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3 




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^jJJ c t* l 



•i:, 



No 62,626 



THURSDAY NOVEMBER 27 1986 






-senator to 


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From MkJiaelBmyon, Washing 

Pl ^S 1 l? e ?^ n 2““®*** blistering attacks on the 
mxmlsdMr John Tower, a Admiration, l£d Sis “b£ 
former Tags senator, to head vend credibility’ thatCtilonS 

North acted alone without 


inquiry 

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ici- 




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the presidential inquiry into 
the National Security 
CounciFs ’ role in the Iran. 
Contra arms fiasco, as Amer- 
ica reacted with shock and 
outrage to what is seen as the 
most serious scandal of the 
Reagan era. 

President Reagan himself 
left yesterday for his Califor- 
nia ranch for the Thant™. 
giving holiday. 

But Mr Edwin Meese, the 
Attorney-General, who is 
conducting a separate judicial 
inquiry into the stiU-unanr 
swered questions about the 
affai r, assure d him that no top 
Administration officials were 
involved. He admitted how- 
ever that it was likely that 


— alone without 
authorization from above. 

And in a move sttol 
reminiscent of an aspect of 
Watergate affair, congres- 
sional leaders are calling for 
the appointment of a special 
Prosecutor, independent of 
Mr Meese’s inquiry. Already 
they have begun hearings into 
the Iran arms and toes* 
are likely to be broadened to 
include policy in Central 


Skids trader NSC 
Match to muddle 
Gulf War stepped op 
The Contra cause 
Leading article 


7 

7 

10 

18 

19 


. - • M 

" -Cjr 
’ t •• . 


ever uru 11 was luceiy that - — ™ 

other people knew of the the Middle East and 


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‘ ' *''•£: 

’ • tr 


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diverted funds as well 
Lieutenant Colonel Oliver 
North, the maverick NSC 
military assistant 

“We pretty clearly estab- 
lished at this point that Presi- 
dent Reagan, Vice-President 
Geoige Bush and all Cabinet 
secretaries and top White 
House aides were not 
involved,” he said in a tele- 
vision interview. 

Congress however has 
sharply challenged this asser- 
tion. Congressional leaders of 
both parties, in a series of 


Tomorrow 




Watchdog 
Rippon 


the whole dedsion-making 
~ process in the Reagan Admi- 
nistration. i 

-The Administration itself 
remained in complete disarray 
following the shock of Mr 
Meese’s disclosures on Tues- 
day. However Mr Georae 
Shultz, the Secretary of State, 
who had criticized the arms 
sales to Iran and conspicu- 
ously distanced himself fins 
the President in the past two 
weeks, made a strong state- 
ment of su p po rt on Tuesday 
evening. 

“I &lly subscribe to Presi- 
dent Reagan’s objectives of 
ending the Iran-Iraq Gulf 
War, establishing a more 
constructive relationship with 
Iran, if possible, and ending 
the scourge of terrorism:** 


Despite rumours to tire 
contrary yesterday, he said he 
intended to be “very much a 
part of the President’s efforts” 
to bring them to fruition. 

Mr Shultz was also dearly 
pleased by President Reagan's 
decision to hand back im- 
mediately control ofUS policy 
towards Iran to the State 
Department. His pledge of 
loyalty foDowed a strong state- 
ment by Mr Meese, which 
appeared pointedly directed at 
him and called on every 
member of the Administra- 
tion to stand “shoulder-to- 
sh oulder” with the President 
and support his policies or 
leave the Cabinet 
Mr Reagan’s appointment 
of Mr Tower, a conservative 
Republican and former chair- 
man of the Senate Armed 
Services Committee, will 
mean an immediate start to a 
thorough inquiry into the 
conduct of the National Sec- 
urity Council, which is at the 
heart of the present crisis. 

Mr Tower trill be 
by Mr Edmund Muskie, who 
was Secretary of State during 
President Carter’s last months 
in office, and General Brent 
Scowcroft, who served as 
President Ford’s National Sec- 
urity Adviser. Mr Muskie was 
deeply involved in the final 
stages of Mr Outer’s negotia- 
tions to free the US Embassy 
hostages in Tehran. 

A permanent replacement 
for Vice-Admiral John 
Poindexter, who resigned as 
National Security Adviser on 


1,500 workers 
to lose jobs at 
Scott Lithgow 

D. D. IJ l? p ■ . . _ . 


By Ronald Faux, Employment Affairs Corresp onden t 
Fifteen hundred workers at £12 million order to lengthen 


Tha nksg iving for a President under 
at the ” 


Mr Reagan takes part in th 
White House before leaving for his California 


ranch. 


turkey 


DPP considers 
Rothschild breach 
of Security Act 


• r -- 
v » 


• v 



Arms cas 
sent to 
Geneva 


From Martha Hoaey 
■- -Safe Jos £ l • 


Continued on page 7, col 5 

Meese to 
report 
on fiasco 


By Richard Evans, Political Correspondent 

The Attorney General and no virions or slanderous cal- 
the Director of Public Pro- umny that can't be put on the 
somtions are considering order paper without you brine 

allegations that Sir Arthur able to exercise some degree of 
Franks, former bead of MI6, control over it?” 


Drunken 
driving 
campaign 
‘too cheap’ 

d.. n.j 4. * 


“I hope to represent 
the anxieties and 
opinions of the 
public over nuclear 
waste.” How will 
she tackle her rote? 



—^old— 


• The £4>000 prize in 
yesterday's Tones 
Portfolio Gold 
competition was won by 
Mrs Eileen Card, of 
Southampton. Details, 
page 3. 

• Portfolio fist, page 
27; hdwto play, 
information service, 
page 22. 


■ Millions of dollars derived 
from the. ctendcstinft sale of 
US mSitapr equipment to Iran, 
and destined for the anti- 
S a ndmi s ta Nk a ragnan Con- 
tras was deposited in tire Swiss 
bank account of&finn run by 
a group of framer US intdb- 
gence agents, according to 
Washington-based investig- 
ators: 

The money was then trans- 
ferred to an . account in the 
Cayman Islands but it‘ is not 
clear if it has already been 
used to purchase' jnilitaiy 
equipment and supplies for 
the Contras. Contra leaders 
interviewed here and in Mi- 
ami have denied receiving the 
money. 

According to a Washington- 
based intelligence analyst, be- 


_ L Rom Our Own 
■; Conesponiest r 
Washington 

President Reagan has or- 
dered his "Attorney General to 
produce an interim repent on 
the Iran fiasco as soon as 
possible. The devastating de- 
tails of diverted funds have 
shocked America. But almost 
every senior o fficial and 
congressman now believes 
that there is more to come. 

Not only are there strong 
indications that at least five 
US laws were broken, but the 
real question remaining is: 
Who first approved direct 
Israeli arms shipments to Iran, 
and later asked Israel to divert 


for the Contras? 

On ’President Reagan's or- 
ders, Mr Edwin Meese began 
his inquiry that led to the 


~ — z ° J r- , r uun icq id me 

tvreen January and September extraordinary revelations last 
this year top National Security weekend. He himself inter- 


and Lord Rothschild, a dose 
friend of the Prime Minster, 
breached the Official Secrets 
Act by leaking information 
about state security, it was 
disclosed last nigh t. 

. The new twist in the 
increasingly bizarre spy saga 
followed a Commons row 
over the naming of Lord 
Rothschiidin connection with 
previous security scandals. 

In an early day motion,.Mr 
Brian Sedgemore, Labour MP 
for Hackney, South, and 
Shoreditch, called on the 
Prime Minister “to' state 
whether the security services 
ever carried out an investiga- 
tion into suspicions, which 
surfaced at the time and of 
which Lord Rothschild was 
aware, that he was a Soviet spy 
and the fifth man.” 

Furious Conservative MPs 
bombarded Mr Bernard Wea- 
theriH, the Speaker, with de- 
mands to stop Labour MPs 
using the Commons order 
paper, which is covered by 
parliamentary privilege, for 
making accusations and inn- 
uendos against people outside 
the Commons. 

Mr Patrick Nicholls, MP for 
Trignbridge, a$ked:“Is there 


But last night, Mr Dale 
Campbell-Savours, Labour 
MP for Workington, who has 
named a long list of former 
Ml 5 and MT6 officers in early 
day motions and parliament- 
ary questions for allegedly 
passing on information about 
the security service to authors, 
was unrepentant. 

“In every case .we have 
sowed with the answers we 
have received. We are- per- 


Sydney bearing 12 


times business 


More jobs 


The National Institute has 
forecast stronger growth and 
tower unemployment for 
Britain next year. But a big 
balance of payments deficit 
and higher inflati on are also 
Projected Page 23 


Offer raised 


The Mirror Group publisher 
Mr Robert Maxwell has in- 
creased his takeover bid fra- 
me engineering group AE. His 
timber group, Hollis, has of- 
fered 280pa share, valuing AE 
at £280 million Page 23 


Council officials in Wash- 
ington supplied a Swiss-based 
company with $12 million 
(£8.4 million) in CIA funds to 
purchase, at their original 
value, military equipment lor 
sale to Iran. 

The military hardware, inc- 
luding spare parts for F-14 
fighters and several thousand 
missiles, was delivered to Iran 
on three separate flights and 
sold for its replacement value 
of S30 million. 

The S18 million profit was 
then deposited in the account 
of Credit Feduciaire Services, 
a Geneva investment banking 
operation run by several for- 
mer CIA officials. From there 
it was transferred to CFS 
Investments limited the Ge- 
neva-based company’s ac- 
count in the Caymen Islands. 

It was intended to be used to 
purchase military supplies for 
the Contras, but sources in- 
volved in the operation told 
the investigator the purchases 
may not yet have been made. 


fectly justified in tabling these 
parliamentary questions and 
indeed we will carry on doing 
so.” 

Meanwhile, in a Commons 
written answer last night. Sir 
Michael Havers, the Attorney 
General confirmed the new 
moves involving Sir Arthur 
Franks and Lord Rothschild. 

Mr Tam DaJyell, Labour 
MP for Linlithgow, had asked 
if consideration had been 
given to proceeding against 
the pair for breach of con- 
fidence in relation to informa- 
tion on matters of state 
security given to authors. 

“I am considering with the 

Continued on page 22, col 5 


By Rodney Cowton 

Transport Correspondent 

The Department of Trans, 
port yesterday launched its 
Christmas war on drink-driv- 
ers. It includes the slogans: “If 
you drink and drive you’re a 
menace to society” and “An- 
other 1,100 will die if you 
can’t say no”. 

The £600,000 campaign was 
immediately attacked by the 
pressure group Alcohol Con- 
cern as being “seriously 
underpowered." 

“The campaign is being 
done on the .cheap. Whaj 
they’re spending represents is 
about two hours’ worth of 
government revenue from 
drinks", they said. 

Last year’s campaign cost 
£980,000 but Mr Peter 
Bottomley. Minister for 
Roads and Traffic, said th?r 
overall they were spending the 
same amount as last year on 
campaigns against mixing 
drinking and driving He said 


Another 1JKOO 
will die if 
(yon cant say no. 


viewed top Cabinet officials, 
including Mr George Shultz, 
the Secretary of State, and it 
was at bis lengthy sessions 
with Colonel Oliver North, 
the maverick Marine at the 
National Security Council, 
Continued on page 7, col 3 


TUC council refuses to 
act against electricians 


The general council of the 



TUC yesterday rejected by 24 
froi 


votes to 21 demands from 
print union leaders for the 
electricians’ union to be disci- 
plined because its members 
work for News International 
at Wapping, east London. 

The decision was taken after 
Mr Eric Hammond, general 
secretary of the electricians, 
had said his union bad abided 
by an earlier TUC directive in 
spite of death threats to union 
officers and their families and 
violence to his members and 
their property. 

Mr Hammond pointed out 
that throughout the dispute, 
thousands of members of the 
print unions, the journalists’ 
union and the transport 
workers' union have worked 
to produce and distribute all 




News International 
publications. 

His union, the Electrical 
Electronic Telecommunica- 
tion and Plumbing Union, 
was found guilty last February 
of five of seven charges. 

After yesterday’s vote, 300 
print workers and their 
supporters who were lobbying 
the meeting shouted insults 
against the general counciL 
Miss Brenda Dean, general 
secretary of Sqgat ’82, de- 
scribed the decision as “wrong 

and harsh". 

In February, the EETPU 
accepted “without reser- 
vation” five general council 
directives in which it under- 
took not to enter into agree- 
ments with News 
International without the 
agreement of the print unions. 


The Christmas message. 

this year the money had been 
divided between a summer 
campaign and the Christmas 
campaign. 

Last December the number 
of deaths was 26 per cent 
lower than in December 1984. 

Like last year the campaign 
will not include any television 
advertising. 

Mr John Over, Chief Con- 
stable of Gwent and chai rman 
of the traffic committee of the 
Association of Chief Police 
Officers, said there were 1,100 
deaths annually involving 
drivers who had been 
drinking. 

He believed that the present 
laws affecting drunken driving 
were adequate, but be in- 
dicated that he wished mag- 
istrates would impose heavier 
penalties. 

Mr Bottomley said that 
8,000 people a month were 
caught driving with above the 
permitted levels of alcohol in 
their systems, and this could 
raise the risk of accidents five 
limes. He added that half had 
consumed twice the permitted 
amount, which made them 20 
times more likely to be in- 
volved in an accident 


the Scott Uthgow ship and oil 
rig yard on the lower Clyde are 
to lose their jobs, it was 
announced yesterday. 

Trafalgar House, owners of 
the yard, said that 700 
permanent and 800 temporary 
jobs at tbe yard would have to 
go and blamed a slump in the 
oil industry and a lack of 
orders for the decision to cut 
the workforce to a permanent 
hardcore of 700 employees. 

The news, described as 
“devastating” by local 
community leaders m Gree- 
nock and Port Glasgow, was 
given by shop stewards at a 
mass meeting of the workers 
and followed speculation that 
1.000 jobs might have to go at 
toeyard. 

“The news was far worse 
than we expected," a shop 
steward at the yard said. 

The Government last night 
ruled out any action to save 
the jobs. 

Union leaders want the 
Ministry of Defence to bring 
forward contracts to ease the 
crisis. 

But Mr Malcolm Rifltind, 
the Secretary of State for 
Scotland, said yesterday that 
there was “an acute shortage" 
of new work for all offshore 
and shipbuilding yards. 

“The only way to win new 
work is to stay as competitive 
as possible," he said. 

Scott Iithgow’s has had 
difficulty in transforming it- 
self to meet the requirements 
of the oil fabrication industry 
and when the long-delayed oil 
rig Ocean Affiance is com- 
pleted for Britoil in the new 
year the order book looked 
exremely bleak. The redun- 
dancy list would have been 
longer had it not been for a 


the bulk carrier Atlantic Con- 
venor. Contracts on four sister 
ships involving similar work 
ha ve been won by Korean 
shipyards who are reported to 
be carrying out the work at 
one-third the price set by the 
Scottish yard. 

Mr Duncan McNeill, sec- 
retary of the shop stewards 
committee, said the company 
was looking for volunteers for 
redundancy among the 
permanent workforce. The 
800 temporary workers em- 
ployed on the Ocean Alliance 
are to be paid off before next 
March and would have lost 
their jobs anyway when the rig 
was handed over to Britoil. 

For the local community 
the latest blow to the giant 
shipyard could push the num- 
ber of unemployed in the two 
Clydeside towns to more than 
7.000. Already Greenock has a 
male unemployment rate of 
25 per cent. Scott Lithgow’s 
was the main employer in the 
area and in the days when ship 
building boomed on the 
Clyde, 7,000 men worked 
there. 

Trade union leaders are 
pressing the management to 
increase the permanent 
workforce at the yard but 
Trafalgar House is unlikely to 
turn from its aim of cutting 
numbers to a minimum and 
increasing them only when the 
order book allowed. 

Mr Donald Dewar, shadow 
Secretary of State for Scot- 
land, said the news was a 
terrible blow for the lower 
Clyde. Some 2.000 jobs had 
already been lost this year in 
Clyde shipyards. Dr Norman 
Godman, Labour MP for 
Greenock and Port Glasgow. 
Continued on page 22. col 4 


Scottish teachers 
call all-out strike 


By Nicholas Wood, Political Reporter 


The biggest. Scottish 
teachers union vesterdav 
oiled an all-out strike for 
December 4 in an attempt to 
force the Government tack 
into new no-strings 
negotiations. 

The Educational Institute of 
Scotland, which represents 
about half the country's teach- 
ers, offered an olive branch of 
sorts by saying that it might 
postpone subsequent disrup- 
tion to enable a “breathing 
space" for talks. 

The vote on a strike ballot, 
on a turn-out of 89 per cent, 
was 28.257 to 5.292, a split of 
84 per cent to 16 per cent, 
against a 1 6.4 per cent pay and 
conditions package to be im- 
plemented over 15 months. 
Anger over the Government's 
decision to pay the recom- 
mendations of the indepen- 
dent Main committee in two 
stages — half in January and 


half nine months later — lav 
behind the ballot result 
Mr John PcL’ock. tbe 
institute's general secretary, 
said in Edinburgh that the 
vote showed that the package, 
put forward by Mr Malcolm 


Duke attacks schools 2 
Parliament 4 


Rifltind, Secretary of State for 
Scotland, was not a basis for 
negotiation. 

A Cabinet meeting today is 
expected to impose a settle- 
ment by law in the long- 
running pay dispute in 
England and Wales. 

There were strong indica- 
tions last night that tbe 
Government's patience has 
run out after the overwhelm- 
ing vote by the Scottish teach- 
ers to reject Mr RiflrincTs 


Continued on page 22, col 2 


Higgins waits By Alan Hamilton 


Epsom railroads its announcer out 


A complaint a gainst Alex 
Higgins, the snooker player, 
who is accused of a head- 
butting incident, mil be dealt 
with by the sport’s rufing body 
after a seven-day “c 
off" period 


TIMES FOCUS 


Britain is on course for an 
export bonanza, winning back 
influence as a leader of world 
commerce Pages 29-31 


Hone News 2-5 
Overseas 7-12 

Appts 

Aits 13 

Birds, deads, 

mairfages 21 
Books 17 
Business 23-28 
Com 20 

Crosswords K 22 
Diary 18 

Features] 4J5J8 


Law Report 


41 
& 

L ett ers . 19 

OMtnu? 20 
Parliament 4 
Sale Boom 20 
Seiner 21 
Sport 41-44,46 

Theatres, etc 12 
TV & Radis 45 
Weather 22 
W3s 20 


* A * *. 


In an unprecedented court 
case a British Rail announcer 
has been found guilty of being 
too loud and dear, and has 
been banned by magistrates 
from Epsom station. - . 

Local residents were driven 
to despair by the strident, 
plummy tones intoning at all 
hours of the day and night: 

, “This is Epsom, this is Epsom, 
this is Epsom. All change. This 
is Epsom." 

The local residents knew 
perfectly well where they were, 
and as the voice escaped from 
the. station confines to punc- 
ture the peaceful air of the 
surrounding town, they chris- 
tened it Her Ladyship. 

Residents living nearby 
complained repeatedly to 
Southern Region, but to no 
effect. Eventually, Mr William 
Bowler, one near neighbour of 
the Station, brought his owq. 
private prosecution under the:! 

Control of Pollution Act .. 


During tbe three-day hear- 
ing at Epsom court, mag- 
istrates were played tapes of 
lhe station announcements, 
which were revealed as pre- 
recorded messages supplied to 
BR by a specialist information 
recording company. The voice 
has since been identified as 
belonging to Miss Angela 
Peberay, of Buckinghamshire, 
a professional speaker. 

Miss Peberdy said yesterday 
that she had never received 
any complaints about her 
voice before, and indeed had 
been complimented on toe 
clarity of her announcements. 

Thp conrt has given South- 
ern Region three months to 
silence Her Ladyship, and BR 
has agreed to replace her with 
a pre-recorded male voice, 
which it believes will be less 
offensively penetrating. - 
to the meantime Her Lady- 
ship is being silenced between 
the hours of 7 30 p m and 7 30 
a m , and loudspeakers on the 
open 'platforms are being 




moved inside in the hope that 
the station canopy will con- 
tain the offending sound.' Her 
Ladyship has also been si- 
lenced on Sundays, with im- 
mediate effect. 

Mr Carl Littlejohn, manag- 


ing director of Infernal, the 
company which supplied the 
recordings, said yesterday thar 
the problem was not Her 
Ladyship’s voice, but Epsom 
station’s speakers, which were 
too good and too numerous. 

“British Rail is often ribbed 
for the lack of clarity and poor 
quality of its announcements, 
but in Epsom the opposite is 
true. That is the real 
problem," Mr Littlejohn said. 

Southern Region said yes- 
terday that it used a number of 
pre-recorded station annou- 
ncements. sometimes by out- 
siders and sometimes by 
members of its own staff It 
hoped to have Her Ladyship 
off tbe air well within the three 
months set by the court. 


Night search 
of moor after 
clothes find 



Shredded clothing was 
found last night at one of four 
sites on Saddleworth Moor, 
Greater Manchester, being ex- 
cavated by the police in the 
search for graves. 

Floodlights were ordered as 
excavations of the area contin- 
ued in darkness In case other 
remnants were washed away 
or buried by snow. 


Non-stop flights. 
Comfort. 
Convenience. 


Berlin hunt for 

Syrian official 


But Her Ladyship will not 
be silenced entirely. The voice' 
of Miss Peberdy is used at a 
□umber of stations through- 
out Southern Region; British 
Rail is understandably reluc- 
tant to say which . 


West Germany has issued a 


fiany 

warrant for a Syrian intelli- 
gence official after the jailing 
on bomb charges in West Ber- 
lin yesterday of two Jordani- 
ans, including the brother of 
lhe man sentenced in London 
to 45 years for his attempt to 
blow up an El A1 jumbo jet. 

Details, page 9 


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HOME NEWS 



NEWS SUMMARY 


Police quiz men 
over murders 

. . J L 



ano IWO women to » 

Jnlibed the work ot the “raj l«y ggS. -.„ and 

One man was arrested o n SmW ^ 

appeared before mgsMg* JSLr 24 toas. 

^S’^TbddS^^sday night and mkeo 

3-5SSk^— •*# 

of Alison Pay, a^d 15, ^ jyfrs Anne 

- b“ borne u. 

Hertfordshire. 


Duke speaks 
of ghastly 
quality in 
some schools 


Claws, 


By Derek Harris, Industrial Editor 


Hertfordshire. 

New attack on BBC 

_ ■ — - — iwf itnlMpal IMK VI 


The BBC was feeing a new 

to 


The series, to De Siam j**, “ ™ — r , _ • 


Msm^er, and. t* 
fSSK wS has Wd the sen* is to 
give a “blatantly left wing” view of intelligence ffimtters. 


£3 killer 


gets life 


Ordered 
to leave 


'A teenager who mur- 
dered a woman aged 76 for 
the £3 she had in her purse 
was jailed for life yes- 
terday. 

Exeter Crown Court was 
teid that Clifford Norton, 
aged i9, of Glenmore 
Road, Mioeiiead, Somer- 
set, burst into Mrs Wini- 
fred Borman’s home and 
slit her throat last May. 

He initially denied min- 
der but yesterday changed 
his plea. 


Mr Ammanallah Khan, 
of Westbonrne Road, Lu- 
ton, leader of the Kashmir 
Liberation Front, was serv- 
ed with a deportation order 
yesterday. J 
Mr Khan, aged 52, who 
was cleared of explosives 
charges at St Albans 
Crown Coart last Septem- 
ber, was told then that be 
was to be deported because 
the Home Secretary cons- 
idered his presence was not 
conducive to public good. 


The D uke nf Edinburgh said 
yesterday that some education 
|n Britain was of a ghastly 
Quality and gave a warning 
that certain comprehensive 
schools were producing “sec- 
ond-class citizens” . 

The Dube was spoking to 
an audience of 300 indus- 
trialists after givmg mis 

years’s London Lecture to the 
British Institute of Manage- 
ment. 

In answers to questions he 
said that education m Britain 
was “patchy”. 

He added: “There are exam- 
ples of marvellous quality but 
also many examples of really 
ghastly quality in education- 
It was a question of atti- 
tudes. “There are sections of 
the trashing population which 
have attitudes that many peo- 
ple do not understand. It is a 
free country and there is no 
reason why they should not 

think this way. Personally I do 
■ i. rlninp 9 


quality of the old g r a mm ar 
schools. 

“It is all very well if you can 

do that, but it means the 
stream in the comprehensive 
school which is not a c a d e m ic 

or intellectual tends to become 

a s eco nd cla ss citizen. If yon 
take people from the second- 
ary modem schools wh ere 
they were first class citizens 
and put them into a first c las s 
school then, if the criteria is 
intellectual quality, they are 
bound to be second class 
citizens.” 


He emphasized: “I am not 
preaching against comprehen- 
sive schools. The problem is 
perception by the teachere ot 
the school as a whole on where 
they put their priorities either 
on intellectual and a c a dem ic 
achievement or on practical 
and technical skills. 

In his lecture the Duke had 

criticized those in education 
who decried competition. 

.. !j,.Ti<w.aivihn 


“In an effon to equalize 
education there has been 


CUUULUVU . 

development of comprem 
sive schools which from 


hen- 


Bishop 
of Oxford 


The Rev Richard Doug- 
las Harries (right), at 
present Dean of King s 
College, London, isto be 
the next Bishop of Oxford. 

t i .Mil Qt it 


Mr Harries," aged 50, is 
’ i of Wells, 


a former warden — . 

Salisbury and Wells Theo- 
logical College, and vicar of 
All Saints, Fulham, south- 
west London. 

The Queen's appro ved 
hi$ nomination yesterday. 

The former bishop, the 
Right Rev Patrick Camp- 
bell Rodger, resigned last 
July. 



51 VC 3LUUVU -T — „ 

philosophical point of view is 
perfectly reasonable but the 
difficulty about that, or the 
consequence, is that most of 
the comprehensive schools are 
I trying to ape the academic 


freedom and equality, are 
busily trying to do away wiui 
competitive sports or with 
competition of any kind. 
There may well be undesirable 
elements in competition if it 
sets out of hand but one 
Wonders what life would be 
like without any challenge or 
without any opportunity to 
succeed. 


Kinnock to 
continue 


purge on 
Militant 




Rumpus on urban 
aid conference 

a 


By Gavin Bell 
A daw, a finger and a 
humerus bene firms an enor- 
mous flesh-eating dinosaur, 
being studied by. Dr Alssa 


Charig (centre) with Dr An- 
gela Milner and Mr Ron 


It has been named Baryonyx 
walked, meaning ‘‘heavy 
daw” and honeming Mr Wil- 
liam J Walker, an amateur 

fossil collector who discovered 

it in 1583. 


Illustrious limps back 

« , & trXitc iriiMitTinns. forced to abandon 


The juroaft carrier HMS Illustrious, toned to atarfOTi 

fte first half of a Royal Na^woridtouradtera^»^K«- 

ploded, is returning to Portsmouth with more geartox 
trouble. 


Rewjrs costing £5 rafflkm were carried out when the 
^S^Sd^srbox exploded earlier tMs yrer. 

Now a twoHnch piece of metal has sheared ™ opp- 
osite geurbox in tiieGntfrf^toan. 


Terrorists’ deals 
‘fund activities’ 


International terrorists are 
using the profits from legiti- 
mate businesses, accoun ts and 
investments to fill their war 
chests, the head of Scotland 
Yard’s detective force said 
yesterday (Our Crime Re- 
porter writes). 

But the use of legitimate 
financial institutions could 
prove to be one of the 
terrorists’ weak points. Police 
and security services should 
attempt to attack terrorism 
through its finan c ial roots, Mr 
John Dellow, assistant com- 
missioner of the Metropolitan 
police, said. 

Speaking at the Royal 
United Services Institute, Mr 
Dellow pointed to the Yard’s 
successful policy of attacking 
the assets of international 
criminals. If the strategy 


worked against criminal gangs 
it could also be very effective 
against terrorist organizations. 


By Christopher Wurman* 

The Prince of Wales today 
launches Inner City Aid, an 
appeal to raise funds to sup- 
port self-help community 
projects in deprived urban 
areas of Britain, amid con- 
troversy over sponsorship of 
tiie conference he will address. 
The two-day conference at 

the Astoria Theatre in London 

has attracted more than 800 
delegates, but a number of 
tenants' organizations and 
Shelter, the national campaign 
for the homeless, have refused 
to attend. This is because the 
main sponsor is Regalian 
Properties, a company spec- 
ializing in renewing old build- 
ings, many of them council 
owned, to provide homes for 
sale. The company has given 
£25,000 to help pay for the 
conference. 

Case UK. a tenants 
organization, is or g a nizin g a 
protest for tomorrow. 

Community Architecture 
Information' Services, or- 
ganizers of the conference, 
yesterday described those att- 
empting to organize a boycott 


Property Correspondent 


as “narrow-minded and neg- 
ative”. They said that the 
privatization of public hous- 
ing estates, while vitally im- 
portant was only one of many 
issues relating to the built 
environment 

They said the attempt was 
negative because effective 
resolution of the conflicts 
involved in privatization 
would come about only if all 
parties started talking. 

Mr David Goldstone, head 
of Regaljan, said he bad 
offered to .withdraw, but that 
was rejected. , . 

The Inner City Trust will 
administer the funds -in- 
tended to reach tens of mil- 


and _ 

yesterday at the 
Natural History Museum, 
London, where Dr Charig 

described the partial skdeton 

as the most important fossil 
found this century. 

The creature, affectionately 
known as Claws, possessed at 
least one large daw-bone, 
unlike any other known dino- 
saur, affid was found in a 
daypit in Surrey. 


The daw is thought to have 
measured up to I5m long. It 
would have been used to 
convey food into a momi 
c ontaining almost 130 razor- 
sharp 


passive fish-eater Bring near 
rivets and swamps. The dtao- 
sanr, which lived 124 nnifion 
years ago, probably scooped 
up fisM& ranch the same way 
as North American grizzly 
bears do today, although « a 
rather more spectacular man- 


By Philip Webster 
Chief Pofitkad 
Correspondent 

Mr Nml Kinnock yesterday 
signalled that there would be 
iro feHipm bis efforts to purge 
the Labour Party of the Mih- 
xant Tendency. . 

The party teaderwon a vote 
at the national executive com- 
mittee meeting for a new 
inquiry into the Liverpool 
Labour - group, winch some 
members hope will lead to the 
removal ofMrTony Byrne, its 
newhard-fefi leader, and pave 
the way for the disbandment 
of the. MiHtant-dominated 
KTOwstey North constituency 
party. 

HHe overwhelmingly de- 
feated a left-wing attempt, fed 
by Mr Tony Bcxm, to Mode 
further party expulsions. 

- Mr Kinnock moved swiftly 
against Mr Byrne, who be- 
came frsMb* 1 of the Labour 
group last week in a hard-left 
coop which deposed Mr John 
Hamilton, the veteran leader. 

Mr Byrne, who, as chair- 
man of the council finance 
commit tee, masterminded. Li- 
verpool's budget fight with ibe 
Government, infuriated Mr 
Kinnock by appearing at a 
press conference soon after- 
wards at which Mr Derek 
Hatton declared that he was 
still de] 
coundL 

stood down. 

Mr Kinnock moved for a 
three-man inquiry into the 
Liverpool Labour group, “and 
the constitutional position of 
Councillor Byrne foil owing 
the group meeting and his 
apparent immediate breach of 
the party rules and constitu- 
tion'* 



Dr Charig estimated tiiat it 
would have measured 30ft m 
leng th, and have stood about 
15 ft high on its hind legs, 
weighing ®P to two tons. 

It was probably a fairly 


Claws will go an temporary 
exhibition at the museum next 
year. Dr Charig and tos 
colleagues hope to piece®* 
fragments together into * 
permanent, mou nted display 
in three or four years* time. 


INeWS jiuci 

TUC victory by electricians 

Bv Tim Jones . . . .. 


deputy leader of the 
icaL Mr Hatton has since 


jrice iof c 
iilielp with 


It 


;ft. d E 


He won the vote by 19 to 
five after a passionate speech 
in which he attacked the 
treatment .of Mr Hamilton, 
who he said had endured 
“every taunt, pressure and 
insult”. 


■r- 

:.**»& '?■ 
!■ -r.k.'Ot- 






J! ■ f 


Mr Byrnefec« disripfinary 

a u the inquiry, headed 


action u inc iiujuu/, umb»» 
by Mr Ken Cure, finds that be 
acted unconstitutionally _ in 
immediately foiling to with- 
draw support from Mr Hatton 
and other expelled members. 


■- 1 ■ 


• *2 
.V H 
Vi 




Sikh was 
‘horrified 





ItUUV-U IV ivw. — — V, . 

lions of pounds — raised by_rts 


He said: “It should not be 
beyond our wit to apply to 
terrorism the philosophy of 
striking at money supply and 
profit We know that many of 
the world’s terrorist organiza- 
tions no longer rely on hand- 
outs either from individuals, 
groups or states but are now in 

the business of investment 
property ownership and 
money dealing. 

“This could be addressed in 
a similar fashion as is or- 
ganized crime. The concept is 
also attractive because of the 
manner in which some funds 
are acquired for investment 
such as robbery, fraud and 
extortion.” 


campaigning arm. Inner 
Aid. The money will come 
from commerce, industry, in- 
stitutions, societies, dubs, pri- 
vate benefactors and the 
general public. 

It will also promote pop 
concerts and other events to 
raise money to regenerate 
communities. 

Spectrum, page 15 


Community building 
award is Launched 


By Charles Knevttt, Architecture Correspondent 

m i yjjg f noi£ 0*7 cm* htfnm 


The Times and the Royal The 198 ^®7 , sd £“ e J? 

Institute of British Architects again supports! by the 
announced yesterday the laun- ^ouste Guib^^ Fo ut^ 
ching of the second Annual non, which is contributing 


Community Enterprise Sch- 
eme for 'community-based 
environmental projects. 

Mr Rod Hackney, chairman 
of the scheme, said he hoped 
there would be even more 
entries than the 184 last year. 

The aim of the scheme is to 
encourage community _ invol- 
vement in commission 


uuu, — — : — 

£1 0,000 in prize money. It also 
plans to publish a second 
edition of Community Enter- 
prise Booklet, in conjunction 
with The Times. 

To mark the International 
Year of Shelter for the Home- 
less in 1987, there will be a 
special category for projects 
which house the home 



encourage Ujiumum.j .***;-- WHICH House LUC UUUI.IW. 

v eroent in commissioning. The Prince of Wales, patron 
designing, and m a nagin g all of the scheme, will present this 
types of buildings. These m- vear ’ S awards next July. The 

. . . : J mi Mn 


dude housing, community assessors will indude Mrs 
centres, adventure playgrou- Jessica Douglas-Home, widow 
nds, workshops for starter and 0 fMr Charles Douglas-Home, 
small businesses, urban forms, f onner editor of The Times, m 
on vimn mental imorovemen- mhne* name a snedal award 

the most 


bUUUi uuaiuwww* 

environmental improvemen- 
ts, and facilities for the 
disabled. 

Awards are given for the 
most imaginative, viable, ana 
need-fulfilling community^- 
ojects in the United Kingdom. 


whose name a 
will be given __ 
outstanding entry. 

The dosing date for entries 
is January 23, 1987. Con- 
ditions of entry and entry 
forms may be obtained from 


niects in the Uni tea rangnom. torms may ue wuuu~ 
gnuies are assessed on their tfie CES Awards Co-ordinator, 
value to the community, Lynne Hutton, c/o Busmen m 
environmental quality, and the Community, 227A City 
fuiure plans for maintenance Rd. London ECIV 1LX. Tele- 
and running- phone 01 253 3716. 


The General Council of the 
Trades Union Congress was 
told yesterday that the 
electricians' union had acted 
-within the letter and the 
spirit” of directions imposed 
upon it concerning its involve- 
ment in the News Inter- 
national dispute. 

• It had done so in spite of 
death threats to union officers- 
and violence against members 
and their property. 

After hearing an un- 
compromising defence of lus 
union's position from Mr Eric 
Hammond, the general sec- 
retarv, the members of the 
TUCs ultimate ruling body 
decided by 24 votes to 21 not 
to invoke disciplinary pro- 
ceedings against the Electrical 
Electronic Telecommunica- 
tion and Plumbing Union. 

In a statement to the general 
council, Mr Hammond smd 
he believed that when the 
council had found his union 
guilty of five out of seven 
charges last February, it had 
ignored the “whole back' 
ground and culpability of ihe 
mint unions for their own 
plight”. 

Mr Hamm ond was defend- 
ing union against attacks 
from the print unions Sogat* 
82 and the National Grap hical 
Association, who were de- 
manding disciplinary action 
agains t the electricians’ union. 
EETPU members work at 
News International's new high 
technology plant at Wapping. 
east London. 

He said that since the 
publication of the book The 
End of the Street which im- 
plies complicity between bis 
union and the company, there 
had be en refuelled a “wry the 
EETPU” campaign orches- 
trated by the Communist 
Morning Star newspaper. 


By Tim Jones 
The reality was, Mr Ham- 
mond said, that throughout 
the dispute thousands of 
SogaL NGA, National Union 
of Journalists members and 
Transport and General 
Workers’ Union members 
■have worked to produce and 
distribute all News Inv- 
itational publications. He 
added “In contrast, at 
Wapping, no more than a 
couple of hundred EETPU 
members are employed” . 

Detailing specific 
“ferocious” attacks by Sogat 
and the NGA against each 
other, Mr Hammond said ihe 
general council had to recall a 
Sogat conspiracy to push his 
union (Hit of Fleet Street with 
secret meetings involving 
EETPU Communists and se- 
nior Sogat officials. 

His members, be said, had 
been subject to raids and 
harassment throughout the 
provincial newspaper industry 
and there bad been the 
obstruction of new technology 
by print unions, which had 
denied e mploy ment opportu- 
nities to EETPU members. 

Referring to specific allega- 
tions that he had given a 
personal go-ahead to Mr Ru- 
pert Murdoch, chairman of 
News International, to print 
four national newspapers, 
including at Wapping, Mr 
Hammond said: “Such an 
approval has never been given 
by me or any other officer of 
the EETPU”. _ , 

He said that only through 
the intervention of the 
electricians’ union, at the re- 
quest of the TUC, had News 
International conceded finan- 
cial compensation to former 
employees, which could in 
some cases be in excess of 

£30,000. ■ 

In addition because of ms 
union's intervention the com- 


pany had recognized the 
establishment of a four-union 
national joint council to act as 
a- consultative body and 
agreed that former employees 
would be considered lor any 
vacancies at Wapping. 

The reality of the situation, 
Mr Hammond said, had been 

J TT TtT MtnMMC IPCt 


X J - 

pot to the TUC congress last 
Septem’ - t " 4 


iber. He had pointed 
out that his union had in 
Wapping only a minority of 
the production workforce. 

He bad told congress: 


“Would a call us secure 


their stoppage of work? We 
are, in any case, bound as the 
print unions did, to have a 
ballot Does anyone doubt the 
result of that ballot? 

“Whatever the result, our 
funds would be Uable, but 
seemingly, having gone 
through such a charade, we 
wouldbe shriven pure like the 
TGWU and the NUJ. They 
both had many more mem- 
bers at Wapping but with 
ineffectual' instructions, to 
their members, with a ritual 
washing of hands, they es- 
caped condemnation.” 

He also recalled another 
pji y si g p- which he delivered to 
congress “We refuse to accept 
responsibility for the plight of 
former News International 
employees. The immediate 


_ If A 

Parmatma Singh Marwaha, 
’one oCthree Sikhs accused of a 
conspiracy to assassinate Mr 
Rajiv Gandhi, the prime min- 
ister of India, was horrified 
when he heard of the plot, 
Birmingham' Crown Court 
was told yesterday- 
Lord Gifford, QC, 
representing Mr Marwaha, a 
company director, aged 44, 
from Kedleston Road, Leices- 
ter, told the court that he had 

been roped into the plot 

He said that Mr Marwaha 
was asked to go to a meeting, 
but when he realized assass- 
ination was being discussed, 

he did not believe what he was 

hearing. 

“Hedecidedto playajongto 

get away and stop *1 Loro 
Gifford said. 

Mr Marwaha, together wim 
jarnail Singh Ranuana, aged 
46, of CanonStreel Leicester, 
and Sukhvinder Singh. 
aged 30, of Worthington 
Street, Leicester, all deny 
conspiracy to commit murder 
and soliciting others to com- 
mit murder. 

The trial continues today. 


responsibility for that plight 
lies with the bad judgement of 
the print unions.” 

Mr Hammond told the 
genera l cou ncil yesterday: 
“The EETPU recognize that 
the TUCs rules, providing 


they are subject to, and used 
within, the laws of the land, 
must be the instrument to 
settle differences within the 
trade union movement, how- 
ever much we .dislike the 
outcome. That is why we 
accepted the directions with- 
out reservation.” ■ 


liether 


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£1.6m fund 
for helicopter 
safety scheme 




si, ■ * 

r- ' 


The Ovil Aviation Auth- 
ority confirmed yesterday feat 
it is to ^pend £1.6 mflhon op 
research into improving b®” - 
copter safety (Our Air 
Correspondent writes). 

Ac Hicrlncpfl hv The 


■■ W UM 


■ ■ '■’•Xi 


As dlsdosed byf rfte Tmus 


n* 


last week, the fund will be 
made up of £600,000 from the 
CAA, £500,000 from foe Gov- 
ernment and £50 0,000 from 
the helicopter industry. 

Mr Christopher Tugendbat, 
the CAA chairman, said yes- 
terday : “It will be used over 
three years to fulfil the long- 
term need for an 
higher standard off 








5- 


9 


V-'LtT? 


km 


Guernsey- C : . ■ 

Europes conference island... 
with all file trimmings. 


Average home is burgled once every 35 years 

uffflrt iw 


By Peter Evans 
Home Affairs 


Atmosphere can play a 
big part in the success 
of your conference. Only 
an hour from London, 
Guernsey offers a unique 
blend of England and 
the Comment -in its 
buddings, its names, its 
food and drink (VAT-free), 
and its very air which 
manages to be both 

bracing and relaxing. 

The facilities are extensive; 
the services professional; 
and the overall costs, 
indudmg flights, highly 
competitive. Its a good 
place to hold a meeting, 
in fad. its an inspiration. 


Correspondent 


to 


GUERNSEY 


Pto Michael Paul Conference OfficaTl 
I Dept. 1 1 . Guernsey Conference 

1 Bureau. PO Box 23. White Pock. 

' Guernsey. Cl. Id- 0481 26611 


| Heascsend me a Guernsey 

* Conference Information Dosswi 


Name. 


Address. 




The Government is ap- 
proaching the general election 
without announcing a pro- 
gramme of legislation on law 
and order, which fa expected 
10 be one of the main issues of 
the campaign. 

Instead ministers will be 
relying on the Government’s 
record, including increased 
inding, a general strategy 
within the present legislative 
framework- and the Criminal 
Justice Bill now before 
Parliament. 

The Government’s inten- 
tions are plain from a working 
paper, Criminal Justice, pub- 
lished this morning as a pre- 
emptive strike before the 
i second reading of the Bill also 
i today. 

The document provides a 
mass of information with 


which Conservative MPs can 
base counter-attacks on La- 
bour in the run-up to the 
general election, whenever it 
fa, and during the camjaign- 

Using this detailed informa- 
tion the document says that 
although a burglary a minute 
all year throughout England 
and Wales sounds alarming, 
the chances of the “typical 
household” being burgled in a 
year are one in 35. 

The “statistically average 
person” aged 16 or over can 
expect: a robbery once every 
450 years: an assault resulting 
in injury once every century; 
theramily car to. be stolen or 
taken by joyriders once every 
60 years; a burglary in the 
home once every 35 years. 

But it adds that 30 per cent 
of males bora in 1953 had 
been convicted of a relatively 
serious criminal offence by the 
age of 28. About 5 per cent of 


Move to cut jail terms 


Prison sentences should be 
cut by a new supervised re- 
lease scheme for those soring 
less rh«n three years, die 
National Association for the 
Care and Resettlement of 
Offenders said yesterday in 
evidence to the Commons 
home affairs committee. 

Under the proposal, floated 
by the Home Office » 1981 


bat not implemented, inmates 
would serve shorter jafl terms, 
but be supervised outside with 
the threat of recall , if they 
misbehaved. 


The association called for 
alternative ways of dealing 
with fine defaulters, who ac- 
count for a quarter of all jailed 
offenders. 


known offenders commit 70 
per cent of detected crime. 

The B31 will provide a 
vehicle with which ministers 
can get their good intentions 
across to voters. 

Although; minor Bills in the 
Home Office field would not 
be ruled out after an election, 
the belief within the Govern- 
ment fa that the balance 
between extra powers to deal 


with crime and the safeguard- 
ing of individual's rights fa 
about right. 

But the process is not 
finished. The Government’s 
preelection strategy includes: 

• Strengthening court and 
police powers' while keeping 
safeguards for individuals. 

• Still more resources .for 
police, prisons and probation. 

• Making criminal justice 


more effioest and effective. 

• Better support for victims 

• Action to prevent crime. 

“Over the last 30 years the 

statistics of recorded crime 
have consistently made 
gloomy leading,” the working 
paper says. Improved pol- 
ice/public relations, the in- 
crease in the use of the 
telephone and the extension of 
insurance can aft put up the 
level of recorded enme and so 
make the crime figures look 
more serious- Paradoxically, 
more police officers may re- 
sult in more reported crime. 

The working paper say 
•^Crime in England and Wal 
has been growing at a fairly 
constant rate since the 1950s 
and, as in other western 
countries, fa- at a level which 
causes very serious concenx. 
Criminal Justice, a 'Working 
Paper. (The library, Home Of- 


fioe,. Anne's Gate, 


London SW1H9ATJ. 


DOMESTIC 

DAMP? 


A once and for all solution 
to the problems caused In tha 
tome by condensation is now 
available. 


By Irwrotiudng Just one 
compact, efficient unit to each 
home, which, via an advanced 


home, wmen, vo an 

refrigeration process, gfacfr 
quickly and permanently absorts 
rrtAfetlira. VOW - 


quiwy > 

atmospheric moisture, your 
home can avoid rotting 
woodwork, peeling paper*™ 
piaster, damp currai ns and 
general discomfort. 


If you’d like further 
information on how to rid your 
home of cosdy and annoying 
wetness, with running costs as 
Ittde ail pan hour, writ* in Mr or 
Mrs C Round, of DLGDtptodge 

Ltd., the country's leading 
deHumldificatlon experts, for 
details, free no-obUgrtk* 
home demonstrations, etc.^ » 

29 Forest Road, OWbur* 
Wkrtey, WescMkJtands B68 Offi, 

Teh 021-421 6527, quoting 
reference DT20. 


•r % 



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" S* 


too 


-M* l 




i 


■TT-J'tfs 

■~^r * 


T! 


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cm 


Concern at 


closure of 


services in 
rural areas 


Patients should be toki 
more about the risks of sur- 
gery and other medical treat- 


ments, rather than receiving 
the “benevolent deception” of 
doctore, a report published 
today says. 

Patients should be allowed 
more “freedom to gamble” on 
treatments in a move towards 
shifting the responsibility of 
risk-taking in medicine more 
towards the patient and away 

jTir.rr» ilia tK* L__ 


Brunei University, the rep- 
ort’s author,. says. 

Mr George Teding Smith, 
director of the OHE, which is 
mnded by the drugs industry, 
said yesterday that there was a 
“lunatic irrationality” in how 

TtcW- «n 1 . 


A patient suffering from 
vagina who underwent a coro- 
nary by-pass operation had a 
<®c in 30 chance of dying 
within a month- Someone 


dependent researchers in- 
vestigating the rfwimad bene- 
fits of a product It would he 
“totally irresponsible” to con- 
ceal any details of the possible 
risks of taking the drag. 

But many patients who , 
were suffering from arthritis 
and rhe umatism had been 
deprived of the only drugs that 
could alleviate their pam be- 
cause of the assessments of the 
Government’s Committee 



the Office of Home Econom- 
ics said. 

“It is complacent to assume 
that a patient’s desire to 
gamble on a treatment wifl be 
the same as the clinician’s. 
Patients are often averse to 
taking rides, and are prepared 
to trade longevity for quality 
of life improvements,” the 
report said. 

^ 


7 ***** UW 

prescribed drugs which had a 
one in 10,000 risk of can^ra 
death. 


patient did not have to give a 
warning of the risks of surgery, 
but the drug would be with- 
drawn because it was too 
dangerous, he said. 

“Some surgeons have made 
claims for the benefits of 


•Miciy ui mcoicmcs m me 
drugs’ potentially fi n al haz- 
ards. Fully informed of the 
risks, many people would 
have chosen to continue with 
those drugs, he said. 

Some patients were natu- 
rally “risk-takers” while oth- 
ers were naturally “risk-avoi- 
ders”, the repent said. 

Doctors should take this 




into account when judging a 


patients so as to educate rather made on behalf of individual 

than frighten them, Mr Benue drugs,” he said 

O’Brien, o f t he Health Econ- Drug companies should be 


- . ■_ , — zz — “ ju b tumpaiues soouiu ne 

onucs Research Group at completely frank with fo- 




- V* 


Advice for clergy 
on help with Aids 


Church of England clergy- 
men who tend Aids patients 
must ml question the morality 
of the victims’ lifestyles a ns! 
should put aside their own 
views . abeat homosexuality 
and drug abuse, according to 
gridetines issued by the 
church today. 


Encouraging sensible re- 
actiona to the development of 
Aids, responsible behaviour 
among people who are at risk 
and sensitive care for those 
affected are priorities, the 
booklet says. 


All those who suffer from 
the disease deserve both com- 
passion and help, and the 
church should assist m 
promoting their pastoral care, 
the gatefees, contained in a 
booklet, suggest 


“Socb pastoral conc ern is 
quite different from mHng 
moral judgements about mat- 
ters such as homosexual 
through which Aids has been 
usually, but not always, 
tr a nsmitte d.” 

The booklet, prepared by 
the church’s social policy 
committ ee , deads with pastoral 
rather than moral aspects of 
Aids, the Bishop of Bir- 
mingham, tbe Right Hev High 
Montefiore, says: la a fore- 


Aids: Some GuMelmes fir 
Pastoral Care (Church House 
.Publishing, Great Smith 
Street, London; 60p). 

• Pathologists at St Mary’s 
Ho spita l, Paddington, refused 
to carry out a post-mortem 
examination . on a 
haemophiliac because they 
feared catching Aids, an in- 
quest at Westminster was told 
yesterday. 

Mr Christopher Ashe, aged 
28, of Needham Road, 
Westbourne Park, west 
London, who collapsed and 
was found dead by his wife on 
October 22, had been tested 
regularly for the vims. Each 

time the tests proved negative, 
the inquest was told. 

Dr Paul Knapman, the 
coroner, recorded an open 
verdict. 


U IVUIVCU fliauiw DUUi LUC UCOIUJ 

professions and the general 
public needed to learn more 
about the actual risks faced 
every time a medical proce- 
dure was carried ouL 

Medical or surgical progress 
would be impossible unless 
patients were prepared to 
accept inevitable risks of treat- 
ment. 

Doctor? 

(OHE, 12 Whitehall London 
SWIA2DY; £ 1 . 50 )l 1Maaon 

• Private locum agencies, 

• anxious to cash in on the 
shortage of junior doctors, are 
going bankrupt, leaving debts 
of thousands of pounds (Jill 
Sherman writes). 

Dr Ian McKim Thompson, 
deputy secretary of the British 
Medical Association, said that 
the BMA had had complaints 
from members who had not 
been paid or whose payment 
had teen held up by several 
months. “We found that a few 
companies had gone into liq- 
uidation or no longer existed 
and there was no way of. 
chasing up payments,” be I 
said. I 


Private agencies providing 
temporary medical cover for 
holidays, sickness and study 
leave, are mushrooming ail 
oyer the country because of a 
high demand for locum doc- 
tors. Many offer rates of up to 
three times the NHS and take 
agency payments of at least 20 
percent Bat faced with delays 
from health authorities forw- 
arding the payments some 


Mother Papers of 
tells of revolution 
shop visit for sale 


companies are r unning into 
serious difficulties! 


Therapist 
‘interfered 
in affairs’ 


A newsagent accused of 
selling typewriter correction 
fluid to a boy who later died 
from inhaling it, denied stock- 
ing the Quid when confronted 
by the boy's mother, a court 
was told yesterday. 

Lee Kendall, aged 14. col- 
lapsed and died on August 8 
after sniffing the fluid with 
friends in a park in Bermond- 
sey, south-east London. 

Mrs Maria Kendall, his 
mother, told Tower Bridge 
Magistrates’ Court that the 
next day she, her mother, and 
her daughter went to a 
newsagents’ shop in Dunton 
Road, Southwark, and asked 
Mr Chandrakant Patel, the 
shopkeeper, to return a radio 
which she believed her son i 
had traded for fluid 
He denied laving the radio 
but produced a tape recorder 
that the boy had toft with him 
several days before. 

Mrs Kendall, of Hazel Way, 
Bermondsey, said: “He denied 
that he sold the fluid and he 
denied that he even stocked 
it”. 


Important Marxist lit- 
erature, including the first 
nine issues of the original 
Iznstia, reporting the start of 
die Ru s s i an revolution in 
1917, will be auctioned at 
Sotheby's today. 


Valuable first editions of 
books by Karl Marx and 
Friedrich Engels will also 
come up for auction, after the 
successful sale of the first 
edition of The Communist 
Manifesto last May for 
£26,400. 


Dr Joseph Jaffe, the hyp- 
notherapist accused of serious 
professional misconduct, 
interfered with tire business 
affairs of a patient whom he 
brainwashed into secrecy, a 
disciplinary hearing was told 
yesterday. 

Eventually the patient, Mr 
George Waterson, aged 49, a 
wealthy businessman, was en- 
couraged to go to the fraud 


squad by another psychiatrist, 
although police inquiries into 
the case remain unknown. 

This was alleged at a Gen- 
eral Medical Council tearing 
in London where Dr Jaffe, 
aged 60, a former mayor of 
Salford, Manchester, denies 
five charges of serious pro- 
fessional misconduct 

The accusations were matte 
by Dr Ian dark, a former 
consultant psychiatrist at 
Cheadle Royal Hospital, who 
treated Mr Waterson after he 
had spent five years in the care 
of Dr Jaffe. 

In that time. Dr Jaffe had 
allegedly administered an 
addictive drug concoction 
which he called “Jaffe juice” 
as part of hypnotherapy treat- 
ment, for which he charged up 
to £60,000. 

Dr Clark said Mr Waterson, 
married with four children 
from Altrincham, Cheshire, 
showed him business docu- 
ments including bank 
statements. 

Dr Clark said: “The conclu- 
sion I came to was that there 
were dearly irregularities 
which needed to be further 
looked into by the appro p ri a t e 
authorities.” 

The case continues. 


The nine copies of Izvatut, 
da ti ng from Febntaiy 27 to 
March 4, 1917 (Russian cal- 
endar), “some slightly turn 
along the folds, the paper 


yellowed, a few edges slightly 
frayed,” were printed by an 
anonymous committee of 
Petrograd journalists and ace 
expected to fetch between 
£5,000 and £7,000. 


But _ her daughter pushed 
him aside and saw a box of the 
fluid. 

Mr Paid, aged 35, and his 
cousin, Mr Sureshbhai Patel, 
aged 23, both of Si Stephens 
Close, Southall, west London, 
deny supplying Lee Kendall 
with the fluid while knowing 
him to be under 18 and being 
aware that he intended to sniff 
iL 


It was the first newspaper to 
report the start of tte Rassian 
revolution in 1917, after the 
Tsarist newspapers went on 
strike. The February 27 issue 
features the report of the 
Petrograd garrison’s supply of 
arms and ammuniti on to the 
workers, striking against the 
government. 


The headline declares; “The 

newspapers aren’t coming oat. 
Events are happening too 
quickly. The people most 
know what is happening.” 


Chandrakant denies two ch- 
arges and his cousin one. 

The case continues. 


But it was also the first of 
three different newspapers, aO 
called Izrestia meaning 
“news”, to appear at that time. 


Bailiffs ‘too heavy-handed 9 


By Frances Gibb, Legal Affairs Correspondent 

Councils and housing ass- Councils advised its members alleged 
'nations who send in bailiffs to take such action as a last premist 
when tenants are behind with resort, but a few “heavy- were in 


their rent are criticized as 
“unnecessarily cruel” and 
“heavy-handed” by the Na- 
tional Consumer Council to- 
day. 

In its evidence to the Law 
Commission the council calk 
for “this pernicious practice” 
to be stamped out and sup- 
ports the commission's pro- 
posal that die right of public 
landlord^ to tackle rent areeaxs 

in such a way should be 
abolished. 

Mr Michael .Montague, 
council chairman, says: “The 
practice of sending bailiffs in. 


alleged to have entered 
premises when only children 
were in the house and seized 1 


tended” councils seemed to goods,” he said. In other cases j 
send in bailiffs without warn- it was alleged they “turned out 


ing tenants first, he said. 

Those who got behind with 
the rent were hkely to be those 
low-income families who 
could not pay, because of a 


drawers or cupboards and 

smashed fittings”. 

Although there are leg al 
limits on what bailiffs are 
allowed to take, and the tenant 


sodden drop in income, rather can pursue a bailiff for ill egal 


than those who would not 
Their plight was made 
worse by bailiffs coining in 

and seizing household essen- 
tials such as furniture and 
selling them for far less than 
their value. In one. case this 
had happened to settle a debt 
of only £20. 


actum in the courts, he must 
first settle his debt in order to 
recover the goods. 

The council calls for rent 
arrears to be tackled in other 
ways, and says that councils 
should first review their rent 
collection procedures and en- 
sure they have not made the 


it is actually counter prod- . other people, such as rented, suraer. Council. 20 Grosvenor 
active.” .TV seisTI he added. • - • Gartens, Loudon SWl ODH; 

The Association of District . “In some cases , thev are free with sael. 




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j-’.'. •' - • »% • • | 

■ V 



l ll ^ m i l l II m I 

sagggB gjaatgiaiBMia^jeBe 

G “^ School, Orpington, Kent, who hopes to become 
to* wmnas of the Leadership *86 competition, part of the 
Year to find potential leaders of the nation 
frous among the pnpils of 7,000 schools. Girls outnumbered boys by two to one in the final 
fat (Photograph: Chris Harris). 


By John Young 

The present debate about 
the future of farming and the 
countryside should be wid- 
ened to include the mounting 
problems of unemployment, 
inadequate bousing, school 
closures and lack of services 
that faced many rural commu- 
nities. Lord Vinson, chairman 
of the Development Commis- 
sion. said yesterday. 

“Villages used to be places 
where people lived and 
worked and not just places to 
which commuters returned 
home to roost at night." he 
said. 

Last year some 7,000 jobs 
were lost in agriculture, com- 
pared with only 1.000 the 
previous year. To this should 
be added thousands more jobs 
lost in the agricultural service 
industries. 

“We believe there is an 
opportunity now for the Gov- 
ernment to demonstrate its 
concern for rural areas, and to 
help them adjust by redirect- 
ing some of the savings from 
agricultural support into more 
general support for rural 
communities,” he said. 

“Developing alternative 
sources of farm income 
through diversification and 
new. forms of land use may 
help to keep some fanners and 
their families in business. But 
the scope for creating new jobs 
in this way for the displaced 
farm workers, let alone meet- 
ing other employment needs, 
is limited.” 

Lord Vinson was speaking 
at the launching of the 
commission's annual report, 
which says many rural coun- 
ties have unemployment rates 
well above the national av- 
erage. 

The report discloses that in 
England 483 village schools 
have closed since 1980. In 
Surrey 39 villages lost at least 
one shop between 1973 and 
I9S3, leaving 18 without any. 
Against the grain, page 14 


— — 

Australian 
trip for 




Mis Eileen Card is the sole 
winner of y est e rday’s Portfolio 
Gold prize of £4,000. 

Mrs Card, aged 53, from 
Blackfield in whanpls, 
has played the Portfolio Gold 
game since it started in Tke 
Tima. 

She said she was “ray 
pleased” to have won. 

When asked how she in- 
tended spending the prize 
money, she sank “My hus- 
band and I will use it to visit 
our daughters in Australia 
next year”. 

Readers who wish to play, 
the game can obtain a Port- 
folio Gold card by sending a 
stamped addressed envelope 
to: 

Portfolio Gold, 

The Times, 

PO Box 40, 

Blackburn, 

BB1 6AJ. 



Mrs Card: Pleased to win 


Man acccused 
of PC murder 


A man detained in North 
Staffordshire Royal Infirmary 
in Stoke-on-Trent was yes- 
terday charged with die mur- 
der of PC John Taylor. 

He is Terrence Butcher, 
aged 26, of Birmingham. 




r’s 

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to good 


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November 26 1986 


Government 


is accused 


of fiddling 
trade figures 


INVISIBLE TRADE 


Allegations of fiddling figures 
for invisible trade were tossed 
around the Commons chamber 
during exchanges on a private 
notice question. 

It began with Mr John Smith* 
chief Opposition spokesman on 
trade and industry, highlighting 
scepticism in the City about the 
recalculation of invisibles in the 
hade figures to show a higher 
surplus and warning the Gov- 
ernment to be careful, in view of 
its record in “manipulating'’ 
unemployment statistics, not to 
let its previous convictions run 
before it. 

It continued with Mr Michael 
Howard, Under-Secretary of 


pounced they accused the Gov- 
ernment of fiddling the figures. 

!l, was not the Government 
but the Opposition itself which 
was in need of some creative 
accounting in support of its 
economic policies. 

Mr Howard agreed. The Op- 
position was unwilling to rec- 
ognize good news when it was 
thrust before them. 

Dr Jeremy Bray (Motherwell 
South. Lab) said that there were 
suspicious circumstances that 
this change should apparently 
have occured just at the mo- 
ment when the balance of 
payments would otherwise have 
slipped into deficit. 

Mr Howard said the Opposition 
were questioning figures pro- 
duced by CSO statisticians. 

Mr John Townead (Bridlington 


challenging Mr Smith to say in 
the dearest possible terms if be 
was in any way alleging that the 
figures bad been doctored by 
statisticians at the Central 
Statistical Office. 

It ended with Mr Ian Gow 
(Eastbourne, C) refusing to 
wiihdraw his remark, despite an 
appeal by The Speaker (Mr. 
Bernard Weatherill) in the name 
of Christmas, that it was Mr 
Smith who would apparently 
fiddle the figures -a totally 
unjustified allegation, according 
to Mr Smith. 

Responding to Mr Smith's 
request for a statement. Mr 
Howard said; “Statistics of in- 
visible trade are compiled by the 
Central Statistical Office mainly 


Opposition's pessimism would 
affect the value of the pound. 
Mr Howard thought that the 
markets were sufficiently used 
to the antics of the Opposition 
to be able to take their com- 
ments in an appropriate spirit. 
Mr Brace MUlan (Glasgow, 
Go van. Lab) asked why the 
publication of these figures had 
been brought forward. 

Mr Howard said that large 
changes became evident to the 
statisticians which they thought 
it would be right to bring to the 
attention of the public. He 
hoped that Mr Millan was not 
suggesting that inaccurate fig- 
ures should be pul forward. 

Mr Robert Sheldon (Ashton- 
under-Lyne, Lab) asked if the 
statisticians had insisted that 
their revised figures should be 
incorporated u the trade 
figures. 

Mr Howard said that he did not 
know if Mr Sheldon was suggest- 
ing that the Government ought 
to have told the statisticians to 
take their figures back. 

Mr Alex Fletcher (Edinburgh 
Central Q asked the minister to 
confirm that there had been no 
change in the relationship be- 
tween trade ministers ana the 
professional statisticians since 
the latter provided figures for 
Mr Smith when he was Sec- 
retary of State for Trade. 

Mr Howard said that he could 
not say what the relationship 
had been between Mr Smith and 
the statisticians, but he could 
say that these figures had been 
brought forward by the stat- 
isticians and were not subject to 
any interference by ministers. 
Mr Gow: Is it not dear that die 
minister and his department 
have in no way interfered with 
the statistics which came from 
the CSO? Is it not also dear 
from these exchanges that it is 
Mr Smith who apparently 
would fiddle the figures? (La- 
bour protests and shouts oC 
Withdraw!) 

The Speaker I hope there is no 
question of anybody fiddling 
anything- In the interests of 


from quarterly and annual sur- 
veys of businesses and individ- 
uals engaged in invisible-trade 
transactions. 

“This information becomes 
available much less frequently 
than the corresponding in- 
formation for visible trade. Es- 
timates of the invisible balance 
for the third quarter of 1986 and 
the month of October were 
calculated by the statisticians of 
the CSO on the basis of the latest 
information available to them.** 
Mr Smith asked if the Govern- 
ment was concerned about a 


report in today's Financial 
Times which said that the large 
revisions in the invisibles came 
as a surprise and were greeted 
with widespread scepticism in 
the City. Such scepticism, he 
said, was disturbing about fig-' 
ures on which the markets 
depended and the integrity of 
which ought to be beyond 
question. 

In order to restore confidence 
in the figures, and bearing in 
mind the heavy reliance placed 
on invisibles in the autumn 
statement, next time a more 
detailed justification for the 
calculation of invisibles should 
be shown so that the scepticism 
did not recur. 

Mr Howard said that, unlike 
others, he regarded some news- 
per reports with scepticism. 


because it became dear to the 
CSO statisticians that there were 
changes of a magnitude which 
ought to be drawn to the 
attention of the public. 

The House was accustomed 
to the Opposition finding failure 
where there was none and Mr 
Smith should now stop sniping 
at the success represented by 
these figures for invisibles. 

Sir William Clark (Croydon 
South, C) said that every time 
there was good economic news 
the Opposition made wild 
allegations. The increase in 
invisible earnings was because 
of the increased investment 
since 1979. 

Mr Howard agreed, adding that 
the' Opposition could not bear 
good news and wanted to mis- 
represent it whenever it ocurred. 
Mr Paddy Ashdown (Yeovil, L) 
said that there was scepticism in 
the City and not only among the 
Opposition parties. 

Mr Howard said that be did not 
believe that there was wide- 
spread scepticism in the City. 
Indeed, it was due in no small 
part to the City’s performance 
over the period in question that 
(he invisibles had improved. 

Mr Anthony Nelson (Chich- 
ester. C) said that it was quite 
extraordinary that when a trade 
deficit was announced the 
Opposition blamed the Gov- 
ernment’s economic policies but 
when a trade surplus was an- 


would Mr Gow rephrase that 
remark about fiddling? 

Mr Gow: 1 thought the implica- 
tion put by Mr Smith in his 
PNQ to the minister was that 
the minister had done so (ns 
newed Labour protests and 
Conservative shouts o£ They 
say so every week!). 

Mr Howard: I have invited Mr 
Smith to say in the clearest 
possible terms whether he is 
making any allegation against 
statisticians at the CSO. That is 
a matter be has consistently 
refused to answer. 

Mr Smith: On a point of order, 
Mr Gow made a suggestion that 
I would fiddle trade figures. I 
think in the circumstances he 
ought to withdraw such a totally 
unjustified allegation. 

The Speaker We often hear that 
phrase about fiddling figures in 
all kinds of contexts. I dp not 
think Mr Gow was intending to 
impute any dishonour to Mr 
Smith. I gave him the opportu- 
nity to withdraw because I was 
anxious to move on in a good 
spirit today. 

Mr James Callaghan (Cardiff 
South and Penartn, Lab): While 
no one would accuse the min- 
ister of fiddling any statistics, is 
it not fortunate, fortuitous, and 
a happy chance that every 
revision of figures published. 


whether in this field or employ- 
ment. always redounds to the 


meat. always redounds to the 
advantage of the Government? 


Free vote in Lords on 
homosexual bias Bill 


By Sheila Gann, Political Staff 


Labour peers will have a 
free vote next month on a 
private peer’s Bill aimed at 
curbing pro-homosexual bias 
in some Labour-controlled 
schools. 

It was disclosed yesterday 
that there will be no Labour 
whip on the Biirs second 
reading on December 18, 
which means that it stands a 
good chance of completing its 
passage through the House of 
Lords and going to the Com- 
mons. Many Labour peers 
sympathize with its aims, but 
are likely to abstain because of 
an unwillingness to vote for a 
measure aimed so precisely at 
left-wing local authorities. 


Lord Halsbnry. an indepen- 
em peer and president of the 


dent peer and president of the 
National Council for Chris- 
tian Standards in Schools, 
argued that his Bill win pre- 
vent local councils financing 
schools that actively promote 
homosexuality. It will also 
give parents the right to sue 
such councils. He saw homo- 
sexuality as a “disability", he 
said. 


promiscuity, proselytizing and 
boasting of homosexual aefai- 



. "The state of affairs among 
the 'loony lefl'-coniroUed 


boasting of homosexual achi- 
evements." 

The Department of Educa- 
tion and Science said it 
wanted to test the effective- 
ness of the new powers in the 
Education Act which come 
into effect on January 7, 
before backing stricter con- 
trols. 


PARLIAMENT 




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councils is getting appalling. 
So-called heterosexuals art be- 
ing victimized and some of 
them threatened with 
violence. 

“The best way to tackle this 
is not through the Education 
Act. which is already a sham- 
bles because of the disagree- 
ment over sex education 
between Government min- 
isters and their backbenchers. 
We say if you want to preach 
homosexuality - and that 
heterosexuality is a male- 
dominated perversion — you 
cannot do it on the rates.” 

He added; “I am anti- 
homosexual. Some of them 
are responsible people and 
some of them are not 

“These are the ones who 
indulge in exhibitionism. 


Mr Michael Howard (left): OtaDeoge to Labour on statistics. Mr Robert Hughes: Poor being sacrificed to nuufcet freedom. 

Mr Malcolm PHkimL A generous pay offer to teachers. 


Too little 
spent on 
the arts 


Benefit of bus freedom 
evident, says minister 


HOUSE OF LORDS 


The arts was a booming growth 
industry and making an im- 
portant contribution to the na- 
tional economy, yet public 
funding was ludicrously smalL 
Lord Donooebne (Lab) said in 
the House of Lords when open- 
ing a debate on the need for 
better provision for the arts. 

The respect and priority given 
to artistic endeavour was .fun- 
damental to the quality of life in 
society, he said. Thai might 
seem obvious, yet it needed 
stating in view of the low 


The results of the new freedom 
for bus operators were already 
viable, Mr John Moore, Sec- 
retary of State for Transport, 
said when the Commons de- 
bated the effects of bus deregula- 
tion. New services were being 
introduced and neglected cor- 
ners of the market were being 
developed. 

He moved an amendment to 
an Opposition motion calling 


BUSES 


for the repeal of the Transport 
Act, 1985, and its replacement 
with legislation designed to put 
the social and economic needs 
of the community and the 
travelling public in the forefront 
of public transport policy. 

The amendment congratu- 
lated the Government on its 
radical measures to arrest the 
long-running decline of the bus 
industry by abolishing outdated 
controls and creating the con- 
ditions in which competition, 
innovation and enterprise could 
flourish and provide better ser- 
vices, while enabling local 
authorities to obtain value for 
money in subsidizing socially 
necessary services, thereby put- 
ting the social mid economic 
needs of the community and 
travelling public in the forefront 
of public transport policy. 

The 1985 Act bringing in de- 
regulation was an abject failure, 
Mr Robert Hughes, Opposition 
spokesman on Transport, said 
when moving the Opposition 
motion. 

Those who depended on pub- 
lic transport for mobility — the 
elderly, women and children in 
large housing estates, and co un- 


priority given to the arts by the 
Government. 


Government. 

It was striking bow isolated 
the Government was on the 
issue and how the Minister for 
the Arts (Mr Richard Luce) was 
so isolated as to be virtually 
invisible. The Government had 
apparently concluded there were 
no votes m the arts. 

Yet, in addition to the many 
tens of thousands working or 
dependent on the arts, more 
people in the United Kingdom 
went to the theatre, heard music 
and visited museums than 
watched football Maybe there 
were more votes in it than the 
chairman of the Conservative 
Party (Mr Norman Tebbit) 
realized. 

Public funding was about 
0.003 per cent of national 
expenditure as a gross figure and 
as a net figure about 0.001 per 
cent or zero. 

The alternative to increased 
funding was to cease to be in the 
international league, to cease to 
have performers of inter- 
national calibre and to slip into 
the second division. 

Lord Boyd-Carpentar (Q a for- 
mer Minister for the Arts, said 
that pleas were heard year after 
for more public provision 


try peopJe — were all being sac- 
rificed ui the pursuit of profit, be 
said. 

AH the evidence pointed to 
the situation getting worse as the 
months went by instead of there 
being any improvement. The 
Office of Fair Trading bad 
already had 50 complaints of 
unfair competition and a test 
case on that was being prepared. 

The frequency of buses in the 
early morning and evenings had 
been drastically cut. On Sat- 
urdays and Sundays, services 
had almost disappeared in many 
areas. 

Public reaction had showed 
the true level of dissatisfaction. 
In Lancashire, there had been 
12,000 phone of complaint 
and requests for information 
and 1,000 in Tyne and Weir. 
The Bus Watch monitoring 
group had been inundated with 
fetters of complaint 

Bus fares had gone up, both 
with direct fere increases and 
because many people had to 
take two or three buses to make 
the same journey instead of one. 

Labour would make sure 


ment had made the most radical 
changes in the bus industry for 
50 years. It had removed out- 
dated controls that were crip- 
pling the industry and had 
sought to create the maximum 
possible potential for innova- 
tion and efficiency. At the same 
time, it had safeguarded the 
provision of socially worthwhile 
but commercially unprofitable 


A vote against the government 
proposals to settle the teachers’ 
pay dispute in ^Scotland would 
be a vote for a renewal of 
disruption in schools, Mr Mal- 
cotm RiBund, Secretary of State 
for Scotland, said during Scot- 
tish questions. 

He was commenting on 
information supplied by Mr 
Donald Dewar, chief Opposi- 
tion spokesman on Scotland, 
who said, that the Scottish 

teachers’ union, the Education 

Institute of Scotland, had voted 
against the proposals by 84 per 
centto 16 per emit. 

Mr Dewar said thai the vote, in 
which 89 per . cent of the 
membership took part, under- 
lined the tragic Wonder that the 
Secretary of State bad made in 
refusing to honour the central 
financial recommendations in 

He must take responaWity for 
the situation, which could easily 
lead, to a return of confrontation 
and disruption. 

It was essential that ministers 
should allow negotiations be- 
tween employers and teachers. 
That was preferable to any 
imposed solution. Tbe worst 
possible thing would be if 
ministers maintained their 
present diehard stance and pu- 
pils were asked to pay the price 
for that obstinacy. 

Mr Rifitind said that he had yet 
to receive any official notifica- 
tion of tbe numbers or figures. 

Scottish teachers had been 
offered one of the most generous 
settlements offered in the public 


SCOTLAND 


retazy of State for. Scotland, 
disag reed. He said that he and 
MrRrfltind would study the 
details of tite ballot Although 
there had been a "no" vote, the 
door was stiD left open -for 
negotiations. 

“That is what we are urging 
and that is what all parents wffl 

be wanting.” 

Earlier, Mr Michael .Hirst 
(Strathkelvin and Bearsdcn, Q 
asked Mr MacKay if he agreed 
that the decision of the Scottish 
Secondary Teachers* - Associ- 
ation in seeking negotiations 
with ministers ratter than 
resorting to strike action was 


infinitely preferable to the pos- 
ition of the other onion, which 
b ad threatened di sruption in 

Scottish schools. 

Mr MacKay agreed. 

Mr Dewar said that, there 
seemed to have been an 
overwhelming vote of no con- 
fidence in tbe Government's 
proposals so it was desirable to 
find a way forward. Cercainiy 
that was the Opposition's view. 

But the Opposition did not 
believe that it was possible for 
the minister to argue for nego- 
tiations and, ax the same time. 
Impose such restrictive con- 
ditions on negotiations that 
would amount to saying that the 
negotiations must produce the 
same result as the offer which 
had been rejected. 

Mr MacKay said that Mr 
Rifitind had already stated tbe 
basis- on which things could 
move ahead. The overall cost 
laid down and the timing of the 
two phases of tbe pay increase 
were not negotiable, but that 
still left a good deal of room for 
manoeuvre. 

Sir Russell Johnston (Inverness, 
Naim and Lochaber, L) said 
that that was not good enough. 
Mr MacKay most admiuhatthe 
Government had been wrong w 
break np the Main proposals. 
Tbe only hope of keeping some 
peace was . to recognize that 
because the ballot result was a 
devastating rejection of the 
minister's proposals. 

Mr MacKay said that E1S 
meetings were rej ec ting tbe 
Main proposals before Mr 
Rifitind bad laid down on 
October 30 the basis on which 
things could move ahead. 

So the ECS had gone a long 
way to throw out the proposals 
of this independent committee 
when Mr Rifitind had made 
dear that he accepted the main 
point of the proposals. 

• Mr Dennis Guavan (Falkirk 
West, Lab) later unsuccessfully 


provision ot socially wonnwnne sector in recent years, 
but commercially unprofitable “if it is the case that they have 

routes. . , rejected the government pro- 

A dear-sighted look at the bus pools and if a is the case that 
industry immediately identified the EIS leadership appears also 


two kinds of service: those that 
were commercially viable on 


at their recent general meeting 
to have rejected the Main 


their own and those that were report, it would appear foa* the 
socially necessary but could not only thing that has been voted 

kA fwtttM nntlimif 4 mshcu/lu «" ■ _ ___ 1 


be operated without a subsidy. f OT renewal of disruption in 
The Government said that the the schools. 


free market must identify which “TheScc 

was which. Sc ottish pi 

Under the new Act any li- ,-wmmptmr 
censed operator could run a bus acceptable, 
route so long as safety standards ^ 

were met. Competition was ever offer which 
present and was having a in the put 
remarkable effect on the ef- years." 
ficiency of bus o perator s . Mr WHtiu 

There was no compromise on fjfe Lab) 
safety under de-rqgulatkm. It niflrin d du 
remained the priority it always flexibility a 
had been. iq get . pi 

Mr George Howarth (Knowsiey progress it 
North, Lab), in a maiden the fault ft 


“Tbe Scottidi parents and the 
Scottish public wouhjfmd any 
resumption inexplicable and un- 
acceptable, particularly if it 
arises out of the government 
offer which is tbe most generous 
in the public sector in recent 
years." 

Mr Winfaua Hamilton (Central 
Fife, Lab) said dial if Mr 
Rimnd did not exercise some 
flexibility and humility in trying 
to get peace, stability and 
progress in Scotland's schools, 
the fault for the ensuing strike 


services that were provided at all households in his constit- 


sp c ecb, said that 67 per cent of I would be his and not that of 


reasonable fores. There would 
be the widest possible local 
consultation. Local decision- 
making would be restored. Leg- 
islation would be based on 
service for the customer pro- 


oency did not have access to the 
use of a car. Deregulation bad 
had many effects on his constit- 
uents, ail of them for the worse. 
In some cases it made it difficult 
for them to seek employment. 


vided by directly elected local Tbe lack of buses was 


transport authorities. 


to have a deleterious 


Mr Moore said that the Govern- tbe local economy. 


teachers. 

If tite Education Institute of 
Scotland baffot had been against 
government proposals to settle 
the teachers’ pay dispute, Mr 
Rifitind should cease to adopt a 
holier-than-thou attitude in 
Klamin g everyone except him- 
self for the situation. 

Mr John MacKay, Under-Seer 


sought an emergency debate on 
what be called the greatest crisis 


what be called the greatest crisis 
to face Scottish education in its 
history-’*’ .. . .. 


Coal Industry Bill 

Measure would give equal rights to the UDM 


regime the arts had progressed 
and developed. 

Lord Ritchie of Dundee (L) said 
that a voice to speak for the am 
was needed in Cabinet, backed 
up by a department of state. 
That would offer more douL 
Lord Charteris of Amisfield 
(Ind) said that, as chairman of 
the National Heritage Memorial 
Fund, be could say that the 
Government had been ex- 
tremely generous and prov- 
ident. The fond had been given 
sufficient monies to fulfil the 
tasks given it by Parliament. 

Only on rare occasion had 
they bad to refuse assistance to 
projects for lack of funds 




is a summary of The NUM had refused a looked as if it would he his last, that stiff takes place only makes who lacked .the guts to stand ap 


Changes to 
boundaries 


A review by the Welsh Bound- 
ary Commission resulted in a 
decision to redraw the bound- 
aries of six parliamentary 
constituencies to make them 
compatible with local govern- 
ment boundaries, Mr Douglas 
Hogg, Under-Secretary of State, 
Horae Office, said in a debate 
late on Tuesday.He successfully 
moved approval of the appro- 
priate draft order. 


morn on the second reading of 
the Coal Industry Bill 

Hie Coal Industry BUI, which 
will help to gbe the Union of 
Democratic Mmewnrfcera para- 
llel representa tion with the Na- 
tional Union of Mineworkers on 
coal Industry pensions organiza- 
tions and charities was gives its 
second reading after the defeat 
of an Opposition amendment 
rejecting the Bill by 268 votes to 
177 — Government majority. 91. 
The Bill was read a second time 
by 263 vote to 173 — Govern- 
ment majority, 90. 

The debate was the occasion 
for a farewell speech by Mr Don 
Concannoo (Mansfield, Lab), 
who said tint there was political 
apartheid in No ttingh a m shire . 
where the UDM represented 
most of the miners. He raged the 
Labour Party to stop the rejec- 
tion of loyal party members alter 


20 years' service because they 
were connected with the UDM. 


Parliament today 

Commons (230): Criminal Jus- 
tice Bill, second reading. 

Lords (3): Family Law Reform 
BilL second reading. 


were connected with the UDML 
Mr Concanaen is not standing 
at the next election. 

Mr Peter Walker, Secretary of 
State for Energy, moving the 
second reading of tbe BUI, said 
that it changed the name of the 
National Goal Board to the 
British Coal Corporation and 
would encourage the industry to 
be successful in improving its 
viability and its performance hi 
production and marketing. 

It was envisaged that ever the 
next three or four years more 
than £2 billion of new capital 
investment would go into the 


rights over the institutions, 
iadading the pension foods and 
welfare services, that its mem- 
bers bad contributed to. 

Mr Stanley Onne, chief Opposi- 
tion spokesman on energy, 
moved an amendment opposing 
the BilL 

“Miners believe that this is a 
lritdooraeffin.lt is not a Bill for 
recovery.” 

Since 1979 there had been a 
loss of 100,009 miners. “The 
Bin before ns continues that 
process. It sets the preconditions 
for further pit closures and 
farther redundancies." Inherent 
within it was the privatization of 
the coal industry. Written into 
the small print was a disastrous 
expansion of midear power, an 
expansion this country neither 
wanted nor needed. 

“This Bill spells doom to 
coalfield c ommuniti es, not just 
in the peripheral areas, but 
centra] coalfields too." 

The BiB was not dealing with 
tbe central points which the 
Opposition believed faced the 
industry. It ran contrary to a 


put, be against his own Front 
Back 

“No one can dispute what 
nnion represents the vast major- 
ity of mineworkers in the Not- 
tinghamshire area. They have 
bees working for their own 
legitimate rights of fair re- 
presentation an the bodies that 
affect their members." The BB 
provided fair representation. 

“This has all been tried by 
negotiation but the NUM has 
consistently refused to recognize 
the reality of foe situation. So 
foe Goverament has had to art." 

If the BUI helped to stop the 
intimidation that still went on 
between the two groups, then it 


scnsihle energy polky. 

Sir John Osborn (Sheffield, 


Sir John Osborn (Sheffield, 
Haifa m, Q said that the ffiU 
would ensure that members of 
the UDM would have equal 
rights with the NUM on char- 
ities and similar institutions that 
had been setup for the benefit of 
all miners. 

Mr Don Concanmm (Mansfield, 
Lab) said that be was making 
his first contribution for Jo 
months after a motor accident. It 


“We have pofitkal aparthcM 
in Nottinghamshire. Not only 
are UDM members net allowed 
to join the Labour Duly but in 
certain sections even members of 
their families are not allowed to 
join. 

“People are not hang re- 
selected, not because they have 
not done a good job for 20 yeara 
It is jnst because they belong to a 
certain organization. 

“I wish someone would pass 
this along to Walworth Road 
(Labour Party taeadqaartera) be- 
cause for two years some rf ns 

have tried to get this acted on but 
to no avafi." 

The UDM was certainly not 
going to go away. Threatening 


not bring the results desired. 

“They are not to be threat e ned 
or bullied and the intinridation 


succeed." 

. It was sad to find that the 
battle was befog fought in the 
local Labora parties, not for the 
good of the Labour Party, bra 
just for vengeance on people who 
took certain actions a few years 
•go. 

*T have never considered my- 
self to be anything rise bra a 
No ttfogh a m sMs-e miner and I 
have dime my best to look after 
their interests along with my 
constituents for nearly 21 years. 

“Clause five, six and seven of 
this BOB are necessary If we are 
to start to bring some kind of 
sense and harmony to my area 
as well as a sense of fairness. I 
only wish we could tarn the dock 
bade. 

“ft is time somebody started 
the process ot heating these 
wounds. If this is me way, then I 
am all for iL It saddens me that 
for the first time hi 21' years I 
have had to speak against my 
party’s actions on this B£D/* 

Mr Malcolm Brace (Gordon, L) 
said that “SeargOUsm" had to 
be resisted. The amrtry was the 
better because that kind of era 
had been defeated. 

Mr James Lester (Broxtowe, CD 
said that he paid tribute to Mr 
Concaanon and recognized the 
brave speech he had jnst made. 
The House recognized Ms 
sincerity and the value of his 
contributions -to the national 
effort. 

Mr Spew Batiste (Ebnet, C) 
said that it was sod but not 
surprising that Mr Knaark, 


bad defeated him, now faded 
the gras to support basic hmnaa 
rights in the trade mrion 
movement. 

Labora wasted to deny UDM 
. members all protection. 

Mr Michael McCMre (Mak- 
erfield. Lab) said tint he was at 
odds with many of his criDeagnes 
in his belief that there should 
have bees a baffot before foe last 
miners’ strike. Until then foe 
bedrock of foe NUM bad been 
its steadfast allegiance to tint 
elementary test of democracy. 

It was now time for foe NUM 
to hold out foe hand of friend- 
ship to tbe UDM. The way foe 
UDM would almost wither on 
the vine was for the NUM to say 
there would never again be a 
strike without its bemg put to 
the test of a ballot. It was not in 
the interests of either ofihm to 
allow the conflict to Tester ate 


grow wane. 

Mr David Ashby (North West 
Leicestershire, C) said Oat Mr 
Kfoneck let Arfonr ScargiD 
deep on his lap. Only Mr 
Ceocannon had the courage to 
refuse to allow Mr Scmgul to 
piddle on him. 

Mr David Hunt, Under-Sec- 
retory of State for Energy, said 
he had obtained a copy of a 
document detailing a Labora 
Party meeting which said the 

was appreaated°^2 th foe^m- 
portance of not alfienatiag local 
members in the UDM we- 


Alliance housing policy 


Spending boost of £2.8bn is planned 


Spanish fishing gap in 
law is to be closed 


By Nicholas Wood, Political Reporter 


By Martin Fletcher, Political Reporter 


The Alliance yesterday 
sought to evoke the spirit of 
1966 and the seminal tele- 
vision programme Cathy 
Come Home as it pledged 
itself to a £2.8 billion spend- 
ing boost to overcome the 
country’s housing problems. 

The extra cash targeted on 
building new homes, repairs 
and insulation was linked to 
the launch of a national 
campaign aimed at making 
tbe Government's record on 
housing an issue in next year's 
local elections and the widely- 
expected general election. 

Party activists have been 
equippol with a detailed pack 
designed to highlight the 
claimed shortcomings of se- 
ven yean of Toty rale and the 
Alliance recipe for generating 
homes fit for the nation’s 
children. 

Yesterday, its leaders casti- 
gated the Government for 
policies that had seen the 
number of homeless families 
nearly double over the seven 
years lo 1985 from 53.000 to 
*34.000. 

They pointed to a divided 


Britain in which those who 
had prospered under Mrs 
Margaret Thatcher were bliss- 
fully unaware of a stratum of 
society m which mtUioos lived 
in homes in a "serious state of 
disrepair" or on souiess 
estates. 

Mr John Canwrighi, the 


between public and private 
finance through housing as- 
sociations and shared owner- 
ship schemes. 

The Alliance said that the 
Government has cut capital 
spending on council housing 
by 60 per cent since 1979 so 


SDP housing spokesman, 
spoke of blocks of flats where 
the lifts are constantly out of 
order, where walls drip with 
damp and condensation and 
where graffiti and vandalism 
are the norm. 

“It's no way to expect 
people to live in 1986 and yet 
hundreds of thousands of 
people are being forced to live 
that way because they are told 
money is not available to 
repair their homes and bring 
them up to standard.” 

Mr Simon Hughes, the 
Liberal housing spokesman, 
attacked Labour for its out- 
dated commitment to new 
municipal housing, saying the 
Alliance would instead con- 
centrate its energies on the 
renovation of properties and 
the creation of a partnership 


producing a 40 per cent drop 
in the number of completions. 
One and a quarter million 
householders were on local 
authority waiting lists and 
demand' was continuing to 
outsrip supply. 

Dr David Owen, the SDP 
leader, said that this winter 
hundreds of elderly people 
would die of hypothermia and 
cold-related illnesses because 
of poor housing, and children 
were also being put at risk. 

"We owe it to our old 
people to improve the con- 
dition of the housing stock." 

The Alliance is to campaign 
on a nine-point programme, 
which includes allowing coun- 
cils to spend the £6 billion of 
receipts from council house 
sales now locked in their bank 
accounts, increased home 
improvement grants and a 


new deal between the public 
and the private sectors to 
revive the rented sector. 

They would also give coun- 
cil tenants more control over 
how their estates are run. Tbe 
Government’s “ririit to buy” 
legislation would stay as 
would tax relief on monagage 
interest, though that would be 
restricted to the standard rate. 

The party’s campaign was 
bitterly attacked as "shame- 
less and cynical" by Mr John 
Patten, the Housing minister. 
Its instructions to activists 
were no more than an exercise 
in voicing "prefab ri cated in- 
dignation”. 

He added; “Shamefully, it 
seems to suggest deceit It is 
frill of complaints but no 
solutions. This is a campaign 
without a policy.” 

After the Chancellor’s au- 
tumn statement, the Alliance 
is revising its spending plans. 
Yesterday, its leaders were 
unable to go into detail bn 
how cash would be divided 
among the various growth 
areas. 


The Government is to dose 
a newly discovered legal loop- 
hole which is once more 
allowing Spanish, vessels to 
fish against valuable British 
quotas. 

Operators in Plymouth and 
elsewhere have been buying 
! up decrepit British boats and 
transferring their fishing lir 
ceoces to much Jaiger Span- 
ish-owned vessels which can 
then operate from British 
ports and in British waters. 

According to a written par- 
liamentary answer from Mr 
John Gammer, the fisheries 
minister, there are now 73 
Spanish-connected vessels re- 
gistered in the United King- 
dom, 50 of them former 
Spanish vessels flying a British 
flag of convenience and 23 
former British boats “bene- 
ficially owned by Spanish 
interests". The second cate- 
gory has increased by 1 7 in the 
pastyear. 

Aner pressure from angry 
MPs, Mr Gummer has just 
announced a moratorium on 
the transfer of fishing licences 
from small boats to vessels of 
80 feet or more. From January' 


1 legislation will be altered to 
invalidate licences belonging 
to boats that have not fished 
in the previous 100 days. 

Mr Anthony Steen, Conser- 
vative MP for the Devon seat 
of South Hams, has described 
the present situation as a 
national srandal and called for 
licences to be limited to 
British citizens fishing from 
British boats. Mr David Har- 
ris, Tory MP for.St Ives, said 
yesterday that the position 
was horrifying. 

The number of Spanish- 
controlled boats registered in 
Britain had "shot up ft' 
cent!/’, he said, and he called 
for tough new legislation to 
tackle “the scandal”. 

“The Transport, minister 
should have discretion to 
refuse to re-register a foreign 
boat if he suspects it is being 
transferred to the British reg- 
ister simply to gain access to 
our waters and fish quotas." 

The Mtnafry of Agriculture 
and Fisheries has repeatedly 
tightened legislation over the 
past five years, but each time 
the Spanish have discovered 
and exploited loopholes. 


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THE TIMES THURSDAY NOVEMBER 27 1986 


Local authority finance: 1 


home news 


Government launches 
its ‘rates revolution* 


after 13-year struggle 


The publication today of a 
Bill to set up a new rating 
system for Scotland, as a test 
bed for further legislation to 
follow for England and Wales 
in the next Parliament marks 
the beginning of.the end Of a 
13-year quest by Mis Margaret 
Thatcher. 

. It has been her desire since 
1973 to “do something about 
the rates'* which she regards as 
monstrously unfair. 

It was Mrs Thatcher’s 
exasperation at the failure of 
her ministers in the last Par- 

liament to come up with an 
alternative to rates that led her 

to bounce the Cabinet at their 

last meeting before the 1983 
election into the politically 

expensive and time-consum- 

ing commitment to scrap the 
GLC and the six main metro- 
politan councils. 

That decision cost Mr Pat- 
rick Jenltin, the former Sec- 
retary of State for the 
Environment, his career and 
established Mr Ken Living- 
stone as a national 
monument. 

The Government’s case 
against the present rating 
tem is dear enough. Too 
people pay rales, too many are 
insulated by rebates and sub- 
sidies from the impact of the 
spending decisions of those 


The Government will today launch its 
rates revolution in Britain, starting wiu_ 

Bofem Oakley, Political Editor, reports that the 
Cabinet s ideas are provoking controversy, inside and 
outside the Tory Party. 


whom they vote into office. 
Under some high-spending 
councils in inner-city areas as 
few as 20 per cent of those 
with votes are paying rates. 

In an electorate of some 35 
million, about 21 million of 


whom pay income tax, there 

are only 18 ' 


— , --million ratepayers, 

of whom at least three million 
have their' rates met in fall by 
rebates and many more of 
whom are subsidized. 

Rates, paid only hy the bead 

of the household, bear only a 

limited relationship to ability 
to pay, particularly for single 
people living alone as com- 
pared with houses fan of wage 
earners. They are not related 
to the use of services and are 
capricious in their effects be- 
tween different areas. 

The rating system, in- 
comprehensible to most rate- 
payers, is based on imputed 
rental values for pr op ert y 
which are now, in England 
and Wales, 13 years out of 
dale and meaningless anyway 
as the rented housing market 
is now negligible. 


More than half the rate 

income of local authorities 

comes from industry and busi- 

ness, who have no votes. The 
non-domestic rate raises some 

£7 billion, compared with 
about £5 billion from domes- 
tic ratepayers. 

It is not only the inequity of 
the rating system which dis- ' 
turbs ministers, it is die 
disruption of the CfcanceBor*’s 


calculations by local govern- 
i has led 


ment spending which 

to a state of almost permanent 

warfare between Secretaries of 
State far the Environment and 
the town halls since the Gov- 
ernment came to office in 
1979. 

The problem has been that 
almost every alternative con- 
sidered has upset the Conser- 
vative Party or its s u pp o r te rs. 
Now that, the Government has 
discovered the political win to 
begin replacing the present 
system it is set far a new 
period of turmoil within its 
own party. 

Tomorrow: Government plans 
aad tire snags. - 



The Reith Lectures 


Judges 9 dilemma 
in interpreting 


a Bill of Rights 


By Frances Gibb, Legal Affairs Correspondent 


Boy’s dreams come true 


Gregory Fiokins, aged 15, 
who was able to fulfil his most 
ambitions before 
undergoing heart s u rg er y, 
thanks to Tie Times, says the 
final part of his wish is to he 
visited by a celebrity (Angefia 
Johnson writes). 

Gregory, photographed with 


name Margaret Nicbolsoii, 
left, and staff nurse Terri 
Collins, is bow recovering 
from a heart by-pass operation 
in Brampton Hospital, south- 
west London. 

Before the mne-and-a-half- 
hoar operation he advertised 
m tire newspaper asking peo- 


ple to give him the chance to 
fulfil his dreams. 

In the months before sur- 
gery fast week Gregory, of 
Bruton, Somerset who was 
born with only three chambers 
in his heart flew In Army and 
Navy helicopters and an RAF 
glider. 


A BUI of Rights would 
involve judges in malting 
policy choices which they 
cannot be trusted to do. Lord 
McCluskey, a High Court 
judge, said last night. 

In a strong statement 
against such a Bill the judge, a 
former Labour Solicitor-Gen- 
eral, said that it would “turn 
judges into legislators”, which 
was not their job. 

His remarks, made in bis 
fourth Reith Lecture, broad- 
cast on Radio 4. come only 
days after Sir Edward Gard- 
ner, Conservative MP for 
Fylde, has said be wiD bring in 
a private member’s Bill which 
would effectively create a Bill 
of Rights. 

His Bill, which is high in the 
list of private member’s mea- 
sures, will be the latest attempt 
to incorporate the European 
Convention on Human Rights 
into English law. 

Lord McCluskey said that a 
Bill of Rights was “inevitably 
a charter of enduring, super- 
rights, rights written in del- 
phic words, but indelible ink, 
on an opaque surface”. 

It “makes the mistake of 
dressing up policy choices as if 
they were legal choices” and 
asks judges, “whose job it is to 
know and apply the law, to 
create and reform the law”. 


Man in the news 


Judges who interpret a 
constitution, as in the United 
States, cannot avoid choosing 
among competing social and 
political visions, and the 
“walls between the political 
and judicial systems become 
paper thin”. 

American judges had had to 
decide among other issues; if 
telephones could lawfully be 
lapped; if the mentally sub- 
normal could be compulsorily 
sterilized; if minimum-wage 
laws could be enacted and if 
blacks and whites could inter- 
marry. 

Lord Denning, former Mas- 
ter of the Rolls, had called for 
judges to be trusted. They 
could indeed be trusted “not 
to fiddle the results”; to apply 
the law honestly to the case; to 
discover and enunciate new or 
revised rules of law and to 
make difficult choices. 

They could even be trusted 
to make interim policy choices 
about what the law should be, 
pending action by the legisla- 
ture, he said. “But there is no 
sound reason for trusting 
judges to make final policy 
choices.” 

Final policy decisions had 
to be made by “society as a 
whole" and “not by lawyers, 
however distinguished and 
upright they may be". 


Rothschild was 
trusted by Wright 


9y Michael Evans, Whitehall Correspondent 
The faD story of Lori chocolate, which were also 


You Have Only 6 Days 


Rothschild's role in arranging 
far Mr Peter Wright, the 
former senior ME officer, to 
collaborate on a book about 
suspected traitors m the sec- 
urity service by Mr Chapman 
Pfacher wBi probably never be 
unravelled. 

The bead of Britain's most 
famous hanking family served 
with MB only daring the 
Second World War, but he 
kept in dose touch with the 
intelligence world and main- 
tained contact with Mr 
Wright, who emigrated to an 
isolated Arab stod farm in 
Tasmania. 

Mr Wright field Mm m 
some awe and sources who 
know them both say that Lord 
Rothschild went ost of his way 
to be kind and helpful to him, 
knowing that he had to five on 
a very small pension. 

Mr Wright served in ME 
far more than 2® years, bat for 
much of that tone he was 
employed indy on a part-time 
basis. 

Mr Wifaht was taken on as 
a scientific officer and was 
soon regarded by his superiors 
as an invaluable asset. He 
knew everything abort gad- 
getryand many of the comiter- 
espionage techniques used 
during bis career with “the 
firm” woe his inventions. 

Lord Rothschild was also a 
scientific expat. During the 
Second World War he ran an 
anti-sabotage art designated 
51(c), in ME. In 1944 be vi 


; won 

the George Medal for defusing 
a bomb hidden in a consign- 
ment of Spanish onions . 

One of his wartime roles 
was also to check all tire cigars 
sent to Winston Churchill 
from abroad, in case they had 
been poisoned. People used to 
send trim jars of honey and 



Lord Rothschild — keeping 
qriet abort his role 


analysed. 

Lord Rothschild's wartime 
work with ME was secret and 
dangerous hut, as he admitted 
himself not nearly so secret as 
the role played by his one-time 
Cambridge University Mend, 
the late Mr Anthony Blunt, 
who was later to confess that 
he had been a Soviet agent 
■ Lord Rothschild wrote in his 
book, Random Variables, pub- 
lished in 1984: “He (Blunt) 
became -involved in highly 
secret work, so secret that toe 
weedere will see that it is net 
disclosed, even after 30 
years*’. 

- Mr Wright, obsessed with 
lus conviction* that ME -had 
been penetrated by the Rus- 
sians at dm very highest le vel, 
knew he could trust. Lori 
Rothschild. 

Suspicion fan on anyone 
within tire service who bad 
been at Cambridge at the same 
time as Blurt and the other 
membos of the notorious 
Apostles, such as Guy Bur- 
gess, bat lord Rothschild was 
cleared iff rumours that he 
may have been the fomth man 
in the Cambridge spy circle. 

It must have come as a 
welcome surprise to Mr 
Wright when Lori Rothschild 
invited him to come ova to 
England to talk abort the one 
subject which still consumed 
him — treachery inside MB. 

Mr Wright now claims that 
he believed the whole idea was 
sanctioned officially and that 
Lord Rothschild was acting as 
a government go-between. 

Lori Rothschild, who has 
never kept a diary iff his past 
exploits, has chosen not to 
break his sfience abort bis 
part in the affair, bat senior 
Whitehall sources continued 
yesterday to deny that official 
.backing was given to the 
pubticatioB of tire book. Their 
Trade is Treachery, by Mr 
Pindrer in 1981. 

Nathaniel Maya Victor, 
third Baron Rothschild, is best 
remembered for the time when 
be ran Mr Edward Heath’s 
Central Policy Review Staffs 
the Think Tank at the Cabinet 
Office. 

Today Lad RothschOd is 
keeping oat of the fimetight 
while ms name is brag ban- 
died abort in coart: He has no 
doubt decided against becom- 
ing embroiled in the political 
rumpus between Sydney and 
London abort Mr Wright’s 
book. 

. Sydney bearing, page 12 


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Alternatively hand in your application at any UK branch of NatWest, Bank 
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Club ignored fire 
warnings says QC 


ISSUED BY N M ROTHSCHILD & SONS LIMITED ON BEHALF OF H M GOVERNMENT. 


OFF 


C E 


By Ian Smith, Northern Correspondent 


UP AGAINST TIME by Jeanne Willis and Trevor Melvin 


A large share of the Name 
far tbe Bradford football sta- 
dium disaster lay with dub 
officials who ignored repeated 
warning about the fire haz- 
ard, the High Court sitting in 
Leeds was told yesterday. 

In his dosing speech far the 
Health and Safety Executive, 
Mr Hugh Carlisle. QC, said 
strong attacks had been 
launched against both the 
safety executive and West 
Yorkshire County Council in 
its role as fire authority by 
counsel for the dub. 

Although the* club had ac- 
cepted liability by admitting 
the Valley Parade stadium was 
a tiederbox, it stiff argued that 

the fire, which Jriiled 56 spec- . 
ia tors, could not have been 
foreseen by the dob. 

Mr Cariisfe said that tire 
safety executive and tire 
countyconacQ acted only in a 


supervisory capacity, majemg 
only brief visits to the ground,, 
whereas dub directors must 
have been constantly aware of ; 
the hazard. 

He added: “I say that the 
dub must bear the very largest 
share of the Maine. They were 
creators and continuers of tbe 
hazard- 
The hearing, now in its third 
week, is considering an action 
grains! the football club, tbe 
Health and Safety Executive 
and the now defunct county 
council, brought by Mre Susan 
Fletcher, who lost ha hus- 
band, sou. brother-in-law and 
his father, in tire fire. - 
Also trying to prove liability 
against the .three parties is 
police Sergeant David Britton, 
who was injured trying " 10 - 
rescue victims. ’ ... 

• The case coo**™® 81 * 



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For a\folvo 240 brochure, complete the Goupon. 

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THE TIMES THURSDAY NOVEMBER 27 1986 


OVERSEAS NEWS 



s under the shaky NSC 


COMMENTARY 


From Michael Binyon, Washington 


President Reagan’s com- 
mission of inquiry into the 
National Security Council is 
likely to produce the most 
radical shake-up of this 
presidential advisory body 
since it was founded more 
than 30 years ago. It is 
virtually certain that short of 
disbandment — -which looks 
unlikely - the NSC’s power 
win now be sharply curtailed. 

It wiB have to be more 
accountable, either to Con- 
gress or to foe President, will 
be strictly limited to co- 
ordinating plans and wMghing 
options, and will be forbidden 
to engage in any operations. 

Meanwhile, President 
Reagan is about to nan^ a 
successor to Vice-Admiral 
John Poindexter to h«>d the 
NSC He already named as 

# Hawk named to 
head Inquiry 9 

chairman of the inquiry Mr 
John Tower, a former Repub- 
lican senator from Texas and 
chairman of the Senate armed 
services committee. He was 
named the US negotiator with 
foe Russians in Geneva on 
strategic arms redactions, but 
resigned after a year. A strong 
conservative and hawk on 
defence issues, he is a firm 
supporter of foe President As 
chairman of foe inquiry, he is 
unlikely to become NSC 
Director. 

Others mentioned for the 
job include Mr John T-ehman, 
the Secretary ofthe Navy, Mrs 
Jeane Kirkpatrick, foe com- 
bative former Ambassador to 
foe United Nations, Mr Max 
Kampelman, chief US arms 
negotiator at Geneva, General 
Brent Scowcroft, head of the 
NSC under President Ford, 
and Mr Paul Laxalt, the 
outgoing Republican senator 
from Nevada and a dose 
friends of Mr Reagan. 

In foe meantime the NSC is 
being run by Dr Alton Keel, 
Admiral Poindexter's deputy - 
and a veteran government 
official. Described as a bright 
and hand- working staff wan, j 
he has seldom taken a viable 

Israel’s role 

Experts at 
swapping 
arms for 


leadership role himself, and 
went to the White House 
directly from a job as execu- 
tive director of the presiden- 
tial commission that invest- 
igated foe accident involving 
foe space shuttle. Challenger. 

The NSC has ted a troubled 
history under Mr Reagan. 
Four of its directors have 
resigned under a cloud; the 
first, Ricband Alter, was ac- 
cused of improperly accepting 
watches and other gifts from 
the Japanese. The second. 
Judge W illiam flartCj was an 
outspoken anti-communist 
whose hardline views clashed 
with Mr Reagan’s desire be- 
fore the 1984 election to try to 
improve relations with the 
Russians. 

The third, Robert McFar- 
lane, left in bitterness and 
frustration after lengthy and 
vehement dashes with Mr 
Caspar Weinberger, the De- 
fence Secretary, and a baseless 
smear campaign of rumours 
about his private life. Now 
Admiral Poindexter has re- 
signed with foe NSC at foe 
centre of the worst crisis of the 
Reagan Administration and 
his whole handling of the NSC 
in question. 

a lire presidential commis- 
sion is likely to include many 
distinguished s tatesm en and 
former NSC officials, with 
such names as Dr Henry 
Kissinger, General Scowcroft, 
and Mr James Schfesinger, a 
former Defence Secretary and 
a former Director of the 
Central Intelligence Agency. 

Even before the Contra 
connection was revealed. Sen- i 
ator Sam Nunn, the inftuen- < 
tial Georgia Democrat, was i 
cafiing for just such a “com- 1 
mittee of wise men". But this < 
alone win not now be enoi^fo 1 
to satisfy Congress. 

Lengthy congressional hear- 
ings are certain, and further 
irregularities are expectol to 
emerge- Some congressional - 
leaders are already calling for a , 
special prosecutor, along foe J 

But Mr 

Attorney-General, has flatly i 
ruled that out ( 

President Reagan is likely to t 


Radical changes will follow 
Storm hits Peres in Knesset 
Grave setback for major policies 

Gulf War stepped up, page 10 



■ 


•'■■■■ ml 






* i i. 




Hit!!" m 



look now at his own Cabinet 
team in foe light of foe crisis. 
His priority must be to restore 
credibility to those govern- 
ment departments that have 
felt undermined by the capers 
of lieutenant Colonel Oliver 
North and the NSC, and 

6 Shultz may not 
stay much longer 9 

particularly the State Depart- 
ment and the Pentagon. 

Mr Reagan is unlikely, how- 
ever, to make any further 
Cabinet reshuffles or to sack 
top officials — unless new 


evidence shows that others 
condoned the diversion of aid 
to the Contras without his 
knowledge. It is dear that at 
this stage any further attempt 
to sacrifice scapegoats would 
be counter-productive, and 
Mr Reagan is notoriously 
loath to dismiss colleagues. 

Two teg question marks 
nevertheless hang over both 
Mr Shultz and Mr Weinber- 
ger. The Defence Secretary, an 
ambitious man, has recently 
been eclipsed by Mr Shultz, 
and has lost influence in 
shajang arms control policy' 
and negotiations with foe 
Soviet Union. 

Though himself opposed to 


the Iran arms deal, and un- 
aware of foe Contra connec- 
tion, he may have foe support 
of conservatives who are 
deeply unhappy with Mr 
Shultz's conspicuous lack of 
support for foe President in 
the past three weeks. Many 
right-wingers would like Mr 
Weinberger to replace Mr 
Shultz. 

Mr Shultz himself appears, 
for the moment, to have 
emerged from this fiasco with 
his own position strengthened 
and his credibility enhanced. 

Nevertheless few people ex- 
pect him to remain in office 
for long. The White House 
resentment is deep, and some- 
thing of a vendetta against Mr 
Shultz has developed there. 

The Secretary is likely to 
leave within two months. 
Possible successors have al- 
ready been mooted, and in- 
clude Mr Laxalt, Mr James 
Baker, the Treasury Secretary 
and Mr Howard Baker, foe 
former Republican majority 
leader in the Senate. 

The man whose position is 
one of the most precarious, 
however, is Vice-President 
George Bush. He has kept 
almost entirely silent on tne 
whole Iran affair. 

His display of loyalty 
obliged him to know no thing 
and say nothing. But he has 
already been implicated in the 
shadowy private groups sup- 
porting the Contras, and dam- 

S l links may now be 
osed which wiD raise 
questions of his judgement 
and knowledge. 

If be is to remain a credible 
candidate for foe 1988 presi- 
dential elections be must, at 
some stage, distance himself 
from this greatest disaster of 
the Reagan Administration. 


i i w ■ i r t* iff n nan hwr i n 

Step-by-step 
march towards 
a muddled 
Mideast policy 

Fhun Mohsin Ali, Washington 
Key dates in foe Iranian- December 4: President Reagan 


Geoffrey Smith 


Israel i-Nicaraguan Contra 
connection: 

November 1983: Congress ap- 
proves $24 million (£17 mil- 
lion) in covert aid to foe 
Nicaraguan Contra rebels. But 
it bans further aid later in the 
year after foe CIA helps 
Contras mine Nicaraguan har- 
bours in violation of inter- 
national law. Congress lifts 
this ban in late 1986. 

June 1985: TWA flight 847 
hijacked to Beirut. White 
House determines that Iran is 
crucial to release of American 
hostages in Lebanon. 
July-August: Secret US-Ira- 
nian contacts begin through 
Israel 

Augnst-September: First 
planeload of Israeli-arranged 
arms arrives in Iran. 
September 18: The Rev Benja- 
min Weir, an American hos- 
tage, is released in Beirut. 
White House delays announ- 
cement several hours in the 
main hope that other Ameri- 
can hostages will also be freed. 
November: First known ship- 
ment of arms to Iran from 
Israel. But these were later 
returned to Israel for reasons 
not disclosed. 


announces resignation of Mr 
Robert McFhnane. his Na- 
tional Security Adviser. 
December & Mr McFarlane 
meets Israeli and I ranian 
middlemen in London to 
discuss hostages and arms 
shipments. Throughout foe 
winter there is increased pres- 
sure on President Reagan 
from foe families of hostages 
to arrange their release. 
January 7, 1986: White House 
policy review of Iranian role 
in foe hostage situation. Tfae 
Secretary of State, Mr George 
Shultz, and foe Defence Sec- 
retary, Mr Caspar Weinberger, 
oppose arms shipments to 
Iran to make contacts for 


Weapons / Money trail 


1. National Security Council 
authorizes sale of weapons to 
Iran; arms shipment is sent to 
Israel. 


4. Israel deposits the 
money in secret Swiss 
bank accounts. On orders 
from Col. Oliver North, 
the money is subsequently 
passed on to the Contras in 
Central America. 


January 17: President Reagan 
signs secret document called 
“Finding,” which authorizes 
arms shipments to Iran. 
February: Fust US arms ship- 
ments arrive in Iran via Israel. 
Two aircraft, each carrying 45 
tons of unknown caigo, malm 
deliveries from an Air Force 
base in Texas to Tel Aviv. 
May 20: Mr McFarlane visits 
Tehran secretly in aircraft full 
of aims to put out “political- 
diplomatic feelers.” 

July 26; The Rev Lawrence 


More than most presi- 
dencies Mr Reagan’s has been 
a matter of confidence. His 
principal achievements have 
been psychological. Before the 
present crisis broke, he had 
restored the confidence of the 
American people and the 
standing of the presidency. 
After the traumas of Vietnam 
and Watergate, these were 
historic accomplishments. 

But to emphasize their im- 
portance is to point to how 
much will be lost if his 
presidency is finally dis- 
credited. The psychological 
blow to the American people 
will be enormous. It wifi 
strengthen the tendency for 
them to turn in upon 
themselves. 

For Britain and for the other 
allies there wifi be the addi- 
tional frustrations of dealing 
with an impotent Administra- 
tion. Other governments al- 
ways prefer a strong Presi- 
dent They are then able to 
deal with someone in Wash- 
ington with the power to 
determine what wfi] happen. 

As I travelled round the 
United States over die past 
few weeks, I was struck by the 
reluctance of many people to 
lose their confidence in Mr 
Reagan. Even among Demo- 
crats there was at first a 
widespread belief that he was 
personally invulnerable. 

This attitude changed as the 
President began to offer such 
unconvincing explanations. 
Now his Administration 
stands on die verge of dis- 
integration. American Admin- 
istrations are customarily 

Can resignations 
restore confidence? 


Ffn -m g» U “J iuc uiwicukc 

I HP WPh nf Jenco is ^leased. Tfae White 

AMV "" vl/ vl House, is aeain disannointed 


UNITED 

STATES 


Wash: 


‘ Frorateii Murray 
Jerusalem 

With the arrival of 
Ayatollah Khomeini hi power ' 
in Iran, Israel began looking 
for ways to persuade foe new 
regime to allow the Jewish 
population, then some 80,000 
strong, to leave. With foe start 
of the Golf War and Iran’s 
need for weapons, a way was 
found. 

Israel had, anyway, always 
been prepared to support Iran 
as the other non- Arabic state 
in the area. 

Knesset debate 

authorized dealers, who were ___ 

secret serriremeo. “ Peres mum 

on details 

mOitaiy awwrhfr in Tehran in . * 1 

the early 1970s and who had lllC rlnol 

doseMossad connections- U1 ilvtli 

. {* From Our Own 

able that the Israelis involved mnwmmMiMW 

came into contact with CIA, KSf 

men working in Iran under 

orders to iMe contacts with “With - pride”, Mr Shimon 
anyone who would eventually Peres, the former Israeli Prime 
be helpful hi improving refat- Minister, at last .told the 
tions with Washington. Knesset yesterday that Israel 

It was against this Jmck- tad-ddrewed arms to Iran to 
ground that a meeting took hdp the fives of Axnen- 
ptace in foe early summer of 0311 hostages. 

1985 between Mr Robert Knesset members, who had 
McFarlane, then National beard the news from Wash- 
Security Adviser, and Mr ington more than 12 hours 
David Kirache, Director-Gen- before, gave him a rowdy 
oral of foe Israeli Foreign reception. But they allowed 
Ministry. At that meeting, Mr him to stay sflent on details of 
Kfanrix* CT ggggtfrrf that the the deal he agreed, along with 
United Slates aright be able to Mr Yitzhak Shamir, who took 
win I ranian help in freeing its over as Prime Minister last 
hostages in re tort* for arms month, and Mr Yitzhak Ba- 
deliveries. bin. Defence Minister. 

A «riK nf mfietmoK be- ’ - Mr Feres denied “emphafi- 

bimehe was green the green .. ~ fi™ in 


Atlantic Ocean 


3. Iran hands Israel 
between $10-30 
million. 


CENTRAL 

AMERICA 





deceit 

The web of deceit that led to 
die resignation of one senior 
Reagan aide aid foe sacking 
of another is illustrated in this 
diagr am. 

The National Security 
Cornual authorized the sale of 
weapons to Iran; aims ship- 
ments went to Israel and 
Israelis then delivered them to 
Iran. Payment was made to 
Israel and between $10 million 
(£7 million) and $30 million 
was deposited in secret Swiss 
hank accomts. On orders from 
Colonel North, the money was 
subsequently passed on to 
Contra rebels in Nicaragua. 

As a result Colonel North 
was dismissed and bis boss. 


House is again disappointed 
that more hostages are not 
freed. 

August: Third US arms ship- 
ment to Iran via IsraeL The 
White House indicates that 
more hostage releases are 
expected. Congress finally au- 
thorizes $100 million of mili- 
tary and humanitarian aid for 
the Contras. 

September: Mr Frank Reed 
abducted in west Beirut on 
September 9. Mr Joseph 
Cicippio abducted in west 
Beirut on September 12. 
October. Fourth reported US 
arms shipment to Iran via 
IsraeL 

October 5: Private supply 
plane, carrying arms for 
Contras and crewed by Ameri- 
cans, shot down over Nica- 
ragua. Surviving cargo hand- 
ler, Mr Eugene Hasenfus, 
arrested. 


the National Security Adviser, October 21: Mr Edward Tracy 
Vice-Admiral John Boin- abducted in Beirut. 


dexter resigned. 


Reagan’s dilemma 

Fatal lure of the Contra obsession 


From Onr Own Tehran. With the hostages 
Correspondent released, however, he ignored 

Washington Iran aHogether far the first few 

•n^ . - years of his presidency, and 

1.^,1 S ff? mms s ppply concentrated instead on trying 

firs ^wTpSitcS 

*£*£2* “tirartaWe and ^ ^ Arab-Isxaefi 

contentious issues of foe 

7S!t — *■ *■ 


u* m put mumry situation spilled over into fhfi- 

pressnre on foe Sandhusto I S 


Government 


Nicara gu a. 


scale war with foe Israeli 
invasion in 1982. America was 


strongly critical of Israel, bet 
kbs matte to influence the 
SSTaSlr* te US **** course of events. Then, US 
Support for foe Contra 

A* Camp David Maoris with 
Egypt collapsed. The US m- 
volvement led to direct 
confrontation wifo Syria ami 


deals. He was equally firm in 

wStobeMrAlScI iwimmer. 
the founder of Israeli airaaft p® 

industries. to foe Contra rebels. 

n_ - . - ___ There was barely a-famt of 

“y need to worry over foe 
farad-US special relationship, 
there remains official 
22L? CO**™ d»t Mr Shultz could 

KSS replaced ^ Mr- Caspar 
"“IJPcanq&i ted rome up with Weinberger, win ' 
an Iranian stepping fist much lessfriend 

A first delivery by a char- ~We will coni 
fered DC 8 to Tehran failed to t^r-mr l but rema 
produce any hostages and Mr about the welft 
N innodi is said to hare re- hostage,” he s 
turned foe $10 mflEon he ted proud that they i 
been paid by Iran, saying he American hosts 
n9flt£d men Mid not money* A ■ sought si 
second ifighi on Septeafoer 14 for ourselves. Isr 
wasimnesBCcessfrdaiidledto to help. It did so 
the immediate release w to do so with 
Benjamin Weir. secrecy. That we 


same tone, Mr Reagan’s 

frnstratioB in foe Middle £ast • The US involvement, how- 
tes also grown. ever, hri left a legacy of 

He was elected on the wave Mttoness which soon mani- 
of anger ami hmaifiation that tested itself in terrorist acts. 
Americans j&t daring the tong The most seriate was the 


Weinberger, who is believed ■ that much of story came out. 
mocb less friendly to IsraeL Mr Meese said that first 
“We will continue to fight hintsoftbe irregularities came 


• TEHRAN: The Prime Min- 
ister, Mr MnvHosgrin Moo- 
sari,' yesterday dismissed as 
lies reports that Iran bad 
received aims tbxoagfa Israel 
(Renter reports). The daily, 
Kaybau shut , he was coukd- 
entmg on “tfae effort fey news 
imperialism” to .estaMfeh Ie- 
rad as foeMernedboy inthe- 
. shipn^nt of US weapons. 


VT MU «V1VW 

modi less friendly to Israel 

“We will continue to fight 
terror, but remain concerned 
about the welfare of every 
hostage,” he said. “I was 
proud that they released three 
American hostages ... we 
never sought any advantage 
for ourselves. Israel was asked 
to help. It did so. Ft was asked 
to do so with the utmost 

secrecy. That we did ... If we 
want to help our allies save 
human lives, we will If we arc 
asked to keep it.a secret, we 
will keep it a secret.” 

