” by Lord Rothschild, 
who sent him a first-class air 
ticket “inviting me to come to 
London to discuss the impact 
of the Blunt disclosures” 

In this way, Mr Wright said. 


he believed that he was drawn 
into an “authorized but deni- 
able operation” to bring whai 
he termed “the Hollis affair 
and other MIS scandals" into 
the open. 

When begot to London, Mr 
Wright said he had discussed 


his concerns about Sir Rogpr 
Hollis, former bead of MI5, 
with Lord Rothschild as he 
had “many times before”. 

Mr Wright said he told Lonl 
Rothschild be had started 
writing a paper on the subject 
and asked if he could not bring 
it to the attention of Mrs 
Thatcher, who had informed 
the nation of Professor Blunt’s 
treachery in a Commons state- 
ment only months earlier. 

Lord Rothschild had told 
him that the Prime Minister 
“was inexperienced in intelli- 
gence matters”. He had said 
that a book was the best way to 
get a new investigation into 
Sir Roger and suggested Mr 
Pincher as a posable author. 

Mr Wright said Lord Roth- 
schild had telephoned Mr Pin- 
cher, “and shortly afterwards 
he appeared. I had the distinct 
impression this meeting had 
been pre-arranged.” 

An offer of royalty pay- 
ments, to be made through 
Lord Rothschild’s Swiss tank, 
was gratefully accepted by Mr 
Wright, who said he had been 
in financial difficulties ax the 
time. 

Mr Wright said that al- 
though he had been “terrified 
of getting into trouble”, he had 
been reassured by Lord Roth- 
schild, and could not conceive 
of him embarking on such a 
project without the sanction, 
albeit unofficial “of the 
authorities”. 

Everything that he knew 
about Lord Rothschild, and 
the ease with which Their 
Trade Is Treachery was pub- 
lished,' made him believe that 
“the powers that be” had 
approved the book. 



The Prince of Wales talking to members of tire British 3rd 
Parachute Regiment and the Canadian Airborne Regiment 
in the UN buffer zone near Nicosia yesterday. 


Churches 

fight 

Kenya Bill 

From A Correspondent 
Nairobi 

The National Christian 
Council ofKenya (NCCK) has 
joined the legal profession in 
expressing reservations about 
proposed amendments to the 
Kenyan Constitution which 
would remove the security of 
tenure enjoyed by the Attor- 
ney-General and the Control- 
ler and Auditor-General 

The Law Society of Kenya 
has called on Parliament to 
reject the Bill as being against 
the public interest 

Bishop Alexander Mugo, 
the Anglican Bishop, read a 
statement signed by the 
NCCK general secretary, Mr 
John Kamau. and the Presid- 
ing Bishop of the Methodist 
Church in Kenya, the Rt Rev 
Lawi Imathlu, expressing 
“deep concern" about the 
proposals. 

The Minister for Labour, 
Mr Peter Okondo, has de- 
fended proposed chants, say- 
ing a permanent Attorneys 
General was alien to democra- 
cy, and an Auditor-General 
could not continue m office if 
he fell out of favour. 

Mr Okondo said security of 
tenure for the Attorney-Gen- 
eral was provided m the 
Constitution at Kenya's inde- 
pendence, because European 
settlers demanded it 


Police stop 
bid to 
kill Pope 

Brisbane (Reuter) - Austra- 
lian police yesterday arrested 
a former modal patient armed 
with five fire bombs who, they 
said, had phrased to Still foe 
Pope “because he has gut toe 
much money”. 

The Sydney resident, aged 
24 and recently d ischarged 
from a mental hospital, told 
detectives he had ceaae to 
Brisbane three days ago to MD 
the Pope. 

Hems arrested in foe lobby 
of Brisbane Town HaH after 
being discovered daring * * 
routine security check seven 
hoars before foe Pope a r riv e d 
during foe second day of Ms 
week-long visit to Australia. 

He was carrying a card- 
board box contain ing five soft 
drink bottles each filled with a 
litre »rf petrol They were taped 


.jfice said foe man told 
them he went to the Town Hall 
as part iff Ms search for an 
derated position from which 
to throw the petrol bombs. 

A Papal spok e sman de- 
clined to say if foe Pope had 
been told about the arrest, but 
police said bis bodyguards 
were informed. 

The Pope was shot mid 
severely wounded fa St Brier's 
Square in 1981 and a Spanish 
priest longed at him with a 
bayonet fa Portugal a year 
later. 


Philippines 
‘dose’ to 
ceasefire 
agreement 

From David Watts 
Madia 

The Philippines Govern- 
ment may sign a cease-fire 
fl ftwflwwwt with Communist 
insurgents before the end of 
the week. 

Eroeigfag from some eight 
boms of negotiations with 
representative of tire Na- 
tional. Democratic Boot ai a 
secret location, Mr Ramon 
Mitra, who is Mimsier of 
Agriculture aad one of . the 
Government's . three nego- 
tiators, sa& there had been 
substantial progress. 

He saad Saafizsion of the 


today, tad in any event he 
experted it tobeagreed before 
the deadline of November 30 
set by Pteshfeut Muino. 

Mr Mhra said that addi- 
tions had to be made to the 
pact, but foe general principles 
were already in place for a 
ceasefire that would last less 
than foe 100 days suggested by 
tire NDF -earner this year. 
Once agreement was reached 
the cessation of hostile acts 
cotdd begin fa early Decem- 
ber. 

It. remains to be seen, 
however, whether Mr Mfrra's 
optimi sm is justified. Yest- 
erday's was the third meeting 
which he had indicated was “a 
make or break” meeting. One 
ofhis feffow^iegoaatoni said 
earlier in the meek that there 
remained two .sticking points. 

The negotiator, MrTeofijto 
Giringoas, also said that tire 
points were does which the 
Manila Government could 
not concede. 

Each time the two sides 
have come dose to agreement 
in the past, some external 
factor has delayed the final 
signing- The nego tiat ions be- 
gan on Augnst S and broke off 
at the end of September when 
Mr Rodolfo Frias, ch ai r m an 
of the NDFs military com-' 
mission and erf the New 
People's Army, the party’s 
military wfai was arrested. 

The rate were later re- 
sumed by foe NDF without 
the release of Mr Frias, buz 
broke off again last month 
after foe murder of the labour 
tender, Mr Rolando Otalia. 
The Communists retarded to 
the negotiating fable yesterday 
despite the fact that no 
progress has been made fa 
investigating that killing. 

Asked if the removal as 
Defence Minister of Mr Juan 
Ponce Enrile^ who had been 
advocating a tougher tine 
against the CoBWuaats, had 
h»l any effect on the negotia- 
tions, m Mitra safa there had 
been none. 

The new Defence Minister, 
Mr Rafael Beta, has initially 
welcomed the Government’s 
stance of negotiating a cease- 
fire. But he is known fa 
private to be concerned that 
the communist insurgency is 
getting beyond the means of 
the poorly-equipped armed 
farces of the Philippines to 
controL 


ENTERTAINMENTS 


CONCERTS 


BAHHICAM HALL 428 8796/658 
8891. Torn 7.46 Wna Oltm 
trm «f London. Jacek Kasprayk 
coho. MKfiaef Oaittu cUrtnet. 


ROY 41. FESTIVAL HALL 01-428 
nn CC 998 8800 Tamm 
7.30pm 


ft i i li n . Nflftanrir Lc Carnival 
de Londrea. Mne Ora>*> 
Concerto H avfc La Totwbaro dr 
Couperin. M i ni f ti Sanmonony 
No. SI (Pans). 


|o™a&BAU£t| 


e nUBBW S 836 3161 CC 
940 OSS8 

smun NAlmUL owu 
Toni 7.30 The Rape of lu cra H i. 

Timor 7.00 C ar m an 


KOVAL OKRA BOUSE 01-200- 
1066/ 1911. Stdby Info 836 
6903. S CC. Tickets £l-£22.GO. 
<Balleu C2-C40 roperu- 60 Ampiu 
aeac avail on the day 

hL OKRA 


Toot 7.00 THE KOVAL 
Me T aa fi ar Sto a, Frt 7.00 (Ptmr 
now carder Hart tune) - 


THEATRES 


1 836 761 1 or 2*0 7913 

/* CC 741 9999/836 7368/379 
6433 Gra Sales 930 6183 First 
CaD Mtir 7 day OC sao 7200 (bks 
feel NOW BOOKB4Q TO MAY 30 
1987 

ME AND MY GIRL 

THE LAMBETH WALK 
MUSICAL 

NtaMty at 7.30 Mats Wed at OJO 
a sai 4.30 a 8.oo 
(nhitaMiLM*l 
THWHDT SHOW 
M TOWN" a Express 


ALDWCH oi 856 6oOa/OMi cd 
Ol 379 6233. 01 741 9999 R*7 
dund kW bnw (rean Tomer 
Opens Pee 5 at 7,OQpra 



BRIGHTON BEACH 


Directed W 
A National Theatre Production 
“Humour al Its ben. a Heft and 
taring production" oaoxy iwau “A 
oeauofoay stuped family 
comedy" Ttsnea - It wtn ran for a 
long ttear Time Oul 
Evening* Moa - Frt 730 Matt 
W*« 30 Sat* 6.00 & 8.30 FlrB 
Can 24 nr 7 day cc 01 240 7200 
Uio bfcg ftcj Croup Saw Ol 930 
6133. 


>01-8366111 CC 
836 1171. FITS CaU (24 lus/7 
day*) 340 7900 (bfea fort. Cum 
7 jo. Wed mat 3. Sat 4 3 8 

Bqd Yhriiesyaw Caopaqr’i 

LES LIAISONS 


K aaiiH a t. i l far 4 (Wrier Aarnh 
!■■. tu* d tka tMF 1 


APOLLO THEATRE 4S7 wn 
*34 3698 Ftrd OH 01240 7300 
Ttetodmastar cc 379 6433 
MOO- Frt 8- Sal 4.30 ft 8.16 
Thun Mss 3 
MULWOmu 


■juM Ca ndy Pat-far 
Dm Year ■» (_svrgfsc*i c 


‘WONSTCDW o.Md 

WJ2L?appaport 

lmw AOOtONG 1987 



APOLLO VICTORIA SS 828 8666 

CC 630 6262 Party Ups 838 

6188 TfcKetmaster cc 579 6433 

Ftt-St CaU CCI24IU1 240 7200 <Bk9 

Feel era Sam 930 6133 Eves 

7 46 Mam Tue 3, Sal 3.0 
“A MUSICAL THAT SURPASSES. 

ANYTH — U A ROUND IN EVERY 

rou wnow D Exp 

STARLIGHT EXPRESS 

Music by 

ANDREW LLOYD WEBBER 
Lyras by Richard SthjGOC 
Directed tty TREVOR NUNN 
APPLY DAILY TO BOX OFFICE 
FOR RETURNS Special csmm 
M ona at SB on Turn matt for 
OAFS 


IL W pa Wad 17 Rea 


ALBERT 836 3878 CC 379 6868/ 
379 6433/ 741 9999 (poop 
S am 83 6 3062. Eve* 8pm 
LIMITED LONDON SEASON 

DAVE ALLEN LIVE 
-sevastatumly funny" 


Ol 638 8796/638 
8891 cc tMon-Swi lOara-apmi 

ROYAL SHAKESPEARE 


E lonl 
7.20. totnor 2.00 St 7.30 MS* 
ALLIANCE Sbawa 

"MMieratcce. a Mortons 
performance- Time*. SCENES 
FROM A W Me by 
Feydeau. Frt 7.3a Sat ZM & 
7.30 

THE PIT lent 7.3a lamer 2.00 
& 730 


by Richard Net- 

MCnHMK 


by Arthur Miner. Frt 
7.30. Sal 2.00 & 7 JO 


CHURGMUL Bramkar 460 6677. 
Eves r.4 S Mott Thura. Sat 2 JO 
GirtMoptMr Timothy in THE 


COMEDY THEATRE 930 2STB 
CC 200 7200/579 6455/741 
9999 Oik 930 6123 
“A me* acH _ 

Tlm ea 

JOHN ALSCRTOH 


TAYLOR 

THE MAINTENANCE 
MAN 

A Comedy by Hehlvd HUT* 
“A MARITAL MAST LB P Ig C E 
~.WONOCKnftXY FUNNY** 
Nofn»w 

**Thr applause of rapturous 
recognition- □ Mad 
"Very funny ttdMd'* LEU 
Mon-TlPI 8 Frt/Sat 5.30 A 8.30 


COTTE1LOI «■ 928 22S2 CC 

(National Theatre's small audl- 

temmiT un-L Tumor 7 30 THE 

AMSMCAN CLOCK by Arthur 

Miller. FW. mm. Tue 7 JO. Sat 

and WtC MP COOS. Toni 
Apm TMst •( Hw Haifa, as min 
PtaBorni perf an nos £ 2.00 


CflffiRMMI 5 930 3216 CC 37b 
6363/379 6433/741 9999 . Qtk 
636 3962. Ergs 8.00. Thu iren 
2JO. Sal 8 JO 4 850 
"iwriSii FARM! at m w ar - 
D Mail 

TheThMb - * of Comedy company 
SE5* ROTCC 

FOWL06 MU 

ALFRED HARKS 
AJdtTA JACK! 


SAW COX 
RUN FOR YOUR WIFE 

Written and dhnaed tor 
rav cooNgy 

Ox «r 1.500 H 4a a p toWnp p erft 
-SHOULD BUM FUR LIFE* 9. Ex 
Good seats avail Thura man 


240 

8230 CC 379 6S6&/6433. Eves 

Bora, saa mats *pm TREATMENT 

by Jooatban Mom 
dory previn 8 Dee ■ 10 Jan. 


PO— WIOI I THEATRE 580 8846/ 
9662. ALL M CC MW FIRST 
CALL SMtir 7 day on 836 2428 no 
BOOKBK FIE Grp SOM 930 

MYllSlBCi 

TI ME 

TK ULTIMATE HFU B D ttt 

CLIFF RICHARD 

AS "THE ROCK STAR" 

THE PORTRAYAL OF 'AKA8H' 

LAURENCE OLIVIER 

Moo- Frt 7.30 Thu Mat 2.30 Sal 4 
A 8 is. Ai Thun matt only Hw 
“Rock Star” win be pm-formed by 
John ChrttUe 

SPECIAL CONCESSIONS at £7 ad 

oertb except Frt A sat eves, tor 
OAPtt. UB4DV student* A under 
16*s avail 1 hr MFan> port 
Reduced prices Thun mats Only 
£7 A CIO 

Now >nl*d to AprfS *87. 
■EATS AVAIL FOR (OF TOUT 


DRURY LANE THEATRE ROYAL 

Box Offler A CCOl-836 BIOS. Ol- 

240 MM/7. First GROMIT 7 day 


fee). 


anas On Ol 240 7200 (no Meg 

■)- Tlchetmasuer 01 379 6433 


42ND STREET 

A SHOW FOR ALL THE Fi 


■total Award* for 1984 

«eted 

BEST MUSICAL 

STANDARD DRAMA AWARDS 

«dM 

BEST MUSICAL 

LAURENCE OUWER AWARD 

voted 

BEST MUSICAL 

FLAYS A FLAYERS 


AWARD 

Evfls 8.0 Matt Wed 50. Sat 60 A 
8-50 Reduced prior m at Weds. 
Students and OAPtt standby. 
Sales 930 6123 


Special manned Dec 26 3pm 


DUCHESS 8 836 8203 CC 240 
9648 OC 379 6433 A CC 24 
br/7 day 240 7200 Evtp 8 wed 
mat 3 Sat B & 8 

HO SEX. PLEASE 


DUNE OF YORKS 830 6122 CC 
836 9837 /741 9999/379 6453 
24hr 240 7200. Eves B. Thu 3. 
SKI & A 8J50 

COMEDY OF THE YEAR 

Stan da rd Drama Awwd 1M4 

STEPPING OUT 

HU Comedy tar RKfurt Hants 
Directed by Julia McKenna 

‘TR R J M F R OH TAP" Std 

THIRD HILARIOUS YEAR 


FORTUM B Of CC S 836 2238/ 9 ' 
AW 240 7200 i24hn «*« fMI 
Mon to Frt B Sat 8.30 Mat Thurs 
A Sat 3.00. Final 2 «■_ 
LYNDA RUTH 


in DOUBLE DOUBLE 

“1 en loved every flimuto" ST 
-A cuw of whodunltni • to 
unbeatable- Tim es ES 

WE DOUBLE DARE YOU T O 
DETECT NOW TTS DOf* 


OARR1 CK 8 Ol 579 6107. la cafl 
24/tw 7 day 240 7200. Gra Sale* 
930 6125. Eves 7.30. Sat 8 * B 
Tups im at 3pm 

JUDI MICHAEL 
DENCH WILLIAMS 


MR ami MRS NOBODY 

Keim WMcrttotse 
Opened tor Ned Sbertla 

twat earne d! to reach Da 
_JSst EadtS y— Tiroes 

“W*wwbt must ns ran 

'Y** DM411 


UME 457 1092 OC 379 6433 
1*1 Can 24 hr 240 7200 (no &k« 
fee) 7«i 9999 mo Ug feel. Grp 
Sales 930 6123. Eves 8 
Matt Wed 3 Sal 4. 


r o unr r of tw year 


LEND ME A TENOR 

“tf irs Launder you're after . Own 
the fun comes nowhere tucker 


A Omedy by Km LMwfg 
Directed tor David Ctffmora 


UfU E imWC R THEATRE 01-889 

7756. First can cc zahra 240 

7200 Orica Fee). EwwTas. mas 


Sm SJO. _ 

by Dylan Thomas. -Saartaa 

aad lin eal a m lanaRiaHai; 
—warai, ararfaa aad Sandy” 

Hally Telegraph 


HAMPSTEAD 72 2 9301. Opens 

Tool 7pm. Sub Ew m.SH MSt 

450. SSLUMe THE SIZZLE. A 
New Conway by rotor a 
with Aim Damp . Cari U aa Win , 
Dtoadato Landed. DaaM 
Tin .IfaH. Directed by Dab eel 


HAYMARKCT THEATRE ROYAL 

Box Office* OC Ol -930 9882. IM 
Call 241UY7 day cc bkv 240 7200 
Ewa 7JIO Wed£ S« nub 250 m»| 


fNaorinaini Actor of the Ym 
L aurence OUvtar Awards! to 

BREAKING the CO DE 

by mWH WHJTEMOaK 


Db- by CUFPOHD WJAMS 

MOVMB AND ENORMOUSLY 
DUOYAMLC- D8>ep 


HER MAJESTYSl HaymaeMt. Ol- 

839 2244 -ncaeantoier OC 579 

6131 First Can C C 240 7200 

ANDREW LLOYD WERBOTS 

■iEW MMCKL 

THE PHANTOM OF THE 
OPERA 

MKHAExfaU&BroRD 

Sarah Sieve 

B i t uh tman Barton 

CldiiY Moor e paw Oir aane 
at certain pernn luoaoes 
Directed by HAROLD PRBXCE 
Eves 7 45 Matt Wed A Sal 3 
Postal Iricos only for Aar 10 Oct 


LYRIC THEATRE Shaftesbury 
Am W1 01437 3686/7 01434 
1BBO. 01434 1080 01-734 

6166/7 


-A brtniani A lamb 
ottMc aaHonuancO- F. Ttaaas 
to 

TBp NaiRWbl Th eaflVY acfMlnied 
umSocaan of 

ALAN AYCHBOURJrs 

A CHORUS OF 
D1S.APPR0VAL 

“H e artbretotogly ftmay" Cdn 
"HOanoitt..." SL Times 
-A rare evnVM Of 
comic ndtUaradoo" Tines 
Evos 7 . 30 . Mats Wed and Sat 10. 

01-930 6123. 


Reduced price nan 
OAD Stand -tor 

FIRST CALL 24WI T P AY 
CC BOOKINGS ON 01-200 7200 
(NOROOKBRS FEB 

WINNER OF ALL 
THE BEST COMEDY 
AWARDS FOR 1985 
NOW BOOKING UNTIL 
APRIL *87 

FRANCES DC LA TOUR 
AS IJLllAN HBL1MAH M 

LILLIAN 

A play &v Wlttan Laee. fflrrcted 
by conn RHtgnne. Sunday Nov 
30 at 4pm. 


LVYTBLTOH *S' 928 3BS2 CC 

(Nanonal Theatre’s proscenium 

stage) TanX Tomer. Frt 7.4 8. 

sms ta iM wpn niMOtTjfi 

THE MACtSIHATE by Ptarfd. 
Tenwr 1030 am. m Tue 
40.30 am « 2.00 ran MBS 
F RE W. MOW . Tue 74S TORS 
OF MONET. 


LONDON PALLADIUM 457 7373. 
741 9999 tab dbg It*}. First CH 
24 H r 7 D «y OC 240 7200. (HO 
BHB FEE) Cra Sales 930 6123. 
TIcbmnBSMr 379 6433 


THE HIT MUSICAL 
COMEDY 

OEORCE HEARN 
& PENS QUUEY 

LA CAGE AUX FOLLES 

•—a ahumm NOAir or 

APPROVAL" S.Tpt 
Movfll >.3a Mata Wed SLOO 
Sat 2-30 a 8.00 
Ssant conc es wons avail, at door 
I Mnwn A Sal mats 
SCATS AVAHAHLE FROM <750 

m ran ist, an, 3RD dec 


LYRIC HAMMEKSHUTH 01-741 
■ 2311. Eves 7.45, wed Matt 
2 30. S at Mott 4am THE 
DtFEMMl. MACHDIC tor Co^ 
IMNL untb Maato 
I srtlMO e Wed - sat 8pm 
IHHTHIHm FSSTHf AL. 


MAVFABt 01 629 3057 
From Dec 18 to Jan 3 
TWIC* daily 2-0 & 4.0 
Weds & Sacs 1O30L 2-0 A 4.0 

SOOIYS XMAS SHOW 


MAYFAIR S CC €09 3006. Mot* 
Tim 8 Frt/Sat 540 A 8.10 

RIC HARD TODD u 

rhe —Rita Mortar yratsrSM 

THE BUSINESS OF 
MURDER 

'An fMb Hied wtaw" S EXp 


236 BB68 ce 741 

9999. Cn> Sales 930 6123 Ftm 

CHI 240 7200 124 Hn 7 Days) 
TKbetnMscer 579 6455. 
Eves am sm 6pm & &5D 

STEVEN BERKOFFS 
SINK THE BELGRA NOi 

-SAVAGELY COtBC” FT 

foo d an d drink 

THDS MATH 


01-236 

BB68 1st Cab 240 7200 5796455 
741 9999 Ora Sales 930 6123 

THE WIND IN THE 
WILLOWS 

Ombs December is far 4 wee» 
owy Twice daily 8 20460 


NATIONAL THEATRE 
COMPANY 


■■OUYMR/ LYTTELTON/ 

CUmOLQE. CnxffentH^fa 
seats dan o f nerft an Baton 

from lO to RESTAURANT (9QB 

2Q35L EASY CAR PARK. Info 
■ 633 0880. AM CONDMM| 


NEW LONDON Drury Lm* Wpa 
406 0072 CC 379 6433 Eves 748 
Tue A SW 5 00 A 7.48; 

IRE ANDREW LLOYp WEBMB 
/TA, ELIOT MUSICAL 

CATS 

APPLY DAILY TO BOX OFFICE 
FOR Brawns 

Group Homings Ol 406 l«7 or 
Of 9SO6I23M0W BOOKING TD 
MAY 30 18S7. 8s« avaa tor ttl- 
tnntaiai nouoay pens on Dec 22* 
Jon a at 3 pm 


OLD VTC 928 7616 cc Ml 1891 
Due ta public demand run ecsencs- 
ed to lO ton. Eves 7 JO. Wed Mats 
2J0. Sab 4.00 ft 7.46 

MMOA ATTKEN 


FAITH BROOK 
BARBA RA EW1W 0 
JULIA FOSTER 
CFORCBM KALE 
PATH LOVE 
DIANA QWCK 
ZEHA WALKER 

Mid 

SUS ANNAH YORK to 

THE WOMEN 


by Cton? BOMbe Luce 


OLIVIER -S' 928 2262 CC <No- 
ttonu Theatres open range] 
Closed for iMttMnanoe raun 
Dec 5 Previews MW UM 
Dec 3. 4. S. 6 (no Mats ovaitaWr 
Hitt Dec 6 p r ev i ew - Standard 
TtMMrc CtubL Dec 9 tool ANI- 
MAL FARM as printed to 
HaOw A Dec 10 ad ax 7.00 
prompt. Opera Dec 11 ol 6.45. 
men Dec 12 A 15. Otoe a Hw- 
«re dark ■ not A WH PA 
as primed m tmneu. 


1 ROYAL COURT SCC 730 1 746/ 
1867 oc a*nr 7 day swo 7 zoo 

... W KOH» by 

cnryt asan ft nwM lap. 


PALACE THEATRE 434 0909 CC 
579 6433 FH CMD 24Hr 7Day OC 
2407200 Cm B am 93 0 6123 

THE MUS I C AL SENSATION 

LES MISERABLE 
“IF YOU CANT GET A 
TICKET -STEAL ONE” std 

Eves 7.30 Mato Tim ft Sal 230 
Mcntaen not admi 
™tH the luHi val 

BY oaquHt- 
IATTHCBOX 


PNOORXI 836 2294 OC 3aO 9661 

DIANA RIGG 

“A CCMMAND PtO P RESENCE-. 
WRYLY VmTY" F.T. 

WILDFIRE 


Dlrectea by PS 
“FASCMAIIHUU. 


_ — OMall 

1 st CHI 240 7200 ao agptoei Ora 

80 MS 930 0125/741 9999 too Ms 

fee) Mon-Thu B Frt/Sal 4 ft 8.15 


PKCABKLY 457 4806 OC 379 
6860/ 579 6435/ MO 7200. 
- - 9306125/836 3962. 

tSt* 430 ft 8.16 WM 
‘ 3 



A FUNNY THING 
_ HAPPENED 

ON TIC WAY TO THE FORUM 

"Tbecta-tata ratter atone is worth 
U» Brice of osndaNoH- tod. . 


WEE EDWARD Bax Once 
734 8981 First CbD 24 Hr 7 Obva 
cc Booking 836 3464 era »es 
950 6123. MOttSat 750 Mato 
Timm ft Sri 250 

CHESS 



Hep MM to Mam* 2S, 1N7 

MAT SCAlSSOMEnNS 

AVAILABLE ON DAY 


FmiCEOF WALES W1 9308681 
/2 or Haffue 930 0S44/9/6. Ora 
Sales 930 6123. Ketto Frowst 
741 9999. TfctoOnaster 579 6435 
im CaU 24ftr/7aay 2*0 7200 

’A L L 0 ’ A L L 0- 

Wttb toe TV MOW STARS 
Eves 8. Frt ft Sal 650 ft 8.40 - 
EXTRA PERFS 30 A 31 Dec M 
g..yi 


01-734 1166/7/ 

0261/0120. 24hr cc 240 7200/ 

379 6433. Cre Salto 930 6123. 


LONDOtP* Cdn 
" A WONDERFUL STAR" Mail 

MAUREE N UPMAN m 

LEONARD BURUiftlWL 

WONDERFUL TOWN! 

-ft rtppies vmh e ulto n oi P* 

& Ttmes “Just wonderful" D£xp 
MctoSst 8 Mob wed 2JO SM B 


HYCRRDE STUHOS 748 3384 

HCC5T9 6433 SHARED CXPC- 

BOKt to TOO TRUE TO BE 

GOOD by ■a ta ri Sfcaar Until 
Isa*. Eves s. Sun mat ajp. 


730 

886 4 Eves 7 .30. Sri Matt 350 
by ' 


ROYALTY Ot«31 0660 84br cc 
340 7800 CC 3798453 741 9999 
Croup Sales 930 6122 


.OK 


■MDIBDMTl 

Frtun 16 Dec twice daflval 250 ft 

HM7JK7W00K NOWHMMi 


SAVOY THEATRE 01 836 8888. 
OC 3796219. 8360479. RntCaOl 
24 hr 7 day 0*8 fee) 340 T2oal 
Ketto R«WM 741 9999 (Mm fc«X 
Ewes Mon-m 8PW. SM 8 ft BJO. 

wed Mas 3 po> 

■ntnimaMMm 



B Directe d by HWWMM— — 


COSB9Y Ol 579 SS99CC01 379 
6435/741 9909. Ftm CUD 24hr 
240 7200 CbkBffO. Qrp Sales 930 
6133. 

MtaFri a wed mm 5, Sai 6 ft 
ajo 


THE THEATRE OF COMEDY 
COMPANY'S 

“afcsMip revival - toe best 1 have 
ever sw" tTUnesi of 

ROOKERY NOOK 

“toe bum oEttbratad to B 
Travam* bnw" (Sbectason 
Previews from Dec 8 tar 
TOM CONTI ta 
a lavish ne w pro duction 
AN ITALIAK STRAW HAT 
Book NOW 


ST MAKTBrs 01-836 1445. Sm- 
CW OC No. 379 6433. Eras AO 
. -Turn 246. am &o and B.P 
38 Hi jnr Of ACA1RA CMMSTEta 

THE MOUSETRAP 


ftM 2660 OC 8 3Ul 

4143/6190. 741 9999. First Cas 
24 Hr 7 OOP CC 200 7200 Os 
Sales 930 6123 

CABARE T 


Sfamno 

WAYNE SLEEP 

Ureaed ft ator e oyophad by 


Uterfrt 7^6. Mat Wed 3.00 
.014.30 ft ftts 

HOW DRUID TO 
AMU. 87 


STRATFORD IMS AVON 

(0789) 295623. ROYAL 

SHAK ESPEARE CO MP AN Y to 

*RST. Pea — TontpM 750. Sea 
1JO. M Hatai ** Tale Totnor 
1.30. Macfteto Tomer. Frl 7.30. 
RMtard B Sat 750. Sm IB- 
Mra, Rewar Tttdw 1 SO. 
ToirigbL SM 7.30. fW MaM 
Toroor. Fn 7.3a 


THEATRE OF COMEDY 
COMPANY 

-roe very best to Brttatm 
ewnte ttoenf" OaBy Mall ' 
See separa te emrtec under: 


VICTORIA PALACE Ol 2407200 
BOO KING NOW 94 hf 7 d ay 

TREVOR SKPHCH 

EYE BEA 

MATASHA RKHARDSON 


HIGH SOCIETY 

ureaed tor Rtchanf Eyte - 
Prevs Feb 12 Itt NKIlit FW 28 
Man-Ftl 7 as wed Mar 3 Sal 4.48 
ft 8.16. Op Sales MO 6193 


VICTORIA rALACC MAM 1307 
Eucs 730 Matt Wed ft Sri 248 
EXTRA XMAS MATINEES 
December 26.29.30 JOB 1 A 9 
94br 7 day cc trims (no enra 
ctottpel Oti FIRST CALL 240 7900 
-A NIGHT OF SHEER SONG ft 
DANCE MAGIC- WK|y News 

CHARLIE GIRL 
ONLY 7 WEEKS LEFT TO 
SEE THIS FABULOUS 
CAST LAST PERF JAN 10 




CHARLIE GIRL 

M M PARTY DBCOUHTS ■ 

AUosaok. Ticfeetmtoer 579 6433 

^■W H Srafm Tl-avei Brtincb 


VAUDEVILLE Baa Office ft CC.I 
836 9907/8648 Ftart caO OC 24 
Mrs 240 7200 Ibko feel. Eras 8X1. 
■ Matt Wed 2-50. Sw 50. a3a 


Standard OnaOa Attortf 
. MARTB t WHS . 

_ , PETER BLYTH E 
Wjo mhhk tm aw ba 
ALAH AYCKDO«fs?rS Hew FtajT 

■sfas^sufflBn, 

&sH 


834 0983/4 

cc 834 0048. ccHetotmaattr 379 
6455. Today. Toner, Tne 
1030am, & 2.00. Frt. Men 2-00 ft 
630. Sat 3 jOQ ft 6JO 


msYAL awmr’t 


NKIILHJHJL 5W1 Ol 930 7763/ 
339 4405 CC 01 379 6660/379 

6 ^ 74 6 , |^6^2“-““° 



7pm MatoTHfl. ft 830 


6666/TlckaDnaater 579 6455 /m 
6123/83*1 

3969. Eves 7 JO, Sat mala 5 
toe Meat E mfT tMtHUim. 1 

VANESSA REDGRAVE 

_ tom WTLKINSON In 

■I VlasM* ' 

GHOSTS 

By Huwtk Rva 
Pjggea-toLPwMTtecW 

rTOWUCTKBL 

C8y Lbnttt 


VUUM VTC 92S 8363 OC 879 
*«®_Tb« Tnj* Via Co. hi 
nnm catbar -Aha*. 
— — — ta tatanrt 

■ - hi, ttftjHf. 

r r.T. Bw* Tjo 
Wed ft rrf mat 2pm 


TOftS** ■"*"* 908 6363 

paines Pl o ugh . to 
NwCMOWTHy Jim Mir. 

rb *TiaM| y la HriaritoJV 

■ UwS r oan.'Evto a^Tti sa 


ART GALLERIES 


AKIHOHY dWAY 9 ft 25 
$L Wl. 499 4100. 


BARBICAN ART GALLERY Bar- 
Mcra cun. EXS. < rt-OSB 
4141. Unto 4 jmc David Raft- 
erta fl 796-1864 )e patnons* to 
Etoope ft me Near Etas plus 
Un ftm by nanatoc Fan 
trtbto toot nm . TOW ■ SOI lO- 
648.. Sun ft B Hott la^Ldfl. 
Oaaad Msa d a j i, Atom £9 A 
£»■ mum rates for pro- 

WDinmnm ^ 
RAY by la— a Bmctaa - ntfl 
19 Dec (ptiaac ftar. detafta to 
dales and-tonad 


mm ART SO CI ETY 148 New 

ST ” 8 IM8 - 


I ntT-Bapnitan 

Sl^W l 01-498 9107. 


NovarobCT - |90> December. 
Mon-Frt IQS. Saw lO-lgJQ. 


UDFEVRB GALUnrr. 30 BR— 
8L Wl. 01^95 2107. SHPtMt- 

Mt» AM» ofl 

W avioftir - inHH r. 

- Frt 106. Sets 10-12-301 I 


UKDt 13. Old Bond St 
AW KIAL wwaco-ow m. 
NtaBTsOB. MnrfH. 930ft3a 


ROYAL ACADEMY. Ftccedtoy Ol 

-g^OP. £1.70 cone. ra&e. 


Me d aox tor rat, Maarialr' 

MMOriA 


10 - sjq Sriimav io . i 


r SMta W RftW. ^^457*84 iV 





WNXUUB iWltl— IRIf a soo 
ombtb m 
■NOW AT BERKROMBtS, » 

Si George SL Ufylttr wT 


CINEMAS 


emmcXHAZA — Carooen 

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THF TTMFS WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 2fi 1 98fi 

THE ARTS 


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Nuclear 

families 

«TCr jjfce patting m loo ta the 
middle', of yonr larder*' 
grimched one of the protesters 
la Tte Dmmp (BBC2), a 40 
Afhates. : special .an the 
Lincolnshire village whose 
disused airfield is to be re- 
cycled as a unclear oubliette. ; 
Every year for the next half- 
ceatnry, 1 &QO 0 tons of low- 
level radioactive waste win be 
buried ia shallow, trenches on 
the site, where it will remain a 

piteatfal hazard to vegetables 
fir a good 306 years. 

I TELEVISION I 


Sun, sea, sand and savagery 


| THEATRE I 
B29 

Theatre de la Parte 
St-Martin, Paris 

Two American airmen fcmd 
into the roles of Robinson 
Crusoe and ManFriday^raun- 
chy Second World War style, 


Beny and Nids Arcstrap- It is 
best described as wide-screen 


The local sqmre, whose 
family has been in residence 
for aa even longer period of 
time and with no deleterious 
consequences, Oinks this is a 
very bad idea. So do the 
risking view, a sometime met- 
altergist, and fate parishioners, 
from the rectory ladles to the 
gamesome belles at the fete. 

One would Kite to rfcfafc of 
this kind, of Middle England 
mftftancy as a potent fence for 
change which Government ig- 
nores at its periL Infect - as 
this report, showed bat did not 
say — it is a potent force for 
conservatism, muting the 
community and giving a co- 
hesive feens to traditional 
values, 

Otesrindd not bat think that 
tte impoverished Mack vil- 
lagers fa Viewpoint Back to 
the Frostier (Central) had a 
deal mote to protest about 
Wfth ma lnutritio n and lack of 
sanitation, half of all children 
in the Mack homelands die 1 
before their fifth birthday. 

TMs progra mm e was a 
lengthy and pretty thorough 
in die lin e al of apa r t heid , Egto 
on history hot heavy on the 
martyr mentality that smstsaaa 
die laager. One Afrfkaaner 
former whinged dent having 
to foee up to landmines when 
his fore&thers had been con- 
fronted with nothing deadlier 
than assegais, while another 
explained dud “these people" 
(laagerspeak for die Macks) 
would bathe topless if allowed 
on to white beaches. The 
Minister for Planning spoke 
with heated si nce rity slmt 
“tte totality of development 
concepts” and s omething 
called “mOT. It shorid be 
noted that these people , (the 
whites), observe niArtaHy 
the same nfofoi is fie 

Tflbyw «f Mnmlflitrk- 

Martin Cropper 


LONDON 

DEBUTS 

Dimitri Sdadkowski, who 
lives and trained in London, 
tackled the technical problems 
of Rachmaninov's Second So- 
nata like e seasoned virtuoso. 
Every detail of the piece's 
darkly virtuose score came 
off with immaculate precision. 
He is a editored player, dem- 
onstrating a natural affinity 
with the Russian Romantic 
repertoire, bat to develop 
further he must work at 
projecting the emotional «oi>- 
tem of the music to a greater 


Before the war La Motta 

Was a jaZZ Tniig'rian antj hiy 

banner memories are easy 
plunder for the sexually de- 
prived Hunter. La Motta intu- 
itively exploits this, donning 
with equal ease the personality 
of a Emp-wristed h ai rdresser 
or a slinky-hipped female 
dancer. Inevitably, Hunter is 
led towards making real sex- 
ual advances, which are forc- 
ibly rebuffed. The 
master/slave syndrome begins 


altogether orig- 
: is often super- 
peribnnen’ own 



inal dioL 
fluons to 


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theatre The filmic qualities of r emar k ab l e physical inter- 
this encounter of a distinctly pretation of the characters. 


masculine kind are, however, aided by a second wave - of 
no real surprise: this is Page's cinema realism with close-up 
first ■ foray into live drama deep, all-over suntans (main- 
fnom. a successful career as a tained by daily sessions under 
novelist-cum-screen-play- ultraviolet ImnpsX pvrana t 
wright, and most recentiy as a unshaven duns, matted hair, 
filnwnaker with 7axi Boy. tattered hot accurate uni- 
Out of the dart me** come forms, Us airmen area 1940 
the eardrum-bombarding for the use o£ 

Kmmls of an airborne B29 However, the convincing 
fighting for its lire, losing and qualities of Arestrup’s fet-cal, 



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spinning earthwards. The 
blackness lifts to tire gentfo 
swish of the ocean and exotic 
bird-song, and the wrecked 
fuselage of the aircraft is 
discovered nestling amongst 
the palm trees of a Pacific 
island paradise. Hus is cap- 
tured down to tile test scatter 
of nnhnsked coconuts by 
Jean-Marie Fievez’s applanse- 
drawing design, realistically 


slow-thinking. 


supercilious Hunter, 


executed by Robert Pttit with 
the help of the tropical-great 
fingers of Pierre Dederoq. 

Four years have passed, and 
the war is over, but not foe foe 


alley-cat, subservKsiy cun- 
ning La Motta go for beyond 
fiend stubble and a spell under 
a sun-lamp. They are the 
prodnet of a near perfect co- 
ordination between two 
exceptional actors and a direc- 
tor^ who knows exactly what he 
wants, and how to get it. 

B29 is the British-bam 
Gcddby's first Paris produc- 
tion. During the past 10 years 
he has been closely involved 


. '• • • 




Palling rank: Niels Arestrnp and Richard Beny as the forgotten castaways in B29 

Bringing up baby 


in the Belgian theatre, as wefl 
w ** coatinuing to work regu- 
lariy in tte UK. USA and 


ftwn Hnniw fArcstnml <*tiH 
Private. Tony La Motta 
(Beny) — whose castaway 
existence has evolved into a 
harsh fantasy world, given 
shape and purpose by past 
realities. 

They continue to act out the 
military routine: foe daily 
ritual of r unning tip * tOD— 
bleached rag that was once the 
American colours, a regular 
aims inspection. But the real 
force behind their existence is 
Hunter’s en fo rce men t and La. 
Mona's ap p a r en t conc urr ence 
in main taining the military 
pecking-order. Hunter 
progressively elevates himself 
to the lankof General and La 


Panaifa This international 
patina shows Itself to some 
advantage in his outspoken 
treatment of B29. In complete 
contrast to tte liberated im- 
ages on French television and 
cinema screens, in the theatre 
there still lingas an outmoded 
and inhibiting decorum, 
particularly in the private 
sectm, which all too often 
r esults in emaOTilatinn. Page’s 
cinema experience ignores this 
and Goldby's direction keeps 
tte actors wefl squared, with- 
out turning than into a Broad- 
way pastiche. 

The big-screen imagery has 
not gone unnoticed: an Ameri- 
can company has already 
shown an interest in turning 


J^mthat of Command ^ wn ^ 1 ^ r 
S»s 3 ^foSS 2120 into a film, 
master and slave. • ■ D 


Diane Hill 


Fathers 

Tower, 

Canonbury 

Although tiie En glish theatre 
has been buzzing with politi- 
cal drama for the past IS years 
there have been surprisingly 
few plays on specific public 
issues, and fewer still with any 
concrete proposals for reform. 

Playwrights may consider 
themselves above this 
journalistic task, or leave it to 
television. But the “bhie 
book” tradition proves still 
very much alive in this piece 
by Charies Langley. The sub-, 
ject (discussed by Barbara 
Amid in The Times on 
November 19) is that of the 
rights Of the unmar ried fitter 
to his offs prin g if tte mother 

opts for adoption. - single 
parenthood, or abortion. 

Fathers follows through a 
test case from tte breakdown 
of a partnership to a settle- 


ment out of court. After four and passion he brings to tte 


years with Tim, tte pregnant 
Kate ducks out of the 
approaching marriage ™d de- 
cides to have ter child 
adopted. To ter and everyone 
else's amazement, Tim digs in 
his hw»U and fight* for cus- 
tody. As tte only child of a 
wealthy factory-owner, he 
knows what it is like to grow 
up in a house where Daddy is 
always busy, and is deter- 
mined sot to hand on tte 
damage to the next generation. 
At once he finds himself in a 
labyrinth of legal discrimina- 
tion and prejudice, where 
social workers, feminists and 
his own family share the same 
incredulity at tte sight of a 
man who would ratter bring 
up a chil d than go out and 
make money. 

From tte highly-slanted 
treatment of Tim's antago- 


nists, I am not persoadedthat tion of Ghosts, aedaix 
Mr Langley knows very much Irving Wartffle at its 
about miKmnt feminists or Vic opening last mon 
captains of industry. But there now transferred 
is no d is p u t in g tte authority Wyndham’s Theatre 


A new jazz age for the cinema 

tarry KMT 


I could not make much 
sense out of tte American 
pianist Michael Seflers’s re- 
cital. His Mozart was half- 
learnt, tus Chopin metrically 
naive and bis Liszt technically 
messy. But Leo Orastein’s 
Three Moods . of 1914 con- 
firmed that for Sellers the 
sonority of the instrument is 
paramount, and he allows this 
priority to override all other 
considerations. 


. The French film . 

. director Bertrand 
Tavernier never 
treads the same > 
road twice. His , 
newGhn,Roimd 
Midnight, recalls, 
the days when 
emigre jazzmen ' 
wereacultin 
Paris. Interview by 
John Preston 

Tte cinema has never had 
much time for jazz. HoQy^ 
wood, in particular, has 



grave suspicion, partly be- 
cause they were inclined to be 
blade, and partly because the 
unpredictability of jazz was 
held by some to be at fun- 


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Tte LMorDno consists of damental odds with the nar- 
tte baritone Give Hane and rative drive of the cinema. In 


fjartwi) iMiWl g^nalg TUrfrand Tavimricr has gong far dirnrsily in a 12-year career hi featnres 


his pianist partner Brian Par- 
nell. Harre's voice, at its best, 
is capable of an effective ami 
expressive legato, but he is 
predominantly a ratter effort- 
ful singer, whose light timbre 
tends to sound raspy. 

James Methuen- 
Campbell 


feet it was, as film director 
Bertrand Tawmier is quick to 
point out, his fellow country- 
man Look Malle who asked 
Miles Davis to write his first 
film scon for Ascenseur pour 
Pechaftnid w 1958. And now 
Ta verni er is out to cany on 
Malle 's good work in Found 
Midnight, which opens at the 


Warner West End at the end of 
(he week. 

- SetprimariN in Paris in the 
late Rftks, the film follows 


id at the end of It was while lu nc hi n g in 
Paris more than two years ago 
in Paris in the noth Martin Scorsese and tte 
: film follows producer Irwin Winkler that 


the mixed fortunes of an the idea for Round Midnight 
elderly Mack American saxo- took serious shape.“Evcr since 
phomst as he struggles to stay I was a film critic I have been 
off tte drink and out of tte intrigued why iazz was used so 
finaiaaal ctatefaes of various little in the movies,’* 


igatiMrf Caiteiy Oty ErirtMtion 

jdavid ( 179 S- 1864 ) 

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November 26lh -28th Dnin - Spm 
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Ttoeal TOR OFFICE DECORATION 


avaridous and outstandingly Tavernier says. “Why was it 
o3y i m p resa rios. Based on a that . someone Eke Duke 
loose amalgam of Bud Powefl Ening fori only scored two 
and Lester Yotxng, the charao- films? Bfrbop particularly fes- 
ter is played by veteran jazz- abated me. Tve always re- 
man Dexter Gordon. gaided bebop musicians as 

Tavernier himreff despite tte real geniuses of A me rican 
his canary yeBow puDoves; music, 
looks as if he has just stepped “Iwasalsofosrinatedbythe 
out of a canvas by Daunrier. A fed that be-bop was the only 
large man with a long hose and music that has never been 
an assortment of ! chins, his bastardized or tampered with, 
higubrkms exterior is belied Somehow it is impossible to 


by a manner which is qtrnest, 
expansive and comes com- 
plete- with a full ranee of 




Britain's besi- 


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st, interfere with it because it is 
m- such fine music. I wanted to 
reflect that spirit in the struc- 
ture of the film: to build it up 
n. like a musical piece. There is 

no intricate plot _ but a 

freeform structure with time 
^ lapses, flash forwards and 
^ things happening that don’t 
y appear to be related to each 
' otter.” 

Tavernier decided early on 
that he wanted a musician to 
play the lead role iaiher than 
an actor, and as soon as he saw 
Dexter Gordon shambling 

’ into his New York hotel room 

te knew be had found his man 
— “it is absolutely incredible, 
he even walks bo*bop with a 
! three-beat rhythm”. At tte 
same timg, Tavernier's plans 
to make both the film’s main 
characters musicians immedi- 
aiely went by the board. “I 
realized that mtuadans only 
really communicate property 
when they are playing music. 
1 When you ask Dexter aques- 
tion, sometimes you have to 
wait for up to five minutes for 
J an answer” 


Working with Gordon was, 
Tavernier concedes, a hazard- 
ous as well as slow business. 
“Yon know,” te says in 
awestruck tones, “tte pacait- 
ageof akxfool in his blood can 
be quite astounding.” But 
Gordon turned in a perfor- 
mance that drew extensive 
plaudits from tte American 
critics and may wefl do the 
cum from tiie British ones 
later tins w e ek. 

Midway through tiie inter- 
view a messenger comes in 
bearing a large fit package. 
Tavernier tears it open and 
crows excitedly when te sees it 
•contains a copy of Michael 
Powell's . recently published 
autobiography. “Michael 
Powell, I love him," te says, | 
repeating it three times to 
dispel any doubts. “I am 
trying to do in my films what 
Powdl and Pressburgerdid, to 
let tte emotions cany tte plot. 

I think a lot of my work 
recently has been a reaction 
against tte current vogue in 
American movies where they 
are selling emotion instead of 
exploring it In Road Mid- 
night I wanted to go with the 
emotion the whole time, so 
that it almost became tte (dot 
as wefl as dictating the pace 
and tiie rhythm of tte fi£m. M 

In the 12 years since te 
started directing feature films, 
Tavernier has tinned out a 
determinedly edectic body of 
work, from his admirably 
restrained account of a school- 
teacher on the verge of crack- 
ing op in Une Semmne de 
vaatnees, to the sri-fi excesses 
of his otter English language 
film to date, Death watch, 

“I have this terrible fear of 
repeating myselfi” te says. 
“For me directing movies is 
like exploring unknown terri- 
tory. ‘J hire to explore a lot and 


communicate to tiie audience 
what I have been discovering. 
Tte people I really admire are 
the ones who extend them- 
selves tte whole time and are 
not .. afraid of the 
consequences.” Tavernier 
gazes at tte Powdl book and 
taps it sharply with his index 
finger. “Like you-fcnow-wha” 






Russia’s voice 
raised in joy 


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central issue, both in sorting 
out the legal inequities, and in 
tunning down tte thought- 
asphyxiating cliches that sur- 
round the subject 

The piece is written in solid, 
serviceable dialogue, with 
comic relief tacked on like a 
fretwork frame round a family 
photo. But the narrative gets a 

rlftan nwr and In tlw- final rtnri 

everything superfluous is 
barm away in the intense heat 
of feeling. 

There is some excellent 
support playing (from Tom 
Tillery and Marcus Touhnin- 
RotheX and a main' partner- 
ship of strengthening interest 
from Bob Hutt ar id Maria 
Davies. 

Irving Wardle 

• David Thacker's produc- 1 
tion iff Ghosts, acclaimed by j 
Irving Wardle at its Young 
Vic opening last mouth, has 
now transferred to 


{ CONCERTS | 

Arkhlpova/Dya 
Wigmore Hall / 

Radio 3 

With tte voice of Mother 
Russia captive within the 
Wigmore Hall, one wanted the 
bedtime stories to go on and 
on into tte night As it nos, 
Irina Arkhipova was being 
broadcast Eve as part of tte 
BBCs Russian Season, so she 
bad to stop just at tte point at 
which, having been spoilt by 
Mussorgsky's “Gopak” and 
Rachmaninov's “Do not weep 
for me”, one longed to whine 
for still more. 

Any London recital by 
Arkhipova is a landmark in 
the sin g in g year. This one will 
be particularly memorable be- 
cause of the repertoire which 
the BBCs season invited: 
rarely p e rfor med and revela- 
tory late-nineteenth and 
twentieth-century works by 
Medtner ana Taneyev, 
Shaporin and Sviridov, what 
is more, in Ivari Ilya, from the 
Moscow Conservatoire, 
Arkhipova has a pianist not 
only hffequal in technical and 
imaginative virtuosity, but 
also equal to the voracious 
appetite of Medtner's 
acco mpanimen ts. 

Arkhipova, unbelievably, 
has had more than 60 years to 
know and nurture her voice: 
seldom does one tear tte 
instrument and the mind be- 

Philhan nonla/ 
Haitink 
Festival Hall 

It wodd be ironic if Mfldudl 
Pletnev’s reputation m the 
West soared after this impres- 
sive performance of 

Rafhmuwinfw ’ft Ohapwdy an a 

Thane of P^ a a mi . For tte 
young Soviet pianist was play- 
ing only becaose his erstwhile 
compatriot* Vladimir 
Ashkenazy, ted wfthdrawn for 
sofid capitalist reasons. 

Pletnev has not played in 
Britain or America since 
shortly after winning tte 1978 
Tchaikovsky Competition. 
One can understand the 
Brogans’ concern that te 
stenld not accidentally get lost 
on foreign soft. He has a 
siqierb tecbniqiie by any stan- 
dards, presenting a ^titering 
cascade of steely-toned figura- 
tion in tiie early unaccom- 
panied variation, taking a 
refreshingly unsentimental 
view of tte tosher sections, and 
tackling the ferodons octave 

Holliger/ 

Northern 

Sinfonia/Pay 

Huddersfield 

Polytechnic 

Monday in Huddersfield was 
predominantly Heinz 
Holliger’s day. In the lunch- 
time concert, we beard three 
of his more intimate com- 
positions, two of them su- 
premely idiomatic studies for 
solo instruments not his own, 
while later te gave a marvel- 
lous performance of a work by 
John Gasken with the North- 
ern Sinfbnia. 

But first of all, Jean Sulem 
attacked the ferociously un- 
remitting Trema for viola 
(1981) luce a man possessed, 
achieving tte intended multi- 
layered, simultaneously fist 
and slow effect quite bril- 
liantly. In feet one was 
tem p te d to suspect that tech- 
nical rmwiriwatiftiMi moti- 
vated this work more than 
e x press i ve ones. Not so in 
(t)air(ej for solo flute 
(1978/83X ope of a series of 


Spring 1987 

Subscription 

season: 

Now booking 


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EniM Batten! Own IchnM fey (fat 
_ ■ -Ms.CandfafGralRifMauft 

Wntaiastar Qtj m Mml of Utrin 



Glowing: Irina Arkhipova 

hind It in snch intensely live 
accord. listening to her scal- 
ing of Taneyev's sinister 
“Minuet” - a dance of death 
with a view to the guillotine — . 
or following the entire range of 
the mezzo voice as it tracks - 
the bare octaves of Sviridov's 
“Silhouette" was an expert- • 
ence comparable to hearing 
Shakespeare read by the finest 
of actors: proportion and 
pitch, weight and measure, all 
vibrantly alive in tte joy of re- 
creation. 

We were even to tear of a 
sample of this, too: tte voice 
rose from speech into song 
and back again in Sviridov’s 
“Willow Song" from his in- 
cidental music to Othello. 
Sviridov, a pujjfl of Shostako- ; 
vich, was happily presented at - 
his most ideologically on- 1 
fettered in two more pieces: a - 
delightful Siberian folk-song, 
and a setting of Pushkin’s - 
“Winter Road”. 


Hilary Finch 


runs with insouciant speed and 
accuracy. 

How deep does his ma- 
skfarnship run? That question 
will have to be answered ' 
another day, for here I found 
my ear constantly being drawn ' 
away from his ideas and 
towards Bernard Haitink's ! 
masterly delineation of tiie - 
orchestral writing. Haitink re- 
vealed some remarkable inner 
details that usually te ob- - 
scared (particularly ia the 
early variationsX and he main- ■ 
tained a razor-sharp ensemble . 
at considerable pace. The 
general effect was nervy but 

exhilarating . 

The performance of 
Bruckner's Fourth Symphony 
was a much more spacious 
affair, for Haitink is both 
patient and courageous 
enough to seek long-term re- - 
wards, not to fiddle abort with . 
tiie speeds of second subjects. 
He was rewarded with some „ 
vintage PhHhannoma playing, 
particniBrly from tte principal . 
horn Richard Watkins. 

Richard Morrison 

pieces composed during the;, 
last decade in which Holliger 
atteinpts to reflect the ' 
strangely timeless late verse of 
HdUertin. I 

Here the composer requires l 
the protagonist to tackle any ; 
number of new techniques. ' 
Few flautists otter than ; 
Aurdc Nicolet could have "* 
negotiated such a plethora of ; 
harmonics, whistlings, sharp 
intakes of breath, and even a 
basso raspberry with such 
exactitude, while at the same- 
time achieving an impression 
of sustained line. The result is 
actually a delight, as in a 
rather different maimer is 
Holliger’s Trio for oboe, viola 
and harp (1966), justly one of 
his most celebrated works. 

The Casken piece in the - 
Northern Sinfonia's evening 
concert, which Antony Pay 
conducted, was the ingenious, 
haunting Masque for oboe 
solo, two horns and strings of 
1982, a five-movement struc- 
ture full of shadowy meta- _ 
morphoses and commentaries 1 
which nevertheless bears itself 
with a classical elegance. 

Stephen Pettitt : 


flexible schemes 
and big savings for 
Tosca* 

Faust 

Akhnaten 

Sutton Boccanegra" 
Don Giovanni 
The Stone Gnest* 
Orpheus n the 
Underworld 
Lady Macbeth of 

Mltonrlf * 

Hnsensit 

Carmen 

*ae»prodi!diMi 

Phone 

01-8362699 

for leaflet 


Bmamfan Bottom#* 
toAassfctfttOMmm 


in 

iZnEOmitne 




THE TIMES WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 26 1936 

SPECTRUM 






Europe’s Common 


Agricultural Policy 


have spread far 


across the worid. 


From Buenos Aires 






Part 3: No winners to Sydney, from 

in the subsidies war Washington to 

Bangkok, EEC farm 


policies are causing everything from anger to 
misery flT *d starvation to over-supply, as this 
third report on the state of the CAP shows 


I f all the victims of the 
Common Agricultural Pol- 
icy lived in Europe, it 
would at tost be possible 
to draw a line around the 
problem. But the CAP is a 
blight which knows no borders, a 
which has infected the nee 
paddies of Thailand, the beef 
herds of Argentina, the industrial 
and agricultural heartlands of 
America. . 

It has either caused, orsignro- 
cantly contributed to, a situation 
where Third World Sinners, once 
unable to produce enough, are 
now unable to sell what they do 
produce because of competition 
from cheap imports; where Presi- 
dent Reagan, once the high priest 
of free trade, now finds himself 
forced to put up barriers against 
Europe; where in Australia and 
New Zealand, whose fanners once 
benefited from artifiriaUy-mgh 
pricing in Europe, often stave off 
bankruptcy only because their 
debts are so big that the banks 
cannnol affo rd to foreclose on 
them. There is even an argument 
that the CAP is indirectly adding 
to child prostitution in Thailand. 

Hopes of change are hedged 
about with uncertainties and 
contradictions. All branches of the 
EEC's giant bureacratic tree are 
agreed that the problem is a 
worldwide one; and that percep- 
tion is shared in Washington. 

So the solution lies with the 
GATT, the General Agreement on 
Tariffs and Trade. Some promis- 
ing yi g«ais have come out of the 
latest GATT round, which began 
in Uruguay in September with an 
American ynd EEC commitment 
to review their extensive use of 
farm subsi d ies. 

But does this amount to more 
than mere rhetoric? Although the 
GATT declaration called on mem- 
ber countries to discuss all sub- 
sidies, direct and indirect, Mr 
Wily de Qenj, the EEC's external 
affairs minister, says that the 
‘-aims and fundamental mecha- 
nisms of (the CAP) cannot be 
called into question” — a state- 
ment apparently designed to pla- 
cate the French which also served 
to baffle the Americans. 

US o ffic ials say the worid 
problem cannot be resolved until 
there is bilateral agreement be- 
tween Washington and Brussels 
and that in turn cannot happen 
until Europe puts its CAP house in 
order. 

Hoiks of a US-EEC agreement 
look slim while claim and counter- 
claim are the ™»n commodities 


crossing the Atlantic. And al- 
though the US has in the past 
couple of years become as mu ch of 
a transgressor as Europe on farm 
support — Washington’s is ex- 
pected to exceed S3S billion tins 
year against about $25 billion m 
the EE C — Europe is still seen as 
the main villian. 

Uruguay's President 

Sanguinetti said after the Gatt 
meeting that “the United States 
has recently passed some bad 
policies but Europe is our histori- 
cal problem.” 

Wa s hin g ton’s approach to the 
EEC since the GATT round 
opened has been conciliatory, but 
Daniel Amstutz, US imder-seo- 
retary for Agriculture, said in 
Brussels recently that avoiding a 
breakdown of the GATT round 
would be a ‘'monumental 
challeng e". 

The EEC is especially upset 
about the US “export enhance- 
ment programme”, basically a 
subsidy, which costs Washington 
$300 million a year. But American 
officials claim that “export 
restitutions” cost the EEC that 
amount every three weeks. 

T he US says the EEC is 
"deliberately 
discouraging” Third 
World imports, while 
Europe counter- 
claims that it spends 
£40 billion on food imports a year, 
80 per cent of it at zero tariffs. 

While the buck is passed back 
and forth, in countries like Argen- 
tina the effects of subsidies are 
plain to see. “In the war betw ee n 
the EEC and Reagan,” said one 
government official, “we are the 
losers. We have no possibility of 
competing because we can’t afford 
to subsidize." 

In 1970, Europe bought 48 per 
cent of ail Argentina's exports; by 
1984, the figure was down to 24 
percent EEC subsidies have cost 
Argentina between $600 million 
andSl tuition in the last two years, 
according to the government 
which also says that EEC subsidies 
have helped Europe cut heavily 
into Argentina’s traditional third- 
country markets, indudin g the 
Soviet Union, Egypt and loaeL 
Last year Argentina exported 
only one third of the meat it sold 
at the end of the 1970s. The final 
irony is that, with its farmers 
finding beef increasingly un- 
economic to produce, the govern- 
ment may soon have to import it 
to satisfy domestic demand in a 
coals-to-Newcastle operation. 


•■•■■■■ .Jfc . ' 










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Zt#*" 



P! m-0 

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% 



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“MOLESKIN” TROUSERS 


rTihese “Moleskin” trousers are ideal for 
JL the cold winter months ahead as they 
arc made from HX) % brushed cotton which 
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the colder weather. Apart from their 
warmth they are well styled with a zip-fly 
and clip-fastener, two side pockets and a 
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Available in Lovat green(a grey/green), 
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with waist sizes ranging from 28" -48" (in 
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Tapioca u a nan* 

to invoke terrible 

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dinners. Bit ft also 
serves as an dject 
lesson so the cob- 


355 




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Whitting ham 
and his wife Ei- 
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THE TIMES 





XX 


1* 1 1 II |) || i m t njm t '. t* 





John Yomg, Bkhard 
Owen, Brin James, 
Michael Evans, 
Mkimel Hartaock, 
DbnaGeddes, 

Susan MacDmuld, 
Michael Hualyn. - 
EdnardoCw,Steplus 
Taylor, Kfchwd 


and Jolm Endand 







Don jams oar 
current series of 

supplements on thegneat 
British canof the, 'sixties. This week: Lotas Cortina, 

Ro*& 2000 and Triumph Spitfire-^rnffina! road tests 
















THE TIMES WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 26 1986 


15 



WEDNESDAY PAGE 


‘Feminism has been hijacked, but it is not lost; common sense is a great 
influence and mainstream women are ready to reclaim the movement’ 






bout a month ago a 
friend sent me a copy 
of Private Eye's 
anthology of 
“Wlmmin , its col- 
umn - that exposes 
'loony feminist nonsense.” Many 
of too entries were hilarious, of 



i - coarse, but I was especially taken 

5 i* * — ‘ ' niith an aih/wti tfu'iw t fiw a 



with an advertisement for a design 
competition .for women’s posters. 

“Youngwomen under 21", h 
read, “arc invited to design a 
poster depicting themselves and 
their fi ves in a ‘non-stereotyped 
and positive way*, in a. com- 



« 


Red Women’s' 

"Entries are particularly wd- 
/ - 71! , ; come from young women who are 
-*■ Black,. Jewish, Lesbian, have 
disabilities, are mothers, un- 
employed or live in Scotland, 
Irefend or Wales. There will be no 
'overall winner of the 
competftian.” 

That particuhur advertisement 
seemed' to me to sum up every 
aspect :of the loony wing of 
feminism, from its gender confu- 
sion ttrits ega li t a rian muddle, f 
wanted to enter very much, but try 
as I might, 1 couldn’t think of a 
single one of my acquaintances 
who would fill more than three of 
the categories. Of course, one gets 
a bit squeamish about asking even 
good friends if they are both 
lesbian and from Wales. 


Uke a lot of women of my age 
(mid-40s) and (iniddlislHo- 
vague) I _ have an . ambivalent 
relationship with feminism. After 
all, those of us who have been out 
. m the work place for 20 years or so 
cannnot possibly deny that - at 
times the arrangement of our 
reproductive organs has been an 
impediment to better wages and 
advancement. I remember when 1 
worked for the Canadian 
Broadcasting Corporation some 
20 years ago and was assigned the 
job of. .training a new 
employee in the finer paints of 
film production. ■ 

He was paid- 30 dollars a week 
more than me, "But, Barbara," 
said the executive producer when 
- 1 complained, “Keith has a wife 
and family to support." I suppose 
there was . some logic to the 
producer’s remarks. Twenty years 
ago, the law demanded >hnt Keith 
support his wife and family at 
penalty of jafl. On the other hand, 
.if I wish to sit in bed, cat’ 
chocolates all day, let my husband 
wash the children and pay for my 
sweets on top of it, it was perfectly 
all right as far as the law was 
concerned. 

In that sense, Keith did have 
more responsibilities than I and 
perhaps it was right that the 
workplace recognised this inequal- 
ity before the law and paid him 
more. Today the law las chang ed 


Paula Youam 



and men and women are supposed 
to share responsibilities ami the 
marketplace is supposed to treat 
is all equally. It doesn't quite do 
that yet, still — in spite of the 
difficulties wo men do encounter — 
I have never thoug ht them to be 
the result of a male conspiracy. 
Society, it seemed to me, arranged 
itself in the best way to guarantee 
■ its survival. 

In the pre-tedmological age; this 
meant that men went out and (fid 
the heavy labour. Women stayed 
home to have children simply 
because, the high rate of infant 
mortality did force us to spend a 
great deal of time breeding and 
mourning and breeding agam. AH 
of this changed, of course, when 
technology need women from the 
high risks of- childbirth and at the 
same time allowed men and 
women to perform similar tflglre 
regardless of their differences. 


Without these technological 
feminism could never 
have come into being. But having 
said that; rm very pleased the 
women's movement developed. I 
happen to a bilious shade of 
magenta when male co-workers 
call me "deaf”. I didn't need 
fem i nism to help me cope with 
that, of course, but I think it very 
unlikely that I would have been 
appointed editor of a Canadian 
dally newspaper if the Z eitg eist of 
the time hadn't been affected by 
'feminism. What feminism did was 
help speed up changes of attitude 
in the workplace. And, insofar as 
feminism coincided with the gen- 
eral principles of a rational and 
liberal society in which individ- 
uals should he treated on their 
own merits irrespective of race, 
religion or gender, feminism has 
been an unqualified good. 

But something went wrong with 


feminism. It started in the 1970s 
when the ambitious of the 
women's movement were trans- 
lated into such pieces of legislation 
as the Equal Pay and Sex 
Discrimination Acts. I think we 
made one fundamental error that 
went against the thrust of a liberal 
democratic society; we confused 
legal discrimination with individ- 
ual rights to discriminate. 

The law, of course, should never 
discriminate. But that always 
seemed a separate thing from 
passing laws that removed an 
individual’s right to discriminate 
in favour of a man or woman. 
Remove that and I think you 
remove the right of people to 
arrange their own private lives or 
businesses. 

At the same time, feminism 
went after much more than equal- 
ity. It seemed to want special 
privileges like time off to have 


babies while their job was conve- 
niently held. I can't blame women 
for having such ambitions, but no 
matter how much I sympathize 
with people’s private goals. I have 
never thought they should be 
legislated. At best you work for 
change- 

Hie real watershed for femi- 
nism came when it was hijacked 
from the mainstream by three 
groups. Generally speaking, those 
groups included the Marxist- 
Leninist fringe who often latch on 
to any legitimate grievance for 
their own purposes; the man- 


seem to have a psychological 
problem with the gender to which 
they belong, and the mindless 
egalitarians of our day who simply 
cannot, in the work place, see the 
difference between such concepts 
as equality and statistical parity. 
Those groups took the women's 
movement into the balmy fringe 
world in which the tabloids 
delight 

That is the world where, for 
example, Brent council will ban 
teardance posters because they 
show a man and a woman fox- 
trotting in a relentlessly hetero- 
sexual clinch which is considered 
upsetting to homosexuals; or the 
world of local town halls like 
‘Bradford which became gender- 
free zones banning words such as 
“housewife” and “manpower". It 


is the anti-heterosexual world of 
the Inner-London Educational 
Authority, with its banning of 
books like Tom Sawyer ana its 
promotion of such books as Jenny 
Lives, with Eric and Martin, in 
which the homosexual family is 
actively promoted as an alter- 
native lifestyle. It is a world in 
which if there are 55 per cent 
women in the labour force, it is, 
ipso facto , a sign of unfairness if 
there are only 5 per cent female 
train drivers. 

But though the movement has 
been hijacked, I don't believe it is 
lost British common sense is a 
great steadying influence. Main- 
stream women are, it seems to me, 
ready to move back and reclaim 
feminism. All that is necessary is 
that when any course of action is 
proposed in the name of femi- 
nism, it be tested against two 
principles: is it in conflict with the 
normal principles of liberalism or 
of common sense? 

These two principles would, for 
example, eliminate the radicalism 
of book banning and the nonsense 
that there is no difference between 
the two genders. With those 
ordering principles in mind, the 
women's movement could easily 
get back on the rails again. 


Barbara Amiel 


g) Tines Nswspapara Ltd 1986 


I'' 





‘tf. 


A round-up of hews, 
views and information 


■Qa?: 


■ 

“ -*5*1 
1 • *•* 

s*ri 

• •• -TSS- 

r - - ‘ii a 
-ari 


Presents 


of mind 




- -X ‘ 
* s 


- rr ir-w 

. . \i X 




Bath salts and crystallised 
ginger nay make perfectly 
pleasant presents — but in- 
finitely more asefal Christ- 
mas gifts for the elderly and 
disabled can be found is the 
Products For Home Health 
Care catalegae,' which 
speriaBses in ingenious im- 
plements designed to make 
life ran more smoothly for the 
handicapped and foe old. 
Footwarmers, toothpaste tube 

squeezers, one-handed boded 
egg cotters, na dh Smto 
— there are hundreds of 
gadgets fa Ihe catalogue, 
available by post from Not- 
tingham Rehab Lid, 17 Lad- 
le* HBl Road, Mdiau Road, 
West Bridgfbrd, Nottingham 
NG2 6HD. tel: (frS02) 
235190). : 


Quote me.. 



& iJ * 


“Christmas is like 
pregnancy . . . yon forget 
what it was like last time.” — 
JxDy Cooper, author. 


- * 




Play it safe 


9 . 1 


The launch of Esther 
Rantrca’s high- 

lighted the plight of parents 
and teachers fa making chil- 
dren understand die im- 
portance of saying *110* to 
strangers. Keeomg Soft by 
Michele EUfot (Bedfori 
Square Press, £2J5) is 
pa cked with advice on tack- 
ling the subject, whether with 
toddlers er teenagers. It is 
unusable in bookshops or by 
post (£332 xnc p & p) from 
Harper and Row Distrib- 
utors, Estover Road, Plym- 
outh PL67PZ. 


Russian rose 


rV 



Even the, imagination of Bar- 
bara Cutfand would be hard- 
pressed to conjure a tale as 
romantic as Eugenie Fraser's 
fa scina t ing chronicle of her 
Russian girlhood The House 
By The Kiser (Corgi, £3.95). 
Baser; now in her nineties, 
fled to Scotland in 1920 as 
Russia ‘ faced devastation 
following the Revolution. 

It may read like romantic 
fiction — but candid observa- 
tions of her illustrious family 
provide a fascinating insight 
into a privileged cfafidhood. 

Josephine Fairley 



Paul Lovelace 


path to long 




Ariel Bruce is unusual, even 
unique; she is a pro fe ssi onal 
searcher and tracer, tracking 
down the parents of children, 
who have been adopted or 
taken mtocare and who wish, 
as adu&Mo regain thefr roots. 
She also advises — and, when 
necessary,- consoles — her 
cheats, during a of 

family rediscovery that is “90 
per cent happy, and 10 per 
cent just the reverse." 

Bailee’s experiences show 
that a widespread need exists 
for her special services, de- 
spite provision for such family 
reunions under the 1975 Qrif- 
dren Act It all began with an 
encounter three years ago with 
James, an odd job man erf 18 
who had wanted to find his 
mother since early childhood. 

Since then she has enabled 
about 70 “children”, some 
now in middle-age, to meet 
their “natural” or “birth 
parents”, often for the first 


The appliance of 


social science is 


being used to 


reunite parents 


with children — - 


David Leitch finds 


ifs big business 


time since infancy. 

“If the Act worked as it was 
meant to, I*d be superfluous”, 
says Bruce, a 34-year-old 
qualified social worker from 
.Weybridge in Surrey. “And ifi 
•could be employed within tire 
.statutory services to do an 
identical job I'd jump at it It 
would mean the system was 
functioning properiy.” ■ 

It took Janus's experience 
to teach her that “many of the 
best intentions behind tbs 
1975 Children Act have been 
thwarted. And that’s where I 

ramie in.” 

Her first faltering steps in 
family tracing were under- 
taken with extreme reluc- 
tance. “James was doing jobs 


around the house and then, 
out of the bine, he said he was 
adopted. Would I help with 
the records so he coda find 
his mum? I said no automati- 
cally — and I kept saying no.” 

Her negative response, 
Bruce now admits, “was be- 
cause I held the stereotyped 
view of someone who hadn’t 
thought it out I felt be was too 
young; only 18. 1 didn’t want 
ihe personal responsibility, 
and I felt be shouldn’t be 
encouraged.” 

However, James’s 
determination proved stron- 
ger than Bruce's reluctance. 
“When he asked me how be 
should set about it I made 
enquiries. The first step was 
the births register at St 
Catherine's House in 
London.” 

It was soon dear that James 
did not possess the to 
pursue the paged alone and 
Brace decided that she had no 
right to deny him any help she 
could offer. .. 

One case Jed to. another. 


largely by word of mouth, 
though in time die advertised 
in a newspaper. From the start 
she found the research 
enthralling — “like solving a 
detective story”. .There was a 
fascinated initiation into the 
arcane world of genealogists. 
Bruce was astonnded to dis- 
cover, for example, a harassed 
band of specialists who devote 
themselves to winkling, out 
(fig a fat percentage) va n is he d 
netidtan — the unknown 
beneficiaries from imdaimed 
estates. 

She was able to learn from 
foe Dickensian metier. “WiDs 
are often invaluable 
indicators”, she says, “though 
(miy among the middle- 
classes. The poor, fig obvious 
reasons, usually efie intestate.” 

Unlike James, most cheats 
have been middle-aged and 
well ed u ca te d. They include 
teachers, psychotherapists, a 
firmer, an insurance exec- 
utive and social workers. And 
there are many more women 
than mm. 

The work is detailed ami 
time-consuming. “One case 
took 18 months but, because 
I’ve developed an eye for foe 
right nuance, I did one re- 
cently in 24 hours flat 

“People need someone 
sympathetic but cool, and 
matter-of-fact", she believes. 
“A lady said recently that I 
was the first person who made 
her feel a wish to find her birth 
mother after 30 years was 
entirely nonnaL After all, it is, 
isn’t it?" 

What happens if the story 
turns out to be a sad one, or 



Perfection in detection: super death Arid Bruce revels in her role as a matchmaker who binds together fragmented families 


the discovered parent wishes, 
for good reasons or not, to 
leave the past buried? 

“Nine results in ten are 
excellent But there can be 
cruel and hurtful rejections, 
and they are extraordinarily 
sad. But even when it doesn't 
work out I’ve never heard 
anyone say that they wished 
they hadn’t done it 

“Most people come to terms 
with their family history once 
they learn about it. It's the 
nnlmown which is so disturb- 
ing, and won't let them alone. 

“One person I worked for 
had the experience of every- 
thing falling to pieces a year 
after making contact The 
prognosis probably wasn't 
good from foe start But I'm 
still there for the client, two 
years later, which makes all 
the difference." 

Because she believes that 
she has no right to withhold 
information Bruce follows 
each project to its conclusion 
— even if she has doubts about 
the outcome. 


“I tend to get a picture from 
foe address, handwriting, a 
voice on the phone — you get a 
sixth sense", she stressed. 

What happens if a client 
comes in a vindictive quit? 
Polly Toynbee refins to such a 
case in her book Lost Children 
and in fiction, if not in fact. 


‘Cruel rejections 
can be terribly 
hurtful and sad 9 


foe idea of a child coming 
back to reap vengeance on a 
parent who has deserted them 

Hit 


is weH-known.“It has never 
happened — the clients are 
always solicitous to a fault 
about their unknown 
parents,” she insists. 

The idea of people paying 
fees for a service which was 
meant to be available, if only 
in part, under the Childrei! 
Act, will not commend itself 


to everyone. NORCAP (the 
National Organisation for the 
Counselling of Adoptees and 
their Parents) is a fast-grow- 
ing, widely experienced self- 
help group, convinced that 
volunteers with first- hand 
experience are the best help- 
ers. They lack the resources, 
however, to undertake traces 
themselves. 

Phillida Sawbridge, director 
of the newly-established Post- 
Adoption Centre at 48 
Mecklenburgh Square, 
London WCl, says; “As things 
stand, Ariel Bruce is very 
much fulfilling a need. Un- 
covering the past is very 
challenging. Imagine 
confronting a total stranger, 
perhaps in some sterile budd- 
ing or dreary office, who 


pulsory counselling was meant 

to be backed up by a full range 

of local authority adoption 
services. But because of foe 
cost they simply do not exist 
There are also many more 
searchers, I believe, than the 
Registrar-General's tiny 
percentage suggests.” 


Most of Arid Brace’s 70 
successful searches will never 
be counted in foe Registrar- 
General’s statistics. They are 
foe fruit of a freelance effort 
already weD on foe way to 
fulfilling a prophecy made by 
her tutor when she graduated 
from Kingston Poly. 


knows more about your past 
* mrself?" 


than you do yot 
She thinks that counselling 
is all the more important 
because foe 1975 Act has only 
been implemented in pari. 
“The well-known section 26 
provision for one hour’s com- 


“We believe that Ariel 
Bruce will make some inno- 
vative contribution to social 
work," the report said. “We 
also expea h will be outside 
foe statutory social services." 


© TbnM Nampapws Lid 1S86 

Ariel Bruce can be contacted at 
38, Beechcrofi Manor, Oak- 
lands Drive. Weybridge, 
Surrey. 




MARtST.IONOONBGA. 
(□w&rRd No. 231323) 


among fas happiest of tor He. 
Year geo fa riffis caned fee 

itlHIf J h mi iiO M of djfag.i&lD.B 

art-fansL” 

Thoe pound wads fan* i 




They ate quoted hen ia 
dudqgMog to you farfatJmd 
support ob which ax care tfe- 
padt. . - ■ ’ ^ •’ - yj. 


Roll Up, Roll Up. Ye Olde 
Christmas Hayre is upon us. 
The Big Bang, Bob Gettkrf and 
the Standing Order to Oxfim 
have not made a * jot of 
differe nce to this, the biggest 
time of foe year for buying and 
retting second-hand goods in 
the wane of charity . We d o. It - 
reeros, thrive on emptying the 
affic aoe day and Suing it the 
next with someone rise's 
rubbish. 

In our efforts to swell the 
charity coffers, there are, how- 
ever, greater pitfans than sheer 
bad taste. Tins is my guide to 
the Christmas feyrc. First, be 
aware of the consumer law as 
it now stands. If you are a 
c^nw/fer fer foe great day 
itself do not get carried away 
on behalf of the Good Cause 
and tril white lies about the 
things you’re flogging. If that 
old television set you persuade 
Mrs Smith to buy for a fiver 
prmally blows up m bee face 
foe next day, you might be 
able to avoid bemg prosecuted 
for selling dangerous goods, 
bat ifyouswear tfs odour and 
it turns out to be black and 
white Mrs Smith is entitled to 
her money back oil the 



The season of sweet 


charity looms and 
shoddy second-hand 
. goods are a-plenty 


If you're a customer remem- 
ber tint ifs a rotten trick to 
force ihe seller into a comer 
about foe goods. If you've 


-up • Which?-b uymg wom an 
now is foe . time 'to abandon:-; 
.any abrnrive castomer tech-- 
nfoue you may-bave sapped: . 
Should ym get roped in to 


bolding a Ch ristm as feyre in 
your home, do consider the 
cost of wear and tear in 
advance. If you’re going to 
make £200 in an event which 
wrecks the hall and stair 
carpet, rains foe paintwork 
and leaves you exhausted and 
not speaking to your husband 
all the following week, maybe 
you would be better cancelling 
the invasion. If it’s too late to 
do that at least taro the good 
sense to serve food and wine 
roughly foe same shade as the 
floras. 

' How to makc.yoor money? 
Surprisingly enough, some 
new ideas don't work as well 
as foe old favourites. • 

. “Down the Drain" was a 
cunning potential cash builder 
I; saw ax one. event foe other 
evening. You bad to drop 


money down a piece of dean 
plastic drain pipe, guess foe 
' evening’s total and, n correct, 
win back half of foe money 
raised. Around a 120 wefl- 
heried guests speculated on 
amounts up to £145 but the 
total proved to be a paltry £30. 

Now thaz we are all hypo- 
chondriacs .and lake an un- 
healthy interest i n t hings 
medical, one heart surgeon I 
know of has hit on the right 
idea. Ax his fund-raiser he 
brought home his equipment 
and had guests quoting up, 
and paying for, their blood 
pre s sure readings. Pity he 
hadn’t used even more 
imagination. Guessing who — 
apart from the hostess — has 
the highest blood pressure in 
the room could be a livelier 
game than guessing foe weight 
of the cake. 

Finally, beware the idea of a 
jumble stalL Remember that 
old joke about the woman 
helper stripping off her cardi- 
gan during foe first flood of 
bargain-hunters and finding 
laser that she’d sold it for 
2s6d? 

“Whoever in their right 
mind would have let their 
husband walk around in 
these?", can roQ off foe tongue 
all too easily as you exhibit 
those flared checked golfing 
trousers.' Ifs the ky reply “I 
did” that Mows more cruelly 
baric at you. than any bleak 
mid-winter gust 


From Ellen Eisenstein , 
Richmond, Surrey. 

Barbara Amiri’s 
an the Question of a 
’s rigid to decide If his 
unborn child is to be aborted 
or not (Wednesday Page, 
November 19), far ages it has 
smugly been daimed by men 
that anatomy is destiny an| l 
that women must accept the 


TALKBACK 


if they want the so-called 
advantages being a woman 
offers them in retain. 

The same pies far men — 
they cannot have ft both ways, 
either. If an a tom y is destiny. 


then men most five with the 
fact that: since forty MMW* 
give birth, then they should 
not have a deciding voice over 
who else most 
From Mrs S Parkinson, 
Maidstone, Kent. 

Barbara Amiel conhajes her 
article, “I don’t want to farce 
any an willing mother to spend 
years bringing np an imwanied 
child, hot surely when there is 
a parent happy to do this~.” l 
suggest one should add “or 
couple wishing to adopt”. 


Vivien Tomlinson 


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c: 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 26 1986 


ivg • q *w * 1 rd «- i rrv-x* ^ 


THE TIMES 
DIARY 


A long trail 
a-winding 

David Steel attains some of his 
goals, even if be has to wait ten 
years to do so. After enduring a 
decade of fearfully cramped poflti- 
cal life, he hosts a modest occasion 
tonight to celebrate the acquisition 
of a suitably spacious office in the 
bowels of tire Palace of West- 
minster. So labyrinthine is die 
route that he has had a pub-style 
sign hung outside the door to 
declare ms presence within. One 
cross-party irony is that Steel is 
beholden for all this to Labour MP 

Jphn StOtin, chairman of the 
Commons accommodation; and 
administration sub-committee. I 
gather Thai Steel intends to offer a 
prize, bruited to be a bottle of 
champagne, for the first Liberal to 
find his or her way to the premises 
tonight. I am putting my money 
on Elizabeth Shields, recent victor 
at the Ryedale by-election, who 
has been gleaning intelligence 
from Steel's research staff 

Chez new 

Much amusement among Tory 
MPs over a request by the whips' 
office for updated telephone num- 
bers and addresses “and any other 
numbers where you may be 
contacted.” One MP tells me: 
“One’s mind boggles as to what 
might be included in that range.” 
He said it, not me. 

Millennial 

I have heard of forward planning, 
but Michael Storey, managing 
director of Westminster Cable 
Television, stretches the concept 
to its logical limit. He has just put 
down a £5,000 deposit for an 
option to both: Wembley Stadium 
for the night of December 31, 
1999, for a “Greatest Hits of the 
Twentieth Century” concert I 
have to confess that the prospect 
of Mick Jagger strutting about tire 
stage just a few years short of 
qualifying for a pension strikes me 
as fine enter tainm ent value. 

Exotic East 

The most improbable holiday 
resort, I would have thought, is the 
London Borough of Islington. 
Hence I am surprised to note that 
it is tiie only London council to 
have its own stand at the World 
Travel Market in London. “For 
the first time we have taken a 
stand at the show to promote the 
borough and create jobs,” says a 
s pokesman. “Where are West- 
minster and the Royal Borough of 
Kensington and Chelsea?” Filch- 
ing a few timely ideas from 
Bradford, which promoted Last of 
the Summer Wine and Heriot 
Country holidays, Islington is 
offering “EastEnders mini-break 
weekends,” with the chance to 
meet members of the cast. 


BARRY FANTONI 




■Win 


Tired? rDsay.Fre been apaD 
night listening to the Radio Three 
commentary on the spy trial* 

London pride 

London's cabbies so enjoyed 
Sporting the Guinness “Genius” 
posters on their vehicles that 
about 30 of them are still driving 
around with them, even though 
their advertising payments stop- 
ped in May. The reason, lam told, 
is that taxi drivers, who have to 
pass a test called “the knowledge”, 
consider the slogan to be a good 
- reflection of their driving skills. 

