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L-rvre DIVERSITY OF 

}\ acc.no. 6 - S .- 52 & 

CLA1<« - 





WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 1 1986 


Gorbachov to 

Meet Reagan 

summit’ 



Russian 
freed to 
fly to 
Moscow 


Double 




• Mr Re^and Mr Gorbachov are to 

“ Icelan < J next week in a move 
which astonished their nations 

• anmrancement followed a double 
exchange for Nicholas Daniloff, the US 
journalist freed in Moscow on Monday 


• In New York, Mr Gennady Zakhar” 
ov, the Sonet UN employee on a spying 
charge, was expelled from the country 

• In Siberia, Mr Yuri Orlov, the veter- 
an human rights activist jailed over the 
Helsinki Accords in 1977, was set free 


From Michael Binyon, Washingto n 
In a momentous announce- Daniloff, ihe US News & 


mem that caught America by 
surprise. President Reagan 
said yesterday he was flying to 
10 days to meet Mr 
Mikhail Gorbachov for a 
preparatory summit to pave 
the way for the Soviet leader's 
visit to ihe United States later 
inis year. 

.The meeting, suggested m 
Mr Gorbachov's letter to Mr 
Reagan 10 days ago. will be 
held in Reykjavik on October 
1 1 and 1Z No agenda has been 
set, but the two sides will 
discuss the whole field of East- 
West relations, includin g arms 
control, regional conflicts in 
the world, human rights and 
bilateral relations. 

Mr Reagan's announce- 
ment — pre-empted by a Tass 
report in Moscow a few min- 
utes earlier — came immedi- 
ately after Mr George Shultz, 
the Secretary of Stale, had 
revealed the details of the 
package to free Mr. Nicholas 

Tomorrow 


Odds on 
Sunday? 



World Report correspondent 
arrested in Moscow on spying 
charges. 

_ These involved the deporta- 
tion by a New York court of 
Mr Gennady Zakharov, the 
Soviet United Nations em- 
ployee accused of spying, as 
well as the release from exile 
of Mr Yuri Orlov, a prom- 
inent Russian dissident. 

Asked whether the US had, 
after all, traded Mr Zakharov 

Maa In the news 6 
Atmosphere of distrust 6 
Breaking the ice 12 
Leading article 13 

for Mr Daniloff President 
Reagan insisted: 'There was 
no connection between these 
two releases.'’ 

However, be said Mr 
DanilofTs release had made 
the Reykjavik meeting 
possible. 

“I could not have accepted 
and held that meeting if he 
were still being held." 

He had “no idea" what the 
.outcome of the Iceland meet- 
ing would be but it would not 
be just a signing ceremony. 

He believed the chances 
were now better than they had 
been in many years lor reach- 
ing. some agreement on arms 
reductions. 

Mr Shultz said there had 
been “a great change" in the 


negotiating positions on inter- 
media le nuclear forces over 
the past l& months. 

“in the discussions that we 
have had there are suggestions 
of other possible areas where 
agreement might be found. So 
I think there are reasonable 
prospects. 

“But you never have an 
agreement until you have an 
agreement." be added. 

The Reykjavik meeting was 
no substitute for a full-scale 
summit as agreed by the two 
leaders in Geneva lak year, 

Mr Shultz said: “It's veiy 
clear that they recognize, as we 
do. that the genuine summits 
will be the next one in the 
United States and the follow- 
ing one in the Soviet Union. 
And that is in everybody's 
plan.” 

He said the Reykjavik meet- 
ing would give things a “spe- 
cial push". 

On the most significant 
issues the gap had dosed and 
the US could see the prospect 
of agreement There was 
enough motion and sense of 
importance to “energize" both 
the Soviet and US negotiators. 

Asked why the US had 
changed its mind about the 
value of a pre-summit meeting 
at beads-of-goverment level, 
Mr Shultz said the US was 
engaged in a very important 
and very serious effort to get 
Continued on page 20, col 2 


Horse racing has 
a bigger paying 
public than any 
other sport, yet it 
misses.out on the 
biggest pay day of 
all— Sunday. 

Now the industry is 
debating plans 
for Sunday racing 
and even Sunday 
opening for betting 
shops. The Times 
gives both sides an 
airing in another 
major and 
controversial 
series 


Kremlin made the 
ranaia& 

From Christopher Walker, Moscow 



From Christopher 
Washington 

Mr Gennady Zakharov, the 
Soviet physicist accused of 
espionage, flew to Moscow 
yesterday as Mr Nicholas 
Dan Hoff, the American 
journalist held on spying 
charges, arrived home to a 
tumultuous welcome in 
Washington. 

Under a package arrange- 
ment for ending the month- 
long superpower confron- 
tation. Mr Yuri Orlov aged 62. 
the Soviet human rights lead- 
er. is also being released and is 
due to leave for the United 
States whb his wife, Arina, by 
October 7. 

After exile in Siberia Mr 
Orlov, a physicist and a 
member of the Armenian 
Academy of Sciences, is in 
poor health. 

Mr Zakharov, smiling 
broadly, appeared before the 
Eastern district court of New 
York yesterday and pleaded 
no contest, a neutral term (hat 
is not an admission of guilt 
Earlier he had ■ attended a 
session in judge's chambers 
Judge John McLaughlin 
sentenced him to five years' 
probation and ordered him 
out of the country within 24 
hoars. Still smiling Mr 
Zakharov was whisked out of 
a side door, saying merely as 
he left that he fell “great". His 
only comment to the court 
was an emphatic “yes” when 
.asked by the judge if be had 
fully understood what had 
transpired in chambers. 

At a White House press 
conference Mr George Shultz, 
the Secretary of State, would 
not link the decision to free 
Mr Orlov to the release of Mr 
Daniloff 
He had been informed of 
the decision to release Mr 
Orlov by Mr Eduard 
Shevardnadze, the Soviet For- 
eign Minister, during then- 
talks in New York over the 
past lOdaysand the release of 
other dissidents is widely 
ru moored. 

He made dear tharthr US 
was. standing by, its expulsion 
of 25 iiairi^titqnjbeivof'th« 
Soviet mission to the United 
Nations. 


addressing the Labour conference in Blackpool yesterday. 

Left wing lose out 
as Heffer is voted 
off Labour NEC 

By Philip Webster, Chief Political Correspondent 



The way was dramatically 
opened last night for the 
possibility of two superpower 
summits before the end of the 
year with a brief announce- 
ment from Tass. the official 
Soviet news agency, that 
President Reagan had ac- 
cepted an invitation fora two- 
day meeting in the Icelandic 
capital of Reykjavik on the 
weekend of October 11 and 
12 . 

The announcement was the 
unexpected outcome of four 
recent meetings between Mr 
Eduard Shevarnadze, the 
Soviet Foreign Minister and 
Mr George Shultz, the US 
Secretary of State, ostensibly 
held to resolve the month-old 


affair of the US journalist, Mr 
Nicholas Daniloff 

Tass made dear that the 
initiative for what has already 
been dubbed here as a “pre- 
summit" came from Mr 
Mikhail Gorbachov. 

Soviet sources said that 
recent progress towards agree- 
ments on the key issue of arms 
control bad been the main 
reason in overcoming Ihe 
Kremlin's former reluctance 
to agree any summit date for 
1986. They added that the 
main hopes were for an even- 
tual agreement on limiting US' 
and Soviet medium range 
missiles in Europe and secur- 
ing progress towards a mutual 
ban on all nuclear tests. 




SummiT 

kunurn 






Mr Neil Kinnoek yesterday 
tightened his grip on the 
Labour Party machine after 
elections to the ruling national 
executive which resulted in 
losses for the hard left and the 
removal of one of bis fiercest 
adversaries Mr Eric Heffer. 

The Labour leader was left 
with a commanding 19-10 
majority on the executive 
giving him a dominance over 
his 

generi 
acl ’ 

Mr Heffert defeat was (he 
biggest shock in the NEC 
elections for years. He paid the 
price for his strong support for 
the Liverpool Militant lead- 
ers. his histrionic walk-out 
during Mr Kinnock's speech 
at last year's conference and 
his constant attacks on the 
leadership, most recently in a 
book published last week. 

But out too. went Mrs 
Margaret Beckett the far-left 
MP for Derby South, in a poD 
which saw big increases in 
votes for Mr Kmnock's closest 
allies. 

Voted in to replace Mr 
Heffer in the constituency 
section of the executive was 
Mr Tam Dalyell, MP for 
Linlithgow. 

Mrs Beckett is replaced by 
the pro-Kinnock Mrs Diana 


- ( SM- 

• The Times Portfolio 
Gold daily competition 
prize of £4,000 was 
won yesterday by Mrs 
ESinfield of Truro, 
Cornwall 

Details, page 3. 

• Portfolio list, page 
25; rules and howto 
play, information 
service, page 20. 


TIMES BUSINESS 


Holiday bonus 

triiain’s holiday prices battle 
ntered a hard-hitting, new 
iiund as Thomson Holidays, 
ic biggest tour operator, 
lunched programmes for 
ext summer with many av- 
rage prices unchangedPiage 21 


TIMES SPORT 


iigan writ 

uigan, the former 
ting Association 
it champion, is 
i High Court wnt 
connections with 
p B J East- 
Page 42 


UK fights 
to stop 
sport curb 

From John Goodbody 
Dublin 

Britain was straggling yes- 
terday to stop the Council of 
Europe from demanding Gov- 
ernment action if British 
competitors visit South Africa 
for sports events. 

Britain logically could be 
obliged eventually io with- 
draw individuals' passports if 
ihe resolution, proposed by 
Sweden, is passed tomorrow. 

The resolution is not due to 
be discussed by the fifth 
conference of European sports 
ministers until today but last 
night the British delegation 
was seeking a compromise 
resolution. 

The Council of Europe 
could put pressure on the 
Government to cany out its 
wishes but generally it seeks to 
get unanimity of agreement 
Botha hint, page 20 


Sealink crews stage sit-in 

By Rodney Cowton, Transport Correspondent 

tional Union of Seamen said 


Two ferries operated by 
Sealink British Ferries were 
being held in port by then- 
crews last night following an 
announcement that the com- 
pany was lo reduce jobs on 
services to the Channel is- 
lands and Cherbourg by about 
460. 

Passengers expecting to sail 
on Sealink ferries from Wey- 
mouth were offered alter- 
native sailings ‘ from 
Portsmouth, or cash refunds, 
while passengers trying to get 
home from Cherbourg were 
offered passages on other 
lines. 

A spokesman for Sealink 
said arrangements for getting 
passengers home were com- 
plete, including those with six 
airlines and Torbay Ferries for 

the Channel Islands. 

Last night two of five ferries 
operated by Sealink and 
Channel islands Ferries, the 
Earl William at Guernsey and 
the Earl Godwin at Wey- 


mouth, were being occupied 
by their crews. 

Problems arose because of a 
scheme by Sealink and rivals 
Channel Island Ferries, which 
»dll come into effect today, to 
rationalise services. They are 
to form a jointly owned 
company, British Channel Is- 

• Northern Engineering In- 
dustries (NE1X the Newcastle- 
based power equipment manu- 
facturer, yesterday announced 
it would be shedding 5£00 
jobs in Britain this year and 
next (Afison Eadie writes). 

Details, page 21 

land Ferries, in an effort to 
eliminate heavy losses. 

Crews were only told of the 
changes yesterday morning at 
the time as they were made 
public. Sealink is ending 437 
sea-going jobs and 220 shore 
jobs but will offer to re- 
employ 191. In addition, 
Channel Island Ferries said it 
would .be making 30 people 
redundant 

A spokesman for the Na- 


yesierday that the union fully 
supports! the action members 
were taking to protect jobs. 

He said Sealink had taken 
its decision without consulta- 
tion with the union, “Sack 
■them now and argue after- 
wards is management’s 
shabby motto," he said. 

There would be a meeting in 
London tomorrow of repre- 
sentatives of Sealink members 
and it was possible that anion 
would be taken against other 
routes. 

The bulk of the job losses 
are expected to be based on 
Weymouth. Changes to routes 
mean that-a triangular service 
operated by .Sealink from 
Portsmouth to Cherbourg and 
the Channel Islands will be 
discontinued, and a service 
from Weymouth to the Chan- 
nel Islands will be operated 
only during the summer rather 
than all year. 

Sealink will continue to 
operate during, the summer 

Continued on page 20, col 5 


Tenants to get a better deal 


{01 


iih scrum- 
3tned as 
d's rugby 
I against 
ham on 

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20 
M2 
13 
13 

mis' 18 

S? *8 

“ 37-40,42 
tfreMW 41 
Radio 41 
20 



By Robin Oakley 

In an effort to control the 
house price spiral the Gov- 
ernment is determined to 
provide a better deal for 
people seeking rented. accom- 
modation in the private 
sector. 

Mr John Patten, the Min- 
ister for Housing, will tell next 
week’s Conservative con- 
ference that he intends to 
establish a RighMo-Rent leg- 
islation designed to be as 
powerful and appealing as the 
RigbMo-Buy legislation. 

He plans to dismantle the 
vast council estates and wants 
building society, bank and 
investment trust money to 
finance the creation of rented 
homes for those who cannot 
afford, or do not want tobuy. 

This week The Times has 



reported on the urgent need 
for action to reduce the num- 
bers of families facing mort- 
gage and rent arrears, 
repossession and eviction. 

Mr Patten said: “In a few 
co$e$ lending institutions have 
transgressed the borders of 
prudence, and I am watching 
the trend very closely." 

Mr Patten added that he 
was looking at ways to reform 
the Rent Act. “I want to 
ensure a good deal for private 
landlords — , and there are 
many good ones. 


A 


In mobilising Tory party 
support for the Right-to-Reft t. 
Mr Patten plans to take hous- 
ing out of the political 
battleground. 

However, the House of 
Lords is set to undermine the 
Government's attempt to 
speed up the sale of council 
homes. Peers are expected to 
approve changes to the Hous- 
ing and Hanning Bill later this 
month which will greatly 
weaken its scope: 

Mr Nicholas Ridley. Sec- 
retary of Sate for Environ- 
ment gave a concession to 
Labour MP$ and peers yes- 
terday by tabling a new clause 
giving council tenants the 
right to block the sale of their 
estates to private landlords. 

Spectrum, page 10 
Pipperty. pages 30-35 , 


y 


Suicide bid 
‘just like 
a circus’ 

Mr Ian. Wood, the solicitor 
wanted for questioning in 
connection with two muiders, 
abandoned his attempt to 
commit suicide by jumping 
from Amiens cathedral roof 
because it was “being turned 
into a circus”, his brother said 
yesterday. 

He could not stand “the 
thought of his family seeing 
his fall on television". Mr 
Mark Wood said. 

He had a 1 5-m'muie meet- 
ing with his brother, who is 
wanted for questioning police 
in Sheffield to connection 
with the shootings of his 
French mistress. Danielle 
Ledez. and her daughter, aged 
three. 

Report page 3 

V 


Pressure 
on Interest 
rates eases 

Pressure for higher interest 
rates eased in the financial 
markets yesterday. This 
makes it less likely that mort- 
gage and overdraft rates will 
rise, though market rates are 
still indicating an increase. 

The stock market recovered 
some of the ground lost on the 
previous day with the Finan- 
cial Times Index closing 14.4 
points up at 1227.0. Prices of 
gilt-edged stocks were also 
sharply higher rising by up to 
2K points for long-dated 
stocks. 

. In the foreign exchange 
market sterling rose against 
both the mark and the dollar 
closing at DMZ9352 and 
$1.4477. 

Dealers were encouraged at 
intervention by the West Ger- 


Details 


21 


man central bank' in support 
of the pound which they 
interpreted as forming part of 
a confidential agreement be- 
tween the leading countries on 
exchange rate 

managementThe Bank of En- 
gland again intervened to 
support the pound. In the 
money markets it left its 
dealing rates unchanged in- 
dicating its resistance to 
higher rates. 

Rumouis that Britain was 
about to link its currency to 
the European Monetary Sys- 
tem helped to support sterling 
despite a denial in Wash- 
ington by the Chancellor. Mr 
Nigel Lawson, that, any move 
was imminent. 

Mr Lawson said in bis 
speech to the International 
Monetary Fund that Britain's 
economy would grow more 
slowly than forecast this year 
but faster next year. The 
underlying rate of inflation of 
about 3to% was likely to 
remain, constant for some 
time. , 


for Labour leader 


Kinnoek plays 
for high 
stakes over 
defence 

By Robin Oakley, Political Editor 


Jeuda. research officer of the 
Union of Shop. Distributive 
and Allied Workers. 

The only other change was 
in the trade union section 
where the retiring Mr Alex 
Kiison was replaced by the 
equally pro-Kinnock Mr Jack 
Rogers, executive member of 
the Union of Construction 
Allied Trades and 
Technicians. 

A. sad and embittered Mr 
Heffer claimed yesterday that 
a campaign had been' or- 
• ganized against him 

He admitted that his walk- 
out last year had contributed 
to his defeat. He said: “I am 
not surprised because I knew 
that since my walk-off and 
because of my stand on vari- 
ous issues over (he last few 
years there has been a great 
campaign organized by certain 
sections of the party to get me 
off.” 

The swing towards Mr 
Kinnoek and the centre was 
reflected in the other NEC 
votes. The soft-left Mr David 
Blunkett stayed at the top of 
Ihe constituency poll and Mr 
Gerald Kaufman, the shadow 
Home Secretary, achieved one 
of -the most respectable votes 
given to a senior member of 
the cemre-right in recent years 
by the constituency parties. 


Mr Neil Kinnoek gambled 
yesterday on making Labour's 
unilateralist defence policy the 
centrepiece of his party's elec- 
tion platform, despite the 
handicap it proved when the 
party was heavily defeated in 
1983. 

But after Mr Kinnoek had 
reaffirmed the anti-nuclear 
stance in his keynote speech to 
the Labour conference in 
Blackpool he walked straight 
into a revival of the dispute 
with the American Govern- 
ment oyer Labour's commit- 
ment to close the American 
nuclear bases in Britain. " 
The American Ambassador. 
Mr Charles Price, confirmed 
his government's backing for 
the criticisms of Labour's 
stance by the US Defence 
Secretary. Mr Caspar Wein- 
berger. and made it plain that 
American officials would con- 
tinue their criticism up to the 
next election. 

Mr Price said: "The things 
Cap Weinberger expressed are 
fully supported by the Ad- 
ministration”. 

Mr Kinnoek launched his 
election gamble yesterday 
with an emphatic reaffirma- 
tion of Labour's anti-nuclear 
stance. But he promised that 
Labour would discharge its 
obligations to fulfil the “first 
duty” of any government, the 
maintenance of the country's 
security. 

In a dramatic passage de- 
signed to assure the electorate 
that Labour was not “soft" on 
defence. Mr Kinnoek said: “I 
tel! you in no casual spirit that, 
like most of my fellow citi- 
zens. I would, if necessary 
fight and give my life for my 
country. 1 would die for my 
country.” 

Then, in a reference to his 
weekend admission; that he 
would never ask. America to 
use nuclear weapons to defend 
Britain once labour had re- 
moved our own independent 
deterrent, he added: “But I 
could never allow my country 
to die for me” 

In a carefully structured 
speech, Mr Kinnoek won 
bursts of applause for a long 
attack on America’s policies in 
Nicaragua. 

But then he told the con- 
ference: “From the early warn- 
ing station at Fylingdales to 
the submarine watching sta- 
tion in Pembrokeshire and 
from GCHQ to Cyprus, from 
Hong Kong to Edzell in 
Scotland there are intelligence 
and protection facilities that 
are essential to the national 
interests of the USA and the 
collective interests of the Naio 
alliance. 

“We don't propose for one 


instant lo withdraw those 
facilities lor up are allies and 
we discharge our obligations." 

Mr Kinnoek won a six- 
minute ovation from the con- 
ference for his speech. 

But he had no new policy 
points to make and he failed to 
please the Labour left. 

Shadow ministers and MPs 
were delighted, however, with 
what ihcy saw as a strong 
launching of Labour's election 
campaign. 

The confusion remains, 
however, around Labour's de- 
fence policy. 

The .shadow Foreign Sec- 
retary'- Mr Denis Healey, was 
quoted on BBC Television's 
Panorama programme on 
Monday night as saying that it 
was “not inconceivable" that, 
after consultations with Naio 
allies, a Labour government 


Conference reports 

4 

Geoffrey Smith 

4 

Leading article 

13 

Letters 

13 

Frank Johnson 

20 


might allow America to keep 
nuclear weapons in Britain. 

On the same programme 
Mr Kinnoek confirmed La- 
bour's plans to close all US 
nuclear bases. 

Yesterday Mr Healey back- 
tracked. saying that it was no 
longer conceivable after what 
he called “the son of bullying 
and blackmail which has been 
used by American officials”. 

Questioned by Sir Robin 
Day on what there would be to 
deter the Russians from 
attacking once Britain's in- 
dependent deterrent had gone, 
Mr Healey said that .America 
would still have its nuclear 
weapons. 

When asked how Labour 
could win an election on a 
nuclear unilateralist policy 
when he himself had said that 
the party lost the last one 
because of its stance on de- 
fence. Mr Healey said that at 
the last election Labour had 
coupled the call for the ending 
of nuclear defence with a 
pledge to cut conventional 
forces by 30 per cent. 

The country had believed 
Labour was unilateralist in all 
senses and not just in relation 
to nuclear weapons. 

• MOSCOW: Tass. the of- 
ficial Soviet news agency', has 
entered the controversy over 
Labour's future defence policy 
by accusing Mr Weinberger of 
delivering “wrathful invec- 
tives and almost open threats” 
against the party in the run-up 
to its annual conference 
(Christopher Walker writes). 


r**- 



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only devastating forecast” 
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HOME NEWS 


More women in 
college places 

Women are more than ever revealing their academic 
prowess in the contest for places at Cambridge. 

Since 1972, when Kings, Clare and Churchill colleges 
started admitting women, they have been taking np more 
and more places (Mark Dowd, Edncation Reporter, writes). 

Now, only Magdalene adheres to a meo-only admissions 
policy. Figures Just published in Cambridge University 
Reporter magazine show that there were 3,488 women 
undergraduates engaged in studies last year, more than 
three and a half times the number for 1968, when details 
were first recorded. 

The number of men t»«« fallen by more than 1,000 to 
6,232 in the same period. Undoubted victims of this 
reversal are the less intellectually endowed male 
applicants. 

Mr Dennis Barrington-Light, assistant university 
registrar, said: "The competition is obviously tougher for 
men. Those who would have got in a few years ago now 
don’t 

“When the colleges only took men, they took less 
capable ones to fin the places.” 

Further figures, to be released by the university will show 
that competition for places is as stiff as ever, with a ratio of 
nearly three to one between candidates and vacancies. 

MoreMP Boost for 
charges Rover 


THF. times wednesda; 


TIBER ) 1986 


MacGregor widens attack 

Thatcher ‘failed to give backing’ 


. . By George HOI 

Sir lan MacGregor, chair- would he dismissed as pan of 


Fresh charges may be 
laid against Mr Peter 
Robinson, MP for East 
Belfast, when he appears in 
court in the republic tomor- 
row (David Sapsted 
writes). Mr Robinson, dep- 
uty leader of the Demo- 
cratic Unionist Party, faces 
four charges arising oat of 
the mass “loyalist inva- 
sion” of Oontibret early in 
August 

Reports yesterday sug- 
gested that the office of the 
Director of Public Prosecu- 
tions in Dublin may add to 
the two counts of assaulting 
police, one of malicious 
damage and one of unlaw- 
ful assembly. The DPP 
spokesman would not con- 
firm this. 


Austin Rover has started 
a night-shift at its car plant 
at Cowley, near Oxford, to 
double production of the 
new Rover range. 

The company has said 
the night-shift would begin 
as soon as day-shift 
production reached 750 a 
week, and the intention is 
to build up production to 
1,500 a week. 

A full year at this rale 
would produce more than 
70,000 cars and many of 
them are expected to go 
overseas. 

The European launch 
will begin at the Paris 
Motor Show and the car 
will be on sale throughout 
Europe before it goes on 
sale In the United States. 


man of the National Coal 
Board during the miners’ 
strike, yesterday widened, to 
include' by implication the 
Prime Minister, the attacks he 
has already made recently on 
some members of the Govern- 
ment for their alleged lack of 
support during the dispute . 

Sir Ian told The Times that 
the dispute could have been 
over three months earlier — 
“by Christmas” — had he 
been "properly supported by 
the Government”. 

He implied that during the 
dosing months of the strike 
when there was a campaign 
against his leadership in some 
sections ofboth the media and 
the Government. Mrs Mar- 
garet Thatcher should have 
stepped in and made an 
unqualified declaration of her 
backing for him, yet failed to 
do so. 

Sir Ian said: “I have no way 
of knowing Mrs Thatcher's 
sentiments. 

But there were numerous 
anicles in the media about the 
Government's dissatisfaction. 

“The publidty department 
at No 10 was not unfamiliar 
with these, and 1 would have 
expected an authoritative 
contradiction. I took the view 
that there was no smoke 
without fire.” 

Sir lan has been crititizing 
Mr Peter Walker, Secretary of 
Slate for Energy, in his ac- 
count of the strike. The Ene- 
mies Within, which is being 
serialized in The Sunday 
Times. 

He has been engaging in a 


dispute about events with Mr pute. 


a sell-out settlement with the 
mincTS. 

“It should have been over 
by Christmas if I had been 
p ro p erty supported by the 
government-” Sir Ian said 
vesterday. He repeated his 
charges of defeatism and inter- 
ference against Mr Walker. 

“Peter McNestry of zhe 
overseers' union quite frankly 
admits that he used to call 
Walker and have long chats 
with him. and these were not 
fully reported back to me. 
Peter's actions didn't seem to 
me to disassociate him from 
the Nervous Nellies,” Sir lan 
said. 

Ministerial conflicts of that 
kind helped the miners* lead- 
ers to convince members that 
the Government was about to 
compromise, and so dis- 
couraged the movement back 
10 work, he said. 

“The fact that overtures 
were being made gave Arthur 
Scargill a certain amount of 
ammunition.” 

Mr Walker has strongly 
rejected Sir Ian's accusations, 
denying that the NCB chair- 
man was left unbriefed over 
his contacts with union lead- 
ers. and claiming that there 
were times when be had to. 
stiffen the resolve of a falter- 
ing coal board. 

Sir Ian's charges were con- 
tested at length this week in a 
Sunday Times review of his 
book by Mr Stephen DorreU. 
Conservative MP for Lough- 
borough. who was Mr Wal- 
ker’s parliamentary private 
secretary throughout the dis- 






Sir Ian (left) who yesterday repeated his charge of defeatism against Mr Walker (right). 

at a time of year disadvanta- Composed but evidently to me to be something 1 
geo us to it. still bruised by the mauling he should offset.** 


EEC grain ‘realism’ 

A new mood of urgency and realism about the need to re- 
duce the EEC's mounting cereal surpluses pervaded 
yesterday's informal meeting of agricultural ministers on 
the shores of Windermere (John Young writes). 

That was the view of Mr Michael Jopling, Minister of 
Agriculture, but ministers fromother EEC countries were 
more sceptical, suggesting that while ministers were agreed 
on the problems, they still could not reach a consensus on 
solutions. 

Mr Frans Andriessen, the EEC agriculture commis- 
sioner, said that Britain's proposal to pay farmers to take 
land out of production calculated the economic implica- 
tions. But it was not dear whether it should be seen as a 
marketing measure to reduce intervention purchase or as a 
social measure to maintain form incomes. 

Mr Andriessen said that the biggest problem facing the 
Community was still the milk surplus. The quota system 
was not working as well as had been hoped and he would be 
pressing for farther cuts in production. 

Princely 
jobs plea 

Prince Charles (right) 
asked Nissan car company 
executives to help the on- 
employed when he visited 
the firm's new plant at 
Sunderland, Tyne and 
Wear yesterday. 

The Prince of Wales said 
he hoped the company 
would recruit locally, where 
25 per cent of the men are 
out of work, when it ex- 
pands its plant and in- 
creases job -from 470 to 
2,700. 

He said: “I hope hope 
very mnch yon will be able 
to employ an increasing 
number of people in the 
area. It is very important, 
especially with the loss of 
the other jobs” 




Walker which has verged on 
the acrimonious; but broaden- 
ing bis attack to include the 
Prime Minister who ap- 
pointed him will raise eye- 
brows in government circles 
and at the very least do 
nothing to repair his flagging 
reputation as a diplomat. 

Sir lan said that in the latter 
months of the dispute he fell il 
was "a real possibility” that he 


Anderton 

hearing 

delayed 

Mr James Anderton. the 
Chief Constable of Greater 
Manchester, and his police 
authority have combined to 
prevent Mr Kevin Taylor, a 
businessman, gaining access 
I to confidential files kept on 
the police inquiry into his 
affairs (lan Smith writes). 

Summonses were issued 
separately on Mr Anderton 
and the authority to attend a 
High Court hearing tomorrow 

Mr Taylor, a key figure in 
the John Stalker affair, 
planned to submit a 15-page, 
affidavit supporting his 
application for access to 
documents. 

Legal representatives for Mr 
Anderton have promised an 
affidavit by the end of this 
week outlining his reasons for 
refusing access to the files and 
it is now expected the High 
Court hearing will be ad- 
journed until October 15. 

Mr Taylor's alleged 
relationship with known crim- 
inals led to the suspension of 
Mr Stalker, the deputy chief 
constable. 



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“I have not read the review. 
When Mr Walker writes a 
book. Til have it reviewed by 
my secretary too,” Sir lan 
said. 

He rejected charges that the 
closure of the Cortonwood 
mine just before the dispute 
began, without following the 
full procedure of formal 
consultation, bad been a ploy 
to lure the union into striking 


geo us to it. 

“It was a decision of the 
area manager. The idea that it 
was done to provoke a strike is 
one of the favourite canards 
that get passed around. 

“If it hadn't been that 
pretext, it would have been 
another -Scargill was spoiling 
for a fight.” 

The violence of the dispute 
had shocked him. Sir Ian said. 
“( was used to intimidation in 
the US. Many of our unions 
are run by thugs anyway. It is a 
tradition in some places there 
that union disputes are settled 
with the aid of a rifle. But at 
least il was a good clean 
economic dispute.” 


School standards 


received from the media dur- 
ing the strike. Sir Ian said that 
if he had to live through- it 
again, the main error he would 
put right would be over public 
relations. 

“I would have followed my 
instincts and set up my own 
public relations department 
much earlier.” he said. 

But he rejected the idea that 
he might have taken a per- 
sonal lead in the public rela- 
tions campaign. “In had tried 
to take that role it would have 
been used against me. and 
efforts made by the media to 
caricature my position seemed 


Baker has mixed tidings 

By Mark Dowd, Education Reporter 

Mr Kenneth Baker. Sec- # Echoing the report by her among its other recommenda- 
lary of State for Education, Majesty’s Inspectorate, which lions, urged the Government 


retary of State for Education, 
had mixed tidings for primary 
school teachers yesterday. 

He assured them he wanted 
to boost the numbers entering 
the profession, but expressed 
anxiety about the present 
quality of teaching. 

Speaking on BBC Tele- 
vision, he said that primary 
education was “very much at 
the top” of his agenda. 

Later, however, when he 
addressed a meeting organized 
by the National Union of 
Teachers, he appeared to give 
a wanting against com- 
placency. 

He listed three main areas 
for concern. 

• Despite the Government’s 
recent initiatives, he said that 
many at the junior level were 
suH given little opportunity to 
engage in science and practical 
subjects. “Science is not just 
watching newts,” he said. Too 
often work lacked depth and 
was inadequately prepared. 

• Widespread evidence still 
suggested that parents were 
rightly anxious about the ba- 
sics of numeracy, reading and 
writing. 


‘D’car 

sales 

record 

New car sales registered in 
August, the first month of the 
“D” registrations, were a 
record — 387.600 or 2 per 
cent higher than last year's 
record. 

Of the new registrations. 34 
per cent were in a company’s 
name. Imports took 57 per 
cent of the market, the same as 
last year. 

• Deaths in road accidents in 
1 985. at 5. 1 65. were the lowest 
since 1954. according to an- 
other set of statistics released 
yesterday by the Department 
of Transport. 

The figures are 8 per cent 
lower than in 1984. while 
there was a 3 per cent decline 
in serious injuries. 


stated that curriculum plan- 
ning was a weakness in three 
quarters of all primary 
schools, he said he was wor- 
ried that schools often had no 
means of ensuring that their 
intentions were put into prac- 
tice. “Vague aims are not 
enough,” he said, “mecha- 
nisms need to be established 
to ensure that policy and 
practice converge.” 

• Finally, Mr Baker said that 
the pace and content of most 
classes were geared to middle 
level ability, with the con- 
sequent danger that more 
talented pupils were not being 
stretched enough. “Able chil- 
dren are rarely given the extra 
help and attention that they 
need if they are to realize their 
potential” he said, ft would 
be a dangerous lesson for the 
foturc if children got away 
with work which may be 
adequate but has cost them 
little effort. 

The Secretary of State’s 
remarks follow the publica- 
tion last week of the all-party 
select committee report on 
primary education which. 


should offset** 

Sir lan blamed weaknesses 
in the educational systems of 
Britain and the United States 
for hampering public under- 
standing of complex economic 
issues, such as those that arose 
during the coal strike and over 
the present nuclear debate 

More economically success- 
ful nations like Germany and 
Japan were able to “achieve a 
greater degree of 
homogeneity” in their public 
attitudes. 

“This constant, rather pa- 
thetic. longing for simple solu- 
tions to complex problems 
may ultimately undo our 
society.” Sir Ian said. 


Inquest on 
family is 
adjourned 

The inquest on the five 
people found dead in a man- 


to provide 15.000 more pri- sionat Fordingbridge. Hamp- 
marv teachers as well as an shire, a month ago. was 
additional 1.600 students for I nrwnpd in Smiihninninn ves- 
teacher training. 

Mr Baker declined to com- 
ment on the committee's 
conclusions yesterday. 

However, the hints on the 
possible expansion of the pri- , 
marv sector will be further 
grist to Mr Baker’s mill as he 
attempts to dissociate himself 
from the cutback policies of 
bis predecessor. Sir Keith 
Joseph. 

The general secretary of 
Scotland's largest teaching 
union. Mr John Pollock, yes- 
terday spoke of a bleak period 
ahead if a report on teachers* 
salaries and conditions of 
service to be published on 
Thursday did not come up to 
expectations. 

The Educational Institute of 
Scotland, which represents i 
more than 80 per cent of the 
workforce north of the border. ! 
is awaiting the findings of a 1 
government-appointed 
committee of inquiry into 
teachers' pay and contracts. 


Land Registry to cut 
conveyancing costs 

By Frances Gibb, Legal Affairs Correspondent 
Many conveyancing bills lion surplus. In 1982-83 it 


will be reduced from today as 
a result of reductions in the 
fees charged by the Land 
Registry'. 

The fees will still depend on 
the value of the property but 
in the price ranges most 
relevant to home buyers, they 
will be coming down by 
between 27 and 37 per cent. 

A £35.000 transaction will 


increased to more than £11.5 
million and in 1984-85 it 
exceeded £20 million, ft is 
estimated that the figure for 
1985-86 will be about £16 
million. 

Under the various land 
registration Acts, fees are not 
meant to generate a surplus. 
They are intended to cover the 
cost of salaries and other 


be £30 cheaper and one of "pcnscs and ensure there are 
£500.000 will cost £1 30 less to L^ nds _ l ,° . «■&’ ,0 [ an > . mden }- 


process. 

The reductions have been 
made by the registry because 
of its growing surplus. 

In 1977-78. the Land Reg- 
istry. Registration of Title 
Depart men L made a £1 mil- 


nity claims where loss is 
caused through an error on the 
register of title. The Land 
Registry has therefore ad- 
justed its fees io take account 
of the high level of conveyanc- 
ing fees and rise in house 
prices. 


opened in Southampton yes- 
terday. 

The bodies of the five were 
found after a small fire. They 
were Mr Joseph Cleaver, aged 
82, a retired publisher, his wife 
Hilda, aged 82; their son 
Thomas, aged 49. and his wife 
Wendy, aged 46. and a nurse. 
Mrs Margaret Murphy, aged 
70. 

Three men have been 
charged with their murder , 
George Stephenson, aged 35. a 
former handyman at the man- 
sion. of Elgar Road. Coventry 
and brothers George Daly, 
aged 24. and John Daly, aged ! 
20. both of Deedmore Road, 
Coventry. 

At the inquest Mr Roderick 
Mackean. the coroner, was 
told by Del Chieflnsp Dennis 
Luly that the bodies of Mr 
Joseph Cleaver, his wife and 
their nurse were burned be- 
yond recognition. 

Mr Joseph Geaver was 
identified by a signet ring, a 
silver pillbox and a silver 
toothpick; his wife by a caliper 
on her leg and dental records, 
and Mis Murphy by her 
clothing. 

Dr Roger Ainsworth said 
that Mrs Wendy Geaver was 
strangled and the other four 
died from burns and carbon , 
monoxide poisoning. The 
coroner adjourned the inquest 
to a date to be fixed. 


Coach attack 
investigated 

City of London police were 
last night investigating an 
attack by about 40 men on a 
coach from Southampton 
which was taking workers into 
the News International plant 
at Wapping. east London. 

Windows in the coach were 
broken and one of the 33 
passengers was slightly injured 
but was able to work normally 
after medical attention. 


Britain’s space plans 


Research decision time for minister 


By Keith Hindley 


During the next few days 
Mr Geoffrey Pauie. a trade 
and industry minister, will 
frame Britain's space plans for 
the next five years, based on a 
report by Mr Roy Gibson, 
head of the British National 
Space Centre, the fledgling 
Space agency. 

The British National Space 
Plan outlines the options and 
makes strong recom- 
mendations. 

Mr Gibson believes Britain 
should increase spending on 
research by at (east four times, 
lo more than £400 million a 
year, to close the gap with 
France. Thai would give Brit- 
ain a much bigger say in 
collaborative projects within 
the European Space Agency, 
which France dominates. 


BNSC has recommended 
supporting a further four years 
of development studies" into 
the Hotol launcher project 
proposed by British Aero- 
space. Hotol could be devel- 
oped only through the 
European Space Agency and 
there is growing support 'for its 
adoption to follow on from 
the French Hermes space 
shuttle project. 

Another BAe project to gain 
BNSC support is an orbital 
space platform capable of 
canying a wide variety of 
scientific and commercial 
projects. The platform could 
become Britain's main con- 
tribution to the US space 
station, while a free-flying 
version could be placed in 
polar orbit to view the earth. 


Mr Gibson believes Britain 
should expand its interest in 
earth resources satellites 
which scan the earth's surface 
in many colours. We have a 
slice of the European Space 
Agency's ERS-1 satellite due 
to fly in 1993 to study the 
oceans and polar ice-caps 
using radar and infra-red light. 

He also believes Britain 
should move at once to im- 
prove its ground station facil- 
ities for receiving information 
from orbiting satellites. 

"Ocarly it isn't worth 
developing sophisticated sat- 
ellites unless we can handle 
the information they generate 
quickly and efficiently. We 
must be able to process all this 
data instantly.” 

In space science, the report 


identifies several key projects, 
including satellite borne X-ray 
and infra-red telescopes, areas 
where Britain leads the world. 
It also proposes support for a 
mission to return rocks and 
dust from one of the asteroids 
between Mars and Jupiter as a 
follow-on to the highly 
successful Giouo probe to 
Halley’s comet. 

In satellite communica- 
tions. Mr Gibson recom- 
mends laying the groundwork 
for a new generation of 
communications satellites 
with greater emphasis on mo- 
bile communications, 

Mr Gibson will address the 
European Space .Agency coun- 
cil in three weeks and is 
anxious to present a final 
space plan. 


Banks win 
£15m case 
against 
insurers 

By Michael Horsqel! 

Leading international hanks 
which lent more than £21 
million to finance projects . 
including a loumi complex in 
Minorca, were caught out by a 
massive fraud after accepting 
oxer-valued gemstones as se- 
curity . 

Vesterday Banque Keyser 
l 'liman nt Switzerland "and 
others won a High Court case 
against two insurance cmrK 
pantes which will entitle them 
to recoup about £ 1 5 million of 
their joint loss - plus interest. 

In a 2O.O0iT-word judge- 
ment. in the commercial 
court. Mr Justice. Srcyn upheld 
their claim to be indemnified 
by insurers who had guar- 
anteed repay mem ol'tltc loans. 

The insurance companies. 
Skandia (I’K) and Westgate 
(formerly Hodge Mercantile) 
disputed (he claim on the 
ground that the policies they 
wrote contained clauses 
excluding them from liability- 
in the event of fraud. 

Bui the judge found that the 
lead underwriter discovered 
an insurance broker hud been 
fraudulent — in that he had 
issued cover notes in respect 
of non-existent insurances 
fundamental to the hanks’ 
security — but did not tell the 
hanks 'and went on writing 
further insurance through the 
same broker. 

The judgement means that 
the duty of “utmost good 
faith" which applies to a 
person giving information 
when he takes out an insur- 
ance must also apply to an 
insurer who has information 
which his client does not. 

In I98D-S! 15 banks agreed 
to lend a total ofSFrSO million 
lor two "years to four 
Lieichtenstein companies 
owned or controlled by Mr 
Jaime Ballestero. the son of a 
Spanish banker. 

The gents were lodged at the 
banks w ith professional v alua- 
tions showing that they were 
valued at twice the amount 
lent. 

Bui when the loans were not 
repaid the gents turned out to 
be wonh substantially loss. 

Mr Ballestero and the funds 
which he extracted front the 
banks have disappeared. 

Judgement for damages will 
be given in December when a 
decision as to costs, estimated 
at over £5 million, will also be 
made. 


Hopes rise for 
lower EEC 
air fares deal 

Hopes are rising that EEC 
transport ministers will agree 
compromise measures to lib- 
eralize air travel within the 
community (Harvey Elliott 
writes). 

Mr John Moore. Secretary 
of State for Transport, has 
called all 12 ministers to 
London on Friday to consider 
detailed proposals, including 
greater freedom for airlines to 
set fares, scope for new ones to 
fly existing routes and a curb 
on pooling arrangements ■ 
governing the scats and flights 
each country can provide. 

Within the past few weeks 
Spain. Greece and Denmark, 
which have been opposing any 
moves towards greater free- 
dom. have shown willingness 
to make some movement. 

But there will be no sudden 
sweeping away of controls. 
Instead, it is hoped that broad 
agreement can be reached on 
half-way measures which can 
be formally approved io 
November and implemented 
within three years. 

Ministers are likely to ap- 
prove fare “zones’*, setting 
maximum and minimum 
fares . 

Three escape 
from prison 

Three prisoners escaped 
from a high security prison at 
Portland in Dorset early yes- 
terday by using a rope to scale 
the prison wall. 

The escape was discovered 
when a rope was found hang- 
ing over the wall at Verne 
prison. Prison officers held a 
roll call and found that 
Kenneth Williams, aged 26. 
Martin West, aged 21. and 
Iain Wilson, aged 27. were 
missing. 

£3 .5m bypass 

A £5.5 million bypass on the 
Gwyd-Cheshire border opens 
today. The road includes a 
new bridge over’the river Dee 
and will take iratTieaway from 
the border villages of Holland 
Famdon and a narrow bridge 
built in 1345. 


Correction 

The headline “Soft drink 
gas could save lives'* in /7/r 
Tunes on Monday should 
have read “Soft drink gas 
cylinder could save lives” as 
the text of the report ex* 
plained. The breathing appa- 
ratus described uses oxygen 
gas. Fizzy drink cylinders 
contain carbon dioxide gas 
which would quickly suffocate 
anyone inhaling it. ’ 


V 









Mob chanted ‘km, km 

PC was kicked 
Sj^kbed, court told 


THE TINGES WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 1 1986 


HOME NEWS 


KeYKH? 0 ^ 0 ' ConSie on ihe S™"* I 

3v=waZ 

ground.” 31 “ "* 

Jje officer, aged how Police Constable Miles Bar- 

three childrefw^'hSii 1 ^ ISr a of the dead 

death hacked to officer, said in evidence that 

I* 1 ** a shield and 


They were giving evidence 
at the trial of Simon 
MacMinn. aged 19. of Liston 
Road, Tottenham, who denies 
charges of affray and shop 
burglary daring the riots on 
October 6 last year. 

dratti.— ‘““ cn ' '»*> tacked » officer, aidin A ™ of Sto 

Police Conwjih^ »#■ . J e J*g5. a shield and officers on the scene, told the 

Shepard told .X - Mjchael had PC Blakelock behind him TO he had received 
— Ia me jury that he wiic n they were attacked by a ^formation several days be- 

rilh DP man with a maolut. fnn* ih» nAte that 


was in a 


Blakelock 


group with PC 
trapped by W a e " ^ we ra 

he saSY" 8 ° Ut b,ue 

PCtoD^n ° f 40 or 50 
f™P|f ‘n a cirde around 


man with a machete. 

“As soon as he started 
attacking us there were what 
seemed like hundreds around 
us," he said. 

“I saw Blakelock on the 
ground being stabbed, kicked 
and punched. His body was 
lifeless and it moved like a rag 
doll when it was kicked. 

“ The man with the machete 
attacked die body. There was a 
youth with a long piece of 
drainpipe hitting the body 
with it." 


fore the riots that 
and pre-planned 
would occur. 


organized 

violence’" 


“It had all the elements of , 
having been set up," he said. 

Mr MacMinn was alleged to 
have confessed to being dose 
to a crowd at the spot where 
the officer was murdered. “I 
knew something bad was 
happening. They were out to 
kill somebody," he told detec- 
tives later. 

The trial continues today. 



™ “{ppm. a ffpap Of yonng Londoners, reviving the American dance form of "lindy kipping" vesterday at 
the ICA Theatre in Loodoa. They were marking the launch of Dance Umbrella *86, churned as Britain's largest showcase 
for international contemporary dance, which will nm for six weeks from next Monday (Photograph: Ros Drink water). 

Falklands author challenges BBC 



Solicitor will not 
fight extradition 

By Diana Geddes and Ian Smith 


*: 


Mr Ian Wood, the solicitor 
being sought by police in 
connection with the murder of 
ms French mistress and her 
daughter, was awaiting extra- 
diuon to Britain last night 
after being transferred to the 
Amiens jail. 

M. Rene Hardy, the public 
prosecutor in Amiens, said 
that Mr Wood, aged 36. had 
been taken to the prison from 
a police cell in the town. 

Shortly before his transfer, 
Mr Wood was seen for quarter 
of an hour in the office of the 
Amiens chief of police by his 
brother Mark, aged 29. and his 
sister. Mrs Victoria Weeks, 
aged 31. 

They said their brother, 
who appeared calm but was 
very emotional woukl not be 
opposing extradition. 

Mr Wood was arrested by 
French police after threaten- 
ing to throw himself from the 
top of the Amiens Cathedral 
on Monday. He came down 
after nearly six hours of 
negotiations with the police 
and a Catholic priest 
Mr Marie Wood said that 
his brother had apparently 
come over to France on aferry 
fast week, and had first gone to 
Paris, where he had visited 
various -churches, including 
Notre Dame. 

He had then driven to 
Amiens, the home town of bis 
murdered French mistress, 
Danielle Ledez. 

Mr Mark Wood said: "He 


was not armed and was never 
a threat to anyone except 
himself. He wanted to commit 
suicide but his problem was 
that he had no gun, no weapon 
of any sort That's why he 
decided to jump from, a tall 
building." 

- He cbose the cathedral be- 
cause he bad easy access to the 
top and because he wanted to 
talk to a priest before commit- 
ting suicide; 

However, by the time the 
priest arrived, a crowd had 
already gathered and were 
“turning the whole ihing into 
a circus". 

He "could not stand the 
thought of his family seeing 
his rail on television". 

His sister said that there was 
a lot the family were unable to 
say at present because of the 
affair being subjudice. but that 
her brother was greatly com- 
forted by the idea that "the 
truth can be heard at a trial". 

He had been greatly dis- 
tressed by the "gross lies", 
which had appeared, in the 
press, she said. 

The Abb6 Marc, the prison 
priest who had spoken with 
Mr Wood as he stood lettering 
on a catbederal gargoyle 190 
feet above the ground, said 
that he had "a lot of 
admiration" for Mr Wood. 

The public prosecutors of- 
fice said die French police 
were now awaiting a formal 
extradition request from Brit-J 
ain. 


Neglected 
child was 
called ‘Oi’ 

By Angella Johnson 

A girl aged three thought her 
name was “Oi" because that 
was what her parents called 
her, the Natural Society for 
the Prevention of Cruelty to 
Children arid yesterday. 
When an NSPCC officer visit- 
ed the house after being call- 
ed by neighbours, the child 
was so starved of affection 
she rushed to put her thin 
arms around hnw. Her par- 
ents masted the child was 
happy, but the inspector 
found no toys in die tense. 
Sarah was pot into care and in- 
vestigations showed that her 
stepfather resented die child 
and the mother was too 
scared to stew she cared. 
The child was one of thou- 
sands in Britain who live a 
Dickensian lifestyle of ne- 
glect which can scar them 
for life, the NSPCC said at 
the launch of a £250,600 

camp aign to hi g hli g ht the 

feet that many youngsters 
were denied food, war mth , 
shelter and love. 

"These are the forgotten duld- 
ren, victims of Detect which 
is often coupled with phys- 
ical or sexnal abuse," the 
society said. 

"Neglect crosses all social 
strata, affecting rich ami 
poor alike., .it is crashing 
the physical and emotional 
development of children — 
damaging minds and 
bodies," Dr Alan GOmonr, 

. p | die NCPCC director, said. 

VirtllYW fit T** NSPCC says that the 
▼ ItUII19 VI | forgotten children are often 

these left atone, ignored, not 
property fed or clothed, 
never washed or firing in 
filthy conditions. Sack chil- 
dren can end up scavenging 
through titter bins for food. 

A boy aged three was seen 
searching rubbish bras and 
drinking water from a lava- 
tory bowl because he was 
hungry and thirsty when he 
visited a NSPCC faunDy 
centre in Wellingborough, 

. Northamptonshire. 

Billy, aged three, and his 
brother, Paul, aged 15 
months, were found by an 
NSPCC officer dirty, Samp 
with mine, frightened and 
alone in a sixth floor flat. 
The only food in the home 
was a slice of bread and no 
one knew where their par- 
ents where. 

When the NSPCC found Bil- 
ly’s mother they discovered 
she had been kit with huge- 
debts by her husband and 
walked oot on the children 
after hearing be had a girl 
friend. They helped her to 
regain her - confidence and 
look after her children. 

The NSPCC intends to focus 
new attention on such cru- 
elty by mounting its biggest 
ever offensive against neg- 
lect and abuse. They hope 
increased awareness will en- 
courage people to tefl them 
of youngsters at risk. 

Dr Glfanonr said: "Many par- 
ents are unaware they are 
neglecting their children be- 
cause they are putting their 
own Interests first. The 
NSPCC deals with more 
cases of neglect than phys- 
ical and sexual abase put 


The author of a controver- 
sial play about the Falklands 
conflict yesterday challenged 
the BBC's explanation for 
postponing production until 
after the next general election. 

The BBC said it had decided 
in July that the characteriza- 
tion of an incumbent Prime 
Minister and serving mem- 
bers of the Cabinet would 
have been irresponsible, and 
an ^“unnecessary dramatic 
risk", in the run-up to an 
election. 

However, Mr Ian Curteis 
claims that the £1 million 
production was shelved be- 
cause he refused to make 
political changes to his script, 
which he says conflicted with 
a previous assurance from Mr 
Alasdair Milne, director gen- 
eral of the BBC. 

Mr Curteis said: “On June 
2, the director general person- 
ally assured me that the 
coming election would not be 
a valid reason for cancelling 
the play. This was later con- 
firmed in correspondence." 


By Garin Bell Arts Correspondent 


Mr Curteis subsequently 
suggested that the play be 
produced on schedule, but 
teansmiued after the election, 
instead of on April 2 next year 
— the fifth anniversary of the 
Argentine invasion. 

Mr Curteis has alleged that 


a BBC executive asked him to 
consider changing certain 
scenes, to give the impression 
that some government de- 
cisions were taken for political 
gain. 

He rejected BBC denials 
that it had sought to alter the 


Choice of corporation 
chairman is delayed 

By Jonathan Miller, Media Correspondent 
The selection of a new BBC crate who is the corporation’s 


chairman has been delayed 
after the rejection by Mrs 
Thatcher, the Prime Minister, 
of a shortlist of candidates put 
to ber by the Home Office. 

Au official familiar with the 
selection process said yes- 
terday: "The appointment is 
no longer imminent." 

The BBC has been without a 
chairman since the death late 
in August of Sir Stuart Young. 

BBC officials hoped that 
Lord Barnett, a political mod- 


vice-chairman, would get the 
job. But in rejecting the Home 
Office shortlist, Mrs Thatcher 
has implitity ruled him oat 
BBC officials yesterday 
admitted they were fearful 
about the consequences of 
allegations that the BBC 
sought to amend a play about 
the Falklands conflict 
The dispute may strengthen 
the resolve of the Prime 
Minister to appoint a hard- 
line chairman. 


Introducing 



Pregnancy 
warning 
over Aids 

Pregnancy increases the risk 
of contracting Aids (acquired 
immune deficiency synd-; 
rome) women were warned 
yesterday. 

The Terrence Higgins Trust 
appealed to sexually active 
women, especially those who 
have bisexual partners, to 
avoid becoming pregnant. 

In a leaflet Women and 
Aids, the trust said that 
women in high risk groups, or 
whose partners were in high 
risk groups and those who had 
been diagnosed as carrying the. 
Aids virus should avoid preg- 
nancy. That also applied' to 
women who had decided not 
to take an Aids virus test 

"If you do become pregnant 
you might want to consider 
having an abortion as preg- 
nancy increases the chances of 
an infected woman develop- 
ing Aids,” the leaflet says. 

Women infected with the 
Aids virus might pass it on to 
their unborn children. 

The British Pregnancy Ad- 
visory Service has announced 
that from now on sperm 
deposits will be put “in 
quarantine" while donors un- 
dergo .Aids tests. 

The Institute of Housing 
will hold a seminar in London 
on Friday to train housing 
officers how to deal with 
occupants who have Aids. 
Sufferers had been harassed by 
neighbours urging them to 
leave their homes. 


rape still 
doubted 

By Stewart Teodler 
Crime Reporter 

Rape victims whose experi- 
ences do not fit preconcep- 
tions of police, courts and 
society are often still treated 
with scepticism, a leading I 
police expert on rape in- 
vestigations yesterday told a: 
conference of senior officers. 

Commander Thelma Wag- 
staff who led a Scotland Yard 
working party which radically j 
changed rape investigations in 
London, said few doubts were 
raised when victims were 
under 10 or over 70; had 
suffered extreme violence or 
threats with weapons; were 
attacked by a gang, or there 
had been similar incidents in 
the area. 

Yet outside those categories 
there was sometimes a “huge 
reluctance" by society to ac- 
cept rape had occurred. 

Miss Wagstaffi who was 
presenting a paper on the work 
on rape in London to the 
annual conference of the Po- 
lice Superintendents’ Associ- 
ation. said there were seven 
situations which threw up 
scepticism. 

Those were incidents where 
the victim offered no resis- 
tance or did not try to escape. 
Other situations included one 
where no violence was used; 
where the Woman took some 
lime to report the incident 


On-the-spot road 
fines start today 

Police .raffk^trols go out 

which ticket on whichsomefl2mi 

m penalize motorists under 
.hi' new svstem of “oq-the- 


new system -- — 
soot” justice (Frances Gibb. 
lSsU Affairs Correspondent, 

^ Motorists who com*"* 1 one 

a wide range of offences 

hntnnA t 


Hon a year is lost in unpaid 
fines in London alone, the 
Government is determined 
that the new fixed penalty tic- 
kets will be paid. 

If the motorist decides to 
ignore his ticket, the penalty 
will be increased by 50 per 
nj- 


oi a harine de- wll « mcreasea oy jy 

from speeding to cent and the sum payable 

freu'-e tsjes or faihnsjo gjstered in the driver's local 
a 5031 T.fcifS court as a fine for which the 

selves faced wuh a fixed pen- CQUTl ^ be able to use its 
ally ticket for £l-or x- . lQ sccurcpayracnL 

depending on ^Jether meed Horae office says: "It’s 

fence is endorsaWe. Cfffcnifere ^ a cheap ^ w break the 

have 28 days in *J ,ch P 8 * i**. To ignore the ticket will 
or request a courthsuwS- ex _ make you automatically ans» 
The new system. whicn« b , e w lhec0 urt and prove 


more serious 9® ;nc ^| money wnemei «»»*** - — 

ed ai saving «*" c penalty ticket or prosecute. 

_by rtriurine the numoer 01 


Police have discretion 
whether to warn, give a fixed 


j He said social workers and 
other professionals involved 
in child care often ignored 
the problem because of the 
complexity, intractability 
and long-term nature of 
dealing with it 

I Although many neglected chfl- 
drett are from families with 
low income. Dr GfluMmr 
says a comfortable dean 
hone where the parents 
show no affection is also an 
example of neglect 

The Forgotten Children cam- 
paign wfll be trying to make 

the pubik and profess! 

more aware of. neglect and 
encourage them to get In 
touch with the NSPCC 

London degrees 

A further fist of degrees 
awarded by the University of 
London will be pnbii$bed 
tomorrow. 



political slant of the play. 

“It is absolutely plain that 
this major production was 
cancelled because I refused to 
comply with an attempt to 
falsify recent history in a 
particularly ugly way. The 
producer, the director and 
rm self were united in rejecting 
such pressure." he said. 

The BBC decision has left 
Mr Cedric Messina, the pro- 
ducer. in the enviable position 
of having secured a lucrative 
seven-month contract with 
ostensibly nothing to do. The 
corporation is expected to 
offer him an alternative 
production, however he is 
under no contractual obliga- 
tion to accept it. 

Several Conservative poli- 
ticians have expressed con- 
cern about the affair. 

Mr Nicholas Soamcs. MF, 
is writing to Mr Douglas 
Hurd. Home Secretary, and 
Mr Gerald Howarth. MP, said 
yesterday: “It is scandalous 
that the BBC has apparemly 
assumed the role of official 
rewriier of British history." 


- ( 8<dd- 

Woman 
of 73 is : 
winner 

A retired Civil Servant is the 
sole winner of yesterday's 
Portfolio Gold prize of £4,0001 

Mrs Elizabeth S infield, 
aged 73, from Perm* 
nanrorthaL near Truro in 
Cornwall, has played the Port- 
folio game for five years and 
the Portfolio Gold game for 
the past six months. 

She said she could not 
believe ber luck. 

“1 kept on checking the 
numbers before 1 phoned The 
Times because I wanted to be 
sure that I wouldn't be wrong," 
she said. 

Asked what she intended 
doing with her prize money, 
Mrs Sinfield said: "There are. 
so many things I wonhl like to 
buy. Bn! I'd rather wait and 
think about it." 

Readers who wish to play 
the game can obtain a Port- 
folio Gold card by sending a 
stamped addvssed envelope to: 

Portfolio Gold, 

PO Box 40. 

Blackburn, 

BB1 6AJ. 


Campaign to 
revive 

more victims 

Hundreds of lives could be 
saved each year if people knew - 
simple rules about resuscita- 
tion, the Royal Society of- 
Medicine claimed yesterday. ; 

It said hundreds of then- 
sands of people die every year . 
before an ambulance reaches 
them, either after a road . 
accident or a heart attack. 

Launching its "Save a life" * 
campaign yesterday. Mrs * 
Penny Webb, the campaign ! 
director, said she hoped that 
250,000 people could be ! 
trained in simple resuscitation - 
techniques within the next six ‘ 
months. 


As you can see, this is not some new kind of 
vehicle for negotiating rough terrain. 

It is, in fact, Saginaw Tilt Wheel Steering. 

A special feature that can alter the way a 
car fleet is run. 

The wheel adjusts to five separate positions. 

So, from a driver’s point of view; it can make 
life more comfortable. 

In turn, making driving far safer. 

(Added to which, a unique Saginaw energy- 
absorbing column comes as standard) 

C h an ging the angle of the wheel takes no 
effort whatsoever 

By moving a small lever on the steering 
column, it can be set to the ideal position. 

Tilted down, it’s easy to imagine what a fast 
sports car feels like. 

Tilted up, its like being behind the wheel of 
a London bus. 

This last position also 
provides more leg room, so 
getting in and out of a car 
becomes a much simpler 
exercise. 

But its not only the 
fleet driver who benefits 
from Saginaw Tilt Wheel 
Steering. 

Fleet Managers do, too. 

Because every car it’s fitted to will adapt 
to many more people. 

Allowing drivers and cars to be inter- 
changed quite easily. 

And giving a fleet greater flexibility. 

There aren’t many extras that can do that. 
And certainly not for just £75 (plus VAT and 
Car Tax). 

So give us a call on 01-200 0200. 

And find out more about 5-wheel drive and 
bow it handles. 



3 


Degrees more comfortable. 
Degrees safen 

AS SXWWHD OH OPTIONAL roon^tEhrr ON MUST HEW VALIXHAU. CARS, 








■ HOME NEWS 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 1 1986 


labour party conference 


Leader’s speech • Naming judges • Prisons policy • NEC vote 


] 


Labour will stand with Allies, Kinnock pledges 


hnJJ JS ? 1 KjnnocJ L the La- 
!^!!^ ler V made clear in his 
speech to the Labour Party 
,n Blackpool yes- 
jenday that an incoming La- 
o^Govwmnem would not 
vttal non-nuclear 
feabtiw that were critical or 
“L£ and intelligence 
needs of the United Stares. 

tn a dramatic section of his 
he said he would fight 
and die for his country but he 
could never allow bis country 
JO die for him. A Labour 
Government would sustain 
the non-nuclear facilities be- 
cause they were allies. 

They would discharge their 
Nato obligations and thus 
demonstrate that they would 

® A society more di- 
vided than since the 
last war 9 

continue to play their part in 
providing security for the 
American people. 

No US Government would 
want to sacrifice that, he told 
the conference but only after 
he voiced his opinion that if a 
member ofNato was to seek to 
subordinate the policies of a 
democratically-elected allied 
government it would be 
invalidating the very prin- 
ciples of democracy and sov- 
ereignty that Nato existed to 
defend. 

U was the first duty of any 
government to ensure the 
security of the country and 
meeting that required that 
they participated properly in 
Nato. Labour would fulfil that 
obligation and that was 
amongst the most prominent 
reasons for implementing a 
non-nuclear defence strategy. 

Mr Kinnock said they were 
meeting in the autumn of the 
eighth year of Thatcherism — 
90 months of Maggie in which 
society had become more 
divided than since the last 
war. in which industry had 
been devasted as never before 
and in which the ecomony had 
been weakened as never 
before. 

After all that the Prime 
Minister says that she seeks 
another term. “Well she is not 
_ to have another term, 
e and the British people will 
definitely see to that" 

They had had these years of 
Thatcherism and they had had 
the coagulation of the Liberals 
and the SDP. The Liberal 
gathering last week would long 
be remembered as the assem- 
bly which put the lie in 
Alliance. 

The votes on defence and 
nuclear power should not 


going 

Wean 


have come as such a surprise 
considering the assembly had 
the inspirational experience of 
being addressed by Dr Owen. 

“As the Tories lade and the 
Liberals and SDP falter, our 
party is entering its fourth year 
of recovery and of advance. 
That recovery has been 
worked for by all people across 
the movement." 

The recovery had been 
brought about by ensuring 
that the party sustained both 
democracy and socialism. 
They had not done it in an 
authoritarian manner. They 
had done it because they could 
not let their democracy be 
distorted and they could let 
their generosity be abused. 

The Labour Party was about 
the serious business of 
convincing more people, of 
putting its ideas and policies 
across and of persuading peo- 
ple to their view. They had 
seen what others had done. 
They had increased un- 
employment, cut manufac- 
turing investment and 
destroyed capacity, lost world 
trade and wrth £50 billion in 
North Sea oil revenues they 
had blown it, wasted it on the 
bills of the unemployment 
caused by their policies. 

And all of the time that had 
been going on, they had heard 
the strident homilies about 
Victorian values and moral- 
ity, on the virtues of self- 
reliance. thrift and respon- 
sibility. Mrs Thatcher said her 
policy started with the free- 
dom and well-being of the 
family and she had as her 
clone Mrs Edwina Currie who 
thought a high fibre diet 
should replace the NHS. 

Mrs Thatcher lectured the 
country on morality when the 
Sileninight company, British 
Coal, News international and 
so many others deserted their 
basic obligations to people 
who had given them faithful 
years of service, ft was the 
people outside who were lec- 
tured, never those who sat in 
the offices inside. 

He supposed that (he pious 
sermons and self-righteous 
homilies from Mrs Thatcher 
and Mr Tebbit were easier 
than facing the real problems 
or answering real questions. 

Tories dressed up the get- 
rich-quick society as the 
"opportunity society”; they 
continually represented ar- 
rogance and aggression as the 
only proof of strength. They 
had dedicated every policy to 
making the very rich richer 
and the poor, poorer. They 
had flaunted a commer- 
cialized paradise before young 
people but given them the 



Mr Denis Healey, the shadow Foreign Secretary, and his wife, Edna, in Blackpool yesterday for the conference 


purgatory of unemployment 
and insecurity. 

With their 40p pension rise 
and cuts in concessionary 
fares and community care, 
their housing and benefits 
cuts, these moralists daily 
breached the commandment 
“honour thy father and thy 
mother”. That was the moral- 
ity of this Government and he 

# There is a moral 
majority. It is 
broadminded and 
compassionate 9 

asked himself: “lust where do 
they get their idea of 
morality?” 

He went on: “There is a 
moral majority; it is not 
narrow, bigoted, self-righ- 
teous. crude; it is broad- 
minded and compassionate. 
That majority is not 
sentimemtal; it is realistic for 
it knows that if its morality is 
going to have a practical effect 
it must be backed by material 
provision. 

“We, as democratic social- 
ists. make our appeal to that 
moral majority. It does not 
expea politicians to deliver 
heaven on earth but it does 
expect politicians to work to 
prevent hell on earth. That is 
what the moral majority de- 
mands in this country." 

“We make our appeal to 
that moral majority", he said 


It does not expea politicians 
to deliver heaven and eanh. It 
does expect politicians to 
work to prevent hell on 
earth.** 

Millions still considered 
they needed a government 
that would use policies to help 
them attend to their material 
needs. 

“A government that does 
not preach the pious sermons 
of Maggie's morality, but prac- 
tices the policies of provision. 
It may give some temporary 
comfort to sympathize, but 
that does not provide sus- 
tenance. That must come 
from economic policies that 
generate wealth." 

That could only come from 
a government determined to 
adopt policies of investment, 
production and growth. The 
Labour Party would provide 
that government 

First, there was no prospect 
of a sustainable reduction in 
unemployment unless stable, 
long terra economic growth 
could be sustained; second, 
there was no possibility of 
long term economic growth 
and resilient prosperity for the 
British economy without a 
major development of British 
manufaauring industry; third, 
the length of economic decline 
over the past seven years 
presented a new set of strategic 
problems to which new strate- 
gic answers must be found; 
and fourth, none of the major 


social, commercial, industrial 
or economic problems was self 
correcting. 

Britain had literally to make 
its way to recovery, produce 
its way to recovery, sell its way 
to recovery. There was no 
other way to earn a living for 
ourselves and our children. 

Like any family or any 
business or any country, a 
Labour government would 
have to raise money in order 
to invest in the means of 
making wealth. 

"And what we will have to 
borrow is an extra 2 per cent of 
the total income of this 
country.” 

Mrs Thatcher did not care 
that the result of not spending 
was an increase in unemploy- 
ment now and a guarantee of 
fiiture unemployment, future 
underemployment, future 

6 Britain has to 
make its way to re- 
covery, produce its 
way to recovery 9 

underinvestment, future 
underdeployment of our 
country. 

Apartheid was truely a 
crime against humanity and 
while it remained none of the 
people of South and Southern 
Africa would be really free, no- 
one in the while majority 
would enjoy real security, the 
black majority would have 


nothing approaching liberty 
and none of the neighbouring 
countries would be able to live 
in lasting peace. 

“That is why we want to 
hasten the day of change. And 
the lever we chose for that is 
stria and strong sanctions 
against South Africa, for they 
are the only practical means of 
trying to promote an end to 
apartheid that is not soaked in 
the blood of millions.” 

“We will fulfill that obliga- 
tion and that is among the 
most prominent reasons for 
implementing a non-nuclear 
defence strategy.” 

It was plainly the case that 
by pursuing a nuclear-depen- 
dent defence policy, the 
present Government was 
diminishing the conventional 
defence of the country. 

The alternatives before the 
British people were dear the 
Tory policy which in building 
up nuclear weapons at ruinous 
cost eroded conventional de- 
fence and added to nuclear 
danger without enhancing na- 
tional security in any way; ora 
policy which responded to the 
realities, ending the nuclear 
illusions and properly meeting 
the conveniuonal defence 
needs and duties of the 
country. 

The so-called Euro-bomb 
option would mean more 
fingers on the nuclear trigger, 
would not influence friends or 


impress potential enemies. 
They could call it the mini- 
mum deterrent but it could 
kill 60 or 70 million people. 

“They can call it these 
names as long as they like but 
in reality it would not increase 
security but would be the 
entente terminate .” 

(Applause) 

It had nothing to do with 
protecting the country or the 
continent but everything to do 
with the attempt of Liberal 
and SDP leaders to conjure an 
illusion of policy out of a 
delusion of grandeur. . 

There had in recent days 
been some other intervening 
voices, from outside Britain. 
Some of their language had 
been lurid but it had been 
repudiated. It had been made 
clear the voices were not 
representative of the Ameri- 
can administration. 

The interventions were not 
so much a product of Ameri- 
can anxiety as a result ofTory 
alarm at the fact that Labour 
was defeating them, and 
would beat them at the elec- 
tion. They would use every 
dirty trick to avoid that. 

The US administration's 
attitude showed much more 
common sense and common 
interest than the Tory 
attitude. 

That arose from the knowl- 
edge that if a member of the 
alliance of democracies were 
to seek to subordinate the 
policies of a democratically- 
elected allied government, it 


\ 


6 1 would give m 
life for country. But 
could never let my 
country die for me 9 


would be invalidating the very 
principles of democracy and 
sovereignty which Nato ex- 
isted to defend. 

This was the first generation 
which had to deal with .Weap- 
ons of total obliteration. That 
must not generate panic. Peo- 
ple must face the fart of the 
existence of weapons of 
obliteration. 

“I face it as the leader of this 
party who works to become 
the democratically elected 
leader of our country. I face it 
as an adult, as a citizen, as a fa- 
ther. ! tell you in no casual 
spirit, with no bravado, that 
like most of my fellow citi- 
zens, I would, if necessary, 
fight and die, give my life for 
my country. But I could never 
la my country die for me.' 


INDUSTRY 


Delegates 
display 
their unity 

The desire of the Labour 
Party to present a united from 
was demonstrated in the de- 
bate on industrial relations 
when the Tass section of the 
Amalgamated Engineering 
Union agreed to remit to the 
national executive committee 
a motion, parts of which were 
said to conflict with 
TUC/Labour joint policy. 

Mr John Evans. MP. Oppo- 
sition spokesman on indus- 
trial relations and an NEC 
member, sad that sections of 
the motion were not in 
compliance with the joint 
document which he com- 
mended to the conference. 

The remitted motion called 
on the next Labour Govern- 
ment to replace all anti-trade 
union legislation with a char- 
ter of positive rights not 
involving state interference in 
internal union affairs. Part of 
it sought to give to trade 
unions full freedom to decide 
how officials and executive 
members should be elected. 

Mr John Edmonds, General 
Secretary of the General. 
Municipal. Boilermakers and 
Allied Trades Union, said the 
time had come to stop the 
workers of Britain becoming 
throwaway people in a throw- 
away society, when he moved 
a resolution, which was ac- 
cepted by the NEC and carried 
by the conference. 

It called on the next Labour 
government to introduce a 
new system of industrial rela- 
tions law, including a charter 
of legal rights for all at work, 
backed by sanctions against 
employers failing to observe 
its provisions. 

Miss Betty Barra tt, Wyc- 
ombe, seconding. . said 
workers’ basic rights which 
had been trampled on must be 
replaced so that never again 
would the country witness 
such horrific scenes as during 
the miners' strike and cur- 
rently at Wapping. 

Mr Evans, MP, said the 
next Labour government 
would restore trade union 
rights to all at GCHQ. 


Today’s agenda 

This morning the con- 
ference turns its attention to 
foreign affairs with debates on 
the Third World. South Af- 
rica. Nicaragua. Iran and Iraq. 
This afternoon delegates will 
consider energy policy and 
party organization covering 
women, blacks and youth. 



LAW REFORM 


Call for new method of 
appointing judges 


A comprehensive policy 
statement, including im- 
portant reforms of the law and 
proposals for new systems of 
appointment to the judiciary 
and magistracy . was made by 
Mr Tony Bean. MP for 
Chesterfield, when he replied 
on behalf of the national 
executive committee at the 
end of a debate on legal 
reform. 

The need to repeal vicious 
Conservative laws meant 
dealing with judges who inter- 
preted them in a way biased 
against justice for the working 
class, he said. It meant dealing 
with a legal system which 
supported the protection of 
property at the expense of 
people. 

An accountable magistracy 
had to be established to re- 
place the present secret 
appointments of magistrates 
bv secret committees, result- 
ing in politically biased 
Conservative magistrates in 
some areas using their power 
against working people. 

One of the problems or 
reform was the British 
Establishment, who wanted to 
protect their privileges, prop- 
erty and power by using the 
Jaw to deny justice to the 
working class, 

A ministry of justice with an 


elected House of Commons 
minister in charge was long 
overdue. Mr Gavin Millar. 
Society of Labour Lawyers, 
said in successful^- proposing 
the resolution, which called on 
the next Labour government 
to reverse law centre closures, 
improve legal services in ur- 
ban and rural areas and ensure 
that all rights were effectively 
enforced and enjoyed. 

It further instructed the 
NEC to draw up a comprehen- 
sive policy statement, in 
consultation with the Labour 
and trade union movements, 
to provide a network of 
accountable and responsive 
legal aid services, a judicial 
system geared to the protec- 
tion of the individual, and a 
family court to deal with civil 
and criminal matters involv- 
ing children. 

Mr Graham Eastwood. 
Manchester. Wythenshawe. 
seconding the resolution, said 
there would not be justice for 
working people in the courts 
under the present Govern- 
ment. 

Lord Gifford, a barrister, 
said people must have access 
to justice in fair courts and 
there would have to be an 
overhaul of the system for 
appointing judges and mag- 
istrates. 


GAY RIGHTS 

‘We must 
be party of 
equality’ 

Delegates forced a card vote 
at the end of a debate on 
lesbian and gay rights to get 
the motion written into the- 
party’s programme. 

Although the motion, 
instructing the national exec- 
utive committee to draft a 
lesbian and gay rights policy 
and calling on Labour local 
authorities and groups to 
adopt policies to prevent 
discrimination, was carried on 
a show of hands, it needed a 
card vote with a two-thirds 
majority to be written into the 
party programme. 

The motion was carrried by 
4,791000 votes to 1,261000. 

Mr Mike McNair. Leeds. 
North-East, moving the mo- 
tion. said that he wanted 
action taken on the party 
policy agreed last year. He 
specifically wanted the party 
to co-ordinate policy so that 
every Labour local authority 
followed the example of the 
best, such as Manchester and 
Haringey, and not the worst, 
such as Glasgow. 

Mr Chris Smith. MP for 
Islington South and Finsbury, 
said that a policy for lesbian 
and gay men was central to 
socialism because the Labour 
Party was the party of equality 
for everyone to live their lives 
and conduct relationships in 
their own way. 

Miss Jo Richardson, party 
spokesman on women’s 
rights, said that no child 
should be taken from a 
mother or father because of 
their sexuality. 


Success for Tam, hammer 
of Whitehall and Cabinet 

By Richard Evans, Political Correspondent 


Mr Tam Dalyell the first 
Old Etonian to be elected to 
Labour's national executive 
committee since Hugh Dalton 
half a century ago, has gained 
fame — some would say in- 
famy — for his relentless pur- 
suit and harrying of 
government ministers. 

In a parliamentary career 
stretching back to 1962. the 
former trooper in the Royal 
Scots Greys has taken up the 
most obscure causes and bom- 
barded Whitehall with endless 
parliamentary questions. 

But it has been his 
controversial and persistent 
hounding of the Prime Min- 
ister and senior Cabinet min- 
isters over Westland and the 
sinking of the Belgrano that 
has shot him to national 
prominence. 

Last night he attributed his 
“surprise” NEC success, 
which came after 22 un- 
successful attempts, to the 
failure of Mrs Thatcher to tell 
him or the House of Com- 
mons the troth. 

“My eleaion is a reflection 
of the interest of many constit- 
uency Labour parties in the 
answers to questions I have 
been putting to the Prime 
Minister, not only on the 
select committee on the 
Belgrano, but also on the 
Libyan bombing, her role in 
the miners’ strike and. above 
all. the leaked law officers* 
later during Westland.” 

During the past two years he 
has addressed about ISO 
constituency parties, nearly 
always talking about Westland 
or the Belgrano, sometimes 
both. 


Yesterday he made clear his 
intention to use his new 
position to continue his per- 
sonal crusades. 

On most NEC issues he is 
unlikely to rock the boat and 
will support Mr Neil Kinnock. 
but the party leader will know 
that support cannot be taken 
for granted. 

“I owe my old friend Neil 
my best judgement on any key 


issue. The situation is we are 
old friends in adversity. I want 
him to suceed; 1 want him to 
be Prime Minister.” 

Although Tam, as he is 
universally and affectionately 
known, is a member of the 
hard-left Campaign Group of 
MPs, he does not owe alle- 
giance to any particular wing 
of the party, and is a genuine 
political maverick. 


Results of the Labour Party 
elections were: 


National Executive Committee 


Trade Union Section: 

E. Hanh.TGWU 5.593.000: 

T. Clafte.UCW 5.321.000: 

N. Hough, Gmbatu 5,279,000; 

S. Tierney, Usda* 5,113.000; 

E. O'Brien.Sogat 62 5.020.000: 

C.E. Tumock.Nur 4,893,000: 

K. G. CureAEU 4,647.000: 

J. Rogars.Ucatt 4.605,000; 

T. Sawyar.Nupe 4.530,000; 

C. AmWer.Coftse 3,980,000; 

E. Clarke.NUM 3.757.000; 

G. Cofling, NCSA 3,757.000. 

The foVowing were not elected: 
E.D. HoyteAstms 2,954.000; 

B. Switzer AEU-TASS 2,718^00; 

R.A. Rosser.TSSA 2^17,000; 

J.F. Spellar.EETPU 1.437.000; 

T. O’N&II.BFAWU 533.000: 

P.D. Holt,NCU 409,000; 

MA. BanetLNLBD 108A)0. 

Socialist Co-operative end other 
organizations: 

J. Evans, Labour and SodaBst 
dubs 41.000 

Not elected: 

L. Huckfield, Co-op Retail 

Services 6.000; 

J. Tait, Socialist Educational 
Association 2.000 

Constituency Labour Parties: 

O. Blunkett 499,000: 

T. M. Meacher 4824)00; 

D. Skimmer 430.000; 

T. Daiyett 376.000; 

J. Richardson 364.000; 

A. Wise 279.000 


Not elected: 

E. Hotter 

251.000; 

J. Ashley 

232,000; 

G. Kaufman 

224.000: 

R. Cook 

207,000; 

O. Davies 

78,000; 

M.R. Profit* 

69,000; 

J. Straw 

59.000: 

A Mitchell 

51,000; 

G. Radice 

39,000: 

G. GaHoway 

38.000; 

N. Makanfi 

33.000: 

S. BeB 

21,000: 

G. Robertson 

20.000.- 

C. Smith 

11,000; 

C. Gray 

A. McKay 

10,000; 

8.000; 

P. Patel 

2,000. 

Women members; 

R. Short 

4.378.000; 

B. Boothroyd 

4.268,000: 

G. Dunwoody 

3,820,000; 

D. Jeuda 

3*01.000: 

J. Maynard 

4374,000. 

Not elected: 

M Beckett 

3,101,000; 

A. Davis 

2387.000; 

C. Short 

2,1804)00; 

J. Lester 

1,2704)00; 

F. Morrefl 

1204.000; 

D. Abbott 

654,000; 

A. Cfwyd 

609,000: 

P.Ottey 

87,000. 

Treasurer: 

S. McOustoe 

5.442.000. 

Not elected: 

G. Strang 

564.000; 

K. Livingstone 

317,000. 


CRIME AND POLICING 


Motions criticized as too woolly 


Black delegates protested 
that crime and policing mo- 
tions before the conference 
were too woolly and that there 
sfaonld be a stronger in- 
strument for making the police 
accountable. 

One of them. Miss Martha 
Osamor, of Tottenham, won 
the right to address conference 
only by occupying the 
speakers* rostrum while the 
NEC representative was start- 
ing his speech from the plat- 
form. 

Some delegates drowned the 
words of Mr Tony Clarke, of 
the NEC. until he said he 
would cot some of his speech 
so that Miss Osamor could 
address the conference. 

The conference passed all 


the resolutions before it de- 
spite the protests about them. 

One called for a broad 
socialist policy on crime and 
policing. The conference also 
passed aan emergency motion 
calling for an inquiry into the 
Stalker affair. 

Miss Cynthia Derail Lan- 
cashire West, moving a resolu- 
tion demanding democratic 

acconntability of the police to 
locally elected representatives, 
said that in Inner cities, where 
working people were already 
suffering under the strains of 
unemployment, fear of crime 
was yet another burden they 
had to bear. 

Mr Geoff Dixon. Old Bex- 
ley and Sidcop and Sogat *82, 


seconding, said it suited the 
Establishment to use the po- 
lice to criminalize working 
dass blacks and bade union- 
ists in an attempt to blame 
ordinary people for the crisis. 

Miss Sarah Stevens, Ecdes. 
moving an emergency resolu- 
tion calling for a judicial 
inquiry' into the Stalker case, 
said rhe call for an indepen- 
dent authority to investigate 
complaints against the police 
was a first step in the right 
direction. 

Mr Gerald Kanfman, 
shadow Home Secretary, said 
Labour would seek to prevent 
crime. They maid bare more 
bobbies on the beat But’ their 
plans would cost money. 


Divisions on 
independent 
schooling 

Independent schools could 
face a- future where they all 
became truly “public” if a 
motion passed by the Labour 
conference is put into effect. 

The motion was agreed on a 
show of hands without the 
card vote necessary to show 
the majority required for it to 
become official Labour policy. 

Mr Giles Radice MP, 
Labour’s education spokes- 
man in the Commons said 
after the dehate that present 
policy seeking a voluntary 
transfer of private schools to 
the public sector would re- 
main in force. 

The nodoaadmrw The 
end of subsidies to the presail 
independent schools 


Conference reports by Alan Wood, Robert Morgan, Joiin Winder, Anthony Hodges and Howard Underwood 




COMMENTARY 




VI p - 


Geoffrey Smith 


Last year NeO Kinnock 
electrified the conference and 
impressed the country with his 
atfaffai first on the Liverpool 
Militants and then on Arthur 
ScargOTs leadership of the 
miners. He had to demonstrate 
that he was able to stand vtp to 
the extremists and he suc- 
ceeded magnificently. 

This year he had a less 
dramatic purpose. It is a 
conference of high expecta- 
tions. Labour believes at last 
that it can win the next 
elections. So Mr Kinnock bad 
both to respond to this mood, 
to encourage die confidence 
and at the same lime to 
restrain the expectations. 

One of the best ways to 
reduce Labour's electoral 
chances wonld be to promise to 
do everything at once, and one 
of the certain ways tn eusrae 
the faDare of a Labour govern- 
ment would be to try to do 
everything at once. 

This particular signal was, I 
thought, transmitted quite 
effectively in general terms. 
Nobody could have been in any 
doubt about Mr Kinnock's 
broad intentions. Bat this does 
not mean that he roll have 
convinced all sections of the 
party of the. wisdom: of 
proceeding gradually. The left 
will undoubtedly want to se- 
cure commitments to more 
ambitions programmes. 

How far will 
the left press? 


The critical question, on 
which a great deal in British 
politics may depend over the 
next year or so, wfll be how far 
the left presses the party 
leadership in advance ofi the 
election, and how publidy it 
does so. 

If there were to be a 
succession of public wrangles 
over demands for the Labour, 
leadership to embrace social- 
ism more enthusiastically, the 
electorate might well be fright- 
ened ofiT and - the facade «T 
party unity which has been so 
carefully prepared, would be 
torn apart But both here at 
Blackpool and at the TUC ia. 
Brighton last mouth there has 
been an evident yearning for 
the retail of a Labour govern- 
ment which imposes a certain 
restraint. 

This restraint has its effect, 
though, not only on the party 
bat also on the leader. 
Whereas a year ago Mr 
Kinnock deliberately con- 
fronted the hottest issues, this 
time be seemed tn be intent on 
keeping out of tumble. When 
the most loadiy applauded 
sections of a party leader’s 
speech are (hose on Nicaragua 
and South Africa that is some 
indication that be has avoided 
contentious specifics. 

There was dear evidence 
that the return of a Labour . 
government would mean a 
considerable increase in mate ; 
control of the economy. Bit 
that was hardly a new revela- 
tion. There was a ddptfc 
warning about excessive pay 
increases, bat it was *o 
wrapped op that the precise 
meaning was net made ev- 
ident. 

It was particnlariy an de- 
fence, however, that Mr 
Kinaock seemed to be deter- 
mined to skirt trouble w i t fafa 
the party.- He focused under - 
standaMy enough on the 
warnings from Mr Caspar 
Weinberger and Mr Richard 
Pale on the implications ■ of 
Labour defence policy for 
Nato. 

