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3 


o' 



No 62,627 




TIMES 


FRIDAY NOVEMBER 28 1986 





Rothschild stays silent on book involvement 






*3 




Mr Kenneth Bate; Sec- 
retary of Stale for Education 
and Science, will today pub- 
fish a Bill giving him sweeping 
powers to determine leacfagy 
pay and-conditions of service. 

It wiD consst of only seven 
classes and win be rushed 
through Parliament with the 
aim of its receiving. Royal 
Assent byFebroary. 

If the present dispute has 
not been .resolved, then by 
agreement, as Mr Baker 
hopes, the new -legislation will 
be used toimposea settlement 
retrospectively. " : 

Ministers were saying last 
night that they recognized 
they were taking a gamble. But 
they judge that the political 
kudos of behig seen to act 
decisively to break a logjam 
win outweigh any damage the 
unions can inflict by disrupt. 


By Nicholas Wood, Political Reporter 


The 


be 

of 


committee would 
the 

and take evidence .. 
the unions and employers. It 
would then give advice which 
Mr Bate would discuss with 
the two sides before coming to 
a decision and laying it before 
MPs. 

Tbejpresent Burnham sys- 
tem effectively binds the Sec- 
retary of State to accepting its 
recommendations on pay 
alone once a deal has been 
strode. 

- But, it was later made dear; 
the final word over settfo- 
ments would tie with him and 
would be enacted in the form 


the particular nni^ win 
say.” 

Mr Giles Radice, the 
hour education 
began a lengthy bout 


Parliament 


O ?• » ’*» 

a * ’i 


Mr Baker's announcement 
came in a stateme nt to M Ps 
calculated to avoid inflaming 
passions over the current im- 
passe ova* staff-room pay and 
duties. 

He said the Bin would 
repeal the Remuneration of 
Teachers Act 1965 and replace 
tire Bur nham pay bargaining 
machinery with an interim 
advisory committee to guide 
him on all aspects of salaries 
and contracts. 


Tomorrow 


A down 
like Alex 



of recommendations to the 
Commons in the form of 
statutory instruments. 

In - a interview on BBC 
Radio 4, Mr Bate confirmed 
be would have power to 
impose a settlement 

Mr Bate's conciliatory line 
m which he spoke of “some 
useful progress” in the talks 
between the teachers and then- 
local authority employers, en- 
shrined in the Acas document 
agreed by a majority on both 
sides last Friday, lazgdy over- 
shadowed the full import of 

the fimdamental rhany he 

was announcing. 

He carefully avoided any 
reference to imposing a settle- 
ment in tiie current dispute, 
though he did em ph*riTfr he 
was not willing to allow the 
present “highly unsatisfactory 
situation to continue” for die 
sate of the nation's childr en. 

Asked by Mr Ian 
Wriggkswortfc, Social Demo- 
crat MP for Stockton South, 
whether he was going to 
continue exhort a change of 

mind t nffgntiale a ttUfement 

or impose one, he said: “We 
shall have to wait to see what 


that despite press reports 
there was no mention of 
imposition. 

• But he later wrung fioxnMr 
Eater the admission that the 
new BUI would give him such 
a power. 

Mr Baker repealed his view 
there is a “huge gap” between 
his proposals and those in the 
Acas document 

The latter would exceed his 
£600 milli on cost «*Kng over 
1 5 months by £85. milKon and 
it did not offer a “sensible” 
career structure rewarding 
good classroom teaching and 
extra responsibility. 

He said he wanted 14QJXX) 
“incentive posts” in the 
40Q/)00-meniber profession. 
Currently, there were 105,000 
and the Acas proposals would 
cut that to 80,000. This was a 
“fundamental point of 
principle”. 

Mr Radice urged Mr Bate 
to accept the Acas deaL Class- 
room peace would be better 
secured by embracing a settle- 
ment that is supported bytwo 
thirds of the profession, he 
said 

• Mr Bate, pressed at a press 
conference, on bow long he 
was prepared to wait for the 
employers and the unions, 
said: “I would have thought 
about the early part of next 
year.” (our Education Re- 
porter-writes) 

He emphasized that the 
philosophical d»ffi»n» n nffy on 
the structure of the imching 
profession were “very 
substantial”, but reiterated 
that he was prepared to listen 
to further ideas font Mr John 
Peatman, the employers' lead- 
er 



North Sea 
oil slick 
discovered 


Alex Higgins, 
srs wa 1 


snookers wayward 
superstar, teeters 
on the edge of a 
life ban. What : 
makes him tick? 
And what makes 
him go cuckoo? 
Gordon Bwn 
gets to the heart 
of a flawed genius 


Soviet doctors to 
join Aids research 


Emergency services were on 
UK&y last night as three 
fields were shut down after 
an oal stick, five miles long, 
was spotted in tire North Sea. 

It was feared that the oil was 
coming from a leak in the 130- 
mile submarine pipeline 
which runs to the Occidental 
terminal on the Orkney Island 
ofJFlotta. 

The.. terminal, which was 
opened 10 years ^o,' has 
handled more than a billion 


Key figure ‘shreds’ 
arms documents 


From Midtael Brayon, Washington 


barrels of oil — nearly 15 
cent of Britain's North 1 


By Thomson Ptenrice, Science Correspondent 

British and Soviet doctors doctors in both countries, as 


are to collaborate on research 
fotO the ac quired immune 
deficiency syndrome (Aids) 





• The Times Portfolio 
Gold competition was 


because or some 
incorrect Stock 
prices 
to 


newspapers thmutiiout : 
.Toda/s 


the country, 
competition prize wSI 
therefore be C&00Q, 
double the usual daily 
amount 

• Portfolio Bst, page 


service, 20. 


and other public health issues 
in a .: return to “medical 
detente” between the two 
countries. 

Soviet virologists will work 
with British specialists cm 
studies of Aids after talks in 
London this week between a 
delegation of Russian doctors 
and the Department of Health 
and Social Security. , 

The inclusion of Aids re* 
search on the agenda suggests 
that Soviet health anthonties 
are more concerned about the 
impact of the disease in Russia 
than recent official statements 
lay e in d icated. 

The meetings mark the end 
Of Britain's suspension four 
years ago of formal medical 
collaboration wdh the Soviet 
Union after the invaaon of 
Af ghanis tan and the^ sup- 
pression of the Solidarity 
movement in Poland. 

Since the suspension of the 
agr ee m ent, signed in 1975 to 
“develop and widen co-opera- 
tion on important problems of 
medicine and public health”. 


wefl as politicians, health of- 
ficials and groups such as the 
UK-USSR Medical Exchange 
Programme, have been striv- 
ing for its revival. 

Unofficial visits by parties 
of doctors and medical stu- 
dents have taken place 
The moves come after For- 
eign Office approval of re- 
newed “cost-effective” co- 
operation. Increased 
collaboration in cardiology, 
ophthalmology, accident and 
medical care and 
well as Aids 
kdy u> be of- 
ficially agreed 
Soviet authorities have fre- 
quently denied that Aids is a 
serious threat in their country. 
Professor Viktor Zhdanov, 
director of the Ivanovski In- 
stitute of Virology, told a 
conference on Aids in Paris 
last June that only 12 cases 
had been identified, of which 
seven came from Africa. 

• Mr Neuman Fowler, Sec- 
retary of State for Social 
Services, will discuss the Aids 
epidemic with the World 
Health Organization in Ge- 
neva today. 


output 

Yesterday, however, 
production was stopped at all 
three platforms which serve 
the terminal — Piper, Clay- 
more and Tartan. 

Last night the diving sup- 
port ship Deep Water ! was on 
its way to the area, about 100 
miles east of the Scottish 
mainland, to try to locate the 
problem. 

The ml stick was first spot- 
ted by fishermen who reported 
it to Pentiand Coastguards at 
Kirkwall. 

An Occidental spokesman 



said there was “evidence of oU 
in an area roughly five miles 
by two miles in the vicinity of 
our pipeline” 

le spokesman said that 
depressunsiig of the pipeline 
"had continued all day in an 
attempt to locate the source of 
the leak. 

The operation was being 
monitored by coastguards in 
Aberdeen. 



The repercussions of the 
Iranian arms scandal contin- 
ued to grow yesterday, with 
only a brief respite for 
Thanksgiving. The Justice 
Department called in the Fed- 
eral Bureau of Investigation 
amid reports that a key figure 
had shredded documents that 
might have implicated top 
Arfminiigfratim i officials. 

The Los- Angela Tima 
reported that Gokrael Oliver 
North, the dismissed military 
advisor at the National Sec- 
urity Council, destroyed a 
number of documents from 
NSC files last weekend, either 
before or after being inter- 
viewed by Mr Edwin Meese, 
the Attorney-General 

It was reported that Colonel 
North entered his “secure 
office” next to the White 
House and shredded the docu- 
ments at least 36 horns before 
White House security officials 
were sent to change the 
combinations on the locks to 
the office and safe. 

The FBI has been 
in to investigate this and i 
aspects of the scandaL Its 
findings could lead to the 
convening of a grand jury to 
look at evidence for c riminal 
prosecution. 


Colonel North is reported to 
be depressed and extremely 
angry at the way be has been 
treated- His friends said he 
was not officially informed of 
his sacking until President 


Reagan announced it during a 
once. Mr 


televised press conference. 
Reagan then telephoned him 
.and thanked him for his past 
service to tbe Administration. 
The colonel is- said to be 
concerned about his future 
without a military pension. 

Mr Reagan also telephoned 
Mrs P eggy Say, the aster of 
Terry Anderson, one of the 
hostages in Beirut, Idling her 
that Administration officials 
would continue “to do every- 
thing they can” to free her 
brother. 

The latest twist over the 
destroyed evidence has fur- 
ther heightened comparisons 
with Watergate. Sceptical 
congressmen and media com- 
mentators are again asking the 
famous Watergate question: 
What did the President know, 
and when did he know it? 

The results of an ABC 
Television poll released on 
Wednesday showed that 62 
per cent of respondents 
thought Mr Reagan had 

Continued on page 20, col 1 


US Salt2 breach 
enrages Kremlin 


From Christopher Walker, Moscow 


The Kremlin said yesterday 
that the Soviet Defence Min- 


istry was now reviewing on- 
to be take 


Khoo resigns 

Tan Sri Khoo Teck Pnat the 
Singapore businessman whose 
family is involved in problems 
with the National Bank ofj 
Brand, yesterday resigned as 
director of Standard Char- 
tered Bank Page 21 


Prince launches Inner City Trust 


TIMES SPORT 


Higgins back 

Alex Higgins was given a 
rousing welcome when he 
returned to action in tbe 
Tennents UK profess 
snooker championship at 
Preston two days after an 
incident in which he allegedly 
assaulte d an official 


The Prince of Wales yes- 
terday lent his wholehearted 
support to community 
architecture as he l a u nched' 
die Inner-City Trust (Chris- 
topher Wamuui writes). 

It is an organization set up 
to fund self-help community 
projects in deprived inner-city 
areas: 

The Trust, through its final- 
raising arm Inner City Aid, 
based on Bob Gekiofs Band 
Aid, and using staff from that 
campaign, aims to raise tens of 


millions of pounds to fund 


The intention is to provide 
money to grass roots organiza- 
tions, to fond projects from 
the “bottom up”, from among 

the local .people, rather than 
use the “top-down’ 

The prince told the] 
Communities c o nference at 
the Astoria ' Theatre, .in 
London, the first international 
conference on c ommunity 
architecture, p kmrtfng 
sign, that he supported tire 


“bottom up” approach to 
building because Ire believed 
that every individual had a 
contribution to make. “I'm. 
here because frankly, what is 
known as the community 
archi te c tur e approach makes a 
great deal of sense to me 
In the test year or two, 
however. Prince Charles has 
visited several community 
schemes, including one in 
Stirfing described in The 
Times on Wednesday. 

Prince’s campaign, page 3 


crete measures to be taken m 
response to the US breach of 
the unratified Salt-2 treaty. 

The warning that the Soviet 
Union would itself abandon 
tbe restraints imposed by the 
1979 treaty in direct response 
to tbe American move was 
accompanied by an angry 
announcement that Wash- 


ington's decision would have 
negative repercussions on the 
disarmament talks due to 
resume in Geneva next week. 

The swift Soviet re- 
action^nnounced at a special 
news conference called here by 
the Foreign Ministry, fallowed 
the statement in the US that 
the 131st B-52 bomber 
with anise missiles 
despatched today for 
operations at a Texas air base, 
topping the ceding of 1,320 fin 
missile warheads and cruise- 
carrying bombers laid down in 
the treaty. 


Mr Boris Pyadyshev, the 
Kremlin spokesman, said that 
if the US move went ahead 
“the Soviet Union will con- 
sider itself free of the 
corresponding committments 
to tbe treaty and will take the 
necessary practical measures 
not to allow tbe undermining 
of the military-strategic par- 
ity”. Mr Pyadyshev stressed 
that the Soviet side would not 
have to hurry with hs re- 
action, because the immediate 
threat to hs security was not 
“fetal”, but beS&dded.-“T 
refusal of toe Reagan Admin- 
istration to abide by tbe Salt-2 
treaty cannot but influence 
most negatively the at- 
mosphere in which Soviet- 
American contacts lake place 
in the sphere of arms and 
forces reductions.” 

Questioned by The Tima 
about tbe concrete steps in 
terms of new military hard- 
ware that tbe Soviet Union 
would be introducing,the 
Continued on page 2®, oil 1 


Labour’s secret war on ioony right’ 


Howe decision 


The Football Association has 
rejected a request by Bobby 
Robson, the England man- 
ager. to appoint Don Howe as 
his fciU-time assistant Pwgt 36 


Ramp News 2-7 

Owncas 8-10 

Appis 15U22 
Am 12,13 

!«**«*,„ 

21-26 

8 

Cam . is 

<£>n««ifcI420 

M*y 16 

14-16 


Lew Report 

Leaders 

Letters 

Mooring 

OUnj 

Sale Roots 
Science 


31 

17 

17 
29 
18: ; 
4 

18 
19 


31-3436 

etc 12 
fV & Ratio 35 

Weather 28 


By Martin Fletcher 
Political Reporter 
Labour is secretly pieparing 
a new year counter-offensive 
to toe Government's a tt a ck s 
on “loony-left” councils. It 
will seek to expose unsavoury 
business, finan ci al and politi- 
cal activities within toe 
Conservative Party. _ 

The Shadow Chhmet en- 
dorsed the plan at a meeting 
earlier this mouth, and key 
fronfbench spokesmen have 
since been advised to start 
gathering and collating 
evidence. . . • 

Mr Robin Cook, a trade and 
industry spokesman, is be- 


en vironment spokesman, on 
Tory-run local authorities and 
Mr George Foulkes, a foreign 
affairs spokesman, on right- 
wing or ganizat ions HVp tbe 
now-defunct Federation of 
Conservative Students. Mr 
Gerald Kaufman, the Shadow 
Home Secretary, is also under- 
stood to be involved. 

Sources stressed yesterday 
that attacks on tbe personal 
lives of- Conservative Party 
members had been ruled out, 
but noi disclosure of their 
business or political connec- 
tions or financial interests* . . 

Labour believes it can find 
plenty of evidence of Tory 
maladminis tration -on local 


* ft te ft ft * 


lieved to be concentrating on - im i aanam s a auuu 4>n 
the City: Mr Jack Straw, an authorities. 

■ i 


The FCS may have been 
disbanded, but its more ex- 
treme members are still 
. around, and attention will be 
paid to the backgrounds of 
MPs* research assistants. 

Also likely to be investi- 
gated are some of die more . 
shadowy groups loosely linked 

to toe party. 

It is believed that two recent 
Granada Television World In 
Action programmes concern- 
ing tbe Anglo- Asian business- 
man Mr Abdul Shamji, whose 
huge business empire col- 
lapsed with debts of nearly 
£40 million following ihe 
Johnson Mattoey banking 
aamtol are also being closely 
studied. 


Mrs Thatcher herself was 
cited as having visited Mr 
Shamjfs house for a Conser- 
vative fund-raising dinner and 
having written a letter praising 
his achievements, while Mr 
Norman Tebbit was named as 
a friend. Mr Andrew Rowe, a 
Conservative MP, became “a 
consultant for Mr 
nji, promoting his in- 
terests with Government 
departments” whilst Mr Mi- 
chael Grylls, another Tory 
MP, “lent his support to 
Shamji in his dealings with a 
government department” 


Mr Shamji was also a 
memos contributor to Tory 
mds. 


Shake-up of 
rates starts 
in Scotland 


By Robin Oakley 

The long-awaited shake-up | 
of Britain's rating system, first : 

promised by the Censer- ! 
va lives in 1974, began yes- 
terday with the publication of 
a bill to reform tbe system in ] 
Scotland. 

Domestic rates will be 
phased out there fromApril 
1989 to be replaced by a 
system of community charges 
paid by all adults. Had the 
system operated this year toe 
charge would have been be- 
tween £150 and £260 per 
person. 

The sew system, page 2 


A 


in face of spy 
case grilling 


• The Prime Minister was 
grilled in toe Commons ever 
toe role of toe Attorney- 
General in tbe MIS affair 


• The judge in toe Australian 
co art case ordered Britain to 
haw! over secret documents 
about M15 (Page 10) 


• A photographer was injured 
and his camera smashed as he 
attempted to photograph Lord 
Rothschild (Page 2) 

• The Australian judge, Mr 
Justice Powell, made dear he 
was losing patience with the 
British Government (Page 10) 


By Philip Webster, Chief Political Correspondent 


The Government ran into 
deeper trouble over the spy 
book affair yesterday as the 
Prime Minister faced a sus- 
tained grilling in toe Com- 
mons over the role of the 
Attorney-General, Sir Michael 
Havers, and in Sydney the 
judge in the court case ordered 
Britain to hand over secret 
documents about MI5. 


With a growing number of 
Conservative MPS wishing 
that the Government would 
drop the case, in which it is 
trying to stop publication of 
toe Peter Wright memoirs, 
Mrs Thatcher had perhaps her 
most uncomfortable Com- 
mons session since tbe West- 
land affair as toe refused, for 
security reasons, to answer 
questions. 


Lord Rothschild, pictured yesterday, still refused Id talk about suggestions tint he raaster- 
nanded publication of a spy book. Details,' page 2. Photograph fey John Gray 


She was provoked into an 
angry defence of toe Attorney- 
General, the main target of the 
Opposition's intensified at- 
tack and at one point chal- 
lenged the Opposition Leader. 
Mr Kinnock, to table a motion 
of censure. 


Ha to try to suppress Mr 
Wright’s book, had both been 
taken personally by toe Attor- 
ney-General. 

Using toe formula she has 
employed before Mrs That- 
cher said it would be inappro- 
priate to comment on matters 
concerning toe Wright case 
and she would not comment 
on security matters. 

But loudly cheered on by his 
backbenchers Mr Kinnock 
said that questions about de- 
risions and res ponsib lilies in- 
side toe Government had no 
implications for national sec- 
urity. “Will you give a straight 
answer to a straight ques- 
tion?" he asked. “Did the 
Attorney-General take either 
or both of those derisons 
personally? Has the Attorney- 
General been a fool or a fall 
guyT 


Judge loses patience 10 


Meanwhile it was an- 
nounced that the Commons 
would debate the security 
services next Wednesday. 


The Government had ear- 
lier been embarrassed by Mr 
Justice Powell's criticism that 
the conduct of toe case could 
cause grave injustice and that 
it appeared as though the 
Government was not pre- 
pared to accept any derision 
that was not in its favour. 


In the Commons Mr 
Kinnock repeatedly asked the 
Prime Minister whether the 
decision not to impede toe 
publication in *981 of Chap- 
man Pmcheris book on MIS, 
on which Mr Wright collabo- 
rated, and the decision to send 
Sir Robert Armstrong, the 
Cabinet Secretary, to Austra- 


Amid uproar Mrs Thatcher 
dismissed toe question as 
“totally unworthy” and, when 
Mr Kinnock persisted said 
that such decisions were de- 
cisions of toe Government 
because “the Government is 
indivisible”. 

With toe Opposition ben- 
ches in full cry the Prime 
Minister refused to answer a 
Labour MP who asked 
whether in 1980 or 1981 she 
had discussed the contents of 
Mr Wright's book with Lord 
Rothschild. 

The concern on tbe Tory 
side was reflected by Mr 
Jonathan Aitken, MP for 
Tbanet South, who said in 
view of the difficulties bring 
encountered by the judge's 
rulings in Australia she should 
consider a moratorium “on all 
legal activities referring to 
historic matters concerned 


with the late Sir Roger 
Hollis”. 


Girl’s murder remand 


By a Staff Reporter 


A man accused of the 
murder of a schoolgirl in 
Surrey earlier this year and 
three rapes was remanded 
until Monday by Guildford 
magistrates yesterday. 


Tbe man was charged with 
murdering a girl aged 15 at 
Horsley, Surrey, on April 17 
this yean the rape of a gwrl aged 
1 7 on February 2 last year, the 
rape of a girl aged 18 on 
November 20, 1985 and the 


rape of a girl aged 14 on 
October 21. 

Journalists were warned by 
the court clerk not to identify 
toe victims. No details were 
given in the charges read out 
apart from ages, dates and 
offences. 

The man charged yesterday 
was arrested last Sunday by 
Surrey detectives. A second 
man was arrested on Tuesday 
and freed yesterday without 
charge. 


H* w * c * c * 






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4 Black Bentwood Chairs 
For Only £179 


Outstanding Christmas value from 
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Thatcher firm ? stic 


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mechanical en- 
it the £8,000 be 
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ester-day to good 


late my gramo- 
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hall appeal and 
next year,” Mr 
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ged 51, who has 
io Gold since It 
Times, said that 
elieve his luck, 
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i!d cards can he 
ending a stam- 
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Id, 



Wood 


;er of 


eer 


i Young 


xl in brewing 
tinkers and. in 
ven kill them, 
for Real Ale 

L y - 

be campaign's 
a/’s Brewing, 
otz, a former 
d Beer Guide, 
le who have 
ter breathing 
s disorders, 
bo are allege' 
, can suffer ill 
king beers in 
have been 
3uce a foamy 
irity, or to 


l States, the 
>re than 40 
heart attacks 
;ers used co- 
rn beer to 
ting head. 


man couple 
: last July for 
eking reduc- 
ences. 

Lord Lane, 
x, will pre- 
i cations by 
oja Schulze, 
ir leave to 
e sentences 
Justice Mi- 
toe Central 





h storage 
My shows 
ce Heater 



ST I 

HUd 1 ' 


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IO 




■ jsa h tmTZ 




HOME NEWS 



NEWS SUMMARY 


Appraisal scheme 
gets under way 

Six local education authorities have been Mined by the 
Government to take part in a pilot protect for appraising 
the performance of teachers. _ 

Of the 18 that applied earlier in the year, Mr Kenyan 
Baker, Secretary of State for Education i and Scta ce,has 
invited Croydon, Cambria, Newcastle, Salford, Somerset 
and Suffolk to take part m a scheme which will be mmS 

xt l .j a* * iepTDmed (O 


get under way in January. . . , _ * 

Teachers have screed in principle, after years ot 

a. !-L «a an OVttmKHll VJtffflfi* 


US Chinook ruling 

A court order «wn»»rf the American Boeing Corporation 
has been won by lawyers seeking £14 million femages for 

the widow of one of the 45 Shetland hehcopt» crash nc- 

lim ^ Mrs Sharon Jennings of Eston, Cleveland. 

Mr Paddy McCarthy, a Teesside solicitor, said 
yesterday that a US corn! has barred Boe r* from makmg 

farther tests on the gearbox ofthe crashed Chinook withont 

experts representing his ctient bong [^ senl rJ v J? 
Jennings, aged 24, gave birth to a gin on November 15, 
|1 m« ^Aai . tka fluadli rtf hot* hlVkhillld. PflllL flttCCl 2o. 


Secrets 

charge 

A journalist accnsed of 
an offence muter the Of- 
ficial Secrets Act was yes- 
terday committed for trial 
at Croydon Crown Court by 
Croydon magistrates. 

Mr John Lee, aged 40, a 
reporter on the Croydon 
Post, is accnsed of receiving 
a secret document, knowing 
or having reasonable 
grounds to befieve Oat it 
was commimriated to him 
in contravention of section 
n of the ActMr Lee, of St 
Peter's Street, Croydon, 
was given baiL 


Rival to 
Labour 

The Labour Party would 
lose a third of its support in 
the mining constituency of 

Mansfield if die Union of 
Democratic Mineworkers 
pot op a rival candidate at 
the next General Election, 
an opinion pofl has shown. 

The poll, carried out for 
Central Television, in- 
dicated that support for 
Labour would fall from 
39-4 per cent, now, to only 
2 63 per cent if the UDM 
carried oat its threat to 
sponsor its own candidate. 

Car chase 
death 

A policewoman died yes- 
terday after the car she was 
driving crashed while she 
was a private 

motorist “on a hratch." 

Women Poike Constable 
Deborah Leaf, aged 20, 
who lived with her father at 
Canham, Bristol^reshed 
into a tree mi a bend on 
Speedwell Road, Bristol. 

PC Richard Ca d dwi , 
aged 19, received a dis- 
located shoulder and minor 
head injuries. 

The car they wore following 
was later found abandoned. 

BR sues News group 

British Ba3 yesterday served a writ on News 
iwtwwKitfnnal, alleg in g that the company had cost it 
business worth £30 mfflioi through breach of contract _ 
The writ claims that radii a four-year contract for the dis- 
tribution of its newspapers, including The Tams, was 
allegedly broken in Jannary, News Inteniatioii&l acc ounted 
for one-third of its business in that area of operations. 

The National Union of Rafiwaymea, which supports 
former employees of News International, has claimed its 
members would refuse to handle the newspapers. 



Drop McGoldrick case, says 


By Philip Webster 
Chief Political 
Correspondent 

Mr Neil Kinnock and other 
members of the S hadow Cabi- 
net yesterday criticized Brent 
council over its decision to 
proceed with a disciplinary 


McGoldrick, and made a last 
appeal for the issue to be 
dropped 

In a statement Dr John 
Q jnpin gham, the shadow 
environment secretary, said 
he very much regretted the 
move and added: “No pos- 
itive purpose can be served by 
such hearings.'” 

Miss McGoldrick, head- 
mistress of Sudbury Infants 
School in North London, was 
suspended from her job last 
July after allegedly telling a 


council official she did not 
want any more blade teachers 
on her staff. 

An original di scip l in ary 
hearinFu a pmmd her was 
stopped by the High Quart, 
which ruled that the council 
had no right to stage its own 
investigation after the teacher 
had been deared by the school 
governors. 

Tins resulted in MSas 
McGoldrick, aged 36* being 
reinstated three weeks ago. 
But the High Court ruling was 
overturned by The Court of 
Appeal, although Sir John 
Donaldson, the Master of the 
Rolls, said he hoped the 
authority would not proceed 
with the disciplinary hearing. 

Even so, the council said it 
would go ahead and would 
aim investigate the behaviour 


of governors and parents at 
theschooL m 

• That move was attacked 
yesterday by former head- 
master Mr Harry Greenway, 
Conservative MP for Ealing 
North, as "“a breathtaking act 
of savage vengeance”. He 

the Labour Party 
leadership to step in and stop 
this “blatant and brutish 
injustice”. 

• The National Union of 
Teachers announced yes- 
terday that it would make a 
decision “within the neat few 
days” on foe question of 
farther legal action in the case 
of Miss McGoldrick (Our 
Education Reporter writes). 

Mr Fired Jarvis, foe genial 

secretary of foe NUT, and Mr 

Graham Clayton, the unions 
solicitor, issued for the first 


tim<» the documents which 
formed the basis of the case 
being considered by foe 
coundTs disciplinary sab- 
committee. 

Mrs McGoldrick said yes- 
terday that she bad not been 
surprised by the sub- 
committee's decision to con- 
tinue with disciplinary action. 

“I did not make foe-state- 
ment I am alleged to have 
done,” she said. 

• Her Majesty’s Inspec- 
torate has issued a damning 
report on a college of farther 
education in Brent, which 
criticizes its poor manage- 
ment, “drab and dirty” dass- 
xooms, and obsolete specialist 


The overair student atten- 
dance record was.describedas 
“doqi” and the report fates 
many ofthe 160 staff » task 
for not giving " sufficient 
thought to the dunce of 
reaching methods, although 
those who teach for foe pre - 
muring and social care certifi- 
cates. were singled end ; for 
praise. . V 

A copy of 'foe report's 
available .from the Publica- 
tions Despatch Centre, 


Science, . Honcypot * lane, 
Stanmore, Middlesex HAT 
1AZ. • - 

. A Brent cornual spokesman 
said the report concerned the 
situation at the pdytedutic 12 
momhs ago and smoe then a 
new principal and yico^nm- 
apal had been appointed. 


First steps 
towards the 
abolition of 
domestic rate 

By Robin Oakley .Political Editor 
Tbe Government took the A registgof^ t he adatom 


first step yesterday towards 
the abolition of domestic rates 
in Britain, with foe publica- 
tion of a Bill to substitute the 
payment of a comm unity 
' arge of between £150 and 

60, by everyone over 18, in 

Scotland. . . . . 

The Cabinet is pledged to 
extend the new system to 
F pgianti and Wales if tbe 
Conservatives win the next 
election. . . . . 

The Bill provides for the 
p hasing out of domestic rates 
over three years, b eg i nnin g in 
1989-90, for tbe two million 
ratepayers in Scotland/The 
new community charge will 
then start to be paid by about 
3.85 million adults. 

The Government calculates 
that about half those affected 
will be worse off and half will 
be better off. _ . 

The less well-off will be 
protected with rebates, the 
level of which is yet to be 
determined. But even those on 
benefits will have to pay a 
porportion of the community 
charge. . 

For premises in multiple 
occupation thelandlord will 
pay a multiple co mm u nit y 
charge and a standard 
community charge will be 
payable by second home 
owners. 

Students will be expected to 
pay foe community charge at 
their term time address and 
the grant system win be ad- 
justed to assist with the extra 
expense. 


Scotland will be established 
and kept up to date by the 
community charges registra- 
tion officer, who will be foe 
same person as the electoral 
registration officer. But the 
two registers will be separate. 
Foreigners who cannot vote 
will have to pay the new 
community charge. 

Eighteen-year-olds who are 
still at school, and in respect of 
whom child benefit is still 
payable, will be entitled to 
vote but win not be required 
to pay foe community charge. 

Tbe Government is keen to 
stress that foe new charge is 
not a poll tax in the sense that 
there will be no direct connec- 
tion between paying tbe 
charge and having the vote. 

The Government will take 
control of non-domestic rates, 
freezing these and pegging 
future increases to the infla- 
tion rate. 

Work has begun to 
harmonise the valuation sys- 
tems north and south of the 
border to pave the way for i 
nationwide introduction of a 
unifo rm business rate, deter- 
mined by foe Government 
and redistributed 'lo*' local 
authorities according to then- 
populations. 

Official estimates say that if 
the new system had operated 
for 1986-87 charges would 
have ranged from about £150 
to about £260, depending on 
foe area in which people live. 



Bank staff stop Mr O’Neill photographing Lord RiStebild (Photop^ Roa Drfakwater) 

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A photographer was injured 
and his camera smashed yes- 
terday as he was attempting to 
photograph Lord RotoscMni. 

Mr David (TNeffl, a staff 
photographer working for The 
| MaB on SsmSmy, was set upon 
by several employees of N M 
Rothschild and Co as Lord. 
| Rnrtncchild arrived at the of- 
fice. He is at the centre of die 
| controversy about Mr Peter 
| Wright’s involvement with Mr 
I Chapman Fincher's book, 
Thar Tradeis Treachery. 

Lord Rothschild had left his 

home in St James’s Place by 
chanfievr-driven car yesterday 
morning, and Miss Kos Dnnk- 
water. The Times photog- 
rapher, photographed him 
there. She then followed the 
dear, riding on foe pffion of a 


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The car did a U-turn fa The 


rad light on the eml 

Once outride the N M Roth- 
schild headquarters Lord Ro- 
thschild got ont. Mr O’Neill, 
who was by the bank entrance, 
was kept away. 

Miss Drinkwater said that 
several people tried to grabber 
as ber motor-cycle turned into 
the private road outside the 
bank doom. "They also tried 
to stop me taking pictures of 
David being manhandled." 

- MrO’Neffi’shandswerecut 
in foe scuffle and his Nikon 
camera and DJB lens worth 
£1,300 were smashed beyond 
repair. Mr Stewart Steven, 
editor of The MaB on Sunday, 
said afterwards: *T have n ever 
seen a camera so comprehen- 
sively shattered." 

Mr Steven said: “It is 
unbelievable that in this amaa- 
ing episode everybody seems 


to have taken on foe 
photemfoers," a reference to 
the fact that Sir Robert Arm- 
strong apologized alter swing- 
ing a briefcase at a photo- 
grapher when leaving Heath- 
row Airport to give eridence in 

Australia. 

A - spokesman for N M 
Rot^cfali, who had himself 
been outside foe bank when. 
Lord Rothschild arrived, said: 
“We have no co mem we. w fah 
to make. Afrefus outside foe. 
bank . were regular staff 
e mpl o y ees. There bdo chance 
of yon speaking to Lond Rofo- 
schild. You are asking imperti- 
nent questions.” 

Mr Steven said he had made 
a formal complaint about foe 
incident to foe police, and a 
statement issued by The Mail 
ob said that the news- 
paper was taking legal advice 
about foe affifo. 


‘Wanted’ 
man flies 
back to 
Belfast 

An Ulster man wanted fay 
foe US authorities for alleged 
gou-nniirjmfto Syria, ban and 
other prohibited commies and 
for whose anesta warrant was 
issued by a Washington DC 
court on Wednesday, flew 
baric into Bd&sfs AUergrove 
Airport yesterday afternoon 
after a meeting with peers at 
the House of Lords. 

Mr Thomas O’Brien, aged 
45, a unionist activist, and 
riiajnmii . of the BaugDT 
branch of the snail, hardline 
Progressive Unionist ftety, 
said be monk! consult tawyen 
about the /THzarxe^ .a&egp- 
tions being made agsinst him 
by foe US authorities. 

. Applying for an arrest war- 
rant on- -Wednesday a US 
customs representative told a 
Washington court that Mr 
frBrien was wanted tog ether 
with two Americans and an 
E pglfahmat VB a iDcdasMrEric 
Magee for conspiring to sup- 
ply a ' r nw , ammunition and 
high tech navigation systems 
to severed countries to which 
such exports are banned, in 
ccrntravefition of the US Arms 
Export Control Act. 

. The four were alleged, to 
have bad contacts with under- 
cover Customs investigators 
between last March and this 
. month. Mr O’Brien was bring 
sought and was thought to be 
in the United Stales, the court 
is reported to have been told. 

Mr O’Brien flew openly into 
Afdeqpuve airport yesterday, 
unimpeded t either at 
Heathrow or on arrival and 
professed hims elf to be mys-! 
tified by foe charges befog 

made against him. 

“I have not been, out of 
Great Britain in the last 
quarter. I was in London on 
business, with a group of other 
people to meet somelonfaat 
the House of Lords: I met 
them but I out foe visit 
short — I was supposed to stay 
for farther meetings this eve- 
ning. Fve returned home to 
find out what is going on. Tm 
joot in hiding from anyone." 

He has been a member of 
the Progressive . Unionist 
Party for more than fouryean 
and chairs his local branch in 
Bangor, where he . fa un- 
employed and lives with Iris 
wife and two children.; Last 
year he stood, unsuccessfully, 
m the local authority elec- 
tions, polling only 267 first- 
preference votes. 

The RUC would not com- 
ment on whether Mr O'Brien 
was known to than, but they 
said an . extradition request 
I bad-been received. ' 


Magazines 
seized in 
pom alert 


By Stewart Tendler 
Crime Reporter 


One of Britain’s 
police operations against 
pornography was launched 
esterday when Scotland 
/aid’ s Obscene Publications 
Branch seized four lorry-loads 
of magazines and video cas- 
settes from a warehouse in 
Stratford, east London. 

Thirty-four forces through- 
out tbe rest of Britain had 
been alerted by foe police to 
retail outlets in their areas 
supplied with material from 
the warehouse. 

After the police moved in 
on the warehouse other forces 
began their own operations 
against the outlets and also 
seized material 

During the day forces car- 
ried out their own raids on 
shops in Chatham, Margate , 
Folkestone, Oxford, Reading 
and other towns. 

The action was code-named 
Operation Walrus and police 
seized nearly 300,000 maga- 
zines from the warehouse. 

On SL Valentine’s Day the 
police carried out another raid 
on foe warehouse and took 
magazines worth more than 

£2 milli on. 

Last week magistrates or- 
dered the material should be 
returned because less than half 
of the batch of material shown 
to foe court was considered 
obscene. 


Defence blueprint on 
rapid-response forces 

By Peter Davenport, Defence Correspondent 


A major report which will 
provide foe Wuepnnt for fu- 
ture rapid strategic deploy- 
ment of British Armed Fences 
outside, tbe Nato area is to be 
prepared for defence chiefi. .. 

It will be drawn up from the 
experiences in foe joint UK- 
Omani military exercise, now 
coming to a dose, which has 
been testing operational con- 
cepts developed from the 
F&Ddands campaign. 

Air Chief Marshal Sir Peter 
Harding, Commander-in- 
chief Strike Command and 
director of Exercise Saif 
Sareea (Swift Sword) said 
yesterday that foe report 
should be ready by February. 

He said that foe rapid 
deployment capability of foe 
Armed Forces was signifi- 
cantly better today than it was 
five years ago. And an ongoing 
programme of improvements 
in the RAFs air-to-air re- 
fuelling capacity would pro- 
duce further enhancements in 
the ability to move a powerful 
force, thousands of miles at 
very short notice. 

After the Falklands cam- 
paign the chiefs of staff de- 
cided that future out-of-area 
operations would be run by a 
joint force headquarters to 
eliminate the problems of co- 
. operation between the three 
services experienced in the 
South Atlantic. ' 

The forces assigned to any 
task run by a. joint force 


headquarters^ who could 
range' from tbe evacuation of 
British nationals from hostile 
territory to providing military 
assistance to a friendly, non- 
Nato country, are drawn from 
5 Airbourne Brigades and 3 
Co mmando Royal Marines. ' 
Royal Navy and RAF forces 
are allocated as required 
depending on tbe circum- 
stances of the operation. • 
Although 90 per cent of 
Britain’s military commit- 
ment is to the deterrent strat- 
egy of Nato, troops have been 
involved in 83 separate opera- 
tions out of area since the end 
of the Second World War. 
Further such deployments are 
considered more likdy in the 
future than any major Nato 
action and there is a commit- 
ment to continually upgrading 
One major improvement is 
the air-to-air refuelling and air 
transport capacity of the RAF. 
Although only a quarter of 5 
Airborne Brigade were air- 
lifted into the Oman exercise 
over a period of days. Sir Peter 
said that in war they could 
have been taken in with all 
their equipment within 36 
hours. 

• Royal Ordnance, foe de- 
fence manufacturing com- 
pany, announced yesterday 
that the 2,000 workforce at its 
Blackburn factory is bong 
reduced by 270 to enable it to 
remain internationally 
competitive. 


Snails in biological foul-up 


By Martin Fletcher 
Political Reporter 

The plight of the female dog 
whelk or marine snail is to be 
raised in the Commons today. 

Mr Anthony Steen, Conser- 
vative MPfor South Hams, is 
to table a written question 
alerting ministers to She fact 
that all along the coast of the 
Sooth-west these creatmres are 
growing male sex organs. 

He win dte the latest edition 
of Journal of the Marne 
Biological Association in 
which two marine biologist? 
from Plymouth, Dr Peter 
Gibbs and Dr Geoffrey Bryan, 
rlflirtn Hurt fbfe ffllltjttion fa the 
direct effect of the toxic 
Tributyl Tin (TBT) anti-foul- 


ing pint Esed on the bottoms 
of boats. 

According to die scientists, 
the existence of the dog whelk, 
or NttceBa Lapinas, fa threat- 
ened fa foe heavily polluted 
areas around estuaries and 
marinas because the male sex 
organs are griming over the 
female opening and the crea- 
tures are effectively becoming 


revelation gives Mr 
Steen fresh ammunition to 
coatmne his t ong- rnniring 
campaign to have TBT paint 
banned. He chums that it has 
already killed tbe oyster and 
scallop industries on Devon’s 
sooth coast, destroying jobs 
He paints oot t hat the 
French banned TBT paint in 


1982 when they discovered it 
was destroying marine fife, 
and devefaped a non-toxic, 
copper-based anti-foaling 

b Britain, from January 1 
next the TBT content iff the 
copolymer content most be 
reduced from IS per cent to 
5.5 per cent 

Since last January tin 
Department Of the Environ- 
ment has also been moautoring 
foe results of earlier tegfafar 
tion restricting the use- 

“The damage to marine life 
fa devastating, but unfortu- 
nately, because of foe pressure 
of paint manufacturers and 
yatdismen, we are stack with a 
reduction that is not going to 
make foe slightest difference,'* 
Mr SteensjudL 


Anti-pact 
campaign 
in chaos 

The Ulster “tojrafisT cam- 
paign of exposition to the 
Anglo-Irish agreement was in 
chaos yesterday. 

Hopes of bringing about tte 
collapse of local government 
were stymied in a revolt by 
Official Unionists who re- 
fused to vacate their council 
s e yi y — leaving foe future of 
Mr James Molyneaux, foe 
party leader, who called fix' 
tbe resignations, dangerously 
exposed. 

Now, rival Democratic 
Unionist Party hardliners, 
infuriated by the rebellion, are 
likely to push fix' an all-out 
public civil disobedience cam- 
paign to revive the intensity of 
the protests. 

Mr Molyneaux’s position as 
leader of the province’s largest 
political party did not appear 
under any immediate threat 
But the split within his ranks 
will make it increasingly diffi- 
cult for Mm to keep pace vrifo 
the anti-agreeme n t campaign 
being forced by senior officials 
in the Rev lan Paisley’s DUP~ 

The two leaders met yes- 
terday to discuss their next 
move. But foe uneasy alliance 
between the two parties who 
I agreed on a joint pact of 
opposition fa as dose as it has 
ever been to breaking np. 

The Official Unionists 
voted 82-44 against vacating 
the seats. They feared the 
mainly Roman Catholic 
SDLP and Sinn Fein would 
take over most of Ulster’s 26 
distric t councils, many of 
which are continuing to ad- 
journ all business. 

But foe emphatic rejection 
of Mr Molyneaux’s resigna- 
tion call, at a special meeting 
in Belfast, was a setback to the 
party leader’s authority. 

. He said: “I am absolutely 
determined, come what may. 
and ao matter what kind of. 
forces are mounted against 
me, to carry through that 
policy in conjunction with all 
other pro-union people who 
will not tolerate consent to the 

gflTE i j .ment . - 

“As far as my position is 
concerned, 2 was elected by 
the 800 members of foe Ulster 
Unionist Council seven years 
ago. 

“They are the only people' 
who can decide to remove me. ‘ 
If they say it fa time to go I will 
go quietly, but not until then 
ami not at the behest of any 
element within foe party other 
than the unionist council. " 


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THE TIMES FRIDAY NOVEMBER 28 1 QRfi 


HOME NEWS 



took massive 
of drugs and 

drink before he died 



,S^y 


n 


0and Cross - 

Police Constable Philip 
Olds, who was paralysed from 
the waist down by a robber’s 
bullet six years ago,, died of a 
huge overdose of drugs and 
aicohofaftej an argument with 
his giri friend, an inquest at 
Hornsey in north London was: 
told yesterday- . 

Ontbe sheet of the bed 
where he spent his last night 
on October 1 , hehad scribbled 
“Sorry Vessa” in red ink but 
no other message was found. 

. He had tried to get a 
telephone messes to Police 
Servant Vanessa- Peridns, 
who had mrrsed him through 
his ordeal and whom he 
intended to marry. 

Bat she had left .the bun- 
galow in Pinner, Middlesex, 
where he lived, intending to 
«anrn the next day. 

Recording open veandici, 
-Mr. Bernard Pearl, assistant 
deputy coroner for north 
London, said it was “a tragedy 
that a man of that sort should 



PC Olds, who had discussed 
. suicide several times 


We 


have, been (educed by injury 
oulddrii 


to a state where he could drink 
so much alcohol that he did 
not know bow many fingers 
were two and how many 
tablets were four”. 

PC (Mds> aged 34, had been 
a hero and a proud serving 
member of the Metropolitan- 
police force, he added. 

Mr Pearl read a statement 
from Miss Peridns, aged 30, 
saying that the couple were 
planning happfly for their 
future on the night of his 
Hflfltir But an argument had 
blown up and she had left him 
“upset and angry”. 

She added: “He was a man 
of sudden moods, up one 
minnte and down the next. He 
had discussed suicide with me 
on several occasions. 

“He would drink rather 
heavily, disregarding the num- 


had arguments abqutthis and 
three months before his death 
we decided on a trial 
separation. 71 

Miss Perkins was unable to 
attend the inquest because she 
was recuperating from a mi- 
nor operation. She said PC 
Olds had .stopped drinking 
and they had (tedded to get 
back together again. “We were 
happy and planning out future 
together.” 

Dr Rufus Crompton, a 
hokxdst from St 


Hospital, Tooting, 
said that a post-mortem 
examination on PC Olds had 
shown a very high level of 
alcohol in his Mood and that 
some of the alcohol had been 
consumed within 30 minutes 
Of his Hath 

There were also four drugs 
in his stomach, a tranquillizer, 
an anti-histamine, ;a potent 
painkiller and a sleeping pilL 
“The cause of dentil was 
multiple drug and alcohol 
poisoning;” he said. 

Asked what the impact of an 
alcohol level nearly four times 


. the legal limit for drivers 
combined with drugs would 
be. Dr Crompton said that he 
would be “confosed enough 
not to know how many tablets 
he had taken”. 

PC Peter Dale, a friend and 
colleague for 12 years, said 
that PC Olds had found it hard 
to come to terms with his 
inability to walk after the 
shooting incident. 

Nevertheless, PC Date said, 
a shooting incident in his 
1 home a few weeks before his 
death had worried and upset 
PC Olds badly. He had also 
been concerned by an earlier 
incident when he had heard 
two would-be burglars 
discussing how to get into his 
bungalow. 

rasp Algis Leufon, stationed 
at Harrow, said that PC Olds 
was showing off his gnn to a 
friend when it went off ao 
ciden tally injuring the friend. 
The gun had subsequently 
been examined and found to 
have a tight trigger 

PC Peter Hotbak told the 
inquest that he had taken a 
telephone caO from PC Olds 
about 3.30am on October 1. 
“He wanted to talk to Police 
Sergeant Perkins. She was not 
there and he asked for a 
message to be left,” be said. 
“He sounded drunk,” 

In his summing up Mr Pearl 
said that PC Olds was vary 
reckless with drags and at- 
cohol “arising, I am sure from 
the pams and tribulations he 



Prince’s 
campaign 
for inner 
cities 


The Prince of Wales yes-1 
terday called for a new renais-: 
sauce for Britain “from the! 
bottom up". 

He made the appeal as he' 
launched his own initiative to 
help the inner cities when he 
addressed 800 delegates at a 
Building Communities con- 
ference in London. 

Announcing a new charity, 
the Inner City Trust, the. 
Prince directed his appeal to 
commerce and industry, in- 
stitutions. societies and clubs, 
and members of the public to; 
help with cash and kind. 

The Prince is patron of the 
trust which win administer 


The Princess of Wales bong greeted oo arrival to present the awards for Westminster City Ctamdrs anti-drug campaign 

Princess launches 


drugs campaign 


But to record a verdict of 
suxade, he bad lobe sure that 
whar-he did was fin- the sole 
purpose of taking his life. . 

But the very high level of 
alcohol found in his blood 
might have confused him 
enough not to realize how 
many drags he had taken, nor 
the implications of what he 
had done. 


By Sophie Witter 

“Say No To Drags” was the people," 
Princess of Wales's message 
when she bracked West- 
minster City CoaadTs cam- 
paign against drag abase at 
Covad Garden yesterday. 

The Prineess. presented two 
Westminster Ribbon Awards 
to organizations which have 
worked against drag abuse 
and atoned « “pledge board” 
giving her personal support fo 
tnecampiign. 

The ribfe n campaign takes 
its name from the Mne, green 
ami silver ribbons wool by the 
pop stars and public figures 


Dr Jaffe says patient’s 
case notes were stolen 


Important documents were 
stolen in a binglary at die 


private consulting rooms of 


Joseph Jaffe only weds 
before be was charged with 
professional misconduct. 

This was disclosed yes- 
terday at a General Medical 
Council disciplinary hearm^ . 
where Dr Jaffe -has been 
accused of wrecking: the per- 
sonal and business fife of a 
patient with a .course of 
hypnosis and injections of an- 
addictive drags concoction he 
called “Jaffe Juice”. 

Among the papers stolen in 
June 1985 were case notes, 
relating to the patient — Mr 
George Waterson, a wealthy 
businessman. 

Mr Waterson, aged 49, a 
married man with four. chil- 
dren of Altrincham, Cheshire, 
has complained to the GMC 
about Dr Jaffa's five-year 
course of treatment for which 
he was charged up to £60,000. 

Yesterday Dr Jaffe, aged 61, 
an associate member of the 
Royal Collie of Psychiatrists, 
told the hearing that when the 
break-in at his consulting 
rooms m Manchester was. 
reported to police he did not 
notice Mr Watereon’s file was 
mi ss ing. 

But a “frightening” incident 
happened which made him 
look fin- it on September 8, 


By Michael Horsnefl 

1985. That was when Dr Jaffe 
saw Mr Waterson and others 
taking photographs outside 
his soigery. By then Dr Jaffe, a 
former mayor of Salford, had 
been told legal proceedings 
against him had been started, 

. Mr Anthony Ariirige, QC, 
for Dr Jaffe, said it was not 
soquising that the doctor had 
his susptefons about who car- 
ried oat the burglary.- - 
Parts of foe fire charges 
against Dr Jaffe woe dropped 
yesterday after Mr Axindgp 
argned there was insufficient 
evidence. 

Dr Jaffe is now accused of 
administering undisclosed 
drags which adversely affected 
Mr Waterson's capacity to 
fulfil his domestic and bust- 
ness responsibilities; dis- 
regarding requests from Mrs 
Ann Waterson, a trained 
nurse, to refer her husband to 
hospital; foiling to. provide 
details of the treatment he had 
given to a consultant psychi- 
atrist who requested them; 
and abusing his- professional 
position by signing an untrue 
character reference. 

Dr Jaffe confirmed that Mr 
Stephen Ledger, his own 
accountant, had been taken on 
by Mr Waterson's cycle busi- 
ness, but that he bad not 
introduced them. 

The hearing continues. 


in head-on 
bus crash 


1 i I w ho followed the Princess 

Four dead iz-jj&i* **■*«••* 

Awards went to the Tmmng 
Point Hmgcxford Drug Pro- 
ject, a group providing advice 
and support for problem drag 
takers, and Core, a new centre 
set up to give intensive homeo- 
pathic treatment to addicts 
Wes t min ste r City Council 
recognizes that Britain’s drag 
proilen is concentrated in 
Loudon and among young 
people. 

' “Next year the Ribbon 
Awards w31 go to anttdrag 
projects devised by young 


By Graig Setts 

Workers who rushed from 
their factory yesterday to help 
victims of an accident outside, 
found four of their workmates 
had died and two others were 
critically injured in a head-on 
collision between a car and a 
double-decker bus. 

Twelve of the 38 passengers 
on the bus were treated for 
minor injuries as firemen used 
cutting gear to release six 
young men from their car 
outside the Brush Electrical 
Engineering foctoiy in Lough- 
borough, Leicestershire. 

One survivor from the car, 
wgs seroously ill in the inten- 
sive care unit of Leicester 
Royal Infirmary last night and 
the other was describ e d as 
“seriously ill" 

Police said all six men 
wmked at the factory in the 
Meadow, Loughborough, 
dose to where the. accident 
happened in a narrow country 
lane, but could not release 
their n ” |wc until they had 
been identified. 

Mr Stephen Hastings, the 
bus driver, from Clifton, Not- 
tingham, said: “The driver of 
the car came over a bridge and 
lost control He was fighting 
hard to regain control, but be 
could not and just careered 
into me.” 


_ . . Lady Porter, leader 
of the council, said. “Too 
many anti-drag warnings have 
sounded like adults preaching 
to the young and the result has 
been self-defeating.** 
Campaign organizers hope 
many young people wffl also 
sign the pledge.boaid, which 
will be kept 1 b the Rock 
Garden at Gwent Garden. 

The campaign, which, 
emphasizes self-help and 

tnwll c niuiwwty nr gflnm - . 

tions, has the support of the 
Prime Minister. “The task is. 
one not just for the Govern- 
ment but for the whole 
community,” she said 
Support for the campaign 
also comes from Mr P&ge 
Peary, director of the Straight 
Rehabilitation Centre in 
Washington, which was vis- 
ited by the Princess of Wales 
last November. “The age of 

drug gdiHrte is falling anti 

community support for rehab- 
ilitation schemes is becoming 
increasingly important,” he 
said. 

His p r og ranmuM he largest 
hi the US, has achieved a 75 
per cent success rate far clients 
between 12 and 25 years old. 



resources raised from the ap- 
peal. Its eight trustees include 
Lord Scarman, chairman of 
the conference, whose report 
on the riots in Brixton, south 
London, was published five 
years ago this week. 

The Prince told delegates 
that Britain had an opportu- 
nity to do three things: to 
create a new renaissance in 
architecture; to launch a seri- 
ous campaign to save Britain's 
heritage and to stimulate local 
initiatives to promote 
community and economic 
development- 

11 was time, he said, to 
resurrect the principles of 
classical Greece, that propor- 
tion was not a matter of 
individual taste bat depended 
on mathematical laws of har- 
mony which could only be 
broken at the expense of 
beauty. 

The Prince said: “We have 
been led by the noses for long 
down a path which 


enough 

totally ignores the principles 


Tire Prince iff Wales at the launch of the Inner Cities Trust 


RAF help 
with moor 
search 


Princess’s poster refusal 


By Inn Smith 

Northern Correspondent 

The RAF took aerial photo- 
graphs of Saddlewortb Moor 
yesterday to help police 
searching for the bodies of two 
youngsters thought to have 
been buried there 22 years ago 
by Ian Brady - and Myra 
Hindley. 

Photographs of ground con- 
tours win be compared' with 
those taken when the first 
search of the moois was 
undertaken by police from 
four neighbouring forces. 

Eight body detection dogs 
continued the search as the 
Canberra reconnaissance air- 
craft flew overhead. 

Mr James Anderton, the 
Greater Manchester chief con- 
stable, yesterday defended the 


Princess Michael of Kent 
has told foe British Safety 
Comal that she will not allow 
a photograph of herself to 
appear din a 
electrical accidents. 

Her office at 
Palace said last night that 
white On princess bad said 
how worthy and necessary the 
poster was, site did not con- 
sider Hat a p iicini e of a 
member of the Repl Family 
sboald appear hi tins way. 

Her private secretary said 
he found a statement by Mr 
JantesTye, the coanczFs direc- 


By Kenneth Gosling, 
tor general* “rather 


Mr Tye had earfier issued to 
the- press a “mock-up” of the 
paster which had also gone to 


It reads: “Live wires are 
Itillera. Fit a power breaker, 
says HRH Princess Michael 
Of Kent," and carries a draw- 


exception urid: *T am amazed, 
indeed shocked, by her refusal 
to help to save lives on what 
woold have been a tasteful and 
dignified pester.” The prin- 
cess had been' sapf roac&ed, he 
said, because of her pmk 
fori 


re- 


sketch a i Princess 
which wndd have bee 
placed by apbotegraph. 

The statement by MrTyeto 
which Kensington Palace took 



the tatty emu, a 

i for children, 
have been mere 
approp ria te,” he asked? 

He also referred to “Prin- 
cess Michael’s love of self- 
promotion" as a reason for 


new search for Keith Bennett, 
who was aged 12, and Pauline 
Reade, aged 16. 

He said the decision was 
entirely his and denied that 
there had been any excessive 
or unwarranted use of police 
resources. “There is nothing 
unusual in the re-opening of a 
case of tins kind, no matter 
bow macabre or notorious it 
becomes. The case can never 
be completely dosed so long 
as some opportunity for jus- 
tice r emaiBfi. 

One of the children's moth- 


ers 


BAORmail 
destroyed in 
lorry blaze 


An electrical fault was 
blamed for a tony fire which 
destroyed tons of Christmas 
mail yesterday intended for 
British servicemen in Germ- 
any. 


Christmas cards, letters and 
packages for the Aizny and 
RAF were destroyed when the 
tony and trailer burst into 
flames on the -A12. at 
Rivenhall in Ejwtac. 


But 

the cause 

that 


investigating 


the 

a letter bomb 
have been the cause. 


The Army's special in- 
vestigation brand! said: “Ar- 
son has not been fully ruled 
out but is not suspected. We 
believe an electrical fault 
started the fire.” . 


The civilian tarry was. on its 
way from Mill Hill in north 
London to catch the North Sea 
feriy at Felixstowe. Fireman 
were able to salvage some of 
the marl which was later 
returned to London. 


Six deny attempt to 
doctor US cheques 

By David Sapsted 


A gang forged the signature 
of Clint Eastwood, the Holly- 
wood actor, on a stolen US 
government cheque, Ideworth 

Crown Court in London was 
told yesterday. 

Six defendahte-foce charges 
arising out of a swindle that 
could have netted $3 million 
(about £2 million) in doctored 
US Treasury cheques, Mr 
Victor ■ Temple, fin* the 
prosecution, said. 

One mistake the ga ng m ade, 
he alleged, was to forge Mr 
Eastwood's signature on the 
back of a cheque originally 

made out for a few dollars but 

ahered to make it look worth 

more than $38,000. 

According to Mr Temple, 
the cheques, most with a 
SI, 000 maximum, were stolen 
from froma mail centre in San 

Francisco and taken to the Far 

pac t where the amounts on 
them were increased and . 
payees' signatures forged. ; 

They were then sent to 
England where the gang med 
to cash them, he chinned. Staff* 


at the London branch of a 
Dutch bank became sus- 
picions. 

five of the defendants de- 
nied charges of conspiring to 
cash fraudulent cheques, 
conspiring to use false in- 
struments and conspiring to 
obtain cash by deception. 

They were Jamil-ur- 

R ah min qgprf 34, an 1 

unemployed banker, ofj 
Madrie Road, Bristol; James 
Soon Bee Ang, aged 48, a 
Singapore merchant; Hue 
Kud Lee Soon, aged 50. a 
Singapore broker, Muham- 
mad Want Khan, aged 36, a 
Karachi bank official, of] 
KUbum, north London; and 
MoeedUdin Ahmed, aged 35, 
managing director of a Ka- 
rachi asbestos firm, of Maida] 
Vale, north-west London. 

A sixth defendant. Axis 
Khan, aged 28, a typist, also 
Maida Vak^ denied two 1 
chaises of trying to pervert the] 
course of justice and one of | 
handling stolen US Treasury 
cheques. The trial continues. 


that the renewed inquiry was 
an unwarranted, grisly and 
macabre operation. 

Mrs Winifred Johnson, the 
mother of Keith Bennett who 
his 

birthday in 1964, 
warmly welcomed the re- 
newed search and said both 
she and Pauline Reade's 
mother wholly supported the 
police inquiry. 

Criticism about the search 
and claims that it should not 
have begun unto the spring 
were dismissed as uninformed 
nonsense and Mrs Johnson 
also fiercely a t tacked the 
suggestion, by Mr Geoffrey 
Dickens, MP, that the search 
should be called off and a 
monument to the missing 
youngsters be placed on the 
moors instead. 

“These people just do not 
know what they are talking 
about They have' no concep- 
tion of the pain and anguish 
with which we have lived for 
tite past 22 years, never know- 
ing with absolute -certainty 
.whether our children are alive 

or dead. 

“All I want is for Keith's 
remains to be discovered so 1 
can put my son to rest in a 
proper cemetery -with a head- 
stone which -I can visit with 
flowers to keep his memory 
alive.? 


of harmony and the well- 
cultivated relationship of the 
parts to the whole.” 

Tbe Prince said: “Can't we 
try and make mankind feel 
grand? Can’t we raise the spirit 
by restoring a sense of har- 
mony, by re-establishing hu- 
man scale in street patterns 
and heights of buildings; by 
redesigning those huge areas 
of what is euphemistically 
known as ‘public open space' 
between tower blocks which 
he derelict, festering and 
anonymous. 

“Can’t we restore people's 
pride; bring back selfcon- 
fidence; develop the potential 
and very real skills of individ- 
ual people in this island?” 

Lord Scarman opened the 
conference with an appeal for 
people to be given more 
control and say over their 
living conditions. . 


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te my gramo- 
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ed 51, who has 
i Gold since it 
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d cards can be : 
miiif g a stam- 
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Wood 


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i Young 


xi in brewing 
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■oiz, a former 
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THE TIMES FRIDAY NOVEMBER 2 » 1986 


November 27 1986 


PARLIAMENT 


Baker throws out 
parts of schools 
pay settlement 



There had been useful progress 
on teachers' pay. but the Gov- 
ernment was unable to accept 
important parts of last Friday's 
deal between the local authori- 
ties and the teachers' unions, 
Mr Kenneth Baker, Secretary of 
State for Education, told the 
Commons. 

A Bill that will abolish the 
Burnham Committee and bring 
in an advisory committee on 
pay ' will be introduced to- 
morrow. 

In his statement, Mr Baker 
said: Progress has been made, 

but Friday’s document contains 
some features which the Gov- 
ernment cannot accepL 

First, we cannot accept the 
excess costs of the proposals on 
pay. The phasing and distribu- 
tion mean that the proposals 
cost an extra £15 million for the 
three months of January to 
March next year and another 
£70 million for the next finan- 
cial year. The Government’s 
offer, worth £600 million, is for 
16.4 per cent to be implemented 
in full by next October. That 
offer stands. It is very generous 
by any standard. 

Second, I must leave the 
House in no doubt about the 
unacceptability of the proposed 
pay structure. We have not been 
given a sensible structure for the 
profession. Instead we have a 
reiteration of earlier ideas with 
higher figures and only minimal 
movement towards the Gov- 
ernment's criteria. 

The Government wants a pay 
structure for the teaching pro- 
fession which will provide more 
incentive posts and there is 
considerable professional sup- 
port for our view. These posts 
will reward good classroom 
leaching and extra responsibil- 
ity. 

They will also pay for skills in 
short supply and attract good 
teachers to demanding posts 
which might otherwise be diffi- 
cult to fill, for example, in inner 
city schools. 

My proposals are based on 

140,000 incentive posts in a 
profession of 400,000 teachers. 
Today there are 105.000 such 
posts. Friday's proposals would 
provide only 80,000. That 
would mean that 25,000 teach- 
ers who are now on the higher 
scales would not hold promoted 
posts come September. 

My aim is that half of the 
profession should hold pro- 
moted posts or be heads or 
deputies. Theirs is that only 
about one third should hold 
such posts. This is a huge gap 
and a fundamental point of 
principle. We must enhance the 
career prospects of good teach- 
ers and give management the 
flexibility it needs to improve 
the quality of education in our 
schools. 

Lastly, there is the question of 
future negotiating machinery. 
All are agreed that Burnham 
must go. Friday's document 
would in effect perpetuate 
arrangements similar to those 
which have so signally foiled in 
recent limes. The Government 
holds to the view that for an 
interim period we need an 
advisory committee and I shall 
tomorrow introduce the Bill 
announced in the Queen's 
Speech to establish such a 
committee. 

I have been and 1 remain 
willing to see the local authori- 
ties and the unions about these 
matters. But 1 am not willing to 
allow this highly unsatisfactory 
situation to continue. Our chil- 
dren are entitled to better 
schooling and that has often 
been denied them over the last 
two years. The House, the 
public and all parents win 
understand that the Govern- 
ment must pul our children 
first 

Mr Giles JRadice, chief Opposi- 
tion spokesman on education, 
said that although the Opposi- 
tion were in favour of reform of 
die Burnham machinery, they 
would strongly oppose any leg- 
islation which removed bargain- 
ing rights. 

He also welcomed the fact 
that despite press reports, there 


EDUCATION 


was no mention of imposition; 
any attempt to impose a settle- 
ment either now or in the future 
would be strongly opposed. 

“The whole nation wants 
decent pay for teachers and 
improved education services 
and, above all, peace in the 
classrooms. 

“Are these objectives more 
likely to be secured by an 
agreement which has already 
been negotiated by employers 
and teachers and which is 
supported by at least two thirds 
of the profession, or by an 
imposed settlement which will 
not only be accompanied by 
severe technical difficulties, but 
is also highly likely to lead to 
renewed disruption?" 

He was glad that Mr Baker 
had recognized the substantial 
advances and achievements of 
the d ea l which established de- 
cent pay for classroom teachers, 
provided a dear definition of 
teachers* duties, laid down a 
minim um number of duty days. 



Mr Baker Useful progress 
has been made. 

set up a system of appraisal, 
established negotiating machin- 
ery. linked pay and conditions 
and defined maximum class size 
for the first time. 

While accepting that there 
remained difference s between 
the Secretary of State’s position 
and the agreement particularly 
over structure and costs, these 
differences had been exag- 
gerated. 

“Is he really telling the House 
that these difficulties are in- 
surmountable? Is it not the case 
that the employers made it 
abundantly clear to him last 
night that they are prepared to 
discuss the differences in a 
flexible and reasonable manner? 

“So for the Secretary of State's 
handling of the dispute has been 
mept"\ he said, to loud protests 
from the Government benches. 
“His ham-fisted intervention at 
Nottingham, and bis unfortu- 
nate comment to the House just 
30 hours before there was a 
settlement, about the talks being 
a fiasco. 

“He still has a chance to 
redeem himself by talking seri- 
ously and constructively to the 
employers and teachers and 
reaching an agreement with 
them. Will he confirm that be is 
going to do this, because parents 
will not forgive him or the 
Government if he foils to g rasp 
this opportunity for lasting 
peace in our schools?" 

Mr Baker said that six weeks 
ago Mr Radice had accused him 
of dithering for not making his 
position dear. Then when he 
did make it dear he was accused 
of being ham-fisted and inept. 


What he had set out on October 

30 had been the Governments 
position, the framework against 
which an agreement could haw 
been reached acceptable to the 
Government. 

The present document was 
not in feet an agreement, it was 
an agreement to submit pro- 
posals to members of the 
unions, and that process was in 
hand and might take several 
weeks. 

There were real wo rries 
within foe unions. He had seen 
the secretary of the Head 
Teachers* Association and 
noted their anxiety about struc- 
ture. He had also met repre- 
sentatives of the Professional 
Association of Teachers and foe 
National Asociation of Head 
Teachers, and would be seeing 
them again. 

He would be willing to hear 
further representations. Mr 
John Pearraan. the local 
authority re p r esentative, had 
been to see him the previous 
evening and they had discussed 
the principles of costs and 
structure. 

The suggestion that the dif- 
ferences were minor was not 
right, those relaxing to structure 
would lay down foe roles for the 
teaching profession for the rest 
of foe century. 

For example, in running a 
large secondary school with 75- 
80 teachers it was usual for 50- 
60 to hold some sort of incentive 
or promotion post. The pro- 
posal would reduce this to 15- 
20. One could not run a 
secondary school on that basis if 
you could not provide the 
incentives to foe good teachers. 

He could not accept such a 
“fiat earth" pay structure with 
insufficient incentive and pro- 
motion posts. 

Mr James Pawsey (Rugby and 
Kenilworth, C): The parents will 
respect what is bang done and 
acknowledge that the pay on the 
table for the teachers is a good 
dal for the profession, for 
schools and for teachers. 

Mr Baker The amount avail- 
able is foe largest In any 
teachers' pay deal — £600 mil- 
lion and it is a great pity that the 
negotiators spread it in a way 
which intensifies the flat-earth 
approach to pay structure. 

Mr dement Freud (North East 
Cambridgeshire, L); Does he 
genuinely think this negation of 
negotiating procedure will bring 
long-lasting peace? 

Mr Baker There can be no 
justification for disruption. 

Mr Jack Dormand (Easington, 
Lab): His proposals are a recipe 
for further disruption. He makes 
great play with foe fact that this 
is the biggest increase there has 
been but foe proportion is not as 
great as was agreed in the 
Houghton report. How does be 
intend to implement assessment 
of teacheis. Whether it is by 
head teachers, local inspectors 
or HM inspectors, it is an 
exceedingly difficult task and 
nothing like as easy as he is 
making out 

Mr Baker In our discussions 
with local authorities we have 
agreed on six pilot projects 
which I yesterday agreed to 
fund. There is no one set 
method for appraisal of tea- 
chers. 

Mr Martin Flannery (Sheffield, 
Hillsborough, Lab): If he had sat 
down and planned disruption, 
Mr Baker could not have done a 
more brilliant job than making 
this statement- If he persists in 
his attitude, there is not the 
slightest doubt the teachers will 
react The profession is unified 
against what foe Government is 


Mr Giles Radice: Attack mi an ‘inept and ham-fisted” Secretary of State. 


Mr Baber He cannot say the 
profession is unified. A substan- 
tial amount has been provided 
for a settlement Many working 
parents who are not likely to see 
the sort of increases available in 
these proposals will resent it if 
the teachers walk out on their 
classes. 

He said later that he had no 
plans to transfer teachers’ sal- 
aries from local authorities to 
central government respon- 
sibility. 


Anglo-Irish pact fears 
‘are manifestly false’ 


The Anglo-Irish agreement was 
a way in which by good will and 
co-operation a happier future 
would be seen for people both in 
Northern Ireland and the repub- 
lic, Mr Tom Sag, Secretary of 
State for Northern Ireland, said 
in the Commons. 

One year on, while people 
might be critical of the lack of 
achievement, they could not be 
ignorant that many of foe 
allegations, fears and mis- 
representations which existed at 
tire start had proved to be 
manifestly false. 

Mr Enoch Powell (South Down, 
OUP): Five weeks ago Mr King 
told the House in the context of 
foe agreement foal he expected 
ratification of the European 
Convention on Terrorism by 
the Irish Republic to go forward 
shortly. Has something gone 
wrong? 

Mr King: No. The Bill for 
ratification was signed by the 
Irish Minister of Justice some 
time ago. It was tabled in the 
Dail for its parliamentary proce- 
dures only this week. 

Mr Michael Colvin (Rorasey 
and Waterside. C): Would he get 
a message through to the Garda 
that Sundays are working days 
where the IRA are concerned? 
What were foe Garda doing 
about patrolling the south side 
of the border last Sunday when 
my old regiment were mortar- 
bombed by the IRA? 

Mr King: I fully share his 
concern about foe incident and 
on Sunday phoned the Irish 
Minister of Justice about it One 
must be fair and recognize that 
it is the first mortar attack, so far 
as ! am aware, that has taken 
place from the republic 
Mr Roy Mason (Barnsley Cen- 
tral, Lab): What improvement 
has taken place in security co- . 
operation between the RUCand 
the Garda in the past 12 months, 
particularly on cross-border 
operations? 

Mr King: There is now the 
detailed fresh assessment which 
has been agreed. There has been 
agreement between the Garda 
and the RUC on co-operation 
on intelligence matters and foe 


IRELAND 


methods of organizing it, on 
organization structure and on 
certain details of communica- 
tions into which 1 am not 
prepared to go into detail in 
public 

Mr Ian Gow (Eastbourne, Ck 
Does not the experience of foe 
first 12 months show that 
instead of peace there has been 
strife, instead of stability, tur- 
moil, and instead of reconcili- 
ation. sectarian suspicion? What 
progress has he made in securing 
from foe majority' 1 community 
acceptance of this agreement? 
Mr King: I share to the foil the 
concerns about the tensions and 
difficulties which exist within 
foe province He knows the 
history of Northern Ireland too 
well to suggest that somehow 
divisions and strife have sud- 
denly broken out in the past 
year. We are seeking to move 
away from the tragic back- 
ground which has now lasted for 
many yean. 

Mr John Home (Foyle, SDLP): 
Has he taken into account the 
recommendation made yes- 
terday by foe Standing Advisory 
Committee on Human Rights, a 
Government-Appointed body, 
that to improve the public 
conception of the administra- 
tion -of justice in Northern 
Ireland there should be three 
judges in foe Diplock courts 
instead of one? 

Mr King: It is not a unanimous 
report. There was a note of 
dissent by two members of the 
committee. 

The report itself does not 
question foe quality of justice at 
present in Northern Ireland and 
points out the very real prob- 
lems that would exist. As to the 
idea that this is just a matter of 
political attitudes, there are real 
and practical problems con- 
cerned in this issue. 

It is a matter that is likely to 
be on the a&mda for further 
discussion. We have made no 
secret of our concern about the 


difficulties that would exist over 
i his issue. 

Mr Ivor Stanbrook (Orpington, 
C): Twelve months after the 
conclusion of foe agreement the 
majority remain unalterably op- 
posed to it. The best nay 
forward is to find an agreement 
acceptable to the minority in 
accordance wifo democratic 
principles as well as being fair to 
the minority. 

Mr King: The objective of 
successive British governments 
has been precisely that There 
has been the unwillingness of 
one party after another and each 
party is equally guilty of abstain- 
ing at one stage or another from 
our various initiatives to try to 
find some way forward. I regret 
the present attitude of the 
majority community. 

• Mr Robert Madennan (Cai 
fouess and Sutherland, SDP) 
later said that there was consid- 
erable interest in the possibili ty 
developing local representative 
democracy in Northern Ireland 
even if there was a stalemate in 
foe central institutions of gov- 
ernment That would strengthen 
local control over local decision- 
making. 

Mr Richard Needham. Undo 
Secretary of State for Northern 
Ireland, said that as part of the 
devolution package which tire 
Government was likely to put 
forward on Northern Ireland, it 
was worth considering. If only 
members of the majority parties 
.were prepared to go into nego- 
tiation with ministers, it was 
something they would wish to 
consider. 

Mr Stuart BeU, an Opposition 
spokesmanon Northern Ireland, 
asked for an assurance that talks 
with foe majority community 
on devolution would , not in- 
volve suspension of the North- 
ern Ireland agreement. - ; 

Mr Needham: I shall speak to 
anyone who comes to my door, 
and in the present framework of 
government I only wish the 
majority would find foe way to 
my door. 


Minimum 
wage ‘with 
caution’ 

By Our Political Reporter 

Mr Roy HattersJey, * the 
shadow Chancellor, said yes- 
terday that a future Labour 
government would proceed 
cautiously in introducing a 
national minimum wage. 

Implementation of the pol-. 
icy, agreed at the TUC con- 
ference in the face of fierce 
opposition from the transport 
workers 1 and the electricians’ 
unions, would not be "easy or 
without some penalties", he 
said. 

Speaking at a Fabian Soci- 
ety conference in London, Mr 
Hattersley said: M A national 
minumum wage has to be 
phased into our wage structure 
with some care~ 

“No responsible party - 
and no responsible trade 
union movement — could 
make an exact commitment 
on either the level or timing a 
year before a general el- 
ection” 

At the TUC conference, Mr 
Ron Todd, general secretary 
of the Transport and General 
Workers’ Union, opposed the 
move, saying it could be “a 
slippery slope to a statutory 
incomes policy". 

Mr Hattersley met that 
charge head on, insisting tha t 
he was opposed to such a 
policy and that a minimum 
wage would e nhance trade 

union activity. 


Alliance and the councils 


Baker ‘most dangerous man 9 


By Nicholas Wood, Political Reporter 


Mr Kenneth Baker, the 
Secretary of State for Educa- 
tion and Science, was branded 
yesterday the most dangerous 
member of the Cabinet as the 
Alliance launched a bitter 
attack on the Government for 

eroding die powers of local 

antiunities. 

It claimed that foe real 
motive behind "Tory para- 
noia" about “loony left” coun- 
cils was foe desire to redoce 
local government to parish- 
pump states »nd to con- 
centrate control in WhitehalL 

It singled oat Mr Baker — 
“foe mod to Tebbifs ro- 
cker” — for special scorn be- 
cause behind his disarming 
manner he was destroy i ng the 
independence of local educa- 
tion authorities through set- 
ting up new schools tended 
directly by his department and 
was sow poised to Impose a 
settlement in foe teachers’ pay 
depute. 

Mr Adrian Slade, president- 
elect of tee Liberal Pmty, said: 
M K believe the current Baker, 
TebMt, Ridley obsession with 
foe iniquities and uselessness 
of local g ov a nnmd is pure 
Tory paran o ia. 

“Where sensible people are 
actually m charge and conr 
ducting government sensibly 
then local government works 
welL” 

Mrs Shirley Wi lliam*, 
president of foe SDP, said 
local politics was becoming 



Mrs Williams: Local politics 
more polarized. 

“more and more polarized" as 
Labour used foe town halls to 
launch a crusade against foe 
Government and rainistera re- 
sponded m kind. This dogfight 
was “ripping foe country 
apart". 

The Conservatives were 
paving the way for a “steady 
redaction" in local anfoorities' 
remaining powers, she said. 

Referring to foe “political 
chicanery” of foe Tory 
chairman's attacks on the 
hard left, she said that he 
ignored the obvious sofation — 
proportional representation 
in counea elections. 

“He is Bring Labour coun- 
cils as battering rams to put 
Lobov in the doeft and be is 
it without any consid- 


eration at all for good admin- 
istration and tiie people of tins 
country." 

The attack on Mr Baker 
came from Mr David Wil- 
liams, Alliance leader of the 
London Borough of Richmond. 

Mrs Williams, a farmer 
Labour Secretary of State for 
Education and Science, said 
that if Mr Baker decided to 
“hijack foe teachers’ pay 
settlement” it wonhi amount to 
foe “neatest act of centraliza- 
tion since the introduction of 
compulsory education in 
187®”. 

The Alliance covnter'Ottedc 
on foe Conservatives came at a 
press conference to branch a 
booklet extolling its achieve- 
ments at local leveL 

It says that about 40 per 
cent of foe population live 
ander an authority wifo Alli- 
ance influence and foe umber 
of liberal and SDP coon- 
dflors has risen from 1,912 in 
1982 to 3,880 in May this 
year. 

Of the country's 513 coun- 
cils, 105 woe subject to Alli- 
ance mflnence, of which 24 
were majority or mi nority 

Value for money, gjvi^ 
tenants more say over foe 
management of their estates, 
better e q uip p ed schools and 
open government are among 
the changes wrought by recent 
shifts of p o w er m towns and 
shires, the booklet says. 


Minister refuses 
to rush report 


There was no question of the 
Government’s jumping in with 
action ahead of consideration of 
the Sampson report on the 
RUC, Mr Tom King, Secretary 
of State for Northern Ireland, 
said when be was questioned 
about the progress of the two- 
part report. 

Mr Martin Flannery (Sheffield. 
Hillsborough, Lab): The failure 
of the Government to react in a 
democratic manner to this by 
clearing the air. and the -wide- 
spread publicity everywhere, 
leads people to think mat the 
suspicion that the Government 
is concealing something is reaL 
Why did they subject Mr Stalker 
to all the suspicions, and his 
famil y to misery, when they 
could dear, it up by an appro- 
priate report? 

Mr Kmg: He appears to be 
unaware that the Sampson re- 
port was made on October 25 
and has been with the Chief 
Constable and is with the Direc- 
tor of Public Prosecutions for 
Northern Ireland. The second 
report will coming forward 
shortly. These are serious mat- 
ters which may lead to criminal 
proceedings. There is no ques- 
tion of the Government jump- 
ing in ahead of them. The 
prope r procedures and processe s 
of taw will be carried through. 

It is my concern that the 
m a t t er should be p roc e eded 
with at the earliest opportunity. 
The deputy Chief Constable of 
Manchester is nothing to do 
with me, but the Manchester 

police authority. 

Mr Anthony Lloyd (Stretford. 
Lab): Taking Mr Stalker out of 
that inquiry led to widespread 
belief that there was some kind 
I 


of conspiracy or some attempt 
to make sure that areas he was 
investigating would not be 
readied. 

Mr King: I bitterly regret that 
the inquiry was not more speedy 
ami tint there was this interrup- 
tion. He appears to be unaware 
of the background. The inquiry 
was at the request of the Chief 
Constable of the RUC . who 
appointed Mr Stalker. 

He then received information 
from the Chief Constable of 
Manchester that Mr Stalker was 
no longer available and a gainst 
that background took immedi- 
ate steps to see that the inquiry 
proceeded by appointing some- 
one else- Any question about the 
suspension of Mr Stalker by 
Manchester police authority was 
not a matter far me. 

Mr Warren Hawkriey (The 
Wrefcxn, Q: Is be satisfied that 
the inquiry was done thoroughly 
and to his satisfaction? 

Mr One It is not posable at 
this. stage to reach that judg- 
ment. The reports have been 
wifo foe Chief Constable and 
the DPP. I have not semi them. I 
shall see foe first shortly. I have 
nwfe dear that I shall want to 
address a number of matters 


Miss Betty BeoteroyiTs ques-t 
tion to foe Prime Minister' 
(Parliament, November 26) 
should have read: “In the light 
of recent disclosures showing 
that President Reagan's ad- 
mission of a limited supply of 
arms to Iran fell very far short of 
the troth, does Mrs Thatcher 
still stand by her original state- 
ment that she believes implicitly 
in the President’s integrity in 
thismatterf'’ . 



on Wright case 


The issues raised by foe Pete 

Wright case dominated Rime 

Mimstex*s question time fa -foe 

Commons with Mrs Thatcher, 

fa the teeth of noisy Labour 

protests, refaria g to com ment on 

mBfoU^^foep^dentaet 

by pterions prime ministers and 

acting fa accordance wifo Er- 

skme May* foe guide to pur- 

ntnwnluiy proced ure - 

The exchanges were opened 

by Mr John Hcddte (MM 
StAffradsbire, Q who asked: Is 

it not foe case that all those who. 

work , for British fa te ffi genc c 
have a go l o an - duty .of 
to the Grown? Is 

it not foe forty of foe Govern- 

ment of the day sad of foe 
Opposition parties to wpbM 

that fundamental principle and 

not to Negate St for party 
political p urpos e s? 

Mrs Thatcher replied: He b 

ri ght- Hitherto, gover nm ents of 

all parties have upbU lfat 
fundament al princ ip le, other- 
wise the effectiveness of the 
secrarky services mrid be 
qndenniaed. I pay tribute to the 
orenrhefanfag majo rity Off those 
in die security services who 
r ecognize their ohHg a fions and 

Mr Ndl Kinaock, Leader of foe 
Opposition: May I warmly en- 
dorse both foe last qnestion and 
the last answer. 

WID tiie Prime Minister tefl 
as if the decision not to impede 
foe poblicatieu at Mir Chapman 
Pinchers book in 1981 was 
takes personally by tire Attor- 
ney General? And was the 
decision to prt Sir Robert Arm- 
strong in court in Australia 
taken personally by the Attor- 
ney General? 

Mrs Thatcher: As I said to tiie 
House last Tbrasday, it would 
be inappropriate tor at to 
jummant on matters which may 
arise in the proceedings coa- 
centing the Peter Wright case in 
Australia while these proceed- 
ings continue. 

On the general q u estion of 
security matters, I miH foDew 
the precedent set by pre vi ous 

p ri m* mm hl w « and I Undo 1 -. 

stand upheld m Erskzae May in 
not commenting on security 


PRIME MINISTER 


Mr tnmmrfc This is n specific 
qnestion about decisions and 
responsibilities reside the Gov- 
ernment ***** has no implica- 
tions whatever for matters of 
— Snnai mal t y. While it does 
not raise questions abort na- 
tional security, it dees raise. 


and irtegoty of the Government 
So wfl] the Prime Mhrister 
give a straight a ns wer to a 

straight question: Did the Attor- 
ney General take either or both 
of those decisions personally? In ■ 
these mattery is foe Attorney 
General a fool or a faR gay? - 
Mrs Thatcher: EDs question I 
think b totally unworthy. On the 
general qnestion of security, I 
shall follow foe precedent set by 
pi ev i ous prime m inis ters and I 
understand upheld fn Erskine 



on minister 


The following is a summary of 
debates in the Commons that 
appeared in later editions of this 
newspaper yesterday. 

The Government’s position on 
the dispate at J.A. Hanger & Co, 
the Rpehampton company that 
supplies artificial limbs, was 
legally unsound, Mr Rank Dob- 
son, an Opposition spokes ma n 
on health, said in moving an 
Opposition motion regretting, 
the mtexTuptioni of service to 
severely disabled people. 

He raid that the contract for 
the supply and fitting of limbs 
was not between the company 
and the people. It was between 
the company mid tiie Gov- 
ernment. 

Failure -to provide a proper 
service was in breach of that - 
contract Yet still tiie Govern- 
ment refused to take resolute 
action to end the dispute which 
had been going on for 10 weeks 
and a day. 

The company was nm by 
odious DHSS ministers- 

were craven and complacent 
and they would rather patients 
suffered and. workers and. their 
families went without than risk 
offending the sort of company 
on which tiie Prime Minister 
jdoted. 

1 Mr a John Major, Minister for 
Social Se curi ty, moved a gov- 
ernment amendment urging the 
managemen t and workforce to 
resolve the dispute without 
delay and noting with approval 
{tiie Government’s initiatives to 
[minimise inconvenience to 


patients. 

He said tins was an industrial 
dispute be tween tiie manage- 
ment and one part of its 
workforce and it could be 
resolved only by them. 

Mr -Toby Jessel (Twickenham. 
Q said that 'from what he had 
heard tonight foe management 
was unimpressive and had 
shown poor qualities of leader- 
ship to the workforce. 

Mr Nicholas LyeD, Under-Sec- 
retary of State far Health and 
Soda! Security, said tint of tiie 

53.000 tower-timb patients, 

29.000 were Hanger’s patients, 
of whom 3,00(5 retied on 
ftoehampeon. Ofibose^ 350 had 
been affected by the dispute and 
1 16 of than were priority cases, 
including 13 chfldren. There 
bad been fewer than 10 com- 
plaints and all had been dealt 

with. 

The Opposition motion was 
rejected by 246 votes to 167 - 
Government majority, 79, and 
the Government amendment 
was carriedby 210 votes to 21 — 
Govern meat majority, 189. 

• BUS RUL£$Trhe benefits to 
bus passengere from the de- 
regulation of routes under tiie 
Transport Act, 1985, were now 
beginning to be shown, Mr John 
Moore, Secretary of State -for 
Transport, maintained during a 
Commons debate. 

Labou r MP*, however, took a 
different view and oomplaiDed 
of loss of services, irregular 
timekeeping and huge increases 


in fares since deregulation last 
month. 

The debate was opened by Mr 
Robert Hughes, Opposition 
spokesman on transport, who 
said that deregulation was an 
abject failure. He moved an 
Opposition motion calling for 
repeal of the Act and condemn- 
ing the loss of essential services 
to the public 

Those who depended on pub- 
lic transport for mobility — the 
elderly, women and children in 
large housing estates, and coun- 
try people — were all being sao- 
rificed-m the pursuit of profit 
Mr Moore, moving an amend- 
' meat congratulating the Gov- 
ernment on its radical measures 
to arrest the decline in the bus 
’ industry, said that the Govern- 
ment had made the most radical 
changes in the industry for 50 
years. 

It had removed outdared 
controls arid had sought to 
create, the rareiminn possible 
potential far innovation and 
efficiency. At" the same time, it 
haH safeguarded tfa provision 
of . socially worthwhile but 
commercially unprofitable 
routes." 

Mr George Hewarth (Knowsley 
North, Lab), in a maiden 
speech, said that 67 per cent of 
all households in ms constit- 
uency did not have access to the 
use of a car. Deregulation had 
bad many effects on his constit- 
uents, all of them fbr the worse. 
„ In some cases it made h difficult 
for them to seek employment. 
The lack ofbuses was beginning 
to have a deleterious effect on 
the local economy. 

Mr Roger Stott, an Opposition 
spokesman on transport, said 

that deregulation overall had 
been a disaster. When Labour 
was returned to power it would 
have a social conscience and put 
public transport bade on the 
map. 

Mr David Mitchell, Minister of 
State for Transport, said that 
not as many new operators had 
crane forward as the Govern- 
ment would have liked, but be 
would be surprised if the new 
year did not show an improve- 
ment. 

The Opposition motion was 
rejected by 264 votes to 189 
rotes — Government majority, 

• EXTRADITION TREATY: 
A new extradition treaty with 
the Unite d States, aimed at 
preventing Ulster terrorists 
seeking to escape prosecution 
from remaining In the United 
S tates, was approved in the 
Commons on . Wednesday right 
MPs, without a rote, accepted 
changes to dose the loophole by 
which terrorists were able to 
avoid extradition by claiming 
that their offences were of a 
political nature. •. 


1 


. The second point of order 
arises from another reply of the 
Prime Minister when she said 
that her Government was fa- 
firfsflde and therefore she eoaM 
not gfae any separate answer 
abort foe role of tire Attorney 
GeaenL. 

Surely ft is a co nsti tu tion al 
fact and accepted principle id 
the coasfftrtioa tint the Attor- 
ney General has a specud pos- 
ition. fa foe Government ^md 

the Government. He is not 
therefore . to be incorporated 
within the collective office of the 
Gover nment . 

The Speaker: The rules regard- 
ing what is admissaMc are set 
out on pages 342 and 343 of 
Enkine May and foe whole 
Horae knows abort that. As to 
foe Prime Mfaistert answer as 
to tiie indivmbffity of Govern- 
ment, tiutt sort a matter for me. 


Mmy of not 
fwwi l y ni i fflff f 
Mr Kmaoffc The Prime 'Min- 

ister mast now- then expiate 
what is foe inference far national 
security of CdOae ns whether it 
was an fadfridaql member of hs 

Government fhatpetsauaBy, nut 

nomfaiBy. and fonuaffyi, but 
personally took tiie dedsfao. 

That does lima direct effect e* 1 

tiie infegriljyaf national scanty 
fa this Country. 

Mis ThatdtoBi 1 The Government 

is indivisible (Labour bnghter). 

Pe dri on s . are made by fa 
GoTBimiurt and not by partico- 

taraastus. 

Dr David Owes, Leader iff foe 

SDPiflktMneMhUajtei 

been offered foe opport unit y of 
patting tills issue away, from 

J ill | | MO il l i ll In to mi |g_ 

party select conmittee. 

Mrs ThatdNK He often pro- 

poses fa opposition what he ffid 
not do in office and we mrter- 
ataadwhy — because he is doing 
ft for party political reasons. 

- I rant the eractice and 
astern of all prime mfaistera of 
aD parties to adhere to the 
normal practice of not 
moiling on sec 
Mr Pieter Shore, chief Opposi- 
tion spokesman on Commons 
affairs, on a paint of eider, said: 

Mr But raked foe Prime 
Mhrister a direct question abort ;*} 

foe role of the Attorney Genera! 
m dealing with dm Ch a pm an - 

Fincher memoirs. 

She repBed by saying that 
aecosdfag to £rsree May fob 
question fell within a security 
ctesriB c a tkii mnJ there for e she 
was entitled not to reply to it 
E would be grateful, Mr 
Speaker, if if yon,can help the 
House by checking the fife and 
reporting hock to as as to 
whether or not tiffs does come 
ander tbe dassfficafion of sec- 
urity ander which the Prase 
Minister is entitled net to 


Parliament today 

Gnumbs (9.30): Banking BilL 
second reading. 




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Decision on Bradford 
football fire claims 
deferred till next year 

. By Ian Smith, Northern Correspondent 

Reaves of foe 56 support- fae hazard he saw at Valley the existence of snch a hazard. 
5 who died ffiflam s most Parade football ground, it was Three laymen had agreed in 



ers who died in Britain’s most 
catastrophic football stadium 
disaster wiD not learn until 
next year whether they can 
rfrft" millions of pounds in 


• • *■ » ,N v damages for their losses. 

\ "‘r-.J** . * altera 14-dav hearing a 


After a l 4-day hearing at tbe 
High Gtart in Leeds to hear 
feed ptsf™™*” supporting 


ford City Football Club, the 
now defunct West Yorkshire 
County Council and the 
Health ami Safety executive, 
Mr Justice -Canttey said he 
needed time to consider his ju- 
dgement 

He told bani s t e rs be faoped 
people would understand the 
necessity io examine details of 
the case very carefully and the 
tone needed to read case 
papers. He would deliver his 
judgement in the High Court 
m London as soon as possible 
in the new year. 

Earlier the claim for dam- 
ages against the Government’s 
Heahh and Safety Executive 
was dropped after it was 
accepted that the safety exec- 
utive had fulfilled its statutory 
obligations - although it had 
done nothing more. 

Probably because of inad- 
equate training, the HSFs 
principal inspector respon- 
sible for entertainment com- 
plex safety conditions, did not 
alert the local authority of the 


Three laymen bad agreed in 

cann ed. evidence that the Valley Pa- 

He had complied with his rade stadium was a potential 
““ties, merely by forwarding fire trap, and the fire brigade 
to West Yorkshire County who were controlled by the 
p>uncfl a copy of the warning county council, had received a 
tetter he had sent to the letter informing them of the 
football dub. danger, Mr Ogden said. . 

Safety executive inspectors ‘‘Therefore one says, what 
responsible for assessing fire did they do? A copy of the 
nsks should receive proper letter was sent to the Deputy 
training as a matter of ur- Senior Fire Prevention Offi- 
geocy, Mr Michael Ogden, cer. 

QC, said. He represents Police Arguing that the county 
Sergeant David Britton and council were negligent in their 
Mrs Susan Fletcher who lost role as local fire authority, Mr 
her husband, son, brother-in- O gde n <a«rf an y compe tent fin* 
law and bis father in the fire prevention officer would have 
on May ! 1 last yean . assessed tbe situation a n d 

. His condemnatory attack said: “Heavens, here is an 
switched to the now-defunct appalling situation” a nd im- 
West Yorkshire County Conn- mediately hibw whatever ac- 
al - tion necessary. 

■’ He said it had an elected fire The letter written by the 

c o mmi t tee and safety team county council to Bradford 
selected by fire officers which City Football Chub was woe- 
together were responsible for fully inadequate, be said, be- 
examining various aspects of cause it failed to give a 
safety. Yet during the past 14 warning of the risk in dear, 
days not one ward of evidence strong language and did not 
had been presented that the ask the chib to stop using the 
fire committee actually did stand, 
anything to exercise their du- “Had they done so the 
funder the Sports Grounds overwhelming probability is 

ACt- fliOt tkir fnmWo /lirviHAr 


' -Tv',: : ' -JT- 


v#j(^ ■■■■ • >> .... 



& i?, 

.: V 



200 arts groups get cash ultimatum 


There was no policy which would never have occurred, 
precluded their taking action Hie whole point of statutory 
over known fire futzards, but powers is to stop people being 
there existed the practice of ItiOed or injureaand sadly that 
merely informing occupiers of did not ha ppen in fhk case.” 


strong language and did not 
ask the chib to stop using the 
stand. 

“Had they done so the 
overwhelming probability is 
that this terrible disaster 
would never have occurred. 
The whole point of statutory 
powers is to stop people befog 


By Gavin Bell 
Arts Correspondent 

The Arts Council has issued 
an oltiinatmn to more than 200 
arts organizations to cut their 
losses, in view of what it 
regards as the persistent foB- 
ore of government f Boding to 
keep pace with inflation. 

Before considering future 
support for theatres, operas, 
orchestras and other clients, 
the comtilwiQ require them to 
prepare a balanced bndget, 


and to prove that they can 
remain solvent, on the basis of 
their current grants. 

They octane the four na- 
tional institutions: the Royal 
Opera House, the National 
Theatre, the Royal Shake- 
speare Company and English 
National Opera. 

Mr Lake Rtttner, secretary- 
general of the council, said 
yesterday the decision had 
been prompted by concern at 
the number of companies fac- 
ing increasing deficits. 


It would force some to 
curtail their activities, and 
could lead others in severe 
financial difficulties to dose 
down, he said. 

About 26 of tbe 220 
organizations which receive 
Arts Council funds had defi- 
cits of more than £50,000 at 
the end of the last fiwanrifll 
year. Of those, 14 were in debt 
to the time of more than 
£ 100 , 000 . 

Prominent among them is 
the Leicester Haymarket The- 


atre, which is straggling to 
reduce an accumulated deficit 
of almost £300,000. 

Mr Bittner said the coancD 
was working with its cheats to 
raise income from other 
sources, particularly focal 
authorities. 

The council is to receive 
£13&4 minion from the Gov- 
ernment for 1987-88. It had 
estimated its needs at £164 
million. It would require a 
minimum of £140 million to 
maintain the status quo. 


RAF will 
fight off 


recruiting 

By Harvey Elliott 
Air Correspondent 

A shortage of civilian pilots 
is threatening the RAF. 

British Airways will be 
advertising for more than 100 
qualified pilots next autumn. 
Other airlines are expected to 
offer high salaries to tempt 
military pilots to join them. 

Now the RAF is launching a 
counter-attack with a cam- 
paign designed to convince 
officers they should stay in the 
service. It also wants to spend 
more money on married quar- 
ters - up to 70 per cent of 
which are regarded as sub- 
standard. But the estimated 
£400 million needed is un- 
likely to be made available by 
the Treasury. 

Tbe problems faced by civil 
airlines arises largely from 
“tbe lost decade” during 
which no new pilots were 
trained because it was felt that 
there were too many already 
flying. 

Recent studies by the Air 
Transport Industry Training 
Association have given a 
warning of the gap in the 
numbers and the obvious 
place to look is the RAF. 

In the service there is a 
“bulge” of officers either 
reaching the age of 38 or 
having completed eight or 16 
years service when they have 
to decide to remain in the 
RAF or leave to take up a 
career in civil aviation. 


Commercial court 
may face curbs 


Restrictions on access by 
litigants to the commercial 
court through greatly in- 
creased fees and a bar on any 
case involving less than 
£50,000 arc called for by the 
Laid Chancellor’s Depart- 
ment as ways to tackle delays, 
in a report published today 
(Our Legal Affairs Correspon- 
dent writes). The report is 
part of a full-scale review of 
the civil courts by Lord 
Hailsham of St Marytebone. 

It also calls for more High 
Court judges to be appointed 
to the court and for targets 
within which cases must come 
lotriaL 

It says the “substantial in- 
crease in the court’s workload 
and its effect on waiting 
times” has led to complaints 
of serious delay in hearing of 
cases. ■’ 

The average waiting time 
for trial has grown from eight 
months in 1980 to 27 months 
this year, it says, and the court 
is fast increasing in popularity. 

Recommending a monetary 
limit of £50,000, tbe report 
says claims on the court 
varied from £345 to £9 million 
and such a limit would im- 
mediately remove from the 
court’s jurisdiction a 
“significant number of cases”. 

It recommends the cost of 
issuinga writ, or transferring a 
case into tbe court, should nse 
from £60 to £500; and fees for 
interim applications could be 
increased from £10 to £ 100 . 


A rise in fees would also 
discourage “small unmerit- 
orious actions” and mean that 
users of the court were “pay- 
ing for the privilege of using 
it”. But if these proposals to 
restrict access are unaccept- 
able, the report says litigants 
should instead have to apply 
for leave to transfer a ram to 
the court, although this coukl 
badly effect waiting lists. 

The report also proposes an 
increase in the court's judicial 
strength from five to six 
judges. 

Other proposals are for 
temporary judges to be ap- 
pointed from among commer- 
cial QGs to help cut the 
backlog an automatic time- 
table of six months -within 
which pleadings should be 
exchanged and evidence dis- 
closed; monitoring by the 
court of the progress of cases 
to ensure lawyers stick to the 
timetable and allocation of 
complex cases to one judge. 

Research carried out fin the 
Lord Chancellor by the 
management consultants. 
Coopers and Lybrand, also 
published today discloses that 
more than 2 , 00 ft writs have 
been issued so far this year 
compared with 913 for the 
whole of 1979. 

Although most cases in the 
court are short, it showed 
than are exceptional cases. 
Reports from Lord Chancellor’s 
Department (Room 61 1, Trevel- 
yan House, London SWIP 
2BY). 


You Have Only 5 Days 
T o Get Your Application In 
For British Gas Shares. 

You’ll Find Prospectuses And Application Forms In Banks. 
Post Offices, Gas Showrooms And The Press. 


MPs and lawyers fight 
changes in jury trials 

Lawyers, civil libertarians ily; and to give magistrates 
and MPs united yesterday to power to deal with breaches of 
try to force the Government to some crown court orders, such 


change plans to abolish the 
defence right to challenge 
jurors (Our Legal- Affoirs 
Correspondent writes). 


as probation orders. 

The Law Society, Criminal 
Bar Association ami civil lib^ 
ertarians are all opposed to 


At a meeting at the House of government proposals to abd- 
Commons, timed to coincide ids a defendant’s right to 
with the second reading of tbe challenge jurors. There is also 
Crimiiol Justice B21, the Law concern about plans to re- 
Soriety outlined a package of move trial by jury for some 
alternative measures which offences, 
could make more effective use • A judge's ruling that a 

of crown court time without confession may be admissible 
undermining jury triaL even if police breach the codes 

Mr Andrew Lockley. sec- of practice under the new 
retary of the society’s litiga- Police and Criminal Evidence 


tion committee, told a 
meeting of the all-party civil 
liberties group of MPs that it 


Act 1984 was criticized as 
“vwy worrying” by the Na- 
tional Council for Civil lib- 


L Use first 


was time “to stop nibbling at erties yesterday. 


the right to jury trial”. 