Only four of the 25 ooalitzon 
MPs were there, a sign that 
they did not want to beJtekl 
responsible, for. something in 
which they had not -been 
consulted, Mr Shamir - was 
conspicuous by his absence. 


captivity of the US hostages in hijacking in Jvmt 1985 of the 

Meese to report on 
Iran arms fiasco 

Continued from page 1 fet e s arms transfers and 

prohibits the. sale of 
goods to countries engaged in 
state-sponsored terrorism; the 


TWA flight 847 to Beirut In 
the lengthy negotiations the 
Administration realized that 
Iran held the key. The release 
of the TWA passengers, how- 
ever, still left several other 
Americans in the tends of the 
pro-Iranian Islamic Jihad. 

Already Mr Reagan had 
approved the approaches to 
his National Security Adviser, 
Mr Robert McFarlane, by 
Israel, who suggested that it 
could play a rote in cultivating 
moderates in the Khomeini 
Government in the hope of 
stopping terrorism and in- 
fluencing the captors in Leba- 
non to release foe US 
hostages. Mr Reagan was told 
that oily foe shipment of some 
arms would be taken as a real 
token of US good faith in 
Tehran. It seems dear, there- 
fore, that he gave tacit ap- 
proval to IsraeTs effort to 
supply US arms to foe Ira- 
nians. Ami despite vigorous 
objections from several senior 
Cabinet officials here, be de- 
cided in Jsumary this year that 
the US itself would send 


directly 

Tehran. 


weapons 


Meanwhile, things were go- 
ing badly for the Administra- 
tion in Nicaragua. The 
Contras lacked arms, supplies 
and training. It was only a 
matter of months. Mr Reagan 
was told, before tfae Contras 
would cease to pose any mili- 
tary threat at all, and US 
leverage in forcing a change in 
Managaa would be ended. Mr 
Reagan’s dilemma, however, 
was that he could not legally 
do anything to help the 
Contras. Congress in 1984 had 
cut off all military help to the 
rebels m angry reaction to the 
CIA's raining of N iraragnuin 
ports. The WMte House, and 


November 2: The hostage. Dr 
David Jacobsen, is released. 
November 3: Pro-Syrian Leba- 
nese magazine, id- Shiraa , 
reports that Mr McFarlane 
travelled secretly to Iran. 
November 4: Mr AJi Akbar 
Hashemi Rafsanjani, Speaker 
of foe I ranian Parliament, 
confirms Mr McFarlane's 
visiL 

November 13: Mr Reagan 
defends Administration ac- 
tions in televised speech. 
November 16: Mr Shultz ques- 
tions arms deal during a 
television interview. 

November 1ft At a press 
conference Mr Reagan says 
foe responsibility for foe de- 
cision and the operation is 
entirely his. 

November 25: President 
Reagan announces that Vice- 
Admiral John Poindexter, his 
National Security Adviser, has 
resigned and that Lieutenant- 
Colonel Oliver North, an NSC 
official has been dismissed 
after Mr Edwin Meese, the 


especially Colonel North of Attorney-General, reveals that 
the National Security Council between $10 million and $30 
set about getting private million of Iran’s payments for 
American organizations to fill US arms have been diverted 
the gap. For although the law to Nicaraguan Contra-con- 
forbade government military trolled accounts in Switzer- 
sapport for the Contras, it said land. Mr Meese is ordered to 
nothing about private merce- continue with his inquiry into 
naries and indrridnals who the affair and foe President 
hauled fund-raising oper- sets up a commission to report 
atoms. on the working of foe NSC. 


White House in disarray 
over arms cash scandal 


of foe aims shipments. Justice 
Department officials, discov- 
ered differences in amount 
between the funds paid by 
Iran and foe cost of foe actual 
weapons. They then found in 
other documents references to 
money being paid elsewhere. 
So far, they have not deter- 
mined whether any criminal 
charges can or. should be 
made. Nor has Mr Meese 
decided whether to convene a 
Grand Jury. 


omnibus Anti-terrorism Act, 
which prohibits the transferor 
commodities in excess of Si 
million to any country en- 
gaged in tenonsm; the 1947 
National Security Act, which 
set up the CIA and requires 
Congress to be notified before- 
hand of covert operations, or, 
foiling that, notification after- 
wards in “timely" fashion; foe 
Boland Amendment which 


■ u Jur J * . specifically prohibits funds for 

Congress, however, is al- military equipment for any- 
ready convinced that several one trying to overthrow foe 
vital ' laws were infringed. -Nicaraguan Government. 
These include: the Arms Ex- This restriction was lifted in 
port Control Aci which regu- August . 


Continued from page 1 

Tuesday, has not yet been 
announced. 

Congress has left no doubt 
of its outrage at these latest 
revelations. “The credibility 
of the President and his ability 
to govern are threatened,” Mr 
Peter Rodino, the Democratic 
chairman of foe House Ju- 
diciary Committee, said in a 
letter to Mr Meese. 

“An independent investiga- 
tion is foe only way to restore 
the confidence of the Ameri- 
can people.” 

Senator Patick Moyniham, 
a New York Democrat, asked 
rhetorically: “Do you really 
think this whole thing was run 


by one lieutenant-colonel? 
How do you feel about foe 
tooth fairy?" 

Many congressmen have 
strongly attacked Mr Reagan's 
professed ignorance of foe 
whole affair, saying it was 
inconceivable that be should 
not know foe details of what 
his own White House staff and 
security advisers were doing. 

But Mr Donald Regan, foe 
White House Chief of Staff, 
insisted foe diversion of funds 
bad not been reported to him. 

“Does the bank president 
know if a idler in the bank is 
fiddling around with the 
books? No. 

Confusion has been added 
to foe whole story by the flat 


denial in Miami by Adolfo 
Colero, a Contra leader, that 
bis organization bad received 
any of foe funds described by 
Mr Meese. 

Newspapers and com- 
mentators are increasinly 
comparing the scandal to 
Watergate. But Mr Meese 
yesterday aid a special pros- 
ecutor would be appointed 
only if possible involvement 
by high level officials was 
found. 

“In Watergate you had at 
least foe allegation that people 
were trying to conceal things. 
In this situation both foe 
Justice Department and foe 
President have done just foe 
opposite.” 


; more loosely disciplined than 
British governments. Bat what 
is now happening ter exceeds 
the traditions of American 
bureaucratic warfare. 

It is in all onr Interests that 
Mr Reagan's team ‘should 
recover confidence in itself and 
win back the confidence of the 
• country. Can the resignation of 
Vice-Admiral Poindexter and 
the dismissal of Ueutenant- 
Colonel North be sufficient for 
this purpose? 

Simply as a response to the 
latest twist in the saga — the 
diversion of money to the 
Contras — they may be 
enough. If it is true that 
nobody else of consequence 
was involved, then no other 
sig n ificant departures can be 
expected. If, however, it turns 
out that others at a higher 
level were implicated, then the 
consequences will be terrible. 

But, in any event, Mr 
Reagan has to do more 
apportion blame for this last 
ntisadventrae. He needs a new 
managerial team to send the 
signal that he is determined to 
mite a fresh start. This means 
that the roles of Mr George 
Shultz and Mr Donald Regan, 
the White House Chief of 
Staff must be particularly in 
question. 

Mr Shultz presents an espe- 
cially difficult problem. It 
woiild look unfair for foe 
Secretary of State, who was 
right, to be sacked by the 
President, who had refused to 
take his advice. It would also 
look indecisive for Mr Reagan 
to get rid of Mr Shultz when 
he has been insisting that he 
wants the Secretary of State to 
stay. 

But Mr Shultz's part in the 
fiasco has been less than 
glorious. There have been 
conflicting accomits of how 
much he knew and when he 
knew it. But, while he opposed 
tfae arms deal he does appear 
after losing that argument to 
have behaved as if it were 
possible for foe Secretary of 
State to shuffle off responsibil- 
ity for what be knew to be a di- 
sastrous enterprise in foreign 
policy. 

Above all Mr Shnltz ap- 
pears to be so disaffected that 
it is hard to see how he can 
work effectively again with Mr 
Reagan. The Premdent cannot 
be changed, so K would be 
better if he were to have a new 
Secretary of State. 

The case for a new Chief of 
Staff is simpler. Mr Regan 
supported foe wrong policy on 
Iran, and be lacks foe political 
judgement and style required 
to restore foe equilibrium of a 
shattered Administration. 

The best arrangement would 
be for Mr James Baker, the 
Treasury Secretary, who was 
such a steadying influence as 
Chief of Staff during Mr 
Reagan's first term, to become 
Secretary of State, and for Mr 
Drew Lewis to rejoin the 
Administration as Chief of 
Staff. When Transportation 
Secretary. Mr Lewis showed 
just the required combination 
of loyalty and independent 
judgement 

Nobody can be sure that any 
changes will be able to restore 
the credit of the Reagan 
Aduumstration. Bat it w£Q not 
be re-established without 
them. 


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Rebels agree on 
Manila pact 


wsh 


WIi 



An island 


no more 


! Bahrain (Renter) — The 
leaders of Saadi Arabia 
and Bahrain yesterday for-- 
ntally opened a b3Hoa- 
doflar causeway between 
their countries. 

la a speech on a man- 
made island half-way 
across the new fink, the 
Emir, of' Bahrain, Sheikh 
ha Mb Snhn«w al- inwlifc, 
left, named it the King 
Fabd Causeway m hononr 
of King Fahd of Saudi 
Arabia, describing the 
15%-nfle causeway as “a 
symbol of solidarity . . ” 


Soweto shacks go 


Johannesburg - More than 100 squatter shacks were 
reported to hare been destroyed yesterday in Soweto the 
sprawfing Hack township near Johannesburg, amid conflict- 
ing chums about who carried ont the deamfitioa work 
(Michael Hornsby writes). 

The government Bnrean for information wafahh^ ftat 
settled honse-dwetlos in toe area, known as Mofoto, started 
tearing down toe squatters* shacks, mid that in torn they 
were a tt a c k e d b y the squatters. When police arrived on toe 
scene, accenting to the burean’s acoonitt; stones and petrol 
bombs were thrown at them, and they had to nse tear gas to 
disperse the warring factions. ' 

Local residents claimed, however, that the police 
themselves either joined in the denolhiba of faeshacks or at 
least made no attempt to stop it 


General Festival 
barred discord 


Lisboa — The Portngese 
Government has refused a 
visa to General Magma 
Mahrn, the Sonth African 
Minister of Defence, to. 
visit the island of Madcria. 
He tad beta invited by a 
groap of Madeira basmess- 
men who are established in 
Sooth Africa. 


Harare hesitant 


Virama — The hitter 
wrangling of a trade dis- 
pntetasengnlfed thecele- 
heated - Salzburg music 
festival, with toe famed 
Vienna PhQtaimonic Or- 
chestra threatenin g yes- 
terday to withdraw from 
the festival if it were not 
given a 40 per cent pay rise. 


Harare— Evidence of Zimbabwe Government hesitancy to 
release its most fimridaUe oppqddwn figBxefiimi detention 
without trial emerged yesterday. The High Coart heard that 
the Review Trflmnal had, at some mspeeffied date, 
recommended the release of Mr Dmoiso pabengwa, ^ed 47, 
.who tas been in jail almost six years (Jan Raato. writes). 

Mr Justice Dudley Reynolds postponed the case to today 
and ordered Mr Canaan Data, the state advocate, to 
“prodoce some reason far yaw lade of action**. 


Bokassa trial adjourns 


■Bangm, 1 Central African Republic (AF) — The former 
Emperor Jean-Bedel Bokassa went on trial yesterday, tat 
proceedings were postponed until December 15 after the 
prosecator said that the case was not ready for trial. 

Daring the stormy but brief opening session, the former 
Emperor repeatedly spoke ont in a load and firm voice, say- 
rag that he was grateful to thelate French fresidei* Charles 
de GanBe and toe present Prime Minister, M Jacques 
Chirac; He did not give reasons for his gratitude. 

The prosecator, Mr Gabriel Mbodon, surprised toe 
courtroom with his admissioa that the fear-page indictment 
accusing Bokassa of crimes rangng from emhaatement to 
morder and cannibalism n e eded more work. By a g ree me nt 
between Mr Mbodon and Bokassa’s defence counsel, the 
trial was delayed to allow ‘farther inquiries”. 


From Christopher Walker, Moscow 


The Foreign Office has pro- 
tested to Prnvda, the official 
Communist Party newspaper, 
for its censorship of hard- 
hitting remarks by a British 
minister about Soviet failings 
on hitman rights during a 
lengthy interview with the 
newspaper's London corres- 
pondent earlier tins month. 

During the. interview,. Mr 
Timothy Renton, Minister of 
State at toe Foreign Office, 
combined an exposition of 
Britton's -stand on arms con- 
trol with a stinging attack on 
the Kremlin’s policy towards 
Soviet Jews, but the latter 
remarks never appeared in the 
newspaper. 

Yesterday The Times ob- 
tained a transcript of the 
remarks winch woe censored 
from the article, which took 
up nearly halfapage under the 
headline “What is London's 
Opinion?". British sources 
said the cuts demonstrated the 
strict limi ts to the Kremlin’s 
new policy of glasnost (open- 
ness). , "... 

hr the censored passage, Mr 
Renton told Prnvda “On. 
human rights and humanitar- 
ian issues, 1 think it is very 
important for the Soviet 
Union to bring forward the 
discussion and resolution of 
these issues, because what I 
find most of all in Britain at 
the moment . . . is that people 
in the UK cannot understand 
why, if the Soviet Jew wants to 
leave the country to go and 
settle in the United States, or 
Israel, or' the UK, he shonld 
not be abfe to do so quickly 
and simply. 

“That, of course, applies 
even more to those, who are 
held in detention camps where 
we see no ' reason for them to . 
be. The Soviet Union, if it 
wfehes to present itself m a.-.- 
morc favourable light. as L am 


sure Mr Gorbachov does to 
the . Western world, I do 
believe it is very important 
that your country should 
adopt a policy in terms of 
allowing freedom of move- 
ment and freedom to leave the 
country that is frilly consistent 
with the Helsinki Final Act, to 
which the Soviet Union is a 
party.” Also censored was the 
reply of the interviewer; Mr 
Arkady Maslemrikov, who lik- 
ened "the position of the 
refuseniks to that of a British 
nuclear specialist who told 
him.she was unable to attend 
conferences abroad for sec-' 
"urity reasons. “There is no 
problem of allowing Jews, or 
anybody as such, not to leave. 

. It is only a . problem of 
security," the Prnvda corres- 
pondent said. 

He added, according to the 
British transcript: “On the 
humanitarian ground, every- 


thing is being sorted out 
Maybe it could be more 


Maybe it could be more | 
speedy, more efficient.” 

Pravda also cut all reference 
to .Mr Renton's response. 
“You really cannot expect that 
answer of yours to hold 
water.” he told Mr Maslenn- 
ikov. “It does not hold water 
because I know a number of 
committees and delegations 
who come into here and say to 
me ‘We have these Ioi% lists 
and the names of those Soviet 
Jews who simply wish to leave 
the country.’ 

“They are not in important 
strategic jobs, they are not in 
prison camps. They just wish 
to move, to leave, to go and 
join their relatives m tire 
United States, logo to Israel” 

The interview was accom- 
panied by a critical Friznfa 
commentary which ..attacked 
Britain's stand- on aims con-, 
trol but made no reference to. 
the issue of human rights. . 


THE TIMES THURSDAY NOVEMBER 27 1986 


OVERSEAS NEWS 


Manila — The PfeiKppmes Government and toe Com- 
mnmst Nation al Democratic Front (NDF) will sign a 60-day 
ceasetoe agreement today as the &st stage of what is hoped 
"J long-tenn pesc* agreement (David Watte writes). 
The date wfll coincide wtth the birthday of the (ate Senator 
Benigno Aquino, husband of President Aquino. 

Tta ceasefire, which will become effective on December 
Ww s agreement readied yesterday on provisions 
covering safety ami immunity gu arantees, according to Mr 
Satar Ocampo, a former journalist who is one aftheNational 
Front negotiators. 

The plan is to proceed tn substantive dfacasrioas V) 
after the ceasefire comes into eflect These would come under 
the h e ad in gs of htaaan rights, people's welfare, national 
sovereignty and durable peace. The NDF is expected to set 
up an office in Manila for toe talks, which now have toe 
endorsement of the military. 


Defence takes its stand Hindawi brother 
on identity issue in 
‘Ivan the Terrible’ trial 


The stale of Israd opened 
its case yesterday against Ivan 
John Demjanjuk, the man it 
claims is “Ivan the Terrible,” 
the mass executioner at ibe 
Nazi death camp ofTreblinka. 

For much of the proceed- 
ings in the Jerusalem district 
court, the defendant, aged 66, 
appeared in considerable dis- 
tress, sometimes standing, 
sometimes sitting, holding bis 
stomach, rocking back and 
forth or dabbing at hi$ eyes 
with a handkerchief 

He looked relieved when 
the 45-minnte bearing ended 
and he was told that toe case 
would be adjourned until 
January 19. - . 

The Supreme Court presi- 
dent, Mr Dov Levine, entered 
a plea of not guilty to the long 
indictment after Mr Mark 
O’Connor, the defence lawyer, 
had protested at length but in 
vain that be was not yet in a 
position to make a pka. 

Mr O'Connor spent most of 
the hearing protesting in vain. 
His client <hd not understand 
what was going on, he said, 
because he had needed med- 
ication after being brought to 
the court because he suffered a 
series of accidents in the van' 
that brought him there from 
the prison. His bead had 
repeatedly been banged ag- 
ainst the sides of the vehicle, 
he explained later, because he 


From Ian Mnnay, Jerusalem 


was shackled band and foot 
and could not keep his balance 
when the driver braked. 

His client tod not under- 
stand what was going on, Mr 
•O'Connor said, because the 
only interpreter being offered 
to translate proceedings into 
his native Ukrainian was a 
police officer who was al so a 
prosecution witness. That was 
obviously unsatisfactory. 

Mr O’Connor had found it 
impossible to understand a lot 


The Foreign Office yesterday 
njected demands by a Conser- 
vative MP for a more ngonns 
approach to Israd for inform- 
ation on toe nuclear tech- 
nician, Mr Mordechai Vammn 
(Our Diplomatic Correspon- 
dent writes). Mr ' Timothy 
Renton, Minister of State, told 
Mr Dennis Walters, MP for 
Westtary, there wonld be no 
farther approach. 


of the written prosecution 
evidence, which had not even 
been translated into Hebrew, 
let alone English. He did 
understand there was not 
enough money available to the 
court to pay for afl the 
evidence to be translated. - 
All this meant, be went on, 
that he was merely a spectator 
of what was going oa His 
client backed him up. “1 don’t 
understand everything be- 


cause nobody read them in 
Ukrainian,” Mr Demjanjuk 
said in English when asked if 
he understood the indictment. 

Mr O’Connor interpreted 
this to mean, not that bis 
client did not understand the 
charges but that he did not 
understand their legal im- 
plications. He asked that the 
charges should not be read 
out 

Mr O’Connor said he did 
not contest 95 per cent of the 
.facts set out in the indictment 
“The crimes of Hitler are well 
known. The crimes of Trebl- 
inka are well known. But we | 
are not going to admit those,” 
he said. 

“The point is this is not the 
man of the indictment” be 
said, pointing at Mr Demj- 
anjuk, sitting crumpled be- 
tween his two guards. 

Mr O’Connor asked for a 
“threshold trial” to settle the 
question of identity and so 
save Israd the expense of a 

show trial 

• “This defendant is helpless 
in the power of the state of 
Israel We are helpless before 
you,” Mr O’Connor told the 
bench. 

Mr Levine took it all as a 
plea of not guilty. He prom- 
ised to provide translations of 
any documents requested by 
the defence and adjourned the 
hearing. 


is jailed 


From John Fyrglqftd 
Boon 



Ahmed Hasi, who was sent to prison for 14 years yesterday 
for his part in an attempt to bomb offices in West Berlin 


A court in West Berlin 
sentenced two Jordanians to 
long prison terms yesterday 
for a bomb attack in the city 
with explosives that the judge 
said were supplied by toe 
Syrian Embassy m East Berim. 

West Beilin justice authori- 
ties also issued an inter- 
national arrest warrant for a 
man described as a Syrian 
military intelligence official, 
who is alleged to have brought 
the bomb from Syria. 

Ahmed Hasi, aged 35, a 
brother of Nezar Hindawi 
who was sentenced in London 
last month to 45 years in 
prison for attempting to blow 
up an H A1 airliner, was given 
a 14-year sentence. His 
accomplice, Faruk Salamch, 
aged 40, was sentenced to 13 
years. 

Both were found guilty of 
attempted murder by ca u s in g 
an explosion at toe Geiman- 
Arab Friendship Society’s 
centre in West Berlin on 
March 29, which injured nine 
people. They had confessed to 
toe attack and told police that 
a Syrian named Haytoam 
Saed had given Hasi toe bomb 
in a suitcase at toe Syrian 
Embassy in East Berlin. 

Saed, the man named in toe 
international arrest warrant, 
was also mentioned during the 
Hindawi trial In the West 
Berlin court yesterday, Herr 
Hans-Joacbim Heinze, the 
presiding judge, said Hasi 
went to the embassy after a 
pre-arranged telephone call 
from Sara and collected toe 
bomb from Him . 




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Heathrow Airport: 07-1 


758 New Bond Street London W1Y OAY. Tel: 01^499 9511. 

7592372. Manchester; 061-436 3800. Cargo Bookings : 01-8972811. Prestel: 344150. 


A sharp intake: 

134 direct flights a week. 

More destinations and frequency 
to France than any other airline. 
That includes London to Pans - up 
to nine flights in all - each way 
per day. 

And there are now direct flights 
to Pans from Aberdeen and 
Edinburgh, Dublin, Birmingham 
and Manchester. 

Quick but nevertheless com- 
fortable. Basically (or rather 
luxuriously), because we've now 
upgraded Economy Class on 
our London-Paris route. Not only 
giving you more legroom but also 
adding in-flight catering with com- 
plimentary wine or drinks. 

Just one call books your flight, 
hotel, hire car 


Air France. Breathe the words. 




leer’s 

astic’ 


■ectanfad en- 
be £8,000 be 
*01110110 Gold 
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my gramo- 
my donation 
J appeal and 
xt year,” Mr 
of Allestree, 


1 51, who has 
Told since it 
ter, said that 
ve his lack, 
antastk. It is . 
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cards can be 

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ves 


; -io brewing 
fikers and, in 
m kill them, 
< Real Ale 


campaign’s 
’s Brewing , 
z, a former 
Beer Guide, 
who have 
' breathing 
disorders, 
are allergic ', 
an suffer ill 
ng beers in 
tave been 
ce a foamy 
ty. or to 


States, toe - 
: than 40 
art attacks 
■5 used co- 
beer to 
ig head. 


urn couple 
ast July for 
ring reduc- 
nces. 

ord Lane, 
will pre- 
nations by 
j’a Schulze, 
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OVERSEAS NEWS 


THK TTX/fF.S THURSDAY NOVEMBER 27 1986 


Crucial test for racial peace 


Whites’ veto threatens 



progress in Natal on 
getting rid of apartheid 


The Natal indaba, widely 
seen as South Africa’s last 
chance to Show that a nego- 
tiated settlement of the 
country’s racial conflict is still 
possible, entered a crucial 
stage when it resumed in 
Durban today amid reports of 
serious disagreement over the 
issue of minority rights. 

Since April 3, delegates 
from 37 organizations, rep- 
resenting all race groups, have 
been meeting, on average once 
a fortnight, in the city hall, and 
are now tantalizingly close to 
agreement on a working 
model for South Africa's first 
fully multiracial provincial 
government. 

The aim of the indaba (the 
Zulu word for a tribal con- 
ference) is to merge the white- 
occupied and KwaZulu tribal 
homeland areas of Natal into a 
single apartheid-free entity 
represented by a legislature 
elected on a one-man-one- 
vote, proportional representa- 
tion basis. 

The most important black 
participant in the indaba is the 
well-drilled Inkatha organiz- 
ation of the conservative Zulu 
leader. Chief Gaisha Buthel- 
ezi, who is a force to be 
reckoned with in Natal, where 
78 per cent of the 6.620,300 
inhabitants are black and 
predominantly Zulu. 

Also taking part are the anti- 
apartheid Progressive Federal 
Party, the main parliamentary 
voice of white liberalism, 
several mixed-race Coloured 
and Indian parlies, and vari- 
ous business, professional and 
cultural organizations, includ- 
ing several representing Afrik- 


From Michael Hornsby, Johannesburg 

iely aans-speaking. and English- and “general” — would be 
hSl speakingwhues. allotted 10 seats each. 

■go- President Botha's ruling For the most 
the National Party was invited to second bowt!** jhe Bomb, 
still take pari, and after some House of Lords, would only 


hesitation warily accepted ob- 
server status instead. Pretoria 
appears to be waiting to see 
what the outcome of the 
indaba is before committing 
itself. 

The ingenious model now 


i u/uau vi ■ j . - 

have the power of delay. But 
in the case of legislation 
affecting the cultural, religious 
or language rights of any 
ao up. 41 of its 50 members 


S , 41 Of IIS mcmuns 

have io vote in favour. 

By this mechanism, devised 


being discussed by the indaba appease whites and mainly 
envisages a two-house legisla- Afrikaner whites, any one 


ture. The first house, of 100 


A West German shipyard. 
Ho wa Id tswerke- Deutsche 
Werft of Kiel, which is alleged 
to have sold Sooth Africa 
submarine blueprints, is bong 
investigated on suspicion of 
having broken arms export 
laws, Herr Hans-Dietrich 
Genscher, the Foreign Min- 
ister, said yesterday (Our 
Bonn Correspondent writes). 


seats, would be elected on a 
proportional basis, and the 
party which won 51 per cent 
or more of the vote, and hence 
of the seats, would supply the 
Prime Minister. 

The Prime Minister would 
be entitled to fill half the 
Cabinet posts from his own 
party. The other half would be 
allocated to other parties in 
the house in proportion to 
their share of seats. The Prime 
Minister would thus com- 
mand half the votes in Cabi- 
net plus his own. 

The second chamber, as 
currently conceived, would 
have SO seats in which r pre- 
sents fives of five “cultural 
backgrounds" — Afrikaner, 
English, black African. Indian 


group would have an effective 
veto over such legislation. It is 
over this proposal that the 
indaba ' s hitherto miracu- 
lously maintained consensus 
is in danger of cracking. 

Indian and Coloured partic- 
ipants are threatening to walk 
out over the issue. The In- 
dians, who account for 1 1 per 
cent of Natal’s population, ask 
why whites (9 per cent) 
should, in effect, have a 
double veto, one exercised 
through the Afrikaner group 
and one through the English 
group. 

A Coloured delegate, Mr 
Pieter Marais, complained 
this week that die indaba was 
turning into “a Zulu-Afnkan- 
er pact”, and that Coloureds (2 
per cent of Natal's population) 
were being treated as “non- 
entities". 

If the indaba can resolve its 
differences, it would put Pre- 
toria on the spot. Mr Botha 
would have no convincing 
reason for not allowing Natal 
to go its own way, other than 
his ingrained reluctance to see 
apartheid disappear com- 
pletely in even one part of 
South Africa. 



Paris joins 
Pacific 
nuclear 
curb pact 


Tokyo 


Amy Carter, student daughter of the former President, talking to some of 60 other demonstrators m a court at .Northampton, 
Massachusetts, yesterday. She pleaded not goaty to chargesm connection with a sit-in at the University of Massachusetts 
on Monday against CIA campus recruiting. The judge ordered ho- to attend a “pre-trial conference on Janaary 28. 


Parking fine s candal in New York 


Democrats fear more corruption trials 


From Christopher Thomas 
New York 


New York City’s political 
establishment was in shock 
yesterday following die con- 
viction of the Bronx Demo- 
j era tic leader on racketeering 
and bribery charges. 

, With a rash of FBI in- 
vestigations now under way, it 
seems that the greatest politi- 
cal scandal in decades has 
, only just begun. 

Mr Stanley Friedman, for 
: years one of New York’s most 
powerful politicians, faces op 
to 30 years’ imprisonment for 
his role In a racketeering 
enterprise that transformed 
the Parking Violations Bu- 
reau, which collects miOions of 
dollars a year in overdue 
parking fines, into a gold mine 
of personal profit. 


lie was convicted with three 
others on Tuesday, following 
an eight-week trial in New 
Haven, Connecticut. 

The Mayor of New York, 
Mr Edward Koch, dedaring 
himself “naive” for trusting 
Mr Fieldmaa and others 
tainted by the scandal, has 
risen skOnfly above the affair. 

His friend, Mr Donald Ma- 
nes, the former Queens Bor- 
ough president, committed 
suicide earlier this year by 
plunging a kitchen knife into 
his chest after being im- 
plicated in the scandal. 

So many Bronx Democratic 
leaders are bow under in- 
vestigation by the FBI that 
there is a dearth of candidates 
to succeed Mr Friedman as the 
Qneens Democratic boss. 

He did not immediately 


resign, but party leaders made 
it dear that he would be fired if 
he did not do so. There was 
talk yesterday of going outside 
the party’s tightly-knit organ- 
ization and choosing a retired 
judge to establish an image of 
integrity. 

With the Friedman trial out 
of the way, law enforcement 
agencies say a new round of 
corruption cases wfll come 
forward. 

Mr John Hogan, director of 
the New York office of the 
FBI, said corruption inquiries 
would continue for several 
years. He knew of several 
important cases in the works. 
“This wifi not go away. This 
will blossom,” he said, with 
obrioas delight 

Mr Koch announced that 
the dty would sue more than a 


dozen people involved in the 
Parking Violations Bureau 
q g m d at for as much as $10 

miili mL. 

The wife of the late Mr 

Manes is negotiating with city 
officials about returning 
bribes paid to. her husband. 
She has a job with the dty but 
the mayor steadfastly refuses 
to sack her. 


The otners convicted were 
Lester Shafran, former direc- 
tor of the Parking Variations 
Bureau; Michael Lazar, a real 
estate developer and forma- 
city transportation admin- 
istrator; and Marvin Kaplan, 
chairman of Otisource Inc, a 
company chosen to manufac- 
ture handheld computers to 
issue summonses for the Park- 
ing Bureau. Sentencing has 
been scheduled for March L 


ing that the treaty will cover a 
200-mile limit round every 
island, which effectively cov- 
ets. most of the high seas in the 
South Pacific. 



Gulf War stepped up 



TYP 






naval blockade 


By RobertFIsk, Middle East Correspondent 


DEALS 




1 ' 




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Iran is expected to increase 
its harassment of' merchant 
ships entering and leaving the 
Gulf after the Iraqi air raid on 
the Larak island, nil ter minal, 
sending more naval gunboats 
into the Strait of Hormuz to 
stop, search and confiscate the 
cargoes of vessels travelling to 
and from Arab ports. 

Some shipping officials in 
the United Arab Emirates 
even fear that Iran, may 
contemplate dosing the strait 


number of important ques- 
tions remain to be answered 
about other attacks in the Gulf 
this week. Not least of these is 
how Iraqi jets managed to 
stage their attack on Larak, 
hitting three oil tankers and 
setting one of them on fire, 
during a round-trip journey of 
at least 1,400 ntiks. 

' Western shipping sources in 
the Gulf are now convinced: 


Ti/7 


altogether, provoking a major 
international crisis, If further 
Iraqi raids on Larak strangle 
Iranian oil exports. 

The Iranian missile attack 
yesterday on the centre of 
Baghdad, the third in. a week 
and by for the bloodiest so for, 
showed just how. fiercely the 
Iranians now choose to retali- 
ate for Iraqi attacks on their 
cities. ' 


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• that the Iraqi jets landed in 
an Arab slate; quite probably 
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their way to and from Larak. 
Press reports that the Iraqis 
were refuelled in mid-air by 
their own aircraft are being 
ridiculed by several diplomats 
io the Guff who say that the 1 
Iraqis are incapable of per- 
forming so sophisticated an 
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An increase in Iranian naval 
operations off Hormuz is 
likely to be an immediate 
result of Tuesday’s Iraqi raid 
on Larak, calculated to send 
shock waves through the Arab 
Gulf states which rely on the 
□arrow waterway for the ex- 
port of their own off. 

At least 48 civilians, includ- 
ing 17 women and 13 chil- 
dren, were killed when the 
Iranian Scud missiJe landed in 
die centre of Baghdad, accord- 
ing to Iraqi radio. 

The Iranians said that their 
missile had hit an “intelli- 
gence headquarters". They 
said it had been fired in 
retaliation for Iraqi air raids 
on Iranian cities in which, 
they said, 1 1 2 people had died. 


• that the attack bn an oil rig 
off the United Arab Emirates 
on Tuesday was carried out by 
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ing, in which five foreigners, 
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A statement by the Revolu- 
tionary Guards headquarters 
in Tehran gave a warning that 
Iran was “capable of launch- 
ing missile attacks on indus- 
trial, economic and in- 
telligent* centres is all Iraqi 
cities" if Iraq “did not stop its 
criminal acts". 

While there was no confu- 
sion about the znissOe explo- 
sion in Baghdad, however, a 


• that Iranian oil shipments 
will continue despite the 
Larak raid, but that with 
winter storms disrupting ship- 
ping at Hormuz, oil exports 
could be reduced seriously in 
the coming weeks, placing a 
severe new- strain on Iran's 
economy. 

One of the three tankers hit 
in Tuesday’s raid was still 
burning yesterday afternoon 
although fires on board an 
Iranian vessel the “mother’' 
ship Tabriz, which' is used as a 
floating oil storage depot, had 
been put out Radio reports of 
wreckage and rubble on Larak 
Island are untrue, since the 
island is merely an uninhab- 
ited sand dune that gave its 
name to the ter minal. 

The dramatic developments 
of the past two days, however, 
appear to have, been staged 
more for their effect on public 
morale than on furthering the 
course of the war. 


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British warships will 
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Royal Navy warships have 
been ordered to increase their 
patrols in the sensitive waters 
of the Gulf it was disclosed 
yesterday as hostilities be- 
tween Iran and Iraq reached 
new heights. 

They have been instructed 
to make more frequent patrols 
and to maintain- a higher 
profile in an attempt to pro- 
vide protection for British 
ships and seamen. 

The new orders were dis- 
closed yesterday by the Sec- 
retary of State for Defence. Mr 
George Younger, who was in 
Muscat after visiting a joint 
British -Omani military exerc- 
ise. 

“The objective is to mike it 
dear that we are there, within 
reach, should the need arise, ” 
he said. 


assis tance. We wfli not inter- 
fere with normal activities, 
but if there is some distress, 
difficulty or disaster involving 
a British ship then you have 
the Royal Navy somewhere 
nearby.” 

. The Navy has main tained 
«s patrols in the Gulf for 
wvoal years. Currently the 


. . UH-iTOw-iA—.l.r -.-1* 




li.;-.,--- o g --~g 


“If British Ships ard people 
get into difficulty, ib; Rnvai 
Navy yiin be tfc--r tif r*,,.^ 






‘-vwi^udu jino me 

mgate Andromeda, backed up 
by the Royal Fleet Auxiliary 
vessel Orange Leaf are under- 
taking the task. 

■ They have been contacting 
Iranian Hercules aircraft fly- 
ing over the Guff and identify- 
ing themselves, a tactic which, 
rt is believed, can often pre- 
vent an attack on merchant 
ships in the immediate area. 

, The two warships have been, 
involved in the military ex- 
e * 1 cise in Oman, blit are ex- 
pected to' return to their, 
patrols within the next few 
days. = 




France made a bSStep 
forsrart towards a P^mc 
zone free from .nadear 
cont amination when it s»ned 
on Tuesday a treaty with the 
L United Sates. Austrate, New 
Zealand and the small South 
; pacific islands aimed ai 
eradicating nudear and aQ 
other - pollution from i te 

rC ^he Frcndi, who exploded a 
20 -kifotonne nuclear device 
on Mururoa Atoll only days 
before the treaty meeting be- 
gan, have now committed 
themselves to prevent, reduce 
and control pollution which 
might arise from such tests. 

- Officials who' attended the 
ipfpfrog in Noumea, New 
Caledonia, said the agreement 
paved the way for strict in- 
dependent monitoring of the 
effects of any fur t h e r French 
nudear tests. 

Delegates at the meeting 
hurst into applause at the 
1 French- dedszosa. m a d e after 
years of French Insistence that 
its nudear tests had no dan- 
gerous environmental effects. 

The officials said that clear- 
ance for the decision had 
crane direct from . President 
Mitterrand and that it was m 
part intended to improve the 
country’s bad political image 
in the region. 

The US had agreed before 
the meeting to stop its own 
insistence that it reserved the 
right of nudear dumping in 
the South Pacific. : 

A spokesmanibrthc United 
Nations Environment Pro- 
gramme, which helped bring 
the nations together, told 
reporters here after the nteet- 


1 




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AEW NIMROD. 


In the coming weeks, Britain must choose 
between two airborne early warning systems. 

Needless to say, the prime consideration 
in this debate is national security. 

The Boeing AWACS system is already 
flying operationally. 

But can the AEW Nimrod system deliver 
the goods? 

The answer is emphatically 4 yes.” 

The entire radar system has been 
improved and upgraded. 

And, in the words of one informed 
observer, these improvements now appear 
to be “a technical reality.” 

A further reality is that the AEW Nimrod 
can give the RAF an operational capability 
within twelve months. 

This compares with three years for the 
Boeing AWACS system. 

When it comes to the important area of 
total system costs, it is significant that the 
Boeing proposal has no advantage. 


Indeed, despite the continuing debate 
about the millions invested so far, the AEW 
Nimrod will offer Britain a massive saving. 

Which leaves us with one further major 
difference between the two systems. 

Choosing the AEW Nimrod will defend 
the future of Britain’s Avionics industry. 

Choosing the Boeing AWACS will not. 

For the past 30 years, GEC Avionics has 
been the mainstay of tliis high technology 
industry. 

The Nimrod will allow this British success 
story to continue and secure 2,500 high 
technology jobs. 

The fact is, GEC now offers the only 
airborne early warning capability outside the 
United States. 

With seventeen nations, from France to 
China, already showing an interest, the export 
market has vast potential. 

Proof positive that Britain needs the GEC 

Nimrod. GEC AVIONICS 


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mechanical en- 
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12 


OVERSEAS NEWS 


THE TIMES THURSDAY NOVEMBER 27 1986 


The MIS spy book hearing 


Judge suggests British security 
_ sensitivity often ‘just stupid’ 


From Stephen Taylor, Sydney 


"J Whitehall mounted yester- 
day a new phase in its cam- 
. paign to withhold confidential 
“documents from the MIS 
book trial here, to the evident 
"riiagrin of the judge, who has 
twice ordered that they be 
■produced. 

_ The British Government’s 
attempt to seek refuge behind 
.a legal shield -that the papers 
are so secret that they are 
"immune from public interest 
concerns and should not even 
( '6e shown to the judge himself 
— brought from Mr Justice 
Towel! a rebuke about the 
implied insult that his court 
“was not “leakproof”. He also 
'Observed that it was “abun- 
‘dantly dear to everyone that 
'’Whitehall was doing its 
’damnedest to stop anyone 
^getting near the documents.” 
-- Mr Justice Powdl has ex- 
pressed concern about the 
British case before, but never 
so fully as yesterday. He 
; repeatedly brought Mr Theo 
‘ Simos QC counsel for the 
; Government, back to points 
'which he said “puzzled” him. 

In the process, he again 
'voiced suspicion that a Sworn 
Written answer given to the 
court by Sir Robert Arm- 
strong, the Cabinet Secretary, 
was raise, and questioned 
whether British security sen- 
sitivity was not “just stupid”. 

The judge, himself a former 
officer in Australian Military 


Intelligence, indicated that 
bewould treat the secret pa- 
pers with proper respect and 
found it “offensive” that he 
was being told he could not 
inspect them. 

Late in the day, Mr Simos 
appeared to take a step back, 
stating that the British Gov- 
ernment would have no objec- 
tion to the judge examining 
the documents. But Mr Simos 
said he would seek leave to 
appeal if the judge still insisted 
they be shown to lawyers for 
Mr Peter Wright, whose book 
Whitehall is seeking to have 
suppressed. 

A ruling on the papers ts 
expected today, after which 
Mr Wright’s counsel, Mr Mal- 
colm Turnbull, will resume 
his cross-examination of Sir 
Robert m camera. 

Exactly what the documents 
are is stated on a secret list in a 
sealed envelope deposited 
with the judge. 

In an affidavit fifed last 
Sunday, Mr Christopher Mall- 
aby. Deputy Secretary at the 
Cabinet office, said disclosure 
of the papers would endanger 
British national security by 
identifying serving and past 
members of MIS; revealing 
details relevant to current MIS 
operations; identifying sour- 
ces of information; and identi- 
fying people who had been 
investigated by the service. 

Mr T urn bull submitted that 


at least three of the documents 
were “enormous whales in the 
bay” which went to the heart 
Of the British case. 

The judge went bade to the 
affidavit. He found it difficult, 

he said, to get to grips with Mr 
Mallab/s proposition that 
disdosing the identity _ of 
agents was necessarily detrim- 
ental to national security. 

He had been reading A 
Matter of Trust by Nigel West 
and found it "replete with 
instances of agents being 
nam ed, and of informers and 
defectors being named, of 
operations being described 
both by codename and 
. nature”. 

The question that worried 
him about cases like this was 
whether there was a degree of 
over-reaction. Some instances 
of securiry sensitivity were 
“just stupid”. 

Then Mr Justice PoweQ 
returned to a subject which 
has troubled him before — the 
British answer as to why it did 
not try to restrain publication 
of Their Trade fs Treachery by 
Chapman Pincher (Sir Robert 
says it was decided there was 
no basis on which to suppress 
it). 

The judge proposed a 
hypothesis that the list of 
documents included an in- 
ternal government letter say- 
ing that the case was “a 
political hot potato” but that it 


could be won on the law. 

He added: “I am faced with 
a puzzle which I stiff have not 
been able to sort out in my 
mind, how on Earth could 
anyone have given that 
advice?” (that rare was no 
basis for restraining the book). 

Mr Simos said the British 
case would stand or foil by its 
contention that disclosure of 
information by a security 
service “insider” was what 
constituted the risk. It did not 
follow that because Whitehall 
had not interfered with books 
by “outsiders” like Mr 
Pincher, it should be deprived 
from obtaining an induction 
against an “insider” ike Mr 
Wright 

The judge then took up the 
question of how authoritative 
an i nsider might be. 

“If out there is material 
which suggests Mr Wright was 
among a group which got so 
bemused by the exotic of 
mtdligence-gathering, and it 
could be demonstrated that he 
would believe anything so 
long as it supported his 
hypothesis— what damage are' 
you going to get by publication 
by an insider? 

“Assume Mr Wright is a 
slightly dotty old gentleman in 
an advanced state of Alz- 
heimer’s disease — could there 
be the slightest danger from 
rambling*; from a demented 
oldman?” 


'Soviet defectors refuse 
: offer to return home 


From John Best, Ottawa 


Five defectors from the 
Soviet Army in Afghanistan 
have rejected an appeal from 
the Soviet Government that 
they end their asylum in 
-Canada and return home. 

At a press conference in 
-Toronto, members of the 
group described atrocities they 
-had seen committed by the 
Russians in Afghanistan, and 
said that morale among the 
troops was poor. 

1 ’ “They do not want to fight,” 
said Mr Sergei Busov, aged 22, 
who was a driver-mechanic 
with the Soviet forces. 

■ The five were spirited out of 
Af ghanistan last week after 
being held prisoner by the 
Mujahidin resistance fighters 
for periods of between three 
hod six years, and brought to 
Canada on Thursday from 
Pakistan. 

- The Canadian authorities 
have refused to release any 
details of the top-secret rescue 
operation which, according to 
some unconfirmed reports, 
involved the British intelli- 
gence agency, MI6. 

- On Tuesday, at a Canadian 


imm igration office in To- 
ronto, the five were con- 
frontal by two officials of the 
Soviet Embassy from Ottawa 
who had asked to interview 
them. A representative of the 
Canadian External Affairs 
Department was present 

The officials assured them 
that nothing would happen to 
them if they accepted an offer 
to return home, and said that 
three other Soviet army 
deserters who had gone back 
to the Soviet Union from 
Western countries were now 
living happily with their 
families. 

The five turned the Soviet 
officials down point-blank. 

They denied having taken 
part in atrocities in Aighani- 
. stan, while acknowledging 
* tha t such activities were com- 
mon. Mr Vladislav Naumov, 
aged 24, a paratrooper, re- 
called one Soviet operation in 
which 98 Afghan civilians 
were killed. “Only one of them 
was a guerrilla.” 

The five have been granted 
special permits allowing them 
to remain in Canada 


Pope pleads with erring 
Catholics to return 


Sydney (AP) — The Pope 
yesterday issued a passionate 
appeal to Roman Catholics 
who have left the Church to 
come bade. 

The Pope, speaking in a 
country where less than one- 
third of its 3.9 urinhm Roman 
Catholics go to Mass rega- 
larly, said it was no longer jost 
a question of spreading the 
Gospel to those who have not 
heard it, but of reaching those 
who have heard it “bat no 
longer respond". 

The Pope later drew his 
hugest crowd yet in this nation 
of 16 million people, an es- 
timated 200.000 faithful at a 
Mass at Randwick racecomse, 
Sydney. 

From a podium crowded 
with 450 bishops and 650 
priests, the Pope teld these “I 
am thinkhq; of those baptised 
in the faith who are no longer 
actively present in the Chorch. 

“They are of many different 
types, and the reasons for their 
absence from die community 
of Christ’s faithful are also 
many,” he said. 

Since starting the Austra- 
lian leg of his two-week Asian 


and Pacific pilgrimage, the 
Pope has gently chided his 
flock with ont harshly con- 
demning those who have 
strayed from Church teaching. 

la his hmnOy during the 
Mass, at which 20 people woe 
taken to hospital suffering 
from die effects of die 26 
degrees Centigrade (79 de- 
grees Fahrenheit) heat, the 
Pope conceded that some have 
“perhaps been hart by the 
Church, by the misunder- 
standing or abruptness of the 
Churdra ministers, by the 
scandal of their fellow Chris- 
tians ... 

“To all of those who have 
wandered from their spiritual 
home, 1 wish to say: Come 
back. The Chnrch opens her 
arms to yon, the Church loves 
yon.” 

In a whirlwind fluid day of 
his visit to Australia, the Pope 
also met industrial workers at 
a factory, members of the 
Jewish coanmnity, university 
professors and Catholic bish- 
ops, and saw fee Opera 
House, where he posed fur 
pictures with the Sydney har- 
bour bridge in the background. 



Mr Mikhail Gorbachov and his wife, Raisa, 

park in Delhi which marks the place where 

Gorbachov 
protesters 
rounded up 

From Michael Hamlyn 
Delhi 

The Indian authorities, no 
doubt trying to make Mr 
Mikhail Gorbachov feel at 
home, yesterday rounded up 
anyone who appeared to be 
demonstrating against his 
visit 

Fifty-eight Afghan refugees, 

15 of them women, began 
waving placards protesting at 
the Soviet occupation of 
Afghanistan when police swo- 
oped and arrested them. 

A hundred or so other 
Af ghans began tearing down 
posters of Mr and Mrs 
Gorbachov in Old Delhi. Sev- 
eral hundred passers-by beat 
and kicked them. Two women 
and 57 Afghan men were 
arrested. 

The Afghans were out on 
the streets for die second day, 
and posters appeared appeal- 
ing for a Soviet puU-oot 

Outside die Soviet Embassy 
protesters from the opposition 
Janata Party gathered with the 
same object Their placards 
were ripped from them and 15 
were hustled away by police. 

MrGtwbachovandmswife, 

Raisa, planted a magnolia 
sapling at the cremation site of 

Mahatma Gandhi, 

Mr Gorbachov then visited 
the home of Mrs Indira Gan- 
dhi, which is now a museum. 

He hutched with President 
Giani Zafl Singh before 
embarking on talks with Mr 
Rajiv Gandhi, the Prime 
Minister. 


_ in the manorial 
Garndhi was cremated. 


Falklands vote in the UN 

UK unmoved by 
Argentine success 


By Our Foreign Staff 


The British Government 
remained determined yes- 
terday not to be influenced by 
the huge majority in Argen- 
tina's favour in the United 
Nations General Assembly 
vote on the Falklands. 

Sir Geoffrey Howe, the 
Foreign Secretary, treated the 
116-4 vote as an annual ritual 
devoid of practical import 

There was no mood to 
accept criticism that the 
majority might have been 
closer to last year’s 107-4 but 
for the unfortunate timing of 
SSr Geoffrey’s announcement 
of an interim fishing protec- 
tion zone around the islands. 

Coming just four weeks 
before the General Assembly 
debated Argentina’s motion, 
the announcement was seen 
by some countries as a harden- 
ing of British resolve on 
Falklands sovereignty. 

Whitehall has always in- 
sisted that the zone was 
strictly a measure to conserve 
rapidly dwindling fish stocks, 
unrelated to sovereignty. ' 

A%to the timing, the sources 
said that the zone, which 
comes into effect in February, 
had to be announced in Octo- 
ber to allow time for fishing 
nations to apply for licences 
before next year’s season 
starts. 

Although efforts were made 
to drum up support before the 


UN vote , especially among 
Britain’s EEC partners, the 
result was a foregone concha 
sion. The loss of support from 
The - Netherlands, which 
joined four other EEC nations 
which voted against Britain 
last year, was the main 
disappointment. 

The attitude of Britain’s 
former supporters has been 
that enough time has passed 
since the 1982 war for Britain 
to adopt a more magnanimous 
attitude. There isa widespread 
assumption that Britain will 
compromise sooner or later 
for finandfll reasons and that 
international pressure may 
accelerate the process. 

A further reason for the 
heavy defeat lay in the super- 
ficially mild wording of the 
resolution, which calls for 
negotiations with an open 
agenda. This enabled tra- 
ditional allies,, inciuding the 
US, to argue that no one could 
be a gainst talks. However, 
Argentina’s President Raid 
Atfonsin has made it dear that 
an “open” agenda would in- 
clude sovereignty/ • . . 

Beyond the feelings of 
frustration with Whitehall's 
stand lay a wider dissatisfac- 
tion with British foreign pol- 
icy. In die political trade-offs 
which determine UN voting 
patterns, Britain is increas- 
seen as having tittle to 

JCT. 


Jail terms 
cut Thai 
attacks on 
refugees 

Bangkok - Long 
sentences, such as the 448- 
year terms imposed on two 
Thai fishermen, have reduced 
pirate attacks on Vietnamese 
refugee boats in the Gulf of 
-Thauand, according to United 
Nations o fficials (Ned Kelly 
writes). 

They said that fewer than 
one. in two of the boats were 
attacked tins year compared 
with four out of five during 
1981-82. 

r The fish er*™* * 1 were con- 
victed of abducting and raping 
two Vietnamese re&gee wom- 
en, aged 17 and 15, whom they 
held for a month before 
throwing them into ibe sea. 

Peking envoy 
seeks asylum 

Peking (AFP) — China has 
acknowledged that a Chinese 
diplomat and his wife, re- 
ported to be seeking political 
asylum in West Germany, had 
disappeared. 

Sources in Bonn said Mr Tu 
Bingm had applied for asylum 
on Monday. 

Lightning raid 

Moscow (Reuter) — Eight 
Soviet soldiers were knocked 
unconscious when lightning 
struck the ground at their 
Caucasus mountain training 
range in Soviet Georgia. 

Quake hits 

. Belgrade (AP) — An earth- 
quake measuring 5.5 on the 
Richter scale injured 14 peo- 
ple fmd damaged buildings 
near the port town of Split. 

Books seized 

' Peking (AP) — The city of 
Peking has seized more than 
500,000 illegally published 
works this year, including 
tales of ancient military ex- 
ploits and sexual adventures. 

Marine ban 

-Washington (AP) — The 
Pentagon, which authorized 
the Marine Corps to assist in 
the production of a CUpt 
Eastwood film, toW the Corps 
not to hrip promote it because 
the final version did not 
“accurately portray Marines 
or their training”. 

Arms blast 

Stockholm (Reuter) — A 
Swedish military ammunition 
dump eocpltitied, causing a 
huge blaze in a village south of 
Stockholm. 

Morals arrest 

Tehran (Reuter) — Man- 
ouebehr Kalimi NDcrouz, the 
only Jewish deputy in the 
Iranian Parliament, has been 
arrested on morals 
the Tehran Times \ 


ENTERTAINMENTS 


CONCERTS 


RAMCAH fUULL 628 8796/638 
8891 Tool 7-46 Monteverdi 
Ctaotr. Engusti Baroque Soloists. 
John EUM Gardiner raid. 
Sylrtt McNair w- Diana 
Montagus mean-son. Anthony 
TtoKe Johnson too. Cornelius 
HauMroann Dm, 


RMl FESTIVAL MALL Ol >828 

JIM CC 928 8800 Tanlatn 
-7.30pm. ~ ■ 


-Festival Overture: Plano Con- 
certo No. z Symphony No- a. 


|^PmA8AIiET| 

- COLISEUM S 836 3161 CC 
240 6368 

CNQUSH MATTONAf. OFE3M 

Toot 7 -OQCmw. Tornor 7 JO 


ROYAL OPERA HOUSE 01-2 40- 
1066/ 1911. SMPy Info 836 
6903. S CC. TMketa £1422.60 
CtJaDeU £2-£40tOpenU. 66 AmpW 
seals avail on the day 
Tamer 7.0 0 t n t ose note earner 
THE ROtrtl^ OTCTA 


THEATRES 


„ I 836 7611 or 240 7913 

/« CC 741 9990/B36 7368/379 
6433 Cm Sales 930 6124 Ftnt 
Con 24t*r 7 day OC 240 7200 tbkg 
feel NOW BOOKING TO MAY 30 
1987 

■ME AND MY GIRL 

■ THE LAMBETH WALK 
- MUSICAL 

NUMty at 730 Mats wed at 230 
ISM 430 A atX) 

— IK TOWN** S Enures 


AUDERVS36 387a «- 379 6666/ 
370 6433/ 741 9999 Group 
•=8aKs 836 3963. Ewes 8am 
-UMITED LONDON SEASON 


ALDWCH 01 836 6404/0641 cc 
Ol 379 6233. Ol 741 9999 
Now Previewing 
* 1 Own Dec 3 at 7.00om 

DOHOmiY TU11KSUMH EMSEL 


STEVE* M A CKINTOSH 

mmtwm 


BRIGHTON BEACH 

□urrded by MffiMEI RUOMMI 
A NaUenal Theatre Production 
"HUnreur at Its beat- a neh and 
wring m**#**" W M M ‘* 4 
Kpottfutty shaprd family 
remedy" mow It will nm tor a 
. M(t9 Be®*" Time Ota 
Eutntaiot Mon ■ Frt 730 Map 
rtfeCH 3.0 SOB 5.00 A 830 FBW 
3aU 34 hr 7 day CC Ol 240 7200 
no bkg feel Grow Sales Ol 930 
6123. 


.... > 01-836 6111 cc 

836 im. not Can O* hrs/7 
Uajvl 240 7200 am fte». Eva 
730. Wed mat 3. Sal 4 ft 8 

Bey el th alli um 

: LES LIAISONS 
DANGEREUSES 

REST PLAT IMS 


IlMttortui tor A OtMer Aaraeda 
.to. •«« ef the Tear" 


APOLLO THEATRE 437 2663 

4J4 3598 tttt Can 01 <240 7200 
Ttdwtmaairr cc ST9 6*53 
Mon-m ft SM 430 A B.1B 
Thun Mate 3. 

Paul seonsLn 

Hun i ’ eetod O 
at 8 m Yi 


-MAGNtfTCENT* IXMalJ 

rM NOT rappaport 

-wonderfully tear DXap 
TONY AWARD BEST PLAY 
NOW BOOKING 1987 


APOLLO VICTORIA SS 829 8666 

CC 630 6262 Party Hkto 828 

6188 TMcetmaner « 379 6433 

Pint Can ct 04br) 240 7900 (BAs 

Pec) CIV Sales 930 6123 Eves 

7.46 Mats Tue & SM 30 
-A MUSICAL THAT SURPASSES 


Dimension— o Em 

STARLIGHT EXPRESS 

Music tv 

ANDREW LLOYD WEBBER 
LyriCS tv RICHARD ST7LOOE 
Directed (xy TREVOR NUNN 
APPL Y DAILY T U BOX OMFKE 
FOR RETURNS special conns 
slam at £5 on Toes nab for 
OAP1 


ILASgm Wed 17 Dm Ms a bn 
•flto tor delete 
NOW DOOKMO 70 MARCH 1*87 


BARBICAN Ol 628 8795/638 
8891 oe (MUd-Sot lOam-som) 
ROYAL 


E today 
2.00 4i 730 MIS A LL IANCE 
Straws -Masterpiece, a man- 
o ub pertwraa nce" Tones. 
SCENES FROM A MAMBAOE- 
W Feydeau, tumor 730. Sal 
2 00 A 7.30 


Arthur saber. lomar 7-30. Sat 
2 00 A 730 


CHUnCMJL Bromley 460 6677. 
Ernes 7.46 Mats mure. Sal 2.30 
Chfteoptier Ttmottur In THE 

PRISONER OF ZENDA 


COMEDY THEA TRE 930 2678 
OC 240 7200/379 6*55/741 
9999 Cnw 930 6123 

A a«Mt ACttoc paitoen l 

T hun 


TAYLOR 

THE MAINTENANCE 
„ MAN 

-.wondopully m art" 

_ n of me w 
"Tb« applause of rapturous 
. .. rtcogmiton- o Mall 
■■very runny indeed'' S-Ejo* 
Mon-Thu 8 Fri/Sat 5.306030 


contiLoe -s- 92 s 2202 cc 
(National Theatre's null awB- 
»°nunu Tout 730 THE 
fMERKAM CLOCK By Arthur 
Mute. Tomar. Mon. The 730. 
gff g-30 6 730 THE R AY AT 
NICE and WRECKED EOS*. 
Tout tan T»M «f Rw Mfe. 
46 nun platform peri ad Ikts 
£ 2.00 


CHP UgUN S 930 3216 OC 379 
D Man 

of COmedy Qsmaany 

ROY or 


amr-a "Kbiunu 
JUOTA Men 


sam cm 

rl £L^J 0ur wife 

wmen and directed by 

RAY QQOfCY 
Cood scab mail Thurs nm* 


DOAUMOM THEATRE BSO 8848/ 
9662. ALL M CC teas MBT 


nor on Sam 9so 

6123 

MVC OAK** 

TV ULTBRATE^DtPWWJICt 
TNETORTRAY^lV 'AKASW 

UURENaffl®® 4 

Moo- Frt 730 Tim M« su» 

6 8.18. At Titan w aBocg^ e 
Star- wuibe 

join QvtsIK SPECIAL 

MOHS M 27 an parts ewsW *«* 
Sat met for OAP*% UB«F». 
denis A under l6?_2 vaB JLS 
before perf Redoced dHosTW** 
mats oKy C7 & go 
How ReeUA* to Are* ■87. 

scats «mTt>> w *wr 


8230 cc 379 6666/6433. Eve* 
8pm. San mats 4pm TREATMENT 
by Jon athan Moont. 

DORY fflEVM a Dec - io Jan. 


DRURY LAKE THEATRE ROYAL 

Bax Omoe A CC Ol -836 8108. Ol- 

2409066/7. Fir® Call 24hr 7 daw 

cc teas, an at 240 7200 (no Mre 

lee}. TkActmaster 01 379 6433 
(no Hg lee) 

DavM PteerteAM 

42ND STREET 

A SHOW FUR ALL THE FAMLY 


STAN 


voted 

BEST MUSICAL 


ARM 

voted 

BEST MUSICAL _ 

LAURCMcr auvmr award 

voted 

BEST MUSI C AL 

PLAYS A PLAYDK 


AWARD 

EV9S 8.0 Mats Wed 30. Sat SO * 
a.30 Reduced price mat wad*. 
Students and OAfs 'aandtor. 

Special matinee Dec 26 3nm 


DUCHESS S 896 8243 CC SMQ 
9648 CC 379 6433 A OC 24 
nr/7 day 240 7200 Ev*l 8 Wed 
mad 3 sat 6 & 8 
MO SEX. PLEASE 


DUKE OP YOR KS 836 51 22 OC 
836 9837/741 9999/379 64® 
24IW 2*0 7200 E\« 8. Thu 3. 
sal 6 A 830 

COMEDY OF THE Y EAR 

standard Drama Anri 1964 

STEPPING OUT. 

HH Comedy by nchara Harris 

Direc ted te Jana ■'SEE'™? 1 * 

“TMUterM OH TAP" SU 

THIRD HILARIOUS YEAR 


raamiNE B.OT OC S 836 2238/9 

Any 240 7200 laumrs bko reel 

Mon to Frt 8. Sal 8 30 Mai Thun 

L Sat 300. Pinal 2 ante 
LYMBA UBIH 

BT1 1 tteftliaM URBIWTL 

in DOUBLE DOUBLE 

-I eutayed every nrtmue" ST 

-A c taml c Of whoduoitry - ts 

r Time* ES 

DARE YOU TO 
ITS I 


flW WM 5 01 3796107. let Cafl 
24/hr 7 day 240 7200. Orp Safe* 
930 6123. fives 7.30. Sal E A B 
Tues mol at Spin 

JUDI MICHAEL 
DENCH WILLIAMS 

"Onto «f tealr dMT SU 

MR and MRS NOBODY 

by krttb WateChOUM 
Directed by Ned Shrrrtn 

"The M riunedy to reach He 

DMaH 


T v annooY 


CURE 337 1582 CC 379 6433 
ui Cali 2* hr 240 72oo uw 3k« 
fee) 741 9999 (no Mtg fee). Grp 
Sates 930 6123. fives S 
Mats Wed 5.SM 4. 


COMEDY OP THE YEAR 

ten. OBeter Amrte 19C8 

LEND ME A TENOR 

“tr ir» laoaMer you're after .Jhen 
me tun comes nowhere attanr 


A Comedy W Ken Ludwig 
Directed ear asvtd Gunore 


QBanWWeH THEATRE 01-858 

7755. m> can cc 24M9 340 

7200 IMH M Eves 7.4S. MB 

13a non ■ 


s*» a3a 

by Dylan Thomas. “Sente f 
am Iwm w ri tanatoaHaa 
—team. veaaSoB mid tente r " 
DeUy Tetevraph 


. I 722 9301. Ev e* 8. 

aw M M 4.3a HOLMS TB 

KCZLE. A New comedy by Pe- 

ter O&rta. with Arm B—eh, 


Lenteo, DmM TtoMML Mreci- 
4* hy “ " ~ - 


HAYMARKET THEATRE ROYAL 

Boa office ACC 01-930 9832. l« 
Can 24hr/7 day cc bte*a40 7200 
Evea 7 JSO Wed A Sat mate 2JOom 


(Nominated Actor at the Year 
Laurence OUrier Awards) to 

BREAKING the CODE 

tty mum 

Immmm DavM 


Dir By CLIFFORD WIL11AI*5 
MOVHW AND D I OR M O UTIY 
ENJOY ABLE” OBO 


MERMAM3TYS. Hayn>aritri.oi- 

839 22*4 TIUUdlliSMl Cf 879 

6131 Find Can CC 2*0 7200 

ANDREW ILOYD.WEBREirs 


THE PHANTOM OF THE 
OPERA _ 

tmaUKCALlNB 
STANDARD AWARD 

ul'crmiford 

Stew 


Bngtiiman Barton 

Chore Moore ptasrfChrM 
at certain perform ance! 
Directed by HAROLD PRINCE 
Eve* 7 45 Mate W«d A Sat 3 
Pottal Mtgi only (or Apr to Oct 


LONDON PMLAORJM 437 7373. 

741 9999 too bhs feel Ftret Cafl 

24 Hr 7 Day OC 240 7200. (HO 

BHD FEE} Grp Sales 930 6123. 
TkjHtnwUrr 379 6 433 

OVER 200 mm OF 

THE HIT MUSICAL 
COMEDY 

GEORGE HEARN 
h OEMS QUtLLEY 

LA CAGE AUX FOLLES 


" S.TN 

MovITI 7-10. Mats Wed 2J30 

sat 2-» & 800 

Stdnt conceg u o m t avail, at door 
Mon-Frt A Sal mate 

SCATS AVAILABLE FROM 


DO mm 1ST, 2MB, : 


LYRIC IIAMMPUBnW 01-741 
2311. Eves 7.46. Wad Mote 
2- SO. S al Mate tut THE 
BVESMAL MACHINE by Coc- 
teau. Vvccfi a t 1 41. 1 1 S w rit * 

STUDtOi wed - Sat Boca 

MRTFWORK FESTIVAL. 


LYRIC 7HEA7RK SMtobn}- 
Ave WI 01 A3 7 3686/7 01-434 
1560. 01-434 1060. 01-734 

6166/7 

CQUN BLAKELY 
“A UrtlUani A Joyou By 
coRttc p ert Or mancF- F. Thuds 
in 

The Naucnai Theatrya ac riwimed 
amhiftto of 

ALAN AYCKBOUHH-S 

AGIORUSOF 

DISAPPROVAL 

wi tear ttm Itlinilir funny" (Me 
-HllvioiB.-" ft Times 
-A rare evening of 
create ehnuaranaa" Tima 
Ever 7 30. Mats Wed and SM 3.0. 
Croup SUM 01930 6123. 

Reduced pnee mate Student A 
OAP Stand -oy 

FIRST CALL 24MR 7 DAY 

cc Roouptss oh ot aw 7200 

(NO ROOKBK FEZ) 

WINNER OF ALL 
THE BEST COMEDY 
AWARDS FOR 1985 
NOW BOOKING UNTIL 
APRIL *S7 

FRANCES DC LA TOUR 
AS LILLIAN HOLMAN M 

LILLIAN 

A stay by wauam Luca, directed 
W conn Redorave. Sunday Nov 
30*49*. 


LYTTELTON -S - 928 2282 CC 

(NMioaM Theatre's prasmtum 

stage) Today iaao an To tear. 
Toe. Wed 10 30 ares aoOTM 

PICS) POUR a muricai now 

train Brawidnsn povre (Tar 6- 

11 HWOiti low prices). Toot 

Tomar. 7.43. 2.18 (lew 

price IttnO A 7.45 THE M BS 
TRATS By Pinero. Mon. Toe. 
Wed 7.46 


MAYFAIR Ol 639 3037 
From Dec 18 to Jan 3 
Twice duty 2 0 A ao 
W att a Sets 1030. 2.0* -J.o 
SOOTTS XMAS SHOW 


MAYFAfli S CC 029 3036. Mon- 
Thu 8 Fn/Set 040 A ftio 

RICHARD TODDto 

-TteMTkttoteriWSM 

THE BUSINESS OF 
MURDER 

'An unabashed wtww" S Exp 


mm 


MERMAID 236 6668 or 741 

9999. Op Sates 990 6123 First 

cafl 240 7306 O* Mrs 7 Days) 

.TMienwr 379 6433. 
Evea 8pm. Sat Gmn A 8-50 

STEVEN BERKOFFS 
SINK THE BELGRA NO! 

— SAVASELY C ORR C" FT 

Ptwthe are » od and drink 

TNDS un 


. ... 01-236 

6668 1st can 240 7300 379 6433 
741 9999 Grp Safes 930 6123 

THE WIND IN THE 
WILLOWS 

Opens December IS tor 4 wteU 
only Twice daay m 2D A 6.0 


NATIONAL THEATRE SUi Bank 

NATIONAL THEATRE 
COM PANY 

See SEPARATE ENTRIES under 
OUVMR/LYTTELT0H/ 


seals days or peris aB theatre 
Cram IO am. MWMaMM (928 
2053}. EAST CAR PARK, brio 
^(MBOOaa AM COND 


HEM LONDON Drury Lana WC2 
406 0072 CC 379 6433 Eve* 7.48 
Tre A SM 3 jOO A 7.46. 

THE MMW LLOYD WERRED 

/tSwotruhSB! 


CATS 

LY TO R 


APPLY DAN.’ 


MAY 3B 1M7. Seats avtel tor ad- 
dUkatel holiday prets on Dec 22 A 
Job 2 at stxa 


OLD VK 928 7616 (X 261 1821 
Due to piddle demand ranexml- 
«t u toJaa. Eves rjd hwimui 
230- Sate 4.00 A 7 j46 


FATTN BROOK 


PATTI LOVE 
MAMA 4UMX 
ZEMA WALKER 

CUMHNAH YORK la 

THE WOMEN 


by Cure 


Luce 


(SUMER ■S' 928 2282 CC (Na- 

tural Theatre's open stage) 
aosed lor manteMatoe uoni 

Dec 3. Previews KMC LEAR 

Dec A. «, a. 6 (no sene svaBaMa 

tWs Dac 6 preview . somurd 
Threure OubL Dec 9 um ANN 
MAL FARM to pnoM to 

mom & Dec io an m 7.00 

prompt opens Dec II W 045. 

Then Dk 12 a 13. Otoe a the- 

atre dark - DM AMAML FARM 
as rated m leaflet). 


PALACE THEATRE 434 0909 CC 
379 6433 FM CM) 24Hr 70ay OC 
240 7200 Grp Sale* 5*30 6123 


LES MISERABLE 
-IF YOU CANT GET A 
TICKET- S7EAL ONE?" sm 

Eves 730 Mall Thu a Sal 23D 
Latecomers not admtnsd 
unt il the interval 
MAT TM TOUIV *Y DHRRR- 
MS FUR HinJMKl AT THE BOX 


HWDRX 836 2294 <v 240 9661 

DIANA RIGG 

-A COMMANO tSC P RESENCE^ - 

wryly wrm- F.T. 
WILDFIRE 

a ne w play 

lUAFR g P" PMn 

IK CAB 240 7SOO um t*o real orp 
saito 930 6123/7*1 9999 MMS 
toi Mon-Tbv 8 Fri/Bm A A ftlE 


PICCADILLY 437 4606 CC 379 

6666/ 379 6438/ 240 7200. 

QrtMRI Safes 93061Z3/ 836 3962. 

Eras Sum. Sate *■» A 8.10 Wed 

matt 3 


nuHUU 

CARRRJ. 


PATRKX 


■ nm > evarb ■ 

DEREK R0Y1E la 


A FUNNY THING 
HAPPENED „ 

ON THE WAY TO THE FORUM 

“The curtain rateer atone te worth 
the price of adratodon" tnd 


EDWARD Box Office 
734 8961 Ftret CUB 2410-7 Days 
cc BNUsg 836 3464 CXp Sated 
930 6123. Mon-Sat 7-30 Mats 
Thun A Sat 230 


CHESS 



i 28, Ut7 
MAT SEATS SOMETIMES 

AVASARLE ON DAY 


PHDICE OF WALES WI 9S0 8681 
/2 CC Hatum- 930 0844 Z6/6. Crt> 
Sales 930 6123. Ketth Prowre 
741 9999. TtdWtmnter 379 643S 
let caa 24tri/7day 2*0 7300 

'ALLO’ALLO 

wHh the TV SHOW STARS 
Eves a Frt >8 M 8-30 « a 40 
EXTRA PEWS 30 6 31 Dec at 
220 


—a— 01-734 1166 /7/. . 

0261/0120. 24hr CC 240 7200/ 

379 6433. Grp Coles 930 6123. 

-THE REST MUSICAL M 

LONDON" Cdn 

"A WONDERFUL STAIir MM 
MAUREEN ^UPMAN to 

WONDERFUL TOWN! 

-R ripples with tmtemuii" 
S.Ttroee -Jos] w on derf u l*' DXKP 
MorvSat a Mate Wed 220 Sat 6 


Hvnane stubnm 74b 3364 

CC 379 6433 SHARED EXPB- 

RfSNCC to TOO -mUE TO K 
GOOD ay lured Share UMB 

Stai. Evea 8. Sun mat 520- 


I ROYAL COURT SCO 730 1 746/ 
1867 CC 94M- 7 day 240 7200 
OM toe) Evas 8m. Sat Mate 
open latot Stoefe rena l A 
MOUTHFUL OF B IROS tor 
Caryl awremfl 6 tterid Um 


royal eoutrr upstars 730 

■ 2684 gves 7 30. SM MW 320 

IlB W ua by Sarah Da n l ste 


ROYALTY 01-631 0660 SMhr cc 
240 7400 379 6433 741 9999 
Ofauo sum 930 6122 

JOSEPH 


From 16 Dec twice daOVja230 A' 

7 JO SOON HOW 


SHAFTESBURY THEATRE OT 
GORKOV Ol 379 53990001 379 
6433/741 9999. TVU Can 24» 
340 7200 (Mcatoto.Grp Sate* 930 
6123. 

Mon-Ftl ft Wed Mat 3. Stf 8 <A 
8.30 


THEIWATREOF 
COMPANY^ 

Tbpui rrvtvai - the best I tone 
ever seen- (Tunes) or 

ROOKERY NOOK 

"Ore toM c eteua i t d or Bn 
T uvas ' tarter* (Spcratort 
P re v i ews frres Dee 6 tor 
in 


• lavish nc* » pro duction 
AN ITALIAN STRAW HAT 
Book. Now 


ST MUTIRPS 01-836 1443 She- 
dal OC No- 379 6433 Evfl* ftO 
.T uat 2.46. Sat ao a nd 8 0 

M jr ad AMTHA CIMUIIE s 

THE MOUSETRAP 


SAVOY THEATRE OX 836 888ft. 
OC 319 6219. B3S 0479. FM Ct«s| 
a* br 7 day (bkg toa) 2 40 7aoa r 
KeiUi PimK 741 9999 (Mug FML 
CvmM<x>-F7t 8pm. Sots A 8Ja 

MinlXHMME 
DAW 


Mrectea to/McYArt rod 
tetrismsoaMM 


DJ4BD 


^ 36 2660 OC L__ 

4 143/E 19a 741 9999. First Cafl 
24 Hr T Dap cc 840 7200 Orp 
Safes 930 6223 

CABARET 


Starring 

WAYNE SLEEP 

Directed A OMreoreapMd by 

s nsra lrrm 

MbfrPri 7 Aft Mat Wad 3X30 
■ t a JO ft 


STRATFORD UPON AVON 

(0789) 


WWS/i Ida Today 
l.sa MadMlR TPniflW. Tomor 
730. Draw Sat 130. Rfetereri 
H Sat 730. tote Theatre, Fair 
Maid TonteM. Timor 7-00. 
■rear sal 7.3a 


THEATRE OF COMEDY 
COMPANY 

“The very bate or BrttetoR 
comic talent” Daily MaR 
Srea cparal e e ntries 

CMTCRMM TIMA 


VAUDCVUE BMC Office 6 OC. 

6S6 9987/S646 Flrri call CC. 24 

fan 2«0 7200 (tow toe). EvneaXL 

Mata wm 2-3o. sat aa aao. 


HOP BLYTWR 
P l O iiP MU TCWSUN in 
ALAR AYCKDQtMWS Rate Ray 

■ WOMAN IN MI ND 

■bs MUST BE THE FUNKIEST 
PLAY M LDWMHLJT H ALSO 
THE MOST P mU A RHM" &TU 


HO AT IRS BEST- 8.TMM 


VtCIRHA PALACE OL-SS4 1317 

Eve* 7JD Mat* Wed ft Sat ZA S 
EXTRA XMAS MATTJEES 
DrtnW 3*29 JO to 112 
satjr 7 day cc bte» (no extra 
charae) on FffiCT CALL 240 7200 
“A NIGHT OP SHEER SONG ft 
DANCE MAOCr TWdy Neva 

CHARLIE GIRL 
ONLY 7 WEEKS LEFT TO 
SEE THIS FABULOUS 
CAST. LAST PERF JAN 10 

PAUL IRCMOLAS 
CVOCHARMHC 
HrtAH 
PARSONS 


CHARLIE <HKL 

8NOUP SALES M SOT H23 
SW PARTY MSCOUNTS 
AUnboek. TKbenaaaer 379 6433 
«■ any WHSravti Trttvri toRm* 


WCrOmA PALACE Ol 240 7200 
NOW 84 hr 7 




katasra hmnard s ow 


HIGH SOCIETY 

OteMMi tty Rtenara Eyre 
Prevc Feb 12 191 NWit Fd> 26 
Mon-Fit 7.48 Writ MU 3 Sat 4-4S 
A SIS. CR Safer 930 0123 


, . h> 0283/4 . 

«c 834 00*8- «r-nriato«aHr379 
6433. Today lOjaum, ZOO A 
030. Tomer. Man 220 * 6-3a 
Sat 3-00 ..ft 131 Ito Wed 
lOwSOato ft 2.00 
M 



wurmtALL swi oi 930776s / 
839 4468 CC 01 579 6668/379 
6433. 7*1 9999. Crt* ealea 990 
6123/836 3902 



bp Shannan Maooooato 
Dtrected by Shnafl SMRe* 
Prevs Fran Tnea - Omm 9 Dec. 
79 a Man-Fit ft 8« ft30*ftso 
Wed mate 3 


WMTEHALLSW1 Ol 930 7 766/ 
839 4456-OC 01 379 6660/3791 
6433- 741 9999. On> safes 930 
^^H612V8S6 


The Award Wtnntng Comedy 

MOW 1 WAS A 


Directed bp Simon Stoke* 
Previews 2 Dec - Oman 9 Dec 
7MB MOH-Frt ft SM 6.30 ft ft30 
Wed man 8 


- S 836 3028 CC 379 
6668/ncitettoaaer 379 6433/ur 
Can 34 hr 7 days 240 7200/741 
9999/CTO Satea 930 6123/836 
3962- Era* 7.3a Sat mate 3 

Yt imiferMBafreMraMed Si 
tha Waal bThStpadW. 

VANESSA REDGRAVE 

_ TOM WILKINSON m 

The Yaaato Vte reted— M— mf 

GHOSTS 

By Henrik Bwen 
Directed tor DavM Thackar 

*smumr paosuenoN. 

DON'T WP * City Urao* 


YOUND tne 92S 6363 CC 379 
6433. Tte Yatean Vic Ca In 


’ D rift - Ma beat Iter- 

i rear" F.t Die* 730 

wad ft Frt met 2m 


YOURS VK HUM 928 6363 
P AINES _ PLOUGH to 
JtU 


m nma m T Oan. Evre ft TB Sat 


ABT GALLERIES 


3 


ANTHONY dTOWAT 9 ft 23 
WI. *99 «ioa 



14 out Bend Sl Wi. 
491 740ft Anrehliilfem Ot 
OLD MASTER PAMIIHU. 
Thraugb NowMbtr and De- 
amber. MofrFrt 10-030: 

so 10-1 


FIRE ART SOCIETY 148 New 
Bund S urat. W.i. 01-629S1 16 
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THE TIMES THURSDAY NOVTMBFR 27 1 9S6 


THE ARTS 



$ 


> » *. 




Camera 
cruise 


■ hack *° w «iere yon 


Wbeeo happy 
®ake sore Desmond Wilcox is 
nor recording the moment with 
a camera crew. Fifty years 
after the 

maiden voyage to New York. 

some veterans of the trip made 

fhfrKKf 1 ?? 1 ***** Journey on 
jjjf 9^ was there. And 
*”7- 7A * Vmt (BBC2 > was an 
embarrassing eavesdrop on 
tne recollection or these pas- 
sengers. But whereas a school 
retmion gathers the survivors 
in their original location, this 
exercise was more of a works 
owing in which the elderly 
participants cast their eyes 
a ? d 1 compared, rather 
than looked around 
admired. 


A glitter 
of gossips 


theatre 


The Women 

Old Vic 




and 


television 


.„^' hick o r and Robinson have 
both made entertaining pro- 
Bremmes about cruises. It 
most be said that, doggy- 
paddling m their wake. WOcra 
has not. Only one or two hems 
of interest bobbed to the 
surface; the fact that Ciraard 
wished to name their ship - 
then the biggest ever - after 
Victoria and therefore asked 
George Vs permission to call 
h by the name of Britain's 
most illustrious queen. (He 
w*i sure, he replied, that his 
wife would be very pleased.) 
And a story told by Larry 
Adler of how he met Joseph 
Kennedy on board, sailing to 
tell Roosevelt that he should 
divorce himself from Britain 
and ally America to that man 
of the future. Hitler. 

Otherwise, it was a pro- 
gramme which got its just 
desserts when, because of 
icebergs, the QE2 skipped 
New York altogether and 
made instead for Baltimore. 
An “utter disaster", said one 
passenger. 

Breaking Up (BBC2), by 
man. of the moment Nigel 
Williams, continues to create 
Its own atmosphere in a series 
about a young boy caught in 
the no-man Viand between his 
divorcing parents. Haunting, 
different and memorably 
acted, this drama plays on the 
cheeky intelligence of children 
when not in adult company 
and the childishness of adults 
when in each other's. It Is also 
very fanny. 


‘"Bloody bui un wowed™ was 
the response of one spectator 
emerging from the 1 936 pre- 
miere of Clare Boothe Luce's 
famed portrait of the Park 
Avenue set The piece is new 
to me, but from its past 
reputation as one of 
Broadway’s hottest potatoes 
one expects nothing less than a 
devastating onslaught on the 
idle rich. 

After all, as Mrs Luce 
remarked in a radio interview 
last week, she had spent her 
working life in a man’s world; 
and what could be more fitting 
than a derisive fereweO to the 
world of gossip before dis- 
appearing into a career in 
federal politics? 


However, anyone expecting 
of 


an evening in the company oL 
a Tina Brown of the New Deal 
should be warned that The 
W omen is about as corrosive 
as a milk shake. It is strong on 
wisecracks and put-downs, 
though they have none of the 
bite of Dorothy Parker As for 
the plot, for from mounting an 
attack on female parasites it 
amounts ib a thunderous 
endorsement of the married 
state. 


There are two brief scenes 
where the lot of Mrs Luce's 
characters is contrasted with 
that of the unprivileged 
majority. Otherwise the whole 
piece is built around the 
gracious figure of Mrs Mary, mt0 a jamboree. 

Haines whose marital idyll w ^ iat is lacking here and 

elsewhere is any strong sense 


the ammunition she needs to 
shoot down her rival (the 
second Mrs Haines, need it be 
said, is a gold-digger of low 
degree), the audience are in- 
vited to join with the idle rich 
in relishing the biggest scandal 
of the month and eliminating 
a vulgar upstart. 

_ The justification for this 
fiftieth anniversary revival 
lies entirely in the amazing 
company Keith Hack has 
managed to assemble. With a 
cast of more than 40 any 
production would need 
strenuous doubling; but here it 
is carried out by artists such as 
Patti Love, Diana Quick and 
Emma Piper in a company of 
18 who present an array of 
high precision performances 
with a profusion that defeats 
any attempt to do justice to 
more than a few. 

In Voytek’s glitzy art-deco 
surround, the various inti- 
mate locations are swiftly 
trucked on and off enabling 
the flow of gossip to proceed 
uninterrupted through the 
various tribal watering holes. 

The action necessarily 
binges on Susannah York as 
the ill-used Mary who - 
although she is finally allowed 
to develop claws of her own -- 
ts unavoidably stuck in the 
unrewarding role of ir- 
reproachable martyr in the 
midst of a gleefully malicious 
party. 

Miss Love, as an infuriated 
gym instructress, comes over 
as a firecracker of professional 
exasperation, and Zena 
Walker as a much-married 
cradle-snatcher turns even a 
gloomy Reno divorce queue 



Lost opportu 


of the Turner I 



ieer 


The 


The Women: left to right. Sosannah York. Patti Love. Maria AiUteoattd feorghm Hale 

Images of desolation 


The Great Hunger 
The Almeida 


clay 

into 


might have survived had not 
her back-biting friends got 
wind of her husband's 
adultery. 


Nicholas 

Shakespeare 


The development of the 
play tells you more than any 
passing episode. We start off 
at a bridge party with high 
pressure conversation about a 
bewildering variety of people. 
At this point the audience are 
nude to feel like outsiders. 
The action then moves 
through the sitting room, gym, 
and bedroom, taking us more 
and more into complicity with 
the gossips and divorcees. 
Finally, when Mary secures 


of mutual contact The price 
of assembling a company of 
this quality is that it offers 
individual star turns rather 
than ensemble. Georgina 
Hale, as Mary’s rival presents 
an Anita Loos parody that is 
mannered almost to the point 
of becoming incomprehen- 
sible. Julia Foster as the 
perpetually pregnant Edith, 
Judi Bowker as a beached 
Southern Belle and Maria 
Aitken as Sylvia, the back- 
biier-in-chieC are all de- 
liciously funny in isolation. 


Irving Wardle 


Tom MacIntyre's play arrives 
in London garlanded with 
praise after performances in 
Dublin, Edinburgh and Bel- 
fast. Evidently it sparks a deep 
response in Celtic audiences 
who can bring to it their own 
familiarity with remote, re- 
ligious forms. 

The Jongish poem, by Pat- 
rick Kavanagh, that inspires 
the play is a bleak evocation of 
emotional poverty told in 
matter-of-fact lines that now 
and again throw up powerful 
images of desolation. 

Patrick Mason’s production 
achieves something of the 
same sort of haunting excite- 
ment, climbing out of pulling 
or humdrum incidents. But 
this is described, not as a 
dramatization of the poem, 
but a meditation upon its 
themes. And the most signifi- 
cant of these, the emptiness of 
Paddy Maguirejs life, mother- 
dominated and fearful of girls, 
is crowded out by the sheer 
energy of what goes on in front 
of us. 

Bronwen Cas son's setting of 


furrows curving awav 
the wings is absolutely 
nghL Sheets of corrugated 
iron against the back of the 
stage continue the monoionv 
mto_ the distance, yet also 
confine the participants to 
their backwater parish. 

The time is 1942. Isle of 
Capri is playing on a scratchy 
record, and Paddy’s mother is 
there behind him, represented 
by a statue — part weathered 
Christ, part Sphinx. Paddy 
polishes it and mu tiers into its 
ear; bis unmarried sister pours 
scraps of water from pail to 
kettle and back again. Their 
lives are a cycle of trivial 
routines that will push them 
forward to their graves. 

On the other hand, the 
group's sexually hungry girls, 
that come dashing through 
their lives, are given such 
theatrically-exciting trans- 
formations and movements 
that you would say there is 
never a dull moment. 

These are the erotic fanta- 
sies of timid Irishmen, but 
such dreamlike meta- 
morphoses show creative 
imagination of a high order. 
Patrick and a village girl enjcy 
a courtship display where a 


flapping bundle of raffle tick- 
ets serves as his rooster's tail; 
the girls make up their mouths 
with ever bigger scarier lips as 
they grimace with desire. 

A choric procession, 
celebrating the arrival of 
spring, marvellously becomes 
a Mass where the congregation 
bleat like animals and the 
priest conjures playing cards 
out of the chalice. 

Little of the language of the 
poem survives the staging and- 
much of what is said is hard to 
follow. Words are but one 
element along with movement 
and gesture, and all are 
fragmented. 

Tom Hickey’s Patrick, 
leather-faced and unsmiling, 
emphasizes everything gro- 
tesque in the character, the 
gawkiness, the gabbling, the 
nearly-conscious adoption of 
eccentricity to scare off frisky 
girls. But however arresting 
his performance manages tc 
be. like the production itself, 
for a fair amount of the time, 
tne heartbreak of emotional 
hunger seldom came across to 
this Anglo-Saxon onlooker. 


award of this year's 
Turner Prize to Gilbert and 
George is rather like giving an 
artist a knighthood: the 
predictable reward of the 
establishment to a new recruit. 
This has in fact been the 
trouble with the Turner Prize 
throughout its first three 
years. It is rather as though 
the Booker Prize were to go to 
the best-selling British novel 
of the previous vean ad- 
mirable though Malcolm 
Moriey, Howard Hodgkin and 
Gilbert and George may be, 
they hardly need any addition 
to their laurels (or, presum- 
ably, their bank accounts) 
when they are already exhib- 
ited all over the world highly 
prized, highly priced and gen- 
erally riding high. 

It may be argued, of course, 
that while the Turner 
shortlists seem excessively 
conservative and commercially 
oriented to the cognoscenti, 
the likes of Gilbert and George 
are still a mystery to the 
general public, and a prize of 
this kind is just the thing to aid 
comprehension. But if seems 
likely that by now everybody 
who needs for any reason to 
"understand” Gilbert and 
, George already does, and that 
j those who continue to re gar d 
their glossy photo-pieces, tike 
Carl Andre’s bricks, as some 
kind of confidence trick to 
snare a gullible intelligentsia 
will merely take the prize as 
more evidence for their views. 

The framing of the prize's 
terms, which refers to “the 


greatest contri 
Britain in tb 
months", dof. 


iuuiium t uir y 

evitably 

success: Uk ^ 


IS 

is 


r*>- 


which 


George retiis 
has teen iminuq|»nig America 
and the Continent no doubt 
deserves some kind of recog- 
nition on n par with an award 
to industry. But the Tamer 
Prize, snrely, should be look- 
ing forward rather than back; * 
not necessarily to someone 
fresh ont of art school but 
perhaps to artists not 
middle aged who are still 
making a mark, consolidating 
a reputation. 

This year, for example, one 
might have expected to see 
nominated one or more of the 
new Glasgow painters such as 
Stephen Campbell or Peter 
Howson. who have been 
revitalising international ideas 
on British art. 

In any case, what is lacking 
from the shortlist is any idea 
of potential. Of the six nomi- 
nees only the sculptor Bill 1 
Woodrow really seems to be in 
the midst of a developing 
process. Even if it is true that 
Gilbert and George persist in 
refusing the accolade of the 
Royal Academy, it is quite 
evident that for some time now. 
their art has been accepting^ 
The Turner Prize is becoming 
little more than an extension 
oftheRA. 


■echanical en- 
he £8,009 he 
'ortfofio Gold 
erday to good 


my gra mo- 
rn y donation 
1 appeal and 
(1 year," IV2r 
of AJIestree. 


i 51, who has 
Gold since it 
res, said that 
ve his lack, 
antes tic. It is 
e.” 

cards can be 
ling a stent- 
ivelope to: 


"VLA. WtV* 


tv 

\-l . 4 -. 

Vi-* 




John Russell 
Tayior 






rSWk.t-.-S7* 
-1 laaSV-g.'s: 


JAZZ 


Ray Brown Trio 
Ronnie Scott’s 


Jeremy 



CONCERT 


LPO/Solti 

Festival Hall 


The mellowing of Sir Georg 
Solti has perhaps been pro- 
nounced too soon. Last night 
he was back on form as the 
human dynamo of music, 
leaning over the London Phil- 
harmonic Orchestra to enc- 
ourage from them an angular 
assault on Haydn's Symphony 
No 99. and then entering the 
ring to do battle with Mahler's 
Fifth. Perhaps a closer image 
would be that of a rodeo 
display of horsemanship, with 
the conductor taking great 
nsks yet just — and very much 
just in an increasingly hectic 
finale — staying on. 

This combative dualism 
also became a principal fea- 
ture of the substance of the 
music. Within a very short 
while, when the trumpet motif 
harking back to Beethoven's 
Fifth returned, its accompani- 
ment was strongly dissociated 
from it, active in a life of its 
own. 

The LPO’s strong and 
characterful bass, developed 
in Klaus Tennstedt’s Mahler 


performances, certainly help- 
ed this impression of so manv 
textures being in two indepen- 
dent strata, but the strain and 
daring in the performance 
were very much Sir Georg’s 
own. They were there, too, in 
all that followed. The second 
movement was again vig- 
orously unified but at the 
sarnie time caught in the act of 
tearing itself apart; even the 
third had tempestuousness 
mixed into its good humour. 

A performance so con- 
. cemed with the music’s 
comportment, however, was 
not going to delve into its 
interior ambiguities, and so 
there was no special need for 
the Adagietto to offer repose; 
it could be almost as tightly 
driven and wayward as the 
rest, with the same tone rarely 
maintained for more than a 
couple of bars.The placing of 
the harp with the double 
basses drew its part more 
wholly into the music and left 
the centre stage for the 
violins. Then the finale, apart 
from quickening speed, of- 
fered gladly seized opportu- 
nities to solo woodwinds, to 
the percussion, and to a team 
of seven horns who had been 
rampant throughout. 


FESTIVAL 


Paul Griffiths 


SINCE 1973 THE COST 
OF THIS ROUND OF DRINKS 
HAS GONE UP BY £54.200. 



Yesterday I wanned to Heinz 
Holliger’s ft/Airfe), a piece 
inspired by the late poetry of 
Holderiin. Today I can be 
even more enthusiastic about 
two works by him similarly 
motivated, and performed by 
the West German group En- 
semble Modern in the last of 
their concerts in this year’s 
Huddersfield Contemporary 
Music Festival. Unlike 
fi)Air(e), both Eisblumen 
(19751 and Ad Marginem 
(1984) are essentially static, 
essentially withdrawn in na- 
ture. Eisblumen in particular 
radiates an eerily enticing, 
half-lit atmosphere, refle ' 
the ambivalence o 
HoJderlin’s schizophrenic 
existence. And because the 
piece has no real harmonic 
motion its predominant mood 
is one of emotionlessness. Its 
emptiness is vast, overwhelm- 
ing and beautiful. 

Holliger has always been 
one to relish subtle timbres, 
and here he makes full use of 
the battery of effects available 
to his solo string ensemble. 
The same applies to Ad 
Marginem, where, however, 
he also has at his disposal a 
pair of flutes and clarinets and 
a tape. Here the objective of 
stillness and emptiness is at- 
tained gradually, the sounds 
conspiring to give a perfect 
silence, the extremes of reg- 
ister widening into im percep- 
tibility. If Holliger can go on 
producing such musk, he risks 
being remembered more as a 
composer than as the super- 
lative oboist he is. 

These works quite eclipsed 
Sandor Veress’s deliberately 
ecliptic, over-long Orbis 
Tonorunv. and even the effect 
of Klaus Huber’s tough 
Remember G, in which the 
excellent solo double bassist 
was Thomas Fichter, was 
relatively ephemeral. 



makin 


An earthy Carmen with holes in her stockings is promised 
at the Coliseum tonight as Saily Burgess sings Bizefs 
title role for the first time. Interview by Hilary Finch 


British 


Stephen Pettitt 


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fnfil isirn-.iM- in iliirrii-n y;ir-. 

Wi- fi.ni* n'li'iifh Imi-ii iH-bii'wny «-un.-M< < nih hi«h jiri-i— fur 
many uiIht uitrL-iifiiiaTiiiVihii'niiin HriiMi ;in. 

jr.- n*m dii' |«iii« li* fur .-air in mir tw\j inniitm' uf 
utmli-ni lirili-h jwiuiinu* ami tlrawiny*. 

I mnijil .lunu— nr Kiw 

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\;illiilti<in nil limit fiiilrjsriinn. 


I If you like 
theatre, 
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With three new 
productions in as many 
months, and with images from 
Peter Brook and Peter Hall 
indelibly stamped on the pub- 
lic imagination, Carmen has 
become very much the 
producer’s opera of the de- 
cade. But, despite a healthy 
degree of speculation as to 
what David Poiintney will 
have up his sleeve at the 
Coliseum tonight, attention 
this time is likely to be focused 
closely on Carmen herself, in 
the person of Sally Burgess. 

Not so many years ago 
Burgess was singing Micaela, 
along with Adele, Violetta, 
Pamina and Mimi. The voice 
began to wear trousers, and 
descended a little further into 
the boots of Hoffmann's 
NicJdaus. Oriofsky and Octa- 
vian. Last spring, in Leeds, the 
metamorphosis was complete. 
With an Amneris which domi- 
nated every Aida review, she 
took wing as a fully-fledged 
dramatic mezzo. As John 
Higgins observed on this page, 
she was “a singer moving on 
to a new and higher plane”. 

“It was the Amneris,” Bur- 
gess admits, "that taught me 
to sing property.” But the 
change was not without 
trauma. About five years ago 
she reached the point where 
singing at the top of the voice 
became increasingly difficult. 

“I couldn’t understand what 
was going on. You can’t see 
anything, or even hear any- 
thing yourself, and yet the 
voice is a part of you. And no 
one wants to talk about it.” 
She sang more and more to try 
to work out what was happen- 
ing — with near-disastrous 
effect. "Esther Salaman — who 
is very motherly — spent a year 
taking me right back to the 
beginning. Then I spoke to 
Phyllis Cannan, who at that 
time was a mezzo turning into 
a soprano - we did a Beetho- 
ven Nine together, reversing 
the pans, and it was wonderful 
lo be singing mezzo." Cannan 
recommended Josephine 
Veasey (ENO’s voice consul- 
tant, and a formidable 
Carmen in her time), who did 
the rest. 

Carmen, marginally lower 
than Amneris. should now fit 
the voice like a glove. What is 
more. Burgess has bad a full 
three months to tvork on it 
uninteirupted - something 
she insists on. Her approach is 
mentally methodical, phys- 
ically robust. She found ber- 


Zoe Dominic 



While he was a member of 
Oscar Peterson's group in the 
Fifties and early Sixties. Rav 
Brown defined the state of the 
jurz bassist's art: a firm 
middleweight tone, a mas- 
sively secure sense of swing 
and an immaculate choice of 
notes made him the object of 
enormous respect. Some lis- 
teners might now think 
Brown's playing old-fash- 
ioned. Others, though, will 
find his work in Soho this 
week a relief from the over- 
amplified and interminably 
garrulous style of vounger 
men. 

Brown can “walk” a dozen 
choruses in 4/4 witacm feel 
mg the need for the least 
decoration; when he takes his 
bow to a ballad theme, he is 
satisfied to depend on intona 
tion and inflexion for ex- 
pressive effect At other times, 
by contrast, he will fill the gaps 
in the theme of "But Not For 
Me" with emphatic double- 
time commentaries. In other 
words, he covers it all 
The contribution of the 
trio's pianist. Gene Harris, 
will come as a revelation to 
those who remember him only 
as a member of a rather 
unexciting group called the 
Three Sounds in the early 
Sixties. .And Harris's routines 
are unerringly underlined and 
italicized by a fine drummer. 
Mickey Roker. 


ROCK 


Mi 


Elvis Costello and 
The Attractions 
Royalty Theatre 


•‘I 

ves 




Richard Williams 


Talk about running with the 
hare and the hounds. Elvis 
Costello's "Spectacular Spin- 
ning Songbook” show on 
Tuesday lampooned the 
superficial, glittery milieu of 
the TV game show with 
exquisite irony while simulta- 
neously milking the novelty 
values of such a format for all 
they were worth. 

Thai the event was such a 
resounding success was due in 
large pan to the affectionaie, 
knowing rapport that Costrilo, 
>n his Napoleon Dynamite 
persona, developed w’<;h the 
audience, plying a stock of 
ineffable cliches with quick- 
w-ii;ed charm — •■dreams do 
come true", he assured manv 
participants. 

Guided by such a genuinely 
random theme. The Attrac- 
tions were shown to be an 
uncannily flexible and ve*. 
saule band, and Costello to be 
a performer with an un- 
n vailed presence of mind. 
Breaking off from a litanv of 
cheerful platitudes to stack up 
lour randomly-chosen titles — 
"Mirade Man". “Shabby 
Doll . “Man Out Of Time".- 
and "Clubland" - and im- 
mediately guide the group 
through them in a series of 
seamless segues was quite; 
astonishing It was the best tiny . 

I hat e w-imessed in ages. 


oaag 


in Drawing 
kersand, in 
a kill them. 
’ Reai Ale 


campaign’s 
‘s Brewing, 
z. a former 
Beer Guide. 
who have 
• breathing 
disorders, 
are aliergic 
an suffer ill 
ng beers in 

-ive been 
ce a foamy 
ty. or to 


States.’ the 
.* than -ifi 
.■art attacks 
rs used co- 
beer to 
ig head. 


asl 


David Sinclair 


^Romul Midnight Inis lo be tivcoimled 
one of llw mosl fHmerfuliy memorable 
jazz movies ever made. . . 
a remarkable jiln, 


tan couple 
last July for 
king reduc- 
•nces. 

-ore Lane. 
-. wil ! pre- 
taiioas by 
ya Schulze, 
r leave to 
} sentences 
Justice M(- 
he Central 


. .gtmvrr fully emotional. . . 

-Ul l 17. Mari 


Sheep's clothing: Sally Burgess in her Carmen costume 
self landed with the 


new 

Anthony Burgess translation, 
recently premiered at Scottish 
Opera. "He's put his stamp on 
what he thinks Carmen is like, 
and I objected to - hat initially. 
But it happens to tie in with 
what David wants. His idea is 
to go back to the Carmen ol 
Prosper Merimee who is. of 
course, seen through the eyes 
of Don Jose. She couldn't 
possibly be the Teresa 
Berganza type of good girl, 
working in a factory to send 
money home to her mother. 
She has wolves’ eyes; she has 
holes in her stockings; there's 
all the roughness, earth iness. 
dirtiness even, of the Carmen 
Bizet was unable io present to 
ihe opera-going public of his 
time." 

Burgess, who has just clat- 
tered down the srairs two at a 
time, whistling loudly, to fetch 
coffee in thick, hand-painted 
Portuguese cups, is not likely 
lo be fenced in even by this 
much directorial sperificiiy. 
"The character is 0|*?n to ariy 
imcrpreiauor., simply because 
its essence is freeedom. 
Carmen does what she likes 
from one situation to the next 
— almost as if she has no 


memory." Improvisation? 
Working with David Freeman 
in Akhnaien had a liberating 
effect on Burgess, and this 
already highly physical per- 
former has now been working 
it all out through flamenco as 
well. 

"I found a lady called Maria 
Rosa who does cabaret and 
restaurant dan ring in London. ' 
^ ou have to gc down, down — 
not up cn >our toes — down 
into the floor with a lot of 
stamping. I lore il" For 
Burgess, it is yet another wav 
deep down into character, and 
ihai is whaL interests her most. 
“I loved Zerlina - there are so 
many possibilities in her 
character — but soprano roles 
tended to be a bit bland for 
me." 

Berlioz's Dido in The Tro- 
jans for Opera North next year 
should provide stronger stuff: 
she h 2 s her eyes set on Saint- 
Sacra's Dalua ai some si age; 
2 nd "I can't wait for £boh! For 
me there's noihir.g like Verdi. 

I need lon^ long music. Bui 
vou have u> get those Bs and 
hold them or for a long 
time ...” 

Verdr and his princesses 
u- ait pauemly :n line. 


fcb ... / mention this vow ftassiotmte 
and beautiful film this far 
in advance only to 
exhort yon lo supfHiri it 
ivhen it does apgjean 
thereby enconragfin “ 
exhibitors to 



»■». SoJurfl:-' 


I nu - 







> 



THE TIMES THURSDAY NOVEMBER 27 1986 



SPECTRUM 


no flpge's 



gainst 

e grain 


ft 4: Science and 
fc storehouse 


ben Europe’s grana-' 
lies are bulging with 
grain and its dairies 
brimming with 
milk and butter, 
raid scientists continue to 
■ new varieties of high yield-, 
" r-wheat and super-cows' 
luce more milk? 
the advertising says, even 
>.'Botham can't eat three 
ibix for breakfast And that 
the cream on top. 
luctivity of arable land in 
UK has doubled in 30 years, 
>ugh scientific advances 
strains. Milk production 
' has doubled over 25 years, 

' through advances in breed- 
and dairy technology. The 
itains grow, but the research 
>on — for the present 

;I Jopling, Minister for 
ri culture, recently paid tribute 
the success of agricultural 
lology in increasing yields. 
(jBnt he warned: “To apply science 
in a constructive and coordinated 
manner it is necessary to stand 
finther back and to take a wider 
view”! Shortly after his address 
cm3.pt £20 million in agricultural 
research and development were 
disclosed in a Government White 
Paper. 

Scientists, however, would ar- 
gue that the surpluses may not last 
^ for ever. The next generation may 
be grateful for the advances being 
made now, many of them de- 
signed to reduce the costs of the 
small former. 

At an agricultural research 
centre in the heart of Bedford- 
shire, a giant machine is towed to 
the fields. Known as a variable 
height gantry it can span almost 
■ 40ft of land and is designed to 
replace the tractor. The final 
version will be a robot-controlled 
multi-purpose device to carry out 
all the jobs, from sowing to 
tending (like spraying and weed- 
-inglaad harvesting a crop even in 
wet weather. 

At the same research centre, a 


While Europe’s food 
surpluses grow ever 
greater, robots are 
taking to the land, 
cows are milking 
themselves, and 
science is finding 
many other ways to 
increase productivity 

machine has been developed that 
will enable acow, feeling the need 
to be milked, to meander to a 
corner of its field — and milk itself 
No human hand will be involved; 
the cow's yield will be higher than 
before; and the husbandry costs to 
a small former will be reduced. 

In Edinburgh scientists are also 
working on ways to breed cows 
which give higher yields. The 
latest innovations could double 
output again. Demand for milk, 
meanwhile, remains static. 

The main components of milk 
are proteins, butterfot and lactose. 
One of the new foodstuffs being 
developed at the National In- 
stitute for Research in Dauryingat 
Reading is a substitute for egg 
made by extracting whey-proteins. 
It has already been used as an 
ingredient in angel cake. 

Purified lactose costs about 
£450 a tonne. The market is 
saturated, but a biotechnological 
process of fermentation is being 
developed to convert it to lactic 
acid, which is worth over £2,000 a 
tonne and is widely used in the 
food industry for its flavour and 
preservative properties. 




Grain brain: John Bingham with 
Rendezvous, the wonder wheat 


Meanwhile, at the Plant Breed- 
ing Institute at Cambridge, John 
Bingham examines his latest 
wheat hybrid, called Rendezvous. 
He is one of the world's most 
successful plant breeders and 
within the next few weeks he will 
learn whether 12 years of pains- 
taking research is about to pay 
dividends. 

If the the National Trials List, 
official guide to formers of a new 
superior variety of seed, accepts 
his strain his judgement in choos- 
ing Rendezvous as the best of 
more than 1 .000 hybrids, created 
by his ’Mm more than a decade 
ago, will be vindicated. 

The choice followed an exacting 
process of selection, whiefa at one 
stage involves growing more than 
20 million plants. 

ohn Bingham says there 
are 100 reasons to breed 
new varieties: higher 
fields, more flavoursome 
fruits, hardier plants, 
grain with the best properties for 
bread-making are a few. Ren- 
dezvous was born when spores of 
the wild Mediterranean goat grass 
were crossed with a winter wheat 
by hand pollination, using camel 
hair brushes. 

The alien, coarse variety of 
Mediterranean grass holds the 
answer to a spreading plague for 
the cereal farmer eyespoL It is a 
devastating disease which fun- 
gicides are foiling to control. 

Breeding is a combination of 
art, science and extraordinary 
patience. At Cambridge, the plant 
breeder is backed by a team of 
cytogeneticists, who identify 
potentially useful genes in wild 
plants, and plant pathologists, 
experts in the way diseases spread 
through crops. 

There are no short cuts to new 
varieties. Even when the new 
techniques of genetic engineering 
become useful, it will still take 
about 10 years to get a new seed 
into the hands of the former. 

The achievements of the Plant 
Breeding Institute, which is about 
to be privatized, are considerable, 
its varieties account for 80 per 
cent of the winter wheat grown in 
Britain, and the UK yield of 7 
tonnes a hectare compares with 
2.5 tonnes in the United States. 

Improving the protein content 
of British wheat needed for bread- 
making has cut imports of North 
American varieties from 70 per 
cent to about 30 per cent In 
addition to wheat, each year new 
strains of cereals, potatoes, 
brassicas and legumes are created. 

As the grain mountain grows, 
the seedstock on which agriculture 
for the 1990s will depend is 
already ger minating 



HOW THE DAIRY 
CHAIN WORKS 



Other products including 
powder, cream 
condensed milk 
1 -385m tonnes 


Money in the mountains 





Last year, a Scottish grain com- 
pany quietly picked up well over 
half a mBfien poods of taxpayers’ 
money for simply looking after 
barley it did not grow ... a har- 
vest nobody wanted to bay. 

Intervention is the name of the 
game and, as the EEC grapples 
with a problem that threatens to 
bankrupt its entire farm policy, the 
Edinburgh firm of Philip Wilson 
Corn Factors has become the 
uncrowned king of Britain’s grain 

mmmfam 

Basically, intervention is the 
support system that enables farm- 
ers to sell surplus stocks to the 
EEC at guaranteed prices. Result: 
evurywfng moan tame of cereals, 
butter, beef and milk. Agriculture 
minis ter John Cummer pot 
the price of storing and disposing 
of the European surpluses at £73 
billion in 1935. “It is not," he 
concedes, “a sensible way to spend 
money." 

Nearly six million tonnes of 
wheat and barley, worth £666 
million, were being stored in 
Britain by the end of last year, pins 
£400 million of batter and £160 
million of beef carcasses. 

The taxpayers' ill-wind, how- 
ever, has been Mowing Philip 
Wilson some good. Latest figures 


Intervention — or 
buying in goods and 
storing them — can 
mean fat profits... 


from the Intervention Board few 
Agriculture Produce, the Reading- 
based organization responsible for 
overseeing the Community's sur- 
plus boy-in in Britain, reveal 
96,684 tonnes of barley in store at 
Dims, a «m 1I facing town near 
Berwick-upon-Tweed. 

Almost 80,000 tonnes of this is 
in the four huge barns erected on 
Philip Wilson’s 10-acre site. It 
represents Britain's biggest single 
store of surplus grain. 

The company's chairman and 
managing director, David Scott, 
refutes charges that the company 
is making hay at the taxpayers' 
expense. “The system of interven- 
tion may be wrong but the cost 
controls are very effective — 
nobody is making a fortune out of 
it," he says. 

Although the Commons Public 
Accounts Committee pots the 
annual cost of storing surplus 


cereal at £37 a tonne, Mr Scott 
says that those actually looking 
after the pain get less than £ 10 . 
And he pomts out that barns can 
be abruptly emptied when cus- 
tomers are found. “If barky is 
taken out of your store in, say, 
October, then it is going to stand 
empty until the fallowing harvest," 
Scott says. 

“Looking after i n tervention 
stock is an expensive business. 
The bnMdmgs are very costly, 
there are rates to pay and there are 
staff and equipment costs. I 
wouldn’t like to hang ray hat on 
intervention. We regard it as little 
more than a temporary phenom- 
enon on the forming scene." 

The Intervention Board ad- 
vertises every quantity of gram 
that needs a home and awards 
contracts for np to a year to the 
lowest tender. Exactly how much 
goes to whom, and far what, 
remains a secret. The storers 
main tain they cannot say; the 
Intervention Board gives nothing 
but generalized figures. 

The Government, however, has 
estimated that it would cost almost 
£725 million to store surplus 
cereals this year, plus another £38 
million for beef, hotter and 
skimmed milt 


• Britain is a relatively 
small contributor to trie dairy 
mountain. For example 44 
per cent of the milk we 
produce is drunk in liquid 
form compared with only 1 1 
per cent in Germany and 9 
per cent in France. In France 
49 per cent of total milk 
production goes to butter 
making, compared with 46 
per cent in West Germany and 
29 per cent in the UK. 

• in 1 985 90.347 tonnes of 
British butter was sold into 
intervention storage, which 

is only a tiny fraction (less than 
1 /1 50th) of total milk 
production. Nevertheless it 
cost £173,21 2.000 to buy 
and probably another £20 
minion to store. 

• The situation is 
complicated by the fact that the 
UK is a net importer of 
butter. Last year it imported 

139.000 tonnes, of which 

78.000 tonnes were from New 
Zealand under quota 
agreement But for this it would 
not have been necessary to 
sell any butter into intervention 
although, ironically, the 

dairy companies often prefer 
to do so as they get a better 
price from the intervention 
board than they do on the 
open market 





Which Midland savings account 
is best for you? 

Immediate access with a cash 
machine card? The answer is 
Saner Plus. 

With a 
cheque 
book to 
pay large 
bills? 

. CHOOSE THE SAVINGS ACCOUNT 

The answer is toathtsyoubest. 

High Interest Cheque Account. 

Oi; with £5,000 and 60 day 

access, an interest rate of 8%* p.a. 
net, paid half-yearly? 

The answer is Premier Savings 
Account ( * Ra,e vanab!e jnd corrcct at ,inxe °fi gorag p re * s - 1 


Come and talk 

l or phone 01-200 0200 for leaflets. 


WHEN YOU NEED US WE’LL BE LISTENING 



The unhealthy subsidy 


How the EEC is 


throwing good 


money into the 
worst of diets 


The Common Agricultural 
Policy’s subsidies are not only 
a political problem. They also 
encourage unhealthy eating. 

Medial advice is that some 
major illnesses and causes of 
death (including cancers and 
heart disease) could be re- 
duced if we ate less fot, less 
sugar and more fibre. 

A review of the products 
directly or indirectly sub- 
sidized by the CAP reveals a 
bizarrepicture; 

• Sagan Having little or no 
nutritional value beyond the 
calories it supplies, sugar is 
associated with tooth decay, 
obesity and malnutrition. 
Under the CAP the EEC has 
expanded its production of 
sugar beet to almost half as 
much again as the actual 
demand, which has been static 
or foiling since the early 1960s. 

• Cereals: Nutritionists see 
advantages in increased 
consumption of fibre-rich 
carbohydrates, such as 
wholemeal bread but the strict 
quality requirements applied 
to the CAP cereal regime 
encourage the production of 
highly processed white flours, 
not wholegrain. Quality is 
defined in terms of perfor- 
mance in mechanized bread- 
making processes, where 
white dough is easier to 
handle. 

© Dairy fot Almost a third of 
the CAP budget is spent on the 
dairy sector. High support 
prices have led to chronic 



Times reporting team: 
John Young, Richard 
Owen, Pearce Wright, 
David Sapsted, 
Robin Young 


overproduction — about 13 
per cent despite the introduc- 
tion of quotas. The Communi- 
ty has relied heavily on 
subsidized exports to non- 
EEC countries, but some 
schemes to encourage EEC 
consumption are nutritionally 
perverse. The Community 
may subsidize milk consump- 
tion in schools, but this ap- 
plies only to whole and semi- 
skimmed milk, not the 
(healthiest) skimmed kind. 
Subsidized sales of butter and 
cheese to hospitals and char- 
itable institutions actively 
promote an inappropriate 
diet, as do subsidized sales of 
concentrated butter to cake, 
biscuit ice cream and confec- 
tionery manufacturers. 

Generally the EEC chooses 
to subsidize for human 
consumption the dairy prod- 
uct with the highest fot con- 
tent (butter), while skimmed 
milk products go mainly fin- 
animal feed. The European 
Commission does, however, 
propose to use some of the 13 
million tonne European butter 
mountain (which has laready 
received a subsidy from the 



consumer) to feed cows in 
order to produce more con- 
sumer subsidized butter which 
wifl go to feed . . . 

Medical opinion supports 
an increase in the ratio of 
polyunsaturated fats (as in 
some vegetable margarines). 
The Commission, conversely, 
is considering the introduc- 
tion of an oils and fats tax, to 
encourage the consumption of 
butter at the expense of 
margarine. 

• Meat: Dietary advice sug- 
gests that chicken, turkey and 
other poultry is better for us 
than fattier red meat The 
CAP gives most support to 
beef and veal This keeps then- 
prices artificially high — but 
poultry prices are also in- 
fluenced by the high cost of 
cereals under the CAP support 
system, making one source of 
lean protein more expensive. 

( TOMORROW ) 

Fallow future: 
should farm land 
be set aside? 


•• • * 

£ •> vC s ‘'.\ • 


toftfetpUMiNnp**. 





SOMETHINGS 
NEVER CHANGE 

Our commitment 
to the traditional English 
values and standards of 
service has never changed. 
Next time you're in London, 
experience for yourself 
what our guests 
take for granted. 

A**”'. 



THE MAY FAIR 

INTERCONTINENTAL HOTEL 

Stratton Street, London W1A 2AN. 

Tel: 01-629 7777 Telex: 26252 


,k\ 









THE TIMES THURSDAY NOVEMBER 27 1986 


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SPECTRUM 




First lady, second wife, third force 


Shejs, ui her quiet way, the most 
influential and feared person in 
the While House. Tenacious, 
proud, single-minded, jealously 
protective of her husband. Mi* 
Nancy Reagan has emerged in the 
past ax year s as a formidable 
political operator in her own right 
a woman whose role in guiding the 
president, setting bis priorities and 
choosing bis associates has m a d r 
her an . icdispensible half _of a 
devoted partnership. 

• president Reagan’s most ener- 
getic cheerleader, she keeps herself 
resolutely behind the go 

that the glory may shine more 
brightly - on him. But at times of 
crisis,, tike now, she emerges with 
an authority and decisiveness that 
the White House staff disregard at 
their peril. It is Mrs Reagan who 
can tilt the balance between 
squa bblin g factions, Mrs Reagan 
who marks down the incompetent 
of the-baastful, Airs Reagan who 
prompts the dismissal of those 
who do not serve the President in 
the way she thinks best 
How much her p r es sur e fed to 
the resignation on Tuesday of 
John Poindexter, the National 
Security Adviser; is undear. But 
other. 'senior officials such as 
George. Shultz, the Secretary of 
State, or Mr Donald Regan, the 
White House chief of staf£ must 
now he reflecting nervously on a 
commentator's recent cnid epi- 
thet, 'The smiKiy mamba.** 

Mrs Reagan is accustomed to 
the limelight. The daughter of an 
actress, she -became rare hersdf 
and featured in 11 films - over 
seven years before moving into 
television. For eight years slse was 
the First Lady of California, and 
appeared at all the ceremonial 
functions with her husband, Gov- 
ernor Reagan. California remains 
the couple’s favourite retreat and 
yesterday they flew there — as for 
every other holiday — to spend the 
Thanksgiving weekend at then- 
ranch. 


Do-it- 


ITHE TTMESI 


PROFILE 


NANCY REAGAN 


Mrs Reagan is an « 
nervous and private parson. She is 
ill at ease in - a crowd and 
compensates with an exaggerated 
fixed smile, staring eyes and an 
awkwaxd fidgeting with her hands. 
She seems lost without her hus- 
band beside bdc. When he fe- 

torncri frnm iti* Inrinwt — 

a trip on which, unusually, sire did 
not accompany him — the whole 
of Ameri ca saw her at the foot of 
the aircraft steps, j nmpfng np and 
down with excitement as he 
down to cm brace her. 

She has made several broad- 
casts, either about her own life or 
to reinforce her anti-drug crusade 
to get young Americans to “just 
say no.” But she appears shamed 
and unforthcoming. It was only 
when she made a joint broadcast 
with the President that sibe exuded 
confidence. 

H er shyness goes bade, 
perhaps, to her child- 
hood, which was un- 
happy. Born Ann 
Francis Robbmsin New York dty 
either 63 or. 65 years ago (the 
muddle over hex Teal age has never 
been resolyedX she was a lonely 
gid, whose mother was often 
working and whose father, a car 
salesman, was absent When she 
was two, her mother sent her to 
live with an aunt fin- five years. 
The first security she knew came 
when Dr Loyal Davis married her 
mother and adopted her, changing 
her name. 

Her entry into political life was 
not easy. She was not a political 


person. Diminutive and pretty, 
her interests were in fashion and 
money, and the gossip of the 
wealthy, sociable code she ram? 
from in southern Gdifornia, 
where she met Ronald. But she 
quickly identified her new role, 
when they moved into the 
governor's mansion in 
Sacremento: it was to protect the 
privacy of “Ronnie,” and their life 
together. “My life began with 
Ronnie", die used to say. “My life 
began when Igot married." 

But gradually her role widened; 
protecting him also meant protectr 
fog him politically. And for that, 
she had to immerse herself in his 
world of politics. “I think Tm 
aware of people who are trying to 
take advantage of my. husband, 
who are trying to end-run him, lots 
of times, who are trying to use 
him,” she has said. *Tm very 
aware of that. All my little 
antennas go up.” 

Several' White House figures 
have felt her enmity. She was 
active in ousting former Secretary 
of State Alexander Haig and 
former national security adviser 
William Clark from the cabinet, 
and it is strongly rumoured foot 
die would bice to see Donald 
Regan go as wdL Sire has sided 
with moderates against hard-line 
conservatives. Bui like Lady Mac- 
beth, she has had to steel her 
husband's resolve when there has 
been a need to lake the tough 
decisions on sacking people; often 
he refuses to. Reagan is not the 
sort of person to voice criticism of 
a subordinate's performance di- 


rectly. But he might repeat it to 
Mrs Reagan, and she will then 
telephone the hapless individual 
and pass an the message. 

When she is angry or upset, she 
retreats into a shed sometimes 
refusing to speak to people for 
days. She has known wounding 
public criticism, right from her 
arrival at the White House; her 
mannerisms, her apparent frivol- 
ity and he rich friends. They 
calkd her "Queen Nancy”, 
mocked ah her dresses and criti- 
cised her expensive refurbishing of 
the White House at a time of 
economic slump. 

A dvisers steered Mrs 
Reagan into taking a 
more active role in social 
issues and her discovery 
of tire drug crisis has given her a 
real rote, an image of compassion 
and a visibility that has sent her 
popularity soaring. She has taken 
her crusade aD over the world, 
separating from hex husband on 
his- Asian tour to press home the 
message. It has made her more 
adept at public relations, and she 
evdn conducts some {ness brief- 
ings on her own. 

Her influence has often ex- 
tended beyond personnel to her 
husband's policies. She is thought 
to be one of the driving forces that 
moderated his anti-Soviet rhetoric 
so that he could pursue arms 
control agreements with the Sovi- 
ets. She is keenly aware of public 
opinion, and saw that the Demo- 
crats would make much in the 
1984 election of her husband’s 
failure to meet a Soviet leader or 
seek agreement On one famous 
occasion even Andrei Gromyko, 
the grim-faced framer Soviet for- 
eign minister, turned to her for 
help, asking that she whisper 
"peace” in the President's ear last 
thing every night 
Michael Reagan, the president's 
eldest son by Ins first marriage — 
to the actress Jane Wyman — said 


I BIOGRAPH Yl in 



1921: Bom Ann Francis 
Robbins, New York, though 
she has claimed it was 
1923. 

