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THE 


No 62,628 



-•^■ary 


SATURDAY NOVEMBER 29 1986 









Attorney General wanted to ban the Pincher spy book 

Havers forces P 1 ' . ''*< 




20 plane-loads 
of US weapons 


MI5 about-turn 


sent to Tehran 


“^x 


• Sir Michael Havers has forced Sir Robert 
Armstrong to tefl the MI5 hearing Hint he was not 
involved-hi the deeisioa to bah the Pincher book 


• Mr Neil Kionock has denied that his office was 
involved in secret contacts with Sydney lawyers 
involved in the case against the Government 


■ x - 


• Doubts have also been raised over whether the 
Attorney General took responsibility for the Wright 

case'.. •• • 


# The Times has discovered that a circular was 
to afl MIS pensioners in 15181, reminding them of 
their obligation not to talk about their work 


The Pnine Minister became 
the Opposition’s prime target 
in' the MI5 secrets affair last 
night after an ultimatum from 
Sir Michael Havers, the Attor- 
ney General, forced the 
Government into an extraor- 
dinary about-torn in Sydney- . 

On the insistence of Sir 
Michael, Sir Robert- Arm- 
strong, the Cabinet Secretary, 
idd the New South Wales 
Supreme Court that, contrary 
to his earlier evidence, the 
Attorney General bad not 
been involved in the decision 
in 1981 not to try to ton the 
book by Mr Chapman 
Pincher, Their Trade is 
Treachery. 

He also revealed that if Sir 
Michael had been consulted 
his advice would have been 
that an attempt should have 
been made to stop the book. 


By Philip Webster, Chief Political Correspondent 


Stome of Sir Michael’s col- evidence yesterday, Mrs 
leagues are in little doubt that Thatcher, Lord Whitelaw, 
he would have resigned had then Home Secretary, and he 
Sir Robert corrected his wanted to stop the book 


evidence. 


It also raised considerable 
speculation as to whether Sir 
Michael, although the action 
is in his name, was in favour 
of the derision to try to stop 


Sydney bearing 
BnOt-ln wrongs 
Letters 


the Wright book The decision 
to launch the Wright case was 
a collective ministerial de- 
rision and not for Sir Michael 
alone, as would be the case in 
criminal cases. 


However what Sr Robert 
called .“legal advisers” - not 
including Sir Michael - had 
agreed that there was no basis 
for restraining it. 

If Mrs Thatcher had con- 
sulted her senior legal adviser 
she would have got the answer 
she apparently wanted. 

Mr Peter Wright has 
claimed that it was suggested 
he should collaborate in the 
Pincher book by Lord Roth- 
schild, a dose friend of the 
Prime Minis ter. 


revelation 


The admissions came after have been in &ypur of 

Sir Michael had it dear rtying to suppress the Pincher 


to MreMsngaret Thatcher that wb seized, upon by 
he was not prepared to wh Labour MPs to bode the chum 


the responsiWity for the way toe Government had 
derisions were taken about the bee 0 1 tacitly happy to see the 


Pincher book 


Monday 


A deadly 
devotion 


Pincher book, with its allega- 
tion that Sir Roger Hows, 
framer head of M15, was a 
Soviet mole, published to give 
the Prime Minister ammu- 
nition to take a firm grip bn 
the security services. 


Yesterday’s twist in an af- 
fair __ that is increasingly 
dogging the Government 
came after repeated attempts 
by Mr Neil Kinnock, the 
Labour leader, to discover 
from the Prime Minister in the 
Commons on Thursday 
whether Sir Michael had taken 
the decision on the Pincher 
book 


blamed for the way the affair 
has been handled. 

It is known that Sir Michael 
and .the Prime Minister met 
fora drink on Thursday night 
Later that night, on the Prime 
Minister’s instructions, the 
Cabinet Office got in touch 
with Sir Robert in Australia 
and told him that Sir Michael 
had not been involved in the 
derision in the Pincher book 

Sir Robert then went to the 
court where, in camera, he 
apologized for unwittingly 
misleading the court over Sir 
Michael’s position. 

It is the second major 
internal government con- 
troversy that Sir Michael has 
been involved in this year. It 
was on his insistence - and 
some reports have suggested 
that he threatened calling in 
the police to Downing Street - 
that the Prime Minister set lip 
an inquiry into the leaking of 
the Solicitor General's letter 
during the Westland affair. 


NT 


Sir Michael Havers 
near to resigns 


Vanimu on I Teachers' 


Mrs^ Thatcher’s eventual re- 
ply that the Government was 
indivisible was assumed by 
Conservative MPs to have 
been the last straw for Sir 


Mr David Steel, the Liberal 
leader, said that as in the 
Westland case “the law offi- 
cers are objecting to being 
used as fell guys.” 

Booksellers last night re- 


treason 

charges 


disarray 
over han 


Michael, who has complained ported a “substantiaT in- 
to his friends over recent days crease in sales of Cha pman 

Eva Lui ■ n! i. . ■ *■ 


From Ian Murray 
Jerusalem 


According to Sir Robert's how he has been wrongly Fincher’s book on MT5. 



Silence warnings in 1981 


By Michael Evans, Whitehall Correspondent 


As th e ro w m tne . Sydney sent out a few months earlier copies of the typewi 
court contin u e d yester day to all MI6 pensioners from the manuscript six weeks b 
xcver WTO wa $^fes pon»ble for - deputy director-gencaS I erf the publication dgtei if 

MJ6, who is oowithe head of stiff not ab sbfatety riea^ 

eryby MrChaJnr&nftnc?^^ . Hnth rirniinK iiihnnsb m. although, according, u 


in 1981* The Times oan dis- 
close that early iri the. same 


Both riroulars.'tthQug!|. xie- 
gartied as fairly routine 


Love for. Ian Brady 
helped make a kilie 
sOf-.Mym Hindley. 
The M4 rapist was 
protected by his 


.reminders, were dear ev- 
y&TR circular was smt out to Ktence that the two arms of the 


So was Jeremy 
Bamber.Whyis love 
so blind to evil? 



all former members of MIS 
from die director of establish- 
ment in the Security Service. 

ft warned them against 
talking to anyone about their 
past work ft was supposed to 
be a strong reminder to all 
MI5 pensioners of their 
contractual obligations. Mr 
Wright would have received 
the circular at his .home in 
Tasmania. 

A similar circular had been 


idence that thetwo arms of the 
British intelligence service 


Pinchers book on MT5. dry Tunes nuclear informant, 

• with treason and “aggravated 

m l U3|C I espionage” was read out to his 

’JL Ur JL lawyer, Mr Annum Zichroni, 

_ . . in the Jerusalem District 

moent- Court yesterday. 

copies of the typewritten J* ^ J2* £ 

manuscript six weefcTbeftwe ** 

the publrcaiioB dateiftyF^ “2?®^ ^ a t***™*™ camera, 

.xjw-nu-uut- was \ “ fr 0 ® to® st®*e to extend hiaH 

afthongh. accordi^ ^iiN \rjpjifcinand in custody un til the , 
Pstebcc," one \ tend of all k£ir 

“®<* r nxetred no 

to* 0 ® t0 \^©ney pot his story before he 

Those who saw ■ the . } _rasr .(niritwi ftnm 


4sa& the. 




r from 
Septem- 


bers who had either left or 
retired. But there was no 
indication at that stage that 
MI5 or MI6 had prior know- 
ledge oT the planned book by 
Mr Pincher. which dealt at 
great length with both ser- 
vices. 


The director-general of MIS 
at the time made his opinion 


quite clear that the book 
should be stopped. The head 
■■ P ?S Of .MI 6, who was then Sir 

eat length with both ser- Arthur “Dickie’’ Franks, now 

ces - retired, must also have re- 

Even when they got hold of ceived a copy of the book 


• Yesterday's £8,000 
daily prize In Tfte Times 
Portfolio Gold 
competit ion -double 
lie usual amount 
because the previous 
day’s competition was 
canceled— was won . 


Action plan to 
Unlit Aids risk 


of Ajjestree, Derby. 
Details, page 3. . 

• There fc£12 f 000 to be 
wort today — E&0Q0 in 


the weekly competition 
and the £4,000 daft y ' 


and the £4,000 daffly 
prise. Portfolio fists 
pages 24 and 29. 


Fkench campaign 


TIMES SPORT 


Fans backed 


The Scottish Football Associ- 
ation fined Celtic £5,000 but 
commended their supporters 
for their restraint during .the 
club’s Skcri Cup fund against 
- Rangers last month in which 
there were seven bookings and 
a •sending- off Page 44 


^4 Tennis defeat 


Britain's women tennis play- 
ers suffered another humiliat- 
ing defear when they were ; 
beaten by France m the Euro- 
pean Cup in Eindhovra _ 

Bex BeUamy, page 42 


By Sheila Gmm and Thomsoo Prentice 

The Cabinet committee on The aim [ 

Aids is considering the issue of addicts from Sharing, or re- 
free condoms as its leading using old needles which can 
defence against the spread of easily become infected 
the disease: The most sensitive issue 

Government sources made facing Lord Whitdaw’s co- 
plain : yesterday that the mmittee is screening, with the 
committee, nrade up ; of lead- ■ * »— 
ing ministers, recognmcd that Children fr om five 
this was controversial. But 'Nottingha m have 
tough decisions wooM have to swimming lessons 
be taken before Christmas to hecanse the cbanc 
back tip the£20 million public pmamt “Gays Onh 
information . campaign la im- gt a l efaaie centre 

ijied test week. ■ ■ ■ "— — 1 — ; 

. Condoms are available free French campaqgi 
-at present from family plan- ■■ 
nmg dinks. The committee is ' argument turning a 
attracted by th« idea of mak- form of compulsory 
ing them much easier to the near future, 
obtain, for example, over the Among the pro 
counter in chemists and health what to do with thoj 
centres, because of thrireffeo- - have the virus an 
tiveness in Mocking the trans- that a negative test 
mission of the disease. mean someone wiD 

A decision is expected next up the next day. Bui 
week on whether drag addicts for those entering o 
should be given free dis- fessions, such as 1 
posable needles. Mr Norman forces, , is • bring 
Fowler, Secretary of State for considered 
Social Services, and his mm- . ■ 

isteis are likely to win the fight * A dime in eas 
for such a distribution, al- dealing with Aids-ii 
t ho ugh some ministers fear h tients has been givei 
will damage the vigorous anti- by . an anonymous 
drugs campaign. improve facilities. 


Thatcher 
pledge 
on CAP 


The aim u :> tb discourage ""y Martin Fletcher 

addicts from - «baiing or re- Political Reporter 

The Prime Minister prom- 
ised nearly 40 Conservative 
_The m^ ansrtjve tssue yesterday that she. 

faring Lord Whitdaws co- fight haiti at next 

mmitte^ ts screening, with the week’s KC smnnri: for re- 

fram of the Common Agri- 
Chiyrai from five schools ra rwitnrai policy. 

Nottingham have had their m - 

swimndng lessoBH cancelled ^ Henry Ptob, tea&r of 
becausethe criznril has or- the driegabon from the Euro- 
gamzed “Gays Only*’ sessraas p»n Democratic Gronft raid 

Page 3 iSSlSXStS 


could free the death penalty ra 
receive a life senteiKe. 

. The mote serious charge 
against him is that the stray he 
told “assists the enemy in its 
war against Israel”. The lesser 
charge against him carries a 
seven-year sentence, ra IS. 
years if it can be shown he 
meant to tons state security 
by his revelation. 

It is expected that seven 
witnesses will be called for the 
prosecution during the trial, 
which will be in camera. The 
defence might try to cafl Mr 
Shimon Beces^ the Foreign 
Minister, and one of the few 
who must know the truth of 
the story. He said in an 
interview that Mr Varnrau 
had lied, and toe defence 
would make a point of saying 
that the story could not there- 
fore have harmed state 


security. 


argument turning a piiwi any 
form of compulsory testing in 1 
the near future. 

Among the problems are 
what to do with those found to 


that Mrs Thatcher had been 
“in total accord” with the 
MEPs, who want radical ac- 
tion. to cut the- EEC's £8.7 
billion food mountains. - 


They believe the key; is to 
take tend out of production as 
a way of cutting surpluses and 


have die virus and the fact matching prod action with de- 
that a negative test does not mand. Fanners would be corn- 


mean someone wiD not pick it 
up the next day. But screening 
for those entering certain pro- 
fessions, such as the armed 
forces, is • being actively 
considered. 


pensated, but the cost of this 
would be ter less than the 
enormous costs of storage 
being incurred under the 
present system. 



Mr Vanmra: 
death 


free the 


By Mark Dowd 
Education Reporter 

Teachers were in disarray 
last night after the news that 
the two unions which dis- 
sented from last weekend’s 
Acas deal are to be excluded 
from further talks with the 
local authority employers next 
Tuesday. 

Mr David Hart, general 
secretary of one of the unions, 
the National Association of 
. Head Teachers, has written to 
Acas, the secretary of the 
• 8flff\hajrn_management panel 
to express 
hostility” to the move. 

He described it last night as 
“a flagrant breach of the 
bargaining rights of my 
members.” 

He said: 'The idea that the 
four signatories think they can 
change the package without 
bringing in the NAS/LTWT 
and ourselves is just 
laughable.” 

Mr Nigel de Grucby, deputy 
general secretary of the Na- 
tional Association of 
Schoolmasters/Union of 
Women Teachers, said that 
the “secret meeting" was 
discriminatory treatment of 
the worst kind. 

A spokesman for the Local 
Authorities Conditions of Ser- 
vice Advisory Board 
(LACSAB) said last night that 
the two unions were wrong to 
be reacting so angrily because 
Tuesday's date was not in- 
tended to be a fully-fledged 
negotiating session but more 
of a stock-taking exercise. 

Nevertheless, the clash is a 
blow to any bopes that a 
revamped package between 
both sides might secure a 
greater consensus among the 
teachers than the one which 
obtains at present 

Today more than 2,000 
delegates of the National 
Union of Teachers meet in 
Blackpool to decide whether 
to recommend a “yes” vote to 
its members on accepting the 
Acas deal in a future ballot 
Meanwhile, Mr Kenneth 
Baker, Secretary of State for 
Education and Science, yes- 
terday introduced a new Bill 
in the Commons which would 
give the Government un- 
precedented powers over 
teachers' pay and conditions. 


t.A clinic in east London 
dealing with Aids-infected pa- 
tients has been given £250,000 
by an anonymous donor to 
improve facilities. 


Trap laid for drunk drivers 


TIMES BUSINESS 


Border angry MPs’ wrangle 
as England over. Channel 


Dollar drops 


The .dollar fell on .market 
worries about the Iranian 
arms affair. Sterling rose 60 
poinUtoSl.4355 but was near 
all-lime lows against the mark 


Gas dealing 


As Wednesday’s dosing date 
Tot British Gas shares applica- 
tions approaches, banks- are 
sharpening competition in 
their shartdeafing services 
Fam^Mosey, pages. 30-37 


* *■* * * * 


pile on runs 

England’s impressive form 
in their Test cricket series 
«i gainst Australia continued 
on the first day of the second 
Test in Pdto when they 
fltnaacftd a score of 272 for 2, 
with Chris Bioad 146 not out 
and Mike Galling 1 1 not out 

Allan Border, toe Australian 
ca ptain , was involved in an 
angry exchange with Bill 
A the}' when the England bats- 
man wi* given noi out after an 
appeal for a catch behind the 
vidccL 

- Albey, who had made 26 at 
.the time, was eventually dis- 
! missed tor 96* • 

} John Woodcock, pagp 44 

■' ' 


tunnel persists 


The Commons select 
committee yesterday- com- 
pleted examination of the 
Channel Tunnel Bill and-pufc 
lished . its report, but con- 
troversy over the £6.7 billion 
project and the parliamentary 
process chosen to review it 
persists. 

Mr Nick RaynsfonL a La- 
bour member and leading 
critic,, produced a minority, 
report 

He criticized the 
“inadeqriacies"- of the 
.committee procedure and reg- 
istered bis dissent from four of 
the report’s conclusions. 

Report, page 4 


By Craig Seton 

Special police squads in 
unmarked cars will s p e arh e ad 
a lough new Christmas Mite 
against drunk drivers in Soli- 
hull, the ‘‘stockbroker^ toburb 
of Birmingham. 

' Superintendent Sidney 
Perks, SotihulTS traffic chief, 
warned drivers: “We will use 


every legal opportunity to 
administer the breathalyser.” 


Patrols of uniformed offi- 
cers in unmarked cars could 
be doubled in the area at night 
over the Christmas and New 
Year period to catch drank 
drivers returning home from 
pubs and parties. 

The patrols would also be 
targeted on certain roads used 
by revellers returning home 
from public houses in country 
areas. 

Supt Perks said: “I am not 
trying to fill police cells, but 


offence, and we will have 
patrols in those areas and at 
those times when experience 
shows us that people are 
drinking and driving.” 

Police will not lie in wait 
outside public houses or carry 
out random breath tests, but 
be warned that his patrols 
would be specifically directed 
to detect drink driving 
offenders. 

He pledged that any motor- 
ist stopped by a police officer 
for a moving traffic offence or 
because of an accident would 
be immediately breathalysed. 

Using unmarked cars meant 
that some drunken drivers 
who thought they had “got 
away with it” would now get 
caught 

He said: ”If motorists think 
that any unmarked car on the 
road might contain my offi- 
cers, then hopefully it will act 
as a deterrent. . 


there is a likelihood they will 
get caught if they drink and 
drive. 


drmk^driving is a very serious “We want people to think 

t 


The Solihull crackdown on 
drinking and driving is part of 
the West Midlands police 
campaign. 

In 1985. 6.256 drink-drive 
offences were detected in the 
force area, and traffic chiefs 
have warned that a policeman 
may stop a vehicle at any time 
if he suspects that the driver 
had been drinking alcohol. 

In Solihull, Supt Perks said 
he would be prepared to use 
the “back calculation” 
method of determining how 
much alcohol a motorist had 
consumed. 

The method was used by 
West Midlands police to con- 
vict a motorist who was below 
the legal limit when tested 
four hours and 20 minutes 
after a fat^l. accident. 

Vi 


ed with American weapons 
and spare parts, including 
engines for tanks, arrived iD 
Iran during Mr Robert McFar- 
lane’s secret visit to Tehran, 
according to very reliable 
sources in Iran. The planes 
landed at Qale Morgh> mili- 
tary airbase near Mehrabad 
international airport in a mis- 
sion so classified that a group 
of Iranian air traffic control- 
lers were later arrested on toe 
orders of the Speaker of the 
Iranian Parliament for fear 
that they would talk about the 
shipments. 

The Times has also learned 
that: 


White House crisis 
Leading article 


inlay: Colleagues believe he was 
(Photograph: Alan Weller) 


• Five of the most prominent 
figures in Iran — including 
Ayatollah Khomeini’s son 
Ahmad — arranged for Mr 
McFarlane’s visit to Iran with- 
out even telling Ayatollah 
Khomeini himself. TTiey in- 
cluded the President, the 
Prime Minister and the Par- 
liament Speaker. 

• Saudi Arabia played the key 
role in opening negotiations 
between Washington and Teh- 
ran that led to Mr McFarlane’s 
visit to Iran; 

• Hojatolislam Hashemi Raf- 
sanjani, the Parliament Speak- 
er, only told Ayatollah Khom- 
eini of Mr McFarlane’s visit 
after the American envoy 

j arrived in Iran. Khomeini 
refused to permit Rafsanjani 
and his colleagues to talk to 
McFartane - but he did 
authorize more junior officials 
to negotiate with McFariane at 
a Tehran hotel and act as 
liaison officers between the 
American delegation and 
more senior figures in the 
Iranian Government; 

• In a bitter controversy that 
almost rivals the one now 
engulfing President Reagan, 
Hojatolislam Hussein Ali 
Montazeri — Ayatollah Kho- 


plosive in their baggage. The 
plot may have been concocted 
by Mehdi Hashemi — the man 
who controls pro-Iranian rev- 
olutionary groups abroad — 
but all the Iranians were 
arrested and President Kham- 
enei of Iran later promised 
Saudi officials during the non- 
aligned summit in Harare that 
the culprit would be punished. 

Details of the fierce argu- 
ments within the I ranian 
leadership are complex but 
they- nonetheless mirror the 
political controversy now rag- 
ing in Washington. 

Hashemi, it transpires, tried 
to wreck the negotiations 
when he found out that Ira- 
nian officials were negotiating 
arms deals with the Ameri- 
cans. Early in the autumn of 
this year, he wrote to 
Montazeri to tell him of toe 
US-lranian negotiations. Raf- 
sanjani told Khomeini that he 
wanted Hashemi arrested — 
and received the Ayatollah’s 
permission on condition that 
Montazeri was told of Hash- 
emi’s detention in advance. 

Montazeri. apparently un- 
aware that Khomeini already 
knew of the McFariane mis- 
sion, wrote a letter to the 
Iranian leader. 


CIA chiefs role 
in the spotlight 


From Myfapj B h w a. w *3hineton 
Investigations by participated in the Contra 

m& I«etfc&..Dei^ Tn,enl funding operation, 
now wdenirn* to mHS.are Washington Post sources 
detailed study of the roR^ -.yesterday said inquiries are 
played by the Central Intelli- in on CIA involvement 
genre Agency, as evidence account uup a Swiss hank 


mounts that Mr William 
Casey, its director, ap- 
proached other countries to 
seek assistance for the Cont- 
ras. 

One of the central figures in 
the scandal. Colonel Oliver 
North, the maverick former 
military adviser at the Na- 
tional Security Council, was 
turned away as he tried to 
enter the White House on 
Thursday. During the week- 
end he reportedly shredded 
several key documents that 
may have indicated who else 


man pa ym em» .transfer Ira- 
and on the agency sws anus 
behalf of the Nicar^j. 
rebels. 


Mr Casey asked other coun- 
tries, including Israel, in 1984 
whether they could secretly as- 
sist the Contras after Congress 
had cut off aid. Mr Casey says 
he was only aware of “gossip” 
about the diversion of money 
to the Contras. He has told 
Congress that the CIA helped 
set up a Swiss account to 
Continued on page 24, col 4 


Are you leaving 
your heirs more tax 

than Capital ? Naturally you want 


uiun • Naturally you want 

to leave all of your estate to your family or dependants 
or at least to someone of your choosing. 

But the truth is that without some forward plan- 
ning your heirs will receive only what is left after 
die Inland Revenue take their share in the form of 
the new Inheritance Tax when you die. 

And that share can be quite dramatic. 

For example, on an estate of £500,000 (including 
house, contents, personal effects, stocks and shares, 
bonds, trusts, cash, life assurance and any inheri lances) 
the Exchequer stands to be the largest beneficiary. If 
there were two children they would each gel £99,425 

but the Exchequer 

would take £101,150. | 'J frh I 

And ft gpts worse; 1MIK J U j 

above £317,000the rate AOWTy LAllV 

Mimpamai \ 

help you make plans j financial adviCC. j 
to reduce your liability , Toirry . Utw d . ( n UH% i 

and pass on your FREEPOST. Windsor. , 

accumulated wealth to | Berks SL-t U5T I 

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Vw»niafiriarip»«s Outside office hours ■ 

benehcanes. m Or OH-226 2244 | 

Nou } ^ r a ! <: Edinburgh ) or 0>i2 44 W/ I 

moment. I.H.T does j ; 

not just apply to the I Please send me your ueir I 

very rich. Anvone with guide to inheritance Hi.: and j 
an estate exceeding I hou toavoidit 
£150,000 could use | Lm , dim . 


And ft gpts worse; 


above £317,000 the rate 
is a staggering 609 o. 

At Towrv Law we can 
help you make plans 
to reduce your liability 
and pass on your 
accumulated wealth to 
your chosen 
beneficiaries. 

Now think for a 
moment. I.H.T does 
not just apply to the 
very rich. Anyone with 
an estate exceeding 
£150,000 could use 
some good advice. 

Think what vour 
house and investments 
are worth. And then 


— 


jineer’s 

a) 


By Robert Fisk, Middle East Correspondent 
Twenty cargo aircraft load- meini’s chosen successor — 


ered mechanical en- 
o put the £8.000 he 
• sole Portfolio Gold 
er yesterday to good 


sent an eight-page letter to the 
Iranian leader, demanding to 
know why the Islamic revolu- 
tion had been besmirched by 
negotiations involving the 
Saudis. Washington and Teh- 
ran: 

• So closely did the Iranians 
value Saudi Arabia's assis- 
tance that government of- 
ficials in Tehran tipped off 
Saudi intelligence men when 
1 30 Iranian pilgrims flew into 
Mecca carrying gelignite ex- 


update my gramo- 
rease my donation 
rch hall appeal and 
lay next year,” Mr 
jj'ood, of Allestree, 

d, aged 51. who has 
tfobo Gold since It 
"he Times, said that 
rt believe his luck. 
“It is fantastic. It is .' 
■erience.” 

Gold cards can be 
y sending a stam- 
sed envelope toe 
Gold, 

% 

ffl, 

a. 






ml Wood 


iger of 


beer 


)bin Young 


used in brewing 
ra drinkers and, in 
.*s, even kill them, 
gn for Real Ale 
erriay. 

in the campaign's 
What's Brewing . 
r Protz, a former 
Good Beer Guide, 
eople who have 
other breathing 
sinus disorders, 
>r who are allergic ' 
Teals, can suffer ill 
drinking beers in 
ives have been 
produce a foamv 
clarity, or to 
/life. _ 

tiled Slates: the- 
more than 40 
i of heart attacks 
brewers used co- 
te in beer to 
oaming head. 


. couple 


German couple 
/ears last July for 
* seeking reduc- 
sentences. 
ay Lord Lane, 
'ustice, will pre- 
applications by 
i Sonja Schulze, 
6. for leave to 
>t the sentences 
Mr Justice Mi- 
at the Central 

it 





room or storage 
I probably shows 

Se Space Heater 


■ SnUfleatvor 

teas. TO7S/76. 


. hidress. 


•de x 3 v 2 - high 
«dex3”2"high 


think: 1 must gpt in 


touch with Town' Law 
today. 


ur 

Eei.Bumeu «oho» 


| Postcode^ j 

r .. I TT29/n.86/;tl 


BTEDL 

r.aesLE*. 


a.nk for our frf.eghdf. 


banjuvMfL 

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NEWS SUMMARY 


Mortar attack 
victims return 

Residents aid traders in Newry, Co Down, moved feadt 
into their shattered homes and business premises m t* Ed- 
ward Street area yesterday when the all-clear was given 
more than 20 hoars after Thursday's mortar bomb attach. 

The bomb, intended for die neighbouring police station, 
succeeded in injuring 39 people and d amagin g op to 1W 
booses and shops, some of which may have to be 
demolished. 

Fourteen casualties remained in hospital, the three most 
seriously injured haring been transferred to Belfast. They 
included a girL aged four, under intensive care after surgery 
for a shrapnel wound to the head. _ 

Mr Nicholas ScottJVIinister of State in the Northers 
Ireland Office, described the attack as barbaric ir- 
responsibility. “The IRA know these weapons are 
inaccurate.** m 

Eviction for racists 

Council tenants who are guilty of harassing their 
neighbours on racist grounds may be evicted from their 
homes in the London Borough of LaMbetb. 

The council’s bousing management committee has 
decided the ruling will not only apply to tenants in flats and 
houses, but to people in bed and breakfast accommodation, 
reception centres for the homeless and sheltered housing 
for the elderly. . . . 

Mr Peter Mountford-Snrith, the committee chai rma n , 
said yesterday: M Reconciliation will be our overiding aim, 
but if we find indisputable evidence of racial harassment 
and the situation cannot be resolved any other way we will 

seek immediate action through the courts either for an evic- 
tion order or an injunction.” 

The committee Is also increasing measures to support 
victims of racial attacks. 


THE TI MES SATURDAY NOVEMBER 29 1986 

6 


730 tyre 
jobs cut 

Avon Rubber, the only 
remaining British-owned 
independent tyre producer, 
is to cut 730 jobs at its 
Melbsbam and 

Chippenham plants in 
Wiltshire. 

The 2300 workers at the 
Melksham tyre plant will 
bear the brunt of the reduc- 
tions, as only about 100 are 
employed at Chippenham 
where products include the 
“skirts” for hovercraft. 

Avon hopes to achieve 
the cuts by next June. 


Miners 
end ban 

Coal miners in South 
Wales voted yesterday to 
end their four-month _ ban 
on overtime after receiving 
£350 in backdated pay. 

Members of the National 
Union of Mineworkers 
were paid the money this 
wvrit after their national 
executive committee de- 
cided, against the advice of 
Mr Arthur ScargUL, to 
accept amendments to their 
pension scheme. 

The ban cost British 
Coal about £3-4 million. 

Abbado 
to leave 

Another London or- 
chestra faces die loss of its 
leader, following Audit 
Previn's decision to resign 
as music director of the 
Royal Philharmonic 
Orchestra. 

Amid widespread com- 
plaints of London concert 
mmariaiK being underpaid 
and overworked, it has 
emerged that Clandio Abb- 
ado is expected to leave foe 
London Symphony Or- 
chestra when his current 
five-year contract expires 
in 1988. — f 

Myra Hindleg- ^ 

Myra Hindley has offergi i ttie 12-year-old boy police be- 
Manchester of the msSr and fellow murderer Ian Brady, 
lieve was a vWinade in a letter to foe Rev Peter Timms of 

Her off*, a former prison governor who has been visiting 
Gitor a year. In the Channel 4 programme Seven Days be- 
mg shown tonight Mr Timms will say he thinks Hindley 
has become a penitent who is truly sorry for the anguish 
she has caused. 

Bat last night Mrs Winifred Johnson said she would not 
accept the offer to meet Hindley unless she became 
convinced it would produce information on where her son is 
buried. 



: 'i 


Homeless hit by 



By Christopher Warman 

Property Correspondent 

Mr John Patten, Minister 
for Housing, yesterday criti- 
cized local authorities which 
had ignored Government help 
to renovate council estates 
and assist the homeless be- 
cause of their “political 
posturing’*- _ .... 

Addressing the Building 
Communities conference in 
London, he nanuxlthe 
London boroughs of Brent, 
Camden and Lambeth as 
those which had “spumed 


invitations” to 
money through 
Housing 


apply for 
the Urban 
Renewal Unit lor 


of the re- 


take advs 
sources* 

Mr Patten announced that 
the Unit was to be renamed 


its increased resources much 
can be done.” 

He said that life for tenants 


managed without proper re- 


special schemes to renovate the Umt was to be renamed 0 f Britain’s housing 

estates and bring empty flats Estate Action, and aid that cached a “crisis of 


back into use for the homeless. 

He said that while those 
authorities had rejected help, 
other councils such as New- 
ham, Greenwich and Tower 
Hamlets — “who are less 
ready to strike political pos- 
tures and are more committed 
to helping homeless people in 
their area” — were showing 
themselves ready and able to 


financial assistance was to be 
increased undo 1 the scheme by 
50 per cent in its second year, 
from £50 miltion to £75 

milli on. 

“There is no magic wand 
which we can wave over our 
rundown estates. There are no 
overnight solutions. But Es- 
tate Action is beginning to 
make a real impact and with 


Baker moves 
to halt Brent 
McGoldrick 
hearing 

By Martin Fletcher, Political Reporter 

Mr Kenneth Baker, Sec- been cleared by the school 

ruling 


rotary of Slate for Education 
and Science, payed foe way 
yesterday for direct govern- 
ment intervention to halt 
Brent Council's disciplinary 
hearing against Miss Maureen 
McGoldrick. 

In a letter to the left-wing 
authority, he demanded de- 
tails by next Wednesday of the 
precise charge against her, and 
an explanation as to why it 
had decided to proceed with 
foe hearing in spite of a 
statement in foe Court of 
Appeal by Sir John Donald- 
son, Master of the Rolls, that 
he could not believe it would 
do any such thing. 

Mr Baker has also sought to 
find ont on what basis there 
might be an investigation into 
the behaviour of some school 
governors and parents in foe 

G3SC. 

He could decide to apply to 
the High Court for authority 
to direct Brent to abandon the 
hearing under Section 68 of 
foe 1 944 Education Act, which 
empowers him to intervene in 
the affair s of local education 
authorities where they are 
ndng , or about to use, their 
powers unreasonably. 

Miss McGoldrick was sus- 
pended from her job as head- 
mistress of Sudbury Infants 
School last summer after alleg- 
edly telling a council official 
that she did not want any 
more black staff. 

She was reinstated after the 
High Court decided that the 
council could not conduct 
investigation when she 


governors. That ruling was 
overturned by the Court of 
Appeal, but in doing so. Sir 
John made dear his hope that 
Brent would not proceed with 
foe disciplinary hearing. 

The Labour-controlled aut- 
hority's decision to proceed 
regardless has been criticized 
by Mr Neil Kinnock and Dr 
John C unningham, Labour’s 
environment spokesman, 
who appealed on behalf of the 
shadow cabinet for the hearing 
to be dropped. 

No more money 
for teachers 

No more money would be 
made available to settle foe 
teachers dispute, Mr John 
MacGregor, Chief Secretary to 
the Treasury, said yesterday. 

Mr McGregor said in Nor- 
folk that foe £550 million cost 
of the Government’s present 
offer was “very high indeed” 
and would mean increases of 
up to 4 per cent in local 
authority rates next year. This 
was over and above the 
“substantial” contribution 
made by central government 

“I hope that all teachers will 
recognize that we had to strike 
a balance between a fair offer 
to foe teaching profession and 
a fair bill to taxpayers and 
ratepayers,” he said. 

Mr MacGregor said that the 
offer would give the average 
teacher a 25 per cent rise in IS 
months, “very fcnuch more 
than most other people can 
expect to get 


nunt lor boy wid< 


The net was widened yes- 
terday in the search for Peter 
Kane, aged 1 1, a Belgian boy, 
who has disappeared in his 
first term at an English schooL 
Mr Justice Wood said in the 
High Court that Peter may 
have been registered at lire 
school by his father, Mr Erich 
Kane, an international 
businessman, under a false 
name, in an attempt to keep 
the boy “hidden”. 


Peter had been ma 
of court by his m 
Elizabeth Kane, who lives in 
Brussels, and has custody of 
the boy who has not seen smee 
he went to stay with ex- 
husband in Switzerland last 
July. 

He told her he had sent the 
boy to a private school in 
Britain but refused to reveal 
which one. 


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Medicine 
deal with 
Russians 

By Thomson Prentice 
Science Correspondent 

Britain and foe Soviet 
Union signed a health co- 
operation pact yesterday, 
which offers foe closest co- 
operation in medicine be- 
tween the two countries in 
recent years. 

The agreement came after a 
week of talks in London 
between a delegation of Rus- 
sian officials and doctors, and 
the Department of Health. 
The new pact will entitle 
British visitors to Russia to 
emergency treatment for ill- 
ness or accident, with a recip- 
rocal arrangement for Soviet 
travellers to Britain. 

Leading specialists from the 
two countries will work jointly 
on Aids, cancer and other 
diseases, and will collaborate 
also on aspects of emergency 
medicine, eye s ur gery, viroi- 
/ and primary health care. 
Both sides considered foe 
week’s talks to have been 
“highly productive”, accord- 
ing to a statement issued by 
the depaitmenL 
The agreement to be known 
as a Health Plan of Co- 
operation, replaces a (teal 
struck in 1975 but suspended 
by Britain in 1982. Since then 
there has been little exchange 
of medical information bis 
tween the countries. 

No details of collaboration 
on Aids have been disclosed, 
but specialists are likely to 
exchange data on studies of 
the .Aids virus and on public 
health measures to control the 
spread of the disease. 

British specialists in the 
disease may be invited to 
Russia to give talks. 

“This signals the start of a 
new period of activity in the 
health field between the two 
countries and will, it is hoped, 
lead to mutually advanta- 
geous results in the areas 
concerned," the Department 
of Health statement said 
Both sides have agreed to 
review their co-operation at a 
meeting to be held in Russia in 
1988. 


confidence” Many people 
had lost faith in the ability of 
council estates to provide a 
decent home to live in, or a 
community in which they 
would film their children to 
grow up. The huge estates of 
the 1960s and 1970s, built to 
compete in the damag i n g 
housing numbers game, were 
designed, built and too often 


gard for the desires aiui . pref- 
erences of the most important 
group — the consumers.- 

Mr Fatten emphasized the 
Government’s belief in. tire 
need to Involve foe commu- 
nity in pknnmgand managing 
their homes and environment, 
and said that Estate Action’s 
approach included Commu- 
nity Refurbishment Schemes, 
in which jobless residents 
were employed to cany out 
improvements on their own 
estates. 



Mis Maigaret Thatcher greeting the Russian dissident, Mr Yari Orlov, at No 10 yesterday. 


Salvage operation called off 



By Michael McCarthy 

prospects look increasingly 
n tender this weekend of sal- 
vaging tiie stricken freighter 
Kowloon Bridge, which has 
been agrooad for the past five 
days on rocks off the south- 
west coast of Ireland. 

The Dutch tag companies 
which have been trying to free 
the huge ore-carrier from 
Stag’s Head rock off west 

Cork yesterday abandoned the 
operation, saying the ship had 
become too damaged to re- 
cover. This morning they are 
ffijwifwl to disconnect their 
-paw lines to tire, vessel, which 

is split into two. Kf a » 

*# Sc KlM.lv, hdwcr«.5 "rw.- 

ilk stay m the 
noat uk beach 
threat posed bytbe 
reserves of fuel oil, 

Mrrnrt to anoot to more 
1,000 tons. A little has 
Steady escaped and caused 
damage to beaches. Officials 
from the Irish environment 
ministry are moni tori ng the 
position. 


As the outlook for the 
Kowloon Bridge deteriorated 
her master said he 
had nothing to fear from foe 


British and Irish government 
inquiries into foe wrecking of 

Bayfco Cork toA steact^M 
damage after a rough Atlantic 
crossing a week last Thursday. 
The vessel later pot to sea 
smain, allegedly against ad- 
vice, only to lose her steering 
gear and be abandoned within 
hours. 

Captain S.T. Rao said in 
Cork yesterday: “I conducted 
my duties to foe best of my 
aMEties ana saved everyone’s 

ag«r40, from 
be had put to sea 
because his anchor had broken 
in the narrow confines of 
Bantry Bay. “You can’t get 
trapped hi narrow seas, yon 
have to move into the open,” 
he said. “There woe a lot of 
otter casualties that night. 
I’ve never seen weather like 


India, 


lost my steering gear and in 
that sea it was suicidal to stay 
onboard.” 

Captain Rao added: “I feel 
terrible. I was «m board yes' 
today and it’s just not pos- 
sible to save her. ” 

The captain strongly denied 
a report tint the Kowloon 
Bridge was at the centre of an 
Integral drags investigs “ 
and had been monitored as a 
possible drags carrier on her 
voyage from London. 

“This is simply fantastic 
and nonsense,” - , he said. 
“There is no basis to it. 
Gertofady the Irish police have 
not qwstionrfpie dwtit,* 
Sfochana, 
IrdantPs jMfke, would not 
comment on yesterday's re- 
port The ship’s agents in 
London, Zodiac Marnime, ex- 
pressed surprise and said they 
had no knowledge of any 
police investigation. 1 
The ship's cargo is- £4 
mllkm worth of Canadian iron 
ore bound for foeBnveascraig 


Cod ban k 
lifted 
after Irish 
pact 

ByKetoffifoGodag 

A baa on cod fishing in foe 
Channel,- unposed because 
quotas bad been exceeded, has 
been lifted aftera deal with foe. 
fnsh Republic. The accord 
came after a week of protests 
by . Britain’s rod and foe 
anglers. 

“They had underfished 
their quota, we bad over- 
fished, so a swap was done, 


Agriculture,. 
Food 


foe Ministry 
Fisheries and 
yesterday. 

Theban until tire end of fas 
year was imposed only a week 
ago and its fitting was an- 
nounced in foe CwnEHMS by 
Mr John Gurinner, Minister 
of State for Agriculture, only 
boors after he bad told Warn 
at OntriistenerS on BBC Radio 
4 that he understood tire 
frustration and difficulties of 
Britain’s fishermen. 

“We are woritir® extre me l y 
bard,” he said, “to see if we 
can get a little bit of quota 
from the Irish.” - 

On tire same programme, a 
Newhaven charterer, Mr De- 
nis O’ Kennedy, said he stood 
to lose £1 ,000 m lost bookings 
to next April Mr Bob Eage^ of 
the Sea Anglers’s Federation, 
said be had written 500 tetters 
to members warning them of 
theban. 

Rod and line anglers, he 
said, had been 'unaware that 
they were affected by the ban. 

. The ban, which comes off 
from Tuesday, covered an 
area from Hythe in Kent to 
Fishguard in west Wales. - 

said 

had come to tire end of their 
annual quota “rather sharply” 

It had been found possible, 
after the minister had tried to 
see what could be done in 
view of the frustration he 
■knew was being experienced, 
to win an additional 200 
tonnes from tire IrislL., 

The agreement with Ireland 
was reached as Mr Glimmer 
was speakingm an emergency 
adjournment debate initiated 
by Mr Anthony Nelson, 
Conservative MP, who had 
complained of foe effect on 
foe livelihood of fishermen in 
his Chichester constituency. 
Mr Gununer was handed a 
note about foe swap with 
Ireland and made an immedi- 
ate announcement. 

Mr Nelson said the news 
would be received with great 
joy by his . fishermen constit- 
uents and nD others along the 
south coast. - • 

L- am delighted,” he told 
the minister, “at the way and 
the speed in which you have 
wresfled this change and swap. 
This is very good news 
indeed.” ; 


that In 20 years of service. I _ steel plant in Scotland. 


Correction 

A report in The Friday Page 
yesterday stated that Britain 
had withdrawn from UNI- 
CEF. This is not the case, and 
we apologize for the error. 


Jobless 
‘here 
to stay’ 

The problem of unemploy- 
ment would inevitably con- 
tinue “for 1 a substantial 
period”, Mr Douglas Hurd, 
tire Home Secretary, said last 
night (Sheila Gunn writes). 

Criticizing Labour’s plans, 
Mr Hurd said that unemploy- 
ment would not be overcome 
by any irresponsible explosion 
in public spending; any move 
towards protectionism; or 
recreating inefficiency, sub- 
sidies and overmanning in 
industry. 

He told Oxfordshire 
Conservatives: “The welcome 
downward movement in un- 
employment in recent months 
will only be sustained apd 
accelerated by a continuing 
determination to control infla- 
tion,’’ 


TV helps 
Midlands 
jobless 

Late night television in tire 
Midlands gives about 100,000 
unemployed tire chance to 
look for work. After tire late 
night film or final programme 
of the night. Central Indepen- 
dent Television transmits de- 
tails of job vacancies in tire 
East and West Midlands and 
in other parts of Britain. 

The station claims that its 
Jobfinder service, the first Of 
its kind in Britain, has proved 
so successful that similar one 
hour broadcasts have begun in 
foe early morning before the 
start of normal transmissions. 

So far, tire service has 
secured work for 126 un- 
employed Midlanders. The 
latest to secure a full-time 
work was as a cleric in an 
unemployment exchange. 


Tobacco firms’ TV 
hoardings curbed 


Tobacco companies win be 
ordered to take down many 
hoardings around sports 
grounds next month to reduce 
the cigarette adverts seen by 
television viewers ■ (Sheila 
Gunn writes). 

The use on sports equip- 
ment of certain colours, used 
to represent particular brands 
of cigarettes, will also be 
banned. 

The new code governing tire 
coverage of tobaccoHspon- 
sored sport, to replace the one 
that ran oat in .1985, is 
expected to be announced by 
Mr Richard Tracey, Minister 
for Sport, before ChristmasL.lt 
results from consultations be- 
tween the Government, the 
Tobacco Advisory Council 


and the television companies 
and is seen as one step towards 
cutting down on tire use of 
televised sport to get around 
the ban on cigarettes 
advertisements. 

But the broadcasters have 
been left in no doubt that 
sterner measures will follow if 
foe Government believes 
them necessary. 

Up to 20 per cent of the 
advertisements will have to go 
under foe new code. At 
present racecourses are allow- 
ed three signs of no more than 
360sq ft; show jumping, up to 
sax signs of 9Qsq ft ma ximum; 
and snooker, two signs of up 
to 24. sq ft — with similar 
controls for other sports. 


Three North Sea oil 
fields shut by leak 


Nearly 15 per cent of 
Britain’s North Sea oil produ- 
ction was halted yesterday. 

Three of the biggest oflshore 
oil fields remained foot as 
divers tried to find the cause 
of a North Sea oil slide. 

But fears of pollution re- 
ceded as the slide, covering 10 
square miles, began to break 
up as the south-west wind 
pushed it away from foe 
British coasL 

The oil was leaking from 
part of foe 130-mite-lang sub- 
marine pipeline network 
which runs to the Occidental 
oil terminal on the Orkney 
island of Flotta from the 
Piper, Claymore and Tartan 
platforms. The smaller Scapa 
field near-by was also hit 
The pipeline would usually 
carry nearly 350,000 barrels of 
oil a day -worth more than 
£5 million. 

A diving support ship, 
Deepwater L was on station at 
the scene to allow divers with 
video cameras to cany out an 


underwater survey of the 
pipelines. 

They eventually located the 
teak at a point when the 
Claymore pipeline connects 
whh the main pipe to Flotta. 

Occidental, who own the 
Piper and Claymore fields, 
said the pipe had now bees 
filled with seawater 

The company said a heli- 
copter flight had confirmed 
that oil was still visible 

Last night foe divers were 
trying to determine the 
seriousness of the repairs, 
about 100 miles east of the 
Scottish mainland, to estab- 
lish when production can 
recommence. 

The Occidental oil te rminal, 
which employs 300 people In 
Orkney, celebrates its tenth 
anniversary this month. Since 
it opened the terminal has 
handled more than one billion 
barrels of oiL 

The Tartan field is owned 
byTexaca. 


Radio launch 

Jenni Murray, presenter of 
BBC Radio 4’s Woman's 
Ham, is to launch a Saturday ■ 
edition of the station’s early-' 
morning Today programme m 
January, 


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THE TIMES SATURDAY NOVEMBER 29 1986 


HOME NEWS 


Radio links to be used 
in crime crackdown on 
London Underground 


in 


By Rodney Cental, Transport Correspondent 

Hans for a crackdown on 
crime in the most dangerous 
stations on the London 
Underground system were 
disclosed yesterday. 

Mr John Moore, Secret a r y 


of State fix' Transport, an- 
nounced last month that the 
Government was to provide 
£!5niiIlion during the next 
three years to combat crime 
on the Underground, and 
yesterday a detailed study was 
published. This will be the 
basis of the campaign to 
combat it. 

Mr David Mitchell, Min- 
ister of Slate for Transport, 
said top priority would be a 
crackdown on robberies along 
the southern section of the 
Northern Line between CJap- 
ham North and Tooting 
Broadway, plus a drive against 
violence and theft at Oxford 
Circus. 

Dr Tony Ridley, chairman 
and chief executive of London 
Underground, said that about 
£5 mflUon of the £15 million 
would provide radio facilities 
for police at 42 key stations. 
Other measures to be taken 
include installing more and 
improved closed circuit tele- 
vision equipment, providing 
passenger alarms on plat- 
forms, making staff* mote 
accessible to assist the public, 


and improving li g htin g 
tunnels along which 
trians walk. 

He said that in the long run 
measures identified in the 
report might cost £30 minion. 


bat he regarded the Govern- 
ment's provision of £1S mil- 
lion during the next three 
years as “a rapid and generous 
response” to the report. 

Dr Ridley emphasized that 
there was no evidence that tiie 
Underground was signifi- 
cantly more dangerous than 
other places, but he accepted 
that there was a public percep- 
tion that it was. 

In 1985 there were about 
1,600 violent crimes, out of a 
total of more than . 15,000 
crimes of aD sorts on the 
Underground, but this had to 
be compared with the 
725 million passenger jour- 
neys made in that year. 

The likelihood of anyone 
encountering violent crime on 
the Underground was very 
smalL Out of 250 stations, 140 
had no crimes a 1 all last year. 

The report shows that 75per 
cent of robbery victims were 
male, and comments that 
“this runs contrary to the 
popular belief that women are 
more at ride from attacks of 
this sort”. 

Dr Ridley said British 


Transport Police had about 
300 men allocated to policing 
the Underground. This would 
rise to 350, although because 
of shift work, court appear- 
ances and other duties, “ 
present only about 50 were 
normally in the Underground 

system. Before considering the 

case for further increasing the 
numbers of police, it was 
important to make the best 
possible use of those they 
already had. 

The report shows that in 
1985 the station with the 
highest number of robberies 
was Oxford Circus, with 27, 
followed by Baiham with 26, 
and King’s Cross and Ele- 
phant and Castle with 24. 
King’s Cross beaded the num- 
ber of assaults on passengers 
with 23, followed by Victoria 
and Leicester Square. Vic- 
toria, Leicester Square, Ox- 
ford Circus, Green Park and 
Tottenham Court Road had 
the greatest number of thefts. 

In 1985, out of 837 offences 
of violence against the person 
285 were cleared up, but only 
33 out of 251 sexual offences 
were cleared. For thefts from 
the person, the clearance rate 
fen to 130 out of 7,017. 

Crime on the London Under- 
ground ; (Department of Trans- 
port; Stationery Office; £7.80). 


Patient was given 300 
6 Jaffe juice’ injections 


By Mkfael Horsnefl 


Dr Joseph Jaffe, the hypno- 
therapist accused of serious 
profehfonaT misconduct, agr- 
eed yesterday that he has no 

pgy rma trir q imHfiratinmi 

He told a General Medical 
Council disciplinary hearing 
in London that during a five- 
year period of treatment be 
gave 300 injections of “Jaffe 
juice” to a patient 

This is die allegedly addic- 
tive concoction with which he 
injected Mr George Waterson, 
of Altrincham, Cheshire, aged 
49, the former owner of a 
bkryde business, who claims 
that the doctor wrecked his 
personal and business Kfe. 

During the five years of 
treatment Dr Jaffe told the 
hearing that he saw Mr 
Waterson, who came to him 
for treatment for bosmess and 
domestic stress, on about 450 
occasions for which he 


charged about £7,500 - deny- 
ing the allegation that he had 
received up to £60,000. 

Dr Jaffe, aged 60, who has 
consulting rooms in Manches- 
ter, denies four charges of 
serious professional misco- 
nduct 

He said he did not know 
that the barbiturate, Bristol, 
which he used in his concoc- 
tion was addictive; But after 
hearing the evidence of an 
expert in anaesthetics during 
the hearing be would no 
longer use it 

Mrs Channame Owen, aged 
35, Dr Jaff^s medical sec- 
retary, denied that she had 
ever had physical -intimacy 
with Mr Waterson. 

Mr Waterson had earlier 
said that she had wanted to 
seduce him and wore see- 
through . Mouses. 

‘ The hearing continues. 


Prison for 
threats to 
stores 

Anne Marie Carroll, aged 
34, a famine relief worker, of 
Wallasey, Wirral, who was 
convicted of blackmail at 
Liverpool Crown Court on 
November 13, and remanded 
for psychiatric reports, was 
jailed for three years 
yesterday. 

She had threatened to poi- 
son food and to disclose that 
staff at a supermarket had 
Aids. She planted a fake bomb 
in the Birkenhead branch of 
the Asda superstore chain, and 
demanded £220,000 from 
Sainsbury’s, Asda and 
Greenhall's brewery. 

She had at first denied all 
the charges but during her 
evidence admitted being 
responsible for the threats. 

Judge Naylor said the grav- 
ity of her offences was that 
people bdievedber threats. 


Aids scare 
halts swim 
sessions 

By Craig Seton 

Fear of die disease. Aids, 
has led five schools to cancel 
swimming lessons for pupils 
at a leisure centre where the 
local council has introduced 
private swimming sessions for 
homosexuals and le sb ians. 

Lifeguards and pool atten- 
dants at the Victoria Leisure 
Centre in Nottingham are also 
boycotting the “gays only” 
swimming sessions on Sunday 
nights. 

The private sessions were 
introduced six weeks ago. by 
the Labour-controlled city 
council because of alleged 
harassment of homosexuals 
and lesbians when the pool is 
open to the general public. 
Yesterday Mr Keith Dud- 
', chairman of the governors 
Manvers Pierrepont com- 
prehensive school said: “Peo- 
ple are frightened. On 
Monday morning about 20 
parents came to the school 
and they said they were not 
smiting their children there 
because the gays were using it 
on Sunday night. 

“I have two children myself 
and 1 fed the welfare of our 
children must come first.” 

Mrs Maria Demldw, of 
Bakersfield, Nottingham, 
whose son attends the Jesse 
Boot junior school which has 
cancelled swimming lessons at. 

the leisure centre, sakfc “There 

could be blood about in the 
water. 

“My son goes swi mmin g 

Mans nithaf nnfh 


S 


four tunw; a week, either with 
his dub or with his school 
and he often comes home with 
cm feet or ankles because the 

tiles at the pool are not very 
good. 

“The feeling is very strong 
on this issue in (he area.” 

Lifeguards and pool atten- 
dants are refusing to »»«» the 
sessions for homosexuals be- 
cause, they said, they were not 
consulted. 

The sessions are also to be 
challenged by officials of the 
360-strongNottingham Swim- 
ming Club, 

A spokesman for Notting- 
ham City Council said gays 
had been harassed in the past 
asd the special sessions had 
been organized for them to 
create a nicer atinaqjhere 
where there were “no jeers . 

He confirmed that five 
schools were boycotting the 
pod but said the fears about 
Aids were unfounded. 

There had been no reports 
anywhere of the disease being 
transmitted in swimming pool 
water, which was thoroighly 
disinfected with chlorine 
which kilted bacteria and 
viruses. 


Soldier is given life for 
garrison murder of girl 


An Army captain’s beauti- 
ful teenage daughter was bru- 
tally killed by a soldier on 
guard duty, a court was told 
yesterday. 

John Hardie, aged 18, from 
Lanark in Scotland, was sen- 
tenced to life imprisonment at 
Teesside Crown Court after 
pleading guilty to the murder 
of Julie Harrison, aged 16. of 
Catterick Garrison, North 
Yorkshire, on June 22. 

The girt was walking to her 
home in French Road at the 
garrison after a night out with 
friends when Hardie, who was 
supposed to be guarding lor- 
ries, dragged her into a field 
and strangled her with her 
shoulder bag strap, Mr John 
Hitchen, for the prosecution, 
said. 

After her death he sexually 
abused her body and fified her 
mouth with grass. 

Referring to a police state- 
ment claim by Hardie that the 
girl had led him on. Mr 
Hitchen said the girt, who had 
lived at Army installations a II 
her life, was “sexually experi- 
enced to a degree which is 
perhaps unusual for her age. 


without being absolutely 
extraordinary”. 

“But nothing has been 
discovered during the ex- 
haustive investigation of all 
her previous sexual experi- 
ences to suggest she behaved 
towards the accused in the 
way he alleged.” 

Miss Harrison, the daughter 
of Captain Brian Harrison, of 
the Royal Grips of Signals, 
had been looking forward to 
getting engaged in October, on 
her seventeenth birthday. 

Her body, naked from the 
waist down, was discovered 
during a search which began 
when Hardie handed in her 
shoulder bag, claiming he had 
found it near an Army cadet 
hut. 

Mr Hitchen told the court 
that Hardie, a Royal Corps of 
Transport driver, who was 
married in November last 
year, killed the girl just seven 
weeks after the birth of his 
son. 

Mr Vivian Robinson, QC 
for the defence, said his client 
“expressed his deepest regret 
and utter remorse for what has 
happened”. 


Inquiry on 
patient’s 
death 

By J3I Sherman 

A hospital inquiry has been 
carried out into the death of a 
teenager who suffered brain 
(famay while he was prepared 
for a kidney transplant 
operation. 

David Aldridge, aged 19, an 
office clerk, died at Addeo- 
brooke’s Hospital Cambri- 
dge, on November 2. He had 
been in a coma in the inten- 
sive care unit since the opera- 
tion was carried out on 
September 13. 

Results of an internal in- 
quiry by the hospitals senior 
management and medical 
staff have been passed to the 
coroner. But at the opening of 
the inquest on Thursday, 
Professor Austin Gresham, a 
Home Office, pathologist, said 
that Mr Aldridge, of West 
Mill, Bimtxngford, Hertford- 
shire, suffered brain damage 
because of lack of oxygen at 
the time of the preparation for 
the transplant 

Mr David Astiey, the 
hospital's unit general man- 
ager, confirmed that Mr 
AJdndge had been an out- 
patient receiving renal dialysis 
treatment at the hospital be- 
fore the transplant was carried 
oul A foil inquest wiH be 
heard after Mr Robert Stem- 
dale Burrows, the coroner^has 
finished investigating the ca.%1 


Shop ‘had 
no stock 
of solvent’ 

A newsagent accused of 
supptyfog typewriter correc- 
tion fludd thinn ers to a boy 
who died after a sniffing 
session yesterday denied that 
he swapped the teenager’s 
radio for bottles of the solvent 

Mr Chandrakant Patel, aged 
35, told magistrates at Tower 
Bridge, south London, that 
Lee Kendall came into his 
shop about two weeks before 
his death and asked if he 
wanted to buy his radio. 

Mr Paid said he refused at 
first but the boy pleaded with 
him. 

Mr Patel lent him £3 and 
kept the radio as security. A 
few days latex the boy returned 
the money and took back the 
radio. 

But 10 or 12 days after that 
he came back and asked for a 
second £3 loan. 

Mr Patel denied that Lee, of 
Hazel Way, Bermondsey, 
bought three or four bottles of 
liquid correction fluid. 

Mr Patel a newsagent in 
Dtmton Road, Southwark, 
south London, said he had no 
liquid correction thinner in 
stock in the week before the 
barfs death on August 8. 

Earlier the boy’s mother, 
Maria, aged 39, tom the" court 
that she confronted Mr Patel 
the day after Lee’s death. Her 
daughter, Debbie, allegedly 
saw bottles of thinner. 

The case continues. 



A 1933 Mercedes-Benz 380 Supercharged Roadster outside Christie’s showroom in Loradoa (Photograph: Mark Pepper). 

£60,000 tag on a veteran left in barn 


A vintage car which has been standing 
in a ham near Buckinghamshire since 
19S7 is expected to be sold for more than 
£6(1000 at an auction next month to 
mark the centenary of the motor car. 

The owner of the two-door Mercedes 
cabriolet 540K, Mr John Fraser, a$ed 
77, from Denham, Buckinghamshire, 
said that his father bought the car in 
1935. ”1 can remember going to pick it 
up from the Mercedes depot opposite 


two crisp, white £1,000 notes,” he said. 

Mr Fraser, who has been the only 
person to drive the car, said that selling 
it wfll be like parting with an old friend! 
“One of the best (rips I remember was to 
Monte Carlo in 1946 jnst after the war. 
The cabriolet was the ideal car for such a 
trip,” he said. 

But the car became too expensive to 
ran because it did only eight or 30 miles 


to the gallon. “It will be nice to«ee it out 
on the road again,” Mr Fraser said. 

The car is befog sold by Christie’s at a 
sale which is bring held with the snpport 
of Daimler Benz at the National Motor 
Maseuzn at Beaulieu on December 8. 

Mr Robert Brooks, director of vintage 
cars at Christie's, said that many people 
around the country who owned or had 
inherited vintage cars did not realize 
their value. 


US interest in BBC scheme 


By Jonathan Miller, Media Correspondent 


At least one large American 
corporation is understood to 
be considering sponsoring 
programmes on the BBC if the 
Government approves a 
scheme to allow it 

The sponsorship proposal, 
which is supported by senior 
BBC management, calls for 
the corporation to transmit 
acknowledgements when 
commercial organizations 
fund programmes made by 
independent producers. 

The plan would guarantee 
sponsors a visual and spoken 
acknowledgement of their 
support, but would prohibit 
the mentioning of specific 
products or lines of business. 

It would benefit the BBC by 
making new funds available 
for prestige productions, and 
would benefit companies by 
allowing them to associate 
themselves with such 
programmes. 

But a BBC official yesterday 
said that sponsorship would 


have to be controlled rig- 
orously, to prevent the abuses 
which he said have become 
common in the United States. 

In America, critics claim 
that relaxed guidelines 
governing sponsorship of the 
nominally non-commercial 
Public Broadcasting Service 
have resulted in a “petroleum 
broadcasting service” fi- 
nanced by oil companies. 

The situation arose after 
sponsors successfully fought 
to weaken guidelines similar 
to those now being considered 
by the BBC. 

The BBC proposal which 
was accepted in principle by 
its board of governors this 
week, may require a change in 
the corporation’s licence, 
which says it may not transmit 
“any sponsored programme” 

However, the licence does 
not specify the meaning of the 
word sponsorship, and the 
BBC routinely transmits 
commercially sponsored sport 


and entertainment events. 

Corporation executives are 
to meet Home Office officials 
next month to sound the 
Government’s view. 

The BBC yesterday said that 
the proposal was an attempt to 
help independent production 
companies which have been 
seeking more access to its 
schedules. 

Independent producers yes- 
terday expressed scepticism at 
the plan. Mr Paul Styles, 
director of the Independent 
Programme Producers Associ- 
ation, said sponsorship car- 
ried with it problems of 
editorial control and could 
not fully substitute for 
commissions from the BBC 
and ITV companies. “We are 
very wary," he said. 

A sponsorship proposal 
similar to that now being 
considered was rejected by the 
BBC governors about five 
years ago. 


Historic 
house to 
stay open 

Hammerwood House in 
East Grinstead, West Sussex, 
bought, restored and opened 
to the public three years ago by 
its present owner, survived a 
Court of Appeal attempt by 
local residents to force its 
closure. 

The house, grade 1 listed, is 
at the centre of a dispute 
between its owner, Mr David 
Pinnegar, and residents 
outside. 

The court yesterday refused 
to grant residents an injunc- 
tion forcing the closure of the 
house. 

Lord Justice May, sitting 
with Lord Justice Woolf and 
Sir Rouaieyn Cumming- 
Bruce, said the mere fact that 
the house is open and thus 
attracted traffic whereas in its 
derelict state it had not, did 
not constitute a breach of Mr 
Pinnegar’s right of way. 


Good intentions of car tax offenders 


By David Sapsted 


, A disparate group of offend- 
ers, each oae part of a £190 
mflJum-a-year swindle, made 
their excuses, were fined and 
left Highbury Corner Magis- 
trates' Court in north London 
yesterday, apparently 
unbowed. 

in a scene repeated daily at 
courts throughout tire land, a 
string of names appeared on 
foe clerk’s fist, each of them 
feeing a charge of failing to 
have a valid vehicle tax licence 
under die Vehicle Excise Act 
1971. 

Car tax-dodging has 
reached epidemic proportions 
according to the Commons 
public accounts committee 
which estimates that 22 mfl- 
Hon drivers are costing the 
country £100 million a year in 
lost revenue. 

At Highboy Corner, 39 


cases of not having a valid tax 
disc were doe to be heard 
yesterday. In the end, and as 
usual only 15 came np~the 
remainder trad either not re- 
ceived their recoded delivery 
summons or had not been 
traced. 

Of those who did enter 
gnflty pleas (nobody attempted 
to deny the charge), most had 
a “good” reason Iot not having 
paid. 

“1 had only bought the car 
three days before and was in 
the process of taking tike car 
off the road and taking it into a 
car park,” one man whose 
vehide had not been taxed for 
four months, said- He was 
fined £50 and ordered to pay 
£3333 in backdated duty plus 
£15 costs. 

A woman told a police 
officer whose statement was 


read to the court: “1 will be 
getting one bat 1 haven't had 
the time.” Her tax disc was II 
months out of date and, al- 
though she maintained she 
had just bought the car, the 
magistrates derided £91.66 in 
tack doty, a £100 fine and 
costs of £15 would be lair. 

A motor-eyrie mechanic, 
aged 17, did however, produce 
a bill of sale to prove that he 
realty had only bought his 
machine a couple of days 
before the offence ami be 
escaped with a £5 fine. 

A Hackney council worker, 
who had paid six months’ tax 
with a bad cheque, claimed he 
had not received the recorded 
delivery demanding the return 
of the (fisc or that Ids bank had 
informed him his cheque had 
bounced. 

When the magistrates sug- 


gested he should change his 
plea to not guilty while in- 
vestigations were made at the 
Post Office and hank, things 
got a trifle confusing hot he 
eventually opted for a £40 fine 
and £15 costs. 

The Government has urged 
the Magistrates’ Association 
to get its members to impose 
stiff er fines on the dodgers. 
Existing levels are often 
“derisory” according to the 
public accounts committee. 

Guidelines of a fine roughly 
twice tiie level of the wpasi 
tax, plus the outstanding tack 
duty, are unevenly applied, 
though. At Highbury Corner 
yesterday, a woman who had 
dodged just a month’s tax was 
fined £30 and ordered to pay 
£15 costs phis £833 in tack 
duty. Another offender, who 
owed £8333, was fined £80 



Engineer’s 


A chartered mechanical en- 
gineer is to put the £8,000 be 
won as the sole Portfolio Gold 
prize winner yesterday to good 

“I wfll update my gramo- 
phone, increase my donation 
to (he church hall appeal and 
ga oa holiday next year," Mr 
Richard Wood, of Allestree, 
Derby, said. 

Mr Wood, aged 51, who has 
played Portfolio Gold since it 
started in The Times , said that 
he could not believe his hick. 

He said: “ft is fantastic It is 
a novel experience. ” 

Portfolio Gold cards can be 
obtained by sending a stam- 
ped, addressed envelope to: 
Portfolio Gold, 

The Times, 

PO Box 40, 

Blackburn, 

BB1 6AJ. 



Richard Wood 


Danger of 


By Robin Young 

Additives used in brewing 
beer can harm drinkers and, in 
extreme cases, even kill them, 
the Campaign for Real Ale 
claimed yesterday. 

An article in the campaign's 
newspaper. What's Brewing, 
by Mr Roger Protz, a former 
editor of the Good Beer Guide , 
says that people who have 
asthma and other breathing 
problems, sinus disorders, 
skin rashes, or who are allergic 
to certain cereals, can suffer ill 
effects from drinking beers in 
which additives have been 
employed to produce a foamy 
head, extra darity, or to 
lengthen shelf life-.... . 

In the United States', the 
article says, more than 40 
drinkers died of heart attacks 
when some brewers used co- 
balt sulphate in beer to 
encourage a foaming head. 


Spy couple 
to appeal 

The East German couple 
jailed for 10 years last July for 
espionage, are seeking reduc- 
tions in their sentences. 

On Monday Lord Lane, 
Lord Chief Justice, will pre- 
side over applications by' 
Reinhard and Sonja Schulze, 
both aged 36, for leave to 
appeal against the sentences 
imposed by Mr Justice Mi- 
chael Davies at the Central 
Criminal Coutl 


Man who 
shot gull 
fined £680 

A video tape recording iff a 
BBC television documentary 
on so-called “Hooray Henr- 
ies” was used yesterday to 
convict a man of illegally 
shooting a seagull doting a 
fishing trip off the Herthern- 
most tip iff the Scottish 
mainland. 

John Bocktend, aged XI, 
was one of four businessmen 
whose abortive efforts to catch 
a record-breaking halibut in 
the Peadaod Firth were filmed 
as part of foe BBC 2 40 
Minutes series. 

Not only did foe qaartet, 
said to earn £2S0fi00 each a 
year In the City, fall to land 
any fish, but they also set off 
owsidefaMe anger among 
viewers. 

Mr David Hnagstoa, proc- 
urator fiscal told foe Sheriff 
Court at Wick in Caith n ess 
yesterday that the BBC’s 
switchboard was clogged with 
callers complaining about the 


ing in February. Both he and 
foe police also . received 


The court was told that the 
12-bore shotgun was brought 
above deck after the fishing 
efforts of foe party had proved 


Mr Ewan Stewart, foe 
uto W/iiJ foe court, watched 
part @f the programme where 
Backhand was seen shooting 
foe gnfl to wild apphune from 
his companions. 

Mr Hnagstoa said that, 
after the public ornery, 
BuckfemFs firm of commodity 
brokers folded and Ms City 
friends helped police trace 


In a letter 

■■defend, of < 

London, asked the cost to 
for^Eve Ms “sfily and dnUfeh” 
behaviour. 

Buckfead was feed a total tf 

£ 688 . 


12 years 
for raping 
girl of 11 

A man who dragged a gfri 
jed 11 from her tent at a 
luides’ camp and raped her, 
was jailed for 12 years, at 
Stafford Crown Court, yes- 
terday. 

Mr Justice French told Stu- 
art Tomlinson, aged 24, an 
unemployed hotel porter, he 
had considered imposing a life 
sentence. 

Tomlinson, of Tuppenhurst 
Lane, Handsacre, Stafford- 
shire, had denied rape, but 
was convicted by a jury after a 
week-long trial which ended 
on November 19. 

The attack happened in 
June 1985, two months after 
Tomlinson, originally from 
Newcastle upon Tyne, was 
released from a 1 2-month 
sentence, imposed at Teesside 
Crown Court, for unlawful 
sexual intercourse with girls 
‘ 14. 


He dragged the girt, still 
her sleeping bag, from a te 


in 
tent 

she was sharing with four 
other Guides at Beaudesert 
Camp on Cannock Chase, 
Staffordshire. He was armed 
with a knife and dressed m 
black. 

The judge, who had delayed 
passing sentence until yes- 
terday for a psychiatric report 
to be prepared, said Tom- 
linson bad not shown the 
slightest regret or contrition, 
or any insight into the offence. 

Mr Martin Wilson QC, for 
the defence, said a psychiatrist 
had concluded that Tom- 
linson bad not yet matured, 
but said he should mature in 
time. 

After Tomlinson was con- 
victed, last week, the girPs 
father criticized the legal sys- 
tem which took 17 months to 
bring his daughter’s attacker 
to justice. 

He declined to comment on 
yesterday’s sentence; 



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HOME NEWS 


THF TTMF-S SATURDAY NOVEMBER 29 1986 


Channel tunnel clashes 
persist as Labour critic 
adds key riders to Bill 


The Commons select 
committee examining foe 
Channel Tunnel Bill finally 
completed its task with the 
publication of a report yes- 
terday, but with no sign of 
abatement in the controversy 
surrounding either the project 
or the chosen parliamentary 
process. 

Mr Nick Raynsford, a La- 
bour member who has become 
the standard-bearer of the £6.7 
billion project’s opponents, 
simultaneously produced a 
minority report criticizing the 
“inadequacies" of the 
committee procedure, and 
registering his dissent from 
four of the report s 
conclusions. 

He also served notice that 
he will continue his opposi- 
tion when the Bill passes to a 
standing committee, of which 
he will again be a member, 
next Tuesday. 

The broad findings of the 
committee were announced 
on November 5. but Mr 
Raynsford has since suc- 
ceeded in opposing one last- 
minute alteration, and in 
implementing another, 
thereby keeping alive two 
particularly contentious 
issues. 

At a private meeting the 
committee had been asked to 
approve an amendment incor- 
porating its decision to back 
the disputed northern access 
road to the huge Cheriton 
terminal which also suggested 
that the amendment should 
not be overturned “at any 
subsequent stage of the BilTs 
passage through Parliament”. 
Mr Raynsford succeeded in 


Martin Fletcher, Political Reporter 

‘■sar-sasa =?S8S£S 


JsT'SESS aE bj a K&O* -to 

V7S million cubic metres or than a public ^ .inquiry, _ and 


3 75 million cubic metres of than a public inqmryjBiia 

“SSKKB astaasas 

of Shatespeare Oiff a sen- png® lof t lha : land 


tence expressing the 
committee’s concern at the 
proposal and a recommenda- 
tion that alternative sites are 

re-examined. This wiU be 

seized upon in the BiU s later 
stages. __ 

In addition, Mr Raynsford 
has already tabled three 
amendments to the Bui tor 
consideration by the standing 
committee. 

These would require that 
the i rains running through the 
tunnel be operated by either 
British Rail or SNCF. thereby 
precluding any future 
privatization of the rail ser- 
vice; that the use of Waterloo 
as the London terminal 
should be deleted from the 
BiU thereby necessitating a 
full public inquiry before it 
could be used: and that the 
volume of spoil to be dimiped 
at Shakespeare Cliff be limited 
to 1.85 million cubic metres. 

In his minority report yes- 
terday Mr Raynsford gave 
vent to widespread criticism 
of the committee procedure, 
arguing that it had rushed its 
business, had failed on some 
issues to take sufficient ev- 
idence to form proper judge- 
ments. and had denied 


pi UJWM VI - ■ 

The committee had given 
itself ample time to bear the 
evidence, and while not all of 
the nearly 5,000 petitioners 
had been heard, all the argu- 
ments had. “Five thot^and 
petitions do not mean 5,000 
issues," he argued. 

But he did criticize the 
Government for not challeng- 
ing the right of certain pe- 
titioners to give evidence. As a 
result “we heard a great many 
cases either about matters 
outside our jurisdiction or put 
forward by people who were 
not specially or directly 
effected by the proposals in 
the Bill". 

The committee was not 
charged, however, with 
e xamining matters of public 
policy, and these will be 
looked at by the standing 
committee. 

Foremost among them is 
the question of safety, with the 
tunnel’s opponents arguing 
persistently that passengeis 
should be separated from their 
vehicles in the tunneL 

That would add millions to 
the project’s cost, and seri- 
ously erode its time advantage 
over the rival ferry services. 

Last night Mr Robin Grove- 

. 



Private 
firms may 
doable 
clampings 


. ;n t 

'■*’ it 

tA 

»* . V V. _ . ,..4, 


i * 


5 -, r 

, s&mr 


i P off their Best Station 1986 certificate 

The staff who keep Dumfries station ijai foe mnom veanF service? Mr David Anderson (30fc Mr John 


Business planes face Heathrow ban 

. . . < ■ i .a Avar 4 nmv hncinfHHimen with aircraft n 


Bv Harvey Elliott sure of scheduled and charter 

Anr Correspondent flights. My priority now is U> 
ait alternative accoramoda- 

Compaixy mrcraft ti on for what is a very 

taxis could be banned from ^ of 

using the overcrowded run- - 

ways at Gat wick an But during his tour he was 
Heathrow under new regular many companies 

tons due to come into force business air- 


menis and naa aemea unuueinwu nui»»viw,v- 
peti doners the same opportu- While, director of the Council 
nities to present their evidence for the Protection of Rurel 
. . . . u i q Pnoland denounced the 


that they would have had at a 
public inquiry. 

However, Mr Alexander 


IV? A UIV a lUkWUVu wa 

England, denounced the 
committee's investigations as 
“cavalier, superficial and bla- 


nowevci, — , • 

Fletcher. the committee chair- tantly un&ir . 

room I Premature 


Sale room 

Bidders disagree with 
Mahler valuations 

By Geraldine Norman, Sale Room Correspondent 
Two important musical Serusier, including a sketch of 


baby given 
lethal drug 


next year. 

Amid mounting concern 
among air taxi operators and 
pressure from companies 
owning business aircraft a 
government minister yes- 
terday flew into four small 
airfields around the capital in 
an attempt to find them 
alternative accommodation. 

Mr Michael Spicer, Min- 
ister for Aviation, said as he 
left Northolt airfield, west 
London to visit Famborough, 


now operating business air- 
craft could face bankruptcy 
while alternative facilities 
were developed. 

Mr Ian Sutherland, manag- 
ing director of IDS Aircraft 
Ltd., based at Heathrow, tojd 
the minister. “The crunch will 
come in April when the BAA 
will have the power to ban us 
altogether. If they do, we will 
simply go out of business.” 

At every airport Mr Spicer 
visited he found problems for 


planning dispute over a new 
access road. Furthermore, a 
maximum of 28 civil -move- 
ments a day will be allowed. 

• Fa rn borough. A new £60 
million development for a 
business park and aviation 
centre will not be ready for at 
least two years and the airfield 
is regarded as too far from 
London to attract many visit- 
ing businessmen. 

• Biggin HilL An aggressive 


businessmen with aircraft now 
based at Heathrow have a 
strong resistance to moving 
north of the capitaL 

The Air Transport Op- 
erators Association, _ which 
represents 65 companies who 
fiv business aircraft, said: 
“ATOA members must be 
protected against the powerful 
airline lobby and given right 
of access at all times to 
Heathrow andGatwick. There 


■ iJiPKin ruu. nu — . _ - 

marketing campaign to per- is no smtaMe aftenranve mr- 
suade businessmen to use the port at present, and foede- 


airfield, which is owned by aaon to 

Bromley council, is meeting Airports A^thornypowffto 


resistance from operators be- ban us ta®** 1 ** 1 ? 
cause it is in uncontrolled air senous damage to British 


LOnOOH UJ YISH r*u uwiuugu, 

anT H&i £ Sei5bJddtire : • NortholL Plans for a busi- 

ams.'syn: 

difficult for business aircraft - 


manuscripts by Mahler came 
op for sale at Sotheby’s yes- 
terday and die bidders dis- 
agreed with the auctioneers 
about which was the more 
distinguished. 

The manuscript of his early 
song-cycle, Lieder ernes 
fahreaden GeseUes, sold for 
£198,000 (estimate 

£140,000 - £160,000) to Otto 
Haag, a London dealer 
specializing in musical manu- 
scripts, while the Todtenfder 
manuscript.' the original ver- 
sion of the first movement of 
the “Resurrection" Sym- 
phony, was left unsold at 
£130,000 (estimate 

£140,000 - £180,000). 

Prices for music nuuw- 
scripts appeared buoyant A 
Mozart aria manuscript made 
£33,000 (estimate £30,000 — 


Gauguin's painting 

“Vairaomnati tei oa”, was 
offered on Thursday afternoon 
but left unsold at £20,000 
(estimate £40,000 — £50,000). 

Christie's has demonstrated 
how seriously German buyers 
take their nineteenth century 
school during the past two 
days. Carl Spitzweg is the 
most beloved Munich genre 
painter of the Biedermeier 
period. A characteristic little 
dimmer, “Der Philosopb", 

depicting an old man seated on 
the base of a statue reading a 
book throngb a glass, secured 
£121,000 (estimate £80,000 - 
£100,000) yesterday. 

On Thursday a preparatory 
drawing by Friedrich 
Overbeck for one of his fres- 
coes in the Casino Massimo 
sold for £68,200 where 


£40.000). The manuscript of Christie s had only estimated 
“Schelomo” Ernest Bloch's £H» to £1,200. 


"acneiuniu , much * ZZ ” — " , ,, 

most famous work, made The ofoer onWandmgi jrc- 

£4930 (estimate £50,000- tore ra yesterday s safe™* * 
- portrait of Nijinsky m Us 


^The two-day sale of books Oriaaala by Jacqu^ Emile 
and manuscripts made Blanche 


ana manusmiiia . rz — . •utAAnn 

£1,044,769 with 24 per cent £110,000 (estimate £10030 
unsold. An 1882 six-page let- pins) to Danny Katz, a LoimIou 


uujuiu, ru r — a - - 

ter from Gauguin to Paul sculpture dealer. 

Nov ember 28 1986 

Kinnock accused 
over MI5 case 


The parents of a premature 
baby who died, aged three 
weeks, after being injected 
with the wrong drug, are to 
start High Court proceedings 
against a health authority and 
a doctor, for negligence. 

The baby, called Leon, died 
when he was given a lethal 
dose of potassium chloride 
while in the intensive care unit 
at King’s College Hospital 
south London, on September i 
9. He should have been given 
sodium chloride. 

The feth er. Mr Maurice 
Phinn. aged 28, an electronics 
assembler, and the mother. 
Miss Angela Bertie, aged 31, a 
bank clerk, who live at South- 
wark, south London, are to 
sue the Camberwell Health 
Authority and Dr Tariq 
Massoud. 

Dr Massoud told an inquest 
at Southwark yesterday: “I did 
not read the phiaL I was in a 
hurry and I was tired.” 

After a verdict of misadven- 
ture was recorded, the couple’s 
solicitor, Mrs Linda 
Muirhead, said she under- 
stood the authority would not 
contest liability for the boy’s 
death, but had not admitted 
negligence. 


rr ' into He^rSd bedevilled by security^ resiric- 
Gat^ck bSaiSe orfoe pres- tions on foreign aircraft and a 


space and road connections 
with London are said by many 
to be “unacceptable”. 

• Hatfield has the best facil- 
ities and the greatest potential 
for expansion. But it is owned 
by British Aerospace, who use 
it for testing new aircraft, and 


industry" 

Mr Spicer said after his tour 
that he was impressed at foe 
amount of work going on to 
improve facilities. He prac- 
tically ruled out a proposal 
from some . operators for a 
dedicated business airport 


By Peter Evans 
Home Affairs 
Correspondent 

The number of wheel 
damping of illegal parkers in 
the original London zone is 
e x pected to double when it 
wm be done from Monday by 
two private contractors. 

Parking Protection and 
Highway Maintenance Ser- 
vices will divide foe zone 
which includes parts of West- 
minster, Kensington and 
Chelsea. 

Parking Protection is a sec- 
urity firm and Highway 
Maintenance Services a traffic 
management company, 
arranging contraflows on 
motorways, painting yeflow 
fines and doing other work. 

One police officer will wort 
with each of 14 wheel damp- 
ing teams, making a total of 20 
police to cover from 7am to 
12.30am 

The Metropolitan police ex- 
pect that the number of wheel 
damping within the zone 
cook! rise from a previous 
maximum of 300 a day to 
between 600 and 700. Until 
now there have been only 
seven teams. 

The Metropolitan police 
said: “It could mean an an- 
nual increase of vehicles being 
wheel damped from 40,000 to 
about 100,000-" 

As before, a police officer 
will identify an offending ve- 
hicle with a parking ticket: fee 
£12, or if not paid or disputed 
within 28 days, £18. 

The officer will then tell the 
contractors to put on the 
clamp and the statutory notice 
will be placed on foe vehicle. 

The scheme wifi be ex- 
panded next year to include 
more firms doing contracts 
and a communications centre. 

Commander Neil Dickens 
of territorial operations, crime 
and traffic branch at Scotland 
Yard, said yesterday: “It has 
been estimated that there are 
some 350,000 illegal parking 
acts in London on every 
working day". 


Hardline judge steps down 

- - . a _ 1 „ f JfmJoi 


By Frances Gibb 
Legal Affairs Correspondent 

Lord Justice “Fred" Law- 
ton, one of foe last of the 
tough, “no-nonsense" judges 
feared by the most hardened 
criminals, heard his last crim- 
inal appeal cases at the High 

Court yesterday . 

The grammar school boy 
who rose to be a senior Court 
of Appeal judge steps down 
next month, aged 75. He has 
firmly made his mark since 
being appointed one of the 


youngest High Coot judges at 
the age of 49. 


the age of 49- 

Yesterday barristers and 
court officials crowded his 
court room to pay tribute. Mr 
Justice Michael-Davies said 
they all recognized he was an 
“exceptionally good judge” 
and “irreplaceable". 

The son of a prison governor 
he has often attracted the label 
of foe “han g in g judge". Send- 
ing down Ctaries Richardson 
for 25 years in 1967 he said foe 

south London gang leader was 



Lord Justice Lawton: feared 
by criminals 

“vicious, sadistic and a dis- 
grace to society". 

He has also been well- 
known for robust views on 
sentencing; in 1971 he called 
for a national labour corps in 
which offenders could under- 
take such jobs as clearing 
industrial debris and in 1978 
he recommended “short, sharp 


shocks" for young offenders, 
possibly in disused Army 

camps so that they would learn 
that “bad behaviour results in 
unpleasant consequences". 

Nor has he much time for 
foe theorizing of social work- 
ers and penal reformers or 
what he called “cosy chats 
with probation officers”. 

Bat the judge also has an 
unexpected reformist streak. 
He favoras non-cnstodial pen- 
alties where there is room for 
them and has often shown 
leniency confronted with foe 
lesser offender. 

Under his chairmanship As 
Criminal Law Revision Co- 
mmittee recommended radical 
reforms to the law on sexual 


Teenager who cannot 
cry awarded £185,000 


A teenager who cannot cry 
after being knocked down by _a 
car won £184,990 da mapa in 
the High Court yesterday. 

The court was told foal Roy 


Milton Keynes, Bedfordshire. 

Mr Justice Potts said that 
the car driver, Mr Frank 
Collar, of Great Yarmouth, 
Norfolk, who has store died. 


ine conn urn* - — - —tv,. 

Rain« , aged 16, was severely and had denial liability, 
handicapped and had become should have sounded toshora. 
. i Mjtun ■ UnnH>i»>r an award of 


a television addict to relieve 
his boredom. - 


ois nuicuum- — - 

He was struck by foe car in foe boy was partly to Name as 
julv 1980 near his home to he did not look before nmmng 


July I70U w r BIS Hums ui ucuiuuw . ~ 

Meriland Court, Lakes estate, a cross the road, foe judge said. 

Justice Bill in motion 


offences^s a QC he chaired a 
committee of the law reform 
group. Justice, which in 1960, 
criticized police question^. 

Lord Justice Lawton went to 
Battersea Grammar School 
and then Cambridge Univer- 
sity. 

Law Report, page 38 


The Criminal Justice BQ1, 
the centre-piece of the 
Government’s legislative pro- 
gramme for the present par- 
liamentary session, got over 
its first hurdle in the Com- 
mons on Thursday night, 
when it was given a second 
reading after an Opposition 
amendment was rejected by 
219 votes to 160. 

The most controversial part 
of the Bill is the abolition of 


PARLIAMENT 

More protection for depositors 


Conservative MFs called for a consequence of the early day 
statement from Mr Neil Kill- motion put on the order paper 


nock over what was called his yesterday for entirely mango 
^ Vw-havinur* 1 in and mischievous reasons which 


“unpatriotic behaviour" in and mischievous reasons which 
connection with the case in the are not connected with matters 


Supreme Court _ in 
involving the British 


Iney of national security and every- 
iver- thing to do with efforts by 


The Banking Bill, which will 
give greater protection to depos- 
itors, was read a second time to 
the Commons. One of its main 
chang es is the establishment of a 
new Board of Banking Super- 
vision to advise the Bank of 
England. 

Mr Ian Stewart, Economic Seo- 


nmeni and Mr Peter Wright, the Conservative hack-benchere to 


retary to the Treasury, moving 
the second reading, said that if 
the British banking system was 
to continue to serve customers 
satis&ctorily at borne and com- 
mand confidence abroad, there 
bad to be a framework of 
supervision within which it 
operated realistically, and which 
was comprehensive and up to 
date. 

It was primarily devoted to 
supervision in the interests of 


farmer MI 5 officer. 


try to cover the very exposed tail 


Their action stemmed from a of the Government. 


motion on the order paper 
tabled last night by Mr Richard 


The news available from the 
BBC this morning about 


Hickmet (Gtanford and Scun- evidence given by Sir Robert 
Thorpe, C) and signed by 52 Armstrong ensures that detailed 


other Conservatives, calling on attention will be given to this 
the Leader of the Opposition to and therefore matters 


explain why bis office was in relating to national security. 


regular contact with Mr circumstances' it is 


Wright’s. lawy«. giving them , 

information .and receiving ad- ^ - m or der 


information 


important that 1 make . a 
statement in order to give 
members an opportunity to 


depositors covering 290 recog- 
nized banks and more than 300 
licensed deposit-takers in the 
United Kingdom, he said. 

At a time of rapid and 
fundamental change it was im- 
portant to have appropriate 
legislation for the regulation of 
financial institutions. One pur- 
pose of the Bill was to ensure 
that the supervisory regime for 
banks was compatible with the 
systems established for invest- 
ment and securities business 
and for building societies by the 
Financial Services Act. 


them. It further called upon him '££££ VW 
to explain why he vrasusingthe moliorL 


House in an attempt to destroy 
the Government’s case and 
undermine Britain's security 
interests. 

Mr Peter LOley (St Albans, C), 
who had not signed the motion. 


I would be more than happy, 
if you were to find it more 
acceptable, to provide either in 
written form, or before the 
House, a full statement of 


said, on a point of order, that exactly what has manspired, the 
earlier this week the Speaker reasons for whal has trrmsj^red 


(Mr Bernard WeatheriU) had and the extent to which I have 
several times pointed to the used quotations^ .which I drew to 


misuse of early day motions to the attention of the House on 
vilify people with no right of Monday last, of the transcript of 


reply. the case in Ausiralia. 

“This early day motion makes ^ Deputy Speaker: If he is 
serious and important alleg- presetting a personal statement 
aliens about the Leader of the ^ send it to the Speaker. 

mates a statement to the House tSf ,0 _ n 
ittponding to the allegations?” 

The Deputy Speaker (Mr Ernest Si* sSSSS l 

Armstrong) said that the making 



years the banks had greatly- 
extended personal credit and 
mortgage lending. Since 1979 
there had been an enormous 
explosion of personal credit By 
the end of the second quarter of 
this year consumer credit spend- 
ing was almost £28 billion. 


Mortgage lending had grown 


apace and the proportion of 
repossessions of homes was 


repossessions of homes was 
increasing rapidly. 


McDonald: City scandals 
since foe Big Bang 


alogue between supervisor and 

auditors would be removed. 


The Bill drew on the lessons 
learnt from the collapse of 
Johnson Matthey Bankets to 
1984. That case showed vividly 
the need both to strengthen the 

powers of the supervisors and to 

impose more exacting duties on 
supervised institutions. 


of statements was not a matter 
for him. 

Mr Jerry Wiggtn (Weston- 
super-Mare. O said that alleg- 
ations of this sort against a privy 
councillor setting out to con- 
siderable detail what appeared 
to be unprecedented and. on the 
face of it. unpatriotic behaviour, 
surely called for a personal 
statement from Mr Kinnock 
who was present in the chamber. 
The Deputy Speaker said that 
the matter might be of intense 
importance, but be had dearly 
said that the making of 
statements was not a matter for 
the Chair. 

Mr Kinnock: I have with me a 
statement, which 1 deliberately 
• brought into the House as a 


member of the Australian 
establishment, is in Aus- 
tralia . . . 

The Deputy Speaker said that 
the matter should be raised at 
another time. 

Mr Kinnock: The House is to 
danger of being misled as a 
consequence of the specious 
and. to say the least, un- 
gentlemanly conduct of Mr 
Marlow. 


A new Board of Banking 
Supervision would be estab- 
lished to advise the Bank of 
England on supervisory matters 
in the exercise of the Bank's 
powers. It would consider both 
individual cases and general 
matters of supervisory policy. 
The majority of members of the 
board would be independent of 
the Bank. 


The person he ref erre d to, 
erroneously using the wrong 
name, is no lick-spittle. Miss 
Patricia Hewitt does work for 
me and is not in Australia. At 
this moment, I presume, she is 
at home tending her baby of a 
few months. 


The distinction between re- 
cognized banks and licensed 
deposit-takers would be ended. 
The provision of information to 
the supervisor would be subject 
to statutory reserve powers and 
there would be specific require- 
ments in relation to the noufica- 
j tion oflarge exposures. 

The legal constraints on di- 


“Tbe Bill also provides a new 
power enabling the Bank of 
England to block a proposed 
merger or takeover on pruden- 
tial grounds. Anyone proposing 
to acquire, or substantially in- 
crease, a controlling interest to a 

deposit-taking business will 

have to give adequate notice to 
the Bank of England, which will 
have power to object to the 
transaction if the intended 
controller does not meet its 
prudential standards.” 

The Bank of England at 
present had virtually no powers 
to investigate cases of suspected 
illegal deposit-taking. Accord- 
ingly, the Bin greatly strength- 
ened the powers of the super- 
visor to that area: It also 
contained new provisions to 
help depositors recover fends 
held by illegal deposit-takers- 
There were provisions allowing 
auditors and reporting account- 
ants to communicate infor- 
mation about client companies 
to the Bank of England without 
breaching obligations of con- 
fidentiality or loyalty. 

Dr Oonagh McDonald, an 
Opposition spokesman on Trea- 
sury afiaixs, said that in recent 


Since the Big Bang the City 
had already faced xnqjor scan- 
dals on insider trading. It might 
well be that, if some banks, 
particularly the “bucket shop” 
banks, were buying shares, that 
insider trading was going on and 
the Opposition hoped the Bank 
of England would be alert to 
stop it. Who would carry the can 
for the insider dealing — the 
individual or the bank itself? 

To suggest that all the prob- 
lems bad been solved by the 
Financial Services Act was to 
takp an optimistic view. 

The Opposition would be 
looking tor better depositor 
protection in the Bill. 

On foreign takeovers of 
banks, the BiU should spell out 
much more clearly that foreign 
takeovers should not be allowed 
where there were no reciprocal 
arrangements. There should 
also be considerations of na- 
tional interest, particularly with 
the major clearing banks, which, 
played an important part to the 
management of the British 
economy. 

She was concerned about 
auditors informing the Bank of 
F.n gtenri supervisors about the 
conduct of business by the bank 
for which they acted. Auditors’ 
prime duty was to the share- 
holders, and auditors, too, often 
came from large accountancy 
firms which were, perhaps, act- 
ing as management consultants 
to the same bank. 

Mr Anthony Nelson (Chiches- 
ter. C) said that this Bill was 
mudi needed, it was about 
seeldng better protection for 
depositors. 

There was a danger that the 
new Board of Banking Super- 
vision could become a cosy club 
because the Governor of the 
Bank of England was able to 
appoint its members and both 
• he and his deputy would be ex- 
offido members. 


Mr David Penhafigoa (Truro, 
L) said that he took a cynical 
view of the provisions prevent- 
ing bank take-overs. The fear 
was that following the Big Bang 
the Japanese would come u and 
obey every rule, until they got 
too big for anyone to do 
anything about ft. Then they 
would revert to the dubious 
practices they bad employed 
elsewhere. 

Mr John Browne (Winchester, 
Q said that people pur theft- 
trust to banks and the Gov- 
ernment had a dmy to see that 
money was protected by pre- 
venting hanks from taking im- 
prudent risks as they had shown 
themselves willing to do, for 
example, in the international 
debt loan problem. 

Mr Kenneth Weeteh (Ipswich. 
Lab) said that his contacts in the 
City believed that the Bill was 
not drawn stringently enough. It 
was reacting to events ra th er 
than trying to shape the future. 

■ Sir Eldon Griffiths (Bury St 
Edmunds. C) said that a major 
flaw to the Bill was that ft would 


. Assets «ceed£1,l00 mHlon. Over 300 branches and agendas 
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smaller banks which did not 
. have £5 million paid up capital 
and, therefore would not be 
allowed to call themselves 
banks. _ __ 

Mr wm jam Cash (Stafford, C) 
welcomed the Bill and stressed j 
the importance of the role of the 1 
independent members of the 1 
new Board of Banking Super- 
vision. 

Bvsiaess News page 25 


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Car tax offices 


An additional 200 sub-post- 
offices are to be added to the 
motor relicensing network to 
the next 18 months and, in 
parallel with that, enforcement 
of vehicle excise duty had been 
substantially strengthened, Mr 
Michael Spicer, Under 
Secretary of Slate for Transport, 
said to a Commons written 
answer. 

The deployment of an add- 
itional 75 posts and foe 
introduction of new technology 
into local offices should provide 
for. further improvement, he 
added 


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However, an award of 
£369,980 was halved because 


* C - 










*-sal 


foe . peremptory challenge of 
jurors,, an issue which might 
find little favour with lawyers. 

It also provides for foe 
confiscation of foe proceeds of 
big crimes, and. it allows for 
children who are victims o£ or 
witnesses to, assaults, 
particulaiy sexual assaults, to 
give evidence on television. 

The Opposition maintains 
that foe Bfll would do nothing 
about the record crime wave. 


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WORLD SUMMARY 


Syria in tit-for-tat 
envoy expulsions 

Damawasffe^) - Syria yesfcrfay ordered three West 
German dgwimfs in leave within aw»ic in w ^ t * **» 
Boon’s expulsion of five Syrian rft piwat. Syria’s offi 
news agency, Sana, said tbat Damascus had also decided to 
recall ftsA mh a ssad w from Bonn. Mr Shtafarf Saifft anrfi^- 
dnce the size of its wrflit wy whrii^ dime. 

West Germany said on Thursday that its Ambassador to 
Syria, Herr WOfibald Dftger, who ended bis assignment 
this month, woold not he replaced mttfl farther notice. The 
Bom moves fallowed testimony in the West Berlin trial of 

tWO Jor daHmilS OB bombing charge* Ufa* tfn»pTf|il ^y iTOqfl» p y 

nsed were provided in East Berlin by a member of Syrian 

Air Force intelligence. 


Basque voters offered ‘carrot’ to pick Socialist 


Fishing 

solution? 

Bnenos Aires — Argen- 
tina is studying the possib- 
ility of applying aspects of 
the Antarctic Treaty to 
resolve the fishing con- 
servation dispate with 
Britain in Sooth Atlantic 
waters, according to dm 
Foreign Minister, Sefior 
Dante Capnto, (Eduardo 
CoS writes). 

A convention established 
under the Treaty monitors 
all marine resources in 
Antarctic waters while 
patting aside all conflicting 
claims to sovereigiity in the 
Antarctic. According to re- 
ports here, the United 
States first suggested the 
idea of using the convention 
as a model to resolve the 
controversy. 


Warmer 
relations 

Harare — Mr James 
Rawlings, aged 57, the new 
US Ambassador, says that 
he senses a desire in Zim- 
babwe to open “a new 
chapter'" in hitherto chilly 
relations between the two 
countries. 

Anti-US attacks reached 
their nadir in July when 
Mr Jimmy Carter, the 
fanner President, stormed 
out of a reception at which 
US foreign poiicy was criti- 
cized; $22 mfiftou was then 
slashed from Zimbabwe's 
aid programmes. 

The former Union Car- 
bide executive yesterday 
said be bettered Zimbabwe 
was wining to “share oar 
desire for a new chapter in 
our bilateral relationship.' 


Nato chief may stay 

Brussels — General Bernard Rogers may continue as 
Supreme Allied Commander Europe for a further two-year 
term until June 1989 (Frederick Bonnart writes). “I have 
been asked to stay on by Nato," he said at The Hagne this 
week, “and I win, provided Reagan reappoints me and afi 
the nations want me to stay." 

General Rogers has held the position since July 1979. A 
strong personality, be has on occasions clashed with the 
nations’ permanent represent ati v e s and recently disagreed 
with the US position over the Reykjavik arms control 
proposals. 

Ndebele 
choice 

Johannesburg — The el- 
ection of Mr George Mah- 
fengu, right, aged 35, as the 
new Chief Minister a 
KwaNdebele, the impover- 
ished tr3ud homeland, h« 
raised fears of renewed vio- 
lence in the territory (Mi- 
chael Hornsby writes^ 

The only other candidate 
was a dfeftiirt relative. 

Prince Janies Mahlangn, 
who this year fed a cam- 
paign against Pretoria's 
“independence* plans. 

UK opinion silenced 

Moscow — Shr Bryan Cartiedge, the British Ambassador 
m Moscow, last right accused IzresHa of refining to print a 
tetter from him detailing the Maks - never disclosed in the 
Soviet Union — between Near Hmdawi, the jailed terrorist 
and the Syrian Government (( 



The letter was part of a campaign fndnding private 
meetings with senior Foreign Ministry officials to try to ex- 
plain the recent break in Angle-Syrian diplomatic relations, 
which has been criticized bitterly by the Kremlin. 

The letter pointed out that HmdawTs visa applications 
were twice haded fay notes from the Syrian Foreign 
Ministry and that he spent the night after the attempted 
btmibmg ofthe El A1 jet In Syrian Fan hassyafrommod atfam. 


Treasurer 
under fire 

Canberra (Renter) — 
Australia's conservative 
opposition has demanded 
the resignation of the 
Treasurer, Mr Paul Kea- 
j, after he admitted 
haring failed to file tax 
returns since 1984. 

Mr Keating, who de- 
scribed his faOnre to lodge 
tire returns as regrettable, 
was now a laughing stock 
who had lost all credibility, 
the Liberal Opposition 
leader, Mr John Howard, 
said. “The Prime Minister 
ought to sack him.** 


Muscles 
in bikinis 

Shenzhen (Renter) — 
Cheers and whistles yes- 
terday greeted China's first 
female body-bunding con- 
test as scantity-cbd girls 
flexed their anodes to the 
disco music of Michael 
Jackson and Tina Tomer. 

Thousands crowded a 
gymnasium in this border 
town near Hong Kong as 
contestants worked out in 
what was also China's first 
ofBcfally-sanctioaed bflrini 
parade. Some people were 
offering four times the 
entry fee to see the show. 


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From Richard Wigg 
Bilbao 

Malting one of bis rare visits 
to Spain's Basque country for 
tomorrow’s regional general 
Election, Senor Felipe Gon- 
zalez, the Prime Minister, held 
out the *“031101" of more 
economic progress if the 
Basques vote for a Socialist as 
their next Chief Minister. 

“We will advance much 
more if the Socialists form the 
nucleus of a new government 
in Vitoria," he told Socialist 
supporters at his party’s final 
meeting here, largely drawn 
from the worfcm^class dis- 
tricts of the Basque country’s 
industrial capital. 


He was answered before 
campaigning ended last night 
by Senor Jos£ Ardanza, the 
outgoing Chief Minister from 
the Basque Nationalist Party 
(PNV), who asserted that 
many promises made in the 
past by Se&or Gonz&lez to 
assist the troubled Basque 
region had not been kept after 
election time. 

A deep spin in the PNV and 
the formation of a breakaway 
party, Basque Solidarity, 
which is now running 
him, obliged Senor Ardanza to 
call elections 18 months be- 
fore they were due. He runs 
the risk tbat the Socialists 
could, for the first time. 


provide the Chief Minister in 
the self-governing region. 

Neither the Socialist chal- 
lengers nor the PNV is ex- 
pected to get an outright 
majority in the 75-seat Basque 
Parliament. 

Sefior Ardanza is threaten- 
ing to go into the Opposition if 
the PNV is not in first pJar» 
tomorrow (something widely 
doubled in the Basque coun- 
try!, opening the prospect of 
much post-electoral bargain- 
ing over a share of the spoils of 
office with the Socialists. 

Senor Jose Benegas, aged 
38, the Socialist candidate as 
Chief Minister, understand- 
ably wants to negotiate after 


Sunday from a position of 
strength. The Socialists have 
therefore gpne all-out for the 
so-called non-uationalist 
“Spanish vote" — the middle- 
class vote previously shared 
by the centre and right. 

Symbolically, the Spanish 
flag figured alongside the 
Basque Ikurrina at ail their 
meetings. 

By giving top priority to the 
economic issue and the fight 
against Eta terrorism, con- 
trasted with the region’s lack 
of progress under the PNV 
over. the past six years, the 
Socialists hope to capture this 
vote. too. 

The fundamental differ- 


ences over home rule were 
underlined by Senor Benegas, 
who stresses it is only an 
instrument for resolving citi- 
zens* problems. All the 
nationalist parties have told 
him that home rule is some- 
tiling precious in itself. 

All the parties have spoken 
of the acute necessity after the 
elections of a solemn pact “to 
make the Basque country 
governable". But in reality 
this campaign has divided 
nationalists and those from 
parties in the rest of Spain as 
never before. 

To complicate the post- 
electoral arithmetic. Popular 
Unity, which never took its 


seals in the old parliament, 
has threatened to participate 
in order to vote against some 
candidates for Chief Minister, 
and then withdraw again. This 
threat, if carried out, could 
make the Basque parliament 
unworkable. All the other 
parties have condemned the 
idea. 

Unless it now strikes in the 
final hours before tomorrow. 
Eta has kept out of these 
elections with no killing s or 
kidnappings. 

The view in the Basque 
country is that Eta does not 
want to help the Socialists 
with a vote based on fear. 


1987 named as ‘Aids Year 9 


France steps up fight 
to control disease 


France is to set up an Aids 
Foundation, with responsibil- 
ity for both research into the 
disease and care of victims, as 
part of a new campaign 
against Aids. The Govern- 
ment has also decided to make 
19S7 “Aids Year". 

France has twice as many 
Aids cases as Britain. More 
than 1,000 people have con- 
tracted Aids in France over 
the past five years, and the 
disease is now spreading at a 
rate of 15 new cases a week — 
nearly three times the number 
just one year ago. Between 
100,000 and 200,000 people 
are believed to be carriers of 
the Aids virus. Every day a 
baby is born who is contami- 
nated by the virus. 

An estimated 10,000 wo- 
men of child-bearing age are 
infected, and the French Soci- 
ety of Perinatal Medicine says 
that Aids is set to become the 
most common infectious dis- 
ease among new-born children 
next year. 

Two-thirds of Aids sufferers 
in France are aged between 20 
and 40. Most (85 per cent) are 
men, but the proportion of 
women is growing rapidly. 
Homosexuals and male- bi- 
sexuals account for 68 percent 
of Aids cases, drug addicts 8 
per cent, and people who have 


From Diana Geddes, Paris 

received contaminated blood 
transfusions 4 per cent, but 
more and more cases are being 
found in the so-called “no- 
risk" categories. 

At present, the disease is 
spreading most rapidly among 
drug addicts, who account for 
nearly half the new cases 

The US State Department is 
p burning to screen its foreign 
service applicants, employees 
and their dependants far signs 
of the Aids vims, The Wash- 
ington Post reported yesterday 
(Mohsin Ali writes from 
Washington). The Defence 
Department has been testing 
recruits and active-duty per- 
sonnel for some 12 months. 

registered within the last three 
months- The Government ad- 
mits that a drug addict now 
has a 50-50 chance of catching 
Aids from using dirty needles, 
but it has rejected requests for 
syringes to be sold over the 
counter. 

Although France is in the. 
forefront of research into 
Aids, it appears to be way 
behind Britain or the United 
Stales in other respects. 

The only concrete measures 
adopted so fir have been the 
introduction in August I98S 
of compulsory screening for 


all Wood donors and the 
recent lifting of the advertising 
ban on condoms. 

Mine Michele Barzarii, the 
Health Minister, announced 
this week that the Govern- 
ment is to spend 13 million 
francs (£1.4 million) next year 
on prevention and a further 37 
million francs on reimbursing 
those who undergo Aids tests. 
But the funds fill far short of 
what the medical profession 
says it urgently needs. 

Mikhail Baryshnikov, the 
Russian ballet dancer, is to 
dance in a new solo ballet 
especially created for him by 
Maurice Bejart at a charity 
performance at the Moulin 
Rouge in Paris on Monday in 
aid of Aids. The show has 
been organized by the Associ- 
ation of .Artists and Entertain- 
ers Against Aids, which raised 
over £i million at its last 
charity performance a year 
ago. 

• GENEVA: “There is a 
message of hope that if action 
is taken what is now foreseen 
can be prevented", Mr Nor- 
man Fowler, Secretary of State 
for Health and Social Security, 
said yesterday in s umming up 
on fus almost four hours of 
discussions on Aids at the 
World Health Organization 
(Alan MacGregor writes). 



A student using Louis Pasteur's statue in the Sortaonneasa 
pulpit to present his case against the university B3L 


Reagan criticized 
over Salt 2 breach 



From Mnshin All, Washington 
Mr Les Aspin, the Demo- The Defence 
crat chairman of the House 


armed services committee, 
said yesterday tbat President 
Reagan's derision to violate 
Salt 2 limits is a “very bad 
decision" that would work to 
the Soviet Union's advantaj^. 

He claimed that the Admin- 
istration made the premature 
announcement about It on 
Thanksgiving holiday eve to 
try to heal political wounds 
still sore from the Iran arms 
scandal. 

The US was yesterday due 
to breach its Salt 2 stratetic 
arms treaty by deploying its 
131st bomber carrying cruise 
missiles. 


Department 
said on Wednesday that the 
B 52 heavy bomber, armed 
with cruise missiles, would be 
flying yesterday to a Texan air 
base to become operational. 

The B 52’s armaments wifl 
bring the US total above the 
1,320 limit set by Salt 2 for 
land and sea-launched mul- 
tiple warhead ballistic missiles 
and cruisooanying bombers. 

The move had been ex- 
pected since May of this year, 
when President Reagan, who 
1979 
and has 


has called the 
Salt 2 pact flawed 
accused the Soviet Union of 
violations, announced his 


White House 

intention to end voluntary 
compliance. 

Mr Aspin said the ability of 
the Soviet Union to take 
advantage of a world in which 
those Salt limits no longer 
exist fir exceeds that of the 
United States in the short run. 

He said Moscow could add 
warheads to large missiles 
fester than American produc- 
tion lines could. “In the short 
run, it's all to their advantage 
to do away with these Salt 
supplements.” 

Mr Aspin said President 
Reagan’s arms control policies 
were “in very deep trouble" in 
the new Democrat-controlled 
Congress. 


Iran still offering 
hostages for arms 

By Robert Fisk, Middle East Correspondent 
The Speaker of the Iranian sperm - for arms purchases". 


US nuclear move angers Gorbachov 


From Michael Handyn 
Delhi 

Mr Mikhail Gorbachov, toe 
Soviet leader, yesterday re- 
acted angrily to reports that 
the Americans have breached 
the agreed limits for nuclear 
weapons in the Salt 2 talks. 

“We regard this as a major 
mistake," he said. 

Mr Gorbachov was ques- 
tioned about news that the 
United Stales has broken the 
limit, by arming additional 
B 52 bombers, during a joint 
press conference with Mr 
Rajiv Gandhi, the Indian 
Prime Minister, at the end of 
his four-day visit to Delhi 


Mr Gorbachov said he had 
had no official confirmation 
from the White House, but 
had read press, reports. 

“If that were so,” Mr 
Gorbachov said, “we believe 
that step is contradictory to 
the entire logic of the Reyk- 
javik meeting and to state- 
ments by the. US side alter 
Reykjavik that the US re- 
mains committed to the 
search for disarmament.” 

The Soviet leader said the 
Americans were demonstrat- 
ing their contempt for the 
other arms limitation treaties, 
as well as the Salt series. He 
said it would make the search 


for an approach to disarma- 
ment more difficult. 

But then his mood light- 
ened; after all, be was at the 
end of a successful visit to his 
closest non-communist 
friend. Remembering the 
unswerving support that Mr 
Gandhi had just given him in 
the Russian view of the dis- 
armament process, be suggest- 
ed: “This is an incentive to 
those who understand the 
need for nuclear disarma- 
ment. Today everyone should 
act together. Evei^one should 
declare his position to the 
Government of the United 
States.” 


Parliament yesterday reiter- 
ated his willingness to help in 
tite release of foreign hostages 
in Lebanon in return for die 
delivery of American weapons 
bought by Iran at the time of 
the Shah. 

His statement was im- 
portant, since it suggested a 
desire on the part ofthe Iran- 
ians to continue negotiations 
for the freedom of US hos- 
tages despite the apparent 
breakdown of contacts bet- 
ween Washington and Iran. 

In bis sermon at Friday 
prayers in Tehran, Hojatol- 
eslam Ali AJcbar Hasbemi 
Rafsanjani insisted tbat the 
Ameri-can Government was 
misleading its people by con- 
centrating their attention on 
the payments made for arms 
rather than on the hostages 
who might be released in 
return for the weapons. 

“If America slops being a 
bully and returns our materiel 
held there we will ask the 
Lebanese people to help you 
on the question of the 
hostages," Mr Rafsanjani 
said. “Therefore, do not try to 
change the issue and pretend 
that it has to do with arms 
purchases.” 

He denied that Israel had 
trans-shipped some of the 
American military supplies, 
claiming that Iran had “never 
negotiated with Israel — which 
we consider an illegitimate 


If Iran found the weapons had 
come through Israel, “we will 
not even use them in the war 
fronts”. 

Mr Rafsanjani attacked 
what he called America's 
“financial corruption” — an 
apparent reference to the 
channelling of funds to the 
Contra rebels in Central 
America — which had “forced 
all the political figures and 
Attorney-General of America 
to engage in contradiction and 
lies.” 

The Russians were not 
spared by Mr Rafsanjani, who 
is aware that Soviet equip- 
ment has been given to the 
Iraqis. 

“Unfortunately, the Soviet 
Union has also misused this 
issue and has announced that 
America's interference in the 
war will cause the war to last 
longer," he said- “But we say. 
Do you who give missiles, 
aircraft, weapons and ammu- 
nition to Iraq — wish to see 
the war end? If you claim that 
you wish to see the end of the 
war, you should not give 
anything to Iraq." 


Students 
call Paris 
rally to 
beat Bill 

From Our Own 
. Correspondent 
Paris 

Students and secondary- 
school pupils throughout the 
country continued strikes and 
sporadic demonstrations yes- 
terday as deputies began 
debating the French Govern- 
ment's hotly contested Uni- 
versity Reform Bill. More 
than 1 ,000 amendments to the 
Bill have been tabled by the 
Socialists and rninmnniat 
The ad hoc students’ na- 
tional co-ordinating commit- 
tee yesterday tailed for 
another mass march in Paris 
on December 4 to protest 
against the Bill, following the 
success of Thursday’s demon- 
strations which attracted more 
than 500,000 students. 

The committee also called 
for the occupation of univer- 
sity buildings from Monday, 
and for the continuation of 
student strikes that have al- 
ready affected more than two- 
thirds of universities and 
many secondary schools. 

University teachers are to 
be asked to strike in support 
Meanwhile, many students 
have been carrying out their 
owrn forms of protest In 
Nunes, for example, 2,000 
students stopped trains from 
tunning for neatly an hour by 
occupying the station; while in 
Carcassonne, traffic in the city 
centre was brought to a stand- 
still by a student sit-in. 

The students* main griev- 
ance is over the Government’s 
alleged plans to introduce 
selection for university en- 
trance. At present, a univer- 
sity place is open to anyone 
who passes the baccalaureat , 
which about 25 per cent of 
school-leavers do. 

The Government claims it 
is not planning to introduce 
selection for university places. 
But suspicions have been 
aroused by the omission from 
the Bill of the key word “all” 
from the existing' law stating 
that university entrance will 
be open to “all students with 
the baccalaureat". 

Universities are also to be 
allowed for the first time to 
refuse entry to those who are 
under-qualified for the course 
to which they apply, and to 
those applying for courses 
already over-subscribed. 

At present, selection is only 
supposed to be practised by 
the most elite establishments, 
such as the Polytec hnique and 
the Ecole Nationale d ‘Admin- 
istration. Other universities, 
however, have long been 
practising their own clandes- 
tine selection system. 

The students also dislike 
proposals to give back major- 
ity power to university profes- 
sors and lecturers and to 
reduce student representation 
on university governing 
bodies. 


How much did the President know? 


condoned the breaking of petty 
laws for personal or political 
gain, nor to have authorized a 
subsequent cover-up — indeed, 
quite the opposite. His Admin- 
istration is all too anxious to 
avoid any whiff of Watergate. 

But the question of presid- 
ential knowledge is a persis- 
tent one and is potentially very 
damaging. In the unlikely case 
that Mr Reagan knew of the 


As one Democratic wag put 
it “There are probably more 
shoes left to drop in this esse 
than Imelda Marcos had in 
her closet.” Far virtually no 
one believes that with the 
dismissal of Iieutenant-Cblo- 
nel Other North, the Iran 
scandal has come to an end. 

Indeed, to a Bowing number 
of people the similarities with 
Watergate are becoming all 
too pointed: the leak, the n — 

Washington View 

knowledge by the Presidents By Michael Binyon 
top men, the public suspteten 
that otters must have been 
involved, the setting up of a 
formal inquiry, the shredding 
id key d m m n Vnta , pnd B—Hy 
the crisis of credibility, which 
has begun to lap at the feet of 
the President himself. 

And now the old Watergate 
refrain fa again echoing 
around the co un tr y: What did 
the President know and when 
did he know it? 

Jt fa most unlikely that a 
Nixonian fate awaits Mr 
Reagan. There are fun- 
damental differences: what- 
ever the blunders and mis- 
judgmeots, ft is generally 
recognized that Mr Reagan 
began the Iras operation out of 
a genome concern, widely 
reflected in the country, to get 
American hostages home safe- 
ly- 

Uuffke Mr Nixon, Mr 
Reagan is not thought to have 


Contra connection to his Iran 
arms deal he is, at least, gmlty 
of deception, lying and break- 
ing the law. 

But if he knew nothing, he is 
charged with, incompetence in 
not having control over his 
own Government. How is it 
possible that a President 
should not have taken the 
trouble to Oral out what was 
on in his National 
Owncfl? Mr Reagan 
has never been a mas for 
details. It rarely mattered in 
the past 

After the almost obsessive 
attempt by President Carter to 
oversee every detail of his 
Government, Americans were 
happy with a President who 
was able to delegate respon- 
sibility, to take a broad view 
and to rise above the tech- 
nicalities of his derisions. 
Many made fun of government 


by cue card, bat most admired 
the President’s ability to cut 
through to die heart of issues, 
his Insistence on redneug 
paralysingly complex dilem- 
mas to simple questions and 
then answering them. 

Bat reliance on subordinates 
and Cabinet officers to draw 
up policy options makes ft all 
the more essential tbat such 
men are of the highest calibre. 
And here, many agree, Mr 
Reag an has been badly let 
down, especially in his second 
term after Mr Jim Baker left 
as White House Chief of Staff 
to become Treasury Secretary. 

Under Mr Donald Regan, 
the White House has increas- 
ingly been staffed by those 
whose loyalty has comited for 
more than abffity.Tbe ten- 
dency has been to govern 
reactively. especially in for- 
eign policy, rather than to 
develop strategies for the 
President to fallow. The Reyk- 
javik debacle was in large part 

dne to a lack of preparation, to 

the attempt by the President to 
negotiate from his instincts 
rather than from properly 
thought-out briefing papas. 

The White Honse has 

seemed especially concerned 

by the perception of policy 
rather than its content, by the 
way decisions wffl be perceived 
by media ami the effects on the 
President’s popularity rating. 
Too often this has led to 
popularity becoming the yard- 


stick. Favourable treatment by 
the media became aft-im- 
portant. 

But those who live by tele- 
vision can also perish by 
television. And it fa the sudden 
turnaround of the columnists 
and commentators over Iran 
that has seemed to hurt Presi- 
dent Reagan and the White 
House most. His subordinates 
had not prepared him for 
unpopularity, had not exposed 
him to real debate about his 
derisions. They took care of 
the details, and left him 
unprepared when he had to 
take personal responsibility — 
as in Iceland or over Iran. 

To retrieve his credibility, 
tiw President must now work 
harder, immersing himself 
more in the nitty-gritty of 
policy, especially as be faces a 
stiffened challenge from the 
Demoeratic-controlled Con- 
gress. He cannot rely solely on 
Donald Regan to organize [be 
White House like a board of 
directors governing a big 
banking institution, or to let 
him be the filter of what he 
ought to know. 