Instead the society is urging 
the Government to include 
measures in the Criminal 


Mr Justice Stuart-Sntith 
earlier this week ruled al 
confession admissible in a 
murder trial al Exeter Crown i 


Justice Bill to stop magistrates Court although the defendant 
sending offenders to the crown was denied access to a 


court for sentence uimecessar- . solicitor. 


class post and allow at least 2 days for delivery 

Alternatively hand in your application at any UK branch of NatWest, Bank 
of Scotland or Ulster Bank before close of business next Tuesday December 2nd 


Theft-case 

American 


An American accused of 
stealing between £1.60 million 
and £330 million, from his 
employer, Kuwait Airways, 
was ordered to be extradited 
to the United- States at- a 
hearing at Bow Street 
Magistrates' Court in London 
yesterday. 

Robert Sensi, aged 35, ap- 
peared on 18 speriman 
charges alleging theft of vari- 
ous amounts of cash, totalling 
£266,000 between 1980 and 
August this year. 

Through his solicitor, Mr 
Robert Roscoe, Mr Sensi 
agreed not to challenge any of 
the evidence and agreed that 
the extradition papers were in 
order. 

The court was told that Mr 
Sensi was arrested in London 
in August by British police ; 
after a request for extradition : 
by the US government - i 


’Dealers 



indeath’ Hurry if you want to apply for a share of the shares. 

sentenced ISSUED BY N M ROTHSCHILD & SONS LIMITED ON BEHALF OF H M GOVERNMENT. information 

Two shopkeepers were yes- 

UP AGA INST TIME by Jeanne Willis and Trevor Melv in 

barter-fuel for sniffin g to two / W0TS A *=0 ^ S’ — 

boys- . ^ / MESSA&e POWN \ J ^ 

Mr Chris Worthington, for ( FLOAT " \ 

the orosecution, told Brent- FT &1/TT 72? 5SA"* ' \ ° ^ / P * 


Itfos prosecution, told Brent- 
ford magistrates in Middlesex 
that Abdul Karim e, aged 52. 
and his wife, Sansha, aged 51, 
had sold the teenagers be- 
tween 70 and 80 cans from 
their shop in St John’s Road, 
Isteworth. Middlesex. They 
denied the charge. 

Mr Jack Hyde, the 'map 
istrate, said their actions were' 
“completely callous” and; 
could have killed the bays, i 
I He gave them each a three- 
month prison» sentence, sus- 
pended for two years, and 
fined them £1*500 each.- 


rr ourr to sea— 


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. £/£»/ y 


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istic’ 


mechanical en- 
tire £8,008 he 
Portfolio Gold 
Uerday to good 

te my gramo- 
j my donation 
all appeal and 
lext year,” Mr 
, of Allestree, 

ed 51, who has 
> Gold since it 
‘imes, said that 
lieve his luck. 

: fantastic. It is 
ice.” 

d cards can be 
□ding a stam- 
envefope to: 
d. 


;er of 

Ives 

eer 

i Young 

xi in brewing 
tinkers and, in 
ven kill them, 
for Real Ale 

ie campaign's 
at's Brewing, 
oiz, a former 
•d Beer Guide. 
: e who have 
ler breathing 
s disorders, 
ao are allergic 
.can suffer ill 
king beers in 
have been 
iuce a foamy 
irity, or to 


l States, the 
ire than 40 
heart attacks 
•cts used co- 
in beer to 
ting head. 


man couple 
: lest July for 
eking red lic- 
ences. 

Lord Lane, 
:e, will pre- 
nations by 
nja Schulze, 
Dr leave to 
c sentences 
Justice Mi- 
the Central 




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San i sn<n i 









T he AIDS virus can be spread 
during sexual intercourse. So if 


I during sexual intercourse. So if 
you are faithful to your partner. 
And you sue absolutely certain that 
he or she is faithful to .you, then 
you needn’t read on. 

Otherwise learn the dangers. 

At the moment the infection is 


'' ( 


An infected man has the virus in his 
semen. An infected woman has it in her 

V 

vaginal fluid. 

The real danger is that not every- 
one who is infected knows it. They 
don’t even look ill. 

So the more , sexual partners you 
have, the greater the risk of infectidn. : 

Protect yourself. And always use a 
condom. It’s safer. . 

People who inject drugs face the 
added danger of infectidn if they share 
needles or equipment. 

So don’t inject. But if you do, never 
share. 

For more information, phone the 
confidential Healthline. 


Si"*"- 


THE vitESLTBOME 




Or write for more information to 
Dept A, PO Box 100, Milton Keynes, 
MK11TX. . 


ISSUED BY THE DEPARTMENT Of HEALTH ANDSOCIALSECl! 





T 








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averts qtwl 

JWroianu i 
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?w-style 
ting in 
abuse 


He said there woe “leading 
questions, hypothetical ques- 
tions and a lot of answers were 
left in the air” that be 
could not agree with the 
conclusions drawn that there 
had been child abases 

The team now tries to 
“ensure that the fthilri hn$ an 
opportunity to show sponta- 
neously, or say spontaneously, 
what his experiences have 
.been," 

In tire past, because Of the 
“tremendous resistance” that 
has to be overcome to help 
children speak about their 
experience the team had relied 
on more hypothetical and 
leading questioning to help 
childrea -speak. Dr Bentovim 
sajkL 

But it was dear both from 
the courts and from corar 
ments by other psychiatrists 
that "it is essential that it is 
seen that children are given a 
very great deal of opportunity 
to be able to speak of their 
experiences" 


Shake-up 
sought in 
law advice 
services 

A network of advice centres, 
more thorough training for 
lawyers and standard fees are 
urgently needed to help people 


cope with the growing number 
of legal problems, the Gov- 
ernment’s consumer watch- 
dog said yesterday. 

“People's needs for advice 
on highly complex legal mat- 
ters appear to be ever-increas- 
ing and there is a vast area of 
unmet need,” Mr Michael 
Montague, chairman of the 
National Consumer Council, 
said. 

A national network of ad- 
vice centres was needed, be 
said. 

He also called for a further 
relaxation of restrictions on 
solicitors advertising services. 

He added there was a need 
for wider training as few 
solicitors had expertise of 
problems most likely to affect 
the less well-off — problems 
with debt, wd&re rights, land- 
lord and tenant disputes, im- 
migration and unemp- 
loyment. 


Local authority finance: 2 Rrain Uni t appeal 

'Tw J An appeal has been laun- old. The Development Tins 

I lOll DIG 9 . 1169(1 for ? ed - 1 P ** upa special for the Young Disabled plan 

-*■ 4 Wllv im fvl hospital turn offering new to build the new unit, provid 

a a . hope to victims of severe mg 45 beds, at the Roya 

rPT ni*TH AT 1 *QtAC! ^ rain injuries (Our Science Hospital and Home fo 

lVlUlUI 111 1 i||C5 Coraxmdentwntes). Incurables in Putney. 


In spite of widespread agreement that die domest ic 
rating sytem is unfair, the Government’s plans for 
reform are being hotly contested. Robin Oakley, 
Political Editor, ; looks at some of the reasons. 


The Government's plans 
for drastic rates reforms, being 
tested in Scotland first, pro- 
vide for rates to be phased out 
over a period and replaced by 
a “community charge" (the 
chosen euphemism for a poO 
tax) payable by all adults over 
18. 

This requires a register of all 
those liable to pay; separate 
from the electoral register to 
avoid the charge of deterring 
people from registering to vote 
and including those not eli- 
gible to do so. 

There win also be a uniform 
business rate for ram-domes- 
tic ratepayers, determined and 
collected by central govern- 
ment with the proceeds shared 
out among councils according 
to their number of residents. A 
simplified centra] grants sys- 
tem will offer councils greater 
stability and allow for vari- 
ations in need. 

With the average rate biB in 
1984-85 of £322 that would 
require a community charge 
when fully operative of only 
£1 55. a considerable benefit to 
those suffering under the 
present system. 

But change is always fought, 
especially in local govern- 
ment. And it is not just the 
Government’s opponents who 
are finding soags in the reform 
plans. The community charge 
is being criticized as expensive 
to collect and impractical. 

Problems which surfaced at 
a seminar conducted by the 
Chartered Institute of Public 
Finance and Accountancy in- 
cluded: what to do about those 
with two homes, what is the 
legal definition of a resident, 
bow to ensure the accuracy of 
a register when only 60-80 per 
cent in inner dries return their 
voter registration forms, with 
no potential cost involved? 
How do yon cope with urban 
areas where 25 per cent of 
those livir^ there are likely to 
move in a year? ' 

Do you introduce registra- 
tion for the use of council , 
services to catch the cheats? ■ 
How do you enforce payment i 
when a grown-up son or j 
daughter daims to have ; 
moved out of the parental ] 
home? How much rebate will : 
there be for the unemployed 


or for pensioners? Exempting 
the pensioners and the poor 
. could double the cost of the 
charge levied on the rest of the 
country's 40 million adults. 

Councils cannot include ; 
community charge requests in i 
rent demands, as they do with 
rate demands, because they 
will vary according to tire size 
of household. Certainly eva- 
sion would be a problem. 

There has been considerable 
alarm in small business circles 
at the likely effects of the 
Unified Business Rate. The 
UBR, they say r would have a 
redistributive effect, shifting 
the burden from hi^-rated 
authorities and fevouring the 
inner cities over fire suburbs 
and the shires. 

A study by the chartered 
accountants. Coopers and 
Lybrand, calculated that it 
would mean hefty increases in 
what businesses pay in 
London, most of the South- 
east, South-west and the Mid- 
lands. • 

The first muttering? are 
already reaching Tory whips 
thala number of Conservative 
MPs are deeply unhappy 
about the planned reforms 
and that they would see ft as 
inconsistent to vote for them 
in a Scottish Bill when they 
may be forced to refuse to 
support their implementation 
in England and Wales. They 
will not be enough to lose the 
Government its Bill, but there 
is clearly trouble ahead. 

ft was a fonner minister, Mr 
Timothy Raison, no habitual 
rebel, who gave a warning b 
tire Queen's Speech debate 
with the authentic voice of the 
average Tory constituency 
that the community charge 
was inequitable, its collection 
would be a nightmare and that 
while the poorest and the rich 
might gain the income 

earners would almost all lose. 

That is not a message which 
Tory voters like to bear. And 
although the Prime Minister’s 
determination lies behind the 
refoim attempts there is tough 
going ahead. It was, after all, 
the last attempt to introduce a. 
poll tax in J 381 that fed to the 
Peasants Revolt 

Concfnded 



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and SUN 30 that 9 . 0 - 5 . 30 pm 


An appeal has been bun- 
ched to set up a special 
hospital unit offering new 
hope to victims of severe 
bam injuries (Our Science 
Correspondent writes). 

The campaign to raise 
£1.94 millioa for the unit, to 
be built in London, is bring 
supported by the Prince of 
Wfllcs. 

Most of tire victims of what 
doctors described as a “silent 
epidemic” are under 25 years 


old. The Development Trust 
for the Young Disabled plans 
to build the new unit, provid- 
ing 45 beds, at the Royal 
Hospital and Home for 
Incurables in Putney. 

Dr John Wedgwood, 
consultant for the project, 
said: “With advances in care 
and treatment we hope to give 
some patients the ability to 
work and to resume life with a 
degree of dignity." 



Woman 
limb fitter 
loses equal 


Drug haul 
totals 
£104m in 


pay battle a year 


James Cornwall comes face to face with a model ponk - part , 
of the entry from Merrywood Boys' School, Knowle, Bristol, I 
in Cadbury's National Exhibition of Children's Art at the I 
Royal Festival Hall. The exhibition's young painter of the 
year is Justin Mortimer, aged 15, from Reading, Berkshire 
(Photograph: Peter Trievaor). 


An artificial limb finer from 
Glasgow bad her claim for 
equal pay with a nude col- 
league rejected by the House 
of Lords yesterday. 

The law lords unanimously 
agreed that the Greater Glas- 
gow Health Board had “good 
and objectively justified" 
grounds for paying Mrs Eliza- 
beth Rainey £2,790 a year less 
than the £10,085 earned by Mr 
Alan Crumlin at the Belvidere 
HospitaJL 

Dismissing the test case 
appeal Lord Keith of Kinkel 
agreed with the findings of a 
Scottish industrial trib unal 
and the Court of Session. 

“The- feet that one is a 
woman and the other a man is 
an accident," Lord Keith said. 
The difference arose because 
Mr Crumlin had been re- 
cruited from the private sector 
when the National Health 
Service took over the limb 
service in 1980. 

Without offering him and 
others from the private sector 
wages no less favourable than 
they were already enjoying the 
NHS could never have estab- 
lished the service in reason- ; 
able time. Lord Keith said. 

When Mrs Rainey joined . 
the service later that year she 
was, in his opinion “for 
sound, objectively justified 
administrative reasons’* paid 
the normal NHS rates. 

It would have been highly 
irregular if limb fitters, alone 
were lo have a different pay 
scale than the rest of the NHS, 
Lord Keith said. 

“It was not a question of 
Mrs Rainey being paid less 
than the norm but of Mr 
Criimlin being paid more." 



was invented on a train. 


John Dankworth 
composes musk on fr 


Peter Barkworfh 
reads scripts on a train. 


This advertisement 
was conceived on a train. 


The only thing 
ever created in cars is a jam. 


Illegal drugs worth more 
than £100 million were seized 
by customs and excise in the 
year up to March 31. 

There were 4, 1 82 seizures of 
drugs worth an estimated £104 
million, compared with 3,539 
seizures worth £97 million the 
previous year, according to 
the annual report of the 
Customs and Excise Board. 

The number of people ar- 
rested for drugs offences in- 
creased by 127 to 1,801. and 
807 people were sentenced to 
terms of imprisonment vary- 
ing from one day to 16 years. 

A record total of 74 kilos of 
cocaine was seized compared 
with 45 kilos the previous 
year. The report points out 
that more cocaine is reaching 
Britain via the Continent, ana 
an increasing number of sei- 
zures was made from pas- 
sengers arriving on European 
flights or at Channel ports. 

Heroin seizures were down 
by one kilo to 316 kilos, but 
cannabis seizures increased 
from 20,562 kilos to 21,676 
kilos. 

Enforcement of endangered 
species legislation led to the 
seizure of 264 live birds and 
animals, 26 fertile birds of 
prey eggs and 4,500 articles 
derived from endangered 
species. 

More than 53,100 obscene 
and indecent articles were 
seized, compared with 43,400 
the previous year. 

There were 25 prosecutions 
for export offences involving 
arms and strategic goods. Jail 
sentences totalling 13 years 
and 10 months and fines of 
£330,572 were imposed on 13 
people. 


Id— 

leer’s 

istic’ 


mechanical en- 
tire £8.000 he 
Portfolio Gold 
terday to good 

e ray gramo- 
my donation 
ill appeal and 
ext year," Mr 
of Ailestree, 

id 51, who has 
> Gold since it 

totes, said that 
feve his luck, 
fantastic. It is 
ce." 

1 cards can be ' 
uting a sfam- 
•nvelope to: 

L. 


Wood^ 

er of 

ives 

eer 

Young 

d in brewing, 
inkers and, in 
ven (till them, 
for Real Ale 

»y- 

le campaign's 
aVs Brewing, 
ot z. a former 
<d Beer Guide,' 
e who have 
ter breathing 
s disorders, 
to are allergic ! 
, can suffer ill 
king beers in 
have been 
iuce a foamy 
irity, or to 

a 

I States; the- 
>re than 40 
heart attacks 
■ere used co- 
in beer to 
ling head. 


man couple 
; last July for 
eking reduc- 
ences. 

Lord Lane, 
will pre- 
ications by 
oja Schulze, 
x leave to 
e sentences 
Justice Mi- 
the Centra! 




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Iranian The ten men at the heartofRga ^sam^^^_ pharirvn 


OVERSEAS NEWS 


I 

TOT? TTMPS FRIDAY N OVEMBER 28 1986 . 


WORLD SUMMARY 


regime 

‘shaken 


by links’ 


By Hothir TriiMiiiriaD 


Mr Abotliassaa Bani-Sadr, 
.Iran's first President a fter the 
Islamic revolution of February 

1979, said yesterday that the 

di w I l WH i pg of Iran's arms 
purchases from the UsW 
States and Israel had shaken 

the regim e of Ayatollah Kho- 

meini to its foundations. 


position of Hqjatojedan AB- 
Akhar Hashemi Rafsanjam, 

the parlfcamentary Speaker, as 
tbe imi« contender for power 
after Ayatollah Khomeini. 

Speaking to Hie rone from 
Ids of exOe in Paris. Mr 
ftani -Sadr said the sodden 
arrest in Tehran on charges of 
immo rality of Mr ManEchehr 
Nikronz, the parliamentary 
Deputy for the Jewish commu- 
nity, showed that, the regime 
did not know how to react to 
the revelations that it had been 
^Kng mth Israel, whose 
pbffcpratinn it had c o ns i st en tly 
promised its supporters. 
“Khomeini is desperate to 
nm infiii an anti-Israeli pos- 
ture.” „ 

Mr Bani-Sndr said the first 
secret contacts with Israel 

were made in 1980 by a fadwa 
of the ruKiig clergy bnt that he, 

as chairman of the Supreme 
Revolutionary Council, had 
stopped them. 

“Bat the contacts were re- 
sumed after they carried ont 
their coup against me. Ever 
since, a vast flood of weaponry 
has been on its way from Israel 

to Iran." 

Mr Bani-Sadr bad no 
doubts about who had sabo- 
taged the arms deals and the 
release of American hostages 
in Lebanon. “It was an ante- 
pofeanj ani faction within the 
Foreign Ministry that was in 
charge of Islamic Jihad, the 
kidnap nane,"* he said. 

• ROME: No sooner had the 
Italians managed to smooth 
over their alleged involvement 
in the affair of supplying arms 
foe inn than the Iranians 
themselves delivered two 
strongly-worded protests 
against a sketch said to have 
been u sacrilegioiis r ’ on Italy s 
state television and withdrew 
then ambassador (Peter Nich- 
ols writes). „ 

At the same time The. 
Iranian authorities dosed the 
ffifam Cultural Institute in 
Tehran. 

According to the embassy 
here the decision to withdraw 
the ambassador was taken 
because the parody in the 
television programme of 
Ayatollah Khomeini was 
g« Irani as “a grave insnlt.” • 

As the sketch went out on 
the Italian state network the 

embassy said it Wt the Itatian 





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New face Return to 
on Bench Uganda 

Nm'sis (Renter) — 



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jonn rvuDwunf '-"-ft*' 

Contras say cash from 
Iran arms deals could 
have paid for air drops 

From Michael Bin yon, Washington 



Los Angeles — Mr 
George Denbw^ 
Governor of CaEfenua/bas 
named a conservative t#‘ 

replace Chief Justice Bose 
Bsr4fl» most liberal mem- 
ber of the state’s High 

Court, who is to step down 
on January 1 (Ivor- Dons 
writes). . ' . . 

Justice Malcolm Incas, 
aged 59, a - toner law 
partner of the Govenmr, 
has promised to try ^ to 
“healaome of the wounds 
inflicted on the court dur- 
ing this year’s bitter eteo- 


Nairobi (Reuter) -Ug- 
anda and Bntam have 
agreed in prisdlde that 
British police Instructors 
wiU return to Uganda to 
train fee police force far the 
first time since the tenner 
President Milton Obefe 

officials at the Brawn i 
Conmnsshm in -Kan 
said yesterday. 

The countries have net 
vet agreed details, but the 

■ ■ wwtlwhMv KnCMl 



tion campamns, which 

I in Cafifornian vot- 


resrdted ux wumvh™- 
ere ousting Judge Bird and 
two of her as s ocia tes , Jus- 
tices Gsz Reynoso and 
Joseph 


In' Kampala, : axe more 
KinOy to train, instructors’ 
than toe nrak and file. 

- The last members of a 
Briikh military training 
team left Uganda last 
weekend with the expiry of 
' & six-month agreement. 


op the matter. Signor 
Giuseppe Baldocd, the Italian 
ambassador in Iran, was sum- 
moned for the second time on 
Wednesday evening to the 
Ministry of Foreign Amirs 
and was somewhat taken 
to learn that the sketch 
was seen to have possibly 
“grave consequences on rela- 
tions between the two 

countries.” ... 

The parody of Iran s leader 
amounted to a “hostile 
measure” and threats were 
ottered that Iran would “mak e 
the It alians repeat their 
disgusting behaviour” 


Contra leaders, who at first 
denied all knowledge of Uie 
funds funnelled from the Iran 
arms sales, are now saying mat 
the secret operation that flew 
weapons to their forces in 
Nicaragua could have been 
financed by the Iran ship- 
ments. 

Mr Adolfo Calero, a senior 
Contra leader based in Miami, 
said that the Contras received 
“services”, including the air 
resupply operation, from sev- 
eral unnamed donors. But he 
never knew how much these 
cost, or who organized and 
paid for them. 

It is being suggested, how- 
ever, that each clandestine 
flight over Nicaragua cost at 
least $30,000 (£21,000) and 
some 80 flights were made in 
the past year. Between Feb- 
ruary and October 5, when a 
cargo plane was shot down, 
the resupply operation, run 
from a Salvadorean military 
air base, cost well over $- 
million, sources say. But the 
Contras contend that their 
private backers in the US were 
unable to raise more than 
$500,000 from normal appeals 
during that period. 

New evidence has also 
emerged suggesting that Ma- 
jor-General Richard Secord, a 
retired Air Force officer who 
onoe served in Iran and was a 
senior Pentagon official for 
the Middle East, played a key 
role in the resupply pro- 
gramme. He had dose links to 
Lieutenant-Colonel Oliver 
North, the dismissed military 
adviser in the National Sec- 
urity Council responsible for 
the operation. 

General Secord has been 
named as the buyer of five 
C 123 cargo planes used in 
supply runs from the US 
■ through El Salvador, Hon- 
duras and Costa Rica into 
Nicaragua. One of these was 
shot down on October 5, and 


the sole American survivor, ment banking^^fron ran 
Mr Eugene Hasenfus, gave by. several lorn i- . ...»i Can- 
many details of the operation. 

Initially the Contra leaders 


Oy several iuiiufc-1 _ 
ficials, induding General Seo- 
leodore 


denied all knowledge of the 
ik funds. Mr 


secret Swiss bank 

Calero, who oversees procure- 
ment of military supplies, said 
tha t he was not aware of any 
connection with Iran and 
denied flatly that he had 
drawn any funds from Swit- 
zerland. 

“These revelations were uxk 
loaded on us all of a sudden,” 
he said. “We have been like 
innocent bystanders at a car 
accident." 

The resupply network was 
told that its money came from 
“foreign sources”, but it now 


The state-controlled S oviet 
media yesterday reacted with 

1 * *— rfaloA dlft tholtpuinsei 


Adminis tration s severe politi- 
cal difficulties over the Iran 
affair (Christopher Walker 
mites from Moscowj.Tass 
daimed last night the incident 
had laid bare “the adven- 
turism, duplicity and treach- 
ery of US foreign policy before 
the whole world”. 


emerges that the network in- 
volved former Central Intdlir 
gence Agency staff, induding 
some with ties to the office of 
Vice-President Bush. 

Mr Bush has said nothing 
on the Iran affair and has 
resolutely avoided answering 
all reporters’ shouted ques- 
tions at public functions. He 
was cleared, by Mr Edwin 
Meese, the Attorney-General, 
of any knowledge of the 
Contra connection but many 
questions remain on his links 
with the Contras. 

Intelligence sources say that 
the profits from the Iran arms 
sale were deposited in the 
account of Credit Fedudaire 
Services, a Geneva invest- 


ord, Mr Theodore Shackley 
and Mr Thomas Clines. 

Telephone records from El 
Salvador show that several 
calls were placed to General 
Seconfs home and business 
place in North Virginia last 
summer from a “safe house 
tied to the resupply operation. 

He has acknowledged hav- 
ing sold one small aircraft last 
year, but has denied having 
commanded the Contra air 
force. He has also suggested 
that he had an advisory role in 
the Iran arms shipments, but 
has refused to say how he was 
involved. 

Federal investigators are 
also trying to discover 
whether the middle men in- 
volved in the flights and 
resupply drops syphoned off 
money by themselves. The 
high cost of the flights over 
Nicaragua was said to be a 
result of the “risk feet or”. 

The investigators will sub- 
poena documents, records and 
even any telephone intercepts 
as they gather evidence. 

Monitored telephone con- 
versations played a big part m 
the original discovery of the 
Contra connection. A secret 
intelligence intercept quoted 
Iranians and perhaps others 
discussing the price of weap- 
ons in amounts that appeared 
to be far greater than their 
actual value, prompting the 
search for the profits and the 
reason they woe diverted. 

Sources say that while the 
resupply operation cost mil- 
lions of dollars with 
monthly costs running, about 
about $100,000 for aircraft, 
fuel and salaries - it is 
unlikely that the Contras re- 
ceived as much as $10 million, 
the lowest figure cited by Mr 
Meese as bavin gbeen diverted 
to the Contra effort. 


Ni caragua connection 

Long-standing ties 

with Israel, PLO 

— • j — * 


jOSqUbraum. • - 

Harare holds chief 

mm . . ** ■» rtnl 


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1-. }»»“<! M 

* jm* 


,v* mi 


-jV Hw* 

W- i 


.KWS 

..■ra- 4*5? 
-to 


Harare— President Cuman Banana yertoaay ororome 
detention of Mr Dmniso Dabengwa, aged^ ^ “ 

formidable opposition ft ???*,!? 

tension in political unity tfascussiOHS which were dose to be- 
ing finafized (Jan Raath writes). 





The millions of dollars of 
profit from US-Iranian arms 
sales that were channelled to 

the Contra guerrillas in central 

America form only the latest 
chapter in a long history of 
military involvement in Nica- 
ragua by the Israelis and the 
Palestinians. 

The Israeli authorities and 
the Palestinian Liberation Or- 
ganization in Lebanon have 
helped to arm or train pro- 
and anti-government forces 
during the past seven years, 
although Nicaragua’s first 
contact with the Middle East 
conflict was as long ago ^ 
1940. 

The Somoza femily, which 
had then been in power for 
only seven years, is believed to 
have sent weapons to Jewish 
guerrillas in ftlestine in the 
early years of the Second 
World War, shipping them to 
the Middle East aboard a ves- 
sel flying the Nicaraguan flag. . 

Israel's first military sup- 
port for the Somoza femiljrs 
successors — the Contras of 
Nicaragua, who have been 
funded by the Americans — 
started in T983 when hun- 
dreds of second-hand guns 
were sent to the guerrillas to 
use against Sandinista Gov- 
ernment troops. 

The shipment from Israel 
included 2,000 Kala shn i k ov 
AK 47 automatic rifles and 
hundreds of .RPG 7 anti-tank 
rockets which the Israelis had 
captured from the PLO during 
their invasion of Lebanon in 
1981 The PLO supported the 


S£E Festive 


S andinist a guerrillas before 
and after they toppled [toe So- 
moza dictatorship m 1979. 

Palestinian guerrillas helped 
to train the Sand inis ta Na- 
tional Liberation Front before 
the civil war and several. 
Nicaraguans loyal to the revo- 
lutionary government visited 
the PLO in Beirut before the 
Israeli invasion. The Sandi- 
nistas are always invited to 
Palestinian international con- 
gresses and the Iranians have 

established warm relations 
with the Ortega Government 
Arab leaders have for 
months known of intelligence 
reports that the Iranians have 
sent a small and symbolic 
shipment of American rite to 
Ortega's army, thus enabling 
anti- American troops to fight 
with US weapons against pro- 
American guerrillas armed 
with PLO guns. 

• JERUSLAEM: Arms deal- 
ers in Israel exploited the feet 
that American equipment was 
being channelled through Is- 
rael to Iran to make secret 
similar sales of thar own, 
according to informed sources 
here (Ian Murray writes). 

The Israeli Government, 
aware of the deals sanctioned 
by Washington, turned a blind 
eye to the private deals in the 
hope that they would help to 
improve relations with Iran 
and lead to the release of 
Israeli soldiers believed to be 
held by the Syrian-backed 
Amal militia or the Iranian- 
backed Hezbollah (Party of 
God). 


me ruing f / ,*• ”v. — : . , 

Joshua Nkontt, which has the loyalty at the 
speaking minority in mstan Zmhafowe^tero bees 
toward an agreement that promises to aid rivalries and to 
bring about a de facto one-party state m g mb^ we. 

Mr Dabengwa a-shadowy but revered ^8®* **««“**“ 
foe Zaps military effort in tire Bberatnm war, n*s oeen m 
detention since early 1982 * 


reprieve 

• Washington * — CSsag 
God, personal beliefs an# 
foe spirit of Thanksgiving 
Day, the outgoing Gov- 
ernor of New Mexico, Mr 

Tony Anaya, yesterdgvre- 
prieved five men on Death 
Bow (Christopher Thomas 
. writes). ' 

It was the first mass 
reprieve in the US '8®®. 
1970. Mr Anaya, a Demo- 
crat, was defeated m the- 
November .election fey Rfe 
Garvey Carnithers, who 
had campaigned heavily on 

foe law and order issue and 

is furious at the act m 
clemency. He interim to 
chgaHenge its legality. 


Taxing 

McEnroe 


Pretoria rc 
amp raid r 






«.« • 0 i 


. t 




**.*(■ m 

am 


•Alt 


New York -The United 

Stales Internal Revenue 
Service wants John Mc- 
Enroe, the tennis star, to 
pay more than $900,0*0 
£B«§§§) in badt taxes, 
but McEnroe’s lawyer says 
foe IRS has incorrect 
inform at ion (AP reports). 

The IRS contends that 
McEnroe, aged 27, took 
improper deductions on his 
1982 tax returns amount- 
ing ta $906^91. But fais 
lawyer said McEnroe fflei 
a petition this month, to 
over turn the ruMa g. A 
three-year statnte of fiotita- 
tions has passed without 
IRS conducting an audit 


engauenge ns iKguu;. _ 

US lead world chess 

_ „ • . j,, . tv. fiAKx0M<Ml T1S fesm held a ( 




Dubai (Renter) - The fifth-seated US team Mda d«ir 
lead yesterday after 10 rounds ofptay m ffie Dsbm chess 
Olympiad, witii the Soviet UmoB, Engl and Spain jointly 
hofr ioa second place on 27 points, one bl ind. • 

ySr Sefrarom, The US Grandmaster, won ax 
- *Kawin<ii mxmd mrer Hiraaarv’s Lajos Portisck to 


k.- 


iu 


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sAieftM. 

ww -m 

+ T* i 

tW' a i 

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kiMKi* 9* 
iV “Ar ut 

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****** 


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sakawu) 

) poach 




>4 


mvetne uoa>i wuiw» . 

k*^ oM*>d Kimhi k their crushlns 3%-% upset 


the Russians aaaataseti m — -r-” 

of Wti pfawii were “ridicnlons and insulting”. The appeal off 
fop Englis h yy plain, ParM Anderton, has made no progress. 


r'^rvyB. 

• J - 

P :•* Srjum 


GorHw^hny call for Indian Ocean peace zone 


Offer to reduce superpower te nsions 

. _ ■ 


From Michael Hamlyn 
Delhi 


Mr Mikhail Gorbachov, the 
Soviet leader, last night made 
a series of dramatic proposals 
aimed at reducing the super- 
power tension which has been 
slowly building up in the 
Indian Ocean region. 

Speaking to a joint session 
of the Indian houses of Par- 
liament in Delhi, Mr 
Gorbachov made his pro- 
posals as a series of announce- 
ments, each of which while 
undoubtedly contributing to a 
relaxation of tension would at 
the same time extend Soviet 


interest in the region. 

id first of all that 



He suggested 

the United Nations should 
convene, by 1988 at the latest, 
an international conference to 
declare the Indian Ocean a 
zone of peace. Then he de- 
clared: “The Soviet Union is 
prepared to begin, with the 
United States, and with other 
non-littoral states, negotia- 
tions on substantially reduc- 
ing the size of naval forces in 
the Indian Ocean.” 

He continued by suggesting 
that the safety of the sea lanes 
could be made the subject of 
new guarantees, which would 
ensure freedom of passage in 
the Guff the Strait of Hormuz 
and the Strait of Malacca. He 
undertook to take part “in the 
long-overdue agreement” on 
the safety of the air lanes over 
the Indian Ocean. 

He offered to partiepate m 
the drafting of, and to become 
a party to, an international 
convention to combat terror- 
ism on the seas and in the air. 

He also made the suggestion 
that Russia would be prepared 
to co-operate with other space 
powers to establish an inter- 
national centre to cany out 
joint research and develop 
space technologies at the re- 
quest of the developing 
% countries. 


be a school for training 
specialists from the develop- 
ing worid. he said, including 
cosmonauts. He said that a 
India were prepared to host 
such a centre “we would 
welcome it”. 

Speaking in the central hall 
of the pillared circular Par- 
liament building designed by 
Sir Herbert Baker, Mr 
Gorbachov clearly made his 


* vwBmtMssNBsm 1 1 mi nm ihiiim _ . -.^i 

Mr Gorbachov and Mr Gandhi, right, all smile s after signing the 

Part of such a centre would Gandhi, the Indian Jftjjg* 

- - - Minister, signed a Delhi 

Declaration” calling for spe- 
cific and immediate action for 
nuclear disarmament 
It followed the Gorbachov 
line, announced on January 
15, and urged the complete 
destruction of nuclear arsenals 
before the end of the century, 
the barring of all weapons 
from outer space, the banning, 

his of all nuclear weagjns .^e'^^d’effortiess 

proposals - as a bid for theprotabrtionofthedev^^ onST humour has won her 
establishing the Asian security meat of new types friends in India, was 

pad which has been a Russian of mas destruction, ute mb- ji v fonnisitive about 

” ’’ ** ** ' ningofchemical weapons and Pgnsi r *hown. 

the destruction of their_ stock- what sne was . 


_ was going 

on Mrs Raisa Gorbadhov, the 
Soviet leader’s wife, was 
undertaking some serious 
tourism around Delhi. " 

She visited the histone 
t\relfth-century site of the 
Qutb Minar, where one oftne 
first Muslim conquerors built 
a grand mosque out of the 
rtiSs of 27 Hindu temples. 
Mrs Gorbachov, whose 


police idea since the time of 
the late President Brezhnev’s 
visit to India in the 1970s. 
which he reformulated re- 
cently in Vladivostok. 

“One-third of Asia’s terri- 
tory is in the Soviet Union," 
he said, and emphasized the 
importance of the sea lanes of 
the Indian Ocean, linking as 
they did the east and the west 
of his country. 

“Peace in Europe and peace 
in Asia are of equal signifi- 
cance in our policy.” he sakL 
He also sppke of his 
country’s commitment to the 
United Nations. 

Earlier in the day. Mr 
Gorbachov and Mr Rajiv 


piles, and the reducing of 
conventional armies too. _ 

In the meantime, since 
nuclear weapons are plainly 
not going to be eliminated 
overnight, the two countries 
propose that an international 
convention banning the use or 
threat of use of nuclear weap- 
ons should be concluded 
immediately. _ . . 

Indian and Soviet officials 
also signed a technical and 
economic agreement, an ac- 
cord to establish a PesUva^of 
India in Russia and a Festival 
of Russia in India* and an 


France hit 
by realist 
protesters 


From Diana Geddes 
Paris 


Hundreds of thousands of 
students marched throogbout 
France yesterday in protest 
against the Government s iwo- 
posed university reforms, due 
to gp before Parliament tot 
night. It was said to be foe 
hugest student demonstration 
since May 1968. 

But today’s dean-taced, 
short-haired rebels haye tittle 

in common with their nmUistic 

revolutionary predecessors. 
They are pragisatH: realists, 
not idealistic dreamers. They 
mint foe withdrawal of foe 
Government's Education K1I, 
not the overthrow of society. 

In Paris tiie old evocative 
meeting- points in . 
Quarter were again used, but 
there were only a few 
skirmishes between extreme- 
right student factions and foe 
a *Jt 4ia 1110111 cfndent 


body. 

The police w«e there in 
force, complete with riot gear, 
tear-gas canisters and water 
cannons. But they kept as 
discreet a distance as possible, 

intervening only to try to keep 

.i . f — ..... gtormina 


Bonn expels four 

~ -m. m m • • a 


At times she asked her 
guide. Mr Nagarajan too. me 
director-general of the 
Archaeological Survey of In- 
dia, questions of such all- 

embracing magnitude^ that 
thev defiKl answering what 
is the most characteristic fea- 
ture of Hindu artr she de- 
manded. or “Have .the 
craftsmen nowadays retai ned 
their iraditioual slriUs?” 

That one Mr Rao was 
pleased to answer. “From the 
Himalayas to Kanyakumsn, 

. __ .*ii s J ab thncp 


they are still drawing on those 


agreement 


to".- increase the 


traditions and 
them." he said. 


lev doping 

J 


LUC SUni^Md o — - 

National Assembly, where the 
Education BUI was to have 
been debated, though there 
was a strong possibility last 
night that the deputies would 
not reach the Bill until today. 

The Government appears to 
have decided on appeasement 
rather than confrontation, in a 

speech to Parffament on 
Wednesday, M Aiaia De- 
voquet. Minister fin Higher 
Education. . said that the 
students’ protest should be 
“treated with care 1 ". 

The students' main griev- 
ance is over the Government s 
alleged plans to introduce 
selection into university en- 
trance. > 


The West German Govern- 
ment yesterday ordered four 
members of the Syrian Em- 
bassy in Bonn to leave West 
Germany within one week as 
part of sanctions against 
Damascus for its involvement 
in a bomb attack in West 
Berlin. 

Two are civilian diplomats 
and the others are militoy 
attaches. Bonn ordered, the 
embassy to reduce its military 
attache staff from four to two 
to bring it in line with Wrat 
German military attache 
st reng th in Damascus. 

The Government named 
the diplomats and one of the 
military attaches who had to 
go, although identities were 
not made public yesterday. 

The Syrian Ambassador 
will decide who will be the 
fourth Herr Friedhdm pa, 
the chief Government spokes- 
man, said that West Germany 
would not, “until further 
notice", name a new Ambas- 
sador to Syria to replace foe 
former envoy who left Damas- 
cus on November 16 when his 
tour of duty expired. 

There would be no new 
West German development 
aid for Syria, he added, and 
Svrian passes for nonrdip- 
lomatic personnel at the Em- 
bassy in Bonn would no longer 
be recognized. 

• Nezar Hindawi, who was 
sentenced in London last 
month to 45 years m jail for 


attempting to blow up an El A1 
jumbo jet, had a service pass 
from the Syrian Embassy in 
London. ' • , 

Herr Ost said that the 
German Government would 
raise the question of the 
involvement . of Syrian 
“authorities" in East Berlin in 
foe bomb attack in talks with 
foe East German Govern- 
ment. - 

West • Germany’s moves 
a gainst Syria came only 24 

hours after a West Beriin court 

convicted two Jordanians, one 
of them a brother of Hindawi, 
of bombing a German-Arab 
society’s centre in the city on 
March 29 and injuring rune 


Western militaxy govern- 
ments in West Beriin said later 

that they_ were bann ing “cer- 
tain Syrian citizens” from 
their sectors of the divided 
city. This means that Syrians 
living in East Beriin will not 
be able to cross into West 
Berlin. A US military spokes^ 
man said that , the older was 
taking effect immediately. 


w WASHINGTON:The 
United States will strongly 
welcome the new measmes- 
and restrictions in relations 
with Syria announced in Bonn 
(Michael Binyon writes). 

The West German. mea- 
sures, though short of a break 
in diplomatic relations, are foe 
kind of steps Washington has 
been urging on its allies. 


Damascus envoy sought 


Ankara - A court trying 
alleged members of the Abu 
Nidal and Islamic Jihad 
organizations for the murder 
of a Jordanian diplomat has 
issued an international arrest 
warrant for the Syrian Em- 
bassy Second Secretary, Mr 
Muhammad Darwiche Baladi, 


who left Ti — _ 

(Rasit Gurditek writes). 

. Mr Baladi was among nine 
defendants, three of whom are 
being -tried in absentia, who 
are on trial for the murder of 
Mr Ziad Skti the Fust Sec- 
.retary at the - Jord anian Em- 
jbassy. on July 24 last year. 


Jaruzelski 
catalogue 
of blunders 


. " T 

• t-ii 

- T - Wfe 


From Roger Boyes 
Warsaw 


11 Ti f . 


General Wojciech Jaruze- 
lski, the Polish leader, yes- 
terday made an unusual 
admissi on of government 
blunders and called on the 
new--. post-Sotidarity trade - 
unions to be more effective in 
criticizing bureaucratic abuse; 

The General, in a civilian 
suit, made his appeal to a hall 
brimming with delegates at 
’foe congress of the officially 
sponsored trade union move- 
ment set up after the banning 
of Solidarity. The congress is 
regarded as crucial to govern- 
ment plans to expand but at 
the same time control political 
expression and thus soften the 
impact of fresh economic 
austerity measures. 

General Jaruzelski said that 
the new unions, which now 
have .some seven million 
members, were “neither an 
extension of the state admin- 
istration nor an anti-socialist 
movement” Both he and the 
leader of the unions, Mr 
Alfred Miodowicz, a Politburo 
member, emphasized that the 
unions had to maintain a 
balance between critic 
the Goveripent openly 
“its deviations from soc- 
ialism” and not letting itself 
become a grouping on the 
lines of Solidarity. 

But to stamp out ihe idea of 
competing unions, the auth- 
orities have to let the existing 
unions work more effectively. 
That means giving them more 
teeth in critidz- ing the Gov- 
ernment and foe Government 
itself becoming more self- 
critical on worker issues. 

So General . JaruzeLdd was 
unusually free in attacking the 
Government “There are still 
moves that remind one of a 
bull in a china shop,” he told 
the delegates. ■ =v 




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THE TIMES FRIDAY NOVEMBER 28 1986 


^ ue s 


.:*••>: \ 4 52S 


trial in Transvaal 

treason test for ANC 

. From Mkhanl Hnmeiw iv.* 1 ^ 


xm- . v . -:i_ 


- ■•*.,« ^ 


* . .. •••••»» - ".'S 

•, J ’ r -?S2 

a-. 

l - 6^1)4 * 

■ ■■■; : ^ 

:, 


tw n wlJ*"" Mfchael Horasb y Dctoas, Transvaal 
-Three out ot 22 black jnen mavi i c , T . 

* dunged withtreasonand mur- UDf" <J? ? C riots > 

;der were acquitted on afl dPS*. i™* “® rent : 

: counts in the Magistrate' SsSsSriJSLf 18 ? ro.Sh 

; Court of this small farming PeoDftS?" 00 n ™L ft ”,™" ^ 

~nm -yesterday, but thT»S s _ .Organization Sente 


(own yesterday, but ttenst SSSol anrf « sani K ZatIon 

■JBfl ESJfcifeS SlfMjS 

' that thev bad a %ee of its 


Justice Kees Van Dykhorst, 
' that day bad a prima- facie 
case' to answer. 

- Ju dge D ijkhorst for the first 
, time granted a defence reoiiest 


iui iwwjfcOD bail, but only for ances took nlaa>M Inna «n r — »» ui/r 

six of the . accused. The June last vea? involved in a conspiracy 

remainder, who have already SmSiii” the tnal and that it would^Stbe 
been, in tendon for period? SS? I ^5S^?^2 JS£S' infer that m 2 goal 

ranging /from 18 months to pJeadS^otguilty fiSSS hadbeen ihe destructionof 
twowara. wilj spend their involved in ttecSi ,££552 J??J,«? ven ™em bodies in 
second successive Christmas ^1 Cn „,!riz5i l ^jp inic *** the Vaal townships, 
behind tare. SSSt^SfiS^ for As to thereof murder 

Those released must each Judee* DiiVhS^c »• O«bhorst said that the 

im bail of 15,000 rand can^S £gS?l- ^^musthavebeSS 

(£4 700), must not attend any mission b^SdSbnraJedSl 11131 ^^cats against township 
gathcrmg. mKt report twice a counrfUpra (several of whom 

da L t ° «, P ° Il ^. S ^ ioa ’ *»* soned dSd r&'u££cE ^kffled rathe early days of 
must not enter five blade that the state tad the . 1 naience) might incite 

townships m the Vaal River umdim*9rL^j-^7 10 mobs to attack them, 
area sonlh of Johahn«h,u^ ^ ev, * ! ? ce It followed. if it was an. 


figures, Mr Popo 
Molefe, Mr Patrick Lekota 
atidMr Moses Orikane. 

Preli minar y court appear- 


nets, sparked by protests over 
rent increases, which erupted 
in. Sharpe ville and other black 
townships along the Vaal in 
September 198< setting off a 
nationwide chain-reaction of 
violence: which has so fir 

taken more than 2,000 lives. 

Judge Dijkhorst agned that 
a reasonable man ought find 
“tat the evidence supported 
the view that the UDF had 


... 

*wfe 

. . : 

\ S 

- 

- • - . 

• .-v^y 

- • -«iw, 

r .* 

-C ;e, ^k 

-> chief ' 

•.v. 

" ;: ^Sk 

Pi—. J . 

’ ... • .''•'’'‘’St 

- ' -ris 

• • - -i."*. 

' * ; 




;two years, will spend their mvi 
r second successive Christinas trial 
I behind bars. an0 

- Those released must each Ji 
■ put up tail of 15,000 rand cam 
■(£4,700), must not attend any mi? 

gathering, must report twice a Mr 

day to a: police station, and sonc 
must not enter five black that 
.townships in the Vaal River prod 
;area south of Johannesburg, to si 
even though all but one of all t 
them have their homes there. " free. 

H ie trial, the biggp^t ma^ ^ 
treason trial in 3Qyears, is thret 
seen as crucial for the future of Vila! 
the United Democratic From and 
(UDF), the loose alliance of their 
hundreds of grass-roots anti- answ 
.apartheid organizations which prim 
;has developed into the most const 
.potent above-ground opposi- andi 
-hon to the GovraumenL other 
Of the remaining .. 19 ao- .' Th 


had been the destruction of 
local government bodies in 
the Vaal townships. 

As to the charge of murder. 
Judge Dijkhorst said that the 
accused must have been aware 
that threats a gainst township 
councOJoni (several of whom 
were killed in the early days of 
the violence) might incite 
mobs to attack them. 



OVERSEAS NEWS 9 

EEC budget compromise 

Soaring cost of farm policy 
may cause crisis next year 


t From Richard Owen, Brussels 

fcfcC officials have given a Mr Peter Brooke. 

5? Sl£ e m g C I 987 of ttarfe^S 

SrSffggSPgE- 
fAAH&SSSS'J jU* 

“ up trouble for the Ss SS.^L. Frr 

c B£3£r- - 


costs. 

gian presidency of the EEC in ^ he that much worse , one 


e extra contributions. 

“It means pie Community’s 


rather than under iSTbiS Co SS?S. l, - fa 

nresirtem-v which mAcm rv. *® hold tellrs son with Britain 


iHuutrce any crecuDie evidence r t fon ow «r If jT 

| vssssm 

answer be found there was Ttastate ha* h** 
onma-fonp niHm» . iac had bttle 


JPdhSroothepertofu.e 
The case arises out of the * revoIn - 



Pretoria revises 
camp raid report 

From Ray Kennedy, Johaanesbarg 


apartheid regime: Mr Edward Perkins, the 
first, black American Ambassador to Pretoria, arriving to 
present his credentials to President Botha yesterday. 


presidency, which ends on De- 
cember 31. 

But Mrs Thatcher will be 
under pressure at the London 
EEC summit meeting nexi 
Friday to ease the pain of 
succeeding presidencies by at 
least laying the groundwork 
lor overdue reform of the 
Common Agricultural Policy 
(CAP). 

The EEC budget ministers 
acknowledged that the Euro- 
pean Parliament had sent 
them an unusually unanimous 
political message from Stras- 
bourg on the urgent need to 
cut farm spending, which ac- 
counts for two- thirds of the 
budget and is veering out of 
control. 

. Until recently the Par- 
liament tended to support the 
farm lobby. But the ministers 
rejected Parliament’s proposal 
for a special fund of nearly £2 
billion for the disposal of 
surplus stocks. 


about (be 150-mile restricted 
(fishing zone around the Falk- 
hnd Islands (Renter reports 
from Brussels). Spain, which 
has traditional Ih»fc* with 
Argentina, has refused to rec- 
ognixe the zone. 

Commission official said. 
Much would depend on the 
agriculture ministers’ final 
meeting for this year on Dec- 
ember 8 and 9, and on the 
EEC London s ummi t meeting 
which precedes it. 

The European Parliament, 
which gives the 1987 budget 
its second and final reading in 
Strasbourg next month, is 
critical of the budget minis- 
ters’ evasion of how to deal 
with the soaring costs of stor- 
age and disposal of food surp- 
luses. 

During the past six months 
Mr Brooke has acquired a re- 
putation for emerging fresh at 


■ dawn with a compromise after 
all-night talks. The 1987 draft 
budget of £26.5 billion which 
he announced on Wednesday 
enables Britain to claim that 
an EEC budget has been set 
which is more or less in line 
with the Commission’s pre- 
liminary budget. But it uses up 
all available resources and is 
bound to collapse as costs rise 
next year. 

To compound the problem, 
the budget ministers failed to 
agree on how to make good 
the estimated shortfall of £1 
billion in this year’s budgri. 

The 1986 budget was inge- 
niously stitched together by 
Mr Brooke in July when Bri- 
tain took over the chair from 
The Netherlands. But since 
then the fall in the dollar, ris- 
ing. form costs and reduced 
tariff revenues have blown a 
hole in Mr Brooke’s achieve- 
ment and ministers were un- 
able to agree on Wednesday 
on where to make savings to 
keep the 1 986 books balanced. 

As a result the 1986 over- 
spending is carried forward to 
1 987, further aggravating next 
year’s looming crisis. 

Mr Brooke told M Pflimlin 
that Parliament's demand for 
a surplus disposal fund and for 
radical cuts in milk quotas 
could be considered by EEC 
farm ministers only after the 
London summit. 

Spectrum, page 14 


-nrr 

- ■‘-- 1,1 


■ • -‘.Z. £• 

1 ■** 

' *' * V. z- 

' ~T. 


IteBmean for Information, 
South Africa’s sole s ou rce iff 
official news about events 
covered by the state of eraer- 
: gency laws, did ah about-turn 

- yesterday over its account of 
I file demolition of a squatter 

camp in Soweto. 

It said on Wednesday that 
residents of Mofolo Mirth, 
part of the huge Soweto com- 
plex outride Johannesburg, 
had taken it apon themselves 
to demoiisb shads in the 
Mshengnvflle squatter camp. 

Police were called ja, the 
bureau said, after squatters 
attacked thou with petrol 

- bom bs. The police fired back 
frith tear gas, according to the 
official account 

Yesterday the bureau said 
that the shacfcs were “deinol- .. 
ishedon thehrstrucdonof the 
Soweto Housing CundL 1 * - • ■ 
The Star, a Johannesburg . 
newspaper, reported that hall- 


dozers ploughed through more 
than 10® shads and that they 
were demolished in the pres- 
ence of police and troops. 1 
Mofolo residents, the news- 
paper claimed, helped the 
squatters to gather, what was 


rags an d that tear gas was 
thrown ^ groups of squatters 
weeping over their demofished. 
shelters. A torrential thunder- 
storm erupted as residents 
tried to accommodate them. 

Meanwhile the so-called 
Mayor of the Soweto Coamril, 

a body spumed by the majority 

of residents, said that be would 
resign. Mr Ephraim Tsha- 
babfla said that the demolition 
of the shads was canted out 
without warning. 

hi the Mad township of 
GagHtetn, outside Cape Toms, 
two white poficemea were 
tafffiy injured yesterday in a 
haad grande «n«rlr; 


Basque general election 

Breakaway leader aim 
to poach PNV seats 

From Richard Wigg, Vitoria 


A REMINDER FROM THE TOBACCO INDUSTRY 


IF THIS SYMBOL 

IS MISSING 

PLEASE LET US KNOW 


. Seflor Carlos Garakoechea 
is after the widest possible 
Basque nationalist vote so he 
. holds (me of the biggest meet- 
ings of bis campaign for 
-Sunday’s Basque general elec- 
; tion in a municipal fives court 
-in the capital of Spain's trou- 


-in the capital of Spain's trou- 
■ bled north. Fives is the Basque 
national sport. 

Outside, however, handbills 
signed by the Basque Nation- 
alist Party (PNV), which he 
once led, warn voters against 
the former Chief Minister 
“Don't vote again for some- 
one who has changed his mind 
so many times just for a job". 

Sen or Garaicoechea sym- 
bolizes the morass into which 
the almost 100-year-old PNV 






Sefior Ardanza: already , 
rictim of the Basque Left. 


l absolute majority raises tbei 
likelihood of the smaller par- 
: ties helping form a coalition 
- government afto* the election. 

Senor Garaicoechea has 
said he could not rejoin his 
former colleagues, but has not 
ruled out teaming up with the 
Socialists. If the PNV should 
itself formed a coalition with 
the Socialists, he could look 
forward to becoming the prin- 
cipal Basque nationalist figure 
in the Opposition. 

A second party seeking a 
pivo tal role is the Basque Left 
(EE) led by Senor Joan Maria 
Bandies, aBasqup member of 
the Madrid Parhament - 
In Opposition in the Basque 
Parliament, his party has pro- 
vided the best-argued critique 
of what has gone wrong with 
Basque home rule, blaming 
chiefly the sectarian intol- 
erance and the failure of 
society to stand up to ETA's 

blackmail. 

The party is strong among 
urban professionals, but is too 
intellectual for the rural areas 
where the “classic” nationalist 
formula of “all against Mad- 
rid" is a powerful rallying cry. 

Senor Bandies, a potential 
ally for the Socialists and one 
who is also offering himself as 
a Basque chief minister, has 
forced Senor Jose Ardanza, 
the outgoing chief executive, 
to admit that his Government 
“blackened” the extent of the 


W.- 

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Btilff 1 ■ j 
V-S-.C-: i 


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A-.-..:..-?' 


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™ unique Ldb _ — . . .. — ~ 

Basque economic decline in 
has fallen, having failed to Brussels to obtain more EEC 
provide political stability and funds, while telling voters that 
economic progress while go- things were improving on the 
vemmg for the past six yeans economic front, 
of Basque home rule. Senor Adolfo Starez, the 

Ousted as Chief Minister in former Spanish Prime Min- 
a bitter power struggle, he ister who helped set up Basque 
leads a breakaway party, home rule, is hoping that his 
Basque Solidarity, which aims Democratic Centre Party 
to draw the nationalist vote (CDS) will capture die pivotal 
from his former party, from role. But unlike Senor Ban- 
thc People’s Unity coalition dies, his party is offering to 


/‘i < 


■, s Mataeaafc’j ~ v «•.-<.# *r>v;o. :■■■ 

Rif ■ ’ 

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sfefis 

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-A-:.' 

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(HB) and die political wing of help the PNV against the 
ETA. the Basque armed sepa- Socialists. 


ratist organization. 

Every seat in the 7 5-m em- 
ber Basque Parliament which 
he lakes from the PNV will be 
sweet revenge. Public opinion 


In an interview in Egin. the 
Basque extreme left-wing 
nationalist daily. “Txomin* 
Iturbe, the best known leader ; 
of ETA’s military wing, has 


I1.»VU^. 1 UU1IV vpuuuu VI *- a re. * .uiuim.; 

polls show the former Chief told its sympathizers to vote 
Minister is personally Ihe for the People’s Unity Co- 


in the past year the Tbbacco Advisory Cbundl, 
acting on behalf of the tobacco companies of the 
United Kingdom, have put a million pounds behind 
this symbol. 

Its aim is to help to prevent the unlawful sale 

of cigarettes to children « 

under 16. And it is working, j symbol is missing from: 

However; we know it’s I Name of outlet 

not appearing everywhere I Address 


most popular candidate. 

He is offering himself as 
head ot a broadly ba sed 
administration of rejuvenated 
Basque nationalism, opposing 
ETA's violence and "standing 
up" to the Madrid Govern- 
ment. 


aHtion. 

The interview, given in 
Algeria, was the first proof of 
Madrid's suspicions that the 
terrorist, expelled from France 
last July, is in North Africa. 

“Txomin." insisted that 
time was on the side oTtbe 


it should. So if you know of a shop, supermarket, 
kiosk or off-licence where the symbol's not on show, 
then please get in touch with us. 

Simply fill in the coupon with the name and 
address of the business concerned, post it to us and 

[ we’ll send them a complete 
j set of the material we've 

I designed. 

j It couldn’t be easier 


lUCllL UIIK vu IHW. VI uu. 

The certainty that neither radical independence formula 
the PNV nor the Socialists. " and that ETA would continue 


who ranked second in. the old 
Parliament, wiB obtain, an 


to make the “Spanish forces of 
repression" its target' •• 


Post to: Tobacco Advisory Council, 
Glen House, Stag Place, London SW 1 E 5AG. 


ISSUED FOR THE BRITISH TOBACCO INDUSTRY BY 
THE TOBACCO ADVISORY COUNCIL. 


tf&lic 

fl- 

eer’s 

istic’ 


echankal ea- 
tbe £8,000 be 
*ortfolk> Gold 
erday to good 

e my gramo- 
my donation 
Jl appeal and 
art year," Mr 
of Aiiestree, 

d 51, who has 
Gold since it 
mes, said that 
eve his lock, 
fantastic. It is . 

cards can be 
ding a stam- 
nvefope to: 



er of 

ives 

eer 

Young 

d in brewing 
inkers and, in 
yen kill them, 
for Real Ale 
iy. 

ie campaign's 
at's Brewing \ 
olz, a former 
d Beer Guide, 
e who have 
ler breathing 
s disorders, 
10 are allergic: 
.can suffer ill 
king beers in ' 
have been 
iuce a foamv 
irity, or to 

I Sates," the 

ire than 40 
heart attacks 
ers used co- 
in beer to 
dnghead. 


man couple- 
; last July for 
-king redne- 
ences. 

Lord Lane, 
■e, will pre- 
cations by 
nja Schulze, 
ir leave to 
e sentences 
Justice Mi- 
tbe Central 





>r storage 
bty shows 
ce Healer 


3%'’ h>gh 
3 ,J c"high 


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10 


OVERSEAS NEWS 


THE TIMES 


The MI5 book case: steps in a ‘danse macabre’ 


Judge loses patience with UK 


From Stephen Taylor, Sydney 




The judge in toe MIS spy 
book case served notice on the 
British Government in wt- 

he has run outotjSence with 
what he regards as legal mano- 
euvres designed to block 
production of confidential 
papers. 

in a series of broadsides at 
Whitehall, Mr Justice Powell 
said that in applying for an 
injunction to suppress a book 
by Mr Peter Wright, the 
Thatcher adminis tration had 
sought to avail itself of the 
jurisdiction of the Australian 
courts but was evidently 
unwilling to accept a ruling 
unless it was favourable. 

That was an attitude which 
no court could countenance, 
he said. 

The upshot of yesterdays 
proceedings is that the British 
Government must say this 
morning whether it will bow 
to Mr Justice Powell’s de- 
mand that he be allowed a 
private inspection of the pa- 
pers. If it does not. it must 
seek leave to appeal, having 
already failed once in a similar 
application. 

If there is no appeal, Mr 
Justice Powell will look at the 
papers and then rule on 
whether he accepts the British 
contention that they are so 
secret as to be immune from 
the normal considerations of 
public interest and should 
therefore not be shown Mr 
Wright’s counsel, Mr Mal- 
colm Turnbull. 

Either way, the judge said 
yesterday that Whitehall’s 
practical manoeuverings had 
become a “danse macabre ” 
which had placed him in “an 
intolerable situation,” and 
threatened “the gravest injus- 
tice" to Mr Wright and to the 
Heinemann Publishing Com- 
pany of Australia, which 
wants to publish his book. 

Mr Justice Powell’s criti- 


cism stemmed ftom ye* an- 
other change of British 
position revealed yesterday.. 

On Wednesday Mr Theo 

Sim os, QC. indicated that the 


The judge remarked that he 


Muage 

had already delivered the 


nw, — 

Government would accept an 

if he 


order by the judge t- — 
insisted on seeing the papers — 
which deal with why no 
official action was taken to 
restrain recent books on MI5 
and M16. The British position 
then was that it would want to 
appeal only if the judge ruled 
that the papers should be 
shown to Mr Turnbull. 

However, when the court 
reconvened yesterday, Mr 
Sim os said that his instruc- 
tions had changed, and that 
the Govern meat might seek 


6 I don’t know 
from one day to the 
next what the British 
Government says 9 
Mr Justice Powell 


leave to appeal if the judge 
insisted on seeing the papers. 

Mr Justice Powell replied: 
“1 hope you will forgive me if I 
appear to show a degree of 
pique, Mr Simos, but youre is 
the only head above the 
sandbags at the moment 

“I regret to say that I am 
placed in an intolerable situa- 
tion. I am quite unable to 
predict from one day to the 
next what is the attitude of the 
plaintiff in this case, what 
submissions will be persev- 
ered with, and what course is 
to be taken. 

“The situation I am placed 
in is. I believe, intolerable, 
and, more to the point, since I 
am paid to be here, if this is to 
be a continuing pattern, the 
defendants are to be placed in 
an intolerable situation, and 
one in which I feel they would 
be subject to grave injustice.” 


opinion three times that the 
papers should be handed up. 
Only once had tire Govern* 
ment tested that opinion be- 
fore the Court of Appeal, and 
then unsuccessfully. 

*Tm not joking when I say I 
don't know from one day to 
the next what the British 
Government says. It is merely 
another manifestation of what 
appears to me an attitude of 
the Government — namely 
that it is going to lay down the 
issues and ground rules.” 

Mr Turnbull arguing the 
case against the British claim 
that the papers were subject to 
public-interest immunity, said 
that even from a bare affidavit 
which lists the documents it 
was evident that three of them 
were “whales in the bay”. 

One of the papers was 
relevant to the defence case 
that Chapman Pinchers book. 
Their Trade Is Treachery, was 
published with official ap- 
proval Mr Turnbull said, and 
was sufficient to cast “enor- 
mous doubt” on the evidence 
of Sir Robert Armstrong, the 
Cabinet Secretary. 

Without describing the 
document, Mr Turnbull drew 
attention to the dare 

“That document was cre- 
ated ... at (east two months 
before Sir Robert said the 
Government knew of the 
book. The sending organiza- 
tion is the one Sir Robert has 
difficulty identifying (M16). 
Look at what was enclosed 
with that letter. What can that 
be but ... I won’t say.” 

The' Government had reso- 
lutely denied any involvement 
in publication, and it was not 
hard to see why, Mr Turnbull 
said. It would be a mockery if 
it were shown that it was doing 
secretly under the counter 
what it would not allow over 
the counter. 



Mr Peter Wright, author of the book, strolling with his wife 
in Sydney’s Hyde Part after attending the Sydney court. 


Kremlin to 
insist on 



From Christopher Walker 
Moscow 

The fipfosatfe argument 
between Moscow’ and Bonn 
ever recent remarks by the 
Chancellor, Herr Helmut 
Kohl intensified farther yes- 
terday with the pnhficttiea in 
Prawffl of one of the most 
bitterly worded attacks on a 
Western leader . 

The wwigned editorial en- 
titled “A Dangerous Throw- 
back”, described Herr KohPs 
recent comparison m a Afews- 
week interview of Mr Mikhafi 
Gorbachov to Joseph Goeb- 



The Cammhmst Party par 
per continued: “la Bonn, they 

must always remember tire 

pain, anger and disgust Soviet 
people fed in their hearts on 
fcesnng monstrous, unmoral 
comparisons between ■ our 
country and Naa Germany. A 

heavy paB has been cast over 

Sovkt-German relations and 

they have hem poisoned, and 

teat at a time when they had 
began to aquire a -new 
dynamism.** 

. The attack, sanctioned at a 
high level ia the Kremlin, 
followed less than 24 hems 

after Moscow’s latest cancei- 

btioh of an ftffirial 
with Boon, this time by Mr 

Vtafintir Tikhonov, foe dep- 

uty Marine Minister, who 
no reason for scrapping! 


river and: 'sea 


on 

nav^atioo. 

. Accenting to informed Sov- 
iet sources, the Kremlin, is 
anxious to secure a foil and 
formal apology from foe Ger- 
man Chancellor, and is ex- 
pected to keep op the 
diplomatic freeze. “There is no 
doubt of the bitterness felt 
here on this vary sensitive 
issue”, one West European 
diplomat observed. 



last in 


coi 


Mill 


Rom David Watts, Mamb 

ThAgnmc mill fan sjtentiiext little 
ml ftateime ftovermnent ■ But be 


‘ nsgotiangM WOukJ t* evta 
Two historic agreements _• more difficult. . 

signed yesterday open the way The. umnumtyagpeacnt 


Kra&topewfflbe ^ 


a** 2,000 lives smee 


dent Aquino came to power in 
February. . . 

Bui even as representatives 
of the Government and of the 
National Democratic Front 
(NDF) were embracing in. 
celebration, government for- 
ces were involved in what was 
10 be a “massive” 
itary operation against 
insurgents in Anrora prov- 
ince, 30 miles rrorthofMamla- 
Efeven government and 
communist troops were killed 
in fighting before the signing 
of tire agreements, and a 
communist radio network 
headquarters responsible for 
the control of New People’s 
Army fighters in central Lu- 
zon was also overrun. after a 
30-minute gun battle. The 
ceasefire itself does not be- 
come effective until Decem- 
ber 10. _ 

Many military officers re- 
main cautious about the 
advisability of the ceasefire, 
but- one senior western mili- 
tary said that it could 
have some chance of -success 
in the long term only if the 
Government 'finds the nec- 
essary political wifi to make 
social and economic improve- 
ments and . to reform- the 
corrupt Philippine constabu- 
lary to- better the lot of 
Filipinos in the regions. 

The two agreements cover 

the immunity of 

for the NDF, who 
discussion of a 
peace 

,y 


tiations in Manfia and will 
have irrevocable immunity 
from search, arrest and 
prosecution. . - 

.The memorandum on the 
-ceasefire defines the hostile 
acts that shall cease dining its 
60-day term: These include all 

conventional means of waging 

warfare, torture, dtsanning.of 
NPA fighters and search, as 
well as coercion and threats. 

, In a dear hint of the threats 
to the agreement posed not 
only by some dements m the 
Army and police bat also by 
private Tnilftj”* sudiasthat of 
the former defence minister, 
Mr Joan Ponce Emile, the 
.Government pledges itself to 
disarm and prosecute armed 
groups,, “goons” and death 
squads who try to disrupt it. 

In an extraordinary agree- 
ment, both the Government 
and the NDF have promised 
jointly to protect their put 
from such outside inter- 
ference. 

Mr Mitra revealed that the 
actual site of the signing and 
press conference was being 
protected by both the com- 
munists and the Government. 

A special committee to. 
oversee -the' ceasefire wifi be 
set. up. It mil be responsible 
for any breaches and for ap- 
portioning blame- But both- 
government and NDF repre- 
sentatives - affirm ed that nei- 
ther side had any interest in 
violating iL 



coraprenensrve . 
mesa 30 days after the 
ceasefire takes effect. 

The Government is also to 
open. laik* with the Muslim 
liberation Movement, which 
is active in .the southern 
Philippines. 

Tlfe negotiations are to 
open in Saudi Arabia earty 
next year. •. 

After qgnifyg -the agree- 
ments in front of hundreds of 
journalists, Mr Ramon Mitra, 
a leading government nego- 
tiator, said that opening peace 
negotiations with the NDF 
had been one of themes*' 
urgent priorities for Mrs 
Aquino's new Government, 
and *bar ‘foe si g nin g of foe 
doc umen ts four, months after 
talks opened had bees at “ho 



Mr Ramon Mftra: jahOation 
over>t*ase6re agreement 


Rome tests 


motorists’ 

restraint 


Rom Peter Nichols 
Rome 


Rome is feeing its severest 
test of dvic maturity today, 
when motorists in the city’s 
historic centre wifi not only be 1 
required to obey the rules —in 
itself a revolution for Rome — 1 
but also to make the sacrifice, 
where possible, of voluntarily 
doing without their cars for 
the day. 

The idea of 24 hours with a 
m inim um of private cars on 
foe road came originally from 
the trade anions. It followed 
warnings that the level of] 


pollution due to constant traf- 
fic jam 


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fir 


c jams in the city centre had 
reached alarming levels. 

The judkaaiy : :too thre- 
atened to intervene. If -these 
threats seemed exaggerated at 
the timfc, there can be no 
mistake now that the moment 
has arrived for urgent action. 

' The problem oftraffic in the 
centre of Rome has been 
growing for years, but in the 
past few months a change in 
quality has occurred calling 
for emergency action. - 
The step taken by foe 
unions won quick support 
from tiie municipal govern- 
ment. In view- of-the im- 
potence of the tityaathorities, 
whether Communist or Chris- 
tian Democrat, to prevent the 
city centre's degeneration over 
the years, j the support of 
public opinion for foe unions’ 
initiative was particularly 
important. 

- Asa result, today will see a 
dress rehearsal for what could 
be a rational -start to a remedy 
for the problems of the city 
centre. Unions and the city 
administration have agreed on 
a series of one-day “innov- 
ations.” . . 

There will be 130. extra 
buses on .foe city streets: 
schools wifi start an hour later, 
to avoid the rush hour;, rub- 
bish wifi be cleared during the 
night; 3,000 police wifi be on 
duty from 6.30 am; roadworks 
will be stopped; local railway 
services wifi be improved; and 
routes through the city centre 
wifi be limited to buses and 
taxis. 

The only private cars al- 
lowed to enter wifi be those 
with up-to-date permits. And, 
as a special gesture taxi 
drivers wifi be free to work 
when they wish instead of 
being bound by shifts. 

“The* are the steps which 
could take us,” according to 
Signor Julio Carlo Argun, the 
art' historian and . former 
Mayor of Rome, “from foe 
Inferno to Paradise.” 

Today’s experiment should 
give the politicians some ideas 
on how to solve the dry 
centre’s problems. . . ..... 1. 


Gibraltar 

anti-drug 

curfew 


‘ Gibraltar— loan attempt to 
cut drug and tobacco smug- 
between Morocco and 
the British colony is to 
impose a curfew for high- 
powered launches stating on 
New Year’s Day (Dominique 
Seaxie writes). 

Applicants for boat licences 
wifi requires dean record and 
launches wifi be forbidden 
from using Gibraltar waters 
after dark. 


Court killing s 


(Reuter) — A sns- 
murderer, SongpoJ 
Pansida, aged 30, shot his 
wife, Thipawan, with a.pistol 
she handed him and seriously 
wounded his father before 
shooting himself dead in a 
courtroom. •• 


Gold digger 


Dhaka (Reuter) — An 
Australian, Darren Chambers, 
and two Thais, Ho Doranadee 
Panjart and Mrs Banjuta Sein, 
have been sentenced to life 
imprisonment after 
smuggled gold worth $40, ( 
(£28^000) into Bangladesh. 


Killer fire 


Paris (Reuter) — Four chil- 
dren were among six people, 
mainly immigrants, who died 
in a fire that swept through & 
building in an impoverished 
area of eastern Pans, accord- 
ing to firemen. 


Bomb charge 


Sydney (Reuter) — Levon 
Dmnirian, aged . 34, an Arm- 
enian restaurateur, has been 
charged with p lanning the car- 
bomb explosion which Jtifisd 
the suspected bomber and 
damaged the Turkish con- 
sulate in Melbourne on 
Sunday. 


Aided escape 

Oslo — Norwegian police 
recaptured an unnamed drug- 
addict burglar who broke out 
orGjoevik jafi here by threat- 
ening prison wardens with a 
syringe, full of his own Aids- 
infected blood. 


Death plunge 


Oviedo, Spain (Reuter) - 
Two miners fell 150 ft to their 
tfeaihs after a pulley control- 
ling the descent of their lift 
cage snapped at the state- 
owned Hunosa coalmine. 


Peking poser 

Pftlnna 


Peking (Reuter) - China’s 
main newspaper, foe People's 
Daily, reused organizers of a 
bodybuilding contest of trying . 
to cam in on- a recently- 
approved parade of bikink 
dad women 


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THE TIMES FRIDAY NOVEMBER 28 1986. 

THE ARTS 1 





„ T . 

H&Z:*:'- R-~'Q 

■ ' -Si'h:.-: "r ■ ; : :; v - ■ :;■■ v. 






: : ■ : v • v .* 'I*.' v’ :.i;x fP' :V*PP 





V'?#‘ 


Sweet sound of a bebop swansong 

- rMuvnior nrpams. directed by a t?..— ciim Pma 











An American j «™™»n in Paris: Dexter Gordon in Honud Midnight 


Perhaps it is not surprising that a 
Frenchman should malm one of 
the best tributes to American jazz. 
In the bebop Fifties - the era in 
which ’Round Midnight is set - 
many great American jazz players 
went to Paris, delighted and 
amazed to find themselves re* 
vered as artists, rather than being 
taken for granted as ethnic show- 
biz, which is what tended to 
happen at home. 

Bertrand Tavernier’s film is the 
fictional portrait of one such 
musician — in part a composite of 
Lester Young and Bud Powell (to 
both of whom it is dedicated), as 
John Preston pointed out in his 

interview with Tavernier earlier 
this week, as well as the saxo- 
phonist Dexter Gordon, who plays 
the leading role. . 

At the start of the film, in 1959, 
the protagonist is in New York, 
defeated and alcoholic. He returns 
after 15 years to Paris, where he is 
befriended by a long-time French 
fan, whose own life is in some 
disorder. 

The two enter upon a curious 
mutual dependency, with the old 
musician good-humouredly 
accepting the nurse-ma i di ng of the 
younger Frenchman, and respond- 
ing by temporarily kicking drink 
and returning to composing. 
Eventually the Frenchman 
accompanies the musician to New 
York, where his protective sen- 
sitivity is contrasted, in some drily 


’Round Midnight 

( 15 ) t . 

Lumiere, Gate Notting 

Hill, Screen-on-the-Hill 


comic scenes, with an American I 
counterpart - a brash local pro- I CINEMA 
moter. played by the director I — 

Martin Scorsese. . . , • r , 

Tavernier’s romantic kscrna- ’K01Uld MldWgnt 
tion with the world of jazzmen is n 
reflected in Alexander Trauneris V*- 5 / 

sets (the film was mostly shot in Lumiere, Gate NOtung 

££■££&' SS. Hill, Screen-on-the-Hi] 

hotel rooms lit by the inevitable ' 

lurid neon from the street outside. Crossover Dreams 
Loosely but dejgnily struo- 
tu red, moodily shot by Bruno de (nncertlTiefl) 

Keyzer, and with well integrated Cinema 

supporting performances, this # HA Unema 

swan-song story is inevitably 

dominated by the central figure of - /l 

Dexter Gordon. Tavernier chose a LCS mncea 

musician rather than an actor for phoenix East Finchley 

the role because he recalled his i 

disappointment with Robert De wherever possible. He 

Niro’s patently vamamd perfor- ^ ^ majestic, desp 


Crossover Dreams 
(uncertified) 


Crossover Dreams, <firected bya [“^ 3 I gJj|^^ l i^Prize. is 
Cuban emigre, Leon Uauh isato foe cinema's most con vuic- 

about a musician - a New Ycrt one ^ - ons of ^ character 
Puerto Rican salsa anger stnig* a^tlives of urban gypsies. 

gjing to break out offoe Latin club feckless, unappealing 

!^ Ch lSv old 2d violent, coloured bylh t 

ssss 

go for ate We of big m __ d ^ toaghness and 


EU 1U1 U ****** w _ f 

clothes and orgies m the jaoiza. 
When the hmeligbt fedes, he finds 
himself alone, abandoned and 
shabby in foe streets, and is only 
saved from the ultimate fell to the 
desperation of drug-running by a 
shamelessly sentimental 

denouement , 

Ichaso quite successfully _ dis- 
guises the essential corn m a 
6 77 !j: fkn I4rt^ rtf MQlUll. 


ItUMI y—mMmmm+J * __ . 

mance in Scorsese s New York. 
New York. 


dialogue wherever P<*® bh ~ 5* ® idio^foe kind of casual, 

tall and lean and majestic, despite 0 ff_the-cuff style that distinguishes 
legs that appear somewhat beyond independent film 

htc mnirnl 


Even when he is not actually 
playing his virtuoso sax, Gordon 
is still every inch the musician: we 
believe his comments, sometimes 
wry, sometimes poetic-preten- 
tious, on his art, as well as his 
weary declaration (actually ja 
quotation from Bud Powell), “I 
am tired of everything, except 


legs that appear somewhat beyond Y ork independent film 

his control. - w __. roast counterpart 


The character is seemingly not 
much different from the real-life 
Gordon, and Tavernier en- 
couraged him to improvise his 


His eyes rarely settle on foe 
person to whom he is talking, but 
focus vaguely, anxiously on the 
middle distance. His statements 
come slowly and reluctantly, in a 
throaty croak that speaks of 
decades of abuse; but when they 
come they are vivid and pregnant, 
and accompanied by strange, elo- 
quent gestures of his big graceful 
hands. He is one of the most 
memorable, eccentric and charis- 
matic characters lately seen on the 
screen. 


from its West Coast counterpart 
The most serious challenge to 
belief is that Ruben Blades, a 
prominent salsa singer and com- 

r . i far frtrt 


Uib v - 

the men and the toughness and 
superior wisdom of the women of 
the group- 

While Nara lurches from brawl 
to brawl, and bizarre negotiations 
with foe brothers of his callously 
cast-off wife, his daughter passes 
on to her old granny the lessons 
she has learned in school- When 
they are violently evicted from the 
squat, it is granny who leads them 
off on an abortive protest to 
demand their basic human rights. 

Geraid Darmon plays Nara 
with a convincing blend of feroc- 
ity, guile and stubborn stupidity, 
and lucidly expresses the moral 


prominent salsa singer and com- and lucidly expresses me moral 

poser who plays foe lead, is far too pride of foe race when he protests, 

good and assured a performer to -we do not beg- we take. • 

be vulnerable to this kind of But in the end the picture k 
defeat stolen by Muse Gal bray, an octo- 

Tony Gatlif, a tough-looking genarian classical actress and air- 
man around 40, was born and t hor, as the stalwart old granny. 

‘ - “ J striding around with her great 

skirts and brolly. 


riiaiii cuuuiiw ” — « 

raised as a gypsy in Algeria, and 
claims to have lived by thieving 
before tumbling enthusiastically 
into theatre and film. His second 


David Robinson 






•tr\ ■**>, ^ 
y. L %' 


v X 


\\ W. / VI 

m\X‘t . vf 
%\\ rt f" \1 


A Steinwav arancL 

It rather depends on which 
way you look at it. 


STEINWAY U.K. DEALERS 


BELFAST: Tughan 
Crane, Fountain Street. 
Belfast 22<>034. 


BOLTON: Harker* 
Howarth. 2*>/31 Good- 
win Strceu0304 :«0.V4. 


HUDDERSFIELD: 
J. Wood & Sons. 

11 Market Street 
0484 27455. 


f| 

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if 

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BRADFORD:) Wood 
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Road. 0274 720014. 


H1GHCLIFFE: Piano 
Galleries. 

415b Lymington Road. 
Nr Christchurch. 
04252 7855<J. 


Jacks of all 
musical trades 


ROCK 


CARDIFF: Gamlms 
Music Centre. 

5o Sl Mary Street 


CHESTER: 
Rushwonh5.31 Bridge 
Sueel. 0244 25252. 


LE EDS: J. Wood i 
Sons. o2 Street Lane. 
0532 696*101. 
LIVERPOOL: 

Rush worths, 

42/46 Whitechapel. 
051 70*9071. 


Simply Red 

H amm ersmith 

Odeon 


EDINBURGH: Hans 
Music, 16 Dundas 
Street. 031 5574263. 


a t 
\ 


X f s.^ x 

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Upright traditional 


Small Grand 


1 3 






Wfe have never compromised. A Steinway is 
still a Steinway whether you choose a grand 
piano or a traditional upright The same 
attention to detail, craftsmanship and obsession 
with quality is applied to each and every piano 
that we build. 

So if some Steinways are considered a 
little less grand than others, it is safe to assume 
that this largely refers to their price. 


GLASGOW: Hans 
Music, lb Channg 
Cross Mansions. 
Sl George’s Road. 
CHI 332 6070. 



MANCHESTER: 
Forsyth Broiheis. 
121/128 Deansgaic. 

061 S34 3281. 
NOTTINGHAM: 
Clement Pianos. 

J7/23 Derby Road. 
0602417912. 

OXFORD: Russell 
AcoiL 124 High SireeL 
0\ford24U Q 5/b. 


§ STEINWAY & SONS 

... u-ii 1 1 k i.wiAhnnj I -in» WioTnnri* Street. Londoi 


l MMO lull l LI I* ■ "I ^ ^ 

Please send me further information 
on your range of Grand Pianos □ 

Upright PianosD 

Name_ 

Address 


By gathering virtually the 
whole gamut of traditional 
black music styles into one 
smart pop package, the group 
which formed in Manchester 
in 198S have come up with a 
product as popular as sliced 
bread, and of about the same 
anodyne texture when com- 
pared to foe wholemeal source 
of their inspiration. 

In performance, their stron- 
gest card was Mick HucknaD’s 
distinctive white soul voice, 
and it was dear from the lack 
of interaction between the 
band members and the way 
that foe stage was lit that he 
was foe star of the show, 
despite foe long tuft of hair 
which made him look like 
Bobby Chariton caught in a 
high wind. 


Sieinwav Hall. 44 Marvlcbone Lane. Wigmore Street. London Wl. 
TelrOI-487 33«*l 


L Siiiinway Hull. 44 Man l^bonc Lane. 
Wigmare SlrwL Lond'H »1 M 6EN 


TT 28/11/86 


But although he sang force- 
fully, and with pmticular grace 
during Talking Heads’ 
“Heaven”, there was a lack of 


emotional resonance in most 
offoe material. Similarly, the 
band foiled to gain adequate 
purchase or impose its own 
personality on the over-am- 
bitious range of styles, which 
included the jazz swing of 
“Sad Old Red”, the heavy 
funk of “No Direction", the 
gospel touches in “The Right 
Thing", the soul-slashed disco 
sound of “Red Box” and the 
sluggish reggae of “Picture 
Book”. Such a cavalier ap- 
proach to idioms, any one of 
which would take most artists 
a lifetime to master, resulted 
in an inevitably superfidal if 
pleasant entertainment. 

The look of unconcealed 
relief on foe bassist Tony 
Bowers's face after the band 
had successfully negotiated a 
long free-time break near the 
end of “Heaven" illustrated a 
lack of experience which was 
emphasized by their aspira- 
tions to musical sophistica- 
tion, and it may be a little 
early to judge them too 
harshly. If nothing else “Hold- 
ing Back The Years" made 
them foe first band in my 
experience to induce couples 
to waltz romantically in foe 
Odeon’s aisles. 


David Sinclair 


entertainments 


CONCERTS 


BARBICAN HALL 6£B 

*a*l Ton‘1 T.-15 MEL&OM 
MASS, rat* at London Sfcilonio, 
TTw Riowrd Hlckcrx Sown. 
RidvdTd HltlitO* coral. 


OPERA & BALLET 


APOLLO THEATRE *S7 3663 

Jit AS98 Fir« Call 01-2M> TKM 
TuaKelmaMcr Cl 57*> 6433 
MulvFn 8 Sal 4.30 A 8.16 
Thur» Mats 3. 

PAUL SCOnBLO 
Noralnaiad Comrfy PMfliiu— «eo 
of Ura Ymt - Lrawj* OIMor 
A-onta IBM 
HOWARD ROLUNS 
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TONY AWtRD BEST PLAY 
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DRURY LANE THEATRE ROTW- 

Etox Offlor A OC 01 836 8108. Ol- 
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ire). Ticket masur Ol 379 6433 
I no 6k8 ire), 

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42ND STREET 

A SHOW FOR ALL THE FAMILY 


HAYMARKET THEATRE ROT AL 

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Ei*n7.30Wwl ASal mata2.30*m 

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iNamiiulca A ci or of Ow Y«w 
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MAYFAIR Ol 639 3037 
From Dec 15 lo Jan 3 
Twice daily 2-0 A 4.0 
Wwfc A Sals 10.30. 3.0 A 4.0 

SOOTY'S XMAS SHOW 


SADLER'S WELLS 278 841-. 
Fir-l Can CC 3«hr 7 day 24 v 
7203 LnUI Dec 6. Evre 7 30 

LONDON CONTEMPO 
RARY DANCE THEATRE 

Torn & Toroor Flrot Gonoretloo 
DancomafcarE Son«« A Dao coi 
Rainbow Baadfl- UqoM Ajrew. 

and do Bwjr do 01 278 0866 Iw 

Vi inter Opera lnf-x 


COLISEUM S 836 3161 CC 
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ENGLISH NATIONAL OPERA 
Ton 1 ! 7 30 Coe and Pn*. Tomoi 
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AMBASSADORS 01 836 6111 « 
836 1171 FIP4 call >24 ttnfr 
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Royal StukMpwn BfiR Tf 

LES LIAISONS 
DANGEREUSES 

BEST PLAT IBM 
Standard Drama Award 
Hamlaatad far 4 OHrrnr Awards 
bne. “Play of the Tsar" 


voted I 

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BEST MUSICAL 

LAURENCE OLIVIER AWARD 

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BEST MUSICAL 

PLATS i PLAY ERS 
LONDON THEATRE CMYKS 
AWARD 

[,qs 8 O Matt Wed 3 0. Sal 50 A 
8 30 Reduced price mal Weds 
Sludenis and OAP^ slandP*. 
Group Salev >*30 6123 
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Special manure Dec 24 Sum 



ROYAL OPERA HOUSE 01 240- 
1066/ 1611. Sldhv Ui lo B3 p 
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Ton't 7 >>D ■ Pis pol e ear lier Han 
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Tomor 7 OO Dio ZantswBot*. 


THEATRES 


BARBICAN Ol 628 B795/6SB 
8041 re i Mon- Sun lOam-tWHt 

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COMPANY 

BARMCAN THEATRE lonT 
7 30. I amor 2 00 A 7 30 
SCENES FROM A MARRIAGE 
by Feydeau "Madndleenl.. 
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LIANCE by snaw returns 1-4 
Dec 

THE PIT lom 7 30. tomor 3.00 
* 7 30 THE ARCHBISHOP'S 
COL INC By Arthur Miller. 
PRINCfPIA SCtHPTOMA by 
RKlurd Nrltoti relums l -4 Dec 


DON MAR WAREHOUSE 240 

8230 er 379 6E6 S '6J 3 3 Evev 
6pm. Sols mala 4pm TREATMENT 
ov Jonathan Moore. 

DORY PREVIN 8 Dre ■ lO Jan. 


HERMAJESTYS. Haymartel OF 
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6131 FirU C aU.CC 240 7200 

ANDREW LLOYD WEBBER'S 
NEW MUSICAL 

THE PHANTOM OFTHE 
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WINNER BEST MUSICAL IBM 
EVENING STANDARD AWAIS 

Startlnq 

MICHAEL CRAWFORD 

Sarah Sieve 

Brtqhtman Barton 

Claire Moore play* Chrtstlne 
al certain pertortnancev 
Directed Oy HAROLD PRINCE 
Even 7 46 Matt Wed A Sal 3 
PtnLu bkm only lor Apr lo Del 


MAYFAIR 5 CC 629 3036 Mon- 
Thu 8 Frl/Sat 6.40 4 8 IQ 

RICHARD TODD m 

-The Beet TMBer lee year*” S M 

THE BUSINESS OF 
MURDER 

-An unabashed wmraf" S Exp 
-Sensahonal** Tunes 

STH THRHJJNG YEAR 


MOCMX 836 2294 CC 240 9661 I 

DIANA R1GG , 

-A COMMANDING PRESENCE— 
WR3XY WITTY" FT. 

WILDFIRE 

a wwpW 

Directed Bar PETER Wpoo 
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9306123/741 ^JWIJJOhRg 
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ROYALTY 01-831 0660 24 rare 
240 7200 379 6433 7419999 
Group Sales 930 6123 

JOSEPH 


B UJUMIWSIER 834 0283/4 
CC 834 0048. CC TKfcetroaaJrr STq 
i 6433. Today. Mon 2.00 A 6.30. 
Tomor 3.00 A 6J0. -n»e. Wed. 
Thur lOJOam A 2.00 


TECfOOCOLOR DBEAMCOAT 

From 16 Dec twice daliy at 2.30 » 
7wS0 BOOK HOW 


By CS Lewis 



IHE MAIL CALLEME1 tnejr 
Admiralty. . jWW TW M 
6844. ROYAL SOCI ETY OF 
MMATU8E PART TEBS . 

SCULPTERS AND ESA VERS. 
28th Nov - 18th Dec (clows 
Ipmi Dally 10 6. Adm £1 00 
Conccsstoro SQp. 


COR FINE ART 


MERMAID 236 5568 re 741 
9999. Grp Sales 930 6123 Flrsl 
Can 240 7200 <24 Hrs 7 Ravil 
Ttckcemaster 379 6433 
Last 3 peris Toni Bpm. Tomor 
6pm A 8 JO 


STEVEN BERKOFFS 
SINK THE BELGR ANO! 

-SAVAOELY COMIC" FT 
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Eves Bran. Satt 4 30 * 8.1B wed 
matt 3 

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a pATwin^R«LL 

DEREK HOYLE In 


CO MEDY Ol JT9S3S9CC01 379 
6439/741 9999. First CoU 24Dr 
240 7200 10*4 IreJ. G*P Sake 930 
6123 

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WHITEHALL SW1 01 930 7766/ 
839 4456 CC Ol 379 6E6S/379 
6433. 741 9999. Grp sales 930 
6123/836 S9b? 

■HUE CPtALDaC 

WALTERS 


HAMB.TONS 

13 Carta Place, wt. Tei Ol 499 
9493 


CINEMAS 


19 November - 14 December- 
Mon -Sal 10-630- Ftdl M Cal 
AvbU. JT7J50 Inc PAP- 


CAMDEN PLATA opp Camden 
Town Tube 485 2*43 MEN'15i 
Film al 2.28 4.30 6 4Q 8 56 


THE THEATRE OF COMEDY 
COMPANY'S 

"slap-up revival - the best I have 1 
ever seen" (Times) of 

ROOKERY NOOK _ 

■•the mod celebrated of Bon 
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Previews from Pec 6 for 


The Award Winning Comedy 

■ usofoacww ASWOWT 

By Siiarman Macdonald 
Directed by Stamp StoLes 
Prevs From Tue* ■ Om»9 Dec- 
Tom Mon-Frt 8. Sal 8.30 It 8 JO 
Wed mats 3 


FME ART SOCMTY 148 New 
Bond Street. W.l. 01-629 5116 
FWTB -TKA ULOtW. Als o 
ARTIST D EM B tOH 1916 

1955. 


CHELSEA CINE MA ki ngs Road 
' SW3 351 3742 MEM (lfii. Film 
al 22 S 4.30 6 40 8. SB 


■■AN IRRESPONSIBLE EVENiMC i 
WAS HAD BY ALL" D-Je* 

A FUNNY THING 


a lavish ne w pro duction 

AM ITALIAN STRAW HAT 

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DUCHESS S 836 82*3 CC 2*0 
9648 CC 379 6433 * CC 24 
nr/7 das 2*0 7200 Ev® 8 Wed 
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1067 

ME .AND MY GIRL 

THE LAMBETH WALK 
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CHURCHILL Bromley 460 6677 
Ev« 7 4S Mats Thurs. Sal 2 30 
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JOHN ALDCRTON 

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THE MAINTENANCE 
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A Comedy Bv Ric hard Harm 

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,_WOWCRFUU.Y FUNNY” 

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Mon ThU 6 Fn/Sal S 30 6 8 30 


DUKE OF YORKS 836 5122 CC 
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24hr 240 7200 Eves 8. Thu 3. 
Sal 5 4 8 30 

COMEDY OF THE YEAR 

Standard Drama Award 1SB4 

STEPPING OUT 

Hll Crane® By Richard Hams 
Directed by -!±2;4 htaerroe 
■TRtUMPH OH TAP" Std 

THIRD HILARIOUS YEAR 


LONDON PALLADIUM 437 7373. 
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i,. 


THE TIMES FRIDAY NOVEMBER 28 1986 


THE ARTS 2 



One of television’s most insid- 
toos effects is to create 
expectations Oats successful 
person ia me field sboald be a 
greatand interesting per- 
fonuer on screen. Some hap- 
pfly maasge dus. Others do 
net last right's Forty Min- 
utes (BBC2% on what lan 
Botham got ap to daring Us 
two-month ban, revealed that 
off the pitch at least, the most 
exciting cricketer we hare ever 
spawned is a man of tiumder- 
tats banality. 

.“There’s more to Hfe than a 
of cricket," he began, 
his tahrador locks. 


Once otd of the dressing room, 
his role model appeared to be 
find mm of meffifinoas grants, 
Sylvester Stallone. Iain 
Johnstone, the programme's 
writer, pstfemi a comparison 
with Ulysses, bat his delib- 
erately (I hope) ever the top 
script was not given enongh 
IrostSc emphasis in WDEBam 
Frankiyn’s voiceover. 
^Botham is not 
academic . . we heard, as 
the great man wrestled with 
the problems of aerod ynamic 

on his way to 
heffagrtor pflot 

Botham’s Penelope, who 
spins away in Yorkshire dar- 
ing Us annual tea montiur 
absence, is a sweet girl called 
Kath. They met in file car park 

of Tijiwdg wiftrt 

She ta deBghted that 
from first class cricket win 
him home to Us three 
Not that we receive 
match sense of borne fife. No 
sower had he ducked 
daughters under their chhm 
than offhe disappeared to play 
golf and fish with the boys. 

One of the boys is v e ry mu ch 
how Botham emerged; a like- 
able, restless, loose-tongued 
chauvinist who after a jar has 
occasionally indulged in mari- 
juana and let slip a few home 
truths about “the gin- slinging 
dodderers” in charge of our 
national game. It is for such 
small beer, as much as for Us 
intoxicating cricket, flat he is 
known. He might well he too 
big for his white flannels, but 
on the basis of last night's 
really qrite tedioas portrait he 
is certainly no larger than life. 


Nicholas 

Shakespeare 


Paragon of a paiR Karita Msttfla and Siegfried Jerusalem at Covent Garden 

Unenchanted evening 


OPERA 


Die Zauberflote 

Covent Garden 


Wfl] Tamino’s flute ever bring 
magic to Covent Garden? The 
answer is probably not, while 
August Everding*$ haunted 
house pop-up production is 
still with us. If even the 
animals prance around in 
from of the temple as if 
preparing for a game of round- 
ers, then there is, perhaps, 
little chance that this fhae 
will enchant mere human 
beings. 

Wilfred Judd, staging the 
production this time round, 
does what he can to activate 
its confused extravaganza of 
purely visual ideas — even to 
the extent of falling back cm an 
arm-in-arm, one-step-for- 
ward, one-step-back routine 
when uncertain quite what to 
do next. But the only thing 
which can save this produc- 
tion from itself is theoondno- 
ton and at Covent Garden 
waiting for a Mozartian is Kke' 


waiting for the Messiah. 

Peter Schneider from Vi- 
enna is the chosen man this 
time, and he is making his 
London debut here. For 20 
years he has been working his 
way through the Ge rman and 
Austrian opera houses, and 
has spent time — perhaps, 
under the circumstances, 
rather too much time — with 
Wagner at Bayreuth. For he 
seems to conceive ofthe/Tute, 
by comparison, as a mere 


about as much as one could-' 
wish for the performance 
itself has a little further to go 
in pursuit of perfection. 

Given the dipped numb- 
ness of the orchestral 
accompaniment, it may be 
asking too much to expea 
truly lyrical phrasing: the top 
of the voice does take the 
strain and his wooing is as yet 
brusque. And this Tammo 
must learn to walk up to the 
doors of the temple as if there 


musical-box opera: one tune . just might be some vestiges of 
follows another,' preferably as wisdom, ; labour and art 


dose to it in tempo and 
character as is possible; phras- 
ing and the breathing of the 
human voice seemed to be 
well down on his list of 
priorities. 

The pity of it is that Covent 
Garden has at last assembled 
an entirely tempting cast 
When Tammo and Pamina 
walk off into the sunrise, we 
know we have both seen and 
heard a near-paragon of a pair. 
Siegfried Jerusalem has put 
the hdden back in tenor, anda 
shot of heroism can do this 
production no ham at alL 
The physique, the very nature 
and weight of the voice, is 


within, rather than as if he was 
visiting his auntie for tea. 

It is worth waiting all 
evening, though, for Panama's 
cry of “ Tammo mem!”.' So 
sure is Karita Manila's under- 
standing of the musical 
character of her role, so 
refreshingly full of rich. 


creamy colour is her vocal 
palette, that disbelief — both 
in bar plight, and indeed in 
what is going era in the pit — is 
temporarily suspended when- 
ever she appears. This young 
Finnish soprano must return 
whenever Mozart comes to 
Covent Garden. 

Her mother has a harder 
time of it The Queen of the 
Night maria a nervous, 
lustreless Royal Opera debut 
for SaBy Wolf, and Peter 
Haage’s debut as Monostatos 
is likewise only adequate. 
Jonathan S ummer s returns as 
an irresistibly spirited- 
Papageno, and Jan-Hendrik 
Rootering as a young, likeable 
Sarastro, in a world in which 
that is just about all he can be 
expected to be. 

Hilary Finch 


Mikhail Pletnev 

Wigmore Hall 


As a pianist in the old ro- 
mantic mould, Mikhail 
Pletnev is of a kind to arouse 
partisan feelings according to 
one’s own ideas of style and 
interpretation. So ft -was that 
at a sold -out Wigmore Hall 
last night on Wednesday the 
Soviet virtuoso delighted me 
most at the beginning and end 
of bis programme, the last 
item his own transcription of 
seven numbers from 
Tchaikovsky’s Nutcracker. 

With only one of them 
overlapping the familiar 
orchestral suite — the Sugar- 
plum Fairy even more crys- 
tallized than usual in 
keyboard tone — these bene- 
fited from the essentially dec- 
orative approach the pianist 
brought to them, and could 
well have been extended into 
more of the neglected music 
from the ballet’s first act 

As noted on this page alter 
his unscheduled appearance 
on the South Bank last Mon- 
day, Pletnev has an imposing 
technique which also enriched 
the Salieri Variations fay 
Beethoven and coaid well 
make them more popular. 
They do not just play with a 
theme (from Salieri's opera, 
Falstaff) but invest it with 
ried character and content, 
for which this playing was 
more than a match 
It was in the more searching 
matters of the F Minor Sonata 
by Brahms that 1 found the 
pianist over-indulgent in va- 
garies of tempo, phrasing and 
dynamics, and in emotional 
embellishment, at the expense 
of the music's form and its 
relationship from one move- 
ment to the next Such a 
quirky performance I found 
hard to take, but I left the 
audience happily accepting all 
the encores he cared to give. ' 

No€l Goodwin 



(CONCERT 


RLPO/Hlckox 
Philharmonic Hall, 
Liveipool ■ 

Everyone is entitled to an 
opinion, buf I cannot think 
that the man who at the end of 
the world premiere of Robert 
Simpson’s Variations on a 
Theme of Cart Nielsen loudly 
accused the work of befog 
pretentious rubbish got it 
right. Whatever rise Simpson 
may be, he is a composer of 
unquestionable integrity, and 
this piece, based on an un- 
published sitd * sardonically 
polytonal trifle of incidental 
music, stated its case as' 
straightforwardly as we might 
have expected. How sad that it 
has had to wait three years for 
its first airing. 

The influences upon it are 
the inevitable ones. There is 
muchofNirisen himself in the 
tonal design, the conflicting 
assertions of different tonal 
centres, and in its constantly 
elusive, ever-changing moods. 
Bruckner surfaces in the 
orchestral layering and, ul- 
timately, in the sheer, ob- 
stinate massiveness of its alL 
And Brahms is there, too, with 


Simpson presenting the basic,, 
• strongly /iriteryaffic ■ ideas in 
different, transforming lights 
•as the variations progressed. 

It could conceivably have 
been written 30 years ago, of 
course, but it was not. and 
vastly mare important is that, 
however conservative the lan- 
guage and the essence of the 
structure, it has something of 
compelling originality and 
drama to say, a something that 
could be said only in music. If 
ihe new work does have any 
weakness, a single hearing 
suggests that it might, lie in 
some of the links between 
sections. But a more intimate 
knowledge of the weak may 
well make the jumps less 
abrupt, even logical, and in 
any case they are few. 

The Royal Liverpool Phil- 
harmonic Orchestra, con- 
ducted by Richard Hickox, 
gave a performance that was 
obviously the fruit of careful 
rehearsal One coukl thus 
easily forgive a few blurred 
edges m Nielsen’s majestic, if 
distinctly un- Aegean, Helios 
Overture, though the turgid 
inconsistency o? Kyung-Wha 
Chung’s playing of 
Beethoven’s Violin Concerto, 
all misplaced heroics, was 
another matter altogether. 