1940s: Became Hollywood 
starlet Later helped by 
Reagan, as president of 
Screen Actors' Guild, after she 
appeared on list of 
“communists" in McCarthy 
witch-hunt 

1952: Married Reagan — 
already pregnant with first 
child. Patti- 
1958: Son, Ronjrtr. 

1981: Reagans move into 
White House, "Queen Nancy” 
row breaks, to which she 
responds: “a crown would 
sped my hair.” 

1981: Represents President 
at Prince Charles wedding. 
1982: Launches "Just say 
no" anti-drugs campaign. 


his father would not have reached 
the White House but for Mrs 
Reagan. Once installed. Ire has 
leaned on her for support in all the 
critical moments: after the 1981 
asssassination attempt during his 
cancer operation last year, and of 
eburse now, when his political 
fortunes, his hick and his famed 
communications skills all seem to 
have deserted him . 

Tire first lady has grown mere 
confident in her rote as con- 
fidante, and is able to comfort and 


advise her husband, who despite a 
superficial gregariousness is really 
an aloof man with few dose 
friends. Nevertheless, despite her 
concern to be the fynchpin of her 
family, she has not always got on 
well with her children. They find 
her too jealously protective of 
thdr father. Her daughter Patti 
wrote a devastating book which 
depicted her mother as cold and 
calculating. 

And there was considerable 
strain with Michael Reagan's fam- 




fly. In a television profile of Mrs 
Reagan, Michael says of Nancy’s 
relationship with tire President: 
"She’s watched out for him, she's 
taken care of him, she's taken care 
of the details, she’s worried, 
worried, and worried for him. And 
it's because of that, that they are 
both where they are today.” No 
one in the White House, or indeed 
America, underestimates Mrs 
Nancy Reagan. 


How themner-city 
project that today 
inspires a new Royal 
initiative is maldns - 

builder of mothers V 

Genevieve Jones, community 
architect, rits at a drawing 
board in a Stilting tenement 
Sire works to a background of 
winding, drills and. chugging . 
cement mixers. At her feet is a 
roll of electrical wire, a few 
inches from her head stands a 
stopcock. Around her, un- 
employed people, angle par- 
ents, the low paid, are working 
to realise a drea m, making 
new homes in fire decayed 
centre of Scoffaixr* industrial 
heartland. . 

It is all a long way from a 
theatre in fire West End of 
London, but the physical dis- 
tance is deoentive; in other 
ways, the Colqohoun Street 
tenement and fire - Astoria 
Theatre are at one with each 
other. 

Today at fire Astoria, Prince 
Charles launches the Inner 
City Trust and its fond-raising 
arm. Inner City Aid — and the 
Colquboun Street project is a 
prime realization of his 
refurbishment vision. 

The project was organized 
by Rod Hackney, Prince 
Charles's architectural advi- 
sor. Hackney was asked by 
Stirling district council in 
1984 to lake, a look at a 
tenement built in 1902 and 
boarded up IS years ago after 
it was condemned, with a 



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We can do that Genevieve J 

Prince Charles visited 
Cokjuhoun Street last month 
and told the members of the 
project that he was “im- 
mensely impressed” by their 
scheme. The project members 
were themsdves impressed by 
the Prince's enthusiasm. 

Genevieve Jones lives on 
tire site and she is on call to the 
sdf-buflders from 8am to 
11pm. Living on the job 


council felt that something 
had to be done to house young 
people and the low paid. 

- Hackney's team was aWe to 
design nine new bouses and 27 
small flats, funded by the 
council and two local building 
societies: Tire new bouse- 
holders will have mortgages of 


The two and three-bedroom 
houses will be worth in excess, 
of £30,000 and -fire rare- 
bedroomed flats up to 
£20,000. 


‘It’s amazing what 
yon can do when 
you have no roof 


means constant 
and redesign, making 
meet the demands of their 
future owners. Every few min- 
utes a mud-spattered self- 
builder emerges from fire rain 
wanting anything from advice 
toacupoftea-IfGenevieve— 
Gen to her “clients”— tliinksa 
little more dedication to 
finishing the job is needed she 
is quick to cajole: “You could 
be finished fin Christmas”, 
she told rare young man who 




CONCISE CROSSWORD NO 1 117 

ACROSS 

1 Gross dvapridqg 
(33) 

4 Day nursery (6) 

9 Enwrgence(7) 

19 Flower ringpan (5) 

XI Deceased (4) 

12 Butanes dddrea 

V) 

14 Sate rale extension 

(ID • . ; 

15 Lsu*e Mol (7) 

19 Marine force(4). 

22 Bingo (5) 

24 Guaranteed (7) 

25 Ctrurinly(6) 

26 Stoke (6) 

DOWN 

1 Mob behaviour (4) 

2 Greek bread (5) 

3 Compel to eu (5.4) 

5 Bteme(3) 

6 Sailor's swonj (7) 

7 Join op (6) . 

8 Other gender (3^). 


3-3 

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U Hawaiian garland (3) 17 WaH firing staeffi) 
13 Samoa. Copt, Tonga 20 Sp«Ue{5) 


15 Gfeensokbtty(7) 

16 Hwrthoro(3) 


2 1 Roman mid months 
(4) - 

23.Lobncaai(3) 


SOU/TTONTONO 1J16 • ‘ 

ACROSS: 1 Credence 5 Jess 9 RBten> »^«v T?Agi«e 12 
Rabid 13 Fm* ISWfaed l&Shnnx UTonh 20 Visor 21 . 

Armband Shb 24Meok*y . . , , , , , * 

DOWN: 1 Cipher 2Eawntft. 3 BSE 4C Htfte forwa rd [4 
Envy.. 7 Shafer 8 Sheepish D Adultery MPtnmhago IS 
Waiver 17 Tawdry l9Uwd 22MOO/ *. 


oner (front) and homesteaders 

was not putting in enough 
horns. 

When another project mem- 
ber said he was off home 
because of the weather she 
responded sharply: “Why? It’s 
not rauung in your flat is it? 

“The community spirit is 
tremendous. It was there more 
when we started because 
everyone worked together to 
dear the ground and take 
away all the bags of un- 
mentionable filth from himV 
the tenement. Now that the 
work is weQ cm, everyone is in 
their own space choosing 
bathrooms and kitchens and 
furnishings.'' 

Anne Bailey, a angle parent 
with a 1 6-year-old daughter — 
they live in bed and breakfast 
accomodation — was rare of 
the first to be accepted to 
refurbish a tenement flat She 
has been repainting internal 
brickwork, hammering 
plasterboard to walls and 
replacing folds. The only 
work she and the other project 
members have not done them- 
selves. has been- the electrical 
wiring and the plumbing. 

“It is amazing what you ran 
do when you have no roof 
over your head, as was the 
case when I started”, said 
Anne, who comes from Stir- 
ling originally but had been 
away fire car years until she 
split up from her husband. 

“It is a marvellous scheme 
and the Inner CSty Trust needs 
to fund more projects like ft. 
I’ve made a lot of good 
friends”, said Anne,who now 
works as a clerical officer in a 
local bospftaL 

Unemployed diesel fitter 
Maurice Brown, aged 23, has 
almost finished his care-bed- 
room flat. He decided to keep 
the old pine doors of the 
original building and has 
stained fire skating boards 
with mahogany varnish. The 
bathroom has walls and ceil- 
ing of impressively tongtied 
and grooved pine — all done 
by him. 

He rays: “Anyone jointttg 
this kind of scheme most 
realize the commitment. 
Don’t fjve up — it will be 
wrath ft m the end.” 

Howard Foster 


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nechanical en- 
tire £8,000 he 
Portfolio Gold 
tterday to good 

te my gramo- 
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ieve his lock, 
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a. 



Wood 


;er of 
fives 


Michael Rinyon CC T 


i Young 

ed in brewing 
linkers and, in 
ven kill than, 
for Real Ale 
ay. 

he campaign's 
mi's Brewing, 
notz, a former 
id Beer Guide,'. 
te who have- 
her breathing 
is disorders, 
bo are allergic' 
i, can suffer ill 
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> have been 
duce a foamy 
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o^rais'&i'os r*ws 


THE TIMES THURSDAY NOVEMBER 27 1986 


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THE TIMES THURSDAY NOVEMBER 27 1986 


BOOKS 


Great 


Greens 


Fiona MacGarthy reviews the diary 
and Whitbread-winning life 
of the father of English nature lovers 

THE JOURNALS OF GILBERT WHITE 1751-1773 
Volume One 

Edited by Francesca Greenoak 

;J r • Century, £25 

GILBERT WHITE 

By Richard Mabey . 

Century, £14.95 


his is a good week both for recognized and Hired the feet that 


' I 2*® firc sns and the green- Gilbert White was so inspired by the 
■ fingered, with, the pubhea- random and irregular in nature 
R tion of the first volume of These reflected the unevennesses of 
The Journals of Gilbert his own existence, the “scambting 
White, the raw material for The rantipole life” dot Mulso envied. It 
Natural History of Selbome, hard on is hear tening to find White so 


the heels of Richard Matey's fine 
biography. Together these books 
alter one’s view of White decisively, 
destroying the old image of sweet, 
equable red use, the Moldy Warp the 


fey s fine receptive, prone to accident. His 
se books relationship with Seiborne itself was 
letisively, frtiriy casual His recordings are in 
of sweet, feet fantastically unmethodical, ebb- 
Warp the ing and flowing with the onrush of 


Mole of English Literature, and enthusiasms, 
replacing ft with someone much Actually, he is almost always mad 
more edjpr and neorotic, and in some about the melon. There is something 
ways quite astonishingly modem in about melons that unfailingl y de- 
his outlook. _ lights him- He aim loves the 

Perhaps Richard . Mabey goes a cucumber; but melons are his fe- 
htile far in claiming Gilbert White as vourite, and from the very early 
the father of ecology. But he had a entries in his journals, in the Garden 
modem ecologist's quiet passion for Kalendar of the 1750s, the most 



the pattern of the landscape and the enthralling references are all those to 
complicated built-in balances of the melons, which in' their wntir 
nature, and that stubbomess one sees rarefied, grotesque appearance and 
now in the new environmentalists the feats of horticulture entailed in 
walking around London in their their production are the epitome of 
Natural Shoe Go. footwear. He was Eighteenth-Century taste. There are 
certainly an early Real Food fanntifi few directly personal comments in 
with hi love of nuts and salads, Elite's journals. The formufa is 
subtle textures, intense flavours. His mostly quasi-Grientific But a strong 
fastidious Eighteenth-Century aes- sense of his character, obsessive, 
the tic, both of culinary nature and tense, and sensuous, breaks through 
nature in the landscape, links him in in the accounts of the Selbome 
a sente that u revealing and Sunnis- melon mania He constructs hot 
ing with the present day exponents of beds for melons; piles on dung; 
cuisine nature. . plants and transplants them. Cuts 

He supported the erratic. It be- them; 'eats them carefully. Makes 
came his great fixation: “1 never seea judgments. Saves the seed. 

Spot which lies much out of Levrfe ‘ . nervousness encouraged him 
but I think of -you**, wrote White’s - to make for the enclosed existence of 
great friend John Mulso. Mulso, ah., the -Hampshire village, hemmed in 
old Oxford friend and a co-<Jergy- Jitexa^ symbolically by the 
man, whoa lifelong . correspon- .network of deep gouged out lanes. 


dencowithWhi 
Mabcy’s most 


one of Richard surrounding Selbome. But once 
sable ; sources, Ihere^ Selbome turned into aplace he — 


could branch out from. And in rather 
the same way he embraced the 
formal framework of the scientific 
journal only to break free of iL In 
1768, he began compiling The 
' Naturalists Journal, a standardized 
diary foe the scientific gentleman. 
But soon his observations over- 
flowed pre-ordained columns, and 
he then began inserting his own 
blank pages too. White makes one 
reconsider the whole function of a 
diary as one watches the entries in 
his journals fining out and «r*pnring 
their own rhythm and conviction. 
The diary seems to come to be his 
way of getting through. 

“ Hirundo domesticdVT He uses 
exclamation marks for thing s that 
really thrill him like, every year, the 
reappearance of the swallow. Of all 
creatures he foods buds the most 
amusing and mysterious, and birds 
inspire his closest and fondest 
observations, the acutest of his 
■insights. Richard Mabey argues that 
White is less important for bis 
formal scientific observations, ' 
though these in themselves are by no 
-means negligible, than for this very 


sentient attitnde to nature, in which 
be seems more early Nineteenth - 
Century than Eighteenth. 

White is a man of instinct He 
studies instinct avidly, marvelling ad 
infinitum about buds’ migration 
patterns. His observational methods, 
his unorthodox attentiveness to very 
smallest details of animal behaviour, 
are shot through with emotion. 

H e is genuinely, transpar- 
ently, keen on living 
creatures, even if after, 
dissection they arrive on 
his own dinner table; and 
it is his serious longing to find echoes 
and connections which malras White 
appear so much in tune with people 
now. One of the great treats of 
Mabey’s book is turning tables and 
scrutinizing White; early on a dis- 
placed person, insecure and very 
lonely, emerging as one of the leaden 
of his circle, with his own definite 
role in the small world of horticul- 
ture, swapping seeds, exchanging 
anecdotes on how the sea kale grows. 

Some biographies work well be- 
cause the people who have written 


David Arid, hffled in the 
Hurt as “the noted literary 
sleuth”, smhs up the fife of 
Alam-Foramer (1886-1914) in 
a sentence: he was “ft country 
boy who stormed Paris, wrote 
a best-seller, and won the love 
of a famous actress.” ArkeH 
fills out the picture with a 
similar economy in his short; 
sharp biography, die fist m 
English. The best-sefler was 
leGraad Mamba, published 
the year before its author was 
killed in Wodd War I; one of 
-the great and justly famous 
novels of a d o l esce n ce, it has 
been toanshtfad into more than 
thirty fcungnages. The famous 
actress was Sanone Casfmir- 
Perier — but she was not the 
inspiration for the haunting 
Yvonne in Lt . Grand 
Meanings. 

When he was 18 Fournier 
spotted a slim Monde gill in a 
Paris -street; followed her, 
spoke to her and, until his 
death at 27, remained ob- 
sessed fay his vision of ber. He 
was a virtuoso in. nostalgia. 
The unattainable person, or 
the place he had jost left, was 
always perfection. Later in the 
year that he saw Ids Yvonne, 
he spent three months in 
England; on the point of 
returning home, he wrote: 
“Nothing w31 stop my craving, 
for their tea— When Fm back 
home, yonTI see, TV love 
everything in Engfand twice as 
much.” 

His time in England was, on 
the face of it, ongfamoroos. He 
was working for Santapori’s, 
the wallpaper people, at their 
factory in Tnmham Green, 
translating letters In fie ex- 
port department He lodged in 
Chiswick -wifi the family of 
Mr Nightingale, fie company 
secretary. WJ. Stracfaan has 
collected and translated the 
letters he wrote home. Aficio- 
nados of he Grand Meaabus 
can .see fie germ of a master- 
piece growing m bis literary 
fetters; another pleasure is to 
gfimpse London in 1905 
through fie eyes of a young 
French provincial. 

The unforgettable central 
episode in Le Grand Mamina 
is when a schoolboy, lost fa fie 
freezing wight, stiUSHes upon 
the strange ffite is the lost 
domafal — a children’s fimey- 


AOVERTCB*ENT . 

AUTHORS WANTED 
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10001 J S A ' 


Victoria 
. Glendinning 

AJLAIN-FOURNIER 
A Brief Life 
By David Arfcell . 

Caramel, £9.95 : 

TOWARDS THE 
LOST DOMAIN 
Letters from London 
1905 . 

By Henri AIsin-Fouxnier 
Edited and translated 
byW J. Stracfaan . 

Caramel, £1635 


dress party hi a magical 
chateau in die woods. The 
dream-gfrl in the lost d om a in 
was fie girl he saw fa Paris, 
and the mfitean was a real one 
in his native Sofogne. But the 
mysterious party was inspired 
by two garden fetes attended 
by young Foamier doing his 
Timtoi summer: a Congrega- 
tional Church fate and flower- 
show, and the sports-day and 
dance organized by 
Sanderson’s social cfab. Never 
before can such resolutely 
Anglo-Saxon entertainment 
have been transformed into 
sort ddkatriy Gallic fantasy. 
It’s wonderful what m agma - i 
tioa can do. 

Foamier was enchanted by 
London’s suburbia, seeing fie 
streets of ordinary Victorian 
villas as rows of tittle cha- 
teaux. He was less enchanted 
by the unspeakable and insuf- 
Orient food (fie Nightingales 
had high tea and no evening 
dinner), and dismayed by Eng- 
lish girls, even the attractive' 
ones. Accustomed to demure 
Jama filies whose remoteness 
satisfied his romantic: tem- 
perament; he found fieeasoal- 
ness and easy chatter of their 
English counterparts almost 
shocking. 

Worse stiff, Esgfisb 0ri» 
wore no corsets, which gave 
them “a loose, floppy look”, 
according to Stracfaan’s trans- 
lation. In his chapter cm fie 
London visit, AriceD quotes 
the same letter, in this version 
the lack of corsets made 
everything the girte ware look 
“too free and easy*. Con^ar- 
W otter ' renderings of 
Foonrier’s letters, * becomes 
apparent that either Strachan 
or ArkeO <or both) fa no good. 
There. are gross disparities hi 
fie translations end, once, fa 
the whole sense of an anec- 
dote Cfasete apart; yon’d have 
thought fiat' they could have - 
got together over ft. or that 
Cgrcaziet, who publish both 
hooks, arid have dose r a . 
better fiaison job. 


The sheer scale of Gladstone’s 
•political career is mind-bog- 
gling. Try, as his latest biogra- 
pher suggests, transposing the 
dates to imagine a Twentietb- 
Centmy equivalent First 
elected to Parliament in 1832, 
he finally retired in 1898, 
having been Chancellor of fie 
Exchequer fora total of almost 
ten years, and Prime Minister 
in four administrations for 
more than twelve. But— lon- 
gevity apart — the prodigious 
intensity of his personality is 
even harder for our debased 
generation to comprehend. 
The stupe n d o us physical and 
intellectual energy, fie spirrtu- 
i ai and sexual anguish, the high 
I moral seriousness which de- 
termined the use of every 
God-given minutes ofhis time 
were astonishing to his con- 
temporaries, but are almost 
literally inconceivable to us, 
raised as we are on cynicism 
and pap. If anyone can com- 
prehend him for us, however, 
it is the editor of his monu- 
mental diaries — nine vol- 
umes so far published. 

. Dr Matthew’s book is not in 
truth either a conventional 
biography or strictly new, but 
a reprint — slightly reordered 
and with two additional chap- 
ters — of bis superb Introduc- 
tions to each pair of volumes 


Bringing God 
into politics 


John Campbell 

GLADSTONE 

1809-74 

ByBLCG. Matthew 
.. Oxford. £15 


of the diary. They do demand 
a good deal of previous know- 
ledge of mid-Victorian poli- 
tics - they are preferably to be 
read- alongside Richard 
Shannon’s biography, of 
which we eagerly await the 
second volume; but it was an 
excellent idea to bring them 
together in a form accessible 
to the general reader. Within 
quite a short compass they 
form an extraordinarily com- 
prehensive commentary on 
Gladstone’s life and thought, 
lucidly explicating the almost 
overpowering religious, mor- 
al, and philosophical preoccu- 
pations which he transmuted 
so astonishingly into political 
action. 



The conviction pofftidan 
who saw it as a moral issue 

Though a supreme politi- 
cian who enjoyed the game as 
much as anyone, Gladstone’s 
political purposes were above 
all religious. Wisely dissuaded 
by his father from the clerical 
career he felt he ought to have 
followed, he devoted his life 
instead first to proving that 


Amateur 8 th Army before Monty 


Since Field Marshal Lord 
Carver wrote his Tobruk and 
El Alamdn . in the -2960s, 
much has been published 
about fie Desert War. Unfor- 
tunately, most of the authors 
have been over-influenced by 
the controversial judgements 
in John GonnelTs Auchinleck 
and Correfli Barnett’s Desert 
Generals: neither of them has 
much good to say . about 
General Sir Neal Ritchie, 
Montgomery's predecessor as 
Commander 8fi Army, who 
was trounced by Rommel in 
the disastrous battles of 
fianlh in the s li m m e r of 1042 

Neil Ritchie died in 1983, 
and his family presented his 
papers to the Imperial War 
Museum hoping, no doubt, 
that an author could be found 
to present his ride of fie story, 
which he had refused id do 
during his life time out of 
loyalty to Auchinleck. Who 
better to undertake the task 
than Lord Carver, who fought 
in most of the desert battles as 


William Jackson 

DILEMMAS 
OF THE 
DESERT WAR 
A new look 
at the 

Libyan Campaign 
1940-1942 
By Michael Carver 

Balsford, £14.95 

a commander or operational 
staff officer? His later career 
makes his judgements all the 
more important 
But a vindication of Ritchie' 
is only possible within the 
context of the whole cam- 
paign, and not just the battles 
of Gazalfa. The seeds of that 
disaster were sown by Wavell 
and watered by Auchinleck 
before Ritchie took over 8th 
Army. Dilemmas of the Desert 
War is a reassessment of the 
whole campaign, based on a 
detailed study of the War 


Diaries, and concentrates on 
what went wrong, why, and 
who was to blame. 

Mike Carver’s conclusions 
do not flatter fie British 
Army. “There was no lack of 
intention at the top to impose 
a directing intelligence and 
wifl: the trouble was the 
machine was not capable of 
producing fie results demand- 
ed of it.” In short, British 
military amateurism was no 
match for German profession- 
alism until Montgomery, the 
professional and a much less 
likeable man. took over. 

The author knew and 
served under most of the 
principal actors in the desert 
drama. AD are now dead, so be 
has been franker about them 
than he could be in his earlier 
books. They were not super- 
men, but were no better or 
worse than those who succeed- 
ed them. It takes time and 
many bitter lessons to create a 
professional army. If Mont- 
gomery had been appointed to 


8th Army earlier he would, 
probably have resolved some | 
of the desert dilemmas, but be 
might equally well have been 
sacked for recalcitrance. 

It would be nice to record 
that the Field Marshal's study 
enhances Ritchie’s reputation, 
but this is only partially so. He 
confirms fie general view that 
he was a sound, straightfor- 
ward soldier, placed in an 
impossible position by 
Auchinleck. He was 8th Army 
Commander only in name; in 
reality he was chargg 
d’affaires, not plenipotentiary. 
He should have demanded 
freedom to command 8th 
Army in his own way or 
resigned. “But he was loo 
decent, loyal and traditional a 
soldier to put his superior, 
whom be liked and admired, 
in such a difficult position.' 1 
High command in war de- 
mands more ruthless quali- 
ties. Montgomery had and 
knew how to use them. 


Will Russia 
ever be free? 
Maybe never 


them are different from their subject; 
some the opposite. Richaxd Mabey is 
an argument for the kindred spirit. 
He has had a deep rapport with 
White the man and wifi White’s 
countryside. He has done his field- 
work wifi a manic assiduity, tramp- 
ing Selborne’s sunken lanes, and 
exploring in great detail White's 
dense, luxuriant, and muddled Eng- 
lish landscape. He has eaten of toe 
melon, and it shows. 

Anyway he passes with an extreme 
rapidity that ultimate test of good 
literary biography. He leaves fie 
reader desperate to get back to the 
original; and fie newly-published 
Journals, less worked over than the 
History , are fie closest to fie basic 
Gilbert White one can approach. 
They are excellently edited and 
indexed, and to a generation so 
much inclined to wallow in Edwardi- 
an Gentlewoman’s Garden reminis- 
cence Gilbert White's observations 
are startling in their purity. There is 
no nostalgia in his view of nature. 

In these circumstances bow odd, 
and how mistaken, to have designed 
this book to be a visual pastiche. 


politics could be a godly 
pursuit at fie personal level 
(in refutation of Palmerston 
and Disraeli), more broadly to 
the reshaping of secular soci- 
ety on what he conceived to be 
moral lines. This, in his great 
sequence of Budgets of the 
1850s and 1860s. establishing 
free trade and the proper 
balance of direct and indirect 
taxation, he largely achieved. 
He conceived of his accession 
to fie Premiership in 1868 as 
the culmination of this pro- 
cess, not as a new beginning. 
Such was the inexhaustible j 
fertility ofhis mind, however, 
that bis mid-century Liberal 
synthesis contained fie seeds 
of future developments that 
he could not have dreamed of 
He himself actually retired for 
the first time in 1874, yet was 
still Prime Minister twenty 
.years later. 

And all the time he was 
reading and writing prodi- 
giously, walking great dis- 
tances, felling trees and 
translating Homer, praying 
strenuously, fathering nine 
children, “rescuing” prosti- 
tutes without fear of ridicule 
or exposure, and scourging 
himself afterwards for his sins. 
Just flunking about Gladstone 
is for a modern reader deeply 
humbling. 


Only one form of retribu ti on is 
visited upon an executioner, 
Vasily Grossman observes. 
“He ceases to be a human 
being.** To make fils spiritual 
death seem a worse slavery 
than the suffering of those 
behind barbed wire is one of 
fie man y triumphs of rtiic 
shut, poignant novel. It re- 
mains hard to see how 
Grossman could have began 
Forever Flowing in 1955 in 
Russia with any hope of ever 
seeing it published. 

Without the huge canvas of 
his masterpiece iJfe and Fate, 
this novel is a series of 
sketches linked only by fie 
return of Ivan from 30 years m 
a Siberian camp. For Ivan, fie 
change be sees in his friends is 
as appalling as any of the 
horrors be has survived. 
Among those he meets are 
those who have been scared. 
fate treachery; others whose 
envy and greed led them to 
rejoice as fie Stalinist cam- 
paign against 

“cosmopolitans” saw the bril- 
liant demoted; and others still 
who accepted what was hap- 
pening wifi vritfol blindness. 
“It was very hard to go about 
one's work knowing fiat pro- 
fessors and academicians had 
turned out to be assassins.” 
Some of the most unnerving 
scenes in the novel describe 
Kulaks dragged off their land 
on foot through mud so deep it 
dragged thm boots off; or 
whole fannies of them left to 
die of starvation wifi their 
children’s rt>«« faces inalriwg 
like dead birds. 

In most of those who es- 
caped such horrors Ivan found 
a submissive hypocrisy, which 
made them as modi a prisoner 
of their own fears as any 
brutality could have made 
them. The book is not only a 
catalogue of human evil, how- 
ever. There are people who 
remain render and gentle 
against aD reason; uncom- 
plaining, religions spirits who 
accept fie worst that can be 
done to human brings without 
losing their feeling for those 
around them. Their love has a 
Dostoevskian nobility. Yet 
Grossman explicitly recog- 
nizes, even as he delineates 
their behaviour, fie fatal link 
between the very beauty of the 
Russian soul which accepted 
Christ's gospel so ecstatically, 
and fie equally ready accep- 
tance of fils world’s flavour- 
ing. In this, his last book, 
Grossman asks his most de- 
spairing question: “When will 
Russia ever be free? Perhaps 
never.” 

Writers in fie West usually 
confront different issues; and 
many of us will fed more at 
home with Ms Schaeffer's 
elegant New York wit. The 
In fared Party draws a fanny, 
frank portrait of an obsession- 
al woman writer whose work 
habits would worry any hus- 
band. “Suppose she began an 
enormously long bode? Would 
she stay in fie house for two 
years? Would she never wear 


FICTION 


Elaine Feinstein 

FOREVER 
FLOWING 
By Vasily Grossman 

Collins HanUL £10.95 

THE INJURED 
PARTY 

By Susan From berg 

Hamish Hamilton, £10.95 

THE VOYEUR 

By Alberto Moravia 

Seeker & Warburg. £9.95 


anything but the blue 
kimooo?” Ire's ordinary be- 
haviour is modified by a spell 
in hospital into fie altogether 
surreal. She takes to her bed, 
stops talking even to ha 
children, and watches fie days 
go by, staring ont of fie 
window at trees ami sky while 
fie rest of fie household 
revolves around her. 

In this total withdrawal, she 
remains indifferent to fall 
chums upon her, until a lover 
from 20 years bock, who but 
once declared his inability to 
love her, tarns np at her door 
stricken by a mortal illness 
and bereaved of both wife and 
family. Iris’s husband, be- 
mused by his inability to cope 
with his wife’s condition, al- 
lows fie man to move into the 
family home in the hope that 
his presence wiD at least 
restore to his wife some wish 
for communication. His plan 
succeeds rafter better than he 
hoped. About human relation- 
ships at once absurd and edgy, 
Ms Schaeffer is both humane 
and wise. Yet the effect of the 
novel, finally, is dose to 
haUmdnataon, far all fie accu- 
rate dafogne and precise ob- 
servation of place and weather. 
Something fa the story itself 
has the fed of a fairy tale. 

Moravia bis always been a 
subtle master of tire erotic in 
all Its perversity. Yet this 
fastidiously dever study of a 
son's perennial rivalry wifi 
his bed-ridden bat still potent 
father is cnrioasly 
Hninvofring. We are made 
helplessly into voyeurs our- 
selves by Moravia's Insistence 
on letting us see the shape of 
events to come before fie 
narrator discovers them. 
There is no surprise in finding 
ont either the tone reason for 
his wife’s leaving home or tire 
name of her lover, once a 
childhood memory of parental 
love-making has been pvt 
together wifi fie wife's de- 
scription of her own sexnal 
behaviour. Perhaps fie novel 
would have made more sense if 
It had tamed ont to be only 
fantasy, or even, as the poem 
of Baudelaire so loved by the 
narrator and given body in the 
real world, almost supernatu- 
ral. But Moravia's intentions 
appear to be more clinical than 
poetic. 






Books for Christmas 

In The Times on Saturday our critics will pick the books they 
enjoyed most during the year, from fiction to poetry, 
and biography tothrillers; there will be round-ups of the 
jolliest books of the year on wine and wit, and for children 


Take out a year's subscription to The 
Times Higher Education Supplement . . 
and we will also send a free copy of ' 

the hardback edition of The Longman 
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St. John's Lana. London EC1 M 4BX 


neer’s 

tastic’ 


ran 


d mechanical en- 
int fie £8,000 he 
ile Portfolio Gold 
yesterday to good 

date my gramo- 
ase my donation 
i hall appeal and 
f next year,” Mr 
od, of AJlestoee, 

aged 51. who has 
juo Gold since it 
t Times, said that 
believe bis luck, 
t is fantastic. It is 
•fence.” 

fold cards can be ' 
cpjirimg a stain- 
si envelope to: 
fold. 



rd Wood 

ger of 

itives 

beer 

bin Young 

used in brewing 
a drinkers and, in 
s, even kill them, 
m for Real Ale 
today. 

in the cam p ai gn '* 
What's Brewing, 
• Protz. a former 
Good Beer Guide, 
»p!e who have 
other breathing 
anus disorders, 
r who are allergic 
sals, can suffer ill 
IrinJang beers in 
ves have been 
produce a foamy 
clarity, or to 

ited States, - the- 
more than 40 
of heart attacks 
rowers used co- 
2 in beer to 
naming bead. 

couple 

[>peal 

Herman couple 
cars last July for 
seeking reduc- 
entences. ' 
y Lord Lane, 
istice, will pre- 
pplications by 
Sonja Schulze, 

, for leave to 
the sentences 
fr Justice Mi- 
at the Central 
L 


®r 







m or storage 
JbaUy shows 
Space Heater 


Mffltatte* 

.1875/78. 


x 3%* high 
•x3V&"high 


| St John's L 


iSmmuj. 1 1 




‘ V. - 







THE TIMES 
DIARY 


Party 

lines 


Tin: TTMF 5 : THURSDAY NOVEMBER 27J38tL. 

Kinnock’s US conundrum 

innock will fly to the Smooth talk or fi ghting stan ce on defence^ gj-jj gygf-wi 

SSfijSSfiJ Bnhin Oakley. Poli tical Editor, before 

SeTi" snells out the Washington alternatives 

ire emphasjzing Kjnnock s -E " commitment to spend more^on 

experience^ Ubour’s ^ erisbed Britain has a defence overall? H~ 


mi 


Ronald Butt 


Ndl Kinnock will fly to the 
United Sates this weekend on a 
mission which could prove crucial 
to L abour’s hopes of returning to 
power. As the election nears, the 
Tories are emphasizing Kinnocks 
lack of experience and labours 
unilateralist defence policy. Both 
factors will be under close scrutiny 
throughout his trip. 

Kinnock’s attempts so tar to 
build up his international (and 


Labour imposes 
a new taboo 


nt;\v 7 


^ any Nato ally bad token toe crimed Brinmh^a d»i«be- ^'^would^ 

convcadocal detoe and, dftt “.ntos in bis pany who jto 




av-5S5 


SSSoC? Labour Party may 

SSF.EStS SS3S3S3SlSSif^S£ SSSOsSS 


want peace. But I th^thepo&e 
are bent on war". Lord Scarman, 
impeccably liberal on manm 

concerned with rac^ has mKl 

(concerning Lambeth s ^y can ot 


.b-l 

*■ rd 


Richard Perie, angered 


the ability to counter a. altogether, given max mere ~ ~f elecl0 ia! 

Pact. advance with a ^e Mu*?™) tfS>l 


that extreme political 


ir^Ok, 


general, tells me that the party’s 
Whitehall HQ is getting crossed 
telephone lines to Conservative 
Central Office. For several weeks, 
he says, staff have been picking up 
their receivers only to find them- 
selves party to conversations be- 
tween Central Office and Tory 

- constituency branches. All the 
more odd, if true, since the two 
headq uarter* are not on the same 
exchange. Bryceson hints darkly 
that some of the information he 
h ps picked up would embarrass 
the Tories if made public. Is a 
sym pathize r at British Telecom 

- playing dirty tricks, or are the 

- Liberals the object of a hoax? 


Riposte 


1 Robot Maxwell is to publish an 
! instan t book on his libel victory 
' over Private Eye called Malice in 
! Wonderland. He is also bringing 
j out a one-off magazine called Not 

- Private Eye r consisting of 

\ ” contributions by “many who have 

• suffered from Lord Gnome’s 

i hatchet men". Incredibly, the 

• book looks as if it will be on the 
shelves by next week. A statement 

; signed by “Not Lord Maxwell” 
’• ‘.said the magazine, out in two 
; weeks’ rime, would sell for 50p. 

■ This is half the price of the Eye’s 


\ . special £1 glossy issue, which it 
i - hopes will raise funds to help pay 
J . the costs and damages of the trial. 
* I wonder which will sell the most? 


he went to Greece and gave away 
the Elgin marbles, he went to India 
and gave away Britain’s immigra- 
tion laws; what would this man 
not give away in his eagerness to 
impress if he ever became prune 
minister? Here is a man, the 
implication goes, that you courtd 
not trust to stand eyeball to eyeball 
with Gorbachov or to ensure 

Britain’s adequate defence. 

Kinnock’s last vist to the Ub 
was not entirely successful. He 
had a celebrated row with George 
Shultz over Central America and 
told the press that the usually 
equable Secretary of State had 
“got out of his pram" — a remark 
later translated as “Mr Shultz had 
departed from his normal dip- 
lomatic calm”. . 

perhaps on that occasion it 
suited Kinnock’s party needs to 
show his macho qualities in 
dealing with the Americans. But 
he must play a more sophisticated 
game this time, since be is 
presenting himself as a possible 
prime minister. 

Selling the Americans the no- 
tion of a non-nuclear Britain will 
be almost impossible. Kinnock is 
pledged to scrap Polaris, can™ 
Trident and close down US 
nuclear bases in Britain. It would 
be the most dramatic switch in 
British policy for 40 years, the first 


Nato and lead to the Uo 
withdrawing into a Fortress Amer- 
ica isolationism. Denis Healey 
denounced them for acting in 
collusion with the Tones. But 
when Kinnock tried to .dismiss 
their intervention as having been 
disowned by the White House, 
Charles Price, the US ambassador, 
bluntly corrected him. 

Kinnock’s hope of selling his 
policies at least to the Democrats 
has been dashed recently as those 
who have come to London to meet 
him have warned him with equal 
fervour that his policies, would be 
catastrophic for the alliance ami 
would sunder the transatlantic 
special relationship. 

Few Americans follow British 
politics in detail, but as Kinnock 
appears on TV chat shows and 
interviews over the next week they 
will be disappointed to find that 
the man they have vaguely heard 
of as a moderate battling to free 
his party from left-wing extremists 
is offering what they regard as a 
backward and left-wing defence 
policy. 

So how does he hope to con- 
vince the Americans? Kinnock 
concedes that he will make few 
converts. But he does hope for an 
understanding of Labour’s aims. 
He wilt argue that an impov- 


bdieves would be launched. 

Labour, he will say, is not 
abandoning defence but the un- 
necessary and unusable nuclear 
force in order to maximize our 
conventional deterrent against a 
conventional war in Europe, hav- 
ings from Trident will go on more 
conventional arms. 

Kinnock will have to answer 
some questions about Labour's 
plans. He says that he iqwts 

America’s nuclear umbrella. But 

Denis Healey says that as long as 
Britain remains in Nato we are 
protected against Soviet nuclear 
blackmail by the American 
deterrent. Is Kinnock only ruling 
out the first use of nuclear 
capons on our behalf or is he 
ruling out their use in all cncum- 
stanceS? 

If he is saying he wants no 
midear shield for Britain s forces 
in Germany, is that not laying 
them open as a softer target than 
the rest for any Soviet advance? 

What access would the Uh tie 
given to their bases if it came to a 
Would he then relent, or 
surrender? What, by his defi- 
nition, qualifies as a nuclear base: 
one with nuclear weapons stock- 
piled or one capable of use by 
nuclear-armed aircraft? How 


to abandoniKkey^uclear role? 


10 aoanuuu iw ««./ . f 

Labour has been a little shorten 
transatlantic contacts once <ue 
exodus to the SDP hot J 
Gilbert, Dick Douglas. Bruce 

reprocessing to'Ie “antHadsT p«»cmw*s. 

^iSoh^o^Robatsoa, in his constiu^ncy. And what of Haringey? Rafley . 

men, keep um» ujw- nmara R^f this week he has repneu w . _*■ th _ —homosexual prop- 

Ba 5 ry M J rtX’ CTNeiJ, who spent Tory ministers’ lo !S Sanda” being fed to sJroot 

Labor’s intoterm^l^^ 

sj&fiSS gSisgafi 

SSStonstotoPtoty 

SSSSSfl %SB£5ES 

be “incipient” 

“so^KtoC, despite his ^ 

i-h^n does have a hard time in baffle Why indeed do people return a 

SSmca on this trip there, is workkbi party which so hlatantiy misrepre- 

SS'5M32fgfflSS MSgSSS 

British politics should Wash- Ridley, the Ea councils humourless intellectual fanatics, 

£££ appear to be threatening «tary filing some socalted. mod- 

Sreconsequences in the event ofa he had w,. black erates, and ordimry people is v^. 

asrassass sr sr&s&g 

the Reagan administration pursue takes i ofintoiSmire' tf wsa “lamentable” feelthat 
its offensive against the Sandimsta attack the politic of mtole^oen of people left school with 

SrHiC the Contra £T 01 UdTSS they dmttkl be 

sorters in Washington have However «treimsta bora^ ^ ^ -street language”, 

wnstSl In the White House authority, jf^wack w^ he went on to exemplify 

^ tho w*iipf that the rebels be mentioned if there ~Kch hv us ing orobabhr the 


their known dBUKe ootitical parties in this country.” 




nmmeessina workers of fiellafiekl 


Much thesamcappfi« to Brat, 
which Ridley also menti oned, and 
whose offences arc not resulted 
to its “anti-radsT peraeemrao. 
And what of Haringey? Ridky 
spoke of the “homosexua l prop - 
a®nda“ being fed to sdtod- 


protests arc broshed asnle. 
Cunningham ts in a Pn °I a. 
dflenma here siiwe a great deal erf 


DCHHI nuj, » 

that bad, they had_b«n 

inpmitHl maiontKS by mack 


Unmerited 

• I would not have expected the old 
- boy network to have much rele- 
. vance for the SDP. but perhaps I 


. am mistaken. A candidate rnter- 
: .viewed recently for the post of 

• pnsss officer was taken aback when 

1 MP Ian Wriggiesworih. as an 
■ opener, barked “What’s your 
; school?”. On hearing the answer 
1 - (an obscure Catholic college, as it 
; happens) Wriggiesworih appeared 

* ~ to lose all enthusiasm. 


41 Overheard in the Commons: 
Clare Short and Tony Benn 
* discu ssing Mrs Thatcher’s recent 
j»iaim that die Conservatives mil 
destroy socialism within two de- 
cades. “Only if Nefi Kinnock 
doesn’t do it first,” said Bean. 


All-time Greats 

• Oxford University examines re- 

. . main more or less in tune with me 

’ trends of youth judging by this 
year’s entrance examination gen- 
eral paper. One question con- 
!’ denied Bob Gddof s Live Aid and 

• another asked candidates to con- 
1 -sider the more profound implica- 
1 tions of the Bruce Springsteen 

• lyric “Is a dream a lie, if it don l 
; come true, or is it something 

• worse?” The question then asks: 

’ “Are our unfiilfillable hopes and 

■ aspirations dishonest? If so, in 

• what ways and to whom?” A tough 
*, ' one. Sixteen-year-old Sarah Lyons 

■ from Surbiton, who sat the exam 
I this week, tells me she chose notto 

• answer this question because 7> l 
! was too abstract.” A university 

• spokeswoman points out that “it 
. -illustrates that philosophical prob- 
; lems crop up everywhere ” 


i .Deja vu 

: .Behind-the-scenes nail biting on 

• the fust night of The Women at 
i the Old Vic this week. Guest of 

honour for the 50th anniversary 
- production of the Broadway (»ro- 
; edy, which is about gossiping high 

• society New York ladies, was the 

: author, 83-year-old Clare Boothe 

■ Luce. Unfortunately she got stuck 

t ' in the traffic and the start was 
. "delayed for 10 minutes. But the 

■ anxiety of production staff and 

^ — including S usann a h York, 

• Georgina Hale and Maria Aitken 
\ — was unfounded. “You sbouldn t 

■ have bothered,” said Mrs Luce on 

! arriving. “I’ve seen it hundreds of 

• times already” . 


BARRY FANTONI 

/ — jaQMTKAMeL' 


As reverberations of the Reagan 
administration’s adventure m 
Iran continue to shake Wash- 
ington. the punch-drunk leaders ol 
the Nicaraguan Contras must 
wonder what further disasters can 
overtake them. It is barely a week 
since Eugene Hasenfus, the 
American gun-runner, was con- 
victed by a Sandinista court after a 
trial that blew the cover off the 
clandestine (possibly illegal) US 
network which had been supply- 
ing them with much-needed arms 
and ammunition. That alone was 
enough to ensure that the newly 
elected Democratic majority in 
both houses of Congress would 
take a lot more convincing about 
the wisdom of voting for farther 
financial asssistance to the rebels. 

At the same time, although the 
first instalments of the $100 mil- 
lion in US aid that President 
Reagan won from Congress earlier 
this year were at last beginning to 
flow, the Contras had to dem- 
I onstrate their worth on the battie- 
field against a much superior 
enemy. When Sandinista forces 
began softening up their base 
camps in Honduras last month, 
morale slumped. In private, prom- 
inent Contra officials would con- 
cede that they needed a good break 

as never before. . 

What they got, instead, is tne 
rough end of the worst scandal to 
engulf the Reagan White House. 
With the ignominious sacking ot 
ihe National Security Councils 
Colonel Oliver North they have 
lost a supreme fixer, the man at 
the centre of a web of strategically 
placed sympathizers who could 
arrange an airdrop of Kalashnikov 
rifles inside Nicaragua with a 
couple of telephone calls. 

Even worse, the President who 
once hailed the Contras as “free- 
dom fighters” in the heroic mould 
of America’s founding fathers » 
today seen distancing himsell 
from the murkier aspects of the 
Nicaraguan operation with all 
possible baste. 

So where do the Contras go 
from here? That $100 million is 
not going to last long, especially if 
they really do intend to stand and 
fight the Sandinista army (some- 
thing which their most loyal US 
advisers consider would be court- 
ing disaster). . 

Their leaders are wise enough to 
! understand that when the dust 
finally settles on the Iranian 
, fiasco, their cause may well have 
}• been damaged beyond repair. The 
implications of that rang? rar 
beyond official Washington, rais- 
“ ing questions of deep concern to 
all Nicaragua’s neighbours. 

1 In Honduras, the Contras’ mam 


PhBip Jacobson on what the Colonel North 
affair means for Reagan’s chief crusade 




Americans win havenottcedthe 

inordinate amount ofKmnoctrs 
party conference speech this year 
devoted to an assault on US 
policies in Nicaragua and H 
Salvador, a dear swaying before 
the wind of Labour’s anti— Ameri- 
can streak. . - 

So if Kinnock. despite fas 
charm, does have a hard tune in 
America on this trip there is 
always the possibility ofa reaction 
against American interference ui 
British notifies should Wash- 


and white electors ahte. Mcy^ 
reply that some were elected by 
only 20 per cent is no . answe r. 
Whv indeed do people return a 
party which so blatantly misrepre- 
sents them? . . 

The gap between Labours 


British politics should Wash- 
ington appear to be threatening 
dire consequences in the event ota 
Labour government. He might oe 
obliged to drop the charm and try 
the macho approach once again. 


Is the Contra 
cause sunk 
beyond saving? 



A Contra on watch at a camp on the Ho^ra^s bordeT. But 
how many more anti-aircraft missiles will the US snpfi/ 

stronghold, they have »me 15,000 ^without - W 


men under arms, considerably 
more (and considerably better 
equipped) than their hosts. To the 
unconcealed alarm of the Hon- 
duran authorities, these forces 
have already established their own 
no-go zone - “Nueye Nicaragua 
to the locals — in the coffee 
growing border region, attracting 
increasingly heavy Sand in ista at- 
tacks on an area of major im- 
portance to the Honduran 
economy. . 

Earlier this year, a CIA omoal 
intimately involved with the 
rebels in Honduras admitted that 
the possibility of their taking root 
there permanently, defying the 
government to move them, was “a 
nightmare for all of us.” But what 
happens if the beleaguered Reagan 
administration decides to give up 
the Contras as -part of its da m a ge 
limitation exercise? What do you 
do with so many trained fighters. 


undoubtedly harbour a burning 
sense of having been abandoned 
by Uncle Sam? . 

The Contra ranks contain de- 
cent and disciplined volunteers 
who genuinely believe that the 
Sandinistas have grossly betrayed 
the popular revolution against the 
Somoza dictatorship. But the 
rebels’ record of behaviour inside 
Nicaragua, even allowing for San- 
dimsta propaganda, includes ev- 
idence of rape, torture, 
a ssa s s ination of doctors, teachers 
and local officials and random 
attacks on civilian transport. 
similar allegations of brutality 
and extortion are now surfacing 
inside the Contra enclaves m 
Honduras. They would not be 
welcome elsewhere. 

If the US does eventually decide 
to drop the Contras and contrives 
to resettle them in peaceful ob- 
scurity here and there, how will 


been split. In the White House i 

there was the belief that the rebels 

might one day actually overthrow 1 
the ruling comandantes ; resulting < 
in an acceptably pro-wKtern gov- i 
eminent. Other US officials m- \ 
volved with the programme raw 

the Contras as an extremely useful 

(and inexpensive) lever with 
which to exert the combination of 
■military, economic and t dip- 
lomatic pressure that would fi- 
nally Force the Sandinistas to 
mend their Marxist ways. 

This second approach had the 
advantage of underlining the 
Reagan administration’s repeated 
public disavowal of deeper US 
involvement in Nicaragua. But 
one western ambassador in Hon- 
duras observes, “if you take the 
Contras out of the equation, all 
•that’s left are the various airfields 
the Americans have been breaking 
their necks to build here. You 
don't have to be a Sandimsta 
supporter to wonder what hap- 
pens to all those runways Pitting 
at Nicaragua.” He wondered if the 
US would now attempt to involve 
Honduras’s own armed forces 
more directly in the struggle with 
its powerful neighbours. , 

Others wonder if there is sail a 
possibility of direct intervention 
by the US. Back in March, 
President Reagan told Time 
magazine that despite his firm 
intention to keep Amen can troops 
out of the conflict, “there might 
come a day when Sa n d ini sta acts 

would be directly against us. . . It 
would then be a case of protecting 
ourselves.” Well before the Iran 
arms scandal erupted, there were 
experienced western diplomats in 
Central America who found thenv- 
selves sharing the Sandinistas 
concern that the _ President s 
apparent determination to excise 
the “cancer" in Nicaragua could 
produce some drastic action by 
the US before his term expires at 
the end of 1987. . 

None of this speculation will 
interest Contra leaders as they 
grapple with the depressing im- 
plications of the drama now 
pinfo lding in Was hingto n- When it 
came to US aid, _ critics always 
accused them of being much more 
interested in paddi n g^ their own 
bank accounts than in fighting. 
Fitting, perhaps, that the first 
official comment foam rebel head- 
quarters on this, extraordinary 
■ affair should have been a com- 
\ plaint that for all the millions of 
dollars involved, they had only 
i received “a trickle of the money ” 


leader (which there is m only three 
of the six or seven boroughs 
named by Ridley) or a large black 
population. . 

That seems to cover mtsdeeas 
which have nothing to do with 
race or racism. Thus, enticing 
the performance of Lambeth s 
social services, Ridley cited some 
items from a recent full Lambeth 
council meeting, “Petition against 
the attendance of male counctuore 
at meetings of Women s Rights 
Committee", “Addrera by Sinn 
Fein Councillors,” and “Lesbians 
and Policing." Not unreasonably 
he added: “No wonder the ser- 
vices in Lambeth are in a mess. 
He rightly spoke too of peoples 
reluctance to speak out for fear of 
what might happen to their fam- 
ilies, though he did not. mention 
Lambeth’s 20 Hetero-sexism 
Awareness Training Courses (cost 
£12,000) for rooting out the 
“oppression” of assuming that 
heterosexuality is the norm. 

None of these has anything to 
do with racism. Yet because 
Lambeth has a black leader, Ms 
Linda Bellos (who also happens to 

he a militant feminist, lesbian and 

a hard leftist), they are now 
unmentionable. One of Beflos s 
p pms (not referred to by Ridley) 
was: “The people of Brixton only 


spoken to in “street language , 
which he went on to exemplify 
with relish by using probably foe 

filthiest language ever heard m the 

Commons. . . 

But while this may be the 
frn g yia g e of the barrack room or 
the factory floor, where it is 
deperso nalized ami usually un- 
related to the realities of sex, it is 
not the language 'that any de cent ■ 
working-class man or woman uses 
or wishes to have used to their 
families. Abse, a master of the 
living, dich^ wants to explode the 
Tunbridge Wdls taboos. But these 
taboos, rooted in dementaoy good 
sense and hygiene, are no less and 

perhaps more real to decent 
working-class people. _ 

So why do so many people vote 
for a party which, in ns 
humourless intolerance and bogus 
intellectualism, so ill represents 
them, a party, moreover; which 




* M O_.fi 
'.J- - 


MRGOKrSU’l 


offers them only dependency? The 
answer is simple- They vote fora 

brand name once associated won 

the defence of their collective 
interest in hard times when they 
felt exploited by those with power 
and money. We shall not have a 
healthy political society until the 
attachment to that brand namcis 
broken, and woririnfrdass people 
are convinced that other parties 
will better defend their material 
interests and their freedom. 


Paul Pickering 


Wising up to 
Christmas 


The intelligent way to control MI5 



‘We’ve got Poindexter’s number, 
amigo. It’s is a Swiss bank’ 


■ Over their heads 


’- After meeting armadillos from 
-Texas and Maoris from New 
Zealand at the World Travel 
Market in London this week, I 
bumped into a Korean tiger. Not 
‘ -the real thing, of course, but a boy 
. in a furry orange and black sttiped 
‘'suit named Hodori who is the 
official mascot for the 1988 Seoul 
: Olympics. I thought there were no 
tigers in Korea. But Chang Hyo 
‘ Kang, UK director of the South 
.Korean tourist office, tells me 
■ there are plenty, although they are 
' rarely seen because most hide m 
- the no-man’s land of the de- 
militarized zone. This long, nar- 
row strip separating North and 
South Korea has become, quite 
fortuitously, a wild life paradise. 

PHS 


Nothing could have more power- 
falty rekindled our national fas- 
cination with the world of spies 
and spy-catching than the block- 
buster now into its second week in 
the New South Wales Supreme 
Court. 

Not surprisingly, opposition 
politicians — some giving the 
impression that they are ready to 
disregard or are even unaware of 
the requirements of national sec- 
urity — gleefully seize on the 
government’s discomfiture. The 
clamour crows for a much greater 
degree of parliamentary control 
over the security services. In- 
evitably, these demands are led-by 
the opposition parties but voices, 
are also being heard on the 
Conservative benches suggesting 
tha t the services would be better 
managed if they were subject to 
much closer scrutiny by Par- 
liament or at least by an all-party 
group of senior pariiamemanans. 

Control of intelligence services 
is a difficult issue for all democ- 
racies, but it seems to give us 
particular problems. Even allow- 
ing for the current ructions to 
Washington, Americans generally 
approach it with a breathtaking 
openness. Public and political 
opinion in other European coun- 
tries manag es a cynical acceptance 
of it as a routine feature of 
international relations. In Britain 
there has long been pressure from 
politicians out of office for a 
degree of supervision of — and 


often a reduction in — the activ- 
ities of the security services. But, 
once in office, they have always 
taken a different view. 


Soon after he became prime 
minis ter in 1945 Clement Attlee 
launched a review of the intdli- 
cence services but was persuaded 
of the need for MIS and MI 6 as 
then constituted. The question 
then to be decided was how to 
exert adequate political control 
without seriously impairing their 
operational efficiency. The nature 
of the work of the security services 
means that their relationship to 
minis ters and accessibility to par- 
liamentary scrutiny must be fun- 
damentally different from, that 
say, of the DHSS, the Home Office 
or even the Ministry of Defence. A 
certain distance is essential; min- 
isters and services alike would be 
inhibited by detailed control 


A careful compromise was 
worked out and emerged as the 
Maxwell Fyfe directive, issued by 
the then Home Secretary to the 
Director-General of the Security 
Service in 1952. The essence of the 
mechanisms then esta blishe d that 
“Ministers do not concern them- 
selves with the detailed informa- 
tion which may be obtained by the 
Security Service in particular 
cases, but are furnished with such 
information only as be 
necessary for the determination of 
any issue on which guidance is 
sought." 


The Maxwell Fyfe rules have 
survived to this day because the 
essentials of what made sense m 
1952 have remained sensible. 

No one could deny that 
Britain's intelligence services have 
had serious troubles since the war 
— ' but would things have been 
better under a system of all-party 
monitoring? Most of the moles 
discovered years ago have long 
since gone to their maker, to 
Moscow or to Home Counties 
retirement — yet their names are 
replayed again and again as part of 
an unremitting attack on our 
security arrangements. It is a well- 
established intelligence technique 
to cause problems for a rival 
service by keeping alive stories 
about penetration and moles in 
high places and one in which the 
KGB must certainly be well 
practised. MI5 too must suffer 
Sum the paradox that the more 
moles they catch, the more their 
service comes under fire. 

The security service failures 
which have occurred are an argu- 
ment for better management and 
better recruitment rattier man 
closer parliamentary scrutiny. 
One immediate and highly 
damaging effect of a move in the 
latter direction would be that the 
intelligence agencies of other 
countries would become deeply 
reluctant to co-operate with their 
British counterparts. Yet, particu- 
larly in these days of international 
terrorism, co-operation between 


security agencies has never been 
more important 
Last year Mrs Thatcher dem- 
onstrated the need to improve the 
management of MIS when she 
persuaded Sir Antony Duff to 

become Director-General. Duff is 

admirably equipped for the job 
but is already well past retiring age 
and I believe more changes are 

needed. The Cabinet Secreory, Sir 

Robert Armstrong, for whose 
current ordeal in Sydney I have 
the greatest sympathy, is unlikely 
to provide support in this. He is 
possessed of ruthless urbanity in 
large measure but his lack of the 
sort of political fed that is needed 
was all too painfully demonstrated 

by his handling of the GCHQ 
affair and the top salaries in- 
creases in 1985. 

The best way forward would 
probably be to adopt the proposal 
ofmy parliamentary colleague, Sir 
Anthony Kershaw, who has sug- 
gested that the Director-Gtnettd 
of MI5 should be assisted by a 
permanent watchdog committee, 
probably timiiar to that which 
already exists within the Foreign 
Office. Such an arrangement 
would not satisfy opposition ap- 
petites or parliamentary egos but 
it -might well give us- a better 
security service. 

Ray Whitney 

The author is Conservative MPfar 
Wycombe. 

©Ttaea Newspaper!, UU, 


My inclination to dive for cover 1 
during Christmas party season i 
was clearly shared by a girl at the i 
first 1986 office thrash I attended : 
the other evening. She was wear- i 
ing a complete nuclear, biological 
and chemical warfare protective 
uniform. “My boy friend’s at 
Sandhurst, it was his idea,” she 
giggled breathlessly, tearing off the 
gas mask. “Better safe tharr sorry.” 

Soon after she passed out from 
beat exhaustion on a sofa. As a 
precaution it seemed a little 
excessive, but then all this Love, 
Peace on Earth and Goodwill can 
seriously damag e your health and 
happiness. 

Love, if we are to believe the 
scare statistics, will lake, more than 
its irenfll toll this year. That does 
not necessarily mean that the 
much-publicized grim reaper lurks 
behind the slinky black dress of 
pretty Mrs Spangle from Accounts 
or the sharp Hep worth suit of Mr 
Thrope from Marketing. But they 
have good grounds to fear their 
customary Yuletide tryst behind 
the filing cabinets. 

So instead of going straight into 
their third-Liebfraiimilch clinch, 
and their separate ways when the 
MD calk time, they are more 
likely to start agonizing about 
their respective states of health. 
An hour or two of such intimate 
earnestness can only have one. 
consequence: come June two bro- 
ken homes in the suburbs, Mrs 
Spangle becomes Mrs Thrope and 
chaos reigns in Accounts. 

While Love can end in the 
divorce court. Goodwill usually 
leads to the casualty ward. The 
scenario is grimly familiar. Mr 
Thrimble with the nervous twitch 
from Soft Toys has been passed 
over for promotion by bright 
Yuppie Mr G Khan. After a few 
drinks the more Mr Thrimble tries 
to exude a spirit of benign 
fellowship towards Mr G Khan 
the more he wants to murder him. 
Finally they crash in a hail of fists 
through a partition wall where the 
post room boys are sniffing type- 
writer correction fluid. Goodwill 
then causes the luckless inebriate 
who decides to chauffeur them to 
hospital to lose his driving licence. 

But for a really seething at- 
mosphere of hatred and distrust 
you have to await the arrival of 
Santa Ckuis. One thing is certain 
about a man who dresses up in a 


white woolly brard and cheery red 
costume — he is deeply sick and 
twisted. At hospital parties Sana 
is always the surgeon with the 
highest on-table kill rate. Venal 
politicians, power-mad indus- 
trialists and psychopathic colonels 
love disguising themselves as the 
jolly old soul when they are the 
very last people you would let 
down your chimney or into a 
child’s bedroom. 

Publishing parties are usually 
packed with vicious Santas; an 
with. East European accents and 
questionable pasts, doing their 
best to ensure that Peace on Emm 
will not ensue. 

Nor will Peace on Earth oe 
reflected in this year’s decorative 
paraphernalia. Thanks to Chern- 
obyl, East German mistletoe will 
probably glow in the dark and a 


bottle of Finnish cranberry sauce 
could orovide sufficient Alumina- 


could provide sufficient Alumina- 
tion -to go carol singing by. 
Rudolph the Red Nosed Reindeer 
is so radioactively co ntamin a t ed 
that, besides pulling Santas 

sledge, experts at Sellafiekl bdieye 

he could provide the electricity 
needs of a small town; as long as 
no one fives there. 

Perhaps they have the right idea 

in Liverpool and certain London 
boroughs, such as Brent and 
Hackney where the office end-of- 
term romp is being suppressed as 
racist and imperialist by gangs of 
anti-Santas, or Santamstas. “Ba- 
sically what is really disgusting is 
the displaying of Odinist fascist 
symbols such as Christmas trees 
and. Yule logs,* 1 said War Against 
Xmas spokesperson Gloria Car- 
rion. “We want the scualled 
parties ended now and the money 

sent to Nicaragua via Iraq and the 

North Pole.” . 

Quite apart from the danger of 
ligh tni n g Santanista raids there is 
the cheap plonk 'laced with anti- 
freeze and the deadly smoked eel 
and sausages from the poisoned 
upper Rhine, not to mention the 
loud and lethal bore who knows 
the connection between the West- 
land affair . Ml 5. the photogenic 
wife of a former Cabinet minister 
and a kinky leathergoods manu- 
facturer in Petticoat Lane. 

All in all, the safety and 
tranquility of an army standard 
issue nuclear, biological and 
chemical warfare protective suit 
could be a sound investment 


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THE TIMES THURSDAY NOVEMBER 27 1986 




r u ^ V 0 | 



LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


1 Pennington Street, London El 9XN Telephone; 01-481 4100 


A NEW TEAM NEEDED 


Nowhere to go for mentally ill 

From the Chairman of the Society in many parts of the col 


The prospect now feeing the 
work! is of three years of 
indecision in American for- 
eign policy — two years of 
paralysis under President 
Reagan and one year of learn- 
ing the ropes under his 
successor Already weak, Mr 
Reagan's presidency could be 
reduced to an almost catatonic 
state by the Poindexter-North 
debacle. The combination of 
.financial irregularity, secrecy, 
illegality and Boys Own adven- 
turism looks likely to keep 
Congressional committees and 
the networks happily engaged 
in raking over the scandal for 
man y months to come. The 
normal business of govern- 
ment will be hindered as 
leading officials are forced 
perpetually to deal defensively . 
with new charges. Experienced 
middle-rank: officials will now 
be looking, for lucrative law 
positions outside the Admin- 
istration and able potential 
replacements will avoid the 
becalmed ship. In such 
ci rcumstanc es it is all but 
impossible to muster the sup- 
port needed to launch major 
new policies and difficult 
enough to maintain conten- 
tious policies that. are already 
in place. 


finale and even wicked. Yet, 
whatever its faults, the policy 
was designed to deal with the 
real problem of a highly- 
militarised Sandinfsta re gim e 
which was promoting guerrilla 
insurgencies in neighbouring 
states. Now that the US at- 
tempt to obstruct such insur- 
gencies by destabilising 
Nicaragua is almost certain to 
be abandoned, Honduras, H 
Salvador, Costa Rica and even 
Guatemala may soon fed the 
combined beat of subversion 
and pressure from Managua. 


agreement. Here the risk is 
that Mr Reagan, desperate for 
a political success in these 
conditions of policy paralysis, 
might offer major concessions 
to obtain an arms agreement 
along the dangerously utopian 
lines of Reykjavik. Dangerous 
in itself such an agreement 
would also split Europe from 
America 


At first glance, superpower 
relations will be less directly 
affected by the week’s events. 
But Mr Reagan's bargaining 
clout in the Reykjavik summit 
and elsewhere was markedly 
increased by his domestic 
popularity and evident sway 
over Congress. The Soviet 
Union had a particular interest 
in reaching an arms control 
agreement with a popular 
right-wing President since that 
would minimise domestic 
American opposition to it But 
Mr Reagan's popularity and 
political sway are now both 
much reduced. 


The' accusation that money 
was channelled to the Contras 
against Congressional wishes 
has doomed any future moves 
to aid them. The Contras have 
thus been assured that they 
face death and imprisonment 
with no prospect of ultimate 
victory. Most will drift quietly 
away and those who remain 
will decline to the status of 
regional bandits. 


That will not greatly distress 
most European governments 
which regard United States 
support for the Contras as 


In that lie two opposite 
risks. Since Mr Reagan has less 
to offer, Mr Gorbachov may 
now decide it will do no harm 
to wait out the President's 
remaining term. That would 
dictate sticking firmly to the 
condition that the “Star Wars” 
Strategic defence initiative be 
abandoned as part of any arms 
deal. Stalemate would then 
result — which would have the 
added attraction for die Rus- 
sians that Congress might 
respond by cutting appropri- 
ations for SDI over the 
President’s objections. 

Even such a stalemate, how- 
ever, is preferable to a flawed 


This pessimistic outlook is 
not, of course, certain. One of 
the assumptions underlying it 
is that President Reagan has 
suffered a large and permanent 
fell in popular esteem. If that 
should prove false. Congress, 
the media and rebellious 
bureaucrats would have to 
mute their opposition to his 
policies. It is difficult to see 
Contra aid surviving even 
then, but he might be able to 
patch up a new Middle East 
initiative or muster support 
for a judicious arms control 
offer. He will not improve 
matters by the remedies, 
fashionable though they axe, of 
vesting all conduct of foreign 
policy in the State Department 
or of extending congressional 
control over the National Sec- 
urity Council. Ultimate con- 
trol of foreign policy under the 
American Constitution rests 
with the President who will 
always end up relying upon 
trusted advisors dose to hand 
rather than upon a remote 
bureaucracy responsible to an- 
other major politician with, 
'perhaps, an agenda of his own. 


It is not measures but men 
whom President Reagan 
should now change, since it 
was the bad judgement of his 
advisors, not the bureaucratic 
structures they inhabit, which 
brought on the crisis. A thor- 
ough house-deaning is in or- 
der. 


of Clinical Psychiatrists 
Sir, Dr Malcolm Weller's letter 
(November 22) highlights a man- 
made and expanding tragedy that 
is occurring in front of the eyes of 
relatives and involved doctors in 
this country. 

Under a sacred banner 
proclaiming that an »hmm people 
can be treated in the relative 
isolation of their own homes, 
hospital care facilities far them are 
being ruthlessly swept away. All 
the appalling consequences of this 
are minimised, or cannot achieve 
’ public attention. 

Acute schizophrenic and 
depressive illnesses cannot be got 
better overnight. Humanity and 
the relatives of patients cry out for 
an often brief spell of in-patient 
care, which anally gets them 
better. 

When sufferers’ opposition to 
help is coming from those made 
violent by delusions of persecu- 
tion that have already led to 
violence to innocent people they 
think are poisoning them, the 
mentally disordered persons* 
wishes should not be paramount. 
Some of these untreated deluded 
people are capable of the severest 
violence. 

Treatable depressive psyehotics 
can likewise be salvaged to bless 
the people who overrode their 
destructive wishes at a time of 
despairing madness. 

Many of the more resistantly ill 
! patients are not always done a 
; kindness to by being cast out of an 
understanding environment with 
friendly feces and an occupied 
day, for one of meaningless drift- 
ing in an uncaring void. 

We should have been warned by 
the disasters in the USA and Italy, 
where similar policies were pur- 
sued. In Italy these poor souls at 
railway stations were called the 
abandonatti. Laissez-faire is not a 
kindness for schizophrenics who 
refuse medication. It is a downhill 
path to the gutter for not a few. 

Psychiatrists want to see their 
patients in the community, but at 
a time and in a condition where it 
is humane and reasonable. The 
current scrapping of the acute beds 


MR GORBACHOV AND MR GANDHI 


The Indian government took 
two precautions in advance of 
the Soviet leaders visit to 
Delhi this week. It detained 
prominent Afghan exiles liv- 
ing in India (though failing to 
prevent a large protest 
demonstration yesterday) and 
ensured a rapturous popular 
reception for Mr Gorbachov 
by busing crowds into the 
capital to greet him. 


The precautions reflected in 
their way the present slate of 
Indian-Soviet relations: a deli- 
cate alignment of security 
interests dictated by geography 
in which complications are 
swept under the carpet, and a 
long-standing popular affinity 
in need of a little encourage- 
ment. The Soviet leader ar- 
rives in India intent, no doubt, 
on refreshing the alignment 
and capitalizing on the affin- 
ity. He may find that things are 
not exactly as they seem. 

In the two years that he has 
been in power, Mr Gandhi has 
veered away from the political 
legacy of ms mother. He has 
looked to private enterprise 
rather than public ownership 
to solve India's economic 
problems. He has made efforts 
to reduce the corruption en- 
demic in Indian society and to 
tackle ethnic conflicts. He has 
sought a less antagonistic 
relationship with the West and 
adopted his own style of 
leadership in the Third World. 
It is doubtful whether the two 
leaders will be able to re- 
capture the spirit that pre- 
vailed in Indira Gandhi's time. 
Over the longer term, their two 
countries appear to be headed 
in different directions. 


For this week, however, the 
differences, present and poten- 
tial, will be relegated to second 
place. Mr Gandhi can be 
flattered, as he was probably 
intended to be, that the Soviet 
leader: chose to visit India 
before any other Asian coun- 
try, including closer allies like 
Vietnam. The visit satisfies the 
same aspiration for inter- 
national recognition that has 
spurred India's prominence in 
the Non-Aligned Movement. 

The two leaders share some 
common problems. They have 
both expressed their 
determination to galvanize a 
huge country into action after 
long years of stagnation and 
corruption. The large popula- 
tion of the one and the sparse 
population of the other may, 
in economic and commercial 
terms, prove complementary. 


On the eve of his visit to 
India he said that a political 
settlement was possible and 
insisted that neither Moscow 
nor the A f ghan people wanted 
a permanent Soviet presence 
in the country. Such an atti- 
tude will be welcome to India, 
which was placed in an awk- 
ward position by the Soviet 
Union’s military involvement 
in the region. The presence of 
virulently anti-Soviet Afghan 
exiles in India was just one 
byproduct of the invasion, but 
one which has complicated 
bilateral relations. 


Beyond their borders they 
have common enemies and 
security interests. They both 
feel threatened by Pakistan. 
They are both sceptical about 
the intentions of China. More 
immediately, they both have 
an interest in seeing a political 
settlement in Afghanistan. 


Now Mr Gandhi will have 
to decide whether Moscow's 
tentative, and perhaps tem- 
porary change of attitude on 
Afghanistan is enough for him 
to grant what Mr Gorbachov 
must surely be asking for this 
week: Indian support for a 
Soviet-sponsored Asian sec- 
urity system. This grandiose 
scheme is an attempt to draw 
non-aligned countries in Asia 
into a loose alliance designed 
to counter the influence of 
Japan, South Korea and the 
United States in the Far East 


Ending apartheid 

From the Executive Secretary of 
Christian Concern for Southern 
Africa 

Sir, You assert (leading article, 
November 18) that through eco- 
nomic growth and increasing busi- 
ness activity in South Africa 
foreign companies “undermine 
the barriers of occupational 
apartheid** and “act as subtle 
undenniners of apartheid**. You • 
further suggest that educational 
help from major companies can 
“outflank . the - institutions of 
apartheid”. Thus, you hope, soci- 
ety there win evolve in a more 
liberal direction. 

The best that you can hope for is 
that such policies will ameliorate 
South Africa’s problems. To this . 
end diplomatic and financial 
backing should be given to British 
firms. 

Is it not important first of all to 
be clear on what we mean by 
apartheid? Your view seems to be 
that it is personal and social 
discrimination It is not just that 
It is, first, denial of basic human 
rights and exclusion from the 
democratic political process. 

There is no historical evidence 
that growth in economic activity 
weakens the institution of apart- 
heid as property understood. Is it 
not optimistic in the extreme to 


Ever since he came to 
power, Mr Gorbachov has 
tried to limit the damage 
inflicted on his country's 
reputation by the continued 
presence of Soviet troops in 
Af ghanistan. He has en- 
gineered the (relatively grace- 
ful) replacement of 
Afghanistan's former leader, 
Babrak KarmaL He has im- 
plemented a partial and largely 
cosmetic troop withdrawal, 
and he has started to mend 
fences with the Islamic world. 


While essentially a revival 
of an idea current in 
Brezhnev’s time, it is an 
integral part of the new-style 
Soviet foreign policy. Indian 
involvement in such a scheme 
would do much to give it 
credibility elsewhere in Asia. 
Mr Gandhi would do well to 
consider the long-term con- 
sequences of such a plan 
before putting his name to it 
So long as Soviet troops 
remain in Afghanistan, Mr 
Gorbachov's talk of Asian 
security can only ring hollow. 


THE SILENT SURGEONS 


On Tuesday Fellows of the 
Royal College of Surgeons held 
a meeting of their council. This 
was the first opportunity for 
them to raise the extraordinary 
case last week in which Mr 
Felix Weale, FRCS, was found 
guilty of serious professional 
misconduct by the Pro- 
fessional Conduct Committee 
of the General .Medical Coun- 
cil. 

Mr Weale, it win be recalled, 
was revealed to have refused to 
go to his hospital to operate on 
an emergency patient who, on 
his own instructions, had been 
prepared for operation by his 
surgical registrar and was on 
the operating table already 
anaesthetized. Mr Weale’s rea- 
son was that between the time 
of his instruction to his reg- 
istrar and the readiness of the 
patient for the operation, his 
on-call shift had finished. 

There were a number of 
disturbing aspects to the case. 
The feet that the events took 
place on . Christmas Eve in 
1983 was less than reassuring 
about the speed with which 


such events are dealt with by 
the medical authorities. The 
tales of dangerous mistrust 
between professional col- 
leagues would have been more 
alarming still, were it not for 
the fact' that without this rare 
breakdown in the medical club 
rules we would have been 
unlikely to hear about the 
offence at alt 


Most of all, however, it was 
the punishment which seemed 
inadequate. Mr Weale was 
“admonished” and be is 
continuing his normal work. 
The reasoning of the Commit- 
tee may well have been that 
the next step up in punishment 
would have been to strike Mr. 
Weale off the medical register 
for a period. They were 
presumably of a view that the 
sin did not justify this . re- 
sponse, especially as the mat- 
ter was being considered so 
long after the event took place. 

But if the General . Medical 
Council cannot tune its re: 
sponses more precisely or, 
indeed, react on a more realis- 


tic timescale is it not time that 
the Royal College of Surgeons 
and the other colleges and 
faculties of the medical pro- 
fession started to exert some 
greater self-regulatory in- 
fluence? These colleges and 
faculties rightly regard them- 
selves as guardians of stan- 
dards of practice. They fulfil 
this role for the training and 
teaching of their junior doctors 
in an honourable fashion. 

Now they should turn their 
powers to establishing some 
fast and flexible mechanisms 
to influence the behaviour of 
that minority of consultants 
and academics who foil to 
fulfil their commitments. 
They should look not only to 
those who break the letter of 
their contracts but also to 
those who breach the spirit of 
common humanity that jus- 
tifies the privileged place in 
society that the public accords 
to these senior hospital doc- 
tors. So far the Royal College 
of Surgeons, of which Mr 
Weale is a fellow, has not 
considered the case at all.. 


Tory students 

From Mr Douglas Smith 
Sir, The Federation of Conser- 
vative Students has never ad- 
vocated “decriminalized incest, 
legalized heroin, privatizing the 
Royal Family” or any other quasi- 
anarchist policy as alleged by 
Toby Young (feature, November 
14). 

In the past individual members 
(some not even office bearers) 
have aired eccentric views which 
have been seized upon by a 
grateful Press eager to create 
headlines. Thus, in the case of 
incest, the chairman of the 
federation's Scottish branch, who 
had written a legal thesis on the 
position of partners related by 
blood, advocated the decrim- 
inalization of such relationships 
between consenting adults. 

He was subsequently disowned 
by FCS both regionally and na- 
tionally, yet the myth continues to 
be perpetuated that FCS favours 
the legalization of incest, with all 
the emotive connotations that this 
entails. 

There is no denying the foolish 
statements and actions of certain 
FCS members. Nor can the 
embarrassment of the “Stockton . 
war crimes” episode (involving 
one individual) be ignored, but I 
feel certain that individual 
resignations could have been de- 
manded (and obtained) before it 
became necessary to dose what 
remains the largest and most 
vibrant political youth movement 
in Britain. 

Yours faithfully, 

DOUGLAS SMITH. 
(Vice-Chairman, FCS, 1985), 

10 Sun bury Lane, SW11. 


in many parts of the country is a 
scandal whose results are not 
being added up in terms of 
increasing suicides, violence and 
avoidable general trauma to many 
caring relatives and sufferers. 
Yours faithfully, 

harry Jacobs (Chairman, 

Society of Clinical Psychiatrists), 
Sevenths Hospital, 

Colchester, Essex. 


The Queen’s victim 


From Mr J. S. Deane 
Sir. I was in command of s.s. 
Liemba, ex Gotten, towards the 
end of 1961 and must therefore 
have only narrowly missed the 
pleasure of meeting your corres- 
pondent, Mr Nicolas Beflord 
(November 20). 

At second-hand from Tanzania 
I understand feat the ship op- 
erated until 1970, when engine 
defects caused her lay up, until the 
fitting of diesel units enabled her 
to resume operations in 1979. 


imagine that extra funds for a few 
schools and greater opportunity at 
the workbench are going to under- 
mine apartheid? 

The recent meeting of the 
business c ommuni ty and Mr 
P. W. Botha showed deariy that 
they are co-operating closely on 
the way forward. That is not the 
real consultation which is re- 
quired. 

It will need much more than 
this to bring to an end the political 
system of apartheid. Violent dis- 
order over a long period is a real, 
possibility and it will probably 
bring increasing chaos in most of 
southern Africa. That can only be 
prevented, if at all, by honest 
negotiations between leaders of all 
communities, with encourage- 
ment from outside. Mr P. W. 
Botha resists this. 

Economic and financial pres- 
sure is about the only means left to 
achieve that objective. The weight 
of opinion in support of this policy 
is overwhelming in specialist in- 
stitutions, apart from wi thin the 
business community with its 
strong vested interests. More 
objective judgements arc required. 
Yours truly, 

R. ELLIOTT KENDALL, 
Executive Secretary, 

Christian Concern for Southern 
Africa, 

2 Eaton Gate, SW|. 


Records on tape 

From Mr lain C. Baillie 
Sir, The cries of outrage about 
home taping exemplified by the 
President of the Performing Right 
Society (November 15) confuse 
several issues and ignore an 
important one. The simple playing 
of music in the home has never 
been and never will be copyright 
infringement. 

The music industry has bene- 
fited enormously from the tech- 
nology of sound recording and 
reproduction. How much would 
the composers receive as income if 
we were still in the era of only bve 
performances? It is, however, 
implicit in the technology as 
developed over the last few years 
that there can be transcription 
within one reproduction unit from 
one medium to another. 

Copyright law is intended to 
deal with the problem of 
reproduction and distribution, al- 
though unfortunately the signifi- 
cance of this latter aspect has 
never been fully explored. It is 
only now that the right of a 


Chance to offer 
Scots a chance 


Alcohol records 

From Dr John Penman 
Sir, The medical students of the 
1940s, of whom I was one, were 
taught at the very be ginning of 
their clinical training that in every 
case they should inquire into the 
patient's smoking and drinking 
habits; and nothing which they 
were taught seemed to them more 
obvious common sense than this. 

Now you report (November 12): 
“Family doctors ... are today 
urged to find out and record how 
much alcohol is befog drunk by 
their patients” — as if that were a 
brilliant new idea, and as if it were 
exceptional to record one’s find- 
ings. 

In the 1940s it also went without 
saying that when dealing with a 
new patient one examined com- 
pletely every system of the body, 
since otherwise there could be no 
hope of accurate diagnosis and in 
the 1960s, to my direct knowledge, 
good family doctors still did so. 
(This is very far from saying that 
patients should be fully examined 
at every interview). 

Now you report: “It [the Royal 
College of General Practitioners] 
believes that most people who 
drink heavily . . . deserve a full 
physical examination ” — as if that 
were a last resort. 

One sometimes hears that mul- 
tiple special investigations have 
replaced history taking and clini- 
cal examination. Reports such as 
this, allegedly emanating from an 
official body, make one fear it may 
be true. 

Yours feithfuly, 

JOHN PENMAN, 

Forest View, 

Upper Chute, 

Andover, Hampshire. ■ 


purchaser of a work embodying 
copyright to its reasonable util- 


copyrigbl to its reasonable util- 
isation has been folly explored. 

The House of Lords has looked 
at the situation in the case of spare 
parts m the British Leyland de- 
cision and has expressed a right of 
use. Bernard Levin (November 


10), by emphasising the right of 
the private user, has evinced a 
better understanding of the real 
problem Than those who have 
denounced him. 

Yours faithfully, 

IAIN C. BAILLIE, 

20 Chester Street, SW1. 
November 17. 


trading from K igoma to Zambia 
and Burundi. 

In my day the chief engineer was 
a Scot — Mr George Locfaead; the 
first officer a Tanganyikan — Mr 
Mauhidi, and the steward was 
from Goa. She was a happy ship 
with a firm place in my family 
memories, since my daughter was 
christened into the Church of 
Australia from the forecastle belL 
upended to serve as a font. 

Yours faithfully. 

J.S. DEANE. 

5 Lam bourne Road, 

Sunderland, Tyne and Wear. 


Sports restriction 

From Mr Mormon R. Mortimer 
Sir, Having read the Coe report, 
produced by the Sports Council, 
copies of which have only recently 
come to hand, I must protest 
a gainer Mr Rifkmd's decision to 
dose the Scottish School of Phys- 
ical Education. 

The Confederation of British 
Industry, in evidence to the above 
review, stated that it 
would certainly be very concerned 
if resources were not available for 
Britain to participate effectively and 
credibly in international sports 
events. 

Every male teacher of physical 
education trained in Scotland has 
attended the Scottish school and 
to close such an institution is akin 
to giving over the playing fields of 
Eton to property development 

To remove the only specialist 
college of physical education in 
the west of Scotland only reflects 
the rest of the world's low opinion 
of Britain as a modem force in 
world sport 
Yours etc, 

NORMAN R. MORTIMER. 
(Director of Schools and Youth 
Development British Handball 
Association), 

5 May Terrace, 

Mount Florida, 

Glasgow. 

November 25. 


Neglected exam? 

From the Headmaster of Liskeard 
School 

Sir, In response to the letter from 
the Headmaster of The King’s 
School, Gloucester (Novembw 
14), there are two other dis- 
advantages to the new AS-level 
examinations, in addition to the 
lukewarm or even chilly reception 
from the universities. 

First, although AS levels may 
broaden a student’s education, 
they are very likely to narrow his 
or her choices. At present a good 
A-level student will embark on 
three or four A-level courses and 
choose one of them as a subject to 
study when applying to university. 

If AS levels are widely accepted 
then only two subjects are likely to 
be taken to a level which makes 
them acceptable as a starting point 
for a university course. In the 
example Mr Charters gives, it 
would prevent the potential en- 
gineer switching from engineering 
to chemistry even in his or her 
upper sixth year. 

Secondly, in a rural comprehen- 
sive school such as ours, at a time 
of felling rolls and reducing staff 
we can only introduce AS levels 
where they can be taught in A- 
Jevel classes, since to introduce 
new classes for very small num- 
bers is beyond our resources 
without sacrificing smaller classes 
amongst the younger children. 
Yours faithfiilly. 

A D. WOOD, Headmaster, 
Liskeard School, 

Luxstowe, 

Liskeard. Cornwall. 



NOVEMBER 27 1812 


From Mrs Jillian Luff 
Sir. Surely the Scottish Office are 
being shortsighted in their opposi- 
tion to the proposed siding 
development on Aonadt Mbor 
(report. November 19, Scottish 
edition). This development will 
bring benefit to the country as a 
whole and not just to skiers. 

I believe our country suffers 
from over-urbanization and there- 
fore increasing the ease of access 
to a small part of our beautiful, 
exciting, empty mountains is good 
news for all 

More important is the aspect of 
jobs. I am positive that foe likely 
number of jobs which would result 
throughout the employment spec- 
trum — in hotels and bed and 
breakfast, in restaurants, in retail- 
ing. in transport, in information 
and public services — would be far 
in excess of the 60 to 80 men- 
tioned. 

The cost to the country of not 
creating these jobs is high: more 
dole money or more famili es befog 
forced to move to the already 
madly over-populated, expensive 
South, where they may ado to the 
social problems which we con- 
stantly witness as a result of our 
overcrowded cities. 

As a Scot who has had to move 
south, I know that for foe em- 
ployed the quality of life (es- 
pecially for families with 
youngsters) in an area such as Fort 
William is infinitely preferable: 
Let’s aim at maintaining employ- 
ment opportunities throughout 
our country and not just in the 
South-east! 

Yours faithfully, 

JILLIAN R LUFF, 

Westcroft, 

Narthchurch Common. 
Berkhamsted, Hertfordshire. 
November 20. 


The retreat of Napoleon's army 
from Moscow had begun in mid- 
October, but in the absence of any . 
regular information from that 
front this article proved to be a 
well judged appreciation of what 
had in fact already begun to 
happen. The destruction of the 
Grande Axmee was complete by 
December 30. Napoleon left the 
army on December 9, travelling 
direct to Paris on a journey that 
lasted 312 hours; Murat, who was 
left in command, reached 
K&nigsberg ten days later with the 
remaining 1,000 of the Old Guard, 
including dismounted cavalry. 


LONDON 

Friday, November 27, 1812. 

At length, our curiosity to learn 
the fete of the French Grand Army 
has received some slight gratifica- 
tion. A Gentleman, who has 
reached town from Moriaix, in- 
forms us that he there perused the 
26th and 27th Bulletins, which are 
dated on the route towards Poland, 
passing in a direction somewhat to 
the southward of Sinnlwi«tm- 

The 27th Bulletin related a 
number of attacks by the 
Russians on the French rear-guard, 
down to the 27th ulti, all of which it 
is said were easily repulsed by 
Davoust and Eugene Beauharnois, 
who covered foe main army in a 
masterly maimer. Great part of 
this Bulletin is taken up with 
descanting on Buonaparte’s hu- 
manity! Some of his soldiers, it 
seems, requested permission to 
burn all the towns and villages 
through which they retreated This 
infernal proposal is not noticed as 
at all unreasonable in itself: but its 
rejection is meant at once to 
characterise Buonaparte as a mod- 
el of magnanimity although it is 
perfectly obvious that the fear of 
speedy vengeance must have con- 
stituted a very sufficient motive for 
his forbearance. It was farther 
stated that Mortier had blown up 


the Kremlin, and joined the main 
army, which after foe chastisement 


Where the truth lies 


From Mr E. P. Wilson 
Sir. Sir Robert Armstrong's phrase 
in Sydney, “being economical 
with the truth”, is already being 
spoken of as a candidate for 
inclusion in future anthologies of 
quotations. Credit (if that is the 
right word) for the notion should 
at least be shared with the British 
statesman, W. £. Forster. 

Recording his impressions of a 
conversation in 1877 with the 
Russian diplomat. Count Nicho- 
las Ignatiev, Forster was sus- 
picious that Ignatiev’s frankness 
was far from genuine, and was 
driven, more reluctantly than Sir 
Robert one imagines, to reflect: 
“What is the use of lying, when 
truth, well distributed, serves the 
same purpose?” (T. Wemyss Reid, 
Life. ti. (1888). pl67). 

Yours faithfully, 

E P. WILSON, 

Worcester College. 

Oxford. 


army, which after the chastisement 
(so it is expressed} which it had 
given foe Russians, on the 27th, 
had been no further disturbed by 
them, but proceeded, in the best 
condition, towards its ul timate 
destination. No very accurate ac- 
count, however, is given of what 
had been done with the sick and 
wounded, whom the 25th Bulletin 
stated to have been removed to 
Mojaisk and Smolenskn, which are 
out of the present line of march. 
We have every reason to believe 
that though the Bulletins in ques- 
tion have not reached this counby, 
the above will be found to exhibit a 
tolerably faithful outline of their 
contents. It is easy to gather from 
thpm, that th* French army has 
abandoned all idea of establishing 
itself, for the winter, in any nart of 
Russia: and is in full retreat out of 
the bounds of that empire. We are 
ready to believe that whatever can 
be done fay military science, in 
conducting the retreat, has been 
effected by the united efforts of the 
French Generals, who altogether 
constitute a greater body of talent 
and experience, than any other 
army in the world can boast; but we 
look, in this instance, beyond the 
skill of the General. — we look to 
the physical powers of the soldier, 
— we picture to ourselves a 
Provencal, or a Tuscan, or a 
Neapolitan struggling, from day to 
day, with the snow and the frost, 
toiling through the nwrahgn and 
fording the half-frozen torrents, 
which, as be advances, swell gradu- 
ally into impassable rivers: we see 
his hopes failing, his strength 
exhausted, his constitution broken. 
Little boots it, that be may repulse 
the enemy in the daytime, if he 
meet a more fetal enemy in the 
fhilKng damps and agues of the 
night. To sufferings such as these, 
independently of all the slaughter 
occasioned by their pursuers, it is 
hardly to be doubted, but that one 
half of the soldiers who left 
Moscow must fell sacrifice before 
they can reach a secure asylum. 
Not less than three hundred thou- 
sand men. on both sides, will have 
fallen; and between five and six 
months of scientific arrangement 
and sanguinary contest will have 
been employed, only to close, on 
the Vistula, those operations which 
began at a more advanced point on 
the Pregel. On the 20th of June the 
first Bulletin was issued, from 
Gumbinnen. The Orders, ad- 
dressed, at the same time, to the 
army proudly announced that the 
war should be carried into the 
Russian territories, — that the 
destinies of Russia were about to be 
accomplished, — and that she was 
for ever to be excluded from any 
influence in the affairs of Europe. 
If Buonaparte shall have to date a 
fixture Bulletin from Warsaw, he 
must select other topics —The 
French nation itself will reflect 
that there is neither wisdom nor 
justice in waging so deadly a war 
against Russia, only to prevent her 
from exercising a tree right of 
trading, as she thinks fit. We do 
not man to intimate that any 
sensible decay of Buonaparte’s 
popularity is yet visible in France. 
On the contrary, we learn, that 
notwithstanding the late short- 
lived conspiracy, very little open 
disaffection to his person or gov- 
ernment is any where exhibited. 


Bitter-sweet memory 


From Mr John Greene 
Sir, In 1980 I inherited an oak 
chest- Whilst treating it for wood- 
worm I found secreted behind a 
false panel a half pound of Ty- 
pboo tea (“Authorised price 
lid”), my grandmothers final 
war-time supply in the event that 
the worst happened. 

Its condition may not be as good 
as Mrs Weston-Davies's Ang- 
osturas (November 21). but as!a 
comestible from imperial India it 
is at least older. 


Yours faithfully. 
JOHN GREENE, 

3 Richmond Place, 
Bath, Avon. 
November 21. 


M- 

ineer’s 

tastic’ 


vm 


ed mechanical en- 
pnt the £8,000 he 
ole Portfolio Gold 
- yesterday to good 


pdate my gramo- 
jase my donation 
h hall appeal and 
ly next year,” Mr 
rod, of AUestree, 


, Med 51, who has 
foBo Gold since it 
\$ Junes, said that 
believe his luck. 
It is fantastic. It is 
Hence.” 

Sold cards can be 
sending a stain- 
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3oId, 



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THF. TTMF51 THURSDAY NOVEMBER 27 1986 



COURT AND SOCIAL 


COURT 

CIRCULAR 


BUCKINGHAM PALACE 
November 26: His Excellency 
Senhor Bubacar Tute: was re- 
ceived in audience by The 
Queen and presented his Letters 
of Credence as Ambassador 
Extraordinary and Pleni- 
potentiary from Guinea-Bissau 
to the Court of St James's. 

His Excellency was accompa- 
nied by the following member of 
the Embassy, who had the 
honour of being presented to 
Her Majesty: Senhor Oscar 
Batica Ferreira (First Secretary). 

Sir Patrick Wright (Perma- 
nent Under Secretary of State 
for Foreign and Commonwealth 
Affairs), who had the honour of 
being received by Her Majesty 
was present, and the Gentlemen 
of the Household in Wailing 
were in attendance. 


The Queen. Air Commodore- 
in-Chief, Royal Observer Corps, 
received .Air Commodore J 
Broughton upon relinquishing 
his appointment as Com- 
mandant of the Corps and Air 
Commodore I Horrocks upon 
assuming the appointment 

The Lord Skelmersdale and 
the Lord Brabazon of Tara had 
the honour of being received by 
The Queen upon relinquishing 
their appointments as Lords in 
Waiting to Her Majesty. 

The Lord Hesketh, the Lord 
Beaverbrook and the Earl of 
Dundee had the honour ofbeing 
received by The Queen upon the 
appointments as Lords in Wait- 


ing to Her Majesty. 

The Earl of Haddington had 
the honour of being received by 
The Queen and delivered up the 
Insignia of the Order of the 
Thistle worn by his late Father. 

The Queen and the Duke of 
Edinburgh held an Evening 
Reception at Buckingham Pal- 
ace for the Diplomatic Corps at 
which The Duke and Duchess of 
Gloucester were present. 


The String Orchestra of the 
Scots Guards played selections 


of music during the evening. 

Her Majesty’s Body Guard of 
the Honourable Corps of 
Gentlemen-ai-Arms. The 
Queen's Body Guard of the 
Yeomen of the Guard and a 
dismounted detachment of the 
Household Cavalry were on 
duty. 

The Duke of Edinburgh, 
President, this morning pre- 
sented the 1 *186 Royal Society of 
Arts Presidential Awards for 
Design Management and at- 
tended a Conference on the 
Management of New Ideas at 


the Royal Society of Arts. John 
Adam Street. WC2. 


Adam Street, WC2. 

His Royal Highness gave the 
London Lecture to the Inner 
London' Branches of the British 
Institute of Management and 
afterwards attended a luncheon 


The Prince or Wales will open 
the sports hall at Mountbarten 
School. Romsey, Hampshire, on 
December 1. 

The Prince of Wales will open 
the new Ocean Sound Studios at 
Segensworth West, Fare ham. 
Hampshire, on December I. 
The Princess of Wales will join 
the Archbishop of Canterbury 
and local schoolchildren for a 
carol service in Canterbury 
Cathedral on December I. 


at Hudson's Bay House. Upper 
Thames Slim. EC4. 


Thames Slim EC4. 

Brigadier Clive Robertson 
was in attendance. 

The Duke of Edinburgh this 
afternoon at Buckingham Pal- 
ace presented the Young 
Environmentalist of the Year 


Awards for the Young People’s 
Trust for Endangered Species. 


Trust for Endangered Species. 
His Royal Highness, Presi- 





After A Car Crash 
Lynda Ellis Lay Unconscious 
For Nine Months 


Today she can again speak, hear, get around and 
take care of almost everything for herself Shrt still 
amazing us with new improvements. 


Her recovery over two years was no acddenL 
New buildings with the most up-to-date facilities are 
being provided for disabled people like her - given 
by The Development Trust for the Young Disabled. 


And the Trust funds and encourages not only 
work for helping severely disabled people in practical 
ways, but also research into new techniques for 
treating and caring for them nationwide. 


As these brave people face up to degenerative 
illness or severe physical or mental damage, we owe 
it to them to make their lives as fulfilling and active 
as possible; hope of improvement must never desert 
them. 


Please help. Write to: 

Captain A. D. Hutton, OBE, RN - Rci'd. 1 , Secretary, 
The Development Trust for the Young Disabled, 
Dept TTE, 97 West Hill, Putney, London SW15 3SW 



The Development Trust For 
The Young Disabled 



dent of the Westminster Abbey 
Trust, chaired a meeting of the 
Trustees ax Buckingham Palace. 
CLARENCE HOUSE 
November 26: Queen Elizabeth 
The Queen Mother was present 
this evening at a Reception 
given by Queen Elizabeth’s 
Foundation for the Disabled at 
St James's Palace. 

Mrs Patrick Campbefl-Pres- 
lon. Sir Martin Gilliat and 
Captain Niall Hall were in 
attendance. 

KENSINGTON PALACE 
November 26: The Prince of 
Wales, attended by Lieutenant- 
Colonel Brian Anderson and 
Surgeon Commander lan Jen- 
kins, RN, arrived at Royal Air 
Force Northolt this afternoon in 
an aircraft ofThe Queen's Flight 
from Cyprus. 

YORK HOUSE 
ST JAMES'S PALACE 
November 26: The Duke of 
Kent this morning opened the 
new Crown Court at Guildford 
and later, as Chancellor, visited 
the University of Surrey, and 
attended the Annual Dinner of 
the University and Guildford 
Borough Council. 

Captain Michael CampbdJr 
Lamenon was in attendance. 

The Duchess of Kent. 
Controller Commandant of the 
Women’s Royal Army Corps, 
today visited the London Dis- 
trict Provost Company RMP at 
Rochester Row. London SW1. 

Her Royal Highness was at- 
tended by Mrs Peter Wilmot- 
SifwelL 

THATCHED HOUSE LODGE 
November 26: Princess Alexan- 
dra, to mark the Centenary 
Year, this morning visited the 
Royal Samaritan Hospital for 
Women, Glasgow. 

In the afternoon. Her Royal 
Highness opened St Oswald’s 
Hospice at Gosfarth, Tyne and 
Wear, and afterwards, as Patron 
of the People’s Dispensary for 
Sick Animals, visited the PDSA 
Animal Treatment Centre at 
Blandfond StreeL Newcastle 
upon Tyne. 

Princess Alexandra, who trav- 
elled in an aircraft of The 
Queen’s Flight was attended by 
Mrs Peter Afia. 


Birthdays today 

Mr John Aiderton, 46; Professor 
J. M- Ashworth. 48; Mr Rowan 
Bentafl, 75; Mr Rodney Bewes, 
49; Lord Bridges, 59; the Very 
Rev Edward Carpenter, 76; Sir 
Rex Cohen, 80, Mr Leonard 
Cults, 82; Mr Robert Dougall, 
73; Air Marshal Sir Eric Dunn, 
59; Admiral Sir Ian Easton, 69; 
Lcnrd Howard de Walden, 74; 
Lieutenant-General Sir Edward 
Howard-Vyse, 81; Miss 
Rosaline Kelly, 64; Mr Walter 
KJien, 58; Viscount Lambert, 
77; the Marquess of Lansdowne. 
74; Mr F. Leslie Preston, 83; Mr 
Alan Simpson, 57; Mr Ernie 
Wise. 61. 


Christening 

The daughter of Mr Howard and 
Lady Camilla Hipwood was 
christened Rosanna Charlotte 
by the Rev Thomson Gibson at 
St Michael and All Angels, 
Badminton, on Sunday, 
November 23. The godparents 
are the Hon Julian Bine, Mrs 
i Henry Brockbankand Mrs Peter 
I Marshall (for whom the Hon 
Mrs Harry Fane stood proxy). 


Fuibright 

Commission 


| Mr Kenneth Baker. Secretary of 
State for Education and Science, 

I was host at a breakfast held 
yesterday at the Ritz Hold in 
honour of Senator J. William 
Fuibright and the fortieth 
anniversary of the Fuibright 
! Programme. 


Luncheons 


HM Government 
Mr Alastair Goodlad, Par- 
liamentary Under-Secretary of 
State, Department of Energy, 
was host at a luncheon given 
yesterday by Her Majesty* Gov- 
ernment at the Ritz Hotel in 
honour of the Director General 
of the International Atomic 
Energy Agency, Dr Hans Biix. 


Lord Foot 

Mr John Wickerson, President 
of the Law Society, gave a 
luncheon at the House of Lords 
yesterday, sponsored by Lord 
Foot, for the members of the 
Solicitors’ All Party Par- 
liamentary Group. Among 
those present were. 

Viscount BrenilonL. Lora Carnock. 
Lord Oeawyn of Pailtfw,.C H. .Lo rd 
Coleraine. Lord Evans or CuuflMon. 
Lord Goodman. CM. Lord MteftCon, 
Lord Nathan. Lord Noel-Buxton. Lord 


Raiticwdan. Lord Wrvnbury. 
Hugh Rossi. MP. Mr Leo Abst. MR 
Mr Richard Alexander. MP- Mr 

N'ftoSrag 


Princess Anne. President of the 
Royal Agricultural Society of 
England, will attend a council 
meeting at 35 Belgrave Square 
on December 3. 

The Princess of Wales will open 
the new headquarters of the 
Bodv Shop pic at Hawthorn 
Road, Wick, Unlehampton, on 
December 3. 

The Princess of Wales will visit 
the Downland Housing Society 
Project run by the Sussex 
Association for Spina Bifida and 
Hydrocephalus at 5 Grand Ave- 
nue, Worthing, on December 3. 


Mr Barry' Pori it. MP. Mr Da vid 
Surnbera. MP. Mr John M Taylor. 

Viewers. MP. Mr John 


MP. Mr Pete r triggers. MP. Mr"Jofin 
WhlllleM. MP. Mr Derek Bradheer. 
vlce-presdenL and Mr John Bowron. 
secretary general. 


Carlton Club Political 
Committee 

Mr Kenneth Baker. MP, was (he 
guest of honour and speaker at a 
luncheon given by the Political 
Committee of the Carlton Club 
yesterday. Mr Eric Koops, chair- 
man of the committee, presided 
and Mr Christopher Granville 
also spoke. 


National Children's Home 


Major the Hon PWUo Sidney. Sir Jtahn 
RHdril. Sir Morris Ulna Mr re ny 
MP. Mr and Mrs Ted H ughes. 


Tyne Tees Television 
M Valery Giscard <f Estaing 
attended a luncheon given Tyne 
Tees Television on November 
| 26, at the Hyde Park HoteL Sir 
Ralph Carr- Ellison, chairman, 
i presided. The guests included: 



Dinners 


Society of Local Authority 

Chief Executives 
The annual dinner of the Society 
of Local Authority Chief Exec- 
utives was held at the Savoy 
Hotel yesterday. Mr P. Rust, 
president, was in the chair and 
Dr John Cunningham, MP, was 

die guest speaker. 


Bush. Judge Thomas. Mbs SMrtey 
mtaue. Q& Mr Pwrr Coni. QC. Mr 
John Wldeenen. Mr tan Yates. Mr 


Sale room 


‘Hope’ sets record auction 
price for Victorian painting 


ByGeraMnreN^Tna^SakRumaQgipe^wodeitf 


G. F. Watts’ failure paiHt- 
ing of “Hope”, sitting on a 
globe with bandaged eyes 
plucking the one remaining 
string of her lyre, b ecame the 
most expensive Vict orian 
paiatmg ever sold at section 
when it sold for £869,000 at 


Sotheby’s prffited estimate 
was £150^000 to £250,000 bat 
they had upped their hopes to 
around half a Billion by the 
eve of the safe. 

It was boaght by Pd« 
Nahum, a London deafer, an 
Wi »lf of an nn name d English 
collector. Hit chief rival was 
J ulian Harteofl who acts for 

Frederick Koch, the American 
milKiwiair e who plans to set up 
a centre for the study of 
Victorian ait at Sutton Place, 
near GuiMfonL 

Nahum was stained by the 
pleasure of acquiring _ the 
painting gnrf dabbed It a 
“steal”. “Who would think 
tfat you could buy ok of the 
most famous Victorian paint- 
ings — perhaps the greatest 
Victorian painting — for as 
little as that."’ 

He pointed out that Watts 
was virtually deified by the 
British public of his day and 
by his fellow artists, as mil as 
being a significant influence 
on the French Symbotistes. 

Sotheby's safe mixed Vic- 
torian and nineteenth century 
European pictures. There were 
some high prices but quite a 
u umber of unsold lots, dem- 
onstrating that this field is not 
fally caught up in the autumn's 
art market boom. 

A charcoal drawing by Mil- 
let of a peasant mother teach- 
ing her little daughter to knit 
secured £165,000 (estimate 
£70,000 -£100,000) while a 
tittle roundel by Fod Maddox 
Brown, “Southend looking to- 
wards Shearness", with a pony 
trap passing a white cow on a 
country lane, made a record for 
the artist at £126,500. 


Gray’s Ion 

The following have been elected 
Masters of the Bench of Gray’s 
Inn: 

Mr Brian James Higgs, QC, 
(Recorder), Mr Michael ap 
Gwilym Lewis, QC (Recorder). 
Mr Alan Rupert Tyrrell. QC, 
(Recorder), Mr Richard Leslie 
Clifford Hartley, QC, Mr Chris- 
topher OhI Macredie 
Bedingfidd. QC Mr Anthony 
John Butcher, QC (Recorder), 
Mr Michael Anthony Bowes 
Burke-Gafihey, QC, Mr An- 
thony David Coleman, QC Mr 
Elvet John Prosser. QC (Re- 
corder). Mr Robert Lionel John- 
son. QC (Recorder). Mr 
Christopher Hiley Ludlow Batb- 
mst. QC, Mr Eliot Michael Hill. 
QC (Recorder). 


Company of 
Merchants 


Viscount Tonypandy, Chair- 
man of the National Children’s 
Home, was host yesterday at a 
luncheon at the Travellers’ 
Club, in aid of the home. 
Among those present were: 


Bakfry. MP. Mr and Mr* Ted Hugljra. 
Mr Alderman and Mrs autMopM* 
CDUett- Miss SLdrle y Aim rtefaL Mbq 
Aid la Roddick. Mr David Kossoff and 
Mr diaries Love- 


Bain & Company 
Sir Jack Lyons and Mr John 
Theroux were hosts at a lun- 
cheon on Tuesday. November 
25 at 16 Connaught Race, W2, 
for die Hon Douglas Hurd. 
Secretary of State for the Home 
Department. Among those 
present were: 

Lord Hunt Lard KdDl at Castfcacre. 
Lord Ezra. SU- RayrTKmd Lyoo. sir 
John Read. Mr David AUaoce. Mr 
Archibald Cox. MrHvw Dundas. Mr 
j R da Fonseca. Mr Jon FoiMs. Mr 
Paul Fax, Mr RanaM Crierwn. Mr 
Nicholas Horsley. Mr James Lumen. 
Mr John Loudon. Mr Stuart Lyons. 
Mr Mick Newmarch. Mr Lewis 
Robertson. Mr Ernest Saunders and 
Mr Vic Steel. 


Ball 


Richmond Tutorial 
College 

The annua] Colwell lecture, 
“The Labour Party and the 
Abolition of the Public Schools 
and Oxbridge Colleges’* will be 


delivered by Mr Carey Palmer, 
Principal of Richmond Tutorial 
College, on December 18, at the 
college. For farther information 
please telephone OHMO 8273. 


Appointment 

Mr Michael Hoy. Managing 
Editor of The Times, is to join 
the Defence and Press 
Broadcasting Committee. 


High COmt Journalists* 
Association 

The annual dinner of the High 
Court Journalists' Association 
was held at the Law Society Hall- 
yesterday. Mr Douglas Broom, 
chairman, presided and the 
guest speakers were Mr Justice 
, Scott and Mr Justice OgnaiL 
i Among others present were: 

Mr Justice Batcambe. Mr Justice 


Reginald Pullen, chairman of 
the society, presided and Mr 
Rodney Brooke also spoke. 
British Museum 
Lord Windlesbam, Chairman of 
Trustees of the British Museum, 
gave a dinner at the museum 
yesterday in honour of the 
Minister for Foreign Affairs of 
Madagascar, the Minister of 
Culture and Revolutionary An 
and the Inspector of the Armed 
Forces and Military Adviser to 
the President, on the occasion of 
the opening of the exhibition 
“Madagascar Island of the 
Ancestors" at the Museum of 
Mankind. 

Fuibright Commission 
The fortieth anniversary of the 
Fuibright Programme was cele- 
brated at Guildhall yesterday 
with an address by Mr Alistair 


Brian Mxjuztiur. Mr E H Manb. Mr 
Jotjn Leese. Mr Norman Fox. MT 


Philip walker and Mr Jonathan 
Fenby. 


Cooke, who was introduced by 
the American Ambassador, fol- 
lowed by a reception and din- 
ner. Mr Roger Jospe was host 
and Lord Young of Gtanhoxn 
and Senator J. William Fid- 
bright also spoke: Mrs Anne 
Collins. Chairman of the Fuf- 
bright Commission, made the 
presentations. 

S mratonran Society of Civil 
Engineers 

TheSmea Ionian Society ofCivil 
Engineers held its final dinner of 
the present session at the In- 
stitution of Civil Engineers last 
night MrJ. W. Baxter presided. 


Past Overseers' Society of 

St Margaret and St John, 
Westminster ' 

The Lord Mayor of West- 
minster, locum tenens. Coun- 
cillor R. W. Forrester, the Duke 
of Norfolk and Mr David 
Hopkm. Chief Metropolitan 
Magistrate, were the principal 
guests at the annual dinner of 
the Past Overseers* Society of St 
Margaret and St John, West- 
minster, at the Hold Inter- 
Continental yesterday. Mr 


wmm 




MM 




US* 


mi Millet’s “The knitting lesson* which was sold 
for £165,000 at Sotkebfs, yesterday. 


The bargain of the sate was 
probably Knbke’s brilliant lit- 
tle portrait of Dr Johann 
Hjantemaal at £50,600 (es- 
timate £40,000 — £60,000), an 
oatstanding work by 
Denmark’s leading artist The 
sale totalled £ 1 , 920.000 with 
16 per cent left unsold. A safe 
of second division pictures in 
the same field added another 
£1.063,260 but 25 per cent was 
nnaold. 

Phillips succeeded in selling 
the sfiver-moanted baton of 
Fidd-MarshaD Eiftard Mitch, 
a senior Nazi officer, for 
£7,480 (estimate £4,000- 
£6,000) to Adrian Forman, a 
Loudon dealer. It was their 
second attempt It was' fo- 
ci aded in a sale of war 
memorabilia a year ago on 


behalf of the farafiy of Briga- 
dier Derek Mzfls4toborts to 
whom MM sneadesed on 
May 3 1945. The MBch family 
challenged their ownership fa 
the courts and the baton feu to 
be withdrawn from safe. They 
dropped the case against Ph3- 
lips and the Mms-Roberts 
family a few months ago, 


allowing the sale to go ahead. 

Mflcn is repeated to have 
surrendered the baton with a 
crisp “Hefl Hitter" and a 
salute. At which MiDs-Rob- 
erts broke the baton over his 
head. Shortly before, he and 
his troops had experienced the 
honors of the Neastadt 
concentration camp and found 
hundreds of massacred pris- 
oners os the beach at 
Travemende. 


Forthcoming marriages 


Mr D J. Lawson 
and the Hon Ashton 

The engagement is announced 
between Douglas, son ofMrand 
Mrs H. D. Lawson, of 58 
Seafield Road, Brough ty Ferry. 
Dundee, and Kate, younger 
daughter of Lord and Lady 
Ashton of Hyde, of Fir Farm, 
Upper Slaughter, Bourton on 
the Water, Gloucestershire. 


Mr A. Anton 

and Miss M- Rhoden Price 
The engagement is announced 
between Alexander, son of Mr 
and ' Mrs Graeme Anton, of 
Worcestershire, and Melissa 
Marie, daughter of Mrs Charles 
H. Price II and step daughter of 
the American Ambassador to 
the Court of St James’s. 


Company of Merchants of the 
City of Edinburgh 
At the annual meeting of the 
Company of Merchants of the 
City of Edinburgh held in the 
Merchants’ Hall. Edinburgh, on 
Thursday. December 13, 1986. 
Mr Michael James Walker was 
elected as Master and Mr Peter ! 
Heatiy, as Treasurer. Mr Wil- 
liam McDonald was reelected . 
Secretary. I 


Mr TJ. Crime 
and Miss LJ. Rowles 
The engagement is announced 
between Timothy John, second 
son of Mr and Mis Kenneth 
Crane, of Barry, South Glamor- 
gan. and Lisa Jane, eldest 
daughter of Mr and Mrs Alan 
Rowles, of Barry, South 
Glamorgan. 


RNU Lifeboat and Mermaid 
BaB 

The RNU Lifeboat and Mer- 
maid Ball will be held on 
December 4 at the London 
Hilton hotel. For information 
about tickets, donations and 
advertising in the ball pro- 
gramme. please contact the 
chairman. Lady Bernard, 7 
Cresswell Gardens, London, 
SW5 OBJ. Telephone 01-373 
9412. 


MrJ. Fara 

and Miss JJL Kempton 
The engagement is announced 
between Jonathan, only son of 
Mr and Mrs J. L. Faro, of Neija, 
Spain, and Julie, elder daughter 
of Mr and Mrs J. Kempton, of 
Finchley, London. 


Mr P.C. Hunt 
and Miss SJL Allen 
The engagement is announced 
between Peter Clayton, eldest 
son of Mr and Mrs George 
Hunt, of Winchmore HBL 
North London, and Sarah Lind- 
say, younger daughter of Colo- 
nel and Mrs James Allen, of 
Chun, Surrey. 


MrP-AJE. Uttleboy 
and Miss ML Besson 
The engagement is announced 
between Peregrine Aidan Eldon, 
younger son of Mr and Mrs C. 
G. Liuleboy. of Howe, Thirsk, 


Mr SAJL Mffls 
and Miss EA. Morphy 
The engagement is announced, 
between Stuart, eldest son of the 
fate Mr A. T. Mills and of Mrs 
A. M. Mills, of Pinner, Middle- 
sex, and Elizabeth, eldest daugh- 
ter ofMrand MrsJ. A. Morphy, 
of Hariington, Bedfordshire. 

Mr SJL Pritdurrd-Snrith 
and Mis sN. A-L. De Yoong 
The engagement is announced 
between Simon Alexander, 
youngest son of Mr and Mis S. 
Pritchard-Smith, of The Cot- 
tage. Blackawton, Sooth Devon, 
and Nicole Astrid-Lisa, eldest 
daughter of Mr and Mis R- de 
Young, ofThe West Penthouse, 
Grove Court, Drayton Gardens, 
SW10. 

Mr DJLA. Batman 
and Miss SLA. SheOey 
The engagement is announced 
between David, elder son of Mr 
and Mrs Eli Reitman, of 
London, and Stephanie, twin 
daughter of Mr and Mrs Ronakl 
Shelley, of London. 

Mr P-G. Sargent 
and Miss NjC. Reeves 
The engagement is announced 
between Peter Glenn, son of Mr 
and Mis J.R. Sargent, of Auck- 
land, New Zealand, and 
Natasha Clare, younger daugh- 
ter of Flight-Lieutenant and Mrs 
W. Herridge, of Tickencote 
MiU, Rutland. 

Mr M.P. Simpson 
and Miss SJL Paries 
The engagement is announced 
between Mark Philip, eldest son 
of Mr and Mrs Michael J. 
Simpson,, of Shenstone, 
Staffordshire, and Susan Rosa- 
lind, daughter of Mr and Mrs 
Jeffrey W. Parkes, of 
Halesowen, West Midlands. 

Mr G.D. Tanner 
and Miss A-P. Crosse 
The engagement is announced 
between Gordon Dariey, son of 
the late Mr J. D. Tanner and 
Mrs E. G. Tanner, of Goring-on- 


Thames, Oxfordshire and Anue 
Penelope, daughter of Mr LS.B. 
Crosse and the late Mrs J. HL 
Crosse, of Beaconsfieid, 
Buckinghamshire. 


North Yorkshire, and Maw 
Louise, eldest daughter of Mr 
and Mrs D, A. Benson, of 
Thorn borough, Bedale, North 
Yorkshire. 


Dr TJ J. Nkhoboo-Laitey 
and Dr CA. Jones 
The engagement is announced 
between Tom, son of Dr and 
Mrs P. J. F. Nicholson-Lailey, of 
Balionsborough, Somerset, and 
Claudia, daughter of Mr and 
Mrs G. Jones, of Shatton, 
Derbyshire. 


Reed's School 

The annual dinner of Reed’s 
School was held at Grocers'’ Hall 
yesterday. Mr John Robertson, 
presi dent was in the chair. Mr 
George Nissen and Mr David 
Prince, Headmaster of Reed’s 
School, also spoke. The Master 
of the Grocers’ Company and 
Mrs Whitmore and the Deputy 
Mayor of Bmbridge and Mr 
Lyou were among those present. 


sided at the annual dinner held ; 

last night at St Enmn’s Hold. 

Lord Cullen of Ashbournfc, i 
president, Mr M. W. Bateman, 
vice-cbairman, and Mr Tony 
Newton, Minister for Health, 
also spoke. . Others present 
inducted: 


SxS p sg§s 


Company of Stationers 
and Newspaper Makers 

Mr Allen Thompson, Master of 


Council, me Chairman or Utf A JWd- 
BtUB) or OpUcal praq mopera. tut 
Chairman of ttn OpOcal taftormaxlon 
Council and BW PrettMat of tt» 
B rmgi .Coney, o< Opwnalmtc Op- 
nrtain (Optometrists). 


the Wardens, Mr Mark Tollit 
and Mr John Leighton, presided 
at a dinner held ax Stationers’ 
Hall yesterday. Commander 
ami Alderman Sir Robin Gtilctt 
was the guest of honour and 
Lieutenant-General Sir Michael 
Wilkins, Commandant General, 


Royal Marines, also spoke. Hie 
Prime Warden and Clerk of the 
Dyers’ Company and the Mas- 
ters and Clerks of the 
LeathersdleTs’, Cord Warners’, 
Musicians and Glass-Sellers* 
Companies were among others 
present. 


Federation of Ophthalmic 
and Dispensing Optidatts 

Mr R_ T. Harris, Chairman of 
the Federation of Ophthalmic 
and Dispensing Opticians, pro- 


Horwxtfc & Honrath (UK) 

Mr Jonathan Bodtender, 
Managing Director of Horwath 
& Horwath (UK) and Stay 
Hayward, chartered accoun- 
tants. was host at a dinner held 
at the Reform Club yesterday to 
mark the international con- 
ference, “Tourism in the 
1990s”, befog held this week. 
Senhor licinio da Cnnha, Sec- 
retary of State for Tourism of 
Portugal, and Lady Vlqar Nisa 
Noon, Chairman of Pakistan 
Tourism Development 
Corporation, were guests of 
honour. Among others prese n t 
were: 

Mr II Ha| HU grown* Tcurttf 

A ilm liih teQH rt n flalnai MT RAf> 


AiwoqWowi. Mr 
ariMEu 




oursin of nortuBBD. M 
MP. Mr Leo u Swrttfil 

«vcl GornMagHani. Mr 


peso Travel Oormm 
Sraan antwnaponal 


and Mr Qnnttm maona 

H0M9L MU) 


OBITUARY 


MR DEREK HART 

Gifted broadcaster and 
film-maker 


career m radio, tdevisipn and 
documentary films began in 
1946, and vriu> was a founder 
member and co-presents- of 
■foe original BBC Tonight 
programme, died in London 
fan November 21 He was 61. - 


Derek Osborne Hart was 
bom on Mach 18, 1925, and 
educated at Christ’s College, 
Bath, and at Lincoln College 
and New College Oxford. 
Bom 1943 to 2945 he served 
as a pitot inlhe Fleet Air Arm. 
Bis fiist broadcasts were as an 


Bid and repertory, and he 
appeared in . a number of 
tefeviskra dramas as eariy as 
1948. 


In 1949 he joined the radio 
cast of Mrs Dale’s Diary in 
which he played the part of 
Bob Dale for two years. For 
four more years he played a 
wide variety of idles in BBC 

repertory, bnt it was as one of 

the pt ese n te ra of Va&'Tomght 
programme, and as one ofits 
principal interviewers on cur- 
rent affair s and the arts, that 
he became a household name. 
His intelligence, charm, firm- 
ness and humour helped to 
make the programme foe ex- 
ceptional success it was. 

Subsequently he presented 
for BBC2 the Europa pro- 
gramme, which made effect- 
ive use of foreign countries' 
coverage of current aflans, 
often conferring on the British 
people foe gift to see them- 
selves as others saw them. 
Among many other television 
and radio programmes of his 
was foe first BBC consumer 


programme, 0iotce, and. foe 
radio series The Livefy 

& 1968 he began to build a 

forfoer reputation as an inde- 
pendent producer, writer; and 
director of documemaiy films, 
at first in partnership with 
Lord Snowdon, making Don't 
Count The Cameg, Love of a 
Kind, Bom to be Small, and 
Happy Being Bappy.Tbn first 
of these won two Emmy 
awards. 

In the mid- 1970s he joined 
the parHamentary and public 
affaire consultancy which was 
to become foe RusefiPaittier- 
shtp,and made three films for 
the Red Ores on Lebanon, 
Africa and Cambodia, which 
were repeatedly shown all 
over the worid. in foe coone 
of ten years he made many 
highly successful films for 

ddfcrentdients, in the process 

traveffing-widdy. 

His interests extended far 
beyond foe confines of his 
work. He loved music, cricket, 
foe arts, horse racing and 
parries.' The qualities which 
made him such a czyifized 
interviewer had won him 
many friends. He was both a 
very sociable and - a Very 
private person. 

Despite serious Alness in the 
last year of his life he contin- 
ued to puraue his work and 
interests with the same perfec- 
tionist zeal and enjoyment as 
ever - occasionally casting an 
amused and mischievous eye 
on (he Hlffiraihifis of his bid 
employer, the BBC 

He married, in 1951, foe 
journalist Siriol Hugh- Jones, 
who died in 1964. Their 
daughter survives him. 


SIR DUGALD BAIRD 


Professor JSL John Dermis 
writes: 


Sir Dugald Baird’s interests 
spanned a greater and more 
varied field than your obitu- 
ary (November 18) may have 
suggested. 