Mr Reagan's reputation as 
“the great communicator” 
cannot carry him through thh 
crisis; he needs to demonstrate 
control of what fa going on 
around him. AB the Presi- 
dent's men have not served 
him wefl by keeping him in 
ignorance: though by doing so 
they have stopped this being 
his Watergate. 


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tttf: TTMES SATURDAY NOVEMBER 29 1986: 







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/HOME l/P WHILE CREDITS DOWN 



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“You tike Qbe Guevara?** 
asked the youn^gnnmanfrom 
the Sunni Muslim Popular, 
liberation Army ;asrhe Ht 
another dsaieoe . inside his 
improvised sentry post on the 
deserted coastal nod. “Gue- 
vara ^very . good, Ama] no 

own ashe stood there, indiL 
ferent to the artillery blasts 
that rattled Ae tin roof of his 
hut . 

Should the legendary goer- . 
rilla commander have sur- 
vived . his campaign in the 
jungle of Bolivia 18 year? ago, 
said the gunman, Guevara 
wotdd.be out there, fighting 
alongside die * Palestinians. 
Things would have gone dif- 
ferently: Orsohe said. 
..Hundreds of tired Pafestin- 
ian guerrillas batttingin the 
hIDs east of Sidon would 
probably like to think so, too. 
Since they launched . an 
impressive 'ofbnstvt; .to. cap- 
ture the strategic hilltop vil- 
lage of Maghdousbefa from the 
Sma Mushm Axhal militia six 
days ago, they have been 
repelled several times, by 
Amid, came. under fire from 


to rebuild his power base in 


m 


% 


So fee, his efforts have 
proved fruitless. Neither the 
Popular liberation Army nor 
any. other leftist ' mfiftfnq are 
defending Amal m the battler 
field. The latest Syrian fafl m-R 
became ■ evident yesterday 
afternoon, wben both the 
.Palestinians and Amal- -ig- 
nored a ceasefire agreement 
painstakingly reached in Da- 
mascus — largely because Mr 
Arafat’s forces we r e not repre- 
sented in the negotiations. 

Syria, which refuses to talk 
to Air Arafat, has been dealing 
exclusively with the Palestine 
National. Salvation. Front, a 
Syriho4»ased coalition of six 
guerrilla groups opposed to 
Mr Arafat. But concern. ‘id. 
Syria grew as several of these 
.groups began to involve them- 
selves on Mr Arafat's side in 
the fierce confrontation 
around Sidon. Both Pafcstis- 
iansand Amal rinfm to he in 
controlof the hflk. 

. As expected, the battle for 
Maghdonsheh, which has al- 
ready claimed -around 200 
fives, yesterday spread to the 
Shams of Barm, where Amal . 
gunmen, supported by mortar 


newspaper cohuunbris are 
, warning that the Palestinians’ 
; dtaenmnationtorecover mifi- 
tary and political power in 
Lebanon heralds a new phase 
in thfr l 1-year-old civil war. 

“The situation has taken * 
very dangerous turnT said a 
Lebanese source wiy> was 
present at the talks in Damas- 
cus. In -Syria’s view, a struts 
Pa lestini a n prese nc e in | 5 idan 
would not only give the.P-LO 
its first foothold in Lebiaitia 
smee 1982, but would push 
Amal below the Zahrani nvei, 
thus crating a de factor Shia 
Mushm canton in the south. " 

.■ M R is very difficult to- 1 be- 
lieve that the PtalestHHans wiU 
; -withdraw from their new.po- 
rifions Simply became Syria 
wants to help Amal maintain 
its only strorahold near. 
Sidon,” said the Lebanese. 

When it comes to ensuring* 
trace, Syrian negotiators are 
usedio failure. But this time; 

. the- Damascus Government is 
so eager to stress its decisive 
influence in Lebanon that 
some, offidab are said ter be 
considering the deployment of 
-Syrian Ajmy troops into the 
Magbdousheb biDs — ' only 25 
mfies north of the Israeli- 



~v "Wi 

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Austerity 
measures 
start riot 
in Brasilia 

From Mac Margolis 
Rio de Janeiro 

Work crews sport most of 
yesterday morning sweeping 
up the charred debris and 
rubble left behind by Thurs- 
day’s anti-government protest 
l in Brasifia. 

A peaceful protest against 
recent austerity measures 
tuned into an ugly confronta- 
tion as soldiers and military 
police dashed with thousands 
of demonstrators protesting 

a gqiwrf imminent <tionw»al fj 
of government workers and 
stiff new price rises. Some 
protesters wait on a rampage, 








try to halts Pakstimanrenaa- 
sance in southern Lebanon 
four years after the Israeli 
invasion; a Damascus-spon- 
sored rebellion within the 
PLQ- scattered Mr ^Yassir 
Arafiaf s badly beaten fences 
across the Arab worid. . . 

President Assad ' dearly 
wants to keep the risks as low 
as possible and has mustered 
support in Libya and Barrio 
try to Crush Mr Aririsf s plans 




The Pope receiving a kiss as be arrives at a 
Catholic school m Melbourne yesterday, 
where he fielded questions from pupib before 
tearing to lead prayers for destitute men at a 
hostel (ReuterreportsX 


ton racecourse and warned embryo research 
scientists that they must use their skills in the 
service of humanity “to make sure that these 
never become false idols”. 

The Pope will fly to Alice Springs today 
where 10,000 Aborigines from all over the 
country have gathered to meet him. 


Fatah faction said two Aural 
tanks were destroyed during 
the Pales tinian counter-bflfen- 
-rive, in Which six people were 
reported ktiled- 

> Appeals fry Lebanon,’ s 
Christian and ■ Muslim re- 
figious leaders; &3ed to tiispd 
the tension hi the strepts of 
: west:- Behnt, where armed 
mfljtfrmten could , be seen 
manning checkpoints for the 
firsitime in months. Lebanese 


not allow Syrian forces to 
penetrate. ' V . 

.. Most Synan officials axe 
' saidtobeinctined to repeat an 
experiment which proved brn- 
. tally successful a year ago in 
Tripofi. There, bested Pal- 
estinian guerrillas and Sunni 
Muslim allies woe defeated 
by Syria and its allies after two 
weeks of savage shelling that 
destroyed entire neighbour- 
hoods. 


a Mass attended by 1 10,000 people at Fleming- country have gathered to meet him. 


Talks on Hong Kong constipation 


Pressure for early agreement 


By Andrew McEwen 
Diplomatic Correspondent 


Aquino accents more resignations 


From David Watts V 
. ManQa ..C. 
President Aquino of,. foe 
PhDtagfaaa began the renewal 
of her Gahfaet- yCstek&yJty 
removing two mfafe*eis^jHfer 
move co in cided wilhMr Juan 
Ponce Emile, her . ^qteoed 
Defence Minister-.-. Ianp®% 

handing oyer Mg ^ jet 

hading at a retain to p ^ 

Mis Aquino ncrepterf Xhe 
resignations of Mr Enhito 
Meceda, Minister of, Ntfaral 

Maalo, 


' Works and Hi ghwa ys . She did 
not say why foe two were 
dismissed, but it it fooaght 
they had been involved in 
_ cm i o pti on. • 

The President is expected to 
coatinne with farther Cabinet 
changes next week. ; • 

- Mr finale's comments as Ire 

'hMedodisDdacelVfiifalir 

couH be iHtopretedas signaL 
RngfrMraAqatofoatltew9I 
soonbebadtTnoppositiwi 
politics, 


« crowd of .' 


yesterday after two meetings timxe travelling abroad after 
with Sir Geoffrey Howe, the 1997 appeared far more secure 
British Foreign Secretary. On yesterday after the Joint Li- 



wefl-wisbers at foe Ministry of 
Defence building in Cup 
Aghw l d o, ftw which he ai 
General FiddL Ramos led foe 
February revoitamunst Mr 
Mm**, Mr Emote said: ?Y. 
leave wifooot anyjrucoar, any 
regrets or recrmfaations . . 
as tag as intact is avoided,' 
we mteft be. prepared to test the 

thinking Md Ideas Of Others 

against oar omt and la foe 
process gala deeper taught to 
bolster oar common task of 
hnftfing a real common 
democracy.” - ■ • ■ 


the type of democratic process 
to be used. Whitehall is debat- 
ing whether to introduce di- 
rect elections in 1988 and 
Peking is planning the settle- 
ment’s post-colonial law. 

While publicly insisting that 

the constitution until June 30, 
1997, b for Whitehall and 
Hong Kong to decide, Britain 
is anxious not to implement 
democratic str u ct u res des- 
tined to be dismantled when 
Pelting takes over. 

Sir Edward Yonde, foe pofo- 
isf i Governor, amved^cme 


a ill vrucwii 1 L IAIUIU 

be suggested that up to a quar- 
ter of the National Assembly 
be directly elected in 1988. 

The Basic Law Drafting 
Committee, made up of 36 
Chinese officials and 23 prom- 
inent local citizens, is debating 
what law will apply when the 
British leave. Its first draft is 
expected in 1990, 

In theory there is a water- 
tight barrier between the two 
moves. In practice both rides 
want to lmk them. 

. The right, of Hong Kong’s 
5.5 minion residents to con- 


nesenot 
National Overseas Passport 
will remain v alid and will 
. contain an indirect assurance 
of their right to live in Hong 
Kong. 

The two sides were also 
close to reaching agreement 
on safeguards to protect three 
million Hong Kong Chinese 
eligible for the British Na- 
tional Overseas Passport, 
winch is to be issued from next 
year, and the existing British 
Dependent Territory Pass- 
port. 


ablaze, looting supermarkets 
and vandafiring banks. 

The demonstration, or- 
ganized by opposition parties 
and trade miens, started with 
a peaceful rally at Brasilia’s 
bos station. The crowd 
marched towards the Ministry 
of Finance where thousands 
started anti-government slo- 
gans. Bnt when President Jose 
Saraey left the presidential 
palace to attend a Thanks- 
giving Day Mass, police ad- 
vanced on the crowds. By dusk 
foe lawns in front of the 
ministries were a near-battle- 
field veiled in tear gas. 

Yesterday police were again 
dispatched to disperse a crowd 
at foe Ims station. 

These disturbances have 
maned the administration of 
Senhor Sarney, who less than 
two weeks ago was enjoying an 
OTerwhehniBg election victory. 

The Government gambled 
on a sweeping array of eco- 
nomic reform, such as steep 
increases in petrol and utility 
rates, and the closure of loss- 

making mmyni^s . TIia i 

reforms were judged vital to 
control consumer spending 
and foumce a gaping budget 
deficit, which threatened an 
anti-inflation plan. However, 
the price rises hurt middle- 
class consumers and the plans 
to dose 15 state enterprises 
cmld result in the loss of up to 
30,000 jobs. 

Public outcry was im- 
medacte and almost overnight 

plunged. ^T y stock° I iMriS 
plummeted and Senhor Dilson 
Fauna, foe Finance Minister, 
offered to step down. 

Senhor Sarney refused to 
accept Senhor Fnnaro’s resig- 
nation, bat foe aims may not 
be over. The Militant Ceirtre 
of Unified Workers has called 
a national general strike for 
mid-December. 


Thailand 
tests EEC 
goods for 
radiation 

Bangkok — Large quantities 
of dairy products, cereals and 
farm fertilizers imported from 
Europe are held up on the 
Bangkok docks for radiation 
testing because of fears (hat 
they are contaminated from 
the Chernobyl disaster (Neil 
Kelly writes). 

EEC officials in Bangkok 
have complained that the 
Thai Government has set 
safety levels far too low and 
have warned that the derision 
could damage Thai-European 
trade relations. 

Fruitful racket 

Foggia, Italy (Reuter) 
Italian magistrates have is- 
sued warrants for the arrest of 
40 people over a huge fruit 
and vegetable racket they say 
has defrauded the EEC of up 
to 30 billion lire (£15 million). 

Jobs for girls 

Bonn (Reuter) — More West 
German girls are going into 
“men’s jobs" than ever before. 
A nationwide study showed 
one in 12 girls going into 
trades once the preserve of 
men only, such as metal and 
electrical work. 

Yamani ban 

Le Brassus, Switzerland 
(UPI) — Sheikh Yamani, the 
former Saudi oil minister, 
missed a Swiss hotel share- 
holders’ meeting because King 
Faud has banned him from 
leaving Saudi Arabia. 

PC spyjailed 

Hamburg (Reuter) — A 
Bremen detective who sold 
East Germany data about 
fellow-policemen has been 
jailed Tor five years. Horst 
Manske. aged 33, was also 
fined DM 21,900 (£7,820), the 
amount he said the East 
Germans paid him. 

Protest fires 

Tokyo (Reuter) - Suspected 
radical extremists firebombed 
homes of two executives 
working on a controversial 
expansion of Tokyo’s Narita 
airport. Simultaneous fires at 
the front doors of the houses 
in Yokohama and Matsudo 
caused slight damag e. 

Tower death 

Paris (AP) — The body of an 
unidentified woman who 
threw herself from the Eiffel 
Tower has been found at the 
foot of the Paris landmark. 



m § \ *k •>'- ; V .V 

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it; ; i' *3 


EISENHOWER 
BY EISENHOWER 

A major re-assessment of his military 
and political careers by his grandson 





4*^*' y 

*> ** i * *r 

■ * 


THE 

SUNDAY 

TIMES 

Better than a month 
of other Sundays. 


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en«m ib* 


OVERSEAS NEWS 


THE TIMES SATURDAY NOVEMBER 29 1986 


The MI5 case: Cabinet Secretary apologizes 


Sir Robert admits misleading 
court on who passed spy book 


jfroin Stephen Taylor, Sydney 


Sir Robert Armstrong, the Cabinet 
Secretary, admitted yesterday that he 
bad misled the MIS book hearing abort 
who had effectively sanctioned publica- 
tion of the Chapman Pincher book. 
Their Trade Is Treachery. 

Sir Robert conceded that, ahhongb he 
had testified under oath that Sir 
Michael Havers, the Attorney-General, 
had been the one who decided against 
trying to restrain the book, he now 
understood that he was wrong. As a 
result of speaking to London by tele- 
phone earlier in the day. Sir Robert said 

he realized he had unwittingly misled 
the court and wished to put the record 

straight .... 


Sir Michael had been “unhappy 1 " with 


Those who had actually advised that 

there was **no basis on which to seek to 

restrain peMkaikm” ef the book, 
according to a sworn official sta temen t 

provided to the court and signed by Sir 

Robert; were unknown “legal advisers** 
who. Sir Robert said, it might now be 


court, but because his concession was 
said le be of “enfmoos gravity”, and 
because ft related to evidence given in 
open conrt, Mr Malcolm TranbnD, 
counsel for Mr Petear Wright, the former 
M35 mole-hunter, asked that it be made 
part of tbe public record. 

Mr. Justice Powell agreed, and a 
transcript of the relevant evidence was 
made available later in the day. 



Afghanistan soon 


firom Michael Hamlyn, Delhi 


The Cabinet Secretary apologized to 
the court three times for what he said 
was an unintentional and said 

be had tried tbrosgbort bis evidence to 
tell tbe truth. 

He was speaking in a dosed session of 


Mr Turnbull has argued that the 
reason there was no attempt to restrain 
the book was because it had beat 1 
secretly sanctioned. Mr Wright, whose 
own book covering similar ground 
Whitehall docs want. to sumaress. sm 



mm * 


Attorney-General not party to decision 


As recorded in the tran- 
script, Sir Robert Armstrong 
said in court yesterday that, 
when he first gave evidence, 
he bad “assumed from what I 


against trying to restrain the 
book had been Sir Michael's, 
but he now understood that it 


received the advice from these 
lawyers, that there was no 
basis to restrain the book? 

Sir Robert It was a conclu- 
sion reached in discussion 
amonga number of people. 

MrTurnbuU: What are their 
names? 

Sir Robert As I have said, I 


had not been referred to the can’t teU you who they were. 


Attorney-General 

The following extracts are 
from the transcript: 

Mr Turnbull: Who made 
that decision? 

Sir Robert I don't know 
who made that decision. I do 
not think ii was a single 
person. I think it was a 
collective decision among 
those concerned. 

Mr Turnbull: Who was 
concerned? 

Sir Robert: I would like to 
find out about that I do not 
know exactly. 

Mr Turnbull: You do not 
know? 

Sir Robert: I have been 
informed, as I say, that it was a 
decision taken by legal advis- 
ers concerned. I have not yet 
found out who they all were. I 
am afraid there are no papers 
in regard to the decision, and I 
am afraid it may be impos- 
sible to find out. 

Later the crossexamination 
resumed. 

Mr Turnbull: Sir Robert, I 
want to put it to you that the 
only reason you have made 
this concession is because Sir 
Michael Havers has made it 
very plain in London that he 
had no part in the decision not 
to restrain. That's so, isn't it? 

Sir Robert Sir Michael 
Havers was unhappy with the 
answers which I gave and, 
having made inquiries, I was 
intending to find an opportu- 
nity of putting the record 
straight in this matter. Your 
questions have given me that 
opportunity now. 

And later. 

Mr Turnbull: Well, who was 
the piece of blood and bone, 
who was the human being that 


Mr Turnbull: You have no 
idea? 

Sir Robert: I don't know 
because I wasn't a party. 

Mr Turn bull: Was the 
Prime Minister one of them? 

Sir Robert: No. 

Mr Turnbull: Let's go 
through them. The Prime 
Minister had nothing to do 
with it? 


Sir Robert I was aware of 
the conduaon, as I have told 
the court before. 

Mr Turnbull: Did you re- 
ceive the conclusion yourself? 

Sir Robert I didn’t receive 
it, I was aware of iL 

Mr Turnbull: Sir Robert 
Armstrong is number two. 
Who else was involved? 

Sir Robert Who else was 
aware ofit, I wouldn’t know. 

And later Sir Robert said be 
first learned earlier yesterday 
that Sir Michael Havers was 
not tbe person responsible. 

Mr Turnbull: What time 
today, please? 

Sir Robert I think this 
morning in a telephone call 
from London. 


On the first day of Sir Robert’s cross-examination by Mr 
TurnbnU, the following exchange took place: 

Mr Tnrnbtill: I pnt it to you that you and the Prime Min- 
ister and the security service allowed Chapman Pincher to 
write the book ( Their Trade Is Treachery) for the issue (die 
Inves tigati on of Sir Roger Hoffis) to come oat bom a right- 
wing journalist, rather than an ngly journalist of tbe left 

Sir Robert It’s a very ingenious conspiracy theory and it* s 
quite untrue. 


Sir Robert It was official 
legal advisers, but I don't 
know who they were. 

Mr Turnbull: You're not 
telling me that official legal 
advisers to tbe security service 
and some nameless person in 
the Treasury solicitors made 
the ultimate decision not to 
seek an injunction? 

Sir Robert: They concluded 
that there was no basis for 
restraint 

Mr Turnbull: I am asking 
you now, to whom was that 
advice given? 

Sir Robert: That advice was 
available to all those con- 
cerned. 

MrTurnbuU: And who were 
the people concerned? 

Sir Robert Well, the direc- 
tor-general of the security 
service, no doubt 

Mr Turnbull: Thai’s one, 
the director-general of the 
security service. Who else? 


Mr Turnbull: Did you speak 
to the Attorney-General? 

Sir Robert I did not 

Mr Turnbull: Who did you 
speak to? 

Sir Robert 1 spoke to my 
colleague in the Cabinet office. 

And later 

Mr Turnbull: Was the 


Prime Minister in favour of was wrong. 


ferred this book not to have 
been published, but it was 
advised that there was no 
basis for restraint 

Mr Turnbull: Right That 
advice was given not by the 
Sofichor-General, not by the 
Attomey-Generai, not by the 
Treasury solicitor, but by 
some anonymous lawyers 
whose names you can’t 
remember, and whose pos- 
ition in the hierarchy hardly 
indicates that they were peo- 
ple of first-class calibre. That 
is so, isn't h? 

Sir Robert I don't think 
that follows at all I have said 
that I am not informed about 
who they were. I have been 
informed that the advice was 
reached, the conclusion was 
reached, after consultation 
among the legal advisers con- 
cerned. 1 am not able, I'm 
afraid, to advise you who 
those were, because I can't 
find out There are no docu- 
ments to show it 

Mr Turn bulk Do you only 
teU tbe truth when there are 
documents likely to dem- 
onstrate it? 

Sir Robert: I have tried to 
tell the truth throughout, Mr 
Turn bull. I'm sorry that I was 
misled in this case, that I 
misled myself in this case. 1 
assumed that when it said the 
legal advisers concerned, it 
included the Attorney, but 1 



Mr Gorbachov gives an Indian farewell after a speech to the 
Delhi Parliament "Harking the US Star Wars programme. 


Declaring that he looked 
forward to focesteb fis h racnt 
of “an independent noth 

aligned Afghanistan, a neutral 
Afghanistan” Mr Mikhail . 
Gorbachov, the Soviet leader, . 
yesterday insisted that he saw 
movement in foe UNnegoti- . 
ations. 

Senor Diao Cordoves, tbe 
UN 'General Secretary’s spe- 
cial- representative, is . at 
present m Ran conducting a, 
farther round of contacts 
p reliminar y to renewed in- 
direct talks in Geneva. He is. 
expected to ream .again to 
both Kabul and Islamabad 
before the round is over. But 
Mr Gorbachov, without dis- 
ctosmg what the change in 
attiriKtes might be that would 
bring about a settlement, in- 
sisted that there had been 
“reciprocal movement**; this 

time. • 

“Prospects for a setttemeot 
of this problem in the near 
future do exist, 1 ” he told a 
crowded press conference 

marking the end Of his foUT- 

day visit to the Indian capital 

Mr Gorbachov, who sat 
alongside Mr Rajiv Gandhi, 
the I ndian Prime Minister* to. 
sum up the successes of his 
meetings, was surrounded by 
the curiously . inappropriate 
grandeur of the Ashok Hall of 
India’s presidential palace — 
the former viceregal lodge 
built by Sr Edwin Lnlyau» of 
which this was the state 
ballroom. 

The Conmuntist leader was 
pressed again and again by 
imtia-n journalists oat the 
apparent conflict between the 
friendly relations his Govern- 
ment had with India and the 
friendly relations he sought 
with China which, questioners 
pointed out, was m occupa- 
tion of several hundred square 
mil?* of Indian, territory. Mr 


Gorbachov wisely dcdincd to 
be drawn into foe dispute, 
allowing merely that “what we 
are doing in the improvement 
of our relations with China 
will not weaken csxr relations 
with India 1 *. 



The subject of Chinese refa- 
■ tions drew farther attention to 
Mr Gorbachov's poficy on 
Asian ted P&ufic security, 
which heiutd outlined in Ins 
speech in Vladivostok, and 
which he was no doubt hoping 
wouU evoke some response 
from fad**- Unfortunately for . 
Inm, the Indians „ 

remained obstinately cool on 
the subject. 

The elaborate series of pro- 1 
posals relating to the Indian 
Ocean which foe. Russian? 
leader brought forward in his ' 

- to the Par- - 

figment remained on tire cable, * 
without farther demfopmenV ^ 
and the dosing joint state- 
mem issued yesterday noted:. - 
“The Soviet side explained m - 
detail the Soviet Union’s con- * 
crete programme for mam- — 
turning peace and security and 7 
estabusaxqg co-operation and - 
interaction in the Asian Pa- ' 
tific region.*’ 

The statement continued / 

- tfwt thA WtaiidHgpblinnrtiBj 

the. steps “in buikUng 
co-operation at the. regional 
level through the South Asms 7 
Association for Regional Co- ; 
operation**, adding pointedly: - 
-^without outside interfer- 
enctT. . ■ — 


.. - 


•” ;.sr 




This setback apart, tire four- 
day visit was as efinbeat a 
festival of bro t her l y affection — 
as could have beat wished. » 
India and the Soviet Union — 


turned: be 
Palestine, 
Garcia. 


Africa, Diego 


Uzbekistan faces anti-Islam campaign 


Their Trade Is Treachery be- 


Sir Robert No, not at all 
Mr Turnbull: Sir Robert, 
what about Mr William 
Whitdaw? Was he in favour? 

Sir Robert I don't think he 
was any more in favour of it 
than anybody else. 

Mr TurnbulL- So we have 
the security service, tbe Prime 
Minister, the Cabinet Sec- 
retary and the Home Secretary 
all against foe publication of 
this book. Correct? 

Sir Robert I think that foe 
Government would have pre- 


Mr Turnbull’ Sir Robert, 
why was the Attorney-General 
left out of the derision-making 
process in respect of Their 
Trade Is Treachery?*. 

Sir Robert I don't know 
why he was not brought into 
the process by which that 
conclusion was reached, 

Mr Turnbull: He wasn't 
part of the conspiracy, was he? 

Sir Robert He was not part 
of foe conspiracy. 

Mr Turnbull: And you 
were? 

Sir Robert I was not part of 
any conspiracy either. 


From Christopher Walker 
Moscow 

The first details emerged 
here yesterday of an important 
speech delivered in the Cen- 
tral Asian republic of Uzbeki- 
stan early this week by Mr 
Mikhail Gorbachov, the Sov- 
iet leader, in which he called 
for a stepping-up of atheist 
propaganda there and criti- 
cized foe corruption for which 
foe republic is notorious. 

Speaking party mid govern- 
ment officials during a stop- 
over on his way to India, be 
called for “a firm and un- 
compromising struggle against 
religious phenomena and a 
strengthening of political work 
among the masses and of 
atheist propaganda”. 


His speech was of special 
interest because the republic is 

largely Muslim and is foe 

headquarters of foe officially 
approved Muslim Board for 
Central Asia, an area where 
Islam remains strong. 

Uzbekistan is known as one 
of the most corrupt of the IS 
Soviet republics. Pravda re- 
cently disclosed that some 
2,600 officials there had been 
sacked, fined or disciplined 
for incompetence and corrup- 
tion. Two months ago a 
former minister in the cotton 
cleaning industry was sen- 
tenced to death for corr upti on. 

The first account of Mr 
Gorbachov’s speech on No- 
vember 24 readied Moscow 
only yesterday in a copy of the 


Uzbek party daily, Pravda 
Vostoka. 

“We must be strict above all 
with Communists and senior 
officials, particularly those 
who say they defend our mor- 
ality and ideals, but in feet 
help promote backward views 
and themselves take part in re- 
ligious ceremonies,” Mr Gor- 
bachov said. 

No explanation was avail-, 
able as to why die text of foe 
speech was not immediately 
released by Tass, foe-official 
news agency, which simply re- 
ported that Mr Gorbachov 
had delivered a “major” ad- 
dress during his stopover. In 
the past, few of Mr Gorba- 
chov’s mayor speeches have 
been kept secret and those 


have dealt with detailed 
daims of corrupt practice in- 
ride state boefies. 


Pravda Vostoka raid Mr 
Gorbachov called for a cam- 
paign to bring “new, healthy 
forces” into leading positions 
in foe republic. “In foe key 
question of selecting person- 
nel, serious twishAas and vio- 
lations were made, which 
caused great moral and mater- 
ial damage,” he said. 

The fen extent of corrup- 
tion was exposed early this 
year when foe long-standing 
Uzbek party chief Mr Sharaf 
Rashidov, was posthumously 
stripped of all honours and 
accused of bring at the centre 
of a web of corruption. 


Greek budget aims to cut inflation 


Liberal reforms in Taiwan 


From A Correspondent 
Athens 


Greece's Socialist Govern- 
ment has presented a deficit 
budget for 1987, maintaining 
high defence and welfare 
spending while seeking to 
reduce inflation, which now 
runs at more than 17 per cent 
or six times the EEC average. 


The 2,740 billion drachma 
(£14 billion) budget, which is 
19 per cent higher than this 
year's, marks foe second year 


of economic austerity under 
the prime ministership of Mr 
Andreas Papandreou. It was 
assailed by the Conservative 
opposition as unrealistic con- 
sisting of “sacrifices without 
hope”. 

According to the economic 
forecast, inflation will drop to 
1 2 per cent by the end of 1 987. 
The Government has already 
frozen prices for the last two 
months of this year to bring 
year-end inflation dose to 16 
percent 


And on the baas of the 
Government’s economic per- 
formance this year, Greece 
expects to receive foe second 
part of a £1.1 billion special 
loan from the European 
Community. 

Officials said another year 
of austerity would trim the 
current account deficit to £880 
million from a predicted £1.3 
billion this year. 

The new budget forecasts a 
668 billion drachma (£3.4 
billion) deficit 


Chiang ready to welcome opposition 


Malacca 




NEW BRITISH 


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WORKS LIKE MAGIC TO 
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From Robert Grieves 
Taipei 

The huge red flag with foe 
blue and white sun design 
Inflowing in front of Taipei's 
modern Chiang Kai-shek air- 
port alerts foe visitor to Tai- 
wan that he is in “foe other 
China”. Similarly, the sleek 
airport tazkfiflg and foe cheer- 
ful well-groomed customs 
clerks have few, if any, 
counterparts in foe People’s 
Repubfic of China. 

The foor-lane highway from 
the airport to Taiwan’s capital President Chiang: shocked 
offers vistas of well-kept farm- by Kuomintang corruption. 


_ 


toi and neat Wek homes nrfed Nationalist China for 22 


years before fleemg to Taiwan, 
stBJM as welcome reud tram w ca * a, r» Karim Hu. 


has set foe stage for lifting foe 
. ‘J ra “ mrtrysme ot tbe island's 37-year-old martial 
mamland. Phalanxes of motor tow regulations and for foe 


S T teSl ^ emergence of a new political 

partyTfoe DMOrffcPTOg-. 


Hyimlytsttttcy jbocWH Pwf, (DPPX oppo^J 

E-mhtwg 


FROM THE AIR 


traffic,, in which bicycles and party _ 
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irate. 


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Now this new British made Moisture Magnet has been 
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harmful dampness and humidity from the ah: It soaks up 
condensation like a sponge. Excess moisture in the air within 
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peeling wallpaper, crumbling plaster, wet rat and other 
costly damage. This amazing New Moisture Magnet win 
help keep rooms and cupboards free from mildew and 
musty odours and create a comfortable damp-free 
environment. It is highly economical, simple and sate to 
use. Special crystals are placed In the unit- they attract 
masters in the air which aecumulafesrt the base at the 
tub. A highly efficient way to solve a very common problem 
and great value at only £&99 plus £1.05 postage and 
packing. 3 units or more poet free. 


these differences, 


Elections win be held across 
Taiwan on December 6 to fill 
184 vacancies in the 976- 


bofo Chinas are led by men member National Assembly, 
who, late in life, are deter- which elects a President every 


mined to liberalize their politi- six years, ««f the 323-member 
cal systems. Legislative Yuan, which fane* 


For more than seven years dons as the island's par- 
Mr Deng Xiaoping, aged 82, Uament Since November 21 


has posted for a more flexible candidates have been cun- 
economic policy and political paiguiug in parks and streets 


reform in China. Now Mr foroaghoat Taipei and across 
Chiang Ching-guo, aged 76, foe country . 


the son of the late Geeeralis- Before foe election, either 


simo Chiang Kai-shek, who on Monday or perhaps even 


some time this weekend. Mr 
Hsu Hsfo-Uang, aged 45, a 
dissident founder of the DPP, 
who was charged with sedition 
for his role irn opposition party 
riots seven years ago, will 
return to Taiwan In the com- 
pany of Mr Ramsey Clark, US 
Attorney-General under Presi- 
dent Johnson. Mr Clark said 
last week foat he wants to see. 
foe attempt of Mr Hsn and 
otter dissidents in foe Padfic 
region to gain admission to 
flwir h omcMnds and 
opposition politics. 

Three days ago police said 
that they wonld arrest Mr Hsa 
if he set foot in Taiwan. Bat 
foreign observers say that the 
Government reaction remains 
less than dear. It is thoagfat 
that the Knomintug, which 
has refused to give Mr Hsu a 
new passport or visa, might 
simply pat him an foe next 
aircraft oat of the country. k 

Whatever the oBtcomeef his 
return — and he has said that 
he drew inspiration from foe 
late Beaigno Aquino's return 
to the Philippines, winch set in 
motion the revolution that 
toppled Mr Ferdinand Marcos. 
- it wffl dearly put pressure 
on the DPP. 

“Hsn is an adventarer and a; 
romantic,” according to Mr 
Antonio Chiang, aged 42, 
farmer editor at foe burned 
dissident magazine, The Eigh- 
ties, and a co-founder of foe 
DPP. “If he redans, party 


control could be lost We want 
to present foe DPP as die 
loyal opposition.” 

At the same time, of course, 
Mr Hsu's re t ur n wonld also 
put pressure on the Knomin- 
tangp Bat not half as much 
pressure as President Chiang 
has himself brought to bear on 
his party of two nriffian. 

Foreign observers say that 
Mr Cbmng is old, infirm ani 
seeking to secure* place in 
history as-an enlightened lead- 
er, much as Mr Dog is 
attempting to do on foe main- 
land. Moreover, Mr Chiang 
believes that his designated 
successor, Mr Lee Teng-hui, 
vice-president of the Kn nrain - 


patrols 

increased 


he m to govern effectively. 

Perhaps most importnntiy, 
say experienced observers, re- 
cent corporate scandals in 
Taipei have shocked Mr 
Chung- isf • foe - extent of 
cormtica hi the Kaonriiffang 
that they have revealed. It is 
thought that he hw wiw to 
the realization that any effort 
to dean op his party vraald of 
necessity destroy ft. He there- 
fore sees foe creation of new 
parties as the only way to 
purify Taiwan politics. 

What Peking and Taipei 
both fear from Taiwan's 
opposition parties b the 
development of a horn fide 
independence movement. Pe- 
lting has said that ft might be 
forced to invade Taiwan if 
such a movement succeeded. 


Jakarta (Reuter) — Indo- 
nesia and Malaysia have 
agreed to increase security and 
joint patrols alora the Strait of 
Malacca, one of the world's 
busiest sea lanes. 

The agreement was an- 
nounced yesterday by Indo- 
nesia's armed forces comman- 
der, General Benny Madam, 
and the Malaysian Defence 
Minister, Mr Abdullah Ah- 
mad BadawL 

Mr Abdullah said Indonesia 
and Malaysia would increase 
surveillance to prevent smug- 
gling, drug trafficking, illegal 
fishing and pollution from 
t an ke r s. 

“The Strait of Malacca is a 
very strategic sea-lane that ac- 
commodates a large volume of 
maritime traffic. We should 
not rule out the occurrence of 
unlawful acts that could 
threaten the security and in- 
terests of both countries,” Mr 
Abdullah 

He said the two countries 
would tackle ofl spillages to- 
gether and would introduce an 
early-warning system and 
joint patrols to give quick 
information. 

. The Indonesian armed 
forces’ newspaper, HarianAB, 
said the measures , would in- 
clude naval and air patrok 
and co-ordinated radar cover- 
age of the strait, which links 
the Indian Ocean id the South 
China Sea. 


Bangladesh factions in 


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Violence rocked foe second 
largest university in Bangla- 
desh yesterday as hundreds of 
pro-government students 
dashed with Muslim funda- 
mentalists in a bid to take 
control of the campus, which 
was dosed four days ago after 
bitter fighting. 

Police in Chittagong , the 
port city about ISO miles 
south-east of Dhaka, said 
more than 300 people were 
wounded in week-long clashes 
at the university. 

The office of the fun- 
damentalist student organiza- 
tion, Chhatra Shibir, was 
burnt down. 

Militant students armed 
with shotguns, bombs and 
staves refused to leave the 
campus as authorities deploy- 
ed security forces to quell riot- 
ing in dormitories. 


Two students were reported < 
missing and the university 
Vice-Chancellor, Mr Moham- 1 
med Ali, was injured when he 
was attacked by rival groups. 

The opposition newspaper, ! 
Banglar Barn, said yesterday 
that several students hid in 
hills around foe campus after j 
police began to use force to 
evict rioters. 


FORCED DISPOSAL 
HIGHLY IMPORTANT 
PUBLIC AUCTION 


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which has boon dsarad from 


H.M. CUSTOMS & EXCISE 


The National Students' 
Society, which supports the 
Government of President 
Ershad, has called forageneral 
strike today to press for a ban 
on foe Islamic student organ- 
ization. 


bond, to be dpoaad of «t ftouiid or no wwm for hnmodbtu cash reaiaadon. 
Every tarn guamnuad authentic. Expert advioo svaBabta at tint of viawng. 

To *>• t nutf m r a il from boadad -aeboueea and offered at 

AUCTION 1 AUCTION 2 

Tha fatfah Spaaldiifl Uafoa Tha Fanffam MaMngs 


The attack on die fun- 
damentalists came in the wake 
of calls by a top government 
official for a ban on foe main 
Islamic political party, the 
Jamaar-i-IsiamL ^ 


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TIMES 





November 29-December 5 


A weekly guide 
to leisure, entertainment 
and the arts 


: ^ 

■ ■v-^gfe 

' ' '.-"f.iSs* 

■■ 

■ ■ ~ 

.-,v2^S 
- • -■??%£ 
- 

. ■ ■’ ;■??«( 


.rs £*1 

■|8* 

■.-rss 

• ** 


in to your good books 

Join»iiSiacOa nau 


Times critics make their choice from ths wi^ variety of 
books they have most enjoyed over the last 12 months. 


PROSE & POETRY 

> Peter Ackroyd • ' 

I was impressed by die 
scholarship of the Oxford 
Sh a k e sp ea re , published this 
year, edited by Stanley Wells 
and Gary Taylor (Oxford. 
£60), although my pleasure 
will be tempered-, anrii an 
edition emptoyingfoc original 
spetimg . is . delivered to -my 
door.. As fir as prose is 
concenied^ I most admired 
Shiva NaqnoFs posthumous 
collection of essays, AnTTirffak. 
isbed Jomey (HamMi Hum. 
fltoo, £1095); and, in poetry, 
the most significant event this 
year was the publication of 
Selected Poems by John 
Ashbery (Carcauet Press, 
£16.95). _ 




Mataflo 

pairofe 

increase 


FICTION 

• John Nkfcobon 

A splendid year for new 
fiction, an even better one for 
the Booker Prize. But the otd 
boy needs no further hdp; so 
Til go for: ftr Grater's Duph 

abohcal 

Elliott' (second year running 
for Miss E, but 1 caa'tresut 
her stuff); The Bridge (Mao- 
miTbm, £9.95) by hm Banks, 
whidt seems to hams been too 
Kafkaesqoe for many critics, 
but impressed me with its 
cunning bind of surrealism 

Warirf*s*FW 
(Michael Joseph, £9.95) for its' 
deceptive simplicity and 
delightful insets into the 
mindof adtild. 

• IsabelRkphacI 

For me, thk has been the year 
of Primo Levi fixst tbe ir- 
resistible sweep offfNotNair, 
When? (Michael Joseph, 
£Kfc95); now die precise mid 
intellectual The PeriodfcT*- 
We (Abacas, £3.95). Both are . 
books to shake one’s faith in 
humanity to its roots: both are 
crowned with the true tap* 
timinn of t be survivor of 
Auschwitz, Levi himsd£ At 
the end of each 1 wanted to ay 
out “Victoiyr like Conrad ' 
truly enriched by the experi- 
ence. -I have also enjoyed 
catching up on earlier novels, 
now in paperback, by Alice 
Thomas EDis who is guar- 
anteed to make me laugh at . 
the most unlikely times: The - 
Sin Eater and The Other Side 
of foe Fire (Penguin, £2.95 - 
each). 


• Andrew Sinclair 

The Fifth Sob by Ehe Wiese! 
(Viking, £9.95) -is haunting 
- and harrowing, notsomudia 
testimony of the holocaust as 
an i nquiry into the roots of 
retribution and atnmwtwrt, 
the strange mercy of God and 
the impossible vengeance of 
men. Penelope lively’s col- 
lected stories of the past nine 
years, Pack of Cards (Heine- 
Trtann , £10.95) gave me in- 
finite pleasure. And Alan 
Massie’s adventure into 
historical fiction, Augustas: A 
Novel (The Bodfey Head, 
£9-95) is canvindngenoqgh to 
be the Roman .Emperor’s 
missing memoirs. 

♦ Efifue Fehestem " 

Tins has been a remarkably 
fine year for fiction. At the 
head ofthe Hst: John Updike’s 
Soger's Version (Andri 
Deutsch, £9.95) is" sharply 
written but never dipped, cool - 
yetalways alert Updike enters 
the world of computer graph- 
ics with deceptive ease, to 
explore both the terror of 
finding God at the frontiers of 
science and some of foe 
seedier corruptions of Present- 


Bailey’s GahrieTs I w r 
(Cape, £935/ recaptures a 
detailed " wood of monster 
fethcrantf delicate mother. .. 

• PhffipHommd 

. year, happily, an 
enjoyable book won tire 
Booker Prize; The OU Devils 
by KjB§jsley. Amis (EEolchui- 

foe graveyard and bottle-bank 
hnmora of tins story of edd 
friends, rivals and lovers in 
south Wafesoiit the boozy path 
to the everlasting bonfire. I. 
ex^oyt^rUjeariy^L foe novels 
j-aafoe Spokd^nd r WldfoEead 
shortlists, and thought that 
Staring at fte Sm hy Jufian 
BaineS 4Cape,j£9.95) and 
Jnocence m Penelope Fitz- 
gerald (Coffins, £9.95) de- 
served tobeupthere. Wendy 
Cope's Makin_ CoeM fir 
Kingsley Anris (Faber, £3.95) 
is notable fix- parodies and 
poems that are dever, candid, 
erotic and very fimny. 

• Gillian Greenwood 


domestic to the surreal in 
modern-day America. .The 
other memorable poUkation 
was four novellas by Leonardo 
Sdascia under the title Sfcff- 
ian .Undes (Carcanet, £&9S1 
These powerful stories, each 
revoking around a particular 
historical moment, are set 
mostly- in Sriasria’s native 
SicQy. - 

• Stoat Evans 

The Real Life of Alejandro 
Maytt by Mario Vargas Iiosa 
(Bibo; - £9.95)w Set in an 
explosive Urim of the near 
future; foe novel moves with 
characteristic mastery b ack 
and forth in time to. enmim 
the violent predicament of 
Peru and of Latin America, 
through a reconstruction of an 
obscure uprising in a provin- 
cial town led by a naive 
idealist revolutionary. The 
implications of social injustice • 
that lead to stteh abortive 
paroxysms are, however, 
much wider. ' 

• Nicholas Shakespeare 

Wifo hk latest coOeGtidn, The 
News from Ireland (The Bod- 
ley Head, £9.95), Wfifiam 
.Trevor confirms his position :i 





My favourite fiction this year 
came from abroad. The first 
was in January with the 
app ea ra nce of Waite Naisc by 
foe American Don .DcliQo 
(Picador, £9.95), a writer who 
had not been published hoe 
before. This is a brilliant an d 
fimny novel about foe fear of 
death, veering from tite 


.Trevor confirms ms position 
as foe best short-stray writer 
we have: Vivisecting the for- 
. lom lives of middJc-aged men 
and women, Trevor shows 
himerff at much at fa*™* in' 
Florence as in Dublin. 

Caryl Phillips’s short sco- 
cmd novel, A St*te of Indepen- 
dence (Faber, ££95) k as 
haimtmg as bk first Plnllqn— 
a much younger exponent of 
exfiethanT^evra-r returns his 
immigrant hero to foe Carib- 
bean. 

Indisputable novel of foe 
year, though, is The Real life 
of Aiija nd i Mayta (Baber, 
£9195) by Mario Vargas Lkxsa. 
j A brilSant portrait of a hope- 
less Peruvian revolutionary, it 
riso happens to be technically 
breathtakmg. 

• VictoriaGIendinniug 

I greatly enjoyed Paul 
Theroux’s O-Zone (Hamish 
H a mi l to n, £9.95), a disturbing 
adventoe story of foe near 
future, in an America where 
whole regions are- letoally 
contaminated by radioactive 
waste, and Manhattan is a 
sealed city for the wealthy and 
healthy. My rally criticism k 
foal it goes on a bit too long - : 
like ourselves, according to 
Kingsley Amis in The OU 
Devfis '(Hutchinson, £?■«), 
the irresistible Booker winner 
— a comedy of ill-manners 
about variously disgruntled - 
non-goldcn oldies set, 
afcoholipally~ in Wales. 




- 


Do you enjoy playing 
the PIANO? 

Ask anyone who docs andyon can be sure that they will tdl 
you: **Yb, bm 1 wish I had a baaer sdec tin a cf gijod nnisic," 
«... “Yes, but I wuh music was less .expensive and- easier to . 
obtain. ” If yoa’re a player; learner or parent, Tm sure you've 
Wt the same way jwwjeK - 

If you have, I think youH be de l ight e d to hear about The - 
Chwwfcal Ke y board Co ne ct io a. Briefly, ifra 12 vohmie 
coHecaoti of some of foe very best-loved classical music, 
specially arr a n g e d for foe -piaao. Ir contains paces- by more 
than 60 composers, frtHn ihe masterpieces of Bacfi and Vivaldi | 


CLASSICS 

• Peter Jones ■ 

F. A. Wolfs qmchy lfog 

pub^todto^l795 in Latin, k 
translated into En^ish for foe 
first time by Grafom, Most 
and Zetzel (Princeton, 
£3020). This' contentions 
wrak brought together all foe 
arguments . against a single 
‘Tfomet'’ as composer of foe 
liiad wd Odyssey, and do- 


‘ the last theatre critic (anyway 
in this country) sfoose awaited 
notices curdled a pfeywright*s 
Wood. But he could make as 
weQ as break; his judgements 
were the truth that he saw. If 
foe theatre wax his life; Ms 
own Ifie almost beat it for- 
theatricali^. Dr Haidn^g, in 
what is for me a model 
biography, misses nothing of 
tins, from . the subject’s 
stupefying output of words to 
bis alanmng sexual tastes and 
grotesque horse-blanket over- 
coats. Digging up the dead is 
easy, given foe researcher’s 
energy and zest, but often 
yields little beyond facts and 
footnotes. This exhumation 
restores foe foil man to larger- 
than-hfe hfe clever, childish, 
outrageous. 

• Hugo Vickers 

It was almost, impossible to 
obtain Refein Woods: An 
AHtohiogpuphy (SCM Press, 
£1Z95). There is no doubt 
that he revitalized the College 
of .Si Gerage at Windsor 
during his brief spell as Dean. 

• Fiona MacCarthy 

In a poor yearfor life history, 
the greater wdcome for the 
new volume ofThe EWctkraary 
of National Biography (Ox- 
ford, £60) covering the decade 
1971 to 1980, providing 748 
.Mpgrapibies in one. Fra those 
who do not" know it, it is just 
1 about, impossible to give the 
exact flavour of tins amazing 
enterprise winch, very fir 
from being simply an old 
buffers’ bode, last pronounce- 
ments ofthe grand old men on 


HISTORY 

• J. Enoch Powell 

Robert Reid’s Xaad off Lost 
Content: The Luddite Revolt 
(Heincmarm, £14.95) Ru- 
minated with haunting detail 
one epirode in that Industrial 
Revolution which forever tan- 
talizes the men of the 20th 
century, with its premonitions 
of so much that we have 
striven to grasp and to cope 
with In our own time. The 
young Luddite worsted-fin- 
isher George Meflor, who was 
hanged at Yrak in the winter 
of 1812, and the hard-bitten 
Major General Maitland, who 
had him hanged, become im- 
mortal alongside foe charac- 
ters created by Thackeray and 
Dickens. 


CRICKET 

• Chris Flatten 

The Wbdeu Booh of Obito- 
aries compiled by Benny 
Green (Macdonald/Queen 
Anne Press, £29.95) has re- 
placed the Michelin Guide to 
France as my man literary 
companion in foe bathroom. 
It k invaluable for all who 
show a proper interest in foe 
averages of dead cricketers. 


ART 

• John RBsseO Taylor 


MUJTARY 

• wnHam Jadcson 

Two books stand out Nigd 
H a milt on’s third volume of 
his Monty (Hamish Hamit - 
ton, £13) looks bade at our 
recent past, and Jon CramdTs 
New Magteot Line (Seeker & 
Warburg, £12.95) peers into 
the clouded crystal of our 
future. Hamilton prorides a 
fasc in a tin g study ofthe Held 
Marshal at the height of his 
career, and during his declin- 
ing years when he was West- 
ern Europe’s self-imposed 
military mentor. Both periods 
were sadly marred by his 
extraordinary personality de- 
fects. Jon Connell explores the 
equally grotesque flaws in 
current American military 
policy. 

• David Hunt 

No campaign in either ofthe 
two world wars is So vividly 
remembered as foe battles in 
the Western Desert and Libya. 
It was pure war with no 
civilians and no atrocities and 
a dean conclusion. The best 
book has been long in appear- 
ing but arrived this yean 
Michael Carver’s Fji fo i tixi of 
foe Desert War (Batsford, 
£14.95). Lord Carver kings to 
his task the brisk immediacy 
of one who was on the spot 
throughout, in a theatre where 
everyone knew everyone else; 
he is vivacious but astonish- 
ingly impartial in a field where 
angry passions constantly rise. 
He has used the papers of Neil 


THRILLERS 

• Tim Heaid 

Best thriller of foe year was 
John le Carre’s A Perfect Spy 
(HodderA Stoughton, £9.95), 
a classic genre-buster which 
surely deserved to be mea- 
sured alongside the Booker- 
winning Amis. Best first effort 
was Death ia Leningrad by 
John Lear (Pluto, £8.95), also 
— unlike so many artefacts 
under this heading — & real 
book try a real writer. 


ARCHAEOLOGY 

• Glyn Daniel 

The Archaeology of Brittany, 
Normandy and the Channel 
Islands by Dr Barbara Bender 
(Faber, £14.95) is something 
we have all — amateur, pro- 
fessional, ordinary traveller — 
been waiting for. Dr Bender is 


a professional archaeologist 
who has worked for many 
seasons in Normandy, and an 
amusing traveller with wide- 
ranging interests. Her book is 
authoritative and well illus- 
trated with maps and {dans. I 
have been visiting megathhic 
sites in southern Brittany for 
half a century: on a brief 
sentimental pilgrimage this 
autumn to foe classic areas of 
Camac and Locmariaquer I 
took this guide with me and 
found it accurate, detailed and 
full of wise and helpfol new 
ideas. 

Continued on next page 


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“...Andyou maybe 
interested to know that 
the following BBC books 
are available to 
accompany the 
programmes you have 
most enjoyed this 


autumn. 



mm 



BIRDS FOR ALL 
SEASONS 


Jeffery Boswall 


£10.95 hardback 
illustrated 


THE FOOD AID 
COOKERY BOOK 


Edited by Delia Smith 
with a foreword by 
Tern- \ Vegan 


£3.95 paperback 
illustrated 


UNDER SAIL 


Introduction 
bvTom Salmon 


£5.95 paperback 
illustrated 


E. * 


TEi'&Tf’ 


gg| 


Wm 




TEST PILOT 


Brian Johnson 


£10.95 hardback 
illustrated 


^ j 


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THREE MEN IN A 
GARDEN 






A Practical Guide to the 
Complete Garden 
Dr. Stefan Buczacki, Clay 
Jones and Geoffrey Smith 

£12.95 illustrated 


THE MONEY MAKERS 


A:V\ i 


Six Portraits of Power 
in Industry 
David Lomax 


£3.95 paperback 


i- -.W- .1 


■rtf- jri. 

ZOOKS 

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THE TIMES SATURDAY NOVEMBER 29 1986 


CHRISTMAS BOOKS 2 


Another case for 



CRIME 


• Marcel Berlins 


At the elegant, elegiac and 
famous end of the crime- 
writing spectrum. P. D. 
James's long (nearly 500 
pages) A Taste for Death 
(Faber, £9.93) manages to 
combine superb writing, a 
bleak chilling story starting 
with the dual death of an MP 
and a tramp and, in Adam 
Dalgliesh, the most complex 
tormented police hero in fic- 
tion. 


At the other extreme, The 
Lolita Man by Bill James 
(Constable, £8.93) is short and 
forceful. Its cast of blunt, 
tough, dissatisfied coppers is 
convincing; dialogue and 
descriptions are aggressive 


and unyielding; and the plot — 
a search for a sex murderer —is 
only too believable. 


The most enjoyable of the 
American private eye imports 
was the cynically sensitive 
Amos Walker in Loren D. 
Estl eman’s Sugartown (Mac- 
millan, £7.95). a fast and witty 
trip through Detroit's gloom 
to solve a 1 9-year-old murder. 



POETRY 


• Peter Levi 




The best new book of poems I 
read this year was die Col- 
lected Poems of Elizabeth 
Jennings (Carcanet, £14.95). I 
do not understand the quality 
of permanence, but she has it; 
nor the power of poets to 
develop, but she certainly had 
that because her most recent 
work is her best. It must be 
something like good bone 
structure. The best new edi- 
tion of poems is the Penguin 

Shakespeare's Sonnets, edited 

by John Kerrigan (£2.95), 
which uses brilliant recent 
work by K- Duncan-Jones to 
show how the entire collection 
subdivides and how the 
“Lover’s Complaint”, a 
grossly neglected poem, be- 
longs with the Sonnets. This 
edition also gives a serious 
account of textual history. The 
Sonnets are inexhaustible but 
most editions are hopeless. 


delights an fens of the difficult 
and the obscure, eschewing 
any kind of dear subject- 
matter. Ashbery’s friends and 
disciples throw words at the 
page much in the mannerof 
Jackson Pollock hurling paint 
at a canvas, with results about 
as amusing as the average 
Rorschach test. I think it 
worth insisting that Ashbery 
himself has another dimen- 
sion. The content of his work 
may be elusive, but the struc- 
tures have grown increasingly 
beautiful and the effects 
compelling. His Selected Po- 
ems (Carcanet, £16.95) scans 
to me a rich and inspiring 
book, an Arabian Nights* cave 
of treasures and entertain- 
ments. Beside it 1 would 
put the diam etrically different 
excellence of C. H. Sisson's 
translation of The Aeueid 
(Carcanet, £16.95), which 
rnatw a living FpgKshman of 
VlrgiL 


HISTORICAL 


CHILDREN 


Philippa Toomey 


Chilling stuff: another super thriller from PJD. James 9 Robert Nye 


• Brian Alderson 


More Christmas Books in the Books Pa§e of j 0 hn Ashbery is master of that 
December ! 1, including biographies, fiction, science, y or k school of poets 

cooking, and gardens. which flirts with nonsense, 


New York school of poets 
which flirts with nonsense, 


Unequalled among this year’s 
children's books is Allan and 
Janet Ahlberg's The Jolly 


Niccoio Rising by Dorothy 
Dunnen (Michael Joseph, 
£9.95) was a splendid start toa 
historical series, set in 15th- 
century Burgundy, which 1 
hope will occupy the author 
und me fix' the next 10 years. 





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^ Pf ices correc tat limy of g5ing lo press Subject to availability 



Postman (Heinemann. £5.95) 
with its ricfai>' inventive se- 
quence of other-people's-let- 
ters for children to open and 
read for themselves - and 
how many will purloin 
Goldilocks's one pound note 
issued by the Bank ofWonder- 
land? Among books for older 
children I would like to single 
out Ruth Hwia Harris's The 
SBent Shore (Julia MacRae, 
£7.95), carrying us from 1910 
to 1 920 in the first volume of a 
family saga that postpones 
paradise without recourse to 
false dramatics. Lastly, excep- 
tional amid the patsy writing 
that goes on about children’s 
bools, is Maigery Fisher’s 
subtle assured exploration of 
the debatable land of the 
adventure story: The Bright 
Face of Danger (Hodder & 
Stoughton, £12.95). 


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Funny as a 
fruit cake 

vnr*D £ :a _ . 


CHRISTMAS BOOKS? 




TTiis J^s fiwi cake of 
Christmas funnies is even 

ijohd and imetesS 

usual. Pui m your thumb and 

youwiUalmwtcen^SSi . 

2“ ■"{P- '**£&*, H^anthol°gy is Hammer and 

ample slicing T®"*"** a Actionary of 

separates the newjy baked (65 woin ® s J wt and humour 

mJ»°fil tofthel,eapillfiron tof 5°7 p ? 5d Michele Brown 
me) from yesterday's crumbe 22 oJVjE O’Connor (Dent, 
fecddJi.)reyAeMa(35 percent) IS some rather 

gj_repeats, Alan Coren's desperate humour from 
for (he Weekend Amencans over-exerrisme 
(Robson, £6.95) is less stale £? ,r I 5 t * do,n of screech, but 
than most. I liked his efforts to Hlza beth Taylor unexpectedly 

ivf ■ Gu ° rdia u informa- ?“*?: To,d ca ® uaJ fr by Prin- 
uon-retneval system (“Wei- c £ ss Mai^aret that a diamond 

mmA In « - - — — J w-v . CnP urac — * 


humour 


i vvei- 

rome to Guarnaid Datahane 
Give name of the category you" 

^ot" “Winter." 

2£r?tSTdSt ,er * n 


— owvi uuu a uiajDOfHI 

, *3® sporting was rather 
vulgar, Taylor placed it lov- 
“gly on Margaret's finger 
commenting, “There, it's hot 
so vulgar now, is it?” 

A third slice carves the cake 


The Frangh* ^ Pompous 
Woman (Roteorun?^^? £ 5 , ^-““POrtani - MPs, 

pick. Fran giaS-ha tiffs, life "tS? lhe . UiS1 ^Sh by 

myself, can be assured ?Sj n *. abopt themselves in 
Franglais is auite im*iwo«?f 1 books that breathe sanctimo- 
Uk5«x*£ ^Klf-samfectioaCricKrt 

collection - “ d mus,c “* “» <ky- 


•jSi-NasTS 

bey, vs Mansfield Park, The 
f^uble Chalk Circle of 
Szechuan Murder dans La 
-j un (uspecteur 
r.®- 01 ®* Mystery) and La 
Gideon Bible: God's first act 

ofrationts a fiote! Complex 
where He can rest on the 
seventh day and decide how to 
fill the empty Gideon Bible 
left in his room. 


I n Dudley Moore’s some- 
what scrappy Musical 
BwniK (Robson, £7.95), 
[liked the story of Schna- 
. ^ \elling a poor student 

who could not afford his 5 
guinea lessons that he gave 3 
guinea ones but could not 
recommend them. Laughter 
before the Wicket by Peter 
ttontog (Alien A Unwin, 


running (Allen & Unwin 

Alternatively, you can dis- provides a superb 

sect by types of humour. Joke feasl of stories from (among 
“■» make “ p 35 per ojers) J. M. Barrie, Trollope 
rent of the cake, but no real Wodehouse, A. p. Herbert 
humorist tells jokes (can you 3nd Conan Doyle. 

8“f . of 3 i° ke in P. G. . Whatever happens to these 
Wodehouse?). books after Christmas (trans- 

ported off to a Book Mountain 
<****+ ollections of ,n . Bm ^ els and turned into 
m ’ “essays” account for £3* Russian Trade 


C ollections of ,n -. Bni 9 ete ^ turned into 
“essays” account for SHE for Russian Trade 

30 per cent, car- P^a^ons?) two will, I hope, 
toons for 15 per £ I £J!!f.f u k- H ® ,y and 

rpnt anH vn.'^iu Her oton bv Riana Dlinran 




■ 30 per cent, car- 

X. y toons for 15 per 
L rent, and miscella- 
neous anthologies, biography 

nnMrv on/I ■ J 


pop. ^ • "v iiiix, i UUUC 

Sf 3 ** !he cut - History and 
■11a- Her Story by Riana Duncan 
ihv t R< # son ’ £ 5.95) gives “his and 
I * her versions of history in 


poetry and television scrims Per ve *? uon s of history in 

for the rest Alvin StaSS? foiin. Tte Adan/and Puppy7re U ptod ‘Si ' ' "B . ’ JSJBWMV ’ • “ • ' 

Stores out of School (QuiUer, ^ I f speciai| y Wright’s almost entirelv^S " ^J|Llffls0f 

a-95) gives us celebrities’ SkSS^J^ " ho,e d ® p endent what-a-messy ‘ 

^“Ofthetr schooldays; but a s ub_Iexl illustrations bring on nervous R n n«,n.„- a 

335325 i&KSSS « 

their brilliant Yes. Prime |L. umn . complete with illus- 5* Twelve Dow of FICTIOTST falls in love with a taxi meter animals, presided over bv • 

ister scripts (BBC. fsosi Melons (three ex-wives Christnms by Sopbie and a mouse tries to become Hazardik-ladoram. a memhS - whe .^ Bonnie 


PICTURE BOOK S 

A Was an Apple Pie by 
Tracey Campbell Pearson (The 
Bocfiey Head. £4.50) 

Where better to start than with 

the longest book of the year — 
all six yards of it? The text is 
me traditional one with dread- 
ful things happening to the 

Poor pie at the hands of 

marauding children, and you 
ad can read it slice by slice or 
of spread out along the hall 
ur “n ,eL , Either way Miss 
m Pearson’s drawings are a 
it, continuous delight. 

j-r The JoHy Postman, or 

S SS!fflSSLS , " bl ' jBn “ . 

at (Heinsinann. £5.95) 
ly The “other people" win be ^ 
l- well enough known: Mr and 
d Mrs Bear of Three Bears '• 
T Cottage (a letter from 
'- Goldilocks), Mr V. Bigg of ■ 
r Mile High House (a postcard 
t from Jack), HRH Cinderella i 
(a complimentary copy of her • 
e biography from the Peter : 
s Piper Press) and so on. The 
, letters and their appendages 

t are all inside the book, tucked -■ 

i mio envelopes which you can • 
open as you turn the pawy a 
small work of genius. Why ' 
can t the book’s jolly hero get a -p 
job with our Post Office 
instead of the insufferable 
Postman Pat, whose latest 
idiocies (all too dose to actual- '■ 
’ty) have just been encao- : 
plated in four “easy readers” 
(HJppo paperbacks, £1.50 ■' 
each). 

Dudley Books (four titles) 
by Judv Taylor, itlustratad by 
Petar Cross (Walker Books, . x 
£1.95 each) * 

Four-title series seem to be 
[ foshionable this season, but • *’ 
mis set about an engagingly ■ 
dozy dormouse deserves to be 
bought en bloc. The precisely ^ 
drawn pictures have a lot of W- 
witty touches, the text is firm T ‘ 
but unobtrusive; and the price • 
is a public benefit. To some ... ' 

extent that goes for the “Four '• ' 

Square Meals” in Frank ^ • 
Muir s new What-a-Mess se- ■ 
nes too (Black, £2.95 each), ".. 
bm the continuing frantic • 
behaviour of that Afghan \ 


zgmmmmmmm 





CHILDREN'S 







•&F- 












he bested by a couple of 
teenagers. Mr Jefferies writes 
with the old-fashioned idea 
that children read stories lo 
find out what happened next, 
as though social realism and 
heavy fantasy had never over- 
taken the Famous Five. What 
a welcome relief! 

Isaac Champion by Janni 
Howker (Julia MacRaa, £5.95) 

If we have to have social 
realism, then let it be with the 
full-blooded commitment of 
this powerful story of a feud 
between two horse -dealing 
families a: the back end of the 
I9ih century. Janni Howkers 
absorption in the detail of 
Lancashire working-class life 
allows her to teli her bleak tale 
in the convincing tones of her 
Campion protagonist. Hardly 
a book for the Christmas 
fireside, but it signals the 
maturing of a notable talent. 


iffii 

KKjSHi' 


' =i v. [he Happy Eirthdey Book 

** ■ /tei&SstM t : b y Denr,| s Pepper and David 
K ? ‘ Jackson {Oxford. £7.95) 

^ R nrifihf have been more 


J Wmm 


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* , 


: ister scripts (BBC, £8 95 ) ? ra I ,l ® n » (three ex-wives 
strike me as ruinously ham- ! nc,u “ e ?)- Bernard’s unswerv- 
fisted. y JPS dedication to the con- 

o _ n« « fesred absurdities of booze 

^ randma feD off f 3gs. the horses, unsuitable 
“ a , woraen ’ ov erspending and the 
must for those who do not law courts, have made him thp 
know Hairy Graham, the arehetypS’ l£3te Objec? 
Saki-esque master of the light Lesson, a Knight in Shining 

%//„ f ■ Black /ymour who spends his 

Billy, w one of his nice new hfe tilting at WindraSl Girls 

iSSimtkMB A L P n soft going, missing, and 
Fell m the fire and was burnt landing up in bed with the 

, , friend Revenue and a shoe 

Nm. although the room full of Chinese takeaway. He 

S Vhmj!%’,h u , Jirili be ssdiy missed as Deputy 

poor Billy 1 ^ hem l ° ^ ha,r7nan of : foe Tory Party. 

Pertaps Ihe mofl infra.- Peter Jones 


— --WHVU uaU”Wf 

Book Two. 

The Twelve Days of 

<MlSK b &y eWindham 


FICTION 


imauiniHn, XO.OU; 

An advent calendar for the EUJKS?" ^ 


■''“Vtf ^UUdLUldS. 

tach page pictures the tra- 
ditional tnieiove gift while, 
opposite, doors and flaps run 
be opened to reveal all the 
previous offerings. A beautiful 

ni/w rtf _ 


_ ‘■I.™ 

SSJ'S J his year the 

B^ke/^oban team produced 
i he Ram Door, a scatty 
picture book about a thunder- 
storm, featuring a rag-and- 


Piece of dSTSSim Sr ,ea!uriag a rag-and- 
cleverly conceived “variaSt f «oS k SJ >lk 

Pictures, especially for the No . w 


■ " tbiuuii 

pictures, especially for the 
partridge who has to appear in 
a dozen different poses. 

f - /.f. -r v 


. - — — v 1>UW 

(hey return with an apparently 
more sober but in fact more 
suneal, story in which an owl 

pdii • f£&A. .♦ "■* * ■’ . ■ '« / 


falls in love with a taxi meter 
and a mouse tries to become 
an hibiscus. In lesser hands 
the whole thing would be 
catastrophic, but Russell 
Hoban writes with the 
compelling conviction 

Noah’s Brother by Dick 
King-Smith, illustrated by Ian 
Newsham (Goliancz, £5.95) 
Deserting his accustomed ter- 
ritoiy of flying pigs and 
intellectual parrots, Dick 
King-Smith turns to an ark- 
full of comparatively normal 




LUKE: NOUGHT TO 21 

TFE STORY OF A GLDED VOUTH 

ByJVNESmm. 

^xj've never feadanythhs 
so witty. .sosexy. .soentert^mg 

NJT0I5CUS PRESS C3 95 


The tension of a thriller. 
The richness of a saga. 
The power of modern drama. 


animals, presided over by 
Hazardik-Iadoram, a member 
of Noah’s family overlooked 
by the scribes of the Old 
Testament. I can’t think why, 
since he is a for more engaging 
fellow than his pusillanimous 
relations and his story is more 
touching, and decidedly fun- 
nier, than theirs. 

The Visitors by Angela Bull, 
inustrateef by vale no Uttiawood 
(Hamish Hamilton, £3.25) 

Queen Victoria, incognito on 
one of her Great Expeditions, 
must needs spend a night at a 


‘ h 

V Jt V/J 


Highland inn where Bonnie 
Pnnce Charlie is still revered. 
The story is deftly told, nudg- 
u^ the reader into secrets 
which the characters take 
more time to discover, and 
bolding the worst of the 
expected sentimentality at 

Meeting Trouble by 
Roderlc Jefferies (Hodder & 
Stoughton, £ 6 . 50 ) 

Computer scientist under du- 
ress. bis family under threat, 
me police complacent - how 
delightful that they can still all 

... ;■ 


i lSTv 1 ' appropriate tc recommend 
K'$ Dennis Pepper's new Oxford 
a v '>* Book of Christmas Stories 
<£7.95), an excellent and 
smoothly produced anthol- 
ogy. Far preferable - for 
Chnstinas, too - is this birth- 
day compendium: a great 
j"um ble of stories, jokes, verses 
and little-kncwTi facts (did you 
“ ow tbai Captain Kirk has 
"S* 11 “d, 

^ final from). The whole boiling 
“ set about with crowds of 
fr* vulgar illustrations, very 
^ 5 ? proper for the party season. 

< 5 $ Christmas Tir.dsrfioa by 

S Sue NlchcJIs (Black, £6.95) 

A more sober volume, as 
W? befi ts one intended “primarilv 
H 2 ? 2 reacber’s resource book”’. 

But the good ideas for things 
^ to make and things to do 
y alongside some well-chosen 
3 | stones, poems and carols, 

3a make it a handy parents' 
g resource book too. 

A Bag of Moonshine by 
Alan Gamer, illustratecf by 
% Patrick Jamas L«mch 
| (Collins, £8.95) 

| Twenty-two traditional Brit- 
isn stories and rigmaroles, 

[ f° me being variants on well- 
known tales (“MolJyndrout” 

, ,s a Manx RumpelstiltsJan), 
others with more elusive ech- 
oes. The blurb cracks up Mr 
Lynch's sub-Rackham pic- 
tures, but it seems to me that 
they needlessly intrude on 
Alan Garner's marvellous 
storytelling. With words like 
this, who needs drawings? 

The reverse argument ap- 
phes to The Magf- Ointnaent 
and other Cornish legends 
(Anaersen Press, £7.95) where 
Enc Quayle's ieaden prose is 
much enhanced by Michaei 
Foreman’s pictures, dramatic 
and skittish by turns. 


-n. $■■■ 


“■ ■■ A .. 


to rest them on: not at 
all suitable for a comfortable 
bedthise read. Then come the 
pockrt gmdc^ pioneered fry 
MUcheO Beazley, which slide 
into the jacket as neatly as an 
e x a min ation crib or an opera 
libretto. 

Thin this year tends to be 

especially in (be case of 
Champagne and Sparkling 
(Mitchell Beazley, 
*2*95)by otnr own Jane 
MbcQmtly. Seagram’s are an- 
bfeiy to be raising a glass to 
J**. fo* atying that the 
Hei dsieck Dr y Monopole NV 
“ cwiwitly a dnfl dis- 

appointmg mouthfol with 


cue: mt Johnson finds more 
*wtetrian grape varieties and 
wm» than were ever dreamt of 
on the road to old Stain bool. I 
floesfes, though, a final sec- 
tion headed “Wines at then- 
peak id 1987”, which lists no 
fewer than eight vintages of 
Rr* 4s crus dass^s. If so then 
there really is a heavy drink- 
tog year ahead. 

The most important of the 
ut books is Janos Robinson’s 
Vines, Grapes and Wines 
(Mitchell Beazley, £16.95), 
"bfoh is the first in my 
experience to analyse wine 
through the grapes that ac- 
tually produce it Why did no 
one think of it before? Miss 


. ® vraiuaa 

vmeyards. The practical robs 
shoulders with the pompons, 
as when in Warzbnrg the 
aothor samples “the immortal 
vintage of 1546”. 

TThe prize for the worst 
writing - or translation — goes 
to Beaujolais; The Complete 
(Michael Joseph, 
£19.95). When wine-makers 
■vo described as knowing 
“how to direct whole or- 
chestras of organoleptic ele- 
ments and subtle aldehydes, 
till they reach a crescendo of 
sweetness” we are swept into 
the world of the tourist office 
brochure and maybe reach for 
a glass of something stronger 












wmes 




THE GREEN FLASH 

f 400 pages of sustained tension- 
tremendous narrative power' 

M&rtyn Goff, Da#y Telegraph 

'Defies one not to read on . . . 
absorbing, unpredictable' 

Daly Mai 

Collins £10.95 


DICK FRANCIS GREAT RATTLES 

BOLT OF WORLD WAR 

n 

JOHN MACDONALD 
Foreword by 

Genera] Sir John Hackeu 
’A vivid new dimension to the 
historian's viewpoint' (Len 
Deighton), with brilliant 

Financial Times V hB *?! 

‘Brilliantly authentic’ new instghis to 17 crucial 
Vogue £ 9.95 ^risofthewar 

*-?^y** illustrated throughout 

LrM I C H A E L JOSEP 



DILLONS 

THE BOOKSTORE 

... . Marx? Marlowe? Marlow? Maigret 7 Mahlpr? 


KEITH 
WATERHOUSE 
THE THEORY AND 
PRACTICE OF LUNCH 

An elegantly witty and au- 
thoritative manual on the art 
of taking the most agreeable 
meal of the day, by an 
acknowledged master of the 
practice 

£595 illustrated 

A: •: 


MISS READ 

TIME REMEMBERED 
Illustrated by 
Derek Crowe 

The second volume of her 
enchanting autobiography, 
set in the village of Chekfield 
during the early Twenties 
£7.95 


THE BEST YEARS 



The National Service 
Experience 1945-M 
TREV OR ROHE 
‘An inieliigentiy-wriiien 
hook about a fascinating 
episode in Britain's post-war 
social history*’ 

Auberon Waugh Daily Mail 
£12.95 illustrated 


I Iiifv— 171/3 

Barbara Sneyd 
adapted by 
Phylb'da Barstow 
A vhid and captivating 
picture of tum-of-ihe- 
century country life, seen 
through the sketchbooks, 
diaries and letters of a 
talented young girl. 

£12.95 

reproduced in full 
colour throughout 

!|L pel 


Second Innings 
A Lord's Taverners’ 
Miscellany of Cricket 
edited by 
Leslie Frevvin 

The book that every cricket 
enthusiast will want to own: 
a treasure trove of anecdotes 
and reminiscences, stories, 
poems and pictures from a 
star-studded list of more 
than fifty contributors. 

£14.95 illustrated 

ham 


COMPANION 

Jill and Martin Leman 

A new collection of Martin 
Leman s distinctive and de- 
liSklfiil cat paintings, each 
one accompanied by a poem 
specially chosen to compli- 
ment its mood. 

£5-95 colour throughout 



BOO K S 







THE TIMES SATURDAY NOVEMBER 29 1986 




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I always thought the proper 
way to approach any place was 
by foot. But not a town in Java 
like Jogjakarta. The proper 
way is by pedicab made for 
two or three and a sack of rice. 
Their mudguards are painted 
brightly, bearing powerful and 
exotic names: Rocket, Laju, 
Apollo, Aha. 

Java is a long, lanky island 
that sports a central chain of 
volcanoes running west to 
east; Pangrango and Gedeh, 
Malabar amd Slamet, the 
twins Merbabu and Merapi 
above Jogjakarta, then Lawn 
and the perfect crater of 
Mount Bromo, best seen 
smoking at dawn. 

Only one pedirab was 
painted as an eruption, a red 
crater spewing out yellow lava 
all over the mudguards. Oth- 
ers were chequered with batik 
patterns, formalized beasts, 
Hons and dragons, disporting 
themselves above the wheels. 
Even the Cellophane hoods 
and front wrappers were deco- 
rated to charm away the 
looming rain. 

A pedicab to the main 
shopping street leading from 
the sultan’s palace, the 
Malioboro, is a journey 


H0T 

SPOTS 


Javanese life 
moves at the 
perfect pace for 
Andrew Sinclair 


through Javanese street life. 
Pony-carts with bright brass 
carnage lamps come dipping 
by the bicycles and the scoot- 
ers. Trucks and orange buses 
bulging with passengers belch 
by, respecting the pedkabs 
crawling along as part of the 
road. 

Water-carriers with twin 
tanles on die ends of a long- 
pole, old women in sarongs 
with dried gardens on four 
heads, nuns m violet habits in 
jeeps, buffaloes and ducks and 
cods — all pass as slowly as 
ourselves. There is no strain 



except for the man standing at 
the pedals behind. 

The walk down the Mali- 
oboro is through an avenue of 
painted leather and weird 
shells, stickers for Rambo and 
Madonna and piles of strange 
fruits, the best of which is the 
rambutan, its sweet-sour 
white flesh hidden within a 
hairy shefo 

For most people, Jogjakarta 
is a stopover between Bang- 
kok and Bali. But it is more: it 
is the cultural capital of Java. 
About 1,250 yean ago, foe 
Buddhist ruler of foe Mataran 
empire in Java decided to earn 
his place in his heaven by a 
mighty deed of merit At 
Borobudur he began foe 
construction of foe greatest of 
all foe step pyramids. The 
lower three terraces represent 
foe life foal must pass; the 
middle three the renunciation 
of desire by those seeking the 
Way, foe top three platforms 
show nirvana, foe Buddhist 
heaven. Delicate frescos of 
sinners and of foe birth of 
Buddha surround foe lower 
levels, with episodes from his 
life, and allegories of meta- 
morphoses to a higher sphere 
continuing on the rising plat- 
forms; statues of the seated 
Buddha fill every niche and 
corner. 

Many of these Buddhas are 
headless because of those 
executioners called collectors 
or museums. The pinnacle of 
foe monument contains a 





L* .• 


Calm contemplation: on the step pyramid of Borobudur, the Bi 



toll 

TRAVEL NE’ 






i *7 5’ . 


jgSM 




an 

ana Ano|tt«s&«oBBectioDs 

to other riftnds, nrtorfny & 
and Grenada. ' 

The p rog ramm e dra in, 
dudes Concosdc’s round-the- 
world dr. anise d epar t ing 
from Heathrow on Maich7 
for an I&day tour -which 
inrfndrs visit* to Moscow, 
Cairo, Delhi, Guam, 

HomoWn, Mafeft Qty, Bar- 
bados ad New York. The 
price is £14,995, based an tam 
occupancy of hotel rooms or 
£15,790 .-oduive of amgfe- 
room ^supp l niittfl. Informa- 
tion from agents .or from 
Spcedhird an6S-?4l S04L 


gazes over foe valley towards the endrding mountains 


^nmntOT 


chamber without a Buddha: 
He has entered nirvana. We 
contemplate nothingness. 

The approach to Borobudur 
is along a curving walk, 
scented with a honeyed mint 
The steps up to foe monument 
on its green hillock do not 
anticipate foe wonder of its 
site. Looking past 
oeneUations or the tight curls 
on the back of a Buddha's 
head, the eye flies tike a hawk 
to the wrinkles and nnmds on 
the riffling mo untain*. The 
green of foe slopes and the 
valley is vivid and virulent, 
the green of paddy field and 
palm and banana, foe rich 
verdure from rain and mon- 
soon. 

The far volcanoes to the 
centre of Java raise their 
slanting shoulders to a head of 
a cloud. They seem to suck out 


the floods that bathe the crops* 
and the people most 
afternoons. 

At the Hotel Ambamikmo 
Palace there is a floating 
octagonal restaurant, foe Bah: 
Kambang, where we sit with 
our feet in small circular holes 
under foe tables and Javanese 
waiters kneel to serve us 
“royal” Indonesian cuisine, 
mainly satay on sticks, spiced 
chicken and rice, and peanut 
sauce with everything. 

Jogjakarta is a sultan’s city, 
radiating from his palace, a 
wonderland of ornate pavil- 
ions and gilded beams, 
su ggesting lirnittes* wealth as 
palaces should. The present 
sultan was a great supporter of 
foe Indonesian republican 
guerrillas, including the 
present President General 
Suharto. The palace was their 


base. Accordingly, foe sultan 
has kept some power and great 
reputation, although the 
power seems no more real 
than the puppet play that we 
saw on our way out of the Bale 
Kambang. 

In front of an orchestra of 
souattmc aona-nlavers. smil- 
ing uncontrollably and puffing 
their exotic cheroots, sat a 
demented, dark magician, his 
teeth protruding past his blade 
lips and blacker turban. 
Ranged on either side of him 
and his tittle stage were three 
dozen puppets, the white- 
faced ones fine and sensitive, 
the red-faced ones angry and 
demoniac, with slides, at- 
tached to each hand, which 
the puppeteer manipulated 
with frenzy. 

Gongs beating, a lone 
woman «mg like a banshee 


and the puppeteer gabbled and 
yelled. Bang-ban#bang J foe 
wtrite-feced puppet would slap 
the red-feced villain. Bang- 
bang-bang, the red-feced vil- 
lain would riposte. 

The puppet show was in- 
terminable but hypnotic. 
There was no sense of drama, 
of timing, of dimax, only of 
episodes which could have 
gone on all night. • 

Is this Muslim island, the 
art of foe ancient Hindus and 
Buddhists is the monument to 
peace. There is a vast tol- 
erance here until the next 
eruption, volcanic or re- 
ligions, divine or human. Java 
has a measured pace^ stow, a 
pedicab speed that makes us 
see more of the people behind 
that puppet show which is 
usually presented to us on 
a tour abroad. 


First cf the major ferry op- 
erators to announce its fiats 
for next summer is Ttnmsend 
Tharesen. A family of Jour win . 
be (Ale to mmd mm their car 
from Dover to Odais, Ostend 
or Zeebntgge from. £65 one- 
way in tke peak season, only 
£3 mare than last summer. : 

Townsend Thoresen wffl- 
atso be offering lower fates on 
selected peak-season satiates 
to Calais. Information: 0304 
203388. 


• The cost oftear riB n g jBw 
Xoadoa to Dabfe by rail ad 
sea from Holyhead or 
Liverpool has heat cat for 17 
per cot, to £39. It wiH be 
vaBd up to December 17 raid 
from January 26 anfil tether 
notice. Information from 
British Rail travel centres. 


WEATHER EYE ? 




Daytime temperatures at 
sea level are generally in the 
upper eighties, but it tends 
to Be cooler at higher altitudes. 
The humidity is always 
uncomfortably high at sea 
level, but becomes more 
bearable higher up. Winter is 
the wettest time of year 
with dry, sunny mornings. 


Wheel time: pedicab power on foe streets of Jogjakarta 


heavy afternoon showers 
and frequent rainy days. 



TRAVEL NOTES I: 


Bookbargafcos 


Java la most economfcagy 
visited on a round-the-worid 
ticket from a spedafist travel 

a aqentfflca TraMnders (01-837 
w Reho Travel (0MG5 
Expect to pay about 
for economy class. The 
most convenient airport for 
Jogjakarta is Denpasar, BaflL 
A double room at the 
Ambamdano Palace Hotel 
costs about £55 a night 


Kuoftii has just published the 
first of a series of qnutedy 
“limit ed Edition" brochures 
fisting tang-haul holiday bar- 
gains, winch include tong- 
weekend breaks in Cafiforma 
at £299, seven nights in Mexi- 
co for £449. and a seven-ntfa 
Nile cruise from £349. Infor- 
mation: 0306 885044. . 




Philip Ray 



HOLIDAYS & VILLAS 



teTri 


NOW YOU OU 
AFFORD TO 
ESCAPE 10 THI 
SUN IN SPAIN 



SeofonlyMoneysavei5tol3deslinatlonsto no extras to pay. 

•Stoy Sniffs- J m<xfo.#Schectoiedcloyfimeflighb-noconso&kitions. 

• Daily departures tram Heathrcw ond Manchester • FuB details and instant - 
axnputowsen«SonsfrDm yourlATAtravalcigent 
a ring ttwfat London (01) 437 5622 (30 lines), HrminghamflEl) 64S1953. 
Manchester (061)436 6444, Glasgow(041) 248 6581 . 

AI major creefit cards ciccepted. Faasin^iDSamnmapai^ 


».Tf .... 
9 1 *- Lsiv- 

sL- ’ 


tifiOj. 


&JJJ f 

TWf^ 




Ireland. 

Weekends 

From £iul. 


How about an exotic 
holiday in Glasgow? 


Ireland. Whether you fancy a weekend break 
in the character and charm of the city or prefer 
the gentle pace of the country, there's some- 
thing for you - and all from just £122 
per person. Prices are based on two adults 
travelling together and include: 

• Return air travel from London to Dublin. 
(Shannon/Cork only £20 extra per person.) 

• 2 nights' accommodation in a choice of 
superior town and country houses. 

• 2 DAYS' FREE CAR-HIRE 


Think again! From December 1 5Bi. a twice-weekly 
NON-STOP service will be m operation between 
GATWICK and WASH INGTOWBALTI MORE, with 
continuing service to LOS ANGELES. 

That means new seat availability. And fantastic 
value. Plus the most important ingredient of art, 
ENJOYABLE flying. Air America knows how to make 
its passengers happy. So . . . Happy Christmas! 

* BALTIMORE/WASHINGTON LOS ANGELES 
O/W Return Q/W Return 

▼ £139 £278 £199 £398 

■ £179 £358 £235 £470' 

▼GET ACQUAINTED FARE ■ EASY SAVER FARE 


Swaying palm rr rr : nHrTtm errnp 

and exotic scenery don't spring insanity to 
mind when yon drink of Glasgow. Btrn r 
thinking aTGtagom Jamaica instead. 

The Glasgow we'ne got In mind is a fir 
i ay from the one in Srntfanri 1ft always 
L i mnv and sunny sUi a ntber more 
ft tropical feeL 

w For die Jamaica Infarnarion Pack, 
LI write n Jamaica IbuisiBoant 50 Scjsnxft 
li Snm London SWUV 0TM-499 noj/oofi 
V408W5. vJI/- 



=i=va 


DECEMBffi VILLA AND FLIGHT BARGAINS 


AUSTRALIA 


Self catering villa holidays inclusive of flight also 
. ftighl only from Gatwick, Luton Fru*t«h, 

and Manchester. AiriVIUa 

Destmalion Depart DoraHtM Pitas front . iodube 
LANZAROTE 4Dec 2wks £129 £65 

LANZAROTE IDec 3wks 5139 £65 

LANZAR0TE II Dec Iwk 5139 £75 

LANZAROTE II Dec 13davs SMB £75 

ALGARVE 7 Dec 112 wfo .5129 £65 


CHRISTMAS TRAVEL 


□-*-TR/VHBAG®x 

co»uno.CMhem 8 IPn 8 aCTBiWa 



RING (0223) 31 1 113/350777 (24hie) 

Beach Vflas (Hofidanl IkL DeptaUitaW fessatr. Cdmbrtdge CB23QR 


*i» wnum nr» urn %i — 




1ST & CLUB CLASS FUOKTSc 



t WorWMda low-cost ffigMs 
Ttw boat - and wa tam prow it 
19&000 cflmas dnee 1070 


TWwL (03327) - 2*5097 

rsmoa/xnatt. 


/im/IMERIC/l 

Ready to go Dec. 15 th! 


the QreaX^ 
Carrier ZReef 


RENT BEST BUYS 
I ms World from £766 


MLMU. ouuwa. 01 Ml 
till. TnmMR. ADOk AML- 


nnpalna Q M 

And many more 


rang now on 


56-60 Conduri Street London W1R SFO 
01-439 92S2(Admn/Sales) TekR:2956S9 


•Suapa 10 flov am mew Approval 


lY0«4*-CWagTMAS BREAKS 


To book now, call Aer Lingus Holidays on 
01-439 7262. But hurry this offer doses on 
1 5 December 


OVERSEAS 

TRAVEL 


Romantic i| 

ways to Rome. 


Hotel B Parahro a 

_ ■»- • « ■ » » AH 


nr. Marbelia -*■■*■*-*■ 


ft HowBaUtKtaaJmra* frj 

0582-400000 


WHERE EAST . MKTS WEST 

TUNRUA— DJERBA. 

for flw hottday of m Wmtiatm 


Experience! the luxury of a 
true tropical paradise. Waft 
white sandy beaches. See 
the magnificent colours of 
the world's most famous 
coral reef! 

Far and away 
your first choice 
We know Australia and we 
will give you the best 
value for money Write 
now for our. FREE holiday 
aftxirri or see your Travel 
Agent. abta 



*. WWW Fran MS& Oifti 
ran ast a. 


£369. stunt ore CAS7. Other 
FE Cilia. 01-064 6614 ABTA. 


SELF-CATERING 


42-4* Eaita Court Road 
London tm CEJ 
. OPEN W MON-SAT 
Lonp4taol ei-937 MSI 
and 0l-«03 1516 
EwofwjU&A 91-9S7 5400 
Imt/Bmmea* «-988 3444 



| ABTA IATA ATOL/14S9 


SELFCATERING 
CANARY A MADEIRA 


I ngming, nenriddoma. Pay 1 
for 2 wHb, stay 3. Up to 60K 


nsCOUNTH) FARES 


IcMd raduorion. 


DOMtA < E«Si 


real floSMity tot 


Vf.liL*A/V/j 


1 You'll Only Know By Being There. 


FBOM 

te m «,ngm rras 

imsm 

bum aazuiffzna 

jUMB 2IJB/12 £T2S ■ 

BIBO £145 

PALMA 26jyi2rtia 

man m 


for bmebun. pittas* phone : . 

01-262 2734 

Swrara Hying Sawfc— 


liMe IC0NG£55ol 

*MM^»o| 


I Sdectedhotek-.-am^bitafale 
ffiahl tiroes... umqtteEfCwade 
vafaKforatmcy 
i Phone 01-749 703 CM hoi 
I farfrw wJora-tepdrori Wfi 


1987 BROCHOBE 
ROW AVAILABLE 


UP UP & AWAYj 


StK-antiag vramts. hott 
and yachts on Yuoosianl a 's 
bBMritl Mud of tarafe. 


NturebL Jofiare. Cairo, Oubol 
btariboL Smpoic. KJ. Deflii. 


^XMAS 





Algarve Tenerife 


81 987 1131 
Mol ISM 


The Amencac. 
«aTtavd, ! 
may Aveanei 
WIV7DG. 


W-4 »flfo2/t M»T751 

OmSMwdayltun-Ujog 



Ml* ICONHS 

sagargasv»“ 

MM ASUN TRAVEL UD 


mm vuin. me larr fldn. Shared 
POOL AMI on. T« 0906 0304 
Ad ATOL 9X1 


iDSCMK Ooao Lao ABMricas. 2 
bid. tax. ant_ nnniVhrMi 
TCE0993 s«au5 


' M bale In Para * 



Vy avail 01 836 4661. 
e ituri l iU . ABTA. 


SHJZCATEMNG 

FRANCE 


NEW LOW FARES _ 

MM«H B35 HNWr t» 
bohacl oh wk mat S 
OBB ESOS BdLTMHE EZ7B 

as?* gs&i is 

m 

bww*. nra Tjuna tsa 
riNMOa EMSktaO SSB 

2 DwfSSfSlS Wt- 

Til: n -09 3sn«V7 

muk ano 


Few remaining hofitiays 

* Selected Hotote** 
6** * 

cay Tried SI-680 8191 
* * ♦ * 


m/ma. case p«th wo. on 
motor e ame w to Auo/nz. oi- 
084 7371 ABTA. 


■OMOCOO BOUND, mgmn 6 L 
Wl. Ol 734 0307. ABTA/AtoL 


CITY BREAKS 
SPECIALISTS 

WBMKIBBW, 
ROME, VBffiX, RfiRENCE 
CtfRKE HOUMYS UD 

31i ftawKBav 


'tar fines dare of 


DOCOWIT FAMCS W aftdwkt«l 
01-454 0734 Jocdbr TravoL | 


cncAP njtMn worwwMM. 
haymanuH 0L-930 136& 


■nr VOBK, 1_A_ USA. For am 
t ti — o es rarm. fBetunoodTiav 
•L 1 Data Street. Rtannooo 
Surrey. ABTA 01-940 4073. 


TEL 8138 316822 (24ta*i 
f’taw lor a bracture todw. 


WAremW. 01-387 9100 


ONX CALL tor twanr e* m* e>eM 
orm tn ntoMs. a ratnnw iD . *o- 
tefe) ad car Idre. Tal Loodoa Ol 
636 (woo. nunaiceitr oat esz 
200 a Air Travel Atfvfsay 


war never ten you we ora tta» 

rarapMi on Mr qm w aradeo- 
Uunon. w, win Ktiow you. Tet 

Ol VT9 7778 ABTA. 

XMAS «y?T Dw « Summer 47. 
DHM. Canarlu. Cnea Ob 1 
Mi 6 wk hois 0/1 fr £399. 
Lunf ee pe. 01-441 4123 

amm. 


latw Aten e cA . low cm 
monte •« Me £468. Um 
£496 m. AM Gseofl Oraun 


CmWk AM/hoMe f rom 
many OX niiinrta. FMrwayi 
Travel CEL 907 Q20B ABTA 


^| ^Sg:-»SA ?«n£ffii£ 


from jaW JLA 01-747-310B ’ 


iMHTMAfl Cyme, u Ctam 
hotel on randy tai fr H/raw, 
Iwk £299. 3wM £360. Pan 
World even SuLOl 704 2862. 


mvcouhto 4 anew 

2S3 ssr UTA 


Al w HoteatasginnmBed 
(tMftnk, 

61fln, ftkoen d» 

wrier 14 ooTTremeL 
CgOorvmK far year bradwt. 

<*}E3SSF5? 

K7P0I nutwuli MUl M 


7AKC 7MB OTT to we. Am- 


l ^Sa. F n^a«wSol ‘nr cm. 

Aftm. AiHi ra Wd, A at 
TrayvNc. 48 Mrenet Street. 

m. 01 eeo «» tvua 

AMOMBd) 




SeoBoB IWUwiOl tOt 9712 
ABTA ATOL 1170 


w wrng r wt Qfcra ad arecM 
a/w £420 lie £778- Jetwi MnettOww. Marin. Morac- 

deye. Ol 73* 2662. 


tMMUL Bjy m MHdmr 
whore K*e atTO eoenmra. Can toe. 


rKh. The Hague. DaHm. 
Rouen. S outoon * ® Otewe. 
Time Off. 2a. Chester CUeo. 
Lcnonn SWLX 7BQ. 01.238 

eoro. * 


VP. Ttnectfe. Oreemt TtaKny. 

mb. Eam. Sri Lanka m 

iSaraM/IRiih.VWi». 
OOTQ 331100. ATOL 2084. 


Travel Burma. OT-573 441 L 


084 7371 .ABTA 


the p wre taneh aAta IATA 

cr esamed. Tel Ol 2S4 87SS ■MTTAMV Lavdy ptBm. See 400 
^^«84.AhmAW 

WO U Uf m. Dotty OWJ, « a_m ona». OS 9W. Tet SS9 

gg> :«4 « f>rf*a555t fiS5 . 

BW. MsSBaap JeL 0X579 3322 ' T*anilBaul OS w 

















lN* ilv Ij£/> 


THE TIMES SATURDAY. NOVEMBER 29 1986 


SHOPPING 












Fairyland: the pretty ski resort of EhrwaU in A nsfia, canopied in several inches of snow 

Nostalgic journey to 
ski in the distant past 


Sknng has to be reckoned an 
extravagance, even for bs in- 
curable addicts who have coxae 
to regard the annual fix as 
pretty well a necessity. So to 
combine it with a largely 
irrelevant journey on the Ori- 
ent Express might seem to be 
overgilding the lily. 

Bnt it was, as they say, an 
invitation one could not reftise, 
and on a murky March morn- 
ing the departure from Vic- 
toria in the plash comfort of a 
Pullman carriage, rh»mpwgm» 
to hand and the prospect of a 
leisnrely hmch to follow,, 
seemed in every way snperior 
to the frenzy and discomfort of 
Gatwick Airport 

The journey fulfilled nearly 
all our expectations, the res- 
taurant Car at riinmnr fwno 
replete with fancy-dress trav- 
ellers who might have beea 
recruited straight from Cen- 
tral Casting for an Agatha 
Christie film. Later, awakened 
by the jolting night-time stops 
through Switzerland, listening 
to the station announcements 
echoing across empty plat-' 
forms, over breakfast begin- 
ning the long familiar haul op 
to the Art berg, I was reminded 
of skiing holidays in the 
distant past, of overnight ski- 
specials with disco music blar- 
ing down the corridors and the 
floors awash with spilled 
drinks. 

I have to admit to a hopeless. 


John Young 
indulges himself 
with a ticket to 
Austria in the 
sedate luxury of 
the Orient Express 

Idas in favour of Austria. X 
know it does not aiways have 
the long steep “hairy” rams to 
be found around the concrete 
resorts that have been grafted 
on to the high treeless slopes 
of Savoy and Valais. Yon may 
need a car or bos to get from 
your hotel to the ski-lift 
instead of an elevator from 
your apartment Yon may have 
to queue for longer than yon 
would like and, in the absence 
of a technological miracle of 
interconnecting lifts and 
pistes, yon may have to ski the 
same slope several times. 

At Ehrwald, the three-stage 
cable car ap to the summit of 


TRAVEL NOTES 


Crystal Holidays' prices 
range from £159 lor one week 
hair-board to £459 for two 
weeks, including airfare, 
depending on the time of 
season. The equivalent prices. 



1 ; 




1 

i ’ 

D 


X _ 

new 

Pi 




Is. 

b 

£ 

toei 

j 

r 



n i - •'« 



Your health 
and well-being 
in good hands. ^ 


indoor and outdoor thermal suimming pools. 

Our tharmcl tpfingi ham H%« m.rtrol ionu,i 

ofonrinSwiUttlond. : ' \ ' ‘ - 


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Paris Poster 


For a free copr of an 
attractive poster delight- 
fully iOusratcd by Andilic 
together with our 
brochure on individual 
mchttivr holidays to this 
beautiful city, wrier to - 
Tune Off Ltd-, 
la Cheater Close, 
London SW I X7BQ. 




People in the know about skiing 
know about Bladon Lines! 


Chalet parties, hotels and 
self catering holidays in 47 
top resorts- Prices from £99 
for 1 week by air. Save £40 
and gain a day's skiing with 
sleeper coach travel. 


from Gatwick. Luton. 
Manchester. Glasgow & 
Edinburgh. 

(01) 785 2200 

Munch. Dcps. 0422-7KI2I 



ABTA lr.71) 
ATOL 1 23’ 




" Where in the world did Franz Klammer 
learn to ski?” 


It was on the Austrian 
mountains of Carimhia that Franz 
Klammer: the greatest downhill 
skier oFall time, learnt his skills. 

Many championships latei; 
he Still returns to his native 
mountains for their unrivalled 
slopes and apr&s ski atmosphere, 
with good food, hot drinks and 

lively entertainment. 

Of course w e cant guarantee, 
you such fame, but we can 
offer you the chance to win a 


fabulous holiday for two and a 
unique video in which Franz 
Klammer takes to the slopes of 
Carinthia once more, showing 
Duncan Goodhew and Sharron 
Davies how it should be done 
For full details of Carinthia's 
fabulous resorts and entry into 
our free competition contact: The 
Austrian National Tourist Office, 
Carinthia Dept, 30 St George St, 
London, W1R0AL 
(Tel. 01-629 0461). 


the Zugsphz Is said to be the 
oldest m Europe, and looks it. 
Not only does the journey take 
a painfully long time, bnt it 
involves ranch climbing of 

steps and tramping of 
passageways, and the glacier 
skiing at the top is not very 
exciting when yon get there. 
The Ehrwakleralm. on the 
other side of the town, is modi 
prettier, although it would 
have little appeal to dedicated 
piste-bashers. 

So what is the appeal of 
Austria, other than middle- 
aged nostalgia, romanticism 
and satisfaction with some- 
thing not too demanding? It is 
hard to say, bat X know that 
the wooded glades nowadays 
bring a lifting of the spirits 
such as I have never known on 
the altiplano of the Isfre. 

On oar first morning, as we 

Stood in b rilliant e mwhiyw- j flw 
woods canopied with several 
inches of overnight powder, 
my colleague from the Sunday 
Times and X were moved to 
admit that it was prettier even 
than Wapping. 

travelling by coach, are 
from £129 to £419. There are 
reductions of 20 per cent 
for children under five and 15 
per cent for those under 1 1 
travelling by air. Travelling 
by the Orient Express, one 
way, costs £349 more. 


A bedtime story 

^ Ss> V_ Cnartaa Mfflgan 


A new hi-tech 
range of electric 
duvets can read 
body language. 
Nicole Swengley 
investigates 

Duvets sparked a bedtime 
revolution when they were 
introduced to Britain I S years 
ago. An estimated 60 per cent 
of households snuggle under 
them but, despite their 
popularity, English fens of 
continental quilts have grad- 
ually discovered faults with 
their new-found bed-mates. 

Typical English summers, 
for instance, mean that tem- 
peratures may be in the seven- 
ties one night and dip below 
fifty the next. And winter 
creates extreme problems for 
duvet owners with a low tog 
rating (the measure of bow 
quickly body heat escapes 
through the quilt). 

Then, there's the perennial 
problem of cold feet, warm 
nose — and, worse still, quar- 
rels between sleeping partners 
who aren't comfortable in bed 
at the same temperature. 

To solve these dile mmas, 
Northern Blankets, a leading 
electric blanket manufacturer, 
spent 10 years — and a 
massive £15 million — 
researching the answers. And 
they’ve come up with a 
“thinking” duvet, a “body 
responsive” quilt which de- 
tects the sleeper’s cold parts 
and hot spots and accordingly 
adjusts the temperature of the 
duvet. 

Hidden inside the duvet is a 






All togged up: snuggle under a new electric duvet with automatic temperature control 


special heating element which 
will heat the duvet to a pre- 
selected level and monitor the 
temperature of its 
surroundings. 

This brainy duvet also fea- 
tures a dial-a-tog facility so, 
with a cosy capability of a 17.5 
tag rating for sudden cold 
snaps, it can also be used as a 
summer-weight quilt of 4.5 
togs. 

Like an ordinary conti- 
nental quilt, the duvet fits 
standard covers and can safely 
be hand or machine washed. It 


costs £59.99 (single) and 
£72.99 (double). To keep both 
partners happy, the double 
and kingsize duvets are avail- 
able with individual bedside 
controls (£84.99 and £99.99 
respectively). 

The body responsive duvet 
is currently marketed undeT 
the Rowenta label but next 
year is likely to be sold under 
the Sunbeam brand-name. 
(For enquiries, contact North- 
ern Blankets (061 652 1211). 

Dreamland’s new electric 
Superduvet is also a quilt for 


all seasons. After pre-heating 
the bed, its setting can be 
switched to the chosen tem- 
perature then safely left on all 
□ighL Behaving like a thermo- 
stat. the control unit responds 
to fluctuations in bedroom 
temperature, automatically 
adjusting the heat generated. 
So, from a minimum of 4.5, 
the tog value can be increased 
to over 20 to outwit Jack 
Frost's frigid fingers. 

Like Northern Blankets’ 
heated duvet. Superduvet is 
machine washable and com- 


Ritzy night and knock-down gifts 


If you’ve always thought that 
gift vouchers lack the glamour 
of more personal festive offer- 
ings, then think a gain 

The Ritz has introduced a 
pink parchment gift voucher 
which includes two nights' 
accommodation for two peo- 
ple in a twin or double room, 
English breakfast in the Ritz 
restaurant on both mornings 
(or in your room if you prefer) 


newslines ;; 


and a bottle of Ritz pick 
champagne on arrival. 

The cost? A mere £240 
which, we are assured, is a 
saving of nearly £200. Vouch- 
ers are valid from January 1 to 
March 31, 1987 and available 
from the hotel reception or by 
post from The Sales Office, 
The Ritz, Piccadilly, London 


GARRARD 


-t is;*-. 


Garrard is pleased to announce the reopening 
of their renovated Showrooms incorporating a 
NEW GUT DEPARTMENT 
offering a wide selection of 
original Christmas Presents from £5.00 upwards. 
Garrard is now open on Saturday 
from 9.30 am to 5.00 pm 

112 REGENT ST LONDON WIA2JJ - TEL 01-754 7020 


W1V9DG. 

• Turkey and Christmas pud- 
ding are traditional ingredi- 
ents on the Christmas menu, 
but what can you serve as a 
starter? 

Gravad Lax makes a de- 
licious alternative to predict- 
able soups and requires very 
.little preparation. It was orig- 
inally made by the Finns over 
100 years ago by curing 
salmon in dill weed to acquire 
its unique flavour. Buy it pre- 
sliced in vacuum packs by 
mail order to simplifiy shop- 
ping from Ridding Hall, 
Quendon, Saffron Walden, 
Essex CBN 3YJ. TeL’ (079 
988)487. 

It costs £10.50 per pound 
including postage and pack- 


INEWSOAP; 

FROM OLD 

imiPi 


ing. For overseas deliveries, 
please order by December 3, 
adding an extra £3.60 
(Europe) and £5.10 (USA). 
Serve it with dill mustard, £1 . 
per 225g pot from Ridding: 
Farm Foods, and thin slices of | 
brown bread. I 

• Bonham's Christmas Sale 
may well answer perennial ! 
present-finding problems. On 
Thursday December 4 at 6pm 
a special auction sale in 
Knightsbridge will include a 
range of unusual gifts with 
prices starting around £30. 

Silver tankards, snuffboxes, 
scent bottles, tea caddies, 
jewellery and carriage clocks 
will be among the items for 
auction, each vetted by 
Bonham’s for authenticity . 


Able-LABELStl^ 

3C 


plies with BEAB standards for 
electrical safety and BSI stan- 
dards for conventional duvets. 
It costs £59.95 (single), £79.95 
(double) £89.95 (kingsize). 

Less hi-tech, perhaps, dou- 
ble duvets also cope with the 
problem of temperature 
changes. Habitat’s Trio con- 
sists of two separate quilts, a 
summer one of 4.5 togs and 
another with a nine tog rating 
for spring and autumn. 

Fastened together with Vel- 
cro, Trio mutates into a 
double-thickness winter- 
weight quiJt of 1 3.5 togs. Both 
quilts are filled with ICI’s 
machine washable, non-aller- 
gen ic Superloft polyester. It 
costs £45.95 (single), £68.95 
(double) and £79.95 (large 
double). 

Fogarty's non -allergenic, 
machine washable Microduo 
duvet works along similar 
principles, clipping together 
with plastic poppers. It con- 
tains “Microfill", a blended 
polyester fibre and costs £40 
(single), £55 (double), £67 
(kingsize). 

Dorma also offer an “All 
Seasons'* quilt in their Coun- 
try Diary collection. Like 
Microduo. one quilt has a 4.5 
log value, while the other has z 
nine tog rating and the pair 
fasten together with Velcro. 
It’s padded with ICI Terylene 
Hi-Spun filling fibre and costs 
£49.95 (single). £69.95 (dou- 
ble) and £83.95 (kingsize). 

Another version. Puffin’s 
“Four Seasons'" duvet also 
contains ICl’s Terylene Hi- 
Spun filling fibre and sells for 
£45.95 (single), £65.95 (dou- 
ble) and £78.95 (kingsize). 
Puffin also have a His and 
Hers duvet. 


■ National "V 

GARDEN 

GIFT 

TOKENS 

nuke the perfect present 
Inr every gardener and pi jni 
loser. They oiler such freedom 
ol choice - and soke so many 
31 lid 1 icmm .11 They can be 
used In buy ever ythin g lot 
the garden at 1.500 Garden 
Shops and Centres- and at 
Inter ilnra florists nationwide. 

Sold in SI. £5. IS and £10 
values at alt 1 .500 If TA- 


mcmticr shops and centres 
all over Iftc lih. they're easy 
In post - easy Jo redeem . 



national 

GARDEN GIFT TOKENS 
show you care. 

Ring 107341 303998 

or write lor addresses of 
neatest tu A- member 
stockists. 

HA>»u>..ll... si 



THE V£*Y BEST ttiWE 1* 
-WE ve*cy best RESOKTfc/ 



siciiif— * 

ART AND 
ARCHAEOLOGY 

Oeuwei ins ueasufH of me. oenea 
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■we* HiptUr pMcur. nuie sol* BW OP* 

DUO: m ine MPV3 rmeie uxmnq a new, TOO 

iragn swiq 

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ai " 100 tom Sum CeMnCk siamrg 
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oroenuw r^i-l 

island sun”" 

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SMESF0. Dfe 01-2227*52 “ 


«il ■ I nil J. 


forma, woriwui ft 
Order in CLEAR BLOCK CAPITALS 
with paynvmr TODAY 1 Del 21 Days: 

Steepleprint Lid - Dap* A - Eada Barton 
NORTHAMPTON Wt68L5 -Td 0604 810781 



WAXED COTTON COAT 


12 NIGHTS. FROM £499 


Acapulco as in Mexico? The very same. Also Cozumel, the 
largest of the Mexican Caribbean Islands: 12 Nights, £525. 
Prices include return airfare, hotel accommodation and 
transfers. 

Ask your Travel Agent: Or ring us on (0293) 776979. 

^CONTINENTAL AIRLINES TOURS 



Phone: (0444) 459921 Mon-Fri 09.00-1 7.15 
v (Sat 10 . 00 - 13 . 00 Sept-March inclusive) 

(hp hone: (0444) 45779024 hour brochure phone 
6rosvenor Halt Bolnore Road, Haywards Heath. 

RH164BX \ > 



D ue to the success of our previous offers 
for waxed jackets we are again offering 
this new style waxed coat. The Times Waxed 
Coat is designed to keep you warm and com- 
fortable whatever the weather and is ideal 
for both town and country being fashionable 
and practical It is made in the UK from 
100% olive green waxed cotton and lined 
with a tartan lining. 

T he coat has a traditional, brown 
corduroy collar and fastens with a double 
action zip and poppers. It has interior ribbed 
storm cuffs and there are two roomy pockets 
with double folding flaps to keep them 
watertight. Inside there is a large game- 
keepers pocket and a deep, zippeapocket in 
tire lining. This garment is generously sized 
to allow it to be worn over thick sweaters and 
measures 36T from neck to bem. 

T his coat is invaluable for a whole 

range of country pursuits from fishing 


THE TIMES 


DIAL YOUR ORDER 

kAPID ONDEFISG S£Kl ICF J 
| BY TELEPHONE ON 

ACCESS CiRNLSA ; 

tno need to nmrpfcte mupuni 1 

(Cray ford) 0322-58011 1 

34 hour; a day - 7 days a 


and shooting to horseriding and point-to- 
point. Stylish and comfortable, the coat is 
suitable for both sexes. 

Marvellous value at £49.95. 

Sires: Small (36-38"), Medium (38-42"). Large 
142-46''). Ex Large (46-50" l. (All sizes have an 
extra four inches added lo make sizing 
generous). 

Ml prices ore inclusive oj post i tnd pocking. Please Mo* up to 21 
Jjvs/’V detnvrt f'Om receipt of order Ifwoujrt run sotisbed 
The Times in II refund your noney uiihoul question .In addition 
to our euaranlre .mu ho re the bcnrfil uf jour full statutory mills 
whirl; are not affected. 

Orders and enquiries should he sent to: 

The Times Waxed Coal Offer, Bourne Road. 
Bexley, Kent DAS 1LB. 

Tel: Crayford 53316 Tor enquiries only. ■ 

Please send me Waxed Conoo Coats <A£49.9S 
each as indicated below: 

SIZES: 

□ SMALL (36-381 □ MEDIUM (38-42') 

□ LARGE (42-46 ) □ X LARGE (46-50") 

1 enclose cheque/PO for £ made pavable 

to: The Times Waxed Cotton Coat Offer’ 

Or debit my .Access/Visa No. 


Signature 

Mr/Mrs/Miss 
Address 



Registered No. S94646 


exclusive to Budget Furs 


icT'sSi r « 

30 io - i 


iviinK coats - j 

i 


i* ox jackets - £9“ 















.ack I eo<n 9.VK 





THE TDV1ES SATURDAY NOVEMBER 29 1986 


CSii’istasaas Gigfc Gaiisfle 



FOR EVERYONE 



i . 


CDGJQ Bridge Companion 
a great gift for the Queen 
of ft this Christmas 



taffawdenffrrauriyattift math owe Itai-OatayMl 
Sbaptatontol - Picsnaiar Wwsnn- - dvcanito peMn itente wry 
part of ptyd job «m pace -coned j*u trebles at the touch oJ a button. 
iwbdoitaJi jar CcniWiim is BRIDGE BIOBER 'OaenOte fates of pk&n 
cartnfeestatang you step by step though your Mpt 
Mfc use a gofegafttOB. initaaa 34 hantSapotayff rtowB handicap 

ntaywTI i w wt—B. w w o t^nci'P^roun 

The BBC Bridge Companion- more enjoyment from ;your bridge. 


kMamm • (0933)79300 



5 ! 





r 


n 

i 

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- 5 

_ _ 

L _ - 


"'J 



oKfcnjBrd 
j m j&taa 


PENNY PLAIN 

I □menu WNinri>D * nrtuTEl 



PENNY P LAIN, 7 Si Mur}** Place 
Nmk open TJne. NEI JPG 
WqAoocMf 232 1124 


UNIROSE 

Quality Gifts 
Chanqiagne 
Wines & Spirits 
Luxury Food 

Perfume 

Roses/Chocolate 
All Credit Cards 
01-749 9735 
125 Askew Road 
London, W12 9AW 


rtap Dianes of iwnenra- I b 


MHO) Boom- Dr-HavfOtnd 
tor. aba a up model hdmu 
ptaBMdP calendar ftaturtag UK 
up nudrts. EUher takndar 
£3.96 «od) U rt udM U pip. 
Send your ramutaaev. ommut 
h amc lul Wnnio House. 
Effingham Rwd. SMBem SO 
TVS. TM 0742 783833. Money 
rcfuDdm if net taumed. Call- 


.RDrMMHTORVOUCWnS 
me perfect pin of sxa.oa or 
U II 6 -GCt complete w" “ ~ 




me fuB cost of * 3 mim Table 
ITHBlr meal IP over SO of 
London's Quest restaurant* UK 
MaWM, Wtwtom. and Marta 
ft Franco*. Cmttl Gird bkto Qi 
579 6433 V WTtt* wllta chrqa* 

to Table IT Horn. 103-109 
pWanloura. London WIV3TS. 


new MMW IMP * herbal m- 

ansMaae A nUlMim 
list tuuflim c unn gpo « iiimni 

m. 66 

- Wi_". 

IF33 ®LT. » hr, 


CLEAN 
YOUR CHIMNEY 
CHEMICALLY! 

NomessrrtttiSAFEBURN— 
Suitable tor stwes. open fires 
OrvrtxxOximera. Especially 
good for ataosardy shaped 
chimneys. Non towc. 
Prices One P4P etc]: 

1 packet (3 months supply)- 
£7.90 2 packets- £3£LOO. 


CnetweriPUs or SAL for details 

Ann VaBoy Tradtag Ud 

Rttfaworth. Sussex, RH201ER| 
Tel: Q79-B82482 


CHRISTMAS 

‘survival nr 

FASCMATWG OFT IDEA 


unMU 

3 a 9ml HO* al HOT pm 

<*. Ex* stoat* tar 3s 

IP M 


aadM pmopils al ambonm.l 

Ugoi gflvi^r iltt ^bctfr rub . 

S^’ft^wSe^OMlrtiBii htlp 


over he ad! ra rt mitalba aw 

A me ait H — d 

Manirtiti 
3SBTTIM. wmMa 
P-0. BOX 




ntnow 

A WRSE? 




anew Otar nnM 
««MM 6 long Mtag tar tawd 
O au JiHWr / CBmKs 0630 
ctn Mi your wa n e to DavM 
Mary TT. Oaddtaptew Bank. 
Cafcflngfoo Lane CMOnetoR. 
NorUmteh camrara ewa 2SZ. 


nto avattataeta too*. Mucha*. 
nUrtd free m. ralaunaw « 
apuBtaB yun for p 8 am. 
Hawkta a, Co. H aUawarth. Suf- 
HX T*L (09867) 3103 


ARCHITECTURE 

& 

DESIGN 



17th & 18th century 
engravings and etchings 

Weinreb Architectural Gallery 

34 Museum Street, London tdcia ilh 

Telrphoer ci- 6 j 6 489 J 

Mon-Fri 104pm So 10-1 pm 


Formula. 



THE SUCCESS OF THE DAILY MAIL IDEAL 
HOME EXHIBITION 1986 


iha Formula Gna Bad Is pal ong ol a range OfvXHr**. 
peracnAod dattgnar (tore*. Data and comtoa tar bothboy* 

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( The time for action} 


Superb Quartz sportswatthesfermen 
and women. Water resistant lo 66011 
mineral crystal glass, diving ©(tension 
bracelet, protected screw-in crown, 
uni- diredional bezel. TAG-Heuer 
are outright winners with their 
new range of diving and 
sports watches. I£I 



AUSTIN KAYE 



4Q8S!RAiaU»D0N.VW^WE1feI 01-2401688 

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r wmairoa^iincaaigHBaM. s ara sr oa usis.. 



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Enea. 1G2 7RG 
Tel: S1-SS4 SS79 




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Hawn Tnowi l l iw n Im e r o l U4 O w l m P n tCmm.0— DOM. Dm 



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W Sato 


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and murti more tar Um« wHh a 
none ta cricket hbtory end hu- 
mour. £3.96 Inc. Other 
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CRKMETana (Depi STV 18 
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nuUMHT MEHMU Owe ■ 

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£57 OW* ■One lor Ow PoT. ju- 
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puur added. Over ltJO moollv 
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patch hfftrnetldns. He tnfanoL 
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BACK RAIN REU! 


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TOfiHT 
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HELPED 



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new £480 3 pmanttoontjou- 
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London SW1 

The above are open Mon-Sat 10-6 
Contra* House 
23 Great Ftussaa Street 

London WCl (nr Tottenham Court Road Underground) 
Open Mon-Frt gjxi - G.00 

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London EC 2 (nr UverpooTareet Stetfor) 
open Mon-Frl 430 - 650 
107 Fpnehmch Street 
London EC& Open MortPri 1000 - 600 


A large selection of gifts and catendn are atom on side. 

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ms.. 




IN THE GARDEN 



in the nursery 


CtoraftoM 



Take your picte crab apple trees at a garden centre 


Over the past few years I have 
almost completely changed 
my opinion about garden 
centres, now that restricted 
rHnipp and uninformed staff 
have become the exception 
rather than the norm. 

Closest to my is the 
one on the sunny spacious 
hillsid e at Akaandra Palace, 
north Lxmdon. It is making a 
permanent conservation gar- 
den, has a nice little play- 
ground for young chiklrea and 
even a place to have coffee 
while you ponder your 
purchases. 

It also has a roomy indoor 
plant display and stocks not 
only a range of standard 
outdoor species but a good 
selection of more unusual 
ones all intdligniily and 
attractively displayed- If they 
are on the dear s^e, I have 
never seen anything in less 
than peak condition. 

But best of all is the 
knowledge and enthusiasm of 
the staff Don’t expect a 
grumpy one-word answer here 
to your enquiries. You will be 
asked about aspect, shelter, 
what you want Born a plant, 
whether you have dogs, cats, 
or children — and finally you 
will be shown a select short- 
list of plants. 

I believe there is a tendency 
to underrate our local garden 
centres. I know I have mripsed 
miles after plants only to find I 
could have obtained them in 
the ndghbomiKXxL - 

My nearest garden centre in 
Beikhamsted, Hertfordshire, 
is irot particularly large, but it 
has on hand a horticultnralist 
knowledgeable about local 
conditions and ready to advise 
m particular requests or prob- 


lems and to introduce people 
to plants they are not femfliar 
with. 