Stephen Pettht 


THEATRE 


] 


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DKECTTOBY • • 

_ ANTON RODGERS 

SH A FTFASRf IKY THEATRE OF COWEPf _ 


The setting of Peter Gibbs's 
ptay is the showroom of 
novelty goods warehouse; and 
it arouses, feelings of awe. for 
the designer, Sue Plummer, 
who has managed to amass 
this ghtterfog heap of junk. 

However, to the proprietor, 
it is anything but junk. For 30 
years Desmond has made a 
good living by selling light-up 
yo-yos and barometers set in 
the beffics of wooden basset! 
hounds, well aware that he is 
marketing dreams. He op- 
erates on the same principle as 
Miller’s Willie Loman. 
Salesmanship is a dream. You 
sell the sizzle, not the steak. 
And no-one is more vulner- 
able to tins approach than 
Desmond himself when of- 
fered such bargains as gondola 
lamp-bases or “the official 
Vatican spice rack”. As for his 
slinky daughter Stephanie — 
filling in time as his temporary 
secretary — she is a dream 
-walking. 

. It is through her that Des- 
mond acquires a new sales- 
man. A shy young metallurgist 
who comes in out of the rain 
and stays an to be initiated 
into the trade, Malcolm 
proves a star recruit He 
acquires masterful self-con- 
fidence, opens up long dead 
accounts, and closes every sale 
— with one exception: he 
cannot sell himself to Steph- 
anie; And her marriage to 
another torpedoes his order 
boric and brings a brutal day 
of redeeming with the boss. 

Sexual passion is ' beyond 
the play’s comic range, and it 
becomes rather clammy in 
spite Of Caroline Bliss’s cool 
performance. On its main 
territory the play supplies 
material for two glorious higb- 
farce - performances from 
Dinsdale Landen and David 
Threl&lL 

Threlfairs Malcolm 
matches his Leslie THmuss in 
its unscrupulous ascent to the 
top of ihe greasy pole. Mr 
Landen, alternately at death's 
door and emerging buoyantly 
in white tails and topper to 
boost sales morale, puts his 
personal stamp on Desmond 
as a wreck who will outlive 
everyone in sight The part 
ought have been written for 

him. 

Together, they present a 
remarkable father and son 
routine, withthe initially vile- 
tempered Desmond settling 
back into awed amazement at 
his proteges prowess; and 
Malcolm, in increasingly 
resplendent suits, employing 
his newly-won sates tech- 
niques on his benefactor. 

UuheeaditisThretiallwho 
goes berserk, pushing comedy 
10 the very brink, and Landen 
who phlegmatically picks up 
the pieces and arranges the 
next week’s sales schedule. 
Ann Beach, as his wife, com- 
pletes -the crack casting of 
Robert Chetwyn’s production. 

Irving Wardle 


WHAT THIS MAN DOESN’T KNOW ABOUT 
THE SICILIAN 1859 BOMBA HEAD 
COULD BE WRITTEN ON THE BACK OF ONE 



The roan in question is David Boyd, 
who runs the postage stamp department 
at Phillips. 

TTie head in question belong? to King 
Ferdinand ll.vvho used lo run Sicily. 

Ferdinand was not one of Europe's 
more shy and retiring monarch*. 

His idea of a good time was to 
homhard his subjects with shellfire 
whenever the fancy took him, hence h'ts 
nickname of “Bombar 

In 185 l J he arranged a competition 
lo select a decorous design for Sicily's 
first set of stamps. 

The entry of one Tommaso Aloysio 
Juvaro was deemed the winner possibly 
because he chose to depict the kings 
head in noble profile. 

However, a courtier pointed out to 
Ferdinand that splendid though the new 
stamps looked when mini, it would be 
little short of treasonous to ink over the 
royal image with a cancellation mark. 

Ferdinand agreed, and 
Signor .Aloysio Juvaro was 
hurriedly recalled to Palermo 
to design an ingenious new 
mark which would frank the 
stamp while leaving the 
monarch's visage unsullied. 

The writing, however, 
was on the wall for Ferdinand, 
.so the long-suffering people 
of Sicily dragged themselves 
from the shrapnel and started to have fun. 

A few artistic jioslal clerks risked 
draw ing curly moustache* and beards 
on the royal features. This was received 
with much dismay by ihe court of King 




DiSVSiiih Ipmnn 
(tijfirinl i ivsion) 



W.W Siril} Ipnnu 
(uiutffirwl rersinn) 


Ferdinand II but with much delight by 
David Boyd. 

The reason being that the 1859 
Sicilian issue is one of the very few 
stamps that is worth mure, not less, 
w hen defaced. 

The »ton of the Bomba Heads is 
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THE 


FRTDAY NOVEMBER 28 1986 


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: 1 


'■ « 




SPECTRUM 


Can wheat fields be turned into 



Part 5: A fallow 


Everyone now agrees 
that the Common 
Agricultural Policy is 
a sick animal. By 
subsidizing wheat, 
beef and milk that 
no one wants, it is 


future for Europe? heading towards 

bankruptcy. There 


is wide disagreement, however, about the 
remedy. Should subsidies be reduced? 
Should farmers, as Mrs Thatcher believes, 
be paid to take land out of production — or 
turn it, perhaps, into forestry? Concluding 
our series, we look at the answers on offer 



was 

lit 


illegal’ 


W e are producing too 
much wheal at the 
wrong price, Profes- 
sor Colin Spedding 
agrees. "But if we 
could produce it much more 
cheaply, which is not impossible, 
it would find industrial uses. We 
are producing more than we can 
sell, not necessarily more than we 
need" 1 . 

Radical words, compared with 
those of other experts on the 
Common Agricultural Policy, ex- 
pected by some to overshoot its 
budget by some £2 billion next 
year. Most agree that the CAP 
must be reformed. As Roy Jenkins 
said this week: "In the past it 
ought to have been done; in the 
recent past it was essential to do it 
- but the situation is now moving 
into a position where it is impos- 
sible not to do it” 

But do what? While politicians 
and formers in Brussels aigne over 
intervention prices and variable 


make. But then there is the pospib- 
ility of major disease in crops. It is . 
all very wefl saying that we can 
wipe them out with chemicals, but 
we might not be allowed to use 
them. Attitudes have changed 
since Chernobyl. A large wheat 
growing area was put out of action 
and, ifthe wind had changed, who 
knows what might have 
happened?” 

Spedding suggests that the first 
step towards CAP reform may be a 
disguised reduction in prices 
through tinkering with the inter- 
vention system. If that foils, there 
may be further artificial produc- 
tion restraints, such as quotas, 

"Moving on, we can assume 
either that a lot of land wifi come 
out of agriculture because it is no 
longer needed, or that we wifi 
move to less intensive systems.” 
He sees no reason why organic 
forming should not continue to 
grow. 


THE POLITICIANS 


THE FARMERS 




premiums. Professor Spedding, 
director of the Centre lor Agri- 
cultural Strategy at Reading 
University, looks to the long-term. 

The present economic frame- 
work will not always remain the 
same, he points out A drastic fill 
in land prices, for instance, could 
upset calculations. The first coun- 
try to subsidize crop production 
for industrial use (probably 
France) stands to gain because the 
new processing plants wifi be built 
there. 

He does not accept that technol- 
ogy wifi be applied just because it 
is there. "We can grow pineapples 
in Aberdeen undo- glass but we 
don't because it's not economic. 
Dairy formers used to use a lot of 
concentrate feeds for cattle, but 
when the milk quotas began they 
cut down because they couldn't 
afford them.” 

“Some technology — nitrogen 
fertilizers, for example — wifi be 
applied, because it increases 
profitability. The more you get out 
of a field, the more money you 


Times reporting team: 
John Young (Agriculture 
Correspondent), Richard 
Owen, Martin Fletcher, 
George Hifl, 


I f land is taken out of 
production — and Dr Sicco 
Manshoft, original architect 
of the CAP, thinks as much 
as 20 per cent may have to 
go —the price of such land wifi foil 
drastically. This may give young 
people the chance to buy it and 
form it less intensively. Professor 
Spedding says. 

The price of timber, meanwhile, 
will rise. “I am interested in what I 
call agro-forestry ent er pr i ses. We 
might try inuring sheep with trees 
for example. Young trees can now 
be protected with plastic sheaths, 
and the sheep would provide an 
income in the early years. 

"We should also be looking at 
the idea of muring trees with free 
range poultry, which would in- 
volve no risk to the young trees, 
while the birds would eat pests 
and weeds. But no one has tried it 
yet, so for as I know. So why not 
pay formas to experiment with 
alternatives?” 

Spedding thinks that the prob- 
lem of hunger in the Hurd World 
is irrelevant to that of surpluses in 
developed countries. "People go 
hungry not because they can’t 
produce food but because of 
poverty, which means they can't 
buy it If you go to any country in 
Africa ana stay in a fog hotel, you 
can get all the food you want” 


For the Conser- 
vatives, Michael 
Jopimg, Minister 
of AgricnltHre, has 
been advocating a 

imrfrugp of mea- 
sures to reduce sur- 
pluses, control 
spending, and introduce market 
place discipline without 

rfiyiTnn'mrtrng o jrahmt the rel- 
atively efficient British former. 

The "senior partner” m this 
package would be a tough price 
policy, with cuts rather than mere 
freezes in commodit y suppo rt 
prices. Mr Jopimg broadly sup- 
ports EEC proposals to support 
bmer quality grain at lower prices 
and to adapt i nte rv e ntion prices to 
reflect more dosety market needs, 
and has called for studks into a 
possible EEC “set-aside” scheme 
to encourage marginal producers 
to take land out of cereals preducv 
tion. He also believes there is 
greater scope for maiketing of 
produce abroad. 

Mr Jopimg is opposed to any 
system of quotas, which “ossify” 
production patterns, and to the co- 
responsibility levy, a Europe-wide 
tax to fund the disposal of sur- 
pluses, which is hard on British 
formers and "irrelevant to the 
underlying problem of achieving a 
more sensible market balance”. 


freeze in prices — or even a 
reduction.” 

He does not despair, however, 
believing that political self- 
preservation is likely to force EEC 
members to take concerted a cti on 
before long. 

The Alliance's official policy 
wonhl be to un derwrite family form 
incomes through price support for 
pre-set gimnifrfowi ®f production, 
but extra production would be sold 
at market prices. 

This, it rfawnft, would protect 
mull formers while limitiBg the 
cost of CAP support and reduriag 
surpluses. Each country would he 
given production quantities for 
each commodity, but gover nm ents 
woaid be aMe to distribute alloca- 
tions as they saw fit 

The Affiance would review the 
system of intervention baying, but. 
believes in the need to maintain a 
fleer for commodity prices. 


M 




\ Buy Jenkins, fbr- 
'ff'ij mer SDP lender 


and the only Britea 
to have headed the 
h ureac r a cy of the 
European Commu- 
nity, fears today 
that if its members 
do not take concerted action to 
reform the CAP, states wifi begin 
to Impose their own separate 
solutions, thr eate n in g the very 
survival of the Community. 

Tf the Common Market in 
agriculture broke up, some people 
wonder whether the industrial 
market could survive,” he says. 
“The system of takas land out of 
cultivation may well be the sen- 
sible way to go, but I'm net 
absolutely dear how it's gang to 

avoid all the difficulties associated 

with production qaotas, or with a 


The Labour Party 
1ms no official 
icy on the CAP, fast 
its agriculture 
spokesman, 
Brynmor John* said 

h«t Mawth that 

"there is no mfrade 
cure. A combination of measures 
will be needed, even where one 
plays the central role”. 

That central measure would be 
the introduction of national quotas 
for all major agricultural commorl 
fries, with detailed imphuieutitiau 
of those quotas w ith i n each cow- 
try left to the national govern- 
ments to decide. 

Production, he said, needs to be 
curtailed “to an amount which 
represents the level of consump- 
tion plas a small safety margin”. 

Mr John is opposed to restraint 
through the price wiffhaiiism — 
which he fears woaid merely drive 
V volume; to co-responsibility 
levies; to land “set-aside”- a 
“short-term palliative”; and to a 
tax ou nitrogen. He is in favour of a 
woodland scheme whereby the 
state would pay a former aa manual 
income for each hectare on which 
trees ware planted, and would 
receive a proportion of fie pro- 
ceeds when fie trees were felled; 


Sir Richard Buffer, 
who nuts a form m 
Essex, is also head 
of ; Cops, the 
organization which 
represents Euro- 
pean ’ farmers 
throaghout the' 
EEC Farmers were pre pared to 
adapt to a reformed CAP, he said 
recently, bat on “certain 
conditions”. The m a uitemm ce of 
formers' incomes remained a top 
priority “for the sake both of fie 
Tuiwl and the Common 

Market itself”. 

"One respects the commisshm’s 
desire to contain the budget;” he 
said, “but it is difficult to see how 
we move from where we are now to 
a better balance of supply and 
demand ™l we have more 
money to do so.” 

In this be agrees wifi two of fie 
sternest opponents of re fo r m — 
I^m Dearie; West German agri- 
cnttiue minister and a former dairy 
former, and Francois Guilfemne, 
French agriculture min is ter, and 
himself a forma. Both want 
greater national aid for formers’ 
incomes; both oppose any redac- 
tion ia prices for form products. 


There are ghomexs of a way out 
of this bead-on dash between fie 
Commission and the formers. Sir ■ 

Richard hwmlf suggests alter- 
native crops, or payment to farm- 
ers to take a role in nature 
conservation rather than produc- 
tive forming, ideas fie Commis- 
sion has also proposed. 

He also agrees fiat new tedmot- 
ogjes such as Mo-efianol ; «nd 
vegetable fibre production are 
feasible, provided they Imre “u 
sound economic bare” — another 

nwmt tl mN< jnrflUK. 

The British National formers’ 
Union fa v our s "set-aside” — In- 
centives to formers to keep had 
follow hot says it would hare to 
apply across the board, and fie 
land couM not beused far growing 
other crops such us vegetables, 
which would simply cure u huge 
phrf Q B fiy 

"Jopimg’s idea ts fiat, if you let 
market forces take commaad, 
prices wffl foil automatically,” 
says lan Ganfiner, director of fie 
NFlPs commodfly pa&y «e- 
ardraatiou division. “Ftoaure bO*S 
right, and that is precisely what we 
are afraid ot It would rum tens of 
thousands of fanners-” 


r r ■ he EEC has been accused 
' ■ * of false accounting by 
! ■ - Peter Price, the Conser- 

I I vstive Euro spokesman 
on the budget, and 
1 Conservative MEP for London 
South-East Mr Brice, a lawyer 
I who has investigated EEC Sr 
nances in dentil for the Court of 
Auditors and the European Par- 
liament, says EEC officials are 
operating a system under, which 
fie Community spends far more 
■on storage than fie real value of 
the stocks bring stored. 

Mr Price befieyes fie 1987 
I- budget wifi overshoot by at least 
£2.2 billion. This, he axgues, is 
because. the Cfixunisrian, when 
preparing its preliminary budget 
for next year, deliberately put in 
farm spending figures it knew were 
£1.3 buHaa short of the real totaL 
.Two economic factors have 
made things even worse, Mr Price 
says: fie dollar depredation, 
which means- lower prices in 
European currencies feu 1 EEC agri- 
cnfrnral stocks -sold an fie world 
market; and the gaieral downward 
trend in world prices. 


^Someone 
should be 
certified} 


THE COMMISSIONER 


As EEC Coaunfesfeaer for Agri- 
culture, Frans Andriessen is per- 
haps fie most important figure 
pressing for refo rm. “We s houl d, 
hare adopted tile CAP the moment 
we reached setf sufficiency,” he 
says. “We can no tamer continue 
to guarantee onfinrited quantities. 
Intervention most re tain to its 
original role — as a safety net, not* 
standard outlet.” 

Among fie reforms proposed by 
a Com m ission Green foper a year 
ago are: a restrictive pridag 
policy; early retirement far form- 
ers; assisting formers in less 
favoured areas; compensating 
formers who maintain the enriron- 
ment and set aside hud; and 
afforest ati on of fen d fa ro ufr am i d 
for crops. . 

For the dairy sector fie 
Comaosaioa has aa e merg ency 
plan: dis continuin g mterregtoual 


compensation* mfik quotas; step- 
ping axflJk powder i nte rvention in 
win ter; ending intervention pur- 
chases of butter; and the direct 
disposal of fresh batter, especially 
to the needy. 

AH this, Andriessen says, is part 
of u campaign and mast be 
followed fay more comprehensive 
measures. “Europe is not alone in 
theagricaltnral crisis. It is a world 
phenomenon. National form poli- 
cies i»d irtp n w Htwi trade must 
be co-ordinated.” 

“We can set aside fend — we 
have already authorized sabridies 
in West Germany for an. experi- 
ment to take fend oat of produc- 
tion. Bit tf you make it compulsory 
you wffl meet enonu o ua resistance 
and yro ran fie risk of b urea uc ra - 
tizing agriculture even more. We 
risk caring fie symptoms; aotfie 
disease.” 


. He warns fiat the Commission 
and the Farm Ministers are quite 
capable of again resorting to a 
temporary expedient to get out of 
this situation by using “creative 
accounting.” 

According to the Commission, 
fie SC is spending some £18 
billion on storage, as part of a 
package of farm support measures 
costing about <£8.5 billion. “Is it 
worth spending sums of this order 
on stories which are worth less 
than fie storage charges?” Mr 
Price asks. 

The Commission's book value 
for fie stocks is £&_5 billion (the 
cost of buying them into interven- 
tion); but fie Commission admits 
that the' stocks are probably 
resaleable for far less, perhaps at 
half the book value. 

• Mr Price’s investigations show 
that the real book value of fie 
stories is more like £2 biHion/Tf 
we are spending £2£ billion to 
I store stocks which are worth £2 
! billion, clearly anyone involved 
i should be certified”, Mr Price 
remarks! 

“The EEC has never shown in its 
balance sheets the condiment 
liability of disposing of farm 
stocks,” Mr Pnce says. “Any 
commercial firm would have to do 
so. "A private company would be 
required to depreciate fie value of 
stories because they are assets. If 
you knowingly publish balance 
sheets which show certain assets at 
a certain value, when you know 
their true value is half or even less 
than half fie value shown, then 
you are in trouble with the taw.” 


ITHE$s£ 


►TIMES! 


SATURDAY 


A new hat for the Klan 


CONCISE CROSSWORD NO 11 18 


£16,000 to be won 



With a new chief 
who is a Yankee and 
a Catholic, the Klu 
Klux Klan is trying 
to change its spots. 




There was a coarse edge to the 
New England voice. “Are yon 
a Jew?” 

“No.” 

"Are yon sure?” I told him I 
was sore. 

“Well what are you then?” 
It was sot dear whether this 
was a racial or religious ques- 
tion. I furnished answers for 
both. “OK. rn do the 
interview.” 

High on a hiO in Connecti- 
cut, in a well-to-do suburb of 
fie quiet residential town of 
Shelton is not where yon 


Lords »4wapinB from SopW Windha ro l nnAvAgvcVCMMM* 


Winter’s tales 


From marzipan pigs to Mendeleyev’s periodic 
table. . JfeTfeus guide to Christmas bodes offers 
amusement, eu te rt amm ent and erudition from critics 


a fire with romance; or simply keep the chifafren quiet 
with fie lowest book of the year —all six yards of it ... 


Pantomime Crowned heads 
show time of tragedy 

Guide to beauties King Lear comes 
and best beasts to the National 


Can you always gel your c opy of The Times? 

Dear Newsagent, please deliver/ save me a copy ofThe Times 


name 


ADDRESS 



of the Ku Klux Klan. But then 
James W. Fanands, recently 
sworn in as fie new Imperial 
Wizard of the invisible empire 
of the Kkn, is not predictable 
in every aspect 

For a start he is both fie 
first Yankee and the first 
Roman Catholic to be elected 
to the top job in fie white 
supremacist organization, 
historically dominated by 
southern protestants. 

A heavy-set man in hiseariy 
fifties with receding hair. 
Fanands has fie hefty fore- 
arms one might expect of a 
tool-and-die machinist. 
“Someone came from New 
York to interview me,” he told 
me. “First thing he said was 
that be was a Jew and then he 
started to abuse me. It worn't 
much of an interview. Sit 
down, make yourself comfort- 
able. I'm gonna take off my 
’shirt.” 

It was a comfortable mid- 
dle-class American home, 
with deep plush armchairs 
and a huge television. Clearly 
fie stock car racing business 
fie Fanands family runs on 
fie side is profitable. 



James Fanands, Imperial Wizard: “ A political programme” 


“The thing about the blacks 
is fiat they're not as intefligeni 
as we are. Dr Shoddey proved 
that, you know, out in Califor- 
nia. He has. all the facts and 
figures. Perhaps it was fie 
nigger fiat descended from 
the apes and fie white man 
was made in fie image of 
God...” 

“See here. I got a letter of 
support from someone in your 
National Front in England.” 
He waved one of the papers 
from his bundle: 

That was nice. “No it ain’t, 
these people are crazy. They 
want us to get involved with 
direct action. These people are 
talking about throwing bombs 
and so on. We're not terror- 
ists. We're a respectable politi- 
cal movement.” 


That was not exac tly' the 
image fie Klan had in Britain, 
I told him. 

"Well, there were things in 
fie past, maybe. But now- 
adays if one of our members 
breaks fie law well mm his 
ass in. We can’t be a bona fide 
political party wifi fiat going 
on.” . 

There are three divisions of 
the Kn Klux Klan in fie 
United States: the Invisible 
Empire, the United Klaus of 
Amreica and fie Knights of 
the KKK. During its last 
resurgence in the late Seven- 
ties the Invisible Empire was 
the largest, wifi around 4,000 
members. It was described by 
the US Justice. Department as 
the most violence-prone Klan 
in America. All this, Fanands 


was adamant, had all changed. | 
There were lots of changes, he ! 
said, and he would nuke I 
more. "We don’t have to go I 
around burning and hang in g i 
people.” 1 

Ktanwatcfa, a civil rights 
monitoring group based in 
Montgomery, Alabama, was 
not convinc'd. "That may be 
his official line but the type of 
people who are attracted to the 
Ktan are volatile and hot- 
headed. He couldn’t control 
them if he wanted to,” said 
Ktanwatch's director, Bill 
Stanton. 

For all that he is not too 
worried about Fanands. 
“Most of the really dangerous 
people have left fie Klan now 
and gone to neo-Nazi groups 
like The Order or lire Aryan 
Nations Group. The Klan isv 
pretty much a spent force. The 
United fKlans, which is now 
the biggest, is largely made up 
of card carrying middle-aged 
men who joined in fie 
Sixties.” 

Fanands, however, persists 
in his analysis fiat fie Klan is 
merely changing. "We have a 
political programme now. 
There are some blacks who 
want u create a new Africa in 
the southern states. We sup- 
port fiaL There’s a lot to be 
said for apartheid, you know. 

“On trade, we believe in 
protectionism. I can't stand it 
whoa those slimey little Jap 
businessmen come around my 
factory. We believe in steriliz- 
ing ail smgl&parent women 
after their second child. And, 
of course, we're against 
abortion.** 

The phone rang. It was a 
Canadian radio statio wanting 
to know if he would take part 
is a phone-in. “Sure,” he said. 

"I just won’t answer if they 
want to be abusive^” He put 
down the receiver." “You just 
can’t trust some of these radio 
stations,” he explained.. 
“They’re run by Jews.” This, I 
decided, was where 1 came in. 


ACROSS 

1 Round stone <6) • 

4 Bed cushion (6) 

7 Algerian navy centre 


8 . Missile front (8) 

9 Locally prevalent (7) 

11 Ed*r(5> . 

12 Combat weariness 

<6,7) 

15 Minim am (5) 

16 Take air J7) 

20 Fur a i t m c beetle (8) 


min 






HU ■ 

■ 

■ 

■| 

)■ mmum 

■ 0 B 

■■ 

■ 

■ ■ 

■ 

■ 

sa 


21 Nuisery rhyme 
y collector (4) 

22 Roofbeam($) 

23 Spoul(ti) 


DOWN 

1 Grading saying (7) 

2 Plait (5) 

3 Boredom (5) 

4 Smart (4) 

5 ObservbgfT) 


3 DwBtom<5) 10 Defraud (5) 15 Further down (5) 

4 &n*n(4) 11 SwimfS) j 7 Vertical type(S) 

5 Obser^(7) 13 Rush away (4 3) 18 Glassy gemstm* (5) 

6 Soril-sbeUedmoIhKC 14 BiHica] interpreter 19 Hard op ( 4 ) 


SOLUTION TO NO 1117 

ACROSS: i Rj^q ff 4 Creche 9 Outcrop 10 Fetal n Late 12 Or- 

SS 22Lotto n ^- 

DOWN: 1 toot 2Pitta 3 Force feed 5 Rap SCaUass 7 Enlist 8 
v^^lWe^zfoii 13 Polynesia Militia 16 May 17 Ashlar 29 



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concern 


Here is the news, and this is Angplq 
Rippon making it The country ghT 
who became the BBC’s first woman 


newsreader spoke to Sally Brompton 
about her new challenge at Nirex 


a ngela Rippon 's first 

A reaction on being 

/l invited to join the 
/ '\ board of Nirex, the 
nuclear waste 
agency, was “Oh, heck — this 
is a very hot potato and I don’t 
think I want to get involved.” 

After months of soul search- 
ing over the whole issue of 


documentary, The Dump. 
about the distraught villagers 
of Fulbeck in Lincolnshire, 
one of four proposed sites for 
die dumping of nuclear waste. 
She has not yet seen the 
programme but recorded it as 
part of. her research - into 
nuclear waste. 

“My Christmas reading is 


nuclear waste, however, she anything and everything that 
changed her mind, helped by -has been written cm the sob- 
the “visual images of people in ject of the nuclear industry — 
enormous distress.” Sire will both official and uno fficial 
never forget the weeping There may be ordinary in- 
woman on the television news dividuals who know more 
who bad just beard that her about it than I do at the 
village was being proposed as moment but in six mouths' 
a nuclear dumping site. “She time there won’t be many.” 
was very emotional, bat what She feels that her skills as a 
impressed me was that she television reporter will enable 
was terrified as weO”, says her to absorb the necessary 
Rippon. “Until now, there has information, ask die right 
been no identification that questions, and break through 
those people are not jnst angry the “paternal arrogance that 
or worried or vodferous — but comes very often from sd- 
terrified.” entists because they under- 

It was as a result of what she stand what they - are talking 
sees as the huge rift of non- *boat 2 nd no one else does.” 
comprehension which exists She sees herself, as 
between the nn^fop r industry ^presenting the various 
and thegenesal public that she environmental pressure 
finally accepted tire job. “I 8 rou P s such as Greenpeace 
want to de-mystify a lot of 811(1 fiends of the Earth, as 
what they are talking about 88 the general pubhc — 



Skin patches catching on 


The application of a plaster. 
Impregnated with a drag which 
can be slowly absorbed 
through the skin, is being pat 
to ingenious use in an increas- 
ing range of conditions, 
including post- menopausal 
symptoms and male hormone 
shortage. The plaster's initial 
use was for the prevention of 
angina; patients, who pre- 
viously had to take long acting 
trinitrates by month, or more- 
rapidiy absorbed ones under 
the tongue, were able to apply 
the patch and thereby slowly 
absorb the dreg at an even 
rate. Unlike time which are 
absorbed through the gat, the 
itch allowed the dreg to 
.■pass the fiver, which 
metabolises many of them. 
Smaller doses of the drug can 
therefore be given. 

Their use against travel 


MEDICAL 

BRIEFING 


sickness has been widely 
publicized. Volunteer lifeboat 
crews were recruited for 
experiments, which studied 
the effect of the administration 
id a scopolanine through a 
patch stuck behind one ear. 
The sailors lost their 


Dr Viral Place, Medical 
Director of Aha, the company 
which piooeeredjskin patches, 
is reported as saying that Aha 
already has American ap- 
proval for a hormonal prepara- 
tion for the treatment of post- 
menopausal symptoms and are 
working on a testosterone 
patch for men who are short of 
male hormones. German and 


Irish scientists have been 
experimenting with nicotine 
skin patches which it is hoped 
may replace nicotine chewing 
gum. 

Only dregs which will pass 
easily through the skin can be 
used in tins way. Even tire skin 
patch is not free of problems 
and there is some risk to 
children. Cases have bees 
reported in which they have 
taken parents' plasters or 
absorbed a drug when hogged 
too closely by a doting relative. 

One side effect which has 
been reported occasionally af- 
fects sexual partners of the 
anti-anginal dreg patch users. 
They have hero surprised to 

fin d that w hile Inv ent* Irinp 

they have absorbed enough of 
the dreg to suffer from its side 
effects; headaches and 
flushing. 


A recurring problem 

H Glaxo claims foal Zantac, an H2 inhibitor used 
in the treatment of peptic ulceration, is the 
world's best-selling drug and was an important 
factor in boosting their pre-tax profits by 52 per 
cent last year; its rival. Tagamet, is made by 
Smith Kline and French. Their success in 
treating severe indigestion, even in the absence 
of actual ulceration, has made their names household words 
{ despite the fact that the majority of patients will relapse; stud- 
ies show that between 80 and 90 per cent of duodenal ulcers 
have recurred within a year after treatment with H2 
antagonists. 

Dr Paul Miller of foe Department of Medicine at the 
Universfty of Manchester suggests, In. a leading article In foe 
British Medical Journal, that foe relapse rate might be lower if 
other ulcer-healing drugs wereused. He compares foe rate af- 
ter foe use of H2 antagonists with that following treatment 
with De-nol (tri-potassium di-citrato bismuthate) made by 
Brocades, rn which only 59 per cant of those treated had re- 
lapsed after a year. 



Of mice and 
melons ... 



fp4 


particularly people who live 
near the threatened sites. She 
has always been dosety in- 
volved- with environmental 
matters — both professionally, 
in tezmS of television docn- 

mentaries, and personally irt- 

And if you’re in a . that she fives ne ar Ta vistock 
ignorance, you're on foe edge of Dartmoor and 
regularly rides her - horse 
across the moots. 

“If you have, a general 
awareness of what is happen- 
ing to the environment then 
yon worry.” 

She is aware of the risk that 


and put it into real language. 
There’s a veil of mystery 
around everything involved 
with the nuclear industry. 
While it's easy for the sci- 
entists to understand the jar- 
the rest of us are left 


weak position 


posiuon 
in a very 
indeed.” 

The 42-year-old television 
presenter and former 
newsreader is one of three 
independent directors to be 


.FPdtoa to .« *» i° ■ ike 1SS to 

world after Chernobyl. Herco- JLS’SJT -1 

Hans Romberg of Christ's 

£E&&35i.£i 

very difficult job to do and I 
the rad union, ASLEF. think that one of the biggest 

Rippon has no idea whether problems is going to be win- 
foe announcement of the- rung the confidence of the 
appointments was deliberately people Tm there to represent” 
tuned for the morning after She has no qualms about 
the showing of the BBC2 making waves. Indeed, when 


Nuclear slut Angela Rippon looks forward to spending Christmas boning up on pintmtimn 

Nirex’s chairman, John Baker, 
told his new directors,"! think 
you've been very brave to join 
us”, Rippon replied: “I think 
maybe it will turn out that 
Nirex has been very brave to 
have taken us on”. - 

S he recognises that it is 
the most important 
task she has ever tack- 
led. Her career, to 
dale, has been largely 
non-controveraaL She fol- 
lowed the public debacle after 
she was fired from TV AM as 
one of the _ 
inal presenters (“Now I : 
more interesting to watch .my 
TV AM shares rather than the 
programme”) by going to 
America where she spent a 
year as arts and entertain- 
ments reporter for a Boston 
television station. But she is 
basically an En glish ' country 
girl and happiest living in the 
17th century house in Devon 
which she and her husband, 

Christopher Dare, bought for 
£4,000 in 1969. 


They met at a YMCA dance 
when Rippon was still at 
school and Dare had just 
started work as an apprentice 
electrical fitter at Devonport 
Dockyard. Now he has his 
own xpotor spares .business 
and morally supports his wife 
in whatever role sbe is cur- 
rently involved. When Energy 
Secretary, Peter Walker, of- 
fered her the Nirex job 
Dare advised her “If you feel 
strongly enough about it, do it 
The only failure is not trying 
in tiie first place.” 

It was an attitude which 
reinforced Rippon’s own gut 
reaction. She compares the 
British public’s reluctance to 
take any personal responsibil- 
ity for their nudear future 
with their behaviour towards 
child battering. “You hear the 
screams and think ‘I won’t 
ring the police because per- 
haps someone else might’ and 
tiie next thing you discover is 
that the fhilri is Hwrf 

“I really do believe that the 
public deserve and should 


have a voice when it comes to 
nuclear waste: We’ve got to 
bridge this ritadd between the 
scientists, the politicians, 
those in the industry and the 
rest of us. 

“If anyone in a position of 
authority is faced by a whole 
group of people shouting at 
them, they are inclined to 
dose their mind and perhaps 
don’t take it on board. All Fm 
saying is that the reason I took 
on the appointment was be- 
cause if it was me and they 
suddenly dedded they were 
going to put a nudear dump 
here in Tavistock I would 
want a voice on the board to 
put my point of view. Now I 
am the vicarious repre- 
sentative for all those 


Bad news and 
good news for 
vegetarians. 
The bad news is 
that water 
melon seeds so 
favoured by 
wholefood devotees may be 
dangerous. One Harley Street, 
physician was so intrigued to 
find that some of his British 
patients were following the 
example of those from the 
Middle East Saharan 
countries who take water 
melon seeds for a wide variety 
of complaints, ranging from 
stress-iacontineuce and 
bedwetting to diabetes, that be 
resolved to search the lit- 
eratme to see if there was any 
evidence that the seeds could 
beharmfeL 


He discovered that sci- 
entists at the University of 
Kartoam had tried feeding 
them to sheep with disastrous 
effects on the kidneys. In 
another experiment they were 
fed to Nubian goats, desert 
sheep and Zebu calves, result- 
ing in both fiver and kidney 
damage. Finafiy, the 
extracted various tars from the 
seeds and painted them on to 
mice, producing dose-related 
cancerous changes. 

If water melon seeds are out, 
vegetarians will he pleased to 
learn that brasskas, cabbages 
and brussel sprouts are stifi in. 
The British Medical Journal 
reports that alihongh 
ghteosfenolates found in green 
vegetables have a theoretical 
anti-thyroid action (at the 
normal rate of consnmption) 
the serum thyroid hormone 
concentration is not affected 
by them. 


Better late 

Parents have re- 
sponded pos- 
itively to foe 
campaign to in- 
crease whoop- 
ing cough 
vaccinations. 
Figures quoted in foe Drugs 
and Therapeutic Bulletin show 
that foe number of children 
vaccinated felJ firm 78 per cent 
in 1971 to 37 per cent hi 1974, 
but rose to 65 per cent last 
year. In consequence of foe 
numbers of children still un- 
vaccinated foe 1977-1979 and 
1982-1983 epidemics were 
particularly large. 

Many parents ten doctors 
that they would rather not have 
their chdd vaccinated, but wiR 
rety upon antibiotics to dear foa 
infection if they catch it The 
report examines the use of 
antibiotics in whooping cough 
and comes to foe conclusion 
that none of the anti-bacterial 
drugs used in whooping cough 
treatment result in any major 
clinical benefit 

Experiments show 
that Erythromycin, which is 
particularly safe, is very active 
in the laboratory against 
pertussis and penetrates spu- 
tum weft; even in the human it 
eradicates foe bacteria from 
the upper respiratory tract 
within a day or two. 

Unfortunately it does not 
seem to prevent foe spread of 
infection as children pass it on 
before their symptoms are 
characteristic. 

Antibiotics are useful in the 
treatment of complications of 
whooping cough when second- 
ary bacteria) infection fre- 
quently gives rise to pneumonia 
and ear infections. 

Dr Thomas Stndaford 


Double the shopping fun 

THE TIMES 

LIBERTY 


people 1 


themselves. 

“Tm all they've got — but ai 
least they’ve got me, and it’s 
better to have me and Ray 
Buckton and Hans Koraberg 
than no one.” 


QTtowi 


Ltd ISM 


The chance to spend an 
evening Christmas shopping 
without the crowds at Liberty 
proved irresistible to Times 
readers. So much so that the 
stores throughout the country 
will now open for a second 
evening on Tuesday, Decem- 
ber 9. 

Those readers who applied 
early are being sent tickets for 
the first night, Tuesday, 
December 2. The remainder 
will receive tickets for the 
following week. 

Both nights offer a wealth of 
attractions. Closed to the gen- 
eral public from 6.30 pm to 


8 JO pm, each Liberty store 
will feature a free draw with 
prizes including a £100 Lib- 
erty gift voucher. You will be 
welcomed with a glass of wine 
and a special Liberty gift and 
for every £50 you spend you 
will be presented with a £5 gift 
voucher. 

On the second night the 
London store will feature 
many of the attractions that 


we offered on the first, plus 
some new activities. A special 
draw will include a weekend 
for two in Bavaria from 
Geraia travel specialists DER, 
with a Liberty weekend case; 
Cobra and Bellamy jewellery; 
an oriental carpet; a Liberty 
hamper of soaps and seems; 
and a Liberty print handbag. 

The Rheingold Bavarian 
Band and the Chelsea Sym- 
phony Orchestra will both 
play, and graphologist 
Eric Rees will advise on gifts 
by analysing the handwriting 
of the intended recipient. 

The offer is now closed. 


CHRISTMAS AT 



A student wiggle 
for sweet charity 


Britain may have 
quit Unicef but 
Oxford students are 
rallying to raise funds 

Studious young ladies, more 
at home in Oxford’s Bodleian 
library than in the Body 
Shop, hung up their blue 
stockings and slipped into 
designer lingerie tins week to 
celebrate die fortieth anniver- 
sary of Unicef 
*Tve wanted to do a fashion 
show for ages,” said Danielle 
Nay, a second-year French 
and Latin student at New 
College and the organizer of 
the Oxford Union Fhshion 
Show. “No one has ever done 
a brilliant show in Oxford and 
I wanted to prove it was 
possible.” 

When Unicef — the United 
Nations International 
Children’s Emergency Fund — 
telephoned the Oxford Union 
Society to raise some money, 
they did not expect the stu- 
dents to do more than pass 
around an empty baked beans 
can at one of the union 
debates. 

The debating , chamber is a 
cold, draughty room. From 
the outside it looks like the top 
half of St Paul's. It is hardly an 


1?A -taentam Court Road' Undon-WI • Tunsgate: Guildford 
Drummond Place Croydon - Eden Walk Kingston 


ideal setting for a fashion 
show — more used to cat-calls 
than a cat-walk. But after 
fitting it up with a sound 
system, several tables and a 
wooden platform, it was at 
least prfit-d-party if not prtt-4- 
porter. 

“1 just did it because I 
thought it would be a faugh”, 
said one of the models, 
Rosaline Blair, a 20-year-old 
psychology student at St 
Hilda's. “I thought I might get 
some free clothes too.” 

Some of the clothes on show 
would have to be free to end 
up on the backs of impov- 
erished students. One outfit 
provided by Kansai Yama- 
moto cost £2,000, while some 
of The Print’s hand-painted 
silk jackets were £600. Other 
designers were more in fine 
with student budgets. Die- 
For-It, for instance, sell jack- 
ets for Sloane rebels at £J 6.99 
in the Hyper Hyper emporium 
in Kensington. Most of the 
dotbes were either adorable 
but unaffordable or cheap but 
unchic. 

“I chatted up the designers 
at Olympia'*, admitted 
Danielle. “We didn't go for 
any overall look. We just got 
anyone who agreed to do iL” 
One of those was Helen 
Anderson, Damefie’s Liver- 
pool-based mother, who de- 
signed suede jackets fin- the 
Beatles. 

Despite their amateur sta- 
tus, tiie models managed to 
spin round and wiggle their 
bottoms convincingly enough. 
Even 18-year-old Lady Louisa 
Goidon-Lennox, daughter of 
the Earl of March and 
Kinrara, got into the spirit 


Toby Young 



Modelled on mum; DanleOe Nay in mother's silk and talk 


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. can suffer ill 
king beers in 
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THE TIMES FRIDAY NOVEMBER 28 1986 




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THE TIMES 
DIARY 


Tory race 
to Reece? 


Central Office remains in disarm y 
over the search for a director of 
communications to mastermind 
the Tories’ ejection ca m pa i g n . 
Four candidates were shortlisted 
and interviewed almost two weeks 
ago*. Roger Hayes from Thom 
EMI, Anthony Knox from Streets 
Fi nancial, and PR specialiasts 
Peter Lendrum and Michael 
Mander. None has yet been cho- 
sen. Nor is the brief as wide as 
some would wish: candidates were 
told that press and broadcasting 
would not be part of their empire. 
Mrs Thatcher’s daily routine stays 
in the realm of Harvey Tho m as, 
moved sideways from Commu- 
nications to Presentation earlier 
this year. Speculation continues 
that Gordon Reece, the magic 
ingredient of Mrs Thatcher’s two 
previous victories, will step for- 
ward into the breech. 


Blue period 


Middle age has certainly brought 
respectability for journalist Rich- 
ard Walsh, who worked for Oz, the 
underground magazine of which 
three editors were jailed in 1971 
after Britain's longest obscenity 
trial. He has just become editor of 
Australia's top-selling Women's 
Weekly. 


Roughriding 

Britons* signal lack of courtesy is 
plainly worse than Ian Gregory, 
secretary of the recently formed 
Polite Society, initially feared. In 
its first newsletter he asked the 200 
members to nominate the town or 
village with the best record for 
common courtesy — the winner to 
receive a Polite Society plaque to 
display in the local pent office or 
town hall So for he has had not 
one reply. Despite the risk of 
appearing discourteous, Gregory 
is compiling a list of places that 
definitely will not win. At the top 
comes South Yorkshire. 


It’s the sand 


After a year’s negotiations, Britain 
has made it as a package holiday 
destination for Saudi Arabians. 
The British Tourist Authority has 
announced that all-indusive Brit- 
ish holidays by Saudi Arabian 
Airlines will be launched while the 
Prince and Princess of Wales are 
visiting Saudi this month. Many 
Arabs, the BTA notes, “regard 
London as a second home" but, 
since they lend to prefer amuse- 
ment parks to stately homes, 
Blackpool also makes it into the 
Saudia’s Britain brochure. 


All forgotten 


Oxford's Ruskin College has got a 
nerve. Having censured lecturer 
David Selbourne, who was boy- 
cotted by students over an article 
that appeared in The Times. il 
now writes to us seeking publicity 
for its 1987 scholarships. And, 
says a PS, would we be interested 
in using the college as a conference 
centre? 


BARRY FANTONI 


THE-bTDVGES 

CQURT 
bans 
'CLEAR ’ 
B R- 

annduncer 


‘My client's evidence. Mind, will 
be arriving af 9-57, 1032 gad IL58* 


Goodwill . . . 


Union Scrooges in Wandsworth 
town hall have tried to scupper a 
Christinas party for admin typists. 
They were looking forward to 
holding it at the National and 
Local Government Officers 
Association social dub, as they 
did last year, but were dismayed to 
be told that unless they were 
already dub members they would 
have to pay a levy. This was set at 
£1 for Nalgo members, £3 for 
other union members and £50 for 
those who did not belong to a 
union. Faced with such a demand, 
the secretaries booted the civic 
suite, which lacks a bar. I cannot 
help but wonder whether Nalgo is 
acting out of spite, since it has had 
a long dispute with the admin 
department over staff leaving 
Nalgo to join other unions. Nalgo 
has exceeded it jurisdiction in this 
case since, according to admin- 
istration director Gerald Jones, 
the club is leased to it by the 
council “for the use of all staff”. 


Hot and cold 


A reader confesses confusion at 
receiving, by the same post, two 
missives from British Gas. 
“According to our records you are 
not registered under the scheme 
and, therefore, are not eligible” 
reads the first “Dear British Gas 
Customer," states the second. 
“You are registered as a British 
Gas customer under the Customer 
Share Scheme..." Both are 
signed by area manager David 
marie a trend 
as the day of foe Great Flotation 
approaches? pjjg 


Since the early 1970s, western 
governments have used trade 
talks, cultural exchanges and arms 
negotiations to press the Soviet 
government to make concessions 
on human rights. While the Sovi- 
ets* continue to reject such de- 
mands as interference in their 
domestic affaire, in private they 
have been willing to mate con- 
cessions on what they prefer to call 
“humanitarian cases.” 

Two hard questions arise: how 
for should human rights issues 
determine the negotiations with 
the Soviet Union and to what 
extent will western pressure 
change Soviet behaviour towards 
its people? Some right-wing schol- 
ars, Pentagon bawls, Soviet exiles 
and Jewish emigration activists 
believe in effect that there is 
nothing worth negotiating with 
Moscow except the emigration of 
dissidents and Jews. These groups 
argue that the Soviet leadership 
will only understand when spoken 
to in the language of force, and 
believe that the pursuit of human 
rights justifies trade embargoes 
and a military build-up aimed at 
exacerbating the internal eco- 
nomic difficulties of the Soviet 
system. 

This approach appears to make 
arms control and every other 
feature of our relations with the 
Soviet Union a hostage to progress 
on human nghts-Moreover, it 
assumes that Moscow will re- 
spond favourably to the bribery of 
human rights linkage. 

Yet when the US Congress 
passed the Jackson Vanik and 
Stevenson amendments in 1974 
linking economic concessions to 
Soviet liberalization of Jewish 
emigration, the Kremlin reduced 
Jewish emigration from a flood to 
a trickle. As the legacy of detente 
attests, the prospects for human 
rights are best when progress is 
being made on ahns control It 
was in the period of detente that 
the emigration of Soviet Jews and 
dissidents increased most, and 


Soviet dissident Yuri Orlov today meets 
Mrs Thatcher to plead for greater pressure 
over human rights. Michael Ignatfeff argues 
for an approach based on political reality 


Don’t lean on 
Moscow — it 


just won’t work 


emigration was among the casual- 
ties of d&ente's collapse. 


A second broad strand of fenigrt 
and dissident opinion accepts that 
failure to mate progress on hu- 
man rights ought not to stand in 
the way of other bilateral interests, 
notably arms talks, but insists that 
arms talks in themselves can do 
little to reduce the tension be- 
tween the superpowers. Western 
nations should use every negotiat- 
ing field — nuclear arms, trade, 
cultural and scientific ex chang es, 
technology transfer — to press for 
improvements in Soviet citizens' 
basic freedoms in order to wear 
away the ignorance and suspicion 
which prevent the establishment 
of long-term peace. 

Such views gain in authority 
when expressed by men of courage 
such as Yuri Orlov (this page, 
November 26) but questions re- 
main about the exact dimMi-rinns 
of the changes in Soviet society 
that can reasonably be expected 
from human rights leverage. It is 
one thing to lobby on a case-by- 
case bans or to press for a 
comprehensive exit visa agree- 
ment; quite another to envisage 
western hmnan rights pressure as 


a means of transforming Soviet 
society. The patchy opening out 
since Stalin’s death owes less to 
■western pressure than to the 
Politburo’s belief that some degree 
of liberalization may be necessary 
for economic and social progress. 

To demand that the Soviet 
Union grant its citizens what the 
West means by freedom of the 
press, freedom of speech and 
freedom of political organization 
is to ask the Communist Party to 


preside over its own dissolution. 
Orlov and others imply that 
external p ressure will be re- 
inforced by growing internal pres- 
sure to disman tle the apparatus of 
secrecy and rep re s s ion which 
hold s hftfJc the devel opmen t of 
Soviet society. 

Soviet history gives scant com- 
fort to those who believe that 
intellectual freedom is a necessary 
condition for economic and social 
progress. A regime that has taken 
’its people from wooden sho es to 
sp acecr aft in 70 years, from 
backwardness to superpower sta- 
tus, will have difficulty believing 
that future progress depends on 
allowing its citi z e ns freedoms it 
never allowed them before. 


As long as the Soviet Union czm 

get the technical and scientific 
information it needs by way oftp 
secret services, ‘it is imder 
pressure to enter into free 
open intellectual exchange with 

the West As long as the economy 
can continue to grind out tiny 
increases in standards of hving 
and maintain military compet- 
itiveness with the West it fa ces no 
genuine economic, imperative to- 
wards increased liberalization. - 

The West has a right to ask the 
Soviet leadership to tiveup to its 
pledges about legality- The West 
has a hnmanftarian duty to speak 
up on behalf of those who wish to 
emigrate. Individuals who work 
with Soviet citizens on s cientific 
terimirai or cultural projects 
should bring up human rights 
cases even when, or especially 
whim, these cases embarrass their 
Soviet friends. But between gov- 
ernments it is not a credible 
negotiating stance to deman d ofa 
sovereign stale that it change the 
g^spjntiai i nature of its political 
organization. 

At present the disar m a ment and 
human fights issues are beset by 
illusion: on the arms control side 
the fantasy of a world delivered 
from nuclear weapons by Star 
Wars technology, and on h uman 
rights the illusion of pushin g the 
Soviet system towards western 
standards of individual freedom. 
Neither utopia can serve as a 
realistic basis for poticy. 

We can negotiate with the 
Soviet Union only as it is, not as 
we would wish it to be; a 
negotiating straiegy dominated by 
an unrealistic human rights 
ypmfa is as likely to foil as one 
Hnminatwi by. the dream of a 
technological fix We cannot aff- 
ord to fefl. If the post-Reyjavik 
stalemate goes on, those whose 
rights we wish to protect may 
suffer. 

Michael Ignatieff, a philosopher 
and historian, presents Thinking 
Aloud onBBCZ' 


Robert Fisk on the consequences of Reagan’s arms deal with Iran 


Arabian faith betrayed 


The newsreader on Tehran Radio 
was being careful yesterday. In the 
main midday bulletin he dutifully 
referred to American “allega- 
tions” that milli ons of dollars paid 
by Iran for US arms had been 
channelled to the Contras in 
Nicaragua. But then he embarked 
on a long news item which quoted 
the de nials of the Contra leader- 
ship in great detail giving credit to . 
their c laims that they bad never 
received the money. Receiving US 
arms is one thine sending your 
cash to the Contras quite another. 

Ayatollah Khomeini has been 
doing his best to silence any 
discussions on the subject. Last 
week he tried to still the remark- 
ably dramatic debates on the arms 
deaf in the Majlis (parliament), 
commenting that the voices of 
assembly members sounded “har- 
sher than that of Israel”. Scarcely 
any reference has been made to 
Israel's role in shipping American 
weapons to Iran. Khomeini wants 
no Watergates in Tehran. 

There are fierce arguments, of 
course, particularly between Hoja- 
tolislam Rafsanjani, the Par- 
liament speaker, and AyatoHa 
Montazeri, Khomeini's successor, 
whose initial ignorance of the 
negotiations with the Americans 
has annoyed him more the 
arms deal itself But Rafsanjani 
has been left to maintain the 
public voice of Iran which remains 
scornful of Washington, boastful 
of its own achievements, self- 
satisfied at the humiliation of its 
enemies. 

In the past it has been the West 
which divided the people of the 
East against one another, which 
set Iranians against themselves. 
“Now we are paying the US bade 
in its own coin," Rafsaqjani has 
proclaimed, promising archly that 
“there is more to say about this 
issue aud we shall clarify it later." 

The Americans will find no 
comfort in such words. Across the 
Arab world their coin had long 
been devalued by a whole series of 
foreign policy and military blun- 
ders stretching from Lebanon 
through Egypt to Libya and Tu- 
nisia. It will need another presi- 
dent in the White House before 
the Arabs trust America again. 

In public, of course, the anger 
has been muted. In Egypt, whose 
economy is totally dependent on 
the US, President Mubarak, fear- 
ing political upheavals, merely 
expresses surprise at foe arms 
shipments to Iran. King Husain is 
too loyal a friend of theWest to do 
more than call the negotiations an 
insult to Arabs. The Iraqis, who 




Khmnrinc low profile 


RafsoBjurr scornful 



Mubarak: Surp r ise d’ 


*an isstif 


have most reason to 
object,confined their fury to a few 
words from their foreign minister, 
while tire Kuwaitis, in whose 
capital the 91ns of the Gulf War 
can be dearly heard, expressed 
only their concern that America 
had damaged its credibility as a 
superpower. Ibis was, to say the 
least, a generous reaction from 
states to whom the American 
president had consistently and 
regularly made promises which he 
evidently did not intend to keep. 

The point, of course, is that 
most Arab leaders had long ago 
grown used to President Reagan's 
obfuscations, confusion and wish- 
ful thinking. They had long ago 
accustomed themselves to the 
gung-ho language of an American 
who was going to “walk tall” in the 
world and who then ordered his 
marines to retreat from Lebanon; 
who promised to support foe 
sovereignty of Tunisia and then 
approved of an Israeli bombing 
raid on foe PLO in Tunis; wbo 
bombed Libya for Colond 
Gadaffi’s iniquities but left Syria 
untouched because it was too 
powerful to attack; who went to 


war against "international 
terrorism" and then rewarded its 
progenitors with guns. 

Most of the Arab leaders bad 
known for months that US weap- 
ons were being shipped to Iran 
with Israefi help. In short, they 
thought that President Reagan 
often told lies. Now they are 

Certain to nwdwifland the 

as well as the contempt which this 
has induced among the pro- 
western Arab leaders. 

It is necessary to realize the 
ex ten t of the embarrassment 
which some of them have suffered 
at Reagan's hands. Was it not 
Reagan who ordered the hijacking 
of the AchiHe Lauro hijackers as 
they fled to Tunisia aboard an 
Egyptian airliner? Was it not 
President Mubarak, as loyal a 
friend of America as any Arab 
leader, who bad to set his riot 
police against his own Egyptian 
students as they demonstrated 
against the American decision? 
Yet now that same US president 
wbo was prep are d to damage 
Mubarak’s credibility in the cause 
of his crusade against evil turns 
out to have been sitting down with 


the devil: or at foe least sending 
him acake along with a plane-load 
of arms. 

It was the Americans who 
advised the Egyptians to storm 
their own hijacked airliner at 
Malta last year. “Give them both 
bands," the Egyptians were 
personally advised by Shultz, foe 
US Secretary of State: The Egyp- 
tian nrwimgndfMC did just 
albeit that the bands fired most of 
their bullets into the passenger s 
rather than tbe hijackers. Now the 
Americans turn out to have been 
q*ndmg weapons to Iran at the 
same time; arming foe allies of 
Syria whose own acolytes are 
believed to have been behind die 
same jet's hijacking. 

King Husain has tried repeat- 
edly to bring the PLO into talks to 
negotiate with the Israelis over the 
future of the West Bank. The PLO 
shamefully deserted him. So did 
the Americans, whose toleration 
of Israeli settlements in the occu- 
pied West Bank and of the Israeli 
army in southern Lebanon has 
been in such marked contrast with 
his anger about Syria's military 
presence in Lebanon. Repeatedly, 
the Americans have promised the 
Arab Gulf states that they will be 
defended, that there will be no 
Iranian expansion in the Gulf 
region. Hie Arab sheikhdoms ' 
quietly accepted this confidence. 
Now they know that if the 
Iranians attack they will be carry- 
ing new American weapons with 
them. 

The parameters of Reaon's 
world, in which the Afghan 
mujahedeen are "freedom 
fighters” and foe Palestinian Feda- 
yeen “t e rr oris t s” , is a familiar one 
in the Middle East But the Arabs 
do not like to be lectured, es- 
pecially by a nation which wishes 


to play the role of honest broker 
but which is totally committed to 


one side in the Arab-IsradI con- 
flict; >ixi the Reagan administra- 
tion has done more moral 
lecturing than most of its prede- 
cessors. 

The association of things west- 
ern with things good, of things 
anti-American with things bad, 
has long been a theme of Ameri- 
can policy in the Middle East; the 
Soviets have an almost identical 
policy except that it operates in 
reverse. But Reagan was the first 
man to carry a crusade into the 
Middle East, and be did so at the 
very time when a far more 
fundamentalist crusade had begun 
in the area: one under which 
Reagan has become the delight of 
his enemies and the despair of his 
Arab friends. 


In a few days foe Independent 
Broadcasting Authority is to 
award a franchise 10 one of the five 
consortia that have applied to 
launch Britain's direct broadcast- 
ing satellite (DBS). 

From its orbital parking space 
22,300 miles up, DBS, its enthu- 
siasts hope, wiU launch B ritain 
into the media space age, beaming 
three new television chann els 10 
anyone equipped with a dish- 
shaped aerial costing only a couple 
of hundred pounds. 

Critics of the current broad- 
csting system love the idea. At one 
stroke, they imagine, the tight grip 
of Britain's television duopoly will 
be broken, and new viewing 
choices will become available to 
the public. But there are opposing 
voices too. The prospect of sky- 
high rewards seems to have en- 
couraged au overly high degree of 
optimism. 

The company currently re- 
garded as foe frontrunning con- 
tender is British Satellite Broad- 


Dish of plenty or 
pie in the sky? 


dish. On this petimation hangs 
BSB's hope to attract advertising 
and subscription revenue to cover 


foe £200 million needed to get the 
system into place, and a further 


S (BSB). whose members 
Granada. Virgin and 
Amstrad Consumer Electronics. It 
has told investment analysts foal 
it hopes to launch its satellite in 
1989 and foal within three years it 
expects 2.5 million customers to 
have equipped foemsetves with a 


system into place, and a further 
£100 million to pay for pro- 
grammes and marketing and to 
meet other costs. 

is this figure realistic? Little in 
foe history of television suggests 
that it is. In 1977, foe first year in 
which Japanese video-cassette 
recorders became available in 
Britain, only 20,000 were sold. It 
took six years for sales to exceed 
2.5 million. Colour televisions, 
introduced in 1967, showed- an 
almost identical pal 
Not all the proa^ re DBS 
operators are as optimistic as the 
Granada-Virgin- Amstrad consort- 
ium. Direct Broadcasting Ltd, 
backed by Ferranti. News Inter- 
national and Sears Holdings, fore- 
casts more conservatively foal 
500,000 dishes will be sokf in foe 
fust three years after launch. But 
even this more modest projection 


assumes that more than twice as 
many people will buy satellite 
dishes as bought video cassette 
recorders in the first three years 


they were on sale. 
Obviously, the 


Obviously, the comparison is 
imperfect. Satellite dishes at an 
estimated £250 will be cheaper 
than either colour televisions or 
videos. But they will probably be 
more difficult 10 instaL Hooking 
up a video recorder is a project 
within the technical competence 
of almost anyone. Erecting a dish 
on a roof is not 
Furthermore, both BSB and 
DBL also expea to collect 
subscription fees from viewers. 
Here there is even greater un- 
certainty. Research by foe Peacock 


Committee suggested that with 
no tradition ofpay television in 


no tradition of pay television in 
Britain, viewers might be ex- 
tremely reluctant to subscribe to 
television services. The experi- 
ence of cable television operators. 
wbo so far have signed up only 
about 20 per cent of the houses 


they have passed with their wires, 
confirms the difficulty. 

There are technical uncertain- 
ties too. Development of the high- 
technology transmitting devices 
required for the satellites have 
been beset with problems. So have 
the rockets needed to launch the 
satellites. Insurers currently regard 
the odds of a launch failure at 
around 24 per cent. Delays in 
getting the satellite iato'orbit will 
add years to the date at which a 
DBS service can start, and mil- 
lions to foe costs. 

The first DBS to be bundled, in 
Japan, stopped working soon after 
it went into space. Even in France 
and West Germany, where DBS 
projects have been heavily sub- 
sidized (which they will not be in 
Britain), the experience has been 
sobering. Both satellites are cur- 
rently five years behind schedule. 

DBS is not the only way to 
improve choice in broadcasting. 
The same goal can be achieved by 
investment is cable TV and 
increasing the number of con- 
ventional tele vision stations. The 
danger is that, by concentrating on 
DBS, the government will con- 
tinue to neglect the alternatives. 


Jonathan Miller 

Media Correspondent 





David Watt 


Leagan: the truth 
at last exposed 


The disaster which has engulfed 
the White House has been coining 
along time. It has been inherent is 
foe Reagan presidency from foe 


solved them wholly satisfactorily. 
The Nixon White House provided 
foe classic demonstration of foe 

■ .problem, with foe president's 
man , Rjss iq g cr, cheating Congress 

■ -and. bypassing the State Depart- 
ment Pentagon, and Nixon's 
political “minders”,' Haldeman 
and Ehrtichman, cracking dirty 
jokes with foe president and 
quarrelling with and often bypass- 
ing everyone; including Kissinger, 
to keep the political lid on. 

It was a sordid set-up. wasteful 
of talent and energy and fre- 
quently in violation of the 
constitution, but it worked after a 
fashion because Nixon was a 
highly intelligent with great 
. international experience, Kissin- 
ger was ti remarkable operator, 
and even HaMeman and company 
usually .had enough sense to see 
when they were out of their depth 
on foe international side. 

The case against Reagan is that 
he has never managed to make the 
1 . system work, even after a fashion. 
. His national security advisers 
have been lacklustre. His Califor- 
nian political . mafia, with . the 
exception of James Baker, have 
. been aggressively parochial and 
tactical in ' their approach to 
foreign affairs, and - Reagan him - 
self; too inexperienced and too 
unable or unwilling to grapple 
with detail, has never been able to 

- control -what has gone on at the 
centre of government. General 
Haig’s picture of. foe Reagan 
White House as a kind of ghost 
ship whose sails move mysteri- 
ously and almost randomly with 
nobody on deck is a telling one. 
-Reagan rightly sensed that 
America was looking, to him for 
confidence, security and peace (in 
tha t order). The first of these, 
being a psychological commodity, 
he has managed to restore by 

- rhetoric and gestures. But he has 
never been able to provide more 
than, the shadows of the last two; 

. consequently the effort to prevent 
even confidence slipping away 
again Ires had to become more and 
.more frenetic; hence the 
disinformation - campaign and 
Colonel North's laundering activ- 
ities. 

What has happened now is 
foerefore far more significant *ha» 
the subject matter of the Iranian 
row. The point is that the Reagan 
myth has been shattered, the 
Huston exposed. The conjuror's 
. false pockets have been turned 
inside out and die Emperor has 
been revealed in aU his nakedness. 
Nothing will be the same again 
Even n a little of the present 
scandal can be deflected from 
Reagan himself by the suitable 
sacrifice of scapegoats, foe Demo- 
crats tend -foe media will have no 
difficulty, over the coming 
months, in making the incom- 
petence charge against him stick. 
Its validity flows from a fun- 
damental arid irremediable flaw in 
this administration, and people, 
having once seen it for what it is, 
cannot forget what they have seen. 


very beginning in 1981, its nature, 
perfectly obvious to any. serious 
observer. It was spelt out in foe 
memoirs of Alexander Haig, the 
former Secretary of State; and in 
David Stockman's account of his 
rime as Budget Director. Every 
authentic anecdote . to have 
emerged from foe White House 
has confirmed it 'The US has a 
president who does not have the 
intellectual energy or capacity 
required for foe conduct of foreign 
policy, and foe aides on whom be 
depends to do it for turn are foitd 
rate. The results have been con-~ 
tinuous squabbling within the 
administration, wild fluctuations 
of policy, and a long scries of 
miqtalri* brought on fry. panicky 
attempts to impress domestic 
o pinio n with bogus ideological 
consistency and quick results. 

These facts have been concealed 
- from the American public for a 
number of reasons — partly 
Reagan’s extraordinary skill and 
charm as a television performer 
but, more to foe point, public self- 
deception. After Vietnam, Water- 
gate, and foe Tehran hostages 
nightmare they have desperately 
.wanted Reagan to s ucceed, and 
since he has acted foe part of the 
successful president to perfection 
nobody in foe US (certainly not' 
the media, still smarting from 
accusations of having brought 
down Nixon by foul means) has 
until recently dared or indeed 
wished to break the euphoric spelL 
Foreign opinion has been more 
perceptive, but there has been an 
understandable conspiracy among 
the European establishments to 
mate the best of a bad job. 

It is also fair to say, in defence of 
Reagan, that the underlying prob- 
Jem that has produced the present 
crisis is intractable and systemic. 
In an era when foreign pokey is the 
transcendant political issue of 
American government, the presk 
' dent canno t afford to relinquish 
control of it either to members of 
his cabinet or to the legislature. 
But if he tries to impose himself 
seriously on the subject (through 
some such instrument as the 
National Security Council or spe- 
cial advisers in the- White House) 
be automatically sets up enor- 
mous tensions between ins own 
machine and the powerful institu- 
tions — State Department, Penta- 
gon and, above ail. Congress — 
that have a vested interest in ft. 

And not only that There is 
almost bound. to be a tension 
between two sorts of White House 
adviser the man who seeks to 
ensure that the president's foreign 
strategy is carried out and the man 
whose job is to keep foe president 
out of domestic trouble and sees 
foreign policy as a means or an 
obstacle to that end. 

These are genuine difficulties 
and it cannqt be said that any 
president since Eisenhower has 


A.N. Author 


Shaping up to 
rejection 


Today I want to take as the target 
of my spleen that much under- 
maligned figure of the literary 
Worid, foe publisher's reader. I 


have one partipdar example of the 
genus in mind. She “works" for 


foe fiction de partmen t of Chatter 
and Windup and has such a full 
complement ofaU the faults which 
stalk her breed that, fry giving her 
a bad time in the press, I fed we 
are going at least some way 
towards adequately rubbishing the 
rest of her ilk. 

It is said of her within the trade 
that she has a built-in tripe 
detector — which I take to mean 
that she recognizes tripe when she 
sees ft, and pushes for ft to be 
published without delay. Worse 
sttil/she rejected my tripe. 

I apologize for being so dys- 
peptic about bookftdk this week 
The other day on tins page I gave 
my enemy CJR. Ittic a terrible 
going-over for his disgusting elit- 
ism (you may have read it, 
although one part of me hopes that 
you did not, since your ignorance 
of his existence would help to abet . 
the obscurity which faedesenrec)) I 
bumped into him in ■ Bedford 
Square the following morning, and . 
he cut me dead, which is the nicest 
thing that has happened to me 
since he was so rude in Publishing 
Times about my first novel. The 
Soul of Mrs Saxby (Sucker and 
Winding, £635). I must confess to 
deriving great pleasure from the 
fact that my depiction of him was 
instantly recognized by his fellow 
club members. 

Put my tartness down to the 
time of year, .this being the season 
that A.N. Author and his fellows 
on foe basest rung of the literary, 
ladder receive “royalty cheques” 
for £4.95 — if they are lucky. Gan. 
you wonder that this quickens the 
author’s envy of those who, wife 
only marginal q ualifications (fre- 
quently the qualifications of fail- 
ure iu the very field which they 
criticize) prescribe the prospects of 
the ones who still endeavour to 
mate a crust from honest-fiction? 

Bui where was I? Digressing, as 
ever. The publisher’s reader. Now, 

I admit that hadTbeen employed 
in a bouse to sample the untried 
work of the young Grades Dick- 
ens {The Pickwick Papers had 20 
rejections), or that of foe early 
James Joyce [A Portrait of the . 
Artist as a. Young Mari got 4QX.I . 
would lave been equally as - 
dismissive. • 

But feat fajiot the point 1 have - 


long assumed that publishers’ 
readers are employed less for their 
critical faculties than for their 
contours. Have you noticed that 
all tile members of this caJHng are 
■ curvaceous young graduates from 
universities with a middling 
reputation for academic ex- 
cellence? ‘ 

Their careers tend to run as 
follows: leave university with an 
indifferent degree in Eng Lit; 
inveigle your way into publishing 
via a combination of Daddy's 
friends and something that passes 

for charm; become chief PR byfoe 
age of 28, and acquire a seat on the 
board not more Bum five years 
later. 

Hie reader of whom 1 write has 
a special formula for sampling the 
manuscripts of aspiring authors. If 

yon can believe it — and I swear ft 
is the truth — she reads fee third 
sentence of the first page, foe fifth 
sentence of page 69 (don’t ask me 
why), and the final sentence of the 
last page.- If these three elements 
give her a favourable impression 
of foe prose style, she might just 
delve at random into a few of the 
other lovingly typed sheets before 
bunging rt off to the typesetters. 

11 her attention remains un- 
grabbed, she will dictate to htt 
secretary (an avid Mills and Boon 
reader) a letter along the following 
hues, which I have before me on 
my desk, even as 1 write, 

“Dear AJL Author (or who- 

ever). While many of us here quite 

enjoyed your exposition of subur- 
ban amours, ft was felt that 250 
pages was a somewhat excessive 

!!? sex « al foibles 

or a frankly implausible social 
artefact.” 

Mostly these letters of rejection 
get a few things wrong; either the 
name of the book, or fee tame pf 


Unfortunately they do tend to get 


unrortunatety they do tend to set 
the address right 

&** 1 fiwnd AJ-1. 
Other-Author has a wonderful 
ploy m mind. He is going to 
s ubmit a manuscript to the fiction 
gpaj&oent of Chatter and 
Windup m which the third sen- 

^ Page, fee fifth 
sentence of page 69, and the final 
sentence of the fast page will clip 
Jpflew nicely as a coherent 

Of a publisher’s 
leader I fear that something will - 
gounwontedly right vrifem the 
and that Chatter and 
Wipdh ag noil put the work on fa 
spring list. ! will let you know 






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THE TIMES FRIDAY NOVEMBER 28 IQ86 




1 Pennington Street, London El 9XN Telephone: 01-481 4100 


Afl the heads of Government 
meeting in London next week 
for the EEC summit know 
perfectly well that the 
Community's agricultural pol- 
icy is grotesquely wasteful, 
damaging to member coun- 
tries and even more to the 
world outside, unpopular and 
ultimately unsustainable. 

The evidence marshalled 
this week in our survey of how 
the Common Agricultural Pol- 
icy has gone adnft reinforces a 
lesson which has been plain for 
almost twenty years to all 
except thosei who are deter- 
mined not to see. But the 
prospect of any decisive action 
next week is remote. 

The fact is that -the CAP is 
not yet unpopular enough. The 
sections of the co mmuni ty 
which benefit from it are 
passionate in resisting change, 
while the consumers and tax- 
payers who meet the cost are 
only mildly aggrieved as yet at 
being required to fund the 
purchase of millions of tons of 
grain, milk and butter which 
nobody needs. 

In spite of the steady reduc- 
tion in forming manpower 
which the policy has succeeded 
in bringing about with rel- 
atively little pain, the agri- 
cultural lobby remains as 
powerful as ever in most parts 
of Europe. Germany, for the 
largest cash contributor to the 
policy and the key country in 
any fundamental reform, is 
holding elections in January, 
and its politicians are certain 
to pay abject court to their 
farmers at least until then. 

Britain, with relatively few 
formers, is freer than other 
members to take an initiative. 
But the conflict in the early 
1980s over our share of the 
EEC budget, necessary as it 
was, has left US with minimal 
goodwill to build on. The 
Government is now appar- 
ently convinced that reform 
cannot come without resort to 
the drastic measure of fairing 
land out of production. To 


A CAP OF WOE 


reassure its partners, it contin- 
ues to insist that only minor 
adjustments are needed. 

In default of conceited ac- 
tion, the point is not for off 
when, as Mr Roy Jenkins 
warns, EEC members will seek 
to ‘Tenationalise” their agri- 
cultural policies — a course 
which would strike a fun- 
damental Mow at the aspira- 
tions of the Treaty, of Rome 
and threaten to draw the 
industrial community into 
ruin with the agricultural one. 
The possibility of a tariff war 
over form prices breaking out 
between Europe and the 
equally over-productive USA 
multiplies the dangers of such 
policies to the rich economies 
which can afford to protect 
their formers in this way — let 
alone to the less affluent 
economies to which these 
policies export the inherent 
insecurities of agriculture. 

If the problem were simply 
one of over-production, it 
could be cured quite easily 
through the price me chanis m. 
The most efficient formers 
would survive, the weaker 
would go to the waff Without 
complementary social policies, 
however, the social damag e 
would be considerable and the 
political cost high. Xt is essen- 
tial that the regime should 
either continue to provide a 
measure of protection for 
formers who are less well able 
to compete or give them 
transitional aid to leave the 
land. Which approach suits 
which cases will depend 
mainly on whether they are in 
areas where the industry still 
operates at a low level of 
efficiency, or whether the ter- 
rain and the cKmqt ft malm it 
simply impossible to match 
the output of more favoured 
regions. 

A whole battery of protec- 
tions and inducements already 
exists, to temper the wind to 
French peasants, Welsh hiB 
formers and Bavarian part- 
time sons of the soiLIn the. 


POWER TO THE SHAREHOLDERS 


The Confederation of British 
Industry has made a welcome 
initiative in bringmgtogether a 
task force of powerful figures 
from finance and manufac- 
turing to bridge the growing 
rift between the City and 
industry. For it became plain 
at the CBFs recent annual 
conference that many man- 
agers today view the City with 
the same combination of sus- 
picion, fear and frustration 
that they once reserved for 
trade unions. 

It is argued, with a voice of 
powerful intellectual support 
from the Bank of England, that 
the culture of short-term 
thinking and the drive for 
short-term profits in the finan- 
cial markets is being forced on 
industry. That threatens long- 
term investment, research and 
development and the launch- 
ing of new products on which 
economic growth ultimately 
depends- 

Industry principally resents 
the entrenchment of takeover 
fever on the stock market. 
When, a year ago, the takeover 
boom reached a crescendo 
with £5 billion of bids in a 
single week, if could still be 
regarded as merely a phase of 
excess for basically benign 
market forces. The big insur- 
ance companies and pension 
funds winch between them 


safely be left to restore con- 
fidence in their ability to sort 
the wheat of commercially 
valuable mergers from the 
chaff of fashion and short-term 
premiums. 

It is no longer credible to 
give the City full benefit of the 
doubt The free market re- 
mains, as it always will be, the 
only guide to the control of 
companies on which any reli- 
ance can be placed. The 
market's internal dynamics 
have, however, introduced a 
distortion. The tendency to 
treat shares in companies as 
mere tradeable pieces of paper 
has accelerated. Increasing 
competition and structural 
cbangy in the finan cial world 
have spawned what amounts 
to a takeover industry that has 
become an important continu- 
ing source of profit to many of 
the new integrated financial 
groups. Big companies too 
often see only a choice be- 
tween uring the City’s take- 
over machine or becoming raw 
material for it 

The CBI task force could 
play an important role in 
resolving these problems. Its 
members should understand 
that stultifying Whitehall 
interference is likely to be the 
price of their failure. In doing 
so, they will need to recognize 
that, while improving rela- 
tions between individual corn- 


control most companies might 

THE KING’S PEACE? 


panies and their big 
shareholders can play a useful 
role, enlightened attitudes can- 
not alone reverse market 
trends. Perhaps that relation- 
ship needs a new formal 
framework in which market 
disciplines can be allowed to 
operate freely. And a greater 
role should be found for the 
mass of new small private 
shareholders if they are not to 
become disillusioned and 
powerless spectators. 

One possibility is that big 
Institutional shareholders 
should be more directly repre- 
sented in the average board- 
room, encouraging greater 
involvement and giving them 
much greater direct power 
over company policy and 
management. It is often the 
case that the dominant 
shareholders are able to ex- 
ercise their power only by 
dealing in shares on the mar- 
ket Small shareholders, who 
paradoxically take a longer 
view than the professionals, 
might be compensated with 
some indirect influence 
through enhanced' voting 
power. Some such com- 
promise may be needed to 
deter instant swings of control 
in the market while preserving 
the market’s disripline.But the 
basic choice still appears to lie 
between greater Whitehall 
control or new boardroom 
structures. 


Lord Dawson of Perm 

Has killed many men. 

That is why we sing 
. “God Save the King" 

So ran a favourite contem- 
porary rhyme about the doctor 
of George V. Nobody who 
repeated it can have imagined 
that it would turn out to be so 
sharply and literally to the 
point 

Shakespeare’s Richard H 
takes the view that all mon? 
archs are murdered- The 
“news" that Napoleon died 
from unnatural causes on St 
Helena caused some surprise 
at the time even if its shock 
value was reduced _ because 
Napoleon was a foreigner, an 
upstart, too dever by bal£ and 
responsible for the death of so 
many of his fellow human 
brings that it was only fair be 
should be done in himself 

But our own King George V, 
who renounced his foreign 
origins during the First World 
War - defending his British- 
ness against the aspersions of 
H.G Wells - an d who, though 
responsible for the death of 
innumerable game-birds, was 
innocent of human killin g, 
might have been expected to 
be allowed to die not only m 


his bed (Napoleon did that) 
but also in his own, or God’s, 
good time. 

Such an ordinaiy departure 
was, however, denied him. We 
now know that he was has- 
tened on his way by the toxic 
attentions of Dawson, and that 
the motive for this act of 
regicide was, at least partly, 
that the doctor felt it would be 
unsuitable for news of the 
King's death to be announced, 
first, in the evening papers. 

We ran understand Daw- 
son's prejudice, aB the more so 
as he applied it for the special 
benefit of The Times , tele- 
phoning his wife to advise us 
that our first edition should be 
held back (until the effects of 
his mini strations were com- 
plete). Even in those days it 
was a bit above the odds to be 
tipped off that the King was 
about to die by the man who 
was killing him. Despite our 
own and foe general distaste 
for what was done, the value of 
such a source .Iras to be 

acknowledged. 

At a more serious level, we 
can surely assume that Daw- 
son's chief motive waste spare 
his patient unnecessary dis- 
comfort and pain, and in that 


sense he, like most other 
doctors ; then as now, must 
indeed have “killed many 
men'* — and women. 
Euthanasia at the margin of 
life is unofficially practised by 
the medical profession, and is 
only called in question when 
there is a suspicion of criminal 
motive. 


It was not hypocritical of 
Dawson at about the same 
time to oppose in foe House of 
Lords the legalization of 
euthanasia, and to say “we do 
not lay down edicts for such 
things". The case for leaving 
the discretion to doctors is 
strong, because a defined sys- 
tem would probably be more 
open to abase than the lack of 
one. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Built-in curbs on prison reform 

From the Director qf the Prison had to admit he did not know. 
Reform Trust 


short term, compulsory limits 
on productive acreage may 
also be necessary. For only 
when an arrangement is 
reached which ensures control 
of the surpluses will it be 
possible even to begin dis- 
mantling the food mountains. 

It is a worthwhile discipline 
to contemplate the future in 
the light of Dr Mansholt's 
prediction in our series that 
within SO years Europe is 
likely to be able to meet its 
food seeds from one-third of 
today’s acreage. What kind of 
rural society, what - kind of 
outdoor environment, can we 
envisage as desirable if some 
such future as that lies before 
us? It must be one, above all, 
in which a smaller percentage 
of Europe's workforce remains 
on the land. 

The imperative of 30 years 
ago, to maximise production, 
becomes the least of our 
problems in such a context 
Incentives to raise output — by 
grubbing up pretty hedges, 
buying new machinery which 
releases farmhands to join the 
urban dole queue, or by 
saturating the land with 
fertilisers which pollute our 
lakes and rivers — become not 
merely irrelevant but counter- 
productive. 

The marginal fa rmer and his 
protestations will, almost by 
definition, be with us always. 
With fewer formers, however, 
he should be marginal at less 
cost to foe taxpayer than he is 
today. Let him also have other 
strings to his bow to make him 
less dependent on his form. AD 
this needs to be achieved 
without making forming a 
kind of museum occupation 
where no stimulus to enter- 
prise remains. 

Europe’s perennial debate 
over form support needs to 
change. Today’s squandered 
resources must be purposefully 
redirected towards fostering 
the kind of rural economy that 
the Community as a whole 
desires and can afford. 


All foe same, we must hope 
that Dawson’s example is not 
widely followed so for as his 
subsidiary motive is con- 
cerned. Kings and commoners 
alike are entitled to hope that 
their end will not be accel- 
erated by their doctors for any 
other purpose than to spare 
them suffering - even if the 
other purpose is, so intrin- 
sically worthy as promoting 
the interests of The Times. 


Sir. if politicians are lo bring their 
thinking to bear upon tin prisons 
— . as yon counsel in your leader 
today (November 25) — tee first 
question to pose is whether the 
rising prison population is, in your 
words, a “severe restraint” upon 
prison policy or an integral part of 
that policy. 

Successive governments have 
predicated their expenditure plans 
upon a rise in the number of 
prisoners. Planning a reduction in 
the number of prisoners, say to the 
EEC average, would introduce at a 
stroke the greater clarity which 
you seek about who should be sent 
to prison, what for, and for how 
long. 

Such a reduction in the pressure 
of numbers would also m ak e 
feasible the establishment of hu- 
mane iftin i TH Hj H iii eta rata rrlc As 
things stand at the moment, a 
substantial proportion of the 
prison population will still be 


out” well into the next century. 
When, earlier this year, the 
Permanent Secretary at the Home 
Office was asked by the Public 
Accounts Committee when this 
most degrading and unhygienic 
ritual would come to an end, be 


Furthermore, the very levels of 
overcrowding are leading to the 
postponement of modernisation 
schemes for the most antiquated 
gaols. The recently published 
Prison Department annnai report 
records that renovation of Dart- 
moor has been put off and eefis 
which had been vacated for the 
work to take place have been 
reoccupied. 

The department states plainly 
that “if the recent population 
increase is maintained it may 
hamper redevelopment plans by 
limiting our ability to decant 
inmates into vacant awnmnwyly . 
tion while carrying out refurbish- 
ment schemes”. 

No one who has had to debate 
the case for a reduced use of 
imp risonmen t will doubt the chal- 
lenge which it presents. Neverthe- 
less, at the end of an extremely 
difficult year for the prison ser- 
vice, it is remarkable that the 
Government seems to have ig- 
nored the opportunity for reform 
which was presented by the new 
Criminal Justice BilL 
Y ours faithfully, 

STEPHEN SHAW, Director, 
Prison Reform Trust, 

59 Caledonian Road, Nl. 
November 25. 


Airborne warning 

From the Managing Director of 
GEC Avionics Limited 
Sir, The assertion made by Mr 
Pamplin, of Westinghouse 
(November 25), that the Boeing 
gives earlier warning of attack 
than Britain’s AEW-Nimrod is 
misleading. The Minister of State 
for Defence Procurement, Lord 
Trefgarne, has publicly stated the 
expectation ofhis department that 
“both solutions have the potential 
to meet our requirements”. 

The task is to choose the system 
which does so in the most cost- 
effective way. By tins criterion, the 
choice will certainly foil on AEW- 
Nimrod, as is so dearly brought 
out in Sir Woodrow Wyatt’s 
article (November 15). 

Moreover, the interest in 
putting the British radar and 
electronics into the C-130 Hercu- 
les is not just GECs. Lockheed- 
Georgia have been working for 
some years on this project and 
have completed very detailed 
system design and wind tunnel 
tests. They obviously do see a 
strong export market, as ev- 
idenced by their willingness to 
spend money cm the project ami 
their presence in London now. 

The fact is that some 15 


Thin blue line 

From Mr Allen Chubb 
Sir, The letter today (November 
19) from the Chief Commandant 
of the Metropolitan Special 
Constabulary rightly draws atten- 
tion lo the contribution which 
specials make to policing in 
London. How much greater their 
contribution would be if they were 
used more intelligently and given 
more encouragement Too often, 
they are a wasted resource. 

In 1985, 24 per cent of them 
resigned and of these 72 per cent 
resigned for reasons other than 
reaching the age limit, leaving the 
district or joining the regulars. 
They included many experienced 
specials who were of great value 


on the street as pohoe officers, 
often at the busiest times, and In 
guiding new recruits. 

While the national strength of 
specials has increased for the 
fourth year in succession, the 
number of specials in London has 
declined, the good continual in- 
take of enthusiastic recruits only 
partially making up for those 
leaving. 

Scotland Yard and the Home 
Office must address themselves to 
the reasons for this high wastage 
without further delay. 

Yours faithfully, 

ALLEN CHUBB, 

Child & Child, Solicitors, 

13 Molcomb Street, SW1. 
November 19. 


Ski development 

From the Chairman < 

National Ski Council 
Sir, I am writing in support of 
Ronald Faux’s article (November 
19, some editions} on ski develop- 
ment at Fort William . 

At peak times the Scottish ski 
resorts have reached saturation 
point Access roads are congested, 
car parks are overflowing, and 
participants must queue to skL In 
spite of these diancentives the 
number of people who ski in 
Scotland is increasing significantly 
each year. 

The proposed development at 
Fort W illiam will allay the conges- 
tion in other ski areas and attract 
new skiers to the sport. These wfll 
not be missed by fellow skiers, or 
by already overcrowded commu- 
nities. 


Competitive skiing is being 
retarded in the only appropriate 
mountainous area of the UK 
because chairlift companies are 
understandably reluctant to re- 
serve slopes for racing when they 
are required by the mass of 
recreational skiers. 

Another major ski area is 
desperately requireeLGoverament 
should support those agencies, 
such as the Highlands and Islands 
Development Board and 
Lochaber District Council, which 
have offered assistance to a town 
fighting to save itself from the 
degradation of mass unemploy- 
ment. 

Yours faithfully, 

ALLAN D. QUINN (Chairman, 
Scottish National Ski Council), 

16 Oraigs Crescent, 

Edinburgh. 

November 19. 


Lost for words 

From Mr Richard J. Hildesley 
Sir, I was interested to read Mr 
Richard Lewis's tetter (November 
20) expressing nostalgic concern 
over the possible drying up of the 
typing pooL Few of those who felt 
drowned by such impersonal 
arrangements would, I suspect, 
mourn their passing. 

Modern technology has 
equipped our secretaries and typ- 
ists with word processors and the 
typing pool survives, albeit thinly 
and euphemistically disguised 
under the banner “central sec- 
retarial services” or some similar 
device. 

Frequently these days we find 
ourselves placing secretaries in 
smaller groups of two or three; 
which seems to the benefit of both 
them and those they serve. In our 
practice, we refer to such 
groupings as “puddles”; so total 
dehydration is not with us yet. 


Perhaps we can reassure Mr 
Lewis by suggesting that “she is 
not dead, but bleepethT* 

Yours electronically, 

RICHARD J. HILDESLEY, 
Space Planning Services, Pic, 
Western House, 

Uxbridge Road, 

Middlesex. 


Colouring films 

From Mr Brian R- Pow 
Sir, Further to David Robinson’s 
article on the “coiorization” of old 
movies (November 24), I suggest 
that every film which has been 
treated this way be prefaced with 
the statement: “Hus film has been 
artificially coloured. It was orig- 
inally shot in black and white.” 

At least the makers' original 
intentions would be remembered. 
Yours sincerely, 

BRIAN R. POW, 

28 Heathfield Gardens, W4. 
November 24. 


Radio hazard on 
the motorway 


countries have already received 
detailed Lockheed-GEC presenta- 
tions and proposals are even now 
on the table to several of them. 
That the C-130 AEW can now 
offer a radar performance which is 
comparable to Boeing’s, and at a 
fraction of the cost, only increases 
the pressure on Boeing to exclude 
Britain from the world com- 
petition at all costs. 

It is inconceivable that the UK 
would find greater benefit from 
the paper “jobs” implied by offset 
than from jobs created by produc- 
ing and e x port in g its own hard- 
won technology. Offiet in a free 
market mily means the right to bid 
competitively. UK companies al- 
ready have that right, and when 
competitive they win orders in the 
USA anyway, and elsewhere. 

This is precisely what GEC has 
been successfully doing in avion- 
ics for the past 25 years and can 
continue to do with the C-130 
AEW system. Only a decision not 
to buy Nimrod can frustrate this 
capability. 

Yours farthfiilly, 

WILLIAM a ALEXANDER, 
Managing Director, 

GEC Avionics limite d , 

Airport Works, 

Rochester, Kent 
November 26. 


From Mrs A. Campbell Jensen 
Sir, I often have to drive long 
distances, cross-country, late at 
night. During recent months I 
have been subject to several 
breakdowns, in spite of taking 
every precaution to keep my car in 
good running order. 

With ever-increasing incidents 
of rape, and in view of police and 
judicial advice that women should 
not walk alone in the dark, I have 
decided that it would make sense 
to have a telephone installed in 
my car. 

The attraction of this idea was 
slightly shaken on a motorway 
recently when I saw a car closing 
upon me from behind at alarming 
speed. Only when 1 flashed my 
rear fog-lights did the driver 
appear to realise that he was on a 
collision course. He was deep in 
conversation on a car telephone. 
When he overtook me neither of 
his hands was on the wheel: the 
left one was foil of telephone and 
he was gesticulating with the right 

I followed this driver’s erratic 
progress (as he altered his speed 
dramatically from cruising on the 
inside lane to overtaking every- 
thing in sight it was impossible to 
lose him) for well over half an 
hour, through the of 

filtering and heavy traffic. He 
appeared to be in constant 
conversation and therefore unable 
to use his indicators whilst weav- 
ing from lane to lane. 

Before I invest in a phone of my 
own could someone please tell me 
whether there is a chance that the 
Government and/or motor insur- 
ance companies have plans to ban 
the use, when moving, of all hand- 
held models — except in cases of 
necessity by police and rescue 
services trained in the use of such 
equipment? 

As things stand, I am less likely 
to be slaughtered by a rapist than 
by a phone-crazed car driver. 
Yours faithfully, 

ALISON CAMPBELL JENSEN, 
Rectory Farmhouse, 

Britford, 

Salisbury. Wiltshire. 

November 19. 


Neglected exam? 

From the Principal and Vice- 
Chancellor qf the University qf 
Strathclyde 

Sir, Well . done, Mr Ferrar 
(November 20). Almost all sen- 
sible men and women appreciate 
the foolishness of early 
specialisation in schools but the 
new AS examination will not have 
an easy time, if only because the 
vested interests in the present 
arrangements are so poweniiL 

Take courage, however: the 
baccalaureate system is alive and 
well in Scotland, where the 
simultaneous learning of English 
and a foreign language and a 
science subject is the norm for 
most pupils. 

I doubt that Scotland comes 
into your category of a mayor 
European neighbour, still less a 
rival, and that may be why what 
has been done here so well and for 
so long tends to be overlooked. 
Yours faithfully, 

GRAHAM HILLS, 

Principal and ViceChanceflor, 
University of Strathclyde, 
McCance Building, 

16 Richmond Street, Glasgow. 
November 21. 


The Queen’s victim 

From MrJ. A. Sankey 
Sir, Your correspondent, Mr 
Nicolas BeHord (November 20), 
asks whether the African Queen's 
victim, the Gotzen (now Liemba), 
is still afloat 

I am glad to be able to tell him 
that this historic vessel was still 
making regular trips round Lake 
Tanganyika when I visited Ujiji 
(Kigoma) in July, 1985, and I 
imagine she will continue for 
many years yet 
Yours sincerely, 

JOHN SANKEY (High Commis- 
sioner, Tanzania, 1982-85), 

United Kingdom Mission, 

37-39 rue de Vermont, 

121 1 Geneva 20, Switzerland. 
November 20. 


No laughing matter 

From Professor Emeritus A. R. 
Kirajfy 

Sir, Your feature article (Novem- 
ber 22) on the subject of the 
Crystal Palace fire 50 years ago 
should really discredit the daim of 
the I^ess to sit in judgment on 
politicians and others. 

I lived a few hundred yards 
below the west tower and saw 
approach roads for fire engines 
blocked by crowds of joking 
sightseers who had seen the flames 
from great distances. Now we have 
David Howarth telling us how 
deliriously happy Richard 
Dimbleby was and what fun the 
broadcasters had. Is this really the 
attitude of journalists to disasters 
which affect other people? 

Yours truly, 

ALBERT KIRALFY, 

King's College London (KQQ, 
Faculty of Laws, 

Strand, WC2. 

November 22. 


ON THIS DAY 


NOVEMBER 28 1840 


Acre, theSyrianport 
defended hr Sir Sidney S 
against the French in the 
Napoleonic wars, was again under 
attack, this time from i 
predominantly British Allied fleet. 
The captatre of the city drove out 
the Egyptians who, under Ibrahim 
Pasha, had occupied it since 1832 
and restored it to the Turks. 


THE CAPTURE OF 
ST JEAN D’ ACHE 

(From Uk Malta Times.) 

MALTA, Nov. 15,1840 

The Phoenix steam-frigate ar- 
rived on Thursday evening teat, 
bringing ff w* intelli- 

gence of the capture of St Jean 
d'Acze — the far-famed fortress of 
the Levant — by the combined 
fleets of the Allies. The action is 
the most splendid of all the recent 
□aval achievements in these seas, 
demonstrating to the staggering 
faith of the pobticianB of Europe 
that "ftthiwg fwrt withstand British 
genius arid valour. Vainly have the 
French incendiaries defied ^ 
British naval forces to take the 
great fort of the East”; for, whilst 
they pour out their bitter invec- 
tives, and sing their savage war- 
whoop of nationality, a council of 
war is formed to attack these 
redoubtable batteries, it is decided 
in a moment, and in another St 
Jean d’Acre is a heap of 
mins, dyed with the profuse 
of the enemy! 

We cannot pass fay the apfawdid 
action of Admiral Stopford — an 
action which has covered the 
Admiral with immortal honour, ft 
was Admiral Sir Robert Stopford 
who left his flagship for the 
Phoenix — who directed the attack 
— who fired the first shot upon the 
devoted fortress, who neared the 

fnrmiriah lw h)^i>riw l nvir? imA»f 

bristling cannon (the labours and 
accumulations of ages) stood up 
with coolness, daring, tmahwirp-n 
courage, and commanded the 


whole operations! . . . 

The result of this grand action is 
3,000 prisoners, an immense quan- 
tity of war-like stores, ammudaUid 
for years in this celebrated fortress, 
and possession of the entire coast 
of Syria. ... 

We refer our readers for the 
details of this splendid achieve- 
ment to our correspondents’ com- 
munications from the scene of 
action. 

... At a quarto’ past two o’clock 
the batteries to the south opened 
on the Castor, as she most gallant- 
ly, and to the admiration of the 
whole fleet, took up her station 
within about 700 yards of the 
batteries. . . At 25 wiwmh*» past 
four, the action being at its height, 
a terrific explosion took place in 
the town, which for a time wholly 
concealed it and the southern 
division from view; its appearance 
was truly awful, and I can compere 
it to nothing but as if a huge yew 
tree had suddenly been conjured op 
from the devoted town — it hung 
for many minutes a mighty pafi 
over those hundreds it had hurled 
into eternity, and then slowly, 
owing to the lightness of the wind, 
drifted to the southward. 

It proved to be the explosion of j 
the principal magaadne of the place, 
one-third of which it has de- 
stroyed, and, from a whole regi- 
ment having been quartered in a 
khan immediately adjoining, it is 
supposed from 1,500 to 1,700 
soldiers perished in the runs, 
besides a number of camefa, horses, 
bollocks, and donkeys. After this 
fearful event the fire from the 
southern batteries nearly ceased, 
but the western one still kept it up 
with animation, and was answered 
broadside with redoubled vigour 
and tremendous effect. Shortly 
before 5 the Admiral made the 
to discontinue the 
engagement This sudden si- 

lence immediately succeeding snch 
dinning uproar had a very 
peculiar effect. . . Admiral Walker 
one or two unsuccessful 
attempts to land some spies; but 
happily about 30 minutes after 1 
ajn. a small boat came off from the 
captain of tire port, to say that the 
Egyptians were leaving the town, 
and that if a party was landed at 
the water-gate it would be found 
open; this was of course immedi- 
ately done, and 300 Turks and a 
party of Austrian marines took 
unopposed possession at 
daylight . . 


Lost in the post 

From Dr S- Roy-Chowdhury 


Sir, Is republicanism coming to 
the front 


the United Kingdom by the 
door, albeit through the actions of 
Government agencies? 

Otherwise why, pray, has the 
Post Office erased the Sovereign's 
head from its latest aerogramme? 
Never since the inception of tire: 
penny Hack, I presume, has this 
happened. 

Yours etc, 

SANJOY ROY-CHOWDHURY, 
Niraia, 

90 Links Avenue, 

Gidea Park, Essex. 

November 17. 


Compulsive viewing? 


From Miss Lynette Ferde 


ley 

Sir, I am perhaps more fortunate 


Steel price stability 

From Mr James Campbell 
Sir, You report (November 13) 
substantially improved half-year 
“profits” at British SieeL Achiev- 
ing good results in any enterprise 
which has received untold vol- 
umes of free capital from tax- 
payers and which operates within 
a market-manipulating cartel 
should be easy. Protection from 
competitive import penetration 
must also help. 

The other tide of the coin is that 
the customers of British Steel, 
tin’s much maligned engineer- 
ing industry managers, of whom I 


am proud to be one, are threat- 
ened in 1987 with price increases 
of some 20 per cent in their basic 
rawraaierial. This is likely to lead 
to a loss of market and a loss of 
jobs at the hands of cartel-like 
operations within European stain- 
owned steel producers. We face 
the prospect of British Steel 
marching to spurious glory over 
our dead bodies and may he 
forgiven a degree of bitterness. Of 
course, we have to compete in a 
wholly international free market 
economy. 

MrSchoky is reported as saying 
that the steel industry needs stable 
prices. At the very least he should 


extend these to his customers who, 
after all, would rightly be pros- 
ecuted if they sought to combine 
to frustrate the workings of eco- 
nomic forces for tbeir own benefit, 
as does the steel industry. 

Mr Scboley should surely not 
welcome privatisation, under 
which he would have to operate in 
fair competition both with his 
friends in Europe and Third 
World producers. 

Yours faithfully, 

JAMES CAMPBELL, Chairman, 
G.F.E. Bariett & Son Lid, 
Maylands Avenue, 

Hem el Hempstead, Hertfordshire. 
November 14. 


than Mr Michael Hopkins 
(November 24). I have never 
owned a television set, and “No 
television” written across the 
enquiry form has been sufficient at 
intervals over the last ten years to 
keep the licensing authorities at 
bay. 

However, since Mr Hopkins 
and I, together with others of like 
mind, represent only 2 per cent of 
all households in this country (or 
some 39,000-odd homes) we must 
clearly be an irritation to those 
whose professional occupation it 
is to ensure that we have afl paid 
up. 

You rs faith fully, 

LYNETTE FENLEY, 

44 Narbonne Avenue, SW4, 
November 24. 


.1 




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I appeal and 
.t year Mr 
if AUestree, 


51, who has 
laid since It 
her, said that 
re his luck, 
incostic. It is . 


aids can be 
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in brewing 
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States, the' 
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tan couple 
last July for 
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xml Lane, 
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COURT 


Forthcoming marriages 


AND 

SOCIAL 


COURT 

CIRCULAR 


BUCKINGHAM PALACE 
November 27: The Queen ar- 
rived at Winchester Station in 
the Royal Train this morning 
and was received by Her 
Majesty's Lord-Lieutenant for 
Hampshire (Ueotenant-Cotond 
Sir James Scott, Bt). 

The Queen, CoioneMn-Chief, 
The Royal Green Jackets, 
accompanied by Princess Alex- 
andra, the Hon Mra Angus 
Ogi/vy, Deputy Cofood-in- 
Cnief, The Light Infantry, sub- 
sequently opened the new Light 
Division Depot at Flowerdown. 

Having been received at Sir 
John Moore Barracks by the 
Colonel Co mm a n d a nt The 
Light Division (Lieutenant- 
General Sir David Mostyn), Her 
Majesty opened the Barracks 
and unveiled a commemorative 
plaque. 

Afterwards, The Queen, es- 
corted bv the OHpntanrtinB 
Officer Light Division Depot 


and the Chairman of the Coun- 
cil (Councillor Wj_D,Roacb)- 
Afterwards, The Princess 
Anne. Mra Mark Phillips was 
entertained at luncheon at 
Sedgemoor Town HalL 
In the afternoon Her Royal 
Highness opened the new In- 
door Riding Arena at Sandhill 
Park Hospital, Bishop's 
Lydeard, Taunton. 

The Princess Anne, Mrs Mark 

Phillips toured the £rena, es- 


MrS-A. Woodward 
and Miss CD. Sifeslary 
The engagement is announced 
between Shaun Anthony, youn- 
gest son of Mr and Mrs Dennis 
Woodward, of Oevedon, Bris- 
tol, and Camilla Da van, eldest 
daughter of the Hon Timothy 
and Mrs Sainsbuiy. of West- 
minster, London. 


Mr S- Frauds 

and Miss CJL Coope 

The engagement is announced 

between Steven, elder son of Mr 

Richard Francis, of Richmond, 


Mr A*D. McLeish 
and Miss PJ. Cluster 
The en g a g ement is announced 
between Alastair, elder son of 
Mr David McLeish, of Tilford. 


and Mrs Beate Francis, of Surrey, and Mrs Catherine 
Roehampton, and Charlotte. McLeish, of Ct anlei g h , Surrey, 


Of Mr and 


Dorset 


MCi-eisn, ui wnuungu, 

and Pippa, second daughter of 
Professor and Mrs David 
Glaister, of Godaiming. Surrey. 


Mr R.CS. Acbesod 

and Miss EJSJL Bateman 

The engagement- is announced 


Mr GjC. Hamer 
and Miss AN. Gardner 
The engagement is announced 
between George, son of Robert 


Mr JJL Mcd&Ott 
and Miss N-J- Connor 
The engagement is announced 
between Hamon, son of Mr and 


Godman stone, Dorset twin son 

.k. rV\Uwi#*l nn/t Mrs 


of Klosters, Switzerland, and 


Wire CUWiUU ITiBUlwyii, ,V 

Sacombc Park, Hertfordshire, 


younger daughter of Mr and Mrs 
Ian Bateman, of Farabam, 
Surrey. 