His status as a tran of 
energy with great powers of 

anal^ «nA r ritirigm tan first 

recognized nationally in the 
mid- 1930s when foe (hen 
president of the British Con- 
gress of Obstetrics and 
Gynaecology, Sir Eardley Hol- 
land, cancelled his own ad- 
dress to malm way for foe 
young Baird. 

This gave him an opportu- 
nity to describe the adaptation 
of the kidneys and Madder in 
pregnancy and explained why 
p regnan t women were so sus- 
ceptible to serious and some- 
times fatal infections in this 
-area. 


In the 1950s his critical 
epidemiological approach 
produced changes in the man- 
agement of pregnant women 


DR IAN BUSH 


DrsJ.F. TaiU FBS, and S. A. 
S. Tail, FRS, write: 

One of the contributions of 
Dr fan Bush (November 1 l) to 
endocrinology was his studies 
on foe nature of the secretions 
of the adrenal cortex. 

He combined the in situ 
adrenal perfusion system, pio- 


neered by Dr Martha Vogt, 
with his microchemical meth- 
ods to analyse adrenal secre- 
tions. This was foe first time 
this had been accomplished in. 
terms of known individual 
steroids snch as corticosterone 
and cortisol. 

The most significant work 
on aldosterone in foe 1950s in 
Britain was to establish that 


this hormone was secreted. 
The application of foe Bush 
chromatographic methods 
was essential to separate 
aldosterone from other ste- 
roids and they were then used 
to analyse dog and monkey 
adrenal perfusates obtained by 

him. 

In a sense, he wrote his own 
obituary last year in auto- 
biographical notes for Ste- 
roids, where his early 
excitement in the science is 
dear. This, together with his 
originality and articulate 
explanation of his ideas, was 
die basis for his inspiring 
personal influence on his 
colleagues. 


SIR GEOFFREY 
THESTLETON- 
SMTTH 


MR RICHARD 
ARMITAGE 


Marriage 

Dr J.MjG. Foster 
and Miss F J. Vailfant 
The marriage took place on 
Saturday, November 22, at St 
Johns’ Church, Bfeckheath, of 
Dr James Foster, elder son ofDr 
and Mrs Robert Foster, of 
Bembridge, Isle-of-Wight, and 
Miss Felicity VaiDant, younger 
daughter of Dr and Mrs Chanes 
Vaiflant, of West Derby, 
LiverpooL 


A. H. writes: 

The main responsibility of 
Geoffrey Thistietoa-Smith 
(November 18) as ““Mining 
Commander” HMS Vernon, 
from 1940 to 1942, was foe 
safety and reliability of all new 
underwater weapons except 
torpedoes. 

This included depth charges 
and foe ahead-throwing weap- 
ons that were to supplement 
them, which were all vital to 
the defeat of foe U-boats, as 
well as moored mines bring 
laid in barrages, and ground 
mines for faying by aircraft. 

In his mid-seventies, he 
asked my wife to enrol him for 
a cordon bleu cookery course 
at foe Chichester College of 
Technology. The supervisor 
seemed surprised. "Is the 
admiral really serious?” she 
enquired. 

“This one win be” was foe 
reply. And, of course, he was 
top of the class, as, I suspect, 
be often had been during 
sublieutenants* courses long 
ago. 


Rita Falk, 19S2 Olympic 
figure-skating champion, who 
competed under her maiden 
name of Ria Baran, died on 
November 12. She was 63. 

She and her partner, Paul 
Falk, whom she later married, 
won the figure skating event at' 
foe 1952 Helsinki Olympics. 
They also won the worid tide 
in 1951 and 1952. 


Latest wills 


Baroa Rant Of -Beneadeo, of 
Montacuae Road, Lewes, East 
Sussex, who, as Mr Cyril Plant, 
was general - s e cr et ar y of the 
Inland Revenue Staff Federa- 
tion for 16 yean and was 
chairman of foe TUC in 1976, 
left estate valued at -£184,329 
net. He died intestate. 

Mrs Hilda Grace Bafabridte, of 
Winchester . Road, Worthing, 
West Bosses, left £85410 net, 
equally between Dulwich Cot- 


. ***** 


resulting in a dramatic reduc- 
tion in perinatal mortality in 
north-east Scotland. 

The scientific publications 
from his department were 
recognized by the Medical 
Research Council which, in 
1956, established the obstetric 
medicine research united in 
Aberdeen under his director- 
ship. The- unit’s publi catio ns 
in foe fields of reproductive 
physiology, endocrinology, 
epidemiology and medkri so- 
ciology quickly established an 
international reputation. 

The width of bis achieve- 
ments can be judged by the 
fact that at least 26 of those 
working with him were later 
appointed to professorships in 
the United Kingdom and 
abroad. 

Following his official retire- 
mem in 1965 be confirmed his 
- research interests, and his last 
scientific paper,, containing 
original data, was published 
last year. He was a. humane, 
friendly, readily approachable 
man, of great intellect 






J. B. S. writes: 

May I draw attention to a 
curious error in the obituary 
of Richard Annitage (Novem- 
ber 20)? 

. The name Nod Gray was 
intended to be that used by his 
father Reginald Annitage (at 
that time a cathedral orgmist) 
in his capacity as a composer 
of popular son$s. But he was 
mishear d by ms first music 
publisher with the result that 
he became known as Nod 
Gay. 

At the time the mistake was 
rax regarded as significant and 
he continued to be known by 
that name. 

Armitage’s badness deal- 
ings were characterized by the 
strongest integrity, a feature 
not as common as it should be 
in foe industry in which he 
worked. 


^against h 

m to save j 


Mr Leroy “Unde Roy” 
Johnson, self-proclaimed 
prophet and leader of foe 
small polygamist border town 
of Colorado City, died on 
.November 25. He was 98. 

Johnson and two other &m- 
ifies, the Bariows and Jessops, 
formed, in 1943^ foe United 
Effort Plan, a coope ra tive 
trust that owns most of foe 
town (pop. 2,000). 

Their sect holds to the old 
Mormon polygamist bebef 
having separated from main- 
stream Mormon ism in 1890. 

Johnson is survived by 13 
of his 16 wives. 


lege, and foe Marie Curie Me* 
modal Fo u nda t ion. 

The Rt Rev John Gilbert 
; Hindley Baker, of Orchard End, 
Dorking. Surrey, former Assis- 
tant Bishop of Guildford, who 
as Bishop of Hong Kong! and 
Macao from .1966-81 became 
foe first bishop to ordain an 
English woman to foe pries- 
hood, left £21 8*265 net 
*Mr Robert Geoffrey Hoitoe, 
Bettmmgfazoii. Hereford and 
Woicesier, left estate valued to 
£943,779. > 


‘ -Ur. 
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— — —— 

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J CM \So 



‘’••in.;*,. ^1(J 


'•a 


BIRTHS, MARRIAGES, 
DEATHS 

AND IN MEMORIAM 


■ THE TIMES THURSDAY NOVEMBER 27 1986 


21 


PERSONAL COLUMNS 




Ttwrafara tumthoo 

• ai w* 1 imlin mrnT autt »ran on mv Got 

(O&HmsdU'- • ■- ■ .■ ■ 

. HomI2'6 


1 
■ 'Vltlk- 


BHETHS 




c£?U 








--Jg. 




■ 


■ ■S 

-*a 


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" 


■'■?!'■ 
• :.tT 


■JUMETT - On November asnt to 
Laura (»6e WetoarfUO and Otftato- 
oner, a daaghur. Clara Anrfana. a 
staler tor Benjamin. Rowan and 
NatonmeL ' . . 

POT - On November 2XaL at the 
North Dev do Otatrtct MomHSd. to 
Georgia and Ttau JJ» Joy of a (faugh- 
ter. Maxtor EUabeth. now hone at 
The Manor. Bradford. 
FACXEUUYEX ■ On November 2Btb. 
ai ute Undo wing. St Mary's Hosfa- 
iw PwkflnotoiL to Oflyia and FrtcttL 
a sen. Oliver Jano- 
FO OU tl -On tbe.33nl November. In 
Inverness. tv JWbKnee Scott-Webb) 
and Hngh. a atm. Alexander Ames. 
LBMMts - On Saturday November 
32nd .1966. to Study Into Pcrttn) 
and RWurd Leonard, a daughter. 
Ndasha Leanae. a sister for 
Alexander. 

HANK - On November Z3RL at the 
Norm Devon District Hospital, to 
wim (nfe HOdyard) and Richard, a 
daughter- 

MARTW - On 21at November 1986. in 
Exeter, to AHson. wife or Anthony, a 
son. Richard. . 

ROCHEZ - On November 19th. to Ha- 
zd and PHcbotes. a son. Hartv. a 
brother for Charlotte. 

SHELLEY - On November 23rd 1986. 
to Francesca (nee Floes) and Philip, a 
son. Tam Stephen Kenneth, a broth- 
er far Raul'and Henry. 

STTFCm - on November a am. at 
Queen ChartoOc’s HoeotoL Ham- 
mersmllh. to Penekne and Gregory, 
a son. Sara, brother to Adam. 
HWUPIOK - On November 2Stti. at 
The Portland Hospital. London. Wl. 
to veneda Grfe Heaftcofe) and 
. racbdao. a son. Qtanes PrederkdL A 
brother for Staton. 

VALNER - On November 24th. at St. 
Peters. CMrtaey. to Jane and Nlcho- 
b&. twin sons: Sbwn and Andrew, 
toothers 10 Jam ea. 

VJIM OE KTTF- On November 24th. 
at St Thomas' Hospital, to Nicole (n£e 
Abdev Sfflfflt) and John,, a son. 
Mathew Edward Ainley. a brother 
for 'uuHam and Jonathan. 
WMLEMM4MHE - On Novenfeer 
26th. in JOda Kinabalu, to Anne and 
GontMer. a son. Nicolas Gonlhler. 


On 22nd NgetDAtr 1986. 
Mddenly. WUttatn (BUD JOsby. aged 
hushaod or Annaick 
and falha- or Thomas and CitartoUe. 
PrtvMe family Service- Memorial 
senrtea to be held at St Peter's 
Church. March, on Monday m De- 
cember 1980 al 2 pm. Donations, tf 
desired, may be sent to Cancer Re- 
search Campaign, c/o Georae 

Brewin. .TS %mt 

Cambridgeshire. 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


■ <5 November 24th 1986. 
Peacefully at homa after a long ffi- 
new. Agnes Mary (Motile) Lawson, 
of Futooum Manor. Cambridge, aged 
79. Fanend at St vigor* church. 
5** 1 *™®" Tuesday 2nd December 
ft** noon. Ad enquiries to Hanv 
WOttam s & Sons. Tel: nm 359480. 
BMMO . On November 23nL tn hosid. 
W d Sutton after a sudden short 
IHnesAKettb Stanley Nlirano. much 

loved father of Blair. NeO and Sbooo. 

grendfaing- to Lucy, Thomas and 
SfPto win a nd dear husband to the 
yg — ABB - Service at St 
Joan* arorcn. Brtmoni on Monday 
December 1st at 230 pm. Family 
Dowers only. Donations K desired to 
toe Admtofttrator. Royal Maraden 
Hostel. Downs Rd. Sudan. Surrey. 
HOKES - on November 22nd. peace- 
hdhf In Ills 90th year: Mafeota) 
Qiiho en. at The Lawn. Husband of 
EBmfaclh. dear father of Jonathan 
and Johan. grandpa of Sebastian and 
Humphrey. Cremation at GaDdtord 
Crematorium. November 28th at 
3pm- ^orations may be sent to. 
Wend* or the Elderly c/o The Lawn 
Hetytoourne. Alton Hants GUZM 4J A. 

- On 24th November 1986. 
a fter a s hort Illness bravely borne, 
btorgara Winifred a*. Gay), aoed 
66 years, beloved wife Of Charles 
and mother of David. Funeral Ser- 
vice wm be held on Friday 28d 
Noyanber al 1130am at St 
Botofah* Church. NorttifteeL foi- 
towed by crematton at Medway 
Crc maiorlum at 1230 pm. Floral 
tribute toTSttoriockfr Son Lid. xo 
Th« HUL NorthfleeL Keru. 
Gravesend (0474; 3S2159. 


EMINENT HONORARY 
FUND-RAISING 
CHAIRMAN/LADY 
(not averse to pobScny) 
rough! by new nara—i Charity in the 
field of housing for ddcriy people 
Please comae? The Secretary 
1. Duraaid House. 31 Ke mi u go n 
Coun. W*. 01-937-3709. 


FOB SALE 


YOU’LL BE FLOORED BY 
OUR PRICES AT 
RESISTA CARPETS 

Wto n de r ab e mmnu iwiuraj mV ujo. 
EMraaebliM wearing 0»e oew rruw 
» can buy taw per aq yd ♦ vat. 
tonban velvet sue carpet id plain 

colour*. Bum In underlay 15 J- wide 

Own Moca. T you- wear guarantee tor 
IWBfor ofUcn. £4.75 per nm« vaL 
Plu* he largest selection of plain car- 
peting kz> London. 


BOOK PUBLISHER 


TefcOI-73 1-2588 

Free Emniaica cvnert FUUag 


tovtles oow* la -sand paanoeerM 
tor iw tohcgn e n or upm v tern. An 
M toportw ceoMeM. Unne^ WAR 
MEMOIRS. auTobtograpblea and 
Poetry. New autnws are v ucotne. 


® «* Buaerti cool atte 14, tongoi 
47". l year dm. Mmxk vat anon 
£12X00 asking £SjOOo ono. tw Day 
01-7303808 


MERLIN BOOKS LTD 

Sraunien. Devon CX33 2CA 
Braun ten (0271) 816430 . 


trawiMUff HI . Best Hearts for an seta- 
bm events. Our ettsa indoor moat 
mll or co mnnn l ts Qrsflilcawiiacoegeaa. 
01-828 jsm 


FLATSHARE 


DBITBbO MeCA W W. bom 1084. The 
- DsHtn Trust wMhBS to have Intormaden 
about the life and wotlc of t&e rctXMer 
Sltceanfl who was active In the Untied 
Ktogdom In 1921. in pgrae w t a r. tt wtab- 
es to trace the present owner uf any) or 
the cettyrntt la bis works. Please write 
to 16 Ogle Street. London W1P 7LC. 


a/c studio or mare Junker. Northern. 
victo ria Hue To £6cyw. Tel: day 283 
6063Ub) eye 453 0043. . 


WHV mot HELP os tty help unwanted 

dogs, to be imped Into loving homes by 


■AKJSJt st Lady mans- large Oat Own 
bed. £260 pan Inctudve CH. gas. 0K- 
tmuy services. TttOI «5 3614 i after 
630 POV. 


hefetog Pine n wpc rV'B - Suncnar y. Prlo- 
«- Berkshire SLfi 8RJ. Tel 


ry Rd. Ascot. 

not 0990-882669. The largest nanoe-' 

strucuon Dog Sanctuary or Grew 

Brttabi ID help save, more dogs Hem Is 

the Bye Word n Ttttafly maonN man- 

tore avaoaate on requesL Xmas dim 

too. 


CLAPHAM Male tor own sal -ring*. 
moot. CH fa. WM. £36 pw tnc. 01 622 


RENTALS 


tf you have quality property 
» lei. teU us. 

LANDLORDS - 
OWNERS 

Expert professional service. 

QURAISHI 

CONSTANTINE 

27D EarB Court Road. Sws 
01-244 7383 


DOE 08 CHELSEA Brtprt bed garden 


tUL new con mai. gat CH. d/waensr. 
01 . m/c. i 


i/dryer, warn. m/c. m/wavc. Ir/freevrr 

etc. Short or long m. CI86dw Tel: 

Ol 362 1690 or Ol 681 0660 


nave a lor seKcaon w luvwy 1 / 2 / 3 / 

4 B a ar oo m IM with maw service. Inte- 

rior ac ag ntd a cemrefly incstea. Avan 
Now ConaangM Pro g aiUes 727 3000 


vn Near Hyde Park. Luxioy 2 double bod 

ML for 3 to 12 months, colour TV. 
phene, doable glased, srrvtcrd. inaom- 
ItnV cowSOod- E20D gw mg. Ttk Ol 
584 7213 anytime. 


«l - 2 ndas Oxford SL DrOghlfm large 2 
room b al con y nal. urge IdL over look- 
lag garotn square. CH. tuKv turn. £176 
pw. TetOl 905 3393. 


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We* London Areas for waning mon- 
oids M M 221 8838 


WB K roungton Large mm level interest- 


South profeaknm 

-own room H idm noose. Near tube. 
£1 15 bcm eMOuaive. Tel: Ol 673 S84& 


StUdiO. £120ow. Tel: 01 570 ISGt 
040381 2411. 


SID SAYS FORGET THE 
SHARES, TM OFF TO 
AMERICA 

N. York... £229 Atlanta ....£339 

Boson... . C2TK Texas £339 

Chicago.. £339 L Vegas- £349 

nonaa .._ £299 CaUfnna - £319 

Denver — £349 Wton 

Nov deps ind 7 days car renia) 
Oisneywond Speow £529 
Cayman totands Beachcomber £449 
Hawaiian Sunsets £489 
The Big Apple £299 
tod flight and 7 days actomra . 

Air passes from £59 and hotrt 
votKtwrs £27 per nighL 

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Ruislip (0895) 63087J/2/3 
and 639900 


SVB/I 


£636 Perth £666 AH mate 
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01-950 1366. 


DOMESTIC iS 
CATERING SITUATIONS 


RCUBF NANNY in nai 22r wun expen- 
ente. 2 cmldren <3 vein and 6 nsnlW 
in Hampstead home. Ninny duttos 
only, as other stair kepi Two days a 
week and one weeke n d per month. First 
cta» toemM emcndal. Reply 10 BOX 
J53 . 


HAMIT sough* tor wvdy pc xtl o n in 
S out h miuw pav Sole cnarpe of tod- 
dler Sen Mean. * own car + CLOQ- 
£120 pw. Cau Heather on 370-1562 
MONROe NANNIES. 


MATURE NA NNY To aceonwuy CanUr 
to hoflda . for one year, carr for one 
year old girl. References and expe r ience 
returned. CaO Monday to Friday Ol 486 
6988 


Tff ALPS. Cnalet gins (Cor- 
don Bleu oreoulvalenU wUheawnnye 
reoutred to start poor. Tei Ski Esprit 
0262-626176. 


Handy ma n/ Housemaid 
couple required lor south of Franca 
£180 clear per week plus ace. Fry staff 
Consultants AJdrrshol. Tel 0252 
315369. 


COOKS. Mothers' HrtpsABuders wanted 
le» the ChrtHmas period A other book- 
ings Phone BOOK-A-COOK 0929 
471606 


DCF COOKS IN Ski Seasons small hotel 
Chain. France (near Geneva! Ol 731 
7989. 


MSCOONT FAKES WortdwMe: 01-434 
0734 j under Travel. 


FUOHTROOKEIIS DHcoonl Fares world- 
wide l&i/ economy. 01-387 9100 


SmiATIONS WANTED 


DEATHS 


S'.IRD 


If -On November 2«ttis 986. Ar- 
I thor. Uoyttt Underwriter, husband 

of Marjorie, father of Brian ml Attn 
and a much loved srandfMher. 
Funeral ai Worthing Ovntaiorlinn. 
nndon. on Wednesday December 
3rd at 12.16 Hn. Flowers and an en- 
quiries to F A HoUand * Son. 
- Terminus Hoad. Llttienampcon. Tel 

10903) 713939. 

BASHFDBD - On November 23nL al 
Plymouth. PWHp. husband of Liz. 
The Bungalow. Runieigh- Bere 
Abton. Oder son of Aiyson and 
Humphrey. 

BLAKEWAY - On November 24th. 
smtoenty ol iMRne. Jobn Days, dear 
Doaband of Jasmine and feiher of 
Alvs. Sopbla and Denys. Enquiries to 
L C HUi i San. Funeral Directors. 
Tell 0747 060361. ‘Bcrfd. 
true and my loving cumrade*. 
■OURNE - On November 2S0 l peace- 
fully in hospital. StoBonL aged 86 
years. Dearly loved hoMon of Jane 
and father of Jinny and Edward. 
Cremation privaie followed tty scat- 
tering of ashes at sea. Ptaase no 
ktten or dowers. 

CAKBZW-KEND EE - On November 
19th 1986. at Westminster Hosmtto. 
PhynhL Wife of a C. -Cardew- 
Rendlc. of Srtwyn ■ Avenue. 
RKhmood-upoti-Thanies- Cranattoo 
Iuh taken place. 

DAVIS - On November 23. at the Sue 
Ryder Home. Cheftenham. Marimfe. 
aged 69. Fanner Had of Cirencester 
School and former Chamnan of aw 

Council for Professions SuppfeL 

tary to Medkine. Prtvaie rra mp tim 
followed by Thamasivino Service at 
Ctrenceoler Parish Church at a bder 
dale. DonaHoos to the Star Centre. 
Wien wood. .Cheltabara. 

Oo ucesierature. 

FDtSUSOK - On HmsMr 24th 
1986. suddenly al' home. 34 
GuudhaB Sl Bury St 
Adam John aoed 23 years much 
loved son of Duuaid and Margaret 
Ferguson and grandson of Kathleen 
Mary Waooo. The reauten i 
takes place an Monday December 1 st 
at St Edmunds Church. Bmy St Ed- 
munds. at 11 am followed by 
UiietmenL Flowers or dona Dons if 
preferred to The BritWi Epilepsy As 
sodaUon. . may be sent C/o. j_ 
Fulcher Ltd. 80 Whiting Sheet Btny 
SI. Ednnmds. 

60*8 - On Novonher 23rd. Suddenly 
m London. Gustave Joseph of Lau- 
sanne. Swiaeriand. sued 83. Mncfa 
loved father of Ptoilp and Mined 
grandfather of David and MKhaeL 
Funeral at Spanish and Portugese 
Jews Cemetery . Hoop Lane. Golden 
Green. London. NWll. Thursday. 
November. 27th. at 2J0 PftL 
KEBBLETHWAfTE - On 2 Stt> Novem- 
ber 1986. very suddenly at 121 a 
Benhnek Drive. Troon. May 
Anderson, beloved wife of Dougins 
and lend meatier of Michael and Gra- 
ham. Funeral Service at St NtnUn's 
Episcopal Church. Benttack Drive. 
Troon at 12.30 on Friday 28th No- 
vember fallowed by private 
cronaUou. FaraHy flowers only. 

<uss - On November 260. peaoefuBy 
m Ms sleep aged 6 months. -Billy 
Hearty loved son or Jay and Docy 
and brother of Henrietta. 

RWN ■ On 24th Noveotoer. Graham 
Irwtn. aged 53 yeara of Btncough. 

AU ehotdrtes Nease tm John TVner & 
Sons. 7 Mart Lane. Bnrsnwgh. Tel 
(0704)892264. 

-UNION • On No vember 22 nd. In Bas- 
sets. Name. formerly - of 
Woidingham. Dearly loved husband 
of Gra. FmwraL has already taken 
Mace. 


WBOMS - On 22nd November, sud- 
dtxiy ml of l CtoUbecfc Close. 
Ashton In MakernekS.W&An. Lanca- 
shire Kenneth John to his 62nd 
yemi Belova husband of the late El- 
sie Dorothy (Jo). Dearty loved father 
of John. Amanda. Sosa and Cbnyi. 
A loving father-in-law and a much 
loved grandad of Nathan. Anon. 
Claire. PhMp. Nicholas. Samantha 
and Tansy. Funeral Service and cre- 
mation wffl lake grace on Friday 
28th November In Wigan Cramaiorl- 
um Chapel at 11 am. All emttories to 

Middleton & Wood. Gerard House. 
Gerard Street Ashton to MakerflekL 
Tel: 0942 727169. 


THE ADMAU FAM Ttos taoouk Oirtol- 

nws Banar win again be >wid in ou 

Otetaem Town Had. Kings Hoad. SWS 

an Sanrfay Haweii gm a o t b ftum Ham 


la 4j5Qgai. 36 aunties wiu m rmtt- 

■wiied. all vwUrs tor the welfare of 

entmato- Please eerae and sagpert ut an. 


H/r. W/S. Km refer. Wx. heme. Offt- 
£2SO pm tncL TteOl 673 2S49 (even) 


AVAILABLE NOW Luxury futo 6 houses 
£200 - £ 3.000 per week. Tel: Bwgesa 
681 5136. 


ABTA 47869 


WA UC A. CANARtCt. Ol 441 
TraveteKe. Abu. aioL 


FEMALE ORAOUATE 07} LOMOo based, 
flurm to ShuW and French, expert- 
cored in tourkm and widely iraveUed, 
seeks Iniereating engtoyrnml wuh goad 


HnoNtt Reply to BOX 834 


1ATA 


SLOANS BqUAHC 2 infra. Two profe* 


GJUnWEW - Contracts exchanged on 
excellent recently redecora te d and 
very well presented double framed 
Premises (suit young family) follow, 
tog favourable inspection and fun- 
structural survey by Canny Scot. 
Completion September 877. 


IVIA 2 oed RaL iiwnar ceodlL 
ntto 6 mofttra Corasany leL £326 pw. 
Tat Ol 43e 9779. 


Uncurioosty funushed rial wtth one oUv 
»■ Brtgtu spacxx* bedroome. CT0X30 
per week TttOI 730 7015 (aA* 7 P.SO 


*nwo fim Ladbrnke Qua arcwlect 


IJfZNHNnN. Qntrt 3 rm Ite for 1 / 2. 
New decor. T V. Coo/ temus. Antiques. 
CISBpw. 684 8267/ 996 7220 l-7Bm. 


amnw. arete mow. Portooeao market 
£130 bw referenees essential Tel Ol 229 


KUNE - On 24th November, peace- 
fully to hospital. RQnau Peddle 
CBE-. devoted husband of the late 
Vera and much loved father and 
grandfather. Funeral service at St 
Mary's Church. Wedmore, Somerset 
on Friday. 28th November at 12 
noon. Family flowers only. Dona- 
tions- if desired., to British Heart 
Foondaiton. 102 Gloucester Ptaoe. 
London W1H 4DH. 


A Son or Antony wmaur K? 
■MOer of urgency 01-683 1709 or 
01-822 9U33 


- ProfesNonai 23+. own room 
in mtx/a house. Near cube. GCH. £40 
P.W. Tat OS 767 7262 eves 


CLAFMAMfjUmEKCA. Two room* to 
ha toe. CSS and £68 p«r wea k exd ti« 
Jgve. SofK pfM F. AM mod cm. T®t OI- 
22B 2C7o. 


RPt MNCTOW Mi Soacloui. bnghi 3 
bed manaon fUi toco) tor totownm. 
pwe rrrep. Ige may app U a n od kn. 
toann £ khowo* rm. newly dee St turn 
to htoh standard. Orem vada over gdra 
Oo i« exciBeni value. £ 275 pw. 
Quraani Oanstanltne 244 7353 


BIRTHDAYS 


FLATMATES Selective Shartra Wed 

Mtfc 01-509 5491. 313 
Road, SW3 


SOUTMFMEZDS MU. PteasatUly located 
1st floor ftai dose to Soumoetos nine. 2 
beds, attractive reception, ltt dan ut 
all amenities bath wdh shower, im of 
gone. TV. vtora anewerphone. Avad i 
yr. Sun couple or 2 ttn ret v £110 pw. 
Ouranm C faniwd l i ie 2*4 7353 


DKSS- PS- HAPPY 


• On November 24 m. after a 
short Illness. Dorothy Margaret bite 
Orosd aged 85. devoted mother or 
No« and grandmother of Alice. Poily 
and Beatrice, much loved hy all who 
taew her. Funeral at St James's 
Church. Groat SaUag, on December 
2nd at iO30am fallowed tty a Ser- 
riceofThanto^vtngatst Andrew, 
Church. Buhner, at l J-mwi Flow- 
ers or ttontoioos. to the NSPCC may 
be sent to. Brown ant Fean. Acton 
Square. SotBnsy. Suffolk. 


E TA - low 
BIRTHDAY 

CRAKAM KWITT. Homy 

iMmon-ow. Remember Lttbanv Love 


ed stntoe room to let ruity laciuttve £6& 
Close I 


tux 


% 


3061. 


i to Borons Court lube. Tel: Ol 


SERVICES 




SW 19 Fern age 2028. own room to stare 
wtu» prof, owners, par stxHogs. 
£i 6 aoa pan ptas uas. Ten sao S 224 

7pm. 


flal/hotue: up to CSOOpw. Usual fifes 
reg. Pttoilps Kay A Lewis, soutn or the 
Part CtMtoaa ofBoe. 01-362 81 1L or 
North of toe Part RegenTs Part otnee. 
01-586 9882. 


An _ 

meet lots of attractive stosfss- 39 
Ravemdate Ace. London N12 SML Ol 
446 1241/506 1233/904 4122. 


2 bedroom net. 

Owner leoatm prof person into / rate 
20'S to skate. All mod tons. 3 Mm Maes. 
£196 pern Inc. Tefc01-99£6792 ova. 


CWJHCA, HI Lovely bngtu garden Hat 
wen all new tauenor. Rerev/Otnar. 2 
Bads wtth direct acc es s to pretty pa Ho 
Ensuxe Marine Baih. Shower. KO. UU5- 
ty. Access! 

828 *051 


ITS ALL AT 
TRAILFINDERS 

More k>»-co 9 Digbis vg more rootes 
to mare denmatioiis 
ihan any other agency 

PLUS 

• Faa, ctpea tagb-tech service 

• Free warktwide hold & car hue pass 

• up to 60% discounts 

immanisatkia Insurance. 
Foreign Eidant e 
Map A Book Skip 

TRAILFINDERS 

The Travellers Travel Genue 
42-48 Easts Court Road 
London W 8 6£1 
OPEN 94 MON-SAT 
Long-Haul 01-603 ISIS 
Europe/USA 01-937 5400 
la/Bainest 01-438 3444 
Government Licensed/Bonded 
ABTA 1ATA ATOL/1458 


M OROCC O ROUND. Regent SL Wi. Ol 
734 5307 ABTA/Atol. 


WINTER SPORTS 


RETIRED OCIICTIVC H.cs. New Scot 
land Yam seeks gatniu] erapJoymeoi. 
Owns Land Rover, witling to transport 
val u ables, securtues or persons. Lives in 
Suun Bonded securtty. Tel: 0787 
223838 


— P A-wetf genptoyed) with 
editorial/ P R experience 
ref* TefcOI 364 3771. 


SKI WHIZZ 


100 HOLIDAYS TO SELL AT... 
KNOCKED DOWN PRKESU 
CHRISTMAS NOW..XI59 
1 week 20 Dec. catered ctuieB 
induttve of flight 
MERtBEL. VERB1ER. COUROtCVEL- 
MCCEVE A CHAMONIX 

OPEN TODAY...DONT 
MISS OUT_BOOK NOW 

02^5700999/0236 
ATOL 1820 ACCESS/VSA 

121 . ffietd Rood. London SWIO 


PUBLIC NOTICES 


CHARTTV COMMISSION 
Charity ■ The cnamubtr Trim of 
Turner Manufarturing Company Limited 

The Ourity cwwmiwlon propw p to 
aiakea Scheme tor ttdv Charity. Coma of 
the draft Scheme may be obtained from 
them (Ref: 292663-A/l-Ll) al St. Alban'* 

House. 67-60 Haymartet. London swiy 

4Qx Otnectlons and suooeshdnD may be 

seni to them wfthtn one month Iran 

today. 


LEGAL NOTICES 


SKI BEACH VILLAS 


CHRISTMAS OFFERS 20(h 
DECEMBER 


Catered chalets in Verbier. MeribeL 
Andorra ud Aiabta. 


HOSE - On November 24th 1986. 
Frank wnijatn O.B.E.. jj».; «f worth 
Court. Worth, sandwich, Kent, aged 
81 years. Funeral ertvate. Memorial 
Service to be announced later. 


raitWE ctr» Ltd professional currles- 
han vuae docmnenH. DetnUc 01-631 


IARWS MMS Nr Staoott. 9 Bra Prof 
F. OB*, a/s. Karr tow own /r. CH. 
£190 pen fact. 01-8760209 eve*. 


■EOUMCDl Only bixary dais and bouses 
In W1/W2/NWB/ SW1/SW5/SW7 for 
long eo let*. Kenwood 01-402 2271. 


cafe by JOB SCAR04 PLUS CV ttrvtcoa. 


o/a to share 

O/r all amenities £200 pan. 
EXCL 434 3232 X 154 or 674 3971 eve*. 


. _ - offer* selec- 

tion of flat* & to ga in the Cay. 
KtUQhtshridoe. Keattagt o n. WtmMedoa 
and other areas. Ol 637 0821. 


(04427) 78209. 


TAYLOR - On November 24th 2986. 
peacefully to Gays Hospital. Bernard 
David, aged 69. Gretnatton on Mon- 
day December 1st Mo pm at Horn- 
Gaik CTemalortmn. Brockley Why. . 
SE23. when firiemte will be I 
wetootne. 


.Love or* tom SQL. An ages. 
. Dateline. Dept |Q16) 23 Ateradoo 
Road. London WB. Tel: 01-938 toil. 


FULHAM. M/F. O/R. to shore lux mixed 
(Hi near tuba. CH W/mao. Btocsay. 
- £200 pan. 370 0266. or 385 1498. 


*- KEM. Elegant 5 bnL. bemmful recep. 


CAFtTALCVs prepare tri grou nJttrcCTrtc- 


otusi Vitae*. 01-607 


FUUUM RROaOWAT Prof 22-28 yn to 
Kwre comfortable QaL 6 mb* tube. 
£216 pan ed 01-386-6369 after 6tn 


OL washer, col TV. maid. £300 
neg. Short/ long let. 373 0763 


DISCOUNTED FARES 

Return Return 

JCTBURO/HAR Z4 86 DOUALA £420 
NABtOB) £390 SYDNEY C7B0 
Chmo £230 AUCKLAND E7B5 

IAGOS £360 HONG KONG 2550 
DBJBOMBAY £350 MIAMI £330 

BANGKOK £350 AND MANY MORE 

AFRO ASIAN TRAVEL LTD 
tG2ft6S RagMt St Wt 
TE^ DT-43/Sffi 
Lain i Group 
AMEX/VISA 


* FREE places for groups • 
RING US FOR A GOOD DEAL! 


(0223) 350777 (24 brs) 
Atol 38 IB Abta 1415X 


«wol <1840 age grotto) Tat 01-373 

loo& 


tUalPSTCilD WtUflC F abare tge hto 

flat o/r. w/mach. £65 pw. Tel: 01-629- 
9933 217 


Cavz - Character cottage In qoiel cul-de- 
sac. 2 bedroom. CH. £120 pw. owner 
abroad, couple preferred. TeC Ol 674 
2671. 


- On November 24th 1986. 
al Cheltenhant General HoopttaL 
Gnrdan Peter waOdeB. of FawtAw^ 
and London, barrister at Law and 
formerly of Uganda Mice. Dearly 
towd by Pbva. DOuglBE Mnricl and i 
Erie. Funeral a 2 Bin on Friday No - 1 

vember 28th at St Aodrew^ Church. 
Ettanmch. nr Cirencester. Ffcmliy 
ffewart only. DodsUobs. If deatred. i 
to Overseas Service Penslenen Be- 
nevolent Society. -65 Church Road. 
Hove. Sussex. BNS 2 BD. 


KDKaMTON. Wll. Luxury BU ttexttoL 
suit 2 prof F. n/s. £45 pw oxOuttvc. TeC 
627 1337. 


•37 MSI The n u mber to reman ber 
when lecfctng best rental prooertlm In 
raitr*! god prime 
£150/£2.0000W. 


WANTED 


KM*™ Prof person to share lodge. 
Qsesboosa trane. £46 jjwexct Ol 581 
1393 OXL 325B«daPX Ol 649 7105 (eve) 


ALUM BATES 6 Co bove a lane getec. 
don of flats a bouses avau Mr long / 
sheet Wt tot £100.00 p.w. Ol 499 1665 


£276 

£366 

£320 

£420 

£335 


SPINK 
Boy War Medals 


■» nVf. own targe room, taxury go r s ui 
BaL £55 pw «cL Trt: 01-637 1475 
(day)/ 01-226 7118 laves) 


nm ST A Modern funy rundsAM 1 bed 
flaL K/B. CM. re o s POnu. £130 pw. Tot 
03722 73137. 


PROF person required for bouse to SW18. 
tearing wttb 4 males. £160 pan excL 
Ol 870 6329. 


Will* aiarndng 2 brdrom a Oil 
D euwe reception room, xttriten 6 bath- 
room. £200 pw. 730 3435 <TL 


LOWEST FARES 

Parts £69 N YORK 

Frankfurt £60 LA/5F 

Lagos £320 Mtamt 

Nairobi £326 Gtogapore 

Jo-borg £460 Bangkok 

Cam £205 Katmandu £440 

Dei /Bom £536 RSOSOte £360 

Hong Kogg £510 Qdndto £425 

Hage DtsrouWs Avau oo 111 tOOCtoi 

SUN & SAND 

21 SwaBow SL London Wl 
01-439 2100/437 0637 


SKI • FLY • SKI * FLY 

MANCHESTER * 
CATW1CK 70 ANDORRA 
1 WK BY AOt FROM £119 
ZWKSY AIR FROM £163 
PLUS FREE cha dre te hoUdaya. FREE 
Lut Maes or FREE Insurance an 
many dales Inc. Xmas/NV 

FREEDOM HOLIDAYS 

The Andorra Experts since 1972 
01-741 4686/4471 (34 lira) 
Manchester 061 236 0019 
ATOL 432 IATA A TTO 


IN THE MATTER OF 
C & J POULTRY PRODUCTS LIMITED 
AND 

IN THE MATTER OF 
THE COMPANIES) ACT 1985 
Notice >9 hereby Idven. that uie creditors 
of the above-named Company, widen ts 
bring voiuMaray wound up. are required, 
on or before the 1 2th day of December 
1986. to send In their fun Christian and 
names. lh«r addresses and descrip- 
tions, tun particulars of ibetr debts or 
dabw. and the names and todr tiM i of 
their Sobdiors Uf any), to the und ersig ned 
David A t Wood of Latham Qonlw & 
Davis. 6 Part Road. Chodey. Lana PW? 
I OP. the Ugfadamr of the saw Company. 

1. If so required by notice to writing 
from the said Liquidator, are. per sona lly 
or by tnrir Solicitors, to come to and prove 
their debts or claims at such Umr and 
place PS teaU be specified in such nonce, 
or In deUun thereof they will be excluded 
from the benefit of any dMrfauttou made 
before such debt* am proved. 

DATED Uds 12th day of Nove m ber 1986 
DJV.T WOOD 
LIQUIDATOR 


HUMS - On November 23rd. Bar- 1 
tbokuirtw. darting hudrand. friend f 
and partner of Maxyamie. Beloved 
father of Joshua. Sophie and EHber. 
A Service to be held at Christ] 
Church, tfighbury Grove N 6 , on Fn- 1 
day 28th « 230 pm. No flowers. 


Including Orders & Decorations 
Spink & Son Limited 
8-7 King Street SLJaxnes'a 
London SWIY 6 QS 
Tel 01-930 7888 <24 hours) 


PUmpf Largs rtonv. own b athroom to 
tamfly house. SMO per vw eh exrtottve. 
TcHPhonet 01-785 9678 (after 7.PJW 


C1B5W*C» Lae too Roar furn rt Own 
rasHlto- battuoom and phone. Baetc 
£5Q pw. Tel Ol 994 62DS. 


PlflNETr Prof M. 23 yra +. to share Oat 
with 1 other. Own room. Avau now. 
£80 Per week toe. TaL 789-4074 tEvesL 


Established 1666 


SW. Pleasant mesa m tan- house. N/s. 
Near lobe. FUtoom Broodwov and bus- 
es. £250 (too pan Inc. T«£73i-35flB- 


rSB ltwi- K mm. 2 bed. 2 stony flat wm 
bakuay to nvtrsdc nt tnfng—p| 
£160 PW. 01-940 4566 fT) 

DoeKLANDB Flats and house* to Nt 
throusroul the DncMtoXl S area. TMXU- 
790 9660 


NEW LOW FARES 

AMMAN £235 KUWAIT £ 
BOM/DEL £366 NEW YORK £265 
CAIRO £203 BALTIMORE £278 


SKI SUPERTRAVEL 

CHfOSTMAS SPECIAL OFFERS 

Selected catered chalets 

DEPS 20 DECEMBER 

ONLV£199toP4ertbeL Veitser 
& Val mere. 

ONLV £249 to Oteichsmf. SL Anton 


ttoikahoohcases. bureaus 8i OB palnitnna 

etc. Ol 946 7683 day.0i 7890471 eves. 


SMQ.Twtn bedded room In attractive CH 
DaL Very ckue tube. Stm 2 girts- £50 pp 
pw. Tel; 491 7396 CO) or 373 8813 (O. 


RMEAL FOB vtttiora. Sottth KeMtogtou. 
FuBy serviced llau for 2. Lift. Phone. 
CW TV etc. 01-684 2414/0372 64281 


DAMASCUS £3*6 ROME 
DUBAI £346 SEOUL 

FRATURT £ 65 StN/KUL 
HONG KONG £490 SVD/MEL 
ISTANBUL £170 TA1PAI 
KARACHI £285 TOKYO 

6KYL ORD TRA VEL LTD. 

2 DENMAN STREET. LONDON Wl. 
TEU 01M39 3521/8007 
AIRLINE BONDED 


£106 

£606 

£420 

£590 

£570 

£690 


Limited offers - ring now! 

01-584 5060 


MEMORIAL SERVICES 


Noel Stuart this SMorday.l 
Woburn Church, at noon. Bookings/ 1 
enquiries <09081 791 U. 

MAXWELL - A Thanksgiving Service 
wm be heU far Ute life and wraic of 
WUUam.W. MaxweO ALA.. SLng^at 
Hampstead Parish Church. Church 
Row. NW3. On Friday 28m Novem- 
ber at IS noon. 

ruClNCTON • A Service of Ttranks-I 
wing far the life of Dr. HusSt 
PnHogtOQ. won be Mtf WSLLmes* 
GarBcknyihe. on Thursday Decent- J 
ber 4th at 11^0 am. 

YOUNG - Dr Carmichael, a Memorial 
Service for the late Dr Carmichael 
Young wfB be held In the Chapel of 
SI Mary's Hospital. Paddington on 
Wednesday 3 December at 12 X pm 


painted forounre Mr Athlon Ol 9*7 

6946. 667-669 Csrratt Lane. Bwtsftrid. 

SWI7. 


SWlh Prof M/F. 23+ . ooo arete O/r. 
CH hoone. Nr. tube. £180 pa» exri. Tab 
6728199 (eves). 


LUXURY SERVICED FLATS, mural Lon- 
don from £32B nw plus VAT. Ring 
TOwn Howe Apartments 373 3433 


£80 pw Very targe room to lovely 
w ftttL chne to vtctoria TM Ol 828 


M VALID 2 bedim garden naL Ntoe- 
ty furntaned. 1/2 persons to snare. Ctaw 
tube. £650 PQB end TeU)l -423-4160. 


JEWELLERY. OoHL Stiver. Dtownds or- 


gentiy wanted. TOo prteeawiinaras, « 

Lama i 


i CoadttM St WCl. Ol 406 8698. 


moons Green, dbi rm to «*. 

m nteto net. £37.50 per pa 


Private Ol 606 1188 


*WU Large room to fanttty house. Vic- 
toria 9 none. Meal prof pled a terra. £40 
pw IldWM. Teh 01-6Tte6090 


FOR SALE 


W2. profpos. O/Jt In modem mats wtth 
potto. CH. CHW. £70 pw tnc. Ol 221 

6210 after apoL 


MATY MB Wl Lux turn maisonette. 3 
Je. 1 rac. new K ★ B. new decor * 
carpets. J326pw. Tel: 0342 7L2617 

Null MU MLL: may pentnorae. Share 
with ownet 4 days «geh month. £90pw 
• owl. TetOt -34 1-9643. 

PtaiUtO hm. f u rnished 2 britrm QaL 
Newly decorated. £j7Bpw incl. Tel Ol- 
821 9586. 


CANARY m AH , Xmas hols spedtab. 
Incl sccorn. A free afrport parking. Te- 
POtfe 23/12. X 8 days £2E8DP- 
C/Canirta 22/12 x 8 days £278pp. Te- 
nertfe 19/12 * 15 days £368 do. 
Lanzarote 18/12 x IS days E3T8W. Fit 
ooty from £1 BOpd. Bonanza Hols. Agt 
OSL ATOL 231. Tei 0002 298844 


ITCNY FEET- Dutty Sdtt TUbe ade 
age of our pre-Xmas ekUng bargains 

val disere A Times catered rttatet/ctub 

HMMays. 28 Nov. 6 A 13 Dec ft only 

£106n>. The Snow Has Arrived!’ Sid 

VAL Tet Ol 20OGO80(24hra)«rOi 90S 

4444. ABTA/ATOL 


M THE MATT ER OF 

GIFT NOVELTIES LIMITED 
AND 

M THE MATTER OF 
THE COMPANIES ACT 1985 
Notice Vs hcretar given that the creditors 
of the above-named Company, which Is 
being voluntarily wound up. are req ui red, 
on or before the i9m day of December 
1986. to send In theft fun Outsuan and 
surnames, theft addresses and desoip- 
Uods. full parocuura of theft debts or 
dune, and uie names and addirams of 
theft Sobdiors Uf any), to me undersigned 
Steuben Damn Swaoea FGA of 30 
EautbtxrmeTwraoe. London W2 6LF. the 
l . wnt da m rut the said Company, and. If so 
required by more in writing from the said 
Liquidator, are. p erson al l y or by theft 
Solicitors, lo come wand Drove theft debts 
or dam at auch nme and place as shall be 
specified to ouch notice, or In default 
thereof they will be excluded from me 
benefit of any CUstr&xiUon made before 
such debts are proved. 

DATED (Id 14th day of November 1986 
S.D. SWADEN 
LIQUIDATOR 


• Super value self caurtog 
eki holidays w toe best French resorts. 
Rteg tor new brochure now. 

Tel 01-789 2992. 

ABTA 69256 Atol 1383. 


„ N YOrtf £249. 

LA/Son Fran £329 Sydney /Metoourne 
£769. AH direct dal tv moots Donntr ISO 
Jermyn Street Xu 859 7144 


SKI WEST - HEW! Special offers on 
WOUM- RMG FOR A DEAL) Atoothei 1 
amazingly tow prices starring at £S9. 
ask for a aw of our bumper b roch u r e . 
(Ol) 783 9999. Aba 69266 AIM 1383. 


.... Offers 

around ra.OOO. 0376 576372/374278 

vtewtog during normal pub ooentao 


WALK u work, own room in Georgian 
house ECl. CH. W m / tartar. Cdn. 
£66pw. Tel 01 261 5806. 


MONO MLL. Altracrive 2 bed ItaL 
mrtdng. knrdp court. E 1 E 6 pw tod 
CH/HW. 01-940 4556 <TI 


I WC1 : 9WSC- CH flaL 


urotk. N/» 

WWS. TtoKcss 328607 eves. 


: SELECTION of 2/3 bednn flats. Short ten 
Sable. £390 • SSOOpw. company 
Mi preferred. Ring 722 7722 Baity. 


COSTCUI lifts ON (UgMs/hols to Eu- 
rope. USA A mod destinations 
Dtptomal Travel: 01-730 2201. ABTA 
tATA ATOL. 


6ft« 


IN MEMORIAM -PRIVATE | 


mem and haruriom e piece of furniture. 

cuoa Tei 0202 692790 (Dorset). 


fortune bouse. CH. prtn. £30 pw 
csoeL Tel: 01-874 4063 toner 7-00 puoj 


BLOANE APARTMENTS Prefect (oca bon 
off stoane Square. FuOy serviced A 
equipped. Tel: 01-373 5306 (T). 


SPECIALS. 12 day holiday available to 
January in staffed chateL a lew places 
left on Powder co u rse s for all levees of 
5MMV with swm Mountain Guide. 
Phone Powder Byrne 01 223 0601 


IN THE MATTER OF 
ROY KING iCOACHWORKSl LIMITED 
AN D 

IN THE MATTER OF 
THE COMPANIES ACT 1985 
Notice is hereby given ihai the creditors 

of the above-named Company, whleh ts 

betng voluntarily wound up. are required. 

on or before the 26th day of December 

1986. lo send in Uirir lull Chrwtan and 

surname*, theft addresses and deaertp- 

Uons. fufl panicuiara of tbetr debts or 

daftns. and me names and addresses of 

theft Senators uf anyl to tbe undersigned 

Mr Peter Schofey Dunn FCA af 30 East- 

bourne Terrace. London W2 6LF. toe 
UqoWMor of uie said Company . and. if so 

required w oottcr to wrlttog from the said 

Uouxuior. are. personally or by theft 

Sol Kl lora. to come in and prove theft dints 

or claims ai such Umr and pace as teatt be 

specified in such notice, or in default 

thereof they wui be excluded from me 

benefit of any dUntnittaa made before 

such debts are proved. 

DATED tfih 17m day of November 1986 
PETER SCHOLEY DUNN 
LIQUIDATOR 


OLD TORE l UBir— L cobble setts 


5T IABEFS PLACE SW1 Luxury 
serviced 2 Bed apartment. Prime iocs 
don next lo Part. 01-373 6906 fT). 


£SO of 1 couchevri Ctutamias chafers. 

FOr fOU details cau Le 8M 0464 548996.. 


9. AFRICA From £465. 01-584 7371 


DRAKE. - Ntett - Ntwentbcr 28ft - a 
flxttng tribute - 1 named my son far 
you - You wm nve oo in my heart 
forever. 


10380) 850039 twins). 


CENTALS 


ILL rnateARY Seeks furn pragerum In 


Science report 



uverfes stUI 

dlrung eokes to 

oak. NeoMbed. i . 

(0491 > 641115. Bodra gnouth <02021 

29358a TbpSham (039287) 7443. 
Bsrketay. Gtos (0455) 810952. 


Beetle against beetle 
in fight to save trees 


ROYAL YACHT RetatBOMd. Thta fam- 

ous range or Meta Tooeiries is now 
gvattaMe from Ha nw ta. General Trad- 

ing Company. EXfmtoos and leading 
straps throuaboed the country. For your 

neareststaddst telephone 06285-31439 


STJUMU PLACE- Wll 2nd and 3rd 

Door malsonrtle. A Bohl and bright corv 

verted prope rty dm to shops i 

wantffnrt comprismg of 3 MSrai 

<2d.l*L b all ftu Biii. separate WC. double 

room, rally luted kuctwa with 

lined. £200pw 

nea crnuaa Brian Lack A CW. Ol 586 


•BIB Sftta.1 Bed lux nal. New dec 
CBTV. £150 pw. Co let pref. TM Ol 221 

130OaE). 


CHBKTMAS/New Year in Kyranta Norm 

Cyprus Comprehensive range of s/evtt- 


WALTHAM C ROS S FUmtstied home. 3 
bed. suitable sharing EdOOpan apply 
0234 67169 


down to earth prices. Grand Univ ersal 

Services (TAT). 20 Stoke Newington 

Church SI. London N16 TeL 01-249 

0721. 


I Cau TRACER BONANZA n Tlgnes. La 
Ptortta « Deux. Atpas. Sett earning 
apa rtm ent s 6 Dec ... 1 wa £89 unri. rtp 
coach) 13 Dec ... 1 wk £89 (Ina. coach 
out/ni bade) CHRISTMAS FROM -. 
£89< RING 01-370 0266 (24 Im) ATOL 
1820 


sect predator against one of the 
most serious scourges of 
commercia] forestry, the great 
spruce bark beetle, and they are 
increasingly confident that their ' 
appointed champion will 
prevail. 

The great spruce bark beetle. 


By Gareth Hnw Davies 

Scientists have pitied an in- drops, seek another food source, 

fira rfttic remains in tune with 
the population of Dendroctonus \ 
micans. 

The commission's scientists 
expect tbe Grandis population 
to - increase sharply, with a 
potential tenfold increase per 

Dcndroaonus' micans, is. found ^ 

it was first delected in- British nverwhrimine it 
plantations' in 1982, ahhon^i h Evans, orinchral 

probably arrived 10 years®*- 

wideftOTt'SwS^oKrattr Commissjon. belxyt^Mizo- 

sta^fo^mtosrfSiU.aa™! '^T^s ^,1 in SO pet 
Tte qegg* DenJraamus ““ * 


TRE ntl (1814-1986) TM» XZZXta gttte 

original Meat dated me 

VRV ttfeOift «tr* Mn. DI. 9 &M 1 B 

free IffTDV newapaperf) Ycstertfxirt 

. News. 43 DBB d wu M Road. Ootwyn 

. Bay. Tel. 0492 631196/631303. 


RHMI MM Mn. Snoertty fated A 

f u i ul rtted cat to (Mb exausive Private 

don *rim Mrt) weurtty. 2 dbje bedr 

Ige reap. IT ul bath. wc. 2 * Itr paner- 

eae. parting, dbte gtag. Oo lef £220pw. 

. Quratahi Goustanttoe 244 7383 


Good 

htoara/IUta- No fee to tenants. Trte^ 
phone WIBame A Son 01 9*7 3130. 


ALICANTE. Faro. Malaga etc. Dtmoad 
Travel ATOL 1783. 01-881 4641. 
Horsham 68641 


I CMAIXTB. VCUKR. CMATEL. Megne. 
caiamonto. Arge nM era. La duraz. ft , 
£85 Baaw PtaC«. Ol 790 8976 or 587 

1513. 


A WEST END Flat and Houses Ltaf to For 
Sate/Let. Davts Wootte. O! 402 73B1- 


BEST Fares, aest Flights. Beta hotuuy* 

anywhere. Sky Travel. 01 834 7426. 

ABTA . 


to courcftevel. Have a fun 
packed (radltmaai Atptne Cbroomas 1 
wtth ALL the trimming* tor only £169. 1 
Ring SU Boone Nrige. 01 244 7333. 


SLOAIK SOUABE. Briphl and spactocB I 
oearoo m flaL £200 pw. 730 3436 m. 


ODFOWTK tube. SW*. m private Regen- 
cy creoc ni L Luxurious. eewty 
appointed gdw ad h. 2 au bedrooms. 

recegtton. dbang w l KAS. GCH. pa- 

Mo Flee parking. £186 pw. Reft. co. teL 
TCI: 7238081. 


EUROFE/WORLO WRDE lowest lares on 

charter/scheduted fits. Pilot FUgM Ol 

6SI 0167. AN Aid 1895. 


CMBSTMAB OFFERS. Ftofr catered cha- 
lets wdh mb Xmas extras, only £197. 
Can Le Ski 0484 648996. 


OVERSEAS TRAVEL | 


JAHUARY SMI SKOALS from SU Les 
A toe* 10 verbier. vmars. Menbei A 
Megrvcs. Tei Ol 602 9786. 


IN THE HIGH COURT OF JUSTICE 

NO 007183 Of 1986 

CHANCERY DIVISION 
MR. JUSTICE M EBVYN DAVIES 
I N TH E MATTER OF 
MONTEFT8RE U K. UMTTED 
AN P 

fN THE MATTER OF 
THE COMPANtCS ACT 19B5 
REGISTRATION OF ORDER AND 
MINUTE FOR REDUCTION OF CAPITAL 

Nonce i* hereby gtvra that the Order 

of the Wish Court of J totter (Chonoety 

DftWoa* dated 3rd November 1986 con- 

firming me reducing of the capital of the 
aboveraamed company from £7.000.000 

10 £648.000 and Uie Min uie approved by 

the Churl showing with respect to Ute 

capital of the Company as altered the 

several particulars required by the above- 

mentioned Act were ragbteted by the 

B eg b fta r of Companies on 13th 
November 1986. 

Dated lifts 27th day of Nov ember 1986 
Mtodtoton Potts A Co 
Solic it ors for the above-named Company 


year iapr ate). Low toteresl 

rates over 2 years rAPR 9.9V A 3 years 

(APR 1229k) Written OMWOBS Free 

WtMraoe. 30B HWigtte Road. NWS. 

01-267 7671. 


reBIUU MOUSE Unary. 7 beds. 6 balfas. 

' 11/2 hours London. AvaSabte far 2 lo 

a months from jpn. xs.ooo pan ind 

gardemr and dally help. Tel: New Rom- 

ney 0679 62156. 


EBVFT tdert far wmur hobdays. 1987 
brocbuieonl dow coven winter Greece 
and Turkey too A rabia cnm. 25a hids 
C ambridge. 0223 63266. Oar 30th 
year. Atol 262. 


HOLLAND. Daily rooms- £ 36 O/W. £66 
Rtn. Frankfurt from £69. Miracle Jet. 
01 579 3322 


LE SKI Courchevel. Chateta far oB se 
•mi By aft. coach or oft. For 
Uuv t itm e can 0484 548996. 


. £369. 

Singapore £467. Other FE elites. 01-684 
6614 ABTA. 


SW lAMUOL Piobshty me bear etteri 
holiday In Auvru. Chnannas Bargains. 
Ski Tal Ol 486 8866. 


FBWfT quality wool carpets. At trade 
Prices ad under. Mao available law 
extra. Large room jtae remnants under 
half normal price. Chancery Capets 01 
406 0463- 


LOVELY BARDEN Flat wtth own private 
antraocc Is quiet osbbted mews. Mir- 
rored Beceo/Diner opening onto pane. 
New Red A White NIL Otto Bed. Bath, 
umty Area. C200VW- Cowes 6888261. 


THE TR EE S 1785-1186. Other UtteS 
avail. Hand bound ready for presenta- 
tion - also “Sundays". E12.BO. 
Remember WM). 01-688 6323.. 


1 cefl- 


NEMSBMTDN Newly decorated Jdeh 1 

toged. qutet street. Otoe Bed. SOM L._. 

20ftxr6ft Rec. Ku an opgltancea. Baus. 
n«bw. 498 2091. Evea 870 4703 fT) 


TAKE TIME OFF to Parts. Amsterdam. 
Brussels. Bruges. Geneva. Berne. Lau- 
». Zurich. The Hague. Dublin. 

Rouen. Boulogne A Dieppe. Time Off. 

2a. Chester Close. London. Swix 7BQ. 

01-235 8070. 


... Dally nights- £350 return 
tod tiding faxes. Sky Travel. 01 7«1 
0961. 


AVOHIAZ. 5 room nx roartmeat. Sleeps 
8 Facing slopes. SU from a u grat ep . 01 
STS 1961. 


VARO FASHIONS LOOTED 
NOTICE IS hereby OVEN pursuant to 

Section 688 at uw Companies Act. 1986. 

Ufa! a MEETING Of the errdaors Of the 

above named Company wtu be held at the 

oftJces Of LEONARD CURTIS A CO., situ- 

ated M 30 EASTBOURNE TERRACE. 
LONDON W2 6LF on Thursday me 4th 

day of December 1986 at 12.00 o'clock 

midday, for tbe purposea provided far to 

Sections 589 and 890. 

Dated the 17th day of November 1986 
a ROSENBERG 
DIRECTOR 


LOWEST Aft Fares. Europe and world 
wide. Ol 836 8622. Buckingham 


BARBAS* OngnnM/N. "Year break to vx- 
ctastv e cnamoery. Scott Dunn 0489 
877839 


TtCRETS FOR AMY EVENT, Cato. Star- 
Hght Dtp. Chesa. Us Mb. AU theatre 
and sports. Tel: 821-6616/828- 

OrtSJLEs / Visa / Dtan. 


CHBUIEA BW3 5 mtostes Stoane Square. 
1 tienrnemed tw. sitting room. kHcften. 
bat hr oo m . 3 months plus. £12Spwexa. 
01-638 5767 ext 282. 


AIRFARE SPECIALISTS Sydney o/w 
£420rtn £764 AucMand o/w £420 rtn 

ET7&. Jerturg o/w £246 tin £486. Loa 

Angries o/w £178 rtn £340. London 

Flight Centra 01-370 6532. 


lABfaSEAN Concorde. Jan/Feb 87 10 
Barbados. Antigua etc. Special prirea- 
0244 41131. 


JOHN — CAM TRAVEL Oulrt Parties 
from £169 per person. Tei Ol 499 1911 
or 0730 66561 


AEG. Neff. Cnugrimi ovens, nobs, dtob- 
wasbers. fridges, etc- TtoUMIvny. Try 
us - We are imcrarnhlel neipate *0*03. 


1EWM A B U T U W O FF far luxury pr operties 
to 8t Johns Wood. Regents Pork. Maftla 
Vote. 9Mn Cod A Hampstead 01-686 
7561 


TRAVEL CENTRE speritoWng to First and 

Chib Ctoss travel wnriwide. Budget 

Fares A taste. NZ. S. Aftfta. USA and 

Portugal with mom. Tel 01 655 1101 . 

ABTA 73196. 


TUNISIA. For yqur bodday where tTssttii 
summer. Cau for our b ro chu re now. TU- 
nlston Travel Brno. 01-373 4an. 


MABf L MERHKL Chalets A Set! Ca- 
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Pa***. 0690 78219 (24 mi. 


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srheduted rarrtera. OI-SS4 7371. ABTA 


WUfUBMTB. Danyto Cerava. Zurich. 
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Ol 783 9999. 


2ESTSCOPE LIMITED 
_ NOTICE IS HEREHV’ CRVEN pursuant to 

Section S 88 of the Companies Art. 1985. 

UW a MEETING or the creditors of Uie 

above named Company wm be held at the 

offices 01 LEONARD CURTIS & CO- situ- 

ftf d 30 EASTBOURNE TERRACE. 

U3NDON W2 6LF on Friday the 3rd day 

of December 1986 al 12.00 o'clock mid- 

day. for toe purposes provided for ui 
Srettoos 689 and 690. 

Med the lam day of November 1986 
B- JUGGLER 

DIRECTOR 


miatns is capable of attacking 
and killing the tree on its own. 
without needing to establish a 


commission examined, in 1986, 
it was being found even in the 
course of general surveys, when 


CAT*. CHESS, LCIMbaadPHUML AD 
theatre uni mart. TU 439 1763. AH ma- 
lar credit cdp. 


BEST PART IWWY. Bright cteto) f toty 
fore sic Oai overtook tog gardens. Ate 

bednn * Hying k & to CH £ioo p w 940 
2266 day / 788 1820 ewes» view today 


— , We wui never 

teK you we are Ute rhnpts an aft urea 

to any deriinallon . w» wm snow you. 

Tel: Ol 679 777S ABTA. 


ALTERNATIVE .The fines 
houses for rental 73 SI Jama SL SWi. 
Ol 491 0002. 


SKI TOTAL. Oiaiei Portia, noted, opts In 
Franrr/Austna. Xmas vac*. (0932) 
231113. 


PARLIAMENTARY 

NOTICES 


SaSijSsa • a .iSWsS? 


LYNX COAT Fan length. DkcUbi condi- 
tion. £2-500- CASOO new. !i mwlc COBL 
• New worn. Cl. OOO. Tet 079573466.' 


when its victim is under stress 
during tong periods of drought. 

The great spruce bark beetle's 
most dedicated predator is 
Rhtzophagus grandis, a smaller 
beetle found in mainland 
Europe but not in Britain. For 
three .years the Forestry 
Commission,, m a programme 
unprecedented in Britain, has 
been breeding JtAisopkagus 
grandis from stock imported 
from Belgium under licence and 
releasing it. 

After the fhst experimental 
release of 27 pairs is 1983, the 
programme was increased with 
the release of 88,000 insects at 
2,400 infested sires, owned by 
the commission and private 
groweis. 

Grandis was chosen because H 
stacks no other insect and is the 


least two-and-a-half miles from 
a given release poinf- 
Dr Evans is encou ra ged by the 
experience from Georgia in tbe 
Soviet Union, where, over the 
past 20 years, Soviet scientists 
have set four million Grandis 
beetles on the great spruce bark 
beetle over 312,000 acres. Tire j 
pest is now considered under, 
eontroL 
He sees no reason why the 
British release programme 
should not enjoy similar suc- 
cess. So viet scientists estimate it 
takes seven to 10 years for tbe 
predator to exen control 
- Each beetle costs £2 to rear,, 
but this mrtiaT-fngh costs com- 
pares well with the alternative 
strategy ofnttensive surveys and 
the feSingof infested trees. If foe 


7KAMTOM OF INK OPERA TKfccfe avatL • 
AW WnbMoa - orders uhen. Pop. 
theatte. Ol 240 8609/01 831 7968. 


; 1 dbi bed. ensutte bad). Wc. 

shower, to) / dining, ige sunny recep. 
Private park. Co let only. £150 fw. Tel 
Chris Lawrence 01-488-2486 ed 331. 


XMAS. Winter. Sommer. Algarve. Tener- 

ife. Greece, Turkey. Spam. Egypt- Sn 
Lanka and many more hols/iugnta. 

Ventura; 061 83* 3033. ATOL 2034 


ALB AW VE Lux VMa*. Nov. torn winter, 
ideal Coif * tenato Mayen. Ol aog 
2838. V Ufa World 


SKHVOMLD Ton S8d Resorts. Lowes 

Prices from £69. ABTA. Brochure: Ol 
602 4826. 


PIAIKV ’Barm' Mahoga ny uarirtd. eon— 
cert pttrii. Can arrange delivery. £3*6. 
Mlttt Condition. Ol 463 0148. 


KEMIM4TON WB milMMW With style, 
hm refmtobM. Raora. 2 dbi oera k a 
B. washer / dryer. (uri» shower etc. 
£240 DW. 967^3964 / <07223 72639. 


AMERICA nights wtth MXRdmter deoar 

L otoo South Africa & New 

Zealand. Tri Travel Centre. Blarlrtnim 

(0264) 62057 ABTA 73196 


TEN ERNE Ind hoto to Puerto & Los 
Cnsttanra Xmas and new Year avau. 
Ol B36 4681. AUantJda. ABTA. 


IN PARLIAMENT 

SESSION 190687 

CORN EXCHANGE 


SANTA’S SALE AT TOPB. CM T Vo from 
0*9. Videos from £99. 91 Lower Stoane 
Street. SWI. -7300933. • 


Wide constantly chanrtng mwfttinn of 
rumMted flats & bouses on our currani 
ItaL Bentaara 6 Reeves 938 3822- 


cmBUMS Cyprus, m Class hotel on 

sandy heart) from H/njw i wk £299. 2 

wka £366 Rmg Pan World Holidays Ol 
734 2662. 


LOWEST Air Farrs. Scheduled Europe Ml 
worldwide. Mrd Star Travel. Ol 928 
3200 


UK. HOLIDAYS 


LOWEST WORLDWIDE FARES. Ctagrt- 
corn Travel Tal Ol 730 6216. ABTA. 


otoy gnft. staying to 
Rtandtogs Hne country bouses. Parties 

of 2-10 Colour brochure: mendings. 

Old, vica rage. F ra n ce Lynch. Stroud 
GLfi 8LN. <04531 882644. 24 fay. 


STdMWAY Grand. 5- ltr. Rosew o od. 
Exreuant co n dl tt o n £6.800. TeL Ol 
686 *981. 


Dedrrns. targe gMIO garden, large Ugtd 
racsL K 6 B. £196 B*» UCt. CH 6 CHW. 
Long tet to fttn a. Phono: 093888-641 


LATIN AMERICA. Low cad fUgbu e« 

Rio £456. Lima £«96 rtn. Atao Small 

Croup Holiday Jomieys.ieg Peru from 

£3501 JLA 01-747-3106 


LOW FAMES YD America. Australia 6 

New Zealand. Tri Ol 9302666. Hm» 

Travel 36 WhBBnlL London. SWI. 

ABTA 3455X. 


WINTER SPORTS 


J 


ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 


LOW FARES WOWU H —t ■ USA. N/S 

Atoaxa. Far EaH. Aina Airline Arm 

Agr Trayyate. 48 Margsral StraaL Wl. 
Ol 680 2926 (Visa Accepted! 


JOIN BLADON LINES THIS 
CHRISTMAS AND SAVE ££££ ‘S 


British Heart Foundation 

The heart research chartty 


only species capable.Qf reducing predator cootinues to do wefi, 
Dendroaonm micans txs vtxy- releases could soon be sus- 
low levels. Unlike other prtfl- petiided and the advance of.the 
atore which, i»soon ss-ihe, prey. Grandis lcft-to take h'cowse, ' 


HKGIoucestQ- Place, 
London vmoDH. . 



■CW YORK, LA- LISA Worldwide deftt- 

mbora. For uw dtraoess fares, try us 

iu. RKtqnond Travel. 1 Du*? street. 

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LOOK AT THESE AMAZING OFFERS FOR 7 NIGHT HOLIDAYS 
Dcs*. 20&1/S1M December 

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MfeHMAMl Seat rate to USA-Cantabrarv 

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TH 01.254 6788 


COURMAYEUR 
Chairi Marconi 
MERIBEL 


VAUXANOOL Ctirtttraas aracabaity. 
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re 

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re 

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Notice It hereby alien thal anptlcatton 

naa Keen made lo Parusment by B. L 

Holdings Limited for leave to introduce In 

■be oresenr session a BUI under toe above 

name or short I Ute toe purposes or wtuch 

are to relieve The Corn Exchange 
Company Limited of its statutory obliga- 

tions lo provide a corn exchange, to alter 
toe obtrets and bowers of that Company n 

consequence thereof and for rotated 

purpose*. 

On end after 4in December. 1986a copy 

ol the md may be inspected and copra 

■hereof may be obtained al toe price or 60 

pence each ai toe offices of 8 L Holdtnas. 

IP Cornwall Terrace. London nwi 4QP 

and at (he afiicm or me underagnM 

Partfameniary Aostra 
Objection lo toe BW may be made by 

depositing a pruDan against it in rimer or 

Doth Houses of ParUameM. The latest dale 

for toe deposli of such a PeUQon to toe 

First House win bean February 6th. 1987 

tf the BUI ontaiutes in toe House of LOrtla. 

or January 3ftth- 1967 if toe BUI origi- 

nates in me House of commons. Further 
irforraanon may be obtained (ram me 

office of the Cterti of toe Parliaments, toe 

Private Bin Office m toe House of 

Commons or tor imaemgae c pasttanwn- 

ary Agents 

c»M ins 27th day or November 1966 
s qcr win « co 

S36 Inn Road 

London Wcix SMB 
SobCKors 


WINTER SUN Sbretaia para to Cypna. 

Malta. Morocco Cftrote. rrtiliga & re- 

Pritfe Nov 4 Dec Pan Wgrid Hobdim 

01 734 2002 


ftferingHofei. Self Catering A Chalet Ponte s in 47 of Europe* urn resorts 
Ol 786 2200 ABTA 16723 

0422 78121 ATOL 1S32 


DVBON. BELL A CO 

16 Groat College street 

Westminster 

London SW1P 5RX 

Rsrttameniuy Agenta 


Con tinned ob pdfie 48 


:t r-v 


X 




'Wl® 


" 'f : K35Mii«ara : - 



M- 

ineer’s 

tastic’ 


vm 


ed medMinical es> 
pot the £8,000 he 
oie Portfolio Gold 
yesterday to ^nd 


pdafe my gramo- 
ase my donation 
h haO appeal and 
ly next year,” Mr 
red, of Allestree, 


, aged 51, who has 
‘olio Gold since it 
a Times, said that 
believe his Inch. 

It is fantastic. It is : 
rience-” 

Sold cards can be 
sending a stain- 
ed envelope to: 
Told, 



rd Wood 


ger of 

itives 

beer 


Inn Young 

used in brewing 
i drinkers and, in 
« even kill them, 
n for Real Ale 
rday. 

l the campaign’s 
Vhat’s Brewing. \ 
Protz, a former 
'ood Beer Guide,' 
jple who have 
other breathing 
nus disorders, 
who are allergic 
tis, can suffer ill 
linking beers in 
»es have been 
reduce a foamy, 
clarity, or to 
iifi» 

red States; the- 
more than 40 
3f heart attacks 
ewers used co- 
in beer to 
anting head. 


ouple 

ipeal 


tennan couple 
ars last July for 
seeking rwiuc- 
mtences. 

• .Lord Lane, 
stioe, will pre- 
plications by 
Sonja Schulze, 
for leave to 
the sentences 
r Justice Mi^ 
t the Central 



n or Storage 
tiatrty shows 
pace Heater 


tWfeatoal 

197506. 


x 3%- high 
*314* high 


PBAWDegr 


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(LET, 


1 

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SUM1J6 | 1 

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22 THE TIMES THTTKSDAY NOVEMBER 27 1986 


Europe Stacking up artistic praise and awards 

steps up 

Hotol 


Frank Johnson in the Comment; 


interest 


By Harvey Elliott 
Arc Correspondent 


Military planners through- 
out Europe are showing 
increasing interest in using 
Britain’s revolutionary Hotol 
space vehicle as a platform for 
the next generation of super 
weapons. 

After a series of top-secret 


briefings on the project given 
to Ministry of Defence and. 


to Ministry of Defence and 
Nato chiefs, experts are now 
convinced that Hotol, de- 
signed mainly as a way of 
putting commercial satellites 
into orbit, could be used as a 
virtually practically indestruc- 
tible weapons launch vehicle. 

They believe that the cargo 
bay of the Hotol could carry 
independently-targeted mis- 
siles or some of the new laser 
or electro-magnetic space 
“guns" now being developed 
for use in the controversial 
Star Wars defence system. 

The increased military in- 
terest in the concept could 
help to guarantee Govern- 



Mait-orderspread 
of lurid motions 


— ■ 


.... .. '• 
-* . 


' 


meat funding for the project 
which, it is hoped, will Be fully 
tested by the turn of the 
century. 

HotoL designed by British 
Aerospace, win be powered by 
a revolutionary air-breathing 
engine called the RB 545, now 
under development by Rolls- 
Royce. The engine powers the 
Hotol from a normal runway 
and pushes it out of the 
atmosphere before switching 
to burn liquid oxygen while ! 
the spacecraft is in orbit 

The original conception of 1 
the Hotol was to use it to put 
satellites into space or repair | 
them at a fraction of the cost 1 
of using the existing shuttle or 
rocket launch vehicle. 

The Government has 
backed a two-year technical 
feasibility programme, part- 
funded by industry, worth £3 
million, which involves criti- 
cal component testing of the 
engine and wind tunnel tests 
of the spacecraft itself. Both 
Rolls-Royce and British Aero- 
space are convinced that work 
is now going so well that the 
whole project will be ready for 
full-scale development within 
the next ten years. 

Before then, however, it 
could need at least £75 million 
worth of further research and 
development and the final bill 
is expected to be around £4 
billion. The Government is so 
far unwilling to commit fur- 
ther scarce rends for further 
research and development. 


The praters Gilbert and George (in 
glasses) on the roof of their home in 
Sf talfields, East Loudon, after winning the 
Turner Prize. The presentation of the 
£10,000 award, “for the greatest contribu- 
tion to art in Britain in the previous 12 


months”, is a recognition that their glossy 
photo-pieces — invariably including the 
Italian-born Gilbert and his English part- 
ner — have, despite their mysterious 
content, pot British art on the map. Tky re- 
ceived their award at the Tate Gallery, 


London, on Tuesday night. Recently the 
retrospective exhibition of the pair, who are 
still a mystery to the general pnblic^inade a 
great impression on tire United States and 
tape. (Lost opportunity of tire Turner 
Prize, page 13). Photograph, Nick Rogers 


The Speaker, Mr Bernard 
Weathenfl, yesterday faced 
demands from Tory MPs for 
a massive crackdown against 
bogus points of Older. They 
also wanted him to take 
action against die growing 
spread of motions on the 
order paper which contain 
scurrilous allegations about 
people involved with the 
security services. 

The Tory MP’s maih taiga 
was Mr Dale Campbefl-Sav- 
OQI 5 , the Labour member for 
Workington, who from an 
address in Westminster runs 
a massive business in bogus 
points of order and hard-core 
motions. The Tones believe 
that Mr GraipbeB-Savours’ 
business corrupts impress- 
ionable young Labour front 
benchers. 

They cite the case of. Mr 
Neil Kinnock, aged 44, a 
Welsh youth who has been 
approaching Mrs Margaret 
Thatcher — a London house- 
wife, aged 61 — and trying to 
get her to talk about private 
matters connected with the 
security services. 

The Tories claim that Neil 


cestershne, asked the Speaker 
for guidance as to “the use of; 
a point of order m terms i 
where hon. Mem bersuse that 
point of order wrongly to 
make accusations and allega- 
tions against members of the 
public, tire Crvfl Service or 
other hon. Members. 

.“A tot of is are becoming 
concerned at tire abuse of tire 
House mainly by hon. Mem- 
bers opposite making allega- 
tions in the guise of points of 
order.” (Tory cheers,) 

The Speaker: “Yes. we are 
getting info the bad habit of 
ra&ng .points of order on 
political issues which are 
nothing to do with the 
Chair.The wfaoto. House will 
know 1 am frequently on my 
feet mouthing the words 
Has a not a matterfor me 7 . 

. It would be is tire 
in terests of good enter if we 


started to indulge in these 
practices asa result of reading 
points of order and motions 
put out by the Campbefi- 
Savours organization. Their 
view is that the Speaker must 
act now before more of our 
ldds throw away their lives in 
this way. 

Psychiatrists argue that 
there is no “causal 
relationship" between Camp- 
bell-Savours’ publications 
and Mr Kinnock’s behaviour. 
They take' the view that 
censorship would be the 
greater obscenity. 

The Tories reply that, in 
the nature of things, the link 
between ditty Commons mo- 
tions and deviant actions in 
the House cannot be proven, 
but that common sense sug- 
gests that there must be one. 
They blame the parents. .. 

Mr CampbeB-Savours has 
for weeks been issuing his 
points of order at the end of 
question time. They all con- 
tain “explicit maleriaf 1 in tire 
form of a story containing 
characters with such names 
as Sir Robert Armstrong, Sir 
Roger Hollis ami now Lord 
Rothschild. Each point of 
order ends with a demand to 
the Speaker that Mrs 
Thatcher be forced to talk in 
public about the sort of 
subjects which are never 
discussed in the House, let 
alone by a woman. 

Yesterday’s Tory protest 
began when Mr Eric Forth, 
the member for Mid-Wor- 


Scottish teachers 
call all-out strike 


Continued from page 1 
package and the refusal of the 
English and Welsh unions and 
Labour-led local authorities to 
think again about their Acas 
agreement 

The Prime Minister was 
said to be sticking to her view 
that tiie offers are the most 
generous male in the public 
sector and that there should be 
no concessions on cost or pay 
structure the principal bones 
of contention. 

Meanwhile, Mr Kenneth 
Baker, the Secretary of State 
for Education and Science, 
was meeting Mr John 
Pearman, the leader of the 
employers, to impress on him 
the consequences of a refusal 
to accede to the strings at- 
tached to the same offer south 
of the Border. 

Mr Pearman was expected 
to counter that the Acas 
package signed by four of the 
six unions, which con- 
centrates extra cash on the 
middle and lower ranks of the 
profession, represents the only 
way forward. 

Mr Rifkind called in the 


Today’s events 


Royal engagements 


The Queen opens the new 
Light Division Depot of the 
Royal Green Jackets at 
Flowerdown, near Winchester, 
10.57, Princess Alexandra. Dep- 


uty CoIond-in-ChieC the Light 
Infantry, attends; and opens the 


infantry, attends; and opens the 
extension of die Royal Hamp- 
shire County Hospital at Win- 
chester, 2.40. 

The Duke of Edinburgh, 
President of the National Play- 


The Times Crossword Puzzle No 17,214 



ACROSS 

1 Bones found in saintly let- 
ter-writer’s home (6). 

5 Brooke's English rose wasn’t 
so authentic (81 

9 Crew gets bill for bed (4-6). 

10 Garment for work in church 
(4). 

11 Rugby player to keep at a 
distance (5,3). 

12 One wanting to reduce leg- 
islative assembly put ruler 
on it (6). 

13 Requirement for horse — or 
mule, perhaps (4). 

15 Israelite accepts order for 
do-it-yourself drink (4-4). 

18 Water mixed with ink in 
Jersey and Guernsey, say 
( 8 ). 

19 Put in order that’s consid- 
erable (4). 

21 No automatic source of 
instructions (6). 

23 Two boys and not a giri in 
part of France (8). 

25 For example, sole member 
of school (4). 

26 Letters from Disraeli to 
leaders (10). 

27 Demeaning for one if grand, 
perhaps (53). 

28 Flight starts and ends here 
for disheartened fugitive (6). 


3 Binding cord on new net (9). 

4 Lade of spinners upsetting? 
Exactly (4,2). 

5 Unable to win if turn not 
enough, perhaps (3,2,3,7). 

6 Dismissed current measure 
as danger to mine (8). 

7 Concealing store’s money 
for auditor (5). 

8 Run in fear (9). 

14 East European executed 
heretic (9). 

16 Group of companies con- 
tains strike, thanks to celeb- 
rity (9). 

17 We win shape our course for 
this source (8). 

20 Cockney’s injury time 
protection (6). 

22 Doorkeeper’s hard-hearted 
employer (5). 

24 Sort of wing — Daedalus 
used one of each sire (5). 


Solution to Puzzle No 17,213 


DOWN 

2 In the neighbourhood of a 
fight (5). 


i?Hr3I3S5i3n £tfIIiflHi3 
m R E E i'3 H 55 E 
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£J@5rtEEJHS 3J5B31SJ3EB 
S S • n H. FJ P5 

S £j? £2!' E2' t2J ES (3 

r-nrassE i-iiiEJiransn 


Concise Crossword page 14 



Scottish teachers for more 
talks on Monday after 
denouncing the ballot result. 

He told MPs that parents 
and the public would find 
such a course “inexplicable 
and unacceptable" given the 
generosity of his offer. 

But it was clear the last- 
ditch efforts to persuade the 
education service to abide by 
the Government’s terms were 
intended more for public 
consumption than to signify 
any real willingness to reopen 
negotiations on the main 
pouts of disagreement 

Mr John Mackay, a junior 
Scottish minister, said neither 
the cost nor the timing of the 
package was negotiable, but 
there was “still a good deal of 
room for manoeuvre" 

Mr Donald Dewar, 
Labour’s shadow Scottish sec- 
retary, said the vote under- 
lined the “tragic blunder” the 
minister had made by adopt- 
ing a “hard line stance". 

He added: “Agreement is 
infinitely preferable to an 
imposed solution which, could 
never command goodwill" 


1,500 will 
lose jobs 
on Clyde 


Commons call for 
security inquiries 


Gmtinned from page 1 


said the scale of the losses was 
staggering when set against 
levels of unemployment in the 
area that were “scandalously 
high" He would urgently seek 
a meeting with Mr Paul 
Cbannon, Secretary of State 
for Trade and Industry, to 
demand that Scott Lithgow be 
included on the EEC list of 


yards qualifying for special 
financial assistance Mien bid- 


ding for orders. 

Sir Simpson Stevenson, 
Provost of Greenock, said the 
losses were worse than they 
had feared. Although the 
Scottish Development Agency 
has sent a task force into the 
Port Glasgow area to try and 
find new sources of industry to 
absorb some of the mounting 
unemployment, the arid feet 
is that shipbuilders do not 
have skills that readily trans- 
fer to the so-called “sunrise" 
industries of computing and 
electronics which in Scotland 
have suffered their own 
recession. 


Confirmed from page 1 

Director of Public Prosecu- 
tions the allegations made in 
respect of the two named 
individuals," Sir Michael said. 

Earlier Mr Alan Williams, 
shadow deputy leader of the 
Commons, wrote to Mrs 
Thatcher demanding to know 
why she bad not taken action, 
as head of the security ser- 
vices, against staff who the 
Government knew had leaked 
information to authors. 

“We need a statement from 
you as custodian of the sec- 
urity of the state on foe 
adequacy or otherwise with 
which you have fulfilled that 
role." 

• Dr David Owen publicly 
questioned the political neu- 
trality of Sir Robert Arm- 
strong, the Cabinet Secretary, 
last night , suggesting that his 
credibility as a Civil Servant 
was “at a very low ebb" (Our 
Political Reporter writes). 

Interviewed on Radio 
Four’s Analysis programme, 
foe SDP leader said that foe 
Alliance would not be talking 
to Sir Robert under the so- 


called “Douglas-Home 
Rules", which allow opposi- 
tion leaders to consult senior 
civil servants before general 
elections, because “1 can see 
nothing that (he) could 
contribute to foe debate | 
personally". 

• Last night, Mr.Chapman j 
Pincher, foe author and 
journalist at foe centre of the 
row over his book Their Trade 
is Treachery which was based 
on information supplied by 
Mr Wright, attacked foe man- 
ner in which Lord Rothschild 
and Sir Arthur “Dickie" 
Franks have become em- 
broiled in foe political con- 
troversy (Our Whitehall Corr- 
espondent writes). 

He said :“There is ab- 
solutely no reason for foi&AlI 
that happened in his case was 
that I lad certain information 
that I felt I should pass on to 
MI6. My contact at MI6 had 
been Sir Maurice Oldfield, foe 
director-general, but he had 
died. In foe past, when I 
wanted to speak to Sir Mau- 
rice, I used to leave a message 
with Dickie Franks.” 


Mr Anthony Beaumont- 
Dark - (Bir mingham Selly 
Oak, O Called for a similar 
condemnation bytheSpeaker 
of lurid motions. He claimed 
that the order paper was now 
befog used “almost like a 
mail order catalogue ' of 
innuendos and accusations 


about .people ouiside foe 
House." 


Mr Patrick Nichoils 
(Tdgnbridge, Q protested 
that there was a motion on 
the order paper winch 
“names Lord Rothschild and 
accuses him in plain, direct 
terms of a criminal offence, 
and was pul there by foe hon. 
Member for Woritington (Mr 
Campbefl-Sayouis). . . Is 
there no vicious or slan- 
derous calumny which can- 
not be put on the order 
without you bring able to 
exercise some control over 
itT 

The Speaker's reply gave 
hope to the Tories who want 
a tougher policy. In case of 
misuse; the. Committee of 
Procedure could took intofoe 
matter, be said, “andl under- 
stand that they are seeking to 
do so." 


Amid uproar an the Tore 
benches, Mr Campbell- 
Savours rose to insist foal Ins 
business was legal. “The in- 
dividuals I named have been 
the subject of a reprimand by 
letter from foe Attorney- 
General,” he said. 


The Speaker. “Order. That 
is nothing to do with me." 

list night, Mr Campbell- 
Savours made it dear that he 
intended to carry on publish- 
ing, pending any swoop by. 
foe Committee of Procedure 
on his -Westminster 
warhousc. 


THE TIMES INFORMATION SERVICE 


iug Fields Association, presents 
the President's Certificates at 
Buckingham Palace, 10; as pa- 
tron and trustee, attends recep- 
tions at St James's Palace for 
young people who have reached 
the Gold Standard in the Duke 
of Edinburgh’s Award, U and 4; 
attends the annual meeting of 
the Institute of Sports Sponsor- 
ship at Buckingham Palace, 
2.30; later he attends the fortieth 
anniversary dinner of the 
Cranfield Institute of Technol- 
ogy, 7.10. 

Queen Elisabeth the Queen 
Mother visits foe York Street 


Chambers of the St Maryiebone , 
Housing Association, noon ! 

The Prince of Wales launches 
the Inner Cities Trust and | 
addresses the Building Commu- 
nities Conference at the Astoria i 
Theatre, 1030, and later, I 
accompanied by the Princess of 
Wales, attends a dinner to 
inaugurate the Prince's Trust 
Youth Business Appeal at the 
Mansion House. 730. 

The Princess of Wales , 
presents the awards for West- | 
minster City Council's Anti- 1 
Drug Campaign at the Rode j 
Garden Restaurant, Covent i 
Garden, noon. . 

Princess Anne opens the first 
Sheltered/Special Sheltered 
Housing Scheme to be built by 
Sedgemoor District Council, 
Bridgwater, Somerset, 1 130; 
and opens the new indoor riding 
arena at Sandhill Park Hospital, 
Bishops Lydeard, Taunton, 
Somerset, 2.10. 

The Duke of Gloucester visits 
the Lincoln College of Technol- 
ogy to mark the occasion of their 
centenary, 11; and visits St 
Mary's uufldhaD. Lincoln, 2.10. 

The Duke and Duchess of 
Gloucester attend a production 
of “The Lion, the Witch and the 
Wardrobe* at the Westminster 
Theatre, Palace Street, Bucking- 
ham Palace Road, 635. 

The Duchess of Kent, Colo- 
nef-in-CbieC attends the 4th/7th 
Royal Dragoon Guards annual 
officers’ dinner at the Cavalry 
and Guards Club. 7.45. 

Prince Michael of Kent, as 
President of the Motor Industry 
Research Association, attends 
the annual luncheon at the 
London Marriott Hotel, noon; 
and presents the 1986 Associ- 
ation for Business Sponsorship 
of the Arts/Daily Telegraph 
Awards at the Savoy Hotel 

6.30. 

Last chance to see 

Animals in Art, prims from 
20th century artists; Aberdeen 
Art Gallery and Museums, 
School hill; 10-8. 

Music 

Concert by M exborough Mu- 
sic Centre Orchestra; Saltergate 
Middle School Mexborongh; 

7.30. 

Concert by Rosemary Furniss 
and Kathryn Stott; Royal Ex- 
change, Manchester. I pm. 

Concert by Charles Ramirez, 
guitarist; Trinity Arts Centre, 
Tonbridge Write 8. 

Concert by Peter Lawson; The 
Galeway, ShrewsSary: 7.45. 

Piano Duo by Claire and 
Antoinette Cann; Sotihnll Li- 
brary Theatre; 1. 

IHano recital by Enid Kaiahn; 
Leicestershire Museum and Art 
Gallery, New Walk, Leicester, 

J 145 pm. 

Concert by Bournemouth 
Symphony Orchestra; Festival 
Theatre. Paignton; 7.30. 

Recital by Caro! Williams. 
Uni led Reform Church, South 
Street. Farnham, Surrey- 
Talks 

What is the use of the State? 
by The Right Reverend D E 
Jenkins. Bishop of Durham; 
Newcastle University: 530. 

Turner and the Italian 
Renaissance, by Cecilia Powell: 
Whitworth Art Gallery; Man- 
chester, 6.30. 


Books — paperback 


The Literary Edftor*s selection of I nterest ing hooks published tills wrote 
FICTION 

A Maggot, by John Fourfes TPan, £330) 

Best Detective Stories of Cyrfi Hare, chosen and introduced by Michael 
Gilbert (Faber. E3JB5) 

Collected Stories, by Maurice Gee (Penguin, £335) 

Nine Men Who Laughed, by Austin Clarita {Penguin, £3.95) 

NON-FICTION 

Cut Stems and Crossroads, by Ronald Wright (Fenasn, E355) 

Here Lies Eric Ambler, an autobiography (Fontana. £3.95) 

People and Places, by Richard Cobb (Oxford, £4.95) 

Terry Street, by Douglas Dunn (Faber, £355) 

The Penouin KeBo ne rw of Curious and buenwBny Numbers, by David 




HIGH TIDES 


t Danya Parsons (Future, £1 35) 


The pound 


Roads 


AintraBa* 

Anuria Sen 
Belgium Ft 
Canada* 

Denmark Kr 
FMandMkfc 
France Fr 
QemmyDm 
Greece Dr 
Hoag Kong* 

Ireland Pt 
Italy Lira 
Japan Yen 
Hattart a m le GM 
Norway Kr 
Portugal Esc 
South Africa Rd 
Spain Pta 
Sweden KT 
Switzerland Fr 
USAS 

Yugoslavia Dor 

Rates tor smal denambuuton bank notes 
only as supplied by Barclays Bar* PLC. 
□marant rates apply to traneflets' 
cheques and ether foreijyi currency 


The North: Ml: Lane closures 
between junctions 31 and 33 
(A57 Worksop/Rotherham). 
MI& Contraflow between junc- 
tions 1 and 2 (Rotherham) and 
between junctions 6 and 7 
(Thome/M62). M63: Various 
lam* closures and restrictions at 
Barton Bridge,. Greater 
Manchester. 

Scotland: Edinburgh: 

Bomrington Road closed at 
Breadalbane Street, diversions 
in operation. M74: Bridge re- 


Crwfiff 
Davenport 
novar _ 

FWraoudi 


Glasgow 

Harwich 




Liverpool 

Lowestoft 


NOnd Haven 


pairs at Bothwell interchange, 
contraflow in operation. M9fc 
Contraflows between Halbeath 
and Cocklaw and between 
Cairney Bridge and Aralzy 
interchange. 

Information sopplwd by AA 


Tom 

OTton-on-Nas 


AM 

HT 

PM 

KT 

r 9.19 

55 10.10 

65 

9A1 

35 

942 

a? 

233 

93 

354 

107 

7U9 

25 

721 

35 

2.18 

95 

249 

95 

1256 

45 

1.17 

43 

&5Z 

5 J 

726 

5.6 

12 JZ6 

45 1247 

45 

858 

4.1 

857 

45 

7.13 

35 

8.11 

3.7 

052 

45 645. 

45 

1-45 

55 

254 

65 

1.44 

7.1 

256 

75 

1042 

4.7 1059 

45 

7.10 

75 

728 

85 

447 

22 

8.10 

22 

7.40 

4.1 

825 

42 

242 

54 

223 

5J 

151 

55 

122 

55 

2.16 

21 

2.18 

35 

12.12 

45 1Z32 

4.7 

258 

1.6 

25 3 

1.7 

7.15 

4.1 

758 

45 

657 

52 

727 

5.1 

7J30 

35 

754 

35 

156 

7.4 

223 

75 



1255 

45 

7.74 

35 

85 

33 


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11 Jr.- 


7 Ji-O \n 

J- y 44 * 5 I- 

J*? 3 & 


11 V”.: .r ^ 

1 z* '^y 





h: Zr'/SZn 


MOO&lATI-l 




LIGHTING-UPTIME 


London 4.28 pin to 709 am 
Bristol 4J38 pm to 7.1 9 am 


Bristol 4.38 pm to 7-1 a am 
ErEnfaunfi 4.iapm to 7M am 
Mmhasier 4£7pm to 737 » 


AROUND BRITAIN 


er4£7pmto7.27am 
4^6 pm to 7-25 am f 


Mi Sunrises: 

Sun aeJ* 

M mLLM 

358 pm 

h aSoonriiwK 

■OOOSOtB 

Hwrad i.4»8m 

157 pm 


New moon: Decanter 1 


Ratal Fries tadae 3884 


London: tin FT index closed iSSupal 
128&3 


Christmas mail 


Anniversaries 


Births: Anders Celsius, 
astronomer, inventor of the 
centigrade thermometer. Upp- 
sala, Sweden, 1701; Chaim 
Weizmann. first president of 
Israel 1949-52, Motol Russia, 
1874. 

Deaths: Jacopo Saasoriuo, 
sculptor, Venice, 1570; Henry 
Winstanley. designer of foe first 
Eddystone lighthouse, drowned 
when it collapsed, 1703; Andrew 
Mritfe, millwright and inventor 
of a threshing machine, Hous- 
ton Mill Dunbar, J82i; Eugene 
O'Neill. Boston. Massachusetts. 
1953; Arthur Honegger, com- 
poser, Paris, 1955. 

Tehran conference of Chur- 
chill, Roosevelt and Stalin, 
1943. 


Today is the latest recom- 
mended posting date for Christ- 
mas surface mail to France. 

A leaflet Christmas Mail 1986 
giving details of latest recom- 
mended posting dates for 
Christinas mail by air and 
surface is avilable from post 
offices. 


Sc art wro 

Mag ** 

Cramer 

Lowestoft 

Ctocfon 

Margate 


Sun Rain Max 

hrs In C F 
-33 9 48 cloudy 
S3 38 8 46 sunny 


YESTERDAY 


Parliament today 


a rin btoa 

Wddhtag 

Lfttatapu 

BogaorR 

So u ttaea 

ShnkSn 

Bownemfe 

Poole 


43 .07 9 48 sunny 

W JH 9 49 sumy 

■ - 10 60 sunny 

45 .01 11 52 sunny 

S5 54 11 92 sunny 

5.4 - 10 50 sumy v 


Temperatures it midday y este rd a y , c, 
cloud; f, Mr. r, rato s, sun. 

C F C F 

Belfast s 746 GWnnsy f 948 

B'mflhera e 948 m em o si f 541 

Btadmooi t 749 Jersey a 1050 

Bristol f 1050 London s 1060 

CmfH r 746 Wridtster C 745 

EAteorp r 745 Mtomaatfcrs 646 

a esgaw r 648 ITMtiSMy s 846 


NOON TODAY 


Commons (230): Criminal Jus- 
tice Bill second reading. 

Lords (3k Family Law Reform 
Bill, second reading. 


Weynxntb 

En aa u lh 

Torquay 

FteoxMth 
Se»y Wen 
Guwnsay 
Ne wq ua y 
HftBco tn P e 
Spool Airpl 


Charity card shops 


— ^old— 


Dougin 
Braun JUntt 


g 48 sh ow e r 
8 46 doudy 
S 48 ShOMF 



Bristol (CM) 

Csfiafe 

LotMhn 


Charity- Christmas cards are 
now available from tire follow- 
inssbopx Bisbopsgate Institute, 
EC2 (Mon to Fri 930 to 5.30); 
Congress House, 23 RusseD 
Street, WC1 (Mon to Fri 9 to 5k 
1 1 Grand Buildings, Northum- 
berland Ave, WC (Mon to Sat 
10 to 6); 107 Fenchureh St. EC3 

S lou to Fri 10 to 6 Y, Kingsgate 
se. 66-74 Victoria SlTSwf 
(Mod to Fri 10 to 6); 9 Berkeley 
Si, W| (Mon to Fri 10 to 6). 

All these shops are admin- 
istered by Ihe Charity Christmas 
Card Council telephone (01) 
242 0546.. 


P ortf ol i o - bow to pn 
Mcnday-Saiunuy record JW dzay 
pomouo. total. 

Arid these tapemer to ri 


Hot twoh aa 


10 50 shower 
7 45 taU ■ 

11 52 t*i0t 
9 48 Shower 
9 48 Shower 
9 48 Shower 


ABROAD 


your weekly PerUDUo total, 
If your total 


[uatchev ow puhOstad 
■flgge you have won 


weetuy amaeod ngurv you haw 
gntrupn or a afliarc of the erte e 
stated for mat week, anfl must 
your prize as iwnn^^brisw 


Tenby 

Eikria fcm u fr 


10 50 aunty 

10 BO hail 

11 52 sunny 


MDMY: c, doud: d, chizzt^ f, (aft; fcj, Ipg; r, rain; s, wm; srv snow; t Bwnder. 

CF CF CF CF 

cote c 18 64 Ootapie c 12 54 Mpteree a 18 64 Rone s 17 63 

odd s 19 teCptegn c10fidS3g» r 18 64 Satztwrg s 9 46 

rttte c 23 73 Corfu Malta SF’riecor s 14 57 

— a 19 68 Doban - - - - * - - 


C F 
c 12 54 
c 10 SO 




5 41 stumer 
7 45 shower 

6 43 taB 


19 68 D(A8n 8 8 46 IMtftne 0 16 61 Sanbsgo* I 24 75 

11 SZ Oohram* S 20 68 Mexico C* EPte^ f 32 » 

■ _ Faro a 18 64 War c 29 64 Seoul s 0 32 

22 72 n oteo co a 14 57 Man . a 9 48 Sitm’Por „ 


You must uvr your corn with you 
when you triepfaone. 

ir you are unaut to tdntKme 
someone «sc can claim on your fiohair 
Mir they must nave your cant and cad 
The Tiroes Portfolio euhna Hne 
Between the sdputeteu Umes. 

No resbonabuti’ cm Be scanted 
tor (allure to contact trio claims outer 
(m- any reason within Ihe stated 

.The above Instructions are ae- 
a dany and we«3y 


PresMck 

Tm* 

Wkk 


9 48 shower 

10 50 hen 

5 41 sho wer 


s 22 72 n orance & 14 57 

f SB 82 Frankfort C 10 50 

a 16 61 Aactate 1 16 64 Moscow 
, . Gwna s 9 48 Mm«Mi 
M 5 41 OanHte r e 16 64 H$Mt 

5 11 H Heteteu c 9 48 Naptee 
( 24 75 HonoK c 17 63 NDefi 
c 13 55 htramek s 7 45 NYM* 
C 12 54 tatuteul d 10 SO Men 

r 9 48 Jeddah s 3a .90 Otio 
1 10 so JOTarn* f 26 79 Paris 

6 7 45 Karachi s 25 77 P*teg 
s M 79 L Palmas c 21 70 Perth 


Bdbat 4.1 OS 8 48 Shower 


( 24 75 HOOOK 
c 13 ^ IttMDfiefe 
C 12 54 Masted 
r S 48 Jeddah 
1 10 SO JQtwnr 
6 7 45 Karachi 


©TIMES INCWSPAPERS LIMITED, 
ra 86. Printed by Umtfon Past ttnvo. 


dividend damn. 


mm. Printed by London Post iPrmt- 
«»j LunitM 3 i Virginia Street 
London Et 9XN ami by jwm 
Scotland Ltd.. iaa Ponman StrvcL 
Kiruuno Park. Ctassow 041 1 
TTrttrwTay. November 27. 

Registered aa a newspaper at the Pan 
Office, 


; isms .«« 

d -2 28 Stmtttg s 12 54 
9 14 57 Sydney * 27 £ 
C 18 64 fo^sr S 20 « 
S 20 68 Taftete 8 21 70 
f 21 70 Taaerite 1 21 70 
g 9 48 Tokyo c 11 » 
s 16 61 Tomato* s 5 41 
r 7 45 Ttaris f 19 | J 
8 11 52 VUencte * 1 B 81 
s. 2 36 VancW « I* 
r 22 72 Variic* ? 12 64 
s 8 46 Vteoae c B 41 
t -1 30 Warsaw s U B 


g TO. fJatooo ■ a 15 59 Prague, a 0 46 Viera 
Capatti 3 23 73 Locarno s 10 50 Itey&fc -e -1 30 Worn 

gfatonca c 16 01 LAngeh* 3 IB 04 RhedN Wsaht 

gy pgtf'. s 8 46 U B n i mh g d 8 46 Rtede J . ■ Werrit 

CtPctaadi r 11 52 Madrid s 11 52 Wywto s 22 72 Zurich 

' dome? Bgum era tataaovaBabto 


VOriice 3 12 6J 
Waoae c 5 
Warsaw, s li B 
Wsshton* I -6 46 
MteThtoa c 12 64 









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( WEATHER A ridge fltf high pressorewffljiersistovOT southern areas 

v ' but fronts wifi remain near or over the N. North Wales, 

northern and western Scotland and NW England wiB be rather cloudy with some 
rain and drizzle. Sonth Wales, eastern Scotland and England except NW wfll be 
mostly dry with some smmy or dear intervals. Winds will be SW moderate or 
fresh, stronger in the N. It will be mild in most places. Outlook for tomorrow and 
Saturday: Dry in most places at first bat becoming unsettled, mild at first bat 
temperatures near normal otherwise. 








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THE 



TIMES 


SPORT 41 
TELEVISION AND RADIO 45 


THURSDAY NOVEMBER 27 1986 


'.;3v 

.• W* 


Executive Editor 
Kenneth Fleet 


FT' 30 Share 

1286-3(+15.9) 
FT-S-E 100 
163330 (+13.7) 


£g, 6bn payments deficit expected | Maxwell raises AE cash offer 






USM (Datasfiraam) 

n/a 

THE POUND 

US Dollar 

1.4315 (+0.0090) 

W German, mark 

2.8494 (+0#136) 

Trad e we i ghte d 

6&£ (+0.3; 1 

Mercury 
shares 
jump 40p 

Shares in Mercury Inter- ; 
national, the mer chan t bank- j 
mg and securities group, rose 
by 40p yesterday, one day 
before it publishes its first 
interim results rince the lull 
group was' formed in March. 

Tfie price move. 'which sent 
the shares from 388p to 428p, 
prompted speculation that Mr 
Saul Steinberg, the American 
artHtragenr, had been enlarg- 
ing his stake in Mercury. Mr 
Steinberg holds dose to 14 per 
cent of the company. 

However, the buying was 
probably more widely spread. 
“It lodes as though other 
investors may be jumping on 
Mr Steinbergs band-wagon, 
hoping the price has further to 
go,** said Mr Rod Barrett of 
stockbroker Hoare Govett 
Analysis expect today's re- 
sults to show profits after tax 
of slightly more than £30 
million. 

250,000 seek 
gas shares 

More than 250,000 com- 


total forecast 


By David Smith, Economics Correspondent . 

The National Institute for Unemployment is forecast to deficit next year, it oroects a 
Economic and Social Re- foil to 2.94 milli on by the end £7.2 billion deficit in 1 988; the 
rise in of next year. Treasury’s forecast is for a 


search predicts a strong rise in of next year. Treasury’s ft 

output and a drop in tin- However, owing to the large £1.5 bilbondefidtnextyear.lt 

employment to below three current account deficit, over- has not yet published a fore- 
mflh on next year in its latest all economic growth is fore- cast for 1 988 - 
Economic Review. cast at only 2.4 per cent next _ Thelnstitui 


Hollis, Mr Robert Max- 
well's timber group, has con- 
firmed its intention to raise its 
cash offer for AE, the auto- 
motive engineering group, af- 
ter two days of consultations 
with institutional sharehold- 
ers. 

The new offer of 280p per 
share £20 million to the 
price Hollis is willing to pay 
for AE. The share swap offer 
of 7 Hollis shares fin* 2 AE 
shares remains pnrhangpd 
and values AE at £290 million. 

Hollis foreshadowed the in- 
crease in its terms last Friday, 


By John Bell, City Editor 


provided that the idea at- 
tracted substantial support 

Hollis yesterday claimed it 
had enough backing but re- 
fused to be mare specific. 

Mr Maxwell’s company, 
which is much smaller than 
AE, says these terms are final 
unless there is a counterbid by 
a third party. 

The stage is now set for a 
straight fight between Hollis 
and Turner A Newall, whose 
final offer doses on December 
5. No closing date has yet been 
fixed for the Hollis offer. 

Mr Maxwell's master com- 


pany, Perga m on, holds almost 
1 1 percent of AE while Hollis 
can speak for a further 0.5 
percent. 

T & N commands slightly 
less than 30 per cent of AE, 
acquired in its first bid which 
foiled narrowly in September. 

Before Mr Maxwell raised 
his cash offer, T & N said 
holders ofa farther 14 percent 
of AE shares were inclined to 
accept its own terms. It would 
not reaffirm this statement 
yesterday. 

Financially, the rival offers 
are not for apart. Hollis etaiitue 


its share offer is worth 295p 
per AE share if the right to 
AE's final dividend is taken 
into account 

T A N meanwhile put a 
price of up to 285p on its own 
offer by which accepting AE 
shareholders can elect to re- 
ceive a variable mix of shares 
and 

AE also confirmed its fore- 
cast of £28 million profits for 
the year to end September and 
is bringing forward the 
announcement date to Mon- 
day. 


Economic Review. 

But this good news for the 
economy win be accompanied 
by a £5.6 billion balance of 
payments deficit and a rise in 
inflation to nearly 6 per cent, 
the institute says. 

The insti tute, which has 
tended to take a gloomy view 
of the economy under the 
present Government, is en- 
couraged by the extra public 
spending announced by the 
Chancellor in his autumn 
statement earlier this month. 

It also expects Mr Lawson 
to adhere to his previous plans 
arid cot taxes by £2 billion in 
the next Budget mid by £4 
billion — assuming the eleo- 
tion does not intervene — in 
the spring of 1988. 


cast at only 2.4 per cent next . The Institute is less optimis- 
year, virtually unchanged tic _ than the Treasury on 
from this year’s 2L5 percent, invisible earnings, expecting a 

The institute’s prediction £7 MEon «gplus next year 
for the current account is a gamst theomaaJ forecast of 


noticeably more gloomy than b^ion. B also expects a 
the' Treasury's aT *d die major- fagner rate ot import penetra- 
hy of other outside fore- tmn than the Treaswy. 
casters’. After a £5.6 billion . forecast on inflation - 

5.75 per cent m the fourth 
_ • , quarter of next year — com-. 

The Governments loss af pares with the Treasury’s 


control over public spending 
will mean that the basic rate of 
income tax wfll go back above 
30 per cent after foe election, 
says PbflEps & Drew, the 
stockbroker. . 


projection of 3.75 per cent 
This is mainly due to higher 
import prices as a result ofthe 
pound's fafl. 

The Economic Review con- 
tains new m edium -term pro- 


Tbe next Budget wiD prob- jections based on both Con- 
ably radadea cntiathebasic Strive and LabompohdS 


rate to 27 per cent from the 
present 29 per cent, it 
says in i& latest Economic 


This fiscal expansion, to- -forecasts. 
gether with the fall in the But this will be the last give- 


pound-that has already taken 
place, will produce stronger 
growth next year, tile Institute 
forecasts. 


away Budget for some time. 
“The question for the medium 
term is not how soon taxpayers 
will enjoy 25p m foe pound,” 


Manufacturing output, after said Mr BUI Martin, the firm’s 
a modest 0.1 per cent rise this . chief UK economist. “Rather, 
year, is expected to increase by it is whether they wifi escape a 
3.6 per cent next year, partly rate well above 30& whatever 


far British Gas had arrived by 
last night after a day which 
saw the “grey” market juice at 
which gas shares could be sold 
slip by 3p to 58p. 

Meanwhile, 11 firms have 
registered with the Stock Ex- 
change as market-makers and 
more are expected before' 
tonight's deadline. .V 

Offer lapses 

The Lloyd's broker PWS 
has formally announced the 
lapsing of us. £173 |nilhon 
offer for fellow broker C E 
Heath. This follows the Heath 
shareholders’ deriskm last 
week to bade their board’s 


3.6 per cent next year, partly 
due to the strength of exports. 

Capital 
go es to 
market 

.By Teresa Foole - 


rate well above 30fc whatever 
political party is hi power.” 


Labour's proposed public 
spending expansion, together 
with cuts in employers* na- 
tional insurance contributions 
and extra measures for the 
long-term unemployed, 
should reduce unemployment 
below two minion, according 
to the institote. But the pen- 
alty would be a sharp rise in 
inflation to more than 10 per 
cent and a big balance of 
payments deficit. ■ 


Farmers help trim 
US trade deficit 

. Fkom Bailey Morris, Washington 


The US trade deficit, which Despite the improved ex- 
tras hdd back economic .port performance, imports 
tii, narrowed to $1X1 hat- also continued to rise, increas- 
in October, in die third tog to $31.4 billion last month 
scutive monthly decline, from $30. 1 billion in October. 
» Commerce Department The persistent high level of 


acquisition of Fielding Insur- 1 audience 


Capital Radio, - Britain’s 
largest independent radio sta- 
tion, yesterday announced 
plans for a full stock market 
fisting early next year. The 
company is likely to be valued j 
at more than £11 raflfioo. . • • 
Capital bas been broadcast- 
ing since. 1973; when tite 
consortium, under foe- chair- 
manship of Sir Richard 
Attenborough, won the 

f radio 

franchise. Its advertising rev- 
enue accounts for about a fifth 
of all independent radio sta- 
tions and it bas fault up an 


consecutive monthly decline. 
US Commerce Department 


officials say the October defi- imports, in the wake of the 
cit was the best trade perfbr- faffing dollar, suggests that 


ance. 

BP for Tokyo 

BP intends to apply for a 
listing on the Tofcyo Stock 
Exchange in the first half of 
next year after pubfication of j 
1986 results. 

Magnet up 71% 

Magnet and Southerns, the 
vertically integrated timber 
and do-rt-yoursdf group, yes- 
terday announced pretax prof- 
its up 71 per cent to £20.7 
nnffion. Turnover increased 
from 28 per cent to £153-8 
miffion. An interim dividend 
of 2J2p was declared. 

Tempos, page 26 

Profit rises 

Kwik Save Group, foe 
North, of England super- 
market chain, revealed pretax 
profit up 1 7.4 per cent to £422 
miffion on turnover up 11.8 
per cent to £795 million for 
the 52 weeks to August 30. 
The dividend was increased 
by 1.2p to 6p net 

Tempos, page 26 


Tub 26 USM Prices 28 
Mu*yMi*ts2£ Wall Street 24 
PoreitaExck 26 Co News 24 
Traded Opfc 26 CoHmeot 25 
muc Prices 27 Economic 

Trusts 28 View 25 

C— nnfldffiM 28 Stock Market 25 


STOCK MARKETS 


million a week. The offer for 
sale of shares is unlikely to 
raise new mosey for CapkaL 
Mr Nigel Wahnsley, man- 
aging director of Capital, said: 
“We have always promoted 
strong links wfch London’s 
fl WM tift and wide owner- 
ship is in fine with our 
dec lar ed i ntenti on to go public 
attbetimeofonrlastlndepeB- 
dent Broadcasting Authority 
re-appointment” 

Pretax profits for the year to 
September, doe next mouth, 
should be almost double tire 




MDI&194 

£936060 made in the previous 
year on tu r n over of £17.5 
mfifioo. Capital, with all in- 
dependent stations, has bene- 
fited recently from re da ctions 
in the Exchequer Levy and a 
rebate on the primary rental 
paid to foe DBA. 

Tire non-voting shares arete i 
be enfranchised for tire sale. 
The hugest voting share stake, 
285 per cent, changed hands 
this year when the AnstraKan- 
owned Paul Ramsay Broad- 
casting (UK) took over 
Standard Broadcasting Cor- 
poration. 


[ mance in 14 months , on an 
unrevised basis, compared 
with the September unrevised 
| figure of S 12.6 billion. But on 
j a revised baas, the September 
deficit was shandy higher at 
| $14.7 InfiiozL 

The new figures show an 
; encouraging pattern of rising 
exports which increased to 
Si 9.3 billion, up from 
$175 biffioa the month be- 
fore. Exports af manufactured 
goods and farm products, two 
sectors of the economy which 
have been particularly hard 
hit by foe high doBar, rose last 
month. 

But the deficit for the year is 
nonetheless running at a 
record pace of $167.9 trillion, 
already larger than the record 
deficit last year of $148.5 bfl- 
bon, officials said. 


consumer preferen ces for for- 
eign products remained strong 
in important sectors of the 
economy. 

A new study by the Wash- 
ington-based Institute for 
International Economics, con- 
cluded that there must be 
drastic reductions in foe US 
trade deficit over the next few 



CBI sets up City 
link task force 

By Edward Townsend, Industrial Correspondent 


A top-level task force 
comprising soine of Britain's 
leading business figures bas 
been established by the 
Confederation of British In- 
dustry in a new attempt to 
bridge the deep rifts between 
manufacturing industry and 
the City of London. 

The new group, to be 
chaired by Mr David Nickson, 
president ofthe CBI, has been 
given a year by the policy- 
making CBI Council to come 
up with radical ways to bring 
the country's industrial and 
financial sectors together and 
to “improve the longer-term 
performance and internat- 
ional competitiveness of Brit- 
ish industry.” 


executive of AUied-Lyons, Sir 
Hector Laing, chairman of 
United Biscuits, Sir Raymond 
Lygo, managing director and 
chief executive of British 
Aerospace. Mr Alan Stole, 
group chief executive of the 
BTS Group, and Mr Ronald 
Utiger, chairman ofTI. 

Leading financial figures on 
the committee are Mr Ian Hay 
Davison, former chief exec- 
utive of Lloyd's of London 
and now chairman of Arthur 
Andersen, Mr Ron Artus, 
group chief investment man- 
ager of the Prudential, Mr 
Ferrier Chariton, senior part- 
ner at Linklaters and Paines, 
Mr Robin Fox, vice-chairman 
of Kleinwort Benson, Mr 


Mr, Nickson, cWan of & 


Scottish and Newcastle Brew- 
eries, described the initiative 


Assurance, Mr Hugh Jenkins. 


group investment director of 
as me angle most important xnip £ Mr 


event in my presidency. 


Allied Dunbar Assurance. Mr 
Richard Lloyd, chief exec- 


Members who have so far utive and deputy chair man of 


agreed to serve on the task 


Samuel, 


force include Mr Ian Butler, Quinton, deputy rhairman of 
c h a irm an of the Cookson Barclays Bank, and Mr R A 
Group, Sir John Clark, chair- Stormonth-Darling, chairman 
man and chief executive of of Alexanders Laing and 


Plessey, Sir Derrick Holden- Cruickshank. 


Brown, chairman and chief 


Comment, page 25 


Panel ‘operating 
system of no law’ 

American securities house examine the court's powers to 
Prudential-Bache claimed in review decisions of the Panel. 


the Appeal Court yesterday 
that it was 'very undesirable' 
for the City Takeover Panel to 


Mr Leaver is asking them to 
overturn the refusal of High 
Court judge Mr Justice Hodg- 


be outside the control of the son on Tuesday to give them 
courts. leave to seek judicial review of 

Their counsel Mr Jeremy a Panel decision. . 


Sir Chrigtopher: “No question of onrpuUiiigMt” 

Courtauids stays in SA 

Mr Fred Beaten, the Courtauids, which announced a strong increase in 
institute's director, said a new profits yesterday, has no intention of joining the 
global recession is possible by international exodus from South Africa. Sir Chris- 
1988 unless these large adjust- topher Hogg, chairman, said: “There is no question of 

ort ofScmth Afriau Wedo not feel that 
required, be said, Japan and we have anytfchy to be ashamed abort m our operatMm 
Europe would have to share there.” Courtauids owns two-thirds of a South African 
the bulk of the corresponding wood pulp business, Saiocor. Courtauids’ pretax 
trade deterioration in other profits rose 35 per cent to £82 mOKon cm turnover 4 per 
countries. cent higher at £1096.9 million. Comment, page 25 


Leaver Q C, accused the Panel 
of operating a “system of no 


Pru-Bache is advising 
Datafin, a company formed by 


law” as the City’s self-regulat- “ element in the McCorqu- 
ing body. odale printing group favour- 

“Thmr o _r rag a management buyout of 

5 corpus of foe company, 
roles which are administrative tt™. wTJ, 


rales which are administrative 
and which have many of the 
characteristics of legal rulings. 


They want to challenge the 
Panel's rejection of their claim 
last Monday that supporters 


McCorquodale had broken 


system,'' said Mr Leaver. 

In a case which could have 


the Panel’s rules. 

Mr Justice Hodgson ruled 


wide implications for the fa- that the Panel was not a public 
tore of City self-regulation, law body whose decisions 
mree Appeal Judges led by were open to judicial review 
Master of the Rolls Sir John and he had no jurisdiction to 
Donaldson are being asked to deal with the matter. 


News Lat to develop Fleet St offices 

By Judith Hontley, Commercial Property Correspondent 


News International which 
owns The Sun, News of the 
World, The Tunes and Sun- 
day Times, is to develop 
275,000 sq ft of offices on the 


_ AH of News IniemationaJ’s 
titles are now printed at 
Wapping, East London, leav- 
ing behind the valuable Fleet 
Street site. News International 


site erf" the News cf the World fa likely to put the site out to 
bu i lding, fronting London’s competitive tender by devel- 
Fleet Street, in a development opers in what fa now a 
which could be worth close to booming office market fuelled 
£100 million. by Big Bang. 

News International, whose -ni. . n*;— .-.m , 
chairman fa Mr Rupert Mur- SfJ? 

doch, received .fall planning 


in what fa now a 
(g office market fuelled 


will retain 
reetfrom- 


Sent of foe Fleet Street and to the new^seyen-storey offices 


Bouverie Street she from foe 
City of London Corporation 
this week. 


which could be on foe market 
in 1989. 

The top office rent achieved 


in the area is £32 a sq ft But 
tents are rising rapidly as 
firms of accountants, lawyers 
and financial conglomerates 
demand larger offices which 
they cannot find in foe Square 
Mile. 

The Daily Telegraph, which 
has sold its printing site in 
Fleet Street and other papers, 
such as the Daily Mail and the 
Daily Mirror, want to capital- 
ize on their sites now that 
newspaper production fa mov- 
ing away from Fleet Street to 
London's Docklands and 
elsewhere. 




Institutions offered shares in Sherwin Pastoral 

A stake in the big country 


By Richard Lander 


PROPERTIES OF SHERWIN 
PASTORAL COMPANY 


MAIN PRICE CHANGES 


:±" p V-~ 


NnvVnk- 

DMr Jones — 1911.14 f-09Qr 

Tok»o 

N&kei Dow 17727.91 (-19-59) 

HoogKon* 

Hang Seng 2377.71(+1&5a 

Anutafdem Gan 2833 (-1.5) 

SytftMK AO 13KL6 (+1JLS) 


2057.4 (-8.1) 


Commerzbank 


RISES: 

Turner S NewaH 
BPS Industries _ 
Magnet asthns. 

Meyer fntnl. 

MKBectric. 

MHcfteB Somecs 

GKN 

Tazer Kemstey _ 


182p(+fip> 

517p (+9pl i 

232p (+18p) 

280p (+10p) 



INTEREST RATES 









p 




m 



Owning a share in British 
Gas is one thing: buying a 
stake in a land maai half foe 
size of Britain is something 
else entirely. 

That is what is on offer to 
British institutions this week 
from foe Sherwin Pastoral 
Company of Australia. The 
group owns no less than 
72,605 square km (2^361 sq 
miles) of land in the Northern 
Territory and Queensland, 
most of it hot, dry, dusty and 
bounded by an endless ho- 
rizon. It is foe part of foe who looks far more at home in 
world where foe local doctor a cowboy bai than a 
arrives in an aircraft and businessman’s suit. 