Labour is nnhaf in its 
determination not to be bulftd 
by the Reagan Administration, 
and on that point it may find a 
certain amount of public sym- . 
pathy. There is a risk ; of 
international realities broom— 
i ng pa rtly obscured by an - 
argument over niceties. 


Main question 
concerns Nato 


But. for Mr Kinaock yes- 
terday that was die easy issue. 

What mattered was whether 
he could assuage foe fear that - . . i/„ 

a' Labour g o v er nment would 
undermine Nato and whether 
he could resolve the un- 
certainty .crorted by Denis ■ 

Healey’s’ recent remarks. He 
failed on both scores. 

It. fc fafienras to suppose - 
that it would hie possible to - 
escape the damaging con- 
sequences of expelling Amerf- ? 
can nuclear weapons from 
Britain by all owing the United 
States to keep other military 
installations here. Bat woold a : 

Labour government demand L * 

the withdrawal of American . 
missiles or merely seek to 
negotiate their withdrawal? 

That is ttterUitestien posed by 
comments. It 
required a categorical :aip*rar 
from Mr yesterday, . 

bat he failed to : respond. J ' 
doubt if fotaMs the best way to . 
win the ’ election,^ but It h 

certainly opt foe best ^ay jto — 






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Hurd says more police 

accountability would 
put enemies in control 


■8SBW 

. ^ lc * ■»■ _ "OIO roilll OtULC IH» ISM 

«Mfc PTOposa,s for great. -LaDOUT IS yw ‘ 

mwn T Sd _ , There was also ibe antipa- 

- poS^ nd,n 8 control of ule HCCUSfid OH Ay by some London boroughs 

; fe s F s S&35 picketing ttUBT'Jz 

^"•‘hS SS5S«a sasaiSsi 


: police in some "r Vi 1 of lhe 
? danecmnc <, ^ of the most 

S '°! hcir vei > 

manders wo"' 0 


water Farm estate xioi Iasi 
year. 

There was also the antipa- 
thy by some London boroughs 
to police programmes for 
crime prevention or police 
visits to schools. 


Mr Hurd mari , . ■ . *t e AKStion of how the police 

rouniahiiii. adc . saitack °n s !*® Qld respond to picket line 


asfes 

asieS ? t 

Hon >0 Sccrctarv told an 

fhan "‘niMi rCpr ? scnlin8 more 
er^hT.' 0 * ^ ollCc command- 

hi nspii - eofihedifficui1 

fj 1 l “ at,0n m mncr-ci iv areas 

' h '> 1!?L agcd 10 glance the 
need to keep the peace with 
enforcing [he law. 

» lV ^« id: rln circumstances 
like these 1 thank heaven for 
the operational independence 
or ch|ct officers and for the 
traditional delegation orauth- 
orny to the man on the spot.” 

Mr Hurd told the confcr- 
cnce-. "Ideas now being ban- 
dicd about for greater account- 
ability may sound cosy at 
pan> conferences. 

But if. as I believe, they in 
practice would mean handing 

C r 1 u r ° ,he P°bcc in some 
oi the most dangerous areas to 
the enemies of the police, then 
how is the individual citizen 
to be protected? ... the con- 
cept of operational indepen- 
dence under the law suits 
British policing best.” 

There* was controversy over 
the use of plastic bullets and 
the tactics of handling dis- 
order hut the Home Secretary 
told his police audience: **lt 
will be interesting to see how 
some of your critics would 
react to being placed in the 
front line of a riot situation.” 

Asked to define what he 
meant In “enemies*’ Mr Hurd 
said: “l am not talking about 
the Labour Party as a whole 
because what. T have said 
would wot Ih the wishes of Mr 
Kinitock or Mr Kaufman, but 
they need -to pur their own 
bouse in order in that 
respect." 

Mr Hurd said he was refer- 
ring to a number of London 
boroughs and (he situation in 
Manchester, where the police 
were attacked in. a glqssy ma- 


violence of the kind seen in the 
prin (workers’ dispute at 
Wapping, east Loudon 
(Nicholas Wood, Political Re- 
porter, writes). 

He told industrialists in 
Bradford that the responsibil- 
ity for police involvement in 
such disturbances lay not. as 
Labour maintained, with gov- 
ernment policies, but with the 
practice of mass picketing — 
destined to become more com- 
mon under the Opposition's 
proposed new anion laws. 

He added: “1 have not been 
able to get a straight answer to 
the simple question: "Faced 
with attempts by mass picket- 
ing to prevent workers who 
ha ve chosen to go to work from 
going about their lawful occa- 
sions, what are the police 
supposed to do? Ignore the 
picketing and allow bullying 
tactics to triumph?' 

“If Labour thinks the police 
should not protect one group of 
trade unionists from their 
more militant brethren, then 
this gives a more sinister di- 
mension to the title of their law 
and order document, Pro- 
tecting oar People." 

The Home Secretary also 
said that Labour's promise to 
repeal the Prevention of Ter- 
rorism Act was “an act of 
appeasement of their own left 
wing"* and would deprive the 
police of a crucial weapon in 
their armoury. 

He suggested that a future 
Labour government might, 
through lack of money, renege 
on its promise to put “more 
bobbies on the beat”. . 

gazinc prepared by a local pol- 
ice monitoring group. 

There were plenty of La- 
bour authorities and individ- 
ual politicians who were sup- 
portive of the police, but there 
were others in London and 
Manchester who were cons- 
tantly sniping at lhe police and 
undermining their cITons. 

The Home Secretary point- 
ed to criticisms of the police 
and other comments from loc- 
al politicians after the Broad- 


oresscQ the cues! ion of man- 
power shortages which has 
already drawn criticism from 
the association which is call- 
ing for more men. 

The Home Secretary prom- 
ised that several hundred 
more officers are likely to be 
given to forces in the next few 
months as part of a pro- 
gramme announced earlier 
this year. 

But told police: “In seeking 
more resources I cannot use 
the crude argument, that more 
officers will produce a drop in 
crime. That would fly in the 
face of all the evidence.” 

He said he had to show that 
more officers were needed for 
specific tasks and that is what 
he was doing. 

Increases in policeand civil- 
ian staff already announced 
would lead to an increase of 
4.400 in operational police 
strengths during the next few 
years. 

In spite of the criticism of 
the lack of manpower many 
forces were below establish- 
ment. 

At the end of July. Mr Hurd 
said, there were 1.024 va- 
cancies in provincial forces 
and 1 0 forces bad a shortfall of 
more than 1 .5 per cent of their 
establishment. The Metro- 
politan Police had 73 3 va- 
cancies on its establishment, 
which included 300 extra 
posts given to it this year. 

London was recruiting and 
other forces should do the 
same because, the Home Scc- 
reiary said, the money was 
available. 

Noting the problems faced 
by the police Mr Hurd pointed 
to the cost of the Wapping 
dispute where he said 379 
officers had been injured and 
1.181 arrests made. 

He said he was saddened to 
see valuable police resources 
diverted and hoped the dis- 
pute would be resolved soon. 

What the police faced was 
not mainly a matter of prini- 
workere exercising their right 
to picket but “a matter of 
undisciplined groups seeking 
ah outlet for violence”. 



Acid rain: 3 


Children help out 
in pollution war 


Captain Mark Phillips, carrying a 
spade to cut the first turf fora £3 million 
equestrian centre to be built at 
Gleneagles Hotel, Perthshire. 

Captain Phillips, who will manage 
the centre when it opens in 1988, said 
yesterday that it will rival the best in the 
world. As well as providing riding 
instruction, it is envisaged that the 


centre will stage international events. 

Captain Phillips said: “I thought it 
would be wonderful if I could do more 
teaching in the United Kingdom.’’ 

The centre, subject to final planning 
approval, will be built on an eight-acre 
site. A 30,000 sq ft arena will seat 500 
spectators and 70 competitors (Photo- 
graph: Tom Kidd). 


Crown court service 


Solicitors’ role a pay issue 

By Frances Gibb, Legal Affairs Correspondent 


Rights for solicitors to 
appear in crown courts will be 
one of the key issues tied in 
with the next round of pay 
talks about to start between 
the two branches of the legal 
profession and the Govern- 
ment. 

The Bar is to press for a 
change in the rules so that 


The issue is likely to be one 
of the most controversial in 
the next round of discussions. 
It was raised by officials in the 
last pay talks when the Law 
Society described it as “the 
most significant proposal 
from the Government" but no 
agreement was reached. 

At that time the Law Society 


barristers can appear on their said that if the Government 


own in crown court cases 
without a solicitor needing to 
attend them. 

Solicitors arc determined 
however that if lawyers are 
allowed to appear alone in the 
crown court. Ihcn it must be 
on the basis that the lawyer 
can be cither a barrister or a 
solicitor. 

In the last pay round 2 per 
cent of the- Bar's pay rise, 
which lakes effect today, was 
in return for agreeing that 
barristers might appear alone 
in magistrates' courts. Now 
Bar leaders want to reach 
agreement with the Law Soci- 
ety that the same might apply 
in crown court cases. . 


“insists for public purse 
considerations” that crown 
court cases can be conducted 
by one lawyer, then it must be 
possible for that lawyer to be 
either a solicitor or barrister 

Bui the Bar chairman. Mr 
Robert Alexander. QC. in- 
dicated last weekend that 
there might be room for 
manoeuvre. Addressing a 
solicitors' conference he out- 
lined the pros and cons of 
granting solicitors limited 
crown court rights in simple 
cases. •. . 

Although stopping short of 
conceding the case, he did 
emcrtajn the possibility of 
such, rights for the private 


profession, emphasizing that 
on no account should they be 
extended to the crown pros- 
ecution sen. ice. 

• The early operations of the i 
new crown prosecution ser- 
vice. which comes into force 
today, has already created a 
catalogue of inefficiency with 
lost cases, wasted police time 
and incompetent lawyers, the 
Home Secretary was told yes- 
terday at a conference’ of 
senior police officers (Stewart 
Tcndlcr writes). 

The problems of the service 
were outlined by Chief Supl 
Leslie Stowe, president of the 
Police Superintendents' As- 
sociation. when he addressed 
Mr Douglas Hurd. Home 
Secretary, and members of lhe 
association at its annual con- 
ference in Harrogate. 

Mr Stowe said there were 
examples of case papers being 
lost.' cases discharged for lack 
of prosecution, and mag- 
istrates threatening to dis- 
charge prisoners facing very 
serious offences - 


Satellite photographs and 
children's acid kits are two of 
the tools being used in the race 
to find the exact causes and 
effects of arid rain. 

The Government has com- 
missioned researchers based 
at the Royal Aircraft 
Establishment, at Farn- 
borough. Hampshire, to 
choose a British power station 
and see if the path and 
destination of its smoke 
plume can be traced reliably 
by photography from a 
satellite. 

Meanwhile, on the ground 
Mr William Waldegcave. 
newly confirmed in his role as 
Minister for the Environment 
and Countryside, has given 
his blessing to a scheme that 
will involve children in the 
search for the precise effects of 
acid rain. 

The project, in which chil- 
dren will test the acidity of 
rain that falls on gardens at 
their homes during the next 
month, is described by its 
organizers as “the most am- 
bitious environmental survey 
of its kind". 

It is being organized by 
Watch, the junior branch of 
the Royal Society for Nature 
Conservation, which says: 
“There simply are not enough 
professional scientists to col- 
lea all the information we 
need to understand acid rain 
properly.” 

The slow pace of political 
acceptance of responsibility 
for acid damage enrages 
environmental campaigners. 

Britain has been cast as one 
of the villains of Europe for its 
refusal to adopt international 
standards. Soil structure, pre- 
vailing winds and industrial 
practice all help to ensure that 
Britain exports more at- 
mospheric pollution than it 
endures. 

Bui even here concern is 
growi mg about the impact of 
acid rain on watercourses, 
including some of the finest 
and most lucrative salmon 
streams in Scotland and 
northern England. 

Some of the airborne mois- 
ture reaching Scottish lochs 
and rivers is turning out to be 
almost as acidic as lemon 
juice. The relationship be- 
tween the water droplets in the 
sky and the fish in the streams 
is turning out to be more 
complex than was first imag- 
ined. 

Two processes seem to co- 
incide so that the streams 
catch a stiff seasonal dose of 
arid just as the salmon are 
hatching. The power stations 


# Millions of pounds are being 
pound imp research to find the 
answers to lhe mysteries of 
acid rain. Bui as Hugh Clay- 
ton, Environment Correspon- 
dent, reports in the third of Jour 
articles, it is hard to persuade 
governments to go further and 
invest heavily in environment 
ta! protection outside their awn 
oxuirriVs. 

producing the emissions that 
lead to acid rain arc owned by 
the Central Eleeiricilv Gen- 
erating Board, which is 
sponsoring wide research into 
the problem. 

Its chairman. Lord Marshall 
of Goring, believes that there 
is now “a solid and sound 
scientific basis for linking acid 
deposition and fishery status’’. 

The Government has 
agreed for the first lime this 
year that Britain is responsible 
tor some of the acid damage 
recorded in Norway. That is 
one reason why ministers 
have agreed to a partial curb 
on acid emissions from British 
coal-fired power stations. 

But Britain continues to 
object to l^SO bring used as 
the starting date for multi- 
national efforts to reduce the 
emissions that cause acid rain. 
The 21 nations who are mem- 
bers of the ”30 per cent” club 
have agreed to cut sulphur 
dioxide emissions by 30 per 
cent between the starting dare 
and the mid-1990s. 

The 1 9S0 dale is also signifi- 
cant for a draft EEC rule 
telling member stales to cut 
sulphur dioxide emissions 
output from factories and 
power stations by bO per cent 
and nitrogen oxides by 40 per 
cent. 

Britain, which is outside the 
club and opposes the draft, 
argues that starting with 1980 
neatly skips past the period in 
the mid-1970s when British 
emissions fell fastest. 

That does not satisfy critics 
who sec evidence of environ- 
mental damage from acid all 
over Europe. 

Their concern is echoed in 
the EEC Commission where 
Mr Qinton Davis, the former 
British Labour minister who is 
now Commissioner respon- 
sible for environmental pro- 
tection. called for faster 
political acceptance of the 
need for action. 

He said in London: “Part of 
the political problem is id 
convince the-damage export- 
ers that they must spend 
money to help others “ - " 


Tomorrow: The future. 


4 MM 

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On the instructions of the London Residuary Body, the County Hall complex - five impressive office 
buildings with a total gross floor area of 22 million sq.ft, -is now offered for sale. 

The 11 acre site commands a city centre location unrivalled in Europe, on the banks of the Thames and 

overlooking the Houses of Parliament. 

The potential exists, subject to planning approval, for the widest possible range of refurbishment and 

redevelopment opportunities. 

Rjch^dEUitB^S™ London W1X.6AN. Telex: 262498. 


Richard Ellis 

Telephone: 01-629 6290 







. "6 


OVERSEAS NEWS THE TIMES WEDNES DAY _OCTOBER 1 1?S6_ 

Journalists and Soviet citizens face new atmosphere of distrust 


Daniloff affair casts a 
shadow over future 
of openness campaign 


From Christopher Walker, Moscow 


Whatever the final verdict 
on the complex deal which 
ended the 30-day ordeal of 
Nicholas Daniloff there can 
be no doubt that the arrest, 
interrogation and attempted 
character assasination of one 
of the most senior members of 
the large Moscow press corps 
will leave its mark on the 
reporting of the Soviet Union 
at a crucial moment in its 
history. 

“However hard the Reagan 
Administration may try to 
gloss things over, there are few 
of us not convinced that what 
the KGB heavy mob has done 
on cc. it is quite capable of 
trving again.” one of the 40 
accredited US journalists in 
Moscow said yesterday. “It is 
bound to leave a bitter 
legacy.” 

He added that the bitterness 
would be greater because of 
the expectations of change 
that had been so widely 
aroused by Mr Gorbachov's 
campaign of glasnost (open- 
ness). and his assiduous woo- 
ing of the foreign media 
during his early months in 
office. 

A similar new was taken by 
many of the hundreds of 
Westerners now living in the 
Soviet Union without dip- 
lomatic immunity (the major- 
ity either journalists or 
businessmen). Several have 
complained that one result of 
the Daniloff affair was to leave 
them as quasi-hostages for the 
behaviour of their own gov- 
ernments towards Soviet citi- 
zens without immunity sus- 
oected of espionage in their 
home countries. 

“What has happened is a 
very bad precedent for all of us 
living here.” said one West 
European diplomat with two 
years’ service in Moscow. 
“My view, and the view of 
many in the embassy, is that 
the ■ Americans should have 
acted a lot tougher from the 
outset Once both Daniloff 
and Zakharov had been let out 
to their respective embassies. 


the principle of some sort of 
equality had been conceded.” 

As if to drive home the 
lessons of the affair for report- 
ers, the Communist Party 
paper. Sovidskaya Rossiya — 
reputedly the daily most fa- 
voured by Mr Gorbachov — 
carried a strident article yes- 
terday emphasizing what it 
alleged were the close links 
between American journalists 
and the CIA. 

“Daniloff is not the only 
agent of the CIA hiding be- 
hind a correspondent's card,” 
it claimed. 

Although most Western 
reporters remained convinced 
of Mr Daniloffs innocence, 
especially those who had 
known him well during his 
recent fi ve-and-a-hal f-year 
stint in Moscow, the great 
majority of Soviet citizens — 
with the exception of the 

US and Soviet negotiators on 
space and defence met for 
three hours yesterday at die 
US mission. in Geneva (AP 
reports). No details were re- 
leased. The teams were led by 
Mr Max Kampelman and Mr 
Viktor Karpov. 

Russian friends who bravely 
stood by him and his family — 
will have taken their cue from 
the Kremlin and regarded him 
as guilty. . 

Inevitably, the atmosphere 
of mutual suspicion which has 
long dominated relations be- 
tween Western correspon- 
dents and most Soviet citizens 
has worsened, a result which 
diplomats believe will have 
been regarded as one of the 
most valuable spin-offs of the 
affair by those in charge at 
KGB headquarters at 2, 
Dzherzhinsky Square, in cen- 
tral Moscow. 

“There have been more 
than enough signs to indicate 
that some senior people inside 
the secret police were getting 
restive about the idea of 
opening too for what they 
wanted to keep a closed 


society ” another Western dip- 
lomat said. 

“This was their perfect 
opportunity to drive home the 
message to any citizen pre- 
pared for too close contact 
with foreigners.” 

Already in the four weeks 
since Mr Daniloff was 
unceremoniously bundled 
into the back of a KGB van 
with his wrists painfully hand- 
cuffed. Western • newsmen 
have detected a growing reluc- 
tance among certain of their 
Soviet contacts to keep up the 
type of relationship which 
existed previously. 

The increased suspicion has 
been mutual, with the cor- 
respondents displaying more 
than the normal prudence 
when dealing with invitations 
to meet Soviet citizens away 
from their offices. 

One leading American cor- 
respondent recalled that in the 
week before Mr Daniloff was 
seized, he had received four 
calls from a supposed “Ukrai- 
nian nationalist” requesting 
“an urgent meeting” 

As part of the unwritten set 
of “Moscow rules” which had 
grown noticeably Iaxer during 
the Gorbachov era. Western 
newsmen always used tq at- 
tend meetings in twos, and 
travel only in Western com- 
pany when outside Moscow. 
Most are now once again 
sticking closely to those 
com monsense precautions. 

Friendships formed before 
the Daniloff affair, which are 
so vital for any proper under- 
standing of such a vast and 
secretive country, of course 
remain. 

But. for several months at 
least, both parties are going to 
be treating each other with 
much greater doubt than be- 
fore Nick Daniloff went to the 
Lenin Hills district, only five 
minutes from his office, think- 
ing that be would be exchang- 
ing farewell gifis with Misha, a 
27-year old teacher who until 
that day bad been a well-liked 
and trusted contact 



An emotional farewell for Mr Daniloff as he embraces the US Consul-General in Frankfort, Mr Alexander Rattray. 


Man in the News 


Orlov expected to leave for America 


By Nicholas Beeston. and Mohsin Alt in Washington 


The release of Mr Yuri 
Orlov brings to an end eight 
years of hard campaigning by 
h uman rights groups and 
Western governments for a 
political prisoner, considered 
the second most prominent 
dissident figure in the Soviet 
Union. 

Mr Orlov, aged 62, was last 
seen in 1978 when a court 
found him guilty of “anti- 
Soviet agitation and pro- 
paganda” and sentenced him 
to a ■ngximmn term of seven 
years’ hard labour in a prison 
camp and five years’ internal 
exile in the remote Siberian 
town of KobyaL 

Mr Orlov has a history of 
outspoken critidsn of the 
Soviet regime dating back to 
1956, when as a unclear 
physicist he was expelled from 
the Communist Party and the 
Institute of Theoretical and 
Experimental Physics and 
sent to Armenia. 


He returned to Moscow in 
1972 and was re-admitted to 
the institute, but then em- 
barked on five yean of human 
rights campaigning, which 
ended in his arrest and 
imprisonment 

Mr Orlov is one of the 
fonnder members of the Hel- 
sinki monitoring group and, in 
the words of Mr George 
Shultz, the US Secretary of 
Stale, “a giant of the Soviet 
h uman rights movement”. 

He and his wife Arina wiD 
be allowed to leave die Soviet 
Union by next Tuesday and 
are expected to come to 
America.The precise timing 
and means of their departure 
will be determined by the US 
through diplomatic channels 
with me Soviet Union. 

Mr Orlov, a member of the 
Armenian Academy of Sci- 
ences, was chairman of the 


Helsinki group until his arrest 
in October 1977. 

Mr Shultz said: “The Hel- 
sinki monitor, as a courageous 
group of human rights ac- 
tivists, openly attempted to 
bold the Soviet authorities 
accountable to their commit- 
ments” under the 1975 Hel- 
sinki declaration on East- 
West detente and human 
rights. 

They maintained direct con- 
tact with Western diplomats 
ami journalists in an effort to 
keep them informed of Soviet 
human rights abuses. Such 
well-known figures as Andrei 
Sakharov. Yelena Bonner and 
Anatoly Shcharansky took 
part in the Moscow Helsinki 
monitoring group. 

Similar groups, modelled on 
the Moscow example, sprang 
up in other Soviet cities. 

Mr Shultz added: “As 
chairman of the Moscow 
group, be singled himself out 


for particular attention from 
the KGB and was caught up in 
the first wave of arrests of 
group members. Since 1984. 
he has been forced to live in a 
remote Siberian village in 
extrmely harsh physical 
conditions. 

“At age 62, Mr Orlov is in 
extremely pom- health as a 
result of prolonged periods of 
solitary confinement op to six 
mouths at a time, in labour 
camps and severe beatings 
suffered both hi camp and in 
exile.” 

Mr Orlov's wife shared his 
commitment to the Helsinki 
process. She has maintained 
regular contact with Western 
embassies and journalists over 
the years since her husband's 
arrest and has steadfastly- 
worked to ameliorate the 
harsh conditions of his 
confinement Mr Shultz said 
yesterday. 


Zimbabwe 

torture 

dilemma 

From. A Correspondent 
Harare 

The dilemma facing Zim- 
babwean churchmen over 
publicizing human rights ab- 
uses has been brought into the 
open here, although the sub- 
ject escaped debate, at a Pres- 
byterian general assembly. 
The church decided to keep 
secret the contents of 24 “case 
studies” it presented to the 
Government of Mr Robert 
Mugabe. 

In July the Minister of 
Home Affairs, Mr Enos 
Nkala, threatened to invoke 
his sweeping powers of indefi- 
nite detention against anyone 
found in communication with 
Amnesty International’s Lon- 
don headquarters. 

In a recent report. Amnesty 
alleged widespread detention 
and mistreatment of suspected 
Government opponents, 
particularly in the Matabele- 
land provinces loyal to Mr 
Joshua Nkomo's Zapu party. 

A spokesman for the 
Presbyterian Church of South- 
ern Africa said that members 
of its Zimbabwean church and 
nation committee had “entered 
into a covenant relationship 
they did not want to destroy” 
when they received an assur- 
ance that their “case studies” 
would be investigated by the 
authorities. 

The committee entered a 
minute recording “the pain 
they felt on the reports they 
had heard of unlawful deten- 
tion and torture”. 

South African churchmen, 
who joined colleagues from 
Zimbabwe and Zambia for the 
Harare general assembly, 
faced a similar possibility of 
confrontation with their au- 
thorities when they debated 
whether to urge young Presby- 
terians not to serve in the 
South African forces. This is 
an offence under Sooth Af- 
rican legislation. 

The ISO delegates, rep- 
resenting 70,000 Presby- 
terians in South Africa, 
Zimbabwe and Zambia, voted 
to receive a report which said 
that neither South African 
forces nor those of blade 
liberation movements were 
vindicated by traditional Pres- 
byterian doctrines of a “just 
war”. This is the nearest the 
church has yet come to 
advocating conscientious 
objection. 

The Presbyterians also vot- 
ed to offer chaplaincy services 
to the African National Con- 
gress, to the Pan-Africanist 
Congress and to Swapo. as 
well as to the forces of South 
Africa, Zambia and 
Zimbabwe. 

With a membership which 
is 60 per cent white, the 
Presbyterians are the only 
English-speaking denomina- 
tion in southern Africa not 
dominated by blacks. 



Defiant black Sooth African youths in Soweto confronting 
police who had jnst given them five minutes to dispose at die 
funeral of an 18-year-old killed by police gunfire. 

Howe defends 
British stand 
on sanctions 

By Our Foreign Staff 

Sir Geoffrey Howe, the 
Foreign Secretary, yesterday 
defended Britain's stand on 
sanctions against South Africa 
and told the Commonwealth 
to concentrate “on realistic 
joint commitments”. 

Speaking at the Common- 
wealth Paniamentaiy Associ- 
ation Conference, in a day 
dominated by the issue of 
sanctions, he warned that 
Com mon weal th meeti ngs 
should not be devalued by 
discord. 

Britain was isolated in the 
Commonwealth mini-summit 
last month when it refused to 
accept a policy of broad 
sanctions adopted by the other 
member countries. 

Bui Sir Geoffrey said the 
Government did not believe 
that apartheid could be de- 
feated by wrecking the econo- 
mies of southern Africa. 

“A bankrupt South Africa is 
no legacy for the majority who 
will one day control it." he 
said adding that critics of the 
Government's policy should 
not question its sincere desire 
to end apartheid. 


Sudan food 
airlift 
to restart 

From Charles Harrison 
Nairobi 

The first food airlift to 
southern Sudan since rebels 
shot down a civilian airliner in 
August is due to take off from 
Khartoum today for Juba, the 
main town in the south. 

Operation Rainbow, backed 
by the United Nations, has 
been delayed for ten days by 
the Sudan Government’s re- 
fusal to allow flights to areas 
controlled by the rebel Sudan 
People’s Liberation Army 
(SPLA), and by SPLA threats 
to shoot down aircraft, includ- 
ing relief flights. 

Earlier plans to reach starv- 
ing civilians in areas con- 
trolled by both Government 
and rebels have now been 
shelved. There are no plans at 
present to fly into Wau, one of 
die worst-hit famine areas. 

Sudan officials say food can 
be sent by road from Juba to 
Wau, but there are doubts 
about whether government 
forces can prevent rebel at- 
tacks in (his ansa. 

Operation Rainbow is plan- 
ned to continue for a month. 
The C 130 Hercules cargo air- 
craft can carry up to 30 tons of 
food at a time. 

Relief agencies hope that 
their assurances that the airlift 
is for the benefit of starving 
civilians will influence the 
SPLA against trying to shoot 
down the aid flights. 

More than two million peo- 
ple in southern Sudan are 
thought to be short of food. 


Mayor sacked for 
not going Dutch 


In a decision which is 
bound to inflame dormant 
linguistic differences in Bel- 
gium, and could lead to a 
government crisis, the Belgian 
Council of Slate yesterday 
dismissed the controversial 
mayor of a small French- 
speaking community near the 
Dutch border for his refusal to 
speak Dutch or deal with the 
surrounding Flemish pop- 
ulation. 

The Belgian coalition Gov- 
ernment had hoped that the 
long-standing divisions be- 
tween the French-speaking 
population of Wallonia and 
the Dutch (or Flemish) speak- 
ing people of Flanders were 
over, and that the passions 
and violence which the split 
has traditionally provoked 
were no longer a live issue. 

But the language problem, 
which in the past has brought 
down Belgian governments, 
recently resurfaced around the 
figure of Mr Josi Happart, 
who since 1982 has been the 
Francophone mayor of the 
group of villages known as the 
Fourons. a country commu- 
nity of about 4,000 people. 

As a French-speaking en- 
clave in a Flemish area, the 
Fourons were placed admin- 
istratively under Limburg in 
Flanders more than 20 years 
ago. 

But the villagers, led by the 
outspoken Mr Happart, want 
their local affairs returned to 
Uige in Wallonia, and there 
has been a revival of the 


From Richard Owen, Brussels - - 

tensions, demonstrations and 
slogans of the 1970s. 

The Council of State ruled 
that the area, like the rest of 
Belgium, must be bilingual. 
Mr Happart refuses to speak 
Dutch even though — it was 
revealed — he came top of the 
class in Dutch as a boy. 

Mr Happart precipitated the 
crisis a year ago by refusing to 
take a proficiency test in 
Flemish. He was dismissed by 

1 





20 miles 


the provincial council and 
yesterday’s ruling by Bel- 
gium's supreme legal body 
was his last chance of a 
reprieve. 

But Dr Wilfried Martens, 
the Prime Minister, said Mr 
Happart was not worth a crisis 
“althoiteh the Fourons are”. 

The Government has tried 
in vain to make the Fourons — 
where the French speakers 
refuse even to play footbal or 
drink beer with Dutch speak- 
ers — into a symbol of 
linguistic peace at a time when 
it is already beset by other 
coalition disagreements over 
economic austerity and public 
spending cuts. 


India debates legality of suicide 

Wives who die on husbands 9 pyres 


Just as Indian political and 
intellectual circles are debat- 
ing the advisability of penal 
sanctions against attempted 
suicides, a young woman, in 
the traditional heartland of 
India, has brought the debate 
sharply into focus by climbing 
on to her hnsband's funeral 
pyre and dying in the flames. 

The practice of suttee — 
Hindu widows immolating 
themselves with their bus- 
bands' bodies — was frowned 
on by the Moguls, and first 
legislated against in 1829. 

The number of cases of it 
happening these days is rare, 
but as Vajjayanti, aged 20, of 
U maria Dhirhan village, near 
Jabalpur, in the central state 
of Madhya Pradesh, proved at 
(be weekend, it does happen. 

The district magistrate has 
ordered an inquiry Into her 
suicide since there were said to 
have been officials and police 
on the spot, who did nothing to 
prevent her from mounting the 
cremation pile as it was lit. as 
hundreds of villagers looked 
on. 


From Michael HsunJyn, Delhi 

VaijayantTs death lends 
point to a warning by Dr 
Pritam Phatani, a forensic 
expert in Bombay, who said 
that by removing die criminal 
penalty from suicide: “We will 
be encouraging such barbaric 
customs as suttee, which have 
been restricted with ranch 
effort after several years of 
pitched battles against tra- 
ditions.” 

He said it would also con- 
flict with legislation against 
aiding and abetting suicide — a 
provision often enforced to 
prosecute the relatives of 
brides who are burned for 
reasons of dowry — and re- 
cently amended legislation 
specifically aimed at prevent- 
ing bride burning. 

The debate was started last 
week when the Bombay High 
Court declared that the section 
of the Indian penal code which 
punishes sokkte is unconstitu- 
tional. The Delhi chief justice 
made a similar decision in 
December. 

These verdicts have been 
welcomed by the pro-euthana- 
sia lobbyists ' such as Mr - 


Mraoo Masani, president of 
the World Federation of the 
Right to Die societies, who 
insisted: “Every citizen of 
India has the right to choose 
between life and death — that 
is the law io all civilized 
countries. I am glad that the 
people of Maharashtra have 
now joined the drilized 
world.” 

Dr Phatani believes that if 
attempting suicide is not a 
crime inviting punishment 
people will begin to take 
political advantage of such 
power that fasting to death or 
self-immolation gives to politi- 
cal protest. 

If the section is abolished, 
he feels, psychiatric and hos- 
pital care, which are com- 
pulsory for attempted suicides 
today, will be effectively re- 
duced and more people will 
make repeated attempts to kill 
themselves as a result 

He said: “if the constitution 
gives the right to life than if 
must also extend this protec- 
tion to include the threat to a 
person from his own self.” 


French told 
to beware 
more bombs 

From Susan MacDonald 
Paris 

The French Interior Min- 
ister, M Charles Pasqua, has 
appealed on television for 
continued public vigilance 
against terrorist bomb attacks. 

Referring to the current 
pause in the Paris bombings, 
M Pasqua said he did not 
believe terrorist activities bad 
ended. 

“I am afraid, unfortunately, 
that the worst may not be 
behind us,” he said. 

The minister added that all 
inquiries into the bombings 
led back to the Abdullah 
family and evidence showed 
that the Lebanese Armed 
Revolutionary Faction (Far!) 
had been responsible. 

The brothers of Georges 
Ibrahim Abdullah, impris- 
oned in France and presumed 
to be the head of Far!. have 
again offered to return to 
France from Lebanon to 
prove their innocence, if the 
French would guarantee their 
safety. 

M Pasqua said that if they 
had nothing to hide let them 
come. 



Congress 
battle over 
CIA funds 

• From Michael Btnyon 
Washington 

Representatives of the Hou- 
se and Senate are to meet soon 
in secret to discuss funding for 
the Central Intelligence Age- 
ncy. after an angry confronta- 
tion between the agency and 
Senator Jesse Helms over his 
attempts to establish new 
guidelines for the CIA. 

Senator Helms, still smart- 
ing about alleged CLA surveil- 
lance of his meeting with 
President Pinochet of Chile in 
July, has proposed an amend- 
ment to the CIA’s secret 
budget, which Administration 
officials say undercuts the 
agency's authority to manage 
its own affairs. 

There was a sharp con- 
frontation between Mr Wil- 
liam Casey, theCLA's director, 
and Senator Helms, who said 
the CIA had become a “loose 
cannon”. Both the amend- 
ment and the details of the 
budget are secret, and all the 
provisions affecting the CLA's 
work and funding are classi- 
fied and available only to 
senators. 

Senator Helms, a right-wing 
Republican from North Caro- 
lina. had threatened to hold up 
the CIA budget if his amend- 
ment was not accepted. 

His provision is understood 
to be an attempt to strengthen 
the Defence Intelligence Agen- 
cy, the Pentagon's intelligence 
service, at the expense of the 
CIA 

At the same time a team oi 
15 experts from outside the 
Government would spend a 
year reviewing some of the 
agency's intelligence findings, 
especially those on Soviet 
arms control violations. 

Conservatives have often 
criticized the CIA for its 
allegedly “soft” view of Soviet 
violations in this field, as well 
as on chemical and biological 
weapons. 

Another Helms amend- 
ment, offered in public ses- 
sion, called on the CIA to 
prepare a report to Congress 
on alleged drug dealings by the 
armed forces of Panama. 

Mr Helms is determined to 
make the agency suffer for its 
alleged surveillance of him in 
Chile. 

He has asked Mr Edwin 
Meese. the Attorney General, 
whether he was the target oi 
“electronic surveillance” by 
the CIA either in Chile or in 
his home and office in the LIS 
and has sent similar fetters to 
Mr Casey and to Mr George 
Shultz, the Secretary of State, 
asking for copies of all intelli- 
gence reports titev received on 
his trip to Chile. 

In August State Department 
officials accused Mr Helms or 
his staff of leaking classified 
information to the Chilean 
Government which enabled 
the Chileans to shut off a pro- 

channel inforrnalion -^ lh cring 


Solidarity 
comes in 
from 
the cold 

Warsaw < Reuter) — Kj r 
Ztngntcw Bittak the former 
Solnluniv undei ground lead- 
er. said yesterda) that the 
banned trade union's under- 
ground branch would emerge 
to work in puNie in response 
to a government amnesty for 
all political prisoners. 

Mr Buiak. who was released 
last month under the amnesty, 
said that underground Waders 
still on the run would Ware the 
moremeni immediately. 

Two underground activists. 

Mr Jan Lu>nski and Mr Wfo- 
tor KuWrski. presented them- 
sche* at a news conference. 

Terror threat 
to mayors 

Beirut (Reuter) — A state- 
ment issued in the name of the 
Abu Nidal group has threat- 
ened to kill three ncwly- 
appomted Arab mayor; in the 
Israeli-occupied West Bank. 

“We issue an ultimatum to 
these mean and dirty fares in 
Hebron. Ratnalluh and At- 
Bireh.” it said. “The flue ot 
Zater al-Masri is awaiting 
them, and very soon.” Mr ai- 
Masn. Mas or of Nablus, was 
shot dead soon after taking 
office in March. 

Mounties miss 
their men 

Ottawa — Royal Canadian 
Mounted Police constables 
guarding embassies here have 
had their semi-automatic 
weapons taken away after two 
accidental firings in a week 
(John Best writes). ■ , 

An MP5 sub-machfflfrfun 
was discharged into the pave- 
ment during a parade at the 
Mounties’ headquarters on 
Saturday, and tour days earlier 
a constable shot himself in the 
foot outside foe residence of 
the US Ambassador. 

Shin Bet men 
transferred 

Jerusalem -* Pressure from 
lawyers in the stale pros- 
ecutor's office has forced foe 
two senior legal adviser* of the 
Shin Bet counter-intelligence 
agency to be transferred to less 
sensitive jobs (lan Murray 
writes). . 

They received a presidential 
pardon after admitting falsify- 
ing evidence and suborning 
witnesses before two official 
commissions of inquiry into 
the killing of two Palestinians 
by foe agency in 1984. 

Top brass 

General Wolfgang .Alten- 
butg, aged 58. of the West 
German Army, takes over as 
chairman of Nato's military 
committee today from Gen- 
eral Cornelius dc Jager ofTbe 
Netherlands. 

VW stalled 

Wolfsburg (Reuter) — A fire 
at an assembly line at West 
Germany's leading car maker, 
Volkswagen, halted produc- 
tion for four hours. 

Envoys back * 

Athens (Reuter) — Greek 
diplomats at foe Foreign Min- 
istry and at embassies over- 
seas went back to work after 
suspending a pay strike 
following settlement of one 
demand 

Arsenic error 

Peking (Reuter) — A 
chemist's assistant has been 
charged with manslaughter 
over the deaths of six cus- 
tomers who took arsenic given 
in error to 16 patients of her 
father-in-law. a doctor who 
had prescribed other 
medicine. 

Vatican safe 

Rome (Reuter) — Three 
gunmen tried unsucce&fuNy to 
rob a safe in the Vatican 
because an employee held at 
gunpoint told them he did not 
have a key and sounded a* 
alarm. Vatican officials said 

Colony plea 

London — Mr Desmond Yu 
Tai Lee. a Hong Kong par- 
liamentarian, appealed to the 
Commonwealth Parli*“ 
mentary Conference to grant 
the colony's citizens dual i»: 
tionality “as an insurance 
measure" against China’s 
takeover in 1997. 

Star test 

Washington (Reuter) — A . 

US Air Force FI 5 fighter., 
launched a 1ft anti-satellite 
weapon aimed at a distant filter 
rn the fifth successful lest ca 
the projectile, foe Pentagon 
said. 

Peres date 

Hadcra. Israel (Reuter) 

Mr Shimon Peres, foe Israeli 
Prime Minister, said he wouW 
resign on October 10 for Mr 
Yitzhak Shamir, the Foreign 
Minister, to form a 
govern ment u nder a *7°” 
power-sharing accord wnicn 
gave him until October 14. . 

Lenin out 

Santa Eugenia R8**5* 

Spain (Reuter) - Towa 
cials refused permission 
Senor Jose Hermo SanTora 1 ® 
name his son . Lenin «n c r . a 
family Wend. 




'fou are die survivors. 

TbiAe in your forties now. 

You’ve probably also survived a mort- 
gage. The costs of raising your children. 
Building a career 

But you may also be paying more tax 
than at any time in your life. 

So it’s -worth asking yourself whether 
yourinvestmentportfolio is as tax-effident 
as it could be. 

Do your investments, for example, in- 
dude the current 31st Issue of National 
Savings Certificates? 

These give you a ; tax-free return of 
7- 85% pa, guaranteed over a full five years. 

. .. The m a xim um holding has just been 
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Manila arrests 
threaten future 
of rebel peace 
negotiations 


From Keith. Dalton, Manil a 


Military agents in the Phil- 
ippines yesterday arrested the 
alleged" chairman of the out- 
lawed Communist Party. Mr 
Rodolfo Salas, and two other 
people. Rebel negotiators 
have threatened to pull out of 
the current peace talks unless 
they are released. 

Two lawyers, representing 
the Communist negotiators of 
the National Democratic 
From (NDF). said the two- 
month-old peace talks could 
collapse because the three 
were directly involved in the 
negotiations. 

Mr Salas, his wife, Mrs 
Josephine Cruz, and their 
driver-bodyguard. Mr Jose 
Concepcion, were arrested 
outside a hospital where Mr 
Salas had gone for a check-up. 

“TTieir arrest imperils the 
further progress of the talks 
and we demand their immedi- 
ate release” the lawyers. Mr 
Romeo Capulong and Mr 
Amo Sanidad. said in a pre- 
pared statement 

The lawyers, who also . 
claimed to have been put 
under military surveillance 
last month, accused the De- 
fence Minister, Mr Juan 
Ponce Enrile. and senior mili- 
tary officers of trying to 
sabotage the negotiations 
“which were close to succeed- 
ing had this not happened”. 


The lawyers admitted that, 
alihough the three were not 
covered by military-issued 
safe conduct passes, they were 
“directly and actively” in- 
volved in the talks, which 
indirectly gave them immu- 
nity from arrest under an 
unwritten agreement with the 
Aquino Government The 
Government's negotiator has 
denied this. 

• Kidnap deadlock: Neg- 
otiations were still trying to 
secure the release of a kid- 
napped Swiss business man, 
Mr Hans Kunzli, yesterday, 
the day the military set as a 
deadline (AP reports). 

They said they would at- 
tempt to free Mr Kunzli if he 
were not released by then. 

Mr Kunzli was taken cap- 
tive in July by a Muslim 
group. 

• Church call: The leader of 

the Roman Catholic Church 
in the Philippines, Cardinal 
Sin. has called on his country- 
men to support President' 
Aquino's peace overtures to- 
wards the Communist rebels 
(AP reports). 

Cardinal Sin praised the 
President for her efforts to 
uplift the Filipino people’ 
“from virtual economic death 
to new heights of progress and 
achievement”. 



The US battleship Missouri firing a broadside of practice shells off Sydney yesterday. The Second World War veteran is 
part of an international fleet of 41 ships due in the city today for the 75th anniversary of the Royal Australian Navy. 


Japan leadership struggle 


A new straggle has broken 
oat for the leadership of the 
hugest faction in Japan's 
Liberal Democratic Party. 

The faction, led by Mr 
Kakaei Tanaka, the former 
Prime Minister, untO his 
stroke 19 months ago, has 
been looking for a suitable heir 
to head Japan's richest and 
most potent political tribe ever 
since it became dear that he 
would not return (o politics. 

At the weekend Mr Sosumn 
NJkaido, caretaker since Mr 


From David Watts, Tokyo 

Tanaka's illness, hinted that 
the successor might be Mr 
Nobora Takeshita, the farmer 
Minister of Finance. 

Mr Tanaka was 
“infuriated” by Mr Nikaido's 
remark, according to the Japa- 
nese press. 

Mr Tanaka h as been at 
odds with Mr Takeshita since 
the latter formed his own 
faction-witbin-a-faction to 
promote his chances of becom- 
ing prime minister under the 
guise of a study group. The 


presidency of the Liberal 
Democratic Party carries with 
it the prime ministership. 

What Mr Tanaka now- 
thinks is unknown because no 
journalist has talked to him 
since his The latest 

report on his attitude to Mr 
Niknido came from a relative. 

What effect Mr Tanaka's 
attitude will have on the 
impending power struggle 
remains to be seen, but he still 
has considerable power to 
make and unmake Japanese 
'political leaders. 


Seoul students 
and police in 
pitched battle 

Seoul (AFP) — About 20 
students and several police- 
men were injured yesterday in 
clashes near sites being used in 
the Asian Games here. 

Eyewitnesses said some 500 
students threw petrol bombs 
and bricks. 

Police responded with a hail 
of stones in the two-hour 
battle at the Korean Univer- 
sity of Foreign Languages. 
Several students were 
arrested. 


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Car bomb danger In Kabul 

Russian minister 
gets taste of war 

° From Michael Hamlyo, Delhi 


A senior Russian politician 
got first-hand evpericncc of 
the war in Afghanistan at the 
weekend when a car bomb 
exploded close to the Soviet 
Embassy in Kabul, killing 
three people. 

According to reports from 
Western diplomats, received 
in Delhi yesterday. Mr 
Vsevolod Murakhovski. a 
First Deputy Prime Minister 
of the Sov iet Union, and his 
entourage, had been accompa- 
nied by Dr Najib. the Afghan 
party chief, when the bomb, 
went off at noon in the ear 
park behind the Soviet 
commercial centre. 

The entire party were either 
struck by the blast or threw 
themselves to the floor. 

Private houses near the 
embassy were severely shaken 
by the bomb, and many 
windows were broken. 

The attackers had appar- 
ently placed the bomb in a 
Lada car. the make often used 
by the Afghan secret police, 
and on this occasion parked in 
a restricted area. 

Those killed were reported 
by one diplomatic source to 
have included two Russian 
children and a Soviet guard. 

Radio Kabul, which re- 
ported the incident compar- 
atively quickly, described the 
dead as a policeman, a mer- 
chant and a girt student. 

Mr Murakhovski. who is 
chairman of the Soviet state 
committee for agro-industries, 
was guarded with unprece- 
dented security during his stay 
in the Afghan capita/. 

Eveiy morning troops pa- 
trolled the streets and 
armoured vehicles guarded a/I 
intersections between the 
Intercontinental Hotel, where 
he and his party were staying, 
and the Arg Palace, where the 
principal Afghan Govcnttneul 
officials have their offices. 


On Monday, the day af 
the explosion. the road to 
Gfuuni from the south of the 
citv v»-js cloved. 

FKwhcrc in the capital in-' 
termmem rocket attacks 
continued as the Mujaaidi0r. 
gucmlias maintained their 
activities despite a recent*^ 
offensive against their h 
outs in the nearby “ 
hills. 

The Russian and Af 
Army campaign in 
has continued for ncaijty a 
month and very hcav y civfhaa 
casualties have been reported, 
cspevialtv from the villages, of 
Chandal Bat. Becg Tut. Hju 
Lakan. Qalai Muhabai and 
Saiamhat. 

Muiahidm arc under 
considerable pressure from a 
ring of So' iet troops around 
the southern town of Kan- 
dahar. hut even si' guerrilla 
rockets pounded the central 
telegraph office, cutting 
communications with die rest 
of the country tor 10 days. An 
assault on the Kandaharrmfeio 
building was less successful. 

Nevertheless, according to a 
reliable diplomatic source, 
pans of the town are perma- 
nent l\ under Mujahidin con- 
trol. with other grey areas 
alternating between the two 
sides. 

An unconfirmed report 
from the north of Wardak 
province said that before a 
planned attack on a 
Mujahidin position an Afghan 
force, ordered to go through a 
minefield, refused and turned 
their guns on their allies. 

Diplomats report that the 
Mujahidin came to their assis- 
tance with both sides suffering 
casualties. 

Kabul newspapers have re- 
ported plans to csiabtiah a 
military university in the hope 
of instilling badly needed pro- 
fessionalism tn the Afghan 
military- 


Virgin Islands election 
causes wave of protest 

From Jeremy Taylor, Port of Spain 

Barely two months after a tabled a no-confidencc motion 
scandal over drug money and against Mr Romney. The 
corruption toppled the Gov- Chief Minister, finding sup- 
enunent of the Turks and port in his own Government 
Caicos Islands, a similar row wavering, advised Mr David 
has developed in another of Barwtck. the Governor, to 
Britain's tiny Caribbean col- 
onies. 

As a result, the British 
Virgin Islands (population. 

11,000), an idyllic group 50 
miles east of Puerto Rico, 
voted yesterday in a premature 
general election. 

At the centre of the row is a 
company called Financial 
Management and Trust, 
which was investigated earlier 
this year by British police and 
the US Drug Enforcement 
Agency (DEA), in connection 
with allegations about an op- 
eration to launder narcotics 
money and proceeds from the 
1983 Brinks-Mat robbery at 
Heathrow airport. The in- 
vestigations also extended to 
the Isle of Man and the United 
States. 

In April, the company's 
British managing director was 
arrested and later agreed to co- 
operate with the DEA in cases 
which are pending in the US 
courts. 

The majority shareholder in 
Financial Management and 
Trust, however, was Mr Cyril 
Romney, Chief Minister of the 
British Virgin Islands. 

Although he has not been 
personally implicated, the 
Opposition demanded an in- 
quiry into possible government 
involvement, and in August 


islatiw Council and call 
elections. 

During the month-long elec- 
tion campaign- sober analysis 
has been overtaken by fvy 
over the voters' list State 
there was no time to compile a 
fresh list, more than 600 
people who have turned 18 
since 1983,oraboutl0 percent 
of the potential electorate, 
have found themselves 
disenfranchised. About 250' 
people demonstrated outside 
the Governor's office and pre- 
sented a petition asking for 
voting to be postponed. 

But in London last week Sir 
Geoffrey Howe, the Foreign. 
Secretary, firmly turned down 
the request, explaining that 
the constitution specifies Che 
time-frame in which voting 
must take place, and that 
changing the system would be 
“time-consmning, cumber- 
some and pro(sbly ineffect- 
ive". 

The two main parties, the 
United Party and the Virgin 
Islands Party, each won four 
seats at the last election in 
1983. The other was won by 
Mr Romney, standing as an 
independent He became the 
Chief Minister after fo 
an alliance with the Ui 
Party. 


By-election 
scares for 
Mulroney 

From John Best 
Ottawa 

Voters in two Canadian 
federal constituencies gave the 
Conservative Government a 
fright when it was beaten by 
the Liberals in Monday's by- 
election in St Maurice', Que-. 
bee. and barely managed to 
hold on to Pembina in r 
Alberta. 

Neither constituency chan- 
ged hands in the voting, the 
first by-elcction tests since the 
Tories ousted the Liberals 
from office two years ago. 
However, a steep decline in 
the Tories' share of the popu- 
lar vote is being widely inter- 
preted as a signal of 
dissatisfaction with the perfor- 
mance of the administration 
of the Prime Minister. Mr 
Brian Mulroney. 

The by-elections took place 
two days before the opening of 
a new session of Parliament 

In St Maurice, the Liberal 
candidate. MrGillcs Grondin. 
obtained 19.649 votes, or 
about 59 per cent — the same 
proportion of the popular vote 
as the Liberals took in the 
1984 general election. 

The Tories barely managed 
to retain second place in the 
face of a surprisingly strong 
bid by the New Democratic 
Party. 

In Pembina, which includes 
part of the city of Edmonton, 
the Conservative candidate. 
Mr Walter Van De Walle. 
polled 1 6.524 votes or 37 per 
cem, compared with the 71- 
per cent the Tories won two 
years ago. 


Ugandans 
still want 
British aid 

From Charies Hantaan 
Nairobi 

Mr John Stanley, the Min-- 
ister of State for the Armed 
Forces, yesterday met meth^ 
bers of the British military 
team helping to train lire 
Uganda Army at Jinja, 5Q 
miles east of Kampala. 

He has already learnt from 
discussions with President 
Museveni that there is still d 
role in Uganda for the team, 
which has worked through; 
two coups and three 
governments. 

However, the nature of the 
Uganda Army has changed, 
and further changes are likely 
with large-scale recruitment 
due to get under way this 
month. 

In addition, some army 
leaders, who were operating 
with the British team under 
past governments, are now in 
exile. ? ! 



Mr Stanley: told of role in 
Uganda for British soMieis. 


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THE TIMES WEDNESDAY QCTORFR 1 1986 


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FEATURES/OVERSEAS NFWS 



SPECTRUM 1 



empire with new strings to its bow 


The Queen’s tour of 
China next week will 
take her to the 


traditional palaces 

PTJ’MMI and monuments of 

past dynasties. B ut 
^^^iheoldtrorld Brian James found a 
—Sog^ nying technology, fashion an d hi P 

-Hgggg : Photographs bv Graham Wood 

Part 2: Towards the new frontier 


I "f9' ina > breadbasket. west 
° f J. han S hai - IK Maiu. Once 
a commune n is now a self- 

r ^ssrss^s, z 

much as you can make. 

■J2* 1 governor Fan Jian Min 
2S® r g* ft*w« which have 
resulied; his 32.000 people now 

a ° annual income of £30 
million from agriculture and liaht 

triniSP' Th r Wwn ’ s income has 
fnpled in five years: personal 

JJJ'gJg* are “P from £100 a year 

In the old days every hour’s 
work was needed for a fuD belly 
and to keep warm. In the first five 
years of economic reform we 
teamed to live on SO per cent ofin- 
corne and spend the rest on 
building new homes. Now every- 
one has a new home, and the 
money goes on the Big Pieces, 
electrical goods. 

“Work is still directed. By the 
family. Nearly everyone has a job 
in a factory. After eight hours and 
at weekend they work the land. If 
you want to eat, you wort” 
Walking his village we came upon 
Mrs Wo Huai Ying. She was 
beamingly proud to display the 
home built early in this decade of 
reform. The ground floor is given 
over to growing mushrooms. Up- 
stairs her living/sleeping room 
has a double bed, table, four small 
chairs. 23 inch colour TV. giant 
radio, glass-fronted wardrobe, 
plaster statue of an armless Greek 
god. and a wall hanging of the 
docktower of Big Ben. 

The family's combined factory- 
bench and agricultural income 
was 7,000 Yuan last year. Almost 
£1400. "Ten years ago I could not 
dream to be so wealthy. We always 
had food. But nothing more. We 
borrowed money to build this 
house. We have also spent money 
for the marriage of one daughter. 
We have all the Big Pieces, TV, 
radio, sewing machine, fan.” 


Chinese equivalent to the KGB, is 
looking for a partner for a near- 
complete Peking hotel tower. The 
West seems not to be queuing to 
oblige. I was told something 
perhaps to do with the PSB’s 
record with previous 'guests*. 

~ CLASS OF *86 


T he first surprise of the 
Peking middle school was 
the courtyard shaded by 
peach trees with luscious 
peaches. Untouched. Pupils do 
not steal peaches, said director 
Yao. They have respect for their 
schooL Whereas in the time of the 
Cultural Revolution they had 
respect for nothing: "This was a 
place of madness. Only Chinese 
language and writing was taught, 
all other classes were dosed, and 
children came and went as they 
pleased. - 

“May we talk of these better 
times? These children have per- 
sonal ambitions. To win Nobel 
prizes." And be rich? “I do not 
think that is in their minds. Again 
China is concerned with having 
children make their parents 
proud. Why don't you ask them?” 

Thai was not easy. The English 
class of 1 5-year-olds under teacher 
Li Chiehtein were too busy ASK- 
ING questions to answer mine. Is 
Manchester United best team? 
What does the Queen eat? Can 
England play volleyball as well as 
the Chinese? Will Queen come to 
our class? 


PEOPLE’S ARMY 


TOURIST BOOM 


I t was a wonderful visual 
image, the peasant in the 
straw hat biking past the half 
built hotel: the hidden de- 
light of the scene was knowing the 
peasant was part-owner. 

The important village of 
Sijiquin (pop 49.000) bought 30 
per cent of China's half share of 
this joint venture. It is an act 
everyone is getting in on: com- 
munes that make profits, factories 
wishing to diversify, even public 
authorities who save from their 
budgets can buy into the tourist 
boom. 

The Public Security Bureau, the 


T he National Defence Col- 
lege. at the foothills north 
of Peking, is China’s 
Sandhurst In the 1.4 
kilometre base a cadre of 500 staff 
trains 600-strong intakes: men in 
their 50s being honed to take 
command of armies and 30-year- 
old ex-graduates with one year's 
field experience on pre-promotion 
courses. 

Brigadier Wang ke Yuan. "Yes 
here we are an elite. Three kinds of 
talent, military, logistic and politi- 
cal Thearmy is in the midst of 
great reforms. We are releasing 
one million soldiers, men with 
skills as drivers, engineers and 
mechanics to go back to help the 
people." Then he takes you to see 
electronic war-game wall maps of 
China's first great war. And what 
they fear may be the’ next. 

It shows the growth of Russian 
imperialism from a dot in the 14tb 
century to today. "Between 1858 
and 1915 the Russians by force 
and unjust treaties took from 
China 1.4 million kilometres of 
our territory. Our mistrust had 
deep roots." He presses keys, and 



Play it again: the face of traditional China sits side by side with the youngsters of today, growing up in a modem world of new technology and westernization, of jeans and satin shirts 
electronic pulses point up the 


up 

deposition of 4.4 million Soviet 
troops, 2.000 warships, 2,500 
ICBMs, 10,000 strike aircraft 
More keys, and electronic arrows 
slash the lines of the USSR's 
projected lines of advance. 

Was there a similar war-game 
map featuring the USA and her 
ally Great Britain. I asked. A very 
long silence. Then "yes". But 
today, they much regretted, it was 
in use. Could not be seen. 

We found Lt Wang Li-ying, a 
pretty 29-year-old. poring over the 
English version ofOausewitz. She 
had been a soldier for 10 years and 
joined the PLA because it was 
"very honest is that the word, 
career. No. not honesL Of glory. It 
is patriotic to defend our land. 
Against whom? The Soviets. And 
the Vietnamese. 

"I love to wear uniform when I 
go home. My parents are proud 
and it is good for my friends to see. 
.Ambitions? Only to learn more.” 

C'S 



Vt-A.W-'. 


RAGS TO RICHES 


N 


' o western eye could foil 
to observe the 
overwhelming change 
in the Chinese approach 
to fashion: the nation which in its 
ordeal under Mao made uni- 
formity a symbol of the levelling 
down of the individual now 
blossoms shapes, styles and col- 
ours. But no western mind could 
easily arrive at the very Chinese 
justification for the change. 

An absolutely seminal article in 
the People's Daily exposes a 
fascinating debate. Anything 
dress-wise could be permitted in 
the new China, provided its 
provenance as the authentic garb 
of a working class, somewhere, 
sometime, was established. Thus: 
jeans were OK because they were 
the dress of the oppressed form 
workers of the USA. Ties were 
“in" because they were traceable 



In fashion: designer Zhao ye Fong with sketches at the Shanghai 
Garment Research Institute and smart soldier-girl Lt Wang Li-ying 


to the scarves of Scandinavia's 
hard-living fishermen. 

"Silk and satin used to be 
considered only for the exploiters. 
Must we throw away beautiful 
fabric now we have wiped out the 
exploitive class?" 

This argument, summarized 
into one sentence, got every bead 
nodding vigorous agreement in an 
office above a scruffy' alley in 
Shanghai: this was the head- 
quarters of the city's Garment 
■Research Institute, and this a 
meeting of the creative design 
team which decides the look and 
line of the $200 million clothing 
exports from Shanghai. 

This was always China's most 
fashion-conscious city, said direc- 
tor Chen Shen De. it being the 
entrepot for the West. Yes. in the 
cultural revolution we wen? deeply 
influenced by the political climate 
of the time. Translated, that 
meant his squad wore Mao suits to 
work, gazed out of windows for 
inspiration on millions dressed 
exactly alike and tried to copy 
from tattered western magazines, 
goods to tempt the world. 

That changed in 1 978, when at a 
handicraft exhibition young de- 
signers erupted into a blaze of 
"absorbed ideas" and young 
Shanghai queued all night every 
night to get a glimpse of styles 
which were still designed for 
export only. “And we have trav- 
elled to the West for fashion 
shows. We have absorbed much, 
much more into our work."For 
"absorb" could we say “copy"? A 
fragment grenade would have had 
less effect in the room. But 
blushing. Zhao yu Fong." 21, the 
team's menswear expert did con- 
fess that she never watched west- 
ern TV or a film without a 
sketchpad handy. That and a 
dozen scruffy much-used patterns 
were the templates from which she 
produced the mound of leading- 
edge designs she showed us. 


HIGH FINANCE 


O 


ne momh after China's 
first bond market since 
1949 was opened, a 
lively out-of-hours par- 
allel black market was trading 
briskly. The official market 
experimentally launched in Shen- 
yang to trade in bonds issued by 
state enterprises to raise funds for 
expansion, was soon making 200 
deals a day. "Outside trading was 
inevitable." one official says. 
“This will challenge, not hurt the 
official experiment." 


with another lace square for when 
not in u&c: another the 
refrigerator. 

Individualism is a quality of no 
value — why risk loss of face by 
appearing not to know ihc proper 
way to place two chairs? 


SURVIVAL CODE 


I 


WEDDING VOWS 


W 


ill you, Chen Lie. take 
this man..? The final 
spoken vow at a Chi- 
nese wedding is a 
promise not to drown girl babies: a 
leftover from a hideous old cus- 
tom retained in an a modem 
ceremony almost as bleak. You get 
permission from your work unit 
(at least they don’t now arrange 
the partner), fill in forms, give 
photos, fingerprints and then wait. 

My informant was told only 24 
hours before which hall to attend 
for her wedding. "They were very 
nice, shook our hands, wished us 
well Then we called on friends 
and handed out tiny bags of 
sweets. That was about it." 


HOME COMFORTS 




eing, say, a Chinese rent- 
collector could be a short- 
cut to terminal madness: 
as far as it is possible a*’ 
Chinese city homes are entirely 
alikeA&insi the for wall will be 
ranged a small table, with a lace 
doth under glass. Two chairs are 
set back to the wad on each side. 
Opposite, a sideboard with large 
radio and family photos. One 
comer of the room holds the TV, 


t was one of those encounters 
that were common: strolling, 
you became aware of a single 
Chinese amid the crowd 
drcling you like a predator. But 
when he moved in it was with 
teeth bared in a smile, not a bite. 

He said his name was Lo Shan, 
which was probably untrue. He 
was 30 and a transport offidal: 
"Please do not be misled. China is 
a flute. Someone else's fingers are 
on the holes. What comes out, 
therefore, is mere sound, lt is not 
music, and even if it were it is not 
China that plays the tune. The new 
order will change nothing but the 
number of possessions in our 
lives. 

“The big authority in this land 
has eased, has a fine new friendly 
face. But the little authority 
remains. On every step of life in 
China stands a cadre. His power is 
to tell you whether you may step 
up to join him or not. Almost 
always he will say noi Not from 
malice but because if he says yes. 
then you become his equal. 

"He does not forbid you to 
change house, vary your job or 
acquire peimission to buy this 
item from dislike, but because that 
is his function. A dog who is put to 
bark at a gate and who fails may be 
taken away and eaten. So all China 
is about learning to pat the dogs." 

C TOMORROW ) 

Labour of love: the 
courting ritual 


/Mo 


sii : 


*}'. 


Uv f: 


Chink committed to new ideological script 

■ mmtmm m ■■■ i i ■■■■■■■ 

Deng opens door to greater democracy 


From Robert Grieves 
Peking 


A Western diplomat leaned 
back in bis chair at a res^ 
taurant in Peking’s Ritan Park 
and Jit a cigarette. J 

“Deng Xiaoping's great 
contribution to China was h s 
erasure of ali those Maoi a 
savings from the nation’s ide *- 
logical blackboard. He ga>e 
China a clean slate and told fit 

to stan anew,” he said. j 

“The trouble is. no ope 
knows what to write next On 
the blackboard.” _ / 

That observation might 
have been true until this past 
weekend, when the sixth de- 
nary session^ of the ^j-th 


IHII J — — — ~ _ a 

Chinese Communist , , 
Central Committee unani- 
mously adorned a set) of 
ethical guidelines that [ re- 
affirms China’s commitment 
to the open door policy arid to 
a far greater measurd of 
democracy and role by law 
than ii has enjoyed to daw. 

Such principles constitute 
in effect, the new script that 
Mr Deng. China s paramount 
leader, would like to Ifflve on 
the nation's ideological black- 
board before he steps 
chairman of the panys Cen- 


tral Advisory Commission 
next year, if the party accedes 
to his wishes. 

Behind such awkward phra- 
ses as “socialist morality" and 
"spiritual civilization’’ con- 
tained in the plenum’s resolu- 
tion is the Dengist desire to 
build a Chinese society run by 
a relatively representative 
Government whose conduct is 
based on codified laws - ' 

That concept is a direct 
reaction against Chairman 
Mao Tse-tung’s China, where 
the will of one leader, ex- 
pressed through the party, ran 
the country for many years. 
He pronounced on everything, 
from broad foreign policy 
questions to the neighbour- 
hood and rural block organ- 
izations that decided local 
disputes and, in some cases. 


dictated when young people 
would marry. 

Those excesses reached a 
crescendo that neatly de- 
stroyed the nation during the 
Cultural Revolution. Like 
many of his countrymen. Mr 
Deng was a victim of that era. 

Twice thrown out of the 
Government and sent down to 
the countryside, he spent 
much of his time caring for his 
son. who was permanently 
crippled when he was thrown 
from a third-storey window by 
Red Guards. 

Beyond the visionary aspect 
of the resolution adopted by 
the party is a gritty, practical 
side. Mr Deng and his 
supporters have realized that 
China’s strength must be 
grounded in economic dev- 
elopment not in ideology. 


Peking and Warsaw sign pact 


Pelting — General Jaru- 
zeiski, the Polish leader, re- 
turned borne yesterday after a 
three-day unofficial visit to 
China (Robert Grieves writes). 

Polish and Chinese officials 
earlier signed a cultural and 
scientific co-operation agree- 
ment that covers art, science. 


journalism, medicine and br- 
oadcasting. 

Mr Zhao Ziyang, the Chi- 
nese Premier, Mr Hu Yao- 
bang, General-Secretary of the 
Chinese Communist Party and . 
President U Xiannian ac- 
cepted invitations from Gen- 
eral Jarnzelski to visit Poland 


"Take economic develop- 
ment as the key link." Mr 
Deng has said repeatedly, 
which is a modification of the 
old Maoist line "take class 
struggle as the key link". 

The Premier, Mr Zhao 
Ziyang, embroidered on that 
theme in a National Day 
speech in the Great Hall of the 
People, delivered before 400 
party leaders, foreign journal- 
ists and diplomats. 

"Industrial and agricultural 
production is increasing 
steadily, the market is stable 
and brisk and the people’s 
living standard continues to 
improve. At present, we must 
firmly grasp the central link of 
achieving better economic 
results.” he said. 

Problems, of course, remain 
for the Dengists. They must 
tackle political reform, the 
thorny task of taking the party 
out of central government and 
letting the Government run 
the country, with the party 
acting as an ideological 
adviser. 

But for now at least Mr 
Deng and his supporters can 
concentrate on those prob- 
lems without fear of a conser- 
vative backlash from within 
the party. 


Haitian demonstrators 
hold hostage in churdi 

Demonstrators bad thrown 


Port-au-Prince (AP) 

About 100 antijBPy efn 2*JJ 
demonstrators, O^PS-iSes 
not police. 
officer hostage aid 
themselves in the cap>»» * 
S caOttdral for several 

h0 The°^”^®H ,of ^ 

-jj-jsssafassss 


Demonstrators bad thrown 
stones at a car with diplomatic 
plates, breaking its wmd- 
Sreen. When abont 200 not 
police went to the scene *e 
demonstrators seized the hos- 

^ey had been demanding 
an end to the three-member 
military-civilian council, 
which has ruled Haiti since 
die dictator, M Jean-CIaude 
Etovalier, fled in February. 


Japanese union agrees 
to railways sell-off 


From David 
The executive of Japan's 
largest railway union has de- 
cided to co-operate with plans 
to break up and privatize the 
national railway system, after 
a meeting that lasted more 
than eight hours. 

The central struggle 
committee of Kokuro. the rail 
union, took the plunge yes- 
terday despite widespread ev- 
idence of opposition .within its 


Watts, Tokyo 

own ranks and those of other 
rail unions. Hie decision has 
siifl. to be ratified at an 
emergency meeting 
Union leaders said there 
was no choice if there was to 
be a chance of protecting 
railway workers' jobs or the 
union itself About 37 rail 
workers have committed sui- 
cide either in protest or de- 
spair at the privatization plans 


Dingo case 
evidence 
discredited 

Melbourne (Reuter) — A 
forensic expert told an official 
inquiry into the so-called 
“dingo murder" case yes- 
terday that stains, found in a 
car and claimed by the police 
to have been blood, were in 
foci a spray used to deaden 
engine noise. 

The "bloodstains" were a 
key element in the conviction 
of Mrs Ljndy Chamberlain, 
who was sentenced to . life 
imprisonment in 1982 for 
cutting the throat of her nine- 
week-old daughter, Azaria, in 
the car. 

She. was released in March 
this year, after the discovery, 
at Ayers Rock in central 
Australia, where Azaria dis- 
appeared in 1980, of a baby's 
mud-covered jacket 

Azaria’s body was never 
found and Mrs Chamberlain 
maintained that the child had 
been carried away from their 
tent by a dingo (wild dog). 

The inquiiy has yet to hear 
forensic evidence on the 
jacket but Mr Tony Ray- 
mond, of the Victorian Foren- 
sic Science Laboratory, told 
the court his examination of 
the car had produced nothing 
resembling human material 



Mrs Chamberlain: released 
after discovery of jacket 


Juiy to see film of fatal 
helicopter crash in trial 
of Hollywood director 

From Ivor Davis, Los Angeles 


The 12 men and women who 
will be taken to the cinema 
tomorrow morning will not be 
going for entertainment They 
will view a dramatic scene 
from a film in which a heli- 
copter crashes on an actor and 
two youngsters as they strug- 
gle across a river. 

The scene, from The T*ei~ 
light Zone, was supposed to 
have been merely Hollywood 
make-believe. 

But when it was shot early in 
the morning of Jnly 23, 1982 
in the California desert, which 
was doabling for a Vietnamese 
village, it turned into reality, 
claiming the lives of Vic 
Morro, the actor, and two 
child extras, Myca Dinh Le, 
aged seven, and Renee Shinn 
Chenn, aged six. 

The special screening is 
being staged for the jury in a 
unique Hollywood triaL 

Five defendants, including 
the director, John Landis, are 
faring charges of involuntary 
manslaughter in connection 
with the deaths, caused when 
the recreation of the bombing 
of a Vietnamese village went 
terribly wrong. 

The case has drawn world- 
wide attention because critics 
of the film industry claim that 
some film-makers are sacrific- 
ing the safety of actors in their 
quest for bigger special effects. 

It is the first time a film 
director has had to stand trial 
for a death in connection with 
a fihn he was making 

Also on trial are Paul 
Steward, who was in charge of 
special effects for the $20 
million (£14 million) picture, 
George Folsey, a producer, 
Dan Allingham, a production 
manager, and Dorcey Wingo, 
who flew the helicopter. 

All are charged with invol- 
untary manslaughter and all 


have pleaded not guilty. Mr 
Landis. Mr Folsey and Mr 
Allingham are also accused of 
taking the young actors, who 
were the children of Viet- 
namese refugees, on to the film 
set after 630 pm in violation 
of California child iabonr 
laws. 

Such film-makers as John 
Hnstoa, Sidney Lumet, Fran- 
cis Coppola, George Lucas 
and Billy Wilder have all come 
to Mr Landis's defence, saying* 
they believe a director has 
artistic responsibility for a 
film, but depends on the 
"skills and professional 
responsibility of otters in 
making a picture". 

Mr Landis, whose films 
include box-office successes 
such as The Blues Brothers, An 
American Werewolf in Loudon 
and Trading Places ; has hired 
a former Watergate pros- 
ecutor, Mr James Neal, to 
defend him. 

There have been many tears 
and dramatic testimony, with 
the parents of the young actors 
denying that they were ever 
told that their children would 
be exposed to explosives and a 
low-flying helicopter. The par- 
ents also denied haring known 
that their children were being 
’hired illegally without work 
permits. 

There has been testimony 
that Mr Landis, when told 
that it would not be possible to 
hire the children because of 
the working hours, reportedly 
said: “To hell with yon guys, 
we'll get them (children) off 
the streets ourselves." 

Several pending multi-mil- 
lion dollar lawsuits filed by the 
families of the three people 
killed will hinge on how the 
jury rules in a case that could 
last eight more weeks. 


Spree on 
eve of NZ 
tax change 

From Richard Long 
Wellington 

Supermarkets and alcohol 
wholesalers were busy here 
yesterday as New Zealanders 
went on a last-minute buying 
spree before the imposition 
today of a 10 per cent Vat- 
style indirect tax. 

The goods and services tax 
(GST)- which has no excep- 
tions, was described by Mr 
Roger Douglas, the Minister 
of Finance, as the most fun- 
damental change ever made to 
New Zealand's taxation 
system. 

Political pundits predicted 
that public response to the tax 
change — the estimated NZS3 
billion (£] billion) in revenue 
is to be distributed in income- 
tax cuts — would seal the fete 
of the Government at next 
year's election. 

Mr David Lange, the Prime 
Minister, acknowledged that 
there had been blatant price 
increases associated with in- 
troduction of ihe GST. but 
said public reaction would be 
better after six months. 

The lax reform, part of Mr 
Douglas's economic restruct- 
uring programme, will allow 
ihe top rate of income tax in 
New Zealand to be cut from 
66 cents in the dollar to 48 
cents. This applies to incomes 
of NZI30.000-plus a year. 

The average wage-earner on 
NZ$300 a week gets an in- 
come-tax cut of NZ$20 a 
week. Those earning NZ$600 ■ 
get a tax cut of NZ$42. 

A family-support tax credit 
programme will assist lower- 
income families. It will pro- 
vide NZ$36 a week for the 
firai child and NZ$1 6 a week 
for successive children. 

Mr Douglas said the present 
tax system was inefficient and 
had turned tax dodging into a 
leading industry. 




r. 

■ '.JS] 



* 









SPECTRUM 2 


scramble to buy. But housing law is widely 
regarded as a jungle and lending controls, 
insofar as they exist, fail to prevent 




* .;«n t 


, -I si 

-OS v* • 


$>?.■ : i {V 


01 


VVy " cn 


pi 


borrowers becoming hopelessly stretched. 
Today we ask what the politicians can, 
or should, be doing; we look at the way 
party leaders live and compare an owner 
high on the ladder with one trying to get on 

Part 3: Politics and the housing jangle 


J-vW 


I n 1923 The Spectator maga- 
zine coined a phrase; prop- 
erty owning democracy. In 
1986. properly is in short 
supply and ownership is a 
path to tread at our peril — so what 
arc our democratically-elected 
leaders planning to do about it? 

Not very much. A string of 
reports, several from sources that 
could hardly be called radical, 
have focused attention on in- 
numerable failures in the way the 
housing system works. Only a few 
weeks ago. the august Royal 
Institute of Chartered Surveyors 
referred to an “uncoordinated 
jungle of legislation" over the last 
60 years which, it said, had led to 
acute regional housing shortages, 
disrepair, homelessness and in- 
equality of opportunity. Its report 
called for a fairer financial frame- 
work for the provision of housing, 
including the phased abolition of 
mortgage tax relief. 

Last year the Duke of 
Edinburgh's committee of inquiry 
came to a similar conclusion. Its 
views were rejected by Mrs 
Thatcher. And Mr John Patten, 
the housing minister, underlined 
her outlook: “A very large number 
of people in the country have a 
substantia! interest in maintaining 
the system. No change is 
envisaged." 

Thai “substantial number" has 
risen by two million under Mrs 
Thatcher's right to buy legislation 
for council tenants came to power 
seven years ago and with polls 
showing 80 per cent of the 
population wanting to own their 
homes, the pressure is bound to go 
on increasing. 

Mr Patten says right to buy has 
produced “an irreversible change 
in the political map" and now. he 
says, there will be equally im- 
portant “right lo rent" legislation, 
aimed at helping those unable to 
buy. 

So the Government is dearly 
not contemplating intervention 
on the buying side, except in the 
sense that easier renting may case 


A Times investigation by 
Jack Crossley, Christopher 
Warm an, Philip Webster, 
Michael Dynes and 
Lee Rod well 


buying pressure. Nor are the 
opposition parties well-placed to 
attack the government approach. 
The Labour Party and both part- 
ners in the Alliance are as commit- 
ted as the Conservatives to 
retaining mortgage tax relief a key 
motor of demand, but Labour and 
the Alliance aim to stop the belter 
off from benefiting most, by 
confining tax relief to the basic 
rate. 

Bui should the politicians act at 
all? Dr John Doling of 
Birmingahm University's Centre 
for Urban Regional Studies, who 
has made a two-year study of 
mortgage debt believes something 
must be done to help people with 
mortgage debt and he wants 
government grants for money 
advice centres, which at present 
dare not advertise their presence 
for fear of attracting more people 
than their funds can cope with. 

He says: “If the government's 
housing policy is going to be based 
on the expansion of owner- 
occupation then it is also the 
responsibility of governments to 
ensure that people do not come a 
financial cropper as a result.” 

H owever. Dr Doting is 
among those who 
think that legislation 
to control lending 
could worsen the 
situation rather than improve iL 
“Legislation mighty simply force 
borrowers to go to fringe lenders 
who charge very much higher 
interest rates." 

Spiralling house prices have 
caused all the opposition parties to 
formulate policies aimed at help- 
ing young first-time buyers to gel 
on the home-ownership escalator. 
But none of them sees any obvious 
way lo stop the trend of soaring 
increases. 

Drastic measures, like some 
kind of ceiling on building society 
and bank lending, have attractions 
for some politicians but they 
admit they would be politically 
sensitive. All the parties believe 
that easy credit is a factor, and 
governments, as Mrs Thatcher's 
has done recently, can exhort the 
lending institutions to exercise 
prudence: but no government has 
ever tried lo dictate the lending 
policies of the building societies. 

It was a Labour government in 


As prescribed: Dr Owen's East End conversion in Umebouse 


Cottage alliance: the Steeis* iwo-int<K>ne in Ettrickbridge 


Britain's political leaders have all 
benefited from the property boom 
— and some have contributed to it 
Margaret Thatcher's purchase of 
a neo-Georgian mansion in Dul- 
wich. sooth London, has stoked 
considerable interest in the exclu- 
sive Barratt estate which backs on 
to the Dulwich and Sydenham golf 
course, one of the main attractions 
for Mr Denis Thatcher. 

The Thatchers paid £400,000 
for the house last year. Now it is 
conservatively valued at £550.000. 
Few of the hundreds of people 
making inquiries about homes on 
the estate have much chance of 
raising the funds. . 


Housing’s market leaders 


A prime minister, actual or 
potential, as a neighbour is a 
money-spinner for sellers and 
estate agents; one agent has two 
houses similar to that of the 
Thatchers on sale at £610,000 and 
£635.000. And Neil Khuock's 
four-bedroomed 1930s semi in 
Ealing, west London, is 1 worth 
about three times the £60,000 be 
paid for it in 1980. Local estate 
agents Cole and Hicks say snefa 
homes are going for between 
£160.000 and £180,000, “and the 


presence of Mr K innock would be 
worth another £10,000 on these 
bouses for notoriety". 

But their three-bedroom ter- 
raced constituency home near 
Tredegar in the heart of the 
unemployment-ravaged Welsh 
valleys has merely kept its value in 
recent years — £18,000 to £20.000. 

Liberal leader David Steel and 
his wife Judy — like aD couples 
who bought their homes in the 
mid-sixties — have seen the value 


of their bouse in the Scottish 
border village of Ettrickbridge 
multiply many times.They bought 
the property, two cottages which 
had been joined together, for 
around £5,000 just before be was 
first elected in 1964. Now it is 
worth around £60,000. 

The property king among the 
party leaders is undoubtedly Dr 
David Owen, who has homes 
worth £750,000 and £300.000, in 
addition to a remote constituency 
retreat. Some 20 years ago, while 


still a medical student. Dr Owen 
paid £3.000 for a former set 
captain's cottage in Narrow Street, 
Umebouse, in London's East End. 
He spent a lot of money renovating 
and restoring it himseK then 
bought the bouse next door rad 
later bad them knocked Into one 
property. The result is an impres- 
sive, five-bedroom house worth 
about £750,000. 

The SDP leader also has mi old 
rector)- near Marfoorongh in Wilt- 
shire, which he and his wife, 
Debbie, bought for about £7,500 in 
1968 with money borrowed from 
their parents. Now it is worth 
£300.000. 


T978'ihai legislated to introduce 
the home purchase assistance 
scheme to help first-time buyers. 
The scheme gave registered savers 
who had accumulated £600 an 
interest-free loan of £600 and a 
tax-free bonus ofupto£N0. Eight 
years later the figures remain the 
same. 

The Labour Parly admitted in 
its document Homes for the 
Future, approved last year, that 
first-time buyers faced serious 
problems and promised to help by 
bringing in index-linked mort- 
gages to those needing lower initial 
payments. Shadow cabinet mem- 
bers say the party will have lo offer 
more in the way of an extension of 
its 1978 scheme in the run-up to 
the general election, but as the 
party most associated with council 
housing. Labour's front-bench 
spokesmen have to tread warily in 
their efforts to encourage private 
ownership. 


The Alliance, in its joint policy 
document Partnership for 
Progress, which went before both 
parries' conferences, says that it 
wants more people to become 
home-owners, and promises to 
extend the home assistance 
scheme and promote index-linked 
mortgages. 

Mr Patten docs not intend to 
increase the home purchase assis- 
tance scheme. He says that the 
scheme was not popular, and if 
extended in the areas — such as the 
south-east — where the problems 
were worst for first-time buyers, it 
could be inflationary. “I want to 
go down another route, and lo 
promote shared ownership, which 
is less price inflationary and is a 
way of helping first-lime buyers lo 
gel on the first rung of the ladder.” 

This scheme, part ownership 
and part rental, would allow 
people to increase their slake in 
the property when they can afford 


ta until they own it outrighL 
Despite claims that first-time 
buyers have been increasingly 
unable to buy. the Department of 
the Environment has figures 
which show that first-time buyers 
in Great Britain totalled 620.000 
in 1985. the same as in 1984, 
compared with 600.000 in 1983. 
But demand for housing is rising 
much faster. 

A nother worrying factor 
is the relaxation offend- 
ing guidelines by build- 
ing societies and other 
institutions as a result 
of the ready availability of funds 
and sharp competition. Mr Patten 
welcomed the warning given by 
the Governor of the Bank of 
England. Mr Robin Leigh- 
Pemberton. that some mortgage 
lending in the UK could give rise 
to inflationary pressures by 
accommodating house price in- 
creases. The Governor told in- 


stitutions to exercise self-restraint 
and resist the pressure lo allow 
lending criteria to become exces- 
sively lax. If they failed to regulate 
themselves they could end being 
regulated by statute. 

Mr Patten said: “Any govern- 
ment minister would be con- 
cerned if he believed that people 
who could not afford it were being 
driven into home ownership. But 
the figures show this is not the 
ease. The average person was not 
borrowing three or four times his 
income. In 1979 the figure was 
1.79 limes income, while in the 
first quarter of 1986 it had 
increased to L97 per cent." 

Yet this statistic is misleading in 
one sense: as an average, it 
disguises the huge loans oflen 
being taken out by young first- 
lime buyers. 

Mr Patten agrees that “in a few 
eases, lending institutions have 
transgressed the borders of pro- 


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D 


Catch- 22 : the 
heartache trap 


Kayti Falrim and her husband 
Steven have been looking for a 
home of their own ever since 
they married a year ago* But 
they are still living in one room 
of Kayti's parents* house in 
Wood Green, North Loudon. 

Like many young couples, 
particularly in Loudon and the 
south east, Kayti and Steven 
have been caught by soaring 
property valnes. Kayti, 28, 
earns £6,100 as a sales assis- 
tant ina West End department 
store. Steven, 22, is stock 
manager In a warehouse, earn- 
ing £6,700. 

Kayti says: “One buflding 
society told «s it would lend 
three times Steven's salary, 
plus the equivalent of what I 
earn a year. That brings us up 
to£26,200. But there just isn't 
anything in that price range. 
Even studio flats in north 
Loudon go for around £37,000. 

“We have started to look in 
south London because prices 
are slightly cheapo-. But al- 
though we get sent all the 
estate agents' lists there is 


"We save enough, 
then prices go up’ 


rarely anything we can afford. 
We have looked at a couple of 
places. Recently we saw a two- 
bedroomed flat over a disused 
warehouse bat it was 
appalling. 

“It wasn't just that ft was 
dirty — we could have re- 
decorated — but wiring was 
com fag oat of the walls and we 
would have had to spend at 
least £6,000 to make it habit- 
aide. Now another building 
society has told ra they wifi 
lend two and three quarter 
times our joint income, which 
would bring as up to just over 
£35,000 hot I doubt if even 
that wID be enough. In any 
afford the repayments.” 


•’ Steven and Kayti try to look 
on the bright side. “One of the 
advantages of living with my 
parents is that we have man- 
aged to save £4,000 in a year 
but every time we think we've 
just got enough, prices go up 
again and we are back to 
square one. It's really frustrat- 

Getting pregnant 
to get a home? 

fag- We don't go out as much 
as we used to. We spend most 
of our spare time up in that one 
room. 1 wouldn't mind if we 
looked likely to get a place of 
our own in the end.” 

“My parents have been very 
good but we have no privacy 
and nor do they. You get under 
each other's feet all the time. 
And there are little problems, 
like wanting to use the wash- 
ing machine only to find 
Mum's using it” 

For couples like Kayti and 
Steven the problem has been 
made even more acute by the 
lack of alternative accom- 
modation. Rented accom- 
modation from local 
authorities, housing associ- 
ations, even private landlords, 
is hard to come by and they 
stand little chance of being 
housed by the coundL 

Kayti says: “Most of the 
rented accommodation round 
here is bedsits and prices seem 
to start at around £45 a week. 
By the time we'd paid rent and 
the biib I doubt we'd have 
much left over to save and in 
terms of accommodation we'd 
be worse off in some ways titan 
we are now. At feast by tiring 
with my parents we m«n»p» to 
save.” 