Among the pitfalls of plant- 
buying are finding your ha* 
pulse purchases don't fit in 
your garden or that they are 
beautiful for three weeks of 
the year only. 

A friend of mine dreamt up 
a b rilliant ly ample scheme of 
gnmg out with a notional 
budget to a good garden centre 
eprh month of the year. Yon 
see which plants are ax tiatir 
best and can expect sensible 
advice on their cultivation. - 
This seems to me a very 


good way for people without 
specialist knowledge or a 


• modi 

tune to spare to develop their 
own tastes and build up an 
attractive and individual aR* 
the-year-roimd garden. 

Garden Centre Plant of the 
Month: 

h was somewhat unfair to start 
my garden centre wrays at the 
end of November, but I was not 
disappointed. Crab appla are 
dearty outstanding now. I had 
not realized that the kind 
called Sparest, which has mar- 
ble-sized carmine ends In 
open sun. has subtler greeny 
orange tones grown m the 


Coming to a mature height 
qf only lOJeet. it is a good 
dunce for small gardens and 
ruti so harshly bright asGolden 

Hornet 

Red Sentinel, with crabs like 
small crumbs, grows to 12 to 
15 feet while John Dcwnie is a 
much taller spreading tree, 
since it was raised in 
[ more than 100 years 
ago. (Crabs also havebeautifid 
spring blossom.) 


WEEKEND TIPS 


tftamm&n 

in greenhouses 


dead and tfiamsod wood, 
cutting out canker and 
crossing b ran c hes . 

• Remove dead leaves 
from your pond. Don’t let them 


leaves fal, cutteqp back 
sidestiootstotwobuds. 

• Let bare-rooted roses 
soak tea bucket of water for a 
day before ptanting. 

• Matiaeappte trees can 
be primed now, removing 


rot rod poflute the water. 
H back th« dead ■ 


• Trim I 
leaves from w a terside plants 
(except far read and rash 
species). 

• Make your plans for next 
year and order seeds from 
c at alogues. 


A joy for ever 


While shopping for Christinas 
presents, don't forget that 
plants make ideal gifts. 

A tempting introduction to 
an old-rashioned method of 
bulb growing comes from 
Austin Morgan. Their excep- 
tionally attractive packs con- 
tain a tulip, daffodil or 
hyacinth bulb, a simple well- 
shaped bulb-glass, a small 
nutrient mvelope, and good 
and carefully written instruc- 
tions. An irresistaWe gift. 

Available from The General 
Trading Company, Sfoane 
Street, London, SWl, and 
selected garden centres £3.95. 

Rosemary Rose Christmas 
Collection (£7.95 inc p+p) 
consists of three Chrtemaa 
roses. White Christmas is a 

ar- 
eas, and for catting. Robin 
Redbreast is as you might 


OUR OWN GROWN 

FRUIT 

MAKE 

IDEAL GIFTS! 

CARRIAGE PAID TO 
ANT U.K. ADDRESS 



te& HwUmj Gin vffiSSS 

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ret fan 


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SSA'SJjPcKl ,,- ra 

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. a at aKL mo no mamon 

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FOOT TO* WWW TO TT« worses HOW 

WJEWT CuwimF^ 


K33H2SP 




guess, a red rose, single with a 
white eye and can be grown in 
window boxes and tubs. The 
Bells, pink, white or red, are 
ground cover roses, giving 
large clusters of small blooms. 

Available direct from Rose- 
mary Roses, The Nurseries, 
Toton, Beeston, Nottingham, 
who will despatch the gift- 
pack with a grating card and 
m e ss a g e direct to anywhere in 
the UK. Last dale for orders is 
December 15 for Christmas 
delivery. 

A special Christmas Collec- 
tion of six. fitttaia rooted 
cuttings is available fro m 
Saxondale, tire specialhtt fuch- 
sia growers. The names are 
unremittingly Christmassy: 
Yuletide, SIcighbefls, Snow- 
cap, Prince ofPeace, Angef s 
Dream and Chriatnuwg Tree — 
they are varieties of Fuchsia 
triphylla, long-tubed species. 

Die healthy little plantlets 
come well-packed and with 
some _ initial growing 
instructions. 

if yon can't get them into 
pots over the Christmas pe- 
riod, keep the roots in their 
compost wrapped in wet pa- 
per. 

* Available direct from 
Saxondale Fuchsias, North 
Tamerton, Hols worthy, 


Devon EX22 6SG.(b.SGi£ 
p+p: credit cards or cheque). 
Gaft wrapping and card an 
extra £1.50. Last safe rfutp fof 
applying December 11 . 

Francesca Greenoak 

Noicntts Nurseries 

• Ihe tAflne mSer of 
Notcntts Narseriei of 
Wi^tibndge, Snfluft, mfo- 
h^>ed test wedg sfcsald hare 
been 03943 3344. 


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THE TIMES SATURDAY NOVEMBER 29 1986 


THE TIMES COOK 


EATING OUT 


After gold, fimjqncerae and 
myrrh, . there is no more 
traditional Christmas present . 
than a gift of food. - 
Preserves of all kinds, even 
the great Yorkshire pies 
containing fabulous mixtures 
ofbirds and stuffings baked in 
fortresses of pastry, and the 
gaps fined with melted batter 
to exdttde the air and prolong 
freshness, endured long jour- 
neys oh winter roads without 
benefit of refrigeration or the 
vacuum pack. 

Sides of smoked 
cheeses, h a ms, jams,, con- 
serves, pickles and cakes are 
still sent packing fer afield,, 
bringing with them a tasteof 
home or of unacenstomed 

luxury. 

- Postable home-made 
presents indnde all die long- 
standing favourites fike fudge 
and fruit cake, which can be. 
relied upon to arrive more or 
less in one piece. When hand- 
deliveay impossible, unfimitMT 
opportunities ' offer them- 
selves. 

An antique jelly mould 
could be fined with a festive 
jelly of spiced peat wine, or 
one node with fresh fruit. 
Plain orfency tonnes can be 
filled with nomeBe fish or 
vegetable pfitfcs or with robust 
pork or game mixtures. Casse- 
roles can be packed with 
packets of dried provencal 
herbs, and smaller dishes 
filled with home-made or 
hand-made chocolates. 

. Tams and other long iwtlng 
sweet preserves like mince- 
meat need only pretty packag- 
ing, but ;, shorter lived 
confections like real lemon 
card may need a note about 
keeping it in a refrigerator. 

If there are any Seville 
oranges still in the freezer 
from last January, use them 
now to make orange curd - 
instead of die traditional : 
lemon recipe, or use fresh 


nnirv w iiHJi hit 

the moment 

LEMOM, ORANGE OR LIME 
CURD 

Makes about 1.35 kg (3 fb) 

6 juicy lemons, 8 Dines or 4 

Seville oranges 

225g (8 oz) unsaHad butter 


art 


Home-made confectionery, cakes, and 
jams can make an ideal seasonal gift 



iSKSlSf 1 e9SS ’ hewly Cowand Tabeltl 
laid rf possible as soo n as tbey am 

Thnm ngViV y wash and dry them in the refrige 
the jars or pots and put them Top qnafity ingr 
into a cold oven. Switch on the up to really good i 
oven and set it to very cool Cooking qnafificati 
(110 D C/225°F, gas mark 14). required to make : 
Thivwfil sterilize the jars, &ud good mincemeat, b 
by putting them into a cqk l . or. food processor 
oven there , is no danger, of handy. Melted bid 
cracking. in at the end, ca 

Wash and dry the lemons or • stitutetj for the su 
limes. Finely grate thezestnnd ' cfaangingthe kcepr 
squeeze and strain the joiceJf of the mincemeat. 


using frozen Sevres, grate die 
zest while die . oranges are 
frozen hard, theztiesve them 
to thaw before sqneezn& the 
juice. The rind is too soft to 
grate onoe they have thawed. 

Put the juice and grated zest 
into the top of a large double 
saucepan, or into a bowl over 
a pan of hot water. Adi the 
butter and sugar and heat over 
hot water until the butter has 
mritwl anri fhf! sugar has 
dissolved complete^. 

Beal the eggs figfady and 
pour them through a sieve 
into the fruit mixture. Cook, 
the mixture, still over hot 




thfi Curd w yv i g h to 

coat the back of a wooden 
spoon. Ifit is allowed to boil it 
will curdle and spoil 

Take the jars out of the oven 
and allow them to cool fifr a 
minute or two before pouring 
in the curd. Fit each jar with a 
waxed paper disc, placed wax 
side down on the cord and 
pressing out any air bubbles. 
Cover and label the jars, and 
as soon as they are cool, store 
them in the refrigerator. 

Top quality ingredients add 
up to really good mincenteat. 
Cooking gnaTHTratirwix are not 
- required to make memorably 
good mincemeat, bur a mmcer 
or food processor cranes in 
handy. Melted butter, stirred 
in at the end, can be sab* 
stitutetj for the suet without 
cfaangingthe keeping qualities 


Fendia: (n) A sacred ceremony 
which transforms ripe grapes 
into ruby red nectar. 

Ferreira: (n) A rich red liquid 
sought after for its 
therapeutic qualities. 


Ferreira: THE 
PORT WORLD’S 
BEST KEPT SECRET 

Avaibbfc*lAahttrRacUflunWiacWinfcoaia,OiMbin$, . 
Ashe and Nofacw, Gooch Bnxba*. Wsweisdibdea, 
ManHo^TWhcr»odsekaalSa*ewayScW«rw< stores. 

fen oHSants S^^^^L^V^eCorefcCMqiirLBJe, 0 



MINCEMEAT 
Makes 7.8 kg (4 b) , 

450g (1 lb) cox's orange ... 
pippins 

450g (1 (b) stoned muscatel or 

texia raisins = . 

22Sg (8 oz) crarants 

22Sg (8 oz) caridtedorange 


(4 oz) cancfied lemon 


170g (6 oz) dark muscovado 

sugar : 

225g (8 az) shredded suet - 

110g (4 oz) finely chopped 
almonds 


and juice 

lemon • 

1 teaspoon fresh mixed spice 
1 teaspoon freely grated ' 


frtabfespoons whisky or 


Fed and core the apples and 

pa of foam through a winnw 

fitted with its coarse blade, 
together with the raisins, cur- 
rants, and candied orange and 
lemon peeL Alternatively, 
grate the apple and use a food 
processor to cut die peel very 
finely before mixing both with 
the raisins and ni rrair R 

. Add the ‘ sugar, suet, 
chopped almonds and lemon 
zest and mix well. Stir in the 
mixed spice and nutmeg, fob : 
lowed by the lemon juice and 
whisky or brandy. 

Pack the mincemeat into 
sterilized pots or jars, (see 
previous recipe) seal, label; 
and stare.in a cool place, out 
of direct .fight The flavour 
matures with keeping, ideally 
for at least four weeks, and up 
to a year. . . 

Shona Crawford Poole 


Trial by nude, trial by in-laws, 
trial by the sociopath who 
“traditionally” spends Christ- 
mas with you (but who, the 
rest of the year, when sanity 
gets the better-of conscience, 
goes ignored). . . 

There’s no doubt about it, 
Christmas is the time when 
boms come out of the wood- 
work, when cousins (whose 
conversation is a litany of gifts 
given and received) cre ep 
round the door, when frightful 
children tug your arm thus 
intemipting Des O’Connor's 
fescatfam r * wt with. Michael 
Paririnscra — then is the time 
to bolt. Bat whe re to? 

. Why not escape from the 
relatives by shutting op house 
and beading for a good res- 
taurant or hotel with a top 
chef for a bit .of peace? The 
only criterion I’ve used in 
selecting those mentioned be- 
low is that they won’t make 
yon suffer that terminally 
Fn piicti t n rt n re All the 
Trimmings. ■ 

If yon don’t escape for 
Christinas, then New Year is 
gaxtronomicaHy dan- 

gerous. Indeed there is some- 
thing to celebrate at New Year 
- foe end of foe enforcedly 
idle week that has preceded it. 


CHRISTMAS 


nWnidnn fin iMr *■ — — — 

ClungB w pm rwwcnwr 

Akfemtinster, Stratford-won* 
Avon (0789 740740) 

The budding is a per v ers e 
gem, it’s in a Gothic so 
muscular that it looks Hire an 
a$yhnn at best, a public school 
at worst. The donring room is 
massive and neo^oococa The 
dining-room is all 
marquetry. 

There are two fine chefs 
here: Michael Qninn who was 
> formerly at the Ritz and is 
now on the idly, and Barry 
Foster who is shortly to leave 
for LongueviOe Manor in 
Jersey — which is good news 
for that island and bad fix- the 
south Midlands. 

The {dace is doing a Christ- 
mas packag e which extends 
from the evening of December 
24 till post breakfast on the 
27th. The cost is £1 IS per 
, person per night and mdodes 
bed, VAT, grab but not drink. 
There axe seme resistible 
attractions such as carol ring- 
ing and a visit from Father 
Christmas — Quinn would be 
good casting for this role. 

Dinner on Christmas Eve 
involves dock, lobster, salmon 
and veal. Christmas Day 
lunch comprises seven courses 


A great escape 

If yon can’t face sharing another traditional Christmas at 
home with boring relatives, Jonathan Meades suggests 
some comfortable hotels where you can get away from it all 


RvncfeiMcafey 


'jV 


and wbfle, yes, turkey is 
available you can have beef 
inst ead. The beef fiHet, cooked 
by Mr Foster, that I ate here 
last spring was quite wonder- 
fuL Foster is also a s u p rem e 
soap maker and the menu will 
indnde a veg broth. 

Boxing Day hmch is centred 
round roast venison, with 
devilled oysters before and 
h mwi *nti butter pudding 
after. D inner tha^ night is R«h 
soup, a granite, lambroast or 
beef stewed, Cheddar with 
homemade walnut bread, 
caramel icecream. 

Feathers Hotel: Buff Ring, 
Ludlow, Shropshire 


Blade and white buddings 
abound in the Matches and 
west Midlands bat acme is so 
confidently ostentatious as the 
Feathers. 

The damage is £200 per 
person for three nights. More 
if you want a room where 
someone like Shakespeare or 
Lou Reed slept That price is 
inclusive of VAT, an awful lot 
of drink, meals, an architec- 
tural tour of the ftsrinating 
town by the local historian 
David Lloyd, tbe sight of foe 


DRINK 


Stock up with good cheer 


To gu arantee that they can 
defiver yoor wine before 
Christmas, most mer chan ts 
have a cat-off order date of 
aroond December 10. But for 


The perfect Christinas giftz. . 


. . ... two nights at The Rttz. 

Imagine receiving The Ritzras a gift on Christmas morning. 
Or more precisely a Rite gift voucher for two people to stay 
two nights in a twin or double-bedded room. The cost is only 
£240 with English breakfast included and a chilled bottle of 
tte ^ famous Ritz pink champagne in the room when you 
arrive. This special offer lasts from 1 ; st January to 31st 
March. Telephone Mary Bishop to obtain former details of . 
The Ritz Christmas gift voucher on 01-493 81 81 or 
write, to The Ritz. Piccadilly, m 1C D I' I / 

THE RITZ 

WritmtetietamisMA PtCCADUlY' (ONDON 


Berry Bros A Rudd it is 
Decanher 1, even for their 
Half Bottle Fade of six dif- 
ferent wines. Priced at £25-50 
it brings yoa sprightly 
Saavignoo Sec from Bor- 
deaux, Benjft own plummy 
Bourgogne Pino* Nofr pins a 
warm oaky ramDx-aased ’78 
Ardsm Reserve Rioja. From 
3 St James's Street, London 
SW1 (01-839 9033). 

The Wine Society (Gunnels 
Wood Road, Stevenage, 
Herts) allows its members 
ottfi December 12for Christ- 
mas orders. Their “Flavoar of 
toe Soafo” case (£2150) with 
its viigiB ofive oB, ofives, 
tetragon and afire paste, quail 
p£t& sad three somhera . 
French reds should cheer np 
any Francophile’s winter. 

TradWansHste would per- 
haps prefer foe Claret sod 
Cheddar case. Prked at £28, it 
contains a farmhouse truckle 
cheddsr of about (bar and a 
half pounds pins four Afferent 
of claret- 

Lay & Wheeler have the 
ideal Christmas present: Ron- 
ald Seal's wktedly amasdug 
Sometkhtg in the Cellar 
(£SL95) plus some wines. 

The six bottle pack (£29.75) 
coatainsthe crisp ’85 
Saavigeon do Hint Poitou 
pins rich fruity *85 Lay A 


Wheeler chreL For £59 foe 
12-bottle pad confaiasspfcy 
’85 Chateau da Grand 
Monies, Cfites da Rhone Vil- 
lages pias foe honeyed *83 
Mondmits Demi-Sec. Lay A 
Wheeler are at 6 Culver Street 
West, Colchester, Essex. 

Ad Dams, the Crown, 
SostowoM, Suffolk have aa 
aptly-named Survival Bt 
(£21) with Admans own chain- , 
pagne and taway port ptas foe 
old Amontillado 
from VaUespino. (Ocders for I 
pre-OnistBias ddlvery before 
Decembo- J0.) 

Taylor’s Qaiata de 
Vargribs pack box contains 
foe viotet-nosed *74 Quinta de 
Vargeilas port pins foe 
estate's virgin olive til, honey, 
stuffed ofives and a lmon d s . 
Around £42 from B ft e ndm n, 
113 Regents Park Road, 
London, NW1, and £48J50 
Cram Backhighani Wines. 

Finally, this year’s newest 
and mote asefal vinous stock- 
ing filer cooes from the 
ingenious Screwpafi people: 
the capsule remover (£3.95) 
zips foe capsules off wine 
bottles in seconds and foe 
spin-handled corkscrew 
(£8.95) removes corks from 
bottles equally efficiently. 

Jane MacQnitty 


Foot 


^ When frightful 
children tog your 
arm thus 
interrnp ting Des 
O’Connor’s 
fasrinating chat 
with Michael 
Parkinson — then 
is the time to bolt) 

fireplaces, door surrounds etc. 

When I ate there a few 
weeks ago there was a fine 
dock and apple dish, a well put 
together and generously 
priced wine list, and tbe sort of 
service that combines friendli- 
ness with promptness. 

Vantoofe 2 Greanman 
Street, London N1 (01- 
359 6707) 

John Varnom, who owns and 
cooks at this idiosyncratic 
basement restaurant in Isling- 
ton, is fawtifl in his con- 
tempt for turkeys. In lieu of 
that lard he’ll he cooking a 
Chris tmas Day touch of 
hannch and saddle of venison. 


McCormack will probably be 
more apparent in the Boxing 
Night dinner (£22.-50 per 
head) which will be mussel 
and saffron soap, fricassee of 
tuibot and salmon, beef with 
shallots, fruit mousses and 
cheese from Alan Porter. 

There is a range of 
“activities” — some of them 
alluring (Wefoerby races), 
some less so (hand-bell ring- 
ing, Babes in the Wood at foe 
newly restored Bradford 
Alhambra). 

The Oak Room: Lo 
Meridian. PiccadMty, London 
W1 (01-734 8000) 

As weD as the usual carte of 
Michael Lorain’s dishes there 
is a £60 per head eight-course 
lunch devised by David 
Chambers. A pate of goose 
liver and s w eet b reads with 
brioche; something or other 
with lobster and scallops; a 
herb sorbet (good idea, this); 
lamb wrapped in veal; salad; 
Stilton with port; pear and 
chestnut “parfeit”. 

This is the most opulent 
interior of all London res- 
taurants and is do donbt apt 
for a celebratory tuck-in. 


NEW YEAR’S EVE 


L’Aquftaine: 158 Old 
Brampton Road, London SW5 
(01-373 9918/5758) 
sodding pig, goose, duck and. There'll be South American 
if he can get them,, swan and music from a trio. The pre- 
wild boar. AD the meat will be prandial punch has more to do 
boned. with south-west France — it is 

The meal will begin with made from armagnac and 
soup and culminate in a pousee rapiere. The meal be- 
Chnstmas pudding made to gins with cep soup or oysters, 
an 18th-century recipe. Then ballotline of wood pi- 
Therell al so be sorbets and 8e on or scallops noth water- 
preserved fruits mainly cress pnrfie; veal with prunes 


Bnjfoh rhi-esr* for £20 per or venison with grand veneur 
person, which is a bargain for sauce (redcurrant, wine, stock, 
cooking of Yarn Din’s cream); c h a mp agne sorbet. 
standar d The cooking here is consis- 

MUMiihnmnitofc tently good and this £25 per 

head meal is fry no means 
||ho^orp6Road.Yo* gadfly priced.^ 

This is a copybook early IQaire: 68 Old Brampton 
ffpfitpgntii 18 th-century house Road, London SW7 (01- 
on the outskirts of York. A 584 8993) 
four-day package fiomdrist- Simon H opkin son s cook ing 
mas Eve untfl the morning of goes from strength to strength, 
foe 28th will cost £300 per His New Year’s Eve menu will 
person, which covers every- cost you £35 and you get a 
thing save ^rinV If you just glass of fizz thrown in. There 
want rTprj flmac Day hmch will be six courses consomme, 
you’ll pay £25 per head: this boudin blanc, a so fer nu- 
meal wfil comprise leek and decided fish course, pheasant 
watercress soup, smoked ™th morels or venison, foie 
salmon salad, champagne gras, passion fruit bavarois, 
sorbet, turkey, Christmas pud- something chocolato Hilaire 
dine or brandy snaps and has a marvellous wine fist and 
orange ice-cream etc. Mondavi s 1982 Qtbernet 

Th^ mn«iHcnihte talents of Sauvignon cannot be too 


orange ice-cream etc. Mondavi s 1982 tit 

The considerable talents of Sauvignon cannot be 
Mkidlethorpe’s cook Aidan highly recommended. 


There are over TOO wines at Majestic 
Wine Warehouses. 

And if you’re still short of ideas for 
Christmas, why not try a p:»lypin of 
real ale? Or a few tinnies of Aussie lager? 
Or even one ctf our estate- bottled olive 
oils cr Raspberry Vinegars? 

At Majestic prices, they're a gift. 


Ring 01-731 3131 for' - 
details, pnrt- to arid 
M;iil0rda , Strv'l». 
Branches throughout 
London 5 ite UK. 


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THE TIMES SATURDAY NOVEMBER 29 1986 


p ¥? I How the RSC lost its sense 


speaking 


MarkStfao 


Robert Kilroy-Silk, die ex- 
tremely moderate former MP, 
has bow completed his first 
week of office as moderator of 
Day to Day (BBC1). His 
invited audience has debated 
abortion, privatization, women 
at work, spiritualism and* ! 
yesterday, capital punishment : 
Next Monday, be promised, 
be will be discussing 
“samethink ebe”. 

The beta-plus he has al- 
ready earned for the way he 
com bines emollient fairness 
with wen-timed in flaming- j 
toriness most be set against 
his detta-miniis for elocution. 
There is no reason why a 
debate-host shook) not speak 
with a Liverpool accent, but 
Mr Kflroy-Silk's has got stock 
somewhere between Lime 
Street and Easton. “Doris, yon ; 
gorra lerra answer the 
question!” he expostulated on 
Thursday at the dairaodiant 
battleaxe Doris Stokes. 


TELEVISION 


Looking as though a 
Burton's display mannequin 
had stepped oat of its window, 
stick-mike at the ready, he 
certainly appears to be liked 
his studio guests — even 
when they are engaged in the 
bloodiest bouts of soap- 
boxing. 

At an hour rtf the day when 
many decent folk have hang- 
overs, it is disconcerting to 
find so many people eager to 
be teeth-gnashingly ad- 
versarial. Yesterday's propo- 
sition that hanging should be 
reintrodaced for chUd-mnrder 
got a surprising Aye vote from 
Ruth Elite's sister, who was 
jodidoasly seabed well away 
from Albert Pierrepoint (“I 
sleep easy at Bight"), file man 
wbo judicially killed Elite. A 
hanging granny of — one 
suspects — very little brain 
embarrassingly failed to ex- 
plain the acronym of her own 
organization. This was par for 
the course: the “debate" was a 
messy and inconclusive excuse 
for soondmg off in public. 

The crime for which 
Federico Garcia Lorca was 
executed was that of being a 
sentient and articulate human 
being. What a pity that this 
humanist who never joined a 
political party should by his 
death have become a martyr of 
the Left 

The Spirit of Lorca (BBC2) 
completed Arena's triptych of 
modem Spanish icons. Forced 
to be die most resourceful of 
the three, it turned out the 
most gorgeous, with the ab- 
sence of primary televisual 
material mitigated by excerpts 
from Yemut, shots of the 
Andalusian landscape and 
lashings of cante jondo. 

Lorca's biographer Ian Gib- 
son showed ns the desk at 
which Blood Wedding was 
written in IS days straight, 
with only Bach's Wachtet oaf 
cantata for repetitions com- 
pany, and there were enough 
mngjpgi poems to soften the 
viewer's referred anger at his 
stupid death. 


W ith its West End 
transfers, its Queen's 
Award for Export, 
and its opening at the 
Swan Theatre, the 
Royal Shakespeare Company be- 
gan this year on the crest of a wave: 
However, from that position there 
is nowhere to go but down, and I 
remember experiencing a slight 
sense of vertigo in the midst of the 
Swan's festive debut in April. Here 
was Stratford's long-awaited third 
stage; the means at last of escaping 
the Bardic treadmill and doing 
justice to the whole classical rep- 
ertoire. It seemed odd that Trevor 
Nunn was not even in the bouse to 
see his dream coming true. 

We all know the sequel to that 
little social omission. And in the 
months following the task of 
reviewing has been complicated by 
having to look at productions 
through a fog of accusations and 
rumour. The season is now almost 
over. It has included some good 
work: but even if the question of 
“absentee landlordism" had never 
cropped up, the company's career 
both in Stratford and London 
would have given the impression of 
a driver falling asleep at the wheeL 
The one indisputable success has 
been the sequence of Swan produc- 
tions which faithfully carried out 
the theatre’s four-category policy 
without exposing a single dud text 
With luck, the company will find a 
London house for these shows next 
year, as there is precious little 
worth transferring from its other 
Stratford stages which have shown 
no si gn of the new grand design 


Attention has been focussed this week on 
poor houses at the Royal Shakespeare 
Company’s London home, the Barbican 
Theatre. But it has not been an encouraging 
season at Stratford either. Irving Wardle asks 
whether the RSC now lacks leadership 


supposedly ushered in by the Swan. 

The Other Place, formerly the 
home of studio Shakespeare and 
source of such London transfers as 
Camille and Les Liaisons 
dangereuses, has been occupied by 
family chronicles and anachronis- 
tic biographies. The trouble with 
these (honourably excepting Nick 
Dear’s The Art of Success) is that 
they come over as rambling first 
drafts which, in their present form, 
are clearly going nowhere. The 
main house made a last-minute 
recovery with last month’s Mac- 
beth. Significantly, this also 
marked a return to the bare stage 
after a design-dominated season. 
Even Michael Bogdanov’s Romm 
and Juliet, which did have a strong 
directorial concept, relied heavily 
on its modem dress setting (added 
to which, the show was a replica of 
one previously staged by Bogdanov 
in Leicester). But with A Mid- 
summer Nights Dream and Rich- 
ard II, the meaning of the plays was 
engulfed in William Dudley’s 
dense Arthur Rackham forest and 
prospective battlements. Decora- 
tion apart, there was no clear sense 
of why these plays had been 
chosen. 


As for the company, there has 
been plenty of good middle-range 
work and the emergence of two 
front-rank artists in Hugh Quarshie 
and Imogen Stubbs. What have 
been lacking are lead actors with 
the muscle and temperamental 
range to cany the great heroic roles. 


I n London, meanwhile, things 
were hardly better at the 
Barbican. Of the two main- 
stage productions, Adrian 
Noble's flamboyant version 
of Mephisto proved to have been 
badly timed, and its Central Euro- 
pean companion piece, The Dan- 
ton Affair, was scuppered by poor 
direction (irrespective of recent 
memories of the Wajda film). 

The Pit season, which has now 
picked up with two searcfaingly 
intelligent plays from Richard 
Nelson and Arthur Miller, opened 
with dated exercises in American 
impersonation, one of which was 
grossly unworthy of professional 
performance. 

The RSC no longer assigns 
directors to individual theatres, 
and the repertoire for its four stages 
is decided in collective discussion 
with the artistic director. This year. 


Trevor Nunn has been off the 
scene. What of his partner and 
successor, Terry Hands? None of. 
the above productions was hjs 
work. But did he support them alT? 
Did he read the script of Nick 
Darke’s The Dead Monkey and 
enthusiastically authorize Roger 
Michell to drive ahead into the 
Californian brick wall? Did he 
observe The Daman Affair stum- 
bling towards its undercast, ill- 
staged opening? Was he in 
sympathy with the eccentricities of 
Stratford design? 

perhaps he did; perhaps he was. 
But from the spectator's viewpoint 
it is hand to discern any sign of 
leadership either in box office 
strategy or artistic commitment. 
With the collapse of Nicholas 
Nickleby on Broadway the RSCs 
chairman, -Geoffrey Cass, issued 
the warning that ^ “there are no 
reserves with which to meet a 
crisis". The RSC denies that it is in 
crisis, although “like al 1 West End 
theatres we haven’t had a great 
.year". (A misleading comparison, 
given the advance bookings for 
some West End shows including 
their own past transfers.) Either 
■way, the company's only guarantee 
of survival lies in continually 
renewing its identity through pas- 
sionate belief in its own work. 
There is no mistaking that quality 
when it does appear. It appears in 
John Caird’s production of Misalli- 
ance. It does not appear in Mr 
Hands's Scenes from a Marriage, 
which will be withdrawn in Janu- 
ary in favour of The Merry Wives 
from Stratford. 


■- ■ ■ j 


o-'m 


y'- 





Man in the driver's seat: Terry Hands ponders tire way ahead 


A Carmen of cheap thrills 


Agnes von 
Hohenstaufen 
Teatro dell’Opera, 
Rome 


Spiritual Mozart 


OPERA 


CONCERTS 


Carmen 

Coliseum 


Martin Cropper 


• The National Theatre pro- 
duction of Neil Simon's Brigh- 
ton Beach Memoirs is to 
transfer to the West End, 
opening at the Aldwych The- 
atre on December 3 (with 
previews from Thursday). 
Dorothy Tutin and Susan 


Engel join the cast, as Blanche 
and Kate respectively. The 
director is Michael Rudman. 


• The 1987 season at the Old 
Vic opens on January 20 with 
Lindsay Anderson’s produc- 
tion of the American comedy 
Holiday, by Philip Barry. Mal- 
colm McDowell leads the cast, 
together with his wife Mary 
Steenburgen. 


I suppose it is the lack of 
taboos that makes eroticism as 
difficult to realise on the stage 
as spirituality: what we man- 
age so much more easily is the 
merely sexy or the religiose. 
And having witnessed David 
Pounmey’s new production of 
Carmen I would not look 
forward to his ParsifaL 

The programme book is full 
of phrases clamouring for 
entry to Private Eye's 
“Wimmin" column, but as it 
nuns out this is not a feminist 
Carmen. Nor .could it be, for 
the piece , is not in essence 
about the struggle between the 
sexes but about tire struggle 
between the rational self and 
Eros. This is its mythic dimen- 
sion, which might well be- 
come more prominent and 
challenging in a production 
released from realism. It 
would be nice to fed that was 
Mr Pountney’s intention. 

In ditching Seville, how- 
ever. he finds no other place in 
which to situate the opera, qnd 
yet he is for from accepting 
Lucien Pintilie's solution for 
the Welsh National Opera of 
presenting the work as a 
theatrical show. 

The broken-down, vividly 
decorated limousines, the 
wide back hoarding of a sleazy 
seductress and the brilliant 
fluorescent and Smartie col- 
ours of the costumes all 
combine to make a striking 
stage picture for the first two 
acts (the design is by Maria 
Bjomson), but in movement, 
grouping and expression the 
reproduction remains . reso- 
lutely stage-bound, refusing to 
inhabit the mental landscape 
that is waiting for it 

Partly this is a matter of 
stiffness which may be sorted 
out during the course of the 
run: the final tableau, for 
instance, wifi have to be much 
more mistily assembled. But 
the most serious problems lie 
deeper, in a representation of 





f- 'S ■■'I'-’-:*: y~ : ' ; ^ 

we/mmsm 


....... 

tlfi# 








A wrecked car lot outside the ramparts of Seville: JohaTreleavea and Sally Burgess 


erotic behaviour that aims low 
and then fells short. What one 
sees is, I imagine, what can be 
viewed al less expense and 
with more honesty in Brewer 
Street and around, a few 
strides away from the Coli- 
seum: there are a lot of 
gyrating hips 2 nd bottoms, 
hands smoothing over legs, 
lightly clothed bodies tottering 
on high heels, crotches daring 
a response, women pouting in 
fake fur and glitter. I dare say 
these things are not terribly 
convincing when done by the 
professionals, but at the Coli- 
seum the effect is much more 
ludicrous than dangerous. 

It also utterly destroys the 
tension between Carmen and 
Don Jos6, for we are surely 
meant to be confronted with 
someone for whom sexual 
desire has become uncontrol- 
lable. not with a man turned 
on by rolling eyes and black 
underwear. John Treleaven 
does well in these circum- 
stances to retain so much of 
the character’s decency, and 
indeed to present the worthi- 
est Don Jose I have seen (if 


not by any means the best 
sung). 

But Sally Burgess is landed 
— or has landed herself, since 
Hilary Finch's interview with 


her in Thursday’s paper sug- 
gested a joint effort — with an 


gested a joint effort — with an 
interpretation of Carmen that 
it would be exceedingly hard 
to make credible. 

Everything in her behav- 
iour, ret off by a skimpy black 
costume in the first two acts, is 
that of 2 cheap tart who 
eventually enjoys her moment 
of glory when she comes on in 
silver dress and blonde wig for 
the fourth act 

Unfortunately there is not 
much allure either in her 
singing The top of the voice is 
still troubled by a bard glare, 
and the new low range does 
not sound well established or 
integrated yet. But it would be 
quite unfair to judge anyone 
on an -appearance in this 
production; though I would 
doubt that David Arnold, 
making his ENO debut, is 
going to provide any surprises 
after showing such a small 
usable range as EscamiUo. 


Another newcomer is Ste- 
ven Page, of whom I would 
have much higher hopes: 
given the smooth, fine 
■sensuality of his appearance 
here, one looks forward very 
much to his Don Giovanni 
later for the company. But it 
comes to something when a 
production of Carmen is most 
notable for its Morales. 
.Among the rest, Vivian 
Tierney became a vocally 
bright and lively Frasquita 
when she had overcome some 
initial nervousness. The 
Micaela was disappointing; 
the casting of the smugglers as 
a comic double act is a lesser 
misfortune. 

Mark Elder conducts with 
great vim and vibrancy, 
though the more intimate 
passages, tike that after 
Escamillo’s exit in the third 
act, need attention. There is 
also an exuberant and raucous 
children’s chorus who at least 
supply with authenticity the 
Cockney accents sported in 
this leaden balloon. 


Gaspare Spontrai was by all 
accounts a pompons man with 
little warmth and no sense of 
proportion. These qualities are 
dearly reflected is his test 
opera, Agnes von Hohen- 
staufen, which in Italian 
translation opened the season 
m Rome. Composed in its 
final form for Berlin in 1837, 
Agnes was described by its 
creator ms a “grassehistortech- 
romantische Oper". Ernst 
Ranpach’s libretto inter- 
weaves the historical schism 
between the Emperor Henry 
VI and Henry the Lion in the 
late 12tit century with the 
plightof a pair of star-crossed 
loms, and the resalt makes B 
Trovaton seem a model of 
expository darity. 

In ranskal and dramatic 
style Agnes is the ultimate 
extension of the serums operas 
Sponfini wrote far Paris, 
which were the greatest suc- 
cesses of his career: it is 
massively o r chestrated, con- 
tains few solo timbers, makes 
extensive use of a large chores, 
and demands elaborate scenic 
effects on a grand scale. 

It could be performed rather 
more convincingly than it was 
in Rome. The choral contribu- 
tion is essential to the effec- 
tiveness of the big ensembles, 
bat the Rome chorus alter- 
nated between inadequacy 
and inaudibility. Antonio 
Calenda’s staging of the work 
made it seen more static than 
it actually is; eves when 
violent action was called for 
the characters retained their 
statuesque poses. Montserrat 
CabaOe cut an incredible fig- 
ure in the title-role, -and her 
singing rarely displayed the 
parity of line that used to be 
its hallmark; she produced 
sweet pfenteshni and solid 
fortissimi bat not much in 
between. Veriano Lnchetti 
sang powerfully and with mar- 
tial ardour as Agnes's lever 
Enrico. 

The yonng Chilean comtnc- 
tor Maximfliane Valdes had 
difficulty in keeping his dis- 


EBS/Gardiner 

Barbican 


if one could summon Mozart 
to finish a single incomplete 
work, 1 would pick not the 
Requiem but the C Minor 
Mass, K427: a masterly torso 
with a dramatic range and 
musical audacity that sur- 
pass even the swansong. 

The next best thing most be 
to hear the unfinishe d work 
performed with such a sure 
grasp of its possibilities that it 
se ems entirely satisfactory as 
it stands. This was SUCh a 
performance. 

In the past John Eliot 
Gardiner add his Monteverdi 
Choir have occasionally 
sounded more intent on inter- 
preting the letter, rather titan 
the spirit, of the sacred choral 
repertoire. Here, though, bril- 
liant choral technique seemed 
perfectly allied to deeply-felt 
emotion. 

This was dear from the 
“Kyrie”, where Gardiner 
emphasized the C-minor 
hardness of the writing: the 
choristers' chest voices match- 
ing the nasal timbres of the 
English Baroque Soloists* 
“authentic" oboes and trom- 
bones. Thus he maximized the 
contrast with the radiant 
“Christe”. sung with unforced 
purity by the American so- 
prano Sylvia McNair. 

Similarly, he accentuated 
• the shock of being thrust into 


the shorn und drang dimin- 
ished chords of the “Gratias" 
straight alter the skipping 
coloratura of the “La udam us 
te" (which found Diana 
Montague in expansive 
voice). And in the “Qui tollis” 
something hugely melo- 
dramatic - was made of 
Mozart’s unexpected piano 
marking at "Miserere”. 


Perhaps he should have 
been equally bold in the 
galloping "Credo” and the 
final “Benedicms" both of 
which sounded over-refined: 
too much super-ego, not 
enough id. But he did provide 
shapely accompaniments for 
the delightful “Domine 
Deus”, where the two so- 
pranos exchange notes an 
octave and a half apart, and 
the “Et incamatus”, with its 
celebrated cadenza for so- 
prano mid woodwind. 

1 have heard conductors 
give little history lessons be- 
fore perforating a symphony 
(several times, unfortunately) 
but never, before tonight, 
during one. 

Gardiner completed two 
movements of Mozart’s No 31 
(the “Paris”), then announced 
that he was also going to 
perform the alternative sec- 
ond movement — the one 
Mozart substituted when the 
Parisian impresario Le Gros 
said tiie French equivalent of 
“too many notes, my dear 
Mozart” about the original 
The verbal interjection was a 
pleasant quirk, and possibly 
even livelier than the 
performance. 

Richard Morrison 


Definitive Dorati 


RPO/Dorati 
Festival Hall 


parate forces firmly trader 
control A canons revival 


Paul Griffiths 


control A canons remaL 

Nigel Jamieson 


Reservations have recently 
been voiced on this page about 
the performances of Antal 
Dorati and, in particular, 
Jorge Bolet. On Thursday 
itight, they wiped their slates 
dean. It was one of those 
evenings when chemistry be- 
tween conductor, soloist and 


orchestra was at its most 
productive; and when the 
programming itself seemed to 
bring to the fore some of the 
most positive and distinctive 
aspects of their performing 
characters. 



The Present with a Future 




Move into party power -fc- 
Sivola Shu I man toasts the hosts 




Power of a play possessed 


It was midsummer Brahms: 
the Second Piano Concerto 
and the Second Symphony, 
both written on holiday re- 
treat in the Austrian country- 
side. It was dearly Dorati's 
intention to minimize conflict 


Donald Cooparj 


at every point in the 
concerto’s opening move- 
ment The string?, obviously 
well-rehearsed, purred in as- 
sent to Dorati’s cultivated 


THEATRE 


Eat out and be in ★ 

Meredith Etherhtgtnn-Sntiih says vhere 

Be merry merry well-dressed ill ★ 
:il)-ovcr Christina* cnuilCrv-lioiisc clothe* 






Earn £1 million a year at ,35 ★ 
N icholas Coleridge tors it tip 

Find frith amusing ★ 

Alexandra Artley meets the gnnidvtf fluff 

Look and fuel divine ★ 


A Mouthful of 
Birds 

Royal Court 








tion and light, fluid rubato. 
He, in turn, was later to 
provide a long, expectant ap- 
proach of sustained pianis- 
simo for the solo cello’s 
beautifully poised return in 
the Andante. 


The notion of being “pos- 
sessed” may sound like a 
discarded superstition, but 
everyone has experienced it 
and used phrases tike “I 


wasn't myself”. This Joint 
Stock Theatre production 




kl»4. 1 tins Ch'n smuts’,! utl all tl tnittuli. tYc!> 



; T;li 


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Stock Theatre production 
(first reviewed in Birmingham 
by Andrew Rissik) takes the 
idea very seriously indeed. 

The text is a collaboration 
between two playwrights: 
David Lan, a professional 
anthropologist, and -Caryl 
Churchill whose past work 
has focussed on witchcraft and 
criminology. They have 
pooled these resources to 
examine what happens when 
ordinary lives are invaded by 
some other internal or ex- 
ternal force. The piece con- 
sists of seven such 
“possessions” linked by ref- 
erence to the ultimate' model 
of Euripides’s The Bacchae. 
Reduced to anecdote, it shows 
such episodes as a woman 
drowning her child, a 
businessman . felling m love 
with a pig, and -two noisy 
neighbours going for each 
other with knives. 




A.?'*' "■ 


Dionysos double: Philippe Giraadean and Stephen Gaff rnA Mouthful of Birds 


Bolet’s particular skill at 
filtering melody into its har- 
monic support — some thin g 
which so distinguishes his 
Liszt playing- made its mark 
if® gentler theme 

of the Scherzo. It ventilated 
the properly oppressive three 
beats — Bolet’s playing made 
us feel the tugging undertow of 
each one — and, with Dorati's 
metic ulous balance of parts, 
freed the movement to rise 
into the mqjor without a hint 
of the bombastic. 


But what counts is not the 
basic events, buz the means by 
which the production (Ian 
Spink and Les Waters) takes 
you inside the heads of the 
afflicted characters, either in 
nightmare or ecstasy, making 
you fed how easily you could 
act as they do. 

Dance figures prominently 
in the show. When the victims 
dance it is a jerky, autistic 
ballet of imprisonment. Only 
when the two figures of 
Dionysus (Philippe Girau- 
deau mid Stephen Goff) take 
the stage does it expand into 
the flowing line of those at 


peace with their own bodies. 

As for the individual epi- 
sodes. the production displays 
an amariig variety of devices 
that lead you into forbidden 
places of tiie mind. The child 
killer, for instance, is assailed 
by a seductive tempte- who 
breaks into the regular quarrel 
with her husband over the 
kitchen table. The ' pig-lover 
engages in a rapt pas de deux 
with a lithe, graceful partner 
defined only with strap-on 
ears. And the Eunpidean fi- 
nale shows the devouring of 
Pentheus as a giggling girls’ 
party only felling silent when 


they see the heap of tattered 
rags at their feet. 

With chameleon perfor- 
mances from Tricia Kelly and 
Vivienne Rochester, the pro- 
duction is a most accom- 
plished collage which succeeds 
in discovering extraordinary 
varieties of tone.and rhythm . 
within the limits of’ un- 
controlled passion. My only 
doubt is this suggestion that 
“possesaon” is in some way 
therapeutic and capable of 
changing people's lives. 
Euripideswonld disagree. 


Ptis sense of deliberate 
weight reduction, of a refusal 
2 . “Wring approaching 
metonc, was a refreshing 
efiara^enstic oftheeveninga! 
a whole. Dorati had slimmed 
gecontours of the Academic 
Festival Overture, drawing 
rorne unusudly refined cli* 

paxes from the brass; and had 

an ai m ost 

Schuberban suppleness of 

spadoiS “^iSd^pfSor! 


Irving Wardle 


Hilary Finch 


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CHRISTMAS SHOW GUIDE 


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in the tale 


imng me traditional pantomimes this year are Muppets, Hobbits and 
reggae rockers. Tony Patrick presents his pick of the seasonal fare 


JAZZ RECORDS 



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LONDON 


THE ADVENTURES OFTOAD: 
ftoGfcmusfcxrf version of the . 
Kenneth Grahams story. 




r ,f ‘T > iTTTi H 
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f_* • 1 * ^1 

1 |h|i 


eras 


Deo 16-Jan 10 - - 

ALADOOk Nonrian Beaton, . 
Debby Bishop, Anna Karan. - 
Shaw (01 -3881 394) Doc Man 

10 • ■ - 

AL4CEM WONDERLAND: . 
John-Utafla’aad ap tetlor t ofthe 
Lewis Carrol story. 

Lyric. Ha mmer smit h (01-741 - 
2311). Dec 13-Jan31 

AMAHLANDlHEtOOKT 
VBdORS/niEBOYWHO 
GREW TOO FAST: Two operas 
;by©anCaftoMenottf,one 
estabtishetf favourite. the 
secontiaBrffsh premiere. 
Sager's WeBs (01 -278 891 6) ' ■ 
Dec 11-27 . • . 

CBCBttUJL-StuFraicfe, 

Tony Adams. Linds Nolan. ' 
Ashcraft Theatre, FairSeW 
HaBa. Croydon (014188 9291). - 
Dec 16-Jan 24 • 

CMOERELLA: John Noakss. 
Intimate, Palmers Green (01- 
8885461). DeclWanT7 . 

CINDERELLA: Amaka Hoe, 

Rolf Harris, BBT Owen. 

Richmond (01-940 0068) Dec 
12-Fetol 

WCK WHITTINGTON: Barbara 
Whdsor, John Craven. 

Beck Theatre, Hayes (01- . 

561 8371) Declf-JanlO 

DtCKWHrrnNQT0NANDM8 





MANCHESTER: Jack & the 
Beenstatic Russ Abbot, Befia 
Embara, Windsor Davies. 
Palace <061 236 9922). Dec 12- 
Fab21 

Pied Piper; 

Libfffl^{061 2367110) Dec 5- 

MANSFIELD: CtedereBa: 

Frank Carson. 

CMc (0623 656656)- Dec 15- 
JanlO 

MOLD: AOca Through the 
Looking (Bass: Resident 


Teatre (Swyd (0352 551 14). 
Dec4-Jan24 

NEW BRIGHTON: Babes in the 
Wood: Stan Boardman. 

Floral PavDSon ((SI 639 4360). 
Dec 26-dan 24 

NEWCASTLE-UPON-TYNE: 
Oicfc Wh ittington: Patrick 
Mower, Juts Trott, Peter 
Goodwright and Lenny the 
Lion. 

New Tyne (0632 320899). Dec 
18dan31 

NORWICH: Ondereda: Robin 
NedweH, Avrfl Angers. 

Theatre Royal (0603 628205). j 
Dec18-Feb7 I 

NOTTINGHAM: Robinson 
Crusoe: Rod Hud & Emu. 

Theatre Royal (0602 472328). 
Dec20-Jan31 

OLDHAM: Dick Whittington: 
With Jeffrey Longmore. 

Coliseum (061 624 2829L Dec 
5-Jan 17 

OXFORD: Snow White and the 
Seven Dwarfs: Dana, Mike 
Newman, Ross Davidson. 

Apollo (0865 244544). Dec 22- 
Jan31 

PLYMOUTH: CtedereteBffl 
Simpson, Jan Hartley, Susan 
Maiighan, Paul Henry. 

Theatre Royal (0752668282). 
Dec 22-Jan 31 

READING: Dick VIMUnOtMc 
Bobby Davro, Brian Cant, 

H^a£n^OT34 591591) Dec 

ST HELENS Jack & the 
Bwanatatic 

Theatre Royal (0744 28467). 
Dec6-Jan3 

SCARBOROUGH: School for 
^^ ^cqgdhwTswnady. 

SHEFFIELD: Jack A The 
BeanstaHc Bobby Knutt 
Crucible (07427699221 Dec 
12-Jan17 

SOUTHAMPTON: Christmas 
Cat A the Pudding Pirates. 

Nuffield (0703 555028) Dec 
11-JanlO 

SOUTHEND: The Plod Piper: 
Vince Hi, Melvyn Hayes, Jack 
Douglas, Powys & Jones. 

C8ffs Pavlion (0702 351 135). 

Dec 1 5-Jan 10 

SOUTHPORT: Dick 
Wlrittington: Roy Walker. 
Southport Theade (0704 
40404). Dec 19-Jan 24 

STOCKPORT CtedereBa: 

Lewis Coffins, Aldan J. Harvey, 
Lynda Baron. 

Davenport (081483 3801). Dec 
19-Jan 24 

SUNDERLAND: Humpty ' 

Dumpty: Keith Harris & Orville, i 

Empire (0873 42517). Dec 10 1 

Jan 31 l 

SWANSEA: Mother Goose: i 

Christopher Bigglm, Las 3 

Demis. 1 

Grand (0792 475715). Dec 17- j 

Feb 28 J 

SWINDON: Jack A the * 



S 1 v \ j 


V'/vA v« 


Taking offi Bonnie Langford in the tearing mu si cal Pete Pan at Leeds 




i - j i r 1 1 








"Shadow^ is a gfowing halted 

confidently emmdated on the 
larger horn, and the leader is 
joined by ms lather on Elis's 
own accurately titled tk Swing r 


nigfaz somewhere & central 
Europe SOyearsagtv := 

The audacious ending in 
which mstruments and voice 


mg at the Haven*’, which abo gve way ^tfae -riririble of 
features the superlative work and tteteteatteta hiss 

of “Smitty" Smith, already ram pn the mud L of some 
one of the dozen finest smalt 20th^efltmy^ Golgotha, a not 
grasp dmmmm m tey y ea^y forgotten. .. . 

history. _ . ; , Huh ardWilliams 


ROCK RECORDS 


Malacca 

patrols 

ncreased 


thrretevant musical and lyri- 
,cal vooabolary needed tofeel 

The TUI Gators: Mumbo . . . OTtenst : and vocalist Don 
Jumbo (ZfrtoZONG 010) : ‘ .Leadyjs better able fo capture 

— ■ — : : — — — : — • the flavour ofthetiines uang 

the kind -o f scra ppy guitar 
Even a glance at the songtiffes sound and gritty technique 
on Angast betrays the poverty Cbptte tes emplnyrag 
of jmagiTMrfAn . which has ®^ n he recorded Five Live 
beset I*nc Clapton in foe Yardbirds ~ in 1964. Bat 
twilight of Ids iteea; howcan Mombo Jumbo, foe Jlnnl al- 
anyone cal a new song "Miss bum by-the trio from Anstin, 
You" or' "Walk Away" or Texas, is not in any sense i 
“Hold On", a title already revivalist record. Leady^ j 
bestowed on six .songs to my fotmd»menfoerof-foeLeRoi 
certain knowledge? Brothers, toother with bassist 

The malaise is confirmed by Keith Ferguson (the Fabolous 
the mtKic, a hotch-potch -of Thunderbirds) and Gary, 
pensionahifi-aged rode steered Smi th (Stevie Ray Vaughan' s 
unerringly down the mi ddte band) has p l undere d -foe rich 
fane by foe ubiquitons Tfcil Southern traditions of C^pm 
Coflins (drums, production, and Zy deco to come up with a 
and one songwritmg credit) firesh permutation that may 
Tina Turner. Am ur - with best be called modern swamp 
Clapton on a monotonous reefc 
frog, “Tearing UsApart" the The smart chord changes in 
Brecker Bncrfhers somehow “Behind foe WheeT, thetrill- 
appeacte five trades without iog guitar sdo in “ Yard D og", 
maifTTTg any impact, and even and foe bouncy instrumental 
a great Song like Robert Gray's hooks in “Little GM-Bfue^, 
“Bad Influence”, is despoiled confirm foe spontaneous tp- 
by axT unbocoaning shuf - peal of an album. that maizies 
fle mmngemCQL - musical aocximidishiiieiEt to 

The best songs, “Miss Ytm” some, near-garage band 
and “It’s in the Way that You recording techniques, and 
Use ir, show gfonmem- of manages to breathe, new life 
Clapton's former sense of sivle mto the somewhat- 


IhurchaLBronUey.KontfOI- 
4606677). DeclSJan 17 
FLASH TRASH: a Jamaican 
reggaii pantomime. 

Half Moon, 213 MBs End Road, 
London £1(01-7904000). Dec 
24 • , \ • 

THEHOBBm Adaptalion of 
the storv by JJLToNden. 
FbrteS^NBfi 2238) Dec 9- 
Jan24- 

HOUDAYON ICE *S7:The 
annual skating spectacular. 
WUmbtey Arena (01-902 1234). 
Jan204nb22 

JACK ANOTHE BEANSTALK: 
Hairy Wbrth, Anita Harris, . 
Robin Aakwtth, DonteeNotan. 
Wimbledon (01 -540 0363). Dec 
tW=eb,7 - • - 

JACK AND THE BEANSTALK 
■RadWonal pantomime. 

North PBcknamCSvic Centre 
(01-703 2917). Jan 2-17 

JOSBW AND THE AMAZHIQ 
TECHNICOLOR DREAMCOAT: 


uuriam up on 
a feast of fun 


Paiaoe, Watford (0923 25671L 
Dec4-Jan3 . 

THE VOYAGE OF THE DAWN 
TREADEft Adaptation of the 
C^. Lewis story. 

Sadler's WMs (01-278 6916). 
Jan20-Feb14 

THE WIND IN THE WILLOWS: 
Vbreion of the Kenneth 
Grahams classic. 

Mermaid (01-236 5568). Dec 


OUT OF TOWN 







into the somewhat 




R^l^-831 8680). Dec 18r 

THE KMG AND' THE CORPSE 
Based on acoBectkxioftates 
from ancient India. 

(01-359 4404). Dec 15- 

TTg LI ON, THEW ITCH AND 
THE WARDROBE: Adaptation 

ofthe.CS. Lewis story. 
Westminster (Ot-834 0283). 
Nowon 

MR SPOON ON BUTTON . 
MOON: Pfayboerd Puppets: 
Lyric, HBmmennTdthffll-741 - 
2311X Mattedes Dec2DJan 10 

TNEMUPPETWOWON 
TOUR' Human-size Miss 
unit, Gonzoeta. 
..Conference Centre 
1234). Dec 16-28 

OLD MAN OF : 
4NAQAR; Musical 

of the story by HRH 
Prince of Wales. 

336 3878) Matinfes 
3 , . 

“ >!ED PIPER: Adaptation 
tea noern by Robert 

wrtBDecfiLOSvier 
19) (01-926 2252) In 
morning and 
shows -■ 


Far from 


ffl). Beol-Jan 17 

ELLORrSpoof : 
Chridmaeafww". 




CONCISE CROSSWORD NO 11 19 

Prizes ef the New CoHeds Thcsmnns wfll be given far foe first two 
correct sofatkms opened onThunday, December 4, 1986. E n t rie s 
should be addressed to The Times Concise Cro sgw o nl Com- 
pethteo, 1 Penoiogton Street, London. El 9XN. The winners and 
sohuiaa w31.be announced on Saturday, December 6, 1986 • 

ACROSS 

l Hntdafis(6) . . 

4Tommtt(6) 

TSt«^gak(4) 

8 ft au Mi u r tl iyffl 

9 Afcoteifesiiin iOT . . 

(12) ..... 

15 Ifinda retreat (6) 

16 Cabndytf) 

17 Owraaended 
- (4A3) 

23 Ran*nlriH( 8 ) 

24 Banicr( 4 ) . 

25 UnartliodoxbeBe& 

-W-. . 

26 Reranl co*ei (6> 


anwsiBHBiaHQBa 

B B B B B fl 

QBBBBH 3BBBBB 
B B B BBT 

aaBHBSBaBBBB 
B B B B 3 J 
I3BBBBBBB 



ABERDEEN: Snow White and 
ttwBeven Dwarta: Ted 
Rogers. Honor Blackman. 
Stogy's (0224 641122) 

A3HT0N-UNDER-LYN& 
Mteeon Crusoe: Jim BowBn< 
Davkf^raon. : ~ ■ 

Tameside (061-308 3223). Deb 

11- Janlt . , 

AYR: Ataddte;. Johnny Beattie. ' 
Gaiety (0292 264639) Dec4- 
4an24 

BATH: Mofher Goose: Danny 
La Rue.' 

Theatre Royal (0225 65065) 
De&23-Fbb7 

BELFAST: OBverfc Own 
production. 

Grand House (02322 

BHJJNGHAM: CtedereBa: 
Duggie Brown. . 

Forum(0642 552863) Dec 13- 
. Jan 10 

BmMNQHAM: Babes te the . 
Wood: Les Dawson, Ruth 
Madoc, John Nettles. 

Alexandra (021 643 1231) Dec 

12- FebS 

StegW in foe Rate: Tommy 
Steele, now towing the show 
which was at the PaUatfiiHn in 
London. - v 

Hippodrome (021 622 7486) 
Dec22-Feb2» • 

BOURNEMOUTH: AJadifin: 

Anita Dobson,- Jeffrey Holland. 
PavjBon m202 297297) Dec 

BMCKNELUPteocchio: 
Italan-styfe pantomime. 

WHde Theatre (0344 484123) 

. Dec l6-Jan3 

BRADFORD: BSbes In foe 
Wood: Gfflmon and BaH. 
Alhambra (0274752000) Dec 
18-Feb 28 

BRIGHTON: CtedereBa: CoSn 
Bdier, Wendy Richard, Hugh 
Lloyd, Carol Kaye. 

Theatre Royal (0273 28468). 
Dec.12-Jan 10 

BRISTOL: Qndareltattim 
Davidson. 


CANTERBURY: Snow White 
and the Seven Dwarfs: Jess 
Conrad. 

Marlowe (0227 67246). Dec 13- 
Jan 17 

CARDIFF: Dick Whittington: 
The Krankies. 

New (0222 394844) Dec 15- 
Jan24 

TbeAmeztegMrToed: ' 
Version of the Kenneth 
Grahams stories. 

Sherman (0222 30451). Dec 3- 
JanlO 

CHICHESTER: The Pied Piper 
of Hamelfo/Tlie Prisoner m 
Zenda: Adaptation of the 
Browning poem with Michael 
Cogan. Adaptation of the 
Anthony Hope yam, with 
Christopher Timotlw aid 
Terence Longdon. Plays 


Festival Theatre (0243 
781312) Piper Dec 17-Jan a 
Prisoner Dec 12-Jan 3 



Baxter as Widow Twankay. 
^^(041 552 5961) Nov 24- 

Dick Whittington: Andy 
Cameron. 

PavHon (041.332 1846) Nov 
27-Jan31 

Red ffidkw Hood and the 
Wolf: OavH McKay. 

Citizens '(041 429 0022) Dec 
9Jan 10 

GUILDFORD: Jack and foe 
BeanstaHc Terry Scott, June 
Whitfield. 

Yvonne Amaud (048360191). 
Dec 17-Jan 17 

HANLEY, STOKE-ON-TRENT. 
Mofoer Goose: Ken Dodd. 
Theatre Royal (0782 266301) 
Dec18-Jan17 

HASTINGS: Ataddte: Bobby 

Crush, Charlie WiKams. 

White Rock (0424 434343) Dec 
20-Jan 10 

HULL: Aladdin: Uttie and 
Large. I 

New (0482 20463) Dec 19-Jan 
24 

The Lion, tiie Witoh mid the 
Wardrobe: Adaptation of the 
[ C.S. Lewis children’s story. 
Sprtrm Street Theatre (0482 
23638). Dec 2-Jan 1 0 

INVERNESS: Ctnderetia: Tom 
O’Connor. 

Eden Court (0463 221718) Dec 
5-Jan 10 

LEEDS: Peter Parc Bonnie 
Langford in the towteg musical 
version. 

garri (0532 459351) Jan 27- 

Jack and the Beanstatic Rusty 
Goff, Teddy Turner, Daniel 
Day. 


THE TIMES 
ARTS DIARY 

Exhibiting 

discomfort 

'Despite the growing tendency 
to charge admission fees, it 
appears that public facilities in 
hundreds of museums and 
galleries throughout the coun- 
try axe less impressive than 
their exhibits. This bleak pio- . 
ture emerges from a govern- 
ment-funded survey of some 
2,000 establishments, more 
than half of which demand 
cash at the door. 

Less than a quarter have a 
cafe or offer any other refresh- 
ments, only half have a car 
park and a third do not have 
toilets. Most have no special 
facilities for children, and 
under a third cater for foe 
disabled. A quarter of the 68 
million people who visit them 
every year are tourists, and yet 
only one in 10 offers publica- 
tions in foreign languages. 
And it’s not because all the 
museums and galleries are old 
— at least half of them have 
opened since 1970. 

9 B ntMtngrlmirfffl I wmwhiw 
may usefully begin f raming at 
the age of minus five months, 
according to Donald Sheder of 
the Eastman School of Music, 
New York. After placing head- 
phones on the abdomens of 29 
expectant mothers and playing 
classical music twice a day, he 
claims that foe chiUbeu, now 
aged 40 months, bare a rep- 
ertoire of more than 10 songs. 

Second best? 

Ho-hum, seen-it-a 11 -before 
department the Laurence 
Olivier Awards ceremony on 
December 7 may be little 
more than a repeat perfor- 
mance of last week's London 
Standard ‘ Drama Awards. 
Winners in the major Stan- 
dard categories are odds-an 
favourites to scoop the top 
prizes again, according to 
bookmaker William Hill — Le. 



iSugfii’ in foe Rain: Tommy 
Steele in B ir m ingham with the 
show from London's Falladiam 

DARUNGTON: Jack and the 
Beanstatic Bentie C&ftcvi, 
Kathy Staff, Suzanne Dando. 
Cfvlc (0325 486555) Dec 12- 
. Jan 24 

DARTFORO: Babes in the 


11-Jan 


343333) Dec 


DUNDEE: The Snour Queem 
Repertory (0382 27684) Dec 6- 

Jan3 

EDINBURGH: CtetterenasFUkkl 


CAMBRIDGE: Robinson 

CSusoe: Matthew Kelly. 
Artsj0223 355240) Dec 18- 



Dec 18-end of Feb 

LEICESTER: Hgh Soctaty/Tbe 
Mr Men’s Magic Island: World 
stage premiere of the Cote 
Porter musical, starring Trevor 
Eve, plus a second musical 
show based on Roger 
Hargreaves's cartoon 
characters. 

Haymarket (0533 539797) 

High Society Nov 19-Jan 31. 
/Stand Dec 1-Jan 3 

LINCOLN: Dick WhftBagtom 
Eric Sykes. 

Theatre Royal (0522 25565) 
Dec 19-Jan 10 

LIVERPOOL: Ataddte: CiBa 
Black, Bob Carofgees and Spit 
the Dog, Gareth Hunt. 

Empire (051 709 1555) Dec 19- 
Febl 

Dtefc Whittington and bis Kod 
Kbot Kat Rock ’n’ rod musicaL 
Everyman (051 709 4776) Nov 
27-Jan24 

LUTON: Aladdin: McDonald 
Joblay, Michael Sundte. 
StGeor^es (058221628) Dec 


Beanstek: Johnny Ball. 
Wyvem (0793 24481) Dec 16- 
Jan 17 

TORBAY: Dick Whittington: 

Iris Wrffiams. 

Princess (0803 27527) Dec 26- 
JanlO 

TUNBRIDGE WELLS: Dick 

PraSwSe^?^^^jS 10 

WAKEFIELD: Ctederetia: Don 
Maclean, Ctodagh Rogers. 
Theatre Royal and Opera 

House (0924 366 SK^Tbec 10- 
JanlO 

WINDSOR: Babes in the 
Wood: Joe Brown. 

Theatre Royal (0753 853888) 
Dec 12 (charity gala)-Jan 24 

WOLVERHAMPTON: Ataddte: 

John Irunan, Jimmy Cricket 
Grand (0902 29121) Dec 23- 
Jan31 

WORTHING: Mother Gooem 



--a 

Finnay, McKenzie 

Les liaisons Dangereuses as 
best play. Phantom qf the 
Opera far best musical, and 
Julia McKenzie as best ac- 
tress. Only exception to the re- 
run so for is Albert Finney, 
running a dose second to 
Derek Jacobi in the betting for 
best actor. 

In the money 

Less well-known patrons of 
the arts are to be recognized by 
a new annual award scheme 
by foe National Art-Collec- 
tions Fund. The aims are to 
honour a “benefactor of the 
year" for generosity to art 
heritage, and to hand out 
prizes of up to £5,000 for 
meritorious work by artists in 
areas such as conservation, 
research and exhibitions. 
NACF director Sir Peter 
Wakefield says the idea is to 
pay tribute to the “forgotten 
heroes" of the art world. 

• Tight arts budgets have 
foiled to dip the wings of at 
least one high-flying artist in 
the north-east Darlington 
wildlife artist David Cemmick 
has jast received a £450 grant 
from Northern Arts towards a 
trip to New Zealand ... to 
paint a rare breed of parrot 

Busking out 

American actor Stephen Ha- 
nan, presently starting in Les 
Miserables, recently received a 
standing ovation in Co vent 
Garden — because his audi- 
ence had no seats. Ha nan was 
entertaining a West End street 
audience with a selection of 
Italian arias, accompanying 
himself on a concertina. He 
tells me he did it for fun and 
was quite pleased to nip bade 
into the Palace Theatre for a 
matin fce show £1 5 richer. 

Gavin Bell 


CHESS 


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SOUrnDNTONO 


21 (Beam 22 Kacjf 


That erratic, att eking genins, 
Ljubomir Ljubcyevic of Yu- 
gbslavta, has femHjr Founded 
mto a most-formidable oppo- 
nent, -even -for foe world's 
greatesL . Since 1971, when he 
obtained' ' bis'-. Grandmaster 
title, IjBbojevfc has — on Iris 
day — been eapable of 
destroying afenost any oppo- 
nent But at the highest «vd 
Ljubojevic has lacked consist 
tency, and the volatile Yugo- 
-stav has been prone to bouts 
of nerves which have under- 
mined his staying power over 
a .sustained course. 

But 1985 has been Ijubo's 
year.: In the sununer be 
scored a magbty triumph Mt 
ithe- OHRA tournament in 
: Am^fdam,_ be performed 
welt m BogqpiOr and now in 
THbuig be, has taken second 
place, ahead of. Karpov. 1 h 



streak 


French Defence, Tilburg, 

November 1986 ' .. . 

1 mt «B 2 at OS 
a nes 

Fashionable nowadays is 
Tarrasch's restrictive 3 Nd2, 
against which Ljubqjevic 
himself had suffered in a 
game with Karpov ax Brus- 
sels earlier this year. The 
ride-loving Yugoslav pre fer s 
to sacrifice pawns and pawn 
structure with, foe more 
aggressive text 


with Ljubojevic, an unusual 
opening variation threw his 


process, , be .won; five. ^ppoDCnt offbaJance, then a 
games, .and- demolished whirlwind attack, even with 
K or c hn oi twkts.One.Gf these reduced .fortes, rapidly fin* 
was a - miniature- in ished off foe tob. 

KorcteoTs and-mfoted White: Ljubdevic; -Black: 
French Defence. .As is typkad’ 


White’s opening . does not 
enjoy a sparkling reputation. 
9 Ne2 b6 10 Bg5 Qe7 11 Qh4 
Bb7 12 NgT h6! Fifoer- 
Kovacevici Zagreb -1970, ted 
to - foe hut loss -by the 
American genius , before he 
set off on his victorious 
world championship cuit- 


I have never seen this idea 
before. Ljubcrjevic blithely 
sacrifices his g2 pawn. 
Korchnoi loves to take sacri- 
fices. This must have been a 
sore temptation for him, but 
he resists, grabbing the pawn 
for one move. 


The threat of Qxf7+ obliges 
Black to. sacrifice the ex- 
change, ie give up his Rook 
for White's Knight. 

IS - nap K7MS ORBS 

CSqS Hze 3 is at 

Black has collected a quantity 
of pawns for the loss of foe 
exchange, bat he is sadly 
lacking in development. 
.White’s Rooks are soon 
me na c ingly sweeping the 
board. 

K IB 1*03 MS 

-Iflmil tB »M NWS 

21 faaA MB - 22 BbSf Ka7 

23 HgS BdT 24 Rg7+ 

Black reagns 
After 24... Kd8 25 
Rd i*d7+ Nxd7 Rg8+ 
nets Black's Rook 

SflTmbnd Keene 


BRIDGE 


Going by the book 


Positive Declarer's Play by 
Terence Reese and Julian 


good hands, impatience with 
modern bidding and 
□ndigitiscd contempt for weak 
defensive tads which reveal 
foe distribution. Here is a 
game from foe book. 

Looking at only the North- 
Sonth cards, it is not easy to 
spot the winning line on this 

hand. 

Love alL Dealer South. 

4 0 S3 
V 10964 
O 972 
.♦A 10 7 


4A7 
JA0852 
0 K Q 24 


♦ 86 
V J73 
O 85 3 
+ J9642 


* KJ 1094 2 

. ti K 

OAJTO 

♦ K 05 

N E 


V* 

NO 44 

NO -.t- 

OpBoing had 44 


West starts with the +A 
and continues with a second 
round of the suit. All follow. 
Can declarer improve on 
playing for foe diamond 
honours to be divided? 

The experienced player win 
look hopefully at the hearts, 
without necessarily seeing 
how to exploit his chance. 
The winning tine is to cash 
two rounds of clubs before 
exiting with foe ^?K_ West 
wins and postpones his fete 
by playing a small heart to 
East’s ^J, which declarer 
ruffe. But when declarer 
crosses to dummy and plays 
a diamond to his OlQ and 
West’s 0Q, there is no 
escape. West is forced to lead 
into the diamond tenace, or 
establish dummy’s ^!0. 
Positive Declarer's Play is 
published by Victor GoUancz 
at £4.95. 



Jeremy Flint 












Ortwin n err i 


THE TIMES SATURDAY NOVEMBER 29 1986 


' '.r 


THE WEEK AHEAD 






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HAT TRICK; Clive Dunn plays the 
dithering uncle of bridegroom Tom 
Conti in the classic French farce, An 
Italian Straw Hat Stratford Johns. 
Clare Higgins and Deborah Norton 
also star in an adaptation by Simon 
Moore of Eugene Labiche's story of 
frantic efforts to replace a lady's 
straw hat, which has been chewed 


up by a horse on the way to the 
wedding. The Theatre of Comedy 


wedding. The Theatre of Comet 
production is directed by Anton 
Rodgers. Shaftesbury Theatre i 


Rodgers. Shaftesbury Theatre (01* 
379 5399), previews from Friday, firs 


night December 15. 


IN THE DOCK: Anna Ford takes the 
chair for 7V on Trial the final 
programme in BBC Television's 50th 
annwersary celebrations. Conducted 
by the lawyer. Paul Sieghart, the two- 
hour-plus “trial" will cover three 
areas of concern — TV and violence, 
TV and the home and TV and values. 
Witnesses include Bill Cotton, 
managing director of BBC Television. 
Michael Buerk, Russell Harty and 
actors Tom Watt and Glynis Barber. 

A jury of 500 viewers wifi use an 
electronic vote to give thsir verdict 
BBC2, tomorrow, 8.05-1 0-20pm. 


RUSSIAN SALAD: Semyon Bychkov, 

the young Leningrad-born conductor 
who made his British debut in March 
last year, takes the baton for two 
concerts with the London 
Philharmonic. Today's programme 
includes the Tchaikovsky Violin 
Concerto, with Dimitry Sitkovstsky as 
soloist, and the Shostakovich 
Symphony No 5. On Thursday Radu 
Lupu plays the Mozart Piano 
Concerto K595 and the other main 
work is Mendelssohn's Scottish 


GALLERIES 

TOP DRAWER: Edward Artfizzone 
started work as a clerk in the city, 
drawing secretly when the boss was 
not looking. He caused his family 
consternation when he resigned to 
become a full-time artist But he was 
soon designing book jackets and 
evolving a delicate style of drawing 
that became famous. An exhibition 
featuring old favourites, from Little 
Tim to Lucy Brown and Mr Grimes, 



BEAUTY TREATMENT: Anthony . 
Dowell has his first created part 
since becoming artistic director of 
the Royal Ballet in Beauty and the 
Beast. This new work fas music by 


as well as works by his family and 
friends is at Salty Hunter ana Patrick 
Seale Fme Art, London SWt (01-235 
0934), from Tuesday. 


Symphony. Royal Festival Hall (01- 
928 3191 ), both 7.30pm. 


Wayne Eagfing; design is by 
Pienkowski, best known as an 
illustrator of childrens' books. 
Dowell’s new job has obBged him to 
give up the big classical leads but he 
is keen to continue working 
alongside his dancers to the stodlos 
and on stage. Covent Garden (01- 
240 «J 066), Tuesday. 


SONGSMTHS: Eurythmic* duo 
Annie Lennox and Dave Stewart can 
took back with satisfaction on a 10- 
year songwriting partnership. 
Battered oy the cofiapse of The 
Tourists, they reappeared in 1981, 
making DIY albums on 8-tracfc 
machines, and laying toe unlikely 
foundations for tneir.iransftian to 
worid-ranked stadium rock band. 
This Is their first British tour for three 
Scottish Exhtoltion Centre, 




NEC, Birmingham (021 780 4133), 
Monday, Wednesday send Thursday. 


Lyric. Hammersmith (01- 
741 2311). 


OPENINGS 


LABYRINTH (U): Fairy-tale 
saga from M up pet man Jim 
Henson, with Jennifer Connelly 
as the teenager out to rescue 
her baby stepbrother from 
□avid Bowie's Goblin King. 
Odeon Leicester Square (01- 
930 6111). From Tues. 


EAT THE PEACH (PG): 


MACBETH: Jonathan Pryce a 
ferocious regicide in Adrian 
Noble's intense production. 
Stratford (0789 29562). 


igagmg ana potisnt 
comedy from Ireland, based 
the bizarre true story of a man 
obsessed with building a Wail 
of Death; a huge local nit and a 
major prize-winner at the 
Taormina Film Festival. 

Plaza (01-437 1234). From Fri. 


BREAKING THE CODE: 

Intelligent stage biography of 
the enigmatic Alan Turing, 
computer genius and 
homosexual; fins performance 


> Derek Jacobi. 


rarket (01-930 9832). 


KANGAROO (PG): 

D. H. Lawrence's Australian 
novel, prettily but ponderously 
filmed by Tim BurstaU, with 
Colin Fnels as the author's 
surrogate - a writer wooed by 
fascists. With Judy Davis 
(excellent) as his German wife. 
Cannon H aymarket (01- 
839 1527). From Fri. 


SELECTED 


ROUND MIDNIGHT (15): 
Bertrand Tavernier's loving 
homage to jazz musicians, set 
in Pans during the 1950s; with 
Dexter Gordon as a 
saxophonist befriended by an 
idolizing Frenchman. 

Lumiere (01-836 0691), Screen 
on the Hill (01-435 3366), Gate 
Netting HiB (01-221 0220). 

SHOAH (PG): Claude 
Lanzmann’s meticulous and 
chilling holocaust 
documentary; more then nine 
hours long, presented in two 
parts. 

Curzon Mayfair (01-499 3737). 


u. 


ROCK 


LEVEL 42: A lot of fast twiddty 
bass-playing, but no new 
material. 


Tomorrow-Wed, Wembley 
Arena (01 -902 1234); Fri, NEC, 
Birmingham (021 780 4133). 

CHRIS REA: If Chris de Burgh 
can become an overnight 
sensation there may be hope 
for Rea yet 

Tomorrow, Pavilion, Glasgow 
(041 332 1846); Mon, 
Edinburgh Playhouse (031 551 


KES(1969): Barry Hines’s 
story of a boy and his kestrel, 
filmed with freshness and 
sympathy by Ken Loach. 
BBC2, tomorrow, 3-4.50 pm. 


HAIL THE CONQUERING 
HERO (1944): Roistering, 
sardonic Preston Sturges 
comedy about an army reject 
(Eddie Bracken) feted in his 
home town as a war hero. 
Channel 4, tomorrow, 9.45- 
11.35pm. 


Manchester Apollo (061 273 
3775). 

STATUS QUO: Join the 
professionals on their winter 
manoeuvres. 

Mon, Brighton Centre (0273 
202881 );Tues-Thurs. 
Hammersmith Odeon, London 
W6 (01-748 4081). 

BARRENCE WHITFIELD AND 
THE SAVAGES: Good time 
raucous rock ’n’ roll of the kind 
favoured by Andy Kershaw. 
Wed. DingwaHs, London NW1 
(01-267 4967); Thurs, Astoria, 
Leeds (0532 490362). 

MOODY BLUES: Still peddling 
their mystic philosophies on 
the meaning of life, and still 
placing alburns in the US top 
ten. 

Thurs, St David's Hall, Cardiff 
(0222 371236); Fri, Wembley 
Arena 101-902 1234). 


A STAR IS BORN (1937T: Janet 
Gayrvor, Fredrlc March in the 
first and best version of the 
much-filmed tale of a rising 
actress and a falling star. 
BBC1, Tues, 2-3. 50pm. 


THE GOOD, THE BAD AND 
THE UGLY (1966): Clint 
Eastwood leads Sergio 
Leone's stylish, violent story of 
bounty hunters in the American 
Civil War which set a new trend 
in Westerns. 

BBC1, Fri, 9.30pm -mid night 




JAZX/-% 


RAY BROWN TRIO: Gene 
Harris, a pianist who plays the 
blues tike he invented them, is 


the revelation of band led by 
one of the great bassists of 


THEATRE 


Tonight, Ronnie Scott’s Club, 
47 Frith Street London W1 (01- 
4390747). 

KENNY DAVERffc Ruent and 


OPENINGS 


lyrical mainstream clarinettist 
Tonight Pizza Express, 10 








yj 

mislmsB 


Tonight Pizza Express, 10 
Dean Street London W1 (01- 
4398722). 

COURTNEY PINE: Behind the 
hype. Pine is a genuinely 
talented musician with a lot of 



growing to da 
Tonight, University of East 
Anglia, Norwich (0503 505401); 
Thurs, Portsmouth Polytechnic 
(0705819141).' 

NAPPY BROWN: A welcome 
comeback by the Fifties rhythm 
'n' blues veteran whose 
gospel-derived composition 
"Night Time is the Right Time" 
provided Ray Charles with an 
early hit. 

Tomorrow, Powerhouse. 
Birmingham (021 643 4775); 
Tues, Cricketers. Kannington 
Oval, London SE11 (01-735 
3059); Wed. 100 Club, 100 
Oxford Street, London W1 (01- 
636 0933); Thurs. Gossips. 69 
Dear. Street. London Wt (01- 
434 4480); Fri, Lakers Hotel, 
RedhHI (0737 61043). 

JOHNNY DYANi MEMORIAL: 
Chris McGregor, Louis Mohdo 
and Dudu Pukwana pay tribute 
to the recently deceased 
Dyani, who played bass with 
tram In the band that brought 
these remarkable South 
African musicians to Europe 
more than 20 years ago. 

Tues, 100 Chib, 100 Oxford 
Street. London W 1 {01-636 
0933). 


WOMAN IN MIND: Powerful, 
poignant Ayckbourn drama 
with award-winning 


wnn awara-wmning 
performance from Julia 
McKenzie as distraught wife. 
Vaudeville (01-836 9§87). 

THE INFERNAL MACHINE: 

Last week of Simon Callow's 

adantstinn a( 


adaptation of Cocteau's 
wr^on of Oedipus; Odd but 
imngumg. 


.;i ^ > /.I 


A FUNNY THING HAPPENED 
ON THE WAY TO THE FORUM: 
Revival of Sondheim's tuneful 
romp through ancient Rome; 
Frankie Howerd once again the 
roguish guide. 

Piccadilly (01-437 4506). 


ABBA DO/ASHKENAZY: 

Claudio Abba do conducts the 


London Symohony Orchestra 
in Tchaikovsky’s Symphony 


in Tchaikovsky's Symphony 
No 6 "Pathdtique", Vladimir 
Ashkenazy solos in Brahms's 
Piano Concerto No 1 . 
Barbican Centre, Silk Street, 
London EC2 (01-628 8795, 
credit cards 01 -638 8891 ). 
Tomorrow, 7.30pm. 

ALL BRAHMS: The 
Philharmonla Orchestra is 


WEBER ANNIVERSARY: The 
200th anniversary of Weber's 
birth is marked by the Hanover 
Band with Concertino for Horn 
and Orchestra, and Symphony 
No 2. 

St John's, Smith Square. 
London SW1. Friday, 7.30pm. 


|;>T , ; :, TELEVtS[QN f 


DANCE 


THE KHANS OF PAKISTAN: A 
timely look at the extraordinary 
family from a tiny mud vfflage 
on the north-west frontier 
which has dominated world 
squash for 35 years. 

Channel 4. today, 7.30-8 .30pm. 

THE WORLD AT WAR: Reprise 
of Jeremy Isaacs’s 26-part 


THE CHOSEN FEW: First of 
two 40 Minutes films in which, 

for the first time, television site 
In on the selection of 
candidates for the top jobs in 
the Civil Service. 

B8C2, Thurs, 9.30-1 0.1 0pm. 


k GALLERIES \ 


OPERA 


conducted by Bernard Haitink 
in Brahms's Serenade No 1 


and Symphony No 4. 
Festival Hall, south E 


outh Bank, 


London SE1 (01-928 3191, 
credit cards 01 -928 88G0). 



credit cards 01 -928 88G0). 
Mon, 7.30pm. 

HELP POLAND: In aid of the 
Help Poland Fund and in the 
presence of HRH Princess 
Alexandra Alan Kogosowski 
plays nocturnes, etudes, 
ballades and the F minor 
Fantasy by Chopin. 

St John's, Smith Square, 
London SW1 (01-222 1061). 
Tues, 7.30pm. 


ROYAL BALLET: David 
Bintley’s Young Apollo, with 
music by Britten and Gordon 
Cross, designs by Victor 
Pasmore, is given, splitting its 
arduous leading role among 
three men (Tues, Thurs). On 
the same bm, a new Beauty 
and the Beast and MacMilan's 
reworking of Baiserdela f6e. 
Covent Garden (01-240 1066). 

SADLER’S WELLS ROYAL 
BALLET: Frank Staffs staging 
of the Prokofiev Peter and the 
Wolf has its first Royal Ballet 
performance at Birmingham on 




War, first shown in 1973 and a 
television classic. 

Channel 4, tomorrow, 7.15- 
8.15pm. 


Fri together with a revival of 
MacMillan's Solitaire, Michael 
Corder's Wand of Youth and 
Balanchine’s Tchaikovsky Pas 
de Deux. Mon-Thurs, the 
company dances The Snow 
Queen. 


MASUR/RPO: Beethoven’s 
Prometheus Overture and 
excerpts from Prokofiev's 
Romeo and Juliet are heard 
from the RPO under Kurt 


Birmingham Hippodrome (021 
5227486). 



ROYAL OPERA HOUSE: 
Mozart and JaMCek dominate 
the week: tonk^it and Fri at 
7pm is Die ZauberfJote in a 
revival of August Evenfing's 
production. Peter Schneider 
conducts a cast led by 
Siegfried Jerusalem as Tamino 
andKarita Mattfia the Pamina. 
Bernard Haitink has made an 
auspicious start as music 
director-designate with an 
exciting production of Jenufa, 


(Greeted by Yuri Lyubimov. 
Wed and Dec 6 at 7.30pm. 


Masur and Kyung Wha Chung 
solos in Beemoven's Violin 


• Eddie Constantine as the 
private eye Lemray Caution is 
Alphoville (BBC2, 1135pm- 
1.20am), Jean-Lnc Godard's 
excursion into science-fiction 
which remains one of his more 
accessible films- An alter- 
native title was Torzfin verses 
IBM which oeatiy sum- 
marizes Godard’s blend of 
pulp fiction heroics and a 
bleak vision of a society 
controlled by computer. It is 
being shown with his latest, 
more pretentions, film. Detec- 
tive (935-11 35pm). 


solos in Beemoven's Violin 
Concerto. 

Festival Hall. Tues, 7.30pm. 

ALL BEETHOVEN: As James 
Lough ran conducts the LSO, 
John Ull solos in Beethoven's 
Piano Concertos Nos 1-3. 
Barbican Centre. Tues, 
7.45pm. 

PRITCHARD/BBC SO: As a 
contribution to Radio 3’s 
current Russian season. Sir 
John Pritchard conducts the 
BBC SO in Shostakovich's 


Symphony No 11 "The Year 
1905” and Prokofiev’s Piano 


1905" and Prokofiev’s Piano 
Concerto No 2 (soloist Dmitri 
Alexeev). 

Festival HaH. Wed, 7.3Cpm. 

FROM COPENHAGEN: 
Lamberto Gardelli conducts 
the Danish Radio Symphony 
Orchestra in Tchaikovsky’s 
Romeo and Juliet, Brahms's 
Symphony No 1, and John 
Ogdon solos in Grieg's Piano 
Concerto. 

Barbican Centre. Wed, 7.45pm. 


LONDON CONTEMPORARY 
DANCE THEATRE: The last 
week of its London season. 
Siobhan Davies's newest work 
and Richard Alston's Rainbow 
Bandit are on tonight’s bii. 
Robert Cohan's Ceremony has 
its London premiere Tues (until 
Dec 6) together with Jerome 
Robbin's Moves and Robert 
North's all-male Troy Gams. 
Sadler’s Wells (01-278 8916). 

LONDON FESTIVAL BALLET: 
A fortnight at Plymouth begins 
with seven performances of 
Ashton's Romeo and Juliet 
(Mon-Dec 6), to be followed by 
a new Nutcracker. 

Theatre Royal, Plymouth (0752 
669595). 


NORTHERN BALLET 
THEATRE: Elisabeth Maurin, 
from Paris Opera, dances 
Swan Lake, partnered by her 
Paris boss Rudolf Nureyev, in 
Manchester on Thurs, Fri and 
Dec 6. 

Palace Theatre, Manchester 
(0612369922). 


_ 

• Hancock's Half Hour 
(BEC1, Toes, 8-830pm) is 
probably the only television 
comedy of the 1959s that can 
be repeated today without 
embarrassment. The staging 
may seem p rim i ti ve, bm the 
humour is as fresh as ever. A 
re-ran of six vintage shows 
begins with the oae in which 
Hancock, alone ia his bedsit, 
blows smoke rings, grapples 
with Bertrand SnaseU and 
dreams of polling the birds. 

THE DREAM IS OVER: The life 
of John Lennon, assassinated 
six years ago, is told in a ballet 
by Christopher Bruce, set to 
Lennon's music and film of him 
and the other Beaties. 

ITV, tomorrow, 10.30-1 1.30pm. 

BLOOD RED ROSES: John 
McGrath's epic drama of the 
personal andpoStical struggles 
of a doughty Scotswoman, 
memorably portrayed by 
Elizabeth MacLennan. 

Channel 4, Thurs, 930- 
1030pm. 


ENGLISH NATIONAL OPERA: 
The new Pountney production 
of Carman with Salty Burgess 
in the title role takes to the 
stage at 7pm tonight, Tues and 

Fri, conducted by Mark Bcten 
there is one last performance 
of Britten's chamber opera. 
The Rape of Lucre tia, on Thurs 
at 730 pm and Ian Judge's Cav 
and Pag plays on with 
performances on Wed and Dec 
6 at 730pm. 

Cofeeum, St Martin’s Lane, 
London WC2 (01-836 3161). 


WELSH NATIONAL OPERA: 

Contmiang their visit to Bristol 
with the rest of The Ring 
tonight at 5pm, Siegfried on 
Tues. also at 5pm, and 
Gdtterdammerung on Dec 6 at 
4pm. A further performance of 
Lucia di Lammermoor on Wed 
(7.15pm), and one more of The 
Ma&c Fiute. with its lively 
young cast on Thurs (7.15pm). 
Hippodrome, Bristol 
(0272 299444). 


OPERA INTEGRA: Gluck 
u Sdon a dos should seize the 
opportunity to see a 
comparatively rare staging of 
/p/ubdrne an Tauride on Thurs 
and Pri at 7.30pm. Brian 
GaDoway conducts the Opera 
Integra production by Michael 
Hunt 

Polish Theatre, 238-246 King 
Street London W6 (01- 
741 3696). 



Four faces of Lear : Paul Scofield (left), Laurence Olivier (top), Donald Slides (centre) aid Michael Harden (right) 


Kings of the theatrical tragedy 


T hai tragedy of retribution. King 
Lear , used to be seen in the 
theatre as a battle of man against 
superman. Inhibitions have long 
vanished. During the last six decades our 
major classical players (Gielgud on four 
occasions; have taken the Promethean 

challenge for good or ilL Anthony 

Hopkins, soon to be seen ai the National 
in the tragedy's first arrival there, now 
follows a group of Lears on various 
stages within, roughly, 16 or 17 years. 

Roughly, because the famous perfor- 
mance outside that limit was Paul 
Scofield's in Stratford and London 

(1962). The production is remembered 
not only for its actor — who could 
resemble an ancient sea captain 

commanding the bridge of his vessel and 
defying the cosmic rates as it drove, 
unmanned, towards doom — but also for 
a contentious treatment by Peter Brook. 
He saw the play as Brechtian, or as 
Beckeuiar. in the Endgame mood, a 
narrative without pity or sympathy. 

Directors have usually regarded Lear 
as a dawn -in-^ritain, Stonehenge trag- 


edy, though the actor-scholar Robert 
Speaighx insisted that it was Jacobean in 
the sense that it mirrored a period and 
the thought of a period The Stratford 
production of 1976 began surprisingly 
when the old King (Donald Sicden) in 
poiished top-boots, was a late 19th- 
century ruler, disposing of his realm in a 
quiet inner-court ceremony but talking 
still of the sacred radiance of the sun and 
the mysteries of Hecate and the night 
Generally, Lear’s Britain has been 
pictorizhy out of time, as in Brook's 
primeval statement, or when Anthony 
Quayle appeared for Prospect (Old Vic, 
1978) on a stage simply straw-littered. 

It is the performance that matters’ 
Probably a mosaic-Lear might be assem- 
bled from the playing of actors from the 
thirty immediate past: say, Michael 
Hordern's testily wilful patriarch of the 
first act (Old Vic, 1970); Donald Sin den 
(Stratford, 1976) as he acutely imagined 
the bartered mind, “Keep me in temper; 
J wouid not be mad”; the sustained truth 
of Michael Gambon (Stratford, 1982) 
during the trial m the hovel, what has 


been called “the terrible contrapuntal 
effect between delusion and reality”; 
Anthony Quayle's colloquy with blinded 
Gloucester; and, in the lament over dead 
Cordelia, “she's gone for ever”, die 
ultimate extraordinary pathos of Robert 
Eddison (Actors’ Company, and in New 
York, 1973-1974). 

Laurence Olivier played Lear in 1946 
and in a television film version nearly 40 
years later. From the latter we recall a 
progressive emotional impact, over- 
whelming but utterly unforced. 

Even if we think less now of the 
apparatus of foe {dot, it remains a shock 
to read Nahum Tate's version (1681) 
when Cordelia lives to share the throne 
with Edgar. Lear goes into retirement, 
and in a phrase of exquisite banality, 
“old Kent throws in his hearty wishes 
too.” Certainly any new Lear must have 
our beany wishes, if scarcely in the same 

“ n,exL J. C. Trewin 


9282252). Previews from Wed, first night 

Qgcem&er ii.. 


JOHN BELLANY: Selection of 
paintings by tire Scottish 
c on tempor a ry artist, from the 
exhibition shown in Etfinburgh 
earlier this year. 

Serpentine GaDey, Kensington 
Gardens. London W2 (01- 
402 6075). From today. 


THE BICYCLE-CUPPED 
MISANTHROPIST: An unusual 
view of foe poet PWfip Larkin, 
recafied by friends and 
colleagues in Hull, where he 
was tfte university fflxarian. • 


THE ELEMENTS: New 
sculptural pieces by five 
artists, incUxfiro Susan Hffler 
and Richard Wilson, specially 
conrntissioned by the Arts 
Council to reflect responses to 
the four elements. 

Mitton Keynes Exhibition 
Gallery, 555 Sfflxny Boulevard, 
Milton Keynes (0908 605536). 
From today. 

ART CLUB: Third show this 
year for toe Englishman's 
answer to the Impressionists: 
the New Engtish Art Chib set 
up by Wison Steer, Sickert and 
friends 100 years ago. 

MaB GaReries, The Mafl, 
London SWt (01-930 6845). 
From Fri. 

THE PRWT SHOW: Christmas 
exhibition featuring gallery 
artists both famous and 
unknown, inducting Abrahams 
and Rotoenstein. 
AngetaFtowmsGaltory.il 
Tottenham Mews, London W1 
(01-637 3089). From Thuns. 

THRACIAN TREASURE: 

Discovered last year In true 
treasure-trove tradition by a 
tractor-driver digging a trench, 
ft is the biggest hoard of 
Thracian treasure ever found. 
From now until March it is on 
loan from Birigaria. 

British Museum, Bloomsbury, 
London WC1 (01-636 1555). 
From Thurs. 


mmmm 




i I if li 









1 


Ti er 


BOOKINGS 


SELECTED 


FIRST CHANCE 


ERICH WOLFSFELD: Tribute 
to a 20th-century German artist 
(1885-1955) who was exiled in 
this couitry from 1939. 
Paintings and watercolours in 
the tradition of Rembrandt and 
Durer, often on subjects of 
human concern I ike poverty. ’ 
SomervSe 8 Simpson, i.i 
Savile Row, London W1 (01- 
4375414k 

RODIN; Major show exploring 
toe dose relationship between 
the old master Auguste 
Rodin's drawings and his 

sculpture. 

Hayward Gallery, London SE1 
(01-928 3144). 

MEDIEVAL TREASURY: Brand 
new display space for the 
museum's top-class medieval 
co Section. 

Victoria and Albert Museum, 
London SW7 (01-589 6371). 




sissii 




mmmwm 

mmm m 




PHOTOGRAPHY 




BRITISH INDUSTRIAL 
PHOTOGRAPHY 1845-1988: 

Fascinating exhibition, with 
some surprising images 


thrown up from what might 
seem a dull subject 


ppi pi 

BBSs 


London WC2 


ANGUS McBEAN: Five 
decades of work from this 
theatrical photographer; 
humour end Merest 
maintained throughout the 
years, with just a dash of 
surreaEsm. 


LAST CHANCE 


West End GaSery, 186 Drury 
Lane, London Wl (01-831 


SOL LE WITT: Work of minimal 
artist from Connecticut 1970- 
86. Ends tomorrow. 

Tate Gailenr. Mlftbank, London 
SW1 (01-821 1313). 


i « ’MKY7S 


JEPPEOFTHEHILLrAweek 
of drama from Scotland begins 
with a comedy by the 18 th- 
centwy Danish dramatist 
Ludvig Heiberg, about a 
peasteit farmer who is 
suddenly transported into a 
world of elegance. 

Radio 4, today, 7-8.30pm. 

A WORD IN EDGEWAYS: The 
egghead chat show celebrates 

its 21st birthday with Brian 
Redhead and guests on 
whether we are enslaved, or 
nourished, tty toe past 
Radio 4. tomorrow, 830-8pm. 

CITY WHFTEUGHT: More 

Scottish drama, a tough 


THE NORTHERN 
LANDSCAPE: Dutch 17th- 
century masters and British 
artists. Ends tomorrow. 
Courfeuld Institute, Woburn 
Square, London WC1 (01-580 
1015). 


■ - • -wi 


PRE-RAPHAELITE 


Henry Read Robinson, and 
Julia Margaret Cameron. Ends 
tomorrow. 

Manchester Art Gallery, 
Mosley Street Manchester 


ackeraae about a city in toe 
grip erf political hoodlums and 


Radio 4, Mon, 8.15-9.45pm. 
SIX FIGURES AT THE BASE 
OF A CRUCiFDOON: A Good 
Friday discourse on guilt and 


Martin Crimp. 


For ticket arafiabflity, 
perfonaaace and opening 
times, telephone the 
nombers listed. 
Khas; Geoff Brown: 
Rode David Sinclair; 
Theatre: Tony Patrick 
and Jeremy Kingston; 
Television, radio and 
films on TV: Peter 
Waymariq Jazz: Richard 
Wiliams; Concerts: Max 
Harrison; Dance: John 
Perdval; Opera: Hilary 
Finch; Galleries: Sarah 
JaneQwct fared; 
Photography: Michael 
















Lit* vSk> 



THE TIMES SATURDAY NOVEMBER 29 1986 


19 


ENTERTAINMENTS 


•THE SOUTH BANK CENTRE 


r.nvtCF « t « Z 







ROYAL FESTIVAL HALL 


•j. ; 



Sabeto 

s*» 

7 JO pot 


IB Nor 
7J8P* 



iST 

ups 

s? 

UBpre 

HsiLMM 
3Dw ' 
7JBPH 

Timber 
4 Dm 

776 e* 

FSm 

6 DoS 
7J0PBI 




7 Dm 

315ren 





BDk 

FBI pre 


3^" 

730 pat 


ID Dm 
MO pn 


TlDac 

7 JO fm 


WDM 

Mpa 


Qi;f 

•K.\ ELIZABETH HALL 





50 IN* 
7.«pi 





Tnesaip 
Xdm a 
Lid pal . 



JISS BARBICAN HALL 


Ml) Barbican Centra, Silk St, EC2V 8DS 
01-638 88917- 628 8795 -E • 


01-638 8891 ^623 8735 

Telephone Bookings: lOam-Spm 7 days a week 

Cwr**? Io^Sj-o r-»ru 5 »etiyl»>« Ci'jon’onc) the City W Lofton 


at the BARBICAt 


W|» 


M pa 


3 Ok 
tMpm 


BDoe 

M«a 


And m 

7f>«: 

UQpm 


3==T 


TOk 
MB pa 


rar 


• Dee 

110 pat 


• Ok 
7.45 pn 


100 k 
746 PR) 


11 Dk 
7-«6p» 


P^sr 


uok 


the Nwn u B pai i — m nuiww 
wn*— o—mHiiw a s> «n«N»rvarr-wa z 

.(omiOanppDiMn D 8 H» ipeawano me W ipe r ] 

Irajo B50C*5DX3a0 Guns Gamerl Ti JU 

iSSAiWio «U33Vi 


Tomer 

3D NOV 

730pm 


Seal gM wgjg BB a woe qt aomc, to press 


LONDON SYMPHONY OWOCBTHA. Clau dio tonart n :cargi 

VMmir Acnfeonacv lounoi Tcnraumky: SrmoRony wa 6 



'PaftieuM Bnm. ftinc Contend No l m 0 row Ob is 

RSTVFti&OMJ 


. _ . Mwmi Km o inna f in w inyn Cu n Kn 

taunmOwnsnD K 314 Am Dub D ane* Non 

£3 Mi C460 cssaibaa rso 1 JC 0 


I HANDS. AND VTSALOl I_ _ 

idiriHosarf CDnc&teGrmtuinBnQp 3 > MndwMiufcW i« 

If WseMtfbalOQn Conrans « A eve baCWamonD Cmcttm 

D mm as jkm a'w«* a wiu> 

PSu MMifSagB lonryl ECO 6 V— *- qv-i-ijfl 

UMTON OWPMEySCHCSH t oachcstiuT 


Aon 
( TOne 
MJpni 


Sggggggg^BSBSJSSSSS 


TONIGHT at 8 p.m. 

OPERA GALA NIGHT 

ALL SEATS SOLD 

VERDI GALA NIGHT 
JANUARY 4 NOW BOOKING 


rj fj St John's Smith Square 

. -SJ0I-M. ;‘L«naohS\V1P3HA Pau! Davj>i 

..>■ ly cCKICi CC 01-222 7 J :c-l .NL.'tvFri L:arsx-6pni 

■w'wtSQi' '■■■■ a:'id :nim opnt at oath r;i;r..: L »rt . 


ST ANDREWS CONCERT Bonn of tm S eim Q)»nflvH^hHnd 


Dancartt ana Pipor* of 2 nd Bottom Scan Guam. Harrow 

:Chor. i 


UwvOamMCnonUBC icwvli Kazbtoan 

LMWgWM. Ns* MKHe. toe** 6MM. Omd Mortice. 


__ — lS0"Ol 

Ada Mwtud oofn M KumI tcouPtat-tsm Winbail Gu fwu 

to*» «■— I KM) Latte hmn .crpinj Becfl CMu to «3 

Canute to <40 Mao si MamCwa 

t* £4 -SO is P _ Iordan Omwe.-* Cryyt 


Toe 
2 Dec 
745pm 


Soonzaroa ay loti &ndLr*ip< 


|cwmcna*»« » ii uw>. omungT croon fl . ni o n J 

IWl H7PHP)»4»M> IDidt /ami a in fan KaondM 

Op TbMsa.OunwiT'bO^ »>«. 5 UaMnCtm .n A.OB6J 


I 3 Dec 
iittpn 


— . MTOumw n 

nnunamam rr 




- nauwi 

Bmn Jon* iconoi takng 


30 oe 

74Spm 


— . _ Kmatcnoa Cancmo hi E Ewv 10 U VMa 
ConcaROinEmnOs 14 Bach ^n-ornoun Concenp Nb * 

ftsaBf- — ■ - - 


ftUK>TM0 ‘ 

Tru m C hod XU 17. 

«p ml Tnpm A<w Ithdol TnpmE*39 0 S9 

t2S0aiOE450-£550 EBSP KHawiia 

uWfaitwE SEXENMKS Luomsnntamitan'jmin ,, _ 
tcMnnauHqnnOniittiinOmHioaCto^MgnnCtvneiaHmrinA It Fit 


Thu 
4 Doc 
?45pn. 


LONDON S Y T OrtV OWCMESTHA Said^lWB . cjia, 

JonnUBipano 1 Bddfcouen: Pane Concedo No 1 mC V;nB 

talf»]i<Cmncr CH50 C9 50 tTSO E6. C4 SO C5 SV 

SociTiPrefltS H^4cnoi»WiGrowtTO) w1 

MTEJMAnOML LUNCHnUE CQHCBtT. Fou Tdtong nano 

n ec n a l Owpar Baaaoe wo 1 mG mw t>«o M ananas. T m> 

NoaurmSonaUNc3«iBnwi0 ALL SCATS £3 Grpsoffcor 

mom C? 50 Gro ex 20 or more CS jgnMttgjfc gg d W IM 

OMOat AAD« SntfNtOMV ORCWSnUL DMd StuBcw IC0R3V 

John Ogden loanoi Tchadiavaky: Romeo 4 Jobe* Snag. Piano 

Centeno 41 A mno> p r a nm e. Sympnony No 1 n C mnai 
eiQ50.C9.t7 CS tS50 INnwetonMaoeoememia 


FRIDAY 5 DECEMBER at Z45 p.m. 

Sappc ..OVERTURE 'POET AND PEASANT 

Grid! PEER GYNT SUITE No. I 

Tchaikovsky PIANO CONCERTO No. 1 

Tchaikovsky THE NUTCRACKER SUITE 

Waldceufel THE SKATERS* WALTZ 

Tchaikovsky 18 l 2 OVERTURE 

LONDONCONCERT ORCHESTRA 
CssJucToi. NICHOLAS CLEOBLRY ANTONI PEEBLES phm 

i 1 'lY (■». w. is. L*. to. £10 5a £ 11 . w 


BBC LUNCHTIue CONCERT 

(STUTTGART PIANO TWO 

7'li hi C mrnoi OP 1 NO 3 
> fio 3 hi E ishioi Cp 6 7 

■tone&ar 

ftENOT WOOD CK*M 8 *R ORCHESTRA John Lfe.>oer com 
uonme Seagnmn mnu Mnwr iDurenore m nommsoi a Milan 



Tummy 
20 m 
730 pm 


B"BWI 


Ihamdoy 


730 pm 


LO*JDO«gVMPH£Miy ORCHESTRA Pnar SCTyMSam 
Sa M a SHvr Jo tiBte Concerr SO Gar^ aEwosinaTaUMi 


Proa me Wbgoar DeMeslosncBr 0v and ««pcs from eperas 

by Modi. Mosart. Puccau. Bow. &«om. JOMphme Beiclimi 

narlda CTOno, Deborah anon Bobwts. RtMtorB Srtwelt. 

PBOWk Wiwaflcft Jonn Coonpd. Onadi Arne* Hughes icone I 

CHAO, ra 50. C73Q C4 SO C350 


TUESDAY 9 DECEMBER atZ45 p.m. 

BARRY DOUGLAS pk. 

1986 Tchaikovsky Gold Medal Winner 

S ENRIQUE BATE conductor 


FncMy 
6 Dec 
730 put 


■C D453 


5vnip(un I r lu In 


• arNRHI 


[ALAN KOQOSDUISXI Mt u GN* Concert Cnoolm BiArflB No I Hi 

10 <rin.v (i*.«£W>-s e 40'.i •!! f n* ^ .\k> 43 s.. Eiuor. Bangor NO 

hinf rnir.r, kianf at Die Help Poland Fund. 

tau. SEATS SOLO Conernt AmSK Ufl 


B WPn BicMry muo-wb RMppp Dana >'uHi Omdoatwr 
Jempmi WMuuU criio SUpBal fhiatn Ourtf 

1 nr*' LotnnoH. Tit vtncc UnaPK mi tut 5—ynff 

C4 iCorts Oi _ _ 


IHE HANOVER BAND Ray Goodman duerr* «oim Aumony 

4Wm naiHUi rn7m. UWBei 3PB Ann u m n a ry Conccn 
bVtoer Sympnon, Nc ;-.n C Cd'icervno hv non and oenrum 
iX- JaBeedimaii; l iymtit.Qn» No S«i C nurar 

S-SQ C550 t* 50 Uii! _ Neman Manaaemenl 


MouM iiaenmr panuipB £626 


. SBi £250 iHUBMnea 

baamvOAPf UB4011.SO 
Mviimanoi-fiBJom TheSsan Bru aoartnw*! t,nh lm 
-CHAIKOVSAT: demwi &, BRabjA 


SDK 

■M6s» 


MAAOAUT 


_ vjoi lehe di iMM4i<n 

I wli mu uraoa Marpan «.«< 1 nni* T.-wm>i 

fima>iGn nan S Hhjw hi a pmg 1 am MNpn Hiciuae* ne PA"d 7 ne 

|hi AnanOc 50 Q £4 16 £6 a 

LOMJOI* aKlZART PLAT^a J» cSim~ 


LOWON CONCERT ORCHESTRA MchoUs OeoOury , ewia I 

AnCiony P»Klp c ipanoi Seope Oi ApunflAwamOneo; 

Pees Gffd Suae Tc> a»eu ik y . Paro ConcenoNa MuicnuMi 
OKfiuS iSl? 0v MWdtNdpi Skaiers Waaz. 
ril50.ClOao. C9 50.ra.C6 50, C5 50 nwrmona CitMav Lee 



WT PLATERS- Jane Glow icanducir-i 
1 Mon Serenea nanani a 2B BMUn DOcTuii* 

„ -„iB9mMatH^anSy«iipnav»»»'leSo4i 

K 43 O £6 £7 CS CS XmnndACTi Srow. 

fTHEHliiJARQfcNflfe MB LE VSESfiSS UCamurr'a^iw 


SDK 
1 7.46pm 


'Hi mime nan moanmi Engwno 

[of mo niMPppsid TuO* muse, hdt Kus lor 4 mi ana uraa 
lecouamonc enow Sexy 

EonDON MCH^H cMsnU^Wnl KiKi'Srwin 


Sun 
7 DdC 


TT-ffi uikaoo AaxnpMeandcosnxiiedocTtotGflberik 

SoOtran ■ The iSaMto Dy The Loaxm Snovads Cho'ie «ia 

OewnmnaiThomui Laakx. Geaffm Shwuhwi. Ahsnar 

DaaUR. ftrtea RDbdBoa M tun. PgnncB Case. Hieftael 
WBuhem. Jaxm Roebuck. Amanara Hpna. Retard BNcombo 
(condi Sally Oftoui renori Ton imh ior| 

CIL 5 0. £ IQ, ca, C7S0 C6 Hormjn Urxjmv re 


Beethoven OVERTURE, LEONORA No 3 

Rachmaninov PIANO CONCERTO No. 2 

Holst THE PLANETS 

ROYAL PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA 

Sponaored by DHL World *idc Esprew 

Lk£4£6.£i.£9.£ll 

Coral PhiCiargiofljc Ord^rtra in aiaociaoooiiriih Raymond GoMnyUd 


ST.JOHN'S Saocb Sqnere FRIDAY NEXT 5 DECEMBER 7J0 pm 

THE HANOVER BAND 

Musical Director/ violin ROY GOODMAN 


WEBER 

WEBER 


SyopiMi No. 7 
Concertino for Horn 


ANTHONY HALSTEAD horn 
BEETHOVEN Symphony No. S 
£V5CL £4.50. £5 50, £b SI lrcan Box OtSiAc 01 *273 1061 


^Ufpi WU O Pig y u ffmaMrtEMM w aU cl KnTda Com»nolS 

[IU^4«apK 2tt VOUiConCDhpeiGK 1H, myai Mnnmle 

Omnertre LK 


ATWUUrsBANO Chdtlii ,nh S Fandy Fun Concert peunuec Dy 

Ataiah Ben -TovknMBE A special pre^Chnstmas prog tUrnu^ 

mo iffuacaKun non a* oenoos anon many ^sMes Cnaoenarf 

mcoumged 10 Dnng a noroet 01 pefcussco xmnxpent u 10 m r> 

«xn me tanfl ALL SCATS C4 


SUNDAY J-i DECEMBER at 7.30 p.m. 

JOHN WILLIAMS 5 

CHRISTMAS COLLECTION 


The Sparkling new family musical 


W) Ita Parscnel £350 15. CS £7. U Lonctxi Bacn 1 


Sun 
7 Dae 
730pm 


LONDON S*MFH0H7 ORCHESTRA. Jgpes ljOughrKHOrCl 

■««concerpH 


PURCELL ROOM 


JphnLdlipanoiBeatMven;Oi' egmert. R»io 

G No $ *iE >K tmpcnx 
f 1150. C5 50 C7S0.C6 C4 50 r3 50 


No 4 rf) 



SDK 

200 pm 


m- 


hu£ NUIdlAV iWnnei OOAOON «JKWOaO 
g^Ceng^^HutjNMSgmgpvWMqMK^^^^A 


730 pm 

i»»r 


iBARTH0U>VTiaO Noon Bono Too 41 BUNK. 5® 
FaapnanoTnonOnMwiOp laouam ucwQ-wop 3 
IP OB EnctHH Conran. Hm a nw n 


Tup 
9 Dec 
, ?A5plB 


NATIONAL WESnBNSTSJ CHOCR Wo* CtamDef 

Orcneeha. ten Homphfbi iconO) Deborah Rees 1 sop> Mrten 
Th nmpe on iieni Un Caddy (vass) 

Heydn: THE SEASONS C7 C6 C5 C4 P3 

ROYAL PHUUMSMC ORCHESTRA Ennque Ban (cortfi 


PrfS a: Ha n d el Itjirr Musk Suuc. Rodrigo Coaarno 
Or \i annus. Vhaldi Conceno ui D u-r Collar. 
. Satnman mi ContenpinFiorDevanr Rmndo: Myrr* 
CjniittiiThamlionih Drerturalefi HancyCkiBiKr 
Suit far Guiai and Orchnrra PachdbcL Canon. 
ENGLISH CHAMBER ORCHESTRA 
Cmchiao; .-recorder RICHARD HARVEY 
£5 £7.50. £KL 03.50. £1' 


ipmoi UKfles ol thd LondBA Symphony Cborud. 

r PmoConi 


j Conceno No 


am a, ten 

CedWig»itt>HMamd^rri 


.SaVuSliLfliow oUtmf 

Uwaon BBSms rn «»» and Orortra an nmaaoi n ras nmv 

|apaa The gay Wd»o Ow* too t4g~.be BtXan p umea 01 «4»cn ia 

<« area a Suai s arm Tiwse 

n 50 aujDmuOAPvuBU II Til* B— H- 

Wpaa-fticm 


10 Dk 
245fM 


YNk SLacnas Pqm a Bnopan ABun Mr onng mo (Ha 

London pert). HM appeOuaiM K 370 — — ■ Sacrw. Oo 20 

P O.E4 CnrvKtfRieT C/un 

jitoac AtlQ wannjuarrs m bwicgrs 


Tha 

n dk 

TBpm 


; Dv -Leonora No3l„. 

2 * 1 C moor Holet The ftanefc C n. C9. C7 £5 C4 

Sooworao Dt DHL Atomnnae Ercrass I n agoc B GmSOj. tJC 
TfC EM3J5H CONCERT «#fi Cho* A Omheaha. Treat* 

Pbnoek i<Ni CoraK Conceno Grasso ei G mnor iCmsonas 

Concerts) Bach: Comau M7 Hon uno Uuna una Tai 1410 letan 

VheUk Glom «i D 

CW CB5Q.C7S0. C6.CS. rasa PEC concerts UH 


SATURDAY 20 DECEMBER at 3 & 730 p.m. 

JAMES GALWAY’S 


CHRISTMAS COLLECTION 


MmnMpMMKfueracraic canal* o%ann«'wiiMHury<* me 

wgixmgB oi tn> Carrenwry TaMB.«jbBUM«maiiWMam)aB« 


Fn 

SDK 

745pm 


CITY OF BRBMGXAU SYWHONY ORCHESTRA Sfcnantettie I 

leondi gHtiW n DUfwp X m rau evi ch tsanoi r lnvP i a. Syn ip hony I 

NoBMcaanr PanoCcncenoNo2SbCBrahni*;Sm3fixiyNo4 ■ 

cusp. CV50. C750. re. e«so. osq ut ««« lso 



5S£ ! U) ^SSKS 

men Mto nmo MMppd m im «onu in Mfbara Bameui 

Kgntr and 9ioaaKMen. >VkCA ne ma tawu in smg 

L150 EtudenCB/OAPi/UBrori Tha Saai nmn 


THE KORN/TERFtY CHKSTktAS CONCERT. Engbsh Chmnbtfl 

Ormioatra, Wincheatar CsOwram Choir. Woynflon Stngara. 

Hprtfci Nevry (cocrJl Bactc GhRStnK Qmnyio. l& U Honegger 

Cwaorms Cantsa CmuK A sxstees Rose. Sv Chnsamas. etc ■ 
E950, efi, E650. C6, C350 Sponsorea By KtMJFarrv bautmn*l 


Muon OVERTURE. THE MAGIC FLUTE* , 

Tehpflwky SUITE PROM •SWAN LAKE' 

Mercadeste FLUTE CONCERTO IN B MINOR 

(RUSSIAN RONDO) | 
Phis a idea ion of jame* Gahrar's Chntfmas farounirv and 
Carols for ■nidun.-e, choir and orchesm 
BBC CONCERT ORCHESTRA AMBROSIAN SINGERS 
Conikuior- JOHN GEORGIADIS 
£h. r> 50- «.«L £«.Wl £tt.S0 
Children under l6&OAP*.halfpnce|itutineconlr) 


Opens 

Dec 16th - 
Jan 10th 


LUNCHTIME SERENADES 

lift • Tuesdays at 1 .1 Opm 




iso 


Van WaisuTi Manaqement presents 
INTERNATIONAL LUNCHTIME CONCERT- 


MONDAY 22 DECEMBER at 2 p.m. & 
TUESDAY 30 DECEMBER at 3 p.m. 


THE SNOWMAN 


LONDON SYMPHONY 
ORCHESTRA 


allhe I 
BarfYCjn 



•: | 

*— >** r , i 


ROYAL FESTIVAL HALL 



RAYMOND GUBBATprefeU At the ROYAL FESTIVAL HALL 

TOMORROW at 7130 p.m. 



. EABBEKOF SEVILLE OV. 


Beetbwen. 


WUER MUSIC SUITE 
.F1AN0 CONCERTO 


.STMPBONYNo. 3(ER01CA} 


LONDON PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA 

Conduaor JAMES JUDD VOVKA ASHKENAZY paoa 
£4,15^50, £S.£9.Sg 00.50.01.50 HaU 01-9381191 C.C 01^928 8800 




PHILHARMONIA 
ORCHESTRA 

ipal Conducton Giuseppe Sinc^ioli 


■ 35 WiCMOPE STREET WIHSDF 

— _ L VA.V4SEA WiLL-AM LYHS 

SCX OFFiCH O'. 53‘2;<! MAIUNZ I ST CJ 


Tomorrow Sunday 30 November 7.30 pm 

Concert Sponsored by British Telecom 


Htward Bae'i MTrdanujmf The Spoonan larunnr dr ba «nj* 
ffatUag h ihe Aip fdo Bn Ktaieiy Rkyae Oramre. jpi Tte 
CBddldb ftamfcov Soar-Sros 
SINFONIA OF LONDON 
CmduarROWMlD BLAKE REBECCA HOLT pm, 
BERNARD CRIBBINS nanain- 
DAMELLUDfOSDTBOALAS bir uynw (BETduirBoiaftkcfrar) 

So; price: Adult* £7. SH. L5.50: Children under 16 £S.M. C3 50 



Tickets from £3 


Bob Offitv Na 01-387 %29 
Credit Card Hotline: 01-380 1453 


Bloomsbury 
Theatre, 

Gordon Strtel London WC1 
Nearest Tubes Eusion/ 
Euston Square/Warren Street 


WIGMORE HALL 


*My 



C 


3 1 MNU QUARTET. Mm Concerts H mB b OuMWiQ 
or Kramaer Sam I 


RETURNS ONLY 

For full programme details sec Bartiican paneb above 


__ 77. Ml 1. .Ma cM. Odbm No 1 fei E mnor .. 

IP1C3}: BMkotikOkiW No t5m AtnmorOp. 132 

NnfiAnnBSnC mE89BI535o 


llXan. 