Devon. 




Chester, New 
United States. 


Hampshire, 


Somerset Charitable Trust (Mr 
Anthony Vaughan Read). 

Mrs Richard Carew Pole as m 
attendance. 


Mr JJP Rouse 

and Miss F.TJL RoUe Neville 
The engagement is announced 


CLARENCE HOUSE 
November 27: Queen Elizabeth 
The Queen Mother this morn- 
ing visited the York Street 
Chambers of the St Maiyiebone 
Housing Association. 

Mra Patrick Campbdl-Pres- 

ton and Sir Alastair And were in 

attendance. 


Mr J-P. Husband 

and Miss A-M. Siuptr „ „ 

Mr P. P ickhmH The engagement is announced Mr Jf Rn«e 

and Miss A. Evans betweenJffl^ftene, only son of and Miss F.TJL Bode Nerille 

The engagement is announced Omtain and Mra T.A. Husband, The engagement is announced 
bctweenfitilip.ymmgKt son of of3lGiesaenhall Road, SWlg] betwem Johnathan, younger 
Mr and Mra T.E. Dickinson, of and Angela, only daughter of Mr son of Mr and Mrs Maitm 
Taunton, Somerset, mdAfiMn, and Mis Sc lmper, of Rouse, of Footmen Kfagna, 
elder daughter of Dr and Mrs Hernsey Wood Farm, Dorset, and Taman, daughta- 

SSE"* Sa ‘ muodham ’ ffiSK 


elder daughter of Dr and Mrs 
JJV.F. Evans, of Nmmington, 

Herefordshire. 


KENSINGTON PALACE 


Mr RX. Baker 
and Miss G.C Hartley 

The epjpgement is announced 

between Robert, eldest son- of 


Mr MJ. Lambert 

and Miss AJ. Ramsay 

The engagement is announced 


November 27: The Prince of Captain U. Baker, retd, and 
Wales this morning launched Mrs M. Baker, of GiTHngham, 


between Michael, younger son 
of Mr and Mra J.B. Lambert, of 
Lingfieid, Surrey, and Amanda, 
elder daughter of Mr and Mrs 
HA Ramsay, of Priastcd, 
Emsworth, Hampshire. 


(Lieutenant-Colonel MJLO’M 
Dewar), visited the Training 
Wing and later met members of 
the 43rd and 52nd Association, 
the King’s Royal Rifle Corps 
Association and the Rifle Bri- 
gade Association. 

Her Majesty then visited the 
Warrant Officers’ and Ser- 
geants' Mess and, with Princess 
Alexandra, the Hon Mrs Angus 
Ogslvy, honoured the Colonel 
Com mandan t with her presence 
at luncheon in the Officers' 
Mess. 


the Inner Cities Trust and 
addressed the Building Commu- 
nities Conference at the Astoria 
Theatre, 157 Charing Cross 
Road, WC2. 

Sir John Riddell, Bt, and Mr 
Humphrey Mews were in 
attendance. 

The Prince of Wales, Honor- 
ary Air Commodore. Royal Air 
FOroe Brawdy, this afternoon 
received Group Captain D.R.H. 
McGregor upon relinquishing 
command of the Station and 
Group Captain R.C. 
Jiumphreyson upon assuming 


Kent, and Gillian, only da 
of Mr and Mrs H. Hart! 
West End, Southampton. 


Mr MJ. Saunders 
and M5ss EJLS. Timuus 
The engagement is announced 
between Morgan John, second 


DrlLS. Maduy 
and Dr ILN. Bartow 
The engagement is announced 
between Robert, eldest son of 


son of Mr JJ. Saunders, of Professor and Mra Donald 
Henley House, Wookey. and Mackay, of Highway Lane, 


The Queen this afternoon 'command, 
opened the new Nightingale Tbe Prince of Wales, Presi- 


Mrs J.M. Saunders, of Old 
Down Farm, Emborough, and 
Emma Lucinda, youngest 
daughter of Mr and Mis AILS. 
Timxnis, of Hymerford House, 
East Coker. Somerset 


Keek. Staffordshire, and Re- 
becca, ekJest daughter of Profes- 


sor Horace Barlow, of Sdwyn 
Gardens. Cambridge, and Mrs 
Ruth Bariow, of Stansgate Ave- 
nue, Cambridge. 


Wing of the Royal Hampshire 
County Hospital. 

Having been received by tbe 
Chairman of Wessex Regional 
Health Authority (Professor Sir 
Bryan Th waites), Her Majesty 
viewed an exhibition portraying 
the Hospital's history, opoied 
the Nightingale Wing and un- 
veiled a commemorative 
plaque. 

The Queen, escorted by tbe 
Chairman of the Winchester 
Health Authority (the Lord 
Northbrook), then toured the 
Departments and Wards in the 
new building and met hospital 
staff. 

Tbe Hon Mary Morrison, Mr 
Robert Feflowes and Lieuten- 
ant-Commander Timothy Laur- 
ence, RN, were in attendance. 

The Duke of Edinburgh. 
President of the Natinal Playing 
Fields Association, this morning 
presented the 1986 President’s 
Certificates at Buckingham 
Palace. 

His Royal Highness, Senior 
Fellow of the Fellowship of 
Engineering, pre se nte d the 1986 
MacRobert Award at Bucking- 
ham Palace. 

The Duke of Edinburgh, Pa- 
tron and Trustee, attended 
Receptions at St James’s Palace 
for young people who have 
reached the Gold Standard in 
The Duke of Edinburgh's 
Award. 

His Royal Highness, Presi- 
dent of the Institute of Sports 
Sponsorship, this afternoon at- 
tended the Annual General 
Meeting of die Institute at 


dent, The Prince’s Youth Busi- 
ness Trust, accompanied by Tbe 
Princess of Wales, this evening 
attended a dinner, to inaugurate 
Tbe Prince’s Trust Youth Busi- 
ness Appeal, at tbe Mansion 
House. 

Mrs George West, Sir John 
Riddell. Bt, and the Hon Rupert 
Fairfax were in attendance. 

The Princess of Wales this 
afternoon presented the Awards 
for Westminster City Council’s 
Anti-Drug Campaign at the 
Rock Garden Restaurant, The 
Piazza, Covent Garden, WC2. 

Mra Max Pike and Lieuten- 
ant-Corn mander Richard 
Aytard, RN were in attendance. 

The Princess of Wales, Presi- 
dent, Wales Craft Council, this 
afternoon received Mr Malcolm 
MacIntyre-Read (Chief Exec- 
utive of tbe Council) and mem- 
bers of the Committee.* 


Birthdays today 

Mr Tim Aitken. 42; Vice- 
Admiral Sir David Brawn, 59; 
Mr Geoffrey Clarke, 62; Lord 
Justice Oroom-Johnson, 72; Sir 
John Dudding. 71; Mr F. C. H. 
du Preez, SI; Mr Terence 
Frisby. 54; Sir Ronald Gibson, 
77; Mrs M. H. Grim wood, 82; 
Mr Keith Miller, 67; Lieuten- 
ant-General Sir David Mostyn, 
58; Miss Dervla Murphy, 55; the 


Sale room 


No takers for 
early ‘Izvestia’ 


Right Rev Patrick Rodger, 
Mr R S. Tate, 55; Mqj 
General EL E, Urquhart, 85. 


By Geraldine Norman, Sale Room Correspondent 
No one wanted the first nine Russia in this way if they did 


Royal Victorian 
Order 


KENSINGTON PALACE 
Princess Alice, Duchess of 
Gloucester, Cokmei-in-ChieC 
King's Own Scottish Borderers, 
today received Lieuteoant- 
Cokmd Robin Hulf on assum- 
ing the appointment as Com- 
manding Officer of the 1st 
Battalion. 

The Duke of Gloucester this 
morning visited Lincoln College 
of Technology to mark the 
occasion of the College's Cen- 
tenary Year and in tbe afternoon 
opened the recently restored 
West Range of St Mary’s 
Gufldhafl. Lincoln. 

His Royal Highness, who 
travelled in an aircraft of Tbe 


The Queen has commanded 
that a service of tbe Royal 
Victorian Order is to be hdd in 
St George’s Chapel, Windsor, at 
i lam on Friday, April 10, 1987, 
followed by a reception in St 


George’s Hall, Windsor Castle, 
for all members and medallists that 
of tbe order attending the unsol 
service. £5,00 

Members of tbe order and ■tt. 
holders of the Royal Victorian 
Medal who wish to attend 
should apply for a ticket as soon jne 
as possible, and not later than (esm 
Friday. February 27, 1987, stai- did I 
ing also if they require a car of C 
parking label, to the Registrar of £1 Of 
the Royal Victorian Order, Gen- £2,0Q 
tral Chancery of the Orders of _ 
Knighthood, St James's Palace, J”. 
London, SW1A 1BG. 

Tickets for tbe service and the “M™ 
reception will be restricted to Tb 
members of the order and medal the iz 
holders only, due to the limited mg 1 
seating capacity in St George’s (urns 
Chapel Please do not apply for 
tickets for spouses who are not 

members or medallists of the 

order or for any other guests. comn 


The Duke of Edinburgh this 
evening attended the 40th 
Anniversary Dinner of the 
C um fie ld Institute of Technol- 
ogy at Cranfidd where His 
Royal Higheness was received 
by the Chancellor of the In- 
stitute (the Lord Kings Norton). 

Major Rowan Jackson, RM, 
was in attendance. 


Queen's Flight, was attended by 
Lieutenant-Cokmd Sir Simon 


The Princess Anne, Mrs Mark 
Phillips this morning at Bridg- 
water opened and toured the 
first Sheltered/Special Sheltered 
Housing Scheme to be built by 
Sedgemoor District Council 
Her Royal Highness was re- 
ceived by Her Majesty’s Lord- 
Ljeu tenant for Somerset (Lieu- 
tenant-Colonel Walter Luttreli) 


Bland . 

The Duke and Duchess of 
Gloucester were present this 
evening at a performance of The 
Lion. Die Witch and the Ward- 
robe at the Westminster The- 
atre. London SW1. 

Lieutenant-Colonel Sir Simon 
Bland and Mis Michael Wigjey 
were in attendance. 


YORK HOUSE 
November 27: The Duchess of 
Kent, Colonel-in-ChieC this 
evening attended the 4th/7th 
Royal Dragoon Guards Annual 
Officers' Dinner at the Cavalry 
and Guards Club, London SW1. 

Mrs Alan Henderson was in 
attendance. 


Miss Anne Beckwith-Smith has 
been appointed Assistant Pri- 
vate Secretary to the Princess of 
Wales. She will continue to be 
lady-in-waiting. 

A service of thanksgiving for the 
life of Mr W. W. Maxwell will be 
held at Hampstead Parish 
Church, Church Row, at noon 
today. 

A thanksgiving for tbe life of Mr 
Wolfgang Herman will be hdd 
on Sunday. December 14 at 
3pm at Stockport Grammar 
School. 


issues of the earliest of three 
Russian paper called fzvertm 
(“news” in Russian) when 
they were offered at Sotheby’s 
yesterday. 

Pubfished by a committee of 
Petrograd journ alists bet w een 
February 27 and March 4, 
1917, it ran for only nine 
issues and pre-dated the birth 
of the' present newspaper of 
that name. The papers were 
unsold at £1,800 (estmate 
£5,000-£7,000). 

The first Russian edition of 
Marx’s Das Kapital suffered 
tbe same fate at £11,000 
(estimate £15,000^20,000), as 
did Lenin’s The Development 
of Capitalism bt Auras at 
£1,050 (estimate £1,506- 
£2,000)and^Ep^s^Dfe l age 

load at £3,000(estifliate 
£6,00048,000). 

The difficulty appears to be 
the impossibility of establish- 
ing how rare these publica- 
tions are in R nssia. Under 
these dre— s t an ces, dealers 
and collectors are anwiDing to 
commit large sums of money. 
A semi-official Russian dealer, 
who brings suitcases of 
publications out of Rnssia for 
sale in the West, is a well 
known source among Londo n 
dealers. 

Tbe Sotheby items hare no 
stated source and could have 
come from him. It is presumed 
that the Russian authorities 
would not allow material oat of 


not have sufficient copies in 
their own archives. 

The big success of Sotheby’s 
book sale, in contrast, was a 
fifteenth century Dutch Mock 
book, a BibOa Panperea with 
engraved pictorial pages. It 
has 37 leaves and is dated to 
around 1460. The price was 
£148£00 (estimate £4<MXW- 
£50,000). 

It was sent for sale by the 
Duke of Northmnberland, who 
had hied to seO Rat Sotheby’s 
in 1978 but on that occasion 
there were no takers and it was 
bought in at £38400. The 
book was bought yesterday by 
Herebert Tenschert, a dealer 
who has only recently estab- 
lished himself as a major force 
in the market, working from 
the village of Rotthalmmister. 
near Munch. 

The morning sale of printed 
books and manuscripts total- 
led £453338 with 13 per cent 
left mtsoid. 

In Paris on Tuesday the big 
jM i tnmu sales into their 


“Ladovic Hafery rencontre 
Mme Cardinal dans le 
Vestiaire des Dansenses” sell- 
ing for 3.6 milBon francs 
in an Ader sale. 

Libert et Castor had a Goya 
ink and wash drawing on offer 
depicting a beat old man in a 
cape which sold for IJ. tnSUaa 
francs (estimate 1-5 million 
francs) or £127,250 to an 
American collector. 


Who picks up the bill 
for your Telex line 
when you buy a 
3M Whisper Telex? 


Dinners 

The Prince’s Youth Business 
Trust Appeal 

Tbe Prince and Princess of 
Wales were tbe guests of honour 
at a dinner hdd at tbe Mansion 
Hoose yesterday to launch the 
Prince’s Youth Business Trust 
Appeal. Tbe Lord Mayor and 
Lady Mayoress received the 
guests and the speakers were tbe 
Prince of Wales and the Lord 
Mayor. Among those present 
were: 

The Hon 




pa Sw and Dr Alcoa 
chairm e n o f the 

« UlC Governor 
landMrsBoWn 


speaker at a Thanksgiving Day 
dinner arranged by tbe' West 
Sussex branch of the English- 
Speaking Union at the Cni Ch- 
ester College of Technology 
yesterday. Mr Michael Foyle, 
chairman of the branch, 
presided. 

British Scrap F e d e ra ti on 
Mr Pat Neenan, President of the 
British Scrap Federation, pre- 
sided at a dinner hdd at the 
Hilton hotel yesterday. Mr Giles 
Shaw, Minister of State for 
Industry, was the principal 
speaker. 


»dor an d VK-oott CTSc flg Nantgufl. Il» 
fhriat Amtewad or and M m, Ptete*. 

Lord and L ady BqardBvm. JUrt and 
Lacty Ogham. Lord .and Lady hum of 


BS-'SES: 






'ssem 

Mrs 


Kemp & Hawley 
A dinner was held last night at 
daridge’s hotel to celebrate tbe 
175th anniversary of the found- 
ing of Kemp A Hawley. The 
speakers were Lord Mishcon 
and Mr Ronald Bernstein, QC 
Mr DAG. Troup. President of 
the Royal Institution of Char- 
tered Survey ore, also attended. 
Mr J. Simon Davies presided. 



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For more intbrmarion fill in the 
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I Caledonian Club 
The Eart of Airlie, President of 
the Caledonian Club, presided 
at the annual St Andrew’s Day 
d inner hdd at the dob yes- 
terday. The Right Rev Professor 
Robot Craig, Moderator of the 
General Assembly of the 
Church of Scotland, was the 
guest of honour. 


Business Graduates Assoc iatio n 
Tbe Business Graduates Associ- 
ation held its nineteenth annual 
dinner at Fishmonger's Hall last 
night. Mr Bruce Lloyd, chair- 
man, presided and the guests of 
honour was Mr J. Graham Day, 
Chairman and Chief Executive 
of Rover Group pic. 


Luncheons 


Gray’s Ina 

The Treasurer, Lord Hoosoo. 
QC. and Masters of the Bench of 
Gray’s Inn entertained the 

following guests al dinner in hail 

yesterday, it being Grand Day of 

Michaelmas Tenn: 


Lord Graham of Edmontm 
Lord Graham of Edmonton 
entertained at luncheon al the 
House of Lords yesterday prize- 


of Mr and Mra Martin Root 
Neville, of Frampton Mansell. 
Gloucestershire. 


Mr TJVL Spiers 
and Miss VJL Smith 
The engagement is announced 
between Timothy Mark, youn- 
ger son of Mr and Mrs K. Spiers, 
of White Cottage. Long 
Melford. and Victoria Louise, 
eldest daughter of Dr and Mra L 
Russell, of Within dale Mil, 
Long Melford, Suffolk. 


comuang and contradictory 
instructions from the Govern- 
ment, was technically admira- 
ble. 

He was approaching the end 

of his tenure as GOC 1st 
Corps BAOR when the crisis 
broke, and he was appointed 
military commander of the 
Anglo-French forces which 
landed at Port Said under 

General Keightley. 

StockweO brought with him 
his corps headquarters from 
Germany, and arrived in time 


as a last resort 
He, also hdd very, strongly 
that tbe flanks of the Nato 
front should be extended to 
the Baltic 'and the eastern 
road-making bridging of Mediterranean The bird ws 


nvers. 

He stayed with the efi vision 
until the middle of 1946 when 
he was brought bade to Big-, 
land to command the 44th 
Territorial Division and the 
Home Counties District 
There he remained few a year. 


to take part in Be planning AirborneWwskm. 


before taking . over the 6th 


Mr MJ. Velarde 
and Miss TJB. Webster 
The engagement is announced 
between Matthew, son of Mr 
AJ. Velarde, of Riyadh, and 
Mra P. Martin, of the Isle of 
Man, and Una, daughter of Mr 
and Mra Di. Webster, of the 
Isle of Man. 


operation. It was a complicat- 
ed assignment as his forces, 
many of them untrained and 
ill-equipped for the task, had 
to be collected from as for 
•apart as Cyprus, Malta, Alge- 
ria amd Britain. The difficul- 
ties were furtl^ compounded 
by ibe need to avoid unneces- 
sary casualties and destruction 
of property. 

Despite aO these handicaps, 
he brought order to the c h a o s, 
and there is little doubt that 
the operation would have 
been crowned withjSuccess, in 
the strictly military sense, had 
it not been called off on orders 
from London. 

Hugh Charles StockweU was 
born on June 16, 1903, the son 
of a soldier who later became 
chief constable of Colchester. 
He was educated at Marlbor- 
ough and the RMC Sand- 
hurst, from which be was 
commissioned in 1923 in the 
Royal Welch Ftisfliers. 

As a young regimental offi- 
cer he was seconded for six- 
years to the Royal West 
African Frontier Force, an 
experience wbich stood him in 
good stead when he com- 
manded the 82nd West Afri- 
can Division in the Second 
World War. 

At the outbreak of this he 
was brigade major of the 
Royal Welch Brigade, but he 
volunteered al once for service 


In 1947 he took it to 
Palestine, where it played an 
active part hr the maintenance 
of law and order in foe last 
months of the British occupa- 
tion. He was particularly suc- 
cessful in organizing foe 
withdrawal of onr forces from 
Haifa, arranging a five-day 
trace between Jews and Arabs 
to allow the peaceful evacua- 
tion of the Arab population. 
For these services he was 
madeKBE 


too fet in the middle, and he 
was afraid that its wings might 
not be strong enough to cany 
it The formation of a Baltic 
command, after several yearn 
of negotiations, did much to 
improve mailers on the north- 
ern flank. : 

He retired from the post in 
1964, and the following year, 
on his 62nd birthday, retired 
from the Army. 

He was Colonel of the 
Welch Fasikis (1952-65), 
Colonel Commandant of the 
Army Air Corps (1957-63), 
Colond Commandant of die 
Royal Army Education Corps 
(19 5964). and the first Colo- 
nel of the Royal Malay Regi- 
ment (1954-59). He was ADC 
General to the Queen from 
1959 to 1962. De Gaulle made 
him a Grand Officer of the 


On his return home be was • Legion of Honour in 1963 -an 
appointed commandant ofthe exceptional gesture. 


RMA, Sandhurst, and two StodcweB i 
years later, GOC 3rd Infantry rare generals 
Division and East African been through 
District. The 3rd Division was But this prove 
sent to the Middle East when rapid promoi 
relations with Egypt became end ofthe S& 
strained in tbe autumn of' he was, at the 
1951, but StockweU was there the youngest 
only a few months before manders in ti 
being appointed GOC . Hewasana 
Malaya. gained the c 

In 1954 he returned to officers and x 
command the 1st' Corps, his calm and e 
BAOR, from where, two years meat, his fau 
later, be made for Suez. The his delightful 
i ngen uity and coinage be. mour, but fc 
showed there earned him a bar; courage as we 
to his DSO. He afterwards He was a ta 
wrote a report on the affair in with blue eye 
tins be emphasized the need and close-croj 
for dear political aims in He had a vi 
operations of this kind; noted and a gift of 1 
the problems of Allied cooper- expression. Hi 
ation; and criticized outdated such engaging 


StockweB was one of those 
rare generals who have never 
been through the StaffCoIIege. 
Bat this proved to be no bar to 
rapid promotion, and at the 
rani oftte Second World War 
be was, at the age of 42, one of 
the youngest divisional com- 
manders in foe British Anny. 

He was a natural leader who 
gained the devotion of ins 
officers aa& men not only by 
his calm and equable tempera- 
ment, his human touch and 
his delightful sense of hu- 
mour, but by his personal 
courage as wdL 

He was a tall man, and fair, 
with blue eyes, a beaky nose 
and close-cropped moustache. 
He had a vivid personality, 
and a gift of forceful, incisive 
expression. His manner was of 
mrh enga g in g frie ndliness 


with the new independent mando battalion, he in sis t e d , 
com panies, the forerunners of should always be primed for 


equipment. At least one com- all who met him found rt 
mando battalion, he insisted, irresistible. 


the commandos, which were 
bring raised at that time to 
carry out raids. 

He went with his com pan y 
to Norway in 1 940 and, during 
the withdrawal from Bodo, 
commanded a rearguard in a 
stubborn action in the Rognan 
valley, for which be was 
awarded a DSO. On his 
return, he was appointed com- 
mandant of the commando 
training centre at Inverary. 

He returned to his regiment 
in 1942, and commanded the 
battalion of the Royal Welch 
which took part in the Mada- 
gascar landing. After the cap- 
ture of Diego Suarez, foe 12- 
inch batteries at foe mouth of 
the harbour had still not 
surrendered, but were called 
upon to do so by StockweU, 
who approached them in a 
jeep with a white flag, a bugler, 
and two bottles of gin. He 
returned accompanied by the 
Fre nch commanding officer. 

After Madagascar be was 
promoted brigadier and given 
the task, in East Africa, of 
forming the 30th East African 


instant action. 

Before leaving Germany he 
hart been nominated military 
secretory to the Secretory of 
State for War. After Suez, he 
took up tins appointment, 
which he held for two-and-a- 


In retirement he spent some 
of Ms time to painting. Most 
of his energies, however, he 
devoted to conservation, tak- 


ing an active part in the work 
of tbe . . British Waterways 


Board,* the Kexmet and Avon 
Canal Trust, and other water- 


half years. Tbe new defence way organizations. He was 
plan, with officer displace- also a governor of Felsted 


ment, made the duties of the 
post onerous. The War Office 
wanted to part with officers on 
terms which left few griev- 


Scfaool for many years. 

He married, in 1931, Joan 
Garrard, who survives him 
with their two daughters. 


MR STAFFORD BOURNE 


Early in the following year 
he was transferred to Burma 
as commander of the 29fo 
Independent Brigade, Gurkha 
Rifles. He led the brigade with 
skill and gallantry m Slim’s 
counter-attack across the 
Mayu range in 1944 to relieve 
the 7th Indian Division, 
which had been surrounded 
by Japanese in the Arakan. 

A year later, the 82nd West 
African Division was midway 
in the 400-znile drive down 
the Arakan coast when its 
commander fell ilL StockweU 
was promoted major-general 
and flown in to replace him. 
He led tiie division into. 
Myohaung and in the subse- 
quent advance to thesouth. In 
these operations be had practi- 
cally no transport and was 
dependent on supplies 
dropped from aircraft. In ad- 
dition to fighting, his troops 
performed remarkable feats of 


Mr Stafford Bourne, a be- 
nevolent employer who spent 
his entire working life in the 
service of his family firm, 
Boome & Hoflin^worth, died 
on 25 November. He was 86. 

He was born on February 
20, 1900, the eldest son of 
Walter Bonrberfounder of the 
firm, and of Clara Louisa 
Hollingsworth. He was edu- 
cated at Rugby (making top 
score for tire school in foe 
1918 public school sniping 
competition), at -Corpus 
Christi, Cambridge, : and in 
France. 

Soon after the death ofhis 
father in 1921, Bourne took 
charge of the store, and re- 
tained control until his retire- 
ment in 1979, when the 
premises were sold for rede- 
velopment He was chairman 
from 1 938 until 1972, when he 
became president. The war. 
years he spent working with 
the Admiralty Ferry Crews. 

In its heyday. Bourne Sc 
Hollingsworth was a fairly 
grand Oxford Street store, 
beneath whose famous art 
deco dock ladies from the 
suburbs would meet when 
they came for the day to 
choose a wedding dress for 
their daughters and to lunch in 
the genteel restaurant 

The store was renowned for 
high standards of staff disri- 
pbse, appearance and conr- 


serving the customers a glass 
of sherry. 

Bourne preserved these tra- 
ditions like a proud father. He 
upheld the firm’s policy of 
rewarding loyal employees 
with cheap and decent accom- 
modation at the company 
hostel, Warwickshire House, 
whose amenities included a 
swimming pool, and where he 
also lived himself The Rent 
Acts put an end to aO this. 

Fluent in French and Ger- 
man, he encouraged the ex- 
change of ideas and cultures 
by employing students from 
tiie Continent to work in the 
store for short periods. 

In 1958 he was a founding 
father of the Oxford Street 
Association, .and for foe next 
decade served as its president 

But the old family traditions 
were forced to yield in foe face 
of rapidly .changing trade pat- 
terns. Bourne struggled to 
keep the- firm independent 
until the pressure to seD 
became too strong. 

His -hobbies were yacht 
crusing, painting, chess and 
siding, all of which be contin- 
ued to enjoy late in life. On his 
seventieth birthday he was 
still overtaking tbe rest of the 
family on the rid slopes. 

He married, in 1940, Jane 
Leeson, who survives him 
with their son and daughter 
(another son having prede- 


Service dinners 


4th /7th Royal Dragooo G uar ds 
The Duchess of Kent, Gokmd- 
in-Chief of tbe 4tb/7tb Royal 
Dragoon Guards, attended tbe 
annual regimental dinner at the 


of tesy, stopping just short of ceased him). 

for Greater London held a f fYnnm Palm 
dinner at tbe Duke of York’s I UOOID Wim 


Headquarters, yesterday. Colo- 
nel and Alderman G. D. Spratt 
presided. Councillor John Cox 
and Major-General D. B. H 
Colley were, among those 


winners in tire Institute of Cavalry and Guards Club yes- present. 
Meat’s examinations. Baroness today. General Sir Robert Ford, 


Lord Horn* tt* HJr**]. Lem MkMc 
at swiwe. UsU CmocaiL Mr Jsmes 
CanaoharL. MP. Sir John Donaldson 
o I fee Mttune Temp* and 
r the Rons). Lons Justice 
[VC. CtMM tan i Alderman 


Bd Gardner-TtxjrDe. Mrs 

Owwer. MP. profOsor Jona 
Thomas and Mr David Ma> 


7t!?M»£F5F§««iTWBilt 
livery, (firmer of On CBas 


nit atandnl a 
mans' Com- 


of Peurbaroueb. Mr Richard 
Master's steward, and Lord 
also spoke. Amor* others 
msm were: 

Constantine of St ai snore. Sir Ian 
.n-uMto ft the Provost and vtce- 
Provosi of Sotshwvk. Mr Deputy B L 

• Mr w i cortaa and the 

of the Palmer toein-rs*. 
-■ra'. Tobacco Pipe ***fc*r*' 
acco Blenders’. Snemiflc 
t Makars’ and Lauionci»‘ 


Meat’s examinations. Baroness 
Hooper was tiie guest ofhonour. 

Royal College of Sngeoas of 
England 

Mr Ian Todd, President of the 
Royal College of Surgeons of 

England, entertained the follow- 
ing at luncheon at the college 
yesterday: Mr Derek Anderson, 
Mr David Cramb. Mr Eric 
Parker and Mr David Evans. 


Colonel of the Regiment, pre- 
sided. 


Royal Naral College Greenwich 
The Royal Naval Barristers held 
their annual dinner at tbe Royal 
Naval College Greenwich, yes- 
terday! Captain A. G. Y. 
Thorpe, Chief Naval Judge Ad- 
vocate, presided and Lord 


Glasgow and Strathclyde 
Universities’ Air Squadron 
Squadron Leader S. DuffiXL 
Officer Commanding. Glasgow 
and Strathclyde Universities’ 


Air Squadron, presided at the 
annual dinner held in tbe Trades 
House, Glasgow, yesterday. Air 
Marshal Sir David Harcoun- 
Sntith, Controller Aircraft, was 


prize 

The Groom Heim Ancient His- 
tory Prize for 1986 has been 
awarded to Dr Paul McKenhie 
for his study. Outsiders in the 
Greek Cities of the Fourth 
Century BC. The book will be 
Pubhstei by Croom Helm in 
J98*. The pnze win be awarded 
again in 1987 and fufl 
mid nd« are available fiom Mr 
krooni 

H®**” Limited. Provident 
House, Burrell Row, Beck- 
enhanvKcnt, BR3 1AT. 




0272 217300 


fphsBtfXifc! raxe minnwtum a Km, rile JM Whiter Teles lire imuiUthm iMcLer”! 


t Name 

i Ibsition. 
! Company 
I Addre*_ 


Lunchtime Comment Clab 
The Ambassador of South Af- 
rica was the guest speaker at a 
luncheon of the Lunchtime 


Rawlinttm of Eweh, QC, was ihe t the guest of honour. Among 
guest of honour. Among others others present were: 




Comment Oub held yesterday ; 
at the Connaught Rooms. Mrs. ! 


at the Connaught Rooms. Mrs. 
John Holt chairman, presided. 


present were - 
AdmsraiSb- Kfdiard Filch OtcehO 
Sea Lord). Juttt A F waxvyu age 
Advocate of the FteeO. Rear-Attnitm 
A M Norman bfircCW-eoMraLNava! 
Pmoiwl ServJcesJ. Mgr W R Brown. 
tPrlndpal Raman Catholic CAftpUtn. 
Mktap and captain a Lewis osw 
Zealand Ht® comratetan). 


Air Vtee-MUttiM E H 


IvtcoAUrshal D CO Brock. Dr C Hois, 
Prafegor.M. Lewis. Dr NC Meadows 
and Professor L w Barr.^^^H 


Matey. Air 
U Dr G HOIS. 


Benenden School 


Sixth femscholarahip 1987; 
TnefoUowing awards have been 


^saSBsr- 


| To Bosideu Common kJiion Products. 

I 3M United KiastowPLC. FREEPOST, 

I 3M Home, POB« No I, Bruited), 

| Berkshire RG 12 IBR-THj (05-H) 56665 
| •Offatdow* Dcnahfr llM N86 IMhiealcnri 


Warwickshire Lieotenano 
The Lord-Lieutenant for 
Warwickshire, Mr C M. T. 
Smith Rytend, presided ji a 
dinner held at the Shire HalL 
Warwick, yesterday. 


n j Dtii /18th Royal Hussars 

Keception Tbe officers’ dinner of. the 

HM rnwramHit 13ih/18ih Royal Hussars 

Baroness TrampiMton, Par- ^ 

liamentary Under Secretary of J 1 ®" 


i Jib/ lam Royal Hussars 
(Queen Mary's Own) was hdd 


Fellowship of 

Engineering 

The Duke of Edinburgh, Senior Oxford Dromorinn 
Fellow of the Fdlowship tf Tbe Lord SS!E?S!v 


(.ommunwrion' 
that mean buMncv. 


1 faj&Mpeilaiig Union 
■The Eart of March and Kinrara 
was the guest of honour and 


State, Department of Health 
and Social Security, was host 
yesterday at a reception at 
Lancaster House in honour of 
Minuter Oleg Scheptn and the 
Soviet Health delegation^ 


terday. Major-General H. S. R. 
Watson, Colonel of the Regi- 
ment, presided. 

TAAVR Asso ciati on 


miow ot tne waiowsfop or The Lord J 

Engineering, presented the 1986 imat^that^^T J&** dcs " 
Mac Robert Award to Mr G.R ^ C 9 un Centre at 


MacRobert Award to Mr G.B. 

Marstm, Chainnan of the Ox- (ran aa^TiJ?. 1 
fed Instruments Group pic, for centre JamS^ 
tbe ,, development of to 

superconducting' magnet sys- 


should be 


The Territorial Auxiliary and twos, at Buckingham Palace Divisioncasst 
Volunteer Reserve Association ^yesterday^ .... . ~ crime. ^ TO,asweJ Ias 


“Hint tier 
r 1, allowing 
High Court 


3 ::.; 





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■ repeal 


*®g fears 
' feted Katt 




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BIRTHS, MARRIAGES, 
DEATHS 

AND IN MEMORIAM 

COMRAH - On NovetUber 260 i (In ho*- 1 r 
ottal after a tana itinera) or 31 I I 
TTwinBate. Bantam Casoe. George 1 1 


THE TIMES FRIDA Y NOVEMBER 28 1986 



19 


PERSONAL COLUMNS 


qiw nr. O «'!***’■ 




i seaftnvr. ibetttm 


FMtkn 





1 £ * 1 




BhJff hS rf . to Helena (nte Banos) 
SEii™ Jom& a eon, JoBan Jo- 


■bTH 







■t 


•• ---C 5 * 


i-sfrfiSS 

NkdMiae David. 

tarther » -M»*Uww- 
PAME - on rtovenber ana. In Britfi. 
ion* to Susan lute MBeham) and 
c£. a son- Banudw Guy Uwtan 

FeowK*. ' : 

nHi|E. OB NoveudMr aStti. al Qoeen 
~Maiy*». RseftanipOn, to Katarina 
Uile Koenraads) and tenrtd. a daugb- 


y i K 

'i- V-M ? 
: ScT" $)• 

• • ■ -'-ts.-. 


On November 2 Dttu to 

awin fFoWPTjjmd RfcbanL a son. 
Fen* Guy priMey. 


books - On November 27Ut In Mono 
Kuo u Judy tnfe BWtop) and 
PoJrkk a ran- Gw Benedict, a bram- 
er far James and Marti. 


•: v». 




HOFF - On 25tb November 1986. 
ppOTfitfiy n Shrewsbury Hospital. 
mill Mary Cote Starkest). Heady 
loved wife, mother and mandmo(t>- 
er. Service at Shrewsbury 
Oe ma tortian 12X0 Tuesday Sind 
December ■ 




ROWLANDS ■ On November 10th. to 
Fiona (nfe ThomUnsoe) and David, a 
v ff"i Thomas BarUetT. . 




TJMPM - On November 24th. _ 
Kingston HospUaL to Patricia tafe 
Brooks) amt Michad. a daughter, a 
sister for Victoria. 


MARRIAGES 


ARTHUR - LA WHY On 22nd Novem- 
ber 1986 at PetersflekL Hampshire. 
Mr Christopher F P Arthur, .younger 
son of Mr and Mrs Ronald Arthur of 
Usk. Gwent and Dr Rachel M F 
La wry. daughter or The Revd John 
La wiy and me late Mra Susan Lawiy 
of PeteraiMd- 


DEATHS 


ATNNMN - On Wednesday Nov«d- 
ber 26th. at the Royal Free Hospital 
London after an Btness bravely 
borne. Henry Guy Christian, aged 23 
years, beloved son of Brtga flfc r and 
Mra. AJ_ Atkinson and brotba- of 
Rtctard and Julian. Private Rmotf. 
Memorial Sendee at SL George's 
CltapeL Windsor Castle on Dsoembsr 
12lh at 6.16 pm. Any donatians to 
the Leukaemia Research Fund. 43 
Greet Ormond Street. London WC1N 
3JJ. ‘ 


AUKER - On November 25th. In Brom- 
ley after a tang Illness. Tom WBtan 
Arthur Reginald, aged 78 years. Fu- 
neral Service at St Pauls Quuch. 
Brackley Road. Beckenham mi Tues- 
day Decem b er 2nd d 11.15 am. 
Donations to St C&riaoplier^s Hos- 
pice. Sydenham S£26_ 


Antif; 

campsii 


BHLt - On November 25Qv at home. 
Helen Gwendolen (BtmtyX widow of 
Captain ® W f Bafly R N retired, 
and - mother of Heather and Hugh. 
Funeral Banow Crematorium 28th 
November . at 3pm. No Down 
please, but donations to AJLN.O. 
would be ajXJredMed. 


" m 


l Li 


BtCKLEY - On Wednesday 26th No- 
vember 1986. peacchifiy at home. 
Patricia Margaret (Belinda) net 
Townsend, dearly beloved .wife of 
Frederick (Ricky), much loved moth- 
er or John. Elizabeth. Robert and 
Philip and devoted sister of Tony. 
Requiem and Funeral Service at 
Hlghgaie School ChopeL tflgbgale 
village. London N6 at 1pm on 
Wednesday 3rd December followed 
by private family bald. Flowers to 
Leverton A Sons. 212 Evarsho* 
Street NW1 or donation* to The 
Friends of HMhgate SchooL 


On November 27th. Min- 
nie. For futy yearn the denrty loved 
nanny and friend of the Lawrence 
family- Funeral Service at Utile Eas- 
ton Church, on Monday 1st 
December, at 1200 noon. 


On 2S0i November 1986. 
Alice Clare, aged 77 years of Ewell 
village. Epsom. Funeral Service an 
Wednesday 3rd Decem b er , at 12 
noon at Randalls Park Crematorium. 
Leatherhead. 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 


I pm at 

Flow era 

nay be sent to John Meynan Funeral 
160 North Road. Darttae- 





Chelsea OM Church. SW3 m 2X0 pm 
on Wednesday 3rd December, fol- 
lowed by private i 


VERS ACE. YSL. BASQUE 
FERRE, KRGEEA & OTHERS 
AT 78% DISCOUNT 
Fashion gnaw and tv iwimuhi sam- 
ple* Meaner ms -Marty New. 

TOE DESIGNER 
COLLECTION 

Moray HMM. am Regent sum. 
Wl. (Entrant* Oama SO 
TEL: 01-439 7888 
SotAtan - 89 * SO 


14/16 

ve rney R ead. London SE16 m? 
EMIEBBV - On 260i November, after 
a short fitness, at New Town Hoooi- 
tto. Worcester. Mss -Auditor 
Old 


BOOK PUBLISHER 




/AR 



toe D ownhBi Only Skf CM*. 

MBS - OB November 27B» 1 . .. 
pmoehdly at The Hrighla. Wonnley. 
Harold Leslie Guy. 


Braun ten (0271) era 6430 


ra. much loved mde of Patricia and 
seat unde of James. Charlotte and 
Rebecca, wm be missed by hb many 
Mends- Funeral Service at AD Saints 
Church. Wlttey on Friday December 
5th at 216 pm. followed by crema- 





MEMORIAL SERVICES 


FROST - A Thanksgivtog Service for 
the life of Henry AX. FVost will be 
held at An Hallow*. By the Tower. 
London. ECS on Friday 1 2m Decem- 
ber at 11X0 am. 


IN MEMORIAM - PRIVATE 


AUSTIN - In memory of George Aus- ] 
tin. a brave and wonderful man and 
beloved father who died on Novem- 
ber 270) 1986. 

OVER - Thomas Henry WMUey. 
2Bth November 1984. Lovtogty 
Remembered. 

MDSES - Commem ora tive Service I 
for Katharine Lady Bruges. at SI 1 
Mary’s Church. Headley. Surrey.. 
1 L30 am Monday D ec e m ber 29. 

CORST - EDM GorsL In my lov- 
ing memory. 

BRKUON - Geoffrey, died Novemho- 
28th 1985. ‘What’s die good of 
mourning IMS passing of poets? Be 
glad they have Brad.' 

MeMMUOTT- G eoffrey Lyster. 1912- 
1978 dlptomat and author. Beloved 
husband and father. 1311161 consum- 
mation have*. 


Science report 


Growing fears for the 
polluted Kattegatt 


By Christopher Mosey 


The Kattegatt, the main 
stretch of water between Sweden 
and Denmark, is dying. It is 
rapkfly becoming unable to 
support fish Ufc because it is so 
polluted and starved of oxygen. 

This is the finding of a 
Swedish survey carried out after 


point of view, being the place 
where the brackish waters of the 
Baltic meet saltier currents from 
the North Sea. 

The resulting mixture has a 
reduced capability to deal with 
both po&imoo and die natural 
of minerals from the 


fishermen reported large hauls . land, which results in a form of 


of dead fish in the ana. 

The Swedish fisheries re- 
search vessel, Ancytas, found a 
severe lack of oxygen at all 
depths below 75 reeL In most 
places the oxygen contest was 
only 2mg per litre of seawater, 
said Mr Lars-Ove Loo, of the 
Fisheries Laboratory in LysekiL 
near Go then berg, where 
Ancylus 1 samples were 
processed. 

“The sea bed is not com- 
pletely dead yet", he said. “But 
fish samples show the situation 
to be very serious”. 

In addition to poUtmon from 
Denmark and southern Sweden, 
the Kattegatt is a difficult stretch 
of water from an ecological 


over nourishment. 

First indications that the 
Kattegatt was endangered came 
in toe 1960s when lobsters 
evacuated the southern part of | 
the area, said Mr Brodde Aimer, 
fisheries consultant at Halm- 
stad, one oflheKatregatfs main 
pons. 

He said a hurricane force 
storm was needed this winter to 
“flash” the area, “It is the only 
thing that can save the 
Kattegatt". But even a hurricane 
would provide only a temporary 
solution, he added. 

Mr Aimer called on the 
Swedish and Danish govern- 
ments to take action to save the 


Appointments 

Latest appointments include: 
Mr DAS. Vaisey, Bodtey's 
Librarian, to be a member ofthe 
Royal Commission on Histori- 
cal Manuscripts. 

Mr Michael Kaser, Sub-Warden 
of St Antony's College, Oxford, 
to be Chairman of the Wflton 
Park Academic Council, in 
succession to Professor Peter 
Nailor. 

Mr Michael Crosby, house- 
m aster at Stamford School, to be 
Headmaster of A&hvifle College, 

Harrogate, in succession to Mr. 
David Norfolk, who retires next 
summer. 

Mr David MacPhersou, Head- 
master of Ashfbld School, to be 
Headmaster of Beedwood Park 
from next September, on die 
retirement of Mr Jade Higgs- 


Polytechnic news 


City of London 
Lord Denning and Mr C3nre' 
Schrnitthoffhave been awarded 
honorary 'doctorates of law of 
the Council for National Aca- 
demic Awards. 


Slimbridge 
church appeal 

A £30,000 appeal to pay for 
urgent repairs to Stimbridge 
parish church in Gloucester- 
shire - often caUed the cathedral 
of the Severn Valley - whose 
spire is a landmark near Sir 
Peter Scott's Wild Fowl Trust, 
has been launched by the rector, 
the Rev Eric Chariesworth. 
Death-watch beetle and the 
weather have taken their toll on 
the twelfth century building. 


University news 

Bradford 

Professor Gerry RandeU. head 
of psychology in the university^ 
management centre, has been 
appointed professor of organiza- 
tional behaviour. 


or RCL AaceL gMMftw SL6 BRJTtU 

OK 0990aa2689. Tht i MMUit KKMto- 

■truetkn Dog Sanccuuy tn annul 

BriMn lo Mt moradooc. HeU> H 

tor tore wort u TtteBy raaowd Um- 


. too. 


Gorringe & i 
56 Hare 
Godateotoa. Surrey. Tot: 04868 6403 j 
HOUSTON - On November 26 m. peace- 
tally after a long Otoes. Jay aged 66 I 
yeara formerly or ChuvSHlowii. 
Gtowester. widow or the late Ivan, 
dear mother or John. Jntie and Rcto- 
en and a modi loved grandmother. 
Funeral Service a t SL Andrews 
Church. Ctunthdown on Tuesday 
December 2nd at i 1.46 am. Nkmed 
. tv private crematioai. FamOyOowera 
only, dotations, to lieu, fir deetred tor 
Rotary Charities c/o Dr. W. Murray. 
BotUngtons Cottage. 2 MBe Lane. 
Mgltnam. Gloucester. 

UT - On November 26m. paaceruay 
to Us sleep aged 6 months. Billy, 
dearly loved aon of Jay and Doey 
a nd brot her of Henrietta. 

KBtOMDE - On November 24. to hospi- 
tal to Kampala. Ertsa Ktronde. aged 
6a Funeral today at ~ 
Bukmgo. 

PRATT - On November 240t 1386. 
peaceftdly after a brief Blness In her 
,9001 year. Mu Ebtoe Pratt, beloved 
sister of the late Vera. Funeral Ser- 
vice at Rustington Parish Church on 
Tuesday December 9th at 10 am. fol- 
lowed tar cremation at Worthing 
Crematorium. Ftndosu At! ennobles 
Please to F A Holland A Son. Termi- 
nus RcL. Uttiehampton . Td: 0903 
713959 

READ - On November 26th. suddenly. 
Vera Etixabelh Beth), of Tars PtatL 
Oaokha m Dean. Cremation at noon 
Thursday 4th December, at Slough 
Crematorium. Flowers to: Newman 
and Son. 180 Stoke RosaL Stoonh. 
DSDiTHAL - On 2Stti November. 
E.C, President of BecramaL Mtono. 
naly. aged 90 years. No ftowerg 
please. Donations, in lieu. IT so de- 
sired to any cancer orgnnknilon. 
SNEDDON - On November 26th. John 
M. Sneddon, husband of Lorna. for- 
merly of KBale and Par Es Salaam, 
peacefully at home to Potomac. 
Maryland after a bug fltoetobraveiy 
b orne. 

OMERVIULE - On 20th No v em b er. 
pearwfliTty hi London. 'Med 82 
Margaret Lucy. Ftmeral 1230 pm 
28tii November at St Michael's. 
Haiam. Suuonwtt. Nottinghamshire.. 
THOUGH - On November 26th. 
peacefully hi her 87lh year. Sylvia, 
daugbur of the late Sh wmiaiu Trol- 
tope Bart. Much loved aunt great 
aunt and great-great amiLFtinerai at | 
L30puu Tuesday December 2nd at 
St MIchaeFa. Qiester Square, fol- 
lowed by latvate tyemation. 


tot TO an uwsuefcy trash wta Um law. 

Uck. mtctwrd (0. nswwcs BSM I 

OflkbH U shortly id be DacaUMd la 


> or synsoamy vnaefuay received. 


The National Beoevelent 

Fad for me AoM lo se vuM e -TENS' 

martdnes far the reoef of palii In coreU- 


Tanypandy. Chunun. NBFA.3B. New 

Bread SL. London ECSM 1NH. 


. r fn» Aumera V you have wrmtn 

a book turn deanvea pubHcatlon wmtw 

kk Dew: TMH/36T * 

LTD. 20 HHh ■ 

BN7 2LU. 


Vft entries ter W nod rercUheed 
Plano sale on 29lh January 1987. nr 
Dicrdmoi from Oarm Lewie. PhUHpe 
West 2. to Ostein Read. London wa 
4BU. Tat 01-221 8303. 1 


■ oaoiocf FtetMl St 


legeno 01-483 1709 or 01-822 9886 


Book £2 

boat the Britoh Hraentt An. ( Reg 
Charily) 13 Prince or Wales tor, we. 
fMC naimar- Coring an Tbunos. Rest- 
nrnsioi nsMremrni linmr oiimn ages 
bordering the Thanes. 0491-872883. 


■UNJMD - Fior mr and ever Sdiooadn 


Golden WoMna- ah my love. Tod. 


BIRTHDAYS 


COHQBmUUinOHl Her on your 70to 
Otothdw. lave from Sanaa. Adorn. Hat- 
ch. Mark. Marietta. Roaauad. Kevin. 
Jeff. Penelope. David. Lidy. 


BMKM Ham birthday dmua. shed a 
■ear lor mr mtu we can be togril 
I wfll love yon always. From your UUSa 
boy. 


SERVICES 


ANCESTRY 

Contact 

the learn with ihe best 
experience Wortd-wide 


achievements 

DEPT T, 
NORTHGATE 
CANTERBURY 
CT1 IBA 

TEL: 0227 4626IS- 
HERALDRY 


IMNEmut Carte*. Uvres. 
mapwrinre locotk m da IDmOiln a 
ALBO-FRANCE. Box IBA. Co n fll eto ti. 
CW12 1XP. 


BRE OTM Ltd prafCoatnnal currtcn- 
han vksae document*. DetaBK 01-831 
xx«« 


Love or 


165 S 


ADI 


Road. London WB. TO: 01-938 lOll. 


me. loosen school of Bnoge and 

Club. 38 Km Road. SW3» 01-889 
7201. 


WANTED 


tt WAHTtD Large vie wardrobre. 


i A tdl patoUne* 


etc. oi 946 7683 dayOl 789 0471 avtt. 


MSOMC RKMS and ail related arUcle* 
wnM. GraoM Ammues.117 Koatav 
ton Church SLW8 S 01 *29 9618. 


WANTED 


FOR SALE 


by Ronald Omary Hindoo 


OonoMon Court. Aloasur. 


90HAUE Mete* London a/maam/rioL To 
£BS per werit. Tel; tn-348 8000 
nUM# mead or oam saoogi (elWr 
7pfHL 


YOU’LL BE FLOORED BY 
OUR PRICES AT 
RESETTA CARPETS 


Moaed rununa*. Mr Altaian oi M7 
SM&D67469 Oerren Lane. CuMMd. 


_ buy £8.96 par eo yd * vat. 

Maaam vetwri im carpet 14 mam 

Men Bum ha underlay 17 vena 

from nock. 7y*nr; 


FOB SALE 


bom* or office. £4.78 per m yd + vaL 

Pirn the bnvmt aeteenon or plain car- 

peUno m London. 

148 WanUwUP) MIR Rd 
I SWo 


TcfcOl -73 1-3368/9 

Free E riun o MiMa wen FKtmp 


"TO FOX superb cooL *toe id. mem 
x vnr old, HBtTOdft 

v^top £8^X30 mm. Ter Day 
01-730-3658 


■mtSTim 6 ft Orand. MnRcteiis Benru- 
nwntiuid ho n daa n e place «d ftnmre. 
Td 0202 692790 COOnud). 


BIZET DOING NOTHING 
WRITING THE 
CHOPIN LISZT 

Be sure yon In c lud e MartoeM’ 


CATmma Trader. 17n by 7fl. ConuXXr- 
b> Rued and ready lo war*. £11.960 
ono. TO: 06806 3902. 


markson pianos 

BAItaaey SL NWi 
01 936 8682 
Aitnaiy Pace, seib 
01 864 4517 



maps "WOIIB the CMMeam Haanie- 

vddie and Sheraton Mviea and Enptwi 

brie mm drn* of Kara* of nrraalonal 

tornakae. Soma or aw nnaal repHca tor- 


in 


***** on ■name* (0491) 641 IIS. 


FLATSHARE 


KJ»gro 7443. Berkeley. Cka (04635 



BAKER ST Lady Phare tarn flat, own 
bed. £250 pan tadtodv* CH. pas. « 
tndty service*. TekOl 93S 3614 (after 
630 pnu. 


Price*. Firewood free. 

Brtap jon- own caw. Sat 22nd end 29tn 

November and Sat dmoacembar. 10 am 


STKEATHAH Ate dole nn In newtv dec 
flat. OCX W/macbtne. TV. Share bam 
* UL But to tube 5 mtzn £70 pw. Tel: 
01 674 1007 (after 6 pm). 


tore Rd~ Bow. us. 01 739 0440. 


CtKLBEA, savs. Prof male 2EH- m re. . 
newly dec lonly RaL Own reran. £50 
pw. aacL Tut 01-361 1937 (eveo). 


1 (1814-19861 TN* Xbb* phw 


wy date Utey were barn. U 1.95 oiua 

free 1870** newspaper!) Yeatardayb 

New*. « Oondbnaid Road. Cotwyn 

Bay. TO. 0492 531196/S31303. 


M/T. N/& dune loe. lux. home. o/R. 
£290 PIP tori- TefcOl 873 2549 (eves) 


Weil 

eriab mtradnckny nran. Pbe td for 
■PPC 01-689 6491. SIS 
Road. SW3 


-■ 1007 

extra. Laige ream otze renmut* under 
bair normal price, cnancaiy Carpets oi 
405 CMOS. 


-cnrtmuuny'. As new. rixo 12- CfiOOt 
ware Cl 300 . 01 994 1 179/ S77 llOO 
SEATFMDBR8. Best Uelcate lor afl aold- 
oul eve nt* . Our titenb hdndt moat 


01-828 1678- 
TBE HOLY KORML Ptoduem oatonp ndot 
Me copy, imhnie 54 ca «» «ae reconftap 


FltiJMM Vounp prof u/F te start pdn 
net with one other. O/R. £60 PW. 
TetOl 741 7646 cve/wktmh 
IQIBWTON - aatracMva newty dorewd- 
ed atorieroom to let fUBy toclastve X66 
pw. Cka m Baron* Corel tuha. Tat Oi 
722 3661. 

WALTKAMSTOW. Prof M/T. NtS to 
share lovely bouse wan one other. An 
amentum. Oriwamaat City. £160 pem 
ml. Tel: 01-521 5720 umeaL 
■AKER IT, Wl. Prof m/f to share tax 


RaL Oft. an nod com. £2150 pan. TO 

STB 99S 


T*l: 0491-641234. 
179S-1BB8. Other titlea 
avao. Hand bound ready tor . 
ton - also -Sandvr*. . £1230. 
Wemambai' When. 01-688 6323. 


ANV EVERT, Cola. Star 
tight Exp, Cham. Las Mto. AB theatre 
SPOfSLTet: B21 6616/826- 

Ex / vm / Diners. 

CMl k cms,LasMtaa 

theatre and man. To! 439 1763. AE i 
Jar credit ate. 


CATS. CBreiC, Les Mteand Phantom. All 
theatre and toon. Tel 439 1763. All ma- 
jor cremate 


MMUES/FREEZERS. Cookers, etc. Can 
you buy cheaper? BAS LKL 01 229 
1947/8468. 

TOR COATS Fun length model*. Perfect. 
Canadian Wolf. £1.250: Enver Fog*. 
£3600. Mint be seen. TefcOl -363-1 246. 


EATHBR SOFA A Chairs. Brawn. 
im n»a rhaL nx) dten.Oori£3400Latnew. 
£1600 ono. Other Ham*. Oi 435 OP3B. 


MINK COAT Dark rantn fMnau. Aa new. 


Unwanted gift, toayto cusa Tele- 


phone: OJ S42 


nuNTMornropcMTutawM. 

Also wtmbtadra • order * tafean. Ron. 

theatre. OI 240 8609/01 831 7968. 


9999. even 723 6498. 

! Nr Sutton. 9 8ns. Prat 

F. 39*. n/s. share home own/r. CH. 
£190 pan Ina- 01-8760209 even. 

I near the Pond. Own doable bad- 

? in _ 

£220 pan tori. TaL 748-4OT8. 

RJUMAEL Prof tamale a/ a to 
mow. o/r aa amanwao £200 pan. 
Excl. 434 3232 x 184ar 6743971 4V4S. 
RRMRTBR Prof person to share lodge, 
else shop* & tram. £4Gpwenri.01 Eat 
1393 CXL 32G8 tday). oi 349 7 IOS (two 
* MONTHS O/R mx. Matomnoa. near 
trampoM. sws. fSEpw. TeL oi 720 
6951 

. J m/f. own Urge roam, l u x u r y gorrlrn 
RaL £56 pw ante Tel: 01-857 1475 
fd nflt 01-22 6 71 18 (eves) 

TOTIIEV. Lody seek* profearional person ( 
nan smoker) lo shore luxmry fbte 
jcaaoptn toe. Tat Ol 788 5366. 

Turin bedded room in attractive CH 

RaL vary rime tube. SuH 2 girl*. £50 pp 
pw. TeL- 491 7896 SR or 373 8813 CD. 
SW1 £80 pw Very urge room to lovely 
> DU. done to victoria TO Ol 828 
2617 

SWS Prof. Male. O/R tn CM RaL Very 
aoae to rube. Avatiahto let December . 
£216 pen. Tel Ol 731 8725 

1 Prof F. N/S. To share oxnf 

hse. O/R. CM- AE toriltots , Nr lm» 
pert. £166 pem. Ol 947 6569 teveL 


OVERSEAS TRAVEL 


ITS ALL AT 
TRAILFINDERS 


worldwide low coot own* 
tw beat - and we on prove n 
196 XIDO cheats since 1970 


AROUND THE WORLD FROM £756 


O/W 

£374 

£403 


HONG KONG 

DCLHI/BOMSAY 

COLOMBO 


NAIROBI 

JO*BURC 

LIMA 

LOS ANGELES 
NEW YORK 
WASHINGTON 


HONOLULU 

GENEVA 


£270 
£275 
£195 
£ 99 
£137 
£137 
£281 
£ 75 


£420 

£396 

£434 


£198 
£274 
£274 
£467 
£ 89 


42-48 EARLS COURT ROAD 
LONDON W8 6EJ 


Earepe/USA FUghte 01-937 5400 
Long Hard FBgths 01603 1515 
tst/Busmess Oats ot-wsss 3444 
Government Ucenaad/Bonded 
ABTA IATA ATOL 1458 


DISCOUNTED FARES 


JO-BURG/MAH £489 DOUALA £420 

toUROBI E3St‘ SYDNEY £760 

CAIRO £230 AUCKLAND E7SS 

LAGOS E360 HONG KONG £550 

AY £350 MIAMI £330 

£350 AND MANY MORE 


AFTO ASLAN JTIAVH. LTD 

igfMtoBMAW! 

LOB 3 Groce 
AMEX/VEA 


LOWEST FARES 


NairoM 

Joteorg 


N YORK 

LAXKF 

MUnd 


£460 BBnokok 


Dat/Bam 

Hone Kong £510 QdCUSU £436 

Hngr otvoaoti Arafl on IN 6 Ctab CMaa 


SUN & SAND 

21 Swallow sl London wi 
01-439 2100/437 0637 


NEW LOW FARES ._ 


AMMAN £235 KUWAIT 
BOM/DCL £365 NEW YORK 
CAIRO £205 BALTIMORE 

DAMASCUS £245 ROME 
DUBAI £345 ■ffTKff 

FRATURT £ 65 SIN/KUL 
HOMO KONG £490 SYD/MEL 
ISTANBUL £170 TAtoAl 
KARACHI £286 TOKYO 

SKVLORP TRAVEL LUX 
2 PENMAN STREET. LONDON Wl. 

TEL: 01-439 3521/8007 
AIRLINE BONDED 


£275 

£105 

£606 

£420 

£590 

£8701 

£590 


TRAVEL 

WORLDWIDE 


Soaod adnoe Md ptobnea c 

l Easel end 


ndnad frag hat I 
EXIRA SPECtAL 1ST & CLUB TO THE USA 
(03727143559 

SPECIAL 1ST 6 CLUB WOflUMWK 
1037271435518 

LOW COST ECONOMY WOBUJriOE 

(83727)42739 

Menbai ol the ndtua H Trual 6 taabai 
Tot kwraoce SpeobtaL 


■nMMTOM or IRE OPOM'- T ttam for 

December. 1st. onn 9 PI ring (0628} 
28933 after 7-30 ran. 


FULHAM r to share ream, luxury large 
Ite*. CM- near tube. £36 pw. TeL 01-242 
2648 (day) or 01-684 4322 (asms) 


PIANO. ‘Barnes' Mahogany oprtghl. con- 
cert pacts Can nanu e detivny. £346. 
Mtat Ooddmon. Ol 453 0148^ 


Mb Room Ip tel sharing In largo town 
house- £50 pw. TeL- 01-602 2137 


vw Beano, see Sun- 
day Tunes. C rite rio n Cara 


OVERSEAS TRAVEL 


THE PIANO WORKSHOP FREE credit 
ewer 1 year (APR OOA. low Interest 
ram over 2 yean (APR 9-SSfc) 6 3 years 
(APR 12JNW Written quotations. Flee 
Cotetoane. son WgbgaM Rond.. NWS. 
01-267 7671. 


HSOMMT FANES Worldwide: 01-434 
0734 JnpNcr TnsveL 


SIUNWAY Grand. 5* 10”. 

Eae ri ten t rendUon. £&800 l Tel: Ol 
686 4981. 


FUOHlBOOKatS DMoom Fare* world- 
wide. lst/aconomy. 01-387 9100 


Travetwtee. Abtn. AtoL 


Ol 441 lilt. 


AUmas and Hbdocy 
Books Of Die Mghmt quality Bond tor 
frit ca tetogu* to 16 Golden Square. 
W1R 48N. or aee toe range In afl good 
bookshop*. Open up flit world Uds 
Christmas with the water* beat boobs. 


MOR O CCO MMOL RaguM SL Wl. Ol 
734 6307. ABTA/Alri. 


OUR COLOURFUL PAST. The Wort* 

An Muetraled History - bundreteof col- 

onr Iflusnatton e and mow combine wHh 

a strong lurid narrative to bring vtvvny 

ito life the story of ma n kind tram o» loo 


6. AFRICA From £466. 01-584 7371 
ABTA. 


Age to tot Grid war. Fantastic value - 


I banes, hardback. £15. In bo okshops 


8PABL PorragaL Chaapm tores. Blgghn. 
Ol 736 8191. ABTA ATOL. 


RABR TREA SUR E S . Maps of Use IMbla 
to - rare tre asu re* of manoacript O- 
to ml nati on and masterpieces of ceny 
latultou rin* defWllve eaamn. H 1 
bock. £30. to bootahopo now. (Tliau 


ONE CALL lor sotnr of toe beat deals m 
flights, apartment*, hotel* and or tore. 
Tel London Ol 636 6000. Manchester 
061 832 200 0. Air Travd Advisory 


| ANNOUNCEMENTS | 


. wr win oavar tell 

you me ore the ct unpaM on ah' tores to 
any dcsttoauon- we wiu show you. Tel: 
Ol 579 7775 ABTA. 


Let your care for 
animals live on 



the PDSA in 
your will 


Dispensary 
for Sick Animate 
Oft* STL PDSA House, 

Soofli St. Dotted array HH4 2LB 



THE MIND 
CAN TAKE ONLY 
SO MUCH 


Major C, after yeas m Bomb Disposal, 
now seas an auptosion Inamy Mono 
dock. M Serekanen rak mental 
breakdown ki (Kara w war a&n. We 
devota Qwsehss to the uaffm of 
thess men and women. W6 must do on 
hefpnio them. We must have birds 
Please sand us a Donation, a Conran! 
or rententoK us wi® a Legacy- 

Ex-samcEs mental 

WELFARE SOCIETY 


Hnto. The 
8 IBL T* 








(HARRY SECOMBE SAYS: 


I r Whathavelgot 
that I cant give?’ 


Diabeies is. not infectious bin 
ii can suikr anyone. Ii is siUI 
incurabb? bui we can Osbi 
the damage and suffering ii 
can cause- every year more 
than l .500 children develop 
diabetes, the hidden disease. 


Cooks 9 Company 

The following have been in- 
stalled as officers of the Cooks' 
Company- fbr the ensuing yean 

Mato. Mr Andrew Murdoch: Second 

I MEh: 

1 Warden. Mr R S AmMnon. 


Join us in the 
fight. TOneerf 
yourhcip -Now 

BRITISH 
DIABETIC ASSOCIATION 

IU Quet*n Anne Sfftt't. London 

UviMflRD. MU. HlWIlV. ■l,|isa. 



W M L winter, summer. Algarve. Tcner- 
Ur. Greece. Turkw. Spato. EWpL Sri 
I ^.uca ns many more tate/RNtits. Ven- 
tura: Ol 261 5456. ATOL 2034 


AK 


With 850 scientists, 
doctors and 
technicians in our 
Jrics, over 93-lWa of \ 
I yoor donation or lejpc-y goes 
| directly to research. 

Said to: RO. Box 123, 

Rntun Tl. Lincoln's Inn Field*. 
London WC2A3PX. 

Jwisi 




Austraitauta. USA. Africa. Fbr Eaa. to- 
creSL 01-737 0659/2162. 

ABTA 

LATM AMERICA. Law cost fllahta 69- 
Rto £485. unu £496 nn. Atao Saudi 
Group HoHdey JtxwdeyMeg Peru from 
£3601 JLA 01-747-3108 
LOW FARES TO America. Australia A 
New Zealand. TeL- 01-930 2866. Henuu 
Travel 36 WfdHMfl. London. SWl. 
ABTA 3483X. 

LOW FARES WORLDWnC - USA. N/S 
America. Fter EreL Africa. AMneAprd 
Agt Trayvate. 48 Marowri Street. Wl. 
01 680 2928 (Vba Accepted) 

HEW TO IB L LA~ USA. WOTMWMe desB- 
naaoos. For toe cheapest tores, try re 
1st Richmond Travri, L Duke Steart, 
nauBona Scrrey ABTA 01-940 4073. 
M PPO H M t Seal sale to USA-Carfbbon- 
t-AUstralte. Cell toe 
p rofe ssional* ABTA IATA oc excepted. 
Tel Ol 2S4 8788 

VAUEXAMKR. ChrUmas avaSaUUy. 
Cetwtok/FXra Ifl Dec £179. Malaga 22 
December. Cl 79. Ol 725 6964. Able 
Atot Aeeeos/vua. 


4UQARVE ALTERNATIVE. 

nSTniri aau» ^ »gg- 73 

James SL SWl. Ol 491 0802. 


Thousands 
of people need 
your help to 
ease the pain 
of cancer. 


^■qi ranttrip us injrrpfarr (raramltk- 
tvs »ul calm and ilipiii> tot v> imi>. 
th nuLmga Irpn. rtrtotinl or draouoo. 
Plm ksfloci ev Urddakef |«< mnn 


ngbl eiui M 


National Sunrn tor t 'anccr Rehrf. 
Kbuc V 


Kmen 74- V. Uxbuc ilnuw. 15-14 RnlKn 
M.. lumlon S».l ,rn. 
tckTtomf lH-tSI 7X1 


Maranfllanfnnd 


AqrMri av Ac lUEsMd Smuii b 
nod Ho. 281017 


te-taKyrentoNanh 

Cypruv CempraheuaMv raupr of a/t VH- 

las. teetow 6 bearinlde hotels at 

down to earth price*. Grad Universal 

Service* CTATL 20 Sicilia Nowtaoton 

Church SL London NI6 TO: 01-249 

0721. 


ISPI1UI SUN Specials prices to Cyprus. 
Malta. Morocco. Greece. Malaga tt Te- 
nerife. Nov* Dec- Pan Worid Hobdays 
Ol 734 2562. 

E. Fare. Melnge Me- Ohnond 
Travel ATOL 1783. 01-581 4641. 
Horsham 68541 

C uMC orde. Jan/Fkb 87 to 


0044 41131. 

CUROPE/WOHLD WW lowest tores on 
chaner/sctiedried ran. Pilot FUgM Ol 
631 0167. Agf Atol 1893. 


9011 


fare*. Duroas Travel 01-488 
ABTA 

■BUM. DaSy (MR. £35 O/W. £55 
Rm FtesUht from £69. Miracle Jsl 


Ol 379 3322 


. _ . l £457 
6S14 ABTA. 

LOWEST weslowkle Faros. Capricorn 
Travel TO Ol 730 6216. ABTA. 


Woridwtor. Med Star Travel. Ol 928 


SNBL 


Esl1912 

A plea for the elderly 
who have spent their lives 
caring for others... 

... and are now in need of care 

tbemselves.inwNBlbdpstbemto 
remain m their own homes; gjwss 
grants for beating, telephone, 
mp/faul I watma drsfr. ftnri Kgi pc 
towards Nuranc fees. We also 
have flats at Ola Windsor and 
Wcstgaie. Please scad wfaa lever 
you can spare to: 

The Secretary Tlie Nathmal 
BewwknifastitBtion( 13 ), 
61Bflg5warerRo«d, n^oanr 
W23PE. 2I245VJ 


TUMSIA. For yourholiday where Kte sMB 
summer. Call tot our nre clmr e now Tu- 
risteh Travel Buretm. 01-373 441 L 


s c htUuted carriers. 01-684 TSTl^lBTA 


UP UP & AWAY 


NairobL Jo'Burp. Cairo. DrinL 
M a nh t il . Sing ap ore. KLDlH. 
Bangkok. Hong Kong. Sydney. 
Mexico. Bojtote. Caracas. 
Europe. A The Americas. 


76 Shaftesbury Avenue 
London W1V7DG. 


01-439 0102/01-439 7751 
Open Saturday 10.00-13.00 


Am TICKETS SpeCteMtS N York £249. 
LA/Sou FrisB £329. Sydney /Mctootime 
£769. Afl direct dally fUgnteOsertab- tao 
Jermyn Street 01 839 7144 


CUKIfllUB ON fUebte/hria to Eu- 
rope. USA 6 roost dasHnm o n* . 
Dtatomto Travel: 01-730 2201. ABTA 
IATA ATOL 


MBCOUKTEB A Group Fares Wotfdwtdh. 
Td U.T.C. (07B3j 857035. 


1ST 6 CLUB CLASS FUCHTS: Huge Dte- 
ceoeita. _ Bunworm Travel 103727) 
26097 /27109/27538. 


STB/MKL £536 Perth £665. Afl motor 
camera to Aus/NZ. 01-554 7371 

ABTA. 


GMEAP Flights Worldwide. Haymarket 
01-930 1366. 


UWrt Heat for winter Itotkteys. 1987 
orocmireoul now covers winter Creece 
and Turkey too. Aegtaa Club. 25a HUB 
Rd. Cambridge. 022563266. Our 30lh 
year. AM 262. 


TAKE 


The Hague. Dublin. 
Rouen. Boriogne A Dieppe. Time Off. 
2a. Cheater Close. London, swix 7BQ. 
01-235 8070. 


AIRFARE SPECIALISTS Sydney o/w 

£420 rm £764. Au ck la n d o/w £420 rto 

£776. Jotenrg o/w £246 rtn CABS. Loo 

Angeles o/w £178 nn £340. London 

Flight Centre 01-370 6332. 


ORUTMAl in Lamaree*. 4 wka far toe 
or 2. £339. (09231 778344. 
Holidays- ABTA. ATOL 

1107. 


WINTER SPORTS 


TCMT F8ET- Dusty BkU7 Take advan- 

tage of our pro-Xmas sum bargains. 
Val dtsere A Tkmes catered chaHt/Chto 

HriMtevL 28 Nov. 6 A 13 Dec fr only 

£106op. The Snow Has Arrived!' Ski 

VAL TH Ol 2006080C24hrUer01 903 
4444. ABTA/ ATOL. 


JUST FRANCE - Super value self catering 
ski MOW to Ihe (MSI French resorts. 
Rtog tor new brochure now. 

TM 01-789 2592. 

ABTA 69266' AUX 1383. 


SKI WEST - NEWI Boecial offers on 
groups. RING FOR A DEAU Also other 
amazingly tow prices starting at £59. 
ask lor a copy ol our bumper brochure. 
(Ol) 785 9999. Abtt 692S6 Atol 1383 


Ml Trtew Bonanza It Tlpnes. La Magna 
6 Deux Ator*. SeK ralering aportmenla 
6 Dec.. 1 wk £59 (tori. Rf> coach) 13 
Dec ... 1 wk £89 UacL coach oul/m 
necklCHWaTMAB FRO M ... £891 WWC 
01-370 0266 124 tote) ATOL 1820 


packed traditional AWtoe CnristotoS 
with ALL the trim mi ng* tor onto £16 9. 
Rmg Ski Bonne Netga. Ol 244 7333 
BU OBERBURB I Xtoae 6 New Year. 
Coach or S/Drive. S/C fr £118. BA D 
£136. Hotel Regina £235. 

0902 4BB97. 


SMT0UL (toatrt perries, hotels, am to 
France/ Austria. Xmas Voc 
231113. 


SKIWOBLO Top 8W Reoorik. Lowed 
Prices toom £59. ABTA. Brochvr e: Ol 
602 4825. 


WINTER SPORTS 


JOIN BLADON LINES THIS 
CHRISTMAS AND SAVE ££££‘S 


LOOK AT THESE AMAZING O F F E RS FOR 7 NIGHT HOLIDAYS 
Den*. 20UI/2I91 December 


val Dvene 

CSialel Hotel Savote 

FB 

£249 

SAVE £89 

Cftalef Hotel Blanche Nelgc 

FB 

£249 

SAVE £89 

CKSU* Le Petaou BtasieFB 

£249 Save 



Clio 



OOURMAYEUR 

arid Marconi 

ME3BBEL 

FB 

£199 

SAVE £68 

Chalet La Grang* 

re 

£199 

Save £i<» 

Chalet Bochol 

FB 

£249 

SAVE £110 

AlotaN Apts. 

ST ANTON 

sc 

£149 

SAVE L186 

Haas Kiata 

BB 

£149 

SAVE £66 


BLADON UtES THE BKXJEST CHOKE ON SKS 
OHerine HeM. Self Ctetenns 6 Caairt partus m 47 of Europe's lop matte 
Monch Dens. 01-786 2200 ABTA 16723 

0422 78121 ATOL 1232 


WINTER SPORTS 


SKI BEACH VILLAS 


CHRISTMAS OFFERS 20* 
DECEMBER 


Catered chalets ia Verbier, Meribd, 
Andona end AraUs. 


* FREE places fbr poops* 

RING US FOR A GOOD DEAL! 


(0223) 350777 (24 hrs) 
Atol 38 IB Abta 141 5X 


SKI WHIZZ 


tOO HOLIDAYS TO SELL AT... 
XNOCKED DOWN 74UCES& 
CHRISTMAS NOW.. XT 59 
i week goDec-csatereddietete 
toriuslve of fOehi 

MQZIBEL. VERBIER. COURCHEVEL. 
MECEVE & CHAMONIX 


OPEN TODAY-DONT 
MISS OUT-BOOK NOW 

01-3700999/0256 
ATOL 1820 ACCESS/VISA 

121. HteM Road. LoodeoSWlO 


SKI • FLY * SKI • FLY 


MANCHESTER 6 
GATWKK TO ANDORRA 

1 WK BY AIR FROM £1 19 

2 WK BY AIR FROM £163 
PLUS FREE chil dren* POBday*. FREE 
Lift ne s tei or FREE Inauraooe an 
many dates lac. Xmas/NY. 


FREEDOM HOLIDAYS 
The Andorra Expert* Oner 1972 
01-741 4686/4471 (24 hn) 
Manchester 061 236 0019 
ATOL 432 IATA ATTO 


SKI SAVOIE 


The very boi 
value chain holidays in 
MER1BEL 


personal service, excellent food, 
marvellous ski-ing (bran standards. 


(0752) 263523 


RENTALS 


AVAILABLE MOW Luxury ftab 6 houses 
£200 - CIJOOO per week. TO; Bmgess 
351 5136. 


BELMUfiWA 2 bed SaL Unmet wet. 
ndn 6 m onth*. Oranneny toL £325 pw. 
TeL Ol 434 9779. 


S-KHmHSTO«L Quiet 3 rai Bettor 1/2. 
New decor. T-V. Otto/ tennis. Anttaues. 
£135pw. 684 8267/ 998 7220 I -Tom. 


SWS. Convenient am a c tiv e one bed bale 
Oar even bemad. £620 pan. tori. Cell 
Tim Brooks: 01-570 3315. 


WEST DULWICH tounacnlote flat, one 
bed. I rec. k and b. CH. £90 p/w Tel Oi 
6700847 Eves. 


■Alttmr ROAB, wra £126PW. Chwn>- 
tog Upper Owm Floor flat lun off 
Fulham Broadway In a ousel tree Hned 
cul-de-sac. DM* bed. Traditional bring 
Rm. Fll Kll 6 Balh. Co let only. Bargain! 
Chesterton* Residential. Fuflum Office 
01-751 5111- 


U1UIIMI Seeks lux 
ftat/hoase up to £800pw. Usual rm 
reo. PtullUn Kay A Lewi*. South of the 
Paefc. Chelsea office. 01362 sin or 
Norm of the Para. Regan's irate office. 
01-585 9882. 


■ARROW-OM-THE-MU DettghtfUL new- 
ly man. ttny studio cottage with potto. 1 
bed. ML b a throom- £520 pan. 01-422- 
2280 


FOOUD HOUSE Luxury 7 beds. 5 baths. 
I 1/2 hours London. Arams tor 2 to 
4 months from Jan. £3000 pan tad 
gardener and daily nrip. Tel: New Rom- 
ney 0679 62166 . 


SWl Good Vawe. Extremely Hgnt man- 
sion nai wan skyltae view*, 
necep/btaer with dfv dooro. F/F KU_ 2 
Ben*. Bam. Shwr Rm. £236pw. Cootes 
828 8251. 


OTTV IKW*: 1 tab bad. onstmo bom. WC. 
shower, tot / dining- tee sunny recap, 
private parte Co let only. £150 pw. Tet 
Chris Lawrence 01-488-2488 esd 331. 


HAMPSTED CARDENS. 8ttearb pretty 3 
Pe dr o om e d cottage, lounge/ dtalng. IW 
hath, washtag machine, central heating. 
£195 pw. Tec 01-465 6769. 
HEMSMSIWIlM mMsoncOe with style, 
tori refurthhea. Recetk, 2 dM node. K ft 
B. washer / dryer, turbo shower etc. 
£240 pw. 907-3954 / (07221 72699. 


bedrtns. large patio garden, large UgM 
recpL K 6 B. £195 pw UKL CH 6 CHW. 
Long let preferred. Phone. 0935BB64I 
■AYFABI , Hyde Park the moat luxurious 
lang/rimn uu 1/6 beds, best pries 
Globe Apartment* Ol 935 5512. 

SWl Lge 1st floor Rai Idea) tor Dually. 
Recen. Lge Formal Dtotog Rm. KK. 
BfaeL 5 Beds. CnsuKe Shwr. Barn. 
£323pw. Cootes 828 8251. 

37 sen The nundi e t to remember 
when seeking' best rentar prapodes to 
central and prana London areas 

£lSO/£2JXX»w. 

BATTERSEA Prince of Wales Drive. I bed 
mansion Mock flat- 23rd Dec. 2/3 
month*. £110 pw excL 01-622 B46& 


RENTALS 


For (he Ml 
rental sriecnon of 


CO 


QURAISHI 

JNSTANTINE 


270 Earls Court Road. SWS 

01-244 7363 


P U TNEY 5W16- Spacious 2 bedroom flat. 
6 minute* East Putney lube. Fully tom. 
new carnet*. Mhrm A ML dW Mazing. 
rntranM Phone, pvt partetaa- Long co- 
lei pref. £125 PW. Ol 870 2341 


tee trading Estate Agents la Central 
London. Utah g uara m e ed minimum 
wage Call Jennto ' Watt Personnel 
01-724 3160 


HH • 5 min u te* Victoria. I or 2 pratos- 
toml ursplt for eharmlna well dec 
furnished 2 bed Ora. Recap. Bath. KH. Nr 
tube. £450 pan. toduelve. TM Louisa: 
01-681 5402 (work) or 01-082 4682 
(home). 


EDGE OF CHE L S EA Bright 2 bed. garden 

n*L new conversion, gss CH. d/washer. 

t/dtver. wash. m/c. tn/wave. fr/freerar 
etc Short or Iona let ClBBpw Tel: 
Ol 362 1590 Or Oi 581 0660 


THE LOHQ/SHOHT LET specUHril. We 
have a tee ae te enon of nanny 1/2/3/ 
4 D hPooni flan with maid service. Inte- 
rior designed St centrally located. Avail 
Now Oxuunahl Properties 727 3050 


W* Near Hyde Park. Luxury 2 double bed 
Oil for 5 to 12 months, colour TV. 
Phone, doable ottmL serviced, in excel- 
Irnt condition £200 pw DCS. Tel: Ol 
684 7213 anytime. 


W> - 2 mins Oxford SL DeHghtful large 2 
rodmtiMcaw BU. large HL overlooking 

$£ d 7. s 25riSi- ,uay “?6 pw. 

TH: Ol 935 3395. 


F W B AF F IManagemem Serv ice*) Ltd re- 
quire properties In OentraL South and 
West London Arras for watting appli- 
cants M Ol 221 8838. 


HEW OARDEH6 to let 5 bed family house 
with garden. Family £200 per week or 
sharing £40 pp/pw. Tel: Ol 749 1962. 


FU|y furnished g 

bedroom cd flat to prestige block, done lo 
all ammeneUes. £126 pw. Ol 946 7333 


WH UEP OW. Worpte Road. Seif-eon- 
Btaed newty decorated, fufly f unU i h e d . 
two bed flat. £426 pern, mdnetr. TeL 
0272 80091 1 (evenings) 


MC W BUD MLL Large bnlsfl. tog floor 
of family home. KHcben. shower and 
WC £S0 pw. Tel 01 940 3662 


SELECTION or 2/S bedno flats. 6hon lets 
available. £350 - CSOOpw. company 
leta pre f erred- Ring 722 7722 Batey. 


- l In Keneingion. 

Col t.v. 24 nr 8w. Telex. Coumriuin 
Apartment*. 01-573 6306. 


H LBAIE APARTMENTS Perfect location 
off Soane Square. Fully serviced A 
equipped. TO 01-373 6306 fTX 


ST JAMES’S PLACE SWt Luxury 
serviced 2 Bed apartroenL Prime loca- 
tion nod lo Parte. 01-373 6306 07. 


1 ®"»h“flaLNewdee. 
C* W «*«■ TO Ol 221 


WEST KOOUnTON A eeieetton of f/r 2 - 
3 bed opts - mate. £i6O£200 p.w.tac. 
TefcOl 676 1096 


A WEST EMB Flat and Houses Uri lo For 
Sale/Let. Davis WoolfC. Of 402 7381. 


VEAL FOR vutoro. South Kensington. 
Fully Bcrviccd flats fbr 2. LUL Phone. 
COI TV esc. 01-584 2414/0572 64281 


LUXURY SERVICED FLATS, central Lon- 
don Cram £325 pw plus VAT. Ring 
Tbwn House Apartments 573 3433 


MARIA VALE: 2 boom garden flaL NK*- 
ly furnished. 1/2 persons to snore. Ctos- 
tube. £650 pern excL Teifli -4234160. 


MATFABI Wl Lux fare nuusonetle. 3 
Mds. i rec. new XII. new decor A 
carpets. £326pw. Tit 0342 712617 


FRRUCO togM. furnished 2 bedim flaL 
Nesriy decorated, dose u lube. 
£175pw tad TO 01-021 9586. 


DOMESTIC & CATERING 
SITUATIONS WANTED 


OAT NANNY mom 33* wtm expert 
enc*. 3 ch il dren CT years and 6 monmzi 
in Hampstead home. Nursery duties 
only, as other staff lax Two day* a 
week and one weokrad per month. First 
dass references essential Reply to BOX 
JS3 . 


MATURE HAUNT To accompany family 
to Florida . tor one year, care tor one 
yew old itol. References and experience 
requir ed. Can Monday to Friday Ol 486 
6988 


EXP Odom req 8U Seasons smog hotel 
Orid. Franc* inr Geneva) OI 731 


furnished BaL £360 per month. 01-622 
0033. 

BO CK LAHBf Flail and hoosra to let 
me norfcfaitae area. Tcfctn- 


tnroupnour 
790 M60 

HAMPSTEAD NWC Lux flaL 26ft rec. dble 


ocd. CH. TV. lge sunny bate, w/mach. 
Go M pref. £126 


PW 01-624 4617. 


SITUATIONS WANTED 


Dewier*. Permanent A temporarv 
poetttona. AMSA gpectatia Bccnittmeat 
ObMdttoms. Ol 734 0632 


U. IIUD DETECTIVE R.CJ5. New Scot- 
land Yard. Seeks gauu employment. 
Owns Land Rover. WOUng to transport 
v a l u a b l es , securities or persons. Lives m 
Bonded security. TO. 0797 


PORTSMOUTH pre-school loach. F. Nor- 
way. 25 yra old. Wants to be so au-pair 
tor a nice Family In PYnouth. A Joh- 
nsen. Ahnev 4. 7068 JakobsU. Norway. 


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io.: 



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who have 
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THF. TTMKS FRIDAY NOVEMBER 28 1986 


****** 


New Bill to hit 
criminals and 
assist victims 


The man with the golden feet 


Frank J^nsoo in the Commons 


wm. 




Sweeping powers to stop 
most criminals profiting from 
crime and to give extra help to 
their victims were unveiled 
last night by the Home Sec- 
retary, Mr Douglas Hurd, as 
part of the Government’s final 
law and older package before 
the next general election. 


The Criminal Justice BUI, 
the most substantial and 
potentially controversial leg- 
islation facing the Commons 
this session, would complete a 
“massive programme of re- 
form” involving the police 
and the courts, Mr Hurd said. 


He said the reforms would 
be under threat if a Labour 
government was elected. It 
would throw everything into 
the melting pot “by politiciz- 


ing the police, stripping the 
police of the necessary powers 
we have given them, remov- 
ing a crucial part of our 
defence against terrorism, and 
no doubt putting the police 
service and the prison service 
back in what under Labour is 
their historical place at the 


bottom of their list of 
priorities”. 

The mam purpose of the 
Bill was to strengthen the 
powers of the courts in rela- 
tion to large-scale crime and 
improve the treatment of vic- 
tims, he said. Having given 
courts power to confiscate the 
proceeds of drug tra ffickin g, 
the Government now intends 
to extend the powers to cover 
proceeds of other highly prof- 
itable crimes. 

“It is an affront to justice 
that a criminal should, having 
served his sentence, be able to 
live comfortably on the fruits 
of his crimes" Mr Hmxl said. 

New powers would be avail- 
able to courts where profits 
involved were more than 
£10,000. A crimmaFs assets 
would be frozen before trial 
and once a confiscation order 
had been made the High Court 
would be empowered to sell 
off the defendant’s property. 

“Extended periods of im- 
prisonment, up to 10 years on 
top of the original sentence, 
will be available in cases of 
default.” 


rath* V 




rmiSEtmi' 




m 




FBI called after arms 
documents shredded 

Continued from page 1 “ 


known of the Contra fading ( ^ fmison ^ Watergate 
for someUme, J*de44por ^ ^ ^ investigation by 
cent suspected h&ljad ^ een Mr Meese would uncover any 
aware of the operation wrongdoing. 

The poll also found that He said that as soon as Mr 
four out of five believed there Reagan became aware of the 
were others involved besides gets, he summoned Mr Meese 
Colonel North. Two-thirds and told him: “I want you to 
said Mr Reagan had mis- get on it and do it quick". 


soon subside. He rejected any 
camnarison with Watergate 


handled the Iran situation, 
and his overall approval rating 
dropped from 67 per cent in 
September to S3 per cent 
As Mr Reagan arrived fora 
brief holiday at his mountain- 
top ranch, an aide predicted 


Mr Meese has been resisting 
calls from Congress to appoint 
a special prosecutor, but many 
Senators and members of the 
House of Representatives now 
think that such a step is 

inevitable. 


US Salt 2 breach angers Kremlin 

Continued from page l European observer said last remaining barriers in the w 


— 

Working for a living: Steve Cram's feet, photographed by Snowdon. Below, the feet m action, pounding the track. 
T7 - « I The feet of Steve Cram, Wayne Sleep?” Why 


spokesman refused to go into 
any detail. “I believe that our 
defence ministry is currently 
thinking about that in prac- 
tical terms” jie replied. 

The talks on nuclear and 
space weapons are due to 
resume in Geneva next week 
at a special session slotted into 
the long Christmas break in an 
effort to speed up negotiations 
in the wake of the collapse of 
the Reykjavik summit. “The 
prospects for progress now 
seem very slim indeed”, one 


European observer said last 
night. 

Soviet anger at President 
Reagan's decision to breach 
the Salt-2 limits — a move 
which has already caused 
considerable concern among 
his main European allies — 
was also reflected in a sharply- 
worded commentary issued 
last night by Tass .the official 
Soviet news agency. “The 


remaining barriers in the way 
of a nuclear arms race,” die 
agency declared . 


• WASHINGTON: The 
deployment of the 131st B-52 


the world tfiOO metres 
champion, are not easily 
recognizable, although 
they are famous enough to 
have been photographed 
by Snowdon (John 
Goodbody writes). 

Mrs Moira Wood, the 


bomber equipped with cruise Mr s Moira wood, the 
missiles, which had been acbEg deputy p-inripal of 
smugly opposed by western the , London Foot Hm- 


europe, provoked sharp at- 
tacks in Congress, which re- 
cently passed a non-binding 


Reagan Administration s resolution formally asked Mr 
renunciation of the Salt-2 Reagan to remain within the 


U.UUUI*UIMVU — “—XI 

treaty proves that Washington limits (Michael Binyon 
is seeking to remove all writes). 


pital, was not expected to 
know the identity of the 
owner. Bnt she could tell 
immediately that they be- 
longed to someone phys- 
ically active. 

“Is it a dancer? Is it 


dancing ? “WeU, it is quite 
an artistic pose. The feet 
look as if they work for a 
living and seem 
sensitive.” Yoa are quite 
right there, but how do 
yon know? 

“There is well devel- 
oped musculature and fee 
growth of hair indicates 
that the tircnlation is 
good.” Anything else ? 
“There is some minor 
trauma on the big toe on 
the left foot It could have 


been caused by jarring or 
kicking a ball.” 


The current security affair 
has reached the stage at 
wfak&yUaffirioTianY, theGov; .. 
eminent caSs on Lotd Rad- 
ctiffe to hcOdan inquiry. 

. . Lend Raddiffe is now 
dead. That would not be an 
insuperable barrier, to 
appointing him to diair the 
inquiry into the presenlcase, 
since most older people ^Hub- 
abty- don’t know that The 
trouble is that many younger 
MPs have-. perhaps never 
beard of the great old star of 
stage, screen, tribunal and 
committee: of privy coun- 
sellors. What is needed is a. 
comparably impressive fig- 
ure: A manof unquestioned 
stature and probity with 
experience of Whitehall and 
the security, services, who .is 
also a bom chaimm Some- 
one like Lord Rothschild. 

He was good enough to be 
appointed by Mr Heath to 
chair a body, the legendary 
Think Tank, to look into the 
entire coutmy. The trouble is 
that, in the present’ con- 
troversy, MPs are divided as 
to whether he is the sort of 
person who should inquire or 
be inquired into. 

In the old days, these 
affairs had a beginning, a 
middle and . an end. The 
revelations would be made. 
The politicians would accuse 
one another. Lord Raddiffe 
would be appointed to in- 
quire. The Government 
would say that nothing more 
could be said, “pending 
Raddiffe” ' 

Weeks or months would 
| pass. Raddiffe would report. 
By then, neady everyone had 
forgotten the details, of what 
j the row was about in the first 
place. The Government 
wbuld accept or qualify the 
1 Raddiffe Report, dependi n g 
on the extent towhich, if any, 
j it had contradicted what the 
Prime . Minister had said. life 
went on. 

In the present case, after 
: two weeks,' we are stfil at the 
beginning. At Question Time 
[ yesterday, the Prime Minister 
\ was still saying that prime 
ministers. never commented 
on security matters, or that 
she could say nothing while 
the Australian court case wa* 
going on. In effect, she was 
acting as if she had already 
appointed Lord Raddiffe. 

Meanwhile, everyone elsc’s 
imaginations wandered. Did 
Sir Michael Havers, the 
Attorney General, who took 
the decision to try to stop the 
Wright book in die Austra- 
lian coin% aka take the 
decision not to stop fee 
Chapman Pineher book in' 
1981, which . contained the 


same information? (Mr Kin- 
nock asked feat question 
twice: 1 Mra 'Thatcher twice 
told him : thal- she never 
discussed security mamas in 
the House). 

Did the Attorney General 
himself discuss security mat. 
ters with Mr Cha pman 
Pmcfrer?(Various Labour 

backbenchers asked that, 

■ ■ ■ . 7 ■ 


Mrs Thatcher gave the same 
redly as she had to Mr 
Krnnock). ^ 

Above aH, at tms stage, 
wh o is Mr Dale Campbefi- 
Savoms- He is of coarse the 
Labour MP for Workington, 
elected in 1 979. But he seems 
to be excessively interested iq 
“Security matters”. In Dodi 
Parliamentary Companion, 
he includes in bis special 
interests “investigative 
political and social worir, . 

.. The reference books also 
say he was cm Ramsbottom 
Urban District Council 1972- 
74. From 1972 to 1974, eh? 
Surety that was one of the 
most turindou periods in 
Ramsbottom’s history. Other 
bodes say he worked for a 
dock-manufacturing firm. 
Presumably, this is. one of 
those euphemisms familiar to 
all readers of Mr John le 
■ Carre, King lamplighter, “My 
dear Smiley, J can assure feat 
C has put one of our best 
dockmakers in charge of 
Ramsbottom station- His 
loyalty is unquestioned.” 


' Bnt, in this spy affair , 
whose ride is he rarity on? 
Yesterday Mr Richard 
Hickmet, and other Tory 
backbenchers, claimed that 
Mr CampbeD-Savoors, and 
certain unnamed figures from 
“rite Leader of tire Opposi- 
tion’s office", had been in 
constant contact wife the 
lawyers in the Australian 
court who were fighting the 
British Government’s at- 
tempt to stop file Wright 
book. 


These suggestions were put 
to Mr John Biffed, Leader of 
the House, during the regular 
Thursday occasion on which 
Mr Biffen answers questions 
about the next week’s busi- 
ness. The Tory backbenchers 
wanted the Attorney General 
to look into the matter, 
although at the moment he 
seems busy enough. 

: Mr Biffen, who has so far 
kept well, out of the whole 
affair, said he would pass thn 
on to the Attorney General. 
Bui he did say that, although 
the activities of people such 
as. Mr Campbell-Savours 
woe froth, “froth could be 
poisonous”. 


Today’s events 


Royal engagements 

The Duke of Edinburgh visits 
the Joint Air Reconnaissance, 
Intelligence Centre, RAF Bram- j 
pton, 10. j 

The Prince of Wales. Chair- j 
naan, the Prince of Wales's 
Committee, presents awards 
certificates at the 1986 Award | 
Ceremony for the committee, | 
Colwyn Bay, 10.15. 

The Duke of York, President, 
the Royal Aero Club, accompa- 
nied by the Duchess of York, 


presents the Dawn to Dusk 
Awards, Royal Aeronautical 
Society, 4 Hamilton Place, Wl, 
63a 


Princess Anne, Colond-in- 
ChieC The Royal Corps of 
Signals, attends post of the corps 
committee meeting, the Reg- 
imenal Headquarters, 56 Re- 
gency St, 11.45; and later, as 
Chancellor, London University, 
visits Charing Cross and West- 
minster Medical School, Reyn- 
olds Budding, St Dnnstan’s Rd, 
2.30; he then vials the institute 
of Dental Surgery, Kastman 


The Times Crossword Puzzle No 17,215 



Denial Hospital, 256 Gray’s Inn 
Rd, WC1, 4.15. 

New exhibitions 

The Original Portsmouth Pic- 
ture Slow: paintings, water- 
colours and prints of Old 
Portsmonths; City Museum & 
Art Gallery, Museum Road, Old 
Partsmoatte; Mon to Sun 1030 
to 5.30 (ends Feb l). 

Gold, Frankincense and 
Myrrh: original presents and 
rare collections; Read Molteno 
Gallery, The BuDdings, Brough- 
ton, Siocfcbridgc; Mon to Son 
10.30 to 6 (ends Dec 24). 

Last chance In see 

John Kimpton: Restrospec- 
tive; Ginnel Gallery, Lloyds 
House, 16 Lloyd St, Manches- 
ter, 930 to 5.3a 


TopFQms 


Food prices 


The top box-office films in 
London: 


1 2 ) The Mission 

2 3 Tap Gun 

3 1 Ruthteso People 

4 5 Big TrouWe *n Uttte China 
* 5 4 1 Mona Lisa 

6 g Running Scared 

7 7 True Stores 

8 8 A Room WBh a View 

9 9 Ex tremi ti e s 
10 (- PsyChom 

The top fihns in the provinceG 

1 Tap Gun 

2 Ruthless People 

3 Running Scared 

4 Mona Lent 

5 Exhumates 
Bui&ma By S Uimi a w nu to ta 


ACROSS 

1 Puny son, often washed out 

( 6 ). 

4 In confusion, lops head of 
everlasting flower (8). 

10 Urchin learning to beg (7). 

H Fish farming in bays (7). 

12 Rollers bringing fish to the 
table (10). 

13 Sir Andrew’s sort of im- 
pudence gives one a fit (4). 

IS Sound pitch, but on one 
spot it’s getting thinner (7). 

17 Field force unit concealed in 
E Dorset (7). 

19 He interprets outdated notes 
about contract (7k 

21 Feared movement to the left 
of central government (7). 

23 Guide pointing to the light 
(4). 

24 Cricket side delicately tap- 
ping the ball — bow dis- 
concerting! (3-7). 

27 Stop, change to amber, then 
green (7). 

28 University man accepts 
married Italian (7). 

29 Put too much value on 
speed of deliveries (8). 

30 Blackbird used to close 
hares (6). 


3 Protection for the Chair 
from mudslingers? (5,5). 

5 Is sweet-bread a prominent 
feature in Brazil? (5-4). 

6 Listen hard to chest (4). 

7 Some men taken for a drink 

(7)- 

8 Left sharp side of rock 
projecting (5). 

9 Surgeon with nothing to say 
no to (4). 

14 Praiseworthy arrangement 
to dear one debt (10). 

16 Soldier wouldn't look' right 
obeying this order (4,5). 

18 Application for a stage-coa- 
ch (9). 

20 Not chang in g uniform (7). 

22 Abusive language from a 
fence (7). 

23 Professed faith in sacred 
offerings (5). 

25 Fish look sullen (4). j 

26 Brother to Unde Remus (4). 

Sabrina to Pnzzte No 17214 


Musk 

Concert by (he Scottish Na- 
tional Orchestra; Usher Hall, 
Edinburgh. 730. 

Recital by the Midla nd 

Cathedral, Coknot-e Row, 1.10. 

Concert by the Holbume 
Group; Seafbrd Music Society, 
The Downs, Seaford, E Sussex. 
7.45. 

Concert by the Takacs Quar- 
ter; Music Centre, Little Barrack 
St, Armagh. N Ireland, 8. 

Concert by the Annatis Quar- 
tet; School Hall, Up p in g ha m , 
730. 

Concert by the Bingham 
String Quartet; C of E Middle 
School, St Mary’s Rd, TickhiH, 
Doncaster. 8. 

Concert by the Borante Piano 
Trio; Nottingham Playhouse, 

1.05. 

Concert by the Halle Or- 
chestra; St George's Hall, Brad- 
ford, 730. 

Concert by the Christ Church 
College Choir Canterbury Cath- 
edral, 7.30. 

Concert by the K^elslatt 
Trio; The Bam, Beech House, 
Cmthwaite, Cumbria, 15- 
Talks, lectures 

Matthew Carey talks about 
his work; Usher Gallery, 

I inriiim Rd, T imiln 73a 

The Message of the Tall 
Ship*, by John Hamilton; 
Vaughan College, Leicester | 
University, 7.3a 
General 

Book Pair, The Guildhall, 

. Cambridge, 10 to 5. 

Book Market. Northgate Hall, 
St MichaeFs Su Oxford, 10 to 5. 

Textile Craft Fair, Quarry 
Bank Mifl, Styal, Cheshire, 
today 2 to 43a tomorrow and 
Sunday. 10 to 43a 

Autumn Fair; Niccol Centre, 
Brewery Court. Cirencester, 10. 


Top video rentals 


1(1) IrnSana Jones and tha Tem- 
ple at Doom 
2(4) Fright Night 
3(2) Teen Wofte 
4 (5 ) Spies Like Us 
5(3) Tne Delta FOroe 
6(6) Death Wish 3 


7(1(fl Tha Hawing 2 
8 (- ) Santa Clause - 


Santa Clause - The Movie 
Year of the Dragon 
The Sword in the Stone 


9(7) Year of tt 
10(8) TheSwoi 
Supplied by hum 


Fresh fish supplies are better 
this week and prices have cased 
slightly, particularly in the Mid- 
lands and East Anglia. At 
Billingsgate there are ample 
deliveries of white fish, oily fish 
and fanned salmon. Finest Scar- 
borough cod fillets should be 
around £2.20 lb, Icelandic had- 
dock is good value ax the same 
price with Aberdeen haddock 
£230 lb. 