Stevra and Kayti are on the 
council housing list, but as 
they are both working. mar- 
ried, without chOdres, there 
doesn't seem much chance . 
“People say if r got pregnant 





More for leaser the Islington home that keeps adding noughts 

they'd have to rehouse ns — 
but what if they didn't?” says 
KatyL 

“Other people have sug- 
gested living out of London. 

But the kind of work I could 
get locally wouldn't be as well 
paid and if we both had to 
travel in every day the fores 
wonkl be pretty hrfty. One of 
the girls I work with who 
bought a flat outside London is 
now selling it, because she 
can't afford the fores. 

. “It's a real Catch 22 situa- 
tion. I don't see any way out.” 


dencc. and I am watching the 
trend very closely.” Bui even xflhe 
•trend continues, he sees no need 
for regulatory action by the Gov- 
ernment. “Self-regulation is best," 
he said. 

If the Government is merely 
reluctant to impose controls, the 
Bank ofEngland is appalled by the 
prospect, which is why Mr Lcigh- 
Pembcnon issued his warning. 
Qfficials believe that il is much 
belter lo "put some grit in the 
system" by making lending in- 
stitutions aware of the dangers, lo 
ensure that in the new competitive 
atmosphere they take full 
responsibility for their lending 
policies, and do not wittingly or 
unwittingly lower their fending 
standards. : : 

.It is dear from all this that 
property is a political minefield. 
Bin its victims arc ordinary people 
wjro have strayed into it — and the 
casualty list is growing day by day. 


ON THE UP AND UP 


This is the remarkable story of a 
modest terraced house in a now- 
fashionable part of Islington, 
north London. This year atone, the 
value of the house has risen ■ 
from £77,000 to £1 1 0,000. 

Because the house fans outside 
the scope of foe Leasehold Reform 
Act it is almost impossible for - 
tenants to buy the freehold. 

1902: First lease issued, 70 
years at rental of E9.5s.0d (2&25L 
1927: First lessee died, wife - 
took over foe lease. 

1952: Second lessee died. 

Present owner bom. Heir soft! . 
house to surgical instruments 
manufacturer for £100. Mortgaged 
through the North London . 
Building Society. • 

1972: Lease expired, but tenant .. 
remained living there under foe 
provisions of foe Rent Act. 

1978: Tenant died. New tease of 
75 years sold for £27,000 with »r 
annual rbntal of £240. 

1982: Lease sold for £52,000. . 
1986: January -lease changed 
hands foir£77,000. March -sdd J 
again for £84,000. • 

Yesterday: Property valued tar - 
Hotolack Desiato at £1 1 0,000. 


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Years ago the menopause 

was R sign that women had 
outlived their usefulness. 

1 hey were ready to die’ 


The uncomfortable, blue nlastir 

!»*““• ™t ail 

sure whaij.es beyond the 
ingroora door. 1 

This 




These days women 


can simply walk in to 
a menopause clinic 
for treatment that 


can transform lives. 
$?' twuss onecf Jane Bidder reports 




. • .V- 


:y 


most famous meno- 
pause research clinics. Newcomers 
like the woman in front of me - 

Ull 0 1. t°!? ewhal surprisingly 
brought her 1 0-year-old daughter 
^ong too - look decidedly 
feUen at the sight of the peeling 
wahs, the sterile atmosphere (as 
dried up as a packet of redundant 
P v “ ie ?). ai, d the posters, somewhat 
insensitively advertising visiting 
times for the antenatal ward. 

Other patients like June — a 44- 
year-old east London housewife — 
are more concerned with the 
treatment than the surroundings: 
Three years ago, I became un- 
accountably depressed and ir- 
ritable and eventually 1 swallowed 
a bottle of pills. Luckily, my 
husband — who’d assumed I was 
depressed because I’d just been 
made redundant — arrived home 
an hour earlier than usual «wrt 
rushed me to hospitaL" 

After being pumped out, June 
was .told her depression was almost 
certainly due to the menopause 
(something which neither she nor 
her husband had thought of) and 
was referred to Dulwich’s clinic for 
hormonal treatment: “It's changed 
my life dramatically: everyone says 
i’m a new woman." 

Not all patients arrive under 
such dramatic circumstances. But 
the unusual factor about Dulwich 
is that no one has to have a doctor’s 
referral letter women can simply 
ring up for an appointment What 
is more, treatment is free on the 
NHS. though the waiting list can be 
as long as three months. 

The non-referral system is the 
idea of consultant John StuddJfe 
is genuinely concerned with help- 
ing women who, at worst have 


been driven to attempted suicide 
by “the change" and, at best have 
been tormented by the terrible 
night sweats, the extreme irritabil- 
ity. weight gain, hot flashes, osteo- 
porosis (thinning of the bones) and 
a crawling sensation under the 
skin. 

It is 1-3 years since Mr Stndd first- 
opened his Dulwich clinic and 
even its most hardened critics 
admit that it has come a long way: 
“1 originally opened the service in 
Birmingham in 1970 but the 
British Medical Association caused 
a terrible stink since patients didn't 
have to have a standard GP*s 
letter." recalls Mr Stndd. an enor- 
mous, kindly man with huge, dean 
medical hands. “We felt some 
women would be too scared to go 
to a local doctor who might tell 
them to grin and bear the meno- 
pause as their mothers did. We 
eventually persuaded the BMA to 
relent. We re-opened two months 
later and (hen I started Dulwich." 

Today, there are seven nation- 
wide similar walk-in centres but 
Mr Studd is still dissatisfied: 
“Some are more effective than 
others," be says darkly. “And there 
are an enormous number of 
women ' desperately needing help 
who either don’t live near such a 
clinic or don’t know about it" 

The more fortunate have GPs 
who are enlightened enough to 
direct their patients towards, 
specialized help but there are still 
those who as Studd wryly puts it, 
rely on the soothing platitude that 
it’s “just your age, my dear". 

Money is another cause of 
division amongst doctors. “We see 


about a hundred women a week 
and the average pharmaceutical 
bin is £6 a visit. 1 think lhat’sabar- 
gain considering how h prevents 
depression and all die other prob- 
lems which other hospital depart- 
ments would have to treat. 

“Certain colleagues fee! that 
carving through cancers and 
delivering babies axe more deserv- 
ing causes. I think menopausal care 
is one of the most important forms 
of preventative medicine in the 
twentieth century. Interestingly, 
women are the only animal species 
to undergo the change apart from 
apes m captivity. In the old days, 
the menopause — which starts 
when the ovaries stop producing 
eggs — was a sign that women had 
outlived their usefulness (for 
heaven's sake, don't'quote me on 
that!). In other words, they were 
ready to die because they were no 
longer fertile. 

“Now, with medical advances, 
we live longer so go on longer than 
parts ofour reproductive systems." 

Not everyone agrees about the 
correct treatment Mr Studtfs 
clinic, for example, concentrates on 
hormone replacement therapy 
(commonly known as HRT) since a 
menopausal patient suffers from a 
low level of oes tr ogen. Extra 
oestrogen is therefore given 
through tablets, skm creams or 
implants. The latter involves a 
simple insertion of an oestrogen 
pellet which is shot through the 
skin by syringe under a local' 
anaesthetic. Patients are given 
supplementary progesterone tab- 
lets to prevent thickening of the 
womb and the procedure is' re- 
peated every four to six months, 
depending on the patient. 

“When I started the Birmingham 
clinic, the general medical consen- 
sus was that hormone treatment 
was not altogether to be trusted," 
says Studd. “There were fears — 
ungrounded to my mind — that it 
could cause cancer or that it was 
downright unnatural." 

In Britain, medical opinion is 
still divided. Dr Jean Coope, a 
Macclesfield GP and author of The 
Menopause: coping with the change 



improving HRT and collating 
statistics to prove his beliefs: 
“We're still finding out which kind 
of hormones should be given (i.e. 
tablets or implants), in what dosage 
and so on. in the old days, we used 
a very complex oral therapy where 
wc tried to mimic the body’s own 
cycle. Nowadays, implants are 
becoming more important than 
tablets: it’s easier to control the 
dosage through implants and it also 
allows us to bypass the gut and 
liver. Another idea has been a 
vaginal ring which releases hor- 
mones into the body but even as a 
mere male. 1 don’t think it would 
be very pleasant for a woman—** 

Talking of male doctors, surely 
most patients are surprised to see a 
man in charge of what is an 
essentiallv feminine problem? Mr 
Studd guffaws with laughter “I 
totally poopooh the middle class 
notion that women want to see 
women doctors. My patients don’t 
care two hoots for my sex. When 
they come in here, they are too 
desperate io worry. When they 
come out. they are transformed. 


‘Two weeks after 
the initial 
implant I felt 
better than I‘d 
done for years’ 


(Martin Dunitz, £3.95) estimates 
that about two thirds of doctors are 
sceptical: “Personally, I think HRT 
can be very useful provided it is 
used correctly under careful 
supervision. 

“Despite this, only 2 per cent of 
British women are undergoing 
HRT even though it’s been around 
since the mid ’70s. (In America, the 
figure is much higher — around 30 
per cent) British women are still 
scared about the side effects, such 
as bleeding, which can be caused by 
hormones. Many dislike the arti- 
ficial ‘periods’ which arrive every 
month." 

There’s also the fear - linked 
with the contraceptive pill scare — 
that too much ■ progesterone or 


oestrogen might cause thrombosis. 
The Dulwich team, however, dis- 
misses this totally, claiming that 
the hormonal content of that pill is 
different from the one they use. 

Nevertheless, as Dr Coope 
points out, there are more natural 
methods of treating the change: 
“Exercise and healthy eating (with 
plenty of calcium) are crucial to 
prevent osteoporosis. Sometimes, 
a woman thinks she’s suffering 
from the menopause when she’s 
really going through another crisis 
like divorce or the children leaving 
home. Then she’s more in need of 
counselling than drags." 

While Mr Studd concedes that 
emotional help is important, his 
research is more concerned with 


“I even have JO patients aged 
under 25: the menopause can strike 
much earlier than people realize, 
especially if there’s a family history 
of this. And of course, hysterec- 
tomies can cause surgical meno- 
pause at any age." 

The hormonal treatment can 
also make patients look younger 
through giving them extra collagen 
(natural fibrous protein) which 
would have been lost through the 
menopause. The new collagen 
improves their skin, makes hair 
shine and generally enhances 
appearances. 

A good example is Valerie 
Marshall a teacher from Croydon 
who having had hormonal im- 
plants for the pa si eight years, looks 
more like 41 than her real age of 51. 

“Before. 1 had the usual meno- 
pausal hiccups like lack of energy, 
loss of confidence and so on," she 
says. “Two weeks after the 
initialimplant. I felt better than I’d 
done for years. It’s given me the 
enthusiasm to spend more lime On 
my hobbies (fitness, painting and 
drawing). And my two grown-up 
daughters say I look terrific." 


©T mm N wip ipi n Ud 1MB 



T 


he first time the Is- 
raeli pianist Maya 
Weltman played in. 
public with an or- 
chestra was on the stage of the 
Royal Festival Hal). The or- 
chestra was the London Phil- 
harmonic. the conductor 
Klaus Tcnnstedl 
Tonight she will be on the; 
same stage, with the same 
orchestra, under the same 
conductor. All that will have 
changed will be the music — 
Beethoven's first concerto, in- 
stead of the Mendelssohn G 
minor - and Maya's age. She 
was 12 then: now she is 14. ’ 
To Tennstedi. who had 
discovered Maya 18 months 
earlier, that first ever public 
performance was an outstand- 
ing success. To Maya, the 
concert was "like a dream". 
To her father. Joseph, who 
was in the audience, it was 
“like seeing your child climb 
Everest alone". 

But while Maya swept 
through the demanding work 
with the apparent ease or a 
seasoned concert pianist, her 
twin sister, Yfeat, chewed her 
nails every note of the way. 
This time; too. it. is Yfaat who 
has been suffering the pre- 


At the age.of 14, 


Maya Weltman 


returns to the 


Festival Hall tonight 


to play Beethoven -- 
watched by her 


equally talented twin 


concert nerves while Maya has 
been concentrating on her 
practising. 

The fact that Yfeat is as 
skilful on the cello as Maya is 
on the piano makes the story 
even more remarkable. For 
flie Weltman twins come from 
an entirely unmusical family 
and had not the girls them- 
selves decided — at the age of 
eight — that they wanted to 
learn the piano, their remark- 
able talents might have re- 
mained undiscovered. 

They are a delightful and 
seemingly unaffected pair, 
virtually indistinguishable to 
an outsider and with a habit of 
completing one another's sen- 
tences. They are each other’s 
t emit 


friends — the inevitable result 
of having more in common 
with each other than with 
anyone else. 

“The girls' at school talk 
about pop music, boyfriends, 
television." Yfeat scoffs. "We 
Jik^io talk about a perfect 
performance. Maya is less 
friendly at school than I am. I 
know I need friends so I smile 
at everyone." 

In feet, school is currently 
the twins' greatest problem. In 
order to practise the necessary 
hours they are forced to play 
truant — with their parents’ 
consent. “We livedafly with a 
conflict" their mother. Es- 
ther. admits. She is hoping 
that their state school in 
Jerusalem will .prepare a spe- 
cial timetable for them. 
Tennstedt first heard Maya 




Roc Drtnkvnar 

«•; 4 



are predictably proud of thdr 
daughters and happy to make 
the sacrifices necessary, they 
worry about the twins* lack of 
lime for any other interests. . 

Joseph, a computer systems 
analyst is particularly aware 
of the potential hazards. 
“There is a danger that hav- 
ing climbed so high, they may 
fell." he admits. “But they are 
so sure of what they want" 


( FRIDAY ) 


The sex 
education 
debate: a 
mother’s view 


Waning 

wonder 

ofWoolies 


FIRST 

PERSON 


6 


Our local Wool worth 
store is to be given a 
new image. Out will go 
the food and the 
clothes and most of 
the things I want to buy, and 
in will come a lot more do-it- 
yourself and gardening fere, 
which always makes me feel 
guilty for nor doing-it-ali- 
myself and. worse still, not 
wanting to. 

Electrical goods, hi-fi and 
videos will, I suppose, also fill 
the shelves. But 1 shall miss 
the Woolworth I know so 
well. I remember it when 
everything really did cost less 
than sixpence, or not much 
more. My childhood treat was 
being taken round the store, 
clutching sixpence — my 
week's pocket money — and 
being able to buy a colour 
pencil, a tiny red notebook in 
which to write “poetry" and a 
small cap-gun. 

In early adulthood, it was 
the shop where I could buy 
curlers and ankle sucks, lip- 
stick (pretending it was Eliza- 
beth Arden) am) talcum 
powder. The girls behind the 
counter were not considered 
to be quite as classy as the 
ones in Marks and Spencer, 
but they were helpful if not 
very clever. 

On marriage, 1 could buy 
food at the same time as 
washing powder, shirt but- 
tons, reels of cotton, en- 
velopes and cotton wool. And 
with children of my own, I 
was back at the toy counters, 
with some items still costing 
under sixpence. 

Now all this is to change. 
My local store is to close fora 
few weeks while the alter- 
ations are carried ont. The 
food is going because, al- 
though It sells well, it doesn’t 
make enough profit for the 
floor space — a video recorder 
will make much more per 
square foot. And because onr 
town centre, like so many 
others, is changing beyond an 
recognition, I probably won't 
be able to get any of my needs 
anywhere else. 

I am sure there -will be 
many of us who will mourn 
the passing of the Woolworth 
we knew and loved. 

We will miss it, and 
who knows? Perhaps 
one day Woolworths 
will miss us, too. 


nwonn 

5 


Jacinth Whittaker 



lunch in a guest house in Tel 
Aviv.-She was auditioning for 
the israel-American Cultural 
Foundation in another room. 
“1 couldn't understand how 
there was a pianist so fantastic 
in this house." Tennstedt 
recalls. “The manager told me 
it was a child auditioning and 
f said ‘It is not possible’." 


Dual ambitions:, musicians Yfeat (left) and Maya Weltman 


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e went to investigate 
and discovered 10- 
year-old Maya in 
the middle of a Mo- 
zart and Schumann recital. 
“She was unbelievable." he 
says, “and not only as a 
pianist, but also.because of her 
style. I thought . ‘With such a 
talent maybe she can play with 
an orchestra’ and I invited her 
to London to play with the 
Philharmonic." 


That was only two years 
after Maya and Yfeat had had 
their first piano lesson. Their 
Russian-born teacher. Luisa 
Joffe, was enchanted by the 
girls who arrived al her home 
sporting identical party frocks 
and remarkable musical gifts. 

After a year of piano lessons 
she suggested that Yfaat 
switch to another instrument 
“They were equally good at 
the piano." she explains, “but 
because they are twins it was 
not good for them to compete 
with each other." She also 
wanted the twins to play 
chamber, music together — . 
which they did until they 
began to resent each other's 
criticism. 

“When we play together we 
do a lot of aiguing." Yfaat 


admits. “I hate it when Maya 
tells me what to do. When we 
practise together she always 
has something to say." 

As it happened. Yfaat mas- 
tered the cello with the same 
brilliance that she had exhib- 
ited on the piano. “She is very 
talented." Tennstedi says, 
“but the cello needs a lot of 
power - which is not possible 
for a child." He hopes to 
feature Maya and Yfaat to- 
gether at the Festival Hall in a 
couple of years time — not 
because of the gimmick value, 
but because “they are both 
very very talented— that's all". 

It has all posed something 
of a dilemma for Joseph and 
Esther Weltman. who emi- 
grated to Israel from Argen- 
tina 30 years ago. While they 


ut music is not en- 
tirely a family affair. 
The twins’ two older 
brothers have no 
musical leanings and have 
been known to sleep through 
the girls’ concerts. Their 
mother has had to give up her 
hobby, painting, and their 
father spends his holidays 
ferrying the twins to lessons 
and concerts. 

For their own part, the girls 
are ambivalent about their 
talents. “I am ambitious to be 
a professional pianist but I 
don't think 1 can be great 
because you need such a big 
repertoire." Maya says, and 
Yfaat adds: “Most of the great 
musicians were geniuses and 1 
don't think we are." 

Maestro Tennsiadt dis- 
agrees. “I am sure in the 
future. Maya will be a great 
soloist." he insists."She is not 
only a pianist she is a 
musician, and that is very very 
important She has a sense of 
style. Her sister has the same 
talent They want to make 
music. Both these girls burn 
for music." 

Sally Brompton 

© TJma» Nawspapw* LM 19S8 



A round-up of news, 
views and Information 


Tea party 


Survive Financially (Unwin, 
£255), is heavily, biased to- 
wards the calculating hus- 
band, but by tackling every 
Twist of the legal system In 
! intelligible, down-to-earth 
' style, it provides excellent 
ammunition for either divorc- 
ing party in what can easily 
amount to financial war. As 
Tony Hetherington points out 
In this battle "there are few 


Quote me... 


Today sees the start of 
month-long tea-drinking winners, just good losers and 
marathon in aid of the NSPCC bad losers. And knowing the 
appeal fur £100,000 towards rales of the game before you 
additional child protection play can make all the 
centres. Twinh^s, the span- difference." 
sots, are offering a “starter 
kit" of tea, posters and leaf- piav for tOCfelV 
lets, available from Twining* 3J •£ , . 

Information Service, Hutton For Dfe is a registered 



this latest product, which 
costs £6.50, uses a unique 
“colour bead indicator” 
where Just one bead changes 
colour to show whether the 
result is positive or negative. 
By rinsing the indicator, the 
result can be preserved for 
Inspection by a doctor at a 
later date. 


House, 161-166 Ffeet Street, 
London EC4A 2DP. 


Split tips 


By 1990. it is expected feat 
three million Britons will, have 


charity organization, set np by 
worried parents to promote 
alternatives to toys that pro- 
mote violence. They hare just 
produced the second edition of 
A Guide To Playthings, a mail 
order catalogue packed with 


“I'm am remotely sentimental 
about black people. I am just 
as nasty to black people as 1 
am to white people. And that 
can be very nasty indeed." 
Helen Suzman, Sooth African 
activist 


Sybaritic scents 

The continuing saga of last 
year’s fragrance success 
story, Chanel’s Coco contin- 
ues: sybarites can now sink 
. into waters perfumed with 
their favourite scent (with its 
floral, amber and spicy 
notes), and smooth delicious 



become divorcees. Uiefinan-.. around 200 and toys 

ciai consequences of a bro- designed “to help children to 

ken marriage • can. be " - * 



after a- broken . heart , is^Sah Ipswich Road, Norwich 
mended- Tony Hsther^‘pR22LN, p ri ce d£L including, 
Ingion's How to ,^^^. ; t(ch3pc^j^>6stage and pacing . 


Now you know 

Women anxious to find out 
whether or not they are 
pregnant can now dispense 
with the nail-biting. Discover 
Colour — launched today and 
by far the simplest pregnancy 
test yet — uses the most 
accurate technology -to give 
results in 30 minutes. In the 
past it has not always been 
simple to Interpret the results 
of home pregnancy tests, but 


unguents into skin stripped of 
mol! 


moisture by central heating 
systems. Coco’s bath line 
comprises Gel Moussant for 
foamy waters, a creamy 
soap, Efau Deodorants and a 
rich Body Creme. These lux- 
uries are priced from £10 to 
£36, but as one might reason- 
ably expect at that price, the 
black and gilt packaging is 
stunning enough to display in 
even the .. chlcest of 
boudoirs ... 

Josephine Fairley 



The face of the killer 
devouring Africa 


At this moment ^ ^ 

are swannins across toe African continent .destroying 
:fooai 


precious food crops. Swarms of up to AO billion locusts 
are feared, able to est 80,000 tonnes of crops each day - 
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Michael Binyon charts the change in superpower relations from chilly mistrust to goodwHancto 

Breaking the 
ice in 
Reykjavik 



Washington 

It is a summit, bur not the real 
one. Thai was the thrust of 
President Reagan’s announce- 
ment yesterday after George 
Shultz had told the world that 
Gennadi Zakharov was being 
whisked home from New York, 
Yuri Orlov was being released 
from exile in Siberia and Nicholas 
Daniloff was already on his way 
home to America. 

With the sudden ending of the 
month-long superpower confront- 
ation, Soviet- American relations 
are lurching forwards, taking 
Europe, America and world public 
opinion by surprise. Only days ago 
the US administration was talking 
gloomily of a torpedoed summit, 
of Soviet perfidy and mistrust 
wrecking all hopes for arms con- 
trol agreement. The mood now is 
very different. Shultz spoke con- 
fidently of immediate agreement 
on medium range weapons, of 
genuine progress over the whole 
range of relarions from human 
rights to regional conflicts. 

What appeared an insuperable 
obstacle has become a catalyst to 
frank talk, swift compromises, and 
real progress. Reagan has pulled 
off a political coup just in time for 
the mid-term elections, and 
Mikhail Gorbachov has un- 
doubtedly reinforced his some- 
what shaky authority at home. 
Both sides have recovered from a 
series of initial blunders and 


disarmed domestic critics with a 
compromise package which both 
can claim as a resounding success. 
There may still be sharp criticism 
■from the right-wingers in the US 
who have advocated a much 
tougher tine from the be g i n n i ng. 
But Reagan made a dear decision 
within the first week that the 
Daniloff affair would not hold up 
arms control talks or summit 
preparation. 

Without doubt, both Reagan 
and Shultz saw the dangers in the 
vortex of recriminations over 
Daniloff; that everything achieved 
in the tortuous improvement in 
East-West relations since the Ge- 
neva summit in November was 
being sucked down in the rhetoric 
and galloping mistrust. Just as 
Reagan had become convinced 
the Russians were serious in their 
latest arms control policies, and 
when he was confident he had the 
authority to quell the doubts of his 
vociferous right wing on any deal, 
the Daniloff affair threatened to 
wreck it all. 

To defuse it Shultz, like a 
patient sapper, spent hours with 
Eduard Shevardnadze, the Soviet 
foreign minister. .Both sides were 
under the strain of a ti me deadline 
and the burning suspicions of the 
American right sniffing a sell-out 
as well as disaffected elements in 
the KGB and the politburo who 
wanted a return to the old, hard 
tine with Washington. 




It took four long negotiating 
sessions to wrap up the package, to 
synchronize the timing of each 
step in order to disguise the 
linkage. It is a personal triumph 
for both Shultz and Shevardnadze. 
Shultz remains in the ascendant 
over his critics and rivals such as 
Caspar Weinberger, the hawkish 
Defence Secretary. Shevardnadze 
was being tested in the workf s 
spotlight For his diplomatic skills 
and mastery of a field until 
recently unknown to him. 

What have Washington and 
Moscow gained from yesterday’s 
announcement? For the Ameri- 
cans, the advantages they can 
claim are dear, the frill summit is 
to go ahead, and it will be in 
Washington this year. Reagan had 
staked his personal prestige on 
holding Gorbachov to his Geneva 
promise. He has come to believe 
in the urgent need to do business 


with the Russians at a time when 
he thinks they may be .under 
strong economic pressures. He 
does indeed want to be a president 
remembered for changing the 
direction of arms control and 
getting a deal that cuts the number 
of weapons rather than legitimiz- 
ing their build-up. With no sum- 
mit. the recent Soviet concessions 
at Geneva might have come u> 
nought. 

Secondly, the US acceptance of 
Gorbachov’s invitation to a 
preparatory meeting so swiftly will 
enormously strengthen Allied con- 
fidence in the administration's 
seriousness about seeking bettor 
relations with Moscow. It could 
not have come at a more critical 
time, as the Labour Party in 
Britain and the Social Democrats 
in West Germany are consolidat- 
ing an anti-nuclear policy that 
Washington sees threatening the 


whole fabric of Nato. 

The swift US volte-face in 
agreeing to go to Iceland at such 
short notice, ingoring past 
dismissals of preparatory summit 
meetings and vague offers from 
Moscow, can help assuage the 
fears of the European left that US 
commitment to arms control and 
a summit is only skin-deep. 
Thirdly. Reagan needed just such 
a coup to regain the initiative at 
home against the increasingly 
insistent attempts by a sceptical 
House of Representatives to man- 
age foreign polity- and lay down 
arms control guidelines. Reagan 
has now restored his waning 
influence over the defence budget. 

As for the Russians, they too 
can point to short-term and long- 
term gains. Their immediate wor- 
ries - on the arrest of Zakharov 
and the expulsion order against 25 
members of their UN mission — 


have been accommodated They 
have had to trade awav a dis- 
sident. but that is of little con- 
sequence internally and may even 
do some good for their image 
overseas. 

They have removed the obstacle 
to discussion of what they see as 
the most important issue: arms 
control. They have cleared the 
atmosphere for a summit in the 
US which would have been a 
humiliating insult for Gorbachov 
if everywhere he went he en- 
countered boos and demonstra- 
tions. And they have put the 
Americans under a moral obliga- 
tion, if nothing more, to talk at 
Reykjavik about the Soviet mora- 
torium on nuclear testing. 

Moscow cannot afford a new 
spiral in the arms race, nor can 
Gorbachov be distracted by a 
fresh crisis with Washington from 


his gargantuan task of frying to 
impose domestic economic re- 
form. 

Neither Daniloff nor Zakharov 
could ever have imagined that 
their indiv idual cases would have 
led to so much world attention, or 
to such an unprecedented flurry of 
diplomatic activity. In the same 
way. the Czechs could never have 
seen that the crushing of their 
independence was the spur to the 
detente of the 1 970s. nor the East 
Berliners imagine that the build- 
ing of the wail would make better 
East-West German relations so 
much more urgent. 

For Shultz and Regan, for 
Gorbachov and Shevardnazde, 
the real test will come in 10 days, 
when Reykjavik w»H decide 
whether the past month’s storm is 
really behind us or has left a 
lasting scar of distrust. 



THE TIMES DIARY 


Battlefield 
of Eton 

Eton will take any future Labour 
government to court if it attempts 
to cany through this week’s 
conference decision to nationalize 
public schools. Denying persistant 
rumours that Eton has contin- 
icy plans to set up shop in 
iihem Ireland — “or anywhere 
else" — headmaster Eric Ander- 
son told me yesterday that leaving 
the country was “inconceivable". 
“We would fight the issue in the 
High Court, the European Court, 
and if necessary, the World 
Court” he said. Anderson, who 
named four separate international 
conventions supporting the rights 
of the boater-wearing classes, 
added darkly. “We certainly do 
not intend to leave a site we have 
occupied for nearly five and ahalf 
centuries." One of the human 
rights conventions that Eton 
would use against Labour is the 
United Nations Convention on 
Economic. Social and Cultural 
Rights, which endorses the rights 
of parents to send children to 
“schools other than those estab- 
lished by the public authorities". 
The convention was signed by the 
Labour government in 1976. 

Boomerang 

Labour brass are somewhat em- 
barrassed by the invitation to 
delegates to cover the Winter 
Gardens “Berlin Wall” security 
screen with jokes about Edwina 
Currie (Diary yesterday). Among 
the Edwina graffiti — “Let them 
eat fibre” and so on — has 
appeared anti-Kinnock scrawls. 
One verse, though, hits both tar- 
gets: While Currie smells strong; 
And for some spells revulsion; The 
Red Rose smells sweet; But its 
thorns spell expulsion. Ouch. 

'• Meanwhile the North continues 
to snp'pjy Edwina with more 
jumnmiition for her campaign 
against fatty Bl health. Bladspool 
has a snack bar called Calorie 
Counters whose mem comprises 
chip butties and toasted tea-cakes- 

Sid and Kev 

Kevin Scally. the Labour party 
member expelled from Roy 
Hattersley’s Sparkbrook constit- 
uency in what Dennis Skinner 
condemns as a “witch-hunt” is 
still wowing the activists. Describ- 
ing himself as a “delegate for the 
disenfranchized”. he told a fringe 
meeting at Blackpool that, banned 
from the conference hall, he was 
filling the empty hours rear 
Hattersley’s A Yorkshire Boyht 
Quickly distancing himself — “It 
was a present from a friend who 
won it in a raffle” — he drew a 


political parable from the 

leader’s description of a 

Labour loyalist in his home town, 
one Sid Ugglesworth: “Sid is just 
tire sort of party member that 
careerists tike Hattersley climb 
over to get to the top. They 
thought I was Sid, but I wasn’t” 

• Ted Heath is billed to appear In 
Blackpool this week, his opponent 
not NeO Kinnock bat "Lion 
Hearted” Little Prince — on the 
wrestling bill at the Tower Circus. 

Expert advice 

Douglas Hurd spent hours on 
Monday night closeted with a 
group of senior police officers at 
the Old Swan Hotel in Harrogate, 
where he is attending the Police 
Superintendents* Conference. He 
was, I leant, begging them to help 
him with a problem he has been 
wrestling with for years. The next 
morning he explained to his 
bemused audience that he had 
been seeking their professional 
advice on how to eject a passenger 
from a car so that his partly- 
covered body is found lying on the 
drive with a broken neck. Hurd, I 
hasten to add, is a part-time 
thriller writer. 

Clatter trap 

Sir Robert Armstrong, the Civil 
Service head criticized by a select 
committee for his part in .the 
Westland affair, can’t get away 
from helicopters. Last year he 
bought a large house in Somerset 
— directly underneath the flight- 
path of the Royal Navy helicopter 
training base at Yeovflton. Paddy 
Ashdown, the local Liberal MP, 
tells me that previous occupants 
have complained to him about the 
unbearable noise: “The bouse 
tends to change hands in the 
summer when the pilots go on 
holiday.” Sir Robert, the fourth 
owner in nine years, stoically 
insists that he is not worried by the 
din and that he tikes helicopters 

Hard numbers 

Who is to run education in the 
London Borough of Brent? First. 
Adrian Parsons, the chief educa- 
tion officer, walked out complain- 
ing of political interference. Then 
Dinah Tuck and Gordon Mott. 
Nos 2 and 3 respectively, found 
other jobs. When the top job was 
advertised it attracted only one 
application, from Brent's multi- 
cultural adviser, and it has now 
been re-advertised. What can It be 
about Brent’s progressive, go- 
ahead council that is keeping the 
applicants away? 


reading Three Up 

ovhooa. , „„ 


BARRY FANTONI 



•Cheer up. Saatdns might tike to ase 
it as a party political broadcast’ 


Thomas Layton, sacked after 26 
years as editor of the journal of the 
Duke of Wellington’s genteel An- 
g)o-Spanish Society, is carrying 
out his threat to start a rival paper. 
Knowing only too well the 
journal's main selling point, 75- 
year-old Layton is promising to 
give his Hispanophile readers 
even more of what they wane four 
Spanish crosswords per issue, to 
the official journal's one. 

Half-seas over 

Coveting Britain's lone-standing 
reputation, austere Saudi Arabia is 
sprouting its own soccer hooligan- 
ism. Coachloads of Ians visiting 
Bahrain for the start of the Gulf 
Cup tournament disgraced them- 
selves by climbing mio the un- 
accustomed booze and getting 
rowdily drunk. Now they have 
been tanned from using the 15- 
mile causeway linking Saudi Ara- 
bia and Bahrain even before it is 
officially opened. 


It is 30 years since Anthony 
Crosland published The Future of 
Socialism , that clastic text of post- 
war Social Democracy. Like all 
classics, its subsequent fete is to be 
generally unread, even by many of 
those who claim to know what it 
says. 

By many on the left it has come 
to be regarded as a monument of 
revisionist deradic&lization, 
which nobody anxious to prove 
their Socialist credentials should 
be found quoting as support For 
didn’t Crosland argue that Labour 
should forget all public owner- 
ship? Did he not want to sub- 
stitute for it a mild-mannered 
commitment to . equality of 
opportunity? Did he not turn the 
red blood of socialism into the red 
wine of open air caleS? 

The answer, on all counts, is 
that he did not. In arguing against 
a stea d ily expanding chain of slate 
monopolies he argued for more 
varied forms of public ownership. 
While welcoming wider opportu- 
nities, he insisted that in Britain 
“class stratification goes too deep 
to be uprooted merely by equaliz- 
ing opportunities” and required 
tougher treatment He argued fora 
Socialism in which liberty would 
be extended by allowing people 
free choice. 

But now, as then, the profound 
conservatism of so much of the 
British Labour movement (which 
Crosland frequently referred to) is 
causing it to denounce the ideo- 
logical betrayal of traditional 
collectivism by such dangerous 
radicalism. 

Despite the continuing rele- 
vance of his discussion ofSorialist 
values and goals, it seems unlikely 
that Cros land’s ideas will be 
revived, since he now represents a 
different world. He assured us that 
capitalism had been domesticated 
by the modern state and no longer 
deserved its name; that economic 
growth was mopping up residual 
poverty and would finance pain- 
less redistribution and high qual- 
ity public services; and that within 
a decade or two we could forget all 
about economics and concentrate 
instead upon culture and leisure. 
He further assured us that frill 
employment was politically guar- 
anteed and that there would be no 
ideological counter-revolution 
from the right, since "the political 
battle today is waged mainly on 
ground chosen by the Left." 

AH this was somastivefy wrong, 
that those in search of an explana- 
tion might be tempted to recall 
that Crosland’s only claimed 
expertize was as an economist 
Central to British politics in recent 


Anthony Wright shows up the flaws in the 
reasoning of Socialism’s guru of the Fifties 
— but praises him for at least thinking 

Why Labour 
needs a 
new Crosland 


decades has been the decline of the 
economy, which Crosland dis- 
counted. At the beginning of the 
1950s Britain was soil the richest 
country in Europe; titirty years 
later it has become one of the 
poorest It is now widely rec- 
ognized that the 1950s was a 
crucial time in which the fun- 
damental weaknesses of the econ- 
omy should have been addressed, 
but were not- Furthermore, far 
from having been tamed by the 
modem state, contemporary cap- 
italism is ever more international 
and footloose. 

Pension funds accounted for 
only 1 per cent of quoted stock in 
the fete 1950s and were dismissed 
by Crosland as irrelevant to the 
argument about ownership and 
control. But they now account for 
nearly 30 per cent of all 
shareholdings and exercise a ma- 
jor economic role. 

So much has changed since 
then. Croslamfs problem was how 
to adapt Socialism to the improv- 
ing world of 1956. The problem 
for the contemporary Labour 
Party is how to adapt to the 
bleaker world of 1986. To estab- 
lish a future for itself Labour has 
first of all to come to terms with its 
own past. In a sense it has been 
Socialism's century. Around a 
third of the world’s population is 
now to be found living under 
regimes which describe them- 
selves as Socialist 

However, as Orwell once re- 
marked, the feet that they are 
always described as living under 
Socialism is significant. Some- 
thing has dearly gone wrong with 
the rival prospects offered at the 
beginning of the century by Marx- 
ism-arad Fabian collectivism, the 
two major schools of early century 
Socialism. From this point of 
view, the 20th century has seen the 



Crosland: wrong on many counts, 
bat displaying radical imagination 
and intellectual toaghness 

collapse of the whole Socialist 
pack of cards. 

Both revolutionaries and 
reformers believed that history 
was on Socialism's side, and 
assumed that Socialism was 
synonymous with political free- 
dom. Capitalism has been adopted 
internationally, as Marx pre- 
dicted, but without the anticipated 
consequences for Socialism in the 
West, The western working class 
has neither organized itself for 
revolution nor voted for Social- 
ism. No wonder then, that Social- 
ists, brimming with theoretical 
confidence at the beginning of the 
century, look in such intellectual 
disarray towards its end. 

If Crosland had wanted to 
divest the Left of some of its old 
intellectual baggage, he had plenty 
of new equipment with which to 
replace il His position represents 
the optimistic mid-century heyday 
of Social Democracy; as he ex- 
plains how a transformed capital- 
ism can now be made to deliver 
the fruits of Socialism without any 
messy business on the way. It soon 
became dear that the economic 
systems of the West were unable to 


perform the role assigned to them 
in providing a future for Social- 
ism. 

Crosland's version of Social 
Democracy was soon revealed as 
being essentially a dependent 
strategy, needing an expanding 
and expansive capitalism for its 
own success. Deprived of this 
condition. Social Democrats had 
either to move rightwards and 
settle for what they could get (the 
present SDP option) or move 
leftwards (as Crosland himself 
acknowledged) in search of new 
routes to the old goals. 

The goal is proving difficultio 
attain because the intellectual 
mountain to be climbed is much 
higher and iis shape more elusi ve 
than a generation ago. The belief 
then was that societies and econo- 
mies like our own had achieved a 
durable stability; the belief now is 
that they are feeing a period of 
profound and uncertain change. 
Change cannot just be left “to the 
market”. But does the Left have 
anything more convincing to 
offer? 

Until Labour admits that it 
must adapt to a changed world, it 
will not be taken seriously, nor 
deserve to be. It must offer a 
Socialism that is attractive in 
principle and plausible in practice: 
This of course is harder to achieve 
than it sounds, even if some 
Socialists persist in making it 
sound easy. This was the challenge 
accepted by Crosland. as he 
endeavoured to map out a distinc- 
tive identity for what he increas- 
ingly wanted to call “Democratic 
Socialism”. Thirty years on, this is 
an even more radical challenge for 
the Left, and likely to suggest a 
form of Socialism that offers a 
coherent policy of Socialist 
production as well as the familiar 
one of Socialist distribution. 

Yet Crosland was a radical, 
prepared to think dangerously in 
public not a characteristic of the 
contemporary Left in Britain. 
Apologizing for the length of his 
1956 book. Crosland said he had 
become increasingly dissatisfied 
with the brief essays which had 
been almost the sole response so 
far to the reiterated demands for 
“new thinking” about Socialism. 
Today, with the challenge so much 
greater, the rebuke is even more 
justified. It will eventually have to 
be remedied if the Left is to have a 
future. 

Anthony Wright is a lecturer in 
Political Studies at Birmingham 
University. This article is adapted 
from Socialism: Theories and 
Practices published this week bv 
OUP. 


Trade: help others and help ourselves 


Seven years after the completion 
of the Tokyo round of multilateral 
trade negotiations, governments 
have committed themselves to a 
new one which will determine the 
pattern of world trade for the rest 
of this century and, perhaps, well 
into the next. In so doing they 
have shown, yet again, the value of 
Gait, the General Agreement on 
Tariffs and Trade. Never more 
than provisionally applied, lack- 
ing the machinery of a properly 
established international org- 
anization. Gall none the less sull 
plays a central role long after the 
other constitutional pillar of the 
post-war economy, the system of 
exchange rates agreed at Bretton 
Woods, has crumbled away. 

Other than at exceptional times, 
trade policy attracts little atten- 
tion. Disorders in international 
finance and money are far more 
compelling. Yet finance and 
money matter only because they 
serve the real economy, the inter- 
national exchange of goods and 
services on which we all live. That 
little attention is paid to trade is an 
indication of the intrinsic lack of 
appeal of a subject whose essence 
is a host of petty disputes about 
everyday commodities. 

Another reason for the lack of 
interest is Gatt itself. In the 1 9th 


century trade policy was domestic 
politics, the stuff of fierce battles 
among domestic interests. It is still 
that, but it is also a system of 
international relations managed 
by an impenetrable structure of 
diplomatically interpreted rules. 

The intellectual basis of those 
rules is absurd, and pushes gov- 
ernments into absurd postures. It 
is not too much to say that within 
Gatt trade liberalization is ach- 
ieved when each government 
represents the interests of its 
opponents while pretending to 
represent its own. 

How does this work? Govern- 
ments are assumed to be slaves of 
their organized producer groups. 
They represent those interests by 
insisting that they can consider 
liberalization only if other coun- 
tries liberalize top. In this way the 
interests of protectionist domestic 
industries are set against those of 
exporters and the general desire to 
maintain international co-opera- 
tion. By demanding that one’s 
negotiating partners liberalize, 
each country insists on increasing 
the economic welfare of the others 
and is compelled by them to do 
the same. This reciprocity leads to 
more liberal trade. 

The implicit assumption of Gatt 
seems to be that the best policy of 


all would be to remain prot- 
ectionist in a liberal world, if one 
could only get away with it. This 
is. indeed, what developing coun- 
tries insist upon. But it is not only 
developing countries that believe 
in such absurdities. Witness the 
squabbles that preceded the agree- 
ment at the recent Gatt meeting at 
Punta del Este. 

Until the last minute, the EEC 
insisted on defending an agri- 
cultural policy which sells food to 
our enemies at prices fer below 
those our own consumers pay and 
at the expense of our friends. The 
US threatened that if it did not get 
the negotiations it wanted it would 
be forced to introduce protection, 
even though its principal victims 
would be tbe American public. . 
Finally, tbe developing countries 
continued to insist that they 
should not “make concessions 
inconsistent with, their develop- 
ment. financial and trade needs” 
when, most observers would 
agree, those needs stem from their 
initial refusal to accept more 
liberal patterns of trade. 

So each country insists on the 
right to hurt itself, presumably 
hoping that the others will force it 
to abandon that right. But experi- 
ence, since 1947 shows that such 
deceit is benign only if govern- 


ments recognize it as deceit It is 
not just the process of reciprocal 
bargaining that has produced lib- 
eralization. It has also been a 
recognition, however feeble, of the 
value of liberalization for one’s 
own country. 

The successes of the system 
meanwhile remain limited. The 
issues now confronting it such as 
the liberalization of agriculture or 
textiles and clothing, are the hard 
cases that it has failed to deal with 
in the past precisely because of an 
inadequate recognition of the all- 
round benefits of liberalization in 
these areas. In the case of agri- 
culture in particular, the EEC 
would never have contemplated 
liberalization if it were not for the 
feet that the costs and absurdities 
of the system had become so 
glaringly obvious. 

If the new round is to solve such 
problems, each government, not 
least our own. must remind both 
itself and its public more force- 
fully than ever before that the 
interests chat will be served by 
conceding liberalization of im- 
ports into our markets is. first and 
foremost, our own. 

Martin Wolf 

The author is Director of Studies at 
the Trade Policy Research Centre 


Moreover . . . 

Miles Kington 

More of 
those 
musings 

From linn' to time we are 
honoured by a visit from our 
pnmrhnor. Lord Moreover, who 
calls at the alike rn announce a cut 
in our salaries, to check the levi’is 
in the cocktail cabinet, and to leave 
behind another instalment of his 
forthcoming book. The Wit and 
'Wisdom of Lord Mortwer. We 
are proud to bring you today 
another selection of thoughts from 
the top. 

Whenever I am woken by the 
ringing of the telephone, 1 always 
try to sound bright and breezy 
when l answer it. as if 1 have been 
up for hours. Despite this, my 
callers always say: “Oh. sorry — 
did I wake you up?”. When, on the 
other hand. I yawn and snore 
during a telephone conversation 
to express my growing tedium, 
they never notice. 

Many of my friends have an alarm 
clock which they shout at. in order 
to stop it ringing. It comes on 
again in five minutes, and they 
shout at it again, until the lime 
comes when they learn to outsleep 
it. What is needed is something 
quite different: an alarm dock 
which shouts at you. I have pre- 
recorded a tape of my voice for my 
morning arousal which is so rude 
to me that I have to get up to 
dismiss it from my employment 
Deep inside every radical revolu- 
tionary, there is a man straggling 
to get out who would like to be 
asked on to Desert Island Discs. 

I have noticed that Englishmen 
often tell jokes about clergymen. 
This is because they do not believe 
suffidemly in Goa any more to 
make jokes about Him. Irishmen 
also tell jokes about priests. This, 
however, is because they believe 
in God too much to make jokes 
about Him. 

When I was a young man you 
could tell a girl that you loved her, 
but to utter four-letter words was 
absolutely taboo. Nowadays even 
girls utter four-letter words, but 
everyone seems ashamed to use 
the word “love”. 

Whenever there is a serious riot, 
the newspapers report that cars 
have been overturned and set on 
fire. This leads me to wonder 
whether cars always have to be 
overturned before they can be set 
alight — something, perhaps, to do 
with the position of the petrol 
pipe. It may be that the salvation 
of tbe British car industry lies in 
the design of a new car which can 
easily be set on fire in the standing 
position, and which could be 
exported plentifully and cheaply 
to all the world's troubled areas. 
Opinion is divided between those 
who think the silly season ends 
with the arrival oT the party 
conference season and those who 
think that is when it starts. 
Revolutionary young playwrights 
always say they cannot stand 
establishment playwrights, or the- 
atre companies, or managements 
or producers. Actually, it's the 
audiences they despise. 

Until the 1960s all popular singers 
smiled throughout their perfor- 
mances. no matter how heart- 
broken their message. But for the 
last 20 years all popular singers 
have looked as if they have Just 
been deserted by their loved ones 
or tortured by the secret police, no 
matter how cheerful the lyrics. No 
wonder people are going over to 
opera, where you can make a 
reasonably infutmed guess at the 
relative happiness or misery of the 
singer from nis expression. "even it 
not from the words. 


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THE TIMES WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 1 1986 


13 


Street, London El 9XN Telephone: 01-481 4100 

r prospectus 


confidence "and In UiTsni JSK 


Ii5 n »! n , who be!,eve s that he has ^ sovereignly NATO 

aU bui won the fight f" -IS ?," ked to J£ e sacking of defend. So indeed it' 
possession of if) nnSLi 9 usl ° Tner s officers), violence- 
Sum. The Labour ££22 I\ the h ° me and 
responded in like soirit^Ah i*S y - ,nvest in “d 
prolonged aBDlaiJ P Sf," S l,ehtln - E?) - ? nd >he lack of 


prolonged applause followed 
Ranging “Here we go” - ite 
Jrfain rwth which the nation 


during the 


became familiar 
Scargill strike. 

Fof practical purposes, all 
dtvtsions were hiddenTway! 


scree ning for cervical and 
breast cancer and kidney dialy- 
sis, were all grist to his mill. 

Yet Mr Kinnock had noth- 
ing new to say about how 
Labour would pay for these 
moral investments. He could 


* 


V 


I* 


* . * 


even though Mr Erir H^I’ , investments. He could 
the platform deriiJfJi °! y , relale ^ ^miliar recipe 

in the standing ovfdon Bu" Planning - repalrialion of 
Mr Hcffer s own removal from 
the National Executive 
Committee earlier in the day 

as a penally for the support he 

has given to the expelled 
Militants of Liverpool, was 
nailf symbolic of the single- 
minded determination on all 
wings of the party to maintain 
pre-election unity. 

A few token extremists have 
been expelled, those many 
more who remain are to be 
relegated and the party, left 
and right, is to rally round its 
leader and his policies which 
have been carefully treated for 
general consumption. What 
those policies would mean in 
practice, however, both with 
regard to the nation's domestic 
economy and its defence 
would not have been easily 
learned from the generalities 
of Mr Kinnock's speech yes- 
terday. 

In its own terms, it was a 
speech of considerable politi- 
cal skill and boldness. Appro- 
priating a term hitherto used 
by the political right (es- 
pecially in the United Stales) 
and hitherto employed by the 
left only for abusive purposes. 

Mr Kinnock declared himself 
and his party to be speaking for 
the real “moral majority" of 
Britain, broad-minded and 
compassionate. This majority 
is. in effect, the agglomeration 
of every individual, group and 
interest wiih anything to com- 
plain about for any reason 
during the years of Mrs 
Thatcher’s government 

Since there is never any 
government under which there 
is no cause for complaint Mr 
Kinnock is in one sense 
ploughing fertile ground, and 
he was quite specific about the 
sort of thing he has in mind. It 
was not simply the familiar 
accusations of high unemploy- 
ment inadequate production, 
cuts in public services, and the 


overseas investment money, 
tne return of industries to 
"social ownership" and the 
like. There was also a note of 
caution — and Mr Kinnock 
made^ an oblique but not 
insignificant hint to what used 
to be called an incomes policy, 
though that expression is no 
longer tolerated in decent La- 
bour circles. He was careful, 
also, to insist that, contrary to 
other calculations. Labour 
would have to borrow no more 
than two per cent above what 
is being borrowed now. All the 
fundamental questions which 
must be asked about the 
impact of Labour policies on 
inflation, sterling and both 
national and international 
confidence remained unan- 
swered. 

The same was true of the 
grave questions which have 
been raised this week over 
Labour's nuclear defence pol- 
icy. Having (to huge applause) 
devoted a long passage to 
condemning the policy of the 
United States in Nicaragua as 
"sponsoring terrorism", he as- 
serted Labour's claim to be not 
only the party of the moral 
majority but the party of 
patriotism which would al- 
ways defend this country and 
which was a loyal ally of the 
United States. 

Then, however, he went on 
to dismiss those voices from 
America who have criticized 
Labour's nuclear policy. (Mr 
Wcinbcigcr was un-named but . 
was clearly in Mr Kinnock’s 
mind) as the product more of 
the Tory party's anxieties. than 
of Washington's. The notion 
that the BBC’s Panorama 
programme, which invited Mr 
Wcingcrgcr's comments, is in 
the Tory party's pocket will be 
novel to Mrs Thatcher. And 
the allegation seemed all the 
stranger since it was coupled 
with a warning that if the 
United States were to seek to 


undermine the policy of an 
ally, it ■ would subvert the 
exists to 
defend. So indeed it would, but 
it hardly seems the mark of 
confidence in an ally to raise 
such a question. 

Mr Kinnock, however, was 
as free with his generalities on 
defence as on home policy. He 
undertook to maintain vital 
NATO non-nuclear installa- 
tions in the UK, and declared 
that no American government 
would sacrifice these. Indeed, 
he appears to be as confident 
of this as he is that NATO 
would not be harmed by his 
declaration that a Labour gov- 
ernment would renounce the 
nuclear umbrella while staying 
within the Alliance. 

The truth is that the mind of 
die Labour party on defence 
was revealed by Mr Denis 
Healey's retraction earlier in 
the day of his very slight hint 
that it was not inconceivable 
that a Labour government 
might, in certain circum- 
stances, retain nuclear weap- 
ons. Mr Richard Perle, die US 
Assistant Defence Secretary, 
had already suggested that Mr 
Healey might be hoping to 
change Labour's nuclear de- 
fence policy again as he had 
done in the past. Mr Perle 
added his own view that this 
time it had gone too far — and 
Mr Healey's retraction proved 
him correct. Indeed. Mr 
Healey sold that pass long ago 
and his hesitant last-minute 
stand was more pathetic than 
brave. 

With grandiloquent rheto- 
ric. Mr Kinnock- declared yes- 
terday that he would 
personally die for his country 
but would never let his coun- 
try. through nuclear weapons, 
die for him. What that really 
means is that he is prepared to 
risk the balance of power and 
the NATO alliance which has 
preserved the peace for 40 
years, but that he hopes the 
country will not notice the true 
significance of his policy. 

That is also ’his approach to 
domestic policy. The "moral 
majority" hc hopes to harvest 
is one created negatively by 
discontent with the present 
government not by Labour's 
own policies, whose full im- 
plications arc to be soft- 
pedalled. When the time for 
decision comes, .however, Mr 
Kinnock is likely to find that 
the electorate has a more 
sceptical and inquiring mind 
than he now cares to think. 


SYMPHONIE DIPLOMATIQUE 




•» 4 




The month-long cacophony of 
superpower squabbling has 
been resolved after a climax, 
part pacific, part hectic, in a 
finale of simple and elegant 
harmonies. A deal has been 
wrought which is a triumph of 
the diplomatic art. Its compos- 
ers have every reason to 
congratulate themselves on the 
skill with which they have 
carried out their task. 

But the audience is still free 
to make-up its own mind. We 
should keep our critical facul- 
ties about us and beware the 
siren sounds of mere diplo- 
macy. In performance the 
Reykjavik symphony may not 
offer quite the balance of 
harmony it promises. The 
main themes are already dis- 
tinct: the US-Soviet summit 
theme, the exchange of spies, 
the sub-theme of human 
rights. They have been cleverly 
interwoven. There are gains on 
both sides of the East-West 
division. 

There is to be a Reagan- 
Gorbachov meeting before the 
month Is out. All sides stand to 
gain from this. President 
Reagan will be able to say he 
has met the Soviet leader 
before his party contests the 
mid-term elections. The 
President's reputed ambition 
to be cast as peace-maker has 
been partially satisfied. He can 
deal with Mr Gorbachov. 

The Soviet leader, for his 
part, has a summit he can 
attend without risk of losing 
face. He docs not have to go to 
Washington as supplicant; he 
can go later, when there is an 
agreement to sign, a trophy to 
take back to the Kremlin. He 
can face his Kremlin critics 
(who undoubtedly exist) with- 
out the anxiety that must have 
been present before. 

Two accused men. botn in 
their own way pawns in * 
greater game, are back in their 
home countries. The Amcn- 
can journalist. Nicholas 
Daniloff, is back in the United 
States. He has been expelled 
from the Soviet Union wrthoui 
trial his case is closea. 
Gennadi Zakharov, the Soviet 
“scientist" on the staff of the 
United Nations, is back m 


Moscow. He has faced a 
summary trial, pleaded “no 
contest" and been allowed to 
go — expelled from the United 
States to his homeland. 

As for the human rights 
theme, Yuri Orlov, one of the 
pioneers of the human rights 
movement in the Soviet 
Union, a symbol of the wrongs 
of Helsinki, is beingreleased to 
the United States with his wife. 
Oriov, who has spent seven 
years in a strict regime labour 
camp and the past two in 
Siberian exile, was the first 
chairman of the Soviet group 
set up to monitor Soviet 
observance of the Helsinki 
agreement. His imprisonment 
embodied its failure. His re- 
lease offers a faint hope. 

But jarring chords are 
already audible. President 
Reagan has agreed to a meet- 
ing which the American side is 
choosing not to call a summit, 
but rather a meeting in 
preparation for a future sum- 
mit in Washington. In reality, 
any meeting between the lead- 
ers of the two superpowers is a 
summit and it is sophistry to 
pretend otherwise. _ ■ 

But it is a very significant 
sophistry. For it reveals 
American embarrassment at 
the fact the summit in Wash- 
ington, to which both leaders 
agreed in Geneva last Novem- 
ber, has effectively been post- 
poned. Mr Gorbachov has 
gained time and dignity for 
himselfand avoided ihenskof 
coming home empty-handed 
<h,m the enemy camp. None- 
theless, an agreement — pos- 
sibly the only 
to emerge from the fin- 
summit - has been broken, 
and President Reagan ts the 

Cl T^e°United States has con- 
ceded another point, too. 
There has been an exchange 
and one which many people 
will interpret as an «<*angetf 
spies. The equivalence be- 
tween the US J°umab« 
the Soviet spy conceded by ™ 
Americans to pm Dw*** 
release from prison has ten 

maintained,and^t 

Contra back to 


Moscow within 24 hours of 
Daniloff arriving in Frankfurt. 
The appearance is all. and the 
appearance is a straight ex- 
change. 

The diplomatic niceties, of 
course, are different Zakharov 
had to appear at a trial (of 
sorts), and he left the United 
States a marked man. Daniloff 
left Moscow without a trial 
but the charges against him 
were not dropped He cannot 
retum.to the Soviet Union. He 
is as marked in Soviet terms as 
Zakharov is in the United 
States, and that is the version 
the Russian public will be 
given. 

The loss to the Soviet side 
consists, possibly, of their 25 
UN employees — who were 
brought into the balance as a 
belated sub-theme but really 
belonged in an earlier Ameri- 
can drive to reduce the Soviet 
mission to the United Nations 

— and Oriov. But the release of 
Orlov represents more a gain 

' to the West than a loss to the’ 
Soviet side. 

To the West, he is perhaps 
the most valuable human 
rights representative after 
Andrei Sakharov to remain in 
Soviet captivity. He stands for 
all those Soviet citizens whose 
hopes of Helsinki were dashed 
His freedom is an achievement 

— and one to welcome. For 
Moscow, however, Orlov 
means little. His value as- a' 
symbol of the defeated Human 
rights movement is. already 
past. Allowing him his free- 
dom costs the Kremlin Tittle, 

- now. But it is calculated to 
satisfy the West, and it prob- 
ably wilL 

It looks, in short, as if 
President Reagan has been too 
easily satisfied The harmo- 
nious resolution to the summit 
squabbles - rehearsed forte in 
Moscow > and - Washington 
simultaneously — drowns an 
unpleasantly insistent theme 
related to Daniloff If Mr 
Gorbachov’s hostage-taking 
can win for him the summit of 
his choice and the release of 
his intelligence agent with so 
little sacrifice; he may just be 
tempted to try a variation in 
future. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Nuclear query for Labour reply 


From Mr M. H. Lomas 
Sir. Mr Kinnodc has reiterated 
that a Labour government will 
immediately order the removal 
and exclusion from Great Britain 
of all American nuclear weapons 
and their bases, but at the same 
time MU remain "frilly committed 
to Nato" and 'therefore fully 
committed to reliance on Ameri- 
can forces for the defence of 
western Europe. 

It is now generally accepted that 
Nato's non-nuclear conventional 
land forces are substantially out- 
numbered by those of the Warsaw 
Pact and could not hope to 
contain an invasion of western 
Europe by conventional means 
alone. For that reason Nato is 
obliged to rely finally on American 
nuclear weapons for the effective 
defence or ' western Europe. 
Present Nato defence strategy is 
not otherwise credible. 

It must follow that a Labour 
government, ff Mr Kinnock is 
sincere, will remain committed to 
reliance upon the very weapons 
and bases that they will banish 
from this country. Where, then, 
docs Mr Kinnock wish those 
weapons and bases to be removed 
to — Holland? Germany? Italy? 
How docs he propose to justify to 
those countries the proposition 
that we wish to rely for our 
defence on weapons on their soil 
that we dare not or will not allow 
on our own? 

Or is it in fan Labour's policy to 
ban all American nuclear weapons 
and bases from the whole conti- 
nent of Europe? 

The implications of this policy 
for this country and for western 
Europe could not be more serious. 
We must all insist on full and 
honest answers to these and 
further questions about Labour’s 
true position on the issue. 

1 am. Sir. your obedient servant 
MARK LOMAS. 

2 Crown Office Row. 

Temple. EC4. 

September 29. 


From Mr Paul Williams 
Sir, If war with the Soviets did 
ever occur (and that is really what 
defence planning in Europe is 
currently all about) would not an 
all-out assault on Labour’s Britain 
be a good preliminary move for 
the Soviets? Nato conventionally 
could not protea us and we could 
not protect ourselves. 

Indeed why should a Soviet 
general lose men and materials in 
a conventional assault at all? The 
use of nuclear weapons by a Soviet 
commander would actually 
achieve his object and save Soviet 
lives (a similar reasoning to that in 
America when they used nuclear 
weapons against Japan rather than 
carrying out a conventional inva- 
sion). 

A Labour Britain would be a 
softer target for attack than most 
Nato countries because it bad 
abandoned its own nuclear deter- 
rent and rejected the American 
nuclear umbrella. The foreign 
policy to accompany such a non- 
defcnce policy must consist of 
appeasement to the Soviets and 
continuing denunciation of all 
things American (for which La- 
bour have practised hard). 

Whether Labour's Britain could 
remain in Nato is unclear. 

Yours faithfully. 

PAUL WILLIAMS. 

58A Rosemary Hill Road. 

Four Oaks. Sutton Coldfield. 

West Midlands. 

Flower power 

From Mrs Michael Morel 
Sir.- Now the socialists have 
adopted the expensive red rose as 
their emblem, may I suggest to 
Mrs Thatcher the simple blue 
forget-me-not and for the Alliance 
the rose “Masquerade". 

Yours faithfully. 

JOY MOREL. 

The Down House. 

Tockington. Bristol. Avon. 
September 28. 


Post Office — promises, promises? 


From Mr John llullnn 
Sir. The Chairman of the Post 
Office was reported (September 
27) as saying that for the first lime 
the Post Office was beating its 
target of having nine out of 10 
first-class letters ready for delivery 
by the next working day after 
collection. 

This means very little. What we 
were ..promised and what- we 
expect is delivery to our addresses 
by that time. Letters can (and do, 
in Salisbury; our post town) sit : 
another 24 hours “ready for 
delivery", which is not much use 
to us. 

The figure for delivery by the 
"next working day after 
collection" down here in darkest 
Wiltshire is something like 2 per 
cent. 

Sir Ron seems to be living in a 
dream world. And it's going to 
cost us more from October 20. 
Yours. 

JOHN HUTTON. . 

Fern dale. 

Chariton Lane. 

Charlton. 

.near Shaftesbury, Dorset. 
September 28. 

From Mr T. II. Cobh 
Sir. In your issue of September 27 
you reported the Chairman of the 
Post Office as saying that at least 
90 per cent of first-class letters 
were ready for delivery by the next 
working day after collection. Start- 
ing 17 months ago. because I was 
sceptical ofa similar claim (I think 
it was 85 per cent), I made a note 
of every letter I received, provided 
I could read the date on the 
postmark. I omitted December ' 
because of the Christmas rush. 

Of first-class letters. 60.1 per 
cent arrived here on the day after 
being franked. Perhaps the 
remaining 30 per cent were “ready 
for delivery", but awaiting that 
consummation. 

Yours faithfully. 

TIMOTHY COBB. 

Parkgatc Farm, 

Framlingham. 

Woodbridgc. Suffolk.' 

September 29. 


From Mr Michael Gannon 
Sir. The Chairman of the Post 
Office was quoted in The Times of 1 
Saturday as saying a survey 
showed 90.7 per cent of first-class 
letters were ready for delivery the 
next working day after collection. 

Ah. but were they an delivered 
on that day? 

Last month the late arrival from 
Hastings (10 mites distant) of two 
important, to me, first-class letters 
prompted my own survey. It 
lasted four weeks and coveretT all 
mail that bore readable franking, 
about two thirds of the whole 

Seven out of 20 first-class letters 
arrived at least one workn% day 
late. One look four working days 
to get here from Ipswich, though 
clearly addressed and 
coded. Second-class. fared worse: 
five latecomers out of 11. The 
overall failure rate for both classes 
was 38.7 percent 

The situation here is aggravated 
because the postman usually does 
not appear until 10 JO a. til. often 
as late as II. This means that 
someone who leaves for work at a 
normal hoar cannot deal until 
evening with post that may be 
urgcnL 

Yours faithfully. 

MICHAEL GANNON. 

Edgdl Cottage. 

Staptecross. 

nr Roberts bridge. East Sussex. 
September 29. 

From Mrs Alice Boase 
Sir. I doubt if John Galsworthy 
would have been very impressed 
by Sir Ronald Dealing's claim that 
nine out of 10 first-class letters 
reach Ihcir destination the day 
after collection, for in The Forsyte 
Saga, written between 1906 and 
1921. there arc frequent references 
to letters being dispatched and 
delivered, in the London area at 
least, all in the course of a single 
day! 

Yours sincerely, 

ALICE BOASE, 

Linden Cottage. 

Linden Chase. 

Uckficld, Sussex. 

September 28. 


Identity crisis 

From Mr M. Grosvchor Myer 
Sir. Then? is arcstlcssspirfi which 
always brings changes at the most 
inopportune moment. John 
Player's replaced their bearded 
sailor on a wavy background just 
as its antique style was becoming 
interesting. J. Lyons & Co did 
away with the gold art nouveau 
lettering of their fascia just fu» it 
came back into aesthetic fashion. 

Now, just as the word 
“spinster" is acquiring the charm 
of the ncar-archaic. objections are 
being raised to its use in connec- 
tion with marriage ceremonies 
(letters, September! 6 ,23,37). May 
I please enter- a plea for its- 
retention? 

Yours faithfully. 

MICHAEL GROSVENOR MYER. 
34 West End. 

Hadden ham. 

Cambridgeshire. 

September 27. 


A fuming nuisance 

From Mr Nigel Foxell 
Sir, Of the 100 right-band-drive 
cars that have just passed me at 
the bus stop 1 1 had their exhausts 
on the offside. 87 on the nearside, 
and two bad twin pipes, centrally 
placed. In the interest of pedes- 
trians. should not something be 
done about this? 

Yours faithfully, 

NIGEL FOXELL, : 

50 Parftey Street, W6. . ■ 

Septenjber25, 


Slow to start 

' From Mr Benjamin Tobin 
Sir. On September 25 you pub- 
lished an article about Mr Bunny 
Barnett, who has launched a 
crusade to "turn Britain’s Blacks 
into entrepreneurs". 

The list of financial sponsors for 
his foundation is impressive, but 
it is noticeable that the pension 
funds and institutions which, 
directly or indirectly, control large 
amounts of property are not 
included. 

White pension funds must have 
conservative criteria for invest- 
ment. the resources are so large 
that it should noi be difficult for 
them to divert relatively small 
amounts into establishing a base 
for people to start in business. 
What is needed is workshop space 
where young people can take 
occupation without the need for 
lengthy legal formalities, ref- 
erences ana financial guarantees, 
for a flexible period of lime, 
preferably on a monthly or quar- 
terly basis. - 

While invariably there will be a 
high turnover and running costs, 
the unsatisfied demand is so great 
that there will be little time when 
the space is unoccupied. 

Time and again landlords will 
not allow occupation by people 
starting up in business because 
they have limited resources, 
experience and references. Catch 
2Z 

Yours faithfully, 

BENJAMIN TOBIN. 

Strcuons. Chartered Surveyors. 
460-462 Hoe Street, El 7, 


.Trumping cards 
of clubland aces 

From Wing Commander Bentley 
Bcauman. RAF (retd) 

Sir, I can beat Mr Reginald Pound 
(September 24) twice. I have been 
a member of the Alpine Gub for 
65 years ami of die Royal Air 
Forte Gub for 64 years. 

Yours etc, 

E BENTLEY BEAUMAN. 

59 Chester Row. SWI. 

From the Hon Secretary Emeritus 
of the Savage Club 
Sir. I have news for Mr Reginald 
Pound. Within our own dub is 
one four years his senior in 
membership. The author. Augus- 
tus Muir, was elected in 1920. 
Yours (and Mr Pound's) infor- 
matively. 

ALAN WYKES, 

Honorary Secretary Emeritus, 
Savage Gub. 

9 Flttmaurice Place, 

Berkeley Square. WJ. 

From the Hon . Secretary of the 
Green Room Club 
Sir, I would not dare, nor would I 
wish, to belittle Mr Pound's long 
and gallant service as a Noble 
Savage, but I hope it will amuse 
him and others to hear of Mr 
Harold French's brave survival of 
this dub since 1919. 

1 am. Sir. your and Mr Pound's 
obedient servant, 

PETER CORNEILLE 
Hon Secretary. 

Green Room Gub. 

9 Adam Street WC2. 

From Major-General W, At. 
BroomhaH (retd) 

Sir, I joined the “Rag" in the 
Spring of 1916. a month before 
bang wounded on the Somme. 
Those were the days when I could 
speed my recovery by drinking 
half a pint of Pol Roger from a 
silver tankard at a cost of Is 6d. 

Sic transit gloria mundi. 

Yours faithfully. 

W. M. BROOMHALL, 

Army & Navy Gub. 

Pall Mall. SWI. 

From Major L At. £ Deni and Sir 
Walter Howard 

Sir. We have each been members 
of this club for exactly three- 
quarters of a century. 

Yours faithfully. 

LEONARD M. E DENT, 
WALTER HOWARD. 

United Oxford and Cambridge 
Universities Gub, 

I Pall Mall SWI. 

Politics and religion 

Frmn the Right Reverend Trevor 
Huddleston. CR 

Sir. Professor Kcnneih Mmogue 
asserts (feature. September 25) 
that my statement “The cruci- 
fixion was a highly political act", 
was intended as “an abstract 
doctrine with which to gloss the 
political activities of priests in 
South Africa." 

On the contrary, it was. first of 
all a statement of fact and. 
secondly, an answer to those who 
persist in asserting that politics 
and religion can be kept in water- 
tight compartments. Pontius Pi- 
■ laic made the mistake of thinking 
that by washing his hands he was 
excusing himself from political 
responsibility for the crudfixion 
of Christ. 

Unfortunately many people, 
even those claiming the Christian 
faith, persist in believing that they 
can do as Pilate did. Professors of 
political science should-bc particu- 
larly wary of tendentious 
generalisations. 

I am. Sir. yours faithfully. 
1TREVOR HUDDLESTON. 

Si James's Church. 

197 Piccadilly, Wl. 

Fiscal policy 

From the Chairman of the Associ- 
ation qf Independent Businesses 
Sir. Your leader. “Taxing our 
patience" (September 24). ap- 
plauds this Government's reforms 
on corporation lax by “ending the 
favourable treatment of those 
companies which happen to be 
able to make use of investment 
allowances'*. 

There arc many of us who aw 
no wrong in expenditure on new 
equipment -being allowed -against 
lax: it stimulated growth, in- 
troduced new and better work 
practices and ensured that smaller 
companies, which traditionally 
expand out of retained earnings, 
could do so to the maximum 
advantage of the economy. 

Many small manufacturing con- 
cerns. particularly those that are 
investing in new equipment, are 
today teaming that whilst tax rates 
have gone down, tax bills on the 
same level of profit have gone up. 
Not quite the road to sustained 
growth we. had hoped from a Tory 
Chancellor. 

Yours faithfully, 

JOHN COCHRANE Chairman, . 
Association of Independent Busi- 
nesses. 

. Trowbray House. 

1 08 Weston Street. SEI . 

September 26. 

Looking askance 

From the Chairman, Carbodies Ltd 
Sir. Mr S. A. Cotton (September 
10} complained of his fruitless 
sprints ip to taxis because the “for 
hire” sign is not visible from 
behind. 

As manufacturers, we must be 
concerned that our ultimate cus- 
tomers might get so fit that they do 
not need a taxi in the first place. At 
least, if successful there is room in 
a Hackney carriage to stretch out 
and recover. In the meantime, 
may I thank him for an excellent 
suggestion. 

Yours faithfully, 

JAMIE BORWJCK, Chairman, 
Carbodies LuL 
Holyhead Road, 

Coventry, West Midlands. 
September 26. 



OCTOBER 1 1938 

The “settlement of rte 
Czechoslovak problem" wom the 
transfer to Germany of the 
Sudeten-German territories. The 
few lines from the boding article. 
“A new dawn ", exemplify The 
Times 's policy of appeasement, 
which greatly damaged the paper’s 
reputation. 


OVATION IN 
LONDON 

Mr. CHAMBERLAIN’S 
HOMECOMING 

A cautions historian's comment 
on a former Prime Minister's 
achievement as a peace-maker in 
Berlin was that, without anticipat- 
ing the verdict of history, it was but 
fair to place on record the daim of 
Lord Beacons field that be had 
brought back to his country “peace 
with honour". London last night 
anticipated the verdict of history 
on Mr. Chamberlain’s work at the 
Munich Conference without any 
reserve, and the stirring welcome 
home which he received expressed 
in a most remarkable way the 
public gratitude to him for hia 
successful efforts in the high cause 
of European peace. 

For two hours before Mr Cham- 
berlain landed at Heston the 
narrow roads leading to the airport 
were made almost impassable by 
motor traffic and many thousands 
of people assembled as near as they 
could to the entrance to give him 
their greeting. Inside the gateway 
the road leading from the airport 
buildings was lined on each side by 
120 boys from Eton College, who 
had on their own initiative Bought 
and obtained permission to be 
there to cheer the Prime Minister 
on hia return. On the aerodrome a 
number of distinguished people 
began to gather long before the air 
liner was due from Munich. . . . 
LETTER FROM THE KING 
The Lockheed air liner in which 
Mr. Chamberlain and his official 
advisers flew from Munich was 
sighted over the aerodrome at 5.38 
pan. against a grey sky from which 
there had just fallen a heavy 
downpour of rain. Two minutes 
later the machine had come to a 
standstill and the Prime Minuter 
was standing at the cabin door 
smiling and waving hia hat in 
response to the loud cheers that 
welcomed him back from his third 
and must memorable flight to 
Germany within 15 days. 

As soon as Mr. Chamberlain 
stepped to the ground the Lord 
Chamberlain handed him a letter 
from the King. . . . 

THE NATION THANKED 
Then, amid continuous cheers, 
the Prune Minister stepped to- 
wards a microphone and spoke a 
message to the nation. He said:- 
There are only two things I 
want to say. First of all I received 
an immense number of letters 
during all these anxious days — 
and so has my wife — letters of 
support and approval and grati- 
tude: and I cannot tell you what an 
encouragement that has been to 
me. 1 want to thank Che British 
people far what they have done. 
Next I want to Hay that the 
settlement of the Czechoslovak 
problem which has now been 
achieved is. in my view, only a 
prelude to a larger settlement in 
which all Europe may find peace.. 

This morning I had anot her talk 
with the German Chancellor, Herr 
Hitler, and here is a paper which 
bears his name upon it as well as 
mine. Some of you perhaps have 
already beard what it contains, 
but I would just like to read it to 
you. 

Mr Chamberlain then read the 
joint declaration, and there was a 
further buret of cheering. There 
were more cheers as policemen 


made a way for him to his car. and 
the drive to London began to the 
singing of ‘Tor he’s a jolly good 
fellow". As Mr. Chamberlain drove 
past the cheering Eton boys to the 
airport exit his car was Borrounded 
by crowds who could not be held 
track by the police, and amid the 
enthusiasm many people tried to 
open the doors of the car to shake 
him by the h a n d - 
Mounted police eventually made 
a way, and the Prime Minister 
drove slowly through the pressing 
and cheering crowds — among 
whom were hundreds of children 
waving tiny, flags — towards Lon- 
don and the stdl greater welcome 

that was the acknowledgement of a 
victory gained for peace. 

ANEW DAWN 

No conqueror returning from a 
victory on the battlefield baa come 
home adorned with nobler laurels 
than MR. CHAMBERLAIN from 
Munich yesterday; . . . The joint 
declaration made by HERR HIT- 
LER and MR. CHAMBERLAIN 
proclaims that “the desire of tf** 
two peoples never to go to war with 
one nwot-hur again" »h*n hence- 
forth govern the whole of their 
relationships. There have been 
times when such a manifesto could 
be dismissed as a pious platitude, 
likely to be forgotten long before an 
occasion could arise for it to be 
practically tested. The present, it is 
fair to think, » not such a 
time..... 


In the belfry? 

From the Reverend D.F. Fosbuary 
Sir. Could not the Nature Conser- 
vancy Council purchase half-a- 
dozen redundant churches in 
which to house their bats? (letters, 
September 10.15,18^0). If they 
need financial help for that pur- 
pose they could hold sponsored 
poetry readings in-the churchyard 
(“Gray's Elegy" and "The De- 
serted Village" spring to mind) 
with late-night screenings of 
Dracula ana the Vampires to 
introduce teenagers to the' cause. 
Yours faithfully. 

DAVID FOSBUARY, . 
Colsterwonh Rectory, 

17 Woodlands Drive, 
Colsterwonh, Lincolnshire. 





'*■ . — » 




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i rtrlkrrft i fflM ■ «l — m m u , m i m > — kOwi w— — 1 —— ———— 



Excellence, oddities and Eastern promise 


Actu«& JvunHvmn 



When the 
managing 
director of 
the new 
Nissan car 
factory first 
set foot in 
the North-East, he was quickly 
seized upon and invited to 
dinner by Professor Laurence 
Martin, vice-chancellor of the 
University of Newcastle upon 
Tyne. 

At that first meeting the 
Western academic presented 
the Eastern entrepreneur with 
a painting It depicted Robert 
Stephenson's H.igh Level 
Bridge across the Tyne, a 
wonder of new technology at 
its erection in 1849 as it was 
the first structure of its kind to 
be made of a revolutionary 
material — cast iron. 


The vice-chancellor’s gift 
was his expression of hope 
that the Japanese would bring 
back to the North-East the 
reputation for innovation and 
enterprise it once so proudly 
held 

The hammer-blows of 
recession that have beaten the 
life out of much of Tyneside's 
traditional industries are also 
beating at the door of the 
region's higher education. 
Newcastle University was 
winded by a body-blow earlier 
this year when it opened its 
annual letter from the Univer- 
sity Grants Committee to find 
that its funding had been cut 
almost twice as severely as it 
had been led to expect. 

An actual reduction of O.S 
per cent, compared with last 
year’s grant, meant a cut in 


Wfci 


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\ A IELWYN ELECTRONICS is proud to acknowledge the value 
V Vof its links with the University of Newcastle upon Tyne. 

WELWYN, based in Northumberland, is part of Crystalate 
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defence, strain measurement, control and instrumentation 
industries, and committed to maintaining and developing 
links with higher education in both teaching and research. 

WELWYN prepares to celebrate 50 years in the electronics 
industry not only as the leading European manufacturer of 
resistors, but with an impressive product range — providing 
solutions to interconnections problems with hybrid micro- 
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Crystalate 

FORCE FOR THE FUTURE 


real terms of nearly 4 per cent. 

It was deeply wounding 
news. In the year that, for the 
first time, the UGC used the 
quality of teaching and re- 
search as a partial basis for its 
disbursements, Newcastle had 
some reason to hope for not 
ungenerous treatment, with 
four of its departments rated 
by the UGC as outstanding 
and another 12 above average. 

Labour MPs accused the 
outgoing Education Secretary, 
Sir Keith Joseph, of sacrificing 
northern universities to pro- 
tect those in the Terry-voting 
south. Newcastle licked its 
painful wounds, assumed that 
i! was its subject mix which 
had not found great favour, 
and wondered where on earth 
it could cut any more without 
destroying the lifeblood of the 
institution. 

Before last May's depressing 
news. Professor Martin and 
the university senate were 
calculating on balancing the 
books by losing 90 posts out of 
a total academic staff of nearly 
1,000. 

Early retirement schemes 

Funding cuts were 
very severe 

had not been taken up by as 
many as had been hoped and 
compulsory redundancy 
schemes would have cost the 
university far more than it 
could afford, quite apart from 
the legal difficulties of aca- 
demic tenure and the dire 
threat to the quality of the 
institution's work. 

So far the only department 
to have been forced out oi 
existence by the latest finan- 
cial savagery is the relatively 
modest one of Scandinavian 
Studies. But throughout the 
university academic posts re- 
main unfilled in almost every 
department and recruitment is 
at all but a standstill. 

Professor Martin, Comish- 
bom, Yale-polished, but im- 
bued with traditional Geordie 
refusal to lie down and admit 
defeat, nevertheless admits to 
a certain desperation. 

"Our target for lost jobs was 
to have been about 90 aca- 
demic staff perhaps rather 
more. Now we need to cut 
closer to 180 or even 200 and 
it is for from clear that savings 
of that kind can be doubled. 
We are trying to be more 
ruthless, but we do not have a 
strategy as to where foe 



Professor Laurence Martin, the vice-chancellor, top left; the ivy-covered old university" and above, Professor 
Hussein Rabbia with a group of Chinese students studying mining engineering 


ruthlessness should folL" 

For lack of any other ob- 
vious source of hope; Profes- 
sor Martin, in common with 
vice-chancellors throughout 
foe country, is forced to view 
foe future with a kind of 
desperate Micawberism — but 
without Micawber's bouncy 
optimism. 

Something, he believes, 
must turn up. simply because 
no government, not even foe 
present one, could allow the 
nation's university education 
system to collapse. They read 
into foe utterances of foe new 
education secretary, Kenneth 
Baker, hints that a lifebelt may 
soon be thrown. 

If foe UGCs favouritism 
was not one of south versus 
north, it certainly appeared to 
some unhappy vice-chan- 
cellors to be one which 
awarded foe plums for tech- 


nological bias, with univer- 
sities like Bath, Loughborough 
and Strathclyde all enjoying 
relatively generous treatment, 
and more arts-biased institu- 
tions like Durham. St .An- 
drews and Aberystwyth faring 
badly. 

Yet Newcastle, which has a 
heavy emphasis on engineer- 
ing and other earthy dis- 
ciplines, was still picked for 
rough treatment. 

It is in fact a broad-based 
institution, lacking only a few 
major disciplines like vet- 
erinary science and theology 
(although it does maintain a 
department of religious 
studies). 

Among its undoubted areas 
of excellence is computer 
studies, a department whose 
expertise has helped to build 
up an associated marketing 
company employing nearly 


200 people, for foe benefit of 
foe North-East as a whole. 

Its medical school is said to 
turn out particularly good 
general practitioners and its 
departments of marine en- 
gineering and naval architec- 
ture are packed with 
undergraduates from Hong 
Kong and other such oriental 
parts, ironically the very peo- 
ple who undercut foe British 
shipbuilding industry to a 
near-fatal degree. 

It has its oddities, too. One 
of the smallest (but by no 
means foe (east distinguished) 
history departments in the 
country, with a staff of 12 
compared to Oxford's 65; a 
strong department of agri- 
culture and related sciences; 
rare degree courses in survey- 
ing science, town and country 
planning, speech therapy, and 
East Asian politics. 


It is the ninth British 
university in terms of size and 
one of the newest. It was 
granted independent status 
from its former parent Dur- 
ham. in (963. although its 
constituent colleges can trace 
a history back to 1 834. It could 
be said to suffer from being 
outstandingly good at a num- 
ber of things, but outstand- 
ingly famous for none of 
them. 

Staff sometimes complain 
that people in the south of 
England do not even know of 
its existence, yet the county 
which sends it more students 
than any other outside its own 
home territory is Surrey. 

Such a lack of a clear-cut 
corporate image does not trou- 
ble the vice-chancellor un- 
duly. For one thing, he knows 
the compensations of having 
his institution situated in foe 


heart of a city whose reputa- 
tion for friendliness J* ** 
endary — and deservedly sa 

For another, he is too 
concerned with promoting his 
university's usage when? it 
matters most - among those 
who disburse its funds — to 
trouble overmuch about its 
overall public profile. 

"If we arc to continue no be 
funded we have got to show 
that we are useful - and dim 
basically means showing we 
are contributing to (he econ- 
omy — while still trying to do 
foe more purely academic, 
things that a university is 
supposed to do," Professor 
Maniq said. 

Hence Newcastle's 
establishment of its own Tech- 
nology Centre, a limited com- 
pany charged with marketing 
the university’s vast research 
skills to outside industry and 
smoothing the path for 
academics who wish to offer 
their best ideas in foe 
marketplace. 

Yet foe public image (foes 
niggle. Senior staff were not 
overjoyed when Tyne-Tees 

Marketing the 
research skills 

Television chose as foe title of 
its forthcoming 12-porter on 
the university. "Redbrick". 
They would have perhaps 
preferred “Pfateglass”. 

Newcastle has a fine new 
medical faculty building and 
an outstanding new library, 
probably foe last to be built m 
any university this century. At 
the same time its older build- 
ings enjov a facade of mellow 
brick and Virginia creeper that 
would not be out of place by 
the Isis or Cam. • 

Behind foe plate glass lies at 
least one majestically unusual 
repository or wisdom which, il 
it did not impress foe Univer- 
sity Grants Committee, at 
least astounded (he managing 
director of Nissan. By foe 
quirk of some long-past be- 
quest. foe university is foe 
custodian of one of the finest 
collections of Japanese tech- 
nical journals in the Western 
hemisphere. 

If by some mischance the 
boss of Birtish Nissan finds a 
spanner in his works, he 
knows where to go for the 
cure. 

Alan Hamilton 


af 

l-sA? 


HATS OFF TO A 
PROFITABLE PARTNERSHIP 










w.,. - 

IMN — . 


Both education and industry are vital to Britain's future. And they're 
interlinked - education fostering and developing people's talents, and 
industry using those talents in manufacturing and services- It's a 
profitable partnership for all of us. 

At British Gas we have a long-standing commitment to this process. In 
the field of higher education, for instance, we fund scholarships, 
encourage our research scientists to take up visiting professorships 
and even maintain an industrial chair at one university. 

In schools, too, we provide a comprehensive resource materials service 
backed by a local field force of around 250 regional advisers- Their 
work brings them into schools, where they are able to build bridges 
between subject specialists and the gas industry's engineers and 

scientists. 

The relationship between British Gas and the community isn't just a 
commercial one. It depends on mutual goodwill and understanding. 
That's why we are so committed to promoting greater awareness of the 
importance of science, technology and industry, from an early age. 

We put a lot of energy into building and maintaining these 
partnerships with the communities we serve. But then, 

energy is our business. J 

British Gas F 

ENERGY AS OUR BUSINESS 


T^ne Tbes Television spent a 
year in Newcastle University. 