• Clive James, in typically un- 
charitable style, on tire second part 
of his autobiography: “Actually, 
parts of it were written by Princess 
MkhaeL” 

Liaison off 

Sir Alfred Sherman's campaign to 
save the Federation of Conscr- 
. vative Students has ground to an 
abrupt hah. At a meeting hosted 
by Sir Alfred on Monday night, SO 
FCS members out against 
the Sherman plan to establish a 
liaison committer, instead they 
have opted to join the Conser- 
vative Collegiate Forum, the 
org aniza tion which will replace 
the FCS. Only Harry Phibbs and a 
few other right-wing diehards are 
now refusing to knuckle under to 
Central Office. Game, set and 
match to Norman Tebbit 

Enlightened 

. Sammy Wilson, Belfast's hardline 
Danoaatic Unionist lord mayor, 
switched on the dry's Christmas 
illu m i n ations yesterday, he and 
.his fellow Loyalists having boy- 
■ cotted the ceremony Iasi year. 
Immediately beneath the huge 

; Belfast Says No” banner which is 

Still slung across the front of the 
oty hall in protest against the 
Anglo-Irish agreement. Wilson 

mfinxptiysi.p-- * . li 


Amos Perlmutter on the departure of Admiral Poindexter 

A good hand badly played 


w Uiuv UIV 31 UUU 1 

Noel 1 bo* “ 
PUS 


The resignation of President 
Reagan's National Security Ad- 
viser, Vice-Admiral Poindexter, 
exposes disastrous mismanage- 
ment of foreign policy. Current 
foreign policy ideas are sound; it is 
their execution that is at fault. 

How did this embarrassing 
debacle occur? It has a great deal 
to do with the quality of those 
responsible for management and 
policy p»di«nrg at the National 

Security Council, going back as for 

as 1980. Under Reagan, the NSC 

has been headed and managed by 
men with little knowledge of 
foreign policy, as was the case with 
Judge William Clark, his second 
National Security Adviser, or of a 
specifically military outlook, such 
as Admiral Poindexter and former 
colonel Robert M cFariane. The 
only academic was Richard Allen, 
who soon proved to be without the 
stature of a Kissinger or Brze- 
Tinslri ?md left. In feet, Rea gan 
aides have always been apprehen- 
sive of the NSC being dominated 
by another Kissinger of Bize- 
Tfnsfci The result has been a 
succession of mediocrities or men 
of very narrow focus. 


Kissinger understood the design 
and structure of foreign policy — 
and the delicacy of its im- 
plementation. In the present crisis 
he would have sensed theopportu- 
-nities presented by a forward 
policy towards Iran while rec- 
ognizing its pitfalls. 

Members of Reagan's staff have* 
never been clear on the line of 
demarcation and influence be- 
tween the NSC and Stole Depart- 
ment. Normally it depends on a 
president's personal style, but in 
Reagan's case it has never been 
dearly defined. 

After this latest fiasco, the need 
fin- a strong National Security 
Adviser has become painfully 
dean indeed, this may be the most 
significant lesson to emerge from 
the whole affair. 

It was the job of tire NSC to co- 
ordinate with the State Depart- 
ment, the Defense Department 
and other agencies to recommend 
to the President a consensus of 
policy. That was the NSC failure — 
recommending a policy which was 
obviously opposed by Defense 
and State. 

As Secretary of Stole, George 


Shultz should have made sure that 
his influence and thinking got to 
the President instead of pretend- 
ing ignorance at a later date. He 
was, like the NSC, negligent in his 

duty- 

In an earlier address to the 
nation, President Reagan offered 
the possibility of a breakthrough 
on Iran and the Gul£ To address 
itself to the issues of Shia tenor- 
ism and fundamentalism, die US 
must grapple seriously with ban. 
Reagan was atte m p tin g to reverse 
Carter’s discredited policy, and 
well he should. He has to fake into 
account the reality of the revolu- 
tion and the influence of the 
Khomeini regime. None of the 
other so-called revolutionary 
movements in the Middle East — 
from Nasserism, to Rm-Arabism 
— have managed to change Mus- 
lim and Arab societies, thetr ruling 
classes, their political systems and 
politics in the way that Khomeini 
has changed Iran. These are tiie 
facts, however unpalatalbc, on 
which US policy must be based, 
not on some idealistic hope. 

An American policy that geared 
itself to recognition ofhan and the 


reality of its revolution is rife with 
opportunities. If anything, it 
would probably encourage a cer- 
tain degree of restraint axnongfee 
Muslim aad 

might help assure that religious 
zealotry is not used to dominate 
the Arab Gulf states. It would also 
agqwgF. the fear that dominates 
thinking in the prowestem 
sheikhdoms. 

In recognizing Iran formally, 
the US would at least have some 
leverage over the regime. Eco- 
nomic assistance would provide 
the US with further le verag e in 
brin g in g an end to Shia terrorism 
now conducted from Syrian-occu- 
pied Lebanon. It would also act as 
a further obstacle to the Russians* 
political inroads in die Middle 
East. Tire political options resultr 
mg from di plomatic negotiations 
j nefort* the ability, in addition to 
containing Shia terrorism, of 
restraining the more repugnant 
aspects of Khomeini's revolution 
and finally ensuring the stability of 

the Arab Gulf states. 

The author is Professor of Political 
Science at the American Univer- 
sity, Washington DC. 


Wilfred Beckerman 

Pay: Lawson’s 

real U-turn 


Yuri Orlov on western misunderstandings over Soviet human rights 


Peace through pressure 



International security cannot be 
guaranteed by agreement between 
governments alone. Ribbentrop 
and Molotov embraced and shook 
hands immediately before the war 
between Germany and the USSR. 
One could object that in negotiat- 
ing for peace and friendship they 
did not have mutual disarmament 
in mind. Today however, even 
mutual disarmament by the USA 
and the USSR would not, of itself 
guarantee peace. 

Of course disarmament is essen- 
tial It would help to reduce the 
danger of war breaking out ac- 
cidentally. On the other hand, 
complete nuclear riicnniamenT 
would reduce the mutual fear of 
retaliation, and this would it 
easier for a war to start with 
conventional weapons; and no 
matter how another world war 
might start, it would end with 
nudear strikes. The midear end of 
the Second World War and the 
fierceness with which small wars 
are waged today leave no doubt of 
that 

True, security would not be 
guaranteed by agreement about 
mutual Higirmament Snmrthing 
else is required: the relationship 
between the peoples of the West 
and the Soviet bloc must be 

appro ximat ely the same as that 

between France and Great Britain. 
Both are nuclear powers, but a 
nudear war between them is 
inconceivable. 

Is such a relationship possible 
between western nations and the 
USSR? Would not the USSR have 
to be capitalized, and the West 
Sovietized? I do not think so. The 
ordinary people on both sides do 
not want a nudear war, so to 
ensure that one never happens it is 
essential that they have complete 
control over all foreign and mili- 
tary policies of their governments. 

Further democratization is nec- 
essary for Axis to be achieved even 
in the West; in the Soviet Union, 
the present system is totally at 
odds with this essential require- 
ment for mutual security. Soviet 
citizens are not only denied the 
opportunity to protest against the 
military actions of their govern- 
ment but cannot even take an 
interest in them. If our Helsinki 
monitoring groups bad become 
involved in these issues we would 
all have been sentenced as “spies” 
or “traitors”. 

The degree of secrecy in the 
USSR is such that passing 
information about political pris- 
oners can be viewed as “treason”, 
so it is not hard to imagine the 
reaction to publishing informa- 
tion about military policy. In 

The depressing spectacle of half- 
empty and vandalized blocks of 
flats, set against the back-doth of a 
rundown urban environment is 
today a new and unwelcome 
feature ofFrench cities, just as it is 
in Britain.The issue has become so 
pressing that over the last four 
years the French government has 
spent more than 4 billion francs 
(about £400 million) on rehabilita- 
tion programmes. But unlike 
Britain, where the problem is seen 
to stem mainly from the 19th 
century, in France it is a con- 
sequence of the huge, seemingly 
interminable apartment com- 
plexes (often callwd grands en- 
sembles) which formed such a 
significant feature of the country's 
rapid post-war suburbanization. 

The grands ensembles were built 
in response to the severe housing 
crisis in the 1950s and 1960s 
produced by the combined effects 
of a high birthrate, a substantial 
inflow of immig rant aad returning 
colonial expatriates and a large- 
scale movement from rural to 
uiban areas. In these huge estates, 
the largest housing more than 
20,000 people, shortcomings were 
soon apparent: a high-rise, high 
density living environment, poor 
construction, lack of shops and 
services, few local jobs. But at the 
time they were regarded as a 
success simply because they pro- 
vided homes. 

Twenty years later many of 
these vast, anonymous “cites” are 
rejected. The more affluent have 
moved to new houses which have 
mushroomed on the outskirts of 
the cities, leaving b ehind empty 
flats in deteriorating areas no 
■longer respected by their inhab- 
itants. 

The grands ensembles were 
increasingly the refuge of families 



consid erin g international security 
we cannot ignore the direct link to 
the overall question of human 
rights in the USSR, including the 
citizen's right to criticize govern- 
ment actions. 

The defence of Soviet citizens 
who are persecuted for expressing 
such criticism is therefore not only 
a universal moral duty but a self- 
interested insurance against dan- 
gerous recklessness by the Soviet 
leaders. The West, unfortunately, 
seems almost unaware of this fact. 

To ensure that the people of 
both sides get to know and 
understand each other, and so 
demonstrate that they want peace, 
there must be no barrier to free 
and open communication. No one 
in tiie USSR should be persecuted 
for their desire to leave and return 
to the country whenever they wish 
and to talk freely to foreigners. 

At present, Soviet society still 
remains a kind of “underground 
organization” with respect to for- 


John Tnppen finds cross-Channel parallels 
with Britain’s fight against nrban decay 

Squalor of the 
inner cite 


with low incomes, the un- 
employed and a large and diverse 
immigrant populauon often re- 
sented or misunderstood by the 
French and with a high proportion 
of adolescents, an inevitable con- 
sequence of the arrival 20 years 
ago of a large number of young 
families. Members of this group 
now face particular problems in 
getting jobs, especially when, as is 
often the case, their educational 
standards are low. Not surpris- 
ingly, many of these youngsters 
fed rejected and frustrated. 

In the early 1980s their resent- 
ment exploded with a series of 
violent outbursts, notably in the 
bqge complexes of Les Mingueoes 
at Lyon and “Les 4000” at La 
Couroeuve in the northern sub- 
urbs of Paris. It was dear that a 
major programme of remedial 
action was needed. 

The government commission 
appointed to look into the prob- 
lem put the emphasis on improv- 
ing educational and vocational 
training and promoting racial 
harmony. Local bodies were given 
greater administrative responsibil- 
ity to end the delays caused by the 
previous need to get the agreement 
of several ministries for rehabilita- 
tion measures. 

The most obvious improve- 


ment since then has been to the 
physical environment. Tower 
Mocks have been demolished, 
despite their recent construction, 
and an increasing of the 

remaining apartments substan- 
tially remodelled. Balconies have 
been kitchens enlarged and 

the binkfings’ previously austere 
and uniform facades brightened 
up in tiie hope that residents will 
take greater pride in their 
surrounding usually they are 
consulted on i mprovements in 
advance. 

To improve conditions gen- 
erally, health centres, post offices, 
computer centres, and recreation 
halls were built and evening 
cl a sses started. More social work- 
ers now operate in these areas; and 
advice is available on managing 
the family budget- Young people 
are helped to find jobs. Foreign 
housewives can team about 
French ctmme. and considerable 
information and guidanc e are 
available to try to assist young 
people to find their first job. More 
ambitiously, employers have been 
urged to provide work in the 
immediate neighbourhood and 
some rehabilitation jobs are avail- 
able for the local residents. 

There has been a significant 
Change Of attitude among the 


Jaffevy Morgen 

eigners. When an “underground 
organization” possesses tiie might 
of a superpower, this is dangerous. 

Faced with the might of the 
Soviet state, many people in tiie 
West display cowardice, selfish- 
ness and a feeling of hopelessness. 
It seems to them that it is better 
not to irri t a te the Soviet govern- 
ment Some will help to save 
individual victims of persecution 
but they do not relate this to world 
security, and they do not believe 
in the possibility of change within 
the USSR. 

In fact change can be brought 
about, given greater collective 
efforts. Soviet society is incom- 
parably better today than in the 
1950s before the death of Stalin. 
By the aid of the century a 
sufficient degree of openness 
should have been achieved to 
ma ke it r elatively safe for citizens 
to criticize military and foreign 
policy. But this must be fought for 
today, and constantly. 


Dr Orlov, a physicist, spent nine 
years in Soviet prison camps and 
internal exile because cf his work 
for human rights. He was allowed 
to leave the Soviet Union for the 
West last month. 

housing bodies responsible for the 
estates. Their role m the past was 
simply to manage the property, 
often froma distance. Now some 
have established a local presence 
to resolve daily problems, such as 
the need for repairs, which were 
previously left unattended. Simi- 
larly, allocation procedures have 
been revised to ensure a wider 
assortment of occupants in any 
one block. 

More than 120 suburbs have 
now been designated for priority 
rehabilitation; and in the last four 
years 40,000 flats have been 
modernized and vacancy rates 
have fallen; tiie unrest of the early 
1980s has largely evaporated. 

But, in spite of the obvious 
progress, problems remain. Few 
new jobs have been created and 
change seems unlikely without an 
improvement in the Frency econ- 
omy ovmfl. The work of 
refurbishing flats has been slow 
and expensive. 

Moreover, as tiie number of ! 
areas qualifying far government 
assistance has grown, expenditure 
in 3ny one district has diminished, 
leading to the disappearance of 
some new services and a dissipa- 
tion. of the initial enth usiasm, i 
Indeed, tiie problem of an eq- 
uitable and adequate distribution 
of financial resources is likely to 
grow, because it is now dear that 
rehabilitation fa no longer a 
problem only of the grands en- 
sembles but also of much of the 
public-sector housing throughout 
the country and, increasingly, 
privately-owned property in cer- 
tain inner areas. 

Here a further parallel might be 
drawn with Britain, where the idea 
of rehabilitation being linked with 
one type of area has been shown to 
be false. 


Such refonns would not necessi- 
tate the collapse of the Soviet 
system. They require only the 
rejection, of the K remlin' s dream 
of c ommunfam d ominating the 
entire world. Dissidents in the 
USSR well understand the direct 
connection between tiie dream 

that mmmnnion will prevail and 
the dosed and repressive nature of 
the regime. But their thinking fa 
still insufficiently understood in 
the West. 

It was with great difficulty that 
the West realized the possibility — 
indeedthe necessity— of using the 
Helsinki Final Act to improve 
hmnan rights in the Soviet Unum. 
But before we can speak about the 
possibility of change, we have to 
maim die e ffort for thgre c han g e s 
to occur. At the Belgrade review 
c o nference, fin- example, not one 
western delegation made such an 
effort. Now, at the Vienna review 
conference, everyone is speaking 
about human rights, fait the 
majority do not name the country 
guilty of the violation. Most of the 
western delegation have failed to 
mention tiie nam^c of individuals 
who should be released immedi- 
ately from prison, labour camp s, 
exOe or psychiatric detention, or 
of the refuseniks who have waited 
many exhausting years to leave 
the country. 

It fa essential to demand, openly 
and persistently, a universal 
political amnesty in tire USSR. 
This would lead to the release of at 
least 800 political prisoners, first 
and foremast the 40 or so who 
monitored the observation of 
human rights agreements. At the 
very top of the least should be Dr 
Andrei Sakharov, Anatoly 
Koryagin — nominated for a 
Nobel Peace Prize — - writer 
Anatoly Marchenko, the Jewish 
leader Iosif Begun and Professor 
Naum Meiman and his wife, who 
has cancer. It fa cradal to lay down 
in the text of the next concluding 
document the unassailable rights 
of citizens to monitor human 
rights. 

At Helsinki the Soviet Union 
promised to the world that its 
citizens would enjoy basic free- 
doms. The West most demand 
that that promise be kept. Some 
progress can be observed, but as 
yet it fa a far ay flora the right to 
finuiaTTi wital criticism which is so 
important for the security of us aQ. 

Q 11— a Wmp^m, 1968. 


Perhaps I should not be writing 
this fa public since the succ ess o f 
the Chancellor’s economic strat- 
egy depends on nobody noticing 
what it really is. fort politici an s 
cannot I mp anything hidden for 
.long, as President Reagan las 
discovered over arms for Iran. So 
Lawson’s real U-turn, as distinct 
from the imaginary one, aright as 
wdl be exposed now. 


declared that unemployment 
could not be reduced without 
greater flexibility in the labour 
market, and particularly in real 
wages. He caundaied this doo- 
trine dearly in iris Mais lecture in 
1984 and repeated it frequently 
thereafter. In tins he was stoutly 
supported by the OECD and by 
The Economist, which regularly 
publishes a diagram prepared by 
the OECD p ur por tin g to establish 
a relationship between real wage 
rigidity in various countries and 
the degree to which their un- 
employment rates have risen. 
These diagrams show Britain as 
having the most rigid real wages 
and the highest increase in un- 
employment. This one fa ex- 
pected to deduce that Britain's rise 
in unemployment must be a result 
of our greater wage rigidity. 

U fa this doctrine that the 
ffrangrilo r seems qmetiy to have 
dropped- Presumably he has fi- 
nally discovered that, given other 
features of the British economy, 
unemployment is not the result of 
real wages being too high but of 
bong too low. 

The continued rise of real wages 
of those in jobs is probably partly 
responsible for the increase in 
overall Hwmmri and slight fan in 
unemployment over the past few 
months. This must be very wel- 
come to the Chancellor in the run- 
up to an election. It makes it less 
necessary for him to take expan- 
sionary action in the form of large, 
genuine increases in pab&c expen- 
diture. (The planned increases 

annftnnpwl in fee a u t u mn State- 
ment arose largely out of increases 
in areas oflocal authority expen- 
diture over which central govem- 
ment has little contrcl)L Hie rise in 
wages also adds to government tax 
revenue, thereby leaving scope for 
further expenditure increases or 
tax cuts in the next budget without 
laying him<trif open to charges of 




“outsiders'* with oo say in wage 

negotiations. Second^ ware 

economists would argue that a 
those in work dearty «w, or 
expected, expansionary poucacs 
'they might demand such large 
wage increases as ro prevent tire 
outriders from bring ngcL 
In an economy where invest- 
ment fa shiggisb, where 
balance of payments is worsening, 

i « - BMwmnmiiV 


rhetoric preventsu np» onsemm 

the deflationary balanc e m t he 

private sector by an adequate 
defeat in the pufcfic rector, the 
only hope foe a tty iBfttantod 
rx pmwm of demand must lie in 
the continoed rise in real wages. 

This is a deader hope and a 
short-term remedy at best. On the 
side too much of the 
increased co ns um ption win be of 

imported goods and, on the s upply 
our competitiveness will 
suffer even further. By early next 

-year fee deterioration in the 

hpinr*-^ of payments could bo- 

come more serious, and with it the 

threat to tiie exchange rate. 
Lawson may still have time to get 
in a generous budget in the spring 
before the price is paid, includi ng 
p erhaps fast; devaluation jus- 
tified as part of a package frwohr- 
ing our entry into the European 
Monetary System — hence, per- 
haps, the ament refusal to do so 
before it is teafly n ece ssar y. 

It fa &e the p re-e l ection 
developments in 1964 which left 
tiie incoming Labour government 
with a balance of payments cribs 
to deal with. But fee 1 964 election 
did procbice a change of govern- 
ment. This e fee strategy of 
raising real wages for the 87 per 
cent stifl m work may mean feat it 
mil be Lawson who faces the 
consequences of a consumption- 
led boom. 

The official Conservative doc- 
trine has always bees feat infla- 
tion mutt be criminated for 
employment to be raised. It is now 
dear how this works: inflation 
co me s down, fortuitously, as a 
result of faffing world commodity 
prices. Interest rates are still kept 
high, largely to protect the ex- 
change rate which is the crux of 
the anti-inflationary policy. This 
dampens investment and weakens 
the current balance of payments. 
But, since none of this has much 


IHll.'/Oli. 


Paul Vallely 


Walking into 
trouble 


Los Angeles 

Some of the time in California 
they mean what they say. There 
are the bartenders who tril you 
that beneath their short white 
jackets they are really poets and 
men of letters dedicated to tiie re- 
evahjation of the reputation of 
Rupert Brooke. There are the 
would-be movie moguls with 
nothing to lose except their rented 
West Hollywood apartments who 
will wax greedily about the 
bankability of the new package 
they are putting together. And 
there are the traffic s igns. In Los 
Angeles when it says “Don’t 
Walk” it means “Don’t Walk”. 

The other day I saw an assorted 


woman with a gnarled walnut 
stick hobbled across the road. The 
traffic signal was on green but the 
cars stood patieutiy as fee moved 
before them. There was no un- 
seemly revving of the engines, no 
sounding of horns, not even an 
irritable tapping of fingers on the 
steering wheel. 

To me, a recent arrival fr om 
New York, where cars seem to be 
compulsorily fitted with some 
beat-seeking anti-pedestrian de- 
vice, it seemed ah unnatural 
occurrence. As I leaned forward to 

get a better view of the wo man I 
noticed the face of the driver of the 
white and green taxi cab in which I 
was sitting. He was aniKng tol- 
erantly. The woman was old, in 
her eighties, perhaps, and tanned 
and wrinkled as a sun-soaked 
sultana Hex dothes were elegant, 
though their designer would not 
have thought her their best 


direction. Public transport in 
many areas seems virtually non- 
existent. It is almost as if the very 
act of waflting constitutes a dul- 
leage to fee autocracy of the 
automobile. 

If ignorance is no excuse for 
jaywalking, neither fa injury. An 
82-year-old woman who was re- 
cently inching her way across a 
Beverley Hills boulevard was 
knocked down by a speeding car. 
When she arrival home after 10 
days in hospital she found a 
jaywalking ticket to welcome her. 

Defending the routine practice 
of t icketing both jaywalker and 
driver in such cases as good 
policing, the LA traffic depart- 
ment says that strict enforcement 
bdps keep down fee number of 
deaths The US National Safety 
Council has estimated that more 
than a third of all pedestrians 
killed in motor accidents were 
jayw alking, ami certainly the 
numb er of pedestrians lolled in 
Los Angles fefl last year by 28 per 
cent to 102 . 

But there seems no consensus 
among traffic e xperts on whether 
there fa any causal relati onshi p. 
New York and Chicago, which 
both have more relaxed regimes, 
suffer similar rates. And there can 
be no doubt that the issue raises 
otter complications — as well as 
tempers. 

A Santa Monica lawyer, Robert 
Mann, has fifed a com plaint 
aUi^ing “unlawful detention” a£ 
^ bciiig held for 20 nrinnff ^ by a 
traffic cop who claimed feat he 
couldn’t read the attorney's sig- 
nature on the jaywalking ticket — 
you sig n them in lieu of bail as a 
guarantee feat you will plead 


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THE TIMES WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 26 1986 


17 


fr = 


1 Pennington Street, London El 9XN Telephone: 01-481 4100 


THE FIRST CASUALTIES 




The resi gnat i o n of President 
Reagan’s National Security 
Adviser, Vice-Admiral John 
poinderter, and the murky 
arctnnslances winch attende d 
it are evidence that only part of 
the troth, and perhaps a very 
. wnall part of the troth, about 
the US arms-for-Iran affair has 
so &r been told. The more 
details are uncovered, the 
more stffl seems to be buried. 
For the first time since he took 
office, power sits uneasily , on 
the President It is a disporting 
sight 


President Reagan's judge- 
ment on matters of national 
and international import is 
now being comprehensively 
called into question. For the 
second time since the dealij 


with Iran became put 
has been forced to backtrack. 
Only 24 hours before 
announrihg Mr Poindextei’s 
resignation, he had masted 
that his policy towards Iran 
had not been in error. There 
would, he said, be no rcsigna- 
. lions. Now there has been both 
a resignation and a dismissal 
and the whole edifice of the 
National Security Council is 
starting to look shaky. 

If President Reagan’s advis- 
ers had been actively trying to 
discredit his administration, 
they could scarcely have done 
better in the timing and con- 
tent of yesterday’s revelations. 
It now appears that not only 
was the United States selling 
aims to Iran in contravention 


of its own ^ not 

only was it so ■ lading in 
circumspection as to get 
caught, but that the sales 
operation itself was tumriipd at 
worst dishonestly, at best with 
incompetence. 

Ten days ago, when the 
President's enemies ^ even 
many of his friends were 
baying - far Mood, a single 
resignation, most probably 
that of Mr Poindexter, mi ght 
have sufficed. The N ational 
Security Adviser had already 
been tainted by suggestions 
that he had fed disinformation 
to the Wall Street Journal 
about US intentions tow ar ds 
Libya. The misguided nature 
of the Iranian contacts ap- 
peared to seal his fete. Now, 
his scalp will not be enough 
The calls wifi not and should 
not be for blood, but for the 
truth. 

Thus fer, the tr u t h a moun t 
to a sophisticated piece of 
creative foreign policy which 
went wrong because the other 
party — a certain group of 
ayatollahs who hoped for 
power in a post-Khomeini Iran 
— was found out or chose to 
divulge the details. It seemed 
to extend to a deal in which a 
quantity of arms was sold to 
Iran in return for the release of 
US hostages held in Lebanon. 

It now includes elements of 
devious financial dealing in 

which the mam tienefieiariey 

were the Nicaraguan Contras. 
Promise of a full judicial 
inquiry into the affair may 


TINKER, AUTHOR, SALESMAN, SPY 


The revelation that Mr Peter 
Wright received half of the 
royalties for Their Trade Is 
Treachery, the book upon 
which he collaborated with Mr 
Chapman Pincher, fays* further 
confused an already tangled 
affair. Mr Wright claims that it 
is evidence of a Government 
plot to smear his name. It 
certainly reveals him as a man 
driven by financial gain as wdQ 
as by other motives he may 
have. 

Its Initial impact, however, 
was more unfavourable to the 
Government's case than to Mr 
Wright's. Fast appearances 
were that Lord Rothschild, 
presumably acting in some 
official interest if not capacity, 
had arranged for Mr Wright to 
be brought over to Britain and 
offered a substantial sum for. 
his cooperation in writing a 
book abont events in British 
intelligence during his period 
of service there. 

The implication was dear 
and extremely damaging. It is 
that fer from protecting the 
confidentiality of state intefit- 
gence services, which is the 
principle the Government 
claims to be upholding in the 
Australian courts, Ministers 
on this earlier occasion had 
procured . its wholesale 
abandonment under the in- 
substantial cloak of Mr 
Wright’s anonymity. 

Questions are certainly 
raised by this curious episode 
which, until Lord Rothschfid 
offers bis own account, mil be 
subject to conflicting inter- 
pretations. In whose interest 
was Lord Rothschild acting 
and with what purpose? On his 
own account? On behalf of a 
faction in one of the intelli- 
gence agenties? Or on behalf of 
“the Government”, however 
defined? No one at present 
knows the answers to these 
questions. . 


The view that he was acting 
for the Government rests not 
upon evidence but upon three 
. vague inferences. The first is 
that, in intelligence matters, a 
dark official c on spiracy must 
always be afoot Another arises 
from Mr Wright’s reverential 
attitude to Lord Rothschild 
wham he sees as a. Myeroft 
Holmes moving in the very 
highest aides in the fend and 
tires, almost inevitably, the 
_ Prime Munster's fixer on this 
and other occasions. 

The final “proof” of official 
culpability . is that Ministers 
foiled to move against the 
Pincher-Wright book in the 
courts- That last point is the 
strongest But it is more plau- 
sibly interpreted as a political 
judgement that greater trouble 
and e m bar ras sment would be 
cansed by prosecution than by 
official silence. . 


man driven entirely by the 
need to expose both a traitor 
and a cover-up. It now tran- 
spires that he was in need of 
money in order to keep his 
form from bankruptcy «nH 
that he sought to obtain it at 
the cost ofbreakiiig his duty of 
confidentiality. 

To conclude from this that 
Mr Wright acted from corrupt 
financial motives would be to 
go too fer. He gives every 
appearance of being obsessed 
by the Hollis affair and of 
wishing to continue in public 
-the battle he lost at the secret 
trials. Nonetheless, doubt has 
at least been cast upon the 
purity of his motives and by 
extension upon the justice of 
his case: 


This is a strong argument 
and one, indeed, winch the 
Government's critics would 
have preferred it to have acted 
upon in the Australian case. 
Why, they ask, do they resist 
now a logic they apparently 
accepted then? 

The different official de- 
cisions in the two cases rest 
upon a crucial distinction 
which tiie Prime Minister 
rightly reaffirmed in tire Com- 
mons yesterday; namely, that 
there is a world of difference 
between a signed memoir by a 
former intelligence officer and 
a book by an outsider, how- 
ever well-supplied with 
information from inriders. It is 
more plausible, more authori- 
tative and so more damaging. 

Yet if the damage done to 
the Government by the news 
of Mr Wrighfs royalties 
diminishes npan examination. 


What is more important is 
that the introduction of finan- 
cial gain into this affair has 
greatly increased the im- 
portance of the principle that 
the Government is defending. 
When the duty of confidential- 
ity was threatened solely by a 
former intelligence officer with 
an obsession about a possible 
“mote”, it was threatened by a 
rare and exceptional hazard. It 
was then possible to make 
some sort of case that silence 
was the most prudent response 
to publication. 


the damage done to Mr Wright 
himself increases. Until now, 
he has presented himself as 


Greed, however, is a much 

mom Common hrrman failing 

than obsessiveness. If intelli- 
gence officers are able with 
impunity to sell to publishers 
tiie secrets they obtained dur- 
ing their service, some will be 
tempted by tiie large rewards 
to do so. The avalanche of 
secrets that would then ensue 

— and the knowledge that all 
current secrets might be ex- 
posed after the next retirement 

— would make it impossible to 
nm an intelligence service at 
afi. That is the magnitude of 
what is at stake in Australia. 


TEACHERS OF QUALITY 


There is still a strongly held 
view in some parts of the 
teaching profession that to 
attempt to assess quality in 
education is a waste of time. 
Which? reports are all very 
well for washing machines, so 
the argument goes, but educa- 
tion is a more complicated 
matter altogether. 

Of course, it is perfectly true 
that good teaching is easier to 
recognise than to define. But 
the dflemma now feeing the 
Education Secretary, Mr Ken- 
neth Baker, over teachers' pay 
is essentially abont quality. A 
higher level of teachers’ pay is 
app r o pri ate — that is agreed. 
Nor is there now much dispute 
about the quantity. The agree- 
ment worked out at foe 
Arb ri tr a fioa Conciliation 
Service between foe majority 
of teacher unions and the local 
authority employerc could cost 

about £70 million more over 

the next 2 years than foe £600 . 
million proposed by tfce.Gov- 
emment, but in relation to foe 
total size of the package the 
gap is not wide. 

What remains at issue rs the 
improvement is foe quality of 
teaching winch it can. be 
expected to achieve. A steep 
change in pay levels such ns 


ih fr teaching unions propose 
can only be contemplated if it 
delivers an improvement in 
the productivity of teachers. 

That is why Mr Baker reaDy 
has no choice tomorrow when 
he meets the leader of the local 
authority employers, Mr John 
Pearman, other than to stick to 
his guns in deman ding a 
radical restructuring of 
teachers’ pay scales. The 
choice is between an ACAS 
deal, winch gives most to those 
on the lower grades and ao- 
mall y compresses differentials, 
and the Bake r pr op osals which 
would improve the prospects 
of middle grade teachers. 

Admittedly, both sets of 
proposals offer a reasonably 
attractive starting salary, 
around the average for good 
hononrs graduates. But 
whereas foe ACAS deal gives 
most to those who do least 
writ extending the rewards for 
grade one and two teachers, 
the Government wants * to 
introduce, incentive posts for 
good teachers, and for those 
teachers in subjects where 
there is a shortage in grades 
three; four and above.They 
have the further merit of 
keeping good teachers in foe . 
classroom rather than forcing 


than to seek promotion into 
administrative posts. 


Mr Baker seems prepared to 
accept foe ACAS deal so fer as 
it relates to terms and con- 
ditions. But he needs to look at 
foe details of foe agreement 
with a very beady eye. It Is, 
afro- afi, tiie number of free 
periods, the degree to which 
teachers are expected to cover 
for absent cofieagues and simi- 
lar factors which convert per- 
fectly acceptable pupil/teacher 
ratios into unacceptably large 
classes. Nor should he uncriti- 
cally accept the aspiration of a 
maximum pupS/teacher ratio 
of 33 without insisting on 
action concerning the minority 
of classes which are accepted 
by educationalists to be not 
too large, but too small for 
effective teaching 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Cutting councils 
down to size 


Failings in the churches’ mission 


help to still curiosity; specula- 
tion, most of it harmful to foe 
President, will continue until it 
is complete and probably be- 
yond. 

In statiu that he was not 
apprised of all these dements 
of the Iran deal. President 
Reagan may have helped to 
protect his position as tire rest 
of tiiis sony affair unfolds. The 
Secretary of State, Geo _ 
Shultz, may also benefit He 
has said afl along that he knew 
some, but by no means all of 
the truth. 

Yet the President's ig- 
norance reflects poorly both 
on him personally and on his 
dosest advisers. Until now the 
US public and the world had 
assumed that even if President 
Reagan had neither the time 
nor the induration to gngrpss 
himself in tiie fine details of 
policy-making, he had the 
broader virion ap pr opri ate to 
his office, he had an overall 
grasp of the « f 1 «rtion and he 
knew when to take advice and 
from whom. Yesterday's 
revelations cast doubt on that 
fast and pe rhaps crucial point. 

The President retains his 
reputation for openness which 
may have been ewhanrwi by 
the decision to give derails of 
the financial irregularities as 
soon as they Immiw known, 
even though they were bound 

In he as damaging as anything 

that has emerged so fir. That 
openness now needs to be 
continued — if necessary, at 
the cost of further departures. 


With two out of tiie six 
teacher umons not prepared to 
sign tiie ACAS deal, Mr Baker 
can afford to hold out for 
something closer to his own 
objectives. Although parents 
fervently want an end to 
disruption in schools, they also 
want to see the Government 
fostering that tire quality of 
education should be improved 
if its cost is to increase; 


■ 


From Mr P. J. Barlow 
Sir, Yon report (front page; 
November 20) that “a radical plan 
to allow the break-up oflaige local 
amhorities into smaller, self-suf- 
ficient councils is being consid- 
ered by G o v e r nm ent ministers”. 
Would it be too much to ask if this 
Government consideration could 
extend north of the balder? 

Most of your readers probably 
do not know that one local 
authority — Strathclyde Regional 
Council — administers education, 
roads, social work and the police 
and fire services fra: ban the 
population of Scotland. Three 
village communities in Arayll — 
Mmard, Ardenthmy and Newton 
in Islay — are at present fighting 
proposals by Strathclyde council 
to close their primary schools. 

What chance do we have of a 
fair h«mng when our county, 
which has a coastline longer than 
that of France and whose leuiotot 
part is as far from Glasgow as the 
heart of Somerset is from London, 
has one (that* s right, one) repre- 
sentative on Strafadyde region's 
setoefe subcommittee? 

Yours etc, 

P J. BARLOW, 

Annandale, 

Minard, 

Inveraray, Argyll. 

November 21. 


The old city and west Oxford 
suffer, constant env ironm ental 


threat from a Cowley-dominated 
borough council. On environ- 
mental fames, such as the «in»n t 
plan to legalise a serious encroach- 
ment on Port Meadow, their 
Labour councillors steadily op- 
pose the Cowley Labour ma j ority . 

The two towns have d i ffe rent 
origins at different tunes and serve 
different proposes. The contig uity 
is fortuitous and malign. 

Overheads in maintainin g two 


iTmmnpgl adunmstra t ioMa would 
be too expensive to justify; but it is 
now time to enquire whether two 
s ep ara te mmriapel bodies could 
share tiie expenses of admin- 
istrative. organization, making - 
separatoderisksis for it to execute. 

As a form of local government, 
this idea may be a fresh one; but 
the weaknesses of local govern- 
ment are egregious and should be 
intelligently fought. 

Yours faithfully, 

R. T. RIVINGTON, 

5 Carlton Road, 

Oxford. 

November 21. 


Research decline 

From Dr Denis F. Owen 


Sir, Recent discussions abont the 
decline of “British” science are 
misleading. Today there are many 
more research institutes and 
univereities scattered throughout 
the world than there were thirty 
years ago. Scientists often move 
between them and arc thus able to 
work in each other’s countries. 


Many of the papers and books I 
have published have been written 
from universitieaabroad and bear 
their addresses and so, using the 
method of scoring suggested by 
tiie Editor of the British Vet- 
erinary Journal (November 7), 
they would presumably be 
counted as “non-British” 
contributions. Yet I have not 
changed my nationality. 

Science is international and the 
published results of research are 
freely available to all, no matter 
their nationality. Indeed, the na- 
tionality of the contributor is not 
important What is important is 
that the work is done and is 
published for all to read. 

I suggest these is no such tiling 

.as “British” science and that 
scoring “UK publications” is a 
misleading and worthless activity. 
Yours sincerely, 

DENIS F. OWEN, 

2 Shetfbrd Pla ce, 

Heading! on, Oxford. 


Health or wealth? 

From Dr James Undesay 
Sr, The Government is now 

planning to < pmd pfl ntiTHn n pq 


educating us about the dangers of 


Aids. The recent campaign to 
advertise the British Gas share 
issue has cost £30 million. It 
would appear that our masters are 
more i n terest e d in Sid’s money 
than in his fife. 

Yours faithfully, 

JAMES UNDESAY, 

Flat 1, 

11/13 Broad Court, 

Bow Street, WC2. 

November 21. 


From Mr Anthony Richmond 
Sir, I agree with Mr Waller 
(November 17) that the sfate of 
the cemetery in Peshawar is to be 
regret t ed, but even more to be 
regretted is the fact that Christians 
in this country do so iirtte to iirfp 
the Church in Peshawar pay its 
clergy, maintain its 
institutions or «**■"** its framing 
and work. 


From MrR. T. RrringUm 
Sir, The Government is consid- 
ering the introduction of dans for 
dividing large boroughs Eke Brent 
for the propose of better serving 
the interests of smaller groups 
within it Another boro ug h 
deserving the «»me consideration 
is Oxford, and the Government 
should invite tiie Boundary 
Commission to investigate its 
separation into two boroughs of 
Oxford and Cowley, for environ- 
mental reasons. 


Given these problems, and not- 
ing also the sometimes heroic 
efforts of Peshawar’s tiny Chris- 
tian community to serve in their 

hospitals dmiat, udinnh arid 

workshops some of the two 
million Afghan refugees in their 
diocese, then to me the m a t ter of 
the upkeep of the cemetery be- 
comes a secondary one. 

The link between the Church of 

England and the f^nw-rh of Paki- 
stan is conducted mainly 
the missan societies and is, 
supposedly, a partnership. 

In recent years the Pakistani 
partners, for their part, have 
contributed richly to this partner- 
ship. Fhre ramp le; tht-h- acsi dartre 
in tiie liturgical explorations with 
other churches, notably the Ro- 
man Catholics; the progres s they 

have ma^te in diakyte with Idam, 

which can profitably be studied by 
those struggling with the same 
questions m Western cities; the 
new flowering erf* a religious tra- 
dition in music and poetry, point- 
ing new ways to the revival so 
sorely needed in jaded Western 

eh u ir h eg; the lemon of their 

experience as an impoverished 
and sometimes scorned minority, 
a pr edicament increasingly famil- 
iar to riiritfimK m tins country. 
As oar Western missionary zeal 

the Pakistani Gtwrrrh hactafa-n 
over some of the hard work, 

sending rniwimi aivc fn dapp ermta 

os depressing places Hke the Gulf 
states and inner-city Britain. (The 
Rev Daniel Singh, who (tied in 

June, wac an rmt atandrng mkoiw . 

ary in London). 

The B ritish partners, for our. 
part, seem to have little to offer 
but money and we are increasingly 
reluctant to part with it. Between 
1970 and 1982 giving to a ll foe 

OVCr&CfiS 

S&OZI a ynrtwt of tfaC QtUIch of 

England dropp ed steadily to a 
mere 4 J per cent of parish 
income. 

Mr Waller asks whether it is 
morally right for the British 
Government to have walked away 


Once a local group has been 
established, Bacsa provides a 
bridge for advice and such funds 
as we can raise for selected capital 
projects (e&, repair of walls, 
gatehouse, restoration of tombs 
etc), with foe long-term aim that 
the local group should accept 
res ponsibility for regular mainte- 
nance. 


This takes time but projects 
have been successfully punned at 
such places as Calcutta, Delhi, 
Kanpur, Tanjore, Bamm, Dhaka, 
Rangoon; and each year we extend 
the lisL Peshawar is now near foe 
top of our lisL We have been 

attem p ting fO hnfld up a grrar p nf 

local helpers there. 

Yours faithfully, 

THEON WILKINSON 
(Honorary Secretary, 

British Association for Gemeteries 
in South Asia), 

7 Wk Chartfidd Avenue, SW1 5. 
November 18. 


College free speech 


From Mrs Maureen Johnson 
Sr, I was concerned to read in The 
Times (report. Novemb er 19, 
earlier editions) that students at 
University College, Cardiff; have 
been issued by tbe students* union 
and the college authorities with 
guidelines on how to heckle 
political speakers. 

These guidelines per mit heck- 
ling and chanting tO talra place if 
racist or sexist comments are 
made from tbe platform. 

It seems that we in tins country 
are being muzzled by fear that any 
comment we might make wifi be 
misinterpreted by people who are 
a nx ious to prove that they are on 
foe side ofthe angels but who have 


to argne their point 
democratic debate. 


view m 


I work in farther education and 
I am aware that I cannot any 
longer speak freely to my col- 
leagues about racial subjects lest 
my comments be misconstrued. I 
passionately believe that it is only 
by speaking freely and honestly 
about problems that we can make 
any attempt to solve them. 

The guidelines of University 
College, Cardiff (an institution 
which should by its very nature be 
encouraging informed debate; 
whatever the views) reinforce that 
trend towards intolerance, and 
hence towards the suppression of 
free speech on any “hot” subject 
Yours, 

MAUREEN JOHNSON, 

54 Kings Road, 

Dkley, 

West Yorkshire. 

November 20. 


Patent protection 

From Sir Graham Wilkins 
Sir, Over the test year Govern- 
ment ministers at various venues 
have stressed foe i mpor t ance of 
investment in r esearch and 
development to the wefibemg of 
the British economy and have 
berated industry for 
allocation of resources in tins 
direction. 

It most therefore be a dis- 
appointment to industry that does 
invest heavily in research and 
development to find that inad- 
equate protection is afforded to 
that in ves tm ent in this country. 
This is of concern to many 
industries, particularly the 
pharmaceutical one. 

Earlier this year the Govern- 
ment gave the plwnwapwitiral 
industry an undertaking to revoke 
tbe licence of right provision of 
foe 1977 Patent Act This pro- 
vision is unique to the UK and 

unfair ly mwim n niBll the already 

scant protection given to patents 

cm TTwhnnf-c 

It had been hoped that pro- 
vision for this promised actum 
would be incorporated in an 
intellectuai property Bffi. Unfortu- 
nately no such Bill was envisaged 
in tbe Queen's Speech and I do 
hope that the Government has 
identified some other vehicle for 
this overdue legislation. 

Not only is research and 
development in medicine im- 
portant for the wefibemg of the 
British economy; it is essential for 
tbe wefibemg of the nation's 
health, more so now than ever. 
Yours faithfully, 

GRAHAM WILKINS, 

Alceda, 

Walton Lane, 

. Sbeppertoo-aD-Thames, Middlesex. 


The law’s delays 


From Mr Leo PUkinyum 
Sir, The Financial Services Act 
1986 received Royal Assent on 
November 7. Section 195 (short- 
dated debentures) canto into force 
immediately, and sections 177, 
178, 180, 182, and most of 198- 
210 (investigations into insider 
dealing) were brought into force 
on November 15. Yet the text of 
foe Act is not yet available, and 
HM Stationery Office is out of 
stock ofthe only edition ofthe Bill 
which even approximates to foe 
Act- 

Ignorance of foe law is, of 
course, no excuse. What about 
unavailability of the law? 

Yours faithfully, 
LEOPILKINGTON, 

37c Albert Square, SW8. 
November 24. 


More distant past 

From Mr Adrian Room 

Sr, I am afraid it is not true to say 

(feature, November 20) that Sir 

Stamford Raffles gave Singapore 

its name when he landed there in 

1819. 

Tbe designation of Sinha Pure 
(“Kon city”) is on record as having 
been that of the Malay capital here 
m tbe fourteenth century, mid 
Raffles, Mho spoke Matey, simply 
adapted the name to its present 
conventional spelling. 

He did personally raise tiie 
British flag there on January 29 
that year, however, on the site of 
the old fortifications. Doubtless 
patrons of the Raffles Hotel mark 
this e vent with an annual Singa- 
pore Sling or two. 

Yours faithfully. 

ADRIAN ROOM, 

1 73 Causeway, 

FetersfiekL Hampshire. 


Future of N Ireland 

From Father J. Buddey 
Sr, Mr A T. Q. Stewart (feature; 
November 15) declared, “In this 
part of the United Kingdom 
d emocracy has ceased to operate". 
The historical reality is that 
democracy has never frilly op- 
erated in that corner of Ireland. 

Tbe plantations of 1609, which 
drove the natives from foe best 
land . and repteced them with 
settles, put paid to foe possibility 
of democracy. The centimes that 
followed saw the minorities 
dis c riminate d gainst time and 
again. The bar <h history teaifies 
to this. 


My own lifetime has seen 
various leaders r gecte d because 
they tried to introduce reform. Mr 
Terence O’Ncifl was doomed 
when he shook the hand of Mr 
Swm iwmwii in an effort at 
reconciliation. Sunningdale, 
which proposed “power sharing”, 
& necessity for any true democ- 
racy, was bullied out of existence. 
Mr Prior's “assembly” never got 
off the ground. Now tbe assanlt is 
on the Anglo-Irish Hillsborough 
agreement And Mr Stewart has 
foe audacity to say. Give us hack 
our democracy. 


accompanied by Dr FitzGerald, 
trampling on the democratic 
rights of people. Even I, an 
Irishman, would have to admit 
that she is genuine and consistent 
in opposing terror and violence 
and is defending the rights of 
individuals. Whatever else, one 
cannot take that from her. 


He depicts Mrs Thatcher as a 
tyrant striding across history. 


In his sidestepping and distort- 
ing, Mr Stewart does a disservice 
to tbe truthful and objective study 
of history. 

Sincerely, 

JOHN BUCKLEY, 

Spanish Race Rectoy, 

22 George Street, WL 
November 18. 



from its responsibilities for a 
cemetery in Peshawar. I gigpst 
there is a far deeper question to be 
asked. Is it morally ri ght for 
British churches to have walked 
away from their responsibilities 
towards a people to whom we are 
indebted historically anrf a jc j’yte 1 ' 
church to which we are indebted 
today? 

Yours sincerely, 

ANTHONY RICHMOND, 

78 Spring Road, 

Abingdon, Oxfordshire. 
November 19. 


From Mr T. C Wilkinson 
Sir, Mr D. M. Waller's cay of 
concern at foe condition of the 
Peshawar cemetery hi g h t igh t* a 
serious situation. It is not, how- 
ever, a new state of affairs and, 
alas, it is repeated throughout the 
sub-continent. 


Tbe Briti s h Association for 
Cemeteries in South Asia (Bacsa), 
die charity to which Mr Waller 
refers, came into existence tea 
years ago as a result of mounting 
concern from those who visited 
the sub-continent about the mili- 
tary and civil cemeteries there, 
excluding those of the two world 
wars under the G o mmonweaffli 
War Graves Commission. 

A policy was adopted of seeking 
to involve all the interested parties 
— the Church, the State, the 
Archaeologica] Survey Depart- 
ment, the Services, the business 
houses — in South Asia and foe. 
UK We have bees very fortunate 
in receiving their active co-opera- 
tion. 


NOVEMBER 28 1952 


The first-night notice of The 

Mousetrap was a reasoned, 

pleasant piece in harmonyunth 
Fleet Streefe general reaction ; 
superiorities were rare in the 
reception gmen to what is billed as 
the worm 8 longest running play. 
Since k opened 214 actors haoe 
taken ports in the eight-strong 
east, and then haoe beat 88 
leading ladies. The cast is now 
changed annually, the last change 
taktng place at the beginning of 
Bus week This evenings 
performance will be the 14,151st 


CAST LIST 


Who's Who in foe TheatrtJ 
MoBie Ralston — Sheila Sim 

Giles Ralston John Paul 

Christopher Wren Allan 

McClelland 
Mrs Rojde~Mignon O'Doherty 
Major MetcaU— Aubrey Dexter 
Miss Caseweu. Jessica Spencer 
MrParavidni Martin Miller 

DeL-Sgt Trotter Richard 

Attenborough 
Producer: Peter Cotes 


AMBASSADORS 

THEATRE 


“THE MOUSETRAP” 


By AGATHA CHRISTIE 


A woman has been strangled in 
Paddington and at MonksweO 


Manor, which is normally within 
easy reach of London, the spectral 
presence of Hercule Poirot seems 
to supervise foe examination of 
half a dozen snowbound paying 
guests by e very young pohigman 


who arrives on akm. It is all for 
their own good — and that, too, is 
in the Poirot tradition — since one 
other person, or perhaps two other 
people, will probably meet the 

ttnmo rnm liuiiumt tmil 

The Poirot tradition is, in foot, 
part of Mrs Christie's elaborately 
skfifbl scheme to keep ns guessing 
or even to make us wave the matter 

aside as already guessed. As usual, 
we swallow foe bait. No sooner 

hmw w maria tha nwirfal flirt. 

Poirot might advantageously be 
substituted for the d e tectiv e on 


nlria have a cubit or so 
to his height, and let himself be 
impersonated by, say, Mr Austin 


Trevor, than the author shows 
excellent reason wfcy her detective 
should be instead within Mr 
Richard Attenborough's uny- No 
sooner have we, following the 
precept* of our old friend Poirot, 
peeredbackinto the past— fortius 
is what is known, rather grandly, as 
a revenge tragedy — and found in 
foe present a suitable couple for foe 
AiH victims of h»ng ago, foim the 
ingenious pattern shifts, and we 
are back where we started. 

So much, it may be supposed 


the printed tale could also do. Yet 
foe piece admirably fMfiia the 
special requirements of the theatre. 
There are only two acts, the first of 
exposition and preparation, the 
second of action and conjecture. 
The peopte are nicely assorted, and 
oprfi is individually htnJM «mri 
readfiy identified — the manly 
young woman, foe effeminate 


young man, the dubious military 
man, the maiden hefy who perpetu- 
ally fancies she is being imposed 
on, foe dderiy foreigner with the 
pointed face whom Mr Martin 
Millar mafcpw half devil, half jack- 
in-the-box, and, of course* tiie 
young cockle who own and nm the 
place. Three provide the colour, the 
mystification, the suspects, and 


the screams, and Mias Jessica 
Spencer, Mr Allan McClelland, Mr 
Aubrey Dexter, and Afire Mignon 
O’Doherty, as the first of the 
c har ac t e r s m e nti o ned above, and 


Minn fihffilp Sim nrM ^ Mr John 
Paul, as the test two, all fit the play 
as pieces in a jigsaw 
puzzle. There remain the alarming 
silences, which are perhaps foe 
true test of such a piece on the 
stage. That we fed them to be 
alarming can only be thanks to the 
producer, Mr Peter Cotes. 


Racing handicaps 


From Mr G. N. D. Locock 
Sir, I really do not see the point is 
sending racehorses to stud as soon 
as they have won a gronp race — an 
act which invariably puts three or 
four noughts on their value. 

John Hislop (November 1 1) is 
quite right in aiguing that in top- 
class races, the winning of which 
determines breeding prospects, 
abnormal nutrients shook! not be 
permitted. The usual purpose of 
these is to overcome some inher- 
ent defect. 

But John Hislop did not go far 
ennn gh in aiguing a case for 
breeding from the best and tough- 
est animate 

I suggest that the rules govern- 
ing all three-year-old group one 
races should be changed so that 
winners of afi soch races are kept 
in training as four-year-olds, on- 
less a veterinary certificate is 
produced to say they are unsound. 

The racegoing public would get 
the benefit of seeing good horses 
more often and breeders would 
have greater scope for thoroughly 
assessing the relative merits of 
horses before they are sent to stud. 
Yours faithfully, 

G. N. D. LOCOCK, 

Greengates, 

Whhsbury, 

Fordingbridge, Hampshire. 


Cold comfort? 

From the Reverend Andrew Beer 
Sir, A parson in a hacking jacket! 
In die words of Lady Bracknell, 
“the idea is grotesque and 
irreligious”. 

Anyway, it’s sorely only because 
lots of people spend lots of money 
on lots of clothes that the Rev- 
erend Edward Underhill (Novem- 
ber 22) is able to display himself in 
his Omm finery, to tbe envy of all 
in Tyne and Wear. 

Yours faithfully, 

ANDREW BEER, 

St Pancras, 

Irelands f •> 

Lewes. East Sussex. 


: — > ■„ * 






TW. ■*»* 7 .-vrr^r 


S-SQ. 






TW“ 





18 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 26 1986 



COURT AND SOCIAL 


COURT 

CIRCULAR 

BUCKINGHAM PALACE 
November 25: The Queen hdd 
a a Investiture at Buckingham 
Palace this morning. The Sri of 
Airiie (Lord Chamberlain) had 
an audience with Her Msyesty 
and presented an Address from 
the House of Lords to which 
The Queen was graciously 
pleased to make reply. 

Her Majesty held a Council at 
12.40 pm. 

There were present: the Vis- 
count Whitelaw (Lord Presi- 
dent). the Right Hon Nicholas 

Edwards, MP (Secretary of State 
for Wales), the Right Hon John 
Stanley, MP (Minister of State 

for the Armed Forces) and the 

Right Hon John Selwyn Gam- 
mer. MP (Minister of State, 
Ministry of Agriculture, Fish- 
eries and Food). 

Mr Geoffrey de Deney was m 
attendance as Cleric of the 
Councfl. 

The Viscount Whitelaw had 
an audience with The Queen 
before the CoundL 

Mr Tristan GareKJones, MP 
(Vice-Chamberlain of the 
Household) was received in 
audience by Her Maj esty and 
presented an Address from the 
House of Commons to which 
The Queen was graciously 
pleased to make reply. 

The Duke of Edinburgh. Pa- 
tron and Twelfth Man of the 
Lord’s Taverners, this morning 
at Buckingham Palace presented 
the 1986 County Championship 
Trophy to Essex County Cricket 
Club. 

His Royal Highness. Patron 
and Trustee, attended Recep- 
tions at St James’s Palace for 
young people who have reached 
the Gold Standard in The Duke 
of Edinburgh’s Award. 

The Duke of Edinburgh, 
Grand President this afternoon 
attended the British Common- 
wealth Ex-Services League 
Cbunril Meeting at Buckingham 
Palace. 

His Royal Highness, P a tr on 
and Trustee, this evening gave a 
Reception for the Friends of 
The Duke of Edinburgh’s Award 
Scheme. 

The Duke of Edinburgh, Pa- 
- tron of the London Federation 
of Boys’ Clubs, attended a fund- 
raising dinner at daridges, 
where His Royal Highness was 
received by the President of the 
Federation (the Duke of 
Westminster). 

Mr Brian McGrath was in 
attendance.' 

The Princess Anne, Mrs Mark 
Phillips. President of the British 
Olympic Association, was enter- 
tained at luncheon and after- 
words attended a meeting of the 
Association at 1, Wandsworth 
Plain, London, SW18. 

Her Royal Highness was re- 
ceived by the Chairman of the 
Association (Mr Charles 
Palmer). 

The Hon Mrs Legge-Bonrke 
and Lieutenant-Colonel Peter 
Gibbs were in attendance. 

The Princess Anne, Mrs Mark 
Phillips this evening attended a 
Ball, organized by St Loye’s 
College for the Disabled, at the 
Huriingham Club, London, 
SW6. 

Her Royal Highness was re- 


ceived by the President of the 
London Friends of St Loye’s 
Society (the Viscount. 
Exmouih). 

The Hon Mis Legge-Bonrke 
was in attendance. 

CLARENCE HOUSE 
November 25: Queen Elizabeth 
The Queen Mother this after- 
noon opened the Small A nnual 
Referral Hospital at the Royal 
Veterinary Coflege, Hawkstead, 
North Mymms, Hertfordshire. 

Mrs Patrick CampbeD-Pres- 

ton and Sir Martin Gzlliax were 
in attendance. 

Mrs Patrick Campbell-Pres- 
ton has succ ee ded Ruth. Lady 
Penney as Lady-in-Waiting to 
Her Majesty. 

KENSINGTON PALACE 
November 25: The Princess of 
Wales, Patron, British Long 
Foundation, this evening at- 
tended a Gala Concert in aid of 
the Foundation at Merchant 
Taylors’ Hall, Thrcad ne edlc 
Street, London, EC3. 

Mrs Max Pike the Lieutenant- 
Commander Richard Ayfard, 
RN were in attendance. 
KENSINGTON PALACE 
November 25: The Princess 
Margaret, Countess of Snow- 
don, President, The Royal Bal- 
let, was represe n ted by Sir 
Frederick Ashton at the Service 
of Thanksg iving for Sir Robert 
Helpmann which was held in St 
Paul's Church, Covent Garden, 
today. 

KENSINGTON PALACE 
November 25: P rin ces s Alice, 
Duchess of Gloucester, Patron, 
The Grange, today received 
Lady Cubitt on relinquishing 
her appointment as Chairman. 

In the afternoon Her Royal 
Highness. Patron, East African 
Women's League (United King- 
dom). was present at the Gen- 
eral Meeting at Holy Trinity 
Church House. Brampton 
Road, London, SW7. 

Mrs Michael Harvey was in 
attendance. 

The Duke of Gloucester this 
afternoon opened the Curver 
Consumer Products Ltd factory 
at Corby. In the evening His 
Royal Highness. Colond-in- 
Chiet Royal Pioneer Corps, was 
present at the Corps Central 
Mess Dinner Night at Simpson 
Barracks, Northampton. 

The Duke of Gloucester, who 
travelled in an aircra ft of The 
Queen's Flight, was attended by 
Lieutenant-Colonel Sir Simon 
Bland. 

The Duchess of Gloucester 
this morning opened the World 
Travel Market 1986 at Olympia 
Exhibition Centre, London, 
W14. 

Mrs Michael Wigley was in 
attendance. 

YORK HOUSE 
ST JAMES’S PALACE 
November 25: The Duke of 
Kent, Vice Chairman of the 
British Overseas Trade Board, 
this morning opened tile 
Interphex 86 Exhibition ax the 
Metropole Hotel, Brighton, East 
Sussex and later vis ted Singer 
Link-Miles, Lancing, West 
Sussex. 

His Royal Highness, who 
travelled in an aircraft of The 
Queen’s Flight, was attended by 
Captain Michael CampbeU- 
Lamerton. 

The Duke of Kent, President 
of the Britain-Australia Bi- 


centennial Committee,, this eve- 
ning attended a Reception atthfi 
Mansion House. Later, His 
Royal Highness, as Patron, at- 
tended a concert given by the 
London Philharmonic Or- 
chestra at the Royal Festival 
Hfltl- 

£r Richard Buckley was m 
attendance. 

The Duchess of Kent, Honorary 
Colonel of the Yorkshi re Volun- 
teers, today reeved Lieutenant 

Colonel John Dowuham on 
assuming command of the 3rd 
Battalion and Lieutenant Colo- 
nel Simon Hill on relinquishing 
fin* appointment. 


Princess Anne. President of the 
Royal Agricultural Society of 
England, will attend the Cooper 

dinner at Oaridge’s hotel on 
December 1. 

The Queen and the Duke of 
Edinburgh w 31 visit the 1986 
Smithfidd Show at Earls Court 
/ m i X c eimh er 2. 

Princess Anne win open the new 

HTV West studio and office 
f acilities at the Television 
Centre, Bath Road, Bristol, on 
December 2. 

Pr in cess Anne, President of the 
British Knitting and Clothing 
Export Council, will visit Mul- 
berry Company (Design) Lim- 
ited, The Street. Chflcompton, 
Somerset, on December 2. 

The Duke of Edinburgh wQl 
attend the second meeting of the 
Council of British Food and 
Farming Year at Buckingham 
Palace on December 2. 

Tbe Duke of Edinburgh, Patron 
for the Outward Bound Trust, 
will attend a recept i on at 
Buckingham Palace on Decem- 
ber 2 for the donors to the 
fortieth anniversary appeal of 
the trust 

The Prince ofWales will present 
the J986 Willis Faber Manufac- 
turing Effectiveness Awards at 
the Hilton hotel on December 2. 
Tbe Prince of Wales, Chairman 
of the Cambridge Common- 
wealth Trust, will be the host at 
a reception for the trust at 
Kensington Palace on Decem- 
ber 2. 

The Duke of Edinburgh win 
attend a dinner given by the 
Royal Yachting Association at 
Claridge’s hotel on December 2. 
Tbe Duke of Edinburgh, patron 
and trustee, will attend the Duke 
of Edinburgh's Award Scheme 
General Council in Bourne- 
mouth on Dece m ber 3. 

A thanksgiving service for the 
life of Sir Gordon Richards will 
be held at St Margaret's, West- 
minster, on Tuesday, December 
16. at noon. 

Birthdays today 

Major-General Sir John Ariand, 
58; Mr Cyril Cusack, 76; Mr 
Geoffrey Drain, 68; Sir Sidney 
Eburne, 68; Lord Forte. 78; the 
Earl of Gowrie. 47; Mr John 
Selwyn Gammer, MP, 47; MrR. 
W. Hamilton, 81; Professor Sir 
Harry Hinsley, 68; Vice-Ad- 
miral Sir James Kennon, 61; 
Lord McFadzean of Kelvinside, 
71; Mr John Moore. MP, 49; 
Colonel K. H. Osborne. 72; Mr 
Charles Schultz, 64; Lord 
Strathcona and Mount Royal, 
63; Miss Tina Turner, 48; Mr 
Emlyn Williams, 81. 


Royal Horticultural Society 

Ornamental shrubs and 
orchids dominate show 


Tie Royal 

Society’s flower show opened 
yesterday ia Westminster. 

A competition for araa- 
meatal trees and shrubs is 
beingheki with tins show, and 
the Basse cap for conifers 
shown for foliage effect was 
awarded to AttBe, Cosatsss of 
Basse and tbe National Trust, 
of Nymans Gardens, Hand- 
cross, West Sossex. 

The exhibit consists of 
Sdadopitys rertiaUaia, Pam 

l flaBw-AMnpi and ft afag th 

dasidiana. 

Mrs A. H. Potter, of Watf- 
worfo, Surrey, is also a leading 
prizewinner and is showing foe 
gold foliage of pmratia, green 
seed pods of halesia and goU 


Society oS 
Competition 


By Aten Toogood, Hortiadtore Correspondent 

Horticultural ‘ tbe trophy winners are: G wiegated-fid»ff 
DfluIU, of London, the W. B. 


In the 
Great Britain’s 


Schroder -challenge cap for a 
coflectfon of orchids; M. Fat- 
ter, of Hemhm, Middlesex, the 
Jeal challenge trophy for Cat- 
Utya labiate; R. W. Bayne, of 
Wraysbary, Buckingham- 
shire, the Coach Party chal- 
lenge trophy for a pink 
as ce centrum; Mrs J. 
Keflecher, of Orpington. Seat, 
the David Sander cfcaflenge 
cop for spedes and the 
Ritters hansen rlwl lw i p ny 
for miniature spedes; T. 
Lewis, of London, the 
Charkswnrfo t * Qn ** , gp am 

far odoBtodossums. 

Theftmowin^pbnits have 
received the award of merit 
Cotomeaster gambM. red- 
aas 
Wltfte^ 


berried shrub. Pm 
la uroau rs os *MarMed Wh 


Comas ‘Norman Hadden’,. 
email tree with stnwbory- 
KbP finite, all dm by the 
HRKar Arb o retum , Ampfidd, 
Ham pshir e Heliampbora 
nutans, candraroos ptat from 

Goyana, shown by tbe Oxford 

Botanic Garden; Iris 
plani/olio* bine ftowCT S, for 
alpine tease, and Pkotmta 
(Strataaesiaj daddm nr 
Modulate Tndn latte, yd- 
tow-bemed shrub, both shown 
by the ifirectw, Royal Botanic 
Gardens, Kew; Chrysan- 
tkemsm ‘Rystai*, yellow spray 
variety, raised and shown by F 

Rowe, of Wellington, Somer- 
set 

The show, at the New 
Horticultural Hall, central 
London, is open today from 10 
am to 5 pm. 


Forthcoming marriages 


Mr MJEL Brown 
and Miss SwF.NfeboOs 
The engagement is announced 
between Michael Ross Brown, 
of Walton-oo-Thames, Surrey, 
and Susan Frances Nicfaolls, of 
South Woodford, Essex. 

Mr J. Cox 
and Miss K. Royds 
Tbe engagement is announced 
between Jeremy (Will) son of 
Squadron Leader William Cox, 
RAF, retd, of Stoke-Mandeville, 
and Mrs Patricia Cox. of Ayles- 
bury, ami Karen, daughter of the 
late Bryan Royds and Mis 
Elizabeth Royds. of Thors- 
tonland, Huddersfield. 

Mr AJLDeal 
and Miss S. Prince 
The engagement is announced 
between Adrian, only son of Mr 
and Mrs CW. Dent of Harro- 
gate, North Yorkshire, and Su- 
san, youngest daughter of the 
late Mr and Mrs F. Braith waits, 
of Leeds, West Yorkshire. 

Mr AX. Goddard 
and Miss LH. Power 
The engagement is announced 
between Anthony, son of Major- 
General and Mrs John God- 
dard, of Cranford, Pinewood 
Hill. Reel, and Isabel, daughter 
of Colonel and Mrs John Power, 
of Mystole, near Canterbury. 


Mr HJL Hanriboa Fairley 
and Miss AX. Kyle 
The engagement is announced 
between Hans, son of Dr and 
Mis J. Hamilton Fairley, Read- 
ing, Berkshire, and Alison, 
daughter of Dr and Mrs A. Kyle, 

Kcmpside, Glasgow. 

MrD.CHartsffl.RA, 
and Mbs J. Hoyfend 

The engagement is announced 
between David Clavering, eldest 
son of Mr and Mrs John C 
HartsjH, of Chalfont House, 
Shal den. Alton, Hampshire, 
Joanne, eldest daughter of Mr 
and Mrs Graham Hoy land, of 
Oak Bank, Penistone Yorkshire. 
MrCP.Mfflar- 
aad Miss SJL Gntenehaum 
The engagement is announced 
between Christopher, only son 
of the late Mr AJL Millar and 
Mrs MX. Millar, of Carshahon, 
Surrey, and Suzanne, daughter 
of Mr T. Gruenebaum, of New 
York, and Mrs L Gruenebaum, . 
of London and New York. 

Mr A-P. Murray 
and Miss P J. Jarvis 
The engagement is announced 
between Anthony, son of the 
late Mr. Patrick Murray and of 
Mrs Patrick Murray, of 
Felpham, Sussex, and Jane, 
daughter of Mr Ryan Jarvis and 
the hue Mrs Jean Jarvis, of 
Phantom House, Newmarioet, 
Suffolk. 


Mr MJL Morris 
and Miss R- 
Pezmington 

Tbe engagement is announced 
betwee n Martin Robert, son of 
Mr and Mrs John Morris-Eyton, 
of Beckside, Whicham, Mfflom, 
Cumbria, and Rowena, youn- 
gest of Mr and Mrs 

Patrick Gordon-Duff- 

Penningtou, of Muocaster Cas- 
tle, Ravengiass, Cumbria. 

FEgte Ijtentenant DX. Prowse 
and Dr CJL Shmnd 
The engagement is announced 


. son of the late 
MrHJ. ProwseandofMisPJvL 
Prowse, of Barbican, London, 
and Oaudia, younger daughter 
of fii pftri" JJL Stand, OBE , 
RN, and Mrs Stand, of East- 
bourne, Sussex. 


Marriage 


Mr AJL Badey 
aad Miss MJL Ambaye 
The marriage took place on 
October 9, 1986, at the Rich- 
mond Register Office, between 
Mr Alexander Graham Bailey, 
son of Mr and Mrs David 
Malcolm Bailey, ami Miss Mir- 
iam Atsede Ambaye, daughter 
f Mr and Mrs John Ambaye. 


Memorial service 

Sir Robert Hdpuuum 
Princess Margaret was repre- 
sented by Sir Frederick Ashton, 
OM, CH, at a service of thanks- 
giving for tbe life of Sir Robert 
Helpmann held yesterday at St 
Paul's, Co vent Garden. Canon 
David Elliott officiated. Sir 
John Tooley, General Director 
of the Royal Opera House, 
Co vent fimiim, read the lesson 
and a tribute from Dame 
Ninette de Valois, CH. Miss 
Margaret Rawlings read from 
Adonois by Percy Bysshe Shelley 
and Mr faul Scofield read from 
The Tempest by William Shake- 
speare. Dame Margot de Fon- 
teyn de Arias gave an address. 
Mr Anthony Twiner, piano, 
played a selection of music from 
ballets associated with Sir Rob- 


ert and accompanied Miss 
Yvonne Kenny, who sang 
Bailero. Mr Ralph Elston, or- 
gan. and Mr James Watson, 
trumpet, played Tchaikovsky’s 
The Sleeping Beauty. The Dep- 
uty High Commissioner for 
Australia and the Agent-General 
for South Australia attended. 
Others present included: 

Mbs Shelia Helpmann (sttfert: Pamela 
Count r*% Jemcoe. Lord and Cady 


■um Beryl] 

I Mr Wjynf Sleep. Mr MHtfarl 

Mr Charles Gordon an d Mbs Pamela 

May- Mt» Jane Brae. Mr David Wad. 

Mr Aatbany DowelL Mr MMcotm 
Wnt Uii TO on (M add Of Pa> Qoegn'a 
Mostct. Mr peter 

raiHin Lyase. Mfss ■ 

Mbs Moyra Fraser. Mr DonaM 
MacLaaty. Mxs Pam ScoCaid. Hi 
Andrew Cr u l ckst iank. Mr John 
TBmcrasd Miss BarSara Jefford. Mr 

MlcftaiH Powell. MT John FleKL Mr 

4 MTS - kmartian Rwithan Dr and 

Mrs P E Thompson Hancock. Mr 

WHUam diappen. Mr Mtnrray MeLvtn. 

Mbs Gwen Ncteoo. Mr Leslie Ed- 

wards. Mrs Jane SaocM. Mr Peter 
wns&t (SnUbr-a Wella Royai BalleO 




FGQnoo (Harwood ArtOirW. BdteP 

Woodward and Mb* F JKtaoa CSX 

John Anttdnce Brigade). Mba Mi 

TrusooC ORcanU Academy of DoncinQ). 

MBs Jane Nicholas (dance dir ec to r. 
Arts Council of oread BrttafnL Mr 
RoMr Onff CmstdenL Scotnab BaDaQ- 

Mbs SmB woodcock (naarc M»-| 

scum). Mr Michael Brodrtcfc IMP 

I n»«t- London Baltel Ckrte). Mr Jofai 

wewey (Sana RinMd Mr George 

Hoare {Theatre nayaL Dnay Lane). 



Mr Georga Get, Mr wimaml 
crawshsw. Mr raooias BerlazaB. Mr 

Ewan Balfour. Mr KSeran Tmtney. W 

Alan Martin. Mr David Alex a nder . 

HMraMagL Mr Hugh Man- 

fWabh. Mr John 


Mbs Bddgd 


Mr George Straaoo. Mr 
MUchcB. Mr serf .Mrs An- 


Calls to the Bar in Michaelmas term 


LINCOLN'S INN 

Catherine A Roberts. MA and. LLB. 
ChureMU CoU. Gnobrldpe; Vv s 
canide. LLB. London Unhr: M P 
Brehcny. BA CLaw). Kcot Unlv : Mee 
K Lee. BA (Law) Sussex Unlv; 
Adeiene Tee. LLB. B ncMp p ham Unlv: 


LesKy A whom. Ba (Law) Kent Unlv: 
K H D CMS. B6c CEcoire). Louctfi- 
Dorough Unlv: Jm H COnway. fiA 
(Law). Kent Ltahr Sorlna S Hinder. 
BA. Hull Unlv: T C Wong. LLB. King's 
CoU. London: F Wee. LLB. Cen 
London Poly; R K Saboote. LLB. 
Brunei Unlv: AntaU G Asnanee. LLB. 
1^: UimOla SeenaUi. BA. Unlv of 
Ontario. LLB. Bucklxmhora Unlv: S J 
DvWe. LLB. Brttiol Poly. Marta H 
Jahall. BA ILawX Cen London Poly: A 
A K Khan. BA. Gonvine and aha 


Coll. Cambridge; Sarasvathy 
Krtstmamny. LLB. Bo ddu tfmm Unlv: 
K Qwicu-Sekyere. Bsc Bus Manage- 
ment. Unlv ofcnana: Btan m z 
Fadzafa. BAOawL EaUna CoD HE: 

PauUne J Gnoeford. LLB. 

Poly: R G Langham. BA. T 
Oxford: Hardarsban Kaor d/o 
aifflWkhJ | i^..LLB I London Unlv: 




A K Frasa-. BA. UMv victoria. LLB. 
Unlv BrniBh CDJumWa. BA. New Coil 
O xford; C K KWt LLB. Warwick 
Unlv; E M Han. Bristol poly: Jessica G 
P Creoue. LLB. King's CML London; 
Heather A Clarke. BA. Unlv W Indies. 
LLB. Newcastle Poly; p U Yen Chen. 
LLB. Cm London Pobn Monica Vlk 
KUng KotL BA (Law). South Bank 
Poly: Mohamed Nik t£m Nik Aliena 
Sahuanm. LLB Middlesex Poly: I B 
Sharpies. LLB. Untv of E AngUu H P 


Coll. O xf ord; N_N G Cusworth. BA. 

Christ Church. Ozfoid: m P Grtenhs. 

LLB. Leeds Unlv; I 


BAH 

EvtSnte 
Poly: AH 

Newcastle U 



Redfeam. BA. Vcrtt JJnhr; RM 
JUndar. LLB. N London Poly. Bdkaxta 
C fhoomah. LLB. N London Poty; a S 
Lucas. BA CUrw). Kent Unlv: a 
L ederer. BA tLawL Manchester PoQr. 
Paulina M Bhamea. LLB. Maidi attr 

Harrietn- Black, llb. Manches- 




Cream tip No. 49 


Dip into 
something 
pure and simple. 

Honey Cream Dip:^ 

Here’s an unusual and 
attractive sweet that literally takes 
minutes to make. 

Mix together 150ml (V 4 pint) fresh Double Cream 
and 2 tablespoons of clear honey. Whip until 
mixture starts to thicken. 

Add 150ml (V 4 pint) plain yogurt Continue to 
whip until thick. 

Sprinkle with chopped walnuts. (Serves 4.) 

Honey dip makes an ideal dip for fresh 
fruit Or it can be served in 
individual dishes with a crisp 
biscuit 

r delicious way to end a meal. 

Get fresh with 




ter Poly: H v Thomas. LLB. KUmsUsi 
P otyfN Chan. LLB- S Of Ortemalapd 
African Studies. London:, J oan Y | 
Moo re. LLB . Trent Poly: M D Barca.' 
BA. ChurctdB CoO. Cambridge: R D 
Roy. BA. Chmagon g^BA (Law) Kent 
Unlv; Rachel Fimg-Ylns Sham. LLB. 
NE London Poly: J H D Sykes. BA 
[Law). Kingston Poly: PTC Waning. 
LLB. L an caste r Unlv; AMMa D Law- 
rence. LLB. NE L ondon P Obr. Mrus 
un ttrautm. llb. Buckingham umc 
Barbara G T MHogr. LLB. Unlv 
CoU. London: C C Bear. BA. Magdaten 
CoIL Mord: R D BlckerdJke. LLB. 
.Nott ingha m Unlv: Joanna M Handyn. 
BA. Cmisr Church. Oxford: Ar^rwOa 

0 Mobee. BA. CUy of London Po tar. B 
H Tan. ba. UnW ot Malaya. LLB. 
UMv of London. P H Morris. MATS 
John's CotL Cambridge: Janette 

1 Poneous. LLB. Wolver hamy oon Poly; 
MM " il '-.LLa L iverpool Uttfv: 

llb. s of 


S^gaSSTfc^SSSg: 

. untv ColL London: N D Caddirit. BCX- 
BA. StECtound HaP. Ox ford: Plana R 
ra Coll. London: 

Unov: 

WMBWO. BA. UMv Wtodsor. Ontario. 
Canada. LLB. EaBng CoU of HE: R J 

aaS ***- My^ryoi Urd^y 


e James. Ba. bc 


Of E 


A J Needham. LLB. UMv o f London: F 
G Borne. LLB. Buckingham UMv: 
M Adler, ba. carton Con. 


CamWIdoe; AmrH Kaur d/o Artan 
SJngh GaL becoim. UMv of Malaya. 


Unlv otLonrton. 

INNER TEMPLE 

N J Cox. MA. Bllnots: A J Um LLB. 

Kingston Poly; N K NiroL LLB. Unlv 

CoUTLondon: Hilary N Messer. LLB. 
Middlesex PoU^M A CrfcOTtm. BA. 
New Con. Oxford: T J ifflencock- BA. 

St Had* and SI Bede COIL 

Linda P SaxrnL BA. Wo» 
Cambridge; Jessica M BaiL«>, — - 
Southamt? ioO|| ^ Unlv: ^ Pol ly ^ L 

Cod. London: Madelyn K VkSaL LLB. 
up hr. A P K ent. LLB . N London 
-: 8» K Harnanan. ba. Bir- 


Oxfont 

Chrtsa CoIL Oxford.- BL Sear.LLB. 

UMv OotL Cardiff: A A J TrtMaad. 
llb. Hun Unlv: P LTnmnuO, ba. 
Klngao n potoi I Ma e tt-u . B*, llw 
■gMaly: P AstoohJones. UR. UMv 
LAngua: R E Anderson. BA. 
■feta CotL Cambridge: R A 
ArtoHasamy. LLB. LLM. UMv of 
London: Sonan A wgeyaratoe. BA. 
Bamol OotL Oxford: G B D avies. BA. 

LLM. St John's CoO.^ OHME A L 

R Jack. BA. Hertford CoO. Oxf ord: D 

R Garland. LLB. LL M. AK C. 

Coa. L on d o n: P mcnanbooBBB 
Umnste PoQr: R cany. _IJJS._Uvg- 
IP^PlAMoooJMMd 


Arty: C A Caie. LLB. Vntv ofLoodoa: 

C Wimentta e A Nkwga. BSoc * ScLi 

urdv or Ottawa. LLB. WmwKk UMv: 
Patricia A HoQtns. LLB. Warwick 
Unlv: D Bubnan. LLB. Newcastle 
Poly: Anne M Wallace. LLB. Man- 
chester POlV. Jenntfg D NadeL LLB. 
Bristol UnM G B R Ooffls. BCom. 
Untv of Toronto. BA^j Corpus ChrtsBe 
OotL Oxford; H A "TVbvmj, HA. St 
Edmond Had. Oxford: Usfia Devi 
Krtstman. llb. UMv of U xtotMK J v 
pro^WisnlewskL LLB. Birmingham 
Unlv: J O Finnegan, BCL. LLB. UMv 
■■■coll. Dohtta: B V Rogan. BA MA. 
LEC Trtndy coH-DuhUn: A S. Lewis. BA. 
Mlttte Pranbrolce Con. Oxford: J J Gordon. 

BQL Nat UMv or Irelan d; M P Ames. 
AB. Yale UMv: Patricia O-Brieru BA. 
TltnUy CoO. Dubt&u J E 

janes. BE. JUUH UKBTSRfnrLKIBl N 
J L MacGowm. BA. TTlDHy Cod. 
TOMta; Greta M B Wabh. BCt, UMv 


con 


umv vAw.Ddbttn Franc** T Effffi. 
BCL. BL. Untv CoD. Dublin. 


UnlvCoB. 
UMV CoO 


mmmm ba. exam o&pi 
Elizabeth Shaw. ha. 

London; A 



r- BA I 111 ill »_l.lnlji.— I W 
MMt-LLB. IXrndee Uzrfv: A 


Atenat- 

,, Wolver- 

V E Jude. BA. erty of 


Con. 


w y«K S 






umv: S G NowdL ba. jesas Coil 
C an*ridg« C LG Bayba. BA. EMter 
Unlv: Nina D Stadnix. BA. HMfleld 
Pcrfy B J Heme. LLB. Cm London 
Poly: S H Kanoax. BD. Dags CoD. 
Land an Garonne WUktos. Dtp Law. 
Cen London Pair. Mankrae A F Allan. 
BA. Bristol Unlv; Lo Lai Wan. LLB. 
Unlv Coil. London: Emma L 
BroacftenLBA. Qd~Mary CoO. 
London: Sarah J sna. LLB. Oa 
Manr CoB, London: N J Wetemley. 
BA. Jena CoB. CaaMhcR D C 
HowaL BA. HMBeld oStUMK 

B 

W^^BA^^eS^UMvfR^^ld P 
Came. BA, SomerviBa CoIL Oxford: 
Rag u«f A Machado Pe_ Vaz C mrMro . 
BA. Snssex UMV; Ledey A Carter. 

BA. Wortww cod. Oxford: Napna 
Khahwm. LLB. N London floteJl. 
CbapHn. BA. ExeterUrtv. K L ShMd. 
LLB. LSE; S M MOb. LLB. BiT- 
ndogham UMv: Oariene A Scotl BA. 
MSc. CKy UMv. New York. LLB. 
Essex Unhr C Roberts. MA. Wbv- 
chester Cwl Cambridge and MPtM of 
the Courtatdd lust: P A Brook. US. 
Leeds Unhr; Kalhryn A tflnL BA. 
Trent PMy: J □ ntrWwin . LLB. 
Brislal Unlv: Sharon M Baatfle. LLB. 
Uvdr Lnhr: Sarah B E O’Qmoor. 
LLB. Southampton Untv: R M Brown- 
ing. LLB. Soumamgton Unlv; R T 
Stmoaaa. LLB. Manchester Untv: ON 


auMes. 

London. BA. CarBoa Unlv. Canada: 
johannah Cntts. LLB. OMtaner bbt 
HE: A A Cameron. LLB. BrtStM Untv: 

Counsea. BA. Bedford Cnu. London: C 
OMonga LLB. Leiratef Unlv: F 
Etna. BSe. Tham es ray. LostOxu 
Nicola Morse. LLB. Trent Poly: D C 
Dudkowgti. ba, soewt UMv; Lorna 
M Buna. LLB. Leicester po an Jayne 
E Stoaard-HHL jab, BuddMiwm 
Untv: Susan □ Nefl. LLB. soottiano- 
ton Unlv; S T R Sevan. BA. Warwick 
umv: M A F Borneo. LLB HUB umv; 
C D Blackwood. BA. GtmvlBe and 
Calus Con. Cambridge: Aim D Wil- 

liams. U3. LSEL Yvonae C McCabe. 
LLB. Trinlly CoO. DabUn: R WTk 


P— — 1 UMv of 
[omwEba. UMv 

otL o MdO M J J Harm. BA. St Peter'S 

con. Oxford; w MR Pimarey. MA. 

Christy CotL Camtrkte M Thnow. 
MB. BC3i. Webb S of Medicine: 
MitJwfle M Ptadnng. UALSE J W P 
Waters. BA. Peterbouse. Cambridge: J 
C Loa des . 8Sc Unhr. W G H 

Godwin. BA. Unhr Oofl, London: Avr& 
- m^^M^Sablna A 

1°^ 


S H Lee. HA. Kent VW 

MaHV | I f», i uh .UT » ui> | 

Barnes. BA. Middlesex . 


London: J PRose-J 
Gibbs. BA. Christ O] 

T Qaanw-Brown. 
Oxford; M R Haftke. BA. 
HaB. Oxford; C LocTBA. j 
R s Gr a h a m. BA. UMv j 
A M Davison. Dip Utt 


LSE: P M E 
M 



GRAY’S INN^ 

A Prestwlch. LLB. UMvH 
J BladcManang 
Cl I I II———— 
M WMIa.. BA, Untv of Kenc C V 
wanep. u£rUMv of Warwick. LLM. 
Queens' CoB. cuMaldge: HJ Rich- 
ma. Nervunuun: JADwye. LLB. 
Utdv of London; P M 8 MttcbelL 
BWOK JD bherwop d . BScfEng). 

%z 

MA. Lmcrtn CoB. OrfordTs S Bhakar. 

I CotLQxkvxLL L B. untv or Bnckmg- 

S^M M 

m3 

| « LLM. LSE: Nerys A JjegbwL BA. 

>Cofl . Lo ndon. LLM. 

Damk Wokteg: D J Lennon, ba. 



OBITUARY 

major-general 

PATRICK HOBART 
Dashing tank commander 

MajM^General Patrick Ho- 
ban, CB, DSO, OBE, MC 
who had a fine war record m 
tanks and rose to bediwtoref 
tiie Royal Ai moored Corps, 
died with ins wife, Sasie, in a 
road accident on November 
22. He was 69. 