SurKyX 


Ikfenan. Oo 15 Nob i»no2llli|| |n u I .u — 




Monday ococt, 1 December at 7 JO 

BERNARD HAITINK 

BRAHMS " 

■Serenade No. 1 

Symphony No. 4 



Monday 8 December at 730 

GENNADI ROZHDESTVENSKY 
VIKTORIA POSTNIKO VA 

Tchaikovsky: Piano Conceno No. 2 
Borodin: In the Steppes of Genual Asa 
Mussorgsky: Pictures hi an Exhibition 

Sponsored by NISSAN UK LIMITED 

TKtea. 4350. £4JU. 45J0.J7.iB. £■>. ilU.£U 
A nubble lino Hod -0)^2h 51911 CClOI-RV SDOOl A .pent. 


RAYMOND GOBBAY present* sr the ROYAL FESTIVAL HALL 
SUNDAY 28 DECEMBER at 3 pan. & 7.30 p.m. 

JOHANN STRAUSS GALA 

JOHAKNSTRADSS ORCHESTRA 
DnatdktnihrnoloteJOUk BRA0BUSV 

K Ta.1 A SNJAMg rryitc 

■ M GEKAUHNSSTbPggtSON i barii ei k 'l lg 

JOHANS STSABSS DANCSS in thwonaa aftfetmd 
The Gtoriaua Musk of the Strand* Family lndudwg: 
Mb' * Lift W*te Czech FaUu, Tdesfiom the Vieon Wbocb, 



Moataet ^Prifa. OhneSotpii, ftei. 

AjcdenaiMBTOta, SangeriM^fla, C a rh a rh a Galop. 
LaopiiseSoiic 6 «b Die Fkdcnranv ChampepK PWto, Hoc Daube Walcz. 
Mw aa5D.£iSO,£kSn 1 £ZS0 1 0.50 
7 t.O> £h fl £& M. ff 50. flfi.S) ttaflOl^awl CC 0)^88800 


QUEEN ELIZABETH HALL 


Tuckddy It December * USpn 


b the preieacr of HRH The Priace «[ Wales 
Rama, Ea^eb chamber Orcbctfra apd Mode Secfeiy 


MOZART HaQher Symphony 
C HOP IN Piano Concerto No. 2 
BEETHOVEN Symphony No. 4 


Fn»i M i n iani i a - Orc hes tra 
JUKKA-PEKKA SARASTE MARIA JO AO PIRES 

• anduaor pram 


Spt qmud fay tWEegfc Star Group end The Wiggtna Teapc Creep 

T«aw» 43.50, 44.M. £%V\. 
iron Hanoi -92a 3141 icreOn cad books 


l 5t£ £7.50 

01>938 8800' » Jpmc. 


WEDNESDAY 17 DECEMBER «r 7 JO pun. 




ACADEMY OF LONDON 

Conductor RICHARD STAMP 



Bach CHRISTMAS ORATORIO 

ARLEEN AUGER sop- SETH McCOY tenor 
MI CHAEL DASH Counter ten. 
GREGORY REINHART bass 
£k45.£H£B.£WHaU01-VM318l CC0I-W28B800 


ROYAL OPERA HOUSE; 

Handel’s 


SAMSON 


Conductor 

ROGER NORRINGTON 


Cast includes 

ROBERT TEAR CAROL VANESS 
SARAH WALKER GWYNNE HOWELL 
DONALD McINTYRE KIM BEGLEY 


“The sta g in g achieves an 
astonishing blend of classic 
and modern theatrical taste” 

"feat SmcltOe TteGnanliax 


December 8, 10, 16, 18 , 72 ai 7.00pm 


Reservations 01-240 XG66/J911 
AcccssA'isa/Dicers.Club “IicteisfejmC . 


Hirer OoTijor no Nun. Ovanaanoe 


LSO 


Op 8 


PBrtra No 3*i iewvtUM Frora IMc« n ec au or i i n s. 
S PraKvie*. Suit ppputw braotenre 


p_iQ_n o 
y*ovs»x -naorQUNiBt uitnwo nano 


ftano Tmx 


. — Para Oiarurin E loi M93. 

Mai Ktm: Stmg Tncc JoeetTi HmNI 

Pane aLOrw in Q nwiot C* _ 

k4J0. E4.E3 p EiiCTpwh T^ane^cro>T-S' r »gi 

^LraUE HOWARO pocro u*zt Anntu Oe pNancape.- Tihjswit« 


7JDF41 


Hufif 


P^K^KOTnowEirenorOp US 0907/8) 


AtaremtNi 4emrtSananaiAKS3l.BM>rora>i:Sorma*tCn«(KxOp til. 
730 |MO. Id ^qi r EonaB-QeagaonpKOfm, tlWUKpertj 
3u^KSonB*m B<w mmor Op 35 


■ Cy^.QS) EZbC 

p* LOVOON CONSOkr/FHILtf- PlixstVoIrew" 


3P » Ml«f any MUK Senas ItilhdMlMNii 
7-SOpjn, w Bnem. Prar AiMlred, Freer of Btok 




8 

730 pn 


F IMBC . . . 
paeneues et ravpamoi [1SJ4). Grtaat 

. . jStft»no«arA*»»iera3cr«na85m8o*a*.ai 

ffranos ae RM «®*ung en m «JBr |Lnt 01 3 lea CbneeneL 

8S £4. 0. C2 . jxrc Gray 

iyf*tHMA.«£HUhorT TWO iro<»i»cna. Ptefaia LOermany; 


'■ ^PXJ Tnovi F Op 8(1696). 


ARTHUR PA>A2MN 


Anp«>-4xa>ia»i >fciac Sogety 


BEETHOVEN 

Tuesday 2 December 745 

BEETHOVEN Piano Concerto No 1 

BEETHOVEN Piano Concerto No 2 

BEETHOVEN Piano Concerto No 3 

JOHN LOLL piano 
JAMES LOUGHRAN conductor 
Sponsored by Harris Agricultural Group Limited 
II 1- 50. £9.50. £7-50. £6. £4.50,0 .50 

Sanday 7 December 7.30 pm 

B ttiH OVEN Overture 'Egmcmr 

BEETHOVEN Piano Concerto No 4 

BEETHOVEN PianoCbncertoNoS 

JOHN IJDLL piano 
JAMES LOUGHRAN conductor 
£1150. £9.50. £7.50. £6. £4-5U, £3.50 


MONDAY 22 DECEMBER at Z30 p.m. 

KING’S COLLEGE CHOIR 

Moan. REGINA COEU, K276 

HamcLCHRBTMAS SEQUENCE FROM MESSIAH 

Corelli .CHRISTMAS CONCERTO 

Csrols far Unaccompanied Cboir 
Carab for Choir, Oichamud Audience 
ENG LISH CHAMBER ORCHESTRA 
Conductor STEPHEN CLEOBURY EDUAN DAVIES wnrano 
£M» 50. £7 50. £8 it), £0 50, £)0.5|» 



BOXING DAY 26 DECEMBER at 7.45 p.m. 

BEETHOVEN 



St. Paul’s 
Cathedral 


Advent 

Carol 

Service 


1830 Sunday 
30th November. 


Egmoot Overture 
Piano Concerto No. 5 (Emperor) 
Symphony No. 5 
ROYAL PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA 

Conductor JAMES JUDD HOWARD SHELLEY piano 
£5 50. £b SO. P». £9.50. £10.50, £11 M> 


AUMMVCHOl 83bt<»/0641 a 
OX 379 62U Ol 741 9999 
Now Pmipwlnp 
oncm Dry 3 at 7 00pm 
Dommrr TUrut 
SUSAN tNOH 
HARRY TOWB 
tnvn MACWNTOAH 
RUUBI CLCMtSTCR 
la 


BRIGHTON BEACH 
MEMOIRS 

DirvcVtf by NKMAI. 

A NaUoaal The alrc Production 
-Humour al Us best, a nch aod 
loving oroduenon" Daily Man "A 
beautifully sutn) family 
m*dy~ twin ** tt win run lor a 
long urn*.- Tune Out 
Em Mon • Fli 7 30 Mali Weds 
3 O Sms S OO A 8 30 Ftnl Can 24 
nr 7 day cc Oi 240 7200 ino DU 
lm Grp Sales Ol 930 6128. 


CONCERTS 


APOLLO THEATRE 487 2663 

*34 3S98 rim Call Ol 240 720 0 
TKHVInunn- Cr 879 6438 
Mon-m 8. Sal « 30 A 8 15 
Thin Mats 3. 

PAUL SCOnELO 
M iulwh l C— *4, t*fni*m. 
of are Yam- • ‘ 


JWBr 


Songs by I _ 

_ - . . and ION d> Franco, anon. 

tarongi ol Hanafla & Sirraon. conga bom pa Cvnna Burara 
Ptwjcr un CS C4 .D. E2 __ Ohm tAac Nrenon 


— aOnrEPo Mbsbi 1 

• Dacamba Ami* 3 NeuaraC8nn«tTnoK49fl Ru re w iioy Mt Saronftiereaol 
UOpoi UeoiwJer Bare Op. 127: T N idto Hy : Sow: TT — m~iti in PM> 
XweiOe 57 Han«ys«Mnya8raadoDnroan7&7J0pm 


Thmsday 4 December 7.45 pm 

OPERATIC 
FAVOURITES 

With SIR GERAINT EVANS narrator 



SUNDAY 28 DECEMBER at 3 p.m. 

Bach. BRANDENBURG CONCERTO No. 1 

Mozart BNE HEINE NACHTMUSK 

Moan. .VKHJN CONCERTO No. 4* 


MUSIC CONCERT 
MERCHANT 
TAYLORS’ HALL 


Award. 11 

tMMVJMB ROLUM6 

“MAGNIFICENT" D MpU 

I’M NOT RAPPAPORT 

-WondrrfuHy t unny- D.Cn 
TOW AWARD BEST PLAY 
NOW BOOKING 1987 


SO THREADNEADLE 
STREET EC2 


YOUNG EDV» ARO GERMAN 


VJvaidL„ _...THE FOUR SEASONS 

ENGLISH CHAMBER ORCHESTRA 
Conductor- PHILIP LEDGER JOSE LUIS GARCU viohn 
AU5 BHNDnolui |BBCVgmg Maudai olikr Yew, 1SS*)* 

£4.50. £5 SO, CX CS >0. 0> »- £10 50 


a gropmaa of mmir inino- 
duopd ay Bmn Dm wllh 
miKicun i ram mr Mrrrhani 
Tjylon- School Tha Ttumn 
Swprt and Paul 
Woodmanamm. ibmi. 


rpOnoflMi KiacMir 


: Aaegrano ai B Da acO 39. 
F5mo Tnom B to 0090 


Honing Codaa 
Hlrwpantonw 


Hommkicaaa 


[gcpgaA.lraacodaarenewyoiaaraaHtWarpe rtn r in re wtt . 


K8 1WAL OF -THE SOUM3 W lOWOQW.- AU-ECWI STHHitO 
roaemba. XMRTET / JAIC8 CAMPBELL aairm < tf alepk TRVON preno / | 
»«p*v HAM DUBOIS mr. Vaupban Waiu On MWKU Eook 
“** 7pjn. Mit Clamiat Ou«w W Abo mmm by PraMto. BdKn. 

Up r n—l i (lg part) CASRta. q q wonnan UcGrnn ua aiurs ua. 
BEOFWH3 jStUSAi-EM Bnor. SEQFRJSD MAUSER 


TBOaday 
• Dac^ 


tetatod: Ore wim i mi Bail 
M Sma 3oe 
•lAOhN fiUAftTCTOI 


7JHpun. 


MtHiioi8fflUarSDsimp(y/SEtad»fethretatdiDmnQ>OBtOOeain 

tSSrB f Ban ° 


780 PAL 


cOuanatinFOpae 


Llaa AHonaa LM 

itenrr Ctreean. 

I Rasuraovaky. Sctoatm Canon in 


mi ar^^sOuMd rH LONDON. " 


^SdioartreraTSinnQ 
2 2&., 1 ® tom topi. to«»art Shapnara on me Rock. 
^Fi»ng<pe56 E4. S0. C4 a £2 NOnrian McCww lm Arum Ua 
fr)f£ grt-jacotvys canzon* pirraYMAS fencgiT.'to? 


Wajmer: Prelude and Liebesood from Tristan and Isolde. 
Venfi: Ovemirc La forza del desrinn. 

Britten: Four Sea Interludes from Peter Grimes, 
Arias and duets from: 

Verdi: Otello, Macbeth. La forza del dcsiino. Nabucco 
Pucdac La Bohfcme. Tosca, Madam Buuerily 
Mozart: The Magic Flute, Cos fan tutte. 

The Marriage of Figaro 
Bdfinh lPuritani 
Bizet: Carmen 

JOSEPHINE BARSTOW. PATRICIA O'NEILL 
DEBORAH STUART ROBERTS, 
ROWLAND SI DWELL, PATRICK WHEATLEY. 
JOHN CONNELL 

OWAIN ARWEL HUGHES conductor 
PeurSitrntsant Foundation 'Stiver JuMee Concert' 

£1 1.50, £9.50. £7.50. £6. £4_S(j, £3.50 


SUNDAY 28 DECEMBER at7L30pja. 

CHRISTMAS LOVE CLASSICS 

Ttotoniy. — BOME0 AND JULIET FWT.SST OS. 

Htaapi KTESHEZZOFKOU CMALLERLA B15TKAN.V 

Gra* .RUaCDWXSTtVIS AMPaiR 

Boo — _ — —SUTl F1KMI -C^RUEk* 


Tundav 2nd DKonter 
M 7 JOam 

Admnuon £2 50 ai thr door 



j jSwre»n- 


. THE BLUE DAMUBf WUJI 
J0LEK0 


St Ane & St A$ks 

■ i Sl EC2 (St PaaT* M) 


APOLLO VtCTDFHA SS 828 866S 
CC 630 6262 Party BfcQi 828 
6188 TU-kMnuratrf CT 379 6485 
Tim Call cc iZ46ri 24Q 7200 (BK« 
Fan Grp Sun 930 6123 Eve, 
7 4fi Mob Too * Sal 3.0 
“A MUSICAL THAT SURPASSES 
AMTT M Ria A ROUMO W EVERY 
DIMCNUON- D EXD 

STARUGHT express 

Must by 

ANDREW LLOYD WEBBER 
Lynn by RICHARD STTLCOE 

Oi reded by TREVOR NUNN 
APPL Y PMLY T O BOX OFFICE 
P D* RETURNS specui renca 
wms atsm Tim mats for 
OAP9 

CHARITY tRWKHT MATINEE 
lMS*n MM X 7 Dk (Btac bn 


*OW BOOtUNO TO MARCH IFH7 


LONDON CONCERT ORCHESTRA 
CondKTer BARRY WORDSWORTH STEPHEN HOUGH pono 
and a Red Rote for every Lady member of the a u dien ce 

£5.50. £b 50. ig. tO. £10.50, £J1 .50 


The* IB Dec r JQm 
0* iMH Jea> (Cmomm ol Ibis) 
WsMbiCocb Sonus annaab 
bboyJCF ten 


Ol 628 B795/63B 
§891 rc I Moo Sun I Cun apm i 


ROYAL 


|*i»c«BiiBai«SMttA Programme* ratera Ina mure: (or if* 


MONDAY NEXT 1 DECEMBER at 7 J8 pjn. 


NOVSAK TRIO 


GUNTER LUDWIG piano 

MOZART; Finn Quants in Efls K493 
URO S KRSc String Trio (UK prenaoe) 
JOSEPH HASELBACH: Piano Trio (UK pi t mia e) 
BRAHMS; Piano Quann in G tzdnor op. 25 


Saturday 13 December 7.45 pm 

BEETHOVEN ‘Overture Coriotari 

DVORAK Cdlo Conceno 

TCHAIKOVSKY. . Symphony No 6 ■Pathetique’ 
NATALIA CLITMAN ceUo 
LEONARD SLATKBM conductor 

Sponsored by Harris Agricultural Group Limited 
£1150, £ 10.50. £8.50. £6.50. £5. £3 JO 


Boh Office Td ltFX every day inc Sun «1 -«8 MPM ib » 8W 


X-L50, £4, £1, £2 Gnoi Bn Office / CC 01-YJ5 2 M I 
M » nnjrmrnr- ERMbcrii Th ome y erofi-Sniitli 



WIGMORE HALL 


The Wigmore 
Christmas Cracker 


s0HD f^S^^^ 


^£ 3 .o°^ 

...nCRCltJ ' 


^•Joa' nl 


Saturday 13 December at 7pm 
Michael Gulfias clarinet 
Pascal Dcvoyon piano 
Engfish Echoes 

Gothic Voices directed by Christoper Page 
Steven Isseriis cdlo 
- - London Oboe Band 

Francois Rabbath double-bass and 
t Malcolm Martxneau piano 
Lilian Watson soprano arid 
Gerald Martin Moore piano 
A Christinas least of music and surprises 



Prog r a m me includes; 
Christmas Carols; Christmas Chestnuts; 
The Ride of the Valkyries 


Thursday II December 7.15pm BARBICAN HAIL. 

SIMON RATTLE 

conductor 

STEPHEN B1SHOP-KOVACEYICH 

piano 

SIBELIUS Svmpbonv So 6 

MOZART Piano Con»rto No'25 m C, K 5l)3 

BRAHMS Symphony No 4 

CITY OF BIRMINGHAM SYMPHONY 
ORCHESTRA 

Scat Pnce, £11. SO. t* JO. p.HO. £6. fl SO. £3. JO OI-G.TS RS«»I 628JT9S 


Music by Aubcr, Donizetti, Balfe, 
Bach. Faiire. Gniflaimie He Mrahw, 
Landfari , Ravel, Pi c me, Arthur Benjamin, 
and Lenoa & McCartney 
£6.50,^50, /;4Ja ^3-50 



ROYAL ALBERT HALL 
SUNDAYS 7*31 DECEMBER ai 2J0 pjn. 


FAIRFIELD HALL CROYDON 

BOX OFFICE Ol-o&i 939] OltDITPHOSE 01^80 5«5 


THE BACH CHOIR 
FAMILY CAROLS 


Wednesday Ned 3 December 8 M pm 

ROYAL PHILHARMONIC 
ORCHESTRA 


LONDON BB/YSS 

THE K.VELLER HALL TRL MPETERS 
DbridCorUuB* Nigel B*to. jvrafcwao John irw nfia 

sm DAVID WDXCOCKS 


£’• £4, £>A0. £3 V). £ 1 5*1. .TT •mdifiB 

r BcaOlIkx.UI-iMJ «ir *Jru/fl Ljnl. UI-iw0*J 

SreniaRj by Unilever 




NICHOLAS CLEOBURY 
RALPH MARKHAM 
KENNETH BROADWAY 
Pam Duo 


ELGAR Dirnwe -"Ci3etap»e“ 

RAN’EL ' PavniepCTiriaiffljtettdifuntt 
SAINT-SAEfS UnuvaolUie Amro^i . 
■-aBSHLS KacSa Suite ' 

.GERSHUTN .4a Amnxan m ftri. 


£ k£<. £5.5iL£6V%£tSJ Shwtiri F nca:iL».£«l > £4.7S.£5ift£6.5ft 


Royal Aibrn Hall 

WHITEHALL CHOIR 
TWICKENHAM CHORAL SOCIETY 

• 2 nd Dtcvmtor Mb at 
ELGAR - Corbisar Offline- Spini cf England 
WALTON - BcMaaart Fe« 

Willi [hr Bowden Ortcsra 
lafin k<8> lusonobi 
•tedac(haKt>te»> 

Onhetcd in ( R<iWlKt Hoflii 

TratlK 11 SV ta. u> KS«6d £* 

Hum tbe Rural Afrm lid nJI3i s»d bub) leans 

firdn oni minliBg. ■■w 


MONDAY 29 DECEMBER at 145 p.m. 
Popular Classics 

Bonin! OVERTURE “WILLIAM TELL* 

S*belh»...> FINLANDIA 

Rachmaninov -....PIANO CONCERTO No. 2 | 

Orieg — PEER OYNT SUITE No. 1 

Tchaikovsky.. - CAPRICCIO ITAUEN 

LONDON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
Coafociix: NICHOLAS CLEOBURY CRAIG SHEPPARD mao 
£550, £h W, £&. £9.58,(10.50. £11.10 



f3 IctaMS sw gr to Sl *me s Uotc 
Smm, 8CtovunSM6m.»S) 

u mcmsaiUBM 

SW13DN0O )pm bmuiM 

laaHfae Cnoiti Hadm L fl^a 

Dect.Smtb Aansiminf 
Ptoae 81^73 5566 lor Mrifc 


nurac today 
2 00 * 7 30 SCENES FROM A 
■WWIAtt by Feydeau "Maq- 
mfuvnt... imnl entoyanie - 
D TH MMUMNCE or Sftaw 
rrturm 14 OK. 

TtOEffT today SLOO A 7 S0TMC 

iKwawira couifB or 

Arthur Miner. PRINCIP1A 
MJUriUM by Mctierd Nd- 
van returns 1^ Dec. 


CHMICMRA Bromley 460 66T7 
Em 7 45 MMi Tburt Sal 2.30 
cainnlooltn- Timoiny lb THE 


TUESDAY 30 DECEMBER at Z45 p.m. 

Mendelssohn. .HEBRIDES OVERTURE | 

Tchaikovsky VIOLIN CONCERTO 

Dvorak. -SYMPHONY No. 9 1 

(NEW WORLD)} 

’HILHARMONIA ORCHESTRA 

Conduaon SIR YEHUDI MENUHIN 

HU KUN violin 

£5.50, £6.50. £8, £0.50. 00.50. 01 50 
to Office 0W2S 87W CC 81^)8 8891 



Experienced Amateur Singers I 
for Opera Tour from 5th to 
30th September 1987. Beftioz f 
Trojans m Lyon. 

ALL EXPENSES PAID. 

[For Central London audition [ 
and rehearsal next Saturday 
details img:- 

01*286 8328. 


COMEDY THEATRE 930 2578 
CC 240 T200/ST*> 6433114, 
9999 Grp* 930 6133 

“A rere* «to rebeny 

Tom 


EXHIBITIONS 


TAYLOR FEHHAUOON 

THE MAINTENANCE 
MAN 

A Comedy by Richard Harris 

-A MARITAL MASTERPIECE 
—WONOOtFVLLV FUNNY** 

N M I he W 

“T«v applauw m raoiurou, 
recowuucm" D Man 
"Very lunny indeetT* S£xd 
M on Thu»Fn/9ai 5 30 & B 30 




VAN W ALBUM MANAGEMENT preaems 
BARBICAN WEDNESDAY 3 DECEMBER ut IMpxn. 


JOHN OGDON 

GRIEG . . . Piano Concerto 

DAVID SHALLON : DANISH R.S.O. 

Prspanme als.-MDdBde» 

TCHAIKOVSKY Romeo & Juliet i 

BRAHMS Symphony No. I in C minor | 

See Bartsea panel lor dash 


A2ULEI0S 

The stunning Ule nentaoe of 
POvniOAL 1800-SUC. 

“The Most mmouiag nuubtuen in 

London- (Observer) 

'Arts Rev 
BarMcan Qmcounr ADMISSION 
FREE. 


COYTESLOE -S* 928 2363 CC 
« National Theatres small mmU- 
tanumi Today 2.30 & 7.30. 
Mon. Tue 7.30 TW NAY AY 
UN* and WNECKOt COCA by 
David Hare. Thur. Fn 7 30 
studio mcitt i. 


OPERA & BALLET 


BARBICAN W fdirafa y 10 Drtxabtr at 7.«S pm 
Choir and Orchestra of 

THE ENGLISH CONCERT 

Trevor Pinnocfc director 
Nancy Argents. Lorna Anderson sap, 

Carolyn WaiUnsoa Mean, 

Mawfair Elliott ten, Stephen Vance bar 

CORELLI ‘Christmas* Concerto 
BACH Canou 'Here und Aland un d Tat urnj Lcbcn' 
VIVALDI Gloria in D 


COUt CU b S 836 3161 CC 
240 62S8 


Toni. Tomor 7 DO 1 


ROYAL OPERA HOME 01-240- 
iOm>' 1911 S400V info 836 1 

6903 S CC TKVB CI-C22.60 
iBaueii C2Xao lOvera) b&Amphi 
wb atatf on me day lomort 
Too l 7 OO THE ROYAL OPERA 
Ma In t ediH Tomer 7 OO A 
Tr fb— tm P bear Pun. 


CRITERION s 930 3216 CC 379 
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M 



SPORTS 

DIARY 


As good as 
a wink 


After our battering in inter- 
national sport in recent years, it is 
a joy to report that a Brit has 
captured a world title for only the 
second lime in his sport, and 
beating an American to boot. Jon 
Mapley, of William, Essex, over- 
whelmed Larry Kahn 25,5-16.5 at 
Churchill College, Cambridge, to 
become world tiddlywinks singles 
champion. Mapley began 
‘'Winking” 25 years ago when he 
was 14; according to the official 
report of the match, he won in 
tremendous style, among other 
things “quickly recapturing his 
only squopped wink to go for a 
pot-out”. The title will stay in 
Britain for the foreseeable future 
since Mapley's next challenge will 
come from Alan Dean, the only 
previous British world champion 
and winner of the national singles 
championship in Southampton 
last weekend. 


Squash squeeze 


Monday morning is likely to be 
infuriatingly expensive for Dun- 
lop Sports and its squash promo- 
tion budget. After months of 
leisurely negotiation with Ross 
Norman to switch to Dunlop's 
new MAX 500 GS graphite racket, 
the New Zealander unexpectedly 
wrested the long-held world 
championship from Jahangir 
Khan, and his signature on die 
contract could now be worth five 
times as much as when he was 
world No 1 


• After the Frances Edmonds 
item about the Hong Kong rngby 
player Rick Shaw, the Park House 
dab of Hayes. Kent, tells of a 
member named Mark Card. 


Starstudded 


Lots 1,235-1,254 at Tattersalls' 
Newmarket sale on Tuesday will 
mark the end of an era in British 
bloodstock. The 1 5 mares and five 
fillies out of training are being sold 
by 92-year-old Jim Joel to wind up 
operations at his Childwick Bury 
stud near St Albans, which he took 
over from his father in 1940. 
Founded 99 years ago, the stud's 
roll call of honour includes Derby 
winners Sunstar, Humorist and 
Royal Palace. Tuesday's sale in- 
cludes its latest classic winner. 
Fairy Footsteps (1,000 Guineas. 
1981), who is in foal to Derby 
winner Teenoso. For her the 
bidding is likely to be conducted 
in telephone numbers. Tbe sale 
will not sever Joel's lifelong link 
with the Turf, he will continue 
racing horses under both codes. 


Beat that 


Metropolitan Police believe they 
have set a record for soccer's 
quickest substitution, la a Vaux- 
halkOpel League match against 
Caroberiey Town, Ian SiiJwelJ, 
their goalkeeper, failed to arrive 
the necessary 30 minutes before 
kick-off to sign the referee's sheet 
Andy Taylor replaced Stilwell, 
who was named as substitute but 
arrived just before the kick-off He 
was brought on when the ball went 
out of play after only 2.8 seconds. 


BARRY FANTONI 



‘Mine's an industrial accident 
I'm a snooker official' 


All the angles 


Football commentators wifi be 
hoping today that Kidderminster 
Harriers end their opponents* 
involvement in the Welsh Cup. 
They are third round hosts to 
Llanfeirpwllgwyngyllgogerycb- 

wyrndro b wll 11 anty s iliogogogoch. 
Ray Mercer, tbe Kidderminster 
secretary, who reports the chib's 
matches on local radio, says; “I 
shall refer to them as the team 
from Anglesey." 


• However distressing tbe Man- 
ton affair, Robert Swpter is 
cheered by the prospect of becom- 
ing a father for the fifth time. 
Racing wags are now referring to 
bis Isle of Man home. The 
Nunnery, as Tbe Nursery. 


Slipping in 



Although no true cricket buff 
would be without his latest 
Wisden, any who can’t wait until 
April can take solace in the pre- 
Christmas appearance of two 
books which together provide 
comprehensive coverage of the 
past year. Benson and Hedges 
Cricket Year, now established in 
its fifth edition, offers — amid the 
customary superb photographs — 
reports, summaries and statistics 
of the game at home and overseas, 
while the second County Champ- 
ionship^ Review, sponsored by 
Britannic Assurance and pub- 
hsbed by The Cricketer, gives 
detailed rnatch-by-match report- 
*ng of the senior domestic com- 


THE TIMES SATURDAY NOVEMBER 29 1986 


The government's attempts to 
prevent the publication of Peter 
Wright's memoirs have provided 
embarrassments aplenty in the 
past week. But the drama now 
being played out in the New South 
Wales Supreme Court has also 
again, focused attention 011 Brit- 
ain's secrecy laws and their effects 
on the conduct of public life. 

On a strict interpretation of the 
Official Secrets Act, government 
in Britain is carried on by a 
process of leaks. The system 
depends on everyone knowing and 
respecting how much they are 
allowed to leak. Roughly speaking, 
the Prime Minister can leak 
anything. Ministers (an leak secret 
material and senior officials can 
leak confidential materiaL Much 
experience and sophistication are 
required to know how to leak 
constructively, Le. in order to help 
and not hinder government 
The whole process is easier for 
the aspiring civil servant than it 
sounds, because in practice ma- 
terial graded secret and above 
constitutes only a small part of the 
information on which govern- 
ment depends. On defence mat- 
ters the proportion is higher, and 
in a few sensitive areas very high. 
But even in foreign affairs, depen- 
dence on secret material is low, 
probably less than 10 per cent 
Those ministers who receive it 
tend to enjoy having information 
from secret sources. It is often 
more colourful, personal and 
theatrical than information from 
normal sources, whether open or 
confidential It bypasses the civil 
service hierarchy and provides a 
sort of second opinion. It gives the 
high-ranking reader a feeling of 
insight and flatters his or her 
powers of assessment 
Assessment is the crucial issue. 
As a rule it is risky to jump to 
conclusions about any piece of 
raw intelligence. The assessment 

to bear, sbouS^always be allowed 
to intervene. There are no doubt 
occasional exceptions, but they are 
very rare and almost entirely in 
the field of military operations. 

It is very difficult to find a 
satisfactory way of carrying out 


Sir Reginald Hibbert argues that the 
intelligence services need greater scrutiny 


from ministers — not from Parliament 


Built-in wrongs 
behind the 


and not to take advantage of or 
abuse their priyflegedtiKWgb pub- 
licly mute position. And added to 
this, they have to endure the full 
rigour of the Official Secrets Act 
without ever enjoying the relief of 
leaking. 

It is not surprising if various 
behavioural deformations have 
occurred — ill-discipline, fee- 


Wright affair 


assessment, steering a midway 
course between arbitrary individ- 
ual brilliance and uninspired 
committee work. The crucial 
question is, who should do it 
Should the “open" government 
departments have the main say 
(e^. the Foreign Office in foreign 
affairs) or the “secret" purveyors 
of secret information, or should a 
quasi -independent staff of selected 
talents be assembled to do the job? . 

Tbe method varies from cous- 


come professionals with a belief in 
their own and their work's im- 
portance. Nevertheless, the 
historical convention is that they 
do not exist and can be neither 
seen nor beard. They have no right 
whatever to leak. 


This anomalous state produces 
many strange effects. The organ- 
izations in question are substan- 
tial and able to have direct access 
to die highest levels of govern- 


try to country and is never ideal 
UK tbe conn 


ment, but they are accountable to 
only a handful of minis 


In the 

adopted is a mixed staff in the 
Cabinet Office drawn from the 
various interested departments 
and agencies. The Cabinet Office, 
like ministers, tends to be 
strengthened by its link with the 
secret sources of information, 
which in turn gives these sources 
of information more influence on 
the assessment process and on 
central high-level opinion-form- 
ing than perhaps, in pure theory, 
they ought to have. 

The secret and security services 
of the Atlantic powers have grown 
large and powerful in two world 
wars and the cold war. This is 
because of the larger weight which 
secret information has in matters 
of national defence. 

The services in question have 
developed into full-blown bureau- 
cracies. Their members have be- 


only a handful of ministers and 
highest officials who have fax too 
many other preoccupations to 
exercise dose control. They gen- 
erate policy views and attitudes of 
their own, influenced heavily by 
their own secret material, al- 
though this is only a fraction of the 
information on which policy judg- 
ments ought to be based. Pieces of 
their information, being labelled 
secret, can sometimes reach and 
rivet attention at the highest levels 
before more considered reports, 
drawing on a much wider range of 
information but bearing only the 
unattractive confidential label 
can filter through. They can see 
virtually all the correspondence of 
the normal departments of gov- 
ernment, but others cannot see 
theirs. 


This state of affairs imposes on 
them a superhuman responsibility 
to act with discipline and restraint 


It is doubtful whether these 
tendencies can any longer be kept 
within tolerable limits or ade- 
quately hidden from the public 

by strict application of the 
Official Secrets Act. Differential 
use of the strait) acket is bring 
shown once again in Sydney to 
lack credibility, and ooa-differen- 
tial use would probably impose 
unworkable rigidities. 

Perhaps what is needed is more 
exposure of the agencies to the 
friction of discussion; by better 
accoontobitity upwards, bringing 
in a political parliamentary 
dimension. An opening sideways 
might also be healthy- If ways 

could be found of enabling senior 
nfficf flk in the departments of 
state, senior officers in major 
commands . of the armed services 
ynd heads of diplomatic missions 
overseas to be better informed 
about the operations and commu- 
nications of the agencies and to 
have less one-sided discuss 
with them, the agencies could be. 
better influenced by the judg- 
ments. 

In the long run this might help 
to avoid situations of tbe sort 
which have fed to the imbroglio in 
Sydney. But the problems of en- 
suring good management of 
organizations which must of 
necessity avoid public scrutiny 
will remain- They deserve more 
public understanding and sym- 
pathy than they are at present 
receiving. 

CHuMwwwpm MS 

Sir Reginald Hibbert, director of 
the Dizchtey Foundation, was /ve- 
to France. 


This week a French Medids prize went for the first time to an English novelist, 


Julian Barnes — repayment, writes Joanna Richardson, of a long-standing debt 


Vive l’entente litteraire 





Hffigoc a voluntary exfle 
in the Channel Islands 


Shakespeare: inspiration 
for French Romantics 


Byron: influenced Vigny’s 
dunce of a wife 


Zola: looking a native 
In his bowler hat 


Extraordinary, fruitful unpredict- 
able, intense. Any of these adjec- 
tives — or all of them — might be 
applied to the relationship be- 
tween this country and French 
literature. "How many surprises 
England held in store for me,' 


wrote Pierre Loti, "apart from the 
greatest — which was finding 
myself there!" Despite tbe occa- 
sional outburst of Anglophobia, 
the relationship is profound. It is, 
after all one between two great 
civilizations. 

The English Connection, as one 
might define ii has depended 
largely on the vicissitudes of 
French politics. No one was more 
aware of (his than Chateaubriand 
On May 17, 1793, a subaltern in 
the Armfee des Emigres, be landed 
as a refugee at Southampton. Poor 
and unknown, he arrived in 
London and lodged, for six shil- 
lings a month, in an attic off 
Tottenham Court Road. In 1800 
he returned to France and earned 
feme with Atala. and with Le 
G&nie du Christiansme, which he 
had begun in London. Then he 
embarked on politics. 

In 1822, Louis XYDI appointed 
him ambassador in London. On 
April 4 be landed at Dover where, 
he claimed, the castle guns fired a 
salute. He was still not satisfied. 
“There was not," he wrote, “a fool 
in the United Kingdom Who did 
not prefer the Ambassador to the 
author of Le Genie du 
Christianisme . " A typical Ro- 
mantic, be now regretted bis 
“world of tribulations and tears". 

In his first days as ambassador, 
he hannted Kensington Gardens; 
for it was there, as he explained, 
“that I reread the diary of my 
travels overseas and drew from 
them the loves of Atala; it is in 
these Gardens ... that I set down 


the first sketches for the passions 
of Rene." In his Memoiresd’outre- 


tombe he paid repeated tribute to 
his English years. 

Mme de Stael paid two long 
visits to this country where, in 
1813, she met Byron. Byron and 
Scott remained heroic figures to 
French men of letters. And so, of 
course, did Shakespeare. In 1822, 
an English company gave a 
Shakespeare season in Paris; it was 
only seven years since Waterloo, 
and audiences shouted down 
“Shakespeare, aid-de-damp de 
Wellington,” But in 1827 another 
English company was enthusias- 
tically received (and Berlioz fell 
unhappily in love with Harriet 
Smithson, who played Ophelia). 
In the years of French 
Romaniticism, Shakespeare was 
the overwhelming foreign in- 
fluence on French literature — 
translated, discussed and quoted 
in defence of Romantic doctrines. 

In (act the French Romantics 
had remarkably dose links with 


this country. Sainte-Beuve had the 
advantage of an English grand- 
mother, although, as Harold 
Nicolson observed, “he could 
never speak or understand English 
with any facility, the most he 
could do was to construe the 
simpler passages of poetry or 
prose." This lack of understanding 
did not prevent him from attempt- 
ing an imitation of Thomas Gray. 
He ventured, more unfortunately, 
on imitations of Wordsworth and 
Keats. 

Sainte-Beuve was a quarter 
English by descent; Lamartine and 
Vigny both elected to marry 
En glish women. Mme Lamartine 
renounced her religion “to be 
worthier of tbe Catholic poet of 
Les Meditation, f'. She remained 
her husband's muse and his 
delight. Mme de Vigny was to 
cause her husband much unhappi- 
ness. When they met, in Pan in 
1824, he was 27 and she was 25. 
Vigny was under tbe literary 
influence of Byron and Moore, 
and h has been suggested that 
literature helped to favour his 
marriage. However that may be, 
he fell in love, and he did so ail the 
more rapidly since Lydia Bunbury 
was majestically beautiful and her 
father objected to the marriage. 

They were married in 1825 and 
spent their honeymoon in Eng- 
land. It was probably now that he 
thought of translating Othello. The 
Merchant of Venice and Romeo 
and Juliet. From 1829 to 1835, 
from the performance of his 
Othello, to that of his Chattenon, 
Vigny lived for Shakespeare and 
for the memory of England. All his 
life he was drawn to England and 
to Englishwomen. Not, alas, so 
much to his wife. “Her beauty," 
wrote his biographer, “like that of 
most of the daughters of Albion, 
had lasted no longer than die 
flower of the camellia. She had 
been majestic at 25, she became 
massive at about 40 and between 
the ages of 50 and 60 she no longer 
had a shape." 

She was also a permanent 
invalid. For 30 years Vigny served 
her as sick-nurae, permanent sec- 
retary and interpreter. It was not 
love which bound him to her but 
affection and pity. 

Victor Hugo, the son of one of 
Napoleon's generals, felt small 
affection for anything English; but 
in 1852, as a result of Louis* 
Napoleon's coup (fetal he sought 
refuge in tbe “ravishing En glish 
island " of Jersey. Thanks to his 
continuing political activity, be 
was expelled in 1855 and moved 
toGurnsey. There he remained for 
15 years until tbe fell of the 
Second Empire. He coukS have left 
in 1:59, when Napoleon Hi 
grated a general amnesty to the 
rep’.fcucaa exiles; but chose to 
recr-.ain in Gurasey. 


He was well aware of the status 
and commercial value of banish- 
ment, even though that banish- 
ment was now self-imposed. The 
personal defiance of Napoleon m, 
the deliberate choice of martyr- 
dom, gave him a new heroic 
dimension. 

In Gurnsey he became, literally, 
a vassal of Queen Victoria: he paid 
two hens a year in rent to her; but 
be would sot go beyond droit de 
poulcge. When “God Save the 
Queen" was sung at a public 
concert, he refused to rise. He 
knew (his daughter tells us) only 
two words ofEngiish; none the less 
he wrote a book on Shakespeare. 
Henri Rochefort, a notorious 
anglophobe, decided that Shake- 
speare owed much of bis glory “to 
the profound admiration which 
Victor Hugo felt for him." 

Hugo showed little gratitude to 
the nation which had given him 
asylum and allowed him to write 
much of his best-known work. 
Other writers were less antagonis- 
tic. Not that they were much more 
reasonable. In 1861 and, again, in 
1862, Hippolyte Traine crossed 
the Channel, to make preliminary 
observations for his Notes sur 
I’Angleterre. “I am," he explained, 
“collecting types, as botanists and 
zoologists do . . . You go and sit 
on a bench on a public path, and 
you plant yourself in the morning 
on the arrival platform at a 
railway station. French eyes, 
accustomed to French feces, will 
immediately grasp the differ- 
ences." Much of his boofe to 
Enghsh eyes, simply suggests how 
far the most scientific writer may 
go astray. 

Tame may have expressed some 
curious views in his Notes and his 
Histoire de la literature anglais, 
but he came to have a deep 
affection for England; his love of 
Oxford, in particular, was shared 
by many other French writers in 
the latter years of the 1 9th century. 

In 1883, Paul Bouiget, the 
novelist, attended Eights Week 
and Encaenia, and declared: 
“Thrones wdi fail and men win 
pass, but ancient Oxford cannot 
pass - this Oxford to which Dante 
might have come." 


istrative chinoiserie of the Cu- 
rators of the Taylorian”, foreign 
lecturers were obliged to deliver 
their lectures in English and then, 
again, in their native tongue. 

Professor York Powell of Christ 
Church, who had entertained 
Verlaine, spent an exhausting 
night translating Les lettres et hi 
musique. He delivered the English 
version of the lecture next day, in 
front of a bewildered Mallarnte. 
Tbe original lecture was then 
given by MaUarate himself 

A few weeks later, tbe 
Alphonse Daudet and his 
arrived in Oxford to see some- 
thing of Eights Week, and, in- 
evitably, watch “le crocket". 

Etnile Zola had other concerns. 
In 1898, after the publication of 
J' accuse . . . and the trial at which 
be was sentenced to imprison- 
ment, he escaped to London. He 
lived, under various names, at 
various addresses in London and 
Surrey. He cycled around Walton 
and Weybridge, took photographs 
of Windsor Castle and the Crystal 
Palace. His translator, VizetcUy, 
reported that “he purchased a 


bowler, which greatly altered his 
l there is > 


Woodrow Wyatt 


Anti- 




agencies, an elaborate system of 
contralted leaking from foe top of 
the agencies through chosen writ- 
ers, journalists other rao utfa- 


In 1893, the poet Verlaine 
arrived in Oxford to lecture on 
French poetry “in tbe room 
behind Mr Blackwell's shop” and 
became so enamoured of the city 
that he needed much persuasion 
to depart Many years later it was 
disclosed that his lecture fee had 
been withheld until he was safely 
on the London train. 

Verlaine was followed, in 1894, 
by Mallanne. Although he had 
taught English for many years, 
Mallarmfe’s spoken and written 
English dearfy left a lot to be 
desired buti thanks to “the admin- 


appearance. Indeed, there is noth- 
ing like a bowler to make a 
foreigner look English”. 

It was in a rented house near 
Weybridge that this glaringly ob- 
vious foreigner began F£candiit, 
the first in the turgid series of 
novels called Les Quatre Evan- 
giies. He finished it at the Queen's 
Hotel in Norwood. 

England has done much for 
French writers: provided them 
with inspiration, wives, political 
asylum, even, perhaps, with pure 
simple- pleasure, an unexpected 
affection for this com 

One of the most 
curable anglophobes, Piene Loti; 
arrived in England for the first 
time in 1909. He was 59; 
he had sailed around the world 
before he brought himself across 
the Channel. “It's strange," he 
wrote, “I imagined that in London 
everything would be offensive to 
me, and on the contrary I feel that 
it is gradually weakening my racial 
hatred of this nation, the eternal 
enemy of our own." 

Soon afterwards, at the French 
embassy, he was presented to 
Edward VH “AhT said the King, 
holding out his hand, “so this is 


‘Your Majesty said Loti, “I 
am much less so already." 

The entente cordiale was now 
officially five years old, but for 
Lotti it had only just begun. 


Julian Barnes hwj the ess ay category 
of the Prix Medids tor his novel, 
.publishes 


Flaubert's Parrot, published by Jona- 
than Cape Joanna Richardson is the 
author of biographies of Stendahl 

tad Verlaine. 


Barclays in South -Africa was 
steadfastly anti-apartheid, in its 
employment of staff treatment of 
non-white customers and en- 
couragement of non-white busin- 
essmen. By forcing it to withdraw 
for fear of losing business here and 
in America, anti-apartheid cam- 
paigners have extinguished a 
powerful engine of advance for 
non-white communities needing 
foreign capital There .will be 
sorrow in tbe black industrial 
estates where earlier this year I 
met Mack entrepreneurs. 

Barclays’ departure win intens- 
ify the demand for sterner sanc- 
tions against South Africa. This 
will please the mainly middle- 
d p$ s intelligentsia who run the 
African National Congress and 
want economic chaos as a breed- 
ing ground for violent revolution. 
It wiH not please ordinary blade, 
coloured arid Indian workers and 
their rising business and pro* 
fessional middle classes. 

In August the Centre for App- 
lied Social Sciences at Natal 
University collated its own and 
other surveys on blade opinion. 
Only a quarter or less of bracks in 
major metropolitan areas sup- 
ported total disinvestment or frill 
sanctions. Black workers oppose 
politically motivated massive -job 


losses. No survey posing the 
s of South 


probable consequences 
Africa's economic isolation wins 
an urban black, majority. 

Well-meaning and not so well- 
meaning outsiders who try to 
impose their own solution are 
awry. Change has come from 
internal not foreign, pressures. 
The favourite hate figure of anti- 
apartheid campaigners. President 
Botha, is the main reformer. He 
knows better than any foreigners 
how fast the white population can 
be pushed along. 

The Pass Laws with their 
degrading documentation have 
gone. So has influx control into 
black townships. Tbe right of all 
South Africans in the homelands 
to a common South African 
passport has been restored. 

This has caused a problem in 
Bopbuthaiswana which has a 
.democratically-elected govern- 
ment, no South Africans in its 
administration, and does not rely 
on South African financial sup- 
port. It considers itself indepen- 
dent whatever the rest of the 
world may think. 

The new rights ofblacks to own 
business freeholds and trade in the 
central districts of major towns 
has transformed them. The centre 
of Johannesburg, for instance, is 
cow predominantly in black 
hands. Blades may now also own 
the freeholds of their houses. 
Moreover, the Group Areas Act is 


fist’ . 

burg residential areas — Hiffbrow, 
Joubert Pari and Berea — wo® 
thought to be South Africa's most 
densefy-poputattd white areas. A 

- survey shows that of the 65,000 
people living in them nearly a 
third are coloured, Indian or 
Mack. 

The Rand Afrikaans University 
this month published a pofi of the 
inhabitants and reported . that 
sporting facilities, churches, sup- 
ermarkets, cinemas, tertiary ed- 
ucation* occupation of flats and . 
other buildings are generally open 1 
to all races. The substantial major- 
ity of whxtcs accept this and more 
then 60 per rent of whites raid 
they would also be happy to share 
hospitals and public transport, 
stiH partially segregated, with 
other races. The most resistant to 
sharing amenities were recent 
white immigrants. 

The: Group Areas Act designat- 
ing areas where the various races 
may live is doomed. At the very 
least the many grey areas which 
already have multi-racial occupa- 
tion will be Legalized after the 
election, probably to be fadd in 
April Then Botha will be able to 
get away with a reform of the 
Group Areas Act which might 
jiKenate some white voters if 
attempted beforeThe Separate 
Amenities Act, with its reserva- 
tion of numerous facilities for 
white use only, has already gone. 

John Kane-Berman, director of . 
(he South African Institute of ^ 
Race Relations, hates apartheid. 

He sees the momentum of racial 
equality irresistibly gathering pace 
because the -whites are increasmgty 
ready for it. Soon the only 
s ignificant item left will he the way 
in which political power is to be 
shared. 

The hfti fflinmg will revolve 
around the rights and political 
-inputs of the minorities which 
make up South Africa. The white, 
Indian, coloured, and Zulu minor- 
ities mid up to more than die 
potential followers of the ANC, 
another minority. The Kwa- 
Zuhi/Natal indaba. backed by tbe 
Zulu leader. Chief Buthdezi, is 
making headway on a plan for a 
angle Legislative body to govern 
Natal and KwaZulu. This could 
form a model for power-sharing in 
tbe rest of South Africa. 

It fa ho m egrown progress of this 
kind — Chief Buthdezi fa strongly 
opposed to sanction and violence 

— which offers theroest prospect 
for a peaceful and fair South 
Africa. Attempts by foreigners 
who know nothing of the prob- 
lems of South Africa to fence the 
pace win either slow it down or 
prevent a genuinely democratic 
outcome. 


Michael Kinsley 


Hostages to 
hypocrisy 


Washington 

These are trying times for the loyal 
Reaganite. Not since 1939 when 
US communists (earned about the 
HitlerStalin pact has a sudden 
policy reversal put devoted ideo- 
logues to such a severe test of 
devotion. A party tine of stark, 
moral simplicity — no dealing with 
terrorist states - has suddenly 
gone all gooey and geopolitical 

As in 1939, many are felling off 
the train as it rounds this sharp 
bend. But a tenacious few hold on. 
Jeane Kirkpatrick, the former US 
ambassador to the United Na- 
tions, for example. Last summer, 
she was writing with scorn about 
craven allies who refuse to isolate 
terrorist nations. Now she writes 
with equal scorn of those who 
refuse to recognize “the hard 
realities with which governments 
must deal — This is the way the 
world is . . ." Dealing with terror, 
“may, occasionally, mean paying 
blackmail" Who would have 
thought it? 

And tbe gooeyist geopolitician 
of all fa the president. Last year 
Iran was part of “a new inter- 
national version of Murder 
Incorporated". Now it “en- 
compasses some of tbe most 
critical {geography in the world 
. . . critical position ... oil 
flows ... an absence of dia- 


sd complaints about 
Reagan’s dealings with Iran an- 
alyse them in terms of ineptitude 
(blunders), decision-making dis- 
array, or, ironically, geopolitical 


naivete (we really would be tUti 
* " ). N< ‘ 


toward Iraq). New in order ... 
prestige come moral qualms about 
trading weapons for hostages. The 
ample objection that the presi- 
dent was saying one thing and 
doing another ranks very low. 

Even when tbe focus fa on the 
gap between Reagan’s words and 
deeds the sophisticated term of 
abuse fa “credibility". An interest- 
ing word; the implication fa that 
he need not necessarily be sincere, 
just believable. 

It's true that in international 
diplomacy some hypocrisy is 
essential But on the level of 
politics it fa, or ought to be, less 
acceptable. The question of how to 
deal with terrorism has been one 
of the major foreign policy debates 
of the past few years. The percep- 
tion that Reagan had very dif- 
ferent ideas from Preddent Carter 
about terrorism in general and 
Iran in particular, was a key factor 
in his election. Yet what fa the 
point of elections if the winners 
can hide the feet. that they aren't 
doing what they say? 

Yes, diplomacy also requires 
secrecy. Reagan and his defenders 
have offered Henry -Kissuoaef’s - 
secret pre-recognioon 
with China as a supposedly teUihg 


example. How much of that 
secrecy was diplomatic necessity 
and how much was Kissingerian 
melodramatics is a nice question. 

It's hard to believe the China thaw 
wasn't on the horizon with or 
without the theatricals. Bui more 
important, relations with China 
were hardly a central political 
issue while Kissinger was engaged 
in his derring-do. President Nixon 
and other administration officials 
did not spend the months of secret 
negotiations publicly bragging 
about their refusal to deal and 
scolding allies wbo refused to 
follow their high-minded exam- 
ple £ 

_ There are laws — derived from 
bitter experience — that are de- 
signed to assure democratic re* 
view of official actions. To justify 
operations such as the secret Iran 
d e aling s, the funding of Nica- 
raguan Contras and the Libyan 
disinformation campaign, the 
Reagan administration lawyers 
. have worked overtime to produce 
highly creative, although inad- 
equate, explanation of how these 
raws don't apply on alternate 
Thursdays when the moon fa full 
and so on. It seems that reverence 
fa- the wish of democratically- 
elected representatives applies 
only if they've been dead for two 
centuries. 

Reagan's new approach to Iran 
may even be the correct one. It’s 
more sophisticated and more 
compassionate towards the hos- 
tages than his previous tough-guy £ 
stance. Bui Reagan fa the one who 
has made his reputation by 
seeeming to nject both this sort of 
decadent geopolitical sophistica- 
tion and this potentially paralyz- 



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----- agonizing foreign policy 

questions usually boD down to the 
trade-off between innocent lives 
and long-term na t ional interests. 
War, for example. If Reagan's 
alleged “standing tall" means 
anything, it means that he fa more 
prepared than others to sacrifice 
the few for the good of the 
manyin feci he has been 
spectacularly successful in having 
it both ways: taking “tough” 
actions that only cost the blood of 

foreigners -- albeit including inno- 
cent foreigners — snch as the 
Contra war and the Libyan bomb- 
ing. 

The reason Reagan gets away 
wijhthis fa that his hypocrisy 
nomas the hypocrisy of the 
voters, who also want to be hard- 

nosed and sentimental at tbe same 
time. In that sense, unfortunately, 
the president's duplicity fa a 
f u l fill ment of democracy more 
than its betrayaL Americans like 
being feed to. 

eNwrRtpoMe.im 
The author is editor 0 f New 
Republic. 


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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 




1 Pennington Street, London El 9XN Telephone: 01-481 4100 


‘ ‘-or 

\ 'o m3 


THE PRESIDENT AT BAY 


Implications of Barclays pull-out 


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President Reagan's famous 
luck has not altogether de- 
serted him. Not only did the 
discovery of the Contra 
connection emerge almost on 
the eve of the Thanksgiving 
holiday which imposed some 
restraint upon media criti- 
cism, but the fact that Con- 
gress is out of session until 
January 6 preserves the White 
House from the hostile scru- 
tiny of Democrat-controlled 
congressional committees un- 
til then. The President must 
use tins interval to restore 
order and confidence to an 
administration which cur- 
rently suffers from disarray 
and mistrust 

If Mr Reagan fails to revive 
the administration's standing 
in popular esteem, he will 
spend the last two years of 
office engaged in defensive 
manoeuvres against congres- 
sional investigations as the 
Democrats finally see the tef- 
lon wearing off That might 
not ' matter overmuch in 
domestic policy where the 
President has already estab- 
lished his major objectives 
such as tax reform. The Demo- 
crats, anxious to establish their 
moderate credentials, are un- 
likely to try to overturn them. 

But paralysis in government 
could obstruct and undermine . 
Mr Reagan’s foreign policy. 
His objectives here include 
reaching an agreement with 
the Soviet Union on arms 
control, human rights and 
regional issues; keeping 
protectionism at bay; isolating 
Nicaragua in Central America; 
and shoring up the allian ce by 
keeping troops in Europe. 

All of these policies are 
either unrealised, like an arms 
control agreement, or insecure, 
such as keeping protectionism 
at bay. A government which is 
weak, divided, unpopular and 
distracted by scandal cannot 
hope to pursue them eff- 
ectively. Indeed, it might not 


be aide to pursue a foreign 
policy of any lrmH 
Not even the President’s 
most supercilious critics 
should be pleased by that 
prospect. With the exception 
of his backing for the Contras, 
the aims outlined . above 
should command general sup- 
port. Though not urgent, they 
cannot wait two and a half 
years for a new President to be 
ready to tackle them. And the 
likely result of drift will be 
exactly that — a drift to 
protectionism, to alliance dis- 
array and to increasingly 
relations between the super- 
powers. 


that of Secretary of State in a 
few months, a major consid- 
eration should be that the new 
men can work together with a 
minimum of friction. The 
argument that the Secretary of 
State must necessarily be at 
odds with the NSC advisor is a 
half-truth on stilts. One of the 
two must, admittedly, be su- 
perior — as Dr Kissinger was 
over General Scowcroft 


To avert that Mr Reagan 
must first, in Dr Henry 
Kissinger’s formulation, admit 
immediately what must be 
revealed eventually. He can- 
not risk even a suspicion of a 
cover-up. In this regard, a good 
start has been made with the 
Justice Department investiga- 
tion under a suddenly impres- 
sive Mr Edwin Meese, the 
Attorney General, and the 
inquiry into the National Sec- 
urity Council under three 
genuinely wise “wise men". 

Nor can the President avoid 
admitting personally that the 
Iranian anns-for-hostages deal 
was a mistake, quite irrespec- 
tive of its connection to the 
Contra slush fund. 


But such an outcome could 
be achieved again by, for 
example, placing Mr Caspar 
Weinberger at the Stele 
Department and Mr John 
Le hmann, now the Navy Sec- 
retary, at the head of the NSC 
Or by leaving Mr George 
Shultz where he is and moving 
his protege, Mr Elliot Abrams, 
from the i-atin American desk 
to the NSC These permuta- 
tions can be multiplied. 

Mr Reagan, by such steps, 
might begin to regain public 
support arid revive his Presi- 
dency. That perhaps looks 
unHkely in foe immediate 
aftermath of the Contra revela- 
tions. But it was in that 
afte rmath tha t he obtained a 
respectable S3 per cent 
popularity rating in an opinion 
poll in which, significantly, 
three-quarters of the respon- 
dents also thought that he was 
lying about the Contra money. 


His most essentia] step, 
however, will now be to re- 
construct the senior levels of 
his administration. The first 
requirement of any appointees 
must be that they command 
public confidence. That al- 
most certainly meansihat his 
Chief of Staff, Mr Donald 
Regan, who dominated the 
White House machine in 
which the scandal ger minated, 
should gracefully retire. 

When it comes to filling 
such posts as the National 
Security Advisor’s, Mr 
Regan's own job and perhaps 


MRKINNOCK’S EDUCATIONAL VISIT 


The Washington atmosphere 
into which Neil Kumock ar- 
rives today is very different 
from the one expected when 
his visit was originally 
planned. Congressional 
preoccupation with the revela- 
tions concerning the Iranian 
arms deals are likely to draw 
the spotlight away from Mr 
Kinnock. Since Labour's de- 
fence policy is in no sense 
ready for the spotlight, this 
development is likely to be in 
his favour. 


mains that nuclear deterrence 
may have kept the peace in 
Europe for over forty years, 
but that there is no guarantee it 
will continue to do so. Labour 
argues that the threat of Soviet 
territorial expansion in West- 
ern Europe is greatly exag- 
gerated, while the threat of a 
nuclear accident or a series of 
misunderstandings between 
the superpowers is increasing. 


The visit marks the begin- 
ning of a campaign, which the 
Labour Party hopes win pro- 
vide the British electorate with 
a rational case for the uni- 
lateral renunciation of nuclear 
weapons. Under former La- 
bour leader, Michael Foot, 
unilateral disarmament, the 
centre-piece of the Labour 
Party's defence policy, was 
asserted as a simple moral 
position, with little regard for 
the practical realities of Euro- 
pean defence. 

Mr Kinnock’s policies are in 
substantial respects the same 
as those advocated by his 
predecessor. But the unity of 
the party and the presentation 
of its policies are, at the 
moment at least, in much 
better shape. Moreover, La- 
bour senses some political 
tides in its favour, isolationist 
sentiments in America as well 
as anti-American sen timent s 
in Britain. 

The central proposition re- 


The time has come, Mr 
Kumock will say, for a radical 
departure in Britain's defence 
policy. By abolishing our in- 
dependent deterrent, remov- 
ing American nuclear weapons 
and increasing spending on' 
conventional forces in Nato, 
Labour sees Britain pointing 
the way to a defence policy 
which will eventually be em- 
braced by all our West Euro- 
pean Nato allies, and perhaps 
even the superpowers them- 
selves. 


Influential figures in both 
the Republican and Democrat 
parties have retorted that 
Labour's action would lead to 
a new wave of isolationism in 
America and precipitate the 
dissolution of Nato.Mr 
Kinnock hopes that this kind 
of reaction can be put down to 
the feet that Labour’s defence 
policies have largely been ex- 
plained to Americans by. 
Labour's adversaries. He 
hopes that American hostility 
is thus less deep seated than it 
appears. Once the Americans 
understand that Britain win 
remain committed to Nato, 
and will increase its con- 
ventional contribution to 
Europe’s security, he argues, 
then the US reaction will 
soften. 


This is a radical alteration of 
British defence policy, 
proceeding on the bass of 
evidence that is at best implau- 
sible and at worst catastrophi- 
cally dangerous. But it would 
be unwise to assume that for 
these reasons alone it will lose 
Labour the election. The dif- 
ference between Mr Kinnock 
and Mr Foot is that Mr 
Kinnock knows how herculean 
is his ta$k in convincing the 
US, our European neighbours 
and the British electorate to 
endorse Labour’s “blind leap 
of faith”. 


Even if the reaction does not 
soften, Mr Kinnock believes 
that a , future Labour Govern- 
ment could call the American 
bluffy on the assumption that 
the US would be loathe to lose 
those non-nuclear British 
bases which play so vitala role 
in America’s global security. 
This, believes Mr Kinnock, is 
Labour’s trump card. 

These are high-risk games 
for the highest stakes. It is to be 
hoped that Mr Kinnock will 
listen to his hosts as well as to 
his advisers on this trip, that 
he will learn as well as lecture, 
and thus use the cover of 
Washington's domestic 
preoccupations to real advan- 


FOURTH LEADER 


A group of scientists at the 
University of Louisville have 
discovered a substance which 
they claim lengthens the life of 
a mosquito by SO per cent The 
elixir is called nonfihydro- 
guarefic add (we think that is 
howitis spelled) andwhenitis 
added to the mosquito's diet, 
the little fellow can look 
forward not just to his present 
average life-span of some three 
and a half weeks, but to a 
serene old age of 35 days. 

Which is good news for the 
mosquitos; but we cannot help 
feeling that the scientists have 
very seriously misunderstood 
their instructions. What most 
of us have lot® been seeking is 
a substance that will reduce the 
life-span of a mosquito, pref- 
erably by 100 per cent 

The scientists have an an- 
swer; they say dna t they were 
looking for a substance that 
would prolong human life, and 
no doubt they felt that they 
mus t walk before they can run; 
first mosquitos, then mice, 
then dogs — finally, we shall all 
live forever.’ 

Provided, that is, that we 


have not first been bitten to 
death by very did mosquitos. 
For the snag in the present 
plan is that although it will,'' 
understandably, be a very long 
time before we are all safely 
quaffing a daily glass of foam- 
ing nordihydroguaretic add, 
the mosquitos arc slurping it 
up right now, and already 
living longer in consequence. 
What arc we supposed to do 
while we arc waiting? (Don't 
tell us to use that stuff you 
squirt from a can; it might be 
pure nordihydroguaretic acid 

for all the effect it has on the 
blighters.) 

Of course, we can comfort 
ourselves by thinking about 
the Struldbruggs, those pitiful 
creatures invented by Swift, 
who lived forever but in 

circumstances so frightful that 

they would have been better 
off dead possibly there is a 
^mflar catch in it for the 
mosquitos. Unfortunately, 
that wiO not help us; a month- 
old mosquito might be an 
object of pity and derision to 
his younger friends and rela- 
tions,- but wc arc -not con- ' 
coned with his-fedmgs. We . 


want him to stop biting us, and 
-grim though the conclusion is 
- we are of the opinion that the 
only good mosquito is a dead 
one. 


The frontiers of science 
must, we know, be constantly 
pushed out. We cannot stop 
the inarch of progress, man's 
inquiring mind must be free to 
roam at will, no one can say 
what undiscovered trifles are 
waiting to be snapped up. But 
surely a compromise is pos- 
sible? And we think we have 
devised one for the mosquito- 

men. 


Let the Louisville scientists 
be shut up with an ample 
supply of nordihydroguaretic 
add and a perfectly enormous 
number of hungry mosquitos. 
Their task will be to make the 
elixir safe for us; their in- 
centive Id achieve that aim 
rapidly will be our promise to 
let them out as soon as they 
have done so. We flunk that 
our plan is exactly what is 
meant by the phrase “the biter 
bit”, and we ratter suspect 
that, intimfi tte scientists wM 
come to think so too. 


From Mr Christopher M. Jackson, 
AfEP for East Kant (European 
Democrat (Conservative)) 

Sir, I wonder how many people 
who abhor apartheid realise the 
blow to black progress implicit in 
Barclays* decision to withdrew 
from South Africa (report, 
November 24). 

The disinvestment lobby has 
been ferociously active against 
Barclays — yet Barclays National 
in relation to its size employs 
about twice the proportion of non- 
whites as the avenge of other 
banks. It employed the first Mack 
cashier, fee first Made manager, 
and gave the first multi-racial 
training even when that was 
against the law. 

I have seen for mysdf in Soweto 
the splendid results of its giving 5 
per cent of post-tax p rofit for 
educational, medical and welfare 
work among blacks. Not for 
nothing did Barclays earn in South 
Africa the sobriquet “the anti- 
apartheid bank”. 

Bardays has, fortunately, been 
acquired by anotho - fighter 
ag aingt apartheid, Anglo-Ameri- 
can, which ha* a far-sighted and 
courageous chairman. Yet dis- 
investment has received a major 
boost, and other companies may 
now fed inclined to follow 


Barclays’ example. 

By whom will they be bought? 
The risk is dear forced sellers may 
wefl be acq ui red by local com- 
panies less opposed to apartheid, 
even periaps inclined to the status 
quo or worse. 

Lacking the pressure-point of 
the EEC code of conduct, we in 
Europe will lose even our current 
influence over these companies. 
More important, they will be cut 
off from the pro gre ssive influence 
of their former owners. Non- 
whites will lose out, and white 
South Africa will become more 

ent i f_n rbc d and self-sufficient. 

Bardays responded to the pres- 
sures on it but I hope that other 
companies will give full weight to 
the benefit of their presence in 
South Africa m the fight against 
apartheid and in giving opportu- 
nities to non-whites. 

1 hope, too, that as pressure is 
increased on South Africa to 
accelerate the pace of change away 
from apartheid, more emphasis 
will be given to the need to avoid 
harm to blacks. 

Yours faithfully, 

CHRISTOPHER JACKSON, 

8 Wdhneade Drive, 

Sevenoaks, Kent 
November 26. 


The Democrats are only too 
aware that Mr Reagan can call 
upon a large fund of goodwill 
as the President who has 
restored the self confidence of 
his country. They may sh rink 
from destructive political war- 
fere. Nor should outsiders 
ignore the respect that almost 
all Americans feel for the office 
of the Presidency. 

It may be that, for all these 
reason, Mr Reagan will re- 
cover sufficiently to conduct 
foreign policy in tte two years 
left to him. It is in tte interest 
of the entire West that he 
should do so. 


Car tax dodgers 

From Mr Lester S. Lovd 
Sir, The House of Commons 
Public Accounts Committee (re- 
port, November 20) blames eva- 
sion and derisory fines — on those 
that are prosecuted — for the loss 
of £99m revenue every year from 
tax dodgers. 

The explanations for the deri- 
sory fines — delays in bringing 
prosecutions and difficulties in 
securing payment of fines — as 
given by tire cleric of a London 
magistrates* court in your report 
on November 21, do not give 
grounds for expecting any 
improvement in this situation. 

And yet the solution seems so 
amide: surety these untaxed ve- 
hicles are obvious candidates for 
instant wheeldamping and re- 
moval to the local police pound? 

This immediate action is 
particularly appropriate since 


Evil that men do 

From Professor Cornelius O’Leary 
Sir, I entirety agree with Bernard 
Levin’s reference (November 24) 
to the “peculiar and imitpif. 
horror” of the Gunbodian experi- 
ence under the Khmer Rouge 
regime. Bat I am somewhat 
surprised that he does not advert 
to the extraordinary feet that one 
of the infamous trio of Khmer 
Rouge leaders, Khieu Samphan 
(Head of State, 1976-1979), is 
currently Vice-president of the 
“Coalition Government of Demo- 
cratic Kampuchea”, which is still 
reoognized by the United Nations 
as the legitimate government of 
that unhappy country. 

Yours sincerely, 

CORNELIUS O’LEARY, 

The Queen’s University ofBdfest, 
Belfast, Northern Ireland. 


Bitter-sweet memory 

From Lieutenant-Colonel D. A. 

Rowan-Hamilton 

Sir, Please teD Mrs Weston-Davies 

(November 21) that her bottle of 

Angostura is seven years younger 

than my bottle of orange bitters. 

In 1938 1 helped my father, then 
commanding 153 Highland Bri- 
gade, to prepare champagne cock- 
tails by adding a few drops of 
bitters to a sugar lump in a 
champagne glass 

He feed after the war. My 
mother died in 1978, when I found 
the bottle in a wine cooler. It now 
graces the drink tray, half- full, 
white hundreds of gin bottles pass 
it by. 

Yours faithfully, 

DENYS ROWAN-HAMILTON, 
Killyteagh Castle, Co. Down. 


Cast down by cast-off? 

From Mrs Jenny Crossley 
Sir, I see from your article on 
Christmas shopping (November 
25) feat I risk my daughter's 
resentment unless I spend £59.99 
on her presents this year. 

Well, so be it. She will be 
Opening a present given to her 
elder brother two years ago. It was 
then second-hand. Doubtless the 
present will be wrapped in second- 
hand paper. 

I suspect her enjoyment wfl! be 
as great as if I had spent £59.99. 
Yours faithfully, 

JENNY CROSSLEY, 

23 Pleyddl Avenue, 

Stamford Brook, W6. 


From Lord Campbell of Eskan 
Sir, As one whose great-grand- 
father, R. C. L. Bevan, was the first 
chairman of Barclays I am 
delighted to hear that they have 
cut and run from South Africa; 
and I hope that many other British 
companies will follow their exam- 
ple. 

As soon as I became managing 
director of Booker McConnell, we 
sold (Kir Smith African interests. 
This was because fee majority of 
the board were not prepared to 
pursue employment polities and 
practices in South Africa which 
they could not have contemplated 
in a more civilised country. 

This surely should be the root of 
the decision to get out that one is 
not prepared to m ate money — 
anywhere — OUt of inhuman 

employment conditions. 

I am particularly happy that 
Barclays are the first of the banks 
to withdraw, because during my 
long business experience in Africa 
and the Caribbean I always found 
that they were the best of the 
banks in recruiting, training m*d 
promoting nationals of the coun- 
tries concerned. For that reason. 
Booker McConnell and I person- 
ally continued to bank with 
Barclays. 


Yours faithfully, 

CAMPBELL of ESKAN, 

Lawers, Crocker End, Nettlebed, 
nr Henley-on-Thames, 
Oxfordshire. 


From the Chairman of Barclays 
Bank, Pic 

Sir, Barclays Bank has cer taint y 
left far more than fee “barren 
nest” suggested in your ill-in- 
formed leading article (“Barclays 
flies north” November 25). It has 
left, after more th an 60 years, a 
well-run banking business and a 
record of encouragement of black 
advancement and social pro- 
grammes few other companies can 
match 

These were established during 
the years when Barclays was the 
major shareholder of the South 
African bank and have been 
maintained in the IS months riiw-p 
we ceased to be. 

The rfiairman and managing 
director have already it dear 

that those enlightened employ- 
ment and social policies wul be 
continued under fully South Af- 
rican ownership. 

Yours faithfully. 

TIMOTHY BEVAN, Chairman, 
Bardays Bank, Pic, 

54 Lombard Street, EC3. 
November 27. 


these unlicensed cars are quite 
likely also to be without either 
third-party insurance or test 
certificate and their continued use 
would have serious safety implica- 
tions for other road users. 

Un taxed, uninsured and un- 
tested cars should be held in fee 
police pound nntil all legal 
requirements are satisfied — 
including payment of outstanding 
duty, insurance, fines and costs or 
an adequa t e bond pending the 
outcome of prosecution. 

If the police and prosecution 
services do not have the legal 
authority or resources to impound 
vehicles as suggested above, who 
could be better placed to remedy 
this than fee members of fee 
House of Commons Public Ac- 
counts Committee? 

Yours faithfully, 

LESTER LOVEL, 

Burton Ferry, 

Milford Haven, Pembrokeshire. 


Royal rats 

From the President of the British 
Goat Society 

Sir, Having kept goats for over 
forty years in town and country I 
can assure Mr Thoraber (Novem- 
ber 24) that (I) it is only fee mate 
goat feat smells and (ii) it does not 
deter Mr or Mrs Rat 


Every autumn, as soon as the 
weather becomes cold and wet, 
rats move into the goatbouse, 
which provides them with a warm 
nest for fee winter from the hay 
the goats waste by polling out of 
the rack more than they need. As 
goats are very fastidious they will 
not eat anything that has been 
dropped on the floor. 

When the invasion begins there 
is nothing for it but to summon 
the pest officer, who has never 
failed to rid us of our unwelcome 
visitors. 


Yours faithfully, 

M.LK. PENNINGTON 
(President, British Goat Society), 
52 Broad Street, 

Alrcsford, 

Hampshire. 

November 25. 


Secrets actions 
beyond compare 


An atom of truth 


From Mr Peter Gray Lucas 
Sir, It was good to read Professor 
Seaton’s challenge (November 22) 
to fee church dignitary (article, 
November 15) who draws meta- 
physical consequences from quan- 
tum theory, but when this sort of 
practice is so common, is there 
much point in protesting? 

If there were a sflly-Nobel prize, 
Heisenberg would be the reluctant 
winner. More and sillier spiritual 
consequences have been drawn 
from his uncertainty principle 
than from any other “modem” 
scientific theory. 

This has been going on for four 
centuries and there is a gigantic 
literature, some of h by people 
who ou^ht to have known better. 

I.eihni7 was delighted by what 
he saw through van 
Leeuwenhoek’s microscope be- 
cause ft bdped to demonstrate the 
existence of God, ami was 
apprehensive abonl von 
Guericke’s vacuum experiments 
for the opposite reason. Newton 
thought tte universe was a bit of a 
botch-up and needed a God to 
adjust it occasionally. 


contrast with the sturdy indepen- 
dence of Mr Justice Powell in 
Australia. 

The suggestion is unjust because 
it is based on a fallacy. Like has 
not been compared wife like: 
chalk has been compared wife 
cheese. 

The Attorney GeneraTs action 
in the English courts (report, July 
12) has not yet reached trial. In 
Australia Mr Justice Powell is 
conducting the final trial of fee 
Australian action. 

The English action is at an 
interim stage. The Attorney Gen- 
eral has obtained an injunction 
restraining publication until trial 
on further order. The facts have 
not been investigated, nor has 
evidence been tested: that will be 
done at triaL 

A fair comparison would be 
between the stages of interim relief 
in the two actions. The English 
judges (sntgect to appeal to the 
House of Lords) have granted the 
Government an interim injunc- 
tion: but so, 1 understand, did the 
Australian court at that stage of 
the Australian action. 

Let us not pass judgment on the 
judges concerned in England or 
Australia until we know fee 
outcome and have observed the 
trial process in each jurisdiction. 

I am, Sir, etc, 

SCARMAN, 

House of Lords. 

November 26. 


No hands on deck 

From Captain R. G. Sharpe, RN 
Sir, The shipwreck of the Kow- 
loon Bridge has in part been 
“assisted” by the ever-ready and 
sometimes over zealous rescue 
services. 

The scenario isn’t new : terrible 
weather; mechanical failure; struc- 
tural damag e; ship sinking ; SOS 
calls; distress flares, and in come 
the airborne cavalry. Great skill; 
considerable personal bravery; 
everyone rescued; Press and tele- 
vision; bravo! Embarrassingly, fee 
next day fee ship is still afloat and 
by now a real hazard to lots of 
other people. 

I was involved in the North Sea 
in 1981 in a similar incident on a 
sm a ller scale (the Mayday distress 
call came from a fishing boat) and 
when daylight came fee rescued 
skipper and his engineer were 
quietly put back on board. 

In that incident we had the 
sailors’ advantage of being able to 
stay in fee vicinity of the “wreck” 
and monitor its movements from 
the comparative comfort of a long, 
thin destroyer; and the helicopter 
was, of course, instantly available 
on the flight deck. 

The moral is that a sinking ship, 
like a crashing aircraft, is a 
considerable hazard to more than 
just its crew and if you take them 
off you may have to put some 
back, if only to assist in fee 
salvage. 

Yours faithfully, 

R.G. SHARPE, 

Foundry House, 


nr Bordon, Hampshire. 
November 25. 


Zambian positing 

From Miss Walije Gondwe 
Sir, I read with interest your report 
in yesterday’s Times concerning a 
decision by fee Foreign Office last 
April to withdraw Mrs Sue Dar- 
ling Rogerson’s proposed posting 
to Lusaka because Zambia was a 
“male-dominated society.” 

I would be very grateful if you 
could bring to fee attention of 
your readers the fact that as long 
ago as the late 1970s Zambia's 
High Commissioner to fee United 
Kingdom was a woman barrister. 
Miss Lombe Qubesaknnda. 1 am 
sure this supports the evidence 
feat Zambia is “a forward-looking 
society where women play an 
important role”, as pointed out by 
Mrs Rogereon’s solicitor. 

Yours faithfully, 

VALUE GONDWE, 

41 Chetwynd Road, NW5. 
November 26. 


The argument for the Great 
Designer still features regularly in 
your columns, nowadays usually 
drawing on probability statistics. 


Even so, I doubt whether any 
real abuse of science is being 
perpetrated. People acquire their 
metaphysical principles first and 
then fit selected morsels of science 
to them. But the very idea of such 
a fit is meaningless and therefore 
invulnerable to argument, 
whether it takes the form of naive 
positivism or mystical quantum- 
adulation. 


Some of this is harmless. The 
Chnon of W indsor will kneel 
anyway, and if quantum theory 
makes it a bit more exciting for 
him, who would deprive him of 
the thrill? Unfortunately it can 
also be very harmful. But the 
evidence of the last 400 years is 
tint people, including, regrettably, 
some scientists, are not going to 
slop doing iL 


ON THIS DAY 


NOVEMBER 29 1920 


From Lord Scarman 
Sr, The Peter Wright affair has led 
some (not you. Sir) to make a 
comment contrasting Fnglfch anH 
Australian judicial attitudes to- 
wards the Executive which is 
unjust to the English judges 
concerned and based on a false 
premise. 

The suggestion, which is put in 
di ffere n t ways, amounts to this: 
that the judges in the 
action have shown an accom- 
modating attitude towards the 
demands of fee Executive in 


Herbert Sidebotham (1872-1946), 
a distinguished poli t i c al journalist 
much sought after by the national 
papers, appeared during Lloyd 
George's last coalition 


whose mother was a sister of die 
3rd Marquess of Salisbury, was 
Lord President of the Council; he 
accepted an earldom in 1932. Lord 
Robert Cecil was Lord Salisbury’s 
third son; he was created viscount 
in 1923 and was president of the 
League of Nations Union for more 
than twenty years. 


FRONT BENCH 
FIGURES. 


3.— THE 
CECILIANS. 


FIGHTING A LOSING 
BATTLE. 


Yours t ruly, 

PETER GRAY LUCAS, 
8 Alpha Road, 
Cambridge. 

November 24. 


(by a Student of Politics.) 

Mr Balfour, now floridly benign, 
a rich oracular voice forth 

from the obscurer recesses of the 
Coalition; Lord Robert Cecil, e 
Hamlet in politics, noble of senti- 
ment and frail of purpose; Lord 
Hugh, Mercotio in a coni, intellec- 
tually athletic on a diet of dileni- 
mas; Mr Onosby-Gore, still 
looking like an Eton boy, foil of 
gentleness and good sense; as First, 
Second, and Third Gentlemen, the 
trenchant Lord Winterton, Mr. 
Walter Guinness the frank, and 
Mr. Edward Wood the earnest, not 
forgetting Lord Wohner, though 
odb Bekhan sees him, and, of 
course, the Mhiqueas of Salisbury, 
carrying but hardly w ielding the 
sword of his great name. These are 
the Cecflians. Only one, Mr Bal- 
four. sits on the Front Bench, there 
mourned by his family, but wher- 
ever they sit the Cecffians have 
their minds at any rate on the 
Front Bench. They were bom to 
the Ministry, whether they get 
there or not. . . . 

For twenty years before the war 
there was hardly an gnthnmwni in 
politics that did not find its 
enemies in the Cedis. Irish Home 
Rule, Tariff Reform, Imperial Fed- 
eration, nearly every suggestion for 
nr pmie ekanp has withered alike 

under their s ympathy «ni their 
opposition; every passion and 
nearly every hope in politics owes 
them a grudge, none the less deep 
Imyiw their criticism baa often 
been wise and justified by the 
event. . . . 

From Mr. Balfour nothing fa to 
be hoped. He does not seriously 
believe in politics as an instrument 
of human progress; to h™ they are 
merely the art of neutralising 
forces and engaging th«m m an 
equilibrium that is more or 
stable, so that the realty serious 
activities of the world may not be 
interfered with. What these are, he 
fa not clear. For Mr. Balfour they 
are the critical enjoyment of the 
intellectual play of human life, 
with himself in a comfortable bos; 
for others, the making of money; he 
himself has said feat what makes 
most difference to human happi- 
ness is science, thinking that, 
perhaps, because he knows so little 
about it Office he loves, not for fee 
sake of exer ci s ing power, but for 
the feeling that it gives him feat he 
could exercise power if he chose to 
do so. In fact, he no more 
influences the policy of the Coali- 
tion than Jonah steered the whale. 


I LORD R. CECIL AS HAMLET I 


The only hope Is in Lord Robert 
Cedk Lord Hugh fa the abler man, 
but wife him politics at best axe 
only fee damp of ordered society, 
and fee springs which move its 
elaborate mechanism are to be 
found in religion alone. The age is 
not realty irreligious, but the semi- 
political forms of Lord Hugh's 
religion do not attract it, and for all 
the brilliancy of hfa intellect he fa 
disqualified for leadership. Lord 
Robert Cecil fain better case, and 
l*>nn |hmi a year ego he 
marked out to be the real leader of 
the Opposition- He has dignity and 
a personality; he speaks well 
enough always, and, when be is 
moved with eloquence; he has 
chara cter md the broad humani ty 
of his dam, something of Mr 
RnWhnrt t dialectical drill Mimh inf j 
wife greater fertility of idea and 
more industry. The House thought 
much of him, and from the Labour 
benches in particular he always 
had an attentive and sympathetic 
hearing.... 

These hopes feet were formed of 
Lord Robert have not been real- 
ized, and the reason fa that he 
cannot fight Something always 
gets in the way. ... He Buffers 
from fee fatal defect in rough-and- 
tumble potitka of aiwayB seeing the 
strength of tlw> ti r g n ment n gw mat 
him, and he can no more stand up 
to the Prime Minister in a contro- 
versy than he could box wife a 

dinosaur. . . . 

But if the Cecflians have still to 
team the work of opposition, they 
have shown feat they can strike 
fire and conceive a genuine enthu- 
siasm. Mr Balfour’s Zionism fa 
s o m et h in g, Lord Robert Cecfl’s 
advocacy of the Le^ue of Nations 
and Ufa pity for the plight of 
Eastern Europe have had power 
and sincerity and hfa humanity 
moves one. The younger men, too, 
have done wefl on Ireland, and 
shown that if they cannot as yet 
execute they can conceive a prob- 
lem in a big-hearted and generous 
way. These are promising signs, 

ami there are still the rnakmgB of a 

new party, not b% perhaps, but 

influent ial and dfatjngufahed . . . . 


Cover-up down under 

From Mr H. McG. Dunned 
Sir, After years of clean-shaven 
faces, occasionally embellished 

wife a moustache, this must be fee 

•first Test Match scries when fee 
captains of England and Australia 
both wear beards. 

Yours truly, 
a McG. DUNNETT, 

4 The Close, 

Hiot Vale, SE3. 


To„i a 




a . ^ 

‘‘o'nto, a, SjgfWra i rauc 



...aa* I af><n OM i. 




THE TIMES SATURDAY NOVEMBER 29 1986 



COURT 

AND 

SOCIAL 


David Goodacre 


Unemployment as a challenge 


COURT 

CIRCULAR 


BUCKINGHAM PALACE 
November 28: His Excellency 
Mr Olafur Egilsson was received 
in audience by The Queen and 
presented the Letters of Recall 
of bis predecessor and his own 
Letters of Credence as Ambas- 
sador Extraordinary and Pleni- 
potentiary from Iceland to the 
Court of Si James's. 

His Excellency was accompa- 
nied by the following members 
of the Embassy, two had the 
honour of being presented to 
Her Majesty: Mr Sveinn 
Bjomsson (Minister Counsellor) 
and Mr Stefan Gimnlaugsson 
(Commercial Counsellor), 

Mrs Egilsson had the honour 
of being received by The Queen. 

Sir Patrick Wright (Perma- 
nent Under Secretary of Stale 
for Foreign and Commonwealth 


Her Royal Highness was re- 1 
ceived by the Mayor of 
Hammersmith and Fulham ! 
(Councillor Mm Joan Caruana) i 
and the Vice-Chancellor of the | 
University (tire Lord Roarers), j 
Afterwards, The Piincess 

Anne, Mrs Mark Phillips visited j 

the Institute of Dental Surgery { 
(Dean, Professor G. Winter) at 
Eastman Dental Hospital, . 
Gray's Inn Road, WC1. where j 
Her Royal Highness was re- 
ceived In' the Principal of the 
University (Mr P. Hoi well). 

Mrs Timothy HokJerness 
Roddam was in attendance. 


Not longago a Consent steelman, address- 
ing iheTUC said: “When I finish I will go 
the same way as all other out-of-work steel 
workers I win do nothing till I die”. 

The steelman was, I hope, overstating 
his case, because although he was appro- 
priately expressing the outrage of so many, 
in Consett and throughout Britain who 


The Queen was represented 
v Lieutenant-General Sir John 


by Lieutenant-General Sir John 
Richards (Marshal of the Dip- 
lomatic Corps) at the Funeral of 
His Excellency Dr Ho Guan 
Lim (High Commissioner for 1 
Singapore) which was held in 
the Methodist Central Hah, , 

Westminster this morning. 


face the disaster of unempkryment, it 
would be sad if what he said was true; that 
there was nothing more till death. Disaster 
is not only disaster, it is also implicit 
challenge. 

On the lace of it, to become un- 
employed , even to experience the threat of 
it, is to face a seemingly hopeless future. A 
worker feels, even if it is no* the case, that 
he or she is being rejected. 

The familiar pattern of b er eavement 
follows, initial stock leading to anger, to 
grief; distress finally working itself out in 
the direction of a positive or negative 
resignation to a new reality; a reality which 
is the more devastating in that three 


midion are already unemployed, and the 
actual number of jobs, especially for the 
unskilled, is alarmingly small 


Most of those who find wot fc, find It 


KENSINGTON PALACE 


AflairsX who bad the honour of November 2& The Prince of 
being received by The Queen Wales, Chairman, The Prince of 


was present, and the Gentlemen 
of the Household in Waiting 
were in attendance. 

The Queen, Colonel-in-ChieC 
The Royal Welch Fusiliers, 
received Lieutenant-Colonel 
T.LJA. Porter upon relinquish- 
ing his appointment as Colonel 
ofthe 1st Battalion and Lieuten- 
ant-Colonel DJ. Ross upon 
assuming the appointment. 

The Colonel of the Regiment 
(Brigadier Anthony Vivian) was 
in attendance. 

His Excellency Mr Benjamin 
K. Kipfculei and Mrs Kipkulei 
were received in farewell audi- 
ence by Her Majesty and took 
leave upon His Excellency 
relinquishing his appointment 
as High Commissioner for Ke- 
nya in London. 


Wales’ Committee, this morn- 
ing presented Awards Certifi- 
cates at the 1986 Award 
Ceremony for The Prince of 
Wales’ Committee at Coiwyn 
Bay. 

His Royal Highness, attended 
by Ueutenam-Colond Brian 
Anderson, travelled in the 
Royal Train. 


Princess Anne, Chancellor of 
London University, will preside 
at the degree ceremony at the 
Albert Hall on December 3. 


mem. The problem is much worse for 
those wbo have been unemployed for 
longer a year. Their opinion of 
themselves often becomes so low that 
when they do apply for a job, their 
depressed bearing nufitaies against them. 

The Job Clubs which are springing np all 
over the -country are addressing them- 
selves precisely to (his problem. They 
recognise that if a person is lo be ofihred a 
job. it is more likely a job will be given to 
the spirited, to the person who is confident 
and foil of vision; qualities not often 
observed in the unemployed. 

The situation that is that society 


dbalfengesfoe unemployed, people who by 
the nature of the case are likely to be in re- 
duced circumstances, to discover within 
themselves re sources which w01 make 
them the most alive. 

They face a hard truth of the spiritual 
way , that when people are in their weakest 
circumstances, they must somehow cope 
with their sternest test. They are like 
people in a dry valley* who must somehow 
find water. How is it to be done? 

Some help can be d isco vered in one of 
tbe most valuable tiistillatioas of spiritual 
wisdom in tbe West, foe rule of St 
Benedict. Benedict drew together the 
nrfimnintt-d insights of foe desert father, 
and other experimenters in spiritual living, 
and formed them in to a coherent balanced 
whole. 

The rule emphasizes that the body, the 
mind, and the spirii each need discipline if 
the person is to develop an appropriate 
style of living. 

Benedict axpjed that foe integration of 
foe body required work with (he hands and 
good works; the integration of foe mind 
required stimulus, in Christian terms the 
studying of foe Bible leading to contem- 
plative prayer, in secular terms, educa- 
tional refreshment to maintain alertness; 
the integration of the spiritual required the 
practice of humility and obedience, by 
which can be understood the acceptance of 
foe events and demands of life with 

The Benedictine rote advises six tours 
for manual work, lour for spiritual 
reading, and four fife liturgical prayer. 

It is instructive to turn from these 
ancient writings to the ideas of Canon Bill 
HalTs Middlesbrough organization. Im- 
passe. Impasse identifies six essentials for 
human living. The first is to contribute to 
foe well-being of others. 


Every society requires its chores ro be 


inherently enriching in thedutiftil doingc ' 
such tasks, whether such activity earns 
money or not. A second essential is that 
« tch person should receive s my e n t to 
survive. This corresponds to foe sa hours 
of manual work. 

The third essential, tto need to contrib- 
ute something creative, inevitaUy est- 
erases the mind, whether that creativity is 
purely mental or involves making or 
constructing something. This could be the 
equivalent to the spiritual reading. 

Two farther es s entia l s are tbe opportu- 
nity to meet others and to be valued as a 
person. Both arc vital spiritual values that 
■ require tbe nourishment of companioo- 
sfaip, and for true person firing,, some 
. pfaw-ing of supreme value oa transcendent 
reality, at best, prayer. These c or resp ond 
to the liturgical prayer. 

Impasse’s last essential a “the 
oppportnnity to have some order in 
This is perhaps the fimdamental i nsight of 
foe Benedictine rule, which infuses its 
every part. The tmemployed person who 
neglects order, rises at midday and dnfrs 
aimlessly without focus or p att ern, is a 

tfangfr nf foiling - - 

Attention to these basks of living is 
essential to the unemployed, who may not 
realize how much they depended on their 
work to meet these needs. It follows that if 


OBITUARY 

SIR IVAN MAGILL 
Pioneering work in anaesthesia ■ 

Sr Ivan Magfll, KCVO, later, selective f 

saarMBS - ffW.W35- 


/ : T 
/ ' 
/£.y 

,i 

a ' t * 




Sr Ivan MagiQ, KCVO, 
FRCS, whose reputation as an 

■Bawtriwwwt ms universal, 

died on November 21 He was 
98. 

Ivan Whiteside Magill was 
bom at lame, County Antrim 
on July 23, 1888. He was 
educated at Larne Grammar 
School, where be won a gold 
medal for English, ana at 
Queen's University, Belfast 

He qualified' in roctfidnc 
from Queen’s in 1913. Such 
wasimdergradnateinstructHHi 
at that tram that after to 
qualified be did a term as 
house surgeon and resident at 
the Stanley Hospital, Liver- 
pool, which included some 
surgery. He was not at that 


foe first safe mtra-vtasods 
induction agent, and w 1953 
he introduced Thiophaaaan 
from the United States to 
reduce bleeding daring 


In 1931, when he was Amor 
secretary of foe section of 

.«i_ - n — * is ■ 


dy of Medicine, he 


erf which, he said later; his 
experience as a student made 
him “quite frightened”. 

When foe Hist World War 


work to meet these needs, it follows that if 
u nem pl o yed to in their 

mnempkiymcnt, they create something of 
very real value. 

They become tike people who in fact 
find water despite desert-tike conditions. . 
Those who win through become sy mbols 
of creating living, victors over spiritual 
difficulty, 

. The miter is Editor cf “ Health and 
Heating", and Vicar cf Ovtngham- 


Irish Guards at the Battle of 
Loos. After the war be was 
posted to Barnet War Hospi- 
tal a nd in 1919 went to Queen 
Mary’s Hospital Sidcup, a 
600-bed hospital far soldiers 
wounded in tbe face and jaws. 
He was pleased with this 
posting because he had seen 
the de stination Sidcup on the 
back of a bus, and his wife. 


was outside foe chartff of foe 
society, so in 1932 tbeAssoa- 
ation of Anaesthetists was 1 
fanned. £ 

Three years latff he ^sone 
ofthe first examiners far foe 
DAffven by foe Royal GoBtge 
of Surgeons of Engl a nd and 
foe Royal College of Physi- 
cians of London, fit 1951 the 
faculty of anaesthetists "was 
founded in foe Royal Cohere 
of Surgeons, and the specialist 
examination, FFARCS, insti- 
tuted. Thk las raised foe 
standard of .anaesthesia, and 
hence sur gery, throughout foe 
English-speaking world. He 
was elected an honorary fcfiow 
of the faculty and honorary 
FRCS. ., 

IBs immense tirflt 

and farce of personality matte 

brW | an i m tKacia H nrfig ftil^ i 


The Duchess of York is to be 
Patron of the Carr-Gomcn Soci- 
ety, a charitable bousing associ- 
ation in London. 


Forthcoming marriages 


En^h-Speaking 

Union 


Edith, whom he had married ^^ajden^ittmr- 
m 1916, was then wortang as a ***& 

ertwvii doctor with London sought Im ad vice. 


The Duke of Edinburgh vis- 
ited the Joint Air Recon- 
naissance Intelligence Centre at 
Huntingdon today. 

Major Rowan Jackson, RM 
was in attendance. 


A service of thanksgiving for the 
life of Vice-Admiral Sir Geof- 
frey Thistleton-Smith will be 
held at the Church of St Mary 
and St Gabriel Hailing, Hamp- 
shire. at noon today. 


The Duke of York, President 
of the Royal Aero Club, 
accompanied by Tbe Duchess of 
York, this evening presented the 
Dawn to Dusk Awards at the 
Royal Aeronautical Society 
(President Dr J.W. Fazard). 

Their Royal Highnesses were 
received by the Vice-President 
of the dub (Mr Ian Scotl-Hill) 
and the Vice-Chairman (Mr 
David Hamilton). 

Miss Helen Hughes and Wing 
Commander Adam Wise were 
in attendance. 


A memorial service for DrLH. 
Jeffery will be held in the Chapel 
of Lady Margaret Hall Oxford, 
at 2.15 today. 

A memorial meeting for Mrs 
Joan Bennett will be held at 
Girt on College. Cambridge, at 
2.30 today. 


Mr RJ. Wolfe Murray 
and Miss NLZ. Zorab 
The engagement is announced 
between Roxy, son of Mr James 
Wolfe Murray and tbe Hon Mrs 
Diana Wolfe Murray, of 12 
Cambridge Road, Wimbledon, 
and Marion, daughter of Mrs 
Jane Zorab and the late Dr 
Phillip Zorab, of Golden Hiti, 
Chepstow. 


Mr DC Forster 
and Mra R. FBMn 
The engagement is announced 
between David younger son of 
Mr and Mra MX. Forster, of 
Aughton, Lancashire, and Re- 
nee, only daughter of Mr and 
Mra E.R. Smithies, of Hunts 
Cross, LiveipooL 


Mr SX^E. Ludwig 
and Mbs C-V.N. Last 


and Mbs C-V.N. Last 
The en gage m e n t is announced 
between Stephan, eldest son of 
Dr. J.HLD. Ludwig and Mra D. 
Williams, and Caroline, eldest 
daughter of Mayor General and 
Mrs CN. Last. 


Mr L Airey 

and Miss J. Bazley 

The engagement is announced 

between Jan, son of Mr and Mrs 

Frank Airey, of Tighabruaich, 

Argyllshire, formerly of Reigate, 

Surrey, and Janet, daughter of 


Mr SJLA. Harrison 
and MSn G-AJVU. Dean 
The engagement is announced 
between Stephen John 
Armitage, elder son of Mr and 
Mrs J.A. Harrison, of 
Letch worth, Hertfordshire, and 
Georgina April Mary Jeanette, 


The Princess Anne, Mrs Mark 
Phillips, Colonel-in-Chief, 
Royal Corps of Signals, this 
morning attended part of the 
Corps Committee Meeting, and 
afterwards was entertained at 
luncheon, at Regimental Head- 
quarters. Regency Street, SW1. 

Her Royal Highness was re- 
ceived by the Master of Signals 
(Major-General J.M.W. 
Badcock). 

The Countess of Lichfield was 
in attendance. 

The Princess Anne, Mrs Marie 
Phillips, Chancellor of the 
University of London, this 
afternoon visited the Charing 
Cross and Westminster Medical 
School (Dean, Professor T. 
Gtenister) at the Reynolds 
Building, St Dunstan's Road, 
W6. 


Birthdays 

TODAY: Professor Sir Ivor 
Batchelor. 70; Mr George 
Cansdale, 77; Sir Eric Drake. 76; | 
Professor Sir Michael Howard.' i 
64; Sir Edward Hulton, 80; Mr 
Derek Jameson, 57; Professor 
Frank Kermode. 67; Mr Cedi 
Madden. 84; Mr Geoffrey 
Moorhouse, 55; Mr Toby 
Robertson. 58; Sir James Scott- 
Hopkins, MEP, 65; Sir David 
Steel 70; Sir Peter Tennant. 76; 
Mr Alan Lee Williams, 56. 


sar^' 1 ' 

Mr ILA- Braoman- White 

and Miss S. Thomas Mr Haworth 

The engagement is announced £"Lmunced 

between Jeremy, son of Mr and 
Mrs John Haworth, of Deal 


between Richard Alexander, 
younger son of the late Mr and 
Mrs R- Bnoo man- White, and 
Susan, elder daughter of Mr and 
Mrs AT. Thomas, of St B navels 
Common. Gloucestershire. 


Kent, and Caroline, dai 
Mr and Mrs Geoffrey 
Bath, Avon. 


TOMORROW: Mr Ivor 
Bulmer-Thomas. 81: Sir John 
Burder, 86; Sir Walter Courts, 
74; Mr George Duffield, 40; Mr 
D. W. Fry, 76; Sir Victor 
Good hew, 67; Mr Charles 
Hawtrey, 72; Mr Geoffrey , 
Household, 86; Mr Louis Kirby, I 
58; Mr Gary Lineker, 26; Mr ! 
Radu Lupu, 41; Mr W. G. D. 
Morgan, 51; Lord Parry, 61; 
Miss Marguerite Porter, 38 ; Sir 
Stanley Rees, 79; Mr Max 
Reinhardt. 71; Colonel Sir 
Watkin Williams-Wynn, 82. 


Mr T.S. Dabsou 
and Miss LX. Vowtes 

The engagement is announced The engagement is announced 
between , Timothy Stephen, only between Robert, son ofthe Rev 
sonofMrand Mrs US. Dabson, j 0 b n and Mra Jennings, of 
of Heathfield, Sussex, and Les- ingexsoll Ontario, Canada/ and 
Cendwen, only daughter of Sarah, younger daughter of Mr 
Mr D. Vowtes, ofWare, and Mrs and Mrs Ray Whitfield, of 


Mr HA. Jennings 
and Mbs S.F. Whitfield 


Mr NJ. Murray 
and Mbs SJ. Barnsley 
The engagement is announced 
between Nicholas, son of die 
late Mr Nicholas Murray, of 
Farjeon House, Swiss Cottage, 
London, and Mrs M. Gould, of 
Uplyme, Dorset, and Sfaeena, 
second daughter of Mr and Mis 
J. Barnsley, of Northfidds 
Farm, Milford Green, 
Chobham, Surrey. 

Mr W. Richards 
and Miss Lde Brettno-Gordoa 
The engagement is announced 
between William, son ofMrand 
Mra WJ. Richards, Newton 
Rum, StunninstCT Marshal , 
Dorset, and Lyndefie, daughter 
of Cokmd and Mrs AJs. de 
Bretton-Gordon, Seymour Cot- 
tage. Stunninster Newton, 
Dorset. 


Sir PWer Marshall Common- 
wealth Deputy Secretary-Gen- 
eral Mr Meriyn Rees, MP, Dr 
Paul Rogers, School of Peace 
Studies, Bradford University, 
and Mr Alan Lee Williams, 
Director General of the English- 
Speaking Union, were the 
speakers in a sixth form con- 
ference, “We Can’t Take Peace 
for Granted”, organised by the 
Englisb-SpeakixiK Union at King 
Edward’s School Birmingham, 
yesterday. Mr Bob Clough- 
Parker, regional or ganise r, was 
in the chain 


Latest wills 


Mr Sidney John Teflhg of 
Staines, London, left estate val- 
ued al£l,91 5312 net. He left his 
estate to relatives. 
Lieutenant-Colonel Charles 
Frederic Vflliers Bigot; of 
Brockdish, Norfolk, a Queen’s 
Messenger for 17 years, left 


school doctor with London 
County CoundL 

What he had learnt at 
Barnet was soon tested at 
Sidcup by the magnitude of 
foe problems presented by foe 
developing art of plastic sur- 
gery being pioneered there by 
Sir Hardd Gillies. It was now 
that MagiH began tovn&as 
an anaesthetist, and he bad a 
strikingly original approach. 

He first evolved a two- 
catheter technique to avoid 
bubbling of blood in foe 
mouth, and to get the waste 
anaesthetic out without 
anaesthetizing the surgeon. 
Later, with foe late Stanley 
Rowbothaxn, be developed 
foe technique of “blind 
intubation”, with tbe patient's 
head positioned to scent the 
morning air, winch revohi- 

rif Miwwrl fliutesfowog 


esfttevalued £3793<SS <fcvdoped a smafl 


J. Williams, 
Hertfordshire. 


Sandridge, Kensington. 


MH.de Liskferme 
and Miss N. Risky 
The engagement is announced 


Mr MJ. Jones 

and Miss DJ. Pittam 

The engagement is announced 


Mr TjG. Wilder 
and Miss AJVL Crasbie 
Tbe engagement is announced 
between Timothy Gibson, 
younger son of Mr and Mrs 
J.H.W. Wilder, of St Lucntns, , 
Wallingford, Oxfordshire, and I 
Anne, dder dau^rter of Mr and 
Mrs G.A. Crosbie, of 
Templeogue, Dublin, Republic j 
of Ireland. I 


Appointments 

Latest appointments include: 

Mr John Wheeler, MP, to be 

Chairman of foe Parliamentary 
All-Party Pfcnal Affairs Group, 
Mr Brian Waters to be a 
member of the Ho raeracin g ; 
Betting Levy Appeal Tribunal j 


since in those days much of 

ma ftd l w m wpa iti penmi, swt 

be introduced bobbin flow 
meters in 1928. 


between Hervei eldest son of between Matthew, youraest son 
Baron and Baronne de ofMr B. /ones and Mrs S. Jones, 


Baron and Baronne de 
Lisleferme, of Vaucresson, 
Paris, and Nicola, only daughter 


ofMr B. Jones and Mrs S. Jones, 
of Essington, Staffordshire, and 
Deborah Jane, only daughter of 


of Mr and Mrs E.H. Risky, of Colonel and Mra CC Pittam, of 


Karen, Nairobi. 


Hythe, Kent. 


TO BE SOLD TO THE GENERAL PUBLIC 


Mr A.WX. Wolstenhobne 
and Mbs CLAM. Barnes 
YaHowley 

Tbe marriage has been arranged 
be tw ee n Andrew (Algy), youn- 
ger son of Mr and Mra Michael 
Wobtentolme, of Fitzgeqrge 
Avenue, London, and Caroline, 
elder daughter of Mr and Mrs 
Hugh Barnes, of Gibraltar 
Farm, Firle, Sussex. 


University news ! 

Oxford 

Elections | 

Sir James Ralph Darling, for- : 
merty Headmaster of Geelong ; 
Grammar School Australia, has 
been elected to an honorary I 
fellowship of Oriel College. 


He developed foe “Magfll 
attachment” whereby foe ten- 
sion of anaesthetie gases in a 
reservoir bag was b ah uifi Bt i by 
foe tension of a tight spring on 
tto expiratory ba$. Thus insuf- 
flation anaesthesia was aban- 
doned in favour ofto-und-fio 
breathing. 


TOMORRO 


A: 


m 


Mr V. Wright 
and Mbs A.Y. Toulmin 
Tbe engagement is announced 
between Vaughan, youngest sou 
of Mis Evelyn Wnght and the 
late Mr Frederick Wright, of 
Chelsea, London, and Angela, 
only daughter of Mr and Mrs 
Leslie Toulmin, of Norton, 
Cleveland County. 



He was appointed consul- 
tant anaesthetist to Westmin- 
ster Hospital in 1924. Between 
1923 and 1936 be developed 
endobronchial blockers and. 


He gave much service to the 
British Royal Family, as wefi 
as to overseas royalty and 
presidential patients. When be 
wasa wanted tbeKCVObythe 
present Queenin I960, be was 
<m ly^^ th trd anacattetist to 

Be was adviser to foe 
Ministry of Health, and 
helped to found the anesthet- 
ic section ofthe NHS. 

In 1938 foe Royal Society of 
Medicine presented him wifa 
theHnn y Hffl Hkfamii itiHfr 
al tbe hipest award tint bis 
brother anaesthetists conld 
c onfer on him- He received 
tbe Arnott C omm e m oration 
Medal from foe Irish medical 
graduates. In I94S his - old 
university, Queen’s, which 
bad turned down his MD 
thesis on endotracheal anaes- 
thesia (os foe grounds tint it 
was mmfcdy to be of mndt 
value), made amends by pv- 
ing Mm an honorary doctor* 
ate. 

- In foe mid 1920s he fislnd 
theTest for trout and was, far 
over 50 jobs, a member ofthe 
Houghton Qub. He caught his 
last trout on Ms 96th birthday: 
Hewasagopdstwyjrilgv and 
his Rabelaisian asides were 
anforgettaUe. 

Hegavetitisadvkastoanew 
houseman. “Watch your pa- 
tients waiting np. They show 
in reverse the same signs as 


they do going to sleep, and 
they do it more slowly. You’ll 


they do it more slowly. 1 
learn a lot” 

His wife died in 1973. 


MR GABRIEL FIELDING 

vabrieTHdding, novel- bought just 1 00 copies when it 


Royal College of 
Organists 

The inaugural compet i tion tor 
the Royal College of Organists 
performer of tbe year award has 
been won by Jane Watts. 


Mr GabridHdding, novel- 
ist and poet, died on Novem- 
ber 27. He was 70. . 

Alan Gabriel Barnsley 
Fielding was bom on March 
25, 1916, the son of a sporting 
parson at Hexham, and one or 
a family of seven. His mother, 
whose name he took, was a 



rrsTT 


IGE 


BA/vmtinn the Fusiliers Association, 

ttCCepUUU London, held last night at 

Association for Boaincss Fusilier House, Balbam. The 
Sponsorship of die Arts principal guests were Colonel 

Prince Michael of Kent pro- WJ. Scoggins and Major and 
seated tbe ninth annual ABSA Alderman PJL Newafl. 

Awards and Industry Year . 

Award to business ^jonsora of EpSSjSfS 
the arts at a reception at tbe ®552E 
Sav ^Ha d bddon NovHabn - 

and other guests at a St 


HOTEL 


arion for Busmess Sponsorship 

nf th» Arts *nH Mr atuIvmv A“drews_ Night dinne r m the 


UtECTmOW 

^ Britain’s Largest Furrier 



1/ MANY ITEMS 

LESS THAN 

HALF I 

NORMAL RETAIL PRICE m 


of the Arts, and Mr Andrew 
Knight, Chief Executive of The 
Daily Telegraph. Prince Mi- 
chael Lord Goodman and Lord 
Birkert, chairman of the judges, 
the gne st s. Mr Colin 
Tweedy, Directin' of tbe Associ- 
ation for Business Sponsorship 
ofthe Aits, attended. 


King’s Dining Room. Lieuten- 
ant-Colonel IJLA. Lowis, 
KOSB, presided. 


Army Cadet Force Association 


The Army Cadet Force Associ- 
ation held its winniil dinner at 
Redford Cavalry Barracks, 
Edinburgh, yesterday. General 
Sir Antony Read, presided and 
Lieutenant-General Sir Norman 
Arthur, General Officer 
Commanding Scotland, was tbe 
principal gn*y Among ot hers 


Luncheon 


DIRECT FROM I 
BRTTAINS 

LARGEST 

FURRIER 

SOPCM O R CHOICE 6» C8MUTY 

S^SS^S^SSSSSSi 

1m in**>™*sja>*nra>wmn*tn> 


Conservative Foreign and . 
Common wealth C omm fl 
The Brazilian Ambassado r was 
the guest of honour at a lun- 
cheon given yesterday by tbe 
Latin American Group of tbe 
Conservative Foreign and 
Commonwealth Council at tbe 
House of Commons, sponsored 
by Mr Richard Ryder, MP, 
chairman of the counoL Mr H. 
Ecdes- Williams, ^a rnwnn of 
the group, prcsided. 



Diimers 


Service luncheon 


Oxfordshire and Buckingham- 
shire I Smht Infantry 

Major GJf. Astfey-ComKf pre- 


CENUINE REDUCTIONS & 
NO NOWSEMSE PRICES 

Wjh urtw Hiw iI ^tiBilMMl i i n on 


Lord Ednnmd-Daries 
Lord Edmund-Davies enter- 
tained foe London Glamorgan 
Society at dinner in foe Houseof 
Lords yesterday. Among those 
prese n t were: 


FOX 

JACKETS 

tuSmSwi 

£99 


acted at a luncheon w tracers of 
tbe 6th Battalion Oxfordshire 
and H iiAiqgl u iwihi re Tight la-. 



FEMALE 

MINK _ 1 M^mweSpSiiSsSrBSS. 


at tbe Basfl 


Street Hoi 


Service dinners 


£291 £1495 


lit-.-. 


Not Under Command Chdr 
Commander 1CN. Symons, 
Omirtwgn of the Not Under 
Command dub, presided ax a 
supper held last night in HMS 
Royal Arthur. Vice-Admiral J J. 
Blade was foe principal speaker. 


To Sir WBHam Stabb, QC 
A dinner was given last night in 
foe Inner Temple by past and 
present members or 1 King’s 
Bench Walk far Sr' Wffliaxn 
Stabb,QC, and m recogoitkin of 
his SO years at the Bar and on 
foe Bench. Mr W. Percy Grfeve, 
QC, jaedded and Sir Graham 
Swanwick also spoke. 



ci a ft 4 ^ 1 1 im 


B ACCESS. VISA & AMERICAN EXPRESS CARDS WELCOME 

s elfhipgesuite A first floor 

O. THE 

m c Ly C ' HOTEL 

ORCHARD STREETLONDON 

^ffiSUNDBY ONLY 10 AM- 5 PM j 


Nol MHQRAuxAF 

Air Marshal Sir Barry Duxbury; 

Air Officer Commanaing No 18 

Group, and Lady Duxbanr were 
the guests of honour at a ladies' 
guest night held last night at 
RAF Bentley Priory by officers 
of Nol Maritime Headquarters 
Unit, RAuxAF. Flight Lieuten- 
ant J. G A_ Wells presided and 
.Wing Commander D. A. 
Bridget™ n. Officer Command- 
ing. and Mra Bridgman also 

spoke: 


Ca r awnu rt Chib 

The CornxHant Chib Reunion 

Dinner was hedd in tbe Fainted 

Hall of tbe Royal Naval CaU»e, 
Greenwich, fast right. The 

Chairma n. C a ptain TP LtC 

RN, presided and tbe toast to 
absent Cormorants was pro- 
posed by Air Marsha] Sir Finer 
Harding. 


His upbringing dies a little 
to explain foe nightmarish 
intensity of his writing. His 
mother was both a scourge 
and stimulus in his childhood, 
assuming an air of scriptural 
rightness. Hdcfing’s subse- 
quent revolt against the vicar- 
age was total 

Though from bis earliest 
years he wanted to write - bis 
first published piece appeared 
in the Eastbourne Gazette 
when he was only 14- his fast 
career was in medicine. He 
received his early education at 
St Edward’s School, Oxford. 
At his parents’ instigation to 
then studied medicine, first, at 
Trinity College, Dublin, and 
then at St George’s Hospital 
London. 

In medicine he learat to get 
into people’s minds quickly. 
After war service m the 
RAMC, when to served with 
foe rank of captrin, to started 
in private practice at Maid- 
stone in 1948 and also began 
work as parttime medical 
officer to Maidstone Prison. 
As a physician and in private 
life, Fielding was always 
known as Dr Alan Bandsley. 

Despite a bosy schedule, he 
still found the time and the 
energy to write. Reassured by 
his wife’s firm belief in him J 
he produced a first volume of 
poems in 1952, The Frog 
Prince and Other Poems, and 
another time years later, 28 
Poems. 

This medium failed to satis- 
fy him completely, and it was 
not until his first novel was 
published, the autobiographi- 
cal Brotherly Love ( 1954), that 
he scored Jus first real success. 
In this, the c haracter John 
Blaydon, is driven' into the 
priesthood in defiance of a 
matriarchal mother. 

His second novel. In the 
Time cf Greenbtoom (1956), 
was a sequel to the first, 


The bookisatcurdrjhnsr 
in which Fielding writes ofthe 
traumas of a Jewish Catholic 
family living under the Third 
Reich, showing a perception 
remarkable in a non-German. 

It is a novel of frightening 
intensity in which Holding 
spares the reader no detail 

In 19S8 be published 
Days, foe tale of a Cafhdfe 
converts final fling in North 
Africa to “find an occasion o£ 
sin” before settling down to . 
the disciplines of tbe Church* 1 : 
Gentlemen in their Seasonjic 
which several gentlemen 8ie S 
discovered scratching the 
of adultery in middle agrf 
Wore settling down to hum* 
drum lives as old boys. THr 
appeared in 1966. * 

The following year, Fiddiag, . 
was Invited to become author 
in residence at Washington 
State University. He and bis 
family ori ginally l'ntPwfeH pf . - 
stuyjust the year; but in fact W 
remained in the United Stales 
for the rest of his life. So- 
successful was his period as 
author in residence that he 
was offered a p ro fes s or ship of- 
Eng lish literature at the uui- 
verrity, a post to held untfli 
1981. 

In 1968 to suffered a no- 
vpns breakdown, and ibid: 
turned to painting. It was do* 
until 1979 font he completed j 
another novel Pretty £n8r \ 
Houses. Fariinr this year he; 
published his last. The Wdor 
en of Guinea Lane. In thfa, Df 
Blaydon emerges, like his. 
creator, as a pessimist about' 
curing the hnman body. 


*.• r;-i 


fc^-. 

Sf:-V 

8^- 
I SSF’:-*. ■ -i 



■ ^v; 




fidding was fascinated Iff 

eople. He cobM create fiction 


it-:' 


people. He could create fiction.' 
around himselfj making tiuwe 
in his company the unwitting 
. characters of his fentawytes -an, 
toJc^tfortahle experience for.- 
t he ticti mt He cherished tito. 
“entity of his home affil 
family who him 

against the power of b& 
i ma g inati on. As he did his- 
Mnds during his Maidstone 4 
Pnstm days, to was seen toV 
exercise a hypnotic effect ; 


SSL* * ' 


sJRv>-: 

; ft. - • 


Time cf Greenbtoom <1956), He had a fondness for" 
was a sequel to foe first. Outdoor life, going on piano 
continuing the experiences of rntdindnlguaga taste for cnld.- 
BlaydOTL Yet the novel which ri ver swimming. During h» ; 


astv ■ 
t •• 

m . 


St Godric’s College 

St Godikf s GoOege old students’ 
reunion will .be held on Sw- 


broufothim most aedaim was 
The Birthday King. lt is the 
product of ms long obsession, 
with the brutality of the 
Nordic mind, itegmed in part 


years m America he often ftit ; 
® exue, never losina hiS" •' 
a&ction for EngJaj^^ ' jg 


m- 


Ife and his wi^ Edwinft^ 
whom to married in 1943* - 


Royml gqtewt of Fwflfart 
Major-Ge&end U$, Appleby 


today, December 6, : at22Lynd- 
hmst Road, London, NWS, at 
5-30 pm. Form er stadcate arc 


fay foe author’s observatuons 

of Erhmann athis tnaL He CbitoKosnuafeith 

matte frequent trqn to Genna- fStS: J 


presided at the annual, dinner of . invited tonnend. 


made frequent trips to Germa- 
ny. The book wont foe.W. H. 
Smith prize tor fiteratnre in 
1 1964. atffioddi that crmrr»TTv 


^oonoan, a faith whtd k 
found a comfort fag 



:• ; ‘ 
. ft* 

. 

" „ • » 
A v 


N 


•.-W& 


Noucm- 

J«\27U« al home. Leo. F.RS. 
.■jaWtM W-tteW WCT f ^g™*- W 1 -^ John, 

. fnto Mortimer) wj B ob. _i mb. M wr. F uwnl prtvau. No lecUn or 

OeororHany. fltorttow ittrThdmirt nmm Mease. Donations. 

and Zoe. to Stansfleld Church Restoration 

mi i . Qa November 27111. In CJawtcv Fuid. 

■ HcopKaL to fi®*. Patrtdtt Cote HOPE - On Friday 28 Ih November 

Clartd*3-aBtoW | 0»“V- * **■*" gracefully at none after a long u. 


NEXT SUMMER 
IN 

AMERICA 


■ 

•■■■v 

■- 

- 


;-jS 


• Uiew Alexander. 

wian . On November. 23rd. to 
‘ Lindsay wee Sterne) and Stephen, a 

Lucy and Owidto. 

BA VET - On NeewWberaWh. Bl Bfto lot , 
to Knew (aidCaiianO and Jeremy, a 
. daughter. Alexandra Mmr Diana, a 1 
■- sister For Jessica. Tom and Joanna. 

FtSK-SMMMI . On November 20th 
1986. io- E laine and John, a daugh- 
ter. Carty Anne. 

CATUdO- On November 23rd. In 
cnicheaier. to Emma {trie Sean and 
jcoaUMt. a son. Edward Richard 
WBttm. a brother for Zoe and HkCALL - On November 26th 1986. 
f ' Rebecca. suddenly at Newmarket. Peter John. 