Large Norwegian herrings, 
mackerel and sprats are 
amongst the best buys. Supplies 
of sprats, at around 60p a lb 
fresh and £1.40 smoked, arc 
rarely affected by bad weather 
because they are caught dose to 
shore. Scallops are down in 
price this week at around 50p 
each and may be even cheaper 
by the weekend. Dressed crab is 
plentiful and mussels 40p a pint. 

Beef and pork prices are 
virtually unchanged this week 
but almost all cuts of homo- 
produced lamb are up yet agai n . 
The average price of whole Kg is 
£1.64 lb, loin chops £1.87, best 
end chops £1.67, and boneless 


HIGH TIDES 


TODAY 

London 


Dnwn p o rt 


ar- 


UmqnmI 


shoulder 97p a fix 
Some of the meat and poultry 
on promotion at shops and 
supermarkets this week are: 
Dewhursb New Zealand leg of 
lamb £1.09 a lb, 4 lb packs of 


Roads 


Wales and West M4: Contra- 
flow between junctions 16 and 
17 (Swindon/Chippenham). 
M5: Two lanes closed- north- 
bound betweenjunctions 20 and 
19 (CJevdbud/FOrtishead). A55: 
Contraflow at Boddwyddan and 
lane restrictions at I Janriudna 

The North: Ml: Lane restric- 
tions between junctions 31 and 
33 (A57 Woiksop/Rotherham). 
M18: Two contraflows between 
junctions l and 2 near Roth- 
erham and between junctions 6 
(Thome) and 7 (M62). M(h 
Contraflow between junctions 
29 and 32 (A6 Preston /M5 5). 

Scotland: M8: Traffic restric- 
tions on eastbewmd carriageway 
between junctions 27 and 30 
(Paisley/Erslrine Bridge). M90r 
Two contraflows on the Edin- 
burgh to Perth roadot Halbeath 
and Cairoey Bridge. Edinburgh: 
Bennington Rd dosed at 
Breadolbane St with diversions. 

Infonpatioa suppBed by AA ] 



• rfr. l ; '. v 


* 4t 9 J 




KK'tfVfio 




Lwl’ 11 


T«ea 

WtoKiMln 

TO»mman6\xi 


LIGHTING-UPTIME 


YESTODAY 


pork chM)S £430 a pack and 4 lb 
packs of braising steak £5.60 a 


AROUND BRITAIN 


Sun Rain Max 
hrs fn C F 

- .33 9 48 dotxJy 

S2 3B 8 46 sunny 


Txsiitea4J28pnto7.it am 
Bristol 43? pm to TJZDmn 


brsch 43/ pm to 7a i can 
Edtetangh *17pm to TAS am 


4.17pm to 7X5 am 
*427 pm to 7J28am 
4.55 pm to 7-28 am 


3 lbs 14oz, 59p a lb; Teseo: 
braising steak £1.54 a lb, pork 
spare nb joints on the bone 89p 
alb; 

The best oranges are Naples 
and Navdlinas from Spam, 
Morocco and Greece from 12- 


43 .07 9 48 sunny 

43 .04 9 48 sunny 

EL4 jQ2 10 50 sumy 

* - 10 50 smmy 

43 JH It 52 sunny 

53 34 11 5Z sumy 

5.4 - 10 50 sunny 




C F 

c 1050 . Gosmsa 
c 1050 bnnM 
f 1050 Jsmoy 
c 1050 London 
Ml 52 NTodw* 
CIO SO Nncnl 
c 1050 fMton 


Yuttntey: Tsmpc max 6 svi to 8 
fiSF) ; mki 8-jm to 6 ami 
Hunm% 6 pm, 79 per cm Ram 
6 pmTtw Sum 24 to to 6 pm. 53 


6 pm. Ml Suk 24 hr to < 
meal aaa level, 6 pm. 


hr to 6 pm. 53 hr. Bw, 
9 pm. 1Q37S mHws. 


24p each. Satsumas 25-45p a fix 
clementines 45-65p a lb and 
lemons S-18p each are all very 
good. French Granny Smith 
apples 25-40p a lb and Golden 
Delicious 22-25p lb and Coxes 
25*45p lb. 


Parliament today 


OmmOBs (9.30k Banking 
Bill, second reading. 


11 52 sunny 
11 52 sumy 
11 52 sunny 
11 SS sunny 
ID 50 sumy 

10 50 sunny 

11 52 8tfifiy 
11 52 sunny . 
11 52 sumy- 

11 52 sunny 
la SIT sumy 
11 52 smy 
11 52 sumy 
11 52 amy 
- 11 52 sumy 
11 52 sum 

11 52 sftoww 

12 54 sumy 
n . 52 sumy 
11 52 shower 


7.38 son 358 pm 


3.11am. 209 pm 

New moon: December 1 


NOON TODAY 




The pound 


Bank Sank 


DOWN 

1 Neat jelly at the bottom of 
the packet, perhaps (9). 

2 Parity vegetarian animal 
(7). 


B n b n n n b 

spimraratasnsc; asass 
m ii Q ■ s . m nr ta 
saniaigHSE ansniim 
m is n r m - 

siaHis - . 

m ra k m ta b- on 
igQIlS&iiaBE WDEC21 

1 E • ’ I? . 30 ■ fe j Ei . 

- 'israEKiisiaaH 

. S B- ffl -O TO B : IB 
laosra iifljjnnisEiintiB 
E 13 E E B B fi 
liirasranrT'iiR uiBBnnn 


Anniversaries 


AiutnfiaS 
Austria Seta 
BtigtamFi 
Canada t 
DanmarttKr 
Finland M* 
France Fr 
GemanyPtn 


— c Sc/d— 



‘ * aaMf® 88 ® 




ABROAD 



Concise Crossword page 


Births: Jean-Baptiste Lully, 
composer, Florence, 1632; WH- 
liam Blake, London, 1757; 
Friedrich Engels, Barmen, Ger- 
many, 1820. 

Deaths: Gian Bernini, sculp- 
tor. Rome, 1680: Washington 
Irving, writer, Tarrytowu. New 
York, 1859: Richard Wright, 
novelist, Paris, i960; Ha verbal 
Brian, composer. Shorebam, 
Sussex, 1972. 

Sam Fein was founded in 
Dublin, 1905. 


Hong Kangs 
katana Pt 
Italy Urn 
Japan Van 
H atnar lamte CM 

Nofway Kr 
Rxtugnl Esc 
South AMcaRd 
Spate Pta 
Swatter Kr 
Swttzttriaod Ft 
USAS 

T u go ila wte Dar 


Portfiteo - MW tai Mr . 
Mona»v-Saiuntay record your daffy 
Partrcao total. ‘ 

Add thwe mpmihh- to detorntiiM 
your wMUy Portfolio totaL 
U ymloni matches me pitoUshad 
weekly dtviaeiid ogurr you taw won 
outrMrt or a ftw* af H»e prtw manor 
sutedfor mat week, ana must data 
your pclie m tatenajw &aow. 


TWphan Tbi Ttena PutllMu (Mat 
OBC-Sxnz Miw 


you must taw your card wtah you 
when you Mteptwoe. 

u you are unable to tdeotane 
ooRwooe eue can daim on. your 
but tiwy must have your cord and caq 
The Time* Portfolio claims Uno 
between Bm sttpaUled tunes. 

_ No resBonsto^ty CU M J Wtgto 
for failure to contact n» daiins mtm 
foe say reason wfthUi the stated 
hours. 

.The above In str uct i ons are so- 


FUSS tor final ctonomlnatton 
only as suppied by Banteys 
Ratata Plica tmtac 388-4 


banknom 
Bank PUT 


London Tha FT ftxkK dosad at 1288L0 

down (U. 



MtoDAY: ft doutfc d, drlate: f. Mr, fg, taff r, rein; s, sub; an. snow: L teunriar. 


48 X 11 52 

3.1 - 7 45 

54 - 7 45 

1.1 .19 5 41 

06 -08 7 45 
15 .01 7 45 


05 52 6 43 
2.1 .00 9 48 


34 .13 7 45, 
4.4 .23 10 60 



C F 

s 18 64 Cok»a 
f 19 66 Ctetaaga - 
s 22 72 Corfu 
C 18 61 Dobfin - 


s 10-60 D ulminte a 17 


These am Wednesday's figures 


rttcawe la Bout dally and weekly 
SvMcal culms. 



c 13 55 Fan a 17 83 

5 23 73 ftomaca s 16 61 
c 28 82 Frankfort s 8 46 

6 15 59 Fsncbal f 20 66 Moacua 

* ^ SS*" * 8 46 RtoU' 
C 7 45 Gtatahar f 17 63 tataoU 
e 8 48 HaWnU c 6 43 Iteba 
HongK sSOSSNMd 
8 9 48 teamck f 7 4GNYodr 
a 9 48 tetentate 1 11 6Z Men 
1 11 S2 Jaddtei • 31 88 Otto 


a 0 4B Jo*targ* ih 20 68 Pari* - 
# 8 43 KndS ■ s 3 77 Faking 
c 28 79 LPakaas s 22 72 Farita 
5 2. 77 Lisbon , a 13 55 Ptagoa 
c 21 70 Locarno s 15 59 Bay terik 
s 18 68 Ltagtea* s- 22.72 Rhodes 
c 7 45 linuwabg C 5 4119a da 4 
I 1fr5B4to*U s 1 34 Rtea* 


C F 

i s ifl 6l ftema 
» 18 64 Satetaog 
s 18MSFVIW 
• f 15 59 Santiago' 
C* 1 19. 66 SPaofi* 

r c 134 Btaafa’ig 
f 8 46 Sydney 
1 24 75 langta 

* 17'fB1WM» 

/ 22 72 T«»rfte 
r 13 55 Tokyo 
f 13 55 Tosaoto* 
O 4 38 Ttmte 
s 10 50.Vatencte 


3 37 VaretaT s 7 45 


a Z7 81 Venice 
f 7 45 Msana 
an 4 39 Warm 


8 14 57 
1 8 46 
G 846 


* denotea WadnMtey'a figure* ora latest anlabte 


f 29 84 Wahdna e 14 57. 
*23 73 Zubcil a 7 46 





( WEATHER strong $W airflow orer the Ui. wfth a riow moving 

^ "'frontal tnmgih In the N. N Scotland will start wet and 

windy but dearer, showery conditions wffl spread from the NW later. R em a i n i ng 
parts iff Scodani, Northern Ireland and northern parts of Eisgland will start 
mainly dry and bright, hot rain wfll gradmrily spread from die N. Wales and die 
England will he naMy dry with siamy intervals, but with some early 
fog patches. Generally mdd. Windy, especially in the NW. Outlook lor tomorrow 
and Sunday: Cmduming unsettled, with farther Tain sprouting from the W. Tem- 
peratures near to, or rather above nonnaL Windy again in the NW. 


e f 

s 17 63 
1 745 
1 13 55 
C 18 64 
c 3t K 
s 337 
r 26 79 
* 746 
C 846 
C 16 61 
■ 19 « 
8 19 88 
S 22 72 
c 10 50 
r 4 39 
I 18 64 
1 15 S9 


bs at midday yesterday: c, 
rrr. ratal; 8. sun. 




d*jlj \jSuO 






* 

\*> 

:S$t 

. •' 


s * 

"*ri ^ 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 



TIMES 


21 

SPORT 31 
TELEVISION AND RADIO 35 


FRIDAY NOVEMBER 28 1986 


Executive Editor 
Kenneth Fleet 


FT 30 Share 
1286.0 (-0.3) 

FT-SE 100 

1632.5 (-0.5> 


Exchange curbs electronic chaos | Khoo resigns from Standard 


28696 (25721) 

USM (Datastream) 

129.19 (-6.57) 

THE POUND 

US Dollar 

1.4295 (-0.0020) 

W German mark 

2.8433 (-0.0061) . 

Trade-weighted 

68.1 (- 0 . 1 ) 

Battle for AE 
heads for 
a close finish 

The bitter struggle for con- 
trol of AE looked like drawing 
to a nail-biting climax last 
night after Turner & NewaH 
took its stake to almost 40 per 
cent 

TAN, competing against an 
offer from Mr Robert 
Maxwell’s Hollis group, an- , 
nounced that it had received 
acceptances of 9.66 per cent to 
add to its holding of 29.99 per 
cent Sir Francis Tombs, 
chairman ofT&N, whose offer 
closes on December 5, ex- 
pressed delight with the re- 
sponse. 

Meanwhile. Hollis lifted its 
stake to 14.61 percent 

No referrals 

The proposed acquisitions 
by Waterford Glass of Wedg- 
wood, BPCC of Providence 
Gravure, and BPCC of the 
Webb Co. will not be referred 
to. . the Monopolies 
Commission. 


Rogue prices 
to be muzzled 


Attempts to retrieve the 
situation were going well until 


SEAQ trade arid consequently another wrong button was 
showed inaccurate share pressed, sending a further 


movements based 


batch of faulty prices which 
could not be extricated before 


By Richard Lander Until yesterday, the trigger Attempts to retrieve the 

page stayed open until the last situation were going well until 
The Stock Exchange, faced SEAQ trade and consequently another wrong button was 
with a second consecutive day- showed inaccurate share pressed, sending a further 
of ‘‘rogue” dosing prices on ns movements based on in- batch of faulty prices which 
SEAQ electronic market sys- correct closing prices. could not be extricated before 

tem, plans to restrict the size - Yesterday’s move came af- SEAQ dosed, 
of price changes dot market- ter problems on Wednesday According to a BZW 
makers can put on their, night involving Barclays de spokesman, it had switched to 
sevens. . Zoete Wedd (BZWX one of SEAQ level three because of a 

At present SEAQ has a the Stock Exchanged largest communication problem at 
check mechanism which que- market-makers. - the stock ex ch a nge The 

ries market-makers who insert . When it was unable to use spokesman blamed the 
significant changes to a its in-house price inpnt system appearance of rogue prices on 
particular share quote. How- it bad to switch to its back op the lengthy and complicated 
ever, this can be overriden by system, the SEAQ level three procedure needed to bring the 
users who are able to tell computers provided, by the §eaQ level three systeminto 
SEAQ that a large price move- Exchange — and lhat is when operation, 
meat is intended and not the the.troubte began. BZW were -The,- an -hvimw 
result of a mispunched com- plagued bneflyTjy similar 


Yesterday’s move came af- SEAQ dosed, 
ter problems on Wednesday According to a BZW 
night involving Bodays de spokesman, it had switched to 
Zoete WerW (BZWX one of SEAQ level three because of a 
the Stock Exchange's largest co mmuni cation problem at 


Tan Sri Khoo Teck Puat, 
the Singapore businessman 
whose family has run imn 
trouble over dealings with the 
National Bank of Brunei, has 
resigned as a director of 
Standard Chartered Bank. 

The move throws the future 
of Standard even further into 
doubt after its successful de- 
fence against a bid by Uoyds 
Bank this year. 

The announcement by Stan- 
dard yesterday brought 
Speculation that Tan Sri Khoo 
was on the point of selling his 
6.3 per cent stake in the bank, 
worth nearly £80 million. 

However, it is understood 
that when the stock market 
closed, the shares had not 


By Richard Thomson, Banking Correspondent 
been sold. Tan Sri Khoo, who bid by Lloyds Ranir by build- 


market-makers. 


bought most of his shares at 
dose to 900p. faces a consid- 
erable loss on the shares if he 
sells at the present market 
price. 

Standard's share price be- 
haved unpredictably, drop- 
ping from 824p to 8)3p before 
the announcement of Tan Sri 
Khoo's resignation, but rising 
to 820p afterwards. 

The movements suggest 
that the market expects Tan 
Sri Khoo to sell bis stake in 
one Mode to a tingle investor 
rather than pushing them out 
on to the market 

Tan Sri Khoo is one of three 
large shareholders who saved 
Standard from the takeover 

Nick Rogers 


ing up big shareholdings in the 
bank. He was invited to join 
Standard's board in August, 
shortly after the bid failed. 

The largest shareholder, Sir 
Yue Kong Pao, the Hong 
Kong businessman, holds 15 
per cent of Standard and 
cannot buy more shares with- 
out the approval of the Bank 
of England. 

There was speculation that 
Mr Robert Holmes A Court, 
the Australian businessman 
who holds 8 per cent of 
Standard, may want to buy 
Tan Sri Khoo's share holding. 
The purchase would bring him 
dose to Sir Yue Kong's stake. 

Doubt over Tan Sri Khoo's 


position at Standard surfaced 
last week when h became dear 
that his son, Mr Khoo Ban 
Hock, was in trouble with the 
Brunei authorities. 

Mr Khoo Ban Hock has 
been charged with conspiring 
to defraud the National Bank 
of Brunei and with false 
accounting. 

The bank, which is now 
under the supervision of the 
Brunei authorities, is 70 per 
cent owned by the Khoo 
family. 

Since the Lloyds bid failed 
last July, the outlook for 
Standard has been uncertain. 

It has not been clear what 
the three main shareholders 
intended for the bank. 


excitant 


Fuelling the 
share deals 

In tomorrow's' FamBy Money: 
how the banks are using foe 
British Gas bonanza to 
spruce up their share dealing 
services; the investment 
potential of dassic cars and 
the merits of putting, money 
fcito enterprise zone property-- 
In foe week that an im- 
portant study of investment 
trusts is published, FamBy 
Money examines their rele- 
vance to private investors. 
Plus ways of keeping down 
those soaring car insurance 
bias. 

Profit jumps 

Operating profit at Inter- 
national Leisure, group 
jumped to £21.5 million in the 
six months to September, 
compared with £8.8 million 
last year (before profits on 
aircraft sales). The dividend 
was increased by 10 per cent to 
2-2P- Tempos, page 24 

BPB up 50% 

BPB Industries, the only 
British manufacturer of 
plasterboard, yesterday an- 
nounced pretax profits for the 
six months to the end of 
September 1986 up 50 per 
cent to £69.3 million. Turn- 
over rose from £299.4 million 
to £367 million. An interim 
dividend of 4.-5p was declared. 

Tempos page 24- 

Earlybirds 

Twelve firms have reg- 
istered with the Stock Ex- 
change as market-makers in 
the shares of British Gas. The 


ever, this can be overriden by 
users who are able to tell 
SEAQ that a large price move- 
ment is intended and not the 
result of a mispunched com- 
puter key. 

But under proposals before 
the Exchange’s markets com- 
mittee, a reprogrammed 
SEAQ wiUhave the last word 
so that users will have to input 
large movements in several 
gradual steps. 

The change could inhibit 
market-makers’ reactions to- 
events such as poor results, a 
rights issue or a large export 
order which warrant swift and 
laige price movements to a 
company’s share price. 

In addition, the Exchange 
has decided to dose rates on 
its SEAQ “trigger" page, 
which generates price move- 
ments for stocks in the FT- 
SE 100 share index, at 5 JO pm. 

Ford dealer 
faces £10m 
NZ bid 

By Lawrence Lever 

A New Zealand business- 
man, Mr Colin Giitrap, has 
launched a hostile £10 million 
bid for Frank G Gates, the 
Ford main dealer 
The bid is being financed by. 
Samuel Montagu, the mer- 
chant bank, which is offering 
. I20p in cash per.Gaies share, 
on behalf of Mr Giitrap. 

The Gates shme price 
jumped from 1 14p to 126p on 
yesterday’s announcement 
Mr Giitrap, whose pri- 
vately-owned Giitrap Group 
is New Zealand’s largest mo- 
tor vehicle importer, distr- 
ibutor and dealer, faces an 
uphill task in his battle for 
Gates. 

This is because more than 
56 per cent of the shares are 
owned by the Gates family, 
which has rebuffed Mr 
Giitrap. 

Mr Edward Dodman, the 
Gates deputy dtairman, said: 

| “The Gates family is not 
prepared to sell its shares.” 

Mr Giitrap and Samuel 
Montagu say that the Gates 
family in last year indicated 
that it was prepared to sell its 
then 58-1 per cent stake for 
90pa share. 

According to Samuel Mon- 
tagu, the deal failed because 
the purchaser could not per- 
suade Ford to transfer the 
dealership on satisfactory 
terms. 


Carclo wins 

Cando has declared its offer 
for Jonas Woodhead uncondi- 
tional as to acceptances after 
receiving acceptances for 57.7 
per cent of the shares. The 
casta alternative has been 


.. When rt was unable to use spokesman blamed the 
us m-taousepneempnt system appearance of rogue prices on 
it bad to switch to its back up the lengthy and complicated 
system, the SEAQ level three procedure nee ded to bring tire 
computers prorated, .by the §EAQ level three systeminto 


~JL vnvuZSZL <ten>«ital design weakness in 
imMem, agua yesterday thTaK* esehaege 


system handles the switch 

Montagu, which was forced fc '5 l J?£5.. he 

also to switch to SEAQ level u^^ever, Mr George 

three worskstations, generated 

a stream of omdatodprices “ ; J e 

because of human error. that 


Share prices 

Today’s share prices in The 
Times ou page 25 are taken as 
usual from Stack Exchange 
quotations at 5 pm yesterday. 
However, the (Mice change 
col man reflects movements 
from 4 pm on Wednesday, 
after which time accuracy 
coaid net be guaranteed. 


Wednesda/s problems re- 
sulted from a market maker 
using the wrong procedure to 
close down after a system 
failure. He did not name BZW 
specifically. 

“It is not a system problem 
but one of market discipline. 
The market-maker should 
have telephoned the markets 
department and asked for all 
their quotes to be dosed 
centrally,” he said. 


Big reshuffle 
at HK Land 

By Cliff Feltham 

Hie Hongkong Land groqp Mr Simon Keswick, chair- 
is to float off its Mandarin man of Hongkong Land, said 
Oriental Hotel chain in a big that the proposals would leave 
restructifflfflg pjfa.-As part it as a pore property company 
the mufti-million pound re- with SHK16 bmion of songht- 
shaflte , uaveiled yesterday, after office space in foe colony 
Hongkong Land -the biggest and debts of around SHK6 

property owner in tbe world — hniinn 
its- .sister company, Jardine “We are stm the biggest 
Matheson, and _ Jardine property company in die j 
.Securities are setting op a world,” he added. Tfee group I 
SHK5.500 million (£50§ m3- has already announced tire 
Hon) investment vehicle to be hiring-off of Dairy Farm, its j 
called Jardine Strategic retaifaig subsidiary. 



Hanson to buy 
Kaiser Cement 


By John Bell, City Editor 


Sir Gordon White, who 
runs the US arm of Hanson 
Trust, is spending a little loose 
change. His Hanson In- 
dustries is making an agreed 
$200 million (£ 142.8m) pur- 
chase of Kaiser Cement, the 
fifth largest cement producer 
in the US and the biggest in 
California. 

It is not the blockbuster bid 
that the City expects Hanson 
to mount in the US sometime 
soon and it hardly makes a 
dent in the group's cash 
mountain estimated at more 
than £3,000 million. 

But in typical Hanson style, 
it is a basic business which 
could prove to be a bargain. 

Staying ahead of the pack in 
the highly competitive cement 
industry these days means 
m aintainin g a heavy pro- 
gramme of capital spending. 

Kaiser, which in the receul 
past recently ran up some 


heavy losses, has ploughed 
back no less than $350 million 
in investment over the past 
five years. Sir Gordon reckons 
that Kaiser now boasts the 
most modern and cosi-ef- 
firieni plant in the world. 

Building industry watchers 
say that the US cemenL busi- 
ness is suffering from an influx 
of imports. 

Last year Kaiser made net 
earnings of $16.6 million on 
sales of $248 million. Net 
assets were $ 1 86 million at the 
last balance sheet date. Han- 
son has signed a merger 
agreement with the Kaiser 
board and will be mounting a 
lender offer to acquire 51 per 
cent of tbe shares at $27.50. 
The board has unanimously 
approved the offer and recom- 
mended shareholders to 
accepL 

Hanson's shares hardly 
moved on news of the de&L 



Courts ‘cannot act 
with speed of market’ 


The City Takeover Panel 


Alexander 


yesterday defended its right to Master of the Rolls, Sir John' 
operate as the City's self- Donaldson, sitting with Lord 
regulatory body without the Justice LJovd and Lord Justice 


David Scholey: hard to match last year’s excellent results 

Mercury disappoints 

By Richard Thomson, Banking Correspondent 
fercury International Group, pro-forma figure of £44.9 


interference of the courts. 


Nicholls, 


I and Lord Justice 
t the Panel's code 


Mr Robert Alexander, QC had safeguards built into it to 
for the Panel, told three protect those affected by their 
Appeal Court judges that for derisions. 


the good of the stock market 
the boundaries where the 


HoMings. 

The companies will at 


The effect of the scheme Is 
to give the bidders of the 


stroke be made much less original Hongkong Land 
vulnerable to a takeover at a shares stakes m four Invest- 
time when a number of well- meats — Dairy Farm, Man- 
known predators is prowling darin Oriental, tbe new 


the crown colony. 



V“V %-* ■*: 
V '•••' . 


deadline by which firms must taken for 29 3 per cent and is 
register in time for the first now closed. 
rifaling^ m British Gas- is 
December 5. . 


WAX Street 22 Fotriga Em* 24 
Stack Mttfcet 23 Traded Opts 24 
Cbaanem 23 Share Prices 25 
Tcmnu 24 UnStTimts 76. 
Cs News 24 CMBaodUes 2® 
Money Mrfcts 24 USM Prices 76 


£9m purchase 

Hazicwood Foods has ex- 
changed contracts for the ac- 
quisition of Van Heyningen 
Brothers, tomato growers and 
packers, for £9 million. 



The Mandarin In Hong 
Kong: flotation plan 


investment vehicle and Hong- 
kong Land. 

Mr Keswick said that the 
newly-listed hotel group — 
which owns the Mandarin and 
Excelsior hotels in Hoag Kong 
and stakes In hotels it man- 
ages aromd the world — would 
have assets of abont 
SHK1J100 million and fore- 
cast earnings for next year of 
SHK200 million aftertax. 

The corporate reshuffle wiD | 
leave Jardine Strategic Hold- 
ings as the biggest imtiridnal 
shareholder in Jardine j 
Matheson, Hongkong Land, i 
Dairy Farm and Mandarin 
Oriental. 

Mr Keswick said that the 
new investment vehicle would 
“assume the role of tbe central 
strategic investment holding 
company for the Jardine 
group, and it wfll have ample 
resources to make farther 
acquisitions or investments as 
the opportunity arises." 

After the deal Jardine 
Matheson will own nearly half 
of Jardine Strategic Holdings, 
creating an effective defence 
against any likely bidders. 

-Mr Li Ka-shing, the Hong 
Kong ma p |wt|i i has amassed a 
$HK10 billon “war chest," 
which cmld be ased to bay 
assets in tbe colony, and there 
has been an influx of Austra- 
lian money looking for likely 
targets. Comment, page 23 


Mercury International Group, 
one of the largest of tbe new 
British financial conglom- 
erates, caused disappointment 
yesterday with worae-iban- 
expected interim results. 

Theshare price dropped 
from 428p to 41 5p on news 
that the group's profit after tax 
over the six months to 
September 30 was £26.4 mil- 
lion compared with a pro- 
forma figure of £27 million for 
last year. 

Profit before tax but after 
transfers to inner reserves was 
£38. 1 million compared with a 

Dawson 

profits 

surprise 

By Alexandra Jackson 

Shares in Dawson Inter- 
national, known for its Pringle 
and Braemar high-quality 
knitwear, jumped 12p yes- 
terday to 228p on the publica- 
tion of better- lhan-expected 
interim results. 

Pretax profits for the six 
months to the end of Septem- 
ber rose from £14.6 million to 
£15.7 million. Turnover rose 
by 14 per cent to £166.8 mil- 
lion. An interim dividend of 
Zip was declared. 

City forecasters had been 
concerned that the absence of 
tourists in Britain would have 
had a damaging effect on 
profits. 

Tempos, page 24 


pro-forma figure of £44.9 
million. 

Mr David Scholey, chief 
executive, said that it bad 
been hard to match last year's 
results which had been excep- 
tionally good. 

The group produced earn- 
ings per share, fully diluted, of 
15. Ip compared with 15.4pon 
last year's pro-forma calcula- 
tion. An interim dividend of 
3p per ordinary share was 
declared. 

Mercury announced plans 
to gain a listing and launch its 
fond management company. 

Comment, page 23 


The examination of the 
Panel's legal status, which 


cmtrts could intervene in’ its could have wide implications 
affairs should not be extended. for ^ future of City Self- 
Conflicts in the market regulation, follows a High 
require speedy resolution, raid Court decision this week that 
Mr Alexander. However fast ifie panel is not a public law 
the courts act, they cannot act body whose decisions are 
as speedily as the market open w judicial review. 


operates. If it was open for 


-4S £ SJ? 

nf^he^nJrket^uiS^e house Pnidemial-Bache leave 
™ ^ * to seek judicial review of the 

i» fi>r Pane's derision that its rules 

It would be_ open for nnf hm . . _ Cltn _ 


proceedings to be brought as a 
ploy designed to create un- 
certainty during the course of 


were not broken by a sup- 
porter of the Norton Opax bid 
for the McCorquodale print- 


a bid if advisers thought it m lf r °? P ‘ . 

could be to their clients' The hearing was adjourned 


advantage. 


until Monday. 


MARKET SUMMARY 


Don’t panic, CBI tells boardrooms 


NavYoifc 

Dow Jonas 1916.76 (+4.46)" 

NhSSdow _. 17883^6 (+155.75) 
Hong Kong: 

Hang Seng - 2354.33 (-23.38) 

Anwwttasr Gen 284.2 1+0-9) 

Sydney: AO — 1370.8 (+7.6) 

Frankfurt 

Commerzbank 20723 (+14.9) 

fiRHSefK 

General 3821 j92 (-64:09) 

Parte: CAC 394^4 (+1.1) 

Zurich: SKA Gen — 557.30 (+0.5) , 

London: FT. A n/a 

FT. Gifts SIJ77(+OJH) 

Closing prices Page 25 




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22 BUSINESS AND FINANCE THE TEMESTRIDAY NOVEMBER 28 198 _ 

Sedgwick to seek Harrods: the b< 

listing m US 

By John BdDL Gty Editor Brian Walsh, Chief ' 


in stores 




By John Bell, Gty Editor 



Britain's largest insurance 
broker, the Sedgwick Group, 
is seeking an American listing 
for its shares next month. 

They will be traded in the 
form of American Depositary 
Receipts (ADRs), the com- 
pany said yesterday. The 
move had been expected and; 
analysts said that it was likely 
to prove a bullish factor for 
Sedgwick shares. 

The news accompanied an 
announcement of lacklustre 
nine-month profits, badly af- 
fected by exchange rate fac- 
tors. Profits emerged at £l 1 3.2 
million compared with £U(k3 
minio n last time. 

After a £3.6 million rise in 
the tax charge to £43.6 mil- 


lion, earning s per share ad- 
justed for the rights m issue 

earlier in the year actually fell 

slightly from 19p to 18.7p. 

Sedgwick’s chairman. Mr 
Carel Mosselmans, said that 
profits were affected by the 
increased cost of errors and 
ommissions insurance and 
higher provisions for possible 
doubtful debts. 

“Exchange rate fluctua- 
tions, particularly with regard 
to the US dollar, also had a 
substantial adverse impact on 
profits compared with 1985,” 

The company expects that 
despite the weak third quarter, 
full-year profits will exceed 
the 1985 total of £124.3 
million. 


executive of House of 


Fraser and Harrods, 


does not have to shop 


around for a new 


challenge -the 


company opens a new 


store in Kensington 


next week 




WALL STREET 


Wall Street was dosed yesterday dae to the 
Thanksgiving hoKday.The prices below refer to 
Wednesday’s trading* 


PflEW 
Phelps Oge 

pimp mis 
prxfflpsPet 
Potarttd 

v, ppg mo 

PrctrGmdl 
n PfaSE&G 
H Raytheon 
RyriUsMet 
Rockwefllnt 
Ratal Dutch 



B orn in London, matured 
in Melbourne, Brian 
Walsh at 50 has the most 
enviable job in re tailing . 
He is chief executive of 
House of Fraser (Stores) and of 
Harrods, now privately owned by 
the brothers Mohamed, Salah and 
Ali Al Fayed. In five months - he 
was appointed on June 30 — Walsh 
las put his own management stamp 
on both companies. 

He is enjoying the freedom to 
manag e that normally exists only 
within an enlightened, family- 
owned business where the concepts 
of excellence and the bottom line do 
not conflict. He relishes the 
environment and the challenge. 

“Mohamed wants Harrods to be 
sensational in every way. He is 
volatile and we nave had our 
differences. But this is a big job with 
wonderful potentiaL Awl I am 
loving it” 

You do not have to spend much 
time with this open raced, fast- 
talking rnan to know that he means 
every word. He has a genuine 
admiration for Harrods which has a 
fair claim to be the best-known 
department store in the worid — and 

a healthy awareness that its inter- 
national reputation is part myth. 

“Harrods is unique in Brit ain. I t 
has a fine building and a certain 
magic not found anywhere else. But 
it has to keep the Harrods promise. 
It has to be terrific - in its range of 
goods, in the look of the store, in 
customer services, and in the way it 
serves its customers. It will take a 
couple of years.” 

Walsh has a difficult and delicate 

line to follow. Harrods is no longer 
the store only for dowager duch- 
esses and yet, paradoxically, its 
modern mass appeal depends in 
part on an air of class. The two can 
be reconciled only through high 
standards. 

Harrods had been slipping. The 
choice of standard merchandise was 
often much narrower than its 
broadening range of customers 
might reasonably expect In cloth- 
ing, colours or sizes were not 
available. Too many buyers lacked 
inspiration, imagination or flair. 
Criticisms of sales staff were grow- 
ing. Systems for handling cash and 
dealing with credit were archaic. 

Walsh has begun his assault on 
deficiences in the right place — at 
the top. Recruits to the board 






m. 

- !' i .}! jf : *1 ; I 

til P-y ■& 1 PM 


§ t & ■ -■ 






Modern outlook amid Victorian spleodoun Brian Walsh, chief executive, to the food baJL “Hairodahasacertotomag^ 

o M.vMr. thft CTKifflns are m dace. 'tint thev whose patronage is reminiscent of and responsible for all computer 


include Rob Hampson, a 44-year- 
old Australian, as merchandise 
director, and Rosemary Thorne, as 
commercial director. __ 

Ham pson, who has a marketing 
and advertising as well as store 
management background,has 
joined Harrods from David Jones, 
Sydney, where Walsh made his 
reputation. Thorne, who is respon- 
sible for all systems, is an accoun- 
tant and economist She rose 
through the ranks of Mothercare to 
become group financial controller 
of Habitat Mothercare and later 
Storehouse. 

Both are on the board of Harrods 
(Management) Ltd. where all senior 
executives come together, including 
Clare Stubbs, lured from Harvey 
Nichols to become director of 
fashion, and Carol Peter, director of 
menswear, who appears to be 
Walsh's idea of the model senior 
buyer against whom the ambitious 
and aspiring will be matched. 

The next senior appointment wfll 
bean American whose job is “visual 
merchandising.” Harrods will not 
only be different, it will look 
different 

The emphasis in recruiting selling 
staff is also about to change. “The 
type of education is not necessarily 
important,” Walsh says, “the type 
of person is.” Coming from a more 
open society he is still puzzled why 
when colleagues say “hello” and 
immediately look the other way. 

He wants them to be friendly to 
ea ch other and friendly to the 
customers. He intends also, when 


the systems are in place, that they 
should have the incentive and 
rewards of commissions related to 
selling performance. Extra pay- 
ments would be made monthly for 
sales above the level needed to 
cover salary. 

In a drive to broaden its accounts 
base, (he company pays a pound to 
staff for every customer who is 
converted into an account holder. 
In a good week the number of 
converts will exceed 10,000. Walsh, 
however, is not sold on credit 
business: “Harrods should be sell- 
ing merchandise not credit” 

Harrods is, or may become, 
everyone’s dream store. Certainly 
that is the ambition of the Al Fayeds 


Lgp, 

$ I 

. ' ' *:5f 

w 

b *;«!♦• £ ^ 

& , V ^ 

w-. 3 Z 


‘Mohamed wants 
Haxrodstobe 
sensational’ 

Walsh ob Al Fayed (above) 


whose patronage is reminiscent of 
medieval popes and renaissance 

princes. ■ 

When they prised House ofFraser 
from tire strangulating grip of 
Lonrho, they acquired not only the . 
centre piece, Harrods, bin a multi- 
facetted group of about hundred 
shops and a duster of peripheral 
businesses. 

Walsh has already re-structured 
House of Fraser (Stores) Ltd into 
three regional trading divisions 
southern (36 stores), midlands (20) 
and northern (3!) - each with its 

OWn managing director who SitS OH 

the HoF (Stores) board. 

W ithin the divisions 
general managers are 
responsible for 
groups of about Iff 
stores. Performance 
at each store is measured by returns 
on assets under ™ a nagemcritHoF 
has a centralised merchandise buy- 
ing team of 200, recently brought 
together and installed at- the Vic- 
toria head office, where the 
information they need is on screen 
at the tap of a key. As at Harrods, he 
was made several senior appoint- 
ments. Previous efforts to bring in . 
computer-based systems were cost- 
ing £13 milli on a year and 
ap parenty needed a small army. 
Results were abysmaL 
According, to Walsh “manage- 
ment had not worked out priorities 
nor decided what information it 
wanted.” Paul livesey, after three 
years at NCR, Dayton, Ohio, is the 
new directorof information systems 


operations and tele- 
communications. 

House of Fraser has good sites. 
Walsh’s first objectives have been to 
get the right management in place, 
discover who the customers are, 
deride how best to serve them and 
trade House ofFraser up. The dawn 
of the new era broke over Gateshead ' 
test month when the first store to 
trade under the name House of 
Fraser was opened in the Metro 
Centre. The second House ofFraser 
store opens in London on Monday, 
occupying foe old Barkers she in 
Kensington. 

The strati, remodelled at a cost of 
£11 mfllion, was redesigned by 
Andre Ruetlan, designer of the 
Gateshead store. 

Walsh hopes to have a group of 20 
to 25 big stores trading and 
indentifed as House ofFraser stores 
by the end of next year. Down the 
size scale (30,000-50,000 square . 
feet) he mil keep the best and 
dispose of theresL • 

As a professional retailer, his 
satisfa ctions will come from making 
Harrods as good, or better, than 
people imagine it is already, and 
m aking House of Frasera great deal 
better than it is. 

If he succeeds, both companies 
wifi also become vastly more profit- 
able and h would be logical, at the 
apppriate time, to float one or both, 
on the Stock Exchange, offering 
investors a minority of the shares. 

Kenneth Fleet 



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APPOINTMENTS J 


ERA Technology: Mr Mi- 
chael Withers has become an 
executive director. 

Pirns London: Mr Richard 
Greenwood is now a director. 

BET: Mr Brian Thompson 
becomes chairman of Initial 
on January 1, retaining his 
post as managing director of 
Initial 

Viking Packaging Group: 
Mr Richard Smith has be- 
come director and chief exec- 
utive, polypropylene 
products. 

Abaco Investments: Mr 
Raymond Palmer is now a 
director. 

McAvoy Wreford Bayley: 
Mr Tony Iveson, Mr John de 
Mierre and Mr Richard Orgffl 
have become directors. • 

British Linen Assets: Mr 
Alex Gillies has joined the 
board as a non-executive 
director. 

SIMCARE: Mr Paul Batter- 
shy is now m anag in g director. 

Babcock Energy: Mr John 
Lace becomes managing dir- 
ector, Babcock Power Di- 
vision. Mr Peter McAinsh 
becomes managing director, 
Babcock Construction. Mr 
Ian Steven becomes managing 
director, Babcock Industrial 
Boilers. Mr Alan MacPherson 
becomes managing director, 
Babcock PED. Mr EH Camp- 
bell becomes diairman, Bab- 
cock Offshore. 

Morgan Grenfell Group: 
Mr R N Bowes has become a 
non-executive director. 

T S Harrison: Mr Anthony 
Sweeten has been named 
managing director. 

Morgan Grenfell Laurie: 
Mr Michael Dix is now«n 
associate director. Mr John 
Sloan is a director. 

Thom EMI Electronics: Mr 
John Hakes has become 
managing director. 

Tricentrol: Mr John Raitt 
has been made m a n a g i n g 
director. 


Skill shortages hit small businesses 

uraeasuig number of small this year 7.3 per cent of the re the north of England, 


jpwwising number oi small uus year i.p per cent m tuc 
businesses — and a fifth of small businesses surveyed 
those in a new survey of small identified skill shortages as foe 
business in Britain expea the . most important problem, 
shortage to limi t sales. while 20 per cent said they 


Quarterly Survey of Small 
Business, Vol 2, No 3: Small 
Business Research Trust, 3, 
Dean Trench Street, West- 


lonage to unut saie*. wuuc ~y ^ ™ <nvip WR 

The Quarterly survey, by the expected shortages to LunB minster, London bwir inn. 

• ■ ' „ : mI.. nuM tho nort mtarb>T it I (1L 


Business Research sales over the next quarter. 


Matthew Hall 

Pubfc Limited Company 

INTERNATIONAL ENGINEERING DESIGNERS AND CONTRACTORS 

Interim Report 

Summary of Group results for the nine months to 30 September 1986 


Year to 
31 Dec 85 
£000 
432,672 


9 months to 

30 Sept 86 30 Sept 85 


Turnover 


£000 

377,142 


JO Sept d! 
£000 
294,864 


Profit on trading: 

6,800 ’^Oil, gas, and chemical 
5,523 Mechanical and electrical 
(1,007) . Mining and minerals 
636 Design and construction (note 2) - 

H-952 • 

4,109 Interest receivable (net) 

16,061 Profit on ordinary activities before taxation 

(6,555 ) Taxation 

9,506 Profit on ordinary activities after taxation 
9,500 Profit attributable to shareholders (note 3) 
1328p Per share: Earnings 


Dividends 


10,746 

1,851 

12,597 

(4,728) 

7,869 

■ 6,928 

iO^Op 

USp 


11,370 

(5,310) 


jVbicsr 

1 The oiM n»Mh£' results !« both yeas are uoaudnat The resulis tonto yaar lteStae an ai»«lQed vetaoii ctfthe anttrod 
jmvinht nfihat ywir wtuch have fa^datwaied ip the SBroBaraf Ctecpanies.-ih&Rgpon al ihe Autiitots «aa unqualified 

2 The !DC Group was acquired on 22 Augus 1985. TlW campaiafflfe flares radudB the reaite train that date u 30 Septembei 
1985 and 31 Daoember 1995. 

3 Profit attributable » abaiehohleiSB ater diaiglng entaeiidlnaiy teams olfiSlUXlOm respect of<»ssafctosmeof certain 

n ppmhnns . ” ' “ , * 


Great Movies • Classics • Musicals • Family Fun • Music 
Collect MGM videos for * 9-99 or less 

Available from selected branches of Vi ool worth • \\“H Smith • Asda • Menzies 

■and all aorxl video sr >res. suj^eu ^innp prior 



RATES 

ABN : — 11i»% 

Adam & Corpary 11.00* 

BCQ -11.00* 

Cifoank Saringst 12.45% 

Consolktatod Crts 11.00% 

Co-opaative Bank 11.00* 

C. Hoot & Co n.00* 

Hong Kong & Shanghai 11.00% 

LLoyds Bank 11.00* 

Nat Westminster 11.00* 

Royal Bank of Scottend ...... 11.00% 

TSB ; 11.00* 

Crtank HR ^.-...lim 


t Mwiptc Base Rate. 


Salient Points from the lnteruii Report 

Pre-tax profit up li96. 

After tax profit up 3095. . • , . 

Earnings per share up 1796. ; 

Interim dividend 1.75p per share (1985: 1.5p), . . 

Pre-tax profit for year 1986 forecast at not less than £ 17.5m 
(1985 £I6.1m). 

Copies of the full- Interim Report may be obtained from. 

The Secretary • ' ^ 

Matthew Hall PLC 

Matthew Hall Houser 7 Baker Street, London W.1M 1 AB 

je|epl»lie-01-BB5 S38» • Tel«{ 29M4f 


'■v- 

! -uor 

i hs.;. 

; h \£{ 


















THE TIMES FRIDAY NOVEMBER 28 1986 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


23 


(STOCK MARKET REPORT) 

shares advance 7.5p 
after further bid speculation 



By Michael Clark and Carol Leonard 


JVIEPG, Britain's second 
biggest property group, was 
again the centre orin tense bid 
speculation yesterday after a 
late Awry of activity after 
hours. ... - 

The shares advanced 7.5p to 
246.5p amid whispers that a 
mystery predator bad man- 
aged to complete the arrange- 
ments for the financing of a 
bid of 400p a share with 
various Gty banks. That 
would value the entire group 
at almost £1 billion. , . 

MEPC has attracted bid 
speculation in the past with its 
name being linked to. both 
Trafalgar House and rival 
Umd Securities. Dealers were 
being careful not. to fist the 
names of any likely suitors 
yesterday ana a spokesman 
for the company said: “We 
can't . comment on . any 
rumours." 

Last year. MEPC hit the 
takeover trail itself with the 
purchase of English Property 
Corp, but just recently has ran 
into trouble with the City of 
London' planners over the 
proposed redevelopment of its 
Lee House site m London 
Wafl- 

The rest of the equity 
market spent another quiet 
session with most investors' 
spare cash tied up in the £5.6 
billion British Gas flotation. 
Turnover was again down to a 
trickle after brokers managed 
to complete the computerized 
buying and selling program 
initiated by the Post Office 
Pension Fund on Wednesday. 

Investors also had to con- 
tend with continuing confit- 


tatf 


sion over price changes in the 
Stock Exchanges’ Price Dis- 
play System. . At least two 
market-makers have fed rogue 
prices into the computers, on 
several occasions this week 
resulting in incorrect price 
movements. 

. : Despite this the market's 
undertone remains firm and 
dealers are confident that 
British Gas will be given a 
warm reception in first time 
dealings. 

The FT 30 share index spent 
most of the day fluctuating in 
narrow limits before closing 
0.3 down at 1,286.0. The FT- 
SE 100 share index fared little 
better and finished 0.5 lower 
at 1,632.5. 

Government securities 
drew support from a steadier 

• Expect news that the 
property high-flyer London & 
Edinburgh! 
acquired 

stake is British Car Auc- 
tion Group. In addition, to the 
highly successful Black 
Bush auction site, RCA now 

has several sites with prop- 
erty potential. BCA was un- 
changed at I76p. 

performance by the pound on 
the foreign exchange. Prices at 
the longer end dosed with 
gains stretching to Vh. 

Among blue chips, GEC 
was the highest volume stock, 
ahead of its figures next week, 
with almost 8 million shares 
going through the market But 
the price barely moved, easing 
just %p to 185'Ap. 

Vickers gained lip to 3S4p, 



Glaxo lOp to 912pafter a line 
of 657,000 shares went 
through the 'market at 91 Op, 
Cable & Wireless 4p to 326p, 
and Hawker Siddetey 3p to 
438p. 

Four stocks made their 
stock market debut yesterday, 
with Geest, the banana im- 
porter going to a 29p p rem ium 
over the 125p offer price, and 
GSentree, the USM London 
estate agency, more than dou- 
bling its 16p placing price to 
dose at 40p. Miss Sim, the 
underwear company, stuck at 
its placing price of 105p and 
Sumit dosed at 140p, a penny 
below its 141p placing price. 

Virgin, the record group, 
was still trading below its 140p 
striking price, at 136p and 
partly-paid British Gas shares 
slipped back to 59p on the 
unofficial grey market. 

Vaux Group, the indepen- 
dent brewer which has been 
shrouded in take-over 
speculation for the past Gourde 
of weeks, dim bed a further 
I3p to 488p, but still has some 


way to go before reaching its 
peak for the year of 54Qp. 

The predatory name on 
everyone's lips yesterday was 
A B Foods, which has been 
sitting on an £800 million ragfi 

• Trust House Forte, the 
hotel empire, yesterday 
sfipped a penny to I77p af- 
ter Ladbroke, die betting shop 
and leisure group, denied 
that it is interested in making 
a bid. There has been 
heavy buying of THF shares 
throughout die week, with 
almost 6 nnQhm traded 
yesterday. 

mountain since its sale of the 
Fine Fare supermarket chain 
to Dee Corporation in June: 

The take-out price for Vaux 
is expected to be at least £6 a 
share, valuing it at around 
£250 million, and analysts say 
that a merger between Vaux 
and AB would make some 
sense. 

One leading sector specialist 
said: “We know that they're 


ALPHA STOCKS 


These prices are as at 6.45pm 


Ar m 


Hgb Low CoMpnjr 

Bfcf 

Offer 

WB- 

panes 

% 

PfE 

*000 

Mob 

Low 

11 — J 

BU 

Off* 

r area 

Pmc« 

% 

P/E 

363 

283 

AHed-Lyoas 

303 

308 


-5 

14.5 

47 

140 

1200 

1 11*i734 

bnp Own M 

10S10 8 * 



486 

<5 

123 

174 

126 

ASDAcMH 

150 

164 


+1 . 

45 

3J> 

1S8 

1200 

583 

335 

Japtar 

516 

517 


+2 

12.7 

25 

187 

483 

277 

BTR 

277 

282 


- m 

93 

as 

18S 

2200 

aai 

312 

ledbfofce . 

353 

357 


-5 

taa 

4J 

189 

491 

381 

BAT 

450 

455 


-1 

18.4 

4.1 

11JB 

580 

34a 

278 

Land Securities 

338 

341 

• 

+6 

14 J 

O 

22J 

572 

449 

Barclays 

458 

475 


-1 

28.1 

an 

aa 


288 

133 

Lags) 6 Gan 

240 

242 

a. 

+1 

\23 

81 

387 

840 

680 

Baas 

730 

740 


-3 

217 

3-0 

15-6 

282 

484 

293 

UoydS • 

427 

430 


+4 

25lO 

88 

89 

450 

356 

Besctam 

415 

420 

• 


17.1 

41 

174 

428 

283 

183 

Lonhro 

228 

228 


-8 

17.1 

73 

112 

728 

626 

Blus Orcto 

646 

650 


+5 

30.0 

46 

92 

412 

231 

163 

Marks ft Spsncar 

187 

188 

• 

-3 

5J7 

3.1 

224 

383 

293 

BOC 

337 

340 


+4** 

14.1 

.42 

12.9 

1200 

599 

417 

Mfiand 

SO 

552 



37.1 

87 

284 

289 

170 

Boats 

230 

233 

■ 

-1 

10-6 

48 

15.1 

1200 

593 

426 

NaMMwt - 

497 

600 


-3 

278 

85 

82 

608 

423 

Br Aerospace 

495 

500 


+1 

23.4 

47 

10S 

1200 

576 

428 

P ft O DW • 

602 

505 

• 

-2 

25-0 

80 

144 

709 

530 

Br PetrcSaum 

675 

680 


-9 

486 

73. 

74 

4200 

246 

162 

Fleam 

172 

174 


+2 

73 

43 

1 23 

280 

177*2 Br Telecom 

196 

200 



107 

54 

11.6 

2,100 

942 

718 


813 

817 


+2 

386 

47 

53 3 

193 

98 

BrHofl 

148 

150 


-4 

9.3 

63 

40 

5200 

234 

148 

Racat Bee* 

173 

175 


+6 

43 

23 

184 

3S4 

256 

Burton 

264 

268 


-7 

8.1 

30 

149 

247 

900 

605 

Reddt Ccfrnan 

797 

800 

• 

+1 

9H3 

23 

173 

369 

Z77 

Cana & Wtndws 

323 

330 


45 

73 

23 

179 

. 5200 

562*i345 

Remora 

548 

SO 


+8 

SA 

1J) 

41 3 

196 

158 

Cadbuy Schweppes 178 

181 


+1'i 

87 

48 

21 3 

483 

791 

511 

RTZ 

668 

672 

• 

+1 

S1A 

47 

89 

338 

257 

Com Union 

258 

261 



174 

87 

. . 

2,100 

: 987 

762 

Royal ins 

815 

820 

• 

+5 

386 

47 

87.0 

704 

409 

Cons GoMfiekfe 

663 

670 

• 

-5 

as j> 

S3 

19.1 

2S8 

426 

344 

Sefnsttiry (J) 

410 

414 


+1 

84 

23 

289 

330 

252 

Cour&tdds 

322 

325 


-1 

102 

3.1 

102 

2700 

140*5 39 

Sean 

125 

126*i • 

-1 

53 

40 

182 

438 

318 

Dbcoos Grp 

-324 

328 


-3 

43 

IS 

232 

aioo 

415 

321 

Sedgwick Gp 

338 

340 


-20 

17.1 

80 

182 

850 

408 

Fteons 

553 

£55 

• 

-2 

84 

IS 

247 

335 

970 

653 

Shad 

937 

941 


-10 

513 

85 

93 

954 

701 

Gan Acddanr 

- 815 

820 

• 

+14 

343 

42 

206 

326 

189 

96 


188 

168 


+54 

2.1 

13 

186 

226 

158 

GEC 

188 

188 


+1*2 

6.1 

33 

IIS 

10200 

772 

520 

Sun Aflanca 

620 

625 

• 

+6 

27.5 

44 

581 

11U756'20tWO 

906 

906 


+6 

200 

23 

192 

2200 

81 *« 7W.TS0 PIP 

77 

77b 


+1*a 




462'; 328 

Grand Mai 

457 

4£S 


-3 

13JS 

23 

154 

1200 

420 

265 

Taaco 

377 

380 



an 

23 

21.6 

11'* 721 

GUS 'A 

10 

10*1 

• 

.. 

30.0 

80 

142 

237 

529 

374 

Thom Bfl 

477 

482 


-1 

2sn 

S3 

381 

954 

720 

GRE 

765 

770 

• 

+4 - 

<25 

5S 

».l 

153 

349 

133'iTmMaar House 

284 

288 


-2*i 

189 

86 

73 

385 

235 

GJKN 

272 

274 

• 

+1 

17.9 

as 

92 

1200 

209 

139 

ThaOttusa FartB 

178 

178 


+1 

73 

45 

17 3 

355 

Z75 

Gtfnneaa 

325 

327 


+3 

KL3 

32 

124 

583 

20*. miMbW 

2Q'< 20 s * 

• 


60.1 

3d0 

186 

2154141 

Hanson 

199 

200 


.. 

57 

23 

177 

2200 

209 

216 

UUBBCufe 

230 

231 

• 


13j5b SJ9 

125 

623 

403 

Hanker SxHey 

433 

436 

• 

+6 . 

214 

49 

9B 

1400 












175 


747 

1500 

288 

523 

530 

1.700 

30 

468 


713 

328 

952 


362 

177 


attracted to the brewing area 
because they tendered un- 
successfully for Courage, and 
they could certainly afford iL" 

As well as its brewing 
activities, Vaux owns the 32- 
. strong chain of Swallow ho- 
tels, predominantly in the 
North-east, but with one hotel 
in London. ? 

A B Foods shares’ were 
unchanged at 330p. 

Most other brewers had a 
negative day. Allied Lyons 
slipped 6p to 307p, Devenisb 
6p to 203p and Guinness 5p to 
326p. 

Results from BPS, the plas- 
ter board group, duely im- 
pressed the market and lifted 
the company's shares 25p to 
548p, just 2p below its high for 
the year. Analysis bad been 
looking for profits of £55 
minion at the half-way stage, 
but the company surpassed all 
forecasts by revealing an in- 
crease of more than 50 per 
cent to £69 million. Analysts 
are now up-grading their fore- 
casts for the year to around 
£140 million. 

English China Gay, the 
construction and industrial 
materials manufacturer, 
which publishes its £132 mil- 
lion offer document for Bry- 
ant Holdings today, firmed 2p 
to 319p. But Bryant is still 
holding up at around 149p, 
almost SO per cent ahead of 
the lOOp a share bid. Dealers 
say that if ECC is to win, ft will 
have to increase the stakes. 

Another construction 
group, C H Beazer, firmed 5p 
to 194p, ahead of hs annual 
meeting today. The chairman, 
Mr Brian Beazer, is expected 
to make confident noises 
about current trading and- 
about Gifford Hill, the Dallas- 
based cement company it 
bought for £190 million a 
couple of months ago. 

Pearson, the prestigious 
Lazards merchant bank to 
Financial Times and Chateau 
Laiour conglomerate, re- 
turned to the bid limelight, 
jumping 21p to 594p on talk 
that Mr Li Kashing, who 
heads up the Hong Kong 
trading group Hutchison 
Whampoa, has been bying a 
few more shares over the past 
couple of days, to add to the 
Dear 5 per cent stake be 
already owns. 

Chairman Lord Blakenham 
says- be has not yet been 
notified of any such increase 
and says “I know of no reason 
for the increase in the share 
price. 

He also says that market 
talk that the company is in the 
process of raising $2 billion in 
Far East “is not true." 


COMMENT Kenneth Fleet 


The Mercury drops to 
a disturbing level 


C assandras of the Big Bang are 
gloating. First results from Mer- 
cury International Group since 
the merger of its main component parts 
last April are unlikely to spread happi- 
ness among those with a financial 
interest in the City's deregulated securi- 
ties markets. On the securities side 
profits were pretty dismal in contrast 
with figures from the more traditional 
merchant banking business. 

The problem, admitted chief exec- 
utive, David Scfaoley, was poor trading 
in difficult markets. He puts this down 
to the confusion and disruption of the 
period before October 27 when the 
players' eyes were distracted from the 
ball. There were also competitors 
playing to the new rules before home 
teams like Mercury were; allowed to, and 
spoiled their business. 

The serious question is if Mercury 
laced these problems before Big Bang 
how well will it cope with even greater 
confusion in the post Big Bang world? 

Mr Scholey does not offer much in 
the way of comfort in his assessment of 
the next six months. Costs related to 
securities activities will carry on rising. 
While activity and opportunities in the 
securities markets may be expanding, so 
also is the volatility of earnings. 

There is a him that shareholders 


should brace themselves for more 
bumps ahead, with a warning of 
continued turbulence in financial mar- 
kets and the need for Mercury to take a 
long term rather than a short term view. 
Mercury insists that its securities busi- 
ness (even its agency broking) is growing 
— but that is not to say that it is 
profitable. 

On this evidence, the stock market 
was right to treat cautiously companies 
with significant Big Bang exposure. 
Nevertheless, it would also be short- 
sighted not to recognise that several of 
the major financial conglomerates have 
concentrations of considerable talent, 
and understand the risks they are taking. 
There is no better band at the game than 
David Scholey and teams with the 
names of Warburg, Akroyd and Rowe & 
Pitmando not become poor teams 
overnight. 

The joker in Mercury’s pack is Saul 
Steinberg who has an enlarged stake in 
the company and undefined intentions. 
Mr Steinberg not doubt has mixed 
feelings about the latest figures. On the 
one hand they add force to his argument 
that Mercury's management are doing 
nothing to enhance the group's share 
value. On the other hand, he can see the 
difficulties Mercury feces, in spades. For 
its part Mercury can only sit and wait 
for Saul's next move. 


Moves at the Noble House 


T he relationship of Jardine 
Malheson with Hong Kong has 
been as emotionally close over the 
years as might be expected of any group 
which has had such a formative 
influence on an entire, thriving econ- 
omy. Recent fracas have centred prin- 
cipally on the controlling families' 
understandable priority of preserving 
their own interests. 

This maH<» them distinctly unpopular, 
for instance, when they transferred 
domicile abroad at the depth of local 
depression before the Anglo-Chinese 
agreement made the departing Crown 
colony a much-favoured destination 
for international investment The col- 
lapse of the Hong Kong property market 
around that time was encapsulated in 
the travails of Hong Kong Land, 
Jardine's principal offshoot and asso- 
ciate, which took long and painful 
surgery to restore to its prime position 
among the world's property companies. 

Today, as in a previous boom, the 
greatest corporate threat to the Jardine 
empire comes from being taken over. 
The main local contenders are, as once 
before. Li Kashing and Sir Yuekong 
Pao, who must see the greatest of the old 
British hongs, "Noble House" itself, as 
the ultimate symbolic prize. But inter- 
national money, most immediately 
from Australia is eyeing Jardine from a 
different direction. 

The Keswick family has now moved 


decisively to repair its corporate finan- 
cial defences, which were instantly 
erected via cross-holdings during the 
last takeover scare but had to be partly 
dismantled during the subsequent time 
of Hong Kong Land’s triaL 

The proposed new structure, which 
seems to owe something to the yet more 
tangled arrangements of the South 
African Oppenhiemer Anglo 
American/De Beers empire, turns 
Jardine Securities into a new master 
intermediate holding company with a 
function justly described in the name 
Jardine Strategic Holdings. The family 
would control almost half of this, which 
is about as much protection as can now 
be managed. Provided only that the 
group can resist attack while it is 
erecting its new defences, it will have 
resolved one of Hong Kong’s greatest 
financial uncertainties. 

Given that all-important proviso, it 
still remains to be seen bow far the 
present taipan Simon Keswick will have 
tied himself up in the process and 
thereby restricted his room for 
manouevre in a fast-c hang in g Hong 
Kong corporate scene. 

It is hard to envisage any financial 
arrangement being permanent in the 
current ferment of Hong Kong. If there 
is one unchanging force, it is 
approapriaie that it should be Jardine, 
even though its once-overwhelming 
influence has gone for ever. 



^ — 
leer’s 
istic’ 
in 

Mechanical en- 
the £8,000 be 
Portfolio Gold 
•terday to good 

(e my gramo- 

■ my donation 
all appeal and 
ext year," Mr 

of Altestree, . 

id 51, who has 

■ Gold since it 
ones, said that 
ieve his lock, 
fantastic. It is . 
ce.” 

I cards can be 
(ding a staro- 
■nvelope to: 



iVoOd 


er of 

Ives 

jer 

Voniig 

i in brewing 
nkers and, in 
en kill them. 
Dr Real Ale 

: campaign's 
t's Brewing, 
tz, a former 
1 Beer Guide, 
who have 
rr breathing 
disorders, 
d are allergic' 
can suffer ill 
ing beers in 
have been 
uce a foamv 
•ity, or to 

States,' the 
* than 40 
eart attacks 
TS used co- 
t beer to 
nghead. 


Storm over Electra 
fund management 


A bitter dispute has broken 
out at Electra Investment 
Trust over the management of 
one of its venture capital 
fluids. 

A confidential memoran- 
dum passed to The Times 
over the weekend is heavily 
critical of Electra for. its 
“incompetence" in its han- 
dling of investments made in 
two unquoted companies. 

The memorandum, written 
by Mr Brian Johnson, a 
consultant called in by Electra 
to manage two companies in 
its Electra Risk Capital 1 fund 
(Eric I) and dated November 
12, 1985, was sent to Mr 
Michael Stoddart, chairman 
of Electra, Mr Michael Bent- 
ley, deputy chairman, and Mr 
Chve Clague, an Electra main 
board director. 

Eric 1 raised £8-6 million in 
1981, investing it in 32 com- 
panies. The value of the fund 
had plunged as 21 of the 
companies have other gone 
into receivership or been sold 
for a nominal amount. 

Mr Johnson's memoran- 
dum focuses on Electro's 


By Lawrence Lever 
investment in Independent 
Computer Engineering (Ice) — 
the latest Eric 1 fund casualty, 
which went into receivership 
on October 30. Electra in- 
vested £500,000 in this com- 
pany through Eric 1 and 
£250,000 through a later ven- 
ture capital fund. Both invest- 
ments nave had to be written 
off. 

Electro, with the Globe 
Investment Trust, also pro- 
vided loans to Ice, believed to 
be in the region of £750,000. 

Mr Johnson says in the 
memorandum that a report on 
Ice which Electro commis- 
sioned from him “was most 
damning of Electro's role in 
controlling Ice." Mr Johnson, 
a former managing director of 
NMW Computers, accuses 
Electra in the memorandum 
of failing to arrange “an 
orderly dose down” in the 
event of liquidation. 

He also criticizes Electra for 
not checking Ice’s - accounts 
and for not fully investigating 
Ice's, financial position before 
calling in the receiver. 

“I can only express my 
dismay feat Electra behaved 


in such a cavalier manner," he 
says. 

Mr Claque said yesterday: 
“Hie story of Ice is a sad and 
unhappy one. There are two 
sides to fee story, but we don't 
want to get publicly involved. 
We do not make it a practice 
of pulling the plug on our 
investments." 

Mr Johnson yesterday de- 
clined to comment on the 
memorandum. 


Company wins 
China deals 

Black Clawson Inter- 
national, the Newport, Gwent, 
paper machinery manufac- 
turer, has signed three con- 
tracts worth £3 million wife 
Ch i na. 

The contracts, signed in 
Peking by the company's 
managing director, Mr Eric 
Langdon, brings to six the 
number of contracts the com- 
pany has signed with China 
The deals involve supplying 
production equipment for 
turning bamboo into packag- 
ing grade material. 


Oxford team wins £25,000 
prize for super magnets 


Britain’s highest award for 
innovative engineering and 
technology, the £25.000- 
McRobert Award, was pre- 
sented in London yesterday, 
by the Duke of Edinburgh to 
three men from the Oxford 
Instruments Group. 

The winners were: Mr John 
Woodgaie. executive director, 
Mr BUI Proctor, a physicist 
and engineering director, and 
Mr Ian McDougall, a met- 
allurgist, who joined the group 
in 1979, to help Mr Proctor 
build the first magnet for 
whole-body scaanrog- 

The three men hod teams 
developing superconducting 
magnets. The magnets are 
used mainly for nuclear mag- 
netic resonance spectroscopy, 
and magnetic resonance 
imaging. 

Oxford Instruments pio- 
neered fee magnets:. It has 
received orders worth £250 
million, mostly for export 
markets: 



Winners: John Woodgate (left) BOl Proctor, Ian McDougall 


The award was set up in 
1968 to honour individuals or 
small teams m a k i n g an 
outstanding innovative 
development in engineering or 
the physical technologies, wife 
em phasis on the contribution . 
ihai the development had 
made to Britain’s prosperity. 

Previous awards have been 
made for fee superstructure of 
the Severn Bridge, the longest 


in the world when it was 
designed, the EMI .comput- 
erized brain scanner and a 
mechanical process to speed 
up fee drying of forage crops, 
which has sold 54,000 units 
worth £163 million to 2Q 
countries. 

The award is administered 
by the Fellowship of Engineer- 
ing, which examined 23 
applications this year. 


Lead and 
zinc prices 
‘to slow’ 

By Richard Lander 

The sharp advances seen in 
.zinc and lead prices on fee 
London Metal Exchange 
(LME) this year are unlikely to 
be repeated in 1 987, according 
toShearson f eh mao Brothers, 
the metal trading firm. 

Both metals have been 
driven higher this year by 
supply disruptions, such as the 
one at the Broken Hill mines 
in Australia, where an indus- 
trial dispute baited production 
oflead and zinc for almost two 
months and forced fee closure 
of the Port Pine smelter. 

Looking at lead, Sbearson 
analyst, Mr Stephen Briggs, 
predicts that a revival of mine 
production in 1987 will lead to 
a reduction in stocks of just 
10,000 tonnes, compared with 
an estimated 95,000 tonne 
shortfall in 1986. 

“Now that most of the 
supply disruptions have either 
been resolved or discounted, 
we believe feat there are no 
longer strong long-term rea- 
sons for lead to move consid- 
erably higher.” he said. 

However Western 
consumption, of which nearly 
60 per cent comes from car 
batteries, should continue to 
grow slowly over the next two 
years. Mr Bnggs is forecasting 
an average LME cash price of 
£305 a tonne next year, below 
the current £337 price. 

For zinc, Mr Briggs is 
forecasting a small market 
surplus in 1987 after a 1 60,000 
tonne deficit this year,, with a 
rise in non-communist de- 
mand partially offset by a 
continued decline in exports 
to China. Production from 
mines and secondary sources, 
assuming an absence of strikes 
disruptions, is likely to 
reach a record 5.05 million 
tonnes, around 4.8 per cent up 
on this year. 

“There is little reason to 
expect much overall price 
strength for next year as a 
whole (unless there is) signifi- 
cant rationalization of capac- 
ity or further unpredictable 
disruption,” the report said. 

Shearson estimates that 
cash prices should average 
£535 a tonne next year. Prices 
stand around this -level at 
present, having fallen back 
from a year's peak of £632 in 
earty October, 


The Bowring Bowl. 
Which way on December 9? 



Oxford v Cambridge, Twickenham, December 9 at 2.00 pm 


Whatever the direction of your support this year the signs 
are pointing to another fascinating struggle between these 
traditional rivals. 

Bowring is one of the world’s foremost insurance and 
reinsurance broking organisations and this is the eleventh 
year that they have taken responsibility for the complete 
sponsorship of The Varsity Match. The Bowring Bowl is 
the symbol of that sponsorship. 

Alt roads lead to Twickenham on December 9 so pick up 
the telephone now and book your place. 


Sponsored by 

Bowring 

C T Bowring & Co Limited 

The Bownng BuiBing. Tower Place. London EC 3 P 3 BE 
Tel- 01-283 3100 Tetex 882191 

A MjjmW' tf Mirin 4 iKLAnln CumparoU Inc 

Credit Card Ticket Bookings Tel: 01-891 5969 Visa 3 Access D 


eal 


nan couple 
last July for 
king red uc- 
nces. 

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• sentences 
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be Central 




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BUS I ■ 






( TEMPUS ) 


ILG climbs out of 
earnings trough 


The package tour market is 
dominated by two big op- 
erators who between them 
have more than 50 per cent of 
the market International 
Thomson has a 28 per cent 
market share while Inter- 
national Leisure Group 
(ILG) has 23 per cent Ho- 
rizon is third with 8 per cent 

Cut-throat competition has 
reduced the attractions of 
being in the package tour 
business. Demand for holi- 
days has gr own steadily over 
the years but not as rapidly as 
the growth in capacity. In- 
tense competition has lead to 
some suicidal discounting 
and dedining margins. 

Nevertheless, International 
Leisure Group showed yes- 
terday that it has managed to 
pull itself out of its earnings 
trough of 1985. Pretax profit 
before aircraft sales rose to 
£&2 milli on for the six 
months to September 30, 
compared with £8.8 million 
lastyear. 

There are three main rea- 
sons. Increasing holiday vol- 
umes has reduced unit 
overheads, it sold 90 per cent 
of its summer 1986 holidays 
at full brochure prices and its 
aircraft capacity was up - 
and ILG has one of the 
highest capacity utilization 
rates in the world. Each plane 
is in the air for nearly 13 
hours a day averaged 
throughout the year. 

The efficiency of its airline 
has convinced ILG that it can 
compete effectively on sched- 
uled routes to Europe. It is 
now pitching hard for the 
right to operate 1 1 routes to 
complement its tour business 
but there will be determined 
opposition from the en- 
trenched operators. 

The group predicts that the 
package tour market as a 
whole will grow by 10 per 
cent next summer and that its 
share will grow to 27 per cent 
It should therefore sell 2.1 
mill ion summer holidays 
compared with 1.5 million 
last summer. 

In anticipation, ILG is 
increasing its aircraft and 
holds in time for the next 
summer season. But this will 
result in increased overheads 
and the second half trading 
loss will be higher than last 
year’s to give a full year 
pretax profit of £15 million. 

Of this, it is estimated that 
the airline wQI contribute 
two-thirds and the tour busi- 
ness one-third. 

Bookings for next year’s 
holidays are up 36 percent on 
this time last year but the real 
test is the post-Christmas 
selling period. The shares arc 
not expensive but fears of 
heavy discounting next 
spring may make investors 
cautious. 



BPB Industries 

BPB. known for its low key 
approach to Gty liaison, 
appears to take a pride in, 
producing results which bear 
littl e relation to analysts’ 
forecasts. Even on the rare 
occasions that the pretax 
figure is in line with expecta- 
tions, the constituent parts 
are usually awry. 

Yestenfey's interims were 
no exception. Operating prof- 
its rose a 53 per cent on 
turnover up 22 per cent. The 
most noticeable increase 
came from France where 
more sensible pricing has 
prevailed. Exchange rains 
also contributed to the three- 
fold profits increase. 

Canada is doing wed, 
helped by volume and price 
gains. There are no signs of 
this supposedly cyclical mar- 
ket turning down. 

BPB’s British results re- 
main something of a mystery. 
Admittedly, they contain 
more than results of plaster 
and plasterboard, but even 
taking into account the ab- 
sence of a price increase in 
two years, the performance is 
disappointing. 

The second half is untikeiy 
to move ahead as strongly as 
the first half, hit even so a 
pretax profit for the year of 
£140 million is achievable. 
The shares are on a p/e of 
11.5 times. . 

If BPB manages to main- 
tain this sort of profits perfor- 
mance there is no reason why 
the shares should not regain 
their premium rating. 

However, if the European 
Commission ruled against 
BPB in a case of complaint 
from a Spanish importer, 
sentiment could be adveisty 
affected. 

Dawson Int 

If Dawson International’s re- 
cent investments are any- 
thing to £0 by, th ermal 
underwear is more exciting 
that one thinks. In the last 
two years, the group has spent 
£40 million buying two busi- 


nesses in the - United States 
with a combined market 
share of 40 per cent 

The prospects for increas- 
ing sales to the last growing 
leisurewear market are 
considerable. 

The move into America is 
part of Dawson's strategy to 
broaden the base of its busi- 
ness. The company’s reputa- 
tion arises from its dominant 
position in the high-quality 
branded knitwear market 
However, the - management 
appears keen to grow fester 
than f his Tyiatim* bus iness will 
allow. 

Diversifications into wool- 
len carpet yarns, high quality 
weaving, shower curtains, fur 
fabric and velvets have all 
been part of the same policy. 
S ignifican t market shares 
characterize these businesses. 

Looking at the current 
year, the absence of tourists 
on London's streets knocked 
20 per cent off British knit- 
wear sales. However, exports 
which acoount for 80 per cent 
of knitwear tnrnover, were 
helped by favourable cur- 
rency movements and virtu- 
ally made up for the 
downturn. 

Unfortunately, retailers 
who are buying now for next 
Spring are still destocking, so 
the second half of the year 
will also reflect poor domes- 
tic knitwear demand. Look- 
ing further ahead, the fruits of 
recent capital investment 
throughout the group have 
stiB to be enjoyed. 

For the year as a whole, 
Dawson should make £46 
milli on giving earnings per 
share of 19.5p. This puts the 
shares chi a price earnings 
ratio of 1 1.7 times. 

Although analysts are 
breathing sighs of relief be- 
cause yesterday’s results were 
better that they had expected, 
it may need the full year 
figures and an optimistic 
statement about the future to 
restore their confidence 
totally. 

In the meantime the dares 
are showing signs of 
bottoming out 


Canadian 
bank saved 

The Hongkong and Shang- 
hai Bank is to rescue an aumg 
Canadian bank following a 
plea from the Canadian 
authorities. 

The Hongkong Bank is 



which will be merged with the 
1 2 branches of the Hong Kong 
Bank of Canada. In return the 
Hongkong Bank wiD get 41 
brandies and assets of Ca- 
nadian $2,876 billion, depen- 
dent on pending legislation 
Nine months ago the bank's 
assets totalled Canadian 
$3.25 billion 


PRUDENTIAL COUP: The 
company has completed its 
acquisition of Jackson National 
life Insurance Co (JN L). 
SIMON ENONHERINGcTbe 
company has acquired Ootm G 
R Booth (Holdings) for an 
initial £3 minion, to be satisfied 
by payment of £2 million in cash 
and by the issue of 316,455 new 
Simon ordinary shares. De- 
ferred consktentioo, not ex- 
pected to exceed £1 nunkm, 
may be payable in 1990. 
depending on the average in- 
crease in Booth's profits m the 
next three yean. Booth’s prin- 
cipal activity b the provision of 
road haulage and w ar eho us ing 
for bulk such as 

petroleum, coke and fertilizers. 
UTD GUARANTEE: The com- 
pany is pro p osing a fin an cial 
reconstruction which will in- 
volve a subscription of 
7,306.639 new ordinary at lOp 
per share and a oce-fbr-one 
rights issue of 12,983^54 shares 
at lOp per share. 

PROPERTY TRUST; Figures 
in £000 fix' six months to 


ITC wins right to fight 




calculated on the average share 
capital loss per share; 0_24p 
(1.8). Proposed underwritt e n 
rights issue of 226,638,133 new 
ordinary of Ip each at ISp per 
share and proposals for revised 
capital reorganization. 

• NORSCOT HOTELS: 
Pfcasnrama has bought 46^00 
ordinary shares at iSlp, 1,000 
ordinary at 180p and 351,000 
ordinary at 179p. This gives it a 
6.97 per cent stake. 

• HALL ENGINEERING: 
Regentcrest and its associates 
now own a total of 1,285,000 
ordinary shares (9.06 per cent). 

• J S PATHOLOGY: First 
interim dividend l-5p. Figures 
m £000. Turnover 3^94 (2,808), 
pretax profit 1,506 (1,152), tax 
560 (4811 earnings per share 
7.9p (5.9). The directors are 
confident that the year will show 


The International Tin 
Council was given permission 
in the High Court yesterday to 
move to strike out a winding 
up petition being brought 
against it by Amahgamaicd 
Metal Trading. 

Hearing of the motion will 
begin on December 8 
Objections to the starting 
date by Amalgamated, one of 
11 London Metal Exchange 
broking firms fighting to re- 
cover £165 million they daim 
the ITC owes them, were 


COMPANY NEWS 


“a satisfactory outcome. 1 ’ After 
an approach from Mctpath 
(UK) and its US parent com- 
pany, Coming Glass Works, I S 
Pathology has agreed to buy the 
trading business of Mctpath, a 
private clinical pathology lab- 
oratory operating in Britain and 
overseas. The initial consid- 
eration is £4.6 million, payable 
on completion. Further consid- 
eration may be payable on an 
ascending scale, depending on 
ihe {XHnmned turnover of mJSP - 
and Mctpath. After pufaficatiop 
of its accounts for the year to 
March 31,1987 JSP intends to 
apply for admission to the 
official list. 

• ANGUA TELEVISION 
GROUP: Shareholders have 
overwhelmingly voted in favour 
of the recommended proposals 
fix' the e nfranch i seme nt of 
Anglia's non-voting A shares. 

• PHXSBUBY CO: Applica- 
tion has been made to the 
council of the Stock Exchange to 
admit 45,436,990 shares of com- 
mon stock without par value to 
the official list pursuant to a 
two-for-ooe stock split to 
shareholders on the register at 
November 3. 

• BRYANT HOLDINGS; At 
the topping-out ceremony of the 
Pavilions m the centre of Bir- 
mingham the c hair man, Mr 
Chris Bryant, said that the 
Pavilions, a £55 million project, 
and other developments meant 
that the company’s property 
development operation would 
moia» an increasingly important 
contribution to the group from 
which the existing shareholders 
deserved to benefit. He added 
that “ p ro je ct s tike the Pavilions 
demonstrate that Bryant does 
not need English China Clays or 
any other company." In view of 
the company's re co r d and pros- 
pects it had every reason to 
remain independent. 

• STANDARD CHAR- 
TERED: The company is to 
issue $300 milli on of undated 
primary capital floating rate 


From Our Correspondent 


overruled by the Vice Chan- 
cellor, Sir Nicolas Browne- 
WiDdnson. 

Mr Richard Sykes QC, for . 
the ITC said the baas for its 
application was that its st a tus 
was governed by international 

law and not by English domes- 
tic law. “It is immune from, 
and oatside, the jurisdiction of 
the English courts,” he said. 

By making the application, 
he said, the ITC did not 
“waive its immunity and 
privileges." 


notes (series 4X ofwbich S200 
■ millio n is being issued as an 
f pitial tranche, through an inter- 
national syndicate led by Stan- 
dard Chartered Merchant Bank 
and Credit Suisse First Boston. 
The issue price is par, and 
magm a wfl] be based on six- 
month Libor phis IS baas 
points payable twice yearly in 
arttan.The second tranche can 
be issued by the company Htany 
tim e until January, 1988. 
Application is being made to Hst 
the notes on the London Stock 


But there was a serious 
question to be tried of inter- 
national few and treaty obtiga- 
tions of Britain. 

* Tire Attorney Genoa) -was 
intervening in the case and 
was ready for the hearing to 
begin on December 8. But Mr 
Andrew Manitt QC, fbr- 
Amafeamated said that one of 
their legal ,pam would not be 
available until December 11 
The judge, however, said 
that the hearing should begin 
on December 8. 


Rebuff by 
Chrysalis 

Chiysalis, the quoted record 
company, has no dans, to link 
with Mr Richard Branson’s 
Virgin . Group, Mr - Chris 
Wnght, the Chrysalis chair- 
man, said yesterday. He con- 
finned that Virgin * had 
snapped Bp a near-4 per cent 
stake in ' fire £50 miffioa 
business. 

However, he said: “Mr 
Bra n so n should know that we 
are not for sale. I control 
neariy half fire sharesand lam 
not pfenning to sen.” 

Virgin wants to expand in 
foe United Stares where 
makes much of its 


_ REDLAND: Of the 
33,838,718 new ordinary shares 
of 25p each more than 93 per 
cent have been taken up unde r 
the rights issue. 

• SMITH KUNE BECKMAN 
CORPORATION: The com- 
pany is inviting sharahoMere to 
tender shares of its common 
stock at a price between $86 and 
$96 a share in a special pro- 
gramme beginning yesterday 
and continuing until midnight 
on December 26. The company 
is offering to purchasejbetween 5 
million and 15 rnfliinn of its 
shares. 

• PENTOS: Pentos Retailing 
Group, a subsidiary,- has ac- 
quired the capital of Hooks 
Bookshops. 

• ANGLO-AMERICAN 
AGRICULTURE: Mr David 
Pinsent told the annual meeting 
that the company is preparing to 
seek a fen Stock Exchange 
fisting in 1987. He said feat 
Doane-Western had increased 
Its — nrxVr i Mn www n t 
to 320^000 acres, and. that 
Anglo-American would be 
inaeasztg its in Define^ 
Western to 50 per cent. Negotia- 
tions were at an atfeanced stage 
for the acquisition of a citrus 
plantation, and it was intended 
to acquire SO per cent of the 
Congress Springs vineyards ’at 
Saratoga. California. Mr Pinsent 
added that the results for the 
rear to date . were 


RECENT ISSUES 


EQUITIES 


( 2 S 0 p) 


Ayi5 I 

bceM 

mmmmsn* (Top) 
| 8 l«nrx>im Exttb 
gfeten&BattsraM fl 

fsraSy 

Gsest 025 


UcrdooH 

Great Southern I 

asfri 

Loo, Ap se tar T atj 
Lloyds Chemist (tl 
Long Metropoftan] 
Mecca Latoya (Ite 
Mar ft SantbouM 
Mss Sam HMga (1 




Word Group 
RIGHTS ISSUES 

Backs Leisure HfP 
Bk» Arrow F/r 

Br. Bared Fjfl 

Code Cwm « 

GfmfiaM HfP 

Narfok &P-F/P 


rV 

sacNfi 




100+2 
130 
£1* 
1*1 
7714+1* 
tSO 1 * +1 
167 
86 

108+1 


3*i 

386 

71 

8-2 

27 

26 

73+18 

2 

2-1 

18 


(tapaa price In brackets). 


FOREIGN EXCHANGES 


STERLING SPOT AND FORWARD RATES 


27 

NYortt 1,4260-14310 
MontraOl.S742-l.9K5 

Ams-dan&20<fr^21B3 

Brass* 5&9S4923 
Crptma 107121-107811 
DuMn ums-urno - 
Fm*fa!t28358-2J477 

Lisbon 2107671058 

Madrid 191.51-19233 
MSsr) 196*29-197478 
Osto 10.7192-100008 
Paris 92847-03012 
Sfkhfcn 0828008875 
Tokyo 23173-23200 
Vtawa 1096-2098 
Zurich 28657-28672 - 


_ rg 

14290-1.4300 

19783-19811 

02131-22175 

5907-69- IS 
107389-107538 
1:0449-1.0459 . 

2841026457. 
21121-21243 

191-91-19219 

17B773-197340 

107804-108022 

0309*03285 

08701-04842 

23288-23273 

19892082 
28714-23752 
b 1975a 


iMMh S« 

066-053 pram 188-1. 

O50-O32prwn 148-1^ 

1*-1%pra 4K-4Vpnam 

K^srprsm IMttnm 



21-119da 

Gpram+tfis 
WX--n%cSa 
3-2pram . TOrtXprara 

1%-1pram 4%-3%pnm 

SWpram - Mftpma 

10%-9praar ZBiWSprwH 

1%-1WfNWH 4%-4pmni 

68.1 6734*3}. 


OTHER STERLING RATES 


DOLLAR SPOT HATES 



South Africa rand 
-UAEdMm 

UoydiBank 


Met suppled by tantaysBm* HOfCC sad BdsL 


TRADITIONAL OPTIONS 


Nov 17 
Dec 1 
DSC 15 


Nov 26 
Dsc 12 
Jai2 


Bromwich 

CaBriWi 


Fat) 19 
Mar 5 
Mar 19 

27f11£6 B arham 

_ , Cenrrord 

, London Sacs^ Vitold. JFB, Myson Group, 


For.. 

Msr2 
MarlS 
Mar 30 
Dank Group, West 
* Sears, LMari 
Aran Energy, 


Wnmfi o uaa & Rfefflon. TrioanWt, Dares Fita t s . Britan Land Co, Bsiax tmem a ttamu, 
Arlington Sacs^ A mfl otmnl c Hokflngs, P an Bmd industries, Campari MamadonaL 


Batov CH 

Put&fll 


Cat Tricanfot, Conroy Pat*. 


MONEY MARKETS AND GOLD 


EURO MONEY DEPOSITS % 


cal GX8X 
7 days 5%-6’u 1 mrth 616-6% 

3nmh 6mn» 



Jyske Bank, Denmark, is proud to 
announce the opening of a London Branch, 
with Licensed Deposit-Taker status, 
on 2nd December, 1986. 


Jutland House 
119-120 Chancery Lane 
London 
WC2A1HU 
Telephone: 01 831 2778 
Telex: 266093 jyskbk G 
Telefax: 01 405 2257 


ftJYSKE 
Sal? BANK 

London Branch 



esi 5-4 

7 days 4“a4^i 1 mnfi 4*h#- n * 

3mntti 4tt-4% Branfi 4%-4% 

nma linma cal 7MH 
7 days 1 mnth 716-714 

Smnlri 91+8X Bronth 8K-8K 
S Mssn an c cal 1K-K 
7 days 1V1% 1 ranBi 

Smith 4*10-3 8 mnth 4<*3»» 
Ym caB 414-356 

7 days 4"«*4»» : 1 mnth 4*-4* 
SrTrtri 4"i#-4 , n 5 mn*45WH 


GOLD 


<3c*t*aa25383L75 

fac^iji'^BLs^oo) 

PtaUmsn 

$46085(03585) 

*BcdudsaVAT 


ECGD 


Rxad Rata Starting Export Finance 
Schama IV Average rate ra nc o rata tor 
Maraat period October 8, 1986 to 
Octtar 31 1 1986 induatw 11237 par 


ge a ring Banka 11 
Finance House 11 


CNwrtgW HWt 1 
Weak mad: 10V 


% 

1014 Low 10 


las ik 

3 mnth 10*<w 


{Dta S^H 

2nm 10% 
3 aaiti I0»i* 


: BBaiDtscomtlU 

Jnwfc ID'J.-JOk 2mnft 10»37-1IF>n 
Smrtti 10 a sj-l0 , haBmnth 10%-10"i, 


la<Otscouni 1 l 4 

1 mnth 11*i« Zmntri II^k 

3mn9i11"K 6ramh 11% 

Ovemigbt: open 10% ctaaa 10% 

1 week 11 'iff -11 6mn«i 11^11% 

1 mnth 11 X- 11 *m 9 mnth 11*»1l% 

3m*> 12m 1 1J 7 w-11% 


Local Atrfhortty 
2 days 10% 
iron* 10% 

6 mnth 11% 


TjtoplO* 
3 mrfth 11% 
12mth 11 3 n 


1mrthll%-fl% 2imh 11%-11% 
Smntn TlH-11% 6 mnth 11V11K 
9 mnth 11 1^1 IS IZmth 11%-llS 

3mnm 11SW1% 
Branth 11%-iix ll>u>tt< M 


ii.«i Snqitti &9S480 
8 mnth 685-580 12 n« 585-580 


LONDON TRADED OPTIONS 



SmSm 

Jan 


Jiri 

Jan 

MS 

Apr 

M 



Mas 

. 

Dae 

Mi 

Mar 

Job 

Dec 

H 

Jn 

raoi) 

300 

330 

380 

15 

5 

1 

25 

15 

9 

33 

19 

10 

33 

82 

17 

.35 

65 

22 

.40 

SF 


500 

550 

600 

28 

5 

T 

56 

25 

15 

72 

40 

9 

43 

88 

30 

48 

90 

35 

55 

BP 

(-677) 

600 
• 060 
700 

- 90 
50 
20 

106 

67 

38 

£ 

53 

2 

11 

33 

10 

33 

55 

65 

Thorn ad . 
r480) 


420 

460 

500 

67. 

30 

6 

78 

48 
. 2« 

97 
• 65 

45 

1% 

8 

28 

4 

18 

35 

8 

23 

43 

Cone Goto 

C6SB) 

















600 

660 

90 

53 

110 

82 

127 

94 

10 

27 

22 

42 

30 

52 

Tosco 

(*379) 


330 

360 

55 

25 

42 

55 

% 

2 

11 

ia 

Oourtaulds- 

f324) 

' 260 

68 

80 

74 

60 

% 

. 2 




420 

1% 

11 

ia 

45 

48 

55 

300 

31 

<g 

3 

* 

12 


j 

Sarin 

Fab May Aog Fab May Aug 









BrftAaro 

(*499) 









Ocm Union 

C20J 

260 

280 

14 

7 

22 

13 

29 

21 

9 

24 

16 

31 

19 

34 

47 


480 

500 

.' 60 
35 

65 

45 

83 

55 

10 

23 

IS 

32 

21 

40 








BAT bids 
(*454) 



m gmg- 






Catto&WIre 

C3Z7) 

300 

325 

350 

40 

23 

9 

55 

37 

22 

68 

5 

15 

28 

14 

22 

36 

20 


390 

420 

460 

75 

50 

26 

83 

58 

35 

73 

52 

2 

5 

20 

4 

10 

27 

17 

30 









Barclays 

("474) 









CSC 

(187) 

160 

ISO 

30 

15 

38 

22 

44 

2B 

17 

1% 

8 

17 

4 

11 

22 

6 • 
12 

24 


500 

650 

20 

6 

32 

13 

42 

32 

80 

40 

85 

45 





BritTWaoom 

P®) 



— 


35 

23 

3 

11 

76 

— 


Grand Mat 

T458) 

360 

380 

107 

77 

112 

83 


1 

1 

3 

6 

14 

27 

18 

33 


200 

220 

10% 

4 

19 

10 

14 

27 

T9 


460 

24 

40 

55 

18 

CadtaySchnppa 

160 

180 

200 

28 
. 12 
5 

32 

20 

11 

37 

25 

4 

10 

24 

7 

10 

18 

«C> 

(1073) 

S50 

142 

155 

115 

80 

53 

140 

110 

83 

4 

8 

17 

35 

60 

a • 

45 

72 



27 

1050 

1100 

55 

25 

16 

42 

Guinness 

(320) 


300 

330 

360 

40 

17 

9 

45 

26 

14 

58 

38 

23 

6 

20 

40 

S 

25 

45 

17 

28 

48 


300 

330 



81 

38 

1% 

7 





r340) 

20 

30 

13 

18 


360 

4 

1* 

19 

23 

24 

28 

Ladbraka 


330 

40 

50 

58 

5 

9 

13 

Marks & Span 
(188) 

180 

200 

14 

5 

24 

13 

30 

19 

2% 

13 

6 

16 

7 

19 

CSS5) 


360 

390 

22 

11 

32 

18 

40 

26 

15 

38 

22 

42 

27 

45 

220 

1 

5 

9% 

32 

_JJL 

36 

LASMO 


130 

25 

29 


5 

9 



ShelTfens 

f«0) 

850 

900 

109 

87 

120 

86 

138 

106 

.3 

16 

20 

37 

30 

47 

P43} 


140 

160 

18 

10 

23 

15 

38 

20 

11 

23 

14 

26 

16 

28 

950 

37 

55 

rs 

37 

62 

72 

tactond Bank 


500 

75 

92 

.102 

62 

82 

5 

14 

IB 

Tmtatgar House 
(*285) 

•' 260 
280 

29 

18 

38 

27 

45 

36 

2 

12 

10 

18 

14 

21 

C651) 


550 

600 

38 

13 

52 

22 

20 

55 

30 

62 

37 

65 

300 

9 

17 

24 

26 

29 

33 

PSO ■ 


480 

58 

72 

87 

5 

10 

15 

TSB 

70 

80 

90 

10 12% 

3 TL 

1 2% 

14% 

9 

5 

1 

4% 

14 

2% 

6% 

IS 

3% , 
7% 
15% 

C504) 


500 

550 

35 

10 

48 

19 

62 

30 

18 

50 

25 

57 

32 

63 


Sadat 

Dec 

tar 

Job 

Ok 

Mar 

Jon 

RBCW 

p74) 


160 

160 

23 

11 

30 

16 

38 

22 

7 

14 

28 

9 

17 

32 

10 

22 














m • 


(*416) 

390 

420 

460 

30 

9- 

1% 

so 

32 

13 

62 

43 

24 

2 

11 

45 

8 

22 

48 

15 

30 

55 

RTZ 

(*870) 


600 

660 

700 

95 

60 

35 

112 

77 

48 

92 

84 

10 

22 

50 

19 

37 

57 

48 

67 





48 

33 

20 













r232j 

220 

240 

14 27 

3 15% 

2% 

12 

8 

17 

11 - 
24 

Vart Reefs 

(*78) 


70 

80 

90 

IS 17% 

8 11 

19 

13% 

4% 

8% 

a 

ii 

8 

13% 

BTB 

rzaoj 

280 

300 

8% 

23 

IS 

30 

20 

6 

12 

26 

18 

30 






15% 

17% 



307 

2 

— 

““ 

30 

— 



-Series 

Mar 

Jta 


Bara 

(739) 

6SD 

700 

750 

95 

GO 

17 

105 

© 

40 

120 

8Q 

55 

2 

5 

28 

5 

15 

40 

10 

30 

55 

LonrtTO 

(*227) 


200 

220 

34 

20 

41 

28 

32 

3 

11 

7 

17 

20 

BtoaOrda 

(*647) 

600 

650 

700 

58 

23 

7 

80 

58 

92 

65 

4 

23 

58 

12 

32 

20 

40 



260 

5 

8% 


41 

43 


Da Been 

(*75^ 

650 

700 

750 

800 

110 

140 

— 

3 

20 

50 

70 

100 


Sadat 

Nov 

Fab Mar 

Nov 

Fab 

Wy 

<3 

18 

85 

80 

130 

105 

90 

29 

60 

60 

85 

Tr 11*% 1991 
(*£102) 


100 

102 

104 

1% 

*!■ 

2*sj 

1*w 

*>B 


% 

1% 

*»» 

Obtoos 

r3Z7) 

300 

330 

360 

00 

10 

2 

44 

28 

13 

58 

42 

28 

2% 

12 

34 

6 

15 

34 

10 

20 

38 

Tr 11%% 03/07 
(*2107) 


104 

106 

% 

4% 

2% 

3% 

»w 

I'm 

3*.* 

?« 

7*» 

*18 

3% 

4% 

Vm 

8 

2% 

3% 

«'!• 

Tn 

8% 

GKN 

(TO) 

240 

260 

280 

900 

36 

19 

9 

3 

46 

30 

20 

12 

51 

37 

25 

1 

7 

15 

31 

4 

11 

20 

33 

a 

is 

26 



110 

112 

114 

*!• 

V 

’» 

1* 

>»* 

7 i« 

2% 

M* 

IX 

QMxo 

(*907) 

900 

850 

1000 

1060 

27 

72 

100 

77 

55 

15 

50 

86 

148 

35 

82 

105 

146 

47 

72 

110 


Nov 

Dae" 

Jan 


Nov 

Dec 

Jan 

rtb 

2 

2 

30 

16 

FT-SE IBS 
India ■ 1560 

110 

86 

?0 

52 

37 

23 

15 

8 

loi 

82 

65 

50 

35 

2S 

— 

% 

% 

% 

1 

3 

20 

45 

70 

"i 

10 

— 

Hanson 

C200) 

160 

180 

200 

220 

41% 44% — 

22 26% 33 

6% 14% 21% 
16*12 

% 

1% 

6 

21 

1% 

4 

11 

23 

"i 

14 

25 

* 1600 
1625 

iron 

35 

10 

2 

1% 

% 

75 

60 

45 

37 

11 

17 

25 

36 

52 

75 

18 

27 

38 

47 

62 

30 

40 

50 

67 








27,19 


Total contacts 25737 . (Ms 16127. Mb 6910. 

FT-8E indax. CaSarraoi . Putar1319 


Itodsiffing sactatty price. 


LONDON FINANCIAL FUTURES 


Dec 86 — 

Mar 87 — 

Junfl7 — 

Sap 87 — 

Dec 87 — 

Mar8S — 

Pravtous day's Ml open Maraet 1S901 


Open 

raw 


Lew 

88.64 

Ctoaa 

88.70 

■ EstVel 
839 

86.76 

>8879 

8BJ2 

88.79 

1069 

89.16 

89.16 

8M7 

89.11 

27 

89.16 

89.16 . 

89.16 

88.14 

‘17 

NT 



89JX) 

0 

NT 

•>ndGnm 

— 

■•■•ia 

88.78 

0 


Three Montn Eurodotor 

Dec 88 

Mar 87 

Jun 87 

Sep 87 

USTnaamySond 

Dae 86 

Mar 87 

Jun 87 


Dec 88 

Mar 87 

Jun 87 


SffL 

Mar 87 

Jun 87 — 
Sap 87 — 

FT-SE100 
0ac86 — . 
Mar 87 


94JH 

94.09 

9102 

9280 

9907 

96-16 

NT 


9948 

NT 

NT 


107-18 

107-25 

NT 

NT 

18380- 

186.73 


_ fVavfousdayst 
9481 9388 

94.10 9487 

9402 9480 

9382 9380 

Ftavtous 
99-16 
9924 98-15 


9488 

9481 

9381 


671 

728 

164 

147 


(mates* 3019 
„'15 311 

9823 102 

97-26 0 


* 96-19 0 


Ewd^dJ^Sictaopon taoreat 1B219 
10325 107-10 10808 8814 


10601 


107-17 


108-18 

108-18 


23497 

0 

0 


Previous i 
18480 W... 

16875 168.43 


total 


totafB8t2726 
KS1B0 400- . 
16640 100 - 


UNILEVER N.V. 

«% RHiraMABU! CUMUUUMI MCFEMNCESUMHAraS OF Ft 12 

B8UEDBv«MtNHiBiiAiinscHADaniisniArKBN^^nwni)ai 


London FC3N40A; 

NordiamBanfc UmiHt Zttaha9MC BMtaan 2S: 

Smwta»Oacmimani.Stndt^ Emheaga.1 BrakCM^BAbridg^ 

OntadtoBaak PUX 30 SL Vtamt naoa. Gtagow 
ara — » tama aBB amtato fcrraeWhy8aWtaUKannact S ad4M toa m 

°* * at¥T, * ,km » *» pmardura.maarecaw.w. 

D©u«GES M en^nal Noma (or ea nfiea ta of WMm ni Atwond h. 
SUSPBRJED tarn 12 Oaoantor W96 U 28 DaMflfar 1SB6 both dm * 

CaraficaM onty ba tcooM for wtango aim 28 OaeaiAw anwldad AH >1 

dntanto d a ctotd pn or mdwdamtoraba wd SSd. 

N-V. NEDEJtLANDSCH’AMlINISTRAnB- ENTRUSTXAMTOQR 

1g ndon>w>arOffi o«.U n i W» »rlli,i— Wa 4 t. lai ^ London EC4 p4iiQ 
*• •fflfffcOPGf IWi. 

1 c uM yuram pntJWHLfe oraqtMAL W iWB 

_ ^«W^^ ta ^«frtMto2JmaraiaB7aBto«ai*rBrita«ifCauponife73 
CmaioramoitotoaOTwqnBqfitoi^Aawtoitof ^ m. toi rnv ^L jL^ 


Jsasaass'ssaa^ «=*• 






FRIDAY NOVEMBER 28 1986 


STOCK EXCHANGE PRICES 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


From your portfolio card check your 
eight share price movements, on ibis pa p* 
only. Add ‘them up to give yon your 
owalF. total and check this against the 
daily dividend figure, if h matches, you 
have won outright or a share or the iota) 
daily pnze money stated. If you are a 
winner follow the churn procedure on the 
back of your card. You most always have 
your cud available- when clai ming 


Equities mark time 


— old ‘ 


ACCOUNT DAYS: Dealings began Moods 

§Forwaid 


gs end December 5. §Contaugo day December 8. Settlement day December 1 5. 
are permitted on two previous business days. 