Patrick Robert Chanrier 
Hobart was bom in India on 
November 14, 1917. His Ba- 
de. Major-General Sir Ferny 
Hobart, was the pioneer of 
tank tactics, design and tech- 
niques, whose xevoftitM 

options led him tobert 


served on foe staff of foe 
Armoured Division. He to 
his MC st the Battle of 
Abmem.' 

In foe early stages of foe 
Nonnffldy campaign be teas 
senior staff officer of the 
Guards Artntitired Dhrisfa, 
tad -was appobled OBE . for 
frnswork. 

. But in September IW4 he 
was given command offoclsi 
Ros-al Tank Regoaem which 
he ledteitb great dash and sktll 
from foe Fate* teeakoet, in 
foe race for foe Somme, and 
across foe Rhine into foe bean 
ofGamany, gaining a DSO in 
1945. VBs war service also 
earned fails four mentions is 
despatches. 

Among, his post-war ap- 
porntments were command of 
the 2nd KTR with the British 
Army of foe Rhine, and in 
North Africa, and he returned 
to BAOR as commander of 
20th Armoured Brit 



i Unlv: DP 
Unlv: 1 


P OSDHR. BA. 

Water. LLB. 


MIDDLE TEMPLE 


ZiokawskL CunuTD Cbllof EducaUvn. 
Oxford: KldcMs K GfD. BA. UMv 
Malaya. LLB. Unlv London: S 
Morufly. BCL. MA. Braseno se Coil 
O xford: Sr TynaaK Kscoe. BA. Kml 
unlv: M & PuHonq. BA Chrlortiwch 
COU. Oxford: K H Urn, LLB. LSC: H H 
D Arthurs. BA. BSc. llb. London 


■ 

— - O L WrtghL BA. 

con. C am bridg e: M A French. 
— - ua umv: H N PteuiLff. 

PnH IfindQTV 

LLM. LSC J M 
Bank pa ty; M B 
‘ K 

M J J 

__ M P 

Danby. LLB._mcMw.Unty! P B 
HLHdnhrie. BA. . 9 Acne's Cog. 
Oxford: Sarah J. WIMaira. LLB. 
Brtnot Untv: D l . sna rp. BA. Sj 
Catharine's CoIL OxforO;. Ama nda J 

Rowlands. BSc. UCNW. Aberyvtwyth: 
E w Foohote-LukaTBA. UHlv of Sier ra 
Lm*». LLa umv cfu^srCBia a 
Moussa. BSc. Qu May CoD. London: J 
FeliMtM. BA. , Unlv Siefla O 

Osoba. LLB. Warwnc Utatv. R P 
Scaanel. BA. NE London paly. LLM. 
Wotfson Con. Cambridge: I A Rae. 
LLB, NE London Poly; Lae Ea Kong. 
LLB. Unlv afLoadoo: O D T Ham- 

iS3?j 

Oxford: Juite K Sa mn add a. LLB. LSE: 

Fiona Barton. LLB. L&ttv sf Itaalon : 

Soean C Campbell. BA. Itabtnson Cog. 

Ca m br idge: Patrtda A Taytor. LLB. 

Wotverhamaton Pobt P N Han bon. 

BA. Kent Untv: S A CtiBrcMH. LLB. 

Bomb Bank Petr: E M uaert LLB. 

South sank PoBn R Hartley. BA. 
Ktngartm Poty: J R Burchlll. LLB. 

t&Sssr&rgi ss'wss 


raBetract: MoNlcakBA. aEE* 
Untv: K StMnan. LLB. SZSL F C 

Brody. LLB. umv of Nontag teio; em| 





tS LLa LteteofiONexTLoenaHi 
Arete. BA. MMdiasBx Pott^ A J BeB. 


umv of Noainmiawi: k p 


JR 



from tbe Army eariy in the 
war, only to be annnwned 
hack by Cbigthill to com- 
mand a a _ spe cialized 
anrtotned diviaon is-prepera^ 
tion for D-Day. 

Hobart went . to 
Chaitah»se and the Rqyal 
Mflitey Academy, Woolwich, 
smt\ was mnwiiKgnmiil in foe 
Royal Tank Corps in 1937. In 
December 1940 be got com- 
mand of a tank squadron in 
foe 2nd Satiation RTR, one of 
the regiments roshed out from 
Fngtanri in &5t mr-r rhant 
ships to reinforce Wavefl in 
foe Western Desert. 

With the 2nd RTR be took 
part in foe battle of Sdi 
Barram and tte pursitil to 
Beds Fmnm, which led to the 
complete destruction of Mar- 
shal Gramm's army, lo an 
attack on a fort at Sidi Omar, 
he is remembeaned firing away 
at foe Tftrfwre defenders with a 
pistol from his turret, as the 
R ntrch flrmonr broke into the 
fort 

Suitably, foe imaginative 
tactics that enabled this vic- 
tory to be so complete were 
the h ramduld of iris imrie, 
from his period training 
armoured forces in Egypt 
before tbe war. 

Patrick Hobart stayed in 
tanks in North Africa thn>i$b- 
out the campaign. He beca m e 
adamant of bis r eg im art and 
then brigade major of the 9th 
Armoured Brigade: He also 

SIR FREDERICK HOARE 


1st British Corps (1964-66). 
He was ADC to the Queen 
from 1961 to 1966. 

He was subsequently direc- 
tor of military operations, 
MOD (1966-68), chief of staff 
Army Strategic Command 
(1968-70) and finally directm 
of foe Royal Anx»ured Corps 
(1970-72). 

On r e tire me nt be became 
lie u te nan t-governor of foe 
Royal Hospital, C helsea , Bet 
his unde before him. He was 
cobad commandant, foe 
Royal Tank Regiment, from 
I968to 1978. 

Hobart was a tank man first 
and test, and be preferred 
regimental c ommand to tbe 
legend a ry laagaora of foe staff 
Not a fire-eater, he was never- 
theless a soldier of great verve 
and spirit. Asa leader be had a 
knack of d evel opin g a rapport 
with those aroand him, and 
was wdMfoed by his men. 

He leaves a 90 a and four 


Sir Fnederick Hoare, Bt, 
who was Lord Mayor of 
LtHjdtMi from 1961 to 1962, 
and managing partner of C 
Hoare &C6. since 1947, died 
on November 24. He was 73. 

Roderick ( Derick } Aifiied 
Hoare was bom on February 
11, 1913. On his fotiio’s side 
he was a member of tbe 
banking finxxly. His mother 


was an actress. 

After Wellington he entered 
the bank in 1931 as icteric, on 
the nmigfsfemHing foal he 
woold have no expectation of 
.becominga partner. But fay his 
own efforts he worked his way 
upwards , becoming an ^ent 
in 1936 and a managing 
partneris 1947. 

In that year he also became 
a common connrihnan of the 
City of London; and after 
serving as aldeiman and sher- 
iff became Lord Mayor in 
1961-62, tiie thud member of 
his family to hold the office. 
During Ins year he travelled 
widely, rndnding visits to the 
United States and Ireland, and 
he was active in promoting the 
City of London’s Festival for 
the Aits. 

His speeches as Lord Mayor 
reflected concern for the tm- 
deiprivflegecL During his 
mayoralty foe Thalidomide 


catas&rophe took place, and 
foe traditional Lord Mayor’s 
appeal was devoted to foe 
victims. Tbe fund raised is 
known to this day as foe Lady 
Hoare ThafidomxdeTntSL 1 

After tearing foe Mansion 
House be actirely supported a 
variety tfcbarifobtecanses. to 
which his acumen 

was an asset They included 
the Angfere’ Co-operative As- 
sociation, Toe it Bridewell 
Hospital and tire Goldsmiths’ 
Family Welfare Association. 

, Hoare wa$ an unusual figure 
for a successfiri City banker 
and Lord Mayor. Though shy 
ami retiring he forced himself 
to nndexgo the mayoral duties 
with never a free minute. 
Hating speeches and flum- 
mery, he never spared himself 
in perforating the required 
oratorical and social duties. 

He loved playing chess, bud- 
watching, stamps and above 
all, fishing by a peaceful river, fo 
He married, m 1939. Mary 
Wheeler, who shared fully in 
bis public cha ritable work. 
After her early death in 1973 
he married, m 1974, Ooaah 
Dew. who died six years later. 

His third marriage - to Sarah 
Bamber in 1984 - ended in 
divorce earlier this year. He 
leaves two daughters of the 
first marriage. 


MR JOHN HAYHURST 


Mr John Hayhurst, agricul- 
tural and sporting journalist, 
who was also a strong interna- 
tionalist, died on November 
24. He was 81. 

John Cedric Hayhurst was 
bom at Ttmani, in the South 
Island of New Zealand, on 
November5, 1905. After leav- 
ing the Timara Boys* High 
School, be worked on his 
fetter’s farm before talcing a 
degree course in journalism at 
Christchur ch. 

After working for a time on 
local newspapers, in 1938 he 
migrated to Britain in 1938 in 

search of wider ■*’ 

On arrival, he 
dnate course in 
at Wye College, Kent. 

Shortly before the outbreak 
of war be joined foe staff of foe 
~ orge Newnes ma pmw* 
louholder, of which he soon 
became assistant editor, hold- 
ing the post until the 
was taken over 
1967. 

His passionate sporting in- 
terest was rugby, and during 
the 1930s he did some writing 
on the subject for The Times. 
He also published, in 1954 
The Fourth All Blocks, a 
describing the fourth tour of 


Britain by the famous New 
TealanH side. 

But it is for his agricultural 
journalism that he will be best 
remembered, and above all for 
his services to intmiational- 
ism within tbe profession. He 
helped to found foe Interna- 
tional Federation of Agricul- 
tural Journalists in 1954, and 
served as its president in i960. 
_ Later, as a tribute to -his 
tireless efforts on its beteff he 
was made its president of 
honour. He had also served as 
secretary, c hair man and 
dent of foe British Gni 
Agricultural Jou rnalists, 

After leaving 
Smallholder he wrote widely 
for the British and foreign 
press as a freelance, and after 
his retirement in 1973 still 
wrote a horticultural col umn 
for Living Magazine underthc 
name of Howard Greene. 

His books (apart from the 
one already mentioned) were 
Smallholder Encyclopaedia 
■and the series Successful 
Gardening. 

He married, in 1934, Ellen 
t-jngg. She survives him, with 
one of their daughters (the 
other predeceased him). 


the 


MR R. P. HEPPEL 


Mr Dick HeppeL CMG, 
ambassador to Cambodia 
from 1954 to 1956, died on 
November 17. He was 73. 

Richard Pardon Heppel 
was born on October 27, 1913 
and educated at Rugby and 
Balliol College, Oxford. He 
joined foe diplomatic service 
in 1936, and three years later 
was third secretary at the 
Embassy in Rome; 

in 1942* he was posted to 
Tehran where he remained for 

two years before going to 
Athens as first secretary. He 

returned to London in 1946 as 

private secretary to foe Minis- 
ter of State, resuming fo reig n 
service in 1948 at Karachi and 

Madrid-0951)* 

He was. a counsellor in 
Saigon in 1953 before becom- 
ing ambassador to Cambodia 
attheage of 40. He then spent 


( iSS** 1 * 8 m * n “? er “ 


. >56-59), 

a s head o f !he Souta-nm n 
gepartment at the Fore 

In 1963, after two 
head of the Consular 
ment, be was posted 1 
sort as consul genera] 
be remained until hi 
meat in 1969. 


. "*’'■7 '""auiw 

any and religious 1 
never sought foe h* 
advancement which 
way r ~ — • i — ■ 


Cancer Research 
and was active i 
affairs. 

He married, in 1 
35 eoc h> Ia Matthews 
vivesfamj with thdi 
and daughter. 


1 






• • • (i 

* . . 


• \ ,7. 

*. 


1 11 Ij 

1 \\ 

K % 1 




WBrtlMkHC 1 • 


PERSONAL COLUMNS 



sbesb 




ES 






rf ■' • 


hteMSnsU) and 

HABSHAII - On Novendw Sift to 
CtthcrtK and Martin, a daughter. 
Beanor. 

JUDE - On Notasntotr 18UL to CaroBne 
Cute Itcvcfiran-PaM tOMi Robert, a 
daughter- CtoarioOe Ettutoefh- 

KMGHT • On NoMnber sand, aft 
Pardmy to - veronica bite. 
Hammettoo) and DnkL i fiMAto. 
gmim Kattusrloa. . a akttr for 

' Edward. 

LEECH - Od Novanber 24th 1980. at 
the John RadcUfto Hhmlfal CWfbrtl. 

■ to Dwfl (t& A iioWn) amd Christo- 
pher. a M(tter. Enam VtcCotia. 

HUWMD - On November 24th. at 
Bristol. to Olane (nte Percy) and 
Charles, a daugbter. 

■UTTER- (to Novapbar 2nd 1900. to 
Faya Mmerey and Nick Rutter, a 
daughter. Catherine. 

SJUMOEU - Od Novenber 19th. at 
Eastbourne DMrict HoapttaL to Judy 
(nte Jackson)- and .Dm. a daaghlcr: 
Emily Rebecca Antutneite. 

SMmi - On NoMtoherSaniLto Peggy 
(nte Udbory) and Raymond, a 
daughter, Rosemary Louise. 

- Will 111— - Od November 22nd. 
in London, u Vderts (nte PtcaveO 
and Gerard, a son. David Jacques 
DfcUer. a brother to OSvta. 


nCHET: HSUS The raHThwe took 
place quietty to GUffidtoni on 20th 
November 1986 between Mr Malt 
Camvbea HkSteL. ten of the late Mr 
Graeme LC Higher and Mrs Joan 
Highet and Jane EUsaheOi tagUs. 
daugtder of Mrs Kane Street and 
stepdaughter of Mr Robin Stmt 


BALL - On November 22nd 1986. Ivy 
MurieL widow or OKfiord Evans 
Ball, a daily loved mother add 
tyandmolher. Cremation Lodge Hill 
Crematortom. Bhndngtaam on Fri- 
day 38121 November 19B6 et 11 am. 
CANNON -Ob November 24th. peace- 
fully. Richard N. natmnti. beloved 
husband or Lena and tether of Vic. 
toria and Juha. Funeral at SLPtters 
Ornrch. OBham. Nr Lewes. 12pm. 
Friday November 28th. 

CHAPMAN ■ On November MOl , 
peacefully at home. AJL Hoy). Be- 
loved husbmd of Bate and dear 
father of John. David and M. 
Much loved ruMr-to-tew af Betty 
and Flidde and grandtetter of Mark. 
Adam. Guy. Justin and Aten. Oama- 
tton at Goidera Green, od So retry 
November 30th. at 12.00 noon. Ften- 
lly flowers only. - ■■ 

COHVNBHANi - On 24th November. 
Daphne Georgi na Adelaide, wife of 
the 7th Iterqnas O o wn tfa ra. 
peacefully at home on the He of 
Man. Funeral private. 

MMEL- On Sunday. November Z3nL 
pmreft d l y at home. Abac Ddbato 
Bruce (bte. 


WSSm 


YOU'LL BE FLOORED BY 
OUR PRICES AT 
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aggaa'ai 


BIZET DOING NOTHING 
WRITING THE 
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Thai farad Uteres! ns I have a great Oat 
won ail mod cons and ■me nto rs. 
CeSp-w. TA 01-444 4068 


ntonsnoHAL ao mle daon warm 
S/C studio or share. JubBm. Northern. 
VKtorta Uae To £6Ctew. Tel: day 285 
606300) eve 463 0043. 


W1 1 Olri Id share Bat with 9 othere. CHo 
bum and nioe. AvaM 1st December. £84 
pw met. Tel: O! 737 OEM after 6pm. 


CLAPWUN M/F. Large O/R. Dec to Ap«L 
£180 pan iiKt garage- Near tube. Tel: 
Oi 674 3136 oner 6pm. 


near pauo OH wan l other. £228 pan 
Inc. Tel Ol 381 6103 after 630 pm. 


OVERSEAS TRAVEL 


Worldwide Ion-cast Highs 
The ben - and ®c can prove it 
195.000 diems since 1970 
CURRENT BEST BUYS 
Atwood the Worid from £766 
SYDNEY COLOMBO 


HL WnmSWOKTH CO— BN Prof. 
M/F. N/B. Van ige. luc. bouse- O/R. 
£260 pm IQOL TetOl 673 2649 (eves) 


nOOMIMMY - wci Nrwtv dmraltd 
OUM grant near nai wna own souui 
betas suotn. Dmttto bedroom, bath- 
room. mrparate WC . newly lUMd 
known wtin dtstiwastwr and wasMng 
mmchtiw. unuaaal eparlaoa Bvtng room. 
CH. car i wlrhwtr parMaa. Available 
g t wgcn 2* a months. nett umilM. 
£130nw. mane Ol 37* 7011 or 0633 
843236 

HWto M / jSU NaTOII NT THOO. P** 
pmon. n/B. o/n. snare fenced two. CM. 
U3a pcm ana. Ten 01-60 * 0060 after 
8pm 

HAMPSTEAD Prof female to share s»- 
douHnxmtom 3 be diu ei u HU wltbooe 
other. Non smoker orrf. a rotas tube. 
£280 plus HBs Tel 01 43S 0264 

**** Feminwn. Od SWS. 

3 Md. 2 bam. i pom, unihmu im* 4 

&"!£/£ N'tnywra 

Ol GS3 8573 after 5 pa 

FUUAM ROADWAY Prof 3*38 yre to 
mare comfortable flat. 6 mtm hde. 
£316 pan net 01-388-5369 after 6pm 

FULHAM SWS. prar F to at an now. 
own room. 004. £220 pan IneL Ol 
736 8866. 

8W1-C8Q BW Very large room In lov^V 
tens OaL dm to Victoria Tel 01 828 

2bl7 


amentum. Short lei. £7* pw toe. Eves 
736 1306. 

WXO O/R to share wtm 2 others very nr 

6&0 eJS** ““ pa “ 



WINTER SPORTS 


SKI WHIZZ 

IOO HOLIDAYS TO SEU. AT— 
KNOCKED DOWN PRJCEBfl 
CHRISTMAS NOW..X159 
l week 20 Dec. emend 
chalets tncUMNo or ntgta 
MfHIIIB. MEMBER. 
COURCHEVEL. MEOEVE A 
CHAMONIX 

OPEN TODAY..JDONT 
MISS OUTLOOK NOW 
01-370 0999/0256 

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1 WK BY AIR FROM £119 
3 WK BY AIR FROM £163 
PLUS FREE CMktrMU ftOUdave. 
FREE LH1 Paves or FREE tosunfico 
on many dales toe. Xnuw/NY. 
FREEDOM HOLIDAYS 
The Andorra Experts stoce 1973 
01-741 0686/4471 (20 Ms) 
Manchester 061 236 0019 
ATOL 432 IATA AITO 


DISCOUNT FLIGHTS 

Q/W Rtn 
Sydney £420 £764 

Auckland £420 £775 

Los Angeles £178 £340 

Joteis £246 £485 

Bmgknic £220 £360 

Rib £282 £504 

LONDON FUGHT 
CENTRE 
01-370 6332 


DISCOUNTED FARES 

JOTUFjO/HAn^iia DOUALA "*83 
NAIROBI £390 SYDNEY £760 

CAIRO £230 AUCKLAND E7BS 

LAGOS £360 HONQ KONG £660 

DEL /BOMBAY £350 MIAMI £330 

BANGKOK £350 AND MANY MORE 

AFRO ASIAN TRAVEL LTD 



JUET FRANCK - Super valor eetf catenae 
thl boMdays In the beet French resorts. 
Ring tor new brochure new. Tel Ol -789 
2592. ABTA 69286 AHA 1383. 


810 WEST - NEW! Soecttd often on 
groups. RING FOR A DEAL! Abo other 
amazingly tow priced Sterling at £59. 
ask lor a copy of gw bumper brochure- 
(Oil 785 9999. ADU 69356 AUK 1383. 


SPECIALS. 12 day holiday available In 
January In starred chalet- A lew places 
Mfl on Powder courses for aP levels of 
ability with Swiss Mountain Guide. 
Phone Powder Byrne 01 223 0601 


r /— m- A — ir ■ n * if [A . . I ¥ * J _ 1..I — 1 


etc.Ol 946 7683 day .OL 7890471 eves. 


COM Gold, silver, singia/cdllacllan. Pht- 
chasd cosh. Private Ol 806 1168 






iSsIS 










Conrtaold • 
Institute Galleries 

The Samuel GomtroM collec- 
tion of impresiomst and posi- 
impressionisi is being 

toured to five mqbr museums 
in the United States from Janu- 
ary 14, 1987 to April 3, 1988, 
starting at the Cleveland Mu- 
seum of Art. The tour is 
sponsored by International 
Business Machines Corpora- 
tion, in aid of the CourtauJd 
Appeal Fund. The Counzuld 
Institute Galleries will be dosed 
to the public oft December 1 and 
2, 1986, for rrftRitgmg other 
works from the permanent 
cotections. ThoglkneswiD be 
dosed over the Christmas holi- 
days from December 24 to 28, 
inclusive, hut open cm New 
Year’s Day. 




Bakers 9 Company 


•ENT ALL - On year 700) bttMay. 
Adefta. darting. Loving and lasting 
nmnort n . Rowan. 

BOA - 26Ui' November 1958. in knMne 
temembw a nca of dearest Boa. 
Joteten. 


BD - Ms Excellency Dr Ho Gran Um. 
. ftmemi Sendee at Ham od FHtfay 
2BUi Novotaberto Metbodbt Central 
Hofl. Storey’s Gate. Westmtester. 
SWL 


mma, mamubes 

tEJkTHS MB IB HEMMUM 
£4 a Sac + 15% VAT 

(minimum 3 lines) 
Annoattemcms. aulheniicatcd by 
.ike nunc and pcrmaneal address 
of the sender, may be 'sent to: 

TRIE TIMES 
PO BOX 484 
Virginia Street 
London El 9XS 

or telep h o n ed (by telephone sub- 
scribers only) uk 91-4*1 3824. 


FOB SALE 


FLATSHAKE 


STUDIO Flat LadbroKe Grow*, architect 
moderated, flea* metropolitan, fflaiia 
cennL drew tubes. PortpOano market 
Ciaopw references etoenam TO Ol 229 


cunun Sonny ream to Ige &ntny 
bourn, reroute n/s. Oat ttow and Com- 
mon- £40 pw Inc. Ttfa673-7361. 

CONVEMEHTLY located. Young Prof. AM 
mod com. N/B. a fa. oat- £48 pw 
nd. Thl 01 701 0672 after 7 JO pm. 

CROUCH END KB: Nr 2 tubes / 3 Unto, 
share house, own room £40 pw MtL 
Tel: 01-348-3280 after 6-30um. 

FLATMATE, letnale to Mare small top sto- 
rey apprtmenL Watt Kenstaoton. £38 
pw. 602 5975 eves. 

■ENSaWTDH. WU. Uorory Hat WitotoL 
tedt 2 pro* F. n/t. £46 pw nr h she Teh 
027 1357. 

KEMmOTDM MANSIOH* SWS Shv* 
Measam OaL Prof mute. N/S. own 
room. CH. £66 pm. TW. 373 1245. 

KDMSTOM Prof peesan to tear* todfle. 
Cla* shops 6r traits. £46pweMl. 01681 
1393 exL 3250 warJ-Ol 649 7105 (eve) 

SW18Profn/s.SR/f to share loe 2 bed c/h 
Opl o/r. Avail now. £40 PW End. TeL 
01-437-1019 (Ol or 01-870-7862 M 




ip 






Sf hSSxr wert Air 

Sir John Stmoo, Com- ®p anmwasgry. of tte 


Gonzmand, and Lord Fkwers, 


Mr Roger deGrey, President of 

•ha Dmnt .I> Anu .U- 


tag- £1 JOO TetOl -5083663. 
—■afinvL Oookars. etc. Can 
yon buy cheaper? B St 6 LKL Oi 2Z9 
1947/8468. - ■ 


»M« rwrsni room to tar house. N/k 
Near tue. Ftdnam Broadway and tas- 
£260 Otto pan toe. Tte73l-368B- 

SWS* Twin bedded room In attractive CH 
Obl very cioee lube. Sun 2 ghts. £BO pp 
PW. Tet 491 7996 (D) Or 373 88I3IE). 

SWE2: Prof m/r to mare ige nai wWi aB 
mod cons- Ctos* tube. O/r. £38 pwcaaJ. 
TH: B24-am day 573691 s alter 7 tan. 

8W1S. Prof Mate/Femate 2635 to tear* 
with 1 other. Own Roam. Nr Shu £40 
pw end. 01-871 3260 after 630 

SW4 Lor room to nrwTv decorated shared 
hae. North O a p h a m £88 PW. Escl. Ol 
385 1663 

SW 11 Prof M. N/S. for ootetc/b terraced 
hse. O/R. 2 ndns-BR. £50 pw. bkL Td 

- -01-233 1328 

FLATMATES Bebcuve Snaring, wen 
estob introducto<y service. Pte* M tor 
appn 01-589 5491. 313 Brampton 
Road. SWS 

sans Prof F to share twnf CH tnalaoo- 
eoe won I ether. O/R- etoat BB/tam. 
£130 pan + bMs. Tel: Ol 874 4801 *vas 

WALTHAMSTOW Prof m/f. n/s to tew* 
lovely house won one other, on ameni- 
ties. convenient City. £160 pezn excL 01 
821 3728 eves. 

in— i rnnurmf rimiii in i 

bed tux bouse, nr S mannehts Tatar. 
£163 pan Exd. son Dec. TcL 01-788- 
7093 alter 7pm (wed). 

WOOD CHECH Large 2 bed ftsL OTN. CH. 
wate Mach, dose tube, available now 
£140pcm Ol 493 8400/01 881 1628 

YOUNG flal share, own room, readied by 
20 year old PA .Hanover Square - Ooer 
to Eark Ooun/Soutti Ken tube. Tel. 


BASIN. I —{BBC Nr Staten. 9 Bus. Prof 
F. 28+ . n/s. share house own/r. CH. 
£390 pan IncL 01-8760209 eves. 

BARNET Prof M/F to share IreeOaL Own 
dm rtn. n/B- > nuns tram, eso pw esecL 
Reft. TntOl 872 8310 (after &3D pro). 

BOW E3 Prof M/F for O/R In lux AM. 
Tube a ndns. £35 pw plus den (return- 
able). TetOl 980 1735 (message). 

CHHKH Prof Mb. o/r In toe hse. dose 
lobe & shops. £35 pw let Ol 747 1622 
after 6 pro 


Richard Dimbleby 
Cancer Fund 

TTiere win be a concert on 
Tuesday, December 16,81 7 pm 
m Westminster Abbey, to cele- 
brate the fiftieth anniversary of 
Richard Dimhleby’s first broad- 
cast for the BBC The concert is 
b*rs sponsored by BBC Tele- 
vision and Esso UK pic. Tickets 
are av ailable from the Richard 
Dimbleby Cancer Fund's office 
on 01-821 1464. 


Luncheons : 

Cfty University 

The Chancellor of the CSty 
University, the Lend. Mayor of 
London, Sir David Rowe-Ham, 
was guest of honour at a 
luncheon in the university on 
Tuesday, November 25. He was 
entertained by the chaiima n of 
convocation, Mr David Moore, 
officers of convocation, tbe 
vice-chancellor. Professor 
Raoul Franklin, and heads of 
the academic deportments. 
MfnairrnM m rvwcuiroiM-faw ", 


ffjn I 


mssssm 


ra fr, ‘71^ ann ul- "{■< I 


Mr John Udstone, Cbtirnua. 
and Council members of die 
Management Consultancies 
Association were hosts at a 


Adamson at the Stafford 
yestefday. . . 




[ : > i ur r .I: ; 


' 1 1 1 1 . a? . .1 . 1 -i i . ' x.-MjjJte 


T m 

t r^k 


WITHOUT WARNING 


Reception 

Britain- AnstrsHa .. 

BkimfFnnial CommittEC - 
The Duke of Kent. President of 
the Briiein-Ausjralja Bjcemoo- 
nial Committee, and Sir P e ter 
Gatfeden. chairnan, were hosts 
at a reception held at the 
Mansion-House last night to 
launch the pro gram me otevents 
whida will mark Ore Australian 
bicentenaiy in J 988. Tbe Lon} 
Mayor, Lady Mayoress and 
Sherifis attended. . 


(BUSS 




rrs common... 

Owr IttUIOOpeapleui tbe Utol«i KtogAero auffera Semite evoyjtec. 

rrSKILLING... 

Ow death lamia dot to a Sln d ia wIttoui wo u fi iero. 




TtBiawtiaH tlWW iBiwWi il Vtinfcn imi ihrw hi Brftnh. 

ITS NEGLECTED... ■ 

About a half of aH Scndna could be prevented. 

ITSTREATABUE... 

PfevoatioeaadrrhahiTiiwiiiu nurffandewgguUy. 

National Stroke Campaign 

of THE CHEST HEART AMD STROKE ASSOCIATION f 

RJS.V.P. 

Remember Stroke Victims Please 

fogii t r rfd Chain Na HUUS 


IWCpu. If o m udai i h lmdiilm. 'hii BUt H — Neth. 

TVvl«iKiSsw^lx»droWOB^Utapi«*9l-38730li 



01-439 0102/01-439 7751 
Open Saturday 10.00-13.00 


LA/San FMui £329. Sydney /MelbOteTW 
£769. AD direct daily IMMiDartalr 130 
Jermyn stroeLOi 839 7144 


F U fllfT B OOH Ens pteoeurorwrowertd- 

Wllie. Ite/KomuBy. 01-387 9100 


MALAGA. C ANA RIES . OI 441 mi- 
Travel wtee. Abta. Atol. 


MOROCCO BOUND. Reooil SL Wl. Ol 
734 6307. ABTA/ AIOL 


S. AFRICA From £ 466 . 01-864 7371 
ABTA. 


SPAM. Portugal. Chaapeci fare*. Btgglce. 
Ol 738 8191. ABTA ATOL. 


EOYPT hum for winter hoHdaya. 1987 
brochure out now coven winner Greece 
and Turkey loo. Argtoa caub. 25a HU> 
ftd. Cambridge. 0223 63206. Our SOtfi 
year. AM 262. 



IOHLD «noc cum. we W8I never 
lefl you we ore the cheapcu on air tores 
to any dmUna tt on. we win ehow yon. 
Tet Ol 879 7776 ABTA. 


AM brokers oBertag cii e ap tei ora 
avatatate woridwtde. Only a pttooa caS 
away. GTW 01-960 0033 UO HneM 
ABTA/ ACCESS. 

AM ERIC A aghte wm M a nORte er depar- 
lures A mo south AMca A New 
Zeatend. TH TravM centra. Blackburo 
(0264) 33287 ABTA 73196 


sandy bench from H/row. 1 wk£299. 2 
was £360 rang Pm Wood Holidays Ol 
734 2662. 


EUROPE /MOULD HMDS MwcH tores on 
charter/scltedided na. PSot FUghl 91 
631 0167. AH AM 1893. 

racsr/CUM CUM Concorde. Dttooanted 
tores- Dumas Travel. 01-488 9011 
ABTA 

MMJUUO. Dafly motto. £36 O/W. £65 
Rnv rraokfun tram £69. Mnoi Jet. 
01 379 3322 

HOMO KONC £488, BftNBKDN £369. 
Singapore £457. Otner fe dues. Ol -584 
6514 ABTA. 

L OWL5 1 Air Ftoes. Eurooe and world 
yde- 01 836 8622. Buckingham 

I Im'VIV. 

UM8E9T Air Fare*. Sched ul ed Eureoe 
A worldwide. Med Star Tmw. oi 
928 3200 

11INMM. For your holiday where Its tea 
a u mmer. Cad tor our brochure now. Tu- 
ntoan Travel Bureau. 01-373 4411. 

LOWEST WORLDWIDE FARES. Capri- 
corn Travel Tel Ol 730 6216. ABTA. 

ALL OS CITES. Lowest tore# on Bialer 
scheduled carriers. 01-584 7371. ABTA 


CSO oft Courchevel Christmas, chalets. 
FOT AM daCNHctalLgMd 0484 548996. 




SWWOR ED top BU Resorts. Lowest 
mere team £89. ABTA. BracmirK 01 
602 4826. 

JANUARY SKI SMCULS from Ski Lee 
Atoes to Vernier, voter*. Mertad A 
Megeves. Tel Ol 602 9766. 


Indonesian /Malaysian euMne: mute 
have ability to organter die uichen: 
toocfclaUna and stafr managrmniL The 
restauaram Is Mtualed In Hentey. Salary 
negotiable. Contact Mr Ting on 
01-734 3658. 


WINTER SPORTS 


JOIN BLADON LINES THIS 
CHRISTMAS AND SAVE ££££‘S 


LOOK AT THESE AMAZtNQ OFFERS FOR 7 MOHT HOLIDAYS 
Dor- 20th/2Mi December 

VAL DTSERE 

Chalet Hold Savoie FB £249 SAVE £ 89 

Chalet Hold Blanche Netoe FB C 2M SAVE £ B9 

OteKf Le Petaou Btanc FB £249 SAVE £1X0 

COURMAYEUR 

Chalet Marconi FB £199 SAVE £< 

ME3UBEL 

OuMt L4 Orange FB £199 SAVE £1C 

Chalet HacbaJ FB £249 SAVE £11 

Alpine* Apts. SC £149 SAVE £11 

ST ANTON 

HaueKMdl BB £149 SAVE £ t 

BLADON LINES THE B W3QEST CHOICE ON SMS 
Oftertag Hotel. Self Catering & Chalet Patties In 47 of EuroneY lop resorts 
MowCh Ops- 01-786 2200 ABTA 16783 

0422 7BI21 ATOL 1232 


SAVE £108 
SAVE £110 
SAVE £186 


MATURE NANNY To accompany tonttar 
to Florida . for one year, care tor one 
year old 9KL References and aroenenc* 
required- Call Monday to Friday Ol 486 


EXP COOKS na SM Seasons Midi held 
Chaut. France (near Onna) 
Ol 731 7989. 


SITUATIONS WANTED 


HKmmOHAL coup*, mgriesl refer- 
ences) enmugrattiiB to Tenerife, win 
conatorr Iniereung business opportuni- 
ty- Trt:06l 4283047 fhuainiwi hoars). 


■EIB1U DETECTIVE H.CS- New Scot- 
land Yard. Seeks gatoful ewptoyroonl. 
Owns Land Rover. WDUng 10 ttanawn 
valuables, securities or peraoitt. Lives in 
Susses. Bonded security. Tel: 0797 


ANTIQUES & 






I ■■■■■■■■ 8BNBIIIII 


ANTIQUE FAIRS 

These sections appear today on page 37 
The next publication of this ‘feature’ will be on Wednesday January 21st 1987. 

To advertise please rail: 

Tirade: 01-481 1920 
Private: 01-481 4000 





































































20 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 26 1986 


Sinking 
inquiry 
a step 
nearer 

By Richard Evans and 
Michael McCarthy 
The long-demanded inquiry 
into the loss with all hands of 
the bulk freighter Derbyshire 
six years ago became a 
possibility last night as efforts 
continued to salvage her sister 
ship Kowloon Bridge, 
aground and breaking up off 
the Irish coast 
The junior Transport Min- 
ister, Mr Michael Spicer, said 
that inspectors investigating 
the wreck of the Kowloon 
Bridge would consider “any 
link with the loss of the 
Derbyshire" which might be 
cause for appointing a formal 
investigation, 

A Dutch sal vagi tug tried 
without success vesterday to 
shift the 159,000-ton Hong 
Kong-registered ore earner. 

The Government came 
under intense all-party pres- 
sure in the Commons last 
night to bold an inquiry into 
the Derbyshire sinking, with 
Labour and Conservative 
MPs highlighting the similar- 
ities between the rwo incidents^ 
and that of another sister ship, 
the Tyne Bridge, which suf- 
fered severe structural damage 


in the North Sea in 1982. 

The Derbyshire dis- 
appeared without trace and 
with the loss of all 44 people 
on board in a storm off Japan 
in 1980. She was one of a 
series of six identical oiL bulk 
and ore carriers built by Swan 
Hunter's Haverton Hill ship- 
yard on Teeside (since closed) 
between 197] and 1976. 

No explanation has ever 
been given for her disappear- 
ance. but when the Tyne 
Bridge was damaged in 1982, 
the other four ships in the 
series, including the Kowloon 
Bridge, were found to have 
cracks and weaknesses at 
bulkhead 65 and 
longditudinai girders mis- 
aligned after the bulkhead. 
They were repaired. 

The other ships in the series 
are the Ocean Sovereign (for- 
merly the Furness Bridge), the 
Kona (formerly the Sir John 
Hunter), the Sir Alexander 
Glen and the East Bridge 
(formerly the Tyne Bridge). 

Inquiries by The Times this 
week disclosed that the Ocean 
Sovereign is on her way to 
Taiwan, the Kona is unload- 
ing oil in Sarrach. Sardinia, 
the Sir Alexander Glen is in 
Singapore undergoing mainte- 
nance, after taking oil from the 
Gulf to Korea, and the East 
Bridge is on her way from 
Singapore to China. 

Parliament, page 4 


Today’s events 

Royal engagements 

The Queen and the Duke of 
Edinburgh give an evening 
reception for members of the 
Diplomatic Corps, Buckingham 
Palace. 9.3a 

The Duke of Edinburgh, 
presents the (986 Royal Society 
of Arts’ presidential awards for 
design management, and at- 
tends a conference on the 
Management of New Ideas at 


India greets ‘crusader for peace’ 


From Michael Hamlyn 

Delhi f . ^ 

Mr Mikbafl Gorbachov, the 
Soviet leader, arrived in the 
capital of his closest non- 
coauamnst ally, India, yes- 
terday to a welcome which was 
wanner than any within recent 

memory. He came to sign a 
new trade agreement and to 
talk about weapons supply, 
and hi return received whole- 
hearted backing for his stand 
at Reykjavik. 

Several hundred thousand 
people — one estimate put it as 
high a$ half a milKnn — Lined 
toe streets of Delhi to watch 
his 100 -car motorcade pass on 
its way from die airport to the 
presidential palace where he is 


is by iias and lorry from the 
country villages of the nearby 
states of Uttar Pradesh, Hary- 
ana and Rajasthan, and the 
majority knew only that they 
had come to see “a great 

• i ♦, 


The entire school popula- 
tion of Delhi had been given 
the day oft and the great 
processional routes around the 
fm h tr* were lined with 
people wearing then- 
bright uniforms. 

In fact they did not see much 
of him as toe darkly glazed 
windows of Ins spedafly-im* 
ported bullet-proof Russian 
limousine were kept firmly 
dosed. 

Arches of marigolds and 
jasmine spanned toe road 
decked with banners declaring 
that Indo-Soviet friendship 
would last for ever. Two 
marigold covered model ele- 
phants greeted the Russian 
leader outside the airport, ami 
a presidential guard of honour 

trumpeted his arrival at toe 
palace. 

Mr Rajiv Gandhi, the In- 
dian Prime Minister, in fate 
welcome speech described the 
Soviet Union as “a tried and 
traded friend in our hoars of 
need,” and hailed Mr 
Gorbachov personally as “a 
crusader for peace." 

Tatar at a banquet held in 
the Lutyens-designed former 
palace of the Nizam of Hyder- 
abad, Mr Gandhi made no 
bones about where he stood on 
Reykjavik. (4 lt was 
unfortunate,” he said, “that 
the Strategic Defence Initia- 
tive blocked agreement” 

Mr Gandhi added: “We 
resolutely oppose the mili- 
tarization of outer space. It 
does not matter that SD1 is 
described as defensive. Sec- 
urity is not enhanced but 
dangerously jeopardized by 
creating yet another deadly 
and extremely sophisticated 
weapon. The logic of a shield 
in space is deeply flawed.” 

Speaking after he and Mr 
Gorbachov had spent more 
tha n three hours in a tete-a- 
tete that one aide described as 


the Royal Society of Arts, John 
Adam St, 9.40; later he gives the 
London Lecture to the Inner 
London Branches of the British 
Institute of Management and 
attends a lunch at Hudson’s Bay 
House, Upper Thames Si. 12.20; 
and then presents the awards for 
the Young Peoples’ Trust for 
Endangered Species Environ- 
mental Awards Competition, 
Buckingham Palace, 3; and at- 


tends a meeting of the Trustees 
of the Westminster Abbey 
Treat, Buckingham Palace, 53a 


The Times Crossword Puzzle No 17,213 



ACROSS 

1 As pretty, perhaps, as a pic- 
ture (8). 

5 Carpenter who 
mechanical work (o). 

10 Obstruction in the red chan- 
nel could result in suicide 
(7,8). 

11 Constanta's moot 
anteed lor holiday (. . .. 

12 God help us, we cry (7). 

13 Mercy seat? (8). 

15 After end of surgery, organ 
acquires new ache (5). 

18 It tells the time for waiters 
(5). 

20 Secluded setting for the 
Spanish soliloquy by 
Browning (8). 

23 How to lose a point at 
Wimbledon - ana game! 
(7). 

25 Pastry, extremely short and 
coarse, got left (7). 

26 Sergeant, say, taking mail 
round the troops is out of 
his mind (3.6,6,). 

27 Pass several times round the 
course between the «amc 
points (6). 

28 A small dish of Wood? (8). 

DOWN 

1 Perhaps neck with this affec- 
tionate lover? (6). 

2 Girl getting up is in a sulk — 
not much hope forheri (9). 

3 Crystal cup lies shattere d 


4 Born-again woman? (5). 

6 Cursed, unlike Jim (7). 

7 Nick’s score (5). 

8 Service with an unruffled air 

( 8 ). 

9 It keeps the son off the dark- 
room — not half! (8). 

14 Look, run outside and get 
something to eat (8). 

16 Mutant toad, dean from tail 
to ears (9). 

17 Pontiffs previous address 

( 8 ). 

19 Grounds that may be jus- 
tified by the premises, it’s 
said (7k 

21 He painted his bottom sil- 
ver (7). 

22 Suffer toss in weight in 
small room (6). 

24 Friendly place for printers 

<5>- . . 

25 Cannabis is a Utde hke it 
(5). 


Solution to finde No 17,2X2 




page 15 



•«**?. .e r* 

In dian children welcoming Mr and Mrs Gorbachov in New Delhi yesterday. 


“a fairly Umg and marathon 
session" he also referred to 
Mr Gorbachov’s ratitiative to- 
wards on Asian and Pacific 
security pact, hot without 
granting it any more than a 
general welcome calling his 
Vladivostok speech “thought- 

provoking 7 ’ but am phasning : 

“Greater exchange of ideas at 
all levels is needed to work oat 
a basis for cooperation. 

Mr Gorbachov for his part 
declared that “Soviet-Indian 
relations and contacts are in 
need of still greater 
dynamism," hot stressed that 
their relations “do not seek to 
counter or challenge genuine 
and legitimate interests of 
other countries." 


Za his banquet speed he 
recognized that Mr Gandhi’s 
praise for Soviet mitiatrres 
was appreciated, adding: “We 
know that this is more than 
just an expression of 
coartesy.’Tbe Soviet leader 
referred to development co- 
operation between the two 
coun t ries declaring: “Today 
we have continued tins work 
and agreed on important 
things.” 

While the two leaders were 
meeting privately, their aides 
met in the Indian Cabinet 
room to agree a joint state- 
ment, an agreement on on 
economic and technical co- 
operation, a proposal to bring 
a Soviet cnttural festival to 


India in return for a festival of 
India in Moscow, and a new 


Meanwhile Mrs Raisa 
Gorbachov was taken to see 
seme Indian art and culture at 
the Modern Art Mnsemu — 
where she adarired the work of 
the Indian woman artist 
AmritaShergiH,aadthedraw^ 
mg of toe Besgdi polymath 
Rabindranath Tagore. 

At the National Mnsenra 
she was shown earlier exam- 
ples of India’s cultural her- 
itage, as surrounded by eager 
photographers, she deeply 
emhanassed her gride 
by asking questions about the 
sexual imagery of Indian re- 
tighms artefacts. 


Chelsea 
bomb link 
to Action 
Directe 

Continued from page 1 
linked attacks at snaiqp 
points around the banacl 

inducing the main gate ■** 


As it was the unit seems to 
have pankied. All throe 
bombs were damped together 


tetterfrfWoaPekifig 



m r 

mess and accommodation for 
WRACk. Before the devices 
could explode the bags hidden 
in leaves wen spotted 
passers by. 

Yesterday Mr Justice Jones 
ordered that the two men, Mr 
Charles Boning and Mr Har- 
old Cooper, should each re- 
ceive £250 for carrying out 
their duty and saving lives 

In one bag police found a 
birth certificate, students’ car- 


Scotland Yard’s anti-terror- 
ist brandi watched the ad- 
dress, a Sat on a large council 
estate near Kflburn, and found 
tfrat the family there M 
innocently agreed to put up a 
number of people sometime 
just before the bombs were 
planted. 

Finger print experts exam- 
ining a {Mastic bag in which the 
bombs bad been pot bad 
already discovered mints 
which led them fo McLau- 

ghlin. 

He was at home in London- 
derry unaware of his blonder 
when the RUC arrived to 
arrest him. As officers rushed 
in he hid behind a wardrobe.. 
Questioned by police his four 
year old son loyally said bej 
bad no idea where his father 
was, but McLaughlin's youn-l 
gest son, little more than 
year old, pointed to the 
robe. 

There were more 
to follow. In die area ro 
the address used by the mot,! 
Talbot Walk on the Church) 
End estate, neighbours re-; 
ported seeing a white Ford 
camper whose presence ta- 
lked with the planting of the 
bombs and the presence of the 
INLA unit Police began 
scouring North London andi 
found toe abandoned vehicle. ' 

Forensic scientists found] 
traces of explosives but time! 
was also in crim mating ev-t 
ktence McLaughlin.; 

Police found a puzzle maga- 
zine which he had used to! 
while away the time. McLau-i 
ghiin had left his name and 1 
address written on the 
zine which also 


At the start of the trial two 
weeks ago a second defendant 
Mr Peter OTAughEn, a 
c ar pent e r from Londonderry, 
was ordered to be acquitted on' 
conspiracy to cause an explo-. 
skro. 


waters 

Shanghai citizens hold 
their breath when crossing 
bridges oyer the stinking 
black waters of toe Sttzhaa 
River, a noxious example of 
China’ s acute riwr poflutios 
problems. . 

Pinpointed by some 
enviroranflotal exports as the 
filthiest stretch of flowing 
water in the world, toe minor 
tributary is a dump for one 
million cubic me tr es of 
industrial waste a day. 

In the same week that a 
chemicals riant disaster 
contaminated .toe Rhine 
from Switzerland to the 
North Sea, China said it 
would step up the fight 
against waiter; 



ea rned a the tide of “CfctoB’s 
Sorrow. 


Industrial growth 
left unchecked 


other schemes to halt the 
destructive process, China 
has toe world’s btggcst ero* 
son problem, with sod toes 
“out of ODBttnir across 
380,000 square miles, toe 
People's Daily said recently. 
The country’s state forests, 
70 per cent of aB China’s 
woodland, win d isa pp ear by 
the end of tiro century vfess 
felling is stowed, toe jut* 
reported this month. 

The State Environmental 
Protection Bureau says toe 

quality of water in 

tze. Yellow, S 
Pearl rivers has actually im- 
»ved since 1981, and that 


The country is belatedly 
tackling tire damage i nflic t ed 
by decades of nmnomtored 
industrial growth, tins new 
hazards from the thousands 
of gm«ii that have 

sprang up as a result of 
economic reforms in tire 
1980s. 

The Suzhou River’s grant 
neighbour, the Yangtze, will 
become “totally polluted” by 
the year 2000 unless steps are 
tairAi to control the 16 nul- 
Kon mimes of liquid waste 
which pour into it daily, 
according to the official Qo- 
nese press. 

Government statistics 
show that around 13 per cent 
of the length of toe main: 
streams of the country's main 
rivers are affected. The prob- 
lem is often worse in minor 
rivers. 

In north-east Cbma, where 
much of the country’s heavy 
industry is based, the Gov- 
ernment has claimed success 
m curbing the discharge of 
mercury and other poflutants 
into the main Songhua River. 

But the cost of making toe 
Songhna dean enough for 
fish was equivalent to some 
$55 mflfion (£3&5 million) 
and scores of factories had to 
be dosed or relocated to meet 
toegoaL 

The fast-flowing Yeflow 
River, China’s second largest, 
suffers less from industrial 
pnlhrtkm than from the high- 
est levels of silt in the world. 

The remits of centuries of 
deforestation andsofl erosion 
in its upper readies were 
worsened by foe orders of the 
former Chin ese' leader; Mao 
Tse-tung, to clear . un- 
cultivated land for grain 
production. 

The river sweeps away 1.6 
trillion tonnes of soil a year, 
and. its regular floods have 


water is now treated, com- 
pared with only 15 per cent 
five years aga 
Bat toe Goventzncm ad- 
mits the main b' 
threat now is not 


enterprises it has encouraged 


Only loosely coutroBed by 
the state, and often using 
outdated technology; they 
have in some cases wrought 
environmental havoc. 

Nor do central Sate-nm 
bodies seem radioed to put 
environmental consid- 
erations before bureaucratic 
convenience and profits. 
Communist China has no 
independent watchdog 
groups. 

Despite a national water 
pollution pre v ention fag in- 
traduced m 1984* viSapers in 
tire south-eastern province of 
Fujian bad towrihs to anna's 
Parliament to stop a local 
factory, run by the Army, 
from polluting water 


Radioactive waste 
dumpedinwell 


The poUntiou killed crops 
and caused “hideous 
di sea s e s” , toe New China 
news agency reported, with- 
out giving details. 

In another case pubBciwd 
this year, 25 tonnes of radio- 
active waste from a lab- 
oratory was dumped in a 
village well, and threatened 
to contaminate reservoirs 
near Pelting. 

An investiratioa led to the 
dismissal of toe deputy direc- 
tor of the Envir onm ental 
Protection Bureau, who bad 
let his brother do the 




AndyRoehe 

Of Reuters 


THE TIMES INFORMATION SERVICE 


Queen Elizabeth the Queen 
Mother attends a reception in 
aid of Queen Elizabeth's Foun- 
dation For the Disabled, St 
James’s Palace, 6.30. 

The Duke of Kent opens toe 
new Crown Court Centre, 
Guildford, 1130: and later, as 
Chancellor, visits Sunny Uni- 
versity, 1. 

The Duchess of Kent, Con- 
troller Commandant, the 
Women's Royal Army Corps, 
visits the London District Pro- 
vost Company RMP. Rochester 
Row, 10.45. 

Princess Alexandra visits toe 
Royal Samaritan Hospital for 
Women, Glasgow, to mark toe 
centenary year. 1 1.45; and opens 
St Oswald's Hospice, Regent 
Avenue, Gosfbrth, Newcastle 
upon Tyne, 2. 1 5; later she visits 
toe PDSA Animal Treatment 
Centre, Blandford Street, New- 
castle upon Tyne, 3.40. 

Exhibition in progress 

Kuntihimo: Japanese silk 
braids by Catherine Martin with 
Rachel Leach and Anne Tom- 
lin; Walsall Museum and Art 
Gallery, Central library, Lich- 
field St; Mon to Fri 10 to 6, Sat 
10 to 4.45 (ends Dec 6). 

Music 

Cardiff Festival of Music 
Concert by toe City of London 
Sinlbnia; Concert Hall, Cardiff 
University, 7.30. 

Piano Recital by Robert I 
Colley; Usher Gallery, Lind am' 
Rd, Lincoln, 7.30. 

Organ recital by Dr. Allan 
Wicks: Brighton College, East- 
ern Rd, 7.45. 

Concert by toe Bournemouth 
Sinfometta: Sherborne Abbey, 
7.30. 

Organ recital by by Thomas 
Trotter, Birmingham Town 
Hall, 1. 


Quartet; West Somerset 
Mraehcad, 8. 

Concert by the Bournemouth 
Symphony Orchestra and Chor- 
us; Wessex Hall, Poole, 730. 
Talks, lectures 
Weather forecasting for radio 
and television, by Bill Giles; 
UWIST, Pharmacy Lecture 
Theatre, Redwood Building,, 


King Edward VH Ave, Cardiff. 

Old porcelain as New, by 
Hugo Motley- Fletcher, Room 
MBL Bnrttiughara University, 
7.30. 

Aspects of Portuguese Cul- 
ture: contemporary fiction in 
Portugal by Dr. LS. Rebelo; 
John Hansard Galley, The 
University, Soatharaptun, 7.30. 

The Earth Belongs Unto The 
Lord: Highland Crofters of the 
18805; Third Eye Centre, 350 
Sauc h tehal l St, Glasgow. 7.30. 

A viator to China, by 
Dr. CJ. Bradish, Salisbury and 
South Wiltshire Museum, Hie 
King’s House. 65 The Cose, 

Salisbury, 7. 


Parliament today 


Coamwas (230): Debates on 
Opposition motions on bus 

deregulation and on the dispute 

at J.E. Hanger & Co Lid. 

Lords (230): Debates on the 
arts and on toe state of academic 
medicine. 


New books — hardback 


The Literary Ector's selection of in te re sti ng books 
‘ - — - Mj. Finley, D. Mach 


tMs week: 
CJJi Duggan 

The Second Hood, Essays in Modem German Literature, by Michael 


A History of Sicfly, by 
(Chatton & VWndus, El 4.95) 
After Hm Second Flood, Es 


Maps of th e BMe Lands, 
by Kent ulh 


NebenzaW (Times Books, £30) 

i In Alexandrian Poetry, A Literature and Its Audience, by G. Zenker 
(Croton Hetan, £29.95} 

the Complete ABce ft The Huffing of the Snath, by Lewis Carrofl, 
Bustrated by Ralph Steadman (Cape, £15) 

Teg Mahal, by Raghu Rai (nines Books, £30) 

The Ecodonwt world Albs of Electrons, by Dick Leonard and Richard 
NaHdel (EoonomhffiHoddor ft Stoughton, £46) 

The Outefc te Contributor, by Edward Bitehen {Hambh Hand ton. £1095) 
The People’s Anger, Justice and Revenge a i Post-Liberation France, by 
Herbert R. Lottmen (Hutchinson. E12L95) 

The Royal Court Theatre 1965-T 
Pad, £1835) 


The pound 


Bank 


Arakin Sen 
Bel gi um Ft 

CnSa$ 

Danmark Mr 


France Ft 
GenaenyOtn 
GkaeceDr 
Hong KongS 
MandPT 
Haty Lira 
Japan Yen 


Norway Kr 
Portugal Esc 
ScxA Africa Rd 
Spain Pta 
SwodanKr 
SwttzmtaidF* 
USAS 

VUgMfwbOnr 


2095 

62.10 

2M 

11.19 

7.43 

065 

£965 

23400 

1148 

1.092 

Tttf jnn n 

244.00 

a aa 
1127 
229 JOD 
ass 
197 AS 
1026 
2475 
IAS 
SOLDO 


Ban* 
Seta 
2146 
1075 
5250 
1-95 
1048 
693 
9.15 
27S5 
21490 
lOJtt 
1932 
194590 
23OJJ0 
216 
1287 
2BTM 
ass 
197-26 
9.70 


1-415 

70200 


Rates tar staafl donomteaflan bank ntas 
arty as stm*ad t* Barctaya BarttPLC - 
Different rates apply to travtetefs' 
cheques and oteer foreign currency 
busteass. 


Loadoo: fin rrfndax ctosatf down 1 Z2 
at 1270.4. 


Annlyersaries 


Births: WOBam COwpo-, poet. 
Great Berkhampsteed, Herts, 
1731; George Fovster, explorer, 
Nassenhuben. Poland, 1754; 
John Alexander Nerriands, 
cbcmisi, Loudon, 1837; Sir 
Aurel Stem, archaeologist, Bud- 
apest. 1862. 

Deaths: Nicolaus Scene, 
geologist, Schwerin, Germany, 
1686; John McAdam, inventor 
of toe road surface bearing his 
name. Moffat, Dumfriesshire, 
1836; Coventry Fttmore, poet, 
Lymington, Hants, 1896; Sir 
Ltt Bd er Jrmmn , leader of the 
abortive raid (1895) into the 
Transvaal, London, 1917; Cyril 
Comolly, critic, London, 1974. 


Best wines 


In a blind tasting in which 27 
wine retailers submitted wines 
to accompany' a traditional 
Christmas dmn» J the following 
were the top selections when the 

short-listed wines were tried 
with toe food: 

To BocompHny smoked Batman: Mark 
West Vineyard Russian Ittrer Vafey 

To o wju i pw iy CMstmas puddng: 20 
ww cu uoscsilQl de SetubaT K. Ata 
SRWh (01-837 03871. £285- 
Sounac 7as», Ost/Jaa 


Roads 


The Midlands: Ml: Lane 
closures near junction 28 (A38 
Mansfield). M5: Contraflow 
cleared from junctions 4 and 5 
(Bromsgrove/DrtHtwicfa). M54: 
Lane restrictions between junc- 
tions 2 and 7. 

Wales and West: M4: Contra- 
flow between junctions 16 and 
17 (Swindon / Chippenham). 
M& Lane closures on north- 
bound carriageway between 
junctions 20 and 19 (Qeve- 
don/A369 Royal Port bury 
Dock). A 38s Lane closures be- 
tween Saltasb and Carminow 
Cross, Devon. 

The Nettle M1& La ne clo- 
sures and contraflow between 
junctions 1 and 2 (Rotherham / 
A1 M) and junctions 6 and 7 
(Thome/M62). M61: Lane clo- 
sures at Biacow Bridge (M6 
junction) in both directions. 
Mric Contraflow bet w een junc- 
tions 29 (A 6 Charley) and 32 
(M55). 

Scotland: M9<h Two contra- 
flows between Halbeath and 
Cockiaw and between Cairney 
Bridge and Alarly, Central re- 
gion. A96: One lane only on the 
Aberdeen to Inverurie road in 
both directions W of Aberdeen 
airport Inverness: Resurfacing 
on Kenneth Street roundabout 

with lane restrictions. 

Information snppBed by AA 


Tower Bridge 


Tower Bridge will be raised 
today at 7.30 am. 


c 


HIGH TIDES 


D C 


AM 


5 c 


PM 


jjj— > 


TOOAY IUU 

London BUdga 754 

■ SjflS 

1.02 
ao4 

1247 


&49 

1153 

7J30 

559 

552 

1229 

1231 

942 

654 

aw 

651 

1249 

121 
1123 
153 
8.12 
651 
6.04 
1245 
11J05 
558 
to 


UHl 


KT PM KT 
55 857 55 

&4 242 ae 

9.4 1AO 95 
27 B.19 ftl 
85 125 85 

1253 45 
SA 029 65 


45 720 
24 556 
4w4 &47 
65 15! 
6.7 150 
45 1051 
72 625 
22 £16 
35 721 
5.1 1.17 
1217 
23 151 
45 

15 1.16 
35 654 
55 654 
32 &19 
75 1.16 
45 1155 
3A 6JSB 


15 

27 

45 

as 

75 

45 

35 



ttdn 



r 





( lucATucD ”^A westerly airstream will cover fee British Isles but 

V WCMtnCn wfll approach NW areas. S Wales and Errand, 

except the have sunny or dear Intervals and scattered showers. N Wades, N 

Engtend^Northera Ireland and Scotland will have some smny intervals «id show- 
ezs. The showers wffl he heavy at times partScnlnly in fee W. More persistent ram 
may reach W Scoflaad and Nafluznlrehiid later. Winds will be mainly moderate 
or fresh W. Ten^eratares near nminaL Oatlook fm tommTOW and Friday; Mainly 
dry in fee SE, occashmal rein and druzle.in the N and W. MOd and windy hi the N. 
Near normal tenqwretnres in fee S. 




3 


1^: 


( LIGHTING-UP TIME ) ( YESTERDAY ) 


C AROUND BRITAIN ^ 


London 429 pm to 758 am 
Bristol 459 pm to 7.17 am 

i to 7.42 am 


at midday yesterday: c. 
t, feta r. rate: *, sun. 

C F 



PortfMta - bow to plur 

Manday-Saugctay record yow dally 

Add hwm .weepie r to dste m d n o 
ym wecMy Portfolio total. 

v vow, total BMi C boi me nutotbhed 
wwdOy divli tend Bfl m* yon tew won 
oublom ora non or the ntn money 
stated for t hat work, amlnuat «a*m 
yoor prize a? Insirncted below. 



- you .are WWW U Wnlwm 
aomeone else cam daim an yourbetiaif 

between * " 

No n . 

for Mhie to contact 
ter a ny reason 

Jw above Ontnaenona are 
" to noth tutor and we 
dam. 




13 ES drfzzto 

12 54 rain 
t1 ^ rate 

11 52 rate 

13 55 rata 
13 S rah 

13 55 rate 

14 57 rata 

13 SB rata 

14 67 ten 

18 56 mn 

12 54 rata 

12 54 (tazzto 
16 61 OUB 

13 SB drfzzto 

11 52 bright 

12 54 rain pm 

11 52 rata 

12 54 rah - 
10 60 sunny 

8 48 showor 
12 54 rata 

10 SO sinwsr 

11 52 rata 

9 48 doute 

12 54 ratal 





( 

ABROAD 

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Vi^ctoacfcd. drtzzto;C Mr; tbg;r. rata; s, sun; sn.snoir;t. ttmtar. 

CP' C F C F 

8 J8 W QUpgw c 13 S5 Mojarer s 16 51 
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■ 22 72 COrtB S 21 70 MMtt SPrteco' 

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ftteriMte e IS SlUiMk 8 16 64 HtatooC* t 21 708 


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8 21 70 
f 29 84Ara*J«t 
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CMcago* 

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t 9 48 

C 12 54 I White 

c 11 52 Wanfeol 
c 12 54 
C 12 54 

» 9 48 

8 28 82 LPtfmm 
a 23 73 LUbea 
1 22 72 Loeteno - 
8 20 68 L Maata* 
S 1 84 Lu a nte g 
r 11 82 


8 19 681 
8 17 63 i 
C 10 501 
c 17 83 : 

8 846 

s 17 63 ffaboU 
c 5 41 Hantw 
c 20 88 NDaM 
8 5 41 N York* 
I" M 57 No 
8 52 90 Ota 
m IS 68 Paria 
• 23 73 PoMogr 
o 21 70 
3 13 55 . 

S 10 50 
S . 21 70 
0 9 48 fltoda J 
s 12 94 f" 


c 29 84 
8 11 62 
c S 41 
s -3 27 Strattfta 

8 11 52MteV 
1 24 75 Ttaasta 
f 19 66 Trttav 
C 24 76 Taaadta 
r 11 52 Tokyo 
a 17 83 ftw 
f 8 46 Tata 

e 11 52 VOtoncte* 

9 0 32 Vancfear* 
• M 76 Vtaw 

1 10 60 Maaoa 

t 2 36 waraate 
8 19 Ktataar 
» 27 81 wWtttaa 

s 21 70 Zudeb 


‘denotes Monday’s figures ora hrietatwafeble 


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9 19M 

s 16 2 

C25 77 
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0 ; 






BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


THE 



TIMES 


SPORT 37 
TELEVISION AND RADIO 41 


*9 


WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 26 1986 


Executive Editor 
Kenneth Fleet 


■FT 5W Share 

h 270.4 (-12.2) 


FT-SE 100 


invisibles change reverses deficit 

Britain back 


Bank sets underwriting ceiling 


129.45 (-026) 

THE POUND 

U$Do8ar 

1 .4225^+0.0050) 

w German mark 

2.8358 (-0.0247) 

Trade -weigh ted 
67.9 (-0.3) 


in the black 

By David Smith, Economics Correspondent 

Biiuin bad a trade deficit of die estimate was £600 million g netsinpK ehanengipg thgrtfm- 
>35 mfllioa last month, as a month. The. monthly ing of the revision of the 


£835 millioo last mo nth , as 

imports rose to thdrhighest invisibles surplus for the Jnly- 
gvel smee March last year. September period has been 
But the current account wasm increased to £800 million, 
smpha by £65 m fltkm became As a result, the current 
of a big upward revision of the account was in sniplus by £65 
estimated monthly surplus on million last month,- w hile rm 
mwaWeriade. _ . the previons invisibles’ es- 

The trade defied of £835 ttirny te it would have beo n in 
million compared with £885 deficit by more than £200 
Mimon ip September and million. In September there 
£1.51 bimon in August Ex- . mw a wf fys 
ports and nnpoits both rose The quarterly current a©* 
last month, partly because of count deficit for the July- 
an increase in the value of September period has been 
traie m oiL reduced from £1.23 billion to 

_The mam feature of the £634 miffion as a result of the 


rrra j muuon compared with £885 

Thousands 

rush for I ^.month, 11 ^ becasse*of 


is forms 


N MD Rothschild, the mer-- 
chan t task adviser to die 
Government on the British 
Gas share sale, said “tens of 
thousmgs” of completed 
forms wqre received yesterday 
and 30,000 mint-prospectuses 1 
given butiat.its London bead- 
quarters. in Bristol, the Na- 
tional Westminster Bank 
1 received . more than 15,000 
completed (priority forms in 
the first p apt. On the “grey” 
market, British Gas traded 
yesterday ariabont 61p. 

• National Westminster Bank 
will offer a idling service for 
British Gas ' sfrardabkters at 
245 brandies in England, 

. Scotland andl Wales, selected 
to reach the hrajority of the 
population am not at all its 
branches as reported in The 
Times yestadAy. 

BTR attacks 
Pilkington 

Industrial conglomerate 
BTR last ntghTaccused the 
management of Britain's big- 
gest glass ■ ' manufacturer, 
Pflkingtan, of “tea years of 
sub-standard performance 
and inconsistent results.** 

BTR, bidding £1.16 hiffion 
for P fllcrng tiwi. said ihsrt 
£1,000 invested in BTR in 
September 1976 had increafed 
by £34,054 .while, dm- same 
amount invested m Pflkiiigton 
would have risen by only 
£2,018. . 


figures, however, was a sharp 
upward revision in the es- 
timated surplus on invisibles 
— services, tr ansfe r s and in- 
terest, profit and dividends. 

Officials now estimate ihk 
smplus to be naming at £900 
million a month. month. 


£634 million as a result of the 


ing of the revision of the 
figures. 

“The G ov ernm ent has been 
saved by a whisker from a 
deficit on the balance of 
payments for the third month 
in succession only by pulling 
out of tiie hat a bigger surplus 
on invisibles,” Mr Cook said. 
He aHHfld th at toe underlying 
trade position remained very 
poor. 

The cumulative current ac- 
count surplus tins year, on the 
basis of the new invisibles’ 
estimates, is £429 mflHnn In 
the gwtmrm statement 


! ' By Richard Thomson 
| Banking Correspondent 

Hie Bwfc ef England i»»? 
imposed its first-ever Emit on 
banks' total underwriting 
exposure to coincide with the 
e n won s British Gas share 
flotation. The underwriting 
process for the £5ti bHBoa 
share issne was completed last 
Friday. 

So far, there have been few 
rales governing the oaderwrit- 
HUZ m m m U iw p w tg undertakes 
by banks. At this stage the 
tank will apply specifically to 
banks, whkh fell ndtr the 
Bank ofEagfamFs supervisory 
control, and will not include 
s t ock br okers and seasides 
bosses in the City. 


Some bankets are worried 
that this wffl pat them at a 
disadvantage to other institu- 
tions and could cause « y n p|f« 
s upe r v isory problems when 
fo reign banks and securities 
houses are in v ol ved. 

Before the underwriting of 
British Gas was completed, 

H y Hawt nf Kn gfeiMl rmtarp ^i 

banks involved and asked 
the m net to let their total 
underwriting exposure go 
higher than four times their 
underlying capital 

Banks were asked to contact 
the Bank of Wa gfawJ if they 
planned to take on very large 
mderwritiog exposures to 
British Gas. 

The lteut of four times 


capital for raderwriting busi- 
ness has been mider dis- 
cossion for several months but 
until now the Bank has not 
required any m siti t niioa to 
adhere to iL 

The underwriting commit- 
mests of institutions such as 
merchant banks commonly go 
mm»b higher fta» this limit 
and the "bank has made no 
attempt to prevent this. 

Although the Bank has 
informally imposed the limit of 

four thwftc ra ptofl to hi wvH p 

with the British Gas flotation, 
the Emit is expected to apply 
to all bank underwriting for 
the time, being. 

The Bank yesterday de- 
cimal to comment. 


this month, the Treasury fore- 
Offioals said; yesterday that, cast broad balance on current 
no detailed explanation could account this year, followed by 
be offered for the revision of a £1.5 Inffion defeat next year, 
the estimated invisibles sur- Exports were valued at 
plus. Mr Robin Cook, £6.20 bflfion. an wirjpa iye of 
Labour’s Trade spokesman, £134 miiK«n on September 
has tabled Parliamentary Qfl essoorts rose bv £91 mil- 


the balance of payments 


■ Current account i 
□ VisMe trade | 


NOV DEC JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG S3» OCT 


Exports were valued at 
£ 6 J 0 bflfion, an inoease of 
£134 milHn n on September. 
CHI exports rose by £91 mil- 
lion, while exports of the so- 
called erratic items (ships, 
aircraft and precious stones) 
dumped by £30 millkiL 
Excluding these, there was a 
1.5 per cent increase in exports 
between September and Oct- 
ober. 

E x p orts of finished mau n. 

factious rose by 2.7 per cent in. 
volume last month. But in the 
AugustrOctdber period they 
were down by 3 percent on the 
previous three months. 

Imports rose by £85 million 
to £7.04 biOion last month. 
There was an increase of £174 
million in the value of ml 
imparts, but a£76 million fall 
in imports of erratic items. 



. • *• ' 

.:+> K-*,- r**i* . 

.-§ • - K-yfi&s ikz* 1 
r >;. .. * .. *■ - 

fc 






Pleasure, not business: mechanical engineer Richard Thorne, of North wich, 
Cheshire, pictured yesterday after winning rite nse of Concorde for a day, the 
first prize from 160,000 entries in the British Airways Concorde Challenge 


Profits up 

Powell Dnffiyn, foe fuel 
distribution,' ■ shipping, ®- 
gmeering and construction 
materials grpap, yes t erd ay re- 
ported a 27 per cent increase 
in pretax profits to £10.04- 
mfllioo forfoobtifyear to foe 
end of September 1986 . Turn- 
over feUfr6m£355^6 million 
to £299.86 utilEon. An in- 
terim dividend of 4.75p was 
declared. - 

Tempos, page 25 

EMAP ahead 



IC Gas board hits out at 
‘inadequate’ £750m bid 


Barclays’ shares fall 
after S African pullout 


Mr Brace Matthews: 


S Mr Bruce 

r year to the ^ - 

.86 million Matthews 

l An in- . • . - 

« 5 p whs |q retire 


. The board of IC Gas, foe 
group best known for its Calor 
Gas inte re s ts, yesterday ac- 
cused foe Barclay brothers of 
txymg to buy the company on 
the cheap. David and Fred- 
erick, the Barday twins, have 
offered £750 miffion through 
their much smaller US-based 
energy group GuIfResources. 

In a hard-hitting d efe nce 
document, the board says the 
Barclay terms, 530p a share. 


By John Bell, City Editor 
tains no profit Forecast, 
though it is dear that one has 
been prepared for possible use 
IC Gas 'has attacked the 
Gulf proposals as being inad- 
equate in both form and 
content “To make foe offer. 
Gulf is having to bonow up to 
£670 milium and two-thuds 
of th ese borrowings must be 
repaid within nine months. 
Gulf hopes to achieve this in 
part through foe disposal of 


value foe Calor operations at the Belgian operations,” says 
only 9 times historic earnings.' ICGas. 

IC Gas shares, which have ft points out that foe need 
remained well above the level for rapid asset disposals and 
of Gulfs offer closed last night foe resulting tax liability to- 
rn 566p. gefoer with foe costs of foe 

The d efence docu ment , con- 


gether with foe costs of the 
offer must limit the amount 


Gulf can offer for IC Gas 
shales. 

The document gives in- > 
dependent valuations for the 
nofrCator parts of its business 1 
putting £472 million on the 
company’s Belgian interests 
and £60 million on foe North . 
Sea operations. “Gulfs offer 
implies a value for Calor of I 
only £218 million represent- 
ing a multiple of only nine 
times earnings for foe year to 
March 31, 1986. Why give 
Calor away?” asks the 
document 

The document also rqects 
foe idea that IC Gas has 
performed badly over the past 
few years. 


Mr Bruce Matthews, who 
has been a director of News 
International jric since 1972, 


Reed joins satellite TV consortium 


EMAP, the newspaper, 

magazine -and exhibition will ldtiie at the ei Kiot 


group, said it does not intend 
to. launch a hostile bid for 
Home Counties Newspapers. 

prolitsQp£5.6 mflfi o n m^the 
half 'year to October 4, this 
week increased its stake in 
Home Ctmnties to 20 pa* cent 
Tempus, page 25 


Allied up 21% s^rr'S; 


: Impressive figures at Allied- 
Lyons yesterday fulfilled City 
expectations. The brewing 
division's buoyant results and 
lower finances charges al- 
lowed pretax profits to jump 
21 per cent to £148 mflfion ftnr 
the half year to September 13. 

Tensas, lira 25 


ONe»« 


FarogaEcd. 25 
Traded Opts 25 
Dint Trials 26 
GasomSties 26 

JfiUSM Prices 2 

Money MHrialSl Share Brices 27 


this year, the company an- 
nounced last m&tL . 

' News Tnfmiationfll chair- 
man Mr Rupert Murdoch said 
that over the years Bruce 
Matthews had been one of foe 
most o uts t andin g executives 
in Fleet Street. 

“He has made a huge 
contribution to the industry 
and, more particularly, to the 
success or our company's 
newspapers. 

. “I am pleased that he 1 ms 




The News Corporation Ltd 
and Eric Bemrose Ltd. 

“All Brace's cofleagoes wish 
him well for .the future.” 

Mr Murdoch wifi resume 
die position of man ag in g 
director of News Inter- 
national, and Mr Wiliam 
0*Ndll becomes managing 
director of London Post 
(Primers) Ltd, in charge of foe 
company’s national 
newspapers. 


BrOas-atyStuff ^ 

Reed International, the pa- 

PCT and puMfoing groujMS The Independent 
joining foe Direct Broad cast- . Broadcasting Authority is ex- 
m limited consortium, one peeled to interview foe five 
ot the l eading ap pl i c a nt s for main contenders for the fran- 
the.sateDite broadcasting fiaiH chise this week ami announce 


the winner on December 3. 

The other corporate 
shareholders in the DBL con- 
sortium are British & 
Commonwealth Shipping, 
Cambridge Electronics, Elec- 
tronic Rentals, Ferranti, News 
International and Sears. 


There was continuing 
speculation in the City yes- 
terday about whether other 
British companies would fol- 
low the example of Barclays 
Bank in withdrawing from any 
domestic co mmi tment to 
South Africa. 

After the surge in its share 

SOUTH AFRICAN 
STAKES 

% of pro-tax 
profits earned 
from South Africa 
Consofdated Goldfields 50 
NB 26 

DeKa 23 

Lonrho 20 

Pilkington 14 

Standard & Chartered 13 
Tootal 13 

Martey 10 

Babcock 9 

Metal Box 9 

Courtaulds 8 

Reddtt & Cofenan 8 

Telephone Rentals 8 

RTZ 7 

BOC 6 

Hffi Samuel 5 

Smith & Nephew 5 


price on Monday following 
the announcement that it was 
setting its stake in Barclays 
National Barclays’ shares fell 


The question of limits on 
underwriting exposure is the 
subject of a. Bank consultative 
paper issuedm July, which 
suggests an absolute celling of 
25 per cent of a bank's capital 
on exposures to individual 
customers. 

Exposures of 10 per cent or 
more would have to be re- 
ported to foe Bank automati- 
cally. But foe paper makes 
dear that more time Is needed 
to formulate guidelines on 
total underwriting exposures. 

With the underwriting and 
sub-underwriting of British 
Gas completed, it looked un- 
likely rt»> any tank had even 
come dose to breaching the 
Bank’s Ihut 


Cambrian 
to comb 
records on 
Boesky 

By Lawrence Lever 

Cambrian and General 
Securities, the investment 
trust formerly ran by Mr Ivan 
Boesky, the disgraced Ameri- 
can arbitrageur, is to rail in 
accountants to investigate 
whether Mr Boesky chan- 
nelled illegal insider deals 
through Cambrian. 

A spokesman for S G War- 
burg, foe merchant bank 
called in on Friday to advise 
the Cambrian board, said 
yesterday: “We have to have a 
very detailed investigation. 
We will need a firm of 
accountants to crawl through 
all the records.” 

$300m suit likely 28 

The spokesman said the 
investigation would extend 
: beyond those shares which the 
SEC had already publidy 
highlighted as illegally dealt in 
by Mr Boesky to include 
shares mentioned in connec- 
tion with Mr Dennis Levine. 

In May Mr Levine con- 
fessed to having made more 
than SI 2 million (£8.45- mil- 
lion) profits from insider 
trading. 

The spokesman said “Ba- 


MU 0 pto 4 Tg.ata Jr siraUywe have ,to .identify all 
several other companies with those stocks which have been 
interests in South Africa also mentioned as sensitive in 
declined. Pifidngton dropped co ^ n ^p5 )n Loesk> 

3p to 60Sp, RTZ was also ac £J^ r ^ e . vine ' , . . 
down 3p at 667p and Reddtt . , IS n0 ,n m X 
& Coleman dropped 5p to nwd.** a very thorough 
799p. Consolidated Gold- investigation has got to be 
fields, however, which has foe don £J nt ? tn ? es * 0ur 
largest exposure to South Af- mvestigations have been very 
rica. was up !4 d to 674p. preummary. 

The preliminary lnvestiga- 
Shares in Standard tions carried out by Cambrian 
Cluttered, which now has foe so for have involved cross- 
largest South African exposure checking Cambrian’s trading 
of any British bank, leapt 27p records against specific dates 
yesterday to 834p. published by the Securities 

Sir Leslie Smith, chairman ^ Exchange Conunission 
of the British Industry for Mr Boesky s illegal trades. 
Committee on South Africa, 
which represents two thirds of 
British investment in the 
country, said: “Companies 
should use their influence 
within South Africa to im- 
prove the system, rather than 
withdrawing altogether.” 


Profits ahead 

Coated Electrodes Inter- 
national which came to the 
USM in June, has increased 
its interim pretax profits by 25 
per cent to £653,000 


CBI hails ‘significant 5 drop 


Pay deals down to 5v2% 


MONEY MARKETS 


1 1 »: < ^ ^.5a3B|CLiikiitoiisad ! V l > c I ; 




Cfeahm 

wbwg pnets 







By D«ekHaxrfe 
Indastrial Efotor 

The Confederation of Brit- 
ish Industry yesterday re- 
ported a drop in pay 
settlement to foe lowest level 
for three years. . . 

The CBTs pay databank: 
shows average increases pro- 
visionally dropphog from 614 
percent m foe first half of this 
year to 5 Vi per cent in tiie third 
quarter. 

The CBI haited the drop as 
“significant” and said it would 
please foe Government, which 
is worried that continued high 
earning levels might further 
erode Britain’s competitive- 
ness and- increase nnemplny- 
ment 

The CBI believes a brighter 
picture is emerging on Brit- 



Sir Pieter Watters: UK now 
“much more competitive” 
fac torin g over the levels of a 
year ago. Therefore, some of 
tiie recent deterioration in 
British unit labour costs has 
been reversed,” the CBTs 


ain’s labour costs, although it latest employment affair s sur- 


was cautious about improve- vey said. 

□rents in international com- But, it added: “It is too early 

petiuveness. to Judge how this has affected 

“The rapid rise in industrial Britain’s position in terms of 
output in the third quarter has international competi rive- 
resulted in a Z7 per cent rise ness,” because no third quar- 
to output per bead in manu- ter date woe available for 


Britain’s main competitors. 

Sir Peter Walters, the presi- 
dent of the Institute of Direc- 
tors and chairman of British 
Petroleum, said at an IoD 
dinner last night “The gmeral 
situation is improving and 
Britain is now much more 
competitive with her Euro- 
pean partners. But we are still 
not fully competitive with the 
United States, Japan and the 
newly industrialized coun- 
tries. Europe has still not got 
its act together.” 

The CBI believes tire cost of 
living is continuing to decline 
in importance as an upward 
pressure on pay settlements. 
Companies’ inability to in- 
crease prices also remains the 
most strongly felt downward 
pressure. 

The lower level of settle- 
ments has yet to have an 
impact on Department of 
Employment returns, which 
this month showed foe under- 
lying trend in September’s 
average earnings at 7.5 per 
cent, where they have stayed 
since the middle of 1984. 


JbhnChqj, 






London: Bank B aw 11% 
3 -month interbank 11 %- 11 ’rf* 
3 -month eflgfete 


UK managers dosing the gap 


buying rate 
US ffima Rate 7Yi% 

Federal Funds 5W 
3-nunth Treasury ffls 537-5US1fc 
30-year trends 101-101 ’ u* 


EJEEISiS 




S 5 E 3 ! 


dill feg behind in the Ebo- 
pean pay leagae, the gap is 
slewty dosing, according to 
Hay Marregwaent Coasid- 
tante’ latest animal sur vey * of 
European rommerafouh 
The improvement looks pos- 
sible because Rrftsh salary 
increases in real toms are 
sfrgfrtiy higher than hi most 
European cowntries, says the 
survey- 


paities Cue maeaa m g inter- 
national co mpe t i t ion the gap 
wffl gradually erode,” it 

forecasts. 

Of 16 European contones, 
Britain's gross salaries are 
higher «5y than those in 
Greece and Partngal accord- 
hig to foe ra re y . Taken on 


time to be ame 
paid in Europe 


in in most behind all but Greece, Por- 
i, says foe tugal and tire Irish Repnbfic; 

titf British executive hsis C»ly 
s wffl con- half tire spendmg power to 1 his 
foe lowest Swiss coanterpart 
it as com- Austin ranks highest on 


salaries, followed by West 
Germany and Switzerland — 
all are ahead of tire United 
States. But on the basis of 
purchasing power, foe US 
comes first, with Switzerland 
second. 

In real tarns, the average 
British employee is 15 per cent 
better off than in 1983, says 
the survey. 

*Hay EarcpeBB Remuneration 
Comparison: £890 from Hay 
Management Consultants, 52 
Gresveaor Gardens, London 
SW1WOAU. 


^ibte Mortgage. 

Wouldn’t it be marvellous if you could choose how much you 
pay each month in mortgage repayment? 

It is possible. John CharcoTs new flexible mortgage is quite 
unique. 

it combines the advantages of a fixed interest/floating 
interest mortgage with the possibility of reducing the monthly 
payment without prior notice. 

Unlike other mortgages, which either have a fixed interest 
rate or one that floats up and down depending on die market, our 
new mortgage gives you a choice. 

You may opt for a floating rate and then change your mortgage 
to a fixed rate at a month’s notice. More interesting, you may opt 
to defer up to 30% of the payments whenever you wish. 

This means you can choose to pay less if the interest rate rises. 
Or if 5 ’oor other commitments rise. 

If your other expenses come down, or your income climbs 
temporarily you may opt to pay more. 

Our new mortgage is available to everyone who is looking to 
borrow between £15.001 and £250,000, up to 3.5 times a single 
income. 

It is available to purchase properties up to 100 % of their 
value, although sums up to 70% can be borrowed without a status 
enquiry: 

In short, if your income is flexible, if your outgoings are 
flexible, if you just don’t know enough about your future earnings, 
or even if yon just don't want to be tied down to a fixed monthly 
repayment, then our new mortgage is for you. 

Telephone ns on 01 -5S9 7080 for our brochure or to make 
an appointment. 


KnEPEXDENT MOKTI LV iE RK< 1KEJCS 
Mercury House. 195 Knlfthiahrid^. London SW7 lRELTelrOl 5M9 70-SO. 

















High street key 
to Alphameric 

By Cliff Feftham 

Alphameric, the electronic on-ihc-spot information for 
keyboards company which customers." 
has benefited from business Among the company's cu- 

g inerated try Big Bang, be- cnts are the Cheltenham .and 
eves there is a growing Gloucester Building Socie ty, 
demand for its equipment in which is using the equipment 
the high street to provide marketing infonna- 

It is taking orders for install- tion, and Nabisco, the fow^ 
ing terminals in building sod- group, which is providing its 
eties, motor car showrooms salesmen with terminals to use 
and travel agents. at home. . , 

Mr Doueai Craig-Wood, the Other customers mdude the 

chairman, who yesterday re- Stock Exchange, .with more 
ported a sharp jump in than 5,000 Topic systems 
Alphameric’s half-time prof- installed. Alphameric has also 
its, said: “Retailers of all won large orders for the City s 
kinds, from financial services big dealing rooms, 
to food and white goods, can At the half-wav stage of the 
see the benefit of being able to year, pretaxpronis were . 
use our equipment to ac- from £5 1 2,000 to £1.7 million, 
curately monitor stock control on turnover of £9.8 million, 
and at the same time provide against £5 mimon. 


Readicut acquires 
Drake for film 

By John Bell, City Editor 

Readicut International, the Hoyle, who owned 10 per 
fast-growing textiles to carpets cent. Readicut is paying £1-25 
up, is moving deeper into million cash for the Hoyle 


X * 

Trump card in the B 


Sir Ralph Halpem, 


foremost of a nation 


of shopkeepers, has 


turned round the 


Burton Group and 


become the first 


British executive to be 


paid more than 


£1 million a year 


r.i, .•.'"-v 

tSU- V v ' : 





VI- 
















m 


£11.25 million purchase of 
Drake. 

The proposed acquisition 
will complement Readicut’s 
fibres producer. Plasticisers, 
and it will not lead to any 
dilution of Readicut’s earn- 
ings per share, the company 
says. 