And came out with 
12 weeks compulsive viewing: 


RED 



K 


Starts 730pm Saturday October 4th on Channel4 for twelve weeks. 

TT4 


I ATYNETEESTELEVISION PRODUCTION FOR CHANNEL J I 



1 







n 







r 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 1 1986 



A candid camera 
on the campus 


FOCUS 



proErammp Sf" 1 ' •i™ 1 "- The first hou£ 

S°c!S2S’ ■ Lr n l epiSOde introduces most 

Four’S? of lh e principal characters, a 

comine* n* of about 15 stu- 

v d£ ™s and academic staff. 

ereitv^hS!! .u 7 !? lwo I T,ain *«y lines in 

5? ^Jen £ e . first episode are the naiL 
V"*W- JJW of a group of.can- 
ainino ? ,dates a PPtyfeg for a vacant 

v h?. t0 lhe 5 cluiert Post in the politics 
■: nave . no department , and the expecia- 
jng painful tions of two new students — a 
Imposed on black girl from east London 
UJ Diversity and a medic from Leicester — 
„ going up to Newcastle for the 
l u>, decide, first time. 

explains. Each subsequent half-hour 

t *u light episode, representing roughly 
irgmsjpr be one month in the academic 
k room, with year, is a largely self-contained 
gins. The story. 

£ the house The series reaches some- 

aw-professor thing of a dramatic climax 
i quires con- when the vice-chancellor and 
you sure senate meet to debate the cuts 
Jht?”_ and have to run the gamut of a 

levtsion set hostile student demonstrat- 
locumentary ion. 

ir theme ex- The characters are on the 
i honest and whole likeable, from the splen-' 
ctureofaca- did provincial arrogance of 
the univer- the senior politics lecturer 
itep. But as who dismisses an unsuitable 
began last candidate for a job in his 
le clear that department as being good 
.11 levels was “only for burrowing away at 
by one over- Oxford", to the acerbically 
ion: the cut witty fending of the prima 
unding and donna professors, Murchison 
sions about and Alberti, 
uld fall. Professor Murchison says 

emains - a precisely what he thinks about 
iiffi cully for some of the university's 
i for Stephen departments outside his own 
producer, it medical faculty. And there is 


programme 
in Channel 
Four’s forth- 

Ncwca&Jc University when 
Duncan Murchison, the Scot* 
born professor of organic 
petrology, is explaining to the 
senate that they have no 
choice m making painfel 
spending cuts imposed on 
“I®® by the 'University 
Grants Committee! 1 -. 

"It is like trying ui, decide," 
the professor explains, 
“whether to be left in the light 
with the wise virgins pr be 
thrown into a dark rooni with 
the foolish virgins.” ‘The 
comparison brings the house 
down, until a fellow-professor 
leans over and enquires con- 
fidentially: “Are you sure 
you've got that right?" 

Tyne-Tees Television set 
out to make a documentary 
with no particular theme ex- 
cept to present an honest and 
comprehensive picture of aca- 
demic life inside the univer- 
sity on its doorstep. But as 
soon as filming began last 
summer it became clear that 
academic life at all levels was 
being dominated by one over- 
riding consideration: the cut 
in government funding and 
the painful decisions about 
where the axe should fall. 

It was — and remains — a 
time of extreme difficulty for 
the university, but for Stephen 
Garrett the series producer, it 
was a godsend. “It has given 
the whole series a unifying 
theme: and the feci that things 
are under threat sharpens our 
perception of them. 

“Most academic activity 
takes place inside the mind, 
which does not make good 
television. So the question of 
the cuts gave us something to 
latch on to. It brought the 
academic and cerebral activ- 
ities to life because the univer- 
sity is under threat of losing 
them.” 

Mr Garrett admits his pro- 
grammes will inevitably be 
compared with the recent BBC 
2 series on Queens' College, 
Cambridge. “The Queens’ se- 
ries- was, in a way, timeless. It 
could have been made at any 


Wider world 
does intrude 

the charmingly blunt Glaswe- 
gian student with the sand- 
paper accent who has a 
touching romance with the 
first black girl he has ever met. 

Mr Garrett — an Oxford law 
graduate — said his pro- 
grammes challenge the stereo- 
type. “Not all the students are 
drunken, demonstrating wast- 
rels squandering public 
money in grants. Nor are all 
academics wastrels in ivory 
lowers with over-generous 
holidays. 

“What surprised me. and 
what comes across, is bow 
extremely hard many of the { 


time within the last 10 years. extremely hard many of the 
“This is perhaps a reflection academics work. But we also 
of Oxbridge itself, which-is to- -show there, -are- some who 
some extent insulated from would really be happier if 


the outside world by its 
comparative wealth. Our se- 
ries is much more of the 
moment We see the institu- 
tion at a critical moment in its 
life.” 

The series, he hopes, will 
convey some of the urgency of 
what is happening in British 
universities, straggling to 
maintain standards in the face 
of a bleak economic winter. 

“What comes over about 
the cuts is a pessimism and yet 
a faith that no government 
would ever let the institution 
actually collapse. But they feel 
that they are at the end of the 
road and cannot cut any more. 
If there is any bias in the 
programmes, it is a general 
one" that we felt the university 
system as a whole was worth 
defending and fighting for." 


there were no students in the 
place at alL" 

What also comes through is 
that many prospective stu- 
dents had not put Newcastle at 
the top of their list of pref- 
erences. but when they arrived 
for the first time on Tyneside 
they were surprised, and usu- 
ally converted, by the friendli- : 
ness of the staff and the locals 1 
and by how unlike its grim ; 
image the city really was. 

. One thing that intrudes | 
hardly at all is the economic ' 
bleakness and high unemploy- 1 
ment of the North-East That 
is not so much a failing of the 
programmes as a true reflec- 
tion of the university which, 
like any other institution of its 
type, is bound to be insulated j 
from its surroundings to a j 
greater or lesser degree. 


1 


International Paint 
and Newcastle 
University — 




ntemational Faint is ate erf the world's leading manufacturers of 


closely with Newcastle University by sponsoring students and 
research projects. 

"innovation is the name of the game’.’ says Terry Lemmon. 
Director of International Paint. “It is the only way to stay ahead of 
the competition. We have a great deal to thank the re search team 
for at Newcastle University: they have helped to keep international 
Paint m the forefront of Technology” 

International Paint dominates the Marine Coatings market - 
supplying the paints for nearly 40 per cent flfftvntt 

drydockinqs. innovation keeps international Paint ahea d i n this 

fidchtbe product that did this. Intersmooth S.P.C. was introduced 
in the 1970’s, ire an antrfbuling which smoothes as the ship moves 
thrauqh the water. The revolutionized the economies of shipping 
during the yeare of escalating fuel prices. Sh'POwn^us'^ 
Intersmooth found that the fuel economy of their ships actually 
nSwSmtli ape. because of 

other antifouling roughened up as ternaries and weed attached 
themselves to the ship's hull, reducing economy- ^ _ 

International Paint support research earned out by the Snips 
pJSSSup- « r X of 

developed techniques for 

using Intersmooth, enabling ship owj® ralculare 

StM made bv the coating. This innovative work was awaroeo tne 

Stive? Medal by the Royal institute of Naval Architects. 

Invaluable research wo ffc M* this keeps Intemat.onai Paint at 
the forefront of coatings technology. 


X International Paint 


Stoneygate Lane. Felling 
Tyne & wear 

NEfOOJY. -d 





But the reality of lhe wider 
world does intrude in other 
ways and exercises both staff 
and students. Final-year stu- 
dents are seen tackling the 
grim realities of trying to find 
a job. while religious studies 
lecturer. Denis MacEoin. feces 
his own persona] crisis when 
the Saudi-Arabian foundation 
that has been fending his post 
decides to cut off the money. 
Mr MacEoin is now out of a 
job. 

Academic rivalries are also 
to the fore. 

Newcastle co-operated will- 
ingly with the camera crews 
and the real-life cast speak 
eloquently for themselves; 
there is no commentary. 

The only serious objection 
the academic staff have raised 
is over the title of the series; 
Newcastle, they have pointed 
out has more plate g las s than 
red brick. 

Alan Hamilton 

* “Redbrick", a 1 2-part series, 
is produced by Tyne-Tees 
Television for screening on 
Channel Four. The first epi- 
sode, Join The Circus, wfll be 
shown at 730pm on Saturday 
and the remaining episodes on 
each subsequent Saturday 
evening. 



Life and 
death chip 

Professor Arthur Coving- 
ton. left, of Newcastle's chair 
of electro-analytical chem- 
istry, has developed a silicon 
chip that can detect certain 
chemicals in the blood. 

During surgjcal opera- 
tions the body's potassium 
level is critical and sodden 
changes can lead to the death 
of the patient. The tra- 
ditional method of taking a 
Mood sample for anlysts 
can waste valuable minutes 
that could be the difference 
between life and death. 

la Professor Covington's 
device, a constant but tiny 
flow of blood from the pa- 
dent passes over a silicon chip 
coated with a substance 
sensitive to the Ions of potas- 
sium. The chip registers 
the varying electrical impulses 
and provides a constant 
and instant read-out for the 
anaesthetist. 

It b a development of 
the professor's work on ion- 
selective electrodes: his 
problem was to make one 
small enough. 

The development is ex- 
pected to have wider applica- 
tions Outside the operating 
theatre, to provide, for exam- 
ple, constant monitoring of 

river water for nitrate levels 
from farmers who fertilize 
their fields too generously. 


NEWCASTLE UNIVERSITY/2 

Oil for troubled 
Swiss waters 


Swiss environmental authori- 
ties have been expressing con- 
cern recently at the rising 
levels of organic carbon in 
their lakes and have blamed 
the exhaust emissions of two- 
stroke outboard motors. They 
set the oil industry a deadline 
to come up with a biodegrad- 
able oil. otherwise they would 
ban the use of such motors. 

Burmah-Castrol, working 
with Professor Ronald Cain of 
Newcastle's chair of agri- 
cultural biology', set out to 
construct a lubricant from raw 
chemicals that would re- 
semble a vegetable rather than 
a mineral oil. 

His previous work on the 
use of micro-organisms to 
digest chemicals and his stud- 
ies of detergents in the 
environment, proved invalu- 


able, as did his facilities for 
testing the new oil on Kielder 
Water in Northumberland. 

Casirol now has the product 
on the market and it is selling 
particularly well in 
Switzerland.The makers claim 
it is 99 per cent degradable 
within 2S days: and its 
lubricating qualities are so 
improved that only half the 
amount of oil previously re- 
quired in a two-stroke mixture 
is now needed. 

Professor Cain hopes that 
Casirol will shortly establish a 
research post at Newcastle to 
allow the work to continue 
into oils used in agricultural 
machinery, which can cause 
land pollution if they spill or 
leak. 


Playing the speech detective 


Newcastle's department of speech was 
the first in Britain to establish an 
honours degree in the subject. That was 
in 1 964. The detriment is still unique 
offering the only joint-honours degree in 
speech and psychology in the country. 
The first students to complete this course 
graduated in June I9S4. 

Instrumental to lhe formation of 
Newcastle's speech department in 1959 
was Dr Muriel Morley. who brought not 
coals but speech therapy to Newcastle in 
1933 when she and William Wardill 
undertook the study of children with 
cleft palates in the city's first hospital 
clinic. 

“This year." said Dr Ruth Lesser, head 
of the department and senior lecturer, 
“then? will be 64 undergraduates and 
four postgraduates in the department, 
but the courses are over-subscribed and 
'many cand i dales are turned away despite 
the acute shortage of speech therapists. 

“A major part of this department's 
work.” she said, "is focussed on identify- 
ing and understanding the exact nature 


of the problems faring stroke and brain 
damaged patients with acquired reading 
and language disorders. 

“Often, stroke patients can react in the 
same way as anyone else on the surface, 
but cannot read or speak in the normal 
way due to disassociations taking place 
in die brain. For example, when a patient 
reads the word husband aloud, he will 
say the word wife believing it to be 
correct — this is semantic paralexia. 

“Or another patient may respond to 
the picture of a comb by saying the word 
hair, but writing the word comb. This 
would be a disorder of phonological 
lexicon. 

“The speech therapist's job is to study 
these disassociations in language, read- 
ing and spelling and establish what the 
patient's brain can and cannot do.” 

Dr Janice Kay. the department's 
Medical Research Council research asso- 
ciate. said: “It's like being a detective, 
looking for clues to find out what's going 
on in the brain. You have to find the 
pieces and put them back together again 


to achieve an understanding of the 
patient's problem. Because it involves 
people this field becomes sirongly 
moiivating.” 

One important area of the 
department's research is cognitive 
neuropsychology — the understanding of 
how normal language breaks down in the 
brain by the use of theoretical 
neuropsychological models. 

These models map out in clear stages 
what is happening in the brain and 
according to a patient's response to the 
models during experimental testing, it is 
possible to diagnose and assess the 
precise aphasia and alexia and suggest 
the right strategy for therapy. 

“The future of this exciting new 
research is uncertain." said Dr Lesser, 
“as it is now entering its last funded year. 
The work has terrific application in 
clinics and patients are crying out for this 
sort of thing — it would be a great shame 
not to develop it” 

Judith Parsons 


A history of technological 
development in typesetting and 
printing. 

1951 ... Hindson Print 

was compiling text pages for 
Newcastle University using the 
very latest in hot metal 
composition by monotype and 
page make-up by han d. 

1986 . . • Hindson Print 

is still compiling text pages for 
Newcastle University using the 
latest technology in computerised 
typesetting with single keystrokes, 
word processor discs and fast 
accurate text processing and 
pagination. 

Hindson at Strawberry Place has had a long 
association with the University and a mutual interest 
in advancing word processing technology. 

Specialist Printers to the Educational & Industrial Market 

m HINDSON PRINT 

Strawberry Place, 
Newcastle upon Tyne, NE99 1 PP. 
F*f^aonhKkn>iolHoldns»PlC Tab 091 261 1171 



he Cookson Group has been at the 
forefront of Tyneside industry for 
nearly three hundred years and, as 
fashions and demands have moved 
with the times, so have its product research 

Founded by Isaac Cookson V*Lw 
in 1704, the company has 
grown today into a multi- 
national, multi-million 

which he would b e 

junction with NewcastLefJr^^^ 
University, a notable success has been the 
revolutionary ‘first for Britain’— the technical 

ceramic, Syalon. 

By investing in 
this product and 
other projects in 
the region, Cookson 
has become an inte- 
grated and responsible 
member of the Tyneside 
community and, by being 

able to continually 
offer career oppor- 
tunities both 
here and abroad, 
is proud to acknow- 
ledge that the links 
with Newcastle, the University and all 
it stands for, form a sound foundation for 
future development. 

Cookson Group pic E 

14 Gresham Street London EC2V TAT. Telephone-- lOi) 606 4400 V - mi 

Proud of the Past and looking to the Future. 


amdahl 


extends Best Wishes to 
The University of 
Newcastle Upon Tyne 
for the forth-coming 
Channel 4 Series. 


Amdahl has long been associated with the 
UK academic environment with major 
installations at Durham, Edinburgh, 
Leeds, London, Manchester, Newcastle 
and Reading. 

The Amdahl Corporation is one of the 
world’s leading suppliers of quality data 
processing products to the large systems 
market place. Amdahl (U.K.) Limited was 
formed in 1977 and markets and supports 
a range of products including large-scale 
computer systems, vector processors, 
storage products, communications 
systems, software, consultancy and 
educational services. 


AMDAHL (U.K.) LIMITED 
VIKING HOUSE 
29-31 LAMPTON ROAD 
HOUNSLOW MIDDLESEX TW3 1JD 
TELEPHONE 01-572 7383 


s i 

M , 








16 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 1 1986 


NEWCASTLE UNIVERSITY/3 


t FoajsD 


More business, more jobs 



Current wis- 
dom dic- 
tates that 
universities 
can no 
longer af- 
. ford to in- 

sulate themselves from the 
outside world and that they 
num seek — and be seen to 
scsk — contact with industry 
ana commerce. 

IdraJly there should be 
t»nent to both sides: industry 
should have access to aca- 
“Hjk expertise and the 
academics should be helped to 
tind commercial applications 
tor at least some of their 
research. 

Most universities, including 
Newcastle, have approached 
the commercial work! with a 
due amount of caution- They 
are conscious that commerce 
is not their primary function. 


and that pure research re- 
mains an essential part of their 
purpose. 

They are also aware that the 
money brought in by contract 
research, or by royalties from 
a successfully marketed idea, 
will — and indeed probably 
ought to — remain tiny in 
relation to their overall fund- 
ing. which will continue to be 
dominated by the University 
Grants Committee and re- 
search council grants. 

Nevertheless, within those 
constraints there have been 
notable successes. 

Seven years ago Newcastle 
University joined forces with 
the city's polytechnic and 
CAP Group, a commercial 
computer software producer, 
to set up a company which 
would be a centre of excellence 
for computing in the North- 
Easi. 



Lowndes Lambert UK Limited 




One of Britains 
leading Insurance Brokers 
is proud to be associated 
with one of Britains 
foremost Universities . 


A Member of the Hill Samuel Group 


From small beginnings with 
start-up capital provided by 
Tyne and Wear County Coun- 
cil, the company — Micro- 
electronics Applications 
Research Institute - now 
employs 17Cin the North-East 
and boasts a turnover of £2.5 
million a year. 

By next year it expects to be 
employing 250 and bringing in 
£3.5 million worth of 
business. 

The Microelectronics 
Applications Research In- 
stitute works closely with the 

New opportunities 
for local people 

university's computing lab- 
oratory. many of whose staff 
act as research consultants. 
They are working with GEG 
ICL and York University on a 
£450.000 research contract 
named Aspect which aims to 
eliminate the mistakes in the 
design of major computer 
programmes. 

Overall, the institute's cur- 
rent research programme 
means it Is working with 30 
different partners, both 
commercial and academic, in 
10 European countries. 

But the institute does not 
live by research and develop- 
ment contracts alone. It has a 
trading company and a 


production company, both 
making profits to be ploughed 
bock into the parent. 

One of the institute's aims 
has always been to benefit 
industry in the North-East and 
to create new jobs and training 
opportunities for local people. 
It offers a four-year training 
course in the new high-tech- 
nology skills — 60 trainees 
were taken on last month and 
it hopes to take on 50 school 
leavers a year from next year. 

The resulting pool of highly- 
skilled labour should prove a 
strong inducement to new 
industries on Tyneside. 

The institute also provides 
an Enterprise Workshop in 
Newcastle where five small 
stan-up businesses can grow 
with technical and manage- 
ment help from the institute. 

Successful though it is. the 
institute taps only one area of 
the university’s expertise. Last 
year another oiganization. 
Newcastle Technology Centre, 
was set up by the university 
and the two local polytechnics 
at Newcastle and Sunderland 
to act as a so-called “technol- 
ogy transfer agency** between 
industry and the three aca- 
demic institutions. 

Richard Tomlin, the 
university administrator who 
helped to set up the centre, 
said: “You have to encourage 
the academics to make them 
take a different view of their 



Dr Peter Olive, left, 
was an obscure New- 
castle zoologist 
researching the life cycle 
of the ragworts until 
one of his undergrad- 
uates, Peter Oman, 
pointed out that there 
was a huge potential 
market for the creatines 
as anglers' bait 

Fishermen either 
pay lOp each for worms 
or they go digging on 
beaches. 

Armed with suf- 
ficient knowledge of the 
worms' life cycle to 
know how to maintain 
year-round supplies, 
they have raised 
£250,000 capital to 
set up a worm farm, 
i Sea bait, to produce 6 
million ragworms a year 
for sale through 
tackle shops. 


work occasionally and to look 
for commercial possbililies. ! 
cannot go and shake the ideas 
out of them. I can only 
encourage them.” 

Mr Tomlin is aware be must 
tread carefully. “We must not 
be tempted to encourage only 
the research which is purely 
commercial Universities still 
get the bulk of iheir funding 
from the University Grants 
Committee and you still have 
to win your brownie points 
with them for academic 
excellence.” 

The centre has been busy in 
the pharmaceutical industry 
marketing the university 


pathology and virology 
departments’ important work 
in the development of 
monoclonal antibodies:. It is 
helping a member of staff to 
market a device he has devel- 
oped for testing hearing and 
eyesight. 

In the other direction, the 
centre has introduced a local 
power supply equipment 
manufacturer to academics 
who have helped to update his 
product, and a local maker of 
cake-decorating equipment to 
university engineers who have 
designed a new machine for 
him. 

AH 


Looking East 
to the future 


GETTING THERE BY 
DEGREES 


For fifty years, English 
Estates North have been 
building industrial and 
commercial property in the 
North East of England. 

We were amongst the first to 
help create opportunities to 
develop new businesses in the 
High-Tech industries, by 
building science parks on or 
near university complexes. 

At Newcastle, we also took a 
leading role in the formation of 
the Newcastle Technology 
Centre designed to bring 
industry and academics 
together to develop business 
opportunities. 


And we have recently 
helped establish a Regional 
Industrial Research Unit 
based in the university. It aims 
to implement its findings to 
help improve the economic 
base of the Northern Region. 

English Estates North is the 
largest High-Tech developer, 
with an active interest in the 
economic well being of the 
North. 

I U 1 ENGLISH 

i I B ESTATES 

I I— I NORTH 

The Developing Agency 

Si. Georgefe House, Kingsway, Team Valley, 
Gateshead, Tyne and Wear, NEll 0NA, 


BRIGHT 

SPARKS 


11101*8 what NEEB and 
the University of 
Newcastle upon tyna 


NEB has been working 
with and giving support 
to the University for 
years raid wiB continue 
to do so. 

You could say we're 

both Ruminating Hie 

North East in our own 
ways. 



THE NORTH EASTON 
ELECTRICITY BOARD 


An invitation from Nissan’s 
managing director, Mr T 
Tsuchiya, to the vice-chan- 
cellor Professor Laurence 
Martin, could signal the start 
of another important link with 
Japanese industry. 

The invitation was to attend 
the opening oh September 8 of 
Nissan's new £330 million 
manufacturing plant at Wash- 
ington, Tyne and Wear. 

Newcastle has already 
established several successful 
ties with Japanese companies 
moving into the North-East 
Instrumental to this has been 
the newly created East Asia 
Centre whit* was set up in 
April 1985. 

David Goodman, the direc- 
tor of the centre, said: “When 
the Japanese earth-moving 
equipment manufacturer 
Komatzu was making prelimi- 
nary investigations about set- 
ting up a plant here, it was Dr 
Ian Neary, lecturer at the 
centre, and his Japanese wife ' 
who helped smooth 
Komatzu’s way with local 
government, trade and 
industry. 

“This latest arrival by 
Nissan will create another 
good reason for raising the 
profile and interest in Japan 
and the Far East generally.” 

The East Asia Centre is the 
only university course in Brit- 
ain to offer a four-year hon- 
ours degree in Politics and 
East Asian Studies that in- 
cludes acquiring an oriental 
language and spending one 
year at Fukuoka Univeraty in 
Japan or Beijing Normal 
University in China. 

This year the centre is 
offering places to 44 under- 
graduates and nine postgradu- 
ate students 

Dr Goodman, a Chinese 
speaker, explained why the 
centre must step, up its pro- 
grammes on China, Japan and 
Korea. “As a country, Britain 
needs many more links with 
East Asia. Do you know how 
many students graduated last 
year in Chinese in the UK? 
Between 80-100 and only 26 in 
Japanese. 

“A single US state such as 
Texas, California or New 
York is turning out 10 times 
this number of Chinese and 
Japanese speaking graduates. 

“In the US, postgraduates 
in these subtexts go into 
government, industry and 
relevant aspects of the econ- 


omy, doing things that need to 
be done. Why aren’t we doing 
this in Britain? 

“As a nation we are only 
scraping the surface with 
classes and regional studies.:' 
What we need is a big doctoral 
programme, not just at New- 
castle. spec ializing in reltivailt 
areas such as Japanese' busi- 
ness studies/ _ and 
administration.”-' 

In less than one year, the 
East Asia Centre has estab- 
lished a number of viable 
business contracts and 
consultancies. “We have as- 
sisted companies . in the 
North-East with translations, 
identifying new markets and 
problems with bureacracy,” 
said Dr Goodman. 

Among the recent contracts 
has' been an economic and 
political survey of China for 
Shell with forecasts on 
particular market sectors. 

One of the university’s most 
important and potentially far 
reaching exchange pro- 
grammes is that involving 

Several weeks 
in industry 

Shanxi Mining College at 
Taiyuan, the centre of China's 
biggest coal producing prov- 
ince, Shanxi 

With the tMrlfing of die 
University Development 
Trust and six sponsors from 
British m ining equipment 
companies to meet the £7,500 
fees per student, seven Chi- 
nese students from Taiyuan 
are now attending a one-year 
MSc at Newcastle’s depart- 
ment of mining engineering. 

The students will also spend 
several weeks working in in- 
dustry with their sponsoring 
company. 

Instrumental to this link up 
was John Ryan of the depart- 
ment of mining engineering, 
who has lectured in Taiyuan. 

Newcastle's academic ex- 
change has quickly assumed a 
new dimension as local busi- 
ness interest in Shanxi prov- 
ince grows. In March 1984 a 
civic connection was estab- 
lished when a delegation from 
Taiyuan visited Newcastle. 

The two cities became ■ 
twinned and were formally 
declared “sister” dries. Only 
13 UK dries have such an . 
arrangement _ 

.. jp 


A wall for Hadrian. 
A railway for the world 
A car tor Nissan ... 

An education 
for the future. 


The North of England has been providing its skills 
and experience to the world for centuries. 

Through its expertise in higher education it has a prize 
which will ensure its success with the new technologies 

of the future. 

The North of England has two universities, three 
polytechnics, many colleges of technology 
and research centres under the collective banner of 
Higher Educational Support for Industry in the North (HESIN). 
They provide a wide array of talents and 
skills for industry, commerce and the wider community, 
helping the Region to attract new investment, 
fostering regional growth and underpinning the 
international standing of the Region. 

This Region’s success could be your success. 

Contact NEDC for the facts on the North of England. 

The North is a region that can meet the challenges 
of the future. 



North of England Development Council 

Bank House, Carliol Square, Newcastle upon Tyne NE1 6XE 
Tel. (091 ) 261 0026 • Telex 53721 2 ■ Fax (091 ) 232 9069 




v- 




R evenues in excess of £1,000,000 
a year can be produced by 
hydro-electric power now 
being generated by Kidder Water, 
Northumberland. 

What no-one knows is the 
effect this might have upon the 
environment; the natural habitats of 
wild animals, plant life and fish that 
depend upon the River North Tyne 
for their existence. . 

What will happen to the water 
quality of the river? What will be the 
effects upon its banks if significant 
volumes of water aze released - 
regularly? What changes will occur in 
the micro-climate? What will this do to 
the food networks? 


Generation 



Northumbrian 

Water 


l 

T 



To plug this gap in our 
knowledge, it has been decided to 
conduct an intensive research 
programme over the next three years 
along the River North Tyne. 
Unregulated waterways will be used 
as controls to check chemical variatkm 
in the water quality. Physical 
variations in the river’s contours will 
be closely watched. Effects upon 
invertebrates and fish will be 
monitored, especially fish-spawning 
patterns, the survival of young fish 
and the reaction of adult fish to 
changes in any of the existing 
parameters. With conservation in • 
mind, a river corridor survey will be 
carried out to establish a baseline at 
the start of the programme and also 
when the programme ends. 

fulling this gap will generate a lot 
more than electricity, it will attract the 
interest of other authorities and public 
utility concerns, not only in this 
country but throughout the world. 

These studies are a joint 
enterprise between the University of 
Newcastle upon Tyne, The Nature 
Conservancy andNorthumbrian 
Water. 


Northumbria Horase, Regent C«itre, 
Goafertb, Newcastle upon Tyne, 
NE33PX. 

Telephone: (091) 284 315L - /. 




jr 


i. 

v 

a 

I 


i; 







THE TIMES WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 1 1986 


fjf 


|||^g^jgsr| Benefactors 

9pjQHH novelist 

i.lflTBr Cookson are 
a rare spe- 
cies and pro- 
vide the answer to every 
university vice-chancellor’s 
prayers. 

- Last December, this cele- 
brated writer from Tyne 
Dock, who is 80. presented 
Newcastle’s Professor 
Laurence Martin, with 
£250,000 to create the 
country’s first lectureship in 
molecular haematology, the 
study of blood disorders. 

This was the first in a series 
of bequests to the Catherine 
Cookson Foundation which 
upon the death of Mrs 
Cookson and her husband, 
will total £1 million. The 
foundation will also bewme a 
primary beneficiary of the 
Catherine Cookson Trust 

On that same day. Mrs 
Cookson also donated £40,000 
to the department of medicine 
for the purchase of laser 
equipment and £50,000 to 
support a senior lectureship in 
otolaryngology, the study of 
car, larynx and throat and 
: equip a laboratory to help 
early diagnosis of deaf 
children. 

Professor Marlin said: “We 
felt morally obliged to invest 
the first donation into medical 
research, hence the new 


vSilb: 


NEWCASTLE 

UNIVERSITY/4 


MERCURY ASSET MANAGEMENT 



f wan « crom left, Linda Errineton. 
L ^ rank Chariton and Lance Nicbds^wto 

will Study book conservation through one ofhar^nts 


Cookson ’s choice 


lectureship researching into 
bleeding diseases. 

“But the rest of Mre 
Cpokson s gift will be used to 
stimulate research and fill the 
gaps in the rigid university 
grant system.” 

The foundation will provide 
a useful contrast to the 
increasingly successful 
University Development 
Trust While this tnist is 
considerably larger, with 
funds of £12 million, there is 
no latitude in application with 


every pound earmarked for a 
specific project 
This act of generosity to- 
wards Newcastle is by no 
means Catherine Cookson's 
first The vice-chancellor re- 
calls how in 1984 be had 
hesitated to approach Mrs 
Cookson for a donation to- 
wards a £25,000 appeal to re- 
furbish the Hatton art gallery. 

“Within half an hour of 
receiving my letter," he said, 
“she had telephoned me ask- 
ing if we could possibly wait 


until the end of the week for 
the full £25,000. She acts like 
lightning with the cheque 
book across her knee." ' 

These generous gestures are 
closely linked to her strong 
affection for Tyneside, the 
arts, helping children and 
more recently her own grow- 
ing medical needs. 

She said: "I have had a rare 
blood disease, hereditary tel- 
angiectasia, since I was 18. 
This is nothing new to me 
now. but I thought I was the 
only one who had this disease. 
It was only recently, since 
writing my autobiography, 
that this changed. I received 
responses from as for as 
America arid discovered' 30 
other people with the same 
disease. 

“There has been absolutely 
no research into telangiecta- 
sia. so I wanted to set up a 
research post at the university 
— not just for this disease, but 
for all kinds of blood 
disorders." 

It was the university's medi- 
cal department with whom 
die has been closely involved 
that initialed the nomination 
of Mrs Cookson for an honor- 
ary MA. “It was very nice to 
receive it," she said, “es- 
pecially as I did not go to 
university and I fell I should 
do something more for the 
university as it is very hard up 
for money. After all what is 
money for?" jp 


Mercury Warburg Investment Management 


Mercury Fund Managers 


Rowan-Mullens Investment Management 


Investment Management Services for: 


Pension Funds 


Medicine at two guineas a lecture 


Private Clients 


Newcastle University can trace its 
origins to the good offices of a bunch of 
doctors and can lay at the door of doctors 
modi of the praise — or blame — for what 
has happened since. 

It was in 1832, in die light of growing 
dissa ti s fa ction with the age-hoiwued 
system of apprenticing physicians to 
apothecaries and surgeons to barbers, 
and in the wake of a aeries of cholera 
epidemics on Tyneside, that local doctors 
began a series of medical lectures at a 
house in Bell's Court in the city, at a cost 

of two guineas for the six-month course. 

The School of Medicine opened two 
years later in the Barber Surgeons' Hall 
and tire fee went np to 40 guineas. 

Within five years there was a fearful 
row between members of the staff which 
led to the setting op of two rival colleges, 
each raiding die other’s premises to 
possess and repossess vital specimens. 

They did not reunite for 18 years. 
When one eventually did absorb the 
other it had already gained recognition 
from the University of Durham, an 
institution which then, and for many 
years afterwards, restricted itself to 
theology and arts. 

Meanwhile there was a stir of interest 
at the earthier end of education. It has al- 
ways been a source of some wonder that 
Victorian England achieved the indus- 


trial power-base on only the sketchiest 
infrastructure of technical education. 

The civic universities are chiefly a 
product of the 1860s and 1870s, when 
Britain was already well established as 
the world's workshop. 

Newcastle was no different. The 
North-East was already a powerhouse of 
shipbuilding and engineering when, in 
1870, a local solicitor and archetypal 
Victorian do-gooder, named Spencer 
Watson, emerged as the moving spirit to 
found a College of Physical Science in 
the city. 

Durham University, at that time 
headed by a Dean of on typically ad- 
vanced views, absorbed it at once. The 
science school was later renamed Arm- 
strong College. 

For the first third of the present 
century, Newcastle’s two colleges jogged 
along aneveatfoUy as separate constit- 
uents of the. University of Durham. But 
then foe doctors waxed bronUesome 


again. 

The row was serious enough for the 
Newcastle medical school to become 
virtually ungovernable. 

Id 1935 a Royal Conumssion was 
appointed to dear out the mucky stables 
and two years later it was ruled that both 
ends of the university should he thor- 
oughly reconstituted, with the two col- 


leges OS Tyneside amalgamated as 
King's College, Newcastle. 

The post-war years saw an explosive 
expansion of university education, which 
continued as the baby-boomers reached 
undergraduate age and optimism suf- 
fused the nation. For many years King’s 
College had a separate institution from 
the Durham colleges. 

By the 1960s Durham had grown 
suffidently in size and scope for it to 
survive happily on its own and in 1963 
the split was made. lung’s College 
became the University of Newcastle and 
Durham became Durham, enhancing at 
the same time its reputation and popular- 
ity among arts undergraduates. 

Since then Newcastle has continued to 
expand and prosper, until faced with the 
funding squeeze of toe 1980s that has 
sent a chill through the entire British 
academic community. It boasts an ex- 
cellent new medical faculty building and 
what will probably be toe last new 
university library to be buQt this century. 

The doctors of Newcastle, for aO their 
trouble in toe past, have managed to 
produce the pioneering researcher in 
thyroid disease, the first chief medical 
officer of the fledgling Ministry of 
Health, and the current president of toe 
General Medical CounriL They are 
forgiven. AH 


Local Authorities 


Charities 


Universities and Colleges 


Mercury Unit Trusts 


London New York Tokyo Jersey 


u Education is what survives when what 


has been learnt has been forgotten.” 


B.R SKINNER NEW SCIENTIST. 21 MAY 1954 



WE AT THE AYCUFFE AND PETERLEE 


DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION CONSI- 


DER OURSELVES FORTUNATE TO BE 


CLOSELY ASSOCIATED WITH NEWCASTLE 


UNIVERSITY, AN INSTITUTION THAT PLAYS A 
VITAL ROLE IN THE INDUSTRIAL AND SOCIAL 
DEVELOPMENT OF OUR REGION. 


EVERYTHING THAT WE HAVE ACHIEVED 


h i 

i , 


IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF AYCUFFE AND 
PETERLEE WILL EVENTUALLY FADE INTO 


THE FAR RECESSE5 OF HISTORY BUT WE 
ARE CONFIDENT THAT WHAT WE HAVE 


ALREADY ACHIEVED WILL SERVE TO EDUCATE 


GENERATIONS TO COME. 


YES, EDUCATION WILL SURVIVE WHEN 


WHAT HAS BEEN LEARNT HAS 

— — ■ FREEFONE 

BEEN FORGOTTEN. 


IT IS CALLED -PROGRESS. 


CONTACT KEITH 5UMMERSELL. THE AYCUFFE AND Ht I tHLEE DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION. ACORN HOUSE. AYCUFFE. COUNTY DURHAM. DL5 6AW TELEPHONE C032S)3t2S2t TELEX 56428 AQ3RN G. 




Mr -‘>fc v ‘ • 




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THE TIMES WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 1 1986 


COURT 

AND 

SOCIAL 


COURT 
CIRCULAR 


kensfngton PALACE 

30: The Prince of 

waies In is morning attended an 
informal meeting of Agri- 
cultural Ministers of the Euro- 
pean Community at the Old 
tTOand Hotel. Bowness-in- 
Wmdcrmere. Cumbria. 

His Royal Highness sub- 
sequently visited the Roval 
Windermere Yacht Club. 
Bqwn css-in- Windermere. 

H t™ Prince of Wales. Prcsi- 
S2 11 * 7 h £ Royal Jubilee and 
Minces Trusts, this afternoon 
^■Ud the Civic Centre, 
in connection with 
tne Pnnce of Wales Community 
Venture Scheme. 

His Royal Highness, attended 
by Lieutenant-Colonel Brian 
Anderson, travelled in an air- 
craft of The Queen's Right. 
KENSINGTON PALACE 
September 30: The Duke of 
Gloucester this afternoon 
opened the new Headquarters of 
the Charles Hammond Group 
and the London Interior De- 
signers Centre at 2A Battersea 
Park Road. London. SW8. 

Lieutenant-Colonel Sir Simon- 
Bland was in attendance. 


The Prince and Princess of 
Wales will attend a dinner given 
by the Variety Club of Great 
Britain to launch Lhe Life 
Education Centre on October 
14. 

Princess Anne. President of the 
Riding for the Disabled Associ- 
ation. will visit the Havering 
group at Havering Park Riding 
School on October 14. 


Memorial service 


A memorial service for Sir 
Charles Chadwyk-Healey will 
be held at Chelsea Old Church 
today at 230pm. 


Birthdays today 


Miss Julie Andrews. SI: Ad- 
miral of the Reel SirVaryl Begg. 
78: Mr Moran Cbplau 70; Mr 
Jimmy Carter. 62; Mr R. de C. 
Chapman. SO, Mr Sandy Gall. 
59: Professor Sir Stuart Hamp- 
shire. 72: Mr Richard Harris, S3; 
Mr Vladimir Horowitz, S2: 
Major D. A Jamieson. VC. 66; 
Mr Walter Matthau. 66; Dame 
.Kathleen Ollerenshaw. 74; 
Professor John Reid. 43: Profes- 
sor Roland Smith. 58: Sir Rob- 
ert Tel ford. 71. 


Luncheon 


Princess Anne. Chancellor of 
London University, will launch 
lhe “Science for Industry" Fair 
at Imperial College of Science 
and Technology, on October 13, 
lo mark the university's 150th 
anniversary. 


Gallipoli Association 
Mr Michael Heseltine, MP, was 
the guest of honour ai lhe 
annual reunion luncheon of the 
Gallipoli .Association held at the 
RAF Gub yesterday. Lieuten- 
ant-Colonel M.E Hancock, 
president, was in the chair. 


Dinners 


T,mom * l X A SrffiS 


Walden. .... — 

FislmwMMjcrV company. 


Lord Chancellor and Speaker 
The Lord Chancellor and the 
Speaker were hosts at a dinner 
held in the Palace of West- 
minster last night in honour of 
speakers and presiding officers 
of the Commonwealth who are 
attending the Commonwealth 
Parliamentary Conference. Also 
present were members and offi- 
cers of both Houses of Par- 
liament and officers of the 
Commonwealth Parliamentary 
Association. 

Royal Society 

The Archbishop of York at- 
tended the annual dinner of the 
Royal Society held last night at 
Fishmongers' Hall. Sir George 
Porter, president was in the 
chair and Professor Tianqin 
Cao. President of the Shanghai 
branch of the Chinese Academy 
of Science. Sir John Harvey- 
Jones and Sir Arnold Burgen 
also spoke. Among others 
present were: 

The Ambassadors of Noway. Spain. 
Hungary. Japan and Mexico. Earl 
JeiUcoe. lhe Earl of SH borne. Lord 
Blah*. Lord Chorley. Lord Uoyd of 
Kllgerran. QC. Lord Rhodes. Lord 
Shack lei on. Lord Sheffield. Lord 
WuUson. Lord Young of Graffham. 


Pharmaceutical Society of Great 
Britain 

Dr Geoffrey Booth, President of 
the Pharmaceutical Society of 
Great Britain, presided at a 
dinner at the society's head- 
quarters last nighL Mrs Edwina 
Currie. Parliamentary Under 
Secretary of State for Health and 
Social Security, also spoke. Oth- 
ers present included Baroness 
Gardner of Parkes. Mr Gordon 
Oakes. MP. Sir John Walton. 
Mr and Mrs D Buckle and Mr 
and Mrs W Wilkinson. 


Mr kenneth Baker. MP. Mr James 
Prior. MP. * 


tao Hon Peter Brooke. 


Mr Timothy Raison. MP. 
Mke. MP. Sir David 


Hancock. Sir David Phillips. Sir 
Harvey- 


Trevor Skeef. MP. Lady 


Jones. Uw Lord Mayor of West- 
r. lhe Dean Of Westminster. Mr 


muster. 


Meeting 

Council of Christians and Jews 
The Right Rev Lord Coggan 
presided at the annual meeting 
of the Council of Christians and 
Jews held at I Dennington Park 
Road. London, last nighL After- 
wards the Right Rev Professor 
Robert Craig. Moderator of the 
General Assembly of the 
Church of Scotland, presented 
the 1986 Sir Sigmund Sternberg 
Award for outstanding contribu- 
tions to Jewish/Christian under- 
standing to the Right Rev 
Gerald Mahon, Bishop in West 
London. The Rev Michael 
Bourdeaux and Sir Immanuel 
Jakobovits, Chief Rabbi, also 
spoke. 


Mr J. M. Col tart 

A service of thanksgiving for the 
life of Mr James Milne Collar! 
was held at Si Columha's 
Church of Scotland. Pont SireeL 
yesterday. The Very Rev Dr J. 
Fraser McLuskey officiated, as* 
sisted by the Rev Donald Wal- 
lace and the Rev Hector G. 
Ross. The Duke of Argyll, 
president. Royal Caledonian 
Schools, read the lesson and Sir 
Gordon Brumon gave an ad- 
dress. Among those present 
Mrv Cdun iwidowi. Mr Gordon 
Conan nonl. Miss Helen Collar! 
(daugnicri. Mrs H Ccrttart fdaugtiler- 


Frypr«Mfer-li*-l_ 

Mr and Mrs J C Eosfon. Dr John 
Eavlon. Mr Ian Coulter. Mrs Ingrid 
Coll on 


Lard Thomson of MonJDeUt tcfialr 
man. IBAi and Mr John Whitney 
■dlrrrtar general i. Eleanor Lady 
Campbell Orfle. Sir Richard Beau 
mom. Sir Eric cnaodle (director. 
Thomson liuenuitional Press Con 
sullanryi. Lady Brumon. Sir Denis 
and Lady Hamilton. Sir Groffrov Cox. 
Air Chief Marshal sir Thomas and 
Lads 1 Kennedy. Lady Trwihowan. 

Mr Jamn Ci«n irepresrnung lhe 
chairman Inlcrnalional Thomson 
Organisation!. Mr Norman Peddaway 

(Thomson Foundaiioni and Mrs 
Rrdddway with Mr John Wnohl and 
Mrs M Anns. Mr Rot Wilson ■ master. 
Roval Caledonian Scbootsi and Mrs 
Wilson with Miss Juliet Wilson and 
Mr WuiiamHeepsivicr-chaim’ianiand 

Mrs Hppdv Dr R B Henderson 

icnairmdii. Lister Television). Mr W 

HodUhon iiTNi and Mrs Hodgson mm 

Mr David Nicholas: Mr David Chip 

■ direr lor. Reuter Foundaiioni. Mr Don 

Rowlands iL-niversiiy College. Car- 
diff i. Mr Km Meadows. Lieutenant - 

Colonel Terener Plerce-Coulding. Mr 
and Mrs Peler Campbell -Ord. Mr Vu 
ChrngzM i Xinhua News Agency). Mr 
David Corsan (Coopers and Lybrand). 
Dr M C Ersklnc. Mr A C Kidd (LoreUO 
School). Mrs Tommy Macpherson. 


Church news 


Bishops appointed 


Prebendary John Davies, aged 
S8. Missioner in the diocese of 
St Asaph and Priest of five small 
parishes based on Uanrtiaeadr- 
ym-Mochnam, North Wales, 
has been appointed Bishop 

Suffragan of Shrewsbury in 
succession fo the Right Rev 
Leslie Ltoyd-Rees, who has 
retired. 

Canon Malcolm Men in, aged 
54. Vicar of St Mary Magdalene 
with St James, Norwich, and 
Rural Dean for Norwich East 
has been appointed Bishop 
Suffragan of Knarcsboroutgh in 
succession to the Right Rev 
John Dennis, now Bishop or St 
Edmundsbury and Ipswich. 


Forthcoming 

marriages 

Mr S.M. May 
and Mrs fLF. Weston 
The engagement is announced 
between Simon, elder son of Sir 
John and Lady May. of* 26 
Wellington Square. London. 
SW3. and Kay. daughter of Mr 
and Mrs F.S. Fox well, of 
Dorking. Surrey. 

DrSJP. Ball 
and Miss LPJ. Roe 
The engagement is announced 
between Stephen, eldest son of 
Peter and Mariette Ball, of 
Wimbledon, south London, and 
Lucy, second daughter of Roy 
and Evelyn Roe. of High Wyc- 
ombe. Buckinghamshire. 

Mr N.W. Brereton 
and Miss S.EVL Tail 
The engagement is announced 
between Nicholas, younger son 
of - Mr and Mrs Charles 
Brereton. of Little Massingham. 
Norfolk, and Suzanne, daughter 
of Captain John TaiL RN (retd), 
of Tortola. British Virgin Is- 
lands. and Mrs A TaiL of 
Orpington. Kent 
Mr PJ. Conic 
and Miss L.1. Money-Conns 
The engagement is announced 
between Jamie, elder son of Mr 
and Mrs P. Come, of Bolls 
Cross House. Rotherfield Greys. 
Henley-on-Thames, and Laura, 
younger daughter of Mr and Mrs 
D.B. Money-Coutts. of Magpie 
House. Peppard Common, Hen- 
ley-on-Thames. 

Mr D.W. Hancock 
and Miss T.A. Gosney 
The engagement is announced 
between David William, son of 
Mr and Mrs C.W. Hancock, of 
Warwick, and Tracey Ann, 
daughter of Mr R_ Gosney and 
Mrs C. Silver! ock, of Hay ling 
Island. Hampshire. 

Mr S. Hudson -E»ans 
and Miss S. Bnrdge 
The engagement is announced 
between Simeon, youngest son 
of Dr and Mrs M.L Hudson- 
Evans. of Monmouth. South 
Wales, formerly of Blackheath. 
SE3. and Sarah, daughter of Mr 
D.N. Burdge. of Leeds, Kent 
and Mrs R.C. Tucker, and 
stepdaughter of Mr R.C. Tucker, 
of vines Cross, East Sussex. 

Mr J.C. Maples. MP, 
and Miss J.P. Corbin 
The engagement is announced 
between John, son of Mr and 
Mrs T.C. Maples, of Childrey, 
Oxfordshire, and Jane, daughter 
of Mr and Mrs AG. Corbin, of 
Shaldon. Devon. 


Mr P.D. Maraton 
and Miss P.M. 0*Longhlin 
The engagement is announced 
between Paul, younger son of 
Mr and Mrs W.H. Mansion, of 
Darley Dale. Derbyshire, and 
Patricia, elder daughter of Mrs 
M.P. O'Loughlin. of Langley. 
Berkshire, and the late Mr M.V. 
O'Loughlin. 


Mr J.CJL Monod 
and Miss K.KL Lewis 
The engagement is announced 
between Jeremy, elder son of Mr 
and Mrs Kenneth A Monod. of 
Hun ton Bridge. Hertfordshire, 
and Karen, youngest daughter of 
the late Mr John K. Lewis and 
Mrs Wendy Lewis, of iford. 
Bournemouth. DorseL 


Mr JJL Moss man 
and Miss ZJV1. Millington 
The engagement is announced 
between James, youngest son of 
Group Captain G.K. Mossman, 
CBE. and Mrs Mossman. of Hill 
House. Hunsonby, Cumber- 
land. and Zoe. only daughter of 
Mr J.R. Millington. MFH. of 
The Glebe House. Kilby, 
Leicestershire, and Mrs B.L 
Furber. of Wheler Lodge. Hus- 
bands Boswonh. Leicestershire. 


Mr E.B.H. Stevens 
and Miss H.P. Freeland 
The engagement is announced 
between Bartholomew, son of 
Mrs David Kemp and the late 
Mr R_ Hilary Stevens, stepson of 
Mr David Kemp. QC, of Lon- 
don. SW2. and Helen, daughter 
of the late Mr Jeffrey B. 
Freeland and Mrs Freeland, of 
Ewyas Harold, Hereford. 


Mr J.l. Stoodley 
and Miss S.L. Eagell 
The engagement is announced 
between Jonathon, son of Mr 
and Mrs J.W. Stoodley. of 
Brasted, KenL and Susan, 
daughter of Mr and Mrs EA. 
Eagell. ofTonbridge, KenL 


Mr SJ.TeakJe 
and Mbs J.AT. Aron dell 
The engagement is announced 
between Simon, son of Mr and 
Mrs John Teakle. of Southover 
Old House. Lewes. Sussex, and 
Juliet, daughter of Mr and Mrs 
John Arunaell. of Hook Manor, 
Donhead Shaftsbury. Dorset 


Marriages 


Mr C.N. Yaxley 
and Miss AC. Russell 
The engagement is announced 
between Charles, only son of Mr 
and Mrs John Yaxley, of Hong 
Kong, and Amanda, only 
daughter of Mr and Mrs J. 
Watcyn Lewis, and the late Mr 
Anthony RusselL 


Mr D. Austin-Little 
and Miss GP. Coaten 
A service of blessing was held on 
Saturday. September 20. at the 
Abbey Church. Beaulieu. 
Hampshire, after the marriage 
in Lymington of Mr Denzil 
Austin-Little, only son of the 
late Mr Denzil Thomas Little 
and Mrs Joy Little, of Castle 
Rock. Northern Ireland, and 
Miss Clare Patricia Coaten. only 
daughter of Mr and Mrs Arthur 
Coaten. of Wey bridge, Surrey. 
The Rev D.T.P. Abernethy 
officiated. 

The bride was attended by 
Laura Little, Annabel Lees, 
Emma Hodgkinson and Daisy 
Bird. Mr James Lees was best 
man. 

A reception was held at 
Sowley Crate, Hampshire, and 
the honeymoon -is being spent 
abroad. 

Mr P.RJE. Deedes-Vincke 
and Miss LL Backnail 
The marriage look place -on 
September 20 at the Chateau 
EngJesqueviUe-la-Percee, Calva- 
dos. of Mr Patrick Deedes- 
Vincke, elder son of M Mated 
Vincke, of Langham, Leicester- 
shire. and of Mrs Joan Deedes. 
of Chiswick, London, and Miss 
Lucy Buckiiall, younger daugh- 
ter of Leiutenant-Commanaer 
and Mrs Roger BucknalL of 
Helensburgh. The very Rev 
Allan Maclean, of Dochgarroch, 
Provost of St John's Cathedral. 
Oban, officiated. 

The bride, who was given in 
marriage by her father, was 
attended by Gemma Osborne. 
Mr Jamie Bossom was best 
man. 

Mr SJL Jaffe 
and Mrs MJ. Marciano 
The marriage took place in New 
York on Saturday, September 
27, between Mr Stanley Richard 
Jaffe, son of Mr and Mrs Leo 
Jaffe, of New York, and Mrs 
Melinda Jill Marciano, daughter 
of Major and Mrs Derek Long, 
of Wokingham, Berkshire. 

Mr K. Jones 
and Miss P.A Malcolm 
The marriage took place on 
Saturday. September 27. 1986, 
at St Michael's Church, 
Highgate Village. London, of Mr 
Keith Jones, only son of Mr and 
Mrs C.P. Jones, of The Wirral, 
Cheshire, and Miss Patricia 
Audrey Malcolm, eldest daugh- 
ter of Mr and Mrs R. Malcolm, 
of Belfast, Northern Ireland. 

The bride was attended by 
Miss Kimberley Malcolm and 
Miss Wendy Landneth. Mr Neil 
Drewitt was best man. 


BIRTHS, MARRMfiES, 
DEATHS and IN MHORIUII 
£4 a lie + 15ft VAT 

l minimum 3 lines) 


AniwunnmHiuv authenticated by lhe 
name and permanent address of the 
Lender, nut be sem UK 


THE TIMES 
PO BOX 484 
Virginia Street 
London El 9XS 


or ufeptoned (by telephone subs- 
eibcrs onlvi to: 01481 3024 


Births, Marriages, Deaths and In Memoriam 


TIkju mro*ion\ my son. be strong In the 
grace lhal n ■■■ dirts! JnuK 
i Timothy Z: 1 


BIRTHS 


ANDERSON On September 250). to 
dare inec Bimle ReuU and Ian. a 
daughter. Charlotte Lucy. 

BINGHAM ■ On September 23rd. to 
Jennifer inee Mackenzie}, and Nell- 
Peier. a son James, a brother far 
Joanna. 

TOSHER On lhe 29lt) September, al 
Ihr Lts!*>r Hospital. Stevenage. Herts, 
■o Linda and Colin, a second son. 
Laurence Adam, a brother for Oliver 
James. 

BROOKS . On 28th September 1986. 
toHaliieinee Mi llson land Stephen tn 
Somerset West. Cape of Good Hope, 
a daughter Emma Mortorte 
BROWN On Sepiember 290) al St 
Teresa's, wunotedon » Alexandra 
and Richard, a daughter Georgina 
Caroline, a Mslcr for Liane and Sally 
CRAWFORD ■ On September 21* » 
Fiona fn« Sinclair i and Paul, a 
daughter Isabel Catherine. 

ESDA1LE . on September 28th. to 
Pippa mce Adamsi. and Antony- a 
son. George, a brother for Olivia and 
Victoria. 

GILBERT - on September 27U) al 
Queen Mary's Hospital. Dunedin. 
New Zealand to Catherine inee Mac- 
kenaei and Shayne a son (James) 
HAMILTON ■ On September 1901. lo 
Chmune (nee Akkermansj and 
Geoffrey ■ a daughter. Juliet 
Francesca Boyd 

HAROlE ■ On September 27th. at SL 
Teresa's. Wimbledon, to Marv-Anne 
(Emmai irtee Hodgson' and Christo- 
pher. a daugnier. Clementine 
Rebecca Scott 

HARVEY -SAMUEL On September 
27Ui in Bahrain. Shirley uwc Bren- 
nan I and Guy. a son fTtmoUiy 
Daniel ■ 

KEN NATO . On 27ih September 1986. 
to Angelica i nec Vemoyiand David a 
son. Pans Ttmoihy. 

HAiER On 251 h September 1986. to 
Jessica (nee Mai Hand i and Thomas, a 
daughter. Augusta Lucy Francesca, a 
sister for tsobel. 

MALLET On September 27th. to Su- 
san inee Hamilton) and Stephen, a 
son. George David 

PARKER On 29m September at lhe 
Western General HospitaL Edin- 
burgh. lo Lucs 'nee Belli and 
Stephen, a daughter. Alice Roseflen. 
PUTNAM On 26th September, to 
Gillian inee Hodgson i and Nicholas, a 
son. Thomas David MulhalL 


W j£ LKEB Sfcotember 23rd. at 

Queen Chartolle’s Hospital lo 
Caroline mee Slim and Gary, a 
daughter Zoe Elizabeth 


WJLLIAMS Oil 28th Soot ember, to 
Car0, “!f mee Wight,, and R (chord, a 
son. Oliver Alexander 


MARRIAGES 


CURLING GHOSE-CHOUDHURY The 

montage took place ouictty in Lon- 
don on Sepi 25Jh between Jonathan 
Curling, younger son of Mr A Mrs B 
W R Curling and Shreeta daughter of 
Mr & Mrs N Ghose- Choudhury 


DEATHS 


AYLWARD On September 26th 1 98c.. 
aged J57 years, suddenly at home. 
Captain John Aylward. Royal Artil- 
lery ■ Find). Chartered Secretary 
Murh loved husband and lather Re. 
ouimi Mass at St Edwards Church. 
Srtly Park. Birmingham on Monday. 
6th October, at 11.30am Followed 
nv private cremation Family flowers 
only, donation if wished, to Royal 
ai idler v Benevolent Fund. Wooi- 
or » Mary's Hosptrr. 

BtfBUmjnanv 


CARVER ■ On September 28th. peace- 
fully at home. Maurice Fraser, aped 
87. Beloved husband of Mary, father 
of John and David, and dearly loved 
grandfather. Funeral al SI James 
Church. Col wall, al 1.30pm on Octo- 
ber 6Ui. Committal of Ashes taler at 
Ruzawl. Morandera. Zimbabwe. 
Flowers lo Hollands. Malvern. 5343. 
Or donations lo "Education Trust 
Zimbabwe/ Malawi" C/o Lloyds 
Bank. Ledbury. 

GORHAM On 28th September, peace- 
fully after a short Ulness. Elizabeth. 
Viscountess widow Of Charles 10th 
viscount Cob bam. Funeral service 
12pm. Sunday 5th October at SI 
Johns Parish Church. Hagiey 

COOPER ■ On Saturday 27Ui Septem- 
ber. Guy Hipsley. iragtcatly as a 
result of an arctdenl. Adored hus- 
band of Chairman mee Mostyn). and 
devoted father lo Sophy. Jonquil. Al- 
ice and Tarquin and beloved son of 
Mary. All enquiries to Hams * 
Barnes Limned i0428i 722 180. Cre- 
mation al Guiilord Crematorium 
Friday 3rd October al 2.30pm. No 
flowers, but donations if desired lo 
the British Heart Foundation. 

CUPPER - On 28th September, peace- 
fully at the EdUh Caved ward. Brood 
Hospital, after a courageous tight 
against cancer. John Colin, late of 
the 5th Royal InnlflUIIIng Dragoon 
Guards Dearly loved and loving hus- 
band of Christine inee Miles), much 
loved by twin brother Tony, dear fa- 
ther lo Andrew, and also lo John. 
Barry. Tim. and Jenny. Will be 
greatly mtssed by all his family and 
friends. Funeral Service will be al 
Beckenham Crematorium on Tues- 
day. 71h October at 1 1 .20am. Family 
Dowers only please, but donations 
may be sent lo Cancer Research UnJL 
Brook Hospital. London SW 18. 

DAVIS On September. 27lh. Patricia 
Joy. widow of Colonel WJ Davis of 
Wet] Close, Brockworth. Memorial 
Service al SL George's Church. 
Brockworth. on Monday October. 
6th al 12 noon. Flowers may be sent 
to Ernest Co* & Sons. Seymour 
Road. Gloucester, by 10.30 am. or 
donations for memorial window to: 
Rev p. Naylor. Si. George's vicar- 
age. Court Road. Brockworth. 
Gloucester. 

DENMARK. HH PRINCE GEORG of - 

On Monday. 29th September 1986. 
in Denmark, husband of the late HH 
Princess Anne of Denmark, stepfa- 
ther of Patrick and Elizabeth, funeral 
lo be held al Holmerts Klrke. Copen- 
hagen at 3.00 pm on Monday. 6Ui 
October 1986. Memorial Service m 
London to be announced later. 


EVANS On September 25th 1986. 
Squadron Leader David Sandford 
Evans. Beloved eklesl son of lhe lale 
Maior and Mrs Sandford Evans, of 
Rose Hill Collage. Casheslon. 
Pembrokeshire 


FIELDING - On September 25Ifi 1 986. 
peocefuly al Ealon Gardens Nursing 
Home. Hove. Pamela, daughter of 
Sir Osborne Smith and loving wife of 
Malcolm Martini its Fielding, step- 
mother lo Daln and Stephen 
Martini us Fielding and family, a 
good and loyal friend. Funeral at 
Woodvolr Crematorium on October 
9th at 2-30 pm. Flowers and en- 
quires to Oornrord and Son. 50 
George Street. Hove. 

dLLANDERS On 26th September. 
1986 Rachael (Ray) Morgan, beloved 
wife «f Alexander Duncan 
GUlanders. Funeral private. 

GOODWM • On 29th September 1986. 
Sir Reg. 'Reginald Eustace) Goodwin 
C.B E-. D L- hi his sleep after a long 
nines, borne with great fortitude, al 
a west Sussex nursing home. Devoi 
cd husband Of Pen: brother ol Joan 
Howard: father of Mary. Peter and 
Julian, grandfather of Andrew. 
David. Richard. Thomas. Kane. 
Karen, and Sarah: and Dalcu ip 
Graham and PauL Belovpp by all. 
Funeral and burial at St Mary’s 
Church. Wot Chi rung ion. west Sus- 
sex. Monday. 6th October at 1 2 
noon No mourning or flows. .at ha 
request. Donatten* if wished, to Na- 
tional Assoctauon ^Bqyv0^24. 
Highbury Grove. London NS 2EA 
Memorial Serv.ce in London lo be 
announced later. 


GRAHAM - On SeptemOerStoi 1986- 
peacefully at Oakville, Ontario. Can 
ada. U General Howard Douglas. 
0 G. C VO . C B-E-. P- Sff" a , na ^ 
ED CD. OC-- boro 1898- Loving 
husband of Jean Surmrt I W 
son Peter, of Hamilton, aster Edith 
York rf Cordwon. Ontario, sister-ln- 
law Hei^™ WT«««d 
numerous nieces and nephews. A 
public Service of Commemoration 
«T|S W MM M St John s United 
Crunch. OakvllK-On^^OOpm 
on Wednesday. I s01 October. 


GRUNDY- On 28th September 1986, 
Arreen Paul. Funeral service on Fri- 
day 3rd October at Pinner Parish 
Church, at 10 a.m. Donations if de- 
sired to Untied Nations Association 
c/o T A. EUemeni & Son Ltd. 21 
Bridge Street. Pinner. Middlesex 
HAND - On September 23rd 1986. 
Reverend Charles Connai SJ.. at his 
parish In Lough ton. Essex. Requiem 
Mass at The Church of St Edmund 
Campion. Loughion. on October 3rd. 
ai 10am R.t.P. 

HARLAND - On September 29th. at 
Heoihfleld Home. West Wittering. 
ChKtiester. Right Reverend Maurice 
Henry, beloved husband of Agnes 
Hlktyard for 63 years, and father of 
Elizabeth Wells and Anne Felicity 
Tomlinson, and a grandfather and 
great grand rather, private cremation 
at his request A service of thanksgiv- 
ing for his wife at St Peter and si 
Paul's Church. West Wittering on 
Monday. October 13lh. at 2.30 pm. 
KERSHAW - On September 29lh. 
tan the m her 97Ui year. Much loved 
by Sheila. Pam and Michael, after a 
courageous Life, granted lhe blessing 
of a quiet departure. Funeral Service 
al the Worthing Crematorium. 
Flndon on Friday. October 3rd. al 
SJSDpm. Enquiries to Jordan & Cook 
Tel: 0903 32702. 

KON - On Sew ember 28th. at hts borne 
m Langford. Stantslaw k. CEL. 
aged 86. Emeritus Professor of Read- 
ing University and husband for 54 
years of Phyllis Funeral private. No 
flowers please. Donations, tf desired, 
to the British Heart Foundation. 
LEGGE ■ On September 29th 1986. 
Philip Henry Bevington Legge. aged 
81 years, peacefully at home after a 
long illness, borne wtui great cour- 
age. Beloved husband of Margaret 
and devoted rather of Sarah and 
Amanda. Cremation at 1 2.30pm on 
Thursday October 2nd. ai Tunbridge 
Wells Crematorium. Ben hall Mill 
Lane. Family Dowers only. Dona- 
tions for Cancer Relief lo: Hospice at 
Home. Michael Tetley House. Sand- 
hurst Rd. Tunbridge Wells. 
McFARLANE - On 21*4 September 
1986. os a result of a road accident 
while on holiday In Rhodes. Loma 
Margaret aged 20 years, formerly of 
Roedean School, and at Qalre Col- 
lege Cambridge. Beloved elder 
daughter of Ian and Inez, and darting 
sister of Anne and Gordon. >13 Madi- 
son Avenue. Cathcart. Glasgow. 
Service In Cathcart Old Parish 
Church. Carm unnock Road. Glas- 
gow on Tuesday. 30Ui September al 
to 30 am ro which friends are talli- 
ed. Interment private. 

KLUNSHIP - On September 30th. 
peacefully ai home. Manone May. 
Private funeral . No flowers please 
Donations if desired to MacMillan 
Nurses. A Memorial Service win be 
a nnoun ced later. 

MORRIS - On Saturday. 27ih Septem- 
ber. suddenly but peacefully al home 
In Betmonl. Church Street. 
Ladybank. Fife AJtson. beloved wife 
ol the tale Ian CA. and beloved moth- 
er of Robin and Hilary. Service at 
h’IrkcaKtv Crematorium on Thurs- 
day. October 2nd al 10 30 am. 
Please accept this, the only Intima- 
tion. Family flowers only, no leners 
please Donations may be sent to 
Can cer Re search. 

PARGETTER - On 28th September 
1986. Linda .Alice Hill, aged 90 
years, formerly of Montpelier House. 
High St. Dunstable, widow of Henry 
Artnur Avon Parget er. late General 
Practitioner and Medical Officer of 
Health. Dunstable. Service al Priory 
Church. Dunstable. 1 30pm Tues- 
day. 7ih October 1986 Flowers and 
enquiries (o SA Bales. West ScreeL 
Dunstable. 63633 


PAY On September 26Uv suddenly al 
home. Bill, aged SO years, of Grange- 
Gardens. Cambridge Dear husband 
ol Jnes Honorary member of lhe 
Cog and Magog Golf Dub Funeral 
service at Lillie SI. Mary's Church, 
on Tuesday . Orlober 7lh. al 1 4S pm. 
followed by rremallon All floral 
tributes and enquire] lo. Harry Wil- 
liams & Sons. 7 VK-iorta Park, 
Cambridge Tel. Cambridge *0223i 


PEROVAL- On September 27th I9B6 
Peacefully. Freda Mary mce Mawj. 
Funeral Service al Rowledge Parish 
Church, on Saturday October £Ui al 
11 am 

POTTER ■ On September 29|h. peace- 
fully al home. Stack House, west 
Hill. Dried. Surrey Charles Antony 
(Tony i dearly loved husband of Peg 
gy. father and grandfather. Former 
area secretary for Legal Aid ‘Kent 
Sussex and Surrey i Funeral private 
Family flowers only, bul If desired 
donations to the R AF. Benevolent 
Fund. 67 Portland Place. London 
WIN AAR. 


POWELL • On Friday. September 
26Ui. peacefully In her 103rd year al 
Blrlley House. Brantley. Mary 
Lynetle. ctdesi child of Wilfred and 
Frances Powell (nee Manseflj. for- 
merly of PluckJey. KenL and 
Philadelphia. Pensylvanta. Beloved 
sister of Gladys Powell Brown of 
Chestnut Hill. Philadelphia and very 
dear Lynga to all her family. Funeral 
Service on Friday. October 3rd. 
Guildford crematorium al 11.00 am. 
No flowers, bul donations In lieu lo 
Mount Alvemia. Guildford, was her 
wish. 

ROBMSON - On 27th September, 
peacefully. Elieen Mary Verney in*ei 
Donnelly, wife of W S Robinson. She 
win be greatly missed by her son and 
family. Private Funeral Sendee. 
Family only, no flowers. 

SMART - On September 26th. 1986 In 
(he Evelyn Hospital. Cambridge. 
John Smart B Sc . Ph D.. D.Sc. (Ed 
inburgh). M.A. (CauXab.t. F.RS.C-. 
Emeritus Fellow of Darwin College. 
Cambridge, husband of Elspeth. el- 
der son of the late Mr and Mrs John 
Smart of Edinburgh. Cremation al 
Cambridge Crematorium al 9.30am 
on Thursday. 2nd October. No 
flowers. 

SPEARE ■ On 27Ui Sep te mber 1966. 
Elsie Evelyn iBoMnei inee Johnston 
Ham. of Boswell way. Seaton. Dev 
on. Dearly beloved wire of BUL 
Funeral service al the Exeter and 
Devon Crematorium, tomorrow 
Thursday. 2nd of October al 2pm. 
Family flowers only. 

ST JOHN AIWN - On September 2Slh. 
suddenly in New York. Jonathon, 
gentle and generous husband of 
Beverley. Sadly missed by hts many 
friends. esoedaDy Charlie and 
Hamisl). Funeral Service Si. John's 
Church. Hyde Park Crescent. W2. on 
Friday 3rd October al 1 lam. 
fouiwed by burnt al Kensal Green 
Cemetery. Harrow Rd. W10. 
Flowers and enquiries lo J H 
K enyon. ! 2 ChtUem SL Wl. 
STOPFORD - On 28lh September. 
Katherine Sheila Hope, formerly Of 
Montrose and Stratton) St Mary, 
widow of Captain James Coverlev 
Slopford. Royal Navy and mother of 
Serena. Robert and ChrtSOpber. cre- 
mation a) Reading on Friday. 3rd 
October al 11.00 am. Enaubies la 
Barretts F.D. Lid. Portsmouth. Tel: 
0705 824831. 

SWAYNE ■ On September 28ih 1986. 
peacefully In hospuaL Maior Arthur. 
Oswald Swayne (Rid). The 
Sommentel Light Infantry. Much 
lov ed husband of Clarissa ' Clair i and 
father of Susan and Vivien. Private 
Cremation. Family only, no rtow ere 
WEBB ■ al Dun vegan Nursing Home. 
Edinburgh, on September 28. 1986. 
after a long illness courageously 
borne. Dr Margaret Ewing Webb 
mee Browne). M.B.CHB.D A. Widow 
of LI Commander K Webb. D S C.. 
and dear Sister of Dorothy and Ag- 
nes. Funeral private 
WELCHMAN ■ On 261h September 
1986. peacefully al home in Kew. 
Barbara Lois, loving and beloved 
wife of lhe late Brigadier Godfrey de 
Yere Welchman, of Manolon. Devon. 
DearLy loved mother and grandmoth- 
er. Funeral service Monday. 6th 
October. 11.45am al The Barn 
Church. MarKsbury Avenue. North 
Sheen. Rlcnmond. followed by pri- 
vate cremation. Family flowers only, 
donations i( desired, to The Mothers 
L nton. or Oxfam. Enquiries lo T.H. 
Sanders and Sons. Ol 948 1551. 

WALTON - On Sunday. 281h Septem- 
ber. Winifred of Lam bay fsle Rush, 
suddenly and peacefully al SI 
VinrenTs Private Hospital. Dublin. 
Private funeral al Lambay on Fri- 
day. 3rd October Requiem Mass lo 
be announced. 


MEMORIAL SERVICES 


CLOGG - A Memorial Service for 
Derek Frank Shcrwdf Ck>gg. a for- 
mer senior partner of Theodore 
Goddard, will be held on Tuesday, 
2isi Octooer al 4 pm al Si Mary-le- 
Bow Church. Cheapsxfe London ECS 
RUCC - Sir Percy . A service of 
Thanksgiv mg for the lire and work of 
Sir Percy Rugq will be held al 13 
noon on Thursday 13th November 
1 986 ai SI. Margaret's Westminster. 

followed to refreshments- 


IN MEMORIAM - PRIVATE 


SANSOM. Irew - Died 1st Orlober 
1968 Remembered with love by Pal, 
Irene. Mam. relatives and friends. 


Science report 


Heart 
disease 
link is 
confirmed 


By Pearce Wright 
Science Editor 


The extent to which heart 
disease Is a family disorder 
which can be inherited has 
been shown in an examination 
of 2,416 black and white 
children aged between five and 
seventeen. 

The investigation formed 
part of a long-term research 
project known as the Bogalnsa 
Heart Study, which is mon- 
itoring the risk factors in 
children whose parents have 
suffered heart attacks. 

A strong link was shown 
between fathers who had heart 
attacks and the detection in 
children of risk factors for 
heart disease. 

The research by a group of 
workers with Dr Gerald 
Berenson. of the Louisiana 
Medical Centre, New Orleans, 
is described in the current New 
England Journal of Medicine. 

Their results identified the 
type of fat and oiiy molecules 
to be found most frequently In 
the offspring of parents with 
heart disease. The findings 
also show other molecules 
which give even stronger early 
warning signs of a tendency tn 
heart disease. 

The findings provide an 
even better indicator of risk 
than the previous discoveries 
by other doctors of the im- 
portance of the ratio in blood 
serum of the two types of 
cholesterol; low-density lipo- 
protein (LDL) and high-den- 
shy lipoprotein (HDL). 

A high level of LDL in 
adnlts is regarded as a high- 
risk factor. 

But the Bogalnsa compari- 
son of children and parents 
uncovered other tell-tale signs 
in the youngsters, before the 
cholesterol balance registers 
an abnormal condition. 

From an analysis of blood 
serum for nnnsnaJ concentra- 
tions of a wider range of 
molecules of fats, proteins, 
steroids and sterols, it was 
revealed that two other sab- 
stances were totally different 
in children with fathers who 
had experienced heart attacks. 

Those two substances are 
known as a polipo protein A-I 
and apolipoprotein B. the 
molecules which carry lipids 
aronnd the body. 

The different levels in chil- 
dren or parents with heart 
conditions existed indepen- 
dently of the children's race, 
sex. age. history of obesity, 
smoking, alcohol intake and 
use of oral contraceptives. 


OBITUARY 


BISHOP MAURICE HARLAND 


Robust prelate with roots in the parish 


The Right Rev Maurice 
Harland. Bishop of Lincoln 
from 1947 to 1956, and of 
Durham from then until his 
retirement in 1966, died on 
September 29 at the age of 90. 

He came to the episcopate 
with few of the qualifications 
that some consider necessary. 
He was neither scholar or 
theologian, neither prophet or 
orator, nor was he even out- 
standing as an administrator. 
Nevertheless, he was a fine 
pastoral bishop and it was 
good for his clergy that he 
came to bis first diocesan 
charge straight from 25 years 
of parochial experience. 

To the errant and fractions 
he could be stem to the point 
of harshness. But it delighted 
him to set forward the recov- 
ery of men hoping to make a 
fresh start and to those in 
trouble he was a rock of shelter 
and strength. He sometimes 
disconcerted subordinates 
with special interests by his 
willingness to discard a project 
when it appeared not to be 
fulfilling expectations. But he 
rewardra the loyalty of his 
colleagues with confidence, 
readily delegating 

responsibility. 

On the other hand, when 
difficult questions were re- 
ferred to him, • he never 
shirked making decisions, in 
which he was expeditious and 
wise. He did not allow the 
pressure of affairs to break the 
discipline of prayer, and he 
was assiduous in his daily 
reading of the Scriptures. 

Maurice Henry Harland 
was born on April 17. 1896, 
the son of a Yorkshire parson. 
He was educated at St Peter's 
School, York, and at Exeter 
College. Oxford, and he re- 
ceived his theological training 
at Leeds Clergy School. Early 
in the Great War he enlisted in 
the West Yorks, transferring 
successively to the RFA, the 
RFC, and (on its formation) 
the RAF, making his first solo 
flight at Lincoln. 

He was ordained in 1922, 
serving his first curacy at St 
Peter’s, Leicester. From 1927 
to 1933 he was priest-in- 
charge of St Anne's, Leicester, 
where he laid the foundations 
of a flourishing parish. In 
1938, he was appointed to the 
benefice of St Matthew’s, 
Holbeck, and in what might 
fairly be described as a tough 
assignment he won the hearts 
of the people. 

From there he went further 
North, in 1938, lo become 
vicar of St Mary’s, Winder- 
mere, and Rural Dean of 
Ambleside. This interlude in 
the Lakes was brief Archbish- 
op Temple brought him down 
in 1942 to the front-line 
diocese of Canterbury, to be 



Suffragan Bishop and Vicar of 
Croydon. 

In this testing post, to 
which, in 1 946, was added the 
office of archdeacon, he fully 
justified the confidence of 
Archbishops Temple and 
Fisher, and in 1947 he was 
chosen to succeed Leslie 
Owen as Bishop of Lincoln. 

Here he found a diocese sad 
and disheartened. It had suf- 
fered two grievous blows in 
the breakdown ofBishop Skel- 
ton in 1945, and the death of 
Bishop Owen in 1947, less 
than six months after his 
enthronement All it dared to 
hope for in the newcomer was 
a higher expectation of life. 

Bul the new bishop quickly 
rallied his people, and in his 
own way. He set himself to be 
a pastor to the clergy; and at 
the same time to give to the 
laity a greater sense of respon- 
sibility and a fuller place in the 
life of the diocese. He 
achieved this in many ways, 
not least in coping with the 
problems of pastoral 
reorganization. 

A large commission was set 
up to survey the whole diocese 
and draw up proposals for the 
more effective use of re- 
sources, and the greatest possi- 
ble publicity was sought for 
lhe report (No Secret Plan ) 
that it presented. 

The clergy were startled to 
receive a summons (as of 
obligation) to a four-day con- 
ference at a well-known sea- 
side holiday camp (‘‘wakey- 
wakey” and all). Many were 
outraged: probably the major- 
ity were apprehensive. The 
b&bop himelf confessed to 
qualms, as the murmurs 
reached his ears. But they 
went; and it was a great 
success, and became estab- 
lished as a triennial event. 
Otter diocesan bishops have 
followed his example. 

At the request of Archbish- 


op Fisher he visited the troops 
in south-east Asia in 1951, and 
the following year he went to 
Malta as a missioner to the 
RAF. He belonged to their 
world: and he could tell them, 
in the plainest way. that both 
be and they belonged to God's 
world. He could make it 
simple to them; but he never 
allowed them to think it easy. 

After nine years at Lincoln, 
be was appointed Bishop of 
Durham in the place of Dr 
Ramsey. He had no wish to 
leave, and shared both the 
sorrow and the surprise of his 
old diocese, for he recognized 
that be was not in the Durham 
tradition of scholarship. But 
there, too, he made his own 
distinctive mark. 

In 1962, when a motion 
favouring the abolition of 
capital punishment was debat- 
ed (and overwhelmingly car- 
ried) in the Convocation of 
York, he described how he 
had ministered to six men in 
the condemned cell, with one 
of whom, guilty of “a particu- 
larly beastly murder”, be 
asked to be locked in. The 
man “sat back smoking, look- 
ing supercilious, his feet on 
the table. Divine inspiration 
led me to read about the 
Prodijpl Son. The man broke 
down sobbing”. _ 

Soon afterwards, the bishop 
said, the man was confirmed 
and took communion. “If ever 
1 have seen a man fit for his 
maker and for eternity, that 
was the man". 

It was in keeping with his 
pastoral gifts and practical 
bent that, while be seldom 
spoke in Convocation or 
Church Assembly, the com- 
mittees of Convocation on 
which he sal were those 
H paling with baptism and 
confirmation, and be was 
chairman of the Archbishops* 
Commission mi Spiritual 
Healing. 

For relaxation and 
recreation he enjoyed, in addi- 
tion to the continual refresh- 
ment of a delightful home, the 
sports of the country: a few 
days' fishing or a day with the 
guns. Of his literary pleasures 
one was the reading of the 
works of Sir Walter Scott. 

His boyish sense of fun and 
turn of phrase were the delight 
of many -and an offence to 
none, startled as a vestry-full 
of dignitaries might be to hear 
a mitred figure demanding 
“Hi, chaps, who's pinched my 
pole?” With the shy he was 
himself a little shy, and never 
intruded upon the reserves of 
others;' but those who turned 
to him were never repelled. 

He mafried, in 1923,. Agnes 
Winckley, MBE, who was a 
great support to him through- 
out his ministry. She survives 
him with their two daughters. 


DR L. H. JEFFERY 


Dr Lilian “Anne” Jeffery, 
FB A FSA, DPhiL the eminent 
Hellenist, who was Fellow and 
Tutor in Ancient Histoiy at 
Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford, 
from 1952 to 1980, died on 
September 29 at the age of 71. 

Lilian Hamilton Jenery was 
born on January 5, 1915. She 
was educated first by her 
father. Dr Thomas Theopbi- 
lus Jeffery, and then at Chel- 
tenham Ladies* College and 
Newnham College, 

Cambridge. 

She inherited a strong clas- 
sical tradition from both sides 
of her family and gravitated 
naturally to Classical Archae- 
ology and, in particular, to the 
study of archaic Greek 
inscriptions. 

Her election to the Jenner 
Scholarship at Newnham, and 
later to a research fellowship 
at Lady Margaret Hall, togeth- 
er with periods at the British 
School at Athens and at the 
Institute for Advanced Study 
at Princeton, enabled her to 
advance her research, the fruit 
of which was published in 


1961 in The Local Scripts of 
Archaic Greece. 


This was immediately rec- 
ognized as a major work of 
synthesis, distinguished by its 
patience with detail, its cool 
oommoDsense and the balance 
with which it evaluated epi- 
graphic, archaeological ' and 
historical evidence. These 
qualities also made her a 
valued friend of the British 
School at Athens, particularly 
as joint editor of its Annual 
from 1956 to 1961. 


academe, she felt that, as she 
bad received the same privi- 
leges as a man in her educa- 
tion she ought to be spared 
nothing which her male col- 
leagues had to undergo. 


In 1952, she was elected 
Fellow and Tutor in Ancient 
History at Lady Margaret 
Hall, and in 1965 she became 
a Fellow of the British 
Academy. 

She volunteered early in the 
Second World War, first as a 
VAD, and then with the 
WAAF, in which she served 
for nearly two years in the 
ranks before being commis- 
sioned as an intelligence 
officer. 

Though she could have 
spent her war in the shelter of 


Her last book. Archaic 
Greece \ was published in 1976. 
After a long introductory sec- 
tion explaining how to reduce 
archaic chronology to order, 
the book deals with individual 
city-states in a geographical 
pattern. It was praised for the 
skill and elegance of its pre- 
sentation, though some regret- 
ted that she took the 
traditional view of archaic 
land-tenure. 


A dedicated scholar, she 
was one of the most modest of 
women yet one of the most 
learned. She was at the same 
time a generous teacher and a 
warm friend, with a lively 
sense of humour and wide 
interests. Her hospitality, dis- 
pensed while her contented 
cats looked on, became pro- 
verbial in the college and 
university. 


PROFESSOR PIERRE BERTAUX 


Professor Pierre Bertaux. 
eminent both as scholar and 
wartime resister, died recently 
at the age of 78. 

He was born on October 8, 
1907. into a family exiled 
from Lorraine after the Fran- 
co- Prussian war. in which his 
grandfather was held hostage. 
From boyhood he was natu- 
rally alive to the importance 
of the German question, and 
he came to speak and write 
German as fluently as French. 
His father, also a German 
scholar, was a friend of Thom- 
as Mann. 


Before the war Bertaux 
served as a minister's private 
secretary during the Popular 
From governments. After 
1 940 he was an early pillar of 
resistance to the Vichy regime, 
receiving the first parachute 
drops arranged by the Gauli- 


ists into southern France. 
During one of these he was 
captured by the Vichy police 
and imprisoned for two years. 

But when the Germans 
moved into Unoccupied 
France in November, 1942, 
his prison governor, like many 
others at. the time, released 
him to resist what was now a 
foreign government. When 
the Gestapo arrested his supe- 
rior. the regional prefect in 
clandestine charge of several 
south-western departments, 
Bertaux took over. 

He was present when the 
Germans retreated from Tou- 
louse. and his Libiralion de 
Toulouse (1973) is a leading 
text in Henri Michel's collec- 
tion on the end of the German 
occupation of France. His 
services earned him the Le- 
gion of Honour and the most 
prestigious of all resistance 


awards, that ofCompagnon de 
la Liberation. 


During the immediate post- 
war period Bertaux held the 
south-west steady for the 
Fourth Republic, and in 1949, 
before he was 40, was appoint- 
ed head of the French security 
service, a post in which be 
showed more efficiency than 
tact. Politicians were relieved 
when he returned to academic 
life, as professor of German, 
first at Lille and then, from 
1 965. at the Sorbonne. 


A genial and vigorous com- 
panion, uuth an inexhaustible 
fund of insight and humour, 
he taught almost to the end of 
his life. He also wrote two 
important volumes on the 
poet - HolderUn (1969 and 
1978), as well as a study of 
Goethe. 

He was twice married. 


HERR HELMUT QUALTEVGER 


Herr Helmut Qua! linger, 
the actor and playwright 
whose satirical depiction of 
the vices of the Austrian 
character made him a house- 
hold name in the post-war 
German-speaking world, died 
in Vienna on September 29. 
He was 57. 


Born in Vienna on October 
8. 1928. the only child of a 
schoolmaster. Qualtinger’s ex- 
perience of the brutality and 
cynicism which lay beneath so 
much of lhe charm of inter-' 
war Austria developed a pow- 
erful sense of irony which he 
was to pul lo good use in 
cabaret theatres after the war. 


Despite his obvious gifts as 
an actor, he preferred cabaret 
to the formality of the theatre 
stage, which he believed could 
no longer adaqualdy portray 
that ironic strain in Austrian 
literature which was devel- 
oped in the last century by 
Nestroy and, , later. Karl 
Kraus. 


In 1961. in conjunction 
with Gerhard Bronner’s 
Fkdermaus Cabaret Theatre, 
he unveiled in a- one-man 
play of the same name, the 
character with which he was to 
be forever associat e d- “Herr. 
KarF, the opportunist,. cyni- 
cal, 'perpetually grumbling 


work as a constant warning, 
against any revival . of his 
ideas. 


A vastly built mad- whose 
baroque .size was & landmark 
in - the' oidci Vienna , cafes, 
; QuaJtinger was a link with an 
aft of satire now virtually 
extinct in Austria. 



i- 


■sv 


1? 


JS 






# 


Austrian whose bareiy-re- T 
pressed desire for a “strong - 
' arm” to discipline his innate t 
slovenliness is a literary mon- .* 
uniem to the Austrian - 
character. 

He was well-known for his 
ridings from Mein Kampf, - 
with which he made several 


foreign tours, conjuringhomjr - 
and humour from Hitter’s : 


-K. 