Where stocks have only one price quoted, these are middle prices taken deBy at 5pm. Yield, change and P/E ratio are calculated on the middle price 


© Tbno Nn»i»>w Linweed 

DAILY DIVIDEND 

£8,000 

Claims required for 
+50 points 

Claimants should ling 0254-53272 


leer’s 

istic’ 





El 

wr x \‘f: ■■ l r - "** i 






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297 3*8 Awe 
re 52 And 
2 TB 144 «rm 


Please lake account of any 
minus signs 


Weekly Dividend 



ft 


% SIKW 

m 1 
m re ft* 

73 54 Do K 
VS 51 f odwad Ktg 

MS TUB BUS 1 Mr M 
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258 T» HKWM 

re « hmmur 

2*4 144 Haymd tKn 
643 m &W & ra 
SB SMSM 
m 126 Butte Jctem 

m jratqssgn 

488 205 UtooW 
484 25S DO W . 

us *r 

248 T26 INgwU Saw 
349 178 MB 
135 Ml Uatar 
2» 161 UbkMU 


BRITISH FUNDS 


1ST SB Uwi ltad 
448 3M UcMpn* (Mom) 
304 2M IMtotky * s 
288 171 Mv H 
« 23 BJfer OU)) 
S5« m ess* M 
444 306 Ma*ro (MM 
B2D 798 XteWr" 
243 M3 IMWghM Brick 
249 ITS Pmtomaa 
MO 74 AU Tot* 
395 ZS5 Pastas 
688 440 MB 
471 312 fladUd 
323 188 MmoM 

m mvAoiy chow 

142 87 Stawtnw 

87 70 CM|D 
SIS 342 TtoDE 
348 ZXVTtaor Htaxtaw 
2D2 ire T*wj Gran - 
436 2W IMilMi 

•mi re tw«_ 

205 ire Tmjfr 
SSI w5 write* 

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204 172 MM 

98 67 total Bm 
181 41 WUbi 

290 t57 HUM (Damn, 
Z2S 120 W*wM*W 


80 +1 




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310 

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04 

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185 121 On Mton 

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110 55 MB M 
130 T6 toms 
118 a torts 
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#'i « -<• . 347 

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287 JOB • .. 7S ZB ISO 

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B 5 OB 7 1 72 79 

134 MS S3 17 31S 

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1 B 2 187 51 11 210 

m soa . . iu u iu 

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215 217 •+* 10 M 0.7 

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80 84 O 52 MS 

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HB 4 1 B 84 70 7.4 MB 

54 57 +2 .222 

270 280 -3 18 14 M 3 

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» « -3 SS 75 83 


a is a a *t? 


HB 4 1 BS 4 70 70 MB 

54 57 +2 .222 

270 280 -3 18 14 03 

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255 251 .. Mjb S 6 US 

» « -3 SS 75 83 

513 sre +7 200 35 213 

MS ire *8 80 51 

560 583 . . «4 29 136 

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50 60 200 

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101 104 • +, 51 50 IDS 


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1 + 1 86 64 244 

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+3 


OVERSEAS TRADERS 


INSURANCE 


86 2B ftagwnfe 

^’§£2X T<1 * 

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43 23 hton 

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U5 132 KoytSkM 
m isj u* . 

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294 aun e*a 

415 273 Basse* 

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336 257 can Um 

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684 29-.HX* A Udsi 
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667 782 bSST 
415 321 StfWMG* 
489 346 Stout mrw 
445 380 Saga (Mo* 

772 620 SW Marcs 
927 772 San L4o 
12406 Tate Unto 


200 206 g+«4 MS 00 

tS4 - +4 100 52 . 

625 42 ... 

264 ■ -4 «3 13 .. 

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BOO 882 +2 44J 52 

259 261 .. 17.4 ft7 . 

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765 770 «+4 420 55 213 

467 470 • -2 3500 75 70 

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620 826 *45 270 44 901 

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until) 

OtZM WSM 
Pasrun Tocti 

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5* 

Sna D> or 
sw Bros 
Tam Rcaisier 
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143 •. 100 71 I2S 

88 • . 59 50 

455 -3 at, 63 22.9 

488 *41 259 5J 380 

34S 179 50 126 

-A 171 75 113 

75 -4 16 49 120 

08 s+3 03 33 74 

265 • . 93 33 73 

189 *+13 76 40 36 

BS5 • 229 36 Mfl 

& :i ,07 4, SJ 


nechanlcal en- 
the £ 8,000 be 
Portfolio Gold 
tterday to good 

te my graroo- 

■ my donatiOD 
all appeal and 
ext year,” Mr 

of AUestree, 

2d 51 , who has 

■ Gold since it 
faies, said that 
teve his lock, 
fantastic. It is . 
ce.” 

I cards can be 
iding a stam- 
mveiope to: 

I. 


PAPER, PRINTING, ADVERTG 


Idvestmant Tnrets appear on Page 26 


FfaencM ihnte appear on Page 26 


CHEMICALS, PLASTICS 



snt « WCffl B/V Bom 
235 10 Mot Mato 

4S5 366 Mw 
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158 132 BIP 
no BH>9aeri*eD 
132 102 Blagto 
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174 HB Cuqpi 

366 W catoa 

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174«.1» Do :* 

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245 ire EB* A End 
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298 208 FontoHtanp 
173 113 Hound (Jam 

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159 67 toktoro Caen 


91h - 4-1 ■■ 

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115 IU -’I 

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171 174 

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48 50 


157 169 +1 - 


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480-45 120 
120 11 IU 
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37 20 177 


.. .. 570 

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600 40 .. 

82 99 
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114 49 90 

27 26 8.4 

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100 50 159 

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80 79 83 


M4 SB BW A IM -A" 

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221 130 M9U> 
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225 158 CVytoK 
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137-j 93 nptoa Tmil 
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103 32 JtotosMdgi 

206 137 Irt to 
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360 146 saneim^ 
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74 St Tamm Mg 
US OBUtoto 


LEISURE 


130 MO . . HID 74 MB 
183 IBS +3 281 

SB 212 • 41 70 17 M3 


IU 121 +9 

,88 m -i 


14 17 321 

80 42 123 


365 360 0+1 03 20 IU 

55 SB 1 , +1 .. ..471 

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137 tB +1 *j U 46 U 

125 120 -I 7.1 57 11.7 

48 51 *-1 U U IU 

IB? 184 • .. 39 24 154 

HO ISU • .. U Sl7 04 

3n 331 +3 1 * ||.1 14 T3S 

378 3S3 • . . 16.1 42 164 

3) 38 +*J . . • . 207 

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150 1G0 .. 14 22 92 

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65 67 .. .. | .. IM 

181 184 7.1 19 M7 


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93 61 Huaaam K 

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149 IU naSffmJ-A 1 

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220 168 ErawreEteWl 
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179 IB Do 
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148*. 39 Gem 
304 234 Bngjm-K 

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30S .. 50 14 M3 

7i +i 10 2G ns 

178 +1 79 45 I7S 


235 . . TL1 47 02 

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84 +*. 60 72 *2 

226 +1 ,22 14 114 

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388 +4 80 22 09 

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427 +3 243 57 154 

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281 U 15 T9S 

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417 •-£ 17.1 4.1 173 

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485 -5. 06 10 127 

175 +5 29 17 

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116 • S3 47 129 

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570 65 94 
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103 71 U 

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30 10 103 
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4 G 7 306 W Woe 442 452 

119 64 bE KB « B 

48 31 IITIUMl 41 «V 

313 2 H Itauay 326 m 

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130 J 8 Ibgto 97 107 

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238 249 +V U 29 201 

235 M0 • 75b 12 15* 

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41 42V • .. ,0b 45 130 

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133 MB -2 17 27 111 

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258 173 OHca Bna HKb 172 177 «-3 12-1 09 75 

448 M7 FWtaSnl-A' 415 42Z«.. 171 41 110 

IQ BVPom* 31 300 313 -2 

BB 383 PUOM 588 590 +K 154 20 MJ 

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674 33? PHW-ttnbatay 605 612 


90 6D 20.6 
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520 140 PaatodM 4S0 470 +5 20 04 285 

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98 si Mac COW re 81 . 41 51 M0 

385 Mi Panto 240 »0 W+0 10.8 44 TO 

368 215 (Mr Qaaom 295 310 -12 29 10 370 

3M 1 PHDto 300 302 .. 201 75 210 

IS4 92 PttoKKHUgi 107 IM «+3 13 1.1 IU 

190 119 W> ISJ *64 04 39 0.1 

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589 421 Ha* tiff 515 519 +13 215 44 MJ 

220 115 bnmta 174 ,70 74 42 1*3 

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900 605 Ua < Ctoal TOT ®0 •+! 219 30 ,77 

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364 250 tato 330 333 +S 31 U 19.1 

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152 83 Mnrcob EbR 88 93 .. IS 40 ifiUB 

356 MB Hotosaa (TtoE) JB3 288 • -5 18b U 307 


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SHIPPING 


MOTORS AND AIRCRAFT 


55 30 Nd to 
150 IM Room 
1*6 99 _ Da 
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130 ID Rwoto 


49 SI 
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184 122 SooTOf 
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SHOES AND LEATHER 


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PUBLISHERS 


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BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


THE TIMES FRIDAY NOVEMBER 28 1986 


THE TIMES UNIT TRUST INFORMATION SERVICE 


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M (Mar Sag YW 


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INVESTMENT TRUSTS 


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EXCHANGE 

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13&D-37.8 

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Un Pig Contact p. par Mo 

Month 

Open 

Qase 

Fob 

96.0 

9&B 

Apr 

SU 

96.5 

Jun - 

SU 

96 JJ 

Aug 

95£ 

955 



HsMmtirota 

Vote 

LOMXNUEAT FUTURES 
EXCHANS 

UwCMtoceanct 

Mcrtti 

. . Opan 

Close 

Nov - 

965 

968 

Mi 

B7J 

87.5 

Apr 

1015 

101J 

Jun 

1013 

101J 


1330329 
129 JM&3 
1286-282 
131. MO. 0 
133-5-31 -0 


WTehNATIONAL 
PETROLEUM EXCHANCE 
Supplied vil Cornmoifty 
SStatSantoBBUd 
HEAVY RUB- OIL 


end P(E ratio are calculated on the mkkfls price 


ZINC WOH GRADE 

Cash 64i00.544.00 

77wwMoreiK . ssioysczan 


Vot2 

LOB30N GRAWfG7URE5 


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Whqm 

Bpney 

Month 

Close 

close 

Jsi 

111.10 

112.70 

Star. 

11 «» 

114.90 

May 

116.10 

11&05 

Sap 

101 AS 

11&05 

Nov 

10370 

1032) 


Vbfc8l lots 
Opan mtarest 1921 

TANKS? RBKWT 
HteVLow Close 


me 98 8400-8400 9 * 0.0 


Votuots 

0 penhumn 2 £ 

Spot mwKK commentary? 

Tenter indax: 

9335 down 9JJ on 25/1 1/86 


OO on2S/11/86 








































“W ' : 


1 


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V 

v v ..'!» ■. 
>! <•! 

. . 

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- •*»:>, 


THE TIMES FRIDAY NOVEMBER 28 1986 


YOUR OWN BUSINESS 


BRIEFING 


Defence for 

small firms 


■ This week's Mnistry of Defence 

initiative to give small firms abetter 
chance of defence contracts should be 
taken up by other key government 
departments. It Is befog urged, writes 

Derek Hams. 

Hie Smafl Business Bureau through 
Bs chairman Michael Gryffa, the Tory MP. 
is first to press the Environment 
Department with its team spending 


Burton backs £1.7m 
design workshop 



USINESS AND FINANCE 


BUSINESS TO BUSINESS 


Services Agency, to foflow fa the Mod 
footsteps. 

The Confederation of British 
industry’s sm^or firms counca wants 
other WNteftafl dep ar t me nt s to foflow 
tteMoD tod on locating a part of its 

-me MoD brought in severaf measures 
to make it easier for smaw firms to get a 
slice of the MoD contracts cake which 
©the biggest fa WtutohaL 
A smal Anns advice division is being 
created to heto end advise small 
businesses which want to enter the 
defence market It wB be respon sM e far 
the cesesrch initiative to which the 
MoD Initially teaflocatfagEi mffiion ayaar. 


Training pep 

■ Training seminars for owner- 


By Ian A. Jack 

A £1.7 Briffion project for a purpose-built 
centre for flprign sad nuketua fod- 
oesscs m the north-east ism the 
advanced stage of planning. 

Barton, the fashion group, is Baking 
with Project North East to convert a 
disused 72,000 sq ft factory ** Feffing, 
Gateshead, into a base where designers 
of all skills — rat jest fashion — can 
operate^ A similar, smaller, centre will be 
offered m a Burton h HiMiug in tTaphnm 
High Street, London. 

Archhect Neil Barker is at the site- 
tefeg stags tor the Derail Works at 
Gateshe ad. Planning permission Is ex- 
pected by the New Year allowing 
conversion to begin ready for partial 
opening by mid-1987. 

Marketmg studies have revealed at 
least 25 potential cheats in the north of 
Eng la n d aid Project North East, which 
is managing both ventures, says interest 
has been shown by a number of small 
companies. 

The aim is not only to provide a design 
base but to employ marketing experts to 
sell Ideas. There wiU even be fidl-time 


introduced from next Aprfl as a Private 
Enterprise Programme (PEP) by the 
Manpower Sendees Commission with 
backing on course material from the 
fastituto of Marketing and Grant 
Thornton, the accounta nts . A dozen 
different seminars wffl cover basic 
management skflla from marketing 
overhaul to managing growth. 

AddHonal seminars are planned on 
woman to enterprise and training for 
cooperatives. 

The semirws can be sp8t into half- 
days, taken at weekends or in the 
evenings. The cost for a day is about 
£40 or, for newcomers to bustoess who 
have attended another MSC 
enterprise training scheme, the seminars 
can be free. 

9 DetaBa from MSC, Moorfoot, 

Sheffield SI 4Pa 


Half the money heeded to create the 
centre and run it for the first two years 
will come from the pubfic sector. Barton 


is providing the factory and the services 
of Bob Wahnsley, one of their executives, 
to act as full-time project director. 

Now the hunt is on for the rest of the 
faudSag from pri v ate sources. Project 
North East emphasi ze that help in ktod, 
sad as equpraa, is as desirable as 
cash. 

The hope is to reverse the trend that 
sees many of North East's good de- 
signers — a lot of them products of the 
region's three polytechnics and numer- 
ous colleges of further education — 
drifting south or abroad. Peter Rodger of 
Project North East says: “The benefits ef 
the Design Weeks wffl be e normou s and 
include die advantage of working m a 
envs ronment We hope 
Oat eventually there wffl be a sdf> 
promoting element with the centre 
holding itself a name for success.** 

Long term. Project North East believes 
fee teams which wffl occupy units of 
between 300 and L080 sq ft will fink up 
in joint projects marrying separate s&ffls 
to produce a total design package hr a 
project range. 

• C on tac t Project North East, Mar- 
seilles Chambers, 45 Gnat Market, 
Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 JUG; (091- 
2617856). 



To: Confidential Invoice Discounting Limited, 
P.O. Box 240. Sovereign House. Queen’s Road. 
Brighton BNl 3WX. Telephone: 0273 21211- 
Please send me more information covering 
your full range of services. 




It’s the confidential Factor. | 

Would you like to turn your invoices into cash 
without anyone knowing? Now you can. For just a I 
’phone call you could have an advance of 80% on 
invoice, with the balance when your customers I 
pay, if you have a turnover of £750,000 or more. 

No-one need ever know - it’s called Confidential I 
Invoice Discounting. Well share more secrets with 
you when you ’phone on (0273) 21211 and talk to I 
our New Business Department 


Company 


Address 


Postcode . 


.Telephone.. 


II Ir z3\ il Confidential li 
II 05L.7 Invoice .. 

Discounting 11 

A grater c l di e Llotd« B* 6 Gragg 1 /S/28/11 =J 


leer’s 


mechanical en- 
: the £8,000 he 
Portfolio Gold 
sterday to good 


ie my grzmo- 
i my donation 
all appeal and 
text year," Mr 
, of Ailestree, 


THAN YDUBARGABED FOR 



LESS THAN YOU THOUGH 


wmire Conraes goes jou more car ra *om money 
- aGranaOa2at?xidlC3T9t»3Tn* 


Making money 
out of toys is 
not child’s play 


By Teresa Poole 

The company was in a rut and by 1980 
sales had levelled off after years of 
growth; its products were losing out to 
cheap imports from Taiwan. “We had 
become very small-company minded," 
explains Nikolai Askaroff; finance direc- 
tor of the family-run firm Simplantex, 
which makes baby accessories and toys. 

.th in, ' 


MR FRIDAY 



^ === ^)OrtL 

“Pm here in claim back the 
first part of the £57 biOtaa 
owed to miwB baslaesses a 
this conntryf* 


won the first Young Accountant of the 
Year award for ins work in taking 
Simplantex through its second growth 
phase to a turnover in 1985 of £1.3 mil- 
lion and a 600 per cent increase in profits 
over five years. 

The Eastbourne-based company, 
which has a workforce of 31, was started 
in 1956 by Mr Askaroffs parents and 
when he joined as finance director he set 
about restructuring die company to 
allow expansion. 

The 2,000 product lines were comput- 
erized to cut down on paperwork and 
improve sales analysis; stock control 
policy was introduced; dearly-defined 
dep artmental responsibilities 'were or- 
ganized; and p rop er management meet- 
ings started. Delivery times were halved 
to three weeks and after a year the 
company was in a position to quote for 
any size of order. 

Simplantex sells to about 1,000 baby 



Wneamon Venture Cowans owes voo 
as me benelss ol *u« maintenance ca* con- 
Baa twe *wnout me usual long tenn 
c o mmenetos at aiounfl 7£As o> ncrnui 
conTraa tyire rare To reciuce your com- 
Parry car costs seod lor me orccrwe Wlay 
of crone CP -993 7©l fry lu'me* oewt. 

•All KrCwtr rf»" 


r’-yvv? 


ed 51, who has 
> Gold since it 
imes, said that 
ieve bis luck. 

• fantastic. It is 
ice.** 

1 cards can be 
iding a stam- 
mvefope to: 

U 


- venire Cowaas enawes you loownaicafry cm oar cose. 
- 5ucn as a 5*wa f 6 l to d56 00 p m ■ 

Of evtn a PdCfciCU FVli 

MD210OD<n- 


\Wa 


Wincanton Venture Contracts 


Mncarflon Com r acts Ltd. VWncanton House 
333 Western Avenue. London W30RS 
Telephone. 01-933 7611 


profit is sanity, "says Nikolai 
shops and most of the chain stores, 
except Mothercare and Boots. Rather 
than compete on price with cheap 
imports, the company sells on quality. 
“Turnover is vanity, profit is sanity” 
says Mr Askaroff 

A small part of the business — around 
5 per cent of turnover — is in wheelchair 
accessories for the disabled, including 
waterproof capes. Future growth is 
expected with these products and by 
increasing exports of all ranges. 

In .the five years to 1985, sales output 
per employee rose from £27,000 to more 
than £41,000. and the increase in 
operating expenses was kept well below 
the sales improvements. 

Mr Askaroffs mother is to retire from 
the business soon and will sell her 59 per 
cent stake to her three sons. Mr Askaroff 
is likely to be rewarded with the title of 

manag in g director. 


FERGUSON & PARTNERS LTD 


Someone you can talk to in the City 


Ferguson & Partners are able to offer a 
confidential and personal service in the area of 
acquisitions and mergers. We are also able to 
assist with clients’ equity or commerica! funding 
requirements. 


Cali Robert Graham, Managing Director. 


FERGUSON & PARTNERS LTD. 


Wamford Court. Throgmorton Sheet. London EC2N 2AT. 
Tel: 01-588 1187. Fax: 01-628 4189 


Ferguson & Partners is a subsidiary of James Ferguson Holdings pic. 


Plant Hire 
Division 

South Midlands 


Our client has instructed us to offer its 
plant lure division for sale as a going 
concern. TTria weD established dxvison has 
an exce ll ent customer base serving the 
construction industry, 
ft has an annual turnover of a ppro xima tely 
£1 milfan, employing twen ty right people 
baaed at taro loca t ions. 

Further information is available cm request 
in writing from: 


J H W Traheam, 
Spicer and Pegter, 
Clamb er Avenue, 
Sherwood Rise, 
Nottingham NG5 1AH. 



Spicer andPegfer 


Matching Corporate Needs 


The Corporate OMsion of Capital Consultants offer 
a range of services wHch indude Company 
a c quisition, merger rad disposal, the introduction of 
equity partners, new products and services and 
assist ance with associated Corporate fomfing. 

To ensue success our approa c h is based upon a 
delated understanding of dent needs and 
imagi na tion and enthusiasm in meeting them. 
Currency we have ctents seeking to acquire 
companies in a number c i areas tacfcxflng:- 


Bufkfing Product & Suppfies 
Ktetan Goods Ustrifaution 
DAY. 

Whotesafe Wnss/SpHs 
Manufacture 


Plastics - Hqh volume 

Food preparation/ 
dsutdan 
Cosmefcs/Pactaging 
Engineering 
Service industries 


For more delate or to make an a ppointment for us to 
vMtyou. far an initial con fl d entia *d fe cuss»on t piease 
contact Michael Smite or Peregrine Langton. 



Capital Consultants 


Corporate Division 


I SHOT. FOBOHBJB. SUITS SOI M 
(0730) 63T22 


line 


London 

World Trade Centre 


OFFICE SUITE 270 -8,600 sq. ft- 
Available on flexible lease terms 



For details coaiact 


Peter Milfiaship or Keith Sa dle r 
Ivory House, 

St Katherine by the Tower El 9AT 


01-488 2400 


Northern Computers Ltd. 

Tbs Joint Receivers offer for sate the assets 
and good wil of the above company located 
in substantiti freehold premises in 
Frodsham. Cheshire. 

The compttiy is an estabSshed distributor 
of computer hardware and software. 
Turnover for die last six months to 31st 
October 1986 exceeded £650.000. 

For further details contact toe Joint 
Receivers, Maurice Wrthafl and Allan 
Griffiths, dam Thornton, Heron House, 
Abert Square. Manchester M2 5HD. 

Tel: 061-834 5414, Telex: 667235. 
Fax: 061-832 6042. 


HAMPSHIRE DIVISION OF SOUTHERN WATER 
SLUDGE DISPOSAL TO SEA CONTRACT - 
SELECT LIST FOR TENDERS 


Applications are invited from experienced 
companies for inclusion in a select list of 
companies to tender for a contract to dispose 
of sewage stodge at sea dumping grounds 
from four sewage treatment works in the 
Southampton area. 


'The contract will commence in July 1987 and 
terminate in July 1989. 


The contractor is to provide two vessels to 
meet the requirements of the contract One 
vessel would need about 1500 tonnes cargo 
capacity and be able to proceed to Nab Tower 
dumping ground 13 miles off Portsmouth in 
conditions exceeding those associated with 
Force 8 winds. The other vessel is to travel to 
Ports wood STAN, situated by the River ttchen 
and be of about 300 tonnes cargo capacity. 
Should either vessel be out of service for a 
greater time than one week, the contractor is 
to provide an alternative vessel. 



The following information is to be forwarded 
with all applications: 


1. Name and address of company's bankers. 

2. Names and addresses of financial 
references. 

3. Details and types of shipping operation 
presently undertaken. 

4. Details of previous experience of similar 
operations. 

5. Any other information which may be 
relevant 


Interested companies are to apply in writing by 
29 December 1986 to: 


i in brewing 
inkers and, in 
en kill them, 
or Real Ale 
Y- 

e campaign's 
<t's Brewing, 
>1 z. a former 
1 Beer Guide, 

: who have 
er breathing 
• disorders, 
o are alleigic: 
can suffer ill 
dng beets in 
have been 
uce a foamy 
riiy, or to 


Divisional Manager 
Hampshire Division 


Southern Water 
Sparrowgrove 
Otterboume 
WINCHESTER 
SO 21 2SW 


StatesT the- 
re than 40 
teart attacks 
?rs used co- 
il beer to 
ing head. 



Grant Thornton 

.CHARTERED ACCOUNTANTS 


TELEX SYSTEMS 
COMPLETE RANGE 

Tele Syntra 2000 £ 795 tw.w p, Teie* 
Tele Syntra 2001 £ 549 Base 
Tele Syntra 2002 £ 245 pc Modem 
3M Wisper £1295scvf 
Screen based from £1600 scvf 


Also telephone 
systems 
from £495 


T E L E 


Al onces are plus VAT 


nan couple 
last July for 
:king red lic- 
ences. 

Cord Lane, 
e, will pre- 
rations by 
iya Schulze. 
«r leave to 
J sentences 
Justice Mi- 
llie Central 


01-587 2958 



FOR SALE/ 
DISCOUNT 


ISO to 365 day BBs of 
Exdjange. Fully 
endorsed and insured, 
various values 10K to 
500K. 

0235811319 


IT’S NOT TOO LATE 

for your company to have h’s own personalised 
caJcndam & diaries. 

Guaranteed See Christmas delivery. 

CALENDABS & DIARIES OF BRISTOL LTD. 
Tel: (0272) 636161. 


MICHELMORE 


T0TNES SOUTH DEVON 


Ucensad t/ W» titoca a j for new wee bar joragsticemraB 
ujflsgvtfoi devetopftm. About 600 sq. ft. ratter spaefl w fa tf 
teper Door a taqm. To K on 2S year Inn at rack waaL 



irTTTTwrrnrri 


ELECTRICAL BUSINESS 
FOR SALE 

ESTABUSHBI 49 YEARS 

Attractiw comer foctoandosa 
to Matte Anri. Turnover 
£100,000 px. Hoover (feaJer- 
sttp, etc. Raft 26350 pax. 
Pries: SSOJOOO S TC. 
Owner retiring. 

AS enmities ref JC/HM. 

01-499 8404 




Reeding based 
company seeking 
Haas to manufacture 
& market in the 
kndusUial/teisure 
areas. 


Tab (0734) 755442 


Send brief product detsBe to: 
BOX BtO. 


Mirm'iin'ra 


NORTH WALES 


Ragistared 40 people. 

Substantial bukting in 4 

*3B*ZSSG,«».DetBBs- 


tow rental high street 
kitchen studio with 
offices and fiat above, 
estabfehed 9 years. T/o 
£3O04X» pal Idert 
nvestment prfor 
expanding company. 
Offers and suggestions 
to BOX §68. 


COFFEEHOUSE/ 

RESTAURANT 

in centre of Bradfofd-ochAttn 
neorBrti54eo«eaHnd 
cautjmt seafHU 16. first floor 
ftft Brass profit in na of 
£SOiOOO. 999 ynr lease + 
business for s» a E1254XH) 
SAV. Derek Walter Bab 
fSOSS) 332573. 




ABOUT 
INHERITANCE 
TAX LIABILITY 


Why not conshfer investing 
in MricuBure and obtain the 
sinTredudion in aabey tor 
inheritonca tax. We act tor a 
number of good farmers 
who are short of capital and 
who would benefit 
co n stte raM y from a share 
tannins arrangement, other 
advantages could be a 
holiday cottage, abiflty to 
radaim vat etc. For firmer 
detals reply 

gRfertrt^eftRstafte, 
OxaflSJrtTHL 
Ttit 8367 2262. 


THE LAMORNA COVE HOTEL 

AA LAMORNA, PENZANCE ***RAC 
CORNWALL 

This exdosive hotel is offered for sale due to 
retirement. Set in 6 acres of grounds in an area of 
outstanding natural beauty. Luxury bedrooms and 
suites. Elegant, sumptuous public rooms. Leisure 
area and swimming pool, magnificent views. 
Substantial turnover and profits. Owner’s 
accommodation available if required. Rated as one of 
the best in the County. Offers in excess of £4854)00 
SAV. Ret H. 612 . Sole Agents. 

Mansion House 
Traro (0672) 7421 


LAND FOR SALE 


& PARTS 


Dnect tram US nmdactacre. 
Send your requiroMrts. 


Harvey Stiver 
AssocaflBS. 
061 236 1206 


Loamiergifa W coast- Marine 
maBjr aait m i w * hoati 
eartc & reolsunil coranwroai 

far aevtt MwnL OOws A He- 
Bltf tec 0M77 tot. 



RESIDENTIAL 

SITE 


BexhiD-on-Sca. Sussex. 
Sabsraniia] esmer she. 
Offers in excess of 
£750,000. 


Pfasoe 0424 2X9 092 


DIRECTOR 
FOR AD 
AGENCY 


Thriving long established 
London ogeocy requires 
director of dial 
services. Musi have wide 
maiteiuig/advcnisnig 
experience and sound 
understanding of people 
’ and profits, equity 
pa rtici p ation possible. 

Reply to BOX B49. 


Suitable Hotel or 
Leisure Centra Near 
beach at popular East 
coast seaside resort 
(subject planning 
permission). 

Reply to BOX J60 



PRIVATE 

INVESTOR/ 

PARTNER 


Small building company 
NHBC registered seeks 
private invesur/partner 
for residential refurbish- 
ment projects on a 
participation basis. All 
investments secured on 
freeholds. 


Reply to BOX B35. 



AN EXCITING 




in the ooumrysfcfa 
connected with 
anbnrts. Partnership 
ottered 

for details 
telephone: 

054 70852 anytime. 


NON-EXECUTIVE 

DIRECTOR 

REQUIRED 

Equity paniripuioo 
envisaged. Applkaiioiis 


from rudindnahand 
insOTutioas considered. 

Please ttfeptaae Aadmcr 
(6264) 65874. 


Have you the confldeticB 
to run yow own sales 
team end contrd some 
mobile units? National 
company needs someone 
m your area now. 
TetMr lacy 0272 292579 



WORD 

PROCESSING: 


*Manuscripis 
•Thesis 
•Letters 
•Mailshots 
Etc etc 

Ringri)423 863003 



PALL MALL 

+ W2 


Low premium 24hr 
access + paiicing, Fum 
carpeted offices ind 
pbooe/telex/fex. Fr 
CT5pw. 


01-839 4808 


JUST AVAILABLE pair of I Mrf 5 
HOT or Cnrtun properiMS. 
KWi sim Kcnueti seaooe 
lowp localum wUJi channel 
views approx 1 raile cnannel 
tunnel ronuriei HO These de- 
IVpMSsd penowtte wtth oarape 
A own car parti offer luxury ac- 
ronunedauon above <p-ound 
floor suf BMe for shapi/oHKe 
Ideal for small company. Va 
cam possession for frechokfino 
offers souRhi pi the mum of 
C30QJOQO CenuMete details on 
reouest. Reply to BOX B46 
nteanoLD school m Ayi»- 
bury OO sq. n. retail 
warehouse & office In lown 
centre. Potential lor dnek» 
mem i e meumne floors etc 
£.180000 Tel: (0296) 2SS66. 


COMMERCIAL 
PROPERTY 
TO RENT 


WE SOLVE corpora t e p iuM etas. 

TMrgUbaMn. funding, ertua 
managemeni. aunilsuhm. and 
dwposafc. Tel .06*2 217610 


tBWIiee avafMde for smafl and 
lame Prowesses. 01-229 *832 
dr 0803 60899. 


PRESTIGE MAYFAIR ADDRESS 

Burlington phone, trio and for- 
warding services. Ol *34 2560 


HAMMERSMITH 
& KENSINGTON 

Smafl Offices to let 

Fironi 140 sq ft 
in Business Centres 
wmi an facilities 

01 602 7181 


v storage 
bly shows 
ceHeaer 



SURVEILLANCE 


!•]. §<• ]:i 


and cottotor tuvetera 
equipmem tor bom me 
Bratour & profesaonaL 
Rmg or write for pore Ust 
RUBY ELECTRONICS 
ELECTRONICS LTD 
TIB, Lea Bridg e Rd 
London E10%AW 
01-558 4226 


BUSINESS TO 
BUSINESS 
ALSO APPEARS 
ON PAGE 30 


3VS>”high 
3V5* high 


r re 











































.p. ■ am* I nor 


THE times FRIDAY NOVEMBER 28 1986 


Motoring by ClifFord Webb 


CAR BUYERS’ GUIDE 


GTA gives Renault a racier image 

_ _ , - • ■ wf ciViTKsVV " 


Renault’s involvement in 
Formula One grand prix rac- 
ing has not changed the av- 
erage British motorist’s view 
of their cars. They are still 
seen as run-of-ihe-mill family 
transport The answer, of 
course, is that until recently 
the marque lacked an eye- 
catching, high performance 
road model like Porsche and 
Lotus to link the company’s 
road and track images. 

The pity is that with the 
exciting new Renault GTA V6 
Turbo now making iisappear- 






- : >rv 

-jag-- 


m -**%&*-2*a 


Vital Statistics 

Model: Renault GTA V6 Turbo 
Price: 223,635 

Engine: 2458 ccV6 alloy turbo 
Per fo r man ce: O to 62 mph 7 
secs, max speed 155 mph. 
Official consu m ption: Urban 
22.1 mpg. 56 mph 44.1 mpg, 
and 75 mph ?4-9 mpg. 

Length: 14.2 feet 
Insurance: Group 8. 




seven seconds. A drag co- 
efficient of only 0.28 together 
with a very small frontal area 
enable Renault to d aim the 


Renault GTA V6 Turbo: attracts attention everywhere 

A drag co- turm. In hs earlier forms it support and 


lowest air resistance of any 
nrnduction car in the world. 


ance here, the French group 
has withdrawn from Formula 
One. The GTA attracts atten- 
tion everywhere with its 
aggressively styled, low slung 
body, flared wheel arches and 
big fat tyres all promising 
power and speed. 

It is in fact the fastest 
production Renault to date 
with a top speed of 155 mph 


production car in the world. 
Slickness through the air is a 
major factor in its remarkably 
frugal fuel consumption. I 
returned 28 mph on a 280- 
mile motorway trip including 
entering and leaving con- 
gested central London. 

The 2.5 litre V6 all-alloy 
engine is mounted in the rear 
of the laminated polyester 
body behind a five-speed 
transaxle. It is a developed 
version of the engine built at 
Douvrin and shared with a 


and a 0 to 62 mph time of number of other car manufec- 


was not particularly happy, readily to h 
te nding to become thrash y a car of 
and run out of breath when nally a hi 
pushed hard. The GTA ver- designed u 
sion had none of these short- way miles f 
comings. It delivered its 200 It does that 
bbp with suiprisixu; s moot h- small reset 
ness and flexibility for a turbo- speed, then 
charged engine. ness about 

The GTA is assembled by ing and lil 
Renault’s Alpine subsidiary at cars, it is i 
Dieppe and bears some resem- winds. An u 
blance to the 15-year-okl Al- wiper layo 
pine A3 10 it replaces. That car blades alnu 
was cramped and rather ir- centre of 
ritating to drive: The GTA apparently 
still retains the semi-reclined maximum 
driving position but has much speed. Togt 
more elbow room. Hie front senger, I ft 
seats give excellent all-round distraction. 


support and controls fell 

readily to hand. 

A car of this type is essen- 
rialt y a high speed cruiser 
designed to burn-up motor- 
way miles for hour after hour. 
It does that job well with two 
small reservations. At high 
speed, there is a slight vague- 
ness about straight line steer- 
ing and like an rear-engine 
cars, it is susceptible to side 
winds. An unusual windscreen 
wiper layout with the two 
blades almost clashing in the 
centre of the screen was 
apparently developed for 
maximum efficiency at high 



‘.',0 TOR VAT !QM 


maac'fcaiirt «* **»■» M 

18S6C PEMBEOT SOS 

comes complete with etec windows, centraMocHng. power 
cassette. Manual warranty, it is a ttargan 


^TpBJgStSK u or 5 spa^bmc. Burgundy- Radio & Sunre* 
2 owners. SoU by us previously. Odw sway price at — E4 ' 685 


speed. Together with my pas- 
senger, I found it a constant 


Classical 

collection 


comes to 
the market 


Sotheby’s has assembled an 
impressive collection of early 
and classic cars, bicycles and 
general antomobflia for sale at 
tie Honourable Artillery 
Company, City Road,- London 
on Monday. The star of the 
show for most people win be 
the rare 1931/34 Hbpano- 
Suza J.12 9Vi litre, two-seater 
tourer which is expected to 
(etch a cool £150,000. It has 
been on display at the Mid- 
land Motor Museum and is 
believed to be the only repre- 
sentative of the model striv- 
ing in Briain. 

But the car I would love to 
own is either of the two 
1925/26 Type 35 Grand Prix 
supercharged I bgaWk. As the 
beautifnlly-produced cat- 
alogue says: “Few cars in 
history have developed around 
them foe mystique of- the 
marque Bugatti.” The ear- 
shattering exhaust note and 



Spanish sales 
drive gains 
momentum 






DP automobiles 
46S-4/I Purley Ha>. 


FERRARI 

308 

Connolly Seat Coven 

' t £250 per pair 

ALDRIDGE 

TRIMMING 

0902710805 


M; 


(loydonCili). 

Vpusm SP5C.W*** / I , . I 

U Ol esf 2600 


Hispaoo-Saiza Tourer: expected to fetch £150,000 


high-pitched super-charged 
whine of Ettore Bogatti’s cre- 
ations Is the nostalgic musk of 
my own childhood. 

Original Grand Prix 
Bagattis rarely come on the 
open market and when they 
do, are extremely expensive, 
carefully docamented and 
beautifully restored. These 
two, in feet, belonged to the 
late Charles Moore, a wefl 
known Bngatti en t h usiast and 
restorer, feat they are by no 
means in pristine condition. 
Sotheby’s say their experts 
had to hack away trees and 
undergrowth to get into the 


ga i g a ge where they bad been 
stored for several years. I’ve 
had the same dream for more 
years than 1 care to recalL 
One is offered complete but 
in need of some restoration 
work. It is said to be worth 
about SSOfiOO. The other is 
only part assembled and sold 
with a number of parts which 
appear to include most of the 
■issilig components. The joy 
of acc tdriug a neglected thing 
of beauty is the long months, 
even years, of immensely 
satisfying restoration work 
ahead. Bat it endd cost you 
£50,000 just to start 


The fastest growing im- 
ported car business in Britain 
is SEAT, the Spanish group 
which is now 51 per cent 
owned by Volkswagen. SEAT 
began selling here just a year 
ago and already holds .3 per 
cent of the market with an 
estimated 6,200 sales this 
year. Douglas Clare, managing 
director of SEAT Concession- 
aires UK, plans to increase 
that to over 10,000 next year. 

His model range has just 
been extended to indude five- 
door versions of the Ibiza 
hatchback with a choice of 1.2 
or 1.5 litre Porsche-designed 
engine. Prices start at 
£4,746 - the same price 
bracket as the Ford Fiesta. But 
SEAT is aiming higher —at 
the market-leading Ford Es- 
cort 

Early Ibiza were plagued by 
carb oration problems, but 
modifications seem to have 
solved the problem. I drove 
both versions of the new five- 
door model for nearly 300 
miles this week and found 
them considerably improved. 



OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 


THE HEW RENAULT 21 TL 
£5,950 


Includes defivery, mmber phtes, 
1 year's road had Seance 


NEXT CAR CENTRE 
0279 755127 


WILSONS AUTOMOBILES 
AND COACHWORKS LIMITED 


Sumy's leafing Renault dealer 
Over 2D0 near and used vehicles on da 
Nonsuch IndusUM Estes. East Street, Espoo 

(837 27) 28391 - RetaB Satos 

0 ffiSIK; 


WHEELERS (NEWBURY) 
LIMITED 


Your Renault OTA Dealer 

London Bond 
Newbury 
Berks 

Tel: (0635) 41020 



STAG HILL MOTORS 
OFFER 

m tofts toys* S Mml in 
Cntan, Ml sauce Wsfew 


m4 Go* BTf riiiMlH. hi 

e y-irgg jg 

CT3 Ban no mxtaLb 
Safes® usual bums — 15,195. 
1983 Cap* U kvrctiOCL to 
star, ■ 1 owner. Ml an 

t, -y mu 

FtoanceaaleaaatedwaHinties 
avaitabto. Owr 100 used on for 
safe. TW (W068J 4311 
torture Ftoao, Godatatao. . 
Sumy 


£10.998. Tea 03138 aas»* T 
am Atfo 8pwM - coHtonmt 
198a C "-*»■ red wan pearl 
feather. im . unfed nw. 
caaHo/casaeQl. 9.000 Ms. 
Cia.995. Ttt Om 8251 T9 T 
■Wit 7XR A SE 1988b hm 
nutria. 15.000 nin es. Q7m 
TO 0865 874096 SU 
Tbcsaa whHwT. 



1 


_j^l a door. AM 1986. Zennan 
aw. MSR EW. AHojtv Frau 
■od mr spousn. shmo uhuqi. 
Remote control aluunand cen- 
tral lodMOruyto w 
sports steering wheel. 2JBSO 
mtha. exsjooo. Te oi CT 

«377 leSke mm) Ol 067 
8671 wm/m 


THBHA LX TQRB0 


IG5 BHP. (M2 fflpll 12 tecs 
Mi OTHER MOORS AMIABLE 
FINANCE LEASE ■ CONTRACT HUE 







JUMP YHC am 3281 Ooo- 
veruue. Finished in made wan 
■nihracfM tat. buck hood. ABB. 
run BMW spmb. UK MM 
Biot an Jumonj. run UK wt 
runty. DeHvsry mOeaue only. 
CZl SBO . Til 0955 226897 OO. 






TEST DRIVE THE NEW RENAULT GTA AT 
THESE RENAULT PERFORMANCE CENTRES. 


AVOW Bristol; 

Oty Motors (Bristol} Ltd, Church Rd. Lawrence Hill, BS5 9LU. 
Contact Glynne Townsend on (0272) 559074. 

And Marlborough Street, BS T 3NX. 

Contact Phillip Roberts on (0272) 421 Bl 6 


MIDDLESEX Enfield: 

Old Oak Motor Co. Ltd. 79 Windmill Hili. EN2 7 AG. 
Contact Robert Pearse on OT -367 3456. 


Wheelers (Newbury) Ltd. London Road.RG 13 IBB. 
Contact Mike Grattan on (0635) 41 020. 


NORTHAMPTONSHIRE Northampton; 

Mann Egerton&Co. Ltd.. Bedford Road. Northampton. NN1 5 NY 
Contact Dave Abbott on (0604) 39645. • • 


CAMBRIDGESHIRE Cambridge: 

Wests Garage (Cambridge) Ltd. 2 1 7 Newmarket Rd. CS5 BHD. 
Contact la n Davidson on C0223 ) 35 1 6 1 6. 


NOTTINGHAMSHIRE Nottlnoham: 

GT Cars. Granary House. Ilkeston Road, N6 T 3ET 
Contact Nigel Gray on (0602) 708851 . 


DORSET Bournemouth: 

Wmton Garage. 41 -47 Alma Road. Winton. BH9 1 AB. 
Contact Laurence Handy on (0202) 526501 . 


SURREY Guildford: 

Mann EgertonS Co Ltd, Walnut Tree Close. GUI 4TX. 
Contact Simon Everett on (0483)577371. 


ESSEX Colchester: 

Windsor Auto 5ales. 74-78 Military Road. C01 2AN. 

Contact Mehryn Pennell on CO 206) 577295. 


TYNE & WEAR Newcastle; 

Priory Garage. Scotswood Road. NE4 7B0. 
Contact Bill Boston on (0632) 730101. 


Renault UK Ltd. Manchester Branch. Blackfriars Rd,M3 7FT 
Contact Gary Austin on 061 -B32 6 1 21 . 


WEST MIDLANDS Bjr ni inQ ham: 

Renault UK Ltd. Birmingham Branch. 75-80 High Street. 
BordesleyBl20LL_ 

Contact John Cotton on 021 -773 8251 . 


HAMPSHIRE Por ts mouth: 

Linrngtons (Portsmouth) Ltd. 12B Milton Rd. P04 8PW. 
Contact Mark CXneen on C0705) 81 5i 5i. 


Wtest Yorkshire Motor Group .Thornton Road.BD1 2ER 
Contact Date Hesketh on (0274) 736440. 


KENT Tbnb ridge Wells: 

Merchants. The Spa Garage. Langton Road. TN4 SXH. 
Contact Brett W&lker on (0892) 39466. 


WALES South Glamorgan: 

S.L. Garages Ltd, 325 Penarth Road, Cardiff. CFi 7TT 
Contact Chris Jones on (0222) 383 1 22. 


LONDON W3: 

Renault UK Ltd, London Branch, Concord Road. W3 0R2. 
ContactJohn Bland on 01-992 5544. 

And WC2: St. Martins Lane WC2N 4 AB. 

Contact M ike Mitchell on 01 -836 3588. 


Centre Ca rs. Shield Road.Glasgow.G4l iPA. 
Contact lan Wilson on 041 -429 161 6. 


SW3: Roundabout. Cdebrook Court Garage. Sioane Avenue 
Chelsea SW33DJ. Contact Alan Westonon Ol >581 3427 


Ulster Garages Ltd. Boucher Road, Balmoral. BT1 2 6LR. 
Contact Bill Sickerstaff on (0232)381 721 . 


SW19: Radboume Racing (Wimbledon). 213/217 The Broadway. 
Wimbledon SW1 9 1NL Contact Peter Holmes on 01 -540 9991. 


Motor House (Guernsey) Ltd, The Grange. St. Peter Port. 
Contact John Thompson on (0-181 3 26846 



THE RENAULT GTA V6 TURBO. 15S mph. £23,635. 
THE RENAULT GTA V6. 146 mph. £19,040. 


t ^ Jr Rf?r_JulT W Pricps CcorTPCt at ^Krjvorqoar>g k .ccr^s«*irr:iiiOel5-«9VArCar Tdx. tf «indtr ont mid rfiir 
W9..NumtPr and pit rj Pprlonrnincp nqun Ubtrjr 


fRENAUtT 

fAB E JT ER 



WHITEHILL MOTORS 


Yoar loa4 Renimltweaalhte covering 
The Nwth-Emt Hampehire Area. 

A Fnw drfivoty end pick-up 15 miles taEua. _ 
f\ 24 hour emergency call-oat nervier 

Peterafleld Road \f 

WUtehffl. Borden, Huts. 

Contact Dwryl Perryman an (04208) 2073/4 


Ini. raHo/cMMM. Mann. 
SopOM 4 s er v iced tor dealer. 
Fua service Msury. B W»W 
cmdUan. fiMoo nfles. KMSO 
Sevenoabs (0732) 88967 


BZII 1988 V Res. HWCfcjWl 
. blade tatortor. saarooC jSch. 
UMpunkt servo. 3BAOO mftes. 
aaxUM condemn. £9080. TO 
■ Mfctmel Smd. 0792 MOZSS 
(wort) or 0633.66798 IHcancl. 


E-type Roadster V12 
Manas/, epctcsccoi srlcer. 
exus. 53JD00 snfcSL pcrioSy 
nanisiaat. mwi onsmri 
cosrf mos . 


E Type 2+2 VnWhise, 
51.000 » ftea. I My ona 


£8,250 

Tck 082786 247 T 


Aston RaifcSpttlaBsh 

mean - Aston -Mate 

J SSS na m K WBdtts 

ftnos ' tetaptane 
01 733 1062 
. or 0V733 8658 


BOLLS BOYCE 
1972 




SAmt IMt nttfle, vstuily om 
MH from MH. Ctensfml 
nsotw-FSHdro 
rata ody. PAA- 
Cafl Join HBhr 
04352 71038 ' 


SILVER 
SHADOW 1976 


b Sad «ah flack Hkb 
60000 ok RH. 
TbGaotoaaftr 

msse 

Teb 01 908 1847 
DJLM. Harrow 


SS RESTORATIONS 


of Ctassic. VMage untt- 
UBtaran cars. General 


repairs. Bem on g and engine 
rabutts. . 




MOTOR CO 
RENAULT 




4J»Ff>A(9LMJmq 
FfnaBceavaHaUe, 
special to SJPJKL only. 


Nationwide defivery, 
finance proposals 
taken over the 
telephono 


Tel: (D2814) 2365 


For fEKMULT hi SuffioHr go to 

GflEHl ACE SABAGE 

NVShnMM, 

torafek 

0473-43021/2/3 

SALES' SERVICE ’PARTS 


SM * door. A reg unne w«J. <miy 
l&OOO non.- HgK Muc. sin 

roar. 4 speaker steroa. FSH. one 

owner. EWHtant candtUon. 
SXkSSO. Td: Ol S4Z 3B16. 


EAST « JONES LTD 


i mr / -m L 


tom 19BS. ADoy whNls. SW>- 
root, stereo. S6JOOO mOea. 
RxceOeai cootjmon. Henna rod. 
K&BOO. TO 463 4007 CW» / 
«wS 457 0891 umcei. 


wra c rag: Mo.m«ririili Hah 


OPAL SENATOfl. 


:in*i- i 


1984. Stack - Baled Btan-WD- 
RAS -^BMTsinwo-atarticsm 
root r wknr totertor - ail und 
resumes** - axed. 


Price: £6.750 


861271 v 
JO anytime. 


R0U8 BOYCE Phantom Mark 
1 078, macatfc sftver w«i 
. vinyl mol, low ndtoage, aft 
. usual extras, imnnarfBfe 

HBBa»5QOSEC(LHO) 
1982/83 Model dark bits 
wWi yey Manor, taw 
mieaflp, sports Una. E1M00 
Tel D1 878 7428 mftam. 


BEST BUYS 

key Car/Van appW 

NO DEPOSIT HP 

(suDiect to status) 

SVB LONDON LTD. 

01 950 0052 



32M MW 84. am »«. PAS. 

Oecwindows/kun roof, central 
lock. aUovs. 1 owner- ^Ooo 
-riles, nunc cond. C7.7O0 
oocl Phone 0743 560364. 


7am 1 9B C UU- 19BS. Very aoorty 
motorcar, many extras. Owner 
going abroad force* qnfcfc sale, 
hence ww A&29S cno. value 
EBJOCO. TOL060882 624 


Porscho. Penan. Jaguars, 
Mocedos. BMW ate. 
ConqMtitiva ratas. 
PhoneStawa Stnpe 
Chnkaeta nl (0245 ) 324483 
or 323739. 


WOOD TRIM 


Wb manulecture, repair and 
restore ell wood trim: 

,4m lilif.o— In Amj 

aBSwoeius, ooor cappings. 

consoles, etc. 

WDOOUFT JOINERY 
LTD. 

Unit 5, 9 Part m. 
London SW 
Telephone: 01-827 1943 


1954 MGTF 


Metallic Oreen with 


leather uphobtery. 
Restored 10 yean; ago. 
Hardly used since. 1st 
o&r over £8.500. 
Tel: 0404 822324 
(Devon) T. 


Whfts, rad taathar, infection 5 
speed. 1874, excellent 
condition with registration 
ptata SSM1W. 65,000 mites. 
Fff,pin 

Oxford (0885) 512277. 


OS CSJ '81. LHD. tiOuOOO ion. 
vrUM. 5 maed «or fctnc C8JS00 
ono. TO. 01 736 3181. 



tAMK HVIR - 1981 . W reg. 2 
door. wMta. bdee vmyi me 
44000 mflas. roai PtvmM. imiv 
good oamtttkin. main R/ C. 
No heavy uRMt Oman MOT 
6 taxed. £0.990 ono. to.- at 
671 8779 wall/ Ol 664 7022 


cscarr mm cannoM. ims. 

WMtr. mw raOeage. Inunacn- 
laic. Brad. £6.850. 0763 

6 OSO 6 w/adt eves. 0229 
870203 nay. 


uwinvnswa nih.wc 
gnu new bnite system. £600 
apart m last 2 mifak. avptto 
COM- PM tax/MOT. £2-000 
ono. TeL (Wee Ol 294 8789 
ms or 01 7S4 1600 day. 


LAND ROVER HO V8 COUNTY 
1986 C re g btrat ta i. (Hu*. 
lOJOO mOc*. 12 seasu extra 
seat celts amt JieatVrsts £&80Q 
phis VAT TO 0424 882828 


MIT5UMSM SHOOIIM Oct 88. 
inehmic btue. natroL SWB. nw 
bar. 12 X 00 miles, tscdhnl 
eondUkuv 88AG0 ana. Tel 
0600 809276 


C&2S0. TO. 01 883 7007 

aveuw/e or 686 f093 day. 


1885 C Reo Voho 740 OLE Auto, 
silver grey, cassette radio, car 
phene. CBJOa TO: 0*024 
74107 


1963 MERCEDES 


; i isi: 


Druphead coupe. Black 


wn A/B8UfY SpMttoea 
Scnto, enneom CWA.E5250 

i§63 mmmx Rn mg b. 

wa fu paper. M testory. 

ZJJjOU 

A/ncMPf am UM. Ut 0 . 

metoaUfcnMn. em cond. 


1954 JA60AP XK140 tar 

■asaatTr"* 

Far M Mdt 
•yfleri (S9323) 48488. 


nuhh covamfc iw. 

09.000 mti only. 6 months tax. 

I2mmins MOT. leather uwkm 
stery. aummaSc. PAS. Good 
condition. Offers. TeijO0O9> 
6Q2361 (dayttmei iOSOQi 
. 303337 (eves / w/enth) 


lMCAOSHN WEALEV 3000 Mir 
m Oonvenattc. i owner wire 
1967. h»mry, 2SOOQ miles, tit- 
led wire vutveto. kh even. 


nrtainu UuwwnoiiL £ 11 . 930 ' 
Tel: 0343 tC h telwHn 681234. 


viv 1953. Profmtanaiiy rt- 
Mred,- inanandaie. No aHm. 
Z9.960. Tel: 01-423 6022 or 
«494| 779468. IPtwtn/- 

restoraoan spec avauaniei. " 


WMOC MWI November •82. 
four door. «u vogue apcc lfl ce- 

Uon, hriwtne. 66000 Mies. 

murundate. £7.995 Tel: (0006) 
881111 


VOLVO 245 DL CHaBr. X Rea 
68.000 ms. Blue, matching tat 
Suren. Verv eeod conantaiL 
£3.150 Details 04200-4827 


mb. 14 Mnt warmuy. al 
KU*. PAS. SfR. COOQQ.OI 340 
0964 HO. Ol 528 4861 Off. 
■MW 31M C rag. Arte blue. S»h 
reo ««*<*■ Coed oondHUR. 
£ 8.000 ono TOXJ924 364942. 


KtMCOr FtmOy 608 8 seuter 
Cstale. 83 PAS. Red. 59.000 
mis. 1 owner. New tyres, 1 yr 
MoT. immnc P/ewhaiwe pem. 
£4.750 tmo. (09323) S4321 m 
LANCIA’S advantaoeoua prices. 


VOLVO 2440LT SmginM&r DO. 


Towb.fld C4Ad. Natl pro. 4UM 
HOT. £2980. 01 B 8 S 2048. 


iKw/umn. Ptwpe ter details. 
Pw owr. Manoure Moure 
(Canwmuryl 0227 66844 
POHTUC *<2rand Prix'. new 
MOT A tax. Twjuurty serviced. 
Mnntv motor car. to Derek m 
01-240 2310 days- 
8MKUW MS. Datsao 

BuwtMnl 1800 / a. ironiBc cond. 
low raUrage. TO 874 OOOl Day. 
MAZDA 8X7 A Res 3MOO mb. 
P/X wotrr duaixulni. SAA9C 
More Octane 09378 48846 T 


CMLONKNS vtntage Lanoon taxi. 
1920 % 6 gears e re- 


vere*. 9 n teng. pan oun + 
MeemuMs. £3D00 * eat. Tec 
10440) 86 36a 

MUST SCLL 1 year eld Alfa 
cmtirea u SR. bee winds, 
c/l. W/wtpe. Anays Air can. 
F 09 #. £6.900- T*K)734 733 2 46 
u roumt ) . 

MEUCCOT S08 On Saloon On- 
kdied In auliemlne. 2,560 mtks. 
stereo radU/casBcne. FSH 
£9.960. CoiUatl Brian Mb on 
0T9Q 73391 T j 



Obowide. ^Odl Jetm Otm 
new. on (0462) 22486 
K2fl er *22L Low mAtese. Re- 
euir« oy grival* noyer ret 


■SB ST .1980. Mxk. wire 
wfteris. 7.000 mues. immacti . 
UJ« Qgonqnnu £3800 t«- 
otOcr 01 T47 3020 or 078481 


CAR HIRE 


HUUU MML 1958. Mark VI. 
•QvwttHve. Superb condition 
-HbwisimwL bxnsBdnoiy rare. 

. . , . £1.280. TO: 10836) 81444. 

MUtGEDeS 300 SE and 280 SU 
Self drive hire £78 po* day. , T 

£450 0« week. TO: Ol M09 J 461 JON* 

1127 lOtflre) nr Ol 4*9 8063 1 Snder^ OSSO **"***" . 

(Evmm end wre*«d»> I 





r=i 






.wv 


i ^ < 

\ • Jxmg^i 




































































CAR BUYERS’ GUIDE 





lib-erty 

#7 . 

THE SOUTH OF ENGLAND’S 
INDEPENDENT BRISTOL 
REPAIR SPECIALISTS 


FOR ALL YOUR BRISTOLS 
SERVICING, REPAIR AND 
BODYWORK REQUIREMENTS 
CONTACT US ON: 

CHERTSEY (09328) 66926 


LAURENCE KAYNE 
LONDON LTD 



a . 


WOTSWdw Ftae^ «d. tan hWe, 5*^ m»8^ 

18J8 S fate Sractow M WTMs. 1 owner. 4*000 M 
A And Quottro TntqPSSfts, sunrooLTtei^^ 
18® B UweedM 190E Auto, white, roof & windows, 2&£00 

mta . 

s 

owner — -,gj MS 

CHARIOTS OF PULBOROUGH 

Codmore HO, PiAontnh, W Sussex 
Teh (07982)5147 


f 


RESTORATION 
Avon Coachworks 

Vmtage and Classic Cw Reaorers 
Restoration of aD types of vintage classic and 
sportsters earned oat by experts. 

For farther details and free estimate contact: 

(02756)69275 


DAVID SCOTT-MONCRIEFF 
& SON LTD 

Established 1927 

Complrte restorarum repare, servicing. MoTac, on all makes oT 
can. specialists m Rolls Royce. Bentley and vinta g e iihi») hw mH 

BRITANNIA WOlSS? WEST STREET, 
LEEK, STAFFS 
Tefc LEEK (0538) 384300 





bmtknon AmtfAcroE/ 

246 High Street, Batheaston, Bath 
YOUR DREAM MG CAN BE CREATED BY US 

Telephone Jeffrey Steedman 
on Bath (0225) 852207 

Vmtdsednd Classic Car Restoration. 



STATUS CARS 


* C-Twi Salt! I 2*1 me 

: naM iKMtiiMEqM 

to He laws >Wm Stored 
r on n w w omm 




. Cm br dcunseC 
AMO. M boar,. «Mt 

mta tun 

Mtn vo cam. 





taitatUB 


AGO AS ,VJ 3 < 23 = WANT£C 
-0i f J='r:=i z 

i 5 -;D T:L 5 ri ll lai.q -CC.' ENTRY 

' T.-I 77?-: 45^£r; 


BRISTOL 

CONVERTIBLE 412 $2 

1982. BtUBwtti btafc Hda. 
F.S.H. 1 ownac. 37O00 mOes. 
Coat new today £54000. A 
tmagandaowa'a ear. Uraqud 
opport u nity to acquire Bite 
BrisMfi Classic lor £17.99 Sl 

Tet 0222 763161V 

88367B2681 (T) 


Tinuam stab 1973. mama, 
tmtery. dara Mu*. immaculate. 
C3 Mio one. Tel. Ol 6» 3499. 

ASTON MMIH DBS 6BOOO 
mis. 12 mth MOT. ntraiwfr 
sound. £9.960. 062 92J 262 T 


JAGUAR A DAIMLER 
AUTHORISED 
DEALERS 


XJ40’s 

January 

DELIVERY. 

List price. Most models 
awBiable. UK suppho d. mt 
import 

Executive Motors 
(Car Brokers). 

PI 572 2552. 


mi 




& JS AhCL ^ AUTOS LTD 

k 'f - ' J 

u 


JAGUAR A DALMLES 
WANTED 


WB Huodn iso E 4 «»vr iEc Da« bfc* msts3: 
sinfotri ace teroon PAS Rate czAme t 

t*w Lew cn fcacr moia 

? **3 Sextan I* £ Hifemrilr Surraat PAS 

Fsashtt a cnSH ra. B*6o casso** low 

irwa» ... . eiSjna 

y i=C- Honeta 280 CE Cent. Amwidc Surest* 
eteonc mhim Wo-f wftwts. tabs osare h>e*wd 

Jlcwmaillt. Paly P rime 

;*• mKtnsdB » E Arte rrafle Stntpof ftaaii 

PAS LigM etie r*u< H UB 

■- ■ 2 ? B - St hfta ate 4 hoc, man-. Sarst* ABoyHeas aa» 

asac rasned n Santf** Osh {uok. 

«efc SbciodI. (ta many n« V*y b* mrieast. maf 

«1 Minatni 3B0 a (C fBU). Fnsaee a art uk»p usteuan 

EUy Et7J»S. 

55-57 Stamford Htfl London HIS 01-800 0C11 
Also rt S0U9I Ealing Road, WS 01-567 5484 


ivan Page-Rat cl iff 



T«toTM4nooor«qa2aaas 


E'souTtifRrrsa 

li^Lffssicsj; 


MANY JAGUAR C0NC0UBS SUCCESSES 

Vail k and see far yoandT oar ddh and cuadanti m neaorug and 
retailing ike many XKc and Es a oar new pitaniscs CkH or w* 
Tet Alia Hnfd— y m Chatter (993281 67671 
SOUTHERN CLASSICS LTD, MWG >Wt3&. HaNWOBTH LANE, 
CHERTSEV. SURREY. KTIk VLA 


COACHWORK 



RESTORATION 


Nm COOPER CARS 
TELB*H0WE (81) 229 1180 



Q3 

ENGINEERING 

FERRARI 388 6TB 
1976 

fare fajrefltess model Star 
with Black interior. Excellent 
condition. 



HIGH CUSS 
VINTAGE CAR 
REFINISHING 
SPECIALISTS 

H. TINDALE 
(Motors) LTD 
- LeeStreet. 
off Manchester Street. 
Oldham OL8 1EF 
061-624-5459 



wtommtaB 355% 

Lex Mead 


JIM RUSSELL 

1686(C) Mercedes Bear 
300 GZ> 4 wfaed drive hum. 
6 ipd in while. £ 1 < 0 O&. 
1086 (QMeteedee Bens 
100 In Thwle Green with 
Cream doth. ABS hzakes. 
stfrooC stereo. £1X500. 
1B8S IO Mercedes Benz 
600 BEL la 
with Brown velour, iDoy*. 
s/rooC 7.500 tnfln orrfv. 
£29^96. 

1965 <B) Mercedes Bena 
280 BE In Thistie Green 
with Bctjt doth. »/roof. 
WJ500 miles only. £18^95. 
1985 (B) Mercedes Benz 
230 TE Esleu Is 
Anthzaciu with Blue MB 
ten, s/roof, rear faring asst, 
stereo. £ 12 X 00 
1064 <B) Mercedes Bena 
230 TE Estate h Light 
Ivory with Beige doth. 
s/rooC low mileage 21 1 ,795. 
1003 (A) Mercedes Seas 
1«0 In Signal Red with 
Black doth, aterea £8,995. 



1986 944 

(New Model. S mths old, condition a$ new) 
* Metallic silver * Wide Wheels 

* Siereo/cassette * Black pinstripe seats 

* Rear seal belts + usual Porsche extras 

Also fitted Porsche towbar 

* In car telephone (Racal Vodaphone) 

£18,500 
Phone iatiaUy 

MR BROOKES - (0203) 468910 
Wkend (0905)620985 



no IE ESC AHrat a&ver. Mw 
velour, an* oreakaelev nn 
roof, milse control, ndlo r» 
sclte. 17.2DO miles. 1 owner. 
rsH. cs,«o. s c smith Mo- 
lon Ltd 01 778 5262. 


ZM SC 84 A ueco txue/btue 
rtoftv. auto, elect ! 1c sun roof. 
e*tc windows. FSK 28.300 
miles. £18.950 S O SjtOIH Mo- 
tors LM 01 778 9282. 


JAGUAR & DAIMLER 



Jaguar XiS Vt2 coupe. 
Novamber IB85, C rug. 
BhfehRackto Green. *a 
Eton hide. 8500 mkes, 
axceSent condition 
tofoughout 1 owner sinca 
new. air oondtoonma 
£19.750. 

Tdrnyaaly 8243791541. 



CAST IRON 


- VWTAGE znd »«H)em 
PETROJOIESa VEHRLES 
CY19DER HEMS 
CVLMOER BLOCKS 
UAMF0U3S 

19 Hough HS, Swamagun 
Lacs LEfi 4flf 

(0538) 81130 (day) 
(0530) 38531 (evmtag) 


Tcltp'iK'W. '4 elite.-. C j-ij 55S6I.O 

yin ' 

# 

Workshops Ltd 

5pecia= tsis ir. :h: Restorariori 
Repair zr.i Scr-ice of Vsntaep.. 
PVT ar.d Histone Cars 

BMW S. BRISTOL 

A fol! rsnee- of s^nic« is 
nailable inclodinfi »?r> bipb 
qualify 

PAINTING & PANEL 
BEATING 

i27 Er.jinser Read 
Wes; Wiiis.T, •adint EspjIc •. 
WrsiS'jr. . Wills 


RESTORATION 



| f SNOWDEN'S MG 
CENTRE 


m Spedafists In 
MG rwiovation A 
restoration 

Completsiy refurbished 
MGBs available for 
immer&ale deBvery. 

Harrogate (M2^ 502486 


Memory Lane 
r Conpar^ 1 

INTERNATIONAL 
AUTOMOTIVE 
. CONSULTANTS. 
We specialise in locaiing 
rare and exotic machinery 
for the serious buyer 

077478 2362 

Telex 677467 (Chacon} 


VAUXHAU. VIVA 
DL 1987 

1199cc.ftaaeodtBu& 
Onljf 10JOO Genuno Rriac 
aneene* 

Stored tfioerc o nr since 


• 0 "fJDQ S ; ... ■- 

*^TuR ScSV'.CESiXvC 


.'-STERN CLASSICS 


<&/£&- 


VINTAGE . CLASSIC . 

MODERN CARS 
Boor fepaa red ferns »’ 
hgjwt sBuubnK 

Font Sd& 

r KT a ro *. 

tetunes, Tet fpstm» 

Stota-eo-TiwA. musrtt 4Sfl. 
Slid TNG. (tOJCn) 




ETYPE 

ROADSTER 

1961. 18, chasss 50. 
95% rebuiit needs 
finishing. Oilers around 
£12,000. Serous 
enquiries telephone 0533 
772409 evenings. 


NEW 

Jaguar Sovereign 3.6 

Octoter 1986. Delivery nvteage 
only. Satin beige wWi bariey 
feather ntoiar. Best otter owr 
E26.M0 secues. 

Tet 01 499 9448 
(Office tows) 


350SL SPORT 
CONVERTIBLE 

Had loo / soft top- 13T7. Ody 
ELMO mrtes. 7ms car 5 m 
ah M tuttly imnaodate condtm 
ttHoujaifl. Loos ike a mid] 
newer model Chansh reg. fed 
with all light beige intenor. 
Macmnp £100 Man al iedto 
sttoing wheel. Front spoder. 
£350 loaded Hi Fi system. 
sapMo amp. wheels, cotter 
■donnation. Full MOT. Owner 
pur dashed new ore. £9.650 
mo. Tel 041 6397867. 


1985 (C). 
MERCEDES 
280 SL 

Spin red/tan interior. 8.000 
niles. ImmaodalB condition. 
AMG a Hoy wheats Biajpud 
stereo. Pnco: £22.500. 
Tel Kradsford (0565) 50758. 


230CE 

Auto 1985.22.000 mite. 
Bectric sun roof. Stereo 
radio cassette, electric 
windows. Soperti condition. 

£13^400. 

Tefc 0525 374228 or 
0525237831. 


380SL 

1982 on crashed ptae , 
maattc W» green, boge 
mtenor. hard and sod tups. 
34 j»0 genime nWes. Rff 


so® SE 84 silwr Blue vdour. 
E*r. Am. Cruise control. Air 
cwi. Seat memorv aUuoankt 
raalo/cassene. immaculate. 
38^)00 miles. Chatrmans car. 
£19.950. 0277 211182 M. 
05702 78844 O. 


MO **- B iv®. May 85. t owner, 
8-000 rah. FSH. Cbanuusne 
wah i br«m ctolh aBs Alloys. 

wtndows/onel. 
H/Ump w/wtpe. BUunuiki ve- 
Asnew PX pass. £24.950. 
TM 02816 24IS. 


■ recniet UWKKISMC 1981 7 
seater. rmdnl«U blur, matetims 
blue Interior. 27.000 miles. 
FSH. InmanAae. 1 owner 
smee new. CaMflarml nmnber 
Dine new. Cia.soo ono. Tel: 
02405 5560 


ISOt ‘D* Reg. Auto Ard/ bUct. 
E/w. S/a. (PMcwer were o/ 

mm £].ootn saoo mw 

imrooc. Cosi now £16.000+ ac- 
cept £14.750 Tel 01 854 1602 
IW«m' Ol 955 9895 OK*ne>. 


WRZOCS INC O re®, thistle 
green, electric windows, arm 
rests, deeme sunroof. 5000 
miles. £12.600. TH^)l-790 
5746 work/01-m 6241 home 


880 SEC 1985 Petrol blue/urey 
pinsmpr. air cond. ABS eic. 
Sen-lfe nisi ary tmmaculale 
67.000 mfles ban £19.500 
TE1 BiBlneas 0268 773891 
Home 0702 202179 


800 B. UnreowerM. DeMvery 
mileage aw ootid. Stereo, ami- 
then alarm. Alloys. Manual 
tranwnhOMti. £19.900. 0276 
64564 (Hi. Ol 571 5138 lOl. 


2SQ D Auto Delivery ntoeage. 
Anthracite nwfaiuc pmi sun 
shine roof. Electric Iron! 
windows. £19.000. Tel: 0204 
26158. 


I HESCCOES 250 TC Elate 
Red. auto, elec sunroof, alloy 
wheels, radio rutefle. 4^00 re- 
corded rah Best oner around 
Ust price. THa0642) 788318. 



944 LUX 

•hdv KR. GP white. 13.000 
miles. Extras include 
efarbic aunnaf. 2]5 tyres, 
ultnsuoic abma. Compeny 
car forces &alh 
£22.000 ouo. 

Can dtiiver rniwafam* 
Tel: 03017 6067 
after Opm. 


98® C re® July 86. 4400 train, 
black metallic wKh black leath- 
er toienor. simrera 4 logs 
£20.760 Tel: 07372 47205 


PORSCHE 928 S 
SERIES 2 

1986 C 1 reg. Guards 
red. automatic, sunroof 
etc. 6.000 miles. Fun 

warranty. 

£34,000 Ofl-0. 
Te1:0732 885144 


944 LUX: A re®, while, oood con- 
dltMna. new tyres. elec 
wlnMWroM. anw/nu. 
£12.780 Tel: OI S82 0154 


V.w. AND AUDI 


of Shane Square 


wtmB metallic with toattwr & 

sun roof. X 200 mlos ,r 2 «. 2 sq 

M D AinS Ouattts Star toother, sun roof. 4500 

todfts m,wi 

KD Audi Coop® 2 3. GT Sadn Black. Pioneer 

stereo El 1.995 

wp Aims 90 Quatto Stone Grey. 170 btu. 4.80Q 

retos JE1 6,750 

w C Audi BO 5 speed Tornado Fled. 8300 

mses £8 ass 

86 C Audi BO GL 5 speed. Oceanic Blue, BJOO 


214 PAVILION ROAD. LONDON, SWUIel: D1.-73C 2131 



PRE-OWHED BITTES 

The Bitter SC 
2 Door Coup® 



Boar SC 2 Door Coop® 
39 Law Enona bi Aqua 
Bkw limrifc Automate 
Owboa BD» Warner 
manor Mr cond. Crum 
control Unxwd im 

OkTarareai 4 sakr satto 
cysom C3SS70 

Gordon Lamb, 
Cbssterfieid Ltd 
Contact Paid Ashton 
0948 481(2)0 






OffeR THE R3LL0WMC EX 
DEHOIVnUTORS FOR SAUL 
I98B -C THBHA LX TURBO 
19S6 O' PAI5MA IX IE 
1986 XT YIO FIRE 
1336 IT PfBSMA (600 
HEMEL niPSTEAD 


ABOI COUPE GT 

C reg. automate Star/ Wl. 
blue aite rm BJamunkt rata/ 
cassaie. heaed drmre seat 
dec windows, suraot. Uoy 
inverts FS>H. moookea 
corefiaon KOO mtes.i owner 
£1030 OKL 

Tefcfll 678 8289 eves 
01 947 6837 Oafs. 


E0LF GTi 


n* U’ A;if LiL 


1984. special etSbon. afl white 
antti maidBag uphotetav. 
16,000 rrates. taxed May 1987, 
regutarfysenneed. vnnnflyas 
new, a sfijonraj^tar for drfy 

TeL 0943 864191. 


CAR SHIPPING 

Specialists to all destin- 
ations by roU-on/rofl off or 
container. For the best 
service and lowest fully, 
inclusive rates contact: 

(CARMAN SHIPPING LID 
32 Gresninct! MU. LkMm 
SE10 9HZ 81-858 8268 


MOTORS LEASING 


NEW VOLVO 
ESTATES 

For less than £9300. for 
special leasing arrange- 
ments. please phone 
01-543 3332 

IAN ALLEN MOTORS 
OF WIMBLEDON 


MESCOCS 500 sec 19S3. Sto- 
nal rvd. Creatn WaOier. -45.000 
miles FSH. Fferfecl IhrouahouL 
£21.750. T«n WjRon 881161 
or Dectmra 3866 (fevas). 


mecnes 2SOSC 198a 70000 
miles. sunroof. esmllenl 
condnitan. must Hi mb week 
hence £&800 Tel: Mr Sound 
Ol 603 5315 affior Mm 


380 SC. a REC. Astral 41ver 
wtth Mur velour. Many extras. 
FSH. Price Includes radio tele- 
phone £13.950. T*1; Hove 
104821 52185. T 


PORSCHE OFFICIAL 


GOLF GTi. 

-B' Reg. Mars Red. 
immaculate condition, 
stays wntti new P6. Tinted 
windows, sun roof. Solar 
Aterm. front tog lamps. 1 
owner, 22,000 nates. 
£6300 

Tel 01 879 3627. 


VW COIF dm CC convertible. 
1986. While with blue tnterrar. 
run VW engtoentog comer- 
won. EOaupunkl stereo. 9X<00 
mites. Offers over £8^50. Td 
0529 233472 


CRT cn. 5 poor. -C Ren 1 5/ 
86). Black. 2,700 mues. alloys. 
R/ C. in maculate. £8.760 Tel 
Ol 35? 6625 or 352 9000. 


*e2c vSt»towi-'s/R W ^toLirauSl 6IHF an GTI GTI Over 30 new 

4 weaker radio cassen^tev * 0662 t, S*S52iiiS re r<21‘ In 9l 

nmnii.hiA 7 ttX) mtL Mimniv B72182. *VW dealer) cpndlUon FSH. 9J 


MOST BE SEEK 
GOLF GTI 

WTwb. Immaculate 
showroom cond i bon. 

Puichased December fta. 

Low mileage 6.190 due to 
storage bmontfis every 
year. One dnvar only. 

£7^00 

Tel: 01 221 7896. 


ASTON MARTIN 
VOLAKTE 
CONVERTIBLE. 

fra 1 ‘fBtuei Inna 85 7180 
miss rarafl e been *4n am 
nam/Bom mi not mm. 
MUMXaWihns lulceasoBn 
A wn aesmik cat u a utynj 


AUDI 

QUATTRO 

*C reft. While. Sunroof, 
ABS. Etc 13.000 miles. 
FSH. 

Tel: 0532 438201 
<T) 


TBUIOC O STORM Aug 84. Cos- 
mos Blue, leather InL Ail usual 
extra*; wroof. dm/wlnik, 
atom Car phone ai-altoble 9cp- 
araiety. Low Mltoaoe 
Immaculate £6850- Tel: 
(Eves/Wtomdri 01-7861617 
iOJ 01 248-2593 


COLF OIL CabrMleL special edi- 
tion In white wrth raoichtoo 
interior. May 1985. 29.000 
mile*, expensive Pione e r Mereo. 
BBS Sport wMir wtmh. im- 
macutole Chertohed number 
Mate. £6.760 Tel 08047 2075. 


Aim QUATTRO TURBO 1982 <V 
reel, silver, stereo. 4&.000 
miles. FSH. iramacutole condi- 
tion. £9.460. Tel. 0202 7622S3 
day or 020C 670007 evening* 


AUMGT I4B5. FSH Central lock- 
ing. very go cond toon. Taxed. 
£6.600 ana. 109321 225951. 


ROVER 

Vitesse 3500 

86 1_~ ree. Silver. Twin Ptenem 
f bomber. Bectric unroof. 
Only 6J0U0 milee 
Maker’s wairanly. 
£12260 

TeL- 091 455 7861 
(Evenings & weekends) 
or 091 4 15 0066 (Office) T 



Now in stock 
Moonstone, Stack & Whin 
Immedate detary 

Marlins, 
KRfdermnster 
Tel: 0562 752661 


LOTUS 
ESPRIT S3 

85 C reg, in Gfaasr Blue 
metallic 20.000 mites. 1 
owner. tuB service 
fisuxy. 4 new tyres etc 
£14,750 

0432 276727 T 


maculale. 7.000 mis. wananiy. 
£8.950 Tel 031-667-4980 ev» 
QUATTRO 90 86 S/R. Allow. 
Tints. Stereo. Etc. 24.000 raid 


MEW Gnu CTTs. Canvntudes t 
full VW Audi range at dfeCMim 
prices from ICC 01-202 8696. 


All original, immac. p/x. Has I VW/ AUMux: CoUCTi ai Huge 


Phone If reouirM. £9.950.* Tet 
09323 54521 (T> 


Dbcounl. RaHd Delivery Phoe- 
nix 1025 1261 4676. 



ROLLS-ROYCE & 
BENTLEY 
AUTHORISED 
DEALERS 


'LEEDSi OS320 508454 


500 SO. 84 B while, blue velour, 
electric frocu seals and sunroof, 
alloy wheels, atr conmUantog. 
50.000 miles. 1 owner. Immac- 
Utotc £23.000 7 M 0303 64996 


PORSCHE 


MBUABXJS S3 cabrtaiet. June 



TWR JASUAM XJS 1983. wire 
red mttaetc. doe sUn hide. 2 
owners. oar coraUQotong. 
48.000 miles. FSH. extra mt 
comnuori throughout £13.750 
ooo. MaMsnhead 783795 or 
Twytord 345292. 



CAR CRAFT 



24 hr Cclfular 
0836 229924 



SOVnwMM. 8 199/84 Rhodium 

■diver wtth wry doeskin tntery- 
ar Sunmef Air cond. Electric 
seats. Alloy wheels. Many ex- 
tras. 19.000 rases. £12.9601 
Tel: 01 559 3927 (Office hours! 


198* WS 36. Caban blue with 
. tosh blue leather Interior. 
12i60O miles, tranuauui con- 
dMao. FSH. £15.960. Trt 
■ (07341 417011 oBSce or <0734) 


M8MACU1ATE Xlt red. auto. 
6.3. 1979. only 49,000 touts. 
Service History. Tax. tong 
MOT. C6JK». TM: <011 747 
5023. 


JAGUAR. E Type. 2 + 2. V12 
1972. Omen, professionally re- 
stored Id ortotaai condition. 
Offers Unrated around £9.000 
Tefc 10203) 413074. 


MS HE 1985 British Raring 
Grecn/BtsenH nvhr. phone: 
rnmote car aterm: iramacuiatr 

coumaon £10260 iH) 049165- 
T54 or lOl 01-681-8936 


34000 genim mte. FuU 
Menxfles Bsc sefoca lutay. 
mxracuiajB ihroogtai flfl.750. 
Tet 027934 2330 home/ 
027964 2506 work 


1936. 500 SEL 

AnthTBcite/ligm grey 
feather upholstery. Only 
4,000 chauffeur driven 
mUes. New type aftoy 
wheels. Every extra. Pris- 
tine condition. £32,000. 
Tet (9935) 75242 
(weekdays) or (0458) 

- 251446 (oveiMgs). 


280 SE 

B reg. metallic Astral 
Silver. Bloopunkt 
stereo, electric 
windows, tinted glass, 
only 6.000 mites. 
£17,250. 

Tel: (0909) 473202 
or 485328. 


288 CE 1981. LHD. Hack, low 
mileage, leather. ESR. PSH. 
£S.50a Tel 0272 828696. 


240 D. September *84. an extras. 
. £8950. Tet Oil 1 OL 247 4S4t 
Eve Ol 745 942a 


180 E. AUIO. 8S Red. FSH. EX 
cond. £10.600. Telephone: 
<0911 2841685. 


944 LUX. 

Nov 82 Y rnmaaime 
corekbaa 37 noo msge. MMc 
sfl^ otn biacfc aerarpe 
08s us. sun root, win, (dn 
Nsoonai Pipustwc stsfeo. 2 
Onrets. F«i Porsche Honin'. 
E1UJ00. 

TeL 0296 641881.(W or 
09778 5Z61.(H). 


1982 ROLLS ROYCE 
SILVER SPIRIT 

Ctanrens cat from new (2 
drivers only) 30.000 naks. 
Btaci/bugubdy mm nciides 
Wrotone. cama aod coctai 
setfHoopersl £36.000 tnye 
number ptate also svabble. 
Contact Miss. J. Harman, 
jevefi Pooei Macbmas Ud. 
0923 37211 


ROLLS-ROYCE & 
BENTLEY 


SILVER SHADOW 

<1981 1 GtUd metallic hedi/ 
foran tiny) root nmnacetnc 
Mth etnionc 5JI7 m2es os 
dad Mainuised br imm RR 
dinrAuier. 

£30.000 
Phone Bristol 
(8272) 681451 
9an - 530pa moo - firL 


OTTI5 EXCEL C reg in immacu- 
late condition FSH. 9,000 
■rales. Lots of extra’s. New ex- 
cess of £18.000. oetudne 
bargain £13.995. Can be 
viewed Sin London. (M24 
445629 office houra. 


FERRARI MB GTS OV rep. fun 
spec. pristine Uiroognout. 
1 4.SOO ml les. recent £1000 Mo- 
dena servKe. £2&500ono Fun 
details telephone. Uncial (09721 
28570 work or 744869 home 


•44 LUX 1985 C reg. aula. PAS. 
air con. POM. good condition, 
warranto until 1 987 .While . 
18.800 miles. Private sale. 
£16400. Tet; 0621 828892 or 
741661 


■WBCW 844 June 1985. 
11,500 miles, electric sunroof, 
ironl mgs. back skirt, passenger 
door mirror. cMn/cassrtle hold 
er. immanaate. £17^50 ono. 
Tel. 0602 686568 oOce hours. 


388 E 1986. metaatlr re6 wnh 
cream trim Aotcenauc. electric 
sunroof . crutse control . HLWW. 

RHRs -r other extras. Blaupunkt 
radto/caselte with 4 speakers, 
immaculate. Under B.OOO 
miles- £21.950 Tel. 0254 
212275 or 0234 58488 1 office i. 

230 TE *84 B reg. Labrador blue. , 
blue doth, sunroof, auto, cruise 

control. Btauptmki Toronto. 951 sport cubnolet 1983. Guards 
rem- racing seats, lull service ^ Black leather. Forged al- 
*“[“>■ ♦ ,?wiier. bougnj new uy, Turbo spotlefs Lmmarked 
from rvjcrceod . Law miuonp . Full hHlorv 

■ F laBB ° ^ 01 570 ±^f l L19.9 kTV^ 01 467 3793 
home or Ol 486 BSE9 work. 

2S0T Estate Ndv 1980 Ante. F«dl 
service hsiwy. recent decoke, 
mans- extras, which rocrude 
Btoupuntt stereo. cHMseats. 4 
new tyres 85JX» roues includ- 
ing personal Reg No 6666 PG 
£4.750 or £4-200 without. Tel 
02405 28882 

190E £ 3 16V Smoke stiver 12 
months warranty, imnmued 

mileage, dec t/roof. lull UK 911 TORSO 1982. S9.(XX> miles, 
specs new unrep. £2iooO. Tel: Grand Prtx while. Mock leather 

OIO 49 2161 561835 anytime interior. FSH. alarm, tmmacu- 
FreSun loci. lale cundlUon £21.000. TeL 01 

637 0322 office or 0371 


128 S Series 2 auto. 1984 A rep 
full leather, ran pack, rlec seals 
A sunroof, atr con. ABS. 
35.000 miles. Uuemei . immac. 
condition. £26.950 secures. 
Tr 1:0304 363909 eve 6 wends 


458 SLC. 1978. Magnetite Hue 
wtth Hue velour, ah- coodUMP- 
mp stereo. -Goodvear SCT~ 
tyres, alloy w h eels. fuH sen-tee 
history, bnmacutoie condlUon. 
£9JOO Tel Chedeahani i(Hd2i 
580060 io«rcei or Painswtck 
(04621 812267 fHomeL 


JENSEN 

IntoKjitorSra-WM. 
Coaipfctt cta s M np 
iHurhSiuncm 10 ibc hikhes 
ymrian k. .^bsoiu&ay 
eacdkai UumtoboaL A me 
catowr's car. realistically 
priced al £8.995. 
Apply to Steven LiQ M 
0425 77703 (D 


HEW M8UAR available now or 
J anuanf Ip Tel: (0279) 


mm 










mm 




2TOTC ESTATE. A reg. aufomai- 
ic. 1 owner. 49.000 mfleo. Full 
Mercedes service blnory. me- 
tallic Hue. sunroof, aihws. 
radlo/cassetie. tasted etc Ahso- 
luiefy unmarked. £8.950 o no 
Tel 051-539-3140 Sunday/ 
eves. 031-656-5606 (Qrttoei 


280 T Estate. Forced sate due 10 
res. parldap quota. Immaculate 
condHMti. Whae ex! . Hack taL 
Roar mo. 5 speed. PAS. S/rocf. 
toh ♦ MOT. Inn* prp 6. FSH. 
cubMp radio. 4 speakers. 1962 
(Yl 37.000 mites. £6.800 ono. 
Tel Ol 937. 7838. 




820592 home. 


•11SC Sport targa. 1979. guards 
red/ Mack pin ship. 85.000 
miles, superb example. Porsche 
Service Hutocy. R/C. £12.900 
Tel Ol 980 7689. fEvesr 


L OMU I Uli M1KU.NIU We 

matb setters w«n uonv To 
SHI or buy Tel 01-358 0585. 


511 TURBO 1988 Delivery mile- 
age onto. Red/Black mtenor. 
£47.000 TiN .0388 88203 


844 AUTO Feb "86. only 0.000 
miles. Guards red. as new. ESR. 
PDM. CCH. £19.850 Tel: 
<069261 65566 


911 SC SPORT COUPE 83 i4> 
Guards Rvd/Berber Trim 
43.0CO miles Motor Srfvlce lust- 
Ctrnipteted. £18.750 TeL Maid- 
stone .06221 60025 


ROLLS-ROYCE & 
BENTLEY 


i:; 


0949 20414/ 
NOTTINGHAM 873 241 

Etceorama! 1 owner. T T«ie 
Bentley with non dal mo 
r«9isiialion number WWU T. 
FwkihI n vehw tem wnh red 
leathei ovn. FuV senna relay lo 
support al approximate 5.500 
miles per anmvn pnee whm new 
in 19% Tmalfaw WifflO mte& 
Not to be confused with Die 
averap examples Totally a®ert> 
canton. A (Mjgfn to own and 
drive. Cm be yours for 
£9,995 



SPIRITS 

CoiswoM berge/boge hide 
Ice green/green tods 

SPUR 

With eledne diwnm. 
magnoW.luwBe htae 
UnregEtered tor immediate or 
Jan delivery 
£55/55/60 k 

0296 641383 


ROLLS ROYCE 
CORNICHE 
SALOON 

Gold mentor. Appro* 31000 
miles. FireHcd aradmoa. 
Resulxr service ictonk. 
avaitabic. and MOT muil 
February 87. 

cnjmoaa. 

Tel 0122 91921. 

(9 u SJO). 


SILVER 
CLOUD II 

57,000 (Tries. Earls Court Show 
car. Sage Green over Velvet 
Green. 1 owner umil 1985 
absolutely beautiful £16.750 
No offers but could Pat 
exchange for pre war 
Rolls-Royce. Tel. 0404 822324 
(Devon) T 


VINTAGE ROLLS - 
ROYCE 

Sate of a rare 1949 Vintage 
Stvei Wrath. Trim body 
Supah OTvdrtwn, ta in 
srnuotap nmning order 
£ 16.000 ono 
Tel Rodney Dreyer. 
Beah, Ayrelwe. Scoflind 

S - 4422 Day. w Beah 
- 4370 Evenings. 


Mbs 




H 


8SCTB 


p i 



WEatis m 


An AngHSt 85 
Rolls Royce 
Ceraiebe CeavertfUe 

On a C* rod. wan 1 ownar and 
dravtoyndeogaol 1.100 redes 
Aknosfrew. Fnsned » reognota 
wan megrote unootsttry pud dok 
topwrawaiacioamhootl The price 
of ns car siUact 1C remmng 
umc*J£78500. 

For enquires ptease call Lyo 
499 8487 


BEM1LET HRJLSAfK Turbo. 
1983. Muinidli] Hue wtth Bragc 
biwrfor 36.000 miles. FUH 
Roll* Royce Service History, 
racrtenl condition. To Inspect 
Irirasr call Mr James on Ol 629 
2872 vEves 6 W/ ends Ol 688 
53661 £57.650. 


ROLLS ROYCE 5B.VER SPURT 

bnnwcutole. first reordered on 
16 fh Decem b er 1985 iA reoi. 
RoO> Royce exlendM warranto 
for nexi i wo yean Price 
£37.995 Telephone (Sl^SO 
3333 during baseness hours 


SILVER SHADOW R Req. Cnesi- 
nul wllh magnesia hue. FSH. 

mil wrviCF 2.000 num ogo. Su 
on* condition throughout 
MuU he viewed £10.-195 part X 
CMSUemf. T«- Eves 0378- 
75743 Day Ol -S3 1 2344 


CODMCHE P reg. Blur, berpr 
miner VMS & Inlenor. low 
rralevige. hnnuKiilair rondlhon. 
cteetnc windows, stereo etc. 
£18.000. Tel: Ol 267 7114/ 
267 6510 


19 RRR 

On shadow Marie If in 
chestnut over sand 
registered 1979, full 
history, genuine 43,000 
miles approx. Absolutely 
beautiful. £19,500. PX 
considered. 

Oxford 0865 512277.T. 


SAVER SPOUT Mutsannr. 1981 
Exeter Blue - immaculate - per- 
sonal number - portable car 
phone, pnv-nlr sale. £30.000 
one. Tel Ol 408 1730 icmcc 
hpurtl 


1981 ROLLS Mmt Silver 
Cloud sheU/ludor grey, unused 
last 4 yean. £10.000 ONO. or 
PX lor new Jaguar XJ6 2.9. 
Tel: 0029 62784. 


SILVER SHADOW. 1976. Silver, 
black roof, immaculate cream 
hide Interim. Only 68.500 
record mis. £11.950. Executors 
sate Til 1049171 535 Berks. 


lAMBOHCMM COUKTACH. 

LP600S. 1984. white/ Hue. 
15.00 0 miles, £46.000 or pan 
exchange. Rolls. Ferrari, jag. 
etc Plus Cush Tel 04557 2326 
■Sunday! 0455 46302 iWorVJ. 


LOTUS EXCEL Mk 2 84 B Red 
Cream naif leather Him. rSH 
Excellenl condition ifiroughout. 
Above average mileage nenre 
£8.950. Tel. Watton 88161 
Dereham 3865 levcsi. 


PANTHER KALUSTA 1 J»rAl IW9. 
1984. wood veneer I oca and 
door capotngs. 2.900 genuine 
miles on clock. Super* rotun 
Don £8.000 onn Tef.Ol 878 
8E6G lanyume; 


ALFA GTV6, 190 BMP head con- 
version. A reg. 54.000 m. FSH. 
no expose spared. Hack. 
£4.500 01-720 5677 office 
hour-i. 


ASTON MARTIN Volatile VR. 
A mo. Black, immaculate C 
Mate (1979 reg) Portable car 
phone. Has io be seen. Private 
sale £30.000 ono. Tel 01 408 
1730 'office hours) 


MEUeOPrER entrant F28G. 73 
VHF. VOR. AOF DME. Tran 
^Bonder Just had Us Annual 
£35.000 Tel 03752 78844 O. 
OCT7 211132 H. 


PANTHER KatlHU 16: Feta 84. 
22.000 miles. Ivory. vCC. ex 
Iras. £6.750 TO: 102701 
76e043 Weekends/ evesi 


2000 SPYOCR Alfa Romeo 2 seal 
con venibte. We have a seteclloi. 
of new delivery mileage and 
second hand examples wiui 
non) nano drtv e tor immediate 
delivery Prices from £14.995 
for our 1987 model Green CJo 
verleaf version. £13.495 lor 
our standard version. £11.995 
lor our 1986 model and used 
can from £5.995 All wllh 12 
months warranty, part tot- 
change. leasing, hire purchase 
ono insurance arranged Bell 6 
Colville Phone Boooy Bell or 
Peter Biidger >048651 4671 
Mon/Sal 96pm 

TVR 3SW DH Coupe, b reg 1984. 
Company Directors car. White 
/Red interior. 22.000 miles 
only, immaculate condition 
£10.750 Phone Newbury 
44291 Daytime or 34534 Eves. 
TOYOTA SUPRA New Model m 
Sliver mctanir. 6.000 mites. Hg 
saving on new price. MDl car. 
FSH For runner details Tel: 
0257 453344 office hours 
WORLD'S Pastes! Range Rover 
300 * B.H P E.F I. tm macu- 
late Low mtteaoe. 1 menculous 
owner Try It. you'll buy It! 
0594 26040 Gretlon Motors Ltd 
ASTON MARTIN V8 September 
78. Hue. 2 owners, outstand- 
ing. Eii.ooo. ono. M 
Eddrrsluw 00463 2521 
CABRIOLET Eicon 1.6 l B Rep 
Met Grey . XR3 wheels. 10.000 
mis V tiC. £6.500 Tel Ol 636 
1371 Off. Ol 602 1104 Mm 
FERRARI 308 CTSi X reg. Seel 
Bl. ted/magnnUa a/c. d/s. 
FSH. 40.000 mis. £21 COO Ol 
251 1200 Wk 650 1955 E/WE 
LOTUS EXCEL Mk2 1984. Red 
wftn gold nail hide. 18.000 mis. 
Very good condibon £11.000. 
Tel: .0548841 3709 
CtTBOEH; All Models Al Huge 
Dtscounl Rapid Delivery. Phoe- 
rdx. i Q26 126i 4676. 

LOTOS CARS. For the best na- 
UonwMr cash buyers Phone 
Lotus Norfolk 0603 407766 
NEW ZASATO deftoery 1907. 
with or wtthoul duly, yotu- 
spec. Tel 007074 381 
NISSAN 300 ZX Targa Auto 
1985. red One owner. Mint. 
£9-250 TH- 09274 20076 
PEUGEOT inf. 205 GTI A CTI at 
Huge discount. Rapid dehvecy. 
Phoenix .025 I26i 4676, 


ROLLS-ROYCE £ 
BENTLEY WANTED 


PJ. FISCHER Pav* highest prlem 
for tow mdrw W d Bemlevr 
1930-80 0! 785 6633 

S HADO W 11 WANTED, anything 

rpiBKiered. Pro ale Casn buyer 
Tel. 0246 34907 anytime 


PERFORMANCE CARS 




mi 


i « 

■. S' l l i rei '' l i V B f. ra 


YARNOLDS 

OF STRATFORD 

aftABflOOOTinbolB 86(C) 
6000 mfos only. Oaoargdo 

pray maiaihc, with Buflglo 
faathor trim. ACCi£1B,75Q- 
SAAB 900 Turbo 2 dr! 88 
(Cl 6000 (Mas. diany tea 

SS_iE. 

UaBhqkm U. 

wsfwiwsBte, 

CV37 OUR. 

Tet 2EH* 



leers 


me chanical eo- 
t the £8,000 be 
Portfolio Gold 
sterday to good 

ite my gramo- 
? my donation 
tail appeal and 
Hurt year,” Mr 
, of ADestree, 

,ed 51, irfao has 
d Gold since h 
ones, said that 
line his lock. 

; fantastic. It is 
ace.'’ 

d cards can be 
nding a stam- 
envefope to: 




d in brewing 
inkers and, in 
ven kill them, 
for Real Ale 

y- 

ie campaign's 
it‘s Brewing. 
012 . a former 
d Beer Guide, 
e who have 
ter breathing 
s disorders, 
io are allege 
. can suffer ill 
king beers in! 

have been 
luce a fbasi v 
inly, or lo 

I Stales, the* 
ire than 40 
heart attacks 
■ers used co- 
in beer to 
ling head. 


man couple 
: last July for 
eking raj lic- 
ences. 

Lord Lane, 
ce. will pre- 
irations by 
nja Schulze, 
br leave to 
ie sentences 
Justice Mi- 
thc Central 









or storage 
ably shows 
ace Healer 


3Vz" high 
: 3%" high 























































































THE TTMFS FR m A Y NOVEMBER 28 1986 


Sri* 


BUSINESS TO BUSINESS 


ALDGATE 

900 yards from City 
Large or Small Offices 


Whether you require 1 room with superb 
views, use of reception, boardroom and all 
secretarial and other facilities, or a large 
unfurnished suite with big dealing rooms, 
etc. 


Long or Short Term 


No foimalitUB, covered car park 
available. 


VERY IMPORTANT 
ITALIAN MANUFACTURER 
OF SOLENOID VALUES IS 
LOOKING FOR QUALIFIED 
PARTNER ACTING BOTH 
AS EXCLUSIVE 
DISTRIBUTOR AND SOLE 
AGENT IN ENGLAND. 

WRITE TO BOX NO. B67, 
SIRAI, VIA MASSACCIO 6, 
20096 PIOLTEELO (MI), 
ITALY. 


El Parafsc Q 


PARLIAMENTARY 

NOTICES 


M PARLIAMENT 
-rmfr — i ism «7 


BWIIGH WATERWAYS - 

NOTRE BmBWCWN 9 m MTM oaa; 
RHUBM ta UMMl SUdnti Bn BrtBPyWitorwa 


LA RAPfTA, MALLORCA 


We are looking for active partners for the 
sale of remarkable Bungalows and Was 
at Interesting prices bn the sunny island 
MaBorca. 


P* PARLIAMENT 

S ESS ION 199 te 8 t 


NOBTOLK AND SUFFOLK BROADS I 

Me w House of commons In M ,H* 1 zPv r!LSS 1 

sank Broad? Bfli for Wtltol tf *Wdl toe WaowM Isa I 


For Information: 


EBV Ltd. 

P.O. Box 175 

CK-6048 Horw (Swteerfand) 
Phone 01041 - 41557770 


1 . To MBtW> o Broad, AMheriW f t*> Ana wryTa 

sosAd^MitednMlMiMfnMrmd 
for the Mw MBtofg o f intnae rs tf j? o* 

mlhoritfcs for those comae* id .PMrtaD '< ** ”*■*“ ? ; 
MtoNO"). me ConnwRde OsmMon ,* 5, 

Oad/M (kM YsimMh W H Bl n . 1 ruiientotoOP tr 

{•Ojrntn ai lwr n . Anteao w en Atoh ortty ate Om Scanty to 


Tel:01-377 5500 


WYE VALLEY 


GEORGIAN OFFICES 
ON CITY FRINGES N1 


ELEGANT 5-FLOORS) GRADE U US7ED 
GEORGIAN PROPERTY ADJACENT 70 ANGEL 
Formerly used as aoUcitors' offices with office 
user on kxwr 3 Boors and residential on tipper 2. 
This substantial property is excellently looted by 
Commercial Centre, 

Royal Bank of Scotland Head Office, 
Cterkenwefl Cotmty Courts, 
Agricultural Hall Design Centre. 
£4204K>0 Freehold 
HOTBLACK & CO.. 01 226 0160 


A splendid couitry house 
bow sd in a unique tradng 
position new a major tourist 
tram. Ten newly converted 
eft-suite bedrooms, kutge 
bar. turn restaurants. 

attractive rands. River and 

country Mews. 

E295A00 

SAV. HW/1083. Red Kite 


IN THE HIGN COURT OP 
JUSTICE 

NO. 00764 7 to 1986 
CHANCERY DIVIS ION 
IN THE MATTER OF 
UNIONE (TAUANA ANOjO 
SAXON 

RONSURANCE COMPANY 


SPECIALISTS IN MAKING 
ACQUISITIONS 

If yon have not found the business you are 

^firing in these cnhnnnfl 
fetus find it for you. 