The acquisition is to be 
financed by the issue of 27.4 
million Readicut shares - 21 
per cent of the group’s en- 
larged capital. Drake is a 65 
per cent owned subsidiary of F 
Drake and Co. which is owned 
bv the Haigh family. 

’The balance is held by 
Drake directors and the estate 
of a former director, Mr J 


Drake made profits of £2.33 
milli on on sales of £14.48 
milli on in the year to August 
31. Net assets were £3.28 
mill ion, including £1.3 mil- 
lion in cash. 

Almost 21 million of the 
new Readicut shares have 
been conditionally placed 
with institutional investors at 
40p a share by Schroder, the 
merchant bank. Existing 
Readicut holders wilt have the 
right to purchase new shares at 
40p up to a limit of 10 new 
shares for every 49 held. 

The acquisition is subject to 
shareholders’ approval at an 
extraordinary general meeting 
on December 12. 



A,;# 









y 


• ■Ml- 


m 


Foreign investment in 
UK remains buoyant 

By Teresa Poole, Business Correspondent 

Foreign investment in The US remained die big- 
Brifain has remained buoyant gest investor and accounted for 
so far this year bnt the average 131 of the projects, 
size of projects has fallen. Until three months ago, 

The Invest in Britain Bn- 1986 did not look as if it would 
reao said yesterday that in the be a my good year for inward 
first nine months of fins year investment, bnt a number of 
there were 225 investment decisions over the summer 
decisions by overseas com- months should mean this is 
panics, an II per cent in- die fourth successive year of 
crease. These projects wifi record investment. Last year 
create 10.620 new jobs and the IBB recorded 305 projects 
safeguard 7047. valued at about £3 trillion. 






Buy or sell shares in 

BRITISH GAS pic 

Flee of commission through 

PRIOR HARWIN 

SECURITIES LIMITED 
(Licensed Dealer in Securities and member of F1MBRA) 

01-920 0652 

Note this number for future reference 
65 LONDON WALL, LONDON, EC2M 5TU 


COMPANY NEWS 


WMtrvrt7*w<v • 




• UNILOCK HOLDINGS: 
Interim dividend (Ip) for the six 
months to September 27. Fig- 
ures in £000. Turnover 10,753 
(9,345), trading profit on or- 
dinary activities before tax 902 
(801), tax 315 (328), earnings 
per share 3.46p (3.01p). The 
move of the company's cor- 
porate head office to Haywards 
Heath is now complete. Sound 
progress has been made during 
this half year and the chairman 
anticipates another year of solid 
growth. 



23 million 
addresses and 

postcodes 

nowon 

compact disc. 

The national Postcode Address File, containing 
full details of every address and postcode in the 
country, is now on compact disc This means 
companies with address lists can carry out checks 
in seconds. 

There’s a special introductory price: £3.000 + 

VAT covers a 2-year subscription, i.e. the compact 
disc, associated software* and an updateof data after 
the first year. (A suitable compact disc device costs 
less than £1,000 and can be attached to most 
industry-conpaffle PCs.) 

Please use the coupon to obtain more information. 

•©Silrer Plans Information Lur. W4 4m 


lb: Anne Wine, Boom 380, FREEPOST (no stamp required), Post Office 
Headquarters, 33 Giosvenor Place, LONDON SW1X 1EE 

Please send me information about the Postcode Address File on compact 
disc (including informa tio n on suitable hardware). 


• PROPERTY PARTNER- 
SHIPS: Figures in £000s for the 
six months to Sept em ber 30. 
Interim 3p (2_5p). Gross rental 
income from investment prop- 
erties was 533 (466). Pretax 
profit was 715 (593). Tax was 
250 (237). Earnings per share 
were 8.7p (6.7p). 

• PACER SYSTEMS: An 
agreement has been signed for 
the acquisition of Signal 
Processing Systems of 
Massachusetts, for $540,000 
(£386,000). The unaudited 1 
management accounts for the 
year to October 3 show turnover 1 
of $917,000 and a pre-tax loss of 
$37,618. 

• PERSONAL ASSETS 
TRUST: Figures for 6 months 
to October 31 in £000. Total 
income was 132 (94), revenue 
before tax 64 (38), lax 19 (21), 
earnings per share 0.30p (0. 1 lp). 
Net income for the first 6 
months should not be taken as 
an indication of the fall years 
results. The company values its 
unquoted portfolio on a conser- 
vative basis. Shares 41 fcp up lp. 


More company news 
is on page 28 


• CLUFF OIL HOLDINGS: 
The company’s subsidiary CJuff 
Mineral Exploration (Mbabwe) 
has made a second gold discov- 


whidb is to be known as Freda, 
lies adjacent to the previously 
reported Rebecca discovery and 
exploration indicates a re sour ce 
of about Sl.OOOoz of gold. The 
re-evaluation of the Rebecca 
discovery has increased the size 
of this resource, which is cal- 
culated to contain about 
242,000oz. The total gold con- 
tained in both Freda and Re- 
becca is estimated to be 
293,000oz. Recent drilling at 
Rebecca below ISO metres pro- 
vides significant potential far 
unde rgroun d mini ng. 

STER: The company is to 
an interim dividend an 




v 4 V ' ' * 








.p j§ $ % '• -* 

•- .j*- * ' ‘ 4'. . ,£f l i&fg™ ' • ' ?? • ■■ M 

" y y s 1 0 -■ 

j* v-- ** ■ . -jfc ■ ’ ** 

y,-"' y*' ^ .,yf' ^ 


^ : * , 








■ >* «&***' .-Y’ f 

W"' . • 


Jr ' 


w? 
*-r; * \ 

' • 


, ' • ■ 


. it ; J 
• • . - . 








»• 
-i 




.<£■ 


..,. s §r* 


turnover 23,776 
2% profit before tax 1,254 
tax 249 (65), minorities 2 
extraordinary credit 398 
earnings per share 6.03p 
(3^2p). Tbe boand reports good 
jwogress in all divisions and 
indications for the next six 
months are encouraging and 
point to a healthy profit for the 


Ready for more 
growth. 


V 


NAME 


COMIANY 


TYPE OF BUSINESS 


ADDRESS 



POSTCODE 



warosB^ pass on postcode 


BASE 

LENDING 

RATES 

ABN 1 11.00% 

Adam & Company 11.00% 

BCCI 11JX)% 

Cdtoik Savings! 12.45% 

Consrtdaw Cids_ lli»% 

Cwpsaiw Bank ^!im 

C. Hoare & Co ™11.00% 

Hong Kong & SlBnghai_... 11 . 0 G% 

lioyds Bank 11.00% 

Mat WBStmkster 11J30% 

Royal Bank of Scotland __. 11 .G 0 % 

TSB 11.00% 

Cttfank HA _11.00% 

t Mongage Bare Site. 


Dalgety is a strong and consistently profitable 
international enterprise with strategic in terest s 
in agricultural services and supplies, food 
manufacturing and distribution, and the 
trading and processing of agricultural and 
food commodities. 

Already the UK’s strongest agricultural 
supplies company and the second largest in 
Australia, Dalgety is preparing the ground for 
further growth. 

Its steadily expanding business in fast- 




gety 


food distribution, trading and processing in 
commodities, in branded food products like 
Homepride, and its recent acquisition of 
Golden ’Wfonderfonn the basis for this further 
growth. 

The combination of these interests gives 
Dalgety a unique place in the woridfood system. 

For more information, please cut out the 
coupon and send for your free copy of the 
Annual Report. 


j To: Shareholder Relations Department 
j . Dalgety PLX2, 19 Hanover Square, LmidonWlR9DA 

j . Please send me a copy of the 1986 Annual Report 




















New life 


FnT5 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 26 1986 


STOCK MARKET REPORT 





Standard Chartered shares 
leap 27p in heavy buying 




lAk^bcdstDcUnbr 


s.y-i 



qufai 


By Michael Clark 
and Carol Leonard 

Shares of Standard Char- 
tered, the imwiwiinnfll bank- 
ing group, stood ant from the 
crowd yesterday on sngges- 
tions that anotfaa - stake-bmld- 
fag exercise was nnder way. 

More than £40 million was 
added to the group's stock 
market value as the shares 
surged 27p to 833p. 

The wealthy Malaysian 
businessman. Tan Sri Kboo 
Teck Pnat, one of flute white 
knights who helped rescue 
Standard from the dutches of 
Lloyds Bank earlier thfa year, 
is ndmned to have been 
trying to add to his holding. 

On Monday Tan Sri Kboo 
announced that he had raised 
his stake in Standard to 9.77 
mflKou shares, or &Zper cent 
Last week he agreed to swap 
his near 30 per cent gtai» in 
Exco International, the money 
broker, for shares in Mr John 
Gunn's British A Common- 
wealth Shipping after it made 
an agreed bid. 

>ffSLHnMnp,fte 
specialist travel operator, is 
stffl winning friends In me 
Cfry. Last week it announced 
indxxpra&hoffUBS- 
n far the 17 months to As- 
ms!. and it looks capable 
ofeven better profits in the 
cm re nt year. L McotcI , foe 


COMMENT Kenneth Fleet 


Chancellor strikes 
invisible gold 



Jan Feb Mar Apr 


•Jun Jti Aug Sep Oct Nov 


*/■ - \ 


£4 nrihion. The shares 
slipped lp to 148p. 


But in the Far East Tan Sri 


too busy filling out their a posable bid appears to have 
apphction fonns for British been wide of tbemaxk. 

Gas to worry about what was There were also suggestions 
going on in the market. tint a 123 per cent stake in 

The FT 30-share index fin- Goldsmith held by Swinton 
Mud at its lowest point of ihe Insurance Services had also 
day, 123 down at 1,270.4. The changed hands and had been 
FT-SE 100 dosed 173 down snapped np by the same 
at 1,6193. mystery buyer. 

Government securities Dealers are now expecting 
spent a nervous session, open- an announcement from the 
mg with losses ranging to £¥l new owner within the next few 
They r ec ov ered after the trade days, and they already laving 
figures, but began to drift at themselves for an early fon bid 
the dose as foe pound lost of 275p. That would value 
ground against foe dollar on Goldsmiths at £4L6 million, 
the foreign exchang e nn«*c t, Kennedy Brookes finished 2p 
and they ended Bk lower. lighter at 286p. 

Britofl, down 6p at 153p on Barrirfr Resources, foe Ca- 

ofl price monies, could go natim gold mining company 
better when trading resumes con t rolled by the Hungarian 
today. Mr David - Walker, emigrg, Mr Peter Monk, is 
chief executive, met foe believed to have acquired a 
London Oil Analysts’ Group 43 per cent stake in Censoli- 
yesterday and made a Hatpd GddfieUs, foe mining 
favourable impression. He finance company, 
says that estimates of $1.60 a The stake, which has been 
band on Bntoffs woven hmit n» over the 


• drift at themselves Imran early foil bid 
and lost of 275p. That would value 
ioHar on Goldsmiths at £4L6 milHnn, 
nwrt^ Kennedy Brookes foidwH 2p 
wer. lighter at 286p. 

153p on Barrick Resources, foe Car 

OUld go n a dtnw gyifd mining company 

resumes controlled by the Hungarian' 
Walker, emigrg, Mr Peter Monk, is 
set foe believed to have acquired a 
’ Group 43 per cent stake in Consoli- 
lade a AafaA GddfieMs, foe mining 
OH. He finanra min p a ny 

? $1.60 a The state, which has been 

btuh up over the past few 


Barrick, capitalized at Ca- 
nadian $450 million (£229 
million), could not afford to 
bid for Consgold on its own, 
and any consortium lad would 
have to have the approval of 
South Africa's Anglo-Ameri- 
can which, through Us foreign 
investment arm, Minoroo, 
owns 2837 per cem. 

Ca bl e and Wireless, the 
electronics and telecommuni- 
cations group, slipped 12p to 
320p after a meeting on 
Monday between Mr Paul 
Chaooon, Secretary of State 
for Trade and Industry, and 
Mr Karasawa, Japan’s min- 
ister an< * 

But fears in the market that 
the company had fa ym eff- 
ectively refused its application 
for a licence to compete 
against KDD, the Japanese 

which, is being deregulated, 
were refuted by Cable A 
Wireless yesterday in a 
statement 

Mr Kazasawa suggested that 
IDC, the consortium in which 
Cable and Wireless has a 20 
per cent stake, should merge 
with its rival ladder far the 
licence, ITJ, arguing that no 
fndns f nftfryc d nation hay an 

int e rn a t i onal te fem minntiira . 

tions company winch has 
foreign participation. His sug- 
gested merger would reduce 
the Gable and Wireless 

intan fltf. 

But, despite the market 
reaction. Cable and Wireless 
said that Mr Kaiasawa’s 


than foe enmwnpd mirtyt 
worth tfDxiejtafefin aud Vaal 
Reefs, two ef So uth Africa’s 
target producers. 

While foe 40Soafo African 
ones are covered hi ex- 
haustive detail by foeirewa 
quarterly rqrarts and scrutiny 
by the mining Press and 
analysts, foreign fond man- 
agers find it aflkalt to keep 
track of what foe ever-tocrems- 
ing number of fore Australian 
producers nre doing. And, 

Anihilh wnihiM WMWnwiI 

in remote locations across the 
coimtry, foe flow of 

information even harder. 

The new company's badass 
hope font forrijgn investors 
wffl feel more comfortable 
buying into AnstnBen urines 
knowing that a focal team is 
q r iiiiu i' A n foe imtnafi 
and Oat finds con he with- 
drawn wMwnt dhtnthto g foe 
market too mock. 

Load broken report Ant 
foreign mterost has pawn fids 
year, dee to foe rising boffiea 



• BROWN A TAWSEe The 
company has acquired the bari- 
ngs, goefcand equipment of die 
tube division of ihe British aril 
General Tube company from 
the tiquidators for £1^50,000 in 
cash. 

• BORLAND INTER- 
NATIONAL: For the six 
months to September 30 with 
figures in S0D0: sales and royalty 
income 14,372 (9,678), total 
costs and expenses 11,759 
(7,493), operating profit 2,613 
(2,185), interest (net) 3 72 (58), 
gain on foreign currency tiaiui- 
actions 162 (ml), profit before 
tux 3447 (2343), tax 1313 
(1,063X earni n gs per share 4 
cents (33 cents), folly diluted 
emrrings per share 3LS cents (3.0 


foundries 454 (328), steel 281 
(225), engineering rod services 
135 (448), exceptional debit 100 
(20), interest receivable 57 (179 
payable), pre t ax p rofi t 827 
(802), tax 230(223), minority 
interests debit 27 (54), earnin g s 


growth will coatnme for the 
foreseeable firtnre 

• SAVA GE CR OUft At the 
annual meeting the chaii man 
told shareholders that the cur-' 


mWeX Pga* profit 827 ^dlbarS^ to 

'f*h. “ouugs management remains commit- 
• qiANG^&|&rnES= 

An interim dividend of l.lp is , . 

rrirJrfha tri “qufetoon of complementary 
totepaidforflmsgmOTflgto hardware business. 


The story so fon our intrepid hero, 
one Nigel Lawson, finds himself 
plunging towards the rapids. The 
canoe is awash with money, staling is 
leaking out fast and danger threatens. 
The crowd on the hanks grits its teeth, 
or smiles, depending on whether it is 
long or short of the currency. One 
more disastrous set of trade figures 
and all could be lost 

But it is only a dream, or a 
nightmare. The balance of payments 
was never really in trouble. Hidden 
treasure, freshly dug, has added lustre 
to the October trade figures. Another 
large current account deficit would 
have proved highly damaging for the 
pound and the Chancellor's hopes of 
keeping interest rates at 1 1 per cent — 
perhaps damag in g the British Gas fsie 
in the process, what better moment 
for the statisticians to come up with 
another £300 million a month of 
inviables? 

To be fair, there are reasons why 
Britain's invisibles surplus is expected 
to increase. Since the end of June the 
pound has lost more than 10 percent 
of its value and devaluation always 
has a speedier and more direct impact 
on in visib le ea rning s than on trade in 
goods. A foil in the pound automati- 

ratfv inrrmaepe Hw» sterling ret urn nn a 


British investment in West Germany 
or the United States. As well as this, 
Britain's monthly European Commu- 
nity Budget abatement has increased. 
It is now worth £100 million a month, 
compared with a monthly figure of 
£75 millio n earlier in the year. The 
timing and size of the adjustment, 
however, might make a saint 
suspicious. 

Whitehall statisticians could not 
offer any detailed reasons yesterday 
for the upward revision of the third 
quarter invisibles surplus to £800 
million a month. Hie third quarter 
figures have not yet been fully worked 
through. But co nfidenc e is a fine 
thing. Not only is the July-September 
invisibles surplus revised by £200 
million a month, but the estimate of 
the fourth quarter surplus has been 
lifted by even more, to £900 million a 
month. This, conveniently, was just 
enough to push foe c urren t account 
into surplus, by only £65 millio n. 

Neither sterling, down 0.3 on the 
index to 67.9 yesterday, despite some 
helpful dollar weakness, nor gilts was 
convinced. Hie gilts market initially 
rose on the announcement of foe 
current account surplus but then fell 
back after examining the details. 

The details are fairly gory. The 
trade deficit on manufactures wid- 
ened last month to £872 million. In 
thepast four months, Britain has run a 
deficit on manufactures of nearly £3 
billion. 

Treasury officials were at pains to 
point out that in the latest three 
months, imports of capital goods were 
far stronger than imports of consumer 


goods. All that tells us is that Britain's 
lack of competitiveness is fairly 
widely spread. 

There was nothing in yesterday's 
figures to take sterling off foe “highly 
vulnerable” list. Furthermore, a 
weaker oil price is in foe wind — 
something which spells good news for 
West Germany, Japan and the United 
States but trouble for the British 
payments and budget outlook. Share 
and bond markets are reflecting the oil 
prospect, firming in New York and 
Frankfurt but making no progress in 
London. 

The Chancellor may soon find 
himself back in his canoe. 

Underwriting worries 

The Bank of England's muted instruc- 
tion to banks not to overdo their 
underwriting of British Gas is for- 
mally an isolated ruling for an isolated 
occasion — if only because its dis- 
cussions are still going on over foe 
general paper about large exposures 
by banks. 

As it happens, the discussion docu- 
ment relates only to individual expo- 
sures and the overall underwriting 
rale is certainly likely to stand until 
the exposure rules are sorted out It of- 




I- 


thing s are gAing 

Underwriting has until now been 
seen almost as an exception to the 
general hanking rules of prudence. It 
has proved a method for merchant 
banks in particular to gear up their 
operations to an unusual level in one 
particular area. 

It also questions foe underwriting of 
huge takeover bids by merchant banks 
for short periods pending sub-under- 
writing round the market 

The Bank's worries are justified, for 
the supervising authority has to look 
beyond today's fair weather to foe 
storms that perennially follow. But 
any such rales will need to bejudged 
on two different tests — their effects on 
the total underwriting capacity of the 
market and on the competitive pos- 
ition of smaller merchant bank groups 
compared with foe giants 

On aglobal basis, restrictions on the 
exposure of any one bank are unlikely 
to affect London's total capacity 
si gnifican tly 

When it comes to flexibility, how- 
ever, the story could look different. If 
only the likes of Barclays, Natwest, 
Nomura, Citicorp and Deutsche Bank 
can give an immediate yes, they will 
have an even stronger competitive 
advantage and foe general speed of 
movement might be restricted. 

That of itself might seem quite a 
useful backdoor way of controlling the 
excesses of meigermania, but would 
do so at foe expense of foe London 
financial services industry as a whole. 

In practice, restrictions are more 
likely to accelerate foe trend to fixed- 
underwriting syndicates 


trrency naps- September 30. With rames m _ ~~ 
profit before- £000: profit before tax528 (405), •TOMI 
L lax 1,313 tax 116 (81), earnings per dare year to ! 
per sh are 4 3-O p (2-4p ). The c h airman Dividend 
fully (Hinted ermlinnftd iciowth OH Fcfai 

3L5 cents (3.0 with a healthy increase in profits adjusted 
for the foil year. With fci 

IOLZHNGS: • FAIRBRIARsAn in te rim was, 200 


zPSfcDi 


tFH LLOYD HOLDINGS: 
Pot the half year to September 
27 as interim dividend of lp 
(Ip) win be paid on January 5. 
With figures in £000: external 


New Yak (Beater)- Stare fadtKtrinl average was n» 8.71 
prices were mixed ns Mae to 1306.78 as fe&fed ad- 
chips inched higher, bd the vances by a slight margin on 
market eowtiiuwi to trafl wtt Malffindan. 
limited Incor p or at ed making 
an offer for Gofer Hawley Be tafl stones 1 

ha. while weak Aar 

At one stage, the Dow Jones provided some Bft 


• TOMHNSON5: For the 
year to Se p tember 27, a final 
dividend off 2.75p win be paid 
an February 10 against an 
adjusted 3p making 4p (3p). 
With figures in £000, turnover 
was 20062 (16863). trading 


was 20062 (16863), trading 

dividend of 1.5p (0.75p) will be profit 1873(1228), interest pay- 
paid on Rsbruary 10 for the half able 16(127), pretax profit 1857 
year to September 30. Wife (1 101% tax 608 (369), ea rning s 
figures in £000: turn ov e r 4379 per share 2Q.18p (L2.65p). 


Retail shares rose sharply 
while weak daraMe grads 
provided some lift. 



Exchange 


Smith exit 

ByCfiffFeUham 

The Stock Exchange was 
last night bracing itself for a 
Mow to its future with the 
imminent withdrawal from 
the tradmgfloor ofSmhh New 
Court, its hiding market- 
maker. 

As foreshadowed in The 
Times several weeks ago, the 
firm is doe to transfer all its 
floor deaims to its own elec- 
tron^ trading room eariy next 


Ihe decision follows a re- 
view of die trading pattern by 
Lewis, the chairman 


M 1 iTTl 


senior colleagues. 

They found that while there 
was no lack of business, their 
employees oa the floor were 
less titan happy with operating 
a personal business a while 
maintaining A dose vigil on 
fire paces screens. 

The move signals an abrupt 
policy rhsmg p at Smith New 
Court, which, was formed 
when Smith Bros, a leading 
equity market-maker, and 
Scott GoffLayton,a specialist 
i nwit n tinn ai equity stock- 
broker, merged. 

Mercury Securities, one erf 
thgl»r gjftgt«ftfae new financial . 
conglomerates formed before 
Big Bang, 1ms already with- 
drawn all but a few dealers. 
And Barclays de Zoete Wedd 
has switdmd all trading in 
alpha and beta stocks from the 
floor to its new £18 mUfioa 
dealing reran but maintains a 
presence to handle trades in 

smaller ian e t . 

“There is a realization that 
the Hfc of the Stock Exchange 
floor is limited The people on 
the floor fed as if they are out 
on a limb,” said a spokesman 
No decision has been taken to 
withdraw activities altogether. 

The Exchange believes foe 
space vacated on the floor by 
foe marke t -maker s wfll be 
s nap ped ppby the m u s hroom - 
ing market in (mHfd ^imit 


Potation 00 
ilk the box 





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24 



1982/83 

First haifi 

Profit before 
tax £73.9m 

Earnings per 
share 7.4p 

Dividends per 
share 2.2p 


twf TIMES WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 26 1986 



1983/84 

First half: 

Profit before 
tax £90.5m 

Earnings per 
share 8.7p 

Dividends per 
share 2.42p 




1984/85 

First half: 

Profit before 
tax £100.8m 

Earnings per 
share 8.8p 

Dividends per 
share 2.6p 



1985/86 

First half. 




Profit before 
tax £1 22.6m 


Earnings per 
share 11.2p 


Dividends per 
share 3.25p 




1986/87 

First half:* 

Profit before 

tax £148m 

Earnings per 
share 14.4p 

Dividends per 
share 3.9p 


Forget all that gas, here’s a public company that’s been successful for years 

1986/87 First half:* profit before tax up 20.7% , earnings per share up 28.6%, dividends per share up 20.0%. 


•INTERIM RESULTS (28 WEEKS TO 13th SEPTEMBER 1986) 




FOREIGN EXCHANGES 


Si fcKUMG SPOT AND FORWARD RATFS 


(Meet rates 


LONDON FINANCIAL FUTURES 


Three Month Storing 

Doc 88 

Mar 87 

Jur 87 

Sep 87 ...... 

Dec 87 

Mar 88 ; 

Previous day's total oi 
Three Mona EuradoB 

Dec 88 

Mar 87 

Jun87 

Sep 87 


TEMPUS 


JB 

Lorn 

88.81 

Close 

B8£* 

EstVol 

1478 

88-78 

98£9 

8873 

1238 

89.08 

69.04 

88.05 

308 

89.11 

89.10 

89-09 

144 



... 

B&9B 

0 

— 


88.74 

0 


Previous day's ntal open meres 2S0B1 

94.10 94 JM 94ij7 1814 


94.18 

94.12 

54.15 

3172 

94.08 

34.03 

94 JB 

324 

9345 

93, 80 

9382 

355 

Prewous day's total ooen interest 3301 
100-18 99-2Q 99-25 8546 

99-24 

96-31 

95-00 

1009 

— 


98-03 

0 


Previous (fey’s total open interest 778 
99-44 99-28 9940 31 

95-42 0 

Previous {fay's total oo«\iWacesft79G3 
107-14 18920 107-02 22613 

107-21 10828 107-09 3S75 

— 107-09 0 

"previous day* total ooerTimeresi 2784 
W2J0 181.85 16E.10 409 

184.80 164JW 1S4J5 8 


MONEY MARKETS AND GOLD 


Interbank (%) 

Overnreht open 10K ctosa 11 

1 week 10 l, w-l0 > is SmntJi li’n-iiv 

I0*w-I054 9mntn ll'e-lis, 
3mm»> HVll»iv 12mm ii’ia-rpu 

Local Authority Oapoobarx,) 

2 days IMt, 7days 10» 

1 mmh itHs Srmti li 
Smntl) 11 12mth 11 


3mnm 11 
12 mm li 

lift-lift 
6rnnm lift-lift 
12mm lift-lift 


Imran iQft-ioi 3 mnm lift-11 ft 
6nmh 11*s-11>n 12 mm 11*i»-1V,« 



Allied finds a successful brew 


3 mnm 555-550 
12mm 530-5J5 


EURO MONEY DEPOSITS % 


eafl 6K-5ft 

Imran 6-554 
B mrrtfi 6-554 
caU 54 

Imnm 4%-4» 

6 mnm 4*-4ft 

cat 7s-6 y. 

1 mnm Pv-Pi* 
6 mnm 8*-fi* 
cs» Tft-ft 

1 mnm 2»i0-Qi( 
6mnth 3««-Uu 
call 4%-3X 

Imrttl 4V4V& 

8 mnm 4 i, ir4*)e 


Fixed Rate Sterling Export Finance 
Scheme IV Average reterence rate tor 
Merest period October 8. 1966 id 
O ctober 31, 1908 IncbsivK 11237 par 


The disappearance of the 
Elders IX L takeover threat 
has turned the City's atten- 
tion to Allied- Lyons' busi- 
ness fuodamenlais. 

There seems little to woriy 
about. Turnover for the six 
months to September 13 was 
virtually unchanged at £1.7 
billion, but pretax profit 
jumped by 21 per cent to 
£143 million. 

Brewing accounts for 57 
per cent of Allied's business. 
Profits from this source rose 
27.9 per cent to £84 milli on 
and the group benefited from 
the continuing investment in 
its public bouses and brewing 
facilities. 

The trend for lager contin- 
ues at the expense of mild and 
bitter beers. Allied’s lager 
sales form a little more than 
48 per cent of total beer sales, 
compared with 45 per cent 
bst year and 40 per cent for 
the industry as a whole. 

The food division is 
performing well. Takeovers 
have strengthened some of its 
activities and the group has 
expansion plans for chilled 
foods. 

Although the wines and 
spirits division remains com- 
petitive, it advanced to 9.5 
per cent Hiram Walker, 
viewed originally as a pill to 
poison Elders’ bid, has strate- 
gic merit in its own right. It 
will make Allied a leading 
player in the world drinks 
league, and reduces its expo- 
sure to any threat from the 
tied-house system. 

A £400 milli on deal, which 
gives Allied 51 per cent of 
Hiram Walker, should be 
finalized soon. The other 49 
per cent will be owned by 
Gulf Canada. It is hoped that 
this partnership will produce 
a healthy business after years 
of static profits. So far this 
year, Hiram Walker’s profits 
have increased and the in- 
troduction of Allied-Lyons’ 
products into Hiram Wal- 
ker’s distribution channels 
should benefit both 
companies. 

However the acquisition 


POWELL DUFFRYN 




SRISlSlP 

PRICE RELATIVE 

MJLSHARE IMDExjl ^ I ■ '■ ' ; / |£vj 


will take its toD of Allied's 
balance sheet Its present debt 
ratio of 21 per cent mil rise to 
80 per cent Asset revalua- 
tions and disposals will re- 
duce this, but it will remain 
above 65 per cent 

Allied should make £325 
million in pretax profit this 
year. This gives the shares an 
undemanding p/e of 10. A 
rerating may have to wait 
until Hiram Walker has 
proved itself. 

Powell Duffryn 

Companies which are benefi- 
ciaries of lower oil prices are 
rare, but Powell Duffryn is 
one. Falling prices stimulated 
demand and pushed first half 
volumes up by 21 per cent 
and a less competitive market 
made it possible to widen 
margins. 

The combined effect of 
these factors more than dou- 
bled interim fuel distribution 
profits to £5.7 million. This 
was an especially sound 
performance since coal vol- 
umes, which account for half 
the business, fell by 13 per 
cent with an detrimental 
effect on profits. 

The fuel-distribution mar- 
ket is fragmented. Powell 
Duffryn is the biggest op- 
erator in its segment with a 
market share of only 4 per 
cent. Tire scope for making 
strategic acquisitions is, 
therefore, considerable. 

The joint-venture 
construction materials asso- 


ciate may be expanded. The 
return on capital earned by 
Powell Duffryn in the ven- 
ture— about 100 per cent — is 
well above what could be 
earned if the money was 
reinvested elsewhere. 

The prospects for the 
group's other activities are 
unexciting. The shipping di- 
vision is being reorganized al 
a cost of £966,000, taken 
above the line. The one-off 
benefits have yet to be en- 
joyed, but the market re- 
mains competitive. 

Profits from bulk fuel stor- 
age have stabilized, but they 
are unlikely to move ahead, 
and engineering is holding its 
own. Losses from the Ameri- 
can business, National 
Pump, should be eliminated 
this year. 

The shares have 
underperformed against the 
market since Lord Hanson's 
foray in 1984-85. Although 
the revitalized management 
team is improving the perfor- 
mance of the core businesses, 
it will soon become imper- 
ative for them to tackle 
something with more ob- 
vious growth potential. 

The sale of the timber 
businesses and the cash flow 
from the mature parts of the 
group leave the balance sheet 
looking sound. Although a 
rash move away from areas of 
proven expertise would not 
be welcome, there is room for 
Powell Duffryn to be a little 
more darica. 


Otherwise, on estimates of 
£27 million (24. Ip) for this 
year rising to £29.5 million 
(27p) for 1987-88, the shares 
are supported by the average 
yield alone. 

EMAP 

EMAFs publishing vehicle is 
firing on all four cylinders 
after clearing out extraneous 
matter such as the news- 
agency chain 
In the first had EMAP 
produced a 32 per cent rise in 
pretax profits on turnover 
which increased only slightly 
because of disposals. The 
three print divisions — local 
newspapers, consumer maga- 
zines and business magazines 
— are afl making han dsome 
progress, while the exhibition 
arm continues to bring in 
generous returns on turnover. 

An emphasis on creative 
thinking in-house has pro- 
duced carefully-targeted suc- 
cesses such as Smash Hits 
and Just 17 for teenagers, to 
be followed, EMAP hopes, by 
Q, launched recently for the 
male yuppie market The 
newspapers and business 
magazines are both benefit- 
ing from a surge in advertis- 
ing spending. For the 
newspapers this takes the 
form of increased space while 
for the magazines, volumes 
are static but increasingly 
moving from monochrome 
to high-margin colour. 

EMAP also benefits from a 
management disciplined 
enough to avoid the glam- 
orous bm capital-intensive 
sideshows of tire electronic 
media. Forays abroad will 
come eventually but in the 
meantime EMAP will use its 
£10 million for magazine 
launches and further news- 
paper acquisitions. 

its A shares, up 4p at 137p, 
stand on a price/earnings 
multiple of 17.8, based on 
full-year pretax profits of £13 
million. Such a premium 
rating seems well-earned by 
the group's track record and 
potential 


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NDHObarS, IMS. Total contract. 31683. Cafa«685. Putt 11918. ItaM^Mcaferprin. 
FT-SE htdmx. CoflK 965 . PotKlOTB 


This advertisement ix issued in compliance with the Regulations of th* Council of 
The Stock Exchange. It dots not constitute or contain an offer or uwitntion to 
any person tosubsaibe far or purchase any securities in TMOC Resources Limited. 



TMOC] 


RESOURCES LIMITED 


fa public company- irtcrrporatedirith limited liability 
‘ in the State cf Queensland, Australia! 


"Source. Nikki-i Sanfivo Shimbun 1985 


38 % of the Japanese copier market use Hicoh, 


Authorised 

$A50,000,000 


Share Capital 


Ordinary shares of$A0-25 each 


Issued and 
fully paid 
$A15, 519,313 


TMOC Resources limited is an Australian company which owns 
and operates a diverse portfolio of strategically situated natural 
resource interests in Australia, North America, the United 
Kingdom and elsewhere. Its interests: include oil and gas 
production and exploration, o3 and gas pipelines, gold and base 
metals production and exploration. 

Application has been made to the Council of The Stock Exchange for all 
the ordinary shares of TMOC Resources limited in issue to be admitted to 
the Official List It is expected that dealings in the shares will commence 
on 1st December 1986. 

TMOC Resources Limited is listed on The Australian Associated Stock 
Exchanges, its shares being listed for quotation on the main boards of all 
stock exchanges in Australian capital cities. 

Particulars relating to TMOC Resources limited are available in the 
service ofExtel Financial Limited. Copies of the listing particu- 
lars may be obtained during normal business hours on any weekday 
(excluding Saturdays and public holidays! up to and including 28th 
November 1986 from the Company Announcements Office of The Stock 
Exchange and up to and including 10th December 1986 from 

HoareGovett limited 
Heron House 
3194525 EBghHolborn ■■ 

. London WC2V7PB 


Ricoh have a massive 38%* of the Japanese copier 
market This fact may come as a big surprise to a lot of 
people in the UK. 

Such success does not happen overnight 16 the result 
of 50 years of steady and dedicated effort by management 
and employees. 

Built on a key principle: “Growth of business through 
the quality of our products". 

This principle, together with being flexible enough to 
tailor to the priorities and situation of each market has 
resulted in Ricoh£ success spreading to more than 130 
countries around the world. 

Induding Britain. 

Butto be No. 1 anywhere requires much more than just 
prindples and effort That's why lastvear alone we invested 


£161 million in Research and Development This figure 
represents 9.3% of our total worldwide annual sales 
income, the results of which are now evident 

- RicohS world sales in 1985 totalled £1,731 million. 

- 64% of Ricoh's world revenue comes from copiers. 
-Since 1973, Ricoh have led the world in facsimile 

machines, holding the biggest share in Europe and America. 

- Ricoh's daisy wheel printer is renowned the world over 

- RicohS FF70 was voted “Compact camera of the year 
1986" 

Our commitment to R & D is ongoing to ensure that 
whichever market we're in, we can continue to offer you 
the most technically advanced products available 

And bv satisfying vour needs, we will continue to be 
No.1. 


Ricoh UK Ud. 
(Notftnnpra 


eting Opentiions Dept. FREEPOST 
) 32 Stephenson Wey, London NWI 1 YH. 


Please gnd me taotgml aim l iun on Ricoh and Ricoh copim. 


Company 

































BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


DAY NOVEMBER 21 


THE TIMES UNIT TRUST INFORMATION SERVICE 


Weakly 

B to OHtw ctrng nc 


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179 

184 

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FINANCIAL TRUSTS 



EXCHANGE 

GW Joynson and Co repeal 
SUGAR prow CLCMmkow) 
1508 

DOC 134B-330 

Mar 1<7JM7 j4 

May 150^-604 

Aug 1540-530 

Oct 157.0-560 

DSC 161.4-580 

Vot 1603 

COCOA 

Dec 1428-27 

Mar 1464-63 

» 

Dw 1567-56 

Mar 

Vot 2966 

COFFEE 

No* 2305-2300 

Jan 2115-2110 

Mar 1SSO-196S 

May 2005-2000 

JU 2025-202) 

Sep 2»M030 

Nov 2070-2040 

Vot 5262 

SOYABEAN 

Dec 133JW20 

Feb 1330-330 

Apr 1330-33.0 

J«, 1X.8-302 

Aug 1298-290 

63 131i«L5 

Doc 134.0-320 

Vot 302 

MT EHNAT10NAL 
FETHDLEUM EXCHANS 
Sunned via CommotSty 
WMf Sanrfces Ltd 
HEAVY FUEL OIL 

DBO 6000 

Jan 7300-75.0 


7500-790 

7300-790 


COMMODITIES 



12225-2200 

12525-2800 

12900-2000 

12500-25.75 

12200-2200 

12000-2005 

12100-17.00 

12300-15.00 

12500-1500 


LONDON METAL EXCHANGE 

Unofficial prices 
OfAcHTaiiover fines 
Price in E par maMe tom 
S9w in pence par tray oonca 
tedotfWoWACa Ltd. report 
COPPER GRADE A 

Cash 9160091700 

Three Months. 9425094300 

VM 3850 

Tone Barely Steady 

5TAM3ARD CATHODES 
On* - — — 8960099600 
Three Months, 925.0092500 

Vol j NP 

Tana tffe 

LEAD 

Cash 328.00-32900 

Three Morris . 3150031600 

Tone Easier 

ZMC STANDARD 

Cash 5170002700 

vm re 

Tone tta 

ZBiCWGH GRADE 

Cash 55700-55600 

Three Months . 5500005100 


cash 371.0037200 

Three Months . 38100382.00 

VM 1 

Tone Quiet 

SA.VER SMALL 

Cash 3710037200 

Three Months . 3810038200 

VM Nd 

Tone kfle 

ALUMMUM 

Cash* 78800-78900 

Three Months. 8030030300 

VM 350 

Tone Bereiy Steady 

MCXEL 

Cash 2530-2540 

Three Months 2575-2580 

VM 60 

Tone Quiet 


COMOSSKM 

Amngefatatockpricee* 
repnentaNra nvkets on . 
No*enbar2S 

(» Cattle. 920^a per kg Nr 

GB: Sheep 17701p per kg* 
f +E02) 

G& Rgs, 75^4p per kg hr 

1 art. dead carcase vraistt 
EngtaridendWMw 
Catfie noe. dorm &2 %. a»& 


s n r 6 ^ 

a 2f Band 

154 N6 BAM Arm 

at IS'dHT K# 

Oh Ob v 
198 137 Ban 
779 95 Eob Taut 
278 187 E*u 

ra 66 Pimaa - 

773 375 fastrnaa 
111 8 AU9 
223 183 cr MaanmM 

r, 75 Good! oT a re 
10U488 Waa njaap 
218 163 D1 
4ti am iw 
305 T90 MAC 
3E ZB llanrei HU 
129 BB PkOBckw TU 
34 19 Da Man 

206 «2 SnakMroCM 


St am p n o a . dow n 153 %. ave. 
MiC8.17i23rt-l3.7g 
Pig no*, down 260 %, ave. 
price. 78.16p(-10Q 

LONDON BEAT FUTURES 


Uee Pig Oenhactp. parkfio 

Month Open Close 

No* 980 

F®> 990 350 

Apr 960 962 

Jon 96.3 960 

Aug 963 960 


iz n 4i 
a 29 +i 

145 147 # .. 

m. 

in in 

IS 158 -1 

177 SB .. 
276 Z78 +9 

«7 ItZ #-I 
750 765 -5 

no ns #+2 

197 203 
T62 167 -I 
TO ffl'x • .. 
MB 303 -4 

438 440 # -2 
260 285 -10 

328 330 -S 
T2B 1» +1<x 

33 34 "x +1 
182 18S -1 


fflO 81 81 


PtgMBOtirafeO 



wqtn/a 

LDWDN GRAIN RJTURES 


Kperuone 
- Wheat 

Bortov 

Month 

Close 

erase 

Jan 

110.65 

H£25 

Mar * 

11305 

11490 

May 

11605 

1159S 

JM 

117.15 


Sep 

■101.15 

10035 : 

No* 

10305 

103.10 

Voiuner 
Wheat _ 


242 .j 

“riey - 


-88 I 


Open oose 
1090 1110 
1480 1520 

167.8 1720 


960 1000 


mPFEX 

GJU. FretateRihfrasUd 
report no par inde x pohit 
freight index 
Mgh/Low erase 
JW 87 7140-7030 703.0 

Apr 87 741.0-730.0 731.0 

Ad 87 6420-6400 6340 

Oct 87 738.0-731.0 7310 

Jan 88 740.0-7300 7290 

Apr 88 8200-8200 8200 

Jut 68 705.07050 6970 


Vot 420 IMS 
Open interest 204S 

TANKS! REPORT 

UghfLow OGse 


Vol: 0 lots 
Open Ini9rast22 

SpouaaFkBtco nou e n t B ty: 

Tanker index: 

9420i4> 1O0Qn 2^11/80 

Pgr cargo index; 

7570 Gram 50 on 24/11/86 













































ittivi a»Jil SiW-VegrtViaa i:h:lr‘d 


STOCK EXCHANGE PRICES 


jMSsEBaaSEBag; 


From your portfolio card rtayfr your 
eight share price mowemeun, on this n w 
only. Add them up to give you your 
overall- total and check this « pn«i ft» 
daily dividend figure. If h mairfvc you 
have won outright or a share of the total 
daily pro money sated. If you are a 
winner follow the damr procedure on the 
bade of your cud. You must -ah*»s have 
your card available when claiming. 


B WtT. 


Equities in retreat 

ACCOUNT DAYS: Dealings began on Monday. Dealings end December 5. §Contango day December 8. Settlement day December 15. 

§Forward bargains are permitted on two previous b usiness days. 

Where atoda have only one price qu oted, the»e am arideflo prices taken daflv at Spin. Yield, change and ptf ratio »w- n 



-<QM- 


DAILY DIVIDEND 
£4,000 

Claims required for 
+43 points 

Claimants shook! ring 0254*53272 



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S ts tu 

■ 09 118 


2 i a e. 

95 91 • . 
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248 255 . 

ko ira . 
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tb* a'^SiiuiV nci .. .. 931 M TT 

IBB M EaW I Gm MS ISO 42 48b 11 144 

MB 1M BnaMn FMb 117 1U***2 U 58 57 

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214 <24 -exams *0 164 +2 IS 55 El 

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55 22 Ftani 38 37b -* .. • .. 822 

42 26 FhW Me M M > I.. £1 83 51 

149 me Fwwr{3Q MO M3 -4 7.1 S3 22J 

75 « ftHtoa S ra 44 50 63 17 4 

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123 81 Fop* 88 e e-1 ai u its 

41*1 27*rfofc Bn* VI 314 325 • -* 29 63 14 

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B7 48 FwS (TtawsJ 52 57 4 41 78 . 

131 84 GB * 17 89 *4-1 U U IU 

365 235 031 2B3 268 # 17J U U 

310 2B0 89 . 295 305 e ., 103 13 198 

118 BO SUM Eta KM 137 e .. 53 47 S3 

200 98 fieaear T7S JS3 +1 p 12 MJ 

159 111 Sees 130 133 #4* 50 18 151 

11'* 756*1 Em 890 900 -28 203 23 187 

344 194 Bjnta 3Q2 306 *.. 129 42 152 

505 249 Go* Iter 245 260 *3 155 61 SJ 

182 W7 Swap «l«p 135 MO .. S3 43 U9 

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m as ta w»M as os <1 74 28 ui 

275 175 Hats p**>) 20 252 .. 112 53 0.4 

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212 e HM8I8 207 217 +7 47 22 MJ 



flMttiar Theta appmr on hgi » 


CHEhBCALS, PLASTICS 



® 40 ACT B/V BMW 
235 165 Sw CMte 
455 3s Mataa 
20 T99 Mte Cbnfeal 

a 02 OT 


us 135 Baa cbm 
HO BE BrBaDd 

jsissr w 

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11*734 HOaaU 
M7 333 LMb 

na * Lata 
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178 129 RMtoU 
330 216 SIM BfW 
73 38 SWb taeta a 
240 178 WMtSlH 
IS V Wte ten 


» «*.. 

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401 495 

in nr +1* 

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02 ITS. 43 
91 M 
MO. M2 
M7 - 46 

<7 * S 


CflNEMASANDTV 


213 AtabTVir 
385 taM TV 
27 (teata 
17W WVjff 
283 UWT MtaB 
mb sansr 
MB TVS b/V 

MB*7VAH 
KM-HterlV 
M4 rStabaW 



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315 170 was MS 175 -S 

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197 ■*JBtelbei IS4 1D7 .( 

615 473 Johnan Oean 495 505 

243 133 Jataca Uufi^ 206 20 S 


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29 21 Utanaa 25* 27 *4-1 

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209 13B TOBflasa Fans 777 177 +* 7J 48 178 


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BANKS DKCOtMrW 


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INDUSTRIALS 

A-D 


178 185 43 

124 1Z7 

5£ a? *2 

81 83 

222 ZM 42 
365 373 • 

195 MB 4* 
290 70S «4j 
213 215 43 

48 31 *41 

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12 7a* e-i 

378 383 41 

48 81 -1 

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420 425 -5 

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275 280 -5 

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28 


Brazilians 
head for 
new coffee 
crisis 

AJfenas, Brazil, (Reuler) — 
Abnormally dry weather in 
the coffee-growing regions of 
Brazil has increased fears of a 
second disastrous harvest 
Growers in (he southern 
state of Minas Gerais, where 
some of the country's finest 
coffees are grown, said trees 
were starting to show signs of 
the drought conditions. 

Although .trees had shown 
some recovery after the 1985 
drought, the fresh bout of dry 
weather and die intense heat, 
was beginning to cause fruit 
buds to yellow and fall. 

“Every day without rain 
means a farther drop in the 
crop,*’ a buyer for a big 
exporting company in the 
region said. 

Rainfall so far this year is 
between 14 and 16 inches 

below normal. 

A seven-month drought m 
1985 devastated the country's 
harvest Brazil produced only 
11.2 million bags of 132 
pounds in 1985 — one-third of 
the 30 million bags produced 
in 19S4. 

The 1985 drought also dam- 
aged Brazil's chances of whit- 
tling away its large foreign 
borrowing and prompted the 
countrv to buv about 600.000 
bags, or 36.000 tonnes, of 
coffee in London in Sep- 
tember. 

Confusion about whether 
Brazil, the world's largest 
coffee grower and exporter, 
would ship the tonnage home 
or resell it in London has seen 
world coffee prices tumble. 

At present, coffee is selling 
for about $1.50 a pound, 
compared with more than S2 
earlier in the year ana about 
$1.80 in September. 

Analysts had said the orig- 
inal reason for buying 600,000 
bags of coffee in London may 
have been to satisfy avid 
domestic coffee-drinkers and 
free better grades for export. 

But the government, which 
was re-elected recently, may- 
have delayed shipping during 
the politically sensitive elec- 
tion period because it did not 
want to be seen importing one 
of the country's most im- 
portant earners. 

Traders in Europe said yes- 
terday that Brazil was likely to 
start importing the coffee 
bought in Europe soon. 


Boesky likely to be sued 
for $300 million damages 


From Bailey Morris 
Washington 

rMC Corporation has be- 
come the first of an expected 
wave of large corporations to 
indicate that it may sue Mr 
Ivan F Boesky for damages, 
estimated at more than S500 
million (£214 million), in 
response to the insider-trading 
case. 

Company officials con- 
firmed yesterday they were 
considering a suit although Mr 
James Baker, the US Treasury 
Secretary, announced ^sweep- 
ing review of US insider- 
trading laws to be conducted 
by the White House Cabinet 
Council on economic policy. 

The council will scrutinize 

closely not only insider-trad- 
ing laws but regulations 
governing takeovers and the 
scope of authority exercised 
by the US Securities & Ex- 
change Commission (SEC) 
and other agencies. 

Mr Baker said he hoped to 
avert a “stampede or rush to 
judgment" until completion 



Ivan Boesky: said to have 
nwjg profits of $200 milli on 

of the cabinet investigation 
and the present investigations 
by US Congressional officials. 

The announcement came 
on a day in which the SEC 
denied a report in the Wall 
Street Journal that Mr Boesky 
earned profits of more than 
$200 million from insider 
trading tips, much more than 
the SS0 million reported by 
the agency. 


Ms Mary McCue, an SEC 
spokeswoman, said: “We dis- 
pute the Journal story. The 
estimate is not borne out by 
the facts and is way too high." 

Wall Street officials es- 
timated that during the past 
week, the arbitrage commu- 
nity bad made losses cal- 
culated at $1 billion because of 
a sharp drop in the value of 
takeover-related shares. 

Analysts said the abrupt 
bait to Revlon Group’s $4.12 
billion hostile bid for Gillette 
Company, through a $558 
million buy-back agreement, 
dampened further the market 
for takeover shares. 

“In the post-Boesky at- 
mosphere, takeovers are un- 
der intense pressure," a top 
official of First Boston 
Corporation said. 

Officials said Rcvkm would 
not have abandoned the take- 
over offer if it had not been 
relying on Drexd Burnham 
Lambert to raise funds for the 
hostile bid. 


The decision fuelled reports 
that Wall Street’s arbitrageurs 
had suffered their worst losses 
in the history of the business. 
Speculation grew that Merrill, 
Lynch. Pierce, Fenner & 
Smith had beet pankndaiiy 
bard hit, losing np to $60 
million. Bui Mr James Flynn, 
a company spokesman, said 
the estimates were too high. 
He said MemD Lynch had 
“suffered fosses in the past 10 
days like everyone else" but 
added that the losses were less 
than $20 minion. 

FMC Corporation was 
named by the SEC as one of 
the targets of Mr Boesky*s 
insider-trading scheme. It said 
he bought shares based on 
information supplied by an 
investment banker charged in 
an earlier insider-trading 
investigation. 

The trading caused FMCs 
shares to jump in price, cost- 
ing the company a reported 
$360 million before it an- 
nounced a $2 billion capital 
restructuring plan- 


COMPANY NEWS. 


• CENTURY OILS GROUPS 
A dividend of 1.6p ( L5p) will be 
paid for the half year io Septem- 
ber SO on January 30. Wilh 
figures in £000: turnover 45.580 
(44,371). raw materials and 
operating costs 42,173 (41,054), 
other income 70 (56). interest 
pavable and similar charges 933 
(865). profit before tax 2344 
(2.508), tax 857 (1.080). minor- 
in- interests 57 (51) earnings per 
share 6-64p (5.61 p). 

• LEIGH INTERESTS: For 
the half year to September 30 an 
interim dividend of 1.4p (1.5p) 
is to be paid on January 15. 
With figures in £000: sales 
20.284 (1 9,342). pretax profit 
855 (720), tax 299 (288). earn- 
ings per share 3.1p (3.0p). 

• CHASE CORPORATION: 
The company is to pay an 
interim dividend of four cents 
per share on March 20 for the 
half year to September 30. With 
figures in SQ00: profit 40.979 
(17,563), after paying tax of 
7.137 (7.334). The profit in- 
cludes an equity share of asso- 
ciated comapanies profits after 
tax of 1 1.426 (702). 

• ICI: The boards of ICI and 
Scottish Agricultural Industries 
(SAD have reached agreement 
on the terms for the acquisition 
by ICI of the ordinary capital of 
SAI, beyond the 5,276,687 or- 
dinary shares ICI owns already. 


• JOHN J LEES: Tbecom- 
pany has acquired the capital of 
Vitmix. the patisserie. Vitmix 
achieved turnover of £270,141 
and profit before tax of £1.094 in 
the six months to Sept embe r 30. 

• CARROLL INDUSTRIES: 
Figures for the year to Septem- 
ber 30 in £000. Final dividend 
was 4.7p. malting 7.Sp (7p). 
Group sales were 285,360 
(276.831), pretax profit was 
13,032 (12,710), tax was 2^50 
(2,345) and profit after tax was 
10,782 (102365). Earnings per 
share were !5.0p (14.4p). Divi- 
dend payable on February 9. 

• NZI CORPORATION: The 
value of bonus shares to be 
allotted in lieu of dividend in 
respect of die announced in- 
terim dividend is NZ$1,937 
(70p) share. 

• THE UNITED BREW- 
ERIES: Figures in Danish kro- 
ner millions for the year to' 
September 30. Net turnover was 
9,076 (8.599). profit before tax 
was 748 (673) and profit after 
tax was 375 (325). 

• BRISTOL CHANNEL 
SHIP REPAIRERS: CH Bai- 
ley. which owns 45 per cent of 
BCRS, is involved in talks that 
may lead to the sale of the whole 
ofCH Bailey's holding in BCSR. 

• BSS: The acquisition of 
Manor has been completed and 
the associated placing and 
clawback offer to shareholders 
have become unconditional 


APPOINTMENTS 


Savage Group: Mr Don 
Wightman becomes group 

marketing director. 

Anglian Water Authority: 
Mr Andrew Semple is made 
managing director. 

United Guarantee (Hold- 
ings): Mr Richard Greenwood 
joins the board. 

British Linen Fund Man- 
agers: Mr James Miller be- 
comes chairman. 

Rossmore Warwick: Sir 
Alan Veale is made chairman. 

Godfrey Davis Rent-A- 
Unit Mr Derek Harwell 
becomes managing director. 

Wimpey Construction UK: 
Mr David Horner is made 
marketing director. 

Moore Stephens: Mr Terry 
Newman becomes a partner. 

Manufacturers Hanover 
Trust Mr Gordon Rcnaoldaea 
is made vice-president 

Commercial Union Trust 
Managers: Mrs Sue Chamber 
becomes a director. 

Valin Pollen Inte rnational: 
Mr Tom Maitojo becomes 
group international director. 

Gee/Rosen Organisation: 
Mr Pud Rooke joins the 
board. 

Sealink British Ferries: Mr 
Christopher Garnett is made a 



Christopher Garnett 


director of the European sec- 
tor and joins the Hovezspeed 
board. 

Megasat Mr Brian North 
has become a non-executive 
director. 

Lattice Logic: Mr David 
Simpso n becomes ch ain patL 
Racal-BCC: Mr J A D Hums 
is deputy Chairman and Mr 
David POole managing direc- 
tor, Racal-BCC and Racal 
Carlton. 

Bloomsbury Publishing: Mr 
Nigel Batt becomes finance 
(director. 


H A M s n o s 


P L C 


I N T e R I;M>;’S £S\ti.-LT.S . ,-f-| 

- .. ....J..-. t-.’-'-j , r 5 -- 7 . “ 


Continued progress... 


Group profits show a satisfactory increase overlast yean 


' * • • . - • t . J - u!» ZF 7 '- TST-nrsz wrrzspc ■ x JK-JEfc. >^- wuijH 



Banking companies have all reported increased profits at home 
and overseas. 






>• 

... « 

i .Vi 


\ *.i 

I.:-.*) 


V’r^ 

V'xf* 

w* 

m 

sfcs? 

2% 

'JtiSt 


...with plans for 
the future developing well 


AH companies in the Group continue to be very 
active and to perform satisfactorily.' 





“We have taken the firet steps in out I^iropean strategy including formic 
our association with Istituto Bancario San Paolo di Torino. Hambro 
Countrywide continues to expand and Omningham Hart has gained 
national coverage. Our controlling interest in Fielding Insurance is being 
merged with the major UK insurance brokers CJL Heath and we retain a 
significant interest an the enlarged grou p. 


sar 

•eg 

pz* 

X'-' s vj 
j -fty 
V-’ 

t?} 

« 

SI 

Afjx 

EC 


Charles Hambro. Chairman 





HAM BROS 



Copies of the Interim Report for the haff year to 30rh September 1986, including an unaudited consolidated pmjh and loss account, are being 
posted to shareholders. If you would like a copy please write to Peter Patridc, HambrosPLC, 41 Bishopsgate, London EC2P2AA. 


•>' • v ••■•-•’V • • ? 1 






Law Report November 26 1986 


No injunction against 



Burets & Bond (Wholesale) 
Lid and Others v Institution of 
Professoral CHI Servants 
and Others 

Before Mr Justice Henry 
{Judgment November 17] 

Although an employee who 
went on strike in furtherance of 
a trade dispute with his em- 
ployer might be liable in tort to a 
third party injured by bis breach 
of contract, injunctive relief to 
prevent a onion calling hnn out 
on strike would not be granted 
on that ground in the absence of 
any intention to injure the third 
party. 

Mr Justice Henry so staled in 
the Queen’s Bench Division, 
sitting in refusing 

an application ~by the nine 
plaintiffs, members of the 
Association iff British Abattoir 
Owners and associated com- 
panies in the meat hade, to 
continue ex parte injunctions 
granted by telephone by Mr 
Justice Japp on October 26. 
1986, to restrain the de fe n dan ts, 
the Institution of Professional 
Qvfl Servants and their nego- 
tiating secretary, Mr Joseph 
Duckworth, from interfering 
with the business of the plain- 
tiffs by taking or inducing strike 
action. 

Mr P. A. Gouhfing for the 
MrS. C Robin for the 


MR JUSTICE HENRY sail 
that the Meat and livestock 
Commission (MLC) had been 
set im under the Agriculture Act 
196? to help guar- 

anteed prices for livestock. 

After Britain joined the Euro- 
pean Communities, the MIG 
also performed the delegated 
functions of the Intervention 
Board for Agricultural Products 
(IBAP) which had been created 
to administer subsidies under 
the common agricultural policy. 

The MLC employed 630 fit i- 
stock officers, based at privare- 
sector abattoirs all over foe 
country, who carried out the 
certification procedures nec- 
essary to obtain subsidies and 
export meal. 

The officers 
trained, skilled and i 
In pursuit of their claim for 
better pay, their union, the 
IPCS, called a one-day lightning 
strike. 

The pfamtifis then app&ed for 
an bgunctiou to prevent further 
threatened 

By calling out the -fatstock 
officers, the union were clearly 
inducing the prevention of the 
<fn^ performance by the pbtin- 
tif& of their various contracts 
with producers, retailers and 
exporters. 

But that tortious action was 
rendered n on-actionable by the 


fatstock officers bad with Their 
employers, the MLC - 
- Since ft was primary Indus' 
trial action, the complicated 
provisions of section 17 of the 
Employment Act 1980, outlaw- 
ing secondary actios, had no 
application. 

The plaintiffs, who were not 
concerned in the pay dispute, 
had brought the proceedings 
simply to restore order to there 
and prevent further 
withdrawal of labour by the 

fatstock officers. 

The legal problem confront- 
ing toe plaintiffs was to find a 
cause of action which had not 
been rendered inunsne by sec- 
tion l3(l)of the 1974 Act, which 
read u An ad done by a person in 
contemplation or furtherance of 
a trade dispute shaft not be 
actionable in tort on the ground 
only . . and then set out the 
specific torts in relation to 
vdrich protection was green. 

The use of the word “only". 
Smiting toe immunity to toe 
tortslisted. bad inspired 
employers and their advisers to 
develop so-called economic 
torts to which the immunity 
would not apply. 

The pfamtife founded there 
dans on three such torts: 

1 Interference with the 
p laintiffs * trade, business or 
employment contracts by 
unlawful means, namely 

(a) the inducement or 
of a breach by the 

or MLC of their statutor y 
under the Agriculture Act 
1967 and the European 
Communities Act 1972^ and 

(b) the actual breach by a 
frcoodc officer afhis contract of 
employment with the MLC. 

2 Interference with the 
plaintiffi* contracts by the same 
unlawful means. 

3 Inducement of breach of the 
same statutory duties as a tort 
on its own. 

Dealing with ! andZtogrther. 
the threatened strikes would 
undoubtedly interfere with the 
plaintiffs’ business, but were the 
means unlawful? 

The statutory duty under (a) 
was to provide a proper system 
for the inspection and certifica- 
tion of live and dead stock. It 
was in performance of that duty 
that the MLC had trained ana 
a pp oin t e d the 630 fatstock offi- 


combinanon of section 13(1) of 
the Trade Union and Labour 
Relations Act 1974 and section 
10 of toe Trade Union Act 1984, 
because it -was common ground 
that the strikes would be in 
contemplation or furtherance of 
the trade dispute which the 


It was eminently arguable that 
that duty was owed to the 
plaintiffs. But it was difficult to 
see how the MLC could be 
under a duty to provide the 
plaintiffs with a strflce-free sys- 
tem and there was nothing to 
that effect in the legislation. 

Moreover, there was no ev- 
idence to ip w Ffi tf that the pro- 
posed industrial action would 
bring the certification system to 
a grinding bah. On toe evidence 
as it stood, there was therefore 
no arguable case under (a) based 
on breach of statutory duty. 

The point taken under (b> had 
excited academic speculation 
but had not appar ently been 
before the courts, if correct, its 


effect would be that any em- 
ployee could not obey his 
onion's strike can without leav- 
ing himself personally <901 to a 
claim in tort by a third party 
whose bntincss happened to be 
affected fay toe strike. 

It meant ton while union 
offidris were covered by statu- 
tory immunity for the giving of 
strike instructions, those ^ wfcq 
obeyed those instructions, or 
faced the pcttsSxfity of losing 
zfaeir imioQ cards if they refusal, 
might still be peraaoaOy Cable in 
toil. . 

Most strikes. ha erftred with 
the b usin ess not just of toe 
company which employed them 
but too of others not involved 
is tire dispute. It was dear that 
strike action by the fatstock 
officers wradd interfere with foe 
plaintiffs* (1) trade or business, 
or (2) contracts. 

The Trade Uciou and Labour 
Relations Act 1974 declared fay 
section 13(3) “for the avoidance 
of doubt” that a striker’s breach 

of his own service contract 
should not be reaazried as bu 
unlawful means of furthering a 
dispute, but section 17(8) of the 
Employment Act 1980 provided 
that section 1 3(3) “shall cease to 
have efleet” 

In the c g c u m staa ccs. Ahcre 
was dearly an argmhte .case 
snfBoenl for mteriocnKuy pur- 
poses, (has a' striker’s hereto of 
ms contract of employment 
might be unlawful means » toe 
present situation. 

But to make an uxfivkhial 
striker liable in tort to a thud 
party damaged by tire strike, it 
had 10 be shown tote the 

was injm^i^toe^^iitiff^S 
not the furtherance of his own 
sdfmteresL 

Although the Oman had n- 
ferred with a p parent sarisfiction 
to toe major disruption caused 
by the first otxsday strike, it 
seemed ptem on the evidence 
before his Lordship that the 
purpose of toe industrial actios 
being taken was a perfectly 
stra ightfor ward data for more 
pay. 

Hie ****** officers were 
based at abattoirs nationwide, 
and there was no evidence 
any independent, let alone 
predominant, desire to hpt 
any of toe plaintiffs at 
pr emi ses they worked. 

In any event, by virtue of 
section 16 of toe 1974 Act. toe 
court was precluded from grant- 
ing any injunction to p r event a 
breach of a contract of employ- 
ment or compel an employee to 
attend work. • 

It followed that the injunction 
could not be maintained on 
either of die unlawful means 
relied on for tons 1 and 2. The 
plaintiffs' case tmder tort 3 aho 
tailed in tire light of his 
Lortiship'fc finding tint there, 
was no an maMc case under 
means (a) of breach of statutory 
.duty, actual or threra en ed. 

Solicitors: W. Douglas .Clark, 
Brookes A Co, West ! 

Gasters. 


Sentencing during parole 


Result v McKiraton (WStiam 
Harold) 

Before Lord Lane, Lord Chief 
Justice, Mr Justice Kennedy and 
Mr Justice Owen 
[Reasons November 20] 

A person who had been 
released on licence under sec- 
tion 60(1) of the Criminal 
Justice Art 1967, and s e nten ce d 
to imprisonment in respect of 
another offence during tire cur- 
rency of the parole licence, was 
not entitled, under section 
62(10), to be granted parole, 
should the sentencing court 
revoke that licen c e, within one 
year of the revocation m respect 
of any sentence i mp osed on 

hnn. 

The Court of Appeal (Crim- 
inal Di virion) so held when 
riving reasons for its order, on 
October 24 that the revocation, 
of tire appellant’s parole licence 


appellant had pleaded guilty to 
conspiracy to obtain property by 
deception and was s ent e nc ed to 
12 mouths’ imp ri so nm e nt . The 
parole licence related to a 
sentence imposed in September 

1985. 

Mr Chester Beyts, assigned by 
the registrar of Criminal Ap- 
peals, for the appellant; Mr 
Jeremy Carter- Manning for tire 
Crown. 

The LORD CHIEF JUS- 
TICE, giving the judgment of 
the court, said that between May 
1984 and January 1985 the 
appellant committed the offeoce 

Exchange of 
medical 
reports 

Graham t Wait-Smyric and 
Another 

Bryant ▼ Health 

Authority 

Foster v Merton and Sntton 
Health Aathority 
body Same 

Thomas j North- West Surrey 
Health Authority 
Ihneio t Newham Hen Ufa 
Authority 

The High Court had a dis- 
cretion under Order 38, rule 38 
of the Rules of the Supreme 
Court to order the disclosure 
and exchange of expert evidence 
in actions for personal injuries 
where the pleadings contained 
allegations of medical neg- 
ligence; the express exclusion of 
such actions from tire sc o pe of 
the similar discretion confined 
by Order 38, rule 37, whfeh was 
beaded “Expert evidence in 
actions fin: personal injuries”, 
was not to be construed as 
impliedly excluding such ac- 
tions from the scope of rule 38, 
which was headed “Expert ev- 
idence in other actions**. 

Mr Justice Tudor Evans so 
held in the Queen’s Bench 
Division on November 24, 
when giving judgment in open 
court m six appeals heard in 
chambers from orders of mas- 
ters on applications under Order 
38, rule 36 for directions as to 
the exchange of expert evidence. 


to which h e was se ntenced to 12 
months* imprisonment on April 
30.1986. 

On September 4, 1985 he 
received a se ntence of 22 
months* imprisonment for of- 
fences committed in December 
1984, and was released on 
licence on Match 4 , 1986 (which 
licence would have expired on 
August 9, 1986). 

The appdhmt was not in 
bread: of his parole licence 
when it was revoked, and the 
revocation was made by virtue 
of section 62(7) of the 1967 Act 
which made it dear that a court 
might revoke a pantie licence 
where a conviction, as 
to an offence, took _ 
the period of parole. 

It would no doubt in many 
c as e s rig htly be feft to be illogical 
that a person should be “re- 
leased on licence” in respect of 
cme offence and at the same time 
be in prison in respect of 
another. 

What was sometimes over- 
looked was the consequence of 
sod) revocation as provided in 
section 62(10) of the 1967 Act. 
There were two possible inter- 
pretations of the words in that 
subsection. 

The wider construction would 
prevent the appellant from be- 
ing granted parole within one 
year of the revocation in respect 
of any sentence im posed on 
fn'm 

The narrower c on str uc tion 
would mean that toe person 
whose licence had been revoked 
could not for the period of one 
year he pantied again in respect 


of toe offence for which be was 
sentenced and paroled, but 
might be psuled in respect of 
any caber sentence which had 
been imposed on him. 

The court considered the 
.subsection should be interpreted 
literally and m toe dear and 
easily understandable broader 
meaning: that the emb ar go on 
any further partjfe during the 
one-year period was not con- 
fined to the sentence in respect 
of which the revoked 
licence had been im; 

If that was fikdy to resalt in 
injustice, the answer was for die 
court not to exercise the op- 
tional power of re vocation when 
an offender was convicted and 
sen tenced to a second term of 
imprisonment, despite toe 
apparent fllogkahty. 

In the present case, the appel- 
lant had committed no offence 
while on parole, he had com- 
plied^ with parole conditions and 
it was unjust to leave the 
revocation standing, since the 
effect would be to make him 
ineligible for release on parole 
during the currency of his 
second term of imprisonment. 

Although circumstances simi- 
lar to the present case were 
likely to be rare, the sentencing 
court in deciding whether to 
revoke a parole licence would 
. have two questions to de ri de: 
first, what would be the con- 
sequences of revocation in the 
fight of section 62(10)? Second, 
were those consequences jus- 
tified? 

Soficiton Crown Prosecution 
Service, Southwark 


Truth-drug evidence is 
inadmissible in court 


Fesnefl r Jerome Prop erty ' 

M aw tenaw I 

Before Mr Justice Tucker 
[Judgment November 2ZJ 

As a matter of principle, 
evidence produced by the 
administration of a mechani- 
cally or chemically or hypnoti- 
cally induced test on a witness 
so as to show the veracity or 
otherwise of that witness was 
not admissible in an English 
couit of law. 

Mr Justice Tucker so held in 
the Queen’s Bench Division 
during the courae of as inter- 
locutory application by counsel 
fin- die inaintiff for the ad- 
mission of evidence relating to 
troth drug tests, 

Mr Richard Stowe for toe 
plaintiff- Mr Richard Davies for 
the defendants. 

MR JUSTICE TUCKER said 
that what was proposed was toe 
questioning of a witness, a 
distinguished consultant, as to 
whether be had conducted cer- 
tain-tests on the plaintiff by toe 
administering of some chemical 
to him which thoeby dispos- 
sessed him of his consortia will 
to tedc to deceive. 

It was not the first time that 
such evidence had been avail- 
abfe to parties 10 litigation: it . 
had occurred not only in ovfl 
but also criminal cases, but 
‘never had it been admitted in 
evidence in an Erufish court. 

His Lordship felt that there 


was so mething mhtwnriy wrong 
in admitting such evidence and 
he would reject is. Such ev- 
idence would usurp the func- 
tions of a trial judge (His 
Lordship was not concerned 
with questions of us ur p in g the 


His' Lordship disliked the 
thought that any mechanically 
or chemically or hypnotically 
induced test should sack to show 
toe veracity or otherwise of any 
witness. 

Furthermore, to adduce such 
evidence, even if. it was 
favourable to the plaintiff; 

would have the plain result of 
introducing previous consistent 
statements; the law had always 
stood oat against such state- 
ments being given in evidence. 

For those reasons, the effect of 
such evidence, were It to be 
admitted, would be a distortion 
of the normal process of bid: 
see Cross on Evidence, 6to 
edition (1985) p269. 

Even without toe re ference to 
Cross, his Lordship's own view 
was against the admis sibility of 
such evidence. Tire rating was 
confined strirtly to one of 
principle, and did not extend to- 
die reBabflity or unreliability of 
such evidence. 

Solidlors: Somers & Co, West 
EftHag; Btoant Petre &Co. 


Gailsto theBar 
are on page 18 





29 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 26 1986 


PROPERTY BUYERS’ GUIDE 


LONDON PROPERTIES 


4OB0LGBAVE 


1 




An opportunity to purchase a quite out- 
standing period property in possibly 
London’s most prestigious garden square. 
Suitable for a number of uses including 
Institutional, Embassy Residential or as a 
Residential Club (subject to the usual consents). 
It also has planning permissian for conversion 
into 3 magnificent self aw rained maisonettes and 
a mews house. 

FOR SALE BY PRIVATE TREATY 
Offers invited in the region of £3.5m 
(for the leasehold interest). 



SOLE AGENTS 


,CHESTERT01S8 

V— RB SIDE NTUL- V 


Mayfair Office: 47 South Audley Street, London W1 Tel: 01-629 4513 
Residential Investments: 40 Connaught Street, London W2 2AB Tel: 01-262 5060 
A absidiary of Prudential ProperiySenrices ltd. 


A .DEVELOPMENT BY 


Bugge eiendomS it 



MARROW STREET, LONDON, EM. 
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16 LUXURY RIVERSIDE HOUSES 

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PHASE 1 RELEASE 


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G En suite bothroums c Rued carpets 
d Underpromd paring anlbMe 
□ 99 ye»r leases ci Price frnm 11 55 .000 
Fufiy fnndriied shim apanmem 
deagped by David Hicks International 


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4) Nona AadkrKmt CmmwIvw.MoiVlYnQ 

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Mill Street, London SEl ■ VIEW TODAY 11am - 6pm P ATTY 

Jornr Sole Agents 

___ . ___ _ _ miwM liBW Keith «NocthA*a*ysu«». 

W A-TTIIS SKS* IftcBntoieSs:,?^ 


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A development fs T-. ~ ^ . R^ugh 

by ' Ltd. 

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The Millbank Terraces 
48 Millbank 

174 Brampton Road. 

London SW3 1HP 

TebO I -58 1 7854 Telex:2366 1 

WAE 

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OF A TOTAL OF 57 FLATS 

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Telrf) 1-589 5211 Telex:8955820 

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, SHOW FLAT OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 

6 Arlington Street, 

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TchO 1-493 8222 Te!ex£5341 

11 am-4 pm 



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r SMJDI TERRACE. SW3 A dro ning traaMd famHvbousa hi tts sought after ant paacsU 
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RESIDENTIAL 

20 Mampeher Scect. Knightslgidgg faW7 1HE. 

01-5846106 



SPECTACULAR CORNER PENTHOUSE ENJOYING 
FASCINATING YEWS. SUPERB INTERIOR DESIGNED 
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3 DOUBLE BEDS: 2 EN-SUtTE BATHS: 

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LATEST FULLY FITTED KTT/BREAK: CLOAKS: 
SOLARIUM WfTH STUDY AREA AND STORAGE. 

LEASE 51 YEARS UmOetgoiags PRICE £295.800 


GRAHAM HARRIS 
(01) 409-1990 (open Sun 11 -4pm) 



ESTATE AGENTS & VALUERS . 


BELGRAVIA. SWI Baautttuby modemsto pento house with 4 Bed- 
room Swiss. Osaka Dvrogfioom. 


i. Date Raoep. Fine ML 65' Garden. 
Gas CH. 54 yeara. Oftars'ovor E560.000 tar bat sale. 

NEAR MPEIttAL WAR MUSEUM WaWn Divtsiofi Bel Charming Grads 


d pariod house m qwst earttan Sc 
owa Recap. Wt/Daw. Gas CH 


Squaro. 3 Beds. 2 Batts (1 en- 


Ganlea £235.000 Freehold. 


PfHUCO. SWI 3 fine flBls in newly converted period thdefing. 12 & 3 
CH finished to figh standard. 99 years. 21TDPOO. 


Beds witti Gas 
£120400 5 £170.000. 


01-222 7020 


NW1 


For quick sale needed ai less than market 
valuation. Superb firsi floor luxury flat. One year 
old. in prestige Fairview, Elm Village 
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01 977 4453 Evenings. (T) 


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• HIGH EQUITY TO 80% 

• NON STATUS TO 70% 

NUMEROUS SOURCES BEST RATES 
EXECUTIVE APPOINTED TO SECURE 
YOUR HOME PURCHASE 



H'njQkSsnS 


FIXED 
C11.B APR) 


OPEN MON-FRI Bam -7pm 
SAT 10am-2pm 


CALL US NOW 
ON OUR HOTLINE 


BARBY WINSEB 01-486 8305 


INDEPENDENT MORTGAGE SPECIALISTS 


aHAALlYMWM UmaHAHLCVST LONDON UNI 


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fa) 


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nicai en- 
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f to good 


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itie.lt is. 


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THE TIMES WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 26 1986 


PROPERTY BUYERS’ GUIDE 
LONDON PROPERTIES 


International 
television 
for die 
international 
businessman 
in London. 






The Businessman^ 
home from home* 


Luxurious Apartments 
for the international businessman 
in this famous London building 

FOR SALE 

FROM £68,500 *125 YEAR LEASES 


Saks Office Open Daily: 01-5895100 

MON. -SAT. SUNDAY Teles 937067 

10un. — ipja. ILmp. — < pju hcOlJgfltt 


Hampton* teas Keith Cardale Grows 
01-4938222 0F581G155 


MORTGAGE & 
FINANCIAL ADVICE 















Sic vac Lane. 

London 

fCJ 


Robson 

I ■ N Cl A L S E r! I ' , ^ 

Limited 


iav*<zm°n r 
ACvice. Soecm 
vopt zKtznd 

01-623 3495 fcrfi-Pitrhc,. ?tc 





HOLLAND PARK W11 

Totally Rebuilt Georgian property In quiet road 
off Holland Park Avenue. Excellent Condition. 10 
NHBC Guarantee. Gas C/H. Garage, Alarm, 


i l.bTOBfTiTTMHi 


Bedrooms, Double Reception Room, 2 Luxury 
Bathrooms, (one en- suite), Study/Studio, Luxury 
Fitted Kitchen. 

Price: £378,000 F/H. 

For appointments to view telephone 
G + T Estates. 


WfjF 


EATON TOWAGE, SW1 

B cgs* period taifty tana «A skUM 40' gantan. HaU. 2ff dromg 
mam. dhmg mam. Oat/. Ut/befa. S beds, 3 (bSb. cloaks, 
comovamy. gas CH. dMe pan. ISyrs. £3751100. JOWT SOLE 
AGENTS SAVUS 01-730 06ZL 
COURTHbLD GARDENS, SWS 
(msacM floor Rai «ift nw tnace ad dcAtMU news. KiB, imp. U, 
2 beds. bah. sc CH. comm phs. 94 yr& £124 SUL 
FAWCETT STREET, SW10 
smwthr iftirt rased bound Hoar flu dose Mam Road. HA 
ckakveap. Hied Ibl 2 dtte beds. 2 bats, md gm CH, pdvatt gde. oH 
sued parUng. 88 yi3. £235.000. SMI AGENTS 
MOANE AVENUE MANSIONS, SWS 
■ bnoac 8th floor Rai m pan pit block. Hutto, to. tfKe bed, shorn, 
comm CH. bn. ports. 88m- E8&500. SOLE AGBfTS. 


UN-MODERNISED HOUSE 
WIMP0LE STREET W1 


FITZROY 
01-431 0184 


DYER SON & CREASEY 


BUUMEXllt A period Coach House in a tree-lined ; 
estate. 3/4 bads. 2 bafts, lounge, dmtg rm. lotctian. 


on a private 
f rm. garage. 


bfteaft.7bads,2baftsand 
Grow dose hi vatage. A fine 


mUti-rocoptwi. Qnpial teases. £335,001 
BLACttEkTH A modem 3 bed fbl rateaty Gran dose Ilk v 
26ft kune, u sual s ervices. £89,950. 

BUCKISITN BORDERS A past war 3 bed townhmse mft 
qott ba ckwatar . 27H lounge. Wad Wdien, CH. prams. i 

01 052 9522 


WU*® HS? W«» | dnBarBWimWRIS 2 beds, nagnticen 

tagl 2 te ds, moam sea. s m imanaon ratable! S 1 M .000 


jljWjJ £XCis 


ELLIS & CO 
01 225 0625 

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 


DOCKLANDS 




HOUSES AND FLATS THROUGH- 
OUT THE DOCKLAHDS AREA 

RESIDENTIAL DEPARTMENT 
TEL: 01-79D 9560 


EGERTON LIMITED 
30 BERKELEY SQUARE 
LONDON VV1X5HA 

CHELSEA SH'3 13 10,000 

\ ciurminK carlv Yitfurian Houm- in iraod 
tnmlilh'H boi *nh '*»P* tor lM^rwcrooit. 
OiiutK Rm. DM Dr-n*rr>K Rm. Kuth.-n _ » Hrfs. 

vedmansrow.kmchtsbjudce 
A jinKtiw lair? Ifilh Cminrv Hoiw m ewelteni 
order hui wuh nnpnKHBcM flMcnnal. urwirn; 
Rm. Drain: Rm. -1 Bddmwn*. - Baihrooms. 
Kitchen. CiBhy Rm. UoaLroom Garden. 
FREEHOLD. 

CADOGAN PLACE. BEIXJRAVIA 

Macndirmi stuao fronted \iaonan family 
House and Gurai CmliW min scpap»_ac«« 
from Odoern L am. Maw Hear -"h , Bed- 
mums. 4 Bji broom?. Drjwins Km. Dmiai; Km. 
Sudv Hall, a oak nwn. KiicKen. Do«n«nc 
Oflices- Suff Accom modaiion Lift MW 
TrrrKC Garden- Coat Caros* " r, * h - bedrooim. 
Baihroom. hrtoe Divine Rn>- Kncnen. 
L LEASEHOLD. Pncvonappliemon 
MEWS HOUSE. BffiWTM 
A modern pntcftcil Mnn ,! I, „ KOod 

condilion av4ifatilc for quick ->jlc. Hall- Recep- 
tion Rm. Kitchen. 4 Bed*. '2 Balbs Cloakroom. 
Parin Garden L- LEASEHOLD. OfK-mmrtfed. 


CHELSEA.SWMJ L99SJ»»o.n.o. 

Handsome farrtdv House, closn to I hr Bolton*. 
Hall. Double Recep, Dining-Rsi. Familv Rm. 
Kitchen -Breaittw Rm. S B«ls. 2 Bathx Cloak 
Tunrn. Utility Rm. Secluded Carden. 
FREEHOLD. 

KENSINGTON. SW7 £430.000 

A pan mini on lira Iloon lateral «m««Tuew wirfa 
hichtrilinc»14 elegantly proportioned Drauiug 
Rxn, Dining Rm. Studs; 4 Bedrooms. 3 Bath* 


Km. Dining Km, Stud*; 4 Bedrooms. 3 Min- 
rooms. Kitchen. 

L/’LtASEHOLD. 

SOUTH All DIXY ST MAYFAIR J3S5JM0 

Elegant third .floor Apartment, could be 
reorganised to improve. Large Entrance Hall, 
28' [rouble Reception Rm. Dining Rm. Kitchen- 
BreaUan Rm. 3 Bedroom*. 2 Bathroom*. LilL 
Ca maker Lf LEASEHOLD. 

THE.CHASE.SW-I £280400 

Sloonu Square i* less than XI min* from this 
splendid Victorian family Horae in excetlem 
condition close to Claptum Common. North 
side. Well proportioned Drawing Rm. Dming 
Rm. Studti Kitchen- Brea Idas; Rm. 2 Cloak- 
rooms. ,i Bedroom *. 3 Bathr oom*. FREEHOLD. 

Apptn ECERTON UNITED' Tel: DMW 0676. 


• I - Ill'll 


ESTATE AGENTS 


OPEN MONDAY— FRfDAf 12-3 pa 




IgKStll 


PUTNEY, SW15 

COUNETTE ROAD 

ManraBous uatxxfamlsed Detschad Fandy House *rth Carnage 
Sweep Parking and large West Gaiden at one of Pulwys beet 
posftms. Huge Powiui tor ao ptt ra lBd owner/occupier 
roqumg home at me) quality or luxury Development, 
i Timm 

OFFERS m EXCESS OF Z3SMB0 



CLUTTONS 


IfaETC 

Tefa 01-589 1122 



WHY NOT RE-MORTGAGE 
YOUR PROPERTY 

And gel the benefit of your equity 
1c Installing Central Healing 
* Refurbishment of your property 
* Extension of your property 
* School Fees * Buying a Car 
* Going on a holiday etc. 


NON STATUS MORTGAGES AVAILABLE 

HRSCH INTERNATIONAL 
(FINANCIAL SERVICES) LTD. 

One of Europe's Leading Mortgage Brokers 
15. Berkeley Street. Lenten WIX 5AE. 

Tel: 01-629 5051/2 TELEX 28174 


KHALEEG INVESTMENTS 
ESTATE AGENTS 

•ft Heg« and spacious 4th floor apt ft prestigious Ifcgl* Hock. 1 
bed. rec.kn and bath. HghceiincB and many original tertnres. LBt md 
porterage. Lease 89 years. EidtLOOO. 

•fl. Seynnur Rue. Spae 2nd Root apt in PA block. 3 beds, rac. Ige 
fat bath, W.C. EIIOJOOO lor quick sale. 

W2. Cosypied a terra in tped faction. 1 bed. rac, kit and bath. Lean 
99 yts. £661100. 

W9, HA10A VALE 3 newly converted Gats. 1 bed. rec, kit and bath. 
£62^00. 1 bed. galleried rec, fdl and bath: £85.000, 2 beds, tec, kit aral 
bath, w/bate ESMOO. Al new 90 yi leases. Cdl nut for apt to vm. 
id Begant town bouse dose ten High St 5 beds. 2 bats (I an 
suite) vj |acuza 30 ft drawing rm. dUng rm, kit/tHeaktest rm, 60 ft 
fftfn. F/H F370.000. 

NW1. Close to Baker St BrigM and spac 4th n apt w/bate oloctong 
Dorset Sq. 2 beds. Ige rec. ka and baft. Lease 97 yrs, £M5yOOC 

01-486 2321 
85 GEORGE ST 
LONDON W1H SAL 


ST GEORGES 
SQUARE 

Narrow Sl The exclusive development in 
Docklands. Noted for its DESIGN and FINISH. 
This is a BENNETT HOMES ORIGINAL. St 
Georges Square has been recommended by Fleet 
Street property journalists as THE 
OUTSTANDING DEVELOPMENT IN THE 
DOCKLANDS. Seeing is believing, why not see 
for yourself on Sunday 12-2.30 pm 
Only I V« miles from City. Ideally situated for 
Canary Wharf (the finance city of the future). The 
final release this year. From £1 10,000- £250,000 
Phone Bryants 01 474 8866 


EATON HOUSE 
UPPER GROSVENOR STREET 

Second floor Hat in Exclusive street just off Gfosvgnor S quare. 
Large L shaped reccpuwi. Large Master bedroom pta j «1» 
Double bedroom. Maids Bedroom "j 0 ™; 

filled bathroom, phis guest cloakroom, ftfc n fined ta l cacg. Igt 
Cental heating. 2A hour P o rterage. u» good decocattve Oder. 50 
years lease. For early romp le ri o o. Vacant now. 

tZIMN 

01 439 9951 ext 22, Office boos. 