»a^v5 drte “ nS Mr Sherwin pride, himself 



V/ 




✓ 


WESTERN AUSTRALIA 


Of more interest to poten- 
tial investors is that foe land 


Mr Sherwin prides himself 

■on the cost-efficiency of his 

operation, which employs just 
200 people — less than one 


SowS nf aSS ^ person for every 1,500 cattle - 

c^ (as of A^ 30, 1986) of ^en during foe busiest lime 
which some 73,420 will make Q f ^ year. 


3 




their way this .year to foe 
abbatoir and foence to dinner 
tables in Australia and over- 
seas as lean beef 
' Put amply, Sherwin is foe 


After breakneck expansion 
of both land and animals, 
Sherwin is now raising 
A$50 million (£2.27m) 


higgsst cattle . business in through a public offer on foe 
Australia and one of the Australian stock exchanges, of 


1 V iVk-. '-si .'ll^ ^ :I Vi i: : 




bi®est- in foe worid. It has 
been built'up over, foe past 28 
. years by Mr Peter Sherwin, a 


which some 40 per cent is 
being touted to investors in 
the Far East, the United States 


quietly-spoken 55-year-o ld and Britain through McIntosh 


Hamsou Hoare Govett, foe 
Australian stockbrokers. 

Most of foe money will be 
used to pay off debt that was 
racked up as the company 
built up its land bank. High 
interest rates have meant that 
payments to foe bank have 
swallowed up most of the 
pretax profits in recent years. 
However Sherwin is forecast- 
ing pretax profits of AS 16.2 
mulion in 1987 against 
A52.19 million in foe 10 
months to April 1 986. 

A rather more optimistic 
estimate by its brokers puts 
the company on a prospective 
price-earnings ratio of 5.6 at 
foe $AI offer price with a 9.5 
per cent dividend yield. 


...then come to die Portmon 

for an exciting choice of savings and investment schemes. 
Investing on the Stock Exchange sometimes sounds inviting, 
but remember - stocks and shares can fall just as easily as 
they can rise! With the Portman your hard-earned money will 
continue to grow. 

Portman Building Society— where you 
don't have to speculate to accumulate! 

FREEPOST the coupon for a brochure 

NAMES(S) Mr/Mrs/Miss 




FostCbde. 




ofcf - — 
ineer’s 
tastic’ 


vm 


jd mechanical en- 
put the £8,000 be 
ole Portfolio Gold 
yesterday to good 

ydate my gramo- 
ese my donation 
it fufo appeal ami 
y next year.” Mr 
iod, of AUestree, 

aged 51, who has ! 
olio Gold since it 
e T unes , said that 
believe his hick. 

It is fantastic. It fa 
dence.” 

Jold cards can be 
sending a stain- 
ed envelope to: 

Md, 




- >1 

^ ^ 

y.- • * -l 


rd Wood 

gerof 

itives 

beer 

tin Young 

lsed in brewing 
.drinkers and, in 
, even kill them, 
i for Real Ale 
day. 

i foe campaign’s 
that's Brewing, 
Protz, a former 
'ood Beer Guide, '- 
)ple \riio have - 
sfoer breathing 
nus disorders, 
who are allergic! 
tis, can suffer ill 
inking beers in 
•es have been 
reduce a foamv 
clarity, or id 

life- 

led StatesT the' 
“nore than 40 
)f heart attacks 
ewers used co- 
in beer to 
uning head. 

ouple 

•peal 

«nuan couple 
us last July for 
seeking reduo- 
utences. 

’ Lord Lane, 
itice, wfll pre-‘ 
plications by 
>onja Schulze, 
for leave to 
foe sentences 
r Justice Mi- 
t foe Central 


ST 



wmm 




* 3Vfe" high 
x 3i.4» high 














24 



WALL STREET 


New York (Agendas) - Wall 
Street shares were mixed in 
active trading as the toll in 
takeover activity after an in- 
sider trading case wnw to an 
end. 

A new round of takeover 
speculation and actual bids 
®ored to the forefront, while 
shares hovered modestly be- 
low the previous nights dose 
in active trading. 

The Dow Jones industrial 
average, which came within 
two points of the record dose 
of 1919.71 earlier in the day, 
was op 0.1 to 1913 at mid- 
morning. 

Declines led advances six to 
Gveon 38 million shares while 
the Standard & Poor’s 500- 


share index was op 0.05 at 
235.97. 

Colgate rose 3% to 44 with 
traders saying that shares had 
risen in sympathy with the 
takeover bid received by 
Chesebrongh. 

Borg Warner, which re- 
ceived a takeover bid from 
investor Mr Irwin Jacobs, rose 
144 to 39i/«- 

Michael David, 28, the for- 
ma 1 Paul, Weiss, Riskind, 
Wharton & Garrison associate 
at the center of the so called 
‘‘Yuppie Five** insider trading 
case, changed his plea to gn3ty 
to charges of conspiracy* 
securities fraud, mail fraud 
and obstruction of justice. He 
conld be jailed for 20 years. 


Nov 

25 


Nov 

24 


AMR 

ASA 

AfttfSignai 

AHedStrs 

AUtfiCNmrs 

Alcoa 

Amaxlne 
Am'rcta Hs 
Am Brandt 
Am Can 
AmCynm'd 

Am 0 Pot 
A m Express 

Am Home 
Am Motors 
AmSt'nrd 
Am Tolopn 

Amoco 
ArmcoStaef 
Asarco 
Ashland On 
AtRtcMMd 
Avon Prods 
BfcrsTst NY 
Bankamer 
EftofBston 
Bank of NY 
Beth Steel 


Broen 
Bg Warner 
Brist Myors 
BP 

Burl'tonlnd 
Surf ton Ntn 
Burroughs 
CmpbaUSp 
Can Pacific 
CaterpJllsr 
Ceianese 
Central SW 
Champion 
Chase Man 
ChmBkNY 
Chevron 
Chrysler 
Cttoorp 
Clark Equip 
Coca Cola 

ST 

Cbnbla Gas 
CmtftnEng 
ComwtthEd 
Cons Eds 
Cu Nat Gas 
Cons Power 
Cmri Data 
ComngGI 
CPCInd 
Crane 
Curttes Wrt 
Dart& Kraft 
Deere 
Delta Aa 
Detroit Ed 

P»a»Eq 

ttsnew 
Dow Cham 
Dresser bid 
Duke Power 
DuPont 
Eastern Air 
Estm Kodak 
Eaton Carp 
Emerson B 
Exxon Corp 
fad Dpt Sts 

• E xtt» ■ 


58% 57% 
35% 34% 
41% 41 

63% 63% 

2% 2% 
34% 35% 
12 % 12 % 
22 % 22 % 
44% 43% 

86 96% 

81% 81% 
29% 29% 

57% 57% 

79% 78 
3% 3% 

42% 42% 

27% 27% 

68 % 66 
5% 4% 

14% 14% 

56% 66 

59% 60% 

29% 29% 
43% 42% 
15% 15% 

42% 42% 

37% 37% 

5 5% 

50% 51% 

61 60% 

51 50% 

37% 35% 

79% 79% 
39% 39% 
39% 39% 

61 61% 
nla 80% 
59% 59% 

11 % 11 % 
39% 39% 
240% 240% 

35 34% 

33% 33% 

38% 36% 
44% 44% 

46% 47% 

39% 38% 
50% 51% 

21 20 
35% 35% 
40% 40% 

135% 134% 
44% 44% 

33 33% 

34 34% 
49% 49% 
33% 32% 

16 16% 
25% 25% 
54% 54% 

77% 76 
36% 3fl% 
53% 53% 
54% 54% 

23% 23% 
46% 49% 
17% IS 

105% 105% 
43% 43% 

59% 59 

19% 19% 
48% 48% 
8SK 90 
9V, 8% 

68 % 68 % 

77 75% 

87% 88% 
69% 89% 
86% 84% . 
tSSTEaSSaST 


Nov 

25 


Nov 

24 


Firestone 
Fa Chicago 
FsthttSncp 
FM Penn C 
Ford 

FTWachva 
GAP Corp 
GTE Carp 
Gen Carp 
Gan Dy'mcs 
GwEfectnc 
Gen Inst 
Gen MBs 
Gen Motors 
GnPbUtrry 
Geneses 
Georgia Pac 
GHetT 

Goodrich 
Goodyear 
Gould Inc 
Grace 
GtAit&Tac 

Grind 

Gutman Cor 
GulfS West 
HektzHJ. 
Hercules 
Hlett-Pkrd 
Honeywell 
Kinds 
li 


IBM 
INCO 
Int Paper 
mt Terra! 
living Bank 
JhnsnS Jfm 
Kaiser Man 
Kerr McGee 
Krmi'lyCbk 
K Mart 
Kroger 
L-T.vTcorp 
Ution 
Lockheed 
Lucky Smi 
ManH'nvef 
ManviOeCp 
Mapco 
Marine Mid 
MR Marietta 
Masco 
McDonalds 
McDonnell 


Merck 
Minstt Mng 
MOM Ofl 
Monsanto 
Morgan JLP. 
Motorola 
NCR Cop 
NLIndstrs 
NatDtstlrs 
Nat Med Bit 
NarSmcndt 
Norfolk Sth 
NWBancrp 
OcddntPot 
Ogden 
Obi Carp 
Owens-JH 
Pac Gas B 
Pan Am 
Penney J.C. 
PennzoiJ 


27% 

31% 

53% 

9% 

59* 

38% 

40 

59% 

78% 

73 

83% 

17% 

43% 

73% 

23% 

3% 

39% 

46% 

44% 

43 
18% 
51% 

24% 

32% 

26 

66 % 

41% 

58 

44% 

70% 

25% 

56% 

19% 

1Z7 

12% 

75% 

55 

49% 

69% 

15% 

29% 

81% 

49% 

31% 

1 % 

80 

53% 

30% 

45% 

2 % 

55% 

46% 

41% 

27% 

64% 

79% 

58% 

110 % 

113% 

38% 

78% 

85% 

38% 

48% 

4% 

45% 

25% 

11 % 

85% 

39% 

28 

46 

44 
47% 
25% 

5% 

81% 

71% 

27% 


kH tMsMcmaLnHmc 


27% 

31% 

53% 

9% 

59% 

36% 

39% 

59 

79% 

7Z» 

80% 

17% 

42 
73% 
23% 

3% 

39% 

45% 

44% 

4m 

18% 

52% 

25 
32% 

26 
65 'A 
41% 
56% 
44% 
66% 
25'- 
57% 
19% 

124% 

12 % 

75% 

54% 

49% 

70% 

15% 

29% 

81% 

50X 

30% 

m 

80% 

50'/. 

33% 

45% 

2% 

54% 

46 

42% 

27% 

64% 

79V, 

57% 

111 % 

112 % 

39% 

78 

84% 

37% 

46% 

4% 

44% 

25% 

11 % 

85% 

38% 

28% 

45% 

43 
45 '4 
25% 

5% 

60% 

71% 

28% 


Nov 

25 


NOV 

24 


Pfizer 
Phelps Dge 
PWSpMre 

PhSpsPet 

Asteroid 
PPGInd 
PrctrGmM 
PbSESG 
Raytheon 
flynttsMef 
RockwsBtm 
Royal Dutch 
Sofeweys 
Sara Las 
SFESopac 
SchT burger 
Scott Paper 
Seaman 
Sears R&ck 
SheU Trans 


nBk 


StnCMEd 
S'WstnBefl 
Sid Ofl 
Starting Ora 
Stevens JP 
Sun Como 
Teledyne 
Tenneoo 
Texaco 
Texas E Cor 
Texas Inst 
Texas UtHs 
Textron 
TravtrsCor 
TRW Inc 
UAL Inc 
UnaavarNV 
tin Carbide 
Un Pac Cor 
Wd Brands 
USGCorp 
UtdTectmol 
USX Corp 
Unocal 
Jim Walter 
WmerLmbt 
Wees Fargo 
WstgtneB 
Weyarti'eer 
Wtwlpool 
WOohvorth 
Xerox Corp 
Zenith 


62% 

20 % 

71% 

11 

70% 

72% 

77% 

42% 

66 % 

44% 

43!4 

91% 

61% 

69* 

33% 

32% 

63% 

63% 

43% 

54% 

40 

86 % 

22 % 

35% 

111 % 

48% 

44 VS 
35 
57% 

320% 

39 

34% 

30% 

118% 

33% 

64% 

45% 

93% 

50% 

225 

22 % 

63% 

35% 

43% 

45 
20 
25% 
47% 
56% 

106% 

59% 

39% 

70% 

44 

58% 

21 


62% 

20 % 

70% 

11 

71% 

70% 

78 

43 

88 

45*4 

43% 

92 

61% 

69% 

33% 

32% 

63% 

63 
43* 

54% 

40% 

B6% 

22 % 

35% 

111 

49% 

44% 

35% 

57% 

319% 

39% 

34% 

30% 

120 

34% 

64 
45 
93% 
58 

223% 
22 % 
64 
34% 
41% 
45 
20 '4 
26‘4 
47% 
S7 

108% 

59% 

40% 

69 

43 

59% 

21 % 


CANADIAN PRICES 

AgncoEsg 
AfaiAkan 


28% 25% 

43% 43% 

11 % 11 % 
15% 19% 
13% 13% 

28 27% 

27 27% 

23% 23% 
33% 33% 
47 47% 

39% 39% 

29% 29% 
87% 87% 

19% 19% 

28% 28% 
2.66 2.70 
13 13% 

30% 30% 

i*Jd kM- 1 Trawa. r LMuXed 


Alum 

AlgomaStl 

Can Pacific 

Comlnco 

GonSathrst 

Hkr/SttCan 

HdsnBMbi 

hnasco 

I mp er ial Oil 
hi Pipe 
Ryl Trustee 


Co 

ThmsnN "A" 


‘Little 
cost’ in 
closing 
N-plants 

By Teresa Pode 

Business Correspondent 

More than half of Britain’s 
16 nuclear power stations 
could close over the next three 
years with minimal effect on 
electricity supply and costs, 
according to an independent 
report, published yesterday. 

It says that the dosing of all 
nuclear power stations by the 
year 2000 would put up 
electridty costs by no more 
than 10 per cent and would 
create more jobs in the coal 
industry than would be lost in 
the nuclear power industry. 

The report, commissioned 
by the all-party Coalfield 
Communities Campaign, 
looked at the range of options 
for closing nuclear power sta- 
tions. 

It accuses the Central 
Electricity Generating Board 
of being “misleading” in its 
assessment of phasing out 
nuclear power. 

The report, by Mr Stephen 
Fothergill, lecturer in econom- 
ics at Reading University, says 
that there was adequate spare 
capacity for the nine ageing 
Magnox power stations to be 
dosed by 1990. 

The newer advanced gas- 
cooled reactors could not be 
phased out over the same 
timescale without fears of 
power cuts, but could be 
replaced by three coal-fired 
stations by the end of the 
century. 

Phasing out nudear power 
completely would demand a 
programme of investment in 
the coal industry to increase 
capacity by 25 million tonnesa 
year by the year 2000. This 
would create 40,000 jobs com- 
pared with the 30,000 that 
would be lost. 

Extra costs to the electridty 
industry would arise mainl y, 
because of the need to bring 
forward investment in new 
power plants, the de- 
commissioning of nuclear 
plants and the higher running 
costs of coal stations. 

Mr Fothergill attacks the 
CEGB’s own forecasts of a 50 
per cent increase in generating 
costs as created by “bogus 
accounting methods and du- 
bious assumptions.** 


Surplus must be cut, says minister 

Channon in Japan 



Leading Japanese business- 
men gave the visiting Sec- 
retary of State for Trade and 
Industry, Mr Paul Channon, 
an unexpectedly rough ride in 
Tokyo yesterday after he told 
them that Japan must show h 
is serious about redudng its 
huge trade surplus, 

Mr Channon said that Ja- 
pan had to take equal 
responsibility with the United 
States and the European 
Community to smooth out the 
dangerous imbalances in 
world trade. 

He told industrialists and 
financiers from Keidanren, 
Japan’s main business federa- 
tion, that Japan’s promise to 
stimulate its economy through 
domestic-led growth and not 
exports was welcome but that 
there had to be action on it 

But Mr F ishfm Saito, chair- 
man of Keidanren, fresh from 
a European tour and personal 
meeting with die Prime Min- 
ister, Mrs Margaret Thatcher, 
said that Japanese progress in 
opening its markets appeared 
slow only to an outsider. 



Paul Channon: given a tough reception In Tokyo 
Mr Akio Morita, the head of fidency, but also because of 


Sony, also leapt to Japan’s 
defence. He sard that recent 
Japanese progress bad been* 
extremely rapid. 

Mr Channon said that 
Japan’s surplus, forecast at 
about $90 billion (£63.4 bil- 
lion) this year, was partly 
because of Japanese cF- 


economic and trade policies 
no longer appropriate to a 
country of Japan’s strength 
and maturity. 

Mr Channon cited continu- 
ing unfair Japanese taxes on 
wines and whisky, attempts to 
lock out foreign goods by 
imposing unreasonable stan- 


dards and restricted access for 
overseas financial companies 
in lucrative Japanese financial 
markets. 

He pointed out that Japa- 
nese bonks had 31 per cent of 
international business in 
London while foreign banks 
had less than 3 per cent is 
Tokyo. 

Mr Yoshifflkj Chino, head 
ofDaiwa Securities, compared 
British finance poorly with 
American operations in Ja- 
pan. He complained that Brit- 
ish companies did not hire 
enough local people and Brit- 
ish financiers rarely spoke any 
Japanese. 

Mr Channon ackowledged 
that more had to be be done, 
but he noted that there would 
be more British companies in 
the financial sector if Japanese 
licences were easier to obtain. 

He warned the Japanese to 
take care of foe reciprocity 
danse in Britain’s new Finan- 
cial Services Bill, winch will 
come into force next year. 

Mr Channon also noted drat 
all countries suffered in Japan. 


Broker calls for an end to 
‘soft option’ board jobs 


A demand for non-exec- 
utive directors to play a more 
active role in the affairs of 
investment trusts is made in a 
report on the sector by 
Alexanders Laing & 
Cruickshank, the broker. 

It says: “There are stilL 
unfortunately, a number of 
groups where the day-to-day 
managers in the front line find 
their expertise is limited by 
boards which are not ou fait 
with the realities of the present 
day investment trust sector.” 

Tbe report - the Investment 
Trust Companies Yearbook, 


By Cliff Fettham 
published today — cl aims that 
the highly competitive post- 
Big Bang era will bring greater 
pressures to improve perfor- 
mance on investment trust 
managers. 

It says that they must be free 
to make decisions without 
being held back by boards 
largely composed of inexperi- 
enced non-executive directors 
who consider their jobs a “soft 
option.” 

Mr Ted Sellers, an analyst, 
says: “The days of the old- 
style non-executive director 
who travelled up to town once 


every three months with very 
little idea of what was happen- 
ing in the investment trust 
movement should be gone 
forever. ” 

His* report also predicts 
takeover bids for investment 
trust companies by American 
groups. 

“The influx of the very large 
American groups into the UK 
markets leads to a conclusion 
that it is only a question of 
time before they seek to 
augment both their assets base 
and their influence by bidding 
for trusts.” 


Barclays launches export schemes 


Competition to provide 
short-term export finance yes- 
terday prompted Barclays 
Bank to launch a new range of 
short-term export finance 
schemes. 

The Tradeline and Trade- 
flow packages are designed to 
replace the Export Credits 
Guarantee Department’s 
Comprehensive Bank Guar- 


antee which is to be phased 
out by next October. 

The schemes give the ex- 
porter non-recourse 100 per 
cent finance on credit terms of 
up to 180 days, backed either 
by an ECGD short-term insur- 
ance policy or by Barclays’ 
own ECGD policy. 

Since the decision last year 
to abolish the EGGD’s 


scheme, many banks and 
specialist companies have in- 
troduced their own products. 

Barclays is stepping up its 
attempts to take a larger share 
of export trade. For the first 
time it will market its finance 
packages through branches 
around the country, backed up 
by tbe 20 international ser- 
vices branches* 


Stone Int 
expects 
£2m loss 

By OnrOty Staff 
Stone International expects 
to make a pretax loss of £2 
million in the six months to 
November 30, but a profit of 
£5 millio n in the second half 
The main reason for the 
first-half loss is attributed to 
problems with a large export 
order at the British transport 
division in Crawley, Sussex. 

Stone says tbe problem has 
been resolved and deliveries 
under the ' contract will be 
completed before this finan- 
cial year ends. 

The British boiler business 
had less orders, caused by the 
fell in oil prices. In die second 
half its performance will be 
improved by increased 
production of pressure ves- 
sels. At present, these account 
for half the order book. 

Stone Johnson, in Michi- 
gan. was bit by a six-week 
strike which resulted in losses 
of £500.000. 

The group expects to main- 
tain its inter im amt final 

dividends. 


PROPERTY 



E 


P 


C 


Develop! rig quality 


Austin Friars. London EC2. 

Office development with a total 
tzrejof55.000sq.fi. 
let to Morgan GrenfelL 



SUMMARY OF GROUP RESULTS 

(Year ended 30th September, 1986) 


Gross rents and other income 
Profit before taxation 
Taxation 

Profit attributable to 
ordinary shareholders 
Earnings per ordinary share 
Net dividends per share 
Net assets per share diluted 


1986 

£’m 

19S5 

Fm 

162.3 

136.7 

58.4 

51.6 

19.1 

17.9 

39.2 

33.2 

16.3p 

15.6p 

11. 5p 

10^p 

440p 

415p 


“ The outlook is encouraging for a farther increase in profits this year” 


□ The UK development programme, 
currently in excess of £500m, has 
been expanded considerably. 

□ Our policy is to develop properties 
and expand our investments, worth 
£1 billion in the UK, with our own 
corporate finances. 

□ We intend to increase the scale of 
our trading activities over the next few 
years when suitable opportunities 
occur. 


□ The prospects for expansion in 
Australia are greatly improved. 

□ In Europe our properties continue 
to be substantially fully let 

n 


To: The Secretary, MEPC pic. Brook House, 

113 Park Lane, London W1Y 4AY. 

Please send me a copy of the 1986 Annual Report which will be 
available from 16th December, 198b. 


n 

I 


Name. 


Address. 


Postcode. 


L 


J 


COMPANY NEWS 


• TR TECHNOLOGY 
INVESTMENT TRUST-- fig- 
ures for six months to Septem- 
ber 30 in £000. Interim 0.5p 
(same), pay January 2. Income 
from fixed asset investments 
franked was 2,034 (1.949). 
unfranked was 2,451 (2,907). 
Other interest receivable and 
similar income: bank interest 
859 (922), underwriting 
commission 20 (32), interest 
payable debenture 25 (25), bank 
currency loans 1,341 (1,674), 
administration 588 (450), rev- 
enue before tax 3,428 (3,680), 
corporation tax 511 (657), im- 
puted tax on franked income 
595 (584), earnings per share 
I.04p (I.09p). Net asset value of 
ordinary shares after deducting 
prior charges are at par 148.4p 
(1 1 1.9p). The company says that 
investments in tbe US at 
September 30 represented 42 
percent of the total portfolio but 
exposure to the dollar was only 
37 per cent. However, since the 
end of the half year, S12m of 
borrowings had beat repaid 
increasing the fund's exposure 
to tbe dollar to 39 per cent 

• SHEERS INTERN ATIOAL: 
Figures for six ix months . to 
September 30 in £000. Interim 
0.9p (0.85p). aggregate value of 
sales to customers outside tbe 
group were 10,097 (9.741) while 
operating profits rose to 962 
(911). Interest paid 240 (280), 
profit before tax was 722 (631), 
tax was 252 (259), profit attrib- 
uted was 470 (372), earnings per 
share 4.80p (3-SQp). The board 
remains confident about the 
outcome for tbe full year. 

• KEXMORE: Interim divi- 
dend 0.44p (0.4p). The Six 
months to September 27 with 
figures in £000. Turnover in- 
creased to 16,639 (13.990) on 
Operating profits of 697 (612). 
Pretax profits was 398 (314), tax 
was 67 (3 IX earnings per share 
was 2.6p (2-17pX The board has 
increased the interim dividend 
and will review the final pay- 
ment in the light of the results 
for tbe year as a whole. 

• FLEMING UNIVERSAL 
TRUST: Results for six months 
to September 30 in pounds. The 
Directors anticipate that tbe 
final results for the year to 
March 31 1987 will not be less 
than 0.90p making 1 -50p for the 
year. Gross income from 
franked dividends was 278,300 

(348,185), while for unfranked 
dividends it was 747,093 
(839,624), tax was 30S.526 
(473,872), preferential dividend 
was 17,850 (17,850), revenue 
available 596.557 (780.004). 
earnings per share 0.91p (l.l9p 
adj). The 1985 figures have been 
adjusted lo reflect a 
capitalisation issue in July of 
two new ordinary shares for 
each dare held. 


• AUSTWHIM RE- 

SOURCES: Profit AnsSl.021 
minion (1.6 cents a share) for 
quarter to September 30 on gold 
production of 6,151 oz. Profit 
for nine months AusJ L713 
million from production of 
12,128 ok.'- 

• ROM HOLDINGS: Of tbe 
£1,013.178 of 3 per cent second 
mortgage convertible debenture 
stock 1989 offered by way of 
lights £697.903 (68.89 per cent 
of the issue) bas been taken up. 
Applications for excess have 
been received from holders of 
£1,886.932 of stock. 

• MONK INVESTMENT 
TRUST: Interim dividend l.lp 
(same). Total dividend win not 
be less than 2.6p. Figures in 
£000 for six months to October 
31. Gross Investment income 
232 (1,696), income from 
investment and interest receiv- 
able 2^09 (1.692), other income 
73 (4), revenue before tax 1,934 
(1,401). tax 622 (486), earnings 

1.18). Net asset 
$83). 

MINING: The 
company win not go ahead with 
the partial takeover bid for 
Southern Resources. 

• PETROCON GROUP: Of 
the 6,207, 1 73 ordinary shares of 
12 f-2p offered by way of rights 
5,974,446 Shares (96.25 per 
cent) have been taken up. 

• GOVETT ATLANTIC 
INVESTMENT TRUST: Final 
dividend I.9p, making 3p (2.8) 
for year to October 31. 

• SCOTT GREENHAM 
GROUP: Tbe company has 
acquired tbe business of Farmer 
Cabines from tbe receiver of S 
W Farmer for -more than 
£800,000 cash. 

• NORCROS: The company 
announces the merger of 
Butpsrtey Engineering and John 
Smith (Keighley). The new com- 
pany will trade as Butteriey 
Engineering. 

• AMAX: Tbe company has 
completed the acquisition of foe 
outstanding common stock in- 
terest in AJ uznax which it did 
not already own and which was 
held by Mitsui and Co- (USA) 
and Nippon Steel (USA). 


sets its 
sights 
on land 

Associated British Ports 
Holdings, the docks company 
which was privatized la 1983, 
is intent on tra nsformin g frs 
enotnuns land holdings info 
profit earners to boost its 
earnings per share. ; 

Sir Keith Smart, the chair- 
man of ABPH, is keen to 
exploit the potential of his 
2£0O acres of devefopabfe 
bind, a process which has been 
tinder way mace privatization 
swept aside restrictions on foe 
poem, opening die way for 
property development 
Bat, he says: “I dent bum 
when or whether property will 
equate to or exceed profits 

from the ports services. Prop- 
erty will become more im- 
portant bm I do not regard foe 
ports as over-mature in growth 
terms.' 1 

The latest step in the evolu- 
tion of ABPH firms the 
nationafitied British Transport 
Docks Board has been to make 
an all-share bid for Grosvenor 
Square Prop ert ies, a USM- 
qnoted company set np Mr 
Fttnl Mariwr^ formerly at 
Hammersoa Property aad 
Investment, ore of Britan's 


met. the 
ports services c om p an y’s cri- 
teria: it has a hefty develop- 
ment programme for a com- 
pany worm about £15 million 
and gives ABPH the in-house 
property development exper- 
tise it does not have. 

ABPHV all-share ofier 
looks to be at a high premarn 
to Grosvenor Square’s last 
stated net asset valne of 54p 
per share. But the real asset 
value is nearer the offer price, 
which valued Grosvenor Sq- 
uare’s shares at 12®p each on 
the night before tbe Hd was 
made public. 

ABPH, which is in fee 
fortunate position of having a 
healthy income stream from 
tbe porte services and being ail 
geared, would re-finance some 
of G ro s ve no r Square’s expen- 
sive borrowings. The property 
company's portfolio c o m p ris es 
£35 million of schemes for- 
ward-fimded with institutions. 

Limited recourse loans exist 
oa £15 tiafltion of the portfolio, 
including one of its high 
profile schemes, the re- 
devetopnuitt of tbe London 
Pavilion in Piccadilly Circus 
with Kennedy Brookes, the 
restaurant chain. 



Sir Keith Stuart ‘property 
wOl become more important 1 

Grosvenor Square’s office 
development at Maryietome 
Road is under offer. 

“Normally we seO as soon 
as the ink is dry on the lease,” 
Mr Marber sail, “bot now we 
will have the time to consider 
what to do with 
developments.” 

That is certainly * view 
shared by Sir Keith: “Our 

cash flow is so strong that we 

don't need to sell land and 
developments. We can take 
tire long view.” 

ABPH's share price has 
increased by five times since 
the flotation and earnings per 
share wRl i be improved by the 
property ana and by increas- 
ing profitability from the ports 
services, which Sir Keith says 
will continue to play the 
mainpart in the company's 
activities. 

Judith Huntley 

Commercial Property 
Correspondent 


BASE 

LENDING 

RATES 


ABN 

Adam S Company. 

BCG 

Qtiiati Sarirapf. 


— 1100 % 
1UK 
— 11 . 00 % 

Consolidated Crts 11.00% 

Co-operative Bank 1100% 

C. Hoare & Co 11.00% 

Hong Kong & Sna19ha__.il. 00% 

LLoyds Bank 11.00% 

Nat Westminssr 1100% 

Boyti Bank of Scotland —1100% 

TSB —1 100% 

Citibank NA —11.00% 

f Mortgage Bare Rate. 



Rothschilds International 
Money Funds 

The efficient alternative to a deposit 
account in any major currency. 

1 

* For further information and the currcrn prospectus^. 

I please complete and mum this coupon to: Robin Fuller. 

| MM Rothschild Asset Management (C.I.) Limited. 

■ P.O. Box 242, St. Julian s Court. Si. Peter Port. Guernsey. 
Channel Islands. Telephone: Guernsey (0481) 26741 

| Name 


| . Address 

I _ 

1 __ 

I 


.MOO 


^nm rothschujd assct MANAGEMENT j 






THE TIMES THURSDAY NOVEMBER 27 1986 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


25 


(ECONOMIC VIEW) 



4-^ 

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■^r. s 
- ” <• *?. 

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- T.T ' — ' 1 


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:+ ■“ 




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* 


can regain 
in the tax reform 


first 


game 


K 


By Rodney Lord, Economics Editor 


■ -J"? ?^>| 

C.-.U *• 


■r 


Mrs Thatcher last week coat- 
located that Britain lias to 
compete with other countries 
for stolled personnel not only 
anstiaries, laboratory &cal- 
jnes .and the Tower of 
London, but also on its tax 
jaaa. 

■ She was talking about die. 
top cate of income tax, which 
she would Eke to bring down 
from 60 to 50 per cent Bui the 
same is true of many other 
aspects of the tax system. 

Multinational companies 
have always located their op- 
erations partly with an eye to 
the rate of tax on profits. More 
^nerally, a ^country with a 
relatively simple, non-dis- 
tomcmary pecsonal tax sys- 
. tern, which fevonrs incentives 
rffttierlhan social engin eering , 

may be a mote attractive place 
in which to do business than a 
country where rales are high 
ami some economic activities 
are favoured at the expense of 
otters. 

The world is presently 
witnessing an astonishing epi- 
demic of interest _ in tax 
refo r m . 

In addition to the signifi- 
cant reforms recently passed 
into law in the United States, 
West Germany is preparing a 
package of lax ems fra* im- 
plementation after the elec- 
tion, Trance is in the process 
of removing its two top rales 
of income tax, the Japanese 
government is considering the 
report of a government ad- 
visory committee rec- 
ommending for-reaching 
changes, Canada is wondering 
how best tomatch the rfiangp 
in die US regime, both An&ra- 
lia and New Zealand have 


introduced a form of VAT, 
Den ma rk and Norway are 
bringing down their top rates, 
and even Ireland shows signs 
of beginning to consider seri- 
ously the recommendations of 
its long-standing committee 
cm tax reform. 

Our own Government must 
dearly ask itself what implica- 
tions the radical changes in tax 
regimes overseas hold tor its 
own ambitions in the tax 
reform area. In particular, is it 
still right to spend most of any 
scope for tax cuts on im- 



taxation? 

Most of the tax reform 
proposals have some common 
themes. They seek to cut 
income tax rates and to fi- 
nance this by widening the 
base over which tax is charged 
and by extending sates taxes 
like VAT. 

In the US, for instance, the 
new structure reduces 14 sepa- 
rate rates ranging from 11 to 
SO- per cent to only two of 15 
per cent and 28 per cent As 
Mrs Thatcher has remarked, 
this brings the top rate of 
federal tax in the US down 
below the basic rate in Britain, 
but the comparison is mis- 
leading as it excludes income 
taxes levied by the states — 44 
out of the 51 slates of the 
union add anything up to 14 
per cent on top of federal 
income tax. A few cities levy 
income tax too, so people 
living in New Ybric, for in- 
stance, pay not only federal 
income tax but income tax to 
New York State and to New 
York City as well. 

The conjuring trick of cut- 
ting tax rates without seriously 


increasing the deficit is per- 
formed by removing many tax 
exemptions and switching 
$120 billion (£84.5 billion) of 
the tax burden from individ- 
uals to companies. 

Some of the principal allow- 
ances being eliminated are: 

• interest on personal bor- 
rowing; 

• state and local sales taxes; 

• the first $100 of dividends: 

• two-earner married couples 
who received a 10 per cent 
deduction: 

• losses from passive tax 
shelters except against other 
passive income; 

• payments on Individual 
Retirement Accounts for high- 
er rate payers unless not 
covered by occupational 
schemes; and 

• 100 per cent of business 
meals and entertainment ex- 
penses, which in future relief 
will be limited to 80 per cent 

Mortgage interest relief on 
both first and second homes 
stays, but for the wealthy a 
minimum tax of2l percent is 
introduced to limit the effi- 
cacy of tax shelters. The 


effective tax rate on long-term 
capital gains is raised from 20 
to 28 per cenL 
Reform proposals in other 
countries, being less ad- 
vanced, are not as well defined 
— at any rate in public. The 
West German government has 
proposed income tax cuts of 
DM20-DM30 billion (£7-£l0 
billion) in 1988. Although no 
details are being formally 
revealed ahead of the election 
on January 25, Herr Gerhard 
Stol ten berg, the Minister of 
Finance, has made little secret 
that in his view the framework 
should be: 

• a cut in the top rate of 
income tax from 56 percent to 
about 48 per cent 

• a cut in the bottom rate 
from 22 to 20 per cent; 

• a partial offset by lowering 
tax subsidies to industry; and 

• the balance of the cost to be 
offset by higher excise duties 
on petrol and tobacco. 

The Japanese government 
is now miming over the report 
of an advisory committee, 
which proposes: 

• a cut in the top rate of 


( STOCK MARKET REPORT ) 


£300m computer program 
fuels a sharp advance 


A £300 million compuler- 
inspired buying and selling 
progra m at the Post Office 
. Pension Fund revived a flag- 
ging equity market yesterday 
and sent leading shares racing 
away. 

Computers are bong used 
increasingly to advise fund 
managers when to buy and sell 
. .stocks and when to switch 
from one sector to another. 

' Yesterday the Rost Office 
Pension Fund's computer was 
; idling its fond managers to 
! dump some of their second- 
finer stocks and to switch to 
the more prestigious Alpha 
. and Beta ones: 

James Capel, the broker, 

, was given foe task of carrying 
• out foe business. It found little 

■ difficulty in bidding for foe 
: slock on offer and placing it 

■ around the market, but it may 
'have run into a few problems 
picking up shares for the FO in 
a thin market 

Some of foe leaders for 
which Capel was thought to be 
bidding included Associated 
British Foods, up 12p at 330p, 


By Michael Clark and Carol Leonard 


Rank Organisation: 
overdue for a rerating? 



Jan - Fab Mar Apr May ^ Jun^ Ju» Aug Sep Oct Nov 



• Watch Wins Group, up 
15ptol66pr 
ample of days. 

Investments, a f 
AostraHan concern, yes- 
terday revealed a &02 per cent 
holding and James Capel, 
the broker, has also been buy- 
ing. The company has just 
appointed County Securities, 
as its adviser, and ether 
instore. 


Bass 5p dearer at 740p after 
745p, Beecham up 7p to 420ft 
with -nearly 2 million shares 
traded, Glaxo up lOp to 905p, 
Bmrabee Mackintosh up Up 
to -421p and WeBcome lip 
higher at 2l6p. 

But foe Post Office foray 
into the market gave a dis- 
torted view. Turnover else- 
where. remained at a low ebb 
with . the bulk of investors* 
money stiB tied up with the 
£5.6 billion British Gas 
flotation. 

Late excitement in the gilt- 
edged market yesterday — 
juices were moving ahead 


strongly after hours — was 
caused by renewed hopes of 
lower West German rates. 

Earlier this wed: the five 
German institutes saw no real 
growth between foe second 
and third quarters and real 
growth oftess than 2^ per cent 
in the whole of 1986. The 
feeling is foal, faced with such 
sluggishness, the Bundesbank, 
due to meet next Thursday, 
will cut foe discount rate, 
fuelling hopes of lower base 
rates here. 

There was early confusion 
for investors after another 
breakdown in the Stock Ex- 
change price information ser- 
vice, and this readied in a 
number of market-makers . 
putting hundreds of rogue 
prices into the system. 

This brought some wild 
fluctuations in prices. Many of 
them proved too fanciful and' 
were quickly spotted, but 
some were close enough to 
fool even foe experts. Fortu- 
nately, business was quiet 
enough for corrections to be 
quickly made. 

By the close the FT 30-share 
index was 1S.9 up at 1,286.3, 
while the lead on the FT-SE 
100 was limited to 13.7 at 
1,633.0, indicating that most 
of the turnover had been 
restricted to the leaders. 

Among other blue chips ZCI 
jumped 15pto 1 070p, Hawker 
1 8p to 435p after a seminar for 
fund managers in Edinburgh, 
i«f< 4p to 462p, Thorn EMI 
3p to 477p, Hanson 3p to 


200ft BTR 2p to 28 Op and 
Boots 5p at 232p, with more 
than nine million shares 
changing hanifa on renewed 
bid speculation. 

Videos headed the other 
way, dipping 17p to 373p, and 
AlBei-&.y®is<5 eased lp to 
312p. 

Partly-paid 50p shares in 
British Gas drifted back to a 
middle price of 59ftp in the 
unofficial grey market, a pro* 
mium of 9Vzp, while Geest foe 
banana importer, which be- 
gins dealings today, were trad- 
fog at )49p, a 24p premium to 
the I25p issue price. 

Vans Brewery, one of foe 
few remaining independent 
brewing firms, was once again 
a favourite stock for takeover 
speculators, leaping 62'hp to 
472%p in late trade. 

Guinness - Peat, where 
Friends Provident still has the 
24 per cent stake it acquired 
dong with UKPI earlier this 
year, jumped 8p to 97p as a 
buzz went round the market 
late that foe holding may 
today change hands 

According to market 
sources any such deal is likely 
to result in a fidl-bid, with tire 
takeout price estimated at 
l20pa share. 

But speculation that foe 
suitor is British and Common- 
wealth Shipping, where Mr 
John Gunn is chairman, is 
incorrect. 

“There’s no truth in it," 
says Mr Gunn, who also 
dearies that he is interested in 


acquiring the 24 per cent 
stake. 

“We're not really a machine 
for gobbling up companies, 
you know," says Mr Gunn. 
“We've got enough, on our 
plate at foe moment. The Exco 
deal has doubled the size of 
the company and it won’t be 
completed until the end of 
January." 

Hflbdown Holdings, the 
fast-growing Fresh-Lay eggs to 
furniture group, jumped 7p to 
210ft ahead of a 25-page 
glossy, colour research bro- 
chure on the company being 
published later this week by de 
Zoete and Bevan, the broking 
arm of Barclays de Zoete 
Wedd It is ejmected to be 
extremely bullish. 

Rank Organisation, the di- 
verse leisure group, gained 
15p to 514p after heavy 
buying by Mcngan Grenfell, 
the merchant bank. The slock 
has made up a lot of lost 
ground over foe past couple of 
weeks, after foe arrival at 
Morgan of Mr Richard 
Harwood, who is acknowl- 


• A mystery Americas buyer 
has bmft a near 5 per cent 
bolding in Argyie Trust, foe 
fife . insurance and second 
mortgage company where Mr 
Niek Oppenheim, the 
Tranwood chairman. Ins a 17 
per cent stake. Mr Oppen- 
heira, who rescued Argyle in 
1980, refuses to comment. 


soon. 


edged as foe leading Rank 
expert in the City. 

Mr Harwood left Scott- 
Goff, the broker, two months 
ago. 

The market is also looking 
for an early bid for Thenoax 
Holdings, foe USM-quoted 
manufacturer of toughened 
glass, where Mr David Abell's 
Suter has been building up a 
sizeable bolding. 

He announced yesterday 
that Suter had bought an extra 
354,000 shares, taking its total 
holding to 3. 1 4 million shares, 
or 27.07 per cent. 


ALPHA STOCKS 


These prices are as at &A5pm 


iwt 

HfrhLow Cowpmw 


Wea 


, 363 

288 

AKed-Lyons 

SfO 

315 


174 

126 

ASEM-MFI 

150 

154 


. 483 

277 

ETR 

278 

283 


• 4»J 

361 

BAT 

453 

458 


• 572 

449 

Baralays 

468 

475 


840 

680 

Bass 

735 

745 


450 

356 

Baecham 

417 

422 

• 

. 728 

526 

BtuaCMs 

643 

848 


• 383 

293 

BQC 

S3S 

338 


> 289 

170 

Boots 

230 

233 

• 

: 60s 

423 

Br Aarapaca 

497 

502 


708 

538 

Br PWratoun - 

682 

687 


- 280 

177*) BrTetacom 

ISO 

200 


■ ISO 

SB 

EWo# 

153 

155 


354 

25S 

Barton 

268 

27D 


389 

277 

Cabia & WralMS 

318 

325 


196 

158 

CatKnry Schweppes 

177 

160 


338 

2S7 

Com Union 

258 

261 


. 704 

409 

CM* GoUMto 

866 

673 

• 

330 

252 

Counatdtto 

323 

326 


438 

316 

Dixons <3ip 

328 

330 


650 

408 

noons 

663 

555 

• 

954 

701 

Gen AcettM 

800 

807 

• 

226 

159 

GBD : 

184 

188 


- 1l'< 

758'; 

■ Glaxo 

900 

910 



*62 328 Grand MSI 
, Tl'* 721 GOS *A 
. 9S4 720 GRE 
p 385 235 GOOi 
‘ 356 275- GutaMKS 
. 21S'»«1 H MM 
■ 623 .403 Hawk* SkUhy 


456 463 
. IS'alOS 

no nr 

270 .273 
327 332 

199 an . 


WBa 

tea 

*ht 

panes 

YU 

« 

Vofeana 
' tented 
pye two 

IBM 

Hgh Law 

Coipanr 

Plica 

BU Offer CNga 

teaaa 

dhr 

peoca 

YM 

% 

WE 



14.6 

44 

143 

1500 

1. 11 H 734 

Imp Cham Ind 

10‘s IDS 



485 

45 

125 

120 0 


45 

OO 

165 

anoo 

583 

335 Jaguv 

513 SIS 


+13 

12.7 

25 

10.7 

587 


9 l 8 

05 

193 

5400 

391 

312 

Ladbrafea 

357 362 


-6 

165 

4.7 

173 

233 

+3 

1&4 

44) 

115 

1.60Di 

948 

278 

Land Sacuttles 

333 336 

m 

+5 

. 145 

45 

225 

1500 

-7 

28.1 

6.0 

65 

14X» 

288 

133 

Lege* & Son 

240 245 

• 

+15 

125 

5.1 

91.0 

427 

+5 

21.7 

22 

157 

283 

484 

293 

Urijds 

425 432 



25-0 

S5 

65 

2500 

+7 

17.1 

4.1 

174 

1700 

283 

183 

Latin} 

233 235 



17.1 

75 

115 

108 


300 

45 

92 

234 

231 

163 

Marks & Spencer 

187 190 

• 

-5 

55 

3.1 

225 

6500 


14.1 

42 

125 

807 

599 

417 

Midland 

546 5S5 


-1 

37.1 

6.7 

205 

612 


106 

4.6 

15.1 

9500 

593 

426 

No* West 

498 505 


+5 

27.6 

55 

65 

906 


204 

47 

105 

24»0 

576 

423 

pao Dtd 

502 507 

• 


255 

55 

145 

472 


466 

7.1 

75 

3500 

246 

162 

Ptasaay 

168 172 


+2 

72 

• 4-2 

125 

3500 


107 

54 

113 iaom 

942 

718 

PiudanM 

810 817 


+10 

385 

4.7 

53.7 

477 


95 

84) 

4.1 

5500 

234 

146 

Race! Baa 

170 174 


" +4 

43 

25 

185 

2500 

-6 

ai 

34) 

lit 

8.100 

900 

605 

feck* Cokitsn 

793 .900 

• 

+23 

235 

3.0 

172 

2500 

+2 

7-2 

22 

175 

2,700 

562 ' j 345 

Reuters 

543 548 


+48 

54 

15 

415 

370 


&7 

44) 

205 

563 

791 

S11 

ftrz 

665 B72 

• 

*12 

31 A 

4.7 

65 

129 


174 

67 


1,800 

967 

762 

Royal Ins 

910 817 

• 

+fi 

385 

4.7 

66-7 

347 

448 

SSJ0 

52 

19-1 

728 

426 

344 

Sainsbuy (J) 

410 414 


+18 

8L4 

25 

235 

2500 

46 

03 

ZB 

113 

9500 

148V 38 

Sears 

12S'i127 

• 

+'1 

65 

45 

183 

2300 


43 

1J3 

233 

2,100 

415 

321 

Sadgwtak Gp 

366 360 


-3 

17.1 

45 

17.1 

373 

-10 

&4 

15 

247 

913 

970 

653 

SMB 

943 948 


+43 

515 

55 

93 

1.700 

+2 

343 

4-3 

202 

73 

160 

96 

STC 

182 185 


+4 

2.1 

15 

155 

6 56 

44 

6.1 

S3 

113 

S3ttt 

| 772 

820 

Sun Afianca 

B15 622 

• 

+3 

275 

4A 

56.7 

271 


206 

02 

166 

1300 

81 «• TBVTSB P IP 

73 ’i 76*2 


• a 

, • 

a . 