\\*Ts 

» ~r 


V 


W" 



THE TJM£S WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 1 1986 


19 



THE ARTS 



Television 



More than on? reviewer of 
Jeffrey Arched novels h£ 
remarks on their 
sttowfe with what might be 
thought an inappropriate me- 
dium, namely the English 
language. Like badly briSfed 
invading troops, Mr Archer's 

out blithely 
across the Astroturf of banal- 
ity, only to veer into sloughs of 

If, C IT reh . ensipn - Readers 

hare been known to spend 10 
minutes over page one and give 
. UP m helpless bafflement 

tJL ."“Si s «“ ifi «nt that 
Derek Marlowe s adaptation 

Of first Among Equals (ITV) 
lus been made by “Granada 
Television of England", for the 
first episode suggested that 
the export market was upper- 
most in mind. On the one 
hand, there was the drablv 
idiomatic language-school di- 
alogue - well seeded with the 
limp sallies of the coimtry-clnb 
m drone — which appeared to 
have been translated from a 
foreign tongue in a dubbing 
studio; on the other, the 
tourist-class ‘insight'* into so- 
cial distinction: in 1964. La- 
bour MPs dwelt in shabby 
digs and ate om of tins, while 
Tory MPs knew Winnie and 
had bigger typewriters. Add to 
this the emollient theme music 
and the News at Ten views of 
Big Ben's tower, and one had 
the artistic apotheosis of Sell- 
ing Britain: a flawless nullity. 

The corridors of impotence 
gave way to the pornography 
of pop with Prince in Concert 
(Channel 4), the young 
person's alternative to World- 
wide Concert for Refugees 
(BBC l and 2). Beginning his 
career as a Smokey Robinson 
done. Prince has assimilated 
the sparkiest elements of lit- 
tle Richard, Kid Creole and 
Michael Jackson to become 
the greatest male stripper in 
musical history. On his 28th 
birthday, the Royal One gave 
body and Inngs to his adoring 
fans in Detroit, strutting, pout- 
ing, bumping and grinding, 
and doing things to micro- 
phones that looked positively 
dangerous. 

Martin Cropper 


THE NEW MEN AT COVENT GARDEN: 
Bernard Haitink (right), in his first interview 
since taking over as Music Director designate 
of the Royal Opera, talks to John Higgins 

Teamwork to boost 
dramatic standards 






Theatrical excellence was not 
exactly one of the characteris- 
tics of Covent Garden last 
season. The lack of credible, 
compelling drama on stage 
was in pan caused by mis- 
fortune, rh part by mis- 
judgement and more often by 
a combination of the iwo. 

No one could have foreseen 
the Mexican earthquake 
which deprived the Royal 
Opera first of Domingo and 
consequently of Sir Peter 
Hall's planned new produc- 
tion of OteHo. but there can be 
littie argument that the revival 
of Simon Boccanegra which 
replaced it -was a dramatic 
void, m heahh prevented, 
alas. Andrei Tarkovsky from 
staging The Flying Dutchman* 
but the director appointed to 
lake over from him managed 
to create one of the worst 
botches seen ai the Opera 
House for some years. A littie 
of the spleen vented both in 
the auditorium and in the 
Press on the dosing produc- 
tion, Fideiio. could more use- 
fully have been directed ai The 
Dutchman. Andrei Serban's 
Fideiio is salvageable, Mike 
Ashman's Dutchman is noL 
Bernard Haitink is the first 
to admit that his most press- 
ing problem this season is to 
restore the right dramatic 
standards at the house and 
then go on and build up a bank 
of productions that are both 
durable and worthy of display: 
“Our greatest need is to find 
the right director for the right 
opera and then give him the 
working conditions that wifi 
secure the best results." 

Dieter Dorn, whose Ariadne 
at Salzburg was one the best 
pieces of theatre that festival 
has seen in recent years, is 
coming to stage the Parsifal 
which Haitink will conduct. 
Negotiations are going on with 
Gioigio Strehler to do Berio's 


TOMORROW: John 
Percival interviews 
Anthony Dowell, the 
new Artistic Director 
of the Royal Ballet 


Vn re in ascoita . possibly in 
conjunction with another 
European house. These are the 
encouraging signs, but it looks 
as though the chances of 
securing Trevor Nunn, one of 
Haitink's Glyndeboume part- 
ners. are becoming slimmer. 
He was to have directed the 
new Figaro: *Tm very sorry to 
have lost T revor for Figaro — I 
think it is a work for which he 
would have displayed a spe- 
cial affinity. But I'm still 
hopeful he'll come for The 
Cunning Little Vixen with 
Simon Rattle." 

Had he thought of appoint- 
ing a Director of Production? 
“If you could have someone 
from the very top of the league 
it would be a possibility. But 
I'm beginning to believe that 
opera is more and more a 
team business and not a one- 
man show. Surround yourself 
with the right people and then 
there is a chance the focus will 
come right." 

In the past Bernard Haitink 
has declared that he is not 
interested in dealing with the 
international star circuit, so 
why did he decide to become 
Music Director of a house 
where that has to be part of the 
stock in trade? 

“I took a long time to make 
up my mind. The first time 
Coveni . Garden approached 
me i said ‘No. thank you’. The 
second time they approached 
me I said 'No, thank you'. 
Then you look at yourself; 
consider what you have done 
and what you want to do, and 


you suddenly realize that you 
have the opera bug and you 
reply ‘Yes’. Without 
Glyndeboume. of course, it 
would have been an impos- 
sibility. That is the house that 
taught me about opera, an art 
form 1 came to fairly late in 
my career, as opposed to the 
Italian conductors who are 
weaned on it. Still, if you 
arrive mature, you can at least 
make up speed. 

“The problems with the star 
circuit are that it is not large 
enough and that too many of 
those within it are unwilling to 

f ive themselves sufficient re- 
earsai time even for a new 
production. We are negotiat- 
ing with one famous name 
who has stipulated an absolute 
maximum of five rehearsal 
days. What is the answer to 
that? The only one I see is to 
bring in some new singers. 

“I'm well aware of the 
deficiences in the area of 
Italian opera at Covent 
Garden and also that neither 
Jeffery Tate nor 1 are 
‘Mediterranean' by instinct. I 
think wc may well engage an 
Italian adviser connected to 
the staff. We'll certainly be 
taking a few more risks in 
casting for the Italian rep- 
ertory. And HI be continuing 
with Colin Davis's ‘open door* 
policy with regard to inter- 
‘ national conductors: Muti Is 
coming with Nabucco, Mehta 
and Rozhdestvensky are also 
expected.” 

The other area little asso- 
ciated with Haitink nowadays 
is contemporary music, "Yes, 
a fair comment It's something 
I'm trying to rectify. Apart 
from the Berio, we have a 
commission with Harrison 
Birtwistle for an opera on Sir 
Gawain and the Green 
Knight, which will be given at 
least eight performances. An 
electronic score? 1 hope not, 



but at the moment I'm com- 
pletely in the dark. But even if 
it is I'll still conduct it." 

When Haitink's appoint- 
ment was announced his 
Glyndeboume colleague, the 
conductor Jane Glover, im- 
mediately responded “Ah. the 
Haitink Ring, that's what we'll 
all be waiting for" So . . . 

“It's comments like that, 
however kindly they may be 
intended, which really make 
me nervous. We have talked 
about a new Ring, but I feel 
that it is best left until after all 
the reconstruction of the Op- 
era House, which is now due 
to start in 1990. Let's wait until 
we’ve got the new technical 
facilities. So we're going to 
revive the Friedrich Ring and 
1 hope that Gotz will be across 
to supervise it — he's certainly 
been invited.’* 

Bernard Haitink mil drop 
the “designate” from- his title 
and become plain Music 


Director at a lime when 
Covent Garden will be chang- 
ing considerably. Over the 
next three years there will be a 
new Chairman in place of Sir 
Claus Moser, a new General 
Administrator in place of Sir 
John Too ley, followed by a 
period in exile (probably at 
Drury Lane} while the recon- 
struction goes on. So he will in 
effect be an anchor-man as 
well. 

“I don't mind that too 
much. My fear, a fairly ob- 
vious one. is that there will too 
many day-to-day burdens 
which could sap the musical 
contribution: the best mo- 
ments must come from the 
piL I have to protect myself by 
building around me a good 
team. A few days ago one of 
the doormen at Covent 
Garden said Tm dad you’ve 
come back - you're a com- 
pany man’. Thai’s the nicest 
compliment paid to me this 
year." 


John Percival introduces the Central Ballet 
of China, who open in London tomorrow 

Young ambition 




Forget the comic and rather 
insulting view of China in 
ballet exemplified by the so- 
callcd Chinese Dance tn The 
Nutcracker, with its funny 
hats and convention of keep- 
ing the forefingers pointing 
straight up. During recent 
years we have begun to dis- 
cover. through visits of the 
misleadingly-named Peking 
Opera, that China has its own 
traditional form of highly 
skilled movement-theatre ca- 
pable of comedy, drama or 
sheer bravura. 

Just about the time London 
. first saw that exciting style, in 
w the mid-Fifties. classical ballet 
was beginning to set down 
roots in China. There had long 
been a few emigrt Russian 
teachers working there (Mar- 
got Fonteyn had some of her 
early ballet classes in Shang- 
hai). but in 1954 a remarkable 
woman became director of a 
dance school in Beijing. 

Dai Ailian will be known, if 
only by sight, to some of the 
people who see the company 
which grew from that school, 
the Central Ballet of China, 
when it gives its first London 
season at Sadler's Wells start- 
ing tomorrow. She spent her 
formative vears in Britain and 
returns often to keep in touch. 

She was bom of Chinese 
Jg' parents in Trinidad in 1916 
and studied in London during 
the Thirties, battel with Anton 
Dolin and Margaret Craske. 
modem dance with Ernest 
Berk, also with Kurt Jooss and 
Sigurd Lccder at Darlington 
Hall. But in 1940 she decided 
that she must move to the 
homeland she had never 
known, even though it was 
then engulfed in war with 
Japan. 

From the first, the company 
tried to develop a specifically 


Chinese repertory side by side 
with the international classics. 
One of the earliest examples 
was The Maid of the Sea, 
which is coming to London in 
a revised and shortened ver- 
sion. Its plot is taken from 
folk-stories*, the music is writ- 
ten fora western orchestra but 
uses Chinese melodies and 
observes some of the conven- 
tions of Chinese music. Folk- 
dance and virtuoso tricks 
from the Peking Opera com- 
bine with ballet steps in the 
choreography. 

London will also see one act 
of the company's most famous 
production. Red Detachment 
of Women, about a group of 
women who took up arms to 
fight for the revolution. Cre- 
ated in response to Chairman 
Mao's request for Chinese art 
to reflect Chinese life, it was so 
successful that Mao’s wife, 
Jiang Qing, claimed credit for 
it Thai did not stop her from 
sending Dai Ailian and several 
dancers and musicians to 
work on a “corrective farm” 
for four years from 1970. 

The company regrouped 
about 10 years ago and its 
present leading dancers have 
all begun their careers since 
then. Mostly in their twenties, 
they have been taught and are 
directed by the Central 
Ballet's first generation of 
dancers, supplemented by 
guest teachers and choreog- 
raphers who nowadays are 
more likely to come from 
Britain or America. Dai Ailian 
remains as artistic adviser. 

Earlier this year the Central 
Ballet had a successful season 
in New York. After London 
they go on to Moscow. That is 
an ambitious itinerary for a 
young company, but not un- 
duly so, given their swift rise 
so far. 



Amsterdam’s new 
opera-house has just 
celebrated itself with 
a new Dutch opera: 
Paul Griffiths reports 

Hopeful 

journey 

The world is littered with 
abandoned plans for opera 
houses, but suddenly and 
remarkably Amsterdam got 
itself out of a long-established 
rut a few years ago. and a 
structure of brick barricaded 
behind great marble-faced 
playing cards now looms 
somewhat glumly over the 
Amstel river at the Water- 
looplein. It is called “Het 
Muziektheater": a typical 
example of Dutch modern- 
day informality masking an 
entirely traditional reality, for 
like any old-fashioned opera 
house it is the home of the 
national opera and ballet 
companies. 

It also feels like an opera 
house, once one has come 
inside (the blank exterior per- 
haps is the penalty for the 
economy of combining the 
theatre with a new town hall). 
The foyers are spacious; the 
auditorium is spacious too, 
and Has the form of a triple- 
decker amphitheatre uphol- 
stered cheerily in Edam red. 
The place seems well set to 
become a European asset on 
account not only of the Dutch 
productions but also of the 
visiting companies who will 
be attracted: the Bolshoi Ballet 
arrive this month and are 
followed in January by the 
Komische Oper of Berlin. ' 

Quite properly, though, the 
opening performance was of a 
new Dutch opera, Otto 
Keumg’s Ithaka. Apparently 
Killing's first idea was for a 
symphony which would set 
Cavafy's Ithaka in its finale: a 
musical journey towards a 
poem about journeys being 
more important than arrivals. 
But out of this came the 
arrival at an operatic end- 
game. Cavafy, though un- 
named. is one of the 
characters drifting in a hotel 
bar that is a thin disguise for a 



A heart beating in the inferno: Roby Hinds as Star with 
Louis Vervoort as Manikin in Ithaka 


way-station to hell Also there 
are a journalist who is partly 
the composer's alter ego and 
Star, a star. The journalist is 
obsessed with Carlos Gardel, 
the Argentinian tango singer 
who took a 14-year-old girl as 
his mistress. Star is obsessed 
with finding true love and not 
the sordid sexuality of which 
she has been the focus. The 
poet is obsessed with visions 
and sailors. AH are manipu- 
lated by Angel, the hostess of 
hell’s hotel; inevitably under- 
stood as the Angel of Death. 

One might add that the 
composer is obsessed with 
Berg: a waltz from Wozreck is 
practically quoted, and the 
work skates on the thin musi- 
cal and dramatic ice of Lulu. It 
lacks, however. Berg's irony, 
so that its intended integrity is 
undermined by so many cul- 
tural references: besides 
Cavafy. Berg and Gardel, 
Munch is brought into play, a 
glaciated shriek being one axis 
of the music, while Gardel's 
seductive and dangerous rhy- 
thm provides the other. Some- 
thing in the opera is struggling 
to present an image of the 
human condition, but the 
unexcused autobiography and 
the high-reaching markers act 
against any unified intention, 
suggesting rather a network of 
merely, if intensely, private 
meanings. 

The work does, however. 


offer opportunities for several 
strong central performances. 
Henk Smit stalks his line with 
close intelligence as the hard- 
ened, wounded Journalist, 
and Maarten Flipse has a 
dejected nervosity as the Poet. 
Charlotte Margiono effec- 
tively provides a tone of thin 
steel’ for the objective cruelty 
of AngeL while Ruby Hinds 
sings with luscious warmth as 
Star, and keeps a heart beating 
in the inferno. Sundry chil- 
dren, dwarfs, tango artists, a 
muscle man and a dead sailor 
complete the cast. Lucas Vis 
conducts, and the opera is 
produced by Franz Marijnen 
in the deep shadows of Santi- 
ago del Corral's set. It is all 
over in a single act of 85 
minutes, and so there is time 
for another sideways look at 
myth in Toer van Scbayk's 
ballet Like Orpheus, using 
Stravinsky's score with a pre- 
lude of tavema trash and a 
striking interlude of sounds 
from great lumps of metal. 

The other opera in the 
baptismal repertory is Fai- 
staff, very straightiorwardly. 
even dully produced by Liviu 
Ciulei. who continues 10 
prove it is possible to be 
Romanian and unexciting at 
the same time. Unfortunately 
the limpness on stage is 
equalled in the pit Hans Vonk 
conducting a dumbfoundingly 
zestless performance. 


Rock 

Jackson Browne 

Hammersmith 

Odeon 





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It was not until Jackson 
Browne had practically com- 
pleted the sprint through his 
encores — "Doctor My Eyes". 
“Somebody’s Baby”, “Stay" 
“Fora Rocker" and Sieve Van 
Zandfs "I’m a Patriot” — that 
I realized why, after two 
hours, a rather distant admira- 
tion had at last given way to 
genuine enjoyment. 

Simply, the slideshow bad 
been switched off. No longer 
were we being force-fed visual 
interpretations via a giant 
screen: a picture of the “house 
in the shade of the freeway" 
that is the setting of “The 
Pretender", for instance, may 
have seemed like a good idea 
when the tour’s strategy was 
devised, but its only real effect 
is to rob the listener of the 
power of his own imagination. 

This is. however, the video 
generation, and Browne has 
had more success than most 
singer-songwriters from the 
confessional school of the 
early 1 970s in coming to terms 
‘with its demands by simplify- 
ing his approach and embrac- 
ing modern technology, al- 
though. 10 judge by the 
superficial air of much of 
Monday night’s concert, this 
has been achieved at Lhe cost 
of the deeper rapport he 
enjoyed with his old audience, 
a quality evoked only in a fine 
duel with Doug Haywood, his 
willing mulli-instrumenialisi 
and co-voralisu on “Late for : 
the Sky". 

Browne himself retains his 
personal trademarks — the 
same silky page-boy bob. the 
dean jeans and check shirt, 
the foggy warmth of his voice 
- and. although his subjects 
now include a critical view of 
his country's policy towards 
Central America, it was 
surprising that he should take 
public exception 10 Time 
Out's advance billing of him 
as “the king of yuppie rock". If 
he does not perceive some 
truth in that description then 
he fails to understand his own 
place in a world in which Top 
Gun is the average teenager's 
favourite movie and in which 
Rolling Stone, once the bible 
of the counterculture, runs 
recruiting advertisements for 
the US Marines. 

Richard Williams 


Theatre 



See Classifieds 
Donmnr Warehouse Theatre 


Request 
Programme 
Donmar Warehouse 


The modern theatre is often at 
its best in annexing areas of 
life hitherto regarded as un- 
drama tic. but the first im- 
pression of this piece is that 
Franz Xavier Kroetz has cho- 
sen an absolutely unworkable 
subject. The theme of Request 
Programme is loneliness, 
treated by the head-on method 
of presenting a character in 
solitude. 

Miss Quick, an envelopes 
supervisor in a paper-goods 
firm, returns to her bed-sit. 
eats a frugal meal to the 
accompaniment of her fav- 
ourite radio programme, does 
a bit of work on her rug and 
then goes to bed. As an 
afterthought, she then gets up 
and takes an overdose. What 
is there left to keep any play 
alive when it is reduced to the 
behaviour of a speechless 
animal in a cage? 

There are some things that 
make you query Judy Wald- 
man's translation. The radio 
show, for instance, is not a 
request programme. But. 
quibbles aside. Nancy Diu- 
guid's production develops 
into an extremely moving 
theatrical event, demonstrat- 
ing that Kroetz knows exactly 
what be is doing. 

In its own way. Miss 
Quick's ritual does have a 
plot. She returns with her 
usual round of solitary plea- 


sures to look forward to: food, 
music, creative work and a 
few pages of Dick Francis 
before putting the light out 
They have got her through 
countless identical evenings, 
and given her just enough to 
survive until the next day. 
This lime they let her down. 
The routine runs in parallel 
with a dearly shaped story 
turning on one new dement 
she finishes the rug. Every- 
thing builds up to that mo- 
ment and then declines as she 
realizes she has no further 
business in the world. It is the 
way things can happen. 

Eileen Nicholas is ab- 
solutely on the play's wave- 
length. Her performance also 
lets you know what she is tike 
at work: fast, meticulous, a 
stickler for order and hygiene. 
Hanging up her clothes, clean- 
ing the paintwork, visiting the 
outside lavatory with her pri- 
vate stock of cleaning materi- 
als, are all part of a deft, long- 
practised performance. Hence 
the power of those moments 
when the routine slips and she 
begins a solitary dance or 
catches a dismaying sight of 
her reflection in the mirror; or 
when she comes to rest, 
stroking the rug as if it were a 
creature that might respond. 

In the end. she lays out the 
pills in a nest line as if it were 
something she had done a 
thousand times; until, as befits 
a special occasion, she opens 
and spills a small boute of 
champagne. 

Irving Wardle 


Concert 


Philhannonia/ 
Sinopoli 
Festival Hall 


Last season the RPO played a 
Beethoven cyde under Dorati; 
now the LPO under Tennstedt 
and, with this concert, Giu- 
seppe Sinopoli and the 
Philharmonia are featuring 
Beethoven strongly in their 
programmes. It is becoming 
apparent that, although the 
symphony orchestras have 
greatly trimmed their ap- 
proach to Haydn and Mozart, 
they are determined to defend 
their pre-eminence in Beet- 
hoven. 

Actually the big orchestras 
have been bold enough re- 
cently to increase, not dimin- 
ish. their Beethoven sound. 
Eight or ten double basses, 
doubled woodwind, addi- 
tional brass: all these are back 
in fashion, and audiences are 
lapping it up. The evidence 
may suggest wholly different 
textures, but one should not 
underestimate the massive 
centrality of Beethoven's po- 
sition as a subtle psychological 
influence on us listeners, lead- 
ing us to expect a similarly 
massive orchestral sound and 
interpretative approach. 


In fact Sinopoli here was fry 
no means extreme in his 
numerical requirements; but 
then he has no need to be. 
when the strings are playing 
with such beefy, unanimous 
magnificence. One's appre- 
hension was that this current 
glory of the London orchestral 
garden was going to be ex- 
ploited for unworthy effects, 
and these fears were not 
allayed by Sinopoli's melo- 
dramatic treatment of the 
Coriolan Overture's opening. 

However, his handling of 
the Fdurth Symphony was, if 
too weighty to project the 
whiplash vigour of the outer 
movements, remarkably free 
of quirks and exaggerations. 
The discipline of the string 
playing in the finale was 
impressive; so, too, were some 
gorgeously floated woodwind 
solos in the Adagio. 

In the Violin Concerto 
Shlomo Mintz seemed deter- 
mined to make up in volume 
what his playing lacked in 
grace, cleanness and subtlety. 
His strength and technical 
expertise paid in the treble- 
stoppings of the Kreisfer 
cadenzas,- but elsewhere be 
displayed a rather casual 
approach. 

Richard Morrison 


An auction 
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the time. 

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Sotheby's Conduit Street Sales are devised to fit 
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Sunday viewings, with the sale on the foil owing 
Monday evening. 

You'll find many complete room settings of 
furniture, rugs, ceramics, silver and works erf art 
As few pieces, if any need restoration, they are 
ready to take home and enjoy Delivery is in- 
expensive and easily arranged on the spot. 

Visa or Access Cards are accepted. And as lots 
start from as little as £200, time won't be the only 
thing you can afford. 



VIEWING TIMES 

Thursday 2nd October . . 12 noon-8 pm 

Friday 3rd October 9 ara-5 pm 

Sunday 5th October 10 am -4 pm 

Monday 6th October 9 am -2 pm 


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thf TIMES WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 1 1986 


Botha to 
resign 

as leader 
in Cape 

Johannesburg (Reuter) — 
President Botha of South Af- 
rica said yesterday that be was 
stepping down as National 
Party (NP) leader m Cape 
Province. Political analysts 
said it could mark the start of 
bis withdrawal from politics. 

Meanwhile, the Appeal 
Court backed the Govern- 
ment yesterday by ruling that 
clauses, under the three- 
month-old State of Emer- 
gency, permitting mass 
detentions without trial were 
lawful. 

President Botha, aged 70, 
told an NP congress in the 
Eastern Cape that he would 
not stand again after 20 years 
as regional party leader. 

He will be replaced by Mr 
Chris Heunis. aged 59, the 
minister who drafted South 
Africa's cautious political 
reforms. 

Professor Alf Stadler. 
professor of politics at 
Johannesburg's Wirwaters- 
rand University, said Presi- 
dent Botha may be preparing 
to leave the political arena. 

“The current phase of the 
reform process which Presi- 
dent Botha has understood 
and pioneered has come to an 
end. There is not much glory 
left It is a good time to pull 
out." he said. 

Professor Stadier said Presi- 
dent Botha could also be 
trying to distance himseli 
from party affairs. Other an- 
alysts said he may be trying to 


ease his workload by shedding 
some responsibilities after 50 
years in politics. 

As one of four regional 
party leaders, Mr Heunis will 
now have a springboard for a 
bid to succeed President Bo- 
tha. should he resign as head 
of the National Party. 

Mr Heunis, Minister of 
Constitutional Planning and 
Development, is a close con- 
fidant of the President 

• WASHINGTON: Presi- 
dent Reagan yesterday nomi- 
nated Mr Edward Perkins, a 
career diplomat, to be 
America's first black ambas- 
sador to South Africa, in a 
move aimed at persuading the 
Senate to uphold his veto of a 
tough sanctions bilL 

Fa0 report, page 6 


Today’s events. 



Hopes hi gh: President Reagan, left, announces the October summit in Reykjavik and, right, accused Soviet spy, Gennady Zakharov, goes free. 


Gorbachov to meet Reagan 
in Iceland in nine days 


Royal engagements 

The Princess of Wales, Pa- 
tron. the National Hospitals for 
Nervous Diseases, visits the 
national Hopsital and opens the 
Harris Intensive Care Unit, 
National Hospital, Queen Sq- 
uare, WC1. 10.15. 

Princess Anne opens the new 
unit of L. & K. Fertilisers. 
Sharpness. Gloucestershire, 
2.30. 

Princess Margaret attends a 
lunch given by the Common- 
wealth Parliamentary Associ- 
ation. Royal Overseas League, 
Park Place. SWl, 12.45. 

The Duke of Gloucester, 
President, National Association 


Con tinned from page 1 
control of the escalating num- 
bers of nuclear weapons, and 
to do what it could to defuse 
the tensions that arose from 
regional problems and human 
rights issues. 

The Reykjavik meeting is 
itself unusual in that no prc- 
summii summit has ever been 
held before between Soviet 
and American leaders. 

The US Administration 
sees Soviet willingness to 
travel to a Nato country to 
speed up the preparations as 
indicative of Moscow's 
seriousness in wanting a 
productive and fully-prepared 
summit 

Mr Reagan has clearly 
changed his views also. Earlier 
this year, he flatly turned 
down a call by Mr Gorbachov 
for the two to meet in a neutral 
European country to discuss a 
joint moratorium on nuclear 
testing. 

• NEW YORK: Mr Eduard 
Shevardnadze, the Soviet For- 
eign Minister, yesterday de- 


of Boys’ Cubs visits St Athan’s 
Boys* Village. 11.45; and Boys 
Clubs in the Rhondda Valley, 
arrives George Town Boys* 
Club. 3.15. 

New exhibitions 

The Floor Show: Rugs and 
Wall Hangings by Leading Brit- 
ish Craftsmen; Mid-Pennine 
Arts Association, 2 Ham merlon 
Sl Burnley: Mon to Fri 9 to 5 
(ends Oct 31). 

The West Riding Manor: 900 
anniversary of the Domesday 
Book; City Museum, The 
Headrow, Leeds; Mon to Fri 10 
to 6. Wed 10 to 9. Sat 10 to 4. 
Sun 2 to 5 (ends Oct 31 ). 
Exhibitions in progress 

Richard Ross: museology 
photographs; John Hansard 1 


The Times Crossword Puzzle No 17,165 



This puzzle, used as a tie-breaker in the Birmingham regional final 

of the Collins Dictionaries Times Crossword Championship, was 

solved by the winner in 16 minutes. 

ACROSS 

1 The Army's domestic task 
force? (7-5). 

9 One male ideal that is not 
folly realized (9). 

10 Return a cycle to the sports 
ground (5). 

11 Rachel's little boy catching 
lake fish (6). 

12 No point knocking here — 
the tradesman’s entrance is 
free (4.4). 

13 Optical shutter (6). 

IS Mishit an error in these 

games (8). 

18 Inadequate parking - he's 
in the top storey (8). 

19 Don’t start to criticise the 
fire- water! (6). 

21 Short passage from satirist 
about a schoolboy (8). 

23 Left in peace, say, he is full 
oljoy (6). 

26 Provide food in battered 
crate (5). 

27 Silas in G & S version used 
to make jellies (9). 

28 Author’s contraction 
avoided in typing (7,5). 


7 Girl admits forged coin is a 
plant (8). 

8 Restaurant proprietor who 
might give someone a living 

. ( 6 ). 

14 The total number of sappers 
in existence (8). 

16 Church giri rings twice — a 
variation of telling the hours 
(9). 

17 1000 to one race is an error 

(8). 

18 With father, the beginning 
and end of charity is a re- 
ligious organisation (6). 

20 Lively party, where Mrs 
Brown was invited to 
dance? (5-2). 

22 He has the remedy for a 
smoker (5). 

24 In absentia, ranked as top 
band (5). 

25 This is the platform for 
departures, the porter said 
(4). 

Solution to Pvzzle No 17,164 


DOWN 

1 Easy to make crumble — can 
be cooked in fat? (7). 

2 Peg to hold opera hat (5). 

3 Diverse, oddly, about a 
French verbal adjective (9). 

4 Old wives’ kisses, say (4). 

5 Sort of betting before and 
after the event in Rome (4- 
4). 

6 School crocodile (5). 

Concise Crossword page 10 


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scribed the proposed meeting 
as an “interim summit" 
whose objective would' be to 
give direction to arms control 
negotiations (Zoriana 
Pysariwsky writes). 

The venue, he said, was 
deliberately chosen so that the 
two leaders could confer away 
from the public spotlight. 

At a press conference during 
which he made the summit 
announcement on behalf of 
the Soviet side, Mr Shevard- 
nadze said he hoped the 
meeting would produce a draft 
agreement for limiting the 
nuclear arms race. 

He expressed the view that 
the two sides had so far failed 
to make progress in the arms 
control talks but added that he 
was “opiomistic" over the 
prospects for finding common 
ground and the melting would 
provide the impetus for mov- 
ing forward in the nego- 
tiations. 

He too emphasised that the 
Reykjavik meeting should not 
be considered a substitute for 


a Mr Gorbachov's coming 
visit to the United States. 

Striking on a common 
theme throughout his two- 
week siay in the US. Mr 
Shevardnadze said the time 
was ripe to move the East- 
West dialogue away from the 
propaganda arena to the 
bargaining table. 

The Soviet minister at- 
tempted to diminish the effect 
the Daniloff affair had on 
East-West relations and said 
the tensions between the two 
sides had been the result of 
deadlock over nuclear arms 
control and President 
Reagan's strategic defensive 
initiative, otherwise know as 
“Star Wars". 

But he added that “now that 
a breach in the wall has been 
made through joint efforts, 
one can state that the agree- 
ment on a special summit has 
been reached thanks to the 
realism and constructive 
approach displayed by both 
sides." 


Sealink ferry crew 
stage protest sit-in 


Coatmned from page I 

season from Weymouth to 
Cherbourg. 

The joint service operated 
by the new company will offer 
a morning and an evening 
sailing from Portsmouth to 
the Channel Islands. 

Announcing its plans. Sea- 
link said it lost £1 1 million last 
year on its Channel Islands 
and Cherbourg services, and 
losses were expected to be 
over £5 million in 1986. 
Channel Island Ferries was 
expecting to lose about 
£300,000 this year. 

Mr Charies Lenox Con- 
yngham. chairman and chief 
executive of Sealink UK. said 
these losses were unaccept- 
able. The companies blamed 
their problems on com- 
petition from air travel. 

In its efforts to rationalize 
loss-making routes. Sealink 
has ceased to operate on its 
Dover-Dunkirk and Dover- 
Osiend routes, as well as 
Newhaven- Dieppe. It has also 


pooled its Irish Sea routes in a 
joint operation with the B&I 
Line, and is having talks with 
the National Union of Sea- 
men about ending its night 
Folkestone- Boulogne service. 

NEI redundancies, page 21 


Workmen find 
ancient bones 

The remains of a prehistoric 
mammoth and a deer, thought 
to be up to 50,000 years old. 
have been found by workmen 
in Shropshire. 

The bones were uncovered 
by a team of contractors 
testing for commercial gravel 
deposits at Condover. 

Million-tonne 
output at pit 

Ellington Colliery in 
Northumberland yesterday 
became the first pit in Britain 
to produce one million tonnes 
of coal this year. 


THE TIMES INFORMATION SERVICE 


Jery, 
: Mo 


sity. Mon to Sat 10 to 6 (ends 
Oct 25). 

Byam Shaw; A selection of 
paintings and book illustrations; 
Ashmolcan Museum, Oxford: 
Tues to Sat 10 to 4, Sun 2 to 6 
(ends Oct 26). 

Welsh landscapes: The Al- 
bany Gallery, 74b Albany Rd, 
Cardiff; Mon to Sat 10.30 to 
5.30 (ends Oct II). 

Twenty for Today; new por- 
trait photography; Octagon Gal- 
lery. National Centre of Pho- 
tography. The Octagon. Mi Isom 
Sl Battu Mon to Sat 9.30 to 5.30 
(ends Oct 25). 

Modem Glass: work by 
contemporary studio glass mak- 
ers: Towndey Half Art Gallery. 
Towneley HaU. Burnley; Mon to 
Fri 10 to 5.30. Sun 12 to 5 (ends 
Oct 5). 

Monsoon: work by Charles 
Garrard; Ikon Gallery, 58-72 
John Bright SL Birmingham; 
Tues to Sat 10 to 6 (ends Oct 4). 

Sue Arrowsmith: Egg of 
Night Jkon Gallery. 58-72 John 
Bright SL Birmingham; Tues to 
Sat 10 to 6 (ends Oct 4). 

Work by Bridget Riley, Mae- 
Laurin Art Gallery. Rozelle 
Park. Ayr, Mon to Sat 1 1 to 5. 
Sun 2 to 5 (ends Oct 1 1 ). 

Tapestries and paintings by 
Guy Banon: paintings by Pam- 
ela Izzard; Rugs, shawls and 
scarves by Celia Wright, Dora 
Collingwood Centenary: paint- 
ings and fabric collages by Mary 
Hills: Abbot Hall An Gallery 
and Museum of Lakeland Life 
and Industry. Kendal; Mon to 
Fri 10,30 to 5.30. Sat and Sun 2 
to 5 lends Nov 2). 

Last chance to see 

Primmakers Explore: the dif- 
ferent techniques of exploring a 
printed image: Gawthorpe Hall, 
Padiham. nr Burnley. 10 to S. 

Music 

Concert by the Bournemouth 
Symphony Orchestra; Guild- 
hall. Southampton. 8. 

Organ recital by Thomas 
Trailer Birmingham Town 
Hall. I. 

Organ recital by Anne 
Marsden-Thomas: Reading 
Town Hall. BlagraveSL 1-10- 

Organ recital by Ian Tracey; 
Mcanwood Parish Church. 
Leeds. 7.30. 

Concert by the Halle Or- 
chestra: Wolverhampton Civic 
Hall. 7.30. 

Concert by the Scottish Na- 
tional Orchestra Caird Hall, 
Dundee. 7.30 
Lecture 

Current approaches to pro- 
ducing energy’ by fusion, by Dr 
T.D. Bey non: Large Lecture 
Theatre. Physics Poynting 
Building. Birmingham Univer- 
sity. 11. 


New books — hardback 


Anthony Caro, by Terry Fenton (Thames & Hudson, £t5L50) 

Baudelaire. The Complete Verse, translated and introduced by Francis 
Scarfe (Anvil, E12S5. paperback £5.95) _ __ „ 

March or Ke. France and the Foreign Legion, by Tony Geraghty (Grafton, 
£10.95) 

RuHf 

The BesfYears" ofTheir DvesT Tlw’NationS Service Experience 1945-63, 
by Trevor Royta (Michael Joseph. £123)5) _ . . 

The Cambridge Handbook of American Literature, edited by Jack 
Saizman{C®nribridge,£15) . . _ 

The Okl School, by Simon Raven (Hamish Hamflton, £12) , 

The Self Imagined. Philosophical Reflections, on the Socod Character of 
' - Karen Hanson (Routtedge & Kagan Paul, £11.95) _ ^ 

I Business, by John Houseman (Chatto & Wmdus, £1495] PH 


Roads 


The Midlands: MI: Contra- 
flow continues at junction 20 
(A427 Lutterworth). Ml: Con- 
traflow between exits 27 (A608) 
and 28 (A38) SW of Mansfield. 
M5: Single line traffic north- 
bound between junctions 5 (A38 
Droilwich) and 4 (A38 (Bro ms- 
grove). from 9.30 am to 330 
pm. 

Wales and West: M4: Contra- 
flow between junctions 16 and 
17 (Swindon/Cirencester). M5: 
Nearside and centre lanes closed 
between junctions II and 12 
(Gloucestershire). A30: Contra- 
flow between Exeter and 
Okehampton at Whiddon 
Down. 

The North: M6: Various lane 
and slip road closures at junc- 
tion 37 on the N and south- 
bound carriageways. M63: Ma- 
jor widening scheme at Barton 
Bridge. Greater Manchester. 
M61: Construction of new 
motorway link at Walton Sum- 
miL Greater Manchester; lane 
closures N and southbound. 

Scotland: A92/A987: Various 
restrictions between King Stand 
Si Macher Drive. Aberdeen. 
A74: Roadworks on London 
Rd, Glasgow, at Mount Vernon 
Ave: various width restrictions. 
Edinburgh: ■ Sewer constrUctin 
with temporary traffic lights in 
Bonnington Rd at Tennant Sl 


Anniversaries 


Births: Henry EH, 

1216-72, Winchester. 1207; 
Giacomo da Vignola, architect, 
Vignola, Italy. 1507; Annie Bes- 
ant, social reformer, pioneer of 
theosophy, London, 1847; Panl 
Dukas, composer, Paris. 1865. 

Deaths: Pierre Corneille. 
Paris. 1684; Sr Edwin Land- 
seer. London, 1875; Anthony 
Ashley Cooper, 7 th Earl of 
Shaftesbury, social reformer, 
Folkestone. 1885: Gregorio 
Martinez Sima, poet and play- 
wright, Madrid, 1947; 
LS. Leakey, anthropologist. 
London, 1972. 


Christmas mail 


Today is the last recom- 
mended posting date for Christ- 
mas surface mail to Australia. 
New Zealand and many other 
countries. Latest recommended 
dates for surface mail are fixed 
by the Post Office after taking 
account of available shipping 
and discussions with overseas 
administrations. 

A special leaflet, Christmas 
Mail 1986. giving details of 
latest recommended posting 
dates for Christmas mail by air 
and surface, is now available 
free of charge from post offices. 


6 am to midnight 



Sun rises: 
7.01 am 


Sun sots: 
6-39 pm 


3.43 am 
Now moon: October 3 


6.10 pm 


Lighting-op time 

London 7.09 pm to 6-32 on 
Bristol 7.19 pm to 6.42 am 
B ftihidi 7.19 pm to 6.47 am 
Manchester 7.17 pm to 6.42 am 
Pe n a nce 7-3i pm to 653 am 


New Datapost route 


Da la post, the Royal Mail's 
international courier service, 
extended its global network 
vesterday to include Mali and 
Swaziland to its African routes. 

Goods and documents may 
now be sent to 13 African 
countries with faster delivery 
limes to European addresses. 

Inland Datapost now guar- 
antees overnight delivery- to 
more than two-thirds or the 
united kingdom by 10 am the 
following morning, the rest by 

noon. 


Tower Bridge 


Tower Bridge will be raised 
today at 10.30 am. 3.30 pm and 
6 pm 



Times Portfolio Gold rules are as 

fOUOWS: 

1 nmra Pori/ollo Is Ire*. Purchase 
of The Times ts not a condition of 
lahirra part. 

2 Times Portfolio list compr is es a 
group of public companies whose 
shares are listed on Hie Stock 
Exchange and Quoted In The Times 
Stock exchange prices pane. The 
companies comprtsUM Dial mi win 
cnanor from day to daw. The list 
iwlucti is numbered 1 -44] Is divided 
into four randomly distributed groups 
of 11 shares. Every Portfolio card 
contains two numbers from each 

group and each card contains a 

unique set of numbers. 

3 Times portfolio -dividend' will be 
the figure in pence which represents 
the optimum movement in prices ft-e. 
the largest increase or lowed loss! of a 
combination of eight itwo from each 
randomly dlsti Hjui edgrou p wuiun me 
44 shares) of Hie 44 shares which on 
any one day comprise The Times 
Portfolio list. 


dividend will i* announced 

Saturday in The Times. 

5 Times Portfolio list and details .or 
the daily or weekly dividend win also 
be available lor inspection at (he 
offices of The Times 

6 If the overall pner movement Of 
more than one combination of shares 
equals the dividend, the prize wtu be 
equally divided among the claimants 
holding those combinations of shares. 


8 Employees or News international 
pk- and iis subsidiaries and of 
Europrinl Croup Limited (producers 
and distributor* or me card! or 
members of Iheir immediate families 
are not allowed to play Times 
Portfolio. 

iruclbanls will be 

. on “how 

•' whether 

- _ In Times 

ifouo rcifds will be deemed to be 

nan of llwsa Rules. The Editor 
rewrvei me ngni la amcna the Rules. 
IO In am dbpule. The Editor's 

derision is final and no egrrespon- 

dnwe will he entered into 


li If for any reason The Times 
Prices Page sa not published to ine 
normal way Times Portfolio win be 
suspended for that day. 

H am fa play - Da*y DMdemf 

On each cuyyour unique set Of ddil 
numbers wflf represent commensal 


and Industrial shares published ta The 

Times Portfolio list which wth appear 

on me Slock Exchange Prices page. 

It the columns ^provided next lo 
your shares noie the price change i+ 
or -). in pence, as pubuaned m Dial 
day's Tiroes. 

After listing the price changes of 
your right shares for Inal day. add up 
an right share changes to ghe you 
your overall total plus or minus (+ or ■ 
L 

Ghee* your overall fatal against The 
Times Portfolio dividend published an 
the Stock Exchange Prices page. 

If your overall total matches The 
Times Portfolio dividend you have 
won ourrtghl or a share of me total 
prize money staled for Dial day and 
must claim your Prize as instructed 
below. 

Monday -ieturSay 
Portfolio total. 

Add these togrtner to d e term in e 
your weekly Portfolio total. 

tf your total matches the published 


Tel epho ne Tin Trines P orPoPo chtau 
bwo oase-sm? buea eu I about and 
MMHHteBlB Out voter erereW total 


You must nave your cam wttn you 
when you letephonc. 
if you are unable to telephone 

someone etse can claim on your behalf 

but they- must have your card and can 
The Times Portfolio claim line 
between tbe stipulated times. 

No resoonsUMlity ran be 

for failure to contact toe cl ai ms 

lor any reason wiuun the slated 
hours 

The above inslruetMm are ap- 
plicable lo both aalty and weekly 
dividend nauns. 


Yesterday 


The pound 


Bank 


AuatrSsch 
BatgUtm Ft 


hBUKVS pi 

Raff lira 
Japan Yu 

Kr 


i Africa ltd 

itMKtenKr 


YMjnsiniln fTnr 


21.55 

6335 

Z(J7 

TfJB 

7.54 

9-95 

105S 

202-00 

11257 

1.12 

2115.00 

23SXQ 

3M 

11.16 

220.00 

400 

788.75 

10.40 

2485 

1X1 

75000 



Weather 

forecast 

A ridge of high pressure 
will persist over southern 
areas. A cold front will 
more slowly southwards 
over northern areas. 


London, SE, central S, E, SW, 
NW, contra! N, NE England. East 
AndBa, IKteflands, Channel biands, 
Wafat Dry, misty or foggy morning, 
stowiy becoming brighter with a Mae 
sunshine in places; wind SE fight; 
max temp 18C (64R. 

Lake District, Mo of Man, Bor- 
ders, E dinb ur gh , Dundee, SW 
Scotland: Misty or foggy start, 
some rain or drizzle spreaomg from 
the N; wind S light becoming 
moderate; max temp 17C (63F). 

Aberdeen, Glasgow, Central 
Highlands, Moray Ftrth, Argyll, 
Northern Ireland: Outbreaks of rain, 
becoming drier and brighter later; 
wind SW moderate; max temp 16C 
(61 FI 

HE, NW Scotland, Orkney, Shet- 
land: Rain at first then sunny 
intervals and isolated sho wers ; 
wind SW fresh; max temp 14C (57FJ. 

Outlook tor tomorrow and Friday: 
Rather doudy. Dry in the SE at first 
but occasional drizzte spreading 
from the N. Sunny intervals ana 
showers spreedteg into northern 
areas. Temperatures near normal 
but becoming cooler on Friday. 


Windbagging 
the party’s good; 


Before he rose lo make his 
big speech to the Labour 
conference yesterday, it had 

become the" fashion in the 
newspapers to say that Mr 
K innock was more than, or 
not just, a “Welsh wmdoag. 
These know-alls, who set 
themselves up as the arbiters 
of the sport, had begun to 
write him off. and to question 
ihe judgement of the \>chn 
selectors who first chose him 
as an MP in 1971). 

Wdl. yesterday Mr Kin- 
nock wind tagged for Wales 
once more against England. 
And within minutes, the hoy 
was showing hts class. In the 
space of one hour’s play, he 
mentioned breast cancer, kid- 
ney dialvsis. apartheid, the 
wrong the Americans were 
allegedly doing in Nicaragua. 
Mr Mandela. Bishop Tutu, 
the laic Olaf Palme, okl 
ladies, world hunger, people 
who tell him they “calf t get 
our mam into hospital." any 
other mam to whom any- 
thing unpleasant was happen- 
ing. morality, the deficiencies 
olthe England captain, Mrs 
Thatcher (many times), and 
above all the England Sup- 
porters’ Club (ihe so-called 
Conservative Party). 

Here is an example of the 
sort of play that took Neil to 
the top in the first place, and 
on the strength of yesterday's 
form, will keep him there: 
“There arc in this country 
great reservoirs of injustice 
and impatience built up by 
the years of Thatcherism. I 
know that You know that. 
We can empty those res- 
ervoirs by deliberate and 
persistent policies and 
effort .. . 

Also: "... in our One 
World the dangers know no 
boundaries. Famine spreads 
like a contagion. The poisons 
of pollution spread in the 
winds and the tides. Terror- 
ism and warfare impose the 
rule of fear on millions . . 

The English, slumped in 
front of their evening tele- 
vision news bulletins last 
night, did not stand a chance. 

They were overwhelmed 
by the Welsh attack. The 
troth is that they will never be 
able to equal Wales in this 
game until windbaggery in 
England ceases to be mainly 


the preserve of the 
•ithooKand aptayedifcSMie 
vchoviH av m Wales. * ^ . 

Mr Kinnock brought a* 
match to ettmax * 
passage explaining 
fence policy and entitag *] 
vrt>utdd*e tor my coarary.bct 
I w ould not allow my country 
to die for me." 

Tim. was perhaps Mr 
Km nock's only direct ref- 
erence to Wales m the entire 
game. But no one reofly knew 
what the phrase mtm. it 
sounded impressive, 
which after all is 
this great sport « aff 

The fans gave him a Hunt- 
ing ovation of the kind more 
usually associated with the 
speech of a Conservative 
leader in a conference. 

This wa S a triumph for 
those Labour advisers to Mr 
Kinnock who are frying to 
make the Labour conference 
as much like the Twy con- 
ference as pussihle. This wil) 
not last, for reasons which 
will become apparent H the 
week goes on. 1 

But for the time being, Mr 
Ktnnock beamed as the 
cheers rang around him. Only 
the dedicated anii-Kmnock 
left remained sullen. 

Mr Eric HcITcr. who last 
vear staged an "angry walk- 
out" from the platform dur- 
ing Mr Kmnock's speech, this 
vear staged an angry sit-down 
during the (nation. 

Earlier, he had learnt that 
pro-Kinnock and right wing 
forces had voted him oiT the 
national executive. Mr 
Kinnock's offer to die. for 
whatever country, was the 
only bright spot in Mr 
Heffer's day. 

As the ovation continued, 
the crowd broke into a sons, 
to the tunc of a Sousa march, 
favoured by supporters of the 
rival sport of soccer, as wdl 
as by the picketing miners: 

car n r yii ear nv go ear we 

car \\ v go car n v go tar we 

IfO-p/f 

(Arr. Scargint. 

Fortunately for the cause of 
Labour moderation, the tele- 
vision picture moved out oi 
the hall thus avoiding cover- 
age of the first party political 
soccer riot on behalf of the 
Labour Parly. 



► -..'I. I • 




b-Mup sky: bc-Mue iky and cloud: c- 
cloudy: poiwrasi: flog: rf-drizzle: h- 
haU: mW-miai: r-ratn: 5 - snow; Uv 
thunderstorm: p-showerv 
Arrows show wind direction, wind 
speed imph) circled. Temperature 
centigrade. 


10.58 
94S 
528 
5.17 

LoWi 1.43 

Liverpool 1038 

Lowestoft 8.16 

Margata 1106 

MHtonl Hawn 5.3* 
Newquay 4J28 

Oban 529 

Pe nza n ce 351 

Portland 6.12 

Portsmouth 10.50 

Shoraham 10.33 

Southampton 1029 
Swanaea 581 

Tees £40 

Wfton-an-NM 10.58 
TWo measured m 


HT PH Hi- 
fi 0 1.10 01 

3.8 1253 3| 
10.9 636 11.0 

3.0 1028 33 

mi B 2 i ipi 

4.7 501 5.0 

6.0 10-32 8.0 
4 5 4-31 

1228 4.1 
57 1123 4.0 

4.9 937 53 

6.4 6.M M 

72 521 M 

4.8 210 42 

8.4 10S! 38 

22 930 23 

4.3 11-42 

6.0 5.48 

6.1 4AT 

3.4 528 

4.7 4.0* - 

12 6 .14- 2.1 
48 11.08 . *-3 

5.6 10^7 57 

4.1 1025 -4.1 

8.1 545 .3? 

4.8 3.13 

3.7 1127 


64 

34 

37 

51 


48- 

48 


metres: 1 m»32W 8 H - 


Around Britain 


TemperaMBs a midday yesterday: c. 
cfcxxt (am r. rail: a, sun. 

C F C F 

Belfast s 1864 Gosmsey a 1457 
B'rrogtiam c 1254 Inverness 1 1864 
Btadqpool 8 1559 Jersey s 1763 
Bristol c 1355 London c 1457 
Cwdtl c 1254 RTnchStor c 1559 
Edmburah s 1966 Newcastle a 21 70 
Ofnsgoir a 1763 R*nMswy d 1254 


Sun Rain 

EAST COAST ^ ^ 
Scutum 9JS 
MMngton 98 
Cromw 8.0 
Lowestoft 6.0 
OactoB 12 

^nfcO AST * 

FWkestsne 

Haattnga 

Eastboome . .01 
- .01 


Worthing 


BognorR 

Soutbaee 


0.1 

0.1 

1.8 


Max 
C F 

23 73 Bunny 
22 72 sunny 
19 68 aunty 
21 70 sunny 
17 S3 doudy 
16 61 (Ml 

16 61 cloudy 

15 59 dull 

16 61 dufl 

14 57 dul 

15 59 dufl 
15 59 dufl 

15 59 dun 

16 61 doudy 


Sun Rain 
hrs in 

Bf fc acomlw x .02 
Tenby 62 .01 

Coivnm Bey x .01 

■uuuLniwa ■ ■ 

DouglH 2 £ - 

ENQLAMO AND WALES 
London (L3 
BTtam AIrpt 

Bristol 

Canfifl 


Max 
C F 
16 61 
16 ®1 
16 61 
15 59 
18 64 


AnnfnMy 

B-podAJrpt 


Shankfin 
Bourne mtti 


Bank 
Sals 
2255 
2035 
60-35 
1^8 
1083 
7.04 
94S 
2AS5 
I9a00 
11 .07 
1JH 
199500 
221X0 
226 
1035 
20S. DO 
340 
T88.75 
9X5 
2X45 
144 
860X0 


5.9 
52 

Swarage 5.6 
W eymo ut h 0.3 
Exmouth 3.0 

TeteMWMdi 30 
Torquay 3.4 

Falmouth 


Jersey 


Guernsey 
WEST COAST 



21 

0.1 .01 
0.1 
2.1 
0.4 
7X 

NWOrTyne 72 
CariMe 02 

SCOTLAND 


Sc«y tales 
Newq u ey 


84 

72 


17 63 sunny 

18 64 autny 

These am Monday's Oganes 


02 .14 
1.4 

02 .02 

1.8 20 

02 .14 

25 .11 

0.1 .11 

4.9 .05 

Aberdeen 6.6 - 

SL Andrews 8.9 - 

Etflabtsgh 02 - 

N0R7WRN IRELAND 
5.1 


Prestwick 

Glasgow 

Thee 

S torn ow a y 

Lerwick 

Wick 


18 64 

19 68 

14 57 

15 59 

16 81 
17 63 
21 70 

19 86 
17 83 

15 59 
17 63 

17 63 
15 58 
15 59 
12 54 
14 57 

18 68 
21 70 

20 68 
17 63 


sunny 

sunny 

S T 

sunny' 

3# 

drtajs- 

drtxtfe 

driEria. 

surety 

Ceoaaf 

drizzle 

ongM 

doudy 

26* 

ram 

rain . 
dw idy 
sunny 
sunny, 
drtzw 


- 20 58 vaaat 


Abroad 


MIDDAYs c. cloud, d. dnz*: t. lain Ig. tog: r. rain: a. sun; an. anow; i, ttiundor- 


Aieccto I 
Alirotiri s 
Ahufdrta c 
Algiers c 
Amsfdra c 
Athens < 
s 


Rates tor ama8 denonthtatton bank notes 
only as supplied by Barclays Bank PLC. 

Drnerent rates apply to travellers' 

cheques and other foreign currency 
txidness. 

Rets* Price Index: 385X 

7hn FT index dosed up M4 at 


CrriAIC^ NtWSPAPCTtS UMrrED. 

W 8 a PnniM t»v London Pmi 1 Print- 
rrsi Ltmlinj of 1 Virginia SlrrtH. 
London El 9XN and b\- News 
SroUaTu Ltd. 124 Port man Strm. 
K mn me; Park. Olasgow G4I 1EJ. 
Wnlimdn. October 1 . 1986 Rh 

uinred as a newsNpnr at ihe Post 

Olfirc 


Bariwdf 
Baicslnn f 
Beirut 

s 
s 

Bermuda' c 
Biarritz s 
BMde*x s 
BouTne C 
BniaaeU c 
Budapst a 
B Aires* b 
C airo c 
Cape To s 
(rtrianca s 
Chicago' r 
Cft’churdi f 


C F 

27 81 Cologne 
29 84 Cphagn 

28 82 Corfu 
19 66 Dublin 


C F 
I 18 64 
t 16 51 

S 27 81 

9 17 83 Metb’me 


14 57 Dubrovnik s 24 75 Mexico C~ 


26 79 Faro 
38 97 Florence 
Frankfurt 
23 73 Fincbai 


15 58 HateMd 
26 79 Hong K 
IB 64 Inmfarck 
20 68 tatanbd 

15 58 Jeddah 

16 61 Jo’burg* 
20 68 Kareere 
22 72 LPamna 
31 88 Liaeon 

20 68 Locarno 
22 72 LAngds* 
22 72 LuMffibg 
16 61 Madrid 


a 25 77 Miami' 

9 25 77 MBan 
I 19 88 Montour 
a 23 73 Mos co w 
8 17 63 Munich 
s 22 72 Nairobi 
c 8 46 Naples 
e 27 81 N DaM 
5 18 64 NYorir 
f 19 66 Me* 
s 35 85 Oato 
e 13 S5 Paris 

flahlinx" 

e 26 79 Perth 
a 23 73 Prague 
3 2D 68 Reykjvik 
s 20 68 Rhodes 
[ 18 64 RtodeJ 
3 21 70 ttyatei 


C F 

r 20 68 Rome 
9 26 79 SatadMiB 
1 26 79 S Prisoo* 
a 19 66 Santiago* 
f 23 73 SPtoSF 
I 31 68 Seoul 
a 23 73 Sntfpor 
h 16 61 SrBubn 
c 7 45 S t raah Tg 
a 17 63 S yiS u e y 
f 26 79 TanMer 
S 27 81 TehwM 
e 26 79 Tenerife 
C 24 75 Tokyo 
a 25 77 Toronto* 
i S481tat»a 
I 18 64 Valencia 
3 25 77 VMit*V4f* 
1 17 63 yantee 
8 17 in Vneme- 
c 7' 49 Warsaw ' 
s 27 81 WsahW 
c 21 70 WaiTitoa 
s 38100 Zunch 


C F 
■ 19 66 
f 18 64 

c T ? S 
t -at n 

:il 

Sit 

i '26 79 
f 21 70 

e 22 78 


aenotea Monday s figures are Imam tvaiWte 


* «*»■ V 

|f-E 




peclinr- hi 

jjpu'H"' 1 ’ 

surpl 11 " 


k IVnuuiii 


t ip 


: 


Ini ti| 4 , 


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MTM ,,.v 


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business and finance 


« Mr 
t rel- 
»*nijr 0 

*«U C h 

«'U|. 


STOCK Market 

FT 30 Share 
1227.0 (+14.4) 
FT-SE 100 
1555.8 (+16.6) 

Bargains 

20720 

USM (Datastream) 
121.91 (-0.45) 

THE POUND 


US Dollar 
1.4470 (+0.013) 

W German mark 

2.9331 (+0.029) 

Trade- weighted 
69.0 (+0.8) 


Decline in 
Japanese 
surplus 

Tokyo (AP-Dow Jones) — 
Japan posted an unadjusted 
current account surplus of 
$7,054 billion (£4.9 bUIion) in 
August, down from a record 
$8,026 billion surplus the 
previous month, the. Finance 
Ministry announced here. 

The August surplus, how- 
ever. was sharply higher than 
the $3,494 billion surplus a 
year earlier. 

Acquisition 
by Penguin 

Pearson has announced that 
Penguin Publishing has agreed 
in principle to acquire the 
New American Library from a 
group of investors ied by 
Odyssey Partners and NAL 
Management, No price was 
announced, 

A Penguin spokesman said 
that the combination of NAL 
and Penguin should result in 
significant benefits for the new 
grouping, which would com- 
pete more effectively in an 
increased international pub- 
lishing industry. 

Davidson up 

• Davidson Pearce Group, 
the advertising agency, in- 
creased pretax profits from 
£1.14 million toll JO million 
in the first half of this year, on 
billings up from £37.7 million 
to £40.05 million. The com- 
pany is paying an interim 
dividend of 1.2p, 

Tempos, page 24 

Bank deal 

Marine Midland Banks Inc 
has signed a definitive agree- 
ment for the proposed ac- 
quisition of First Penn- 
sylvania Corp for at least $585 
million (£403.4 *million)cash, 
to take place within a year of 
interstate banking between the 
two states becoming permis- 
sible, probably after March 4. 
1990. 

American buy 

Millward Brown, the U5M- 
quoted market research com- 
pany, has agreed in principle to 
acquire Ad Factors Inc, an 
American market res earch 
agenev with one of the largest 
LIS telephone interviewing 
facilities. Ad Factors’ revenue 
for the vear ended in February 
totalled’ $5.7 million (£3.9 
million). Clients include 
McDonald’s. Proctor* Gam- 
ble. Amoco and Pizza Hul 

MTM offer 

Marlborough Technical 
Management is selling 
6.513.636 ordinary shares of 
5p each at tlOp per share via 
an offer by Hill Samuel 


Germany stages 
operation to 
support pound 

From Bailey Morris and David Smith, Washington 


The Chancellor, Mr Nigel 
Lawson, said yesterday that 
the decision by West Ger- 
many to help support the 
pound did not mean that 
Britain was to join the Euro- 
pean Monetary System. 

The support operation for 
the pound by the Bundesbank, 
Germany’s central bank, and 
by the Bank of England, 
helped the pound yesterday 
and eased slightly the pressure 
for a politically embarrassing 
rise in base rate. 

The Bundesbank has not 
helped in a rescue operation 
since the 1960s. 

Mr Lawson said:“I under- 
stand that Bundesbank did 
intervene in support of the 
pound to a modest extern, but 
to coin a phrase, we have no 
intention of joining the ex- 
change rate mechanism 
today.” 

He said later that Britain’s 
policy on the European Mone- 
tary System remained that 
sterling would only be taken 
into the exchange rate mecha- 
nism when the time is right 

However. Mr Lawson is 
likely to use the experience of 
the past few days in the 
market he is pressing the case 
for EMS membership in dis- 


cussions with Mrs Thatcher. 

The Prime Minister has 
rejected full British member- 
ship in the EEC currency link 
because it would limit the 
room for manoeuvre in pol- 
icy. notably in the pre-election 
period. 

But the pound's recent 
sharp fall has demonstrated 
that unpopular interest rate 
increase still has to be faced 
when the pound is floating 
free. 

Indeed, the success of 
yesterday's Central Bank life- 






Nigel Lawson: 
out EMS mem! 


boat lor sterling suggests pres- 
sure for higher rate could have 
been avoided in the EMS. 

Mr Lawson was optimistic 
in his assessment of Britain's 
economic prospects. 

In his speech to the plenary 
session of the IMF annual 
meeting, he conceded that 
growth this year was likely to 
turn out less than was forecast 
in the March Budget but that 
next year would turn out 
stronger. 

'The pause has come to an 
end, growth is resuming, in- 
deed accelerating.” he said. T 
think we will see stronger 
growth in 1987.” 

He said that inflation, 
which was at present at about 
3-25 per cent, after stripping- 
out die effects of mortgage rate 
changes, would remain at tins 
rate for some time. 

He said: "Given the contin- 
ued pursuii of policies of 
sound money, low inflation 
can be sustained and even- 
tually eliminated altogether.” 

But the Chancellor, in a 
press conference, refused to be 
drawn on prospects for in- 
terest rates for Britain’s 
deterioriating trade balance. 
“I never make an interest rate 
forecast,” he said. 


... ■ . «. •*' »,,.i 








fis£ '«* i 


Places in the sun: Mr Paul Brett, Thomson's managing director, with the new brochure. (Photograph: Leslie Lee). 

Thomson pegs holiday prices 


Pressure eases on pound 


By Rodney Lord, Economics Editor 


Pressure on interest rates 
I and the pound eased yesterday 
as the conviction grew that an 
informal agreement on ex- 
change rate management had 
after all been reached at the 
weekend between finance 
ministers of the Group of Five 
major countries. But a rise in 
interest rates was still thought 
on balance to be likely. 

The evidence of co- 
ordinated management of the 
exchange markets came 
mainly from the actions of the 
West German - central 
tankwhich for the second 
time in. two days intervened in 
support of the dollar. Yes- 
terday it also intervened in 
support of the pound, as did 


the Bank of England. 

Sterling showed a much 
firmer trend with the trade- 
weighted index dosing at 69 
compared with the previous 
dose of 68.Z It was firmer not 
only against the mark at 
DM2.9352, up 2.19 pfennigs, 
but also against the dollar 
where it dosed 1.47 cents 
firmer at $1.4477. 

Money market rates eased 
as sterling strengthened and 
three-month money in the 
interbank market closed at 10 
7/8 per cent compared with 
1 1 K percent at the previous 
close. This, however, was still 
enough to indicate a rise 
above the present bank base 
rates of 10 percent. The Bank 


of England left its own dealing 
rates in the market un- 
changed. indicating its contin- 
ued resistance to a rise. 

Mr Giles Keating, econo- 
mist with Credit Suisse First 
Boston, said: 'The news of the 
Bundesbank's intervention in 
support of the pound makes it 
more likely that the Govern- 
ment will be able to resist an 
increase in interest rates.” 

The stock market also re- 
acted favourably to the re- 
duced pressure on interest 
rates with the Hnaadal Times 
30 Share Index dosing. 14.4 
higher at 1227.0. Gilts rose by 
up to 2Vz points in the long- 
dated stocks and 1 V* points in 
the shorts. 


IMF talks US trade deficit falls 
continue to four-month low 
on Mexico _ ... 


Co News 22 

Comment " 
Stock Market 23 
Money Mrkts 23 
FonrtBDjExdi 23 
Traded Opts 23 


33SU » 

Shan; Prices 25 
UnkTrasts 26 
Commodities 26 
USM Prices 


From Bailey Morris and 
David Smith m Washington 

Negotiations continued yes- 
terday at the International 
Monetary Fund meeting .on a 
$6 billion (£4.1 . billion) 
commercial bank loan pack- 
age for Mexico, after a dead- 
line imposed by the IMF for 
agreement had passed. 

Participants in the talks said 
that progress had been made. 

The IMF set a deadline of 
midnight on Monday for 
Mexico's commercial bank 
creditors to agree on $6 billion 
of new lending. This is in- 
tended to form part of an 
overall $12 billion loan pack- 
age for Mexico. $1.6 billion of 
which would be provided by 
the IMF. 

Seiior Angel Gunia, Mex- 
ico's chief negotiator, said that 
the decision had been taken to 
“stop the clock” and continue 
talking because progress had 
been made, although he de- 
nied that agreement in princi- 
ple had been reached on 
Monday. 

The sucking point between 
the tanks’ advtsoiy commit- 
tee. which includes Sir Jeremy 
Morse, the chairman of 
Lloyds Bank, remains on the 
margin over London Euro- 
currency deposit rates 


The US monthly foreign 
trade deficit fell in August to 
$1332 billion (£935 Wlion), 
the lowest in four months, 
after a revised record shortfall 
in July of $16.05 billion, the 
Commerce Depvtment an- 
nounced yesterday. 

But the department also 
said that its index of leading 
indicators — a measure of 
overall economic strength — 
declined last month by 0.2 per 
cent after rising by a revised 
1.0 per cent in July. 

The department originally 
reported that the July deficit 
was $18.04 billioiL But yes- 
terday it revised the figure 
down to $16.05 billion— still a 
record. 

The deficit in merchandise 
trade was small ear than antici- 
pated by economic analysts, 
many of whom had given -a 
warning of a large deficit 
which would put added pres- 
sure on the dollar. 

The latest US economic 
figures were released as world 
tankers and finance ministers 
held the annual meetings in 
Washington of the Lnter- 
aationaT Monetary Fund and 
the World Bank. 

Growing attention had fo- 
cused on the trade deficit, with 
Reagan Administration of- 
ficials' citing it as a reason for 


trying to lower the value of the 
dollar. 

-The United States is bead- 
ing toward a record trade 
deficit of about $170 billion 
this year. 

During the first eight 
months of the current year the 
deficit totalled $1 1538 billion 
compared with $91.78 billion 
in the .comparable 1985 pe- 
riod. 

The improvement in the 
August deficit reflected a 13 J 
per cent drop in imports to 
$30.93 billion, while exports 
dropped less than I per cent to 
$17.6 billion. 

A sharp foil in . imported 
motor vehicles, including a 
27.4 per cent drop in Japanese 
car imports, contributed 
mainly to the improved trade 
performance last month. 

: The August 02 per cent fall 
in the leading indicators index 
— which measures a wide 
variety of business activity — 
and an identical 02 per cent 
fall in June was the largest 
decline in the index this year. 

Six of the II indicators fell 
last month from July levels, 
with one of the largest declines 
occurring in prices of raw 
materials after government 
subsidies were reduced, the 
Commerce -Department 
noted. 


market summary 


STOCK MARKETS MAIN PRICE CHANGES 


Dow Jones 1772.78 (+1758)* 

BSSdow ..... 17852.86 (-253.46) 

S£££m<* 

Ste=3«fiSS 

lEfSneral 516.00 (sama) 

London closing prices Pago 25 

INTEREST RATES 

Londom 

fSonm 

■pnonth eligible biUsriO- .*-10* ir* 
buying rate 

Pnme Bata 7 Vs®'* 

Federal Funds M * R s ,g%- 


RISES: 

Hawker SkJdetey — 

GKN — 

Federated Housing _ 

Costain Group 

porter Chadbum — 
Conroy Petroleum _ 
British Aerospace .... 

Amstrad 

Pnwtwich Hkigs 

Somalia 

Dixons Group 

Ward White Group — 

Amersftam IntnL 

Burmah Oil 

i.c. Gas — 

Trafalgar House 

Ultramar 

Hambros 

Memcom Irrtnt. 

Real Time 


. 433p(+10p) 
. 252p (+14pj 
, 106p (+10p) 

■ 506p +14p 
,325p(+17p 
. 178p(+10pj 
-44Qp(+9p) 
_l3GpM 
- I04p(+8p) 
. 133p (+10p) 
33Ap (+10p) 
_ 340p (+8p) 


5,800 jobs to go in 
NET restructuring 


_236p(+8p 


FALLS: „ . - . 

Northern Eng. — - 80p l-Sp) 


GOLD 




CURRENCIES 


Londom _ 
£‘51.4470 
DM2.9331 
C. Swf f2 3810 
L FFr96095 
E- Y en223.20 
D*. index 69 0 


NewVorfc 

£: SI .4470 
$: DM2.0270* 
5. Index: 1102 

ECU £0.712521 

SOR £0.841447 


London FWng: 

SUSBEttf*. 00- 

292.75) 

cSli < W25.0&425.55' 


NORTH SEA OIL 


Brent (Oct 

-Denotes 


Northern Engineering In- 
dustries, manufacturers of 
electrical and ' mechanical 
equipment for the power and 
communications industries, 
stunned the City yesterday by 
announcing a restructuring 
programme costing £75 mil- 
lion this year. 

The company also an- 
nounced taxable profits in the . 
six months to June 30 of £10.6 
million against £21.5 million 
In the previous first half. The 
interim dividend has, however, 
been maintained at 1.65p net 

The restructuring, which in- 
volves the loss of ft total of 
5.800 jobs this year and next, 
was the resalt of a three- 
month review by the new 
chairman, Mr Terry Harrison. 

NEFs profits have been flat 
for several years and the re- 
organization is designed to put 
the company on a lower cost 
base to enable the core busi- 
nesses to Increase efficiency in 
an increasingly competitive 
world. 


By Alison Eadie 


The company said that the 
continuing delays in the im- 
iteeitation of a firm order- 
ing programme for British 
power stations and to a lesser 
extent the deferral of the 
upgrading of the national grid 
would lead to a downturn in. 
British . manufacturing 

Other problems have been 
severe trading losses in the 
United States on businesses 
which are now up for sale, the 


South African earnings, 
increasing Interest costs be- 
cause of the financing of, 
overseas projects and the 
continuing costs of nMhnming ; 
down British manafartm - iitg | 

NEI said that, although ! 
results would be poor this j 
year, the order intake in the ! 
first half at nearly £360 mil- I 
lkm was encouraging despite 
the absence of major contracts, 
and net orders were standing 
at £900 million. 

Tempos, page 24 


The package holiday prices 
battle, which produced bar- 
gains attracting an extra 125 
million Britons abroad Iasi 
summer, entered a hard-bit- 
ting second round yesterday as 
Thomson Holidays, the big- 
gest tour operator, launched 
programmes for next summer 
with many average prices 
unchanged. 

Thomson, which precip- 
itated last summer's price war 
by cutting prices by nearly a 
fifth, is holding its average 
holiday price at this summer’s 
£250. 

Behind the figure is a more 
complex picture which is 

Expansion 
at Laura 
Ashley 

By Alexandra Jackson 

Laura Ashley, the clothing 
and home furnishings group 
which came to the market last 
November, is planning to 
open 36 new outlets in the 
second half of the year. 

This is in addition to the 
eight outlets which it acquired 
last month from another Brit- 
ish retail group, thought to be 
Jaeger, the subsidiary of Coats 
ViyeUa. 

Yesterday’s interim results, 
for the period through to the 
end of July 1986. showed 
turnover up from £59.8 mil- 
lion to £77.4 million. Pretax 
profits rose 14 percent to £8.7 
million. An interim dividend 
of 0.75p was declared. Cur- 
rency movements, especially 
in the US, reduced first-half 
operating profits and royalties 
by more than £1 million. 

The overseas operation is 
doing well. North American 
turnover rose by 34 per cent in 
local currency terms, showing 
underlying growth of 18 per 
cent In Europe, sales were 39 
per cent higher whilst the 
underlying growth rate was 12 
per cenL A flagship store in 
Paris was opened during the 
period. In Japan, the joint 
venture contributed a profit of 
£63.000. 

Trading in Britain was af- 
fected by the tad weather and 
lack of tourists. Last month 
the 100th shop was opened in 
Harrogate. 

A textile printing plant, at 
Newtown, Powys, which will 
cost the group a net £3 million 
should be commissioned next 
spring. Two small ac- 
quisitions, manufacturing 
leather goods and knitwear 
respectively, have been made 
since the beginning of the 
year. Capital expenditure for 
the group as a whole will 
amount to £25 million this 
year, equalling the 1985-86 
figure. It is unlikely to be as 
high as this in 1987-88. 

Tempos, page 24 


TSB option 
from start 
of trading 

The Stock Exchange an- 
nounced yesterday that it 
would be launching an options 
contract in Trustee Savings i 
Bank shares on October 10. 
the day the shares start trading 1 
on the stock raarkeL 
It said the move was de- 
signed to meet the enormous 
anticipated demand for the 
shares and to attract more 
private investors into options. 

The new contract will be for 
1.000 TSB shares excercisable 
at a fixed price which buyers 
and sellers can choose from a 
range of prices on any given 
working day. The initial ex- 
piry dates for the contracts 
will be October 22 this year, 
and January 21 and 
April 22. 1987. 

Buyers of the options will be 
required to pay Per share, 
or £30 per contract, excluding 
commission. The seller wifi 
have to put up a margin 
related to the number of 
options sold, as security that 
he can meet the obligation. 




By Derek Harris, Industrial Editor 


likely to be mirrored with 
other tour operators. 

Many Thomson prices are 
held or reduced, there are 
more holidays which are bud- 
gel-priced because of simple 
accommodation or self-catcr- 
ing — and some prices are up 
as much as 10 per cenL 

High price increases mostly 
involve holidays based on 
some four and five-star hotels, 
which have secured higher 
rates. 

Bui Thomson's opening 
shot demonstrates that com- 
petition will remain fierce. 

International Leisure 
Group (ILGl. the second- 


largest tour operator, whose 
subsidiary is Intasun. immedi- 
ately confirmed it would be 
offering more holidays next 
summer with many at prices 
similar io Iasi summer or 
cheaper. 

Horizon, ihe third largest 
operator, made an overnight 
offering of a thousand holi- 
days at 1 966 prices, starting at 
£53 for 14 nights in Majorca, 
marking the company's 21st 
anniversary. 

Both ILG and Horizon have 
still to bring out their summer 
1987 brochures, with Hor- 
izon's due next week. 

Then Thomas Cook, the 


Extel battle with 
Maxwell likely 


By John BeB, City Editor 


The City is bracing itself for 
a proxy tattle between the 
publishing and information 
services group, Extel, and its 
largest shareholder. Mr Rob- 
ert Maxwell over ExiePs role 
as “white knight" in the £145 
million takeover battle for the 
! McCorquodale printing 
group.. 

Extel has yet to declare 
itself officially the unnamed 
third party at present discuss- 
ing a new bid for McCor- 
quodale to top the existing 
offer from the rival printer 
Norton Opax. But close 
sources have little doubL 

The Mirror Group chair- 
man, Mr Maxwell, currently 
has a 25 per cent stake in 
Extel, but cannot makea full 
bid until next April under 
Takeover Panel rules. 

The Extel chairman, Mr 
Alan Brooker. was not pre- 
pared to comment yesterday, 
but close sources suggested 
that Mr Maxwell would inter- 
vene in any attempt to bid for 
McCorquodale. Such a bid 


would dilute Mr Maxwell's 
holding and create a strong 
group much more likely to 
prevent him gaining control of 
Extel 

Meanwhile. Samuel Mon- 
tagu is pressing on with the 
formal offer document setting 
out details of Norton Opax's 
two-for-tme share swap offer 
for McCorquodale. “We do 
not see why we should be held 
up by the indecisiveness of 
other parties,” a spokesman 
said yesterday. 

Current thinking in the City 
is that Extel is preparing an 
offer under which some of the 
costs involved in the white 
knight role would be met by 
McCorquodale. This type of 
agreement, used by Guinness 
in its tattle for Distillers, was 
heavily criticized by institu- 
tional investors. 

“We would view such pro- 
posals gravely and would con- 
sider legal action to block 
them,” said Norton's financial 
advisers. 


largest travel agency in Brit- 
ain. followed the Thomson 
broadside by cutting deposits 
for next summer's foreign 
holidays to £10 a holiday from 
the normal £40 

Thomson yesterday brought 
out nine different brochures 
offering 225 million holidays 
and, with three brochures still 
to come, there could be a 
substantial increase to that 
capacity. 

Mr Paul Brett, managing 
director of Thomson Holi- 
days, said: “We are satisfied 
with our profitability this 
year." 

Printer in 
£3m ‘City’ 
takeover 

By Richard Lander 

Hunterprint. the Corby col- 
our printing company, has 
achieved its aim of expanding 
into the potentially lucrative 
financial documents market 
by paying £3.4 million in 
shares for the privately-con- 
trolled Security Holdings. The 
news helped Hunterprint 
shares gain 5p to 263p^ 

Among Security's subsid- 
iaries is Metcalfe Cooper, 
which specializes in printing 
documents for the City rang- 
ing from share certificates to 
listing particulars and divi- 
dend warrants. 

Much of Metcalfe's business 
comprises overnight printing 
jobs for merchant tanks 

Hunterprint also took the 
opportunity to forecast results 
for both companies in the year 
just ending. It expects its own 
pretax profits to grow by about 
30 per cent to around £3.1 
million, and it predicted that 
Security should show pretax 
returns of about £490,000. 


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BUSINESS AND FfNANCE 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 1 1986, 




Shell will 
keep up oil 
spending 

By David Young 
Energy Correspondent 

Despite the fell of more 
than 50 per cent in North Sea 
oil prices this year. Shell UK is 
to leave intact its £33 million 
North Sea research and 
development budget. 

The biggest operator in the 
North Sea. Shell will seek new 
ways of extracting oil at 
economic rates from the 
deeper, hostile waters there. 

Mr Brian Lavers, technical 
director of Shell UK. Explora- 
tion and Production, said that 
his company believed that 
research and development 
was one of the most vital areas 
of its business. 

He told a London press 
conference: “it is essential not 
only for the oil industry but 
for British business in general 
to maintain a flourishing, 
dynamic and creative research 
industry to compete in an 
increasingly technological 
world. 

“Before we were looking at 
ever-increasing dentand. 
backed up by high prices, 
which required us to venture 
into deeper and deeper waters 
to And new reserves, or re- 
search ever more expensive 
enhanced oil recovery' 
processes. 

“Now research may well 
prove a lifeline for the future. 
Many of the remaining oil and 
gas fields in the North Sea 
needed innovator thinking to 
make them viable before 
prices slumped. 

“We now look to research 
and development to provide 
us with even more efficient 
and cost-effective ways of not 
only developing new reserves 
but of operating our existing 
fields." 

Shell is planning to channel 
the money into three main 
areas — its own laboratories, 
British industry and univer- 
sities and academic research 
establishments. 


Europe records 
69% decline 
in shipbuilding 


Paris (Reuter) — The world 
shipbuilding industry saw new 
orders plunge 29.6 per cent in 
the first half of this year 
compared with the first six 
months of 1985. the Org- 
anization for Economic Co-op- 
eration and Development said 
yesterday. 

Worst drops in Western 
Europe were recorded by West 
Germany, with 68 new orders 
against 395 in the first half of 
1985, France with 56 new 
ordera against a previous 146, 
Italy with 18 against 268 and 
Britain with 45 against 279. 

Figures from an OECD 
shipbuilding working party, 
comprising 14 countries and 
the European Commission, 
showed a sharp year-on-year 
decline in shipbuilding for 
European countries, with or- 


ders received this year felling 
69 per cent to 422 vessels, 
compared with 1.355 in the 
same period last year. 

Japan, the biggest single 
builder of the 13 countries 
cited in the report, saw its 
1986 orders fall 14 per cent to 
3.001 vessels against 3,503 
from January to June last 
year. 

The world total of new 
orders for the countries be- 
longing to the group dropped 
to 3.422 ships against 4,858 in 
1985. 

There was no comment 
from the OECD on the latest 
figures but it said in a report 
last July that it expected the 
crisis in shipbuilding to reach 
its worst point during the 1986 
to 1988 period. 



Mr John Barron, Coioroll general manager, left, with Mr John Ashcroft, the ch a irm an. 

£2 million store for Coioroll 


Iranians discuss oil 
output with Kuwait 


Kuwait (Reuter) — The 
Iranian Oil Minister, Mr 
Gholamreza Aqazadeh, met 
Kuwaiti officials yesterday to 
discuss production and quotas 
ahead of next week's meeting 
of the Organization of Petro- 
leum Exporting Countries. 

Officials declined to give 
details of the talks with 
Kuwait's Oil Minister, Sheikh 
Ali al-Khalifa al-Sabah. 

Iran's national news agency 
said he also met the Emir of 
Kuwait, Sheikh Jaber a! -Ah- 
med al-Sabah, and handed 
him a message from Iranian 1 
officials. It did not elaborate. 

Western diplomats ex- 
pected the Kuwaitis to raise 
the question of attacks on 
tankers in the Gulf. 


Mr Aqazadeh earlier had 
talks in Jeddah with Saudi 
Arabia's Oil Minister, Sheikh 
Ahmed Zaki Yamani. 

He said Opec would aim for 
a price of $19 a barrel by the 
end of this year. 

Prices have edged up to 
about S14 a barrel since the 
13-nation Opec agreed in Au- 
gust to cut output to a ceiling 
of 16.8 million barrels a day. 

Official sources said Kuwait 
would press to increase its 
quota of 900.000 bpd at the 
Opec meeting in Geneva start- 
ing on Monday. 

Iran, which depends almost 
entirely on oil revenue to 
finance the war. has consis- 
tently sought to restrict output 
to prop up prices. 


Coioroll. Britain’s biggest 
manufacturer of wall cov- 
erings, Is to open a £2 mill ion 
home furnishing store in 
London's Regent Street 
tomorrow. 

The 14,000 sq ft building on 
three floors Is st ra tegic all y 
sited between Next and Wedg- 
wood and, despite reassur- 
ances to the do-it-yourself 
trade by the chairman, Mr 
John Ashcroft that the com- 
pany is not becoming a retailer 
and that no other stores are 
planned, .the shop is far from 
being merely a showroom. 


By Carol Leonard 

“Everything in the shop wQl 
be on sale to retaileis and 
members of the public." says 
its general manager, Mr John 
Barron, the British marketing 
manager for Habitat until he 
was “poached” by Coioroll 
four months ago. “And al- 
though it's been designed as a 
fbgs hip it will have to make a 
profit" 

ColoroITs products, which 
include well-known wallpaper 
brand names like Dolly Mix- 
tures. Men Only and Pretty 
Chic, an extensive range of 
furnishing fabrics and bed 


BT wants EEC help in rural areas 


British Telecom is to seek 
financial support from the 
European Economic Commu- 
nity to help accelerate the 
spread of advanced tele- 
communications services in 
the countryside. 

BT said that it recognized 
that rural areas must not be 
left out of the modernization 
of the network. 


The company was replying 
to an independent report, 
commissioned by the Office of 
Telecommunications and the 
Highlands and Islands Dev- 
elopment Board, and pub- 
lished yesterday, which issued 
a warning that the Highlands 
and Islands region of Scotland 
was at risk of felling behind in 
the telecommunications rev- 
olution. 


At Scotland's first rural 
telecommunications con- 
ference, in Inverness yes- 
terday. Professor Bryan 
Carsberg, director-general of 
OfieL said he would ensure 
that services were provided in 
rural areas to meet reasonable 
demands. Claims by British 
Telecom that certain services 
were uneconomic would be 
examined. 


SMITH • BOOKS FOR STUDENTS ■ ATLANTA NEWS AGENCY • SHERRATT & HUGHES • OUR PRICE - DO IT ALL • CLASSIC BOO*. 




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Every month 
WH Smith 
brings nearly 
athiidof 
America toa 
standstill 


Seventy million people in America are served by WH Smith every 
month, through Elsonfc news and gift shops. There are more than 200 
outlets covering 73 cities across the nation, all targeted at people on the 
move - locations include hotels, airports, office plazas and rail terminals. 

A stylish atmosphere which helps to make shopping an enjoyable 
experience and a policy of stocking items which are unique to a region, 
giving each outlet its own local identity, are just two reasons for Elsonb 
success: sales since they became part erf* the group have increased by 32.4%. 

But this is not our only new development Elsewhere abroad we have 
successfully applied the skills learnt at home. WH Smith is now the largest 
bookseller in Canada, and worldwide new retail outlets are being opened 
at the rate of three every week. 

Here in the UK, we are extending our business base with specialist 
retail operations such as Our Price Music. In our wholesale division, 
new technology is helping actually to expand the magazine market And 
Do It AU, after only seven years, is one of the leaders in the DIY market 

Our figures reflect this growth. Since 1981 sales have increased by 
88%, pre-tax profits by 205%, and earnings per share have risen by 180% 
to 17.2p. 

Throughout the group, we aim to help people to enjoy the increasing 
amount of spare time they have available. 

And that goes for every country in which we operate. 

If you would like further information about the development of 
WH Smith at home and abroad, write to Julian Smith, W. H. Smith <6 Son 
(Holdings) PLQ Strand House, 7 Holbein Place, London SWJ W8NR. 


WHSMITH fti 


’ > ° a - ATLANTA NEWS AGENCY • CELEBRATION ■ CLASSIC BOOKSHOPS • WHS DISTRIBUTORS • WH SMITH TRAVEL ■ TELEVISION SERVlC# 



Executive pay 
far outstripping 
inflation guideline 

B* Teres* Boole, Bovine** CwmpomM 


linewc and ceramics from the 
recently-acquired Stafford- 
shire FWteries, are displayed 
in seven room settings. 

Many other items, ranging 
from china and glass to bath- 
room suites, hare been bought 
in to complete the settings and 
they too will be on sale. 

“Only 35 per cent of the 
goods on show hare been 
manafactored by Coioroll," 
says Mr Barron. “The rest has 
been bought in. We're created 
a complete borne famishing 
store." 