VIEW DAILY 

121, SUTHERLAND AYE, W.9. 

GARDEN FLAT; — Hall, toe* kit. 3 bednra, 2 batbnas, 
ahomr & eranra. tnig neepawaL Gas ch. SUSjUB. 

STARLCROFT LTD 

0783 75161 

AVAILABLE NOW, PENTHOUSE W1TB 
STUNNING BOQF TERRACE 



F*»swsT0H Bflroas sW5l Ground floor iMifan Ha. 4 bem 2 
im baft, sfanar na ctoafam. Long Laaae. 

WOODARD & SMITH 
01-930 7321 


CLAPHW SWA. Immaculate Victorian ami of trace Musa 
mod and restored, ndnutna Irom Common and tifte. S bods. Z 
reception rooms, idtchen/dlner, bathroom, gaily, garden, gas 
C.H. eUQJJOO Freehold 

SW4. Spackxis 3 bed Vc mafaonetto. LargotBcapllcn room, 
kitchen /Omar, large bathroom, gas GH. Origmal features. 
Waft to tube. £73,500 Leawhokt 

E Hugh Henry & Co; 
720 1208 


NORTH OF THE 




In favoured Canootwy Park 
Souft. dasaic sami del oily Yfc 
restored, provirffifl 
ru i a amcly corottttabte tarraly 
tarn in pftna poiftnn Superb 
zr x 153 draoong ream, 2? 
kitchen with Agi, 
playroamAfiuing. 4 double beds, 
toft, dressng. daps. Wonderful 
60* ea to omen. £3501)00 F/H. 

HtafURtY NS 
In classic wide early Vic 
pricoed bm hooss. sat back 
befand raflrjgs. a t aaasfc txd 
floor flat win asm panto Sff 
Wed garden. 17* x 176 spu 
level recap with all Mm. 
doable bed. fafly teed to. baft. 
pnCil.catpefa.121 year least. 
E7200Q L/H. 

CITY BOROSIS HI 

BrilbMl and imaglnMivt aew 
convcnlon of dortHo-frooted 



In the fawned lefty Mwynea. 
cfaEsc doftle-franted early Vic 
family house backing on to 
sanpft watera ol New Rmer 
Waft. BeftiWifty restored home 
ft 5 beds, wonderful 32* x W6 
1 st Itoor ftawag room, 19‘ 
dining room. 18'6 family 
kd/dner. 2 bafts, laundry. 40' 
squara carries on to Naw (her 
W*. Baa CiL £450000 F/H. 


f t ; * . . . . , r. \ a r s i x'.'ci 


THE ISLINGTON 
SPECIALISTS 
01-216 1313 


Garfields 


N4. Spac 2 bed [hi dose 
tube Quick ate required 
£51.000. 

N4. B t cd taft ptd Boor coo v. 
2 dbie beds. Sb2JXKL 
NS. Neating completion, 
refarfashed cotnpc many 
fine Ssmires. 3 twfi. £86550 
P7H. 

PHONE TODAY MJMJB 


NOTTINGHAM 

TERRACE 

Hegants Park NW1. mnac 2 
bed, 2 b ath, 1 recep, 
msson&te, m Ugh security 
block, 80 yea lease, 

E219.5Q0. 

Tel.-Ol 435 5436 . 


W2 SUSSEX SQ 

W3h lift & porterage. 
Iramacabre J tetmfef. 

Modem kUmAB 
fa p lances, hah room. a 
rooms facing south. 

73 yis lease. 

£107^00. 

01 402 4610 


normal maximum loan will be 80 per 
cent, but borrowing np to 95 per cent wiD 
be allowed with additional security. 

Sewn ri or holiday homes come in all 
shapes and sires ami prices too, so that 
one man's second borne would be 
another’s main residence. At the expen- 
sive end. The Old Church at 
Manwingfo rd Bohane Common, near 
Pewsey, Wihshire, is an interesting 
conversion created from the shell of die 
church built in 1859 but redundant for 
some years. 

The adaptable accommodation in- 
cludes two reception rooms and three 
bedrooms, with a central galleried land- 
ing. The property, in 1.75 acres, could 

Cotswolds attracting 
speedy house sales 

also be used as an ait gallery or antique 
centre. Mortimers of Marlborough are 
asking £157,000. 

In Little Salkeld, Penrith, Cambria, 
three conversions of b udding s at SaifceM 
Hall are for sale. The Coachhouse, 
originally the very basic quarters of the 
coachman to the Hall, is entered by a 
door under the anyway and has a sitting* 
room /kitchen and two bedrooms on two 
floors. Outgoings, including hearing and 
maintenance, are about £1,000 a year. 
Price: £37,000. 

The Hayloft, formerly the hayloft over 
the main four-bay st a ble s , also has a 
sitting-Foom/ltitc±ea and two bedrooms 
and, like the Coachhouse, has plenty of 
exposed beams. Outgoings are similar 
and the price is £35,000. 

The third converson is the Venetian 


room and is floored throughout 
Italian ceramic tiles. The sitting-room 
becomes the bedroom, with a doable bed 
fitted into the walL Pr ice: £25,000. 

The three conversions have 99-j/ear 

leases and the owners will have the right 

to enjoy the three-acre gardens. Details 
from Heather Stubbs, Sallcdd HalL 
Phone: Langwatbby 618. 

The Cotswolds is an area in great 
demand and cottages there are invari- 
ably sold quickly. Knight Franic and 
Ruiley’s Chipping Norton office is 
offering WanderwaL at Lower Odd- 
ington, Morelon-in-Marsh, Gloucester- 
shire, which is believed to be about 200 
years old and has scope for further 
improvement and extension. 

it retains many original period fea- 
tures, including tne ingJenook fireplace, 
flagstone floors and exposed ceding 
timbers, and has as entrance haH, two 
reception rooms ami four bedrooms. 

Adjoining the property is a gar den- 
room and storeroom, part stone and part 
brick, which could be incorporated 
within the house to provide an extra 
reception room, subject to pla nni ng 
consent. Price: £70,000 plus. 

Roaring Stile, named from die stream 
that rushes through the garden, is a 
delightful thatched cottage ax St 
Keveme, near Hdston, Cornwall. The 
18 th-century cottage first cost £27 for a 
99-year lease and was sold for £249 in 
1870. Standing in more than two acres of 
grounds, the property was originally two 
ground-floor rooms with bed chambers 
in the eaves, but was enlarged in 1972 to 
provide a dining-room and another 
bedroom. It also has a conservatory with 


DON’T TELL 
SID! 





RESIDENTIAL 


01 631 5313 


wnu Mmr. *L teftc 



ASSOCIATED WITH 

HRJj fi AMUEL 

■NlSiTHIDT SERVICES 

Mortgages, Savings, 
Tax Planning, Pensions, 
life Assurance and 
Insurance 





SW1 

A supetb 4 bedrm flit in . 
presage Mock. 3 en ante 
bull lira, sbwrno. Igc Ale 
recep rm, riming rm, ffaRy 
fitted toybreikStsX rm. All 
amfirines. Poftacood. 

87 yr fcse. £325.000. 

Tel: 01-221 2221 



EVANS 

BAKER 



FERME SALES 

N4 Gardes Rb. 2 Ate beds. 
3 raws BR awl park. Enedtent 
VllK ftt J Xft 

N16. Lovclj. spacious I bed 
flat in inraosjn^ Georgan 
property. MAwo, favge 
coma ptn. £58.9501 
NS. Axnactivc 2 bed Vk 
cooaec to wtet mens 
f Demon. £86-500. 

Nl. Etoeffcxtf Georgian 
tcnacc borne . 3 beds. k>U 
bkfast rot. dmrng rm. 25n 
pin. £164^00. 

NS. 2/3 bed Vktenace boose. 
Needing wort. Reams orij 
feami es. 30ft pin. Enc 
poteatiftL £85.000. 

NB CALL ALL VENDORS! 
We curreaity tone 100’S cf 
sppikBPts aeiiveJy looking 
througb oar TEN offices.. 
WE CAN HELP YOU NOW! 

Call FERME SALES 
65, Stoke Newington 
Chart* Street, N16 
254 9789 

"“ssn^r- 


John D. Wood's Chippenham office is 
yfling three thatched c ot tages in north 
Wiltshire. Church View, in Chitioc, a 
parHhatdhed house, is believed to date 
from the 15th century and is a p air of in’ 
ter-cramecting cottagcs, havn^ been at 
some Time a country inn and i 
formbouse. Although “perfectly hab- 
itable" the agents say there is consid- 
erable scope for improvement to form a 
spodous family house: Sianffing in three- 
quarters of an acre, it is for sale at around 
£125.000. 

Hailey Cottage at Heddington near 
Devizes has bera modernized and oners 

around £13(1000 are adeed for this three- 

Comprebeosiye cover 
for thatched cottages 

bedroom cottage in about three-quarters 
of an acre, a John’s Cottage at Collision. 
afcn modernized, has three bedrooms 
and a price lag of £87,500. 

One of the difficulties with thatched 
properties is the insurance. For yean 
insurers w ere wary of the risks and fixed 
high p re miu ms accordingly. CGA 
(Insurance Brokers) yralbr in the 
field and offers comprehensive thatch 
insurance policies. They claim their 
premiums compare realistically with 
those for tiled properties, helped by the 
scale of the operation, and cover 
thatched properties valued at more than 
£300 ntiUioD. Ail in s urances are under- 
written at Lloyd’s. Details from CGA 
(Insurance Brokers) Lid, fetoidd Way 
West, Lescbwonh, Hertfo r dshire. Krone: 
0462682377. 


S» XDfffMV s> xsr* tens 
Me ft fege Mfl.o 
3 Xtroor*. 2 sS’TOnn. 
5 *«WJ Ooftfc ttofs swmj 
room, raft ftrtan tx oalwr, 







Studio fiat in a quiet 
KriffMs&ridjjB Square minUBS 
waft Iran Harods. Ent (Wl. 
StuSoBm, Kit, Bath, 

No Agencies. 

£85400. 

Teh 938 2340. 


j — 








NWS. Inruc 1 MnaiwtthMn- 
nv Micro* in lovA> period dm. 
Lux Ul & bath, done tobt/- 
smss. Ex dec order. OCH. 96 
yra. £78.960 8061 ew 


mi Tefa n iw w m Road. Brtft*. 
cow one oed nai wtm private 
asdni. Quiet sale. ESL960. 
Tft: 01-460 8163 iw/(Bd. eve). 


wa? Mews freehold nr. Marhfa 
Arch. 2d0l Dednm. 1 Jicote. 1 
b K v. good com. Crew pa ton - 
Hal. EJ8S.OOQ Telf78S-r779. 


WX Otr mniaiM Place. Large 2 
Bed naL lux Btocx. Ufa. poner. 
Quick Sate. 5106,000. Ca«w 
Esurs&to 3000. 


SWB3Mdnat Soadora. oerwry 
Qccorawt. £69.980. No aaanB. 
TCI Ol 370 6389 


ntUCO. TreeUmd Gtoucealer 
Street, atttactive 2 tftd M n. 
Rued UL lounge. US toe. 
£115.000 ne> tor etude me. 
240 7240 x51660/821 9008 E 

SMftrnnBJi DCl. Sroeni 2 bed 
na». ftecent fcu/iuo. Baft. CJi 
Lae 96 m. £90.960 View Sun: 
2B5 5125. Then Jarvfa KWler. 
261 9236, 


REGENTS 

PARK 

NWS. 

An uutnt e nrt l ig Oat fcidij 
eppeftfartbeteA fa teirofai* 
comIUbb. 2 bedroom*. 

reoenmn. fcfajro. betfarop. 
■L—nbnU qBBjOOP. 

EbAfiftte Bcftdofafti 

01 835 0190. 


ran 


Ground & basement 
maisonette with '100' 
SoWh facing Gdn backing 
onto Hofland Park. Would 
make 3/4 Beds. 3 Baths, 2 
Receps. Kit. 995 yrs. 

£325.000. 

CtKSterfleid & Co 
01-581 5234 


PUCE, SW1 

An unusual cottage In 
knuacidBto order wift 3 
Beceps, 2 Beds. 2 Bafts, 
Show. Kit Terrace. 56 m. 
£385,000. 

Chesterfield & Co 
01-581 5234. 




ruuum i w Km. oeimuui 

wpM«B4ai IIIL 1 4MMICM 
+ cortterva toiy / spare bed / 
<natng. + nap ♦ lot. outer 
nan, none shape. £67.000. Ten 
Work Ol 579 3086 eXT 208. 
Home 386 8862- 


FUUIAte 4 bed family nouse. 
Ctese to all awftb. Lovely 
mana9eBhle gMo. £2101000 

Ot-736 5887. 

WO LLAHP PARK. Modern 4 
beds. 5 receps haras wna «- 
ra*e- Offer ia excess cf 
£400,000 STC. 01-955 21 7B T 

OFF Fulham Mare toad 1 bed 
flrd ftr (ta( mWi dk rm. 2 mtns 
Hanmermth lube. £65300. 
TeL Ol 748 9452. 




e m f uw anr wet. smau i 

bed Oat to mod Modt opp 
Coram Fields, un. e/BOo ne. 
low outpoensv 118 yr be. 
SJSTJMO. Frank Harris ti Ok 
587 OOT7. 






wuu VMS W9 tEttm Ajenasl 
2 d bntroomed flat. £72400 far 
mAck Sfte Allens Ol 2S8 0548 

rtsinn. Wl. I bed flat 6MtK 
. m. OCH. 96 yr fee C75O00. Ol 
854 4608. COL 434 2BS6 W/ D). 

VCZ- 1 inhr Handc faric. ’Prefer 1 
- bed M vitth roof terrace. « 
ITS. £87.500. 01-727 9703.. 


BMBM eoncr W6Hod 3 bed 
how. bath, ssp shower, fntty 
W Ul Kmooe. Gas Ch. gds. Bi 
Wt ctUdnfe, F/H. 
C125JOOO. Tel Ol SB5 7179. 


MCHWAY VUMt CHS Newfer 
refurb l Bed courtyard naL CH. 
Luxury HUMS. Ls fee. 

ratwoo. Also «m iferra a» 

dlo. £67.500. 01-551 7533 <T). 


U j Bft WW KKHK fell A 

jW la r pe bas ement iu. 3 
b e d T ius. Adsg rm, 2 hatb- 
mno. HNMi. OCH. 120 year 
• lease. Cl l&OOO. Telr727 6936. 


HMMDBmiL Bracfcoihury 

raoriernbed period terrace 
house. Dbie recep rm. eiwn. 

*•“**“■ to* hahnin. naw 
UL uuuty rm a may sfti 

- Oute Bahi needed, jueoooo 

•ranted - no fe es. 748 3BS9. 

W°pP- anqht 3rd Or 
nu. 5 Ms lami.vsou ban/ z 
nad mheJ. supwHy 
oewirued. I dm recep. au lunu- 
ton & fmtnos Quick 
wjtnwtovlna ^60^00084 m 
2? Opdoa to purtfigof 
F/h oid 01 9959582/3725209 
DeUghttol 

mund a tower door inaMOrv 
• 5^25**™* tooer win 

w apaaora rooms. 2 Beds. 9 
S«W ifl| 8«fa Ebaou, Shwr 
JW. Shar e rf F/H, 
eisttooo. coous asa ao&i. 
flw* ftfauau lUHton a 

nal ln mis superb w eaBoei wah 
~.T iffl Cgnt Recep Rm 3 Beds. 

toy Kn/Break Rtn. 
Wfa- C21OJO0O for 
onfek sale. Coote$ 320 365i 


£360 

CONVEYANCING 

For Sales & Purchases 
for prices up to £80,000 
we chaise £360+ VAT & 
disbursements. 

Barretts Solicitors 
01-248 0551. 


C ttO UCH Do HeamneM Roan. 
N.19. mafeonenc. wpde nra ed. 
viet'B 5 bed. Rec. kn both, 
w.c. CCH Aee tube. LH 96 
yrs. £67.950. Work 548 5101 
Horae 281 1636. 

nron court, nwi. nt rfomus 

Pk. 0 We bed Recep K & 5 
toner. UR. CH CHW 1 57 yr 
lease. £69^00 Tel: OI-219 
6021 Kfayji or 10286) 8TOQIO 
west 


MUUDA VAIX charming double 
bed cnwaim m submenu 
Ave. ftned kit. lux bathroom, 
t anen . cunams. CX». eootxe 
euane. Otirt many extras. 
& 61 .SOa Tel: Ol 28b 1456 


■ W4 Matfaro au ro Rd . Maromcent 
restored Victddan house <s bed. 
3 Oath. 3 fee rec hope kbctwn. 
wage ooocl tbe gansm. com 
rua*. Offers around £25s.ooo 
- T0. 01 74T 1919 anvSeT^ 


E5Y5 WATER . purchenee 

M** oloounq Hyde 
shrk. ABuuir s bedim nar. 
Lmmorfdioer. KfetoA £ 
i^9 far. £175.000. Pern co 
Prnpnhe* 01-737 2644 

"SpWMW. £175.000. TO. 
tgy_re-rqote d. rgp unnov'd & 
««i«d - ttus noose K in very 
rood condition a beds. Mh. 
rewfe ow bto ku/break. 
•••’den. 01-731 4448 fT} 

■WM CA mea. SOJOOU3 2 bed. 
Z/3 recep (U »»■ the Arts Con- 
tre. 119 yr be. ci4«m 
frank Hams dr ax a 1 yr~ 
0077. 

SW7. Eleani Mats Hfahcetumc. 
reap. Idt/breakiast itoSTa 
doubir bob. bath, ind ca s c. h 
£ 175000. HbbnoRS 

570 6781 

W-K p o o earow. . hbto new 2 
wo convti nkm. Own enttanr* 
CaCH. Comer balh Ffekgdi. 
en- Caraeb. 99 vr k» 
E89JO0 «ro. 01 SOB 09^ 
















































31 




THE TIMES WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 26 1986 


RESIDENTIAL PROPERTY/2 


Fifteen flats 


for £5 million 


■v'-'A V. 

,v v; 'V- 11 » • *• liT 


■ Behind the Imposing listed frontage 
of the former Debenham and Freeboay 
department store in Wigmore Street, 
London WT, has risen wtrat is befieved to 
be the first purpose-butt apartment 
block hrtfte area for at least 20 years. It is 
the second stage of a redevelopment 
by Ladbroke Group Properties, who let 
the 65,000 sq ft office content In 
.August to a Barque Paribas subsxfiary. '. 
The 15 apartments of one and two 
bedrooms, with two penthouse of two and 
three bedrooms, range in price from 
£1 55,000 to £895,000 with a total value of 
more than £5 m3fon. Entered t hro ugh 
a marble-fined foyer in Wtofoeck Street, 
designed by David Hicks international, 
the apartments have fully-fitted kitchens 
and private car parking at £20,000 a 
space. The apartments ha — 
leases; sole agent is Keith 
Groves. 



■ Portpatrick harbour near Stranraer 
in the vest of Scotland, a favourite hmmt 
of 171h and 18th century amuggters. 

Is for sale. The picturesque harbour, 
inc lu d in g several buildings, has 
potential as a marina, acconflng to the 
agents. BMmHs of Cambridge, and 



finance mat 
the Scottish Tow 
agencies. 


be available 
at Board 


Healangh Priory, new Tadcaster, north Yorkshire, is on the market for 
only the second time in its history as a separate bouse since 1150 when 
Bertram Haget established a priory. It was converted into an Elizabethan 
manor boused 1540 by Sr Thomas Wharton and passed by his family in 
1714 to the Brookshank family who lived dwe until 196L The present 
house, in Tadcaster atone, consists essentially of the dormitory of fliepri^ 
oay T with sotnefMti HriliHng s.lt has recently heen restored and retains fea> 
tores, mdndmg two stone fireplaces dating back to dm original dorter 
(dormitory). The house has two reception rooms, library, study and six 
bedrooms and stands in move than two acres, which include a group -of 
farm buildings with planning consent for two nooses. The York office of 
Humberts is asking £200,000 


Energy-saver 

■ The Round House at Milton 
Keynes, Buckinghamshire, one of the 
most innovative houses buSt for the 
Enemy World Exhibition, is for sale at 
£1997»50 through John H. James' 
local new homes office. One of 50 houses 
built lor the exhibition, the conical 
shape minimizes toe external surface 
area to increase its energy efficiency. 

It has four bedrooms, two reception 
rooms around a spiral staircase, a . _ 
swimming pool and conservatory. 

The same agent is sefling two other 
exhibition homes — a low-energy, 
traditional four-bedroom house built 
by Brosetey Hemes, incorporating 


Don’t knock the Docks 



, at £165,000, and toe three- 
j room house developed by 
Constructive Individuals as part off a 
training course tor people wanting to 
buBd their own home, at £8^995. 


■ Harroda 1 Estate Offices 
flat in Mayfair with two addresses, 
two-be d room flat is hi both— ■ 


Yard Entrance is through a<_ 
private mews. The agents believe it wR 
be of interest to companies and 
businessman attracted by the cachet of 
Grosvenor Square as an addess for 
enteftaMng. Prices £245^000. 


Mobile bam 


bam 


■ Green End Bam at Datchworth 
Green, Hertfordshire, was a i 
with massive oak limbers built in 11 
at OSves Farm near Ware andtfismantied 
recently to await a suitable new 
location. Now rabutit, it retains the 
character and space of the original 
butiding and adjoins a vffiage green. 
Accommodation is on various levels 
and incfcides five betfrooms, a main 
reception room an two levels, and a 
flat atxive toe garages, tt has a swimming 
pool and gardens with open farmland 
on three sates . Hampton and Sons are . 
seeking £750,000. 


Prices in London's Docklands continue 
to debght developers and estate agents, 
asto nish outsiders and «my potential 
buyers to dig deep into their pockets. 
While house prices elsewhere appear to 
be. stabilizing after soaring, this year, 
particnariy in London and the South- 
East, records continue to be broken in 
Docklands. 

A 2.35-acre ate at Lawrence Wharf in 
Rotherfrithe cm the south bank of the 
Thames has been sold for residential 
development at £1.4 million an acre, 
which is claimed as the highest price yet 
for a development site in the Docklands. 
The seQexs are Lawrence Wharf Ltd; the 
buyers 1SLEF UK Ltd, a Danish-based 
property company. . 

Outline planning consent provides for 
108 habitable rooms an acre, which, 
translated, means 56 flats of (me to three 
bedrooms and 40 maisonettes with two 
or three bedrooms. The agreement 
provides for a riverside walk and fall 
public access to die Nelson Dock. 

W illiam Beadles, partner of the How- 
ell Brooks agency, commented: “Hie 
location is outstanding. Lawrence Wharf 
is on the eastern side ofRotheiiuthe, just 
beyond the Surrey Docks, and has the 
added advantages of an extensive river 
frontage and an adjacent public park. 
The purchase price reflects both this and 
mounting demand throughout 
Do cklands." 

The completion of this development is 
in the future; meanwhile two new 
developments are fin- sale. Cascades is a 
development by Kentish Homes at 
Westferry Road on the Isle of Dogs, 
which brings back the tower block to east 
London. Twenty storeys high, it is aimed 
at the international community and high 
earners working in the City and even- 
tually at Canary Wharf, the alternative 


financial centre, when it comes to 
fruition. 

Keith Preston, Kentish Homes chie£ 
has spent time in the US studying 

building methnrik pud . jg nang that 
experience here, intending to sell the 
bottom floors and make them available 
for accommodation while the other 
floors are still under construction. To 
cater for the young and thrusting buyers, 
there win be a sports centre with a 
s wimming pool, gymnasium and tennis 
court The two- and three-bedroom 
apartments win cost from £100,0001 


Trade Wharf; centred on two 
Georgian warehouses originally built by 
the East India Company for storing 
saltpetre, in i jmehonsc. is die lates t 
development to come on the market 
from Rqjalian Properties, who have 
other schemes in Docklands, and are 
dosdy involved in inner-city revitaliza- 
tion. Regalian is also the leading sponsor 
for the Building Communities con- 
ference in London, winch opens tomor- 
row with a speech from JPrmce Charles. 

There will be aboaif350 apartments, 
with boutiques, restaurants, a gymna- 
sium and swimming pool The first 
phase of 171 new homes starts from 
£120,000 for a one-bedroom apartmenL 
Two-bedroom units will range from 
£165,000 (one bathroom) to £205,000 
(two bathrooms) and a three-bedroom, 
three-bathroom apartment will be 
£275,000. Prices for apartments in the 
original refurbished 18th-century ware- 
houses will be released shortly. 

The balconied apartments on each 
side of the warehouses all have fine river 
views, and the development stands 
within entrance gates with parking 
for all owners. CSV 


PROPERTY BUYERS’ GUIDE 


LONDON PROPERTIES 


SOUTH OF THE 
THAMES 


1 


BATTBBEA SW11 


os 


Common aoch- 
tnkam's, 2 boat- 
man's (1 ensute), annum rec- 
aption reom, separate MFC. 
‘ftpn—n Htffapn [arnf mo. 
anted amfc wtg patio par- 
dan. cedar, tony modernised, 
new rant- VacaS man mid 
December. 


TEL 0V228 7817 
OB 81-88 5088 EXT 3121 


JUST AVAILABLE 


rlHln»ldeawl 




587 0600. 






noo- Moderated throughout 

wttb nmigh racep nn. lea ut/ 

b/fUL s beds. mm. sep me. 

GCH. grin. Rowdrea f&rixUng 

loaches. £96.000. TCM8&- 
2288 (day) 6700328 InaL 


ptonltol detected Old Mans* IB 

Cuu M Tii a Han area- 6 bedx 3 

nemu/ brWM. uffllty rm. 3 

um auk. cdor. OCH. Se- 

cluded W -teeing gdn. Gar and 
oH st aarUno- F/H £299.960 

nr quick sad*. Dl- 788 4079 


•LACKHEATK. Chorratna cot 

in Mart of vntauo. taany 


taoe to 

n-huUt .. 

IT tome. 3 beds. Victorian 

Unfpf 1X1 II- — ftpr I H f l aPu . 

paU O. 2 rates BJR. 016,000 

F/H. TH Ol 882 BMZ 


CXJtPMAM. Newly converted hne- 
mr 2 bod art. many Man 
nr anxanttlos. £78JOOi. Open 7 
days a week. John P Denote Si 
Co. Ol 6T3 8881 


Porter 

CASTGLNAU, 
BARNES 

M a pa BMm Reoenc y hse of 
a fliUntftn g ae wa ri raortt sat 
if iodo mm Main bso rib 5 
task 3 recap. 2 (rib ft ha tt. 
teWtso os 2 s/c flats, 
isadufed gSns. 

£450,000 
01-741 1083 


UPPER KQBHDOD SE19 
DetacdHl Vtctorisn house. 
13rooms.4tatdiens.3 
bate in 1/3nf acre. Luge 


satata.4 


Ho (radon. 

T0C813S5S385. 


noma umbo, tuw vie 
at. Nawty nod. Inc new roar. 
CCH. Z bed*, bate. UttS^brBHc. 
through nooeo. SJ. rat gdn. 
Vlow ute. Tefc Ol 235 8666. 


tATTDHU £109.960. Mod Vic 
ter. 3 beds. 2 bates, —rare . 
Ptro u gh rern GCH- SOB grin. 
VKW May. TMBM 223 8660. 


TomuEVS, sana. mod 2 
bedr*m hra b otlW m. Ode 
reap, toe on/ ten. c/H. wot 
gdn. £99.780. Tet Ol 874 4399. 


MfTMEV Lnr 2 bed CM OH ta 
rand - Qora BH. £79.960. Tel 
878 87ST (eves). 


On 


wetedse. Lge tuny mod bee. 4 
dble beitt. 2 new bams. Ipe new 
tuny Bid Ut S >ep Utkty rm. lge 
rac. War dc french windows, 
gdn. gas ch ttnrite Many 
artier features F/n £143-80001 
228 6764 after Tub 


Superbly restored rand ted. 

temBy home. In b wmnrn to ir 

decorative order. QuM rd. 2S* 

recto. luxury aned ML a beds, 

2 bates, fantastic 90* aw ‘ 

£19&jOOO F/H. Ol 373 


cum* Sown. IK OitaL 2 yr 
old ceev in Vic tne. 1 doable 
bed. Urge lge. reap. K * B. 
GCH. Exe order. £61.000. 
TetOl 406 1161 (day). 


NEMHMBTOM, B> dtvMan Bell 
am. Setoenoa fUBy mod 2/3 
bed PJB. fan Courtyard devrt. 
C2u CH. CMS. From E693oa 
Alan Fraser ox 687 1004. 


HOUSEHUNTING??? 


We offer a residential 
property finding 
service to anyone 
looking for a home in 
West and South-West 
London. 


01946 4876(1) 


PUTNEY. 

Superbly mod Vtct tear 
muring afl ortg teriwas 
in quiet id. 3 bou, 2 lute 
p an suita) 2 race. Ui/bifc. 
utfl rm, cater, gas ch. 4tr 
sunny gdn. EISa^SD 

WARREN 
788 7884 


CUM —. AbbeetBc Bd. tote 
vie ten- me. on 0 fn.mra. a 
beds. bate. wc. bit. 27W 
reap., at u/vim. ho. cut. 
och. go* gdn. mar ire. 
£X 42300. TeL Ol 622 8648. 


inferior de a tewd 

swwa i rad mats, co&jooa 

tamedtadr Sale. Vicky 01-685 
2823. 01-283 3464 Wfc C9d 33 


Pretty 3 atony. 
Oear waw ho m e In 

ouriKnet. 2 retoa. ton Me. 

3 bob. large Udan/dtaa:. at- 

tncUae 55* wri-Kocked 
garden. C16CLOOO. m. oi 882 


SBockxia Viaonan fOteOy Home 

with 7 beds. 2 bates raid 48ft 

S te c to g Gdn. £i79i60a Own 

7 dan a week. John P Deanna & 

CO. Dl 073 8881. 


HES IS mins city / west End Sa- 
nction wefl r timtuira a 4 bed 
boose, overloo king nrk. gar- 
d era Bant and rear, wm 
£ 160.000 M Ol 887 
0644/0192. 


m 


devetogmenL 3 beds, telly mxrd 
Mt wnb Neff ooDkances. 
garden, garage. E< 20.000. 
Towncbotce 01-751 4448 


1 1/2 


bids. 1/2 mm MKHwl bnge 

baam och. wni ukSbi paw 

garden. coejscxL ot«re 7900 


I Mud 4 »—4 nonaa. 
2 lge reoen. K/BnM rm. Gge. 


C 12 a OOO. 01 977 1802. 


DULWICH 


1 


FORCST HU Denrawe Rri wKb 
Panoramic view of Loodoo. M 
bouse. 4 bate. Z rvcera- s tutef. 
conservatory. Bairn, bte- 
roocn + shower. 2 

Cm CH. Lae pnk 

£120000 TCfcOl -699 2300 


RICHMOND & | 

HNGSTON I 


/ Fife Road, V 
RICHMOND PARK 
Asabstaatial bnity bouse 
of style and charm. 
Beceady designed 
and taSt to the highest 
specification for Interior 
Designer. 

? double bedrooms, 

5 baihroumsi 
drawing room 
3 further reception rooms 
Strimmag pool rid suma 
AilmiliBO feed kitchen 
Equipped ud4y room 
1 \ acre Landticaped gardens 
Double ganiff 
Security susiem 

FREEHOLD 

£690,000 

, VIEW TODAY ^ 
\ 01-878 5938 / 


KING GEORGE 
SQUARE 


Sewn sfcte. 

Iwra w £95.000 

Flitslrom - El 00.000 
Mem Omagra - E205000 
Tom Kansas bom - E272JJ00 
_ ronetas - S2B5.880 
A Coach House - £31 Ol000 


Centre 
opea seven tors 
eadi week 

1030 am - 4J0 pbl 


PHONE OMMO G32S 



Homos. 
• ttafarib. 


OffiHTBE 
DOOR 10 THE 
GOOD LIFE. 


LANCASTER 

PARK 

R-ramtai 3 storey VSetonaa 

terrace bouse In neefl ol 

83UWI. Wan ongeal 

Oam Stops; imte and 

Ti*es. Coi*t ■ - - - 


mm 


DANEL SMITH 

01 582 


SHEEN/ 

MotltokB bdrs. Exquria 

period ms Cl 853. pro 


Ouch. 3 bads, 2i 

hafi, 2 recap, kit/fam rm. 

OSP. Oowitry gdn. 

21784100 f/tL 
Rodney Scott & Co 
tel 01 876 0152. 


ncmaBd. 3 CU bedrooms. 
Dfadng room, krnnne. 18* uov- 
m £ 110.000 fmboM nei 01 
878 4820 


lUMMMUKM Edwardian rand. 
ong itatun n- fu ktt. 2 targe 
recaps, many room. Bate. 4 
beds. 60/70 ft gdn. Cloae ton. 
£14&S00u Ol 977 0969. 


STJMBBMK18 Tw Ub e ubaw . 
Edwardton 2 bed barac cd 


rooms. WeR armnged accam- 

mteftea- GCH. 8 retrex nver. 

£84.950 nr guide sale. Tel: 01 - 

677 6644 day 892 0914 eves. 


WIMBLEDON 


SW19- 6 

dble baas. 3 lge rectos. Bam. 2 

WO. KBCten. Garden. Send 

detached bouse. Original ceil- 

ings and Bregtaces. Needs 

modernlsallon- Near ntee. Free 

MM C196J900. Ol 947 6365. 


Hunt swi9. De- 

Obl beds. 3 

(1 en auBw. 2 reepts. 

kHcben/dtocr. idnwy . 

GCH. garden, near lube. Free- 

hold £226.000. 01-9474363. 


cons. am. 2 beds. 2 recs. mod 
UI/Mbnn- OJUP- 36B gdn. 
£89.350 TetOl -640 0880 


2/3 mnmtttm Unmac dec 
boose. £79.960. Gas cb. Ste 
gdnOS 643 2068 after 730 pm. 


COUNTRY PROPERTIES 



DENNEL & CO. 


ST PAULS STREET HI 


Sopoib motfemsEd 

3/4 bedrooms rad-tanacsd 
llkuren property m one 
kAnQRn’s prime resdattri 
tattra TastBio^f reftitKlwJ 
Id be tagbesl sMteb and 
bring tbo benefit of new 
wtajjftbntaiog and turns and 
bangs amogboat. MreaAre 
50ft pngarrin. F/H £05990. 

B1 354 5484 


MUteH H The vBtogejNWI. 
New. fuay tern A e a topped. 2 
bed. lu> flat. CBZXXQ 
era prte*. uni urn. £79.995! 
0003 52242. 

BBHUtCIl aw Per*. pdMUj 
bd 3 bed VKIoitea lerrarad 
house. Thrown wte FW™ 
tnctwn. Pretty g ar d en . GCH. 
£1^S» TKCOl 996 4830. 




block. 97 yr lease, ts&ooa 
sale. Tttl0542) 713280 
MUHIA VALE. F/ b teew ajwtg*. 
3 nntnos. Inge rerro. as 4i 1 % 


. Prtvaseaele. £I9&000| 

1 1150 no ag ento 


CIDSXOOLrtJbeteTO^ te- 
nor with beanornl s» facing 


ns. K*8. 01- 731 444 8 07 
at PABMMS atOEM SW6. 3! 
storey. 6/6 bed. 3 

WC-raBcried - 

Ml UL CM. C 

£266/100. Ot 736 1369. 


.fbUD! 


CHELSEA & 
KENSNCTON 


ALL TOE TWOS! 


beds. 2 race. 2 battB. 
t not 2 8xpen^ve! Stfi 
or Courtfteid Gvdens 
VS oonv. twSi Eft. ffiyrs. 
£179^)00 


MAI 
01-462 2341 


F8EEH0LB 


sri see*: away toflwie 

Si Cbriso. Uotira. Qua. 
bous. PerfBS la a Mw a. h 
on tf 1 gKi. Orta! tete] 

morett tarn Home s. 1 ft 
t SripeRon rih snap 
r pmacy & laeoaty. n« 
(Mob is 
1 . 5T8D.OOO 


61 352 8773. 


Saoerbty deenratot: 
bow* newly 

rd. UK> 

ftHotog. Fnuy ts a m- 


tanie. X2OT-ooa ah 

rued _ Owners mutt 

3090/853 4530 


DOW ■ 

ikKlMildtb. kBdl 

si Healing, tenter. 

teBBtro te. Jaa remi 
Srevkses. Ojeteni Dl- 
31 8033 ■ 


SW7 

FREEHOLD 
MEWS HOUSE 


ItedslBUiaxtenantiaa. 
(Ucfcsafei 


mENKHE 01 741 3595 
HO AGENTS 


WEST KEBMTBH 

3 badraore. 2 Uh nous 
Jw, op pMB tenet V 


Pwerfiai fw rari'Si» a 
empoa- 

Ta 61-488 sue 
EXT 5951 
01-683 S8Z7 


KNIGHTSBRIDGE 

Superb 3 bed, 2 buk 
mareanene. 29 w lease. 
£235j00ft 
Joint Afcnts: 

WA. ELLS 581 7654 


dngtonsj 


4998894 


KEHSMGTOH 


Brad am txtiasm- 
amekKUmsH t* 4 loan ' t 
beOreomaanmenhstEtiae® 
and a 3 bodnoor at £185.090. 
Ok? iondOB. Lw ootgoings. 
Vie* Monday betocon 
. 4and7pm. 

IDEAL HONES 
4 65 4 444 


HOLLAND PMKWll £146000. 





ktt. 96 yrere Tri: 01-727-4514 


antwolevrti. Hoof garden. CH. 
^riram. lounge *6B x 16TL tote 

Mclwm. an mod cons to- 


Reg 01-381 


*W7 STADIUM 
-MOdonWd open pton large 


«T. CBS ch. Bom 

SS£5» n S^-86CD 

BURTON COURT. SW3.J 


racep. Mt/btost rm. 

SM 96000. Ol 228 2677 CD- 
191 




.tut. 

. 1/LOM.IW 



bates. 3 NCCteJ tfl/H'fite jm. 

cncwiactoa gard en. 

Neg. Ol 2E6 26T7 fn. 


MC267JE00 dr £S00 DM 01 
(Ml 2M9*0teyer Ol 361 7868 


tem*** 1 *, swiol smreoi ts Hr 
bdKtmy ted tetty mod. tee iSS 


yn. £79.780 Angela Sameu 
352 90B6 or 352 0080. 


■ nil ■lilTIMI ummal modern 
Mtemt. 3-bedfc 
am In acctsB <4 ISMU B OO 
BTC 01-938 2175 CD 


BANCANW Take tone to find- we 
do me krimre 

- Utf pram. Cau 01.370 37sam 


KnmNBTOH • 2 bed flats- tram 
£76000 - JdOOOOO- Ebuiptere 
nrUrtnffllri Ol 603 1855.. 


OwslOM Large 2 barer (tat nri 
r.. HOS- 

WNSL700 9937 


CHELSEA/WQiBKTON 

SQUARE 


as 


Hatefluat reaif read l/h fartt 
bit ■ tens htei 5 Iris, 3 
MB. tidy ad kO. IpcfepgraiV 
iMt setft. ntf BBS pda. 19 Abo 


STEPHANSEHS 
01 221 7582 


HARRODS, 


Mod HiriH Chebu houu 
ki quM straw. Mmy 


LgeU/brittnaSS 
no*. * 


m. riknn, 8 map mm 
bwkms. 2 trims, gdn. Q 
ch- Easy pknp. ite* today 
naebTOf •rantaflt- 


TriaWOHf or3SS477a 
cnSyOOO tmbold 


HOLLAND MM terarac 2 bed 
oaraen Bat wkh uege racep. 
shower rm & ffltod 


£1 60000 for «mck sale. Ol 221 
3T78 iw/cub. eves) No ‘ 


UXItel B AHPgHS ut Doer 2 
bedroom. 1 b sUi roflifl 06 sun- 
m> open plan uviag area, pet 
features ptta front and regrtri- 
crahes- GCH. £146.000 97 year 
ItMt . Tet Ol 373 7114. 


pete garden 
decorated to Mgnera standard. 
Begsnt drawing room. dtulUB 
room. luxury kHctnn. an ante 
2 


dnbton. duty room. GCH. 
barelar anna and entry uticme. 
top uuaiiiy carnets and cor- 


£209.70 a Tet OI 362 3609/ 
Ol 373 2486. . 


converted bra. 2nd Boor. Fuflv 

mad oak ktt. CCH. Very nr 

tube, low on gotnos. Carpets 

and kn appliances to stay. Rest- 

nemtai parWno. Entr y pfaooe. 

For tony compleUnn. £98.000 

long lease- TelaW 229 6327 

eves/ Ol 222 0199 days. 


riuucuismHn t » 

pete new i be ora omed ObL 
£130. 0 00 neg. Abo 1 superb 
- new stndlo £67jOOOl (duel Co 
to. C on ntteOCTa . Decn 
Quack rale. 01-903 8131. 


HAMPSTEAD & 
HLGHGATE 


KENWOOD, N6 





Benham & Reeves 
01-435 9822. 


DOCKLANDS 


ENJOYING 

PANORAMIC 

VIEWS 


botb meat to the City and 
across the Thames, this 
stunning 1 bedim pent- 
house otters good sise 
atxramnadatjon aod private 
pinp, Price £131^00. 
Also boflt along rib the 
Thames ia this attractive 3 
bedim maisonette with 
views directly onto the 
River, the property has 
good bob acBommodatioB ft 
private garage. Price 
£141.500. 

For information 
telepbeie Parris & 
m% 81-907 4473 


3^80 588ARE FEET 
HEW CONCORDIA 
WHABF. HEAR TOWEB 
BfflOSE. 


Luxury apartmoot knmenn 
charador. Exposed Mcki in ri t 

and ortohuil baaras. Larga 

on aa nc a haL Luxuy kitchen. 

Utffly room. Stumdng opan 

plan lounge 31* by 33 4 
bedrocmia. aB With ansuHa 

bath, 1 srih atteg room. Study. 

Baa CH. Griegs. Audb state 
entry. Switnmlm pool. 
Laundry. RasUoni csranhar. 
Boat store and rooormga. 
Gsmes roam etc. 123 yrieaaa. 


TetKI 557 »T7 


S6RRET DOCKS, 
SE18. 


traraf nondrerar 



BJUULSHTB 
01 582 5558 


DOCKLANDS 

property centre 


FLATS & HOUSES 


THROUGHOUT THE 
DOCKLANDS 


TEL: 790 9560 



£120.000. T«t 

Ol 249 8383 OT Ot 278 3801- 


- 1 


Hearn. Fkectnaang net wucti it 

a new censentonin a into Vic- 

torian wflta. /idly fitted Mtctren 
. off la rge Bring nn . t ally ntwd 

double oedroom. toanmai 
storage and nlUHiy area, mod 
bathroom. CCH. Patetng JtteL 
L/H £82.930 Tet 01-43A4DS6 

Sunt or 01-794-6894 wMays. 


HA M P ST E i a MR MOB So* 
new is Door gardes Oat 3 
beds, lounge- itoy ncm Htcb- 
an. 2 trite a ea tritci. 199 
year Vase. £ 210.000 eng Mrs 
tauriton 01-628-7711 day 


IT JOHM WOOD Lovely I bed 
ULanUradUeii. comrtrt* 
wimCHtoc and new funttmm 
£65.000 Td 0485 66780 



QUAY, wanotog. 4 bed 


£119 JOOO. TH Ot 266 0719 
p Dr RobBa 

. 2346 194. 


535 3859 or Pag e Dr RobOnon 
388 61BI t NO. riMM 


MCKLAHK - C»y - Bow. 
Srtnrtk m of period & New 

Hones a Flats dene cay and 

Rher. £40 - £330000. PMne 

MrnowaUt RnSdenaal: Ol 790 

9832 or M60 711664- 

HOT ONLY do We turn a ptodA 

tom IB Wapptog far OB BJXto 
but also a tup* ele c tio n atom- 
■or property. tteotudriridoridB- 
nds. CraniARneOi 5384321. 
W Af i tHO .ix.EaM Quay. 1 bed 
flat k> newt v todU ecMme m> 
TbOaO te Pock - 6 toga mte 
dor. Balcw. £79^600 W. 

EA, Shaw & pmn 403 7260. 

wuvmc a. preaM pb». 

2 bed Oto In new *J- 
Imctlve eeheme. Cue. am n 

Mw.-lMLgeO. 999 JT B&EA 

Shaw A PtDTS Oi 405 728a 


SPfTALHELDS 
BORDERS El 


Chokre of six totally dsrnfict 
Vkamtan houses oniy 100 
trerds from Bohoosoatt & City. 
Enonnous patanual (or those 
with imagination. Cesh 
pucftasBis only. 

Al enquiries to Sole Agents. 
Offers invited 


Ricketts 

Boreham 


341443 ROMAN BOAD UUBOH 
B BW. TH: Pt-WO 7431 


Very targe 2 

bedroom. 2 bathroom Oat In re- 

furbished wart. Bitty ntted 
bnchen. carpeted teraartd- un- 

deroround car paridng apace. 

£160.000. Tet Ol B74 9082 
home Oi 261 8891 days. 


SOUTH OF THE 
THAMES 


1 


£ 


1 MML 


m 

— Charmed Si 


ffiVra ESTATE 
TDOTBffi BEC G0WRM 


nd ttfly mtad tof rtolrioMOU 
Epshmus cdsn oattr Ota 
pMt tea gatete irtri ** «adta read i 
m tort m 2 a riflri . ||9 
mgaaMtr MbnO kda. 


tone W 

E189JUD 


■ gwaHkert 

nonnrihasna 


troanaMMisaaul 
" 491 " 


Miiuoa 

O D toi ri to eam g tor Mureran ,m\ 
doraio Md tw*w WcUri bon etkl 


dnmu irt wn VriRri bcbm era 


haosy EtlOODO. 


On the Instructions of 
Magdalen College, Oxford 


OXFORDSHIRE 

M40 14 miles. M4 27 miles. 


AN OUTSTANDING 
FORESTRY 
INVESTMENT 


Excellent Road Frontage. Well Drained 
Soil All Year Round Access. High 
Proportion of Mature Timber, 
inebdifig Quality Oak. 

About 354 Acres (143 ha) 


For Sale By Tender in 6 Lots. 
Sole Agents 


CLUTTONS 


23 Beaumont Street, Oxford 0X1 2NP. 

Tel: (0865) 246611 


127 Mount Street, London W1Y 5HA. 

Tel: 01-499 4155 


STRUTT 8^5, 

PARKERS 


SOMERSET 

Duhmrton J6 mfla. Taunton 26 miles. 

Exeter 27 mfles. 

An atlr active countvy house wflh deBghtfui 
landscaped grotnds and situated on the edge 
of the Exmoor National Parte. 

3 reception rooms, 5 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms. 


OH central heating. Stabfing. Garaging. Out- 
bufldmgs. Attractive well stocked garden. 


Paddock. 


About 8% acres. 

Region £175,000. 

Taunton Office: Strutt & Parker, 

Memfip House, High Street, Tel (0823) 77261 
Exeter Office: Stnitt & Parker, Iffiehebnore 
Hughes, 25 Sout he m ha y West 
Tel (Q39Z) 215631. . 

(Ref: 13AB382) 


DORKING, SURREY. 


In an elevated setting just a short walk 
from Dorking town centre High Meadow 
Is an exclusive private estate in elegant 
£ surroundings. Comprised oi just 5 new 
f three bedroom detached houses, with 
cloakroom, study and utility room and 2 
new two bedroom detached bungalows. 
Prices start from £129.950. 

Contact White & Sons on 
Dorking (0306)887654. 

A Member ot mo Ttetalgar Home Grow 



DEVONSHIRE 


_228 7474_ 

140 NORTHCOTE ROAD SWI I 


Nr Coffinswefl VBfage. between Torquay aid Newton 
Abbot, detached house with panoramic views and 20 
acres gardens, woodlands and fields. 3 recaps, kit, 
blast roam, study, 6 bedrooms, 2 baths, shower, 
dbktos, swknming pool tennis court Offers in region 
of £200,000. Haarar & Motts, 67 Queen St, Newton 
Abbot 0626 54311. 




2 bod gd ftr 
fix. raqutes iPOdKiasatina 
Esaaoa 


01-878 7575 





thraa- 


ana futuns. 2 racegihiri 1 ? 
h/od im. bam. ten. JBMtt ear* 
pete- Cas C/H. F/H. *l0750a 

merr-aies levou. oi 436 

0121 utoytjmn. 


PUTNEV. EpttMa unmod 3 too- 
rey hse. Sth Jos gta- 
£127.000. 01 876 9356. 


SB CbB us rid wrt rinri your 
Meal heme. P e tera an Rrah 
Property acarcti 01-741 71217 


BERKSHIRE 


WMDSOff Large 6 berioamed 
house wttn auekty penrBra re- 


iHntaa nn. large Known- break- 
cam roam, sxudy & rv roam. 


w» Cud) rate snooker roam. 


^0X»0. wsfSS. 


CCMTHAL BMnram 2 Bats re- 


in 


house, c on ver t ed lnr M-E-P.CX 
dose Wwncnurt. Ideal for prof 
couple. 2 bed. riling, surer 
tmum bate, gas CH. Parking 
space. £71^00 and £74.930. 
Martin A Role CD734) 690366 


DEVON & CORNWALL! 



832E31B3KL 


HCK - Caft boose. Three bed- 


Ctoac to golf course and beach- 
es. £46000. Tet <09261 
401703. 


ter. 6 boa detached House wun 
6 «M. ET9.960. Td 

OkehaasHen lOSSTj 640600 


KbvtY HOUM Doran or Corn- 
welt, worm? I win cheek 11 
fur you: Details rtng liskeard 

iiosm earn m. 


BUCKS 


■8.TDH KEVHES Bopete 3 tm 
dal bouse. GCH. kitchen, 
lounge, durinu . bam. lge ga- 

rage and utBtQ>. Ml - lO mbs. 
BR Eustoo 40 rnttML Songbl a f- 

ler location. £60000 OOO. Tet 

0908 660116 after 6JO pm. 


EAST ANGLIA 




Ranpi ol tadhtart panlbooee trie I 
C MHMieaw krai one bataom id 
ome oeAoont teptorra adtacen to 
■mt. Erne embed around h 


rtraraandaUi 


|toCT7^na 12£^tagrato 




PROPERTY IN 
SUFFOLK 


Ws tow nay properties wH* a 
20 rah item of Sudtuy ta 
Sunok in fee price range 


Cootict bs tor details i 
(0787) 310954 


SOU TH NORFOLK 

EXCEPTIONAL PERIOD MUSE 
In conaanaiai area VMBi al 
and boons, togtanooks, at, 
■oupga dtaer. dtestag loan, 
her eqgppte tochen, rioeto. 
<MS» r bad. rill eata beta, 3 
further both, and second haft, CH, 

flgo, ukm a co. tw pm 

Long anmv NaraUL 

Tet 0508 31434 


f Luxury flat. Hpi 

Street, terrac e garden. 9 beds, 
b/room. Supete lounge- Urao- 
ry kueben. CooswvaJory and 

potto, och. Ex order. £80000. 
TH Aidaoargn 07288S 20U. 


New trad style 

det 3 bed noose. GCH. gge. ami 
gdoe. esav aceess sheen, tram, 
sen. SSMSO. Tel 0263 T7860. 


x f L LEYS0 01-629 7282 


WHADDON HALL, BUCKS 



Ltogefara ^n bo oae, fated property m the t 


-of 

Whaddon. Ufttoo Keynes 5 mb. Ml 10 mb, L£n 50 
mb. Eustrai 45 mins. Spacious entrance, dknn, 
nuperfj drawing nn. dhle panrilwd doom badsa® into 
dimiK rm, 2nd reept, teflity rm, lge fitted kitchen, 3 
iWb beds. tttmffi P T on guxte, "l" 1 hatfiem. Ti ^ nAifflpwi 
garden, ft acre. Dble brick garage. Superb views & 
south tpeiitg - 

Offers in the region of JS 160,000 . 

TeL- 0908-602540 


FABULOUS FAMILY HOUSE OR EXECUTIVE PAD 
HEADLEY DOWN 
51 Mintees to Waterteo - 


i n m n1n » l y JhhA i b ivinfiM hnmp rw w rtwrh Art km bvidiwi 

flri Ttoee Haute jmnrremw t a g pdbhc looms wish (only note 


Soon ate beams ate compimerted \tf date btd ro om wnh Ion raonllb 
oteiloobBt exonc Mdm wife rate and nobrr i n aMe pints, very pnvale 
srimri I w u ri oa s aad Bmakmd fecffidcs waten an CTynipic MtoeStHav. 
Wide ehrax of tenoh, benny ferns and tboppoig centre 


A dream to far e aly £165060 
Day TH. IB uaeS sko 


ESSEX 


8S0DBW COUNTRY HOUSE 


quaRy near toe 
deferable resort tfFrtaton-on- 
Sea and with a qrie raimfiaUe 
ran® ol reererianal facISes ind 
Stank, heated pod. 


complex and sep joest accom. 
Main (ea ind Sbedmis, 3 


batons, games rm 3, tecs, 
gragina fto 4 cas. 7H anes in 


let ABBOTS COtMTBY DHT 


VB6CYMD to S acres wttft toroe 
nnvty bum rterieuvB bouse. G 
Brim. 3 Breens. Gurexms 
Views. Noar Saffron waidm. 
OXR£270raxxnooenCamta>* 
0799 2*“' 


HANTSbJQORSET, & 

uxw. 


SOOTH 

HAMPSHIRE 


A s ympathetic coasastan of m 
earry 1900s bam & stable 

c o mp te r ta ming a mm&sfyfe 

setting, ol which this send 


dose MZ7. sarin & taring 

faeries. £49ifio FhoU 
Arnold titony. Tta 


0329 B33130 



London) shops an 
Near motorway rail M3. Offers 
££is.non TeL- QsSf 616639. 


BOUBMEraeVTH Loamy pen*- 


«im S a wrtmM lounoe/ dinar, 
a bods ( 1 dble). Bathroom en 
rifle. Separate cloakroom. 
wc/WB. Sim balcony. Inc ear- 
pets and rank in g. C6 6J0Q 
only. Tet 0202 293579 


HltTklff iw- New c o Dvam oD 6 
auperp largo tun flab overtook- 
tog th£ mo. 2 bads- o/c/h. from 
£41.780 0983 862289 


MOVING 


to Hampshire? We 
w3l find your ideal 
home for you. Teh 
Jade Homeseekars: 

(0703)735634. 


VEHTMM - Unlw opport un ity. 
Superb 6 bed IwuephudHaU- 

6iy Apptt owertooktng are. Can 
Stmt. £24Sj00a 098S 8622S9 


HEREFORDSHIRE, 
WORCS, A5HROP 


Tywcrton 

Court. Servants ouarten and 

eoocc bouse wttb reeoictwt 

rt— -*-*9 Ibr utet MI d and 

conanetcial Ul tel ap raeiu . Mil 

cottage todusulee. CSOXKXk. 

Utte & Co. B Bridge Si. Hero- 

torcu Tel: (0432) 33067. 


HERTFORDSHIRE 



rr uum 3 year oM takoey 
■padew Vuorte 2 bed Itet to 
petvatontey phone block. Oern 
partdna- Fun OCH. V dote BR 
Staton <29 Mas CUT). Mm* be 
ami £36300 lor wrick tote. 
TW: 0727 39693 w/*od_aod 
ewa or 01 5T8 TWO ext 2124 

day. 


EMUBOCIL 2 ttiifl awactrit bure 
gaum. i rewL nt, “ 
w/i W ifenp rm* 

taQi/ kh oww nn. OCM. 8H808> 
Qw wnOlKM. Offers DA'fif 
KWOOO Tet (04621 89386B 


WARE Detached prated country 
cottage. 40 nuns Uvrapout s 
■tom. < beds. 3 ■ trrai. amws. 
£103000. Quick rile. Enrignx- 
tng. Ware 3394. 


KENT 


MART JAMES 
ASSOCIATES 
HOUSE HUNTERS FOR 
KENT 

Mepondant search services 


r presage property, 
combining easy access to 
London mtfi the Kant 


country-skte. 

TEL: 81-658-9375 


KtTS WOOB - 4 bed detached 
Tudor style boose. 2 large re- 
ceptions. m o d em kuchen and 
hamroMD. large garden, garage. 
FCCH. pits open tin. £169.000 
OmhOld. Tet 0689 20232. 


MIDDLESEX 


W W OWE HU manortiiaie. 
newly decorated, balls adfcrin- 
tog. 4 bens. 3 recap. scmL New 
bum to kttetom. new carpets, 
garage. Prime posWon. 
£138500. evenings and week- 
ends Ol 963 9829. 


MIDLANDS 


Detached 4 bedroon»/« 
house, se clu ded garden. 6 Mte 

driving lo centre, school facili- 

ties. £S2MOO- Tel; 021 744 72 
32 after lOOOam. 


OXFORDSHIRE 


1 


Hampton & Sons 


OXFORDSHIRE, 

BRAMPTON 


IriKU bX tm£bSZ 


UL 3 ncepton ranffi. kdetri. don 
raora, ctaateDom. cmscnataiy. 4 


nuns. Lege total oasm Gonp. 
Gas bed cenral tritsg. An nceflut 
later lusn. 

omn rites* ta ate raobn of 

mojaoo Boaftote 

Sola Agates 
Sbpet, BorfonL 
OXB 401 


M88 382) 3838/2058 


STRATTQI AB8LEY 

Stone Period ccOaoe aider died 
real. Syn^Hfeertcaily renoUBd «i 
qnd mtaj Norin Odontshre 
vflage. Easy access ««/ London 
approx 1 hr. Frart and rear hate. 1 
race p roont. toga dnmg room, 
weaife rt beams, fegtewok Soper 
fireptaces. Crritsman mado. SOM 
Pine couffiy ktteben. bathroom. 2 
doakrooms. 2 tobte twtraoras +■ 
one angle. Cottage enclosed by at 
stone «o ft. Extraraety pmnte 

'’“TetfoM' 97) 553 


OXFORD 

- City Centre 2 miles 

i barn con version AS new 
properties remaixicog ia ibis 
supafo courtyard wring. 


SBOWHOLSE OPEN 10-5 
SATURDAY A SUNDAY. 
12-5 MON. WED. TRITE. 
FRL TEL: OXFORD 864373. 


BUCKELL A BALLARD 
New Homes Dept 
Tei Oxford 249801. 


Family Hour Set 2 acre 

grounds o/Toowng Bto Common 

& Nai.Tnat land. 2 reeera 

study. Ml/hT Cast m. trilltty. S 

beds.3baths(2ensoltei. show- 

er nn. CH. attrac gdns wtm 
swim pool CHrie one. OJters 

around S460W0 WH. 
A-CFron & Co. Henley 

KM91) 572134 or Country A 

EMC. Hotnn <07651 868178. 


HORrailBUM - Banbury 3 miles. 

Superbly atuared stone bufli 

countrv home wtdi raaonUlceM 

views lust ooBlde BtoMunt 2 

racep tom rooms. 4 bedroom. 

oil fired central heating. Lovely 

Umbered garden. About 2 acres. 

Offers around £160.000. Lane 

Fox 6 Partn er s wtth Rytonds. 

MkUBteon Cheney. Baooury. 
own. Ten 10296) 710692. 


LOWER UHPLMUE nr Henley 
Oxon. Victorian family house 
te two S/C- S/S bedroom nan 
phis each flat has D/room, 
lounge, dotes. haBv. fitted 
kUChen. Cas CH. Garage 0491 
576966. 


SCOTLAND 


Seaside S 
bedroomed Mffage In Dtetar- 
rngue ftabtoB Milage 07 
Ganiensiown. near Banff. CH. 
hoed kttehM. tastenuu carpet- 
ed and deconucd. All services, 
boating, ftdrifte Ideal retire 
mem holiday hcene. oners 
around £22.000. Tet 0261 S 
£77 for rurthor inforroanon. 


C oa t iaa e d oa next page 


•••yr- 




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ir’s 


IC 


nical en- 

8,000 be 
>Eio Gold 
/to good 


gramo- 
donation 
peal and 
ar,” Mr 
dlestree. 


who has 
since it 

aid that . 
is lock, 
rtic. It is . 


£ can be 
a stam- 
ps to: 


re wing 
and, in 
I them, 
al Ale 


saiga's 
ewing, 
former 
Guide , 
have 
atiring 
orders, 
iiergic 
fferiU 
«rs in 
been 
foamy 
>r to 


s' the 
in 40 
Hacks 
Jd co- 
s’ to 
id. 


e 


ouple 
Uy for 
■educ- 


Lane, 
i pre- 
s by 
mize, 
/e to 
ences 
: Mi- 
.’ntral 


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■vs 


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SoiurtU, 







K± 


COUNTRY PROPERTIES 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 26 1986 


OVERSEAS PROPERTIES 



ESSEX - Stondon Massey 

U3S 8 Bt fits LMttpn Underground MS miles Central London IS miles. 
A SUPERB SMALL MANOR HOUSE. RECENTLY RENOVA TED AND 
MODERNISED THROUGHOUT. SET IN AN UNSPOILT POSITION AND 
YET WITHIN EASY REACH OF CENTRAL LONDON. 

Entrance/sitting haU, 3 further reception rooms. ftkcten/brea kfesf room. 
Principal suite of bedroom amt bathroom, sauna. Guest wing Wfth Bring room, 
wtchen. 2 bedrooms and bathroom. 

STABLE YARD with 7 loose boxes. Double garage, waited garden, take, 
paddock. 

ABOUT 7 ACRES. 

(adtSfionat buMtngs and land mmflable if required). 

Berkeley Square Office (Rsfc DCM/MPB) 


SOUTH HERTS - Hadley Green 

Central J 2 mifea A1/M25 2 mSeS 

A BEAUTIFUL GRADE IT LISTED GEORGIAN COUNTRY HOUSE OVER- 
LOOKING JOSLIN POND AND THE GREEN. 

Entrance hafl. drawing room, kitchen, broakfastylhring room, utffity room, 
cloakroom. Converted stable block (now a Gamasroom). Principal bedrooms 
with en-su&e bathroom. 5 further bedrooms, bathroom 2. DefightfU secluded 
garden. Heated covered swimming POOL Good perform. 

OFFERS ARE MVITED FOR THE FREEHOLD, 
joint Soto Agents: 

Blade ft Co, 56 Tottoffdge Lane, London N2Q 90S. 

Tec 01-445 3694 

John D Wood, 6G High Street, Harpenden AL5 2SP. 

Tel: (05827) 64343 

John D Wood ft Co, Bokdey Square Office (Ret MAGTL 


ESSEX - Between Ongar and Epping 

Id Open Countryside 

M11/M25 7 miles Central London 16 miles. 

SMAIJ. SECLUDED COUNTRY HOUSE IN A VERY ATTRACTIVE 
SETTING. 

Haft, lounge, reception room, kitchen. Bathroom, separate we. 4 bedrooms. 
Integral garage (could be converted into a further reception room). Summer 
house, greenhouse and outbuildings. 

About 1.4 acres. 

With modernisation and Improvement would make a very valuable family 
bouse in a we& sought after location. 






3 Berkeley Square, Leaden W1X 6AL. Tel: Gt-629 SOS 


MENORCA 

COUNTRYCLUB 



SPECIAL OFFER 


DEC 30- JAN 6 


7 DAY 'ALL 1AT DEAL. AC COM/ 

FLIGHT £150 PI* {Refunded if you purchase) 
fop property. aarespcndenc from *The Timer, - Dwiy E*p*a'. 
Sunday Times', and 'Prqsettylnvestnient’ magasne nave said 
some very r*ce dungs aBOut our development at Play as defomefs. 

Utea« of tre opinion ttWUBtfwoe* In the &**«*«■ 

S3 prone the pamr we’ve chartered a plane ex-GamridthtodiMin 
passengers, compnang owners and prospective Buyers auce. fara 
flee mhange of opasions ow 7 days. New Was Eve Party and 
other fun coa In Menorca. - 

Awan* waving . luOy landscaped apartments, garden houses axJ 
uUas<E30fcup) overtook a Deaunfuibay The CXC sports van 
swwvmng pool, terms, sub aqua-golf nearby. 

Fuitm amq q na itfleaing fadtoes. 

Pfease book soonest- demand Is way heavy. Caff us fora 
colour broc hu re, ‘ex tracts *, etc 
Menorca Corntry Quo, Shtppert o n Manna. Pete Lane. Shepperttn. 

Tel: |0932) 243104/2431 68. 




f-R'rSM T-5- 


—LAMANffi 


BLANCA 


These luxury properties are jdeaJJysftuated 
near extensive leisure, sporting and shopping fedHties. 

With over 3,000 horirs of sunshine recorded annually 
and our ten years experience in the area.yoaand 
vourfeBnilyareasairedof. 

A HOLIDAY HOME FROM HOME 


■ I BEDROOM FROM £17:000 ■ HMESHARE.FRQM £W- £2 750 

■ 2 BEDROOM FROM £25.000 * INTERNATIONAL EXCHANGE 1 

■ 3 BEDROOM FROM £30000 ■ INSPECTION VISITS 

■ COMMERCIALS FROM £20.000 ■ ALDEA REAL FROM £6* OOQ-WQCO 

m RESALES FROM £10.0 00 ■ GUARANTEED RENTAL 

■ INDIVIDUAaY DESIGNED VILLAS FROM £55 000 


ALDEA SEAL 

Built on a hill overlooking the Bay of Pines, this Andalusian 

style village has magnificent views of twb seas. 

ft s whitewalls, red roof tiles, charming squares, cool / 

fountains and waterfafk surrounded bypafm frees - M-" 

mate it a tmique development in a unique area. M . . 

There ts a private dub house and swimming 

pool, with walkways sloping down to the beach. A? 

A security gate manned 24 hoots a dag 
hasa telephone link to each house. 
ensuring enny only to residentsAnd jRH 

their permitted guests 

Privacy and tranquility yet only . w 

a hsH trjtft walk j rgra Tho w 

centre of La Manga. 


. // 

SS* * 




Lane Fox 


& Partners 

Rvlancis 


BERKSHIRE - NR NEWBURY 


Kingsclere 4h miles, Basingstoke 12 m miles, 
M4 6 miles, London 56 miles. 


AN EXCEPTIONAL PERIOD PROPERTY AT 
PRESENT TWO COTTAGES. With enormous 
potential for conversion to a Single Dwelling, In an 
outstanding position. 

4 Reception Rooms. 5 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms. 
Garage. Garden. Paddock. 

About 5 Acres. Further 5 Acres available. 


London Office: 01-499 4785 


SOUTH HAMPSHIRE 

Winchester 4*i miles, Southampton 8 mites. 

A MAGNIFICENTLY CONVERTED BARN with 
waterside garden and land. 

2 reception moms, study, large farmhouse kitchen/ 
breakfast room, 5 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms. Oil fired 
central heating. Outbuildings including stabling and 
garaging. Paddocks. About 9.4D Acres. 

Winchester Office: 0962 69999 





Tel: (0424} 424414 


OXFORDSHIRE 


Oxford 9 miles, Dkfcot Station 8 miles, 
M40 2 miles, London 45 mites. 



TAYLOR WOODROW HOMES FLORIDA 
THE MEADOWS, SARASOTA, WEST FLORIDA 

Tils esoUshcd and prsflnjous shonrasa resort otters a wsfo ran of 
totes • Bobs gdt couses, tme dub. fldns. 'o£mj ate. - 2S wOfas 2 
variety oi ac ton homestyte. 

Now ottered let the tost tone in the UX the (Ma ted homes. Mbs. 


Use our years of experience to guide you. 
Complete choice of villas, townhouses, 
apartments. Weekly four-day inspection trips £75 
per person in November. 

tor sr 


Costa Blanca, Spain. VBb. 
apartments, chalets lor sate 
from £1 WHO to £60000. 
Wa represent octy bidders 
of good repute. 

Free advice. 
CastavMa Ltd, Cotoga 


A SPACIOUS & WELL PROPORTIONED PERIOD 
HOUSE attractively situated in sought after Village 2 
Reception Rooms, Kitchen/Breakfast Room, 5 
Bedrooms, 3 Bathrooms. 


CfflCHESTH HAHB888 

- OU Bos/wtl Compact mod 
cottage, bacnac cood. Iff 
Bvtng rm. tat. 2 beds, gge, 
gctris. £ 64450 . 

Apply Shoe -WbM. 


taentouscs.andggitei apartnmte are praatofr smart flirooctotf Tin 
Meadow tashi BOO raesofl the suit courses, around pBaiOTsooe tales or 


Meodovs tab tBOo sens on the golf coa 
wnrcnmg pads and in cod wooded area 
nfame*. -totems - or tottayng 
tempeatoe of 72°. 


Full Oil Fired Central Heating. Lovely mature and 
well timbered 6arden. ABOUT W ACRE. 

Banbury Office 0295 710592 


FARR BEDFORD 


DATCHET, BERKSHIRE. 

BaaujHU Themetote vSaga wBti tram rente to London, access 
to M25, M4 rmd M3 and S mhn drive from Windsor. 
ElSWfflO. Rartejr BralaUB a large luxury tot h a ma^dficant 
house with views of WMsor Castle. Bftsooa HaB. i recaps, 
study, kitchen, 4 beds. baft, balcony with patio. 130ft private 


£186400. 18ft Century house in excetan order touted on the 
popular vfltege gresn. Bnrance Hafl. 2 recaps, targe kitchen, 
ctaak room, u?*(y. 3 beds, 2 baths and shorter room, annexe of 
bed. lounge and kitchen, dbte garage, courtyard garden. 


PHONE SLOUGH (0753) 682828. 


ARKLEY, 


New detoM date bugdow ne stag comptefl u n totoM to a prestige 
RmI. Qha rtpg 4 double bedrooms, 3 recepttans. kttcbea, afflty. 3 
bathrooms (2 on sute) shower room, spadous htfway, go contra! iKstno, 
double gbsng tbrougtout. Large detached doufcta garage, gardens. 


£395,000 F/H. 
01-888 7068 (7 cfc 


THE PERIOD PROPERTY 
REGISTER 

Conages, Cudes, Manors or Mansons. Eacta mouli taudieds 
of historic bomes ftrsatooaiioeWKto 
Buying or sdling contact 

Tbe Historic Baildines Co, 

PO Box ISO, Chobham GU24 8JD 
Td 09905-7983/6128 


SCOTLAND 


KRVHSaKE idyDK wemoed. « 
bedroom nU ho m e by rootm- 
ram stream, restored, a acres. 
20 miles Penh. Offers over 
£40.000. T CL 0230 8428S. 


SOMERSET & AVON 


BATH 


Fine Regency tmm/nuse 
sympathobcally restored to a 
very high standard. Serm rvd 
tocatfon y« 5 mins walk of toff 
Sm (Paddmgim ihr lOmtos). 

Quet posffion witti wans. 
Hafi.magmftert drawing rm, 2 
lunher reception rros. tatchen/ 
btastrm |Aga). 4 bednns. 
batfirm, stwr ira gas CH. 
garden. 2 garaees. 

Sole Agents 
Pritchard & Ptnrs 
13 QroetSt 
Bath BA 1 2 LB 
022566225 



im m 



abftw 8 nfn. MWsrfan 35 
otes. A 3 /H 25 Z mDes 


3 re ce ption, 3J 4 bedrooms. 2 
(jan®es. 3 ir.es., large tartan. 
h acre ganfns. aB in good order, 
finer 

mw 

Tel: 0932 64753 


NR BRISTOL. CMsr MO/M& Uv 
wretwrse character (amity 
houx. overlooking 

Ahwasdshury Green. Huge 
tomm. tt. room, fined ut_ 
nooks, aunty, a dte beds. 2 
baths ri en sut»). playroom 
wtUi cKxaks. GCH.' swunmlng 
Bfto. Vi acre terraced iand- 
«am oom. mawiiflcmi vteiwc. 
£140.000. Tel: {04641 013361. 


iMtatt btie firm SZJJHXl' 
WOTWWaia. 
177 Lortkn ftl 

K &- 

oi«54s 'mm 


LAND FOR SALE 


ENaunuB MBN mtor 

detached auiet catfrot 4/6 
bedraonw. 3 rcceMoia. 2 bats- 
rowa. fired C/R B mloa 
MSS. «asy aceoe Heathrow, 


£109.500. 0784 34636 Wee*- 
end / evening 01 377 6466 
dayttme. 


SWFaUb Near Itnwtch 65 Woi 
IRMOge tw 136ft. LOCUM in 
between hemes of 
character. OPP detached house. 
Cnn 00. TH®»73) B3069S 
MUteT Pm shortly avail In 
Caw Crowd on Secluded. Offers 
tnvtted. TetOl 686 9971 


CYPRUS 


frVpfrili property. Feta UmM 7 
Contact ik now. OP_P. Assoc 
46-Pvlar House. London WiO 
«QD. 


*to TAUNTON mb 8 rnOets. dose 
jo _ ple asant visage. 4 
hearoomed tacitOy nouse wuh 
odtomm 3 htdte w tm i 
niuyaw. douse garage and 
bam In good order set In I acre 
of garden and iwiiimv 
£ 130,000. Td: 04GS-ZS&21 


raOPERTYTOLET 

COUNTRY 


N8 MOOVHL A fwasted pared 
vttage tousa. 2 rac. 4 beds, fine 
Utcten, C.H. liStopcn md rates. 

IMOME. A ftristad penod 
vfece heuse. 2/3 rac, 3/4 beds, 
toum gas GiL £425 pan 
ncJ rates. 


Teh 6ALITZA & CO 
(0872) 20910 


am D'AZUR - VAR - 17 tan 
FRC/U9- Several hooding Ustt 
tangtag Cram LOOO (o&OOOBH 
from 190,000 FF. frnS Mila 
<70 ntri near centre, 1.100 n 1 
land, price : fiOOOOOO FF. 
Wrtle: CABD4CT IMMOB1L1A 
wive ae la Maine. 83600 

BACNWSBvrOHET. Frw* 

T. 9* 40 61 56. 

AALHI baaed St Trope*. looMnG 
alter YHlaa. Caravans, Pnats 
Him sharp etc. seeks aoauionai 
eflenta. Tel: 061-484 8123, 
F8ANCC - AU regkaa - cottage* ■ 
eftaleaier fro re £10000. Fi- 
nance avasaue. aedtin. 
VIHOtta LM 01-48S 2733. 


TUSCANY 


25 miles from Harms. 
LUXURY. 6 farfmometJ 
VW1A. A sec luded 
position, standing in its 
own garden and vineyards 
of approx 25 acres phis 3 
tedromed modem 
farmhouse. Musi be seen. 

Excellent value. 
Offers around £500,000. 

Tel: 0604 34358. 


WreCAHT - Bated. Several gi«p. 
«Uaa ftjB m £15.000. tone: 
tony SI Edmunds <02B6> 


COSTA 

BLANCA 

PROPERTIES 
FROM £10,000 

with IS years exoerience 

CUBITS SALES 
OVERSEAS 

26 YORK STREET 
LONDON W1 
01-935 7970 



COSTA DR SOL 
Fneagtoia. 

For alt. now 3 tadm gwtotot 
toft gara ge taara gt roam- 

AJ» stuSo afrartmontta Las 
Patrans. 4 star tetai- 
crtjm 

Please phone Tony on: 
<021)777 4262 or 
(038677)4141 


TililrMM 


in Spain. New & resale 
properties. Re- 
mortgages. Bidding & 
dev^opnwrrt. Cartel 
raising. LUC (0202) 
670257 & Spain (010 
3452)785654. 


OnteWUMMliMBnag. 
beaa m d o. 8 mu mwm* 
taeoaa. Florida. CBQWO part 
«*f»wemjtaWfc Ytrtanboaa 
909 asTsaoa. 



WO — o u> Sttmcang vaw ma tea 
palace, todng m. Stwttoe ft 2 

nmoL 1 week rabUr to r 
even tOOOO FF ANCCL 84 roe 
SLCbariet, 7801G PariL Ranee 

taaiWLWWBLUataft ln . 

ft Ota mans. AUraatw Ban. 
sleep V 6. From £3400 p.w. 
Reply in BOX B31 . 
riKItUE ton n—i-n Ln 
tetotw.tawv TUaMn 
weto 43/4^1^225 taps 4. 

90i now. ctjboo. 0380 2esa 
M— RVE 2 weeks, current price 
£9000+. anal ftaua nua 
w^ta. Tta 091 zee 0500, 
rtlftim. SIN. Lax UmcMnn 
bunaikMHii 2.W1B ft™ £2.795. 

Bratanre. 0S1-T40 9808. 


COSTA BLANCA Dents visa. 3 
bto. 2b*m. reeep. dwtag rm. 


mad Idt 2 utility. grgL ranf 

22aooo upon* £73j00cn No 
agents. Tel 091 2813061. 


LAND FOR SAIi 



TOW—ftOUWJ* Center. Ctan. 
Wtot * M UK a Btaaa 
tel 19 man airpori. nay 
MftW Pto and eouippeau Oor- 
gtoi £9960- Tel: 0425 7366ft 



SAW IJSSSasurfr 




A lta * — oivu ei ia Aa Fiubria 
pmue saw dvonment in at 
WjWyjftto lf l/flta. TO 0784 
B64axtdayl or ■ 00946' 

7194S.(«v«t ^ 


ten «ea TA«23-ojfio. 


Coatonefr 


BOBCXt— » 




































































ij* \Sp 



THE TIMES WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 26 1986 



l 


Constantine 


LONDON'S LEADING RESIDENTIAL LETTING AGENTS 
offering than personal & professional service 


BARNES SW13 

Stmnfog Manor designed house completely 
raturtShed to wnyfugn stadard. Comprising 
Urge master bedroom with ensue Jacuzzi 
baft 2 battier double bedrooms and aSh 
sfaKtB/snaty, 2nd bathroom, fiMy fitted 
fritaan wn til new appliances. Large tflnkia 
mom. equate arched reception leading onto 
70ft prdoi Co let 

SSflO par 

CHELSEA SW3 

VHk into contort and luxury in this superior 2 
beftoomed 4tb floor apartment. Beauttlutly 
finished. Short walk to nver and gardens. 


EXECUTIVE HOMES TO LET 
IN PRIME LONDON LOCATIONS 

Personal help in selecting from over 500 prestigious 
„ properties. 

Ran^rtgfrom Studios from £150 per week to five bedroom 
Ambassadorial residences up to £3000 per week. 
Booklet - 'Guidance Notes for Tenants' available on r 

StjMww^SjnS? 586 3088 


Hampton & Sons 


batn/dhoMr. Mt. Co let 
£275 pw 

PWUCO SW1 

Ataaaiw TOtfsoiBSie dose to Vfatma & Hyde 
Paric 3 bedrooms. 2 bathrooms (1 ensute). 
bright reeaptai.ff pine kitchen with machines. 
Co let 


SWISS COTTAGE NW3 

Newly decorated modem tmmfiase in an 
enfasne private load- Tastefully furnished 
throughout- 4 bedrooms, 2 ba te wi re, (l en 
suite), shower lags reception. balcony. Qose 
tube and US sctiooL Co let 


COLUNGHAM PLACE SW5 

ftigti ceflngs wH tunrished Is floor Hat n 
period cowws l on. 2 bedrooms, vary lane 
reception, bath with sheer, balcony, ft open 
plan tateften with machines. Co let. 3-12 
months. 

£228 per 

BROMPTON PARK SW6 

A rare o pport u nity to rent a team near flat in 
ttss dutiable development. 2 bedrooms. 2 
bathrooms ft ensutte), reception. American 
style Wchen. prat, tandsopod ga rd ens , 
parking, sauna, pool and gym. Long co let 
1225 pw 


PROPERTIES IN MANY OTHER AREAS ALSO AVAILABLE 


270 Earls Court Rd, SW5. 01-244 7353 


SAVTLLS RENTALS 


.ONSLOW HEWS WEST, SW7 . CHARLES STREET, W1 

Chamfe home with garaging In new Supert> 2 bedroom apartment in purpoee 
cobbtod raewB dsmtapmem. Aocomn- *“** **»*- Accommodation Includes 2 
odaitare- 2/3 bedroom*, 2 b a throoms, double bedrooms, double recaption room, 
targe double reception room, fifty fitted Study/toadraom, 2 bathrooms, Idtetwn. 
tateben. some with txdcontos. Includes. 24 hour porterage and car 

. . pairing for two case. 


Ftam £400 per week £850 per 

A SELECTION FROM OUR REGISTER 


6 Arlington Street London SW1A IRB 


01-493 8222 


PALACE COURT, W2 
Immac3 bed fiat in converted mansion 
Meek. 

2 large recaps, kit, 3 baths, clfcrm. Lift & 
porterage. Laundry & office facilities. 
LONG LET: £750 p.w. 

RUTLAND STREET SW7 

Cttannfag, newly dec family house with 
4/5 beds, 2/3 recaps, 3 baths, utility rm, 
kit&dkrm. Roof Ice. & good security. 
LONG LET: £1,000 p.W. 

FIRST STREET, SW3 
Pretty bouse in quiet street with 4 beds, 
recap, ige kft/dng rm, 2 baths, dkrm & 
patio. LONG LET: £550 p.w. 


SLOANE GARDENS, SW2 
Newly converted maisonette in excell 
location with 3 beds, 2 recaps, 2 baths, 
kit and dknn. 

LONG LET: £850 p.w. 

CRANLEY GARDENS, SW7 

Elegant flat with 2 beds. Ige recap, 

2 baths, kit & good storage space. 

LONG LET: £425 p.w. 

PALACE COURT, W2 
Charming 2 bed Rat in newly converted, 
well ran mansion Mock. Recep. Ige hall, 
2 beds, 2 baths & kit. Laundry & office 
facilities. Lift & porterage. 

LONG LET: £375 p.w. 


139 Sloane St., London SW1 01-730 0822. Tfelex: 897049 


CHESTERTONS 

R K S 1 D K X T i A I. W 




ABHKY ROAD, «8 


BRUCE 


CAMPOEM NOIRE 6TW 
2758 p-w. 

BfcOrt 4 bat fid Mb 3 tofts & 2 
nKBpB. NaMy dec witti taste & 
ayte. Usa rf conn gdra. Htfdy 
recommended, bxc appotbaiis. 

rintaitaii OBto BMP 7244 


HEREFORD ROAD W2 
£588 p.w. 

Largs period adorn bade, iua 
rrtrt. 3 reaps 4 bads. 2 tads, ft 
dm. Kit S/C l bed Rat £150 pa. 
Hattm HI Office 81*221 3591 


ELM PARK ROAD SW1B 

£1500 p-w. 

Fatatous body boon wth gra in 
«tat mMrt M area. Lge neap, 
drag ibl 6 bads, 3 baths. fllS. 
dks. 

Chain* OBbe Bf-fiB 52ft 

wm ROAD, sws 

■ £158 MT. 

Cbmnbg garden fto In ttefaewt of 
Pwsons Gtaen. «dh pretty garien. 
2 dbla bob, reapi nodlf Mt BtfL 
Min once 81-731 3111 


.WMBUSON SW19 
£380 p.w. 

Tirni House dose lo Afl Eegfnd 
Tare® Cfcb. 4 bads. 2 hafts; 3 
«*ps, ago. gdn. Ca Lcl 

wi ta to gfcc mm 9tn 


UTTLE VBRCE W9 
£198 jlw. 

U e bright 1st floor at at 
VWorae amatol. Ofact axon 
to comm gdns monads from 
transport a shops. 2 beds, logs 
mg. wefl equipped tot ton, 
dodo. Exc what. 

(Ml VMk> Oflfct: B1-2n 4832* 


! WARWICK SQUARE SW1 
£175 pjv. 

Exc 1 bed fix wttfi ms mer tee 
square A access to sq. Anri S 
motto. Ca Let. Vary goad vstae 
-Tol Poor « BtAnda. JeeroM at 
many properties ani. 

- Moire Oflcc ItSM SM 

HIGHGATE N6 
£235 p-w. 

Bead new fight & toy bse in en 
order. 4 Ige beds, mod recop. Eat in 
ML Fi. stytisb recap, tofts, 
daks 

MMata Otto BM41 Sttl 


AVAUBIE ROW 

£200 pjL 

ta M B dtao on bed flat dose to 
the vtage atmosphere el. 
■toytafan Mgb Street Usd far, 
an BDB84M. 

URta tab Hhe 8f282 S» 

TOWER BUDGE SE1 

£128 p.«r. 

Ooflghtftfl 3rd floor tbt in brand 
new dswtapmM 5 mha to Qty. 
‘Good modem tontine. 

Docttaads Un BVS38 9SZ1 


aedmomelBOhrorea 


MAYHAR W1 
£500 P-W. 

Exc flat with mod tonishags in Ha 
tout Of Mayfair. 2 dbfa beds. 2 
bafts, (fate recep. F.F. tt. 

Mayfair UHcc 81-628 4513 * 


AsUitaEaO’OfPriidoabalPmpmlyStniKesUcL 


OPENING 
I SOON IN 
BATTERSEA 


IN LONDON 








i 


* sss-^rs 


PEMBERTON & CLARK 


ratoNil RC4’#lIwDlvy ^*)Cl »HJ 

r |h HH'T^reiTiT'T' 1 


HOUSES AHD FLATS THROUGH 
OUT THE DOCKLANDS AREA 

RSSBENTUI. UTTOIS DEPARTMENT 
TEL- 01-01-730 3560 


CHELSEA. Charming gnxrad floor 1-bed flat wkh paw. CO Long Let 

Et7fl pa. 