- , 

~~~ 


105 

ZB 

153 2300 1 

420 

286 

Tosco 

378 380 


+3 

88 

23 

21.6 

230U 


30-0 

24) 

142 

239 

629 

374 

Them Brit 

475 480 


+4 

255 

55 

353 

1300 


42 £ 

5.6 

22.1 

98 

349 

133*i Ttatatoar Houm 

287 288 


♦ •a 

185 

66 

75 

1300 

+7 

17J3 

66 

9.1 

3500 

209 

139 

TftuHnuM Forte 

17B 178 


+12 

75 

45 

175 

6500 

+15 ' 

"10A 

it: 

123 

1.700 

20% muniievar 

SQUSSPh 

• 

. . 

00.1 

25 

18.7 

193 

-12 

. 5 3 

24) 

173 9300] 

288 

216 

Utt.Btattato 

230 232 

• 

+4 . 

135 b 55 

125 

1500 

-2: 

2IA 

4A- 

•93. 

TfiOO] 














income tax from 70 to 50 per 
cent; 

• halving the bottom rate 
from 10.5 to S per cent: 

• abolishing relief on interest 
for small savers; 

• introducing capital gains 
tax; and 

• introducing VAT. 

The finance Bill now going 

through the French Par- 
liament provides for the aboli- 
tion of the top two tax rates of 
65 per cent and 60 per cent 
and a new top rate of 58 per 
cent. 

The British Government 
has already reduced both the 
top rate and the baric rate and 
removed some of the exemp- 
tions, such as life assurance 
premium relief, while widen- 
ing foe VAT base. Aft these are 
tunes which are now being 
played in other countries, but 
in Britain foe process of 
reform has been brought al- 
most to a standstill by election 
commitments and foe pres- 
■sures of lobbyists. 

These developments over- 
seas have perhaps four im- 
plications for Britain. 

First, the case for taxes on 
spending rather than income 
is strengthening rather than 
weakening. Countries without 
VAT or its equivalent are 
considering introducing one, 
and where they have done so, 
as in New Zealand, they are 
levying it over a very broad 
range of goods, including food 
and children’s clothing. 

Second, although there are 
still veiy large exemptions for 
specific types of saving, such 
as mort g a ge interest relief on 
housing in foe US, foe thrust 
of most reforms is to tax 
- savings. Neural treatment of 
savings can be achieved either 
by taxing them all equally or 
not at all. Bringing them into 
tax argues for the Lawson 
mark one approach of remov- 
ing exemptions on savings 
rather than adding to them. 

Third, there is some case on 
grounds of international 
competitiveness for reducing 
the top rate of income tax 
further— mainly in relation to 
the US. The removal of higher 
rate relief on mortgage interest 
and/or a minimum tax to 
smoke the wealthy out of their 
tax shelters could be justified 
by reference to reforms 
overseas. 

Finally, although the basic 
rate extends oyer a much 
larger proportion ^of the 
population in,, Britain than 
elsewhere, it does represent a 
higher starting point for tax 
than in practically all compet- 
itor countries. Reducing it 
ought to have first call on any 
resources available for tax 
cuts. 


COMMENT Kenneth Fleet 


Courtaulds may be set 
to come out fighting 


T he Courtaulds story — Seven Lean 
Years — has still to be written bat 
in essence it has three remarkable 
themes: the herculean labour of remov- 
ing the dross in the legacy of Lord 
Kearton and Sir Arthur Knig ht; the 
reshaping and reinforcing of the valu- 
able businesses that were also part of the 
legacy; and the halving of a labour force 
ofllO.QOO. 

Preferring, wisely, to tackle these huge 
. tasks with foe minim um of publicity. Sir 
Christopher Hogg and his management 
team have done an incredible job. It 
may look as if turnover has been static 
and that the improvement in 
profitability has come by squeezing more 
out of the same old businesses. In 
reality, Courtaulds has dropped around 
£500 million of turnover since 1 979 and 
replaced it with other sources of 
business in mainly higher quality, less 
volatile areas. 

The time has come to push up the 
periscope and look ahead. The signifi- 
cance of the creation last month of an 
executive committee comprising four 
board members, including the chair- 
man, to study performance and the 
future of the group should not be 
missed 

To make an acqusition because the 
market wants it is obviously not sound 
business practice if the foots dictate 
otherwise. Nevertheless, the psychologi- 
cal effect internally and externally of 
Courtaulds taking a more aggressive 
approach could be dramatic. 

Three years ago, the group raised 
more than £70 million by way of a rights 
issue, mainly with the view to expand- 
ing in the United States. An opportunity 
foiled to materialise but there are 
rumours that Courtaulds may be about 
to buy the acryllic business of the US 
company, Cyanamid 
With gearing set to foil to below 9 per 
cent of shareholders' funds this year, 
there is plenty of scope for Courtaulds to 
look for something sizeable. In the 
meantime, the boost from lower raw 
material and energy costs will make it 
possible for the group to make next 
year's profits this year. Analysts are 
raising their forecasts by more than 10 
per cent to £1 85 million and are looking 
for £205 million in 1987-88. On a p/e 
ratio of 8.9 times this year’s earnings, 
foiling to 8.3 times next year’s, foe 
shares are still on a pityfiiUy small rating 
given the very interesting stage foe 
group has reached 


plans have been thwarted by the 
professional takeover raiders. 

The terms of reference have been 
drawn widely to avoid casting asper- 
sions at foe City. But if anything is to be 
achieved the formative element will be 
the taskforce’s three-part review of long- 
term measures of company perfor- 
mance, communications between foe 
City and industry and foe relationship 
between pension and insurance funds 
and foe industrial companies whose 
share registers they dominate. 

Of these, foe first two are unlikely to 
change much. The spectacle of City 
manouevring that has overwhelmed AE 
is one pointer. The engineering group 
has done as much as it could to establish 
good relations with big shareholders — 
and performed well — since a takeover 
scare a few years ago. But that did not 
help it. 

If there is to be any significant change 
in relationships it will come through 
formal changes in foe position of big 
institutional shareholders rather than 
from spontaneous enlightenment. That 
would need to come from a complete 
reassessment of the boardroom power 
and voting power of big blocks of shares 
held by foe institutions. If that issue is 
ducked, the taskforce will produce only 
fine words and good intentions. And, 
under the pressures now building in foe 
City, those will change nothing. 


NIESR rampant 


T he National Institute for Eco- 
nomic and Social Research, the 
ghost of economics past during 
Mrs Thatcher’s time in office, 
is sticking firmly to its guns. Not only 
will there be a £5.6 billion current 
account deficit next year, but an even 
bigger one, £7.2 billion, in 1988. . 

For invisibles to come to foe rescue 
indefinitely, as they did at foe 


Treasury's behest this week, a regular 

raid be 


Words and actions 


T he taskforce set up by foe CBI to 
work out a new relationship 
between foe City and industry 
certainly starts with a powerful cast 
This is particularly true of members 
drawn from foe City. The industrialists, 
while no less distinguished, tend to 
come from companies that have been 
foe subject of bid scares or whose own 


dose of sterling weakness woul< 
required 

This is a theme of some helpful 
projections in foe National Institute 
Economic Review on foe economic 
consequences of continued 
Lawsonomics, versus foe efforts of 
“shadow” Roy Hattersley. The results 
are bad under the Conservatives, 
worse under Labour. 

On these medium term projections, 
the Government will be faced with 
current account deficits in the £3-5 
billion range in the medium-term 
even if it eschews tax cuts and bolds 
sterling up. Letting sterling go would 
cany the penalty of substantially 
higher inflation than foe 5-6 per cent 
rate projected for foe medium term. 

Labour’s extra public spending 
results in a speedy rise in inflation to 
10 per cent and more, and quickly 
takes the deficits on current account 
up to £10 billion, which foe Institute 
says modestly may not be sustainable. 



Canyo 


to who looks after 


your £100,000? 


All too many investors suffer an 
unwelcome surprise when they visit their 
financial advisor. 

They find their familiar investment 
manager has disappeared only to be 
replaced by a stranger. 

When you are investing sums in 
excess of jQOO.OOO you are entitled to 
expect better treatment. 

A perfect cue for us to present our 
case. 

We assign you a senior investment 
manager who, with the support of his 
team, will manage your investments and 
advise you on a continuous basis. 

They have our worldwide merchant 
banking knowledge to drawon as well as 
our 80 years of experience. 


In a world where investment 
managers are merging with stockbrokers 
and share dealers, Singer & Friedlander 
remains reassuringly file same. 

If you have sums in excess of 
£100,000 to invest, and would like to 
know more about us, telephone or write 
in confidence to eitherjohn Hodson 
orMichael Melluish (both are executive 
directors). 

We will then, if you so wish, either 
arrange to meet you or send you our 
booklets, which will give you a more 
complete picture of the unique way in 
which we work. 

Singer & Friedlander. 

01 - 6233000 . 


SINGER & FRIEDLANDER LTIX21 NEW STREET, B1SHOPSGATE, LONDON EC2M 4HR. 




/ " ta n ft* nrfie- "w w r • ! 



old — 
ineer’s 
tastic’ 
tin 

J mechanical eo- 
Mt the £8,000 be 
lie Portfolio Gold 
yesterday to good 

•date my gramo- 
ase my donation 
i ha n appeal and 
y next year," Mr 
od, of Aliestree, 

aged 51, who has 
plio Gold since it 
e Times, said that 
believe his lack, 
t is fantastic. It is ■ 
■fence.” 

told cards can be 
sending a stain- 
id envelope to: 
told, 

», 



ger of 

itives 

jeer 


•in Young 

ised in brewing, 
drinkers and, in 
. even kill them, 
i for Real Ale 
day. 

] the campaign's 
■'hat's Brewing, 
Protz. a former 
ood Beer Guide, 
•pie who have- 
nher breathing 
lus disorders, 
who are allergic " 
Js, can suffer iU 
inking beers in 
es have been 
■oduce a foamy 
clarity, or to 
ife. 

ed States; the- 
nore than 40 
if heart attacks 
:wers used co- 
in beer to 
iming head. 

ouple 

peal 

ennan couple 
irs last July for 
seeking reduc- 
ntences. 

. Lord Lane, 
tice, will pre- 
plications by 
Jonja Schulze, 
for leave to 
the sentences 
r Justice Mi- 
t the Central 



» or storage 
Kfcriy shews 
aace Heater 


ttfleateot 

1075/7S. 


< 3 high 
x 314* high 



JSpandp, | 
Sp«Ht i 

I - 

B 

1: 

• : t_:.i 








26 


C TEMPUS ) 


Magnet chiefs magic 
formula does the trick 


Mr Tom Dux bury, chairman 
of Magnet & Southerns, was 
right to bring the interim 
figures forward by two 
months so that they could 
speak for them selves. In spite 
of a pension fund benefit of 
£1.6 million and a change in 
depreciation policy worth 
£0.7 million, the results were 
comfortably ahead of 
analysts' forecasts. 

The magic formula, 
drought out by Mr Duxbury 
in his fallow years, was to to 
develop a vertically inte- 
grated group stretching from 
manufacturing to the end 
user. And it appears to be Spence to the group, albeit 
working. capitalized, is considerable. 

There were those who Prices have risen by an 
treated this approach with average 4 per cent across the 
scepticism. They believed the group, which means most of 
structure of the industry was the turnover, up by 28 per 
such that Magnets' era- cent, came from volume 
ditional trade-oriented cus- gains, 
tomere would be alienated. A pretax profit of £45 
They feared that the move million for the full year could 
to become less of a niche be achieved. This gives eara- 
operalion would make it ings of 15.9p. For 1987-88, 
difficult to justify the group's £65 million and 23.2p is a 
premium rating as a specialist distinct possibility. However, 
joinery business. Moreover, with things as they are at the 
they were not convinced that moment, this could be a 
the management had the skill moving target, 
to compete with the hard- Although the shares are on 
headed DIY retailers. a premium rating, they are 

In the early days the strain beginning “show that they 
of this d mms rir change in deserve iL The only cloud on 
direction was noticeable. The the horizon is the possibility 
trade tinned its back, and the that the shareholders may, in 
“super showroom" retail-ori- £me, be asked for additional 
ented concept was not estab- ttiods- 

ikSfiSffiS&E Kwik Save Group 

fore, for the first half of last The trend towards healthy 
year were poor. eating has proved beneficial 

In the first half of 1986-87, to Kwik Save Group's 
however, operational gearing profitability. The change in 
gained momentum and is consumption patterns has al- 
driving the group ahead. lowed it to extend its range of 
The showrooms, which are goods. Kwik Save has moved 
essentially display areas away from “known value 
geared to serve the retail items" such as butter and 
customer, were significant sugar, which are price sen- 
contributors in this improved sitive, towards less price sen- 
performance. Compared to sitive items, such as low-fat 
the competition they look spreads, 
relatively modest but they As a result, its margins 
have bad the effect of more widened last year from a 
than doubling stock turnover, healthy 5 per cent to 5.3 per 
There are now 140 super cent. Kwik Save is a favourite 
showrooms compared with customer with branded goods 
83 at the end of 1985-86. manufacturers because it is 
Thirty more will be added by the last chain of any sub- 
tle end of the year. Each stance without own-label 
showroom costs about goods. 

£100.000 to install, and the Wider margins and higher 



interest income combined to 
allow the group to increase its 
pretax profit by £17.4 millipn 
in the year to August 30. After 
adjustment for the previous 
53 week period- turnover was 
up 11.8 per cent to £795 
million. 

Food price inflation was 
low, and accounted for only 2 
per cent of the increase in 
turnover. Most of the in- 
crease came from higher 
turnover in stores owned for 
more than 12 months, at 5.8 
per cent, and from new 
stores, at 4 per cent 

The group plans to spend 
£30 million this year on 
adding another 1 2 per cent to 
its selling space. This comes 
on top of the 10 per cent 
added last year. It will refur- 
bish another 60 stores. By 
August 1987, it should have 
2.7 million sq ft of selling 
space, including its first Kwik 
Save in the Greater London 
area. This store is due to open 
in February. 

The first 13 weeks of the 
new financial year are going 
well, although volumes in 
retailing appear to be slowing 
down. This may be nothing 
more than a blip on the rising 
graph, but some analysis are 
cautious about the prospects 
for the sector in the short 
term. 

This need not worry hold- 
ers of Kwik Save shares. Hie 
group has a consistent record 
of profits growth and should 
make £48 million in 1986-7, 
giving a p/e of 12.5. This 
rating is below the sector 
average, and there are likely 
to be few sellers at these 
levels. 


Ignore pay critics 
IoD tells companies 


By Edward Townsend, Industrial Correspondent 

However, companies are At a conference of the IoD 

executives deserve their big 


Britain’s UM paid top ^ week, a repot, will be 


SZdaSwriS presemri showing that tie 

should not be concerned required performance, salaries of executives who 

about public criticism, the The IoD broadside in fa- receive pmfitrtflated Onuses 
Institute of Directors says vour of high salaries comes rose by 10 per ceat fast year 
mdav after much public debate compared with only 6 per cent 

Id the latest of its Guides to about big percentage incases for directora on a basic annual 

tontfroom whea^o^raeS The IoD says that effective 

SsL3S£i syar. fc yssa 

bS^fSed b? SS w rises Mother workers. motivation and retention of 

SLfrTa rartkS exec- It also follows the recent -executives, and recommends 
utiTSo^CtedetSSl disclosure that Sir Ralph that "the. manner m whi<± 
ivUm* fts»r nf niihlir rriticiSffl Halpem, the head of the remuneration is paid, should 
tfetthlfavd ofremuneration Bu^Group, earned more be as condnaveas^ possible to 
isexcessWe.” than £1 million last year, high executive performance. 


APPOINTMENTS; 


Alpha Micro: Miss Judith 
Knight becomes director, re- 
seller productivity. 

Pettifor, Morrow & Asso- 
ciates: Lord Lorefl-Davis of 
Higbgate has been made 
chairman. 

Brand New (Product Or- 
igination): Mr David Motian 
joins as planning director and 
Ms Fiona Chaffis as business 
development manager. 

The Glacier Metal Com- 
pany: Mr Roger Williams 
becomes a director. 

Telecommunications 
Equipment Manufacturers 
Association: Mr Mike Hart is 
made chairman, business 
communications division. 

Habit Precision Engineer- 
ing: Mr Stephen Swords has 
been made a director. 

Harrisons & Crosfield: Mr 
George Paul becomes joint 
chief executive with Mr 
Thomas Prentice, presently 
executive chairman. 

Allied- Lyons: Mr H Clif- 
ford Hatch is made a director. 

Wang Laboratories: Dr 
Frederick Wang becomes 
president and treasurer, Mr 
Ian Diery senior vice presi- 
dent, US operations, Mr Rob- 
ert Doretti senior vice pres- 
ident, corporate and mar- 
keting communications, and 
Mr Aresd Vleggeert vice 
president and general man- 
ager, European, African and 
Middle Eastern operations. 

BET: Mr Brian Thompson 
is made chainnan. 

Time Products: Mr Aflan 
Blacker becomes a director. 

British Newspaper Printing 
Corporation: Mr Alan Roe is 
made chief executive. 


RECENT ISSUES 


EQUITIES 


(250p) 


AviS 

BCE (38p; 

Baker Harris Sndr (170p) 
Blenheim Exhib . . 
Bflston&Battersm (1 
Brake Bros (I25p) 
Cttwrow (loOpl 
Daniel Cs (130p) 

Gordon Russet (191 
Great Southern (13S 
Guthrie Corn (150p) 
Harrison nSOp) 
intartink Express (1 
Lon Assc fro 
Lloyds Chemist . 

Lora Metropo litan 
Mecca Leisure (13 
Miller & Santtwuse (105p) 
Plum ‘ ‘ 

Quarto (11! 

Rotunda 


r Tat ft4pj 

tax (lospy 
oflten (I45p) 


232*2 -6*2 
43*2+1 
200 +6 
141+1 
143 
152 
98+2 
156+1 
206 

165- 1 

166- 1 
161 
208 

S'i -h 
132+2 
172+3 
ISO's -'a 
176 +1 
99+1 
130 
95 


Sanded Partem 
Scot Mtga 1 
TSB Group (lOOpt 
Thames TV (190p) 

Virgin (140p) 

Wtanrwy Mactay flfflp) 
Woottons Better (104p) 
Want Group (S7p) 


RIGHTS ISSUES 

Stacks Leisure N/P 
Blue Arrow F/P 
Br. Benzol F/P 
Cook Cwm N/P 
Stanfield N/P 
Norfo* Cap F/p 
Patrocan F/P 
N/P 


Ragtifan 
Sec 


I P 

(Issue pries In brackets). 


170-1 
£19 
76 
300 +2 
134'j +*a 
167+1 
85 
104 


3'i 
386-2 
71 
10 
27 
25 
60 +4 
2 
3 
13 


MONEY MARKETS AND GOLD 


Base Rates* 

Clearing Banks 11 
finance House It 

Uhcwmt Maifnrt lorn % 
OwemtahtHtoull Low 10 
Week fieri: 10K 

Treasury BHIs (Discount %) 

KS 


EURO MONEY DEPOSITS % 


Zmrafi 10* 
3mnth I0"w 


10% 
3mnth 10*11 


Prime Bank Bias (Discount %) 

Imntti 0^2 mntti T0 »m-10Dm 

3 mnth 10 2J a~1O"wB ninth IQV-KP'n 

Trade BUS (Dlaoaunt*>) 

11'*» 2 mnth ll^u 


imnth 
3 troth 11 "» 


Dolor caB 6X-5* 

7 days 8'<»€% 1 mntti 6 1 m-5*u 

3 mntti G'i0-5'*ia 6 ninth S'wfi 1 ** 

Deutschmark call 5-4 

7 days 4*-4K 1 mnth 444-454 

3 mntti 4*-4H B mntti 4*-4% 

Freud) Freac cal 7H-BK 

7 days 7**-! 1 * 1 mntti 7»i«-7*ie 

3 mnth BK-6X Bmntti 

Swiss Franc cal 1)4-14 

7 days 1 mnth 2J4-B* 

3 mnth 3 M »3 tt ia B mnth 3’*w- 1 *>» 

Yen cal. 4V4-3K 

7 days 1 mnth 414-4)4 

3 mnth 4"«-4°i» 6 mntti 4H+K 


6 mnth 11 H 


briertwnk(%) 

Overrent open 10 K dose 12 
1 waeic 11 - 1 &X 6 mnth 11 *m> 11 *» 

1 mnth 10 M tt- 10 K 9mmh 11 ’ro 11 »is 

Smnth 11X-11X I2mth liWIha 

Local Authority Deposits (%) 

2 days 10% 7 days 10 % 

imnth 10* 3 mnth ifjt 

Smith 11% 12 rath 11 >m 

Local Authority Bonds (%) 

Imnth 11 K- 11 K 2mntfr IHMUfi 

3 mnth 11%-n% 8 mnth 1144-11)4 

9 mntti 1114-1154 I2mtti 11%-llK 


GOLD 


Gok£$382JXKF&50 


$90.! 

Piattnum 

S 477 M (£33430) 
•Excludes VAT 


00-33750) 


75) 


FOREIGN EXCHANGES 


STERLING SPOT AND FORWARD RATES 


Market rata* 
day's range ' 

IloYiRlDVr A 

N York 1 .4270-1,4320 
Montreal 13W4-15M0 
Anw’dam32QS-32Z)6 
Brussels 5&fl1-58L10 
CDtaan 10.7D63-10.T586 
BtStm 1.0385-1.050+ 
FranWuct2L833fr2JB4ao 
Lisbon 21120413.M 

Madrid 1B1 35-19232 

M3an 1962^1976.15 
Oak) - 10.7660-10.8016 
Paris 9578+9X323 
St’kWm 9^355^8867 
Tokyo 2313023337 
Vienna 1095^046 
Zurich 23505-23771 


Ilimrenl-aS 
JMIIBimr ZD 

143101^320 

13812-13640 

.22162-3^206 
5a 07-69.18 
10.73^6-107493 
V048S-1D47H 

211 50-&X2-72 
19204-19232 * 
1970.49-1976.18 

'727888-103016 

9315683323 

93867-93808 

5323043327 

50004033 

23733-23771 


inoMti 

OffiOBIpram 

GAMMfXm 

-1K-l%prem 

22-iBpnm — 

is-Spmm 

27-3Sdb ’ 

IVIKprem 

SO-ftafe 

-i7^aa* 

1pr®n-1dfa ■ 


2V5Spnmi 

iXrfSfcprem 

iVIXprem 

1 %-lttpran 


3 

T3M.7Rm 
L41-126pm 
4H-4Xpre» 
5 7 W pns m . - 
ix-lpmtt. 

“ 'US*: ' 


mmst 

ffiv-GKpnm 
4iv-3»p<«n 
3V 


4X-4X7«B 

Sterliog Index eonperedweh 1975m spat 682 (day's mge 87 


OTHER STERLING RATES 


DOLLAR SPOT RATES 


Atganfinaaustrar 
Auttrrtadoiar . 
Bahrundmar _ 

Ksdauzado' 
Cvorus Bound™ 

nfHofto IflBiXl ■■■■■ ■ 

Gwcadrestana- 
HongKongdoler . 

bafennee 

Iraq (finer . 


1.6582-1.0652 kaWW- 
.2196022001 Smoapon 
.... 033804X5400 Mstays* . 
20.11^203302 Ausbatt . 
.0.72604.7360 Canada 


.. 63865-7.0255 Sweden 
19630-198.00 Norway . 


Kuwait cfaarKD 

MabyEiadaaer 

M e xi c o peso - 

New zeafend dollar . 
Saudi Arabia riyai — 
Sknaporadoaer _ 
SoSn Attica rand 

UAEtfrtwm 

tjoydsBank 


11.1293-11.1386 tiemwfc 

1835-18.75 West Germany 

n/a Switzerland — 

0.4170-04210 Nethertands . 


France 


3.7100-3.7300 

.. I210.fla-1KO.00 

2.7385-2751 P 

53430^3830 

3.1327-3.136* Hoag Kona 
3.194+42110 Portugal „ 
... 52230-62630 Spain 



Austria 


. 1JBXM 2710 
.219152.1925 
.2600546025 
. 0JS6O24L6607 
.-1-3848-1.3853 
62020*9070 
, 7S3SQ-7M0 
7503075080 
.15855-12865 
L 15545-15555 

1 2245-22440 

65000-65050 
16255-16275 
137a*-TS7a5 
1841264153 
^7855-77866 
1*7.7944820 
134.15-13^25 
L 1451-1453 


Rataearevlad try Bvdeys Bank HOFEXandEaaL 


LONDON FINANCIAL FUTURES 


Three Month Oaritog 

DacSB 

Mar 87 

Jun87 

Sep 87 — 

Dec 87 

Mar 88. 


Low; 


89.00 

89.11 


*VT 


88.78 

aa.ta 

89.16 

8856 


8955 

89.18 


Previous day's total open Interest 15335 
Three Worth Earoda Ba r 

Dec 86 94.M 

Mar 87 94.09 

Jun87 9401 

Sep 87 93J9 


Ctoee EAVei 
8856 1491 

8877 1681 

88-13 102 

89.18 53 • . 

8952 6 

8878 0 


US Treasury Bond 

Dec 86 

Mar 87 

Jun67 


Shortest 
Dec 88 — 
Mar 87 — 
JunB7 — 


Dacl 

Mar 87 

Jun87 

Sep 87 — 
FT-8E100 
Dec 86 — 
Mar B7 


99417 

98-11 

N/T 


85-42 

96-52 

N/T 


107-00 

107-07 

Wf 


18200 

18550 


9453 9450 - 9452 92S 

94.10 . 94 07 9159 3SS7 

9452 9359 9451 179 

9350 93.78 9250 102 ' 

Previous day's total opwiirpBtBst 3194 
93-09 98-21 8525 

98-18 98-00 98-14 720 

97-17 0 


95-45 

9642 


stottf 


9642 


Previous 
107-10 
107-20 - 106-31 


■ Preriauec 
16350 1€_ 

165-70 16650 


s total 


Japan mtesHg 780 
2 

0 

Open Interest 17230 
10748 14745 

107-19 6439 

107-19 0 

0 

4 open Uarest 2633 
itiSo 464 
18625 S 


TRADITIONAL OPTIONS 


first DeaHoga 
Nov 17 
Dec 1 
Doc 15 


LeM neelnna 

Nov 28 
Dec 12 
Jan 2 . 


lost DedareBon 
Feb 19 
Mar 5 
Mar 19 - 


ForSaHtaowtA 
Mar2 
Mar 16 
Mar 30 


CaBopSoro 
Estates. Ht* 

Benzd.Utd. . 

Wood. Sound 

Tonttdns. Aran Enemy. 

Puts: Blacks Leisure. 

Put & Calk Sheraton. British Oommonmafth. 


taken ere on: S_ 

Foods. GtfHtoKt fanOut. Shwaaori. Ereupeiw Parries, Brttsh 
I, Hawttn. AudMronic. Tricerarol, a Baynes. Hades Leisure. S.W. 

KaBock Trust BOMS. AtjffU Trust British GanmonweaUi, 


1 mrth"11-10t4’ 3 mnth 11U-11K 

6 mnth IIX-ll^u 12mtti 11^11 'ib 

1 mnth ms 3 mnth 650-555 
6 mnth 555-550 12mth 555450 


LONDON TRADED OPTIONS 


Keep up with the London markets 

Real-time refreshed 

information 
on Reuter Monitor 


.7 ^^S 

rmr 
U tit 

1 EES 

7 pn ~t 
t Cu 1 

7 DPI 
/lCi 

7 D 7 *7 
/ L- f i 

IE EG 
1 EGG 


1 nwnnw cthcis cvn.inwrr 
t-uuuun -j f ULtl lau ini i<Jl 


ICON 
I Put t 


Nrr _ 


/ QCT 
Lit D I 


Tern i in 3 /n 
1 Dlu Iul/u 


tun 

j 1 it 1 

TRFIF 

TEST 


453/0 


BIG 353 
33/4 83/G 
BGE/G 433/3 
453/3 433/3 

fttfil EG 1/0 


RLPH8 
CLOSE 
; 87/4 
483/8 
458/8 
373.0 


5 EGG 


785/8 


163/G 7 


ULI/R 3 1 E/G 3 7 G/G 3EG/G 
G8IS ttllih EE 7 /G E3E/G 


3G3/G 

E3G/G 


uPEn 
■81/8 
4 33/8 
455/0 
330.0 
754/0 
833/0 
337/0 


P/T/rC - cnnrr om iNn t ton 

KtJ tiZP t ur\LUr\uui iu ll ii iu 


HIGH 


1 nt 1 
LUU 


1 mi 1 me 
ts-ULUi te 


' QD/ij on /n 
DC / 1 Ou/ u 

Unr /n unn/n 
7UJ//J tuu/u 

4 83/G 455/0 

300 n 333 n 

- uOO.u i_ 1 t.u 

i-CC/n 7CJ/I3 
ruO/u tuu/u 

opn / n o n 3 / n 
3 Du / U UQL-/U 

33 3 /n ppn/n 
i_ Dl. / u l Du/ u 


nn 3 D 7 c 

tUUL 1 u 

7 D 331 C 
t -I L. i t J 

7 ? neeno 

/ / uuuuu 

7 33 D 7 QC 
l -ILL 1 Du 

E33383 

35E338 


UK EQUITIES 

Type 

Page codes 

ALPHA 

IDLA-D 

BETA 

(DL( 

GAMMA 

IDU 

OVERSEAS 

JDLH 

NEWS 

AAKK 

UK GILTS 

REFERENCE PRICES 

G1LX 

CONTRIBUTOR INDEX 

GILY-Z 

INDEX OF PRICES 

IDLK 

NEWS 

RMEA-F 

LIFFE 


AND MUCH MUCH MORE... 

INTERNATIONAL MONEY MARKETS 
INTERNATIONAL GOLD MARKETS 
INTERNATIONAL OIL MARKETS 
INTERNATIONAL BOND MARKETS 
DOMESTIC MONEY MARKETS 
INTERNATIONAL FUTURES MARKETS 

INTERNATIONAL EQUITIES MARKETS 


INDEX OF FUTURES PAGES 


LIEA-B 






• 

• ♦ ' 


• # •* 





•••• ••• 


• 

• • 

. • 

. • - * • « 



• 

• • • ••• 


REUTER MONITOR - THE INFORMATION SERVICE FOR YOUR MARKETS 






Me 



Putt 



Serin 

Jen 

Apr 

M 

Jen 

Apt 

Jul 

AMed Lyons 

300 

20 

32 

37 

7 

13 

19 

r312) 

330 

9 

IB 

22 

77 

30 

33 

360 

1 

9 

— 

66 

68 

— 

BP 

800 

98 

115 

_ 

2 

9 



r678) 

650 

58 

75 

95 

9 

27 

35 

700 

26 

45 

62 

30 

60 

-57 

Cans Gold 

550 

135 

154 


3 

10 



C871) 

800 

95 

117 

137 

in 

22 

30 

650 

59 

87 

97 

27 

42 

52 


260 

67 

81 

_ 

54 

2 

_ 

f325) 

280 

47 

51 

75 

114 

4 

7 

300 

33 

48 

69 

4 

B 

12 


330 

14 

2 / 

37 

12 

IB 

23 


260 

15 

24 

31 

9 

16 

19 

(-261) 

280 

7 

14 

22 

24 

30 

33 

300 

254 

B 

14 

40 

44 

47 

CabteiVWre 

300 

35 

47 

63 

7 

18 

22 

1*321) 

325 

19 

31 

— 

20 

28 

— 

350 

7 

20 

— 

36 

43 

— 


375 

2 

— 

— 

5b 

— 

— - 

GEC 

160 

30 

SB 

44 

144 

4 

8 

(*187) 

180 

15 

22 

28 

8 

11 

12 

200 

554 10% 

17 

17 

-22 

24 

Grand Met 

360 

in 

115 

_ 

1 

3 

_ . 

(-462) 

390 

ta 

88 

— 

1 

6 


420 

55 

89 

78 

5 

13 

18 


480 

25 

42 

6b 

18 

2b 

33 

1 a 

850 

132 

145 



4 

10 



0066) 

1000 

87 

105 

132 

9 

20 

29 

1050 

60 

72 

102 

20 

40 

50 


1100 

24 

48 

78 

50 

70 

79 

Land Sec 

300 

41 

50 

58 

1)4 

4 

9 

C33S) 

330 

18 

28 

38 

8 

14 

18 

360 

4 

13 

17 

27 

28 

33 

MarfcsaSpen 

180 

16 

25 

32 

254 

5 

7 

P90) 

200 

5 

14 

18 

13 

15 

19 

220 

1 

5 

10 

32 

33 

34 

Shad Trans 

850 

113 

128 

148 

3 

17 

27 

f943) 

900 

72 

90 

112 

12 

Si 

43 

950 

42 

60 

80 

33 

68 

68 

Trataigar House 

260 

30 

39 

47 

2 

10 

14 

C288) 

280 

19 

28 

38 

12 

18 

21 

300 

9 

17 

2b 

2b 

29 

32 

TSB 

TO 

6S4 

IT 

13)4 

1)4 

2)4 

4 

(78) 

80 

254 

8)4 

854 

6 

0)4 

7% 

90 

1 

2K 

SK 

1454- 1554 

16 


Series 

Dec 

Mar 

<Jtei 

Dec 

Mar 

■km 


• 360 

62 

re 

— 

1 

2. 



f419) 

390 

32 

bU 

62 

2 

8 

15 

420 

12 

33 

43 

9 

22 

30 


480 

2 

, 1S 

24 

43 

45 

55 

BOOB 

200 

34 

43 

48 

1 

3 

5 

C2323 

220 

1454 

23 

33 

4 

7 

11 

240 

3 

17 

20 

13 

15 

23 


280 

10 

23 

29 

8 

12 

18 

C280) 

300 


13 

20 


20 

30 

307 

2 


— 

30 

— ■ 

— 

Bass 

850 

96 

105 

120 

2 

5 

10 

(741) 

. TOO 

SO 

W 

80 

5 

15 

30 

730 

17 

40 

bb 

28 

40 

55 

Blue Ctrcto 

600 

55 

78 

90 

4 

12 

20 

(W) 

850 

23 

52 

86 

23 

33 

40 

700 

7 

— 

— 

«l 

— 

— 

De Bears 

650 

110 

140 



3 

20 



(750) 

700 

88 

110 

130 

13 

40 

55 

750 

43 

85 

106 

30 

83 

75 


800 

18 

60 

90 

70 

90 

105 

Dixons 

300 

30 

44 

58 

2)4 

a 

10 

(357) 

330 

10 

28 

42 

12 

IS 

20 

380 

2 

13 

28 

34 

34 

38 

GKN 

240 

37 

46 

62 

1 

‘ 4 

8 


260 

21 

30 

38 

7 

11 

15 

280 

9 

21 

28 

15 

TO 

26 


300 

3 

12 

— 

30 

34 


Glaxo 

900 

27 

70 

97 

17 

38 

50 

H905) 

950 

6 

45 

72 

52 

67 

77 

1000 


28 

62 

100 

112 

115 


1050 

e 

17 

— 

150 

150 


Haneorr 

160 

43 45H 



K 

1)4 


P201)- 

180 

23 2754 

33 

1)4 

4 

5)4 

200 

7 

16 2254 

8 

11 

14 


220 

156 

8 12)4 

21 

23 

25 

L 



Series 

Ca«a 
Dec Mar 

Jim 

Dec 

Me 

Mar 

Jm 

Jaguar 

rsi4j 

500 

550 

8 00 

28 

5 

1 

ST 

a 

IS 

- 70 
38 

10 

.43 

as 

28 

50 

90 

35 

SB 

Thom 341 

420 

68 

78 

1QQ 

1) 4 

4 

8 

(*479) 

460 

33 

50 

67 

9 

18 

23 


500 

10 

24 

45 

28 

36 

42 


550 

1 

13 


73 

77 

— ■ 

Tesoo 

330 

as 


_ 

94 



_ 

rS7S) 

360 

25 

42 

56 

3 

11 

IE 


390 

4 

25 

37 

15 

23 

30 


420 

lit 

11 

23 

45 

48 

56 


Series 

Fnb Key Ai« Fab May Aug 


420 

98"T05 



5 

8 



(*904) 

460 

82 

70 

85 

10 

1b 

a 


. 500 

37 

47 

68 

23 

32 

38 

BAT Hide 

360 

107 

__ 

_ 

1 

_ 


(*456) 

390 

77 

85 

— 

2 

4 

— 


420 

53 

62 

.75 

6 

9)4 

17 


460 

28 

38 

63 

20 

27 

30 


460 

40 

65 

70 

11 

22 

27 

T474) 

500 

21) 

30 

42 

32 

40 

46 


550 

b 

13 


80 

82 

— 

Brit telecam 

180 

24 

30 

35 

3 

-6 

11 

1*198) 

.200 

10)4 

19 

24 

12 

15 

19 


220 

4 

10 

— 

28 

28 

— 

Cadbuy Schwppa 160 

28 

32 

37 

4 

7 

10 

(179) 

180 

13 

20 

25 

10 

14 

IB 


200 

5 

11 


24 

27 

— 

Guinness 

300 

40 

45 

55 

6 

10 

17 


330 

17 

2b 

3b 

20 

25 

28 


350 

9 

14 

33 

42 

4 / 

48 


Ladtxroka 

(*360) 


330 45 53 60 4 8 12 

360 25 35 42 15 22 25 

300 13 20 27 35 40 43 


LASMO 

CT47) 


130 26 31 — 4 8 - 

140 19 24 31 10 14 10 

160 11 18 21 22 25 28 


MMtandBw* 500 75 92 102 8 14 S 

(-551) 550 38 52 B2 20 30 37 

800 13 22 32 55 62 65 


P&O 

CSQ6) 


460 83 73 90 5 10 IS 

500 38 50 62 15 25 32 

550 12 23 33 48 55 63 


Racal 

C1B9) 


160 21 28 38 8 11 13 

180 10 16 22 17 20 24 

200 4J4 JO — 33 34 — 


RTZ 

(-679) 


600 

660 

700 


07 112 
58 77 
36 48 


— 10 19 — 

92 25 37 48 

64 50 57 87 


VaalHeefs 

rm 


70 15 17% 19 S (IV 8 

B0 7» 11 13K 9% 11% 1354 

9Q 354 754 9 18 W 19K 


Series Mar Jtm Sep Mar Jm Smf 

Lonrho 200 41 48 — 2 7 — 

r235) 220 26 30 35 10 14 18 

240 12 IS 24 20 2S 28 

280 - 654 10 — 34 39 — 

Striae Mow Feb May Hay Fab May 

TM1M61S81 IOD .IU 2 2'* 1* 114 

PE 1 01) 102 1 1»,. 1 2*» 2% 

104 *w •« »a 3 314 4 

Tr 1111% 03/07 104- — 4 'h _ 2 * 3'm 

r£T05) 106 hi 2'm 3'» I're 3T» 4 «» 

1W 'i« 1»« 2% 3 414 SK 

170 >« IV S 5X 6K 

112 *w 54 1»» 7 751 SK 

114. '» » 9 9% 3% 



. Nov 

E3 

E3 

E3 

ESI 

E3 

E3 

Fob 

FT-SE 

1525108)4 




i 




Index 

1550 83)4 

93)4 

103 


i 

5 

10 



(1633) 

1575 58 

70 

82 


i 

11 

18 




1600 95 


bb 

75 

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Fr-5EIMcs. Ca«K 1239. PMss1688 


*llnd«rtying aecurtty price. 



St Mary’s Hospital 
Harrow Road, London W9 


A unique and exciting 
development opportunity 
comprising 8.9 acres. 
Major frontage to 
Grand Union Canal 

Pole n tig: IO-: 

★ H’esUJeottai' 

★ L.3'T;e R-E/e'i; S'r.'rt '' 

■k Light lncJustria! 

. ★ F.s creati on ?. : F ac/’i ty . 
k !r,3!i>-,.n:onai Use •>. 

• ★,Hotef.- ■ • 

★ Hi tech* scene.© park! : Jar f 


SljbiQvi 

Heaith * 




















THE TIMES THURSDAY NOVEMBER 27 1986 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


,From yoar portfolio card dude your 
<w ht doze price movements. on Has page 
am/. Add them up to rave you your 
overall total and check this against the 
dal y dividend figure. If u matches. you 
have won outright or a share of the total 
daily pros money stated. If you are a 
insiier follow the claim procedure on the 
t x«-i of your card. Yon must always have 
your card available when claiming- 


STOCK EXCHANGE PRICES 


Equities rally 



ACCOUNT DAYS: Dealings began on Monday. Dealings end December 5. §Contango day December 8. Settlement day December 1 5 

gForward bargains are permitted on two previous business days. 

Where stocks have only one price quoted, thee© ate middle prices taken My at 5pm. Yield, change and P/E ratio are calculated on the middto prfc* 


3lB 24 EMM Pnd 
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312 208 GUM* 203 285 416 

Iffl 151 GtCN 164 ID -I 

93 59-iHM Pnxtsoa BB’i 88 +•, 

235 134 HM Sm 233 237 +5 

182 120 mm 136 140 -1 

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29D 230 W 253 263 

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339 188 Hoptans 324 326 • .. 

tm 7B H as&ts S3 84 4', 

323 9 rudtaa Amc 317 323 *-1 

126 08 Mm few 105 108 •♦! 


.99 



© Times Newsmen United 

DAILY DIVIDEND 
£4,000 

Claims required for 
+38 points 

Claimants should ring 0254-53272 


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135 105 Kara* Snto ao 135 

296 230 teSO. (AJ 255 265 

365 123 BmVfZJ 250*, 26SH 


39 22 LEW 

156 VM 3 Up 
323 199 IM 
75 42 LMB 


26 27 • .. 

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130 135 +2 

255 2 D -3 

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HOTELS AND CATERERS 


UNDATED 

464 , 37 *. Can*** 4 % 3 A +k HU 

<t aa’.vK, u> s-aNi .Vi --•♦*« ia* 

524 . 44 'aOOD* 3 *flfc 77 

34 *. 2 B‘. Trees 8 % » +*• .104 

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BANKS DISCOUNT HP 




460 483 420 

290 m •** 
358 361 -« 

485 €ffi «+3 
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362 355 -1 

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ID 190 « 4 l 
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133 86 arttto & Lu*j 
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299 US Nat*S 
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448 247 tortor tea* W 
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315 195 RXHB 
366 215 PBrnrCkHtMii 
314 2 S PoMtUMbm 
164 32 PMM 3 HO 

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900 OS Rata 6 Catana 
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IS ID +2 

230 235 +2 

315’>3?Q', +5 

325 335 
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445 455 

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625 248 feme Or Pam 

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683 480 Gao 
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SO FI 355 385 «+5 SjB £7 114 

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IBB Unfan Hoorfli 197 302 +2 19 45 107 

M'rtaMd t BMW GS 72 44 13 21.1 

82 Pan 136 142 ■ . 55 39 16 

116 snag 6 Ftta, 138 MO 129 93 64 

156 Rita 218 223 -4 04 29 27.3 


TEXTILES 



588 245 KM Tea 
300 1 S 3 Moo* But 
187 125 Bull Hotel 
115 » (Marian (*) 

X 15 BHte 
144 125 ‘rBr Maher 
127 77 Bfater S laatr 

76 1 , 61 ', Carte 
330 252 CBMfatel 
182 128 Onmarui 
276 211 QMm 
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Mi 84 Late 
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230 28 TanUBom 
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180 H» Can* ^ 

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455 457 +3 184 49 119 

133 IX 
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175 177 +19 109 57 U 


Oum 



o/c £- — 

fleer’s 

tastic’ 


d EDechanicsl en- 
Hrt the £8,000 he 
de Portfolio Gold 
yesterday to good 

date my granuK 
ase my donation 

i h«lt anneal anil 

v next year," Mr 
od, of AUestree, 

aged SL, who has 
dio Gold since it 
* Times, said that 
believe his Inch. 
tJsfantastic.lt is 




ger of 

itives 

>eer 

in Young 

sed in brewing 
drinkers and, in 
even kill them, 
' for Real Ale 
day. 

the campaign's 
'hat's Brewing. 
Prolz, a former 
lod Beer Guide, 
pie who have 
•ther breathing 
i us disorders, 
who are allege 
Is. can suffer ill 
inking beers in ' 
2 s have been 
oduce a foamy 
Jarity, or to 

i fp 

ed Slates; the* 
nore than 40 
f heart attacks 
were used co- 
in beer vo 
ming head. 


LiiilLUtiTii'vi 


ST 


'm 


or storage 
>ebty shows 
■ace Heater 



: W high 
< S 1 *" high 


wa* Due* 

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• Ex duidsnd a Ex 30 b Forecast ttwdand a hntenm 
payment passsd f Price ai suspension g DMdena anti 
vie# ax duels a specaJ paymeffl k Pre-marger figures n 

Fcxecast earnings o Ex attwr r Ex ngWS s Ex scrip or 
share striu i Tax-free . . no sjgnificam data. 

55P — I4 g 
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BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


THF. TIMES THTTRSDAY NOVEMBER 27 1986 


THE TIMES UNIT TRUST INFORMATION SERVICE 


ass oner cm yw 


U 0«et Cmg YD 


Bui Offer Owa VM 


BM Oiler Cbog 


an aw cmg vw 


BA0MN5MPUEY. 
9-17. P wi yrn uum I 
IKU *661*4 
Ffeundal 

Snndter Co'a Art 
DO Mcaim 
hai means 
tow 

Men PankMo me 
Do Art 


M. i Human a i nun 


1298 137.0 
SSLS » 17? 
1405 1580# 
SS-9 70S 
7U nijBa 
628 0U 

106.0 1127 
57.2 612 

BU BM# 


-03 2B2 

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+03 059 
*1.7 5.78 
*03 *.78 
*03 301 
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.. 

-Ol 023 


auoniAgnawewaeMEHT 

77m Suck FYcftange London BSP 277 
Oi-SBS 286B 

MtoaWpfec 50* JOS 

Gmraitac W £7.3 23Mc 

Do Aeeutn M 3*73 3020 

wwiMftjndea • 

Do Main (3) 'B2B 191.7 -O 

maw ra tt&fl 1*20 

DoAown a IBM IBM 

3WW £12.07 1079 

DeAcnanpi tlZ.08 1M1 

CSPUMDMHMBB 


185. HWi Hataoro. LondBn V8C1V SPY 
01-3*2 11*8 


01-3*2 11*8 
CS Joan Fbrti 


803 873 *01 057 


CANNON FUM) HAMMERS 

.og^wm.vw^.HAOo* 

SSS S5SS -17 If 

FvEMt 2303 2*01 **3 

North American 152J. 1613 +22 OCT 

Q|oM S2.7 508 *M M 

Mmm 578 61.0 *1 * 12* 

583 82.1 *1.8 050 

CAPB-PAIg«}*WM*aEMBCr 
PO Bo* 551 Bs«N Marta London ECS 7JQ 
01*621 0011 

CWM 3660 m* +2*15 

ss r*w ss 3? as 

01*633 6814 

CIl Trust 899 95.1# ..1238 

OENHMLMM0OFCTMRNCEOF 
CHURCH OF EHO-AM1 
2. Few Strati. London BC2V 3*0 
01-588 1815 

kw ft**! *13« 

Ftasti Int 1»® '■ SS 

MpmH 1000 .. W20 

CHASE ratMHATTAN FUHU MAHAOBIB 
72/73 MM SOM. London EC2V 3DP 


SAC SpaON am 578 80.8 


LBeawt London ECZY SAG 


cumoal mbmcal uNrrnwsr 

KWUOBa 

lem wFUB , BrtMDl BS2 0JH 
<*00 373383 


Anar Qrawtn 
Equity High mow 
Biopaa n Oro**ifi 


tW-u 


G*I A Fond won 
GB A Road me 
rnoax SHvflea 
ua me Tat 
japan Growdi 
padwa am 


8*3 28.1 

43.4 490c 

313 33.7# 
308 408 
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223 705 c 
244 25J7 

33i‘ 392 
24.1 208 


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.. 950 
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101. Cheap**. London EC2V 6CU 
01-728 IMS 

Trust 439 51,8 -04 401 

188.1 17SJW +1.0 822 
1984 (792 -0.1 131 

58.1 SI’S* .. 191 
2B3.7 30 09 +tL6 258 
419 449# +0.1 492 
1829 1939 +05 094 

1069 1129# -03 144 
1149 121.1 -Ol 2.18 
22Z3 2359 +07- T.SI 

813 649c -02 548 
2952 3050 . . 149 

own wnw ruai 

Guam Homo. MWdng GU21 1XW 
04882 5033 

M* mean# Trust 2489 2645 +07 494 

Growth Ihm 2Z29 ZS79 . . 304 

Anaaiean Trust 1282 1374 -08 073 


nun i®t8s*+«*8i 

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TmumwanCtfa 1802 180.1 . 1** 

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2CTJ 3052 
301J 3207 
119.1 123.1# 
1389 1451# 
1350 1«3# 
1829 1729# 
828 5M 
1199 1269 
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BaaoBOt 27SJ 2906 

anToi 2161 2329# 


-09 098 
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- 1.0 1.0 

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1802 2109# +51 990 
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-19 1.10 
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-03 080 
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+51.890 
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0603 622200 

dnuoIMt £1220 1294 .. 31 

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SSlSov*aB3B»5W7flWl 


800 849 
1101 1179 


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529* SU *08 588 
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1799 1CT4# 


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01-405 4300 

CapM 3899 370.1 

OnM me 154.1 19BJ) 

mgn MSB 2355 2365 

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Bn Ftaor. 8 . Dnonshka So. Londo 
01-289 2575 DeWo0 01^6 8431 
a 63.7 875 



1019 1899 
1402 1559 
77.7 827 
1819 1889 
1749 186 . B 


London BCB4 4YJ 
9431 

879 -51 1.10 

1089 +09 270 

155.8 +55 2.70 

827 . . 8.10 

1889 +52 1.70 

30 ..890 


32. Qua#! how Qata. Undon SW1H BAB 
01-222 1000 

a Brit 8 Owes 1419 M89# +5* 178 
a fee plus 57-0 KL4 . . 990 

n Caphd Graaati 889 614 .. 190 

mwaaiMW Tat Fnd 739 789# +51 340 

KET FU M 7AWHAOBCT 

35. FOWln Saw. uanchanmr 

(0909488984 

Etuh A Gan *49 479 +89 190 

<A7nudHFund 625 669 +521094 

Hmnor fee 1227 13 Uu +19 498 

tiSmm 519 5446 .. 393 

bWntmn# 2749 2B*9e +09 19B 


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m2 2308c +58 295 


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1889 20238 +15 498 
1329 1029 +05 192 

879 724 -04 093 

TS.e BS9 +ttl 093 
819 BUa -09 079 
014 0650 +09 157 


MKUFie OHR-TWSTMAHMERa UD 
222. Bamopa, Lotion as 

01-247 754477 


Wgh meat# 

SMS 

Aunh+troarte 


Euro Got A me 


1289 1315 

m.i «*• 

97.1 1093#. 
178.1 1984 
1289 1395 
807 749c 
1109 1244C 
889 95.1 
47.0 509 


-05 093 
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40.1 ITS 
.. 093 
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52.0 

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19 

Do Dht 

489 

599 

820 

33 

+03 133 


F^ctac Growth 

5X5 



4, MaMAs Cmacao. EaHtntfi 
081-226 34B2 

AaMcm Find 729 7|9# -55 190 
capW Fun 1009 seas +54 ij» 
Grow# A me nm 1258 13&3 +55 492 

HWI Dm Fund 109 1 1151# +05 991 
tMirawm Fund 2089 223.1 -04 19t 

ROKMCM Fund 252 289 +05 097 

SnOr Jap Co's Fhd 34.1 389 -• .. 

Tokyo Fimd 1807 171.1 -55 000 

pn Anar (a 1479 1519 . . 391 

fe5 Jwan P) loon iwJc +19 5i> 

Je3p&!3cW 307-7 3162 .. 032 

(Ex) MrJ# (4) 2006 2009 - . 510 

EttUnd 299 319e +02 321 

EAGLE STAR IMrmUST MANAGERS 

Bath Rum. Cha—awn. aouoeimr QL53 7LQ 
03*2 S21311 

UK EWancad me 75* H7o +09 3.17 
OB Aeon 714 7&9c +52 3.13 

UK Qrowto Accum 850 M4 +09 Z17 
uk »gh me me ctj 7i4# . . *90 

N Amancan Aecun 002 739 -09 070 

Par Eastern Aocnm 1059 1150 +0.1 590 

Ewpaan Accw 912 879 +02 1.(8 

UK SO A H me S&S BSMo . . 514 
On Accw 82.1 G95c .. 886 


BS9 59L9# -09 090 

067 679 -51 1.10 

2374 2529 +19 510 

1519 12B9C +1.1 040 
2819 2999 +39 030 

757 B39# +09 090 
512 949# -51 490 
cuurrwincRMMAHAaraB 

n«3%2Mm0O1523 5709 OnWg DMffl 



88-105 BMti9ng Rd. Mawmna. Kant M£l4 1» 


MLA Amaricn 
MLAGananl 
N5A. adamadoW 
MLAGNUW 


A nanom HUB 87.0 04 ... Mg 

AustrWan That ^ M.1 +59 5K 

B M ,A “ Um Si CT3 tSI If 

ISSMT 3S S?° m'o£> 

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tad Ftxad mt Tsl 24.7 253 -51 371 

Qatiti Fati Aeon 184.1 1854# +52 030 
SToot 1762 1859# +51 530 

GOO 9M Tru# 152 182# +02 191 

Hadgad American 329 B42c +02 090 

Hdi kreoma nun 14&2 154 .1 +09 591 

Hong Kong TruB 309 389 . . J20 

Wot# Fund 75i B43 +52 ara 

Insurunca Agncfea £4588 5202 +023 201 

Jam Tram 1299 1379 +51 090 

MmmmU Emm t 2372 2889 +19 229 

Oi fi&WBy Trust 3*9 389 -02 220 

Sped# sa* Tram 956 WJ -09 0^ 

QKawCfeRKTat 759 859# +05 575 

OOygTT(JOWQOWTIIANA fl e#P ir 
WAa ci taaBM 1 Kan, 77, Lotion KM, London EC3N 
IDA 

01-588 5620 

M Grow* 852 0596 -02 1.18 

American ftwadi fi5-7 aae -Of K» 

American he 729 77 .1 -09 4*8 

Eunataw Growth 84*4 Mi® +57 043 

QnUSMhadi 465 489 -51 570 

J## Growth 1857 1689 -17 . . 

GM! IMTMAHMBI& 

Roy# Bata a aga. EC3P3DN 
01968 9903 

GK 6 Read mi 1089 1129 -53 B92 

Growth P*y4w 194.8 2069# +09 511 

cSSSm^ 2989 27U +09 230 

NAmertctai 1404 1559# -09 198 

PnoAC 2825 »[2# +57 OlM 

Property Shan 2766 7B3J .. 190 

SmWtar CompmUae 2185 ^2# . . 170 

Baepaan Thar 2779 2940 +22 598 


Bt^Gwgaa^Mqh 8maat#B* Nth# 

Growth Units 759 BD9 

GB A Hsad H 1025 108.1 
Hgb taconrtr Unfes 114.1 1219 
MiWKUn 557 557 
ri ]rowtn Unas 1419 1804 


mearaNVi unm 
N Ararat IMH 
Far Mr unis 
Saaflar cos Fond 


584 819# -02 095 

219 225# .. 1195 

419 437# +51 5.17 
329 339 +51 573 


+19 392 
+1.1 794 
+19 493 
+99 S.11 
+49 535 
+19 077 
+89 007 
+54 20* 


01-178 3377 

unfexxu EMtr 4004 4237# +02 M2 

EarawT^ 9 m3 1167# +54 092 

WbwOoaam 529 553 -51580 

Ho*om Mgb be 8*9 «3 +52 83* 

Human W toss are 

J MM « S9J7 1055 -57 505 

ms oosm -os as? 
HoBotn Spac BU 8*9 «9c +09 in 

Hdbom UKGRMh 850 855 +51 295 

UotXXTl GB That 1779 1849 +02 256 

Hotxxn 8m# Oaa 489 514 +51 220 

QUUERMAMOSmrGOMMNT 
31-45 Qrsahnen SL Lotion EC2V 7LH 
01-600 4177 

Kadal General 4882 409 .. 283 

Ouawnc tacoma 9449 2SL3 .. S2S 

Quadrant tad » 4129 4359 . . 19B 

0— aN Blff ai 2714 2CT4 -- Z43 
NN HOMaCHOD A88CT HMMBKNT 

st swaMns Lana. London SC4# 4DU 

01- 280 5458 

NC taoonw 879 «M# +51 494 

NC Japan ies9 -ms +58 tun 

NC MtiorUK do 519 54B# .. 191 

NC SanaAar Aus 650 051 .. 198 

NC American tap 251 -S 2904 -09 1.17 

DO Accw 3072 3259 -12 1.17 

NC Smahr Oaa 143.1 1522 +55 132 


+58 001 
.. 191 
.. 198 
-09 t.17 
-19 1.17 
+05 132 


Cans 1084 21516 +09 024 


mt 




1415 1804 
732 779 
9*4 1002 
722 7*7 


rowan Urer trust 

33 Kbm Vfltom Sum. London BC4R BAB 
01-6355678 


BMCAF (HRTTflUST 

Urteom Kaa. 20flemtanl Rd. E7 

tn-234 5544 

Hanes# 1342 1429# 


Regurara Dpi GafevOyOaa. 

Bunas 

0444 458144 


1819 1025# 

Do ACCW am® 347.4# 

Com) Em OA he 500 

Do Accun 339 

Envoy tad 539 572 

Do Accum S0 3 84.1 

Extra tacoron 157.7 187.7# 

Do ACCOn 289.1 3073# 

Carman Oh hat 70S B12# 

□a Acsum 70S 819# . 

taamm 2083 237.1# 

Do Aaeu# 5422 5758# 

tad Thd> 19 (9 2IK.T# 

Do Aoaen 2TH18 2139# 

Jut Gratis 7BA B34 

Do Accw 758 839 

N Amer A Q#t 1855 1129 
Oo Accum 1149 1219 

Pactic BbWi 188.7 1475 

Do Mxun 1449 154J0 

SmataT Co® A Ftec 1928 205.1# 

Do Aocon 2179 281.7# 

Wta H BwIde Grwtl 2H9 2252c 

Do Accw 2977 3187C 

UK (howm Fund 489 519c 


-55 251 
-53 291 
+02 *27 
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+53 510 
+55 510 
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.. 09 8 
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ft® 
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2209 22*9# .. 195 
7120 7274 .. £16 
1720 1759# .. 793 
4299 4379 +154 218 
1545 1559 .. 285 
1189 1114 .. 1378 
2389 3*00 .. 095 


MKAL LIFE FUND MAHAOBKHT 
New Has Pines, Dawpool LBS 3HS 
061-227 4422 

Butty This 805 6*9# -51 £82 

Ind Trust 774 829 +51 148 

GB That 244 2S9c +51 588 

US That 8*4 382 -51 198 

Fame Boon ltd 447 479# .. 040 


2D anon Si Lotion EC2 
01520 0811 • 

Equity DM 1149 

Do Accw 1819 

Htah mam Dual 822 
DO Accum 1050 

US Growth 084 

Do Aatta 589 


1149 12190 +58 193 
1819 17196 +55 193 
822 544 +52 448 

1004 1122 +52 449 

884 819 -53 093 

589 03.1 -54 583 


AuatndW Geld 209 289 +09 518 

PacMcBasta 219 220# +0.1 520 

Cawta DM Gft 809 «05# -05 090 

GfeWa Mae Fud «o*s totlec *03 aaj 


saDMOinmd 885 ra a 
US Goa Baud Ftf <819 519 
CMBngar 458 950 


LONDON A MANCMSTa 
Wtastcda Paris. Era EX5 IDS 
0812 52155 

GonaM DuM 434 464# +51 570 

tar* Than 853 389 *0.1 19 

MsmsdaaJ TVuot 379 328 ..it M 
American 333 3EL46 -52 290 

-ir, van 45.1 479 .. OM) 

Trust ot tnr 309 328# .. 220 

■ kaSECWCTCB 

Tim Quays. Tow HR eon 6 BQ 

01488 4588 


■r s -[+f- > 


NOML LONDON (WriNUOTMAIMOEM 
Rani London Harm, Cafctwslar COT IRA 
005 578115 

Arneatcan Growth 852 907 -58 092 

London UK am 1739 18*7 C +07 220 

Get mem# 512 5*4# -51 898 

Hgbtaoam 782 834# .. *94 

mom A Groatii 972 ms# +51 491 

JROT »p#m 992 949# -51 (MSB 
SpaeW Sax 1129 1204 .. 129 

Hwtnom __ 

25 HMam R(L nomtaR] RM1 3UI 
(noudanD 070940W 

Aim tac A Growth 694 733# -55 74B 
CapM Unfea KS2 1U4 +aj 1^3 

Ctn-MdW 889 599 -53 <177 

European Grow* 121.1 UtM +19 558 

Financial Dace 954 HM4o -54 194 

imi Ramin Ortte M*4 1987 -o.l MB 

l$l YWd IMb 1849 1749 451 493 

fetmlMi 989 9U -52 892 


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UNLISTED SECURITIES 


INVESTMENT TRUSTS 




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M 33 


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02 55 rn Qiy 5 Lon DM BD*i 6l*i 
224 155 7R Ml fen 217 219 

1*9 SSSSTH MM (tat 138 140 

fin 88 TO Harm AMaaca no 102 
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55 25 559 
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f FINANCIAL TRUSTS 


164 120 Man Arrow 
24 S'.ftWy Mai 
20 U ISS Da 'A' 

158 137 Htda 
1« S Sjrnni 
m 187 EM 
T13 86 ap i w 
773 375 Fr winaiBk 
115 81 FW tfc 
2 ® W BT Kunorit 
r,n CaxU (DIM) 

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218 153 K» 

447 330 MTU 
305 ISO MIG 

■M ZS&'T 

m 152 smSi ' team 


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112 117 #+2 
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60 39 257 
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02 07 57.1 

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301 

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29* 23 5.4 

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£5 23 162 

73 31 
77 88 99 
49 LS 41.1 
21 U 15.1 
Si 4f »i 

7.1 5.1 151 

U 17 219 
36 17 370 

4.1 9.1 87 

47 11 108 
19* 49 259 
U 38 167 
79 U a* 
IB 29 170 

H ra s A 
12 Ui 
BB 48 . 
4.8 40 17 

00 49 
64 V 
U 11 
23 32 
33 31 
(U 2* 
a? m 

57 64 
16 29 


EXCHANGE 

G W Jcrynam and Co report 
SUGAR (FrornC. Cxamfcosr) 
FOB 

Dec 135.0-34.0 

Mar 14M-4&0 

1B1441J) 

154.6-54.4 

ISfASfA 

161.05931 


Fab .. 

77.0-80.00 


— 76.0-79.00 



2104-2100 

1960-1955 


1995-1985 

2010-1990 


UnofflcWpotA* 
OtficW IteBovarfigim 
Prte# toepornwMe ton# 
SBsmr In prac# par trey ranas 
RwMf«taH«CD.Ud.mport 
COFFER GRADE A 
CBil ™«. — - 916-SO-9T7.00 
Tftreo Months . 94250-943JM 

W 3260 

Tons Steady 


COMMODITIES 


S8.VER LARGE 

^8h» 364J50-36550 

Three Montfia . 374^0375^0 

Wot M 

Tona Idto 

SO. VR SHALL 

Cash 3845058550 

Tlvse Months. 3745OS7550 

Vpl NR 

Ton* idto 

ALUMMUM 

Cash 7825078350 

Thnio Month* . 7995079950 

JW 9600 

Torn Barafy Steady 

N1CICEL 

9etfi 2540-2545 

Thre# Months £9802687 

Voi — ; IBB 

Tom Steady 


^jf.’.UVrfru 


SOYABEAN 

DOC 

' 135JH3O0 

8a . 133.0-32-5 

Jim — 

129S59.0 

Aug 

12&8-2&0 

Oa .... 

13O*0M 

Doc — . 

133-0-31.0 




STAHCMRD CATHODES 

Cash 8335088550 

ThreeMonths, 92250084,00 

Vol Nfl 

Tone Quiet 

LEAD 

C»ft - 33950-340.00 

T7vw Morrfto. 3215032200 

tfol-w— 3200 

TMO Barely Steady 

ZMC STANDARD 

Cash 5185052350 

Ifaf M 

TOft* KM 

ZINC HIGH GRADE 

Cash 5515085350 

ThreoMonttW . 5475054850 


EXCHANGE 

Liu# FIb Comnaet p. par Mb 
Monte Open Oos* 

Feb 9550 9550 

Apr 9550 

Jui 9650 9650 

Aug 9450 9450 

Ott 9750 0750 

NO* 9750 9750 

’ ’ vbtflS 

Pig Moot TCtO 

LONDON MEAT FUTURES 
EXCHANGE 
UwCMldOonmct 
P-P«»o 

Monte .Open Ctoae 
Nov 9850 9650 

Fob 9750 9750 

Apr 10150 10150 

•fun 10150 10150 


LONDON GRAIN FUTURES 
C par tome 

. YS!* Br Bartft y 

Monte Ora* ooa e 

Jain . 11150 113LAS 
Mtf 11350 11455 

May . T1&S4. 115.75 

Jul 11750 _ 

sg 101^ 10055 

Nra 103.70 10350 

>vaurrat . 

Whaat 7»i 

BRrtoy ! 


LONDON POTATO 
FUTURES 

£ per tamo 

Si Open Ctoss 
71200 110M 
15450 153-20 
17050 171.60 
. 8750 8750 
9850 9550 


GXL Freight FuturnaLsd 
report 310 par indtot paint 


High/Low Clou 
-Km 87 6S7.0-6B85 6905 

Apr 87 7a.imS5 7245 

MS7 GZSM&O.O 821.0 

Oct 87 7285-7185 721 M 

Jan 88 720.0-7205 7205 


vokseeiob 

Opwi interest 2036 

TANKER REPORT 
High/Low Ctoae 


P0C 86 8405-8*00 8405 


Vofcl lots 
Pp*n interest 22 

S^o t m a rk e t eemmet Hay: 
Tranter Inrtoc 

8335 down 95 on 55/11/86 
25/11/88 




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cj* t&P 


— s-s-.i TTrK'M 


INTERNATIONAL TRADE 


_THE TIMES THURSDAY NOVEMBER 27 1 QS6 


((FOCUSD 


29 


A SPECIAL REPORT 


On 


The exhibition. Export ’86, opens at the 
-Barbican from next Tuesday. Britain 
iswell-placed to win back power and 
influence as a leader of world commerce 



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ritish industry and com- 
| Mmeree today faces the 
best opportunity for 
|| 9 many decades- to in- 
crease its share of world 
tracELDcqnte the gloomy prognos- 
tications of many economic 
observers.'. British goods abroad 
ha ve become increasingly compet- 
itive. So long as there is no. let-up 
in the battle; to control cost and 
improve quality, the British 
should be on course for an export 
bonanza; 

This is the' conclusion of Sir 
James Cleminsdn. former presi- 
dent of the Confederation of 
British Industry -and now chair- 
man of the British Overseas Trade . 
Board, the ’Government’s 
speaiheard organization in. the 
campaign to return Britain to a 
more respectable position in the 
tableof global traders. 

Sir James took over as chairman 
in July after a year of remarkable 
improvement in UK export busi- 
ness. Overseas sales were up by 11 
per cent in value and six per cent 
in volume in 198S to reach a 
record total of £78 billion. The 
increase in- Britain's exports was 
greater than the growth in world 


' Exporting companies, says Sir 
James, are recording much greater 
increases than non-exporters - 
with a rise of 15-percent in the last 

year not unusual. He adds: “1 go 
along with the CBI line that a lot of 
companies, are exposing them- 
selves to trouble because their cost 
increases are not matching their 
productivity rises. But many firms 
are doing what the Government 
and the CBI wants and are still not 
winning export markets." 

Sir James says that at least the 
Government is recognizing the 
value of the BOTB- by ghang a 
small rise in the overall level of 
spending oyer the next two years. 
The organization has a budget thi s 


iSSi&L tr 


year of just over £27 milli on. 
" I9f 


In 1984-85, the board was able 
to recoup more funds from cus- 
tomer companies, which, enabled 


it to. maintain the spending level 
a dnrtin- 




6 More competitive 
than ever with West 
Germany and Japan 9 




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trade as a whole. Exporters, he 
says, should not lose the impetus. 

Britain has been- helped by the 
more competitive pound and, this 
year, by felling oil and energy 
prices, which should belpTJritish 
goods to remain popular in the 
UK's most important export mar- 
ket: western' Europe. Exports to 
the' rest of Europe last year 
amounted to £46 billion — 58 per 
cent of Britain’s total In Spain. 
Portugal and Italy, where the 
BOTB has .made special efforts at 
trade promotion backed by high- 
level government visits, sales were 
well up - 40 per cent in Spain 
alone. 

“In price terms," says Sir James, 
“we are very much more compet- 
itive with the West Germans and 
the Japanese than ever before." 

When he was CBI president. Sir 
James led the employers’ groupln , 
its strident campaign, for lower 
i merest rates and much reduced 
pay settlements. No pay rises 
unless they have been earned in 


' , ■;= r*: 
*■ m • t . 


higher jjroductmty.aiKl abolition 
of the annua' 


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■■ 

.*• * *** ■ 


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' the annual pay round, was add 
still is the CBI cry. 

Though Sir James would never 
disagree with that he has changed 
priorities since donning the BOTB 
hat. He says: “1 have recognized 
that the only factor now intensify- 
ing the problem of non-compet- 
itiveness is die cost of money.- 
West Gennanyand Japan are able 
to offer financial terms very much 
more cheaper than can the UK." 

On his recent trip to China. Sir 
James asked the Chinese why the- 
West Germans bad increased iherir 
trade with the country so substan- ' 
dally. The attraction was not soft 
loans but attractive financial 
terms. 


despite, in real terms, 

isfaed budget. Grants available to 
companies attending overseas 
trade fairs or export missions have 
been cut for those on their second 
of third visits to a particular 
country. Those takihg part in 
exhibitions, for example, will have 
to pay 40 per. cent of the BOTB’s 
estimated direct costs if they are 
first-time visitors, rising to 55 per 
cent for second-time exhibitors 
and 75 per cent for others. 

Those taking part in missions 
will face similar restrictions. A 
.visit to Hong Kong on a BOTB- 
approved mission, for example, 
will qualify each individual to a 
£520 contribution to travel costs 
on the first three occasions, falling 
to £260 on the fourth visit. 

“There was a squawk when this 
was instituted," comments Sir 
James, “with some companies 
saying that fairs and promotions 
were the most useful things we did 
but the reductions made their 
attendance difficult. However it 
doesn’t seem to reduce substan- 
tially the number of people taking 
part," 

In its bid io spend money more 
effectively, the. BOTB is 
concentrating more on small- 
business entrepreneurs who, be- 
lieves Sir James, need only a little 
prodding to get them to become 
exporters. 

- A report from the board’s small- 
firms committee, covering enter- 
prises with up to 200 employees, 
shows that ho more than a third of 
the small exporting companies are 
accounting for 80 per cent of the 
sector’s total export turnover. 

“The other two-thirds work on 
the basis of getting overseasorders 
when they feel like ft If we could 
gel these companies to become 
determined exporters, we could 
increase the country’s export rev- 
enue by £5 billion." 

At long last too, the BOTB is 
entering the computer age, via a 
three-year programme designed to 
give companies a fester and more 
up-to-date service, covering the 
BOTB’s operations, the Export 


Intelligence Service and the results 
nform 


of information gathered by For- 
eign Office staff abroad. 



First buy your 
Arab dictionary 


All paxtof the trade equation: top, container package s 
le British Overseas Trade Board cl 


Tamms ^ - ■■ ~~ .are loaded at Gatwick airport; below left. Sir 

TrHde Bosud chairman, rings a bell for business with Harvey 
l ordoff from a Yorkshire firm exhibiting at a Chicago machine tool trade show; right, members of a 
sa es team from China show their planes at Farn borough this year, and bottom, special tractor units 
transport containers between quayside cranes and container terminals 


Nearly 7,000 British com- 
panies will have participated 
in 292 trade fairs in 39 
countries by the end of this 
year. What do they expect to 
gain from such activities 
which, despite assistance from 
the British Overseas Trade 
Board, can be costly and time- 
consuming? 

The ultimate aim is to sell 
pore goods or services. Bring- 
ing many prospective buyers 
together under one roof can be 
cost-effective in enabling sales 
representatives to contact 
many more customers than if 
they had to fix appointments 
ami travel to see each one 
individually. 

But in many industries 
where trade fairs proliferate — 
aerospace, defence equipment, 
specialized medical supplies, 
effluent and water treatment — 
the decision to bny is a 
complex, long-term process. 

Here the exhibitor’s main 
target will be to influence and 
persuade; effectiveness will be 
measured by the □ amber of 
contacts rather than orders. 

Rotunda, a Manchester- 
based company which makes 
PVC insulating tape and simi- 
lar products, for instance, 
attracted 1,500 visitors to its 
stand at the Elenex *86 ex- 
hibition in Hong Kong earlier 
this year. 

But the company, which is 
cited by the Institute of 
Marketing as an example of a 
comparatively smalt company 
that has achieved success in 
overseas marketing, found the 
trip valuable mainly because it 
helped identify new sales 
opportunities in China and 
yielded introd actions to poten- 
tial agents in other Far East 
countries. 

A stand at an international 
exhibition should be much 
more than a one-way sales 
pitch. Handled correctly, it 
can also provide a listening 
post, firstly for gathering first- 
hand intelligence about the 
market-place; second, for 
ganging customers’ attitudes 
to the product. 

> Peter CottereU, managing 
director of Unibrand Training, 
a company which rims training 
courses for exhibition or- 
ganizers and participants, 
says: “I believe that ex- 
hibitions are one of the best 
ways of researching a poten- 
tial overseas market at groand 
teveL" 

a Mr CottereU, who has taken 
his own medicine by exhibiting 
at next week’s Export *86. 
adds that the opportunities for 
instant feedback give ex- 
hibitions the edge over other 
forms of promotion l i k e 
advertising, direct mail or 
public relations. 

Exploiting this advantage, 
however, requires the staff 
who are manning the stand to 
be prepared to ask visitors 
questions like “Are you cur- 
rently baying X?", or "Have 
you ever used our XT” or 


“What type of X are you 
currently buying?". 

This in tun requires not 
only some training in research 
techniques but at least a 
smattering of the language of 
the country in which the 
exhibition is being held. 

It is no accident that Ro- 
tunda, which has developed a 
£11.2 millioa turnover, of 
which overseas business re- 
presents 22 per cent since its 
buy-oat from BiCC in January 
1982, employs export sales 
staff who are linguists. 

An inability to speak foreign 
languages is one of the reasons 
why UK companies are less 
enthusiastic about participat- 
ing in international ex- 
hibitions than their Con- 
tinental and Far Eastern 
counterparts. 

There are many horror sto- 
ries about exhibitors who have ' 
made expensive mistakes. Mr 
CottereiTs favourite concerns 
a stand promoting . washin g 
powder at an exhibition in the 
Middle East. This featured a 
photographic sequence which, 
from left to right, showed dirty 


Kudos as well as 
commercial action 
is part of the show 


washing, the washing being 
processed and a pile of dean 
linen. It took several days 
before the exhibitors realized 
that their Arabic-speaking vis- 
itors (who read from right to 
left) interpreted the product as 
one which turned dean wash- 
ing dirty. 

Information gleaned from 
exhibitions can be put to good 
advantage not only in launch 
mg new products but also in 
tailoring product development. 
Rotunda, for example, has 
developed new products so 
effectively that about 18 per 
ceut of last year’s sales were In 
products that did not exist 
before the buy-out. 

For some products and some 
industries, participation in 
international exhibitions may 
be important for reasons of 
status and image. 

A useful booklet* published 
by the Incorporated Society of 
British Advertisers points out 
that the way a company is 
viewed by existing customers 
and contacts can be improved 
by effective presence at an 
exhibition. 

The Farn borough Air Show 
is one good example of a “soft 
sell” exhibition specifically 
designed to influence a small 
number of key customers. Bat 
the big established inter- 
national exhibitions for all 
trades include an element of 
kudos as well as commercial 

‘ ctu “ L Patricia TisdaU 

* Guide for Exhibitors, avail- 
able from the Incorporated 
Society of British Advertisers 
Ltd. 44 Hertford Street, 
London H 'JY MAE. 



Without export insurance you 

l l. r /* ii L 


heading for a fall 






! Running an export business without export insurance is like 
paddling down the river without a map; you just never know 
what lies ahead. 

Take non-payment for example. One bad debt can cause 
havoc with your cashflow and turn the tide on profits. 

The non-payment of, say, a £20,000 contract could erode the 
profits on a much larger piece of business. All that work wasted 
when the £20,000 could have been covered for as little as £80. 

In such an unpredictable trading environment, the cost of 
ECGD insurance seems a small price to pay compared to the 
damage caused by a bad debt 

ECGD is used by 4 out of every 5 companies who insure, 
their export sales, and can tailor a competitively priced package 
to suit your individual needs. 

Before you set off down the river, speak to your local ECGD 
Regional Director. He could save you from ■ RTvfiFl 

having to bale yourself out. : 

° ‘ 7 , . / Expert with confidence. 


tXPOftl (Krtis GUttwiiltE JWvO'rXti IOMHME:: ii f ^ T "7 MrDCMflUff conn GUCE-- Barer or.r BlttlW6>MUU:."‘ J"i 

Bristol to?: awn c*wbo6ex“->u«:i crrrtif lokdoh gusgow •*»•:•] mwchestm 







5^ — 

neer’s 

astic’ 


ran 


i mechanical en- 
•ot the £8,000 he 
■h Portfolio Gold 

yesterday to good 


date my gramo- 
ise my donation 
hall appeal and 
i next year," Mr 
id, of AUestree, 


aged 51, who has 
>lio Gold since it 
1 Times, said that 
relieve his hick, 
t is fantastic. It Is ' 
fence." 

old cards can be 
sending a stam- 
d envelope to: 
old. 



i Wood 


?er of 
lives 


>eer 


in Young 


sed in brewing, 
drinkers and, in 
even kill them, 
for Real Ale 
Jay. 

the campaign’s 
'hat's Brewing, 
^rotz, a former 
tod Beer Guide,' 
pie who have 
ther breathing, 
i us disorders, 
vho are allergic' 
fs, can suffer ill 
inking beers in 
have been 
oducea foamy 
■ferity, or to 

L& 

3d States, the- - 

lore than 40 
f heart attacks 
■wers used co- 
in beer to 
ming head. 


ouple 

peal 


:rman couple 
ra last July for 
eeking reduo- 
itences. 

Lord Lane, 
tice, will pre- 
dications by 
onja Schulze, 
for leave to 
-be sentences 
' Justice Mi- 
the Central 





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<ahly shows 
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:ar:u-^. 


THF TIMES THURSDAY NOVEMBER 27 1986 


INTERNATIONAL TRADE/2 


Ex?<j*re 6 


Now the banks 
begin to listen 


The International Trade & Services 
Exhibition & Conference 
Barbican Exhibition Centre 
Blue Hall 

2—4 December, 1986 


Supported by the British Overseas T rode Board 
Over 150 exhibitors displaying products and services 
for every orea of (he export operation 
Comprehensive seminar and workshop programme 
covering a multitude of export topics 

The only major UK exhibition to include foreign trade 
organisations and chambers of commerce 


Providing funds to back Brit- 
ish exporters might sound Eke 
a large a nd lucrative Odd fa 
banks. It is surprising, there- 
fore, to discover that ft is an 
area grossly under-exploited 
by the banks, with business 
declining. 

Long-term export finance is 
probably declining faster than 
any other sector of the Market. 
This is a notoriously difficult 
area to predict. All it takes is a 

single iwg project financing to 
boost the flgwes far one year 
far above those far the pro- 


National Westminster. “Com- 
panies trad to fund their 
exports just as they would if 
they were selling in the home 
market A lot of It is done on 


tend to take the credit risk 


EXHIBITOR PROFILE 


Finance ond insurance 

Freighf, Couriers. Customs ond Packaging 

Government, Chamber and Institute Support 

International Trading Opportunities 

International Marketing 

Travel, Transport and Accommodation 

Training 

Publications 


VISITOR PROFILE 

Managing d/rectors, senior managers and executives 
responsible for: 

• Marketing • Transport 

• Finance • Administration 

• Sales • Training 


nous year. 

But more than ever, project 

finance tends to be undertaken 
by multilateral aid agencies or 
by widely-spread syndications; 
laving little “chunky” busi- 
ness fa any particular bank. 
One project finance specialist 
says: “The banks are increas- 
ingly being forced out) though 
they may always come back if 
the drcnmstances change.” 

The biggest changes have 
been in the shorter-term 
financing — those of up to two 
years. The biggest event here 
is the withdrawal of the Ex- 
port Credit Guarantee Depart- 
ment from the field by the end 
of next year. 


Entry to the exhibition is complimentary and visitors can 
register on arrival. The seminar fee is £15 plus VAT per 
morning or afternoon session, registration on arrival. Further 
details from the organisers, Queensdale Exhibitions ond 
Conferences Ltd, Blenheim House, 137 Blenheim Crescent, 
London W1 1 2EQ. Telephone 01-727 1929. 


NOT ONLY NOMADS! 


Exporters too can find it difficult to broaden knowledge 
by attending training courses. Time and location are 
often hurdles but distance learning could scale these 
barriers. 


EXPORT MARKETING 
EXPORT PROCEDURES 


These are two new audio-visual and text based study 
packs suitable for staff engaged in, or entering into 
exporting activity - even for nomads! 

See us at EXPORT ‘86 
Stand 251 The Barbican Dec 2-4 
or 

Telephone Henley (0491) 571552 for 
details 



Distance Learning Limited 


Greenlands, Henley on Thames, 
Oxon RG9 3AU 


The ECGD's withdrawal is 
understandable in view of the 
sharp drop in the popularity of 
its services. In 1 984 it supplied 
£42 million in shortterm ex- 
port financing, but only £16 
million this year — a fell of fl 
percent 

Although the rates of in- 
terest it offered were highly 
competitive, particularly for 
smaller companies, its prod- 
ucts amply did not suit clang- 
ing markets. To begin with, 
large companies can now fre- 
quently finance themselves 
even below EOGD rates. 

Just as important has been 
the switch of exporting volume 
away from Third World buy- 
ers to Europe and the US. The 
political and economic stabil- 
ity of these countries make 
ECGD credit insurance poli- 
cies somewhat superfluous 
and exporters felt they were 
paying h fe fo premiums for 
nothing. 

The result is that ECGD 
provides financing and credit 
guarantees for a mere 10 per 
cent of exports to the growing 
European and US markets. 

That should have provided a 
great opportunity for tire 
banks, particularly the 
dearers which have dose cli- 
ent relationships with so many 
British exporters. So for, they 
have been slow to take up the 
challenge. 

“As ECGD loses the busi- 
ness, no ooe else picks it up,” 
says Celia Ratty, manager of 
special financial services at 


More commercial 
attitude prevails 


“ECGD found that many 
Hahns by exporters were a 
result of the under-perform- 
ance of the exporters,” says 
John Groom of NatWest 


Richard Thomson 

Banking Correspondent 


V 


Jrten you’r e 


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If you get caught up in this one come straight to us. 


Importing or exporting, one day you might 
need a loan 4 to keep your accounts balanced. 

If you come to Nattrtfest we can offer you 
precisely that And we can help with letters of 
credit foreign currency borrowing, clean accept- 
ance credits, forfaiting, factoring and, naturally, 
foreign exchange. 

So if you’d like some help, just make straight 
for toe nearest NatWest branch, or any NatWest 


International Banking Centre. (You'll find them in 
Birmingham, Bristol, Edinburgh, Leeds, Liverpool, 
London, MarK^Tester,Nottir®ham,Redhffl,RomfwTd 1 
Sheffield, Slough and Watford.) 

And well soon have you running rings round 
everyone else in the business. 

Not vice versa. 


A NatWest The Action Bank 


PRESS 


FOR 


A C T I 






FOCUS 


As we move 


ahead to the top of the world league tables 


Britain’s invisible lifeboat 


The dealing banks are now 
waking Bp to the possibilities. 
National Westminster has 
bunched & whole range of 
schemes under the curious tide 
“Export Ease”, following a 
move by Midbnd some 
months ago to provide more 
streamlined finance. Barclays 
is also launching a new export 
scheme. 

The NatWest package is 
probably the most comprehen- 
sive in die new generation of 
export finance and insurance 
products. It not only includes 
credit insurance schemes to 
large and small exporters but 
factoring and forfeiting 
services. 

The idea is that If yen are 
offering one product to an 
exporter, why not make a little 
more money by offering sev- 
eral which he is likely to need? 
There are eight schemes in the 
NatWest package. 

One effect of the withdrawal 
of ECGD is that a more 
commercial attitude prevails. 


He explains that the mew- 
style schemes were not de- 
signed to teach exporters how 
to export “They mnst show eb 
that they can do it already.” 

One example of this attitude 

is a new r^onr with which 
credit insurance policies are 
treated. Unless a company has 
performed to the letter of its 
contract it cannot daim oa its 
policy. That mesas banks take 
a stow attitude to the way 
exporters perform before pro- 
viding finance. 

As the banks* risk has 
grown, so have their charges. 
The smaller companies are 
likely to be the fhst to fed this. 

Does the greater commer- 
cialism and vigilance of die 
hnak» make export finance 
services harder to get? “It 
should not be harder to find 
finance,” Mr Groom insists. 
“In die end, if an exporter has 
a good idea and knows what he 
is doing, he will get the 
finance.” 


I nvisible exports are tak- 
ing over from oil as the 
lifeboat keeping Britain 
afloat in the world econ- 
omy. While tbe trade 
deficit in man ufactured goods 
widens monthly, the surplus 
on services and other 
invisibles is growing. 

Lord Limerick, chairman of 
the British Invisible Exports 
Council, is confident that 
Britain will soon take over 
from the United States at the 
top of the world league table of 
invisible exporters. 

"In this cable the UK has for 
many years earned the largest 
surplus in the world after the 
US,” he says. “Latterly, 
reflating costs of overseas 
borrowing have eroded the US 
surplus so that Britain is likely 
to have the No. 1 position this 
year or next." 

By invisible exports we 
mean the earnings from over- 
seas of banking, insurance, the 
City, the shipping industry 
and tourism. 

In addition, warning s on 
investments overseas add to 
Britain's invisible surplus, as 
do transfers from abroad to 
Britain such as refunds from 
the European Community 
budget. 

So far this year Britain's 
balance of payments on cur- 
rent account has been in 
surplus by £429 million, and 
the invisible account has been 
in surplus by £7,314 million. 

Next year, according to the 
Treasury's latest forecast, the 
invisible surplus will total £9.0 
billion, within a current ac- 
count which is in deficit by 
£1.5 billion. 

dearly, without the grow- 
ing contribution of invisible 
exports, the balance of pay- 
ments would be in dire straits. 
And yet there is, apparently, 
no limit to the ability of the 
invisible exporters to do 
better. 

The City has achieved a 
huge increase in its net over- 
seas earnings. Last year, these 
were £7.6 billion, compared 
with £6.6 billion in 1984 and 
just £2 billion in 1980. 

The Big Bang changes in the 
City of London, despite cur- 
rent difficulties, are expected 
to underline the City's pos- 
ition as the dominant finan- 
cial centre in Europe. 

Lord Limerick says: “We 
are already leaders with 25 per 


cent in value of international 
hanking transactions, ahead of 
the United States with 15 per- 
cent. The turnover in 
. London's foreign exchange 
market averages S90 billion 
daily, “half as much again as in 
New York. We attract the 
largest share, around 20 per 
cent, of the available world 
insurance premiums.” 

Within the City, insurance 
is the biggest net overseas 
earner. Lloyd's and the over- 
seas portfolio earnings of the 
insurance companies gen- 
erated an overseas surplus of 
£3.3 billion last year. In 1980, 
these earnings were less than 


totalled £1.15 billion. 

“Overseas earnings of Brit- 
ish consultants have increased 
substantially in recent years," 
says the BIEC, “despite 
increasingly aggressive com- 
petition from consultants in 
other countries. 

“Some of these competitors 
are able to offer financial 'bait* 
as a means of securing foBow- 
os orders for contractors, 
suppliers and manufacturers, 
to compete with the acknowl- 
edged commercial indepen- 
dence, worldwide experience 
and integrity of British 
consultants.” 

Invisible exports, like trade 


Limerick has posited out. 

“However competitive; our 
invisibles remain — and we 
predict they will — no foresee- 
able growth in foe services 
sector can compensate for the 
eventual loss of oar o3 sur- 
plus, let alone thc total foreign 
exchat^e requirement for im- 
porting our .. domestic , energy 
consumption when tia# North 
Sea really rons dry. . 

“Nor can any foreseeable 
rate of growth in employment 
in services, where extra jobs 
will be numbered in tens of 
thousands rather .than in mil- 






6 We are 
already the 
leaders with 
25 per cent 
in value of 
international 
banking 
transactions, 
ahead of 
America 9 


Lord Limerick 
Chairman of the 
British Invisfoie 
Exports Council 


£1 billion. 

For the insurance com- 
panies, as well as pension 
funds and other financial in- 
stitutions, the removal of 
exchange controls in 1979 
provided an opportunity for a 
rapid build-up in overseas 
investment by British 
institutions. 

Direct investments by Brit- 


in goods, are often affected by 
unhelpful external factors. 
Thus, Britain's net earnings 
on the travel account were hit 
earlier this year by the de- 
cision of large numbers of 
Americans to avoid Europe as 
a holiday destination after the 
bombing of Libya. 


ish companies overseas are 
worth £80 billion, and invest- 


ment in shares more than 
£100 billion. 

One area of invisible ex- 
ports, usually ignored but 
emphasized by tire British 
Invisible Exports Council in 
its annual report published 
earlier this month, is con- 
sultancy services. British en- 
gineers, and management and 
economic consultants remain 
strongly in demand. Last year, 
consultancy earnings overseas 


But invisible earnings are 
also affected by the exchange 
rate and foe performance of 
British mannfaftnring The 
fall in sterling this year, notar 
bly against the Deutschmark 
and most other -European 
currencies, will have tire effect 
of providing a substantial 
boost to invisible earnings 
during the next two or three 
years. 


But it is a mistake to regard 
the performance of services as 
divorced from that of manu- 
facturing industry, as Lord 


which bavebecELidst in manu- 
facturing industry. 

“We remain convinced that 
the way fonvardforlbe econ- 
omy is to maximize our trade 
in both visibles and invisibles 
by building on strengths and 
tackling weaknesses." 

At the meeting of repre- 
sentatives ' of the General 
Agreement on Tariffs and 
Trade in Punta del Este, 
Uruguay, in September, it was 
agreed that tire next GATT 
round of trade reductions will 
involve services. . 

With tire Big Bang tire City 
has removed its trade barriers 
to foe outside world. The 
results will not be dear for 
some time, but the response oi 
tire m^or financial groupings 
of theworid in coming to the 
City in a big way gives cause 
for optimism. 

In other areas, Britain 
would hope to gain from the 
worldwide liberalization of 
services. Within Europe; there 
are moves to ease exchange 
controls to allow freer move- 
ment of capital and the 
Britain's insurance industry 
can expect to gain substan- 
tially from tire opening up of 
Germany’s insurance market 

The Chancellor of the Ex- 
chequer, Nigel Lawson, har 
said that the opening up of the 
European market will offer 
major opportunities for Brit- 
ain's financial sector. 

“The City already has un- 
paralleled expertise in finan- 
cial services," he said earlier: 
this mouth. “And greater 
liberalization of Europe's cap- 
ital markets will open up more 
efoors for it to sell that 
expertise abroad.” 

David Smith 



rsi- # 

- 


pulli 


t 


earnings are chequer, Nigd Lawson, has* r , • 1- * 

foeexchange said that the opening op of tbe Thn 'iff 

formanceof European market will offer I Si v * * ^ ^ 


Economics Correspondent 


•»# : • ... ■■ 


Expertise in 
the Avoidance of Risk... 



raanciui l\ 

for F \po 



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forwards with optional exit 

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For farther details of the TOX* service, 
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INTERNATIONAL TRADE/3 


Better service 
is top priority 


, • - t- 

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'ft'. 


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Payment in kind: A taste of the wine that made up die order for John Walker, Jeremy Wheeler and Alick Macaskil] of MF 
laaaistirlal; right* a Rolls-Royce engine that can lie paid for in dailais or, sometimes* 


ofl 


Pulling the cork in the barter game 


E mployees of a com- 
pany which recently 
sold £1 million 
worth of eatth-nov- 
ing equipment to Tu- 
nisia frill be . celebrating 
Christmas with a bottle of 


be described as “cheeky” or 
even “a little impertinent”. 

. They work for MF Ind- 
ustrial, the British sabsidiary 
of a Canadian company with 
offices in Manchester, Cov- 
entry and London. 

The wine arrived as part of 
one of the more mmsaal barter 
trade dads in which some 
companies have to become 
involved to keep up export 
sales in the world’s poorer 
coantries. 

MF Industrial was forced 


into a baiter arrangement to 
win the order for 60 earth- 
moving machines, agreeing to 
take 6,000 tonnes offertilizer. 
At the last murate, it was 
found that the fertilizer was 
worth 120,000 less than the 
agreed value of the contract. 

Companies in the barter 
trade bnsinessdo not normally 
mind having to take fertilizer 
in exchange for their products^ 
It is an internationally-traded 
commodity and, therefore, is 
easily disposed of thnmgh the 
barter trade departments 
which all major hanfa have 
based in the Qty. 

But hi this case the Tu- 
nisians did not have enough 
fertilizer to meet the shortfall 
Their annsnal suggestion was 
that the 12,000 bottles of 


rather potent red plonk they 
had on the dockside in Tmiisia 
would be worth tiie difference 
— at £1.75p a bottle the sums 
added np. 

Back in Britain the com- 
pany did not really want toget 
involved. After aO* it didn’t 
have a drinks licence and in 
the wine bars of London, 
Coventry or Manchester the 
castomersanuTt exactly fight- 
ing to catch the waiter’s eye for 
a bottle of Tunisian nouveau. 

The company got round the 
problem by selling the wine to 
its employees. Its export sales 
director, Jeremy Wheeler, 
while admffring tfa>f the com- 
pany is not normally in favour 
of barter trade, said: “It is a 
way of creating a demand for 
onr products and is satisfac- 


tory when there is no other 
way of doing that” 

Bnt there are many com- 
panies which embrace barter 
trading with much more enthu- 
siasm. Many have found it the 
only real way id breaking Into 
markets in the Eastern bloc or 


Creating demand 
for products 


Africa, where hard cmreacy Is 
now almost impossible to 
obtain. 

At most Opec meetings in 
Geneva or Vienna there is at 
least one trader who is there to 
make sore that the capital 
goods needed by some of the 
member countries are avail- 


able in exchange for oil, or that 
the 03 can be traded on to the 
spot market at a satisfactory 
price. 

There is more than one 
Arab with a Burberry look- 
alike trench coat in Ms ward- 
robe which was actually made 
in Poland and paid for in oiL 

Most barter trade deals are, 
of coarse, much more sophis- 
ticated. Rolls-Royce produc- 
tion lines at Derby will remain 
busy because the Boring 747s 
ordered by Saudi Arabia, 
specifically with British en- 
wiB be paid for in 


British Aerospace won its 
biggest order because it was 
prepared to take payment from 
Saadi in o3 rather riian cash. 
The aircraft makers have long 


realized that to do business in 
certain areas they have to 
barter and companies such as 
Boeing and British Aerospace 
have their own barter trade 
experts. 

They find a way of placing 
the goods they have acquired 
in a market which is eager to 
pay the best price and com- 
pensate the original manufac- 
turer of the goods involved. 

Thus, Brazilian leather 
shoes have been used to pay 
for I talian pasta, which In torn 
has been used to pay for Soviet 
oil, which in turn has been 
used to pay for medical sup- 
plies for western African coun- 
tries, which have paid in 
phosphates. 

David Young 


Priorities are changing at the 
Export Credits Guarantee 
Department, the Government 
office which provides insur- 
ance to cover British exporters 
against non-payment by 
buyers. 

The emphasis now, says 
Jack Gill, its chief executive, is 
to speed up the provision of 
services and to greatly im- 
prove the efficiency of routine 
business. 

During the past year, 
againsx a backdrop of a vol- 
atile oil price and mounting 
Third World debt problems, 
the ECGD has tried to attract 
a higher proportion of lower 
risk business while sharpening 
its marketing and customer 
service. 

Founded in 1919, it is the 
world's oldest official export 
credit insurer and provides 
cover for 23 per cent of non- 
oil exports from Britain. It 
also is administrator of the 
subsidized interest rate export 
finance which cost the Gov- 
ernment £401 million last 
year. 

In theory, over a number of 
years, the ECGD is supposed 
to break even on its insurance 
business. But last year, al- 
though there was an improve- 
ment in the underlying trading 
account for the insurance 
operations, the department 
paid out £697.5 million in 
claims, compared with pre- 
mium income of £175.5 
million. 

Once again the shortfall had 
to be met by borrowing from 
the Exchequer, bringing 
ECGD’s loans from the 
Consolidated Fund to £75<L2 
million. 

Poland, Nigeria and Brazil 
have been the main drains on 
resources. 

However, a harder-nosed 


approach to risk evaluation 
and higher premiums for the 
most uncertain business mean 
Mr Gill is confident that 
liabilities incurred since 1983 
should, on present trends, pay 
their way. 

Most important for cus- 
tomers, is the ECGD’s new 
commitment to service. 

Companies should already 
be benefiting from the recent 
computerization of details of 
claims which has created an 
extensive database of previous 
defaults and payouts. 

With the improved claims 
database, it should prove 
more efficient to automati- 
cally accept the buyer unless a 
computer search reveals some 
past problem. Whereas less 
than 20 per cent of applica- 
tions used to be dealt with 
within 24 hours, ECGD is now 
aiming to deal with nearly half 
within that time. 

A close watch will be kept 
on the new regime, which 
started just three weeks ago, 
and it may be extended to 
other countries. 

A number of other services 
are also being reviewed. On 
the export finance side of the 
business, the guarantee of 
short-term export credit given 
by banks to exporters is being 
phased out and is now only 
available for credits of more 
than two years. The OECD 
consensus rates stipulate what 
the minimum interests rates 
can be for subsidized export 
finance and then the ECGD 
guarantees the loan. 

This year greater effort win 
be put into recovering more of 
the money paid out in claims. 
Last year, recoveries fell from 
£327 million to £173 mOiion 
and more resources are to be 
put into improving this figure. 

Teresa Poole 


The right advice on export 


Membership of a trade associ- 
ation, business organization 
or professional institute can 
pay dividends for anyone 
contemplating exporting for 
the first time. 

Although the British Over- 
seas Trade Board will help 
with researching the market in 
broad terms, tire best source of 
detailed practical guidance 
will come from a company in 
a similar product area which is 


already trading in theprospec- 
of< 


live countiyof export. 

Participation in trade mis- 
sions organized by tire big 
chambers of commerce is an 
excellent way of making con- 
tact with airlines, banks and 
other services. 

The London Chamber of 


Commerce, for instance, sent 
18 trade missions io-2r coun- 
tries last year. In addition, of 
tire 54,000 inquiries it re- 
ceived 24.000 were for busi- 
ness contacts and trade, 
opportunities, followed by 
nearly 6,000 about UK and 
overseas government regula- 
tions; 5,000 were about trade 
and business names and'1,500 
were requests for statistics. 

Birmingham, which with 
4,500 member companies is 
thesecond. largest chamber, 
organized 14 trade missions 
and helped, with the same 
number pf joint-venture 
projects and overseas ex- 
hibitions last year. 

Among the facilities offered 
by the Confederation of Brit- 


ish Industry to exporters are 
six “talking point” leaflets on 
the right environment for 
growth; government support 
for exporting companies; ed- 
ucation and training; market 
research and planning; in- 
novation and the mechanics 
of exporting. 

The Institute of Marketing 
is also a useful source of 
advice about exporting. Dur- 
ing the past 12 months it has 
been running a series of nine 
marketing seminars in con- 
junction with the BOTB, 
which began in conjunction 
with Export *85 last Novem- 
ber and will culminate with 


Financial Impulse 


The credit services of the Unicoi Group cover 
the world and are constantly being 
augmented. 

Now, for instance, negotiations completed 
with a major bank make FINANCE available 
at keen export financing rates as part of the 
UNEXIS sdieme. 


It was Unicoi's achievement in CREDIT 
COLLECTION and CREDIT REPORTING 
throughout the world that led to the 
introduction of UNEXIS, the favourable 
EXPORT CREDIT INSURANCE scheme. 
Demand is such that, after just over a year, it 
has already exceeded £90m turnover. 

For a practical appreciation of our unrivalled - 
professional reputation, ask how we can 
solve specific export problems for your 
company. 

•••'■ 

Z7a DO. 


Unicoi Limited - 
Unicoi House, 

54-56 High Street, 
Harrow-on-the-Hill, 
Middlesex HA1 3LL. 


Tel: 01-423 3355 
Telex: 893728 







this year’s exhibition. 

Ian Griffith, the institute's 
director of marketing; has 
been telling these meetings: 
“It- is essential to define your 
export objectives clearly and 
make sure they are consistent 
with overall strategic objec- 
tives; use market research; 
visit markets personally; and, 
in the beginning, concentrate 
your efforts on one or two 
markets.” 

' In addition to an adviser 
who deals specifically with 
questions about export, the 
Institute of Directors now has 
a new “on-line” information 
service. At a cost of between 
£20 and £40 this will, for 
instance, provide brief details 


°J\ 


of individual European com- 
panies and lists of companies 
whose activities meet specific 
criteria. ■ 

With so much advice avail- 
able, the first-time exporter 
does not have to “go it alone”. 
But “the company must, be 
committed to an export strat- 
egy at boardroom level”, ad- 
vises John Wilson, director- 
general of the Institute oil 
Export. 

• Contacts: Association 
British Chambers of Com- 
merce. Sovereign Home. 2J2A 
Shaftesbury Avenue, London 
WC2H SEW. (01-240 5831). 
Confederation of British In- 
dustry, Centre Point. 103 New 
Oxford Street. London WC1A 
1DV, (01-379 7400). The In- 
stitute of Export. 64 Clifton 
Street. London EC2A 4HB. 
(01-247 9812). Institute i 
Directors, 116 PaU Ma ... 
London SW1Y 5ED, (01-839 
1233). Institute of Marketing, 
Moor Hall, Cookham , 
Maidenhead. Berkshire SL6 
9QH : (Bourne End 24922). 

Patricia Tisdall 


IF YOU ONLY SPEAK ENGLISH. 



The ability to communicate in 
the language of foreign clients 
can and does give a competitive 
edge. So. if you’re serious about 
overseas trade, don't take 
chances, use foe services of a 


professional business language 
training organisation like 
Ling uarama. 

Linguaxama has schools 
throughout the wodd and 
provides courses and services 
as wide ranging as the needs of 

the international business . 
community. Our UK schools are 
in London, Brcmingham, 
•Manchester; Suutfoid-upon- 
-Auon; Winchester & Portsmouth, 


...EXPORTS BECOMES AN 
EVEN BIGGER GAMBLE 


Linguarama 


Langnag&trainingfor 

SKBMbU LontoiS'mMJH. 


01-950 76^? 



HELP FOR 


EXPORTERS 



The British Overseas Trade Board provides advice, information and financial 
assistance to existing and potential British exporters.Our services are available 
to large and small companies in the capital and consumer goods industries and 
to firms in the service sector. 


Market advice 

• Free market information and advice 

• Statistics and Market Intelligence Library 

• Product Data Store 

• Export Marketing Research Scheme 

• World Aid Section 


Specialist advice and help 


Getting into the market 


Tariffs and regulations 
Technical requirements 
(Technical Help to Exporters) 

Export paperwork (SITPRO — Simplification 
of International Trade Procedures Board) 
Help with major project business 


Export Representative Service 
Overseas Status Report Service 
Export Intelligence Service 
Trade Fairs Overseas 
Overseas Seminars 
Store Promotions 
Inward Missions 
Outward Missions 


Further information and advice on any of these 
facilities is available from your BOTB Regional 
Office - or visit us on Stand 126/127 at 
EXPORT ’86, The Barbican. 


BOTB Regional Offices 


South East 

Ebury Bridge House 
Ebury Bridge Road 
London SW1W8QD 
Telephone 01-730 9678 
telex 297124 

Southwest 

ThePithay 
Bristol BS12PB 
Telephone Bristol 
(0272)272666 
Telex 44214 


West Midlands 

Ladywood House 
Stephenson Street 
Birmingham B2 4DT 
"telephone 021-632 4111 
"telex 337919 


North East 

Stanegate House 
2 Groat Market 
Newcastle upon Tyne 
NE11YN 
Telephone 
091-232 4722 
telex 53178 


Northwest 

Sunley fewer 
Piccadilly Plaza 
Manchester Ml 4BA 
Telephone 061-236 2171 
telex 667104 



Yorkshire and 
Humberside 

Priestley House 
Park Row 
Leeds LSI 5LF 
Telephone Leeds 
(0532) 443171 
Telex 557925 


East Midlands 

Sevems House 
20 Middle Pavement 
Nottingham NG1 7DW 
Telephone Nottingham 
(0602) 506181 
Telex 37143 


British Overseas Trade Board 


The following also act as 
BOTB Regional Offices 

Welsh Office 

Industry Department 
New Crown Building 
Cathays Park 
Cardiff CF13NQ 
Telephone Cardiff 
(0222) 825097 
"telex 498228 

Scottish Export Office 

industry Department 
for Scotland 
Alhambra House 
45 Waterloo Street 
Glasgow G2 6AT 

Telephone 041-248 2855 
Telex 777883 

Industrial Development 
Board for Northern Ireland 

IDB House 
64 Chichester Street 
Belfast BT1 4JX 
Telephone Belfast 
(0232) 233233 "feiex 747025 




t 


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neer’s 

astic’ 


on 


I wwhawf r ^ l pi. 

at the £8,000 he 
le Portfolio Gold 
resterday to good 


late my gramo- 
tse my donation 
hall appeal and 
* next year,” Mr 
id, of AUestree, 


Jged 51, who has 
lio Gold since it 
■Times, said that 
lelieve his lock. 

: is fantastic. It Is 
fence.” 

old cards can be 
s pading a stam- 
d envelope to: 
old. 



1 Wood 


*er of 
tives 


>eer 


in Young 


sed in brewing 
drinkers and, in 
even kill them, 
for Real Ale 
Jay. 

the cam p ai g n’s 
hat's Brewing , 
5 rotz, a former 
wd Beer Guide,. 
pie who have: 
tber breathing 
.us disorders, 
vbo are allergic 
Is. can suffer ill - 
nicing beers in. 
ss have been 
oduce a foamy 
farity. or *o 
ife — 

2d Stated the - 
lore than 40. 
f heart attacks 
wers used co- 
in beer to 
minghead. 


ouple 

peal 


srman couple 
rs last July for 
eelring reduo- 
liences. 

Lord Lane, 
ice, will pre- 
•licatioas by 
onja Schulze, 
for leave to 
he sentences 
Justice Mi- 
the Central 





or storage 
■abty shows 
■ace Heater 


mean or 
grans. 


3Vfe* high 
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32 


THE 



TIMES 


GENERAL APPOINTMENTS 


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b . 


W hen Ncfl Ann- 
strong landed 
on die moon 17 
years ago, there 
were no digital 
watches, no 
home-video cassette recorders and 
no pocket calculators. Neither 
were there any microprocessors, 
nor virtually any of today's 
applications of laser technology, 
fibre optics and biotechnology. 
Such is the revolution we are 
living through. . 

Since 1969 a generation has 
been born and now populates our 
schools. To arm this microchip 
generation we have put 100,000 
microcomputers into the schools 
and spent £23 million on develop- 
ing 2,000 software teaching 
programmes. 

To tackle the shortage of com- 
puter scientists and electronic 
engineers we created an extra 
5,000 places on higher education 
courses over the three years up to 
last year. Another 5,000 mU be 
added by the end of the decade. 

But change extends far beyond 
the use of IT and the confines of 
the traditional education system. 
There are other hew technologies, 
such as biotechnology, and new 
materials, processes, regulations 
and standards and new working 
methods. 

No part of the labour market 


into which our graduates and 
school-leavers enter can be im- 
mune if it wants to survive. It is as 
true for agriculture as it is for 
engineering. It applies to the shop- 
floor and to the boardroom. 

And the pace of change is fester. 
It took a century for the advances 
of the first industrial revolution to 
spread around, the globe. It now 
takes a decade at most. It means 
continuing education and training 
is now a Toot of working life. Our 
industrial competitors realize it 
and so must we. 

Our colleges, polytechnics and 
universities are now rising to this 
Through new adult 
training initiatives they are help- 
ing employees to keep their skills 
sharp and to boost the efficiency 
and effectiveness of the firms they 
work for. What we are talking 
about is PICKUP — training for 
profit 

PICKUP stands for pro- 
fessional, industrial and commer- 
cial updating. It is our programme 
to help colleges, polytechnics and 
universities increase and improve 
training and updating for working 
adults. After four years it is 
showing solid achievement in the 
amount of adult training provided 
for employers. 

Growth nationally is now about 
1 1 per cent Where colleges, 
polytechnics and universities have 
made a major commitment to 


T ast year, 38 of Britain’s polytechnics 
and major colleges made £10 million 
through the PICKUP adult training 


scheme. Here Kenneth Baker advises 


go-head companies who are seeking 


long-term profits: ‘PICKUP or pack-up’ 


PICKUP, average annual growth 
is 40 per cent 

Thirty eight of our polytechnics 
and major colleges are turning 
over more than £100,000 a year 
from PICKUP training. The five 
leaders have turnovers m excess of 
£500,000 a year and at least one 
will leap foe £1 million mark this 
year. Together, the 38 made more 
than £io million and taught 
neatly 3 million student hours last 
year. 

We are not subsidizing training, 
we are investing a change. 
PICKUP does not pay for 
“courses”, it works as a catalyst, 
identifying key areas where action 
is needed and is likely to pay off in 
terms of increased performance. 

This includes the development 
of new teaching methods and 
materials in areas such as robotics 
and mid-career updating for en- 


gineers. Sixty p rojects have been 
set up so for. 

It means helping groups of 
colleges to woik together i n a tea m 
approach to training, to provide 
easier access for firms, better 
marketing and a wider range of 
training. There are now 20 of these 
PICKUP consortia. 

We have paid for the appoint- 
ment of development officers — in 
the regions, in most of our 
universities and, soon, in virtually 
all our education authorities.. 
These PICKUP missionaries have 
brought some remarkable conver- 
sions. One London college last 
year increased its PICKUP hours 
from 3,000 to 14,000. 

'A major staff development pro- 
gramme has been fawned to 
keep college teachers up to date ini 
their subjects and in the skills they 
now need to bring learning to 



working adults. Courses cover 
marketing dolls and priority areas 
such as advanced fte mrig g 
technology, new materials science 
and oomputer-aided design. 

PICKUP has also helped col- 
leges in market research and in 
developing lasting Hnlq ? with 
firms. . More than 350 local 
collaborative projects now in- 
volve 2^00 firms and 300 col- 
leges, polytechnics and 
universities — about half the 
nation's total 

The rewards can be great. A 
college in Humberside earned 
£100,000 in one year through 
training for die offshore ind u st r y 
thanks to such a project 


The programme is also helping 
employers directly. A com prehen - . 
sivc guide to sources of funding 
for adult teaming — Paying far 
Training - was published four-' 
months- ago. Aheady.it is in its 
second rep rin t and a second 
edition mil appear next spring. 

Another report — A Partnaship 
in Learning - was commissioned 
from the Institute of Personal 
Management It looks at 127 
college-company collaborations 
around the country and comes 19 
with the key issues tint lead to 
snccesrihl training partnerships. 

PICKUP has also produceda 
national directory of short courses 
and training opportunities. Avail- 
able on microfiche, floppy disk 
and Restd, it now contains 6*000 
entries. 

Employers bear the responsibil- 
ity for training their employees. 
The test is whether they win pay 
for it. Therefore, we expect col- 
leges and universities themselves 
to adopt a business-like approach. 
We are providing funds on this 
under st anding . " „• 

In putting further money into 
PICKUP I am asking colleges to 
do three things: 

Prodsoe strategic plans. 

Set targets against which perfor- 
mance canbe monitored. 

Plough back the surpluses earned 


NOVEMBER 27 1986 


from successful training isjto far- 
ther developments. 

We are now i 
dire ction — but not 
On current national treads we 
would produc e only a threefold 
increase in PlCKUP by fee mid- 
1990s.. My target is more am- 
bitious. I want to see a fivefold 
increase in the nextfive years -by 
1992.. Y ‘ 

To this end, spending cm 
PICKUP next year win double 
from this yeart £6 million to 
£i22&m3&o&. In partiqtiai; tins 
will indude funding aimed at the 
higher education . colleges and 
polytechnics on‘ foe one Bond, and 
at foe universities 00 the other. 

. .Britain’s t raining record' must 
improve. At stake are better living 
standards and an improved qual- 
ity of life. That jl the mwmagt for 
individuals. Far firms, innovation 
and training are now directly 

finked to cwnpetitiveness ~ and 

ragefor feEmfc^rcKUP^ 

pack-up” 1 


Trafeteg 

2.1s 


• For w wtf. Mmnflm 
PICKUP, coated: Adult 
Promotions Unit; Boom 

Department of Education 

Science, Efizabeth House, York 
Road, London SEX 7PH (01-934 
0859/9886). 

Kenneth Baker is Secretary of 
State far ' Education and Science 


Appointments Phone: 01-481 4481 


Appointments Phone: 01-481 4481 



LONDON 
TAX FREE 
SHOPPING 

is expanding further and seeks experienced 

SALES EXECUTTVE(S) 

To sell an important new financial/ 
administrative system for making VAT 
refunds to overseas shoppers. Proven relevant 
experience of telephone and personal selling 
to senior people in the UK retail trade is 
essential, as is a high level of self-motivation 
and the ability to organise yourself and your 
work. There is a definite possibility of 
promotion to SALES MANAGER for the 
right candidate. Salary, commission and 
benefits are negotiable. 

Call Alison Mitchell now on (01) - 839 4556. 


VAT CONSULTANTS 


London Attractive remuneration package 

Ernst &. Whinney is one of the most rapidly expanding accounting firms 
with a highly developed sense for the market opportunity. We are currently 
seeking high calibre individuals to deal with the exceptional new demands 
arising in VAX related work. 

Our clients range from blue-chip multi-nationals to local businesses; their 
needs cover the entire VAT spectrum. The consultants must possess extensive 
practical knowledge of the VAT provisions in order to provide the service required. 

Together with the necessary technical ability applicants must possess first 
class inter-personal skills and a practical approach to problem solving. Prefer- 
ence will be given to applicants presently specialising in VAT matters. Rewards 
for success are high — an attractive remuneration package including a car for 
senior appointments, together with excellent career prospects. 

Please send a brief curriculum viiae to Barry Compton, Ernst & Whinney, 
Becket House, l Lambeth Palace Road, London SEl 7EU. 


gill Ernst & Whinney 

Accountants, Advisors. Consultants. 


Bright career moves & 


Whether you ate seeking another job at considering a new 
career, we can prorate JOT with e&Siue and professoral help: 

Our service is taior-tiade to yow needs and drcunsiaace&. 
With coverage of both advertised and onadvertised vacancies, 
we aim for more success - in less time ail at less cost. 

For a finee. anfidenbaf dsmssioa, Senior Executives terse 
or ahraed are nwked to contact their local flffice. 


Mainland Executive Services 

Huiggenn Support NoCvhmIc 

Lootoa QM53 imsali 
Manchester MI-834 £825 J 


ijjun e m S u ppo rt M etwui * wj. 

QI45310M Salisbury Sq. Ho,, EC4 
erM 1-834 £82S IS LiojaSt M2 SWA 
i32~WM2A 2 Oxford Row, LSl3BE „ 


031-226 2X3079 Manor Place. EH3 7DX 
0272-277641 9 Small Street, BSt 1DB 


ABBESS 

w ah to ap point a Sain Executive with Office Furniture 
expeneooe, preferably in mamifrquring: some p wmiu 
experience an advantage. 

The successful candidate wifl be 25-45 yean. Please apply, 
cadosm* CV u* 

Perso nn el Officer 
Abbot Bros (Soctfcafl) Ltd 
_ High Street, Southall, Middlesex 
Or Ring 03 574 6963 Weekdays mornings. 



f SALES ENGINEER ^ 

# YUGOSLAVIA & COMECON 1 
c.£1 4.000 p.a. + profit sharing & car 

Pyrotek is a rapidly expanding international company, 
specialising in the supply of high tempeature materials 
to the aluminium casting and smelter industry. 

To supportourconrmuedgrowtfiwB wish to appoint an 
Export Sales Engineer to ba responsible for die sties of 
the Company's products in Yugoslavia and the 
Comecon countries. 

The post requires someone with an enthusiastic 
approach to international sales and would suit a 
Yugoslav National and/or someone with an excellent 
command of German. A degree in Metallurgy {or allied 
subject) together with practical experience within the 
aluminium production industry would be 
advantageous, but not essential. 

The successful applicant will report to the Sates 
Director and operate from our office tn Milton Keynes. 

If you have the relevant qualifications and experience 
please submit your tv. to: 

Mr E. P. Keohane— Sates Director 

Pyrotek 


ggggMjlHjWSjgnD 

. GARAMONDE DRIVE WYMBUSH. MILTON 
\ KEYNES. MK8BLN. 

^TELEPHONE (0908) 56 1 155: TELEX: 825386 PTK 




ECONOMIC 

ASSISTANT 


£ 10,850 - £ 12,485 

British fea is looking for an entt wstic you ng ec onom is t to 
London, wortdng on a wide range c# economic a nd toe casttng pmMerna. 

Pokey Uni supports and advises Rad a five cSstind buainesa sectors - WerOty. Network 

SotfhEast. Provincial Freight and Parcels - as wefl as ttw Board itsdf. 

As » economist you would be a member of a srcal 

very tighl deadbnes. 

You should iderty have a good Masters degree In Economics and hav e Sony e xpenence 
wmtaigasfln econorat m business or government, although we also consider applicants 
with less expenence tar an alternative Tnunee post. 


expenence 

Commenang sab 
and expenence plus 


re* he within the range 



j to £11,625 dependent on quattcaiions 
to £9.102 tar the Trainee Post There is e 

• ‘ —tbs. be 

Career 


Fa hsthg i ntema t i on. please cmtact Veronica Christie on 01-2B2 3232 extension 77a6(01- 
928 5J51 extension 40114 after 8 Dec e mber Appfcatons induing a hi Cuncuium Vitae ■ 
shoiid reach us by December 19th and *twkJ be sent to: 

Director. 

Policy Ur*. 

Bn tun Baiways Board, 

P.O. Bax 100, 

London NW1 ZDZ.' 

Bdttsh fla t wa y s Is an eqeal op portun i ty employer 




BBN Communtaattans UK IM. is a sufesiftay cf B8N Commurications • 

Corporation (a United Sfa tobae ed corporation), a vorld leeder ta to 

c^mut^^^^nettvortca. Wo how^M^pasifion avataWe for a 

Technical Support Engineer in to London area: 

TECHNICAL SUPPORT 
ENGINEER 

The primary responefoWy for Cite portion w* be ta provide postdates 
technical support tor our custamars. This focludBS, Put is not Hntod kc 
1) problem taotation, dfagnosls, and resolution; 2f problem tracking: $ 
gysteros i nteg rati on ; n et work o p eratkwreauppert 5) Interfering ajte 
US. offices when appropriate. Itau short hnreanundeckancIngarUNIX, 
X25 protocols, IBM and awnctaonous protocols. Ybu shnAI also hut 
system a nd technical problem aolvinfl SMBs snd an undeBtodlngot net- 
Horten and padosawtatod concepts. The preferred cendktato vdl hue 
a ttchnfctl degree or to eqUtaaient plus 36 yean ot rotated experience. 
BBH Communfcadons Corporation oftataan amBent beneHta pro- 

London SWIX 7LY.UK. 


BBN ComfflimicatHins UK Ud. 

A SubtkBmy of BBN Communtc^ons Corporation 



IS GOOD JOBS 

IN EXCITING COMPANY. 
IN MARKETING. 

FOR SIX MONTHS 
(or forever) 

WITH FULL TRAINING. 

We (250 of us) are young, 
energetic, attractive and hard 
working. 

You should be young (18-28), 
energetic, attractive and hard 
working. 

Please call on 01-328 9732 


Programmes Recruitment Consultancy 


j EDACOMD4TA SYSTEMS") 


SALES/MARKETING 
DEVELOPMENT MANAGER ; 
- POINT OF SALE SYSTEMS 

Wears the U. K- rfistributoreand software devdopere of tbe nfcxapraaanr based 
Edaan Pent of Sale Tentwals, which lave made an enonnousinipactintexetailSBng 
8tatknuaa1cet-parUculMfy in the area of decmxBcfmds transfer and m a n a gem ent 
xtibraiatron co fluii i nw a t iO fL . 

It is now our aim to take the Erfacom prod uct Into <HfaerU.K. retai l s ec to rs, and we 


m a rta-ftn g and s rfes strategy and kfemify me system application re qug c mQgs fonbe 
axCvidi Bfiii aifcetsectots- 


, , or Closely related f 

Systems a^ficabon rede. 

Thgtoasemorappotonent withm our company and tbe pack a ge fb t the s iirr e gsM 
c anriktee wodd indude progre ss ive partiegation leading toarfireeUHsbip. 


★Salary negotiable *B.TJJP.A- *( . 

★Company Car ★Fringe Benefits. Individual PensiDo ! 


V! 


Beni 


Applic nttons i tn d C.V. to Marketing Director, Edacom DaiaSystenn, 
ltfield Place, Stans ted Monntfitdiet, Essex CM248HL 



InterMatrix Group 

Investment Analysis/Research 
with a Difference 

You have corporate strategy/business development 
experience, international (esp. European) exposure, 
s kil l s in company/investment analysis, ability to 
manage and motivate multi-disciplinary and 
multinational teams. 

We offer a unique opportunity in a «TnqlJ international 
consultancy to build and exploit a state of tbe art 
research service for institutional and corporate clients. 

Earnings will depend on results— functions of ambition 
and hard work. 

Please write with full CV to: 

Richard van den Bergh 
InterMatrix Limited 
4 Cromwell Place, London SW7 2JJ 


News Scotland limited 

printing News International tides at its new plant 
in Kirming Park, Glasgow, is looking for an 
energetic, experienced, 

ASSISTANT PRODUCTION 
MANAGER 

to join an enthusiastic team using new technology 
in a constraint-free working environment. 

Rewards for the right person are considerable. 

Write to: ; 

Managing Director, / 
News Scotland Ltd, 

124 Portman Street, ~ 
Glasgow, G4l 1EJ. • ■ • ► ' . ■ ± ■: 


LANGUAGE STUDIES LTD 
£10K + 

An opportunity has arisen within this succesful West End 
Language School for a talented Graduate to join our 
Administrative Team, taking responsibility for our Foreign 
Language Department.The job will include Marketing, 
Administrative and Personnel Duties. languages. Teaching and 
Office experience are useful and the ability to deal with people of 
all levels essential. 

Applications in writing with CV to: Elizabeth Finney, language 
Studies LTD, 10/12 James Street, London WIM 5 HN 


OFFICE EQUIPMENT 
SALESMEN 

Would you Tike to service over 1,000 eristing^ey accounts? 

Does earnings potential of £35K per annum sound attractive 
to you? ' 

Are you interested in working for one of the most innovative 
and forward thinking office equipment companies, based in 
brand new offices in WI? - f 

Zoo Systems Ltd are currently looking for> ' ^ 

CURRENT ACCOUNTS SALESMEN 
NEW BUSINESS SALESMEN ' 

TELE - CANVASSERS 

If you have the drive and enthusiasm to match ours 
please contact 

MARK GODDARD or DAVID MOORE on 
01 631 4112 







m 


A 


s* 


m 





>'-s. 

yft-- : 



- 1* 













^ y - ■ _?■.. .>a»; ^u . 


THE T1MHSTHURSD A Y NOVEMBER 27 1986 


GENERAL APPOINTMENTS 


: ’ >i3 HRv 


':•••*$ 

, 1 -. r fc " 

.. .“ I 

-i- <},. 

•MV 1 . 

'*•: A 5 ^ 
.. ; ' Sa* ; 

- v. * ft 

>M .l«. 

• V;' 


i. .... y*. 

’•■ ■-HafcA 


Develop your 
RF/MICROWAVE 
desian skills 


with a 

market leader 

Marconi lutaonieaxts is a recognised leader in international 
m a rtini for ita range erf electronic, fast and maagniement 

- ffigJiq naBty at andatdg. t fichiitca linnoyatkmandaflowofnew 
pnyfn c tw rostafa fl»e Co m pa ny' s growth and maaa a ttmHi mW^ n 
pound dengn centre, recently opened. ondeifines Mazcanl 
l as t nu ne tMa 1 fxinfirten oe in its fatme. 

The Company seeks additional engineer* withHP/Wcrawave 
cfacmt design experience to contribute to fins growth. Erase jobs 
am located at St Albans and Stevenage. 


Principal Engineers/Project Leaders 
up to £19,000 

. Ai least five years of relevant exper ie nce is necessary. Ax well as 
leading and coctrlbtiting expertise to their teams, successful 
ca ndidat es will haise with an Ievala of ma nagement 

Senior Design Engineers 
np to £16,000 

A nrinnmnn oi three years RF or nd crowa ve design exp er ience is 
required. 

Design Engineers 
np to £14,000 

With at least two years post grarfnata design ex p erienc e on 

roUnrant ei p ^i R rioaij n 

Opp a tnuill n fijt tfff B iujhwy f w j fft r B g i ta l, iui l> »y » rjf 

test engineering experience and sales or sapport atafl- 

Please telephone Ian Thompson on Stevenage 312311 or 
write to Us witt foil details of year eanar and 
qmliflci MaM, Meccpni iMtnunm h Ltd, Six Hals Way, 
Stevenage, Berts SCI ZAH. ■ 




^^irPlus 

Contractor Services 




New 

Business 

Charge 

Card 

Company 


Marconi 

Instruments 

A G£C Company 



The AirPlus Company Limited is anew 
company with a new product, the AjrPtus 
charge card lor business travel tore. After an 
intensive rune month study. 13 major 
European airlines have farmed the company 
to launch the AirPlus cans. which wnM provide 
corporate business expense services 
relating to air travel, car hire, hotel and 
restaurant charges. 

The Company wifl appoint four 
Contractor Services staH to co-ordinate all 
the operational requirements of the AirPlus 
Charge Card Programme wdh the 
participating airlines. The appointees' first 
priority wii! be to assist in selling up the card 
operations, interlacing with each aufine's 
operating staH to solve problems, provide 
advice, and give support To do this they wtt 
be liaising constantly with the aMines 1 
commercial and OP departments. 

Th e jobs require candidates with wefi 




opcjcuray san 10 save prooiems. proviae 
A advice, and give support. To do this they will MteheHneWStda, 

be liaising constantly with the airlines’ Arthur fating Cog 

commercial and DP departments. Citadel House, 5-1 

■ II \ The jobs require candidates with wefl London EC4A1DH. 

Arthur Ybung Corporate Hoaourclng 

A MEMBER OF ARTHUR YOUNG INTERNATIONAL 


developed interpersonal and organisational 
skills, and with previous experience of 
dealing with comiactois m a card business. 
Successful applicants are therefore likely to 
have a good educational background, be in 
then mid to (ate 20s. with the deswe to travd 
in Europe and some knowledge ol orher 
European languages. 

The new company is likely to be located 
west of London, and s offering extremely 
competitive remuneration packages to 
suitably quakfied candidates. 

if you are interested please reply 
immedaiely in confidence giving conose 
career personal and salary details and 
quoting Ret. 903 to: 

MchoHneWBtdn, 

Arthur Vtoung Corporate Resourcing, 
Citadel House, 5-11 Fetter Lane, 

London EC4A1DH. 


As 


‘ ;i UHl 




.• ■ ».i: 

• -ur» 


csrsss 


A GRADUATE FUTURE 
IN INFORMATION 
TECHNOLOGY 

Start ty training in New "fork aind finish 
with a top IT career in London 

Moagan Stanley IrttmiatioTial rank as one of the roost 
powerful forces in. the world of investment and securities. 

A world lhat idles on the most advanced data processings 
database, madeet quote, voice and communication systems 
yet developed. 

- Ours is anarena in which only the most agile 
intellects can hope to perform. Graduates with the discipline, 
initiative, skill, eneigyand sheer determination to pursue a 
unique career in information technology . . . 

Firstly you will spend 6-18 months chi a training 
programme in our New Yoric offices prior to taking up a 
position in the City of London. Here, you will work with some 
• exceptionally talented professionals in die Securities and IT 
indukries. That is why we wfll look fOT some equally 
exceptional qualities inyotL . 

For a start, you must possess a very good degree and 
have performed with distinction, throughout your academic 
careen Youmust also have proven analytical skffls and, 
ideally, we wuukl Kke to see some evidence of a commercial 
track record:. . * - p‘ 

If you thinkyou qualify, we’d Eke to hear fromyou. 
Hease write to: Lynn Hopping, Morgan Stanley International, 

1 Uiuiershaf^Ldndan EC3P 3HB. 


MORGAN STANLEY INTERNATIONAL 1 


PERSONNEL 
MANAGERS 

NATIONAL OPERATIONS 
c £15,000 pa + Car 


Otis Elevator pic, which is a subsidiary of United 
Technologies Corporation, is the UR and world leader 
in the elevator business. 

Otis is recognised not only far its high quality 
products but equally for the service it provides to its 
customers through a UK national branch network. 

Employing over 3,000 people, the Company is highly 
decentralised with a strong gir yhanin on profit- 
centred management at Branch level. The success of 
the business is dependent upon the c ontinuing 
capability of its people, more particularly the 
Installation and Service Engineers. 

We are looking for two Personnel Managers with a 
well-developed business acumen to provide a 
pro-active service for the UK and the London based 
Head Office. The emphasis erf the job will be employee 
relations in a unionised environment, human 
resourcing, conmruni cations and the development of 
people. The successful candidates will be of graduate 
level, aged under 30 years and resuhs-orientated, 
with a record of personal driven achievement across 
all aspects of the personnel function. It is essential 
that considerable personal growth potential could be 
demonstrated. Career opportunities within Otis 
In t e rnat ional and UTG are CTceflent 

He positions are based in London but extensive' 
travel wffl be necessary. Relocation assistance will 
be offered if necessary. 

Please send fall C.V. to: 


Mi EMsr pk, 43/Sfl Ctaphw BnA Lasdoa SUB 


OTIS 


• « • * • • 



Analyst/Programmer I jg 


WORLD WUXFE FUND 


Greenfield opportunity 

London: up to £16,000 package 

Hay works with over 600 clients in the UK - and many times that 
number in 26 other countries. Our Organisation and Management 
Development Consultants help to identify and measure talent in client 
organisations and sharpen the capabilities of managers, professional 
and technical specialists in meeting organisational changes and finking 
these capabilities to corapany objeettves. 

' In order to keep abreast of developments in the field of training, 
evaluation and manpower planning, we have come to depend 
\ increasingly on computer expertise to help us to extend our product 
range. . 

Hie time is now ripe for os to be able to absorb a technical expert 
into our team. You will have an important role to play in the critical 
assessment of our present resources, making recommendations for 
new investment, and producing workable and imaginative 
programmes from new concepts. 

You should be technically competent in aS aspects of 
microcomputing, and be interested izr contributing to the ideas of an 
enthusiastic and dynamic team. There are positive prospects of career 
development in an area with potential for rapid growth. 

Please write with c.v. to: Colin Bexon, ref A. 15936. Hay 
Management Consultants, 52 Grosvenor Gardens. London, 
SW1W0AW. 


INSOLVENCY MANAGER ^ 

for 

Clark Whitehill & Co 

Chartered Accountants 

As the Insolvency Practice is newly created In 1986, the attraction of this appointment is the 
scope ft offers for making a real contribution to the development of services, including 
investigations, liquidations, receiverships and busmees sdwee. 

Foracapatte and experienced Insohrency specialist currently at manager level In a reoognwed 
Insolvency practice there is the opportunity of working closely with the Head- Of a insolvency to 
develop awtacts, pioneer the Wgh technical standards necessary and help build a spedafist team. 

As a national firm In the top twenty. Claric WWtahffl has a progressive outfook towards the 
importance of top quatty sendees embracing audit, tax. corporate finance, management 
consultancy. The environment is stimulating and offers first class ptoenfial where abffity is 
encouraged and rewarded. 

CarirfidatesJoreferabiy qualified, must possess the technical abStties necessary to faH31 this role. 

Based at the firm’s London office in hottxxn. 

Safety negotiable from gpjOOQ + car. 

a - please write inRiafiy with a GV to Laurence Baehr at 

Ctsric Wtfitahift ft Co 

. 25 New Street Square. London, EC4A 3LN. . 

01-353 1577 


PROJECTS EXECUTIVE 

GODALMING, SUBSET SALABY: cJE12K 

WWP - the leading Intercatkmal Conservation Organisation seeks an 
Executive within their Marketing Department to develop a programme of 
projects for funding. 

You shoul d be 25-3 5, have at least two years* working experience within, or 
exten si ve knowledge ot the UK conservation movement and possibfy an 
environmental sciences qualification. The poet calls for good communication 
and presentation slriUs together with the ability to express yourself 
artictdfltdy both verbally and in writing. 

A commercial sense ia required in order to appreciate the PR & Marketing 
o onaidBBationa offiindiaMng for conaervation through borinem sp on so r ship. 

The salary package includes 4 weeks’ paid holiday and a contributory 
pension srhrane 

If you are self motivated, well organised and respond well to pressure, please 
send your J&U c.v. tot* 

Mrs V.C. Burbridge Panda House 
Godahnmg Surrey GU7 lQU. 


CLOSING DATE FOR 
POLICE GRADUATE ENTRY SCHEME. 
JANUARY 16TH. 


Because of the complex problems of today's society the 
Police have an increasing need for highly qualified men and 
women. 

The ‘Graduate Entry Scheme’ is designed for people 
considered to have the potential for accelerated promotion to 
the rank of Inspector and beyond early in their career. 

You may apply if you are a graduate, or in the final year 
of any full-time degree course. You must normally be under 
30 years of age and meet the physical requirements. 

lb discover more about a Police career, and salary 
levels, contact your Careers Adviser or send in this coupon. 

- Bur don’t delay. Final closing date for applications is 
16th January 1987. 

ToSupi. Andre* Jonc* BSc., Room 553. Horar Office, Qnrm Anne's Gale. London SKWrtT. 
Please send me vour booklet on Careers Tor Graduates in the Police. 


► COMMERCIAL DIRECTOR 

J Rural East Midlands 

► c. £20,000 + quality car + substantia] package 

Our diem, a well established, profitable and privately owned 
nationwide express panel carrier, has embarked upon a major 
^ reorganisation and expansion, thus creating an exceptional 
career opportunity for an experienced distribution 
^ pr ofessi o n a l capable of joining a Board tevd management 

► tiqrni 

f* The successful applicant will be challenged to improve already 
good results through increased efficiency and productivity and 
a balanced traffic mix. 

His/ her experience should demonstrate effective man 
. management and the ability to enhance operational efficiency 
: in the parcel industry sector. Pr efe rred age range 30-40. Ret 

: 10841. 

I GENERAL MANAGER 

► Kent and London 

In excess of £20,000 + quality car 

► 

► Our chent, an associate of Australia's largest bus and coach 
^■1 company, has just acquired two established operations in 

South East England- A new fleet of luxury coaches is on order 
^ and plans are being laid for expansion into underdeveloped 

► markets. 

This new enterprise presents an exciting opportunity for a 
^ talented all rounder with a sound grounding in marketing, 

► financial planning and man management. 

^ The ability to design and successfully implement a profitable 
business development propamine capitalising on experience 
^ in travel or m another challenging environment should justify 
promotion to Chief Executive within two years. 

► The successful applicant will probably be aged between 35-40, 

► of graduate calibre and unafraid of the marketing challenges 
^ involved in building a new business aimed at a sophisticated 
S- international client base. Refi 11847. 

^ Please telephone nr write to Jornane Wfleman quoting 

► reference. 

* TPL Management Resourcing Ltd 
^ 64 North Street, Guildford, Surrey GUI 4AH 

l Tel: (M83 502525. 

TPL ►MANAGEMENT RESOURCING LIMITED 


Marine vacancies 
In the Middle East 

FW Management Operations Limited, a member of the Foster Wheeler 
Group of Companies, has the following vacancies for Marine Personnel to 
work at major oil terminals wtticti handle crude oil and pBtroleum products. 

Marine Managers 

Candidates should be qualified to degree level in marine or chemical 
engineering and be competent in planning, developing and applying 
effective management systems. 

At least twelve years’ experience In a marine supervisor or management 
pos&on is required, including seven years spent in an oil refinery marine 
terminal. Candidates should nave a working Knowledge of terminal 
operations, product transfer, metering documentation end computerised 
tearing systems. 

Marine Supervisors 

CancSdates should be quafitted to at least ONC standard and have a 
working knowledge of marine oil terminal operations including international 
marine regulations. 

At least four years' experience In a marine oH terminal is required, two of 
which should have been at the level of foreman. Candidates should be 
familiar with computerised loading systems, metering documentation and 
metering systems. 

Please write with fii CVto: Mrs B. Jones, 

F.W. MANAGEMENT OPERATIONS LTD. 

Foster Wheeler House, Station Road. Reading, Berkshire RG1 1LX. 

Tel No: Reading (0734) 502121. 

x dwer or am fotur hmmv <awp of omoaniM 


PUBLICATIONS ASSISTANT 
£10,000 + Banking Benefits 

We seek a young, qualified librarian with some work experience 
to assist in the Library /I nformation Centre of a prestigious 
international investment bank in EC2. Reporting directly to the 
Head of the Information Centre, your duties will bring you into 
contact with afl areas of the. bank. You will handle enquiries, 
prepare background reports and be responsible for accessing 
and reviewing current and future demands for publications and 
reference books. WP or computer knowledge essential Please 
telephone 588 3535. 

Crone Corkill 

RECRUITMENT CONSULTANTS 


THE DIRECT LINE TO YOUR NEW CAREER 


o/d — 

neer’s 

astic’ 


1 mechanical eu- 
nt the £8,000 he 
le Portfolio Gold 
esterday to good 

late my graxno- 
sst my donation 
Hall appeal and 
next year,’’ Mr 
id, of AUestree, 

tged 51, who has 
tio Gold since it 

Times, said that 
lelieve his luck, 
is fantastic. It is ’ 
ence.” 

old cards can be 
•ending a stam- 
i envelope to: 
old. 



1 Wood 

l&t of 

tives 

>eer 

in Young 

sed in brewing 
drinkers and, in 
even kill them, 
for Real Ale 
Jay. 

foe campaign's 
hat's Brewing , 
*rotz, a former 
*od Beer Guide, 
pie who have 
ther breathing 
us disorders, 
vho are allergic 
Is, can suffer ill 
nking beers in 
is have been 
oduce a foamy 
ferity, or to 


id States; foe- 
tore than 40 
f heart attacks 
wers used co- 
in beer to 
rung head. 


peal 

:nnan couple 
re last July for 
eekirig reduc- 
ltences. 
lord Lane, 
ice, will pre- 
•lications by 
onja Schulze, 
for leave to 
he sentences 
Justice Mi- 
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ably shows 
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THE TIMES TmrasnAV NOVEMBER 27 1986 


GENERAL 



GUINNESS PEAT AVIATION 


Challenge and Opportunity 


The principal business of GPA 
Group is die world-wide leasing 
and eroding of a portfolio of 
commercial jet aircraft with a current 
value of approximately $1 billion- 
The company plans to quadruple 
this portfolio by the early 1990s. 

GPA SHAREHOLDERS 


THE PEOPLE WE NEED 


GPA’s shareholders and joint 
venture partners include major 
European, Japanese and North 
American airlines, aerospace 
manufacturers, eroding companies 
and financial institutions. GPA’s 
management and staff are also 
significant shareholders. 


GPA LOCATIONS 


GPA’s headquarters are located 
at Shannon, Ireland and the 
company has marketing subsidiaries 
in London, Stamford (Connecticut) 
and Hong Kong. 


GPA now plans to add a number of 
young professionals to its existing 
team to help meet the demands of its 
expansion plans and to provide for 
future senior management positions. 
There are job opening in each of 
GPA’s four principal divisions - 

mar keting, financial, legal and tech- 
nical. as well as within our recently 
formed joint venture companies. 

For these positions, GPA seeks 
enthusiastic and hard working people 
in ihar mid U) late twenties who have a 
good honours degree or an equivalent 
qualification in accountancy/finance, 
business administration, engineering 
or law, together with significant post 
qualification achievement in 
business, the professions or the public 
service. There may also be some 
opportunities for exceptionally 
qualified younger applicants with 
limited experience. 

GPA would also like to hear from 
more mature people m the 30-40 age 
group who have appropriate 
professional qualifications and 
substantial relevant experience, 
particularly in capital equipment 
marketing, the structuring of 
complex financial projects or 
investment banking. 


Most of the positions are 
Shannon based but there will be 
opportunities to work in overseas 
offices. 

Success in GPA’s sophisticated 
and competitive global industry 
requires a very high level of 
personal commitment together 
with intellectual ability and 
physical resilience. GPA’s business 
also requires extensive world-wide 
navel and the ability to deal with 
complex matters under consider- 
able pressure. 

GPA offers excellent employment 
conditions, including performance 
related bonuses and an opportunity 
to acquire a shareholding. However, 
while material rewards can be 
substantial, GPA’s real offer is a . 
unique opportunity to become part 
of the company's leadership in the 
1990s. 

If you are confident that you 
have the talent, maturity and 
motivation to contribute to GPA’s 
future success please write confid- . 
entially and comprehensively 
(including a detailed Q V. ) to: 

Mr. Liam Barrett, 

Company Secretary. 

GPA Group Limited, GPA House, 
Shannon, Co. Clare, Ireland. 


UNITED SUPPLIERS & CONTRACTORS LTD . 

GENERAL 

MANAGER 

EGYPT 

For a leading Egyptian Construction Company with a 
strong financial background, located in Cairo. 

We specialize in industrial construction (Electrical 
Power Substations, Warehouses, Factories, Silos, 
Steel Structures, Office Buildings) with a construction 
volume of 15-20 million US Dollars per annum and a 
work force of 300 employees. 

The position requires an extensive construction 
background (min 20 years) including Management 
experience and working knowledge of Middle East . 
Environment. Strong organizational skills to ensure 
better performance and a management of the 
company (scheduling, cost control, quality 
improvements) are essential. 

Candidate will work directly under President and Vice 
President Car and Apartment provided. 

Please apply with CV and requested salary to: 

Mr N Sawiris 

United Suppliers and Contractors 
169 Piccadilly 
LONDON W1V 9DD 
BY Dec 10 

Selected candidates to be interviewed in London on 
Dec 15. 


International 
Banking Careers 

Systems & Operations 

Our Client is a rapidly expanding financial organisation with 
vacancies in their Systems & Operations Department. This 
Department actively supports the setting up of strategic pro- 
cedural standards and automation systems in their branches 
spread across various countries around the world. 

We are looking for articulate, seasoned professional 
bankers, who have several years’ operational experience and 
user liaison ability for development and implementation of 
systems. Exposure to large DP systems is desirable. A 
flexible mind, a cosmopolitan outlook and proven com- 
munication skills are essential. An A1B or graduate degree 
would be preferred. 

The prospects of growth and stability of the Department 
are exceptional and the scope of applications is truly unlimi- 
ted. If you fed confident that you can meet the challenge, 
please send a comprehensive CV stating the present salary 
drawn, in confidence to Fiona Fellows, Ogjlvy & Mather 
Focus, Chancery House, Chancery Lane. London WC2A 1QU. 

Ogilvy Mather Focus 


barnard 

marcus 


NEGOTIATOR 

With initiative and energy 
required to assist with 
the opening of our 
newest office in 
Kenmrtgton. Minimum 1 
year's experience,' Car 
owner essential. For 
more details of this 
exciting opportunity, 
contact. 

MUAHBCflHEfi 
B1 720 5932 


SPEAK WELL 

Start 1st or 8th December? 