-caEDRttlUI»-Oo November 20W. at of Cafverstowm House Stud. County 
A. MX Portland HossttaL to Vy (nfe Kildare. Ireland, aged 73 years. Be- 
Stgman) and Mttoo. a daughter. loved husband of Kitty and adored 

- Arlane Nicole. > . t*o*r of Ktm and dearly loved step- 

GftAMT . On November 23rd. at “““nt of PMUpoe. loved brother of < 

MiBgrove Park. Taunton, to LaetUa pavkL Belly and Angus. Funeral 

cnee rox) end David, a daughter, Har- Sendee ai Cambridge CUy Creamo- 

rtet FeBcHy.- rtami ion Tuesday December 2nd. at 

KEE3JMC - On November X4tb. at SL 11 -3° a m. FUmOy flowers only. 
Thomas* HosottaL to Sarah ente W tHCl WA - On Novonoer 28th. snd- 
FooksiaDdStnioo, a son. Harry John denly M Peasntarsh Place. Rye. 

Titus. 5^®*** Evel >' n <nw> Nesbltu. aged 

KMLM . On November 171b. to S»- to* *“*Grog , t>Ptaln 

rah Naomi Jane tote RadcUffo and JF * AJ.C.. RA F. Fts- 

, hnatL a daughter. Hannah. 1 ,J* e,toe *?®L_.i rd 

fOngswv. New Malden. Surrey., J*"!"*** ** 2 ' 30 pm ** Wayden 
LEWIS - November ZOttL to Jane »*«»«*. Rye. 

- uiee WhUe-Gaze)and Stephen, a son. HUNHEY - On November 27. peacefUI- 


?***- to**- much loved wife of Sir weeks Io 
*"?*** «.. * CYafghaO and crafts In 

and aartex. Service camp. Be 
SL .Qwrch. Somerford. turafltaf) 

Keyne^on Wednesday 3rd Decern. 

JS" *«■ Fto«nv ftowem onto. 

■»ri . on November asm. peace- 
to“V tototaot al his motiewsiwm JmerS 
ly» Whiteside Maglll K.C.V.O.. 
g£C. FJICLS. F.FJULCA. DX ° ale - U 
Ptoneer In anaesthesia. Private ov , 

- nation. Bristol. Donations In 1 

memury of his work to; Association — — — 

of Anaesthetists of Crest Brtttan and “Wahied K 
■retend. Enourtes 01 935 7964. cue omw. 


CAMP AMERICA off ms teach- 
ers. nurses and students over IB 
yews of age llte opportunity lo 
be a camp counsellor for 9 
weeks to loach sports, arts and 
crafbt In an American summer 
camp. Benefits Include FREE re- 
turn flight. FREE board, pocket 
money and up lo 6 weeks free 
Ume. Please send postcard with 
name and address Ik CAMP 
AMERICA. Dept. TT. 37 Queans 
Gate. London SWT or call 


01-581 2378. 




VERSACE. YSL. BASH.E 
FERRE. KRI23A & OTHERS 
AT 75% DISCOUNT 

rumen mow m TV nnmnM mm. 
pus Hpmr wan ttarv News'. 

THE DESIGNER 
COLLECTION 

Moray House. SOI Rnmi Stmt, 
wi. (Entrance (Mm to 
TEL: 01-190 T808 
Sal/ Sun 30 A 30 


SERVICE DINNER ROYAL 
TANK REGIMENT 


OiMMPr lo commemorate me anniver- 
sary of me Battle of Cambral (20 
Swt^ - ™- w. November 1917) was held m me RAC 

“°*- 1 -■ i — irfr- r i m omeers Mete. Bovtogton camp on 

OreveA wife Mary Am uii« MmOMa Fnday 28 Novtmbar 1986. Malar 
Jam doing a tuatory or tew Drew (May. General A K F Walker. Repreaema- 

^ ste^St^K?S SSZZ 

wilim (M tab. rn h M Jerramaod MMor General LAW 

*S2««p. Mr* _ Steter Drew. New. Colonel's COBBoandaoL woe 

.•■to*- 18 SMWsm Rtuta. xtso tram. 


(TROLLY dcc am - On November 
26th. to Marilyn tnae Burke) and 
John, a daughter. Francesca. 
SfEBUKft - On November 27th. In 
Kate (ate Dtoktnsoo) and WOUam. a 

- daughter. Lay Charlotte Wethered. 
TATUM - On November 2SUi. in 

- CreenAekL MSSsaChuseOa to 
EttzabNh Cnfe Woodgaie) and Simon, 
a son. Jonathan Peter. 

WIBTAKEIf • On November 27th 
1986. at Westminster Kospllai. to Sa- 
rah (Me Seal) and Anthony, a 
daughter. Daily. 

J DE ATHS . 1 

BEMNET - On Wednesday 26th No- 
vember 1986. at The Rutherford 
Mortem Nuntng Home. North Bar- 
wick. CoaOMUX dare, widow <rf me 
late The Honoorabte George wimaai 
BermeL Service to Polwarih Kite 
‘ Greenlaw at 12 noon on Wednesday 
. December 3rd 1986. CremaUon 
thereafter si Waniatan Cremator!- 
inn. EdhAurgh. 

BIH Ca B AM- On November 27th. peace- 
fuily at home with his fernyy. Denis, 
aged 87. Recndetn Man at St 
Augustine's. Stamford. LlnmtnsMre 

- at 1 1.30 am. Mondtay December 1st. 
BLACK - On Novem b e r 27, James AL 
. examter (AJastah) in Us 94th year. 

Cremation private. foBowed by Me- 

- mortal Service at Tunstall Churdi a( 

1 1 ,30m on' Tuesday December 2. to 
which ail fimda are wUcome. No 
flowers please, ■ 

BLAKE - On November 23rd. Charles, 
hurixud of the late Florence and for- 
merly of the Metropolitan Ponce. 
Funeral ssvlce at Worthing 
Crematorium. Radon on Monday 
December 8th at 2 pm. Flowers awl 
aB enquiries please, to F AHdteadA 
Son. Terminus Road. UtUehsiBPIon 
Tel. 0 903 713939. 

BYBOC - On November 21st 1986. 
peacelUBy.la St Albans CUy Hospital 
after long III naotth. Chmttoe Cassia, i 
Ph-C . F.P-S. aged 84. Missionary 
Pharmacist ai Harpur Memorial Has- 
pHal. Old Cairo. Egypt 1924-1986. 
Service at SL BenedteTs Church. 
Hemal Hem pstead 2 pm on Decem- 
ber 3rd 1966. simple Bowen to 
Funeral Directors. J. Woriey. 1 
Chrtstctutrcfa Road. Kernel Hsmp- 
stead. Herts. 

BALE -On November 2Stti. peacefaOy I 
at SL Bacihoiemeurs HosUtaL Lon- 
don. Geoffrey Carrington Dale. 
MAE., beloved brother of Mary and- 
Ceora*- Funeral Service at 1^46 pm ■ 
on Thursday De cem ber 4th at 
Stroud Oreen Baptist Church, corner 
Stapleton Had Road/VtctorU Road. 
London N4, followed Ur private cre- 
mation. Flowers to CAS. Funeral 
Services. 187 HoDowaV Rond. Lon- 
don NT 

BEANE - On November 2*. peacefully 
al Bkitey Home Nursing Home. 
Brantley. Surrey. Evaleen Mary 
aged 88. wife of the late Mator T B N 
Deane and sister of the law Helen 
Hammond-Smlth and Molly Boyd. 
Cremation has taken place. 

.^YMOND - On November 27th. John. 

• tarmeriy of Buhmead Ptewy- FUro- 
By funenfl only. No flowers. 
Eooutrim Bedford 00234) 720348. 
ELLIOTT - On 27lb November 1966. 

In The Jersey General HospRaL Eve- 
lyn Anne (Me Lp Cornu). BNoved 
wife of Charles Rusbton Emott The 
Funeral Service wIB be heu at SL 
Peter's Parish Church. Jersey. CX. 
on Tuesday December 2nd at 11-46 
am. Family Rowers only please. 
Pilcher & Lr Quesne Ltd. Funeral Di- 
rectors. Tel. CS34 77936. 


ty at Several!* Hospital. Colchester. 
Raymond, beloved husband or Au- 
drey. dear father of Tessa and 
Nicholas and much loved grandte- 
Bwt of Hugo and Thomas. Funeral all 
St Mary's Church. BoxfottL Novem- 
ber 30 al 2 cm. Flowers lo Jacobs. 
Bottom. Suffolk. 

REV - On November 26 1986 in Ma- 
nual to Locarno. Watts', aged 76. 
beloved husband of Bunny. Crema- 
tion November 28. 3 pm to 
Bettbsana. No flowers. Donations to 
Cancer Research. 

BirNMOHB - On 2dtb November, sud- 
denly. Zoe. aged 98 years. Funeral 
cowers Green Crematorium. Decem- 
ber in at 3.46pm. Flowers to Lever- 
tons. 62« Finchley Rd. London 
NWii or donations to The 
Abbeyflad Society. 

BUFF - On 28th November 1986. 
peacefully In Shrewsbury Hospital. 
Enid Mary inee Starkey), nearly 
loved wife, mother and grandmoth- 
er. Service at S h rew sb ury 
Cranatortom 12.00 Tuesday- 2nd 
December 


MM sensn - Men* CTMUKt Fomas 
A 8cm at Anton*. Wrutskcr a ■ 
■Maer of urgency Oi-S&S I7W or 
01-843 MBS 

MmOMJC. I have hum you.' 1 love you I 
forever. Dove. 


Cancer 

Together we can but ft. , 

We fund over one jMM of d 
research uno the p mmiuu and. 
can of ameer in the UK. 

Bdp ut by seodint • donstiou 

ar (Bake a kgsey to: 

Cancer 

Research 1|1 — 

Campaign 

2. fkriuus Unya# TedaoL I 

PEPT T729/II- todoa^YML 


ANCESTRY 

Contact 

the team with lire best 
experience World- wide 

ACHIEVEMENTS 
DEPT T. 
NORTHGATE 
CANTERBURY 
CTl 1BA 
TEL: 0227 462618 
HERALDRY 

niDOSHV. Love or Mantm. AD aocs. 
areas. DWMttw. DOXIQI61 3J Abinodon 
Re lad. London wa TOL or ?3B ion. 

WHCU M LOStoOS t D*M a vmM/Tv Dy 
day. week, month. Too* Tv. oi 730 
4869. 

select samara. ekmbv> imrodur. 
non* for me rar a ttathea. sa M aun 
London wi. Teteonona D1 jvj 

9957. 

WOtSCY Hilt Home study tar ay 
Drams (London BA. BSC. LLB. War- 
wick MBA). P ra f endo ns . Praooctus: 
Oral ALA. Wattmr Han. Oxford 0X2 
4PR. Tel: 0066 03200 (24 Mil. 

S FDR SALE I 


■OTMearv CME«m are ampdnB en- FOR SALE 1 

toes for their sates to January 6 ^ _JS 

February ( ncru d tuu funtoure. oaeio. 

trwoM. plclttots. auvwe. tew ai iery. u. M ,„n ■ . . .... ... . , 

ramie* * wort.* of an. If ynn are ■*"*? 1 * 1 ^* Aic * z a |> * - - Suag r l«xw*- 
Uunura Of semno or would DJutadvIce gLjJjSS, ■* part " > *° u 
pjmrmltt Srurfev rudlep so Water. ™*f™w ranuiy in i,iaii|ili.v. Private 
a« MU> tarae savm» rued once 

S^TSlKSL^ » »■«». Mm eve miw/rMl 639 


1 FOR SALE 

YOU'LL BE FLOORED BY 
OUR PRICES AT 
RESIST* CARPETS 

Wtcanders&eaunful nareral corn toe* 
Ektmneiy haro wearmp hr hesl mon- 
ey ran buy CB 9S per sa W + vat 
Mrrahaion irtvd Ode carpel i< piatn 
cotnurv emuv m umsrtBv 12 ww 
from stock 7 year wear otaraoter lor 
MmrsrdIKr £A TB per aq yd + vat. 
FMn toe taraesi srtcruon oi plain car- 
peung m Lo n don. 

l«a WanosworUi Brume Rd 
nanons creep sw« 

TeL-0 1-73 1-3368/9 

Free Esmnaies^zMTt nntng 


BSCHSrm 6 n CranO. MracOn fnstrrr- 
rwm us oandwinc piece of hinttsc 
£3-000 Tri 0202 092790 (Doned- 


•EDWREZ standard wire hatred 
Patxnaad pupwes. KC rep pt err a. Tel: 
102961 666189 


R tOE HCT Long case clack. Mahogany 
and Inbtd case Cxcettem condmon. pri- 
vate sate. C2 -MX} ftepty to BOX BSU. 


ITUNHAr. 6 Son orand Black Nano Re- 
luctant sale. £3.900. Tel: 014174 3460. 


LEGAL NOTICES 


LAMDLMtOS /OWNERS U you have a 
auauty iHwaly lo ici leU ua about it 
we enrr a nrefnstanal * rafiahte- 
srrvlre. Oman Constantine oi 244 
73S3 


WI . 2 nuns Oxford SI. Dwahtful laror 2 
mm tmiaany no*, taxpr kH. oveclaoklno 
mram atuarr. CH. fully forn. £17» pv». 
Trk (H 935, SM3. 


KEW OJUBBEmialet. 6tKd Itanv hauae 
with guitar Family £200 Per week, or 
ttiutag £40 ao/pw Tel: OI 749 1962 


MHMBUCDOM. WorHc Road. SeU<on- 
talned newly docerated. luUv KimaiM, 
two bed flat. C42S pern, inclusive. Tel: 
0272 500911 lev minus t 


SOUTH KENSMUTOML 2 bM lux (idly 
I urn Hired flat. £2BSpw. H.F. Landon £ 
Pam 01 950 0833. OldtoO 7860 eve* 



BIRTHDAYS 


CLKABCTH OtnTXSmXN t> 21 today. 
Over tor nut now. Love and sunshine. 
Alee. - 

NAPPY 21 at txxtMsy vieki. Be happy. 
Love Daddy. 

■KAMBO*. Happy tsih BBthday tar to- 
day. Sandra. 

MONEY CHAMBER! - (FOOY1. Wishing 
you a batony Both txrtmtay. Have a love- 
ly day. Lola ol love from us an. 

SBt EDWARD KULTON. He will be BO on ; 
Saaorday. 


4463. day 041 331 1666 


IED FOX Sapcth cool xtza 14. lenom 
4T-. 1 year old. Harrodm vahunan 
ri^.soo asking £6000 oaa. Tel: Day 
01-730-3808 




STOCmviXL • On November 271b 
1986. pearrfUBy to his NceiL General 
Sir Hugh Charles Btockwe*. GLC.B^ 1 
KJOXL. DAO_ aged 83, busbtoid c t 
Jo o*>. lather of Potty and Anabel and 
much loved grandfather. Funeral tor 
famUy only. 

WATKBB - On November 27th 1986 
peacefully al home, Mdcr Frederick 
WOUam SpiingeU WaMttns OS.E.. 
TbeSdnde Hone. Beloved braband 
of Margaret (Peggy) and father of 
Jan. father In taw of Peter John and ' 
grandfNher of Ban. Tom and WO- 
8am. Funeral service at Sl Marys. 
Chuntatow on Decanter 2nd at 
12.00 noon. No ilowen. 


MEMORIAL SERVICES 


BBBOEY - A Memorial Send v« tor Hec- 
tor Bruce Btoney of MuupMOrd. 
Cantbrklge. on Friday. 6Ul Dcccsq. 
her. at S^Oum. at SLJames's 
Church. Piccadilly. 

T IN MEMORIAM - PRIVATE 1 


BONHAM O B UW - ROBERT AR- 

. THUS (PETER), to loving and ever 
grateful memory. JDqpfca. 

IFARCY- b> proud and loving memory 
of Man who died oo this day tost 
year. Annexe and Gina. 

H UHRD I - BB ra bet h Jam EDeeu. 
tovtng and bating memaetesof *L*en. 
who died 29th November 1983. 


BUnS* MARRIAGES 
DEATHS. ARB ■ MEMORIAM 
£4 > «me + 15% VAT 

(minimum 3 lines) 
Announcemcuis. aulhemicatcd by 
\bc name and pcntuoicni address 
of the sender, may be sem 10 : 

THE TIMES 
PO BOX 484 
Virginia Street 
London El 9XS 

or telephoned (by telephone sub-' 
scribers only) loc 01-481 3824. 


If more people left money to us then perhaps 
fewer people would have to leave money to 
charities that deal with alcoholism, drug abuse 
and cruelty to children and animals. 


You don’t have to be about 
to kiU yourself to ring The 
Samaritans. 


drugs or vent their frustrations. 

Please call Slough (0753) 
32713 or write to: David Evans, 


People wilt call long before The Samaritans, 17 Uxbridge 
they reach that point Before, Road.StoughSLTiSNfor 
perhaps, they turn to drink, further details. 


Hooligan or Stereotype? 

Football violence, old ladies being mugged, cars 
written off, homes ransacked - is this your view 
of crimes committed by teenagers today? 

But most crime is more mundane: around 90% 
of teenage crime s non-violent and 50% fs 
petty theft. 

For most young 'criminals' committed to courts 
and prison is no answer. Up to 85% re-offend: 
-they become trapped in a criminal career. • 
Since 1976 Ramer Has pioneered vited Test 
chance’ alternatives to Cara and prison for 
nearly K mfion teenagers. Rainers' small-scale 
community-based projects focus on specific 
ndividual needs helping to build self-esteem 
and responsfeifity. They successfully divert 
young people from crane. 

But we need yoor committed support. Please 
send your donation, or for more information to 
Chris Naylor, RAINER FOUNDATION, 232 
Tootey Street. London SE1 2JX (01-403 
4434). And help the teenager behind the 
stereotype. 


ovrr i ve ar iAPR 04.) Low mtemt 

re6n ovor 2 years iAPR 9 6^1 & 6 ytors 

■APR 1224i>) Written ouauuons. Free 
Caujraoe 30* Hlghgate Roan. NWS, 
01-267 7671. 

TAJ MA H AL. The only book ever In do 
Justice to (Ns remarkable manunMnL 
HartXiack. £30. In bookshops now. 
(Times Books i. 

MRCM BMW IDS fl tong Lytno Bristol 
VGC. stnre rngme 6 Bear box. £23.000. 
Contort Hamptons at Bristol Lid. 
Tel: 0272 739846 

WOT mmStv wool carpets. Al irate 
prices and wider, afeo BvaaaMe 100's 
extra. Large room stm remnants under 
half normal uric*, chancery Carpels oi 
406 (MBS. 

the TAMES ATLAS or tHE OCEANS. 

An absolute must Tor anyone with an 
Wtttt to the sea" Clara Fnucb. Now 
£*998 - In bootattaps now. (Times 
Doom. 

CVEMDW DRESSES. 2 Superb model 
drawra destvied bar fiowtetu. 
‘Cttrtsmuosy'. AS new. swe 12. £300 ea. 
were £1.600. Ol 994 1 1 79/ 377 I too 

SANTA'S SALE AT TOPS. Sensational 8 I 
bw remote control vhS video. Only 
£329. 91 Lower Stoane SL SW1. 730 
0933. 

■EATFMDEIIS. Best mauls for an sold- 
out events. Our talents tnrtnde bum 
major companies crettu tsnb aaepted. 
01-828 1678. 

I MERE is no lira more l*-”" 1 torn in 
from or than a peat (Ire. DrtnU. Catne- 
loi PnaL Dew 4tH. Puritan. BrldgwMer. 
Somerset TA7 880. (0278) 683383. 

TICKETS FOR AMY EVENT. Cats. Star 
U9M Exp. Chest. Lea Ms. AO theatre 
rod wom-Tet: 821-6616/028- 

cmwjlex / visa / DUwte. 

CATS, CRESS, Lea MWwnd Phantom, ah 
ttieaire and snort. Tel 439 17B3. AH ma- 
ior credit ods. 

FIINIOEII /fflfilfW. Cooker*, etc. Cbm 
you I W Chewwrr BAS LkL.Ot 229 
1947/8468. 

WK BOAT Dark ranch ffemste. as new. 
Unwanted pm. Bargain £32150 Tele- 
phone: Ol 642 7966 

STIENtarAr Grand. F U T. ItaiewotNL 
conamnn. £6800. t«l- oi 

6»6 4981. 

PHANTOM OF T1K OPERA Tickets avoc. 
Atso WtmMvdon - orders token. Pro. 
theatre. Ol 240 8609/01 831 7960- 

PtAMO, -BarneT Mahogany uorigliL eon- 
- cert wtih Can ammo* dcltvary. £346 
Mbit Condition- Ol 4S3 0146 

OLttVorli Flavo u r*, cobble Mb eke. 
NMJrowide dtoiwTieo. Teh tOSSOi 
B50O39 IWHBK 

YORK FLAGSTONES tor pMMs A drive- 
ways. Winter aearam sale. Tel 061 
223 0881 / 061 231 6786 


WANTED 


EAST END Church In areal need or a good 
Quality piano. Regret only modes! re- 
sources. Cm anyone help. Mease? 
Contact John Mtmr, St. Ba mahm 
Church. Grove Road. Bow. E3 STG. 
Tel. Ol 981 6511. 


AC WANTED Large vie wardrobes, 
cham. exteoamo ohms. 

desMhbookcaMs. bureaus & afl swinllnps 
etc. 01 946 7683 day Ctl 7890471 eves. 

TWO All PAHt <ms or COUMte tor Chalet 
SL Moritz. February. Write : Warner. 9 
roe Calvin- CH 1204 Geneva. 

JEWELLERY. Gold, saver. Dtmonds ur- 
gently wanted. Top prices. WtHtams. 43 
Laron. Conduit SI WCi. 01 406 8638. 

WANTED Edwardian. Victorian and all 
palmed furniture Mr Ashton Oi 947 
E9C6 6CT-669 Comn Lane. EartanehL 
SWIT 


FLATSHARE 


BAKER ST Lady share large (ML Own 
bed. £250 pan Inclusive CH. gas. dec- 
maty services. TetOI 936 3614 (after 
630 pm). 


CAMDEN TOWN. Luxury modern house. 
1 dble bed. buii 2 Wa. £40 pw per per- 
son Ml. 1 dm* bed £70 pw ms Tec Ol 
387 9039. 


ML WANDSWORTH COMM ON Prof. 
M/F. NTS. shore fee. tax. house. O/r. 
£290 Pm tod. TeitJl 6T3 2549 I eve*) 


KMQSTDM Prof Person It. share lodge. 
Osesnon6trans.S46pweicl Ol 581 
>393 ML 3258 .day l 01 6«9 7106 leve) 


OOCKLANIIS E6 nr City. Prof m/r 26+ to 
share mod lux house with garden. £46 
pw etCL Tel: Ol 476 4563 (after 1 poll. 

Ml 2 guts to share s/c HbL re» and 
dm. £60 pw naCh. Tel: Ol- 794 6422 

3 MONTHS On* lux. Ma is o n e t te- near 
iranaport. SWB. £SGhw. Tel: Ol 720 
6951 

NW2 Oirt. own room In luxury 1UL TV. 
CH. Video. Communal p a rdma. £46 pw 
TeL- OI 461 6841. 

SW1 £80 pw very large room in lovely 
large IUL ctose lo Victoria Trt Ol 828 
2617 | 

SWI7. prof M/F. N/S. large O/R to Hero- 
. ryCSf Oat Near tube, tail and common. 
£160 pan. TN. 01 673 S3B3. 

SWUL Wandsworth. Prof p fro O/R and 
own hath In lux house wnti garden. 
Near 8R- £66pw. Tet Ol 673 4087^ 

Prof M/ F 2**. to share la Boor 
Homely flat. O/ R. N/ & C/ H. £180 
pan exet. Ring OI 381 9934. 

BAKER ST, wi. Prof m/t to share tax 
flat O/r. all mod cons. £260 pan. TM 
day 678 9999. eves 723 6498. 


CHELSEA KnfghNbrMgeL Belgravia. Ptov 
bra Westminster. Luxary houses and 
ruts available for tong or short lets, 
please ring for current bsl Coates. 69 
Buckingham Palace Rd. 5WI. 01-828 

KUNOTOH 6 mini HMhbury Corner, can 
mananette Beautifully rum DMe 
bedim. 2nd bemn. Ige rvrep. ku/dmer. 
bothrm. CH. pnone etc Parking. £130 


MARBLE ARCH Snort let 1 lo 3 months 
Enormous I bed (Ua. very pretty, v. 
urge. Could steep family of 4. £260 pw. 
Ol 724 4172. 

CITY MEWV 1 dM bed. ensune bath. WC. 
mower. Ut / dmmg. fge sunny rccen. 
private mtLCo let «nl)r £1(10 pw. Trt 
Chela Lawrence 01-488-2488 ext 331. 

NW11 S/C furnished ground floor fUL i 
bed. 2 recep- Kit 6 bain. Store beating. 
Phone. £76 pw. No shore. Stol profes- 
sional couple- Tel: 01 466 6146 

*37 9681 The Dumber to remember 
when seeking best rental properties in 
centra) and prime London areas 
£iso;g2.aoopw. 

HAMPSTEAD NWB Lux flat. 26ft rec. dbte 
bed. CH. TV. Ige sunny bale. W/mach. 
Co let prrt £125 pw 01424 4617 

LUXURY SERVICED FLATS, central Lon- 
don from £326 pw plus VAT Ring 
Town House Apartments 373 3433 


SITUATIONS WANTED 


BE IH tC D DETECTIVE R fXS New Scot, 
land Yard. Seeks gamlni emptaymem 
Owns Land Itover WiUlng to transport 
valuables, securities or persons. Lives in 
Sussex. Bonded security. Trt: 0797 
22383B 


EXP Cooks red Ski Seasons mum hotel 
QuM. France useor Geneva) Ol 731 
7989. 


TRUSTEE ACTS 


NOTICE Is hereby given pursuant to 927 
at the TRUSTEE ACL 1 925 that any par- 
son having a CLAIM agarod or an 
INTEREST to the ESTATE of any of Die 
deceased person's whose names, oddnua- 
ea and drocrtpOoas are set out below is 
hereby req uir ed ha send particulars In 
wrung of Ms claim or uuerest to toe pen 


IN THE HIGH COURT OF JUSTICE 
! NO. 008177 Of 1986 

CHANCERY DIVISION 
IN THE MATTER OF 
BOASE MAS6IMI POLUTT PLC 
AND 

IN THE MATTER OF 
THE COMPANIES ACT 19BS 
NOTICE df HEREBY GIVEN Urol a 
Prtjuon was on the llth Nosemtarr 1986 
presented to Her Majesty's Hhm Court of 
justice tor me confirmation of the 
rrorriLaudn of the shore Premium 
Aerocmi of Dae otaove- named Company. 
AND NOTICE IS FURTHER CSVOI nun 
roe WM pennon * directed to be nearrt 
before uw HoMunto Mr Jusacr 
Mmyn Daik-s at the Royal Courts of 
Justice. Strand. Ldndon WC2A 2LL on 
Monday ihe BU, day of December 1986. 
Any Creditor or Shareholder of Uie said 
Cemnan v dnfruig in orocmr me making of 
an Order for I hr rmifl r malion of Ihe sold 
canrrnalian of Ihe wd Share Premi u m 
Armum vhoww appear ol me lupe of 
heating in person or try Counsel for VIM! 
purpose 

A ropy Of the sou Petition wilt DC 
furnished io any such person requiring me 
same by Use undermentioned Sauaiors on 
payment at ihe regsdated charge lor Uie 

some. 

DATED IMS 29th day Of November 1986 
Messrs Macfartanes 
10 Norwich Street 
London ECAA. 1BO 
REF: RAW/34 OS 87 
Sjjesm for Ihe aPQs caromed Company 

IN THE HIGH COURT OF JUSTICE 
NO 008076 of 1986 
CHANCERY DIVISION 
IN THE MATTER OF 
GAVEL SECURITIES LIMITED 
AND 

IN THE MATTER OF 
THE COMPANIES ACT 1966 
NOTICE B HEREBY OVEN mat a 
Pet) Don was on the 7tn November 1986 
presented to Her Matestys High Churl of 
Justice for me confirmation of the 
cancrfianon of tne Share Premium 
Account of tor above-named Company 
amounting lo £920234. 

AND NOTICE tS FURTHER GIVEN thai 
the said Petition a directed lo be heard 
before Ihe Honourable Mr Justice Mervyn 
Davies oi the Royal Courts of Justice. 
Strand. London WC2A 2LL on Monday, 
tar Bin day of December 1986 
Any Creditor of Shareholder of the 

Company deunng lo oppose Uie nuking of 
an Order for toe confirmation of the 
cancellation of the said Share Premium 
Account mould appear a) the time of tor 
hearing to person or by Counsel for mat 
purpose. 

A copy of the said Petition will be 
furnished to any such Person rroatrmg the 
same by the unarr-mrnuoned Senators 
on daymen! of the regulated charge (or live 
■ante. 

DATED till* 29th day of November 1 986 
NORTON. ROSE. BOTTERELL A 
ROCHE. 

Kesiqnon House. 

Camomile -Street. 
London EC3A 7AN 
Solicitors for roc- sold Company 
Ref: PBA/63/WH0I4 
IN THl HIGH COURT OF JUSTiCE 
NO 007421 of 1966 
CHANCERY DIVISION 
IN THE MATTER OF JAMES SMITH 
6 SONS (NORWOOOl LIMITED 
AND 

IN THE MATTER OF 
THE COMPANIES ACT 19B6 
NOTICE IS HEREBY OVEN Urol a 
PcLtdon was an toe l» October 1986 
presented lo Her Majesty's High court of 
JiBUre far Ihe confirmation of the 
reduction of the capital of tor above- 
named Company flora £ 100.000 lo 
£40.000. 

AND NOTICE S FURTHER GIVEN that 
(he gid Petition is directed Id be heard 
before the Honourable Mr Justice 
Mervyn Davies al (he Royal Courts of 
Justice. Strand. London WC2A 2LL on 
Monday toe 8th day Of December 1986. 
Any Creditor or Shareholder of Ihe aoU 
Company dnorlng to oppose the nuking of 
an Order for toe confirmation of toe »afd 
reduction of capital should appear al toe 
time of hearing In person or by Counsel 
for that purpose. 

A copy of Die said Petition win be 
furnished loony such person regufrtng the 
same by me undermentioned SoUrilom an 
Daymen) of the regrtaled charge for me 
same 


w we ” 1J «"'” 1 ^lYiatiro to me j DATED tou 29th day of November 1986 


RENTALS 


MABM VALE: 2 b e dim garden fiaL Nice- 
ly fumnlted l/a persons to store. Ctose 
lube. £680 pem rod. TetOI -423-4 16a 

mnjco Brtgtu. furnished 2 bedrm flax. 
Newly decorated. Oose 10 lube. 
£17fipw tad. Trt 01-821 9686. 


deceased person concerned before the dale 
speclited: oiler winch date me estate of the 
deceased wdi be dadrlbuiM by Uie person- 
al representatives among the persons 
end tied thereto having regard only lo toe 
ctahps and interests of winch they have 
had notice. 


PAHLAVL TUdyilmalouk Teymoor. (For- 
mer Queen MMher at bini of Acapthca. 
Mexico died on lom March 1982. Particu- 
lars to Herbert Smith. Solicitors. Walling 
House. 36 Cannon Street. London EC4M 
GGD Ref 68/T43 before 3Dtii January 
1987. 


ALCOFROM. KLARA of 20 Cambridge! 
Carden*. London W ladled on 6in August 
1986. Particulars to KKL Executor 6 
Trustee Company Limited of Harold Pom- i 
er House. KlngsWiry ctrete. London NW9 
9SP. before 3an January 1987. 


BOON. CEOL Of 18 Phoenix House. 
104/110 Charing Cron Road. Landon 
WC2H CUN died an 27th October 1936 
Particulars to ucMakh. WUey & Powiea. 
Soticitar* of 7 UpperBroofc Sum . London 
W1V 2B.X before 50m January 1987. 

ULMER. CONSTANCE ROSEMARY of 
FUI 5. 4 Claim HUl. London W2. died on 
1901 Auguai 1986. particulars to 
UckfWds. Wiley A Powles. Sotirtlore of 7 
Upper Brook street. London wiy zbx. 
before 3<Xh January 1987. 



Fmnto. Christopher. 
Foyer 3 Company 

6 Clifford Street 
London W1X 2BX 

Ref: 9/NH 
Trt. 01-734-8411 
Solid lore for me above named Company 
~ IN THE HIGH COURT OF JUSTICE 
NO 008181 Of 1986 
CHANCERY DIVISION 
IN THE MATTER OF LEBU RETIME 
INTERNATIONAL PLC 
AND 

IN THE MATTER OF 
THE COMPANIES ACT 
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a 
Petition was op Uie lorn November 1986 
presented lo Her Mj testy's High Court of 
Justice for uie conOrmatton of the 
cancellation of the Share Premium 
Account of ihe above-named Company by 
£2.363.864. 

AND NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that 
the aid Petition tit directed in pe twvd 
before the Honourable Mr. Justice 
Mervyn Davies a) the Royal Courts of 
Justice. Strand. London WC2A 2li on 
Monday Uie Bin day of December i486. 
Any erremor or Shareholder of me said 
Company desiring to oppose uw nuking of 
an Order far the confirmation of the said 
cancellation of Uie Stare Premium 
Account should appear al the nine of 
hearing to person or by Counsel for that 
purpose 

A copy of me said Petition wiu be 
furnjshed to any such person requirtoq the 
same by Ihe undermentioned Soucuors on 
payment of the regulated charge far toe 
sa me. 

DATED UUs 26m day of November 1986 
Ashum Morris ertsp 
Btnadgale House. 

7 Eldcm Siren 
London EC2M THE) 

Solid iocs for the said Company 


THEATRES 


* -il 


Services tomorrow 


Euctu Mian a Brawffl 
testter mmUHl 
Brett: 3.1JI 


lOANT^gVcATHEpHALia.HG Jrt 

Gtoria CJumiion in B flan. Canon J 
ktoles: g jq Adve nt Ctaroi Service. 

■st cuthbotts. PhHhemch Gaitktna 
ITSWa ID HC; II Stan EQCh (Bach 

yUHK MlN*. I tli: y. B.4S HCS 1Q.1S ChOra te».SIecpo r» Wak e (Bach) . Rev 

6 ™ obb 

Mldsael Vickers: IIJSO M. CDmghnn ST CYPRlAhTS. Oaraoee Gate. MWl| 
[Reflate OtoweOsj, a EP: <L30Advimi 8LM: IOJD M: llHM. f^HMH 

Advent Carol Servlce.1 


CHIGHEtt 8 836 8243 CC art 
9648 CC 379 6433 A CC 24 
br/7 ddy 240 7200 Evga 8 Wad 
hkd SSMGAB 


DUKE or TOM* 836 8122 CC 
836 9B37/741 9999/379 6433 
24hr 240 7200. Eva a Thu 3. 
- Sal 8 fk 830 

COMED Y OF THE YEAR 
STEPPING OUT**" 4 

HH comedy by Richard Harm 
OlrertrdLhy JoHa^MteKroae 

THIRD HILARIOUS YEAR 


Batch: 6JQ AdVBUt Ouv:^ Bton 

^ .1.0-30 

CSaML 3 A S«W» rffW and RWateon- 
ReOdlngs nr AdvwC 6w30 EB. Rev R ST MARG/ 

8W*s 8.10. i 


n-.'iSPssjSs irasTB: 


M MICK SOI 3796107. 1st caB 
24/hr 7 day 240 7200. cm Sates 
930 6123. EVrt 730. Sal 118 
Timmoii at 30m 

JUDi MICHAEL 
DENCH WILLIAMS 

“Cbd of Oiefr own- BU 

MR <«> MRS NOBODY 

by KMth Waterhouse 
Dfrecied by Ned Shcrrtn 


CHAPEL ROYAL. SL JMatfs Mwe 


Sffnc .M'V'fe » 


'TttH 

iuy 

nov 


^f^^^iAPEL, 

SSSat^Hk 1 Ch0,i “- “* 


6JO 

MARY AE . 

8. 12JSO H & 9 -30 S ung OMA. Dte "IW bate e rai.fr to redd, Om 
top of Kententdon: 1116 M. the ww be Hda *w~ Thms 

in 6.30 enrol Service for Advent. -EVOCYBODV KbST SEC TB 

ST MARTS. Bourn* S frees. 8W1 :9. teOrtODY^D.Mxa 

9.46. T LM: 1.1 ML KRRLe BBT 
(nvautiji The Wostern Wind (T«v- ~ . 

verier}. Jerusalem surge (brocL Canon WJt «57 1692 CC 379 6433 
D nnrp SIS. 6.16 Ev*I»— |) MgStt 1st Con ga hr 240 7200 too nap 

Sate nm BepwUrtfan. few 741 9w» uo bhg fwt On. 

. §T MARYLOONE. Martteboue Sate* 930 6123. EvM 8 

Road. WI: B. II HC MW hr Rw Mats Wed 3 Sat 4. 


TP** ™ OFJDHP ON. ECi?. IE HC: 
11 M. BnM^^fPurcaOL-TUalattib 
y^Fd of John KWwS tba Chan- 


^P^CHUROLnert, 
8 “ PM ’-ki DX 


sr MICHAEL'S. . Objslier SSBRe. 
SWll .a.ia HC 1| MP. Rav D C L 
Prior: 7,30 btformal Evaung Serw-| 
ST MICHAEL'S. OorahOL BC3c 1VI 

STPAl^ 



OTMUL'S. Wlm Ptoc*. SW1 : a B\ 


LEND ME A TENOR . 

T «1 tough ter you're afl er... toon 
tb» (u» comes nmm tucker 
rod taster" SU 

A Comedy by Ken Ludwig 
Directed to, David CUmore 


j THEATRES | 

LOHOfM FNLLABWM 437 7373. 
741 9999 mo bkg fee). Flirt Call 
24 I fr 7 p ay CC 240 7200. WO 
■M TO) Grp Sales ftao 6X23. 
Tlcfecunaster 379 6433 
over am ran or 
THE HIT MUSICAL - 
COMEDY 

CE0ROC HEARN 
A DEM8 QUBXEY 

LA CAGE AUX FOLLES 

-~A PAIL ABU— MAR OF 
MTHtNAL" S.Trt 
MOo-Frt 730 Mart Wed 2.00 
Sal 2-30 A 8.00 
Skml ropcntioni avail, al door 
Moo-Fri a Sal man 
«*» AWDUaun—DM 
No w bssbto x to Ajrtfl 2B. 1—7 

ho ran ut. bh, 3rd dec 

LYRIC THEATRE Shaftesbury 
AW WI 01-437 3686/7 01-434 
15(90. 01AM lOGa 01-734 
6186/7 

COUN BLAKELY 

"A brttUant A tovoody 
ramte nerfOrmance*' F. TWH 
In 

The National Theatre's acclaimed 
production or 

ALAN AYCKBOURN'S 

A CHORUS OF 
DISAPPROVAL 

KmntfrtUtob funny' Odn 
“Hnarterti—- S. Times 
“A rare evening of 
erode exhilaration- Tiroes 
Evg* 7.3a Malt Wed and Sal 3.0. 
Crow Saws 01-930 6123. 

Pedueed pure 'mate Sttateni A 
OAP Stand-by 

FIRST CALL 24HN 7 BAT 
CC ROOKRiaS ON 63 240 7700 | 
(NO ROOHRM FEE) 

WINNER OF ALL 
THE BEST COMEDY 
AWARDS FOR 1985 
NOW BOOKING UNTIL 
_ APRIL *7 

FRANCE* DC LA TOUR 
AS LILLIAN mUMAH M 

LILLIAN 

A play by wnttom Luce, directed 
, by Carte H e dgra re . Tomor at 


THEATRES 


NATIONAL THEATRE Sttl Bank 

NATIONAL THEATRE 
COM PANY 

See XEPMIAT E ENTR IES under 
OUVMM / LYTTELTON i 
COTTESLOC. Excel tenf cheap 
Mats dare or peri s all theatres 
from io am. RESTAURANT (gas 
2033). EASY CAR PARK, Info 
633 0880. AIR CORD 

OLD VIC 928 7616 CC 261 1891 
Due to pUttc demand run extend- 
ed to IO Jan. Cuts 7. sa Wed Mate 
2.30. Sato 4.00 A 7.48 


nun W B W 

BARBARA EWlMa 


amaau hale 

PATTI LOVE 


ZENA WALKER 


THE WOMEN 

A aavsrafr toray r wwwfr 

by Clare boouw Lure 
“AE tomato rttxv ntmvaxarad” 
FT. MDELiaOUSLY F U NNY" 
Times. -Winy, wicked women's 
watid- SUExp. "8TYUSH, STAR- 
CTUDOEO PRODUCTION" D 
Mirror 


THEATRES 


PIUNGE EDWARD Bax Office 
734 8951 First CBB 2* Mr 7 Dare 
er Booking 836 3464 Ort> Satea 
930 6123. Mon -Sal 730 Mala 
Thun A Sal 2-30 


THEATRES 







ROYAL COURT S CC 730 1748/ 
1887 cr 24 nr 7 day 240 7200 
tbkg feei Eves Bom. Sat Mats 
4pm total State p rese n l A 
Mourana w nm by 
Caryl Cnurcbin A David Lin. 

ROYAL COURT UPVTANt* 730 
3S64 E ves 7 3a Sal Mats 330 

■SRIHRIIL by 8art* Itetolrts. 

ROYALTY 01-831 0660 24hr cr 
240 7200 379 6433 741 9999 
Croup Sates 930 6123 

JOSEPH 


From 16 Dec twice <toBy at 2 JO A 
7.30 BOOK NOW 


OLIVIER -S' 928 2262 CC (Na- 7 30 

•tonal Thcwre'* ooen stage) 

anmdtormrttolenMce anta SAVOY THEATRE Ol 836 8888. 
w£L r£2n>l*r CC 379 621 9. as* 0479. Fire* Call 

JvSSu/rtJr iS?, 6 ,!* 24 hr 7 day takg feel 240 7200. 

SJS.'T - KMth Prows* 741 9999 ibkg fee;. 

5^9 S5«3aK a K»21i * ‘ 8JO - 

« PATMCilSiiraSb 

j.ao promt* . opens Dee ii at bmvri nan 

6.4S. Then Dec 12 A 13. (Dec 8 iTBSw. 


■BBT ACTREH OF THE TEAR 
Standard Drama Award 
MARTI J ARVta 
PETER BLYTHE 
JOSEPMNE TtWMN to 
ALAN AYCHROURSP8 New Flay 

WOMAN IN MIND 


I - V * 


VICTORIA PALACE 01-834 1317 
Eve* 7 30 Mato Wed A Sat 2.4S 
EXTRA XMAS MATBMtES 
December %»JO Jon i A 2 
24 hr 7 day re bkgs uio extra 
rturgelon FIRST CALL 240 7200 
“A NIGHT OF SHEER SONG A 
DANCE MAGIC- Wkly News 

CHARLIE GIRL 
ONLY 7 WEEKS LEFT TO 
SEE THIS FABULOUS 
CAST. LAST PERF JAN 10 

PAM. NICHOLAS 
CYD C M A RtoSE 


MARK WTNTER In 

CHARLIE GIRL 

CROUP CALEB OS >30 0(23 
■W PARTY DMCOUNT* 

Also book. Tirketnwstar 379 6433 
or any w M SmUh Travel Branch 


I ge Printed to leaflet). 


3 UZ ROBERTSON In 






AU.HAU£nW8BYTHETOWra: 11 
UNRs-SM, 


Evensong .and Benedlenon _ 

(^unwJW VigtiMb CByrtU. tha STttl(MfBASOll^(Of gCOT- 

ssa^*njjsnsji ' 

gm^Rwmdnranta MOflflJto) OF SCOT 





MAYFAIR OI 629 3037 
From Dee IS to Jan 3 
Twice dally LOA4D 
Wed* A Sate 1030. 2X> A 4.0 

SOOTYS XMAS SHOW 

TUXFABI 6 ec east 3036. Mon- 
Thu 8 Frl/Sat 830 A 8.10 

RICHARD TODD m 

“Ite Irt Thttef ter are" 6 M 

THE BUSINESS OF 
MURDER 

"An unabartted wtimef" S Earn 
“Sensational” Time* ■ 




PMOCNDC 836 2294 CC 240 9661 

DIANA RIGG 

-•A COMMANDING PRESENCE... 
WRYLY WITTY- F.T. 

• WILDFIRE 



Wm Swmuntoanfc 630 Rev John 

oSelse a o ld church, cm 

afcto n T h ocnson; a E. Pnn LdtoMan 

WO E6 . Uftp Bwjup nf Kaft rinflten 


fef^t.°?Si n “S3k*S. ,, sK 

nWSbnnK 


laterrerol. Ro 

wmstiva* 

stOrt£*i 


DUOV ABLE" D.Exs 





ERA, 

MUSICAL 


i d LU4i Ej£; l U v. 


holy twin 
bjo, 12.10 


JSM8 UrtSor: (J.ao Attwant carol 

mice. 


. Rwngt c m (patatt W. 

sai s fUffaSOTtjSfc. 

630 lmi i HM. Masa.ier ttwrtem 

SL ecu 9130 damn, Crrator.alnM slderum Ota 




MERMAID mum 01-330 
5668 1*1 (tab 340 7200X70 6033 . 

7A1 9999 Cm Sam 030 9193 

THE WIND IN THE 
WILLOWS 

Opens December IS Tor 4 weeks 

onto Twke dally at 2.0 6 6.0 

HEW LONDON Drury Lane WC? 
408 O0» CC 379 6433 Eves 7 46 
Tun A SOI 300 A 7.4ft 

THE AMMEKW LLOYD MERCER 

rvs. am mumcai 



LYRIC HAMMERSMITH 01-741 rv*. «3JOT M U m efU 

SHI. Eves 7 45. WM MaU CATS 

nmnuLMuraa^wR? apply wult to kmc office 
EZTi^mZSTSJSL 0 *' fob returns 

SiLJg 1 ; Crauo BroUnas m-40& 1667 ar 

gSBfwSfV5S?»Jir\5^r ai 9306122. mm moiwa to 

*»«®“J™fnVAl-P*7w MAT so iw.seote avail far ad- 


PtCCADSLLY 087 4606 CC 379 
6866/ 379 6433/ 240 7400. 
Croup Sales 9306123/ BS6 3962. 
Eve* 8am. Sato 4 JO A S IS WM 
mala 5 


FRED EVANS 
PE RU NOTLE In 

-AN htPOSPONSIBlJE EVENING 
WAS HAD BY ALL" DTet 

A FUNNY THING 
HAPPENED 

ON THE WAT TO THE FORUM 

-Broad farce wnn Stephen 
Sandlin ml sang*** D M41 

PURI ITE OF WALES WI 9108681 
1 2«r Heuine 930 0844/6/6. Grt> 
Sam 930 6123. Kebh Praww 
741 9999. TKkeUtUHFr 5796433 
Irt CaH 24 hr/7 oay 240 7200 

‘ALLO’ALLO 

wnh the TV SHOW STARS 
Cm 8. Frt A Sat 6.30 A 9 40 
EXTRA PEHFS 30 & 31 Dec at 
230 

OUEElrS 01 734 1166/7/ 
0261/0120 2"Hir re 240 7200/ 
370 64W. Cry Sates ’WO 612?- 
“IK BAST MUSICAL M 
LONMHT' Gdn 

“A WONDERFUL STAR" Mail 

MAUREEN L1PMAN w 


VICTORIA PALACE Ol 240 7200 
BOO KING NOW 24 hr 7 day 

KP°" *^£2 

NA TASHA RKHARDSOM 
ANGELA RKHAROS 

HIGH SOGETY 

Directed by RKhord Eyre 

PlWi Feb 12 1st Ntom Feb 26 
(tUmiauBV nunr tm Mon-Fri 7.46 Wed mbi 3 Sal 4.48 
t£!!3nmm£S?S?5is& * Bts - CPSato. amoiaa 

6433/741 9999. Firs) Can 24hr 

■MO 7200 fbkg INI. Grp Sales 950 

fsr* »■ «-* s a re , s»ss5a^kSSt^?79 

MOST TOMBHT 6433 Today 300 & 6 30. Mon. 

THE THEATRE OF COMEDY Fli 9X30 ft. 5tonTii*o So - ' 

COMPANY'S ^OjgaroA .gOO 

ROOKERY NOOK » SsTJST 

The moot retenrsied of Ben . — — 

Travers' farces" tSoeclalori 
P reviews from Dec 8 lor 

TOM eosm m WWTOUULL S«rt Ol sao 7768/ 

a lavish new production 839 A4SS CC Ol 379 6D6S/379 

AN irnUAH STRAW RAT 6433. 741 9999. Ore XtM 

Book Now 6123/836 3962 

»U T GOUUUST 

— WALTERS JAMES 

st martin's 01-836 1443. spe- »tou Mmheomacm 

nu CC No. 379 6433. Evgs 80 K® S ilN fl A IR 

THE MOUSETRAP * 

Of reeled by Simon Stokes 

Press Fran Tires'- Opens 9 Dec. 
STRAND 836 2660 CC 836 7| »" MlHVFrta.^ 8.30 3 8.30 


1030am A 2.00 

3rd Mff ltd S e a ten 


by C£. Lewis 


AN irAUfUt STRAW RAT 


ST MARTIN'S 01-836 1443. Spe- 
cial CC No. 379 6433. Evgs 80 
Toes 848 Sal 6 O and 80 

8MB yr d AGATHA CKMSTtCs 

THE MOUSETRAP 


ART CALLERIES 


THE QUEEN’S 
GALLERY 
BHcfctagkuPttiasB 

Meter Onwritp (mot the ftoyal 

CciteoKO). 

Leofiafdo da vfnd 

Dlhe present day 
Tue - Sal ll-i Sun Z-S 
Adm £). 10. [reduced rate 50pl 
Unbl JNHisy 1907. 


ANTHONY d’OFFAY 9 A 23 

Drnng Si. wi 499 dioo 


BA RESCAN ART GALLERY Bar- 
btran Centre. EC2 01-638 
4141. UnUI 4 Jan: David Rote- 
arts II796I864K pafnungs of 
Europe 4 Uie Hear East PLUS 
■ton Has* by nomMK Fare 
IrtPrswomen. Tnes • Sal to- 
te os. Sun 4 B Hols 12 8.45. 
CteMOd Mondays. A dm C2 A 
Cl. Reduced rain lor pep 
booke d parUn Alio: 
TAPESTRY WEAVMC DtS- 
PWT by Jis s a s Sa x tv s - until 
19 Per (phone for details of 
date and limesl 


bs ,V:-i1:r:r 


HIRE BOOK TRADfTKHI 8 
wanpolpm CALpeearr and 


COLNABHI 14 OM Bond SL WI 
491 7408 An exhibition of 
OLD MASTER PAUmNGS. 
Through Noi ember and De- 
cember. Mon-Frl 10-0.30 
Sats lO-l 

DAVID ROSERTS - Original 
Lithographs of the Holy Land, 
al MJkP. 29A Enfold SJr ref , 
London W1H IDO. Tel. Ol -723 
77b6. Thun NOV 27Ui - Sol Dec 
13*h. Mon - SaL 117. 30. AH 
prat re d s wiu be donaled io 
Charity. Medical AM for Patet- 
untant iBra No. 263670 1 


FINE ART SOCIETY 148 New 
Bond Street. W 1.01-^98116. 
mm THAU LOW. Also 
ARTIST DCMOMERS ISIS 
1955. 

GALLERY 18. IO Citovmor SL 
Wl 01- 491 8 103 Panltngs by 
-8TEFFA REIS . Until 22nd Dec 
HAYWARD GALLERY. 

Southhank. SSL. ROOM and 
BOYLE FAARLT ExtubUtoov 
4dm £3/£l 50. Recocoed info. 
Ol 261 0127. 


ART GALLERIES 


TATE 8 A1LER Y. MlUbank SW1 . 
PANfTIWG IN SCOTLAND Tim 
B s M sn Ac* 1707-1843, UnUI 
4 Jan. Adm. £2.80. ML 
La WITT. Selected Prints 
1970-86- UnUI 30 Nov. 1986 
TURNER FHKEE DISPLAY. Un- 
til 7 Dec. THE UPCMTZ OFT 
Until lO May, Adm. tree. 
Wkdoys 10-5 sa Suns 2-5.50. 
Hecoraed into. 01-821 7128 

THE MALL MllTWEl (near 
Admiral to Archl Tcf Oi 930 
6844. ROYAL SOCIETY OF 
MtW ATUWE PAINTERS. 

SCULPTERS AND CBAVERS. 
38Ui Nov - I8(h Dec inosa 
lpnif Dally 10 - 8 Adm £1 OO 
CtorfHlwa 6Qp. 

VtCTOMLA 8 ALBERT MUSEUM- 



Jaa--2£f 3pm 


WONDERFUL TOWN! . 

“If rippln wUh extltemem" 
&Tmk9 -Jurt wondeffU" d ex» 
Mon-Sal B MW.Wrtf 2.30 SM 9 


STRAND 836 2660 CC 836 
4 143/51 9a 741 9999. nrw CsU 
24 Hr 7 Day cr 240 7200 Grp 
Sales 9BO 6123 

CABARET 

•n* iksrpuL moot saphtoScrth- 
ad. most rhytlrall ratal am 
wl t In the West End" Sid 
SLarrtng 

WAYNE SLEEP 

Directed 4 Choreographed by 

B HH sa Lyras 

Mon-Frl 7.4S. Mat Wed 800 
SM 4.30 A 8 IS 
OAP N OW O P F— CEL MATS. 
SOrttoto NOW UP TO JAM -87 


STRATFORD UPON AVON 

•07891 396625. ROYAL 

SHAK ESPEARE COMPANY al 
3?rr tort Today iJtt 
PI ch ard 8 Thalgni. Man 7.3a 
■ M rh— I Tue. wed 7 Jo Smut 
Tbnstens. Itoese Today t.SO. 
Fair M.M Mon. Tue 7 JO to 

on Mm wed 1.30. 


THEATRE OF COMEDY 
COMPANTY 

eThe very brg of Bnxafnt 
ronsr lateen" Daily Matt 
See srwtralr entires under; 

C I M T Ei aON IliEATRSC 


WYNDHABrS S 836 3028 re 379 
ftSteS/Ttrketmaster 379 6433/lrt 
Crtl 24hr 7 dare 240 7200/741 
9999/Crp Sam 930 6123/836 
3962 Eire 7 3a SM mots 3 
For a tunned anem 
"A p a rt s, siaw » raatoliil M 
to tod EieP* IndepenoenL 

VANESSA REEX5RAVE 

TOM WBJflNSON In 
Tha Tails Vtc pradoctton of 

GHOSTS 

By Henrik ibtefi 
Dirrcled by Dentil Thacker 



BOSPT Mts*~ City URDU 


TOttMB VK ««e 63*y CC 370 
6433. Tta Yranx Vk Co m 
MUMS CAESAR “A AW pro. 

Certfi Rndcms's 
bs a rt h M to id y - Ms Best w 
tow w e m a" F.T ev« 7.30 

Wed 4 FVf mat 2m 


t ™W0 928 6363 

ns Tno* f | to feB*toHnc M J'd 
TM sm m sa te (to ami. 

W i P CBn Toni B 


LCOEft. 1 3. OM Bond SI 
ANNUAL WATERCOLOUR EX- 
IMEflOW. Mon-Fn. 9 366.30. 

NATTOHAL PORTRAIT 
C Atl FR Y, EH Martini Ptnce. 
Londo n WC 2 Tel 01-930 1532 
OOMSTII B : ponraili of 60 
years Adm. cz. Family ticket 
C6 STACMO THE SELF : Self 

rariran PiwupaPtiy Iftim 
IDKk. 4fi,.D Worn 

Sal 106 Sun 26. 


•'“U" CALLERY 1 1 MalCnmta 
B-SWI OS-25S 8144 
AMAH ALUN5CM 1890 - 
1950. mimral A Ihealrtad 

ROYAL ACADEMY, PKCJUNU.Y 

Ol 734 4082 

Own aauy 10* inc. gun vre- 

dured rale Sun. untiJ 1 4Si 

, * W aK£S c S2S mm, 

MtOB, &TMUNC 

s*-8o. ci .to egne. rale. 

•CHUSTER CALLCRV. 14 
MrtMwt Sum. Mkylar 
Trt: 0) 491 220a 
P AMIOT 3 * nUU Ih CHttMT- 
MA£ ECLECTIOH. 2Glh Nov 10 
04Ul Der Mon ■ Frt 
IO 530. SMurddlf ID -1 


ZAMANA CMLLERY. 1 Crroiwell 
Cardera. SWT 584 6612. IS- 
TANBUL - A Photographic 
Journey mrauah Turkish Ar- 
chitecture. (.tain 18 Jan Tue- 
gffl 105.30. Sun 12-6.30 

ZAMANA CALLCRV. 1 Cromwell 
Carden*. SWT. E04 6612. 
ISTANBUL • A Photographic 
Journey through Turkish Ar- 
Chum lire Until 18 Jan Tur- 
Sat IDS Jtt Sun 12 6.30 


CINEMAS 


BA NW CAN Ij 01-638 8891. 
Trkto £3. Student Cone* £2 all 
pem. TTcke to Boo kable. Today 
6.16. 8.30 BETTY BLUE 1I8). 
Today 11.00. 230 Kids Club 
(imtaitl Memoemhlpi THE 
rONNBNNCH PLANET 1U1 

CAMDEN PLAZA OOP Camden 
Town Tune 486 2443 WEN 1 1 6 1 

Film at 2 RS 4 30 6 40 B.56 
CHELSEA HMCMA Kings Road 
SW3 361 3742 MEN 1 15) Film 
Sl 2 26 4 30 6 40 fl 56 

CU RXOW MAYFAIR Curran St 
499 373 7. Cl aude LaiuirurvTs 
SHOAH (PO] Part 1 Tue* 4 
Tnure 5.46 Sals 11.30am & 
5 45 Part 2 Mon. Wed 4 Fn 
Wl Sunday* Pori 1 sl 
1 1 .30un Pan a al S.as -Tolai. 
IV a Mocking ..we jhr film- ShL 

CURZON WEST END Shaheobury 
a, roue Wl 439 4805. Maggie 
Smith. Dmhohn OlhML Judi 
Dench In A ROOM WITH A 
WWW IPO). Film at 1.30 iNof 
Sum. 3 45. 6 IO A B 40. 

-A nun a* near 10 perfection a* 
til possible to ramie'* 
Atexjmoer Walker. Sid 

LEICESTER SQUARE THEATRE 

930 5262 iEnqi/930 7615 i2« 
hr Arena/ Visa/ ARiEs Book 
testa BIO TROUBLE In LITTLE 
OMMA IPO) in 70mm Doer 
Stereo. Sen Proa* Daily 1.00. 
3 36. te.ia 8.60 Lale Ninlii 
Show rn a Sal 1 1.45pm. AU 
.. Prom bookable m advance 
LUtMERE CI N E M A SI Martin's 
Lane WC2 379 3014/836 

0691 ROUND MtDNKSNT ,16, 
Fine ji 1 00 L3Q kOO a SC. 

MBiEMAOS KMUmmiOCC 
US«* HANNAH AND MU 
StSTERS f 15) Dally; 3 0. BO. 

7 g 90 

ODE ON HAVMARKET >a39 

7697) MONA USA ilfll Sep 
nrora Dally 2. :E 6 00 fl 40 
lair Ntghl Show Frt 4 Sal 
1 1 45orn AH seal* bookable to 
ods once. Acccvs and Visa let*- 
Ptiorte booklotn welcome 

ODOM LEICESTER SQUARE 

1950 611 It into 9» 4250 1 
4259 BUTHLE55 PEOPLE 1 161 
Sep prog* Door* open Dally 
200 6 00 800. Loir Nluhl 
Show Frt * Sal Doors open 
11 Item All peopm bookable in 
attlonre CredU Card Hoi Line 
lAcreaa/ Vis At Am Ex 1 tijo 
3232/ BSP 1929 £4 hour 
HTvirr. 

■SNOIR opp Rioxll 8b Tube 
837 B4Q2J1I SMOOTH TALK 
■ 1 5l rtim at 2.300 3Ste 459 00 
f2l ROSA LUXEMBURG IPG' 
Fttm ol I OO 3.30 600 fl 36 







TOE TIMES SATURDAY NOVEMBER 29 1986 


The model choirboys who never stop singing 


- . ^ '**' 

• * V ' • i' 

- -V't ^ rv 


Letter from Peking 


Confucius revived 
in modem China 










***■ - + & 

■y 


If J‘f‘ ' v - ''"' 

ir - jjr * • . . 

i- -m i.-t. / 


- .A ■ . « <">' 

-**'■ i'J 




j ■: " ■ *• J- ’• 

V > ‘ ' -A-.".*’"' -* 

* ~ * & 




L. -S-" 


4f i V • 


..■sr* 


At the end of a mite-long 
gravel avenue lined with 800- 
year-old juniper trees looms 
the Kong Lin, China’s great 
Confbtian cemetery. More of 
a overgrown park 

than a hnnal ground, the area 
contains hundreds of tombs 
of the great sage’s descen- 
dants and many more stelae 
bearing bis words of wisdom. 

Inside the Kong Lin, just 
pp«a the temple of offerings, 
lies the tomb ofKongFozi a 
grassy mound IS ft high an£ l 
24 ft wi(fe A state erected in 
1443 bears the inscription: 
"Tomb of the Prince Wen 
Y nan very accomplished 
and very holy." 

Bom in Qufu in 551 BC 
and buried in his hometown 
72 years later, Confucius 
lived in a divided China. His 
is located on the 


(it [ rW »7t K > ■ 1 0 ■ 




ii\Vv‘ - ' v * 

i \ ' ~4 • . <t ,?> 


An angelic chorus of mec h ani ca l waifs 
in time to a selection of traditiot 


JKvs* 




carols to passers-by from the windows of Simpson's department store in Piccadilly. The ar rt o at a to as more their heads ami hymn books 


~ i r» 1 1 ■. rw \> 1 1 


Fares rise above inflation CIA arms role investigated 


By Rodney Cowton, Transport Correspondent 


Rail hires are to increase by 
up to 10 per cent in January. 
Although the average rise will 
be 5 per cent, the lowest 
British Rail fare increase for 
four years, it is still substan- 
tially above the rate of infla- 
tion — currently 3 per cenL 

The increase, which will 
take effect on January 1 1, will 
bring British Rail £58 million 
extra revenue in a full year. 

The British Railways Board 
said yesterday that, since 
1980, average rail teres had 
risen by less than inflation. 
The average cost of rail travel 
per mile, had gone up by 
43 per cent between 1980 and 
1986. The cost of running a 
private car. the railway's big- 
gest competitor, had risen by 
51 percent 

The need to raise prices this 
year, by more than the rate of 
inflation, is undoubtedly a 


reflection of pressure to meet 
financial targets set by the 
Government 

The subsidy in the current 
financial year was set last 
month at £712 m, 25 percent 
below the level of the 1983 
subsidy, in real terms, with a 
further reduction of nearly 
25 per cent to be achieved in 
the following three years. 

For travellers on Network 
SouthEast, the average in- 
crease will be 4.9 per cent, 
though the cost of season 
tickets will go up by an 
average of 5.8 per cent 

On Intercity services, 
which after next year are 
expected to operate without 
subsidy, many economy tick- 
ets will be held at present 
rates, but increases of up to 
10 per cent will be applied to 
some long-distance season 
tickets. 


On provincial services the 
average increase will be 
around 6 per cent, but British 
Rail says most flues will rise 
by only 4.5 per cent, though 
there mO be some increases of 
up to 10 per cent to reflect 
current market rates, or where 
the quality of the service has 
been improved by the in- 
troduction of new rolling 
stock. 

Some examples of fare in- 
creases are : 

London to Bi rmingham; 
2nd class single flue up from 
£15 to £15.70. 

London to York: 2nd class 
angle fare up from £25.50 to 

£ 26750 . 

London to Brighton: 2nd 
class cheap day return up by 
20p to £7.40; 7-day season 
ticket up by £1.80 to £32.60; 
annual season ticket up from 
£1,232 to £1,304. 


Confirmed from page 1 

accept Iranian payment for 
American arms. 

Sources said Mr Casey was 
one of the bandful of officials 
who during the past year regu- 
larly received copies of top 
secret communications inter- 
cepts that reportedly provided 
the dues test week that allow- 
ed the Justice Departmen t to 
unravel what had happened. 

Admiral John Poindexter, 
the National Security Adviser 
who resigned on Tuesday, has 
said privately that Mr Casey 
was "heavily involved". 

Mr Casey has been one of 
the Contras’ strongest backers 
in. the Reagan Administration. 
Official sources said the CIA 
has intensely followed the pro- 
gress of the rebels. 

Tbe possible involvement 
of Vice-President George 
Bush is coming under increas- 
ing scrutiny. An Oregon busi- 


nessman said he informed Mr 
Bush of reports he had heard 
early this year that the Depart- 
ment of Defence was planning 
to bay weapons for the 
Contras with profits from Iran 
arms sales. 

Mr Richard Brenneke said 
Mr Bush replied: "We will 
look into ft.” His assertion 
would contradict assurances 
by Mr Edwin Meese, the At- 
torney-General that no senior 
Administration figure knew 
about the Contra connection. 

His statements were made 
after a court case had forced 
the Government to release 
memoranda he had written to 
various Government officials 
between November 30 1985 
and February 25 this year. 
Defence lawyers in an Iran 
arms sate case being tried in 
New York successfully forced 
the release of the documents 
to bolster their contention that 


the Administration was send- 
ing arms to Iran. 

Colonel North is receiving 
strong support from leading 
conservatives here who have 
been angered at 'his dismissal 
and say he was essential in the 
operation to support the Cont- 
ras. Many conservative activ- 
ists said Mr North was "the 
tell guyf and they tear that the 
Administration will now back 
away from its involvement 
with the Contras. 

Colonel North was pictured 
in all the newspapers here 
yesterday leaving the White 
House entrance after being 
refused entry. A spokesman 
said he bad been placed on the 
list of those barred 

Colonel North has refused 
to answer reporters' questions 
about the reported shredding 
of documents and said he 
would make a full explanation 
“in the appropriate forum”. 


state of Lu, of which he was a 
citizen and which was one of 
several Chinese “warring 
states” of that age. 

In an effort to create order 
out of the chaos of his time, 
Confucius compiled stan- 
dards of conduct by which 
private men and great rulers 
should, he thought, govern 
themselves. He also searched, 
in vain, for a prince who 
could put his teachings into 
practice: 

Though Confucius never 
organized his precepts into 
books, others did, and they 
became the cultural basis of 
China . 

From the Han Dynasty 
(roughly 150 BC) to the end 
of the Qing Dynasty in 1911, 
succeeding rulers used his 
Analects as the basis ofhigher 
learning. 

The great helmsman, Mao 


admiration for the sage, but 
opposed Confucianism as a 
relic of China's feudal past 
After talcing power in 1949 
the Chinese Communists 
sought to suppress Confu- 
cianism and many temples 
were dosed. 

The high tide of anti- 
Confiidamsm came during 
the cultural revolution (1967- 
1976), when Red guards de- 
scended on Qufu and des- 
troyed as modi as they could 
of tire Confbdan past. Of 
Confucius and his teachings 
Mr Zhang Chunqiao, then 


China’s Deputy Prime Min- 
ister and a mem ber of ft* 
Gang of Four, said m 1975: 
“Rubbish such as his never 
vanishes of itself where the 
broom of the proletariat does 
not reach”. 

Today, however. 2,537 
years after his birth. Kong 

Fun is making a comeback in 
China, and instead Mr Zhang 
has been swept aside. 

litre the emperors of tw. 
Mr Deng Xiaoping and his 
supporters have found in 
Confucianism the same re- 
spect for education, intellec- 
tual achi evement and auth- 
ority that they want to instil 
in modern China, 

Since the late 1970s Peking 
has spent more than £67.000 
rebuilding Qofix’s temples, 
pavffions and steles. Theo- 
retical journals have re-exam- 


private Confbdan societies 
have sprung up. across the 
country, and a government- 
run Confudan Foundation of 
China was set up in 1984 
Moreover, at a time when 
Peking is attempting to woo. 
Taiwan back to the mai nl a nd - 
fold and to induce overseas 
Chinese to tend their money 
and professional expertise to 
rebuild China, the revival of 
Confucianism and traditional 
Chinese values is being used 
to promote the mainland as 
the home of aft Chinese. 

“We have begun with 

g vemmem funds.” said Mr 
to Jinghong, the rather 
blase director of the Qufu 
office of the Confucius 
Foundation of China, “but 
we would like to reach the 
point where we are sustained 
by contributions from over- 
seas Chinese”. 

Mr Gao’s bureaucratic 
boredom (postings are as- 
signed in China) was more 
than offset fay tire enthusiasm 
of a self-appointed tour guide 
who told a group of 50 
middle-aged cadres: “We are 
all descended from Confucius 
... and everyone should 
have a basic understanding of 
Confucianism.” Dr Wang 
then told of one of the sage’s 
followers who had camped by 
bis mound for six years 
mourning Ins death and 
studying his sayings- 

Robert Grieves 


THE TIMES INFORMATION SERVICE 


Solution to Puzzle No 17,215 Solution to Puzzle No 17,210 I Today’s events 


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Tomorrows events ( Roads 



The Times Crossword Puzzle No 17,216 

A prize o/The Times Atlas of World History will be given for the 
first three correct solutions opened next Thursday. Entries 
should be addressed to: The Times, Saturday Crossword 
Competition, PO Box 486, 1 Virginia Street, London El 9DD. 
The winners and solutions will be published next Saturday. 

The winners of last Saturday’s competition are: MrJ?A 
Rawstome, 140 Ware Road. Hertford, Herts: Miss G Parker, 16 
Alexandra Court, Alexandra Road, Barnstable, Devon ; W.T. 
Shelton, 2 Penrose Close, Newbury, Berks. 

Name 



ACROSS 

1 Current in equatorial river 
has disappeared (7). 

5 Poles in characteristic 
conveyance (7). 

9 In conclusion, I certainly 
can appear more critical (5). 

10 Unhesitatingly makes love, 
when passionate (4,1,4). 

11 Edward popped off and 
went round m circles (6). 

12 Remarkably perhaps Leo 
has a friend (Sl- 
id Wash out and scour (5). 

15 Fugitive could provide me 
with a helper (9). 

18 Instruct unmarried people 
io lose weight (9). 

20 Flower I have planted be- 
tween two more (5). 

22 Perverse, like Mary (8). 

24 Two small boys — one suf- 
fers (6). 

26 An art, yet a distortion 
under any circumstances 
(23,4). 

27 Prepared lo study philos- 
ophy at last (5). 

28 The judge grasps nothing 
from ihat(7)7 

29 State , with regret rejected 
pnysotucrapist (7). 



DOWN 

1 Vocalist ultimately seen 
more than once working 
around Nashville (9). 

2 Select an exit, say, for a bull- 
fighter (7). 

3 Reprimand slovenly woman 
in case . . .(6-3). 

4 . . . she ends up in a silly 
way (4). 

5 Cheat worker and assume 
control (42,4). 

6 A prophet listened to once 
more (5). 

7 Student of the sun accepts 
an honour (7). 

8 Inferior races held in 20 (5). 

13 Old woman of 9.5 (6,4). 

16 Ramsagrid in a frenzy, just 
before fast start (5,4). 

17 New, or old, army officer in 
the City (4.5). 

19 Family row takes a long 
time (71 

21 Corrupt French city, a num- 
ber said (7). 

22 Vessel caught bv floating 
logs (5). 

23 What's black for Jack Frost, 
say (5). 

25 Piece of wood used in shaft 
(41 


Concise Crossword page 17 


Royal engagements 

Princess Alice, Duchess of 
Gloucester, attends a service of 
dedication of the new ring of 
bells. Peterborough Cathedral, i 
1055. 

New exhibitions 

35 Artists; Prin Quaking; Mu- 
seum & Art Gallery, Priestgate, 
Peterborough; Tues to Sat 12 to 
5 (ends Jan 3). 

Craftsmanship for Christmas; 
Brewery Court, Cirencester, 
i Mon to Sat 10 to 5 JO (ends Dec 
27). 

The Etements; Milton Keynes 
Exhibition Gallery; 555 Silbory 
Boulevard; Mon to Weds 9.30 to 
6. Thurs arid Fri 9.30 to 8, Sat 10 
to 5 (ends Dec 31). 

Mezzotints; The Whitworth 
Art Gallery, Whitworth Park, 
Manchester Mon to Sat lOto 5, 
Thuis 10 to 9 (ends March). 

Tapestries, sculpture, pottery 
and linoents by four artists from 
I Devon; Rooksmoor Gallery, 31 
Brock St, Bath; Mon to Sat 10 to 
5 JO (ends Dec 20). 

Last chance to see 

Watercolours fey Jenny Mat- 
thews; Flyhui Colours Gallery, 
35 WilliamSt, Edinburgh, 10 to 
1. 

Sir Richard Colt Hoare of 
S lourhead - Artist and Patron 
1758-1838; The Museum. 41 
I Long St, Devizes; 11 to 1 and 2 
to 4. 

Music 

Concert by the Vienna Schu- ! 
bert Trio; Otmdle School Great 
Hall 7.45. 

Concert by the Irwin Singers; 
United Church, Trowbridge, 
7.30. 

Concert by the Chamber 
Choir and Orchestra, Westion 
Wind; St George's, Brandon 
Hill, Bristol 7.30. 

Concert by the Reading 
University Choral and Orches- 
tral Societies; St Giles’, South- 
ampton St, Reading, 7.30. 

Concert by the Reading Phoe- 
nix Choir, The Hexagon, 
Queens Walk, Reading, 730. 

Piano recital by Radoslav 
Kvapil; St Leonard's, Hythe, 
730. 

Organ recital by Peter Har- 
ford; Christ Church Cathedral 
Oxford, 8. 

Advent Carol Service; Win- 
chester Cathedral. 6.30. 

Advent Procession with Car- 
ols; Durham Cathedral 7. 

Concert by the Taverner Con- 
sort; Eye Church. Suffolk. 8. 

Concert by the University 
Choral Society and Orchestra, 
Lancaster University, 730. 

Organ recital by Jennifer j 
Bate: St Peter & Si Paid, 
Buckingham, 730. 

Philharmonic Choir and Eng- 
lish Heritage Orchestra: Dera- . 
gate, Northampton. 730. 

Concert by the Bolton Choral 
Union; Albert Haft, Bohon, 
7.30. 

Concert by the St Albans Bach 
Choir and Cathedral Choristers 
with Bournemouth Sinfonietta; 
S* Albans Cathedral 730. 

Advent Carol Service; 
Tewkesbury Abbey, 7. 

Conceit by the Exeter Univer- 
Bty Sinfonia; Memorial Chapel 
Exeter University; 8. 

General 

Winchester Bookdealcrs’ 
Fain Guildhall, Winchester, 10 
to 4. 

Christmas Market; Gains- 
borough Old Hall Parnell St, 10 
to 5. 

Christmas Steam Specials: 
Midland Railway Centre; sear 
Ripley, Derbyshire, 10 to 5. 


Royal engagements 

Princess Alexandra attends 
“A Tribute to Peter Pears 1910- 
1986”, in aid of the Aldebtngh 
Foundation Appeal Royal Op- 
era House, Co vent Garden, 
6.50. 

Last chance to see 

The Police in Portsmouth 
1836-1986; Southsea Castle, 
Castle Esplanade, Partsnotth, 
1030 to 530. 

A Sheffield Showing: new 
work in paint and crayon by 
Roger Wilson; Mappin Art Gal- 
lery, Weston Phrk, Sheffield, 2 
to 5. 

Mixed exhibition of art and 
pottery including selection by 
Norman Adams RA; Realist art 
of the 1950s by various artists; 
Linton Court Gallery, Duke St, 
Settle, North Yorkshire, 2 to 4. 

The Un-Pain ted Landscape; 
Smith Art Gallery and Museum, 
Dumbarton Rd, Stirling, 2 to 5. 

Recent work by Bruce Mc- 
Lean; Southampton Art Gallery, 
Civic Centre, 2 to 5. 

Music 

Concert by the HaU6 Or- 
chestra; Free Trade HaH Man- 
chester, 73a 

Concert by University of 
Exeler Choral Society; Univer- 
sity Great Haft, Exeter, 8. 

Concert by the University of 
Leeds Department of Music 
Cborns and Orchestra with Mal- 
colm Knowles (tenor); St 
Bartholomew’*, Annley, Leeds, 
4. 


Anniversaries 


TODAY 

Births: Christian Doppler, 
physicist Salzburg, 1803; Lou- 
isa May Akott, author of Little 
Women. Germantown. Penn- 
sylvania, 1832; Eug&e le Roy, 
novelist Haotefort, 1836; Ger- 
trude Jckyll landscape archi- 
tect London, 1843; Sr Am- 
brose Fleming, scientist, 
Lancaster, 1849. 

Deaths: Thomas Wobey, lord 
chancellor 1515-29, Leicester, 
1530; Prince Rupert. Royalist 
commander in the Civil War, 
London, 1682; Giacomo Puc- 
cini, Brussels, 1924; Graham 
H3L world champion racing 
driver of 1962, 1968, near 
Hstree, 1975. 

TOMORROW 

Births: Andrea Daria, Geno- 
ese statesman and admiral 
Oneglia, 1466; Andrea Palladio, 
architect Padua, 1508: Sfr 
Philip Sidney, poet soldier and 
courtier, Prnshurst, Kent 1554; 
Jonathan Swift. Dublin 1667; 
Marie Twain, Florida, Missouri, 
1835; Sir Winston Cfcadiill, 
Btencheim Palace, 1874. 

Deaths: Saint Gregory of 
Tours, Clermont-Ferrand, 
538/539; Oscar Wilde, Pins, 
1900; Edward John Eyre, ex- 
plorer in Australia, Tavistock, 
1 90 1; Ernst Labitsch, film direc- 
tor, Hollywood, 1947; Wilhelm 
Ftafwangter, conductor, Baden- 
Baden, 1954; Patrick Kavanagh, 
poet Dublin, 1967. 

Today is Saint Andrew’s Day. 
Tradition is that he was cru- 
cified on on x-sbaped cross from 

which comes the flag ofScottend 
of which he is the patron saint; 
be is also patron saint of Russia. 

Crystal Palace was destroyed 
by fire. 1936. 



( WEATHER ^ A weak warm front wfll be slow moving over N areas. A 

' — ‘'ridge of high pressure wfll persist over the S- Scotland 

and Northern Ireland will be mainly doody with rain or drizzle at times, especially 
in exposed W areas. Sheltered E and S areas will have some good dry periods with 
bright or smmy intervals developing. England and Wales will be mainly dry. Most 
places wffl start dull and doody with widespread fog, dense in places, especially in 
S and E areas. The low dond or fog win slowly thin and break during the morning 
to allow hazy sunshine hi many places by the afternoon. Fog will again become 
widespread and locally dense in the evening. It will be mild in the N with tem- 
peratures near normal in the S. Outlook for Sunday and Monday: Rather cloudy. 
Bain at times, chiefly in the N.Temperatures mostly near normal. Night frost in 



TODAY Son rises: 


gggH 7-41 am 

357 pm 

Moon rims 

flo« sets: 

427 am 

224 pm 

Hew moon; Dacsmtar 1 






TOMORROW Son item: tank 
mmjmm 7.42 am &56pm 


Moon rises: Mom sets: 
6.09 am 2.45pm 




TODAY 

London 427 pm tt 7.12 am 
Bristol <37 pm » 722 am 
EdUxagb 4.16 pm to 747 am 
M a n cb wt or 426pm » 720 an 
Penance 4S4 pm to 728 am 


mm? 



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HT 

PM 

KT 

6l8 

1219 

62 

4.1 



26 

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13.0 

3.4 

9.45 

32 

1-6 

5.42 1 

20 

5 A 

425 

55 

65 

945 

65 

52 

355 

53 

45 

1128 

43 

3-8 

1050 

35 

54 

S.01 

5.6 

7.1 

526 

7.1 

8J 

4.40 

92 

53 

1.11 

5.4 

9.1 

959 

9.4 

25 

825 

24 

47 

1052 

47 

27 

457 

62 

27 

350 

82 

32 

428 

4.1 

55 

328 

52 

21 

5.41 

22 

42 

10.12 

47 

6.1 

953 

21 

45 

9/46 

4/4 

92 

6.01 

95 

52 

225 

SA 

4.1 

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ABROAD 


‘ if 


rain; s, sun; an, 

C F 
t 15 S 
f 18 84 

* 18 64 
c T5 59 
I 15 59 

f 28 62 

s 10 50 
9 3 37 
C 1 34 
4 1 34 
e 21 70 
s 17 63 
s 23 73 
3 12 54 
8 17 63 
< 10 50 
f 5 41 
s 1 34 
S 27 81 
s 6 43 
a 1 34 
S 17 63 
8 31 88 

* 23 73 



















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BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


THE 



TIMES 


SPORT 39 
TELEVISION AND RADIO 42 


•asa^lL 

3# 

m 

, 1 aau «i* 


SATURDAY NOVEMBER 29 1986 


Executive Editor 
Kenneth Fleet 


FT 30 Share 
1292.2 (+6.2) 

FT-SE 100 
1636.7 (+4.2) 


5 (28696) 


•V nd5 sS 

::$5j 


(-0.14) 


USOoRar 

1.4355 (+0.0060) 

W German mark 

2.8308 (-0.0125) 

Trade-weighted 
68.1 (same) 


Maxwell and T&N raise stakes 

Bid battle for 
AE hots up 


Tim Bishop 


Mr Robert Maxwell’s Hollis 


By John BeU, City Editor 
One of TAN'S leading 


T A. • newau, announced that it had 

II ^rfl TO 1H)V Picked up another 1.5 million 
AV ^ AA lU F a J AE shares, bringing accep- 
Awmm lances of its offer to just over 

£14m ior H per cent With the near 30 


; r : » !«?; 
. 'T-Ving. & 

; ■ it * 

■ 

: • “‘ Ue 

•O'.'*** 


Robert 6 


• r»e\; 

: 

■ tin*.*- 
cniws 

• *. srisiiii’. 
• , :u. ;■>.*?£. 

: =•:: 3C3I: 

: - 

ftaci 
rr-J V£- 


'v £ 


Fulton 

ICH, the international 
money broker, said yesterday 
that it is to buy Charles Fulton 
Asia, the money-broking op- 
eration in the Far P-ao . for 
HK5155 million (£14 mil- 
lion). The purchase will virtu- 
ally ' complete the 
reconstruction of the old 
Charles Fulton group, which 
was broken up four years ago. 

Meanwhile, MAI has sold 
sections of its money-broking 
business in a management 
buyout worth $25 million (£17 
million). The companies in- 
volved are Euro Brokers Har- 
low in the US and Canada and 
Harlow Ueda Savage in 
London. 

Ferranti up 

Pretax profits ar Ferranti, 
the defence goods, computer 
and electronics group, grew 
from £18.9 milli on to £21.9 
million in the six months to 
September 30 as turnover 
increased from £279.1 million 
to £297.8 million. The interim- 
dividend was raised from 
0.55pto0.6p. • 

Tempos, page 27 

Oder profit 

Merry down Wine, the cider 
company, yesterday an- 
nounced half-year pretax prof 1 - 
Its of £615,697 (£601^42) on 
turnover of £5 million (£3.9 
million). The company . is 
maintaining the interim divi- 
dend at Ip. 

Tempos, page 27 

Giltrap offer 

Directors of Frank G Gates 
say they are consulting in- 
dependent financial advisers 
about the unsolicited takeover 
offer by Gil trap Holdings. The 
directors, their families and. . 
their trusts hold more than 
half the shares. 

Lists still open 

• The Stock Exchange is still 
accepting applications from 
member companies to register 
as market-makers for the 
forthcoming £5.6 billion 
privatization of British Gas. 

An Exchange official said t h a t 
the lists would be kept open 
until next Friday. So far 14 
companies have registered. 

BET placing 

BET has completed a 
Euroeqmty placing of 3.5 mil- 
lion shares at 429p each, so ; 
reducing borrowing by £15 ] 
mflHon. The shares were part < 
of a 5.9 million block held by ( 
an associate company, , 
Icecahn. , 

Wico chief 1 

Mr Patrice Mignon, head of . 
strategy and planning at ‘ 
Banque Indosuez, has been , 
made chief executive of Wico, 
the stockbroking arm of Exco 
internationaL s 


group yesterday sig n i fi cantly • advisers predicted : “We are 
unproved its chances of vie- how holding Just under 42 per 
tory m the long-running battle cent with another week to go 
for control of AE, the en- • in this battle. We are confident 
gmeering group, with a share -we shall squeak home.” 
buying spree which took its Speculation yesterday was 
state to just over 20 per cent that HoDSs had lifted its state 
__ The rival bidder. Turner & 'after buying for cash two 
Newall, announced that it had significant stakes in AE held 
picked up another 1.5 milli on 5y two key players on the 
AE shares, bringing accep- Maxwell side. Hill Samuel and 
lances of its offer to just over Laurence Prust 
1 1 per cent With the near 30 Earlier this - week, Mr Max- 
per cent stake which T&N well raised the value of his . 
retained from the first attempt rach alternative for AE to 
to acquire AE, it speaks for 280p a share aha- spending a 
more tha n 40 per cent of the hectic few days canvassing 
SrojJP* .... . support from among 30 Iead- 

The battle -is moving to- jpg City institutions. He said 
wards a gra n d s t an d finish on he needed to get “substantial” 
Friday when the T&N offer, pledges of support, but he has 
which cannot be extended, not revealed exactly what sort 
must dose. Hollis had the of agreement he was speiring 
advantage that its own offer The battle for control of AE 

ran remain open after that has been one ofthe most bitter 
. to hit the City in years. T&N 
But, in the dedicate poker was allowed to renew its bid 
game, it was the T&N camp after the Takeover Panel cen- 
which yesterday still appeared sured the tactics u s e d by AE*s 
to have the winning hand. advisers 


lances of its offer to just over 
! 1 per cent. With the near 30 
per cent stake which T&N 
retained from the first attempt 
to acquire AE, it speaks for 
more than 40 per cent of the 
group. 

The battle is moving to- 
wards a grandstand finish on 
Friday when the T&N offer, 
which cannot be extended, 
must dose. Hollis had the 
advantage that its own offer 
can remain open after that 
date.. 

But, in the dedicate poker 
game, it was the T&N camp 
which yesterday still appeared 
to have the winning hand. 


In its formal offer document 
being posted to shareholders 
this weekend, Hollis said that 
the T&N terms would pro- 
duce substantial dilution of 
T&N*s earnings and that T&N 
shares represented a question- 
able investment. Hollis 
pointed out that a major 
portion ofT&N’s profits arose 
in southern Africa. 

Hollis also drew attention to 
the “exposure” of T&N to 
continuing asbestosis claims, 
and it pointed out that the 
group repeatedly refused to i 
quantify them or slate just 
how much insurance cover 
was available. 

AE spokesmen last night 
said that AE was confident 
that the agreed merger whh 
Hollis would win the day, 
adding that the levels of 
support indicated by T&N 
bad so far failed to 
materialize. 

The first closing date for the 
HoUis offer is December 19. 



‘Unfair’ Dollar 
criticism dives 

of screen against 
dealing mark 

By Cliff Feltham By David Smith 

Economics Correspondei 
Criticism of the Seaq elec- The dollar fell yesterd 
tronic market system which touching DM1.97, its low 
has ran into more trouble this point ageing* the mark six 
week, was countered yesterday the early 1980s. The pou 
hj Sr Nicholas Goodisoo, rose by 60 points to 51.43 
chairman of the Stock but lost ground against otl 


• , .* />• - 1 



£263m US deal 
for Tarmac 


5- • 


By Oar City Staff 

Tarmac, the construction 
and building materials group, 
is making its largest ac- 
quisition so far with the 
planned takeover of Lone Star 
Industries, an American quar- 
ries and aggregates business. 

Initially, Tarmac is taking a 
60 per cent stake in a joint 
venture company- buying 

Lone Star for £158 million 25 concrete block plants and 
.with the option to buy the three concrete pipe plants, i 
balance tor £ J 05 million. . together with other, feetiitiejs 
it • Lone 1 Star, _ which is ex- and a cement manufacturing 
pected to turn in profits of £32 plant with capacity of more 
million next year, is based in than a million tonnes. 

Virginia and North and South sir Eric Fountain, Tarmac's 
Carolina, and has assets wrath chairman, said: “We like 

£234 million. sweetheart deals. Our first 

The deal is Tarmac’s second deal with Lone Star worked 
Ste^Two yeais ago out and we are sure this will 
Jt paid £68 milhon fora dutch too.” 
of quarry operations. _ _ The arrangement gives Tar- 

Tne_ latest acquisition — mac, which will move into the 
fouowmg the £15 million of driving seat straightaway, the 
the Mersey Sand and Rode right to mop up the remaining 
company of California this 413 per cent on or after January 
week — dramatically increases l, 1990 . 






Tarmac's US operations. 

These now span six slates 
and take in 30 stone, sand and 
gravel quarries with reserves 
of L5 million tonnes and a 
total < annual production 
capacity of about 25 minion 
tonnes, 82 ready-mixed con- 
crete plant locations with 
more than 850 mixer trucks, 


The initial payment is being 
financed by a placing of more 
than 40 million new Tarmac 
shares at 400p whh a clawback 
arrangement for existing 
shareholders on the basis of 
one for 7.7. Tarmac shares 
eased 9p to 422p on the news. 
Tarmac forecast a final divi- 
dend of 8.64p, up 20 per cent 


China Pays estimates 
record profit for Bryant 


By Alexandra Jackson 

In its offer document fix pared to that of Bryant, and 
Bryant Holdings, the way in which the two 
housebuilder, published yes- businesses would complement 
terday, English C hina Clays cad* other, 
estimates a 20 per cent in- E nglish C hin a Clays an- 
crease in pretax profits to a Bounced its £133 million bid 


record £90 million for the year tor Bryant earlier this month, 
to September 1986. but Bryant’s shares have re- 

- . , mamed above the value of the 

b!4 Yesterday, they closed at 
l^onnaiia.SirAbii Datong 149r 14 percent abo « the 

etenmm o fOm a Clays, aid cash ahemative and 12 per 


cent above the share ofier. 

ness had performed weH The Tempos, pace 27 

steps taken to restructure the 


Stronger 
policing in 
Bank Bill 

By Colin Narbrough 

The Government sees a seed 
for increased international 
co-ordination of iwirfng 
supervision and fur similar 
standards to be adopted in 
financial centres to ensure 
proper policing of the in- 
dustry, Mr Ian Stewart, 
Economic Secretary to the 
Treasury, toM the Com- 
. nums yesterday. 

His remarks came amid 
widespread concern abott 
die growing scope for mal- 
practice and abuse becadse 
- of the rapid expansion of 
banking and other finan- 
cial services. 

Opening the second reading 
debate oa the Banking BID, 
Mr Stewart said that with 
global markets and round- 
the-clock trading, it was 
important for Britain to pat 
new legislation into place 
for regulating financial 
institutions. 

The Bin, which is pranarily 
devoted to the supervision 
of the interests of depos- 
itors, replaces the 1979 Act 
based oa a two-tier struc- 
ture of wmgiiHfil hanlra 
and licensed deposit-tak- 
ers. Mr Stewart said that 
the JMB collapse, involv- 
ing £248 million of inad- 
equately secured loans, 
vividly demonstrated the 
need to strengthen 
supervisors* powers and to » 
impose more exacting du- , 
ties on supervised institu- 
tions. 

The Bifi provides for a new 
statutory Board of Banking 
Supervision - already 
. fimetioning on a nan-statu- 
tory basis — to advise the 
Bank. The majority of its 
members are independent 
of the Bank. 

The distinction between 
banks and deposit-lakers 
wifl end. The bin also 
„ contains provisions to 
enable information to be 
disclosed to other super- 
visors 


Sir Gordon: “too often we rely on wiiisHe-Mowers” 

OFT ‘lacking in power’ 

By Derek Harris, Industrial Editor 
The Office of Fair Trading preventing competition, with 


should have more power to 
investigate restrictive prac- 
tices such as price-fixing car- 
tels, Sir Gordon Borne, the 
OFTs director-general, said 
yesterday. 

Sir Gordon told a Confed- 
eration of British Industry 
conference a “radical 
reappraisal” ofthe 30-year-old 
restrictive practices legislation 
was necessary in the Govern- 
ment's coming review of com- 
petition policy. 

He urged a simpler and 
tougher approach to prohibit 
agreements restricting or 

French in 

Telecom 

‘errors’ 

Mr Geoffrey Pattie, the 
Minister of Information Tech- 
nology, yesterday identified 
Sociele Generate Merchant 
Bank, a French state-owned 
banking group, as the institu- 
tion which surrendered vol- 
untarily 72,800 shares in 
British Telecommunications 
because of “errors” made 
when applications were sub- 
mitted during the' flotation. 

A statement from the bank 
■confirmed the surrender, add- 
ing that the bank had told the 
British authorities in good 
lime when the errors were 
discovered. Neither the bank 
nor its staff made a profit from 
the shares, it said. 

Mr Pattie said the docu- 
ments were given to the 
Director of Public Prosecu- 
tions who saw no need for 
further action. 

Earlier this week, he said 
investigations into suspicious 
applications had led to a 
number of successful prosecu- 
tions. In another case, profit 
from the shares was vol- 
untarily surrendered. In a 
farther case shares were recov- 
ered after an investor failed to 
pay the second instalment 


some exemptions. 

Provided the OFT is told, 
restrictive agreements at 
present can be operated law- 
fully until they may be re- 
ferred to the Restrictive 
Practices Court and judged to 
be against the public interest 

“Too often I and my of- 
ficials have had to rely on 
information from whistle- 
blowers — people who have 
caught wind of an agreement 
that adversely affects them or 
people who have for some ! 
reason fallen out with the j 
other parties” I 


Sir Nicholas, supported by 

Us <Hr«*fnr of 

services, Mr George Hayter, 
who has masterminded the 
new system, said the attacks 
were unfair and that it was 
now operating smoothly. 

He added that the change in 
the dealing system had been 
built into an event “of volcanic 
proportions and the exag- 
gerated press comment on the 
in i ti a l hiccoughs did ns quite a 
lot of damage abroad. 

“But the marfcgt Iww 
adapted with relish and enthu- 
siasm to the new system which 
has worked well — so much so 
that the trading floor Is visibly 
dying. The London Stock Ex- j 
change is the first mqjor stock j 
exchange in the world to 
convert itself from floor trad- 
ing to an electronic and tele- 
phone market** 

Mr Hayter, also speaking at 
a Stock Exchange conference 
for industry in the City, said: 
“1 think most people have now 
recognized that the proof of 
the pudding is in die eating 
and the market has moved 
very quickly indeed to develop 
the opportunities of the screen 
based system.** 

Mr Hayter said that Seaq 
had been set up after a study of 
the Nasdaq computerized 
over-the-counter market in the 
United States. 

• Greenwell Montagu, the 
company at the centre of die 
Seaq problems on Tuesday 
evening, had to trade outside 
the system again briefly yes- 
terday morning because of a 
computer disk hitch within the 
company's operating system. 

A spokesman said the prob- 
lems were unrelated to those of 
Tuesday when a wrongly 
pressed computer key sent a 
stream of outdated closing 
prices on to Seaq screens. 


dives 

against 

mark 

By David Smith 
Economics Correspondent 
The dollar fell yesterday, 
touching DM1.97, its lowest 
point against the mark since 
the early 1980s. The pound 
rose by 60 points to S1.43SS 
but km ground against other 
currencies. 

Sterling ended the week 
near to iis all-time low against 
the mark. Yesterday h fell iv 
more than a pfennig to 
DM2.8318. The sterling index 
was steady at 68.1. 

Dealers said that pressure 
on the dollar was due to 
con tinuing market doubts 
about the Reagan Administra- 
tion after the Ir anian arms 
affair. The pound remained 
vulnerable because of the 
trade deficit, which has total- 
led nearly £3 billion over the 
latest three months. 

The Bank of England acted 
to relieve a record shortage in 
the money markets yesterday. 
It provided a total of £1.86 
billion of assistance to tbe 
markets. The daily shortage, 
of £1.8 billion, beat the pre- 
vious record of £1.75 billion, 
at the end of February. 

It arose from a combination 
of tax payments, a maturing of 
earlier Bank of England assis- 
tance to the markets and large 
end-of-week withdrawals 
from banks by the public. 

The record shortage co- 
incided with make-up day for 
the banks (technically on Sun- 
day) for the new calendar 
month money supply figures. 
A failure to have taken out 
yesterday’s shortage could 
have resulted in large 
distortions. 

The Bank of England an- 
nounced that it was making 
£400 milli on of government 
stock available to the market 
The funding was in the form 
of taplets comprising £200 
million of 10ft per cent Trea- 
sury Convertible 1992, £100 
million of 9 per cent Conver- 
sion 2000, and £100 million of 
8'A per cent Treasury 2007. 

• The finance houses base 
rate for December will be l 1.5 
percent 


LHW application still undecided 


By Lawrence Lever 

The application by LHW 
Futures, the controversial fu- 
tures broker, for membership 
of the Assoriation of Futures 
Brokers and Dealers, the regu- 
latory body for commodity 
and futures dealers, is still 
undecided. 

A LHW spokesman said 
yesterday that the question of 
the firm’s membership has 
still to be resolved. No-one at 
the AFBD was available for 
comment 

LHW was not included in a 
provisional list of AFBD 


members issued in August 

Membership of the AFBD 
would give LHW the nec- 
essary authorization to carry 
on trading when the Financial 
Services Act becomes effective 
next year. An alternative is to 
seek authorization from the 
Securities and Investments 
Board. 

In the past it has been 
heavily criticized for cold 
calling - making unsolicited 
telephone calls — to private 
investors in order to persuade 
them to deal in the futures 
makets. 

In March this year, LHW 


appointed Mr Brian Edgeley, a 
council member of the AFBD 
as managing director. 

Mr Edgeley resigned from 
the AFBD Council on taking 
up his appointment He said 
yesterday that he considered 
the question of LHW’s 
application for membership of 
the AFBD as sub iudice. 

He added: “We are still 
awaiting a decision. We are 
having a dialogue about our 
application and other things 
with the AFBD.” He said also 
that LHW “stopped cold- 
calling at least two years ago.” 





Tell Jacques: buy St Gobain 


Tip across the Channel 


UUT TBDSTS23% 


By Graham Seaijeant, Financial Editor 


St Gobain, the French glass 
and materials group, hopes to 
attract up to 300,000 share- 
holders, possibly including 
some in Britain, in its 
privatization issue launched 
this week by the French 
government. 

Up to 20 per cent of the 
issue may go to overseas 
holders, principally in other 
European countries, and the 
group hopes for a London 
quotation next year. 

With advice from 


has already pitched the shares 
at Fr350 a share compared 
with the issue price of Fr310. 

The sale is the first of a 
series of privatization moves 
by tbe Gaiillist French govern- 
ment, principally to undo tbe 
nationalization programme of 
its Socialist predecessor. But, 
unlike British Gas, St Gobain 
does not foe e a threat of 
renationalization after a fu- 
ture election. 

M Jean-Louds Beffo, the 
group’s chairman, who con- 


Kleinwort Benson, veteran of dneted a roadshow for British 


!<■*«» Bank 11% 

3-month Interbank 
3-month e ll fllbto 

S^pS2Rate7K% 

Federal Funds 6' w%’ 

3-monlh Treasury BOs 558*36%' 


London Fbdnr 
AM $39000 pm-$3895C 
dose $389.00-389^0 (£2 

271.00) 

JtowVogc 

Comex $389.50-33QJXr 


JjO (£270-50- 


NORTHSEAOIL 


the British Telecom rale and 
British manager for this issue, 
small investors are being of- 
fered special incentives, 
including priority application 
for up to ten shares (worth 
£330) and a one-for-ten bonus 
for those who retain their 
holdings for 18 months. But 
dure have been no “Tell Sid** 
gimmicks. 

Lazard Ereres and Banque 
National de Paris, which are 
leading the sale in France, 
have relied on the more direct 
slogan, “St Gobain, j’achete.” 
Sates are already said to be 
brisk and a grey- market, 


institutional investors and 
brokers in the City yesterday, 

rffTTlti 

SA1NT-GOBA1N 

said that the French opposi- 
tion would look at each com- 
pany separately, and rt bad no 
plans to renatianalize St 
Gobain because it “is profit- 
able, international and has no 


It is claimed to be the 
world’s biggest . building 
materials group and wifi be 


asking price of Fr310 per 
share, including non-voting 
certificates issued earlier this 
year, which will become 
shares. The French state will 
raise more than £900 million 
initially from selling its 85 per 
cent bolding, and the remain- 
ing 15 per cent held by 
nationalized banks will be 
sold later. 

Like its great rival, 
Pilkingion Brothers, now fac- 
ing a £1.2 billion bid from 
BTR, St Gobain is benefiting 
from a marked improvement 
in the long-depressed Euro- 
pean market for flat glass and 
construction materials and 
from a modernization and 
cost-cutting prgranune in 
France and Germany. 

Net profits, which fed to £40 

million in 1982, are forecast to 
rise' by two-thirds to £134 
million this year, and 
Kirinwort Grieveson expects 
a further rise of a quarter in 
1987. Following PUksngton, St 
Gobain has earmarked $700 
million for acquisitions in the 
United States, 

St Gobain is estimated to 
have 15 per cent of the world 


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26 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


THE TIMES SATURDAY NOVEMBER 29 1981 


WALL STREET 


Setback for blue chips 
at start of trading 


New York (Renter) - Wall 
Street shares wen mixed in 
qmet early tradm&yesterdsy. 
Rhe chips, led by IBM, moved 
initially towards the Dow 
neon! of 1919.71 set on 
September 4, before 
Other compu te r shares 
moderate gains. 

The Dow Jones indnstrial 
was down 3.94 to 


11282. Advancing issues led 
dednriag issues by a small 
oa a volume of 19 


IBM rase % to 126%, 
Honeywell % to 72 and Gay % 
to 76%. Cbesebrongh, the 
subject of a. bid fkm American 
Brands, rose 1% to 63. 

Sears Roebuck was op % to 
43%, Tiger International gai- 


ned % to 6, ICN Pharmacenti- 
cal was Bp % to 24%. Remad 
was unchanged al 2(H4* 

EF Holton, at 44% was up 
2%, Verity was op % at 2 and 
OMq was induced at 20%. 

The transportation average 
was down 048 at 84435. 
nHKties were down 035 at 
21134 and stocks at 75337, 
were down UO. 

The Standard & Poor’s 100 
index was down 947 at 
23539, wfaOe the S & P 
composite, at 24846, was 
down 031. 

• The accompanying Wall 
Street table refers to Wed- 
nesday’s trading as Tharsday 
was the Thanksgiving holiday 
in the United States. 


MW 

SB 


Novi 

SB 


AMR 

ASA 


AOsGhlrara 

Alcoa 

Amnlnc 

AmYdoHs 

Am Brands 

Am Can 

Am Own'd 

AmBPwr 

AmEnprasa 

Am Horn 

Am Motors 

AmSTnrd 

AmTetoph 

Amooo 

AnncoStsel 

Asarco 

Ashland 08 

AtRfcMald 

Avon Prods 

BkraTstNY 

Banksiw 

BkofBston 

Bank of NY 

Bath Steal 


Brian 
Bg Warner 
Brist Myers 
BP 

BurTwntnd 
Burton Nm 
Burroughs 
CmpbdlSp 
Can Pacific 
CatarpUer 


Central SW 

Champion 

cruise Man 

CtmBkNY 

Chevron 

Chrysler 


dark . . 
Coca Cede 
Coftmte 
CBS 

CM* Gas 

Cmb'tnEng 
OomwOhEd 
ConsEcBs 
Cn Nat Gas 
Cons Power 
CntrlOata 
Coming Gl 
CPCIrS 
Crane 
CurttuWH 
Dart & Kraft 
Deere 


Detroit Ed 
Digital Eq 
Disney 
Dow Cham 
Dresser Ind 
Duke Power 
DuPont 
Eastern Air 

Estm Kodak 
Eaton Cora 
Emerson El 
Exxon Carp 
Fed DU Sis 
• Ex On. a 


58% 68% 
35% 3554 
41% 41% 
B«% Ban 
3% 2* 

34% 34% 
12% 12% 
22 % 22 % 
46 44% 

S5K 36 
81% 31% 
29% 29% 
57% 57% 
80% 79% 
3% 3% 

43% 42% 

27% 27% 
67* 68% 

5% 5% 

14% 14% 

57% 56% 
66% 59% 
29% 29% 

43% 43% 
15% 15% 

42% 42% 

37% 37% 
6% S 
50% 50% 

61% SI 

52 51 

39 37% 

79% 79% 

40 39% 

38% 39% 

81% 61 

"<£% , S% 
11 % 11 % 
39% 39% 
240% 240% 
35% 35 
33% 33% 

36% 36% 
44% 44% 

46% 46% 
39% 39% 
51% 50% 
20 % 21 
38% 35% 
45 40% 

134% 135% 
44% 44% 

32% 33 
33% 34 

49* 49% 
33% 33% 
16 16 
25% 25% 
54% 54% 
78% 77% 
36% 38% 

53 53% 

n/a 54% 
23% 23% 
49% 48% 
18 17* 

104% 105% 
43% 43% 
58% 59% 
19% 19% 
48% 46% 
80% 89% 

nra 9% 
68% 58% 
77 77 

87% 67% 
89% 69% 


Nov 

28 


Nov 

25 


Rrastono 27% 
Fat Chicago 32% 
FatMBncp 53% 
Fat Fame 9% 

FTWacftva 36% 

sss * 

Gen Carp 83% 
QemD/roca 74 
Gen dectric 83% 
Gen Inst 16% 
Gen MBs 44% 
Gon Motors 73 
GnPbUtny 24 
Geneoco 3% 
Georgia Pac 39% 
oasts 48 
Goodrich 44% 
rear 43% 

Inc 19 

Grace 52% 
GtAttaTBC 24% 
GrUnd 33 
GrvxnanCor 28% 
GUT 6 West 67% 
Heinz HJ. 41% 
Hercules 5BK 
HfBd-Pkrd 44% 

R3 r 

mgersoi 57% 
Irand Steel 19% 
IBM 128* 

WCO 12% 

im Paper 78% 
Utt Terfel 54% 
Irving Bank 48% 
JhnsnSJhn 69% 
Kaiser Alum 14* 
Kerr McGee 28 
Ork 84% 

50 

Kroger 31% 
[_Tv7Corp 1% 
Litton 82% 
Lockheed 55% 
Lucky Sirs 31% 
ManHlNsr 45% 
ManvGeCp 2% 
Mapoo 58 
Marine had 46 
Mn Marietta 43 
Masco 27% 
McOonsids 64 
McDonnsI 78* 
Mead 58* 
Men* 110* 
■MnstaMng 113 
MotdOa 39% 
Monsanto 80 
Morgan J.P. 85% 
Motorola 38% 
NCRCtsp 48% 
NLIndstfS 4% 
Nat Disdrs 45% 
Net Med Ent 24% 
NatSmcndt 11% 
NorMkSth 84% 
NWBancrp 38% 
OcdcMPst 28% 
Ogdon 45% 
OttnCorp 44 
Owens-fi 46* 
Pac Gan 0 25% 

ParAm 5% 
Penney J.C. 82 
“ 71% 


ooMiunxi.il ni i 


27% 

31* 

53% 

9% 

89% 

38% 

40 

ra% 

78* 

73 

83% 

17* 

43* 

73* 

23% 

3% 

39% 

48% 

44% 

43 
18% 
51% 

34* 

32% 

28 

68 % 

41% 

58 

44% 

70% 

25% 

56% 

19% 

127 

12 % 

75% 

55 

49% 

89% 

15* 

29% 

81% 

49% 

31% 

1* 

80 

53* 

30* 

45* 

2* 

55% 

46% 

41* 

27% 

64% 

79* 

58% 

110 * 

113% 

38* 

78% 

85% 

38% 

48% 

4* 

45% 

25% 

11 % 

05* 

39% 

28 

46 

44 
47% 
25% 

5% 

61% 

71% 


NOV 

28 


Nov 

25 


Pfizer 6i% era 

PtMtoaDgo 21% 20* 

fSSpV* 74% 71% 

PhSmf* « 

Pctsofcf 70* 70% 

PPGInd 73% 72* 
PrctrGmfii 78 77% 

PbSEftG «* 42* 

Raytheon 66 66% 

RyrtdaMet 43* 44* 

FkXfcwalM 43% 43* 
m Dutch 32* 91% 
sways n/a 61% 
Sara Luo 70 69% 

SFESopac 33 33% 

5chrtj8rgar 32* 32% 

Seed Paper 63% 63* 

Seepem 63% 63% 

SeareRtx* 43* 43* 
Shel Trans 54% 54% 

fffinBk fi% 66* 

Sony 21% 22* 

SthCalEd 35% 35% 
S’WsinBeH 111% 111% 
SSd O 48% 49% 
Sterling tap 44 44% 

SUwwSjP 38 35 

SuiComp 57% 57% 

Tetadyne 320% 320% 
” naoo 38* 39 
aco 33* 34% 
Texas E cor 30% 30* 

Texas Inst 11SK 116% 
Texas IMb 33% 33* 
Textron 67 64% 

TrevtrsCor 44% 45% 
TRW Inc 92% 93% 
UAL Inc 58% 59% 
LMtewrNV 225% 225 
UnCsrtttt 23% 22% 
Un Pac Cor 63% 63% 

Uld Brands 34% 35% 
USGCorp 43% 43% 
UtdTechnol 44* 45 

USXCorp 21% 20 
Unocal 25% 25% 
Jim Wetter 47% 47% 
YfmarLmbt 57* 56% 
is Fargo 106 106% 

ighse B 59% 59% 

WsySti'aer 30% 30% 
WTwtpod 71% 70% 
Woohuorih 43% 44 
Xerox Carp 61 59* 

Zsntti 20* 21 


CANADIAN PRICES 

AmooEag 28* 26% 
McnAlum 42% 42% 
AlgomaSfl 12 12 

Can Pacific 16 16 

Comtoco 13% 13% 
ConBathnst 28% 28% 

Hkr/SW Can 27% 26% 
HdmBMki 24% 24% 

trnssco 33 33% 

kimariaiOl 46% 46% 
teHpe 39% 39% 
RyiTtustco 29% 29% 
Seagram 88 87% 

StBalCo 20 20 

ThmsnN'A* 28* 28% 
VarttyCorp 2.72 270 
. ... . WCT 13 13* 


Europe may hand £300m 
tax-cut leeway to Lawson 


By Rodney Lord, Economics Editor 

The Chancellors scope for had to reckon with the views 
' of the European Commission 


cutting income lax could be 
increased by £300 million if 
the European Commission 
succeeds in forcing Britain to 
put value-added tax on new 
commercial buddings before 
the Budget 

Oral pleadings before the 


and the Court of Justice. 

The infraction proceedings 
cover new building, fuel and 
power supplied to business, 
metered water and sewerage 
services to industry, animal 
feed stuffe and protective 


European Court of Justice by clothing, 
the Commission and the Brit- Of these, much the most 
ish Government are due to significant in revenue terms is 


begin shortly. The foil case is 
not expected to be heard until 
March but if judgment is 
delivered before the Budget 
the Chancellor, Mr Nigel 
Lawson, could take the 
opportunity of complying. 

In his 1985 Budget, Mr 
Lawson pledged that he would 
not extend the range of goods 
and services Subject to VAT 
any further in the life of this 
Pa rliam ent. But he acknowl- 
that the Government 


new building (repairs and 
alterations are already 
to tax) which could raise ; 
minion a year at the present 
standard rate of 15 per cenL 
Fuel and power would raise 
only f 7 * miDion as most of 
the tax would be offset a gains t 
the VAT levied on industry’s 
outputs. 

There is still some un- 
certainty about the 
Commission’s attitude to 
VAT on budding. It is 



Nreel Lawson: timing of the 
judgment is important 

chaBeqg m g the zero-rating of 
new building other than hous- 
ing “within a social policy.” 

If) for instance, afl non- 
council housing were subject 
to VAT that would raise an 
additional £575 million a year. 
But the Government contends 


COMPANY NEWS 


• MATTHEW HALL: Interim 
dividend 1.7Sp (1.5). Figures in 
£000 for nine months to 
September 30. Turnover 
377,147 (294.864), pretax profit 
12,597 (11,370), tax 4,728 
(5.310). earnings pershare 
I0.20p (8.73). Some trans- 
actions have yet to be completed 
which could affect the year's 
results. However, the board 
expects that pretax profit for the 
foil year win be not less than 
£17.5 million. Negotiations are 
at an advanced stage for the 
acquisition of a fire engineering 
company in the United States. 

• CLONDALK1N GROUP: 
The company has arranged the 
placing of 1,210,000 new or- 
dinary shares (equal to 9.9 per 
cent of the shares in issue) at 
480p to raise £5.2 million before 
costs. The placing is subject to 
shareholders* approval. 

SAFEWAY STORES: 
Safeway UK Holdings' £100 
million unsecured deep dis- 
count stepped interest loan 
slock 201 1 has been guaranteed 
by Safeway Stores as pan of the 
re-organization of the Safeway 
group being carried out pursu- 
ant to the leveraged buyout of 
Safeway Stores. 

FRESHBAKE FOODS 
GROUP: Interim dividend 0.7p 
(0.6). Figures in £000 for six 
months to September 27 
(comparisons restated). Turn- 
over 65.372 (55,217), preiax 
profit 24*2 (1,65), tax 730 
‘ 9). earnings per share 3.27p 
(2.59). The board says that the 
group is trading strongly in all 
areas of its business and that the 
directors view the future with 
confidence. The board expects 
to apply to be admitted to the 
official list in the near future. 

_ VIEWPLAN: Interim divi- 
dend 0.42p (same). Figures for 
six months to September 30. 


Turnover £4,531,521 

(£1,850.152), pretax profit 
229,968 (367,316), tax 80,489 
(128461). _ 

• BRITISH PRINTING AND 
COMM UNICATION 
CORPN: The group has com- 
pleted the acquisition of Prov- 
idence Gravure for St 52.5 
million (£106.64) cash. 

• MILLWARD BROWN: In- 

terim dividend I.25p (Ip for 
five months). Figures in £000 
for six months to September 30. 
(1985 adjusted). Turnover 4.473 
(3480), pretax profit 708 (560), 
tax 268 (240), earnings per share 
7.3p (5.3). . 

The directors say that they 
anticipate a satisfactory result 
for the year. 

• CIRCAPRJCNT HOLDINGS: 
Dividend 1478p(L05). Figures 
in £000 for year to August 31. 
Turnover 8,507 (7447), pretax 
profit 627 (636), tax 209 (148), 
earnings per share 7.9p (94). 
The board says that sates with 
improved margins and the order 
intake are at record levels. 

• MURRAY TECHNOLOGY 
INVESTMENTS: Results for 
six months to September 30. 
Net asset per share fell by 4.99 
per cent from 116.19p to 
1 10.39p per share. Net income 
59,788 or 0.40p per share 
(45419 or 0.30p). In keeping 
with company policy, there will 
be no interim dividend. The 
directors expect to recommend 
a reduced dividend for the 
current year. 

• A F BULGES A CO*. No 
interim dividend (same). Fig- 
ures in £000 for half year to July 
31. T umover 4.6 1 9 (4.476), 
profit before tax and exceptional 
costs 205 (268), earnings per 
share 0.38p (0.26). 

The company “looks with 
confidence" to the year ahead. 


• BRITISH LAND: Guinness 
Mahon and Co has arranged a 
£50 million unsecured under- 
written 1 0-year multi-currency 
cash advance and sterling 
commercial paper facility for 
the co mpany. 

• BASSETT FOODS: Interim 
dividend 1.95p (1.78). Figures 
in £000 for 28 weeks to October 
10. Sales 41419 (37.519), trad- 
ing profit 2428 (1.582), pretax 
profit 1.860 (1.055), tax 371 
(353), earnings per share before 
extraordinary items 10.82p 
(5.15). 

INVESTMENT AB BEUER: 
The plans for the company to 
sell its holding of Malmsten and 
Bergvall shares to Kebo will not 
be implemented. 

• CARR'S MILLING IN- 
DUSTRIES: The company has 
purchased Keytor, a Carlisle 


that ail bousing is for social 
purposes. 

Minister s are determined to 
fight the case strongly. The last 
important EEC case to go 
against Britain was the actum 
oa discrimination between 
beer and wine. The Govern- 
ment complied with the 
court’s ruling in the 1984 
Budget by increasing the ex- 
cise duly on beer by 2p a pint 
and reducing the duty mi 
wine. 

The Chancellor is expected 
to have some modest scope for 
cutting income tax even with- 
out any help from indirect 
taxes. 

Economic growth at an 
estimated 3 per cent win keep 
non-oil revenues buoyant and 
some of the additional £4.75 
billion of puhEc spending will 
come back to the Ti 
tax revenue on 
sector pay. 


private company engaged in 
electronic, electrical and 
T nwim nirai engineering desig 

injmiiftfra iBimH trreralW rirm 

The net value of the assets 
acquired is £443,000 and the 
consideration of £819,500 is 
wholly cash. 

• NORTH BRITISH STEEL 
GROUP HOLDINGS: No divi- 
dend. Figures in £000 for year to 
September 27. Sates 13488 
(14,189), pretax profit 104 (63 
loss), no tax (same), earnings per 
share 2p (!4p loss). 

• SCOTTISH INVESTMENT 
TRUST: Final dividend 44Sp 
(3.95), making 645p (5.95). 
Figures in £000 for year to 
October 31. Pretax revenue 
8494 (7,697), tax 2,905 (2,641). 
earnings per share 6.S5p (541). 
Net asset value after deducting 
prior charges at par value 483. Ip 

(349). 


LONDON FINANCIAL FUTURES 


Itaraa Month Startng 

Dae 88 

Mar 87 i 

JunS7 

ffig=z 

Mar 88. 

PmkM 


U3 day's total open 
Moon EurodoBv 


Dec 88. 

Mar 87. 

-JunS7 

Sap 87 

USTiaaaonrBoad 

Dec 88 

Mar 87 

JunS7 


S&80 56-60 68.75 

88-13 89.13 8946 

83.16 89.18 89.10 

Vffr ~ ~ 

15752 

PravtouadaVstD 
93.99 9336 

94.09 94.06 

94.02 9400 

9081 93.30 

Previoue day's t 
99-32 9932 

aaai sa-ie 


94JB 

94JJ0 

sam 


Short GM 
Dec 86 — . 
Mar 67 _ 
Jwi87 — 


99-19 
SB-25 
*/T 

Previous days total open 
9604 9804 9804 95-62 

— 9817 


ExtVW 
8866 708 . 