ONGHTSinDGE - in guden sqan afft keys - 2 beds. 2 bafts + 
tacunJ. reception with string ptonae wntows. Co Long Let £458 pa. 
FUUUUL Nn> 1 bed flat m cnmplex until w a mawg pool, srenaA 
gym. Garage. Excaflent seamy- Co Let £188 pJL 

GOODARD ft SMITH 
01-930 7321 










T i, * > 4 i rir 


»**i»lvre'\*7.1ii 


■ this is what yoa era looking 
\J| I K. ^ fur- we wdl find h tor you! 

rXl<V> Hfc ham a stawh range ol 

f If V properties trom 

V/l I £150 - El 500 pw. 

nrno ui -2251022 m-ww 

Vjl I C IC8BSEA) (WIMBLHXW) 



8 Ms is what yon are looking 
fur - we wdl find it to you! 
Wdhamasupeihrangeaf 
properties tram 
£150- El 500 pw. 


IS Plaza Estates 




::-7;4 3!X) e:-5£'7&!6 


barnard 

marcus 





WEHAVEWUTING 
COMPANY TStANTS 


rihVt 


CemUL/SW LONDON 

Buchanans 

- Lnilng & Management 

05-3517767 


A variety of luxury 1 
borkoom fiats in heart of 
Gownt Garden. 
Hems trom M75 to £250 
pw. Co tots only. 
EA. SHAW 






iMASKELLS 

I ESOTEaCOfTS 

FBSTSTBSTSW3 




01-724 2100 



UCKRELD, SUSSEX 

Quay Hose hi a qoM tocatoi 
with lovely views. Large 
ntanfahed gashes nd e ten«5 
coot: 4 bedrooms, drawing 


motor, breakfast nxm/study. 
iMttais a ta to m i m .3 
hto bow to caOnd taeawg. 
Canhr wS asutonL Gsage 
and adBqsUB ratong fwaSws. 
Avadable Car I year ® SBffi 

’“’"■^SOTrnBGBiui 
cBBiBOBO Ba nMaai aoa. 


PRIORY WALK 
SW1B 

toaiy dec 1M flri. lge map. 
to, ban. into £125 p!w. 
COLUNGHAM PLACE 
SW S 

iftaWBa. Netoy dec sped 
tto.2HBBBS.lK.baa.E350p.it 


, V i -* 3 \ m illi 


727 7957 



barnard 

marcus 


CAmMSTON H08SE. W1. 8dtffl 
•4Bi n Ba* m panned block. 
Recep/rkn rm. 1 due bed ensute 
toft. 1 nrei bed. k & A CHW/CH 
me. £275 pw. Ca’s arty 


81 483 8889 

OBBtGH 'ST, SWt Lovely 
spans nearly dec Use an 3 fls. 
uasto bed/tuMjae toft. 5p 
ncep/audy. On rm. doto im. if 
to- £300 pw Go's only. 
PWUCO 
01 834 7316 


b wm 



BLOMVM 2 nti n at- munac 
nMn.aaemttfte.Cnm' 
JSIraas pw. -ns. ot «4 9779 


LMBOC ream UB-iuraMwd. 
. Hertford Bd. W2. B Baar L Jrvc . 
SW facing awn. AtormeO- 
coo pw tor jcaao pw wm. j 
m mn run to m 727 zno 


Q4UIII DebgtUfal Omrijr 

Qatar wan earuoL Famsoed 






»d sbntar areas. 
. Phone now. 
RRCH & CO 
81-734 7432 


WTO - 2 mlna Oadora St. DengbiTal 

Urge 2 roan balcony Oat. June 
“L UQklna garden watt. 

CH. TOtfam. El 76 pw. TeL-Ot 


vmhjemn muon m«« 

rnmuued and decor a ted flat. 
OH** renptkn. 2 doom bed- 
raapw. 2 Due. uteftep. Cl 70 
PW. TH: (OaSdei 63495 


S.armiMi.l UN. Quiet 3 rxa flat 
Ur 1/ 2. New decor. T.V. Gdn/ 
lauds. Antiques C13dpw. 6S4 
B267/ 998 7220 X-7pu». 


ST JOHNS WOOD Lux A bed. 2 
Oath. 2 reception flat Pi 
pmudoua Mock. CATS pw Tel: 
Ol 460 2739. 


ST HWS Nr st. 1 Bed tux OaL 
New dec. CAT V. £160 pw Co 
let pref. Tel Ol 221 13S9JO. 
SK2- Seif contained In* fur- 
nished l bed rod- C/H. £300 
PCM. (extol. Tel 01 671 1060. 

A— nrerew UM nrgenty ra- 

ouim luxury m/Maw. 

OHM. KnWilBUrldqe. BeSgre- 
vta areas. £200 - £26000 pw. 
Bargees Ertalr AoemsGS I 6136 

rj Q W WI ffT OII tk s a i mi ndUm re- 
ess. wide eonsHaUy Changtna 
reUectlan of fumUhed ruts dr 
houses on nr current UtL 
Bnlum di Reeves 93B 3622. 
•ST 96*1 The Dumber la remem- 
ber When secktag taut rental 
properties In cenmri and prune 
Loudon areas £160/ JSLOOOpw. 



RICtMDHO. 2 reesps. 5 beds. 2 
bafts, tot aU roadanes, dk. pgo. 
£325 p.w. 

RMfiSTM. 2 reaps. 4 bads, 2 
bats, afl machnes. dkrm. gge. 
£325 p-w. 

01-949 2482 


FULHAM Lovely 3 bed garden 
flat, max 5 people. £156 pw. 
Avail, wms Dec. 01-7200656 

FIR HAM: Susan 3. bed OaL 
Beautifully decorated. £200 
pw. Tel: (0342) 715280 

to mrcHOrr for luxury 
properties tn a Johns Wood. 
Regents Park. MafcUi vale. 
Swla Cottage 6 HarapslcM 
01586 7561 

MAYFAIR , Hyde Park due most 
luxurious leng/shon lets 1/6 
beds, best often Ootw Apart 
ments 01 936 6612. 

DOCKLANDS Flats and booses to 
let throughout Qse Docklands 
area. TO *11-790 9660 

basement ftar. I bMreormpaUo! 
dining, reception UBS pur. No 
aura Is. Tel: Ol 408 1019 

ST UMCFS njtCI SWl Luxu- 
ry serviced 2 Bed aaarunenL 
Prime location next W Park. 
D 1-3 73 6306 <T>. 


For roedkim-sized trade publishing 
house in W1 

To establish and run an effective sales and 
marketing department for well-established 
directories and subscriptions to specialised 
journals. 

Would suit experienced person with own 
secretarial sklls who is able to communicate on 
the telephone and fece-torface. He or she would 
also need to be able to motivate a small team 
and rut a simple computer record system. 
Salary £10,000 plus six-monthly bonus. 

Please apply in writing with c.v. to: 

Mafcotm Cook 
Newman Pubfishing 
43 Poland Street 
London W1V 4PP. 


Admin Flair 

£ 10,000 

A super opening in this stylish Chelsea store for 
someone with real organising abilities and a 
good eye fo r defoii. Ybur role is to run the show 
on the admin side — handling moil order soles 
analysis, cataloguing, stock control etc. Good 
skills ( 8 0/50) and rusty German requested. Age: 
25-35. Please call 01-493 44o6 


ADVERTISING CHALLENGE 

£8£00 ueg 

QMB&B. a large international Aduertsmc Agsncy in St 
James's Square are seeking a young interaqent. articulate 
and enthusiastic person to work with the PA to ow joint 
Manapxj Directors. 

Our ideal applicant would have exceKem typing and sound 
admm exp. the ahWy to liaise confidently with both our 
cherts and Agency staff, the resdience to accept pressure 
ai d resp onsibility when necessary and the wiKmgness to 

busy London^ Agency. A sens?" ol ImtoumwmM be a 
deftnate bonus! 

If you have a knowledge or interest m advertising and are 
looking for a challenging second job this could be (he 
opportuiity you are seeking. We have 4 weeks hols, STL 
and SURA schemes and a sub food aid wine bar. For 
further details please telephone Mrs Helen Bnan; 839 3422. 
DMB&B. 2 St James's Square, London W1 


MFR&YWEATHcR ADVERTISING & SELECTION 




********** ft ************** ****** 

| SECRETARY j 

* Theatrical Production Company require * 
£ shonband/typist prepared to work flexible £ 

* hours in small, busy, West End office. * 

i 100/55 skills and WP experience. £ 

* Salary c-£9,000. * 

* Write only lo Aida, Cameron MacKiniosb £ 

* Lid, Ceilidh House, 46 Museum Street, * 

* London WC1A 1LY * 

******************************* 


SHOP FOR A NEW CAREER 

We are staying open untfl 7.30pm TONIGHT. Combine your late 
night shopping in KMGHTS8 FUDGE with exploring new career 
oppomminra - tampsraty amd permanent - jfrth Krigh&bridgs 
Seeretanre. A glass of wins, a professional and caring approach 
to help you And the right Job in the right area at the right salary. 
R. s. V. P. to 01-235 0393, 4 Mm Street, London SWl. 


BRIGHT YOUNG 
SECRETARY 

with first class skills including shorthand required 
Tot 2 Partners in Surveyors practice near Victoria. 
Pleasant personality, smart appearance and good 
speaking voice essential. Age preferred 22-26 
years. 4 weeks holiday and bonus. Salary to 
£9,000 aae. Please forward CV to Pauline Crosby, 
BWS, 9 Tufton Street, London SW1P 3QB. 



NIGHTSBRIDG 

SECRETARIES 



CHESTERTONS 

v -'t-k l: s i. i; n i.r a l - v ~'- 

ur* 









£9-10,000 

West End OO s tetrician/Oynaecoloya seeks bri^a. lard 
working, enthusiastic and vary arte person to manage Ms busy 
practice inducting accounts and aU the secretarial worts. Honesty 
and Megrty essertbaL 

01 935 8273 


BOOKKEEPER/SECRETARY 
C.£1 1,500 

requBEd by small firm of chartered accountants involved hi 
indnnduats' tax and financial aftars. Minimum of ten year's 
experience required. Knowledge of investment aid Trust work 
helpful and must enjoy client mvolvemeni, working to own 
irritative and rumwtg the office. Some audio work. Own office. 

Please send C.V. to: 

Mr. JJL Ntahtiogirl 
I Cg fatiag u l & Associates 
26 Westnnstsr Pntace Gardens 
Loedoa SWfP 1PH 


j, ji I II. i 




required part time for general practice in 
SW7. Specialist interest midwifery, 
gynaecology, some clerical duties, typing an 
advantage. 

Apply; telephone 01-581 3040. 


SECRETARY 

e£12£08 i 

A wen known PereoraBty (| 
wtfi Wttrests m Fashm 
Design and Hoteb as 
wen as busy social Me 
needs a redly sporting 
eHtosnt PA/Sec vritfi 
good skflls. 



PRESTIGIOUS 
INTERIOR DESIGN 
COMPANY IN 
W1 

retpre a 

secretary/receptionrst. 
Shorthand esssrrtial 
and nq)erisnc8 in the 
furnishing trade would 
be useful. Salary is 
negotiable. 

01402 0031/2 


rmwnurn 2 yem' apcnai ce. 
company & cnraroerraL WP. 
krawierita (Wonfalex system 
8000 preferred but mV cross 
tram). Fnerdty Ism. Emanert 
sday. 

Telmhoie: 

ttt-24Z^^ ?19. 

TO AGENCIES 




COUNTRY 

opening Summer 1987 
requires a PA/Secretary to 
the General Manager with 
working knowledge of 
French and German. 

Apply now to 
BOX B33. 


El 0,500 Aged 21-25 
Marketing department of 
international, tong-sstati- 
bshed drinks company in 
SWl urgently needs a 
stykstv up-market Secraary. 
with an affinity for figures, 
who'd enjoy me bustle of 
this lively, friendly office. 
Skills needed 80/60. 
Company util tram on VHP d 
necessary. 

To complete the 
picture, please contact 
Rosentery WhltflsW or 
Lindsay Anderson on 
01-6310822. 
































































THE TIMES WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 26 1986 


EXECUTIVE CREME 


Fast-moving City Environment 

Executive secretary 


In the process of setting up its London operation, 
this newly established securities house requires 
an executive senior secretary to work with the 
Managing Director. The company is largely owned 
by a highly profitable International Bank, which has 
been active in the London market since 1974. 

As tiie senior secretary, you will hold responsibility 
for all administrative and clerical functions, pro- 
viding full secretarial support primarily to the 
Managing Director and to other senior managers 
as appropriate Yon will enjoy a high profile within 
the organisation and have considerable client 
contact 

Aged between 25 and 35, you are educated to at 
least ‘A 1 level standard and have a minimum of 


5 years’ secretarial experience, ideally gained 
within an international f in a n cial institution. A 
thorough administrator, you have accurate typing 
ability, including audio and WP skills, and are able 
to com pile and organise your own correspon- 
dence. Even-tempered with a sense of humour; you 
are trustworthy, well-organised and seek a 
position which will increase in responsibility as the 
Operation grows. 

An excellent salary is part of the highly competi- 
tive package of benefits offered. To apply, please 
write enclosing C.V. to Deborah Hayden of Cripps, 
Sears & Associates Ltd, Personnel Management 
Consultants, International Buildings, 71 Kmgsway, 
London, WC2B GST. Telephone 01-404 S7DL 


Secretary/ 
Personal Assistant 

c£ 15,000 

An exciting opportunity has arisen for a 
top quality Secretary /PA to assist in the 
start-up and development of a new 
company in the Public Relations and 
Communications sector. As the right hand 
person to the Managing Director you will be 
expected to contribute to the long term 
success of the venture. 

The successful candidate is likely to be a 
graduate, aged 27-35, who in addition to 
first class secretarial skills will be a self 
starter who can communicate at all levels 
both in business and socially. Impeccable 
personal presentation, the ability to 
respond under pressure, ambition and a 
real desire to develop personally within a 
growing business are essential. This 
position commands long hours plus some 
overseas travel and is therefore unlikely to 
appeal to anyone with inflexible personal 
commitments. 

Candidates who are able to meet these 
high standards and who are seeking a 
challenging and rewarding career should 
send a full CV in the first instance to 
Sally Morse. The SM Consultancy. 

S 9 Rolvenden Gardens. 

_ _ Bromley BR12TN. 

M 

THE SM CONSULTANCY 


Cripps.Sears 


f Work at the centre of change 

Secretary for Director 

c£1 0,000 


EXECUTIVE 

SECRETARY 

V. Ell^OOlsh 

Kingston-upon-Thames 

Surrey 


— c/r"' The Managing Director of a 
PuMc Company with UK 
Headquarters dose to Kingston 
\ seeks a Personal Assistant with 
fine secretarial skills. He’s an 
entrepreneur, nearing 40, and travels a great 
deal to the Far East and the UnitBd States. 
Candidates should be seif-confident versatile 
and articulate, mature of judgement and, 
ideally, with a good sense of humour. 

Call Maureen Rigby, Office Angels Recruitment 
Consultants on 01-541 0544 


Si 



Secretary / P.A. 

Salary c. £10,000 
+ Excellent Benefits, Age 25 Plus 

required for leading international Executive 
Search Consultants, Working in prestigious 
new offices for the Director of Administration, 
the successful applicant must have accurate 
typing and audio skills, and preferably WP 
experience. The responsibilities are wide 
ranging and the applicant must be flexible. 


writing, enclosing C 


[^personable. Apply in 


Administration Manager 
24 St. James's Square 
London SW1Y 4HZ 
TeL- 01 839 7788 


SECRETARY/PA 

Managing Director of newly formed London 
company requires a Secreiary/PA - Shorthand 
essential - preferably with knowledge of French and 
German and with experience in commerce, 
administration and simple bookeeping. This job 
offers an interesting challenge as it requires working 
on own initiative in helping MD to set up selling 
distribution fora brand new and exciting product in 
each European country. 

Send CV, photo, salary details, telephone number 
to BOX B07. 


Technology battering every aspect of our fives. 

The TechrwaJ Change Centre was created to promde government and Industry with 
impartial, weft-researched advice on this critical and fast-moving field. 

Ttw TCC is expanding and needs a ms hire secretary to support its director and 
assistant diiector. 

As well as first-class secretarial and word processing skills thejofa calls for a high level 
□i confidence and the ability to communicate effectively with research staff and senior 
external visitors. 

Applicants should have experience of organising meetings , running a busy office and 
working independently and underpressure. 

Benefits include five weeks' holkfavt season ticket loan, medical and fife 
insurance and a pension scheme. 
me For an application form please phone 01-370 5770. 




THE TECHNICAL CHANGE CENTRE 

rwCrorowellRoad, London SW74E5 


Hoggets Bowers 

^^^^ExecatioeSeanA and Selection Consonants 

Mwviaioi sbjoc ouhwk CM&tw. uan. uwnOfc »«*iicwBni*. mfoeas. snannfimm4oavsat 

Chairman’s PA/Office Services Head 

West End Marketing Consultancy, 
£13-15,000; Age 35-50 

This marketing consultancy is 8 busy office of 
ID consul taolsAnauagezs who travel worldwide and 
5 secretaries. The business operates to tight deadlines, 
advising and helping laigs numbers of cl ients including 
many major companies. Their chairman has asked us to 
find Him an experienced professional (o be the focus of 
the day-to-day administration. A high ca l i br e secretary 
with really g ood organisational skills is required, able to 
take responsibility with a strong and diplomatic 
personality. The position includes overseeing the other 
secretaries - helping to recruit and train and arranging, 
workloads at peak times. As chairman's PA, you will also 
be a vital tfatr between him and the other managers/ 
consultants you must be able to act an your own 
initiative. There will sometimes be out-of-hours work. 
Word-processing experience is required, on any system. 
Please apply, even if your skills are rusty, as full tra i ni ng 
ran be provided. 


Male or female candidates should submit in c onfiden ce a 
comprehensive c.v. or telephone for a Personal History 
Form to, D. Venables, Hoggett Bowers pic, 1/2 Hsaover 
Street LONDON W1R 9WR 01-734 6853. Ref: 4B017/T. 


ROYAL COLLEGE OF 
OBSTETRICIANS & GYNAECOLOGISTS 

BIRTHRIGHT 

A well-organised and efficient person 
is required to run a wide variety of 
events for the mother & baby research 
charity Birthright 

A heavy workload and constant 
activity mean that calmness under 
pressure, a cheerful disposition and, 
above alt, a methodical approach are 
essential requirements. Excellent 
secretarial skills are vital and an ability 
to get on well with people at all levels 
would be a great asset 

Small friendly office based in Regent's 
Park. Good working conditions. Free 
lunches. Non-smoker. 

Salary from £10,000 

Please telephone Juanita Hughes on 
01-724 7725 for an application form 
and description of job. 


Ambitious? 

£15,000 + Package 

An unusual opportunity has arisen within this 
leading international trank for an exceptional 
young secretary hungry for early success. 
Working at board level, you will be part of a 
small team responsible for the head - — 

of investments, arranging his 
travel, meetings and handling all __ f- "HHI[ 
confidential business maners. 

This is a prestigious posmongjagga 
which needs a hardworking, 17 FI 

com mined person with excellent L LI LJ 
skills and the self-assurance to \ 
cope at the top. \ jT fl 

Age: 21+ Skills: 100/60. U U 



£ 10,000 + 

Do you have fluent 
commercial French 
bolh spoken and 
written? Accurate 
typing and W.P„ 100 
shorthand, a good 
telephone manner? If 
so bring your mature 
attitude, your sense of 
humour and organis- 
ation and your flexib- 
ility to us and set your 
sights on this and 
many other secretarial 
positions at Senior 
Management level in 
all fields! (Rec Cons). 


International 
.Aiu ) Secretaries 

£ lS./.;is-!cr: C«ji.*unjx 

01-4517100 


Micro Support 
Assistant 

Secretarial/Admin exp. essential 

Consumers’ Association. pufatisbem of Which? magazine, are looking far someone tojoin 
tfrair smell lean of speoaiisis responsUe for hefting staff id get ito most out of itak 
microcomputers; the post is (or a irenanum of ora year. 

Reporting to the heed of information Cadre. the successful appficant wd be Sw mam 
team member prowling backup sod training on word processing systems, and wi sbo 
to required to take on an administrative end secretarial role within the (Bara. 

Candidates tor this post must to atfie to detnonsft ate good co mm u n ic a lionsMfe and an 
aptitude tor learning and teaching computer systems. Several years 
secrBtanal/a div i u tea’ Htiv e experance is essent ia l tog et her with excellent lypmg speeds. 
Stating salary in me range ElOOOO-Ci i .500, accoitfing to experience. 

Phrase apply with ■ full CV to: The Personnel Officer, Consumers' Association^ 
14 BocJdngftam Street, London WC2N BOS. 




DO YOU HAVE:- 


tiutow oouatorti mm Cndtadwg SHp 
AMgtf 2 yeas reponmer A Door's 
hwP . 

KhoeMgt «f wad pmasaon? 
Eranreos w a UaMng/ MwtiMg 


An oopog pemrety? 

A good magnum ? 

An dfiooft Md orgsnriM 
A good same at hnow? 


B you cat answer yes to aB the atom questions ta 
nettops tte job at ore West London offices as sacrabnr 





£11,000 

You'll find the new Managing 
Director of Bus KriqhbtaWge 

company an appreciative boss 
who wfl welcoroe your adroit, 
state and wAngoess to tale 
responsMly. As mfl as the 
usual secret aria l duties you 
w® anango meetings, travel 
eic and assist other drectoo. 
Good sho rt h an d and audio, a 
pleasant Uephooe manner 
and ai *A" level education am 
essential. (Bee. Cons.). Can 
nr KuMuhndge branch am 

01-589 4422 

Senior 

Secretaries 


[»!:f 


The One! Executive of a 
vreWmown restaurant chain 
reqores a RA/Secretsy with a 
good ad iHae st idtiw back- 
pound to be a least two 
steps ahead of hoi. You 
should five in North London, 
own a car md tie toe to travel 
in toe ILK. ExcsBem benefits 
indude tfiscoud vouchers on 
toad, think and holidays. 
Skills 100/60. Age 25/40. 
Salary tTUJ^OO. (Rec, Cons.) 

01-499 0092 

Senior 

Secretaries 


II THE SCENT 


Tto young red dynamic 
General Manager of Ms 
dMsionaf ■ lop cosmetics 
tows needs « PA/Sec id 
whom fas cm ilsts^ls and 
■wfao snjoys tong cue stop 
a h e ad in a busy and Manny 
revtonmara. 

IMs vsM jab «a nqulm 
previous senior lev* 
nxpe n anos. toe abMy to 
su pervi se staff. Wsa 
rtunononafly. i eject 
conference tecflUes and 
orpniM hotels and trevaL 
You wa provide a ft* PA 
support and combine tact 
and tiptomaqr to kaep the 
offices nxxmg s m oothly. 

Age 28,06 Sk*» 120/80 

Vest Eatf Office 
01-629 9C8S • 





let BV646 95531 


A professoral » ■ raqread 
lor the Deputy Qmfcwci a 
feflly regwtod red to ady 
Menton* hob b cent- 
pw, to npfxxt him n he 


isfefe 


M Roar. 124 Wtoneie SL WI 

RIGHT AT THE TOP 
c£12£00 + boons 

Ttw pretogtoei at cu in to Qty 



-efts- 



SEVI0R PA 

up to £11,500 

Hdp out ■ sertor Director in tin 
raafty top class nmto bnk 
■tth ho property dtots. Lots of 
pvsoto contact Wti try to avoid 
aymg ’a wry Imotvad ponton' 
Dean toft Mat anyone 
says bDtthB tow N to topro- 
pride, toy good benefits os you 
reuM expert from a bin Ha Has 
end a real career opportunity. 

Please eel 01-434 0030. 


mm 





CE14kfiQB 

The ntMyapported heed 

ofiMl knows 
stocfdMtiera a loofitogkv 
a top PA who ■ towm » 

FiBocfa Id zxsst Mn n hie 

c tia to ngpig «ttto ot 
stoogrereag ne oonprey 
and setong osier staratonts. 

To do Bre you most to 
abb la mi up a ottos 
from scratch red deakng 
wufa tto tap ttomre in 
bretong red stoddxetong 
sfaoukf hokf no tears for 
yno. You aust tie prepared 
to toka on re ewr 
■ca eu g ca^mnsMtoy. 

Agr. 2Sf Sk«K 90/50 

City Offficv 
01-600 0286 

ANGELA MORTTME 


r t* t 


Ecm 


SALES 


mmm 


to eJtlUOO jul 

■tor London based export 
company, entBufiaiy of imior 


0 ; 736 5503 


= RECRUITMENTI 

— t II M r A N \ 


5 GARRICK STREET 


OUTSTANDING 

OPPORTUNITY 

This developing Executive Search and Sdection 
Consultancy is expanding into new areas, and is 
seeking an experienced Consultant in the permanent 


Yo “ J"* 1 “«d to have around three yean experience 
Tv 1 for , a S™* 1 " chaflenee/eanring ability, 
wnh the drive and resoorcefulness to ensure that the 
success of this opportunity is within your reach. 

Call in confidence for more information on 
111 -191 1875 (34 hour answering) 
or write lo Amanda Clithcxow, 

4th Floor. 28 Conduit Street, London W1R 9TA. 





LA CRIME DE LA CREME 






01-483 651B 





IN SEARCH OF GREATNESS 

£10,500 + 

A leading MuMnational Company in WCZ seek a bright kitsHgent 
PA (25-^) tor thek Investment C om pt r oB w . Good audio and WP 
stdlsara required as wed u * kasn same of humour and tha 
atdHy to remton cakn when working under pressure. 5 weeks 
hdktoy. luxurious modem offices and free hxKtas complete the 

CaTsarah Cowan art 01-235 3427 to arrange an Imm e d to ta 

Interview. 

4 Pont Street, London SW1 


1/ NIGHTSBRIDG C 
A SECRETARIES L 


PA’S CAREER MOVE 


This young manag em ent consultant requires an 
exceptional PA "who is not only seeking a 
challengina role, as his right hand, but also would. 


News & Pictures 

£9,500 

A bright, young secretary is required by this 
International News Company to join their 
News Pictures Dept, 'four role will involve 
overseeing the general running of the dept, 
arranging travel, keeping diaries, organising 
meetings etc. where attention to detail is 
essential. Good skills ( 90.- J 50 ) and excellent 
spelling are required. Age: 21+. Please 
telephone 01-409 1232: 

Recruitment CoiMiiUnb re^HtaH 


MARKETING SECRETARY 

c£7300 

Canard Hotels Limited 
(The Ritz, The Stafford) 

required - by leading London Hotel 
Group to work in hectic marketing 
department. Organisational ability, 
general secretarial skills (not shorthand) 
and the ability to work under pressure 
essential. This is an exciting and varied 
position working for both PR and Sales 



£9-10,000 

Wrist End Ob ate tri o an/Gy iM B oo tagi at seeks bright ton! 
writing, enthusiastic and vary abb person to.manage his busy 
practice Inducing accounts and aB too secretarial work. Honesty 
and Integrity sssentoL 

01 935 8273 


A ftS^ofdwrenunent and charmer whose experience 'rill 
«ame them to ffi comfortably into an envnoamem wans 
would rotate k> the caring of readaras and dsssic collecuow 
interna u onaJ]\. ihc supervokm of staff (to brimlf of the 
owner 

Scavunal skills and immune are needed and travelling a 
involved: 

Please send tn together with recent pboteRraph » 
number J58. * 


for detail, an excellent telephone manner and 
presentation is essential coupled with accurate 
audio skills. 

Contact Aim Grover 

01 531 1541 

Price Jamieson & Partners 
Recruitment Consultants 



Apply in writing with foil c.v. to 

Elizabeth Bluck, The Ritz, 
Piccadilly, London WIV 9DG. 


directors 

SECRETARY 

*10,500 phis 
bonuses 

We require a mature 
P®Json to help run 
our busy gallery fai St 
James’s. Non 
smokier of 
immaculate 
appearance, 
sfiorthand. typing 
experience with 
8tectr onic typewriters 
essential. 




AHNQ SECRETARY 
ElOJWWffiG 

Roquirad to iwb ran ofta of 
soto bendy to* firm n WG2. 






























-N 






>«& 


*-V* 

-•£ 


;s 


■*• v« 


— jf 
'. .i 1 .. 


J*. 




'c* 




ok 


fltf* 


ll 


A 



n BRAZTSLEADER 

This major British plc.a household name for many years, 
needs a q uick-thinking Secretary with plenty of initiative to 
onttein-house Marketing Department Working on some 
of their brand leaders as well asnew products, you will help 

to arrange promotional events, liaise with advertising 
agencies and provide secretarial support Skills 8CV50 + " 
audio. Salary £9,000 -£9.500 plus excellent benefits. 
Age2l+. 


Many of the positions we are currently handling for leading 
City organisations are available on a temporary to permanent 
baas.. If you are unsure of exactly what sort of job you are 
looking for this method will help you avoid making a wrong 
decision. With good shorthand or audio skiHs 


plus WP experience, you may find your next 5 ^ CMi ” rs 


career move is only a temporary 
assignment away. 



FOR Iff 
W-3 tCAR OLDS 
UitHCCtir 

01-2567261 


WE’RE always on the lookout 

FOR RISING STARS 
Waterloo 


£10, 500 + pa 


caccy €rsy fiN^je 


NO DESK, NO ROUTINE 

c£ll,000 


No two daw. are ever the same working for our client who, as a 
Director of several companies, needs- an e n e r gy 'secretary 
who ran keep up with the fast pace of his varied b usiness life. 
Travelling around town with him you must constantly be 2 
steps ahead, often having to reschedule his time table en route 
from A to B. The ideal candidate will have the adaptability to 
ch any from a back-up support role on the City-based 
investment man agement side to - attending meetings in 
sumptuous new offices in the West End. Age mid-205, some 
shorthand, good typing and WP. Please ring 588 3535. 



RECRUITMENT CONSULTANTS 


ADMINISTRATIVE & CLERICAL 
PERSONNEL LIMITED 

3S Nuw Crood atroB-., Lonior- EC2M 1I--JH 
Tc: G1-5S3 3S75 33TJ7J Fj. X- 07-636 S37F, 




An Interesting and secure appointment offering 
prospects of increased remuneration ! 


RECEPTIONIST - SECRETARY 


LONDON— PARK LANE ; £8,000^10^00 

MAJOR INTERNATIONAL TRADING COMPANY 

We would fike to meet receptionists, taniitar with the use of word 
processors, aged 2445, with (foise and presence, to manage a wen 
appointed and busy reception area. In. addition to normal reception 
duties the successful applicant also must be prepared to team to 
operate telex and facsimBe machines. The abffity to use rnitiafive and 
flair is important Initial salary negotiable, £8.000-£10,500 + BUPA, 
non contributory pension, free life assurance. Applications in strict 
confidence under reference RS298ftT, to the Managtog Director: 


M— WMt WlACU MCMLP— CWMBUMnL 
g,«iBMBOTgl. in—mM m TnmT fl4M»<rW4»3P». 
1HBMDIH.f«bM-Snn 


SECRETARY 


WBK 


International 


Doe 10 expansion, a vacancy has arisen fora WP Secretary. Yon wifl (with two others) 
provide seomrial/admio support to the Management Team in an esta b lished firm of 
Risk Management Con s ultants. 


Applicants should be aged 22 or over, have excellent secretarial skills and at least two 
years' relevant experience. You should have a confident telephone - manne r and the 
ability to work accurately under pressure.. 


Doties wOl indude typing rcporu^Iettera. ar r angin g mee t in g s and makin g travel 

arrangements. 


Good salary, p r osp ects and working conditions. 

Appli cat io ns shook! be wade in writing, enc l osin g « CV toe 

Mrs I. Jutton, 

WBK International Ltd, 32 Seething Lane, 
LONDON. EC3R 5BA 

No Agencies 


MAKE A CAREER 
IN FINANCE- 
up T0£i6,ooo 

Do you have a real interest in finance and • 

the ambition to move into research? Oir _ 
diene, a firm of Corporate K n arm* 

Specialists, seeks a PA'Secree ar y of *A* Level/ 
Degree calibre who has dm potential to 
undertake research. 

Working as part ofa small, select team, 

your talent for building a rapport with top 

City diene and organisational flairwiD be 

developed to die fufl. Skills of 100/60* Age 

preferred 23r30.Pkase call 01-631 0479. 


Seer Selection aero 

KECantMENT CONS T.TANTS 


tegp^jg tejg^ ted 




dynamic boss. 
coBnmmlcanm skids sr«; 
ssshuI is you tfsai with • 
compaaiBS wrtftata. tBfcto pu J 
own confidante repons so t ■■ 
correspondence using you; 



CHINA CRISIS 

ladepeufani Trarel Company require feta minded person 

wkto Mfcenm skills to help prepsre and prowoie bjotw . 

Ctaa. Nori-«w*er. Knwriefeeof » 

China essential- Mob be stole » take nspops»ffly: sndwo* 
on tinr own. Safety £M»0 + potential profit *are +-posnWe 
trips to duns. 

Please write enclosing CV to: 

Trevor, Globe Past Ltd, 


BH.MG0AL PA 
£11,58*4- 
BENEFITS - 


secretary with 

flssnt ratwen sri WP sp 
reqarad tor Ifte Prtsfeate ot 
sate taanatioral (Moot. Rate 
asm krettxa offices In the Cly. 
Stood tatanshng post teh great 
deal o? efisot contact sinin- 
iuuine and orurresaewte 
l esp aa M Waa. . 

. bvnedote totewew. . 


, 431 051/2853 


Dulcie Simpson 

Appointments Ltd 


■DRAKE 

PfPSONSriEL S 

ITS A BROKETS f 
WORLDS I 

£181000 -i- § 

COMNSStOK , 

Enjoy tte owrteroetrt md & 
tew of a tee ore » & 
tokwSttbidSmnciod 3S 


IIWMDRAKE 

■■ . personnel™ 


ta aw pass (testa* _ 
let • pioicMtoiwi P Are 
fvgntt tm and « tffee* Sd 
fit nave ta**g.fot tte tan 
j^KMtafe jeto asog-ywr «t 
SSk as k a tack-op 

cal JfflHOM 


as M-8M BS88. 

iMOWvttaNwretAubsiAimniw 


CAREER FA 

El 0^00 


To top SH/Sec PA w® 

ZKSSRSfr 



SPORTING 

opportwty 

£10,000 

TMs ipnatot assoosten are 
saotaQ. m. neeftrsty 
groaned. atMe. atom 
pwonttytsasaettaoire^ 

KS,tt3 

■riteesn die West End you w* 
low «db (tares, so go 
m BSod ptaM mi sy is «p-. 
isatOai as s ttd abotv at 
|bar£le to cnftknW tnteidt 
itte rak Eoltad shontand 
land typing dafe area rast tor 
ids p^gne poaflSoi, ‘ 

Cd StlE DAWS 
« 01-734 0911 


total 


rr 


i i mi 


[DRAKE 

PERSONNEL i 


RECRUITMENT CONSULTANT 
£18K Package 


/OT'V C'U • ... ■ ■ .. ■ n .. . .. ... ■ .. ...... 


Streetwise 
SeH-eietivated 
A Wiaeer 
Persuasive 
Goal Orientated 
Motivated by Money 


We have a rare opportunity for an experienced 
Secretary to work for the Managing Director of our 
Corporate Finance Company, part of the 3i Group. Jt our 
pleasant offices close to Waterloo Station. 

Yon should be educated to ‘A’ level standard, bur 
preferably a graduate, and are likely to be aged between 24 
and 30. You should have sound secretarial qualifications and 
experience, including shorthand, together with a willingness 
to cake responsibility and work on your own initiative. Use 
of a word processor will be necessary and training will be 
given if needed. 

The salary is negotiable depending on age, experience 
and qualifications and we offer a large range of benefits: 
including free lunches, non-contributory pension scheme and 
concessionary mortgage facilities. Prospects are first class. 

Interested? Please contact Ann 
Goldie on 01-92S7822. 

Investors in Industry pic. 

91 Waterloo Road. London SE1 8XP. 

(No agencies). 



If you have 80% of these qualities 
then call me to join a Recruitment 
Consultancy ‘with a difference’. 


The creative use of money. 



DESIGN COUNCIL 
AWARDS 

PERSONAL ASSISTANT 


This post offers an enthusiastic secretary the 
opportunity to develop both administrative 
and word processing skills as a member of 
the small team, responsible for the 
organisation of annual awards to publicise 
outstanding British design achievements. 


Sbonhand/typing of 80/50 wpm, a pleasant 
telephone manner and experience of dealing 
with people at a senior level are required. 
Previous word processing or VDU 
experience would be an advantage . although 
full training would be given. 


Thesalary will be up to £8.600 pa, depending 
on qualifications and experience, plus 24!* 
days' holiday, flextime, season ticket loans 
and a non-contributory pension scheme. 


For further details, phone Gillian Webb, 
Personnel Officer, 
on 01-839 8000 ext 4030. 


An equal opportunities 
employer 


THE 


DESIGN 


COUNCIL 


THE DIFFERENCE IS YOU. 

can fmm neasoE u 01-221 5072 


fj 

i DRAKE WI B W AnONAL GROUP 




PROMOTION PA £10,500 

A key position wffii this successful sales promotion agency. 
As assktaft to tte Managing Director jtoH need Mattie, 
social confidence, excsBert abnWslrative and secretarial 
sU h (80/60). An innovator not teraud of taking on 
responsibity. 24+. 


Ss 


WIMBLEDON RECEPTION £9,000 

+ package 

Sanptajous selling Air the perfectly poamed 
aceptionist/tecretay with a ram. welcoming personality 
for this leading America] company. Mid'20's, wei 
educated, 50+ typing. Amazing pate. - 


MATOCETING ~ £11,000 

Tote BMitamentfram research to presentations as S8C. to 
- tire Marketing Director of this dynamic 
A consultancy vsticti predicts futire trends in 
fesfan aid design. Ended secrefenal 
(90/60) and administrative sfcffls. An ideas 
nercan. 



VIRGIN GROUP 
PLC 


PA required for Senior Executive 

Full secretarial duties. Salary negotiable - company perks. 
Please write with full CV and details of current salary to Ref RZ. 


Legal Secretary 

Duties to include audio/shorthand. One years minimum commercial 
experience required. Salary negotiable - company perks. 

Please write with full CV and details of current salary to Ref SM. 

Personnel Department 
Virgin Group PLC 
95-99 Ladbroke Grove 
London, W11 IPG 

P *0 Agencies) 


TEMPORARIES CONTROLLER 

FOR RECRUITMENT CONSULTANCY 


You wfl be working with a small professional group of 
consutotatta 


On the one hand, you I be looking after a team of 


temporaries. On the other hand, meeting ckents, 
spendng time getting to understand their business and 
estaMsMng a professional relationship with them. 

With al this, the abOty to think quickly, yet analytically 
and to make astute “people" decisions is essential. 


You wM need to have recruitment experience. You wtfl 
receive an attractive salary plus bonuses. Then, it's up 
to you. 


If you think you can organise, sal. co mm unicate and i 
on wel with people, then you could become pan of t 
succastul team. 


Cafl ree today, 

Sharon Offlg. 

Alfred Marin Recruitment Consonants, 
62 Brampton Road, London, 8W3 
(Oppotate Harroda) 

1® 01-584 8166 


m 


ALFRED MARKS 


Handle 
Recruitment 

10 New Bond St, London W1 
01-493 1184 JJ 


IWMDRAKE 

PERSONNEL 

HTESUUT19ML 
PROJECTS 

- asm 

ta mpm M for Wentaad 
dm praiKK teen you im tee 
reaemNl nartj camp»ny. 
Liscee ’■iih-'ionr (reersue- 
■toted as yen tan tte 
cantomfs semen atend. 


UMVEKSTY COLLEGE LONDON/ 

THE MIDDLESEX HOSPITAL MEDICAL SCHOOL 


MEDICAL SECRETARY/ 
SENIOR EXECUTIVE OFFICER 


Required to assist in the central co-ordination of 
an international study of cardiovascular disease 
and the contraceptive pill being undertaken by 
the Joint Department of Community Medicine 
and the World Health Organisation. Applicants 
should have a flexible and professional approach 
to work. WP expenence an advantage but 
training will be given if necessary. S/b skills also 
required. Salary on scale: £8432 - £9764 pa inc. 


For further details please telephone DrN. Poufter 
on 01-387 7050 ext: 5719 to whom full CV 
including the names and addresses of two referees 
should be sent a^a.p. to Department of 
Community Medicine, UCL/Tbe Middlesex 
Hospital Medical School, 66-72 Gower Street, 
London WCl. 


DIRECTORS’ SECRETARY 
UP TO £11,000 p.a. 


We are a small private Venture Capital Company and are 
looking for a second secretary to work for 3 busy Directors 
who are frequently away from the office. The work is varied 
and if you woulo like to be part of a small team, enjoy 


dealing with poeple, are aood at organising yourself and 
H/Typlng skills, please write with 


others and have good Si 
full CV to: 


Dorrmgton Corporation Ltd. 
4/5 Grosvenor Place 
7 London SW1X 7HJ 


GOOD HOUSEKEEPING 

The Editor is looking for a cheerful, efficient 

SECRETARY/PA 

to start in the New Year 


of 


general smooth running of the editorial 
department Must have all the usual 
qualifications, good shorthand, etc. Plus a 
sense of humour and willingness to do 
both confidential work and be part of team. 
Please write with full details including 
present salary and availability to: 

Beveriie Flower, Director of Personnel, 
The National Magazine Co. Ltd., 

72 Broadwick Street, 

London, W1V 2BP. 




ARTS TO £10,500 


The Managing Director of one of London's 
leading an galleries (Contemporary) needs a 
quickwitted PA/Seaetaxy. This is a busy job and 
tire successful eanriitfa* wi& be someone who 
enjoys working under pressure and a varied job 
co n ten t. Aged 24-40. Speeds 100/55. 


GOBfiOLB AND DAVIS 

msumaim. 

35 Bratay Place nn. 01-493 7789 



WORD 
PROCESSING 
SUPERVISOR 

—good developmeDr opportunity— 


We are a leading firm of solicitors with new trfnces near 
Quoccry Lsoc, 

We are looking for a confident, experienced person to 


supervise a large WP deparrmenr. Reporting to the 
WP Manager, the supervisor will monitor the quality 
and quantity of wotk output, taking remedial action as 
netxssaKy. 

The successful candidate, aged 25 yean plus, will have 
a minimum of 2 yean proven supervisory experience in 
a Word Processing department plus IBM 5520, IBM 
Displaywrinr Tear Rack A or Dispbywrire II/III 
experience. Legal experience pr e ferred, but not 
essential. 

Desired persona] qualities include high energy levels 
and effective communication skills. Excellent salary 
and benefits. 


Pleau Jfph to tht Penmud Manager, 

AtACFAKLANES . 

10. Nvrwkh Street. 

LcmJtm EC4A IBD. 

01 SM 9222 


College Leaver 

£7,500 


This is a rare opportunity for a good 
college leaver to start out in die 
colourful world of Advertising. This 
position will give you the chance to 
join as a trainee and later plot your 
course through advertising. If you 
have good typing, some shorthand 
and would lie an excellent start to 
tout career please telephone 01-493 
5787. 


GORDONYATES 


Recrofcuwir ConuihaiB 


1MMHDRAKE 

PERSONNEL ~ 

EXEC PA 
ADVERTISING 

_ £18,500 

Tte offices an so Qbmorous 
a s Ua a ttn set! Tteyae one 
0* ite taigest and most dy- 
ibrk ageones m Europe, and 


tta senur rote •* gwe you a 
i a Seotfr : 


: Hub PA hiwun to 

: Duetto You wfl deal with ev 
: en department from Accord 
[ Qseaors to Desijjvss. Yotr x 

of nptateteoa Ml taatem 

nqjernnce and sec state wd 
■ ensue your career at the ap n 
| adnemssiQ. 

Cafl MONIKA 
WIESCHNER 
n 01-621 0495 


MDMa*nrewnMi( 


CITY BIAS 

£13,000 


Pocsedt 


oL jet mi 


BRIGHT YOUNG 
SECRETARY 


with first class skills includixig shorthand required 
for .2 Partners in Surveyors practice near Victoria, 
Peasant personality, smart appearance and good 
speaking voice esseiitiaL Agp preferred 22-26 
years. 4 weeks holiday and bonus. Salary to 
£9,000 aa& Please forward CV to Pauline Crosby, 
BWS, 9 Tufton Street, London SW1P 3QB. 


TRBST SECRETABY 


Secretary required for tire administration of trusts 
and estates. Organisation, numeracy and a capacity 
to write letters is essential. ‘A levels or a degree 
would be preferred. Salary negotiable. Applications in 
writing with CV to: 


D L Biddle, 

1 Bresbaa Street, 
Larina EC2V 7BB 

No Agencies 


YOUNG TEH-UNGUAL PA to £15,000) 

Combine your City Knowledge, excellent skids (100/55) and 


Ranch (Hid hopefully German) as P A/Sec 
it End french finance house. II 


to the Ctwf Executive of ihto West 
you are ambtoous. wen educated end enthusiastic cafl now. 


PA TO THE TITLED £11,500 leg 

The fanrty name b recognised, contacts and efieras are the 
aristocracy and he is Cnsfonan/Managmg tXrector/Secretary of 
irony conpanies and chantaOie toundabons. Aged 30+ with 
100/50 state, aanfer experience and social graces are required. 


COURSE ADMINISTRATION £10,000 

Srererbopponuiity to leave the secretarial ttehM and get totally 
mrolved In a tut Admin, role- Arrange training comas from 

anginei booking throu^i to awarding cerafic 

outgoing personalty aid WP knowledge a 

Can 629 8863. 

HODGE 


oereficatas at me era. An 
must 


nmc to hml wxk. A tenor 
Wfimral » opposed io Pa 
[ poaiioa. ynniH carrying the p ictfi y 
yair npoieacc doerres. Snpob 
moden compln aftn heated peoL 
BwnnaBwn. sumtnwai 3 -couik 
tancLficeofctaije. 2S-3S. 

State KKMiL UasKdocfc 
fbxnuBaea) 0l-«ns 1846 A®. 


Mmmaoa 


iRECRUmWENT 



am 


£13,000 + 
Mortgage Sub. 


Tte janfiag goa woddno for 


tee Bcutafcc MD rt a nator 
GtDdtaotanganvmynqurts a 

accrewy aid) extaflem City 

nsenwa. a bgfi degree d 
confldenlto&y m sonmre vetfi 
uceflwt orgaasaiioit&l amt 

adatao tnttw Sufis fsti/t rteS 

100/70)- overan package ts 
excalleat ueL hcaaias 


OasMteut 8a war. 

4301551/2653 


Duicie Simpson 

Appointments ltd 




[ njEttss 

MS3UH | 

SAEOTMm 

fe SOM [ 

FkHrt JteMB V SfWCrt 1 

MGABEVra 

Rltefl 

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oranownstekna. 


ctaaoMommcM 

turn 

Itadfc ctans, «yay wwy 1 

PR • 

ran 

One rape wm rec stab. 

PWBWWB 


UwHrt iwmq affi 

KBpS. 

WUMN 

***** 

See ita/IBrt 


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Sapn/rtcnUb 



DRAKE 

PERSONNEL 

SPIRITED 
RMRRETIIIG 

£8.580 + PERKS 
Jon tte neratmi was and 
sprt conpMy ■ Bier My 


IVf ULTn JCNGUA] 

iVA SERVICES ^ 


nintang StpartmsnL Eon 
E and 


organising exfiiMnnE 
pnexuns atm ym afi taw ; 
pMy of appo rta tty to bee : 
WB Sens and tamaHtrate: 
yew state ts s tastes red: 
eqmv Van mS otibe yourS 
good S/H and typing steUs % 


no dyoaaK^o^ 


_ >dyoomat_. 

a tfcKnre and Ae exc e ll ent 
Mtiefils of u Kdemua&al 


paeiA price 

«> 01-834 8388 

nuBaensmgrtwnnwai caoue 


GERMANY 

DUESSELDORF 

AREA: 

Trt-ftiouai Seerewy win 

tUtaSH GERMAN, 
FRENCH and ENGLISH - 
someone mature and 


expenanoad. with En ^ t 


short ha nd, who can 
Brttsfi orector set up new 

otfica al ■iwheshad 
sanrice txganiaatjon n 
Germany and Paris. 
Exotaig topporkrty lor 
self-starter wishing to be 
based m Germany. Salary 
roogWy E19.000 pa. 


618363794 , 

Cteas Cam taad. boetaa woe Uj- 


HIBDRAKE 

I PERSONNEL 


TRAVELURG PA 

£10,500 

Enjoy ? weds m Ttricey wtaa j 
you jam this international j 
consfitecy. Run the show as : 
PA/SEC ta a charming; 
American MD. where 


conammialiM state n JZ I 


uteedtotte 


wMii 


and aiangn g nmmod3tan: 
tor oversee taoaors. Yoa ri 
«w ergwng tte office mi 
mrmlmg tnnporan stall. : 
Uerstaay. good tytmg and WPi 
expmact wfi otter you an { 
aaaog tubra. Ad lad - 

cafl mss HILL 
UR 81-834 8388 


ankw—wiaiatete 


PA/ 

SECRETARY 


tbrGniaal Seanary of 
National Chanty providing 
services for disabled people. 

Intcrarrag varied work, 
dealing with range of l^al/ 
insurance/ administration 
maners including servicing 
monthly committee 
meetings and organising 
annual coafenwM. Good 
SH and typing sLtik 
csscntiaL interesira 
compotm/WP desirable. 
Small friendly office in 
SW1. Salary £8.000. 

Contact Simon 
Hardwick 
828-1822. 


use your 
FRENCH 

City Executive needs 
bright young Secretary. 
Excellent French. gzL 
English shorthand, 
preferably some Spanish. 

£ 11,000 + 
£5 LVs ++ 
01 370 5065 


RECRUITMENT 


PA SEC £&500 
PUBLIC AFFAIRS 

Hqlriy carfstfrtBi , 

nwtem Pft a a mod seriw tewL 
Most possess confidence to handle 
VIP m 1 medta enquiries Mh no 
awl dorm PA mualuonert si 
agansng cross reference system 
lor research prelect aid anangsg 
social Bogagatens and si house 
eraenaroq Mus be a ss* stater 
seekng responafidsy and real 
carer aiudveniaa. 

Please phone Sarah 
81-631 1S2& Statfpiu 
Rnc Cots. 



■XJ' 


M *z ~T' 


t::.t 




lie 


ir’s 


ic 


uical eo- 
8,000 he 
ilioGohl 
1 to good 


grsmo- 
donathra 
peal and 
rar,** Mr 
Jlestree, 


who has 
since it 
•aid that 
slack. 
Stic. It is . 


s can be 
a stam- 
pe Ur. 


Of 


r 


rowing, 
and, in 
I than, 
al Ale 


saign's 
wing, 
former 
Guide, 
have 
athing 
Jrdere, 
ilergic 
fferill 
:ers in 
been 
ioamv 

3T to 


^ the- 
uj 40 
ttacks 
xl co- 
x* to 
id. 


e 


»uple 
dy for. 
educ- 


Lane, 
I pre- 
s by 
lulze, 
ro to 
ences 
: Mi- 
intral 


9e 

MS 

ter 


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3h 


1 

I 

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I 


2 






THE TIMES WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 26 1986 


LA CREME DE 



ME 


PA FOR CHIEF EXECUTIVE 
IN ADVERTISING £ 

M ARKETING AGENCY 

Areyoua matura cxire^Tnincted Seaetay/PA curen tty 
woridng In adverting, maike^cysctepn^^ 
working tong hours wider pressure and considering a change or 
environment? If so. read on... 

Weareone of London's top marketing, advertising and sates 
promotion agencies working for an exciting range of household 
name events. Our energetic Chief Bcecufiwe requires a firetetass, 
coreer-minded Sec/P A. minimum age 28. Vfou must h ave ex cel te-ft 
secretarial skiifc, including WP, be able to work meter extreme 
pressure and used to a tong day! Y 3 urrespoTStoiBtieswffl also 
indudeworWng for ourChairman. Lord Chalfcffit. and general 
invotvemenfwith Itie Agency'S management systems. 

This isa senior appointmenfand requiresa person of outstanding 

and proven abffify In refumw© offer on sccfllng working 

environment, substaitid salary and company cac 

ifyoutWnkyoucanmeetlheserequirerTierttspleasesendCVto: 

Ms P Breckon, The Marketing Wangle limited, 

17 Newman Street, London W1P3HD. 


A 



£13,000 

Leyton orientated? You must 
be a car owner - adaptable, 
lively with common sense + 
shorthand and WP sfcBs, for 
midSO's, easy going Financial 
Director of a Veneer Co. fa) 
Leyton, E10. Age &-35. 


CHAIRMAN’S 


>TddW 


£10,000 

Assist the Chairman’s PA with 
board papers, organising con- 
ferences, dealing with visitors 
- in other words, absolute 
discretion in busy pressurised 
job with a major i n ternational 
City Co. SH + WP. 


SECRETARIES PLUS 


STAR 

£11,000 



£ 12,000 


You are mid 20’s+, mature 
and a good organiser. Look 
alter the VP of a major 
American Banking Group who 
uses mainly autfio, some 
shorthand. Mortgage sifesfdy, 
free lunch etc. 


Go-getting senior (but young) 
partner of West End Account- 
ants who specialise In show 
biz/TV arena, who is looking 
for an adaptable but firm PA, 
28+ . Opportunity for involve- 
ment. 110 + shorthand. 


TRWNGLE 

Sole, Promotion. Uotfcating & Actawibmg 


ft IEDLA- FINANCE- ADVERTISING -SALES- PERSONNEL - MEDIA' -FINANCE 


Top Jobs 

c. £ 12,000 


Secretary to Director 


We are seeking a skilled secretary (110/60 wpm) with a 
professional attitude to work for a functional Director at our 
Headquarters. His responsibilities include company pension 
policy worldwide, involvement with acquisitions and disposals 
and he is on the Board of Reed Regional Newspapers. The work 
is, of course, highly confidential and demands the utmost 
discretion. 

His secretary will be expected to take charge of the smooth 
running of his office and handle matters responsibly during his 
frequent travels abroad. We are looking for a secretary used to 
working at senior level; who is disciplined, tidy and enjoys 
working under pressure. Excellent presentation and accuracy are 
vital. An IBM PC is used as a word processor. 

Benefits include 25 days holiday a year, 
subsidised restaurant and season ticket loan. 


Video 

It's as often dm an 
opport un ity to work m video 
production arises, lei done one 
for a graduate vntk a goad 
European language and a flair 
with clients. 

If yon fit the bBl so far and 
would like to have am 
wformadou, please give us a 
nag. 


Cosmetics 

This is the top PA position 

in das prestigious international 
cosmetic house. 

Ike GJL h young, 
dynamic - busy. You are - 
confident, weH-pmemed and 
able to run zhe office and 
su per vis e the staff. A European 
language would be hdgfid. 

Skills: 100/60 


If you are interested, please write enclosing your 
cv. to: Miss Diana Robin, Reed International PLC, 
Reed House, 83 PiccacBBy, London W1A 1EJL 


ARE YOU A BRIGHT SPARK? 

to £12,000 + Exciting Benefits 

if you have a flair for organising and an excellent telephone manner then the dynamic 

Marketing Director of this prestigious mutt-national holding company needs you. 
Based h Wi with your own office, your responsibflffies wit Include travel arrange- 
ments. setting up meetings and lunches with min. typing of gen correspondence, if 
you are £>-30, skins of 80/55 plus Initiative and enthusiasm you couid sparkle in this 
p ositi o n. Please call: 437 6032. 


A revolutionary video technique is gaming ground fast in stores throughout the 
world and the Chief Executive of this young company u rgen tly neecb hdpu He 
wairts a personal assistant with exedtent seo^arial akilla wiio can ccpe with intr 
emotional fianon at die Upbeat level and n prepared to tnveL His standards are 
hi gh A tads, in c l uding one in French, are ««lwl to twtrii tlmm. 

PERSONAL ASSISTANT EXTRAORDINAIRE - £14,000 

Tins a a oaigne opportunity far a angular person. Oar digit a an international 
I nv est me nt fantar with a home-base in Belgravia and he needs you to run it. 
Impeccable office akiBs will be needed to organise the house and the man behind 
it Yourrcsponaibilitiea will stretch from monitoring his overs eas in ve st m en ts to 
cmt ro BiDg indoor and outdoor staff and your literacy and nmneacy will qdy be 
matched by your personality and presentation. 



01-629 9323 


NEW NOTE 

7 £10,500 > 

A leading merchant bank seeks a mu euiy to a very 
charming director with a good sense of humour. 
A busy, varied position wi* a junior lecreuiy io assist 
you. Banking experience not needed. Benefits include 
a free lunch, mortgage subsidy and attractive hours 
930-5.00. 90/50 stalls and WP ability needed. 


WP ability needed. 


GREEN PARK 

£ 10 , 000 + 

A large famous name membership body seeks a 
well org an ised secretary to their chief executive. 
You'll need to have a flair for organising as regular 
meetings have to be set up with lots of liaison with 
members and VIPs. Handle y our own corresp- 
ondence and enjoy a ftill PA rale. 90/60 skills and WP 
ability needed. Phase telephone 01 240 3531. 

* Elizabeth Hunt * 

S. RbaufenentConsuftonls / 

BGfOSvenar Sheet London Wl // 


Hi-Energy 

£11,500 

Superb opening for an Executive PA 
to foe MD of this Energy Consulting 
Company based in kwety offices 
overlooking Green fork. A demand- 
ing but varied role, you will organise 
conferences, complicated itineraries 
& all foe company’s travel arrange- 
ments as well as providing foil PA 
back-up. Excellent dolls ( 1 10/60) and 
senior level experience essential Age 
26-40. Please telephone 01-493 5787. 


GORDONYATES 


Rag ui m w ii i Oa mdunB 


Secretary 


Of Public Concern 

c£ 10,000 

Prestigious UK pic seeJcs secretory to 
Director of Public Affairs. An involving 
’right-hand’ role, handling confidenfiol 
information, the position calls for confi- 
dence, maturity of approach and highly 
developed organising skills. Some senior 
level experience essential. Skills: 90/60. 
Age: 24 +. Please telephone 01-493 4466. 

MERRYWEATHER ADVERTISING 8 SELECTION 


BILINGUAL ADRfllNISTRATOR/PA 

(Eoglisb/Frencb) cXI 2,000 

2 JUNIOR BILINGUAL SECRETARIES 

(Englisb/FreaGfe) C-E7.500 

We seek 3 capable, enthusiastic candidates to join a 
respected, expanding and fitaWy professional 
organisation running couses in Britain lor overseas 
students, mainly from France and USA Excellent 
French and secretarial skills required, French 
naturals may apply. 

For information and job description send detailed CV 
Ik 

The Director 

AagfopHes Academic Ltd 
34 forth 6 uf Road 
London W14 OSH 


BOGKKEEPER/SECffiTARY 

cXlfcOO 

s™* POL accountants involved in 

ols lax amt financial affairs. Minimum of ten year's 
nee muted. Knowledge of investment and Trust work 
and mist enjoy dent mvrtvemem, working to own 
e and naming tie ofhee. Sana audio work. Own office. 

soU C.V. to: 

_MKSL 

28 WiritehrcteT Pataca Bartieos 
Lnrata SW 1 P tl »8 


Admin/PA 

£11,000 + bonus 

An excellent opening for a real ‘self-starter’ to 
join this large Management Consultants. As FA 
to the Senior Consultant of their Executive 
Research Division you will handle highly 
confidential projects and a constant schedule of 
diary/ interview arrangements. Senior level 
experience, an excellent telephone manner, 
poise, style and integrity essential. Skills: 90/60. 
Please telephone 01-409 1232. 

Recruitment Cwn-ubant* 


FOOD FOR THOUGHT 
c£10,500 Mill Hill 

The dynamic new Chief Executive of a fes-merving 
restaurant drain has no-one to organise his day; do 
you fil the bill? Once in the hoi seal you will lave a 
finger in every pie of this well known international 
company. Responsibilities range from board meet- 
ings to supervision of support staff and you should 
have a high degree of efficiency, good presentation 

and skills (100/60) and senior level e xperience. Hard 
work is rewarded by a 330 finish on Friday! Age 25- 
35. Please call 4M 4512. 

Crone Corkill 


RECRUITMENT CONSULTANTS 


Management Information Services 

Our newly fanned Information S ervic es team controls 
computer activities within EMI muse co m pa nie s 
worldwide. 

W e're lo oking for a bright, hig hly comp etent se cr e un r 
so work with our taro armor managers. L rairin g with 
overseas companies on a regular trash, you will also 
assist with the intro duct i o n of modem office 
techno lo gy and training. And, of course, carry ora the 
usual secretarial duties in do d m g shorthand, typing; 
arranging meetin gs and trod. 

With a good standard of education and confident 
secretarial skills yen most have a keen interest in new 
office technology, plenty of initiative and a friendly 
person al ity. . 

We offer a salary of £IL500 - £9,000 pa (ulcJ, 
CTcd km co mp any be nefits and pleasant working 
conditi ons. 

Int erested? To Sad oat more phrase write with fall 
de t ails of your ba ckground and eapa k nee Dx 
Ba r ham K. Rnuran 

Senior Per sonnel Officer mmmmum 

EMI Mane ■ H T I ■ 

20 M a n c hester Square UIUJ 

London WlA 1ES U— —_l 

ATH0NN EM conwy 


£9,000 

AMBITIOUS SECRETARY/PA 

required by large firm of Central London 


successful specialist team. Must have an 
exceient underst andin g of Engfish, be hard 
workfaig, presentable and able to work under 
pressure when required. Age 25-45 years. 

Driving Seance essential. 

Telephone 727 0530 


PA TO CHAIRMAN 

C-£l 2,500 

Young, dynamic Chairman of a fast npawfing g r ou p of 
companies seeks an efficient, experienced and highly 
adaptable Assistant. In addition to excellent secretarial 
skills, she should have the initiative and ability to work 
unsupervised in a small, informal office, and be willing 
to undertake the many different aspects of this 
cbaOeaging position. 

Please call Martyn Rose on 630 8055 
(No Agencies) 


WATTS & PARTNERS 
RECEPTIONIST/TYPIST 




pteasnt tekpham maim. 
Salary ffijOOO. 

Reply to BOX B17 
The lines, m Box 484, 
Vfcflters SL, El 9DD. 


CflRDUnE Kind 

WE ARE STAYING 
LATE TONIGHT.... 

For time o* you who Rnd h hard to get to us In normal boras. 
Wa hands both CRy and Wmt find companies wMcti ranga 
flon advertising and PR to Storittroking and banking. 
WhjjWw you wu a MtyMy qwdHW senior secretary, just 
storting oft or wanting to temp, phase cafl in up to 7pm. 

87 MEW BONO S TR EE T LONDON Wl 

01-4998070 


TILINGIJAI 

rmrfn?n 


ft Age 2S-3S ' Skills: 100/60 | 

1 HAZELL- STATON 1 

i/i — — ... - ■ 

9 RECRUITMENT SPECIALISTS £ 

7 8 Golden Square, London WL fr 

rj Tel: 01-439 602L 5 

MEDIA • FINANCE- ADVERTISING ■ SALES ■ PERSONNEL ■ MEDIA- FINANCE 


DIRECTORS’ SECRETARIES 


TOP JOBS FOR TOP PEOPLE 

VIDEO COMMUNICATIONS - £12,000 


'GERMAN: Marketing and Banking - the ideal 
>mmbinatioa for someone pofished. poised and 
• committed w ho wishes to use that bead and 
offer tint das secretarial support (with English 
shonhaod) to a busy Manager. You wiR need at 
least a yea's experience. Salary and benefits are 
excellent 

FRENCH PA/Seoetary of Engfish mother 
tongue, m find to fane 20 ’s, for muefc- 
recomntended tn-Imgual past with investment 
firm in Mayfear, uvaitobfe owing to promotion, 
plenty of French and lots of scope for active, 
flexible and intriligent person. c£l(L0004U(L500 
phis bonus and be nefit s. 

GERMAN; Bi-tmgoa! PA Secretary, totaBy 
fluent in both languages and with both 
shorthands, for high-level banking role in the 
City. We are looking for someone in their mid 
2CTs to mid 30’s who will provide really effictem 
back-up for a Se nior Vice President. Excellent 
salary and benefits. 

(HS363794 

: Charing Cross Road, London 'WC2H 


Hi-Tecin Putney 

£ 8,000 

TTifS Hi-Tec Company am looking for 
someone with that ’little bit extra* to work 
in their Real Estate Dept. Deeding with 
people and property aO over the world, 
you should have ambition, drive and the 
ability to communicate at all levels. In 
return they offer excellent prospects and 
training facrlrttes. Skills: 80/60. Age: 21+. 
Please telephone 0 1-493 4466. 

MER 8 YWEATHER ADVERTISING* SELECTION 


X PERSONNEL ^ 

/ Searcary/AdminisaariveAgisranr 
- opportunity for development — 

We are a large, well established Ban of soUri r oa 
located near Chancery lane in modem offices. 

A con fi de n t; g y e ri n xed a e c remy is requited roassisr 
a small P ers o nnel depoamear. Sh orthand is noc 
required bur good typing speeds and the ability to 
undertake responsibility’ are essentia]. 

The succcssfid cmdidare wffl he 23 yeag phis, possess 
an 'O level edwa ri on (hsdudmg Maths and Engfish 
grade Q and will have bad a mauaum t£ 12 moods 
experience in pnsomd trade. 

Excellent salary and benefits. 

Phaartppfyla: 

TbePamud Mataffr 

\ MACFARLANES /. 

10 NORWICH STREET AT 

LONDON EC4A1BD AT 
' Ql-831 9222. /Y 


Bom Negotiator? 

£10,000+ car 

Here is a chance n> escape your 
typewriterfor at least some of foe time 
whilst you leap into your company car 
Co visit your clients! A smart Company 
based in SWI needs a wttizzy young 
person with bags of initiative and a 
way with people to become utteriy 
immersed in the challenging world ctf 
property Yon must be totally reliable 
and 100% professional Think you can 
fit die bill? Please telephone 01-493 
5787. 

GORDONYATES 


GO FOR BROKE 
c£ll,500 

Do you enjoy working in a cosmopolitan, fast-moving 
e n v ir onment? If so, this international firm of 
Commodity Brokers based m sup erb Wl offices needs 
you to pravufedl round back-up for the Managing 
Director andSenior Sbipbroker. In addition to 
providing full secretarial support you will be 
responsible for all office administration, as weQ as 
organising and attending an international Mannwi 
conference. Self motivation maturity and discretion 
together with exedtent prese u tati on. ‘A* level 
and skflls oi90/60/Wp esentiaL Age 25+. 

Please call 434 4512. 

Crone Corkill 


RECRUITMENT CONSULTANTS 


Advertising Madness? 

£9,000 + benefits 

TOuld you ifteto Wfc with jpung. 
Eveiy and dunning people? TSouM 
you like a job dial’s nof juss 
secretarial 3 ^R>uld you ffite a real 
dianoe to learn all about advertising? 
... then this is the job for you! If you 
have good typing, would like to run a 
small office and are a real ream 
member then this wp ranking SWI 
Company wfflwefcome bearing about 
yon. For details please telephone 01- 
4935787. 

GORDONYATES 


Be nata raw Coawfara* 


Architects 

£9,000 

This young, irvefy team of Architects based in 
the VAtest End require o bright, easy-going audio 
secretary to join them. This is a busy involving 
position with lots of interesting protects, includ- 
ing the Docklands scheme. Fast typing(SOwpm) 
and at least 1 years previous experience are 
requested. Please telephone 01-493 4466. 

JMERKyWEATHERAOVERTI9NOSSBJCnCM 


MARKETING SECRETARY 

cJE7,5O0 

Ciman 1 Holds limited 
(The Ritz, The Stafford) 

required by leading London Hotel 
Group to work in hectic marketing 
department Organisational ability, 
general secretarial skills (not shorthand) 
and the ability to work under pressure 
essential. This is an exciting mid varied 
position working for both PR and Sales 
Managers. 

Apply in writing with foil c.v. to 

Elizabeth Block, The Rhz, - 
Piccadilly, Loudon W1V 9DG. 


Wink for all seasons. 

• Immediate work 

m Gwipeffive rates and a kfodaij pay 


London 

Professional and personal service 


assignments 
on 01-439060L 


PI 




Secretary /PA 

to Managing Director 

ffi&Rgnl EagSsh-Gerem Secretary for 
Marketing Conpaay (North hmtom) reqdred. 

The ideal applkant mot be 
•k ambiriotxs 

★ reliable 

* de te r mi ned 

★ mature 

+ self motivated 

* must be used 10 wodting on her own initiative. 

The ideal applicant must further be able to deal with 
world-wide inquiries during the absence of the 
director. 

The applicant should farther be used lo dictaphone, 
electronic typewriter, wordprocessor and Idea 
machine; 

If you ate looking for a challenging job, please write 
with CV and references to OMR LTD, P O Box 232, 
London N 6 5 AH. 


Design in Chelsea 

£9,000 

This young, go-ahead Company are looking for 
a smart, lively person to assist their Director 
and his small design team. An extremely busy 
and pressurised position, you will organise 
travel arrangements, hotels, currency etc, 
liaise with clients and generally become 
totally involved in this fast moving environ- 
ment. Good typing (no shorthand )T Age 22+. 
Please telephone 01-409 1232. 


Remiltnieiil Cotwih jnt. 


KNIGHTSBRIDGE 

RECEPTIONIST 

aRSSSLtaiarA' 

^lai^F E8£100 par annum with reviews and bonus : 

Rtog Ratorance MJC/VHR 

01 584 6108 


PART TIME 
VACANCIES 



tnd busmess and technical pttoS. 


































SPORT 


37 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 26 1986 


caoiCiQpes caoto 

GoLLectaBLes 




THE RICHARD HEWLETT GALLERY 
24 CALE STREET, LONDON SW3 3QU 
01-584 8531 




OnrHonKr piste 
Hortn ^JKtBttBsh. 



f* Its— st t" n s tiHt fcoteried! wrt*. Ac 

* 1113 win (one the bads atom C luiiOaea iwamm 


CHRISTMAS EXHIBITION 
4th December - 13th December 1986 




Furniture, lace, jewellery, porcelain, silver, 
books etc. 

Major new stall extension now complete* 

. 13-25 Church Street, 

London NW8 

A few units still available. 

•' Enquiries tel 01-723 6066 




COLLECTORS ITEMS 

framed fended ecfittan reproductio n prtitsfelaied 
and numbered). Various streets inctixfing BrttanfcaL 
Racing cars 1930 - 1986 , world vnr 2 aircraft, TaS 
sti^is. £30 - £ 70 . Ideal Christmas gifts. For free 
brochure caS 0600 890507 or write to The British 
Scene, Mountain Daisy, SymondsYatWest ■ 
Ross-on-Wye. Herefordshire HR 9 63 L 


ISSs 


»■ -r . 

. *i *■ 

■ sy 


MIBKCMI BUYERS SB* 

fotenj art Mod em JtmeSesy, Wattes, S8vor aid Ptte. Fartem. Brocas. 

Wtte. kmwMe aft by mm tar JMtay »d star Articles su hr 
Os aqnrt cm (W n m or d jMKMaiy Mb - 

Opn Mv - Sit ftOO-UO pja- 

»NC 


HVTI 7 HB 

WT 7 UL TtfnM 
(Hn h Nh Tart) 


Jtfi’ 


MTHKE MAPS 
fr — ' 

JOUTHAI POTTS 

One d toe mortis finest 
seteawts ot me, decoatiw «td 
WoBstmo nu Sand lor our 
HkEbUsa aaaffa - Face £2 - 
sating aera te - or w* off 

showroom at 

IS* NOB M Shot WL 
H.OM 81 352 B. 


BUYING 

ANTIQUES? 

Cowrit Man's tagBHdtag 


THE AKTNXJE DEALER 
AND COLLECTORS GUIDE 
Moatriy from yar jmsagom or 

Tel: 01-261 6894 

far a free specknen copy 


roim do 

A GOOD DEAL 
SETTER AT 

/ Ltrlpi 'i 

- QUEE NS BOlUV . 

CTO E BT ST, H ALIFAX 
WESTYOttSHHLKXl«Jt 

T<fc(fcSb 04 B) 4 i<Sr 
OPEN TUHDAY TO 
SATURDAY Kha h> 5m 
18 DEALHB AND CAFE 


AMAGMHCEIT 

VEKT 1 A* 

8 PKCEBBC 0 CC 8 

BmOWSHTE 

RicUy caned pieiced 
a nd p ainte d with scroa 
work & flowers. 
Com p ris i ng wadrobo 
27S cm wide Bomba 
chest; 2 armchairs, 
double bed head, a 
pair of bedside 
cabinets & wafl nferor. 
£7,500 

6909 485328 


2 SETS 
OF UNIQUE 
WATERCOLOURS 

The ceremonies of 
London 

(14 paintings) & 
The Houses Of 
Parliament 
(10 paintings). Mint 
. condition. 
Never shown. 

0444642136 



WILLIAM YOUNG 

ANTIQUES AND FINE ART 
Established 1887 

1 BELMONT STREET, ABERDEEN 
AB1 I JR SCOTLAND 

Telephone (0224) 644757 



CHRIS BEETLES 

iiMyrtn 

ENGLAND'S LARGEST 
OT WATERCOLOURS 

Current exhibition featuring 
“The Illustrators” 
viewing weekends 

10 Ryder Street • St James's • London SW1 
TELtfl-839 7551 



OLD WRJSTWATCHES WANTED 



ROLEX 
PRWCE it 
18ct £1.200 
. 9ct £800 
Saver £500 
Steal £300 


JAEGER 

REVERSO 

1 Set £900 
9ct £500 
Steel £200 



CARTIER 


18ct £1.000 


PATBC 

PHIUPPE 

Moonphasa 

£3.000 

Chronograph 

£1.500 


A8 other Rofex/Qwfity Watches Wanted. 

Outage Campm? 


BY DIRECTION OF THE EXECUTORS 
OF WMJAM E MORTON DECEASED 
IMPORTANT SALE BY AUCTION 

l^CrwcoACb Don laten they wA bemU oaTbeatay 2 Dttonbcr 
19SS. enmuenanjn <pm pmady. Viewing ihcdnyofmfc dam 3pa. 

Brin Mmtea A Co, 32-34 Aithar SL 
Belfast, N Irefand. Td 0232 23*211. 


HIE ANTIQUE 
BRASS BEDSTEAD 
COMPANY LTD 



.. iwoaiiURUcramc 
rauncK strict 

crenoov. oemRBO essex 
INFO/BROCHURE RING 
CH&MSFORD 71137 


KELVEDON^ 
ANTIQUES CENTRE 

13 H ffigh Street, 


DOUGLAS 

ANDERSON 

Recent W&®b Pantings 
25th November - 
12th December 

10am - 4J0pcn 
■ Sate: 10 - 12 mx»- ■ 


OSCAR A PET® 
JOOMM 

27 InrietSM, 
SW1 


let 01-235 6484 


(offAlS bet mm Cbeboriwif 
and Coiehedxr) 


Soo dsriyta a at (WOiUb, j taB. tf - ( 
wr. woriWy, luailm, boss, copper. I 

ton. M Dm ad ray cdtototSu. \ 

Ahns opB Mnatfe. KT- 5 pm 

Td^h^^^^eae 

(eoatn) or 0206 67393 S 



FREE STAMP 
VALUATIONS 

For sale through our auc- 
tion or Private Treaty 
Sales without charge or 
obligation to sdL We are 
prepared to travd to 
borne. Write or 
for flee brochure. 

PLUMRTDGE & CO 

(K»L 1898) 

A Adam Swrt. Stand. 
London, WC 2 N BAA. 

Teh 01-83S 8894/0939 


LONDON 

LTD 

EDITIONS 

BeanMalty bound tine first 
adtftons. Signed by tha Mhour. 
Fowtss, Less mo. Brookner. 
Mniodt. Baraes-lUte. *nt OH 
Dnte \£25 pba £ 1 ^ A p. 


X 


Long Acre. 

rwbs or 


0723 


CASH IN ON 
HIGH PRICES 

etc 

GANCE 

Rear of 24 MtaB Gsdo 
Leodre EC IN BBQ 

01-242 3151 


BASILDON 
CHw Ftehal gf Aa fi r ww 

SUNDAY 7 th DECEMBER 

w fe5T)v«.hiu- cnees «w 

kmd nauoa Essex 
Star® Hr^cas tarmfeostmr. 

asLan 

Hto-Sm 

IWkWtWIWHH 


iSOp.OAPi 25 o 

TlrUiBetfFibb 


swaaicamuESBias 

MTISEfi (CBt) 7MS7T. 

sturaBN)tnaz) 7 i«a 


ALL BOX 
NUMBER 
REPLIES 
SHOULD BE 
ADDRESSED 
TO: 

BOX NO. 

C 'o Tiroes 
Newspapers. 
P.O. Box ASA 
Vtrcmta Street 
. LONDON 
.EL90D , 


Antiqocs & Hue Art 
Adcuoukcs 
Trinity House. 114 
Northenden Road. Sale. 
MaiKhesier M33 3HD 
Tct 061 962 9237 

TWO-DAY ANTOHES 
AUOTOR 

WHJ 380 * raws 4 TH 0 K ISM 

osnSeSi « 7 iSbzmW 

/mw dBoat tea am Acamos 


CHESTER ANTOK 6 
COLLECTORS FMB 

«S! 

SMuideyWb* -. 
27 ft Dsr a mli e r . .- 

lOMft - Stan. m aSaBm.' ; 
mg nnte flo b erteon 
0244 678106 
EXCatSff TXOiCUiS: 


ANTIQUE 

PORCELAIN, 

POTTERY & 

GLASS FAIR 

atflsUoa Cowf 


{opp CWtpn stapemtan 
bridge). 

Friday 50i Decanter 12 
anon to 5pm. S« 6ft * Son 

7 ft December 1 lam - 6pn 

30 exHWomSf itmr BHWn 
«fl Da treeing bi flout 
qudky Ceramics end ores 
bone 1700 - laeaspecw 
g<«s t Henry S andoo. 

Admbafan £l. 
WNuSm Ceramic FUra. 

. ( 0634 ) 723401 . . 


MTlDttUAC rwSmNN 

30 . BXhMTM Had. U*. 

coder HBL Swil-aw m. 

Dicta A/C Fahr 8m Dr 7. 

CMket r«A«B Onta. FH- 

Moi Boad. SW6. 8blk ( 2 » 

£M Ol-STO 1957. • 




I They're tmriri md a fae tav-l 
OBei* A H9* HHchaa fan E3D0 

bam - • • 

Tefi SH 4 yw n fin 
J SHURA RiaSBia HEART | 
|_- Bm W , Battafc Snmy. 

1 50 w e e ks ia ntaU H Larin 
hi Dadteg { 8306)07342 


ruennsmeewtaWta 

e> tarteue dram ta ova- mo 

cMttiartriHBiMlrana 

hw pence to a me end. mom 

MtUtaHclaWn MoAod- 

mirad -liee- at endow or 

amarine UI for an m 

H mM n ffCo. inn H i. 85- 

Cota- 7 VSL ( 09861 ) 310 S 


JEWELLERY TO SHL? 

Leap HUhM bmw icncfln etSb 
to tartan Mcc n tf tend tatSey 
and taiqz* cartage rttastoatt to 
oe Md annaecsma coteaca. 
WMe aria cm fl dcncg tac- 

AnBoar-Wustai LNL, 
43, Arcade. 

Leadofl W1 
Tet 91 493 8937. 


dm pre I 99 i century and 

1 9Ui cenrary raw of fionti AT • 
Tic*. Ore. Ceytov. Australia 

' _ ’ “ -deoixm* Ol 

730 7575, 


1973. test 

adWop. in ndnr w n i M i w Of- 

fers we l come TM*» 876 1SS9 


___ mile. | 
«ian. -2 recHnkte names-. 
1978. 7 Colours. lOfi X 8*. I 
Mint CO tKH Ha n . C1JSO | 
TCUOSOS) 68050 Eveningi 


TW TOW FOr collectors and am - 1 
M. Free coL mahmie of 40 * f 
man £1 lo CIO. HawWn & Co. j 
Hatenrarm. SUIW- Tel. | 
109067) 3105 


limn l an prtvaco eaMgc 
Hob IU- ate TW DBM (Bf 


KtaHnc-Bowtoo. aoe.BfiMgn. 
A> CHt ii wnn fli rei . smneu. 
s« cm. arm. 870 7 i«i. 


HEOCANO - large dtatey model 
of WoTten Seam Ctae- Hat 
rad amen JC 1.900. tmt 3H39 


sw l n q lno cradle, one p anelled . 

£650. Far acute Ideation* 

jane hm. D UannaHin (0909) | 

669302 . 


I WANTED i DAVB ftOCSWV , 

Wtet*. dranNUkm and MMtoa. 
try Prtvate moectar. Tatep t m e: 
Ot 310 SM6. 


cuLTimi a Sooth Sea Pen* 
nwoctei from £ 300 . PMnr 
David Ol 806 6009 


iiaahCTTi ■ can 

Pteam contact W. 1 1 n e rt . 9 fit 

- deters M. KirUcv. Leuiwsn 

MnSSOK. 0602 87750. 


wenon. un amique tables for 
sate. 0468 71826 nyttow. 


and ah sainted fornmar*. Mr 

AdHHk 01 947 8946 . 657 - 669 . 

Gann Lane. Ean*nefcLSwi7 


coMten. Ateo Iron and tiled 

mala, oi 30a son. mytame. 


IBffWNE BOOL Oeradnc am 
a GPO l e tentto u e bOt£$BO 
R rt dl p 639105 evadnev 
ART DCCO A/asdre £ 100 . US 
CiWi pantalc Hannanlmn 
£150. TW: OI 486 3745. 

TOM BHM - dwd oritaML 
afl ac canvac need at a gtn 1 B~ 
XlC, C 2 JQa Ol 30*6468 


RUGBY UNION; SELECTORS GAMBLE AS UNAVAILABILITY CREATES GAPS 

Bath and Wasps make all the 
running in divisional games 


A fine pair of regency rosewood dwarf cabinets 
in the manor of Thomas Hope circa 1810 2ft T 
by 2ft 10" High. 




By David Hands, Rngby Correspondent 


CDidoqgjte may not be fit to play because of mmnps 


Nine outsiders get 
the regional call 


By Ian McLanchlan 


North and Midlands call 
upon nine players who compete 
in the first division outside their 
region for their opening game in 
the McEwan's_ district 
championship Anglo- 

Scois at Richmond. 

The team’s s t ren gth lies 
mainly in the back row ofBryce, 
Ledrie and Henry Edwards. AD 
three are non-stop, workers but 
they wifi need quicker support 
in the loose if the team are to be 

truly effective. 

Behind the scrum the experi- 
ence of Marshall and Brian 
Edwards win he needed in 
defence and attack, although 
Murray, at foil back, proved 
their most potent 
weapon against Japan. 

Edinburgh have made 
changes in their side to play 
Glasgow at Meggatland 
tonight. Doug Wyllie, the 
Stewart’s- Melville stand-off 
hat£ and Scott Hastings, the 
young Waisonians centre, have 
withdrawn with foot and knee 
ligament injuries respectively. 
Paton (Edinburgh Academicals) 
and Kennedy (Watsomans) re- 
place them. 

Stuart Johnston, * the 
Waisonians scrum haW, and hfc 
understudy, Julian Scott,, of 
Slewart's-MdviUe, have with- 
drawn also and are replaced by 
Hall (Bonwghmuir) and Mac- 
Donald (Musselburgh). 

Glasgow have lost Duncan, 
the Scotland winger, with a knee 
injury, Munro switches flanks to 
allow Manning, his Ayr team 
colleague, to fill the left-wing 
position. 

The Scottish international 
refereeing panel will remain 


unchanged next season, B 
Anderson (Currie), J Fleming 
(Boroughmurr) and R Megson 
(Edinburgh Wanderers) having 
been reselected. 

Fleming will take charge of 
the England-France match at 
Twickenham and Megson will 
officiate in Cardiff when Eng- 
■ land are the visitors. All three 
panel members have been asked 
to indicate their availability for 
the World Cup in Australia and 
New Zealand. 

Two of Scotland’s inter- 
nationals, one away to France 
and one at home Wales, 
wifi be refereed by a New 
Zealander, whose name has yet 
to be announced. He will travel 
to Scotland from Paris and in 
his two weeks here he will be in 
charge of a district under-21 
mjifh ) a schools match a 
McE wan’s National League 
game before officiating at 
MunayfiekL 

Gordon Anderson has retired 
as a first division panel referee 
as he now worts in London. His 
place has been filled by J 
Johnston, of the Gala YM Club. 

The South of Scotland fixture 
with New Zealand Barbarians at 
Nethendale has been rearranged 
from Saturday, March 28 to 
Sunday, March 29. 