Need £400 + per week? Telephone 
me today if you are 23-50 yrs, can 
work near King’s Cross Station and 
are reasonably intpfligpn t/edi rented. 

Work is during weekday office hours 
only & you do not need your own car 
or phone. 

Tel: Bill Smith 
01-278 3772 
or 01-278 3699 


Enjoy o soles career in the holiday property, 
leisure and travel fields 

We are now looking fat Regional Sales 
Directors who wflt 

★ Enjoy excellent c ar ee r prospects 

★ Eon a top income ■ 

★ Be entitled to free annual holidays 
*• Participate in profit sharing 

★ Be covered by a health insurance plan 

We expect you to have proven experience in . 
setting, be a seif-mot i v a tor and not be afraid 
of hard work and long bows. You wifi have the 
backing of o fuB marketing programme, a 
computer-based administration team and, in 
addition to sefiing yourself, be responsible for 
the recr ui ting, training and managing of a 
team of soles agents selling a concept which is 
new, ex c i t i ng, in the leisure field, well 
researched with bank trustees and of 
e n orm ous potential in the UK and 
internationally. 

(DEFINITELY NOT TIMESHARE). 

For further details please contact 
Mr. Coates, 

Property Chib I nternational, 

3 B er k el ey Square, London W1 
TefcOI 491 3611. 


The Queen’s University of Belfast 

POSTDOCTORAL RESEARCH 
ASSISTANT CELLULAR 
IMMUNOLOGY 

Multiple Sclerosis Research Laboratory 
Department of Pathology (BVH) 

This position is funded by Action MS for a period of 
three years WtiaBy, to Investigate tmmunotogica! 
functions in the human CNS. The successful applicant 
mil contribute to an extensive programme of research 
into the aetiology and pathogenis« of MS. and w« be 
expected to cotlabofate with other members of a 
team, involved to histopathotogy. molecular btotogy 
and electron microscopy. AppScams should 
preferably have experience in cefluar immunobiology, 
Inciucfing tissue culture. (Pfeassa quote ref. B6/D). 

Salary range: £8.022 - £10.866. placing dependent 
upon age and experience. 

Applicants, quoting ref. 86/D, shoutd subbmit 
curriculum vitae includfog the names and addresses 
to two referees to the Personnel Officer, The Queen's 
University of Belfast. Belfast ST7 INN. Northern 
Ireland. 


LONDON, WEST-END 
TEXTILE AGENTS 

importing fashion fabrics require young 
salesman - only applicants who feel they are 
seif-motivated and who are prepared to work 
hard should apply. Opportunity exists for 
advancement Some experience in selling will 
be an advantage: 

Phone 01-636 3423 


DXON 



PHIN 


Recruitment Advertising 
Executive Search 
Management Selection 
International Recruitment 


178-202 Great Ptirtfend Street, 
London' WINQLTd: 01-631 441L 

8MathewStreetIivapoc!lL26RE 

Tel- 051-2361724. 


Senior 

Accountant 


Bahrain c £22,000 
( cur r e ntly tan free) 


Our dferttas a vacancy fir aSentor - 

Accountant ^3pE(2rts^dberween 25-35 
must bety to LCADL. CA orCACA. 

with 5 ye® indiotitel experience, preferably 

wrth a company „ - , 

In addition, canmtees shoaMhavebroad 
experience fa Financial and Management 
Accounting and have had cSrectinvralvanfflf 
fa systems degri o pment They sh o ul d also be 
fully cwivasamwi* personal cOTnjxtiersZM 
associated softwa re. _ 

STimilNaJSIHIAL&COSriNG ' 
EXPERENCEISESSEmTAL 

In return we offer two year reoewafcfe 



HeasefawatdfifflCVfefDg urCgo SBtex. 

Peter MuBroxMoBon 

11N BSSfifr 

1&02-6314411. 
Quoting ve& 3295. 



Ml) 


Quality 

Assurance 

Manager 

Developing the quality 
systems behind a le a d ing ' 

light in consumer finance 


Negotiable salary + 
banking benefits 


Thfe exattog envtronm^derr«idsnewand 

improved Sandal systems* operating tome 

wayhitfiestquafiy standards. i 

The dynamic Maaagerwe’rencw tanking 
fofwvQ hap develop our « 
assurance strategy.! 
facets ofafl Systems __ 
activities, ustngan advanced BMi. 

system, you wffi contribute directly to the 
c o mpan y 's continued leadership and - 
expansion in a fnghfy competitive field 
Tq adaevethelevel oflndnridaal .ssxess 
we expect, your credentials must todhde at 
least a yean 


•wil! prove invahiabte. . C . 

■ EssertaBy pragmatic, YOuwfflttsJfbine 
technical expertise with tneaeatwetkive that 
producesresate on time every ItoftEagerto 

fcada small team ofQAPrafesapr^, you 

must have the interpersonal sMBs t 

oth ers and tedpereareae 
enviranmentt 
Thteisac 




so prior 


taviting.andlarge-corripany'l 
tow cast loan and me* 
contributory pension; 
assurance aril health care 

Ifywcan rise tofhsoppottnrriw. write new 
\ctoMCVtoN^dRogeis.<atoar*SBvri^s. 
St Martin's Hoase, 1 Hammersmith Grove. 
London W6GNY j 


Citibank Savings O 



CALIBRE CVs LTD 

Professionally written and produced curriculum vitae 
documents. Founded in 1983. the company is the 
market leader in its field and enjoys a worldwide 
reputation for Its quality of work In discreet personal 
marketing. 

For further Information and company Rferetum; ■ 
Tet. 01-631 3388 (3 lines) / 01-580 2959 
Hamtrito House, 1 Lang ham Place. London WIN 7DD 

CALIBRE MANAGEMENT 

Provides search arid continued individual full service 
consultancy for clients actively seeking new 
employment. 


FRONT OFFICE MANAGER 

£14K 

5-Star ultra-professional for new prestigious 
SW1 hoteL 

You will be experienced, - unflappable and a 
committed team leader. 

Already working at tide level, you will have a 
highly-developed sense of hotel public rdatiotos. 
You will have the dedication ana control VITAL 
for developing your own career potential whilst 
displaying file confidence to motivate each and 
every member of your own substantial staff. 


Susan Beck 


RECRUITMENT 
01-584 6242 




FINANCE HOUSE 
OPPORTUNITIES 


Nationwide 

SALARIES £9,000 - £35,000 

For over JO yean Hem u Mansfonexa Sekaion to* 
built-up a sound reputation with all (he leading 
enmpania a one of the UK's top specialist 
comuhaodes, dealing exclusively in vacancies within 
the Finance Industry. 

If you're looking far a career move and you have 
relevant Saks or Admmtsrrarion experienc e it 
whatever level in any of the following • . 
we're well worth a call . 

• HIRE PURCHASE/LEASING • RETAIL FINANCE 
• FACTORING/INVOICE DISCOUNTING 

• CflMMERCMf ./CONSUMER MORTGAGES 

# CREDIT CARDS • SALES AID LEASING . 

• CONTRACT HIRE/FLEET LEASING 

O CONSUMER FINANCE 

Please telephone in strictest confidence: 
061-928 3664 or write immediately ux- 


HEWm MANAGEMENT SELECTION 


St a mford Home, Stamford New Road, Altrincham, 
Cheshire. WAI4 '1BL 




FIRST IN FINANCE RECRUITMENT 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION MANAGER 
C. London £15 to £23,000 

For a small private and highly profitable commodity 
trading and consultancy company to play a vital role 
in its continued successful expansion. 

Reporting to the directors and liaising closely with 
technical staff this key role is responsible for the 
administration of the purchasing ana sales function. 
stock control and office organisation. This wiU 
involve liaising with the factory dealing with 
shipping, and general problem solving. 

Candidates will be numerate, aide to work on their 
own initiative, aged (30-46) with relevant e xper ience. 
Contact Karen Wood or David Rash on 01 387 5460, 
Financial Sc to O i oa Services, Drayton Hoase, Gordon 
Street, L on don, WC1H 0AN. 


(3 (30 appointments 


EDITOR 

‘Wales Today* 
Cardiff 

Wefre looking for the best news programme editor In the 
business— to run wales’ major nightly news programme, • 
Wales Today 

You will be directly responsible to foe Editor, Wiles, News 
and Current Affairs for running the Unit that produces 

Wales Today and almost all BBC wales’ English language 
television news output. 

You wiH need a solid background in broadcasting, sound 
editorial judgement a comprehensive knowledge of Wales and 
a proven track record in TV production surd team leadership. 

If that’s you, let us know. 

Salary ET6.775— £21*784" according to qualifications 
and experience. (Ref„l327/T) 

PRODUCER 

Radio Nottingham 
(based Mansfield) 
£10,412— £14,725** 

To take charge of the editorial output from Mansfield— at foe . 
heart of Nottinghamshire’s main mining community, and an 
important part of Radio Nottingham's area. 

You will handle news and off-diary items and, on occasion, 
prepare and produce news bulletins, interview, report and 
newsreadfrom Nottingham. Public relations work for foe 
station will be involved as will evening and weekend work. 

In addition to at least 3 years’ journalistic experience, you 
should be familiar with broadcasting techniques and studio 
equipment operation — although training can be given. A good 
microphone voice and current driving .licence are essential. 
Knowledge of our transmission area is desirable and you must 
be prepared to live close to the studio. (Ref.2946/T) 


We are an equal 
opportunities employer 


Relocation expgfreescons fder Btl. 

'Plus allowance of £1020 p^. 

Contact us ImmodfatBiy for application form (quote appropriate 
ref. and enclose sao.) BBC Appointments, London W1A 1AA. 
Toi 01-927 5799, 


Business Systems 

Sales Executive 

West London c£35KOTE + car 

Our client provides a unique range ,of proven integrated 
business software implemented on stand-alone PC’s, in 
local area networks, Xenix and on the HP3000 series of 
minicomputers. With full upward compatibility and a 
wide range of easy-to-use options, the products have a 
ready appeal and the business enjoys vigorous growth. 


To complement the existing hardware and software 



track record of IT sales and will combine energy and 
enterprise with the higjheststandards of business 
integrity Earnings have no upper limit and the 
commission rate increases once target sales have been 
met Reference 12/52. . 

Desk-Top Publishing 

Consultant (Sales) 

Also required is a consultant experienced hi electronic 
publishing to spearhead (he company’s entry into the 
exciting field of desk-toppublishing. The remuneration 
package is entirely negotiable. Reference 12/53. 

For either position, please send CV to: 


D 
_D 

178 SLQANE STREET LONDON SWlX 9QG 
TbL 01-235 9891 


Information Systems Sales 

£35,000 

.London and the Home Counties 


Significant ILK. expansion tiy a 
leading U5. marurfacturet of Infer- 
nation and Business systems has 
created a number of opportunities 
for experienced safes executives to 
Join a very successful team selling 
total solutions in the Busmess, . 

Systems market place. 

The company offers a comprehensive 
range of applications seftware rurnfeg 
on their own well-proven hardware 
with strong maintenance and 
customer support backup. This high 
level of professionaism has 
already ensured an impressive 
and expanding user base. 

To join this dynamic team we are 
looWngfor candidates with a proven 
trade record InsoktSoa safes. An 
enthusiastic approach with a high 
tevei of personal crerfiHity and good 
negotiating skiBswg all be of . 
relevance Fid training wH be pven 


at the ILK. head office to Mfdcflesex. 
Every facentlvewS be offered to high 
acWewas, and successful candidates 
w* be offered an excefert remunera- 
tion package fa accordance with the 
Importance of the position. Based do 
an achtaobfe quota, orrtaget 
earnings will be fa excess of £35,000 
PA and wffl include basic salary of 
up to£15£00 PA, a generous 
guarantee and a choice of company 
cn. In addition there are the usual 
fringe benefits associated with a tag 
mulfrnafianaJ company 

For more Information about these 
ground I floor careeropportunities 
ptease telephone Dominic Okfoam 
or send CV in complete confidence ta 


Cavendish 

Management 

Consultants 


flerontAfcaJeHousft 252260 Hegert Shed. 
LoridonWIRaAMOH37445l 


BBN Communications UK Ltd. is a subsidiary of BBN 
Communications Corporation, (a United Status-based 
corporation), a world leader In the design, manufacture, 
installation and operation of packet-switched data com- 
munications networks. We now have a position available 
for a Reid Engineer in the London area: 

FIELD ENGINEER 

Responsibilities far this position will involve the installa- 
tion and maintenance of our complete line of data com- 
munications equipment in Europe *>u must have a 
capability, for analyzing, evaluating and diagnosing com- 
plex equipment problems In a minimal period of time. The 
■ preferred candidate wifi have technical school trainlnq or 

equivalent miftary training and aevoraJ years of experience. 

Excellent working knowledge of test equipment and 
troubleshooting techniques is also required. 

BBU Communkatiorw Corporation offers an excellent 
• benefit s pw fltaqr and competitive salary.. Jb apply, 
please send your resume to: JL Steven Groff, $BN 

UK Ud " 21 Knt ^**rtOS«. tin<ion 


BBN Communications UK ltd 

A Subsidiary of BBN XkunmunlcaUons Corporation 







J (L M fjSP 







THE TIMES THURSDAY NOVEMBER 27 1986 


35 



^ Sa; %e 



APPOINTMENTS 


DP professionals 


Database Specialists — 




/ 


/ 


City — E20-30K 

With 3-5 years' DBMS experience in 
design, implementation, data modelling, and 
administration in both hierarchical and relational 
databases. Must be strong technically and 
demonstrate true leadership qualities, Banking/ 
Finance/Insurance experience is desirable. 


/ 


/ 


/ 


Technical Product 
Consultants — 






WE CANT 


/ 






/ 


/ 


PERFORM 


/ 


/ 


/ 




WITHOUT 




/ 


^ stems 

• *- -live 




car 


A SUPPORT 


/ 


/ 


/ 


/ 


/ 


/ 


/ 


/ 


» • » 


V* i 


j::smng 




im T-- 


When it comes to performance, Wang is 
way ahead of the competition. Why? Because 
no other computer company is utilising a more 
comprehensive range of systems facilities, 
applications and tools to achieve true integration 
of DP, WPand communications functions, 
through powerful super-mini systems and 
networking; but also because we prioritise 
investment into customer-related services to 
ensure ultimate client satisfaction is maintained 
throughout 

Our track record speaks for itself; just 
considerour success with many of Britain's top 
commercial and financial companies often 
working on projects of.£muiti-million value. And 
look at our expansion; consistently averaging 
30% annual growth over the last decade. 

But none of this would be achievable 
without our support operation. Founded on 


technical experience and customer relation 
skills, its pre and post-sales activity forms 
a central part of our overall operation, 
assisting the penetration of UK markets 
still further. We now need to recruit a 
range of DP specialists in the following 
areas: 


West London — £20-30k 

Will suit senior DP professionals with 
expertise in communications/co-existence, 
networking and database. All positions carry 
major account responsibility requiring around 
7 years’ technical and business management 
experience. 

Project/Account 

Managers— 

West London - £20-25k 

For up-front involvement in pre and post- 
sales activity. Posts require individuals of stature 
who are technically strong and communicate 
effectively with senior management Previous 
customer skills are less important than technical 
ability. 

Senior and Junior 
Analysts— 

London + Regions — £15-20k 

Vacancies in London, Birmingham, 
Manchester, Leeds and Edinburgh, for those 
with user experience of application design and 
system installation techniques. Most positions 
demand Wang VS experience although 
knowledge of other mini or mainframe 
environments may be considered. Interpersonal 
skills are highly desirable for key accounts’ 
support 

These new positions reflect our 
commitment to future growth and development 
within the broad area of support and will appeal 
to people with a computer science background 
and relevant experience in a support 
environment Salaries will reflect your skill and 
experience and all packages include a company 
car, private medical plan, pension, free life 
assurance and a stock purchase scheme. 

To apply for any of the above positions, 
please send full career details, quoting 
appropriate vacancy, to Alan Gane, Wang (UK) 
Limited. 1000 Great West Road, Brentford, 
Middlesex TW8 9HL, or telephone 01 -847 1954 
(24-hour service) for an application form. 


/ 


Telecoms/Co-existence 
Specialists — 

City— £20-30k " 

With an appreciation of protocol and 
communication architectures particularly in 
complex networking or database applications. 
Experience within vertical markets of Banking/ 
Finance/Insurance would be an advantage. 


■stems Sate 


* . A-3 1 ; / 


DEVELOP MANAGEMENT 
POTENTIAL 


Milton Keynes c.£ 18,000 + car 


hr orderto maintain and buHd upon the Abbey 
National's position as a market leader, we 
need managers with the skills and expertise to 
meet the challenges created by new 
legislation, increased competition and new 
technology. 

As a member of the Sefijbr Management team 
you will play a key role in planning our human 
resources, ensuring chat management 
capability is assessed and developed to its fufl 
potential 

Managing a ream of 10 professionals and 


specialists, you will plan and control projects 
inducfmg the research, design and operation 
of development and assessment programmes, 
career counselfing and resource planning using 
computer modelling techniques. 

Ideally professionally qualified, you will have at 
least 7 years’ experience in a personnel 
environment together with proven staff 
management ability. Excellent interpersonal 
skills coupled with tact and diplomacy are 
essential. * 



ABBEY 

NATIONAL 

BUILDING SOCIETY 


. The competitive salary is accompanied by the 
range of benefits to be expected of a large 
financial institution, together with a company 
car and relocation assistance where appropriate. 
Please telephone Barbara MBes on Milton 
Keynes 691 122 ext 3 173 for an application 
package. Abbey National Bidding Society, 
Abbey Mouse, 201 Grafton Gate East, 

Milton Keynes, Bucks MK9 IAN. 


ENTREE TO A MAJOR 
MERCHANT RANK 


Young High Flier from Merchant Banking, 
Consultancy, Law, Accountancy or Government 


The Merchant Banking Group is a leading name among the Accepting Houses and 
has major international operations. It is being reshaped to become an investment 
bank, focusing on carefully selected niches in world markets. 


As Assistant to a Group Managing Director you would cany through projects 
which would contribute to the global strategy and management of the Group, In 
doing this you would be woridng with the central top management There is a high 
degree of delegation and scope for creative thinking. The role provides an 
eanefleitt opportunity for accelerated progression with the individual having a 
considerable say in the next career step. 


You need to bawe a first dass honours degree, be in your late 20’s and have had 
some years’ experience in merchant banking, a high dass professional firm or in 
Government Servica Attractive conditions of service include a high base salary, 
beams, mortgage assistance, non^antnbutozy pension, motor car and other 


THE SOCIETY OF WEST END THEATRE 

THEATRICAL 

MANAGEMENT 

ASSOCIATION 


A vancancy has arisen in our Secretariat 
and applications are invited from 
Solicitors with experience of contract and 
employment law. 


We are a theatrical trade association 
representing members both in the West 
End. of London and Provinces. The post 
will involve advising Members generally, 
minuting meetings and drafting 
agreements. 


In addition to a competitive salary the 
Company oilers a pension scheme, free 
medical insurance and season ticket loan. 


Applications with fall G V. by 8th December to: 
The Secretary, 


West End Theatre Managers Ltd, 
Bedford Chambers, Piazza. 
Covent Garden, London WC2E 8HQ. 


Please write to me, Terence Hart Dyke, Copsuteant to the Bank. 


BnainessI)efvek>pm^Cto3iKaltante(Iiite«iatfonaI)IAd^ 
63 Mansell Street, London El SAN. 








V i 


•=- r ' • *2 * 




,„s' ! V 



Training and 
Development 
Manager 


Are you ready to be Number One? 

CXircSemisttenraiketteariK-m its field employing 
c. 1,200 people across a network of bases throughout 
the UK. 


The business is continuing to grow i 
new job has been crealedto k 
needs amongst management, design and implement 


S.E. Essex 


up to £18,000 
plus CAR 



fin meeting the needs. Training activity will 
include man management, seifing and interpersonal 
skflteandfinaixdal/comTO^ 

The aim of the role is to commit Ime managers to 
training and development and provide them with the 
tools to manage it themselves. 

Candidates, aged 27-35, must have at least three years' 
banting and development experience ideally in a service 
Industry. A strata personality and sense of humour 
are essential to fit wfth^ highly professional, results 
orientated, yet informal and pragmatic management 
style. 

Negotiated salary, folly expensed car. relocation if 
required and other benefits raflaetthe importance of 
jhfeappointnient 

Please ring or write quoting nrf. 1729M to Mark Tufitt 


COURTENAY PERSONNEL LTD. ’ 

Management Selection and Personnel Consultants, 1 ■ 

3 Hanover Squara/London W1R SRD.Tel 01-491 4014. 


Operational Audit 


Central London based 


circa £12K 


Inland Communications, the largest division of British Telecom, 
markets a broad spectrum of telecommunications products and 
services through a national network of 30 districts. 

TheKQ. Quality directorate now requires two Operational Auditors. 
The successful applicants will join a team responsible for the 
investigation of work practises throughout inland Communications, 
with particular emphasis on quality of customer service. This will 
entail extensive travel throughoutthe UK. interviewing management 
and staff, and producing reports on findings for presentation to 
senior management. 

To qualify, you must be a graduate with at least two years' relevant 
experience in a large organisation. Familiarity with operational 
audit or efficiency studies would be a distinct advantage. Well- 
developed interpersonal skills are essential, in order to com- 
municate and gain acceptance at all levels. Finally, you must 
demonstrate sound business acumen, an abililty to present ideas 
clearly in report format, and a positive problem-solving mentality. 


Please apply, In confidence, quoting reference 274/4/TT to 
Bernadette Laffey at Charles Barker MSI, 30 Farringdon 
Street London EC4A 4EA. Tel: 01-634 1143. 


British 


TELECOM 


SURMA PUBLISHING COMPANY LTD 


is an established Bengali [ 
group based in East London. In the line 
of improvement/expansion rt offers die 
following two posts. 


EXPERIENCED BENGALI 
JOURNALIST/ARTIST: 


£7.50 per hr 30 hrs. Minimum two years experience 
with Bengali language paper. Ability to draw, design, 
sketch, etc posters etc. Write articles, interviews. 
Minimum qualification: METRIC standard. 


EXPERIENCED BENGALI 
J0URNAUST/TYP1ST/GENERAL 


£ 6.00 

with 


hr 30 hrs. MINIMUM one year experience 


paper. Ability to type Bengali text. 

Minimum qualification METRIC 1 " ‘ “ 


— MC standard. Expected to 

type letters, reports, articles etc. in Bengali. Proof- 
read, paste-up and general newspaper office work 


For further information, details and application form 
contact:- 


T. AHMED, 

40 WESSEX STREET, 
LONDON E2 OLD. 

Tel: 01 981 5571 or 01 981 0134* 


Closing Oats 15th December 1986. 


WEST END ANTIQUE 
JEWELLERY 
DEALER 


URGENTLY REQUIRES 
SALES ASSISTANT 


22 years plus and driver preferred. Experience 
and character references necessary. Salary 
negotiable plus intresting prospects. 

PLEASE RING 01-491 27S4 OR 
EVENINGS 01-451 2870 


1 






3 



ineer’s 

tastic’ 

vin 

*d mwfwnipil eil- 

;jat the £8,000 he 
lie Portfolio Gold 

yesterday to good 

idate my gramo- 
ase my donation 
i hall appeal aad 
y next year,” Mr 
od, of AUestree, 

aged 51, who has 
dio Gold since it 
p Times, said that 
believe his loch, 
t is fantastic. It is . 
■fence.” 

rold cards can be 
sending a stain- 
'd envelope to: 
old. 



I Wood 


*er of 

rives 

»eer 

u Young 

xd in brewing 
frinkers and, in 
even kill them, 
for Real Ale 
lay. 

the campaign’s 
hat's Brewing, 
*rotz, a former 
H)d Beer Guide, 
ale who have 
tber breathing 
us disorders, 
vhoareaffeigic 
s, can suffer iff 
□king beers in 
s have been 
Dduce a foamy 
larity, or to 
fe — 

xl States," the* 

lore than 40 
T heart attacks 
were used co- 
in beer to 
ning head. 


suple 

peal 

Ttnan couple 
rs last July for 
exiting reduc- 
itences. 

Lord Lane, 
ice, will pre- 
licaiions by 
3nja Schulze, 
for leave to 
he sentences 
Justice Mi- 
the Central 



or storage 
ably shows 
ace Heater 


Waste of 

ffrsffs. 


3Mt" high 


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- 36 


THF TTMFS THU RSDAY NOVEMBER 27 1986 


GENERAL 


WHAFDOSENIOR 


A pioneering rote with earfy 
of 


lo build and toad a quality sales team. Prospects, as General Manager, 
tg Continental entry programme in 1-2 yean. 



ALEXANDER HOWDEN 


Sill ES EXECUTIVE — 

SECURITIES INFORMATION SYSTEMS 


.. *v m i. 

•• ■••• * ...JVmm A 




Management 
in Insurance 


'0m m. 


SP" M 


CITY £30,000-E42 f 000. + CAR 

SUCCESSFUL U.S. SECURITIES INFORMATION SYSTHSS HOUSE WITH AOVANCH) LAUNCH PLANS -SUBS I DIARY OF 

U.S. $2 BILLION COMMUNICATIONS MULTI-NATIONAL 

Fbr Ws new appointment, we seek a seasoned financial services sales executive, aged 2835- Wb require at least 2 yeas' fxcwen record in 
the conversion of financial information service concepts Into substantial sales. A comprehensive understanding of financial markers, leading 
institutions and stockbrokers and their tradng priorities e essential together with established senior level contacts. Reporting to the Managing 
Director, the successful candidate wiU be dracttyresponsfote far all aspects of foe initial launch and the subsequent leadership and control of al 
sates and support activities. The atafity to define prospects, and successfully conclude sales is vital plus commercial acumen, management 
state and me ability to meet objectives with minimum supervision. Initial ramuneraion. high basic salary plus results related bonus, negotiable 
£30 ,000-£42, 000. car, non-contributory pension, free Me assurance and private health cover. Applications in strict confidence under r ef erence 
SCSE4443nT to the Managing Director GW. 


Circa £15,000* 
Mid 20's 


Challenging new appomtmentspearheacfing established team, raising the profile and scope of the 


Publications Department 

QP PUBLICATIONS SERVICES MANAGER 


LEADING FIRM OF STOCKBROKERS 


TO C £25,000 + CAR 


Wfe invite applications from individuals who are fikeiy to be graduates or equivalent, who have had al least 5 years' experience fothe 
printing/pubfehing field, coupled with a knowledge of the financial services industry. The successful cancSdate, who wS report to a Director, wil 
have overall responstolity tor managing an efficient cost-effective inhouse Publications Department ensuring consistently h&r standards of 
design and presentation of research and other material. The objective is to provide a fast, high-quafiy service to meet internal demands ina 
changing corporate structure, plus feasor with externa! printing service supp6ers to ensure cost-effective delivery against tight deacEnes. 
Spedficatiy, these responsibilities win include: the farther development, motivation and recrutoneni of s pe c i a list pereonnet: financial and 
budgetary control and advising on the update of office equipment. Essential qualities are strong managerial and organisational skis, the stibSity 
to motivate staff, an outgoing but tfolomaita personality and an interest in, and knowledge of, modem office technology. Initial sataryto 
cjEZS.OOO. plus perfacmanoe-retetfed bonus, car, mortgage subsidy, pension scheme, free life assurance and private medcaJ insurance, and 
interest-free season ticket loan. Applications in strict confidence under reference PSM1848tyTT will be forwarded unopened to ourdient 
unless you list companies to which they should not be sent in a covering letter marked tor the attention of the Security Manager CJRA. 


Gamble on fmd^ariother throggfcs® job 

ads? It’s hardy surpgshg 

At Chiisid L^ider that 

need is just andfier jofcfc- . •• ^ 

We are a $teup who^ for the past 

thirty years serfofBxeajtives earning in excess of 

£20,000 pa findiier^ptotialakl realise their ob^ctwes for 
the future. 

Vfe’ve helped 1 Ns and we know we can do 

telephone or writefo: 

Chusid Landes 35/37 ; E|^^^tondoh>WlP 5AF enclosing a 
brief career suptoY.fj 

LONDON ; ^ lAANC^STER 061-228 0089 

BBWHNGHANT 021-6^^^ 0949 37911 

BRISTOL 0272^6? GLASSY" 041-332 1502 

r ; BELFAST , 02321521624 


ifcgStfihtes and we know we can do 


Alexander Howden, one of the 
largest Insurance Brokers in the 
world, is looking to strengthen 
its existing, highly professional 
Management team, • 
in order to qualify for our Manage- 
ment Trainee Scheme you need to 
demonstrate ambition, enthusiasm . ; 
end genuine management potential. 
White experience in the Insurance 
Industry would be advantageous it . 
Is more important that you can 
prove to us your ability to motivate 
and manage a team of people within 
an administrative environment. 


'■5?^ v\- : . t ' 
’.■&> ■ • v 


35 HEW BROAD SHEET, LOOM EC2M URL mateONE: 81-688 3588 OR 01-588 3578. IHHfc 887374. BUL 01-256 8591. 


aBGMBSAnaRSSEQURBBASSS1]|ICESR(EC8UnHBrr:ft£ASETBaVHEfff4i287539L 


AMBITIOUS SALES EXECUTIVES 


CIM - Computer-integrated Manufacturing Systems 
OTE £37,000 plus CAR 


Based at Walton-on- Thames, Enfield \ Bristol [ Leicester & Manchester 


Kewitl Systems Pfc is a market leader in computer-based manufacturing systems having installed 
more systems in the UK than any other supplier. Formed in 1972 the company has experienced a 
ten-fold growth over the last five years and joined the USM last year. To prepare the way for further 
rapid expansion, the company wishes to recruit outstanding sates executives to sen its range of 
products. 

•k NBCROSS Manufacturing System (for microcomputer and Local Area Networks) 

★ MJCROSS CADGAM 

* MtCROSS 8000 (Manufacturing and Financial Control System for DEC VAX minis) 

-k MtCROSS Field Service Management 

* MJCROSS Rant Maintenance Management 

★ Consultancy and Training Services 

Ideally candidates will be graduates, aged 25-40. with a successful track record in selfing solutions 
in a computing or 'industrial environment 


TELEPHONE TODAY 

Kevin OverstaH - 0932 248328 

or write giving brief career details 


Ashley House, 

20-32 Church Street, 
Walton on Thames, 
Surrey KT12 205. 


Kewill 

systems 


CONSUMER 

FINANCE 


The busy Credit Control Department of a leading merchant bank 
offers an interesting opportunity to candidates aged 23+. 

The successful applicant will be O/A level educated with substantial 
experience of modem computer-based credit control systems gained 
within a finance house or bank. 


Salary c.£8,000 p.a. + excellent banking benefits including low cost 
mortgage. 

Please telephone or send c.v. to Peter Handford, Personnel Officer, 


C0 


HILL SAMUEL PERSONAL FINANCE LIMITED, 

6 Greencoat Place, London SW1P 1PL. 

Telephone: 01-828 5241. 


SPOT TRADER Salary: To £35,000 

A number of our clients, major International Banks, are currently seeking Spot traders with a minimum of three 
years experience gamed trading major currencies. 


MARKETING OFFICER 

International Bank seeks a Marketing Officer 
have a proven track record of m ar ketin g to 
finance. A1B. is preferred. ' 

SETTLEMENTS MANAGER 


Salary: £30,000 

1 28-35 with a minimum of 5 years experience. Applicants must 
Corporate Clients dealing with project, property and aircraft 


SETTLEMENTS MANAGER Salary: To £20,000 

US Investment Bank intending to establish a UK Stock Exchange Division requires a highly motivated individual 
with several years experience. 

CREDIT ANALYST Salary: To £16,000 + 

European Bank seeks a Credit Analyst with a minimum of two years experience. Candidates should be in their 
early to mid 20's, have good communication skills and thorough analytical approach. Prospects for career 
advancement are excellent. 

Please contact 

Catherine Virr on 01-621 1942 
or write to her at 

18 Rood Lane, London ECSM 8AP 
BRUNEL BANKING 


MAJOR 
ACCOUNTS 
SALES - 
PH0TC0P1ERS 


Management Development 

in a climate of innovation and change 

Northern Home Counties c.£17,000+car 


Are you involved in Fax. 
ptiotKooer Or jjowal office 
wwrt safes and aged under 

Do yon id* to writ S a raw 
s«w>r few ) vrttt ffle leading 
man u t uiu am n Be UK? 

Wt haw a varialy at clients 
fortrtna t h eno. il who sort 
oteensnoed people ti to* gp 

posttns In nunc wares. 
Earnings in each case are 
enpboral ato son *OTE E2IK 
+ car + the berate sssodsud 
wth the biggest rampants in the 

[ «IS| it « 

These pra*ms are pareatety 


attractive for those currently | 
waring fax itoaterartps who won | 
to improve immerattoa.am] : 


I HcMfiag (0734) $4723/54575 

luMsopatMttqmTIwfttey 


Our dient is the service division af a major market lead er 

The company is untfcigcwm major organisation and aitturd change with the aim of torprovinB 
business performance ana profitability, by strengthening management latent and effective- 
ness at all levels. 

Tbenecnitinent(rfalteiaoeme»itI)8WlB»Jwnti'tenageriss«nasciiralto«lfevjj^th^ 

aims. Them is tote commitment to the function from the top downwards and this roie will 
make a major contribution of success of the business. 

He/sfre wi work very dosefy with fine managers, bath ittenttfymg thdr nee& and developing 
programmes to improve their leadership and people handling stalls. There is considerable 
scope to use individual initiative ami creativity. 

This job will appeal to indivitiuais with at feast three years devstoprnent/ tram frig experience 
in a martet-oriertated. fast moving environment Multi-site exposure would be ideal. 
Candidates should be resilient self sfartws who car operate happity in a demanding and ass- 
ertive management style. _ ^ 

-re-a « Please contact Teresa Glover, quoting reference 1ST ST 

/V\l| V\1 or write to her at _ . 

(CJ COURTENAY PERSONNEL LTD. 

s\ Ky Utenagernent Selection & Personnel Cwjajttaiss 
LP 3 Hanover Square. London W1R flRD. Tel: 01-491 4014. 


nasaa + a aLc.t7 jeo + cm 

France housx/contnd m group 


ANTIQUE MAPS 
AND PRINTS 

Poison requnc! for b Sales 


RENTALS NEGOTIATOR 


need pcren wsh 2 vrs seme 
Wuaiy mp e rin ice 24+ fiood 
Min pnapcc tt . UtgoA. 
Tel: Mia Seymor 


Posrtton Vi KntohtspTldga 
strop seOng An&pres Maps 
and Ffonte. iw« be ratable 
and respoRtfte. Wnra Mapp 
House 5* floaurtiamp Flaw 
London SW3. 


A young gpahead person with the ability to work ui a 
busy expanding office dK minimum of wpcm&Ofl. 

Car driver essemiaf. Salary negoaahfc m accoidance 
with age and experience. 


Apply F Bncfcman 
Teh 01-586 3088 


During your initial period of training 
we will equip you thoroughly with 
ail the technical and managerial 
expertise you wfl I needto be a success 
in the challenging msuranceindtetiry. 
Wfe offer an attractive benefits package 
including Non -Contributory Pension 
Sdieme, Life Assurance and BUFA. 
Please apply in writii^ to:- 
Miss J. HanlAig, Persoreiel Manager, 
Howden Management & Data Ser- 
vices Undted, Personn e l Depart- 
ment; 8, Devonshee Squwo, London 
EC2M4PL 


Survey 

Consultants 


Overseas Service 


London, St Pauls 
£13,810 -£17,407 pa inc 



To develop pay & benefits 
surveys with the UK leader 


Hay Management Consultants produces the most highly 
authoritative surveys on pay and benefits in the UK. We have a 
major programme already under way to further enhance the 
quality and range of these surveys and the reward information 
services provided to participants. 

In organising ourselves to meet these objectives we want to 
recruit a number of individuals who have a particular enthusiasm 
for working with a wide diversity of companies in the 
development and marketing of pay and benefits surveys - either 
of a regular or a one-off type. 

Applicants wiQ require considerable energy, should combine a 
high intellectual ability with a track record of success, and be in 
the mid-20’s to early-30’s age range. Salary will be negotiable. 
Career potential is excellent and could lead to consultancy in 
Hay’s Reward practice. 

Please write with foil c.v. including current salary, or telephone 
for an application form to: Nick Boulter, Hay Management 
Consultants Limited, 52 Groevenor Gardens, London SW1W 
OAU. TH: 01-730 0833 Ext. 371. 


Sendee Branch, located at our 
London Headquarters. • 

The Central Electricity , 
Generating Board is response tor 
the generation and tra nsmi s si on of 
electricity throughout England and 
Wales and is one of the workfs 
largest pubSc unities. Our 
Overseas Service Branch is 
responsible tor providing acfviceon 
international issues to the Board's 
senior ofEcersand for coordinating 
the representation of CEGB 
policies and interests in the 
international environment^ Those 
duties involve the administration of 
CEGBpartkapafionin international 
organisations, thecoorcSnationof 
contacts with similar utilities, and 
the securing and dissemireflion of 
information within the CEGB on 
developments overseas. 

Applicants should beableto .. . 
derronstrate an awareness of 
inte rna tional Issues in the energy 
field. They must be abfe to express 
themselves we! both orally 


working under pressure. As ’ 
one of ateam, the successful 
candidate will be required todhect 
and mothrete ot he r pro fessional . 
stafLAwortongknowtedgeofat 
least one other mqor foreign 
language isaisodeshable.lt is 
expected that tfiesuccassfol 
eppScsnt vrill be agraduate wifli 
several years workexperience, 
pnqbabty in adnmrastrabortf 
intemationsd affairs. 

Applications, givingfti8career 
detafis including age. qualifications, , 
experience, present poshion and - 
salary, ^xxiid be sent to the Group 
Personnel Offc8r, Central 
Electricity Ger^rating Board, 
Sucfoury House, 15 Newgate 
Straetl, Lxndon EC1 A 7AU no later 
than 5 December 1986. X 

Quoteref352/86/CGfTT. 

The CEGB is an equal 
opportunity: ■ . 

employer. 


Cloving date for applicants: December 1st 1986. 


HayGroup 


Senior Researcher/ 
Statistician 


General Manager 

Lewisham & North South wark 
Health Authority 

c.£33,000 


akmpkle our Marketing team in tbe planning and devdopment of new 
service x 

This is a senior position reporting direedy to Bilt Blyth, Researeh Director. 
Yon wiU be expected to snow initiative, drrve and the ability to gain new 
business for the Company in this growing ares of marketing research. 
With a good maths/stats degree, you should have ai least four years 


experience in the interpretation of data in an agency or coniine real 
research environment Good cotnmimication and consultancy skills will 
be essentiaL 

Tbe benefits package will be comensurale with ex peri ence and 
qualifications. Please send a copy qfyoor av. or ‘pboue for an application 
from ux Ted South. PcruaacL AGB Researeh Ccstre, Westgate. Ealiag. 
Landau W5 IUA. Tek 61-997 8484. Ext*. 294. 


eomensurate with ex peri ence and 


send a copy qfyoor av. or ‘phone for an application 
Pernuud. AGB Researeh Ccstre, Westgate. Ealing. 


Lewisham & North Southwark Health Authority seeks a Unit 
General Manager for the Lewisham Acute Unit 
Reporting to the District General Manager,- the job holder is; 
Chairman of the Unit Management Board and a member of the 
District Management Board. 

The Unit has 1 800 staff, a budget of £27m and a £25m development 
programme. 

The successful candidate must demonstrate the abffity to achteve 
dear and demanding goals and command the confidence of the 
Unit’s seven Clinical Directors. (S)he must be capable of managing 
autonomously within the overall District management framework. 
For further information, please contact Pauline Fellows, Acting 
Director of Personnel, Lewisham & North Southwark Health 
Authority, Mary Sheridan House, St Thomas Street, London S£1 
9RY(I»1. 01-378 7431). 


Public Appointments 


Judy Farquhanon Limited 


47 New Bond Street. London, W1 V 9HA. 
01-038824 


EXECUTIVE SEARCH RESEARCHER 

to Jon smaS friendly teem ot weB-known company based 
in WCt. Must ft&ve at fwrt a years experience Jn 
headhunting. P t ote r eto y i graduate aged 24-30. 
FYcaft B r rt salary and benefits. 


ARE TOO RESPONSIBLE ENOUGH 
TO RUN MY COMPANY? 


Fast exparxfing Italian Furniture import company requires 
someone - terdwridng, numer^e, and methodical to 
cany oat all aspects of essentia! adm i nistration. 


YOUNG QUALIFIED ACCOUNTANT 


relations coMUtoney. 
rokj Rt best mto ns 


An outgoing kvtty pe r son a toy would Rt best 
tatBWSWtfl and dynamic company. ceiJLOOO. 


1 This smaft bis long established company has sales of 
several £M te a few but.MoMy dtenaidliq household 
■ name customers. 


• Experienced in telecomms to Join thlp 
brand new division of one of London's 
Testing names In toe selection industry. 


GRADUATE COLLEGE LEAVER 

wMi secretarial stda tar pubic reasons oornpahr wtlh 
scops » become an account executive - Wast Uxx»a 


Salary £10-13,000 according to ability 
Please write with CV to: 


• This a an exciting ground floor 
pW»rtun fty to estaMsh yourself in the 
forefront of information technology 
recruitment 


JFL 


RECRUITMENT CONSULTANTS 


FBccardo Rkgtnj 
tevao ftimW Ltd 
Trafalgte Howe 
GreovBe Place 
Loufofl NIV7 3SA 


9 You wffl be supported byn substantial 
efient base predominantly from toe City of 
London, where you wS be situated. 


THE BIG BANG 


• Ideally caratidates should be aged 25-40 





MW*/ 


WANT TO RUN YOUR 
OWN SHOW? 


• Remuneration will be has. BUPA, 
permarwit health insurance and penskrt 
schemes are as non-contributory . 


■nrownoKM.asajn'na umtcd 


Equals big money for the right people. 
If you have a good, confident 
telephone voice and manner then you 
could join our Dealing Team following 
up 1000’s of quality advertising 
leads/enquiries. On target earnings, 
£30,000 p.a. plus. 


R you are re 
approach, then 


ita, nurwes-and nature to your 
s no reason why you stwWn’t 


• If you feet your potential is, as yet, 
.unrecognised then please forward your 
curriculum vitae to: 


At M Sarete biwtenent Services we're looking for 
capable, self motnataJ individuals to promote our pnxiucts 
and services as self enjoyed financial advisers. Weir give 
you aU tt* training and suppoityou need to run your own 
show, the rest Is up to you. 


The Managing Director 


interested? Thar please reply with ftdl C.V. to: 


- • ' SELECTION 


FOR EC4 INTERVIEW 
TELEPHONE 01-236 2332 


hfafea L Bh ' 

B8 tw e l hneahaeil Sendees Ltd, 
29 tees Area's fete, • 
Lh4m SWlti 980. . 


5^54 Kng WBan Stiert, Utodoa S48 9AA 


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Ci M 3 £l S(J? 

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Manags 


./**.***, 

*y 

m. * *-S 


The Morgan Bank has a multi-million pound 
commitment to the development of sophisticated 
database systems. These support the processing 
of all securities and related trading activities. 

The Database Manager will be responsible 
for the design, implementation and future 
performance of these databases. Vmr brief will 
involve liaising with project teams, assuming 
final design authority, and ensuring that the 
databases meet business and performance 
guidelines. In short, your job is a database 
development and management role addressing 
the needs of the business. 

The Database Manager will come from a 
large structured environment, probably 
consultancy, software house, supplier or 
commercial organisation, ’ibu should have 
experience of relational database software and 
database design techniques, including entity 
relationship modelling. If this has been gained in 
a similar environment to our own — DBG/VAX 
with Ingres— so much the better. 

The starting salary will depend upon both 
your experience and potential. Morgan salaries 
are highly competitive. Wfe also place great 
emphasis on both personal and technical 
development. 

Please contact our consultant John Miskelly. 
on the Morgan Hotline 01-405 2727, during office 
hours or on (0836 219419) over the weekend 
(noon -6pm). 

Alternatively send a cv to JM Management 
Services (Re£DBM/TT). Columbia House, 

69 Aldwych, London WC2B 4DX. 


HOTLINE 01-405 2727 - HOTLINE 01-405 2727 • HOTLINE 01-405 2727 • HOTLINE 01-405 2727 


CHARGE 



Auckland, bqnt dty in Nor Zealand {010,000) enjoysa 
temperate climate with no seasonal atones. Rich in 
TEoraticmal fra&fes Aoddaod fe wdl known fcr sdBng. 
surfing and fishing in the immeffate area. 

LrThn A 0 


BRITISH SUIPHHR 

c&mrAmAMPUBumsuFmmAwaMM 


BUSINESS ANALYSTS - 

INTERNATIONAL CONSULTANCY 


Ihe Aaddaud Hosp&al Board fe a progressive body 
serving tins vibrant growing aty. 

A new boildfag for the Department of CMa! Oncology 


Brffish Sulphur Corporation » a leading spectetftet consultant and 
pubfisher, serving the fertSzer and chemical industries worldwide, 
internal growth has created the need for a number of additional 
business analysts in the company. 

Applicants may have recently completed a ffrst or second degyee. or 
may have some working experience. Qualifications in economics or 
agficuBuraJ economics wouu .be- appropriate,, and knowledge of 
European languages would be an advantage. Key requirements are an 
enquiring mmo, ine aWBty to cofete and analyse data, and the ability to 
write and communicate weL 


One draantR. Pfaiii^ fflidiDorM loans. ?bs spate for a 
further m^voitage onM oitatan aadanotber superficial 
unit 

The present camptanHii of 15 nrflogaphes wffl increase 


Successful cancfidates wffl work within a team on consultancy studies 


proposed sh ff stoto fe iodudg^fot graded poflmosand 

12 ^ iphw V foufcrrt iw fl j ffi i phr re ^ akn 

trained in the Department. 

Hie soccesftd appficant for the position of (bam 
fe&gfflptowiBo^af^igDi{Amorqirafiflcattoim 
t hoa peafa at&xflaphy. Supervisory gperiaice is desirable 
toga not.esseiiMTlKC3^{^£fV»fcKspaBto 
for the afamnsttatai and sSaiSitf of the Department. The 


with the NZ Nfftfarf Riw fatign Tedmdogsts Board. 

lie salary is NZ 536,658 - JIZ 537,843 per aonttm. 
Application Frans ariCdncfitfaBrfApptdtimentarc 
ava&Mefaai: 

Ihe Chef Executive, AncMand Hospital Board 
POBoi 5546, Aodfaodl, HEW ZEALftHD . 
Applications dose on Thursday 29 January {987. 


and forecasting, or writing journal articles. Advancement In 
responsibility depends on performance and merit alone, hi 
travel is common after an initial training period. 

Starfag salaries depend on qualifications and experience. 
Send appBcations, with curriculum vitae to: 

Mrs. C. Odefl, 

British SutAw Corporat i on Ltd. 

Parnell House, 

25 WBton Road, 

London SW1V 1NH. 


Buyer 



Contact Lens 
Solution c. £12, OOO 


SYSTEMS 

dattng wftfi major coropanfee 
* nwntnpa 

Salary £13400 + Car 


I ^n i»SWf Ual iirtn|ynrt i rtr ylatonl 
jmur sueeaw •) o«pM oquyanunt I 


Process Technology * Es^senfag - Contracting 


Senior Sales 
Engineer 


A leader in the manufacture and retail of a 
comprehensive range of eye care prod u cts, we 
are currently e&tabfrhing a major contact tens 
solutions plant at per Hedge End headquarters. 


Marfa biQBSi naubduvl 
ol data connuncAigo aystsras. I 


Lurgi (U.K.) Limited is seeking an experienced 
chemxatf/process engineering graduateto join a 
smaB team of mdustry-onentafed salesmen, 
supported by parent company process experts. 
The successful candidate is likely to be under 40, 
with a minimum of S years technical sales 
experience in the chemical industry and a fluency .in 
German. 


Thas highly visible, career development 
appointment for an extremely 
man or woman with good coamaumcationa 
skats. Probably in your late 20's or early 30’s, 
and an IPS member, your sofertantial 
purchasing experience wfll ideally have been 

within ttw phar mi y w'rti t nl tvr 

packaging i n dus t ries, affording you detailed 
knowledge of the relevant regulations and 
kgislatiozL 


Ytex kreMedge and *pMa«» ol 
Dies be a»npte<Tiontad Oy a 
nxMugh nmg programme 3 
•norths long and sn^ptamontod by 
ottwr comem a* your caw 
praonaaa. No Imlt a pl ace d on 
yew neon* and conmml support 
mV era&r you lo acMew way 
Ugh eanwiga indeed 


To oua% tor Am opsnngi you 
should dsptty real tau Intent 
together wMi tanacay. 
imitoinnnitom and a record ol 
toccotg in Mpapmeil sales to 


OutstoMhm camtteto* ' can 
nanWaH a auhatannal eaminga 
ouaaniee afiow nWy and you 
*a ba gnamad tor a lufeaa to 
tuan a ganart- To team more 
contact Qatan Nagle on 01631 
4146 


Luroi is a highly process^orientated worldwide 
enepneering company offering to the chem^J, 
mineral and metaSurgicai industries aver 200 
processes, primarily in the fields of environmental 
protection, energy technology and raw material 
upgrading. 


The positron wfll command an attractive saiary and 
fringe benefits package, negotiable in accordance 
with experie nc e mid quafifications. 


Phase apply to the Personnel Manager, 
CooperVision Limited, Pennaleng House, 
l Botky Road, Hedge End, 

Southanqiton 

m M^-5155- @oper\feion€> 


VISION APTOMTMS1TS, 
Eastgate House. 
16-19 EHStcasUg Street. 
London. WIN 7PA. 


DRIVER- 

GUIDES 


Please urrita with fuS personal and career delate, m 
confidence, to the Assistant Company Secretary, , 
Luml (u.KJ Limited, No. 1, Kingsway, London 


ROYAL COLLEGE OF 
OBSTETRICIANS & GYNAECOLOGISTS 


BIRTHRIGHT 


A well-organised and efficient person 
is required to run a wide variety of . 

[ events for the mother & baby research 


events for the mother & baby research 
charity Birthright 

A heavy workload and constant 
activity mean fliat calmness under 
pressure, a cheerful dispositfon and, 
above all, a methodical approach are 
essential requirements. Excellent 
secretarial skills are Vital and an ability 

to get on wen with people at afl levels 
would be a great asset 


; Are you earning £20,000— £100,000 p.a 

andsB^mganewjob? 

Connaught's cfecreet aid successful Execu- 
tive Mattering Programme provides profes- 
sional excellence in helping you to identify 
those unadvertised vacancies. 

Contact us for a free and confidential 
meeting to assess if we can help you. If you 
are cuirentiy abroad ask for our Executive 
Expat Service. ■ 

01-734 3 879 (24 hours! 


Wasted by Britain's 
largest and most 
established private 
dgfttseeing company. 
Interesting, lucrative, 
Ml/part-time work for 
well-educated (4 Door) 
Car owners. London 
ba sed, l anguages an 
advantage. Oflfidaf training 
coins st a rting early 87. 


81 629 5267 


A guide to 
career development 


Coping with corporate change 


An increasing number of organizations 
responding to the need of technological 
change are discovering, to their cost, a 
rarely identified factor — that of cultural 


change. On emerging from recession, 
they find that their most valuable 


resource — their employees — has 

rhpngprf 

The failure to recognize cultural 
change can be costly, both in terms of 
time and money. This is best illustrated 
by the following account of one 
company’s experience which is, unfortu- 
nately, no fairy story but typifies what 
many organizations are finding. 

A Midlands-based company in the 
sales and distribution industry, which 
was founded in the 1960&, grew rapidly 
to about 1,000 staff by the mid 1970s. 

Its management team was typified by 
young, professionally qualified, forward- 
looking and ambitious people — let’s call 
them adapters. Ambition and ability 
were, of course, to be found at all levels 
within the organization, but the bulk of 
the workforce consisted of competent 
and reliable individuals with a pref- 
erence for work which was stable, 
structured and well-defined - the 
main tain ers. 

The company responded to recession 
by reducing recnutincm to virtually zero 


Psychology can 
help organizations 
cope with change 
in technology, says 
Andrew Kerr in 
the first of a 
two part series 


the stores department and prepare for 
the introduction of new system. By 
encouraging a small number of early 
retirements and monitoring the in- 
troduction of the new system carefully, a 
smooth transition was accomplished. 

The traumas experienced by what was 


then British Leyland during the late 
1970s and early 1980s have been 
described by Sir Michael Edwardes in his' 
book Back from the Brink. He illustrates 
how occupational psychologists contrib- 
uted to manpower p lanning and manage- 
ment development during a time when 
the managerial staff were having to cope 
with extra demands and increasing levels ’ 
of personal stress. 

Returning to the sales and distribution 
company, a programme of psychological, 
assessments was initiated ana identified 
areas of weakness within the 
organisational structure, some sus- 
pected, some uol The psychologist 
looking at the organization had no 
preconceived ideas of what they were 
looking for, but were able to take a fresh 
and unbiased view of the company’s 
manpower. 

In doing so, and this is often the case, 
they did not simply identify potential 
adaptors among the maintainors. People 
who, while doing a perfectly adequate 
job in one area, had much to oiler to an- 


Reducing recruitment to zero 
is not always the best move 


people within the organization can help 
to identify problems — present and 
potential 

Buz how may this be done? What 
assumptions can be made about an 
employee’s future abilities? How will he 
respond to change? Is it even possible to 
obtain an accurate and unbiased analysis 
of present performance? 

To help find the answers and gain an 
understanding of the strengths and 
weaknesses of their employees, more and 
more organizations are turning to 
occupational psychologists. 

Using established psychometric tech- 
niques - psychometrics is that branch of 
psychology dealing with measurable 
factors — skilled psychologists can advise 
on abilities, attitudes, personality and 
potential of employees and job can- 
didates. Such analysis is invaluable in 


The psychologist can take 
a fresh and unbiased view 


, . , . . recruitment, internal promotions and 

and introducing a programme of voL company reorganizations, 
untary redundancies. Plans to introduce t» 1 tp fm- th- 


uniary reaunaanoes. nans to mtroauoe Take, for example, the promotion 
automated handling equipment and from a field-based position m sales or 
comEwterized financial and admin- asiJiT « 


computerized financial and admin , 
istrative systems were put on ice. 


service into an office-based ma nag erial 
role. The demands of the two roles are 


■^ e verynjnre of the “adapters" led often foTfidd 

rote ^ t a measnre..of self^uf : 


mentand their successful recruitment fidracy.^nabiiity to establish a rapport 

sasjftssseLocia 


and the need to promote from below led ScSy and autcroomousS" 
to frequent appointments of maintainers ^ managerial role may require 

^ senior management evd (including the abilitylode^op, motiJafeand 


d “F Ctor l ?' n $ ^ com P a ^ s f work m a team, administrative skills and 

culture slowly changed over a period of an ability to cope with the complex and 

time. InnsJnrn kciipc CItSIInI AmiiMti/uisI 


nme - long-term issues. Skilled occupational 

Emerging recently from recession they psychologists can advise on whether an 
began to implement those technological individual is likely to make the success- 


changes that had been recommended ful transition and thereby lessen the ride 
much earlier. What had been planned as of making a wrong appointment and 


was rushed through during the past 14 
months. 


costly error. 

Many organizations rely on psycho- 
logical assessment One major vehicle 


Many parts of the organization are m a n u fa c tu rer recently wished to in- 
meeting these changes with passive tioduce a new computerized stores 


resentment and occasionally with open controL The main adva ntage of such a 
hostility. In addition, a significant change would be that it would allow for 


numbe r of employees are experiencing l° wer stock levels. The problem was that 
gram difficulty in learning the new skills many ofthelong^ervice stores staff were 


required. 


solidly set in their ways. 

This organization had accumulated. 


As I write, much ofthe new technology nv ^thP 
. (ana expensivrty) recruits ikw blood and th _ 


■JESS some of the stores people would never 

cope with the cfaangewhUe others, very 
Smmi S c^lSSeaSiS^ able individuals, were likely toSve on 


So what lessons can be leanit? While it A “task force”, made np of managers, 
may not always be possible to retain key together with a few of the most able 
..employees, an awareness of the types of stores people, was appointed to educate 


other ftmetion within the company, were 
found. 

For example, two individuals who 
have spent all their working lives on the 
shop floor, have as a result of psycho- 
metric testing and couns elling , more 
than happily accepted promotions into 
customer liaison. Others who, perhaps 
because of their educational background, 
were assumed by the company to have 
limited abilities were identified as hav- 
ing considerable potential. 

Such assessments now form an inte- 
gral part of the company’s recruitment 
and management appraisal programme. 

The final report has also provided an 
objective overview of the company's 
manpower, function by function and this 
is giving the organisation a coherent base 
to work from in considering future 
manpower planning and recruitment. 
However, as the chief executive ruefully 
admitted, “perhaps we wouldn’t need to 
be recruiting at all, had we taken this 
approach in the first place.” 

The recession has had a profound 
impact on organizational structure, with 
organizations that have successfully 
adapted to the altered environment 
changing as a result of it. But the 
companies surviving this “natural 
selection” do not necessarily have a 
cultural climate that is able to meet 
future demands. Occupational psycholo- 
gists are becoming a recognised necessity 
in assessing the strengths and 
weaknesses of the people that make up 
organisations, especially the key man- 
agerial staff. 



TIMES NEWSPAPERS LIMITED 


CHALLENGING 
SALES CAREER 
FOR GRADUATES 


Due to expansion, we now have vacancies in the London Display Advertisement Sales 
Department of Times Newspapers for a few vigorous people who will be responsible for 
selling advertisement space in The Times, The Sunday Times newspaper and the Colour 
Magazine. You will most likely be a recent graduate and possess the king of qualities and 
character to meet our requirements, namely; enthusiasm, energy and dedication. There 
will be ample scope to capitalise on new business opportunities and fell training will be 
given to equip you to meet the challenge and demands of this role. Ideally, you will reside 
in London or within easy travelling distance. 


Your ability to respond to the competitive nature of advertising in order to develop new 
business for Times Newspapers will earn you the generous rewards of an excellent 
starting salary, together with bonus scheme and six weeks holiday. Please write in fell 
confidence to:- 


Ian Wilkie, 

Sales Administration Manager, 
TIMES NEWSPAPERS LIMITED, 
P.O. Box 7, 

200 Gray’s Inn Road London, WC1X 8EZ 


Conmught 

’•'■LWIM ;7VT!W. ! . \ \ N 1 , 1 * I 


PERSONNEL OFFICER 
Investment Banking House 
To £20,000 


CORPORATE FINANCE 
EXECUTIVE 


URGENT 

VACANCIES 


■Ths Executive Jtib Search I 


FINANCIAL 

SERVICES 


Small friendly office baaed in Regent’s 
Park. Good working conditions. Free 
lunches. Non-smoker. 


(23+) 


Bright personality required to take 
responsibility for personnel - from 
establishing the department to day-to- 
day administration in this exciting 
international environment. Around 
30, with IPB qualifications and 3/4 
. years relevant experience. 


Authority Investments PLC seeks to recruit 
a Corporate Finance Executive, aged 25 to 35. to 
assist with research, investigation, appraisal, 
organisation and management of acquisitions 
and investment situations for both Authority 
and its clients. 


ARAB COMPANY FOR LIVESTOCK 
DEVELOPMENT (AC0UD) 


Required qualified personnel for the lotowg positions m is 
putty project in Sudan {Capeoty 2 mOon brafers. 15 mafion 
labia eggs per annum mirth broder parent stocM 


Salary from £10,000 

Please telephone Juanita Hughes on 
01-724 7725 for an application form 
and description of job. 


Wefirisarapidly expanding griwpjn the 
Financial Services sector. We are looking for 

Two ManageaftatTraaieea, towodt at oar 
Oxford Street Brandi If you seek Full Training, 


Phase telephone Charlotte Smith, on 
01-831 1603 or send c.v. to 
39 Floral Street, London WC2E 9DG. 


Opportunity, to Earn over, £20,000 pa and share 
Participation then Contact Nigel Adams 
on 01 4398431.. 


S E NS E 


EXECUTIVE RECRUITMENT 


This is a ground floor appointment with 
excellent prospects 

Successful candidates are most likely to 
have professional skills , an innovative mind with 
relevant corporate finance experience in a 
s ubstantia l commercial group in the City- First 
class remuneration package inrhirjin g car, share 
options, BUPA eic. 

Please reply in confidence to:- 

D G Innea, Managing Director 
Authority Investments PLC 
173-176 Sloane Street 
London SW1X 9QG • 


1 - Rouftry Farm Manager 

2 - Hatchery Manager 

3 - Processing Plant Manager 

4 - Maintenance Manager 


Nof less than ten years experience for each position Is requred 

Please contad; SUDAN EMBASSY 
3 Cleveland Row 
Saint James St . 

SW1— LONDON 

Attn: THE ECONOMIC COUNSELLOR 
OR 

ACOUD 

P.O. Sox 18389. Riyadh 11415 
Saudi Arabia 

Tel 464 9255/464 1497 
Tlx: 404355 ACOUD SI 



old — 


meers 

tastic’ 


nn 


d mechanical en- 
wt the £8,000 he 
lie Portfolio Gold 
yesterday to good 


date my gramo- 
ase my donation 
i ball appeal and 
y next year," Mr 
od, of Allestree, 


aged SI, who has 
ilio Gold since it 
? Times, said that 
believe his lock, 
t is fantastic. It is . 
fence.” 

fold cards can be 
sending a stam- 
d envelope to: 
old. 



I Wood 


>er of 
Lives 


leer 


□ Young 


fed in brewing 
Makers and. in 
even kill them, 
for Real Ale 
lay. 

the campaign’s 
hat’s Brewing, 
*roiz, a former 
od Beer Guide, 
lie who have 
ther breathing 
us disorders, 
vho are allergic : 
s. can suffer ill 
□king beers in 
a have been 
sduce a foamy 
larity, or io 

fe __ 

d States; the- 
tore than 40 
f heart attacks 
were used co- 
in beer to 
ning head. 


rman couple 
■s last July for 
eeking reduc- 
i traces. 

.Lord Lane, 
ice, will pro- 
locations by 
snja Schulze, 
for leave to 
he sentences 
Justice Mi- 
the Central 





or storage 
ably shows 
ace Healer 



3VSt-htgh 


:3V high 


“■‘to** E 

HULK I 


Ok ruhwy„ 







THF TIMES THURSDAY NOVEMBER 27 1986 


BANKING & 


FOR YOU, AN MBA WAS 
A MAJOR ACHIEVEMENT. 

FOR US, IT’S A GOOD BEGINNING. 


As an MBA you will already have been challenge, the 
exposed to a range of complex business You must gu 
problems and have shown a natural flair in are one of th 
structuring workable solutions. In addition, management 
you have finely developed communication, time to take 
team leadership and interpersonal skills and problem sol 
feel you are now ready to exploit these Manchester, 
qualities to the foil. Salary 

Gaining your MBA was no mean £30,000 lev 
achievement but in reality, it was just the provided. Plez 
start. Perhaps for you, the start of a an applicatio 
genuinely outstanding future in management confidence) t< 
consultancy. Touche Ross 

At Touche Ross we can guarantee the Street, Londc 

£ Touche Ross 


challenge, the scope, and the achievement. 
You must guarantee the commitment. We 
are one of the fastest growing international 
management consultants and now is the 
time to take a closer look at us and our 
problem solving work, in London or 
Manchester. 

Salary is negotiable at around the 
£30,000 level and a company car is 
provided. Please telephone 01-353 801 1 for 
an application form, or write (in strict 
confidence) to: Michael Hurton, (Ref 2706). 
Touche Ross & Co., Hill House, 1 Little New 
Street, London EC4A 3TR. 


Management Consultants 


r 


t==i a ii ii in 


HONG KONG 


Newly Qualified ACA with 
Provincial ‘Big 8‘ Training? 

GROUP FINANCIAL 
ACCOUNTANT 

Bedfordshire 

c.£lS'000 + Car + Relocation 

Our dient b a successful ana fast movlra pnvatt group or companies 
operating In the service sector, specialising bl the fteU of electronic 
communications. They now wish to appoint an ambitious newly qualified 
ACA to Join their group finance function. 

Working In a nighty professional environme n t , the successful camitaatg wtn 
be Involved In: 

— Consoiktation of results from subsidiaries and branches worttimoe. 

— Preparation of the financial accounts and management report* 

— Advising sailor imnagmmt on Aranda! matters, including corporation 
tax and current accounting standards. 

— Investigations hnn proposed acquisitions, mergers and disposals. 

— Ualson with external professional advisors. 

Applicants should be in their mid to btB 20's, who have, preferably, trained 
with a ‘Big ff practice In a provincial office. Peisonal skills that our dients 
seeks are. the abWty to communicate effectively with all levels of 
management serf-confidence: ambition and a sense of humour. 

For further Information, please send your up to date C.V- In canfide nce. tn 
NeHQOespie quoting reference no. 1/2348 or telephone him on 01-34Z 7773. 

EJWJL Management Personnel Ltd. 

Kfngsway Chambers. 44/46 Kktgsway. London WCZB 6EN 
01-242 7773 


/[Jv Accountant 

rm — Great Haseley, Oxford 

>1 V ( Near M40) 

Economic Forestry Group PLC, the leading forestry consultancy, 
management and contracting group in the UK, in me cause of implementing 
an expansive corporate plan, requires a quafifed assistant to the Group 
Accountant 

Reporting to the Group Accountant, the successful appficant wfll be 
responsfete lor a section of the accounts involved with developing 
enterprises. Famffiarity with computerised accounts and spread sheets, 
budgeting, forecasting costing and consolidation win be expected. Some 
travel wifl be involved. 

Aged 2W0. A salary of c£12,000 is offered and there is a pension scheme 
and free life insurance. 

Write with detailed CV to: 

J. A. PERROTT 
Gram Finance Director 
Forestry House 
Greet H a s e l ey 
OXFORD 0X9 7 PS 


■mm lonathanX^Tre* 1 

YDNEY J LONDON V W HONG KONC 

ACCOUNTANCY 

RECRUITMENT 

CONSULTANT 

£20,000 to £30,000 

Tbe newly established Accountancy Division of 
a major recruitment consultancy seeks a highly 
motivated and successful consultant, 
experienced in handling all levels of 
accountancy assignments in commerce and 
industry. 

We provide excellent accommodtion, technical 
support and advertising budget, coupled with an 
attractive base salary T plus a very generous 
commission scheme. 

If you are aged between 24 to 40, have had at 
least 2 years successful accountancy 
recruitment experience, please telephone or 
submit a detailed curriculum vitae. All calls and 
enquiries will be treated in strict confidence. 

For further information, please contact: 
Carol Jardine or Peter Haynes . 


ren 


Recruitment Coosufawts ▼ ▼ 

No - 1 New Street, faff BMinpuire). London EOM 4TP. 
Telephone: 01-623 1266 


FINANCIAL 

ACCOUNTANT 

With Entrepreneurial Flair - Gty Based 

Our dients, a leading International Bank, seek a graduate Chartered 
Accountant with invesUgations/mex^er/acquisitions experience either within 
the profession or a financial institution. At least two years post qualification 
experience is essential as weQ as the ability to fit in with an entrepreneurial 
team. Aged 24-30 the successful candidate could expect an above average 
salary and tbe usual banking benefits. 

Please reply in confidence to> Mrs J Dart, Bercsford Associat es Lt d, 
Boundary House, 91-93 Charterhouse Street, London EOM 6H8. 
Telephone 01 251 8191. 


GENERAL APPOINTMENTS 


TRAVEL CONSULTANT 

£1Q£00+ pa after 12 months 

If you are wbB VavsBod with an aptitude tor seWng. or have 
previous travel agency experience and are lookingwr a fast 
moving. chtdan^ng Job hi a very busy and progressive 
r«»! agency, ton apply to us. Situated m Kensington wtth 
a* Sconces, Travtcom, United Apollo and the moat 
advanced technology, wb are market leaders. 

Written appScations and CVS to: 



ttripra 





EXPORT 

ASSISTANT 

Experienced in Far 
East trade. 
Japanese or/and 
Korean speaking 
essential. 
Salary negotiable. 

Please send resume ta 
Wescot Overseas Ltd. 
14SA, Central Road , 
Worcester Park 
Surrey KT4 8EH 


CMEER PROSPECTS? 

If jou law previously run a 
buskiMt tpwHmw or ML 
dma) and ate a good 

^RW| wM* WiDjufAi eu 

aam a high income, we may 
frnpftB career opportt ri fr' 
lor you. 

V you Eve in London ortho 
Homo Coudes pioase rteg 

MeH MacLeod or 


01 631 1816. 



TRAINING OFFICER 

FOR 

SIMPSON (PICCADILLY) LTD. 

To undertake all aspects of muting wititis an ctdntive reoitl 
nwnioesi, Cnddus xoost have a minus un of 2 years' 
experience, good ermunrawaxua skills and a M imriwmin d hrg 
of tbe varied demands of this role. 

Written appbcaiioos giving details of education and exp eri en ce 
should be nt tin 

Personnel Executive, 

Simpson (Piccadilly) Ltd- 
203 Piccadilly, 

London W1A 2AS. 




ft GRADUATE 



AIRCRAFT 

TECHNICAL 

AUTHORS 

ATA IOC all chapters. 18 
nwmh caomct France. Fkac 
contact Lena Salih, quote ref. 
DT3VII on 01-952 8042 or 
write to Htward Orptmuon. 
RiokII House. MO High Sum. 
Edgware. Middlesex. 


■r wtetem Ite ■ UTOl 3BBL 


WHICH CA 
SUITS BEST? 

ftotassionai Gtiteice and 
Assessment tar aif ages. 

JMt yix Counts. Careers 
2*34 yis Hayas s . Changes 
36-54 jts ttarisw, 2M Own 

M details m bft brechsc- 

' • CAREB1 ANALYSTS 

- ^ r 90 Gkraskr Pbre Wl 



tor thermal aoayy sffldes ol 
Men rarsng ptaoc and uttnre. 

B Sc, CEng. 35 plus. To 
£20000 btOMynmeae. 
Sony. Pteasa send CV tK 
Mnfc CnarnHulf Uj 
niaHHre.iIPnteHB&lhi. 
CabtwSsOTfimi UL 

m- 


imm Lkwd* Wwi nci Bro- 
lw„ iw aB M. w nasa 
aim W i itf wstpd rcifcrutea, uia- 
nr negotiable. Rente to box 


GUY DEGRENNE 



Loadca, Essex, Hertfordshire sad 
„ . 4. Socti West 

Covering CwmreH, Dew, Somerset, ffatsirire, BannUre. 
Sg ^hWak a,Avoa.Gioocgtenhgc. 

bebomSSon"" 

Good beksaiaiy, ampagy car, imwaea, peasw. 

wumttcommMopP 

orartt to Taa^ 

TticptaKf0742) 451121 (e*. 27). 


is yaw view negative 
or positive??? 
Enropa's lesfcg Brofcnp sifl 
Is a tetri number a! pasttn 
for S3 par old. aataB W- 
Mots. 

Traaee Brakes wB raom M, 
pnfe sbal Wrin g ad npidy 
rang iwunenttn. 

CaB: Jobs n&affr-Teppii 
n si-499 mm 


IWUNCC aUHMBtg RmkW. 

ay waaen or major UK naan- j . .. . . 

CM Services Co. Oi 856 Bldl I W«ja- AtHupr Cam Manap. 

■sno 1 wnatir surtiae. «» 
tar *fctna. dhnhlng. land 
jrediOng. watte w unlM 9 
w»r tn mrnn s an sh Oetds. 
BfiSi trained. Ormianiniinli- 


Exseneneed M deautg BrtMB 
Sctwei Grow, amv w bb 



Recruitment 


Michael Page City, the major force in financial sector recruitment con- 
sultancy and part of one of the world’s leading communications and 
consultancy groups, continues to expand. 

The company has a substantial market share in many areas, including: . 

★ Insurance and Retail Finance Services . 

★ Securities Sales and Tradmgr 

★ wide range of Bankingand Investment Services. 

We now wish to appoint two further consultants, probably aged 25 -30, 
who have pammlar expertise or interest in one or more of the wove areas. 
We seek highly motivated individuals with, first-class personal qualities and 
total, commitment to dient service and the achievement of company and 
personal goals. Educated to degree standard, you should ideally offer 
experience in eidxer die financial sector or the reatittment business. 

In return we offer an excellent salary, generous profit sharing schemes and a 
foil range of public company fringe benefits, together with excellent career 
prospects. 

Please write to Nigel Halsey; Managing Director, Michael Page City at 
39-41 Parker Street, London WC2B 5LH, enclosing foU career, details. 
Strictest confidentiality is assured. 


I Interna tioru 


Michael Rage City 

International Recruitment Consultants -London Brussels Newark Fbris Sydney 
A member tfAtklison Consultancy Group PIC • . ' . ' 


INTERNAL AUDITOR 

RECENTLY QUALIFIED ACA 

Leamington Spa up to £11,500 4 Car 

Lum Poly, one of the largest travel agency multiples in the UK and pert of the Thomson. Travel Group 
which includes Thomson Hotdays and Britannia Airways, require an Internal Audtar. 

R eporting to the Internal Awfit Manager, the Internal AufltorwB be prat of a team involved fcimraiftorftig 
the admtnlstra ave and atxounfag pracdoes both to the Accounts Depa rt men t a nd throughout our Holday 
Shops. „ 

The tewn is based In Leamington Spa where our Accounts Department is situated. Ai of the accounting 
systems are computerised and coraiderabto aucM work is done at the base, but extensive travefing 
(Inducting overnight stays) Is necessary for local audts and advisory work. A suitable car and expanses 
are provided. 

The ideal canddatewiR be recently quaRfied ACA looking for a first move to a position wtwisaudMng and 
accounting skIBs can be used to the fuL Consideration wB be given to other carxfidates with suitabla 
experience. ' . 

we offer a competitive eatery, contributory pension • 

scheme, luncheon vouchers, 23 days holday. 

Appicants should send Ml personas and career detals toe ~ m 

Aim Righton, mAHWi PcMjf 

httemal AudR Manager, . . H 

Lum Poly Lkntted, ■ 

York Houso, f 

C la rendon Avenue, . I 


C la rendon A vans 
L ea mingto n Spa, 
WareridtaMra. 



Management 


125 High Holborn London WC 1 V 60/3 Selection Consultants G 1 -- 1 Q 5 J -’99 


M M ,; 




I 


B 


If you are reassessing: your 
career or seeking your first 
position as an accountant then 
read on. 

The Oyez Accountants 
Appointment Register presents your 
c.v. each month to a wide number of 
potential new employers quickly, 
simply and absolutely free! 

All you have to do is just complete, 
one specially designed application 
form, which marshals all the 
relevant information about your 
professional and personal qualities. . 
This is then included in the 
Accounts Register for a period 
specified by you. (Naturally, your . 


I would rate to Kg 

pln»e Mad me an 


identity ig withheld until interested 
firms request an interview. You are 
also able to exdude specific firms or 
locations). . 

The Oyez Accountants 
Appointment Register is, quite .. 
simply, the fastest and most precise 
way. to announce your availability, 
in complete confidence, to the 
widest number of potential' 
employers. 

To find out more send today, 
without obligation, for a free 
Candidate Pack. 


Accountants 

Appointment 


■ter as a 

ipfimuattm pad / 


oyezj” 


~nzn. 


ThaSoUnn' LawSUmwy SMltey pk 
Oyea Services Ltd, 

24 Gray’s fan Road, London WCtX 8HR. 
Tdephonc 01-831 2285 


The Ora Aftii mb Iran i teM ite HariiWr i» te 


Address 


S^rtntui 


























ct 0r 

-nt 


& ACCOUNTANCY 


RETAILING FORWARD TRUST NORTHERN RANK INVESTMENT RANKING COMPUTING TRUST MANAGEMENT CLY 
DESDALE BANK THOMAS COOK MIDLAND BASTE! CORPORATE BANKING nTTERSTATIOHAL BANKING RETAILING 
FORWARD TRUST NORTHERN" BANK INVESTMENT BANKING COMPUTING TRUST MANAGEMENT CLYDESDALE 
BANK THOMAS COOK MIDLAND BAJfl g _ RE TAILING. CORPQRAgE INTERNATIONAL BANKING RETAIL 

ING FORWARD TRUST NORTHERN ©j^FUjriNG TRUST MANAGEMENT CLYDES 

DALE BANK THOMAS COOK MIDLAND BANK RETAILING CORPORATE BANKING INTE RNAT IONAL BANKING RET 
AILING FORWARD TRUST NORTHERN BANK INVESTMENT BANKING COMPUTING TRUST MANAGEMENT CLYDE 
SDALE BANK THOMAS COOK MIDLAND BANK RETAILING CORPORATE BAN KING INTERNATIONAL BANKING 


RETAILING FORWARD TRUST NORTHERN J3AN^ INVESTMENT BANKING COMPUTING TRUST MANAGEMENT CL 
YDESDALE BANK THOMAS COOK MTTiT flUfj -^1* 1 OHM &rTTR1 BANKING INTERNATTONAL BANKING 

TRUST MANAGEMENT CL 

TAILING FORWARD TRUST NORTHERN RANK INVESTMENT BANKING COMPUTING TRUST MANAGEME^ CLY 
DESDALE BANK THOMAS COOK MIDLAND BANK CORPORATE BANKING INTERNATIONAL BANKING RETAILING 


-r 


DITOR 






4 mn 


untani 


* ~ * ‘ * ■ r • 


2 -V 


A diversity of highly successful businesses 
with interests which stretch way beyond the 
traditional bounds of banking and finance. 

A broad spectrum of exciting graduate 
opportunities in management, broking, 
sales, marketing, dealing, computing, 
retailing,, finance, investment, and other 
key specialisations. 

An environment where merit is quickly 
recognised and rewarded; 

This is the Midland Group today. With 
companies like Forward Trust which sells 
leasing and factoring to industry, and 
saving schemes to individuals; Investment 
Banking, combining established skills in 
merchant banking with stockbroking 
expertise and experience; Thomas Cook, 
the travel company; Clydesdale and 


Northern, the Group's Scottish and Irish 
banks; International Banking dealing with 
clients worldwide; Corporate Banking 
serving major businesses; Group 
Management Services which provides 
a massive resource of IT and computing 
skills; and of course Midland the high- 
street bank-each looking to turn today’s 
top graduates into tomorrow's top 
managers. 

With all these successful businesses 
to choose from, career development 
possibilities are outstanding. Throughout 
our activities we look for the best talent, 
and opportunities are usually open to good 
honours graduates in any discipline, 
although for some specific roles we do 
look for an appropriate degree. 


The Midland Group brochures, with 
details of all training and career opportunities, 
are available from your careers office, 
along with a special graduate video and 
information about our programme of 
university and polytechnic visits. 

Alternatively, you can write for details, 
stating any preferred sector/function if 
known, to: The Manager, (TT) Midland 
Group Recruitment and Development 
Office, Buchanan House, 24-30 Holborn, 
London EC1N 2HY. 





Midland Group 


INTERNATIONAL 

OPERATIONS 

cftgm + Gur 

Tbe key to success within this major hi-tech organisation (UK T/O 
£125M) Ues in immediate axxlcontiiixiedexpo&ro to its worldwide 
operating companies. Awrigned to destinations within Europe yon 
will undertake reviews, investigations and appraisals whilst 
gaining valuable international business skiDk 
PROSPECTS within the UELand abroad are exceptional; Newiy 
Qualified AC .A-’s seeking an opportunity unrivalled by other 
nugor organisations will be in a position to make a significant 
contribution to the company's success. 

Agpnerous benefits packagewill be offered to the successful 
candidate. 

Applications should be made to BILL CURl'KiSEet 6243. 

Tab 01-242 6321 

P erso nnel Resources 75 Gray’a Inn R oad London WClX BUS 


personnel 

Resources 


SMALL/MEDIIJM FIRM 
BACKGROUND 

£17,500+ • Full Relocation • Sports Facilities 
West Sussex 

Our client, fare-runners in Ma rketing. Distribution and Pro duction 
of quality paper, seek aNEWLY/RECENTLY QUALIFIED 
Chartered Accountant making the first move from Public Practice. 
Key responsibilities will indude:- 

• Fi n ancial Planning • M anage m ent Reporting ■ Liaison with 
Marketing Specialists •Product Analysis 
Backed by their international reputation for excellence, the 
company are renowned for the training and career progression 
offered to bright, ambitious professionals. The ideal candidate will 
be aged 24-27, commercially aware seeking a steep learning curve - 
success will lead to Line Managament/Finantaal Con troll ership. 
S nrte fole applicants should contact VIVIENNE SWAT ,r . quntjpg 

Teh 01-242 6321 

Personnel Resources 75 Gray’s Inn Road Loudon WClX 8US 


CO 



FINANCIAL 


!ii ] i * a 


Retail 

cJ£20,000 + Car 


An exceptional trading year and exciting plans for rapid future 
growth have created tremendous scope for effective Controllersbip. 
l e ading a professional team within this quality multi-outlet 
company, you will attend regular Board meetings, reporting on 
crucial operational areas including: - 

• performance monitoring 

• business planning; and 

• development of marketing strategies 

Qualified Accountants with relevant experience, aged 27-32 must 
possess considerable presence and commercial awareness. For 
immediate consideration contact ANNIE HEATH quoting re£ 6278 
or send CV Ur. 

Tdb 01-242 6321 

Personnel Resources 76 Gray’s Inn Road London WCLX SUB 


personnel 

Resources 


i ;,i Sniut-'f' 



personnel 

Resources 

Iv.iduxtrkil l'iv>i' ,r; 


'rriat A- 


REGIIJIIMENT 

CONSULTANTS 

The Roger Parker Organisation 
is an established consultancy 
specialising in foreign exchange, 
treasury, capital markets and 
stockbroking. Doe to expansion 
of our global client base we now 
seek to complement our existing 
consultancy team by recruiting 
additional consultants. Ideally 
yoiu will be in your early to mid 
20s, have a good standard of 
education and have a knowledge 
of the City. Experience of the 
trading areas within our 
specialist fields would be an 
advantage. Remuneration will 
be negotiable a.a.e. 

Roger Parker 
Organisation 

65, London Wall 
London EC2 5TU 
01-588 2580 


T.W.A. 

TRANS WORLD AIRLINES 
A vacancy b»s arisen in ocr 

Imeniasknia] Accounting o™* 

— for a faff time experienced 

ACCOUNTING CLERK 

Stiity Range £720 to £9548 per aamm. 


You &e young, have ability and personality 
"Why would you want to work in abank? 


With today’s excellent training 
opportunities and real promotional 
prospects, together with variety, 
interest and security there have never 
been better reasons to move into 
financial services —with Lloyds Bank. 

We have immediate vacancies at 
branches in Central and Greater 
London, as well as at head office 
departments^ 

. We are looking for Account 
Services Assistants, aged up to 25, 
with an aptitude for office work, an eye 
for detail and a head for figures. To be 
successful, you’ll need the confidence 
andpersonality to deal in a friendly and 
efficient manner with both customers 
and other members of your team. 


If you’re under 25 and have good 
copy, audio or shorthand typing skills 
you could join us as a Secretarial 
Assistant. 

For both positions starting salaries 
will be up to £7,600 pa inclusive of 
territorial allowance. 

"Ybull also receive a full range of 
attractive benefits which includes an 
annual bonus, a profit sharing scheme, 
season ticket loans, at least 21 days 
holiday sports and social activities. 

So you see there are many good 
reasons for working in a bank— and we 
offer the best of them. 

For an application form please 
complete the coupon and post it now. 


. To: Mike Page 

I Regional Personnel Manager 

| Lloyds Bank Pic 

j Freepost 

i London EC4B 4AJ. 



Lloyds 

Bank 


Dk«S-Or«?eas General Accounting. 
Trans Wprid Airfines Inc 


— 

ineer’s 

tastic’ 

yin 

d mechanical en- 
>nt the £8,000 he 
>le Portfolio Gold 
yesterday to good 

date my gram ch- 
ase my donation 
i had appeal and 
¥ next year,’’ Mr 
od, of AUestree, 

aged 51. who has 
no Gold since h 
f Times, said that 
believe his luck, 
tisfantastir.ltis 
fence.'’ 

old cants can be 
sending a stam- 
d envelope to: 



1 Wood 

;er of 

fives 

»eer 

n Young 

>ed in brewing 
3rmkersand,in 
even kill them, 
for Real Ale 
lay. 

the campaign’s 
hat’s Brewing, 
Yotz, a former 
vd Beer Guide, 
jle who have 
ther breathing 
us disorders, 
vbo are aUeigjc' 
s, can suffer ill 
nxing beers in 
s have been 
3duce a foamy 
larity, or to 
fe 

d States,' the' 
jore than 40 
'heart attacks 
wers used co- 
in beer to 
ning head. 


peal 

nnan couple 
•s last July for 
eeking reduc- 
itences. 

Lord Lane, 
ice, will pre- 
Li cations by 
bnja Schulze, 
for leave to 
he sentences 
Justice Mi- 
the Central 




or storage 
awy shows 
ace Heater 



3Vfc* high 

3Vt‘ high 


fLy 1 * I 

stolid. 1 1 


Cnia&rd, Middx. IW5 9TW. 


A THOROUGHBRED AMONGST BANKS. 










!•» ,1.,^ . uni) 1 s««n flB* < 


: t 




th~f TIMES THURSDAY NOVEMBER 27 1986. 


BANKING & ACCOUNTANCY 


LA CRfeME DEIACRfeME 




TEMPORARY 
SECRETARY P/A 




MESSING ABOUT IN BOATS 

N. LONDON £19,000 + CAR 

UK subsidiary of major leisure/iour operating PLC require ambitious 
Accountant to run the department and become fully involved in corporate 
decision taking at board level 


The External Relations Co-ordinator of tins 
international Arm of Consulting Engineers 
and Architects needs a Secretory/ 
Personal Assistant from January 1987 for 
six months while his present PA is on 
leave of absence. 


decision taking at board level 
C4338 

MONUMENT 9 Eastcheap, EC3M 1BN 01-626 06668 


CORPORATE FINANCE 


W1 £12,000 + 

Leading merchant bank seek graduate/part qualified Accountant to train in 
corporate finance division. One or two vcais accounting experience 
required Benefits: subsidised mortgage ana study package. 

ReC ST/3030 

BOND ST. 79 Now Bond Afreet. W1Y 9DB 01-493 3813 


The job calls for a good academic 
background and secretarial skSs (the 
typewriter is an Olivetti ET2r$, 
memory + DU10Q) and the ability to 
organise social events, exhibitions, 
itineraries fry visitors, etc. Previous 
experience in publishing/ joumafism would 
be useful as the person appointed will be 
expected to (day a large [art in producing 
one of our in-house journals. 


\Mzz Search. 6 l Selection — _ — 

SECRETARIAL AGENCY 

Business Opportunity 

Wears exclusively retained by a Scottish based secretarial 
rtaiutmoit agency who have recantty^aHl 
inactive reaufaiwnt baseless and are tootan g tor som eone 
eaeiiewed in the rrenjflment irefaS&y. Preferably with 
secretarial agency experience, to rebuso previous (Sent 
con tacts and establish new contacts. Future pros pects op en 
the door to being involved in all aspects of management ui 
ihe croup and obam equty share. However, the initial priority 
is to hold up the client portfolio with a view a recruiting 
further staff. 


The salary is regofetfe. £12.000 eta and partfcpahon in 
a performance related bonus scheme. 


if you are interested, please apply 
in writing, jpving details of your 
qualifications and experience and 
indicating salary expectations to: 


Contact m con fid ence Mr RA. Fletcher, Director, 
or Mrs Kathleen Atecm, Ffetcfrar Jones Ui, 
Search end Selection, 4a Wffiam Street, 
Knightsbridge, London SW1X 9HL. 


m VICTORIA' 
STATION 

£9,500 

This very informal 
medium proper- 
ly company seek a PA 
to work with two 
cfcsn3Ufi£ 

You. wilt hm your 
own office sod will 
n«d a confident tele- 
phone manner - for 
travel arrangements, 
H jrni Hajsoa etc. 
Skills of 8Q/50 CX- 
traia Olivetti Wp) age 
21 *. 


Bernadette 

of Bond St- 

Remimcnl 

' in as IWN N t — <hfl< 


Maureen Preston, 


CELLULOID SUCCESS! 


W1 £11,000 

Advertising and film production company seek an "on the ball” 
Bookkeeper with administrative and client liaison flair, experience to inai 
balance essential and excellent benefits offered. 

Ref: JM.BS 106 


Ove Arup Partners] 

13 FHzroy Street, 
London W1P6BQ. 


Admin/PA 


SECRETARY 
(OVER 20) 


BAKER S TR E ET 106 Baker Street W1M 1LA 01-935 1493 


HIGH VARIETY 


WG1 £18-20,000 

Qualified Accountants with flair and ambition - consider this interesting, 
varied role with major stockbrokers! Financial accounting plus acquisinon 
planning, spreadsheet modelling and ample scope for progression. 

Ref: C6787 


HOLBORN 307/8 High Holbom. WC1V 7LR 01-404 4561 


Personnel 


MANAGER 
OF FINANCE 


[ FINANCIAL ANALYST 


COMPETITIVE SALARY + CAR 
+ BONUS + MEDICAL 


A small successful company marketing 
construction equipment seek a Manager of 
Finance who will also serve as Company 
Secretary. The position will involve active 
participation in the operation of the business 
and responsibility for all the financial aspects 
of the Company. It wiR also provide a diverse 
range of experience including personnel, 
admin., and contact with financial institutions. 


This position wiU most likely attract a recently 
qualified accountant (age 27 +) seeking to 
broaden his/her commercial experience 
while managing a small finance department. 


A property annuity ndocatng to 
Maytav in the near tutunt e loolung 
(or a youtg. dynanC perm to 
asset the company «€h As am ot 
(hventtymg its present aebutes 
through the acqwsaon of suutta 
caroms. All apptcarts should 
pieferaMy be quadhed m nurt un s 
or trom a tafeng emravnem 
with commercial and imanctal 
skills, experience of corporate 
finance and acquisition attars, 
takeovers and share aegustans 
and wring to work n a small 
professional team environment. 
We are offering a highly 
competitive salary plus equity 
participati on an d would be 
prepared to engage someone on a 
msu tt an y bass. Please write in 
carrhdence endaseig a hi! cm 
mrium veze to: 

SMC Estates UiL. 

Imperial Chambers. 

10-17 Sownways Parade, 
Woodford Arenas, 

Word 162 6JK. 


£10,000 package 

This multinational holding company are looking 
for a professional person with drive and ambition 
to join their Services Division. Working together 
with the Administration Manager in this 
expanding role, you will assist with staff 
recruitment and total maintenance of the Head 
Office. Good skills (90- 50 1 and WP experience 
are essential. Rersonncl experience an advantage. 
Age 25+ . Please telephone 01-409 1232. 


£11,000 + bonus 

An excellent opening fur a real ‘seli-skirter’ to 
join this large Management Consultants. As RA 
lo the Senior Consultant of their Executive 
Research Division you will handle higlily 
cnnfiileniial projects, and a constant schedule of 
diary- interview amuipements. Senior level 
experience, an excellent telephone manner, 
poise, style and integrity essential Skills: 90- 60. 
Please telephone 01-409 1232. 


60+/90 

For smaD and friendly 
busy Chartered 
Survey ois office dose 
Co vent Gaitten/Oxfbtd 
St Varied and 
interesting work with 
efieot contact 
£8.000 neg. 

Tel: Caroline on 
6372669 




FASHION 
SHOWS ! 

£9,000 


Natural History 

to £9,000 


Are you 22+ with good 
aecrctario! zk3h rad 
interested in t-w nh— and 
fabrics 7 If n you’d enjoy 

• Ona tnWnttHnntl 

Fwthss: GcOKitny. You 
could join (heir pnnaoiioaal 
team ocoinr with both PJt 
and Press. C M Jib R oberts 
on 01-433 3005. 


RivtuiI mciii O.itotillanl* 


Rrst Class Administrator 

for 

a newly established search company 
based in the City 
£10,000 - £12,000 pJL + bonus 


We are young, ambitious, experienced City recruitment 
specialists in need of organising. We wart a friendly, bright 
adi m res tr a to r to assist in setting up systems to 
streantine our efforts. 


This prestigious Vfest-End based Society 
are seeking a well-educated and well- 
organised person to join their small 
team. Working with a friendly informal 
crowd, you will be dealing with pro- 
fessors and experts from all over the 
world. This is an unusual position which 
would suit someone with an interest in 
natural history /conservation. Excellent 
typing essential Age 21+. Please 
telephone 0 1-493 57S7. 


01-4S3 SMS 

-#BCCOt«J 


ESTATE 

AGENTS 


Please apply to: Chantal Gray 


CETCO 

IF®* (Construction Equipment) Ltd 
113 Upper Richmond Road 
Putney, London SW15 2TL 

CETC D Tab 01-785 6311 


QUALIFIED 

ACCOUNTANT 


You should enjoy working on your own initiative, researching 
and contact with dints. 


MANAGEMENT 

ACCOUNTANT 


mg m *1/0 

A vaonn ousts m one <H Uadoi s Hn»a I 


esuwsto# im) hakiIt ttf/a wno 

coniBin, 5 lot j t'Jbo j unbilled 

jra ma B R you n knag la i ' 


DEALERSHIP FINANCIAL COW- 
TmUOS. ££16.000 iwg. 
Mum DC qiulRM. MWrlfncKl 
r*Ul| motor xcounUnb for 
Nfcstn OcaJerslUp, in Camden 
and Ilford Tricpbooe: 107531 
WW092 «24 firf. ans.i Bilan 
SraWti Associates lAjnnyi 


reg no A1/55 

An excefart oax*ti*Ny has arisen 
lor a vWH quoted accountant n 
•mk n ou Treasury departrort of 
an flitemaMmal company. H voi in 
over 30 and loakng for a 
c te tanppg rater will eacdfan 
prospects ana a utry id 525 . COG 
oka benom package, coman tan 
Uer on 01 6269031 

RELIANCE EXECUTIVE 


This position is not a 9 to 5 job for the faint hearted but a real 
opportunity to grow within a new company. 

Telephone: G28 4200 ext 406 to speak 
to Kevin, Paid or Suzie 


GORDON-YATES 


restoenuai mvssiiumus 
department raqoira 
outstanding PA with 
varied duties. Age 22-35. 
Excellent EngMi and 
9acratarial sldla. Driving 
ficenoe and fntlfotivs. 


Salary £10,000 pa. 
Tel 221 3534 


fbenaonau i^'«M>luniu 


emp agy 

kcence no SE|A|2SIZ 


CALLING ALL SENIOR SECS 


! ra.apuatanBaWrw>0i6269B2l 
RELIANCE EXECUTtVE 


cTS ^A)28l 2 


WIUU6QIT. AmbUiMB and 
Writ spoken IndkMdual for Ca- 
reer In Cnmmodiues. 19+. 01 
404 0666. 


PDHSROKC A KMUOKC. Uie 
IMemalkaval «rn- 
ptoymnil agency. In vile 
appUraUons tram orof nslonally 
npeilenced accoemtaom and 
lawen. under 30. lo train m re- 
rmfonrnl consul la ncy. 

OualUlraUan Iho deslrrabie K 
not nsenllal. Tel: Ol 236 OOl 1. 


Make 1987 a happy and prosperous year. Salaries from 
£9,5OO-£U I 5O0 in the media fashion finance etc. 
Don’t delay ring Maria now on 


SPANISH OIL COMPANY 
with offices in Knigfatsbridge 
seeks 

RECEPTIONIST/ 
JUNIOR SECRETARY 


£8,500 - £13,000 


583 1661 

Angel ASB Recruitment Consultants 


from January 1487. Mnfi have a pleasant easy going manner. 
British mother longue. «iih knowledge of Spanish. Salary £8.000 
+ nnUenl perks. Please send CV lonispBDQiJ (UK) limiied. 5 
Prince's Gate. London SW7 IQJ 


Warts and all reports 
on our efients' current 
sec/pa vacancies 
posted tonight if you 
cad Premium 
Secretaries on 486 
2667 before 6.45pm. 


SUPER SECRETARIES 


EXECUTIVE CREME 


FARRAR STEAD A GLYN 


Are looking tor Soper Sac 
to work manly lor Partner 
in busy. but ton 
Commercial office. 2 mrts 
from Harrods. Mainly 
audo and WP. Salary 
area £9.000 aae. 


MULTI-NATIONAL 

EXPORT 

COMPANY 


Tat 91 591 3917 id JG 
(No Agenda*} 


of Indai ongn. requnes 
shorltand typst familw with 
export documanti. West End 
offices, good terms. 

Rug 01-380 1588 
MrKbosfa. 


amrouATe cue pa cii.ooo. 
On# of the most ractung ton kv- 
«f Manooemml CMouluab an 
looking (or a PA to a new Bart- 
ow. You will be dealing with 
graduate m iuili nnil from a 
malor unrvemiy . arranging the 
new annual conference wlUrti 
will be held In the States, and 
generally assisting on I he very 
busy production side. No short- 
hand reaulred. but good copy. 
Age 23-26 years. 563 1034 
Meredith Scon Recruliment. 


« P Wm> SCCMCTAKY 

£10.000. Textile nrm. dose Ox- 
ford Circus, needs Capable, 
versatur all-rounder wiin exs. 
.shipping documents. Deal wiui 
Far Cm More admin than typ- 
ing Memory T/W. Can Maura 
Thomas or Kll Gunner OFFICE 
ANGELS (tec Coos 01-629 
0777. 


SB NODS TOW Top PWOci. re- 
sponsible lor award winning PR 


cam peg! iw needs brfBL social- 
ly confident pa/SECS lo 
£9.500 to worn on exciting 
protects. Also seme 2nd Mbber 
pasts £8.500 ♦. Orvent Garden 
Bureaux. HO fieri SL. EC*. 
363 7W6 


THCATRC THEATRE: Chance lo 
lom tainous London TUcalrc on 
on* organising rtde tor Sec wren 
s/M In early 20V. £8-000+. , 
Cmem Garden Bureaux. 110 
Fleet St_ EC*. 3SS 7696 


SECRETARY TO 
CHAIRMAN OF 
PARTNERS 


KCEpnomsr cor7,ooo. a 

Iiiendly C on st l l l an cy 

ipNWhlng ui Ctly and PR re- 
cru/bReni near Gannon St 
station needs a Wight, very well 
snoken/presenled 18 22 year 
old lo run ihdr prestigious re- 
cejdhm area, dealing with a 
modern iMUMMM, tort at la- 
lerestliig vhllors. some typing 
and admin Please telephone 
Julia on 01 236 7307. No 
dfflctn 


UHERICAIf LAWYERS near 
Green Park arc uig ni iir look- 
ing for a PA secretary lo work 
tor an executive You will be 


shorthand and audio and wp 
experience ix-traln). Legal ex- 
perience u not essential but 
some would be useful. Age 30*. 
£11.000 BERNADETTE OF 
BOND ST. 01-629 1204 irec 
Carol. 


TWO WAJfO WP Operators tor 
American Lawyers near Green , 
Park. This successful firm with i 
superb refwtusned ofllces are 
currently seeking to recruit a 
fulWrne experienced WP opera- , 
lor with float accurate typing - 
£11.000 and a partume Opera- 
tor 'hours S - 10pm. 6 days per 
I ween £9.780 M BERNA- 
DETTE OF BOND ST. 01-629 
1204 tree cons) 


CONSERVATIVE Member of Par- 
liament requires secretary, 
preferabl y wi tn House of Com- 
mons expe rien ce, from 2 nd 
February 1987 tor Hx month 
period, due to maternity leave 
of currem secretary, with 
poMbuty of per m a n en t employ- 
ment thereafter. Contact Ol- 
219 4008. 


a oire secretary for their 
Chelsea office. Shorthand not I 
vital, but dtock and actuate . 
typing essential. Apply imUatry 
to The Ungaro Partnership. 30 
Pan Mao. London SWt. 01-930 
1646. 


RESEARCH t DEVELOPMENT 

sec for inn CO. 90/60 * apti- 
tude for admin. £10.000. Can 
Natalia TED A®> 01 736 9867. 


FRENCH nurauiu. SECS Wllh 
good shills and ncp. for posts In 
City Sanh >£12.000 *t. Cosmet- 
ics Co. ■ L9.0O3i. Engineering 

Co. Ui w London CEIO OOOJ. 
Carreiour Agy 01-404 4S54 


W1 Legal Clo.Soo. ana sec 10 se- 
nior partner comm, convey-, 
anting. Speeds 90/60. Ref 
1082. USB Of SZS 3394 (Agy*. 


I CILOOOi Mature 8/H Sfrt <31. 
one with wp. one with French 
Choice of beautiful offices 
Wl/swi/Covenl Garden. 
Please nng Mrs P rime r. 
Belgravia Buniau 01 584 2844 


RECEPTION - iflLMO. Ea- 
pandlng Cay Co. needs lop 
Quality aoptmnt. Vouag team 
and Superb new omm. Accu- 
rate lyptog esoenOaL 24-45. 
Javsar Careers tsioane Square) 
LHL 01-730 6148. 



UVERPOm. STREET Organised 
secretary with shorthand re- 
aulred lor charming small start- 
up Marine Insurance cu. , 
Considerable scope for Uvootve- 
menl. Up 10 £9.000 neg- ACP i 
roc COBS 01-838 8987/0680). 


EARLY START-EARLY FBftSH 

In Wd GB sec Stalls Of 90/60 * I 
organising aMUly for education- i 
at estaWtthmem. Dudes Involve 
admuslons etc . 5 wla hols, c 
£9.600. Link ASMS. 846 9743 


TKCni Dinpnrj Permanent 
4 m n p orary poa tn o n a. AMSA 


GERMAN /ENSUSH PA Slow SH. 
Maidstone. £9.009. Language 
Staff Agy 4358922 . 


RMWICUAL GERMAN Sec for 
MD. S/H In both languages. Gd 
Iruervmonal skids A presento- 
Ifon. c £14.000 + tone perks. 
Link Laaguap* APMS. 846 9743 


tRERCH PHRASES £10.000 
General managers PA. co based 
In W6. Speeds 90/60 + good 
FTench. Ref 1080. RSB Ol 828 
3394 (Agy '. 


UnU. 01 734 0832 

CEMNAN SPEAIOMC SECS with 
a/h and exp. tor CKy Co. t, 
Chemical Co. in w. London. 
£9.000 * neg. Ctnefoor Agy 
01-404 4864 


MAGAZINE CO. PA to Dir. 
90/50. Professional, ambitious 
attitude * *4 comummcanon 1 
suits. £10000. Can Natalia 
TED Agy Ol 736 9837. 


Watts & Partners is a progressive font providing . 
professional services in the property maxtei and the 
construction industry. 

The position advertised will be bared in Central 
London and offers a challenging and rewarding rote 
to someone who can work on own ini dative and cope 
with respansibtiity. 

A minimum of 5 years experience preferably in a 
professional office is thought to be appropriate. 

Pieose apply in writing wish CP to: 

Ted Watts 
Watts & Partners 
58 Brook Street Mayfair. 
London, W1Y 1YB 


PORUSMKQ See lor Sales Dir. of 
malor Co. 100/60 a- WP dr 2 yn 
See r». tan g na g w useful. 22 - 
23 its. canoO * unk 
Language Appts 846 9743. 


EXEC PA with short ha nd. 
£12.800. TOP Director of large 
orgn seeks high calibre PA. Ad 
die nerics + more. Oil Amanda 
on 4994)788. 


or for farther information please 
telephone 01 629 2322. 


KMCHTSRMDCX £9.000. toiler- 
esl in computers? SH and 
audio? like to Jeani WP? Ref 
987. RSB 01 828 3394 (Awl 


To Place Your 
Classified Advertisement 


N ON-SECRETARIAL 


ADMINISTRATION - LANGUAGES 

SW1 - S11K++ 


Tlcasc telephone the appropriate number listed below 
between 9 a.m and o p.m. Monday lo Friday, 
or between 9.30 a.m and 1.00 p.m on Saturdays. 


NURSE 


Supervisor for luxury hotel’s business centre. 
Must be fluent in at least two European 
languages and very wefi-spoken fn Engflsti. 


Private Advertisers 
01 481 4000 


Birth, Marriage and Death Notices 01 481 4000 

Birth and Death notices may be accepted over the telephone. 
For publication itic following day please telephone by 1.30 pm. 
Marriage notices not appearing on the Court & Social page may 
also be accepted by telephone. 

Trade Advertisers: 


required part time for general practice in 
SW7. Specialist interest midwifery, 
gynaecology, some clerical duties, typing an 
advantage. 

Apply: telephone 01-581 3040. 


Although SH/typ'mg sWBs are not essential tor 
this position, a good understanding of office 
practice is necessary for the organisation of a 
bWingual secretarial team. 


Maturity, flrotibffJty and excellent communication 
skills are aB vital components at the right person. 


PURE RECEPTION. WpC knows 
Progeny Company seeks per- 
son wtin poise, confidence and 
charm (or theta reception. Booh 


Appointments 
Public Appointments 
Property 
Travel 

U.K. Holidays 

Motors 

Personal 

Business to Business 
Education 


01 482 4482 
01 48 i 1066 
01 481 1986 
01 481 1989 
01 488 3698 
01 481 4422 
01 481 1920 
01 481 1982 
01 481 1066 


lunch numbers, and above oil 
‘keep tabs' on everything that 
gorv on. 20-30 yean. c£9.O0O. 
Phone 583- 1 034 MBVdHn Scoo 
Recrunnon. 


Investment Management Co. to ' 
Knfgfitsbridgir. £9.000. Can Ol 

377 8600 (Qiy lor 01-439 7001 
iWeet End) SECRETARIES 
PLUS - The Secretarial 

Contmants- 


(■■DRAKE 


RE CRUHIHG and/or Banking 
exp needed a ronsulUnl wlm 
LJC Bonking Appointments ■ 
ourepKtaiSCRytiWWan- You 

art* 21 -30. rafoy your own area j 
of rcaponalbfllty and are looking I 
far loo satisfaction and good ft - 1 
naocui rewards. CBU Lyn Cecil - 
on 439-7001. 


PAST TIME 
VACANCIES 


SALES EXECUTIVE 


MATURE CLERK .TWT aged 
4060 yean lor Estate Agency 
m W 2 . Saury 3 htomnegotia- 
Me. Please call Joan 402 7360. 


Forthcoming Marriages. Weddings, etc for the 
Court and Social Page 
Cannot be accepted by Telephone 

Please send Court and Social Page notices to: 
Court & Social Advertising. 

Times Newspapers Ltd.. 

1. Pennington Street, 

London El 9DD 


BECROfTMEMT - SECRETARIAL OTVtStOH 

Over the years our business has become mare 
sop hfatica ted, and « particular our maflelng. In order 
to promote our services wb seefc a professorial Mies 
person wtih a proven track record in a service 
industry, who toots she/he coutt handle such an 
totangfote commod it y as fMOpto'. We m world 
leaders vwth Mgh standards, we oftor an excaBeffl 
package, pto npport and a structured career. For 
more information cal Marie-lherreso OstrowsM on 
01-S3T 0666. 


LEGAL LA CREME 


THE DRAKE BflERNATIONAL GROUP 


SECRETARY - RICHMOND 


LEGAL 

APPOINTMENTS 


Please affow at least 48 hours before publication. Any enquiries 
for the Court & Social page may be made after 10.30 a.m. on 


01 822 9953. 


For smafl. friendly h i te m^toia ! Youth Travel Organisation. To 
asst$] w8& aJpcssmert of teachers for Ewfeh Language 
comes. Apotante must have proven omra experanco. 
nceflent sftenti & typBifc an effiram M mettoftaJ 
approach and be aide to work under pressure during pete 
penods. Knowledge of French an advantage. 


de BEBtSTAIN 
HUMPHREY 


You may use your Access, Amcx, Diners or Visa card. 


£7,500+- 

Write CV ts Esn^iiage LU, 


Greytmnd Hoose. 23/24 Geo roe Stmt, 
Ridurand, Swrey TW9 IKY 


RwttB 2 Soficrers ttA testfon 
sri cnwMRsf aeenem hr 
range of pw g aort 
Sf»e» spearing dtatt. Please 
rent] C.V. to 

re asfitsnw ttmmY 
SARONA HOUSE. 

SLilalNBl% 
London W2A 3U. 


URGENTLY 

REQUIRED 


fw English School fa 
Tenerife. Accommodation 
provided. 

Tel: 0784 3 ^6 (Eves ) for 
lurffier Momra&m. . 


- INTERIOR - 
DESIGN 

UAYFA1R 

Top iu re riof design 
comp an y require*' a 
bright attractive sod 
bteiliiaa secretary to 
took after Z mp tfircc- 
too. Orgsatre sad 

occtuijs ■ Tfy 

aod keep track of their 
.where stems! Very 
varied - great foa. 
Good drills 80/50 - 
moa have WP experi- 
ence (Wang) but wiU 
X-oain. Salary £9,500 

age 23*. 


£moo 

PACKAGE 


A raccEBfel Vet j 
End aimmag egeacj { 
opwamiy appreem o lhn \ 


appratiBtts cdbol Tbej j 
ite> fan* . mat jfflfli* * 


ten bow • out tppcti* 

loen arc as eterytiriag 
looking for a 
MiHuunted wefl ipobcB. 
feoxoashlf apenaxed 
t wepiB B BX who wHI be- 
tooted to footing riar 
titer vini ua, booting 
tad* fegte etc. for 
their erecotmi aod oa- 
ttint; hot being troubled 


Bernadette 
of Bond St 

RecRiitmeM Copsmum 
■ NoM.IK4tovwfM4lfl| f* 


Bernadette 
of Bond St 

(teenrtntmCc«wa«ii 
• (fa S&knteMfoiwM^ 


BHJNGUAL SECRETARY 
RICHMOND 


With fluetti oral aid written Frendifla-Weraafional Youth 1 
Travel Orgafetexi. To liaise witti natowfae network 
of Co-OnSrators hantifeg ftomastay p ro pawng for! 
feBttpn students. Ttes varied anti fateresing post reqtires 
proven seort^/admfa stiUs, the atefty to remain 
utifagHbfe end to woik accwateftf imtier presswe aid to 
be pat of a team fa snafi, friendly, modan office. 
Applicants should be vriSog to mxk longer hows (faring 
the summer. Age 25+. 

Write »JBi CV to faroteagsage Ud, 
Groytaaati House, 23/24 Boons Street, 
Ricfemd, Smrey 7W9 1HY 


A NEW DESIGN 
FOR LIVING 


A rare oopoituniy bos arisen for a esroarperaen with a 
flair for aedgu to work in a baaon capacity fer the MD 
of an Dp-marital interior de ciMtiop ti company. 

The position be ban 
South Budcs. The kkai 
with no oomnritmants, h 
and a gamine datire to b 
and rewarding field. 

For further details. 

Call Kathy Lome or Becky Smith 
on 0494 783915. 


^firm's 

im boos t 

:ibe 1 1 1 


M 


Ouiilthorn PBISONNEL 


£9,000 

AMBITIOUS SECRETARY/PA 


required by large firm of Csntrut Londcm 
Estate Agents to administer small highly 
successful specialist team. Must have an 
excellent understanding of English, be hard 
working, presentable and able to work under 
pressure when required. Age 25-45 years. 

Driving Sconce essential 


To 


Telephone 727 0530 

RatanncaJMH 


GRADUATE 

appointments 


DECLARATtONOf 

DIVIDENDS 


GRADUATES 

WITH 1 TO 2 YEARS 
EXPERIENCE 
REQUIRED FOR 

CITY BANKING 
INSTITUTIONS 


PLEASE RING 
MICHAEL MUCH 
OF ROBERTS WATSON 
ON 01 734 5572 


GRADUATES 


tiv: i in »i ifikiiitiimj 

fMnCD liv, 4444UKB ■ ta* 

dmdcqd oT tta. 1.16 per Onfiwr 
Stair oT FtalO <FMLn6 per 
SAM far *e btacsL jwr 

'wiwbi SHAKE WAB»urre 

wrra coupons Amqflai 

Covoon No 3 acnanpuwd ny 
lkcigpnwiMedaim fan* WmMPe 

gnmed lo tee Cbmpn^>-ltaM 
aml Nonotol Wetnaw 
IV. Stack Office Scttkcl W 
Floor. 3) Old Bnad Sra. L4 HSsb 

K 2 N IEJ.ob UuonunU i ily «n 
Hr tan of 10 un. end 2 M. 
Cfalms nan be atatol by 

rmgnvl paam ftata mo- 

noun omm to HKMt,. 

Tbc <Sv*Jcod wffi be peyiNc « 
Svl.lb po-Prrc. k ycaim gp- 
pnafe. a ten S EWcnfacr v» 
30nm nrmder of Crop* No 2*. 




. , .>;u 


iperience" 
^trued w 


.sssssSAsas 

toUniatiKantea hnMeTu n 

to adgon ktakabtei Wmtof 
Tkilkwofinni 
Kingdom Imwnc Ta» M l to am rf 
14% on Or non dmdaid. Rim *1 
VK »dl iwt to Koaind w itKI 


REQUIRED FOR 

THE CITY 




PLEASE RING 
MICHAEL DOUCH 
OF ROBERTS WATSON 
ON 01-734 5572 


ite PH— » Sme. COma Non 
prtKnicd ea or after 4* me IW 
M be Minuf mti by. * 


enaptaed (tarn, n VK Mt 
crn£od by Ike fadvkNol 
taWn'i too rtaor «f Tae 
Kdiea—kmdtata 


RENTALS 


gES- R^Tto^l 

The R rotate of I toted, bad 
JapraT t a a enbe u ra. Tbc Nate-| 
Unto Aitete. tee* Zoted. 


Keith \ 
rCardale 
Groves 


[ No rway, jan p p a fe. SooA Afite, I 

StaTsStata. to lto I 





am to nbniaed a 
— ed b, the agteran. bo 
g Ste d g ■to UA 

Btedoa«ef 5 n«t ujl— d 
far a pmal refund bjrta> 
f— R41L I W lto Do 
Automate. Tbta farm a 


.SH 


W1KHTWRIDGE SW1 


PWly nel decorated ratfen tat 
writ fMowa. UKtan, double 


Utiten, daub 
»t E130pw. 


» IS*. 

ResMtoita of Italy ™ br* a Wl 
rtfimd by atomlna m Form S3 IT. 
certified for Mr bn ■» tepegw. 
tetortepfirtorpfrarjioauenTg. 
WitaalSMM. M, Amuentata. »d* 
tto ndrvm dtwdrod Mr 

In aB udte asm. NrttoHwd* 
Drodtad T»* u 23ft idB to do- 


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Income Tn any to d— fa 
fadpap toe nsiti aHidiMt calAtae 
mnw c d tk ntc n (be Uw» 

k ^shak£ carrmcATfs 


GOING 

OVERSEAS? 

WE HME WAITING 
COMMNYTBUUnS 
UNITING TO RENT 
YOUR HOUE fit 
CBCTML/9N tXWDON 


awsHAKE cnmncAjc, 
UGEIZRSD US THE NAME Of 
NATIONAL PffiOVINC lALlA NK 
(NOMINEES) LIMITED 
UMtdXardwBefaMfJte- 
ton rfHtoSoS'&etaiGt tinted 


Nat k mffi WiiaiinW er Bank PLC 
Stock Office Senta. "Sad HoorJO 
Obt ft nod Soot London tC2N 
IEJ. 

' hymeM «T (he dmdefld ml be 

MWMlbtrmaclidroflkco- 

ufieuc in o mi t ta nce 
Nlne'pMWni 
Ota ibmn mas afao cem- 
Gtee ate taedri dnn fan* “2 
fitranl ton at tto tow Bddrai* 
togntor mb tbe it h n an t «n- 


Buchanans 

Ltoffaga Managmenl 

01-3517757 


SOUTH OF THE 
THAMES 



WUMTwnuH Pretzy 3 storey. 
lunflM.CW9nhfliMla 
outot rtrteC 2 mfits. Crom tube. 
3 todk mr UUKD/ara-. at- 
tractive - B3r ■ ■ wntiwn cfcarf 


M dm ngn be temkned to 
Knoad POJjiBBiu k. Ppttri into- 
am be n w f ifirti 
taoone Tax Roufiemcnu ajjta 
to tan Above far Bow Start 

Wamtof 

Tto Rcasd One it 26 No natte 

hymm «H to oadt by Nnfatof 
tteftlM (Nonml 
tn or after Sto Derentar W» sad 
toti to xnlj eti » Mating te>ae 

”*raSvns«NWiiinOi 

njjtHjJrv 

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nated ■» tieiftto te Zb Navtafart 
l tat. A faHtorSnanueemeai wl 


I FfaJC (Man Stans *sd ffal j 


l» Mnsaber fM» 


K. , , 



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tennis 


BOXING; $100 MILLION BOUT LIKELY TO BE CHAMPION’S LAST 


Gomer and Croft given 

to restore faith 



v: 


By Rex Bellamy, Tennis Correspondent 

Sara Gomer and^ Annabel division will play at JLoano Britain 

and die third div ision 
Maribor, Yugoslavia. 







Croft, Who could be better 
players than has yet been 
evident, will represent Britain 
in the first division of die 
European Cup competition, a 
new event, at Eindhoven dar- 
ing the nett four days. 

Belinda .Borneo, aged 2D, 
will serve as suturing partner 
and reserve, thus advancing 
her education in die special 
stress of international team 
competition. Virginia Wade 
will captain ' the team and 
Owen Davidson has been 

engaged as coach. 


In every division die 
will at first compete in two 
groups of three. The most 
su ccessful nations win then 
contest the championship (or 
promotion) and the least 
successful will play off to 
decide relegation. Ties will 
consist of two and a 

doubles. 




£*» - 


The obvious absentees, are 
Jo Duties who is taking a 
Break from competition until 
the Australian championships 
in January, and Anne Hobbs, 
who has not been invited 
because Sue Mappin, the na- 
tional f** m manager, wanted 
to keep feith with the youngpr 
players — Miss Gomer and 
-Miss Croft — who won their 
group when the qualifying 
competition was {toyed in 
January at Ltiano on the Gulf 
ofGenoa. 



' That was not the usual kind 
of qualifying competition. It 
was necessary to sort out the 
nations competing in thk 
inaugural tournament so that 
they could be placed in three 
divisions, of sdl The second 


The corresponding men’s 
event, originally a Swedish 
initiative, has been played in 
various forms a^a> 1936 an* 
has achieved an ambiguous 
status. Hie competition is 
genome but the stronger na- 
tions tend to use the European 
Cup tournament to test poten- 
tial recruits to their worid. 
championship »«»««_ who 
compete for the Davis Cup 
and Federation Cup. 

Sweden have won the men's 
event more often than any 
other nation and their women, 
led by Katarina Lindqvist, 
must be slightly favoured in 
Eindhoven. The other te ams 
in the Swedish group will be 
Switzerland and The 
Netherlands. 


Britain's first opponents, 
today, will be a team of 
promising West • Germans, 
notably Qanriia Porwflk. Then 


must tackle a more 
formidable French team, led 
byCalherine Tanvier. 

Britain could win their 
group and . would have* an 
outside rf»n cn against Swe- 
den in the final. tin the other 
hand Fiance may beat Britain 
2-1, with the doubles probably 
the key matdi. At worst, 
Britain should consolidate 
their first division status. 

Miss Done and Mire Hobbs 
were beaten 3-0 by Denmark 
in July, in the first round of 
the Federation Cup com- 
petition, and four weds ago a 
makeshift American team m- 
flitted on Britain their heavi- 
est home defeat in the 
Wightman Cup for 34 years. 
Britain took only one set from 
Denmark and, in seven 
matches, only two from the 
United States. 

Mire Gomer and Miss Craft 
were preferred to Miss Hobbs 
in the Wightman Cup contest 
and are young enough to 
improve. In Eindhoven they 
wifi have an obvions chance to 
rescue a tittle dignity from the 
wreckage of Britain's 1986 
ambitions. 

Tbeir task, however; will 
not be easy and much will 



RUGBY LEAGUE 
DIARY 


Kangaroos 
sifted the 
wheat from 


the straw 


In t purely playing sense, the 
feeling in the wake of the 
whirlwind Australian tour is 
rather tike the sensations left 
behind by boisterous and unndy 
children at a Christmas party. 
The Kangaroos have left behind 

dazed and battered hosts, and on 

the field a trail of destruction. 
Yet their departure has left the 
domestic scene Oat la the return 
to doll routine. 

Like the Assyrians, the 
Australians came down Dke 
wolves on the fold, scattering 
and dev o ur i n g die best that 
Britain coadd offer, until at hut 
the final 'mi n raariow a l at 
Wigan the invaders were met 
ad-on, (be barriers went up, 
and British Rugby League re- 
gained pride and passion. Last 
Saturday’s epic battle at Central 
Park, in which only a couple of 
debatable refereeing dedshu 
tilted the scales towards Austra- 
lia, came just in the nick of time. 

The sdbcspect of the game 
in this co u ntr y was saved. 


CROSS-COUNTRY 


not dc easy ana muen win i - 11 . 

depend on whether they have TOT* GAIImOHt 
the self-assurance to exploit 1 1U1 UUL 

chances as well as the ability to 


Keeping his eye in: Leonard (right) engages Hagler in a who-blinks-first self-promotion contest at Bethesda 

Hagler is 
heading 


create them. 


Car Ann’s McEnroe stranded 


£lm boost 
for the ITF 


by Becker power 


tnom «, 




, , *»« 
' . T. *-*• 




The International Tennis 
.Federation have received a £1 
millicm-pbis sponsorship boost 
from General Motors. 

Under the three-year deal, 
■ announced in London yesterday 
by Hans Wflhehn Gaeb, vice- 
president of- public affairs at 
G.M.’s European headquarters 
'in Zurich, the European di- 
vision of the American motor 
giants will have exclusive car 
company advertising rights at 
major ITF tournaments, induct- 
ing the Davis and Federation 
cup competitions. 

General Motors are also to 
become the main sponsors of 
the men’s European indoor 
team championship, which w£D 
m future be known as the Opel 
European Cupv and the Worid 
Youth Cupi 

Philippe Chattier, the ITF 
. president, said: “This is a very 
great addition to our sponsor- 
ship because General Motors 
. have a great network of cars 
around the world.' which will be 
of benefit to us at our 
tournaments.** 

Opel, part ofihe GIM. group, 
have been involved m tennis for 
, a number of years, including 
sponsoring Stem Graf of West 
Germany, the world No. 3 
woman player. 

Meanwhile, in Melbourne, it 
was anno u n c e d that the Davis 
Cup final between Australia and 
Sweden, scheduled to be played 
• in TCooyong from December 26 
to 28, is a seD-oiit- Australian 
officials said that the last tickets 
for the final were sold yesterday 
morning. 

Australia’s last Davis Cup 
final meeting with Sweden, at 
Kooyong in 1983, was also a 
sell-out. 


- Atlanta (AP) — In a match 
dominated by. powerful serving. 
Boris -Becker finally overcame 
John McEnroe with his service 
returns to secure a 6-3, 5-7, 7-5 
victory in the first round of the 
£320,000 AT-and-T ehaiteqp . 
Earlier, Ivan Lendl frequently 
passed Miloslav Mecir at the net 
to beat his fellow Czechoslovak 
6-4, 6-3. 

Becker, the Wimbledon 
champion who is seeded third in 
the eight-man round robin tour- 
nament, broke McEnroe in the 
fifth and ninth games to win the 
first set, while conceding only 
one point on his own service. 

McEnroe, the sixth seed, cash- 
ed in on the first break point of 
the second set in the eleventh 
game when the West German 
pushed an easy return wide. The 
American then held serve to 
draw level 

The second game of die third 
set opened in bizarre fashion 
when McEnroe was deducted a 


penalty point between games, 
but Becker sportingly conceded 
the next point and tort the game 
before the partem of both 
players failing to even read] 
deuce on then opponent's ser- 
vice resumed. 

The end was as sudden as it 
was unexpected: Becker sud- 
denly finding inspiration to 
unleash retum-ofservice win- 
ners to lakft the itiatflh 
Lendl the world No. 1, had 
little difficulty dealing with 
Mecir. breaking his 
countryman's serve twice in the 
first set and immediately again 
in the second. Mecir had his 
only gtimmer of success to draw 
level at 2-Z 
In tire decisive fifth game, 
Lendl came back from 40-15 
downto break Mecir spin and 
and the top seed then stamped 
his authority on the match in the 
final game on Meat's service: 
RESULTS: Hntt round: I Land (Cz) bt M 
Mato (CM. *4, S3: B Bashar fwfo bt J 
Mc&roelus}. 6-3. 5-7. 7-&. .. 


By Sriknmar Sen 
Boring Correspondent 

The £50 mBBon (about £35 
million) World Booting Onmcfl 
boa t between Marvin Harter, 
the undisputed worid middle- 
weight champion* and Sat 
Ray Leonard, the former wefter- 
w ei ght mod lightwei gh t cham- 
pion, is beading for a sell-oat. A 
crowd af 5<LO0O are expected at 
Caesars Palace an April 6, 

The $160 (the cheapest), $200 
and $600 seals me already gc 
and a few more eyeball- 
eyeball publicity meetings, Bach 
as the one at Bethesda, Mary- 
land, yesterday, and aot even the 
$700 ringside cents wffl he left. 
Onr 1,000 ueusiiapu mea are 
exported to attend, the Woak- 
iogtom Post alone having asked 

for 10 «w h m B nhiim 


The boot is expected to «ms 
$100 nrflKnn Hagler will receive 
S37 wHW— and Ltaaud ooty 
$13 marfam, as he warned a fiat 
guaraatef rather thaa a percent- 
age of the gross. It wfll be 
flagter’s thfrteeath deforce and, 
igh it wfll leave hoi one 
short af Carlos Momow's record 
14 saccessi ve middleweight de- 
fences, Bfagfev is anlflcely to 
coatmae after this boot. 


Top-seed Gomez wins 


Rio de Janeiro (AP) — Andres 
Gomiez, of Ecuador, defeated 
Brazil's Ricardo Arioly 7-5, 6-4 
in the first round of the 
S 145,000 (about £100,000) Sul 
America Open tournament on 
Tuesday. 

' Gomez, ranked No. 10 in the 
wodd, is the' top seed in the 
tournament, winch began on 
Monday on the resort island of 
Itaparica, 1,055 miles north-east 
ofRio de Janeiro. - - 
In other first-round matches. 
Mark Dickson, ranked No. 94 
in the world, defeated Rick 
Leach, his fellow American, 7-6 
(7-2), 6-4, Julio Goes beat 


Canada’s Martin Wostenholme 
6-3, 6-1, and BraziTs Joao 
Soares overcame Argentina's 
Roberto Saad 3-6, 7-6 00*). 6- 
o 


In the second round, BraziTs 
Ivan Kky moved into the 
Quarter-finals after defeating 
Austria** Horst Skoffiranked 
No. 42 in the worid, 6-1, 1-6, 6- 
3. Fiance’s Jean Floxrian upset 
Peruvian Jaime Yzaga on Mon- 
day and followed it up by 
bearing Brazil's Luis Matter 7-6 
(7-0), 4-6. 6-1 on Tuesday. 


The tournament 
Saturday. 


ends on 


At the age of 32, some say a 
good bit mere, be any not have 
the desbe to cany m, especially 
if be is stripped of the Worid 
Batting Association aad Inter- 
national Bearing Federation ti- 
des far meeting Leonard aad not 
their respective No. 1 chal- 
lengers, Hero! Graham, of Shef- 
field, aod Thomas Hearns, of 
Detroit. 

At a recent Press conference 
n New York, Hagler said: “I 
have been looking forward to 
tins fight for years and have 
bees saving my mind and . body 
for this moinest. There is no one 
rise for me oat there. I realise 
that if this is my last fight I am 
goteg to aiake it my best fight 
and come ott smokin’." 

Leonard, aged 3ft, has not 
boxed since 1984 after a retina 
operation. 


alive again, and the World Cup 
may yet become a tournament 
and not a cakewalk for Austra- 
lia. Club, schoolboy, youth and 


Hutchings crusade to restore 
England to former glory 


Bamford saved by 
final performance 


By David Powell 


Tun Hutchings, England's 
finest cross-country runner of 
the past decade, has set up a one- 
man campaign to restore the 
nation’s position as a leading- 
world power. England's reputa- 
tion over the country has de- 
clined as markedly in recent 
years as her standing in track 
and field has risen. But, 
.Hutchings believes, the machin- 
ery is there to become great 
again: the problem is the people 
who are operating ft. 

You only have to list the 
names - Buckner, Solly, Lewis, 
McLeod, Qflrir*, Birins and 
Hutchings himse lf — to rec- 


ognize a team of potential world 
champions. But the Fnglfoh 
Cross Country Union's primi- 
tive selection procedure has 
relegated their team to two 
successive eighth places, their 
lowest ever position, instead of 
allowing them to challenge for 
the worid title which they used 
to win more often than not, but 
have not now won since 1980. 

Hutchings has decided to take 
action, writing to England's 
leading 25 cross-country run- 
ners asking them to “call the 
selectors’ bluff” and contest the 
inter-counties championship 
which takes place earlier in the 


EQUESTRIANISM 


Pony Club scheme for 
recreation incentives 


By Jenny MacArtbar 

The Pony Club ye ster da y 
hunched its Countryside Award 
Scheme aimed at increasing 
members’ knowledge of wildlife 
and the country and providing 
an imaginative project for the 
less competitive element of its 
36,000-strong membexsh ip. 

in traditional disciplines of 
showjumping, dressage and 
horse trials, the Pony Club has 
become fiercely competitive — 
and, while mis has helped 
produce most of Britain’s top 
riders including Gixmy Leng, 

Luc ind a Green and Mark Phil- 
lips, it has also created a gap 
between the competitive and 
non-competitive members. 

The Mounted Games, started 
by Prince Philip and aimed at 
closing the gap by providing 
something for the less ambitious 
riders, is now one of the most 
competitive “disciplines’’ of alL 
The scheme, announced at the 
Pony Club annual conference at 
Cardiff by Ernest McMtilen, the 
chairman, is designed for all 


members whether or not they 
own a pooy and whether belong- 
ing to a rural or urban branch. 

It is based on the Duke of 
Edinburgh’s Awards and was 
devised by Sue Waterer, a 
member of the Pony Club 
Council, helped by Maj. James 
Finney, chairman of the training 
committee. The three awards 
(under II, 14 and 17) each 
involve four sections: Horse- 
mastership, service, countryside 
knowledge and country pur- 
suits. Suggestions for the service 
section range from litter clearing 
to entertaining parties of inner- 
city, deprived or handicapped 
children. 

The success of the scheme 
relies heavily on voluntary help 
— one of the projects for the 
under 1 7s involves planning a 
two-hour route fororah the 
country, on horse, foot or 
bicycle, “with an accompanying 
adult” The member must be 
prepared to comment on every- 
thing of interest on the way. 


season than the national 
championship. Thu way, Hut- 
chings suggests, they would be 
obliged to give equal consid- 
eration to both races when 
making their selections 

Although the ECCU have 
informed Hutchings that the 
inter-counties will be used to 
help decide the tram. Hutchings 
believes that will- happen only if 
a strong field takes part. “I am 
going to call tbeir bluff and run 
the inler-oounties and. if I do 
well, hope to be selected for the 
England," be said yesterday. 

The Crawley man. whose 
world championship aspirations 
were ruined last winter when be 
was injured running an arduous 
nine-mile national just three 
weeks before the international 


hi ghlig ht of the season, added: 
“It would be nice to have those 


extra weeks to prepare for the 
worid championship knowing 
that I don’t have to run the 
national” 

H ulchings’s crusade gains fur- 
ther momentum tomorrow 
when he attends an historic 
meeting between athletes and 
ECCU selectors and manage- 
ment to discuss the future of the 
team. Hutchings will put for- 
ward his plan to build a squad of 
world championship winning 
quality on the eve of his 
appearance in the McVftie’s 
Challenge — probably the high- 
est standard cross-country event 
of the season in England. At 
Gateshead, his early season 
form wfll be tested by the likes 
of B inn s, Lewis and Cram 
(England), Hackney (Wales), 
Muir (Scotland), Domi 
Castro (Portugal) and 
(Spain). 

“The ECCU remain in the 
nineteenth century.’’ Hutchings, 
the 1984 world silver medal 
winner and reigning national 
champion, said. “Every aspect 
of athletics is commericiaL but 
the ECCU don’t even give 
grants for warm-weather 
training. 


amateur r ugby league took re- 
newed heart. Britain’s final 
performance probably came just 
hi time to save Maurice 
Bamford, the Great Britain coa- 
ch, aad his — ■ ■p win imm. 
Another thrashing after QM 
Trafford and EUanS Road would 
have placed the pistol of resigna- 
tion at Sanford's temples, and 
given the Rugby League a 
painful decisien to consider. 
Now, on the evidence of 
Saturday's brave and often ex- 
tremely skilful display by the 
i-inim, Bamford, Tfrlliimin 
the manager, and Phil Larder, 
the m if i d * " * coach, a ”4 Hiwr 
team deserve an extended terra. 
In the New Year, Great Britain 
i try oat their new- f ound 
determination against France. 

Although there were many 
who were ready to call for the 
head of B am fotd after the first 
two internationals, certain ques- 
tions need to be asked before 
such a step could be justified. 
Firstly, who could replace hhn? 
Secomlly, there is the larger 
question about the whole future 
of British rugby league, with the 
now entrenched opinion that the 
game in this country is inferior 
to foe game in Australia, with 
Bamford and his team —W"H 
foe best of inadequate material* 

Even if he was replaced by 
Alex Morphy, Peter Fox, Mal- 
colm Reilly « any other pre- 
tender, the situation would 
remain foe same, with the new 
incumbent making the same 
bricks with the same shortage of 
straw. 

To emphasize what this ad- 
man has reiterated in recent 
weeks, foe 13-q-side code in 
Britain needs revolution from 
foe schoolboy game upwards. 

If there is any supporter or 
official who needs farther re- 
minder of foe gap between this 
country and Australia, they can 
watch the progress daring the 
next few weeks of the Australian 
schoolboys squad that arrived 
yesterday for their tour. They 
are likriy to do to our best yoafo 
teams exactly what tbeir seniors 
did to Great Britain. 


Keith Mackiin 


. Queen’s Bench Divisional Court 


Law Report November 27 1 986 


Privy Council 


‘Experience’ to be 
construed widely 


Duty to return tenant’s deposit does not concern the land 


Regan v Croydon London 
Borough Council, Ex parte 
Leney 


Before Lord Justice May and Mr 
Justice Russell 


{Judgment November 26] 


The requirement in paragraph 
5 of PSun n of Schedule 1 to the 
Education Act 1944 that every 
education committee of a local 
education authority should in- 
clude “persons of experience in 
education” fell to be construed 
widely and did not require a 
member to have undergone 
training' or experience as a 
teacher. ' 


The Queen’s Bench Eti- 
visional Court so -held in 

- dismissing an ap pKcaiinn by Mr 
' Thomas Leney, secretary of the 

Croydon Teachers’ Association 
of the National Union ofTeacb- 
i era. for judicial review of the 

- dedskm of the Secretary of State 
for Education and Science on 
June 17, I98S whereby be 
declined to intervene under 

; section 68 of the Education Act 
1944 to direct the Croydon 
London Borough Council to 
. reconstitute its education 
' committee. 


1985, from the council to the 
Department of Education and 
Science details of the experience 
of die current members of the 
education committee were 
given. 

They showed that only one of 
the members bad actual teach- 
ing experience. Afl the members 
had had substantial contact with 
educational matters, having ei- 
ther been members of the 
committee for a number of 
years, governors of schools in- 
side or outside the borongh, or 
parents of children attendi n g 
schools. In most cases members 
fulfilled two or more of those 
criteria. 


Hie applicant’s contention 
vos that only those who had 
actually been teachers or trained 
as such or were involved in 
research in the area of teaching 
were capable of coming within 
the terms of paragraph 5 of Pan 
Hof Schedule 1 to the E duc ati o n 
Act 1944. 




Mr Martin Reynolds for lira 
applicant; Miss Elizabeth 
Appleby, QC and Miss Geneva 
Caws for the coundL 


- Those words should be given 
their ordinary and natural 
meaning The words themselves 
did not empoct foe necessity of a 

technical qualification or of 
having had teaching experience. 


« LORD JUSTICE MAY said 
■ that it had been the policy ofthe 

* council not lo co-opt teachers on 

- to the education committee, 
; which was the main body 

- responsible for the provision of 

* educational fedKtiei in the bor- 
oogh of Croydon, because it 

r took the view that that connnft- 


Io foe course -of argument, 
various examples were pat for- 
ward. One was that of a hypo- 
thetical member of the 
committee who had recently 
retired after being a bursar for 
35 years at a schooL Would such 
a person have had expe ri ence in 
education? Or would a retired 
member ofthe Department of 
Educatio n and' Science itself 
Could ft not be said that he 
would be a person with experi- 
ence in education? Both *"*** *~ 


Hna Ofoto Coomerdal Bank 
Ltd v Chrapfaua Industries Ltd 
(formerly known as Chiap 
Hna Oockes & Watches Ltd) 
Before Lord Bridge of Harwich, 
Lord Brandon of Oakbrook, 
Lord Oliver of Aybnerton, Lord 
Goff of Chievdey and Sr Ivor 
Richardson 

[Judgment November 25] 

The obligation of a landlord 
under , a cla u s e in a lease to 
return at the expiration of the 
term a security deposit paid by 
die tenant was not an obligation 
which touched and concerned 
the. bind, and the re fo re an 
assignee of the reversion was not 
obliged to repay money which it 
had never received. 

The Jodidal Committee of 
the Privy Council so held in 
allowing as appeal by Hna Chiao 
Commercial Bank Lid from the 
judgment ofthe Court of Appeal 
ofHong Kong on April 18, 1985, 
allowing an appeal by die ten- 
ant, Chiaphua Industries Ltd 
(formerly known as Chiap Hua 
Clocks & Watches Ltd) from a 
judgment of Mr Justice Mayo 
on January 14, 1985* in the High 
Court, whereby be dismissed the 
tenant's appeal from the order 
of Master. Boa dismissing the 
tenant’s application fin- a 
declaration that the bank was 
liable to return to the tenant foe 
security deposit of. HK. 
$277,896. 

Mr Michael Barnes, QC and 
Mr John Fraber for foe bank; 
Mr Jonathan Sumption; QC, for 
the T enan t. 


teeshouk lopiycompnse elected 

members. Teachers were, bow- paragraph 5. 

ever, co-opted to various sub- or ™ 

committees. 


That policy was not accept- 

* able to the National Union of 
' Teachers and a complaint was 

made toihe secretary of state m 
; July 1984. In that letter of 
, complaint - ft -was said -foal, 

• uniquely among local education 

l authorities in . aad 

« Wales, Croydon made no pro- 
' vision for co-opting members 
, on to the education committee. 

In a leper dated February 28. 


In tire circumstances one 
could not construe the words 
restrict! vely us contend ed for by 
tire appli cant. He description 
was applicable to the members 
oftfte committee, referred tom 
tire tetter of February 28, 1985- 
The application would be ms- 
missed- 


Mr Justice Bussell agreed. 


Solicitors: H. Pierce; Mr Kicb- 
ardG. Hemmings. CSoydon.- 


LORD OLIVER said that by 
a lease, Fook Kin Enterprises Go 
Ltd. as landlord, granted to the 
tenant a . . lease of certain 
premises in Hong Kong fin- a 
term of five years from February 
1, 1979. 

Clause 4(h) provided foal foe 
tenant should pay to the land- 
lord $277,896 as a security 
deposit <m or before the signing 

of foe tease and if there should 
be no breach of any of the terms 
2nd conditions on the part ofthe 
tenant the deposit should be 
returned to the tenant at foe 
expiration of foe term. 

In 1982 Took Kin m or tgaged 
its interest in foe tcve iti on to . 
the bank by way of assignment 
with provision for re-assign- 
ment, on repayment of ca pital 
and interest. -Nothing was ex- 
pressed about the- security, 
deposit 


Following default by Fook 
Kin under the mortgage, on 
January 15, 1983, the bank took 
possession of foe mortgaged 
property and took receipt of foe 
rents and profits. Fook Kin 
subsequently went into 
liquidation. 

The security deposit, -which 
was equivalent to two months 
rent, bad been paid by the 
tenant to Fook Kin at the 
commencement of the lease. On 
January 31. 1984, foe lease 
expired. Tire tenant was not 
that in breach of any of the 
terms and conditions nor was 
any breach before or after the 
assignment of the reversion to 
the bank suggested. 

It was not in dispute that the 
test of whether the original 
landlord's covenant to r eturn 
foe amount of the deposit was 
enforceable against a successor 
in title was the same as if the 
lease had been a lease of land in 
England, that was to say. 
whether foe covenant was one 
“entered into by a lessor with 
reference to foe subject-matter 
of tire lease” or, to use the 
common law terminology, 
whether it was a covenant which 
“touches and concerns -the 
land”. 

Nor was there any disagreo- 
. merit about tire formulation of 
the test for determining whefoer 
anygjven covenant touched and 
concerned foe land. Their Lord- 