CaD Philip Stockton for a 

co obligation discussion- 


f^rsa'g£gagS5g , £S5^.^s^ 

tr£ Mcm^w aw tmtor the Town 
snacounoy nE>nn i ne Ait«**M»«lsmsM euB»wmff»^ggyg^ 
farther functions tor uum o t tmi gages to* ? ?5, SK^Ssrv 
mwlM of ware resento*. coopery <£*_ ""SL 

Qw provision of cacgdng Ml ideate *M »- parta rnfl omer 
In asBOfdlao wtth cmatnop mum- country pa rts and l ong dttaw 
r ~ .w - M vMsaop and gprdlamntn of Mdeot MMW ■ 
<MHbdohsr M ma roi of ana* of stMsii#|W ow 

rntoaBmcnl of land and the fomBnp Of COBservJtfhiP a* IftlK 


AND 

IN THE MATTER OT 
THE COMPANIES ACT 19SS 
NOTICE «5 HEREBY <HVEN 
flat a MHca vw on Oat as 


Stoekton Morris JSfcSti; 

O a • a tamdon EC2A 4JB 

& Associates Ttepbne (01) 615 200B 


nanitay M»»taifwwi ata»i«n u nde r SMCtfM (MW *• 
Naoeoal Pan s and «tw *o ft* O g mffyd de m IMS. 
Aumenoe* o-ustortc Bte ffiaa n ac* weft e* 

and Areha ro tnBk W Area* Act 19T9 ate me 
wfkffifr M CMBhYAK Ad 1981: 


1 21771. 


Malady's KW Coon of Jmoea 
(or aw rnaltmmtinn of the 
reduction of me capita* of Ihe 
amNuntd Coosany from 

JT7.BOO.OOO lo JL5.07O.00a 
AND NOTICE K» FURTHER 


M PARLIAMENT 
SESSION 1986-B7 


ii cm wiM, Mr. JinMeo Mar vyn 
Davies at me Royal Courts of 
Justice. stxana. Londoa WC2A 
2U «a Monday me 8th dw «r 


1 OfCVENtNO ESTATE 


NPI1P 


V , ,i M Tg 


PACKAGING 

MATERIALS 


ANY Croatia or Shmvtioldcr of 
me said Company MMh to 


u= ti\ 


M PARLIAMENT 
SESSION 1980/87 


NATIONAL. PROVIDENT 
INSTITUTION 





COMPUTERS & 
COMPUTING 
SERVICES 


OFFICE 
A Fir 


WPLE PUBUSmas system ■ 6 
mins warr. comp. s/w HO. Exert i 
areobhnl save ZW. £7.200. 
Tel; 0276 30977. 




to tire umetohaacteo topmost or 

CART OflS La^e Quantities of 

once used ptatn DM aiasie nemiN h nm omm 
waB. lStoxltMns* il'tIB. re q i Mrt ng gw sanr tv the 
18‘Mnsa l3mss9YSi». 191ns x. on 

««««- Hynwot of the n«uMRd CMroe 
700 ether am in stock- Abo n,- om. 


700 other saes in stock. Abo __ 

leduDdam stocks bought and I rmrrr, wu. 2601 
SOM. Phone 0480 432363. 1 



NOTXZ6HEHBYaVlN 
Baa anaticattou a being made to 
i Parliament by the National 
! Provident t ns l Hn Uo B fberel-nafter 
rrfarred to as TtPri tor Imre u 
I i mivdu ce to the prese nt ff s wlnn 
1 of Parttoeneid a sn aader me 


W , ", nr*Z 


pmpem of wtoteti me taRowtno Is 


ELBORNE MITCHELL 




i. To repeal the N aRo wM 
Pravtdent tastUtWon Ac* 1910 
and me Nauonal Provident 
MtoMM 1964 and tomalie 


wnh other property, wore ietned 1 
mm pints (» now havin g effort? 


r i x i m mmmm 


TIUUHMG AGENTS for computer 
software required lor retail ap ! 
pi Ira Hem phase write to 
Adamaolt. Fteepeat NE37 |BR 


COMPANY NOTICES 


Soncwor tor the 



2. To enact prevision* 
Incidental to or consoaaoirtlal 
upon the abovementloned 


Penod and Reproduebon Desks. 
F*ng Cabinets. Wrung and 
Boardtaom Tables. Desk Chairs. 


THE COMPANY OF 


Write tor details: 

Just Desks. Dept ZB/ 11/16 
Showrooms:- 28 Cbarcb Sfccel 
Lmdan NWS SEP. Td Ne 01- 
723-7976 

6 Erstew Road. Laaton NW3 
Tel Nc 01-722-4992 


fc- . : ;£^a E 


INTERCCtonTNENTAI. 


JTTUNE SCHEDULES UMTTED 
*t*lMAN I NDUSTRI AL GROUP 


^Sg«ra^-Y= C 


On and aftor me 40i day of 
Decent-tier 1986. a cony a f the 
BUI may be Inspected and conies 
iharvof obtained at the price of ao 


Stomtuiwyi 




.J» u ■■ d * . " * "i 


Bd< E (MEMO. tWMPSTEAU) 
LIMITED 

MALMAN INVESTMENTS 
LIMITED 

NOTICE B HERESY GIVEN 



S dfVstj n ed Secretary of NPL . 
SoUdlors and Partlaroenlary 
Apents and at the following 


6 Wo 
0*3 6DH; 


• 8u*oefi Howe. 2 »—ui»n 
Street. BcMasI ST3 8AA: 




m 


new at the ofnees Of LEONARD 
CURTIS * CO.. StUBMd « 30 


7T7 .I. T . 




SECONDHAND 



FAX UPDATE 

Portable fax machines. 
Cheapest prices ui Eu- 
rope. Limited 
quantities available 
now. Please phone 
Fax International. 
Tel: (0243) 860662 



LONDON W2 «LF OH Thursday 


wm'iL 


weMviUe House. Fnzalan i 
CourL Newport Road. Cardiff 
CF2 I EX. 


Dated tins wntodpni day of 


T. REAY 
Oak lo the Oo mro mi 
The TUB House 
WhU church Bridge 


330 DR 3.46 m 4.00 pm: 4.18 
Dae 430 pm: tor as soon as 

rv tbl r thereafter) for the j. T « aiter the smoenci 
Mama ^*W*d for in Sections ^ tnrns by making pi 
*?*? *JJ2: ~ for the revival of me trw 

DATED the 2 0th to d vour of a ptnoo noou 
Minnwr 1906 mr prune MMkr tor U 
betoq. Drd. on detormlM 
L DIRECTOR the treat tn favour of the i 


CNvertor Road. Tconndgs Wens. ! 
Kent TNI 2UE. 

of (tie | 

”“5? Conies ef the BH nay atoo ! 


im 


of a NmgUM 
at Mast one rep 
1 of the o wner* 

Norwtcfi turvtga 


- i - r - 


Irasl tn Lav ov or die 


PARLIAMENTARY 

NOTICES 


4. To roofer on me Boi 
ere. sosre lsa bto wim n 
approval of Uie Prune 


an*!*. Objertton to ttw EW now be 

and. made by depositing 4 petition 
wm a g a lwt It tn either or botb Houses 
i wwn of ParaamenL The latest dale tor 
the deposa of such a aatidoa in 
the Fire* House wUI be 3«h 
lnM . January 198T If the Bill 
iHZjk commences in uie House of 
iij<77 Common* or Oh February 1987 
K H commesNW to the Home of 




OISLVXi mprin £5,500 
2DCSS.WBHGLettH0natay 
Printer OISPC ban £395 


LOANS ft 
INVESTMENT 


LEGAL NOTICES 


i of Ovemtai 
orenaaf S 


IN PARLIAMENT 
SESSKM 198687 


from £500 

22E5V-1 15MB Date £4^00 
2265 V-1 75MB Dave 

irfaifctsfa £4350 

VSm06*Gwitb2B6 Drive 

npftirtsdi £S 8 fl 3 B 

MANTOlflEBWUfG 
BABGAUCSAVMLfiBLE 
Seed e d IBM 4 Ot rMtt 

ta dear at act 

Call foe professionals 

totay 01-408 1516 


M TOE HIGH COURT OF 
JUSTICE 

NO. 008177 Of IMi 


M ThMMMimM 1 


» be obt ain ed Don the Oftice of dte 
rietorvlm Oerk of the Parttomento. Mouse 
of Lord*, the Private Bto Oftice of 
me Ho u s e Of C ut am en * or On 
. undersigned Parliamentary 
ravttionto - 


UNIVERSITY COLLEGE I “ ■[*** -- 

IXWTIQN 1 *** kXnTOT w iwwm 


Datod IMS 2801 day of Nov ai Obe r ; 

1986 i 
AJ> JM. Davts 


KaNoo 55*196? l± iNs payable i 


lO. Farther general txjwere tor the i 


PARTNER 

REQUIRED 


ted appoRwity lo nwi and occupy 


ImisY otfkos - 

TTwmtte;' teriM NW9 m. 
HbM3toanu a^ih B0^in iBflten ot 

TBrlfrtemns;- 
r 2028226 


84 THE MATTER OF 
BOA8E MASBMI POLUTT PLG 
AND 

IN THE MATTER OF 
THE COMPANIES ACT 1986 
NOTICE » HEREBY OVEN 
mm a P HlUuu was an me iim 
November 1986 P res ente d to Her 
Mafesty** Mgh Coat of Justice 
for Bie confirmation of the 
canceUaBon o* me Share Prcnd- 
un Account of the aboveetained 
Company. 


PROMOTION, 
PUB LICITY ft 
MARKETING 


AND NOTICE 6 FURTHER OW- 
EN that the saM PetMton Is 
directed lo be heard before the 
Ho n ou rab l e Mr. Justice Mervyn 
Davies at the Raya* Coats of 
justice. Strand. Lomton WC2A 
2LL on Monday dir 8m ftty of 


Nonce is hereby d»n that ap- 
Mication to being made to 
Parliament by Bie Untvrrstty of 
London. Untvermy CoOege Lon- 
don (hereinafter l e fer red to as 
~tite Cbdege-j. The IHMuw 
H ospMsi Medical Stitoo* Oterato- 
after ratoned to aa “the SOtoori. 
the tostmie or Laryngology and 
Ototovy.mettaattuMofOt m npoe . 
dies and Die Institute of Urology 
Herein af ter re fund to as “the 
institutes*’) tor leave to Introduce 
a BUI (hereinafter referred to to 
“the Bun under Bie above name 
or short title tar the popeaesef 
which the following la a condaa 


KaociOtoU forming part of the 
Chevenlng Essie specified tn the 
Trad to— aw* r-fhe apcctoed 


London EC3P 3HH 
S en al a ry 


Drucss 6 At tlee I 


e t o tb e of power* 


(alto sen, aahaag or mortgage 
Oew ato * Home or any of the 


L ondon wan 
London BC2M 6PS 
Sottettora 


Rees 6 FTeres 
1 The Sanctuary 


fbito lease a grant oaatreeo ta 
in ictoticn to Chevenlng House or 
the narr of W specified land 
wtdtft BPi mn s of nksiirt gar- 


London SW1P 3JT 


referred to batow. 




1. To dissolve am School and 


On and after the 24m Novem- 
ber a copy of the am and a coav 

to a plan marfeM “Chevenlng 


B4 PARLIAMENT 
SESSION 190687 


MASOroC TRUST FOR 


trade and. to that o utm ecM un . to wwto tmi dwct wH i 
given Mr Ose Harboa Mater of Ores* Yanantah: 


me said Company desUhm to I 


raav be Inspected 


irs NOT TOO 
UTE 


me tntd b na tion of the s old re- 
duc ti o n a cannot dunsd appear 
at the tone of hearing tn person or 
by Co aw e* tor tool purpose. 

A eoow of the said Petition win be 


2. To tranter (root Use School 

and metoaBtmai tome C otege — 

property, rights and prtvllegea be- 
longing to. veto'd to a 
ex t ■ emai ls by meSeboot and aw 
Institute together with an debts 
and UabOMie* of the Srtxxa and 
the tasututes. 




tor yota oonamw to hno r* osn 
patunabadaWtoars&dane*. 


payment of the ream at ed charge 
tor h 1 * same. 

DATED Us 29th day of Novem- 



1 1 

DISTRIBUT08S 
ft AGENTS 

] 


Gmranwsd fito CMsanas 


cfMbtonrder totetfti 
College ati canting or pendtog 


CAIBDARS& DUKES OF 
BRISTOL LTD. 

Tst (1272)636161. 


to Norwich street 
London ECsa 1BO 
REF: RAW/34. 0287 
SoticMm fa the above-named 


! of Lords so pravtdes. oHection to 
the Ba may be made la that 
Home by d tpa a WUi g a Ratidon 

pravWooa of the order. I n tanoa- 
Uon as to the dre oRt of aocn a 


aroceedtisgs widen bunted lately 
before tst August 1987 «a or 
are pen din g In favour of or 
agmnst the School and the tnsti- 


thertheOfnce of the Clerk of Bie | 
Partiameoattii the House of Lotte 


AGRESSIVE 

SALES 

AGENTS 

Should dm Mr House on 


LEADS GAIjOB E when you use 
our unHue stored rambngs tar- 
geted to executives In London a 
the South CasL Afiwdabte too 
at only per cootacL DetoUa 
01-361 1188. 


Market leader in new huh 
bus. comm, field otters 
sote terr . -t - hJ support 
package to those joining 


COMMERCIAL 

PRINTERS 



. 4. To provide mat nnqi w at s or 
, other benefits applying In favour 
a the School and the tastitnta 
respectively sbtol on and after 1st 
August 1987 apply tn favour of 
the CoOege. 


DateU 2»« November 1986 
_ J.O BaBey. 


NCR SETS ■ mnOctogi 9*v« a tat 
service at me best prkv. For an 
bsttanl guote tel: 01-961 1622. 


NOTICE BS HEREBY OVEN 
pursuant to Section 888 of the 
amwaaies Art- 1986. mm 
mert tn m of the cre dW n ta of the 
above maned Companies wta be 


& To or ovine that that part of 
the Corn-op cnustttutao 8» medi- 
cal school stoa be known as The 
umverstly OeOege and Mkhnesex 
School of Metilctne a umversMy 
CoOege Loudon and shafl be man- 
aged and controlled in 


H.W. Gamoo. 
Queen Anne’s Chambers. 



ta To provide tor me 
savtoo tar agreemetao. 


the Treat and the 
Jbvtmr of die Th 
made In favour < 


C3) To provide tar Ot Mta W to 
boo hi (nar of the 


LO nteif of beo nea 
vour of the Royal I 
tar Ctrts; 


ter granted to the CoBag a on 9th 
Oecember 1977. 




DoRt delay! 


HOTELS & LICENSED 
PREMISES 


CURTS a CO- Sttuated at 30 
EASTBOURNE TERRACE. 
London W 2 6LF on Thursday 
me 4m day a December 1986 to 
I2J0 pan L2A6 pne 1.00 pm: 
1.16 am, 1.30 pro l.tofaw 2.00 
sou 2 46 pot: 5.00 pot: U6 pm 


6 To coact p ro vis i on s inctden- 


IN PARLIAMENT 


I . ^ 1~ . ■ U.e L, 




AGENT seeks fast offing unn 
satiable tar News Agent & cut 
Shop outlets. TeL-0761 221366 


TORBAY 


fa the tuptaa provided fa to 
Sections 989 and 690. 


mmm 


NOTICE IS HERESY OVEN I 


WHOLESALERS 


munWH. TROLLEYS, with 
shelves, for sale, tx4x8li.tr 
6 x 4 a 4 ft. Tel: 10965] 32t7t 
(Hi a 31469 tOL 


Superb 28 tedroomed, 
licensed hotel ctosa to 
seafront Sauna and 
swimming pool. Owners 
accommodation, 
fncretfibte axxxtunty. 

Freehofd^O .000. 
Serious viewers contact 
Richard Wart at Colson 
Drake, Busmess Agents ot 
Plymouth. 


dated the aom day of I 
November 1986 i 
O. PADER i 

dire c tor 




tadtoaaa tv CM Properties 
LUn ttad for leave to t ntroduoa to 

a Btii under the above none or. 
man UOe fa aap aa m of Which 




ynONOT I^ B IffiREBY ALSO GIVEN I 


USED WH8KY mMurtng ba r r en ' 
fa r sale in guantlty. Phone 
1033771 ^33 fa Wormation. , 


Tel; (0752)673377 


ALPOON TRUSTEES UMtlSD 
TTC LP flltP 
DAGP LIMITED 
DONPAL LIMITED 
RLMLAP UMTTED 
PALDON UMTTED 
DON AL UMTTED 
MEH1_AP UMTTED 
BMM LIMITED 

KAY8EE HDCL 

HEMP STEA D! 
UMiTCD 


i iii 


^r aL rf r * jif mt:LgraiaS3g ES S 


agaoar ft tn the octee a tno Ctork 
To repeal th* Liverpool Ex- of ft* pmtemttte. Hoo rn of 
change Arts 1869 to >966. Loedi.aihePrtvjae tauOffleva 

On and alter the amour of Da. U>e Hoove ot Commons. The Bl- 
cmaba 1986. a cooy of me bu g« tor.maj deyosw of cote a 

may be msperted and coptm Petlnoo In fhe U ni H wneidfl be 
tbereto obtained m me prtev a BO ** F notary 1987. if me 80 
penre oaen to the afTka a tbe af tegM s bitte Haaetof Late. 
imdtwlgnid maO phiu. a 30m January 1987 8 8 crigt- 

mereary Agcxte. ootoa to RmHoose of Cgoana.: 


The €3tt»f Ehectdtve A Chsrfc of the Nofoik Oauoty Council to Camay 

HalL Mptiqwi Lana. Norwich. NR1 2DK 

The Otief Ekontire and Cotmty Clcrfc of Ra Diflh l k Cam ty co a nu t 

at County HaB. laswioi WM 2J8: . _ . 

The Oder Execstno OBUer of the NortwkA Chy Cooadl at CRy MdL 

Norwich. NR2 INKS . ■ . , ^ 

The Chief Executive of the tarou YOnooum Borough OooncO ac Town 

Han. Great Yarmouth. Norfolk. NR30 2QF; _ 

The Chief Executive and Ctork of the teoMBand Ptotrlct Chuncfl at 


Tborae Lodge. Ynaoom Hoad. Norwich. NR7 ODU: 

The Chief Executive sod Ctort of m# Norte N«TfOOt Ototrlc ComxB at 

OouncB omcea. Hoti Road. Crams-. WB79 O; . 

The Cbiaf Emcxffive cf the Soum NortaOr Dtdlfts Coaocll at 8 otdh 
Norfotk Home. Swan Lane. LongSPfomm. No rwua . nri s 2XE ; m»o 
The cia-f Executive of the Waveney Dtstnct Cotmca atTnswn Has. 


BUSINESS TO 
BUSINESS 
ALSO APPEARS 
ON PAGE 27 


NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN 
pursuant to Section 688 of the 
Compete Art. 1986k. mat meet- 
iog» «f mr creditors of the abate , 
named Companies wffi be heM at 
■he Offices Of LEONARD CURTIS 
6 CO , allliatod at 30 EAST- 1 
BOURNS TERRACE, LONDON 
W2 6LF on TTiuraday the 4m day 
Of December 1986 at 10.00 are: 
10.16 am: to 30 am: 10.46 am: 
11.00 ait U .16am: 11.30 and 
11 46am; 12 OOnoooj tz.l&pni: 
tor aa soon as poss i ble thereafter) 
•or Ihr awa it provided tar In 
Sections 589 and 690. 


! DATED me 20th day of N*vem. 


O W cctwn to the M may be 
made by depatottag a Petition 
areinsl U in etttwr a both Houses 
of PertlanaeaL The an dole tar 
me denote or such a Petition tn 
me nm hour wta be eoi Fcoru 
ary 1987 if the But ortRnatos In 
the House Ot Loth a 30th Jura- mu .i.nnr 
ary 1987 M u originate p ttar 
House ot ConanOPd. Farther In- 
tamaUan may be obtained from 
me Ptitw Bui Ofnce ot the 
Hooac of CoomMBS. the Ofnee of 
the Clerk of the mruaraeats. 

Hoar of Lords a the under - 
sltetd Parttamcptafy Ajtaa 
Dated mis 28m day at Nov e mber 
1986 
Rem dr Frerm 
1 The Sanctuary 


be phtnbiid from etihg tne OtBce 
of toe Ctork ot tne ParOamerts- 
Houaret Lords a the PrtvmeBffi 
Oftice ot the House ot Oanmore 


mentofy Apt tte . 1 

DATED tuts 28m do or Hove as- 


purchased at «adi to 






STONEHAM 

28 HtteStTMt 


tr an order made by the Hare to CofOfnoo* wteb the Mil rat 
Secon d time tatha* ttooieso preht< teoWe« a ^to Dm MB mm 

SlSmgwiSteaSofgBSffi^ g Mltoi>Hon4S«P»rdei»oteofa 




Kant BR7 6AB 


SPEECHLY BBtCHAM 


164 Fleet Street 
London ecaa 2HX 


London SW1X 7AE 


dated thto 2 1st day of November 1996 

MJ. WARE 
Dtipastment to the Envtranxnret 
2 Manure Street 
London swip 3En 
sovesor and Legal Mhtor 


Rea* A Freres 
I The Sanctuary 


D. PALMER 
Dt RECT OR 


London SWtP 3 ST 
Partanset tt ary Agents' 


London SWIP 3JT 
paraammtary Agents 


SHARPE. PRITCHARD * CO.. 
Queen Anne'h Chamber* 
3 Dean Farrar Street 
Wassataatar 
Londtoi SW1H 9JX 


HWCAMON 
Queen Ann rt Chamber 1 
3 Dean Farrar street I 


London SWiH 9LCJ 



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(-me Boaror) tar fwre to mbotere * aa uada Vmtaoot 

ahattaivtorp MT iia mi awwcnihe iB BowtaB aaCBBetKW 

t. C tant r iXHu n to IM toRcwtng *wto Jn mreare 


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imdtenglMWrtMki 


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b ttwHB Pti — c aa ni naan and Rock rticmsVn 1 Worn mi: 

work No. 11. A.rattiB9 to tMPHVftKkeetow nod to Deter Hatitnoio 
Ncwiowb ww Br Um t iaUttii too»k» t u cto mn w wiagr uw *ktofc 
Nbl: 

work Noa. a ra ooatea t tton to m» m fl u t in g bmareMitong me 


to Uwr eotwany of Bmta» - 

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MaA> 

Work SoA. A hew cut 727 retort* to tontoh to Cate Pt . ; 
Wort NaAA A new rate to O Mflr ntrt lniinrt l n antgeif overwork 

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worft N6.7A. A ntotog to ttt AASSMWkMIioaiietaciitomgalindH 
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want NoJL a new cal 203 retem fet te i gw toC teo 
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Work Nd.9. A wMatoag. ae ire toBto to wte toto. tito Crete. 
3438 metre* to .tote, between a»milrt l n Uda sd M k tftij 
tnctaotag a new lack Otoetey LadO to MtoMAreMMimcMn to Uw 


work Nbsa. a new bridge lo cany tte acsxm nod h te ta te M 
■.4393 and. Lower Hotat otartH) ova Vtark Nate . 
wont N0.9R. A U tiQ B .to the AA83 to MtitodP toctodtoo • belter 
ova Work Na.9t 


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wontNo-iOA. A M wivtfMWe Ti w tack whth b lotter u«g Wane 

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work NMi. AW KM 224 metres in f BBi.at WMtaRrtdgc 
Wot* Noa ] a. A new nod to WMk ante* tariMtas a nnago ovar 
wok No.it: 

worn In chr borousb of Ovwmtry goto to tbd dtoxtat Of North 
Shropshire, co nn Or tistnotet • 

tn me itinw of Usnymynoch to g- P o rt ate < to— y Raw - 

week No 42. A wMatoi g . aiio inbi g and i or mo cote 

MM mm to tote b ecwv «n ttewwwte and Rsdototo 
work N0.12A. A new rood to Ota School how* kKtretmg Abcsteo 
over Wont No. 12: 

Work No.128. A new rote to Rcdwttt toCktotos a krttee arar Vtark 
NOtlta ■ 

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Work 7*044: • 

work No.18 . a voototi. teapwtog ate rateteRMtil oC m» Wtotan 
Mdkato 343 mteas to Room k FkwikMa. 

2. SW Ot n g ap a titoHoa to mo Wate Q fNte oR M - 




0hftt< 
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t tor tbr Aumaniy to say to As 




(tar reward B> be I 



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T — 5A”5? E?*”" 

W County CoaKO-The 


Broad a other functions: powers to ntore the iwtor to ta ttotag 
HitTT "• d*ww me ■ ■ ■ u nite a vtrecks aflbrttag 

navlgaliooc and mo oravotUon or nterlcaan to amriwioataHWOM 

•me atige to w waterway tar the pargaas to nature uMStriatiuu. 


retot aw cuer enooNa tome MetogeaMOtotecf 
Dwna Courted outre*. B e am ntto WCktawaL SY21 7A8e 
wan Dm adef CMcnhe to Ike Oo i teCa' Borongh CboncB. Catie 
View. Omni drj. SYSl UR _ _ . 


11. Powera tar the Norwich sad Broom ta v fMlmi ttefcon to gtaol 
t U rechoas tar the regotretonB of v t M te A n d Mv ig aB o a . fhecMdrot of t 




Airman's u 


irMtaCDudL AOunwChM 






k to 8 m Oeweattv Ratal l 
xy SYll 18X. 
i to the MWteBote Town i 


irrr 




.The OH Rectory. 


k or mt whHflookto Pa 
. Qi any . SYll 2AW 


lto<beprteoto(ti JOt 


to the Powys 


% -v 

t-V-* 

• r i--» 

S‘4 


ylWTitilti 
to thto Hoa 


to ate Ckrtc to 
caw 1987. Fan 


, the Prtvtoo Bto Otsco to tiw Hbon to 


DATED 2ram November 1986 
H_r. DUFFY 


London nwi 6JX 
Solicitor to tbo Board 


Obje 


r.B :-vtr. 


SHERWOOD A CO 
Quorei Amtell QenMt 
3 Dam FOrr»r street 


Londo n SWIH 9LC 


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MOT 0 ! 1 Bfig W jg: MORE CLAIMANTS T HAW COCKPITS AS DUMFRIES GOES LOOKING FOR A CONTRACT 


... 

■ ■— '*1, _ ' 
■■ - 

-•.vOs 

. 

V*. ^s. 

■-* . . 


No lotus-eating for 
the earl as he joins 


1 - v: 1 


the hot-seat job queue 


More tton force months Honda eo»nes next year, they and by mid-season, -with the 
ST! expect tfakajnna’s testing invaluable help of the 
e £P ene ? ce . w mvalu- Longines timing readout, we 

wouldbe no place for him m able during the comma were able to move to him that 


By John Blnnsden 


the JPS Lotos team in 1987 
and it. may well be a further 
month or. two before he knows 
whether or not ire has. a 
Formula One drive next 
season- 

His place at Lotus is . being 
taken by Satoru Nakajima, of 
Japan,, who, though new to 
Formula One; has extensive 
experience in Formula Two 

(he has been Japanese cham- 
pion five-times) and Formula’ 
3000 amt— more significantly 
for Lotus r- has been mainly 


months. - 

Most members of the ream 
are sorry to lose Dumfries, 
who made a considerable 
impression during his debut 
season in grand prix racing, 
especially during fire second 
half of the 16-race series, when 
be drove with growing con- 
fidence as No. 2 to Ayrton 
Senna. 

“His race performances 
were dose to outstanding on 
several occasions,” Peter 
Ware, the Lotus team director. 


coming were able to prove to him that 


responsible for fire testing of recalls. “He proved his abiBty 
the Wnhams-Honda Formula and fitness to race haid and 


One car which has been based 
in Japan for Honda’s domestic 
engine development 
programme. 

As Lotus null be using 


sustain his concentration right 
through to the last lap. 

“I think it is fair to say that 
be was more at home in a race 
situation than in qualifying 


Cruising through 
pit-lane memories 


Sports writers of The Times 
present their selection from the 
sporting bodes of the year. 
Today: John Blnnsden on the 
best of the motor-sport books. 

public 

racing than ever before, the best 
of an excellent crop of new 
books recalls what was happen- 
ing in the sport half a century 
ago. Racing The Silver Arrows. 
by Chris Nixon (Osprey 
Publishing. £29.95) relives the 


run of racing reminiscences. So 
has the book's unusual struc- 
ture, which sustains a refreshing 
variety throughout its 350 pages 
as it paints its accurate and 
detailed portrait of racing, 
record-breaking and hOfdmib- 
ing and of the people who were 
so much part of the scene. - 
Doug Nye has chosen 1966 to 
1985 for the source of his 
excellent volume. History qfThe 
Grand Prix Car (Hazleton 
Publishing, £19.95), a period 


taiousmng. ijy.v3j relives me which saw 331 major Formula 
titanic battles between One races under either the “3- 


Mercedes-Benz and Auto Union 
from 1934 to 1939, when Hitler 
and the Nazi Party helped to 
finance and then used German 
supremacy in international 
motorsport for political ends. 

Such was the rivalry between 
these two dominant teams and 
so powerful were their skinny- 
tyred cars that drivers had to 
display truly heroic skill to tame 
them on the bumpy and often 
tree-lined tracks of the day. 
Some suggest that this was the 
greatest raring period of ail, and 
it was one in which Britain hada 
direct interest when Dick Sea- 
man became a Mercedes-Benz 
driver from 1 937 until his tragic 
death two years later. 


The extensive recollections of effects, 
h is widow. Erica, form one of a otic ms 
dozen revealing memoirs of explain 
people close to the centre of the style, 
stqry which have lifted- Nixon's 
book well dear of the normal % 


litre” or the “turbo” rales. This 
is essentially a book about 
winners, and as most races have 
only one winner and 25 losers 
the majority of the latter are 
consigned to a mammoth team 
directory extending from Aha 
Romeo to Zakspeed. The cars 
which won the 20 constructors* 
world championships, however, 
are treated to more detailed 
analysis and range from the 
Repco Brabhams of 1966-67 to 
the McLaren-TAG Turbo, 
which was victorious in 1984-85 
and enabled Alain . Prost to 
become champion again this 
year. 

Engines, chassis, trans- 
missions, tyres, wings, ground 


collections of effects, tiiroo-chaiging and ex-, 
onnoneofa otic materials are examined and 
memoirs of explained in an understandable 
centre of the style. 


John Blunsden 

TABLE TENNIS 


he was lapping almost as fast 
as the front-runners on a 
regular basis. I’m sure that 
knowledge considerably 
boosted his confidence, which 
in tom helped him in the later 
races.” 

Dumfries, of course, is only 
one of a queue of drivers on 
the lookout for a new Formula 
One contract at a time when 
there are more claimants than 
cockpits, but his credentials 
are considerable. He never 
finished a grand prix this year 
out of the top 10, he scored 
championship points twice (in 
Hungary and Australia) and 
he was heading far a score on 
several other occasions before 
retirement. 

•The foot that he is the Earl 
of Dumfries is, perhaps, a‘ 
mixed blessing in the context 
of his racing career, for 
whereas the title may be 
attractive to a potential spon- 
sor, it is one Ire has preferred 
to divorce from his raring 
image. He has always felt that 
he should be. judged — and 
exposed — as a raring driver 
by his trade performances 
rather than by his family 
environment and he has 
worked hard to justify this. 

He is hoping that ins raring 
career will develop in two 
directions next year. “1 think 
there are two or three possibil- 
ities open to me in Formula 
One and, of course, this is my 
top priority. 1 would like to 
think that I can get something 
settled by Christmas but 1 
know I may have to wait a 
little longer. 

“I am also working on 
patting together a season of 
world touring car champion- 
ship racing. The way the 
calendar looks at present 1 
could take in nine of the 12 
championship rounds without 
dashing with any of the 
grands prix. 

“I’m sure the saloon series 
will prove very competitive 
indeed next year. It is attract- 
ing a lot ox young and very 
quick drivers and is getting 
Rood support from top manu- 
facturers, which is what the 
sport needs. If I can do both 
series it wiD mean raring on 25 
or 26 weekends — a lot of 
travel and a lot of hard work 
but also a lot of fun. 



MaikMLStf 


WERE ELSE 


A giant-killer who 
plans to take 
stadium by storm 


By Dennis Shaw 


Something special: the Earl of Dumfries in his seat of power 

ICE SKATING 

Title winners give 
cause for hope 

By John Heunessy 

The British championships at duties with Jimmy Tarbuck. 


Chairman’s immagnificent seven 


John Pecan, the newly elected 
chairman of fire English Table 
Tennis Association, said that he 
planned to dismiss the selection 
committee. After watching Eng- 
land thrash Italy 6-1 in a 
European League match at 
Tonbridge, Prean, the father of 
Carl Prean, the 1 9-year-old 
international, said: “Why do we 
need seven people to choose a 
team? I think Don Parker, fire 
England captain, is now experi- 
enced enough to be able to 
choose the team without the 
help of six other people.” 

Plena's pruning will not occ- 
ur, however, until after fire 


world championships in India 
in February. The 62-year-old 
retired company, director was 
elected last weekend against the 
wishes of many members of the 
table tennis establishment. Peter 
Charters, die chairman of the 
selectors, retired as a result of 
tire election. 

Carl Prean was not in action 
at Tonbridge. He was playing in 
the German League instead. But 
his father said: “It was obvious 
England could win this match 
without him. Pm not sorry he 
was not here because, this being 
my first duty, he would prob- 
ably have made me nervous.” 


Desmond Douglas led Eng- 
land to a convincing victory 
over Italy. The 31-year-old Bir- 
mingham left-hander won his 
singles, men's doubles and 
mixed doubles matches as Eng- 
land swept into an unassailable 
4-1 lead and maintained their 
strong challenge for promotion 
to the premier division. 


M CcsJaroW. 21-18. 21 -1 1 ; S Anflsw lost 
L Nsnnont 15-21, 21-16, 19-21; L 
‘ 21 - 11 ; 
and taOrawfa CoratatfH and Q 
Ba.~21.16. 21-19- Doudas and F B Ml W 
Constanfert and Zwnpim. 21-11, iMI, 
21-16. 


Solihull this week encouraged 
the hope that Britain will pro- 
duce a stronger team for the 
European and world champion- 
ships later in the season than 
one might have feared. The 
winners of the three titles all 
emerged with reputations en- 
hanced and with genuine pros- 
pects of further advancement. 

Joanne Conway, whose ma- 
ture ice presence belies her 15 
years, seems to have thrown off 
the loss of confidence that 
undermined her performance at 
the St Ivd competition in 
September. Paul Robinson, who 
has dearly put behind him the 
depressing record of four tunes 
finishing second, is benefiting 
from the facilities now open to 
him under Kerry Latch, a 
distinguished teacher in Can- 
ada. And Cheryl Peake and 
Andrew Naylor have formed a 
strong pairs partnership after 
only two and a half years 
together, again benefiting from 
the opportunities offered by 
Leitch. 

Since Miss Conway is trained 
in Colorado by Carlo and 
Christa Fassi, it will be seen that 
the situation which drove first 
John Cuny and Robin Cousins 
and then Jayne Torvill and 
Christopher Dean abroad still 
obtains, indeed is gathering 
pace: 

Nor is it only the skaters who 
have to go elsewhere. Our 
leading teachers also cannot 
resist the lure of better opportu- 
nity. a position highlighted by 
the fact that three of the last four 
American- champions have bad 
British trainers, two of them to 
become world champion. The 
present bolder of that mle, Debi 
Thomas, worked under Alex 
McGowan, once of Glasgow, 
Queens. Bristol and Pwllheli, 
where be shared ButUns redcoat 


The conundrum facing the 
British selectors concerns the 
second choice for the European 
women's and pairs events, our 
allotment for the men's com- 
pel; non being limited to one 
skater as a result of the poor 
performance last year of Ste- 
phen Pickavance. 

Ordinarily, Fiona Hamilton, 
who finished second at Solihull, 
would expect to accompany 
Miss Conway, but, at age 20, her 
potential is and the ■ 

selectors may place their trust 1 
instead in Gina Fulton, aged 1 5, 
the bronze medal winner. It may 
depend on bow Miss Fulton 
fares iu next week's world junior 
championships iu Panada 

With the pairs, the question is 
whether Lisa Cushley and her 
brother Neil, winners of the 
Bnush title in 1984 and runners- 
up twice since, are regarded as 
good enough to cany the flag. If 
the selectors listen to Leitch, 
who has no axe to grind, they 
win certainly send a second pair 
to Sarajevo. “They will not 
disgrace you,” he says, “and 
anyway wbats to be gained iu 
slaying at home.” There is really 
no answer to that, but the 
officials of the National Skating 
Association move in mysterious 
ways and could probably find 
one if they chose. 

Wednesday's fate results 

WOMEN'S FREE-SKATING: 1. J Camay 
(Bmwwnd and Rfinmn), 1-Opra: Z <1 
Soames (Queens), Hr. 3, P H w iOion 
CStraamamJ, 3.0. 4. G Fuaon (Sunderland). 
4.0: 5. H Rowe* (Sheffield). 5.0; 6. 6 
SpondkM (Doewttl. 80. F&efc 1. Coo- 
way. 2J>. 2. Hamrton. 5A; 3. Futon, 62. 4. 
Powef. 13.0; 5. Soames, 132; 6, J Fox 
(Rcnmondl. 16.6. 

MEATS FREE -SKA UNO: 1. P Robinson 
(BtacKpooand BAnqftam), I.Dpcs; 2. S 
Dunam fSoNxfl). 2ft 1 C WUdnope 
(NSA). 3.6; 4. A Moore (Sunderland). 4 Or. 

5. J Martin (Kytaj. 5.0; 6. R Bunce 
fOueens), BA Ftaat 1. Robinson, 1L4 pts; 

JL Duma*. 4.6 3 MoOfB.7.4:4,WSondge, 
9.0: 5. C Newberry (SothuS). 10-0. 6. 
Mann. 1Z4. 


Wembley Stadium, having 
rested elegantly on her laurels 
for 65 years, has joined the high- 
powered commercial world of 
hype and hard sell to support a 
£10 million improvement 
scheme- The famed twin towers 
are being harnessed to spear- 
head an unprecedented business 
expansion scheme which will be 
unveiled in January. 

Tony Stephens, aged 38, a 
form er Sunday footballer from 
Sand well in the West Midlands, 
has been recruited to matimm- 
income from Wembley's range 
of facilities. His arrival was 
preceded by a reputation which 
described his motto as: “If 
there's a space, advertise on it. If 
there's a spare room, entertain 
in it. If you have an event, get it 
sponsored.” 

Giant-killers do not tradition- 
ally reach Wembley. Stephens 
has proved the exception by 
progressing from the compar- 
ative oblivion of a marketing 
consultancy in the Black Coun- 
try to arguably the biggest job on 
the commercial side of sport in 
less than four years. In the 
interim be grossed £2>6 million 
for Aston Villa Football Club 
by, at one time or another, 
getting every spare corner of the 
ground sponsored including his 
own office. 

On bearing of bis appoint- 
ment to a job which has fired his 
imagination, be anonymously 
carried out on-the-job market 
research by joining the street 
salesmen and hawking sou- 
venirs outside the stadium. “If 
you want to get to know a 
project start at the bottom,” be 
said, though three years ago be 
literally went into space to meet 
Aston Villa's commercial needs. 

When Villa played Spartak iu 
Moscow in the second round of 
the UEFA Cup there was no live 
television available to the West, 
so he hired a receiving dish and 
“stole” the Soviet* pictures out 
of the skies via satellite, beam- 
ing the action direct to Aston as 
it happened. That is the kind of 
originality be is likely to bring to 
promoting events at Wembley 
Stadium, the Arena, the Con- 
ference HaD, the Squash Centre 
and the new Exhibition Hall, 


which is still under 
construction. 

Stephens is working on a 
marketing strategy to ensure 
that internal improvements be- 
ing made to viewing space and 
facilities within the stadium are 
used to their full effect- He 
works under the direction of the 
chairman, Brian WooHson, who 
is also chairman of the British 
Institute of Management and 
the chief executive David , 
Griffiths. 

“I have beeta impressed with , 
their dynamism and ambition.” , 
Stephens said. ”We think along 
the same lines. Some five mil- 
lion people pass through 
Wembley's facilities each year. 
Eighty-five per cent of these are 
non-football visitors. We intend 
to capitalize on every aspect of 
the operation.” 

Early on the agenda is a £1.5 
million scheme to build 30 
executive boxes due to be iu 
operation for the FA Cup Final 
next May. 



SWIMMING 

First cap ^ 

follows /a 

Fibbens’s ie< 

trial win isl 

By Roy Moor j — 

Mike Fibbens, of Beckenham, LU 

who provided a big surprise by inecha 

breaking the British short- - 

course record for 100 metres J rf , ? 

butterfly at last weekend's 
Leicester trials, will win his first rteroa; 

full international colours for 
Britain in the European Cup te my 

tournament at Malmo. Sweden ■ my i 

on December 13 and 14. a]] a pj 

He is given a place because ye 

Andy Jameson, bronze medal 0 f * 

winner for the event at the world 
championships in the summer. . 

is busy wuh. examinations at bis “L 3 '* 

American university. \ Gold 

With only one swimmer per imes ,; s 

event permitted from each teve hi 

country other than for the fantai 

relays, it reflects considerable ice.” 

credit on Fibbens. aged IS, that j pard« 

be has gained selection for such 
an important international >nw*kn 

occasion. 1 

The same applies to Sharon 11 

Page, of Stockport Metro, aged 
15. who wins preference over 
world-ranked swimmer, 

Katharine Read, for the 1 00 
metres backstroke. True, only 
7 <oo of a second separated them 
in the Leicester final but Miss 
Page showed she deserves every 
encouragement. Miss Read 
keeps her place in the team for 
the 200 metres backstroke. 

Southampton's Rebecca 
Bowden, aged 1 7, has gained a 
place in the relay squad. With 
Adrian Moorhouse, Gaynor 
Stanley, Jean Hill. Kevin Boyd. 

Mark Foster. David Stacey and 
others showing impressive form 
the British team certainly looks 
capable of making its presence 
felt in Malmo. 

Great Britain team 

MEM 100m Iunmk m Foster (Soutn- Wand 

end). 200m Iw w iv fc. * Bovo tBarouon at wu 

South Tynasme). 400m tom vie: Soyt* 

1500 h mt yie : D Stacey fBecharmamJ; _ _ /• 

100m twcfcs&okec P Bake (Torquay Dl* 

Launder). 200m badcWoke Stake. 100m vl UJl 

Bmeatstmfta: A Moortiousa (City of 

Leeasi; mom tarsaateBoee; Moomousa; _ 

100m bunerUy: M Fooertb (Beckennam). S 

200m butterfy; T Jones (WaKMl). 200m Jl V Wk9 

medtey- 0 RMey (Urwennty at Swansea); 

400m memey. G Roans (Portsmouth _ ^ 

Normseat 4 x iQOm toemyte promt 
Foster Ffcoens. R Lee |Cx> o« Cardttf) G It/W-M- 

Snwan (Harrow and Weamstoia). u 

ggy- ggcg ** 4 * 10ftn Young 

WOMEN: loom Iraealyle: L Donnelly j ■ 


Stephens: commercial wizard 

HOCKEY 


WOMEN: 10Oa freestyle: L Domeay 
(Herndon Bams): 200m freestyle: Don- 
neey: 400m freestyle: K Meflo> (No~ncn 
Pernsnsl 800m Mmsmk Motor 100m 
backstroke: S Page (Stock pon Metroc 
200m backstroke: K Read (Stockport 
Metre* 100m bnm at at m i m : J m 
(Cumbemauid); 300m tarentakote G 
Stanley (Stockport Metro): 100m battar- 
# r- C Foot (MdAaUk 200m butterfly: H 

□iiMtou I flfa a medftoi Ufl. 

Dbwroy (IWgIRRUL m MB UWCf, V 1 ^ 


400m mmflay: Hit 4 x 100m freestyle 

Bowden (City of Sout ha mpton); 4 a 100 

medtayrtD be selected- 


Wiltshire test for Avon HAto receive 

By Joyce Whitehead £420,000 

With four women's territorial breezy vast expanse of the sports ifl €1)011 SOTS 111!! 
aunty champions decided - complex at Swindon will rive ji/i ouiji 


With four women's territorial 
county champions decided — 
Berkshire. Staffordshire, Lan- 
cashire and Suffolk — it remains 
for the West to complete their 
championships this weekend. . 

Avon, with five wins to their 
credit, must be fire favourites 
from the eight counties in the 
region competing but Wiltshire 
only need to beat Avon in the 
last match of the tournament on 
Sunday (2.30pm) to have a 
chance of the mle. They have 
already won four matches but 
drew l-| with Cornwall. The 
question is whether the 
combination of Pearson, 
Coombes and Pocock in the 
Avon team can outweigh the 
fine comer play and attacking 
move of Sarah Workman, of 
Wiltshire. 

The artificial turf pitch on the 


breezy vast expanse of the sports 
complex at Swindon will give 
every opportunity for accurate 
hockey and the rest will depend 
upon determination. If I had to 
put my money one or the other, 
it would be Wiltshire. 

Gloucestershire are un- 
predictable and have suc- 
cumbed to the giants, Avon and 
Wiltshire, but otherwise they are 
doing well It is Somerset, with 
an inexperienced team, who are 
in the doldrums and without 
their captain Iasi weekend they 
were more than lost and have 
yet to score a point 

The programme: Tomorrow: Horoton) v 
Gioucastaranra (10.30am); Avon v 
Somerset (11.45); WHtsnra v Dorset 
(1.15pm): Devon v Cornwall (230). Sun- 
day: Somerset v Hertfordshire (10.30); 
Dorset v Comwal (11.45); Gkwcesnr- 
shro v Devon (Vis); Avon v WNtsiare 
(230). 


The Hockey Association, 
boosted by England's World 
Cup success, received another 
fillip yesterday in lire form of a 
major sponsorship deal. 

Lada Cars are to pump 
£420,000 iuto the sport over the 
next three years. They will 
sponsor the new national indoor 
league, which starts next season, 
and are also funding an invita- 
tion international champion- 
ship next October. 

Martin Austin, managing 
director of Lada Cars, said: “We 
feel we have come into tins great 
and growing sport at exactly the 
right ume. The enormous public 
interest in hockey following the 
World Cup and the recent 
Olympic success speaks for 
itself." 


Law Report November 28 1986 House of Lords 


y 


Rainey ~v Greater Glasgow 
Health Board 

Before Lord Keith of Kinkri, 
Lord Brandon of Oakbrook, 
Lord Griffiths, Lord Mackay of 
Clash fern and Lord . Goff of 
Chieveley 

[Speeches November 27] 

Where, in order to attract 
qualified prosthetists then em- 
ployed by private" contractors 
into the National Health Ser- 
vice, a higher rate of pay than 
that provided by the Whitley 
Council sole was offered to and 
accepted by them* and sub- 
sequently a woman prosthetist 
entering the NHS directly was 
offered and accepted the Whit- 
ley Council scale of pay, there 
had been an objectively justified 
material difference between her 
case and that of the private 
contract prosthetists, who bad 
all been men. and she was not 
entitled to equal pay under the 
Equal Pay Act 1970. 

The House of Lords dis- 
missed an appeal by Mrs Eliza- 
beth Anne Rainey from the first 
Division of the Inner House of 
ihe Conn of Session (Lord 
EmsJie, Lord President and 
Lord Cameron. Lord Grieve 
dissenting) ((1985] IRLR 414) 
who by a majority dismissed her 
appeal from the Employment 
Appeal Tribunal .(Lord Mc- 
Donald. Mr W. Barrie Abbott 
and Mr J. S. Bell) ((1984] IRLR 
*8). The tribunal by a majority 
had dismissed Mrs Rainey's 
appeal from an industrial tri- 
bunal, which had dismissed her 
application under the 1970 Act 
for a declaration. 

Section I of the 1970 Act (as 
substituted bv section 8( 1 ) of the 
Sex Discrimination Act 1975) 
provides: 

“(1) If the terms of a contract 
under which a woman is eip- 

S loved at an establishment in 

treat Britain do not include . . . 
an equality clause they shall be 
deemed to include one. 

"(2) ... (a) where die woman 
is employed on like work with a 
man in the same employment ~ 
(>1 if (apart from the equality 
clause) any term of the woman’s 
contract . & or' becomes less 
favourable to the woman than a 
term of a similar kind in the 
contract under which that man 
is cm {Joyed, that term of die 
woman's contract shall be 


Objectively justified material difference defeats equal pay claim 


treated as so modified as not to 
be less favourable . . . 

“(3) An equality clause shall 
not operate in relation to a 
variation between the woman's 
contract and the man's contract 
if the employer proves that the 
variation is genuinely due to a 
material di ffe rence (other than 
the difference of sex) between 
her case and his . . ” 

Mr Anthony Lester, QC and 
Mr David Pannick lor Mrs 
Rainey; Mr W. A. Nimmo- 
Smith, QC and Mrs Ann Paton 
(both of the Scottish Bar) for the 
board. 

LORD KEITH said that a 
prosthetist was concerned with 
fitting artificial limbs. Before 
1980 no prosthetist had been 
directly employed by any health 
authority in Scotland. The req- 
uisite services had been pro- 
vided by private contractors 
themselves employing qualified 
prosthetists. One of those had 
been a Mr Alan Cru mliii- - 

In 1979, the Secretary ofState 
for Scotland had decided to 
establish a prosthetic fitting 
service within the NHS in 
Scotland and to dis continue the 

¥ rivaie contract arrangement. 

o achieve that object it bad 
been necessary that a sufficient 
number of qualified prosthetists 
should be recruited to the NHS 
en bloc. The only prosthetists 
then available had .been those 
employed by the private con- 
tractors. 

The remuneration of employ- 
ees of the NHS was determ ined 
by negotiation and agreement in 
ihe Whitley Councils for the 
Health Services (Great Britain). 
U had been deckled by the 
Scottish Home and Health 
Department that, in general, the 
remuneration of employees in 
the new prosthetic service 
should be related to the Whitley 
Council scale for medical phys- 
ics technicians. 

It had been appreciated that . 
that might nor be .attractive to 
the private contract p rostheti sts, 
and so they had been offered the 
option of remaining on die rates 
of pay and conditions of service 
that ihey presently received, 
subject to future change* as 
negotiated by their trade union, 
A5TMS. (In England, prosthetic . 
services were to continue-to be * 


provided through private con- 
tractors.) 

Mr Crumlin and all the other 
prosthetists who had received 
the offer (about 20, who had all 
happened to be men) bad opted 
for that alternative. Mr Crumlin' 
had commenced employment 
with the NHS at Behodere 
Hospital, Glasgow, in July, 
1980, at the salary of £6,680 a 
year, the same as be had been 
receiving from his former em- 
ployer. At the time of the 
bearing before the industrial 
tribunal, in 1983, it bad in- 
creased to £10,085 a year. 

Mrs Rainey had' entered the 
employment of the NHS as a 
prosthetist working at Belvidere 
Hospital on October I, 1980, 
directly, not having been pre- 
viously employed for a private 
contractor. Her qualifications 
and experience had been 
broadly similar to those of Mr 
Cnunim. 

The rates of pay and con- 
ditions of service offered to and 
accepted by her had corre- 
sponded to those of a medical 
physics technician at the appro- 
priate point on the Whitley 
Council scale. Her starting sal- 
ary had been £4,773, and at the 
time of the hearing before the 
industrial tribunal it had in- 
creased lo £7,295. 

A male prosthetist, Mr 
Davey. bad been engaged at-tbe 
same time and on the same 
conditions. He had since left his 
employment. 

No prosthetists tod since 
1980 transferred from private 
employment to NHS employ- 
ment, and no such transfers on 
special terms would be permit- ' 
ted in the future. Any pros- 
thetists engagedby the board in 
the future, whether male or 

female; would do so on the NHS 

'scale of remuneration. 

No arrangements had been 
made for phasing out the dis- 
parity bet ween the prosthetists 
who had transferred from the 
private sector in 1980, such as 
Mr Crumlin, and those who 
entered NHS employment di- 
rectly, such as Mrs Rainey. 

In her application to the 
industrial tribunal, Mrs Rainey 
had founded on section 1(1) and 
(2Xa)ofthe 1970 Act. The board 
had not disputed that she was 
employed on like work with Mr 


Crumlin, nor that the term of 
her contract as regarded 
remuneration was less 
favourable than ibe correspond- 
ing term of Mr Crum tin’s con- 
tract. They had founded on 
section 1(3). 

The mam question at issue in 
the appeal was whether the 
circumstances of the case were 
capable of constituting, within 
the meaning of section 1(3), “a 
material difference (other than 
the difference of sex) between 
her case and his”. 

Mrs Rainey bad argued that 
nothing could constitute sneb a 
difference that was not related to 
the personal circumstances of 
the two employees, such as their 
respective stalls, experience or 
training: see C/ay Cross (Quarry 
Services j Ud v Fletcher ([ 1978] 1 
WLR 1429). 

In . his Lordship's opinion, 
statements of Lord Denning. 
Master of the Rolls, and Lord 
Justice Lawton in that case, at 
ppl433 and 1437, were unduly 
restrictive of the proper inter- 
pretation of section 1(3). The 
difference had to be material, 
which meant "significant and 
relevant”, and ii had to be 
between “her case and his". 

Consideration of a person's 
case had necessarily to involve 
consideration of afl the circum- 
stances of that case. Those 
might well go beyond what was 
not very happily described as 
“the personal equation” that is. 
the personal qualities by way of 
skill, experience or training that 
the individual brought to the 
job. 

Some circumstances might on 
examination prove to be not 

significant or dot relevant but 
others might do so, though not 
relating to the personal qualities 
of the employee. In particular, 
where there was do question of 
intentional sex discrimination 

whether direct or indirect (and 
there was none here), a dif- 
ference that was connected wuh 
economic factors affecting the 
efficient carrying on of the 
employer’s business or other 
activity might well be relcvanL 

That view was supported by 
two decisions of the European 
Court of Justice, Jenkins v 
kingsgaxe ( Clothing Produc- 
tions J Ltd {Case 96/80) ([ J 98 1 ] 1 
WLR 932) and Bilka-Kaufhaus 


v Weber von Han: (Case 
170/84) <[19861 IRLR 317), on 
article 119 or the Treaty of 
Rome, which required the 
application “of the principle 
that men and women should 
receive equal pay for equal 
work” and to the implementa- 
tion of which the 1970 Act was 
directed. 

When Jenkins bad been be- 
fore the Employment Appeal 
Tribunal ([1981] I WLR 1485), 
Mr Justice Browne-Wilkinson 
bad said, at pt495: 

“(4) If the industrial tribunal 
finds that the employer in- 
tended to discriminate against 
women by paying part-time 
workers less, the employer can- 
not succeed under section 1(3). 

“(5) Even if the employer had 
oo such miration, for section 
1(3) to apply the employer must 
show that the difference in pay 
between full-time and part-time 
workers is reasonably necessary 
in order to obtain some result 
(other than cheap female la- 
bour) which the employer de- 
sires for economic or other 
reasons.” 

That was in harmony with the 
decision of the European Court 
and was correct. Read as a 
whole, the ruling of the Euro- 
pean Court would not exclude 
objectively justified grounds 
that were other than economic, 
such as] administrative ef- 
ficiency in a concern not en- 
gaged in commerce or business. 

It followed that a relevant 
difference for purposes of sec- 
tion 1(3) might relate to circum- 
stances other than the personal 
qualifications or merits of the 

male and female workers who 
weir the subject of comparison. 

The difference between Mrs 
Rainey's case and Mr Crumlin' s 
was that the former was a person 
who had entered the NHS at 
Belvidere Hospital directly 
while the fatter was a person 
who had entered it from 
employment with 8 private 
contractor. The fact that one 
was a woman and the other a 
man was an accident. The 
industrial tribunal had said: 

“There was dear evidence 
that any male employees re- 
cruited at the same lime as or . 
after the recruitment of [Mrs 
Rainey ] would be paid the same 


rate as [foe] was and subject to 
the same scale. 

“We bad no doubt oo the 
evidence that had any of the 
prosthetists employed for the 
private contractors been female 
they would have been paid the 
same higher rate of pay as the 
male prosthetists transferred 
from the private contractors. 

“The tribunal were therefore 
forced to the conclusion that the 
difference had nothing to do 
with the fact dial [Mrs Rainey] 
was female.” 

Tbe tnbunaTs findings made 
it clear that the new prosthetic 
service could never have been 
established within a reasonable 
time if Mr Crumlin and others 
like him had not been offered a 
scale of remuneration no less 
favourable than that which they 
had then been enjoying. That 
had undoubtedly been a good 
and objectively justified ground 
for offering them that scale of 
remuneration. 

Mrs Rainey argued, however, 
that it had noi constituted a 
good and objectively justified 
reason for paying her and other 
direct entrants a lower scale of 
remuneration. 

The position in 1 980 bad been 
that all NHS employees had 
been paid on the Whitley Coun- 
cil scale and that the Whitley 
Council negotiating machinery 
had applied to them. The pros- 
thetic service bad been intended 
to be a branch of tbe NHS. 

It was therefore easy to see 
that from the administrative 


point of view it would have been 
highly anomalous and inconve- 
nient if prosthetists alone, over 
the whole tract of future time for 
which the prosthetic service 
would endure, were to have 
been subject to a different salary 
scale and different negotiating 
machinery. 

It was significant that a large 
part of the difference that bad 
opened ,op between Mrs 
Rainey's salary and Mr 
Crumlin's was due to the dif- 
ferent negotiating machinery. 

Accordingly, there bad been 
sound, objectvely justified 
administrative reasons for plac- 
ing prosthetists in general, men 
and women alike, on the Whit- 
ley Council scale and subjecting 
them to its negotiating machin- 
ery. 

There was no suggestion that 
it had been unreasonable to 
place them on tbe particular 
point on the Whitley Council 
scale that bad in fan been 
selected, ascertained by ref- 
erence to the position of medical 
physics technicians 3nd entirely 
regardless of sex. 

It was in any event the fact 
that the general scale of 
remuneration for prosthetists 
had been laid down accordingly 
by the secretary of state. 

It had not been a question of 
Mrs Rainey being paid less than 
Uie norm but of Mr Crumlin 
and foe others like him bring 
paid more. He had been paid 
more because of the need to 
attract him and other privately 


employed prosthetists into 
forming foe nucleus of foe new 
service. 

Accordingly, foe grounds 
founded on by foe board as 
constituting foe material dif- 
ference between Mrs Rainey’s 
case and Mr Crumlin's had been 
capable in law of constituting a 
relevant difference for purposes 
of section 1(3) of the 1970 Act, 
and on foe facts found by foe 
industrial tribunal they had 
been objectively justified. 

Section l(l)fb) of foe 1 975 
Act, relied on by Mrs Rainey, 
which had the effect of prohibit- 
ing indirect discrimination be- 
tween women and men, did not. 
for presen i purposes, add any- 
thing to section 1(3) of foe 1970 
Act. since, on foe view that his 
Lordship had taken as to foe 
proper construction of foe latter, 
a difference that demonstrated 
unjustified indirect discrimina- 
tion would not discharge the 
onus placed on the employer. 

Further, there would not 
appear to be any material 
distinction in principle between 
the need to demonstrate objec- 
tively justified grounds of dif- 
ference for purposes of section 
1(3) and tbe need to justify a 
requirement or condition under 
section KDfbKu) 

Lord Brandon. Lord Griffiths. 
Lord Mackay and Lord Goff 
agreed. 

Solicitors: Denise Kingsmill 
& Co, Kew. Lawrence Graham 
for Mr John R. Griffins. 
Edinburgh. 


Repairing wrongfully damaged ship 


Elpidoforos Shipping 
Corporation v Furness Withy 
(Australia) Ply Ltd (The 
Omottssku Friendship) 

Where tbe owner of a ship 
chose a reasonable time to 
withdraw it from its profit- 
earning function in order to 
undertake necessary wrongful 
damage repairs, be was entitled 
to take advantage of that penod 
to do other work of Ius own on 
foe ship which was desirable 
although not immediately nec- 
essary and to recover tbe entire 
cost of the detention from foe 
wrongdoer without deduction, 
because but for the wrongful 
damage repairs .foe ship would 


have been earning during that 
period. 

If, however, owners* repairs 
were immediately necessary 
when the wrongful damage re- 
pairs were earned out, so that 
foe ship would in any event 
have been out of commission 
during thai period, foe owners 
would not be enmied to recover 
anything in respect of foe cost of 
the detention, save in so far as 
the wrongful damage repairs 
increased that cost bevond what 
it would otherwise hive been. 

Mr Justice Him so held in the 
Commercial Court of foe 
Queen '5 Bench Division on 
November 20. allowing an ap- 


peal by the owners of the vessel 
Omoussian Friendship against s 
final award of arbitrators. 

HIS LORDSHIP said that 
that followed clearly from Mr 
Justice Brandon's judgment in 

The Ferdinand Re- -lu/1 ([1972] 
2 Lloyd's Rep 120. f25. 128.). 
which had summarised foe law 
as slated m uie line of authori- 
ties from PaatK-n 'tieamstuj C o 
Ud v London A>sur>inre (J i yOOJ 
A C 6) to Cani-g-e Steamship 
Co Ltd •• /?,•««/ Aum pgian 
Government (;i*»:| aC 2921. 
The decision in The Hassri 
([1962 1 2 Lloyd's Rep ! 59) was 
not inconsistent wuh those 
authorities. 


u— 

leer’s 

istic’ 


mechanical en- 
tire £8,000 he 
Portfolio Gold 
itenby to good 

te my gramo- 
■ my donation 
all appeal and 
ext year,” Mr 
of Allestree, 

ed 51, who has 
» Gold since it 
imes, said that 
ieve his luck, 
fantastic. It is . 
ice.” 

1 cards can be 
iding a stem- 
mvehipe to: 

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s disorders, 
10 are allergic 
. can suffer ill 
king beers in 
have been 

luce a foamv 

irity, or to 

a 

I Stated foe- 
ire than 40 
heart attacks 
«rs used co- 
in beer to 
ting head. 


leal 

man couple 
5 last July for 
.eking reduo 
fences. 

Lord Lane, 
ce, will pred- 
ications by 
>nja Schulze, 
'or leave io 
fe sentences 
Justice Mi- 
foe Central 





i or storage 
aably shows 
pace Heater 


nHfcataor 

tmm. 


* 3Vfe” high 
x 3 VS" high 

munDCEV 


B 

■Bpsnlp. 







SPORT 


THE TIMES FRIDAY NOVEMBER 28 1986 


****** SL 


RACING 


Seasoned Simon Legree 

should have the edge 
over Fitzgerald’s raider 


Following that heartening 
display at Wincanton 15 days 
ago when he finished third to 
Broad heath and 1 
HaventaJigbt in the Silver 
Buck Handicap Chase, Simon 
Legree is napped to win the 
Bigmore Handicap Chase at 
Sandown Park this afternoon. 

Much as 1 admire the 
Jimmy Fitzgerald-trained 
Bucko, his principal rival 
today, four factors persuade 
me to make Simon Legree the 
day’s best bet. 

First, the form of that 
Wincanton race has been op- 
held at the most competitive 
level since thanks to 
Broadheath's fine win in the 
Hennessy Cognac Gokl Cup at 
Newbury last Saturday. 

Second, Simon Legree was 
having his first race of the 
season at Wincanton and 1 
formed the impression that 
day that he -would benefit 
from it 

Third, and every bit as 
important, Simon Legree will 
be racing over only 2fe miles 
again today and that was die 
distance over which he won 
his three races, at Lingfield 
Park, Cheltenham and 
Wetherby, last season. In di- 
rect contrast his Wincanton 


race was over three miles and 
a furlong and in hindsight that 
was arguably too far for him. 

Finally, Simon Legree is a 
seasoned campaigner who 
should be in his element at 
Sandown where the nature 
and positioning of the fences 
combine to make it one of the 

hardest steeplechasmg courses 

in the country. 

Bucko, who has been dog- 
ged by leg trouble for the past 
two seasons after winning the 
Philip Comes final over hur- 
dles, dearly made a deep 
impress on 14)00 those who 
watched him win at Haydock 
Park ten days aga 

But the feet remains this 
will be only his third steeple- 
chase and around Sandown I 
prefer a horse with Simon 
Legree’s experience even at a 
difference of 201b. 

Neither CTuttertxick nor 
Sign Again raced last season, 
while Kyoto, the only other 
runner, did nothing to ad- 
vertise his claims at Newbury 
last Saturday when he was 
pulled up in his first race of the 
season. 

If form at this level means 


anything at all, the Sunley 
Builds Novices' Hurdle ought 


to be won by Teietrader who 
beat Robin GoodfeDow and 
Skygrange in a most convinc- 
ing manner at Ascot a fort- 
night ago. They now meet on 
the same termsL 

Powys, who was fourth in 
their race, contests the 
Crowngap Winter Hurdle, 

Well that he should go, I 
Still prefer Troy Fair, Corbitt 
Coins and The West Awake 
with the vote just going to the 
latter wbo is certain to have 
come on as a result of that 
promising ran behind Federal 
Trooper at Newbury earlier 
this month- 

It is of no little significance 
that Tim Forster has decided 
to put blinkers on Fort Askaag 
for the Surrey Racing Handi- 
cap Chase. Port Askaig was 
not so adorned when be 
finished a remote fourth be- 
hind fount Oak on ins sea- 
sonal debui at Newbury but he 
was wearing them last season 
when he was beaten only l Vi 
lengths by Maori Venture at 
LingfiekL 

That was not a bad perfor- 
mance as Maori Venture 
proved on Saturday by finish- 
ing third in the Hennessy and 
he is preferred to little Folveir 
and Lucky Vane. 



Elsworth may rely 
on Hvnnosis as 


David Hswonh has stilt to 
decide whether to run Floyd or 
Hypnosis mtomonow's Mecca 
Handicap Hurdle at Sandown 
Park, for which they are. cur- 
rently joint favourites. “It’s my 
deacon, but at the moment I'm 


Just a month ago, a car ran 
into hint, but yesterday he 
showed that he had lost none of 
the sparkle which helped him 


His part-owner Sydney AHen 
said: “He was very lucky- The 


Hypnosis.’" he said- - he was out training ana tw 

Tfce newcomer Spring Philtre up with his backside 

maintained the fine loan of Through foe windscreen.” . 
Hsnorth's Whhsbmy stable Mark Pitman, who wasdis- 


he was but training and he 
fwi«hwi up with his backside 


when landing foe first division 
of the YoungFannere Novices* . 


Paul HoHey, the 7fb-daimer, 
brought his monntto a chaDeng- 




from hospital with a. 
broken right collar-bone yes- 
terday rooming following bis 
&fi~from Abba Lad at Ludlow 
on Wednesday, missed a win- 
ning ride on Timely Star in the 


Mtit ■} 


v :; : -7- > 1 

• > ■ * - •*. 

-v 


Elsworth, whose c harge 
opened at 5-1 but was returned 

an m fim at 16-1, wyt* “S# 

has run green on .foe flat, but 
jumped wed here. This is foe 
first time she has got her bead in 
front, and I think she's got foe 
atnfity to win on foe Flat” 
Akxam, trained by Ron 
Hodges, made a remarkable 
retn m from injury when he 
oatjumped the favourite, 
Doobteton, to win foe Chard 
Handicap Chase. 


Ben de Haan deputised on 
Timely Star, who went for tins 
race in p reference to the Mecca 
Handicap Hunfle. 

.His trainer, Jenny Pimm, 
said: ‘ “The horse has been 


hasahvayscome there anlv uj be 
nm Ml of it at foe finish. I think, 
be prefers foe downhill track 
here.” 

. “He’s too big and immatur e 
logo chasing yet, bat I am sure 
he'll be a nice horse one day. We 
will just have to-be patient” 


Indamelody staying 
on the right track 


tndamelody repeated his re- 
cent coarse success when Steve 


went down to foe start today to 
make various noises and send 


Smith Ecdestedall the way on her on her way ."said Pipe. 


to recoup the losses m the Crowngap Winter Hurdle at Sandown today 


SANDOWN PARK 


2Lft) CROWNGAP WINTER NOVICE MJRDLE (Grade II: 2m 5f 75yd) (12 rumors) 


Selections 

By Mandarin 


1.00 Teletrader. 

1.30 Fireworks Night- 

2.00 SIMON LEGREE (nap). 


2.30 The West Awake. 
3.00 Port Askaig. 

3.30 Brani Baby. 


By Michael Seely 

1.00 Teletrader. 1.30 Fireworks Night. 2.00 BUCKO (nap). 

The Times Private Handicapper’s top rating: 1.00 TELETRADER. 


404 0-4011 MAO ABOUT VA (P 8yme) L Kermard 511-4 

405 32300-1 : 

406 BMOKINER (D Horawal) KBaflsy 5-11-0 

407 00 BUCaS»TSKSrpH0k*B)HacWB4.t1O 

409 40-2 OAVTS WBR (Mrs RLACJOJ snort 6-1 1-0 

410 tSLAMD EXA£(D Hunftoreys) A Moore 4-11-0 

412 02t3 UQHTTW LOT (B^ (Q Hackee) J JeHftis 5-11-0 8 

413 3-4 POWT8(RE ABodLtd)FWto*er&-11-0 

416 2 THE WEST AWAKE (Mra CHaaSi) O Starwood 51 1-0 . — 

418 200044) C0mirrC0«8 (Mrs JOoitMQFWWwyn 5-104) 

419 304F4 LADY NEWTON (Su4eyHoldtae8Ud>JFoa 5158 

420 00042- PAGE OF OOU3 (R Bretoworttr) DGsndcUo 5158 . 

ISIS; OCCANUS 4-11-0 C Grant 14-1 Dame Smith 9 ran 


_ BPowtel S3 7-1 
RDanwoody OSS 4-1 
_ M Dwyer 

” RRowe 95P3-1 

Q Haora 

Ma tt Bed— SB 10-1 

S Starwood 93 5-1 

_ KMooney 90 6-1 

SHaora M — 

P Barton 95 — 


Strong British 
entry for 
Irish hurdle 


the eight-year-old in .foe 
Shipston Handicap Chase at 
Warwick yesterday. 

The race developed into a 
dad over the. last three fences, 
b e t ween foe 5-4 favourite and 
Eton Rouge. A good jump at the 
last enabled Indamelody to 
retain his advantage, and foe top 
wright won a little more cleverly 
than foe IM-Jength verdict 


Going: good to soft 

1.0 SUNLEY BUILDS NOVICE HURDLE (£3,043: 2m) (13 runners) 


CODM HAD ABOUT YAHI-aconManBy ridden to taat Random! 
rUrtm ran lOOy, £1442, good to soft, Nov 1 Z t5r»*f 
back i n 2nd whan wtrox] ai Worraatar, a raca in whkJiM 


7IatNewbuyiestttne 
vt^S weft ( 11 - 0)11 


3-12 RQBW GOaOFBUOW(BF) (Miss B Swire) GBaWng 5-1 1-6 GBtedtoy 


102 005F13 SKTGHANGEfJ Green) J Jenkins 51 1-6 

103 2229-11 m£TRADER(D)(JHoaiHR Hodges 5-1 1-6 

106 M AJ771C CHEF (R HaurthortyTM Jones 511-0 

108 PPM BETTY'S KARL (Ms BBucheB)A Moore 511-0 

109 BROOKNOUNT(H Penan) J Gifford 4-11-0 

111 HNQKAS(G Dawes) DOnndodo 4-1 1-a 

112 LE HODESTY (R Smote) A Moore 4-11-0 

113 q|M»- WSCtOEVOUS MONK (A Watss)RGow 5-11-0 

117 4 THE KULAK (C Andrews) KBaiey 5-11-0 

118 F/P25Z 1 lD0HOC(BF)(RCoEra)W Morris 7-11-0 

119 VALIANT PtLGRM (Gen Sr C Blacker) J Webber 5-11-0— 

120 VITAL EXPORT fMra A MtayfOBSMorth 4-1 1-0 


IBradtey 91 3-1 
Harwood so 4-1 
BPowel W99F54 



There are 18 KngHfo torses 
among foe 51 dedazatioiis at foe 
first entry stage for The 
Ladbroke, formerly foe Irish 
Sweeps Handicap Hurdle, at 
Leap ar d stown on Jammy 18. 

Among the entries for 
Europe's richest handicap bar- 
die are River Cenriog, I Bfo 


Zaidooa, Cats Eyes, Cferysaor, OT ^5^ put her best foot 
Tom Sharp , Ra Nova, forward with a little hdp from 


GHoora 

— R Rom — 8-1 

P Barton 

Candy Moore (7) — — 

MPenett 67 — 

HrTTtaraaon Jonea 7514-1 

W Herds 73 — 

GMenmgh 

— — C Brawn — 6-1 


3J> SURREY RACING HANDICAP CHASE (£3.283: 3m 5f 18yd) (8 runners) 


Tom Sharp , Ra Nova, 
Banibeook Again and Floyd. 

The home defence -will be led 
by Dark Raves. Barney Baraett, 
Erm's Invader, Bonalma and 
ftedcoteri, whaer of foeSweeps 
three times. 

The weights win he pa bBshe d 
on December 8. 


nfcdaxnetady is getting his act 
wc wganrik hKj n m ph i g 
and Stew has goe foe bang of 
him now- It’s better to let 
iitdamrfndy nm Iris own race 
out in from, and now he’s 
beginning . to look a decent 
horse,** Ins trainer Nick Hender- ' 
son said. 

Tg nif Tnmwital fitl y Arm* 

Efry, vfoo either refines to start 
or wins, put her. best foot 


Inmmon put in a useful 
performance on his first effort at 
tite winter game to win the first 
divistcai of the Adcrtx Novices' 
Hmdle. 

It was soft going wtea In- 
txddoa scored over IH* miles on 
tiie Flat at Nottingham in 
March fin* Mark Usher, and the 
Busted gidfoim again bad the 
conditions to & liking. 

Intuhkm, partnered by Dale 
McKeown, yotmger brother of 
the Flat jockey Dean, was 
always - fiandaly pla c ed, and 
cruised to the front on the final 
tmn for home with two flights la 


her trainer Martin Pipe and Iris 
bead ma n Dennis Dummet to 
cany Jonathan Lower to a 30 
lengths victory in the 
Lonforkte Conditional Jockeys 
No we^SdUng Hurdle. 

“We usually get her to start 
with a tractor at home - so we 


Sam Marshead showed the 
Anstrafiansthe way home in the 
first round of the Erostin Group 
Gnat Britain v Australia 
Handicap Hurdle when he led 
all the way on White Rose. The 
pair ran out ten-tength winners 
from Koffi, and completed a 
double for Henderson. 

But the Australians were in 
the lead, 13 .points to 10, after 
tins first round in the tour 
match series, to be continued at 
Towcester, Hereford and 
Worcester in the next few days. 


1985: WAFFY-FRYER 5-1 1-0 R Rowe (12-1) J QAord 16 ran 


EflDM TH-ETTtADBl 111-6) qukAsnod knprassiraly tram toe 2ndtort wid soon «wd dev accounted 
rUnWI (vROBMCKlOOrajJOW til-6). wltoeestaU is, and SKYGRANaE(11-a.8w««ty loader, 
by a and 41 leapacttMlr ar Ascot {2m, £3057. good. No* 15. 8 rain Previously SKnaRAHGEran battB- 

vrtMKi (10-12) beatina Paia ChW (10-11] and Rnano (f (M2) 71 and llal Wknsstor (2m 2L £3129. goat Oa 2& 


501 UX3CYVA*(BF) (Mta B Stars) GBUOng 11-11-9 

502 3F0HFP BALLYIHAN (F Stands^ F Starldan S-! 1-7 

503 24000/4 LEAN AH AGHASH (C) (Mrs WTlAoCtl) 8 Ma«or9-11-4 . 

504 0322F4 P0RTASKA13 (B) (Lord Ctahaa) T FbraHr 11-10-12 

505 100022 LITTLE POLVHR(CDJBF)(M Show) JBtaarta 9-10-12 

506 CH4M2 H EMB 1 S ON (C) (P Dulotee) P Dufcaaa 6-10-12 

507 2214F-0 ROLL-A-JOMT (M Kingrisy) G Thomar 8-10-0 

510 QMMO QUAYSBERATTl£(RWU6ttTMJonaa 9-10U 


- JAoat 96 6-1 

lai riagtoa — 12-1 
N DMn 97 14-1 

. P Barton 93 74 

BPowel 94 F5-2 

C Brawn *99 8-1 

Starwood 9020-1 


LEICESTER 


2L15 SREBY NOVICE CHASE {0 .348: 2m) (13) 


IABQ06T TOT HR 7-11-131 
MN A TbmH 


rwnm forROBMOOOOFEUXnvtr 1 - 6 ). who was held i». 
by a and 41 raspecthely at Asoot (2m, £3057. good, Nov 15. 8 ranV 
when (T0-12)baaHia Ba la CHafjiO-lU and ranang (10-1^71 anoi 
23 ran). BETTY’S PEARLpi-O) 201 7th toPin’sPride (11-5) wWiARI 

2f.Elfe7.gOOd. NwAier»a.lHEICULAK(11-^ 195414th to Seta 
soft, Nov ail ranL UNMOC (SsappoWlngjBil ttaw. Pravtoualy ( 
Staten Strafart [2m. IS93. good. Oct 18. 14r 


: (3m 118yd) 


7-1M B PowaO C5-Q P Dntosae 4 ran 


(11-5) with ARCTIC CHEF (1 1-0) taBed off atl 
IKl4th toSwtnmer(ll-0) at Kenamn Cm. £K 


time. Previously (1CM < 
. good, Oct 18. 14 ran). 


| ran right 141 to best when 


IcORfli LITTLE PCLVERpU-7) had UICKY VAIC (11-7) 9 back in 3(6 whan an 8 2nd to Rtzharbert 
rwnm p(M)atOeyonSm5f.E3837.good.Oct31.lOran).Ha®ERSON(l1-0)wasboaJenabyB«>- 
lands Cross (11-13) wdh LENNAR AGHASHp 1-9 51 back in 4th at Aaoot On, 86415. gooa Npvj&SVwlL 
PORT A9CAI8 Iasi of Bmso to finish on Ms seasonal dated. Preriously (10-2) ran a 1 551 aid trfll 
(1 1 -7) at Lingfield (3m, £8240, good to soft, Mer 1 5. 8 rar). ROLL-A-JDOfT down tfie fleld ovttl 
last season (10-4) beat Wortham Say (10-111 1JH at Chepstow (3m 6T, £2164, soft Mar 6, 5 i 


L30 CROWNCO NOVICE CHASE (£3£7fc 3m 118yd) (10 ronners) 


Selections 

By Mandarin 

12.45 Carr Wood. 1.15 God’s Hope. 1.45 Rig 
SteeL -2.15 Wild Aigosy.i45 Saryan. 3.15 «ue 
Sparkle. * - 


) wUi LEAN AR AGHAOtTCl 1 -6) 51 back in 4th at Ascot Om. 26415. gooa Nov 15, 6 ran). 
: of toon to Mah on Ms maaonai dabuL Piwtouaty (1 M) ran a 1 361 aid to Maori VMnra 
3m, £5240, good to soft. Mar 15. 8rar). ROLL-A-JOMT down the laid ovar 2m 4frecandy. 
beef NHan Say (tO-fl) 1 W af Chapstow (3hi 6f, £2164, soft Mari, 5 ran). 


Going: good (chase cowsek soft (bwdtes) 


2 M ALHIAK ATdma lfS-IW StaraKn#4 

a AM) BHD OESPMTUScudBBore 6 -H -5 A Sharp* 

t m OSCRALBREYmXMMcCOurtS'11-5 — OHcCont 

9 SS- QaHHf JEaw UiWT-5 WKnwcrt) 

8 m 

14 WB- LEQAL SUGAR Hunan B-11-5 MbSBarii 

15 iPPr NORTHWARD Pltartt 8-11-6 R Storage 

17 DM REC7tnYMRKPBaHy 7-11-6 DBnram 

18 MO- HELaaORE-G Ktadantay 6-11-6 HHchart* 

22 PP# QUAUTAH PRHCES6 K Stona 5-11-0 . JDDntea(7) 

23 MF OaRWOODIADTPOnConiar 4-16-12 

»MRktardB(7) 


201 2FP-111 MDNmHTUAONESSfDBtaoiiMqOBtaomGekl 6-11-4. 

202 30029-1 BOLD ACCLAIM (J Joseph) R Frost MI-2 

263 0000/21 HBfTBt CITY (HHandaQHHandai 6-11-2 

204 0/00*40- BAJAN SWSHDC (P Green) F Winter 7-10-12 

206 0 BORSNIONQ (GPS (Print) UtQSIMtar 5-10-12 

208 321020- CRANMS1 (B Matthmvs) D J Munay-Smfth 6-10-12 

209 FOOI/On EVH* GREAT (R WortttogionJ D Oughton 7-1D-12 

210 00-01 FIREWORKS TaGKT(J Rosa) N Henderson 7-1IM2 

211 010043 KMGSWICK (SduK UK Lid) J Francome 6-10-12 

214 2P32 WOODSHE ROAD (Pradftg Ikrans) D Ntehotoon 6-10-12— 


3^0 LONGWAY NOVICE HANDICAP HURDLE (£2,757: 2m) (10 runners) 


.SSraUiEccioa «90F7-2 

Brin Kan 92 51 

_ RDaawoodv 91 5-1 


1985: P OIII APS LUCKY 8-15-12 R Arndt (54 fav) D Sswcrth 7 ran 


JHd to Ann. Nov 7, « 

onihenra-in, bsotai'^i in 3nL BAJAN SUNSHMEwi 
vine, at level w rt flht3.6 iaiUvqrp ool gm SfllOy. £130^ 
(ftdrewclawfnwwuprePEWOigtll-Olby 15ia| 




never put a foot 9HHRHH99HMR 
^■■■IHpxiYvWi KMGSWICK (fl-7) weakening 
wasadecern firaJer two jonflo n »«po bemtoflRo8eRtto 
■■ soft Mar30.7ranL F»gwcretS NIGHT n| 
(3m. £1881, good to Ann, No* 17. B ranj.ro 


603 2-2123 SAND CASTLE 64 (B Archer) SlMkjr 5-1 1-6 ! I 

605 834F41 SK3NALHAM(Ms A CtapoonJO Stanmod511-5(7ax) 

606 404P21 NOTH TOO DEAR n(S Adams) G Baking 4-11-2 

60S 0044Q/0 RUM (Mrs C Ctatworthy) J GRfcrd B-10-12 

610 043P-3 H.YIROroSH(P8caramaO Aba J Pnman 510-11 

612 «MF3 FLEXHLEFRBOpF)(GDart>y)JFaR51M 

613 r/0200-1 KEYBOARD KN3 (A WBlar) D VWeon 5-10-7 I 

615 3P-4 STAGHOUND (M>s C Meadows) OOughton 4-1 0-4 

622 PB309-4 BHUNIBABY/PKaamsy) J Sayers 5-TM 

624 00/0 ANY SUSBES8 (C Masai) W Musson 5-150 

198fc YABB 4-11-8 P Scudamore (9-1) J Edwanla 11 ran 


1245 BEGMERS NOVICE WWJLE (Di v l:3-Y-0: 
£713: 2m) (20 namers) .. 

11133 

3 1 

4 


G4VNH Amosy. 2-1 HrdOf SpW. 8-1 G town. 10-1 AJdai. 
Northward, 14-1Doraeartid)r, 20-1 Where. 


2 J) BtGMORE HANDICAP CHASE (£3£64: 2m 4f 68yd) (5 nmners) 

302 P1310-3 SBTONLEGfB (Mrs SEmbWco^ J GHad 9-11-7 RRobb *99 52 

304 011/11-P KYOTO (BMonMtous^JJenfctaS 5159 SSntihEcdm 99 51 

306 41211/1 BUCKO (Mrs p MacCrnij Jimmy Fttzgentt 9-10-1 (4ea) HDwyar 93F64 

308 2FU1F2/ 8MNAOAM(RWrVa)J Fox 5150 RDvwoed* — 151 

312 111F11/ CUJTTBSUCK (CO) (O Horton) FlMdar 5150 PScadanera — 51 

1985: HAZY SUNSET 511-7 B de Haan (11-10 tad F Winter 4 ran 




245 BEONNERS NOVICE HURDLE (Dhf Ik 3-Y-O? 
£713: 2m) (19)... 

1 1 STRAWBBfflRTSPtirpj) P Ffitaate 1511 _ S Johnson 

5 CAROOROYE J Bukcrveta 10-10_Z_ — 

6 CHERRY LUSTRE BStosots 1510 R Strong* 

7 9 CORMSHIWNCEW Wharton I5T0 SJOWaR 

8 DIRECTOR PLEASE J Spewing 1510 AWsbb 

10 6 GBHBWJ Harris I5lff>_-Z J A Horn 

12 62 HU. H YEEAJante 1510 KBurtaW 

14 TBfTLAND HAWK R HoRoshead 1510 PDem 

•18 RCLARPAGO W Wharton 1510 H 

19 - . SARYAN B Cmtoy 1510 

20 90 TRBACOSWGTimarW-1 

21 2093 9IC810Y MAJOR GNndanky 1510 

22 • IRLLOWESaR Orion 1510 

23 0 CTTYLBOtCOURBRHa 

24 0P0 OJUHTS PET W Morris 1 

25 0 DASAQQEBIT Casey 166 

Lskraio^ 




94 HR RydB. 114 Strawberry SpSf, 51 Viceroy Major. 
51 Cornish PThoa. 7-1 H&tato Tie, 151 Gemtao. 


wBsfarfrrani 
canton On If, 
'.(n 1965/86 (157) most 


sd when 111 3TO to subsaquant Hanessy wtnnar 
good to soft Now 13. 7 ran). KYOTO was In need 
Ksnawhaia6I' wtnnar from LBodegrance(IM) 


Course specialists 


at Newton Abbot 12m Sf, £2284, goodto firm, Aug 3, 7rari).BUCiro (1511) rebaned star a 2 war tajHjff to 
beat King JoP5lO) at Haydorit rotttne by 41 (2m 4f. £3740, goodto soft, No* IB, 4 ran). amTAGABl m-^ 
nmsQuaeTuI novice ctKKarnlHSdfararomifoHlBfoRBHimMrororoaBMHroroAHRHHHIfo 


gcxxl. Apr 3, 7 ranj^ttJUTTEHH 
CORNAUCTTRrfeT (11-4) tor the 

SSecticra: BUCHO 




Plato and Sections final at Chetartwm <aw 4/.1S277, soft April), 6 


D Haworth 

FWMwyn 

TForster 

SMefcx 

MTsJPUman 

FVTWar 


TRAINERS 

Winners Rumsro ParCent 
12 S3 225 

17 52 207 

10 52 19^ 

6 32 IB-8 

5 27 105 

18 106 17.0 


JOCKEYS 


TThomeon Janes 
SSrrtthEcries 
RDurwoody 
PScuJemore 
C Brown 
R Rowe 


Wdes Per Cat* 
29 27^ 

67 269 

32 25 J) 

82 20.7 

57 193 • 

76 154 


MM 


SEDGEFIELD 


Guide to our in-line racecard 

50432 TWESF0KH(COJBR(MraJ Ryley)BHH5150 


1.15 BARKBY CLAMING NOVICE HURDLE 

(0,158: 2m) (tQ 

2 

I" 

10 4MP 

11 OB 
IB OM 
19 005 

21 PP-8 

22 

23 5 

26 502 

27 002/ 

28 M 

31 006P 

32 09V 


3.15 WALTHAM CONDITIONAL 
HANDICAP HURDLE (£1,511: 2m) (21) 

2 TATLORSroWKJJertchS 511-8 

5 3600 Al L FLA3M te^ D)R Sisson 5-15T2. 
PORTEYTOiO (pfo«£irr^3BRft 


JOCKEYS 




as 


7 ^6 CER OR J Pates 51 


-. ‘••rS p 


Selections 

By Mandarin 


9 MO 
A*« 

13 -800 

14 2030 

15 045 BKULOVK 

16 3031 3PAMLB1 
19 156 BLUESPABI 


51 

R Antes 5106 

r5HH) 

. RAtatwrst 5-150 
iJ OU 5-10-0.. 


>(B-bOnters. 


Distance winner. CO -oouno 


Trainer. Age and 
wranc& The Times 
Approxiraato starting 


51 God'S Hope. 4-1 Baytown Cote. 51 Btorian. 7-1 
Grumble. Who's Dmtog. 15T Aran Vda.l5l PoooLoca 


12^5 Go Lissava. 
1.15 Doughty Rebel 
1.45 Prince Zeus. 


2.15 Gowan House. 
2.45 Proick’s Fair. 

3.15 AugusL 


2.15 RACING POST HANDICAP CHASE (E1,54& 2m) (6 runners) 

2 12F311 GOWAN HOUSE (CD) blWsta)W A Steptanson 7-157 (7 «be) 


Going: good 


3 4042/M- ROYAL RADAR (CD){R Bowden) R Gray 1511-9 

4 111044 BORDeTKHGHTCCO) (Mrs L Fraser) J HNdwm 11-11-4 

5 22MF4 IEJUVENATOR (CD) (Mre T Metcate) G Wcbsrde 1511-1 — 

7 0PQ/041- GOOH J06|CIJ|(J »Ctairi*on)J Rtctardami 12-153 

9 150002 ANOTIBl FLAME (DRF) (Mra P Ramtson) W Storoy 5150 . 


R Lamb 

D Comte! 

C Grate 

PTodc 

Mr AOrtowy 
_OT«Dar(7) 


12.45 GREY HORSE SELLING HANDICAP HURDLE (£576: 2m) (19 Turners) 

2 SWBTSOU?(LfrCBlWMantB«hlPMorHaath15tf.7 PT 

3 000032- STARSHOT (D)p SwMetonl)O3windl0hurst 11 - 11-6 MrOStemflalrara 

4 012440 GO LBSAVA (H) (BBateyfR Peacock 51 1-3 C Ora 


5 242200 CLCXHAM LAD (Q(M Motley) NChanbertain 51513 

6 2/0053F HOT ETTY (Mrs E Adair) Ron Thompson 51510 

9 2000-00 TOPO’TTT LAfEfHCouaan]NBycrolt 9 -io. 7 . 

10 0009/03 MVEH LUNE p Alan) R Aten 5154 

13 SPLCHFIU (V Hafl) VHafl 12-152 

14 B02/250 CARLHGTOR) BAY (C) p Tato) R Gray 7-152 

16 000002 ASCOT AGAIN (B) (Mrs O Farratt) J P £Mth 15150 

17 4/00005 PETE AT® OUD p»s PRenrtsorflW Storey 7-KM) 

16 004004 DR CORM3UU8(B)(F Barton) FBtoion 5150 

21 050400 JUST GRAYLE (P (tes S Raines) Mrs G Rovaiey 7-150~_ 

22 02/0050 m SNOW (D) p Gray) R Gray 11-1041 

23 009040 FOaiB7JS/RL)Wi)MJam«7-1W 

24 POP/OV FFA91 WEN (W Gritah^ J Thomas 7-10-0 

25 OOOO/P-O NOBLE L£GBO(J Lund) J Doyle 5150 i 

26 00000/0 LADY ROHOHA (F Lees) F Lass 510-0 

27 9/0FPP5 MORE LIVB.Y (MIS MMoritote)E Alston 5150 

198& Meteng teraraterad doe to (teat 


C Derate (7) B89 — 

— 93 51 

^.MPtepw 92 151 
. RMarioy (7) 9611-2 


B Stony 93151 

PTuck 99 51 

— N MtOMnack 

IfcJ Osborne (7) 94152 

PWvsn(4T 94 — 

— PAFraraiW — 14-1 

Stem Janes (7) 


245 DANBY NOVICE CHASE (£973: 2m 4f) (15 runnefs) 

1 010501 EMPMEWATfC^P Wtette R Tats 511-6 

4 00B- BALLYSALY STAR (J Wada) JWbde 51510 

5 FQ005 CANDY CORE (Mra RBira^RBrero 51510 

6 OPIW C MM C' Y H OBW ft Uteutey) A Ports 7-T5T0 

7 00 CONVXX BOY (M Athol im LsR DMoftet 51 510 

8 3-8F263 HOLD OFF (B) (Mbs H KamRon) Mbs H Handton 51510— 

10 140150 JACK OF CLUBS pfctoLean) B Mdjaan.51510 

11 0 W 59 B 2 jwpBBP«NCE(WStaptansteW A Stephen** 7-1510. 

12 PO KWnjsqCTRY(CRBiBtete w Storey 7-1510 — — 

18 IV3PP9P- LUCKY TEN (Ml* HBaSBrtJCTlnlter 51510 ; 

17 OOOP50 LUMBER GUAY (A Madaggw) A Mattoggwt 51510 I 

18 4111-30 PATOCICS FAP (W Steer) R Peacock 151510 

23 40330 MDO«Jaf7WG(KHB9)J Partes 5155. 

24 0000/P OCHAS p Hodgrorfl D Hodgson 7-10-6 

25 2F5P00 PERFECT RMCE p Ramtete W Storey 5156, 


145 SILVER BELL HANDICAP CHASE (£1,766: 
3m) (7) 

1 45F CEBHHUI P)J Edaants 511-12 D B n raai 

4 044- GGLDBt KNOLL (CO) S Motor 7-11-ID 

G Chads* Joaea 

?S5 

B 4-23 

a fpp- 

15 P2/P 

158 ng S»eL 11-4 Ookfan Knol. 4-1 Supreme Bd. 
51 Certasau, 151 La Gran Bran. Suny Me. 251 Conte Ma ta 


20 « HIMBTtME COWBOY A Medwar 7-10-0 DOWan 

-s S 

I a Miiwttfe== 3 BB 

30 25P SHAMBE O OTteB 7-150- 1 PiSSS 

. 9g Stanton Way. 5-1 SomUer Spirit. 8-1 1 Wnnrior mm. 
51 tern. Dancing ArerTOL iBTSroTi piteJSS 




Course specialists 


TTMJNCIli fc s M afior, 5 tamers Iran 23 runners, 21.7%: J 


JO^TO! G McCourt, 8 wlnrara tram 87 rides. 95% (Only 


Results from yesterday’s two meetings 

Wincanton * npo! " dl 


Ned Lavdasa, Throchgm 
Rfctoe.20ran.2 JU. iol a 


doing: good to stft 


T5L fSL S Christian at tembourri. Tate: 
23.0ft eiJR-SIJA OJft OF; SSSO. 


KfTaggart (7). — — 

PTtxk #99 51 

.PNNenffi 82 — 

C Grant 

D Tatar (7) 92 1M 


ALSO RAN: 7 Sa 
Wonder (W). 11 
' Knda. 20 Barytee | 


3.15 on mm i, rawer double 

WwnL7-ft tavt 2, CterokCtoro 


— KDoohra 


1.15 SEDffiFBLD PADDOCX BOOKMAKERS HANDICAP HURDLE (£1,322: 3m 600yd) 


3.15 HARPMGTON NOVICE HURDLE (£660: 2m) (16 runners) 


CMob BmmiiW ; 

Mexican Joe. Node Storm , — , 

Boy, Mttera Way. 16 ran. NR: Lon 
AdwMor. JHtTL «. 2J«. hd. D Bnrartii at 
Tot* 693ft 8230, £1.20, 
£1750. CSF: 28237. . 


1 111100 TBOMBOaW (Mra JParfc) Benya Smte 511-ig 

3 H>W0F SECRETHNALE (C) (Regent 0*c Ltifi J Johnson 7-11-9 „ 

4 000011- TAXaonM(MBowter)MBonker511-7 

5 222100/ IBSS GOLOMGAY (Mm P Wragg) M W Easlertjy 5-1 1-7 

6 03-112P DOUGHTY REBa.(C)(G Wfiiate G HiCtanto 51 1-S — — 

7 013 TOWER HOPE (&BF)p Sawney Mra GRev«y511-3._ 

9 104503 JAYEU£THAW(Op7haw)DM0ftaH51513 

10 U4IP64 HNATUtE HBS (F8coito) W A Stephenson 4-158 

T! 302/004 GtfKXMDY (C Aiexsndbr) C Afexander 7-T57-, 


C Grate 92151 

r Eamatraw 94 14-1 

B Stony* 8412-1 

AStrtngpr —151 

PTuck G99 7-1 

PMwn(4) 64 51 

KTMtei 67 51 

R Lamb go 51 

MrO KMcTaggart(7) 81 — 


12 235442 SENGH RAMOS (D) (MOM Racing Ud) Ron TTumpaod 4-103. G Hater 


13 030020 IIAGN0X{K Adey) N Chambertato 5150 

18 2OPD0* GOLDtSO«S(T Rotate T Robson 51« 

17 O4OVO0 KBTSn.(JSwte^JSteBrs5150 

18 UFPO SEALS! OFFER (MesJ Hey) PBeaumort 510-0- 


. KrJQabanw(7) 
— ten R Lock 


PA Fend (4) 


431000 THE FKHIO Roes) J Mooney 511-8 — 

ACIWS BOY (G Alktoson) D Moffag 4-1 V-0 — 

arktakm shrote o reanw 4-n-o 

AUGUST P Cefeman) Danys Smith 51 1-0. 

«P CUT MMATE fP MontoWi) P Moteltti 511-0 

00 GOLDEN TUPSKZ (tes G Anatege) D Lee 511-0 

dOUVEHHO (Mn J tavrlto) J Barry 7-11*0 

p MEfflT NEASDRE (J Ataon) R ARn 4-1 VO 

D RtMCSS(MraFRapar)VTTxnpson4-11-0 * 

NO RT H ER N LEAGUE (WS te phen ste W A Staphanacd 511-0 

40 THE HOUGH (MMoytel) Mr® GRawtoy 51 W) — 

F THOMAS MAC (T Banon) T Bamn51f-0 

p- CALMATA (Lady A Bowtjy) Lady A Bowtry 5159 m 

CERT AW MBODY (q (P CMdateQ E Alston 4-159 

5 JDOSXAW WS$te Denys Sntei5t50. 

P MORELLAE PRIDE (A Brranter) Ron Thomson 51 M 

QUEEN OFTWBERfMra A Heifera) 8 WKftSOti 4-1 D-9 

SOUND WCtBC (W Goodaon] W Bentisy 4-158 


J Mooney — 12-1 

KTMtei 

P AAnUW 

C Grant — -F52 

D Hotel — — 

— Mr H Brown (7) 

J Hansen — 4-i 

ft Harley (7) —151 

Mr M Thompson (*) 

0~, R Lento —11*2 

PNNeuffi #99 7-1 

G Heritor 

PBurii — — 

M Altera (7) 

A Smith (7) 


LISPmtel.AKRAMtC&owall-! 

2. DeabWB (B Powte. 158 te53.TBn 
Scudamore, 7-1L ALSO RAN: 7-2 Pi* 
Mator (401). «T Sheet (5M, 12 
Awiare ft»Le raod. 40 Hope Gap. Tran. 
3L 1X1. 7T.BL2BLR Hodges at Soraerton. 
Tote; £5 30: 88.00, £1 JO. Dft E330 l CSF: 
£1343. 


VtocanL 7-4 fav); % CteMkCtoro 
Moore. 5"- ’ — 

> 2 ). 

Mnentooo. 16 Sliul Run. 25 Dork . 

Uw-legN Aid. PBrateiFereon &u, 
Touchof Lucie. SOm hd, 1SL2LM. r*To 
Bwonh a WWsbury. Tote: E38ft«2J», 
£280, £1.00. Oft gain. CSR £1582. 


Jjto- HU, ffl. nk. N Henderson at 

BSttSfflSP * 

2 0 (an .St hdte) 1, WHTTE ROSE 



Bom ffl. 4 

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COTIME RUN (R 
^ L Ctea ^’ a 


1, TIMELY STAN (B de 
m The Bex (A Charlton. 
3. SnowtaB Draray (G Moore, 51L 
RAN: 4 Wav Easter Lee (aft 4 iM*v 
OR (teL 6 Upbam Ganbto fedr). 
Prince, 16 Bespoke, 25 Harbour 
Bridge. Mode Wonder. SQThteador «m 
N everof.Tinisah. 13 ran. 2H, 2L«. 

Mra J Pftaon al -Upper Lantooom. Tots: 
£820: £1-70. El JKE350. DR £3i2a 
CSF: £5757. Trieste S41&63. - 


Warwick 

Gatoff good to soft 
KM (2m M4 1. BifomON (Me 
McKeown. 2. MU Bey (NCotamn, 

51b 3. Me Ra (R- Donwoody. 511 


K fr f , r ’ iT. .V." ' 1 1 ’!' 


E580. CS-E18J2S. 