8175 798 

89U9 118 

89.12 78 

sa£6 O 
88JB 0 

i Merest 24918 
944 
9408 817 

94U2 297 

93*2 171 

I open Manat 3188 
99-14 1286 

38-17 1027 

97-20 0 


Dec! 

Mar 87 

Jin 87 — 
Sap 87™ 
FT-SE100 

Dac 88 

Mar 87 




10813 

108-22 

K7T 

Htf 

163/40 

19840 


10 

0 

0 


878 


Previous total ooan Merest 18704 

10825 10801 10804 975 

10830 10805 10809 17389 

— 10800 0 

Ptevious day’s total open MweM 2831 
16430 163-00 163-30 852 

168L40 18840 78800 1 



Jyske Bank, Denmark, is proud to 
announce the opening of a London Branch, 
with Licensed Deposit-Taker status, 
on 2nd December, 1986. 


Jutland House 
119-120 Chancery Lane 
London 
WC2A1HU 
Telephone: 01 831 2778 
Telex: 266093 jyskbk G 
Telefax: 01 405 2257 


Wbank 

London Branch 


MONEY MARKETS AND GOLD 


Ctearrng Banks 11 
finance House 11% 

Dtocsmt Maricct Levs % 
OuwngMHMtll Low 10 
Wsek&uxCIO* 

TreaswrBMi (Discount %} 

fSK IO^jj & 10 **ai 
3 mnth IO^k 3mnth ICP'm 

Pikue Bam BOa (DSacoum %) 

1 mnth KH’u-lO'^^mnth ICPSr-ID* 

3 mnth 10 z >a- 10 "i« 6 mmfi 10 a w 10 °s 

Trade Ba*JDtsccunJ%J 
1 mntfi 11 *K 2mmh 11'** 

3 mnth 11«» 6mSh 11’* 

Mwbank(%) 

Ovarraght open 11* dose 12 
1 weak 1 1 >6-11 6mnth 11%-11’w 

1 mnth 11 ] w-11'ii 9mn9i 11 %- 11 ’* 
3nrnm T1’«#-11% 12 mtfi 11%-tl’* 

Local Aaftodty Deposits (%) 

2 days 10% 7 days 10% 

1 mrnh 11 Somtn 11 % 

Bmnth 11 % I 2 rmn It 3 * 


TREASURY BILLS 


:E469j 3M aSotBctflOOM 

:£97^4% raccivwt 72% 

Last wea k : £97 -3»% recskwdb S2% 

Avga rate: £186892% last wk £106550% 
*:E1«M raptaca£1(XM 


ECGD 


Fixed Rata Sterling Export Finance 
Scheme IV Average r eference rate for 
interest period November 1, 1986 to 
November 28, 1988 inclusive: 11-248 par 
cent 


Pressure on Japan 
to open markets 

By Onr C o respondent, Tokyo 
The Japanese financial new law to intervene; I very 


community in London was 
told yesterday by Mr Raul 
Chaimon, Secretary of State 
for Trade and Industry, that, 
from next year, be would have 


much hope I do not have to do 
5o,” Mr .ChanDon said affer 
meetings with Japanese 
Government leaders. 


the power' to intervene if the 

present unequal access to the . were - ■^P a ^ esc seQJ ri^ s 
..rr cnmnanies m London thrwi 
Japanese market for Bntisi 

companies continued. 

His power win come with 
the newpinancial Sendees Act 
which takes effect next year. 

He said the community would 
face legal retaliation unless 
British institutions were given 
equal opportunities in Japan. 

Mr Oiann nn acknowledged 
that progress was being made. 

Japan is awarding more li- 
cences to US and European 
financial companies to op- 
erate in . the grotring Tokyo 
money and securities market 
“I have powers under the 


companies m London, three 
Japanese members of the 
Stock Exchange, with 40 more 
eligible to join, there were only 
seven British securities deafen 
in Tokyo. 12 banks, and three 
Tokyo Stock Exchange seats 
held by British companies. 

During his meetings, Mr 
Channoa repeated EEC do- 

mands that Japan cut its taxes 
and halt ns restrictive grading 
system for wine and whisky 
imports. An cod to the gradii^ 
System would be seen as a 
symbol of Japan's willingness 
to open its markets, he said. 


Backsliders warned on 
training by MSC chief 

By Derek Harris, Industrial Editor 


Industries which backslide 
on voluntary training . were 
given a strong warning yes- 
terday by Mr Bryan Nichol- 
son, chairman of the 
Manpower Services Commis- 
sion (MSC). 

He hinted thatsome statu- 
tory industrial training boards 
could be revived, leading to 
reintroduction of levies on 
sector companies. 

Mr Nicholson, speaking at a 
Chemical Industries Associ- 
ation conference in Harrogate, 
made clear his concern about 
some indnstrial sectors — 
unlike that of chemicals with 
its strong training organiza- 
tion — making little effort over 
training workers. 


The MSC has been watch- 
ing training dosely since 1981 
when 16 of the 23 
industrial t raining 
were wound up. 

There are now more than 
100 BOn-StatUtory t raining 
organizations but their effec- 
tiveness has been variable. 

Mr Nicholson said: “Those 
industries which have made 
little effort to keep the grand 
promises they made when 
most of the industrial 
boards were abolished 
not be allowed to shirk for 
ever. 

“I don’t think it wifl be 
allowed to happen." 


TRADITIONAL OPTIONS 


ffrafOMfin 
Nov 17 
Doci 
Doc 15 
Cal options i 


Loaf Docferafion fiarSetflentat 

Nov 28 Fab 19 Mar 2 

DSC 12 - Mar 5 Marie 

Jan 2 Mar 19 Mar S3 

i are ora 28/11/86 Pentfand knfeoMaa, Conroy Pats, GtaMd 


Lawrence. JFB. Gumaas Fast Stewart Narin, Wordptex Mormafion Systems, London 
Ssca^ Litter & Co, Hanson treaL STC, Abaca Konraiara, 600 Group. Hujnes Foods. 
Wm. Morris Rns Aits, Somd {Mfusiorv European Farrias Grotp. ParkcWe Hokfeg. 
Wood SW. 


Put Hughes Foods. 
& Cat STC. 


Put &( 


FOREIGN EXCHANGES 


STERLING SPOT AND FORWARD RATES 


rtay*aiteioa 


NYkxk 1^3181X330 1^350-1^*360 

Montraal 13659-1^901 1^859-1-3887 

Amadara3.198S-3-21®I 3.188882090 

Bruasais 583089L15 5832-59.03 

Cphgan 10.7130-107315 10J1S7-107284 

DuhSi 1.0422-1 JX60 1-0428-1.0438 

Frank»uiT2JE75i8*15 ^8298-2^339 

Lisbon 210J5-213^ 2108821203 

Madrid 191.75-19300 19179-19206 

196020-197250 196021-198638 

Oslo 107828103080 107840-103069 

with 1975 mb aam at 


O58056pram 

a41-033prem 

1 %-IXpnn 

20-15prm 

1%-Kpram 

24-30A 

1 %* 1 %praa 

78117da 

l4-32dto 

Ipnan-Zdfe 

384%<Bs 


SaatB 

1.881.75prem 

128121 pram 
4%-4Kprara 
S847prem 
811 
71-1 _ 

4%-4%prem 
221 -34l ab 
28H5dla 
3prem-ldb 
9*-10%rtta 


ana aaM at 681 (day’s nnga 68J8681). 


OTHER STERLING RATES 



taBacartrachna 19675-198.75 

Hang Kong dollar 11.168811.1779 

Ma rape* 1830-1830 

fraqdhar — nJa 

KtMottAnrKD 0A1904L42S0 


DOLLAR SPOT RATES 


1373813765 
2.19382-1948 
25005-25025 
. 0.650806508 
13843-1.3848 
6380055850 


KD 

MatoysJa dotor _ 
Mexico poso . 


37317- 8737 2 
1220.812705 

New Zeeland doiar 27972-251 02 

Stud Arabia riyai 536385^1030 

* MradoRar 3.1431-3.1518 

Airies rand : — 3.1747-3-1912 

UAEctirfari 62S2862920 

UoydaBartt 



Auttmtor 

i 11%-lfl 


_(%» 

1 mnth 11 %- 11 % 2mntti 11 %- 11 % 
3 mrah 11 %- 11 % Bmnto ll%-11% 
9 mirth 11%-11% 12mth 11%-11% 

SteritogCDs(%) 

-10»n 3 mnth 11 *- 11 % 


12mth ll’tvll'u 


1 ninth 11'ia-t 

SMh n%-n% 

Do8arCDa(%) 

1 mrrth 6.10-6.05 3imth538&90 

Bmnth 558S35 12 mth 550835 


EURO MONEY DEPOSITS % 


7 days 5%-8'w 

3 mmh 6%-6 


7 days 4"ia-4 , « 
3 mnth 4*-4% 
French Franc 
7 days 7 l ia-7*t» 
3 mnth FivFn 


7 days 1%-1% 
3mrth 4-3% 
Van 

7 days 4»w*4‘* 
3 ninth 4%-4% 


Bmnth 
cad 
1 mirth 
Bmnth 
cal 
1 mnth 
Snvrth 
caD 

1 mnth 
6 mmh 
c an 

1 mmh 
B mnth 


6%-6% 

0»M-6»w 

6*«rS».a 

54 

4 13 ■#-" i* 

4«*.»ia 

7186% 

T't+Vn 

8%-8% 

1 %-% 

4-3% 

4^% 

414-3% 

4*-4% 

4184% 


GOLD 


GottS3».0838930 
KnjOTnand* (parcoM: 

S M75839050 (E28658Z715(8 
Soverwgra' (newt 
SSI^&Sd COSi 75-64-50 ) . 
Ptahnam 

$49330 (£343.65) 

- J — MWT 


RECENT ISSUES 


EQUITIES 


C250P) 


Avis 

BCE (38pj 
Baker Hants Sndr (17Dp) 
Btanheim Ext* (B“ * 
BSstordBatiBrsoa 
Brake Bros «25p) 
Crtygrava (iQOp) 

Daniel S <130p) 

Geest (i2Sp) 

©entree (I6p) 

Gotten RueaeO 
Great Southern 
Guthrie Coro (1! 

Hamsori (15Gp) 

Interfink Express ( 

Lon Assc hv Tet 
Ltoyds Chemist 01.. 
Lon& Moa upuMmi (1 
Mecca leisure (I35p) 
Mle r & Santhouso fll 
Miss Sam Hktes (II 

sag^ 

Sun* (135p) 

rsa Group poop) 


Wootkre Betorj^104p) 



Want Group 


2324 +'2 
444 +1 

140 
143 
151 -1 
86-2 
1S6 
166+2 
50+10 
207+1 
164-1 
166-1 
160 
207-1 
54 
133 
171 
1504 -4 
173-3 
105 
100 
130 
140 
774-4 
1364-4 
166 
8S-1 
104-1 



RIGHTS ISSUES 

Backs Leisure N/P 
Bba Arrow FfP 
Br. Beraol F fp 
Cook Cwm WP 
GfenfWd N/P 
Nortefe Cap F/P 
Patrocan F/P 
Regaflen N/P 
Throg Sec N/p 
Wad a teg ton N/p 
(Jeeue prtea in breckats). 


LONDON TRADED OPTIONS 


Sartoa Jm Aar M Jot 


ASod Lyons 

300 

15 

25 

33 

10 

15 

21 

r30S> 

330 

b 

15 

19 

33 

35 

40 


300 

1 

8 

— 

62 

65 

— 

BP 

800 

84 

102 


2 

11 

_ 

f6 75) 

850 

47 

89 

80 

11 

33 

42 


700 

17 

33 

50 

3b 

60 

68 

Cons Goto 

550 

127 

180 

_ 

3 

10 

_ 

r«i) 

600 

90 

110 

125 

10 

22 

30 


650 

53 

n 

90 

2b 

42 

52 

Coimaulds 

2B0 

65 

79 


% 

2 

__ 

C323J 

260 

45 

59 

70 

1% 

4 

7 


300 

30 

48 

59 

3 

8 

12 


330 

12 

23 

35 

16 

21 

27 

Com Union 

260 

13 

21 

28 

10 

17 

20 

PM) 

280 

5 

12 

20 

24 

31 

35 


300 

1% 

8 

14 

42 

45 

47 

CahteS Whs 

300 

36 

83 

65 

6 

15 

20 

(*325) 

325 

21 

35 

— * 

17 

27 



360 

9 

20 

— 

32 

40 




375 

2 

— 

— 

bZ 


— 

GBC 

160 

29 

34 

44 

1% 

4 

6 

(*184) 

180 

13% 

20 

28 

6 

12 

12 


300 

5 10% 

17 

18 

22 

24 

Grand Met 

360 

12? 

127 

_ 

1 

1% 



r«74) 

390 

92 

97 

_ 

1 

4 




420 

6b 

77 

K> 

2% 

9 

14 


460 

35 

47 

63 

12 

20 

25 

IQ 

950 

150 

18? 


3 

7 


P082) 

1000 

1U2 

120 

147 

6 

15 

20 


1050 

68 

88 

117 

12 

30 

38 


1100 

29 

57 

87 

33 

85 

63 

Land Sec 

800 

5? 

61 

«7 

1% 

3 

6 

(*347) 

330 

24 

38 

43 

4 

9 

12 


360 

6% 

17 

24 

19 

22 

25 

Mario ftSpen 

180 

14 

24 

30 

7% 

6 

7 

(187) 

200 

6 

13 

10 

14 

17 

19 


220 

1 

b 

9% 

33 

35 

25 

Shei Trims 

850 

102 

120 

138 

3 

90 

90 

rwo) 

900 

67 

85 

105 

16 

37 

47 


550 

37 

55 

75 

37 

62 

72 

TraiaiBV House 

250 

32 

43 

60 

2 

10 

13 

C28S) 

280 

19 

29 

37 

11 

16 

20 


300 

10 

18 

a 

24 

27 

31 

■me 

70 

10% 

13 

15 

1 

2 

3% 


80 

3* 

6 

10 

4% 

6 

7% 


BO 

1% 

2* 

B 12% 

14 14% 


- -1 

wnW 

Dec 

Mfe 

Job Dac Mra 

•ten 

Beecham 

360 

82 

79 


1 

2 


r419) 

390 

32 

SO 

63 

2 

8 

13 


420 

111 

3? 

43 

B 

PO 

30 


480 

1 

14 

24 

33 

47 

53 

Boots 

200 

38 

49 

49 

1 

3 



220 

16% 

28 

34 

2 

8 

10 


240 

4 IS* 

22 

11 

16 

22 

BTH 

280 

B 

» 

77 

11 

14 

19 

(*279) 

300 

— 

10 

17 


30 

33 


307 

1 

— 

— 

33 




. 650 

100 

110 

125 

P 

5 

10 

rTsa 

700 

55 

70 

85 

5 

15 

28 


750 

17 

40 

58 

25 

35 

S5 

Slue Crete 

800 

80 

83 

98 

4 

10 



B50 

23 

S3 

70 

19 

30 

35 


700 

7 


— 

S3 



Do Beets 

860 

135 

IfiO 


2 



r77o) 

700 

90 

125 

145 

7 

30 

40 


750 

53 

98 

120 

15 

50 

60 


800 

20 

70 

100 

45 

70 

85 

Uxors 

300 

36 

SO 

64 

2* 

6 


C332) 

330 

12 

3? 

48 

10 

15 

20 


380 

2 

16 

30 

30 

3? 

34 

GKN 

240 

37 

45 

50 

1 



f274) 

280 

19 

31 

37 

5 

m 

15 


280 

9 

20 

28 

14 

19 



900 

2% 

12 


98 

34 


Glaxo 

900 

35 

77 

104 

10 

28 

38 

fSI^ 

950 

8 

52 

79 

40 

53 

83 


1000 

2 

32 

57 

88 

m 

97 


1050 

2 

19 


138 

137 


USS? 11 

ISO 

42 

45 


% 



f201) 

180 

*Z* 27% 33% 

1 




200 

7 

15 

22 

a to* 

14 


220 

1 

6 

12 

21 

23 25% J 


Cafia 

Sari— Dac Mar 


Put* 

Jm Dac Mar Jm 


ssr 


500 

550 

600 


30 58 
4 25 

1 


73 8 27 32 

40 40 45 52 


Thom Biff 

420 

63 

75 

95 

1% 

5 

6 

(*475) 

460 

;» 

46 

65 

8 

19 

25 


500 

9 

23 

43 

30 

37 

4b 


550 

1 

13 

— 

78 

82 


Tftaco 

330 

55 


___ 

% 



(*381) 

380 

2b 

42 

55 

2 

11 

13 


390 

4 

2b 

3/ 

15 

18 

30 


420 

1* 

TS 

20 

45 

46 

55 


Sartaa 

Fab 

J§ 3L 

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THE TIMES SATURDAY NOVEMBER 29 1986 


■ . v.:;^ 
■ ■■ : 

■ ■ ■ ^ 

. ■ ^ 

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■»>.■■- 

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•— * Ttz 







STOCK MARKET 


Grand Met advances 25p as 
10m shares change hands 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


COMMENT] 


A testing time for 
the Panel’s status 


By Michael Clark 


Grand Metropolitan, the 
drinks, hotels and food empire 
bmh by Sir Maxwell Joseph, 
was the toast among investors 
yesterday as more than £212 
milli on added to the group’s 
stock market value. 

The share price leapt 25p to 
a sew high of 482p as almost 
10 million shares changed 
hands in hectic trading. 

Dealers claimed a combina- 
tion of bid speculation and 
heavy institutional ■ buying 
ahead of a major bullish 
circular being published on 
tiie company by Wood 
Mackenzie, the broker, had 
been responsible for this latest 
finny of activity in the shares. 

There is already talk ofa bid 
from America from either 
Nkbfecn, the food manufac- 
turer, or RJF. Reynolds, the big 
cigarette company which 
would obviously be keen on 
getting its hands on a broad 
spread of non-tobacco busi- 
nesses such as Grand Met 

Reynolds had been tipped 
in the past as a possible buyer 
of Grand Mefs US cigarette 
business Liggett, which it dis- 
posed of for £97 minion a few 
week’s ago. 

Speculation was increased 
earlier this week by the news 
that a line of 4 million Grand 
Met shares (1 per cent) had 


been snapped up in the market 

by one buyer. 

Dealers are convinced that 
someone is trying to build up a 
near 5 per cent stake in the 
company — possibly prior to 
launching a full bid. 

A spokesman for Grand 1 
Met said: “There - is no ev- 
idence of a major build tip in 
the shares, yet.” 

Yesterday’s flurry of activ- 
ity was sparked off in the’ 
traded options market where 
more than 2,000 contracts 
were written. There was heavy 
support for the January 420p 
and 460p series. 

Wood Mackenzie is rfii* to 
publish its review of the 


FTA I 
ALL SHARE! 


mfflsm grand metropolitan giS 

remains target of Wmm, 
|MM|| bid s peculation i j|i| 

Jan Feb Mar Apr. May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov 


The broker ciaimf the Grand 
Met board has now got its act 
together following a recent ne- 


at its highest level of the day 
62 up at 1,2922 — a rise on 
the account of 18. The FT-SE 


of three white knights to race 
to the defence of Standard in 
its efforts to fight off a £1.3 
billion bid from Lloyds Hanir 
earlier this year, haH lifted his 
stake in the company to 628 
percent. 

Dealers reckon he may have 
since added to that ho lding 
following some strong buying 
of the shares through* 
Cazenove, the broker. But on 
Thursday he announced his 
resi g na tio n from the board of 
Standard as he became 
increasingly engulfed in a 
financial dispute back home 
involving his son and the 
National Bank of Brunei. 

Now market-men are 
sp e cu lating that he is ready to 
sell his stake on to one of the 


comoanv next week attend of shuffle and that the shares are 100 share index, finished 42 , other two rescuers Australian 
the figures emeeted overdllc for a re>ratmg. u At up at 1,636.7. • financier Mr Robert Holmes 4 

this level, they are looking Among leading shares there Court and the Hongkong 

_ . . , . „ _ cheap," said a leading broker. 1111 bu sinessman Sir Y.K. Pao. 

*■—,» The rest of the equity • Shares of Dalgety, the Meanwhile, Mr John 

oeuu igiiau'd Group, she fast market soent- another ouiet Sirilim Drmm hp Cnaivinv iitai-u. 


industrial cteanfog group, is 
about to hit the acqnisifa 
trail. Speculation suggests it 
is talking to another USM 1 
services group. Mr Alan Bal- 
dwin, chairman, refuses to 
comment. The scares were 
unchanged at 130p. 

December 9. 

The publication has already 
attracted a great deal of atten- 
tion among the institutions. 


overdue for a re-rating. “At 
this level, they are looking 
cheap," said a leading broker. 

The rest of the equity 
market spent another quiet 
session with most of the 
available cash still tied up in 
the £5.6 bQtion British Gas 
flotation. 

There was some selective 
support for blue chips, but the 
level of turnover remained at 
a low ebb. However, senti- 
ment remained firm helped by 
a good showing for the 
Government in the latest 
opinion polls. 

The FT share index dosed 


TO PLACE YOUR 

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□p at 1,636.7. 

Among leading shares there 

• Shares of Dalgety, the 
SpQkrs food gimp, coaid be 
dae for a renting after a 
meeting this week with Chase 
Manhattan Securities, the 
broker. Mr David Dome, 
chairman of Dalgety, 
apparently pat np an u npr ea - 
sive performance, and the 
market reckons that the 
shares, np lip at 277p, 
look cheap. 

was support for 1CI 9p dearer 
at £10.85, TrustboHse Forte 
25p to 1 82Jp and Glaxo 3p to 
918p as more than 2 million 
shares were traded. 

Gilts drew encouragement 
from the steadier performance 
of the pound on the foreign 
exchange scoring gains of £fA 
at the longer end. The 
Government broker’s de- 
cision to issue an extra £400 
million of three existing 
“taps” made little impact... 

Bnnzl, the paper and 
packaging group, was up 6p at 
21 Ip after a lunch at Phillips 
& Drew, the broker. Rival 
Klein wort Grieveson has re- 
cently raised its forecast of 
profits. ( 

Alter a week of speculative 
buying and drama in the 
boardroom, shares of Stan- 
dard Chartered, the inter- 
national bank, came in for 
profit taking yesterday and 
finished the day 14p lower at 
810p — a rise on the week of 

6p. 

Earlier this week, the shares 
jumped to 834p on confirma- 
tion that the wealthy Malay- 
sian financier Tan SriKhoo 
Teck Puat, who had been one 


Hong Kong 
ethics code 
for banks 

Hong Kong tAP-Dow 
Jones) — Mr Robert Fell, the 
Hong Kong Banking Commis- 
sioner, yesterday put forward 
a model code of conduct for 
banks and deposit-taking 
companies in the . Crown 
Colony. 

The document, which has 
no statutory force, asks finan- 
cial institutions in Hong Kong 
to produce standardized elitics 
codes for their staff barring 
them from making improper 
loans to themselves, friends or 
relatives; significantly limiting 
the size and kind of gifts they , 
can accept; preventing dealing 
on the baas of information 
learnt as a result of business 
dealings; and discouraging 
employees from holding out- 
side jobs. 

The 17-page set of guide- 
lines was compiled with the 
advice of the Crown Colony’s 
banks and deposit-taking 


K , ” . " . ' ^ 


Mr. '"k; ^ y>’z 

* i 


ECO the likely victor 
but not at this price 



Robert Fdk cracking down 
on ‘embarrassing* practices 

companies associations, and 
after direct consultation with 
some banks. It also reflects the 
views of the independent 
-commission against corrup- 
tion, which is responsible for 
prosecutions under Hong 
Kong's tough prevention of 
bribery ordinance. 

Mr Fell said the imposition 
of a code of conduct is aimed 
at cutting back on gifts and 
other “embarrassing’ practices 
in the financial industry. 

He many financial 
institutions already have com- 
prehensive ethics codes for 
staff some of them sfiffer than 
what the government's new 
proposals recommend. But he 
said those which have not laid 
down such rules will be asked 
to formulate a code based on a 
model prepared by the 
Commissioner's office and 
submit their versions to the 
government for approval 
Under the codes, bank or 
deposit-taking company em- 
ployees who accept gifts, take 
loans or trade on information 
they lean in their jobs will be 
asked to disclose those activ-. 
ities. 

. Spokesmen for the indostiy 
weioonjedtheguidelines. 


At last those terribly nice 
people from the West Coun- 
try are doing something 
opportunistic and aggressive. 
English China Clays' aspira- 
tions to move into the 
housebuilders’ “big six" 
shows the group's keeness to 
seize opportunities to en- 
hance its business. 

In the past, ECC dabbled in 
housebuilding, selling about. 
400 homes a year. However,' 
with the purchase in 1985 of 
E H Bradley the business 
doubled. The management’s 
appetite was whetted and 
soon became aware of such 
delights as economies of scale 
and geographical spread. 

The attractions of Bryant 
Holdings are manifest It has 
a huge land bank, a fair 
proportion of which is in the 
prosperous South-east It has- 
a good reputation in the 
industry, an experienced 
management and a quality 
product Bryant's operations 
dovetail with ECCs in style 
and geographical position 
while its profits performance 
suggests, there is room for 
improvement 
In the past, Bryant was 
dominated by the founding 
family. The commitment is 
still there in the shape of 
Chris Bryant who is chair- 
man and manag in g direc to r. 
Directors’ and family share- 
holdings account for about 20 
per cent of the equity. 

Until a few years ago it was 
widely believed the family 
would sell out in due course 
since there were no obvious 
heirs. However, since then, 
the nianap»m«nt team . 
been revitalized. 

If Bryant bases its defence 
on its 8,000-plot land bank, 
worth £72 million on a 
historic cost basis, it will ha ve 
a problem. 

On tire other hand, at the 
current value of the bid, ECC 
is paying about £17,000 a 
plot Based on an average 
selling price of £50,000, this 
appears to be no more than a 
normal market price. The 
property and construction 
interests are, therefore, 
thrown in for virtually noth- 
ing. However, since Bryant 
no longer reveals the profit- 
ability of its divisions, it is 
hard to evaluate these busi- 
nesses independently. 

If ECC were to pay 150pa 
share, this would seem to be a 
fair price. It is, for instance. 

66 per cent higher than last 
month's rights rake of 90p. 
And — even n they were 
wanted— most of the obvious 
white knights are busy. . • 



FMAMJ J ASO ND JFMAMJ JASON 


Merrydown Wine 

At first rightit is tempting to 
regard Merrydown Wine’s 
half-year performance as a 
trifle disappointing. Profits 
before tax rose by only 
£14,000. 

However, the figures dis- 
guise an increase of 26 per 
cent in total sales and a 
growth of more than 20 per 
cent in cider sales. 

The dder result contrasts 
markedly with overall growth 
for the industry of only 1.5 
per cent. Moreover, the 


In feet, Ferranti says that 
operating profits, excluding 
semi-conductors, increased 
by 1 9 per cent in the first half 
Yet in overall terms they 
were up by just £700,000 at 
£22.4 million. The pretax 
figure, which rose by £3 
million to £21.9 million, 
glistens by comparison but 
only because of a £2 million 
surplus on the sale ofa site at 
Oldham and a reduced fi- 
nance bill 

The interim report has 
little to say beyond what the 
chatnrtan r Mr Basil de 


Merrydown growth is spread Ferranti, told shareholders at 
more evenly this year, with the annual meeting two 
the company makin g up lost months ago, which suggests 


ground in Scotland. 


that the company is just 


Interest charges have taken treading water. The defence 


their toll on the profits figure. 
Expenditure last year on 


;ms division continues to 
well, and it will provide 


plant and ma c hin ery means an insurance against disaster, 
interest received of£l 8,5 90 is while some of the smaller 
converted into an interest companies are also doing 
charge of £33,086. better than last year. 

Vn However, it is difficult to 
the. cider market has been other divisions 

achieved with substantial J 


expendfturcon ad£S£ ftJr 

£r_ significant growth in the near 

By Ferranti’s own 

ht sis' 


will not be increased much in 
the next financial year. 


company’s computer prices 


* v - suggests another struggle for 

Analysts are talking about 

full-year figures oftetween nwrfcetshai ^ 

£12 and £1.4 milHon, - The share’s main crutch 
producing earnings of about earlier this year — a possible 
22p a share. With the shares bid — was lacked away when. 
falling 2p on the day to 358p the Government vetoed the 
this provides a p/e ratio ofl 6. GEC takeover bid for Ptessey 


A medium-term 
growth. 

Ferranti 


The City has not been 
impressed by Ferranti's in- 
terim results, despite foe 
company's . continued 
optimistic noises about a 


for and an approach looks un- 
likely, given the potential 
political problems and the 
dull profits outlook. 

sen FuH-year pretax forecasts 
in. are bong pegged at £45 
he milHon which puts the 


company's continued shares. Ip down at 97p, on a 
optimistic noises about a premium p/e ratio of 13.8. 
record order book of £770 Although they have dropped 
million 'and strong profit 37 P* 1 " ceQ l from their year’s 
growth apart from the woeful high, they cannot yet be put 
semi-conductor sector. - -- on the bargain-hunter's list 


• fin a ncier Mr Robert Holmes a 
Court and the Hongkong 
businessman Sir Y.K. Pao. 

Meanwhile, Mr John 
Spalvin’s Adelaide Steamship 
has been buying more shares 
in Blue Circle ind ust ries, 
Britain’s biggest cement pro- 
ducer. He now speaks for 
' 10.17 mill in n shares, or 7.9 
per cent of the totaL 
Mr Spalvin’s stakebuilding 
excerrise has raised hopes in 
the market in recent weeks 
that a full bid may follow. 

Blue Circle shares have 
been a dull market this year on 
worries about profits growth. 
Earlier this month, the group 
announced 1,200 redun- 
dancies and warned there were 
more in the pipeline. 

Analysts fear this could 
provide another blow to prof- 
its either this year, or next, 
depending on how the group 
intends to treat the redun- 
dancy costs. But the price 
responded to Mr Spalvin’s 
news yesterday with a 4p rise 
to 652p. 

BET finned 3p to 429p 
despite a placing of of almost 4 
million shares in Europe by 
Credit Suisse First Boston at 
about the 428p leveL 

The shares belonged to 
Icecabn, an associate of BET, 
which was left with 6 million 
shares following BET’S bids 
for HAT Group and 
Brengreen earlier tins year. 
James Capd, the broker, 
placed an initial 2.4 million of 
the shares last week after 
BEPs figures. 

Pflkmgtoa Bros, currently 
figh ting off an u nwan ted £12 
billion bid from BTR, firmed 
4p to 617p. The group is 
rumoured to be bringing for- 
ward its figures, due during 
the middle of next month, to 
next week. 

Already there is talk of 
pretax profits rising from £1 58 
million to between £215 mil- 
lion and £220 million. 


I t was entirely predictable that the same camp, one opted to accept a Panel 
City’s ways would be rhangpd jr- ruling and the other, based overseas, 
revocably with the advent of de- preferred to seek satisfaction through 
regulation. Now, a mouth after Big the courts. 

Bang, it appears that the very pillars of Whatever happens in the courts, the 
the old regime are about to come death or survival of the old culture is 
crashing down. what will really determine the future 

On a practical level, the embodiment conduct of takeovers and mergers, 
of the old-style City, the trading floor of . Ev ™ before the present court case,, 
the Stock Exchange, has become redan- values were coming under 

dant with breath-taking rapidity. It prossure. The Panel was rightly scathing 
seems destined to become little more ® ver the conduct of Hill Samuel and 
than a tourist curiosity in a month or Cazenove for thpir decision to take legal 
two. advice and say nothing about certain 

Old-style agency trades too are fast s J arc dealings rather than consult with 
becoming a thing of the past and Ean cl about whether disclosure was 
institutional investors are relishing the ne “ B ® r Y- 

new-found ease with which they are able If wholehearted co-operation with the. 
to buy or sell £50 million blocks of ^ sne ^ is bo longer accepted totally, 
shares instantly via their screens. either b ecau se competition for advisory 

But few could have believed that so bas become too intense, or because 
soon after Big Rpng , self-regulation, the newer players in the game call for a 
bedrock principle on which the new- lawyer when t hin gs go against them, 
style City is founded, would be farin g a l “ en ?be present system cannot work. In 
challenge of the most fundamental practice, we are moving towards a de 
nature. facto system of statutory control 

On Monday, the Court of Appeal is whether or not on Monday the Court 
due to finis h its deliberations over the 6* ves us one dejure. 

determine whether it wfljTremain “ Conflicts in concert 

flexible arbiter of all disputes during the TT Then the dust settles over the 
conduct of corporate takeover battles, \J\I Panel’s test case in the courts, 
or whether it will in future be subject to ▼ ▼ there is a good deal of unfin- 
regular and repeated appeals over its ished business over the problem which 
head to the higher authority of the caused it all in the first place. 

Courts. The Panel’s executive ruled that there 

Common sense suggests that it would was no concert party between Norton 
indeed be anomalous for the Panel to be Opax, which is claiming victory in the 
above the law of the land, able to mete battle for the banknote printer 
out rough and ready justice subject to McCorquodale, and the Kuwait In vest- 
re vision by no-one. ment Office, one of the leading under- 

However, it would be equally odd to writers of the Norton offer. 'Hie KIO 
suggest that the present system cannot had bought shares at prices above the 
be integrated with the legal system in level of the Norton cash offer and if they 
some way. Few would argue that had been judged to be acting in concert, 
magistrates courts are futile because the this would have triggered the need to 
High Court and the House of Lords also, make an offer to all holders at the higher 


exist 

But the old system has served 
shareholders well enough in the past, 
and no-one would deny that London is a 
cleaner and fairer place to invest than 
those bad old days when almost 
anything was fair game to those 
privileged to be “something in the 
City." 

The Panel has worked admirably 
becaise the main practitioners in the 
Gty agreed to make it so. Whether they 
liked its decisions or not the leading 
merchant bankers and brokers in the 
Gty have accepted them. The Panel's 
code has been subject to constant 
revision and improvement in the light 
of some times bitter experience. 

The Panel's status is being tested in 
the courts at present because of a dash 
of that culture with an entirely new 
spirit which seems to say that dub rales 
are all very well — so far as they go. This 
emerged dearly in opposing views of the 
two advisers in the McCorquodale case 
presently being considered by the appeal 
judges. Though they were both in the. 


price. 

The objection is that because of the 
performance-related underwriting fees 
being paid in this bid the KIO had a 
strong vested interest in the outcome of 
the battle. 

The issue is a tricky one. And it looks 
likely to crop -up with increasing 
frequency along with other US imported 
tactics in future bids. The Panel 
considered all the circumstances of this 
individual case and found in favour of 
Norton. 

But in general terms performance- 
related fees do create a conflict between 
the passive role of .the underwriter and 
his positive requirement to maximize 
performance for the benefit of bis 
investors. Concert parties have always 
been a difficulty for the PaneL To prove 
one with certainty requires a knowledge 
of what is in the mind of an investor 
when he deals. Performance fees can 
only muddy the water further. 

John Bell 

City Editor 


•*. . • •■> 

:7. 

f :X 

Mw§ 



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To; John Govett & Co. Ltd. Winchester House. 

77 London WalL London EC2\ 1DH. Telephone. 01-588 562ft 

Please send me the latesl Annual Reports for ihc investment trusts I have ikkrd 
Coveil Atlantic InvestmenlTrust PLC □ Govett Oriental Investment Trust I»LC □ 
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29.U.T 


J 0 

GOV 


N 

T T 


lIRttflOUK. 








BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


k#yj aft iW™' 1 

THE TIMES UNIT TRUST INFORMATION SERVICE 


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OB Tran 092 954* +031255 

CHIRAL BOARD OF FBUMCC OF 
church of emlaib . . 

2. Fen Sunt London EC2Y SAQ 
014981915 

Im Rind 4tiMS .. 4.40 

R**l W MOM ■ ■ 

DdMt 1005 -- 1020 

CHASE »4AHMATT ANF9ND IUNMBM 
7T/73 BHnM STOOL UjDdon ECZV SOP 
01-606 6822 

S & C SpacM SIM 983 995 -13 054 


a Fora Sana. London BC2r SAQ 
01-538 1813 



tow pv*i. BrtaU BSZ OJH 


Amor OnMh 249 29.1 . . 150 

Eq<*y High toon 417 4650 +12 490 

Em bj mii Growth 315 367* .. 200 

□Bin Equfey 385 41.1 +07 2-SO 

OS 5 Fixod tot Gdi 27.1 28.8 +04 350 

Qlt 0 RMW me 225 2UC +13 950 

Max Sacuflaa 244 25.7 .. 240 

brat Me TS . . .... 

Jooan Growth 317 35.7 +95 050 

pragma on 2*3 267 + 0.1 250 

COUNTY UT MANAGERS LTD 
181. CmuhUb. London EC2V OBJ 
01-726 1389 

Ban Trust 49.1 515 +11 414 

Ema Wrap 1085 1762 m +04 sai 

FtaandW 1695 1794 +11 231 

SB Straw 58-1 57 5» . . 139 

Graitri Inwlstaiwit 2842 3005 +95 256 

Income & Growth 415 449* .. 452 

Juanas* Grow* 1965 1975 +4.1 053 

EtS/toW Growth 1073 1I35M +05 1.43 

M Roconary 1145 1214 +13 218 

Santo CO'S 222.0 2310 -13 151 

GbMtocTa! 015 66.1c +05 5.47 

Special Sts Me 2095 2055 +05 148 


GB SMMV 511 S75M . . 130 

GrotrinfmastNant 2843 3005 *15 256 

Income & Grrwnti 415 445* .. 452 

Juanese Grawm 1065 1973 +4.1 053 

Nth tom QWti 107.2 1135# +*5 1.43 
M Reeonwv 1145 1214 +13 218 

Santo CP's 2220 2355 -03 151 

Global me TM 015 66.10 +92 5.47 

Sp-«l 80S Am 2095 2055 +05 148 

CROWN uwr TRUST SSWICEff 
Own Herat Wofang QU21 1XW 
04802 5033 

Htoh feKanw Trust 2495 2064 +19 452 

tfSwffl Trust 2234 237.7 +17 103 

American Trust I28J7 1379 *18 0.73 

CRUSADER UffT TRUST MANAOBtS LTD 
FfcraM. Sunoy RH2 8BL 
07372 42424 

UK Incoma 410 513 .. 447 

UK Ml Aran 499 524 +94 243 

Do OW 490 524 +04 243 

Raman Grow* 592 630 +12 153 

Prate Grom 535 57.7 +93 .. 


EHI UNIT TRUST MANA0ER8 
4. MaMe Crescent Edtotutfi 
031-226 3492 

American Raid 725 772* 
Cwatai Raw 1005 107.0 
Growth 6 me RM 1303 13&7 
mgn (hat Fond 1095 11IL7* 
I n amodonM RM 2110 2235 
Rmourom Fund 25.1 217 


So* Jap Co n Fnd 343 365 
Tokyo Flaw 1029 173.4 

(Ext Amur (3 147.8 1515 

(Ex) Japan (3) 1089 1105c 

(Ex) PacMc (4) 3207 3295 

(Bq Smalar Jap (4) 2003 2055 
EurahM 293 3l3e 

EAGLE STM UNIT TRUST NMNAQS 
Bam Roan. Otoan ham . Otacawsr 
0242 S21311 

UK BaMnoad Me 705 745o 
Do Aran TTJ 78.1c 

UK GrowSi Accra 893 94.7 
UK HMl few Me 675 715* 
N Amartm Accum SOS 743 
Far EUtam Aran 107.1 1143 
European Aran 915 97.7 
UK Oh 6 H Inc 51.1 542c 
Do Accra 527 555e 


+15 150 
+12 159 
+05 451 
+05 179 
+06 191 
-11 137 
+93 .. 
+23 090 
.. 351 

.. 019 
+132 030 
-05 110 
.. 331 


+93 110 
+13 lit 
+05 117 
413 458 
+14 172 
+12 109 
+14 1.10 
+95 094 
+95 820 


W osar Chng YU 


HIMr DC Accra 2303 2982* +19 452 
Bo Mcnma 1*77 2i03* +10 

GMs/Ftxad Aeon 333 092 +1.1 926 

□0 tacom 775 015 -HU 059 

WfiArnerTjtActra W03 147,1 +07 IDS 

Far East Tm Aran 1885 1795* +15 0.12 

are Tie Aran 1719 186.1 -11 053 

Gananl Ttawt 2985 2945 +04 357 

FieiowMAWAownff _ 

1; [Mm Penney to. Lootan EC4R DBA 
01423 4080 

US Cn—ar Ctfa 719 795* +04 123 

M R4W 1125 1309 +13 130 

one Find 7&7 90S +14 490 

nr Eastern Raw 741 785 +12 am 

Owso» Mm 718 01.4a +95 359 

nwdMMtast 503 0998 +13 990 

Nmnd nu FMW 495 S15 +15 050 

Eu ropean hum 87.1 917 +15 374 

nwM RM 414 515 +13 291 


190. firaua St Gtogow 02 2f>A 
041-332 3132 

BAKMGOlMC 437 495 

Do Actual 447 475 

Mctm Cth toe 419 435c .. 

DoACWn 439 45.7c 

Santo Go's toe 615 545* .. 

Do Accra 823 555* 


RMr TML TetOaUgt. 7N9 IDT 
0732 391144 

Anwtam 107.1 1149* -KU 


BU Off* Cmg YU 


Bid Offer dug YU 


bu onr Cmd 


BU Off* Cong YU 


BU a* o*B - to 


S3 Him 
IW lMlK 


605 642* 
1135 1205 
2275 242.1* 

KB 37 am 

885 003 

765 795 


ttS* 0 * W IK 


+13 054 
+03 179 
+07 290 
+14 975 
+M 833 
-93 073 
344 
+12 050 


nr East Inc 
CK 5 Rxsd tot 
□rowffia Uc*ae 
ton Spaa* Sta 
JapM 

Managed tat 
mb toecaoa EqoSy 
Pi uCn l ta BI on 
Soutt East Ad* 


107.1 1145* 
354 375* 
ecu xaw 
325 345* 
445 475 
337 375* 
211 293 
055 1023c 
311 415 
1362 1479 
1415 1514 
813 B75e 
325 349 
415 4+3 
1704 1833 


+12 080 
+11 459 
+11 059 
+04 141 
090 
-12 ftiW 
.. HUM 
+05 497 
-03 .. 
+ 1.1 .. 

nfti 

+05 039 

+1.1 059 


American Exampt 0715 3711 
Japan Erato K38.9 447.7 
Am Pmparty Ttt S100009 

Property Trujj £20299 9 


2915 3089 
3064 9249 


+10 UM 

+15 109 


i83>jU psSo itqwgwr(aaw 


1239 1223 +19 290 

2719 2912 *14 13S 

3115 m2* +14 US 


Sinai* Co» 2115 2333* 

NATIONAL novnen* BtyEOTIKHT 

MONonmn 

49, ftaescMcn Si BMP am 
01423 4200 Ext 299 


NR UK 
Do Aeon 


American Acs 
Strops— Ace 
WortOaMs Am 


1999 2129# +4.1 130 
1*s 3411* +1 J 330 
9209 9899 +04 1.10 
7972 9112 +16 1.10 
915 975 +14 050 

034 664C +19 140 

095 024 .. 180 

644 575 +13 110 


NORWICH DT KAHABERS 
PO B ox + H amden HR1 3NG 
obq o a y??np 


mj>. Towor. Addaraabe Road. Croydon. 
01-886 4355 01-0— 0011 


GoW 

DO Accra 
M Ladiira 
Prop S tia a s a 
ttatv finaraf 
Worid TaM 


173 112* +111030 
1 Raids 

1413 1903* -14 130 

474 5C7c *03 1-12 
572 813 +0-1 037 

5B2 833 +11 057 

163 me +11 am 
062 603 +15 052 

435 4K3 -19 056 

429 45 5 +12 090 


854 095* +15 359 


885 833 +12 

985 10Z5 +15 

COS 24.1 2U +11 

Bl HMD MANAGERS 

32. Qua+n Anna Gab, Imdan SW1H SAB 
01-322 1000 

nmi 0 ton 1415 1503* +13 130 

HlncPI* 579 004 . . 9.30 

!H Capital Growth 563 017 +13 190 

toweanam Tat Fnd 745 799* +17 140 

KEY FUND MMUOOai 

35. FOiaKBto Sam MendOMHr 

(03K®} 03354 

zm Eotkv A Gmr 44 4 47.4 -ai 190 

754 dtSrFtasdWFIM 925 065 ..104* 

557 Mgtwr toe 1224 1312c -11 457 

tocom 51.0 545c +11 152 

m te ma ao ni 2716 2955 c +15 1.00 


Ovarian than RM 
An* Growth 1053 

AM Growth 799 

Ranpean P*f 833 

Do Accra 934 

Rap RaaMr 173 

Far Eaat 693 

Hong Kcug 334 

M GrtMOn 384 

M Heooway 1084 

J*ra Part 764 

■Kan SwWBor COS 1&4 
tSSnto Co 083 


+04 157 
+16 194 
.. 056 
-11 035 
.. 174 
+13 HO 
-02 138 
+03 1.-M 
+16 047 
+2-1 ODD 

+04 am 

*03 nun 
+11 090 


CT22+ 1259 +193 S£ 
1413 14&5* +17 138 


51-81 Rad H*. I 
Cl -478 3377 


Omrosas Km Raws 
H High tap 985 OH* +16 459 


611 635 
653 693 


+10 4.10 
+05 4.10 


sr w 


CtotwS Am, EC2R 7BE 


tootaac Fond 4413 4903 
tatatn a dowl 6 CM 2575 2025 


LEQALAOBENALUNniR M T 


2875 2043 
4233 4503 
019 869 
779 925 
114.0 1213 
995 739* 
964 SOIc 
GIB 745* 
834 8&3 
034 87.7 
473 503 
415 523 
475 509 


LLOYDS RANX tJN IT TRUST MANAGERS 
Ragman Dpt Wbrthtog. w 

Susan 


NELTnata 

NstaHr GH 093 709 +141004 

HA UMTIRUOr MANAOENEKT 

99-101 SandOog R(L MaUttona. Knot ME14 DOC 

0922 674751 

ULA Amsncsn 245 £9 +05 099 

ULA General 315 36.6c +11 2-10 

ULA ara uaUuu e l 58.7 023* +03 046 

ULA GB Un# 314 229* +031140 

MLA toOOM 419 449* +03 5.11 

MLA Etabpsan 323 342 +13 17B 


4013 4259* 
1103 117.1* 
929 554 
849 889c 
1044 11D4 
1013 1079 
709 61.0* 
854 604c 
813 859 
1717 1883 
-893 521 


+15 3.11 
+14 052 
+16 047 
+03 633 
+05 176 
+15 096 
+11 ISO 
+09 190 
+04 204 
+13 254 
+03 219 


USE AodrowaSl 
09T 225 2Z11 

UK Ecpky 1794 101 am 

Amancan 1014 1024* 


SOO mOW M UTUAL SWPTI1T 

mu ujrm 

m VtacMK SL SM 90 * 02 SHN 
041-2X8 8100 

IK EmW 1005 1793 

GUI & RM 1075 1144 

UK soar cm BfJ 1504 1003 

Erapaan 221.1 2363* 

N Amaricaa 1193 1270 

Pacific 1099 201.1 

icomwowmoMT 
29l Ctntau Gq. RUtatfi 
031-226 4372 

Pacific 609 729 

Work) Gram 394 419* 

N Amedcan XU 364 

tacomt Fund 464 463* 

Borapoan 463 513 

N Am* no 279 293* 

UK Grow*. 309 329* 

Benin 323 348C 


PO Box 902 brobtx^i EN16 SHU 
031-065 0000 


+19 153 
+19 197 
+14 09S 
+14 051 


+15 299 
+1.1 9.16 
+05 294 
-03 1ST 
+05 143 
+14 149 


+16 090 
+03 035 
+12 OTO 
+11 454 
.. 037 
+14 130 
+12 29+ 
+11 659 


u* 




2312 9(89 
2711 2S74 


Si SwRMna LAM. London EC4P 4DU 


1/0 ncctwn 

Do tocom 

fnimi 

RrEsnin 
OR Trust 
O’ mas EtaAy 
Hstwal Ras 
N American Trust 
UK Spa** Ska 
kihnn atlu i* Band 
JapnaaMTat 
Managed Tat 


+14 258 
+23 250 
+13 455 
.. 159 
.. &7« 
+12 797 
+03 138 
+12 2.41 
+18 150 
+15 1.U 
.. 106 
+14 095 
+13 295 


St Georoaa Way. : 

043039101 
Growth Unto 763 909 

GSt ■ find tot 1025 1011 
High Income Unfca 114.1 1213 


NC tocom 
NC Japan 


869 935* +15 491 
1989 1099 +15 am 


Hgh YWd Gft Unt 063 68.7 
MCtowitb (Ms 1415 1504 


aw Growth 1 Mb 
N Aowden uasa 
Far East Una 
ftnaB ar Coa Fund 


1415 150.4 
733 774 
944 1003 
722 793 


NC Mto UK Co 51.7 564# +02 140 

NC Stow At* 65.1 889 -I-O.I 136 

NC Amadean toe 2022 3009 +09 1.17 

Do Aran 3069 3279 +03 1-17 

NC Smalar CM 148.7 1525 +15 192 

NCSnREurapCtfa 1969 2114c -17 034 

NC £x*o*ll <£t Cl 169 1219* .. 144 

ROWAN UNIT TRUST 

83 Kina WMam Bwbl London EC4R 9*3 


SSXtogWMa 
01-638 5678 




M GroMh 855 S09e 

Amancan GrtMh 654 7ii 

Amancan lac 729 775 

Europaan Growth 2448 2604* 
GaU 8 u wands 462 413 

Japan OpwUi 1504 1672 

ORE UNTT MANAGERS 

Sgg- ^"9S. EC3P 

01-680 9003 

GB A Rxad tot 1005 1129 
Qrowth Equity IBIS 2089* 
GoanM 2719 2914 

N American 1469 1555* 

PBOOC 2543 209.7* 

Property Shane 2767 2029 
SmMRr Crapantoa 2109 2299* 
E ut o p ami Trow 2774 2939c 


UNLISTED SECURITIES 


Balanced 1014 1929* +14 320 

00 Accra 327.4 3M9* +15 390 

Conti Era Gdi toe 505 .. .. 

DO Accra 509 

Bnrny M 534 573 +11 241 

DoAocum mi* 6+9 +11 291 

Extra Income 1563 1964* +17 82S 

Da Aoaan 2903 3065* +15 595 

Gaman Ctn toe 760 014* +11 0.16 

Do Accra 709 81-7* +11 110 

toctm 271.4 2067* +15 4.84 

□o Accra 5 <ses smm +S9 4.64 

me Tech ibz 5 205.1* +19 ftss 

Do Accra 201.7 2145* +14 096 

Japen Growth 716 835 +12 0.02 

Do Aeon 78 8 035 +12 092 

N Am* A Gan 1054 1120 +11 1.10 

Do Accra 1144 1213 +12 1.10 

Prana Bata 1395 1483 +19 025 

Do Accra 1469 1663 +13 095 

Simas* Cos A Use 1834 2057* +05 211 
Do Accum 2104 2523* +05 211 

WfarkMda Growth 2124 2254c +16 049 
DO Accra 298.6 3195C +19 049 

UK Crowd! Fund 483 913c +13 199 

LONDON A MANCHESIBI 
WtalaM Park. Exeter EX5 IDS 
0392 921 55 

General Trust 435 454 * .. 170 

Income Traat 365 394 +02 090 

final n at ional Treat 379 40.1 +13 090 

Amman 334 36.4c *0.1 2J» 

Japan 459 409 +03 aoo 

Trow at to 314 329* +11 290 

M*Q 8 Ktnmn 

Three Duns, Tow* Ml EC3R 980 

01126 4588 


■nCAP UNT TRUST 

UMcam Haa. 258. Hondord RCL E7 

01-234 5544 

Moneap 135.1 M29* +09 430 

MERCURY FUND MANMBI6 LTD 
33. King WBSra SL ECU) DAS 
01-280 aim 

Am* Growth 964 1029* +05 135 

Da Accum 1017 U65* +14 13S 

Aawr Income 521 55.1 +12 392 

0* Accra 565 565* +11 392 

Biqato Growth 1429 1909 -15 150 

DO Aecun 1479 1635 —05 196 

General 248.7 2BJ.U +19 201 

Do Accra 4011 433.8 +3-1 291 

0*8RMd 814 815c +05 BL30 

DO Aoan 019 929c +17 030 

toeonw 859 905 +4B4 457 

DO Accra 955 101.0 +14 457 

ima niB Wn M 2864 2814 +09 1-72 

Do Accra 3384 3404 +17 192 

Japan 101.4 ioi5 +28 s.®s 

00 Accra 1855 1904 +25 090 

Recomry 2020 213.7* +09 246 

Do Accra 2179 2305* +14 245 

EawtWIDH 2333 2999 .. 259 

Exampt Accra 3839 3725 .. 259 

Boo tacom* Fund 015 009 -19 350 

Do Accra 025 079 -12 350 


SacurUm (3 
rtgn Y*ki R 
Marfin .CT 
Fhad torn* 
High bmnst 
Fer East (2) 


2335 2975* *135 156 


m cay No. London ECTV 2AY 
01-036 6011 

Am* Tech 1 Gan 1039 1116 
Pacific . 2085 2209 

Sac fiwcrao Fnd 1725 1835* 
Special SRuMUos 2219 Z3BL0© 
M Growth 425 4 M 

American Ma]ora 245 717c 
Snwl Co * 425 469 

Japan Ttsh & Gan 1079 1145 
W s n w Sma l tocoma 578 815* 
Exampt 0609 8009 

UKGenand 355 376* 

Emu Growth 414 445 

Earn Mona 479 607* 

t MUMl UM 

l^jaBtotag. B12 2XZ 

toann Una* 245 264 
Do Accra UM* 275 295 . 

ST EWART, IVORY WIT TRUST - 

mahaoeiEs 

&wwgh 

031-226 3271 

American Raxt 2219 2361* 

Do Accra 2505 2668 * 

Do WVWrawal 1523 1025* 

AhBUM Raw 1324 14.19 

DO Accra 13*4 1434 

Brtoan rm mm 6312 

Do Accra 8124 SS54 

Bnpaan RM sss.o 3655* 

m Accra 3S24 3784* 


+25 297 
+3.1 297 


+17 154 
+14 090 
+27 454 
+14 148 
+14 018 
+19 196 
+14 157 
+09 090 
-12 653 
.. 225 
-0.1 353 
+15 052 
+14 440 


+19 254 
+15 294 


7129 7275 
1729 175l5# 
«S9 4374 
1665 1575 
1115 1125 
2385 >405 


.. 2.18 
.. 793 
.. 2.15 
+29 252 
+1513.60 
.. (US 


2217 238.1* +18 17* 
2505 2668* +09 174 
1523 1025* +16 174 
1324 1419 +1.1 ISO 

1345 1434 +1.1 050 

6925 6312 +28 450 

8124 8064 +39 450 

3349 3655* +11 050 
304 3764© +11 050 
049 064 +15 021 

045 00.7 +15 091 

1795 1855 .. .. 


NM KM Plan. Uwrpixl 150 3HS 
05I-2Z7 4422 


Oi That 
US Treat 
.Pacific Baton Tat 


809 644* +14250 
711 825 +15 157 

2*7 254c +13 558 
345 385 +05 156 

459 475* +03 030 


Jvan Fmu 649 684 +05 021 

DO Accra 6*5 68.7 +05 091 

Salrt* PPP 1765 nss .. .. 

SUN ALLIANCE 

Son Atone* Hid. Honham. Sussex 
0403 56293 

EquSy Troat Acc 3809 4127 +19 254 

N AIU Trow AM 5Z4 653 +H 19B 

Fir EM Tibk Aoc 875 932 +19 118 

WortJwldB Band 529 559 ..893 

Earopaop 985 S9L6 -11 192 

Eqofey bwTfit 47.1 509 .. 650 


20 CtSton St London BC2 
01-900311 

Equity DM 1155 1223c +17 10 

DU Accra 1024 1719c +09 153 

Mgh tocoma Dnat 087 959 +05 445 

DO Accra 1069 1129 +17 449 

US Grown 504 B2.1 +02 092 

Do Accra 999 604 -19 092 

ROYAL LONDON UHnTRUOTIMNMERS 
Roy* London House, Ca c h e at* COt IRA 

0206 WRITS 


European 985 919 -11 192 

Eqofey toe Ta 47.1 909 .. 650 

IBHIfEdFCNIKH 

254. Coctcaodr Omu l London $KIY SBN 

Darag naoi-9802m 

UK tacaam 29.1 285 +1.1 457 

Do Growth 239 254 +11 390 

TUB UNIT TRUST* LTD 
Kama Ham. Andaror. Hants, SPOT IPG 
0264 5970 Daapnga: 02MO43W4 


MKA^MHOHOWUHTIHUHT 

CratmdiM.E»mr9l Head,ShaflMdS13RD 
0742 799942 


OroaitacanM 
Do Accra 


779 825 
1055 1125 


+05 259 
+14 256 


ComwWSy A Gfin 1257 MI4* +02 278 


Do Accra 
Bin HMt toe 
Do Accra 
rn A Rxsd to 
Do Accum 
HWi YMd 
Do Accra 


1799 1899* +04 276 
564 819 +11 8TB 

0.1 735 +11 895 

505 527a +14 952 
837 874e +05 BJB 
W45 18*5* +15 879 
2087 2055* +05 578 
1734 1039 +05 394 
287.1 3049 +15 354 


0206 STOTTS 

American Grawdi 055 915 +12 052 

London UK Qti 1789 U*ic +15 £18 

GB toaoma 515 54JM +15 H47 

M0 tocoma 704 945* +1 4 459 

tocoma 6 Grow* 905. 10(9* +1.1 490 
Japan <*nwth 905 085* +17 003 

SpacMSM 1112 1204 +04 195 

SAVE 6 PROSPER 

28. Wtoa t am Rd. HofMOrd RM1 3L8 

(Nqndong 0106090 

Am* few A Grow*) 09 724* +11 791 

Captad Unfes 101 1125 +09 192 

Comwto 5&® 595 +09 177 

Banpaan GkcwOl 1214 129.1* -M2 158 

Hnanefed Sacs 05 106.1c +05 10 

HfB Hamm lta«a 19A5 1965 +15 40 

High YMd Unas 109 17S5 +15 459 

tocom unfes 84.1 10.1 +15 550 

fcwaehnant Tm*t 825 964* +14 240 


catM unfes 
Omo*» 
Bcnprai Qo* 
H n a ncBl Sacs 
(Mi HMun Udia 
Mgh YMd Units 
tocom (Mb 
kwaatawnl Ttaat 


Aroarican few 
Do Accra 
Extra torn toe 
Do Accra 
Gan** Ur* to 
Do Accra 
GB ARxadlnc 
Do Accra 
tocoma 
Accra 
Pacflc toe 
Do Accra 
ft# toe 
-Do Accra 
Selected Oops Inc 
Do Accra 
Macs* Ran 
Do Acorn 


1169 1255 
1249 1322 
1152 12(5 
1411 MIT 
1569 mi 
2617 2765 


-11 157 
-11 157 
+05 624 
+16 634 
+02 257 
+10 257 


46 9 47.1* +04 950 
909 635* +15 958 
2165 2307* +12 457 
3439 3069* +19 457 
1794 1909 +13 052 
1862 197.1 +05 052 
309 307* +12 1.11 
4207 4475* +17 1.11 
ms 712 +15 15S 

725 775 +04 10 

30.1 0fi7* +09 157 

572 05* +12 157 


YWMETTWU8TH6NABCTI9 
JSSaSffi Qw*wuro FfeL Aurora, Dwfc, 

Amarjraa 74J 759c -li on 

Alt*! - 214 227 +1.1 0.10 

Consacdfey 855 09* -11 190 

Enaigy 269 319 ..191 


• Ex d h ridaott c Cun dhridand. k Cum 
stock spK. a Ex stock spa m Cum 0 
(any two or more of aoewa). a Ex aB (any 
two or more 0 above}. Deafing or 
valuation oays: fi] Monday. (2) Tuesday. 
-(3) Wednesday. (4) Thursday. (5) Friday. 
(20) 25th of month. {21) 2nd Thursday of 
m ont h. ( 22) 1st and 3rd Wednesday of 
month. (23) 20ih of month. (2-1) 3rd 
Tuesday of month. (25) 1st and 3rd 
Thursday of month. (261 4th Tuesday of 
month. (27) 1st Wednesday of month. (28) 
Last Thursday of month. E9) 3rd working 
day of month. QOHSthofrnonth. (31) 1st 
tanking day of momh. (32) 20tb of month. 
(33) 1st day of February. May, August 
Noramtoer. (34) Last working Cay of 
month. (351 15m of month. (38) 14m of 
month. (37) 21st of month. (38) 3rd 
Wednesday of month. (39) did 
Wednesday of month. (40) Valued 
monthly, pi) Last Thursday or Stock 
Exchange account. (42) Last day of 
month. (43) 2nd and 4th Wednesday of 
month. (44) Ouanarty. (45) 6th of month. 
(46) 2nd Tuesday of month. 


INVESTMENT TRUSTS 




mb iib 

SJ 

84 

131 

134 

0 

53 

M 

41 

IS 

17 

M 

IB 

88 

93 

279 

Z«0 

i 231 

2M 

in 

112 

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153 

345 

347 

3C0 

310 

315 

320 

IBS 

H5 

550 

580 

29 

31 

182 

172 

MO 

MS 

0 

96 

63 

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4Zb 

44 

S3 

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74 

78 

115 

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COMMODITIES 


LOHDON rrWMOOfTY 
EXCHANGE 


GW JoymanaodCorapart 
SUGAR (From CCxxrndaow) 
FOB 

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Mar 1492-4S.0 

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THE TIMES SATURDAY NOVEMBER 29 1986 


STOCK EXCHANGE PRICES 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


From your portfolio card check your 
rigtn share price movements, on this page 
only. Add them no to give you your 
overall total and check this against the 
dady dividend figure. If it matches, you 
have woo outright or a share of the total 
daily prize money staled. If you are a 
winner follow the claim procedure on the 
back of your and. Yon must always have 
your cam available when dahnine. 


Support for blue chips 

ACCOUNT DAYS: Dealings began Monday. Dealings end December S. §Contango dav December 8. Settlement day December IS 

fForward bargains are permitted on two previous business days. 

Where Btoctatraw o onl y ow e price ipiotBd.tf>ce8ewinicM<p*icg»taflienctel> ad 5 pm. Yield, chaniyg and p/e raifa*w« 



£ 8,000 

Claims required 
for 

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0254-53272 


No. Co m p an y 


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PAPER, PRINTING, ADVERTS 




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THE TIMES SATURDAY NOVEMBER 29 1 986 





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c 1 -ues 


A ride on the style road to profits 


( MOTORS ) 

Frank; Dainian is a stylist He gave 
up tartan trousers, wholemeal 
pasta and his pigtail a couple of 
years ago. when only' the trendies! 
of the trendyrealized they were on 
, the; way (Hit Since then he has 
acquired some of the more im- 
portant designer accoutrements; 
permanent stubble, a 1950s civil 
service .filing cabinet as a d rinks 
c u pboar d and an oki car with sleek 
lines. 

-What, you may ask, is so madly 
itytish about all that? Anyone with ' 
the money mid the inclination to 
- ape the. fashion ma gazine models 
slavishly could do it But Mr 
Damian’s point about his smooths 
styled 1 *Won Daimler V8 is that it 
does not work, and be doesn’t care 
thatft does not work. 

It looks good, especially the 
walnut' dashboard with hs aero- 
plane panel of switches and dials. 
It even smelk good, thanks to the 
quality of the leather upholstery. 
And the light activated by opening 
the glove compa rtm ent is a ideas- 
ing shade of police Hue. Only 
when the glove-compartment tight 
fails does Mr D amian say he will 
think of throwing away his driving 
gloves. 

But perhaps the neatest point of 
style is that the car is actually 
worth more than the £500 it cost a 
year and a half ago. The Daimler 
250 2%-litre saloon is a classic car 
(for insurance purposes anything 


over 10 years old is a classic) and 
is one of a select minority which 
appreciates in value Aster than it 
rusts. .... 

According to a survey of classic 
car prices p ublished in nexl 
month's Classic Czrmagazine 
type of Daimler is worth £775, 
even if it is in “ condition C" Cars 
in condition Cneeda fhD rebuild. 





Beetle: future value £10,000? 

although it is possible, as tire 
survey points out, that the ve- 
hicles may still be in use. 

Most cars on the road are in 
Condition B — roadworthy but 
scruffy to a greater or lesser degree. 
Condition A- cars are free -from 
faiths. They have immaculate 
chrome, gleaming coachwork, and 
their owners do not tremble at the 
thought of the annual vehicle test 

As you might expect from the 
wide definition of a clastic car you 
do not have to be spectacularly 


rich to own one, although spare 
cash is essentia] for maintenance 
and spare time is required for the 
tender loving care which older 
care need- 

interest in classic cars “spreads 
right across the social spectrum” 
according to Tony Dron, editor of 
Classic Car magarine. “At the 
lower end of the scale cars can cost 
a few hundred pounds, but at the 
top of the spectrum it is definitely 
a rich man’s bobby. A Ferrari 
GTO can cost up to Si million.” 

Widespread interest from 
enthusiasts naturally keeps prices 
rising, but choosing a car as an 
investment is not easy. Mr Dron 
believes that die would-be collec- 
tor-investor should go for the car 
in good condition rather than look 
for an inferior example and hope 
to do restoration woric. 

Yet returns for this .type of 
investment vary immensely 
according to the type of car. 
Restoring a Morris Minor, fix- 
example, will possibly not increase 
the market value of the car 
sufficently to cover the Cost- 
Spending a fifth of a minion on the 
right model of Ferrari, however, 
might well yiekl a profit. 

Another tip is to join one of the 
collectors’ dubs, especially if you 
are interested in' an older model 
where spares and advice are in 
short supply. Difficulties can thus 
be avoided rather tfam negotiated. 

Most collectors’ dubs will help 
with -other running costs, such as 
insurance. Several insurance com-. 


patties offer special policies for 
classic cars. 

The premiums are normally 
slightly lower if the driver can 
assure the company that mileage 
will be limited to a few thousands 
year, and that the car will be 
garaged. Lf however, one of these 
conditions is not met, it may be 
better to look fix a normal policy. 

- If you are a car enthusiast your 
decision to toy wQ] be based 
simply on the car you like the look 
and fed of best Even if the car 

(Pricing a classic 
car requires a feel 

for the market 9 

Ails to appreciate in. value as 
rapidly- as you might wish, you 
. should not be so disappointed. 
The alternative method of Along 
the profit from, your investment is 
to drive and use your car, and 
enjoy doing so. ■ 

Says Mr Dron: “If yon don’t Ail 
in love before you toy; I think it’s 
easy to come a cropper.” 

inevitably the (rider, grander 
end of the market tends to do wdL 
The big prestige cars of yesteryear 
have done welLA 1959 Bentley 
Continental in good condition will 
have appreciated from £8,522 
then to £30,000 now. An Astern 
Martin - has risen from £3,755 
in 1963 'to around £12,000 now. 


while the Rolls-Royce Stiver 
Cloud S2 will change hands for 
£17.500 now as opposed to just 
over £6.000 in 1966. 

Compiling the price guide was 
not easy, according to hs author, 
Lindsay Porter. He spent seven 
years at the task, and admits that 
the process of compilation is 
rather like painting the Forth 
Bridge: the monrent he has fin- 
ished it is time to start again at the 
beginning. 

The method of calculation can- 
not be exact, especially for models 
where the market is thm ( typically 
when there are few cars around 
from which to distil a reliable 
average), but tire guide's prices are 
ascertained “using both art and 
science” says Mr Porter. “Pricing 
a classic car req uire s both a 
knowledge of tire market— both m 
auction and among collectors — 
and a fed for that market” 

. And the classics of tomorrow? 
Mr Porter predicts that E-type 
Jaguars will breach the £30,000 
level, that soft-top Volkswagen 
Beetles will hands at 

£10,000 mid more, and that tire 
MGTX wifi have a value of 
£20,000-phis. 

“But that’s assuming that things 
continue as they are” he adds, 
“which A probably a very silly 
assumption.” 



Jaguar's already legendary E-type: Ukdy to exceed £30,000 









. :ar». 



S2 Bentley Continental: from £8,522 in 1959 to £30,000 now 







Martin Baker Aston Martin: James Bond associations caught public imagination 


Upset on insurance 
company switch 


A full-scale row is in the 
making between a group of 
Imperial Life policyholders 
and the insurance company 
itself; writes Peter Garthmd. 

The detotiis technical bat 
the essence of the problem Bes 
A a letter sent to Imperial's 
policyholders earlier this 
month by its UK chief exec- 
utive, Roger Wain. 

Mr Wain told policyholders 
that, subject to the approval of 
certain supervisory bodies 
both rathe UK, and inCasada 
(where Imperial has its head 
office), it was proposed to 
transfer imperial’s fife assur- 
ance to Trident Life, a com- 
pany bought by Imperial ra 
1985. 

Mr Wain assured policy- 
holders that foe transfer of 
business would enable admin- 
istrative economies to be made 
and was in the in ter es ts of 
policyholders. . 

Enter Richard Knox-John- 
stoo, an Imperial Life policy- 
holder who was himself at one 
time a senior executive with 
Imperial. Mr Knox-Johnston 
and otfcas have formed foe 
Imperial Life PuficyhoMers 
Committee because, . they say, 
they are worried that the move 
by Imperial may not be m the 
interests of the 180,006 af- 
fected poficyfaoMers. 

They are also critical that it 
has been presented as a felt 
accompli, without any 
consul t ation- 

Mr fijmx-Johnstaa argues 
that the many people who took 


out insurance policies with 
Imperial did so in the know- 
ledge that It was a lang- 
estabiisbed company -with a 
solid reputation, a steady bo- 
nus performance and a high 
free-assets ratio. 

He says “They deserve tite 
right to reassure themselves 
that Trident life can offer the 
prospect of the same financial , 


Mr Knax-Johnstoa also 
contends that the notice sent to 
poifeyhalders gave no opportu- 
nity for questioning the de- 
dshm and was of such a 
technical nature that a layman 
would be unlikely to under- 
stand the .fan implications. 

Mr Wain- says he was 
surprised to hear of the forma- 
tion of an action group, not 
least because his letter to 
policyholders invited them to 
get in touch with Imperial if 
they had any questions about 
the proposals or if they wanted 
them explained La marc detail. 

Mr Wain slides to his view 
that combining tire operations 
of Imperial and Trident wifi be 
to the advantage of polity- 
holders of both companies. Ia 
support of this view, Mr Warn 
says that the chairman of what 
win become Imperial Trident 
Life wifi be C l aud e Brnueau, 
who A chairman of Imperial 
life of Canada. 

The final decision wffl prob- ; 
aMy rest not with either Mr 
Wain or Mr Knox-Johnstoa 
but wffl be made at a High 
Court hearing on December 8. 


You Have Only4 Days 
T o Get Your Application In 
For British Gas Shares. 

You’ll Find An Application Form Over The Bvge. 


i . , i ■ l . . . .1, .,1. 


This School Fee 
Trust Plan could 
slash your 
education costs. 


i 

I School fee plans are not all the same J 

J as so many parents might suppose. J 

I Our new School Fee 'Bust Han, I 
| linked to a trust with charitable .- | 

| status, will provide a head start in. i 

1 providing for school fees in the years ! 

1 ahead. I 

I That trust basis, combined with -| 
| our first-class investment track re- i 

| cord,is the answer to yourpioblem. : ■ 

I And, what’s more it is ..fully I 
I recommended by the National | 

I Independent Schools Information | 

§ Service. ■ 


[. Use first 


class post and allow at least 2 days for delivery 

Alternatively, hand in your application at ary UK branch of NatWest, Bank 
of Scotland or Ulster Bank before close of business next Tuesda y December 2nd. 



Huny if you want to apply for a share of the shares. 

r p p tt r « n >■' w r, it p tt f I T"\ o c Aki C t ! u i T P r» A xi r» r~ 1 1 a i r- A r « 1 >■ A A 1 T r. r, vi 1 1 p ki IHFORMATIOM 


ISSUED BY N M ROTHSCHILD & SONS LIMITED ON BEHALF OF H M GOVERNMENT. 


OFFICE 


UP A< 




EtTIME by Jeanne Willis and Trevor Melvin 


m . 

I TfK-nieEqmtabte Life, FREEPOST 4 CofaBanSoget, London EC2flyn 
m I‘d welcome farther detail* on yoor school he pUre, finrm c m g than by: 

I □ A capital sum; DSprcadn^lhe ao*i OTfcTapenod. <ll|tr(wJroQpo j } , | 


Naitig liit-’Mnt/Mkil 


mfse 


S PEAK TO 
AAE.AL-AJSl— 


ft* ^014 SBS 

Si *s'Tgu~ Hl * A "‘ 









Hmm rjnl 1 7< C 


i ; ” — . j 

L* «.You gain because we’re different.* mJ 




-SPEAK 
, TO MB l 



I:: 








FAMILY MONEY/3 


{ EQUITIES"! 

One of the golden rules of 
equity investment is not to pul 
all your eggs in one basket. 
But. for anyone with limited 
resources, establishing a well- 
balanced portfolio of realis- 
tically sized holdings is out of 
the question. 

To obtain a good spread of 
risk, therefore, individuals 
with modest means are usu- 
ally advised to steer clear of 
direct equity investment and 
to opt instead for a unit trust 
or investment trust. 

This is because both these 
investment vehicles offer the 
individual the chance to ac- 
quire a tax-efficient interest in 
a lot of companies through the 
purchase of a single holding. 
And the investor benefits 
from the fact that the trust 
portfolios are professionally 
managed by investment 
experts. 

A further attraction of unit 
and investment trusts is that 
there are plenty to choose 
from — almost 1,000 of the 
former and around 200 of the 
latter — some of which are 
invested in UK company 
stock, others which specialise 
in overseas markets. 

So, with either type of trust, 
in return for an initial invest- 
ment of a few hundred 
pounds, or in some instances 
through a regular savings 
scheme, the investor has ac- 
cess to a wide range of 
industries and currencies. 

Despite these similarities, 
however, there are several 
important differences between 
a unit trust and an investment 
trust Not least is the feet that 
an investment trust is not 
legally a trust at alL It is a joint 


Beware of putting your 
trust only in units... 


stock limited liability com- 
pany. . 

As such, it has a fixed 
amount of issued share cap- 
ital. and this can only be 
changed with the agreement of 
the shareholders, and in some 
situations, with the approval 
of the court This is why they 
are sometimes described as 
“closed-end trusts". 

So, anyone who buys a 
holding in an investment trust 
becomes a shareholder in that 
company. Sometimes, dif- 
ferent classes of dares are 
offered which cany various 
powers and privileges relating, 
for example, to dividend en- 

Without the same 
direct control 

titlemeut and the investor’s 
it to vote on decisions 
feeling the company. 

The directors of an invest- 
ment-trust company, for in- 
stance, are appointed by the 
shareholders and are account- 
able to them. And, apart from 
having control over the issue 
ofadditional share capital, it is 
the shareholders who must 
approve any proposed change 
in the company’s borrowing 
limits. 

Anyone investing in a unit 
trust is buying a holding in a 
legal trust, and does not have 
the same direct control over 
the running of that trust 


Instead of being governed by 
company legislation, an au- 
thorized unit trust comes 
under the control of .the 
Department of Trade, and it is 
the DTI which must approve 
the trust deed. 

Under this deed of trust, a 
trustee; usually a bank or 
insurance company, is ap- 
pointed, and it is the task of 
the trustee to hold the securi- 
ties of the trust, to issue share 
certificates and pay any divi- 
dends, and to keep a registerof 
unit holders. The manage- 
ment company which is 
responsible for all the invest- 
ment decisions is totally sepa- 
rate from the trustee, 

Another major difference 
between a unit trust and an 
investment trust is that 
whereas the latter can offer 
different classes of shares, a 
unit trust can issue only equity 

units. But unlike an invest- 
ment trust which has a fixed 
amount of share capital, the 
number of units in a trust is a 
moveable feast, and c an be 
increased or decreased accord- 
ing to the flow of money in 
and out of the fund. 

Consequently, the market 
for a unit trust is created by 
the fond manager, who in 
accordance with the regula- 
tions laid down by the DTI, 
fixes both the buying and the 
selling price of units. 

To determine the price of 
the units, the manager takes 


into account not only the net 
value of the assets held by the 
mist, but foe normal costs 
incurred when buying stocks 
and shares.- The purchase 
price given to the units also 
includes an initial manage- 
ment charge and a rounding 
up or down figure. The end 
result is what is known as the 
“bid/offer spread". 

The marker far investment 
trusts on the other hand, is 
made on foe Stock Exchange. 
And though the net asset value 
of each ordinary share has an 
effect on foe price of the 
shares, the . actual price rises 
and fells in line .with supply 
and demand. 

Typically, investment trusts 
are sold at a discount, which 
means that foe price is lower 
than the asset value of the 
company. This is'a bit like a 
sale bargain, m that for a tower 
outlay, the investor has the 
benefit of a greater value of 
assets working for him. Con- 
sequently, anyone investing in 
foe same portfolio of invest- 
ments either directly, or 
through a unit trust, would get 
a lower level of income than 
would be available through an 
investment trust. 

In addition to the quoted 
price of foe investment trust 
shares, of coarse, investors 
also have to pay the normal 
dealing costs incurred through 
share purchase, which are 
itemized on the contract note. 


There are two other big 
differences between invest- 
ment trusts and unit trusts. 
The one, is that investment 
trusts can borrow money 
whereas unit trusts cannot^ the 
other is that subject to the 
approval of foe DTI and the 
trustee, a unit trust can readily 
advertise. — - 

Investment trust com- 
panies, however, cannot pro- 
mote their shares unless they 
prist a foil prospectus outlin- 
ing the reason for foe issue of 
additional shares. 

Clearly, this is an expensive 
exerrise, and rarely used. On a. 
positive note, however, by not 
spending a great deal of 
money on advertising, invest- 
ment trusts are able to keep 
their management expenses 
down, usually, to a signifi- 
cantly lower level than those 
of unit trusts. 

Despite this lower profiler 
investment trusts wffi un- 


lit the long term 
investments are best 


doubtediy become more 
widely known next year when 
Personal Equity Plans are 
introduced. Like unit mists, 
they will be eligible for inclu- 
sion in a Personal Equity Plan 
portfolio. 

For investors, of course, of 
great importance, is how the 
performance of these two 
types of collective investment 
compare. 

In feet, over the short term, 
unit trusts tend to lead. Over 
the long term, however, 
investment trusts are fre- 
quently way ahead. 

Amanda Pardoe 



...and what the future holds 


Analyst Ted Sellers: From now on 
the in vestment- trust sector trill be 
corporate-activity led 


Alexanders & Cnrickshank 

(ALC) published the 60th edition of 
its Investment Trust Yearbook this 
week, writes Peter Cortland. Among 
ALCs comments and predictions are 
that there are still too many generalist 
trusts for which there is little demand, 
many non-executive directors of 
investment trusts will come tmder 
increasing pressme from institntianal 
shareholders to resign because they 
are so out of tend* frith events and 
there will be a higher level of overseas 
interest in investment trusts, particu- 
larly from the US and Japan. 

Bat it is the implicatiofts of more 
corporate activity in the investment 
treat sector that exercise ALC most in 
the latest edition of the valuable 
reference work. Says ALCs analyst, 


Ted Sellers: "It is only facing reality 
to state that from now on the 
investment-trust sector wiH he cor- 
porate-activity led.” 

Not that takeovers and acquisitions 
are necessarily seen as a bad thing. 
ALC argnes that it has been to a large 
extent the threat of aggressive cor- 
porate activity which has wonderfully 
concentrated the minds of investment- 
trust managers in the last five years 
and has consequently produced a 
higher level of performance expecta- 
tion. Without this pressure, invest- 
ment trust managers might well again 
sink back into lethargy, it is aigned. 

In a juicy sideswipe at what it calls 
the "oU world establishment'" ALC 
says corporate activity had been held 
bad hr the investment-trust sector 


because of interconnecting relation- 
ships and directorships between the 
frosts and their institutional 
shareholders, and by lack of desire or 
will to upset the profitable apple cart. 

On die all-important swfeject of 
performance, ALC concludes that this 
has been extremely good compared to 
unit trusts. Specifically, it lists a total 
five investment dusts whose share 
price has improved by at least 400 per 
cent since 25 September 1981: Danae, 
Jove, F&C Enrotrust, Lowland and 
M&G Second Dual Trust 

The star performer, however, with a 
share price increase of ]018 per cent 
over the last five years, is Cambrian & 
General, one of whose directors until 
recently was the now-disgraced 
American arbitrageur, Ivan Boesky. 


Consider carefully before yoo more savings abroad 

Choppy 


The spectre of exchange con- 
trols is beginning to haunt 
many a UK investor, despite 
assurances from foe Shadow 
Chancellor, Roy Hattersley, 
foal if Labour is voted into 
office at foe next general 
election, he will seek to dip 
only the wings of the institu- 
tional investors, pension 
foods in particular. 

So individual investors 
would not be prevented from 
sending their money overseas. 

But this has not put people’s 
minds at rest, and foe off- 
shore-fond industry could weU 
prove the beneficiary of 
people’s worries about the 
potential actions of a Labour 
administration. 

You do not have to save up 
offshore funds far such an 
occasion as this, of course. 
They have always been avail- 
able as an alternative to the 
onshore authorized unit 
trusts, but much of their 
appeal lies in offering a range 
of investment opportunities 
that unit trusts are not yet 
allowed to match. 

That includes currency 
diversification, property (as 
opposed to property shares) 
and commodities. 

Of course, foe heyday for 
offshore funds’ attraction for 
UK investors came and went 
in foe brief but glorious period 
of foe roll-up currency fund. 
These had the effect of ti 
taxable income into capit 
gain, and were therefore 
particularly good news for 
higher-rate taxpayers. 

Money poured into them, 
and at foe height of its 
popularity, foe biggest of the 
funds, Rothschild Ofal Court 
fund, had a billion pounds 
under management — more 
than even the biggest unit 
trust. 

That was before the Inland 
Revenue changed the rules. 
The tax treatment for offshore 
funds is now no longer uni- 
form — there are two distinct 
categories and UK investors 
must check which type a fund 
is before investing any money, 
otherwise they may get a nasty 
shock when foe tax bill 
arrives. 

The tax treatment of roO-up 
funds is savage*, all foe pro- 
ceeds are taxed as income in 
the hands of a UK investor: 
To avoid this, offshore funds 
have to apply for distributor 
status, which ensures that 
investors are liable to income 
tax only on any deposit in- 
terest or dividends, not on the 
capital gain. 



[turning 

capital 


offshore 

investors 

( FUNDS ) 


The mam requirement for 
being granted distributor sta- 
tus is easy enough to comply 
with, being that the fond 
distributes to holders at least 
85 per cent of the income of 
foe fund. 

That does not stop groups 
from offering an automatic 
reinvestment facility for 
investors who do not actually 
want to receive any income. 
But yoo will still be taxed as if 
you had received it 

The Netherlands-based 
Robeoo group is a case in 
point The group initially 
expected no problem in 
obtaining distributor status, as 
foe foods run by foe group 
already distributed all their 
income. Under Dutch law 
they had to otherwise they 
would be taxed! at a rate of 50 
per cent in the Netherlands. 

. But under the status legisla- 
tion some additional technical 
requirements affect a fund’s 
portfolio holdings. The Inland 
Revenue does not distinguish 
between portfolio holdings 



and subsidiary holdings, ^d 
because Robeco is a combina- 
tion of a management com- 
pany and a fund, there was a 
technical breach of foe rules 

Robeco eventually suc- 
ceeded in having foe rates 
amended, which means, uk 
R dinco fund has applied for 
distributor status for 
ending on Angu5l 31. iyw. 
But for various reasons* foe 
Robeco fund cannot apply 
until January 1 988 for distrib- 
utor status for the calendar 
year 1987. The group is con- 
fident that both funds will be 
granted foe status. 

Unfortunately, long-stand- 
ing UK investors in either 
fund will still have to pay 
income tax on the proceeds 
when they sell because the 
funds will not have bad 
distributor status for the 
whole period since the lega- 
tion was introduced in 1984. 

The Robeco group is trying 
to persuade foe Revenue to 
agree to foe introduction of an 
apportionment mechanism 

which would limit an 
investor’s liability to income 
tax on capital gains to the 
period shea foe fond did not 
have distributor status, and 
not to the entire period of 
investment 

Until p ro gre ss is made on 
this, the standard advice to 
investors with this problem is 
to “bed and breakfast” their 
holdings. But Louis Verhay, of 
the Robeco group, has a 
different view. He advises 
investors to bold on to their 
shares, for two reasons. 

First, the group may be 
successful in its appeal for an 
apportionment mechanism. 
And, because if you sell now 
and buy back, you have an 
immediate tax liability that 
you have to pay either from 
part of foe proceeds of selling 
or from money held on de- ’ 
posit In effect you are fore- 
going future income or capital 
gams. 

Robeco has calculated that 
there is little to choose bo- 
tween this loss, and your 
future liabilty to income tax 
on the eventual encashment of ' 
your holdings discounted back 
to the present. 

Anyone who invests in 
Rolinco now, or indeed who 
invested between August 31, 
1985, and August 31, 1986, 
has no need to worry about 
any of this. If you want to 
invest in Robeco, hold off . 
until the beginning of 1987. 

- Pauline Skypala 


Advice to the unwary abroad in the City, or 


HOW A YOUNG UPWARDLY 
MOBILE BEE 

FELL FOUL OF A DASTARDLY 
VEGETABLE PLOT. 



?£- T had been the very essence of an English summer’s 
day. Buckets of rain, a skittering of sleet, massed ranks 
of cloud. But now the rain had stopped. A segment 
of sun peeped through. The lawn sparkled like a jeweller’s 
window. 

A swarm of pinstriped bees was sweeping across the 
garden. They had turned the hive into a profitable business. 
‘ ‘ Money from honey ’’was their slogan. But one wily worker bee 
knew better than 
the rest. 

Perched on a 
branch high above 
the flower beds, he 
mocked their giant 
hollyhocks, scorned 
their cornflowers, 
chuckled at their 
honeysuckle. For, 
lurking by the cold 
frame at the head of the garden were the biggest flowers he’d 
ever seen. Great white globes, eight or nine inches across. Like 
an actor in a bee movie, he tugged up his collar and glanced 
around shiftily. Good: the coast was clear. . 



On whirring wings, he divebombed the first enormous 
flower head. He sniffed the. air: there was no bouquet. He 
rummaged for the nectar, delved deep for the pollen. But the 
cauliflower, in spite of its name, had none. 

The City, too, has its quota of people with harebrained 
schemes for extrac- 
ting uranium from 
Arctic sleet or honey 
from cauliflowers. 

Naturally, they all 
comewithpromises 
of positively garg- 
antuan retums.But 
our shrewd investor 
will always opt for 
a scheme that is 
much more soundly 
based. With their 
wealthofexperience 
and the resources of 
Mercury Warburg 
Investment Man- 
agement, Mercury 
can supply you with 
all the help and 
advice you need. 

For details of our tenunittrusts, please writeto : The Client 
Services Director, Mercury Fund Managers Ltd, FREEPOST 
London EC4B 4DQ, (01-280 2800) or contact your usual finar.ni ? j 
adviser. 


MERCURY UNIT TRUSTS 

Investment by Mercury Warburg Investment Management Ltd. 





THE TIMES SATURDAY NOVEMBER 29 1986 


33 





*•’ i-, 

•I. 

i- 




British Gas pic 

Share Offer 

*>y 

INI M Rothschild & Sons Limited 

on behalf of 

The Secretary of State for Energy 

Under offers in the United Kingdom, 
the United States, Canada, Japan and Europe 
4,025,500,000 Ordinary Shares are to be sold 
at 135p per share payable in instalments of 50p now, 

45p on 9th June, 1 987 and 40p on 1 9th April, 1 988. 

, AppticatiCKi has been made to the Council of The Stock Exchange for the whole of the ordinary share capital, issued and to be 
issued, of the Company, to be admitted to the Official List. The following information should be read in conjunction with the full text 
of the Listing Particulars dated 2 1 st November, 1986 relating to British Gas pic, copies of which are available at British Gas showrooms. 
Clearing bank branches and post offices. You are advised to read the Listing Particulars before returning your application form. 


APPLICATION AND INSTALMENT 
ARRANGEMENTS 

(a] Applications 

Applications must be received by 10 ajn. on Wednesday, 
3rd December, 1986 (or before dose of business on Tuesday, 2nd 
December, 1986, if toe form is taken by hand to any U.K. branch 
of National Wstminster Bank PLC, Bank of Scotland or Ulster 
Bank Limited). Photocopies of application forms will not be 
accepted in any circumstances. The right is reserved to reject, in 
whole or in part, any application. Once made, applications may 
not be withdrawn. 

(b) Allocations of shares 

The ha«« of allocation of the shares is expected to be 
announced by Monday 8th December, 1 986. 

If you are successful, in whole or in part, you will be seat 
a temporary document of title (a letter of acceptance) for the 
shares allocated to you. 

If there is heavy demand for the shares, you may receive 
fewer shares than you apply for ot; in some cases, noneat aH 

If your application is not accepted or is only accepted 
in -part, you win receive (without interest) all money paid on 
application or a refund cheque for the balance of the money paid 
on application. 

(o) Dealings 

It is expected that dealings on The Stock Exchange will 
commence at 230 p.m. on Monday, 8th December, 1986. Letters 
of acceptance are expected to be sent to successful applicants 
on Monday, 15lh December, 1986. Applicants who deal before 
receipt of a letter of acceptance will do so at their own risk. You 
should also note that some dealers in shares may insist on seefog 
your letter of acceptance before purchasing your shares. . 

You win not be liable for stamp duty or stamp duty reserve 
tax on your application for shares. If you seQ your shares, the 
purchaser wfll be liable to pay any stamp duty or stamp duty 
reserve tax. 

(d) Further instalments 

You will be sent reminders in advance of the dates when 
the second and third instalments become payable^ At the time the 
reminder is sent for the second instalment (due by 9th June, 1 987) 
you wffi also be sent an Interim Certificate to replace the tetter of 
acceptance despatched following the Offer. Alter you have paid 
your final instalment (due by 19th April, 1988) you win be sent 
your final share certificate. If you do not pay any in stal m e n ts for 
which you are liable, your right to the shares may be cancelled. If 
you sell your shares, the purchaser will become liable for any 
further instalments due (once the transfer has been registered). 


SPECIAL INCENTIVES 

If you apply for shares in the Offer, you may be eligible to 
receive from the Government, free of charge, EITHER vouchers 
for use against gas bills from British Gas OR a share bonus. The 
special incentives are only available if you buy shares in the Offer 
and not if they are bought subsequently. 

(a) Eligibility 

To be eligible to apply for these special incentives, you 
must be an individual investing solely for your own benefit (or 
investing jointly with not more than three other individuals, 
solely for the benefit of one or more of you). Applications made 
by individuals on behalf of children may also qualify for the 
special incentives. Companies, partnerships, firms, trusts, 
associations and dubs are not eligible for these special incentives 
but they may apply as nominees Tor eligible individuals. 

(b) Bill vouchers 

For every whole multiple of 100 shares you buy in the 
Offer and bold continuously until certain qualifying dates, you 
can receive £10 worth of vouchers (up to a maximum entitlement 
of £250). The way in which the voucher scheme will work is 
illustrated in the table below; 


Number of 
shares held 
continuously j 

ENTTREMEhlT TO VOUCHERS 

ON THE QUALIFYING DATES 

30th . 31st 30th 31st 30th 31st 

June Dec. June Dec. June Dec. 

1987 1987 1988 1988 1989' 1989 

Total 

100 

£10 


' 

_ 

. * 

i— 

£10, 

200 

£20 

— ’ 

— 

— 

— 

— 

£20 

300 

£30 

— 

— ■ 


: 

— 

£30 ; 

400 

£40 

— 

' — 

— 

— 


£40 

500 

£40 

£10 


— 

. — 

— 

£50 

600 

£40 

£20 

— 

— 

— 

— 

£60 

700 

£40 

£30. 

— 

— 

— 

— 

£70 

800 

£40 

£40 

— 

— 

— 

— 

£80 

900 

£40 

£40 

£10 

■ — 

— 

— 

£90 

1.000 

£40 

£40 

£20 

— ■ 

— 

— 

£100 

IJOO 

! £40 

£40 

£40 

£30 

— 

— 

£150 

2.000 

£40 

£40 

£40 

£40 

£40 

— 

£200 

2300 
or more 

£40 

£40 

£40 

£40 

£40 

£50 

£250 


EXAMPLE: If you receive 500 shares in the Offer you will be 
entitled to a voucher of £40 on 30th June. 1987 and a voucher 
of £10 on 3 1st December, 1987, provided you hold the shares 
until 31st December. 1987. If you only bold the shares unuL 
say. November 1987, you wifl only be entitled to a voucher of 
£40. 


On each qualifying date you will be entitled to one 
ucher. worth £10 for e very whole multiple of 1 00 shares bought 
the Offer and held continuously until then, less the value of 
* vouchers already received. However, the maximum voucher 
lue on any qualitymgdate wfll be £40t£50 on the last qualifying 
le). 

The voucher will be posted to you about two weeks after - 
h qualifying date. 

\four vouchers can be used when making any payment 
; to British Gas, if that payment includes chares for gas 
) plied (or standing charges) for your use or beneni myow 
me. Details of these arrangements wfll be issued with ihe 
ichers. 

Share bonus 

You will be entitled to one additional share for every ten 
res which you buy in the Offer and continue w> hold up to 
I including 31st December, 1989. The maximum number of 
itional shares you can receive Is 500. There will be no ngm to 
five fractions of shares. 

The additional shares will be transferred ftlK.JIJSJS 
easonablv practicable after 31st ® eoei ? 1 | x V 
t all rights attaching to those shares at the dawonrj^r«7- 

f Siam pd my. or stamp duty reserve tax on or m respect of the 
isfer will be met by the Government. 


TERMS AND CONDITIONS 


t. Acceptance of applications will be conditional on (i) the Ordinary 
Shares, issued and to be issued, being admitted to tbe Official List ofTbe 
Stock Exchange not later than 31st December, 1 986, and (ri) the provisions 
relating to termination of the UJC. Underwriting Agreement referred to in 
Pan G of Section VII of the fuU Prospectus dated 21si November, {986 
comprising the listing particulars relating to British Gas pic (the 
“Prospectus") not being implemented. Application money will be returned 
(without interest) if either of these conditions is not satisfied and. in tbe 
meantime, if presented for payment, will be kept by a receiving bank in a 
separate account. Rights are reserved for tbe Secnsary of State and his 
agents to present for payment and otherwise process all cheques and 
bankers' drafts received and to have fall access to all information relating 
to. or deriving from, such cheques, bankers’ drafts and the processing 
thereof The rigbi is also reserved to treat as valid any application not in 
all respects coonHeted in accordance with the iosmicnaas accompanying 
tbe relevant applies lion form. 

Z A 


nee of an application by an eligible investor who has elected 


for the share bonus or the bill vouchers wiD entitle that investor to the 
share bonus or bill vouchers (as the case may b e) on tbe t erms, and subject 
to the conditions, set out in Section vm of the Prospectus. 

3. A valid application made by or on behalf of a person wbo is eligible 
for the Customer Share Scheme on a green customer application form 
delivered to that person tty or on behalf of tbe British Gas Share 

to the extern described in paragraph 2(b) of Part A of Section Ex'oPtfae 
Prospec tu s. 

4. By completing and delivering an appltatim form, you: 

fa) offer to purchase from the Secretary of Stale the number of Ordinary 
Shares specified in vour application form (or snch smaller number for 
which die application is accepted) on the terms of, and subject io the 
conditions set rail in, the Prospectus and the Instalment Agreement (and. 
in due course, subject to the Memorandum and Articles of Association of 


have 


provisions of the Instalment Agreement; 

(b) as a collateral contract between you and the Secretary of State which 
will become binding on despatch to or receipt by a receiving bank of your 
application and in consideration of tbe Secretary of Stale agreeing that be 
wfll not prior to 1st January, 1 987 offer any of the Ordinary Shares to any 
person other than by means or one of the procedures referred to in the 
Prospectus: 

(T) agree that your application cannot be revoked prior to 1st January 
1987; and 

(ii) warrant that your remittance will be honoured on first presentation 
ami agree that any letter ofacceptaoce and any moneys returnable may be 
held pending clearance of your payment; 

(c) (if you complete a box to apply for bin vouchers or the share bonus) 
thereby: 

(t) warrant that you are eligible to do s o in accor dance with the provisions 
set out in Pan A of Section VIII of tbe Prospectus; 

(ii) agree that, if you elect for bin vouchers, you will comply with the 
conditions of use thereof set otn in paragraph l(b)ofPan BofSectiom VIH 
of the Prospectus: and 

(iii) agree that, if you complete both boxes, you will be d e emed to 
elected for the share bonus only; 

(d) {if you make an apphcationuncterthe Customer Share Scheine) thereby 
warrant that: 

(T) you. or if you are a nominee, aO persons for whose benefit the 
application is made, are eligible for the Customer Share Scheme in 
accord an ce with the prov isions set out in paragra ph 2(a) of Pan A of 
Section IX of the Prospectus; and 

(ii) so for as you are aware, no other application has been made under the 
Customer Share Scheme in respect of the same separately metered gas 
supply as that in respect of which your application is made; 

(e) declare that you are not a U-S, or Ca n a dian person and you are not 
applying on behalf ofany such person, “U.S. or Ca n adian person" having 
the meaning set out m paragraph 4 ofPart A ofSection IX of the Prospectus: 

(0 agree that all applications, acceptances of applications and contracts 
resulting therefrom under Ibis Offer shall be gowned by and construed 
in accordance with the taws of England; 

(g) warrant that: 

(i) (if this application is made for your own benefit) no other application 
is bong made for your benefit by yew or by anyone applying as your agent 
or; so lar as you are aware, by any other person; 

(ii) (if the application is matte by you as agent for or for tbe benefit of 
another person) no other application for the benefit of that person is being 
made by you or, so far as you are aware, by that person or by any other 
person; and 

(iii) if you sign the application form as agent for someone else, you have 
due authority to do so on behalf of that other person; 

(h) agree that, in respect of those Ordinary Shares for which your 
application basbeen received and processed and is not rejected, acceptance 
of your application shall be constituted, at the election or the Secretary of 
Slate, either (I) by notification to Tbe Stock Exchange of the basts of 
allocation (in which case such acceptance shah be on that basis) or (ii) by 
notification of acceptance thereof to the relevant receiving bank; 

(i) authorise tbe relevant receiving bank and the Custodian Bank to send 
a letter of acceptance fra the number of Ordinary Shares for which your 
application is accepted and/or a cheque for any money returnable by post 
at your risk to the address of the pereon (or the first-named person) named 
in the application form and to procure that your name (and the name(s) 


rights in respect of such 
bom effectively renounced and 
the name(s) of any other joint 
members of the Company m 
entitlement to which is evj . 
which has not been effectively 
conditions references to rights 1 
renouncee(s) being registered by a 


Shares the entitlement to which has aox 
creafrer to procure that your name (and 
applicants)) is placed on the register of 
i respect of such Ordinary Shares the 
by Interim Certificates and the right to 
transferred; and in these terms and 
being effectively renounced mean the 
receiving bank in relation to such rights; 


(j) agree that all documents in connection with tbe share bonus or bift 
voucher arrangements may be sent by post at your risk to tbe perron (or, 
in the case of joint applicants, the first person) named in the application 
form to his or her address set out therein or such other address as may 
from time to time appear in the register of holders of interim rights or the 
register of members of the Company against the name of such person; 

(k) agree that time of payment by yon shaft be of the essence of each 
contract constituted by acceptance of your application and undertake to 
pay the second instalment by. and for value not later than, 3 pun. on 9th 
June. 1987 and the final instalment by. and for value not later than, 3 p.m_ 
on 19th April, 1988 for the Ordinary Shares m respect of which your 
application is accepted and the right to which has not been effectively 
renounced or transferred in accordance with the Insta lm e n t Agreement ay 
yon prior to the relevant time and daw, 

(!) agree that, without prejudice to any other rights to which you may be 
entitled, you will notoe entitled to exercise any remedy of rescission for 
innocent misrepresentation at any time after acceptance of your 
application; and 

(m) confirm that, in making your application, you are not retying on any 
information or representation in relation to British Gas or the Offer other 
than information and representations contained in theProqpeaus or in 
the mini prospectus published in connection with the Oner taken together 
with tbe Prospectus (the “prospectuses") and accordingly you i agree ihat 
no person responsible fra; the prospectuses shall have any habihty for any 
such information or representation other than as aforesaid. 


... No person receiving this application form m any territory other 
than tbe (J.K_, the Channel Isfcpas or the isle af Man may treat it as 
constituting an invitation to him or Iks; dot should he or die xn any event 
use it, unless in the relevant territory such an invitation could lawfully be 
made to him 0 ( her without compliance with any unfulfilled registration 
Or other legal requirements, ft is the responsibility ofany person outside 
ihe U.K.. the Channel Islands and the IsleofMan receiving this application 
form and wishing to make an appticati on hereunder to satisfy himself or 
hersdfas to foil observance of the laws of the relevant territory and to pay 
any transfer or other taxes requiring to be paid in such territory ra respect 
' of the shares acquired by him or her under this Ofibr. 


INSTRUCTIONS FOR RETURN OF YOUR APPLICATION FORM 


SEND YOUR COMPLETED APPLICATION FORM BY POST (OR DELIVER IT BY HAND) TO ARRIVE NOT LATER THAN 
10.00 A.M. ON WEDNESDAY. 3RD DECEMBER. 1986 at the appropriate address below acc or ding to the first letter of your 
surname (or corporate name) inserted in Box 1 , 


AtuCg BankofScsdaod 

New Issues Department, 
Apex House, 

9 Had-ijngion Place; 
Edinburgh EH74AL 
or. by hand only, to 

38 ThreadneedSe Street, 
London EG. 


N to SJ National Westminster 
Bank PLC 

New Issues Department. 
BO. Box 79, 

2 Princes Street. 

London EC2P2BD. 


CbtoF Barclays Bank PLC C to J 

New Issues, 

P.O. Box 123. 

Fleet way House. 

25 Faninskm Street. 

London EC4A 4HD. 


SktoZ Tbe Royal Bank of 
Scotland pic 
Registrar's Department. 

RO. Box 435. 

8 Bankhead Crossway North. 
Edinburgh EH 1 1 4RR 

or. by hand only, to 

New Issues Department, 

24 Lombard Street, 

London EC3. 


Lloyd* Bask pie 
Registrar "s Department. 
Goring-by-Sea. Worthing. 
Wfesi Sussex BN 12 6DA 

or, by hand only, to 

Registrar's Department, 
Issue Section, 

1 1 Btsbopssatc, 

London EC2. 


K to M Midiaml Bank pic 

Stock Exchange Services 
Department. 

Mariner House, 

Pepys Street, 

London EC3N4DA. 


USE FIRST CLASS POST AND ALLOW AT LEAST TWO 
DAYS FOR DELIVERY 


OR TAKE THIS FORM BY HAND TO 
ARRIVE BEFORE CLOSE OF BUSINESS ON 
TUESDAY. 2ND DECEMBER. 1986 
at any U.K. branch of National Westminster Bank PLC, 
Bank of Scotland, or Ulster Bank Limited. 


Additi onal ntdvBW cMWa are open tor de l hrari ea by hand untfl 10 a.m. on Wednesday. 3rd Decamber, 1986. These are sat out on the 
back of the applic a tion form in the mini prospectus, and in the listing Particulars. 


GUIDE ON HOW TO COMPLETE THE PUBLIC APPLICATION FORM 


If you wish to apply under the Customer Share Scheme, you 
must complete the GREEN FORM santtayou by the British Gas 
Share Information Office. 

06 if you have received a peraonaKsad ORANGE FORM, you 
should comple t e that form. 

Otherwise, please use the APPLICATION FORM below 

ONLY ONE APPLICATION MAY BE MADE FOR THE BENEFIT 
OF ANY PERSON. 



Putin Box 1 your fall nuw and address 
(please ise Mock capitals). 

Applications must not be made by anyone under 18, bm a 

fortbe benefrujftbai childL To do this, you shouldput your 
own name m Box 1, and after your surname write “A jC~ 
followed by the fuU names of the child. Ybu are not thereby 
precluded from making a single application for your own 
benefit. 


If you wish to apply jointly with another adult, see Now 7. 

jgj&L Pat in Box 2 (in figures) tbe nmntw r of shares for which yon 
jgpD are applying. lba may only apply for one of tbe nembers of 
shares set out below; Applications for my other oi 

shares win be rejected. 



Using the table a Note 2, pot in Box 3 (in figures) tbe amount 
you pay now. 

Payment is in three instalments. The second instalment of45p 
per share is payable by 3 pjn. on 9th June, 1987 and the final 
instalment of 40p per share by 3 p.m. on 19lb April, 1988. 



Far bQi vouchers, pat “YES** in Box A. For tbe share boons, 
pot “YES" in Box B. COMPLETE ONE BOX ONLY 
If you complete both boxes you will be deemed to have applied 
for the share bonus only. U yon do sot complete either box, 
yon will not neon bill vouchers or the share boons. Before 
making your choice, you should read the details of the special 
incentives set out opposite. 


Once the application form is submitted your choice may not 
be changed. 



Sign and date tbe form in Box 5- 

The application form may be signed by someone else on your 
behalf if be is duly authorised to do so, but he must enclose 
his power of attorney. 

A corporation must sign under the hand of a duly authorised 
official, whose representative capacity must be stated. 


Number 
of stares 
you are 
■PPtyilW 

if—uaf 
yap# 
namfSOp 
*r tUn) 

four loud 

nswemaii 

(1 35p per- 
share) 

Number 
of stares 
you are 
applying for 

Awmmf 

yompny 

ma*<50p 

rtrthmel 

ybur fatal 

investment 

(I35p per 
stare) 

100 

£50 

£135 

1.000 

£500 

£1,350 

200 

£100 

£270 

1.500 

£750 

£2,025 

300 

£150 

£405 

2400 

£1,000 

£2,700 

400 

£200 

£540 

2J00 

£1,250 

£3575 

500 

£250 

£675 

3,000 

£130 

£4,050 

600 

£300 

£810 

3,500 

£1,750 

£4.725 

700 

£350 

£945 

4,000 

£2,000 

£5,400 

800 

£480 

£1,080 

4.500 

£2050 

£6,075 

900 

£450 

£1,215 

5.000 

£2500 

£6,750 


Above 5,000 shares, applications must be in the following 
denominations: 


Applications Multiples of 

5.000 to 10,000 shares 1,000 shares 

10.000 to 50,000 shares 5,000 shares 

50.000 to 100.000 shares 10.000 shares 

over 100,000 shares 50,000 shares 


WARNING 

Only one application may be made for tfta benefit of 
any person. Criminal proceedings may be instituted 
against anyone k n o win gly making or authorising 
more than one application for the benefit of any 
p e rson. 



Pm to Bax 6 a cheque or bankers' draft for the exact amount 
joa here catered ia Box 3. Ifeur cheque or hankers* draft must 
be made payable to “British Gas Share Offer”. Please ensure 
that it is crossed and write oa it “Not Negotiable”. 


\bnr payment must relate solely to this application. No receipt . 
wiU be issued. 


Your cheque or bankers’ draft must be drawn in sterling on an 
account at a bank branch in the United Kingdom, the Channel 
Islands or the Isle of Man and must bear a United Kingdom 
bank sort code number in the top right hand comer. If you do 
not have a cheque account, you can obtain a cheque from your 
building society or a bank branch. 

An application may be accompanied by a cheque drawn by 
someone other than foe applicants), but any moneys returned 
vrill be sent by cheque crossed “Not Negotiable A/C Payee 
Only” in favour of the applicants). 

# JOINT APPLICANTS 

Yra may apply jointly with up to three other people, provided 
each applicant b aged 18 or over. They should complete aid 
sign Box 7. 

Powers) of attorney must be enclosed if anyone is signing on 
behalf of any joint applicaut(s). 


British Gas pic 

PUBLIC APPLICATION FORM 


To The Secretary of State for Energy • National Westminster Bank PLC 
N M Rothschild & Sons Limited • British Gas pic 


Before completing this form, 
carefutty the accompanying 


read 


PLEASE USE BLOCK OWmS 


Mf-Mn. MtaotliUc 

ftnBHK(4<m faB* 

Surname 

_ 


Address 



Pas code 


I/We offer to purchase 


Ordinary Shares 


in British Gas pic on and subject to the Terms and Conditions set out on this page and in the 
Prospectus comprising the Listing Particulars dated 21st November, 1986 


and I/we attach a cheque or bankers' draft 
for the amount now payable of 


I/Ws wish to receive 


Bill vouchers 


Share bonus 


IA, 


or 

B 



PLEASE WRITE ‘YES' IN ONE BOX ONLY 


KM OFFICIAL USE 

cray 


ISatuconal 


1 4 mourn mnd 

£ 


4. Amorim payable 

£ 


4 Annul returned 


& Cteqaeu. 


I declare that to my knowledge this is the only application made for my benefit (or Lhat of the 
persons) for whose benefit 1 am applying). 


Dale 


Scaaiure 


1986 



□ 4 Pin here your cheque/bankers’ draft for the amount ii 

“British Gas Share Offer’’ and crossed “Not Negotiable". 


in Box 3, payable to 



JOINT APPLICANTS 

The fust applicant should sign Box S. Using BLOCK CAPTTaIS. mien below ihe names of the o*er joint appheu is. wtw ransi Hgn m [he righi band column. 


| Mr, Mrs. Miss or title 

Forename(s) (la full} 

Surname 

Signature 

2nd joint 
applicant 





3rd joint 
applicant 





4th joint 
applicant 






FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY 

Those data mg awm i Mioo or reafflwance of con « n i * a ou should samp both boxes appticaMe to Umn. 


nS pfftfui rtranfflg 

fnunrtBttmd WT fg. no 

ttaUMantx oi Ccanmmaon Wf rex no 

SawmqfMTMi rtwimng 
mnm. ml VAT >n.n. 

SanpofofeT laKraKdan Kmuc 
ofranmuMo rad WT mt so 

(If M RnHnd fa> WT. nn ~«oac~1 


IIIlUKBttndtilUT.M'iut'l 

«lf not ws»H unitor MI nTim'i 

AtfClMftM. 

SamasKtaod 

taecfHanca. 

SWn uKrwri 

Conimmottt ■’nfrihlod 

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J 













A neat way to 
land yourself in 
the profit zone 



W ARE (MW 

&atmc. uj 
anERFRisEame. 
PLEASE HftVEIJl/R 
IWEfTMEUTCASH 
RBWY. 


§W?C 


( INVESTING ) 


I am a higher-rate taxpayer 
and do not want to put any 
money into business 
expansion schemes, which I 
regard as generally high- 
risk. I have also used op my 
pension allowances. How 
else can 1 invest in order to 


income? DANE Y BLOCH 
and RAYMOND 
GODFREY advise 

There is an investment which 
is 100 per cent property-based 
and on which you can get a 
100 per cent tax deduction — 
commercial property located 
in enterprise zones. 

Ifyou are a 50 or 60 per cent 
taxpayer, the attraction of 
investing in an enterprise zone 
building is that you need make 
little or no initial outlay in 
c ash and you can look forward 
to seeing a return in the form 
of an income There is no limit 
on the level of your invest- 
ment and it does not eat into 
your entitlement for business 
expansion scheme invest- 
ment. And you do not need to 
be a millionaire. The mini- 
mum investment is normally 
about £5,000. 

In the long run, there could 
well be a capital profit 

A number of enterprise 


zones have bees set up in 
d e s ignate d areas of about 300 
acres. Commercial buildings 
within the zone can qualify for 
the 100 per cent tax deduction 
which applies to offices as well 
as factories and warehouses. 

When you invest in an 
enterprise zone building, you 
benefit from tax relief on 100 
per cent of the qualifying 
expenditure. 

So a high earner with a 
taxable income of £41,200 or 
more would benefit from 60 

Tax relief would 
usually be won back 

per cent tax relief In other 
words, on £10,000 qualifying 
expenditure, you would re- 
ceive tax relief of £6,000. 

The investment has to be 
regarded as a long-term hold- 
ing. The tax relief on the 
initial purchase would nor- 
mally be clawed back in the 
form of a balancing charge if 
you were to sell the property 
within 25 years, although 
there are ways of mitigating 
this. 

But you will see some 
income from your investment 
almost . immediately. And 
yields are likely to be 5 to 7 per 
cent, depending on the loca 


don and desirability of the 
property. 

If you are a higher-rate 
taxpayer in the year in which 
yon make the investment, this 
represents an attractive return 
for the yield is based on your 
gross investment. 

For example, your £10,000 
gross investment as a 60 per 
cent taxpayer costs only 
£4,000; so a yield of 6 percent 

on the gross amount k equiva- 
lent to a yield of 15 per cent on 
your £4.000 net outlay after 
tax relief - 

Again, if you are a high-rate 
taxpayer, but will soon see a 
substantial reduction in your 
taxable incomtfc, this could be 
very convenient. Not many 
investments can generate a 
reasonably secure gross in- 
come of 15 per cent a year and 
rising. It could be particularly 
attractive for people just about 
to retire. 

On the other hand, you may 
want to take advantage of the 
borrowing facilities. For you 
can take out a loan in coder to 
make the purchase and obtain 
tax relief on the interest 
against your rental income. 
Commercially rented prop- 
erties are one of the few 
investments os which such 
tax relief is available. 

If you put together the tax 
relief and the borrowing facil- 


ity, it becomes very attractive 
indeed. 

For example, you could 
invest £10,000 and obtain, at 
60 per cent tax relief, £6,000. 
You could finance the pur- 
chase with a borrowing of 
£4,000 at say 13% percent (2% 
per cent over base rate). 

The cost would be £540 a 
year, which should be ade- 
quately covered by the rental 
income that yon receive and 
on which you would therefore 
pay no tax. 

The best scheme would be 

to arrange a loan where capital 

repayments are not required 
or at least where it is possible 
to set up a pension linked 
mortgage. 

It should be posable to raise 
funds on the security of the 
investment Otherwise, if you 
were to borrow over a 10 -year 
period, the capital repayments 
for an endowment policy to 
generate £10,000 at the end of 
the term would be about £700 
a year. 

After 25 years, the property 
could be sold off with no 
balancing charge. Meanwhile, 
you mil have used money that 
would otherwise have gone to 
the taxman in order to build 
up future income and capital 
growth for yourself 

Is such a plan just for 
millionaires and Big Bang 
players? After all, you are 


unlikely to be able to buy a 
self-contained building or part 
of a building for less than 
about £200,000, although a 
few very small properties 
might be available for 

£joo,ooa 

Probably the answer for 
most investors is to use the 
jinTtj rM arrangement estab- 
lished through Property Enter- 
prise Trust, which is lucked to 
the quoted property company 
London and Edinburgh Trust 
pic. 

The unitized scheme 
spreads the investment and as 
a result the risk over several 
h i Hiding s in a number of 
enterprise roues. 

Very substantial investors 
must consider the competing 
claims of buying i n t o individ- 
ual developments which they 
can identify (and perhaps even 
use) as their own. But for most 
people with less than £20,000 
to invest, there is probably no 
choice. 

The drawbacks are dear. 


The return is 
more long-term 


Though the input is really vjay 
small, the investment is illi- 
quid for at least 10 years. 
Though the risk is substantial- 
ly less than for most BES 
schemes, the return is substan- 
tially longer-term. Rental 
growth may not turn out as 
expected and if that is the case, 
capital growth will also not be 
achieved. 

Wise taxpayers should be 

s canning the possibilities now 

in order to make their arrange- 
ments in good time. 

• Contact The Property En- 
terprise Trust, 243 
Knighisbridge, London SW7. 
(01-4865267). 


5 £ : : 



Rob Monte Sun Life of 
Canada encourages efients Id 
use the loan scheme 


How to avoid 
the crunch 
at Christmas 


over base rate pteaftnrim sfar^ 

( SPENDING 1 <*» charges, a me*ty£5ptos 

V wr&iwiraa / VAT for every letter renrind- 

that you axe 


The season of “spend, spend, 
spend** b almost upon as. 
There fa no other time fifcc it 
for throwing caution to the 
wind and barbie a fimmrfef 
binge. Bat whether It is for an 
extra special Christman 
present, another case of wine, 
or something else 

the cost of getting yoer 

on gone additional cash is not 
cheap. 

The most ratal, and conve- 
nfcnt, way. of stretching year 
budget is through Bardayoffd 
or Access. That way yon need 
not feel the pinch for at least a 
month, and the foil Mow of 
how ranch yon have spent will 
never hit yon if yoa continue to 
pay off the bare mminBiB on a 
monthly basis. 

Another popular way of 
b or r owing is simply to go to 
the hank manager. More often 
than not he wiD not object to 
your having an overdraft Not 
su rpris ing really, when yon 
realize how much yon will end 
op paying for it Even with the 
bulk's prior consent an over- 
draft wiD cost yon between 3 
and 7 per cent above the base 
leading rate (now 11 pa cent). 

If yon jast keep on writing 
cbeqnes without the bank 
manager’s paraisana. It Is 
likely to cost yoa 12 percent^ 


INSURE YOUR LIFE FORUP TO £130,000 FROM JUST PENNIES A DAY 

“If you’re not sure you need life 
insurance, please read my letter. 


••• 


-To \*5w\o*v> it r^a.^ COACorTV , 

fM 0.1 TVWS^ \olUr . if GOTO, oF 

XnSoraX. or \r\ AiooVxt o^> to \0\\«£Hw-r 

rvu-c-X too- IrvSuro-X 

X Jcxtc- ViuSfro-rA . UVxon X Oo. S F'lFfco^n 




called Ian, who zee had both longed amount of money, bdierc me tin so cover you decide you need. 


lo idiom it may concern, 

Plaue read my later. Ifyou are 
thinking of becoming Insured, or 
mtty be in any doubt as to whether 
you need to be Insured. 