ships bad been referred to and 
were conienx to adopt the 
passage in Cheshire and Bum's 
Modern Law of Real Property 
(13fo edition (1982) p430-431). 

The critical question was 
whether, assuming that as a 
matter of construction of the 
danse there could be deducted 
the intention by tbe original 
parties that the benefit and 
burden of the landlord's obliga- 
tion for payment should pass 
without express assignment or 
novation to and against succes- 
sors in title.' that was a result 
which, having regard to the 
nature and purpose of foe 
obligation, was capable of 
achievement. As regarded that 
question their Lordships found 
foemsetves unable u> agree with 

the - derision reached by the 

Court of Appeal in Hong Kong. 

In tire High Court Mr Justice 
Mayo, m holding -that the 
landlord's obligation ' to 
“return" foe deposit was am one 
which , ran .with the reversion, 
relied upon In re Hunter's Lease 


a 1942] Ch 1 24) and In re Dollar 
Land Corporation Ltd v Sol- 
omon ([1963] 39 DLR (2d) 22 1) 
where the relevant (acts were 
substantially indistinguishable 
from those io the instant case. In 
that case Mr Justice Gram in the 
Ontario High Court concluded 
(at p226) after an extensive 
review of the English 
authorities: 

“It would appear . . . that 
such an arrangement as is set 
forth in the guarantee danse of 
the lease- ... is a personal 
obligation only between tbe 
immediate landlord and his 
lessee. 11 is not such an arrange- 
ment as deals with 'the subject- 
matter of foe lease*. As Dollar 
Land received no part of tire 
S165 paid by the tenant Sol- 
omon, 2 do not find any 
obligation on its part to now 
repay the same to Solomon.” 

Tbe Court of Appeal ofHong 
Kong declined to follow that 
authority, observing that al- 
though the cases cited to Mr 
Justice Grant supported tbe 
general proposition that a cov- 
enant by a party to a lease to pay 
a sum at foe end ofthe term was 
personal to lire original parties, 
he did not have (and dot did Mr 
Justice Mayo) the benefit of the 
citation of tire two English cases 
which put a gloss upon that 
general proposition, namely 
MansH v Norton f[ 1 8831 22 ChD 
769) and Lora Howard de 
Walden v Barber ([1903] 19 
TLR 183). 

With respect to tbe Court of 
Appeal, tbeir Lordships did not 
find either of those cases of great 
assistance in the solution of tbe 
question raised by the appeaL 

The tenant argued that in as 
much as its obligation to pay 
over tbe deposit on the execu- 
tion of the lease was an obliga- 
tion to secure the performance 
of covenants which touched and 
concerned the land, it was an 
obligation inextricably asso- 
ciated with covenants whose 
benefit and burden would pass 
with tire reversion in the lease 
respectively. 

The landlord's obligation to 
repay if those covenants were 
observed was. it was argued, 
inseparable from that associated 
obligation and therefore pos- 
sessed foe same characteristics 
as the covenants whose perfor- 
mance was secured try the 
associated obligation. To pm it' 
another way, tire obligation to 
deposit was an obligation of the 


tenant assumed by him qua 
tenant and ft followed that the 
correlative obligation of the 
landlord was an obligation as- 
sumed by him qua landlord. 

That the original tenant’s 
obligation to make tire deposit 
was “bound up” with his obliga- 
tion to perform the tenant’s 
covenants in the lease was 
undeniable, but tbe former was 
a once-fbr-all contractual obliga- 
tion between the original parties 
as to which no question of 
transfer mfo tbe term or with 
tbe reversion could arise. 

The appeal was concerned 
with tbe landlord’s obligation to 
repay once foe lease had expired 
without breach of covenant, 
there being neither any obliga- 
tion on the original landlord to 
pay over the amount of the 
deposit to an assignee of the 
reversion nor any obligation on 
the original tenant to assign to 
an assignee of tbe term his 
contractual right to receive back 
the amount of tire deposit when 
and if the condition for its 
repayment was fulfilled. 

It was bound up with tbe 
tenant’s covenant only, as it 
were, at one remove, as being an 
obligation correlative to a 
contractual obligation which 
was itself connected with tire 
performance of covenants 
touching and concerning tbe 
land. 

The tenant strongly relied 
upon Moss Empires Lid v 
Olympia (Liverpool) Ltd ((1939] 
AC 544) but that was a very 
different case and tbeir Lord- 
ships were not persuaded that ft 
was. or was ever intended to be. 
authority for the proposition 
that every covenant which was 
related, however obliquely, to 
some other obligation which 
touched and concerned the land 
necessarily took on from that 
very relationship the same 
character as regarded iransmis- 
sibiliry to or againsi successors 
in title. 


mised. To ask whether it af- 
fected the landlord fun landlord 
or foe tenant qua tenant begged 
tire question. It did so only if it 
ran with the reversion or with 
the land respectively. 

There was not, on any con- 
ceivable construction of foe 
clause, anything which either 
divested tbe original tenant of 
his contractual right to receive 
back, after assignment, the de- 
posit which he had paid or 
which entitled an assignee from 
him to claim foe benefit of tbe 
sum to the exclusion of his 
assignor and, plainly, the 
money could not be repaid more 
than once. 

Equally, there was not on any 
conceivable construction any- 
thing in the clause which en- 
titled the assignee of the 
reversion to take over from his 
assignor the benefit of the sum 
deposited or which obliged the 
assignee, in enforcing the cov- 
enants against foe tenant for the 
time being, to give credit for 
money which be bad never 
received and to which he had no 
claim. 

Tbe deposit was paid to the 
original payee because it was 
security for the performance of 
contractual obligations assumed 
throughout tbe term by tire 
payer and because the payee was 
the party with whom foe con- 
tract was entered into, but it was 
more realistic to regard the 
obligation as one entered into 


with foe landlord qua payee 
rather than qua landlord. 

By demanding and receiving 
the security, he assumed tbe 
obligation of any mortgagee to 
repay on foe stipulated con- 
dition and that obligation re- 
mained as be t ween himself and 
the original payer, throughout 
foe period of the lease, even 
though neither party might, 
when foe condition was ful- 
filled, have any further interest 
in foe land demised. 

The nature of the obligation 
was simply that of an obligation 
to repay money which had been 
received and it was neither 
necessary or logical, simply 
because foe conditions of repay- 
ment related to the performance 
of covenants in a lease, that the 
transfer of tbe reversion should 
create in the transferee an 
additional and coextensive 
obligation to pay money which 
he had never received and in 
which he never had any interest, 
or that tbe assignment of the 
term should vest m foe assignee 
the right to receive a sum which 
be had never paid. 

In re Dollar Land Corporation 
Ltd v Solomon ({1963] 39 DLR 
(2d) 221) was rightly decided. In 
all material respects it was 
indistinguishable from the in- 
stant case. Their Lordships 
recommended that the appeal 
should be allowed 

Solicitors: Clrfford-Turner; 
Turner Kenneth Brown. 


Summary application 


To say that the obligation to 
“return the amount of the 


deposit was “inextricably bound 
up with" covenants which 
touched and concerned foe land 
did not answer foe critical 
question of whether it itself 
touched and concerned tbe 'and. 

It did not per se affect the 
nature, quality or value of tbe 
[and either during or at foe end 
of foe tens. It did not per se 
affect the mode of using or 
eqjoying that which was de- 


Bebham v William Dawson & 
Sons Ltd and Another 

Where a judge was invited at 
the beginning of foe trial of an 
action to give judgment for foe 
plaintiff forthwith on all or part 
of his claim and then to proceed 
with foe trial of the defendant's 
counterclaim, be should treat 
foe application as if it were an 
application for summary judg- 
ment under Order 14 of foe 

Rules of the Supreme Court and 
follow foe practice set out in 
note 14/3-4/13 in The Supreme 
Court Practice 1985. 

It was most undesirable, even 
in arf^ot matters, that a note of 
foe judgment below should be 
put before the Court of Appeal 
without foe judge having been 
asked to approve it, if only 
informally. 


The Court of Appeal (Lord 
Justice Purchas and Lord Jus- 
tice Nourse) so stated on 
November 25. allowing itte 
defendant’s appeal from an 
order of Mr Justice Potts who on 
foe previous day lad given 
judgment for foe plaintiff on 
pan of his claim and ordered the 
trial to proceed on the 
defendants' counterclaim. 


Correction 


In Barrets & Baird (Whole- 
sale) Lid v IPCS ( The Times 
November 26) counsel for foe 
plaintiffs were Mr Anthony 
Lester, QC and Mr P. A. 
Goukfing; and far the defen- 
dants. Mr Eldred T ab a ch nik, 
QC and Mr S. C. Rubin. 







oid — 


ineer’s 

tastic’ 


fin 


d mechanical ea- 
rn* the £8,000 he 
lie Portfolio Gold 
yesterday to good 


date my gramo- 
ase my donation 
i hall appeal and 
V next year," Mr 
od, of Allestree, . 


aged 51, who has 
>lio Gold since it 

’ Times, said that 

believe his Inch, 
t is fantastic. It is . 


old cards can be 
sending a stam- 
d envelope Uk 
old, 



I Wood 


;er of 
lives 


ieer 


n Young 


led in brewing. 
Makers and, in 
even kill them, 
for Real Ale 
lay. 

the campaign's 
hat’s Brewing, 
’rotz. a former 
<od Beer Guide, 
de who have- 
ther breathing 
us disorders, 
vho are allergic! 
s, can suffer ill 
nking beers in 
a have been 
xluce a foamy 
iarity, or to 
fe 

d States; foe- 
iore than 40 
' heart attacks 
were used co- 
in beer to 
ning head. 


peal 


Titian couple 
*s last July for 
eekiog reduc- 
itences. 

_ Lord Lane, 
ipe, will pre- 
li cations by 
uja Schulze, 
for leave to 
be sentences 
Justice Mi- 
foe Central 





or storage 
ably shows 
ace Healer 


note or 

Brens. 


3V&" high 
: 3’.** high 


et. 


1 


I 


Bpaodp. 

paM(k- 

■biUd. 




SS9L 


T-T-TNOVIO .• 






RACING: GRUNDY’S TRAINER POISED FOR ANOTHER HURDLES VICTORY 




Fort Rupert can underline the 
versatility of Walwyn stable 



By Mandarin Undaunted, WaJwyn en- looked like beating bin) in the he looks just the type to 

(Michael Phillips) joyed further successes in the straight ^“eed a * steepteehaang. 

AJlbougb Peter Walwyn’s ^ NoM To ° ^ lhe fol^HWcf n£j£ ridi^ 

career on the turf is associated ranneHip that day, has won Jadee (12.45) and Co 

Principally with the deeds of by si* lengths in the mean- ftr TU dfSt- 

Grandy. Humble Duty, Eng- SSdnl ’ time, the form lootosohdand 

lish .Prince and Polygamy, w1 " 1 Flatmon & I expect Fort Ftupertto prove SofeRTirSfint appear- 


Undaunted, Walwyn en- 
joyed further successes in the 
jumping arena with Royal 


he looks just the type to 
succeed at steeplechasing. 

Otherwise it should pay to 
follow Hywel Davies riding 


Maclean 
in mood 
to make 
history 


classic winners alt it should Now, after a break of 20 odd 
not be forgotten during these years, he is intent on keeping 
winter months that he cut bis himself and his staff active 
teeth on jumpers in the early during the winter by schooling 
sixties when he was training at and running a few horses over 
Windsor House in Lambourn, jumps again. 

sg_:«£as 


Now, after a break of 20 odd too ‘good for Timely Star, ^oITa %£ou«* -Stf 
years, he is intent on keeping April Prince and Easier Lee, ^ mana ees to win the 
himself and his staff active who represents David ^vision of the Askett 
durina the winter by schooling Elsworth mstead ol Hypnosis. Wnu5p -jt Warwick 


of Helen Johnson Houghton. 

In feet, the first winner that 
Walwyn trained on his own 
account was Don Verde, who 
triumphed in a division of the 
Henwick Novices' Hurdle at 
Worcester on October 22, 
1960 in the hands of the then 
Mr John Lawrence, now Lord 
Qaksey. 


ibis term and at Wincanton 


Following creditable runs at 
Devon and Newbury, 
Doobleton looks a feir bet to 
win the Chard Han d icap 
Chase. On the West Country 


today I shall be both surprised course he was third to 
and disappointed if Fort Ru- Admiral’s Cup and Western 


first division of the Askett 
Novices’ Hurdle at Warwick 
(12J0), his own chance of 
winning the first division of 
the Young Farmers Novices' 
Hurdle at Wincanton a quar- 
ter of an hour later will look 
even greater. 

Si milar ly, another win for 
Indamelody in the Shipstoo 


£1 



ByCofo McQtriSan 


55<=P» MS to add the Su«s«(a ™ since) wide 

Wessex Handicap Hurdle to at Newbury he aqrountedfbr Handicap Chase (1.30) on the 
his spoils now that Hypnosis all but the smart, if somewhat track w ill draw 

has been withdrawn. unpredictable. Little Bay. attention to the chance that 


;"s 


has been withdrawn. 

A winner over today’s 


Qaksey. course and distance last Janu- Gertie Abbas Novices' Chase 

.After winning twice more ary, at the rewarding odds of concerns Aberlow. Trained in 
that season, Don Verde then 33-1. Fort Rupert will not start Upper Lambourn by Simon 
met with a fetal accident at at nearly such an appealing Christian, whose horses are 
Cheltenham where he was still price today following that running well now, Aberlow 
in with a good chance of impressive performance at finished fourth in the Sun 

. .i ^ it 1 1. «« av tka liAmnnino nf A llioitoa MmriivM?* Hnrrllo st 


ipreaiciaoie, uujc My. attention to the chance that 
My principal interest in the Co Member has of registering 


Game Abbas Novices' Chase his third victory ai Wincanton 
concerns Aberlow. Trained in in the Lord Stalbridge Me- 
Upper Lambourn by Simon modal Gold Cup. Recently 


they finished first and third in 
the same race at Warwick and 
1 believe that Co Member will 


; v>:v : -" ■’ : y .. . 

• 

. ‘%uyK ’ • £ 
• '■■iVi -S- •••: 

-;/,5 ■ * 

. V— ' £ • / 




winnine the County Hurdle at Chepstow ai the beginning of Alliance Novices* Hurdle at have benefited greatly from 

■ . n> m . ■■rlinh nAtkiMA IapI MilM>k nn/4 tk*it mn 


the last flight 


this month when nothing Cheltenham last March and that run. 


WINCANTON 


Selections 

By Mandarin 

12.45 Fence Judge. i 2.15 Co Member. 

1.15 Doubleion. 2.45 Aheriow^ 

1 .45 FORT RUPERT (nap). I 3. 1 5 Perfect Double 

By Michael Seely 
1.45 Easter Lee. 2.45 Aherlow. 

The Times Private Han dicapper's lop rating: 1.45 APRIL PRINCE. 


Guide to our in-line racecard 


0-0432 TWESFORM (CDJ3F) (Mrs JRjMy)BHaU 9-1M. 


Racecard number. Draw In brackets. Six-figure and distance winner. BF-beoten favourite In latest 
form (F-lefl. P-pufed up- Unnseated rider. B- raceL Owner In brackets. Trainer. Age and 
brouom (town. S-sflpped up. R -refused). Horse's weight RkJer plus any afcjwance. The Tones 
name (S-bMters. \nnsor. H-noocL E-eyasteaW. C- Private Han d toap peds rating. Appr oximate starting 
course winner. D-dounca winner. COcourse price. 


Going: good to soft 

12.45 YOUNG FARMERS NOVICE HURDLE (Dtv I: £863: 2m)(17 runners) 


1 224-210 DtSPOItT(MrsJ Thomson) WWIgMman 4-1 1-1 

6 O0RM2 BLACK SHEEP (CD) PMrsE Dudgeon) I Dudgeon 9-1 04-. 

7 BLUE HELD (J Kenny) D Kenny 5-1 0-8 

8 00 CAAVMGKMFE FCaptT Forster) T Forster 4-10-8 

10 3 FENCE JUDGE (S Preston) T Forster 4-1 0-8 

11 PO GALLOIS BOSQUET (T Bartlett) C Pophom 5-10-8 

12 HELLO ROCKY (R Shaw) Miss E Snayd 5-10-8 

13 00/0-0 LOCHFEN (D Greag) D Grfflg 5-10-8 — .. 

14 F0 LOSS ADJUSTER (J HucUej C Trietlna 4-10-8 

15 FP- MEXICAN JOE (Ms M Srmthl Q Ham 5-10-8 

16 NOBLE STORM rM»S Hart) Pj Jones 4-10-8. 


Mtterringtoa 

■a 


. P Scudamore 80 — 

H Davlea *99 3-1 

. Fetor Hobba 

J Frost — — 


— 98 — 


18 0FPPU0 RUSTY BOY (F Ayres) R Lee 7-104- 


19 0P0F3- SAILORS REWARD (F Carter) J King 4-1 0-8 

20 OPO-O SKYLARK WOMJEfi (A Hunt) L Kramard 4-10-8 

21 3P0230 EXAYTCE (G Tarmer) t Wardte 4-10-3 

22 OOOOPyP MULLERS WAY (Miss S Robinson) W Turner 4-1 (W ■ 

23 SPRING PUTREtC Best) DEtaworth 4-1 04 


CMan 

W Knox (4) 

SMCNoBf Cl 0-1 

B Rowel 

C Brown 89 10-1 

Tkacy Turner (7) — — 
P Holey (7) — 4-1 


1B8& DOUBLETON 4-10-8 R Rowe (85-40 tew) L Karmen! 13 ran 


CODM BlJlCK SHEEP (1 1-0) found Fishpond tf 0-9) 51 too good at Hereford (2m 4f. good to soft 
rUnM ously (10-0) beat Been Mugged (10-0) ivil hero pin. £1352. good. Oct 30. 14 ran). 
JUDGE (1 0-1 0) shu»d nicely when 71 3rd to Annie Ra (1 0-5), also hero (2m . ESKf, good to soft. Nov 1 3. 


LOSS ADJUSTgttlt-tn h 
Newtavy (2m, £1432. gooc 
Selection: FENCE JUDGE 


# __ rue Ra(lG-S). also here (an, £359, good no soli. Nov it 

rER (T7-0) had DISPORT (11-9 151 bKk in 6tft when 11X1 5»r to Feasraf Trooper (ft-U) at 
£1432. good to ton. Nov 12, 14 rah): a race in which LOCHFEN (11-0) was behind. 


1.15 CHARD HANDICAP CHASE (£1,959: 2m) (7 runners) 

1 0100-2F TARN (D) (MraT Holt) N Gaseiee 8-11-10 PScadamom 92 8-1 

2 1FU11F- AKRAM(D)(5A0en) R Hodges 8-11-9 H Bevies SB 4-1 

3 21210-0 PUKKA MAJOR (ILBF) (Mrs S Jones) O Sherwood S-1 1-6. Mr TltMonan Jones 92 8-1 

5 12-2432 DGUBLETON (BAD) (A Ford) L Kennmd 5-11-3 BPowaB • 99 F5-2 

6 431311 FUGHTSfEET (CD) (Mrs B Reed) P J Jones TO-KM CMsee « 7-2 

7 32024-4 ARCHERS PRMCE (R Shaw) C James 8710-1 

8 10224-4 HOPE GAP (B) (LWarfog) L Wwtog 10-1M GeotgelMrfft 9014-1 

1935: PADDYBORO 7-11-3 R Rowe (84 fav) J GBford 5 ran 


timate of ttxJ3e(11-i)beatD0UBL£T0N(1i4I5(at Newton Abbot (ZriNovH cap Ch.E2731.good to soft. May 
9, 7 ran). PUKKA MAJOR (11-8) weakened inside the trial half mOa when 13HL 5Bi to Majuba Road on 
reappearance art Humuietton C?m. £1632. good, Nov 15. 7 ranil DOUBLEION (10-0) ter from tfsgroced when 51 
SnJto Little Bay (1 l-1»al Newbury (anTraKS, seft, Nov 22, 8 ranjL PTOvtous^ (11-OJ IWsbed 18»1 3rd » 
Admiral's Cup (11-8) with HOPE GAP 111-0) a wel beaten last of 4 at Devon (2m If. £5228. soft. Nov 11). 
FLIGHT SHEET (IO-Wi on e haHnck attar beating Sir Lester (10-6) 41 at Tawitorpm if. £1488, good to Arm, 
Oct 23. 10 tan). ARCtERS PRINCE (-0-0) made late headway to finish SKI 4lh to Bnnesko (10-7) at Towcesfor 
(an. El 280. good, Mov 13. 12 ra n). fTnlertfoir, DOUBLETON 


1.45 WESSEX HANDICAP HURDLE (£3,355: 2m) (13 runners) 

2 1-0 BESPOKE (Mrs W Hero) T Forster 5-11-10 

5 12U22-Q TIMELY STAR (B Smith) Mrs J Pitman 5-11-4 

6 12312-0 SNOWBALL DANNY (D)(A Ward) A Moora 811-1 

7 03141/8- MUSK WONDER (CO) (E Comal) R Hodges S-10-1Q 

8 4314-11 UPHAM GAIQIE (D) (R Brinkworth) D Gandolfo 5-10-7__ M 

9 002FKS/ EASTER LEE (0) (A Hunt) DBsworth 6-188 

10 0112/32- APRS. PRMCE (P Fowler) F Vtcfer 5-10-5 

11 2/0410-0 TACHADOR (CD) (P Axon) R Hodges 8104. 

12 1423-21 FORT RUPBH (CD) (ISmUh)P Walwyn 4-104 

13 2321-13 OPEN THE BOX (B£>) (S Mason) G Bolding 7-10-4 (4*xj 

16 1/3000-0 HARBOUR BRIDGE (CD) (Mm A Lacey) I Dudgeon 6-10-0 — 

17 4/V-Q HEVEROF (J MandevSe) Q Gracey 6-10-0 

18 4010-40 TTMMM (D) (Mrs K Burfng) A Moore 8-10-0 

198S: No cone ep oncflng race 


G Moero 83 12-1 

BPewefl — — 

Mr T Unman Jama 94 4-1 

RAonH — 81 

P Scudamore • 99 F7-2 

WWa»(7) 81 — 

D Browne 91 8-1 

A Charlton 94 8-1 

M Rfchertn 87 — 

A Carrol 

Candy Moons 78 — 



* • WARWICK 


Selections 

By Mandarin 

12.30 Annie Ra. 2.00 Wharry Burn. 

1 .00 Solent Breeze. 23° , 

3.00 Spanish ReeL 

1.30 Indainelody. 3.30 Again Kathleen. 

Michael Seely's selection: 1.30 INDAMELODY (nap). 


Going: good to soft 

1230 ASKETT NOVICE HURDLE (Dtv I: £812: 2m) (17 runners) 


2 

01 MIME Hi 

A (0) (Mrs E Evans) D Nicholson 4-16-1 2 

R Dumaaady 

93 F5-2 



H (Mra E Courago) M waUnaon 4-10-10 

G McCourt 

91 — 











12 

MTUTIO 




13 

53 

ii 

JUSTER (J Huchtfi) C Trtottns 4-10-10 

— — — J Samara 

94 — 

15 

16 

MIST A SI 
0 MONRTTI 

*OOF (P Pernnt) J Parrett 4-10-10 

— R Strange 


19 

20 

0 PROVE T 
B RAILWA1 

HE CASE (K BeSsniy) M Otarer 6-10-10 

— j Daara» 


21 

0 VISUAL 11 

DENTITY (F Jordan) F Jordan 4-10-10 



22 

23 

26 

Iff 

H 

ft ID Russo) R Holder 6-10-10 . . NCuiwam 

IA BELLE (B) (Mrs M Kanywi Hakton) C James 5-108 S Snteh Ecdes 

PWNCESS (fl Smfttil M Tate 4-10-5 „ 

83 8-1 
— 10-1 

27 

STAMJD 

(BW0asjBWefe4-io-S 

Jasaiea CtMitea Jones (7) 

— — 


198S: GERE 4*10-10 R Dunwoody (13-2) P Bevan 21 ran 


1 J) LONGBRIDGE CONDITIONAL JOCKEYS NOVICE SELLING HURDLE (3-Y-Q: £548; 
2m) (13 runners) 

1 010 AUMTETTYmW SwfflJM Pipe 11-1 J Lower — F&4 

3 3B SHARK F*QKTBl(WMcCianncxilD McCain 11-0 

4 00 SUPREME OANCER(M Water) K Bndgwattr 11-0., k Ryan 

5 43 THEUTE(B)(M U«8y) J FOtch-Heyes 1 1-0 Penny Fetch llv.aa — — 

8 0 TIBS? GATE (R HtaBBtoadJ ft Hottnshead 11-0 — 

7 WO BAO (V) (Benrangston FumaurB UtfiOCNefb ID-9 TPMieW — — 

8 P FASHION FOUNTAIN (Mrs P Snath) K Wingrove 104 — 

9 LA BELLE OF SANTO (B wrotgj G Wafis 10-9 TTynwi 

10 43 LA CHULA (B.SF) (P MekfiBa) R Holder 109 W MeFarlend -7-1 

11 028 MAHABAD (V)(C Chan) MraNMacaiAsy 10-9 MBwfey — 3-1 

12 DU MENBHAM STM (C firoomfieM) P Hedger TO-9 0 Motn« 

15 OOSI SOLEKT BREEZE (V^F)(J Tomes) B Stevens 10-9 — — 4-1 

16 TYRANMSE (D Be#) B McMahon 108 CKeater -10-1 

19 « TAYLORS RENOVATION 10-9 K Sim (7-1) L UghHxown IS ran 


1 JO SHIPSTON HANDICAP CHASE (£2,052: 3m) (5 runners) 

2 31F30-1 >NDAMa.QQy (CO) (Mrs M Theme) N Henderson 8-n-il SSmttiEcciee 

3 1104-24 ETON ROUGE (D) (Mrs B Jenhs) Mrs M Renefl 7-11-7 GKcCeut 

.3 QEM8R5 ^'HR l nEH/ACian^CTnaSne8-7J-fi™__ JSuMia 

10 22 -0223 ST ALEZAM(3F) (lord Coventry) M Tate Q-lO-lQ.,^- — 

1« P4J32D2 PRINCELY CALL (8J3) (Mrs G E Jonas) Mrs G E Jones 12-104) J Bryan 

1985: £ft££rf BRAMBLE 8-12-4 8 Smith Ecctos (H-tOfav(N ffondWSOfl ? ran 


• 99FS-4 
98 4-1 
97 6-1 
97 — 
8512-1 


Course specialists 


FWafwyn 

Hlierdprau n 

jwSSBS? 

AfrsMFKmaB 


TRAINERS 

WSwwrs Rw rant Par Cm 
19 80 234 

11 52 21^ 

S 31 18.1 

12 SO 134 

8 62 12.9 


KMxmey 
S Smith Ead03 


JOCKEYS 



VWniwrE 

RWtes 

PerCm 

10 

69 

its, 

6 

70 

11.4 

5 

duty quofiftors 

81 

7.4 



2.15 LORD STALmUDGE MEMORIAL GOLD CUP HANDICAP CHASE (£2,515: 3m TQ 
(5 runners) 

4 2-1F1BP ALLIED NEWCASTLE (CO) (J JeWpW D Bewortl 6-11-7 C Bwn 98 R4 

5 2221M 00 MEMBaiCD) (1*3 J RncSng) T Forsw 10-10-12 

9 1 FI 34-4 BARGBX(Cm(MraJ Fo^FvnntBr7-1W “ P ®S22! 

10 221332- W CANDY (A Moore} KVA SMphBison 7-1 IW-——. 

11 4/31QF0 FAWCWLD (09 (Mrs S Watts) NtesESnoyd 6-104) BPoweB mw 

1985; BROADHEATH B-11-7 P WchoOa (4*8 fav) 0 Bgona 4 ran 

form gBgBmgaBXsaeweaaeBMgg 


Stockbroker Novices’ Chase at Plumptoo yesterday (Photograph: Ian Stewart) 

XP CHASE (£2,515: 3m Tf) 1 Brown has winner 


3rdto Indssmio^ (lu-8) at Waneick^n, £3785. good, Nov15,4iWL BA RQILL (n -3) h^staatrornme bruises altera crmU 
and tea whmlCTI 4lh to Ce«c Steve (1 1-4) at Warwaar gm. ,£1892. stft J tov 19. rOn^- Maitnedee ID the 

at Anal oudrai last season was beaten a head bv Aahtano(TI-b) a FonweB (3m 21 NoyCh, £1935. good. Mar o 


on final ouBng last season was beaten a head by Aahlona (T1-U) at Fonwea(3m2fNoy Ch, £1935. go< 

18.11 ran). OUR CWLD sho wed BB el In3 Engfah outmgs last saMon. Previously (9-8) 

(U-ej XJ ai Umonck (3m TJ, £2U7D. yleWno to salt, Oct 6. 12 ran). Sefecthac ALUED NEWCASTLE 


2.45 CERNE ABBAS NOVICE CHASE (£1^86: 2m 5f) (20 runners) 

2 OP/OIPP TAKE A BOW (B.CO) (J Baibar) R Barber 10-11-7 

4 0148- AICRLOW (P Ftfiey) S Ctwtstlan 6-11-2 — 


Histoiy gnacbcsitseJf to so7ne 
sportsmen and jVlackan appears 
to be one such. He surprised the 
squash. worid fast year when he 

Infielder and Gary Moore dear the last fence on their way to victory iu the Astaire S3? SwS 

Stockbroker Novices’ Chase at Plumptoo yesterday (Photograph: Ian Stewart) play natioaal league squash 

*■ •. front a base in Bradford and 

Brown has winner unddrated domestic reoord^f 

| the former world champion, 

II and crashing fall 3iS»s«a 

>7ia ‘ 1 Colin Brown, who rides the the Astaire Stockbroker station - yesterday prepared to 
favourite, Floyd, in Saturday’s Novices’ Chase by 10 lengths. Madean modi chance of 

££F*2! Mecca Bookmakers Hurdle ar lafidder was a bargain 1,950 ovenumipg Harvey, 

Sn 9 Sandown, escaped with just guineas buy out of Fred Winter's fgS 2 rlJ$? 
from the bruises after a crashing fan from stable earlier this year. seed, Ocofl wunam, Swp the 

Maitnedee in the Qtckmere “What a relief — I was “*« J”* tiwugbcfijl sfail to 

vontw Handicap Chase at Plumpton beginning to think I couldn't “** 3600041 national semi- 

yesterday . train ivy op a wafl,” Moore said. " na *- 

Maitredee fell at the fifth last M rve had six seconds from my The Scotsman Himself was 
fence together with Prince 20 runners but no winners. I’ve doubtful halfway through the 


and crashing fall 


Maitredee fell at the fifth last 
fence together with Prince 


The Scotsman Hirmrif was 
doubtful halfway through die 


— 74 14-1 

mi — FT-4 


Moon, ridden by the 71b 40 horses and some lovely ones J feanh game that he could slop 


daimer, Tony Chariton, who to come ouL 


5 P20000 AH SPACE (Mra V HursQ R Hodgas 7-11-2 I 

G 0P/D1 4-P MANGROVE SOUND (JPhflfips) A JWtaon 8-11-2 

8 32/TJ20-P BEACON8ttE(N Brooks) J Brooks 9-1 1-2 

9 20PP0P BU.Y BUMPS (C Popham) C Popbam 8-11 -2 

11 0F343^ BOWD04 (Miss S Dougfas-Pennani) I Oudgtxxi 8-T1-2 i Ml 

12 3223-32 CAVVCS CLOWN (Mrs J OBvant) D Bsworth 8-11-2 

13 tXJF/FFU- EASTER MGHT (M VIAtoS) T Foratar 8-11-2 MrMAraq 

14 UOOO-fP BT2GAlT£(RDannis)KBtefnp8-tT-2 PI 

15 OOP- HUNTWORTH (DWntiCPophan 6-11-2 

16 OOPQ/PP- BWOIM) (G Cosasy) J Homybafl 7-11-2 

17 00P-204 «FO(AFostw)WssAFirtss6-1l-2 I 

20 8POOQ-F I©) LAWLESS (Mix M Richardson} J OM 6-1 1-2 CUM 

21 Q/F SAMMY DRAKE (GTHorp) R Lee 9-11-2 BDa 

20 006-0 7ENTH OF OCIOBBI (T Fonria) S Motor 7-1 1-2 GCtarti 

24 0042/64= THRUCHAM UU> (Mbs J Southafi) D Tucksr 8-11-2 S 

27 0FO4- GRffll IVY (Mra C Warn) A Tamil 5-11-0 I 

28 300-000 MWH BLBWfBWrigWPBafley 5-n-O 

31 F0PQ0/0 LAPLEIGHRS}GE(R Rood) TKoenor 8-10-11 R 

19B5: CONCLUSIVE 8-11-2 B Powal (2D-1) Mss E Snovd 12 ran 


j was also unhurt. Brown was Martin Pipe’s Lcmgghoret, 


Harvey’s continued progress to 
a first finaL He started brif- 


_ £L AfaMi 

P Usacb 72 2D-1 

— 73 — 

MffcftMfe 85 8-1 

R Amott • 99 2-1 

HbMAnaytegeW — 20-i 
PRkfWRto 


brought back in an ambulance winner Na 41 for Peter Zfeady, tafang the opening game 
and examined by the course Scudamore, sparked off a in 18 minutes - of mrasured 

n4.n mM- -’Mnfhmn mi- Cnmnral ^Anhl# orhli-ll OlflCl ttnmrflW But U-arvMT C4 hu4< 


doctor who said: ‘‘Nothing sen- Somerset double which was accuracy: But Harvey struck 

i — — i i ■*» I i— j. < ..j .u ■ 


BVMgM 8316-1 

- CUM«Bya(7) — — 

— „ B DhwBd j (7) 

GCtartro JoMW — 20-1 

SMcNoH 

C Brown — 20-1 


ous but he was badly winded.” 

Having earlier ridden his 
sixteenth winner of the season 
on Delator, Brown stood down 
from riding Our Tilly in the last 
race but said: Tm all right-and 
I'U be riding tomorrow." 


completed in the Peter Cazalet 
Memorial Chase by Delator. 

The nine-year-old was moved 
up to second place on the final 
circuit by Brown and took the 
lead at the third last before 
cruising home 12 lengths dear 


der Cazalet back in the second and the thinl 
Delator. with tactics remarkably similar 
was moved to those successfully employed 
m the final against Williams and seemed 
id took the poised for victory at 5-1 m the 


Fledge, who had marginally of Colonel Christy. Wardle, who 
led Prince Moon and Maitredee, also won the race 12 months a^o 


- - FORM 


1 1 3 : • I • 'A'lTW' ll llK M ' rlT.*. ' : 


on test two starts but oraviousiy ( 10 - 1 ) bad mada most to beat 
over ibis couroe and efistanca (H'cap Cn, E2l 17. firm. 5opt 16 1 1 ran). 


made a mistake at the fence at with Crowm 
which his rivals felL This at- “Delator is 
lowed Mansion Marauder to go enemy and 
on and beat Fledge by about nine r 
lengths. was riding hi 


(11-1) MniGlwd 9 2nd 


ro and dtefance (H'cap Cn, £2117. firm. Sopfia 11 run), 
i iwnseH useful over hurries. On final outing last season 
Liverpool (2m 5f, £5665. good to sett, Apr 5. 15 ran). 


The 11-2 winner, a first of the today.' 


enemy and has thrown away 
about nine races for me. Colin 
was riding him for the first lime 


But Maclean's game is 
remarkably testing for his oppo- 
monthsm) nents. Aged 22, he is tall but not 
yet feding his fall strength, yd 
he displays a remarkable knack 
for producing unsuspected 
stamina at vita! moments. High 
he first June in the shoulder and long of arm. 
. ... he carries an degam graphite 


CAWBES CLOWN (11HH 
ifofice fuller here (an. Cl SS4 


Nov 15. 1 

LAO (f 1-ZI an Aft fonoo bfier herejSn. 

(ID-12) wMl NH) LAWLESS (lO-iaSAIIMY DRAKE (UM2) and BEACOf 
Ite corase stWorcestar (2m 4f.£34l0. soft, Nov 1ft 17 ran). GREEN WY 
was 27X1 4»i u Anna's M(e (11-0) hero (2m, £1213, soft. Mar 35, 7 ran). 
Mediae CAWIES CLOWN 


Liverpool (2m 5f, £5665, good to Soft, Apr 5. 1! 
IRTOSAVLE(1l-6) puMfld up at Warwick (2m 4f, £1961 
will) credit when a 2nd to Summons (11-2), vritti 


MFOCtO 
HXE(1D-1 
ID-10) oni 


HMth to Devtoer 
to complete 
outing test season 


season for the Chichester Might Move was made 11-4 ^ its ertrerrdty 

trainer, Peter Hedger, was well favourite to comptefe a Pipe- ^ apScs string to baUwiih 
ridden by Penny Ffitcb-Heyes. Scudamore double m Division 2 occas^oal wristy cunning be- 
who turned professional this of ^ Novices hurdle but Mold rawen sharp volfeys andSives 


ammng be- 
s and drives 


finish only fomihbgmd cham- 0 f perfect lengtii and width. 


Also gaioing an overdue vio- pion trainer Nick Henderson's 
lory was the Brighton trainer. Golden Croft, who gave Steve 


Charlie Moore. 


3.15 YOUNG FARMERS NOVICE HURDLE (Div Jh £86& 2m) (20 runners) 


1 000-014 DMENSHM (BJR (M Inpan) Mra N Smrth 4-11-1 

2 POOOO/1 PERFECT DOUBLE (D AMh^ D Hswotlh 5-10-10 

3 0- ARENA AUCTTOW (Mra S P uuamom ) S R u temore 4-t0-8^_ 

4 0400-00 BROAD WOOD (P Axon) ft Hodges 4-10-6 ■ 

5 00/P-022 CANUCK CLOWN (J Bkd) A Moore 6-1M 

6 00000-0 DARK COMIC (H Corbaz) J Kkig 5- f 178 

8 02- HIGH TRUST (M Jones) 0 WneterMey 8-1frB. .. . — . „ 

10 00 IWGSBROOK(J LeavetFShentey) W WSghmBn4-l0-8 

IT OOOW MACS GOLD (Mrs RHeptexnJ I DudgaonA-IQ* 

13 3 NEW FOREST LAB fC WaQs) Mre J Pttrrwr 4-10-8 

15 P-O40Q POLAR GLEN (lAs V R Hodges S-108 

17 PPP-000 SJkULOtGO SONG (J Pansti) P Dunstar 7-10-8 

18 0P00-P smwooo FOREST (N Payne) JSaysra 4-lH 

19 442-020 SMUMY BEAR (Mrs J John) RDfcton 4-168 


„ P Scudamore 94 
. LsmoVtecont •« 

can — 


COMFBJJNG (Mrs P McConrafl P Bwrortb 4-1D-3. 
OOP HaJ-Y-OOWN LASS (P Haman) Mbs E Snayd 6-10-3 

0 LEGAL AID (P HM) L Kmwd 6-10-3 

PBJS1AN PERSON (JPuBngev)G Gracey 4-1M — 

O SHUH. RUN (Mra D Foster} T Foratar 4-10-3 

TOUCH OF LUCK (HPWdteO M« A KrtBfo 4-103 — 


G Moore m 10-1 

SMtfM 8716-1 

CBraan 8810-1 

MHwriagwn — — 

MHcfmnte « — 

MPttem 86 7-2 

WNm(I) 82 — 

RHMnan 62 — 

ItPonWt 

. WKompbaays(7) 9118-1 

H Amott 

J Final — 18-1 

BPovwl 

A Cant* 


ridder by his son, Gary, landed only ride of the day. 

Courageous Regal Steel 
relishes his new role 


Regal Steel, placed 54 times 
on the Flat, was victorious in a 
new sphere at Ludlow yesterday. 

The eight-year-old's win in the 


Golden Croft, who gave Steve 'Lhe j phyrical exertion de- 
Infidder. Smith Ecdes a winner on Us njanded by his neat spread of 
only ride of the day. play and alky movement to 

-*-4 w 1 even the most precise placement 

IcAO^lI NtAAl was suddenly illustrated yes- 
AVvKiil L— / eerday when, with Madean serv- 

■m mg defeusivefy at. 2-5 in the 

S flplXT rn Ip ' ' fourth; 'Harvey failed tOLdly to 
v » m- \FM.\s respond to a floating backhand 
fourth in the Craven Anns howl to th® front right corner. 


Selling Hurdle. 


It was the first sign of weak- 


Careen started joint-favourite ness from the stocky and 
with the winner, BeHekino, smoothly capable Londoner and 


Nov^’ Hurfie - ^ om Jinun y Frost brou ^ lt it proved entirely indicative of 
with astronglatenm to score by fast-fading reserves. Madean 

SrintersnoS- four len 8 ths 601,1 TioseI Rose * gathered the next five points in a 

Th? slewaris foundthat Careen angle hand and went on t 0> wm 


of the courage he has shown 
throughout his long Flat career. 


Gang* KAfokt — — 


A confirmed front-runner, 

Regal Steel was headed with two Richard Lee,- the former from the brink of quarter-final 
flights to go by Smithys Choice champion point-to : point disaster, the Scot needed that 
but came back on the run-in and trainer, wfio saddled his first merest glimpse of op p ort unity 
put in a determined c h a ll e n ge to winner as a public trainer at to trigger amazing resurgence, 
beat Supreme Charier by half a SouthweU last week, was on the He strode into the fifth game 
length. *nark again wifo. the Irish im- with the self-instruction “"now 


had interfered with unplaced the game with shrewd applica- 
Gold Sovereign after the last tion of front-court tactics. 


Just as he had dragged himself 
from the brink of quarter-final 


1S8Si JOTTD 6-11-2 Mr J Bosley (11-10 fav) F Winter 8 ran 



Prfctofi Q-0)a! WarrtcK (2m H’cap H). Prevlouaiy 
Kin (2m. E88S. good to wfL Nov lOjIBnm). Sub- 
66) 1 01 too good at Windsor (2m, £865, good to 
was 20Zil back In Bjh.PBIFECT DOUBLE (10-8) 
.SOIL Nov 22. 21 


tMrk u ^" wllb with the self-instruction “now 
^ WddFlyCT’intheFfaJford push him." Within four minutes 
Novices Hmtfle. Marie Pitman he was the firet Scotsman in the 


to Erastto Riser (ItMZ a WcAwtivra»n (2o> 
hungngda toutwtw na* 5th to Tsaraei(10-9) 

Satecun: PERFECT DOUBLE 

Course specialists 



TRAINERS 




JOCKEYS 


Winners Rmwfs 

Par Cent 



F Winter 

22 

74 

29.7 


17 

Mra J Plunan 

15 

60 

25.0 


13 

D Elsworth 

15 

04 

17.9 


13 

N Qasaleo 

6 

44 

1&6 

BPowaB 

9 

LKannard 

19 

143 

13J 

PRaJiards 

6 

DGandoMo 

8 

64 

1Z5 

OnlyquaMero 



ETSiSSS 

“™ ghi u - ■»■"•*******«" 
woidd do aU he onuld for him Socks jumped weD r-Vm IMf* 

gZHfi S rJ and was never SE* when CYCLfNG 

2®^ ^ *** winning the Ludfonl Handicap _ 


CYCLING 


Rides Percent 
139 . 122 

114 114 

119 109 

108 sa 

74 8.1 


Nick Dawe, the former Flat 


Chase, while Bundle Boy gave 
Tim Thomson Jones a splendid 


jockey, was suspended for four ride when landing the Court Of 
days starting December 5, for Hill Amateur Riders Handicap 


careless ridi: 
was disquali 


on Careen, who Chase for Anne, Duchess of 
d after finishing Westminster. 


24 EROSTIN GROUP GREAT BRITAIN V AUSTRALIA HANDICAP HURDLE (Round I: 
£698: 2m 5f) (8 runners) 


Plumpton results 

Going: sort 


1 1/DPCP-4 CELTIC CRACKER (P Evans) R Mortop 8-1 1-10» 

2 aO0P4F SHANGOSEERU Green) JJenktea 5-1 1-8 

3 0DZ10-0 APRS. GEM (Mrs M Bndgmder) K Bhdgwataf 6-11-1 _ 

4 00120 WM1E ROSE (R Jordan) N Hemteison 4-1 1-1 

5 PU-2D00 USLARY LAD (V Raftm) Mrs M Rbiwl 6-11-1 

8 3012P-2 WHAHRY BUM (Mrs G McFerran) I Dudgaon 5-1D-7— 

8 33-4300 KOFFI (Satexrd Vtei Hre Ltd) □ Mchoteon 4-10-t 

9 244134 TASMONYA (Mrs V WMS) S WWs 4-160 

1985c No ComspnK&ig reeo 


— S SraAh Ecctes BO 5-1 

SIBwnmod 96 12-1 

PDotenep 87 16-1 

S M onV u re d 96 7-1 

_ OCaooai MUM 

RO uw oody P99F3-1 

NHamHl 9410-1 

— KGraan 94 8-1 


18 ran. NR: Sonny HU Lad. 41, TH, sti hd. 
4L *1. H Frost at BuddastMah. Tmbc 
£8.10; E2J0. £180, E7.00Td^ E1&30. 
CSF: £28.16. Winner boutfit In for 2,700 
gna. Canon finishsd tourtti but star a 
Stewarts’ Inquiry was tSsquaBfiad. 


Cut in the 
number of 
tour days 


130 SHIRLEY NOVICE CHASE (£1,797: 2m) (11 runners) 

i BU22-31 HE (D) (Mrs G McFevran) l Dudgeon 8-11-2 P Barton «99F9-4 

8 00400-0 CHARLIE'S COTTAGE (Mrs M Thoms) N Hendaraan 6-10-10 — SSmWiEcdas — 6-1 

8 120P2-F COTTAGE RUN (Mrs M Rogws) D Ntabalson 6-10-10 RDtmwoody — S-2 

11 OWRI GOLD CHEQC (B) (S Pufitcfial) M UcCoud 8-10-10 QMcCoM 

12 004000 MEZIARA (B) (B Scan) W R VWteros 5-10-10 R GoMatete — — 

14 000-120 NO-tl-TURN (BF) (S TbxSafl) S MeOor 8-10-10 Q LanOao (4) — 11-2 

15 1/00006- OUR WWTE HAHT (H) (Ms B Short) N Vigors 6-10-10 CCox — 12-1 

17 02/OT22- RHCXCUS (M Murray) Mra M DUdnson 7-10-10 GBrodfay — 11-4 

19 00Q/0P- SlfFERUNE (Mrs G Godftoy) P W Karris 7-UMO R Strange 

22 0 VBM>OL(K Draw) KDum 9-10-10 — 

23 FOOOp/4 FLORENCE (G Wingrova) K Wbigrovs 10-10-S Mr P To— to y 

19B: DEEP OaPRESSTON 6-10-10 PSaxtenure (4-1) NGossfes 11 ran 



MeCourt.7-1 


cm&rZttJjni. 


10 ASKETT NOVICE HURDLE (Dtv Ik £790: 2m) (18 runners) 


324-311 SPANISH REEL (D) (S Oavtos) J Edwreds 4-11-10 . 

221 KEYNES (D) (D Dodson) J Jenkins S-1 1 -3 

BELL tXPfP Homes) JWabber 5-10-10^ 


6 MO-aa CAROL’S MUSIC (MreS Jamas) A Jamas 5-ffl- 10, 


32- DUDLEY’S STAR [Mrs M Bavan) Mrs M Bevan 410-10, 

0 ESPERO (Mis A Gksn) C J Vanxsn MUer S-iO-io 

atm FLANKER (S Noon} M Ohvr 7-10- TO 

fl »ia©BrS REVB*ffi(E Young) D Ntebobon 5-10-10™ 


11 0000-00 MR GRAPEFRUIT (fl Lambert) A WghDngala 4-10 -id k 


P Barton 90FB4 

SShanrood 91 3-2 

GM a rosgh 

Q Jonas 96 — 

CSMn 3714-1 

KMoonay 

J Duggan 9713-2 

— — 7-2 

HConrafl 95 — 

B C h ap m an — — 

MrAHsnUy — — 


AL^RAAl: 

Doubteuagwi (|S, 12 Gteaonora PiW w 

Redeemer (4th), 6 


Tow 
£SJ0 

or second *ah any athar horse). 


. CANTABKJE (Jao 
Am Oa(P wamer. 


Brussels (AFP) — The major 
national tours, including the 
sport’s most famous race, the 
Tour de France, will be re- 
stricted to a maximum .of 22 
days from 1988. 

The limit, imposed by the 
International Cycling Union at 
their congress here, includes 
prologue and rest day, and the 
races will not be allowed to 
cover more than three 
weekends. 

This year’s Tour de France 
was stretched over 24 days and, 
in 1987, with the start being 
made in West Berlin, it will last 
26 days. The race was originally 
due to. begin on July-2, but the 
prologue has now been brought 
forward .by 24 hours. 

The other mtior national 
tours take place in Italy and 
Spain, and the union’s mea- 


RANr 5-2JMW Dabbles Prai 
Ot Chnstia B Manhattan 


B Manhattan Boy 
■25 Lambounw 


12 0-0 MR MCGREGOR (C MseoBf H O'Nflrt 4.10-10 RCftapman 

13 0 NEON (A HanHy) A Hambty 5-KL10 MrAHambly 

14 PAW OAireiSFWani) MISS GPWtara. 4.10-10 — 

15 WAY ON (Mrs C Tn&fcw) C Trtsftne 5-1O-10 JSufltont 

18 OOF4X1 SAINT HALO (Mrs B Ttiytor) M McCourt 4-10-10 GMeCovt — — 

19 0-0 SOUTHERN REAPER (J Upson) T Casey 4-10-10.^ EBucktoy (4) 

20 F23D- 7HATS ROB MIRE (BfigCHanvy/ONWietoon 5-10*10 ft Duowoodjr * 80 10-1 

21 0 UPTON W0IT (L G Ktfrkwr Eng Ltd) T Forster 4-10-10 LKarrey (4) — — 

22 440423 WALMER SANDS (Mrs C Weld,) J Spoerirtg 4-10-10 PWrenor 98 12-1 

IMS: 7EN PLUS 5-1O-10 KMocnayM tax) FKYalwyn 20 ran ■ 

3J30 CHERDIGTON NOVICE HANDICAP HURDLE (£832: 2m 5f) (22 runners) 

3 00P20/3- inruirs PRIDE (C Lmris) O Barons 7-11-7 PNteMte 

4 2-41401 AGAIN KATHLEEN (8) (Mrs D Strauss) P Mafcn MI-4 SSmltfaEccJn* 

5 F2000D- EASBY EMBLEM (J Owggj J Cnugg 6-11-2 P Dover 

7 03002 CELTIC CYGNET (David Tlmolh, LsD Mra MRoneB 5-11-0 SMorataad 

8 OOPC-O UAGWA (G Lugg) T Fbrear 5-10-12 L HmyW 






9 0F-0C10 DAME FLORA (V Kknnkis) F Walwyn 4-10-1 1 


10 03006- SPEAK MOEVL (Mrs B Cufey) B Curtly 8-1 

11 300X01 PAOFtST (Mra KtTSuSvwiJJRjx 6-10-10. 


| B Curtsy 6-10-11 . 


— K Mooney 1711-3 

□ MorpiijF 89 — 

S Mom — 

12 04 GOLDBl REB5N (P ftytends) G Tbonito’ 5-10-9 ... PBntM . — 10-1 

13 4444ft BRCW2E EFFIGY (Mrs Hara1qns)MHflnrK|uu 4*104 Unreal Ctartu Joan (7) 07F3>1 

14 0U4/0P-P VELMDRE (H BoanNQ Mrs C Raawy 6-10-7 GMcCmrt 

15 4100U3 OREAMCOAT(DGoadeoough) KBnMop 5-10-7 SEroto(4) *91 6-1 

16 DORM STB»™a WAT (Cam OKeOTForstef 5-104 fl Dunwoody 96 — 

18 OttO/OQ HENRY LANCASTER (M &tflTn)T Hatton 7-10-6 — 86 — 

19 6040 1CSS BAUJNACflEE (J MacPTtfiua) G Thcxnof — MRkftMi 87 — 

20 fl/OFPOF- MASTER BARN (Lady CtattramtatoylT HaB 6*10-3 — .... SJO'MUI 

22 0SP4F-6 GOUBEN JUNE (P T«wW«t) D Tudklx 4-10-1 — 93 — 

24 ORXMOQ TAARST9S(NcrO< Wall RMWigUd) Mias A Funlss 7-104 H Strange 89 — 

25 OOOWOQ 7n*rSWHATSJSNA«(rStto(i9flJVYRW«3ms5-J0-0 AJUnos — — 

* P00P-00 CUtET STAR (J Siook) P Dons 5-1D-0 P Dover 80 — 

27 00040 RACHAN MASTER (T Cordon) Mra JUsnow 4-104 — 

28 8P4000 GHARLEBnXffGE0RtZ(0»ak8S)RSteptart 4-104 — 88 — 

1S8S: MASTER BOB 5*10*12 J WMa (4-1) N Hendaraon 21 ran 


me Moor 

Rid Of Spend,! 
aW.5I.T1.«.D 

£3:60; £1.10. £T4tt £a40. OR £740. 945 

CSF: £19.70. Tricaat £B13£9. Attar a 
stewards’ Inqufay the resuB stood. ' 

3J3(2wch)1. MANSrmN MARAUDER 9-J). AlS 
(Penny FRtchHmoa.l 1-25:2, Ptedg* Wrs King Mmrod 
kLidger. S0-1t 3, $bot£« (R Chapman, Orly's Luck. 
20-1).?lSORM4i9^ta«&estn(%5- Goten, Ousy Patrol 
2 MBtoedeeffL 10040 Prim Moon (f), 20 Tom, ftthy(Sh). Tim Bobbin. Mini Pie (pul 
Lulav gBiL 7 ran. m Tin Boy. m «L Sweetwater Lass. The GoH SUe, 17 ran. 
1 JH. IS- P Hataar at OUcfteater. Tow NR: DSacovor Qotd. Kl, W, «L1)U, SI. R 
Jtt.1Q.0UB. DR E113M. CSFr Hofflnstaad at upper LOtMOO. Ton: 
£118.44 £3.70: £1^. E4.l0TB2.8a Wt£ia3a 

3L30 (&n hdte) 1. GOLDEN CROFT " “ 

Snxftj Ecdes, 7Sk Z Qax 

Wcltawfl. 3-1 3, feir WheTl lh m— , ,c j# _u , »»«. ^ 

(M Pemett. 33-1). ALSO RAN: 11-4 lev ^ 

Mem (480, 5 Downtown Brown 
12 Ganoon (bd). 20 Rest Footed 

Tum For Th' Better (6lh). 33 Our TiBy, _ 


- ,0 ... « lt rj lAj I t- sums, dearly aimed at tigbten- 

m IP® calendar to create room 

I*«6- Redeemer (4 th), 8 Connaught oknnere for new events, will also lead to 

'.fit ^«c^^*eten^ofoiher 

H«Ky&«s7 t&'iWS - F 9 r exam P ,e * the Coots Clas- 
4 W* hd. iih. Lady s Emm at Penco m ba. sac, in the United States, will be 

Wia * cut to a fortnight and allowed to 
E 740 ™ ™ » include two weekends, the Tour 

■Liter a n*x<r E of Switzerland to 10 days and 

uaim,' 7-1 h & choic (m wiB«nn. one weekend, and events such as 

MiDER 9-JL ALSO RAN: 7-2 AWaSefesn (fith), 4 PJiriS to Nice to ax days. 

fiSJFTiiS & ® However, at the same time as 

SX 0 i!» PatnKSeteftSe. Meny the changes for 

j,(i). 20 Tom, Fsthy (Sjh). Tim Bobbin ,_Mini 1 988. the intemauonal calendar. 


expeaed to lea.- 

wpgjstaad at upnor Loogpon, Ton: , ? ler y®«eraay. for a 

£3.70: txso. £4.10. 22.8a df: £1030. transitional season next year. 


^ 4 Slewart8 ' will see the introduction of 
roau ^ 3tood ' numerous new races. 


TODAY’S FIXTURES 


0&iM ! if?, 'll 


.Danrtaa, Sit In 77m Doric, nmqiwqroin, 

CUas (IV 16 ran. 7L 3L 3, i®, £n u'rtrS^ffi 

Hfirtdarsoo at Lamooum. Tow esjso; sypjftj? 

gift tim DR £U 0 . csft 

Raeopotmw 


SportaywKOi). 3 ran. NR: -Smart R«nty. 
SBpatang.mmsfthd. ia,5l. JtOngat 
Swtedm. Tote: £740; £340. £ 2 ^ 0 . £15o. 
DF: £31 JO. CSF: £44 jt. Triea8ttl2S.il. 


Ludlow 


SASOm flat) 
pavjaaAtaAB 

jtiliff 14-n~ALSQ *Rft^» 2 
Express (5ft). 12 Owternaa FlreOy! 16 


Goingsgood 

12X5 (2m Itote) 1 . BELLEKMO (J FY03L 
4*1 p-taY): 2, TtaMt Rose (T Dovfs. 6-1): 3. 
Woddtag Tate (M CaswM. 10-1). ALSO 
RAtt i ir^fav Careen. S Our Ct^cUota, 10 
La cnarmtt. 10 Into Dam (4ft), GoU 
ScntewgnlfiM 16 Satant Flyer, state of 
Pandora. 33 Coporcne, Msundjr ©ft. 
Mrtlai Lad Greeravjm Lady (pu). Jouswig 
Boy. K 0 Island, MontbOfBB. TT mOsWot. 




Baisstoros, Kaw Sear. I 
Mansab, Ctoeaenm, Briden GM. 


SSS?mS:. 

3L a. 4L.20L D.H Barons at 


_ 7.30 unless stated 

-Sntari Reply. FOOTBALL 

HLL fMta: T V BtontfOKl (7^5) .... 

SportiSMcOwaL VhtiXHAU.-OPa. LEAGUE: AC Detefi 
iMk C "P : Eacand round: SasMdon v Lflot- 

ra FfceOy. ie 352,*%®! Hamte,; tftTtonwita «» 
ug. Safcorrte FOOTBALL 6btffllNATK)ffc Chariton v 
Readtag (£.0). . 

Bridoi gm; . .OTHER SPORT 

SNOOKER; Tennants UK open' tour- 
SQUAMTHAOCEm InterdSr .... . . 


I RACKETS: 


gg«gftTdteM^|1J(l. £1.10. | 


£550. DR £5^0. CSF: £6^3. 
Pfacapnt E5B2J5 


T\AF . Ctorntpanshtps (at RAF 




’let the 


iOiib 


A Scotsman will occupy 

centre stage for the first time ai 
today's loterCity national 
championships at Bristol His 
name is Mark Madean. Take 
note of it He is a player who 
grows" m courage, intelligence 
and understanding almost 
match by hHUcft.- 


Madean, the thirteenth seed, 
defeated London’s seventh- 
seeded ' Neal Fferyey yesterday 
when, having already made 
histoiy as the first Soot in the 
sentitinak of these British na- 
tfonak, he nose from apparent 
despair to win 9-4, 6-9, 3-9, 9-7, 
9-0 is -81 minutes. Hie previous 
day he beat Philip Whitlock, of 
' Devon, with an even more 
marked resiinectkm which left 
: him «k with exhanaioa 


fei lhe W 
lent fair w 


*■«•* 
I L. 

? • r wM> 
■- 

•..i * . 

•l. -L 

-,ij, am 

- — atd 


' ti 

• /•! :;w 


rv.tr “ 
X- 
/ « 

■ ! 5«* 

• •• »» t 

. rr.Tjeiii 

.: J j i 


-t- 

” m, X 

tw,. 

<■ ‘-4 


.* ■». •'* j 

%«e 


" "B' > 

IP . 

t tiT- to 

* ! ■S.fK 


• . t 


• c trs* 

<- xHK,i 

" ■ bi* 


•* •' * 

- - - ^ 

* 

3&- 

U ’•"'A* j) 

: ' i 

: *' 

i.j,..*- nr 
‘ *vWklj 




I 

r ' ; *r-.j4 

* * V* 


^ORj 


Ufti 
' -Jfr-j*. ; 

■' ‘4L J 1 

■V 


~ r ifieK 


***** 






ilv 


K. ^ 


J " - •■'■■•■■ THE TIMES THURSDAY NOVEMBER 27 1986 

CR j CKET: TWO HUNDRED REASONS WHY ENGLAND HAVE THE EDGE r 


SPORT 






Australia could still 

get the elbow even 
if Emburey calls off 


■isa®g I MOTOR SPORT 


Border to 
review 
tactics for 
Botham 


IT! If I 


I i 


From John Woodcock, Cricket Correspondent, Perth 


Having started the fust Test 
match againsl Australia in 
Brisbane as outsiders, England 
go into the second tomorrow 
as favourites. That they 
should do so is probably right, 
though defeat by New South 
Wales last weekend was a 
nasty reminder of how vulner- 
able England, as well as 
Australia, still are. 

Th?re is also some slight 
doubt about Emburey's fit- 
ness, which is of concern both 
because of the part he played 
in England’s successful start to 
the series and in view of a 
pitch that promises to turn. . 

Emburey complains of a 
pain just above the elbow of 
bis bowling aim and has no 
idea bow it originated. There 
is talk of a pinched nerve, 
which would be preferable, if 
that is the right word, to tennis 
elbow. Emburey and the 
physiotherapist are reasonably 
confident that be will be on 
the field tomorrow. 

Whether or not Emburey 
plays, 1 confess to being 
uncertain about the 'likely 
course of the game, ft is easy 
enough to say that if England 
play as well again here as they 
did m Brisbane they should 
win; but after all we have been 
through in 1986 it would take 
a confirmed optimist to be- 
lieve with any certainty that 
they will What, perhaps, gives 
England the edge is their much 
greater experience. They have, 
between them, something like 
200 more caps than the 
Australians. 

Nothing pots Australia's re- 
cent difficulties into better 
perspective than the feet that, 
of the 1 1 that played for them 
in the Test against West Indies 
here only two years ago, no 
fewer than seven (Alderman, 
Dyson, Hogg, Hughes. 
Rackemann, Wessels and 
Yailop) are in South Africa 
and unlikely to play Test 
cricket again. 


Those are worse losses than 
England suffered during the 
Packer years and they explain 
why Gatling’s side is now 
much tbe more seasoned of 
the two. Nor have Australia's 
selectors done any thin g to 
counter this by giving Border a 


Perth Allan Border, tbe Aastratliaa 

. captain, was widely criticized for 

, . ... showing lan Botham too much 

blossomed, that they must respect m the first Test match in 





! >*Vv- • 


Peugeot to 
consider a 
grand prix 
campaign 




guard at all costs againsl 
complacency. 

If- as I hope, both sides fidd, 
and use, two spinnere, it will 
be for the first time in as 


couple of players conditioned 

tO the SOUnd Of gunfire 


Angl o- A ustralj an Test riwca 
1978-79. It has never hap- 
pened In a Perth Test, against 
England or anyone else. West 
Indies have just done it in 
Karachi but they never did so 
under Clive Lloyd, if they 
could help it, nor wifi they 
under Richards. Should we see 
it here, it will be like looking 
back in tune. 

Border said yesterday 
morning, after practising 
alongside the Englishmen, 
that he may have over-reacted 
to Australia's defeat in Bris- 
bane, when he withdrew into 
himself “I was as dis- 
appointed as we all were at 
having played so badly: worse, 
I hope, than we ever shall 

a gain. ” 

From their hotel close by, 
England have been able to 
walk to> the nets and back, the 
opening batsmen returning for 
more in the afternoon. In 10 
first-class innings on the tour 


to the sound of gunfire. 

If England's plans would be 
badly upset if Emburey were 
missing, Botham, as a bats- 
man. could still bold tbe key. 
To the Australians he must 
seem scarcely less of a threat 
(though not with the ball) than 
Richard Hadlee did to Eng- 
land last summer of his four 
Test hundreds against Austra- 
lia, three have opened the way 
to English victories. 

But there are other en- 
couraging portents. The first 
of Gower's two Test hundreds 
in Australia was here in Perth 
in 1 978-79 and Lamb has been 
in excellent form. Dilley and 
De Freitas did well in Brisbane 
and A they made his best Test 
score thereMf England's vic- 
tory in the first Test would not 
have happened without 
Botham, the whole team made 
a contribution of some kind or 
other. 

And now the matter of 
confidence, which plays so 
great a part in all sports. 
Because it does, I regret the 
attitude in the England camp, 
however superficial that there 
are only five matches on the 
tour of any account, by which, 
of course, are meant the Tests. 


England have yettoget past 16 
before losing a wicket. 


Had England not batted so 
badly against New South 
Wales, they would be in better 
shape to make the runs they 
need now. Border feels he has 
a side of genuine promise. 


Brian Close turned up at the 
ground yesterday where, as a 
young man of 1 9, he made 1 08 
not out for MCC against 
Western Australia in bis first 
innings of the 1950-51 tour, 
the same score as Whitaker’s 
in his first innings out here 1 
hope Whitaker enjoys his tom- 
more than Close was to do. 

Meanwhile, in a recent 
Sheffield Shield match be- 
tween Western Australia and 
Tasmania, Vic Marks had 
Richard Ellison stumped for 


lacking only in confidence: It ■ 42. He payed for it when, next 


is because England have got to 
keep on top of them, for fear of 
a repetition of 1958-59 when 
Australia, young and 
unfancied, suddenly 


day, he was caught off Marks. 
I suppose ifEmbmey is unable 
to {day tomorrow Marks, who 
is spending the English winter 
in Perth, might be sent for. 


When the Wacker Neale after 


went fair wacky 


By Simon Wilde 


‘missing 

ingredient’ 


Two bizarre incidents may 


come to mind as thonghts tarn to 
Perth atMLchejKCond Test match 


Perth aod,thejHDnd Test match 
with Australia. Each concerned 
an Australian, opening bowler 
from Perth itself: one made a 
fool of himsell the other made 
himself look a fooL 
On December 15, 1979 many 
people believed that Dennis 
Lillee bad literally gone off his 
tree when he forsook the tra- 
ditional willow and walked to the 
wicket with an alimanhim bat in 
his hand. Despite objections 
from Breartey, the England 
captain, the aui uues ami bis own 
captain, Greg Chappell, it was 
10 minutes (a lengthy commer- 
cial by any metaUmgisfs stan- 
dards) before he «mM be 
persoaded to exchange it for the 
proper implement. 

Three years later, on 
England's last fafl tour of 
Australia, crowd violence of Che 
kind not usually associated with 
cricket erupted between rival 
England and Australian fac- 
tions. The trouble began when 
about 15 spectators, some carry- 
ing Union Jades, ran on to the 
field as England reached 400. 

One of them cuffed round tbe 
head Terry Alderman, who gave 
chase and brought down hip man 
with something else not usually 
associated with cricket, a rugby 
tackle, and dislocated his right 
shoulder in the process. He was 
not to play Test cricket again for 
nearly 16 months. 

Perth is the only new ground 
to have been accepted into the 
coterie of Angto-Anstrafian Test 
venues daring the past 50 years. 
To accommodate it tbe Austra- 
lian Cricket Board had to per- 
ssade MCC to agree to an 
unprecedented six-match series 
in 1970-71. Perth's first Test 

proved a great success, with over 
84,000 attending, and it was not 
long before the Western Austra- 
lian Cricket Association (the 
Rnmad is known cofkKprially as 
tbe “Wacker”) was being as- 
signed a match every year. 

In eKb of tbe five England- 
Australia Tests at Perth the ride 
winning the toss have always 
elected to field first. Not that it . 
has done Him mucb good: the 
one time that England did it they 
lose Australia's return has been 
ooe win, two draws and a defeat. 
This is not something peculiar to 
these matches- In all Tests at 
Perth the trend is the same and 
the outcome equally mixed. 

Tbe theory is that the pitch 
will held early life for tbe fhst. or 
more particularly fast-medinm, 
bowlers, after which if will play 
better and better. For many 
years Perth used to be reckoned 
among the fastest and truest 
pitches ia the world but more 
recently it has been slower and 
given significant help to the 
seam bowlers, a number of 
whom have retained outstanding 
aulyses there. 


regardless of which succeeded 
with the toss: In 1979-89 
Botham, reGed- upon almost 
excessively by Brearley, took 11 
wickets in 183 oven -for Eng- 
land andDymodu for Australia, 
took nine, including a uiareh- 
wnuring six for 34 la the second 

wiiifBgy. 

The medium-pace exponents 
have found an invalaa hie accom- 
plice in the “Fremantle Doctor," 
a stiff breeze which blows off the 
Swan River in die middle of the 
day. Traditionally, this was 
called upon by die ofrspmneT. 
who could bowl into it with 
benefit, but of late he has not 
had ranch of a look-in. 


AH this pots a great premium 
on a side's dose catching. At 
Perth in 1974-75. when England 
were overrun in four days, the 
Australian slips and gully cor- 
doo gave a brilliant exhibition of 
the art, accepting 13 out of 14 
chances offered. One of them, 
Greg Chappell established a 
Test record for a fieldsman with 
seven catches, all but two of 
them at second slip. 

These days if batsmen are to 
make runs at Perth tbe likeli- 
hood is that they wifi have to 
graft fra them. Boycott always 
used to like batting there. In 
1979-80 he carried his bat for 99 
not out, a heroic innings which 


Phil Neale, the Worcester- 
shire captain, yesterday en- 
dorsed ins county's interest in 
signing Ian Botham. After being 
reappointed captain for a sixth 
season, Neale said: “If Somerset 
let him go I would be very keen 
to see him at Worcester." 

In ibe past two seasons Neale 
has twice led Worcestershire to 
fifth place in the county 
championship as well as taking 
them into three semi-finals in 
one-day competitions. 

Adding that be has ho worries 
about the England all-rounder's 
reputation or his possible effect 
on the dressing-room, he said: “I 
know our players would wel- 
come having lan in the side. We 
are so near to bang a successful 
side and Fm keen to find the 
missing ingredient that would 
turn us into a very good team.” 

Duncan Fearnley, the dub 
chairman and leader of the 
Botham lobby at New Road, 
said tbe county committee had 
expressed its Tull support” for 
moves to strengthen the playing 
staff. 

Two other counties to have 
shown an interest in Botham are 
Derbyshire and Warwickshire. 
Derbyshire are also considering 
an oner tt> Geoff Boycott, but 
are waiting on Botham's re- 
sponse before making a decision 
on new signings. 


costs againsl Brisbane bid he will net be 
repeating the mistake in the 

Mb sides field, yesterday: "We 

inner*, it will _ Want to attack the guv. I don’t 
l time in as like setting defensive fields, but 
t Test since 1 drought that was our best tame 
i never hap- against him in the first Test. He 
Test, against responded by playing a very 
tie else. West «w«ible innings, 
t rirtne ft in Botham, aged 31, set op 
“ England’s seven- wicket victory 
°5 ve Cj* i a» with a magnificent 138. But he 
oyd, tt they was never put under pressure, 
ior win they and was even offered singles — 
Should we see just to keep him away from the 
: like bin king strike. 

However, Border con tinned 
yesterday: “We don’t have a 
yesterday Botham complex. We do have a 
‘ practising very healthy respect for him, bra 
E ngli shm en, yon cant take the respect too 
over-reacted fas. Botham has not had that 
feat in Bris- ranch success in tbe past in 
withdrew into Australia. History suggests he 
as as Hie. wont do what be did in Brisbane 

“allure* g***? '***'"*» 
tedtaw"*; I?mis the old Border who 
e ever shall spoke to reporters after 
Australia's net practice yes- 
itel close by terday. His sour-faced post- 
ieen able to maKh comments in Brisbane 
ind hack the can be pHt down as an ont-of- 
r 1 character p erf ormance, brought 
retnrm ?B for oh by bitter disappointment, 
moon. In 10 -j might have gone a Ht 

> on the tour overboard at Brisbane,” be 

to get past 16 admitted. “Everyone was upset 
ckeL at tbe way we played because we 

. . drought ft was ora biggest 

ned up at the chance to beat England. Bat that 
where, as a is history now. 
be made 108 “I just want ns to play as well 

CC against as I know we can in Perth. We 
a in bis first looking forward to this. The 
950-51 tour mon *fe ** good and we think we 

* Barring last-minute injuries, 

S out here. I Geoff Lawson, the fast bowler. Is 
joys his tour certain to win his 37th cap —his 
vas to do. first for nearly a year — after 
i a recent only twelfth man fra tbe 

match he first Test, 

„2™K» The final eleven wOl not be 

officially named until tomorrow 
Marks had morning, hot Border yesterday 
stumped for pre-empted the selectors by 
t when, next announcing: “Lawson will play, 
it off Marks: The younger pacemrn win get a 
rev is unable lM worn watching him bowL” 
Maries, who l^ysrau 28. wy sarpris- 
letieh winter “S 1 ? omitted from the sole for 
igb&hwmtCT the first Test, leafing Australia 

’ 56111 Ior * fight in terms of penetratiou and 

experience. The pace trio used 

after £?„,“* *** "*»«■ 

Merv Hughes has been 

• ’ dropped from the squad for the 

I flO second Test, following his dis- 

appointing perfor ma nce In Bris- 

> j a bane, and Border warned the two 
I ptlT . Western Australians, Brace 
Lvtlv Real and Chris Matthews, that 

n/ . their international futures were 

Worcester- now on tbe line. 

Sterdw en- “Bra Henry’s (Lawson) prra- 

> win help. He is a senior 
Aflerbemg player and wfll set an example," 

Border said. “B at. when they 
If Somerset h*, e the ball in their hands, no- 
*v°7 kcen ooe can do it for them — it is 
taer - M , down to them.” 
asons Neale Border indicated that Peter 
ssierslure U) Sleep, a right-handed batsman 
m»d occasional leg-spin bowler, 
eti as la kina would be twelfth man. rather 
mi -finals in than Steve Waugh, because the 

. . Perth wicket has less grass oa it 

snowornes than usual. 

Both sides’ players were sur- 
ls *“* e prised at tbe straw colour of the 

o, he said. I Perth pitch and its dryness for 
ZSSfL'St November. Botham had a 
particularly dose look at it, 
lying foil length on his stomach 
“ “5 a* the bowler’s end. 

*5* “I think I ora see ridges and 

!°cd team. gullies,” he proclaimed, foflow- 
the r C iu b to* Ms inspection. He advised 
Grating- England’s c*p- 
NC v. fain- to “win the toss and bat fra 

unnlee L¥ d two days” 
u TP°rt for Meanwhile, Botham’s pro- 
the playing fcssiraialism, which is some- 
. • . times underestimated, shone 


fj.- ■* -cVtC&i S;/*# <■ r-xS>'- 


• V **>*!*. *?*i 






Pariv ( *P) — Tbe French 
team. Peugeot Talbot, the world 
rail) champ ton*, for rbe past f »0 
jars, are considering entering 
Formula One grand prix racing, 
tbe team manager. Jean Todt, 
announced yesterday. Tudt said 
a decision would he taken early 
next year on three possibil- 
hies — " to abandon high-level 
competition, to enter the worid 
sports prototype championship, 
or to form a full grand prix ream 
building engine, gearbox and 
car. 




Meanwhile, there are plans 
for an off-road programme next 
year including the Paris to 
Dakar rrah, tbe Baja 1 UUO in 
Mexico and ibe Pike's Peak 
billdimb in Colorado. 








Fighting hade: Sooth African cricket has helped to rekindle Thomas's enthusiasm 


^ Rejuvenated Thomas hoping 
11 to reclaim England place 


East London. South Africa 

While England career on their 
roller-coaster ride around 
Australia and rely increasingly 
on lan Botham to illicit encore 
after encore on the final leg of 
his touring days. 5,000 miles to 
the west in South Africa, the 
forgotten omission from Mike 
Gatling's squad is steadily — 
and efficiently — honing his 
skills to return to favour. 

Greg Thomas understands 
better than most the pendulums 
of life as an international crick- 
eter. Just 14 months ago. the 
Glamorgan all-rounder was 
England's baffling choice to be 
the spearhead attacking counter 
to the West Indian pace ma- 
chine of Marshall Holding, 
Gamer, Walsh and Gray. After 
nursing a hamstring injury all 
season — and without a fast 
bowling partner — Thomas's 
pride and confidence received a 
battering. 


Future depends on 
more than ability 


thrash again at the nets yes- 
terday. While most of bis Eng- 


almost saved England the game; 
in 1970-71 he hit only three 


bod colleagues were awaiting 
their thru to hat or bowl the 31- 
year-old aU-ronader closely 
studied Sleep, who played the 
last of his foor Test matches in 
1982. 


Only now does Thomas be- 
lieve those scars are beginning 
to heal "Fast bowlers need 
some rest from too much 
cricket" he admits, “and unless 
the pitch was really helpful last 
season, I didn't really let go. I 
can certainly sympathize why 
Botham wants to give up tour- 
ing and why Gooch derided stay 
home with his family.” 

Sitting in a pair of briefs 
named after Ian Smuts, another 
wily campaigner who had his 
fair share of setbacks and tri- 
umphs, Thomas is optimistic 
"I'm beginning to find my 
enthusiasm again,” he says after 
giving his wicketkeeping team 
colleague a goalkeeping catching 
session that would have bad 
Shilton nodding with approval. 

Thomas’s rekindled enthu- 
siasm has brought him a batting 
average of 57.50 so far in 50- 
over games in what is still 
regarded as one of the strongest 
domestic competitions. If Peter 
May's selectors must wish that 
one of their present lower order 
batsmen would display such 
consistency: Thomas is for from 
satisfied after missing out on the 


Australia tour. “Who knows 
how the selectors think?” he 
wondered. “But I must admit 
my main job is to take wickets— 
and 46 last season wasn't 
enough. So I can’t complain 
even if I would have loved to 
have teamed up with Dilley.” 

Unfortunately for Thomas, he 
has again gravitated towards a 
side who are tbe minor-image of 
Glamorgan: Border, a minor 
province, mixing a few successes 
with liberal doses of failure. 
Although Thomas has found 
some success against the major 
province's lop order batsmen, 
he again finds himself with little 
back-up. Bui be is not down- 
hearted. 

“For the past month T*ve been 
working on what Geoff Arnold 
and Mickey Stewart taught me 
at a coaching clinic with Dilley 
and Ellison briore I left England 
—mainly my rhythm. I think it's 
coming right At Newiands I let 
one bumper fly and it went right 
over the wickeie keeper’s bead 
for four. 1 wish there were more 
wickets like that in England _ 
and Newiands is supposed to be 
featherbed!” 

With England about to start 
the second Test in Perth. 
Thomas is plainly envious, 
believing at the age of 26, he is as 
fit and near his peak as he has 
ever been. “I'll be around 30 for 
the next Australia tour," he says. 
“I hope III still be around.” 

Whether Thomas will still be 
“around" however, does not 
depend solely on his ability. On 
the question of why he decided 
to ignore a warning from the 
organizers of next year's World 
Cup that any player going to 
South Africa would not be 
welcome with England in India 
and Pakistan. Thomas is as 
skittish as a yearling at tbe 
Newmarket sales. 

“Months before Ali Baeher 
(the SA Cricket Union’s chief 
executive) asked would I return 
if 1 wasn't chosen for Australia. 
The Border cricket union have 
been great to me and now 1 have 
the chance to become the senior 
professional with special res- 
ponsibilities to coach the senior 
team and provincial school 
teams. Nobody else was going to 
pay me this winter,” he said. “I 


have 3 n advanced coaching 
certificate and have a lot of 
experience to give, so why 

thnulHn'l 1 iica !iv" 


shouldn’t 1 use it?” 

Thomas reinforces his right to 
give loyalty and further his 
career with the view that South 
Africa is undergoing vast 
changes to dismantle apartheid: 
his home town recently voting 
itself an “open" city where all 
races can own property. The 
South African Group Areas Act 
however, does not allow such 
thinking. 

Tbe keen amateurs who 
sneaked from work to lunch for 
a net practice with the “pro” 
have gone. “Fancy lunch on the 
beach?” Thomas asks, and as an 
after-thought:*' You know they 
don't even have the segregation 
signs anymore.” 


Renault. Peugeot's state- 
owned ri»aL have just aban- 
doned a tunc bra vain atrempi to 
win tbe world grand prix 
championship, entering a frill 
team from 5977 to 1984 and 
mounting engines in leading cars 
this year. 

Peugeot's Talbot subsidiary 
started a grand prix ensile 
programme in 1981 but it was 
cancelled for commercial rea- 
sons before an engine was 
unveiled. Tod i said do decisions 
about major development* maid 
be taken until alter a French 
civil mon rules, towanii, the end 
of February* on a case brought 
by Peugeot againsl the Inter- 
national Acto Sport Federation 

(FISA). 

The sport’s ruling body an- 
nounced, after a series of rally 
deaths early this year, that the 
fastest Group B cars, such as 
Peugeot's 205 GTI Turbo 16 . 
would be banned from the 
championship from 1987. Todt 
said tbe decision contravened 
FISA's own rules requiring sev- 
eral year*’ notice of such 
changes. FISA has said that it 
was overruled on safety grounds. 

The tom will run three 
modified 205 CT1 Turbo 16s in 
the Paris to Dakar event, start- 
ing on January l. The Finnish 
driver. Ari Vatanen, who was 
seriously injured in tbe 
Argentinian rally in 1984. will 
make his competition comeback, 
paruered by the French tele- 
vision commentator and Paris to 
Dakar veteran. Bernard Giroux. 


“I want to stay 

clear of tronbie” CeleDImlllg 

The Welshman's throwaway Williams 


The Kenyan. Sbekhar Mehta, 
w ho has wwo the Safari rally Ore 
times, and (tie Safari organizer, 
Mike Doughty, will crew tbe 
second car. The third car will be 
driven by the Italian, Andrea 
Zanussi, with a Peugeot me- 
chanic, acting in part as a bigh- 
serrice car for Vatanen ami 
Mehta. 


The Welshman's throwaway 
line and his refusal to answer 
why he has placed himself in 
jeopardy if wishes to regain his 
England place are not the acts of 
someone who believes the only 
racial battles are fought annually 
at Cardiff Arms Park and 
Twickenham. Strangely, be has 
also told Border he is not 
available to play against Korn 
Hughes's Australian side when 
they are scheduled to come to 
East London early next month. 


“I want to stay dear of 
trouble.” he explains. Un- 
doubtedly he would nod at the 


doubtedly he would nod at the 
sentiments of one of South 
Africa’s popular protest singers. 
Jennifer Ferguson, who 
Jamenls:“We don’t even know 
the questions, never mind the 
answers anymore.” 

Now the question is whether 
Thomas will regain favour when 
Botham waves goodbye next 
summer and only the politicians 
know the answer of whether J G 
Thomas, of England. Glamor- 
gan and Border, has gone be- 1 
yond the pale. Bowling to Viv , 
Richards in fiilMlighi Iasi winter 
may yet prove a picnic ir 
comparison. 

Norman Crews 


Frank Williams, convalescent 
bead of the Canon Williams 
Honda Formula One team, is to 
receive a supersonic salute at 
Brands Hatch on Sunday. 

A British Airways Concorde 
will swoop in low over the Kent 
circuit around noon, ns parr of 
Williams Day — a day-long 
celebration in recognition of 
Williams and his team’s 
outstanding achievements this 
season. 

Among tbe Oxfordshire- 
based team's successes came the 
constructors’ title, and second 
and third place in the drivers* 
world championship, even 
though Williams himself was 
badly injured in a motor accident 
before the season started. 

Nigel Mansell winner of five 
grands prix this year, will also 
be taking part in the day's 
events. He will attempt to break 
the unofficial lap record for tbe 
Indy circuit in his turbocharged 
FW11 Williams Honda and 
must lap the 1.2 mile track in 
under 35H5 seconds at a speed 
of over 120-86mph. 


in 1970-71 he hit only three 
boundaries in his 70 and in 
1978-79 none at all in his seven- 
and-a-half-hosr 77, though this 
was in part doe to the long 
boundaries oa tbe ground. 

Four years 080 Tavarf occu- 
pied tbe crease there for a total 


w signings. 1982 . satisfied after missing out on the pay me this winter.” he said. “I 0011311 i^rCI 

With the World Cup looming, Richard Streeton reviews West Indies’ six-week tour of Pakistan 


FISHING 


Batsmen suffer as Pakistan pitch ploy backfires 


Whether Pakistan's chances 


of almost 10 boms over scores of against West I ndies in recent 


89 and nine. In the first innings 
he remained 66 not out fra 90 
minutes; in the second be took 
64 m«nnn»g over the first run. 
Against which it is unfair to 
place Red path's eight-boor 171 
in Perth’s inaugural Test but 
*fu», too. was dnu and dour. 

England's five Tests in Perth 
have produced four centuries by 
their own batsmen and six by 
Australia's, including two by 
Greg ChappelL By almost two 
hours the shortest of these has 
been Dong Walters's 103 in 
1974-75. when be scored exactly 
100 between tea and* dose of 


play on tbe second day. hitting 
the six runs be needed for his 


century in the period with a 
fierce poll off Willis from the 


Invariably, tbe side superior 
in this department have won. 


fierce poll on wuns irora me 
last ball of the day. 

England should perhaps be 
grateful that Lillee and Aider- 
man will not be playing this 
rim#, for they always enjoyed 
bowling on their home patch. At 
Perth in 1982-83. when the fifth 
day began, Willis’s side were in 
danger of defeat with a lead of 
150 and only five second-innings 
wickets remaining. Had Aider- 
man been fit throughout the 
match, Australia might weD 
have won but, as it was. England 
comfortably escaped with a 
draw, a rare result at Perth. 


weeks would have been im- 
proved if. they had. prepared 
better pitches will divide local 
opinion here for a long time- No 
secret was made in official 
circles that the pitches produced 
for the one-day games and Test 
matches were aimed at assisting 
Abdul Qadir’s leg-spin and to 
nullify tbe effectiveness of the 
West Indian fast bowlers. Every 
country, to varying degrees, 
does this sort of thing and it 
would be naive to linger over the 
morality involved. 

Not everyone in Pakistan 
cricket, though, is convinced 
that the plan worked, to their 
team’s advantage and query the 
necessity for it. Qadir certainly 
had a rewarding season but tbe 
West Indies pace bowlers usu- 
ally rose above the conditions. 
Even more significantly, the 
grassless, caked mud surfaces. 


Mr Hasib Ahsan . who is the 
chairman of both the Pakistan 
selectors and their World Cup 
technical committee, assured 
me that fast pitches, with even 
bounce, would be provided for 
next year's World Cup. “That 
will be essential,” he said. “You 
can be certain that our pitches 
will be greatly imprt>ved.”One 
hopes he is right. 

At it was, however. West 
Indies reckoned that the only 
proper pitch they found on this 
tour was the practice wicket at 
the Lahore Stadium's nets, with 
Hyderabad's pitch the best of 
those used in matches. The poor 
pitches, with the ball keeping 
low and coming through at 
different heights, brought some 
drab batting and unusually low 
scoring. 

There was only one century 
stand for either side in the Test 
series— the 1 11 pul on by Javed 
Miandad and Ramiz Raja last 


Calling magic 
to the mind 
this Christmas 


left the batsmen of both teams Saturday. Nobody managed to 
struggling. Pakistan’s own make a hundred- only the third 
suokemakers, ironically, found time in Test history that this has 


it harder to graft in the necessary 
manner than their opponents. 


happened in any series of three 
or more matches. The first 


instance came in tbe England v 
Australia series in 1888 and tbe 
other was in India in 1969-70 
when New Zealand were the 
visitors. 

Long-term. West Indies will 
remember this crowded six- 
week tour as the time when their 
bowling department was 
successfully remodelled. Gray 
and Walsh confirmed they were 
ready to step into the places 
filled ■ for so many years by 
Gamer and Holding. Gray and 
Walsh have clearly benefited 
from their English experience 
and their good line and 
dernni nation helped them over- 
come the conditions. Both men 
dovetailed splendidly with Mar- 
shall, whose form shows no hint 
of decline and who time and 
time again inflicted a disastrous 
start on the Pakistan innings. 

Gray, Walsh and Marshall, 
though, are going to be tired 
men when they rejoin their 
counties next April. Benjamin, 
the youngster still being 
groomed, did not have many 
opportunities but maintained 
the advance he made with 


Leicestershire last 

summer. Patterson, however, 
seems have lost some of the 
basic speed he was showing a 
year ago. He had the hardest . 
time coming to terms with 
Pakistan pitches. Similarly, 
Butts's ability to spin the ball 
more, brought him more success 
than Harper, his fellow off- 
spinner, when both were used in 
the last Test 

Richards's poor form stole the 
headlines but in fact most of the 
West Indian batsmen had a lean 
time by their standards. The 
coming weeks in Australia and 
New Zealand will give them 
every chance to play their 
strokes again but the time is not 
far distant when new feces will 
have to be infiltrated into the 
ranks as has been done among 
the bowlers. Only Richardson 
among the first six in the present 
batting order is on the right side 
of 30. 

It is hard to say how much 
Salim Malik's broken left arm in 
the fir« Test affected the con- 
fidence and form of the other 
Pakistan batsmen for the rest of 


the programme. Malik has a 
good record against pace and 
before bis injury had hinted that 
it held no terrors for him. 

Like every other country. 


By Conrad Voss Bark 


There is nnthine like a good 
fishing book tor Christmas read- 


Pakistan], inability ,.gci a good I 


sss 


r JZZL which 1 think are among the best 

and Monsin Khan, are clearly „„ . «« k. 

both coming to the end of their a "‘ 1 | T h h are cma,n 10 ** ,n the 
international careers. Waning in snupv 

the wings for regular middle If you love Wiltshire and 

Dorset and if the names of A roa 


order places are Ejaz Ahmed 


left-handed Asif and Wylye. Nadder and Ebble, 


Mujtaba. both teenagers and 
brilliant strokemakers. 

Imran Khan had a magnifi- 
cent series and shared 
Marshall's ability to extract lift 
and bounce from the deadest of 
pilches. In Qadir and the off- 
spinner Tauseef Ahmed. Paki- 
stan have two outstanding slow 
bowlers but in England next 
summer I expect the outstand- 
ing successes to be the left-arm 
seamers. Uasim Akratn and 
SaJeem Jaffer. Both swing the 
ball across the batsman's body 
towards the slips but can bring 
the odd one back a la J K. Lever. 


A thorn among roses 


Dickie Bird, the Yortshire- 
born Test match umpire, has 
caused a stir by defectmg to the 
red rose dob, Lancashire. Bird, 
who fires at White Rose Cot- 
tage, Banefky, Is promoting 
Lancashire Cetmty Cricket Oub 
in a there across the Pennines 
whirfc tiff s urp rised his feBow 

Yorks hiremen. 

Bird is pictured wearing 
bowler hats and carrying 
ombre Has and briefcases on the 


front cover of a leaflet to 
promote business packages at 
Old TraffonL One member of 
the Yorkshire committee said: 
-We were surprised to see him 
promoting the enemy. But then, 
Dickie sever stops amazing ns. 


\ spokesman for Lancashire 
««■ “Dickie was chosen be- 
cause he is such a popular 
character and is so well .known 
in the cricket wraW- 



PAKISTAN V WEST INDIES TEST AVERAGES 


PAKISTAN 
Batting and fielding 

M I NO 
Javed Miandad 3 6 0 
invan Knan 3 6 2 
RwreRfljfe 3 5 0 
Suba round 3 6 0 
Muaassei Nazar 2 4 0 

Vfasun Aknm 2 4 o 
Qasifn Qp>ar 3 5 1. 


Taunt armed 3 6 3 


Adq, r 1 Qurtr 
SrtUT> MtVf 
taoraai 


R HS AM 100 50 Ct 

176 76 2833 - 1 - 

11 S 61 28 76 - 1 1 

120 82 2000 - 1 4 

114 61 19JK - 1 9 

69 26 1735 

87 68 .16.75 - 1 - 

71 48 14X0 

33 9* HOT 

38 14 950 - - 1 

9 9 0.00 

48 40 8.00 - - 1 

3£ 12 8,00 - 1 - 

3 2 1OT 


WEST INDIES 
Batting and fielding 

M I NO 

OLHaynes 3 S 1 1 

IVARIcwos 3 5 0 « 

R 8 Ricaroson 3 5 0 1 

C G Greomoge 3 5 0 i: 


AvalOO SO Cl 


H A Gomes 
C G Butts 
R A Harper 
M D MarsnaD 
AH Gray 
B P Panarson 
PJ Dunn 
C a waun 


149 68- 37 25 
• 75 70 35OT 
146 54 29. JO 
132 75 26 «0 
67 33 1540 

35 17 11.66 
49 28 9.60 

32 13* 6.00 

27i? 6 ,’5 
6 S’ 6.45 
Z7 VS &4C 


- - - - - Bowfing 


Bowling 


Marshall; no hint of decline 


In.*,, Kh^n 
W4jKfT W.II11 

AUCuitiMM 
'iuWi 4iv 
turn*' ■ • 


C‘ M B W 

1*6.1 2* i?9 IP 
5 H3 6 
1 Xe-S '■* 18 

- -■'! £. ,Jtl 5 


ev S/IOM 
2 - 
6-mi . - 

t- T 1 - 

2-7.7 - - 

• 23 - - 


CGSuK 

A hGrsw 

u D warshas 1 14 27 ;««, , b lp 
CA vrs»sn 97 3 2? US ir u 
BPPBnnvw ?« 4 r«i 
ftAHarow Ki 9 W» 5 3- 

wtoed: 1 V A Rtnarce ->j.% i 

• Compiled by Richard Lockwood. 


60 34 9S 6 
96 X u 


B B SMOM 

4-7y _ _ 


Afc-o x-v-so. Sjif VhfisUi Si '-C, Vuo aa*4r Nara W'i .. 



Jtos’ sfl: :* '-eri. 


Stour. Piddle and Fro me call 
maeir to tbe mind then A Ring of 
Wessex 4 aters < Witberby, 
f 15.50) is an absolute must for 
Christinas, for it tells the tale of 
these riven and the history of 
the towns and countryside that 
they pass through, ft was the 
last book written by die late 
John Ashley -Cooper and there 
is a moving tribute to him in a 
foreword by Aylmer Tryon. 

A bedside book for a long stay 
io bed is The Magic Wheel 
(Heine matin. £15). an anthology 
of Fishing in literature from 
Homer to Hughes, delightfully 
selected by Darid Profumo and 
Graham Swtfi. George Orwell 
on float fishing and Virginia 
Woolf on the drv fly are among 
fascinating essays. 

Now for tbe reference and 
hon-to-dfr-its. For salmon, you 
cannot do better than give a 
Salmon fisher Arthur Oglesby's 
Fty Fishing For Salmon and Sea 
Trout \Crowood Press. £16.95), 
for the wbnle book, unlike 
others, is entirely about bow to 
atich salmon on tbe fly. It is 
fascinating and authoritative. 
Inn# ill nut regrei giving op bait 
and v pinner after reading 
Oglesby. 

The New Illustrated Die- 
rionury of l nut Flies, by John 
Rubens ■ Unwin. £14.95), is well 
oa r he w av to hemming a classic 
of its kind with details of more 
rhan 900 patterns, more than 
40U of them illustrated in colour. 


— 


Heer s 
tastic’ 


fin 


d mechanical en- 
mt the £8,000 he 
ile Portfolio Gold 
yesterday to good 


date my gramo- 
ise ray donation 
i bail appeal and 
/ next year,” Mr 
lid, of Allestree, 


aged 51, who has 
■Do Gold since it 
• Tunes, said that 
relieve his luck, 
t is fantastic. It is 
Knee.* 1 

old cards can be 
sending a stara- 
d envelope to: 
old. 





l Wood 


jer of 
lives 


»eer 


n Young 


>ed in brewing 
irinkers and, in 
even kill them, 
for Real Ale 
lay. 

the campaign's 
hat’s Brewing, 
Volz, a former 
od Beer Guide, 
ile who have: 
her breathing 
us disorders, 
/ho are allergic . 
s, can suffer ill 
oking beers in 
s have been 
xiuce a foamy 
larity, or io 

<1 States; the' 
tore than 40 
’heart attacks 
were used co- 
in beer to 
ning head. 


peal 


nnan couple 
"S last July for 
Peking reduc- 
■tences. 
lord Lane, 
ice, will pre- 
lications by 
)Dja Schulze, 
for leave to 
he sentences 
Justice Mi- 
the Central 





or storage 
ably shows 
ace Heater 



3 1 *" high 
31*" high 


S»cMfL JJ 
p— P _ 
Xtabd. I ■ 


cft»4Mwi?p 

m ^ m ^ “-3 V ‘ 


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THE TTMRS THURSDAY NOVEMBER 27 1986_ 

RUGBY 1IM1QM; MIDFIELD SPEED AND FORWARD ZEAL END A BARREN SPELL 


ICE SKATING 


Cambridge confidence returns 
as points begin to flow again 

. . ... .... nrave a orototem, and Obo, 


By David Hands 
Rugby Correspondent 


Cambridge University . 30 
Steete-Bodger*sXV„.20 


It is surprising wbax a few 
points can do for you. Cam- 
bridge University bad been 


downpour midway through 
the first-half did not help 
either side to settle. But 
against a scratch combination, 
Cambridge found holes for 
dough and his agile partner, 
Wyles, both of whom had the 
speed to take advantage. 

Steele-Bodger’s XV could 


at lock this -5-1* 

Ripley moved to tbe to* row. g^g |Btkl jjo^rfs the final 
Cambridge s first twotnes ^ cgnhbndge, with 

came from passes put down oy ^ tota j ^ ^ season 


Lord, Clough scooping up the 
ball both times to score the 
first himself and lay on the 
second for OtL A near break 
by Charlie Smith led to Cook s 


their best total of the season 
and their second win of the 
term, bad already written the 
winner's speech. 

SCORERS: CnMdge ittewMBpTO* 

dough ®. Wytes. 0 * um > w»tau: 


bridge University had been Steele-Bodger’s XV could bydia^MurnKaio^w aPM****^ 5 !**" 

scoreless for their last two find no fluidity behind the try and Gto 
games but their confidence scrum. Despite d» advantage 

returned at Grange Road yes- they possessed in the set pieces lus side was temporarily down 
terday when they won their —Moore took a string of balls to 14 men. 
annual encounter with Mickey against tbe head —Giles never a delightful swerve by bi- 

Steele-Bodger’s j udiciously-se- escaped the attentions of the mon Smitfi gave him (BMSShaM^tMs^kOaUaa 

*' " ~ * J * ' * * m. Bracilsv. MacsiAene); *N 


lected team by two goals, three 
tries and two penalty goals to 
two goals and two tries. 

Indeed, once they took the 
lead in tbe eighth minute, they 
were never headed, although 
the guest side caught up early 
in the second-half They owed 
victory to the wiles of their 
midfield and the enthusiasm 
of their forwards at lineout 
and is the loose. Kelly and 
Withyman grew in stature the 
longer tbe game went on and 
the experience of Cu shing was 
of great value in the closing 
minutes. 

It has not been a good term 
for Cambridge and a freez ing 


- Moore took a string of balls 
against Uk head -* Giles never 
escaped the attentions of die 
Cambridge back row and 
Charlie Smith had an off day 
with ins handling . Cambridge 
may he a frttie naive in 
defence on the flanks bat. on 
the day, it was seldom 
exposed. 

The university led 13-10 at 
die interval, by which time 
their guests had lost die 
services of Cooke, who went 
off having sprung his shoulder 
joint, an injury which may 
prevent him from playing for 
some weeks. He was replaced 
by Pepper, who is probably fed 
up with jokes about adding 
seasoning to the pack and who 
has played for the university 


A delightful swerve by Si- 
mon Smith gave him space to - 
send in Moore for the tty 
which, converted by Metcalfe, taw i 
levelled the scores. But then 
Cambridge went away. lom, £ 
standing deep behind Maw** 

metre scrum, gave Wyles sHT 
space for the . haHJreak, , 
Ooueh finishing m stjfc. ire 
EnSSnd centre scored a third mb 
try by finding a channel clear 

to tbe line from 40 metres smd 

Thomas helped put the uang 
on tbe Cambridge cake by 
racing into the line and send- JESS* 
ing Wyles Over for a deserved 

score. , , , . 

Hobbs, the students’, lock; 
left the field with a jarred £££ 
neck, which is not expected to *bjw» 


isidiMrara 

loud StH 




(Magdafcn, BnMand 

*S Ksfly (Richard Hub* andCopus 

(OJenabnond and llagdalana). JT 

BtesiaasusBagEi 


Umen&rLX), m moon (London Mab 
(EM MUande). 

*Bkw 


Delighted 
Owen 
is cleared 


putycu AVI tuv UlUTW^LJ UVA.AI -T 

Midlands formidable again 


_ - The Midlands, winners last 

l />| nn W Af l season of the Thorn EMI di- 
Jg UlCiU CU visional championship, have 

married the disparate talents of 
Adrian Owen, die Bridgend Leicester and Nottingham to 
captain, succeeded in his appeal p^y London at tbe Wasps 
against a 22-week suspension ground on Saturday week, 
yesterday after bemg sent off for Nei] Maptdl the winning 

the - f0 I l £LSj , LNn^«ST r cap^fo *»d Nottingham lock, 
agamst Bristol on November J. lead a containing five 

The Welsh Bngby Union of his colleagues and sax payers 
iccutive committee cleared the fi-o ra Leicester, who earlier this 
boudda schoolmaster. aged_30, mo ntb terminated Notting- 
play at Pontypool on Sat- ham ’s unbeaten record. 


executive ■ nnn*iwi* cleared the 
Rhondda schoolmaster, aged 30, 
to play at Pantypod on Sat- 
urday. Owen vigorously pro- 
tested bis iunocerice after being 
seat off by Gareth Simmonds, 

tbe referee, when be was alleged 

to have kicked Simon Hogg, the 
centre, at the Brewery Field. 


By David Hands 

winners last Coventry captain, which reflects 
horn EMI di- well upon the Leicester tight nye 
onship, have forwards as a scrummaging unit 
irate talents of (of whom Wayne Richardson 
lottingfaam to murt have been dwcussedasa 
I tbe Wasps fight-bead prop). Gary Pearce 
ay week. will make up the front row, 

the winning assuming be has recovered from 
tindiam lock! a calf muscle injury. 

asaftssKcss: 

Notung- whom qualified because he 
. withdrew from the Yorkshire 
the Midlands tfg>m last weekend. Had he 
ges from that appeared at Morley, he would 

Inn *> Nnrth. . * j r.. 


Steve Thomas (Coventry) 
who played so wefl in the 
divisional championship last 
season, has not played for his 
dub thus &r because of injury. 
Richard Moon (Nottingham) 
will a more than adequate 
replacement, having nudged 
ahead of Nick Youngs, as has, 
apparently, Simon Robson, of 
Moseley, who is the replacement 

ynrm half 

Barry Evans, the Leicester 
ri ght wing, has not played for his 
club for some weeks because of 
an Achilles tendon injury, tan 


Neverthetes the Mtdbmds Weekend. Had he 

show seven changes from that appeared at Morley, he would j“ hooesto SfolSeft 
which beat London at Nonh- automatically have qualified for weekend, 

ampton last December. The the North, whose team is due to secona team uus wcwmu. 


>l S! e J?5£iS!^rF^ , ™ e most substantial ones are in the 
nitre, at the Brewery Field. pack where Brian Moore has 
IBs appeal was supported by Steve Brain, Bog- 

written submissions from Hogg land ’s hooker last season, and is 
and David Thomas, bis fellow joined in tbe front row by Stuart 
Bristol player, who thought the Redfem. whose brother, Steve, 
incident was accidental. was capped as a replacement 

Owen, a second row forward, against Ireland in 1984 before 
who was originally told his ban going to rugby league, 
would keep him out of rugby Redfem has been given the 
mwit April 5, was jubilant at the vote ahead of Lee Johnson, the 
derision which could even give 
him a chance of winning a place 
in the Welsh triaL The teams 
are announced tomorrow. 

“Obviously Tm ecstatic,*' he 
said. “It’s taken a long tune, but 


die North, whose learn is due to 
be released next Sunday. 

John Wells, the England 
under-23 flanker, is rewarded 
for his consistency ahead of 
Peter Cook, who seems doomed 
to an eternal role as replace- 
ment, but the Midlands back 
row selection will pose a for- 
midable challenge as a unit 
which could seek higher hon- 
ours. 


ft 


■4 B Moora 


bruin (Bedford), N 
captain). G Hcesj 


1 : i iB ! r . : J M 


Holifield gets off to a flyer 


sud.-ICsafa.atasfitae.bat By Peter Mmsob 

the WRU got there in the end. ■ - 
I've been fiurty treated and I've ^Strike Command M 

Support Command 

even people I don't know." In fairness it must be 


Support Command. — 9 

in fairness it must be said that 


• Richmond are not looking to in an excellent, hard-fought 
break off fixtures with Swansea match. Support Co mman d were 


allegations 


much weakened by the loss in 


Moriarty, tbeir flank forward, the second half of two key 
punched Chris Mills, the Rich- players - Parsonage, a flank 

, rn J , J c 1 1 UTm.II fh. 


Bond prop forward, and dam- 
aged his eye. 

Mike Humphreys, the chair- 
man, said: “The incident at 


forward, and, Worrall, the 
scrum-halt 

Indeed a superior first-half 
display by tbe Support forwards. 


GMmiay a n— » MMmi suviutm m -w- 

Swansea is c nxi e ut ty mder dis- particularly at the set pieces, 

L .J- M- ik. ak,L. Ikoh ihmM thpir nmmnmtt 


ensskm between the dubs. Both 
are in possession of a video of 
the Harlech TV coverage of the 
match. Any comments which 
have been made concerning the 
incident represent personal 
opinions,” be said. 


had meant their opponents, 
potentially the more dangerous 
force, were obliged to spend 
much of their tune in defence. 

In this period Worrell's op- 
timism fired an ambition to kick: 
goals from differing angles along 


the half-way line, but be was to 
ji irn yd once only, from 35 
metres and a wide angle on the 
left. _ _ 

In the meantime Strike Force 
had moved out of defence to 
score a fine try through Gigs. 
This was borne of a splendidly 
executed movement from left to 
right in which a good pass by 
Gosiin put the long-legged 
Holifield away on a powerful 
run which ended with Gigg 
crossing tbe line. 

Holifield, who bails from 
Neath and who only recently 
joined the RAF, has the look of 
a promising player. The ball ran 
his way — rather than towards 
Underwood on the left wing - 
and at length he underlined a 
first-rate display with the best 
try of the match following a 
quint of 40 yards. 


Sp 1 


(HnntoW; rep: Cp<4 Wcxfinon. New- 
Alhem). HU?3 EWMja 



SWIMMING 


Devon go to college to 
try to stop Yorkshire 


Yorkshire, who last won the 
Esso inter-county knockout fi- 
nal in 1984, will attempt to win 
it again at the Pingfes pool, 
Nuneaton, on Saturday. 

Heading their 30-strong team 
is Helen Rank (Cip» rfLeedsX 


the British junior international of Plymouth), the national age 
and national age group cham- group champion. 


ptotu Also included are four 
national age group medal win- 
ners— Helen Mullins (Harro- 
gate), Alex King (City of 


TREBLE CHANCE PAYING 6 DIVIDENDS 


Bradford), Karl Cockcroft (City championships, carries the 
of Leeds) aod Mark BiHam (City hopes of Essex. He competes in 


23 PIS (Max). . £865.667-50 4DI 

221/2 PTS £10.731-40 1Q 

22PTS £5.981*35 

211&PTS £481-40 4« 

21 PTS £108-40 ^ 

20V2PTS £41-45 Expe 

t reble QMicaiSvaCTdi to nBjtant Vl B- 8th F 


4 DRAWS £75-60 


10 HOMES £2-00 


4AMAYS £5-50 


Aten ftridmb to nits oftOp 


Expanses and Commission 

8th November 1986— 29-2% 


Of Hull). 

Devon, who hope to stop the 
Yorkshire stampede, lean 
heavily on KeBy College. No 
fewer than 13 of their swimmers 
have been selected. In tbe party 
are Helen Starter and Melanie 
Bradley, die British junior inter- 
nationals; Anna RatdiflE the 
Commonwealth Games repre- 
sentative; Paul FedderzoUi, the 
Esso national age group cham- 
pion; and Melinda Bennett, a 
national age group medal 
winner. 

Zara Long, the double 


VERNOHS 


POOLS. LIVERPOOL 


RUGBY LEAGUE 


NETBALL 


*99 


1^0 HOMES 


| (Noth mg Barred) 


5AWAYS 


| (Nothing Barred) J 


St Helens out 
to sign a top 
Australian 


England are 
equal to 
the challenge 


(Nothing Barred) 

Above Dividends 10 Units of lOp. 
Expenses end Commission for 8th 
November 1986- 28-s% 


For coupons Phone 01-200 0200 


LONDON EC 1 . 

Phone OI -253 537G 


Record ISa-tp PAYOUT includes 

mu 


Si Helens are hoping to sign a 
leading Australian tourist to 
replace tbeir injured New Zea- 
lander, Mark Elia, whose con- 
tract has now been cancelled, 
with Mai Meninga, Gene Miles, 
Michael O'Connor and Greg 
Alexander beading their list. 

Alex Murphy, the St Helens 
manager, said: “We will be 
sounding them out and hope 
one of the four will be whh us 
for three months in the New 
Year. 

“But 1 feel very sorry for Eba, 
who is a star in his own right 
The deal cost us £10.000 for IS 
minutes because Elia sustained 
the hamstring injury back in 
.New Zealand. We want a top- 
class replacement and hope to 
tie up a deal quickly.” 

Meninga scored 28 tries in 31 
appearances for St Helens two 
years ago and is due to return to 
the club on a three-year contract 
□ext season. 

Meanwhile. Oldham’s second 
attempt in six days to sign the 
Leeds forward, Brendan Hill, 
fell through yesterday. The 21- 
year-old prop is on the transfer 


-/.'--I Sr-xi, 







seonBtfcaaiMrnwiniit TtewO iga 
HrffieML Pare Aten. Support CwwjSS 
TkF Smite PwcVtoRBCfcoK Can-. 
STRIKE COMMAND: Cpi S Lm*r 
rare® Norton); Cpi It HeMaM (Brtza 
FBLtlGorfn (Brin Norton). Cpi 
N Rains (Lynetom). Rg OttR Undar- 

■■ — — (Nor* Coanss). 

«xx* Cpi H 
Cpi 


(LytMftamy, Cpi G 

ombej. An Tfa^PGl BB Rfl 

SUPPORT COMMAKHSgtP Atanraa 
Attam); CM A Bnfcar (§1 Attain). tpl H 
Tlinm 3 AtfamJ, LAC M C Can 
MfordLSACHTlYawtStAftairi^CpIS 
teay {UntovonOesM. Q 


sSdKm:a 

nri a w. Mr N Hater (Notts. Lhics and 
OarbySodHtj). 


Ml. 

•zr: < . - AS# 

1 ■ v - . . v V 





Up and 


Opyl Bpnlfft and Andrew Naytoshowftar British dnuBHOftAip style 


A pair out to bridge the gap 


ByJobnHeaaesay 


A Nottingham couple, Cheryl 
Peake and Andrew Naylor, 
promise to repair the one glaring 
deficiency that has afflicted 
British ice starring for fin: too 
long. 

Carry and Cousins and, later, 
Torvill and Dean have reached 
die pinnacle of achievement in 
their different disciplines in the 
last decade, and a medal in die 
women's individual event is 
also not unknown. But discover- 
ing a British success in the pairs 
is almost to delve into the pre- 
history of the sport 

Now, Peake and Naylor, with 
a little bit of help from a 
Canadian friend, hope to put tbe 
matter right. Their performance 
in winning the British 
championship for die second 
tfmg at SoUhnfl on Tuesday was 


strafing . Yet, within .18 months, 
they had unseated Lisa Cushley 
and her brother, Nefl, as British 
champions. A year farther on 
and the Nottingham pair were in 

a different class. 

They now spend much tune 
in Kitchener, Ontario, with a 
Canadian - trainer, 
Kerry Leitch, a man who has in 
his academy the top three 
ranadian pairs. The discipline 
is strong in f'gnwiH, and Peake 
and Naylor have tbe advantage 
of habitually rubbing shoulders 
with up to a score of rivals, at 
once setting an example and a 
pace. 


She and her near neighbour, 
Joanne Conway, the British 
champion, were tbe only two 
skaters to succeed with a triple 
jump, and Miss Taylor also 
survived the double axeL with 
which Miss Conway foiled. 
Higher marks for presentation 
lifted the champion into first 
place, but Miss Taylor had done 
enough to awaken us to her 
potentiaL 




“rm hoping fora place in the 
top 10 for than in Cincinnati,’' 
Latch says, “but even that 
won't be easy.” He earmarks 
three places for both the Soviet 


Pr 


, n 









Kara 


FOOTBALL 


Scots are 


among 
the gods 


A team who have found 
their second wind 


Schools football *y George Chesterton 


Commo nw ealth bronze 

medal winner, who has a tors 
Achilles tendon, is in the squad 
without being nominated for an 
event Devon, who win be 
making their debut in tbe final, 
also include Laura Gahan (Port 


Ian McKenzie (Braintree and 
Booking), who won the 
outstanding swimmer award at 
the Esso national age group 


Paris (AFP) -Scottish for- 
wards continued their recent 
run of success in France as Eric 
Black, formerly of Aberdeen, 
scored twice to help Metz reach 
the league cup final on Tuesday 
night. 

Metz won fi-3 after extra time 
at home to the championship 
leaders, Bordeaux, in their semi- 
final. Black, perhaps inspired by 
the efforts of Ray Stephe n, the 
former Dundee forward who 
scored twice on his league debut 
for Nancy on Saturday, opened 
the scoring in the third t* 1 *"* 111 " 
and added tbe fourth goal after 
112 minutes. 


S hre wsbury have not been 
beaten in their last eight 
matches. Only against Man- 
chester GS, whom they defeated 
6-1, have they not come from 
behind. When they entertained 
Charterhouse in a match domi- 
nated by tbe wind their visitors 
were one ahead at half-time, A 
Ivamy being the scorer. Earty in 
the second half Shrewsbury 
equalized through J Prichard. 
There was no further score. 

Forest defeated KtaMton 1- 
0, foe fourth successive match in 


which they have not conceded a 
goal, D Spanton scoring just 


made and took tbeir chances 
wdL They were two up in foe 
first quarter of an hour and 
although Aldcnham pulled one 
bade J KeeMe sealed foe result, 
scoring one goal and making 
another. Eton have won four 
successive matches since half- 
term. 

Under difficult conditions cm 
Tuesday Septan never recov- 
ered from the loss of two early 
goals at Wolverhampton. Tbe 
home ream moved well and 
made foe most of short passes.to 
take the score to 5-0 before 
Repton came bade with two 


After the North v South 
match at Wolverhampton last 


the 100 and 200 metres 
breastrokeand tbe medley relay. 

Nicole Bates and Debbie 
Tubby, the national age group 
champions, add strength, to the 
Norfolk side. Two of their team 
colleagues are Stuart Wyer and 
Stuart Wells, who are national 
age group medal winners. 

The talented Russell 
Stapleton is the top swimmer in 
tbe Kent side. He is accompa- 
nied by Matthew Driscoll, his 
Beckenham team colleague and 
national age group medal win- 
ner. 










B Hi 



n Of hr 










f!W 








K Hi if 1 . 1 .'J 1 . iTr.H 


Vejle until the end of the season. 


During tbe team's next which will keep him out of foe 
match — against Ischia on Sun- game for around six weeks. 


England's hitherto unsung 
heroines are picking up foe 
torch from foe men’s hockey 
team by taking on world cham- 
pions from Australia and giving 
them a run for tbeir money. 

On Saturday, at foe Wembley 
Arena, they are aiming to go one 
better by beating the Australians 
in the Evian International. At 
Gateshead last weekend Eng- 
land belied iheir world ranking 
of No. 4 by talcing foe redoubt- 
able world champions to 39-40. 

Heather Crouch, the England 
coach, said: “We matched 
Australia all the way. When you 
consider it was only a last- 
minute goal that beat us, we are 
going to Wembley reckoning 
that we can go one better this 
time." 

ENGLAND SQUAD: J HfOej (Essex 
Metropofitan). J Bryan (B fc mtrigham). H 
Oattaan Kxiedfte), A Caah (Cumbria). H 
PanoS [West York shir e), K FmJ 00 


FOR THE RECORD 


ATHLETICS 


FOOTBALL 


( HerBorri- 

ThflBBflfl 




BvJolmGoodbody 


2jESSS33!S5 


valaeuf cou qwtition a sport. 

He xbo said he saw no 
jncoiapafflffity b etween the two 
fMbmPMps of competitive aad 
recreational sport. “The two 
things can go forward together.” 

Perhaps. But foe review wffl 
find font many gover nin g bodies 
are wmried that pqgs are not 
being cacomaged to take part fa 
tra«fioonxl games so that many 
schools have become ouaMe to 
fieM tea ms and b «w«in 
numb e r of papfls drift away into 
other acti viti es . 

This has been acoeutnated by 
the .teachers’ dispute and foe 
deefine in foe amber rf ade- 
quate facilities restate schools. 

The. distress tS some govern- 
ing bodies wasexeapGtied yes- 
terday by foe report of Son 
Teazikk of foe Rqfty FoutiwU 
Union, who conducted a su rvey 
of 685 schools in Ragland. One 
0 f the principal needs which 
emerged was “to achieve a better 
ondeataodlag fat trainee teach- 
ers of the benefits that can be 
derived from team sports te 
balance foe new and fa shionable 
philosophy which holds against 
competition." TMs presumes 
that individual sports are non- 
competitive which, of course, 
they are. Indeed many pupils 


Independent trend 
has some faults 


find lkr greater satisfaction and 

beaefft-irom such activities as 
and wrin. 


But sometimes this trend te 
hdmdodi sports has been 
counter-prodactive. Peter Law- 
sou, foe Secretary off the Central 
CouncB of Physical Recreation, 
said yesterday: “ft was widely 
recognized at foe stnriaar that tf 
there is out a back-up id’ 


wide choice is a 


productive. . 

Mr Tracey said tint foe 
GoimmeniwMUcMadultt- 
isiatSoa on sport in schools — *V 
this is the way forwaifl." Btt he 
made foe pdM that foe <a0f 
duty that ednortun a aU a nM e s 
have towards then: pnaOs ea foe 
adbolastic progicaame is to teadi 
refiguux- • ' 

Mr Tracey s tressed foe im- 
portance off better Ibks between 
schools and local authorities 
partfenlariy so that there corid 
be daai use of educational 
fiteffities. “The head teacher 
seems math keeaer on providing 
r esources at schools when the 
money cooks dbeefty hack to 
foe school instead of going te foe 
local authorities.” 

Today's pr ogramme consisted 
of a plenary ressimi and then the 
mmfing broke np Into rear 
groups to discuss differed 
topics. 

These woe cnrricrinm, par- 
tiadariy omirtitko and vec- 
reatien; fiteffities in schools and 
the supervision of exlra-cnrrlca- 
lar activity; teacher leadership 
and couch training and links 
bet ween schools and dabs and 
the rote of local authorities; and 
spo r targ o v e r ai ng bodies. 

The orons were chaired by 
Bon Pfckenng, Peter_La wsoa . 
pr John Kane aadCoHn Afoin- 
son, of MiDfidd SchooL 

One poiat that emerged 
stnmgiy from foe discassimi was 
tbe haradri eSect of tire teach- 
ers dispute. One representative 
of a teachers ariou said that 
foehr reerebexs were now increas- 
ingly expected to be paid for 
Saturday activities when many 
tnafitioual games take place . 


BOXING 


Nelson’s Wow 
for Warren’s 
Alexandra bill 


Annuali Nebou, the- World 
Boxing Council featherweight 
champion from Ghana, who 
destroyed Pat Cowdefl in one 
round, has suspected appen- 
dicitis and has had to poll oat of 

meeting Irving Mitchell, foe 
American, at the Alexandra 
PhvQiounext Wednesday. 

Frank Warren, the promoter 
who has an exclusive promo- 
tional agreement whh Nelson, 
said the bout woafcf now take 
place So foe New Year, leaving 
Errol Christie's 16-ronnd con- 
test against Charlie Boston, foe 
New Jersey southpaw as foe 
maia event 


• Sammy Beeson, foe farmer 
British erniserweigbt title- 
bolder, will make life comeback 
agamst Bash AIL of Nigeria, at 
Battersea on Saturday- despite 
the death of Tony Lavelle, his 
m anager , on Tuesday.- right 
Akay Aaola, his trainer, has 
persuaded Beeson “to . go 
through with the npidi in 


memoty ef the man who gelded 
him to the tide.” 



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„ - — : THE TIMES THURSDAY NOVEMBER 27 1986 

TELEVISION AND RADIO 


When a hero was out— but not down 

lies the .secondary title C CHOICE ^ mMttn ^A •Sm’M'r falnn m 


Edited by Peter Dear 
and Peter Davalle 


• Bottom's Orf (BBC2, 930pm), 
which carries lbe secondary title 
9 % fTrtfa in the Life <f a Boy's 

Own Herd, fills in whatever gaps 

there might be in oar knowledge of 
whai the cricketer did with himaelf 
after being banned from first-class 
cricket last May. He fished, and 
played gotfj and surrounded him- 
self with loyal friends and conviv- 
ial drinkers* And he learnt how to 
pilots behcopter. He was a hero in 
waiting, hero being a word much 
usedm bin Johnstone’s com- 
mentary, delivered by William 


with the cleverly turned line that 
the cricketer is looking down on a 
land fit for heroes, but a in 
which heroes must fit. It most be 
said that home- life with Tam 
Botham is not presented tonight as 
exactly heroic. When he {days bis 
children, at cricket or anything 
else, he plays to win. His wife says 

he leaves his dirty washing all over 
fee place, and she bib to see the 
«nmy side of the practical jokes he 


tonight. Open Space's docu- 
mentary A Seal CasaaJty 
(BBC2, 7.25pm) explains why we 
often have to Irene around so long 
in hospital casnalty departments. 
Shortage of stafl; and resources, 
and too many people by-passing 
their GPs and adopting what one 
medical spokesman caJJsa^supcr- 
market mentality”, by which we 
assume he means expecting every- 
thing to be sittiiig,-WBituig, on the 
shelf In what must be the under- 
statement of the week, a consul* 


on two novels after a long 

“writer's Mode* — is taken to with 
a profile of James CbvdL Here is 
a writer who resembles nothing so 
much as a machine specially 
designed to produce bcst-seHeis 
{King Rat, Shogun, Tajpart, etc). 
Very rich this man, and very sure 
of his attention-grabbing talent. 
Give me a reader who is p re pare d 
to give me a quarter of an hour of 
his time, he says, and I will keep 
him for up to 40 hours. 

• Radio ‘ highlights: Masur 



x+Trr •••••-• 

W 

• t • • 

^ ■' 3{t*i ^ 






M M 

UP 

m 


im 



BBC1 


BBC 2 


ITV/L ON DON 


Day to Day. Robert Klroy-Sflk 
chairs a staaio dtecussion on 


7M Top of the Pupa introduced by 



935 Thames news heaefines. 

930 Schools: bakers and baking 
932 No Hanky-Panky. a story 
by Naomi Lewis *54 Resting 
10.11 Part two of a fftn version 
of the story of Christmas 1038 
Health education 1045 Craft, 
design and tschnotofly * joining 
materials 11J» Poetry vwth 
mosfcll 30 ChBdrena 
experiences of being ignored 
. 1 1.37 How We Used to Lb* - 
rushing to eniisL 

1200 Thonas the Tank Engine and 
Friends, (ri 12.10 Puddle Lane 


mining town whose mines are 
ablaze beneat h the streets. 
Life becomes complicated for 
her and her partner when they 
find themselves involved in 
murder aid at odds with the 
mine-owner, the local 





are models Maria 


a song from 




Friends, (r) 12.10 Puddle Lane 
1230 The SiAvana. Drama 
serial about an Austrafian 
famSy during the Forties. 

1.00 News at One with John Suchet 
130 Thames news. 

1-30 Falcon Crest Drama serial 
starring Jana Wyman as the 
matriarch of a CaUbmia wine 
dynasty 225 Home Cookery 
Cafe. Crown Roast of Work. 

230 Daytime. Sarah Kennedy 
chairs a studio <Bscusston on ■ 
topical subject 34)0 Take the 
Kgfi Road 335 Ttremee news 
headlines 330 Sons and 




Mm 








- 


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'r,y% j±j****$& 



A 1968 ABA tifle fight between 
Mark Rowb and Tom imrie. 
Open Space: A Real Cosurety. 
Thktysix houra in the busy fife 
of the casualty d epartm e nt of 
WNpps Cross Hospital, 
Teytonstone, Essex, (see 


T> 


44)0 The Raggy Dole. 4.10 The 
Tolebuga 430 Routing Looee. 

Adventures of eight inner-city 
youngsters on a camping 
■ holiday In the EngBsh 
countryside. (Oracle) 435 
Dangetmo u eeu Cartoon 
adventures of a secret service 
rodent and his timorous side- 
kick, PenfokL 

5.15 Btockfauatore. General 
- knowledge game for 
teenagers.. 

535 News with Alastair Stewart 
64)0 Thames news. 

K2S He^ti John Murray with detais 
of how to claim a heating 
allowance this winter. 

835 Crasmoads. Adam keeps a 
careful watch on Anne-Marie. 

74)0 rmmaidato Farm. Seth 

Armstrong is acclaimed a hero. 

730 FBm: Bunting Rage (1984) 


94)0 Obis on Top. Comedy series 
about three girls sharing a 
room in a house betongbg to 
Joan Greenwood. Making a 
guest appeara n ce are the 
Bevariey Sisters. (Oracle) 

930 This Week. Jonathan DimbiBby 
reports on the sensitive issue 
of race and school 
104)0 News at Ten with Carol 

Barnes and Atastair Stewart 
Weather foflowed by Thames 
news haatffines. 

1030 Ownmr. The investigative 
pathologist pitis his reputation 
on the Ine when he comes to 
the conclusion that an 
influential businessman is 
responsfcle tor the death of his 
estranged wife, (ri 
1130 The Business of Excellence. 
Management consultant 
GiffOrd Pinchot 111 presents Ms 
new ideas of business 
thinking. 

1215 Lifestyles of the Rich and 
Famous. Robin Leach meets 
Roger Moore. 


CHANNEL 4 


2.15 Their LoKfaMpS* House. A 
repeat of last night's 
programme of nJghfights of the 
day s debates in ma muse of 
Lords. 

230 FBm: Chmy Brown* (1948) 
starring Jennifer Jones and 
Charles Boyer. Romantic 
comedy about a plumber's 
reece and a Czech refugee 
who first meet in a London flat 
and than in an EngBsh stately 
home. The last Urn to be 
dkected by Ernst LubHsch. 

430 BsiMpiat Busters. Cartoon. 

430 Countdown. Yesterday's 
wtonar of the words and 
numbers compet i tion is 


starring Barbara! 

Eddie Atoert Carol Kane and 
Bert Bernese. A made-for- 
television drama about a . 
geologiatwho to sent to a 






6.15 Good Mo rni ng B rita i n 

presented by Arne Diamond 
and Mfloa Morris. Hews with 
Gordon Honeycombs at 830 l 
74)0, 730^830, 830 and 930; 
ftoancial news at 838; sport at 
630 and 730; exercises at 
035s cartoon at 735; pop 
music at 735; and Jeni 
Barnett's postbag at 835. The 
After Nine guests indude 
Professor Stephen 
Schoenthaler talking about Itis 
research tinting ctetinquency 
with (fiet and Claire Raynsr 
with advice on parsons 
problems. 


«*** * 

.3’ ' *V 


Wffiams of Crewe. 

530 lee Stating. The Tuborg 
British Figure Staling 
Championship. Highlights of 
the free programmes in both 
the Ladies' aid Men’s events, 
introduced by Nick Owen. 

530 Rhythmic Gymnastics. The 
Erreys Printers interna ti onal 
from the Wembley Conference 
Centre. The commentators are 
John Taylor and Monica 
Photos. 

630 Unkxi World. By the year 2001 
it is estimated that 51 per cent 
of workers wU be women, as a 
consequence new challenges 
and problems are posed for 
the trade union movement 
Tonight's progra m me 
examines these challenges. 

74)0 Channel 4 News with Peter 
Sissons. 

7JS0 C om ment from Trevor 
Swistchew, described as an 
unemployed poet Weather. 

830 K2* The Elusive Summit. A 
repeat of the late JufieTUEs’s 
account of a previews 
expedit io n to the second 


mm 


claimed her Bfeeartier 
this year. 

94)0 Oh MadeBneL American 
domestic comedy series 
starring Madeline Kahn who, 
ton k^rt, regrets making 
derogatory re ma lc s about two 
iarue wrestlers. 


rrr 

VARIATIONS 


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GRAMPIAN 

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Tara. l£oo About Sadie DflbutB. 1Z30 ran 
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Cooney PracOoa. SJXMJ6 Nmn. 1030 
WM Tne Week. 10J5 Weekend Oudook. 
IIjOO Minder. 1240 That'S Hotywood. 
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1045 Jasale. 1l£ CrannTara. 1245 am 
LataCal. 12.10 TUsakom the Dartaida. 1240 
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TCU/ As London except 140 pm 
OW News. 149-240 Tucfcwi WHCh.640 
Today Sotrih West U0 Action South 
Wtat 846-740 KnigM Ridar. -HU2 WW at 
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TIMES 


First published in 1785 


SPORT 


Higgins plays on 
as code rules 


>fv - i pp •- -C * : r 

M???. rV^K'-T' 


out instant justice 


Alex Higgins, whose pro- 
fessional career is in jeopardy, 
found temporary shelter yes- 
terday under the legal um- 
brella of the controlling 
organization, the World Pro- 
fessional Billiards and 
Snooker Association 
(WPBSA), who admitted that 
they had no power to dispense 
instant justice. 

Contrary to general expecta- 
tion, Higgins will continue to 
play in the Tennents UK 
championship and meets the 
Welshman, Wayne Jones, in 
the quarter-finals today . 

The WPBSA board, at their 
meeting in Preston yesterday, 
heard among other things a 
complaint from Paul 
Hatherell the tournament 
director, that during the eve- 
ning of Monday, November 
24. 1986, he was verbally 


By Sydney Frisian 

abused and head-butted by 
Higgins and as a result suf- 
fered a cut eye. 

The board stated that writ- 
ten evidence from certain 
employees of the WPBSA, 
who were present when the 
incident took place, had been 
taken. These statements, 
which were read out, were 
signed copies of statements 
previously given to the police. 

Under the WPBSA disci- 
plinary code, the board cannot 
consider any complaint 
against a member within a 
seven day cooling-off period 
and the complaints in ques- 
tion, after being put to Hig- 
gins. will be dealt with by an 
independent tribunal 

The board's reaction to 
HatherelTs complaint is that 
they are appalled at the alleged 
incidents and they will not 


tolerate this type ofbebaviour. 
As genuine as these remarks 
appear to be they have, lilre 
Pontius Pilate, washed their 
bands of the whole thing to 
await the judgement of the 
tribunal on a man who has 
been fined seven times since 
1973. 


Here then is another chap- 
ter in the continuing story of 
Higgins and his brush with 
authority and whether the 
prevailing system is the most 
satisfactory way to deal with 
an incident as serious as this is 
open to question. 


Davis recovers to 
take slender lead 


The tribunal has the power 
to publicly reprimand the 
member concerned, to impose 
an unlimited fine, to suspend 
the member concerned from 
one or more tournaments or 
championships, to deduct 
points from the member’s 
total in the ranking list and to 
expel the member concerned 
from the association. They 
will need to find a way of 
making the punishment fit the 
crime. 




e 


ach 


Troubled tunes: Higgins (left) leaves a Manchester police station. Williams (top right), WPBSA chairman, and HathereH, fopraament director 

" FOOTBALL /'• ' ‘'.'•v” ~ 


Steve Davis, the number 
one seed, made a remarkable 
recovery in the quarter-final of 
the Tennents UK champion- 
ship against Tony Drago of 
Malta at the Guild Hall, 
Preston yesterday (Sydney 
Friskin writes). After losing 
the first three frames, Davis 
recovered his composure and 
won the next four frames to go 
4-3 ahead at the interval 

Drago, whose engaging style 
and spirit of adventure have 
earned him high praise, won 
the first frame in only nine 
minutes, terminating it with a 
break of 94. Supported by 
breaks of 58 and 50 he went 3- 

0 ahead 

Slowly and surely Davis 
began his task of reconstruc- 
tion and a break of 62 put him 
right with the world It was 
Drago’s turn to take a back 
seat as Davis compiled breaks 
of 62, 42, 78 and 59 to take his 
4-3 lead 

Neal Foulds, who had de- 
feated Jimmy White in the 
previous round raced into a 6- 

1 lead over Cliff Thorburn of 
Canada, whose highest break 


in seven frames was only 40. 
He played much below his 
usual standard 

Foulds, the winner of the 
BCE International tour- 
nament, having beaten 
Thorburn in the final was at 
his best in the fifth frame, 
which he won with a superb 
clearance of 136. When he 
went 5-1 ahead supported by 
a break of 43. the Canadian 
had not scored a point in two 
frames. 

Tony Knowles and Terry 
Griffiths, the men who had 
started the discourse on 
whether larger pockets were 
good for the game or not 
ended their third round match 
late on Tuesday night, 
Knowles winning 9-6; 
Knowles, who was 2-3 down, 
thought it was time to take 
advantage of the larger pock- 
ets and, pursuing a policy of 
attack, won four frames in a 
row eventually to emerge a 
comfortable winner. 


Higgins's electric style of 
play has illuminated the game 
since he burst upon the scene 
as the youngest world cham- 

S ion in 1972. His admirers 
ave condoned his off-table 
indiscretions in the past and 
have understood his personal 
problems, which at present 
include the separation from 
his wife and children. This 
time, however, be appears to 
have gone too far. 


England caps set 
for club switch 


While Higgins may be jus- 
tified in his tirade against 
larger pockets — the next 
question which sparked off the 
present unfortunate affair 
with Hatherell — his remarks 
about Mike Hallett, whom he 
defeated 9-7 in the third 
round, were not in good taste. 
He said: “If he can run me so 
close when I’m trying then 
something must be wrong.” 
Higgins probably cannot rec- 
oncile himself to the fact that 
Hallett is a vastly improved 


Ian Snodin and Bobby 
Minims, the England under- 
21 internationals- of Leeds 
United and Everton respec- 
tively, are ready to change 
elute by the weekend in a 
£750,000 deal. 


Snodin has been the prime 
target of Howard Kendall the 
Everton manager, since the 
summer, when he had a 
£600,000 bid rejected for the 
captain of the second division 
side. And Kendall watched the 
23-year-old midfield player 

• i i i t — 


again in Leeds's 2-1 League 
defeat at Birmingham City last 


defeat at Birmingham City 
week. 


SCORES: raw round: T Knowles (Eng) M 
T Griffiths (Wafas) 9-fi- Frame scares 
(Knowles first* 64-30. 24-62. 63-34. 29- 
Yi 5368, 71-14. 79-3, 71-14. 70-14. 33- 
74. 40-58, 7SO. 55-58, 67-35. 96-14. 


ier and that Higgins him- 
sel£ the state of the pockets 
notwithstanding, is not the 
great player he once was. 


ATHLETICS 


E Germany’s hint on Seoul 


Meanwhile, Dave Blakey, 
the Leeds chief scout, saw the 
unsettled Minims play in the 
first division side's reserve 
match at Sheffield United. 
The indications are that Billy 
Bremner. the Leeds manager, 
is about to relent in his public 
vow to sell Snodin “over my 
dead body” after the second 
division tide's slide to sixth 


place with three defeats in a 
row. 

In addition to giving his 
tide a top-quality goalkeeper, 
the exchange would provide 
Bremner with about £250,000 
for stren gthening his team in 
their promotion campaign. 
Everton have rivals for 
Snodin’s signature in Liver- 
pool Tottenham Hotspur and 
West Ham United; but these 
three clubs cannot put to- 
gether a similar package. 

West Ham, along with Not- 
tingham Forest, are also show- 
ing an interest in Gordon 
Cowans, the England midfield 
man, who plays for Bari in the 
Italian league Cowans has 
said that be wants to return 
home. 

The former Aston Villa 
player had talks with Franco 
Janie, the Bari general man- 
ager. on Tuesday and was told 
that he must stay for another 
six months before being al- 
lowed to leave for a minimum 
£500.000. 


Brentford 
ready 
to play 
anywhere 


Three into two will 


not wash at Villa 


Berlin (AP) — East Ger- 
many yesterday named 416 
athletes and 221 coaches as 
candidates for their team for 
the 1988 Olympic Games in 
Seoul the state-run ADN 
news agency reported. 

Although the ADN report 
did not mention Seoul by 
name, it appeared to be the 
latest in a series of recent 
official reports indicating that 
East Germany, one of the 
strongest nations in inter- 
national athletics, has no 
plans to boycott the Games in 
the South Korean capital 

There has been concern that 


Communist countries may 
boycott the Games because of 
their support for North Korea 
in its political dispute with 
South Korea.. 

North Korea has threatened 
to call for a boycott of the 
Seoul Games unless it is 
allowed to stage more events 
than granted by South Korea 
and the International Olympic 
Committee (IOC) under a 
compromise plan for the two 
countries to co-host the 
Games. 

The list of East German 
athletes and trainers was pre- 
sented in East Berlin yesterday 


A FREE GIFT 


FREE ISSUES 


at a ceremony also attended 
by several high-ranking Com- , 
munisi Party officials, includ- 
ing Egon Kreoz, the Central 
Committee member, ADN 
said. 

The European race-walking 
champion. Hartwig Gauder, 
and the rowing coach, Joerg 
Landvoigt, gave a solemn 
pledge in the names of athletes 
and coaches saying the East 
German team would strive for 
excellent results and honor- 
able representation of their 
country in the 1988 Olympic 
Games. 

National Olympic Commit- 
tee officials also received a 
cheque for SI. 4m, collected 
from donations from East 
German citizens for the 
team's preparation, equip- 
ment and travel costs. ADN 
did not provide the foil list of 
athletes yesterday but said 
that the veteran sprinter, 
Marita Koch, was one of 
them. 


Few witness Charlton’s 
change of fortunes 


WHEN YOU TAKE A 2 YEAR SUBSCRIPTION 


The new monthly Field is bigger 
and better than ever - giving 
you even deeper and more 
extensive coverage of rural life, 
sports, the arts, property and so 
much more. 


Swede challenge 

Boris Becker and three 
Swedes, Kent Caiisson, Jonas 
Svensson, and Utf Stenlund, 
are the leading seeds in the 
Young Masters tournament, 
sponsored by Waterford Crys- 
tal at Stuttgart from Decem- 
ber 10 to 14. Hus annual 
tournament is restricted to 
men aged 21 or under. 


The Charlton Athletic man- 
ager, Lennie Lawrence, had 
predicted a small crowd for 
Tuesday evening’s Full Mem- 
bers Cup tie against Bradford 
City at Selhiust Park. 

He was proved right as a 
miserable 817 — the lowest 
attendance in Charlton’s his- 
tory — turned up to watch 
them end a run of five defeats 
with a 2-0 success, the goals 
coming in the second-half 
from Robert Lee. the sub- 
stitute, and Colin Walsh. 

The first division side, 
Southampton, were given a 
run for their money at the 
Dell, despite Hull City having 
to field their central defender, 
Peter Skipper, in goal for the 
tie. The feet that second 
division Hull restricted their 
hosts to a 2-1 margin of 
victory was mainly due to 
Skipper, who was forced to 
step in when the regular 
goalkeeper, Tony Norman, 
injured his back on the coach 
trip to the ground. 

Skipper pulled off a- number 
of fine saves but could not 
prevent Southampton’s teen- 
aged forward, Matthew Le 
ussier, from scoring twice. 
Gary Parker replied for Hull 


Vince Hilaire made amends 
for an earlier miss as Ports- 
mouth pulled off a surprise 
win at Sheffield Wednesday, 
the former Crystal Palace 
winger scoring the 69th 
minute winner. Kevin Wilson 
and John Deehan scored for 
Ipswich Town in their 2-0 win 
at Reading to earn a third 
round home tie against Aston 
Villa. 

The Freight Rover Trophy 
opened with some high scor- 
ing. Wrexham trounced 
Tranmere Rovera 6-1 with 
their substitute, Steve Massey, 
getting two goals in the space 
ofa minute; Dave Shearer and 
Tony Cascarino both scored 
twice as Gillingham won 5-0 
at Notts County; and York 
City’s young forward, Marco 
Gabbiadini. managed three 
goals in the first-harf in a 4-1 
defeat ofDfeuiington. 

The Walsall attacker, 
David Kelly, celebrated his 
2lst birthday by scoring the 
only goal of the match against 
Swindon Town, while also in 
the third division, Neil 
Whatmore was responsible for 
Mansfield Town’s winning 
goal against Newport C ou nty 
to end a run of five successive 
draws. 


Brentford have appealed to 
file Football Association (FA) 
to find another venae for their 
first-round FA cup tie against 
Bristol Rovers. Yesterday the 
tie was postponed for the fifth 
time because of a waterlogged 
pitch at the ground Rovers 
share with Bath. It has been 
rescheduled for tonight; but 
Brentford are resigned to an- 
other disappointment, ' 

The Brentford chief exec- 
utive, Keith Loring, said yes- 
terday; “I have told the FA we 
are prepared to play the match 
on any ground in England, 
including our own. Every 
postponement is causing us 
problems — I don’t blame 
Bristol Rovers — and ifs tune 
the FA stepped in. The Rovers 
pitch is in a terrible state and I 
un derstand the chances of 
playing tomorrow are remote.” 

Brentford had to opt out iff 
Tuesday night's Freight Rom 
Cup tie at Orient because of 
they had not managed to play 
the FA tie against Rovers 
and they are worried that they 
coaid lose a lucrative home 
gate next Wednesday when 
they are due to bee Swindon in 
the same competition. 


By a Special Correspondent 

Question: When is a first- cannot belie* 
team game not a first-team unfair ' on. 
game? Answer When the ceraed — not 
Football Association say so! players invo 

According to the game’s matter what ; 
ruling body, the Full having to mis 
Members’ Cup is not an matches whei 
“approved” competition. . banned form 

Ever since it was hundred, - “It’s not e 
the Football League have been . pHnary point! 
striving to get foe FA’s seal of ~ Full -Memba 
approval for their newest countedona] 
competition. But the powers “first-team” 


FA reassure 
Caernarfon 


FA officials yesterday re- 
assured Caernarfon Town that 
they are happy for the 
Multipart League dub to stage 
the home kg of their second- 
round FA Cup tie against York 
on their own ground. 

The WelshFootbafl Associ- 
ation secretary, Ahm Evans, 
had suggested that next 
Monday’s commission of in- 
quiry into crowd trouble at 
Caerwanfon’s ground during 
the first-round tie against 
Stockport County would also 
assess Caernarfon's suitability 
to play hosts to York. But 
yesterday an FA spokesman 
said: “We are in touch with the 
local police for every game 
involving noB-Leagne dubs 
and we are quite satisfied Hut 
the arrangements at Caernar- 
fon will be all right 

If the Welsh FA wish to 
enlighten us with any prob- 
lems regarding the match then 
we will consider them, tat ft is 
getting rather late to start 


turned a deaf ear to all 
arguments. 

The latest upshot of the 
issue is that three Aston Villa 
players will each have to serve 
three-match suspensions next 
month — though the FA have 
officially banned them for 
only two games each. 

Gary Williams, Martin 
Keown and Paul Elliott wifi all 
miss Villa's first division 
matches s gftinst Sheffield 
Wednesday and Manchester 
United following last week’s 
indiscretions in the 
Little woods Cup-tie . at 
Southampton. . . 

Williams and Keown were 
sent off at The Defl. where 
Elliott collected his eighth 
booking of the season, which 
took mm to more than 31 
disciplinary points. 

The suspensions wifi take 
effect from next Tuesday, 
which means that the trio will 
also have to at out Villa's Full 
Members’ Cup-tie at Ipswich 
that night. 

“It is so wrong, it is not 
true,” complained Villa's 
chairman, Doug Ellis, last 
night. “I have registered a very 
strong protest with the Foot- 
ball League and told them to 
stick it on the agenda for the 
next meeting. 

“How can a competition 
with a final at Wembley not be 
an “approved” competition in 
the eyes of the FA. I just 


who suffered a shoulder injury; 
in Saturday' 3-1 win at Chel- 
sea, while John Bailey is only, 
just back in training this week 
after a long absence because of 
an Achilles tendon injury. 

Ken Wharton, Anderson’s 
fullback partner at Stamford 
Bridge, is to see a specialist. 
Wharton's knee injury makes; 
him extremely doubtful for 
Sunday’s match, mid the 1 ' 
club's record s ig nin g. PauL 
Goddard, has not been able to; 
train at all this week because 
of an ankle injury. 

• Derby County’s central de- 
fender,. David Lmighan, yes- 
terday travelled for talks with 
Shrewsbury Town alter the 
clubs had agreed on a £30,000 
transfer deaL Linighah, who 
joined Derby from HartlepooI 
for £20,000 this summer, has 
not played in the league this 
season. 


Maradona riding the 
crest of a new wave 


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Joe Jordan, Southampton’s 
34-year-old former Scotland 
international has emerged as 
a front-runner for tbe Hiber- 
nian manager’s job. 

Jordan, who played in three 
World Cup fisalsfbr Scotland, 
is one of 50 applicants for the 
vacancy created last week by 
John Blackley's resignation. 
Kenny Waugh, the dub chair- 
man, revealed yesterday that 
Jordan, who won the last of 
his 52 caps against Russia in 
Spain in 1982, has applied for 
the position, but said: “We 
have drawn up a short-list of 
six names, but there is not one 
which leaps out and hits us." 


Calling time 


LULXUnr VfcJVTHlY 


Time could be running out 
for Sheffield speedway, unless 
more backers are found soon. 
So far 108 people have 
pledged a total of £21,600 - 
£200 each — to a fond to offset 
an annual deficit of £30,000. 
However, Maurice Dueler, 
the promoter, has said he 
wants at least 1 50 pledges by 
today to persuade hun to 
continue next year. 


McDonnell* Title boot 

On the defence 

Jim McDonnell, the Euro- 
pean featherweight champion 
from Stepney, is to defend his 
title against the Italian, 
Valerio Nati, early in the New 
Year. The European Boxing 
Union have called for purse 
offers for the contest to be 
lodged at their Rome head- 
quartets by December 15. 

New hosts 

Britain will host the world 
sand and land yachting world 
championships for the first 
time next year. Tbe event, 
which wifi combine with the 
European championships, will 
take place at Blackpool from 
September 13-19. 


Britain dominated the first 

worid^saflmg championships 
in Hong Kong by taking three 
of the first four places. In light 
winds Phil Morrison snatched 
victory from fellow team 
member Dick Skip worth, with 
Steve Birbeck — runner-up in 
the Hong Kong national at ihe 
weekend - sailing consistently 
to finish fourth. 


Tbe spokesman confirmed 
that Monday’s inquiry had 
beat called specifically to deal 
with trouble at the first-round 
game. The Caernarfon chair- 
man, Arfon Roberts, has since 
spent £3,000 on penning in the 
visiters' enclosure for the York 
game for which a crowd limit 
of 3,008 has been set 


Chorley on 
the move 


Open plan 


Rodney Barton, chairman 
of Bournemouth football club, 
yesterday unveiled plans for a 
£5 million stadium dose to 
the club's Dean Court 
Ground. The new structure, a 
mini-superbowL would be 
sunk 20 feet below ground, 
level so that stands would be 
n6 higher than a bungalow. 
The stadium, with its artificial 
pitch, would accommodate 
12-15,000 people, and thedub 
hopes to secure planning per- 
mission early in the New 
Year. 

Move to Rochdale 


Paddy McGeeney, the Shef- 
field United defender, has 


joined Rochdale on a month's 
loan. A small fee will be 
involved if McGeeney decides 
to stay 


The FA has ruled that 
Chorley must play tbe home 
of their FA Cup second- 
round tie against Preston 
North End at Ewood Parle, tbe 
ground of Blackburn Rovers. 
The Chorley secretary, Mike 
Wearmoath. sank “We are 
more titan happy to go along 
with that. Preston wanted os to 
play at their ground tat oar 
best chance of getting through 
will be on mss — not their 
plastic pitch?* 

The Multipart League dob, 
enjoying the best FA Cup ran 
of their 103-year history, are 
happy to accept a share of a 
lower gate in tbe hope of. 
meeting one of the Ug dubs m 
the third round. Preston 
anticipated a gate of aroand 
15,000, but while only two 
thirds of that figure as many, 
spectators are likely to go to 
Blackburn. 


Rome (Reuter) - Diego 
Maradona, Argentina’s World 
Cup captain. -is preparing Na- 
poli for the unaccustomed role 
of the bride after years of 
serving as bridesmaid in tbe 
Italian football league. 

“This, ladies " and 
gentlemen,” announced best 
man Maradona, “is tbe Napoli 
I have always searched for a 
team that 1 like ami a team 
that loves football” 

Napoli have moved 
Maradona to such praise', be- 
cause they have knocked 
Jirven tns, toe- reigning cham- 
pions. from* their comfortable 
perch and stolen tbe league 
lead for the first time in 12 
years — the victory made 
sweeter by beating Juventus 
for the first time in 29 years. 

Maradona, the driving force 
of tiie team, admits that his 
greatest dream, after taking 
Argentina to World Cup vic- 
tory in Mexico in June, is to 
see Napoli win the league title 
for the first time in their 60- 
year history. 

But the mood among squad 
and city alike is subdued. All 
too accustomed to disappoint- 
ment with two second places 
and seven thirds in the past 
the fens are waiting with bated 
breath to see if Napoli's 
fortunes will survive the ex- 
tended battle for the league 
which ends in May. 

Corrado Feriaino, Ihe Na-' __ _ 

poli president has appealed to Yesterdav’s reSIlltS 
fens not lo be carried away by - m* »». t>^« Sim m u*. rtmJUn 
dreams of seeing tbe league 
come to Naples. “For decades 
the Neapolitans have dreamed , 
of winning the shield and 
believed in the promises of the 
directors.” Feriaino said. 

“Then, in the spring, the 
promises dissolve. They dis- 


appear like the snow in the; 
first sun." 

Napoli, founded in 1926,!. 
are playing their 50th year in 
the first division. Their great-1 
est domestic triumph came in 
1962 when they became the 
first team from tbe second 
division to win the Italian 
Cup. Another domestic cup 
win came in 1 976, but abroad 
Napoli have had little success. 
Their UEFA Dip hopes this 
rear aided when they lost a 
first round penalty com- 
petition against Toulouse of 
France after Maradona missed 
• Ottavio Bianchl the man- 
ager who took over at Naples 
last season, says he has 
changed nothing. Bin three 
purchases in particular have 
paid off 'Bianchi brought in - 
Fernando De Napoli, one of 
the few Italian Wodd Cup 
players to attract praise in 
Mexico this year, to 
strengthen the midfield. 

In the attack, built round 
.the formidable . talent . of. 
Maradona. Biancfti added An- 
drea Camevale, from Udi- 
nese, and Romano, from 
second-division Triestina. 

The new-iook attack paid 
dividends last weekend. 
Camevale scored twice and 
Maradona was quoted after-. 
wards as saying of Romano: 
“He was more important than- 
me”. 


UEFA CUP: ifcM round, first lag: DuJda 
Prague 0, UHemaztonste v. Spartak 
Moscow 1, Swarovsia Tyrol 0. 
FOOTBALL COMBINATION: Swindon 0. 
ArsanaS .1. Postponed: Oxford United v 
Luton. 

MACBAR SOUTH-WEST COUNTIES 
LEAGUE: BememmiBi 3. Canfft Cay 2. 

R UGBY UNION 

REPRESBCTXnVE MATCH: CamUndM 
UniWTstty 30. M. R. S tee l e ■Dodger's XV 


cannot believe ft. it is so 
unfair on. every (me con- 
cerned — not least the three 
players involved, who, no 
matter what anyone says, are 
having to miss force first-team 
matches when they have been 
banned for only two. 

“It’s not even as if disci- 
pHnary points received in the 
Full -Members* Dtp ace not 
counted on a player’s record of 
“first-team” offences — they 
are. That makes it even more 
of a mockery.” 

To rub further' salt into 
Wife’s wounds, Elliott, Keown 
and Williams wifi also -he . 
ineligible to play in - the 
£50,000 Guinness Socixr'Sx 
competition in Manchestetpn 
December 9 and Iff . " r \ 

• Newcastle United have ?r_ 
fullback crisis for StmdM’i 
televised match with -WeS' 
Ham United at St foiral 
Park. Willie McFa% 
Newcastle’s manager, is|a& 
ready resigned to being wifek- 
out his Republic of Irdasxf 
international John Anderson, - 


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