Pav rises for lop executives 
are far outstripping inflation 
and show no sign of 
moderating, according to a 
survey published todav. 

A ivpical board director, if 
he had a salary increase m the 
six months to August, re- 
ceived an average rise of m- 
per cent. Chairmen and chief 
executives did even better 
with an average increase in 
earnings, including bonuses, 
of 11.6 percent. 

The survey, conducted ev- 
ery six months for the mer- 
chant bank Charterhouse, 
found a small increase in the 
level of pay rises since the last 
studv, suggesting that, at the 
top end of the scale, the rate of 
inflation is of little relevance 
in determin/ng wages. 

There is also a continued 
move towards performance- 
related rewards for top 
management, with nearly 61) 
per cent of directors receiving 
cash bonuses and the propor- 
tion of companies with exec- 
utive share-option schemes 
almost doubling to 61 per 
cent. 

There was a considerable 
variation in pay rises. A 
quarter of directors received 


■’,{ per cent or fen and a 
quarter I o. 7 per or mo*. 

\ quarter of the ch&trmen and 
chief executives had iacieim 
of 3.9 per cent while the mas 
fun unale ones, about a feat 
of ihe sample, received more 
than 40 per cent. 

Bu>c salary increase* for 
senior managers were fit ore 
moderate with an average ef 
S.3 per cent, down from 9.1 
per cent in the previout study. 

Mr fony Vernon Harcutm, 
who produced the survey, said 
the mam reasons for ibe 
•.uhsuniial rises appeared to 
he the need to compete -for 
executives in the international 
market, a shortage of able 
executives and improved 
company profits which fed 
through to performance-re- 
lated benefits, 

I he survey is in sfcatp 
contrast with the Confcder*. • 
lion of British Industry's pay , 
study, published earlier this 
week, which showed the low- , 
est pav rises in manufacturing - 
industry' for three jeans at 5J • 
per cent. Both the CBI. which : 
represents employers, and Mr 
Nigel Lawson, the Chancellor, 
have been stressing the need 
for even lower increases. 


APPOINTMENTS 


IC Gas (Imperial Conti- 
nental Gas Association): Mr 
Michael Rendle becomes dep- 
uty chairman and chairman of 
the group's executive comm- 
ittee. 

Morgan Grenfell: Mr Nich- 
olas Bulk Mr Jeremy Lucas 
and Mr Richard Strang join 
the board. 

Roche Products: Mr W M 
Borns becomes pharmaceuti- 
cal sales and marketing 
director. 

British Shipbuilders: Mr 
Charles Lougbottom becomes 
a part-time member of the 
board. 

Curzon Public Relations: 
Mrs Clare O'Brien is made 
chief executive. 

Tootal Group: Mr Anthony 


Habgond joins the board as 
executive director. 

English China Gays: Mr 
Larry Anderson becomes chief 
executive. International Drill- 
ing Fluids. 

Heron Sellar Properties: Mr 
Tony Ley land becomes man- 
aging director. 

Norsk Hydro Fertiluers: 
Mr George Henshflwood be- 
comes director of sales 
operations, 

Fabcrge: Mr Roger Mead- 
ows joins as British managing 
director. 

Charterhouse Investment 
Management: Mr Bob Deflow 
is made a director. 

Charterhouse Asset Man- 
agement: Mrs Patricia Pren- 
eta, Mr Stephen Dowds and 
Mr Darid Kidd join Ihe board. 


COMPANY NEWS 


• BREDERO PROPERTIES: 
Interim dividend !.5p (nil), 
payable on Oct. 31. for the six 
months to June 30. Turnover 
£1 1.78 million (£6.57 million). 
Pretax profit £979.000 
(£675,000). Earnings per share 
4.9p (3.9p). The board still 
believes that pretax profits for 
198o will be not less than £2.8 
million. 

• FIRST NATIONAL FI- 
NANCE: An agreement has 
been signed providing for a £250 
million, medium-term credit 
facility to be made available to 
First National Securities, a 
subsidiary of FNF. The pro- 
ceeds will be used to replace, at a 
lower rate, a £200 million credit 
facility and to raise additional 
funding on a longer-term basis 
for FNS. 

• BREMNER: Six months to 
July 31. Interim dividend dou- 
bled to Ip. payable on Oct 24. 
Pretax profit £109.000 
(£481.000 loss). Earnings per 
share 1.21p (12.6p loss). City 
and Westminster Financial has 

rchased from Mr Michael 


Melville Robinson and others, 
2.31 million Bremner shares 
(25.64 per cent) at 60p each. 

• BRISTOL OIL & MIN- 
ERALS: Subject to 

shareholders* approval, House 
Property Co of London and Mr 
P L H Bristol, the chairman of 
BOM, will each subscribe for 
£500,000 of 3 per cent convert- 
ible mortgage debenture stock. 
1989, at par for £1 million. 
BOM’s board is also proposing 
to raise up to about £1 million 
by a non-underwriuen rights 
issue of convertible debenture 
stock. Terms: £1 of stock for 
every 40 ordinary shares. 

• EARLY’S OF WITNEY: 

Half-year to Aug. 2. Interim 
dividend held at 0.3 Ip. Turn- 
over. home £332 million (£3.03 
million) and export £1.15 mil- 
lion (£l.lS million). Pretax 
profit £214,000 (£114.000). 

Earnings per share 2.94p 
(l.57p). 

• GEORGE INGHAM 
(HOLDINGS): interim divi- 
dend 0.75p (0.5p) for the six 
months to June 30. Turnover 
£2.58 million (£2.4 million). 
Pretax profit £140,035 
(£49,606). Earnings per share: 
tret basis 6.29p <2.16p> and nil- 
distribution basis 6.60p (2.37p). 

• CAMELLIA INVEST- 
MENTS: First half of 1986. 
Interim dividend 6p (5p), pay- 
able on Oct. 27. The sale to the 
Lawrie Group of the 92.1 per 
cent holding in Jatel realized 
£4.19 million. A gain on the 
disposal of about £2.5 million, 
which is not presently subject to 
capital gains tax. will be treated 
as an extraordinary item in the 
1986 accounts. The board ex- 
pects 1986's consolidated profit 
on ordinary activities to be 
“somewhat higher*" than 1985. 

• ASDA PROPERTY HOLD- 
INGS: Six months to June 30. 
No interim dividend (same), but 
the board intends to pay an 
increased dividend for the year 
(single payment of 3p last time). 
Turnover £6.S7 million (£4.72 
million). Pretax profit £810.000 
(£434.000). The directors are 
confident of achieving “ex- 
cellent results" for the year. 

• WORCESTER GROUP: In- 
terim dividend 2.2p (nil), pay- 
able on November 14. Figures 
in £000. T umover 1 0,859 
(8.684) for six months to June 
30. Operating profit 667 (373), 
pretax profit 591 (208) and eps 
10.lp(4.0p). 

• CH BAILEY: No dividend 
(nil) for year to March 28. 
Turnover £6.171.444 
(£6.669.837). pretax profit 
£2.468 (£203,714). tax overseas 
nil (£33.943). profit attributable 
£182.085 (£477.349). cps pre- 
exiraordinary items 0.3Q3p 
(0.402p). 


• AMARI: Interim dividend 3p 
(same) for six mouths to June 
30. Figures in £000. Turnover 
83.475 (83.3(6). pretax profit 
3.465 (3.6 D). tax 1 .299 ( | .468k 
cps weighted average 7. Ip 
(7.4pk 

• FALCON INDUSTRIES: 
Turnover 18.000 (21.231) for 
half tear to June 30. Figures n 
£000. Operating profit «I 
(973), interest 4W (4421. 
before tax 502 (531). cps t.6p 

(1.7p). 

• JACQUES VF.RT: Half vew 
to July 19. Figures in £000- 
Turnover 6."62 (4.729k gross 
profit 2.5U (1.631). expenses 
1.396 (915). operating profit 
LI 15 1716). profit before as 
1.195 (6°2). tax 470 (326). ep* 
7.95p (4.33pL The chairman. 
Mr Alan Green, said that fee 
spring sales and autumn orders 
were both at record levels and 
orders for spring 1987 were 
encouraging. 

• MEMCOM 

I NT R NATIONAL: Of the 
t. 027.660 new ordinary and 
£2.158,086 10 percent convert? 


offered, the rights of 49.351 new 
ordinary and £90.515 of 
convertible stock (approxi- 
mately 4.8per cent and 4.2 per. 
cent respectively! have ’ been 
taken up b> shareholders. The 
balance of 978.309 new ordinary 
and £2.0b7,57| convertible 
stock have been taken up by fee 
underwriters. 

• QUEST AUTOMATION: 
Figures in £000. Turnover 8,951 
(6.056) for six months to August 
31 . Operating profit 1 .877 { IQI k 
interest 337 (186). profit before 
tax and extraordinary items 
1 .247 (loss 45 ( }. No tax (nilV cps 
8.33p (3.07p). The company has 
returned to profit for the period. 

• THROGMORTON SE- 
CURED GROWTH TRUST: 
Final dividend 3.25p making 
4.25p(3.75p) for year to July 31, 
payable on November 18. fig- 
ures in £000. Gross revenue 
1.076 1972). net revenue before 
lax 654 (560). tax 194 (167).epS 
4.60p (3.93p). 

• POLYMARX INTER- 
NATIONAL : Figures in £000. 
Turnover 1 1 .237 (10.452) for six 
months to June 30. Profit before 
exceptional items 396 (88). 
exceptional debt 46 (82), share 
losses of related companies 32 
(nil), profit before tax 318 (6) . 
profit per ordinary share i.99p 
(toss 2.34p). 

• CUSSINS PROPERTY: In- 
terim dividend 16p (2.4p) for 
half year to June 30. Figures in 
£000. Turnover 3.704 (3,425). 
profit before tax 518 (345), no 
tax (nil), cps 9.39p (6.29p). net 
assets per share 24 Ip (208p). 

• ASHTON BROS AND COs 
The company will redeem whole 
of the 4'.'. per cent first mortgage 
debenture stock at £ 1 02 per cent 
on March 31 next vear. together 
with interest (less* income tax) 
accrued to redemption date at 
annual rate of4‘/i percent 


BASE 

LENDING 

RATES 


ABN 



Go-oparswe Bank, 10.00% 

C. Hoare & Co 10JM% 

Hong Kong & Shanghai 10.00% 

Holds Bank TO.00% 

to Westminster 10-00% 

Royal Bank of Scotland -_1Q.OO% 

TSB... 10,00% 

Citibank NA 10.00* 

t Mortgage B*k Rate. - . 


.moOMHNAMO*' 1 




















THE TIMES WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 1 



BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


STOCK MARKET REPORT 


Reports of Knapp stake in 
Grand Met exaggerated 

“ 3 el Clark on#? P n »i t j C/Cr 


By Michael Clark and Carol Leonard 

J3S* ^^ective work by a 


Knapp: ihT imnSSSS 

ftrsaTSS 

ihanipe?S D ° more 

zfcSTVS Wo 9 d Macken- 
zie have been going through 

the company’s lengihv sham 

Jg have SSwS 

25 September 12 - foe 

end of the last account - Mr 
*wpp owned between one 
and two million shares, 

• Morgan Grenfell, which 

came to market this summer 
at 500p, fell I Op to a new 
low of 393p yesterday ahead 
or interim figures on Mon- 
day. The Americans can start 
dealing on Friday hot are 
in no rush and Cazenove, the 
company's broker, appears 
lukewarm. Dealers fear its 
new partners. Pin chin 
Denny and Pember & Boyle, 
may be planning to sell 
some shares. 

equivalent io a holding of 
around 0.2 per cent. 

, "There is no way he could 
nave bought an additional 40 
million shares in the interven- 
ing period, or the share price 
would have gone sky- 
high.-says an analyst for 
Wood Mackenzie. “We 
reckon that the most he could 
have at the present time is a 
holding of maybe 1 per cent.” 

Mr Knapp has consistently 
refused to comment on his 
shave purchase except to con- 
firm that he does have a 
holding and that it is less than 
5 per cent 

Sceptical City watchers now 
believe he is either trying to 
pressurize the Grand Met 
board into selling him the 


rp 

a- 

ly 

rtS 

v- 

.s 

■h 

fr 

r. 

i 




t * 


* S 


l’V? 


* 


Intercontinental Hotel chain 
Or is simply masterminding a 
clever piece of arbitrage. 

Grand Met's shares firmed 
3p to 416p yesterday. 

Elsewhere the market had a 
generally good day with the 
FT 30 share index closing off 
its best but still up IAA at 
lj227.0. The broader FT-SE 
IQO index, up 22.5 immedi- 
ately after lunch, closed 16.7 
higher at 1*555.9. 

“We are seeing a few buyers 
but almost _ no sellers - the 
exact opposite of the previous 
day," commented one trader. 

. Gilts recovered the losses 
incurred earlier in the week, 
gaining £2Vt in the longs and 
up to £1 Vs in ' the shorts. 
Dealers were encouraged by 
unfounded reports that ster- 
ling was on the brink of 
Joining the European Mone- 
tary System. The pound also 
had a better day, moving up 
against the trade-weighted 
basket of European currencies 
to 69.0. 

Interest rates on three- 
month money in the money 
markets eased V* per cent to It 
percent. 

Among leaders, the Ameri- 
can favourite Glaxo dim bed 
18p to 933p, GKN 13p to 
25Ip, Beecham 9p to 390p, 
Marks ami Spencer 5p to 
I92p and Gninness 5p to 
3»3p. 

Oils were bullish on talk 



JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG SEP 


has 

bar- 


that the Saudis and Iranians 
may have readied some sort 
of agreement over production 
quotas ahead of Monday’s 
Opec meeting in Geneva. BP 
jumped Up to 666p. Lasmo 
“ordinary” 8p to Il6p. Shell 
8p to 906p, Ultramar the same 
to 148p and Briloil 7p to 12Qp. 

In an otherwise oil-de- 

S ressed year, Trafalagar 
loose was given a welcome 
boost yesterday with news of 
its successful bid to build the 
£230 million bridge across the 
Thames at Danfbrd. It was 
third time lucky for Tr afalgar , 
which had lost the battle for its 
Euroroute Channel tunnel as 
well as hs Turkish tender to 
build the second bridge across 
the Bosphorus. Its shares 
climbed 1 Opto 276p. 

Renewed hopes of a bid are 
starting to breathe fresh life 


sector but in so doi 
thrown up a number 
gains, including Ultramar 
which was trading at a high of 
218p earlier this year. 

Bid speculation was also 
good for a 6p rise to a new 
peak of 506p for Imperial 
Continental Gas, after 5 1 Op. 
The group has appointed Mr 
Michael Rendie to the board. 
He was formerly a managing 
director of BP. Close observ- 
ers claim the appointment has 
been made to strengthen the 
board and means that 1C Gas 
is takiog the threat of a bid 
seriously. 

The shares have been a firm 


back into Ultramar, the oil 
exploration group, where Mr 
Ron Brierley, the New Zea- 
land entrepreneur, has built 
up a 1 3 percent stake through 
his Hong Kong-based com- 
pany, IEP Securities. 

Ultramar advanced 8p to 
148p yesterday helped by 
suggestions that Mr Brierley 
was again picking up stock in 
the market. Last month 
Ultramar hit a new low of 
125p, depressed by the con- 
tinuing weakness of crude oil 
on world markets and its 
impact on profits. Interim 
figures showed pretax profits 
tumbling from £160.6 million 
to £66.2 million. 

Dealers are hoping that with 
Ultramar in such a vulnerable 
position, Mr Brierley will 
eventually launch a full bid. 
The oil crisis has hit the entire 


RECENT ISSUES 


EQUITIES 

BeavercoflAj) 

Broad St <43p) 

Chelsea Man (l2Sp) 
Creighton Labs (ISOd) 
Euro Home (160pj 
Eve Construction ri05p) 
Fletcher Dennys (70p) 
Guthrie Coro (I50p) 
Harrison (ISOp) 


170-3 
10 
6S 
150 
48-1 
129 
180 +2 
T26 

106 +1 
68 
161 
158 


c 


Htfto Ergonom (92p) 
Hughes Food pop) 
Local Lon Gp 
M6 Cash & C 
Marina Dev (lit 
Nswage Trans " 
Sandal Parkins' lit 
Scot Mtga 10Q% 
Stanley Leisure (iiOpj 
Thames TV (i90p) 
Trees sH%i/l 2016 #97 
Unilock (63p) 

Yafverton (38p) 
Yorkshire TV (125p) 



RIGHTS ISSUES 

Berkeley Tech F/P 208 

Boots N/P 216+3 

Brown & Tawse F/P 146 

Bunzl N/P 7+3 

Cambium Venture N/P 3 * +'« 
Christy Hunt N/P 4 -1 

New Ct Nat Res N/P l'j-1's 

SWfcwrick FJP 333 +7 

Tiphook N/P 49 

(Issue price in brackets). 


LONDON FINANCIAL FUTURES 


FOREIGN EXCHANGES 


Three Month Stating 

Dec 86 Z. 

Mar 87 

Jun 8? ........ 

Sep 97 

Dec 07 ......... 

Mar 88 

ous day's total open i 
Three Month EanxMtar 

Dec 88 

Mar 87 

Jun 87 

Sep 87 — 


8.65 

88.13 

8950 

88.40 


as 


USTienuyBond 

Dee 86-.— 

Mar 87 

Jun 87 


Short GUI 
Dec 86 

Mar 87 

Jun 87 




Dec! 

Mar 87 

Jun 87 

Sep 87 . — 
FT-SE100 

Sep 86 

Dec 86 


88 


9351 

93.81 

9358 

9324 

94-18 

94-02 

N/T 


95-42 

N/T 

N/T 


110-02 

110-08 

Of 

155.00 

156.60 


High 

LOW 

OflM 

EttVol 

89.43 

88.65 

89.10 

9090 

89.60 

8938 

89.42 

1398 

89.66 

8950 

89.70 

402 

89.80 

89.40 

8950 

14 

— 

— 

89.25 

0 

8830 

8830 

8830 

3 


Previous day's total open Interest 23421 
93.97 93.89 9334 3982 

9337 9380 93^2 371 

93.62 9359 93.60 58 

9331 93^4 9326 30 

Previous day's total open mtsrest 8013 

95- 15 94-ti6 95-12 7969 

84-10 94-02 94-15 21 

Previous day's total open interest 1177 

96- 14 95-42 96-14 Ml 

— — 96-09 0 

Previous day's total open interest 13681 
111-24 109-10 111-82 18178 

111-04 11000 111-21 60 

— — 111-81 0 

— — — 0 

Previous day's total open Interest 2807 
15630 15430 15535 58 

159.25 15630 156.10 627 


TRADITIONAL OPTIONS 


First Deaton* Last Deafens 

Sep 2 2 Oct 3 

Oct 6 Oct 17 

oct 20 octai 

Call options were taken out ok 
P ennine Resources. St Madman, 


Last Doctmafea For; 

Dec 18 Jan 5 

Jan8 Jan 19 

Jan 22 Feb 2 

Vickers, BSR. Hanson Trust, Prestwick. GEG, 
Armour Trust Accord Publcations. 


North Kafgurd Mines. Crusts, Conroy Petrotaum, SR Gant, Aberdeen Steak. Blue 
* • — - — ■ one, Br. Benzol. Astriey L, Barker 0 Dob.. Pentiand, 

tot. H»tok, Tarmac. Bin. Oi 6 Gas, 


Circle. 
Sears. 
A03CO. 

Put: 

Put 6 Call: 


Amstrad, Alabona, Br. Benzol, 
Sornd DiH., Br. Sect. Grand Met, I 
Brows.. Argyte Trust GtanflakL 
hint, Fakflne Boats. 

■. Sacs.. Abaca Energy capiat Premier. 


STERLING SPOT AND FORWARD RATES 


Market rates 
day's range 
September 30 
N York 1.4425-1.4506 
Montreal 1 ,9999-2.0110 
Ams'dam33979-33160 
Brussels 60526034 
Cphgen 113219-11.0071 
Dublin 1.0684-1.0787 
Frankfurt 2.9 1 86-25370 
Lisbon 212.1081432 
Madrid 192.43-193.43 
L«an 201738-203289 
Oslo 106088-10.6840 
Pans 93605-90215 
STWrlm 93548-103138 
Tokyo 221-56-22357 
Wanna 2033-2056 
Zurich 23870-23881 


Marke t n ans 
dose 

September 30 

>.4405-1.4475 

23077-231 06 

33103-33148 

6033-6034 

11.0722-11.0871 

1.0701-13711 

23328^3370 

21235-214,45 

192.82-193.10 

202035-203229 

103094-103840 

93970-9.6143 

9.9997-10.0138 

223.12-223.49 

2032-20.65 

2379&2.3B40 


1 month 


0.42-0- 
Ift-lftpnxn 
22-17prem 
1-ftpram 
5prem-2dis 
Ift-lftprwn 
57-117*9 
22-53ctts 

1pmm-4|Ss 

3-3%tfis 

2H-1ftprem 

Ift-lftprem 

Ift-lprem 

10!t-9Kprem 

1ft- IKprem 


3 months 

1,71-1.66piwn 

1.14-1.03preffi 

4ft*ftprem 

57-48prern 

2%-Isprani 

6- 20dis 
4ft-4ftpre»n 
193-34008 

53-90-J.v 

iprom-fidjs 

8ft-9ft(flS 

7- Cprem , 
254-3 54 prsm 
3ft-2ftprem 
26%-22Mprem 
4K-3»prem 


Sterflng index compared with 1975 was rm at 693 (day^s range 68^7-0949. 


OTHER STERUNG RATES 


Hong Kong dotor 
India rupee 
Iraq dinar _ 
Kuwait Omar KD 
Malaysia defer 
Mexico peso — . 
New Zealand dob 
Saudi Arabia riysl 
Singapore doflar. 
South Africa rand 
UAEdtham 
UoydsBonk 


DOLLAR SPOT RATES 



Rates soppBed by Bmciays Bank HOFEX and ExieL 


LONDON TRADED OPTIONS 



Series 

Cafe 
Oct Job 

Apr 

Oct 

Prt» 

Jon 

*£L 


300 

ll 

20 

30 

13 

18 

23 

r30oj 

330 

3% 

10 

15 

40 

43 

48 

380 

1V4 

4 

8 

65 

70 

73 

BP 

600 

70 

90 

113 

2 

8 

20 

C665) 

650 

30 

5/ 

80 

13 

25 

37 

700 

8 

30 

52 

45 

55 

6b 


500 

80 

94 

107 

3 

10 

24 

C574) 

550 

37 

62 

77 

12 

21 

42 

600 

15 

38 

50 

45 

37 

70 


Courtaulds 

C279] 


200 

22 

34 

45 

2 

280 

13 

24 

34 

8 

300 

4 

16 

26 

24 

330 

K 

9 

— 

S2 


Com Union 
(*207) 


280 

300 

330 


28 

18 

13 


18 

35 

65 


21 

37 

65 


CabteS Wire 
(■ 282 ) 


275 

280 

300 

325 


20 


32 

18 

8 


— 6 — — 


40 

32 

23 


24 

48 


IB 

30 

50 


D« liters 
CRM) 


600 

650 

700 


108 

58 

10 


1 

8 

18 


GEC 

(■166) 


160 

14 

20 

28 

7 

10 

12 

18Q 

37, 

11 

18 

18 

20 

23 

200 

154 

4 

8 

37 

37 

40 


Grand Met 
1*4101 


360 

— 

75 

82 

— 

382 

40 

_ 

— 

2 % 

390 

— 

50 

58 

— 

420 

14 

35 

47 

17 


— 3 


12 

22 


rci 

(■1064) 

950 

1000 

1050 

1100 

120 

75 

40 

13 

152 

112 

77 

47 

787 

125 

90 

OS 

2 

6 

20 

50 

10 

22 

37 

60 

18 

30 

50 

72 

Land Sec 
(-30JI 

300 

330 

360 

12 

3 

1 

21 

10 

5 

30 

17 

8 

S 

28 

57 

11 

29 

57 

13 

30 

57 

Marks aSpm 
(•193) 

180 

200 

220 

15 

4 

v> 

23 

13 

6 

30 

20 

11% 

1 » 
12 
30 

4 

16 

32 

8 

19 

33 

Shell Trans 
(*906) 

800 

6S0 

900 

110 

63 

28 

138 

100 

68 

157 

120 

90 

1* 

10 

22 

10 

22 

37 

17 

30 

48 

Tialatgai House 
<T76) 

260 

280 

300 

21 

10 

4 

30 

17 

10 

38 

27 

17 

4 

12 

26 

9 

IB 

33 

15 

24 

39 


Strife 

Dec 

Mar 

Jm 

DBG 

Mar 

Jin 

BeecWm 

C388) 

300 

390 

420 

400 

40 

23 

12 

5» 

53 

38 

24 

13 

48 

35 

7 

23 

45 

n 

14 

30 

50 

78 

37 

57 

Boors 

(•217) 

200 

220 

240 

23 

m 

6 

32 

22- 

12 

41 

29 

19 

4» 

15 

28 

8 

18 

3 

9 

21 

34 

bth 

(*288) 

260 

300 

333 

S3 

T 

35 

25 

43 

33 

12 

53 

18 

30 

23 

33 

Bass 

1-065) 

700 

750 

800 

33 

15 

8 

43 

Z3 

15 

55 

33 

33 

70 

115 

40 

72 

115 

42 

82 

aueCxcie 

C568) 

550 

GOO 

650 

37 

19 

7 

55 

30 

15 

65 

37 

24 

47 

95 

28 

.50 

95 

33 

55 

De Beers 

(*720) 

650 

7 00 
750 
800 

no 

80 

SO 

30_ 

135 

80 

50 

95 

12 

30 

55 

95 

23 

45 

75 

105 

90 

D»»ons 

C33C) 

300 

330 

380 

42 

22 

10ft_ 

52 

30 

_18 

42 

25 

14 

34 

17 

38 

22 

42 

GKN 

1-261) 

240 

260 

280 

300 

24 

13 

3 

2» 

33 

23 

14 

0 

43 

31 

24 

8 

19 

31 

51 

23 

33 

51 

27 

35 

ST 




Cafe 



Puts 



Series 

Dec 

Mar 

Jon 

Dec 

Mar 

Jua 

Jaws' 

(-36) 

500 

38 

S3 

65 

28 

33 

35 

550 

IB 

33 

43 

50 

(SO 

bb 


600 

8 

16 

— 

97 

103 

— 

Thom EMI 

420 

47 

60 


5 

12 

— 

(*451) 

460 

23 

40 

50 

27 

32 

35 

500 

12 

23 

35 

54 

55 

60 


550 

5 

10 


102 

102 

— 


330 

65 





1 

— 

— 

C385) 

360 

42 

55 

— 

6K 

9 

— 

390 

26 

37 

47 

13 

22 

30 


420 

13 

22 

28 

38 

40 

48 


Series 

Nov 

Feb 

May 

Nov 

FMi 

HSL 


420 

37 

50 

62 

15 

20 

25 

(*440) 

400 

13 

40 

42 

30 

40 

45 

500 

4 

14 

30 

«S 

65 

73 

BAT tads 

360 

95 

108 


K 

2 


(■*461 

390 

65 

80 

87 

3 

5 

8 

420 

40 

55 

63 

7 

13 

18 


460 

18 

28 

37 

28 

30 

3b 


460 

27 

45 

57 

13 

IT 

22 

(•464T 

500 

12 

35 

3/ 

40 

42 

45 

550 

3 

11 

18 

87 

07 

90 


180 

10 

17 

23 

8 

14 

15 

fisoj 

200 

3 

8 

1b 

24 

28 

23 

220 

l» 

3* 

11 

40 

41 

42 

1 Cadbixy Scfwpps 160 

17 

25 

32 

3 

8 

10 

(172) 

180 

6 

14 

15 

14 

15 

17 

200 

2Vj 

7 

— 

29 

30 

— 


aw 

23 

35 

45 

8 

17 

20 

(-310) 

330 

8 

17 

23 

27 

32 

35 

360 

4 

7 

10 

53 

55 

55 

Imperial Gr 
(-388) 

300 

70 




1» 



_ 

330 

4Sf 

— - 


IK 

— * 

— 


360 

a* 

— 



13 


— 


330 

30 

43 

50 

3 

8 

10 

(*353) 

360 

12 

22 

30 

17 

20 

25 

3B0 

3 

0 

lb 

42 

45 

48 

LASMO 

110 

13 

20 

27 

8 

12 

15 

r»i3> 

120 

e 

15 

19 

13 

20 

22 

130 

4 

ID 

14 

22 

2/ 

29 

Midland Bank 

500 

52 

68 

80 

8 

12 

17 

C534) 

550 

22 

40 

50 

25 

32 

37 

600 

a 

17, 

23. 

65 

65 

70 

P80 

460 

55 

70 

_ 

2 

6 

_ 

cm 

500 

22 

40 

53 

13 

20 

PS 

550 

6 

16 

28 

47 

52 

57 


600 

1» 



97 

— 

~ 

Race! . 

160 

10 

18 

26 

9 

12 

14 

(168) 

ISO 

3K 

9 

15 

20 

26 

28 

200 

2 

4 

8 

40 

40 

46 

RTZ 

550 

87 

97 



5 

15 



(*629) 

600 

44 

(S>. 

82 

12 

28 

40 

650 

19 

38 

55 

3/ 

50 

ES 


700 

7 

20 

— 

75 

02 



70 

16 

20 

23 

3 

5K 

7ft 

.CM 

SO 

8 

14 

17* 

7 

10 

lift 

90 

4K 

J!L 

J2 

JL 

1SK 



Series 

Nov 

Mar 

Jun 

Nov 

Mar 

Jun 


200 

17 

25 

29 

8 

13 

15 

(-208) 

218 

236 

7% 

3 

z 


14 

29 



m _ 


240 


10 

13 

— 

39 

42 


255 

2 

— 




— 


Series 

Hov 

Feb 

tar 

Nov 

Feb 

fit 

Tr 11*55 1991 

106 

V 


IK 


5 K 

5ft 

•21(E) 

108 


% 

% 

0H 

7 

7 

110 


% 

"m 


8S. 

8ft 

Tr 11%% 03(07 

106 

4X' 

5% 

6 

n 

3* 


rtiofl) 

106 

3X 

4*i* 

5 

2K 

4ft 

4ft 

110 

2'» 

3% 

4 

3K 

4% 

5ft 


112 

IK 

*ie 

3% 

4* 

6ft 

6ft 


-114 

»» 


M 

6V 

7ft 

7% 


116 


*”.6 

2 


9 

9ft 


Sent Oct 

Nov 

Dec Sept 

Oct 

Nov 

Dec 


Gfcwfl 

('9301 



MONEY MARKET 
AND GOLD 


Period rates came back a fair 
distance yesterday. They had 
not altogether abandoned the 
view that base rates could go 
np in the near future, hot they 
were certainly not poshing the 
idea so aggressively. An im- 
proved performance by ster- 
ling, with a helping hand from 
the Bundesbank, had played a 
part By the end of the day the 
longer eod had retreated about 
half a point from Monday's 
dosing high levels. 

Base Rates % 

Gearing Banks 10 
Finance House 10 
Discoint Market Loans % 

Orenfett HWh; 9 Low 7 
Week /bract §'/> 

Treasury BKs (Discount %) 

Buying SeflJng 

Zirrntfi 107, 2rmttfi 1DS5 
3mnm 107. 3mnBr 10K 
Prime Bank BOb (Discount %) 

1 mntii IQKrlOK 2mntb lOht-iOM 
3mnih 1D%-10i4 6mnm KPis-iO'i* 

Trade BAs (Discount %) 

irrmtii 10a 2mnth io»n 
3mnth 11 6mnth 10 A ia 

Interbank (%} 

Overraght: open 9U dose 9 
1 weak 9%-9% 6 mrrttr lOK-lO^is 

1 mirth 1(ft4-10»..5 g ninflr 11-10’/, 

3 mntii 10*i«-10'J.#12mlh 11-IOJi 
Local Aifeority Deposits (*>) 

2 days 9% 7 days 9* 

1 mntii 10% 3 mirth 10» 

6mRtti1l 12mth 11 

.Authority Bonds p.) 
imnth 11J4-1114 2mntfi litt-lix 


3 mntii iva- 11% 
9fHitih 115S-11M 
Starting CDs nu 
1 irmtii 1 0MQ& 
6 mntii 10K-10K 
Doflar CDs R,i 
1 mntii 6.00-5.95 
8 mntii 5.95^00 


Bmmh 11%-ITVi 
12mtil 11J4-11M 

3mnth lOVIDH 

12mtH 10K-10% 

3 rrartri 5.95^.90 
12mth &20-6.15 


EURO MONEY DEPOSITS % 


Doflar 

7 days 6)4-6 
3 mntii 6H-6 
DautsdHiath 
7 days 4 »iM 7 h) 

3 mntii 
Rranch Franc 
7 days BYt-SX 
3 mitiv 7»»*-7«ii 
Swiss Franc 
7 days 2S4-2K 
3 mntii riHrM'i# 
Yen 

7 days 5K-5K 
Smnffi 5-4)1 


can 6t4-5% 
1 mrth 6'i»-5' 6 m 
6 mntii BK-fi 
caD 54 
1 mrth 

SrmrJh 4%-4V> 
caB 8-7 
Irmtii 7'*i8- is it 
6 mrth 7%n 
cut 1K-« 

1 /Until 4*18-4 ' ib 
6mntiu4U-4K 
cat 5M-4J4 
Ittirth 5-4\l 
6mnth 5-4S4 


GOLD 



S100^0-1"01'JO( 
Ptatram 

S54&50(£379J6) 

•ExdudeeVAT 


■7000) 


ECGD 


Rxad Rato Sterling Export Finance 
Scheme IV Average reference raffl fer 
interest period August 9. 1988 to 
September 2. 1S8S inclusive: 9.890 per 
CBM. 


September 30 


• The nervous state of the 
market is making life difficult 
for dealers. James Capet, 
the broker, yesterday had to 
give op an attempt to place 
4 million shares, worth £9.5 
ariHion, in Smiths In- 
dustries, the mechanical en- 
gineer, that belonged to the 
market Offered at 238p, the 
shares were eventually 
withdrawn after failing to find 
any takers. The price 
slipped lpto238p. 


market since the spring on 
whispers of a bid. Several 
suilois have been mentioned 
including Peirofina, the Bel- 
gian oil company, and Mr Ron 
Brierley. Speculation has also 
been heightened recently by 
reports in this column that Mr 
T Boone Pickens, the Texan 
businessman, was over here 
on the lookout for potential oil 
companies to buy. 

Brokers sucb as Grenfell & 
Colegrave reckon IC Gas con- 
tains a number of attractive 
units, each with particular 
appeal to different potential 
bidders. According to Cole- 
grave. the group's assets in the 
North Sea are substantial and 
certain to retain interest in the 
shares in the long term. 

Shares of Tbermax, the 
USM-quoied toughened glass 
manufacturer, paused for 
breath at 130p after teaming 
earlier this week that Mr 
David Abetrs Suter had al- 
most doubled its holding in 
the company to nearly 24 per 
cent. Despite assurances from 
Mr AbeQ. the market is con- 
vinced he will eventually bid 
for the rest 

Earlier this summer Mr 
Abell sold 6.6 million shares 
(27.7 per cent) in FH Lloyd 
Holdings, the foundry and 
engineering company. Mean- 
while; Safer continues to hold 
a sizeable stake in Newman 
Industries and earlier this year 
paid £12.5 million for UKO 
International, the spectacle 
lens manufacturer. Snter fin- 
ished lp lower at 2Q6p. 


COMMENT Kenneth Fleet 


£50,000 safety net for 
investors inadequate 


The Government's proposal — just six 
weeks before it is expected to become 
law —to amend the Financial Services 
Bil! to allow for a central compensa- 
tion scheme for investors, rather than 
a series of separate schemes run by the 
individual self-regulating organiza- 
tions, raises a number of important 
issues. 

The intention of compensation 
schemes, whether or not they an? 
centralized, is to protect investors 
who Lose money through the financial 

failure — or fraud — of the business to 1 rOUfolCS finfiad 
which they have entrusted their 
money. 

In the brave new world dawning in 
the City on October 27, they are 
needed as never before. The failure to 
incorporate proper _ compensation 
arrangements in a bill designed to 
protect investors from the lurking 
shoals and sharks is extraordinary. 

The Government admits that it was 
mistaken in drafting the compensa- 
tion provisions. The official focus was 
more on investment businesses in- 
demnifying themselves rather than 
protecting the investor. 

The Govemmnent is not alone in 
neglecting investors in the debate over 
compensation schemes. Some of the 
self-regulating organizations opposed 
to the idea of a centralized compensa- 
tion scheme have argued that it would 
be a disincentive to them to regulate 
their members. If their members’ 
contributions to a compensation fund 
can be drained by the failure of 
business outside their jurisdiction, 
why should they try especially hand to 
keep their own members in check? 

The best way of achieving an 
adequate compensation system is not 
easy to pinpoint. The proposed 
amendment to the bill is apparently 
intended to give the Securities and 
Investments Board the right to say 
that members of self-regulating 
organizations can be dragooned into a 
central scheme. 

The Stock Exchange is strongly 
opposed to a centra] scheme. It 
deserves some sympathy as its own 
compensation fund would provide 
considerably more protection for 
investors if it were allowed to function 
autonomously. 

The legislation will lay down the 
principle that compensation pro- 
visions should be “the best that can 
reasonably be made.” This leaves the 
door open to SIB to leave the Stock 
Exchange out of a central scheme. The 
other self-regulating organizations 
would have to dig deeper into their 
members’ pockets. 

But without the financial muscle of 
the Stock Exchange (and International 
Securities Regulatory Organisation 
members who will be merging with it), _ _ 

there might not be enough money equities after Big Bang. As in the days 
available to compensate investors, of music hall, the bang promises to be 
Hence the dilemma facing SIB. followed by a crash and a wallop. 


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At the end of the day concern for 
investors should determine the solu- 
tion. SIB is playing with a central 
scheme providing maximum 
compensation of around £50,000 per 
investor. Losses greater than this 
would be irrecoverable. 

Although better than the £30,000 
first thought of, it is surely not 
impossible for the investment in- 
dustry' to dub together and produce 
something better. 


.As the City enters the last four 
weeks of the run-up to Big Bang. some 
of the problems are coming more 
sharply into focus. The relaxed atti- 
tude that despite the upheaval in 
structure, member firms and dealing 
methods things will be all right on the 
night is giving way to an awareness of 
troubles ahead. 

As the biggest and best market in 
the City, gilt-edged trading has natu- 
rally attracted most attention. 
Poicntialy it has the biggest and most 
expensive problem of overcapacity in 
market-making. Not even the most 
optimistic of gilt-edged partners be- 
lieves that there is room for more than 
20, at most, of the 27 primary dealers 
in the lists to trade successfully. 

In contrast overcapacity in equity 
market-making has attracted little 
attention. Publicly many major in- 
stitutional brokers’who have opted for 
the high profile role of offering a full 
range of services to their clients have 
been gung-ho about their ability to 
make money running an equity book 
after Big Bang. In private, many arc 
bracing themselves for a period of 
sound and fury 

It has been dear for some time that 
there is an imbalance of capacity. 
There will be no queues of traders 
fighting to make competitive prices in 
second and third-line stocks, the so- 
called betas and gammas of the new 
electronic price quotation system. The 
firepower is being marshalled for the 
major high market capitalization 
stocks, the alphas, where heavy 
institutional involvement guarantees 
high turnover. But is it realistic to 
expect each of the 30 or more market- 
makers in stocks like ICJ, Shell and 
BTR to make a reasonable return? 

The street-wise firms are already 
reading the writing on the wall. They 
are adjusting their internal budgets 
accordingly and privately reckon that 
if they manage to earn any profit at all 
from market-making, they will be 
satisfied. 

It would require a huge increase in 
the volume of business taking place in 
London to employ gainfully all of the 
manpower girding its loins to job in 



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firestono 

FstCMcsgo 

FattntBflep 

FotPennC 

Fort 

FTWactwa 
GAFCorp 
GTECorp . 
Gen Carp 

Ger Dy'mcs 

San Sortie 
Got Inst 

Gen MBs 
Got Motors 
Go POUt ny 
Genesco 


Shares 


ASA 

AIM Signal 

AUedStrs 

ABnGrtmrj 

Alcoa 

Amaxlnc 

Am'nJaHs 

An Brenda 

Am Can 

AmCynm'd 

AmBPw 

Am Express 

Am Home 

Am Motors 

AmSrnrd 

AmTeteph 

Amoco 

AimcoSml 

Ass too 

Ashland CW 

AtFttcnfiew 


New York (Reuter) - WaB 
Street shares climbed m early 
trading yesterday, couponing 
a trend that began to develop 
late in Monday's session. 

Before tbe opening, the 
Commerce Department 
the United States trade defiat 
in Aligns! was SI3L2 billion, a 
smaller figure than W been 
expected. 


3ft 3ft 
34ft 3Jft 
37 37ft 
38ft MS 
33 32ft 
Gouiefinc i»* Jg* 
Grace « 

Gi Att&Tac 21* gft 

QumnCor 24ft 2«ft 

SaSwiSl 61ft 61ft 

Huroites Mft 51ft 

2ft 23ft 

HESS- S ,i 

n 134ft 136ft 

^OO 13ft 13ft 
SfSper toft 70ft 
ItitTaJel. <7% 48 
mrtng Bank 47% 47£ 

JtmsnaJHn 

Kateor Alum 17ft 17ft 
KarrMOGee Z7ft 27ft 
Kmbly Cfrfc 7W 79ft 
K Mart 45% 46# 

Krogar 61ft 63% 
JjrTcofp 2ft » 

Litton 73 74 

SBk is 

Se!T Si S 


4ift jijg Dow Jones industrial 
H* 30ft average was np 6.75_p5wTs 
tits »«ft 1,761.95. Adrancmg issues led 

ii* S% declining issues by a two to one 


cash. , . 

The contract has been 
launched just under four 
weeks before Big Bang, I 
think it’s a very good start but 
I don’t expect well see very 
large volumes until after Octo- 
ber 27,”said Mr Brian Will- 
iamson, LifFe’s chairman. 

The Footsie options put 
Liffe. which also celebrated its 
fourth birthday yesterday, 
into another head-to-head bat- 
tle with the Stock Exchange, 
where options are ‘“ready 
traded in the cash FT-SE 100 
index. The two markets al- 
ready compete in gilt and 
currency options and yes- 
terday's launch is bound to 
increase the battle to become 


THE TIMES WEDNE SDAY OCTOBER 1 J986 — — 

► Strong start to “XJT 
Liffe FT-SE 
. options trading jg-*Srsgj 

y Rv Richard Lauder Hone Kong Stock Exctang* 


By Richard Lander 
The latest tool for invertors ^on’s 

Financial Futures Exchange *? 

gS£ 

change (FT-SE) 100 mdea 

fU Just*jnder 230 pul-and-call mfE 
contracts »ere traded on Je 


London’s premier options 
venue. _ 

The Stock Exchange reacted 
guardedly when Liffe an- 
nounced its FT-SE options 
launch some weeks ago, al- 
lhough relations seemed cor- 
dial yesterday when Mr David 
Parry, chairman of the Stock 
Exchange’s traded options 
committee, was invited to 
toast the new contract at a ■ 


contracts were traded on the ««■» ““ 

first day, all in jbe ^3?"^ iSf that well be 

senes, giving "jj-esj™ the major options exchange m 

right to buy or seU one FT-SE 


London,” said Mr William- 
son, "but we’ve agreed lhai 
both sets of members — and 
they'll be quite similar after 
Big Bang — require co-opera- 
tion on regulation and tra ding 
systems and we’ll be working 
as closely as possible.” 

The fledgling contract was 
given an early boost yesterday 


Cable & Wireless) flaw ® 
have its shares listed on the 
Hong Kong Stock Exchange 
by the end of the year. 

The telecommunications 

company’s shares gained a 

Imiogio Tokyo in Apnland 

the chairman and chief exec 
uiive. Sir Eric Stop. ' 

further listings are planned for 
Zurich, Basle, Geneva » 
Frankfurt following the share 
placing last December. 

The company operate the 
telephone service m Hong 
Kong through ns Hong Kong 
Telephone subsidiary, which 
also hopes to win a licence 10 
operate a cable TV network. It 
is the second largest employer 
in Hong Kong. 

Mr Rod Olsen, Cable & 
Wireless's Far East executive 
director, said: "Our decision 
to apply fora listing is a public 
demonstration of our con- 
fidence in the future prosper- 
ity of the territory beyond 
1997 " 

The other Cable and Wire- 
less subsidiary in Hong Kong 
is the unlisted Cable and 
Wireless Hong Kong 
(CWHK). Cable and Wireless 
pic owns 80 per cent of 
CWHK and tbe Hong Kong 
Government has the rest. 

Hong Kong Telephone and 
CWHK together badrast over 
half of the group’s £907 mil- 
lion turnover in the year 
ending March and three-quar- 
ters of the group’s trading 
profit of £490 million. 


Hopeful signs as 
NEI embarks on 
the big shake-up 

ortt , cra Engineering [nd- r '*J£ *“ 


Northern Engineering Jed- «»*» *=£ ■“ 

usim%* suipf 1 * a mav S? e The market ununall) mar- 
menl . fJ. involving ked the shares «W"» Sp «i» 

restructuring. »nvoi * before thinking a Irttli' 

extracydmary costs ^h,s ^ ^ ^ ^ 

?U«onal, of £S mdhon t pnwjJMS* 

»«giyen ? w«o (**■“« public retains 

reception m the ^ promotion -™' 


u ,h* riiv araunu iui 

f^^JTolunicd ^ 3»d sal« promotion com- 

ijsssa^-s 

™nu»ns which h* 

stssr^SS ■s&'sssrijrsi 

sajjrtarjsss KSs 

<he hSISIided in JM , h 

eraung Board **cubstantia)” Action for 

n>ordenng programme is put ^ pubUeizing 

to N E r^y unveiled its to “dSS-.-ftjSg** 
ISSrSfl^Skm. including tandlingtadte Bcpunment 

the communtouon equ^ SwIk! , 

S™ 5 S po« m"- if mspeeaeuLriB staff and 
iSJh in the united clients tend to stay onset 
dun perheps others m the 

2d'lSSSS n t“ Tta management stresses 

:nrsr 

1SJ&, « 

aS Bmidl Teleerint. 

of £24 6 mluSn S the half- r Analysts are diking aboj.l 
cf1t r,. fjfc, clearing-out fuil->ear profits oi *™' 

^ result in a lion. Assuming a tax charge 

nu^millv positive cash flo-v of 35 percent. »|»» rwJ'f'V” 
a^L a signifiranlly lower cost pros|«etj'c «*“"»»[> 

NEI expects gearing 10 rise growth prospect. 

I to 30 per cent by the year-end ASIlley 

from 19 per cent last year. ■ •— 

The increase in debt and The only Laura Ashley ani- 
w ritc-off of shareholders c les \ou cannot buy tn ttu 
funds mav. in fact, push group's flagship store at Ox- 
gearing higher but. if NEI has ford Circus are Laura Afthky 
Stimated its required cost shares, although some bripm 
base accurately, the effect spark has alreadv poinfcotni 
should be short-term. out as a missed opportunity. 

The major question is: will The ten London outUK 
the restructuring do the trick, which account for 30 per cent 
Just over a year ago NEI 0 f British salcs, arc showing 
thought its heavy rational iza- signs of recovering wj 
lion progamme was over. weather and poor tounsi 
This time there arc hopeful business. In the UK as a 
sims. NEI reckons that whole first-half turno ver rose 
CEGB should begin rc-ordcr- bv 38 per cent, but the 
ing power stations at the rate underlying rate of growth w as j 
Lof one a year from the end of on iy 5 per cent. 

1987. The Chernobyl disaster Mr John James, group 
gives more muscle to coal- managing director, believes 


to NEI. least 60 shops tn Britain over 

NETs news has shot to the next three years. Aaai- 
pieces analysts’ previous fional growth willcome from 
expectations of taxable prof- home decorating units ^placed 
its this year of £50 million. i n Sainsbury s Homebnsi 

The range is now £17 million superstores. . 

to £27 million. The potential in North 

However, the issue is not America is considerable « 
this vear’s profits. It is accounts for 38 per cent ot 
whether NEI can operate gr 0up turnover, margins are 
efikiemW and profitably on higher so expansion will 
its lower' turnover and cost boost group profitutmiiv. 
base. . Currency movements w». 

The prospective yield on a however, continue to nc a 
maintained dividend is a fot feature. 

9.3 per cent. At that rate it is A m doubt apocryphal 
certainly worth giving the stor y K us of the rush to buy 
company the benefit of the children’s size clothes when 
doubt. the first joint venture store 

HiividsOQ Pearce opened in Japan. Now the 
LTdVma group has made the necessary 

* adjustments to the product 

wOuP range. There arc plans to 

Davidson Pearce Group, the open 28 stores oyer the next 
advertising agency which three years, bringing the lota! 
came to the market a year to 30. 
ago, has suffered from a The unique nature of the 
downturn in advertising, and business and the prospects ot 
public relations companies. a growth rate of about 30 per 
The legacy of Saatchi & cent a year has pul the shares 
Saatchi’s rights issue and on a 50 per cent premium to 
business losses, with more the sector and an 80 per cent 
staff defections at Good Rela- premium to the market On a 
lions, has cast a shadow on current year forecast ot ±-4 
the sector. million (earnings per share 

Davidson’s shares, there- 7.6pL the p/c ratio is a 
fore, continue to trade below demanding 23.4. More than 
160p, at which they were 90 per cent of the non-family 
initially offered, despite beat- shareholders own under a 
ing the forecast in the thousand shares and are 
prospectus. probably long-term holders. 

Yesterday’s announcement Although the fundamentals 
of a 14.2 per cent increase in are reasonable, the shares are 
pretax profits for the half likely to continue to attract 
year, coupled with a margin private rather than institu- 
improvemem and earnings tional interest 


At County, our rapid growth orer a fairly short period of time 
has something to do with the fact that we'd rather look for- 
wards than backwards. 

So, to begin with uncharacteristic retrospection; in corporate 

finance, Cctfrty has quiddy developed a successful, distme- 
tnre ami wide-ranging approach. 

Developing strengths originally in services to smaller com- 
panies, through County Development Capital and through a 
particular expertise in flotations. 

And then achieving credibility on a much larger scale -so 

AThe NatWest Investment Bank Group 


ftat 'm recent years, we've been involved in some very si*- 
stantial M&A activities indeed. 

White, at the same fine, developing something of a reputation. 
For what might po&tety he known as a proactive approach. 
(Or a Btite less politely as, well, aggressive.) 

And also for a remarkable commitment to continuity of 
management mid of client relationships. 

But what of the future? 

Certainty we seethe continuing development of many of our 
present sendees - in areas from advising companies and 


underwriting, to development capitaL 
We see our involvement with the very largest corporations 
continuing to grove 

And above all we see County as the specialists not in one 
kind of service or another, or in one size of company or 
another - but rather, in companies that want to grow, 
it's a description which fits our present clients pretty 
accurately. 

How does it fit you? 

County Limited 
N obody's in better shape 


* 'f ■* On i.ne >r.$t'uctiOns of 'f.e 
Receiver tor *be 
Vetrcpd.'ian Ponce D.-str:c: 


Wray House 

Elystan Street, 
Chelsea SW3 

Residential block 
comprising 114 fiats 
with refurbishment 
potential on site of 
1-26 acres 

Freehold For Sale 

with full Vacant 
possession 


Foil details 
from 




riMrq 


wepnesdavo ctobp^ , , 


ST0C K EXCHANGE PR 



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INDEX-UNKED 

>£J i >4*. rnm it 2% ism 

107»» U'; Tter O 2% 1090 
1£2 108V Tran 0 2% 1896 
10T> 9S 1 . Tiflw H2’.a% 2001 
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BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 1 1986 


THE TIMES UNIT-TRUST INFORMATION SERVICE 


B-3 Otto. Cling YU 


Be OlfH enng rid 


BC Oner Cmg YU 


Be Otter Otng 


Be 0»er Ong 


Bu On* enng ru 


f raw t ag u me 


Gaom he M 

. Do Accun 3424 

henna FmJ ef) inj 

Do Aeon ffl !7 BlS 

1K6 

DO Ac cun p) 1870 

Gnra er Irg ftT £1191 

Do ocean (5) n2J7 

anMBHMHBOB 
•as. HU" Honm unn 

01-2*9 1148 

CS Japan Fuid 91 S 


513* +03 300 

535.0 . . 3.10 

399 7 .. aid 

107A . . 404 

1084 .. 404 

1316# . . 098 

17S.Q .. 136 

1234 . . 374 

1114 . . 174 


B«#bui tana 8Z2 SBO -03 38* 


Batanced on he *53 479c 

Do Accun 459 417c 

home 0*1 he 41 1 437 

Do Acorn 411 418 

Sana Co * he 90-0 512 

Do «m 50.8 sag 


CS Japan Fwd 


973 413 029 


CANNON HIM fetAMAOStS 

oi-SKrSjwa***' ” ra * y - ""S ®* 


»wr «U- Tortnooe. TN9 IDT 
0732 361144 


Far Eaal 
North Anaun 


2722 2898 -14 IB 

2 3375 -15 188 

225 1 2394 -14 023 

1413 1508 -07 081 

482 6134* -0.1 180 

624 957* -08 130 

901 H94 -08 080 


capel (JAMep awi aoomut 
E ptaW Marta London EC3 7JQ 

01-821 0011 

Capital 359.7 38*96 -28 185 

•NWh 2748 733 Sc -1.7 518 

North American 7731 2921 -09 099 

CATCH ALLEN 

1- Mng Mean SL EC*N 7 AU 


Amaral 907 1012 

Amar Eauhr hcoma 330 358 
Amar Spaoai 9aa SOB 5*2 
AumlB 210 238 

Ernpaan 411 *19 

Fir East he 395 319 

09 5 Fowl hi 298 308e 
□rartltana 82E 696 
Japan Spactal Sts 438 47.0 
Japan 1417 1693 

Mjnagad H 1418 1522 

Max Income Equrt 783 B13# 
Fraunoml Oh 320 S4M 
South East Asa 31* 373* 
Spadal an 1917 17U7N 


01-623 8314 
DO Trial 


CENTRAL BOARD OF FINANCE OF 
CHURCH OF BOJUO 
2. Fua SeaoL London EC2V SAO 
01-588 1815 


Aramcan Exaora £341.1 34950 
Japan Exempt £445.1 *597 
Am Pmpnrty T9 SlOOOO Q 

Propany Truxt CT230 • 


1 London WM1 Boat. London 
6C2M SNO 
O1-0Z0 5181 

Amar a Gan me 2138 2TIM 

So Aeon 2192 232.0. 


WABHANBIDUI IWB9H9SBB 
g/73 Bas*Hp ra anat London ECZV 5DP 

8 4 C Spadal Sat 558 595 .. O 


Amar Twnamo he 2060 219.0 


Capra Tat he 
Do Mom 


CMARrTTESQFFnAL 9NESTMEKT rum 
2 Fora Sonet. London EC2T SAO 
01488 1815 


Do Mom 
Con* A Got he 
Do Accun 

Exaa he T« he 
Oo Accun 
Incoma Truat 
Do Accnm 
MOmti Ffl he 
Oo Accum 


2118 2272 
200 4 213041 
244.0 259.40 
652 908 
1130 1204 


060G 373393 
Amar Growth 
EqUty Ugh heoraa 
Eurooaan Grow* 
General Equity 
cat A Run H Gh 
an A Fined he 
hoax Saamaao 
Japan Growth 
Patera# Gti 


224 239 
413 448* 
292 31 ,1c 
372 396 
27 1 288 
23 3 246# 
245 2S8 
36 0 384 
23.1 248 


Recovery 
Do Accun 
European he 
Oo Accun 


1732 1842 
1128 1196 
1114 1258 
1593 1698 
1798 1980 
638 981 
942 995 

80 4 65 4# 

1348 1414 
1*18 1568 
634 67.4 
83.4 87.4 


P u Jram End. OorWng. Sum* 
0308 895056 


FP Eoxt) Dm 
Do Accum 
FP Rxad N DM 
Oo Aeon 









COUNTY UT MANAGERS LTD 
16i. Cnemnde, London EC2V 8 EU 
01-726 1999 


1904 202.1 
3173 3388 
1058 1125 
1205 128.1 
1682 I76i4 
171.6 182.1 


I SKSi 

Fma ndai 
G<l Strategy 


472 502* 
1802 1714c 
1652 1735 
34 3 565 


Grown Investment 2714 2908 
hot lin e A ttuwtfi 392 418* 


Km Anar Growth 
Ml Raoovary 
Scalar Go's 
Gtt* he Tst 
Special 8b Ace 


2072 2208# 
906 1050 
11*8 122.1 
208.7 2192a 
992 632a 
Z7SA 2972 


♦04 184 
-12 552 
-12 228 
-08 2.17 
-25 257 
-05 171 
+34 056 
-02 1.60 
-1.0 185 
-05 253 
-02 586 
-12 1.42 


RJNDSM COURT 

Puttc Trustaa Mna maa r WC2 

01-405 4300 

Capa* 387.8 3618c 

Grass Inc 1472 151.7 

MgtlYMO 217.1 2Z75a 



1522 165 -03 159 

51.6 5*2 -0.1 171 

1112 1119 -08 358 

1111 1272 -08 258 


MURRAY JOHNSTONE IMT TRUST 


1115 1345# +02 132 
2587 3772a -1.7 125 
2129 2272 -08 123 


NATIONAL PROMOCNr HVESIWir 


41 Gncacnucn SL ECS 1 3W* 

01423 4200 Ext 280 

NPI UK 16.1 20*2 -18 280 

Oo ACCUB 3099 329.7 -18 280 

NPI Ovanaax 8128 8929# +98 090 

Do Accun 7499 7972# +122 090 

Far Ea* Ace toil 1015a +*5 110 

American Acc E85 82.1 -02 I JO 

Euttmean Acc fill S97e +08 020 

WDMwMa ACC 537 62* +15 280 


NORWICH IIT MANAGERS 
FO Boa 4. N orwi ch NR1 3NG 

nftra wMw ai 

Grow That *1183 1224 -OB 188 
tad Toot 1358 1422c +07 121 


08. Cwamn Street. Londui EOM 1 
fllN h gt 01-888 3BSY»7/8/9A» 
Mam a Bon * Growl) 1408 T96 l 6 
Run A Growth 385 024c 

WtendaAB B Rac 882 944 

American Grown 315 335# 

Jams Growth 81.7 888 

Eucpean Growth 702 719 

UK Growth 532 672 

Pxoflc Growth 802 534 

Mpta* 342 364c 

PraoeM income 532 575# 

Do Accum 987 105.1# 


FCARL TRUST 

^hHobmLWCWTEB. 


01-4051441 
Growth Fund he 
Do Accun 
Income Find 


W 0 o E 5Sr : 

UM Truai Inc 
Do Accun 


882 915 
133.1 1418 
1185 1259c 
1349 1435# 
1310 144.7# 
1342 1322 
2152 2292 


PERPETUAL UNTT TRUST 

41 Ken Street IhiCey On There*# 


0481 578988 
k* Growth 


ha Bnare Co a 
Far East On# 
Empaoi GOi 


2885 2872c 
1882 1992a 
1172 1897 
85.0 704 
781 81.7 
798 867 
603 647 


moune nor trusts 


GT UNIT MANAGERS 
0th Root. 8. Oavanah 
01-283 2575 Dung 


CROWN UMT TRUST SERVICES 
Crown House, woeng GU21 1XW 
048825033 

High hem Trust 2322 2492c 
Growth Trust 2095 2239 

Amenesn Trust 1215 1298 


Do Acxua 
tartFun 
Psnoon Exempt 


CRUSADER UMT TRUST MANA0ER8 LTD 


US A Getter* 
Taeti A Growth 
Jepan A Gan ar* 
F* Ex* A Gan 
Cuo paa n Find 
Germany Find 


m 5a London 
01-826 9431 
938 1005 
1312 144 7 

785 815# 
1725 180.7 
1856 1712 
533 67.1 
575 618 
266.1 2816 
1264 1352 
287.4 2868 
738 717c 


RUgtt e. Suray HH2 8BL 
07*72 4242* 

UK hem 468 501 -05 <87 

UK GrowW Accum 413 485 -05 2X9 

DO an 403 435 -03 2.43 

fisnp een (frowth 565 569 +0.1 123 

Pedic&owh 992 635 +15 -- 







aS 










•‘x.B 






aARTMORE FUND MANAGStS 


Z St Mary Ax*, union EC3A 8BP 
01-823 1212 DasBng 01-823 5788 DM 


Amartcwi Trust 795 
Ausetfhn That 222 
Brash Tit Accum 573 
Do DM 487 

C ommo n 9mn 54.7 
European Thai 545 
Extra ncome Thai 47.4 
Far Ewtani Trust 1812 
Had tatareat Fuid 259 
041 Trust 245 

GtaBM Had Accun 1819 
Do Oat 1735 

Odd Share That 15.7 
hsagsd Amancan 299 
Hrti Income Trust 1372 
Hero Kaw Trust 312 
femme Fuid 725 

tasuance Agencies £4502 ■ 
Japan Thai 1572 


Uswn Eanp 2S99 
□i 5 Erwgy Trust 33.1 
Special Ms Trust 87.6 
Uk Sndr CS Rsc Tn 712 





l 1 : '!!) V, 1 






Bath Real COsnsrihsm. GhWCBSWr GL63 710 
0242 521311 

UK Balanced he 675 71.7 -0.1 296 

DO Accum 685 722 -11 292 


C Smtr Co Rac Tsi 712 


-12 050 
-4L4 027 
-07 OB 
-08 088 
-01 151 
-0.1 050 
-09 555 
+15 080 
.. 1050 
-05 9 16 
♦12 aiB 
+15 0.10 
.. 126 
-05 0.10 
-25 5. 88 
♦06 093 
-15 352 
-053 2.18 
+&1 (LOO 
-14 1*2 

.. 1.73 

-15 092 
-12 055 


061-236 9685 or 083-3361 

1 


S2',S G< " 

*26 

459a 

-06 £05 

820 

897# 

.. ia« 

rtghar me 

114 7 1216 

-03 933 

income 

471 

SOI 

-04 195 

intamaaonef 

2S7.1 

2746 

-22 1.00 

KLBNW0RTBSN80 

N 



20. rmntxxch Sl London 


01-623 8000 

Amar Grown he 

813 

856 

-07 135 

Do Accun 

626 

094 

-OJ .. 

Fund few Tsi file 

20.1 

215# 

-ai 231 

Oo Accun 

256 

Z76# 

-11 .. 

>+ra Yield fee 

Do Accum 

124.8 1327 

-1.7 543 

207.7 221.2 

-17 .. 

tat Recovery Me 

1015 

1011 

-03 192 

Da *aun 

1099 

1198 

-06 .. 

Japan Growth tac 
Do Accun 

100.7 

1192 

+16 124 

1099 

1197 

+18 .. 

Smer Col tac 

1565 IBS 9# 

-06 111 

Do Accun 

2 0*3 216 0 

-13 .. 

UK Eg Growth tac 

275 

29.1# 

-04 095 

Do Accum 

493 

430 

-07 .. 

VYorfdvraa Taon tac 

385 

405# 

-14 1JS 

Oo Aeeua 

397 

412# 

-13 .. 


ANAOE 

■s 


nercy Housa. Cope 

01-588 2800 

ra Are 

. EC2H 1 

'BE 

tacoou Futo 

*202 *31.0 

.. 920 

tataroaaon* X Gan 

2*9.1 

2542 

.. 1.08 


Con* A G8t 
Far Eeaum 


117.7 1265c 
996 6Ma 
965 1038# 
1785 1945# 
1242 1348c 
87.1 725a 

1082 1172 
BS5 922# 


51-68. IM HR, Hud 
01-478 3377 


3868 4115C -29 133 

10*2 1112 +02 054 

5ZJ 55.8 -05 OB 

62.1 662# -05 1.67 

1009 1073 +0.7 021 

1017 1115# +15 025 
705 75.1 +0.1 0.80 

615 85J -06 2.13 


Am* Tad l Gan 


772 824# -05 225 


Sac Income Fhd 
Sped* Shota* 
M Growth 


Smsfl CD's 3B9 41 Ji 

Japan Tat* A Gan 1117 iei7 
tatamaOon* Income 537 595 


Road. Brarswood 


1 Gron a EiJnUrgh &12 2XZ 
031 225 2552 


^aSsr 

Oo heoma 
European 
Far Easwm 

am Trust 

□ seta Eoucy 


N Amancan Tiust 
UK Sp*a*3b 


2517 2717# 
4Q52 4377# 
50 6 617 
756 00.9 
1220 1309# 
735 173c 
841 899 
638 665# 
717 62-0 
604 616 


844 3B5c -05 288 
27.1 292o -0.7 229 


DO Accum 885 728 

UK ftoam Accum 833 889 
UK H*I Inc he 642 885 
N Amancan accun 64 7 990 
Fsr Ecnsm Accun 1122 118.7 
Emo cx n Accun 813 92J> 
UK 04 1 FI he 50.7 54.1 
Do Accun 525 552 


675 71.7 -0.1 286 

685 722 -0.1 292 

833 819 222 

142 695 -05 5J9 

64 7 990 -0.1 026 

1125 119.7 *12 OBJ 

885 91 2# +08 1-10 

50.7 54.1 -05 186 

525 558 -05 158 


ENDURANCE FUND MANAGEMENT LTD 


am Gang*, irwsgnn Hobo. 29. wasHtn 
Road. Roudard HM1 3LB 
070 0 069 00 


GOVETT (JQMq (JWT MANAGD8B4T 
mnenssur Has. 77. London w*. lombi EC 2 N 

01-588 5620 

wami 79.4 842 -05 123 

Arnmn Grown 6 a 1 810 +0.1 090 

t 842 71 '• +0-1 559 

^°p+ar i Qrow h 2341 258 6 c -0.6 024 

Gold 1 Mnsrsts 432 452 -02 IB 

Japan Grown 1532 165.1 -Ot .. 


LLOYDS BANK UMTTRUST MANAOBIS 
Ra# 3 tmrs Dpt Gormg«y-S*x. Worms. W 


Oo Accum 
Energy ns 
Do Accun 

Do Accun 
Gumsn Gfi he 
Do Accun 


35. FouSrti SL l 
061 239 5885 


GRE1MTMAHA1 WRS 
Royal Eshanan. EC3P SDN 
01088 9903 

G* i Rxad hit 1105 ^ 
Growth Equity 1915 i 


NWi Income Trust 
Ga 8 Fixed hit 
Tm Of har Thaw 


Sped* Sts That 
Mi Amar Trust 
Far Eastern Trust 
mfl Growth 


722 786c 
745 711 
417 51.9 
615 855 
695 740# 
555 fill# 
817 914 
52 2 55.4 


Paoftc 

Proputy 9m 


1105 1117# .. 067 

1915 2035 -09 IB 

2822 2725# -15 3.04 
135.7 144.4 -08 151 


2505 2865 
2599 1765 


Smafcr Gatnpwaas 207.0 2205 
European Trust 2552 2 ” 3 


Do Accun 
hg Tsoi 
Do Accun 
Japon Grown 
Do Aacun 
N Amsr 1 Gan 
Do Aeon 
Pacific Beta 
Oo Accun 
Snosw Con 1 Roc 
Do Accun 
WertNnde Growth 
Do Accun 
IM Growth Fuid 


1718 18S8 
3098 331 1 
510 555# 
583 523# 
154 5 1952 
1788 2S8.1 
712 775 
712 775 
2613 2794 
5143 5502 

105.7 IBS 
194 o 207.4 

■75 935 
872 93fi 
968 1035 
>045 1115 
1382 1415 
1«5.1 15S.1 

187.7 200.7 
2111 2245 
2068 221 1 
2907 3109 

414 418 


-02 058 
-12 058 
-01 *77 
-1 4 4.77 
-12 054 
-1.1 054 
+1.4 022 
+14 022 
-05 IB 
-as IB 
+15 021 
+1.7 021 
-15 159 
-11 159 
+12 088 
+15 088 
-02 108 


EQUITY A LAW 

SL Georg* Hs* CorporeH U i SL Coventry CV1 
190 

UK Grown Accun 1*49 'l54 lc -13 850 

Do heoma 1255 1335c -22 36 0 

HHW he ACCUOI 2425 2S82c -35 455 

Do hem 1902 2075c -17 495 

aax/Hxed Accum 94.1 992# -05 920 

Do ncm 779 822# -04 920 

Nth Amar TW Accun 1285 I37.ic -04 056 

For East TM Accum 169.7 I80SC +10 027 

Euro Tst Accum 1605 1765# +1.1 125 

Goner* Tram 2325 247.7# -32 355 


LONDON 1 MANOCSm 
JAnaaoa Park. ExeWr EX3 IDS 
0392 52155 

GanerWTru* 41 8 44 8 

heoma Tn*t 353 37 Ik 

tawi ox o n * Trust 314 392 


3S3 378# -01 6-50 

314 399 +02 0 70 

30 8 33 1 .200 


47.7 51.10 +05 020 




F A C UNIT MANAGEMENT 

1. Laumnca Poumsy m. London EC*fl OBA 

01-623 4680 

US Srradhr Ctfa 695 745« -01027 

CKM* Fond 1065 114 4# +08 058 

rneum# Fuid 754 807# -OB 490 

Fir Esstwn Fund 715 815# -05 050 

Oasrsnss hem 732 793 +07 3*9 

Foad narxst 515 606 ..800 

NUFW Rax Fund 417 4 99 +07 347 


■lasECuRmEs 

Tmtt-ja.TnmrHNHaRfiBO 


Anar 1 Gen Inc 2115 2274 
(to Accun 247 8 285.1 

Amt Recovery 23*6 2512 

Da Accum 2559 2718 

Am Mubr Co Acc 558 50.1 
An* he Acc 1015 109.0 

ConxoodheAce 2209 235 4 
Compamd Grow# *m.O *331 
Commrpui Grow* 321.7 3474 
_ Po 11*2 1953 

Owd*nd Fund he *03 7 SZ73 
Do Accun £1164 T255 

Euo he Ace 2704 2816 


2115 2774 -13 1ST 

2*71 285.1 -18 151 

23*6 2812 -1.7 062 

2555 2735 -22 052 

555 501 -05 a« 

1015 1092 -1.1 055 

2202 2354 +35 178 

401.0 4311 -0.7 316 

321.7 3474 -0.1 177 

1042 1955# -07 114 


-1.1 522 
-OB 522 
-05 109 




UK Equty 162.1 1725c 

<34 « Rxao 1075 1144c 

UK Bm* Goto Bj 1*4.1 1535c 

tlro aaan 2115 225.1c 

N Amerkun 1112 1114e 

Pacific 1835 2082c 


■COTTMN UMT TRUST 
29. CtmtOM Ba BHutfl 
031-228 4332 


H Amarlcm 
I nux n * Fund 
Euupaan 
N Amar Inc 
UK Growth 
Exnlnc 


PO Box 902. EACxxgh StIB SBU 
031-656 8000 


The prices in this 
• section refer to 
Monday’s trading 


• Ex dW Da nd. c Cun (Mdend. k Cum 
stock spSt s Ex stock spn. m Cum all 
(any two or more of aDowV a Ex a* (any 
two or mors at above). Deting or 


(2D) 25th of month. (21) 2nd Thursday of 
month. (22) 1st and Sre Wednesday of 
montti. 20th of month. (24) 3ttJ 
Tuesday of m onth. (25) 1st and 3rd 
Thursday of month (35) 4th Tuesday of 
month. (27) let Wednesday of mordh. (28) 
Last Thursday of BKMh (2S) 3id working 
diy of month. (30) 16th of month pi) 1st 
wortong day of month. (32) 20th of month 
(33) 1st day of February, May, August 
November, (3a) Lam working day of 
month (35) 15th of month (36) inn of 
month (37) 2ia of month. P8) 3rd 
Wednesday of mon th . (39) 2nd 
Wednesday of month. (40) Vaiuod 
monthly. (41) Last Thursday of Slock 
Exchange account (42) Last day of 
month. (43) 2nd and 4th Wednesday of 
month (44) Ouaneny. (45) 6th of month. 
(46) 2nd Tuesday or month 


UNLISTED SECURITIES 


INVESTMENT TRUSTS 


15 B'.- A i M Op 9*1 

60 *5 ATA Satecooi 50 

130 93 UMpM 117 

69 33 AOaroMn S8r Hsa 45 

1*3 45 Accbm Sxartn 

106 32 Acorn Ccanp 43 

21 6'i Aon Jewelry IS 

72 10 'j Aaan Labire i* 

123 98 Ai'sxmg 98 


297 204 AWi 

173 152 Anqka Sa 
121 99 Aria* 

165 131 AOPWPM 


Aiwka Secure im its 
A nir 110 


06 62 135 

11 42114 

35 XI 1X7 
ai is ns 
421 .. .. 
.. ..30 

.. .. 80 
.. .. 15 

7.7 73 .. 
95 35 14.1 
13 14 235 


290 210 Ann HoKjgrxphics 719 
ao TO Oo Wma 193 


355 163 Aspen Conans 310 

180 no Aspnaa 110 

020 4*3 Aspray 5*3 

*0 16 Aaaoc Enerey 32 

233 174 ASO ’ 1» 

129 122 Altai Eoutpment 121 

95 El Auionunc S3 

70 60 BBB Dasgn 69 

228 105 BPP 190 

85 68 ETTS Oro 00 

133 50 EMtaRfmawre 08 

28 12 BeraieCI B FouBIfi 25 *j 

53 31 Boraonx CrBpa 40 

17’.- T, Bartaiey 6 Hay 1S>. 

91 26 Bartwtey Exp 32 

2*5 139 Barvrta y Gp 218 

30 11 Bio lxe«x>M 11 

34 18 Btomechanec 27 

44 40 &o* 40 ‘a 

135 09 Bancrurt* 100 

233 1B5 ESuaora Toys 233 

TW 135 Bound 135 

27 19 BroMnahar 20 

210 B5 BrfcU 97 

200 125 Brim 200 

130 75 Brtanra Sac 125 

250 185 Hr OoadsUck 155 

59 50 Br Hand 50 

59 49 Broad SI 49 

59 49 Broad 51 40 

350 I7S Brooumunt 283 

163 115 Brow lOiaiXal 180 

345 195 Bryant (Dunk) 223 

9 2 Bda Ragout** 2 

92 73 CCA Gawnea 90 

1B0 125 CM. MtcTO 150 

36 SL CPS Comp 6'* 

42 25 CPU Comp 28 

19S 130 CVD 145 

320 85 Catenarian ON 90 

69 62 Camcaacfi 65 

147 68 Conran Street tnv 1*3 

350 213 Central TV 3*3 

120 64 Omary Sad 112 

143 83 cnaor p o tr n Europe 130 

132 125 CMW Min 129 

IB 6'.- CToro UMUt 6'r 

253 120 OwatWi W 200 

17 9'< CPer 10 

40 25 CayWMn 30 

603 475 CayvOtan 74L 530 

115 70 Onxpm 71 

173 152 Oarta Hoop* 158 


44 1.4 32-3 

86 73 S3 
143 16 15.6 
. . ..73 

114 6.4 7.7 
7JI 05 11.6 
06 101 116 
14 10 105 

7.1 3 7 155 

5.7 7 1 9.4 
64 73 12 
06 14 27.4 
.. .. 113 

.. ..219 

.. ..45 

10 14 245 


15 44 10.1 
64 55 11.7 
10 It 165 


1.1 S3 108 
65 63 06 


110 1.7 204 
125 75 78 
*JJ 09 105 
15 33 .. 
Ifib 33 .. 
55 Ifi 15.4 
XB 13 23* 
If 6b S3 73 


34 35 10* 
16 1 7 154 

14 224 33 
.. a .. 155 


29 45 133 
36 15 213 
205 58 135 

XI 18 135 
. . . . 11.4 

31 14 213 

35 483 .. 
S3 25 213 
. . a . . U 


181 1*3 

90 51 
42 18 
133 123 
73 S3 

85 31 
208 100 

60 30 

88 84 

220 130 
112 86 
336 210 
148 94 
150 83 

47 35 

05 72 

165 100 
17 11 

60 32 

188 78 

1*3 08 

128 95 

91 50 

140 118 
38 19 

115 81 'i 
190 ISO 

86 58 
228 133 
256 196 

46 28 

480 3B3'j 
390 283'j 
150 IC’l 
415 170 
205 *5 

»i as 

30 'f 7 

119 165 
133 IB 
158 112 
26 22 
14 B'f 

188 115 
255 108 
230 IK 

31 13 
IIS 44 
103 SB 
353 190 

32 21 
3SD 233 
190 118 
26 2 

1« 105 

120 73 

70 40 

330 253 

92 67 
320 220 

83 53 

113 50 


Correuny 


an 7x3 

Cfi gn pence % P/E 


J*qi Low Company 


Gtom 
erv YW 
• penoa % PIE 


Mgti Low Con#my 


or* «d 
i pence % P/E 


F * H Grow 1*3 

FeadDack 53 

FaraNxnol i 21 

SSLy, '8 


35 7.4 181 

1.7 81 1 7 


Ftoges 188 

Floyd 04 30 

Fere a watton ba 

French Garni 131 

Fraaiwaw in 

Ftrtr Snap! W 331 

Gafibco 142 

I 

Otem Lyuw B3 

CB50B Maw 155 


36 S3 158 

.. .. 86 


tWcmatncs 
OStorra B Vnfi* 
Dnnar* Aoroad 
PCT 

Parer Sjdtan# 
Paofic $*n 


46 

♦1 75 

17 

59 

I .. 46 

37 

-1 14 

.. 5fi 

I .. SI 


PvrtUd Gp 
PetA M La# 


OkXuJ Go 44 

Godwwi Wxnxn 81 

□oocfwxd Print 128 

GaUO rUnvance) 106 

Srury* Suflu* 65 

Grawi (Eroaat) IB 

□ ran * eh Crete V 

Groevenor Sq U 

Guanoey Aaatwe iw 

Hampden Konwcaro es 

Harvey S Thomo 210 

HavWocfc Eucpa 230 

Ha«tn Cara 41 

Haevma *30 

Do -A* LV 390 

Hendtraen Pntne i» 

HpvFom 170 

HtaHano Pan *5 

Mia ErDDnun M 


36 

31 

I .. 46 

86 

30 

-2 4.9 


Penonai Comouar 
Pmars (Uenaen 
Puro c an 
P-taci y Raoo 
P er Pat 


Rvyuch Manra 


• .. ae 

35 

-3 11 

• -5 66 

• -3 57 


Pitre?** 
Prcp tn y T# ISp 
Do Bp 
Guam 
Rate Cny A 
Rote Oyda 
Rate* 

Rxmco or 

Rwras 

Rjndxwrrm 


38 

» 

281 -4 

34-. 

118 • .. 
170 

53 • .. 

148 -7 

181 a -2 

54 

18 

160 #-3 

120 -3 

28 
105 

U9 

18 +2 

28 • 

22 +3 

W -2 

48 

143 -3 

90 

•5 • 

*J 

2D». 

2006’t .. 

US • 

S 

53 .3 

93 • -2 

12 


*3 16 209 
11 81 9 7 

46 39 136 


4.3 81116 
53 18185 
5.1 16 iao 
. e . . 236 
.. ..36 

4.7 19 154 
36b 26 566 

1.7 61 B 6 

4 3 4.1 10-7 
17 17 176 


19 104 117 
..44 


16 21 19 

44 11 10* 

5* 6.0 12.0 

19 14 IU 
36 36 10.7 


Hodgson 1J0 

HBktan Hwnnun 123 

H um an mtacson 112 

Hugfiai Food 23 

Hurund Ban 8 

HUM Sater J61 

£3^ iS 

Mac 3 

md Scot Enemy 5 

inbaRed as 

tunnpa TacP 213 

Bra* (Jack L) 23 

JS Pamctooy 315 

.larawi Van 178 

jabaons B 

J OUia afi 1 Jcrg IB 

Johnsaonaa Pnott 100 

Just Ritter 56 

KLP 295 

Ktan (JOhnj JS 

Kenyon Sere 320 

Kama SreWB 53 

Kbrt-Tab* 50 


10 25 19.7 

4B 17 156 


1*3 0-5 

56 

103 +2 


B6 14 125 
. . a . 93 

4 6 17 175 
14 15 14 0 

. a 29 
75 85 146 

04 1.0 .. 

19 4.1 205 
.. 126 
01 0.1 .. 
0.0 09 . 

26 10 44 4 


0.7 36 165 

0.4 50 0 0 

30 22 210 

11 1.1 226 
36 11 ISO 
30 211 16 
.. ..106 


83 36 107 
07 30 17 8 

33 15 283 

76 A A 152 
.. a .. 06 
60 56 126 

6.1b 5.1 11.1 

25 45 96 

47 16 166 

26 31 11* 
1*6 4.7 115 

1.7 36 76 
1.4b 26 91 


25’.- 11 CUtei Odd 3 'j 

40 25 C tod OU Hdra 35 

113 87 Coawd O a cfr oda x 105 


15 21 02 
36 21 21 .4 


l ante* Thunon 100 

L«awe «n 50 

Laa x xar IB 

Lac* Lon Gp 151 


113 87 Comad narfrodei IDS 

95 53 Cobra Emerald 81 

130 21 COtne 123 

IB 21 Cowgan Me 29 

175 110 Comp Financial 153 

53 30 Ctxraxofi 3» 

130 7* CoraUama 130 

BO 38 Cons Tam Invs 46 

343 208 Cort MtoowM 270 

I OB 05 Curtis 93 

143 SB CPU 100 

415 3 B Cremonom 320 

78 48 Cienorooh 50 

114 06 Crtnewa* 110 

138 re Craton m age B 

198 168 O P un ton Labx 100 

IB 58 crown TV Rod 71 

97 75 Croats 95 

73 43 DM Tech « 

183 tl« DOT 175 

1*0 78 OJ Sec Alarms 100 

91 63 Devui « 

210 100 Dt*l45( 0Y) 202 

84 55 Dean B Boaos 76 

a 20 Da Brett (Andrei a*'r 

145 13* P aWor 1« 

57 40 Oumar *S 

IX 100 mweom _ 'J" 

y ?9 70 Detanuu Sec ® 

106 6 B Dewey Warren re 

230 130 M« » 


11 10 291 

.. .59 

16 15 203 
7.1*154 306 
B A 14 IS5 

17 4.0 126 

15 25 140 
7.4 2J212 
17# 1 4 112 
76 06 95 
26 14 175 
56 26 210 

50 95 14 0 

19 1.6 106 


ton B Optae# a 113 

Lulu Baa <01 

Lyxuidar RN 21 

MS Cash fi Carry « 

MMT Cun# 250 

MCLau#rt< A Her 120 


36 52 7 A 
41 55 78 

58 52 130 

. . . . 246 

16 38 126 
SO 33 17 0 
26 33 115 
06 71 102 

16 ZJJ 159 


Mammal K 

Mama Dm 08 

Mortal [Ronald) 160 

jjSSr« 7 

Mea d ow Farm 293 

Mate Tsai 1« 


U-, 3 ?# S5S. l 
,% ,S (ft WWW -I 
J'aS SSftt- S 

^ B Ete 0* * &».. » 

4M 9 44 Sdruga W ' A J 7 ? 

av issm- i 

S SSk—'-yJS 

215 122 EWB ^ ,00 

112 1® EwiOonrtvUWn » 
31U 138 F" 235 

1 & 1 BCBGB 


1.7 1.0 152 

11 II 82 
l.a 11 116 
46 £4 215 

18 4.7 106 
04 IS 146 

57 4.1 . . 

26 04 08 

19 2A 166 
54 68 81 

10.7a 1*3 5 1 
70 31 126 

58 16 296 
06 16 111 

25 46 157 

11 14 214 

04 16 214 

86 36 146 
.. a .. e IS 
06 25 175 
46 <0 156 

26 28126 


Memory Cura 15 

Mamc om me Mdga 32 
MamnanGwaai 135 

MaaTSSara” 115 


Mara BUWtn 115 

MMsac £ 

m um* t **n) re 

HaoUm fin 

Urtteaxa 100 


• . *3 

54 

«+7 4 0 

• . 44 

232 
+ 14 5 0 

-3 38 

#-5 afi 

• . 53 

37 


-0 28 
57 


M IBD 53 
71 51 117 

54 00 120 


220 130 
47 13 

158 IB 

IM ffl 
158 127 
50 25 
23'; «'* 
IIS 03 
192 125 
367 237 
M • 
5'; O'r 

20 M 

« ra 

77 73 

21 10 
150 91 
ISO SO 

165 aa 

46 14 


; 3AC 118 

I Sangare Praco 0* 

! Sosohire Pei 12 

i Saveea ta « 

) Scans 113 

) Sen Nanus# lag 

Seeuncuara 138 

’ 5*t*cYV 20 

STOivfi+cx 3+5 

IT »tare Drug sex 305 

I - : Sratacn Jones 90 

i srnwood Comp r« 

I 9 i«d iea 

I Srgmm 83 

I Sans Cnnu 1» 

I &rda» (WOaml 190 

I Sroexra 155 

Srawcm Bnega 105 

i Souroncxx X 

\ Sum 9us 1*3 

Sw Rasoucaa 12 

St are ^mrq 90 

Swore Auto 58 

1 Sooerrom 28 

Spre S3 

Splun 85 

Scsmass Maul 165 

5--»-r,ng Put) 105 

T S u ae an Elea 25 

S anwtw rc IET) <3 

Swacan +r Nora ns 

5ynapsa Ccmo 190 

T 4 S Stores 235 

T3S Croxi 103 

TVO Ad-ed 116 

Tav Pvre ns 

Toy Hera* 153 

T acn Fn Bus 75 

Tech Cone 310 

Tawcomauw*, 173 

T*l Sar. mt S3 

fi+ira iso 

1>+r-i So nrai c 211 

Trmpac Bi 

T+s*. rEXxai 45 

Tod r*4Ji 143 

Tcwr^-aj# Sac 35 

Trace Premcoen iB7 

T-ancnerwcod 405 

Tra«n so 

T*ra Toes a 235 

me Ceram* 75 

UH Fr+nay 648 

L« Pjwapnj 105 

WO Ta Cada 350 

Usnar irraraj SB 


Ota TM 

Cfa-ga puts* K pje 


11 16 206 
11 17 246 

.16 
*6 35 17 0 
5.7 5 0 92 
48 11 129 
19 11 213 


Moonuia Gp 130 

Manna X Crane 120 

Uonotyse IS 

Moray mre *a 

Moms (W#am) 19 


10 

+2 39 


imw Ccn# 27o 

New a nut (to a 

Da V*na 1 

Ww Engano Press 16 
Do I*. £80 

H a w eg e Tram 73 


35 

43 

-5 86 

r -1 


10 *'• 
7TT >5’. 
490 98 

» *a 

210 151 
220 140 
98 S3 


0 125 . 