Jma my late husband Bob when l 
was fifteen years old. When I was 
eighteen toe decided to save hard 
and buy a house and when we 


for. We had our just holiday with 
Ian taken he was dgfueen months 
old . 

We were so very happy, it was 
never to be forgotten, because just 
after that Bob came home from 
work one day and died zeilh a 
heart attack. 

The doctors at the hospital said 
there zoos nothing thpy could da 
thty tried everything. So I went 
home tamy son, who wanted to 
know where his Daddy zoos. 

Some days later I rang John as 
Bob. from the beginning always 
said I must do. John came 
immediately and as I zoos in shock, 
I could not chink very dearly, John 
teas marvellous. He sorted out 
Bob's Insurance and within a few 
days I received a cheque. Also he 


very important. 

Yours Faithfully 

ES. Thank you Sun Life of 


That could save you up to £29. 

Generous doable benefit 
Many people worry whar 
would happen if they were to 


Canada, fhankyoujohn Holland dieteanaoddort 
chankypu Bobforputdngyour With this Han you receive a 


married Bob said how important it 
was to have some Insurance behind helped me with all the paperwork 
us. So zee met Mr. John HaM, who of vMch there is a lot when 
came and helped us use zohat little 
money toe could spare to die best 
advantage possible. 

Now as time zoau by we had many 
difficulties. Once Bob was very 
shortefworkand IhadaniQness 

which lasted lyear. This meant I 
could not work With high 


someone dies. He is a real friend 
even now. Anyway now time has 
gone try and nature has healed a 
lot. I realise how important it is to 
have some security wish Insurance, they’ll advise you that nothing 
We now have a home free from is as important as protecting 

mortgage and my little boy is secure, your family with life insurance. 
He is going to a Private Nursery So that, should you die, your 


family before yoursdf.* 

Mrs. Johnson’s letter speaks 
for itself. 

Protecting your life is a very 
important thing to do - 
especially if yotffo married, and 
even more so ifyou have 
children, or other dependants. 

With Sun Life of Canadak 
high protection, low cost 
Insurance Flan you can now 
take out up to £130,000 of life 
cover from just 45p a day: And 
your plan lasts for ten years. 

Why you need high 
protection life Insurance 
Ifyou talk to someone you 
trust about money - an 
accountant, ora bank tnanager- 


mortgage and biBs it zoos hard But School, where he is learning to read nearest and dearest will have a 


still we kept up our Insurance. 

We had years without a Holiday 
and bang so young one day I asked 
why are we struggling and yet 
payingfor Insurance? Nothing is 
going to happen. But Bab said 
nothing was more important. 

He explained that if anything 
should happen 10 him. he would 

never toant me hfi to struggle. 

He zoos so caring, he said hard 
times would pass and thty did. 

A few more years went by and 
things got better. We had a tittle bey 


and sortie. I am in a position to be 
insured for more money then if 
anything should happen to me. my 
son zoitibezeefl looked after, and 
zee can live very corrfbnabfy. I do 
run have to Jam turnout. I can be 
at home to watch him grow and# 
he grows up tike his Hither he will 

be avery unselfish and much loved arranged a special discount. 
person. Ifyou reply quickly you’ll 

So please think cf your family and receive your first month Is cover 

get some security even if it is a small for just £1, no matter how much 

«Thbii ■ granitic letter rettiwd by John HaU, s rcpmcmadvrofSoo Life ot Canada, 
LeiecsWrBfanch, for over SyeankOfllji tbc ouut oftlie bttUy have been changed. 


generous lump sum to help 
them man a ge. Plenty of money, 
in fact, to proride for their 
future. 

Special offer Apply today 
Ids easy to pur off an 
important decision like this, so 
to help you get starred we’ve 


generous double benefit in the 
event of an accidental death. 

And any money paid out 
under this Plan is absolutely 
tax-free as the law stands at 
present. 

The Plan is flexible 
Once you’ve joined this Plan 
you have the right to change it 
into one of many other plans 
without having to take a medical 
TibuH be surprised how 
useful this is. Any time in die 
next ten years you can switch 
the Plan into, say, a savings 
scheme. You could use it as part 
of an endowment mortgage. Or 
you could arrange what we call 
a '‘whole life" policy to protea 
you throughout the whole of 
your Hie. 

Your acceptance is 
guaranteed. 

No metrical, either: 

Your acceptance is 
guaranteed providing you can 
truthfully answer “no" to four 
ample health questions (and 
that you sign the declaration 
belowl. Even ifyou do have to 
answer “yes" to one or more of 
the health questions, don’t 
worry. We may still be able to 
accept your application once 
you have given us further 
details. 

If you’ve got any questions, 
you can always ring us on 
01-9302976. 


YOU CAN SEE FROM THIS “READY RECKONER* THAT YOU 
CAN PROTECT YOUR FAM2ETPOR UPTOZUM»FROJH JB5T 
PENNIES PER DAY 



PLAN 

PLAN 

PLAN 

PLAN 

PLAN 


A 

B 

C 

D 

E 

AMOUNT 

PAYABLE 

£10,000 

£20,000 

£35,000 

£50,000 

£65,000 

ON DEATH 






TOTAL 
COVER IF 
DEATH 

£20,000 

£40,000 

£7<MM>0 

£100,000 

£130,000 

ACCIDENTAL 






AGT. \-EARES] 
birthhw 

AMOUNT YOU PAY 

MONTHLY ( 

20-30 

£5.00 

£6.00 

£735 

£10.50 

£13.65 

31-35 

£5.00 

£620 

£9.10 

£13.00 

£16.90 

36-40 

£5-40 

£8.40 

£12.95 

£18.50 

£24.05 

41-45 

£6.00 

£12.00 

£1925 

£27.50 

- 

46-50 

£9.30 

£18.60 

£30.80 

- 

- 

51-55 

£14 70 

£29.40 

- 

- 

- 


Either Melinda Smith or 
Sally Dexter wiD be happy to 
help. 

Sun Life of Canada V 
Doable Guarantee 

1. V5fc guarantee never to 
increase the price of your 
plan no matter what 
happens to inflation. 

2. We guarantee never to 
cancel your policy as long 
as you pay your premiums. 

28 day no-risk trial 
You can examine your high 
protection, low cost Insurance 
Plan at home for 28 days 
without obligation. 

If you're not convinced that 


which this Han brings. 

How to apply 
* Look at the “ready 
reckoner” shown here and 
dearie how much cover you 
need. 

★if, for example, you want 
£50,000 of cover; rising to 
£100$00 in the event of 
accidental death, then you want 
Plan D. 

★Tkk the appropriate box on 
the Priority Application and 
complete the rest of the form. 
■Ar Remember; you only need to 
send a cheque for £1 with your 
application. So you could save 
up to £29. 


hb the best way to protect your ★fbst your Application to Sun 
family, simply return it to us Life of Canada, Dept DM, 
and well send you backyour£L Freepost, London SW1Y 5YX. 

So it won’t cost you a penny You don’t need a stamp . . . well 
to discover the peace of mind pay the postage. 

SmUfeofCcnada 

Sun Lile Axxutaacc i xiamaiiy ol Canada. iDcotporncd in Canada Ln 1 8f 5 s» ■ limned cararanr. 
A mutual company 1962. 2. 3 & 4 Coriuptu Sunt, London SW1Y 5BH. 



INFORMATION 

HOTLINE 

01-9302976/7 


Dept. DM 
Prccpon 
Ustoswiynxl 


Priority Application. Sun Life of Canadas Family Protection Insurance Plan" 


YOUR FIRST MONTH COSTS JUST£1 

Yes. Please send me, without obligation, a policy for the Family Protection Plan I have selected which wiD be 
mine to examine for 28 days. I enclose £1 for my first monthb cover 


NO STAMP 
NEED ED 
WHENY0UWWTE 



I WISH TO APPLY FOR: 

¥□ TD Tn 


FLAN 

D 


□ 


FLAN 

£ 


Please tick appropriate box. 

Do yoa have a bank current account* 

FOUR SIMPLE QUESTIONS 

1. Are there any risks or special dangers connected with your 
occupation, hobbies, sports or pastimes? 

2. Have you ever undergone any hospital investigation or 
operation other than for the removal of wisdom teeth, 
tonsils or appendix? 

3. Have you during the last Gve years received any medical 
advice, treatment or prescription from a doctor other 
than for colds? 

4. Are you currently experiencing any symptoms which 
.might suggest that you are not in good physical 

and mental condition? 


NO 


□ 

YfcS 

□ □ 

YE. NO 

□ □ 

YES SO 

□ □ 

YfcS Ml 

□ □ 

YI.S NO 

□ □ 


Please tick bereifyou do not smoke. D 

Ifyour answer is ‘Yes’® any question, in most cases we hope to be able 
oo give you che benefit ofthe terms as shown in the mtc table. Pfease 
give full details on a separate sheer of paper together wiih the name 
and address of your present doaot Then sign and date the sheen You 
should still send us your£l for your first months covet 


Return the coupon below - 
no stamp needed 


any insurance office to which a proposal has been made for insurance 
on my life, and 1 authorise the giving of such information. 

YOUR PERSONAL DETAILS 

SURNAME (Mr/Mrs/Mis^Ms) - 

BLOCK CAPITALS IIXVdL! 

FIRST NAMES 


-MAIDEN NAME IF APPLICABLE. 


ADDRESS. 


DATE OF BIRTH. 


DONT FORGETTO SIGN: 


YOUR DECLARATION: 

1 DECLARE that all statements made by me in this application are 
true and complete to the best of my belief and thail have disclosed all 
facts known to me and sought by the Company. 

I AGREE that this application together with any additional 
declaration made by me in connection herewith shall be the basis of 
the assurance, and that failure by me to disclose aD facts known to me 
and sought by the Company may lead to a daim under any resulting SIGNATURE^ 

policy being adjusted or rejected. 

I CONSENT to the Company seeking medical information from any 
doctor who at any lime has attended me concerning anything which 
affects my physical and mental heakh, or seeking information from 


-POSTCODE. 


DAY MONTH YfcAK 


-DATE- 


POST NOW TO: SUN LIFE OF CANADA, DEPT DM, FREEPOST 
LONDON SOIY 5YX.NO STAMP NEEDED. 

Available only to persons living in the United Kingdom. 

Please make your cheque for £1 payable ro Sun life of Canada. 


B1 807 01 


I A Awnnt ( (ILflUili InoqnaK J ■ t Uuda loi»iul,i«fi««4cNs’ 2.14 1 1 iutfcjpw Snctl. lond<* VU1\ ABU 


iag you that yoa 
overdrawn. 

Bard a ycari and 

charge 2 per cent a mouth, or 
2&8 per emit APR on par- 
chases, 27,2 per cent for cash 
advances. Looking at the 
APR, or amnal percentage 
rate, js*a amvement way to 
compare Che different costs of 
borrowing. It represents the 
total snout of Merest which 
someone can expect to 


is owed at different 

times daring the Iran. 

For example, S yea were to 
borrow £200 at 14 per cent 
interest to be repaid monthly 
over a year, as toe months go 
by job would owe less and teas 
min by the end of the 12 
months yoa mold owe noth- 
ing. On average over the year 
yea would owe £100, bat would 
stBl pay 14 per cent ratmest on 
the sam of £280 — that is, £28. 
The APR, then, taking into 
acooont that foe amumt of the 
loan diminishes, wovld be just 
yn4itn» 28 percent. 

Back to the various methods 
of borrowing. A personal bank 
loan will cost a fixed 19.7 per 
cent a year fof^re supplied 
by Barclays sad Midland 
BanksX whBe an unseamed 
Iran, that is, a loan not tied to 
your property or other assets, 

thrangh a fimnm htmm g nrh 

as Mercantile Credit will cost 
as modi as 32 per cent APS. 

Unfortunately, there is no 
free way to brarow money, 
other than through a kind- 
hearted relative or friend. But 
if yon have a life aasarance 
policy yon might >ot be aware 
that yoa may be able to borrow 
money agaiost.it at an ex- 
tremely favourable rate of 
interest, as long as yonr poficy 

Likely to cost you 
a meaty fiver 

has not been taken ate to dear 
your mortgage shoaki you die 
before the repayment period is 
OP. 

For example, a. yoang 
woman, 21 next birthday, may 
deride to take oat n 25-year 
endowment policy, paying £30 
a month towards it When the 
poficy matures it should be 
worth at least £37,000. If after, 
say, 15 years the woman finds 
hersetfsbartafmoaeytobaya 
car or go on holiday, she would 
have the option of taking out a 
loan against the valne of the 
policy. 

There are, inridartaliy, no 
restrictjonsonhowsachaldan 
may be used. After 15 years 
the surrender valne would be 
29,500 and the woman would 
be able to borrow op to £7,700, 
approx im ately 80 per cent. 
The amoanl die borrows with 
interest added would then be 
deducted from the final son of 
£37,000. 

The above example 


provided by Sun Affiants* List 
year the company grastep 
1100 poScy loans. The mi®- 
piiiM i ram it will l end is £250 
aid its cnneiit rate of inters* 
is 125 per cent* Compare pat 
with the cast of an overdraft or 
credit cards and the benefits 
mrtifc for themselves. 

According to a detailed sa»* 
vey carried oat hj ESaatud 

Savings Magazine earlier this 

year, most companies ofienas 
fife assurance policies issc? 
policy Joans too, and most oi 
them charge an interest rate 
between 32 and 13 per cent 
These rates do not change 
often. 

like Sun Affiance, most 
companies have a minimum 
<pwn n&t can be borrowed, 
v arying between £25 and £500, 
bat common bottom 

level is £100. Axoand half of 
the companies are willing to 
trod op to 90 per cent of the 

Defeating the aim 
o f life assurance? 

surrender valne; the vast 
majority between 80 and 90 
percent 

Despite the avaiiabilify of 
such loans, and the obvious 
wffit in terras of cost, 
remarkably few people take 
a d v an t age of the foritity on 
offer, probably because they 
do not know ft exists. Sun Life 
of fwnnrfw tops the table, 
having granted 9,927 loans 
last year. That represents one 
loan fra every 35 life assurance 

pofides it has os the go. 

Bob Mraris, Sim Life of 
Canada^ policy payments 
manager, says the company 
has a field force of 800 
r epre se n tatives who encoraage 
efimts with cash problems to 
use the loan scheme rather 
than bong tempted to snnen- 
der their po&y altogether and 
lose the tax relief on the 
investment to winch they are 
entitled. 

But though this feature no 
doubt helps to sell a 
co mp a ny^ policies, there is a 
feeling that paying out a loan 
defeats the purpose of baring 
life assurance at afi. Brian 
Bergin, Snn Alliance's 
marketing services manager, 
says his company sells its life 
pofiries as longtonu saviqgs 
vehicles, and to borrow money 
agains t tha n is almost a 
c ontrad i cti on tfat- 

Bat he stresses that the 
c o mpan y would prefer some- 
one to take out a loan to solve 
immediate fiMwwi problems 
than surrendering the policy 
alt o get he r. 

Perhaps the most important 
point to bear in mind is that 
one of toe mam reasons for 
taking out a fife policy is to 
nuke sure that you depen- 
dants will be finandally secure 
should yoa die. Taking oat a 
loan against that policy simply 
whittles down the amount leh 
at toe end of the day. 

Kate Brown 


ARE YOU 

Self-employed 

and feel you can’t 
afford to be ill? 

The problem with bemgseff-employed is finding the time 
to take time off So when Alness forces an unplanned test 
oa you, tire financial coosequoioes can be quite 
devastating, 

Thai'S why private insurance witfrBCWA makes sense. Rw 
over 50 years BOtFA has consistently undermined die 
theory that private medical insurance fcarichmarisclub. 
During that time^ we haveacqirired a national reputation 
for befng'best buy* the market 

Our schemes indude excellent 
cover for private bospflal 
charges, specialist fees, 
out-patient treatment, and an 
Additional Cadi Payment 
option. BCWA ensures 
that whoa you arc ill, 
youcanaft>rdit 


Bristol House, 
40-56 Victoria St. 
Bristol BSI6A8 
TcT:(0272)295742 



private medical insurance 


I Bristol Contributory Welfare Association 
Bristol House, -iO-SfiVictoriaStree^BristoLBSi 6AB 
l Please send me deta^df the Private Patients Scheme 

I am aged under 65QJ Eortodiwduals fll 

| For members of Professional/TradeAssTCitions 

Name 

f 


TT2S/IS 


Address. 


Lr — Bestrode 1 








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THE TIMES SATURDAY NOVEMBER 29 IQfirt 


35 


FAMILY MONEY/5 




A major problem for thosrwho lave 
moved jobs more thai> once dinibg 
their working life has been that they 
have found on retirement that their 
pension has suffixed in comparison 
with those employees who have 
stayed with one company. 

The Government, noticing the 
obvious injustice and hoping to 
prevent anything that would fonde r 
job mobility, has acted to help 
alleviate blight on the early leaver. 

Now, lor instance^ the offer of -a 
transfer value .from a c ompa ny 
pension scheme is compulsoiy. 

Those leaving a job after more than 
jive years have three options: they 
can leave their pension contributions 
with their previous employer, who 
will eventually pay a preserved 
pension on their retirement; they can 
transfer the money to a dew employer 
— if he is prepared to accept the sum 
and if he has a suitable scheme, of 
they can transfer the value of their 

Yon have the choice 
of abny-ont bond 


contributions into what is known as 
either a buy out bond or a Section 32 
annuity. 

Those who have been in a company 
pension scheme, for less than five 
years are currently able to have a 
refund of contributions, Jess 10 per 
cent tax. From April 6 , 1988, how- 
ever, this five-year period will be 
reduced to two. " 

The object of a buy-out bond is, 
basically, to improve on the perfor- 
mance of the preserved pension left 
behind with a previous employer, 
.like many policies offered by insur- 
ance companies nowadays, you have 


choice for job-hoppers 


Stephen Spurdon analyses the pensions choices 

the 



the choice of purchasing a buy-out 
bond as either with profits or tmrt- 

liqtffd 

Of the two approaches,.^ bond 
with profits is definitely the more, 
cautious and conservative, offering 
steady, secure growth based on the 
accumulation of annual reversionary 
bonuses. There is also the possibility 
of a tennijaal bonus, paid at retire- 
ment, but these are not guaranteed, 
the possibility of payment and the 
level of payment being dependent cm 
prevailing market conditions. 

Unit-linked' policies, however, 
offer a greater possibility of gain. But 
it is also the case that the price of 
unite will rise and M m line with 
market conditions, so it -wifi be bard 
lock if yonrretireraent (fete coincides 
with the low point of the cycle. ' 

The companies offering these pofi- 
des will usually state a mhumum 
transfer value that they will accept to 
i nit iate a buy-out bond. This will be, 
typically £ 1,000 to £ 2 , 000 . 

All the bends available are based 
on the principle of money purchase, 
which means that the pension you 
receive wifl be based on the valise of 
the fund accumulated at retirement. 

. Most company pension schemes, - 
however, are based on the final salary 
principle, which means that your 
pension at retirement wfll be based on 
a proportion of your final salary. So, 
anyone thinking of buying a buy-out 
bond . will have to ensure that 
quotations for the bond match the 


benefits of the scheme they axe 
leaving. 

, The point is that the only realistic 
means of comparison between the 
benefits bong left behind and those 
projected in a buy-out bond is to 
ensure that they match one another as 
closely as possfide. 

The projected fund figure con- 
tained in the quotation is, of course, 
not guaranteed. However, that sum is 
intended to provide your pension, a 
pennon on yortr oath for your 
spouse if you wish it, plus any 
pension increases you require, and 
the tax-free lump sum -which you can 
have- by sacrificing part of your 
pension. 

. • The bans for with profits quota- 
tions has recently been changed In an 
attempt to ait down on the “lete- 
n umber” projections, life of- 
: can only quote on the assumption 
that the maximum growth in the fund 
reflected in bonus payments is 13 per 
cent a year. With profits quotations 
will now appear more or less similaf, 
and wifl' be brought broadly in line 
with unit linked quotations. 

However, readers who have al- 
ready asked about a buyout bond 
during the last year may have 
encountered difficulty because the 
wording of the 1985 Social Security ' 
Act unintentionally. resulted in pen- 
sion-fund trustees bring temporarily 
unable to pass transfer values on to 
insurance companies for buy-out 
bonds. 

The trustees had found that they 


needed to indemnify themselves 
against future claims by former 
scheme members. 

The problem has been partly 
resolved because the wording of the 
Act has been amended. But some 
doubts still, remain and so it may be 
that fire trustees of your former 
company’s pension scheme will re- 
quire the. insurance company you 
select for your buy-out bond to sign 
an indemnity form. 

A surviey of the 35 buy-out bonds 
on the market which appeared in 
Pensions Management magazine re- 
cently found that London & Man- 
chester, Canada fife, Cannon 
Assurance; FS Assurance, Providence 
Cbpitol, Sun Life of Canada and 
Windsor Life were the only on es 
prepared to sign the indemnity form. 
Eagle Star, Equitable Life and Sun 
Life were prepared to sign it in a 
modified form. 

Since. that survey a p peared. Son 


No time limit on 
a transfer value 


Alliance has announced that it will 
also sign indemnity forms. 

But before rushing into the pur- 
chase of a buy-out bond with these 
companies, compare their perfor- 
mance with other offices who are not 
prepared to sign the indemnity. You* 
may find that it is as well to sit hock 
and wail until the whole matter is 
cleared up. 

Remember, there is no time limit 
on taking a transfer value. In fact, any 
time after leaving a pension scheme, 
you may write to the trustees and 
request a transfer value, right up to 
one year before you retire. 


The Government has finally 
unveiled its proposed rules for 
foe taxation of personal 
pensions. 

The new proposals came in 
a consultative document from 
the Inland Revenue, entitled 
Improving the pensions choice- ’ 

Announcing publication of 
the document on Thursday, 
Norman Lamont, Financial 
Secretary to the Treasury, 
declared that there would be a 
new pensions deal for the 10 
million employees m this 
country who did not belong to 
ah occupational -pension 
scheme — and a wider pen- 
sions choice for all employees. 

Mr Lamont said that in the 
past barriers to mobility, 
including the existing pro- 
visions tor pensions, had been 
a drag on the country’s eco- 
nomic performance. 




With the improvement of 
job mobility as an important 
government objective, Jbe 
new proposals were designed 


mty to people to have a 
pension arrangement which 
they could take with them 
when they changed jobs. 

The key points of the new 
proposals are : 

• tax irifefsforpeisond pen- 
sions to be based broadly on 
the present rules for seif- 
employed retirement annu- 
ities. This means that most 
people will be able to pay in up 


to 1 7.5 per cent of earnings to 
a persona] pension plan. 

• broadly the same rules for 
all personal pension arrange: 
meats, whether taken out by 
employees or the selfem- 
ployed 

• special rules, with minimal 
red tape, for new simplified 
occupational pension schemes 
offering ’no frills’ benefits 

• a new simplified type of 
money purchase occupational 
pension scheme with no bene- 
fit limits, ami with tax relief 
limited by - reference to 
contributions 

•.ranch greater transferability 



Tamcntr a better choice 
between different types of 
pension arrangement. It may 
all sound rather technical but 
these proposals could have a 
direct impact not only on foe 
11 million people who are 
members of occupational pen- 
sion schemes but also the 10 
million company employees 
whose pensions are handled 
by the state, currently through 


the State Earnings-Related 
Pension Scheme. 

The Government’s inten- 
tion is that personal pensions 
should be available to aB 
employees as an alternative to 
membership of an occupa- 
tional scheme or -the State 
scheme as from April 1 988. 

The initial reaction from 
Henry James, director-general 
of foe National Association of 
Pension Funds, yesterday was 
that his association had been 
begging the Government to 
introduce a single and simple 
structure for the administra- 
tion of pension plans and that 
be would be studying the 
proposals accordingly. 

The Inland Revenue wants 
detailed comments on its pro- 
posals by 30 January 1987. 

Peter Gartland 


Who needs 
PEP, says unit 
trust firm 


be devoted to Personal 
Plans during foe next two to 
three months.'’ So says 
Henderson Unit Trust 
Management; which is now 
designing its own PEP. 

How right they are and how 
timely becomes a warning note 
on PcPs from (he Bristol- 
based Premier Unit Trust 
Brokers. 

Putting its cards squarely 
on the table, Premier says It 
has "a distinct tack of 
enthusiasm for this malformed 
cripple, conceived by foe 
Chancetor in one of his sffljer 
moments". 

Premier urges people not to 
get too carried away, too 
quickly, as they read foe 
glossy inducements now 
beginning to pour from the 
financial mstuuttons, because 
there is no need to hurry. 

The 1987 calendar year 
PEP maximum investment of 
£2,400 can be placed at any 
time up to 31 December 1987 - 
and whenever during 1987 
you make foe investment in 
whatever PEP, you won't 

tax advantages if you 
mg with that 

nt before 31 
December 1988. 

Hence, runs the argument, 
anyone who rushes now into 
one of foe few available 
PEPs being marketed, and 
hands over his cash on or 
before 1 January 1987, could 
wen be locking into an 
expensive, inflexible and 
unsophisticated early 
contracL"Let others be foe 
a. just for now", 
is Premier's advice. 


Pension number 





get any 
doanyti 


■ Whiter Is on its way, comes foe seasonal greeting from the 
insurance companies, in particular, say the inmirors, make stse 
your gutters are not Moc k ed, check that your drains are dear, 

ana have 


fwWInter.ApaitfRHntlieUps.ttliasatMcetohetopeoptopra- 
vent or minimize storm damage, burst pipes and other miseries 
of a typical British winter, ft also gjhres information on household 
insurance and how to claim ft you suffer damage. Available free 
by semfing a stamped addressed envelope to Dept W, 


-very in 

should oe given a i 
pension number svrular to a 
National Insurance number, 
said Inoiis Lawson, 
pensions director at chartered 
accountants Detoittes. 


wide-ranging changes in the 
last Finance Act, including 
the introduction of Inheritance 
Tax. 

Also included Is advice on 
tax-saving strategies, how to 
draw up a win ana how to 
administer the estate ota 
deceased parson. It is 
written jointly by accountant 
Walter Sinclair and soEcitor 
Peter Sflke, and is available 


£12,50. 


pensions conference this 
week, Mr Lawson sai± “if 
cWTtributions t or retirement 
could be made by the 
employee and by foe employer 
19 ) to a maximum 
percentage, then If the 
imfividuaf leaves and goes 
into seif-employment he or she 
could continue to make 
contrfoutions within the 
maximum percentage". 

Latest edition 

A new edition of foe 
Allied Dunbar Capital Taxes 
and Estate Planning Guide 
has been published by 
Longmans. It covers foe 


Now regulating 

■ Complicated and much 
criticized it may be, but the 
new system of self- 
regulation set up by the 
Financial Services Act is 
very much a reality. The body 
which will in practical terms 
be overseeing the system — 
the Securities and 
Investments Board - has 
produced a free booklet 
which puts the whole system in 
context and outlines how it 
wffi work and who foe main 
players at self-regulation 
wfll be. 

Clearly written, it is an 
invaluable quick reference 
guide. It also contains a list 
explaining what all foe 
unfamiliar sets of initials, 
introduced in foe name of self- 
■ regulation, mean. 


And foe booklet gives a 
government-health type 
warning about the finuts 0 # 
self-regulation: "The existence 
of SIB no more removes 
the need for investors to pay 
attention to where they 
place their money than the 
existence of the highway 
code removes the need to look 
before crossing the road”. 

For single free copies 
contact the Securities and 
Investments Board, 3 Royal 
Exchange Buddings, London 
EC3V3NL 

New contract 

■ Commercial Union 
Assurance has brought out a 
new contract called the 
Prime Trustee Plan which Is 
designed to aHow trustees 
of smaB self -ad ministered 
pension schemes access to 
CU's Prime Series pension 
funds. 

Under the scheme, trustees 
can invest initial amounts of 
£ 10,000 or more in a range 
of eight funds, such as its 
managed fund, as well as 
funds which specialize in UK 
and international equities. 

Until now, investment in these 
funds has been available 
only through policies where the 
investment is earmarked for 
an individual scheme 
member. 


- 'i _ ' 


4 i.- 


ES 


I .The career 
and education 
decisions you- 
take when . ^ 
you’re 16 to 19 
can affect the 
rest of your 
life. 




WM 
r & 


2. Finding any 
job is hard .' 
these days. 
Finding the 
right one can 
be impossible. 




s? I 


4. Exams may 
qualify you foil 
Y a job. But what| 
else will an 
employer look 
for? 


3. After 3 years 
at University, 
you'll get a 
degree. But ><^1 
will it get yon 7 ^ 
anywhere? 


-;j*ther education : - 

MONEY 

KNOW rvJUK KKjiHTS/- 


j. You may be 
ready to earn 
money But do 
-yon know how 
to handle it? 




Issues is a regular new magazine which 
in over 20 packed pages tackles some of the 
serious issues facing all 1 6 tp 19 y efi r olds. 

ItU help you make the right decisions 
about hrrther education. 

Itll help you work out the best career 

togofon - ’■ ir’ 
And itll help you get the most out of 

your money. . 

fA - ’ All m a . style that’s frank arid highly 

'm readable, 

" So for all the facts of life you haven’t 

‘ found out about yet, call in at your local 

...Barclays. ..... . 

\bu can pick up a free copy at any branch-' 
; or order.one fey frUing in the coupon opposite.- 
: Or; tf yoii'Have a Supersavers account 

. and yqure 16. Or over, well send you one 
: ■ : 

' . ..." • . ".V r &fvMgi. ■■■ ;■ / ” - ■* '• '- 


ISSUES. The Other facts of life every 
16 to.19 year old needs:. to know. 

J""~ Post, to: Paul Wilson, Issues, 


Barclays Bank PLCJuxon House, 
j 94 'St: Pauls Churchyard, London EC4M SEH. 

I . Please send me a copy of Issues. □ 

j Name' • • • ' . 

1' Address 


Age 


{ Do you have a bank account? YES/NO j 


If so, at which bank? 



BARCLAYS 




PEPs 

made simplest. 


There's a lot about PEPs - 
Personal Equity Plans - in the 
papers these days. And much 
of it all too confusing. 

Now MIM Britannia, one 
of Britain’s largest and most 
successful investment groups, 
offers you the simple facts 
without any flannel 

fersonal Equity Plans are 
the new, easy, Government- 
approved way for everybody to 
own shares in successful British 
companies. 

You can invest as litde as £2 5 
a month, or up to £2,400 a year 

TAX FREE 
INVESTMENT 


And all your gains - 
dividend income and capital 
5wth - are totally tax- 
, The tax man simply 
doesn’t want to know 



we wfll manage it with the 
same expertise that we already 
devote to investments worth 
nearly £5 billion 

A SIMPLE 
INVESTMENT 

WeVe put all you need to 
know about PEPs into one 
simple booklet, showing how 
your investments can grow 
fester by investing through a 
PEP portfolio. 

SPECIAL 
BONUS OFFER 


Start a PEP with MIM 


Send for it today and find 
out how easy investing in shares 
can be. And about a bonus offer 
to give you a flying start Simply 
complete the coupon below or 
CALL FREE our special 

MIM BRITANNIA ment Monday to Friday, 

— ■-» - 9.00-5.30 on 0800 


Britannia, and ( 

1 Ti. 


k 


MIM Bnonnia Fersonal Equity Plans. 

T4. 7$ Finsbury Ftmvmcm. London EC2A |JD. 
I'd like to knew man.- ahnur PEPs. and about 
imciTjnenr the MIM Bncnnia uaji 
Plcasr wnd your free booklet. I am over IS. 

□ Please rick rf you aic an existing MIM 
Bnonnia Unit Trust Hofciet 
KtsoiuI Equity Plans are nor available To 
lesdcnis of the ReptHic of li eland 


Surname 


■Ui Mi. lh. IS) 


WilM tlTOtl* 




RisuadiL. 





MM rnmN^jPERSONAL EQUITY PLANS j 









jto 


St Paneras 
BUILDING 
SOCIETY 


ONE YEAR TERM SHARE 

LIMITED ISSUE -FIXED INTEREST 


10 00 % =14 08 % 


WHERE INCOME TAX IS PAID AT BASIC RATE 29% 

• ONE YEAR TERM - 10.00% NET • 

• MINIMUM INVESTMENT - £5,000 • 

• MAXIMUM INVESTMENT - £100.000 • 

• INTEREST PAYABLE AT MATURITY DATE • 

* ANY ADDITIONAL INVESTMENT IS CLASSED 

AS A NEW TERM SHARE- I 

r mm ™sSdttwSupon!»w (or full details tor * 1 

. SrWWCMSWIlDWCSOCffiTY . 

I 200 RNCH1£Y ROAD, LONDON NW360A.TEU 01-794 2331 I 

■ MEWBSflOf lH!HJHD«GSOCSre£ASSOCttT«N 

_ AuiHOaSEOKR TRUSTEE WVtSTWNTS | 

I NAME I 

| ADDRESS / 




Rothschilds International 
Money Funds 

The efficient alternative to a deposit 
account in any major currency. 


For funhcr information and the currcni prospectuses, 
please complete and return this coupon to; Robin Fuller. 

N M Rothschild Asset Management (C.I.l Limited. 
p.O. Box 242. St. Julian's Court. St. Peter Port. Guernsey. 
Channel Islands- Telephone: Guernsey (04X1 ) 26741. 


1 
I 
I 
I 

I Name 


| Address I 

| | 

I 1 

I A101 I 

|^NM ROTHSCHILD ASSET MANAGEMENT j 


THE GREAT 
UNIVERSAL STORES 

p.l.c: 


Record profits, earnings and dividends 

■ The principal activities of the Group are catalogue shopping 
with related merchantrngand services, retail trading, export and 
manufacturing, finance, property and business information 
services. 

■ Earnings per stock unit including realised property profits 
increased from 64-63p last year to 75-55p. Dividends total 2 Ip 
per stock unit (1985: 18p) covered some 3-5 times. 

■ The unaudited results for the first 5 months of the current 
year indicate a further improvement in both profit before tax 


Comparative figures to 31st March 

1986 

£m 

1935 

£m 

Turnover (excluding VAT] 

2270-1 

2,098-6 

Profit before taxation 

297-7 

261-0 

Taxation 

108-2 

93-9 

Retained profit 

137-4 

114-1 

Net currant assets 

1284-6 

1,201-8 

Ordinary Stockholders’ funds 

1,618-3* 

1,219-3 

* Including surplus on 1984 mvalujoon erf trading properties. 


GUS am at tradn fmw 4na 1580 Nba Onlet. RetaA Itestral and hmsmot |H 

mnia Ab 

UK red Ottrnm 






FAMILY MONEY/6 


Self-Employed 
Pensions. 
Some people are 
64% better 










I 


chose 

The Equitable. 


If you’re self-employed there isno better way of 
saving tax and saving for your reri remem than 
through a pension plan. Bur which one? 

In the latest Planned Savings survey of 20 year 
regular premium with profit policies we produced 
better results than any other company. Indeed the 
survey showed chat if you had retired on 2 September 
1986 aged 65, with an Equitable plan you would be 
64% better off than with die lowest performer. 

Of course the past cannot guarantee the future. 
However, since 1977, Planned Savings magazine has 
surveyed pensions produced by such policies over 10 
years and 20 years. In 20 tables, The Equitable has 
been top in eleven and second in .four more, a record 
not approached by any- other company. 

For those who wouid prefer to have a unit- 
linked policy where red rement benefits relate directly 
tofonds invested in the UK and various orher parts of 
the world, we can offer attractive plans. 

One reason we do so well is that we do nor pay 
commission to brokersorothermiddlemen.So please 
approach us direct. Just telephone 01-606 661 1 or 
send rhis coupon FREEPOST 

To: Tin: tnuiiable Lite. F1U-EP0ST.4 Coleman Sira-r. Li indon EC26 2TT. 
iy wi-tamc hirdttrifrf.iib <m lour Svii-Emphni'ii ftihiim PLinr with; 
l; Annual VjrwbkContnhunnn^: □Mrauhlt Cumnbutium: 

□I'tw-Imlmi bawd aliemanviw. 


1'krv-i Jem', only i 


Name f Mii.MrsiMi&S! 


Address. 


ftauotfc 


itac n{ Birth 



let: i Offkei 


Teh [Home 


frunjnl i>: 


enssB 


I 

The Equitable Life I 

■ — —You gam because we’re different. _ _ t 


Should we tell 
Sid about 
Barrington? 


( KLEINWORT ) 

In a further article in 
bis series on the changing 
role of financial 
institutions, 

JOHN ROBERTS 
puts Kleinwort Benson 
under the microscope 

Having shed most of its 
interests in the M&G unit 
trust group, Kleinwort Ben- 
son. one of the City’s largest 
merchant banks, feels free to 
develop more vigorously its 
own separate unit-trust in- 
terests under the Barrington 
banner. And says it intends to 
do so. 

Kleinwort, strong in cor- 
porate finance, is among the 
leaders in takeover activity. It 
achieved a coup by taking 
over the stockbroking firm 
Grieveson Grant. GG is 
highly regarded for both the 
size and quality of its private 
client business and, uniter the 
Barrington label, operated the 
largest stockbroker-based unit 
trust group. 

In unit trusts, as in other 
parts of the two businesses, 
there was a neat fit. KJein- 
wort’s in-house funds were 
largely offshore whereas Barr- 
ington was strong in au- 
thorized. unit trusts, but puny 
offshore. Today the merged 
group has balance, with £456 
million of funds in its UK 
trusts and £340 million in 
offshore-based funds which 
may not be sold direct to the 
British public bat are avail- 
able through intermediaries 


such as stockbrokers and 
banks. 

Of more concern fa us is the 
investment performance. Bar- 
rington has consistently been 
among the best of the entire 
industry. Kleinwort has been 
undistinguished. 

Will Barrington’s superior 
abilities prevail? That will 
obviously depend on how the 
enlarged group is managed. 
Already several of the pre- 
viously separate trusts have 
been merged, but that is to 
comply with Department of 
Trade & Industry rules that, 
trusts with loo-similar invest- 
ment objectives may not be 
under the same management 
for fear of conflicts of interest 

Klein wort’s Tony Mortimer 
excused poor investment per- 
formance in what used to be 
the KB Unit Fund and is now 
the Equity Growth Fund on 
the grounds that recasting bad 
obviously caused disruption. 
The results of my own studies 
of the Keinwcrrt trusts’ reports 
lie at odds with that. 

UK Equity Growth Fund 
was less actively managed 
than its stable companions by 
several criteria. I examined 
various factors such as the 
value of new shares acquired 
as a percentage of the end- 
period portfolio value and 
sales of shares as a percentage 
of the portfolio from which 
they were made. 

By all these benchmarks, 
the dealing activity was 
extraordinarily high, ranging 
to 95 per cent in the American 
Growth Fund. The UK Equity 
Growth cited by Mr Mortimer 
was the second-least actively 



Tony Martiraen Recasting problems Tun Edwards: Vague on the details Peter Saunders: Aggressive sefling 


managed of the eight Klein- 
wort trusts. 

On some funds, there was a 
high throughput with shares 
newly bought befog sold 
within the same six-month 
period. That the Smaller Com- 
panies— since merged with its 
Barrington counterpart — 
should sell within six months 
half its new investments 
seems extraordinary given the 


poorer marketability and lar- 
ger spreads between bid mid. 
offer share prices which 
characterize th is end of the 
market 

The vindication would lie 
in performance but Mr Morti- 
mer did not refute my point 
that this had been poor. He 
was not cm top of the 
numbers. 

Nor was Tim Edwards who, 



to mming from Grieveson 
Grant, knew that Barrington 
had done well. When I met 
him he was, however, vague 
about the details. 

These are the men who 
must make the 
Barrington work for us. 

As soon as we met Tony 
Mortimer told me that 
Kleinwort’s unit trusts were 
but a part of the responsibil- 
ities he bore: These- extend to 
property investment “and a 
mainline policymaking rote in 
the bank”. 

Tim Edwards, in addition 
to his other tasks within what 
is now Kleinwort Grieveson, 
is a member of the Council of 
the Stock Exchange. 2 was left 
in no doubt that for both men, 
the weight of their other 
concerns was, for them at 
least, awesome. 

The only director solely 
committed to Barrington full- 
time is the worthy Robin 
Shearmur, the secretary and 
director of administration. 
For all his undoubted merits, 
that appears a poor augury for 
dynamic and creative man- 
agement 


How hard mil Barrington 

be selling to us? As its director. 
Peter Saunders, told me. 
Barrington had not been sold 
aggressively in the past be- 
cause Grieveson Grant had 
felt a natural, inhibition about 
competing with fund manage^- 
mem firms which were the 
stockbrokers clients. The unit 
trusts bad been largely a 
convenient vehicle for han- 
dling private clients’ money. 

Mr Mortimer confirmed 
that the same had held true for 
Kleinwort. 

Big Bang has changed all 
that. But Tun Edwards told 
me: “We shall promote 
Barrington gradually over the 
next five years. We will be 
selling through intermediaries 
though (accountants, solic- 
itors, insurance brokers and 
the like), not going for money 
off the street 

“We shall be aiming for the 
high net worth individuals, 
not for the general public 
through newspaper coupons 
and the like.” 

Perhaps there’s no need to 
“tell Sid” about Barrington. 


Banks 

Current account - no Interest | 
Deposit accounts - seven 
notice required for wither? 
Barclays 5 per cent Lloyds 5 per 
cent Midland 5 per cent NatWest 5 
per cent National Girobank S per 
cent Fixed term deposits £11X000 
to £24,999:1 month 7.50 per cent 3 
months 7.75 percent, 6 months 7.62 
per cant (National Westminster); 1 
month 7.101 per cent 3 months 
7-288 per cent, 6 months 7288 per 
cent (Midland). Other banks may 
differ. 


MONEY FUNDS 

Fund Net CNAR Telephone 

Artksn Hume 

monthly Inc. 7 JE& 7.94 

Bol Scotland 7m 7I» 

Barclays Higher Rate 
Deposit Account 
- ~ — 7.13 7.32 

7 S3 7495 
7 .56 7.83 


INTEREST RATES ROUNDUP 


£1.000- £9393 
£10.000 & over 

Cater Alan cad 
CttEHtt 
Money MM Plus 
KFC Trust 7-day 
Henderson Money 
Market 


7m 7.55 
&50 8.68 


Lloyds I 
M&GHtCA 7.56 783 
UxfandMCA 

£2000*9599 7.45 786 

£10800 andO«r 7.70 7.93 
NatVMBtMfih 
hit Spec flesorvB 
£20&MS.999 7.63 7.B5 

£10.000 Sever 7.75 788 




Account 

underEiaOKJ 757 7.86 

Omrn&OOO 776 7.69 

Royal Bol Scotland 
Pieman Account 7.75 7 SB 

S&PCsfl 7.75 8.05 


725 7.54 
7.48 7.74 
417 836 
7.98 8.14 
7M &04 
7.62 7.84 
735 7.59 


E2500to£9. 
over El 0,000 

TuM&Rieya* 

TSR 7-day 
TyndaflcaB 
Tyndod 7-day 
UOT 7-day 
Western trust 


017281000 

017261000 


012369362 
01 236 9362 

0315570201 
0706 66066 

0705 627733 
070582/733 
01 236 0952 
012360952 
0272 732241 
0272 732241 
016264661 


1 month 7.76 404 0752261161 

CNAR —Compotmded Net Annual Rata. 

i are me latest avahabte at the ttment 
I to press. 

; Deborah Barm 

Nations! Savings Bank 

Ordinary Accounts — if a minimum 
balance of £100 maintained (or 
whole of 1888. 6 per cent Merest 
pj. for each complete month where 
balance Is over £500, otherwise 3 
per cent Investment Accounts - 
11 .75 per cent Interest paid without 
deduction of tax, one month's 
notice of withdrawal, maximum 
investment £100,000 . 

National Savings Income Bond 
Minimum investment £2,000. maxi- 
mum £100,000. Interest 11.25 par 
cent variable at six weeks' notice 
paid montWjr without deduction of 


tax. Repayment at 3 months' notice. 
Penalties m first year. 

National Savings Indexed income 
Bond 

Start rate monthly income for first 
year, 8 per cent, increased at end of 
each year to match incre ase in 

Index! 3 C^^ S ^ue 3 ^’^rafns the 
same. Income taxable, paid gross. 
Three months' notice of withdrawal. 
Minimum investment of £5.000 si 
multiples of £1,000. Maxbraan 
ElOOjOOO. 

National Savings 4th Imtax-iMcod 
C e rt if ic a tes 

Maximum Investment — £5,000 
excluding holdings of other issues. 
Return tax-tree and linked to 
Changes in the Retail Prices Index. 
Supplement of 3,00 par cent In the 
first year, 325 per cent in the 
second, 3-50 par cant In the third, 
4.50 per cent m the fourth and 6.00 
per cent in the fifth. Value of 
Retirement Issue Certificates pur- 
chased in November 1981, £146.66 

, including bomrs and supplement 
October BP! 388.4 . (The new BPI 
figure is not announced until the 
trard week ot the following month). 

National Savings Certificate 
32nd issue. Return totaly free of 
income and capital gains tax, equiv- 
alent to an annual interest rate over 
the five-year term of 8.75per cent; 
maximum investment £5,000. 
General extension rate for holders 
of earfier issues which have 
readied maturity is 8.70 per cent 

National Savings Yearly Ptan 
A one-year regular savings 
converting into tour-wx ‘ 
certificates. MiAnum £20 a 
maximum £200. Return over five 
years BM percent tax-free. 


< For appficatior 
30.1036) 


is accepted from 


National Savings Deposit Bond 
Minimum investment £100, maxi- 
mum £100,000. interest 1125 per 
cent variable at six weeks' notice 
created annually without deduction 
ol tax. Repayment at three months’ 
notice. Halt interest only paid on 
bonds repaid during first year. 

Local Authority Yewfing Bonds 
12 months fixed rate investments 
interest 1 tVn per cent basic rate tax 
deducted at source (can be re- 
claimed by non-taxpayer), minimum 
investment £1 ,000, purchased 
through stockbroker or bank. 

Gua i ante e d income Bonds . 

Return paid net of basic rate tax; 
higher rate taxpayers may have a 
further DabBty on maturity. 12 & 
3yrs General Portfolio 9.1 per cent; 
4yre General Portfolio /Premium Life 
9.1 per cent; Syrs New Direction 
FlnancefCredtt & Commerce 830 
percent . 


Local authority town hoi bonds 
Fixed term, fixed rate investments. 
Interest quoted net (basic rate tax 
deducted at source non-redaim- 
able) lyr Reacting 7.50 per cent, nan 
inv £1,000: 2-4yrs Kirk Lees 838 
per cent uwi inv £500; 5-7yrs 
Hereford & Worcester 7.75 per cant, 
mm inv £1 ,000; 8yrs Vale of Glamor- 
gan 6.13 per cent ran rmr £500; 
9&l0yrs Taff By 621 per cant min 
inv £1.000 

Further detafls avaBabte from Char- 
tered Institute of Public Finance S 
Acco u ntancy. Loans Bureau (638 
6361 between 10am and 230pra) 
see also Prestsl no 24808. 

BuBrfing Societies 

Ordinary share accounts - 630 per 


cent Extra interest accounts usual- 
ly pay 1-2 per cant over ordinary 
share rata. Rates quoted above are 

teose most commonly offered. IndF 
vidua! buikfing societies may quote 
different rates. Interest on aB ac- 
counts paid net of basic rate tax. 
Not redaknabto by non-taxpayers. 

Foreign currency deposits 
Rates quoted by Rothschild's Old 
Court Internationa] Reserves 0461 
26741. Seven days' notice is re- 
quired for withdrawal and no charge 
is made tor switching currencies. 
Sterling 10.10 per cent 

USdoSar aos per cent 

Yen " 3.74 per cent 

D Mark 3.67 percent 

French Franc 6.68 per cent 

Swiss ftanc 307 per cent 


950 good reasons 

for openinga Hoare Govett 
Unit Trusts 
Account 


HOARE 

GOVETT 

The Wem^kxial Stockbroker 
Montes at The London SodtExdange 


■ i Ci : -.ell Unit mu J i.in'.or," S-jf.'ttVS Ur.' 

rf*i. <t ;v?.‘3rs Wiah 

L?n.-. , n WCtii iPB 

TeHSOTI'W v ■ • J 0 7 C- Ic’i; - L' - .'SO' 


With more than 950 unit trusts available, il is 
becoming increasingly difficult if not impossible, 
for the private investor to find his way through the 
unit trust maze. 

If you share our view that independent advice 
is likely to be the best advice and would like your 
portfolio to have full access to all the 950 trusts 
available, a Hoare Govett Unit Trusts Account 
may be just what you are looking for. 

• A choice of investment strategies to meet both 
capital growth and high income objectives. 

• A portfolio of unit trusts selected from The 
whole range available: we do not manage 
any unit trusts of our own. 

• A monthly income facility. 

• Regular investment reports and valuations, 
together with nominee, dividend collection and 
capital gains tax services. 

• Minimum investment required to open a Hoare 
Govett Unit Trusts Account is £8.000. 

For further information on how to open a Hoare 
Govett Unit Trusts Account contact John Savage 
on 01-404 0344. or fill in the coupon below. 

Hionn Savage ^ 

Hoare Govett Ikm Trus! Advisory SenncesLtd. | 

Heron HGus*. 319 325 Hiqh Holtior r> i 

London WC IV 7PB. ’ j 

Please send me details ofhowioaper'CHoaie j 


j Govelf Unit Trusts Account 

| 

1 Name 

» 

1 Address 1 

! ! 

i 

L= 

i 

T 29/11 | 


LONDON - NEW YORK ■ TOKYO - HONG KONG - SINGAPORE - AUSTRALIA - CHAWB3. ISLAW3S 






HIGHER 
INTEREST RATES 


30 DAT SHARE 


Mrenan hffw»m c :£Ka 


9111 *= E 31 LI 1311 K 


Sfcirraci (nmucMr! cLO; 


90 DAT SHARE 

is- am mi* ^ 


3 YEAR SHARE 


Uaenss bra-unm fS££ 


i- 5 B*= 973 *= UltK 


•On 


id Anallta tfbtf'ftali’laaailiCNdMtQibtJIctaaaL Mn***«« wUUc. 


' Cnw Cn« >i M t iu » HWK nm IwfcHwlhWTH BgBitol » tii iJU lTli»gr. 

Hold Office; 176 loadan lud. Noctit End. PartKDMhPOBSDL. 
IfelM tt705) 6S33U. 

ortsmouth Building Society 

.MWOfeBMOU) 



FEW PHIPU GET BETTER RETURNS 
THAN UNIT TRUST MVESIORS. 


WHAT DO THE FEW DO? 







37 




M&G OFFERS 


Please tick the appropriate box for fall details 

Unit Trusts offer managed investment in British and 
overseas stock markets for £1000 or more. 


1 
□ i 


Savings Plan enables you to invest in unit trusts . — . I 

from £25 a month with no extra charges. I 1 * 

Planned Income Portfolio I 


• * fi 


-c 




ro; 

•* . 

• ^ 
' - :> 
---a 



, , „ Rf™f 

,nV£ST0Si 




route to better cover 


( INSURANCE ) 

One-time steady drivers choosing 


insurer is having doubts about the driving habits of 


high-performance models from a 
growing range of injection, turbo and 
sports saloons, according to the 
Prudential. 

The fed 'is that 

premiums have risen by more than 20 
per cent right across the market this 
year. Bid while insures* produce new 


A 

it*] 

35 to 45. 

their renewal forms. 4 Who do they thfokl am -1 

they ask. ROD MORRISON explains the ins and oats 


•p * 


can motorists do to lessen the damage 
to their wallets? Broadly, the options 
are: 

Shop around for a better quote; 
Though the rate rises have affected 
the amide of.the market, discrepan- 
cies can appear between companies’ 
rating grades. Good local brokers 
should be able to detect them and foe 
AA has an extensive quoting system. 

Bm baying the cheapest is not 
necessarily the best policy. Lloyd’s 
Syndicates, for instance, frequently 
quotes lower rates ton some have a 
reputation for bein$ less than helpful 
when a claim goes m.. 

Many people stidc to large insurers 
they know. Rate increases have 
varied between them. GRE was 
on usual in announcmg only rise 

this year: 1 23 per cent effective from 
next month. But the company upped 
rates for smaller to medium cars in 
June while cutting those for larger 
saloons. 

Ofoer big insurers had at least two, 
possibly even three, rises to repeat. 
Legal and General , announced in- 
creases of 15 per cent in January and 
123 per cent m August; Commercial 
Union imped rates by 8 jper cent in 
January and 83 per cent in October. 

Prudential weighed - in with a 9.3 
per cent hike in April - and another- 
increase in August sptit between 15.9 
per cent for comprehensive policies 
and 9.3 per cent ior non-camprehen- 
sive. The difference; says thePtu, was 
because of the higher costs in 


providing accidental damage repair 
under comprehensive policies result- 
ing from higher garage and spare- 
parts costs. 

General Accident bad three rises 
this year , totalling 26,2 per cent for 
comprehensive and 22-2 per cent for 
pon^canpre tenriv e; RoyaFs rises arv- 
! 26 per cent. 


percent. 

No-damn (Knouts: 

. Qalm*fite_ (hiving benefits every* 
body and is rewarded by insurance 
companies with discounts of usually 
UP to 60 per cent off p remiums So 
J * benefit that many 


treasured is this 
people do not rfarm 
protect iL 


in order to 


Many people stick to big .. 
insurers that they know 

But the benefit can be kept in 
another way by fearing nnt apr ^peteri 
no-daims discount policy, fit Royal’s 
case, the cost is l 23 per cent added to 
the premium in .return for two 
allovgaWe daims in four years vrifo- 
out hurting Re discount. 

The Pra, however, has had to 
withdraw its protected no-daims 
discount, except on special policies, 
because pofcybolders were taking the 
company at Os' word by daiming all 
tooaften. 

Valmfitmy excesses: 

Insurers wiH accept reduced pro- > 
uunm&if foe motorist agrees to pay 
parttfanyefarini. 

- This is referred to as an excess and 
in . most: cases can be taken vol- 
untarily, although those m higher-risk 
canzones such as young drivers and 


sports-car owners might be forced to 
nave an excess. 

The reduction is usually calculated 
on a percentage basis but GRE has 
bad to introduce flax discounts as 
premiums have risen sharply. For a 
£50 excess, GRE gives a £30 discount 
and for £100 excess a £50 discount. 

Special packages: 

Family drivers, despite the Pro’s 
views, are considered good rides and 
i nsuran ce-company marketing 
departments are enticing them with 
discount packages. But these policies 
provide less cover, hence foe lower 
premiums. 

Royal markets foe Car Shield 
policy. Divided into two, the policy 
gives discounts of up to 123 percent 
for drivers over 30 and 20 percent for 
those over 50. But Royal imposes a 
compulsory £50 excess and foe car 
must be driven only for domestic 


rating structure and criticize com- 
panics for offering special package 

Dave Aden, of Legal & General, 
comments, bowevenHTtey are just 
marketing ploys;* 

In Legal & General’s case, hus- 
bands and wives who restrict foe 
driving to themselves can receive 
discounts of 10-to 123 per cent and 
single drivers areofferod a 1 0 per cent 
discount 

Women drivers receive a farther 10 
per cent discount for the simple 
reason that their claims record is 
better. 

General Accident is also fond of the 
fairer sex. Those under 28 automati- 
cally get two years’ driving experience 
added to thor record. 

General Accident’s other perk is a 
20 per cent cm for owners of cars 
more than three years old in return 
for a £50 excess. 

Another way to 
reduce premiums 


provides ten income payments spread through the year 
from an investment of £2,500 or more. 


for anyone who is 
self-employed or not in an employer's pension scheme; r — . 
you get complete tax relief on contributions. 1 I 

7*56% net + Cheque Book equivalent 

to a gross compounded annual rate of 1103% (correct at 
time of going to press). High Interest Cheque Account 
with Kleinwort, Benson limited, administered by M&G > — , 

as agents. Minimum initial deposit £2.500. I I 

□ PERSONAL □ COMPANY □ PARTNERSHIP 

□ CHARITY Q TRUSTEE □ CLUB OR SOCIETY 

The M&G Yfear Book gives details of all , — , 

the above services, as well as the Shore Exchange Scheme. I I 


tying is restricted to husband 
and wife and both most have four 
years’ daim-free experience. Those 
aged between 30 and 34 have to 
accept a £100 excess. 

. Commercial Union has a similar 
policy, Dual Driver. Reductions of up 
to 25 per cent are offered and the 
mam driver must be over 30 with his 
or her partner over 25. 

: A £50 excess applies on com- 
prehensive cover. 

. The discount package at the Pru is 
called Top Driver. Three drivers can 
nse the car — main driver, spouse and 
one other named driver. All three 
need four years’ daim-free experience 
and the policy has a £50 excess. 

Other insurance companies inte- 
grate their discounts into the overall 


There is a fifth way of reducing 
premiums: hick. The 20,000 mem- 
bers of foe MG Car Owners Club 
insurance scheme had their rates 
reduced fay 6 per cent after the 
transfer of policies from Crusader to 
Municroal General Insu rance in 


However, Crusader, part of the 
mul tinati onal CIGNA rragiranr** 
group, badly bungled foe announce- 
ment of its withdrawal from the 
personal-insurance market, saying 
that^D existing pohties” were going 

But It forgot to mention that half 
the number of motor policies, hroked 
liytbeAA-morefoan^LOOOinall- 
. were to be transferred to foe Norwich 
Union. Premiums on t tes e policies 
were i n creased by 5 per cent Win 
some, lose some. 


- - V 7 . 


~ '-‘.'iV - * 



investor 


Having fc*Waied copfovEdyjn 
foe last session off parliament 
on tire faffing societies and 
the financial services industry, 
foe Haase of Commons yes- 
terday gave a Mflndira&g 
to foe Bankmg R3L 

This is foe food lea of a 
system aimed atprotecting the 
investor irrespective of. foe 
median through which he 
invests Ms savings. In fob 
case ft is mare a question of 
n pdating « «cf i n g legidatisai 
than introducing an entirely 
new set of roles. 

After the hanking crids of 
the u&I?2970s t foe Banking 
Act of. 1979 was aimed at 
i m pro vin g the supervision of 
banks, while increasing foe 
protection extended statutorily 


to their c fow ml .- H witm ’, , 
foe Johnson: Matfoey affair 
has ' ndexfiaed tfia need to 
imp rove this system and that 
is what foe. nog. ..banking 
legislation anas to do. 

. The main changes from the 
1979 Act revolve around foe 
creation off a Bond 'Banking 
Simenisioh, and foe anting 

. Endingtwo-ffer 
system of 1979 

foe tire-tier system introduced 
in foe- 1979 legislation. The 
new sapervisory beard wilt 
indade wdspmtkM members 
who are Kkely to have 
commercial hanking experi- 


ence enabling them to give 
advice to foe Governor d foe 
Bank of England to foe ex- 
ercise of Ms su p e r viso ry 
responsibilities. 

Unfa- foe 1979 Ac^ 
authorization and sapervisdry 
powers were hoed: on a 
distinction between recognized 
banks and licensed deposit- 
lating institutions. 

TMa was an attempt te main- . 
tain a degree of competition, 
encouraging respectable 
smaller institutions to remsin 
active, bat adding to foe 
'prptecGoa extended to the 
depositors, which had beta' 


Under foe Banking 
which foe Commons approved 


yesterday, all authorized in- 
stitutions wfll be subject to the 
n ilwh and tte mipe 
snperrisory regime bm, hi 
forme, use of foe word “bank" 
in a coavuq’s tide will he 
confined to ihstitntions with 
not less than £5 Million paid- 
up capital. 

One element of the two-tier 


In tune with the 
• greater protection 

system which remains, kow- 
. ever, is that other authorized 
institutions with not less titan 
£1 million paid-up capital will 
be aide to provide financial 
services and accept deposits 


subject to forir not using the 
wort “bank” in their title. 

The changes contained in 
foe legislation are less than 
woridrtiattering, hat are very 
much m tone with tire in- 
creased protection to investors 
which b now foe common 
currency of pofitidans and 
consumers alike. 

I predict an easy passage of 

this KO to foe Statute Book, 
where it will join foe Building 
Societies Act and foe Finan- 
cial Services Act as landmarks 
to change in tire interests of 
foe investor. 

Robert McCrindle 

The author is Conservative 
MP for Brentwood and Ongar. 


Independent Financial Advice 

If you would like independent financial advice, please give 
your daytime telephone number and we shall arrange for 
a professional adviser to contact you. 


DAYTIME TELNO. 


Tb: The M&G Group, Three Quays, TbwerHHI, London EC3R6BQ. 1H: 01-6264588. 


Mc/Mts/MiBs INITIALS 

SURNAME 



ADDRESS 



TTTr 

POSTCODE 




MC 484816 Member of Ihe Unit Tmsl Association 

1 Tkh/tferhwrtatxilabletomid&itsoftheRfpablkrf Ireland. 


□ | 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 

I 
I 
I 
I 


THE M&G GROUP 


BASE 

LENDING 

RATES 


ABN. 


Adam & Company.. 
BCG 


Citibank Savings! - 
Consolidated Crds_ 
Co-operative Baft.. 


tim 
1180% 
11 . 00 % 
12.45% 

iun% 
11 . 00 % 
11 . 00 % 
nm 
n.ow 

Westminster 11.00% 

Rival Bank of Scotland 1180% 

TSB 11.00% 

CfitankNA 1180% 

t Mortgage Base Sue. 


C. Hoare & Co. 

Kong Kong & Shanghai.. 
Lloyds Bank. 


Top of our sector over 12 months... 


1 Our position in the league tables is ail the more 
significant when you realise that Atlanta is nop one of the 
giants among unit trusts. 

Wfe befieve Our size works to your advanta^Wfe aren't 

too big to be flexible vet we have the scope tooeal 
advantageously— an cf we can respond quicklyto market 
changes, buying and selling without adversely affecting ; 
prices. Wfe are also able lb establish a feeKhg of petsonal 
cental with our unit holders. - : . • - 

Our investment strategy is backed by careful research 
and a keen eye for undervalued companies. And now the 




reason for saying 'Small is beautiful.” 


SHOULD YOU CONSIDER INVESTING IN OUR HIGH INCOME TRUST? 



Mr A 

He took eaity retirement with 
a lump sum, part of which he 
in ve^ed in Atlanta^ High 
Income Bust His aim is 
capital appredatkm with . 
a growing income. 



Mr B : 

He hastft a large sum to invest 
' Nor has hi? time to study the 
flnandaj pages and markets day 
after day. But he d oes aim to 
put his money to work where 
renirns are highly promising. 


>les are typical of the way our investors sum. up the situation and. although 

• • • • ' r — -it in their portfolios. If you 

Form. 


ADDITIONAL INFORMATION 


8J3«- 


faawi ttonnjtnUw priLgri sa^pon24 Wowmber.lVWI r „ r 
'. nwrnwi it, tomb me dh^jh tad rtilug Income *ri [fa pxospeosoi 

dutfif 3«*> h tncluded m ibr otter prfce oTunte 

y cwbeTound at At 





APPLICATION FORM 


To: Atlanta Unit Trust 
Managers limited. _ 

46 Moo^gacte, London EC3R 6EL. 

inwjwMnoirivasrS. 


mfm 


.in the Aflanu High Income Thist 


{mininuim £SO0) and 1 enclose xnyfour chequers) in Favour of Atlanta Unit 
Trust Managers forthis ram. ; , 

I wish iD exchange sbaresfeflts-pfease send deoils | | 

(BLOCXCAPfTAiS P1£A5E1 ‘ : 




... 





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38 


LAW 


Law Report November 29 1986 



Whether PC’s decision reasonable Right to home respect 


G v Chief Superintendent of 
Police. Stroud 

Before Lord Justice Croom- 
Johnson and Mr Justice Peter 
Pain 

I Judgment November 28] 

In reviewing the reasonable- 
ness of a constable's belief that a 
breach of the peace was likely to 
occur, allowance had to be made 
for the circumstances in which a 
constable had to make a spur ol 
the moment derision in an 
emergency. Therefore a mere 
disturbance could amount to a 
likelihood of a breach of the 
peace. 

The Queen's Bench Di- 
visional Court dismissed the 
defendant’s appeal by case 
stated from his conviction by 
Cirencester Juvenile Court on 

January 20. 1986. 

The Public Order Act I9 j* 0 
provides by section 5 that “any 
person who in any public place 

. uses threatening, abusive or 
insulting words or behaviour, 
with intent to provoke a breach 
of the peace or whereby a breach 
of the peace is likely to be 
occasioned, shall be guilty or an 
offence". 

Mr Richard Gordon for the 
defendant: Mr Patrick Eccles for 
the prosecutor. 

LORD JUSTICE CROOM- 
JOHNSON. said that there was 
a public playground at Stroud 
where there were swings for 
children aged under 14. On 
August 31. 1985 the defendant, 
then aged 15. was using the 
swings and used abusive lan- 
guage in the presence of Mrs 
Merrick and her granddaughter 
aged three. 

Mrs Memck’s son-in-law. Mr 
Chapman, asked the defendant 
to leave as he was above the age 
limit for the junior swings. The 
defendant refused, whereupon 
Mr Chapman called the police. 

When the police arrived the 
defendant at first refused to gi' e 
his name and address but 
subsequently did so. The 
defendant's mother arrived in 
an agitated stale and besides 
Mrs Merrick. Mr Chapman and 


the child, there were several 
persons including children and 
voung people in the vicinity. 

' When the police approached 
they saw what was described as a 
"very ugly confrontation . The 
defendant’s mother told himio 
go home, whereupon the defen- 
dant jumped off the swings and 
began to walk off. 

As he did so he made a iwo- 
fingcr gesture at the police and 
shouted “fuck off”. _A police 
constable shouted at him to stop 
but the defendant made the 
same gesture and shouted the 
same words again. 

The police constable caught 
up with the defendant, took 
hold of his upper arm and told 
him he was under arrest The 
defendant punched the con- 
stable twice in the race and 
struggled shouting “I’ll fucking 
stab you” and both fell to the 
ground. , . 

Another police constable 
helped to restrain the deicndam 
who was told that he was under 

“rest . 

The defendant was charged 
with using abusive words and 
behaviour in a public place 
contrary to section 5 of the 1936 
Act and also with assaulting a 
police officer in the execution of 
his duty contrary to section 
5 1(1 > of the Police Act 1964. 

By section 7(3) of the 1936 
Act a constable might without 
warrant arrest any person 
reasonably suspected by him of 
committing an offence under 
section 1. 4 or 5 of the Act. 

The question which arose was 
whether the defendant's arrest 
was lawful. If it was. the assault 
was admitted. If it was not it was 
submitted that the constable 
was not acting in the execution 
of his duty. 

Section 5 of the 1936 Act was 
concerned with incitement and 
provocation to breach ot uie 
Seacc and also with behaviour 
on the part of the possible 
defendant. 

It was dealing with a situation 
where a breach of the peace had 
not yet been committed by 
anyone, although it might be 
committed by anyone who was 


incited or provoked or by foe 
defendant himself. 

The mere behaviour, if the 
conditions laid down by section 
5 were fulfilled, was an offence, 
but it did not have to result in an 
arrest under section 7(31. 

On the first charge the 
prosecution had first to prove, 
and undoubtedly did prove, that 
the defendant used abusive 
words and behaviour. They foen 
had to prove that a breach of the 
peace (by someone) was likely to 
be occasioned. 

On the second charge the 
prosecution had to prove that 
the arrest was lawful and it it 
was there was no doubt that the 
constable had been assaulted. 

If the arrest was under section 
7(3) it had to be proved that the 
situation that presented itsdf 
cave the constable reasonable 
wounds for suspecting that 
there would be a breach of the 
peace bv somebody. 

If ihc’ arrest was at common 
law it had to be proved that the 
constable reasonably believed 
that the defendant was about to 
breach the peace. 

Under whatever power the 
constable acted, his belief or 
suspicion (and there could be no 
difference between them) had to 
be based on reasonable grounds. 
\ previous breach by the defen- 
dant could be ground for belief, 
provided it had not exhausted 
its effect. 

Before the justices the defen- 
dant contended that a mere 
disturbance not involving vi- 
olence or a threat of violence 
could not amount to a breach of 
the peace and that in the present 
case there was no likelihood of a 
breach. 

The justices found ihat a 
breach of the peace had occ- 
urred before the arrival of the 
police because the defendant's 
words and behaviour had 
alarmed Mrs Merrick. 

Although there was some 
evidence that she had. naturally 
enough, been alarmed at what 
was going on. it did not justify 
that finding. However, that 
finding was immaterial. 

The constable thought an 


offence against section 5 of the 
1936 Act had been committed, 
but no more. , 

The justices found that the 
constable believed genuinely 
and honestly that a further 
breach was likely to occur in the 
immediate future. That clearly 
implied that they found .his 
belief was reasonable. 

It was submitted for the 
defendant that that there was no 
evidence that any third person 
was either put in fear or was 
likely to breach the peace, but 
that submission ignored the 
likelihood of a breach by the 
defendant himself. 

The justices were also entitled 
to rely on the evidence of the 
police officers as to the behav- 
iour of the defendant before the 
arrest The reasonableness of the 
constable's belief was shown by 
the extraordinary violence of 
the defendant's resista nce to 
arrest It needed two officers to 
overpower him. 

There was evidence available 
to the justices and it was for 
them to assess its weight 

The lest of “reasonableness , 
although a question of feet was 
always treated as a question of 
law, and therefore open to 
review. The tact that the defen- 
dant was walking off was not a 
dear indication, that he was 
going in the direction of his 
home. 

His general behaviour jus- 
tified the constable's belief that 
a breach was likely. 

Police officers had to make 
their decisions on the spur of the 
moment and although they 
were subject to review, mil 
allowance had to be made for 
the circumstances in which they 
found themselves in emer- 
gencies. 

Although no breach of the 
peace had occurred prior to the 
arrest, the constable was em- 
powered to arrest ihc defendant 
and was acting in the execution 
of his duty. 

Mr Justice Peter Pain agreed. 

Solicitors: Ellis Peirs & Young 
Jackson for Winierboihams. 
Stroud; Crown Prosecution Ser- 
vice. Gloucester. 


Gflkm ▼ United Kingdom 
Before G. Wiarda, President 
and Judges R. RyssdaL Thor 
Vflhjataswm. G. Lagergren. L,- 
E Pcttiti. Sir Vincent Evans and 
R. Macdonald 
Registrar M.-A. Eissen 
(CaseNo 13/1984/85/132) 
(Judgment November 24] - 
Decisions by the Guernsey 
housing authority to refuse Mr 
and Mrs GiUow permanent and 
te mporary licences to occupy 
their house in Guernsey, as well 


I on the ap-. 


•hat practice had been foflowed 
to wane coin 


.4 • Z 

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*£S&lZuSZ3& plESSffjSw ^ 

IfflBSSrJSS 

There had aocordmgly1b«*n .Human Righis. _ 
no breach of article Sasfer as j t thus resulted from the text 

the terms of the contested of gufei* 4 that an apress 
legislation were concerned. 

There remained, however, the 
question whether the manner m 
which the housing authority 
exercised its discreti on in the 
applicants' case -*■ refusal of 


as the conviction and fining of sey in 1979, the refusal of the 
Mr Gfflow, constituted intafer- licences applied for, the institu- 


Confidentiality of prisoners’ legal aid interviews 


Regina v Umob 
Before Lord Lane. Lord Chief 
Justice. Mr Justice Taylor and 
Mr Justice Rose 
(Judgment November 28] 
Interviews, between prisoners 
and prison legal aid officers 
should, save in exceptional 
circumstances, be confidential. 

The Court of Appeal held, 
however, that no privilege 
analogous to that between law- 
yer and client could arise in 
discussions between a prisoner 
and a prison legal aid officer, 
when reserved judgment was 
given dismissing an appeal by 
Mfongbong Umoh. aged 23. a 
Nigerian national, from convic- 
tion for conspiracy to supply 
heroin. 

The appellant was convicted 
at Acton Crown Court (Judge 
Worthington and a jury) to 
contravening section 4(3Kb) of 
the Misuse of Drugs Act 1971 
and was sentenced to five years 
imprisonment. A recommenda- 
tion for deportation was made. 
An application for leave to 
appeal against sentence was 
refused. 

Mr Stuart Shields. QC and Mr 
Adrian Fulford assigned by the 
Registrar of Criminal Appeals, 
for the appellant; Mr .Andrew 
Collins. QC and Mr Fabyan 
Evans for the Crown. 

The LORD CHIEF JUS- 
TICE. giving the judgment of 
the court prepared by Mr Justice 
Taylor, said that, while the 
appellant was in custody in 
Wormwood Scrubs prison, he 
asked to see the principal prison 
officer and had an hour-long 
conversation with him about his 
past and case. 

At trial the judge ruled gainst 
a submission that that officer's 
evidence about the appellant's 
disclosures during the conversa- 
tion should not be admitted. 
The officer gave evidence that 
the appellant, unprompted, had 
effectively confessed to involve- 
ment in a deal concerning 
heroin worth £35.000. 

The appellant admitted ask- 
ing to see the officer but that was 
simply because he had been told 
that, on the officer’s orders, he 
could not go to chapel. The 
appellant denied making any 
confession. 

The basis for the unsuccessful 
attempt to exclude the officer's 


evidence was privilege or public 
interest on the ground that the 
interview with the principal 
officer was sought because the 
appellant wished to pursue a 
legal aid problem as he had not 
obtained satisfaction from the 
prison legal aid officer. 

Mr Shields made three sub- 
missions. each based on the 
premise that the conversation 
between the appellant and the 
principal officer concerned a 
legal aid matter. 

The officer, in answer to 
questions, said that the appel- 
lant did not seek advice as to 
how to fill in the form. At most, 
the mention of legal aid was 
confined to the administrative 
problem that the appellant had 
been unable to gel the legal aid 
officer to exercise his functions 
at a weekend. 

There was no factual basis for 
am 0 r Mr Shields' submissions. 

Their Loidships appreciated 
that problems could arise in 
cases where a legal aid officer 
was in fact exercising his func- 
tions. It was dearly desirable 


ihai all parties should know 
uhaL if anv. confidentiality 
aiiached to discussions between 
a prisoner and such an officer. 

The prisoner should know 
when, if at alL he could speak 
confidentially to the officer. 
Likewise, the officer and his 
superiors should know whether 
anv. and if so what, use might be 
made of any information 
gleaned from a prisoner. 

No pnv ilege analogous to that 
between lawyer and client could 
arise. Such privilege was to be 
strictly confined to communica- 
tions with lawyers or their 
agents. A legal aid officer was 
neither. 

There was force, however, in 
the submission that discussions 
about the substance of a legal aid 
application should attract public 
interest immunity. .... 

The prison rules provided the 
facility or assistance from a legal 
aid officer. The prisoner did not 
have the freedom to go into a 
solicitor’s office. If he availed 
himself or the facility offered he 
was likely to disclose and dis- 


cuss matters connected with his 
alleged offence. 

It would seem desirable in the 
public interest that those dis- 
cussions. save in exceptional 
circumstances, should be 
confidential. Otherwise the 
scheme would not work. Pris- 
oners would be reluctant to take 
advantage of it lest it took 
advantage of them. 

The difficulty was to identify 
the occasions on which such 
confidentiality was to be pre- 
served. To that end. it might be 
desirable that interviews to seek 
the assistance of a legal aid 
officer in making a legal aid 
application should be put on a 
sufficiently formal basis to be 
identified as such. 

Immunity would then attach 
to such interviews but not to 
discussions and disclosures on 
other occasions. 

In the present case the 
conversation clearly fell outside 
the protected class. The appeal 
was dismissed. 

Solicitors: Crown Prosecution 
Service. Acton. 


Tributes to Lord Justice Lawton 


Lord Justice Lawton 

Lord Justice Lawton presided 
in the Court of Appeal (Crim- 
inal Division) for the last lime 
on November 28. 

Mr Justice Michael Davies 
said in tribute that Lord Justice 
Lawton bad sat in that court and 
its predecessor for over 25 years. 
His contributions to the sub- 
stantive criminal law and to the 
art of sentencing were in part 
preserved for all time in the 
various Law Reports, and were 
second to none. 

His extraordinary ability to 
dispose of business efficiently 
and speedily without any sac- 
rifice of justice was known to all 
who had worked in the Criminal 
Appeal Office over the years, all 
who had appeared before him, 
and especially to all those who 
had sat wrilh him. 

Lord Justice Lawton had three 
more weeks to serve in the Civil 
Division before his parole eli- 
gibility date. This was just an 
informal thank you to Fred 
Lawton from his partners m 
crime. If any judge was ir- 
replaceable. be was that judge. 


Mr Barry Hudson QC. on 
behalf of the number of eminent 
practitioners who had come to 
court for this informal farewell, 
said that without any doubt 
Lord Justice Lawton would go 
down as a landmark of his 
generation. His Lordship had 
chaired the Criminal Law Re- 
vision Committee and had bad 
wide influence. 

Master Thompson, Registrar 
of Criminal Appeals, said that, 
as on many past occasions, he 
would hand up a document to 
Lord Justice Lawton. It was a 
list of more than 300 cases 
where his Lordship had gjven or 
was party to the judgment, 
which had been extracted by 
computer from the Criminal 
Appeal Reports. 

The 300 cases would be 
enough to fill five out of 45 
volumes since 1 961. All the same 
they were a small fraction of his 
Lordships's contributions in 
this field and achievements in 
many fields. 

The reports reflected his 
Lordship's mastery of criminal 
law and practice; not only that. 


they contained guidelines in 
many sentencing situations 
where his broad understanding 
or human life was especially in 
demand. 

LORD JUSTICE LAWTON 
said that this occasion, the last 
on which he would preside in 
the Criminal Division of the 
Court of Appeal brought to an 
end a full-time life in crime — in 
crime if not of crime. 

As was well known, his rather 
had served in the prison service, 
and until his Lordship was 25 he 
had lived with his parents m 
officere’ quarters at a variety of 
prisons. 

When he decided to go to the 
Bar he had wanted to separate 
himself from a life in crime, but 
fete had been against him. He 
had made attempts to "go 
straight" but they never lasted 
very long. . . , 

Now the temptation had been 
put before him to go to Sheffield 
when he retired to try at first 
instance an important criminal 
case. He had succumbed. 

It had been a great experience, 
being so long in crime. 


ences with the exercise of foe 
applicants' right to respect for 
their home as guaranteed under 
article 8 of the European 
Convention on Human Rights. 

Those int e r fer ences were not 
“necessary in a democratic 
society” as the manner in which 
foe housing authority exercised 
its discretion in the applicants’ 
case was disproportionate to the 
legitimate aun of promoting the 
economic well-bang of the 
island. 

Article 8 of the Convention 
provides: 

“1 Everyone has the right to 
respect for his private and 
family life, bis home and his 
correspondence. 

“2 There shall be no interfer- 
ence by a public authority with 
the exercise of this right accept 
such as is in accordance with the 
law and is necessary in a 
democratic society in the in- 
terests of national security, pub- 
lic safety or the economic ‘well- 
being of the country, for, the 
prevention of disorder or crime, 
for the protection of health or 
morals, or for the protection of 
the rights and freedoms of 
others.” 

In April 1956 Mr GiUow was 
appointed director of the States 
of Guernsey Horticultural Ad- 
visory Service and moved to 
Guernsey with his family. In 
1 957, he bought a plot of land on 
Guernsey, on which he built a 
house called “Whiieknights". At 
that time, the applicants had, 
under the Housing Control 
{Ex tension and Amendment) 
(Guernsey) Law 1957, residence 
qualifications entitling them to 
live on the island without a 
licence. 

In 1960, the applicants left 
Guernsey and lived overseas 
until Mr Gillow's retirement in 
1978. In the meantime, they 
retained ownership of the house 
and let it to persons approved by 
the housing authority. 

The applicants subsequently 
decided ia return to and live on 
Guernsey. However, they were 
informed by the authority that 
they had lost their residence 
qualifications by virtue of the 
Housing Control (Guernsey) 
Law 1969 and that they required 
a licence from the authority to 
occupy their house. 

All their licence applications 
were rejected, and they were 
prosecuted for unlawful occupa- 
tion of their property. They 
finally sold the house in April 
1980. 

Having attempted unsuccess- 
fully to achieve a friendly 
settlement, the European 
Commission of Human Rights 
drew up a report establishing the 
fects and stating its opinion as to 
whether or not the feels found 
disclosed a breach by the United 
Kingdom of its obligations 
under the Convention. 

In its report of October 3, 
1984, the Commission con- 
cluded that there had been a 
breach of article 8 of the 
Convention and of article I of 
the Convention's first protocol 
(unanimously), but not of article 
6 (10 votes to one) or of article 
14 (unanimously) of the 
Convention itself. 

The Commission referred the 
case to the Court in December 
1984. 

In its judgment the European 
Court of Human Rights held as 
follows: 

1 Alleged vi o la t ion of article 8 

The Court observed that the 
Government of the United 
Kingdom had no longer dis- 
puted before it the existence ofa 
violation of article 8. It nonethe- 
less considered _ that the 
responsibilities assigned to it 
extended to pronouncing on the 
non-coutested allegation of a 
violation of article 8. 

Although the applicants had 
been absent from Guernsey for 
almost 19 years, the court found 
that, in the circumstances, they 
had retained sufficient continu- 
ing links with “Whiieknights” 
for it to be considered their 
home, for the purposes of article 
8, at the time of the disputed 
measures. 


non 


licence to occupy 

"Whiteknights” because, as * 

consequence of tire c han ge in 

the law, they had lost their 
residence qualifications. 

In foe Court's opinion, the 

factlbat, on pain of prosecution, 

they were obliged to obtain a 
licence to live in their own 
house on their return to Guam- permanent 

cences, 

__ mailer to 

of criminal 

_ them for unlawful 
occupation of the property and, - 
in Mr Gillow’s case, his convic- 
tion and the imposition of a 
fine, constituted ■ interfe traces 
with foe exercise of the 
applicants’ right to respect for 
their home. 

The applicants alleged that 
the housing laws were immigra- 
tion tows in which were 

outside the legislative powers of 
the Stales of Guernsey. The 
Conrt observed, however, that 
those fews were duly sanctioned 
by the Sovereign in accordance 
with the normal legi slati ve 
procedure, registered in the 
records of the Island of Guern- 
sey and published. There could 
accordingly be no doubt as to 
their constitutional validity and 
accessibility. 

The terms of the housing laws 
left the housing _ authority a 
certain degree of discretion. 

A law which conferred a 
discretion was not in itself 
inconsistent with the require- 
ment of foreseeability, provided 
that the scope of the discretion 
and the manner of its exercise 
were indicated with sufficient 
clarity, having regard to the 
le gitimate aim of the measure in 
question, to give the individual 
adequate protection against ar- 
bitrary interference. 

In the present case, foe Court 
found that the scope of the 
discretion, coupled with the 
provision for judicial control of 
its exercise, was sufficient to 
satisfy foe requirements of foe 
Convention inherent in foe 
expression "in accordance with 
foe law”. 

Although foe statistics sup- 
plied bom by the Government 
and by the applicants disclosed 
that foe population and housing 
situation could be said to have 
unproved in Guernsey in. some 
respects, that did not alter foe 
feci that the island was very 
limited in area. 

It was therefore legitimate, m 
the Court’s opinion, for the 
authorities to try to m ain t a i n 
the population within accept- 
able limits and also to show a 
certain preference for persons 
with strong attachments to foe 
island or engaged in essential 
employment 

The court thus concluded that 
the relevant legislation was de- 
signed to promote the economic 
well-being of foe island, and did 
not find it established that the 
legislation pursued any other 
purpose. 

Was the action taken against 
the applicants "necessary in a 
democratic society”? _ . 

The notion of necessity im- 
plied a pressing social need, in 
particular, the measure em- 
ployed had to be proportionate 
to the legitimate aim pursued. In 
addition, the scope of the mar- 
gin of appreciation enjoyed by 
foe national authorities would 
depend not only on the nature of 
foe aim of the restriction but 
also on foe nature of foe right 
involved. 

In foe instant case, th e eco- 
nomic well-being of Guernsey 
had to be balanced against the 
applicants' right to respect for 
their home, a right which was 
pertinent to their own personal 
security and well-being. The 
importance of such a right to foe 
individual had to be taken into 
account in determining the 
scope of the margin of apprecia- 
tion allowed to a government. 

The obligation imposed on 
the applicants by the housing 
laws to seek a licence to occupy 
their house complied with those 
principles. 

The Court considered that foe 
Guernsey tegisfeiure was better 
placed than the international 
judge to assess foe effects of any 
relaxation of the housing con- 
trols. Furthermore, when 
considering whether to grant a 
licence, the housing authority 
could exercise its discretion so 
as to avoid any 
disproporlionality in a particu- 
lar case. 

It followed that the statutory _ 


Ot STUCK ** j eZT XT 

< tedaraiion was leRaS****™ 
application of Protocol No I to 
foe island of Guernsey. I wtM 
such declaration had been 
•route. 

The court accordingly found 



view to prosecution — corre- 
sponded to a pressing social 
need and, fa -particular, was 
proportionate to the legitimate 
aim pursued. 

Against foe background ot foe 
population and housing situa- 
tion on the island, the court 
considered that insufficient 
weight was given t o the 
applicants’ particular circum- 
stances. 

They had built 
“Whiieknigitis” as a residence 
for themselves and their family. 
At that time, they possessed 
residence qualifications and 
continued to do so until foe 
entry into force of foe 1969 
Housing Law, so that during 

that period they were entitled to 

occupy foe bouse without a 
licence- . - _ 

The property was Mr and Mrs 
Gillow's place of residence for 
two years before they ten 
Guernsey in 1960. Thereafter, 
they had retain ed ownership of 
the house and left furniture 
there. By letting it over a period 
of 1 8 years to persons approved 
by the housing authority, they 
contributed to foe Guernsey 
housing slock. 

On their return m 1979. they 
had no other “home” in foe 


case and 1 

jurisdiction to nd*™ “J 
applicants complaint under 
fo?t provision. 

3 Afieged ri obfo» of 
14 in conjunctiDn with arfde 8. 

The issue of discrimination 
alleged did not relate to a 


dis- 


housing authority’s 
cretionary powers, 
preferential treatment accented 
by foe 1975 Housing Law to 

J . j nf*w»rcnTis wfm 


had no other "home m me mq per cent) likely to be so 
United Kingdom or elsewhere; better-off persons 

“AVhiteknights” was vacant and -onojtweti to be in neec 


there were no prospective 
tenants. _ . , • 

As for the refusals of foe 
temporary licences, foe de- 
cisions of the housing authority 
were, despite foe granting of 
certain periods of grace, even 
more striking. •‘Whiieknights” 
needed repairs after 18 years of 
rented use. with the result that it 
could not be occupied in the 
meantime by anyone other than 
foe applicants. 

The Court therefore con- 
cluded that the decisions by the 
housing authority to refuse the 
applicants permanent and -tem- 
porary licences to occupy 
“Whiteknigfats”. as well as the 
conviction and fining, o f -Mr 
Gillow. constituted . interfer- 
ences with the exercise of their 
right to respect for their home 
which were disproportionate to 
the legitimate aim pursued. 

There had accordingly been a 
breach of article 8 of the 
Convention as for .as the 
application of the legislation m 
foe particular circumstances of 
the applicants’ case was 
concerned , . 

2 Alleged violation of article 1 off 
the first protocol 
Bv a letter of October 10, 
1986, foe Government in- 
formed the court - while 
expressing their profoun d regre t 
for doing so at so late a stage — 
that the United Kingdom had 
not extended the application of 
Protocol No I to foe Bailiwick 
of Guernsey in accordance with 
article 4 of this protocol, winch 
stipulates: 

“Any high contracting party 
may at the time of signature or. 
ratification or at any time 
thereafter communicate to the 
Secretary General of the Councfl 
of Europe a declaration stating 
the extent to which it undertakes 
that foe provisions of the 
present protocol shall apply to 
such of the territories for foe 
international relations of which 
it is responsible as are named 
therein . . .”. . . 

The Court noted first that the 
letter was not couched in foe 
form ofa preliminary objection. 
However, the existence of a 
declaration under article 4 was a 
matter for examination ex 
officio by foe court since it 
concerned the very applicability 
of Protocol No 1 to foe island of 
Guernsey. 

. According . to a statement 
issued by the Government of foe 
United Kingdom on October 
16, 1950 ana communicated to 
the Secretary General of the 
Council of Europe on foe same 
date, the island of Guernsey 
should be regarded as a "terri- 
tory far foe international rela- 
tions of which foe United 
Kingdom was responsible’' for 
the purposes of article 4, and 


did not need any 
occupy a house, namely fowe 
with strong atfachmenK to the 
island and foe owners of bouses 
over a certain rateable value. 

With regard to the first group, 
foe court had already held that 
the preferential treatment was 
legitimate for ttepunxses tf 

article 8, paragraph 2 o t the 
Convention, and saw nocanse 
for arriving at a different tmamg 
under article 14. 

' As to the introduction of 
rateable- value limits, that re- 
flected, in the opinion ot foe 
Court, the Government s desire 
to exclude from the control ot 
the bousing authority the small 
■ ner r gniMB e of expensive houses 

.. .... be sought , 

not 

considered to be in oeed of 
protection, while providing nec- 
essary protection for tenants (rf 
more limited means who had 
strong connections with 
Guernsey. 

The Court therefore found 
that there was no brea ch of 
article 14, taken in conjunction 
with article 8. 

4 Alleged notation ol article 6 
paragrap h J of the Convention 

The appeal lodged by Mrs 
Gillow with the Royal Court 
ag ainst the refusals of licences 
concerned foe applicants' right 

to occupy their home; was a civil 

right within the meaning of 
article 6; and the prosecution of 
Mr Gillow involved the 
determination of a cr iminal 
charae. Article 6 was therefore 
applicable in those two respects. 

With regard to foe dvil 
proceedings, the court 'noted 
that the requirement of a lawyer 
to lodge an appeal before a 
hi phra court was a common 
feature of foe legal systems of 
several member states of the 

Council of Europe. 

U was true foal in foe 
applicants’ case their lawyer did 
not properly perform his duty. 
Nonetheless, foe Royal Court 
entertained the . appeal even 

. though it had been lod^d out of 

time. 

Finally, the Court did not see 
how foe applicants' right of 
access to court had been inter- 
fered with by the refnsal to allow 
them to occupy their house 
pending foe appeal. 

As to MrGiUow's prosecution 
for unlawful occupation, the 
decision of the magistrate not to 
adjourn the criminal hearing 
was not open to criticism. On 
the fects. the refusal to allow Mr 
GiUow access to the tape record- 
ing of foe fust instance proceed- 
ings bad not resulted in any 
unfairness, the registrar having 
checked the transcript ana 
found it to be accura te . 

The Court also rejected the 
applicants* complaints regard- 
ing the impartiality of the Royal 
Court. ■ 

It was held that there bad 
been no violation of article 6 on 
those counts, and further that it 
was not necessary to examine 
various other complaints 
concerning foe Royal Court, 
which had not been pursued at 
foe hearings. 

5 Application of article 50 
The Court decided that the 
question whether the applicants 
should be granted just satisfac- 
tion under article 50 of the 
Convention was not yet ready 
for decision, and reserved the 
matter. 



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\ 



SPORT 


39 


THE TIMES SATURDAY NOVEMBER 29 1986 


RUGBY UNION 




i f 


Swansea’s swift action 
should help defuse 
the Moriarty affair 

„ D_n iin _ _ _ 


Just when By David Hands, Rugby Correspondent 

was safe to dan J as “ i . a hamstring in mid- The North selectors, 

water dioSi:”? m ^ week, which wffl pat him bade 
and ««* morc - Since Bkddyn 

» Bowen, the SoBh Wales Pd- 

“ centI * Mlh whom Dev ‘ 


£ suspending Paul Moriarty 

S* on £™i 0 nandWctaBonA 

Pa^in Ia3 

fete Same in' which 

. Ulns Mins was injured. 

^ Moriarty the Welsh inter- 
vffi»al flanker, punched 
- forced him toW 

-SLr*^ ha PPBy the Rich- 
mond prop has seen a sperial- 

■ ®and there is no permanent 
damage to Iris ffiuredeye. 
Wim luck he may be playing 
again next weekend, though it 
.remains to be seen whether 
-Monarty will; he has been 
-o mitte d from the team to {day 

Ebbw Vale today and has been 
carpetted by his club's 
com mi t tee who have re- 
mmded him, forcibly I trust, 
of the standards required on 
. the field by their players. 

.Swansea have not indicated 
whether Moriarty is being 

■ disciplined for more than one 
match. Mike James, their 
chairman of selectors, said: 
“The matter has been dealt 
with and, as far as the Swansea 
club is concerned, thats the 
end of it.” The Welsh Rugby 
-Union’s disciplinary commit- 
tee have yet to receive a report 
from the referee involved, Les 
Peard (who penalised the 
player but did not send him 
off), while Richmond have 
contented themselves with an 
acknowledgement of 
Swansea's action. 

The Welsh trial teams to 
play at Neath next Saturday 
w ere announced yesterday, 
without the name of John 
Devereux, the Sooth Glamor- 
gan Institute centre who made 
such an impact nationally last 
season. After spending most of 
this season on the sidelines be 


ercnx was paired for Wales 
last season, is not due to begin 
playing until after Christmas, 
the Welsh selectors will watch 
promising centres with 
particular care. 

The Gnon ground will be 
the focus of much attention 
today, too, since Neath enter- 
tain Rath — a meeting of the 
most successful clubs in their 
respective countries this sea- 
son, even if Bath have slipped 
from the top of the John 
Smith's Merit Table A. The 
only chib with a 100 per cent 
record in the table is Harle- 
quins, who have played only 
one match which counts. 

Both suffered unexpected 
defeats during the last week, 
Neath at Blackheath, Bath 
against Gloucester, but Bath 
will have HaUiday and 
Palmer, their international 
centres, back once more; they 
hope, too, to have Chilcott at 
prop but the south-west di- 
visional selectors will be in- 
terested as much in Neath if 
, Laity, the Cornish centre, is 
playing for them. A vacancy 
has already come about in 
their team for the divisional 
championship next month 
since Mogg, the Gloucester 
player, damaged ribs in mid- 
week and is certain to miss the 
opening game against the 
North. 

If Laity impresses he could 
join HaUiday in the centre, 
leaving Knibbs of Bristol to 
play on the wing in Mogg's 
stead. If, however, the selec- 
tors wish to leave Knibbs at 
centre they may consider Carr 
or Duggan of Bristol, or Sagoe, 
who has taken his chances weU 
since coming into the Bath 
side, though injury prevails 
bis appearance for them at 
Neath, where Blackett keeps 
the place that was his against 
Gloucester. 


who 

make their minds up on 
divisional matters tomorrow, 
will be pleased to know that 
John Buckton will play his 
first game of the season for 
Saracens at Leicester today. 
The centre, aged 24, has 
played only 10 minutes of 
rugby this season, back in 
September, when he suffered a 
kidney t rauma; he missed a 
third-team ©me last weekend 
but trained with the North 
squad at Morfey last Sunday 
and a sound game against 
Dodge, Cuswortb and com- 
pany could earn him an 
eleventh-hour place in the 
North team. 

“In this situation you just 
try to do the basics,” Buckton 
said yesterday. “I'm fairly fit 
but the crunch will come in a 
hard tackle or at the bottom of 
a ruck. We try to play an 
expansive pi m e, like Leices- 
ter, but I'm just pleased to be 
back. It's been a frustratin g 
time.” 

Nottingham have their two 
centres. Hartley and 
Northard, involved in the 
Midland squad, one in the 
team and one as a replace- 
ment. and are looking forward 
to adding to their strength 
behind the scrum. Once this 
term is over Chris Oti will 
return from Cambridge 
University to play for them on 
the wing and with him will 
come Kelvin Wyles, whose 
play in midweek tra 
the Nottingham members of 
Steele-Bodger's XV. 

Wyles can expect to be 
named to win bis second blue 
on Monday, when the teams 
for the University Match at 
Twicke nham on December 9 
will be announced. Last year 
he played on the left wing but 
his eye for a half-gap and 
speed off the mart have been a 
Cambridge plus this term — 
and there have not been that 
many positive qualities to 
raise light blue optimism thus 
far. 


TODAY S RUGBY TEAM NEWS 


Northampton v 
Cambridge University 
Franas dough, the Cambridge 
captain, misses his team’s find 
gone before trie university 
match because of a hand ui wy. He 


i plays scrum half instead of 
the experienced Cushing, who 


Heaver moves to prop, rather 
than lock, for Northampton. 

Nottingham v Hawick 

. Simon Hodjcins o n plays ftil 
. beck for Nottingham, who put 
Byron an the wing and 
Swanwick at stand-off hatf. They 
retain Freer and Ward in the 
front row against a Hawick side 
. weakened by district cans (the 
last Scottish visitors to Beeston, 
Gate, tost by more than 60 
points). 

Harlequins ▼ L Welsh 
' Stuart Thresher replaces ihe 
injured Rose at Ml Dock for 
-Harlequins and Oenistar comes 
m at scrum half: Salmon is captain 
in the absence of the injured 
Cooke. The Welsh play Half at 
No. 8 but remain content wtth 
the rest of the side that did wefl 
against Newport 


Orrell v Richmond 

Orrefl play Pegg in the back row 
bmarewrthoutnjurad front raw 
men, Ainscough and Hitchen. 
Richmond rest Smith, at stand-off 
half, where Brinkley plays; 

Heaton returns at centra and 
James replaces the injured 
Mills. 

Leicester v Saracens 
Ian Smith rejoins the Leicester 
back raw against Saracens, stiB 
looking for their first wm in this 
fixture. Robinson steps up instead 
of the injured Saracens IUI 
back, Hancock, and Smith moves 
out to the wing to alow 
Buckton 's return. 

Moseley v Newbridge 
Moseley prefer CotweS to 
Robson at scrum halt after a good 
performance with Jones at half 
back against Fytde to midweek. 
Newbridge play a new paving at 
lock in Smith and Boycott. 

Bristol v Aberavon 

Nigel Pomphrey. Bristol’s 
captain, is at lock instead of Skuse 
while Thomas displaces Hogg 
in the back division. Fauvel, on the 
fringe of the Welsh squad last 
season, is at flanker for Aberavon. 


Oxford U v Oxford OB 

Simon Grtffto. the Oxford 
captain, reams after a Wp iriury to 
the back row but MacDonald, 
the wing, has not recovered from a 
knee in&y and his place goes 
to Outhte. 

Cardiff v Bangor 

Last season's Welsh Youth 
flanker, Bumail. makes Ms debut 


Irish side. Humphreys plays 
second senior game or the 

season at full back and Ring 
retuns to the centre. 

Coventry v Blackheath 
It is feared that Robbins, 
Coventry's No. 0. may need a knee 
operation so Travers plays 
there. In the backs, Saunders has 
recovered from injury and plays 
on the wing; Essenhigh returns to 
the Blackheath front row. 

Lon Scottish v Lon Irish 
Alex Newberry, the London 
Irish coach, comes out of 
retirement after a run of injuries 
to the dub’s props. He is joined in 
the pack by Miter, at No. 6 
(Gibson is playing for Munster) in a 
game which kicks off at 14). 


Six changes for dispirited Glasgow 


By Ian McLaochlan 

V Glasgow conceded nine tries 
to Edinburgh on Wednesday 
night and also lost three of their 
first choice players. This after- 
noon. they have the difficult 
task of lifting their spirits to face 
the champions. South of 
Scotland. 

Glasgow have made six 
changes: Beattie, Ellis and 
McCorkindale drop out through 
injury to be replaced by Young, 
Livingston and Nicolson, 
respectively. Kerap, Ker and 
Riosri come in to the side in 
place of Drummond, Barret and 


McDowall. The inclusion of Ker 
in the midfield will stiffen the 
defence considerably while 
Nicolson. the scrum half, could 
upset Laidlaw 

The home side will not have 
to endure the grinding 
scrummaging power of Edin- 
burgh, but to have any chance 
they must contain the South 
back row and break the half 
back link of Laidlaw and 
Rutherford. The South, for their 
part, having seen what Edin- 
burgh did in the midweek, will 
travel to Glasgow to go one 
better in the try-scoring stakes. 
McEwan's, the tournament 


sponsors, have offered tankards 
to the highest try-scoring team 
and that could prove very bad 
news for Glasgow. 

David Sole, the Bath and 
Scotland loose-head prop, will 
miss the first inter-district out- 
ing of the season by the Anglo- 
Scois. who play Scottish North 
and Midlands at Richmond. A 
shoulder injury sustained last 
week against the Fijian Barbar- 
ians has not mended in time and 
his place will be taken, curiously 
enough, by another West 
Countryman with Scottish ante- 
cedents, Peter Jones, of 
Gloucester. 


Last chance for Munster to impress 


By George Ace 

While a flurry of activity 
exists within Ulster rugby this 
^afternoon, it is two games 
outside the province that win 
■evoke considerable in t erest: 
Munster versos the Fiji Barbar- 
ians in Limerick and Bangor’s 
visit to Wales to meet Cardiff at 
the Arms Park, 


in the teams for the Irish trial at 
Lansdowne Road on December 
20 . 


The Fijian performance 
against Ulster on Wednesday 
night, when the inter-provincial 
champions scraped home by a 
point, has heightened interest in 

the. match at Thomond Park wro .s«^»^c^vDurii e nno a . 
against the province that fin- Club gam*: City of Derry vTMway 
ished pointless in the champion- Cnmni; Caniiff v Bangor; Instortnns 
ship. Another Munster defeat 
would be a devastating Mow and 
would undoubtedly be reflected 


RXT1IHES: Raprasantthe Mete Mur- 
star v R? Barbarians (Thomond Park). 
~ * Section ona: BaBymona v 


Armagh; 
v Acad- 
Cosage 


. _ . . .i Bmw. i 

Old BetvadaiB; Athtona 


RUGBY LEAGUE 


Doncaster’s chance for cup glory 


That well-known catchphrase. 
"this is our Wembley." is being 
heard this weekend from the 
players and officials of two dubs 
for whom tomorrow’s John 
player Trophy first round games 
represent major events. 

■ They are Mysons, the Hull 
amateur dub, who entertain 
'Swintoa on the ground of Hull 
Kingston Rgvers, and the vastly 
improved second divirion side, 
Doncaster, whohavc Hull hit 
as their distinguished visitors. 

Mysons and Doncast er a rc 
realistic enough not to expect 
further progress in the com- 
petition, but they are deter- 
mined to make the opposition 
fight every inch of the way, with 
the possibility of another ram- 
pus giant-killing act always 

temptingly in mind. 

Mysons will get the bulk of 


Rovers’ support tehmd them on 
Humberside, and Swinton, al- 
though in third pface m the 
second di virion, are bound to be 
worried about it* P^sibihty of 
going the way of Batley, the 
second division club who were 
knocked Out by Mysons in tec 
gjutiminary round. 


By Keith Macklin - 

For their big game Doncaster 
have a crowd limit of 3,250. and 
tec match will be an all-ticket 
sell out Rovers will not be 
excessively overconfident about 
this one, since their own form 
this season has been poor, 
largely due to a plague of 
injuries. In addition the Dons 
last year won something of a 
reputation in cup competitions, 
baiting Salford and giving a 
considerable run for their 
money to St Helens and Leeds. 

The league's leading try 
sewer. Ellery Hanley, is ex- 
pected to return to action for 
Wigan in today's television 
match against Leeds. However, 
there is a doubt about the other 
Great Britain centre. David 
Stephenson. 

A couple of seasons ago this 
would have been a major 
confrontation, but Leeds are 
having a bad time with ibeirside 
or ageing stars, and Wigan will 
be expected to win easily before 
another big Central Park crowd. 

Two leading sides who may 
struggle a little harder than 
anticipated arc Warrington, 


who are at home to the un- 
defeated second division leaders 
Hnnslct and St Helens, who 
could have a battle on their 
hands at Whitehaven's narrow 
ground. 

Hull’s stiff fee 

Garry Schofield. Hull's 
Great Britain centre, has been 
transfer-listed at £ 1 50.000 as a 
disciplinary measure, follow- 
ing his non-appearance a fort- 
night ago for the match against 
Australia. The New Zealand 
prop, Joe Grima, has arrived 
from the Auckland club 
Ponsonby for his second spell 
at the second division club, 
Swintoa, while the cham- 
pions, Halifax, have agreed 
terms with Salford for the 
loose forward, John Pendle- 
buty. in a £23,000 deal - 
£7.000 below the listed price. 
Wakefield Trinity, Leigh and 
Barrow were also interested in 
Fendlebury, aged 25. 


SQUASH RACKETS 



Lisa Opie: Fast and determined against her oldest rival 


YACHTING 

Cheating 
storm 
brews up 

Fremantle (Reuter) — Austra- 
lian syndicates have claimed 
teal overseas America's Cup 
contenders have been receiving 
weather information illegally 
during the challenger series of 
races here. Dr Siao Reid, chair- 
man of tee Royal Perth Yacht 
Cub’s (RPYC) America's Cup 
committee, confirmed the 
RPYC bad been approached by 
syndicates claiming teat some 
foreign yachts were using per- 
sonal page mg systems to relay 
any change in wind speed or 
direction. 

Several syndicates, Australian 
and foreign, subscribe to a local 
service which provides constant 
information on conditions at 
sea, enabling teem to transfer 
the latest weather forecast to the 
yachts' on-board computers up 
until tee pre-race 10-minute 
starting signal. But the Austra- 
lians are worried that several 
oversees syndicates arc continu- 
ing to use tee service illegally 
once the races are underway. 

If discovered, yachts and 
yachtsmen could face dis- 
qualification from the 
America's Cup and a possible 
worldwide suspension. Reid 
said the committee were aware 
of the system but added that it 
was “almost impossible to 
police”. 

“The conditions of tee de- 
fender and challenger trials 
make it dear that, when racing, 
a yacht may not receive aoy 
communications from off-board 
unless authorized by tee race 
committee," said Reid. “There- 
fore. tee use of weather informa- 
tion pagers is illegal during a 
race, but anyone foolish enough 
to engage in this activity would 
throw the pager overboard if he 
ran tee risk of being caught." 

An Australian syndicate 
spokesman, who refused to be 
named, said weather informa- 
tion was vital and a wrong 
guess could cost vital minutes 


Beeson success is a 
fairy-tale come true 


By Colin McQmHan 

Bryan 
ic Grea 


Tie arrival of Bryan Beeson 
at Brunei's historic Great West- 
ern Terminus in Temple Meads 
station, Bristol, as Intercity 
national champion is an smlikely 
success story from a game now 
comprehensively professional at 
national level and above. 

Beeson was a hospital en- 
gineer two years ago when be 
freakishly penetrated through to 
the British final as an unknown 
county league player. “I never 
thought then Chat I would ever 
repeat that, let alone with the 
tide," be admitted after defeat- 
ing Mark Maclean, the first 
Scotsman m reach the final, 9-2, 
9-4, 6-9, 9-3 ia 78 minutes. 

The ex traordinary develop- 
ment of B e es on is pat into 
context by the recant for a third 
championship win by Lisa Opie, 
aged 23, who has been based at 
Nottingham reach of the the» 
since leaving school in Guernsey 
at 16, and has in her time ran 
fall gamut of professional cast- 
ing, from national heroine to 
spoiled brat and back again. 

Miss Opie, who won tee 

national championship in I9gi 
««t 1983, has trained amt 
travelled alone for the past year, 
gaining masde power from 
weight training but shedding the 
pressures previously imposed 
epos her by a s u c cession of 
demanding mentors. She was 
fast, determined and superbly 
inventive against Marline Le 
Moignan, a Guernsey 
scboolfriecd now based at Ports- 
mouth and her oldest rival, 
winning 9-7, 9-1, 9-0 In just 23 
minutes. 

“A lot of people wrote me off 
when Martrae won in 1984 after 
1 was fined for chocking my 
racket about in the British 
Open. Then Lacy Sootier won 
last year and 1 seem to he history 
at 22. This win is a sort of 
comeback, but specially becaase 
I beat Lacy as wefl in the semi- 
finals." 

Beeson can hardly be said to 
have come back since only now 


to arrive. 


AMERICAN FOOTBALL 

Turkeys rule the roost 
as bigger birds crash 


By Robert Kirky 

It has been noted that every 
dog will have its day. On 
Thanksgiving, it would seem, 
even the turkeys can have their 
day. On Thursday, the Green 
Bay Packers and the Seattle 
Seahawfcs, easy pickings for 
many of their foes ibis season, 
plucked victories in the Na- 
tional Football League. 

Walter Stanley’s movable 
feast, a delectable 83-yard punt 
return for a touchdown 41 sec 
from time, lifted the Packers to a 
44-40 victory over the Detroit 
Lions in Pontiac, Michigan. 

Stanley's score helped Green 
Bay recover from a 10-point 
deficit in the final five minutes. 


Randy Wright, who com- 
pleted 18 of 26 passes for 286 
yards and one interception, 
threw touchdown tosses of 21, 
36 and I lyards, tee first two to 
Stanley. The Packers’ kicker. A1 
Del Greco, scored 14 points 
with three field goals and five 
conversions. The Detroit 
quarterback. Joe Ferguson, 
threw three touchdown posses 
while guiding the Lions to scores 
on five straight possessions 


In firing, Texas, the Seattle 
quarterback. Dave Krieg, 
proved that the Seabawks were 
birds of a different feather on 
Turkey Day. He led the 
Scahawks to scores on their first 
four possessions, running for 
one touchdown and throwing 
for two others, to beat the Dallas 
Cowboys 31-14. 

Seattle pm a severe crimp in 
the Cowboys’ play-off hopes. 
Krieg, who was so ineffective a 
month ago that he was repfaced, 
lifted tee Seahawks to a 24-7 
lead at half-time. The Dallas 
quarterback, Steve Pelluer, 
established a dub record by 
completing his first 14 passes 
but tee Cowboys managed 
touchdowns only on short runs 
by Tony Dorset! and Herschel 
Walker. 

• Pele Rozelle. the commis- 
sioner of tbe NFL, suspended 
the Green Bay Packers' defen- 
sive lineman, Charles Martin, 
for two games without pay for 
Martin's body dam of the 
Chicago quarterback, Jim Mc- 
Mahon, after a play fast Sunday. 
McMahon, who will not play 


un live straig m possessions again this season will underao 
midway through the game. He shoulder surgery on December 
l££ 11 “He vrastryuig to hurt me," 

McMahon said of Mania “I'm 
just glad he didn’t break my 
neck. That could have happened 

very easily." 


256 yard*. Eddie Murray, of the 
Lions, kicked four field goals 
and added four conversions for 
16 points. 


REAL TENNIS 


Australian challenge 


* or the first time the men’s 
open singles and doubles 
championships are being held 
concurrently with the women’s 
singles event ( William Stephens 
writes). The tournaments, spon- 
sored by George Wimpey, began 
at Queen's dub yesterday. 

Chris Ronaldson, the men’s 
world champion, is defending 
tbe title be first won in 1978 
from Howard Angus, and which 
he has held seven times. Second, 
third and fourth seeds are the 
Australians who will be 
challenging for the world 


championship next spring: 
Wayne Davies, Lachlan 
Deuchar and Graham Hyland. 

The women’s defending 
champion is Katrina Allen, 
bolder since 1983; the second 
-seed is Lesley Ronaldson, win- 
ner 1979 to 1982. 

Real tennis -is experiencing 
continued growth, both among 
men and women. The expan- 
sion will be farther supported by 
the -involvement of Rank Xerox 
who. from January . 1. will be 
joint sponsors with George 
Wimpey. 


is be truly 
despite the 1 

The Tyaesider, aged 26, 
worked steadily at exploiting bis 
unexpected opportunity bote hi 
■ playing sense and with a 
pragmatic professional ap- 
proach. He was rirtnafly 
adopted by InterCfty when he 
enlivened their first champion- 
ship sponsorship in 1984 and 
has worked for teem as a squash 
cowltyt nay since. He was 
doe to organize a business 
tournament for another coosoJ- 
tant sponsor. Lama, the bnUding 
company, on tee night be played 
this second final and he spent 
hoars after Ms iknifeMi of 
defending champion, Philip 
Kenyon, in the senri-fhnls ttte- 
phoning friends in Newcastle to 
take over the chore. 

“The big problem was finding 
someone who did not want to 
come down and watch me play in 
the final,” he explained. 
IntexCity *s marketers manager, 
Mike Lancaster, offered free 
train tickets to any supporters of 
both Beeson and Maclean who 
wanted to get to Bristol for such 
an extra or d inary ev entual i ty . 

“Once they heard they could 
get here free, my friends refased 
to help with the tournament.’’ In 
the cod, an obliging dab owner 
from Durham racked a few 
brownie points with the new 
champion by talcing over in 
Newcastle. “1 evened tee score 
with my friends by arranging for 
my mother to travel on the same 
train," Beeson added. 

Both sets of supporters were 
rewarded with a _ splendid 
competitive final in which 
Maclean's backhand, a deadly 
weapon in previous roods, was 
largely negated by the speed and 
snspedacnlar skill of the left- 
handed champioa. 

The tall Scot, aged 22, may 
develop to even greater heights 
Chan the new tide bolder. Jonah 
Barrington, the former world 
champion, who at 45 achieved 
yet another squash first by 
winning the veteran and over-35 
titles at Bristol, was load in his 
praise on Maclean's flaid move- 
ment, raw courage and educated 
right wrist 

“He Is a real find with 
enormoes potential,” Barrington 
said, adding that his admiration 
was u n a ff ecte d by the memory of 
Maclean ending his own 29 year 
record of domestic victory in a 
n a ti o nal league match fast year. 


GOLF 


The hopeful quest 
for a card that 
can buy very little 


By John Hennessy 


To m orrow 237 hopeful men 
set off in search for golfs 
equivalent of the Holy Grafl. It 
will be an exhausting adventure, 
played over six rounds of the La 
Manga Club courses in Spain’s 
cowboy country, south of 
Alicante; 

’ Fifty of them win take home 
from the PGA European Tour 
Qualifying School the coveted 
players’ card, w hile the others 
will scatter empty-handed far 
and wide to the 20 countries and 
four continents whence they 
came. Only Asia is unrepre- 
sented in this year’s intake. 

The school last year produced 
an outstanding graduate in Jos&> 


Maria OfazfibaL a young Span- 
iard with a remarkable record as 
an amateur — although <hat that 
came to an abrupt halt when be 
took 86 on tee first day of Royal 
Dornoch’s Amateur Champion- 
ship in 198S. He was attempting 
to add his third British title in 
successive years, after winning 
the boys* and youths’ champion- 
ships in 1983 and 1984 
respectively. 

Nevertheless, in his first year 
as a professional, Olazabal has 
amassed tee sum of £136,775 in 
prize money, to stand second 
only to his more famous compa- 
triot, Severiano Ballesteros, in 
tee Epson Order of Merit 

At the impoverished end of 
tee scale, Paul Hoad, tee Rookie 
of the Year in 1980, d rop p e d 
below 127 th place in the Order 
of Merit, and has to go back to 
the school this week. 

A number of W alke r Gap 
players are in foe field, including 
David Gilford, John 
Hawksworth and Sandy Ste- 
phen, together with two former 
England amateur champions, 
match-play and stroke-play, in 
Craig Laurence and Mate 
Davis. 

Hawksworth and Laurence 
will be trying for the second 
time, either stimulated or 
daunted, according to their 
characters, by the experience of 
a season among tbe cardless 
underprivileged. They, more 
than most, will recognize the 
importance of this week’s goit 

Stephen won his card last year 
by finishing 46th, but failed to 
make the top 127 and so has to 
return to tee classroom. His 


standing enabled him to play in 
only nine tournaments in tire 
year, which in turn yielded him 
only £1,093 in prize money. 

Q lazdb al's success, this year 
should not create the impression 
that professional golf is a bed of 
roses. For many, the card has 
less value than that of the 
bum blest trade union. It pro- 
vides only the first rung of a 
ladd e* - op a board strewn with 
enaiw-s ready to speed tire return 
bade to square one. _ 

There is a strong incentive to 
stand as high as possible when 
tire sums are completed on 
Friday evening. Those in t he top 
20 might hope to play in most 
tournaments next year, but the 
opportunities recede the further 
you go down tee list. Only 18 of 
the SO who succeeded at La 
Manga last year won enough 
prize-money to retain their card. 
The cut-off came at £5,246. 

The saddest failure was Adam 
Hunter, aged 23, of Scotland, 
who finished sixth in last year's 
school. He played in 14 tour- 
naments. winning only £5S4, 
and finishing 1 50 over par 
overall. Undismayed, he is try- 
ing again this week, which says 
something for his character. 



Oiazabal: exceptional merit 


BASKETBALL 


Portsmouth seek final 
honours for Dassie 


By Nicholas Harling 


Portsmouth roll begin the 
first of the Prudential National 
Clip semi -finals at Birmingham 
tomorrow wearing Mack tape 
across their shirts in honour of 
Lany Dassie, the club’s player 
who died on Tuesday after a 
road accident. 

The extrovert Dassie bad not 
played for Portsmouth this sea- 
son, bat was very much a central 
figure in their emergence fast 
year. Then, the dub also 
reached the semi-finals, but lost 
for the first time that season, to 
Team Polycell Kingston, who 
went on to retain the cup. 
Tomorrow, Portsmouth face 
Calderdale Explorers. 

Kingston might well be lying 
in wait for teem again, this time 
in tee final at tbe Albert Hall on 
December 15. should tee cup- 
holders prove too strong for 
their old adversaries. Sharp 
Manchester United, in the sec- 
ond serai-finaL It is tee memory 
of last year’s failure — their first 
in 15 games then — that Dan 
Lloyd. . the Portsmouth 
pfayer/coach, hopes will prevent 
any form of apathy creeping into 
tee minds of his players when 
they face newly promoted 
Calderdale. The latter's quarter- 
final defeat of previously un- 
beaten BCP London last week 
was tee shock of the season so 
far. 

With Calderdale subsequently 
sing at home to struggling 
mderiand in tee Carlsherg 
National League on Tuesday, 


Lloyd could be forgiven for his 
concern at the possibility of 
Portsmouth approaching tee 
match with the wrong attitude, 
particularly as they comfortably 
overcame tee Yorkshire club in 
the league only three weeks ago. 