RAN: M tapr Monte, 


Star (C 

- - — l For Sore 

Sands. 16 Banka-. 20 BbB 
a ^- 33 Carol's 


afis 

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bl 2KL2LW.%L4. Mncesa. St Artp. TO ran. Wt Prw The 
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£550. IJft £342a Bwan. Tote: £4,70; £260. £1^0, £220. 
DF=E3240.CSR 




IWJOteanra{7) — — 
DWflktaeon 51 


145 UR CHRIS GATEAU & CAKE NOVICE CHASE (£1,174; 6m 600yd) (10 runners) 

1 521 PHMCE ZBJS (J Cutis) 0 Lee 7-133 MrHao*«i(7J 

2 S4324U ABBtOY (US® T Stone) H Champion 7-11*7: — 94 9-2 

3 000300 AVUT10N SUPPORT (J Wade) JWadG 6-1 1-7 — KJmraa 

6 U434F0 HISTtWC HOUSE (MtesJ Cook) MQerty 11-11-7 —"taw 95 — 

7 F042C2 JAPUNB (J Thomas) J Thomas 511*7 — 96 51 

9 PPPF2F UTILE TIGB1 (Mra B Ramson) K Stone 511-7 ASHtger — S-i 

10 UKETREWARNE(R Price) WStoroy 511-7 N McOHteate 

11 00044-5 Ml CMOS (CDL 44 Foods Ltd) MNiugMon 7-1 f-7^ L Caste —51 

12 30PO4 OWB4 DUFF (Mse MFuineaaJR Tate 7-11 -7 -JHraraan 92 151 

13 0F3-448 RUIEGTR1ST (C Atoxander) C AJexamrir l f-f 1-7 te-OMtataggartlT) SB — 


Course spedallsts 


TRADERS 

VUtonsre Rumen PerCent 
TOBawon 7 22 

J Haldane 8 25 2*0 

Denys Smah M 180 1|J 

(tented Thompson 7 42 167 • 

•UreGRemey 9 54 16.7 

Gftttoards 15 106 142 


JOCKEYS 

Wemera 

32 

34 

13 


Ridas ParCent 
17T 147 

209 143 

149 47 


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THE TIMES FRIDAY NOVEMBER 28 1986 



CRICKET 


£ 


, . * ? »cb ^noui 


-rrs fiy? 

v-^4 

■ ' 'Sk 


plan to give 

more of 
same in second Test 



Froia John Woodcock, Cricket Corespondent, Perth 
After yesterday morning’s As brawling broke out round 

the ground. 


-•«; 1 


Lu l,J »H 


-A,- 


■ :S'£i 

■ ^15 

■■■-a* 


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; 

- vr. 


practice England announced 
that they would be playing the 
same team in the second Test 
match starting here today as 
won them the first Test in 
Brisbant “Leave well alone” 
was th& thinking, and with- 
Emburey back in action only 
the wtcketkeeping place 
prompted much debate. 

Gatting will bat at number 
three again and DeFreitas may 
move up the order, from eight 
to seven. When Colin 
Cowdrey, as captain in the 
West Indies in 1967-68, took it 
upon himself to go in first 
wicket down, because no one 
else much wanted to, he was 
seen at ..his best, as Catting 
couldbe ifhe can summon the 
necessary patience. 

No one, the curator in- 
cluded, has any certainty of 
bow the pilch will last In 
appearance it is quite unlike 
the did ones that started black 
and shiny .or the more , recent 
green-tops. It is pale in colour, 
with a fairly even covering of 
dry grass. The aim has been to 
produce a good first day 
batting pitch. -The forecast is 
for fine weather, and a fine 
day in Perth takes a lot of 
beating. 

In the last two Test matches 
that England have played here 
the cricket has been marred by 
controversy and confronta- 
tion. In 1982-83 Alderman, 
the Australian bowler, had to 
be carried off the field on -a 
stretcher after dislocating his 
right shoulder when tackling 
one of a group of weD- 
lubricated spectators, carrying 
Union Jacks, who had come 
over the fence when England’s 
first innings total passed 400. 


, - . - Greg Chappell 

took his side off until order 
was restored, a quarter of an 
hour’s play being lost. It was 
15 minutes before Alderman 
played another Test 
and it is questionable whether 
he has ever been quite as good 
a bowler since. 

. On England's previous tour, 
m 1979-80, Lillee hijacked the 
Pfcrth Test match, storming 
around and arguing that he 
should be allowed to use an . 
aluminium bat, despite objec- 
tions from the umpires and 
both captains, Greg Chappell 
and Brekrley. By the leniency 
with which they treated the 
incident, the Australian 

Perth teams 

AUSTRALIA (from); *A R Border, D C 
Boon. G R Marsh. OMJone&GMRartfa 

G R J Memww. P R sSgs R wES 

T D 2toetrrar. 0 F LMrttwTc D MatttoSs. 
B A Reid. 

EWGLAMftBCBrond.CWJAftw.’MW 
Qamnft a JL amfc D I Gower. 1C Ottum. 
PA I DeFiMBS. C J Meharis, J E 
Emburey. P H Edmonds, 6 R M ay. 

Cricket Board lost control for 
a while of players’ conduct 
On the same ground a year 
later, when Australia were 
playing Pakistan, Lillee was at 
it again, being involved in a 
scuffle with Miandad To 
some extent it was a case of 
the habits formed in World 
Series Cricket dying hard. 

Lillee is now doing some 
part-time coaching, Tor the 
West Australian Institute of 
Sport and also the New Zea- 
land Cricket Board, and Cbap- 
pdl is an Australian selector, a 
position in which he feels the 
tension every bit as much as 
when he was playing. When 
‘Neil Harvey became a selector 


The laughing cavalier 


Sharjah, United Arab Emir - 
ales (Reuter) — A cavalier 92 
by the opener, Krishna 
Srikkanlh, swept India to an 
easy seven-wicket win over Sri 
Lanka in the opening match of 
the four-nation Champions 
Trophy one-day competition 
yesterday. India, the World 
Cup holders, cruised past Sri 
Lanka’s 214 with 3.3 of their 
45 overs remaining. 

Sri Lanka, the Asia Cup 


holders, paid dearly for field- 
ing lapses, with Srikkanlh 
being put down twice in the 
same over from a newcomer, 
Graeme Labrooy, when in the 
40s. He made the most of the 
reprieve, plundering two axes 
arid 10 fours before he was* 
bowled eight runs short of his 
century going for another big 
hit 

SOCMSsSrt Lanka 214 tbrnkw; imSa 215 
for thrao (K J 
50 rot out). 


he, too, said he got into more 
of a slate than in his playing 
days. But if Brisbane was 
anything to go by, intemperate 
behaviour should not be a 
problem in the present series. 

What, instead, is casting 
something of a shadow are the 
heavy legal costs feeing the 
West Australian Cricket 
Association as a result of the 
Federal Court’s recent de- 
cision in the case brought 
against them by Kim Hughes, 
the former Australian and 
West Australian captain. The 
court ruled that the WACA 
had contravened the Trade 
Practises Act- in barring 
Hughes from playing dub 
cricket in Perth because of ins 
link with South Africa where, 
for the last two southern 
■summers, he has taken a side 
comprising Australian Test 
and state cricketers. 

The Australian Cricket 
Board had already banned 
Hughes and his team from 
representing Australia until 
October 1988 and their states 
until October 1987. Believing 
the club ban to be 
“indefinite”, which the 
WACA say was a false 
assumption, Hughes claimed 
that if he could never have 
played dub cricket again it 
would have ruled him out of 
all future consideration for 
Test and state cricket 

The 75 percent of Hughes’s 
costs, which the WACA have 
to find is expected to come to 
something over £150,000, 
which could hold up the 
building of one of the new 
stands at the Test ground. 

Ftantic efforts were still 
being made yesterday to get 
the players’ accommodation 
and the “media centre” ready 
for this morning. For the 
moment, then, cricket is mak- 
ing the news. On Sunday, 
when the Pope is in town, he 
will be. He drew 30,000 to the 
Sydney Cricket Ground on 
Tuesday. For all the difference 
that the other main attraction, 
the America’s Cup, Iras made 
to our stay so far this week, it 
could as well be taking place 
off Cowes as in the waters a 
few miles from here. There is a 
lull between races, timed to 
coincide with the Test. 



Beauty and the beast: Kinvara Cayzer and her Land Rover, in whkb she aims to cross the Sahara Desert 


MODERN PENTATHLON 




nc 


* 


Buguer’s 
challenge 
to Bruno 

Sriaq (AFP) — The fanner 
werid heavyweight champion- 
ship contender, Joe Bogner has 
challenged Frank Bruno to a 
contest in London early next 
year as a stepping -stone to a 
world title boot, the local pro- 
moter, BSD Manley, said yes- 


BOXING 


Reeson to continue 
despite tragedy 

By Srikumar Sea, Boxing Correspondent 


t* 

A 


|K 

s* 




The Sydney-based 
who now rejoices in the sou- 
briquet of “Aussie Joe”, has won 
both his boats since retaining to 
the ring in S ept ember. Money 
said he would suggest a Feb- 
ruary 7 date to the London 
promoter, Mtekey BhH, who has 
already turned down two pro- 
posals far such a match. “Doff 
didn't want to know about 
Bogner and claimed Bnrao 
woald win emy round,” Morbey 
said. “Bat if we can come to 
terns, Bugner can leave in 
January .* 

When he announced Ms come- 
back campaign, the Him garian - 
born Bogner said he believed he 
was still better than any of the 
world's heavyweights. And after 

demolish Ttewwr^lfcrfrick test 
weekend, Bogner maintained be 
had seen Bathing to change his 


Sam Reeson, the former Brit- 
ish cnuserwdgbt champion, 
from Battersea, is to keep his 
date with Bashirn Ah, of Ni- 
geria, cm Saturday, despite 
suffering from shock at the 
death of his manager. Tony 
Lavelle. in a car crash on 
Tuesday. LavdJe was on his way 
to a show in Manchester with 
two boxen when his cm skidded 
and overturned. 

Reeson bad decided to pull 
out of the bout but Lavelle’s 
wife, Wendy, asked him not to 
withdraw. “Tony would have 
wanted you to fight,” she told 
him. Lavelle said: “I was too 
shocked to fight but Wendy 
advised me to go to Frank 
Warren.” 

Reeson joined Warren on the 
condition that the manager’s 
percentage would go to Mrs 
Lavelle for the next three years. 
Reeson has a European title 
bout soon and ifhe beats AK be 
could take over All’s No. 10 
position in the World Boxing 
Council rankings and be boxing 
for the world tide before long. 

- Tony McKenzie, of Leicester, 
the British light-weherweigbt 
champion, could also find him- 
self moving up in lira world ifhe 


beats Ford Jennings, of Fort 
Worth, Texas. Jennings, who 
boxed at every weight as an 
amateur, was beaten on a split 
decision by the world cham- 
pion. Patnzio Oliva, of Italy, 
last June in Naples. Jennings’s 
manager, Don Leemaster, said: 
“We would like to fight him 
again but not in Italy.” 

With Azumah Nelson, of 
Ghana, pulling out of the 
Alexandra Pavilion show on 
December 3 because of sus- 
pected appendicitis, Errol Chris- 
tie. the Coventry middleweight, 
has been called in to lend weight 
io the evening. Christie’s op 
nemt will be Charlie Boston, 
Trenton, New Jersey. 

Christie fresh from his excit- 
ing victory over Sean Mannion, 
the world rated light-middle- 
weight, from Boston, is ready to 
meet anyone. Boston should be 
a good test for him for not long 
ago he knocked out Dwight 
Davidson, once a world ranked 
middleweight. Also on the bill, 
Sylvester Mitlee, of Bethnal 
Green, meets Kirkland Lamg, of 
Nottingham, for the British 
welterweight title vacated by 
Lloyd Honeyghan, the world 
champion. 


NON-LEAGUE FOOTBALL 


Workington ground closed 


Workington, who were just 
beginning to overcome the se- 
vere financial problems which 
have plagued them since they 
were voted out of the Football 
League nine years ago. have 
been limed to dose their ground 
for safety reasons. County coun- 
cil officials decided at an inspec- 
tion of Borough Park that the 
floodlight pylons, erected in 
19S7, may not be safe in high 
winds. 

. The Cumbrian club are apply- 
ing for a 75 per cent grant 
towards repairs from the Foot- 
ball Trust, but in the meantime 
they are having to seek alter- 
native accommodation. They 
are hoping to be given per i - 
mission by the Multipart League 
to play at the ground of the local 
Rugby Union dub, although 
they are also experiencing diffi- 
culties their stand has been 
temporarily dosed for .safety 
reasons and the capacity limited 
to 300, which is Workington's 
average gate this season- 

Colin Doorbar, the 
Workington secretary, said yes- 
terday: '‘The ground closure is a 
setback we thought we 

were at last getting to grips with 
our financial problems, which 
date back many years. We have 
cut our trading deficit by 50 per 
cem over the last 12 months. 

‘‘But fm confident we can get 
ova- this. If vre were going to 
fold wo would have dmw so 12 
months ago. when we were in 
desperate financial trouble. It 
would also be tragic for the area 
if n® went under, because there 
isn’t , another decent football 

stadium for miles around.” 

-•Newtown, who play in the 
central Wales section of the 
w ebb League, -phut . to appeal 


By Paul Newman 

against the decision by the 
Football Association ofWales to 
veto their application to join the 
Multipart League. 

Newtown are one of 20 chibs 
hoping inform a new division of 
the Multipart League next sea- 
son. The others are Accrington 
Stanley, Ashton United, 
Ccmgjeton Town, Curzon Asb- 
io cuDroylsdcn. Eastwood Han- 
ley, Fleetwood Town, Warn 
Town, Lancaster City, . Leek 
Town, Nttherfidd, FCnrith, 
Stalybridge Critic and Wiosfocd 
United (all North West Coun- 
ties League), and Alfretofl 
Town, Helper Town, Eastwood 
Town, Harrogate Town and 
Sutton Town (all Northern 
Counties East League). 

Radcliffe Borough (North 
West Counties League) are 
standing in reserve in case any 
of the applicants, who must 
have suitable facitties, have to 
pull out. . . 

The Football Association 
have given their approval for 
the formation of the new first 
division, which will be li nked b y 
a system of automatic promo- 
tion and relegation to the cur- 
rent premier division. The 
North West Counties Le agu e 
and Northern Counties East 
League, who had been iseelting 
automatic promotion for their . 

dubs into die present Multipan 
League system, will now be 
offered the chance to have thmr 
clubs promoted into . the first 
division. _ . . . 

• Jimmy Holmes has ■with-, 
draura his resignation as man- 
aaer of Nuneaton Borough. Noel 
Sy, the GM Vauxhall Con- 
ference dub’s chairnran. said 
yesterday: “Jimmy resigned be- 
cause he didn’t like the rumours' 


that were going around that 1 
was going to be replaced as 
chairman. I was negotiating 
with some businessmen who 
were interested in buying , me 
out, but 1 decided the deal 
would not be in the brat 
interests of the dub. Now that 
the situation is clear Jimmy is 
happy to stay.” 

• Maidstone United have 
switched their FA Cup second 
round tie at home to Cambridge 
United to Sunday December 7. 

• Paul McKinnon, the Sutton 
United forward, may become 
the second GM Vauxhall Con- 
ference player this month to join 
a Football League dub for a fee 
of more than £10,000- Sutton 
have tamed down a “substantial 
offer*' from Blackburn Rovers 
and are awaiting an increased 
bid. Vince Jones, the 
Wealds one midfield {flayer, 
joined Wimbledon for a five- 
figure fee last week. Barnet are 
hoping io sign Alan Sunderland, 
whose contract with Ipswich 
Town has been cancelled. 

GM-VAUXHALL CONFERENCE 

P W D L F A Hi 


Drug tests 
do not go 
far enough 

By Michael Coleman 

Two members of Britain’s 
gold medal-warning team at the 
Montreal Olympic Gaines ex- 
pressed the opinion yesterday 
(hat the recent crackdown on 
drags in the sport, which has led 
to the suspension of 15 compet- 
itors, including the world cham- 
pion, though welcome, was not 
severe enough. 

Both thought that an 
soupalons teams and athletes 
would still take a gamble mi 
escaping detection. Adrian 
Parker, whose superb ran at 
Montreal ensured the gold, 
pointed eat that only 36 of the 
159 competitors at this year's 
world championships in Italy 
had been checked, 12 from each 
competition. In other words, 
aboot a ane-in-fom risk of being 
selected for & dope test “For 
an Olympic medal, people would 
gamble on that,” Parker said. 

His Montreal colleague, 
Danny Nightingale, was of like 
mind: “A IM per cent drag 
control of all competitors — as 
Britain offered to provide 
Italy. — is the only answer. 
Obviously if 12 out of 36 were 
caught, then others must have 
been on drags.” 

He felt sure that sustained 
pressore on the governing Unioa 
International Penthahlon 
Moderne et Bmthloa (UIPMB) 
would event™ Hy lead to foe 
imposition of total drugs check- 
ing. Parker even went as far as to 
suggest that without a 100 per 
cent control, competitions 
should be scrapped. 

The general view in the Brit- 
ish camp, however, was of relief 
that at but the UIPMB had 
severely p wished the offenders, 
including the two present men's 
world champions and two mem- 
bers of the champion women's 
team. British competitors would 
at last be able to get near the 
medals and as a consequence 
attract badly-needed sponsors. 

Since Montreal, the men had 
eqjoyed limited success, apart 
fro A Nightingale's SpartakJade 
win m Moscow in 1979, and the 
fourth place of Richard Phelps 
at the Los Angeles Olympic 
Games. The women too. World 
Cap winners from 1978to 1988, 
and world champion team antD 
1983, had made little impact. 

“Once they start testing 
everyone, their (Britain's rivals) 
shooting scores will come down, 
and ours, thesgh not so nec- 
essarily improving, will stay 
where they are,” Nightingale 
said. 

Sarah Parker, winner of three 
world mam golds, pointed out 
that file new hope, Dominic 
Mabony, had been placed tenth 
in this year’s Moscow Goodwin 
Games, the first Westerner. 
Above him were eight Soviet 
athletes, ineluding the now- 
banned world champion, 
Anatoliy Starastin, and a Pole. 
“If stricter drugs checks had 
been enforced, Dominic would 
surely have had a better medal 
chance,” she observed. 

Echoing the relief felt over the 
crackdown. James Haddon, 
a dministr ator of tin British 
Modem Pentathlon Associ- 
ation, the drags image 
whwJn the sport bad acquired 
had proved a big set-hack both 
to attracting new young compet- 
itors and sponsors. This was 
despite Britain's pioneering ef- 
fort to keep the sport dean. He 
warned that 100 per cent testing, 
which was expensive, would be 
beyond the. means of the minor 
countries In the sport, and was 
not being conducted by any other 
Olympic sport. 

Haddon added: “We were 
only able to conduct a 108 per 
cent test at Birmingham this 
er rtwuiijg to the Sports 
Covariir 


SQUASH RACKETS 


Vintage performance keeps 
crowd riveted to their seats 


A couple of good shot en- 
counters or a long, gruelling 
battle will usually satisfy even 
the most ardent aficionado at a 
single sitting. At the Intercity 
national championships in Bris- 
tol this week things were 
happening so last in the main 
men's event and so efficiently 
among the women there was 
scarcely time for a quick British 
Rail sandwich between sessions. 

To be honest, the catering on 
Platform No. I of Brunei's fam- 
ous Great Western Terminus at 
Temple Meads Station has been 
excellent, but the fare delivered 
with high-speed regularity on 
the Perspex sbowcourt has daily 
outshone the efforts of 
InterCity's caterers. 

Jonah Barrington, aged 45, 
arrived on court with Moussa 
Helai for the final of the over-35 
championship after a tumultu- 
ous day in which Bryan Beeson 
and Mark Maclean finished off 
the last remnants of the national 
top eight group to reach the 
men’s final. The women's final 
returned emphatically to the old 
firm of Opie and Le Moignan. 


By Colin McQmUan 

Such is the charisma of the 
former world champion and 
such the curiosity of informed 
squash watchers about his last- 
ing capabilities, the entire 1,000- 
strong audience stayed firmly in 
their seats at Temple Meads to 
applaud his late-night 9-7, 9-1. 
9-6, victory. 

Helai, aged 36, formerly an 
Egyptian citizen but now a 
naturalized Briton and coaching 
happily at a chib in Manchester, 
is delightfully skilful and still 
plays high in the order for Arrow 
Village in the national league. 

Barrington, even in his best 
days, could not have been 
labelled delightful. Nowadays, 
almost wasted from bis devo- 
tion to training, be enters his 
chosen arena with a certain 
angular stiffness which conveys 
all too clearly his arthritis, 
bursitis and the other irritants of 
long-term athletic success. 

There is a natural sympathy 
in most audiences for Helai. A 
small, compact man with a 
rewarding trick of smiling at 
even the most outrageous for- 


tune, he covers courts nimbly 
and wields a knowledgeable 
racket. Against Barrington 
Helal's normal exhuberance 
died amid a welter of mistakes 
as perfect length and cunning 
relentlessly stretched him 
around the court. He lost the 
first two games in half an hour, 
battled gamely back into the 
third, but finally watched with 
spaniel eyes as the Over-35 
crown joined the jumble of 
trophies on the Barrington 
mantelpiece. 

The applause was long and 
enthusiastic. Hie old warrior 
raised his jacket in 
acknowledgement?* He almost 
smiled. But perhaps that would 
have been too frivolous a re- 
action to just another successful 
day at the office. 

WEDNESDAY’S LATE RESULTS 
Man’s a ami-fi Ml s: M Mactoan bt .. 
Harvey. «M. 6-9, 9-9, 9-7. 9*0: 0 Baeson bt 
P Kenyan 9-3. 9-1. 2-9. 9-2. Woman's 
swrt-tmate: L Cute (Notts) M L Souttar 
(Gtoucsi 9-7, 9-5/ 9-1: M Le Moignan 
(Halts) btS Burgess (Yorit3> 9-4. lO-ClO- 
k Woman 1 * over-3S Mai: B t 
(Sussex) M A Cowia (Noriofc) 1-9. 
4.94,9l7. 


ATHLETICS 

Marathon 
runner In 
drugs ban 

New York (Reuter) — Antoni 
Niemczak, of Poland, who fin- 
ished second in the New York 
marathon earlier this month, 
was disqualified yesterday after 
failing a drugs test. 

Fred Lebow, the race director, 
said he was told to disqualify 
Niemczak by The Athletics 
Congress (TAC) after track and 
field’s governing body in the 
United States notified him that 
the Pole bad failed. 

TAC had not revealed which 
banned substances were found 
in Niemczak's urine. Lebow 
said: ”1 spoke to Niemczak on 
the telephone this morning. He 
said before the race be had bad a 
tooth extracted and that the 
dentist had done a bad job and 
he had lost a lot of blood. It left 
him feeling weak so a doctor in 
Warsaw gave him a shot of 
something. He was not told 
what it was but Antoni has 
asked his federation for help in 
finding the doctor to discover 
what be was injected with.” 

Lebow said the marathon 
committee would meet next 
week to consider what to do 
with the $25,000 prize due to 
Niemczak. He said they may 
decide to hold on to the cash 
until the Pole has appealed 
against the disqualification. 

The race organizer said that 
10 runners in the November 2 
marathon had been tested for 
banned substances. 

Solly to run in 
Hiroshima 

Jon Solly, the Common- 
wealth Games 10,000 metres 
champion, is in Britain's five- 
strong men's team who will take 
on the inaugural 1AAF world 
challenge road relay in Hiro- 
shima on Sunday. Solly will run 
the 7km leg after Carl Thackeiy. 
who will start the relay. 

TEAMS: Mane C Tnackary (HanamsMre), J 
SoBy (Brcleyl, K Hanteon (Strattortl. M 
Scrutton (TonbndgaV D OartB (Hercutes- 
Wknbiedonl RasannC MocnrfetLalcas- 
ifirt. Women: P Pudge (Hounslow). C 
Haajn IHoBnsfirth), S Crarian (Sutton), M 
Watson (Swinoon), 


Samme " (Sate). 
(GtAOIOfdt 


,S Sarny 

Buiokb 


i.S 
Mason 


GOLF 


Course record falls 
to in-form Marsh 


Ibusuki — Graham Marsh, of 
Australia, fired a course record 
64, eight under par, yesterday to 
take a three-stroke lead after the 
opening round of the $531,250 
(about £371,000) Casio world 
open tournament. Marsh rolled 
tn a 13ft birdie putt on the first 
bole and followed it with eight 
more on the 6.9S5-yard par-72 
Ibusuki course in southern 
Japan. 

The previous record of 65 was 
set by the American, Gary 
Koch, in 1984. Marsh, who 
earned $1,250 for breaking the 
record, said: “I have been in 
good condition for about the 
past two months, which is what 
I try to aim for in the autumn as 
the big tournaments are being 
held at this time.” Scon Hoch, 
of the United States, and Takasu 
Namia of Japan, shared second 
place at 67 and the Australian, 
Brian Jones, was next on 68. 
Sandy Lyle; of Britain, and Jos&- 
Maria OlazabaL of Spain, and 
three Japanese - Hiroshi Ishii, 
Joji Funtiti and Isao Isozaki — 
were tied for fifth place on 69. 
LEADING SCORES (Japanese unless 
satoov 6* G MarSfi (Ausr NTabasu. 67: 
S Hocn (USt B Jones (Aus). 88: H BMI. 68: 

J Furukt I teocjkl, s Lyle (GB); J-M 
Otazaba) (Sp). oner Bnttth scores: 70: 1 
Bater-Flnch. 73: 1 Wbosnam. 

• AUCKLAND; The Austra- 
lian open and British PGA 
champion, Rodger Davis, shot a 
63. seven under par, to take a 
one-shot lead over his fcllow- 
Australian, Craig Parry, in the 
first round of the Auckland open 


championship yesterday (Reu- 
ter reports). Davis collected 
seven birdies while Parry had 
five birdies and an eagle. An- 
other two Australians. Peter 
Senior and Noel Ratcliffe, 
shared third place with Maurice 
Bern bridge, of Great Britain, on 
65. 

SCORES (Australian unless stated): 6 
Davis. 8* C Parry. 65: P Senior: N 
Ratcftffe; M Benrbndm (GB). 68: D A 
WWDimg (US). 67: P Marttte OlZfc S 
Andererwr-Chapman (Can); A Gflkgan: L 
Stephen; P Hambtefl (NZ); S Owen (NZ); 

Clayton f APan£r ’ ° **’® a M 

• Nearly 240 hopefuls will be 
hoping to follow in the footsteps 
of the Spaniard, Jose-Maria 
OlazabaL when the 1986 PGA 
European Tour qualifying 
school begins at La Manga, 
Spain, on Sunday. Olazabal led 
the SO qualifiers at the previous 
108-hole test in 1985 and went 
on to win two major titles and 
£136,775 after he finished run- 
ner-up to his fellow country- 
man, Seve Ballesteros, in the 
Epson Order of Merit this year. 

Among several former British 
amateur internationals playing 
the six rounds are Mark Davies, 
Craig Laurence, Angus Moir, 
Duncan Muscroft. John 
Hawkswoilh- Sandy Stephen 
and Lee Van net- A11 the compet- 
itors play four rounds, with the 
leading 100 going through to the 
final 36 holes, from which the 
top SO will be awarded tbeir 
cards on December S for die 
1987 European circuit. 


AMERICAN FOOTBALL 

Gridiron challenge 


Randall Trudgen, commis- 
sioner of Australia's American 
football league and a former 
lugby League player, stopped 
ff in London yesterday to 
announce a 12-maich. five-week 
lour of Europe next year. 


Trudgen, who played centre 
for Wakefield Trinity 10 years 
ago. said: “We are not looking to 
emulate the achievements of 
our Rugby League team but 
rather promote the game of 
American football. “But let’s 


face it. We love to beat the Poms 
in anything.” 

Trudgen said his plans in- 
cluded a game against a British 
club, probably in the Manches- 
ter area, an international against 
Wales 2 nd an international 
against Britain in November. 

Trudgen is confident that at 
least two members of this year’s 
successful Rugby League tour- 
ing side, which whitewashed 
Great Britain in the inter- 
national series, will be con- 
vened to the gridiron game 


MOTOR RALLYING 

Kinvara’s 
quest for 
adventure 
in desert 

By a Correspondent 

On New Year’s Day, Kinvara 
Cayzer is going to grt into a car 
and bead off sooth into the son. 
It will not bean ordinary car hot 
then the trip, from the heart of 
Paris to Dakar, on the coast of 
Senegal b West Africa, is no 
ordinary trip. And Kinvara 
Cayzer is to be the first British 
woman to make h. 

Taking in seven countries, 
covering 8,000 miles and lasting 
— it is hoped — 21 days the 
Paris- Dakar rally is one of those 
events that seen poindessly 
gruelling. The type of event that 
people enter “because it's 
there”. 

Set op especially for the raKy, 
the Kinvara sports team was 
launched at the exclusively pic- 
turesque Hurting ham Chib id 
Putney. A more contrasting 
setting to the matter h hand 
would be hard to find. 

Kinvara — named after a small 
Irish town - describes her four 
man team as “a combination of 
desert know how and a dash of 
pure British sporting achieve- 
ment and endeavour”. Quite 
where the achievement aspect 
fits into this scenario remains to 
be seen. 

The vehicle in which the 
attempt is to be made, a harm- 
less looking Land Rover, was 
paraded in the depot grounds. 
Pristine and white it seemed 
totally oblivions of die fact that 
soon it was sung to be knee deep 
in harsh Saharan sand. Amid 
the attendant photographers 
and publicists it sat there look- 
ing on. A peacock strutted by 

disdainfully . 

The P&ris-Dakar rally is 
notorioosly arduous and has left 
a trail of victims in its wake. 
Last year its founder, Thierry 
Sabine, was killed in a heli- 
copter crash while covering the 
event. In 1982 an ambitious 
young man hy the name of Mark 
Thatcher made toe honest mis- 
take of ranting left at the Sahara 
instead of right and got well and 
truly lost. Bat none m this seems 
to bother Kinvara. 

Dressed in a mntrhmg true 
blue ensemble held together by a 
decorous white belt the attrac- 
tive 32-year-old Monde draped 
herself over her vehicle smiling 
graciously far toe assembled 
press. The beast itselL covered 
in the team logo of a winking 
pink cat holding a steering 
wheel, looked ominously 
passive. 

Kinvara said flat the inspira- 
tion for her came last April after 
she had seen a video. “It seemed 
ooe of the biggest adventures left 
in the world. Everest has been 
dim bed. the poles have been 
discovered, what's left?” 

The main obstacle has proved 
to be sponsorship. Not surpris- 
ing as Kinvara has practically no 
rallying experience although the 
rest of the team has. They are 
c ur re n tly looking for a major 
sponsor to offload the estimated 
£120,000 that has already been 
personally invested. 


TENNIS 

Becker 
bows to 
Gilbert 

Atlanta (AFP) - The 
Wimbledon champion, Boris 
Becker, of West Germany, was 
beaten in three sets by Brad 
Gilbert, of toe United States, in 
a £360.000 exhibition tour- 
nament on Wednesday. Becker, 
who had earlier beaten the 
former world No. 1, John 
McEnroe, of toe United States, 
lost 6-7, 6-4, 3-6. 

Ivan Lendl, of Czecho- 
slovakia, the world No. 1, 
warmed np far next week's 
Masters, in which he is seeded 
to meet Becker in the final, hy 
beating the Frenchman, 
Yannick Noah, in three sets. 
McEnroe defeated Mats 
Wilander, of Sweden. 6-4. 6-3, 
and Miloriav Merir, of Czecho- 
slovakia, staged si great rally to 
defeat Mikael Perttfors, of 
Sweden. 

RESULTS: I Lend ( 

6-7. 6-3; J McEnroe i , 

(Suva), 6-4 . «: M Made [Cfl M M Pomtas 
~ a). M. 6-4. 7-5; B Gi*xtt (US) K B 
tor (WG), 7-6, 4-6. 6-3. 

National titles 
seek sponsor 

The Lawn Tennis Association 
confirmed yesterday that toe 
British national closed 
championships would contmae 
despite the withdrawal of the 
sponsors. Refnge Assurance. 

Ian Peacock, executive direc- 
tor of fhe LTA, said: “We are 
naturally very disappointed to 
lose Refuge as sponsors. “How- 
ever. toe event will continue. We 
are at present conducting nego- 
tiations with new sponsors ami 
toe dale, venae and format for 
next year’s competition will be 
announced early in 1987.“ 
Refuge decided to withdraw 
because of the lack of live 
te levis i on coverage. 


and |Cz) N Y Noah (Fr). 7-6, 
fcEnroe (US) M M Wnander 
3: M Meor (Cz) M M Pamtore 


SCHOOLS RUGBY 


Christ’s whistle home in the gale 

By Michael Stevenson 


ABrinefcarn 
ChaflBfltuaan 
Mmcfstone • 
Scarborough 
Teifort 
Enfield 
Runcorn 
Boston 
Sutton 
BajhCtty 


20 11 
21 11 
22 11 
20 11 
21 10 
IS 10 
M It 
21 11 
21 10 
21 8 


3 46 24 89 
4-36 27 99 

6 37 24 88 
6 96 23 37 

4 26 20 37 
3 37 25 36 


miwataster 

Dagenham 

Fn&tev 

Kaaertng 

Nuneaton 

Nontwnch we 

WraJdstone 
Gafeshaad 
WaOng . 


21 

20 

18 

19 

22 

23 

19 

21 

21 

21 

19 

1ft 


3- 634 23 

3 7 40 32 .. 

4 7 39 33 34 
fi 7 44 28 30 
B 732 38 30 

5 7 32 33 2S 
4 6 31 23 28 
1 9JS38 a 

3 13 27 41 21 

8 12 25 40 21 

4 10 26 37 19 

7 10 24 41 19 

9 9 28 35 19 

8 11 26 32 18 

5 11 22 48 14 
4 12 27 46 10 


Among a spate of early 
schools, county matches Ulster- 
18 Grobp beat Northumberland 
24-0 under the Percy Park 
floodlights and Leinster lost 14- 
1 1 to Yorkshire at the Bradford 
and Blngley club. Lancashire 
open their winter campaign with 
a game against Warwickshire at 
Blundeflsands on Sunday while 
Cheshire entertain Staffordshire 
at Davenport 

Christ’s College, Brecon, de- 
feated Oiftoo College 10-7 in 
eale-foree wind and driving hail 
Usi Saturday. With the score 7-7 
four minutes from the final 
whistle. Osian Uoyd-Jones 
kicked a 35-yard penalty into 
the wind to scute the issue. 
Christ's top four teams (first, 
second, third and under- 1 5) 
thus maintained an overall 
record of 39 wins from 40 
matches. 


On Wednesday Christ’s enter- 
tamed MOHhfld and gained a 7-7 
draw. The powerful Christ’s 
pack were challenged by lively 
Millfield hades. Christ’s led 7-3 
at half-time through a try by 
their flanker. Joe Copley, and a 
penalty by Lloyd-Jones to a 
penalty by Mike Bennett but a 
law try by Bennett earned 
Millfield the draw. 

Sherborne, after defeating 

Millfield 13-8. managed an even 
more impressive win when they 
entertained Radley. Sherborne's 
talented right wing, Crawford 
Henderson, scored three tries in 
their 21-8 victory, Radley's 
points coming from two tries 
that were the result of fierce 
forward pressure. 

Uppingham, after inconsis- 
tent early season form, have 
really found themselves. They 
won their local derby 4-0 against 


OundJe. beat Bedford 16-15 
away and, almost the most 
gratifying result of all. beat 
Sedbergh ) 5-0 for the first time 
in 16 years. M Thomas, their 
captain and flanker, had a fine 
match. 

MerehisUHi Castle School lost 
15-14 to Kelvins »de Academy, 
through an interception try and 
conversion. They drew 6-6 with 
Lorefio and have won 10 out of 
12 played; their most spectacu- 
lar victory was against Ftttts 
(31-0) and they have five {flayers 
in the final Scottish 18-group 

trial. 

Colfe's School have achieved 
the enviable record of 1 1 wins 
from 13 matches, scoring 364 
points lo 105 conceded. This 
fine showing includes wins 
againsf Si Mary's* Sidcap (30- 
6). St Damian's (19-131 and 
Judd (16-6). 


RUGBY LEAGUE 


Roberts lodges appeal 


Wigan's Australian forward 
Ian Roberts immediately lodged 
an appeal when he was sus- 
pended for four matches hy the 
disciplinary committee meeting 
at Leeds yesterday. Roberts, 
who was dismissed during 
Wigan's match at Barrow last 
Sunday for an alleged late high 
tackle, says that he was not 
guilty of the offence. An appeals 
committee mil be convened as 
soon as possible, since Roberts 
hopes TO play in the John Player 
Trophy match against Leeds at 
Central Park tomorrow. 

Two other Australians, the 
Barrow players. Steve Carter 
and Tony Kay, were luckier 
with the committee ruling that 
sending off was sufficient 
punishment. Frank Cassidy, of 
Swinton. was found not guilty. 

• Leigh have decided to release 
their Australian forward, Garry 


By Keith Mackiin 

Howell, after only nine senior 
games with the dub. 

• The Australian High Schools 
touring party begin their seven- 
match programme tonight when 
they meet Cumbria at 
Whitehaven. The party, known 
as the Young Kangaroos, are 
seeking to emulate their seniors 
by winning all their matches in 
this country, including two 
internationals against teams 
from the British Amateur Rugby 
League Association. 

• AUCKLAND (AFP) - The 
New Zealand Rugby League 
said yesterday that they were not 
responsible for the fitness of 
players who accepted contracts 
with overseas dubs. Si Helen’s 
had said they would make a 
formal complaint to the league 
after their New Zealand centre. 
Mark Elia, broke down during 
his first game for the club. 


die 


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tic’ 


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folio Gold 
ay to good 

iy gramo- 
donation 
ppeal and 
rear,” Mr 
Allestree, 

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Id since it 
, said Chat 
his luck, 
astic. It is . 

ds can be 

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FOOTBALL: UEFA CUP BRINGS MIXED REWARDS FOR SCOTS 


Dundee United count 
the cost of making 
progress in Europe 


By Stuart Jones. Football Correspondent 


The dawn of the European 
superleague has arrived. The 
Continent, once considered a 
playground full of riches, has 
become a land that is bene- 
ficial only for those who are 
already financially secure. For 
others, such as Dundee 
United, it can be a prohib- 
itively expensive place in 
which to travel 

Jim McLean, the manager 
of the only British club likely 
to reach the last date of a 
European competition this 
season, yesterday revealed the 
potential price his dub may 
have to pay for their success in 
the UEFA Cup. It could 
amount to an overall loss of 
some £30,000. 

The main source of money 
comes through the turnstiles. 
lr cascades through the gates 
whenever two giants are 
drawn against each other. For 
instance, the second round 
ties in the European Cup 
between Real Madrid and 
Juventus, two of the wealthi- 
est clubs in the world, gen- 
erated receipts of over £2m. 

U pours through the en- 
trances of hosts who are 
backed by heavy support 
Glasgow Rangers, for their 
UEFA Cup tie at Ibrox on 
Wednesday night attracted 
44,000 spectators who paid an 
estimated £250,000. But for 
dubs who exist in small 
catchment areas, the cashflow 
is no more than a trickle. 

McLean described United’s 
audience on the same night, a 
mere 1 1,596 for the visit of 
Hajduk Split as “a joke”. 
Although the figure was some 
600 above their average for 
the season so for, it was 8,000 
below their crowds for the 
Scottish premier division fix- 
tures against 'both Celtic and 
Rangers. 

“We have had almost 
identical gates for our three 
home European ties,” 
McLean said. “That is all we 


can muster around here. We 
go into Europe expecting no 
more than to break even. If 
you can’t make money there, 
where can you make it? It is 
obvious that we never will 

“We need to fill Tannadice 
and we have only ever done 
that twice to my knowledge. 
Once was Roma, the other 
Manchester United. The ex- 
pense of going around the 
Continent is now so high that, 
unless we draw someone tike 
Barcelona, we won’t make 
anything like a profit this 
season. 

“We were recently hit with a 
bill for £3.700 just for the 
referee and linesmen in the 
last round against University 
Craiova. £3,700?" He spelled 
it out slowly as though in pain. 
“It seems ludicrous that Eng- 
lish officials can’t come up 
north of the border and do our 
games. 

“We totted up all our 
expenses after the tie against 
the Romanians and we 
discovered that we came out 
£9,700 down. Since the charter 
flight alone to Yugoslavia in a 
fortnight will cost us £20,000, 
we will probably lose about 


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McLean: at a kiss to explain 


the game amount over the two 
games a gainst Hajdnk.” 

McLean states that United 
have reached their full poten- 
tial and are now “just 
surviving”. To do so, his club 
must sell every three or four 
yean to stay afloat in a league 
in which the receipts “do sot 
even begin to cover our 
expenditure”. The latest sale 
took place in thd summer. 
United collected £im from 
Tottenham Hotspur. Neu- 
chatel Xamax and Hamilton 
Academicals for Gough, 
Dodds and Taylor respec- 
tively. “Thai will keep us 
going for a while," McLean 
said. 

The 2-0 lead they took 
a gains t the Yugoslavs on 
Wednesday, therefore, repre- 
sents a possible financial life- 
line. McLean remains 
optimistic about the eventual 
outcome, even though he was 
justifiably disappointed about 
his side's performance. “We 
can play an awful lot better. 
Our final passes in die second 
half were pathetic 

“I thought they were so 
apprehensive about us that 
they were there for the taking. 
But 2-0 is a good result in 
Europe and it leaves us in 
command. The important 
thing is for us to score over 
there and, ifour strikers are on 
form. Pm convinced we wflL” 

The trouble is that they are 
dol After nine years at the 
club Milne is stuck in a rut, 
according to his manager, and 
Gallacber has not recovered 
since being involved in a 
serious crash two months ago. 

United must keep theirs in a 
fortnight and particularly the 
more experienced members of 
the side such as Narey, Mai pas 
and Sturrock. If so, they 
should go through. McLean 
will then pray that they are 
sent to the eastern shores of 
Spain rather than on a costly 
trip to Moscow. 


Rangers need the character 
of Liverpool to survive 


Graeme Soaness's attempt to 
create at Ibrox the kind of 
international football wisdom in 
which he matured at Airfield has 
some way still to go. Rangers are 
an exciting team, but as yet they 
have not mat equilibrium which 

nwl tn ri hri n g nigh Q ftif , wmbr 

Stein, Liverpool, Nottingham 
Forest, in their peak years, and 
now Everton. 

It was an apt snsmmng up, not 
just of the night bnt perhaps of 
the present character of his 
team, when Soaness said of the 
EUFA Cup third round Erst leg 
Bornssia 


bad been notiuag pretty but a lot 
of gnabDonth incidents. Rangers 
excite their passionate crowd, 
bat are still short on that 
wisdom. 

Sonaess also said, with some 
justification, that he had not 
been as disappointed for his 
team since he arrived as player 
manager, for they had indeed 
enjoyed enough of the match to 
have made Bornssia's task in the 
second leg far more severe. Bnt, 
as Soaness admitted: “You only 
get experience by being oat there 
doing it.” Rangers need a good 
deal more experience such as 


By David Miller 

this, and are fikdy to be cat 
short for this reason in a 
fortnight’s time. 

They had toiled folly to 
exploit their almost total 
dootmatioa of the first half, and 
•additionally gave away the goal 
which will in all probability deny 
them a place in the quarter- 
finals. Yon cannot see Rangers 
travelling to Germany and com- 
ing away with a counter attack- 
ing single goal victory of the 
kind Liverpool have so 
oftenadroidy achieved. Not, 
nrind yon, that I’m in favour of 
goalless draws, which regret’ 


ties unavoidably encourages as a 
tactical objective. 

It was nnibrtanate tor one of 
the tabloid newspapers that they 
should have planned for yes- 
terday morning a ghosted fea- 
ture by Ray Qe m e n ce saying 
that Chris Woods, is In bis 
opinion, ready and waiting to 
sncceed Peter Shilton. As 
Soaness said, in that somewhat 
cryptic manner he has tor the 
press interviews which he so 
transparently dislikes, two or 
three players had lacked pro- 
fessionalism in conceding 
Bornssia’s goaL 


Barcelona looking good 


Paris (AFP) — On a night of 
low scoring first legs in the third 
round of the UEFA Cup- Barce- 
lona, the team beaten in last 
season's European Cup final, 
seem the most certain to have 
gained a decisive advantage: 

detoatSTbyte^m^^oi 2-0 
in West Germany, must now 
regard their place in the quarter- 
finals almost as a formality. 

The side who have not con- 
ceded a goal in 1 1 games shook 
off the indecision which bad 

dogged them in earlier rounds to 
control the game from deep in 
their own territory. Their pierc- 
ing counter-attacking paid off 
with two goals in a three-mi note 
spell after the break in which 
they capitalized on the absence 
of Uerdingen's inspirational 
captain, Matthias HergeL The 

McNeill could 
halt City’s run 
to Wembley 

Billy McNeill, the man who 
guided Manchester City to the 
Full Members' Cup final last 
season, could Mock their path to 
Wembley this year. The new 
Aston Villa manager is lined up 
for another return to Maine 
Road in the quarter-finals — if 
his side first beat Ipswich. 

The holders, Chelsea, face a 
quarter-final trip to Blackburn 
or Oxford, while Southampton 
could have a full house for an 
all-south coast dash with Ports- 
mouth — if they first beat 
Norwich. 

Q w rtnr - fi nnt drag; Bretton or Newcastle 
y Charter; Btackbun Rovers or Orion) 
Unted v Chelsea: Manchester City v 
ipswch or Aston VHa: Southampton or 
Norwich (Sy v Po rts mo u th. Dates to be 


thigh injury which barf made the 
key defender a doubtful starter 
prompted his 61st minute 
substitution after which 
Roberto and Mark Hughes 
scared Barcelona's goals. 

Torino and Inter M2an both 
won their first legs, . although 
Torino's 2-1 borne win against 
Beveren of Belgium is by no 
means decisive. A 1-0 away win 
against Dakla Prague earned 
with an early goal from AttobeQi 
enabled Inter to take a decisive 
step towards the last eight. 

The other three matches 
ended in 1-0 triumphs for 
Sweden's IFK Goteborg over 
Belgium's Ghent, G roni ngen of 
The Netherlands over 
Portugal’s Vitoria Gtmnaraes 
and Moscow Spartak over 
Austria’s FC TiroL 


One of them, conspicuoasly 
was Woods, who nris read and 
toiled tn cxrt oat the low cross 
from right hack Winkludd from 
which unmarked on the 

tor post, had equalized in the 
45th minute. I shall be smprised 
if Rangers manage to sabdae the 
elusive Kahn, now rightfully 
back in the national team, in the, 
second leg. 

There are two chances for 
Rangers to save the tie. Firstly,, 
if Bornssia attack, as they must, 
they might leave enoagh space' 
for Bangers to drive through 
from midfield: especially if 


retur n himself. Dnrrant, who 
scored after 14 minutes, Fer- 
guson and Fraser are also 
po si tivel y minded midfield play- 
ere who energetically support 
their attack, bat it is probable 
that their defensive responsibil- 
ities hi Moencb en g fad h ac h will 

be overworked. 

The other possibility is that 
Butcher, from set pieces, might 
be able again to expose the 
evident frail y of Kamps, 
Bornssia’s go alkee per; though 
Rangers most first win the free 
kicks and corners. The odds 
cannot be considered short, in 
any objective analysis, as 
Soaness admits. 

An enduring chauvinism re- 
mains in much of Soottish- 
football, as it does, I suppose in 
most countries. Tbe programme 
antes on Wednesday inrin d ed a 
bold assertion that Butcher is 
‘-arguably the best defender in 
the wo rld”. His c ase coul d be 
argued for strongly ifj with 
England or Rangers, be played 
in a back fine using a sweeper. 
Against forwards of tbe calibre, 
on tbe ground, of Maradona, 
Landrop, or Balm, he will ofte n 
have difficul t y. 

The worst error of the night, 
however, was not by Woods bnt, 
repeatedly, by Casarrn, a sup- 
posedly experienced referee 
from Italy. The British cannot 
hold np their hands in righteous 
innocence about hard tackling, 
but tbe way that Bornssia were 
permitted to hack McMins from 
first whistle to last, was a 
disgrace. 


Gollogly’s festive spirit 
has Hartlepool fuming 


Hartlepool United have re- a side at Sheffield United to- 
ported their midfield player, morrow. MulJery fielded his 
John Goflogly. to the Football first team in a reserve matrfi on 
Le ag u e for refusing to play Tuesday as punishment for 
during the Christmas period, recent “soft” per for mances. 
GoUogly, . who angered the Bui Sieve Gatling, a defer 
fourth division dub fast yar by five sthches *„ a i 

toking a two-week holiday m ^ o™ 


Bui Steve Gatling. a defender, 
needed five stitches in a bead 
wound after the game and 


bar in Middlesbrough during the 
busy holiday period. 

John Bird, the Hartlepool 
manager, said: “1 have tried to 
sell him and now be is refuting 
to play. He is no use to me and 
would be better off leaving tbe 
dub.” 

Brian Gough, tbe Notting- 
ham Finest manager, is caught 


players. Terry Connor (ankle), 
Gerry Armstrong (groin). Dale 
Jasper (stress shin fracture), 
Steve Penney (knee) and Chris 
Hutchings (groin) are doubtful, 
while regular goalkeeper Perry 
Digweed is definitely out with a 
damaged cheekbone. 

Halifax Town, the fourth 
division dub with debts of more 



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The tee score: Rival captains, Mike Gattime (top) and Allan Border, lining np a putt at the 
Royal Perth Golf Club (Photograph: Graham Morris). John Woodcock, page 33 


TENNIS 


A familiar tale is 
told yet again 

From Rex Bellamy, Tennis Correspondent, Eindhoven 


Fetch tbe sackcloth and ashes 
again. Sara Gomer and Annabel 
Croft, of Britain, were beaten 2- 
1 by what could almost be 
described as West Germany’s 
fourth team, when the first 
division programme in the 
women’s European Cup com- 
petition, a new event, began 
yesterday in a village called 
Varkemwaard. 

We have to add this defeat to 
Denmark’s 3-0 triumph over 
Britain in the world team 
championship and tbe 7-0 win 
by a United States reserve team 
in the Wightman Cup contest. 
AH three failures have been 
concentrated into four months. 
I,osing can become a habit that 
is awfolly difficult to break. 

Britain’s three opponents yes- 
terday were all aged 1 8 or 20. are 
listed from eighth to 12th in the 
German rankings, and are not 
supposed to be as good as Miss 
Gomer and Miss Croft. But after 
Miss Croft had won 2-4, 6-4. 6-1 
against Andrea Betzner, who 
had two break points for a 4-1 
lead in the second set. Miss 
Gomer was beaten 3-6, 6-3, 6-4, 
by Silke Meier. Then Miss 
Betzner and Christina Singer 
won the doubles, beating Miss 
Croft and Miss Gomer 6-4, 4-6, 
6-4. 

AD three matches lasted about 
an hour and three-quarters, 
contained much interesting ten- 
nis and reflected audit on three 
promising but inexperienced 
Germans. Miss Betzner had 
Miss Croft on the hook for a 
while, and ultimately played a 
thoughtful, deft, and decisive 
role in the doubles. Once she 
had settled down. Miss Meier 
was too good for Miss Gomer. 
In tbe doubles. Miss S i n g e r ’s 
arrogant confidence in her own 
strength suggested that — but for 
the intervention of rackets and 
balls and rules— she would have 
fancied her chances in taking on 
Miss Croft and Miss Gomer 
single-handed. 

Under the league system in 
use here. Britain are stii in 
business, and have much to play 
for today against a French 
reserve team. There were times 


WEDNESDAY’S 


FOOTBALL 


• The Football Association are 
reviving an old tradition by 
making tbe draw for the FA Cup 
third round on a Monday. An 
FA spokesman explained yes- 
terday: “This season's third 
round on January 10 is a week 
later than usual. It gives the 
pools companies more time to 
prim their coupons, so we are 
able to go back to the traditional 
Monday draw for this round, 
which we know will please a lot 
ofpeopte.” 


up in tbe vicious circle created than £350,000, were dealt two 
by his flair for nutting unknown further body blows yesterday. A 


young players into the limelight 
Cough has so far. been unable to 


Scottish property developer 
pulled out of a deal which would 


persuade Franz Carr, the young have raved the dub and the 
winger with electrifying pace, to inland Revenue, who are owed 
sign a new contract aDd commit £76,000, gave Halifax six days to 
himself to City Ground. produce proposals for payment 

Cough said: “His aspirations Michael Knighton, principal 
are way abend of what we can of the Edinburgh-based com- 
afford at the moment, though pany, said that unless 
hopefully we shall sort it oul” Calderdale Council agreed to 
Alan Mull cry's get-tough sell the freehold of (he Shay 
campaign has rebounded on the Ground m exchange for guar- 
Brigbtoa and Hove Albion man- an lees Hut it would he devd- 

ager. who is struggling to pm out oped as a sports complex 






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yesterday when Miss Gomer 
and Miss Croft both looked 
good, if not good enough. But 
both were inconsistent in terms , 
of self-assurance and tactical 
wit. 

. Miss Betzner took five 
consecutive games from Miss 
Croft and, in the process, 
showed more initiative and 
variety, a greater willingness to i 
volley, a better court sense, and 
more maturity in stringing her 
shots into profitable sequences. 
During phase Miss Croft 
was hitting balls rather than 
playing rallies, and was making 
no effort to turn the match into a 
clash of forehands, which would 
have been to her advantage. 

In the second set Miss Betzner 
had four points lor a 5-3 lead, 
and it was to Miss Croft’s credit 
that, though still looking glum, 
she began to hit through the ball 
more freely, keep it in court 
more often, and play some 
telling lobs. She had played 
badly to get into trouble, but she 
played well to get out of it. 

Miss Gomer*s powerfully 
authoritative start (she had 
three break points for 4-0) 
suggested that Miss Meier did 
not deserve to be on the same 
court. Miss Gomer sniffed or 
snarled with satisfaction as she 
finished rallies before Miss 
Meier could start them. But 
Miss Meier reacted tbe way 
Mike Tyson would probably 
react if somebody New him a 
raspberry. 

She began to take the ball 
early and hit the daylights out of. 
it She ran almost everything 
down and kept the rallies going 
until .she had an opening for a 
big punch. Miss Gomer became 
tactically and technically inhib- 
ited. She no longer dared to go to 
the net That tactical argument 
decided, there could be only one 
outcome. 

The doubles wandered this 
way and that Miss Croft’s 
booming forecourt game often 
made one wonder why she spent 
so much time on the baseline 
when playing singles. 


IN BRIEF 


500th match 
for Price 

Graham Price, Fontypool’s 
former Welsh international and 
British Lions prop forward, will., 
make his 500th dub apperance 
tomorrow when the Welsh 
champions entertain Bridgend. 
Price, who won 41 caps for 
Wales and is his country's most 
capped forwrd. now aims to cur 
tbe number of games he plays. 

Dane blow 

Stuart Marshall, the world 
junior cyclo-cross champion 
from Lincolnshire, will ride in 

an international race in Munich . 
on Saturday, December 6. But , 
Robert Dane, a member of the : 
national squad, has been forced 
to jpull out because of appen- 
dicitis. Steve Douce, the na- 
tional c hampio n, is raciig at 
Koksjjde, in Belgium, tomorrow 
before returning to Sheffield to 
compete in the third and final 
event of the National Trophy 
series on Sunday. 

Girls on ice 

Toronto (Reuter) — The first 
world tournament for women to ; 
be sanctioned by the Inter- < 
national Ice Hockey Federation 
will take place here from April 
21 to 26 next year. Apart from 
Canada, West Germany are the 
only nation so tor to have 
confirmed their participation, 
although several other entries 
are expected, including teams 
from Norway and Australia, a 
federation spokesman *aid 


YACHTING 


Awards for 
nautical 
know-how 

By Ban; PScktbaB 

The Atlantic Blue Riband 
record bolder, Richard Branson, 
the Tornado world champion, 
Rob White, and Britain’s 
America's Cup chief Graham 
Walker, were among several sea 
heroes, yachting personalities 
and marine companies to re- 
ceive coveted Silk Cut Nautical 
awards at the Savoy Hotel 
yesterday. 

The swards are presented 
each year for outstanding 
contributions to seamanship, 
rescue, services to the sport, 
design and yacht racing. 

Branson received his for tbe 
“most enterprising feat of the 
year” after his Virgin Atlantic 
powerboat clipped two hoars off 
the previous passage record 
across the Atlantic from New 
York to Bishop Rock. 

Rob White, rated as one of 
Britain’s best hopes fin- a gold 
medal at the Seoul Olympics, 
won the helmsman of year 
award after winning the Tor- 
nado world championship for 
the second time this year. 

Graham Walker was re-, 
warded fix his eflorts in tbe 
Three-fiuarter Ton Cup in Tor- 
quay, which gave the America's 
Cnp chief his first world 
championship victory in eight 
years. 

Lamazouis 
in the clear 

Titouan Lamazou, the French 
artist sailing the 60ft Ecureuil 
cTAguitame, has established a 
significant lead over his nearest 
rivals during the second stage of 
tbe BOC Singtehandcd Round 
the World race (Barry Pkkihall 
writes). Now into their thir- 
teenth day at sea since leaving 
Cape Town, Lamazou bolds a 
120-mile lead over his compa- 
triot, Jean Yves Teriain, after 
taking a more southerly route 
through the Southern Ocean on 
this 7,900-mfle leg to Sydney. 

Harry Mitchell, of Britain, is 
in last place, 1.200 miles behind 
the leaders but having a close 
tussle with the American, Hal 
Roth, who is 20 miles ahead. . 





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FOR THE RECORD 








B55BCT 


Robson on his 
way back again 

Bryan Robson starts another 
comeback for Manchester 
United tonight when he plays 
against North wich Victoria at 
the DriU Field. Alex Ferguson, 
the United manager, arranged 
the match to give Robson a 
competing game. The England 
captain has missed United’s last 
four senior matches — and 
England's Last game — wife a 
hamstring itymy which he ag- 
gravated against Coventry City 
four weeks ago. 

“A player of Bryan’s ability is 

a decided awt ia n 




CYCLING 














Iwoiild rather ease him back. 
When he does return to the first 
»am I would like it to be 
permanent” 


TODAY’S FIXTURES 






Southend v Burnley 


L»n; 13 


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i m: i iMfcg rKIDAY NOVEMBER 28 1986 



Taking 


TELEVISION AND RADIO 


35 



Edited by Peter Dear 
and Peter Davalle 


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==-'^*S 

MBA 

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• If yon happen to tune in to this 
week’s edition of Jast Anstw 
Day (BBC2, 9.00pm) at the exact 

point Wane a comforting nnnr « 

saying “Sshh, SshhU” to the lOVUt 
Indian python with a sore throat, 
you win recognize in a flash that 
any resemblance between an or- 
dinary hospital and The Blue 
Cross Hospital that lies just 
behind London's Victoria Station 
is (as the movie credits to 
say) purely comddentaL Essen, 
tiallyi Blue Cross is a hospital for 
sick animals but, as Pat Holland’s 
compassionate little documentary 
shows, it is also the place where 
those owners who cannot afford to 
talas their pets to a fee-taking vet 
are sensiHy regarded as peraons in’ 
genome distress and are treated 
accottfingly. It is an attitude that 
mbs off on Just Another Art's 
reporter , John P itman. Whereas 
another reporter might come 


C CHOICE ^ 


C S T$££ i &. 

A^tian pots the rhetorical qnes- 
&on to tan: “When you’re 75?yS 

t *® nble » don't you?? 
ConsKlenng feat Bhie CrdsTcfo- 

budgengais with bad dSSs^nd 
tortoises wuh poor eyesight to a 
tomcat toat has be^S^«^ 

^ •* 

•Anyone who has felt like Mn fr- 
toga wall to get rid of pent-up 
an S* r » wiD know exactly what 


4, 10.30pm) is trying to tell us. 
Wall kickers might not realise it, 
bar what they have been doing is 
to indulge in body-orientated 
psychotherapy, and tonight's film 
is vivid confirmation of 
what^Ibeit unscientifically, they 
have always known: if you want to 
get things off your chest, you often 
have to beat it first And not just 
metaphorically, either. Two of the 
case histories described tonight 
show the therapy at work in ways 
that are quite violent There is the 
resentful son who bashes away at 
the pillow that he has to imag ine is 
his mother, and there is the wife 
who turns her body into a thresh- 
ing machine so that she can lay her 
adolescent experiences to rest and 
bring an adult’s eye to bear an her 

nirn i iajw» 


9.30pm) which completes Arena’s 
triptyc h of Spanish artists of the 
present century, and the repeat 
showing of HTV’s panel game 
Gallery (Channel 4, 230pm) 
which takes the tears out of art 
appreciation and is jolly good fun 
to boot. 


w Also recommended today is 
The Spirit- of Lorca (BBC2, 


• Radio choice: Gerhard Opnhz 
pjaymg Brahm’s Piano Concerto 
No 2 with the Saar Radio SO 
o 3, l-05pm); that fine radio 
actor Bui Paterson as the relent. 
Jessly ambitious husband in 
Alexander Gelman’s strong play A 
Rtotwfth Connections (Radio 3, 
7_30pm), and the repeat of Colin 
Evans’s feature about that 
pioneering 18th century al fiasco 
preacher George Whitefidd, The 

IfjSAwakener (Radio 4, 
i i.uuam) 


Peter Davalle 




uncal en- 
£8,000 he 
olio Gold 
iy to good 


>’ gramo- 
donation 
i peal and 
ear,*' Mr 
Allestree, 




6410 Ooote AIL News headBnao. 
jgjgg- travel and $6%°* 

*30 faftowed by 

Thefflntstones.(i)6^ ^ 


hpha stobgcoTO^oorp y i rt^ 


BBC 2 


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7410 

International news at 

■ 7 js, aas »id 8ja5* and 

Wgatherand 

f C^ras Stocking Store 
: 835 Regional news and 
"MOwOJMNews. 

W» Robert KHroy-SHk. 

fee studio audience and quests 
<S“*2Ptal! PunfehmoA 

i£££!* , ± u,m ‘ f*** c*®* 

and EBsen Evason answer 
questions on social security 
matters. 10100 Nehfebrank frt 

1,120 vssssms^F^ 

times news, and 

/greetings 1030 Play 
[presented by Stuart 

M arfSiBS*" 

1055 Hve to Eleven. Catherine 
Q^wrffe a thought for fee 
S711JM PABcSchoot Part 
five in fee series about ttw ' 




830 Set \r 

^^^^SSrSSSek 

430 ^rfettoUhL-The 

toe, presented by Angeta 

«PPon. 

O00 News with Sue Lawiey and 
a « f*toh^wach^weather. 
035 London Plea, 

7.00 Wbgan. On the show torirtt 
are aferess Gerakfine Jaime 
and Princess Diana's brother, 
Charles Atthorp. Music is 

7J0 


94» Ceefn. 

9-36 Daytfcno on Tteo: baste 

German .conversation 94tt Part 

nifkB rtf fhn nfrutr nh * ■ * — »--* 


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said that 
Us lock, 
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i Station 

10l3f Maths invest 
Got the Facts, and Uj 
1 1 -O gWon dermaths, 

11,17 Manage new 

raffip 

power of language 1Z32 Two 
asters with dwferent views on 
boys, marriage, and fife, 
recon sfea rthalr 'ideas 1J5 


and staff of Radtoy' 
3pm Ate 


W 11-30 Open me. 
Viewers comment on television 


.—.Paul Medford, 

3.10 Dynasty. The first of anew 
series and Oake faces a 
murder charge; Amanda b 

rescued from the blazing La 
Mirage by a handsome 
stranger; and Ben receives a 

— — = — ■ lca g_ 


television ^ 

Under-age drinking and 
society ■s^ttude to afcohoL 
2410 You and Me. For four- and 
ftve-tearofds. 

2-1S ChamplonaMp Snooker. The 
wmlflnate of the Terments 
Unttad Kingdom 
Cha >nptenahip. 3^5 Rerponal 
news and weather. 

100 Pamela Armstrong. The 

rnilH, V.ia. n 


0.15 Good i 

presorted tyAmie Diamond 
md MBw Morris. News with 

E^&aEBRSSSi 

M 53 S 2 ^Sr“ 

BSBt cartoon at 7^5; pop 
muste at 7JS% and Jimmy 
Greajm^s tetevMbn highlights 
at 8JEL The After Nine guests 
include RusseB Grant 

te25 Thames news headlines. 

te3S Sriwote w hat we can team 
from animais &47 How wa 
Used to Live -the rush to enfist 
IteM Junior maths: images 
lOJBSdence- rivers of rock 
1048 The life of a 14-yrar okt 
m a Somali refugee canto 
11 J.S A big department store 
at Christmas fi^7 A profBe of 
a street 1144A trip to the 
seaside. 


WWIKAUVIfl 

Hotness. 

545 News with Alastalr Stewart 

64)0 The6 (yctocfc Show 


12.00 TheRaggv DoBs (r) 12.10 
RatebowTleamlngwith 

ifinhi 4«4(lklJLiu - 


_ pogrammes. 

1220 b^piomhip Snooker. 

Hlghftghte of last night's 


. „ Alda. 

A30 Ctampfonahip Snooker. 
Farther coverage from 
Preston. 

A2S Cricktt Second TeeL Richie 
Benaud Introduces tvghttghte 
from the first day’s ptev in the 


“*»* The stories of a 
Lancashire woman who gave 
up wmy catering to become a 

fniiriirf fnnrln ««4 n 


Cards Right Gama show for 
couples. 

7M New Faces of 86. Talent show 
presented by Marti Caine. The 

^SKSBSdS* 

Hudd. 

8-30 The Two of Us. Domestic 
comedy safes starring 
Nfchalas Lyndhicst and Janet 
Dibley as a couple dying 
toge ther, he ready to p%n Ms 
tronsherekictam at present 

“ felg^S;^? fsoaesUof 

JB.Priesttey’s novel and 

members or the company are 
summoned tw the pcfe» to the 
stege of the Bwri ngton 
Theatre and informed that the 
W»g French acrobat Noni 
has been strangled. 


CHANNEL 4 


Sn 

Whftford arejomed by 
Jonathan MBter and Paul 
Gough. The student panelists 
ere JurSth Mottram end Sandy 

^ ^^SSjSataon. by Ifor 
Wyn WHHams. A Welsh 
language drmna about a 

spmster who decides to 


VARIATIONS 


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a stam- 
ipe to: 


BBC1 WM£S_5j5te»6I10 WMte To- 

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lathy and takes a holiday at a 

seaside resort Storing 
Maureen Rhys and John 

4.10 sswifer^' 

4M Countdown. Yesterday's 
wnner is challenged by Leslie 
Martin, a retired physicist from 


tourist guide; ami a Devon man 
who left a can 


(Oracle; 

104)0 News a 







I.-1V- 


Open pb 

■•Milsiii 


_ news and weather. 

1-00 One OVIock News wife 
“*-”1 Lewis. Weather 1.25 
~ > set in a 

>140 King 



RoBa(r)1J5Qran(ri 
r Ads. Comedy si 


7 r" 

?ney 


24» Liver 

Patty James and 
as LnrerpudBan flat-^iarBri (rt 
2MKnoteLandfog. Richard 
. Aywytemadeatemptinfloflar 
by lis boss - but fee catch is 

lV;-/ 


teOO News with John Kumphrvs and 
HJPjjgi. Regional raws 

te30 Royal Command. A 
documentary fracing the 
historyof the Royal command 
PBftomwnoe which startBdWe 
In1912, featuring highflghts of 
utoae fs by the more famous 
names to hove appeared. 
Championship Snooker. The 
semriinais of fee Terments 
United Kmgdom 


_ __ "«««? and Engtend. 
teSO Choir of fee Year 1986. This 
second quarterfinal features 
choirs from Scotland, the north 

and north-east of England. 

Introduced by Brian Kay from 
Hgpototm House, near 

I, fiBiil 1 1 — 


1035 


David 
Preston. 
12M Weather. 


, Produced by 
IHm, 


i from flm Guild I 


i- 


■:-:P 


1 I- 
Z- • 



7M Micro Live. Kenneth Baker, 
Secretoy of State for 
Education, discusses the 
development of new 
technology in schools, and 
faces Ms critics over what they 

claim is lack of foiiow-up- 
3.00 The Poacher. Brian Glover 


™ wixiii WVUU 

rate the story of the heyday of 
the people's friend ana 


d career n insurance 
for the health and fitness 
business. 

1M News stOne wife John Suchet 
1-20 Thames news. 

1M FBra: Her Favourite Huaband* 
(1950) storing Jean Kent and 
Robert Beatty. A hen-pecked 
bank-derk husbmd b framed 
for robbery when his rascally 
doppelgangar robs fee bank in 
whfchhe works. Directed bv 
Mario SoldatL 

3-00 Take the »gh Road 3£5 
Thamea news headlines 3 l 30 
Sons and Daughters. 

44)0 Rainbow. A repeat of the 
programme shown at 12 . 1 0 
4.15 The Tetobtto>A25 
bmpector Gadget 4M 
Warkfwlaeu Geography quiz 
David Jensen. 


. — a at Ten with Carol 
Bames mid Alasteir Stewart 
weather. 

KUO The London Programme. Part 
two of a K3edal investigating 
fee benefits scandal examines 
the causes of the problems 
and fecfodOB an Interview wife 
John Major, fee Minister for 
Social Security . Followed by 
LWT News headlines. 

114)5 South of Watford presented by 
Hugh Laurie who, this week, 
meets a number of top 
animators who are based In 
London. 

11.35 


^00 ftag^ Where Are You?* 
Vintage American comedy 

530 Jhe Tube. Nigerian mustebn 
Feia Kuti is Interviewed and 
seen in concert with hte 38- 
mece band; there is Dve muste 
from Alison Moyet The Human 
League, and The ^ 
Rpusemartins; on IWrare 
Stump; and there is Paul 
Simon's latest video, The Boy 
„ m the Bubble. 

7-60 Channel 4 News wife Peter 
Sissons. Whether. 

T- 60 go* Ch oice. Norman Stone. 
Prof^or of Modem History at 
Oxford, dhscuases Armed 


Truce, Htigh Thomas’s 
sis of If 


/poses as a i _ 

when on the trail or a hooker 
who mutilates her efients. 


8J» 
8.15 A 


, - - fi» origins of the 
war. 

JW55L. 

teekbi PoBttee presented 

M Dm. ll^i.L.1 


K^fasKssassss- 

s^gassataaaar 

ggrthwafe. Worth wyfc WMownefa Swate 

iUMfe 

saeaawn- 

BORDER 1J0 

Time. 11 JB 

Ci*fin g.12J 0amClpaaeoiwL 
CENTRAL London ewamtl JO 

a'Sss^^c^ 0 *^ 

GRAMPIAN __ 

IIJOQrthjj. mao am News, cion 

GRANADA tap 

»=^SSSfiSS*5SS’-» 

;^JaE°iS!aSE?“- 

linOF&iE Woman kiUwe.1.20 on Close 
Hhr town Station'. 3J»-7J» News. 



es 

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HaremK - M 


Og 

brewing 
rs and, in 
ill them, 
%eal Ale 


/.and 

Charles Smith, a 

icher who was 

woundnga 


5.15 


12M FBm: [Enter the Oregon (1973) 
Lee. Martial aits 


-nncKuuarero. General 
knovriec^e quiz game for 


2.15 


starring Bruce Lee. imoiuoi cun 
adventure about fee breaking 
upof an opium smur^ 1 "" 
operation. Directed I 
Clouse. 


Robert 


t»rca(Irft), pboh»raphed in 1935 with newspaper editor 
Constantino KnizCaiTO« Arena, BBC2, 930 


*L30 GofegtoPotA gukteto 
nousepiant care, presented by 
Susai Hampshire end Geoff 
Hamilton. (Ceefex) 

94)0 Just Another Cby. John 
Pftman spends a day at The 
Blue Cross Hospital for Sick 

Q „ AnxnaMsee Cfctaj) . 

450 A reoa: Th 0 Spirit of Lorca. The 
story of the short Sfe of 
Federico Garcia Lorca, the 
Spanish poet and dramatist 
who dacT aged 38 during the 
grflWa^toWtofenGitjTOn, 

1845 NewanigM^S^s an 

assessment of Ne« Kinnocfc's 
possible reception in fee 

11M The R ockford FBet-tfen 
discovers a murder cover-im 
when asked to research fee 
background of a 1962 high 
school class, (r) Ends at12M. 



- ^ Clive Porting, and 
Cecil Parkmson are 
Interviewed about the battle 
between Boeing and GEC over 

fe e Airb orne Early Warning 
System. Plus Rhodes Bcryson 
on loc al government 
S4W Newiiei L American domestic 
comedyseries. 

8M Gardeners' Calendar 
Roadshow presented by 
^an Brookes. RHS experts, 
MBce Honour and John 
Warwick, answer questions 
fiommnateur gwtteners from 
Harrogate area. 

1880 The Golden Girts. Award- 

wining comedy series about 

tourm Kkfle-aged women 
sharing aRanda seaside 


_ — . WIND «umw 

1ftao ^2^S^** , ^ Paftlh r B9 
or fee series desired to tore 

the mystique out of 
g^gherapy. (Oracle) (sea 

No Future 


omCkmidoML 

HTV WALES * _ 

S’a and ?* Soro-'tSS MtaRHammor. 
izjQ- ttJIfl in Fraezs Frame. 

SCOTTISH AsMnnciptug 

J J «L wow. 1-30 Live BtOna- 
nwly. ZH0 Short StoyTheairB. Z30-3Ja 
Curtng. 6J)0 Scotland Today. a^S-7.00 
OWrent Strokes. 1&S0 Scottish Asaan- 
Uy. 1 1-30 Curling. iSJOamlattCaO, Close 
T5W London except tie pm 

News. i .30440 F&te Ttie Trap. 12S- 
Yo f 1 9ri?F ,ora - 6-C0-74W Friday 

us tso^siasssrs,,. 

uaiwads. UMwamTsRUD 
Crasn oOoaatMp-yj>ocoijniiy Ways. KUO 
FBtangS oUh.il DO Kqjsk. IZOoW 
uwwsFttWier. ICS Company. Ctosodown. 

majas Mqn-. SIM Nortwm Ua 6^0-7 JO 
Qtanoe. TtUB Dw^ 11 J» FAk 
liSOemCMstlanCalBnear 

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a former 
v Guide, 
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meathing 
isorders, 
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suffer ill 
beers in 
ve been 
a foamy 
or to 


JtesT'the 
than 40 
t attacks 
used co- 
beer to 
head. 


11.30 




1 ‘ On nadom wave. Stereo on 
VHF (see befaw) 
M0«n t Sj(non Mayo 740 
Adrian John 930 


Some of the Ea^Emlens cast with the MC, Les Dawson, in 

^ition of Blankety Blank (BBC1, 7 J5pm) ^ 

mD 


«J 0 NowsbeatfRank’ 

J Gary Davies 34M 



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34S Ladtes Lost and Fbind: 

Part eight of Terence 
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fee Duchess and The House 
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*30 ^^toEvensonpj_from 

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S.00 Marty for Pleasure: 

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*30 NkxXai aral Komgokt 
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730 A Man with Connections: 
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S4» Shoeiakovich: Borodin 
String Quartet Part one. 
Quartet No 14 In F sharp. Op 

030 The First Days of 
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^ torawave). (s) Stereo on VHF 

*30 News. 645 
Btrtnese News. 635.735 
Weather. 7410, 84)0 
News. 735, 835 Sport. 745 
Thought for the [fey. 835 
Y^erday in Partement 
830 Letters. 837 
Weather T/avei 
9.05 News 

94)5 Desert island Discs. John 
Ridgeway, adventurer, is 
the castaway on Michael 
Paricinsan's imaginary 
island (T) 

945 Feedback. Christopher 
Dunktey with corrments, 
complaints and quartos 
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10JK) News; Intamattonal 
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„ __ coTMpondents report 

ss?^ 

1045 DaBy Service (New Every 

«« S«g, 

of George Whitfield, a 

S^HfflCT 0 ' 

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1148 The Enchanted Canopy. 
Antfrew Mitchel exptores 
the re mote world of the 

ra»iS£& c £3>' (a ’ 

Progra mm e with Derek 
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1237 Carrott's Crash Course 
on the Cable-Car 
Comics. (Part 1) A guided 
touroftheatend-tto ' 
comedy boom to San 
Francisco. With Jasper 
< m Carrettw 1235 Weather 

1 - 00 The World at One; News 
140 The Archers. 135 

Shipping 

300 Woman’s Hour from 
Birmingham, with 
Marjone Lofthousa. Feature 
about the bored 


J 


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will pre- 
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Roy Hudd with June 
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The Hudtfliners frt. 

430 Kaleidoscope. Another 
chance to hear last 
night's edition. Including 
comment on String the 
Stfale, at Hanw—tead 
Theatre, and Royal 
DKgrere for Industry, at the 

54H) PM News Magazine. 530 
___ Shipping. 535 Weather 
630 News; financial Report 
630 Going Places. Clive 
Jacobs present the 
magazine about travel and 
transport. 

7.00 News 
735 The Archers 
730 Pick of the week. 

Margaret Howard with 
highBghts of the past week's 
programmes on BBC 
radio and TV (s) 

830 Law In Action. With 
Joshua Rozenberg. 

845 Any Questions? From 
Kettering, 

Northa mptons hire, with 
Michael Heseltine MP, 


B^anGajId MP, Rc^er 


(management 

consultant) and Zerbano 
Gifford {Chairman, 

Liberal Party Community 
Relations Panel). 
Chairman: John Timpson. 
930 Letter from America, by 
„ . Alistair Cooke. 

945 Kaleidoscope. With 
Christopher Btosby. 
includes comment on 
M toe Coliseum. 

10.15 A Book at Bedtime. A 
House for Mr Biswas, by 
VS Nalpaui(13LReadby 
Gerard Green. 1039 
Weather 

2?^2 The World Tonight 

1130 Today mParfemant 



11.15 The Fmanctel world 

1130 Mteeltendtog (s) Satirical 
review of the week's 
news. 

1230 News: Weather. 1233 


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MMIPfa 


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SPORT 


I Calm returns as 


the Hurricane 


By Paul Martin 


The England Rugby Foot- 
ball Union is to propose that 
the world's Rugby leaders 
breach the strict segregation 
that has been in force between 
amateur Rugby Union and 
professional Rugby League 
since the turn of the century. 
The move, expected to be 
ven final approval at today's 


blows strongly 


Committee in London, would 
allow a retired Rugby League 
professional to join a Rugby 
Union dub as a member— but 
would bar him from actually 
playing for, or helping to run 
it An amendment to the 
existing regulations stipulat- 
ing that “no dub shall know- 
ing accept or allow to continue 
in membership anyone who is 
not an amateur'' was first 


proposed by England in a 
confidential letter to the Inter- 
national Board last year. 

Dudley Wood, the RFU 
Secretary, confirmed that Eng- 
land intended to press for 
Rugby clubs to allow ex- 
professionals to become what 
he termed “social members”, 
and that today's RFU meeting 
would be “honing and 
refining" English proposals 
for next March's IB. 

Today’s RFU meeting is 
also expected to reaffirm a 
proposal agreed to, with some 
reluctance, in recent months: 
that the International Board 
accept a free interchange of 
players between Rugby Union 
and Rugby League. “We now 
recognize that the ban on 
Rugby League amateurs was 
an anachronism,” Wood said. 

England is also aiming to 
reverse the 1 985 IB decision to 


Alex Higgins returned to a 
half-empty Guild Hall at Pres- 
ton yesterday, two days after 
the controversial incident that 
has put bis playing future in 
doubt, and was given a huge 
ovation by his supporters. 

Higgins had appealed to to 
them not to desert him and 
many turned up to give their 
encouragement as he arrived 
to play his Tennents UK 
championship quarter-final 
match against Wayne Jones. It 
obviously had an effect be- 
cause at the interval of the 17- 
frame match Higgins led the 
Welshman, ranked 56th in the 
worid, 6-1. 

The complaint against Hig- 
gins, that be bad allegedly 
head-butted the tournament 
director. Paul HathereQ. dur- 
ing a backstage incident on 
Monday night, had for the 
time being been forgotten; so 
too was the fact that the case 
had been sent to an indepen- 
dent tribunal. 

If Higgins was classed as a 
rebel, he was not without a 
cause, which was simply a 
matter of self-assertion. He 
acquired it quickly despite his 
unavailing attempt to clean 
the cue ball having been 
stopped by the referee, Leo 
Ganley. whose sole right it is, 
under the rules, to do so. 

The acclaim accorded Hig- 
gins inevitably created a crisis 
of confidence for Jones who, 
apart from receiving five 
points for a foul by Higgins, 
made no progress in the first 
frame after taking an early 


allow American grid-iron 
players, upon making a statu- 
tory declaration of retirement, 
to be readmitted to amateur 
Rugby Union - as the Spring- 
bok captain. Naas Botha, has 
been allowed to do. Wood 
accepted that the idea of 
having ex-Rugby League 
professionals joining Rugby 
Union clubs would cause 
“strong disagreement from 
some diehards who resist any 
change”. But be said it was a 
response to existing realities: 
“We have to face up to the 
facts." 

There has been considerable 
dissension among top-dass 


CRICKET 


Bailed out 


by stroke 
of fortune 


Rugby Union players — 
including ex-England captain 
Peter Wheeler - over the slow 
pace of any rapprochement 
between the two codes. How- 
ever, Wood does not believe 
there is any sigificant pressure 
in England for ex-Rugby 
League professionals to be 
allowed to play or help run 
amateur Rugby. 

The International Board 
will debate next March more 
radical proposals from South- 
ern Hemisphere countries and 
France. Those proposals are 
that they would make pro- 
visions for ex-professionals to 
be eligible to regain full ama- 
teur status after a “cooling-off 
period” — an idea favoured 
and first voluntered by New 
Zealand - and at the dis- 
cretion of each country's 
Rugby Union authorities. 


Virginia, South Africa (Ren- 
ta-) - Michael Haysman, a 
member of the “rebel” Austra- 
lian touring team, had one of 
the luckiest escapes any bats- 
man could wish for when 1 
playing against the Sooth 
African President’s XI ; 

Haysman was well oat of his 
crease when a throw from ! 
Rnshmere, one of the Sooth 
African fielders, hit the I 
stomps. The bails flew into the I 
air, bnt fell back perfectly into ! 
place on top of the stomps by 
the time Haysman bad made j 
his ground. Under the laws of j 
cricket, the disturbance of his 
bails was regarded as tem- 
porary and be was not out. j 

Haysman, who was on 15 at 1 
the time, went on to score 54 
and to share an opening stand 
of 107 with Shipperd as the 
Australians built an impres- 
sive total of 345 for the loss of 
six wickets on the first day of 
the three-day match. 

Hughes, the captain, again 
displayed excellent form as he 
scored 79 off 95 deliveries. 
Hughes and Taylor pot on 74 
in 59 minutes. 



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By Sydney Frisian 
lead Higgins, who had feilen 
16-39 behind recovered to 
■win it 75-44. 

So Higgins settled down to 
smoother action. He won the 
second frame, made a break of 
67 in the third and was 
happily launched Jones had 
the chance of snatching the 
fourth frame but floundered 
on the crucial yellow and 
Higgles cleared the colours to 
win 55-42. 


Preston results 


QUARTER-FMALS: S Davts (Eng) M T 
Dcago (Malta) 9-8. Frame scores (Davis 
2MS. 23-77.980. 81 -50. 78- 
44,07-46,21-100, 112-5. 38-68. 29-79, 53- 
35. 93-8. 8-75. 1180. 39-89. 62-54. N 


Frame scores , 
59-71. 71-35, 136-0, 
B1 -0,71-7,127-6. 


: ii-io, !■«, 

58-22. 0-125. 


Returning from the brief 
recess, Higgins went 5-0 ahead 
after resisting a spirited chal- 
lenge from the Welshman 
who, as Higgins moved in- 
exorably onward, became 
more inhibited Higgins soon 
went 6-0 ahead despite a neat 
break of 47 by Jones, who 
pulled himself together to win 
the seventh frame after being 
helped by an in-off on the 
brown by Higgins. There were 
no big breaks in this session, 
the highest being 67 by Hig- 
gins. 

Amid all the excitement of 
the Higgins match, Tony 
Knowles and John Parrott 
were involved on the adjoin- 
ing table in a more compet- 
itive quarter-final and at the 
end of the afternoon, Parrott 


led 4-3. Knowles won the first 
frame after a hard struggle. 
Parrot! then began a period of 
brief ascendancy during which 
he levelled the score and went 

2- 1 ahead with a consuming 
clearance of 126. Knowles 
levelled at 2-2 but Parrott 
regained the lead with a run on 
the colours. A fluent break of 
69 enabled Knowles to level at 

3- 3 but at the end of the 
seventh frame in which many 
opportunities were lost, Par- 
rott potted a decisive blue to 

go 4-3 ahead. 

Steve Davis, the title holder 
and the world's No. 1, had a 
dose call against Tony Dingo, 
of Malta, whom he defeated 9- 
8 to qualify for the semi-finals. 
Drago, who was 54-1 ahead in 
the deciding frame, missed an 
easy red and Jet Davis bade 
into the match. 

Neal Foulds earned his 
place in the semi-finals with a 
9-2 victory over the Canadian 
Cliff Thorburn, whom Foulds 
had beaten in the BCE final 
earlier in the season. Foulds 
made two century breaks, 136 
and 123, but Thorburn, who 
was suffering from a heavy 
cold, had a break of 125 with 
which he reduced the lead to 
6 - 2 . 


“This is the best result of 
my career. I was pleased to 
beat Cliff in the BCE final but 
to beat him 9-2 is fantastic,” 
Foulds said. Thorburn, 
though disappointed; 
said.-'Tm going to bed for 
three days to forget h all.” 



Back to 


iranii 


By Mfccfcefl Pratts 


Tony Jadrim has won las 
first minor skirmish in h$ 
attempt to lead Europe to 
another Ryder Cap win next 


year. 

Jfkfin, who win he the 
ccptanifor a third successive 


- •'vTTrHTYTr 


and that 1 wffl select the ofier : 
three. These had been same 




the mosey fist end all 12 
p ulnmatjf Wy JpufifipiHg feu?., 
happily, I have the same 
mnuffiement as tost rime.” 

Jacklin ‘ confirmed that 
arrangement tong a bn* 
dteon at the Cafe Royal m 
London at which the Krifc 
Prowse Group uitfled their 
travel pr o gramme to supp ort 
Enrope’s cap campaign at the 
MofrfieM Yiflagr Golf dub, 
Dehlsn, Ohio from September 
25 to 27 next year. 

M emb ers cl the public who 
wish to support the team have 
been offered a variety rf trips 
ranging front a “tear patron” 
Concorde package with the 
team at £4,950 to a 
“matchdsys” tour covering 
four nights at £775. 


AnaU-ont effort 
to wm in US 


forget it all" TnniWe-shootffi Higgins tEmpmaiflypnte his problems behind hhnCPlnrtegrapfc lanStewartJ I 


FA gamble on Howe role 


By Stuart Jones, Football Correspondent 


The international commit- 
tee of the Football Association 
has taken a dangerous gamble 
on the role of Don Howe. A 
statement issued yesterday 
confirmed that he is to remain 
as the part-time assistant to 
Bobby Robson, England’s 
manager, who had asked for 
him to be appointed on a full- 
time basis. 

The decision, which has 
effectively cost Howe more 
than £20.000 a year, could 
prove equally damaging for 
Robson. He is aware that his 
right-hand man, who has been 
out of work since Ieaving % the 
managerial post at Arsenal 
eight months ago, can no 
longer afford to reject lu- 
crative offers from elsewhere. 

Howe had waited patiently 
for the FA to make up its 
mind. He is known to have 
turned down one club offer at 
home, believed to be Aston 
Villa, and several others 
abroad, including a job in 
Saudi Arabia estimated to 
have been worth £100,000 a 


The temptation for Howe to 
seek financial security is sure 
to have increased and Robson, 
growing more frustrated him- 
self by the committee's seem- 
ingly eternal vacillation, 
knows it. Yet he gr eeted the 
regrettable, news with dip- 
lomatic restraint and refused 
to comment directly on the 
blinkered view of his 
employers. 


the preparation of the full 

rr * ti 


England team. 

Yet Howe has a vacant 
three months before he is 
scheduled to resume his du- 
ties. Robson is planning to 
gather his senior squad to- 
gether for a weekend but he 
does not expect to be able to 
do so until the friendly inter- 
national in Spain 

Howe, who is paid only 
£200 a game as England's 
coach, would probably have 
received £25,000 a year. Now 
Robson faces the prospect not 
only of losing him but also of 
remaining the only manager of 
a leading nation in the world 
to work on his own. 

As wed as running five 
international sides ana the 
School of Excellence at 
Lilleshall, Robson most check 
the form of his own players 
and those of future opponents, 
particularly in the European 
Championship. Justifiably, he 
felt that an assistant was worth 
the equivalent of a twentieth 
of the gate receipts of one 
game at Wembley. 


League accused of 
sabotage attempt 


“Don will study what jobs 
line in and no from there,” 


come in and go from there,” 
he said. “If something does 
take him abroad, then that will 
obviously be a different mat- 
ter for me. I couldn't stop him 
taking such a job but that is a 
bridge we would have to cross 
when we come to it” 

The committee had stated 
that it “now had the opportu- 
nity of giving careful consid- 
eration to all aspects of the 
managerial structure of the 
various international sides. It 
has decided against 
recommending the appoint- 
ment of a full-time assistant to 
Bobby Robson. However, Mr 
Howe will assist Mr Robson in 


By Give White 


David Evans, the chairman 
of Luton Town, claimed yes- 
terday that the Football 
League deliberately tried to 
sabotage a meeting organized 
at the dub's request to dem- 
onstrate to League officials the 
effectiveness of their 
controversial membership 
scheme. 

Hours before the League’s 
fact-finding team arrived at 
Kenilworth Road, Luton re- 
ceived a demand from the 
League that the dub refund 
their £5,000 share of the 
Littlewoods Cup pool after 
their withdrawal from the 
competition last month. 

Evans said: “I believe they 


thought I'd call off the meet- 
ing. It’s typical of the present 


Roberts wanted at Ibrox 


By Hugh Taylor 


Rangers last night opened 
negotiations for the transfer of 
yet another English player to 
Scotland. Graeme Sooness, in 
an effort to strengthen a 
defence which lost a vital goal 
to Bomssia Mdnchcngladhatft 
in the home leg of the UEFA 
Cop-tie, approached Totten- 
ham Hotspur for Graham 
Roberts, the redoubtable 
centre-half. 


The Rangers 1 

player/manager considers 
more command is needed in 
the central defence and he 
feels that Roberts, who has In 
his (toy partnered the Ibrox 
captain, Terry Botcher, ip the 


to fill the gap. 

There is, however, little 
likelihood of a deal going 
through quickly. Spurs in- 
dicated that at the moment 
they want to keep Roberts, 
even though he has been out of 
favour recently, because of an 
injury to their Scotland inter- 
national centre-half, Richard 
Gough, and David Pleat, the 
manager, said that while he 
was sympathetic to the 
Rangers' approach, the needs 


fish player to change the tread 
of transfers and go north to 
join Glasgow’s English colony 
of Woods, Botcher and Wert 
at Ibrox. 


of Spurs came first. 

If, however, Roberts agrees 
to the terms, a deal is tikdy to 
be made shortly with their 
robust centre-half becoming 
yet another outstanding Eng- 


A fee of around £600,000 is 
expected, bat Somess wfll 
bear as mach as that because 

he is determined to strengthen 

bis defence. He was badly 
upset at the loss of a goal 
against Bornsma on Wednes- 
day night He fdt that Rang- 
ers ifead been in command for 
most of the match, and shoald 
have scored more goals, bnt 
now face a formidable task in 
the second leg in Germany 
next month. 


mg. ft's typical of the present 
management committee. 
They are so entrenched, so 
vindictive.” 

Philip Carter, the League 
president, who thought that 
the timing was “purely 
coincidental”, said It did not 
make sense to give money to a 
dub who pulled but of a 
competition. 

Evans continued: “1 shall 
just write to the chairman of 
Littlewoods and said him the 
biH Littlewoods have had a 
board at Luton all season and 
our {flayers have visited their 
local store. They have had. 
more publicity out of Luton 
than all the other dubs put 
toother." The League will in 
feet deduct the money from 
that which is sent to Luton in 
the normal course of 
payments. 

The feet that Carter was one 
of only three representatives 
of the management committee 


70 per cent of supporters are 
members. The Prime Minister 
wants 100 per cent 

Carter remained un- 
convinced by the Luton 
method in which all away 
supporters are banned. “We 
are impressed with Luton's 
system. It is first dass as fer as 
that dub is concerned. Any 
other dub interested in the 
scheme can come and see it 
The feet that they don't is 
because they don't have the 
Luton problem in the first 
place.” 

Evans said: “It’s so silly. I 
can't understand, why the 
League are not prepared to 
have full membership. They 
seem to be worried about the 
40,000 travelling fens but in 
doing so they are sacrificing 
the vast majority o] 
supporters.” 

He said that he did not 
believe in home fens only but 
that the problem has to be 
attacked from some starting 
point. “When the climate is 
right we. mil allow away 
supporters to standT side by 
side with our own. The prob- 
lems are not inside grounds 
but in the towns, stations and 
motorway serviceareas. Why 
should the mindless few tor- 
ment the other 50 million. I 
believe you would eliminate 
that trouble with the right 
membership scheme.” 

Ken Bates, the Chesea 
chairman, was one member of 
the management committee 
who did not turn up.. It. was 
believed he did not want to be 


Jacklnsrid: “We need the 
land of support we had at The 
Belfry which Is why we are 
here today. Jack Nkkkms, 
who is toe United States 
captain again, said to me 
d arin g a recent conversation 
drat he doesn't care who wins. 

“I fold Mm that I didn't 
believe that. I told him that, in 
spite of toe feet that the match 
wfll unfold in a sporting 
maraer again, we will begofog 
oof there to m We can * 
with all the support we can get 

Tw no doeftt that we can 
win, »Wmagh l am not saying 
that we wflLIt is a particalariy 
difficult task to try and win hi 
America. But we are no longer 
frightened by the task rf 
gfamirog oa the first tee 
against the Americans. We 
new have toe world-class play- 
ers that we always needed m 
depth. 

“But it amid be quite a 
different team. A few iff the 
players who were m the 1985 
team have not been enjoying 
sachagood time of late. And h 
would seem to me that Josd- 
Maria Olazfibal wfll walk into 
the team. 

“On top of that there are 
several golfers capable of 
making their first appearances 
in the Ryder Cup. Renan 
Rafferty and Robert Lee are 
two of the British players that 
I haVe in mind and then there 
are the Swedes, sach as Ore 
Sellberg and Anders 
Firebrand. Bnt whatever the 
Goal 12 that we take to 
America we will still need all 
the support we can get.” 

Jacklin was quick to empha- 
size that "our big gang ifte 
Sere (Ballesteros) and Bern- 
hard (Lamer) will still be 
Masting^Bnt he is also well 
aware of the revotetion which 
has overtaken European golf 
with the emergence of more 
Continental players capable of 
achieving the highest honours. 


seen, giving publicity to the 
Luton idea. The only other 
two members apart from Car- 
ter to attend were David Dew, 
the Arsenal ' rice-chairman, 
and Jack Dunnett, the Notts 
County c hair man. Carter said 
that be hoped to mate a return 
visit to Luton later 


New faces could 
appear in team 


to turn up yesterday does not 
bode wefl for the introduction 
of the kind of membership 
sbheme that the Government 
has in mind. The League are 
proposing a scheme whereby . 


David Miller, page 34 


Club upset 
by referee 


Newport Rugby dob may 
lodge a formal complaint with 
the RFU over what they see as 
“smear” remarks attributed to 
the top referee, Roger 
Quittemon, after their match 
with London Welsh on Sat- 
urday. Qinttenton was quoted 
in a national newspaper as 
saying, “Whenever I am in 
charge of Welsh dubs, I have 
to whip them like animals.” 

Quitteuton later claimed 
the remarks attributed to him 
were “ghastly misquotes”. 



Mansell’s loss 


Brands Hatch circuit of- 
ficials are working overtime to 
prepare a second car for Nigel : 
Mansell, who competes in a I 
charity race in aidof the Save 
the Children Fund during the 
Tribute to Williams Day on , 
Sunday. The Escort XR3I j 
that Mansell was due to race | 
this weekend has been stolen ! 
from the Kent circuit Mansell 
will be competing against key 
people who sponsor die Wil- 
liams team, as well as Patrick 
Head, the Chiton Williams 


Celtic manager facing 
double hearing 


Indeed it was following the 
success at The Belfry that 
Jacklin predicted that Sweden 
would probably follow Spam 
and West Germany in supply- 
ing a player for the next team. 
The Continentals were first 
given the opp o r t u nit y to com- 
pete in the 1979 match. 


Honda's designer. 

Just the ticket 


Flu at Reading Kano Den stays an captain 


Reading have been hit by a 
flu virus and may appeal to 
the Football League for a 
postponement of their home 
game a gainst Huddersfield to- 
morrow. Seven players are ifi. 


Kapil chosen 


On target 


Douchambe (AFP) - 
Lyudmila Arzhanikova, of the 
Soviet Union, broke the 
women’s archery worid record 
for 144 arrows over the four 
distances of 30 metres, 50 
metres, 60 metres and 70 
metres when she scored 1,331 
points here yesterday. This 
was six points better than the 
previous record. 


Delhi (Reuter)— Kapfl Dev 
has been retained as India’s 
cricket captain for the Sri 
Lankan tour of India starting 
next month.. Sri Lanka are due 
to arrive on December 6 for a 
tour which includes three Test 
matches and five one-day 
internationals. 


Opie wins 


The British Olympic 
Association has named 
Sportsworid Travel as the 
official ticket and tour agency 
for die summer and winter 
Games in 1988. The London- 
company will act as sole 
agents for marketing tickets 
and tours to Seoul ana Calgary 
for British spectators. Dick 
Primer, the general secretary 
of the BOA. said: “The choice 
was made after careful scru- 
tiny of a number of -travel 
firms." 


Lisa Opie beat Martine Le 
Moignan 9-7, 9-1, 9-0 in the 
women's final of the lnlerCity 
national squash rackets 
championships at Bristol last 
night. Happy crowds, page 33 


Australia win 


Massy (Reuter) - Australia 
beat a French selection 36-4 in 
the first match of their Rugby 
League tour of France here on 
Wednesday. 


The Celtic manager, David 
Hay, will make two personal 
appearances before the Scot- 
tish Football Association in 
Glasgow today. Hay will be 
asked to explain his behaviour 
during and after last month's 
Skol Cup final at Hampden 
Park, which Critic lost 2-1 to 
Rangers. He had to be es- 
corted from the side of the 
pitch back to the dug-out after 
be . challenged the sending-off 
of Maurice Johnston; 

After the match Hay made a 
thinly disguised attack on the 
referee. David Syme- “If it was 
left to mel would apifly to join 
the English League 
immediately,” the Celtic man- 
ager said in one of his now 
frequent outbursts against 
Scotland’s match officials. 

Earlier in the season be was 
fined £200 for his criticism of 
the Dundee referee. Bob Val- 
entine. and this morning be 
will be before the SFA's 
referee and disciplinary 
committee together with his 
chairman. Jade McGuinn, be- 
fore meeting the executive 
committee in the afternoon. 

• Celtic have denied that they 
are interested in si gning Joe 
McLaughlin- and Pat Nevin 
from Chelsea (Hugh Taytor 
writes). Both players were 
watched by the Celtic manager 


on Tuesday. McLaughlin 
makes no secret of the feet that 
he wants to leave Stamford 
Bridge. He is a self-confessed 
fen orGritic and if Chelsea are 
forced to agree to his request 
for a transfer foe Parkhead 
dub are expected to move 
quickly.' 

With the stalwart 
McLaughlin stabilizing their 
defence, Celtic, who are un- 
defeated in their .last IS 
League games, would become 
even hotter favourites for the 
championship. They foe pres- 


That prophecy has been 
given encouraging support by 
the performances of Sellberg, 
who won the Epson Grand 
Prix of Europe during fie 
' 1986' campaign and by 
Fors brand, wls® finished 
eighth in the Order of Merit 
wifi £84,706. 

Yet it is the astonishing 
progress of Olazihal, who wot 
twice during his first season as 
a professional and Unwind 
runner-up in the Order of 
Merit with £136,775, which 
highlights the possibility of 
there being several newcomers 
to tire team next year. 

Jacklin pinpointed Rafferty 


-f 1 ■ ' -4 W i 


ently 7-4 on. Celtic supporters 
would certainly hreaihe more 


worid certainly hreaihe more 
easily if the defence were 
strengthened. 

Hibernian eyes foe also 
focused on England. The 
directors have been sifting 
through more than 50 applica- 
tions for the managers post 
Vacated by John Blackley. But 
the chairman, Ken Waugh, 
admitted yesterday. “None of 
them rerily excites us." • 


As foe -list includes Joe 
Jordan, the cra ggy centre- 
forward who ~ became the 
favourite of foe Scottish inter- 
national supporters only a few. 
years ago, . it appears that 
Hibernian are again looking to 
Andy Gray, of Aston Villa, to 
solve their problem. 


on foe British seme but David 
Fehorty, twice a winner h 
1986, and Gordon Brand, 
jmwfll also be seeking their 
Rpler Cup baptisms and 
Mark Monknd, who won the 
Car Care Plan International, 
will be eager to nuke farther 
progress. 

Moreover Philip parkin, 
Mark Roe and Roger Chap- 
man are riro fringe candidates 

rich in ability even if they are 
still awaiting their first im- 
portant successes <m the PGA 
Saropea® tour. Parkin iH 
Chapman bare shown {faring 
the last two seasons fiat they 
possess the potential to de- 
velop -into international 
performers while Roe nude 

BSURatt 

Order of Merft.