5.0 88 86 


Nora* ISO 

Nornam SO 

Hincdl Hows 155 

Ntn Su ( Gan 24 


1+2 4J 2 9 19 5 
16 2.0 5* 
-8 3 4 U 17 0 

40 


Watter EJacSu 1C5 

AWCJC 15 

wns TertshDa 98 

AfiCAW 181 

WfiUaa* Swt B 

WAam (Rex) Hipn 17'.- 

tv+cj-a 405 

vrcia 5a 

n»«tar 215 

W« S! Lfxr* 158 

9i*a 65 

*y*yx 2004 

Y+'OT a nmar 133 

»a N ent m 3A 

•o* Mon 72 

Yen, i Jaoy M 

D3 BJ- £« 

Znv Emamci 35 


56 16 416 

26 103*9 

86 76 86 
+ 6 19 289 

29 17 fflO 

ea i6 at 

5.7 42 165 

75 39 116 

5.1 36 145 
19 17 126 

1.7 4 7 10.7 
43 10 12 

. . 49 
18 29151 

37 04 91 

. a .. II 
40 46 126 
4 7 72 107 

80 38 238 

19b 28 a* 

. 510 

46 76 199 

.. ..383 

21 1 I 239 

*6 20 25 t 
29 18 70 

24 II 21 t 

25 21 17 4 

68 43 230 

7 7 103 7 5 
*6 15418 

2.1 12 165 

31 33299 

71 55 13 B 

36 17191 

38 44 121 

*1 91 87 

* 7 33 26.7 
16 40 273 
62 13 TBS 

76 1 8 232 
IB 2 7 126 

195 8.3 BO 

5* 76 126 
28.0 4.7 .. 

*5 44 BI 

20 0 5 6 . 
a* 65 11.7 
16 47 156 
13 18 88 

33 3 1 126 
0* 2.7 106 
5 7 9 50 136 
15 £0 220 
. - - . 38.4 

11 74 14 1 

£8 0.7 62.3 

1 I 1.9 51 8 
7 9 3 7 225 

36 26170 

37 57 SL9 


High Low company 



36 

32 217 

-2 

316 

40 379 

-1 

44 

35 345 

+3 

99 

25 672 

-I 

09 

09 746 

-1 

36b 33 491 

+1 

151 

06 .. 


10 

56 302 


07 

21 418 


217 

49 286 


13 

34 496 


31.4 

36 355 

-2 

05 

02 .. 


121 

94 191 

-1 



-3 

U6 

44 329 

-2 

16 

09 .. 

-7 

14a 02 .. 


a Ob 4 i S46 


06 

09 773 

-1 

4.7 

33 416 


B4 

17 620 


55 

33 46.1 

-1 

10 

20 600 

-1 

10 

29 756 


26 

22 61.1 

-0 

11 

10734 


ai 

16 . 


150 


-3 

97 

17 14 

-2 

92 

16 616 


7.4 


►2 

119 

42 343 


1 4 

11 . . 

■i 

18 

27 516 

-3 

57 

08 .. 




-s 

39 

26 713 


U 

£2 981 

-1 

lib 

15656 

♦1 

14b 15 649 

-2 

10 

09 


10 

15 .. 

-1 

179b 59 296 

-2 

14 

16 555 

-1 

92 

46386 

-1 

400 11 405 

-1 

13 

1.8 904 

-2 

91 

21 896 


370 2a* O bn UiI m 
320 215 Greeraan Hoaaa 
1&4 15B Hamfirnt 
100 104 bufe Find 
bso 340 fewest in Succaas 


14 06 .. 
69 14 305 

-2 94 14416 


2B* 244 fear Cap 
10 s 132 tawylBkiw 
63 45 Japan Axeets 

10* BO KHnarart CJaner 
136 110 Ktomwon O -sees 


235 18 B Lew Debenture 
70 50 Lon Merom S 

h 57 Lai Treat 
128 TO? M a r c h BB ta 


» U M „ 

.. 194 68 724 

90 49 189 
• ai 02 .. 

35 36412 
-2 36 18 .. 

.. 110 4.1 .. 

.. ID 3928.1 
18 9111.7 
+1 1.1 19 817 

.. 940 57 296 


30h 2T*b UarrN tend) 
221 181 Mows 
186 128 Murrey tana 
IBS 137 kfejrrey few 
344 216 Murray Suae 
405 318 Hun Venture 
440 390 Naw Court 


209 +1 

149 #-Z 

150 

3Z7 -3 

*05 • .. 

413 -1 


0* SOT tawmrog tic 
371 185 Near Tdtyo 
3M 278 Nth Afeoiec I 


200 #-a 

02T -T 


81 20 N8i Saa Aaeatt 

406 279 Ntm Anar 
210 145 Outwtdi 


86 06 Pac#c At 

38 28 Do Wm 
*2 35 PfereonW. 

427 338 Raafiun 


360 -3 

29 -1 

375 

200 -1 

06 +2 


97 19 799 
08b 56Z71 
7.1 n *5 316 
39 U .. 
T49& 16 491 
219 5.1 289 
09a 16 819 
97 10399 
46 7J 17J 
1.1# 08 .. 
49 14 975 

07 14 337 
76B 11 086 
49 25514 
19 12 .. 


82 67 

102 SI 
122 95 

213 166 
138 100T 

101 as 

107 118 

108 140 
118 90T 
160 138 
168 186 
305 237 
370 300 
21* iSTi 
148 112 

36 70 

302 217 
fit 36 
82 33 

7* S3 

109 80'* 


Straw Cps 78 

TR Auttndta 91 

tr era or loo mice 
TW fix) X Gan 200 
TR Non Rax 139 
TR Nora Amoks 91 
TR PacMc Brain 172 
TR Properly 774 

TW Tech 101 

TR Ti ran a * 164 

Ten## Bar 1*5 


Throg Secured Cap 350 
Tran* Oca ante 20* 

Tftw 1*0 


10 16516 
3a 35 32-0 
93b 56 204 
57 25 4*5 
99 46206 
23 29492 
14 09 .. 

57- 98 386 
16 26 47 3 
OD 17 36.4 
91b 56 256 
119b 43335 


IjM j wee t few 93 'r 
USDabanWre 281 


wue fee Tta 
VMng Rtanare 
Wtatpool 


59 17 61.1 
4 .0 19 <0.1 
159 199 94 
83 18 503 


19b 74 W2 
13 35391 
IS 13593 
Ulb *5 345 


FINANCIAL TRUSTS 


171 147 Rtaar X Mare 
266 216 Rnar PHa 
279 207 Rdbaco 


251 101 Rtnneo 
STB 287 Romney 
KPe 11*1 Rcremo 
148 lie 9 Aaron 
39fi 297 Seamen 


35 

418 

162 • .. 
205 

276 -1 

2*8 


as 14 911 
17.1 4.1 42J 

Sfib 53 296 
124 47 807 


127 M &X« ETOtarn 
*20 354 Sea Mare 'A' 


558 402 ScM MBa 
318 2*5 9CMIW 
711 570 Second Atenca 
82 88 BaeaTWOrScutt 


rot 

MS • .. 
975 
79 

116 • .. 
400 • 

620 +2 
293 -2 

675 • 


490 92 497 
99 24047 
18b 13 876 
23 25807 

311 79 159 

111 93 691 
72 26 549 
20* 19383 

39 44324 


471. 34*a American O cpra ei 
71 51 Atmto 

49 21 Boratxad 

154 ns BritamtaAnw 

24 13% Deny IM 

20'. 18<a Do ‘A’ 

IBS 131 Etacfea 
173 80 Eng Trod 

2*7 187 EXco 
106 06 SxptoraOop 

798 375 Ratreupan 
9* 77 FtaatOp 

209 183 GT Mamnareant 
151 75 Goode Jfl M) 

— 400 Handnob ATOMp 


zee ISO M B O 


127 70 Parte few Tat 

20 ’r 10 Do Warms 
200 152 Sott New Court 


14 11 353 

• 69 * 56 189 

.. 700 12 155 

. . TOO 15 111 
♦1 M 42320 

■ 43 25 HO 

• +2*i 7.1 13 14.0 

• 33 13 III 

• .. 119 17.194 

• . . 7.1 79 07 

tl» 

-« IS 19.3B7 

. .. 179 10179 

-1 119b 91 98 

•-6 aa is 75 

-6 91 11 363 

209 79 46 

.. OB 14 .. 

->l 

-2 HU 93 79 


COMMODITIES 


LONDON COMMODITY 


*tn Mount 
Y3-k 8 ccrav 
Dfi 8‘- 

Zn» Cynemci 


8« e* 

a? £o<8 


G W Jaynsan raid Co report 
SUGAR (From C. Cnmfltcw) 
FOB 

Mar 

1402-40 0 



ocf :.. 






COCOA 

Sep - 


Dec 

1492-91 

1534-33 1 

Mav 

1558-54 ■ 

Jul ._ 

Sep 

Dec 

1575-73 

1593-92 



COFFEE 

Sen 

Era 230* 



Mar - 

2240-235 

Jul — - 

- 2230-200 

Sep 

2225-185 

area 

SOYABEAN 
Oa 




FeD 

Aer 

135.8-35 5 
1 37 4-36 7 







INTERNATIONAL 
PETROLEUM EXCHANGE 

GAS OIL 

Oa 

Nav . 

Dec 

- 122 00-21 50 
. 127 75-Z7 50 
. 132 50-32 25 

1 




Jan — 

135 .50-35.25 

Feb _ 

. 13700-3350 

Mar 

12960-2500 

Apr — 

. — 130.00-1 5 

May.... 

128.00-15.00 

Jun — 

12660-11.00 

LONDON NETAL EXCHANGE 


Ottaal Turnover figure* 
Price in £ par metric toon# 
Srhrarln panes portray OUhC# 
RtKfaH W#H 9 Co. LU. report 



COPPER GRADE A 

Cash 931 .0-932.0 

Three Months — 955.0-955 3 

Vol 1475 

Tone Barely Steady 


Cash 2560-2565 

Throe Months 2611-2812 

Vol 380 

Tone Barely Steady 


Cash 906 0-908.0 

Ttveo Months __ 931 0-332.0 


Cash — — 277.02775 
Throe Months 281.5-2823 


n 

PM 

9b,ave. . 

ire. 

Wm 

EXCHANGE 


Contract p. per kilo 

Month 

Open 

Close 

Oct 


10350 : 

Nov 

Ltaq. 

10450 : 

Feb 

Unq. 

9950 | 

Apr 

Unq. 

98 JO 

Jun 

UOQ-- 

9760 

- 

- 

VotO 


Pig Mont vat 15 


EXCHANGE 


Uv* CaMo Contract 


p. per kilo 


Month 

Open 

Ckua 

Oct 

Une. 

9660 

Nov 

Unq. 

99 M 

Ft* 

Unq. 

9950 

Apr 

Unq. 

99 JO 

Jun 

unq. 

9930 


LONDON 

POTATO FUTURES 


Epertom# 

Open CtoM 

109.00 109^0 

120.00 12150 

168.00 MAM 
1B630 19050 

' 85.00 8590 


G9U. Freight FUurea Lkf 
report 310 par Index point 


VoL- 332 lota 
Open interest: 2561 


regh/Low Ctoee 


Castt — „ 611.0-613^1 

Threa Months — 609.0-609.5 


SILVER LARGE 

Cash 379.0-381.0 

Three Months 3900-391.0 



£ per tonne 



Wheat 

BBtey 

.Month 

Owe 

0098 

Nov 

106.05 

10935 

Jan 

110.15 

11035 

Mar 

112J5 

113.05 

May 

11455 

113.05 ; 

Jul 

11735 

— i 

VGhjmo: 



Wheat - 


313 

Bariev . 


Z75 



cM> \ 


m 













































THE TIMES WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 1 1986 


LA CREME DE LA CREME 


- »> # * 

We talk and you listen, no. 
You 



Why settle for less 
than the best agency? 

At MacBlain Nash Temporary Secretaries we offer-. 


1 immediate work 

'competitive rates and a holiday pay scheme 

throughout the winter 

the pick of the best assignments in London 


After all we couldn’t settle for less than the bestS - 
so why should you? 

Call Kerena Henderson today fo 
the latest assignments 
on 01-439 060L 


MacBlain 


Temporary 

Secretaries 


3rd Floor, Carrington House. 

130 Regent Street London WiR 5 FE. 

(Entrance in Regent PL, above Iberia Airways.] 




TOP SECRETARY 


DOW CHEMICAL COMPANY LIMITED Is one of 
the world’s leading chemical companies. We're setting up 
a new tracing unit at offices in W1 . And, as the Manager 
and his executives will be out of the office much of the 
time, they need an experienced Secretary to help then) run 
itsmoothly. 

You’ll have plenty of contact with overseas 
customers, so a knowledge of at least one foreign 
language would be usefuL You should also be familiar with 
PCs and have test accurate typing, as wed as the usual 
office skills. You’ll need to be well-organized, unflappable 
and diplomatic -and be flexible in your hours to cope with 
the changing workload. 

You'll be rewarded by an excellent salary and a 
range of large company benefits including LV's. 

Please write, or telephone for an application form, 
to: Liz Sim, Personnel Officer, Dow Chemical Company 
Limited, Stana Place, Fairfield Avenue, Staines, 
Middlesex, TW184SX. Tel: Staines 61600. 


J 



IN AT THE START 


c. £14,000 


Are you looking for a new challenge in your c a ree r ? If so, we are 
looking for an exceptional PA. to assist the recently appointed 
Chairman in setting np the brand new merchant hanking arm of a. 
Securities House in EC2. There is enormous scope in this pnarinn . 
but as yet specific duties are undefined - h being up to you to 
develop your own areas of responsibility- Corporate finance or legal 
background desirable, ‘A’ levels ewrenttai- Good secretarial skills 
(100/60/WP) together with toe proven ability to work on your own 
initiative ate paramount in this demanding »nH reward ing role. Age 
range 28-40. Please telephone 588 3535. 


Crone Corkill 


RECRUITMENT CONSULTANTS 


SECRETARY TO 
CHAIRMAN 


I need a first class secretary to replace me as I'm leaving shortly 
after Christmas to have my fust baby. The successful applicant 
should be available to commence work on 1st December 1 986. 
and should posses the following qualifications: 


• A brilliant sence of humour. 

• Excellent aU-ronnd secretarial skills. 

• WP experience preferable. 

A bright, cheerful personality. • Adaptability. • Age 24+ . 


In return ire offer: 


• Superb Knightsbridge offices. 

• A super boss Sc friendly workmates. 

• PPP Medical Insurance. • An excellent salary. 


If yam that ymmi&t fit tke ptctmnpUase appty imwritimgtee 



Mrs. Julie Bryan 

Browning-F enis service (UR) Ltd., 
79 Knightsbridge London SW1X 7RB. 


THE MIDDLESEX HOSPITAL MEDICAL SCHOOL 
(Umvenity of London) 


SECRETARY/PERSONAL 

ASSISTANT 


Intelligent secretary with an interest in dm 
acade mic and medical world is required to 
work for the chief a dminis trator of this Medi- 
cal School (and from 1987 of the new 
University College and Middlesex School of 
Medicine). 


This is a responsible post offering interesting 
and varied work and involving close co-opera- 
tion with, academic, medical and scientific 
staff. Applicants should have some previous 
experience and audio and word-processing 
skills. Some shorthand would be an advantage. 


Pleasant office and good social faeflties in the 
School and HospitaL Generous holidays and 
season ticket loans available. 

Salary on the scale £8432 - £9764. 


If interested, please contact Morag 
Brocktehuret. 01-380 9374 : or write wrtjcvto 

her at The Middlesex Hospital Medical SchooL 

Mortimer Street, London WlP 7PN. 


TOP FLIGHT 
SECRETARIES 
£9,000 - £13,000 pa 


If you are looking for a new secretarial position 
wihrin the above salary scale and fed you would 
like to deal with an "out of town" small pnva« 
recruitment consultancy why not send your C.V. 
to me today. Absolute discretion will be observed 
when I contact you. I operate a late appointment 
scheme for your convenience. 


Carol Wisby 

Top Flight Secretaries 

26 toe Broadway, Wimbledon SW19 IRE 

01 879 3180 


FRENCH to £14,000 

This newly fbnnedsuhsufiary of an 
international marketing company needs a 
bt-tingual secretary for their Chairman and 
Managing Director. In addition to normal 
secretarial duties you wiD be required to bold 
the fort during then frequent absences and 
generally assist with the running of a small and 
dynamic office based in the West End. Speeds 
100/60. Age 27-40. 


POLmCS/CHARTTIES 

c£12,000 

A first dass personal assistant is needed for this 
dynamic fund-raiser and political organiser. In 
addition to running a small and busy office in St 
James's-you will be responsible for assisting 
with toe organisation of fund-raising events and 
dinners, and coping with a hectic diaiy and 
workload. Speeds I2Q/70. Age 26/46. . 


C0B80U) AND BAYS 
RECHUVTMEVrilD. 

35 Breton Place W1. 01-«37789 




ASSISTANT SALES MANAGER 
£9,000 


Are you bright, in your 20's and looking to move 
on from s&adght&rwaid secretarial wort? 

We need somebody to assist our busy sales 
manager in all aspects of his wodc. Initially the 
job w3 1 involve mainly ad m i n is tr ative duties 
such as co nf erence preparations, client liaison, 
enquiry response eta, but ultimately we want 
someone with the confidence and ini t ia ti ve to 
takeorcrsomeexisting accounts and move into 
the selling field to obtain new accounts. 

This is a newly created position so the successful 
candidate will have the opportunity to create 
his/her own systems Key board skills and 
experience in a sales environment would be 
useful A nonsmoker is prefened. 
ff you are interested m working for this snail 
international co mpan y off Kensington High 
Street please write in with your CV to: 

The Sales Manager, Countdown PUC, 

. 88-92 Eads Court Road. London WB 6EH. 


CAREER OPPORTUNITY 

c£ll,000 

A highly respected City commodity firm trading 
on the iatmutional markets needs a bright 
Assistant/Secretary to the European Policy Advi- 
sor. Pan of your duties will be s ecretar i al; in 
addition you will research and p rep a re presenta- 
tion material, f ore cast, trends, report on legislation 
and have constant liaison with diems and traders. 
We are looking fra a numerate graduate with a 
good working knowledge of French who will rel- 
ish a pressu ris ed and challenging role. Career- 
minded applicants age 23-30 with WP experience 
and good shorthand (110 wpm) should ring 588 


£8£Q0 + Benefits 


Soc/*dmin» 8trato r (20-25) to Join busy young team 
in distribution department of famous name film 
Company In W.l. The work is verted and interest- 
ing and includes a large amount of general 
admin ist rat i on: holding the fort during ttm festi- 
vals, at home and abroad: and involvement in new 
productions. Typing 50 wpm, S/H not neccessary 
but sates or marketing experience a big plus In this 
challenging career Job. 


Ol 499 6566 


Crone Corkill 


RECRUITMENT CONSULTANCY 
C0WENT GARDEN 
PACKAGE £9,500-£1 1,000 


rHIrlUiuk • . . 


and humoor 

** imporM 

PfcaS8 **** ^Knight Chapman IAL, 

11 Garrick BL 
London WC2E SAB 
tSoi 379 7879 

No 


RECRUITMENT CONSULTANTS 



cnount nno 


KEY ADMINISTRATOR 


to £12,000 pa 


As the Administration Manager yon are completely, 
responsible for the smooth naming of the 3 drri&kms 

“ .m mm ^ CaIm T> ‘ * V— 


r e p ort in g directly to the Creep Sain Director. Your 
duties are extremely varied ana will require full man- 
agement ctiik as experience in planning, co-or dinat ing 
and evaluating customer service, motivating - teaming 
personnel ani devdopmg your a reas are ttttntiaL Ide- 


ally you are b e t w een^- 32. have a teach retard 

and would realty welcome the opportunity of demekpr 


ing your career further. _ 

Contact An Grom 
01 631 1541 
Price Jameson & Pirns 
Rtm uium m Con—lwms 


AT LEAST 50% ADMIN £12,000 

This famous oil company need a senior lavei pa able 
to look after their two personnel e£ rectors, and su- 
pervise and recruit junior staff. A superb position for 
a good admini stra tor with excellent skins. 100/55 
and WP experience. Maximum age 35. 

SWEET SUCCESS c£9,500 

As secretary/assistant with this International City 
based company, you wil divide your time between 
organising VIP functions for the director of public 
. rotations and lookmg after the director responsible 

tor overseas operations. Skills 80/45, audio and WP 

experience. 


pteastteitytaft£ 01-499 8070 

46 Old Bond Street London ML1. 
U80UK KD*6 SECRETARIAL APHMITNBnS 


PUBLIC RELATIONS 
Secretary c£10,000 pa 


A small professional pubfic relations Company re- 
quires a senior secretary to work for the Chairman. 
Top skills and the abftty to work unsupervised 
essential Might sut mature woman. WP experience 
required. 

Friendly and informal office near Hyde Park Comer. 
Please write with CV in the first instance to: 
Carolyn Persson, 3 Spencer Read, 
Ctiiswfcfc, London, W4 3SS 


MARKETING c £9,000 


Mstebn/Design Comoany in Soutii Kenstapon needs ec- 
penencsd, effoait sscreroy to loin tier mgNy successful 
bam. You wd m wonoq tv Smon, a oynanre young Mar- 
temg Manager who neeos vganong. and JutiL one or out on 
catalogue selectors. Total comrmmera recused, and you'll 
need enhusesm and fteoblfy to handle tms demanding po. 
But it's a trendty office and sbough we're a bunco of worio- 
boks. we have a Lot of fun. Good. SH. auao and typing 
reamed. Aoed 23+ . 

. Apply in confidence with ful CV tre 


Fox. Mgal Swabey A Partners, 
Kendrick Mews, London, SW7. 




Redbridge 

urewrlem 


A fop job for the right person! 

MAYOR’S 

SECRETARY 


£9,129 to £10,884 


We need a well-experienced, able and quali- 
fied person to provide: 

* the full range of secretarial duties for the 
Mayor 

* the right "back up' to ensue the 
Borough’s first citizen can carry out Ml Ms 
or her duties smoothly and attend several 
hundred functions with all that hnpRes 

* help with the Mayoress’s charity work 
which raises cash for a different local 
charity each year. 

Obviously toe very highest standards of short- 
hand and typing and office procedures are 
necessary- Diplomacy. tacL an ability to be 
discreet and a good telephone manner are 
vital. 


This is a low profile job in a high profile situa- 
tion. An out-going but not overpowering, 
personality and a knowledge of local govern- 
ment and protocol will be looked for. 
Further details and an application form (to be 
returned by 20 October 198S) obt ai n a ble 
from The Director of A dm i ni stration & Legal 
Services, PO Box 2, Redbridge Town HaB. 
128-142 High Road, Ilford, Essex K31 1DD, 
telephone 01-478 3020 exte n s i on 106 (an- 
swering service), quoting reference CE 32. 


TRADING PLACES 
to £11,588 


A small international company in EC2 is looking 
for a lively, enthusiastic secretory to work for two 
traders in its Commodities Department You will 
be working in a modem open plan office provid- 
ing comprehensive secretarial support to these 
charming but busy men. In addition to sound 
shorthand, audio typing and WP.skilis you should 
have some relevant experience and a flair for 
communication and working under pressure. If 
you are calm, adaptable bright and wed pre- 
sented make the trade by ringmgr 


437 6032 



Life & Sul ol 
the Party 
to £15^88 

hie CM executive ol a City 
based ton of Executive 
Search Consultants sees an 
mmsoensaoie greganous PA/ 
Aonnsnaior. Yotr yX) a 
nwluranous and demands 
ravin pose and in w apenc e 
witn good comwraoMR 
dualities to maraain an excel- 
lent rapport wot cteraa. 
Skills 100/60 witn WP expe- 
rience. Apes 25 to 35. 


81-686 1611 


Senior 

Secretaries 


EatrepreieHr 


£12£80+ 

1A top flight PA is needed to 
•wok to a tided ousnessran 
with many diverse interests 
lanomg from doMcs to char- 
ity hind ra smq H e 6 Otar- 
man ot a rashly cxpanflwg 
fesmess concern and hofls 
w e re DeecRnnns, as well 
as owmiq ns own Company. 
You rnoSJ nave mtnufli 
sneeds oi 120/60. tie ape m 
rert on yam own ana uncer 
wan and moy organ- 
song mam events, to VXP.S. 
Age 3040 


61-499 0892 


Senior 

Secretaries 



Tasteful Temping... 


No hassles. No let-downs. Just plain, simple, 
high grade temping. 

A tasteful package of top jobs, elite rates and 
thoroughly professional service. 

If you have sound skills and experience, you 
should be talking to 'The Wjrk Shop’. 
Telephone Sue Cooke on 01-409 1232. 


Reertriomem Consul rams 


PERSONAL 

ASSISTANT 


Royal Institute of British Architects 


This interesting job, working in the Profes- 
sional Conduct Office, offers plenty of scope to 
use your initiative particularly if you have any 
legal experience. 


Educated to ‘A' level standard, you must have 
secretarial skills, including accurate audio, and 
good administrative ability. 


Commencing salary £7,923. Benefits inchute 
21 days’ holiday + 1 week at Christmas and 
£1.50 per day LVs. 


For further information phone the Personnel 
Officer on 01-530 6533 ext 4126. Royal Insti- 
tute of British Architects, 66 Portland Place. 
London Wl. 


OFFICE MAHAEER/PERSQNAL ASSISTANT 

£1 0,00 0-£ 15,000 


Ely Financial Consultancy based hi West End needs top secre- 
tarial suns, enmmns mind, mod English. Mans. Position 
reciwes an organised professional wnh 5 years experience. 
Management suns and basic tamiinrity with Wordstar essential; 


tamdanty with Lotus and other related software packages 
helpful. Training win be given if required. 


Reply 1 r writng, enclosing C.V. to 
Hss Vanessa Marsden, 

42 Hertford Street, London W1Y 7FT. 


SECRETARY/PA 


European Interactive Media is an exciting 
new Phitips/Potygram venture set up to spear- 
head itw development of software for ifae 
revolutionary new Com pan Disc Interactive 
System in Europe. 

An extra special Secreiary/PA is now re- 
quired for the President of this new venture to 
be based initially in the West End (possibly 
moving to SW or W London). 

in addition to providing a full secretarial 
service, the successful applicant will assist in 
the day-to-day administration involved in set- 
ting up the organisation, providing a valuable 
contact point for all parties involved as and 
when they join the team. 

Candidates should possess fast accurate 
secretarial skills (to include both audio and 
shorthand), be a superb organiser, have WP 
experience, excellent communicative skills 
‘and of course bags of initiative and common 
sense. Any European language would be a 
major asset. 

Benefits include Xmas bonus, LV's and 
monthly lire product. 

If you feel you fit the bill, please write 
enclosing CV and daytime telephone No tu> 
Joy Hamlyn. Personnel Officer. Polygram In- 
ternational Limited. 45 Berkeley Square, 
London WIX 5DB or call 0l’-4934ti00 
Ext 237. 


polyGram 


GERMAN 

We cunertfy haw nunwois vacancies re sew PA.’Staeniies » wmx m 
me City ol London ana Maiuese* Vou wfl need to luve GERMAN n 
GERMAN AND FRENCH as wen as gouo sectetaita skins tSH not rv-ptnu 
k> an docisi kxemahmai Bmng « Me man aiea we me letfuting iui and 1 
sauces lange tram C&S 00 m fi 3.000 
GERMAN 

a you are matm and weM-grawneo «dt> conversational Get nun. you mghi 
M* to look alter me rtceobon area ol uh reauwnanai Bank ana operate 
ther swnswoara too. WOwo sun nun reremng io work Age. 30+ irjOO 
+ Danwtg oenerns 

PRIVATE BAM0NG with FRENCH 
Etes-vous une super set a U recnerm de u oeme oes pastes tifengues 
aans le monae ftnanaer? Moire dm a Desow d une sec ne haul niveau 
cuwiel et socta. Mngue ayam Tangtas comnw lanque mamnefle H un 
mm. de 3 aas denpenence cc r u ncr ciai B et me nnrtm Hu secreonat 
{100/60). Presentatm soignee mdspensatito ZSans+ 

Wife AND RECEPTION 

nresttipoiw Wm Company ui Maytar mqum an extremely vreO-giootml. 
conMem Recnwnsi Aitcwte and wel-spiAen you must be aUe to type 
ana converse runny m noth FRBfCH and G£HMAN. comomg tins «M 
yow social graces a s you tin at alt levels. Are 22-26. c. StO.OOO. 

FteWH/GDWAMTAUMi 

Matins, xnmaettatniy presented SKrearv/recepoonM nOO/GO) Is sought 


t>y Annies Gamy. Pose and suoal etouate is mtoonam as is dvenena I 
on Dw Ofcvea ET IS. French. German or Itakan fluency e essenpaL 3840 I 


jws. £ 10 . 000 . 


UBhPOYCE 

L°5nMS3t,orjifl. 

81-236 5501 

am open to male + terrain. Emp Agy. 


HOOVER 

CLEANING SERVICES LTD. 
OFFICE SUPERVISOR 


We are seeking a self motivated person 
with ability to manage our office, based in 
Feltham. You should possess a knowledge 
of customer liaison, with a sound 
administrative background and experience 
with computerised systems. 


If you are not afraid of hard work and 
enjoy working in pleasant surroundings 
with the challenge of growing rapidly, 
within an expanding service company; you 
should apply to Melinda Gibbs by phoning 

01-844 2222. 


Salary £10,000 p.a. plus incentives. 


' Up to £14,000 
If Yoh Can Stand 
The Pace 


Thu u a non-wop. hems 
rmiroomcm wun one of 
■ be livelim firms of 
American Management 
Consoium in lAndon. No 
wonband or audio wort 


\y PA Secretary 
to Marketing 
Manager 
204 £9,000 


tan good typing a no an apv- 
lude lot WP a cssemul. A 


tude lot WP » cssemul. A 
knowledge of computer 
graphics or a willimt»*i» to 
learn will be ncrord Hi»w- 
e»er. the vital auaimo in- 
on "A 1 tfvrl o» niinn Mir , 
canon coupled -nn , in 1 
caoafuv t,u eitun iv 
time jnd *rrvnd -uft 
'wltirh will iuip a btwi 

L lUUU inkl duuMr 

that. W'lMin mr bPiUwa 
offices are a keep hi gym 
and a irsMumm. Age 


If you are bright and bub- 
bly and looking for a. 
young fun environment 
near Hyde Park Corner 
then this futures broking 
company can ofTer this 
plus 23 days holiday and 
1 excellent bonuses per 
annum in return you ' 
must have masses of ini- 1 
native, accurate typing 
(No SH) and enjoy work- i 
iog as pan of a highly I 
motivated team. 


Bernadette 
of Bond St. 


Aecniirmem Conswums 
ta Si Waaa h K a * 


Bernadette 
of Bond St 

ReC'ietmcm Consultant, 

. as Si rearer dm ; 


PA/SECRETAREES 
TELECOM GOLD LIMITED 


The market leaders is electronic mail with pres- 
tigious offices near London Bridge require a 
senior level shorthand secretary to work for their 
General Manager and an experienced secretary 
to work for a Head of Division. Excellent bene- 
fits are offered, for further details and an 
application form please contact Helen Jones on 
01-403 6777 


DIRECTORS SECRETARY/PA 


Experienced secretary 25-40 required for small 
and active investment company in the City. Sal- 
ary negotiable up to £10,500. Applicants should 
be neat to appearance and have an intelligent 
understanding of their work. They must also 
have accurate shorthand/typing and be capable 
of helping to run snail office. Will train on WP. 
Please apply in writing enclosing lull CV to: 

PARK INVESTMENT COMPANY LIMITED 
128-129 CHEAPSIDE 
LONDON, EC2V 6BT 

01-606-1113 


nm v. -3 

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i J WI r S> w nPiN 


T A CREME DE LA CREME 



Experienced Secretaries Secretaries 



Abetter type of job for a 

Senior 

Personal Secretary 

The Post Office 

is currently seeking two Senior Personal Secretaries - one for 
the General Manager, London Territory letters, the other for the 
General Manager, London Territory Counters. 

Bath are based in London Ed. 

Applicants must be 25-40 with 40 wpm Typing. 

100 wpm Shorthand or Audio 480 word tape 
transcribed in 25 minutes. The abffifyto operate an 
IBM Display Writer is also required. Tests on the above 
skills will be conducted before employment is 
offered. 

Commencing Salary: £8,934-£l0.255 (review 
pending] depending on experience and skills, 
plus £1460 per annum London Weighting. 

The successful candidate will provide a 
comprehensive secretarial service to the General 
Manager. He/she will also be expected to maintain 
a high level of efficiency and courtesy when working 
under pressure. He/she must also possess the drive. 

organisational skills, enthusiasm and personal 
qualities required to cope with a demanding post. 


City 





For an application form please contact London Assessment Centre, 
248/250 Tottenham Court Road, LONDON W1P9AD, 
telephone 01-239 6892. Closing date for applications is 
10 October 1986. 

The Post Office Is an equal opportunities employer. 


HHOPV 



Working for the young MD of this expand- 
ing service company your career will really 
take off! Your initiative and enterprise will 
be rewarded and as well as providing 
secretarial support you could find yourself 
initiating organisational change. Skills 9050. 
£K).000+.22+. 


ADHINSEC 

As Secretary to a Vice-President of this US 
Investment Bank you will be dealing with 
international mergers and acquisitions. This 
will involve extensive dient contact and the 
opportunity to undertake specialists 

research projects. Age 2 1 +. a^ywows 
90/50 plus WP.£IO.000. 01-25672SI 


r sit 


01-5849033 

TM IHTEWnONAl 
SECRETARIAL 
RECRUITMENT 





■ secretarial recruitment 

CONSULTANTS 

Why do you wear 
the clothes you do? 

Consider the care and attention you pay to select- 
ing your wardrobe - then consider tbe amourt of 
creative thinking that goes into presenting you 
with that choice. 

Our dient is at the vay heart of fashion retaing 
and tbe Director responsive for developing new 
retailing concepts needs a young, dynamic and 
creative PA. You oust have good sfa, senior ford 
experience and the enthusiasm to develop a new 
and exciting rale. An excellent package (not less 
than £10,500) includes a generous profit share 
scheme and addffionai be nefits . 

For further information please contact Joanna Bail. 

01-491 1868 


Sec/Bi toMD 

£ 10,000 

Fleet Street news service seeks high calibre 
‘initiator for newly-appointed MD. Routine is 
minimal and admin content is high, dealing 
with personnel agencies and occasional 
interviewing in addition to a wide variety of 
delegated tasks. A standard-setter for junior 
staff, you should have the personal qualities 
for leadership by example. Excellent skills 
( WO GO) essential Age 2-I+. Please telephone 
01 -193 5T. 

GORDON YATES 


RtsiruKrtveni Gfiuulrm. 


SECRETARY/PA 
TO MANAGING DIRECTOR 

Leisure Industry 
c£9,000 pins free medical 
insurance and holiday accommodation 
Excellent SH/typing and administration skills 
essentiaL Interesting and varied work. Pre- 
ferred age 25 plus. 

CV to Operations Director, 
Worldex Europe 

Gilmoora House, 57 - 51 Morti mer Street 
London WIN 7TD 


People-Building 

£10,000 

The company is at die top of its field, 
helping redundant executives from die 
highest Levels of industry to rebuild confid- 
ence and career momentum. Their driving 
force is excellence and as Marketing Secretary 
you will be expected to share in its pursuit, 
while co-ordinating die activities of a 
professional innovative two-man marketing 
team. Good audio typing required. Age 
22-30. Please telephone 01-493 5787. 


GORDON YATES 


Recruumoii Groulune- 


Property 

£ 7 , 000 -£ 9,000 

Variety of opportunities for young, we* educated Sec- 
retaries with established Property Companies ki 
Mayfair and Chetee a. Must be able to type accurately 
with or without shorthand. 

CALL 

JILL ROBERTS 


Wc are seeking two. competent career min ded xcrvuric* 2-i*- jnu 1 educat'd 

to ‘CT level minimum, to provide lira: roe -<vreU£raJ and .aimsGvcrahc support at ear 
busv Tax Division of this renowned firm of Chartered Accountants. 


Mediterranean Coast 
Tax Protected Salaries 


Partner's Secretary 


£10750 


S u p p or ti ng two Partner* will require excellent coronurticithin and Mjaetariil skill** 
- CO py audio GO wpm. shorthand UN) wpm - coupled wji'n uct and deccuoft as vou 
will catty out many highly confidential tasks. 

Too will he maiure and tespoosiblc seeking plenty of job involvement and have 
previous experience in a senior secretarial capadw. 


Manager's Secretary 


£9750 


For a bright, confident secretary supporting unc of our Tax Managers and his team 
will offer you plenty of opportunities lor admin involvement You wifi need audio copy 
speeds of "at least GO wpra and previous seoetarul experience together with j 
determination to succeed in this varied and intaesung post. 

Both secretaries will need to demonstrate a know ledge ofTTP Computers as this 
technology is in ever increasing use in our progressive offices. 

Please write with lull cv f enclosing day-time telephone number) to- Julia Dabney. 
Personnel Supervisor. 

Deioitte Haskins + Sdb ^ _ 1 - 

128 Queen Victoria Street I KUff1|TTM 

London EC-iP -»JX UUIUHIU 

“"■* HaskinsSells 

PROFIT FROM OUR SKILLS 



SALES & MARKETING 
PERSONAL ASSISTANT 

To small professional management team working in at- 
tractively decorated City office of New Zealand based 
company. 

We are looking for a well presented person with a mature 
and flexible outlook, interested in devdoptng a career to 


responsibilities. 

We are offering an attractive package for the right person. 
Phase send O.l". and details to 

A. Maher. A&L 

1 Mardley HUL Welwyn. Hertfordshire ALA CUE 


PERSONAL SECRETARY/ 
ASSISTANT 

To Professor of medicine. Varied life dealing with N.H5 
and foreign patients, activity of research group and aca- 
demic communities. Experience with 1 JIM VP. Salary 
from £' 8 J 0 O depending upon experience. 

Telephone 01-794 0500 ext 3979 


PA/SECRETARY 

£9,000 p«a. 

Enthusiastic person with first class secretarial skills includ- 
ing WP. ability to use initiative and taks responsibility and 
with a knowledge of meda/pubGc relations, requrecf as 
PA/Secretary to Co-ordinator. NATIONAL RUBELLA CAM- 
PAIGN. starting asap until March 1989. Further information 
on this exciting challenge from 

Gloria AbrarocJL Ce-onSntor. 

Tut 01-387 8833, exf 245. 

Please send fuB cv to 
Personnel Officer. 

The Royal Notional Institute for the Deaf. 

105 Gower Street. London WC1E 6AH. 


SECRETARY/MARKETING 

ASSISTANT 

Small hi-tech company in Souih London urgently 
require capable person to run rapidly expanding 
office. Driver preferred. Salary negotiable. 

01-677 9811 


Jawaby Oil Service has been 
established by the Libyan Oil and 
Petrochemical Industry to provide 
a wide range of services, 
including recruitment, to 
individual operating companies 

Our chent. Waha Oil Company ;s 
looking for qualified female 
secretaries to work at their 
modem Head Office m Tripoli. 

'feu will be living tn pleasant 
surroundings in an established 
and lively expatriate community. 

Applicants should be aged 35-45 
years with typmg/shorthand 
speeds of 60/ 120 . issued by a 
recognised secretarial college or 
equivalent establishment and 
have some expenenee of word 
processing and personal 
computers: previous involvement 


at management level, preferably 
in an overseas environment s • 
required 

Attractive benefits include: 

• Salaries ftifly fCRUttablo 

• F:«jo furnished accommodation 

• Generous toave with a* fare ~ 
paid to pom! of origin 

• Two utiprim leave p er iods witfi 
air fare paid to Rome 

• Full medical cover 

if you fuUH the above 
requirements, pfaese write for 
an appHcatkm form or send fu8 

CV (with recent pho togra ph) 
quoting Job reference: VUAt. to 
Recruitment Co-orxSnatoi; 

Umm Al-Jawaby Ofl Service Co. 
Ltd, 33 Cavendish Square, 
London W1M SHF. 


J/WVBYOCSSMCE 


COSMETICS HOUSE. P.A. c£1 0,000 

Mayfair based, international lyrenowrr«d. Cosmetic group require a PA. 
Secretary to their Sales Director. A post for a responsible individual with 
good skills (100/60). capable of taking the initiative during hrsfrequent 
business trips and keeping his national sales management team in 
line". Key qualities: "a decision maker with excellent admm. skills . 
Ana range 25/40. 


Age range 25/40. 

MARKETING: 


c£9800 


A PA. Sec. to work on a "one to one" basis with responsibility for the 
control of the Sales, Marketing and Operating Divisions of this major 
group, reporting to the Marketing Director. Specific admm. aunes 
include; co. car fleet, medical scheme. Diners club card scheme & 
extensive travel arrangements etc. Age range 25/35 with skills of 
100/60. 


EXEC PA/SECS 
£11,000 - £134)00 

Out CbCMj RMDlO ludac 
Mmium tents « me Ciy Dor w 
e*oins®n S tm Ufirtwnmt 
IMr kw ivtwre SMOI KHCp 
PA Secs V fou rune euntr Au&o 
SH or WP noennee or Am 
natal x MmgOMBt Oosmta 
(rwt fewfao your skills to ttar 
90MS1 metoU tom perks 
ea*t sutscsaJ raoncaoe SIIS 
& Poison 

CITY: 01-4512345 


PROPERTY 

£10,500 

>00 50' Rcnmaj la wart' 
tinrtr ctunflr’’ Jaa cf *1 uKa ' 
0 nr jnsner n yes U> *1 r«r 
outwore. tas Oitcia nttft m 
tan on a Mnes to &*■ i»i 
soon Centos e tum t t mw 
Ceoce an vips ivssr a a 

lenU • bttrotmial ccrtrej •&& 
Be Ule O keep mur coot Hot s 
IMH 

CITY: 01-4S12345 


OIL? 

£9.999 

Jfi ntmn you rt *w m cm! 

ctr- run W-Tm 

nwnmrt 6. impI atkidtr 
Kf*t (Cal CtS AHWUB frl CO 
(W. ihw o»crs ■ tut mn 
.'?* (u^iift&oc mol no a 
WTU1 I hi HrKrtimVM CG 
tin ettr* j h.tar Ax i on 

r* «o> mxL. t> om m tm 
Work to. in, uo PtcSetW. 

Cm*. 01*4812345 


albatt aHbatt atibatt 


B(. UNGUAL SEC. 


£NEG. 


Super opportunity for a "second jobber" (19/22) Shorthand Secretary 
to work in the Press Office of a major French Perfumery House. At least 
50% of your time will be spent on liaison work with the Parent Company 
offices in Paris and you will assist with pressreleases* PR activities for 
the U.K. Head office. 

in the first instance please telephone Paul Saunders for interview 
arrangements or send your cv to him at 

Hunter Turner Associates Ltd.. 

2nd Floor. Edinburgh House, 

40 Great Portland Street. 

London W1N5AH. 

TELEPHONE: 01-637 3096/01-636 9891 


LEGAL BEAGLE 

£ 10,000 

A MUSK apoanmv ne # 

Mr » Sec w« too sub UM Shi 
k tom is j legal Sec Uwg kw 
A4ntft*M& ranrff ofkwA jct^s. 
PA to Ike w*'" Miami & 
in**«fy rtfcer need «on! scree 
a* Mai lo pn me* um L«. 
late sot 5 Mtchs Has Snatf 
am sbrtcd inwln 

CITY: 01-4812345 


BROKERS 

£10,000 i- package 

Air tOi cTaw lierOt S K-i 
ti»m rarer Areon 

bri*jncr Pickm jit iam# In 
wo* Has is « nnSea ooovium 
U-i i jmog set iwffi g y*’ sKh 4 
WFrw lu Kui j avnocm oCmne 
Qesrtous (mm. vtruxm 6 

nesnima Men • a man tn 
w r rerrivm onanDMa & pro 

KSMIMI DUMP 

CITY 01-4812345 


FASHION 

£9,000 


Araiw lien w ib raw w» im 
*Wt ocawsrav n out tfM IA s 
wgtP (WMB mm’ Tim s a 
MM* mmoi tn a good Wn 
See PA d you haw Be |m« A 
ntoam to job on Maw lap vet 
onsiMKis lean t«a>u air. 
ptets 5 IM hid earn Ckuhre 
nm*as ■ t mu 

CITS' 01-4812345 


LOTS 

- OF GQUUH 

£1MN 

The Manning Director of 
•ibis publishing firm in 
Middlesex is looking for 
an experienced PA/ 
Secretary to M>ri( on own 
initiative as he travels 
cxicnsivdy. Your German 
needs to be very good as 
you mil use it a lot! 
Shorthand is not necessary 
but good organisational 
skills are. Sian a soon as 
possible. 


LOTS 6F 6EBNJUI 




£10^09 * Bokfrg BoriHs. 

This presigioiis bank m 
the city is looking for a 
senior tri -lingual secretary 
for their Capital Markets 
Depanmcsu. Most impar- 
lanl is your ability to work 
as pan of a team. Langu- 
ages must be fluent as lots 
of outgoing correspond* 
ence needs to be Trans- 
lated. Skills or 100/60 and 
a sense of loyalty wfll be 
expected. 


PA with TmsUtiw 

£tM8V ++++ 

Are you Fr en c h mother 
tongde standard with a 
proof reader's eye for de- 
tail. tbe vision of a transla- 
tor and a thoroughly com- 
mercial aairude? If you 
have top quality s horth and 
and typing rn both langu- 
ages. if you are completely 
flexible, basmesslike and 
astute you are worth a 
small fortune to this har- 
assed New Business 
Director m tbe heart of the 
city. 



International Secretaries 


attatt albatt atibatt 


Secretarial 

Assistants 

£7,500 

The Technical Change Centre wishes to appoint Twoptmoi stvreian ji assist.in'f. 
one as assistant toa Group Secretary providing WPper vice lor .i h* .if ,we»mc 

research stall, and the second as an assistant to jn Aummistrjrof * inemphai.it 
on administrative duties and someone who enjoys f fexipibtv m We* k 
Apphcantsstiouid be age 1 9 appro* and have skills m audio, typing ana wp»d 
processing. 

Senehts include 5 weeks leave, season tKkeMoan.fnedu-.il ,iv !,t e 
J AL_ insurance. 

m M you are mteresiedpleasenng 01-370 S770foranintcrvi-w 


Ti 


01-491 7100 


01-4917100 


Swiss company require 
Secretary/PA 

Salary Cil0.000 

Geaeroos expenses. Extensive travel 
Befog transport require a self motivated secretary PA 
for administrative and secretarial duties possessing 
organisational abilities, an aptitude for languages and 
a current driving licence 

The imrrrarfttl candidate while redding in the UK 
will spend macb of their time in Europe. Interviews to 
be held in London 12-1 5th October. Apply in writing 
supplying i CV to ;Belag Transport AG, 
WlnaenArasee 5 Ch-6317 Oberwil-Zag, Sw itzer l an d. 
Tel 010-41-42-222677 


ARE YOU INTERESTED IN 
DEALING WITH WELL 
KNOWN PERSONALITIES? 

IF SO, INTERNATIONAL MANAGEMENT 
GROUP, the Mark McCormack organisation, has a 
vacancy for SECRETARY to its broadcas tin g posi- 
tion. Applicants should have good shorthand/ typing 
and presentation, together with ability to work under 
pressure as pan of a team. Lots of dient contact. 

Please cell or send CV with salary 
neuroma uk 


Sally Long, . 

International Management Group, 
14-15 Fitzhardinge St, London W1H 9PL. 
Tel 01 486 7171. 


Creative flair 

£9,000 

Cel out ofa nit and into the action with this greet little 
company A leading name in UK design, they create 
new concepts in the Gist-moving, dynamic fiel d of retail 
architecture and design. As Seo Fft to their super MD 
you will enjoy total involvement in a young, exciting, 
‘btray* environment. Shorthand Typing essentiaL 
VP experience desirable Age 22+. Please call 
01-409 1232. 

Recruitment Consultants 


SECRETARY 

required to join small team based in comfort- 
able Mayfair offices. Excellent skills required 
but equal emphasis is placed upon cheerful 
adaptability and compatability with existing 
staff. Terms of employment include salary of 
£9000 and Pension Scheme with life 
insurance. 

Career details to:- 

GENERAL MANAGER. 

KANOO GROUP LTD-, 

1 BALFOUR PLACE, 
LONDON W1Y 5REL 

No agencies. 


THETECHNICAL CHANGE CENTRE 

1M Cromwell Poad London SW7-JE5 


ADMINISTRATIVE 
PRIVATE SECRETARY 

The Chairman and Managing Director of ft~ 
very busy and expanding Shipping Manage* ’ 
inent Company in N.W.l. need now 4m 
experienced, efficient top calibre (28+) Admin- 
istrative Private Secretary. 

Presen (ability, self confidence and dedication 
to the Company must be backed bv good typing 


(50+ w.pjm.) and excellent telephone manner 
with either shorthand or speed writing ability. 

The successful applicant must be numerate sati- 
able to deal with personal arrangements and 
accounts, accept pressure of work as the norm 
and in addition, expect to take on a diversity of 
administrative tasks. The work is demanding 
but the atmosphere friendly. 

Salary circa £11.000. 

Phone: Elisabeth Levin on 01-935 3005. 


2 PA/SECRETARIES 



Powerful Admin 

to £10,500 

The company is a major force in international . 
communications. As admin sec to mananger in iheir 
corporate PR department you will enjoy challenge: 
responsibility and lots of involvement in an unusually 
full-blooded role. Bright, bubbly and confident, you 
will also need to be well-organised and professional in 
approach Excellent typing essentiaL Shorthand 
useful. Age 23-35. Please call 01-109 1232 
Rrcruftnirnt ConMiItani* 


SECRETARY 
W1 c. £9,000 

An enterprising, level-headed person aged 28-40 is 
reqmredby^ rauti but very busy office situated dose 

The work is demanding and coven the organisaiion 
f"? ^wwmion of office systems, retephbne\ro£ 
and typing W e need a good level of wrinen and 
spoken English, together with tbe ability to prioritise a 
worldood effectively. A good sense of homoST* 

Telephone Andrew Nearby-Smith cm 01 629 8677 

BUCKINGHAM ASSOCIATES 


GASCOIGNE PEES 

Eiturorg rorsss tax ol ovnanr Omu ton Agents mnwe 
rwri rogooBW-oftce irax ante am M to aged 17-80 ws. 

a swtf.cceegt lee«cr na»e ■ Mem imwtg »cance. too pi ang^rjijatn 
ana sag* ar earn 

E»ce»ent (TOStoW StatMigwnryvitn* 109 cm 0 *«SDO 
met van, ibwm. 

Please apply ta: Mbs E L Gamy. 54/56 Lower Some SL 

Loaha SW1W 88P. Tdfll 730 8S82 


SENIOR SECRETARY to MD 

£10,000+ 

Experienced audio secretary required by quality print- 
ing company near Old Street Station. Fdst accurate 
t>ping essential. Cheerful efficient and calm with rood 
administrative and Personnel skills. Mato Qr female. 
Pension scheme. 

... _ Please write or telephone: 

Mis Sheila J. Needham, Managing Director 
Needham Printers Ltd, 69-85 Tabernde Street. 
London EC2A 4 BA. 

01*250 1338. 


secretaries. Working for senior directors of the cMB- 
pany. candidates must be able to demonstrate fast 
typing speeds WP experience and tire ability to 
work well under pressure. Duties will include admin* 
■Odfe and genera] secretarial functions and there 
will be a good deal of client contact. Applicants 
must have a good level of education and experience 
in an investment environment, though not essen- 
tial would be an advantage. Salary cJtlll.000 phis 
henefits. Age 22-35. 

Written applications with C.V to: 

Colin Harris! Company Secretary) BOX C25 


TWO AUDIO 
SECRETARIES 

to £11,000 iecludiag bonuses 

solicitors seek two experienced 
^?r«t^ ecr , etel 2? s: 006 10 take the strain as 
for Senior Litigation Assistant and 
£22^ ** rs * ar y to Cornpany/Commerc&l 
jZj ffS'** accurate skWs and enthusiasm 
ess^mal^Young friendly firm with all the latest . 

Please can Liz Sherlock on 235 1288. 


SECRETARY/P.A. 

Small friendly International Law uflicr in West 



5k 






























. ' — 
lc 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 1 1986 


29 


LA CREME DE LA CREME 


Peisonal 

Assistant 

in a^rictfSn ^ tunin’ ’for a bright person who thrives 
to work, mfon dcmand ^? position, with the chance 
iSSSfaES? P 01 ™^ 1 CTCrcise initiative, 
uge or interest in computers a necessity, 

^PPjicants should be 25+ and will be able to ’ 

SSSSaSSSS? “ a ** r ^ 

newhUiS? 1, y °! 1 cxceUcnt vv °rldng conditions in a 
benefits P 1X5 * com P ctidvc abr } r **8* excellent 

c 9 nta cr Sue Arnold, Personnel Manager, for an 
application form or forward your C.V. to: 


35VICE 


* Sheppards 


Miss Sue Arnold 


No 1, London Bridge 
London SE1 9QU 
Telephone! 01-378 7000 


ADVANCE YOUR CAREER 
TALK TO THE PROFESSIONALS 

Do you want to find an agency that will do jnstice to your potential? 
Our consultants have extensive experience of dealing professionally 
and sympathetically with secretaries looking for jobs, we handle a wide 
range of positions from really senior PA jobs to college leaver vacan- 
cies, and we would be delighted to discuss career prospects and help 
you find that special job suited to your skills and personality. Not all 
our jobs are advertised, so if yon have good skills why not do more than 
lust think about a change of job and telephone us now. 

Our skilled temps are now paid £7.00piL GC12,740pjL) phis a no- 
strings holiday bonus for senior se cr e taria l ass i g nm e n ts. 


abfii 


West End 

434 4512 


City 
588 3535. 


Assistant to the 
1 European Executive 

Television Industry 

Weare looking for an assistant to work, within our marketing 
Department, for our European Executive who reports to the sixteen 
Independent Television Companies on developments in Europe 
(including the EEC and Council of Europe) which may affect com- 
mercial broadcasting. 

Ideally, you will have a degree together with experience of informa- 
tion gathering and providing summaries. An understanding of the 
EEC institutions would be a considerable advantage. 

Candidates should have a comprehensive knowledge of French and 
an understanding of German, as well as good secretarial skills. The 
ability to work on one's own initiative is essential. 

An attractive salary will be offered, according to age and experi- 
ence. Applications .in writing with full CV should be submitted by 
17 October 1986 to:- 

The Personnel Officer. lJHH 

ic^htoJfHouse, ■ 

56 Mortimer Street, « , , . ■ . . 

London, win San. independent television I 

Companies Association 

^ AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER A 


ADMINISTRATIVE SECRETARY | • 

SALARY - £8705 MR/T 

LONDON NW1 iA# 

We nead an efficient experienced secretary to work # 

for our Deputy Chief Executive and the Company / 

Relations Unit. In adefitioo to the usual secretarial ■ ■ — 1 — 

duties, the post wffl involve supervision of the Unit PtJqjECTFUUEMPLOY* 
Secretary, liaison with major amptoyere who sup- training FOR the future 
port FuSemptoy’s wait and allending management 
meetings. 

You wffl need accurate typing of at least 50 wpm and good emfio sktes. Short- 
hand and wordprocessing experience are desirable ana training on our systems 
can be arranged. Ideally you should already have at least 3 years' secretarial 
experience. 

Prefect Fu&amploy alms to develop progr amm es which promote equality of 
opportunity in employment through a partnership approach between the private, 
public ana non-statuiory sectors, ana to fecHtata more effective Involvement of 
minority ethnic conrnnties In the economic Me of the UK. 

For more Inform a tion contact the Personnel Unit 
Project Fuflemploy 102 Park Village East, London, NW1 3SP 
or Phone; 01-387 1222. 

(Closing rintn for applications is 15 October 1386). 

Project Futtemptoy la an equal opportunities employer. 


Crone Corkill 

RECRUITMENT CONSULTANTS 


GET INTO A DESIGNER OUTFIT! 

RECEPTIONIST TO £9,500 

Whether Its' working foran informal and ftveiy graphic designer, a prestigious property 
company, a waff known horse racing organisation or an Influential finance house mesa 
are just some of our Interesting opportunities lor presentable confident recep tio nists, 
preferably with some exp. and typing. Age 19-25. Please caL 

437 6032 


IMT PROPERTY 
£ 11,500 

The director of this 
renowned property devetop- 
mant Co is looking for a PA 
with SH to assist bill and 
get fufly involved in the iro- 
ning of the Ca Must have 
bags of initiative. 22 +. 
100/60 STIS -PPP 4 wks 
hois. Efflty review. 


jerraarot V^d tuota v^ tewin 

HEAD HURTING 
£ 10,500 

This bit Co. dealing n exec- 
utive recruitment is looking 
for a Tip-top PA with plenty 
of initiative and who can 
take on responsibility. Lots 
of liaison - well presented 
and people oriented - Good 
skills essential (100/50) LV 
- Bupa - STLS - 4 wte hois 


FILM B 0 FF 
£ 9,000 

WO are belong for a "Super 
Sec" who can give fuB beck 
uptotheVPoftbisintand 
prestigious fihn C& Vaty de- 
manding position - total 
involvement - wiU be Baiskig 
with personalities - Initiative 
aid interest bi fihns a must 
2nd Jobber. 


01 - 9*0 8207 I I 01-930 8207 1 1 01-930 8207 


RECRUITMENT CONSULTANTS 


OSBORK RiaUKDSON 

THE SOUND OF MUSIC 

£ 12 , 000 + 

As PA to the Vice President d this nedor music 
and lasure company you w 9 enjoy a very vanea 

role. Mmtmai shorthand and typing but respon- 

SDVBA'mraE 

nmublrf 

neooBCL 

MARKETING 
£ 10,500 neg. 

Successful Amarcan corporatienseste 
PA/Secn&ry to Executive V.P. m Marketing. 
Organise PA functions, undertaka.resea 1 d 3 .and 
enjoy extensive people contact. Hush offleas. 
free mafical cover, stefl tare and a mortgage 
subsidy. 100/55 + wp skins. 



START-UP £ 12,000 

You will enjoy great variety in the now London 
office of a firm of lawyers. You offer adminis- 
'trative, shorthand and WP skills. Bonus, 
payable. 

SOCIABLE £ 10,000 

You have spoken French and German for the 
Inter na tional cfientele of this feeding commu- 
( nication3 PR company In WC1. They are a 
1 young company, about 100 strong and have 
lots of social events, and a marvellous restau- 
rant Age 22-26. WP skflte. 

£ 8,000 

You are frosty, mid 20’s and would like work- 
ing for the young new Sales Director in 
j Kensington who has a great sense of humour. 
80+ shorthand. Bonuses. 


OPPORTUNITI ES FO R YOUNG 
GO GETTERS 
£10,000 PLUS AGED 21 
BIG BANG - FEEL THE PACE OF 
THE CITY - TJffiPO^R 

FINANCE CE NTR E 

Docs this bold any interns You arc 
for you 9 You are highly and very dipkxnaac. possess 
KM- you . _i cb.llc and morale 1*- 


under pressure while nsrin- Woi l5? { *^ ir Y X3 
wining your cool have an 

U2r fcuti and are a self a bec« atmosphere. If ilm 
CJC IU1 IB.— . Axrritws VOU OUT Cb- 


aancT then ibis City based 
organisation is Ore pi»e for 

>-ou , 


SHEILA CHILDS 
recruitment 

ai M ft 1273 


a MA.UV — —7 

profile describes you our cb- 
ent with beautiful West Enc 
offices is looking few you 




rewswer 

CHMAM 

EXECUTIVE SECRETARY 
TO £11000 

aD*tv HB»c Bus* 

rJisc 


PR SEC/PA 
£10,000 START 
MAYFAIR 

To work for eccentric and de- 
manding up-market PH 
Conafflant in fi rm. Yo u should 
enjoy bong Secretary /pa wnn 
accurate shorthand typing. 
Relish telephone, a mKonst 
healthy, with a sense oUw- 
mmrr. Tidy wtrovert, rave 
good English and able W bdp 
entenan. - 

Contact Paul Dwyar on 
352 8004 myWw- 
35 Dover Street, W1 
No Agendee 


SECRETARY TO 
VIDEO PRODUCER 


You ettfoy recruiting and have at least 2 years 
experience as a Personnel Manager with ma- 
jor company. Your positive approach wfll gain 
you job satisfaction and earnings of £15,000+ 
as a consultant with us, placing top level sec- 
retaries. CaB Lyn CecH on 439-7001. 


City 377 8600 WestEnd 438 7001 


Secretaries Plus 


TheSeaetmUdConsutamts 




FAST MOVING 
AND, EXPANDING 

International Hotel reservations company 
based in Hammersmith are looking for 2 
experienced secretaries with an intelligent 
and mature approach to provide full secre- 
tarial support to their very busy marketing 
and administration department. These posi- 
tions involve a great deal of variety and 
successful candidates will have the opportu- 
nity to become involved in all aspects of this 
multi-faceted company. A generous salary 
will be offered commensurate with experi- 
ence. Please write with your CV in 
confidence! to: 

Heather Bfaueby 
UteH International 
Banda Home, Cambridge Grove 
Hammersmith, London W6 OLE 


TELEVISION SALES 

£9,100 PA 

A rare opporturtiy for a yang 
sacratary. wtffl experience to be- 
come iorota in tbs noting 

^RECROITIIENT 
SECRETARY 
£11,009 ug 

Atm efufienge for 3 top class 
Sh/bd PA K> become reaBy n- 
votv edn cfc nt Bason. nateg 
and promotions wfltun tin ex- 
pandOg company. 










fw mtereswig ana__ 
varied job for a weB 

antixtion. Knowwage 
of WP and a good 
tajapMone manner are 





Oor last yaong sncreteiy has 
lost become, a junior account 
exscutm. We are- a small bta 
expanding Government Com- 
rooMatars firm, and now need 
a brigu anti effleara person 
with good tekohore manner, 
typino skills and an interest in 
public affaire to stepup ate bar 


wnog to teach WP stiffs tothe 
ittyM cenMWe, who le fikefy u 
be «rty -20 s and looking for a 
demanang but interes ting job ' 
wttb promotion prospec ts . Sal- 
ary up to £7.500 pa. - - 
Apply with CV to Mrs J. HMgbt 
Market Access bumahonri 
Landed. 4 Sandyo Row.- Off 
Balupsgate. London. Et 7HW. 


£10400 (Ik bans) 

Exttdem development prospects 
working for this IwnoSsnal CD. 
Use your expercnce & bubbly 
pnvxBfty id move Mo tfas 
super posoon. 

493 6518 


BJ; f l .V 'l ffl 


100 New Bata Street, 
losdoa W1Y 9LF 


£ 13,000 + 
Mortgage 

Senior Executive in tries 
International City Bank 
is recruiting a PA to as- 
sist Mm as Head of the 
bwestment area. Chal- 
lenging post with 
ad mini s tr ati ve scope at 
senior level. German/ 
French useful, skis 
100/70, age 25-35. 

»1 43« 1551/2853 


Dulcie Simpsonl 

! Appointments Ltd | 


TUNBRIDGE 
WELLS 
£13,000 + car 


PA to Chairman of large 
group. Must be well 
groomed and experi- 
enced ai senior level. 
Will nbe able to work on 
own initiative and want 
to take increased 
responsibilities. 

Telephone Action 
Staff Bureau Ltd 
on (0892) 42822. 


SECRETARY/ 

PA 

Required for busy 
City practice. Good 
secretarial and book- 
keeping skills 
essential. Highly re- 
sponsible position 
with attractive condi- 
tions of employment 
Starting salary 
£9,000. Apply in writ- 
ing with C.V. to: 

Dr GJ. WeU-WbM 
51 Lime St, 


VIP assignments 

PBnafl«.'TWBWSeo«n« 



MEDICAL SEC/ 

aombbstrator 

Experienced Secretary for 
busy Harley Street practice. 
Good references essendaL 
£10000 pi 

01-486 5787 


SECRETARY . 

nnwei hramsM but busy 

Chanend Smwyore office 
In WBEtnujdar. Good sec 
rrt®Hl state, s/h imJ judo 

assndal. Sdzy eSJOO 
pa. plus bonus. 


fn-a?44fl 


'Floating 1 Secretory 

Estee Lauder Cosmetics have a vacancy within 
their Mayfair offices for a fuB-time^ Secretary. 

You wifl be working on a 'floating' basis for al 
departme n t s and divisions, covering for staff 
hofidoys, sickness, etc., so flexbtty and odapt- 
abSty are essentiaL 

Addfionafly, candidates wfl need at least two 
years secretariod/affiee experience, with good 
typing and shorthand skiSs. WP experience 
would be on asset, but fufl muring can he 
given. 

This is an ideal opportunity for someone who 
enjoys the variety of temping bur rs also seeking 
the stabRty, company benefits and career pros- 
pects of a permanent posit ion. 

if you are wed-presented, enthusiastic and 
experienced, please write or telephone far an 
application form to: 

Mol Teresa Elbe, 

Recruitment Manager, 

Estee I iitnfar Cmnwrin I 
71/72 Gmram Street. London W1X OWL 
Telephone: 01493 927 L 


ESTEE LAUDER 

L 

Personnel 

Assistant 

We are a firm of solicitors who require an 
eiprimciallViscxinriAsrisDmtontirkciosdv 
with the Pers o nnel Manager on all staff (dated 
mamas. 

Whilst good secretarial *l»lt« ( includin g 
shorthand and audio) are essentiaL the emphasis 
is on personnel administration which incudes 
involvement in the recnjiimnic and sdocnon of 
se cre ta rial and s up p or t staff the analysis of 
secretarial workloads and die control of the 
floating staff and temporaries. Man)' of the 
admin duties are assisted by the ux of the IBM 
PC This is used in connection with salary 
reviews and sekness records, etc, aswdlas with 
Wordstar whidi is used fbr word processing. 

For this busy and demandine position, 
successful applicants should have at least two 
years personnel overknee rained in a 
professional environment. The ability to cope 
under pressure with a heavy workload and to 
keep several “balk in the air’ at once and still 
come out smiling, is essentiaL 
Please write with full pasonal and career details 
to Jackie Hammond, Personnel Manager, or 
tt k ^honc for an application form on 01-242 

FARRER & CO- 

66 LINCOLN'S INN FIELDS LONDON VVQA 3LH 


SECRETARY 
to SENIOR DIRECTOR 
COMMERCIAL OPERATIONS 

CBS Records is one of the 
leading record companies in the UK. 
We are presently looking for a Secre- 
tary to assist one or our Senior 
Directors who is responsible for Au- 
dio Visual Manufacturing & 
Distribution, Special Products, Per- 
sonnel and our Recording Studios. 

Your duties will include 
organising meetings and lunches, set- 
ting up filing systems, travel 
arrangements and handling matters 
of a highly confidential nature. The 
ability to deal with Directors and se- 
nior management with diplomacy and 
discretion is therefore essential. 

You should be aged 21-30 with 
good shorthand and typing skills and 
an interest in working in a very infor- 
mal but fascinating environment 

We are offering a competitive 
salary and an excellent benefits 
package. 

Interested applicants should 
forward CV with covering letter which 
should include current salary to: 

Maureen Heneghan, Person- 
nel Dept, CBS Records, 17/19 Soho 
Square. London W1V 6HE. 


CBS 


Sectors’ Secretai 

Edinburgh Shuttle 

£12,000 

A major Scottish pratruioul firm is niiHulunj; 

a London uhicr and rrquim a ilrnblr 2 nd 
independent P.VAdtrunituainr to ram 1 out ihnr 
own domain and make sure the uperaum nun 
smoothly. 

The job will mom o( rurran^ vour hand 10 anv 
linnaon at h arses: coping with a tluciuaiuip 
number of tenior level ttatl vhuinp ihrotinv, 
including doing Mvrrurial work as required, tniing 
up systems, acting at an ambassador tor die linn, 
and writing your own jiJj docnpinm at 
uremnstanen dictate. 

The ideal candidate lor this poM will enjos 1 the 
tecunty of hckmginc to a successful professional 
tirm. but will reblh die autnmxnv and variety ul a 
small awipanv environment and be willing in accept 
a high level of responsibility. Age indicator 23- 
Speeds 100/60. 

Please telephone 01-437 1564 


MacBlain 


\fULTILINGlJAI 

JLTJL nrroTtrnnn JL^ 


FRENCH: PA/Secretary (25-30) for a top 
executive of Internationa] bank. City. 
Responsibility and opportunity to use your 
brain - graduates with fast, up to dale dulls 
and excellent french prefered. Salary to 
match 

FRENCH: Young bi-linguaJ secretary to 
work with Chairmans Assistant in buzzing 
Mayfair officeA chance to gam or consoli- 
date experience at the top of the treej£8,CRX>- 
£10,000. 

FRENCH + GERMAN: Merchant banking 
opportunity fortri-lingua] secretary PA with 
brilliant skills and languages. City back- 
ground ideal . but could be a graduate with 
at least 6 months experience. To around 

£10.500 aaeQl 8363794 

Charing Cross Road, London WC2H OH 


& Associates Lid 
01-437 1564 

Recruitment Consul unts 130 Recent Street, 
London WIR5FE 


^EXECUTIVE SECRETARY^ 
f to Xll,000 

J oin this Mayfair based investment bank as 
secretary /PA to two very charming executives. 
You’ll enjoy a great deal of diem contact and liaison 
with their offices overseas. It’s a fan moving, busy 
enviro nm ent in very luxurious offices with a young 
and informal atmosphere. 90/60 skills and VP ability 
needed. 

FASHION 
£10,500 + bonus 

A famous name in the fashion industry seeks a tec* 
" reary in a director. He is keen to develop 
his secretary, delegate responsibility and treat you very 
much as an assistant. Supato benefits indude gener- 
ous bonus and product discounts. 100/60 skills and 
WP ability needed. Please telephone 01 240 3531. 

* Elizabeth Hunt * 

^ RecruimentConsuftonts / 

IB Grosveoof Sheet London WI A/ 


£ 13,000 

Our dtert. a Matagement 
Consultant, is in daily 
touch with some of tfas 
counhy's leading ntustri- 
afets. As a specialist 
advising on Boaid level 
iranaaement techniques, 
his nuB is varied and very 
demandinu. He needs the 
back up of a PA/ Secretary 
who has a flair for 
-organisation, at eye for 
detail ami who. above aU. 
wa take a personal inter- 
est and pride in their 
activities. 


DIRECTORS' 

SECRETARIES 


01-629 9323 




£11,509 

A inqur DOHiMy U o *s- 




OO Paragon Language 
Consultants 01-5B0 7056 


PROVE US 
WRONG. 


Yob must be out there 
somewhere! Are you young - 
IB + - godhead and taka 
pride in yaw work? Are yaw 
stalls sand end getting bet- 
ter? if a career in PR, 
Marketing. Property, Bank- 
ing or Ma na gement 
Consultancy wad*, w* on 
Wp. Salaries £7,500 to 
£9,500. We abo advise on 
C.V. writing/ interview uch- 
wjue. To solve our puzzle, 
please contact Bo sanary 
Whitfield or Lindsay Ander- 
son on 01 631 0902. 


PART TIME VACANCIES 



SPANISH 
BILINGUAL PA 
SECRETARY 

100/60 impeccable 
shorthand/ typing. Telex 
experience preferred. 
25+. Flexible, organised 
and with initiative. 
Applicants should be 
prepared for variation 
and ravoivemenL 
US $12,000 pa 
Please send CV to 
Embassy of Ecuador. 
Commercial Section, 
3B Hans Crescent. 
London SW1 


TWO 

BRIGHT, SMART, 


ii‘ 1 , UN W n- 


urgently required try fast- 
Bxfendmg interrabonaf confer- 
ence agan sa hon n Maytsr. 
Typing sMs important ir&jst 
be wed^poken. Plenty of m- 
volvement and excellent 
working contitnus. 
flge is ■ 2 i. 

TefepheK- {Oil 434 1017 
ead ad for Kaaeriau. 


WHITIV1 AIM 

P G = T E R 



Estate Agents with 16 offices in West 
London require a Secretary /PA to a Se- 
nior Partner based in Ealing. 

Must be well-spoken, well-presented 

and able to work on own initiative. 

Tel: Margaret A Gilroy 
Personnel Manager 
on 994-7595 for 
further details 







YOUNG ADMIN 
ASSISTANT 
£8,500 

An repneswg mMai lor a wm 
AtfuettM MW* SO * 

imjuiiuio Hmhoi Unnt- 
nm ubsdyMnn owns But 

rone iepwl* iMfl a Wfctg 

wp. soWPuwWKaeuwn- 
Htf Exstemibtnabuwiti 
LoaanCnyCo 


r ART-TIME SCCRETAKY for 
Mdiw^ng Dtrnw Of wtoun 
iiai Ptodmiv Ounoany 
iminmi Aw> ?&-55. 5 mom 
Inm it week, nur W| offtm. 
Arrurjir nutno ramuai. no 
•Jiortiund. iiniiu to whv on 
o<*n. sotan nwotutili*. Start 
bnnnmno Nov PVOfn nnp 
Cuarm Otvm on G2»-T90J 

PART TIMC Srrmary for busy 
tnondiv niustr .iM nunurn 
mem .Hpmrv in CWwirk Good 
U-pwq ■+ill> «iid ptetuant ivtr- 
onotu- niannrr iwiuia 
Rr«uiml Monday Wnfendoy 
Hour, and um n»«oiiaMe 
Phono Ptup on 01 744 6075 
dMrinq office hours. 


|| l^ V * ';* j. 't . ' i y. j 


HHoMwik* man nor and nr Me 
to woiti mi own iniiuuvr Ac- 
ruraio typing imMui TMrphono 
402 7159 KJflHP tiourvi 

r«juir»d lor tn- 
(AMh/ rflntonnnr bWM m 
Jf" 00 " Total ronfWrnuabiy 

srsssa^ l ftn£ 



Still e ; : s I — I ssee* esEKSSEssEesesffisssesff eescecs l_j issss-ii i_j eeeecegbx^u. 




























30 


i rir: 1 nviro >v i 


PROPERTY BI JYERS’ GUIDE 



LONDON PROPERTIES 






<0‘/aV 
sV / vs> ^ 



wfplm fMES 


Vv>" 
"a-,, )( ' n ^ 

Ao„, V 


f-U |I I[ M 




TENS 





fl 






The Businessman^ 


»TYI it TH t a t J t il »Tt j it 


WHStudios, 2 &3 room apartments. 
*w* mrSKA CA/l 7^ 


FRCM£64,750 

125 YEAR LEASES 
The new Cbdsea Cloisters offers the privacy 
of your own apartment with the convenience 
and facilities of a first class botdL 


Ena a i v e gegriceaand mn en i tk a mctadc: 
•Secom Computerised Security System 
•Qosed Grain Security Television 
•24 Hour Switchboard Message Service 
•24 Hour Uniformed Porterage 
•Lifts, Central Heating and Constant Hot water 
•Satellite Television Reception 
•On-Site Management 


Saks Office Open Dagy; 

SJoaneAvome, London SW3 Tchac 937067 Fia:01-22S 2286 


10V Keith Cardafe Groves 

WET QMMdBunqm 

^ OK5810H55 



MORTGAGE or REMORTGAGE 

tHE 



AMG 






AMG, through their established connections with 
all the major building societies, banks and insurance 
companies, will ensure that you obtain the best rates 
and terms, quickly and without fuss. 


FREE SOLICITOR’S COSTS 


(Conveyancing) by an established Erin 
of W.l. solicitors (except stamp duty and the 
usual Registrar and Search fees) 

ON A TYPICAL £60,000 


PURCHASE YOU WOULD 


SAVE UP TO £700 


□ 95% ADVANCES UP TO £500.000 

□ 70% NON STATUS 

(no proof of income required) 

□ LOW START SCHEMES 
Payments start at 7.88% p.a. 

3 x JOINT or 3.7 x SINGLE income 

Tel: 01-431 0035 for immediate quote 


40A HIGH STREET. HAMPSTEAD. NW3 


IB 















m*7^ 

ij {T\ 1 B ri 



Winkworth 
Financial Services 

25a Motoomb Street 
London SWI 


MORTGAGES 

INTEREST RATES FROM 

V 8.4 v% 

(8,7?,-V A.P.R) ■ 


• 100% Mortgage* 

• Interest rates fixed at 10% (AJPJL 10:9) 

• Non-Status Mortgage* from 11% 

• Principle decision* within 24 boon 

• Solicitor* Convey an cing £180 + V.A.T. 

• Pension Mortgage* 

Place your mortgage with one_o f the worlds 
most successful independent financial advi- 
sory services. With access to all the mortgage 
companies operating in the U.K. Overseas 
Financial Services can jnovide the most con- 
venient and cost effective option to suit their 
clients needs. Impartial advice is just one of 
the advantages of dealing with Overseas Fi- 
nancial Services. 


Telephone 01-379 3452 
Centric Rouse 
391 The Strand 
London WC2R OLT 


OVERSEAS 

FINANCIAL 

SERVICES 


SWEBY COWAN 


RESIDENTIAL 


HOWARD MINTER 


SLOANE SO, SWI 

WHY BOY? WHEN YOU CAM RENT 



2 S. C A D 0 G A N PLACE L 0 N 0 0 K S W 1. 2- 



LION MILLS, HACKNEY HOAD, E2 

ONLY 4 FLATS LEFT 
IN PHASE IV! 


Last chance tor the dtecwnmq Young Urban Professional to 
secure one d lte» 'Stato of m* Art* cowerakre to Umtan's 
most up and coming suburb - only one mile from the City. 
1 bed unit tram £61,950 
2 beds tram £72850 
ASPEN ESTATES 01-586 2216 


LANCASTER GATE. 


NmvfymslcmJ,8pad^Topfloorfl8t3tlbtet»eds, 
large raesp. 2 baths. Supesrbfy fitted kitchen. Marble 
M/Diner, Lift & Parking. Long lease 
Pries S1KL5C8. 

Gorton & Co. 01 724 4477. 


SWI. A tt racti v e Maws house in very quiet setting moments 
from River end Station. 2 large beds, hath, opal plan recap, 
kitchen. Roof terrace- Lease Hold. £195,000. 

881. Close Btaekfiriars. Very spacious 2 bed Oat in Riverside 
development, large reap, kit. bath, cloak, garngtwE. Lease 

bold. £110,000. 

BA V8 WAT8S W2. 2 bed Sad floor ooawsniou. Lounge. Jdt, 
bath. Gw CH. doss Station. Lease hold. £90.000. 
BEDFORD SQUARE. Choke of 2 Mews flats in very quint 
setting. 2 beds. bath, recap, kit. Short leases. £79,000 A 
£82,600 Respectively. 

GODDARD & SMITH 
01-930 7321 



ISLINGTON 


PARK MEWS 



.Situated in a nm eonmamertt within nunua* waft of Camden 
Paomtr. Phase I of ibis select and prestigious devrinpmett of 
turntfauM* mawmeU** end flat* m now mlWds Tar ywwbfc. 
rn waw tint of 6 awiwuattea (in neon of 1.000 sq ft par naill. each 
b»> a Sooth Iseia* roof garden oftojiwextHrswe Kid moiamipled 
vk». rf the City si^ioe. Pries 1 r »w today 12 pm - 4pm. 


Sales Office: 01-226 2966. 



CLUTTONS 



Your brand new 
home 


Show homes open Thursday to Monday 
inclusive from 10am to 5pm. 

Colliers Wood SWI 9, Courtney Road 
2 bed houses & flats from E51 .000. 
Phone 01-540 8029 
Merton Park SWI 8, Church Lane. 

1 & 2 bed retirement flats from £47,000. 
Phone 01-5438858 
North Beekton, ToltgateRoad. 
3.4&5bedhomesfrom£68JOOQ. 
Phone 01-511 640& 

Woodford Bridge, Manor Road. 

2&3 bed houses Asm £58000. 

Phone 01-505 575a 

Woodford Green, Broad mead Road. 

2& 3 bed homes from £49,000. 

Phone 01 -505 6715. ^ 


AMemberttHbe 
Trafalgar HouseGmup 


tout 


MORTGAGE & 
FINANCIAL ADVICE 


• MORTGAGES • 100 % advanced up to 
ElSOfiOO- main Income plus - lx secondary 
income • Kxjomt incomes taken* non status 

• REMORTGAGES For any reason, eg: 

• Home improvements* Business Reasons 

• educational Expenses* Large leisure Purchase, 
(boat, caravan, etcJ* second House, (U.ic or 
Overseas) • Matrtmonal Settlement 

• consolidate Existing Borrowings 

• COMMERCIAL MORTGAGES 

• Shops, Factories, Etc 

• PROPERTY DEVELOPMENT 
AND BUSINESS FINANCE 



Robson 


Limited 

01-623 3495 Sf 


i Careys 

^ BwggAgoqrlBl 

234 CTbunt WtfT Bn*d Land 


HOUSES -nsa ^w— — 
DMHNmm RQJUJ. WTOMUKf, LOBON HM2 Monties* Detached Gd- 
awtiar House ai 8» Beu*M and Leafy Mapaslsay taawnWBHPia. fat 
Bedrooms ndMwg taswt En Sou. a m ntxpno roow. tags toted 


UMn/Dsw. togs Cental. OR iMrabig. wry etas M Brin. to eraStm 
contain tnrotaMML C275M WWOUJ Sate AasMt 

mmooBOKT kmss. &ma nan imam, mb a to iST* 


Mnmned Sana Oetatoed Hearten Home. nor Tifw State* Mmpntmg3 
Hcoumds. oil sMMHrtng end garage. Sas C/K ® ready to mnw wo 


PLATS 

mSMWTCM BBS. UTILE WCE liMOM WJ AfedabcS tadrmnm 
Gdn abl En sme master takm om snvua woo g*dM huge aanual 


ukena 125 jh] low oufronas. tflLM 

ewaowa S98MS. MMMT PARK. UMHM RJTjB Umk 1 
Md an m neo mm tto*. oteeA taut km stigmas. CunmuaH pSi*. 
91 yt tase. SUM MM. 


91 yt lease. HUH ’ . M AM. 

Fonwm mm. imom nau. Nm Lumy emtoposm * mam 
me. too am) thne badpoom Sad Many taswes. Lease 99 jaw, 

WttWBWKMEHOIBB Ml «A»«B RAIS IM® 

01-829 sees 


SM51 COTTAGE MS. A oatffce modsm (am tnse i 
ananc conttmn ttsaanaa 4 bads. 2 Me (1 an meet- 2 
Bto- 09 im rad tea l/h 1215X00 402 9494. 

ST J*UU HN. An eamaent ssmMar fanWr Ows« oa 
and mnanaat nm nawa. e tab. 3 betbe (T an sobb). i 
wmt «c. Mb ixaqraar pen. dUe gge + oqt 17 m JoH i 


oo 3 As oi 
k*.gUH*c. 



SHEEN mitwki dchehnul -COM dttaclKd Vstorua cia ncKT oo«- 

l*x ids inmoiit txn Jk; rkne sear Shorn' Common. Eotcumr k*h>. J 
Uiarmrar mffttw mofav «ai> VKlKnihtiakEBl non. * doahlc tod- 


iimd, jik! IwbnuBi. (ku. i H Scope liar ciintuoa wtncci to pfanflin* 
pmmMici MuperHi«iihUei>w eai<k*n. rMKn i«i,od m Ihcrrsioaol 

lll'U»a> Sumla; taewaa Mh Wfihnallg Tatter Dnoa n«eT'»i» 
•>l l 1 

RICHMOND PARK («it« Uiw SmxrMs prami c d mad m 

HMiiithiave nrJ ,«ah taan Ihc Plrk 4 D«J bedroom. : bathroom 
nion,. kiinh UniB| nxm Kun Mwiaumc. kMctsm miun rocm. 
rtiokn-m. >* ( H mtt) paw Brdcn mracr. FnchoU H«5jX» boo- 
da. , ic-mf «-n ’.sf? Uh. ii alter Ijekirnnn Pwtrr flu ill I) 


ST. JAMES SWI. 


Unexpectetfly back on the market beautifully 
modernised house on three Roots, 3 beds, 2 
baths (1 e/s), biliard room, games room, 
sauna/shower room, utaty room. £560.000 F^H. 
Also avad atria newly refurbished 2 bed flats 
£245.000 Long Lease. 

Davis Wootfe A Co. Tel: 01 402 7381. 



NO FURTHER! 


We offer: 

• Mortgage* with tax relief deducted at source, 
lower than Bonding Sodely rafev 

• lOKs and low-start schemes for first-time 
buyers. 

• Non-status mortgages up to 8tP a. * 

• Written quotations. 

• No fees on Endowment/Pension Inked. 

• Up to 3 X joint income. 

• Too ups to 100? a (no limit). 


MORTGAGES FROM 10% {10*4% APR) 
REMORTGAGES FOR ANY REASON 

• Easy payment plan*Ki*o up to 30%, jnctafng 
id«d at source free redundancy & MfcniM mwronc*. 