“OK, we eventually won that 
one by 24 points, but what we've 
got to remem b er is that at half- 
time there was only one point in 
it and they then had both their 
American players fouled out,” 
Lloyd said- 

“What worries me is teat the 
guys might be a little 
complacent,” he added. “They 
might be t h i nk i n g we've got the 
easy draw. On paper it might 
look as if were already through 
to the final but we’ve got to 
come out on Sunday with the 
same intensity as if we were 
playing United or Kingston. 
We’ve bad a good ran, and it’s 
important that we maintain our 
standard of performance." 

Certainly if Gary “Cat” John- 
son, Calderdale’s pfayer/coach, 
repeats tee kind of inspired 
performance teat proved too 
good for London, there fa no 
way Portsmouth can treat the 
match as a formality. “We will 
have to keep on our toes and I 
just hope we stay on them,’’ said 
Lloyd, whose team are very 
much on form, judging by the 
evidence of their overwhelming 
defeat of their neighbours, 
Drapers Tools Solent Stars, in 
the league on Wednesday. 


HOCKEY 


Devon with a county cream taste 

By Sydney Friskm 


Devon, who were beaten 1-0 
by Surrey in the county 
championship final fast season, 
are hoping to go one better this 
time as foey prepare for foeir 
quarter-final tomorrow against 
Cambridgeshire at the Isca 
ground, Exeter. 

Surrey are now out of the way 
but Devon, who relied largely 
on Isca {flayers, including Rob- 
ert and Graham Skinner, will be 
severely tested by a well- bal- 
anced Cambridgeshire team in 

which Anns, Graves and Spiers, 

of Cambridge City, Rudfaven, 
from Tulse Hill, and Ward, of 
London University, have played 
prominent parts in winning the 
Eastern Counties cham- 
pionship. 

Staffordshire renew their con- 
flict with Worcestershire tomor- 
row fora pface in the semi-finals 
at tee Bumtwood Leisure 
Cefltre, near Walsall, which has 
an artificial turf pitch. Stafford- 
shire defeated Worcestershire 3- 
2 in the Midlands final but there 


may be a different story to teU, 
particularly after Wor- 
cestershire's startling 6-1 victory 
over tbe Army in the prelimi- 
nary round fast week. 

Ken Partington, who scored 
three goals for Worcestershire, fa 
unlikely to be oven the freedom 
he enjoyed against the Army but 
the two wing forwards, Marshall 
and McPhun, are likely to have 
a strong effect on tee match. 
McPhun. a talented forward, fa 
from Zimbabwe. 

Staffordshire, who failed to 
reach the national rounds last 
season, are relying on Imran 
Shcrwanl England’s World Cup' 
outside left, and on Gibbon, 
who converted two short cor- 
nets in the previous match 
against Worcestershire. 

Kent, the early survivors from 
the southern counties, take on 
Yorkshire at Gore Court tomor- 


players, Hughes and Bolland, 
who played prominent parts in 
Yorkshire’s 3-0 victory fast 
week over Buckinghamshire. 

Still, Kent, with a number of 
experienced players, including 
Richards, Abreo and Berry 
available, should, with the bene- 
fit of home pound, have a good 
chance of going throu gh . 

Another attempt wifi be made 
to play tbe postponed prelimi- 
nary round match between 
Somerset and Essex at the 
Imperial ground, Knowle, near 
Bristol If tee ground is water- 
logged the game will be trans- 
ferred to tbe artificial turf pitch 
at the Dorcan Sports Centre, 
Swindon. 

Martyn Grim ley. England's 
World Cup left half tore decided 
to play outdoors for Hounslow 
this season. His application for 
.membership has been accepted 


row in a quarter-final which . and he is in the Hounslow squad 
aroses much interest because of of 12 for today's Pizza Express 
the inclusion in the Yorkshire London League match against 
team of two England World Cup Maidenhead at Feltham. 


SKIING 


Top three in quest for supremacy 

riH. iTtak . . * » 


Park City. Utah (Reuter) — 
Erika Hess and Vreni Schneider, 
of Switzerland, and the Aus- 
trian, Roswifoa Steiner, renew 
their battle for slalom suprem- 
acy this weekend when the 
women’s' World Cup season 
opens here on artificial snow. 

Tbe trio, who do minated (he 
slalom and giant slalom events 
last season, contest tbe longer, 
more punishing giant slalom 
today and tackle foe shorter 
course tomorrow. Both races 
are .being staged on pistes con- 
structed almost entirely of man- 
made snow because Utah has 
trad only one major snowfall is 


the fast month. However, Inter- 
national Ski Federation (FIS) 
officials are delighted. 

In recent years the World Cup 
programme has been reduced to 
’ chaos as early season races in 
Europe have been cancelled 
because -of insufficient snow. 
But Heinz Krecek, an FIS 
official, said: “They have done 
an excellent job of snow-making 
- and preparing the course. Every- 
one should be happy." 

Hess, a veteran of tee slopes 
and holder of . four wond ’ 
championship titles, and 
Schneider, who won tee giant 


slalom crown last season, will be 
looking to open the 1986-87 
season with impressive perfor- 
mances to signal another year of 
Swiss domination. 

• SESTIUERE (AP) - Bojan 
Krizaj, of Yugoslavia, won a 
men's special slalom in the 
world series competition at this 
Italian resort yesterday, beating 
Inge mar Stenmark. of Sweden, 
by 0.09sec. 

Tbe race was a warm-up for 
the cmening special slalom of the 
■ men's World Cup series which 
opens at this . Italian Alpine 
resort today. 


.'F 


-T 






SPORT 



Gordon Bum peers into the eye of the storm breaking over Higgins 


Hurricane Alex is blowing himself out 

A ta H iggins has alwa ys panic ran through the Taylor on. television. The day after he had on the outskirts of Sheffield — the has been looking almost norma 

been burdened with a household when it became clear been given a Mack eye in a late only bold in the city which had in feet, and no thing like his ol 

sense oftns qTOgmma that Ifiggms, then a teenager, had night dub brawl over money, been prepared to lake him — setf. HispnfotenTofcxjursc, btfc 

? l . * a word that rolls off htseye on Dennis s aaer, Mohy- Hqgpns slipped into his lovable looking bereft. He did not have he has beentriaying nothing tik 

hicmnatwaxcamanvas Own n h* In» nnne'e ' _ ___ .J j j... k. . . ” “ 


A lex Higgins has always 
been burdened with a 
sense oflns own sennas. 
It is a word that rolls off 
his tongue as casually as 
the expletives which have won 
him a place in the heart ofhis loyal 
public (“My people” as he calls 
them) and consistently dismayed 
the more upwardly mobile mem- 
bers of die snooker establishment 
“Nobody’s as fast as me, 
nobody’s as attractive as me to 
-watch. Fm the best player who’s 
ever played the game.*’ That was 
Higgins's boast as long ago as 1972 
when, at the age of 23, he became 
the youngest worid snooker cham- 
pion ever. 

“If he can ran me that dose 
when Fm Hying, then something 
must be wrong" was Higgins’s 
ungentleman ly verdict on his 
narrow victory over the unfancied 
Mike Hallett at the beginning of 
this week. It was this match which 
led to the fracas with Paul 
TTathardl , the ton mamenf direc- 
tor of the WPBSA, mooter’s 
governing body, and therefore the 
natural enemy as £or as fiGggms is 
concerned. 

like George Best, his contem- 
porary near neighbour in his 
early days in Belfast, Higgins’s 
name has long been synonymous 
with a contempt for authority and 
the championing of a defiant, 
sometimes delinquent, sub- 
culture. 

In his autobiography, Dennis 
Taylor describes how a ripple of 


panic ran through the Taylor 
household when it became dear 
that Higgins, a teenager, 
his eye on Dennis's sister, Molly. 

Even as he passed Joe Davis’s 
fa m nix old trophy 10 Higgins in 
SeBy Park British Legion in 1972, 
John Pulman suspected that “the 
Hurricane” could turn out to be 
both the best and the worst thing 
that had ever happened to 
snooker. Within weeks the new 
champion was demonst rating how 
he meant to continue by wracking 
hotel rooms, rode V rofl style, in 
Australia, and being kicked out of 
India for getting drank, stripping 
off and sticking ms hand up an old 
man’s dhoti 

Higgins’s problem is that behav- 
iour which was tolerable, even 
endearing, in a young man making 
his way in the worid is embarrass- 
ing, and not infrequently shaming, 
in somebody on the threshold of 
early middle age. 

Higgins's self-image and how he 
is seen by growing numbers of the 
public are increasingly at odds 
with each other. “Sometimes he’ll 
arrive with a packet of bacon and 
say: *Will you cook this for me?’ 
When be stands there with that 
little-boy-lost look on his face yon 
can almost forgive him 
everything,** Alex's estranged 
wife, Lynn, said recently. 

It is an indication of bow far 
adrift “the People's Champion" 
has become from reality tint he 
believes it is a trick he can pull off 
in front of several million viewers 


on television. Tbe day after he had 
been given a black eye in a late 
night dub brawl over money, 
'Higgins slipped into his lovable 
rogue persona and assured the 
home TV audience that he had 
been involved in a riding acririmt. 
This Wednesday, two days after be 
had been accused of ratting the 
WPBSA’s tournament director, he 
emerged from the depths of 
“Hurricane Hair in a sheepskm- 
and-teather get-up that was dearly 
meant to make him look like a 
cuddly Muppets character. 

O nly he, a pp aren tly, is 
unaware that he is 
fooling hardly any- 
body, and that 
“genius” — even ge- 
nius dulled by a prodigious intake 
of alcohol and under-the-counter 
drugs — is no excuse for petulant, 
wilful and tinipgfah behaviour. 
Nowadays Higgins is regarded by 
many of those inside the gone not 
merely as a minor irritant but as 
somebody to be avoided at all 
costs. 

His practice partner in the early 
days of the world championships 
this year was Stephen Hendry, 
aged, 17, the Scottish player, who 
was immediately whisked ha ck to 
Edinburgh when he was elimi- 
nated in the first round. “It's a big, 
bad world we live in and it can be 
dynamite . . . you can’t be too 
careful,” Hendry’s manager said. 

The foD owing day Higgins was 
to be found moping round a hold 


on the outskirts of Sheffield — the 
only hotel in the city which had 
been prepared to lake him — 
looking bereft. He did not have 
another match for two days and he 
could go home but what was the 
point? be said, draining another 
champagne cocktail The bouse 
was big and empty and there was 
no one there. 

This has become the story of 
Higgins’s life in recent years. 
Walk; other players, particularly 
those associated with Steve Davis 
in the Barry Hearn camp, are rat 
turning their dead time into 
dollars and yen, Higgins is left to 
nurse bis resentment and crack 
open another can. 

“The sadness is that we need the 
Higginses to keep the game fresh 
and alive and exerting. But from a 
commercial point of view, nobody 
needs them at alL It would be a 
disaster to have him front any 
campaign,” Hearn likes to say, in 
the full knowledge that he is 
rubbing salt into an old but still 
wide-open wound. 

The irony is that, instead of 
feeding bis grievance against what 
he regards as the infinitely inferior 
playere who arc creaming off what 
is rightly his, Higgins in the past 
few months has been making 
determined and almost touching 
efforts to clean up his act. With the 
aid of vitamin injections, Sassoon 
haircuts and a new go-getting 
young manager with a showbiz 
bent, he has been looking healthier 
than he has looked in years. He 


ATHLETICS 


RUGBY UNION 


Britain set out on the 
hilly road to success 

By Pht Butcher, Athletics Correspondent 


The first steps on the muddy 
path to re-€s aahti&hrng British 
cross-country runners as the 
best in the world need to be 
taken in Gateshead this week- 
end. For it is an wnachrnnigra 
that, while British track and 
field has flourished to an en- 
viable extent in tbe last decade, 
British, particularly En glish, 
domination of tim cross-country 
world has evaporated like sweat 
on a winter’s afternoon. 

Much of the Mama has been 
directed at the selectors, at then- 
insistence on a tough, often hilly 
15km course two to three weeks 
before the usually flat 12km 
world championship in March, 
ar their variable selection policy, 
and at their fell ure to recognize 


Scotland, Wales and Northern 
Ireland. After a rearguard action 

notably France ancMhe bribed 


teams during the h«t *w 
»mi their junior men have never 
feiled to finish in die first three. 
A similar system has proved 


the commercial nature of all -to the inevitable, which is why 
athletics nowadays, ami not they are to talk to the leading 


States, claiming the length of tremendously successful for Ital- 
uaditfon since i nv ent in g the ian long distance track nmnim, 

fenr iMti nnii diampi nmiii p^ the l Hiirii wilm i iwtM tn thrir attL . 

precursor to the world tetes having all three medal 
championships back in 1904, winners in the European 10,000 
the home countries have been metres in Stuttgart in 
mandated by the International September. 

Amateur Athletic Federation to It is this sort of system that 
field a United Kingdom in Tim Hutchings, England’s lead- 
the world championships in ing cross-country runner in the 
1980. There is an appeal against last decade, has been promoting, 
this decision, taken at tbelAAF Hutchings said yesterday: “I 
Congress in Athens last July, but think the selectors are moving in 
it is almost certain to be tinned the right direction, for example, 
down. the national championship is 

And tbe home co un tries* now four weeks before the world 
selectors are gearing themselves championships. But they are 


indemnifying a squad of elite 
runners to ensure they do not 
overeace before the champion- 
ships. And then, ultimately they 
most agree to co-opt the better 


British athletes attending the 

Me Vhie’s inte rnati onal CTQSS- 

country in Gateshead at midday 
today. 

Countries such as Spain, with 


Scots, Welsh and Irish, such as little cross-country - tradition. 
Sieve Jones, Roger Hackney, have proved in the last decade 


Nat Muir and John Robson, 
into a United Kingdom team, 
which would be strong enough 
to wrest bade the title England 
last won in 1980. 

This last decision has already 
been taken for tbe authorities of 
the four home nations, England. 


what can be done with a squad 
system. They select senior and 
junior squads almost six months 
before the championship and 
pay them so that they do not 
race too frequently. With this 
system Spain have consistently 
finished in the first five out of 30 


winch culminated in their ath- 
letes having all three medal 
winners in the European 10000 
metres in Stuttgart in 
September. 

It is this sort of system that 
Tim Hutchings, England's lead- 
ing cross-country runner in the 
last decade, has been promoting. 
Hutchings said yesterday: “I 
think the selectors are moving in 
tiie right direction, for example, 
the national championship is 
now four weeks before the vrorid 
championships. But they are 
still years behind the track 
selectors when it comes to 
thinking in of fiiwnrwl 

rewards ami setting up a squad 
system and looking for 
sponsors.” 

Today's race is over only 
6.9km, and despite his objec- 
tions, the local hero, Steve 
Gram, having- his first race on 
theconraerinoe 1975, could well 
win. He beat Mike McLeod in a 
six mile race three weeks ago, 
and then won a 10-mile race in 
the United States last Sunday. 
The Portuguese Castro twins 
have withdrawn. 


tv/ • . • : 

i 

■if * 

\ V i« 

■■ •• a:*,*' w >?id> 

■> y i >,> 

tfltotirrr • • 


Urn Hatchings: promoting tbe Evopeu squad system 


RACING RESULTS 


CRICKET 











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West Indies continue 
where they left off 



















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Shariah, United Arab Emir- 
ates (AFP) — West Indies out- 
classed Pakistan in every 
department as they strolled to 
an easy nine-wiclut victory, 
with 11.4 Overs to spare, in the 
Champions Trophy here yes- 
terday. Gordon Greenidge, with 
74, and an unbeaten 59 from 
Desmond Haynes sealed the 
result with an opening stand of 
126 after Pakistan bad been 
bowled out for a modest 143. 

Pakistan, thrashed 4-1 by the 
same opponents in tbe recent 
one-day series, were on the way 
to defeat after the West Indian 
bowlers first derived lift out of a 
dead pitch to such an extern that 
only Javed Miandad faced them 
with confidence: There was also 
a superb display of outfield 
cricket from Logie, who took 
three catches and ran out two 
Otter batsmen to earn the man 
of tbe match award. 

From the moment the Paki- 
stan raptafn, Imr an Khan, de- 
cided to bat, the problems ofhis 
team’s openers continued. They 
again made heavy weather of 
their taslq being put under great 
pressure by the West Indies 
speed quartet of Marshal Gray, 
Benjamin and particularly 
Walsh, who not only exploited 
the conditions to the foil but was 



also helped in his task by Harold 
Bird 

A rare mistake by the English 
umpire allowed Walsh to bowl 
an extra over in which he 
churned a fourth wicket It was 
his tenth over, one more than 
was allotted under the rales to 
each howler in a 45-over match. 
That apart, it was the usual 
inconsistent and inept batting 
display by the Pakistanis which 
brought their downfall. They 
could not even last the 45 overs 
and were all om in only 43.4 
overs. 

Their opener. Mudassar 
Nazar, faced 58 deliveries for 14 
while the third man in, Rameez 
Raja, Pakistan’s top scorer with 
44, faced 94 deliveries. Gray 
struck an early blow when he 
had Salim caught by Logie with 
the score only six. Only 31 runs 
were on the board off 16 overs 
when Mudassar was ca ugh t by 
Logie off Winston Benjamin. 

Miandad came in to score a 
brisk -32 in just 35 balls before be 
was unlucky to be run out by 
Logie. The &11 of his wicket 
heralded Pakistan's collapse. 

SCORES: Pakistan 143 M&4 wars, 
Raman Raja 44. Walsh fourterSI); WM 
mates 145 tori (QmenWgn 74. Haynes 59 
not out). 


A group of west Yorkshire 
businessmen plan to take over 
the 120-year lease of the Halifax 
Town ground, if tbe fourth 
division dub do not survive their 
financial crisis. The Inland Rev- 
enue, who are owed £76,000, will 
take the dub to the high court to 
seek a comprisory winding-up 
order, unless Halifax come up 
with satisfactory proposals for 
payment before next Thursday. 
The dob’s total debt is 
approaching £400900. 

A spokesman for the group* 
the auctioneer and vainer, Brian 
Parkinson, said that their mem- 
bers were determined that 
Calderdale Coundl should not 
sell the Shay ground if tbe dsb 
folded. 

Last week the council turned 
down a £3 nriffion offer for the 
freehold, saying they wonld not 
sell it at any price. “The 
members of the group feel that 
the council have said a great 
deal, but have net done enough 
to help the football dnhT 
Parkinson said. “We are deter- 
mined that they should not make 
a profit out of Halifax Town’s 
demise, if it happens.” 

Tbe deputy comcA leader, 
Marjorie Sinus, said that it 
woold be the club’s fault if they 
went out of business. 



Marsh leading 
by four strokes 
in World Open 

Ibusuiti (AP) — Graham 
Marsh, of Australia, shot a 70 
two under par, yesterday for a 
four-stroke lead in the 85 mil- 
lion yen (£373,290) Casio World 
Open tournament. Marsh, who 
fired a course record eighi- 
imder-par 64 in Thimdays open- 
ing round, rolled in five birdies 
yesterday for a total of 134, 10 
under par. 

JosC- Maria Olaz&bal, of 
Spain, and Namio Takasu, of 
Japan, shared second place at 


Open yesterday. 

Davis shot a 65, five under 
par, for atwo-round total of 128, 
12 under tiie card. 

Dmte 




• Gemrision (Reuter) — Fulton 
Afltan. of South Africa, shot a 
course-reconi 63, right under 
par, to move two shots behind 
his compatriot, Mark McNulty, 
in the third round of the 
Cfcn tenary tournament here 
yesterday. 



has been looking almost normal, 
in feet, and nothing like his old 
self. His problem, of course, is that 
he has been playing nothing ifo 
his old self either. 

It is no secret that Higgins, like 
other system -bucking sports stars 
— Botham, McEnroe and Daley 
Thompson are others who im- 
mediately spring to mind — is 
never better than when his back is 
against the wall and be is lashing 
out The Hi^ins who has been the 
focus of all the media hoopla this 
past weds bears only a passing 
resemblance to tiie taciturn, neatly 
turned-out figure who has been 
sleepwalking his way through 
tournaments sin ce season 
began. 

H e came out for bis 
quarter-final ma tch 
against the world 
No. 56, Wayne Jones 
on Thursday, with his 
mouth crusted in sores, his shirt 
hang in g open at the neck and his 
hair dirty and plastered to his 
scalp. Inevitably, charged by the 
mixture of animosity and blind 
devotion, he reminded doubters 
where the “Hurricane" nickname 
came from by sprinting into a six- 
frame l«»ri 

Gordon Bum is the author of a 
new book. Pocket Money (pub- 
lished this week by 
Heinemann, £9.95). which 
studies the men ana the meth- 
ods in the boom sport of 
snooker. 


TENNIS 


Britain’s 
women 
bear the 
brunt 

From Rex Bellamy 
Tennis Correspondent 
Eindhoven 

Britain must win a play-off 
tomorrow morning, probably 
against Tbe Nethe rlands, if they 
are to stay in the first division of 
the new European Cup com- 
petition for women. With only 
Jo Dune missing from the 
strongest possible line-up, 
Britain have teen beaten in turn 
by whax was almost West 
Germany’s fourth team and 
then, yesterday, by a French 
reserve team. 

The Germans and French 
have lower worid rankings than 
Sara Gomer and Annabel Croft 
but beat them, anyway. Marie- 
Christine CaDega, bora less than 
an hour’s drive from Andorra, 
beat Miss Croft 6-3, 4-6, 7-5 
yesterday. Miss C&llqja needed 
five match points, spread over 
three games, and Miss Croft 
played much better than she had 
done a day earlier. 

Catherine Suite, from Nantes, 
made the French lead impreg- 
nable with a 6-4, 6-0 win over 
Miss Gomer, whose perfor- 
mance in the second set was 
swfeL Miss Suite and Sybille 
Niox-Chaleau took France to 3- 
0 by beating Miss Croft and 
Miss Gomer 6-4, 6-7, 6-4 in a 
light-hearted doubles. 

The British captain, Virginia 
Wade, was philosophic and 
sympathetic. “The general state 
of British tennis is appalling,” 
she said. “It’s a pity we don’t 
have more players, to spread the 
pressure. I fed sorry for people 
like Annabd and Sara. It’s rough 
for them to bear the brant of it. 
They get terribly insecure and 
battered. I don’t think we can 
blame them because they are not 
better players. What can they do 
about it?” 

True, Miss Gomer and Miss 
CTOft are not aQ that talented by 
international standards and 
their defeats, though disappoint- 
ing, are hardly surprising. But 
Miss Wade was unduly com- 
passionate. Miss Gomer and 
Miss Croft could be better 
match-players than they are — 
and if the weight of expectation 
is too much for them, they are in 
the wrong business. They lost to 
two teams they should have 
beaten. 

There was a decent match 
yesterday. The nimble Miss 
Calkya was, at first, too aggres- 
sive and flexible for Miss Croft. 
Then Miss Croft found ter 
rhythm and length and won five 
games out of six. Her fierce 
forehand imposed on Miss 
Catleja much strenuous 
retrieving. 

Miss Calleja could not win — 
ah she could do was nag away 
and hope that Miss Croft would 
lose. That is what happened. But 
Miss Croft fought back from 2-5 
to 5-5 in the third set before 
three backhands finished it one 
was a winner by Miss CaUqja, 
the others erro r s by Miss Oroft. 

An odd feature of the second 
match was that Miss Suire, a 
neat and agile player, is a chum 
of Miss Wade's and often prac- 
tises with ter. Miss Gomer 
grazed and bloodied a knee in a 
fell during the second game and 
lost her service in the tfiird. That 
was the only break in a dose first 
set. 

In the second Miss Suire 
instantly broke through, with 
difficulty, and Miss Gomer 
promptly went into a trance. She 
was no longer throwing punches 
— just taking Item. She scored 
only eight points in the set 

The French captain, tbe race 
renowned Francois Janffiet 
(who looks more and more like 
Eric Sykes), found it hard to 
believe that Miss Gomer ranked 
54th in tbe world. Bui he had 
noted that Miss Suire’s com- 
petence in the forecourt had 
disconcerted Miss Gomer, who 
likes to {day that game herself 

“Sara had a slight chance but 
lost h, got annoyed, and didn't 
know what to do,” Miss Wade 
said. “Catherine was sharper — 
rad once she gets rolling she 
doesn't let them win points.” 






















FOOTBALL: THE ONLY WAY CHELSEA CAN BECOME A HAPPY FAMILY ONCE AGAIN IS BY HAVING A CONCERTED - AND FOLLY UNITED - EFFORT 


Chelsea’s chance to 
pull away from their 
intolerable position 


The question concerning 
Chelsea today is have they 
dispelled for good their 
masochistic tendencies or 
have they merely suspended 
them? The feet that Speedie 
and McLaughlin remain on 
the transfer list, at their own 
request, suggests they are not 
yet quite the happy family that 
one was led to believe by their 
determined victory against 
West Ham United at Upton 
Park on Tuesday. 

Speedie and Spademan, 
reluming to the side then like 
two naughty boys brought 
back downstairs alter being 
ordered to their bedrooms, 
injected life back into a side 
which has been decaying ever 


By Clive White 

since John Hollins, the man- 
ager, chose not to select the 
pair 10 games ago. But it was 
not dear whether their spin 
ited performances were as 
much for Chelsea as their own 
pride. 

It must be distressing for the 
supporters that McLaughlin 
and, in particular, the mutii 
admired Speedie, still do not 
see their futures with the 
London club. It is common 
knowledge that McLaughlin 
still hankers after a return to 
Scotland and be must have 
been disappointed to hear 
there was no significance in 
the presence of David Hay, 
the Celtic manager, at Upton 
Park. Mike Hazard, at least, 


TODAY'S TEAM NEWS 


Aston Villa (16) ▼ 
Arsenal (1) 
vffla, unbeaten at home since 
McNeill took charge, add Walters to 
the 12 who drew at West Ham. 
Keown wil face his former team- 
mates. Arsenal, unbeaten In 11 
matches, must choose between 
Allin son. and Groves, who is fit 
again after missing last week's 
game. 

Leicester City (19) 
v Chelsea (21) 

Chelsea retain the side that 
beat West Ham. so there Is no 
recall for Hazard. Osman is 
again misskig for Leicester, who 
Include Mauchten in their squad 
after Injury. 

Liverpool (3) v 
Coventry City (6) 

Johnston's back injury keeps 
him out of the Liverpool Me for the 
fourth consecutive match. 

Emerson returns to the Coventry 
side after missing the midweek 
game at Anfreid because he was 
cup-tied Adams is substitute. 

Luton Town (5) v 
Charlton Athletic (18) 

Charlton must decide whether 
to risk Walsh on the artificial 
surface. Johns should return in 
goaiafter injury. Luton are 
unchanged but North and 
Nwajiooi Join the squad. 

Manchester City (20) 
v Everton (9) 

Reid is poised to play Ms first 
game of the season attar 
dislocating a shoulder. But City 
have Gidman, Clements. Varatfi 
and Redmond under treatment 

Norwich City (7) v 
Oxford (Jnited (12) 
McDonald, who has not pis 
since January I. is Dkety to i 
for Shotton, who has a 
recurrence of back trouble. 
Houghton Is doubtful but 

Philips has recovered from 
influenza and Trewick is 
recalled after suffering a broken 
nose and concussion 1 0 days 
ego. Norwich wait on Phelan's 
fitness. Rosario. Brown and 
Pox stand by. 


QPR (IS) v 

Sheffield Wednesday (8) 
Gavin Peacock, the son of Keith 
Peacock, the Gflfingham manager, 
couM make hte debut In place 
of the injured Rosanior for QPR 
Neffl is set to replace Ffireday, 
who has hamstring trouble. 
Hamstring and foot injuries 
keep Marwood out oTthe 
Wednesday side and 
Worthington needs a test an a 
thigh. Shutt is fit again and 
Bradshaw, who scored three times 
for the reserves this week, is 
also included. 

Southampton (13) ▼ 
Watford (11) 

Hobson, Southampton's new 
signing, is set to make his debut 
and Tankard, a teenager, 
stands by for his first league game 
of me season. Wallace and 
Forrest return after injury but 
Dennis is doubtful with a knee 
problem. Terry, who replaced the 
injured Sens in midweek, 
retains his piace for Watford. 

Tottenham Hotspur (10) 
v Nottingham Forest (2) 

Gough is very doubtful for 
Tottenham but Clive Allen is 
expected to shake off 
hamstring trouble. Forest, without 
Butte rworth and Bowyer 
because of influenza, recal Pearce 
after missing two games with a 
throat infection. Fakdough plays 
his second league game of the 
season. 

Wimbledon (14) v 
Manchester United (17) 

Sanchez returns after 
suspension and Cork and Gage are 
in contention for Wimbledon. 

United name an unchanged side for 
the third consecutive match. 

Tomorrow 

Newcastle United (22) v 
West Ham United (4) 
Newcastle hope to have 
Goddard, formerly of West Ham. fit 
to play after Injuring an adds 
last week. Anderson and Wharton 
should also be fit West Ham 
expect Devonshire, Orr and 
Stewart to ratlin after injury. 


looks set to stay aider the dub 
quashed the fine imposed on 
him earlier in the week for 
criticizing team selection. 

Hollins said yesterday; “All 
differences have been resolved 
in as much as everyone knows 
what they have to do, which is' 
win as many matches as 
possible.” When asked if it 
was his intention eventually to 
bring the pair off the transfer 
list he replied: “1 would not 
like to comment” 

One can only hope Hollins 
communicates rather more 
fully with his players than he 
does with the Press. It is a pity 
Hollins, who openly displayed 
such great heart and humour 
as a player, should have 
become so serious and se- 
cretive as a manager. If his 
side were half as defensive 
they would not now be lying in 
21st position in the League 
and been dismissed so pre- 
maturely (by Cardiff City) 
from the littlewoods Cup. 

At least last week's shocking 
home defeat brought matters 
to a head. Today at Leicester, 
Chelsea must attempt to 
resurrect their season. For 
some reason there has been a 
greater camaraderie about 
their performances away from 
home than there has been at 
Stamford Bridge. They have 
scored twice as many goals on 
their travels than they have in 
the intimidating environment 
of home. Dixon has looked 
like a big boy lost without the 
unselfish prompting of little 
Speedie. It was significant that 
within six minutes of their 
reunion at West Ham, Dixon 
should reopen his goal ac- 
count for the first time since 
October 8. 

In selecting the same side 
plus Wood and Wegeriy, 
Hollins clearly intends to per- 
severe with Pates, a central 
defender to most minds, in 
midfield in preference to play- 
ers dearly better equipped for 
‘the role, such as Hazard and 
Murphy. 

Again omitted are Wicks 
and Dune, on whom he spent 
about £800,000 in the summer 
when all was sweetness and 
light and the only second place 
Hollins may have been pre- 
pared to accept come Novem- 
ber was just behind Liverpool 
Second from bottom is an 
intolerable position for a club 
with Chelsea’s resources. And 
it will require a concerted - 
and fully united - effort to 
remedy the situation. 


Power 
thrives 
anew at 
Everton 

By Peter Ball 

As a description of his form 
for Everton this season, phrases 
such as “Indian summer” and “a 
new lease of fife” do not appeal 
to Paul Power, who returns to 
Maine Road, where be spent 15 
years, in opposition cobras for 
the first tone this afternoon. 
There is, however, no denying 
that his move to a team with 

rlnwipiiHwhy amb itions iflff 

▼ears of struggle has tab le d 
him to flourish anew at 33. 

Power is one of those North- 
ern professionals who are the 
glory of the English game — 
strong, atofaty , durable, whole 
hearted, and, when aa their 


mgs, more wMMftH | kan critics 
sometimes allow. He was so 
ranch part of die fobric of- 
Manchester City, where he 
made 365 League appearances 
after joining them first as an 
an»t »w Byiing pro- 

fessional at 21, when he had 
completed his law degree, that 
there was a g enuin e sense of 
shock when he was released in 
the sammer. 

Power, who had captained the 
dub for the last five years, and 
whose dedication to Oty was a 
by-word, regards the de cisi on 
philosophically. In City's finan- 
cial State, with him due for a free 
transfer in a year's time, and 
with a very promising young left 
back on the horizon, toe decision 
made sense from the dab’s point 
of view. 

The promising young left 
hack, Andy HincfccJiffe, has yet 
to appear due to injary, however, 
and City tons, watching Power’s 
performances for Everton have 
been left entering another black 
mark against their forma- man- 
ager, Billy McNeill's, transfer 
dealings. 

Power can afford to be philo- 
sophical. Instead of a step down, 
as he might have exp e c t e d with 
Us 33rd Wrthday then in sight, 
he was offered the opportunity 
for a step np when Howard 
Kendall approached him. 

“1 was quite flattered.’’ he 
said, “because I had not ex- 
pected to be aUe to Join a dnb as 
big, or possibly even bigger than 
City, at this stage in my career.” 

He was signed as a squad 
player to pve cover down the left 
where Everton had been be- 
devilled by injury problems last 
season. Somewhat to his sw- 
prise, his chance came immedi- 
ately at left back, where both Pat 
van den Ha owe and Ned 
Pointen were ratable to start the 
season, and be grabbed it with; 
both hands. 

He bad a few shaky moments 
defensively to start with as he 
adjusted to Everton's different 
system. From the start, however, 
his marauding runs forward 
gave Kevin Sbcdj a ready 
target and his crossing ability, 
seen by the mass television 




Panl Power: confounded some observers 


audience when he foand Sharp 
for his spectacular beaded | 
against Manchester United, 
confoanded some observers. 

A useful left-side midfield 
player on occasion with Man- 
chester City, he is now convinced 
that faD-fadc seats him best 
Level headed about his abilities 
he explains: “It is better fa- me 
now. I can see the whole game m 
front of me, I can tone my rans 
better from that position, 
whereas midfield players have to 
be up and back (he whole tone 
and midfield needs more creative 
ability.*’ 

He disclaims suggestions Oat 
he has developed new talents, 
however, preferring to pass on 
credit to his new team mates. “I 
don't think I'm doing anything 
different from what I've always 
done, hot it is easy to play with 
good players like Kevin Sheedy 
and Graeme Sharp. Kevin gives 


me good sendee and a forward 
dee Graeme makes an ordinary 
cross into a good one.** 

Power is dearly enjoying bis 
new surroundings, and his am- 
bition is still strong. He is 
thriving on playing regularly 
and would relinquish his pos- 
ition reluctantly, even though be 
has already played enough 

games to qualify for a c hampion- 
ship medal should Everton wan 
the title. 

“As I've been playing that 
wouldn't be enough, I would 
want to be playing when it was 
won for it to be really 
satisfying,” he said firmly. He 
has so for held his place even 
though Pointed is now & Van 
den Hanwe is now also 
approaching fitness and will- 
provide another challenge, bat in 
his present form Power, will 
take some shifting. 


keep Pilgrims 
on the right lines 

By* Correspondent ^ 

The produc t i ve partnership Tynan, agsed 31, 


between n hfiosynaatic Sent 

and a liverpsdfian awed of his 
wanderlust is Set to propel foe 
Pilgrims into foe new world of 


wfth Newport, has 
___ 2d. Six more 

gp ste’to 

tally to 57 m MO Leagat 


Pflgrans into me new wwon m «auy *» “ --- 

j&mitf* 1 m tabu Ptnnntt Ar- nosftam for 24 years 


_ has taken Ffymenfo Ar- 
s from the brink of Ac fourth 
w .Jdra to foe threshold of foe 
Gist - and Tonsny Tynan, their 
prolific grad-sewer, has fired foe 
crucial foots in a metaodoudy- 
pfamned rampafga. The two men 
■re key figures in oae of the most 
stories of 


for 24 

i’s mobility and command 
the fr ont fine have been 

r impressive. 

crowds haw flocked back 

hi treble foe nranba stare 
Smith nssi im ed cogwl - Jg 
today’s visit of Oidham At hletic, 
the league leaders, wiH »■» 
within reach of foe temporary 


When P lymouth took hba on. 
Smith had spent 18 months ont 
of foe game selling, of an tbing* 

insurance after Ming sacked 
doing the infamous Anton 

Johnson's takeover at Southend 
United. The Home Park board, 
which had gone through seven 
managers in the previovs 10 
years, ignored foe load overtimes 
of mere flamboyant applicants 
Hkr John Bend, and went for a 
man who had ha&t force proese- 
ftm-wmnina sides from foe 
fourth division, one at MaasfieH 
b efore moving en to SoatheatL 

Smith's first quote that he had 
arrived "with a homing am- 
bition to make Plymouth great 
again,” sounded to n pfolic 
which bad suffered years of 
nato a ihiCT ti dmt Iikg predict- 
able hyperbole. Gates had plum- 
meted below 4,009 and foe 
spectre of forarfo division foot- 
ball for the first tone had begim 
to assrane solid shape. Yet 
Smith,. an ext rovert with a 
professed passion for poetry, 
has seemingly banished that 
ghost forever. He has been given 
valuable assistance by Tynan, 
whose second spell, on loon, 
produced 10 goals in sme games 
at the end of last season to sweep 
the dnb to promoti on . 

Smith's perseverance and a 
modest £3S,M outlay brought 
back again from Bath- 
United hi September. 


is a mixtmre ofshow- 

- — i and f M n irgr— a self-dabbed 

J “C3dennw" tothefons whoctn 
end Ins programme notes with 
pmtf pa from Goethe — hot be 

is a manager who above all is an 
e f fective motivator of players 

who had apparently only been 

blessed with modest aMitj: 
John Matthews, a midfield 
player, and Garry Nelson and 
Kevin SammerfieU, both for- 
wards, all plucked from the 
lower reaches of the L cagne , 
have surpassed expectations af- 
ter donums foe green shirt. 

Yet South says: “I haven’t 
been astonished by what's hap- 
pened. The Stamfords were set 
last year and hrdividBal players 
have improved on them. I said 
when I first came here that first 
division football wmdd come to 
Plymouth sooner rather than 
mut it’s beginning to took 
Eke that. 

“Look at Liverpool. When 
they got into foe first division 
they did it quietly and not from 
■wiring foe chan g e s overnight. 

. IPs got to be done through quiet 
evolution and not re re l ati o n.” 

Smith has also {bond that 
there is Utile substitute far 
experience. It will take an 
exceptional new talent to pre- 
vent Tynan, one of four Plym- 
outh players foe wrong side of 
3ft, from bnndns brightest in foe 
twfljghtof his 


Lineker at Goodison 


Gary Lineker matte a surprise 
appearance in Everton colours 
yesterday, but the £1 million 
forward from Barcelona was 
simply training with his fawn* 
Goodison teammates. .Lineker 
is in England to play in a 
testimonial for Tommy Wil- 
liams, formerly of Leicester, at 
Filbert Street on Monday. 

Unekersaid: “I couldn’t resist 
the chance to come back and see 
the Everton lads a gain. We 
haven't a game in Spain this 
weekend. One of die things I'm 
looking forward to on Monday 
is playing alongside Frank 
Worthington, who was one of 
my boyhood idols.” 

• Port Vale's home match with 
Bournemouth has been post- 
poned. Nine Vale players are ill 
or injured. 

• Reading’s second division 


. homejannewith Huddersfield is 
also oft Reading are unable to 
raise a team because of an 
tTiflmwwM virus at. the dub, while 
the Bristol Rovers and Don- 
caster game has been postponed 
because the Tiverton Park pitch 
is still unfit. 

• Blackburn have signed the 
forward, Paul McKinnon, aged 
28. from Sutton United of the 
GM Vanxhall Conference for 
£8.000, pins a farther £12,000 in 
appearance instalments, 

• The Doncaster Rovers mid- 
field player. Sean Joyce, aged 19, 
has moved to Exeter Oty on a 
month's loan. 

• Brentford have signed the 
Bir ming ham city forward, 
David Geddis, on loan for a 
month. Geddis, aged 28. will 
play in to m o r ro w ’s game at 
Rotherham. 


SWIMMING 

Kelly’s 11 
can give 
Devon title 

By Roy Moor 

Helen Slaner, the Great 
Britain backstroke inter- 
national. will be one of 1 1 Kelly 
College competitors in the 
Devon team striving to win the 
Esso age-group inter-county 
championship final at Nunea- 
ton this afternoon. 

The strength of the Tavistock 
based college squad has played a 
considerable role in Devon’s 
reaching this final for the first 
time. The five other counties to 
win through the preliminary 
rounds are Yorkshire, who were 
responsible for the elimination 
of the holders, Northumberland 
and Durham, in the northern 
division; Essex, Kent, Warwick- 
shire and Norfolk. 

The title is won by the county 
scoring the most pouts from all 
the finals involving the events 
for under- 1 2s, 1 3 to 14 years and 
the 15- 16 age group. 

Coaches present will be look- 


WEEKENP FOOTBALL, RUGBY AND OTHER FIXTURES 


ing for talent likely u> develop 
1988 Olympics 
but also for the Games four 


not only for the 1! 


years later in Barcelona. 

One who seems certain to 
catch the eye is Nicola Bates, 
aged 14, who swims for Norfolk 
in the 100 metres free-style, 100 
metres butterfly and 200 metres 
medley. She was the fastest of ail 
the juniors in the 100 metres 
and 200 metres free-style at last 
weekend's Leicester trials. 

The busiest competitor today 
is likely to be Paul Tederzolli, of 
Devon, a national age-praup 
champion who is entered for the 
100 metres free-style, 100 me- 
tres breaststroke, 100 metres 
butterfly and 200 metres med- 
ley. 


BOXING 

World title bid 
for Montero 

Paris (AFP) - Antoine Mon- 
itcro, of France, will make a third 
attempt to win a world title early 
in 1987. The promoter, Marc 
Braillon, has fixed a provisional 
date, January 21, in Mont- 
pellier, and the European 
bantamweight champion has 
two options open for the title 
challenge. 

Jeff Fenecfa, of Australia, the 
I ntcmational Boxing Federation 
bantamweight champion, has 
agreed to come to France, but 
first Montero wants to hear 
from the Mexican, Gilberto 
F.vrn&n. the WBC super- Qy- 
’■ - gni champion. 

‘•'dan originally agreed to 
• r. . the Frenchman, but must 
r.ght Korg’orane 

•jr o'. cT Th?.,.nd. OD 
- if T; ... -..re. due to 

•;x; cn i? but 

«\-Mrr.an was injured in training. 

a coaftacJ 
***** 


v SI 


rack-oftaarotassBiaM Second division 

TODAY LEAGUE 

First division Barnsley vWBA 

A Vffla v Arsenal Blackbun v Ipswtah — 

Leicester v Chelsea Bradford v Stoke 

UverpooW Coventry C palace v Sunderland 

Luton v Chariton Grimsby v Bi rmin gham 

Manchester C v Everton — Leeds v Derby - 

Norwich v Oxford Mfflwall v Portsmouth _ 

QPR v Sheffield Wed — Plymouth v Oldham 

Southampton v Watford Reading v Huddersfield 

Tottenham v Nottingham F Sheffield lltd v Brighton 

Wimbledon v Manchester Utd Shrewsbury v HuU 

GM VAUXHALL COW THOIC E: At- Kampeton v 

trincham w WeSng; Barnet v Runcorn; Now's; Soul .. _ 

Dagenham v Gateshead; EnfWd v Raunds; S and LCortwv Patton; Stotfold 
Weaidstone; FricWey v Sutton United: v BtMoflfc Woot ton v Roti iwafi. 

Kettanng v Cheltenham; Nuneaton v GREAT M&US WESTERN LEAGUE: Pro- 
MakJstone: Stafford v Bath; Telford v inter (Mateo: Bam&tapte v Wesun- 
Boator; Weymouth y Scarborough. Port- superstore (2-30); BktotanJ v Plymouth 
gonad: KkjQBrmhmtor v No nl iwi C n. Argyte Res; dandown v Mengoteflald; 

FOOTBALL COMBWAHON; Arsenal v Brt&ol Manor Farm v Taunton; L&koert v 
Queen's PM Rangers; ChateH v Brinh- Radsudc Mafiotam v Brtstol Cfly; 
tan (3.15): Portsmouth « Oxford Unfed KAnehead v Frame; Pautton v Ctevadon; 
(2^)0); Watford v Southampton; West Ham Sal tea h v Chard; Torrington v 
V Swindon (2m Chtepnitam am 

SMRNOFFHRtSH LEAGUE {ZOO* Ben- BBWS AND BUCKS SENIOR CUR Hat 
aor v Dtstfitary. CotarWna v Gtonavom Round: BasoonsfleM Unfed v Buekkig- 
Crusadera v Centcfo Lame v CUftotwBe; ham Town. 

UnSetd v Gtaitmn (3J$ Newry « Ards: AUXOtS SURREY COUNTY SEMOR 
Portedown v BaByniena. CUP: BAe Weytoirtdge v Cranleigh; Cortrv 

VAUXHALLOPEL LEAGUE: ftamtor to- IhiwvCasuate v Cc w irley Tom Dcrtang 
vtatoK Barking v Wycombe Wanderers; v Godolming Town; Ftenham Town v 
Bognor Regis Town v Windsor and Eton; Maiden Vale; Haritoy Wtotney v Kew 
Bixxniev v Bt&hoo's Stanford: CsrahaftOQ Association. 

ArntMt v hSrwBorough: Croydon v FACOUNTY YOUTH CUP (2 jOS: Barks and 
Hendon; Farnborougli Town v Bucks v Dorset (Wtnstow United FCfc 
Wokingham Town; Hayes v Ktngsuntan; Essex v Suttoh (Southend Unfed FCjc 
hfitetun Town v Walthamstow Avenue; St Kent v Royal Navy (Canterbury C8y 
Albans c&y v Tootfog and MActwm; FCAffl. 

Slough Town v Worming; Yaovi Town v LONDON SPARTAN LEAGUE: Planter 
Dulwich Hamtot First wr te ten Bas tio n division: Brimsdown Rovers v 
United v Hampton: BrecknaB Town v Bnrtdngslda; Hs wws fl Town v YeacSng; 
Epsom and Brd; Hnchiey v Uxbridge; Nortiwood v Beckton Unfed; Rad#* v 
fCnsOury Town v Grays AlMsfic; Oown and Manor; Southgate AtMsdc v 
Leather head v Btllertcay Town; Denson; Utyssas v Amaraham Town. 
Loytonotone Word v Lowas; Oidord City v HALLS HELLENIC BREWERY LEAGUE: 
Boreham Wood; Southwicxv Maidenhead Premier dMaton (2JQ£ Abingdon Town v 
United; Staines v Sievwnm Borough: Pegasus Juniors; Houtslow v Monte 
Tfeury v LeytorMMngatK Wa tton and Motors (3-Qfc Moraton Town v Thame 
Heraham v Wembley. Second dMatae United (3-0fc PerM v AMngdon Urfied; 
north: AvfltoyvVaudial Motors: Haringey Raynors Lene v Yale Town; Shortwood 
Borough vWofverton Town; Hemal Hemp- United r Supen 
Stead v Ratoham Town: Hertford Town v FaktaHl Town; 

Chesham Unfed OJO); Hornchurch v Sharpness. 

Wmw. Lefotwonh GC v Whmnhoe Town; SUS&X SaoOR CUP 
Royston Town v Cotier Row. Second Town v Burgess Mi Town 
Ovtelon south: Banstead Athletic vMevo- Heath v Cftchester Qr hddhurst and 
PoHcecChWont St Pater vWohteg; Easeboums United v Hassocks; 
Town v Eastbome UnfeS Oalmood v Newhaven; Saefoid Town v 
Unfed v Whytetaate; Horsham v Pacteam; Baraham v Utfla Common 
Egham Town: tfongwlonl Town v Sou- AJbfcr; WWi a h a wk v Staynfng: wick v 
(hA Newbury Town r Mctasar. H attfam Towa 
Patersaeld Unfed v Marlow: Rifefo SUSSEX LEAGUE: Rrat (flvtefon 
Manor V FtacfcwelHealh. UWaSwniptan Town v Three 

smrmmss LEAGUE: rnsm* dMatae peaceharen and Tatacombe v 
Banbury v Rushdon; Coventry Sportfog v YMCA; Portflaid v Landng. 

Fttest Graan; Gfoucestar v BiUgnortii; COMBINED COUNTtES LEAQUE: 
Grantham v Sulton CofcHtald; Htfeeowen mterdhtetaifSLflg Aah Unfed vCobham: 
v Mfe Oafo Kedfesford v Bfefon; Etour^ Qfobhem vcS^Bad: Fartefoh Rovorev 
bridge v W aB i nporeuoh; VS Rutty v Cove; Horiey Town v Malden Town (3Jft 
Moor Green. SMSMffloMatatAahfofdv Meretiiam v Weetfekl; vtigwa Wetar v 
Poole: Chatham v Cantamury; Dover v FrMy&wi 
Trowbridge: Dunstable v Anoo*er BULBING SCENE EASTERN LEAGUE: 
Gravesend and NorthKeai v Corint hia n , ' Brantham Athletic v Thotford: Bury v 
Huangs v Thenet; fUsllp v Tonbridge: CalchMter Unfed Reft Ctecton V 
Sheopey v Erith and Batvodere; Chatteris; % Oty v Lowestoft FetatOwe 
WaterioovVa v Dorchester; Woodford v v Wlabedn Harwelch and Parkeston v 
Burnham and Hfendan. Gortostan; Hteton v Great Yanaouift; 

(XNMryMATCfe&rtfnotiterlmd Marsh Town Unfed v TMm UnBedL' 

hom tar BMhi. NswmericWt v Sudbury: StOwmaricM v 

BULTff AflT LEAGUE Mtton v Hyde. Havertiffl Rovers; Watton Unfed v 

DRYBROUGH3 NORTHERN LEAGUE: Brsfotree. 

Ftrot ifivtefon: Bedtagton Terriers v 

werSatfia basketball 

SpemnmoarvSoutti Bank (3. IS). League CARLS8ETO NATIONAL LEAGUE: First 
Ccsk tiwcsnd round: Aahingfon v Crock; dw iw (UQe Blnrikw(ham Btoets v 
NorthaHartonvEaanfenfMS; Norton v Draper Toate Sofont Stare; HoneSpara 
Guteborough (T.*5): WWby v Ewndon. Bofenand Bury vBCP London; Happy 
NORTH- WETl COUNTTES LEAGUE; Rrat Eater BrMtneCPIratM V BPCC Oerty 
dhWawBusoougftvNetherfiettCurun Rama; HemeJ/Watfonj Royale v Leicester 
Ashton v Citheroe,- Eastwood Hanley v Riders. 

PenrfflK nutwood v Apetognn Sttnfay: Second dtieU: (HJft: aeamore Portv 
Mam vCongteton; Leek v Boofle; Leyiand Tower Hamlets; Swkidon Refers v CBS 
Motors vStaiybridge OeMe; RadcWfev SI Cwrturiora Cofoheaan Team WMaaB v 

Hatensr Rosaendate v VWnsford Lambeth T opetflt 

v Kirkby. NATtONALTTOWY: Rrsl roraxt OWham 

NORTTfiRN PREMIER LEAGUE CUP: CCttesvTF 

HflR Wtad, first fog; Borrow v South NATIONAL . — — 

Lwergooi; Horvrich v Choriey; MatioOt v (Women): BCP London * Avon Norttatnp- 

BuxtorcMosfeyvGoote. »n (8JJJ; Hemol/WSttoKl Ravels v Team 

NORTHERN PREMIER LEAGUE PoIksU Kknsan (&J3J; Typboo Hattera 
PREBDENTS CUP: nm retmd, am teg: SheKteJd v Oasiws SwttB Oerby (60V 
Burton v Wortangton; Morins v Gslns* 
bomimh; WorhGop v SouPport rciteAWV 

noptSehn cowries east leasue ... ^ TOCKct 

Premier tevtaxac Anmnofpe Weowe v LEAGUE: Preuiiar dMetom 

Bndlngtcn Tdnrv. Berner * CMan Cfovtfand Bombers v SoPhuB Borons 
BentbjVWvHarw^SnJIfogrxiTjwn tWOkOwjdw Rockets v Duttram 
v Long Eaton IMtsd: Bnga v Demtw PflRFfeHyersvWiMay Wantaa(7 % 
United; Emiayv Eastwood; F^rriey Celtic Noeteg^n Panthers v fauroyfla ld Rao- 
« Boston; POntohact Cate vSuoon Town; ^.^^^ ^amham .Rsa adn a y Ay r 
TtatideyvAftstaL 

NENE GROUP UNTIED COUNTIES S underiandjaitetefi ^torfordqtye&re 
irmnp PNnta' Mete* Bourne v v0teagowDwuwa|SOT;8loughJel»v 
DKtooighT WMr. pSS^ftregj^TWtoBl Tlgare 

FyneSjury v North a mp to n Spencer, v Medway Bears (Mi- 


Third (fivision 

Blackpool v Newport 
Bolton v York 


Bristol R v Doncaster — 

ChesterfleJd v Bury 

Fulham v Darfington 

Mldcflesbrough v Chester 

Notts Co v Bristol C — - 
P Vale v Bournemouth ~ 

Swindon v Carlisle 

Walsall v Mansfield 


Wigan v Gffingham (11-30) — — 

RUGBY UNION 

TOUR MATCH: Munster v Fqi Barbarians 
(at Umertck)- 
CLUB MATCHES 

AbertWery v Roadyn Park 

Birmingham v Bedford (2^5) 

Bristol v Abemon 

CantIfY Bangor— - ■ 

Cowntry v BtecklTaath 

Durham « Jedforest (SL30) — 

Q*w Vale v Swansea (£30} 

»v Stria 


v Exater. 

v Camborne. 


HaHlax v Liverpool St Un i o n s p-30) 

Harinfes v London Walsh (at Stoop 

MemGmQ 

'Headlngtey vMet Pofice(2L3Q) 

Leicestar v Sarsmw — 

Ltenett v Newport 


London Scottish v London Iftah (t J?- 

Lytiney y Pontypridd 

MaetRegv South WatesPoloa 

Moseley v Newbridge - 


Neath v Bath (2.30). 


Nortfiwnptor y Cambridge Unvy. 
Nottingham v Hawick. 





Scotland (230). 

Wasps v Goslorth (230) 

Waterloo v Wakefield (245). 

Warn Hartlepool v Loughborough Cdte 

(230) 

Westorvs-Mara v Cross Keys 

GIROBANK LEAGUE: North WMt Dh 

vtaioo 1; Lymm v Wktnes; West Park v 

Parte v Mfc' Cheehke 

teYiafoa&l 

ktegm ; Rochdale 
Sandbach * CakJy. Hortb dMatat 1: 
Coctannouih v Fumess; Thomtcn 
CteWlaya V Leigh. North dhrieton 25 
Creighton v Lancs Moor Hospital; St 
Banecflcc v Mkm West dMstea lx 
AspUl v Chester CBfega; Uoora v 
Sedaloy PbjV West dMsS>2: Choriey y 

St Mays; Hafton v Walaaey; Saltan v 

South LNarpeoL Eaat dhtefon t Da U 
K Uaccteefield v Ecctec 
Okteam vTocH^Entdhteta)2: Ashton- 

undeM.yne v MeewUc Bun v Greater 

Manchester Fn Sanfoe; Cforigiaton V 

Manchester YMCA; North Mandmatar v 

Crewe and NatiMdt. EM tevfaten te 

Alaafer v Botton; Bowden v DUdnlaid. 

SCWEPPSS WELSH CUft FMreaHt 

fiO^^fifoCT^SnSHIISTIBCT 

CHAMPIONSHIP: Anglo Scots v North 

end Udtenda (M RfomMnd. 230); Gtaa- 

gow v South (it Hughanden, 23). 
HORTtSK Bradkxd end 


BMavr 1 

rY , , win ■ P^Mkennarai 1 Mu < 

nw«o uwnopDfni 
UfflM; Ctedar Vtfe * Klrtty Lonsdale; 
Chaster v Otiay: Ceetamoun r 


Gtonop v Bfockpoot; Haas 

Edwardim; Ktegteey v Mane 

Kentfoi v vnmtow: uvatpooi 



r Otiay: Ceetamoun v Furrewc 

Davenport v Burton; Durham UnN v 

Hudderefeld; Fleetwood v Btaefcbum; 

‘ I tettan Moor v 

chaster Un!v; 

IlMvvNortii 

Soft Poto Manehfeter V Hamepool 

Row, New Brighton v BrougMon Pariq 
Northern v M a lay: North flanesdalB v 
Otthtfote OM AldwMm v St Hetana; CM 

Bedfcns v Davenport; Old In sto n te n a v 

Bureau; Rockfony v Mold; Raasandato v 

New^Se-WStow*: nutkfo Park v 

Parkanta»;Soumport v Rtdhfrc Vlckare v 

Keswick, Wantagion v B b B tert ia n s 
^ngan; Wrtodmn v 


RUGBY LEAGUE 
JOHN PLAYH1 SPECIAL TROFWfc Ptat 
round Wigan v Lead* (2.1^. 

LACROSSE 

BRHE NORTHEHN LEAGUE: Hasten 

Morsey v Bo a rdm an and Ecctea; -OJd 

St op ft j i k arq » St o c kp ort , Old Wacontena 
y Ota Hubnaiam; Omwon v Sate. 

BMNE S0UIMSM LEAGUE: &x*huret 

Hffl v Hanmstaad: Chtosaad * Cantandga 

Unto Loraon Unfv v Oxford Unto ftafoy v 

HANDBALL 

Laeuu- Liverpool y KKkby Sefoa 
Tryst TT’vsafididpXti. . y 


Fourth dhiision 

Cartfiffv Cambridge 
Exeter v Aldershot _ 
Hereford v Scunthorpe 


P 


Lincoln v Wolverhampton 

Orient v Tranmere — 

Peterborough v Preston - 

Rochdale v Torquay 

Wrexham v Swansea - — 


Scottish premier division 

Dundee v Clydebank 

Falkirk v Dundee Utd 

Hibernian v Hamilton — 

Motherwel v Aberdeen 

Rangers v Hearts — — 

St Mkran v Celtic 


Southern League 
Premier division 
Ahrechurch v Fisher — 
Aylesbury v Wfflenhafl .. 
Bedworfh v Reddtfich ~ 
Cambridge C v Corby 


Scottish first (Svimon 

Airdrie v Morton 

Clyde v Brechin , 


Dumbarton v Quean of Sth 

Forfar vE Ftfe 

K fc namock v Partick — _ 
Montrose v Dunfermline — 


Crawley v Basingstoke 

Dudey v Kings Lynn (at BBston) 

Fareham v Bromsgrove 

Gosport v Chelmsford 

Shepshed v Dartford 

Witney v Fofltestone 


Scottish second division 

Afloa v Albion 


Arbroath v Ayr — 

Berwick v Stranraer 


Worcester v Safisbury 

HOCKEY 

PIZZA Express LONDON LEAGUE: 

(2.15) Preretar efivtaon: Btackhsteh v 

Brenfey; Rawing v Slough; SwWon v 

Southgate. League: Cheam v St Afoana; 

HountMW v Maidenhood; Mid-Swrey v 


Cowdenbeath v E Stiffing „ 
Meadowbank v Stenhsmir . 

Queen’s Park v Raith 

Snt Johnstone v Stiffing — 


Tutse Hte v Purle^WBytxtdge Hawks v 
Be ckenham ; Wimbledon v Old 

Kfogatonlan. 

NOflWtoH UNION EAST LEAGUE: Pre- 
mier ffiv fe occ Bishop's Stanford v Fort; 
Skjeharts v Cembridga Oty; Hariestan 

Magpies w Broidxxxne; Ipswich v St 

Neats; NorltA Wanderers v Brentwood; 
Old LougMonians v Bury St Edmunds: 
Peterborough Town v Chekrelord; 
Westditi vdedtord- 

McEWAKTS LAGER SOUTH LEAGUE: 

Premier ttivbtan: Anchorians v Bognor; 

Chidwsnr y Trojans; Fhreham v Havant 

Gore Court v Ota Tauntonrans; Lewes v 

Tunbridge Wete; Indian Gymkhana v 

Eastcotur. Marlow v Lyons Oxford l 

v East Grtnstaad. MH 

Bucks and Oxok Aylestxjry 

Oxford; Gerrard* Cron v / 

Hayes * Hendon: Old Merchant Taylors v 

BractaaU: Pteytechnie v TMnirsc Read- 

jn^Unlv v Harrow Town Swans; Sunbury v 


VOLLEYBALL 

SSTi SgVSE^JSSR 

«w»? Patetey-Wfeteg^Si dfrtotag 
ghnta Sport I ylmberi Ladles; WHtaum 
to** v Oartuta; Team Scottish Farm v 
kwerdydo. 

OTHER SPORT 

BADNWiprrON: DOffet TownamteW 
(Po ole SC A mtMa Centro. Pootei 
foumnAMSM: Thart Ptero Bruce 

Monr GnxeyAucB AflHawl Stxwi^inplng 

I ndoo r event (9am) 

tCTBALL: wanq: Chfos tournament, 
(11 Xfc Engtaid v Austafia 0U». 

ROAD WALKMQr NatioraTMetYs 20km 
and Women's 10km Chsmpi 
Poflca Sports 


MkMMxyBaffcs. 
lashury * (Sty of 
ss v Amaraham; 


UK Open Tour- 

. AUtiCpiHtn). 

6 Welsh Open ToJ- 

namert (Part View. Wrexham); RAF 
Championships (RAF Dxbrfdge): 
HalTamahire Invitation Toumameot 
OtatemshtreTandSC,- 

SWnnUNGiEaaor ‘ 

CompvWone Rnaf 


TOMORROW 


TODAY LEAGUE 

KtaHSff3Cufileu8teMd 

First division 

Newcastfev West Hem (2^5). 

Third (fivision 

, Rotherham v Brentford 


HOCKEY 

'JEN’S COUNTY CHAMPIONSHP H 3 

Proi ta inm y rum& Smew v few ... 

''AC Bristol). OuariarmaaiK 



RUGBY UNION 
Bfoefcrd » Rymouth (3.0) 

RUGBY LEAGUE 
JOHN PLAYER SPECIAL TROPHYj Hrat 
rotted: Borrow v Runcorn (2-30) 
pool v Mterstield OJSOb CarSer 
ley; Doncaster r Hii KR 

vCBraaronLHaOtaxvWttMMa; LeUiv 

Rochdale (at HU KR. 43® Mynm v 
Swfanon t£3m: Salford v Ht* SltaflMd v 
Bramley; Warrington v Hunslet: 
Whtahawn v St Hawns (350); VAdnas v 
Dewsbury. 

STOtSS BfTTBt CHAMPfONSHte: fim> 

t»d dMstan; Huddersfield v York(3t30) 

BASKETBALL 

PRUDENTIAL NATIONAL CUP: Seta- 
fiwfefeta i mti h ^ a^ CafcfanMer 
era v Po r tanouti i (3.0); Tom 

CA^aBB^NATHfULLEI^r! 

oad dl trial ore lambetii Topcatt v Rm. 
mitti BaWwa 14 ID 

NATIONAL UBAGUE: ft * t Min 
( ewm w BL Lambeth Lady TocwativStock- 
port LOtetafe BJ* Awn ifertlwnpton v 
NoUn^wn VMMeate 

ICE HOCKEY 

HEMEKEN LEAGUBi Premfer 4M Stan 
Durham Wasp* v MurraylWd Resera 
“ tSofeuti Barons v Ayr Brutal (tiJto); 
r wertora vOunitoe Ffockatetesn. 


Sore Com 
ivWorcestar- 

i Loisue Centre. SL30L 

PIZZA EXPRESS LONDON LEAGUE: 
London Urterv 


COURAGE KBIT CUP tUMk AM 
retard: Heme Bay v Tuba fflh Asads v 
Gfacfcheatft. Second round: Maidstone v 
Rochester AGHnoham: Marten Russets 
v Old Bontentsns; Old WHamsontans v 
Setonoaks. 

UNDER *21 MATCH: Essex v Surrey 
(Casfe Park. Cofohfeter). 

WOMEN UNDER-ZI HATCH: KM V 
Essex (Orpington). 

handball 

fiWTIGH LEAGUE: BC "BZ v Bbtantaad 


Kirkcaldy K 

(R30 fctaa 


KaatnAivI 


Uons v 


Pirates v Richmond Rym . 
Southamploo Vtidngs v Gteago w 
angUfl. 


MDLANDS LEAGIE; Btaharhampton St 
Patera v German Tornados tt^liose- 
ttr B v atafenf oljnqpica (1J|. 

BKflJSH NATIONAL LEAGUE (Womm^: 
Salford v Riisfe Eagkn (Ufc Bedford 
Cofega woman's to um aman i tiSJJh 
Great Dana v H Naw o od Ram Great 
Dane v kfldtaid Nomads; Groat Dana v 

Wakefield Metros; Hafswood Rerun v 

MUand Nomads: Hal e w ood Forum v 

wakofleid Mama; Midland Nomads v 

WatofleW Mama. 

OTHER SPORT 

BADMJNTOifc Dorset Tournament (Pods 
SC Mndate Cenov, PooW. 

BNOCWBt TatwmslKCtaen Tour- 
nement. final stapea (Gu9d Hafl. Froetan). 
SQUASH RACKETS: Welsh Open Tbur^ 
n ament (Park View; Wraxhasaj; 
HaHamshhs fnvltatai Tuarasmaust 
(HafemsMro T and SC, ShaflUtft. 


REGIONAL TELEVISION VARIATIONS 


SATURDAY 


BBCIg SKSSSSvn, 


jtus-ut 

Weittier Close. NORTWBN KELANO. 
-ftLSB-unate News Haadloai and 
Waattiur;Cloaa. 

RfiC9 Aa B8CZ oatwork except 
^^foteawiaiJMaoin 



IWfekom ana ot today's tu> Pro- 
mer Laagoa matchaa. ifiS^iflfeai 
C ha repton'iiip Snooker. Continuing 
tin final of tha Tamenls United Klngdam 
Chanptaahfo. UK-1.W Weather. 
Oos&NOimewnELAKX4J»- 

5JB|« Norttam Inland Renta 
(part or Grandstand). &.1B-&20 News. 
105-1.1 Date Newshearenes and 
weather; CtonJBWANDL fi.1B&afl|M 
South A East (London -Sport. 

South A West (P^mouM- Qpottight 
Sport end New*. M Enatah n*- 
gtont— Regional ftaM and Sport 

ANSUAfijSSS^M. 

HJO-tZJO Jacksons IJOpm-2.15 
Scsracrowand Mrs Kk«lSaifom Maich- 
ing Prerisa. O u sedo w n. 


ANOJA tSSSSSSSio* 

135 

Famtog Otero 5JM 
Fafi Guy A004La0 Brtane 1ZN 
Talas from the Dartakla tz^tea Court- 
down to Christmas, Closedown. 

BORDER Ab London ex- 
■ MtU5te)«30 

Bortar Dtay LOfon-UO Farmtag 
OutookSJO*aScotaport12J» 
CtoGedown. 

CENTRAL 

( 530 Retbrn of tfe^fetopg UO- 


American Hero UOpmPlaaaeSjrt 

Cuffing ULD0 Cufeg Ofearo 
Cfoeedown. 

CEMTBAL{lSa^SSS£-. 

1UO-12AO Runaway Wand iJtopra 
Alrwolf Who’a The Boss 12J0D 

Ffflrc Berbarote tAOen Jobflnder 

Z-Mdosedown. 

£HANNELftCS3fl£~ 

worid 1 JUpre-2.15 Fel Guy 
taJOereriJO Ten Years at the Marquee. 
Closedown. - 

GRAMPIAN 

12JXJ UTO I^Opai Pteeee^IJSO- 
Z49 Curing tzMCtsting tMki 
Resections. OoMdowiL 

GRANADA gSkfiBSt 

12M Tmm IJBpreTSaortc 
Woman 2.15-2^» Dromns 10J» Bfo 
Matah IIjOO F»ic Stapes UMam 
Rock of the Seren t tes l JO Cfoeedown. 

HTVWEST 

12M UFO 12JMI tetatight Jazz 
T240BmCtosadowL 
tfTVWALjS «Hnv^ 

UUXfoB>-1 Id AndrewUoyd Wobbw 
story i-LHMZSObri Simon a Sknon. 

sottish 

Jayoe 4 the Wheeled warriors TLSH 
Victor and Maria tUfr'IUOr ' 


CHANNEL (5JSSSS*. 
S^BSSSSft. 
a^sssisfas?* 

GRAMPIAN *£82^ 


SJI0- 

aitaRtate^O^pho^ilJtaii Re- 
Itecflons. oosedown. 

GRANADA Aa London ox- 

SBSK -jeg^— 

Woortmctar 1.10 Munatera 1 Jw-ajn 

sksjss^isssss^ 

asEsass*^ 

HTVWEST 

ft» Cartoon 1 J»pa (sSSKfo 25 " 
1^-ZJIO What cSSSSSiS EL00 
^Yc^Languope &30 Who% the 

HTV WALES AsHTV 

West except 


Cuing UUfero Late CML 


isw ** 

11 JI5-1UI0 Crtpa &fifi Nawsxxt 
5.10 Bfoddasura fiMMIten 
IMtea Postscript, Closedown. 

ns 

UOpm-2.16 Fal Guy fiUOem Tan 
Yaare After 141 Company, Oosedown. 
TYNE TEES M Lond on 

festoon briand TTJMzISsp&nim 
L20p»B.U BfonfoWbrnn WOm Fb- 
eby of tin Peopia, Cfosedown- 


i tiw Chlpa ere Down. 

SCOTTISH Aa London ax- 

s as^S s^BBsa^ 

TSW *«^«toontog»pcftas- 

WWW *30 Gardaitt 

En-SSffilSEBJSat^ 

^sssrsiL^^ 


ULSTER lUtartUD 


Greatest American 
Haro USpteS fl P Sports Rasuls 
rtjfifi Arcade iSJOam Naas. 
Closedown. 

YORKSHIRE ^^mdon 


e xc ept 

11GM2jgD ftteMOf «)• ApM 
i JOpre-a.15 TUckof* Whch lino Feeti- 
vMMktUOMHUBMusfoBOK, 

S4C 1040m UMon World 

IIjOO W eek to PoUcatUS 
What fiia Papers &yiua Three 
Kaawn Shorts 1&S0 Raring 3.10 EquincK 
4.10 FIbn: The (hatch and Judy Man* 

8410 Gardeners' CManfer Roadshow 
M0 Naseer7Jte NweytUon 7AS 
Sfon A Ston 0-fS Bwitwm Bro ms y 
M aes Chwaraa ttJSSoap 11X8 
Arc Mandy-lZMtan Oosedown. 

SUNDAY 


iZSS-lAtaa NswaorvMHHI^ 
LAWL0JO-M9neUfo(ne.1<L2O- 

etternpfo^ipro 


iSSE 

SIS &vKSrh5&- 






' : 

""■• ^ 14 ?^ 

■ ' 

■ ■:;i^ 




THE TIM ES SATURDAY NOVEMBFP ?Q ioa & 

TELEVISION AND RADIO 

Edited by Peter Dear and Peter Davalle 


SUNDAY 


m 

".is 


• No two people who tune in 
to The Bnjat VuMy Pierfbr- 
HHUMC (BBC1,- 7.15pm) win 
have the same great expecta- 
tions. Shrewdly; the or- 
ganizers know this and build 
on it and, if tonight's show 
runs true to' pattern, we shall' 
all become Jack. Hornets, 

putting in our **"""** and 

pulling out a plum - or two. I 
look forward particularly to 
Victor Barge, unrivalled as a 
polished musical down; to 
Aled Jones, whose voice-break 
seems as faraway as even to 
FrankXarsorvtbc best tefler 
of Irish jokes I have ever 
heard; and to Ken Dodd, one 
of the last surviving purveyors 


( CHOICE 

of muse fan gusto. 

• Bestofthe movies: BBC2*s 
Godard doufate-bin of Defec- 
ttre (WW) and Alphavfife 
(11 -35pm). Aim! a reminder 
that Channel 4 shows the final 

— fix — ■■ 


(9.00pm) 

choice:Hector 
Macmillan s marvefloos Eng , 
hah. version of Holbere’s 
ramionary coinrdy Jeppe of 
(Radio 4, 
TOQpmXand the late Peter 
PGare’s With Great Pleasure 
(Radio 4,4.00pm) 

Peter Davalle 







■ rhe Ba&rrevfews Ma troops: The Thames TV series The 

^ World at War is repeated an Channel 4 (7J5pm) 




• '.V*'*: fe, 

<% 

‘iTab£ 

tae 5 * 
-"*** * 

: ** 

■ ■-'iniaifc 

• M fe 

. : aJI it 


835 The Huppot Babies. 
9L00 Saturday 

managed by Mike Read 
Among tlte customers are 
Dr Who (Colin Baker! nod 
wMammel expert, Chrts . 
Hen wood who has advice 
on keeping dwarf 
hampsteraaspets. 

12.15 Grandstand introduced by 
Desmond Lynam. The 
Bna-up is: 1230 Footbal 


Bne-upte; 1Z20FoottMdi 
hen wltf) Bob WBson; 
12<40 Cricket the Second 
Test from Perth; 1235, 
1^230 FtockShom 

1.10 News sutimary and 
weather; 140 and 2.15 
Snooker the first seven - 
- frames of the final of the 
Twnents United Kingdom 

2SSSgg& 15 

NMimfl 1 England v 
Rugby League: The John 


230 FBok Once Upon a 

Honeymoon* (1942) 

Ginge r Rogers. Comedy 
drama about a rado 
“^respondent in wartime 
Wenna who saves a gold- 

. Leo McCarey. 

3 - 50 Sctaoleftom introduced 


635 TV-mb introduced by 
RWwd Keys. Weather ar 
^“**^730; and 

7J0 

includes a visit to London 
Zoo and guests, pop 
gram Doctor and toe 


0PTKMS 




^ r 

■ 


Excwkgk 


__ ' i5 


match between Wig an and 
Leeds; 435 RnaJ score. 

536 News with Moira Stuart 
Weather. 5.15 

* — Spcrt/Redonal news 

530 Doctor Who. The 

penultimate episode of the 
adventure, Trial of a T&ne 
Lord. (Ceefax) 

645 ABCreatwes Gnat and 
Smalfc The Lord God 
. Made Them ML ft is 1947 
and after demobfflsatton 
James Herriot returns to 
Darrowby and hia wife and 
young son. 

640 Every Second Counts. 
Comedy quiz show 

7.15 

Performance from the 
Theatre Royal, Drury 
Lane, before The Queen " 

■ Mother accompanied by 
the Duchess of York and 
Princess Alexandra with 
Angus Ogihry. Stars from 
Uww^td^emrtakimnl 
cnebrata 50 years of 
television, introduced by 
SueLawtey. Among those 


440 Champioasbto Snooker. 
Framraowto seven In 
K’e^ofttwTflnnents 

6-15 (nto^^!^d%BCIutk. 

Trophy, introduced^ 

*** ^^^^SdTert 
rodfcBo^imroduces 
™9W*gMs of the second 

7.10 Newn^w with Moira 

T^ISSSSHSZ S 8 ^- 

Presented by RusseS 
Davies. FHm: Round 


625 No 76 Fun and games fc 

KCS. 

»«.2SSSB5SSi. ta 

and Jimmy review the 
*eek*s1ocrtbafl news. 
1230 (Mefnatforaf Athletics. 
The McVitie’s Challenge 
Crosscountry. 

130 Chips. Ponch and Bobby 

inuft ri i nalM nab. nf Huti 


weapons hijackers 2Lli» 
Plean Sir. John Alderton 
is the harassed form 
master of an unruly class (r) 
245 International Boxing from 
Latchmere Leisure Centra, 
London, introduced by 
Dickie Davies. A light I 

welterweight bout I 


between Tony McKenzie 
and Fbni FfrabaB 


.-v*' 

TJi :y y 


are Victor Borgs, the Wtof 
tt» night apparently. Marti 
* Webb, PBter Ustinov, Alad 
Jonas, toe Peking Opera, 
Victoria Wood, and, you've 

g uessed it, Tarry Wpgan. 
Also featured are toe caste, 
■ . from the musicals, 42nd 
Street and CharBe GW, 
and the Ptoes and Drums 
oftoelstBattaflon The . 
King's Own Scottish 
Borderers, (continued 
after toe news) 

640 News and Sport. With 
Stuart weather. 

655 Royal Variety 

Porforaiance continued. 
1620 approximatBiy 

Championslifo Snooker. 
Frames eight to 14 of the 

Tenneote Dnfted Kingdom 

i^ssssr^ ■ 




Davies. Htoe Round 

talks to Bemad Tavernier 
who wrote the screnptay: 
Dexter Gordon who stars; 
and fterbie Hancock who 
imposed the score; 
TTreatre: Richard Eyre s 
world stage premiere of 
Cole Porter's screen 
musical, High Society, at 
kwfcstarfsHaymarket 
Theatre, starring Natasha 
Richardson, Stephen Rae, 
and Trevor Eve. 

M0 West Coast Story. The 
first of three progra mm es 
about the music of 
. . CaSfomla. 

665 HtocDetoctivs (1985) 

stamngNathabeBa^and 
Johnny HaMday. A ^ 
*onflw«vchaekthriBer 
about a detective who 
continues on a murder 
rasa that lost him his job. 

He returns to toe hotel 
where toe crime took 
P|ace and observes toe 
other ojests in order to 
solve me mystery. 

Directed tw Jean-Luc 
Godam (subtitled) 

135 nKAIphavte»-(i9S5) 
starring Eddie 
Conrtwifine, Anna Karina, 
and AWm Tamiroff . A 
humorous tribute to 
American gahgster Hms 


nreight 
Rocky 
■own; and 
ontest 

— "--a Reason 
and Bash AS. 

445 Results Service. 

530 News with Anne Leuchars. 

535 Wnrthim M. 

535 TSSSS^The final 
episode of the three part 
story and Murdock 
recruits Frankie Santana 
to help him free hte three 


630 B&to Data. A 

look at what r 


happen 


of a atmr detective, 
Lermy Caution, who 
crones space to a dty 
mledtaan aWmowing 
computer in order to track 
down a Professor Von 
Braun. Directed by Jean- 
Luc Godard. Ends at 130L 


when boy meets ctirL 
7.15 Bestfie** About Jeremy 
Beattie plays practical 
Jokes on insuspectirKi 
members of the pubfc. 
746 Tim Price is HgntGame 
show. 

645 News mid sport. 

SUD0 Unratmaf Causes: 
Window, Sir, Robert 
Stephans, John Cater and 
Arm Mfchefl star in tote 
fate of a pmr of barbers 
with murder in mfnd, as 
has Morved, their 
■ charlady. (Oracle) 

! 1030 LWT News headDnea 
j- followed Stripes 
(1981) starring Bffl Murray, 
i tefo kl Rerrts, and Wisnen 
Cates. Comedy about a 

ffiSWKT” 0 

group of raw and regretful 
rocnits. Directed ty Ivan 
Reitman. 

*1230 Dtaance at Work. Richard 
„„ in concert. 

12-30 Stta c ial Squad. A gold 
bitfon robbery is fofled by 
toe Squad, amt the 

ringleader of the thwarted 
gang hires a hit-man to kffl 
Anderson. 

1.15 Wjtot Thoughts. 


625 AftMStlon of Econoofee. 

Part seven, (r) 930 4 What 
ft’s Worth. (rtitL20 The 
Heart of die Oregon. Part 
seven - the everyday He of 
a peasant tarr y in rural 

SSE25S£- M,1 - W 

ac'- 

1230 Channel 4 Radiig from 
Sandown Park. Brough 

Srattk^xJucestoeToa 

1^6 235 and 235 races. 

600 FMe Enchantment* (1940) 
starring David Niven. A 
romantic comedy about an 
okl general who recounts 
the foofish errors of Ms 
love Gfs in the hope that 
hte great-niece mH not 
mate the same mistakes. 

- ™ frvf rw Rote- 

430 FDm: Guernica* (1950) A 
oetebrated documentary 
d»ut toe thinking behind 
Rcasso’s famous, 

Guernica. Directed by 
AUriResntes. 

5 t Sra^! 0 * ,a, 

Contributions from users 
of the new video box h 
Ywk, and from those in 
^sgow and London. 

630 The Great Ausbaffan Boat 
Race. The etimination 
series of races for the 
America's Cup. 

730 News summary ana' 
weather followed by 7 
Day*. Robert Keefe in toe 
chafr as Methodist 
rotebter Peter Timms, who 
has known Myra Hindley 
for four years, expresses 
the view that toe time has 
gome for forgiveness and 
that she should be released. 

730 TheKhaneof Psidetmi-A 
Squash Dynasty. A 
documentary about the 
amazing femfly from 
Pashawar who have ruled 
the roost of squash for 35 
years. 

830 Redbrick. Part nine of the 
series about a year in the 


656 PteySraooL 9.15 Motniag 
Worship. The first of four 
masses from the Parish of 
Bteddrters, Oxford. 

nsas UMnmd. (rt 1035 


930 Ceetex 945 Open 
University. 

1035 BbiaPetar.M 
1130 The Qrikfrsn Of Green 
Knowe. Part one erf a four- 


Yoga, (r) 1130 lUit 

tHESST/J? 11 * 45 

12.10 SteDBrim^^etarian 
Kitchen adapted for toe 
heartog impaired 1235 

»fesa ,he 


130 This Week Nmd Week. Is 
America going cool on 
Nato? With Casoar 


Frames IS to21 of the 
final of the Tennents UK 


University. (Oracle) 

6M Paradise Postponed. The 
final episode, (r) (Oracle) 
1600 HH Street Blues. 
Swgeant Esterhaus 
departs for that prectoct in 
foe sky. (Oracle) 

1130 Who Dares Wins. Off-beat 
comedy show. 

1145 Six of Hearts. Part three 
of foe six-programme 
series on toe diversity of 
gayfifa. 

12.45 The TWSght Zone: Deed 
Han's Shoes* A tramp 
steals a pair of shoes from 
a dead gangster and 
tfiscovers that they have a 
mind of their own. 

Wtowed byNotitingbi 
the Doric* Robert Bedford 

S£S^S Mp * rsto,n 

ogmaturaLEndsat 


5.10 Domesday, rat two of the 
five- pro gr amm e series 
written and presented by 
Michael Wood tracing the 
story of England and the 
Engfish. Among the places 
he visits is a small form 
that has been run by 
generations of the same 
family since at least toe 
end of the 13th century. 

530 David Coppertiald. 

Episode seven and David 
has folen in love with the 
daughter of hte employer. 
(Csefox) 

630 KJlMnebC&ffMichelmore 
and Maggte Phibki with 
the latest charity news; 
and Paul Heiney appeals 
on behalf of The^ 
Merseyside Council for 

WfMthnr 

640 Songs of Praise from the 
parish church of St John 
toe Baptist, Cirencester. 
(Ceefax) 

7.15 Twenty Years of the IWo 
Ronnies. Heights from 
two decades ofthe 
fri^fuly comic associ a tion 
between Messrs Barker 

__ and Corbett (Ceefax) 


« bi^MBi^ton's story. (r) 

1130 WtortodL Chris Serte 

detves into the archives to 
find films about toe sea 
and ships. 

1230 No Limits. Rock magazine 
programme, this week 
fowl Stoke-on-Trent (rt 

140 Rugby Special Highfights 
of Uaneui v Newport. 

230 The Week in the Lords. 
The week's proceedings In 
the House of Lords. 

^^■sai^sr 8 

Welland and Brian Glover. 
EJeven-year-old Bffly finds 
an escape from hte 
himdrimi life In the north 
of England and the did 
routine of school when he 
takesaftedgefingfroma 
kestrel's nest and starts to 
train the bird. Directed by 
Ken Loach. 

430 Music in Camera. Mayumi 
Fujikawa(viokn) and toe 
Scottish Chamber 
Orchestra ptey Mozart's 
Vrofin Concerto in g(K 
136). 

535 Cricket Second Test 
Highlights of the third 
day's play. 

530 Thinking Aloud. If ft* 
employment is a thing of 
the paw, how wfil the 
future look? Michael 
tanatteff chairs a 
discussion on the topic 
between John Lloyd, Jean 


C choice ) 

• It is. presumably, BBC 
Television’s celebration of its 
50th anniversary that gave the 
Corporation the incentive to 
stage tonight's spectacular ex- 
ercise in navel contemplation, 
Jdf***® <» TiM (BBC2, 
B.ospm). The charges that will 
be laid a gainst The Bent - and 
answered — during this in- 
quiry arc exactly the ones you 
would expect does TV 
encourage real-life violence? 
Is it a threat to children and 
the family ? Does TV ac- 
curately reflect what is 
happening in the world at 
te^ge, or merely distort the 

655 TV-am begins with Sunday I 
Comment; 730 Are You J 
Awake Yet?; 73S Wac I 

Extra. f 

830 David Frost on Sunday. I 

The guests are Barry I 
McGulgan and Mel Caiman. I 

935 Wake Up London. 930 

series. I 

1030 Krazy Kitchen. A 
young person's gidde to I 

cooking. I 

1615 Against 0 m Odds. I 

Pwneer aviator Amela f 
Eertmrt is the first subject f 
in a series about people 
who achieved success f 

against adversity. 1030 I 
The Adventures of Black I 
Beauty, (r) i 

1130 Morning Worship. Mass I 
from St Comgairs Church, | 
Bangor, Co Down. | 

1230 WeMtond Wbrid. Whatwtil 
toe Iran fiasco mean to the J 
future of toe United | 
States's leadership of the I 
West? 130 PoBce Five I 
1.15 The Smurfs, (r) I 
130 Getting On. is the removal I ; 
of a sick old person to a I 
home or a hospital without I 
ttieir permtesfon an J 

mfringement of dvU 1 


image ? The knowledge that 
disputation will continue long 
after the jury of 500 viewers 
have returned their verdicts, 
will tend to lessen the signifi- 
cance ofthe “trial” as a trial, 
but the list of litigants 
rounded up for the hearing is 
impressive. 

• Bes t of the rest; the re-run of 
Jeremy Isaacs' monumental 
documentary series The 
World at War (Channel 4, 
7. 1 5pm), Ken Loach's rough- 
grained tear-jerker Kes (BBC2, 
3.00pm), and The Natural 
World, a veritable A to Z of 
the elephant (BBC2, 7.15pm) 

P.D. 


CHANNEL 4 


935 Sunday East Among the 
items Is a discussion on 
why there Is a dearth of 
Asians in fifstdass cricket 
to Yorkshire. Fbflowed by 
Deewarain. Drama serial 


between John Uoyd, Jean 
Miter. Ray PaM, and Dr 
Madsen Aie. 

630 The Money Programme. 
The GECv Boeing battle to 
supply the RAF with the 
Early Airborne Warning 


The conckxfinasessbn of 
the final of the Tennents 

930 The Singiisg Detective. 
Part three of Dennis 
Potter's six-episode film 
with music starring 
Michael Gambon as PNCp 
Marlow. (Ceefax) 

1035 News with Moira Stuart 
1620 Everyman: The Mracie of 
Intervale Avenue. A 
profile of a small Jewish 
community who worship to 
a synagogue situated in 
the deprased Bronx 

The dostogframes of too 
final of toe Tennents UK 
Championship. 

1235 Weather. 


7.15 The Natural Worid: The 
Etepbant Challenge. A 
documentary, Hmedhy 
Mike Hard in several 
Af rican c ountries, that 

e^hflSstor^^^ by 
poachers and the 
ancroachtog cultivation of 
their natural habitats. 

835 Television on Trial, 
chaired by Anna Font 
Lawyer raid Sleghart 
cross-examines a cross- 
section of celebrities, 
speoaBsts and parents, on 
three matters of concern- 
tv and vlotence; tv and toe 
DwraiBnd tv and values. 

1620 Hm: Foxes (1979) 


’ ,’l 


News an the 




Scott Baio. Four American 
tsenage girts leave home 
and set-up house together 
to Los Angeles. Their 
journey to adulthood te 
fraught with 
disappointment and 
heartbreak. Directed by 
Adrian Lyne. Ends at 
1616 








works by Glinka 






Fri tP i 1 'i 1 I - 


WORLD SERVICE 




230 LWT News headlines 
followed by The Human 
Fbctor. Economist and 
country vicar. Robert Van 
da Weyer, predicts 

hfossive unenmtoyment 

over the next 25 years but 

befleves an obscure 

btoficaltext provides the 
solution. 

230 The Big Match Live. 

_ Newcastle v West Ham. 
430 The Return of the 
Antelope. Adventures of 
three Victorian LiBiputians. 
530 BuBseye. 

530 Suxlay Sunday. Gloria 
Hertford's guests include 
Omar Sharif, Victoria 
Wood mid Vera Lynn. 

!H5 ?!yy» | ef fo Anii fl Leuchars. 
640 Highway. Sir Harry visits 
Loch Lomond. 

7.15 CMkTs Play wfih Liz 
Fraser and Lionel Jeffries. 
745 F9 re Jaws 2 (1978) 
starrtngRoy Schemer. 
M»tm Brody, pofica chief 
of Amity, befeves the 
resort is about to be 
menaoedagainbya . 
deadly Shark-Directed by 
_ JeannotSzwaro. 

945 News. 

1030 Room at the Bottom. 

„„ Comedyseries (Oracle) 
1030 The South Bank Show. 
Christopher Bruce’s new 
bafiet, The Dream is Over, 
rased on JohnLermon's 
fits. 

11.30 LWT News headHnes 
fofiowed by Symphony. 

The work of conductor 
Richard Hlckox. 

1230 Stop the World. A 

dooimentary about six 
young men's hardships in 
Inara's frozen nor*. 

1230 Mglit Thoughts. 


r t * 


laoofgr^rjsr 

Items on toe controversial 
Contras funtfing; the 
FaWands; and British 
companies cfisJnvestment 
„ _ m South Africa. 

1130 Worzei Gummidge. (r) 
1130 The Waltons 1230 
The Tube (r) 230 Pubs 
Eporaratetorchfldrea 
230 FDm: ChaadnMekha* 

I (1948) A costume drama 

| about two brothers, one a 

good prince, the other evfl, 
who are waging a battle 
for control of akingdom 
and for the hand of a 
country maiden, in Hindi 
with Engtish subtitles, and 
directed by S3.Vasan. 

445 World AHve: SpafeL^ 
Polecats, (i) 

615 News sranmary and 
weather toflowed by The 
Business Programme. 
Dermot Mumaghan 
in vestig ates the exporter's 
nightmare -how to raise 
short-term finance to 
cover cashflow until the 
customer coughs up. 

630 American FoattrtL Los 
Angeles Raiders at the 
San Diego Chargers; plus 
a proffle of quarterback 
Jim Plunkett 
7.15 The World at War. 

Programme one of the 26- 
part documentary series, 

MVWktMal k.. I—.— 


Isaacs, first shown almost 
13 years ago, tracing the 
history of toe Second 
Worn War. The narrator is 
Laurence Ofivier. (Oracle) 
615 Mozart's Piano Concerto 
No 21 in C Malar 


performed by Marta Joao 
Pires with the DRS 
Television Chamber 
Orchestra, conducted by 

Matthias Bamert 
845 Thera’s No 

Discouragement A 
biographical documentary 
to mark the 80th birthday 
of Sk Richard Adand. 
(Oracle) 

945 RhicHaB (he Conquering 
Hero* (1944) starring 
Edcfie Brackish, a satirical 
comedy about a United 
States marine who is 
invalided out of the service 
because of ffl health, is too 
ashamed to toil his family, 

S along with the 
the Is a hero 
eventuaBy returns 
to his home town. Directed 


1135 CrMaBey. Mickey Rooney 
stars as a debt-ridden 
private detective, 

. desperate for any case to 
ease his cash-flow 
problems, (r) Ends at 
1235. 







WORLD SERVICE 






3E 




S I 


4" S'S.TS!!): © Stereo on VHF. 

S D News; Morning Has 

730 News. 7.10 Sunday 
Papers. 7.15 Apna Hi 
Glw Samajhiya 745 Bels. 
730 Turning over New 
• [Sf^L^wrathen Trawl 
830 News. 8.10 Sunday 
Papers. 8.15 Suntfay 

piisSr 

Rabbi Lionel Blue. 8^1 
Weather; Travel 
830 News. 8.10 Sunday 

8.15 Letter Ftom America by 
ABstairCooke 

“!S££r a 


uwdn) 

10.15 The Archers. Omnibus 
edition 

11.15 Pick or the Week. 


from lest week's 


12.15 Desart Island Discs. 
^HawmomTitor. 

waattter V 

130 The World This 


News. 135 

230 te^^rdenBrs’ 

„ Question Time 

Bernard Price and Lady 
VlctOflaLaatham answer 
jjsteners questions, 

«0 

Programme with Derek 
Cooper 

430 The tstedural History 
Programme. Fergus 
jteeyg finds out why we 
Em grf ^teatwormsfi) 

530 News; Travel 

535 Down Your Way. Brian 

Johnstone^tsBudeto 

6o» NSsr*” #SMwnB 

615 Actiiafity (new series). 
ranyouiMUverpudteftt 
leave for Sew York and 
goorarah they ware batac 
home 

730 Pendente by Thackeray. 

600 Bookshelf. Susan Wilis 
^30 AwSdmSteways. 


mfM 


Feaver and Dr Jonathan 

Steinberg ni 

axwersation with Brian 
Redhead 

9.00 News; A Matter of 
Honou- by Jeffrey Archer 

830 Law in Action. Presented 
liLOO News 

1615 TTie Sunday Feature: A 
Palace for toe People. 

The story of the Crystal 
Palace which was 

SheAe Cassidy 

11*15 In Committee. The work 
of Partiarnanfs s o J a ct 
Committees 

1230 NewsjWaather. 1233 

VHF in England and 

S Wales only) as above 
except 535330am 
Weather, Travel. 7.10- 
730 Open untvaraitE 7,10 
Technology; values 730 
Into toe Open. 430>530 
Options: 430 Museum 
Choice. 430 Oaks and 
Aeoms 530 Employment 


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44 


SATURDAY NOVEMBER 29 1986 


THE^m TIMES 


SPORT 


Fust published m 1785 


* * * * ** 



A broadside from Broad 


shows 
Athey 
correct 

Allan Bonier, the captain of 
Aastralia, was involved in an 
angr y e xchang e with BflJ 
Athey doing the first day of 
play in the Test match yes- 
terday. Border was convinced 
Englis h batsman had 
edged a delivery on its way 
through to the wicketkeeper. 
Ton Zoehrer, and joined in a 
load appeal. But Athey, who 
had made 26 at the time, stood 
his ground and the umpire, 
Dick French, refused to con- 
firm the appeal 

Athey’s opening partner, 
Chris Broad, said afterwards; 
“Border went up to BOl and 
said: ‘Yon — - hit that 1 Bill 
sai d he hadn't and the TV 
replays we watched later 
proved there was no contact.” 

Broad, after his fust Eng- 
land century, said: “I don't 
think I’ve ever hit the ball in 
the middle of the bat so often. 
“I felt at ease all the way 
through. Even when I was in 
the 90s, 1 was surprised bow 
relaxed I felt” 

Broad has looked in good 
form all tour, but has struggled 
to turn good starts into big 
scores. “Everything seemed to 
go right today,” he said. “The 
wicket did not do a great deal 
bat I don't feel we were put 
under a great deal of pressure 
to start with by the Australian 
bowlers. I've felt in good nick 
all tour.” 

Broad had words of sym- 
pathy for Athey, who fell just 
four nms short of three fig- 
ures. “1 was very disappointed 
for Bill. He played weU and 
was extremely determined,” 
Broad said. The Nottingham- 
shire batsman is determined to 
carry on where he left oft: 
“Tomorrow we must start 
again, knuckle down to it and 
carry on with the job. But 
tonight 1 shall have a good 
meal and a few drinks to 
celebrate.' 

•Abs*; 


Frmn John Woodcodc, Cricket Correspon d ent, Perth 



Borden proved wrong 


Nothing has been more to 
the liking of England's bats- 
men. last year or this, than 
Australia's bowling. Against 
West Indies, India and New 
Zealand they have usually 
been pushed to reach 200. 
Against Australia they go to 
town. . 

Yesterday, in the second 
Test match. England won the 
toss and reached 272 for two. 
Broad and Athey making a 
real name for themselves by 
scoring 223 together, the 
fourth highest partnership for 
England's first wicket against 
Australia. 

Until now, England’s best 
start in the 10 first-class 
innings of the tour had been 
16. If Athey had been caught 
at second dip off Chris Mat- 
thews when he was three, it 
would still not be many more. 
But Border put down the 
shoulder high two-handed 
chance, whereafter England 
never looked back. They* had a 
wonderfully good day. 

At the same rime, it is bard 
to think that Australia, the 
oldest and grandest of our 
rivals, can ever have bowled 
any worse in the first session 
of a Test match than they did 
yesterday. They were simply 
all over the place. Nerves 
played a part, they must have 
done. 

After a long struggle against 
injury. Lawson has yet to 
convince himself that he is 
still a Test match bowler and 
Matthews, playing in his first 
Test on his home ground, has 
done nothing yet at this leveL 

In six of their last seven Test 
matches against Australia. 
England have had totals of 
more than 400, and they 
should do so again today, 
despite the loss in quick 
succession yesterday, with just 
over an hour to go, of Athey. 
when only four runs short of 
his first Test hundred, and 
Lamb. Broad, suit there with 
146 not out, played most 
admirably, some of his on- 
driving being uncommonly 
good. 

There is a certain steadiness 
about Broad, that of a man 
who knows his mind, and is 
not given to missing such a 
goiden opportunity as this. To 
the end of a cloudless day, of 
hoi sun and tempering breeze, 
he retained his composure. No 
shot that he played was better 
than the cover-drive in the last 
over that brought him his 23rd 
boundary. 


As is to be expected of a 
pitch that is not yet two years 
old, the bounce is already 
uneven. I doubt, in feet, 
whether even Lindwall and 
Miller or Lillee and Thomson 
would have got a lot out of it 
yesterday morning, but it 
would have been nice for 
Border to. have had someone 
to find out what good seam 
bowling would have achieved, 
or genuine speed. 

The pick of the Australian 
bowlers was Reid, who took 
the two wickets to fell and 
made the ball bounce enough 


Scoreboard 

ENGLAND: Rrat htrtngs 
B C Bread not out . 


C W J Athey b Red — ~~ 
A J Lamb c ZOehnar b Roid . 
■MW Gatling not out — 


146 
.88 
_ O 
_ 11 
. 19 


Extras (B> 5. w 3, nb 1 1 ) 

Tota 12 wKts) 

O l Gower. I T Botham. |C J Richards. J E 
y. P A J DeFretes. P H Edmonds 


272 


Emburey. 
and G RC 


fOifey total. 

FALL OF WICKETS; 1-223. 2-227. 
BOWLING: Lawson 20-S-65-0: C D Mat- 
thews 19-4-68-0: Rent 206-494: Waugh 
18-4-46-0; G n J Matthews 160-49-0. 
AUSTRALIA: -A R Border. 0 C Boon. 0 M 
Jones. G F Lawson. G R Marsh. C O 
Matthews. G R J Matthews. B A Reid. G M 
Ritchie, SR Waugh. TJ Zoehrer 
Umpires: P McConnefl and R French. 


after tea to suggest that 
Lindwall et ol. might, after all, 
have made it a difficult morn- 
ing for the batsmen. 

After Australia had left out 
Sleep, which was disappoint- 
ing. Lawson started with his 
best over of the day. in which 
he beat Athey twice with balls 
that left the bat. For the next 
20 minutes or so. the batsmen 
could not have reached a lot of 
what was bowled to them even 
if they had wanted to. 

Only the indulgence of the 
umpires kept the wides in 
single figures. Lawson was 
soon almost as erratic as 
Matthews, his opening 
partner. 

Once, surprised by a 
straight ball. Athey must have 
been close to leg before to 
Matthews. There was also the 
life he was given at slip. When 
Reid bowled he was tidy, 
though not as testing as later 
in the day; Waugh hit the 
middle of the bat 

I fell sorry for Border. His 
selectors had given him noth- 
ing like the best bowlers at 
their disposaL If you doubt 
that ask the Englishmen who 
got rolled over by New South 
Wales last weekend. It was not 
long before Broad was work- 
ing the ball through the leg- 
side and easing through the 
covers. 


After his early alarms Athey 
set his sights rather lower. It 
was not until well into the 
afternoon that he found his 
scoring touch. When Athey 
was 26 the Australians 
thought he was caught at the 
wicket off Waugh and they 
told him so. Athey took little 
notice: 

Ax lunch England were 93 
for no wicket, Broad 46, Athey 
30. Between lunch and tea 
Broad made 50 to Athey’s 41 
Broad could have been caught 
and bowled reaching his SO 
when Lawson dived forward 
in his follow-through. 

Normally a safe hooker, 
Athey foundthe stroke hard to 
rime: off one such shot he 
brought a diving attempt at a 
catch out of square leg. But 
once through the 40s Athey 
became a different player. 
Criticized in the first Test for 
not taking his bowlers in hand, 
Border was again a somewhat 
brooding figure. 

Broad's hundred came five 
minutes after tea, in the 62nd 
over. By now. with some fine 
back foot strokes through the 
covers, Athey was also 
advancing on his century. 
Then, suddenly, he was not, 
Reid having bowled him with 
an inswinger. With 77 in 
England's first innings at Bris- 
bane, and now 96, Athey is 
pulling behind him his early 
failures. 

Lamb came in next, though 
Gauing had said on Thursday 
that he would be doing so 
himself. After Broad and 
Athey were well on their way 
yesterday. Gatting and Lamb 
took it in turns to have their 
pads on, and Lamb was 
holding the parcel when Athey 
was oul In the event he 
survived for only five balls, 
the last bouncing more than 
most and having him caught 
at the wicket 

Gatting was half-an-hour 
getting on the mark, surviving 
in the process a close call for 
leg before from Matthews to a 
ball that kept low. Gatting and 
Broad also had six overs of the 
second new ball to negotiate, 
which, with Reid being given 
it was better used than the 
first. 

At the end. Englishmen, 
players and writers alike, were 
prepared to forget, because the 
day had gone so well, that they 
each had a building site in 
which to get padded up or 
written up. But by the time we 
are here next in the New 
Year, the facilities win, I am 
sure, be among the best 


■ .... ' 



JnbDaat grim Broad celebrates his centay against Australia 


Davis surges 

to big lead 
over Higgins 

By Sytoey Frisian 

Spoaaiois gave Alex Hit- Foukis - winner of the BCE 


gms plenty of support ogam 
yesterday Define be began his 
Tennents UK semi-final at the 
Guild Hall, Preston, against 
Steve Davis, the title-holder 
and world’s Ha !. But all the 
support for Higgins could not 
prevent Davis from taking a 
commanding 6-1 lead at th e 
interval of the 1 7-frame 

Davis, who had said some 
tin» ago that applause for the 


international tournament, 
whose game has improved 
enormously after he joined 
Barry Hearn's team of pro- 
fessionals, launched his 
counter-offensive with breaks 
of 75 and 53 against 49 and 32 
by pamra in the two previous 
frames. . . 

Parrott regaining the mma- 

tive, built on early advantage 
in the fifth frame and with a 
break of 38 won it con vine- 


him to greater endeavour, himself m higher gear and 
looked more composed than 
he did against Tony Drago 
whom he defeated 9-8 in a 
tense finish. 

The afternoon was reported 
to be a sell-oat for yesterday’s 
match but the searing accom- 
modation was about two-third 
full, slightly more than the 
previous (fey when Higgins 
played Wayne Jones. 

Davis, intent on giving 
Higgins as little encourage- 
ment as possible, adopted a 
policy of consolidation. He 
went so far ahead in the first 
frame that at the end of it after 
inadvertently knocking the 
pink into a pocket he left 
Higgins only with an opportu- 
nity for potting practice, for 
which he was generally 
applauded. 

Higgins, replying with a 
break of 55 and a clearance of 
36, levelled at 1-1, eventually 
to go 1-3 down, Davis having 
cooly compiled a break of 79 
in the fourth frame. 

A gallant fight back by 
Higgins in the next frame 
ended with an abortive at- 
tempt to pot the yellow into a 
corner pocket with die help of 
the rest, whereupon Davis 
despatched all the colours to 
go 4-1 ahead. Soon he was 5-1 
in front supported by a break 
of 81. 

There was little Higgins 
could do to contain Davis who 
took control of the seventh 
frame with a break of 45 and 
the rest of the afternoon’s play 
became a formality. 

On the ad joining table the 
Londoner Neal Foulds, aged 
23, cancelled out a 2-0 lead by 
John Parrott, 22, ofLiveipooL 
Next week they will pool their 
resources as partners in the 
Hofmeister World Doubles 
championship. The occasion 
was exceptional for Parrott 
who had not been in the semi- 
final of an open tournament 
since January 1984 when Da- 
vis beat him 5-4 in the Lada 
Classic. 


Neither player at this stage 
had achieved mastery but as 
the afternoon’s play drew to a 
dose Foulds, after making up 
a lot of ground, ended a break 
of 46 by snookering himself 
behind the pink. Parrott was 
unable to take advantage of 
the chance he bad on the 
yellow and Foulds went into a 
4-3 lead. 

Wayward genius of 
snooker, page 41 

Parrott, who had defeated 
Tony Knowles 9-4 on Thurs- 
day night, had given earlier 
indication of his return to 
form by beating Higgins 5-2 in 
the qualifying round of the 
Mercantile Credit Classic, 
from which a number of the 
world’s leading players have 
bean fHminfltwt This event 
will be held at Blackpool from 
January 2 to II next year. 

In the 1983 UK final then 
sponsored by Coral Higgins 
defeated Davis 16-15 after 
losing the first seven frames. 

That was the last big title 
won by Higgins who. on 
Thursday night, beat Wayne 
Jones 9-5. The last semi-final 
meeting between Davis and 
Higgins was in the Dulux 
British Open tournament last 
season when Davis won 9-3. 
Two of Davis’s team col- 
leagues, D ennis Taylor and 
Tony Meo, made sporting 
history yesterday by taking 
part in the first snooker match 
ever to be played in Japan. In 
Tokyo, Taylor beat Meo 4-1. 

SCORES: Sort— lr S Darts (Eng) 
toads A Higgins (PH) 6-1. Frame scores 
parts firs$97-28. 3046. 63-26. 107-9. 
64-55. 105-8. 96-6. N FduMs (Eng) toads J 
Parrott {Eng) *-3. Frame scores (Faufcls 
firsts 45-75,4-98, 1090,79-29.20-60.66- 
30, 82-47. DmdqV q ue neMki rt K A 
Hkjgns (Ml) Ok W Joan Mates) 95. 
Frame scores rtfiggms firs}: 75-44, 8923, 
84-14. &42. 5435. 7952. 4960. 7948. 
42-79, 1 1-66. »«. 67-58. 48-71.74-23. J 
Parrott (Eng) tit A Knowtos (Eng) 9-4. 
Frame scores (Parrott tost* S1-73T68-2. 
131-0. MS. 5W2. 6-92. 61-26,91-34. 27- 
59. 72-11, 6S-1. 67-44, 137-0. 




0 


TENNIS 


Profit on a day of loss 


On a day when Britain’s 
women lost again in the Euro- 
pean Cup — this tune to a 
French reserve team — the 
Lawn Tennis Association 
showed a record pre-tax profit 
of £3,129,814 for the year 
which ended on September 30. 

The annual accounts issued 
yesterday also showed a redac- 


tion in taxation to £1,669,000. 

National training and inter- 
national match costs rose by 
£105,000 to £707,000 while 
the expense of running com- 
petitions and tournaments 
claimed £670,000 compared 
with £460,000 last year. 

Britain lose again, page 41 


Allen poised to make a welcome return 


Four years old. 
Seriously underweight 
for her age. 
Scavenging for food 
where she can find it. 
jidshe’s English. 



With parents who re- 
fused to acknowledge that 
she even existed this child 
was being slowly and deli- 
berately starved. Here in 
England. 

Fortunately we found 
her in time. Yet without your 
> donations we’d have been 
powerless to help. 

£15.48 can protect a 
child for two weeks. And 
■ thatb the sum we're asking 
for now 

* If you can’t afford quite 
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gratefully received. 

I want to help protect a child and j 

i> cneque or postal ordo: 

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/ 


By Clive White 

David Pleat was not the 
only one to breathe a sigh of 
relief as he announced yes- 
terday that Give Allen, his 
leading goalscorer (some 
might say his only one}, 
should be fit to face Notting- 
ham Forest at White Hart 
Lane today. It is not normally 
Tottenham's - custom to do 
Arsenal any favours but 
George Graham, their 
neighbours’ manager, must 
have been as delighted as Heat 
that Allen's hamstring has 
recovered. 

Aisenal just two points 
ahead of Forest at the head of 
the table, could find them- 
selves in enough trouble at 
Villa Park today without an 
impotent Tottenham team 
taking the field against the 
first division's biggest 
goalscorers. Villa, like Arse- 
nal have been revitalized by 
the injection of some Scottish 
passion into their manage- 
ment this season. Since Billy 
McNeill took over from Gra- 
ham Turner at the end of 
September, Villa have been 


unbeaten at home and a lot 
more unyielding away — as 
West Ham would testify after 
last week’s draw at Upton 
Park. 

Graham, who was a room- 
mate of McNeill's in their 
Scottish international playing 
days, believes Scots make 
good managers. “Billy is a 
typical Scot, very demanding, 
very passionate about his 
football In feet Td like a few 
more of them at Highbury as 
players. All the teams that win 
things have a Scot or two in 
the side; don't they?” 

The compliments were fly- 
ing both ways yesterday before 
the commencement of battle. 
McNeil] said: “Under Don 
Howe last season Arsenal were 
a good side, but without an 
awful lot of frills and flair 
about them. They were always 
difficult to beat but now 
George has added something 
extra, made them more pos- 
itive and given them a bit of 
sparkle.” 

McNeill is hoping Villa 
continue where they left off 
last week He thought their 
performance in the last half 


Aberdeen will do their 
talking on the grass 

By Hugh Taylor 


Aberdeen have played so 
impressively in their last three 
matches, from which they 
have taken five points, that 
they have again become rec- 
ognized as the strongest chal- 
lengers to the leaden, Celtic, 
for the premier division 
championship. 

As befits a shrewd Fifer, 
however, Ian Porterfield is too 
cautious to make rash fore- 
casts that Aberdeen will be 
champions. After afl. they 
remain nine points behind 
Celtic and all the new manager 
will say about the prospects is: 
H I am pleased with the way we 
have played and I believe we 
can win something this season 
but all the talking about that 
will have to be done on the 
grass.” 

Today he is hoping that the 
grass of Fir Park wifl not prove 
a slippery slope for his team. 
Motherwell are a rapidly 
improving side and they have 
no fear of their more distin- 
guished opponents. 

Yet so composed are Aber- 
deen. with Belt and Connor 
impeccably marshalling the 
midfield, that h is difficult to 
['see Motherwell taking even a 
point. Celtic are looking for- 
ward to their match with St 
Mkren at Love Street for it 


was at die Paisley ground that 
they clinched the premier 
division championship so 
dramatically last season. 
There is a warning, however, 
from David Hay, their man- 
ager, that the support e rs are 
not to expect a repeat of that 5- 
0 victory. 

“It is never easy at Paisley,” 
Hay said. “Anyhow, St Mirren 
are desperately anxious to 
avenge that defeat and I know 
they feel that they have some- 
thing to prove against us on 
their own ground.” 

Although Celtic will still be 
without MacLeod, they are 
driving so fiercely that they 
should extend then 1 unbeaten 
League run to 16 games. 

The liveliest game of the 
afternoon is likely to be played 
at Ibrox where Rangers meet 
Hurt of Midlothian. While 
Rangers were thought yes- 
terday to be increasing the size 
of their fee for Roberts, the 
Spurs defender, they were also 
dipping into foe past and 
bringing their former captain, 
Paterson, into the squad for 
today’s game. 

Paterson, who has been in 
foe shadows since the arrival 
of Butcher, is standing by 
because of McPherson’s 
suspension 


hour at Upton Park, when 
Daley come on for Hunt, was 
their best since he became 
manager. But recent form 
does not augur wefl. Villa have 
not beaten a London side in 
six starts this season and have 
conceded 10 goals against 
Arsenal at Villa Park in their 
last three visits. Also, Arsenal 
have dropped just two points 
in their last eight games. 

If Scottish managers are the 
flavour of the month, English 

More football 
on page 42 

players are still much sought 
after north of the border. 
Tottenham rejected an offer of 
£400,000 yesterday for Rob- 
erts, wno, admittedly, 
breathes the sort of fire one 
more readily associates with 
Scottish defenders. 

Pleat said: “I've got no 
reason for selling him to 
Rangers If they came in with 
a good offer we would have to 
consider it, but not at the 
moment We have injuries 


Rees joins 
Fulham 

Fulham Rugby League dub 
have signed Hugh Rees, the 
Welsh B Rugby Union inter- 
national and former Swansea 
and Fenartb threequarter. 
Rees, aged 27, is the first 
established Union player to 
join the London side. 

Rees, who makes his debut 
at stand-off half against 
Castleford in the John Player 
Special Trophy first round at 
Quswick tomorrow, said: “I 
felt it was time for a change 
from Union. My friends, 
Terry Holmes at Bradford 
Northern and Gary Pearce at 
Hull assured me I would 
make the transition to the 
faster and more physically 
demanding League game with- 
out too much difficulty.** 

Ban lifted 

Ian Roberts, Wigan’s 
Australian forward, is free to 
play in today’s Rugby League 
John Player Special Trophy 
match against Leeds after an 
appeals committee decided to 
overturn a four-match ban 
yesterday. They watched a 
video of .an alleged incident 
against Barrow and found 
Roberts not guilty. 


and anyway he has been 
playing very well this season.” 
Graeme Souness, the Rangers 
manager, is considering 
whether to increase his bid. 

Roberts's presence is all the 
more necessary today when 
Tottenham expect to be with- 
out one of the finest defenders 
ever to copra out of Scotland. 
Gough, who injured a thigh in 
the midweek Littlewoods Cup 
win at Cambridge, joins a 
growing casualty list which 
includes Claesen, Stevens, 
Hughton and Chiedozie. 
Galvin, however, returns to 
the squad six weeks after a 
knee operation. 

“Forest are the highest 
goalscorers in the first di- 
vision; that's the threat they 
bring here.” Pleat said. Of 
ArdSes, who will be playing in 
his first League game at home 
this season. Pleat said: “It’s a 
bjg challenge for Archies who 
will be playing bis third game 
in eight days. I'm sure the 
crowd will enjoy seeing 
Ardiles and Hoddle together.” 

Forest wflf be without Bow- 
yer and Butterworth, because 


Celtic cup 
row draws 


understudies to Sansom at left 
back. Fandough, another 
young man with a big future 
until injury forced him out of 
the game for 18 months, 
makes his second League 
appearance of the season and 
responsibility is thrust upon 
him by Bnan Gough, his 
manager, who said: “We need 
his qualities at the moment 
Everything is down to him.” 

Devonshire Is back 

West Ham United expect to 
welcome bade Devonshire, 
Ore and Stewart for their 
televised game against New- 
castle United at St James* 
Park tomorrow. Newcastle, 
bottom of' the table, have 
shown signs of recovering 
since signing Goddard from 
East London club earlier tins 
month even though he has yet 
to score. Goddard is struggling 
to overcome a week-long an- 
kle injury. 


SPORT IN BRIEF 



Pyatt Eye htfny 

Fight date 

Chris Pyatt, who had to puD 
out of a first voluntary defence 
of his European light-middle- 
weight boxing title in Perugia, 
Italy, on December 6, because 
of a cut eye, wiH meet the 
Italian challenger; Gianfranco 
Rosi, at tire same venue on 
January 21. 

Time change 

Hereford United have 
brought forward the kick-off 
time for their fourth division 
football matdi with Wolver- 
hampton Wanderers on Box- 
ing Day by three hours to mid- 
day on the advice of West 
Mercia police. 


of a virus but have Pearce 
back after a two-match <| a ^ m 

suspension- That will provide I II II I fllip 

an opportunity to compare J.U1V 

two of the leading England By Hugh Taylor 

Celtic were fined £5,000 by 
die Scottish Football Associ- 
ation yesterday as a sequel to 
the unruly conduct of several 
of their players during the 
Skol Cup final at Hampden 
Park on October 26. Ironi- 
cally, the body also com- 
mended the behaviour of 
spectators, who remained calm 
during the rumpus. 

The fine was imposed by the 
SFA disciplinary committee, 
who strongly condemned the 
players for taking part in 
rancorous scenes which, they 
said, did nothing to enhance 
the image of Scottish football 
Maurice Johnston, the 
Celtic striker, was sent off, 
and seven of his colleagues 
were cautioned as the 
ended amid uproar after Rang- 
ers had won 2-1 with a goal 
scored from a hotly disputed 
penalty. 

The SFA added that ft had 
high praise for the Celtic 
supporters. A statement said: 
“It was o nly the strong sense 
of restraint on the part of the 
spectators which prevented a 
major disturbance.” 

David Hay, the Celtic man- 
ager, also appeared before tbe 
disci p l in a r y committee »«< 
was fined £250 for “abusive 
j remarks” made to Don 
■McVfcar for the referee's han- 
of a premier division 
imatch with Dundee United at 
iTjt&oadice in September 
which ended in a 2-2 draw. 

That was a start of a long 
day of worry for the manager, 
fo the afternoon, he appeared 
oeiore the executive committee 
to explain his thinly disguised 
ciUkism of David Syme, the 
referee in the Skol Cap final. 

Afim that game. Hay was 
alleged to have said: “If it was 
«P to me, I would apply to join 
the ] Erolish league immedi- 
ateiy. Controversial decisions 
(0 go agoing 

Orfy last month. Hay had 

BobValentme, the referee pet 
m charge of foe Skol Cup tie 
agwnst Aberdeen at Prttodrie, 
And yesterday the Exec- 
otive Committee decided that 
oific «ed A* 
cup final referee and added a 

fatba of £350, thus 

aSSfi&ss 

sSS-s's 


Marching on 

Paris (Reuter) — Australia, 
fresh, from their successful 
tour of Great Britain, are 
favourites for the first Rugby 
League international against 
France in Perpignan tomor- 
row. The Australians, who 
were undefeated in their 13- 
match British tour, winning 

all three internationals, 
continued _ their sparkling 
form with a 36-4 win against a 
French selection team on 
Wednesday. 

Stuck stays 

Bonn (AFP) — Speculation 
that Hans-Joachim Stuck, 
who. with Derek Bell, of Great 
Britain, retained the worid 
sports car championship 
divers’ title for Porsche last 
mouth, might join BMW, has 
ended with the German 
constructor’s announcement 
that be is stay with them next 
year. 

Meeting again 

Top officials from all over 
the world will, converge on the 
Crest Hotel m Maidenhead. 
Berkshire, . for the Inter! 
national Crape federation's 
annual board meeting next 
week. ... 



iV