NORTH AND WDLANDS: H K Many 
nxmmnlna); M Ctaei (D u n teu nfine). a 
Ednrite (Borougltmuia R D K GMiam 
(H^btendk CJ Macartney (Baroughrarir); 
h J HnM (Heitors FP). if Stem 
nkntannfnefc P Hocfchert pfightonO, 5 
W»fe tBorouQJwraw). J L SccfcUe jSas- 
gew Academicals). C A Gtobntti 
fBornuohrmjir). I T RMktofHowe of Rto), 
SO Bryce (HarioTS FPL 0 Lecide 
(BSrtJw* Aca demia^ J Efee 


Two dubs dominate the 
first two divisional teams to 
be announced for the Thom 
EMI.chamjnonship which be- 
gins on December 6: Bath fill 
13 places in the South-West 
side to play the North at 
Blondellsands and Wasps 
offer 12 men to the London 
side which will meet the 
divisional champions, the 
Midlands, at the Wasps 
ground. 

It is not surprising. Bath 
have confirmed their standing 
as England’s premier dub this 
season while Wasps, alongside 
Leicester, Nottingham and 
Harlequins, are in the pack 
yapping at their heels. Even so 
there are gambles in both 
divisional teams, largely be- 
cause of iqjtuy coupled with 
unavailability. 

The South-West, so dis- 
appointing in last season's 
championship, have asked 
David Egeston to play No. 8 
though he has played so tittle 
this season his form is com- 
pletely unknown. But with 
Paul Simpson included in the 
North's squad and Mike 
Teague making himself un- 
available, their options were 
limited unless they chose to 
play John HaD at No. 8 (as 
England did when they took a 
B team to Italy in May). 

That possibility was dis- 
cussed but Egerton, aged 25, 
who has been plagued by back 
trouble most of this year, was 
given the place after three 
second-team appearances for 
Bath and a haid-woriring eve- 
ning when the squad gathered 
for preparation last week. 

Otherwise selection for the . 
South-West was compar- 
atively straightforward; Mar- 
tin, who has played well this 
season, is preferred to the 
coltish but very promising 
Webb at fall back and Mogg, 
the old campaigner who ap- 
pears at much at centre for 
Gloucester these days as he 
does on the wing, plays out- 
side Knibbs. 

Injuries have helped dictate 
London’s selection, which will 
be M pminwi by Pin- 

negar. He led the London side 
which beat Paris at the end of 
last season and takes over 


from David Cooke, who did 
not wish to be considered for 
divisional rugby. The Harle- 
quins flanker acknowledges 

that - he has no part in 

En gland ’s t«im HnilHing and 

prefers, therefore, to con- 
centrate on dub rugby. Mau- 
rice Colclough has also led the 
divisional side but be has 
apparently contracted mumps 
from his baby daughter and 
may not be fit to play; it is 
hoped a decision can be made 
tomorrow whether he will 
have recovered or whether 
John Howe (Saracens) will be 
called in- 

Steve Bates returns at scrum 
half after one first-team 
appearance, though the Lon- 
don selectors must have been 
tempted to pair Simon Smith 
with his club partner, John 
Cullen. The other Simon 
Smith, the Wasps wing, has 
been asked to play on the left 
rather than the more familiar 
right, leaving room for Mark 
Bailey, which smacks of a 
heavy hint from the national 
selectors that they would pre- 
fer Bailey to have all the 
experience possible on that 
wing. 

Stringer, who returns to 
Wasps’ senior side against 
Gosforth this Saturday after a 
spell in the seconds foliowiira 
a neck injury, is chosen at full 
back in the absence through 
injury of Marcus Rose (Harle- 
quins). Moss, as be did fast 
season, plays blind-side 
flanker because Skinner is 
recovering from a knee opera- 
tion and Jackson, last season’s 
divisional No. 8, has not 
recovered from an ankl e in- 
jury, which leaves room for 
Mark Rose. 

SOUTH-WEST DIVISION (v Nortn) (Bath 
unless stateft C M art in. A SMI, S 
KBfetey, R Knfeba (Bristol), R Mon 
(Gloucester); S Bnm, R Hit G Chflcott 
0 Ohm, R Lae. J Han, JMontoon, M 
Radmaa, A RoWneoa, □ Egerton. 
Replacements J Webb (Bristol). ABuzza 
(Loughborough unhenrty a 
RHarOnfl (Bristol), P.lonea| 

A taail 



unless stated): N Stringer; M BnBoy. R I 
Lozawski. J Salmon (Harlequins), S T 
Snath; s H Sritift (Richmond). S Bates; P 
RandBAASitaaana.JPtataB.ICMosB.e | 
Manag er . M CWrtnatfi (Swansea), H 
Kgr, M Roam Raptaceraams: R Prttoar, 
M RatcharjHariaquins), , J CuBen (Rteb- 

(Hartoquinsj, L Aifonsoa (Saracons). 


Non-capping ceremony 


By David Hands 


Davies the Sole deputy 


David Sole4fce Scottish ! 
head prep, has aot recovered 
fnua a shoulder iqjary la date to 
play for Bath in thdr John 
Smith's Merit Table A game 
against Gloucester at tire 
Reovation Ground this e v enin g. 
Sole did the ten» e last Thurs- 
day and will doubtless hope to be 
able to play on Saturday for tire 
Anglo-Scota in the inter-district 
championship* (David Hands 
writes). 

His Bath place goes to lan 
Davies, who had a sped with 
Gosforth before retm-ning sooth. 
Palmer, Trevaskis and Sagoe 
are all also suffering hqmies, so 


Gmcoc t and Bl ac kett play in tire 
threeRuartera against a Glouces- 
ter side who c o ntinne to field 
Gnest, toe former St Mary’s 
Hospital lock, and Etheridge in 
toe s e cond raw in toe a b s ence, 
thrash injary, of Brain and 
Sail 


Hannaford, the England 
squad sernm-hah^ is among the 
Gloucester replacements after 
recovering from knee and Mtk 
ovaries sustained in Sep- 
tember Jle played for his local 
junior dab. Old Cryp tints, at 
toe weekend, and came through 
anseathed. 


Four internationals have 
withdrawn from M R Stede- 
Bodgcr’s XV, who play the 
annual fixture with Cambridge 
University at Grange Road 
today. Two Wasps, both former 
denirens of Cambridge. Rob 
Andrew and Kevin Simms, 
have leg injuries; Stuart Wilson, 
once of Wellington and now of 
Harlequins, has a broken finger; 
and Jeremy Campbell- 
Lamerton, the London Scot, has 
a bruised shoulder. 

Their replacements evoke 
considerable interest. It is a 
point of policy by Mickey 
Steele-Bodger not to over-face 
the students. Thus today's mid- 
field trio are all uncapped if by 
no means short of promise: Guy 
Leleu (London Welsh) partners 
Charlie Smith (Harlequins) at 
centre and Tony Clement 
(Swansea) plays at stand-off 
half 

Clement was a Welsh youth 
cap fast season and has played 
regularly in a successful Swan- 
sea side this season, either at 
stand-off or centre. Smith is 
unlucky to miss divisional selec- 
tion and Ldeu has become a 
dependable and frequently 
exciting member of the Buies’ 

back division. 

The vacancy in the second 


ten an uaoHKJ). m amaaj 

d England). G Loteo rumdon 
Sarin (Hailaquins). a Surift 
j EnaiBiid): A annul (Swan- 


row goes to John Orwin, capped 
seven times by England in 1985. 

wnsiPHri amiCHB mi minim 
l^ndcmjlrisii and Jretend); M Bafloy 

(Wasps and I 

saa), R Gfes (Aberwon and Wales); V 
Oboga (Moseley), W Jamas (AOeravon 
and Wales). J Probyn (Wasp* P Cook 
. J Onto (Bedford and 
A rapky (Hoouyn Park end 
D Cook* (Harlequins and Eng- 
. M Gftsan (London Irish and 
Ireland). 

• Ulster make two changes 
from the side that defeated 
Leinster on Saturday for 
tonight's match against the Fiji 
Barbarians at Ravenhifi, Belfast 
(George, Ace writes). Cotin Wil- 
kinson is at full back for Philip 
Rainey and John Rogers takes 
over at lock for Colin Morrison. 

Rainey has an injured back 
and Morrison's shoulder is giv- 
ing him trouble. 

ULSTER: C UHcfnson (Malone); T 
Rlnglaad (Ballymena). D Irwin 
(instortans). W Hartrinson (Malone). K 
(Instomansk I Bmwn (Malone). R 
ftymena); P inter (BaflymenuM 
l).J McCoy (BangoO.W 
Dim can (Malone), W Anderson 
(Dungannon). J Roger* (Bangor), N Carr 
(Arts), P Matthew* fWandarere). 

FIJI BARBARIANS: STlsoca: I Rarassa, K 
Safusalu. V Ration!. P Fong; J Edwards. B 
Late T VoatvoiA M Taga, S Matavesl. I 
Tawste, I Satta. I Natoto. B Harvey. M 
Olsen. 

Rafenw: R BeamWr (Utostaq. 


AMERICAN FOOTBALL ~ 

Marino throws spanner 
in the Jets’ works 

By Robert KHey 


It did not lake a pair of flash 
cops in pastel suits to realize 
that the New York Jets were 
caught in a Miami vise on 
Monday night: Dan Marino was 
throwing passes like nobody’s 
buaness and his team-mates on 
defense were stifling New 
York’s assault with uncha- 
racteristic aplomb 

As a result, the Dolphins 
stunned the Jets 45-3 to hah 
New York’s run of nine consec- 
utive wins. The Jets, who 
entered the game with the best 
record in the National Football 
League, fell to 10-2, one victory 
ahead of New England in the 
AFC East. 

Marino completed 29 of 36 
passes for 288 yards, including 
four touchdown tosses (one, 22, 
one and 21 yards). He has 
thrown 31 touchdown passes 
this season, the most in the 

li*agTT«»- 

The Dolphins, who started 
with the NFL’s second worst 
naming attack, gained 189 yards 
against the league’s top-raxed 
defense against the run. Three of 
the Jets' four regular defensive 
linemen did not play because of 
injury. Hampton, of the Dol- 


phins, who gained 148 yards, 
scored on a 54-yard sprint and 
added two one-yard plunges in 
the first hal£ The win was 
Miami’s first against a team who 
had won more games Hum they 
had lost 

“We did a lot of things righ t,” 
Marino said. “We held onto the 
ball and kept h away from their 
offense. When they did get the 
ball the defense dm a good job 
and took it away.” 

Reveiz, the Miami kicker, 
contributed nine points with six 
conversions and a field goaL 
• Mike Ditka, the coads ol the 
Chicago Bears, said that it was 
“very unlikely” that McMahon, 
the quarterback, would be able 
to play again this season because 
of the seriousness of a nagging 
shoulder injury. A late hit 
byMartin. the Green Bay nose 
tackle, on Sunday aggravated 
McMahon’s injury. 

Ditka said that Tomczak 
would be McMahon's immedi- 
ate replacement and that Untie, 
the winner of the 1 984 Heisman 
Trophy as the leading college 
plays, would be given a more 
prominent role m the club's 
effort to retain the Super Bowl 
title. 


MODERN PENTATHLON 

World appeal to clean 
up drug-taking act 

By Michael Coleman 


After the most dramatic drugs 
clean-oat in sporting history an 
appeal has been issued to aO 
competitors, trainers and team 
managers in modern pentathlon 
to rescue thdr sport from in- 
eradicable odium. 

“The future depends on your 
efforts to keep our sport free 
from drugs,” Sven Thofelt, the 
president of the ruling Union 
International Pentathlon 
Moderne et Biathlon, declared 
ina message to all members the 
day after 15 leading compet- 
itors, including Anatoliy 
Starostin, the world champion, 
was banned from competition 
for 30 months. 

Shaken by die extent to which 
dnig-raldngj bad been allowed to 
run riot. Thofelt, an Olympic 
champion in 1 924 and the grand 
old man of the sport, said in 
Stockholm: “I charge everyone 
in the postion of competitor, 
coach or leader in our sport to 
help us in the UIPMB to stop 
drug abuse.” 

The suspension imposed on 
the 15 culprits shows that the 
UIPMB means business and, 
relative to quality of competitor, 
exceeds in its severity the 
s usp e nsions given to 16 athletes 


after the Pan-American Games 
of 1983. 

Vdizar Uiev, of Bulgaria, the 
world junior champion, and 
Svetlana Yakovleva, the 
women's world champion of 
1984, were among those 
banned. It is unlikely that any of 
them will return to competition 
since the sport depends on 
honing each discipline in the 
company of the best. 

None of the accused took the 
opportunity to appear in Stock- 
holm at the “trial” conducted on 
Monday. 

Why so many competitors 
chose to gamble on beating the 
drug controls at the world 
championships in Italy invites 
speculation. A British sugges- 
tion is that many of the culprits 
had been misled after the 100 
per cent drugs control imposed 
at the Birmingham contest in 
June. 

All were checked there and 
the samples taken to Chelsea 
College which, because of the 
pressure of work being done for 
the Commonwealth Games, was 
unable io report its findings 
until late autumn. 


TODAY’S FIXTURES 


7.30 unless sated 

FOOTBALL 
UEFA Cup 
Third round, first teg 

Dundee Utd v Hajduk Spfit 
Ghent v G&sbofg (7J) 


Dufcla 

Spartak 

( 4 . 0 ) 


V Vitora Gujmaraes ( 7 . 0 ) 

v inter hBai (4.0) 

vSwarovskr Tyrol 


Bayer Uerdfagenv Barcelona (7.0). 

Tomo v Beverwi^ ; 

Rangers v Borussia 


FA Cup 
.Fust round 

Bristol Rotters v Brantford (7.4S). 


Litt few oo ds Cup 
Fourth round 

Cambridge v Tottenham ( 7 . 45 ) 

Fourth rotmd replay 
Liverpool v Coventry 

freight rover TRQPffft PmSotamy 

ratal: Enter CHy v Bristol Oly. 

FUL L MEW ere CUP: Ifcfcd mac 
Moncheaar C»ty v Wattonl. 

FWEFARE SCOTTISH LEAGUE: Piwsiar 
a utotot e Abwdawi v Cette. 

SOtTTHHW LEAGUE; MMaori dtofec 

tJKfftnr IMM I V Rushdan; Sutton 

Coldfield v Coventry Sporting.- 

SKH,W sa “ 

YAIKHMJ. 0PEL-LEAG11E: Second dF 

vfafen matte Ctwahan v Hemet 

Hmpstead. 


SUSSEX SEMOR CUP: Second ran* 

Horsham v Raace ha wn and Tetacombe: 

So uBHMCfcv Crawtov. 

GEOFFREY MteES MEMORIAL TROPHY: 
Hertfordshire FA v Nortok FA. 
REPRESENTATIVE MATCH: AFA XI v 

Royal Nmr (at West Wtttem. 2 . 1 & 

SQuflwm CTymptan Le ague v OantoMfl* 

- - ATlON^Sjdofd v 

Luton. iw*ini«it 

CAPCTaTlEAGUE: GBngham v Dag- 
enham, 

BtaUHNG SCENE EASTERN LEAGUE: 
Bury Town v Sudbury; Chatters v Histon; 
Stnmnkei v Cattwster reserves. 

WESSEX LEAGUE: Steywiq v ~ 


RUGBY UNION 

TOUR MATCH: Ulster v F$ Barbarians (at 
B elfast 

DISTRICT MATCH: Glasgow v Edinburgh 
tet Meggatland. 7SA 

CLUB MATCHES: Glamorgan Waraferers 
v South Glameroan Institute ( 5 M 5 ); Liana* 
Keys (fj&k f" 



Cam- 


COUNTIES 

FFAflllFr BoumenxxXn v Cartfifl (2J0); 

Shnswa b ay v Torquay ( 21 % Swansea v 

GREAlHUS LEH6UE: Prnri w * 
vtoani MWQOtaSnld » DeitUsh 


v Cross . . .. 

TATtVE 

bridge v M R 

RAFSWka Command v 
mand ( 2 . 16 ). 


OTHER SPORT 

ICE SKATING: Tuborg Bntah Sanor 
noire Chanutonshtos (« S0H11B). 
SNOOKER Taman® UK Opto Tour- 

nament. final stages tet Gteid HtiL 
Preston). 

SQUASH RACKETS: Inter-City N ato n *l 
Chanjpion 3 tep 6 (ar Tempto fiflaaas, Bns- 
m RAF O te mptanaMp a (a RAF 
Uxbridge). 


3_ 

lie 

t ; 

ir’s 

ic’ 


okal en- 
8,006 be 
>tio Gold 
/to good 

gnuno- 

donation 
peal and 
ar,” Mr 
ilestree, . 

who has 
since it 

jqijl that 
is lock. 
Stic. It is . 

s can be 
a stam- 
pe to: 



Of 

is 

r 

■rowing, 
and, in 
I them, 
ai Ale 

aaign's 
wing, 
ronner 
Guide,' 
have, 
athing 
irders, 
iletgic 
fierill 
*Tsin 
been 
rbamv 
Jr 10 

toe- 
in 40 
Hacks 
xl co- 
ir to 
kL 


e 


»uple 
Uy for 
■aiuc- 

Lane, 
I pro* 
s b>' 
ittlze, 
re to 
cnees 
: Mi- 
:ntrai 




ge 

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] 
gh 
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1 

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SPORT 




THE TIMES WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 26 1986 


RACING 




Bundle Boy can excel 
again in Arkle colours 


Anne. Duchess of 
Westminster's yellow and 
black racing colours, which 
were made famous by the 
immortal Arkle and carried to 
victory in the 1985 Grand 
National by last Suspect, are 
likely to be seen in the 
winners' enclosure again at 
Ludlow today after the Court 
of Hill Amateur Riders’ 
Handicap Chase. 

They will be worn by the 
immensely experienced rider 
Tim Thomson Jones and car- 
ried by Bundle Boy who. like 
so many of the Duchess’s good 
jumpers, spent his formative 
years in Ireland. 

It was there that he won at 
Gowran Park last season when 
trained bv Edward O’Grady. 
Now he is'at Letcombe Bassett 
in the care of Tim Forster who 
helped mastermind Last 
Suspect's victory at .Ain tree. 

Running for the first time 
for his new trainer at 
Towcester a fortnight ago. 
Bundle Boy did well until he 
began to tire after jumping the 
second-last fence. At the end 
he was beaten ten lengths by 
the race-fit Golden Minstrel to 
whom he was trying to con- 
cede 131b. 


By Mandarin (Michael Phillips) 

Thau 1 suggesu was a pretty that decisive win at Chepstow 


fair performance for one who 
was arguably in need of a race 
as Golden Minstrel was as 
hard as nails having won his 
previous race at Huntingdon 
comfortably. 

In the circumstances, I rale 
Bundle Boy a good bet to give 
weight and a beating to his len 
rivals this afternoon, beaded 
bv two who have won on the 
course before. Sointulla Boy 
and Takeafenee. 

Like Bundle Boy, Sointulla 
Boy will also be ftuer for his 
first race of the season at 
Wolverhampton where he was 
beaten a dozen lengths by 
Final Gear. 

Takeafenee has won a simi- 
lar race at Ludlow already this 
season when he was also 
ridden by Marcus Arxnytage. 
But he was getting a stone 
from the runner-up J-J Henry 
that day. I reckon that Bundle 
Boy should be capable of 
beating him on these terms 
and he is my nap. 

His stable companion Echo 
Sounder also has a good 
chance of winning the 
Ludford Handicap Chase at 
his best, and by best 1 mean 


first time oat 

However, he gave a dis- 
appointing performance sub- 
sequently' at Leicester nine 
davs ago when he was beaten 
seven lengths by Numerate. 

So in this instance I prefer 
Socks Do wne who ran weQ at 
Windsor on hi$ seasonal debut 
to finish within three lengths 
ofGeata an Uisce. My selec- 
tion, who is an habitual front 
runner, will be much better 
suited bv the shorter distance 
of today's race. 

The best bet at Plumpton 
should be Castle Talbot to win 
the Astaire Stockbroker 
Novices' Chase. 

The tight South Sussex 
track has never been easy for 
seasoned chasers let alone 
beginners. So all credit to 
Castle Talbot who has won 
twice there already besides 
running so well on his last 
start against the useful Mid- 
night Madness. 

Mister Donut and 
Doubleugain. second and 
third, respectively, behind 
Rogairio at Windsor last time, 
meet again in the Peter 
Cazalet Memorial Challenge 
Trophy on the same terms. 



Dickinson remains 
tight lipped 
over his future 

ByMfcfaaeSSedy 

Mirhsrtracktoo ospeggs- m***5S^ ia * ma * 




Floyd (above) is 13-2 favourite with the sponsors for Saturday’s Mecca Bookmakers Haaffi- 
cap Hurdle at Sand own. Other prices: 7 Jurat Light , 8 BaDydnrow, 11 Chiysaor 


PLUMPTON 


Selections 

Bv Mandarin 


1.00 Beechwood Cottage, 
1 .30 Castle Talbot. 

2.00 Mister Donut. 


2.30 Debbies Prince. 
3.00 Maitrcdee. 

3.30 Golden Croft. 


By Michael Seely 

2.00 Doubleuagain. 3.00 MAITREDEE (nap). 

The "nines Private Handi capper’s top rating: 3.30 GOLDEN CROFT. 

Going: soft 

1.0 NOVEMBER NOVICE HURDLE (3-Y-O: Div I: £685: 2m) (15 runners) 

1 BEAU DIRE iJ Ross) J .'enters 10-10 S Sherwood — 3-1 


43 3EECHWOOD COTTAGE (A B3iay1 A Batfey 1610 — 

UD0 CRAMUtNS iMrs C Parians] W Kemp 10-10 

C9 FORWARDS MOVE (S Lawson} D Wilson IP-10 


.. ACemfl #99 F6-5 

SSMbtan 

KCaptoa (7} 


5 

3222TO HOME OR AWAY (fl Baker) J H Baker 1610 

. .... DMSfpftj 

— S-1 

B 

LOKGGHURST (J Terry) M Pipe 1610 

P Scudamore 

— 161 

9 

to 

OCEAN TRADEH (A MufingsiR Smyth 1610 

PELLS CLOSE (S Dow) S Dew 1610 

_ . .. AWrigtt 


11 

12 

0 PRECIOUS LINK (E Goody) W G M Turner 1610 

0 RAFFIA Rlfll (L Bush) R Akehersil 6 10 

— — C Wuhq (7) 

R Duftwoody 

— 161 

13 

ODD RHODE ISLAND RED |J Bruton) A Moore 1610 

— WssCUoore(7) 
G Moore 







20 

P SHOURAL-sJStamaOD Rutger 10-5 

. , J Bartow 

— — 


Selection: HOW OR AWAY 


1.30 ASTAIRE STOCKBROKER NOVICE CHASE (£1.644: 2m 4f) (15 runners) 

1 0-13212 CASTLE TALBOT (CC) (Mss V Mariuwriak) J Long 9-11-13 RQotdewin 

2 O4-F022 ANSWER TO PRAYER (J Ftah-Heyes) J FBteh-Hejns 7-11-8 — — 


3 400000 / AMEX (T Hayward) Mrc N Srrath S-11-3 

4 FC004-0 ASSTT WE ALL P"Ihom)JBridger 7-11-3 

5 P/0002-F BOYNE SALMON (T OukB) Ifiss L Bower 6-11-3— 

6 COMPTON BOY (RCta(noMs)C Heines 10-11-3 — 

7 03PP-10 EPRYAMAfR Barnett) Mrs CRamwy B-l 1-3 — —. 

11 4340/00 INRELDSR(FTayfc*)A Moore 7-11-3 

13 QP1402P- PALM ERS T O N (M Madge**) M Madge** 7-11-3- 

14 OW04-F ROYAL HARBOUR (B Leaver) O Sherwood 6-11-3- 

16 40002-0 TOPHATTER (M Shine) R Hodges B-11-3 

17 400000- UNCLE DAi (E Tre3Cy)J BfXJgar 7-11-3 

18 FOBOO-P FBBJGHT (Mrs D Bravery) C Bravery 61612 

19 P GLQfflANE LADY (N Buckkmd) R Parker 5-1612- 

20 04/PF-F ROMACtNA(J Mooney) J Stall 6-10-12 


C Brown — 8-1 

— 88 — 

Mr T Grantham (4) 90 — 

KBwto(4) — 3-1 

GMcCovt #99 8-1 

G Moore — 12-1 

AMadgwicfc 95 — 

CCox (4) -fM 

BPrarel 

Mr L Fogarty 


teaC Effiotf 


198S: CHOICE OF CRITICS 3-11-8 R Rowe (7-4) R Atahurst 9 ran 

FORM CtmJE TALBOT, 2nd here last time, pravlomly beat Aberoy(1 1-5) also 
runm £1 530. good, Oct 28,9ran)-ANSWBl TO PRAYER (11-1) came wtoiaiato 
(11-l2)a length at Hesham (2m. £881. good to ftan. Sept 8, 5 ran). AMBIT WE ALL ran 
race on seasonal debut Best aftarl last season (f 1-3) 3 4/ 4tfi to MacUBdee (1 1-3) et P! 
good to firm. May 2. 15 tan). BOYNE SALMON leu a couple of days ago at Fomestone. c 
2nd to Autumn Zulu (11-6) at Foticestone (2m, £1280. soft, Apr 29, 7 ran). EPRYANA’S 
seasonal debut at Fontwsfl an 2f1 00yds, £1600, good, Nov 4. 8 ran) beating Cmwmv i 
S ele ction. ANSWER TO PRAYBI 

Course specialists 


rt last season (f 1-3) 3 41 4tfi to MacBBdBB (1 1-3) et Pksnpton (2m. £2129. 
good to firm. May 2, 15 tan). BOYNE SALMON leu a couple of dews ago at Fomestone. prior to that (10-7) 141 
2nd to Autumn Zulu (11-6) at FoBcestane (2m, £1280. soft. Apr 29, 7 ran). S’RYANA’S wtn (1612) was on 
seasonal debut at Forrtwafi (2m 2f 100yds, £1600. good. Nov 4. 8ran)beamgO*nraw (10-13)1*1. 


iWardle 
R Smyth 
N Henderson 
DOughton 
JJartbna 
G Bakfang 


TRAINERS 

Winners Rurmere Percent 
5 15 313 

8 31 as 

10 41 24.4 

14 73 19-2 

26 140 lfl.6 

7 38 104 


JOCKEYS 


SSmHhEccfes 
PDodKe 
MPenetr 
J Lovetoy 
RGdetesin 
G Moore 


Rides Percent 

67 23£ 

66 19.7 

107 16.8 

68 162 

180 11.7 

232 9 S 


LUDLOW 


Selections 

By Mandarin 

12.45 Tinsel Rose. 

1.15 BUNDLE BOY (nap). 

1.45 Fishpond. 


2.15 Golden Redeemer. 

2.45 Maladictioo. 

3.15 Socks Do wne. 

3.45 Autumn Sport 


Michael Seely’s selection: 1.15 Bundle Boy. 

Going: good to firm 

12j 45 CRAVEN ARMS SELLING HURDLE (£846: 2m) (19 runners) 


P04244 CAREEN (D)(M Pipe) M Pipe 5-1 1-7 

3 F COPGROVE (Mrs F Bowden) P Bowden 4-11-7 H Derma (4) 

5 0 MAUWTr GIFT (Mre P Cosgrove) JCkwgreve 4-1 1-7 BDowting(7) 

6 0-0 MOFFAT LAS (H Vernon) CJeckeon 4-1 1-7 RHyett 

8 0421-00 BBXEKINO(to(M Writer) R Frost 5-1 1-2 JfteM 

9 ORESIHAM UUJV (D Rshei) B Ham 5-11-2 PDever 

10 00 I5LE OF PA»CRA(F Sedge**) G Venter 611-2 MMc Fa ttiwep) 

11 00 LA CHAfltiirT(BF) {Top industrial Ltd) P Onto 4-1 1-2 - H Demos 

12 030000 OUR CHICKLETTE (CO) (C Oonington) R Dlckta 4-11-2 W Humfornys (7) 

13 Q/OOPPO WEDDMG TALK (D)(M Fry) 0 OXeB 5-11-2 MCeswei 


8 0421-00 mXEKIMKDMMWeBieOR Frost 5-1 1-2 


301 T1HSQ. ROSE (D) (Maj R Thornon) □ Tucter 3-10-7 — 

JOUSTING BOY (S Hmer) M Chapman 3-10-5 

PP XO ISLAND (D Seymour) WG Turner 8-10-5 

IMF 8UtnaEnGS(UNk*1eaa)8Ptwea 3-10S 

18 MY DERYA (B) (Mrs J Akyuz) 0 McMahon 3-105 —TWi* — 8-1 

19 BO SONNY HBJ. LAD (MSB W Lutghton) A Leighton 3-104 C frritb 

21 OP GOLD SOVEREIGN (T Cooper) M Obver 3-10-0 — JDoggn — — 

24 0 SOLBIT FLYER (Mrs M Sounders) BSterene 3-100 RStrooga — 10-1 

25 THE nABBB? (B We«a) B Wefts 3-10-0 G Charles Jonae 

1885c PEROVStdA 5-1 1-2 P Warner (7-1) Mrs W Sykes 13 ran 

1.15 COURT OF HILL HANDICAP CHASE (Amateurs: £1 ,466: 3m) (1 1 runners) 

1 0/1200-2 BUNDLE BOY (Duchess ol westmmsw) T Forster 8-11-11 TTTmmeiio I SSF64 

2 O/DOFP-2 SOWTULLA BOY (D) (T HauBKoake) T Houtnooke 11-11-8 THottbrooto 86 4-1 

4 04341P TAKEATONCE ((LCD) (Mrs MHenriquasIMHennques 611-1 Mr M Aiaytsge (7) 96 8-1 

5 14/013- LEC8URY LAD (D) (M WSesmflh) M Wfesmth 9-10-13 GHssaer(7) 9610-1 

6 P/6M SECRETARY OT4SUU.(MFrton|R Hodges 11-10-11 M Fatten 88 — 

7 0000/22 LAURENSUN (CD) (MreCBtecfcJ Mrs C Black 11-10-9 HraQRc«e{4) *59 3-1 

a OOtnOP MASTER BOOH (H Davies) O Tucker 7-100 ItrAKeJewa. (7) 93 — 

9 P20-0QF B OUGH ESTIMATE (V Btehop) V Bishop 10-100 RBe4aoiy(7) 

10 000- MSTSt LUCKY (G Wfegrove) K Wngrovs 9-100 J Ratten (7) 

11 OOIPUPO MITRE HOUSE (Mrs APnca) Mrs A Pries 6-160 Mss L Watiaca (7) 

12 0/U-4M0 STOP ROOTING (Mss L Wonracott) hbs J WAmnacatt 10-100 — 

1585: KEEP A PROMISE 7-lf-O Mrs 6 Rees (2-1 fav| Gspt J tVBson S ran 

1.45 HALFORD NOVICE HURDLE (£1,007: 2m 5f) (18 runners) 

3 F0-1P HASDUN (A Brewer) FJgrdrii 7-11-5 CSratth 9110-1 

5 1 FISHPONO (A Simpson) P J Jones 5-11-C CMarai 98 3-1 

6 0 ABBA UD (Abba Double Glazmg) Mrs J Pitman 4-10-12 MPtnn -8-1 

7 OOP-4P AN07HS) LEASON (P HUse) J Coigrave 9-10-12 — 70 — 

8 00/2002 BRMNOGAN (Mrs J Cotlon) T Foraer 6-10-12 HBma MS9F5-2 

13 000-4 HARLEY STREET MAN (J Fowls) C Jack&on 5-10-12 RHyett 8810-1 

18 31FD/PP KNOCK HARD (BttfMd Manor Farms) J Francome 710-12 L__ K Msoney 

22 F^ MARJNSrS STAR (GBTunftnN Ltd) Mis C UoydOones 4-10-12 5J07M — 12-1 

27 0 ISCKMCKEL(RGmi8S)MreMRIme2a-iC.12 SMorahecd — 6-1 

32 43- WSJ) FLYER (H Thorp) R Lee 5-10-12 B Dewing (7) 83 8-1 

33 OOOOO WILL’S WARRIOR (W Caatray) G Ham 4-10-12 LcnraVmcenl 

34 00FOT/3 ACHAOjord Kenyon) EH Owen jun 5-10-7 G Chafes Jones — 73 

35 33222P- MAPHANTWE(N Lake) R Fraa 4-1 6-7 -‘Frost 96 8-1 

36 P FOREIGN FHEND (A Moore) D Barons 7-10-7 PNfcScta 

37 GOLD RADB1 (C Hanop) Mss S BatilSr 4-10-7 S Sett (7) 

38 PPPfrO KHAHAB BBI (F Ehon-Baneti} R Mem 5-10-7 Clones 

40 OFP SCALE MODEL (J Roper) J Roper 4-10-7 JaeqtfCSwrfrj — — 

41 OOOOBl SHAHDAIICBA (Mrs A Holy) DHoOy 4-10-7 Ms H Victory (7) 

198& (3-Y-O) FREStACER 10 7 J Frost {3-1 jl-favj S Harris 13 ran 


P Holey (7) 

— S Michel (7) 
Tracy Turner (7) 


Course specialists 


TRAINERS 


JOCKEYS 


Mrs J Pitman 
T Forster 
K Barley 
MraMRimeR 


VAmers 

Runnera 

PBrsem 

H Bihries 

Win pare 

Rues 

Peruem 

s 

IB 

278 

17 

77 

22.1 

IS 

65 

23.1 

SMorehc3d 

13 

73 

17.8 

8 

38 

21 C 

P Warner 

11 

74 

145 

15 

73 

205 

R Strange 

7 

55 

12.7 

M 


Guide to our in-line racecard 

00432 TME8F0RM (CDiBF) (Mrs J Ryiey) B Hall OIOO 


Racecard numuer. Draw hi brackets. Sta-ogure 
loan (F-tafl. P-puOed up. U-unmited rider. B- 
Draugnt down. SsOpoed up. R-refused). Horae's 
nameiS-Wnlcara. V%or.l»-hooa E^yasliiefcl C- 
course womer. Distance winner. CDcourse 


and cfistance winner. BF-toeaten hwourtfe tn latest 
race). Owner In brackets. Trainer. Age end 
weight. Rider plus any al owtttce. The Times 
Private Kandicapper’s twtog. Approximate starting 
price. 


1935: FRIENDS FOR EVER 11-1 R GoWsiain p6-1) J Ffitch+feyes 13 ran 

CnOM BEECHWOOD COTTA(£ (10-10) was rumwig on at (he death when 141 3rd to Arrow Express 
runm .rvvwlsor (2m 30y,$S10. good. HcnB 20 ran) With FORWARD MOVE (103) nmrsr a fac- 

tor. HOME OR AWAY vaiy tti san poin t mejast two starts attar previous (10-31 151 2nd to Melendez (11-1) at 
Devon (2m if. £710. good. Sept 2. 9 rani PRECIOUS LINK (lOOi was never nearer than at the One when 4Q 6th 
to Astral (105) tore (2m. £685. good to soft Nov 10. 17 ran) witit DANCMG BALLERMA (10-9 abrays bermd 
In 9th and RHbOE ISAM) RED (107) even further away. 


ZO PETER CAZALET MEMORIAL CHALLENGE TROPHY HANDICAP CHASE (£2,012: 
3m 11) (8 runners) 

2 PF21/40 ROUND THE TWIST (COBF) (A Ross} DOughton 1012-1 POotole — 101 

3 131430 BROWN VEB. (CD) (Mts A Laws) RArmysge 11-11-6 Mfet G Anayttge (7) 91 7-2 

4 43P-402 MBTSt DONUT (E Surafteld) R Hodges 011-3 BPowel 98 S-1 

5 232180 MERCY LESS (CD) (Mrs M Maston) M Botton 7-11-2 RGeldNMn 96 8-1 

7 PP0483 COLONEL CHRISTY (CO) (H Keen) HaNeO 11-100 GMcCowt • 99 6-1 

9 P-P3004 CELATOR (C) (P Brewer) I Wertfe 9-107 C Brown 9112-1 

10 BC3O03 DOUBLEUASAM (B Ctaifc) C Hotnes 12-100 CCox(4) 97F3-1 

11 SOQPOO GREENOREPRDE (Andrew Baird Tennis Couls Ltd) PBugoym 9-104 PBertoa 9414-1 

198S: C80WNMG MOMENT lOI&OK Mooney (04)1 Wardto 5 ran 

I CODM ROUM) THE TWIST, a five tbno course and (kstance winner, tos needed lest two rune atter a 
: rUflm iengtiiyl»oN. In 1984/S5 fil-8) an easy 151 winner here trom Revolver (lOI) an flm ground 
; (3m 11. £1725, May «. 5ran). MBICY LESS (10-21 was a heavy ground atwaner IromMembrid ge (10 ^ tore 
i last season (3m 11. £1932, Apr 21, 9 ran) with BROWNVEa.(1 0^167 further back in 3rd and MUTER DONUT 
i ai-7) premment when tailing. Last time MtSTBI DONUT (11-1) a 2nd to Rogttrio (10-T0) » Windeor 
£1657. cood to soft Nov 17.Tl ran) witfi DOUBLEYTXIAGAM (1 04) only M back in ad. COUMB. CM 
1 nO^)pDig!?xlon iKa3rdwttm 3KI tJChvrd Rogasrta 11D-3) a! S!rm1ord{3m 23, £2714. good, NcvS, 11 
DELATOT (1013) was well backed last line finishing 9»l 4th to Tudor Road (1010) ttTaunion (3m its 
eood to son, Nov 20. lOranL 
Selection: COLONEL CHRISTY 

Z30 STAMffiR CONDITIONAL JOCKEYS SELLING HANDICAP HURDLE (£749: 2m) 
(10 runners) 

5 SOP381 STEAMY fBfl) (Ifiss J Reed) 0 Oughton 5-11-7 LJenfefew 93 7-2 

6 243-C32 DSBIES PRINCE (Mrs D Bravery] C Bravery 5-1012 A Roto »99 4-1 

8 3-01143 MANHATTAN BOV (CD) (J Btaefcnan)J FTrtCtv^feygt 4-1012 P e wy Ptott l leyes 99FM 

10 FF-0Q3 TAICIHICMESS (A Taylor) A Moore 4-10-8 Candy Moore 94 8-1 

11 OOP/OPO FUU. OF SPCT(J Bettor) H 0740*5-104 — 

12 gC40/00 SOME MOOR (M Brown) R Hodges 6-104 W ferine 

13 4/04800 YAZSDW© Pearce) J Long 5-104 Le eee L oe g — tOI 

14 040000 RIBELE STAR (A Burrtvam) P Butler 5-104 Ueee tomhwn — 12-1 

15 P03/330- UfOUHN BOY |C Hdnw) C Hofcnee 5-104 TStomr 90 5-1 

17 39-404F SONG OF CHRISTIE (Dr HNgan) A Davison 4-10-4 — 93 — 

1SS&BEAMMG LASS 6-109 E Murphy (3-1 fav)GGracay ID ran 

2J0 CUCXMERE HANDICAP CHASE (EZ040: 2m) (8 runners) 

3 Pan-1 MAITREDEE (CO) (Mrs A Wstae)RGow 7-11-0 CBIWW 94 6-1 

4 340404- LULAV (D) (D Pftctor) D PWtter 6-11-7 ttt D ftfcher *16-1 

5 140220 781 BOY (CO) (T Fry) W Kemp 7-1 1-1 — SSM n 94101 

6 UPC2Q2 MANSTOM MARAUDER (CD) (M Smith) P Hedger 1OT1-0 P— y ntoh He yee (7) 95 4-1 

7 4PF-022 CtESUN (J H Amusements Lid) to* LCMy 7-11-0 . JLoieicy O0FO4 

9 144U33 PRMCE MOON (Ditte of Athol) GBakfing 0108 A Cherttoi (7) 99 5-1 

12 030Q/PO FLEDGE (R Ledger) R Ledger 010-0 tosNUdg* — 201 

13 48-OCOO SHOTANG (R Bamaey) H OWaR 11-100 RCtiipronW — 16-1 

1985: AKRAM 7-10-4 R Untoy (3-1) R Hodges 10 ran 


Western 
Sunset 
aims high 

Western Sunset is likely to 
take on the stars in Kemptan’s 
King George VI Chase on 
Boxing Day following his vic- 
tory over (MO on favourite 
Half Free at Huntingdon 


Tim Forster’s charge, outsider 
of the three runners, led 
througont the Pe te rborough 
Chase, and was left with a dear 
a^ vanpy when the rii tflrepn 
Half Free pecked badly after 
jumping the last fence; 

Forster win now enter West- 
ern Sunset for the Kempton 
spectacular, a race he won with 
Royal Marshall u in 1976. 

Forster said: “Tbis wm win 
have messed up Western 
Sunset’s handicap mask for life. 
He was badly handicapped even 
before today. He win now nm in 
condition races, and there are 
not many of them.” 

Half Free lost do honom in 
defeat. He was checked when 
s c rap i ng his nose along die turf 
in the incident at the hist fence, 
but was beaten only five lengths. 


today m conference with Hs tag jHrf 

se fi ri ton t and a c connhd b a t i n fac t, to 
LBodomB^neleaviBglVU^ £Tds 3£«5 

the man, who was sacked fc** “ 
his po^WD ns private trefaer mi *e M 

the Fbttte Robert Sngstef 

far ids Andsnl or on what Ae Woodsfodt^urkrt to 
Having krama Dickinson for hrS 

SaSlrM ceMtdeTd opMte £?he ereTIS 

PfcB— * V 

a^pfccto. ri te ndjto. tea i. 

OMeef the meat talented txamcm stake, 

hSTrSg tfaraS Ta iara 

h«aioa&BHfa»*8ride, Md^h ^^gS^thfetVgaons 

The desh of pmwniBfits is heavy outla y la Wiltshire. It b 
easgy wd eehteAb Saa g ffrr ahvioody far tfcb reason that 
bwann hearted, gnoarioos and has lest no time in 

lores fratiucuag with his trato- • VD oiBtiBS the experienced 
ccs. DicHmmn, on the other BanyHiBs ns OkUme's 
hand,. is a rather aloof and scpbcamnl. 
austere figure, whose obsession As hr to Diddam b cm 
with Us wort isahsotete. cened, a man with his recard b 

Sanast g r *»— wa ftnif flam- boendte succeed in dm loagna. 
oal p i ua n res are net the nut ^ b adj g jew drat twp 
reas on far Dfekmeonb Ah wch ow rtaadmg ***** 
mwrei Bat this b hard to own fields have bee n we to 
he&ere oo two coasts. The mss cooperate end that sach en 
who had been Britain’s leading wiwrai mi «gg*f 
onwar five times to the past tea mcnt ihe n H hare feifad. 


r : M ,«* ^ 

»i‘' r 


All-weather racing 
moves step nearer 

The prospects of racing on aB- >«« 

weather in c o u n try mum width of 23 metres wme o 


STSomiSy mum wi dth of 23 m etres winch 
have improved following would ^accommodate s safety 
yesterday’s Jockey Club limn of 16. A track of ttodeagn 
announcement that a brief^ could twe fexommodate any 
nntrmiMi reonirements, has strain five-fiirloog rares unless 
been sent to all racecourses and a chjtte 
other interested parties. amdd be saitaue for most other 

A pviKroinK «tv> iw ^ aatrevf u% conventional tfistances. 
sabnutoatlrae plans to the Interested parties are also 
Jockey Clnb and tte Levy Board bring asked to submit a feasnaK 
by January 31, 1987. when they ity stndy, showing estirn^ 
be invited to discuss pro- costs, proposed funding, and 


posals in de&iL 

Amdicants are being asked to 
give a short explanation of their 
objectives, be&ing m mind that 
the Jockey Chib's mam concern 
is to minimise foe on 
racing and betting of advene 
weather conditions daring foe 
wint er months. This does not 
rule out foe possibility of aH~ 
weafoer trades being nsed at 
other times of the year. 

The brief covers location, 
design and layout of the trade, 
facilities, p ro p o se d racing sur- 


FORM Hto!^^Jini^^rin^ l l”oackin6tHto re(an4l.£ 2l84.goodlDSOW.N6v1d12 

TOJ BOY (10-9) last pfecadowtencaBwton 2012nd to Long Emag«marrt(1(KS at Stratford (2m. 2I960.C 
Oct 18. 6 ranL MANSION MAU H AUNDE H C»Q-0) 301 2nd ttWWkay Eyas (11-<B to Kempton (2m 4I.C 
good 10 soft. Nov 20. 7 ran). CRESIM (10-1) had (Me crisnce with the wnwr vrt»n 121 2nd «> Romsiy 
stode (12-^ to Windsor Can. £1852. goat Nov 8. 5 ranL PRfRCE amON 7JM 3rd to Awitog 

Windsor (&n, £1 315, ooodio soft, Nov 17. 8 ran). SHOTANG (1 M) weB beaten town am to Rousptoer(1^ 1 
Kenfeton (2m 4f. £2456. good. Nov 6, 10 ran). 

SetecSoic MANTON MARAUDER 

£30 NOVEMBER NOVICE HURDLE (3-Y-O: Div II: £685: 2m) (15 runners) 


1 9 back In 6tii Here (2m 41, £21 


Latin American (1T-a 31. »Sh 
, good to soil Nov ia 12 ran). 


Oct 18. 6 ranL Mi 
good to soft. Nov 


1 21104 RBOVMOri Pearce) P J Jones 11-8 CMam 85 6-1 

2 3 10 MR WHAT’S MS M ft SE (CO)(P HopMns) G Enright 11-1 Mtonett 94 8-1 

3 F DOWNTOWN BROOM (G Swire) Mis N Smtt> 10-10 BdaHan 

4 FLEET FOOTED (P Haynas) P Haynes 16-10 A Webb — 4-1 

5 0 GANOON (Mrs R Moms) J Jenkins 10-10 SStannod 

6 24 GEX(V8ntra Chemical fteduas UdJRAtohurst 16-10 Mb M cXeown (7) 90 5-1 

7 02 GOLOei CROFT (G Johnson) NHendsreon 10-10 SSntthEocfee #99F7-2 

8 4 MIGHT MOVE (Hotray BUMbr Ltd) M Pipe 10-10 PScwferaore IS 5-1 

9 OUR TIAY (MCtomon)JH Bator 1610 CBroan — 10-1 

12 000 RAV&5TON (Ms M Bowdan) J HoneytMl 10-10 A Joan 

13 40 SDfON DAMIAN (B Bum) W G M Turner ID- 10 CWtoreo(7) 

14 0 SIT IN HE DARK (S Leteorthy) R Hand 10-10 HHond(7) 

18 04 TVHN FOR 71f BETTER (V) (L Quick) J F-Heye> 1610 -Pf ntiatoR» W 

18 0 WING BEE (A Speake)J Bridger 10-10. — 

22 40P SHBBI CLASS (3 Pewce)J Long 10-5 Mr J Poston 

1985: FOW SPORT 105 R Rowe (3S-1) A PW 11 ran 

2.15 CHARTER HARDWARE NOVICE CHASE (£1,487: 2m) (14) 

1 034000 BROCHEfTBWi)K Bishop 5-11-0 LHarvarM) 

2 03&16P CONNAUGHT CLEAIERS (8) (CBrott»rton)C Usman Mbr 6-1 1-0- K Mooney — 161 

3 FP046U DOUBLE BARREL (WMcKaccfeONs^ WM-CDln 1611-0 WO W-H UM MER 

5 OflOMO GOLDS! REDEEMER (MreEMlsaJR Frtotts 611-0 SJOTMi 91 7-2 

8 P0400F/ HANDY GRAY (GCantttoBCamtjidgB 61 1-0 IN J CambMpe (4) 

11 4F0/444) MAUIGA (M BafTactaugh) M Barradougli 7-11-0 — — 12-1 

12 2J44PO-F NOBLE BLADE (R Lamaart) A MghUngai e 7-11-0 MGbknO — 161 

13 POO PUCKA PADDY (E McKenzfe-Coias) W McKerote-Oofes 61 1-0 MRfehttds 

15 POPUP SAITS nrann (Mrs BSudtanek) Mrs JBerrow 61 1-0 PtowHobto 

16 001404- SOUTAfOO (M taxons) S Rraoce 611-0 TMtiS — 61 

18 244004- SPEMAMO (Lady More) Mrs WSytas 7-1 1-0 S Mo tsh lid *99 61 

19 0UU3P-0 CANTABU (Lady S Brooke) Lady S Brqote 7-109 JacqM Otwr (7) 93161 

20 3226F3 GO ANNA GO (TBatoyJT BaBey 610-8 B Dotifing (7) SOTO-1 

21 OOF-400 HOPEHfl- CMMES (Mrs J Doctott) R Dlckin 7-169 CJonea — 61 

19B& WELSH OAK 611-7 R Eamshaw (62) D GandoHo 7 ran 

2^5 WOOFFERTON NOVICE HURDLE (£885: 2m) (18 runners) 

1 002000 OttCOVER GOLD (D) (AsWey Hetrfeon Lftfi K Bridgwaaar 611-7, W Wo rtoogfen » — 


cost omary jummng errors, was 5222? 

three lengths farther back in umtam -teeter BBxtm. 
third, but may take on Western beann g m m md tfa m most 
Sunset again at Kempton. rtandn pm en t s m ocag between 
„ TT . , . . „ December and Mardi. 

Care initiated a doable far the ' n ie Jockey Chib’s working 
Hywd Davies-Foraw partner- pamr reromfaended tofol 
ship in the BBC Radio tracks should be a circuit of at 
Cambridgeshire Handicap -w-^, -. • •• T t- 

Chase, and it would have been a KAIIC ll K T1 

treble in the brown and gre en M. UU»jil Ihll 

colours of owner Simon __ • 

Sainsbury if Treyford had not Kl'ATXfVI TTO 
telfen at foe last when lookmg aD J/lUfTll Usl 
over foe w inn e r of the 6MWTll)n -, nf 

Ndbcrkcily Novices’ Chase. 

Derby award 

* tij on to take the S h e ffie ld Selling 

lOr NtOUte Hurdle by a neck from Mister 
. Golden at Wetherby yesterday. 
Michael Stoute has won the Brown had to endure a 
International Racing Bureau's lengthy stewards’ inquiry before 
Derby Award for leading over- it was confirmed that Polish 
seas trainer of 1 986. Hzswm and had kept the race afier, 

place money total of £960,531 Guy T-pnrian, who partnered foe 
included ten foreign victories - runner-up, had objected to foe 
four in Ireland, three in Ger- winner for his ground 

many, and one each in Canada, alter the last 
France and Italy. As a jockey. Brown amassed 

Guy Harwood came within *2 ?'“ u * er ** lril W *. remark- 
inches of overhauling Stoute XSrf? 

when Allez Milord just failed to 
beat Jimiter Island in Sunday’s 

Japan Cup. Harwood finifoed tw 

with a total of £832,895, John Tr °T 

Dunlop £566,900. and Jupiter £ tues . wi ?$ S ay5I uf • and 


proiroted income and expen- 
d i t n re figures. However, foe 
Levy Board has deferred for foe 
time being any decision on 
capital support. 

A final decision on a&- 
weaxher tracks will be taken by 
foe Jockey Club and Levy Board 
after aO firm proposals have 
been co n sidered. 

Grant increase 

The levy Board has accepted 
a in wan nJitina fira foe 
Jeckqr Gto atow ruds that to 
point-to-point allocation should 
be iacreased by 7.5 per cent from 
the present £136,506 tn 
£146,750 la 1987. 

The £I6£5» gnat increase 
*31 >pply solely to foe host 
fixtare, as foe p rep ara tion and 
repair of ooanes are foe 
jap o aaM Etfcs of hoot boats. 


Polish Knight gives 
Brown training first 

Alan Brown, formerly one of carried foe colours of Tom 
the leading northern jockeys, Clayton, director of a wholesale 
saddled his first winner as a luggage manufacturing com- 
trainer when Polish Knight held pany based at Chester4e-Sueet. 
on to take the Sheffield Seffing I: was fais firs winner and Polish 
Hurdle by a neck from Mister Knight was bought in for 1,200 
Golden at Wetherby yesterday, guineas. 


Brown had to endure a 
lengthy stewards’ inquiry before 
it was confirmed that Polish 
Knight had kept the race after, 
Guy Landan, who partnered the 


Landau quickly gained 
consolation for his defeat on 
Mister Golden when partnering 
Brother Geoffrey, the odds-on 
favourite, to a convincing two- 


nmner-tm, had objected to foe length victory over Corker in 
winner for taking fais ground the Harrogate Conditional 
after foe last Jockeys’ Handicap Chase. 

As a jockey. Brown a m a s sed Rising Forest, brought down 
238 w inner s during a remark- at T^uysftr last week, swept 


foS of overhauling tate 

ren Allez Milord just failed to SEES HKdS 

at Jupiter Mend in Sunday’s b«-race winners includ ed 

£nTup. SHUd footed 

fo a total of £832,895, John Tr °7 

inlop £566,900. and Jupiter Claysides .and 

John Galoes, the inspiration ^ a Ha, licco^,” 


behind the Breeder’s Cop senes, 
wins the award for services to 
'international racing. 


Polish Knight, partnered by 
David Dutton and wearing 
blinkers for foe first time, 


Jockeys’ Handicap Chase. 

Rising Forest, brought down 
at I Le i cester last week, swept 
bade to form in foe Vaux 
Breweries Novice Chase Quali- 
fier. Mark Dwyer sent him into 
the lead after the second fence 
and the 9-4 on favourite went on 
to win by a distance from Bright 
SbenifE 

Miami In Spring, foe surprise 
15-length winner of the 
Tadcaster Novices’ Handle, was 
immediately announced as a 
Triumph Hurdle possible by his 
trainer. Bill Stubbs. 


' X ; * 


& 4 : ** * 


Results from yesterday’s three meetings 

Huntingdon Newton Abbot Wetherby 


96 61 

5 

6 

9 

u 

006 B&UON MELOOY (F Pttitips) A BrtsOowna 611-0 

P BONNA COUNO (C Clerks) P Davis 611-0 

DAteRTS LUCK (FCtaggJD Barons 61 1-0 

DUSTY PATROI (1 ■ OnlllW" 

MBdabouma 

. Hlfeltt 

— 

— 

— 

PNcMk 

jSuttora 

— 

12-1 

9312-1 

19 

KATE’S PRIDE (F Haraai) Mbs R Hanar 611-0 

SJCTNaB 

97 

61 

85 F2-1 

20 

21 

4 KPto MBWOO(D Graham) N Gasatee 6\.1-0 _ 

40W/P IIHBff TOt fW I*t^) w f-n-a - - 

, te P McEnaa (7) 
A Price (7) 


22 

04 OWN UP lD FaMknerl R Wteaker 4-11-0 


87 

61 


23 

26 

086 PITHY (P Harts) RBrazfegton 61 1-0 

0 REGAL STEB. (Steel PtdB A Sections) R Hafeshaad 611-0 . 

C SaMi 

PDever 

84161 


31 00 toSTWrS CHOICE (B) (A BTOnOMra A Howto 611-0 MW! 

32 24P-00 SUPREME CHARTS) (Charter Racing Lid) Mr# J PBman 6114) Ml 

33 6 TBB BOBBIN (B Moore) J Monday 4-1 1-0 Gt 

39 * HALAlNCT!ON(MrBDGaiqMksURlraB0 6169 SMor 

41 IBM PIE (Miss S Sattier) Mss S Bother 12-169 SSc 

43 00244-0 SWEETWATER LASS (B Lswta) M Eddoy 4-169 AOI 

44 00 TIE OCLF SUSE (D Cooper) Mra A KnlgM 4-169 GM*g»l 

1985: GOLDBf REDEEMER 7-11-0 P Warner (61) Mra W Sykes 17 ran 


3.15 LUDFORD HANDICAP CHASE (£1.766: 2m 41) (11 turners) 

1 1P4F63 SOCKS DOWNS (CCowCstf JKfeg7-J 1-12 

3 Fl 12-13 ECHO SOUWSIFLBF) (Tbo lady VeatedTItotoer 7-11-7 

4 4Z363U LANOMO BOARD (to (Mra PWHsifeJPW Harm 611-S 

6 WHF43 SMART R&LY (Mrs J Hopmeti) R Kodgee 61 14) 

7 13UPP-4 WALWIT WOfSSR (R Fttctartan) R Mcfonan 11-1612 

10 01246F A BOY NABSlSmz (CO) (S Sterns) S Stevens 61 68 

12 0-82443 COUNTY FLAVOR (OF) (Itts H Knott) C Jackson 6167 

13 33P-T33 SCOTS NOGGBI (CO) (Mrs M Spestig) J Spearing 6163 

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Of* V&P 




THE TIMES WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 26 1986 


SPORT 


39 


CRICKET 


England are 
allowed to 
indulge their 
indifference 


From John Woodcock, Cricfaet Correspondent, Perth 


Yesterday held two sur- 
prises. The first was to find 
that only certain of the Eng- 

- land players were practising, 
the second to see the amazing 
developments there have been 
at the ground since 1982-83. 

With a vital Test match 

■ ahead of them and a wretched 
performance at Newcastle still 
fresh in their minds, T would 

* have expected the. England, 
players to .want to practise, 

. regardless of the fact that on 
the original schedule Novem- 

' ber 25 was to be a day off 

If they wanted to sleep off 

■ their iet-lag after Monday’s 
flight from Sydney (there is a 
three-hour time difference be- 
tween here and New South 
Wales) why not a Iate-after- 

! noon net? It is a perfect time 
for having one. 

Instead only Athey, Broad, 
Slack, . Whitaker, Richards, 
DiUey and De Freitas were 
detailed and Gatting joined 
them. The rest were allowed to 

• indulge their indifference. 

It is six days since Lamb 


Border was so widely, not to 
say immoderately, criticized 
by former Australian players 
before putting England in at 
Brisbane that to avoid having 
the same dedston' to matcw 
again be might be happy this 
■ time u> lose the toss. 

I fear for Him if be should 
choose to field and things 
should go drastically wrong 
for him, as they did a fortnight 
ago. For the last week Border 
has . been unabl e to open a 
newspaper without seeing his 
captaincy subjected to the 
closest, often the harshest, 
scrutiny. 

Bill O'Reilly, whose 
temic, even though be is 
makes such a splendid daily 
read in the Svanev Morning 


Herald, wrote a couple of days 
have Border 


even went through the mo- 


tions and all Gower and 
Pfitham have done in that 
time is to lake things easy 
against New South Wales. At 
the present rate the ground, 

. affectionately known as the 
“Wacker" (short for the West- 
ern Australia Cricket Assori- 

■ ation), will be a modem 

■ stadium by the time England 
are here next with a capacity 

1 of 35,000. 


The lights, under which 
night cricket has already been 
played, are said to be more 
powerful than those in Sydney 
; and Melbourne. The field 
itself has been entirely dug up 
and relaid to a depth of three 
feet by the curator, John 
Maley, and his ground staff It 
is very slightly crowned and 
Maley's aim is to make the 
square again the fastest and 
* truest in the world- He thinks 
he can do h and he knows 
what he is doing. 

Although the pitch for Fri- 
day is the one which Hadlee 
found much to his liking when 
Australia played New Zealand 
here last ycar ? Maley is con- 
fident that this time,- in any- . 
thing tike normal Perth 
weather, it win be good , for 
. batting. 

It is certainly a lot less green 
than I had expected, although 
even if it were not I imagine 
England would still play both 
their spinneis. In Brisbane 
they enabled Gatting to apply 
a land of defensive pressure 
I on anxious batsmen. 

In recent years it has been 
no less common in Penh than 
in Brisbane for the side win- 
ning the toss to field, in the 
expectation of helpful con- 
ditions for fester bowling on 
the first day. In no fewer than 
nine of the 12 Test matches 
■ played on the ground this has 
happened. They include all 
four between England and 
Australia. Now that the pitch 
has bedded down and enough 
grass can be taken off it 
without it felling to pieces, 
fielding first could be less of an 
advantage. 


ago that he would have 
out of the side altogether, 
although even as Australia's 
captain Border’s figures speak 
for themselves. His Test bat- 
ting average in Australia’s last 
four series is 65, a remarkable 
achievement, in a struggling 
side. 

The least unexpected 
change in England's side for 
Friday would be a switch of 
wicketkeepers, back from 
Richards to French. Although 
be held three catches and 
made one crucial and awk- 
ward stumping in. Brisbane, 
Richards had a rather edgy 
game behind the stumps, and 
after being preferred to French 
because ofhis batting he foiled 
to score in his only mnings. 
But then, in Newcastle, 


French himself Hod an untidy 
day. Even so, because French 
is undoubtedly the better 
wicketkeeper of the two, I 
should be inclined to .bring 
him bade. Few fours -go by 
without this question crop- 
ping up of whether to choose 
the Jess good wicketkeeper for 
his batting. 

It happened with Ames and 
Duckworth, just as it has in 
many of the years between. 
With England’s batting as 
brittle as it usually is, the 
better wicketkeeper has often 
had to make way for the better 
batsman. 

No one thought that 
Downton was the bat keeper 
in England but he played in 27 
Test matches, or that Alan- 
Smith was, although out here 
in 1962-63 he was preferred 
four times out of five to John 
Munay. . 

! Four years later, again in 
Australia, Murray suffered a 
similar fete when Paries, al- 
though not as good behind the 
stumps, played in all five 
Tests. That gave Murray one 
Test out or - 10. on his two 
Australian tours, despite his 
being a good enough batsman 
to score a Test hundred 
against West Indies. 

In 1962-63 the case for 
Smith was pressed by his 
captain, Dexter, and to be fair 
to Smith he never let the side 
down. In 1986-87 Gatting is 
believed to prefer Richards. 
Whether anything that hap- 
pened in Brisbane changed 
that we shall know when the 
England side for - Friday is 
announced tomorrow. 


Bad light saves the 
day for Pakistan 


From Richard Stxeeton, Karachi 


What promised to be a thrill- 
ing finish to the third Test 
match between Pakistan and 
West Indies ended in anti- 
climax yesterday when the In- 
dian umpires took the players 
off the field for bad light with 
nine overs to play. 

At that point Pakistan wens 
1 25 for seven, their backs firmly 
3 pun«3 the wall, with only a 
draw left to them. Without 
further ado the clouds we have 
seen on the entire tour gathered, 
creating a number of problems 
for the batsmen with the taller 


minutes before he played back 


fatall y to a yorker and bad his 
flattened 


West Indians releasing the ball 
r the 


small 


above the level of 
sightscrccn at one end. 

With nine of the last 20 overs, 
gone, the tourists were poised to 
take a new ball, but the umpires 
indicated to Richards, the West 
Indies captain, that they would 
take the players off if Mar shall 
continued to bowl. 

Butts and Harper bowled a 
further over each before the 
umpires decided play could sot 
continue. By En glish standards 
the light was perfectly reason- 
able out on the sub-continent 
play invariably stops as soon as 
the sun does not actually shine. 

Richards said afterwards he 
-was disappointed that his side 
had been deprived of their just 
reward. “We were looking up 
the barrel earlier but fought our 
way back with good bowling and 
catching. 1 would not say .1 am 
annoyed. You expect anything 
to happen in these parts." 

In . feet Pakistan were kept 
subdued for most of the day, 
with no one aWe to pl ay the 
commanding innings needed. 
They resumed at 1 6 for two and 
Marshall and Gray bowled at 
their fastest and meanest. In the 
vivid Caribbean phrase they 
use. it was time for the batsmen 
"to sraefl da feather.** It was all 
too much for Mohsin Khan, 


off stump flattened. Only 28 
runs came in the morning 
period as Ramiz Raja and 
Mndassar Nazar somehow sur- 
vived against the barrage. 

They had added 48 runs in 27 
overs when Mudassar was leg- 
before as he stepped back to pull 
Butts. Walsh and Butts bowled 
unchanged through the ■ after- 
noon and made the decisive 
breakthrough shortly before tea. 

garntr. who h»d been at the 
crease for four boors, was 
bowled by Butts as he attempted 
an ambitions offdrive. Imran 
Khan arrival with Pakistan 
needing 118 runs in 40 minutes 
and 20 overs. The target, 
t hough , became irrelevant when 
AsifMujtaba -was out in the next 
over, edging a drive against 
Walsh for Dujon to take a 
spectacular high catch to his left. 

After tea, Imran and Tauseef 
concentrated on defence, with 
the 30 .000 crowd, the best of the 
match, cheering every ball that 
they survived- Slowly the clouds 
— said by locals to be part of a 
dust-storm passing nearby — 
loomed, and the frustrating 
finish to a good match unfolded. 

The draw meant that Pakista n 
have now played 25 Test 
matches in Karachi without 
being beaten. 

wear mdcs; fw i«*pa mo o va 
R tctiards 70, AMU O VX * Sr 
Second tarings 211 (D L Hwn«8B ** 
SSwiran KT«n 6 lor 46, Abdul 0*Sr3 for 

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Qasm Omar c Dujon b Gw - — i 
Moftgn Kten c BwgniBte * ‘W"** tn 
SaSm Yousafc Haynes bMaranaH _ 10 
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j*vod Miarttod b Marshatt 4 



Jahangir upholds the time-honoured traditions of the Pathans in Zorich 


Revenge comes swiftly and naturally 
to the recently deposed king of squash 


By David Miller, Chief Sports Correspondent 


The Fatluu people of north- 
ern Pakistan, historic guardians 
of the Khyber Pass, do not 
accept defeat. The Russians are 
discovering this to. their dis- 
comfort across the border in 
Afghanistan, as did the British, 
and as Ross Norman did in 
Zorich on Monday night. In the 
final of the Swiss Masters 
squash tournament, the World 
Open champion was ground into 
sn b t ni s si on by Jahangir Khaw. 

“Rerenge is in the nature of 
ray people,” Jahangir said after- 
wards, with the kind of nn- 
stnile of someone 
his seat on the bus to an 
lady. “I needed to win this 
match for more than I needed to 
win the World Championship in 
Toahmse." He bad jnst done so 
in fear sets, inflicting on the 
gritty New Zealander the ftdl 
range of bis remarkable talent^ 
which have for so long been 
unanswerable, even though he 
will only reach 23 ant month. 

The pnMkity which attended 
Norman's removal of the title 
which Jahangir had held for five 
years will, oddly, have been 
welcomed by Channel 4 tele- 
vision, which on Saturday 
screens their documentary on 
the aniline family Grom “Squash 
Village” — little NavakOley, 
home of some 2,000 
tribespeople, 15 miles from the 
Khyber, where all die Khan*, 
from Hashim onwards, have 
d e s cend ed to the plains to 
torment the Australians, New 
Zealanders and British. 

It was my happy fortune, as 


the scruffiest of i n s ig nifi ca n t 
clnb players, once to have had 
lessons from Nazrnliah, 
Jahangir's late uncle; a gentle, 
tranquil man who would, without 
a glance, richochec a shot off all 
four walls as mathematically as 
Steve Davis might pot It dead in 
a pocket oa a snooker table. It 
was Naz who taoght Jonah 
Barrington and it was this 
inimitable Khan dexterity which 
now had Norman, who is to 
squash what de GuteUa is to the 
marathon, clawing the air in 
vain in die third and fourth, 
games. 


Baled like a man 
in a leaking boat 


“I had to play faster and moire 
physically, and use more wrist 
thij n in Toahmse," Jahangir 
said. “Ross doesn't like to be 
made to twist and torn, and this 
wore him down. I had needed 
that defeat long before, because 
it was good for me and good for 
squash. Ross likes to establish a 
rhythm, and 1 had to break this 
op tonight." 


Prior to Toulouse, Norman 
bad taken no more than one 
game in half a dozen or so of 
their 30 meetings. The break- 
through «*anw> after J ahangir 
had ligament trouble in the 
Malaysian Open and, after a 
month's absence, lacked match 
practice. He also failed to adapt, 
as Norman did in Tonkuse, to 
the behaviour of the fluorescent 


Merco balL On Monday night a 
Dim lop ball was used and 
Jahangir, on his own admission, 
worked far harder. 

I thought that one or two of 
the referee's decisions went 
unfairly against Norman. “I 
know it was a lucky shot, hot it 
was OK," he called out as be 
scraped another drop shot off 
the boards only to bear “not op" 
from the gallery. 

The match lasted an hoar and 
40 minutes, of which the marvel- 
ions second game lasted 44 
minutes. As Che third and fourth 
games had ran away from him. 
Norman baled demonically like 
a man in a leaking boat, hot the 
water rose inexorably as Jahan- 
gir poached hole after hole with 
bis angled, cut, vofieys. 

“The key to my being able to 
challenge him from now on is my 
condition,'’ Norman said. “In 
last year’s World Open, when he 
beat me in four games, I felt 
closer than I did tonight, even 
though that match was only one 
boor 28 minutes. I seemed a bit 
tired tonight. Every tune I've 
been anywhere in the past 
couple of weeks, they’ve been 
opening a bottle of champagne. 
Most of my time not playing 
squash has been spent sleeping! 

He does not begrudge the 
demand on his time. Squash is 
not the magic roundabout of 
tennis. As No 2 in (be rankings, 
and way ahead of the rest, 
Norman makes a modest income 
as a star of his sport. The Swiss 
Masters, top of the prize money 
tournaments with its BMW 


sponsorship, was* worth jnst 
under £9,000 to the winner. 
Norman's world title, a tribale to 
his dedication only three years 
after a serious parachuting ac- 
cident, will substantially in- 
crease his commercial 
endorsement value. 

The interesting psychology of 
the relationship between the top 
two is that Norman has per- 
suaded himself that Jahangir's 
more elaborate game requires 
Jahangir to be even fitter than 
Norman. Therefore, Norman’s 
rationaUsation follows that if he 
is super-bnmanly fit and more 
economic in style, that conk! be 
decisive. 

Jahangir does not see ft this 
way. He knows that, provided he 
can withstand a prolonged 
match, the wider complexity of 
stroke and touch should under- 
mine Norman’s e c o n o m y. 


New spice in 
the rivalry 


“I must make hi™ run," Jahan- 

S * r says with fhnt languid 
e does — and he did. Norman 
believes that if he can nm long 
enough, and find equivalent 
mental strength, he can emulate 
Barrington's self-made pro- 
ficiency. Those who doalHed 
Norman have now reassessed. 
The new spice in the rivalry is 
important in sponsorship ap- 
peal. The Swiss, who have gone 
squash-crazy, were offering 
£120 lo try to winkle a seat for 
the final. 


TENNIS 


The simple, important truth 


By Rex Bellamy, Tennis Correspondent 


The people who make things 
happen with the Lawn Tennis 
Association and British tennis 
as a whole, entertained the Press 
yesterday — in the attractive 
new LTA office block, which is 
just a few yards from the old one 
and still within volleying dis- 
tance of the local cemetery. The 
function was partly a house- 


warming party for the quick, as 
from the dead, and. 


Uyitasstr Nazar Ibw b BUffij i- 
Ust MwttJW c Dujou b Walsh 
Hmn fewa not out 


Tauaet Ahmad not out — 
Extras (b 17. ib ft w t) 
Total (7 wktt) 


ts 


r 

-Si 


125 


_ ivwii — 

who edged a rearing ball high to Saam Qa* cfo 

Uund sfip in Marshall’s second 1 1 

BOWUNa- Marshal 19^31 W- 

MS-l; Wttsh. 3ZA 1-80-ti Butte,! 
fcHWPW.l-O't-O. 


over. 

Javed Miandad, on whom so 
much dep end ed, lingered 40 


distinct 

partly an exposition of what the 
LTA is doing — and intends to 
do. 

The discussion, in which the 
LTA team did almost as much 
talking as the Press, concerned 
the formidable task of helping 
British tennis to compete on 
more even terms with the 
overseas challenge and, domes- 
tically, with all those British 
sports which, for one reason or 
another, attract more and (the 
natural consequence) better 
players. 

With difficulty one sought to 
identify fresh straws In the wind. 
Inevitably there 1 was modi 
familiar comment about -the 
deficiencies about British dubs 
and their failure to encourage 
juniors with court time and 
coaching. 


The only features of the 
relevant waffle to acquire a 
welcome and comparatively 
new emphasis was that dubs 
weren't doing enough to “sell" 
the game to their local commu- 
nities (to such an extent that 
there would be wailing lists for 
membership), nor cha rging 
enough to pay for improve- 
ments in playing and social 
facilities. 


Ian Peacock, the executive 
director of the LTA, made an 
astounding, and presumably 
emb ar rassing, assertion that 
Britain had more courts than 
any other nation in Europe. On 
the other hand, he pointed out 
that the LTA lost about one- 
quarter of their income in tax 
and that golf football and 
squash had mom five to 10 times 

as much money “revolving” 
within them. 


He might reasonably have 
had it that in no other European 
nation was there such intense 
competition from other sports 
for the allegiance of gifted young 
athletes who could — and from 
the LTA point of view, should — 
be recruited to tennis. 

Hie LTA had great hopes for 


the new scheme to accelerate the 
construction of indoor centres, 
for their singles-only national 
“ratings" tournaments, for the 
forthcoming Mortgage Corpora- 
tion National Team champion- 
ship. for a scheme to form junior 
dubs on courts owned by 
municipal or educational 
authorities, for “short tennis", 
an increasingly popular mini- 
game designed to broaden the 
basis of recruitment among 
schools and the British teenage 
society as a whole, and for an 
increasing stress on physical and 
menial conditioning. Good luck 
10 the LTA in all that. 

Perhaps tbe most sobering 
point to emerge, because its 
solution will be so difficult to 
achieve, was made by the 
women's national team man- 
ager, Sue Mappin. There were 
not enough people playing the 
game, she said. Consequently it 
was too easy for the better 

S layers to make it to the top in 
ritain. They did not have to 
work as hard as they should — 
and the stem challenges of the 
international circuit came as a 
diode to them. The important 
truths are always as simple as 
that 


‘The authorities think we’re still little kids,’ Pimek says 


Another Czech son slinks 


slowly towards the West 


' For all their great achieve- 
ments, Czechoslovakia’s tennis 
players have a love-hate 
relationship with their sporting 
and political masters — and 
those who profess love are, it 
appears, considerably out- 
numbered by those who nnrtnre 
the other emotion. 

Martian Navratilova Is on the 
one extreme, with Ivan Lendl 
rather dose to joining her, while 
Hana MandBkova is generally 
still officially approved of- As 
for their fesser-imown fellow 
combatants, a discreet silence is 
almost always considered the 
best policy. 

Libor Pimek, the tall 23-year- 
old who last week beat Henri 
Leconte, tire world’s No 6 
player, on his way to the Benson 
and Hedges semi-finals, has 
been bold enough Co express 
views that wfil not endear him to 
Czechoslovakia's authorities, al- 
though he has reason not to fed 
cowed into snbmissfoa. 

“They think we’re still little 
kids," Pimek told The Tim es in a 
surprisingly frank interview in a 
WeaMey dressing-room last 
weekend- “The Tennis Federa- 
tion and Government gave all of 
ns an opportunity to play and 
travel outside tbe country. Then, 
-suddenly, when the players are 
impnwmg and starting to make 
money, they don't respect them. 
They don't realise how big seme 
of ear players are Internation- 
ally. Thafs where tire pr ob l em 
starts." 

The roots of the problem go 
back to the system that has 
produced a steady stream of 
teams stars, only to let them 
loose into a competitive, capital- 
ist Sporting industry. It foils to 
solve the inherent contradiction 
between their new fife-styles and 
their, previous strict Socialist 
dtcripliapw. . 

Pimek, for example, was gath- 
ered In as a youth to one of the 
country's six or seven major 
tennis centres, where the young- 
sters spent five or m days a 
week rating, sleeping, drinking 
and playing teams — at Govern- 
ment expense. As they pro- 
cessed, school took second 
place, and Pimek recalled that 
he and his oofieagaes in the city 
of PKxov (population 50,000) 
weald often attend school jnst 
once a week. 

Many of the young players at 
these centres suffered a lonely 
existence. Karo! Novacbek, the 
world's No 35. for instance, 
came firms a town about an 
hour’s drive away and, Eke most 
of tike others, she stayed in 
special accommodation in the 
city, visiting her family only at 
tire weekends. 

In Pnnek’s case, the whole 
family moved to he with their 
son. His fotbec, a mechanical 
tinea, was able to change 
jobs, thanks to a tennis-mad 
factory boss. Piraefc's chief rival 
aad adversary, Miroslav Meric, 
was equally fortunate — his 








r - _ 


..... . A.c * 

" . • - 

. • ■ «•#' a 

Czech-male: Libor Pimek is determined to marry and move 


famil y happened to live tn 
Prerov itself. 

Stardom was to come more 
quickly for Medr, although he is 
a year younger than Pimek. 
“Miroslav could sever beat me 
in those days," Pimek recalled, 
“but he has for more natural 
ability dwii me and it eventually 
through." 

Their rivalry, at times, has 
bordered an deep hostility — 
largely doe to the oftra-compet- 
itive, almost desperate, desire of 
tbe younger players to gain the 
solitary team place that would 
allow them to travel abroad — a 
system riwt since become 
somewhat less restrictive. 

Though ranked 25th and 34th 
in 1984 and 1985 respectively. 
Pimek has slipped to 56th in the 
world rankings, while Mecir has 
enjoyed a meteoric rise mid is 
now ranked ninth. Mecir's 
improvement began In January, 
1985, when the two were en- 
fd in a marathon Straggle in 
it of a handfcl of late-night 
spectators at the Young Masters 
in Birmingham. Mecir tri- 
umphed — u$ first win over 
Pimek — . and a bleary-eyed um- 
pire (me!) made a note that 
either or both could toon surge 
to the top ranks. 


Pimek is determined not to be 
left behind: “I have engaged a 
coach and am working much 
harder on fitness and training,” 
he explained. “Medr is Incky - 
though he's lazier, he can 
achieve mnch more." 

It is the experience of travel- 
ling tbe world that has opened 
Pimek’s eyes to the frustrations 
of remaining frilly within the 
Czech tennis orbit. "There 
shook! be freedom and people 
shoald be able to choose where 
they want to live," he said. "Ivan 
has chosen the United States 
and that's the way it is". 

His own exercise in freedom is 
about to begin, amt be plans to 
marry his blonde Belgian girl- 
friend next yean “I will propose 
to ber soon — and hope to 
become a Belgian citizen,” he 
said. "After that. 111 have no 
problems. I think Ffl have a lot 
of opportunities to stay 
around.". 


So Pimek will be giving a new 
meaning to the term “tennis 
engagement" — and the Czechs 
seem set to lose another of their 
increasingly prodigal offspring 
to the temptations of tbe West 


Paul Martin 


HOCKEY 


Buccaneers stay 
top of the mast 


By Sydney Frisian 


I sea, who have won the 
premier division of the Sun Life 
West League nine times in a 
row, are in fourth place after 
beating Brean 2-1 in their last 
match. Isca were earlier beaten 
4-1 by Firebrands. 

Bath Buccaneers, who have 
won all four matches so far, are 
at the top of tbe table with 12 

S ints — there are three points 
a win — followed by Brean, 
Hereford and Isca, each with 
nine. 

Cardiff stay at the top of tbe 
premier division in the South 
Wales League after their 12-0 
victory over University College, 
Cardiff. Five of Cardiff’s goals 
were scored by Tim Perceval, 
making his own contribution to 
Cardin s aggregate of 3,333 
goals scored since World War IT. 

Cambridge City defeated 
Westdiff 7-1 but the win was not 
sufficient to unseat Old 
Lough tomans at the top of the 
Norwich Union East League's 
premier division. Old 
Loughtonians have won all four 
matches played so for, whereas 
Cambridge City, second in the 
table, have won three and drawn 


one. 

Westdiff themselves de- 


scribed Cambridge City's 
performance as the best seen at 
Souihchurcb Park for many 
years by a side who. if they 
continue in this way, should 
retain their title. 

East Grinstead, champions in 
the premier division of the 
McEwan's Lager South League 
and holders of the inter-league 
title, are second in the table to 
Indian Gymkhana, who have 
maximum points from five 
matches, three more than East 
Grinstead, who have lost a 
match. Leading the Indian 
Gymkhana attack is Kulbir 
Bhaura from the England World 
Cup team. 

The lead in the premier 
division of the Pizza Express 
London League is held by 
Guildford with two wins and a 
draw in three matches. Then- 
best achievement so far was a 2- 
I victory over Slough who. after 
their 7-1 win over Bromley, 
pushed themselves up from 
eighth to sixth place. 

In the percentage league St 
Albans, who were beaten 3-2 by 
Richmond, lost their 100 per 
cent record, leaving Teddingion 
the only side with this 
distinction. 


MOTOR RALLYING 


Peugeot win appeal but 
result is unchanged 


Paris (AP) — The world 
champion Peugeot team were 
yesterday cleared of cheating in 
the Italian San Remo Rally. But 
an international appeal court 
said that only the executive 
committee of the International 
Auto Sport Federation (FISA) 
coukl change the results of the 
rally, from which the French 
team were disqualified — and 
they do not meet until Decem- 
ber 18. 

Because of the uncertainty of 
the San Remo result, Peugeot 
wiU have to compete in the 
United Slates Olympus Rally 
from December 4 to 7 to ensure 
a chance of winning the World 
Rally Drivers' Championship. 

Had the appeal tribunal of the 
International Automobile 
Federation (F1A) cancelled the 
San Remo result — or changed 
it to the positions before 
Peugeot were disqualified - the 
French team's Finnish driver, 
Juba Kankunnen, would have 
clinched the drivers’ title with- 


out having to compete in the 
American event. 

He is currently trailing an- 
other Finn, Markku Alen, the 
winner in San Remo, in a 
Lancia, by one point — 103- 
104. If the San Remo result 
stands, Alen must still win the 
Olympus to take the title be- 
cause drivers can count only 
their seven besL results. 

The Peugeots were disquali- 
fied halfway through the San 
Remo Rally because scrutineers 
alleged that strips along the 
underside of the cars gave them 
illegal aerodynamic advantages. 

Peugeot won an appeal in 
Italy because wind-tunnel tests 
bad shown that the strips — 
which Peugeot said were stone- 
deflectors — bad no aero- 
dynamic advantages 

Peugeot appealed to the FLA 
Tribunal, who said the rules 
involved were too imprecise for 
a judgement lo be made, but 
that the Peugeot team dearfy 
did not cheat. 


RUGBY LEAGUE 


Profit for Kangaroos 


By Keith Macklin 


The Australian touring team 
have departed on their seven- 
match tour of France with a 
profit of £1 15,620 from Britain. 
It has been a record-breaking 
tour by the 1986 Kangaroos in 
many respects. Total atten- 
dances at the three international 
marches topped 100,000 for the 
first lime since the post-war 
spectator boom in 1948. 

Receipts for the three inter- 
nationals were £465,958. while 
the whole 13-match tour 
amounted to £793,422. 


The Australians now embark 
on their tour of France knowing 
that everything is clear profit, 
although attendances in France 
will not match levels in 
England. 


The Rugby League has also 
of the unbeaten 


done well out 
and spectacular trip by the 
Kangaroos. The league will 
pocket £150.000 in receipts 
from the three internationals, 
with league administrators de- 
ciding at a later date on how to 
dispose of the money. 


ICE SKATING 


Robinson 
jumps to 
the fore 


By John Hennessy 


Paul Robinson, four limes 
runner-up in the Tuboig Lager 
British Figure Skating 
Championship, is poised to 
occupy the centre stage once 
dominated by John Curry and 
Robin Cousins. 


Robinson convincingly won 
the compulsory figure section at 
Solihull yesterday from Spencer 
Durrani and Christian 
Newbeny, both skating on their 
home rink. 


In Britain, Robinson is 
trained at Blackpool and 
Dillingham by his German-born 
mother. Inge Dorn, but he has 
made fleeting visits to Canada 
to take instruction from Keny 
Leitcb. 


This year, Robinson has spent 
three months in Kitchener, On- 
tario, and the fruits are about to 
be gathered in, it seems. 

Yesterday, he laid down the 
best set of figures he has ever 
produced in a competition, 
according to bis mother. “It 
should put him in a good frame 
of mind for the rest of the 
competition." she thought 


Even the loops — usually his 
weakest element — were under 
firm control, although two of the 
five judges preferred those of 
Ashley Moore, a new recruit to 
ice from the roller rink. Alas for 
Moore, of Sunderland, his first 
two figures were poor and he 
languishes in fifth place. 2.4 
points behind the leader. 


Robinson uses the difficult 
triple flip in the short pro- 
gramme combination jump and 
he opened his free programme 
with the same exercise. For most 
people it would be something of 
a gamble but the jump appar- 
ently comes easily to him. 


All the same, its successful 
execution - not once, but 
twice — may be crucial to his 
winning his first British title. 

The substantial figure of 
Leitch looms laree over the 
championships, for he also 
trains the pairs title-holders, 
Chervl Peake and Andrew 
Naylor, of Nottingham, when 
they are at home. 


Like Robinson, they are full 
of confidence, and they created 
a glowing impression in winning 
the short programme on Mon- 
day night They presented all the 
elements with an elan rare 
among British pairs down the 
years. 


If their double loop jumps 
were not precisely matched, this 
is commonly the case in pairs 
because of the disparity in size 
between the two skaters. 


Their discipline requires he- 
man qualities on the part of the 
male partner and petite strength 
on the woman's pan. Matching 
the two qualities without the 
bizarre character of a man 
playing with a doll — common 
in the Soviet Ltaion — is a 
perpetual conundrum. 


MEN’S COMPULSORY ROUSES; 1, P 
Robmaon (Blackpool and BKngham), OS 
pts. 2, S Durrani iSofenum. IS: 3. C 
Newberry (SoMiuHJ, 1.8; 4. M Renjart 
(Dundael. 2.4; 5. A Moore (Sunderland). 
3.0; B. C Wildndge (NSA), 3.6. 

PARS: Short prograama: 1 , C Peake and 
A Naylor (Nottingham and Patarborough). 
0.4 pis: 2. L CustUey and N Cusraey 
(ToeS5*ie|, 0 8; 3. C Kay and C Nelson 
(Durham and Bilfingham). 1-2. 


BASKETBALL 


Portsmouth pay tribute to Dassie 


Tributes flowed in yesterday 
following the death of Larry 
Dassie. the Portsmouth player, 
who never regained conscious- 
ness after being thrown from his 
TR7 in a head-on collision on 
the A3, just south of Guildford, 
a week ago. 

One of the most popular and 
regular American players to 
come to England, Dassie, aged 
31, from Jacksonville, Florida, 
arrived in 1977. Dassie en- 
hanced his experience at Kansas 


By Nicholas Harling 


114 national league games, scor- 
ing 2.527 points. 


from playing this season. He 
accompanied the team to their 


"He was the type of player 
everyone knew about," 


State University and played for 


a number of English clubs, 
mostly Hem el Hempstead and 
Kingston, although it was with 
Crystal Palace, his first English 
club, that the 6ft 6in forward 
was most successful. He slaved 


- Elan 

Lloyd, the Portsmouth player/- 
coach said yesterday. “People 
appreciated his skills. He was 
quite a guy offthe floor too. very 
relaxed, easy going and always 
looking on the bright tide. He 
had a great sense of humour. 
Obviously he was one of the best 
Americans ever to play over 
here and one of the most 
exciting." 


matches and it was on his way to 
fat 


A dispute with his club and a 
previous accident in which be 
Suffered a head injury, requiring 
15 stitches, after being knocked 
off his bicvcle. prevented Dassie 


a training session that bis fatal 
accident, occurred. 

-We'H dedicate the rest of the 
season to him.” said Colin Irish, 
his team colleague, with whom 
Dassie often stayed overnight 
when he was not travelling 
home to Wimbledon. “We’ll do 
the best we can for him. He was 
a hell of a guy." 

Portsmouth will wear black 
armbands in Dassie's memory 
for their Prudential National 
Cup semi-final against 
Caldeidale Explorers in Bir- 
mingham on Sunday. He leaves 
a wife, Susan, who is a school- 
teacher ip Crovdoo. 


(w 


jr’s 

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is lock. 
Stic. It is . 


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a stain- 
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WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 26 1986 


FOOTBALL 


Souness spells out his 
side’s daunting task 
with a few home truths 


Graeme Souness brought 
home to Rangers* players the 
magnitude of the task they 
face against Borussia 
Mdnchengbdbach _ at ibrox 
tonight when he said: ^You’ll 
be playing in a different 
world." 

The vastly experienced 
player-manager added that 
only a return to peak form 
would allow Rangers the 
slightest chance of winning the 


which will bring a capacity 
crowd of 44,000 to the Glas- 
gow stadium. 

Stressing that the West Ger- 
mans are a class above Tam- 


By Hugh Taylor 

pere or Boa vista — Rangers* 
opponents in the previous 
rounds - Souness demanded 
from his players, who have 
recently lost their edge, a 
repeat of the eye-catching 
performances shown in 
defeating Aberdeen and 
Celtic. 

Seldom since these 
outstanding victories have 
Rangers, however, treated 
their supporters to displays as 


goals as lethaHy scored. The 
prayers this evening will be for 
McCoisi to regain his deadly 
scoring touch. 

The decision to play West 


Appearances can 
be deceptive 

By Stuart Joses, Football Correspondent 


Jim McLean admits that he 
has a. striking problem. Al- 
though his side are second in 
Scotland’s premier division, the 
manager of Dundee United 
recognizes that bis forwards 
must “attack more fiercely.” 
■Tonight at Tannadice Park 
would be an appropriate time 
and place to start. 

On the face of it. United 
scarcely need to. Hqjdufc Split, 
their opponents in the first leg of 
their UEFA Cup third round tie, 
were beaten 4-1 at the weekend, 
have lost two of their players. 
Volk and Andrijasevic, through 
suspension and could be with- 
out another two, Tipuric and 
Deveric. through injury. 

But Cordon Wallace, for one, 
has seen for himself the strength 
of the Yugoslavs that lies behind 
the superficial evidence of weak- 
ness. United's assistant coach 
has warned McLean that 
Bajduk’s defeat by Partizan 
Belgrade is dangerously 
misleading. “They were for bet- 
ter than . the score might 
indicate,'* he said. 

“With seven minutes to go, 
for instance, they were only 2-1 
down and had an appeal for a 
penalty turned down.” In spite 
of the potential absence of four 
representatives, Wallace rates 
them s i gnifican tly higher than 
Vandar Skopje, United's Yugo- 
slavian victims in the second 
round of last season's 
competition. 


Since die Vujovic twins and 
the outstanding Sliskovic have 
been acquired by French dubs, 
Hajduk now have only one 
member of the national squad. 
Milj us, a full back, was not 
selected against England at 
Wembley last month in a Euro- 
pean Championship tie in which 
the Yugoslavs confirmed the 
superiority of their technique. 

Even though they are likely to 
do so again tonight, there is 
adequate room Tor Scottish 
optimism. It would be even 
more extensive if United were 
in top form or at full strength. 
They are neither and McLean, 
like his opposite number, has 
yet to reveal his line-up. 

Sturrock is the principal, and 
most worrying, doubt. United’s 
most experienced forward has a 
toe injury which has troubled 
him throughout the season. But 
be and Narey, a central defender 
who returned to the side for the 
victory over Hibernian on Sat- 
urday. are both expected to be 
chosen. 

So is Hegarty, although 
merely as a substitute. His 
appearance, should it be nec- 
essary, wiO be the most unusual 
feature of the night. He will 
come on, not as a defender as is 
his customary role, but as an 
emergency goalkeeper. The 
club's youujg understudy, 
Thompson, is in plaster. 


and McMinn has pleased 
many of those who still prefer 
the old up-and-at-'em ap- 
proach which in the pas 
brought so much excitement 
against continental 

OI &Sinmibnstious raids did' 
not bring many goals, how- 
ever, and Souness. now 
fashioning a more modern 
and agreeable style, wfll bring 
in these two unorthodox 




going badly. _ 

been out of action for nearly 
three months, Souness said: 
“It’s a gamble but won’t I be a 
hero if it comes off?” 

Borussia are said to be’ 
methodical but dick on the 
break. They have recovered 
from a poor start in their 
league and, now marshalled 
by the international Rahn, 
fancy themselves to take the 
UEFA Cup this season. 

A team bristling with talent 
yet highly efficient may have a 
goalkeeping worry: Kamps is 
believed to falter in a fusillade 
of accurate crosses. But even if 
the tale is true — and whoever 
saw a German goalkeeper who 
was not an all-round tech- 
nician? — Kamps’s defensive 
colleagues are husky to say the 
least Rangers would do better 
to hope that their delightful 
pattern will once again be 
bright enough to dazzle the 
opposition rather than revest 
to the old policy of muscle 
over mind 

Certainly there will be no 
chance of Celtic changing their 
style for the premier division 
match with Aberdeen tonight 
Fast spectacular and skilful, 
the league leaders will attract a 
capacity attendance to 
Pittodrie. 

Ian Porterfield, foe new 
Aberdeen manager, wants to 
make a notable start to his 
career in Scotland with a 
double over the Old Firm but 
Celtic will be more difficult to 
dispose of than foe lacklustre 
Rangers were on Saturday. 

Celtic; who may be without 
MacLeod, are likely to recall 
foe veteran McGrain, while 
Aberdeen could have Joe 
Miller at centre forward if 
Dodds, who scored the win- 
ning goal against Rangers, 
does not recover in time from 



Mm 

ii*' 00m tel: m sm 








for the 


i trophy far : 


plus a 


x: Graham Gooch (i 
smile, from Prince 


Hibs hot 
on trail 
of Gray 


Turner puts loyalty first as 
he recalls building site 


Vital role for Passarella 


Prague — Daniel Passarella 
is expected to return to the Inter 
Milan defence for tonight's third 
round UEFA Cup tie against 
Dukla Prague after being omit- 
ted from last Sunday’s 1-1 
league draw with Coma 

Giovanni Trapattoni. the 
manner, believes the side will 
benefit from the international 
experience of Argentina's 1978 
World Cup winning captain and 
defender, aged 33. m the first leg 
de against foe Czechoslovaks, 
who have an impressive recent 
record in Europe. 

Dukla. however, have made 
an inauspicious start in foe 
league this season. They are 
twelfth in the 16-team first 
division and have not yet 
adequately filled the gaps left by 
foe departure abroad of Vizek, 


their influential midfield player 
and Pdc, their leading forward. 

Despite this, Jiri Lopata, the 
Dukla manager, remains con- 
fident. “Inter are an attractive 
side but they don't make me 
breathless. We pulled it off 
against Bayer Leverkusen in the 
second round, so why not 
again?” 

Bayer Uerdingen’s hopes of 
beating Barcelona, the Spanish 
league leaders, will rise signifi- 
cantly if Herget, their inter- 
national defender, is passed fit 

The West Germans have yet 
to concede a goal in foe com- 
petition but that record would 
be in serious jeopardy if they 
face Barcelona without their 
polished sweeper. Terry 
Venables, foe Barcelona man- 
ager, can however point to an 


MONDAYS RESULTS 


m 


FA CUP: FM lend: RstpaoMb Brtstol 
flora's v Brentford. Rat mud replays: 
Futiam A. HerorortJ 0 (Futjam at homo to 

—MaMMone*. Wolfing 1 

hone to Cambridge 
Swansea 4, Wea'/stone 1 (Swan- 
9« a bane to Sough), fins round; 
Second replays: Chaster 1, Rotherham 0 


3 (Baton at home to Tranmere). 
FREIGHT ROVES TROPHY: Prafcrt oa iy 
lOUDd; EAddtssbonjgh 3, Donca3ter 0. 

FA TROPHY: TMrO mB |*H round 
raplaja: Dutweh HamtatsT&Hys 2 (aeft 
Nwewon 1, (ting’s Lynn 1; Southport 2, 
Wltfbyl. 


SOUTHERN LEAGUE: Premier cfviaton: 
Qwto a tord 2, FoKastone 2; Safistxey 1, 
Gosport 2. M B elow Cap: firat reonrt 
Postponed RusMen v King's Lynn. . 
CENTRAL LEAGUE Second dwtotore 
Preston A. Rotherham a 
SUSSEX SENIOR CUP: Second round: 


vision north: Royston 2. Ware 0; Vauxhal 
Motors LTringi- 

WUGHT FLOBJUT LEAGUE- Gtovenaga 
T. Stansted 1. 

RUGBY UNION 

TOUR MATCH: Bridgend 2D. Ngon Gotha 
(NewZsatox/H. 


equally impressive defensive 
record — 10 games since 
Zubizaretta last picked the ball 
from his net. 

While Barcelona win rely on 
the experienced scoring talents 
of Lineker and Hughes to break 
litis potential deadlock. Bayer 
may depend on Bierboff and 
Witzecek, their teenage for- 
wards, both aged 18, to pull off 
an unexpected win. 

Welsh plan 
card scheme 

Wales are ready to introduce a 
football membership scheme to 
help s tam p out hooliganism in 
the Principality. The National 
Supporters Club will cod m the 
region of £100,000 to set up. 

Home spectators wiO be 
allowed entry to League games 
involving Cardiff City, Swansea, 
Newport County and Wrexham 
only by showing a membership 
card. The Welsh FA secretary, 
Alan Evans, stressed that the 
scheme was still in the planning 
stage, bat that it was the 
Association's aim to hare it 
implemented by tire nearly part 
of next season. 

Football League dobs will be 
asked to cooperate by admitting 
only Welsh dob cardholders to 
matches. 


Hibernian, the Scottish pre- 
mier division d pb , last night 
made their first move towards 
signing Andy Gray, the Aston 
Villa forward, as their player/- 
manager. 

Ken Waugjh, the Hibernian 
chairman, rang Dong Ellis, the 
Villa chpft rwan T to discuss the 
question of compensation for 
the Scottish international, aged 
30, who still has 18 months of 
his contract to ran at Villa Park. 

Villa are understood to want 
at least £80.000 for Gray who 
was signed for £140,000 from 
Everton last season. 

IT the Hibernian directors 
agree that Gray is the man they 
want tQ fill the post at a board 
meeting in Edinburgh this 
morning, Waugh will contact 
Ellis again for permission to 
speak to the player. 

• Mich D’Avray, the former 
England under-2l forward who 
plays for Ipswich Town, wants 
to move to Portugal. The South 
African-born player valued at 
£100,000 by the former UEFA 
Cup winners, is to train for five 
days with Sporting Farense, the 
Algarve chib who are currently 
bottom of the Portuguese first 
division with only four points in 
11 games. 

• Darlington have failed in an 
attemptto re-sign Cat! Airey, 
their former for war d, from Bel- 
gium. Cyril Knowles, tire man- 
ager who sokl him to Royal 
Charleroi for £30,000 in the 
satnmer, has had a £5,000-ofier 
turned down. Instead, Airey has 
joined Twente Enschede, tire 
Netherlands first division side 
on loan for the rest of the 
season. 

• Tottenham Hotspur's home 
first division game against the 
League leaders. Arsenal, will be 
televised five by tire BBC on 
Sunday, January 4. 


Chris Turner, tire Cambridge 
United manager, rejected a 
move to Peterborough United 
yesterday, on the eve of his 
club's Uttiewoods Cup tie 
against Tottenham Hotspur, for 
reasons of loyalty. 

In refusing the offer of assis- 
tant manager to Nod Cantwell, 
he said: “A year ago David 
Rushton, the chairman, took me 


By CHre White 

off a building site to make me 
manager. It was probably the 
bravest decision ever taken by a 
football dub and that deserves 
-some loyalty." 

Turner, for whom Cambridge 
is his first managerial post, 
added: “Peterborough made me 
a very good offer but I owe 
something to the dub. its 
supporters and foe players 



AafieM beware: Adams is on the comeback goal trail 


Vote of confidence for Turner after cup defeat 


Graham Turner’s job as fo e 
manager *of Wolverhampton 
Wanderers is safedespite Mon- 
day nighfs hu m i l ia t i ng FA Gap 
defeat by the Multipart League 
dub, Cboriey, according to the 
dub chairman, Dick Homden. 
Mr Homden said Turner was in 
“no danger whatsoever” of be- 
ing dismissed, despite repealed 
rails for his sacking from the 
terraces. 

“Graham Tomer inherited 
this team and he'll be given a 
fair chance,” Homden said. “I 
ask tire fans to save him tire time 
he deserves and needs.” As well 
as bong the lowest point in 
Wolves’ glorious history, tire 3-0 
defeat was tire worst Turner had 
experienced in his career. 

Turner, who was sacked by 
Aston Villa earlier tins season 
and appointed last month in 
succession to the popular Brian 
Little, admitted he was hurt by 
foe for his dismissal, but 




ts the 


Snooker suffers a blow to the pocket 


The damaging c ontro v ers y 
over easy pockets and generous 
tables rumbled on bemud the 
scenes of snooker’s £3 million 
tournament circuit yesterday. 

Several baiting professionals, 
including Dennis Taylor, Tony 
Knowles and Alex Higgins, have 
openly cr itici z e d the cut of tire 
pockets during the £300,009 
Tennents UK Opes dnumptoa- 
ship at Preston in tire past 10 
days. 

Ail of them have churned — 


tion - that the fractionally eas- 
ier pockets are costing the top 
players their edge over the lesser 
professioBsJs striving to break 
info the game's elite tup 16. 
Now, they may even cost Hig- 
gins his livelihood. 

He was involved in a heated 
argument about the issue with 
Pul HatbereO, the tournament 
director, a few minutes after 
completing * 9-7 third-round 
win over Grimsby's Mike 
Hattett to reach the quarter- 
fingh ji of the 16 -day tournament. 

Hipginni {$ alleged to have 
ended the argument by butting 
HathereU, which scans sure to 
earn the fiery Irishman a 
lengthy suspension from the 

World Professional Billiards 
and Snooker Association, the 


are now playing with are under- 
mining my 17 years as a 
professional. The game is 
becoming more like pool every 
day. Nothing is being done — 
even tfewagh most of the top 
players believe this trend is bad 
for the game. 

“I hale to say a bad word 
abort Mike HaUett because I’ve 
known him for a long time. But, 
if be can run me so dose when 
I'm trying then something has 
got to be wrong. Unless there are 


will disappear from the game, 
ftfi not prepared to stand for it. 
It’s just not (UL 
“Only a few days ago, there 
was a momentous occasion in 
world sport when Jahangir 
Khan was beaten at squash, fa 


squash costs, have they? 

“Snooker has become far too 
commerdaL The game is befog 
devalued for the sake of spon- 
sors and television. Something 
should be done before ft's too 
late.” 

Hatberdl conducted an im- 
promptu Press conference to 
answer Higgins 1 charges and 
explained: “Tire pockets for tire 
tables in this tournament have 
been approved in accordance 


They fulfil every spedffiotfim. 
But, obviously, we will betaking 
the players' complaints very 
seriously.” 

Hnthmll then ran into his 
well-publicised confrontation 
with Higgins. But, while the 37- 


Higgins was dearly i ncense d 
by the state of the tables and, a 
few minutes before bis dash 
vrifoHatirerdl, the “Hurricane” 
had a gain emphasized bis com- 
plaints against foe pockets, 
which he daftnei were redaring 
snooker to foe levels of baiHnMiu 
pool. 

Higgins explained: “1 am 

derated that the pockets we 



Taylor ridiculous 


Knowles; frightened 


year-old Irishman can expect no 
support over that: violent in- 
cident. his argamests on the 
merits of tire BCE tournament 
tables carry some weight. 

Knowles, tire world No 4 
player, agreed with Higgins: 
“The pockets are far too hfe- I’ve 
hardly seen a decent game of 
smoker this year because good 
players are frightened to leave 

anything on because (bear oppo- 
nents can come in, chance their 

„ „ i i._ . hr. mauL 


Irak to 

kiUing the game.” 

Taylor, the former world 
champion, added: “I don't often 
agree with what Tony has to say 
abort the game, but, on this 
issue, he's 100 per cent right. 
The pockets are ndteutoasly big, 
and that won't do snooker any 
favours.” 

Only Terry Griffiths, another 

former world champion, seemed 

to believe that the generous cut 
of the tables was good for 
snooker. He argued: “Pockets 
have to be on foe generous side 
because the paying public want 
h» see open ploy and big breaks. 

“If we go back to tighter 
tables, then safety players like 
myself and Cfiff Thrtfaern 
would domocue and that weald 
hurt the game's popularity.” 

Griffiths, however, was a bate 
voice among foe game's top 
professionals and, white foe 
WFBSA tarn their attentions to 
Higgins, they will also jiRt as 
surely take note of foe consid- 
erable weight of criticism and 
revert to the sort of pockets foat 
their members so badly want. 


added: “It is all part and parcel 
of foe modem game.” 

“It is foe worst moment in my 
career without any shadow of 
doubt but if s no tune to talk 
about whether I regret taking the 
job on. What we have now is a 
culmination of four or five years 
bad management,” he said. 

Choiiey’s opponents in the 
second round, Preston North 
End, have rejected their request 
to play the tie on a Sunday. 
Cboriey humbled Wolves on 
neutral territory at Buroden 
Park, Bolton, as their own 
Victory Park ground is under- 
going safety work, and wanted 
to tackle Preston on the same 
pitch. 

With Bolton Wanderers also 
at home in the second round on 
December 6, the Football 
Association gave Cboriey ap- 
proval to try to arrange their Ue 
for the Friday night or the 
Sunday. Preston immediately 


TENNIS 

Lendl gives 
Mecir a 
tough lesson 

Inglewood, California (AP) — 
Ivan Lendl, of Czechoslovakia, 
the world's top-ranked men's 
player, defeated his fellow 
countryman Miroslav Mecir, 6- 
0, 7-5, in an exhibition match 
here on Monday. In another 
match, Helena Sukova, also 
from Czechoslovakia, beat Car- 
ling Bassett, of Canada, 7-5, 7-5. 

Lendl needed only 25 minutes 
to win the first set over Medr. 
The second set was more diffi- 
cult for the US Open champion, 
who required nearly an hour to 
win the set and end the match. 
“I started missing my first 
serves in the second set,” Lendl 
said. ”1 got carried away by the 
way I played in the first set. 

“1 was playing well and he 
didn't play weft. Then, he 
started playing well and I said, 
Tm going to just power through 
him. Then he starts moving yon 
around. 1 had to tdl myself to 
settle down. It could have gone 
either way. That’s the way it is.” 

Medr, aged 22, raid he didn't 
play his best tennis in the first 
set. “I bad the feeling I could 
improve.” he said. 


ruled out the latter suggestion 
and asked Chorley to switch the 
tie to Deepdate. 

“We are definitely not going 
there,” the Cboriey secretary, 
Mick Wearnxmth, said. “We 
want to get into the third round 
and we feel our best chance of 
doing that will be on grass and 
not Preston’s plastic pitch." 

With Ballou unlikely to agree 
to a Friday game, Cboriey have 
pencilled in Wigan, Blackburn 
and Burnley as possible venues 
for their first appearance in the 
second round. 

Swansea City secured a home 
tie against Slough Town after 
disposing of another non-league 
side, WeaMstone, 4-1 at the 
Vetch Field but had two-players 
sent off in the process. Gordon 
Davies scored twice for Fulham 
as they defeated Hereford 


United 4-0 whDe Brian Croft’s 


City to defeat Krtherfaam 
United. 

Bolton were 3-1 winners at 
Halifax Town and the leading 
GM Conference ride, Maid- 
stone United, earned a home tie 
with Cambridge United after 
beating Wdfing United 4-1. 

Bristol Rovers and Brentford 
will try again, tonight to play the 
only outstanding first-round tie. 

REVISE) SECOND ROUND DRAW: Scun- 
ttiorpe v Runcorn; ctnlay v Preston; 
RodtoBtavWranianRMMsrtvPortVato; 
Chester v Ooncusw: Boton v Ttanmare: 
Notts County v MfEMasbrough; TeBonj v 
Altrincham; Qufington v Wigan; Caernar- 
fon v York 
BrantfonJ; MakJMona v Cartridge 
United; BoumroouA v Orient Swansea v 
Stougtn FUtam « Newport; GEinrttam 
Ctwtorefcrt; Bristol CteyBalfc Swtadon 
Enflald; Southend v Northampton; Aider- 
shot v Colchester. 

Ttosfo be plated on tmakandotOec & 


CRICKET 


Hughes paid £90,000 
for S African tours 



Penh (AFP) — Kim Hughes, 
captain of the rebel Australian 
team now in South Africa, will 
receive Aus$200,000 tax-free 
(about £90,8 50) for his two tours 
of that country. 

The former Australian 
captain’s contract with the 

South African Cricket Union 

(SACU) has been revealed in a 
letter u> the Western Australian 
Cricket Association from the 
association’s lawyers. 

The fetter says Hughes's earn- 
ings are approximately equiva- 
lent to earnings of AuSSSOO.OOQ 
(about £226,750) if those earn- 
ings were subject to income tax, 
in Australia. 

It had been previously be- 
lieved that all members of the 
Australian rebel side were raid a 
pre-tax figure of Aus$200.000 
for the two tours. The tetter does 
not refer to details of foe 
contracts of other players. 

Hughes recently won a court 
battle against foe Western 
Australian Cricket Association, 
which had hannad him from 


FOR THE RECORD 


FOOTBALL 


playing ctub cricket here. The 
federal court ruled that he be 
allowed to play and ordered the 
association to pay the costs of 
about Ans$40G,000 (about 
£181,700). 

• Kimberley (Renter) — Cava- 
lier batting fay John Dyson and 
Michael Haysmau led the rebel 
Australians to an easy 80-run 
victory in their one-day match 
against Griquatond West yes- 
terday. Sent in after losing the 
toss, the Australians reached 
248 for five in their 50 overs and 
then dismissed the home team 
for 168. 

Opener Dyson hit 10 fours 
and a six in his dS before being 
stumped and with Haysman 

a put on 171 for the second 
3. Then paceman Terry 
Alderman, showing a welcome 
return to form after a nifflUng 
shoulder injury, went through 
the home team's top batting. He 
took four for 28 in his JO overs 
white Rodney Hogg removed 
three for 33. 

SC0RE& Austraten » 24S tor flue KQ 
owriftQrtqwtariWteBtisa. 


POWERBOATING 



Turner hopes to make a 
substantial repayment to night 
by beating Tottenham Hotspur 
before a capacity audience of 
over 10,000 at Abbey Stadium 
to earn a quarter-final tie pgainst 
West Ham United at Upton 
Park. 

However. Cambridge, th e last 
remaining representative from 
the bottom two divisions, wH 
be without Flanagan, the former 
Fn gTand tmder-23 international, 
because of a knee injury- Flana- 
gan was the ins pirati on behind. 


athletics 


Desrueiles 

receives 

two-month 

suspension 

Brussels (Reuter) -.The 
European indoor sprint . coam« 
piotoRonaW Desnidtes, has 
£eeo suspended from con> r 
petition for two months after ah 
alleged attempt to mislead las 
regional athletic muon's sdeo- 
tion committee, as athletic 
npion spokesman said. 

It is the second time foe 
Belgian has been banned in six 
wears. In March 1980, after 
winning the long jump at the 
•European indoor- champion- 
ships, be received an iS-nwafo- 
suspension for taking a forbid- 
den drug. • 

Desna cites, the 60 metres. 

winner m Madrid, has now been 

of changing details of a 
100 metre race u Catania, 
Sicily, the, Flemis h at hletics 
disciplinary committee 
president, Rudy Verfaeckt, said 
yesterday. 

Desrueiles allegedly &ve the 
athle tic s union a results sheet 
showing he bad run 10.16. 
seconds, his fastest time of the 
year, with a following mod of 
0.75 metres per second. 

Bm Veriaeckt said the wind 
bad in fact been 2.75 metres, 
over the Emit for times included 
in official record fists. 

Desrueiles receives financial 
support from foe .Flemish 
ralmlalwl OO his fastest 
times during foe year. 

Desrueiles could appeal 
a gainst the suspension, which is 
due to start early next month. 
But Veriaeckt said an appeal 
would mean the suspension 
would be postponed and foe 
sprinter might miss, the Euro- . 
pean indoor championships in 
February and the World indoor 
cham pionships in March. 



Wimbledon and Ipswich Town 
earlier in the competition. 

The team, who are in the 
lower region of the fourth 
division, were assembled for 
£3,000 — the price it took to 
bring Lindsay Smith from 
Plymouth Argyte, for whom he 
appeared in their FA Cop semi- 
final ride three years ago. 
Tottenham, who will be without 
Oaeawi, their Befeten inter- 
national, because of injury, have 
not announced a side. 

The same goes for Liverpool, 
who (day Coventry City in a 
fourth-round replay at AnfiekL 
Johnston, still under treatment 
for a back injury which has kept 
him out lor two games, is in the 
squad. McMahon, who hurt a 
band in the Merseyside derby 
with Everton on Sunday, is fit 
after an X-ray revealed only 
bruising. 

Coventry’s only change from 
the side who held the champions 
to a goalless draw last week is 
likely to be Adams for Painter, 
who was de putizin g for the cup-; 
tied Emerson. Adams has scored 
in two comeback games after 
injury. The winners face 
Everton at Goodison Park. 


for England 

England should have no trou- 
ble gaming their third successive 
victory in the European Leag u e 
match against Italy at the Angd 
Centre, Tonbridge, today. 

Desmond Douglas, of Bir- 
mingham, Is hade for England 
after missing the last match in 
Austria. Despite the absence of 
their No 1, England stiff won 7- 
0, following their earlier 6-1 
victory over Turkey, and they, 
are now top of tite first division 

table. 

Promotion to the premies: 
division, however, is unlikely to 
be settled until April when 
En gland comphse their pro- 
gramme' with an away fixture 
against West Germany, their 
ingest rivals for honours. 

England beat Italy 4-3 away 
last season and comparative 
results this term suggest an even 
easier victory. Italy nave already 
test to Tunoey and managed 
mily a 4-3 win against Austria. 
TEASE D Dowlas (Baringbwi). S ~ 


BOXING 


Training blow ; 
delays Pyatt ; 
title defence 

Chris Pyatt, the European- - 
figltt-nriddieweagtu champion.; 
from Leicester,; has pulled oat of . 
a voluntary first defence of hisv 
title against Giofranco Rori in- 
Perugia, Italy, next Wednesday. 

Pyatt, who won the vacant 
crown when he stopped John 
van Eftereu, of The Nether- 
lands. in 97 seconds at foe Royal 
Albert Hall in September, suf- 
fered a eta eye in training 
yesterday. Sam Borns, Pyatt’s 
manager, said: “He was winding 
up his training at the Royal Oak 
gym in Canning Town before 
leaving for Italy. It happened 
during a sparring session when 
there was a dash of heads. ” 

Christophe Tfozzi, of France, 
who won a bronze medal in foe 
1984 Los Angeles Olympic 
Games, .was Pyatfs sparring 
partner when the accident hap- 
pened. . Burns said that the 
injury, above the right eye, was 
not serious, although it needed a 
couple of stitches. “We have 
asked for a postponement until 
January,” he added, “but who 
knows what the promoters will 
do” 

• The former world welter- 
weight champion John H 
Stracey is to supervise foe 
training of John Williamson, a 
light-middleweight prospect 
who has rigned with Frank 
Maloney, London's newest 
promoter/manager. W illiam . 
soil, aged 22, from Gloucester, 
makes his debut with the new 
team at Lewisham Theatre on 
February 24. 


Kiwi takes charge 

. New Z ealand have nominated 
mtemaoonal referee Keith Law- 
rence. from Bay of Plenty, to 
handfe two of the Five Nations 
championship matches in the. 
new year. Lawrence's cotrjpa- 
tttoL David Bishop, took charge 
of the international matches 
between Romania and France. 

last mouth, and between Ireland 

and Romania, earlier this 
month. 

The two matches he wiD 
handle will be deckled at the 
{MeMg next month of the Five 
nations referees committee, 
wbra appointments will be 
f orih e championship. 
Ireland will be represented at 


^fi r ? erin1ernaliopal offin^r 


a member of their international 

SSmwSK 1 decided kter 




rag a five-contest winning : 


















LJ* X&& 




sm 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 26 1986 


TELEVISION AND RADIO 


Edited by Peter Dear 
and Peter Davaile 


When 


are taken off the ice 


Uo 







• In striking _ contrast with the 
uncomproimsiiigjy realistic and 
intensely human subjects that wo 
have come to expect of Desmond 
Wilcox’s The Visit, a strange air of 
unreality bangs over this week’s 
film The Golden Voyage (BBC1, 

9.40k Spectacular nostalgia can 
have that effect, and when yon add 
to it tbe element of make believe, 
the poor old viewer doesn’t know 
whether he is coming or going. It 
would have made some sense if ' 
the Britons whom we see making 
the sea' crossing to the United 
States in commemoration of die 
maiden voyage of the finer Queen 
Mary 50 years ago, had been aide 
to do it on board the Grand Old 
Lady herself. Bat as she is now 
retired permanently moored, at 
Long Beach, California, the voy- 
agers who are re-lrving their 50- 
year-old memories have to do so 
on board the next best thing, the 


CHOICE 


QE2. It is a bit like flying in 
Concorde to celebrate the first 
flight by air balloon. And, in any 
case, by the time the QE2 pas- 
sengers eventually get to tread the 
decks ofthe Qneen Mary, much of 
the magic has worn off thanks to 
some icebergs that displayed a 
cool insensitivity to the golden 
wonder of the occasion. In this 
epone arion. Titanic echoes are 
stirred. One : passenger recalls that 
when he toldfan acquaintance that 
he planned to book a seat for the 
Qneen Mary’s maiden voyage, he 
was advised to travel only on one 
ofthe French liners. Dirty they 
might be, with poor service, but at 
least there wasn’t any of that 
nonsense about women and chil- 
dren first 

• Familiar only with those 


Sylvester Stallone movies in 
which he plays the pugilist called 
Rocky, I went to see Stallone in 
F.LS.T. (Channel 4, 9.00pm) with 
entirely the wrong expectations. 
Whatever the fide may lead you to 
think, Norman Jewison's film has 
nothing to do with the fight game. 
There is much fighting in it, but 
not of the boring land. The 
violence in F.lS.T±as to do with 
militant trade unionism in the 
Cleveland of the 1930s, and it 
covers the entire . range, from 
punch-ups in the car peak a pd 
heads being cracked open with 
dubs in street battles to trade 
drivers being shot to death at the 
wheel and tracks being blown up 
by fire bombs. Stallone (not God’s 
gift to' elocution; perhaps, but 
more sensitive an actor than you 
might expect, given his physical 
make-up) is the trade union boss 
who, like the te am ster s’ leader 


Jimmy Hofla in real life, gets 
involved with hoodlums. Essen- 
tially, FJS.T. is rust a spectacular 
morality story with affinities with 
The Godfather, but, of its kind, it 
is undoubtedly well done 
• Colin Davis’s four-part adapta- 
tion of Norman Collins's London 
Belongs to Me, already broadcast 
in the BBC World Service, gets off 
to a splendid start ( Radio 4, 
3.00pm). Thanks to many a deft 
touch in Enyd WiDiams s direc- 
tion, all the characters in the house 
are already firmly in place in my 
imagination, and at the end ofthe 
first episode I was left with a 
genuine concern about their 
rates. -Music highlight cm radio 
tonightthe definitive 1872 ver- 
sion of Mussorgsky’s Boris Godu- 
nov, with Vedernikov in the title 
role' (Radio 3, 7.00pm). 


Peter Davaile 



jr’s 


• a 

:ic 


nical en- 
8,000 be 
ilio Gold 
f to good 




gramo- 
donation 
peal and 
ar,” Mr 
JJestree, 




US-bound on the QE2: Charles and Kay Cbllip (The Golden VoyageJQBCl, 9.40pm) 


who has 
since it 
aid that 
is luck. 
Stic. It is 


iTV I ONDON 


630 CwfaxAUL 

630 Now* hsacflnes foHowsd by 
TlwFVntBtonea. (r)635 
Weather. 

7J00 BmktateUme with Flank 
Bough, SaByMagnusson and 
jaramy Ffexman. 

&40 Watchdog. Michael Howard, 
Parifementary Under- 
secretary. Department of 
Trade and Industry, k 
quceOtmed on new consumer 
teglslattonby viewers and John 
Stapleton 835 Regional news 


arge Schaefer 330 
on. 3^0 Save aUfe. A 
to emergency first aid. (r) 


935 Day to Day. Robert Kfroy-Sfik 
end his stufloaudience 
discuss a topical matter 936 
Advice Shop. Margo 
MacDonald with news of two 


ways to which to prepare your 
home far the winter cold TOJOO 
H al ohbo ure .fl) 

1020 ThewomWee. (r) 1025 Phflfip 
Schofield With chttdren's 


330 Pinny’s House 430 Arrimitf 
Fakios i leath cfi fl MKl Co. 
Cartoon adventures of an 
aSey-cat 430 HartboaL Tony 
Hart's art class. 

4.55 John Craven's Itawramf 
530 The CNkfcwr of Groan 
Know*. Epstode one of a new 
four-part adventure about a 
young man who is Invited by 
raa great grandmother to 
■ spend Christmas with her in 
her large and remote country 
house. Starring Alec Christie 
and Daphne Oxenford. 

5.35 MaiMam 

000 News with Nictiofas Wltchefl 


OOO Ceetax. 

015 Daytime on Two: cleaning the 
River Clyde 035 CaetarlQJIO 
For four- end five-year olds 
1015 Science - notse 1038 


Science - Infra-red light aid 
ultrasonic sound 11 JOO words 
and pictures 11.17 Fanning red 
deer and sabnon in Scotland 
11.40 Wbmen factory workers 
and new technology. 

1232 MathsstaUstfcs12J25WOridng 
h the construction industry 
1048 Spanish language 
course 1.10 The state of 
English law 1.38 Comparing a 
one-man highland railway 
station with Glasgow Central 
Station 230 Thfrikabout 2.15 

Dutch and English 
schoolc hi ldren celebrate 
Sfnterldaas Day. 

4 kg f*S. .inhhifTMfT. 

■ wnoQquonsiNp smbdchcoim 

Quarterfinal action in the . 


and PhSpHayton. Weather. 
035 London Plus. 

7.00 Wogan. Tonight's guests 

include M8m Hemingway, 
Ken Livingstone, and Steph 
Baytey. Plus music from Afe 
Mbyte. 

7.36 The Ctothm Show Incttxfes 


tetevisfon programme news, 
10l 30 Ptay School (rt 1050 


1030 Play School (r) 1050 

Henry's Cat (r) 

1055 Ft« to Eleven. Catherine 
Grifter with a thought for the 
day 1130 tlayOuL With 
Angela ffippon in south 
SomerarfW 1130 Open Mr. 
Viewers have the chance to 
comment on televisian 


935 Thames news heacKnes 
030 Schools: Maths -the number 
■ten* 042 Energy-saving 
houses OSB Mates - imams 
1016 Physics: electron 
diffraction 1033 Today in 


Andrews lays an ambush for 
mother unsuspecting worthy. 


CHANNEL 4 1L VARIATIONS 


Czechoslovakia 1132 Music 
far celebrations 1139 A 
hofiday In France. 


houday In France. 

1230 The Giddy Game Show, (ri 
12.10 Our Backyard. (01030 
Spin Offs. Tim Brooke-Taytor 


Tennants United Kingdom 
Championship. 335 Regional 
news and weather. 

430 Pamela Armstrong. This 
a fternoon's guests are 
Anthony Burgess and Car! 
Davis. Plus music from Marti 
Webb. 

430 ChamptoMhfo Snooker. 
Rather action from Preston. 

530 Cover to Cover presented by 
Coin MacCabe. Actress 
Alexandra Pf0g talks about the 
Mils and Boon fibrary; there is 
s discussion on Steven Bach's 
Final Cut the Inside story of 
Hie multi mHion dolar 
Holywood flop. Heaven's 
Gate; and Redmond O'Hanion 
talks about his trip to the 
Amazon. 

630 FBne The Rounders (1964) 
starring Glenn Fbrd and Henry 
Fonda. A comedy western 
about two horse wranglers 
who, try though they might, 
cannot amass the money they 
need to spend a luxurious 
. re tire ment on a tropical bland. 
Directed by Burt Kennedy. 

730 Cartoon. Tex Avery’s, Screwy 
Truant (ri 


McGee, (ri 

830 Dallas. J.R. and 


their control of 


Bobby fir 
MngOfi 


hfayiB ghts from yesterday's 
matches in the Tennants 


United Kingdom Championship 
- 1235 Regional news and 
weather. 

130 One O’clock News with 
MartynLewis. Weather 135 




setin a Melboune amurb 130 
UttJe Ifisaes. LftUe Mbs 
Trouble narrated by Pauflne 
Collins and John Alderton. 

230 FtacAPimofarlteCtmino. 
(1 882) starring Bette Davte, 
Penny Futter, and George 
Heam.Amade4or-talsvttion ' 
drama about a widow who Is 
diagnosed irreversibly sends, 
somewhat hastily It ner view 
and also her granddaughter's. 
Together they try to get the 
diagnosis ravened. Directed 


830 Points of View. 

930 A Party Pofltical Broadcast by 

the GDP. 

9.10 Mews with JuRaSormrviHs and 
John Humphry* Regional 
news and weather. 

930 The VHL A documentary 
about the celebratory tourney 
• made on the QE2 by members 
■ of thepubflewhowereonthe 
maiden voyage ofthe Queen 
Mary, a hafcw-century ago. 
(Cteefex) (see Choice) 

1030 Spoctsagtrt introduced by 
Steve Ritter. Snooker: 
quarterfinal action hi file 
Tennants United Kingdom 
Championship; Boxing: the 
heavyiwelghtoout between 
Horace Notice and Proud 
KSmanjaro; Rowing: profBes 
of Steve Redgrave arid Andy" 
Holmes. 12.10 Weather. 


Spin Offs. Tim Brooke-Taytor 
continues his exploration of 
inter es ting places made more 
accessible by the M25 Orbital 
Motorway. 

130 Newa atom with John Suchet 
130 Thames news 

130 A Country practice. Medical 
drama serial about a health 
cflnlc serving a rural Australian 
community, 230 Farmhouse 
Kitchen. Grace MuHigan does 
wonders with a ham shank on 
the bone. 

330 Take the High Road. Evidence 
gathers that there has been a 


Hilda some advice, artdMika 
Baldwin efiscovers how tough 
his young wife can be. 

830 Strike it Lucky. Michael 
Barrymore presents another 
round of the quiz game show 
that uses the most up-to-date 
technology. 

830 The Benny KB Show. A 
compilation of sketches from 
the master of hmuendc's 


previous shows. 

930 The Equalizer. McCall plans to 
take his son fora peaceful 
weekend in the country before 
the young man departs far the 
delights of Parisian life. But the 
dream of a quiet rustic 
weekend is shattered by 
murder and mayhem. Starring 
Edward Woodward and WUtcam 
Zabka .(Oracle) 

1030 A Party Pottles! Broadcast by 
theSDP. 

10.10 News with Alastair Burnet and 
Carol Barnes. Weather 
followed by Thames news 
headfines. 

1030 Midweek Sport Special 


prowler at both the Lachten 
Croft and at Letir-Fafloch 335 
Thames news headBnes 330 

Sons and Daughters 


430 Thomas the Tank Engine and 
Friends, narrated by Ringo 
Starr 4.10 The Tetebuos 430 
’ S.WJLLLO.W. David Bellamy 
unravafe anothBr selection of 
obscure clues 435 Hold Tight! 
indudes guests, Buddy 
Curtassandthe 
Grasshoppers, and the Ward 
Brothers, presented by 
Jacqueline Reddin, Michael 
Waterman and Peter Simon. 
5.15 B toc h b us tte s . 

535 Nows with Alastak Stewart 
630 Thames news 
630 Help! On the eve of the first 
International Comm unity 
Architecture Conference, 
comm u nity architects, 
planners, and designers 
answer viewers questions. 

835 CtessmNis.Bermy is helped 


730 BBC 


- intro duc e d by Jancis Robinson ~ 
and Christopher Frayfing. A 
newconrietition for wwt 
designed products, graphics, 
and ttesfaned spaces' 

830 Out of Court presented by 
David Jessei md Sue Cook. 

930 M*A*S*R Henry arrives back 
from leave in Tokyo madly in 
fave with a sweet young 
stunner, (r) 

935 Breaking Up. Episode two of 
the four-part dram a about the 
effect on a schooboy of his 
parents's acrimonious divorce. 

10.15 The Trouble WithSex. 

Christine Cox plays Mrs 
Ibbotaon in ttiis dra ma ti zati on 
aimed at debunking the myths 
about VD cflnlcs, or genflo- 
urinary dlnlcs as they are now 
known. Mrs ibbotson has been 


Footbal: news of the Uefa Cup 
thkd round, ftst leg matches, 
and Littiewoods Cup fourth 


round replays; Skating: 
highlights ofthe Tuborg British 
Figure Skating 
Championships. 

12.10 That's Hofiywood. The songs 
and songwriters ofthe 
musicals 

12.35 MgM Thoughts 


• TV -A IV!. - . 


byDiane, 
730 This Is Yi 


b Your Life. Eamonn 


6.15 Good Morning Britain 

presented by Anne Diamond 
and Mike Morris. News with 
Gordon Honeyoombe at 633, 
7.00, 730, 830, 630 and 930; 
financial news at 635; sport at 
630 and 730; exercises at 
635s cartoon at 735; pap 
music at 735; and video report 
at 835. The After Nine guests' 
Include Petu la Clark 


referred to the Royal 
HaBamshke Hospital, 


Sheffield, b 
need of cay 
treatment 


1035 A Party F 
theSDP. 


theSDP. 

1035 NawnUght 11.40 Weather. 





her GP, and Is in 
lasenritive 



2.16 The* Lordships' House. A 
repeat of last night's 
programme of tnghBghts of the 
day s debates in the House of 
Lords. 

230 Fain: The Gang's AD Here* 
(1939) starring Jack Buchanan 
and GoogiB withers. John 
Forrest Is brought out of early 
retirement from his insurance 
investigator's Job when a 
fortune in Jewels is stolen from 
his former firm's safe. Directed 
by Thornton Freeland. 

430 Mavis on 4 . In this week’s 
edition of Predicaments mavis 
Nicholson explores the 
problems of alcoholism. 

430 Countdown. Yesterday’s 
winner of the anagrams and 
mental arithmetic competition 
is challenged by Doreen Whyte 
from Eastleigh, Hampshire. 
Richard Whitekry Is the 
quesflonmaster, assisted by 
Bid Davis as adjudicator 

530 Ice Skating. The Tuborg 
British Ftgiae Skating 
Championships, Introduced by 
Nick Owen. The commentators 
are Simon Reed, Bety 
CaRaway, and Nicky Slater. 

530 Hogan's Heroes. Vintage 
American comedy series about 
a group of resourceful AIM 
pnsonere-of-war who make Rfe 
neH for their captors. 

630 TheAMsottandCoatefio 
Show* Bud and Lou go on a 
hunti ng trip and meet a very 
irate grizzly. 

630 In Tune of War: SokSera of the 
RMng Sm Excerpts from the 

- And 

blatantly racist Canadian-made 

- The MtesJc of Nippon- (Grade) 

730 Channel 4 N o ws with Peter 

Sissons and Nicholas Owen. 

730 Comment TNs week’s political 
slot is filed by Gerry Neale, 
Conservative MP for North 
Cornwall. Weather. 

830 Looking brio Psaitinga. The 
fist of a sertes of six 
programmes aimed to 
stimulate interest in visiting art 
baBeries and museums. 
Tonight, Alistair Smith ofthe 
National Gallery examines how 
paintings have been 
Interpreted and re-interpretBd. 
beginning with the Mona Lisa 
(r) (Oracle) 

830 The New EnBghtonment In 
part three of his series 
Professor Kenneth Minogue 
examines the way society 
makes the most of the 


RBC1 WALES &3Spm-&0a Wales To-M 
day. s^S-7ib JuiCA. 12 . 10 * 0-1 
News Bid weather. SCOTLAND 1 R,S&s»-L 
11.00 Dwaman S35pte-74)0 Reporting ScoTl 
tendaneaitt pant PoMcrf 


I BOP ta Scotland) 

ksSpifri40 Toctny's Soon S^&OOIrvM 
aids Ubtar. &35-nm 12.i cass- | 

12.1S News and weather. ENOtAIO H 
S35pm-74W Ragkxml nawsmagBzinea.^1 




5 can be 
a stam- 
le to: 


BBC2 WALES &3MO-&55 
B52d£ Masterteam. SSSSJOO Interval 


NORTHERN IRELAND 1130Bn-1Z1Bpai 
Ulster in rocus. 


AMSL!^ tt30pB?|.00Garbens tor KL 


1 JO-1 JO News. &S3-SJS About Angfe. 
I2.l0n Jazz. 1Z40 Joy ki my Srxd, 
Closedown. 

BORDER London except: 

12J0F«-U» Gardening Time. 
1 JO-1 JO News. 100 At Home wtti Peter 
Saunders. 3JS-4JX) Young Doctors. UD-&36 
LotWaround. 12.10am Closedown. 

sasiBALgs^sg* » 

Treasure. 1 JO News. 1 JO-ZJO HoteL 6J0 
Crossroads. BJB-7 JO News. 12.10 New 
Awngars. 1.10 Comedy Tonight 135 
Jotofinder. Closedown. 




GRAMPIAN 

iywood. U0-130 Naw&SJO^te North 
TortgW. HUO Scooport 12.10am News, 
Ctosedown. 


■BAnada^js^™ 


1J0 Grenada Reports. 130 Randan & 
HorMkJpeceasad).2J5430GranadaR»- 
□OftB. 330-430 Yoing Doctors. ECO Gre- 
nada Reports. SJS Tms B Your Right 630- 
730 Crossroads. 12.10am Short teory 
Theatre. 1230 Ctosedown. 


KDLWBSTaagaas 


TVne. 1 JO News. 130-230 Scarecrow 
and Mrs King. 53043S News. 12.10am Tales 
trom the Danofcla. 1230 Closedown. 

MTV WALES As HIV Westex- 
niv WHLCa ^ 63feBMUSWalea 

at Six. 

SCOTTISH 

Time. 1 jo News. 1 JO LNe at One-Thirty. 
230-230 Lrxdc Who's Teftmd. 330 Country 
Practfcs. 335-430 S orl o y Madsen at 75. 
B3IHS35 Scotland Today. 1030 Scotsport 
12-tDm Lota Cal, Closedown. 


re wing 
and, in 
( them, 
al Ale 


TSW As London except t2Jflbm-L00 
i=!L Gardens tor Al 1 JO-130 News. 5.15 
Gus Honeybun. 530-535 Crossroods. 


630 Today South West. 830-730 Enune rdale 
Fsnn. 12 .i0bci Tales tram the Daricsale 
1240 Postscript Ctosedown. 

TVS As London except: 1230pm-i30 
-L— 2s SuUvans. 130 News. 1^ Short Snry 
Theatre. 230-233 Problem Pope. 330- 
433 Yonm Doctors. 630-83S Coes! to CoasL 
12.10am Company. Ctosedown. 

TmETEESg^ffg*^ 

the VWd.1 jo News. US-130 Where me 
Jobe Are. 63M36 Nonhere Ufa. 12.10am 
□arts. 1240 Industry Year. Oosedtnm. 


saiga’s 
‘ewing, 
Tormer 
Guide, 
have 
aihing 
jrders, 
Uergic’ 
flerill 
«rs in 
been 
foamy 
jr !o 




vwMMiiMi iwr fmwrw| 

in particular at the 1 
educational policy. 


— i230pm-130 Smnethlnq to 

Treasure. 130-130 LuncMam. 330-U» 
WM WPrld of Anlmais. 630 Good Evening (Jt- 
atar. 6J5-635 Festival Spot 1210m 
Festival Fofc 1230 News, Ctosedown. 


£ the- 
in 40 
Hacks 
xi co- 
ir to 
id. 


9.00 Film: F.LS.T. (1973) starring 
Sylvester Stallone and Rod 


YORKSHIRE K 


Steiger. Drama with StaSone 
as the leader of a trucking 


Sylvester Stallone in F1S.T^ die Hollywood-made flfan aboffi a 
trade ration leader ( Channel 4, 9.00pm) 


as the leader of a trucking 
union battling to improve nis 
members’ conditions and also 
the unwelcome attentions of a 
rival union. Directed by 
Norman Jewison, (see Choice) 
11.40 Joole Hoftand in Pertonmnce 
at the Snug Harbour Chib. New 
Orleans. 


Uva. 130 Nows. 130-230 Falcon Crest 
630-635 Calendar. 12.10am Movtamsfesrs. 
123IKS30 Music Box. 


Starts: ll.WmaScfxjote' Pro- 


= - grammas. 1135 bVervaL 1210pm Rime 
Ctnitsm Hundreds. 135 Their LordshtoB’ 


Ctnitarn Hundreds. 135 Their Lordships' 
House. 230 Coixitdown. 230 Strangns 
Abroad. 330 Print-tt-YoureaH. 435 
Ffatabelain. 415 Guta Goch A Mahma 430 
BIBdowcar. 530 Ice Skattnq. 530 five 
Women Phottnaphere. 630 BrnoksUe. 830 
Mavis on 4 730 Nawyddton Saith. 730 


12.10 Their Lordships’ House. Ends 
at12J25. 


Has Ar Fjrw. 830 Roc Ttol Te. 830 Hel 
Simeon. 215 Snwoar. 1030 Fane Hard 


Hot end Loos. 1130 New Enfightenmem. 
1220am Ctosedown. 


Mmm 


if,: 

^ v-i: 1 v. 


On modtum wave. Stereo on 
VHF (see below) 

News on the tuff-hour from 
630am unfi BJJQom then at 1000 
and 1230 midnight 
SJSOma Simon Mayo 730 
Adrian John SL30 Simon Bates 
1230pm Newsbeat (Frank 
Partridge) 1235 Gary Davies 830 
Steve Wright £30 Newsbeat 
(Frank Patodge) 535 Bruno 
Brookes find Top 30 album 




635 Weather 730 News 
735 Concert Schumann 


(Overture. Scherzo, 
Finale, Op 52: Stotto 


Finale, Op 52: Stut^art 
RSO), Poulenc (Sextet 
Koenig Ensemble), Johann 
StraussJMoraenblaaan 
Vienna P(% MriheS (Jazz 


Symphony: Netfieftands 
Wind EnsmbM. 830 News 


chart7J0 Janice Long IQjOQ- 
1230 John Peal. VHF Stereo 


Wtod Ensmbto). BlOQ N® 
8.05 Concert (contdV: Mozart 
(String Quintet k) B flat, I 


Radios 1 & 2: 430am As Radfe 2. 
1030pm As Rado 1. 1230- 
4j00amAsRadto2- 


(String Quintette B flat K 
174: wdh Arthur Grumsaux as 
one of the players), 

Schubert (Synmhony No 3.D 
200: Vienna POL &00 
News 

935 This Week’s Composer 
Scriabin. Poeme, Op 32 



wtmw 


On medtom wave. Stereo on 
VHF (see Radiol). 

News an the hour. Sports 
Desks 135pm, 232, 332, 432, 
535, 632, 6.45 (mfoniy), 9^5 
430am Caibi Berry 530 Ray 
Moore 730 Derek Jameson 830 
Ken Bruce 1130 Ken 
, Livingston b 135pm David Jacobs 
230 Gloria Hunniford 330 
David Hamaton 535 John Dunn 
730 Folk on2 830 The 
SpirmeiB and Friends (with Stan 
Hugm S30 Listen to the Band 
(Charte Chester) 1030 Aspects of 
Max Wan (Max W6H looks back) 
10.15 WMy Whyton 1030 The 
Golden Years (muCh-toved 
singers aS the pest) 1 130 Brian 
Matthew 130am Cnartes Nova 
330-430 A Little Mght Music. 


No 1 (composer on the 
piano), Poeme, No 2: 


Symphony No 3: 

Ams t erdam Coneertgebouw) 
1030 Terence 

MacQonagtr Mozart 
recordmgs featuring the 
oboe and cor anglats 
player. InctucfingSererrede In 
C minor, K 388, and the 
Adagio for cor anglais and 
string trio, K 580a. Also 
entraacta No2 from 


Jonathan Pryce: Woman’s 
Hour, Radio 4, 2.00pai 


On long wave, (s) Stereo on VHP 
535 Shaping. 630 News Briefing; 

Weather. 6.10 Farming 
635 Today, ind 630, 730, 

830 News. 635 
Business News. 835, 735 
Weather. 730, 830 
News. 735, 835 Sport 735 
Thought for the day. 835 
Yesterday in Partament 
837 wemher; Travel 
930 News 

935 Midweek With Libby 
Purves(s) 

1030 News; Gardeners’ 

Question Time. From St 
Edmundsbury in Suffolk. 

1030 Morning Store; What 
Shall We Do n It rains? 


735 The Archers 
730 In Business, with Peter 
Smith. 


735 The Roith Lectures 1988. 
Law, Justice mul 


Democracy, by Lord 
McQuskey. (4) Trusting 
the Juries. 

8.15 Analysis. Peter 
Henrtessy asks how 
shadow parties can prepare 
themselves for s 
possible return to power. 

9.00 Thirty Minute Theatre. 

The Runaway, by Pat 
Davis. With Peter Baldwin 
Ms) 


Paul Vaughan. Includes 
Jeremy Slepmann's 


1030 CSBo sonatas: Raphael 
Sommer (cetio), Daniel 
AcM (piano). Debussy 
(Sonata in D minor), md 
Reger (Sonata in G mmor.Op 


WORLD SERVICE 


The verv soul of France in the very, heart of London. 


he WerHien Piccadilly,- Piccadilly, London W1V 0BH- 

1 Formed v The lNew Pii-r-atUUv Hotel) Ttd; 734 8000. 



1130 Matinee musicals: BBC 
Concert Orchestra 
funder Jqty), with BBC 
Singers. Shostakovich 
(Overture on Russian and 
kif ipjz folk themes), 
Tcfiarspnln (ComptaJnt. Four 
Rushan Folk Songs). 
Borodn (Nocturne, bit 
S argent). GHr*a 
(Kamarinskaya). Lyadov 


Jeremy Slepmann's 
consumers' guide to 
recordings or Schubert's 
Plano Sonata In B flat D 

430 Cho ra? Eve nsong: from 
Peterborough CathadraL 
435 News 

530 Johann Strauss (Indigo 
and the 40 Thieves 

overture: Vienna PO), Haydn 
(Misse brevis in F: 

Academy of Ancient 
Music/Chois of Christ 
Church Cathedral, Oxford, 
and soloists Emma Kirby 
and Judith Nelson). 
Atterberg (Horn Concerto 
in A: Matm/Gothenberg 
Rado Orchestra). 

Schumann (Sonata No 1: 


Martin Jarvis. 

1035 Daly Service (New Every 
Momlna, page 46Vs) 
1130 NewBjTravS: With Great 
Pleasixe. Michael 
Parkinson selects his . 


favourite prose and 
poetry. With Geoffrey CoIBns 
and Carol Drinkwatsr (r) 
1138 Talking Toys. Runners, 
Wrappers ami Hfders. 

With Bob Symes. 

1230 News; You and Yours. 

Consumer advice.. 

1237 A Matter of Honour, by 
Jeffrey Archer (third 
episode, with Michad York 
and Simon Ward (s) 

1235 Weather 

1.00 The World at One. News 

135 A party political 

broadcast (by the Liberal 

1.40 ThsArcht- 1J3 


930 One Man and His Newt 
David Bean recounts his 
meetings with animals and 
the people who cherish 
them. Tonight: horses. 

935 Kaleidoscope, includes 
comment on Hie 
Women, at the (M Vk^the 
London Contemporary 
Dance Theatre at Samar's 
Wells, and the books 
Towards the Lost Continent , 


by Alain Fournier, am] 
Alain Fournier: A Brief Lite 


10.15 A Book at Bedtime. A 
House for Mr Biswas, by 
VSNalpaul. Part 11. Read 
by Qarard Green 1039 


Earl WM. piano), 

Goldmark (Rustic Wedding 

Symphony: RPO) 

730 Boris Godunov: 

Mussorsky’s opera In 
prologue and lour acts (1872 
version). Sunajn 
Russian. USSR Rado 
Chorus and Orchestra 
(under Vladimir Fedoseyev) 
and Spring Studio 
Children's Chorus. Cast 
kncJudes Alexander 
Vederrrikov In the title role. 
Vladislav Piavko. Irina 
Arkhipova. Yelena 
ShhkGtnacove and Glafira 
Koroleva. Interval reading at 
&10. Act two at 8.15 
835 Six Continents 
9-16 Boris Godunov: act 
three. Interval at 1030. 

Act Jour et lots 

1130 Manchester Chamber 
Music: Mscflci Siring 
Quartet Haydn (Quartet in C, 
Op 64 No 1 ) and Dvorak 
(Quartet sn 6 flat, Op 51) 
1137 News. 1230 Closedown. 


(Kamarinskaya). Lyadov 
(Five Fbjssten foBc songs. 

Op 59). Glazunov (Concert 
waltz in F, Op 51). 
Mussorgsky (Grtts’ko dream 
from Sorocfiknsy Fair. 

N 'ght on the Bare Mountain) 
1230 Ways of Freedom: the 
growth of )az2 ir Russia. 
With John Fottfham (2). 130 
News 

135 Concert HaftBochmam 
String Quartet Borodin 
(Quartet No 1, end Pieces 
from Lbs Vendredls, 

Book 2, No Q, Glazunov 
(Courante NO 2). Lyattov 
(Sar^unde No 7). Kopytav 
(Polka) 

230 Mozart Piano Sonatas: 
Christian Zachartas plays 
the B flat K 281 . and the F. K 

533 and K 434 

230 Record Review: with 


SSI 


230 News; Woman’s Hour, 
with Sue MacGregor. 
Includes ar interview with 
actor Jonathan Pryce. 

3. DO News; The Afternoon 
Play. London Belongs to 
Me, by Norman Coffins.Part 
one. With Norman Bird 


1030 The World Tonight 
11.15 The Financial World 
Tonight 

1130 Today in Parliament 
12.00 News; WOather. 1233 
Shipping 


VHF (Available In England and 
S Wales only) as above 
except 535-830am 
Weather. Travel. 1130- 
1230 For Schools: 1130 


and Liz Smith (r) (see Choice) 
Time for Verse. Minor 


3.47 Time tor Verse. Minor 
Victorians, with Kingsley 
Amis (1) Sir Henry NewbalL 
,4.00 News 
435 FHeon4.(r) 

4,45 Kaleidoscope Extra. A 
feature about one of the 
most Important elements of 
the festival fortnight in 
Stratford-upon-Avon, the 
RSC youth festival 

530 PM News magazine. 530 


Singing Together (s) 
11 JO junior Drama 


11 JO junior Drama 
Workshop (s) 11JS) 
Reading Corner (a) 1130 
Poetry Comer. 135- 
330pm For Schools: 135 
Listening Comer 23S 


Looking at Nature (s' 
Let's Make a Story! i 


Let's Make a Story) 2. 
Pictures in Your Mind 


(Poetry) (8) SL40 Using 
Unemployment 530-535 PM 


Unemployment 530-535 P 
[continued}. 1239- 
1.10am Schools Night-time 


630 News; Financial Report 

EL30 Round Britain Quiz. Irene 
Thomas and Eric Kom 
versus Dcugtas Grfford and 
Robert kemohan. 

7.00 News 


Economics (0-level) Case 

Studies in Production. 

1230 (5): Structural changi 
in the Economy. 1230 • 
(6): A Pregramme for 
Teachers. 


FREQUENCIES: Radio 1:1Q53kH 
92.5; Radio 4: 200kHz/1500m: VI 
1458kHz /206m: VHF 94.9: World 


■ . . — - f 






THE 


TIMES 


W ~W W 'K.w;tc. 


SPORT 



Sangster relies 

old ally Hills for 

Manton 


Barry Hills will today take 
over the reins at Manton's 
racing establishment on behalf 
of Robert Sangster. This fol- 
lows the dramatic dissolution 
of the partnership between 
Sangster and Michael Dickin- 
son on Monday. 

The decision to insert Hills, 
who will also remain in charge 
of his own South Bank stables 
at Lam bo urn for the next year, 
was made over a long and 
intricate session at Scott’s 
restaurant in the West End of 
London yesterday. 

Hills was reluctant to step 
into another man’s shoes until 
be received full reassurance 
that the breakdown between 
Sangster and Dickinson was 
complete. Also present at the 
meeting was Sangster's finan- 
cial director, Ken PauL 
Hills. 50 next April, first 
took out a trainer's licence in 
1969 after serving his 
apprenticeship with Fred 
Rimell and Jack Colling. 

He gained his first classic 
success in 1978 with Enstone 
Soark in the 1.000 Guineas 
and followed up the next 
season with Tap On Wood, 
who gave the newly-arrived 
Steve Cauthen his first classic 
victory in the 2,000 Guineas. 

Success in the Derby has 
eluded him but he has twice 
saddled the runner-up in 
Hawaiian Sound and 
Rheingold. who went on to 
win Europe's most coveted 
prize, the Prix de l'Arc de 
Triomphe, as a four-year-old. 

His other big-race triumphs 
include the Ascot Gold Cup in 
1984 and 1985 with Gildoran 
and the 1974 Irish Oaks with 
Dibidale. _ „... 

The appointment of Hills 
has quickly ended the specula- 
tion as to who would be 
Dickinson's successor. When 
Sangster was deliberating pos- 
sible solutions in Australia 
three weeks ago. his top 
trainer there, Colin Hayes, 
offered to fill the gap while a 


By Charles Besson 
younger man was appointed. 

The Los Angeles trainer, 
John Gosden, an Englishman 
who is now among the leading 
members of his profession in 
the United States, was also 
mooted as a possible replace- 
ment at Manton. 

Sangster also considered the 
top South African trainer, 
Terence Millard, whom he 
regards as the southern hemi- 
sphere equivalent to Vincent 
O'Brien. 

Among the home trainers, 
the short list consisted of 
Hills. Charlie Nelson, and Bill 
Watts, all of whom tram for 
him already. 

Dickinson dilemma, page 38 

Hills, though, was the ob- 
vious choice. A lifelong friend 
of Hills, Sangster has always 
kept and guaranteed a strong 
hand of horses at South Bank, 
even when installing Dickin- 
son as his private trainer. 

. For most of the past 12 
years, Sangster has fielded a 
team of about 30 horses with 
Hills and it was no surprise 
that the owner, thrown into a 
turmoil by the latest problem, 
should turn to Hills, for whom 
he has the greatest possible 
professional respect 

The principal difference be- 
tween the new set-up at 
Manton and the old, when 
Dickinson had to manage only 
the 46 Sangster horses, is that 
Hills, as a public trainer, can 
bring up to 50 animals with 
him from Lamboura. 

These will include horses 
owned by Sheikh Mohammed 
and Khaled Abdulla, this 
year’s leading owners, who 
have both indicated their 
enthusiasm for the new deal- 

Both recognize Manton as 
an ideal training establish- 
ment and the presence of their 
horses will strengthen and 
bring balance to the Manton 

team. 


While it may have seemed 
easy for Sangster to fell back 
on his friend. Hills, he thought 
long and hard about most of 
the other possible candidates. 
He was greatly touched, for 
instance, by the immediate 
offer of Hayes, doyen of 
Australian trainers and a pro- 
lific winner-producer there, to 
come to the rescue. 

This initiative occurred ear- 
lier this month, shortly before 
the Melbourne Cup, which 
Hayes won with At Talaq. He 
included in his offer his two 
very able sons, one his assis- 
tant. the other a trainer in his 
own right. 

The matter of Gosden is 
more complicated. He is a 
good friend of Sangster, who 
helped to set him on his way in 
Los Angeles, a career which 
has landed him at die very top 
of the tree and was initiated, 
among other big winners, by 
success in the Breeders' Cup 
Mile with Royal Heroine two 
years ago. 

Gosden feels a great loyalty 
to Sangster but, having en- 
joyed some long and fruitful 
conversations with him in Los 
Angeles recently, I detected an 
urge to remain in the States, 
where he has been so success- 
ful, for a few more years yet 
Gosden, son of the late 
Towser Gosden, will un- 
doubtedly return home in due 
course. 

As for Nelson and Watts, 
they will continue to train for 
Sangster and are very much in 
the forefront of bis future 
plans. 

But, with the old stables at 
Manton due to be renovated 
as a back-up to the 60 new 
boxes used until now by 
Dickinson's string, a new era 
will begin. 

[f Hills cannot deliver the 
goods, he and Sangster must 
look at each other and wondei 
what next 



No need 
to run 



the law 

By Do* Wyatt, taw Eng. 
land ngby winger and new 
Richmond coach 

I attended the Bedford cea- 
Denary (Earner last math, ft 
was the usual customary eve- 
ning of good fe&ewsitip and 





Intrepid Toleman back on 
the road of discovery 


Competition or recreation? 

By John Goodbody, Sports News Correspondent 


The rival claims of com- 
petition and recreation on the 
state educational curriculum 
will be discussed today by 
representatives of more than 
50 bodies in a seminar, “Sport 
in Schools”, chaired by Rich- 
ard Tracey, the Sports 
Minister. 

The seminar, in London, is 
the climax of a year-long 
inquiry set up by Mr Tracey 
amidst mounting concern that 
competitive sport — particu- 
larly team games — is suffer- 
ing in schools. 

The backdrop of the meet- 
ing consists of both the 
teachers’ dispute, with its 
drastic effect on the super- 
vision of sport, and also a 
clash between different philos- 


ophies of teaching physical 
education. 

On the one hand, there is 
the belief in the importance of 
traditional sports for pupils 
and the encouraging of com- 
petition. On the other is the 
theory that the less-gifted 
pupils must be helped to find 
pleasurable and rewarding 
activities that they can con- 
tinue as adults. 

The day-long seminar will 
be attendee by Mr Tracey and 
officials of the Department of 
Education and Science and, 
after a plenary session, the 
meeting wall break up into 
four groups to discuss dif- 
ferent topics. 

These will be: the curricu- 
lum, particularly competition 




“After 20 years 
ire my family can 
recommend it’’ 


El Botanico. The most sought after 
residential area in Tfenerife. 

My family and business have beat associated with the 
Canary Islands since 1894 and over 20 years ago we decided 
to create a residential area which has now become the most 
sought after m Tenerife. 

Parque Avoceta is the final phase ofluxury apartment homes 
which now completes the El Botanico garden development in 
Puerto de la Cniz. r “ 

I'mTbny \eoward, 

Chairman of the group of 
companies who have created 
this beautiful devefoproent 
and the reason I can 
pensonaily recommend 
El Botanico is because 1 
have nrade it ray permanent 
home. 

My family and I look 
forward to welcoming you 
as neighbours to what is 
truly a unique reskteatial 
opportunity. 


and recreation; facilities in 
schools and the supervision of 
extra-curricular activity; 
teacher leadership and coach 
training and li nks between 
schools and clubs; and the role 
of local authorities and sports 
governing bodies. 

Representatives from such 
organizations as the British 
Olympic Association, the 
Sports Council the Central 
Council of Physical 
Recreation, the National 
Cricket Association, the Foot- 
ball Association, the Lawn 
Tennis Association and the 
British Amateur Athletic 
Board will give their views, as 
will several teaching 
organizations. 

The latest disturbing report, 
published last week, was the 
result of a survey by the 
Secondary Heads’ Associ- 
ation. It found that there had 
been a substantial decline in 
the number of non-specialist 
physical education teachers 
willing to help with school 
sport. , . 

Only 20 per cent of second- 
ary school pupils have the 
option to swim, only a fifth of 
secondary school pupils have 
as much as two hours a week 
of P.E^ and about two-thirds 
of sixth-formers attend 
schools at which games are 
optional. 

About a half of the local 
education authorities have no 
published policy at all that 
recognizes the importance of 


The sedate Dorchester hotel 
in London is a long way from 
the hot and humid seashore at 
Dakar; but it provided a 
typical British setting to 
launch the intrepid Ted 
Toleman on another of his 
sporting ventures — the Paris- 
Dakar Rally. 

For 22 days starting on 
January 1, 270 cars, 130 
motor-cycles, and 80 trucks 
(lorries) will take part in what 
is billed as “the last great 
adventure on wheels.” 

Less tban one-third of the 
vehicles leaving Paris are ex- 
pected to last the 8,000 miles 
to Dakar. Averaging nearly 
500 miles per day, the route is 
through Fiance, Spain, and 
then an all-out onslaught 
across the deserts of Algeria, 
Niger, Mali, Mauritania, and 
Senegal 

The 1987 event will be the 
ninth Paris-Dakar rally. Al- 
though it received some 


By David Duffield 

notoriety three years ago when 
Mark Thatcher got lost in the 
Sahara desert, it has not 
received any great following in 
the UK. Toleman and his 
team plan to change that 

Backed by £150,000 and the 
support of Range Rover Parts 
Division, BridgestoneTyres, 
Shell and, appropriately 
considering the hot desert 
stretches, Dansk Low-Alcohol 
lager, Toleman’s entry will be 
a very much modified 240bhp 
Range Rover. 

Another Range Rover 
“chase” car, a long-wheelbase 
Land Rover, an aircraft, and 
other strategically placed ve- 
hicles will be used to help 
service the operation. Each 
year, the desert tracks mid 
sand dunes are littered with 
crashed and abandoned cars, 
motor-cydes and trucks. To 
finish is an achievement 

Toleman said: “I have gone 
for team spirit. For three 
weeks effort you need very 


SNOOKER 


Jones not put off his 
act by distraction 


By A Correspondent 



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P.E, and less tban half have a 
policy to ensure that all 
schools have the minimum 
Department of Education area 
of usable playing fields. 


Wayne Jones ignored out- 
side distractions to focus his 
attention on reaching the first 
big quarter-final of his pro- 
fessional career at Preston's 
Guildhall yesterday. 

A former Welsh amateur 
champion, Jones, aged 26, 
patiently and often skilfully 
opened up a 4-3 first-period 
lead over the more experi- 
enced Eugene Hughes in their 
best-of- 17-frames third-round 
match in the £300,000 
Tennent’s United Kingdom 
Open. 

Jones began confidently, 
clinching the opening frame 
64-23 before stepping up to 
compile his first-ever televised 
century break. The break of 
106 ended as Jones missed the 
yellow, with all the colours 
conveniently placed on their 
spots; but by then he had done 
more than enough to go 2-0 
ahead. _ 

Hughes produced a break or 
46 to reduce the arrears but 
Jones went 3-1 in front, taking 
the fourth frame 69-38. 
Hughes made it 3-2, wrapping 


said 


up the longest frame of the 
afternoon 50-30 after 29 min- 
utes of scrappy play. 

Jones again restored his 
two-frame cushion, sealing the 
sixth fiame 79-57, but a saspvaiaaill 
Hughes break of 44 was just a Dogma mart director 

enough to give him the final ^ 
frame of the period. 

Tony Knowles also went 
into the mid-period interval 
with a 4-3 lead over Terry 
Griffiths. Knowles produced 
fluent breaks but, tike other 
leading players throughout 
this tournament, was far from 
at home on the generous 
tables. 

Knowles rolled in a break of 
74 to go 2-1 ahead bin 
Griffiths responded with 
breaks of 33 and 53 to lead for 
the first time in the match at 3- 
2. Knowles levelled with one 
break of 51 and another of 53 
to give him that 4-3 
advantage. 

SCORES; W Jones leads E Hughes *3. 

Frama scores (Jones Craft 64-Za, 106-14. 

51-89. 63-38. 3HQ. 79-57 47-63. T 
Knowles leads T Grimms 4-3. Franja 
scores (Knowles Graft 64-30. 24-62, OS- 
34. 29-78, 53-68. 71-1*. 7W. 


SQUASH RACKETS 

Harvey’s 
tactics 
reap a fine 
reward 

By Cotin McQmUan 
Neil Harvey, the seventh 
win oe iuu L/uugnu, «u* l seed al the InteiCire national 
automotive engineer and for- championships m Bnsto^yes- 
mer formula two driver. today continued to defy the 

1 1986 men’s rankings by totally 

outplaying 'Geoff Williams,, 
the former champion, second 
seed, and for many the favour- 
ite for the title. 

In a 71 -minute quarter- 
final,. Harvey, a stocky Lon- 
doner, fought bade from two 
sets down to record a fine 2-9, 
7-9, 9-4, 9-2, 9-0 victory. 

Harvey has been loiig trou- 
bled with severed thigh-mus- 
cle fibres and has scarcely 
featured in national lists for a 
couple of. years. He -last 
reached a^national semi-final 
in December 1983. Today he 
meets Mark Maclean, aged 22, 

who defeated Philip Whitlock, 

<rf Devon, 9-0, 10-8, 4-9, 1-9, 
9-4 in 89 minutes to become 
the first Scotsman to reach a 
national semi-final 
Harvey’s win was a tactical 
triumph on the all-transparent 
perspex court, erected tem- 
porarily for the occasion at 
Temple Meads Station. He 
was confident he could force 
Williams into a negative ap- 
proach by staying in the match 
early on and playing “certain 
shots” he knows frustrate the 
fast front-court approach of 
the tall left-handed .1984 
champion. 

Outpaced in the opening 
game, Harvey came backfrom 
1-6 down to challenge for the 
second, then simply exploited 
the failing resolve of his 


special people.” Driving with 
Toleman will be Barry Lee, 
four times world hot-rod 
champion, but with consid- 
erable rally experience, having 
competed in the RAC rally 
five times. The other co-dnver 
will be Rad DougaO, an 


For Toleman, millionaire 
businessman, skipper of the 
ill-feted Virgin Atlantic Chal- 
lenger /, and ex-formul a one 
race triam owner, this repre- 
sents yet another challenge. 

To mark the occasion, 
Gieves and Hawkes, whose 
headquarters once belonged to 
the Royal Geographical Soci- 
ety, have provided the official 
on-duty uniforms and, . for 
Toleman, a replica of the 
consul’s cap sallied by 
Gieves to David Livingstone 
1 15 years ago- They obviously 
presume he will arrive at his 
planned destination. 


Threat of 
long ban 
on Higgins 

By John Goodbody 

Alex tire former 

world chasapH®, is today fee- 
ing tlm threat ®f a wng 
suspension after 


SPORT !N BRIEF 


Grand prix 
for Japan 

Paris (AFP) - Fo rmula o ne 
motor racing will return to 
Japan for the first tim e m a 
decade next year. The grand 
prix has been fixed for 
November 1, 1987, following 
formula one contractors’ 
association chief, Bemie 
Ecclestone's trip to Japan to 
finalise the deal with the 
organisers. 

FISA, tiie international 
autosport federation, an- 
nounced yesterday that 
Ecclestone had signed the 
necessary contract for the 
race, to be held at the Snzuka 
circuit. The track, on which 
major work will have to be 
carried out is currently under 
inspection by a FISA offidaL 

Pioneer dies 

Wengen, Switzerland (Reu- 
ter) - Ernst Gertsen, founder 
of the feme us Lauberbom 
classic downhill and slalom 
races and a pioneer of Alpine 
climbing and skiing, died 
yesterday, aged 86. 



MlUichip: “no problems” 

Quiet men 

Football Association and 
i Mwift officials remained 
tigbtiipped last night after a 
meeting at Lancaster Gate, 
London, to consider the “on- 
going relationship" between 
tiie two bodies. The League 
are demanding a larger say in 
everyday affairs. The League 
president. Philip Carter, 
emerged from the 75-minute 
meeting to say: "It went well” 
and Bert Mfltichip, the FA 
chairman, insisted "no 
problems” before hurrying 
awav. 


Skipper hurt 

Fremantle (Reuter) — Aldo 
Migliaccio, skipper of the 

America's Cup challenger Ita- 
lia, has sustained several bro- 
ken ribs in a car accident. 
Migliaccio was driving to a 
party in Perth when the 
accident happened. 

Jones debut 

Murray Jones, the stand-off 
half; who broke all points 
scaring records at Stourbridge 
before joining Moseley last 
summer, makes his senior 
debut against FyJde at The 
Reddings. He has been injured 
for most of the season. 

Botham plan 

Charlie Elliott, tiie Derby- 
shire committee member, 
confirmed yesterday that his. 
county are keen to sign lan 
Botham, but said that no 
approach would be made be- 
fore the New Year. Effioti is in 
Perth, where the second Test 
starts on Friday, and his 
arrival had started speculation 
that he had been sent to open 
negotiations, but he denied 
this. 


when asked to take 

a routine drags test. 

“Clearly this is the _ 

serioro incaeiit snw^ter has opponent 

SSvSi “ II w* a “gbtmare,” said 

dtaaazu of timyraM R*- Williams, thesnth of the top 
fessional Billiards and seeds to go out brae, as 

be sat dejectedly beside the 
court on which.be had . hoped 
to re-establish, his national 
supremacy. “I just seemed to 
r un out of. steam. I can t 
explain it" 

Maclean used almost the 
same words as he lay prone, 
but victorious, in exhaustion 
after his titanic tussle with 
Whitlock. The tall Scot played 
with supple authority to take 
the first two games, but then 
■became embroiled . in a 
debilitating fight-back from 
Whitlock. 

It seemed the Devon player, 
who lite Williams trains with 
Jonah Barrington, the former 
world champion, had broken 
Maclean by the end of the 
fourth game. But there are 
great reserves of strength and 
courage in the man who last 
year ended the 20-year un- 
defeated domestic record of 
Barrington himself. 

Plainly exhausted and stiB 
suffering from the effects of a 
stomach bug, Maclean re- 
turned to court for the fifth 
game with astonishing re- 
solve, resisted repeated at- 
tacks at 4-4, and , finally 
clinched his semi-final place 
with a superbly balanced 
cross-court forehand volley to 
the mid-court nick. 

Interestingly, Harvey fin- 
ished off. Wimams witli pre- 
/ the same shot. 

._™TS: Mate .QBBriagftttte M 


speakers. Lucidly, the occa- 
sion was redeemed by. as 
amusing speech by Dudley 4 
Wood, the secretary of the 

Rigby ^ 

visas speaker on his mastery 

of the single entendre and 
rapidly - suggested it: was 
i^cmnw necessary to hold 
probationary officer skfflsfo 
be a successful coach today. 

He had a point. The New 
Zeabnd/Sovtit Africa ernet 

the London Webh-Mosdey 
fracas, and now ray own dob’s 
treatment last Saturday at the 
hands of Swansea showed flat 
it's not just the services of tire 
probation officer that wifi be 
required in Welsh rngby. All 
rngby dobs wifi need the’ 
services of their sdfieftor mare 
and znare. ' 

Sport has for .too tag 
remained outside the law. Last 
year, Hirao, the Japanese 
centre, came to work ia 
London. Beg Clark met Hitae 
when he was working in Kobe, 
Japan, and recommended be 
WaffichwKi 
What happened? One of fee 
most exciting players in the 
world was denied the opportu- 
nity to pfeyia merit tabic 
matches becasse (be RFU had 
rated tint players from over- 
seas had to heki' g toa dob for 
three months before they were 
eligible. I asked the Bfchmand 
committee to select Hfran and 
take the consequences. 1 last I 

Chance lost to see 
leading pkyer 

was convmced we-wonM have . 
won the case (tel we sued the 
RFU) in the European Court 

nf H nrnan Rights. 

A fortnight ago, the Rich-- 
mood, pbjmg. committee was- 
toblhy fee RFU tfataffipogh 
it ha$ informed ns that 1 fee 

London merit fable fixtures 

were obsolete, it had discov- 
ered a loophole and wodd 
therefore have to reacted a new 

by-law. Ten weeks 5ko the 
season I was toM t fa tm a lrfas 

that had been won or lost 

woaU now cotmt for next year 
after alL Well, yotfU forgive 

me if ray reply was to sue the 

RFUfornegfigence. - # 

. And all this activity is off 
the field. What the 

players make of these ridta- 

teos situations. Were it not for 

15 England players playing 
two internationals a year at 
Twickenham, there .would be 
no fiill-time staff at head- 
. quarters, ao technical admin- 
istrators, indeed no Rugby 
Football Union and there cer- 
tainly wouldn’t be this gfet « 
money that currently exists. ; 

Then there is the matter ®f 
litigation going on behind the 
scenes concerning the spon- 
sorship of the World Cigiand 

West Nafly, the official , : 

Adminstrators lost 
touch with base 



Snooker Association, 
yesterday. 

Eight board members of 
snooker's world ruling body 
will consider Higgins’ case, 
but the player has net been 
asked to attend. 

Higgins, who on Monday 
night beat Mike Hallett in foe 
third round of the Tepnents 
UK Open at Preston, had to be 
escorted ontof the bmlii agby 
police after refusing a drags 
test ordered by the tamnameirt 
director. Paid HatberelL 

JohH Spencer, three times 
world champion and a member 
of the board, said: “There was 

physical contact between Alex 

and Paid. I believe Paul was 
head-butted. He has got a cat 
over the eye.” 

The police were called by 
the seemity staff at the Pres- 
ton Gold Had after Higgins 
had to bephyskadly restrained 
by officials. The pefioe are net 
ruling out charges against 

Higgins although HathereQ 
has told them he will not be 

making a formal complaint 

According to witnesses, 
Hi g gins was swearing and 
shouting at foe top of his voice, 
exclaiming “I am F M! — “ 

sell It is ail down to 

Do yon want to ‘chin’ me?” 

Higgins yesterday declined 
to comment farther on the 
incident. His manager, How- 
ard Kruger, said: “I have 
spoken twice to Alex bat we 
feel it weald be better to spend 
time sorting things oat. I have 
no father com men t at the 


marketing company (which 
has just received a timely care 
injection). All this does to the 
players is to demonstrate that 
oar administrators, especially 
the foD-time salaried officers, 
have lost teach with base. _ 

Rngby in the leading dubs 
has newer been in sach a 
healthy state. Comity and 
international rngby k side. 
My own players have ta 
threaten if comity selectors 

i in nlav 


then their names will not 
pot forward for the dfrisisw 

side. Comity men run scared 

because one day they , H Jj*® 

their power base to the dons. 

The two merit tables have 
been widely welcomed, as win 
the leagues. Ri chmon d are 
wellaware foot jnst became 
they are the second oldest 

in Hifi l and, tbey cab stfll 
op in merit telle.C To this 
end, a radical set of solutions 

has been agreed to ensure that 

on and off the field we seenre 
Off future stains. But that 

doesn't mean to say that I fare 

adopted a win-at-aD-costs 
piflosop^y. 

Ora - players foankthe e xaifr 
pie set by Liverpool in feoff®® 
and Leicester m ragby shonm 
be emulated. When as po 
Saturday, Simon Smith, oa 
talented fly-faff; is openly 
raked a minute into the game 
and tire culprit checks whore 

the referee is before he does! 

and then five OT SO Mi M* * 8 
later Chris Mills, out prop, « 
pouched so badly that he 
vision in one eye and the at* 


,r 5i$t-s 







W nw im- _ , , , 

was recently fined ScGtSlOSC 


eye-specialist, of course, f® 


for bringing the game 
epnte after another 
incident back stage at the 
Mercantile Classic last sea- 
son. On Saturday he is due to 
appear before the WFBSA 
board for alleging that CHff 
Thor burn, the Canadian 
player, took drags. 


Scotland woe beaten 5-2 by 
Sweden in their Prudential Cop 
badminton international at 
Wishaw on Monday night. The 
Scottish wins came m toe men's 
doubles through Dan Travers 
-and Billy GUtoasd, the -Com- 
monwealth Games gold medal- 
lists, apd Alex White and .lam 
Pringle. • • -'•••“ 


<«. angry because both 
incidents do a disservice to foe 
game ami to the dobs ,B- 
solved. Police were in atten- 
dance at the grofed on 
Saturday and coald quite eas- 
ily have arrested, both Swan- 
sea players. Tbey would fare, 
had the. inddest occurred a 
mere 100 ntettes away-