^ For further infcmKriion wifhcuf obfcgation contad 

r first-time us now at , 

premier Mouse# 77 Oxford Straet, 
v>, * London Wilt 1RBL 

PREMIERE MORTGAGE 
n Med. SERVICES LTD 

01-4391188 


B 




77KUE 


mm SALES B«J«S PROPERTY 00! W 

THE TWILIGHT ZONE III 


^RQUaoatC CLOSE N19 - highgate 

Sttdta 1 '10,86. We art apoma^fltfvsj+ww^ 
System . C»a« i a ia*M*nrfS5 

It Om ul»*! wadoi Put 4 uoonfl» screen TOatdOfW 
ntaeat a SooO T fs i row d houses Cam ■ 'An wa 
an $a£* r "Ymr lack odne cam assonds «*» « gm 
naBs a mot nuntais. and rfim not iwsateo a PwBfl JS 
nefl l assume they are tor saSa' -Raya, bea m m> dw p ■ 
SaMy - Itoie arazaq a many beaHul Bwe storey twm 
hna wim ewiv ksmy neWng a rodwwjmc 
MtaafcSBl *acuaBnq system can we ctlQM kd 
Enwonse’- Ho Cjptwi. ow wefteotoffy ftoe» i effindttai 
tn . -Thn* twroores » we*, as 50;.-, & i wn Uofl me 
Eneemme I'm mowe mottos olaceT . 

\ *9 




MILLFIELD LANE N6 - 
HAMPSTEAD PONDS 


A most desirabte location frontoiQ 
Hampstead Heath. 


A six bedroom experience m spec* 
which wffl attract more stars than a 
black hole! 


Quite magnificent, with loads of en- 
sutta bathrooms and an incredible 


garden as welt. 

Easily big enough for the family person 


manding ol people. 


Take time out and 'Oft off to this loca- 
tion this century* 


£1954100 (Sterling) 


£1,000.000 (Sterling) 


4 Pantos CwrL 


n SI-431 am 
m NW3 


i TWOOflROUT 



■«« & uU 


OffiCfS INK 
NORTH 






r A 


SHIRLEY HILLS. 

resibnea 
cterader & charm 
set m bsautitui 2 acm 
omds. 10 mms East 
Croydon Station, serv- 
ing London. Gabmk a 
Souft Coast Easy 
reach M2S. Totally re- 
furtehed ntmaailau 
.accommodation com- 
prising: 3 r e c eptio n nns. 7 twdnns. 3 battvms. Gas C.H. 2 
double garages. Healed summing pool. 

£410,000 


MATES ESTATE AGEMCY 
01 680 2422 
(Open 7 days a week) 







WHY NOT RE-MORTGAGE 
YOUR PROPERTY 

And get the benefit ef your equity 


★ imcdliuft Cemnd Hauing 

* Refurbishment of your property 

* Extension of your property 
* School Fees ★ Buying a Car 

* Goins on a holiday etc. 


Wo Jee payable) 

HOT STATUS MORTGAGES AVAIL.4BLE 

HIRSCH INTERNATIONAL 
(FINANCIAL SERVICES) LTD. 

One of Europe’s Leading Mortgage Brokers 
IS. Berkeley Street. Landau W1X SAE. 

Tet 01-629 5051/2 TELEX 28374 


I .r~: OLDSCHfi!D T 

i^j.H O VV l A-N D C.A S Si- LI S' 


NIMC HAAVSTIAO. MWX A «*-V Wl MeM iWl 
How hum axstan^y 4e*e^ <wl areciad «• it* Are*** 
Kmfertb ot .otoaoMhi* aijl «o#pbc» IH ttoaMa 
allows m ce w i iwul ottea ham 3 •» 5 badmaa* «nh neapMMl 
hriny area. Uaaaap kiKbcn. ■bfay 2 *ebp«to 

Tlww tn«2 9iwt»9«<»dlofV towbe^wtttow. AtoB Jljh 

truied bodwi n arailaMa boro riro SOLS xOWTVmWIft 
FXQHOLO. 

IS HEATH STaSnVHAMrSTYAIUtWJI 4TR.0I 4SS 44H 

OTAtl Ag04TC.V4UIUB.4IAO AT BUN6T0M Mull 3M «OT 


SOUTH KENSINGTON 


Cedarlud Terrace, Copse H3L, Wimbledon SW20 
Oitstandiiffi opponuntiy to purchase a new luxury house 
dose to ViDafte and Common and amidst a parklike setring. 
Each house oners: two suites of bedroom and bathroom, two 
other bedrooms, family bathroom, drawing room, diniog 
room, fully equipped Pogge np ohl conservaiory/kilcbeo. fit- 
ted utility room, cloakroom, circular stain, doubk: glazing, 
gas central heating, garage, gardens. 


Show bouse open Sunday Il~5pm 
From £290,000 Freehold 


From £290,000 Freehold 

HAWKES & Co 
946 1000 


An excellent refurbishment of four, 2 and 3 
bedroom flats for sale with fully fined kitchen, 
caprets, new common parts etc. ' . , 
"Lease 125 years. From C110JML 
Joint Sole AgeRts 

w. A. m .t.ts 


01-581 8431 


81-581 7854 



WESlWOtStm. SWI. Eton Freehold bukfing tor sale compnang oround 
Itoor stop, tusanen storage & 2 upp« Hoora. Fid vacant possesson. 
E2S0.0D0. Beuaeus 222 7B2B. 


YIKCarr smuu&. WestomsW Spaoous. bright top floor flat n reaBy 
attaara dwadar buMog ■* driqiatudy kept gardens. Superb views 
across SqnxB. 2 Beds. 2 Wercom Reoeus. for Ml Aatfe. Om CH. 
Cantata. 86 ytais. tl 52,500. leWWI 222 7 S2R. 

bersims. ne uamra ar asm. westmwstbl lohnm swre jef. 


JOHN DEAN & CO. 


CLAPHAM COMH0N bnmaculata 3 badroom flat on 2nd floor rd (me 
Wdonan house. Drang room, luxury bathroom and magmfleant open 
plan Mcm/dming room, hadtog to any mol terrace. 

ESFflOa L/H. 228 I860 


BETWEEN THE COMMONS Sraertor 2 faedmam fbt fei Prestons 
utotaifl oBarmg s pac i a u a accommodation with fuBy fitted 
toKbenflnaldast room, bxwy buimnm, shower mom, lounge. Video 


(nP^hto e^Ml GCH. Carpets. Communal gantens. 


GREENWICH 

Riverside period house In heart of Royal , 
Greenwich 'Ancient Mooring Rights’. PanommiO 
Marinas Studio. 4 beds, 2 oaths etc., afl mod 
cons. £199.950. F/H. 

Dyer Son & Creasay. 

01-852 9522/858 4969 (Sun). 


EDWIN EVANS ESTATE 


W IS LEY ROAD SW11. 3 bed Edwd bowse b e t w ee n common! 

Fun GCM bm nquir» aoera opdatiqi u> kd A hath. 3S* rear auden, 

437500 F/H far quick eate. 

AL.FRISTON ROAD SWfl, Newly reftirfa. a bed. Edwd Hook. 
FuBy mod. and between commons. £130.000 F/H. 
ROSEKEATH fiOAu SWll, I mm o eu la te and specious a bed 
KitwdhBm,.San«ll»inritet» w i «M,iMn, asr pi<li>n B| aT' [ Sn f> 
F/H. 


Tel. 01-228 0051 


FINCH a CO 

WIMBLEDON Exceptional detached charaoW 
»nseniation area, very seotudtd 5 
beds. £320.000 

WIMBLEDON immaculate 3 bed detached 
property tn private dose within conservation 
area. Superbly fitted. 

01 542 1193/4 


WESTMINSTER 

Ewmur 4 Ndm Ite »co vacriuihfins A Uiwrim. Dta iramian. tar. 
ttmmcrm.iK«lall> filtuL hiuikranud&cpu. Aflametum. 

ca&M* 


PEMBRIDGE VILLAS W2 


AOanninr'IndaiurUBCMMdinm bcilrt). J btdnns. J nvm. 3 
tollte rally hUnf lukk'n. 


PHONE 01-221 2221 


y*Vn; 










9 







































~* T 'Sr 


'm y > . 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 1 1986 




r 


PROPERTY BUYERS’ GUIDE 





rsETT 

^ ft- • 




r I 



LONDON PROPERTIES 


Bufton Holes A** 

" ^^GEORGlN^ Lesser Etomes Ltd. 


SHOW FLATS Cr EYB OURNE 

^VHOUSE^ 



afesSSS^i 



OPEN TODAY 

10am to 6pm 


IDEAL FOR 
INVESTMENT 
10% NET 
RENT 

ACmfc TABLE 


to City Standards 

jW HiB Stefem md fit. Katf*rine’.Dock : 

Ckae Square. 


*3»0 p^a. lndwhw d^> iL 1 i.1l? Bloaoia ' Lancs 126 yon. Service rfr, 

AT PMCRS FOR JANAI3HY 1887 OCCUPATION. 
T.Tv.JrQR.BRQCHUR B AND VIEWING 

A 9??f r STEPHEN MORGAN 

ioam^ SAjBStQns; Saturdays) 

10AM - 6PM WEEK DAYS AND SUNDAY. 


MORTGAGES 
NEEDING HOMES: 
APPLY NOW 


At Midland, we've plenty 
of funds and they’re available 
now. We won’t keep you hang- 
ing around for a mortgage. 
Our rate is currently 11.0% 
(APR 11.5%), whatever the 
size of your mortgage. Call in 
to your local branch, and you’ll 
get a decision within a couple 
of days. 

We also lend up to 90% of 
valuation, and up to three times 
your income (or double joint 
applicants’ combined income). 
And you don’t even have to be 
a Midland customer: 

We offer the same rate for 

# MIDLAND 
MORTGAGES 

; CMtdtmd Bank pic 19067 - 


COUNTRY ( 
HOUSES I 
ASSOCIATION » 
UNITED * 


endowment and repayment 
mortgages, and well give you 
a mortgage certificate to 
prove you've got the funds on 
tap. It all adds up to a better 
mortgage. 

Written details available from 
Customer Information Service, 
Freepost, Sheffield Si 1 A2. 


"We’ll make you feel 
more at Home." 




(C85) 41 K1NGSWAY 
LONDON WC2B 6UB 

TELEPHONE 01-834 1624 


CAREFREE 

RETIREMENT 

Private apartments for long-term 
occupation are available in our 
historic houses each of which is 
set within extensive private 
grounds. 

The properties are easily accessi- 
ble' and are situated in Kent, 
Surrey, Sussex, Essex, Oxford- 
shire, Berkshire, Wiltshire and 
Devon. 

AD have been tastefully converted 
to provide luxury living whilst re- 
taining their original character 
and atmosphere. 

AH services including meals, 
cleani n g and heating are provided 
by Resident Administrators. 
Write' or telephone for our illus- 
trated brochure. 


GLOUCESTER WA1X. W8 £ 3B5J00 

Lowly lanky bouse w*m sett contaned basement 
fla .m ptessam roSflenasI 5 real - 2/ -* .ffi'n 2 
reaps, w. toflu S/C W iwnsjol S h®. 
ma tor conversion w jo 5 bed ta*f_ SMgL*”8 
qardan. gas CH. BOOd decoratlw onto ttwwpwrt- 
sama nwSerasawm reduced. F/H. 

01 337 S622/GS91. 

IfXHAMGARD^ W8 

Charrrwg IU *i north «es cofng ol pMcehd pt- 
den souse- With a isumy A wtotW £*» « 
darned aocommodjwi irtnwfc : 2 tod* 2 bate 
II en sude). efts. M. storage wufc fl» CHdW 
abied. access to souse Harass. 999 yrs + share 

■TfJh. 01 937 9622/0091. 

PRINC ES GATE , SW7 ClJWgl 

Spacious apartmert 

tuedy situated «i a S year old dew*wnw»-Zg“- 
Kaih stiOv« ran. recep, lot gas CH. potti*. 996 yrs. 

01 730 9496 

IADBROKE SQUARE, W11«1»JW 

SbSS* tocadonw.tt.Sty 

smart lot. Mb. CH. ^ °LE"25J; 

gardens. Store ol F/H. 01 727 9811. 

?T5*gL» 33. KH5 

01 730 9496. 


LADBR0KE ESTATE. Wll C585J90 

Backing onto mgnHcent Lansdom cwnraual 
rentes. a m monos Atom 1640 house whh 
superb stone stamase & ctawrtaV accornnydawi 
ot 201 recep with 2 hitter twa*s.5 beds. 2 tofts. 
Bitttaup UL ptayrm. 2 cto, utifty rra, s eclude d 
garden. F/H. 81 603 9275 

ADDISON ROAD, W14 £565.000 

An eszpWraHy wide 6oNc house wth sjrem 
sarcase A sorea west rear garden 20ft x3«dU 


decorative order. F/H. 01 G63 9275. 

STANLEY CRESCENT. W11 £275.009 
A fuiuious matorato in excellent pedod comer- 
son ready (or fcnmedkdB otawwi w*h a fcge 
studkr recep wtttr mol terraces 8 tine sotdb news 
over comnwa l gard ens. 3 tods, 2 Mbs, lit. BtL 
S99 yes. 01 727 9811. 

NORTH END HOUSE, WI4 £205*08 

hi a owl cmseivstioo area, a top .floor t amfrffft 
with attractive kratta wtodows mertootan^ws. 
4 beds. bath. shower rra. dfat rare* hit/blast na 
gas CH. Ml yrs. 01 602 0925. 

£255,600 

nl ds sac re- 
ar) easing. 
W/bTasi rm. 
mien, gas CH. 



V.M h"— 

Prices from £145/000 

:»SSSSS !S!r 


BfflSMW 

OFFICE 

ISLE OF DOGS. 1988 Butt First Floor Rat on 
Ffivftr Side Development BedPoom. Lounge. Fitted 
Krtcnen, Bathroom. Gas Central Heating £62300. 
SE16. 4 B edro o m House owriooldng Greenland 
Dock, Lounge. Fitted Kitchen. Bathroom, Gas 
Central Heating. £130.000. 

ST KATHARINES DOCK. Sp* Level Apart- 
ment, 2 Bedrooms. Lounge, IQtehen, Bathroom, 
Central Heating, Garage to Rent. £115,000. 
WAPPING. Spit Level Rat Close to Station. 2 
Bedrooms, Lounge, Rued Kitchen /Dinar, Bath- 
room. Parking Space. Communal Gardens. 
£78300. 

SEA. Superb Spft Level Apartment overlooking 
Tower Bridge, Lounge. GaBeried Bedro om , Dress- 
ing Room. Fitted Kitchen, Central Heating, Video 
Entry Phone. Parking. £175,000. 

ISLE OF DOGS. Fabulous Waterside Apartment 
with Private Mooring, Bedroom, a L a Shaped 
Lounge. Fitted Kitchen, Bathroom, Balcony, Fitted 
j Carpets. £100300. 

i WAPPING. Spacious Warehouse Conversion, 3 
1 Double Bedrooms. 44’ Lounge, Fitted Kitchen, 2 
B a throoms, Utfity Room. 20* Reception Hal. 
Video Entry Phone. Reserved Parking in Base- 
ment £275300. 

ISLE OF DOGS. 2 Bedroom Apartment with One 
of the Finest Views on the Rim. Lounge with 
Balcony, Rtted Kitchen, B a throom, Entry Phone. 
Garage. Passenger Lift, Landscaped Gardens. 
£145,000. 

SHAD THAMES. Large Stucflo Flat in Prestigious 
River Side Development 2i‘5‘ x 18'4" Living 
Room, Fitted Kitchen, Bathroom. Central Heating. 
Video Entry Phone. ESS.000. 

ISLE OF DOGS. 1986 Butt River Skta Rat Bed- 
room, Attractive Lounge Rtted Kitchen. Bathroom, 
Central Heating. Patio. £85,000. 

“LATEST UST OF DOCKLANDS 
PROPERTY AVAILABLE ON REQUEST* 
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 


Conveyancing 

£280 by City Solicitors 

(+ VAT and disbursements) (or buying or selling your home 
si the usual way on paces up to £6tUuO. Rmg for quotes on 
higher figures. 

BAR RET I S SOLICITORS, 

48 ami KCTDKA ST. liWOOH BC4 
IBEMOHEr Ol-Me MM 


BafiRAW Mews House. 
Ffi KA G5 yr to. £335. 
B&0UVM 1 Bed PletiH 
ECC&STDN SQBJUS 
EATDH PUCE Smochi 
B aJrooms. 3 Bate. 0l| 



bouse. 2/3 Beds. 2 Baths, Hecw An. 


Gapp 730 0253. 


DOCKLANDS 

PROPERTY CBVTRC dM 


m 


THE ' 

fFLEETWOOD 

PARTNERSHIP 


easn ant raw 

Uw IU)W 2 tony FfflmW 2 (wfc na,73» 

OfitoTtm BOWS. M 

tostadwe awfc «. 3^ tub. rart mu Just on UK. tnUHL 

aouaesttiei . 

floanqn ons tores. 2 tok. tog tore. JutrekcadOUHl 
1 1M Ska*, latow M KM. Totokaao IMS WSfMWua 


LENNOX GARDENS, 
SW1. 

Attractive ptef-aeanw with , 
patio A own stieet entrance ' 
vta Ctabon Mews. Raoap, K4. 
Bad. Bath. Patio. 29 yrs. 
£85,000. 

CkesterileU 8 Ca | 
81-581 5234. 


BBIW j 

Freehold house, beatofuly 
docorate d con si sting double 
(JmMng mom. Swib room. 
ttdren, 3 tods 1 MKutie 
bathroom. 1 bath with idM n 1 . 
1 shower loom, garden and 
posabity ol rortgardan. 01- 
tere Iran ttOODOO. 

Td *1 73B IMS (MoeL 


J AMGEL Ml , V 

Very pretty 3 storey ter™* 1 
howse. dose to Angel tifte ol- 
tering eweflert accomm- 
odaboo; 2/3 dbie bads, 
teotnh sating room, ttl 
b'tast un. iflAty mvtolh. ua- 
den. Qng teahn F/H 
El 37500 


Uoroua 2 bed. 3rd Itoor apart- 
menr sal n oos ol ttngion's 
ft* snares dose to Angd 
Tide Stadras sdtnp room 
wtb balcony- 2 dbte beds. 

tal/b'tasa na'luto f*W3 vath 
qMWyiwts.2ba ds.au- 
way. pnva» Datoa. axcatioa 
dec reder, ML L/H. 124 yre. 

qggg 

WANS' 

BAKER 



JjL The Blades to 

iZrLuxury Riverside Apartments \W 

f J views from every fk^ TiaCtionafly 

^SXworldiTBfirepteces, 

) ^ Bakonyorpatotoevery^ 

fi \ Car parking, lift 


NORTH OF THE 
THAMES 


FBCHEY 112 

larae famly home, &bede. 2 
.bams, Edwardian terrace, 
convenient a afl emenfSea. 
fuP QCH, sroal garden, orel- 
■ty carpets and curtains, 
ou ts tanding vttue at 
■ 

FOB QUICK SALE. 

NO AGENT&. 

TH 11-445-2389 


C M CWSCK RtvTrsKte. Elcvani Ed- 
wardian -hsv bi e«duavc 
Mcanon. Supvrbty modernised 
wnt» many (Uldiill fe a t u re s 
Esltnhe lanVty aCcommoda- 
lion nuiudlDV award winning 
«i udto Me. 23SH «WTk*n trading 
to Thames. O.I.R. ■ £450.000. 
View Today 01 994 4095 Or 
WMUnan Porter 998 3399 

STUNMMC BKABC B Listed b- 
fcd Sa a Fad, H a w Close 
Cttoon Square: S Mdiwna 

. Large Reception Room. Mawnlf- 
Ireol 25 - Open Plan Kitchen / 
D*nti>9 ttoom- Study, 3 9Mh- 
rooias.il ensuiln tar Soum 
raring Carden. C225.000 Tel 
226 4817 iHonWOl 434 1861 
rwotu 

ASSET road NW6 Elegani and 
uurlois grmmd Door IU wild 
original feature*- Him double 
Bedroom, large rrcaHlon. fcHcti- 
rn. Dunroam.liUl.CCSE Usees 
traau eawen, 98 year leooe in- 
cluding 46 share or. F/H. 
C7bJoa Ftrsacksmarur. 
Tefe 01328 i960 

SWn- Carlisle Place. Very rteganl 
rrccpuon rooms, in snacious s 
bed. 3 recess 3rd floor monstoo 
flat Lease 90 yrs. £247.000. 
Tet Himler estates. 01-828 
2145 

wr2 Ooumter terrace, whi » 
pomled 1 Ded patio flat. 2 matt 
lii-dr pane, erurancr riao. Igr 
lerop. Utebon/brldsl rm. cedar. 
ms rti. he 89 yrs. C79.000. us 
01-723 8099. 

BLOOWtsauanr. Bright and otuet 
sludto liar. 1st nr P/B hock, sen 

. ■ Ut. Ba st be. Low outgoing*. 
C44JOO. Frank Harris * Co. 
367 0077 

toomnsaunr air odmq souaie 

wci Bright 2 bed 4/etfc Or 
man m p/b atone oserioouna 
-comm gdns.- 92 yrs. KdBJOO 
Ibr mark sue. Tel: 405 9229. 


weiuiii llll Hit ll I. t« Lime ad 
trfflHd Lor l eed flat. 64 yrs. 
<456000 01-684 3363. 

MUStiKU. MU. Unmar 4 bed 
Edwardian hse Oriw features. 
Cl 30 000 Tri Ol 888 9191 


KMHHIUHIOCS.QIM la Or 2 
M U In n ML CH. penrr 
rir. 46 st he. Cl 30.000. Rufus 
Raced A Co 609 9896 
LARGE Victorian nee. Burlington 
Rd OfOiWlck W«. £263.000 T 
H06WN8: 730 99S7 Sund 948 
23071. 

IHVERSaC. 1/2 bed IMS. Orert- 
- tv oieriooUng the Tharna. 
rrgm £97.000. 

Rtcenlde ReskScnUal 488 4882 


Townci loiciil 


soerb an m oosc d met me 
Hd wto. kwwy mm mc. new hd. 
scu> pw» Baa rezjooo 

EfflWlMl vabH C—nnwi* 
nr ue oar ire. tat Uftre*. Mb 
eWI to *e Con to bud ml rur. 
Gx CM {tISJXO « iJK 
CtfTBJM Htiwon nra 
tepte ma y aoea ts Only M ■ 
guu aeapout nock due to 
(net. 3 beds. bob. 2 rass. MW.ua 
CM Lanbr gamms 030000 
mmnem* ruK.SK 
Beg** 2 Alt bh « w ue tow 
16 moo nn hbowk tt.rert. mao 
bdh. eng kahra. Cu to Long Ue 


01-731 4448 


jW 


FORD 


AYLESFORD STUDIO 
HOUSE HOLLAND PARK 

Id eaMwg engitaJ areas stodo huse 
m t gut pcfitoMut toe*** SMO 
natton ion. Dnag wen. Stott 3 


tones. Pads grin Am mho 
FBSaHAD RCDUCa 
FOB one SUE 
£495*0 

193 toto— Orb* Stied 
Idrin M Tri 41-727 6663 


MAIDA VALE 


HOUSES AND FLATS THROUGH- 
OUT THE DOCKLAHDS AREA 

KSIDENT1AL DEPARTMENT 
TEL 01-790 956fr 


121 Sflteertari Avme 

Exctoswe eonwrewi 7 tots: 3 
soto. 1.2 or 3 beds. GasCH. 
Quriy troughouL 
Pntts from t© .000 
toEIBSjDOO 

BUT MVCT FROM OEVOOPBI 
new tws E vo wi c ; 

IfORMpto 

STARLCROFT LTD. 
0783 7SI61 
Oflke borers. 


GLOUCESTER 

PLACE 

Three bedrooms. Two 
receps. Two ba throoms/ 
WC. IQuhoi. CH. 24 how 
portET. Entrance phone Lift. 
Eacatont block. £14950a 

Tel: (0634) 32230. 


BEDFORD 
SQUARE (OR). 

2 s 2 Bed Ban In smal 
block. 23 year tanw. 
From ES7^00. 

Alee Bates A Ca 
4994010. 


W11 

An immaculate mews 
house with garden and 
28' roof terrace, recept 3 
beds. 2 baths, kaunr 
kitchen 997 yia £179,500. 

Alex Neil 
01 221 2000 


LAP H QRg gquARF mi . or. 

ganity restored. bWi celHnged. 
rterd around floor period OaL 
fei'oib pneVtoo. naouB 
square. Large recep directly fac- 
ing acres of comnnmu gardens. 
2 bedrooms, kitchen, bathroom, 
dotoroom & mil Long Iraae. 
ttSBOOO mag : 01 229 8901 
(Sun. eves * Wdays in.) 


ST. JP i a ra . WOOD borders / 
8wHs Cottage. Large, period, 
send, house. Al present bi 3 
cotnptetefy self coo lamed flats 
or ran be wed as large family 
house. Has been r ornnw iy re 
furbished, new roof etc. Varan i 
possession. Family leaving Lon- 
don. £210000 ono Freehold. 

• To vetw ring 01-328-0387 or 
(02221 43216. 


style house, many original 
fearurn: new roof, re-wired: 
large reenr. 3 beds: sunny 
kUctwn/brealtfac! ream, new 
fan oven and gas hob: gas C/H: 
wdKIsckM pretty 70 fl oar- 
den. C12SLOOO. Te*. OS 996 
3261 


MQSrr SQ, NWl. Simmy the 
best Ral tat lt*» mansion block. 
Two beds. Hudgr recep Balco- 
ny OTooldng square. All new 
Interior. £146^00. Tel: 01-262 
1701. 


HOLLAND PARK W14 - Ideal 
pied a terre. Entrance hafl. bed. 
recepaon. bath. seo. w.r.. Idl. A 
garage. 92 year lease. Share of 
freehold. FtiraJIure available. 
£120000. Tel : Ol 602 1300 


IMMACULATE Baker street area 
nu in excellent condition Four 
bedroomL Two reception 
rooms. Fully ntttd kitchen. 
GCH. £196.600. Telephone: 
01 724 1546: 


I PBBJCO tmmar oukl one bed 
, paiio nal lor immediate occupa- 
tion. Recep. dble bed. 
. ocraatonsl bedrm. kll. hath. 
GCH. Long Lae. C8BJXX5 Tel: 
Ol 828 3324IHI 231 07171WI. 


ST MARKS RD, 
W10 

Light 21 ’studio recep- 
tion opening to small 
balcony, in top flr flat 
with open plan kitchen, 
ssp dble bed, study 
area, bath. Ideal for 
going person/ artist. 

E71UM0 

Marsh & Parsons 
01-603 9275 


WESTMINSTER/ 

VICTORIA 

Wide Selection of 
Quafity Rats & Houses 
available. 

Coward ft Ce 

8341957. 


HOWARD ESTATES 

01 289 8104/S555 

MAIM VALE VS. Newly con- 
vtrtad 2 bed ta tot Mto tad 
U. GXK. qits £78.500 
KUl VALE WL Newly com 
spa level roaonene 35 ft 
reap. 3 beds. 2 fcnhc hnr ht_ 
roof terrace. (160.000 


SUSSEX STREET. SW1 
Beauctttfy mad unnl t 
kwar graoad lloar masoneOa 
rib tingat, etepm rooms m 
enposne penod boftbng OM 
ftep- f®«l M. 3 Beds. 2 en- 
sue Baths. Gas CH. Entranee- 
pbone Pam. 123 yr to. 
£215,000. 

Cortot 4 Co 351 7341 


Nl. 1 » IQ. Magntllrenl 

5 doored lomilv home m a oui 
rt corner ol IMS favoured 
garden w In vupbrrh order. 
igM and eleganl a r ram. revam- 
inn period lealurrs Thru recep 
(78 k III famtfv LMrhen area 
<78 x 18i wiih rournn atmo- 
whrrr and »uperb luxury 
woods! ock nvaotr kitchen wtut 
aga Mjmrr prd/luaury bam 
room rale. Further 4 double 
beds. 2 nallts. 2 W Ci uUMy 
reom and dinner asragt 60 II 
W (mng earorn. Caa C/H 
E/phone/interrotn on every 
floor Olfere over £300.000 
F/H. Houack Peiiam 226 
0160 


niW Period splendour Map 
mdcenl 5 bed del lair Vwtortan 
reeidenrr Superbly apppt n tcd 
Taslelultv renovated through- 
out with parucular attention to 
period realtors Mo expense has 
been spared to restore ihh line 
property lo Its former gtory. 
with all the romlorta of modem 
tiling Large landscaped South 
faring rear garden. £410.000 
F/H. For further iteormalioa 
and colour brochure ring: Jones 
A Co Ol 992 6006 or Ol 998 
3533. 


Suuare. FM Ume advertised. 
Mag fhld (am hce « tri prime 
square. 5 beds, dble recep. sen 
dnungrm. bfwi rm. Smallbanr 
- kltrherv 5 bams, np naff naL 
COtnprtUng bed. bath, recep rm. 
dble gpe suitable for 2 Rods 
(Joyces. Freeho l d outre to Ex- 
rm of £89&OOa SMphansens 
Ol 221 75B2 


FULHAM Well planned flat 
fronted 3 bed cottage. Drawing 
rm 16 x 16. siudy/halL Bright 
soutn racing kuctien/oreaklato 
rm. Pauo. Bathroom 3 2 elks. 
Outet road, easy parking. F/H 
£12&000. Tel. Ol 731 7723 
From Monday 29th. 


ST. JOHN'S WOOD NWS - Superti 
conversion in a ubs ianh a l Vic- 
tortan villa. 2 dbl beds, 
bain room, showeroom. fully ftt 
led kb etien. lip lounge, own 
parking spare, gas ell. very low 
I outgoings A long tease. 
I £110.000. Tel : Ol 624 3348 


ST BH fl R BSS SQUARE SW1 Un- 
usual and oytUi 1st floor nal 
wXh large lemce overlooking 
square gardens. Needs redeep 
ratxm. Reception, dining. 2 
beds. kK and bam. Lease 116 
yrs. £146.000. Tucker man 01 
222 6811 


SWS Earls Court Souare. Sown 
facing bnghi spacious pent- 
house maisonette, double recep. 
studio. 2 double bed. l single 
bed. fUled kitchen, bathroom, 
large terrace, low outgoi n gs, 
freehold. £259.000 Tri Ol 373 
1233 iht Ol 937 0171 lot. 


F U LHA M Extremely large semi 
del house. 6 dble beds. 2 baths. 
30‘ through drawtogrm AHrac 
live pauo garden. Close to 
Fulham Rd shops A restaurants 
3 rains Parsons Green Tube. 
£280.000. KH Ol 731 0884 


CAVENDISH AVENUE, 
NW8. 

NEW ON THE MARKET 
DTOe noroae spue hauso n me 
evst-pous Sl John s waca kxa- 
W In new 5l cantei 
ixfiatHfmient CMnmUuspaBn- 
tol A would BOW* B BoOV 4 
Bans u.-Bsiasi ten s homos. 6tr 
Gen Fieenok! naUBS 

AstaDChsse 

01-724 4724. 


Pembridge Place 

W2 

Spacnus ground floor 2 bed 
flat with garden, e xceft em 
deavAve conditioa 85 
yens 5185,000 

Alex Neil 
01 221 2000 


W U I M H I4TW- Olfere some of 
Central London's lugnl man- 
sun flats And sr have the 
drtads 1 Mod or uhrnM S - 8 

rooms. K A 7/3 B Mai haw ays. 

77 Budungham Gate. SWi 
222 3133. 


BUMBTON nunerb nat irooied 
1800 mn del villa on 3 nrs 
Modernrwd lo retain all period 
Inatmev 30" dWe reep. 3 beto 2 
oaths. III. teo tamits rm Sec 
7S- odn GCH Car avail 
£730000 F/H. 01 364 7761 


CHELSEA & 
KENSINGTON 


BARBBKTtW- 

SAWBERS 

W2 Fatiukis Froenoe nssr 5 
Bros. ? Rats. ? 

Gdn Stoiit too rate Iran Sued 
Stmt Hide Pak D99£0 
Wil ttodand Part TiexY Me«t 
Hade «nb X Ikcq Room 3 
Bros Gmor Furtne 1739(00 
WS KDCBteTON Huge 4 8K.2 
Rrceo Osrtev *0 tssoi O 
0 ir. 1 t cua {345000 
fieebom 

SW7 lOitey 4 3rt Mews Hxzt 
mm X Lmng Room m sauga U 
m ra niaOCD freffoe 
MU Acnctee 4 B« tre coaa e a 
eoase tu Good 5sy & E33 DM 
MB kenseqroo f letwR Mute ta 
£1*5 0C0 E«U g tOd a wCi- 
ton So (tsry 

M Prestige 5 STO SRecroFne- 
teUfl Hoiae ntfh Cnge {370000 
SWI Thebes: tts > ess m lunoon s 
nfwre ms * Bed. 3 Recep beta 
house d United A m dance to 
ha CBns rvjcd 
am Soeer 3 Bro nmaouse m 
C sny & Guam £735000 
fftthoki 

01-584 2551 


pmm FREEHOLD V8 
MBgate Caocmtiaa Am. 

cl 850 24ft le ct p ao n. sumy tcr- 
raa grien. 2 daiDie tiedroonts. 
hded kdehn. tethroom. criUr 
s to re . 

Reduced tram El 50,000 to oners 
£1404)00+ for a quak sale. 

SAMnI- W eekday 433 8048 
EMriaos/Bcrindt 221 7984 


BASIL STREET, 
SW3. 

Bsgant t* floor na fwturmg Dote 
Rnp Room 3 8ML 2 Bada. 
Shomn Room, dotes, UjBmk 
Roool LA. Dtteteni Porierega. 
(9 yrs. £385X00 

GbesterfUd ft Co 
01-5815234. 


DRAYTON 

GARDENS. 

SW10. 

StivifMng 2 Bed flat witt) 
30‘ Recup Room. 1st 
floor. £1754100. 

Btaobam & EHiot 

581 1059. 


HOUSE HUNTING? 

Do call us Westwood 
Home Finders. We 
search for you & a great 
deal more. For 
properties exceeding 
£300,000 - 
- 24 hours 

01 584 9171 


CAMMUN C0MS SWS Mag 

bright and sunny family fit. 
Ready for immrd occupation. 
Newt)' rrlurbed with access lo 
superb gdn souare and use of 
Ininas rrts immense storage 
spare. 4 beds. 2 baths. Irge dble 
recep, Irge dining no. Iilfed kll. 
Lang tease. £-tS6.ooo 
Stephansens Ol 221 7682 


EALING - Huge. 2 btetroomed- 
luxury OaL Filled SUchen. »1C. 
87 years lease. £87^00. Tel : 
Ol 99B 3709 


EOCEWAHC/Stanmore Bonders 
2 beds nnny tote Kin s mod Id 
floor Har. 2 balconys. £69.960. 
Tel 962 9687 or 982-9144 


MttnMHfUWii ■ Spacious 2 
bed top floor fteL Beaut, dec. 
PotenUalfor nan floor. 120 yr 
hA £126000. TH : 229 1906 


NWI Ughl 4U1 floor 2 bedroom 
flat, m very conve ni en t service 
Mock, easy parking. £75,000 
tong lease. Tel 01 686 47S3. 


CHtSttflCK W12 - Quief. BflhL mu 
per s/c studio art. Fully filled 
UKftcn tor. wiafiing machine. 

. Tons storage space Carpets. 
. rurialBs. sort IHMs nr. Parklna 
nace. C47JOO. Tel : Ol 283 
8566 X 4212 IworiO or 01 740 
4684 i ev«! 


SWt mold rrttage, I Dial refur 
aimed. 1 dm. 1 Mngfe bed. ige 
balrony. l min Ballon's Parti. 
£86.000. Ol 788 9097. 


•Mid* VALE Randolph Avenue 
deswner nal 2 beds, shared 
gdn .199.960 Tel Ol 289 4127 


HLBBSRMf. Ml. Owrmuig 3 sto- 
rey cottage style property In nc 
rood. 2 teds. 2 rectos, lux Idl. 
-halh. 60' rear -odn. Gas eft. 
C99.9S0 l/h. suck ley & Keni 
369 8245. 

tei wn uua ave. m B right 
new flats. Fundshed. equipped 
and ready m Ine m. £50.000 - 
C8S.OOD. Tel: 01-402 6724. 

*• 44SVHHIW HUB, Sup 

eoroer property. Shop, base- 
merd. 2«ednn flat over. Frtdd 
£90400 details 01-361-4733. 


MW* in sought after. Mb' Can 
fteM-Cdns. a well-comened 1st 
nr ftM Lge recep wtui bay win- 
dow. 2 beds fined waroerobesv 
, kll/ bath, verdant ire. GCH. 
119 yr be. For quKL sale. 
OB&JSOO. Tel: Ol 625 3682. 


NWS Hampstead Borden. Earty 
Victorian end of lerrare bouse. 
4/5 bens. 3/4 recepft. kitchen . 2 
baths rl en sidle! mower with 
wc. 40(1 garden. Potential s/c 
easement. £!9aOOO Telephone 
Ol 485 8883. 


PARK ground lloar mansion 
block 5 beds, long lease Offers 
over C1SO.OOO. Private. TeLOl 
235 7328 daytime Mr 

Rowland. 


B RU M P TOW PARK SW6. Ready 
beautiful fully I urn. large studio 
fUL kii. bam. TV. pkg. fined 
wall bed. designer decor, leisure 
I centre £76 jOOO. Ot-249-B664 


I CENTRAL Sunny autei'd large 
I rooms. 2 hams, full OCH. heou- 
! Uful decor, ran awali year 
completion. £148X100. Tet Ol 
i 262 8598. 


EAUNtt Lsc 1 bed com rial. Nr. 
! Ealing Bdwy. CCH. mod IdL 
I lounge. I8‘x 1 J'6. Own gdn. 
I pkg. L57JOO. Tri: Day 01-233- 
I 8466 x3S2 : Eve* 01-991-2316. 


RQUUnta PLACE- Two bed- 
rooms. one recep. k and o. CH. 
2J hour porier. Entrance 
phone. Ltn. Exredem Mock. 
£91,000. Tel: <06341 3223a 


HARLEY Sl. 2 mins walk, Or- 
lignuul a lb fir snidm art.-sep k 
*. b/ room, hr ana porter. 
£65.000 to include contents. 3B 
l-r lease. 723 0272 


LENNOX CARDENS - New 
refuro Super drew 2 bed & 2 
I bathroom (Lari with potto 29 
I years. Cl 50000 View today. 
Tel : Ol OOZ 3941 


pflOJCO SWI Dhtsion Bril. 
Charming 2 bed newly con RM 
10 highest standard in P/B 
block. All kb appliances Odd 
laps rtr C9&000.018283799. 


LITTLE VENICE Id floar Ran- 
dom* oresrem with jon 
Sauarr private Roof Terrace. 
Immar Order- 2 Beds. Bam. 
room lor 2nd. Lttra mod lOL 
20TI Square Rctep. I2fl Crtl 
lugs. 996 years Cl 68. 000 
weekdays 495 2091. Eves 870 
; 4703 >TI 

! CMSWKH W*. unraar flat 5 
rooms. KLB. Secluded garden, 
auiM road. 4 nuns from station. 
£79.960 ono. Tri. 993 6874 
/9S3 2361 

COACH USE N14 White Umbered 
GRH rnid Drt ca9 mat ioso. 
Ideal lam. 6 rep 6 bed pkg age 
udns £32.3000 Ol 886 2810 

C1CS 

DCVORHRRX Ter. W2. v DrirtiL 
pirns and eeartous 2 bdrm 3rd 
nr flal. sep ktl and bath In due- 
co pmod nuts- 120 vrs lease. 
£90000. Tel Ot 435 0934 


CWSMrlCK W4 dritohUul Edwar- 
dian lownhouse close to tube , 
a ad shops. Fully modern bed. 3 < 
beds. 2 recaps, lined ktl chon, 
hath, sep w.r. FuD GCH. Price | 
lor quirk sale eim.oso view I 
today- 996 9182 or Whitman 
Porter 996 3333 
HBLL MU. NWT. Delate hed 
chararier hse In tree-lined Rd In 
imnuc eond. 4 beds. 3 rec. 2 lux 
balhs. lux fW k«. guest WC. gas 
CH. garage, gdn. Vacant Now. 
£139.600 for quick sale. No of- 
fers. 959 7294 day. 958 7370 
eve/wkend <Ti. 

PWLUMORE ESTATE. Freehold 
I am ill' house. 4 bedims. 4 
balhrms. line dpubte reception 
rm. large kitchen, dining rm. 
stalf aparunenL garden, beauli- 
ful reOM-eralton knt fortune led. 
£900.000. Oontart Harmril 
Tav»r cook. 01-491 7323 
BARHBRURT Nl. Ooponunlry to 
acquire unmod Coach House. 
WUI provide 2 beds. 2 creeps, 
kit. bath. oavrhA roof terrisub- 
lerf to ronsridi View today 
£74.960 f/h. Snrkley ft Krai 
01 3B9 8243. 

BLOO—IBUBT. Elroant 1st nr 3 
btim. 2 recep. kll/dlner man 
Sion work flat nr Hofborn luoe. 
bid C/H. superb cond. 90 yr toe. 
LOW OUIOMXB £167.600 
Frank Harris 3 Co: 387 0077. 
FUUMM ElrganUy designed 4 
bed hte. B bath, lge tatty 
equipped kll/brksn. GCH. taled 
rarprts Secluded Bin faring 
gdn. Close lo an araennes. 
£176260 Tri Ol 731 0099 

WESTWNSTHL SpartoiH man 
trim Hal i/2 recep. 3/4 beds. In 
excellent roMUion. lovely pen 
od features. Owner must sea. 
79 yr tease Ollrrs in excess of 
Cl 73000 Tri. Hunter Estates 
01828 2148. 

til ABM VALE spanous ravtaon 
rial bi pmugin block, edm- 
PteKHi- modreruseo. 3 beds, 
recep. kU/otian nn. bain. 
Cl 26^00. 01286 6336 

H2 news. 2 dH bedrooms, recep. 
fitted kiirnrn. bath, garage, gas 
C/H 998 rear how. for a quick 
sale £123.600. ono. Day 01 
636 4685 Eve 01 MS 1234 

K2 EDQWARC Rd. Large bnghi 
manoneito, ^facing lounge. 2 
-dti bedrooms, sunroof. GCH. 
nurnmal outgoings. 93 yrs. 
£75.000 Tri Of 402 SB27. 
oowER st. wci. torn. 7 rm 
unnurd raamton flat, fmmrmp 
potenluu 120 yr he. C18ILOOO. 
01 209 0033 «Ti 
**L CartHIr Manvtons. An im- 
nurulaie snanouv 3rd floor nal 
A beds, t receps. !■- battn. 
kllrhen/h'lasl room Lease 93 
1TV C2BSOOO TrL Hunter Eft 
totes 01 828 2146. 
S TPEI tiHSSq W6. SptetkM Re 
qeno- 4 bear lam houu>. Lge 
gar^si £496.000. T HQfr 
KINS. 730 9937 


PORTLAND rd Wll. townaro- 
Wr early Vrt. ireenoW house 
on 5 ftoors. Dole recent, caning. 
5 beds. 3 baths, cloak, pauo. 
balrony. CH Po&s. S/C flat. 
£331X000 to include new ousU 
ty curtains ft carpets 
throughout. Tri: 01229-8416 
or Ol 8922846 


CMELSEA SWS Lovrty house tin 
son alter location 30* rerep. 
dining, kitchen, masier bed 
room ft lge en sutle bathroom 2 
further bedrooms, and ham- 
room. tube garden, large root 
terrace. Freehold £345.000. No 
agents Tri 01-248 0252 


9TIBMME W14 Brtrtil man- 
sion flat 3 beds, lounge dmlng 
room, large wen fitted kitchen, 
mod e r n luHy toed hauwoom 
and quest wc Gas CH. oood 
decorative order. Long lease 
Of I res around El 40 COO. Tri. 
01 603 3530 


WORLDS EMD OirlM. Superb 
romoieiety renovated a storey 
home on Kings Road 3 bedsit 
emuitel 3 rerps, manire gar- 
dens, sound proofed. £223.000. 
ono F/H forguirkpnvalesalr 
Tri 01 362 isos i also Sunday l 


HOLLAND PARK Wt 1 Superbly 
mod fhld hse 3 beds. 2 baths. 
Irtf rertti / CUtung nn. G96 Brt- 
cony. Owners must sell. 
Freehold. £31 54)00 o.na>. 
View Today 01 221 3090 


REDCLVPE SOUARE Seated id 1 
bed nat «Nh garden, lower 
around floor. 63 year trace. 
Compare Hits lo ocher prices. 
Bargain, no (ImewaMm. urgent 
sale C89J300 Tri. 01 570 7831 


UNA OHMS SW5 Spacious. 
brtgM ground and 1st door 
Man Recep, drte bed. kiL bath. 
Ind C/H 86 yean £92.600. 
HOLMANS- 370 6781. 
MARLOES RD. WB. Huge unmod 
mats * lge pen gdn Currently S 
rres. kit & bafh Ideal as lge mats 
or 2 unite Freehold C220.000. 
Nrison Hearn 937 SB! 1 
NCVCRN PLACE. SWS. Lux fully 
mod tvi nr balcony flat. 2 beds. 
28' recep. mod Ik kll ft bain. 
WiCH Lie 99 vrs. £129.300. 
Nelson Hearn Ol 937 381 1 
HR HOLLAND PK. Rgrg Ogportu- 
miv n> purrluse fired 2 bed 
gmd fir Qal in small purpose 
bum Work Long tec ♦ garage. 
£98^00 01-381 8733 IT) 
sunOu Elegant hi floor flat. Lge 
rrcep. 2 able beds. kiL halh. 

Shower Ind C/H 97 yCHS. 
£145.000. HOLMANS 370 
6781 

SWS 3 bed ground floor flat 
Needs minor updating Tremen- 
dous opportunity al C74.9SO 
No agrntv 01-790 4341 

<HgmeL 01636 1931 rWork). 
EVELYN CONS SW7 gmd/twr 
grnfl mats Bnaul designed 2 
beds. 2 battei £255000. Gra- 
ham Marks 581 4103 
FIHJIAM 1 bed yperlem flat. 
CCH. w Aar log mature 3En 
gdn £66.600. Mew today pm. 
385 8363 or wkdays 851 7791. 
LEXHAM CARDENS Kens. WB 
Two bedr fl4L s ft W far ley 
race C9S.S00. T HO&ONS: 
730 99S7 

HOTTMCMLE CATE. Chamttia 
well decorated 7 bedrm rial In 
Lonsdale Road Long fee 
£90.000 Tel: 0243 307457 


MAYFAIR. PARK UlliE 

:-a nx» - CJ.V.T ' tai «n» 
ti,'<ScM3U4ft aMSWUdttW 

iixsn 

HAMPSTEAD NWl 

m Moan cam umnig- 
cocei’i tBDjmi n cctra 
srdroro art 99S rtH ftisaoo 
BAYSWATER W2. 
fyjftmrfdnrr Vtycwi J&rC 

Bees vwv spite pi G ittM.'W 

Ner [an? gnem an t il 
Cray aeioMi »'trirti E«00fl 

HYDE PARK SW7. 

I " -JM SOWW sod ftaN 9*' 
nsr 3 5*0.1 un i^xsnraL B>> 
run i.'saaB 

KENSINGTON WS. 

Bran-: tops w Has rj 2 
irttp j ' 3«n -n sm?e dm 
tcy-ar. Piki H-T ceiuc*. 

Ss.~ :src: fai slot, i* 

TREVOR PUCE SW7. & 

usir bex !? teas f fthffD 

i™-, in 

Cl U_’ 1161 


KENSINGTON 

W14. 

Msgmlcni hV 3 DaMaro ft* m 
cud oithneo ad et sac non* 
resigned 2nd decsuM to ttafegti- 
es! srandxd 

R«»M» rwo, ttflti tsl roasm 
tiKfttft will fcaav DM uawoora 
risute 3 lurther Dedroons, tid 

ticeron FuB y inufl 

rcrftep lcf jrid room, baksny 
Fitud carocts ftranjhout Car pau. 
rm*jm 

TEL: 01-802 3194 
01-589 7704 


WORLDS END 
KINGS ROAD 
SW10 

Supeiti retrntiy canvcfttd rated 
pomd non 1 tied-stntio flit in 
pence HOLST on tags Road 
Features marble Irffpuct. grad 
eoraces. douoto doors, gvden 
vms Rudy to move ono lot 
£52,000 

Tet 01-584 9594 {day) 
937 3043 (eves) 


GARDEN SQUARE 
KENSINGTON 

fy rCm >uns earpani un 
r.-*IK c#x:k ii-unrO & la 

K .’>niKr3tora'«U0K56i 

yerihtmyr leMpenrei 

wr, -.-jiKinuinft re-.u.-g<iun 
f- '..■■■ S'lil-IJ or ■».>«!' 

ty mi tmnri^a 
' utiEW.- Sm-UJO 

TN 01 373 3249. 


PHILUMORE PLACE, 

W8. 

A Wrorg ft b c tuMuay mod P Ttesea 
(na hpa till teaiuinn a superb 
Recep BecM {Urn Shower Rm 
ind GasCH 3Tps Offns-e mo 
rp>on Cl C1SS 000 Itgttfy 
ftecrewnenoeo by M agents. 

SnWs D1-221 1751ft 
GtattriMriftCe 
01-581 5234. 


Quiet Crescent 
Prime Location 

CHELSEA 

BeauoU red Hmaatate 2 bed- 
room TTStsonfittE wftt spft level 
SW gxden. 55** yen. 
ei97^oa - 

SO AMES ft CO. 
351 0077 


LADBROKE GROVE 
W11. 

Immaculate 2 bedroom flat In 
sale. £110.000. Toady fetir- 
bstied to me Ixghesi qreUy. 
Larpe drawing room, tinny bath- 
room, Srmltxme kitchen wth all 
aqrevnenL gas cemial heating, 
carets and cutans induded. 
01 385 2296 (TJ. 


ORMONDE GATE, 
SW3 

Sunrmg menw dtiBgnsd 2 
Bed Ba m«n DNCony Mrioah- 
ng Gardens S2 years. 
E24SDOO. 

Bltglraa ft EBol 

225 2822. 


SLOANC SQUARE AREA. Conv 
luuble lamUy IreriMHd houir 
aose Klrw Rd ft saoanr SQ. 4 
bed. 2 baths. 2 ms, lge kitchen, 
liliblv. cloak, grfi. gnrage. 
£400.000 Tri. 01 589 7241. 


BRANHAM CDNS. Lge mandon 
llri. 3 hed*. 2 balhs it to suite). 
Mewls designer decorated. 
Ream to move In. Loog tease. 
£215.000 Tel: Ol 375 9271 


EXCEPTIONALLY Sunny interior 
dmtgned Pavement nu. Massive . 

reception. 1 bedrm. tMhrm. - 
kiimcn Ctosc Earls Crt & Ken . 
Hignbt £76.950. 01 3702762. ! 


KCNSMCTON WB Prince U 
Wales Terrace, i bedroom >wr 
qrnd paiio Hal in Rmrncy buna- 
itM on tonq lease £72.000 Tri. 
Oi 653 1713 


KENSINGTON Central mafeOnrttf- 
« bed. 20" so reep. large 
kil/ diner, ruin, ctoakrm. GCH. 
Tereace. Long tease £155,000 
ono Ol 373-2972 


UNMODCRNtSSS SWS. Superb 
large rial with panoramic 
viewv 2 large recepv. 3 beds. 2 
battn. huge kll. very long leave . 
£185000 351 7282 (TV 


REDCUFFE SQ Spb gnd fl rial. 
Period (natures grand rec. b/l«l 
kil. Italian Mhm. 2dbi bdv. 120 
ITS £175.000 OhO. 370 5613. 


WEST KENSINGTON 2 bed Hal. 
pretty gdn GCH 9? yrs. Came 
Ken High Si £79.«50 lor quirk 
sole. TrleplKKie Ol 602 2224. 


KEMUNCTON, WB. One bed Ral 
close to an ammonlllev. 
£62^00. Tri-. 01-603 7011. 


UMtiODERKISED floor 

Itol m Garden samre in South 
herwingion SW7. Ongmai rugh 
ceilings, mouldings, fnrptacr 
and use of Britain gardens. 
\erv large rrcepHon. ttouMe 
bedroom, kitchen, bathroom 
and w.c Long teeoe 
Cl 20.000 Hridan Serurtties 
370 3190 

UWQUE Large garner flaL in 
lavjironaWe Lpper RiMurwe 
Hardens. 3 nedv. 3 recep. fitted 
knmru. haih. plus 2 rooms lo 
make <mmd bathroom and 
ihnd bedroom Some cosmetic 
rriurbnhnreni reotpred lo 
nuumor . potential Hence 
Cl 45.000 Tri Ol 937 3784. 


UNMOOERNBED tower ground 
lluor bright pauo fkd In garden 
viuare in South h'eiKingMMi 
SU.7 -11 prevent 3 rooms ktltlv 
m. bathroom and W.C. but can 
be Made into 2 bedrooms, and 2 
bathrooms Long lease 
£110.000. Kredan SrcurttKb. 
370 3190 

WETHESBT OHS SW7 COT 
wouv 2 bed rial m period house 
wilhiiewsoirr gardens Prril*- 
rerep wilh lurnhte large 
kil/bklM room. 2 good sue dou- 
ble bed,, uvo of garden Mini be 
voM lhr- week £175.000 
k'arade Estates. 408 1033. 

HIRESBT1BLE for smart ever 
rnuple Court ry VfVie in Ken- 
-onqlon. Tennei caurL 
lurnmmiwr pm pallol Qtuel 
Win ILn faring trees and I low- 
ers 2 roc-., 3 beds, lux Mack. 
£229.500. 89 VT. 727 2209. 

EARLS CT SQ SWS Stunning 
2nd ft 3rd dear F/H Mpl* Dou- 
ble rerep. studio roam. 3 double 

‘ beds. kii/bkHi room. bath, roof 
leer Ind uav C/H C269.O00. 
HOLMANS. 370 6781. 


ftn. Suppb Upe 2 bra pxu 
lift wnti csmuul obCws 
£149.950 

nmooattBB) wi 3 DBA m» 
smile ttfli rod tenjee 
F165JD0 

raaSEA. 7 bed. 4 tuff) house 
wntti Oifflcii tfd 2 rod temrei 
rieenaft ££5AH. 
WMODERHSED, 4 beti ? wefl 
lift hi MwHuign OdO.COO 
HDUANDHUK. Etitjam 5 bed 
Irrotidd hause f335S50 

UmOOK PROPERTY 
RRDERS 
81 938 2222 


2ALACC Gardens Triton- turn 
£650000 F IHwM ft Mucro 
Ironrea. snares Pry ion mum* 
wilh innate ganh-n PnlrnlUl 
far iKHlionmed -eti- nnLnMd 

hosetnenl ttol 22' rknii*i loam. 
25' x 2i‘ draw log luuoi. slant 
toni" kiUhen/iaiMlt loom 
opening un lo OJinen ntuih. 4 
bath-- rkukv uhblv room rfr 
L orated ail kriwington High 
SHeei burking onto krnviimkgi 
Palace Gar item TelOI 221 
35M <T> 


HAMPSTE.VD & 
HJGHGATE 


HAMPSTEAD 

NW3. 

Substantial semi-det 
property in prime iocanon 
ideal lor radevaiopment. 
FuB details from toutt sole 


01-586 5999 
Open today 11-lpm 


SE^ HKMCiU N fi 

^Sturt&Tivendale 

bnpowng dcuchM 3 kluniy 
lawn homo with 3 soaoaus 
garngtn m beaunfuiiy 
nuniain«] ordor. situated m 
Ockqfilliil position m qtnei 
CtiHJe-uc, alloicbrig 
sptonciid v«nm 4 hraroamg. 
bathroom, reccftiion. 
kitchen, ckaakroom, ubkty 
room, garden, carpers and 
many fumehmus metoded. 
ga5 cii FreehoM C169.500. 

Hd 5/309S3. 

01-348 8131 


BEL SIZE PARK: 

flraui'lui r*vppi Ma-airnirne incm 

Witipfcn mill en-.uir tutiuiun 

trircr fleefik- beitiiviin-. 4 l.irthr 
twrunom J '.ncrin; rrrc^Bn 
'onms. kiirnra win tarak!a>,i car 

yjftng n pjiern and rod taijra 
gjrjcc I’irn dure m FirehnhJnf tiiui 
mu 

Bd Htth phase. 
tSGQjOBB ran DUCK SAIL 
THj 01-951 3S85 (Em) 
or 01-724 KB (ttoy) 


HIGHGATE 

Sttsmom Real. Kenwood Etcrp 
lanal house wdh mauUlul large 
gzidro wtseti cwfd be med lor 
rroevekwnKnt a tor a seunle 
addnnnal picoerty. Freehold 
Substantial offers only 
Write to PA Bn 174, 
Laart n H6 4MQ 
tor appototneat to itow. 


UHBffiLO GARDENS IW3 

EttepuoraUv spaoeus 2 bed flaL 
Lage tiathioom. sep. WC. Cloak- 
room, drtswg room area. 20'x 13* 
Irungt leadng to 28 tiafcory o»er- 
looking extensive gardens. GCH. 
87 yen lease. 

£1<2jB 08 ONO 
FOR QUtCX SALE 
TEL 81-937-1738 EVES 
01-335 8161 OFFICE HBS 


W1NNINGT0N ROAD 
N2. 

Just oil magnrf Dble fronted 
Oet house on 2 Hoots only . 5 
Beds. 4 Bees. 2 Bams. 
Kd/Btast Rm. Loe Gdn. Dole 
Ggo. Camaoe Drive. Free- 


GgB.Cama peDrive. fra8- 

Aston Chase 
01-724 4724. 


OVEHUHMUNQ gantem. bine 
btHjftl lit floor Mudio flat \ rrv 
nrar tube in piraov built 
Mark, inrindo custom madr 
braiMuuuaii pmc lurnuure 
Spp.u,iin kin twi i .phi luihroom 
with i-nlraiMC hall Lrmq leave 
£55000 ono. Tri Ol 405 6900 
ev 392 


H HAMPSTEAD NW6 
RrturhurtKshrel \ k nruperly. 4 
hills ■] with tilled w.Udratoesi, 
2711 imnuah lounge. |gr fully 
lilted kll/ diner. 2 balhv. rlook- 
iMim. umri with garden l-IOilk 
GCH. £185.000. Tel Ol 794 
63w4 


HfCMGATE WOOD Omlnoks ♦ or 
ress i-xpuiiKkiMr. mod. sunny 
hw rjg unkepi lor btav prof 
l.innli 4 ik-cJs. Iqe trep. Odn. 
sauna plavrtn. 2 root teres ft 

qge L215.QOO Ol *44 7169 
iH'/Ol 950 MW IQ» 


HIGHGATE WEST WLL NS 30 

sees Hampstead HeoUi' Out- 
sumJing a bedroom oonfrei 
apartment Rerephon loom 20 
\ i4Mu\un Gemun kiicnrn 
Dalrnnt and romcnalorv. Ev 
rrrdiiHitt high sumurd of 
finisn Mom- original Inilurev 
£97 OOO Long tease. \ (91 to- 
«|J\ Ol 34H 514a 
KENTISH TOWN KW5 BmM. 
spar tons Isl ft 2nd Floor 
Masinnriie. 200 yds lm 
Norlhen Line ft BR statlom. 
GCH. Ill knrnen. loe living rm. 

I did bedim, tuilimi 99 yr 
■rase C53.500 Ol 8SH 7936 

MUSWELL MILL MO. rhamdna 

II luhl ft spanous spill level 2-3 
beiirnnm nal in mnfratial road. 
17s 18 II Inungi- kilrhen/dlnrr. 
laige loll nteal 1m convemon. 
slnppist pule doors. £74.950 
ono Ol 444 8201 

NW3.-HW6. Superb srierimn at 
Ikils/hoiises All prtres Phone 
□pen Door Ol 7*4 6601 


SOUTH OF THE 
THAMES 


SWI 2. £145,000 

Freehold. Immaculately 

rutuitished lour 


exchange. 

Tel Graham Mortimer 
01453 0959 (WBkSRdS I 
evenifws) or 
01-679 7El4(ibythne). 


TWDCT BLACKHEATH ft Forrsl 
Hill Wales nuiu 4 bed rad lore 
hse } inrm lid kll. avon/nab. 
util im. halh. CH. lid fins. odn. 
gge 20 mins Ham to Citv F/H 
£70000 KOTOdtHIS 01691 
8731 \mllmr 

STREATHAM: Handsome famih 
house Close Tooting Common. 
3 ineos. S baths. 6 beds, lge 
ikUlIrn Convemenl Oil- 
Vlb9 OSO Te| Ot 677 10B8 
SWia Puln-y Borders. \ Klarun 
3 Wil ti-nared nousr. CCH 
*4rutliMlli rvTItonl OuM 
Road W500 Tor quirk bate. 
Tel O l 870 2475 
VICTORIAN irarang. house in 
hmnimdnn luiiv mourrmsed 2 

hdl-sinis, South bring ponton. 

vn^ryio Tri 01 703 OTIS or 
Ol 701 89J5 luorkl 
Ctrr aiKl West End ! mile 
2“ *?"* 11 Krtininoitin 
ReiTO kb GCH 94 \i He 
1.52 500 Home 01 038 8487 
ONE & TWO hnitr Hals in V telnrr 
wos Mmint PHwftni Rd 
SLI3 £40 54.000 T HK 
KIMS. 730 9957 ■ 

Rtyotsine. 1/2 n«f anv Diren- 

n ".i-.M>kiiiq lip- Thames, 
f mm £97600 RiversUe Rml 
deni kll 4H8 4852 


C onrinRed on next page 


V 


WBI t-GU CMCWKCRKCa^ CCCHSKe-- BSSCBCB L_J ^5S-Su L_1 




PROPERTY BUYERS* GUIDE 

LONDON PROPERTIES" 


LOVELY VIEWS 

jut over n**y m. Beam- 

toSy presented, anatil 3 storey 

Tumi house. 3/4 beds. taOi 
2nd iMliwHH n «tn stoaer. 
fifiy ftted w«a tajdwi. open 
ptm tame. Patio oaniaa Pres 
to mdutie fated carets & 

£148.000 

TeL 01 789 1144 

(weekdays oaly) 


ALAR FRASER & CO 

SURREY DOCKS SEISM skew 0 
psaa £ (Us ar»JjOs 

kidwsaiBaUm Sefce 
ft tevn bo Has » J 3 Baa Gas 
CH Gp& La taee us hsnQUSL 
STOOQKU Gwwan germ nouse Gas 
W QJs 2 ik. « »a i Drts ORB? 
VJCs qsnjpK llttflte. 

01-587 1004 



ROEHAMPTON. 

LunmuDy jpportsa omcma 
MuM. a IMS FWwend Park. 
Reeaoaon Has Dramg inn- on- 

■ng room, stutty. kn Mcnen. aoAa 

w«n INC. umy room- traaftfBSt 
mom. ms* nmWom urti onauno 
MWO oar 3toiwr6o»w«iBatt- 
mam. StUIfnarniy svm (K saang 
room. S beets, oah Sauw/saower 
room Bodscaoea gamom grarago 
Ottara m M inpo" C7SOOOO 

Gasdogne Pees. 

01 878 7575. 


BATTERSEA PARK, 
Albert Bridge Road. 
Charmifio ntHd-a-terre 
studio ft* in Victorian 
terrace. Sunny roof gar- 
den. Very wen laid out 
with original features. 
Quick safe. £49,500. 

Tel: 01-827 2481 



NUBSWarTH. 3 bod terraced 

\K1 Mr. 400(3 randHion. OOOU- 
Un rd now Common and 
Station C99.S00 View Sun- 
•tn- erro 7066. Monday 
Douglas a Cordon. 673 0191. 


CUniAM. Snore fpw Knot 3 
bed convened Oat cloy tube 

and Common CT8-000 ooo. 
V ie«w Sun. 673 070?. Monday 
Douglas & Cordon- 673 0191. 


CUTMAH. Wen mod 2 bed Com 
Bdn flat v nose lube and Com- 
mon C99 960 view Mon 
Douglas & Gordon: 673 019 1 


Suren famftv House nr wanda- 
worih Common. 3 retro. 4 ante 
beds. 2 balle 146 n Carom. 
Cl 79.000 FH 01673 3146 


WC5T PUTNEY tmmarulaie new- 
ts ron« erted S bed spUl level 
rial C69.990. Tel (09S2I 
229502 iptcnlngsi 


BARNES COMMON. OutsUncung 
Vtrt Muse m wide ireetined vb 
(age rd. An Megan! farad* home 
with uunmng nmenUUon. The 
gmd nr Is geared to Cannty u\- 
ino having linked accqm swing 
rra leading to cldc handbuiR 
and painted ku elegant dining 
rm overlooking super gda 1st 
fir drawing rm. 4 trge bed. 
ensutle snwr and bath 
C250-000. Do View today 878 
783a Taylor Dixon Porter 01 
T4I 1063 


LONDON mm 10 mins. Fine 
\ iri family h&e. very ige. on a 
firs, semi def. lou or character, 
vuperb order, lovety 106 rigdn- 
35- mtereomm rrceps wnn 
(/ptarr. study. 21* recepL 17" fit 
lat/din. 6 good beds. 3 batm- 
en. rots, new roof. Tetegratm 
Miff Sew Freehold £139.000. 
ROC Odells 01691 8731 anytime. 


SOUTH LONDON Freehold send. 
Thru lounge. Sheds. 3 rrceps. 2 
baih. CH. very Ip gdn. 
Cl 20.000 Ot 228 8798 T> 


DISCOVER OCR 
HEW DOCKLANDS 
CLAYTON COURT 

Sum aaSvtea dasavd Oats 

dosNto&tyttanmelsfeofOogs 
sod also onertootang open cow- 
trysda Lame HwiQ roams with 
Beret hays. fci»y apokanced tattfv 
m. 1 re 2 beds. autoy 
auhrnoHT. fias CH. JO ywr NHBC 
guarantee. Own (mote car parlr- 

S Wt tnat/surtbozrd starve 
year teases. Low outgovgs. 

Resencaons now tang taken 
for June 67 ocopaww 
(with fixed puces) 

£56,395 - £61,995 

PRECOHSTRUCTION PACKAGE. 

Wan completion s not untd June 
87 pnees are tod. We attain 
YOUT 95% mortgage (STSL a9 you 
need is as Utile as El. 800 'and 
the devekner wd pay the rest 
plus pay your legal teas and 
stamp duly. 'For a tooted penod 
only. 

ALAN SELBY 
& PARTNERS 

Brochure Hoe 
01-986 9431 
(Until 8pm) 


ISLE or DOGS. Attractive 2 
bed roomed home nose la river 
with garden C67.509 Trt Ot 
660 4818 ext 218 or 01 SIS 
7730 (after 6 30 pmi 

ST KATHARINES DOCK. CKfee IO 

CHy Spacious 2 bed flat. nm 
r/f ML mod oalh. patio and ga- 
rage Cl 15.000 a no to Inc 
carats Oi -488 9764. 


ROCHAS. KA1HAB & CO 
01 403 OS 08 

CUBE TOOTH BRIDGE. Seta; 
un at hwv wserade flats 1600 
so It earn. bUones suoerti com- 
i wn ( gn s. fare teases from 

NJUWOW ST E14. Onraoer flat 
r awwrteo wrrtouse. 2 beds, 
ban. large teteorvc&SMn. U 
wra. pauo. mat ttrace Lease 1Z0 
yeas £165.000 


ROTNObftniE Luxury mngn 
made II listed 2 bedroom flat, 
ballroom large reception. fully 

filled mirhen Enormous mar- 
arier and rraiaiKanv mwj at 
C74.980 Tel OI 237 3047 or 
Ol 230 9936 


atINN pure. Wapplng El Unu- 
n l bed aparuneaL 3rd floor, 
parking ware included 
005.000 Tel Ruth Cochrane 
266 1282 for appomtmeni la 

view uu dines* nowsi 


SIUVTOH I bed me Sthfanng 
baironi IQ mimOb Nr tube 
ran csaooo re<; ot 2322773 


DPCm-AMDS - CITY - SOW. 

Sri er! ion of period & New 
Homes A ruts closeCHs and 
River C36 C2SOOOO Pho ne 
McDouall* nmdcwnai' Ol 790 

9832 df 0860 711664 


£37300 SOaflPUs grd floor his 
iiai mill modernised, romplelr 
h intum 2 Igr beds unasiri 
.. un mien nKidioMU umm 

hnnee- fultv litrfl- wne bath 
kiiramn wim (Uiaiici flooring 
CtH uln. T Hr Ol *>70 0864 


DULWICH Border* wrt 3 bed 
inun Mw in liutel rul d e M r 
■uinwal uue Q/Clanng. CCH 
mien lit nda seal looker. ie 
iiuoeti v/unm adu C77-5UO. 
I /H. Ol 699 2449 


Dlfl-WICH Borden- MaaaarOr 
L\ cond 2 ON nrtff. Ise reeeo. 
CTH. gpe C37 500 OI 4» 
0792 >Hl 583 1544 ■% 245 lW» 


RICHMOND & 
KINGSTON 


TEDOMCTON lux Edw Hse. 4 
luxl 2 balh. Gdu Cge Reerom 
r (not died to nigh Uaudard 
OcnanaJ features pnred ai 
El 48000 lor QuieV sale. 01977 
igt 1 or Ol 943 2163 


DULWICH 


OVERLOOKING LAKE 


PUTNEY 5 bed. 2 twin, house 
2711 kitchen, suont 30*1 IP 
floor drawina room Prert, 
west raeiDB garden Ongrnai 
features Reword, gas CH. 
Li 65.000 Tel Ol 070 3787 


VILLAGE. 5ubstanual vr semi 
del bouse on lour floorv 6/6 
beds. 3/4 weep. 2 batlW.Su 

morn Doable age C27SOOO 
Freehold Sole Agents. Hawes i 
Co Ol 946 6547 


WBWBLEDON PARK: (Mount Rdi 
Lot lev 3 brd house 26* lounge 
/ diner, sunny 4S* south faring 
garden New wiring & CCH 
££2000 TrtOl 946 1419 


01-720 5361 
Also Mao - Sal 
Q1-761 0900 



NWX Spacious un fura flat mow 
tube. Me rerep. 2 dMe beds, fil 
kit. bam. Gas CH. C* a use of 
garden 6 mins * £210 P 
rw Cold Onions. 482 2277 
BROMLEY Unique t bed fUl. Lie 
Of swimming pod. sauna A 
gym 10 mm commute C120 
PW heg 01 466 1119 
WL well fura. nouae 3 reeegs. 3 
beds. 2 baths, hit 3 patio L-Vi5 
p w. Co Let Otbens 4 82 2277 


Breetot potential, vie 
SemL 5 Bods. 2 Racaps, 
KH/BTaffl Rm, 2 Baths. 
Cedar & Gdn. £235,000 
FiBOhoid. 

Dowell Uoyd 
01-788 7470. 


COUNTRY PROPERTIES 




economy 7 healing, secondary 
gjazlng. with all amenities dgw 
bv Fitted carpets offered free if 
cwrhinoe of contracts wtudn 5 



SHEEN iRartoldri imnuc double 
ironted family re m dPiKC offer- 
ing 4 super beds. 2 amazing 
rrceps. ran ladle Pogpenpanf 
kitchen/ family rm, luxury 
baUirm. ctkrm and laundry rm. 
GasCM Garage and iMrdena ■ a 
sluiuwig home C23Q.OOO FH. 
Sundav viewing 878 1796 
Iherrafler Taytor Dixon Porter 
876 0115 


XAPNAM COMMON very pretty 
I brd Id floor flat for sale in 
dMe fronted period hse rtose lo 
Common and excel me facil. 
Lux CPU ihrougnouf. new rufty 
fit and equip ku. Gas G/H. at- 
tractively decocaled 

ffiroughout. Long lease. Low 
outoauigs. css.ooa Tel: Day 
723 2680. Eves 223 2388 


HIOMUEY 18 rains central Ldn 
tmmarulaie detached Edwardi- 
an house. 4 dM beds * fined', 
wardrobes. Prafc-wonBlb filled 
kllrhen |o Ind. appHanees 
jarruri. baUirm + shower rm. * 
iwh. ffcvUcv Gge. Cdn 120*. 
Inc l- carpets & nirtafns. 
G199JQOO F/H : 014160-3802 


HEAVER EST. \tcWT1an IMtty- 
mvdrnee now to common.' 
drawing room, dining roam. 6 
beds. 3 bains *1 rAi r/room. 
Ui/bnaMM room. uuuiy 1 
loom, cedar, s/facing garden, 
gas CH. new roof, ref ur bi sh ed 
•onion standard. C225.GOOC/H. 
Trf 01 673 0126. 


XAPHAM COMMON, views. Ex 
ceUent value. Maori menu 

Victorian house. Large rvera. 
kit/bMsl rm. 6 double beds. 2 
turns, cellar balcony Front 
and tear gardens C 198.000 
Freehold Sunday- 223 209 1 
John Honing* worth: 736 6406. 


L PUTNEY SouuuirMs Road. 
V ictonan family house Semi 

M4MIM 4 beds. 2 receptions. 
kilrtien/briMKIM room, cellar, 
shipped doors. CCH. Harden 
Freehold LV3aOOO Tel: Ol 
874 1262 i After 4 p.m l 


(E martin Grant Homes 




VOdic 



LITTLE BYRONS IrTL., 

Twelve luxury Tudor Style || 
two bed town bouses. 11 » 

Prices from £74£M . 
Telephone: 

(02403) / V 
22266 / Surrey 



THE MOAT 

28 hnany apartments and 
bungalows for the active 
^ elderly. Prices from 
\ RLS0H554N 
Tetepbone: 
(0256)463366 


THE VALE 

3 and 4 bed detached bouses! 

3 bed from £88,450 

4 bed 2 bath from £126,0001 


TEAZLE WOOD PARK 
1 and 2 bed town houses. 

1 bed from £47,950 

2 bed from £57,750 
5V Telephone: 




THE MARLBOROUGHS 

1.23 & 4 bed houses 
Prices from 
£S4£OO-£I39,5O0 
Telephone: 
<0734)58518! 


J Surrey Y 


HEATH PARK 
Nineteen luxury 3/4 bed 
detached houses. 

Prices from 
£87,950 - £114,500 
Telephone: 
(03727)2819! 


376633 



NASH PARK 

4 bed 2 bath detached homes 
Prices from 
£98^00-£138400 
Telephone: 

(0990) 27101 


Grant House. Feldiri Road, Abimier Hammer. Dorkinu. Surrey Tel: <()3Ub)730822 


tEMMMTON SElt 3 bed Ire- 
raced home. oaedm. 
remplefely m o d e mu e d io tugn 
standard, anginal fiwurH re 
VMM. ncwrarnettuinoualMmL 
C90000 l/h. tor stuck sale. Tef 
Ol 228 0029 24luv 


I M EH L UUHI NB COMMON iToot 
inq Deci 1905 wm def hse 
Many original (MUM. S bedk. 
duung rm. bkfu cm- drawing 
rm. Lge Kit A utility, bath rm. 2 
HCV GCH SUi facing gdn. 
1 160.000 Tef 01-789 *99. 


WEST PUTNEY- SuManttal det 
CHd Maine hi Comer, aUon 
area 6 brdv 3 reevpv Ml/ 
nrkfsi. uUDtv rm. 3 bams, cloak, 
retttr. CCH Smau wearing 
gdn Car and off M parking 
C299.950 FH Ol 788 4079 


■UEIIAMPmW. TUdor flirbf- 
lathed home wtth denghUuf 
landvaped V*e*f facing rear 
garden Drnw-mg room, dlnbig 
room, kuchrn. cloaks with WC 
4 bMK. bath, triple lenght ga- 
rage Offers m the region of 
cao aooo Gaunogne Pern. Ol 
878 7575. 

fRD B TY Gdnv Shi. 4 storey pe- 
riod corner nse in charming 
iWh Vlrtfrm- 3 dbfc tJOds-dble 
aspen drawing rm. diiHng rm. 
Iiivutv kit. 2 baths, walled tear 
gdn. grge Ex«*mi condition 
Cl 28.000 F/H Andrews 3 
Robertson. 01 703 26 62 

BATTERSEA. Rownau Creweru 
Biunmna 2 bedroom manoncue 
mine-verv ouiet cm^wai’Cireer 
(inr |o Battersea Park and 
cnetuia 2 bed rooms, drawing 
loom. IT LKcnen, south facing 
garden Lease 984 veara 
isuoo John Hoflinosworm 
01 360 1300 



CHARLES CHURCH 

*St Johns Fields* North Oxford 



Wessex - 5 bed home. 2 bath, drawing room, study, 
dining room, fcndien/break&st room, 
cloakroom, double garage - prices from 
£235.000 

30 luxury homes with distinctive devations to 4 & 5 
bedroom family residences - prices from £175000 

Stow Home and Sales Office open 7 days a week 
Tefc Oxford (0865) 54243 


SURREY/KENT BORDER 

OxM 3 bbBbs MZSSnfei LondM S bBk 

A VALUABLE AGRICULTURAL ESTATE 

situated in an unspoilt area of open countryside 
2 fine period farmhouses - 48 and 57 acres 
WeD equipped farm - 115 acres 
3 country cottages for improvement - 7-64 acres 
Stable block and barn for conversion 
Potential building plots and pony paddocks 
Arable, pasture and woodland 1-170 acres 
In all aboout 1003 acres 

Auction as whole or in 46 lots on 
30th October 1966 (unless sold) 


■ Bernard Thorpe® 

jrtSPjitru-is ME 


19-24 SAINT GEORGE STREET, 
HANOVER SQUARE, WlR 9RE. 

TEL: 01-499 6353 
OR TUNBRIDGE WELLS OFFICE 
TEL: (0892) 30176 




JLC-Frost&Co 


ENGLEFIELD GREEN, 
SURREY 

Delightful converted Stride, set h acre gardens. Mag- 
nificent drawing rm. «tmmg rm, tux kit/bfaKt nn, 
utility, master bed (eusuite shower). 3 further beds, 
bath. Gas CH, Gararing. £2lOX0a 

Staines Office (0784) 66656 
or Country Homes Dept. (0753) 868178. 


NR WARWICK. £175,000. &»gatow in a fine country resident 
locafity Between Wanmk. L ea rmgton and Kenilworth, stanrfng 
n landscaped garden approaching 1 acre wffli attractive rural 
outtalc. Two drarming connected recaps, kit mtfi garden views. 
Principal bedroom state. 4 other beds, 2nd bathroom, study, 
double glazing, canto heating. Double garage. 

Apply: Locke 6 England (0926) 27988. 



STOKE, NR ANDOVER 

Set in too Bourne vm y. Z 140,000 
A ueSuHf Ftstasta ra ran naipe tare sat is an-Hflctf ’> ate ganw 
ofcokMj aafs/nsaetwj Ha6. sktag nn Oong rm. star, haw He S&ffS 
sbttostftivioarm.jfif09Om.iaam dks-ttwrra Eisf access SJ03 

21 Southgate Stroat, Winebootor 
0922 60300 01-491 7009 


RESIDENTIAL PROPERTY/1 



The' name's thegame: The Hoand of the Baskenilles. left, and DOM) Carte 

Life in Celebrity Square 


Estate agents gel up to all sons of tricks 
trying to sell the houses on their books, 
and one of the roost endearing is to find 
some connection, however tenuous, with 
a famous name fiom the past. Whether it 
sells houses is open to question, but it 
certainly attracts the eye of the potential 
buyer at the expense of just any old 
house. 

The late Roy Brooks, estate agent 
extraordinary, probably used the device 
in reverse, with words such as “no one 
famous lived here and would not have 
been seen dead here”. For the rest, there 
is an interest in knowing not only about 
the house but its residents, and an owner 
can bask in the reflected glory of its past. 

This week there is a wide choice for 
someone who wants a literary or 
historical connection, ranging fiom 
Cromwell to Sir Cloudesley ShoveU. and 
from Biggies to the Hound of the 
Baskervilles. 

The most notable property, though, is 
the D*Oyly Carte Island Estate, on a IV> 
acre island on the Thames at We> bridge. 
Surrey. The Grade li listed villa was 
commissioned by Richard D'OyJy Carte, 
hotel and theatre owner and manager of 
the Savoy Opera Company, and was 
built in 1898 as a country annexe to the 
Savoy Hotel. Unable to obtain a liquor 
licence, he occupied the house as his 
main residence, which was also used for 
rehearsals and visited by Gilbert and 
Sullivan for weekends. 

When the D'Oyly Carte family moved 
overseas, the property was acquired by 
Lord and Lady May. Then in I9S8 it was 
bought by a company which later 
convened it into self-contained 
apartments. 

The house is now divided into 1 2 flats, 
although the main structure remains 
unaltered, and there is a 1.300ft river 
frontage capable of providing moorings 
for 50 or 60 craft. The property « being 
sold bv A.C. Frost and Co's Windsor and 
Weyb’ridge offices, which are seeking 
offers approaching £! million. 


Not far away. Strutt & Parker and 
Gascoigne-Pees' are selling Park House. 
Hampton Court. Surrey, the former 
home of Captain W.E. Johns, who wrote 
more than 50 of the lamous Biggies 
books while living there. The house, 
built in the 1 720s. is set in private walled 
gardens overlooking the Royal ftiudocks 
and Home Park. „ . . 

The house is on four floors and has 
four reception rooms, a master bedroom 
suite and five further bedrooms. The 
agents arc asking for offers of more than 
£375.000. , ■ 

Brook Manor. Buckfastleigh. south 
Devon, an imposing 1 7ih-century manor 
house, has an unusual daim to tame, it 
was built in 1656 by Richard Cabell, a 
man so disliked in the neighbourhood 
that when he was buried in Buckfastleigh 
churchyard the villagers locked him in 
his tomb so that he could not escape to 
haunt them. The key hung for mans 
years in Brook Manor, but “Dirty Dick“ 
was nevertheless believed to have cs- 

By Christopher War man 

Property Correspondent 

taped, to ride his great black horse 
through the woods, chased by hell 
hounds. 

The origin of Sir Arthur Conan 
Dovlc's storv. The Hound of the Busker - 
ri/tes. is believed to have been these 
hounds, black dogs breathing fire, which 
raced over Dartmoor and howled around 
Brook Manor. “To this day." the agents 
report grimly, “there is a stone enclosure 
to the side of the stables at Brook Manor 
which resembles a kenneL which could 
have been used for such an animal." 

The Grade II* house has four recep- 
tion rooms, six main bedrooms and four 
further bedrooms, with outbuildings, a 
lake and paddocks in 23 acres. Strutt & 
Parker, with Michelmore Hughes, of 
Exeter, arc asking for offers of more than 
£150.000. and £60.000 for a further 97 
acres of woodland. 


To judge from some of its other 
properties. Struu Parker must employ 
a laree number of historians. It is sejlihg 
Cockthorpc Hall, near Holt. Norfolk:, 
dating from the late iolh century, which 
said to he connected with the . 
unfortunate Admiral Sir Cloudesley 
ShoveU - he was strangled tor his 
emerald ring as he lay on a beach in the 
Kies of Sally after his ship, the 
Association, broke up on the rocks. The 
house is of bnck and flint, has four 
reception rooms and five bedrooms, and 
stands in one and a half acres, which 
include a paddock and a sw imming pod. 
The agents' Norwich office is asking 
around £150.000. 

The same office is offering the Bath 
House. Melton Constable Park, for 
which local legend is invoked to suggest 
that Henry VI H and Anne Bolevn bathed 
there when staving at Mdion Constable 
Hall. The castellated house has been 
converted to a three-bedroom house, but 
has scope for further modernization and 
improvement. It is set in an acre and a 
half, and the price is around £120.000: 

Like Henry VIII. CromweU often 
appears in estate agents* particulars. 
With his amn he seems to have looked 
in on a tot of desirable country 
properties. Bueknell and Bollard, of 
Wantage. Oxfordshire, is sclhng Grange 
Farmhouse. East Hanney. wantage, 
dating from the Cromwellian penod. but 
now- with a Georgian tacade. where 
Cromwell's troops watered their horses 
on their route to Oxford. The agents arc 
asking for offers of more than £140.000 
for the five-bedroom house. 

For an up-to-date association, the 
playwright John Osborne is selling his 
home. Christmas Place. Edcnbndge, 
Kent. The Edwardian house, in 22 acres, 
has three reception rooms and a conser- 
vators. with five or six bedrooms, a self- 
contained staff annexe, and an indoor 
swimming pooL Egerton. of Berkeley 
Square, is inviting offers of more than 
£33Q.00U. 


9 


Carter Jonas 

Chartered Survevors 


Harlow 2 mdtt. Hartford 6 toes. London 22 rates. DdigMul pond 
tonhouse n atoetne vSage. 3 Reaps, Ktfdcn. BreaHast Room. 
Stem/Cknfcnnn. 5 Bedrans. BaOroom. Gas CH. (Uttodings. Ga- 
rage. to port. Woa started S«hl 

M Jsnp Skate. Loadra WIT Bm. T* 9V931 2181. Jokt Agsots 
Pad MUtoca & Pstasts. Tat B992 48S<7t 
YORKSHIRE 

Pngg Kyras Famt, Iwara Edga. 39b acres Leeds 10 toes. Bradford S 
rates Rm sample of a JKOtean farmhouse qranBMMcaBy modonsed 
4 in notes madam 2 Reaps. 3 Bedrooms. Batbroom. Shower Rm 
Kfetaa. Utiras. O ften. 9 acres Kcoramtonn tend. Conge with 
55?. room. Kad^/Dnp q flro, 1 BbAonti, B^Qwhmi Sfltf (uduL 
totenswe tanemg ima for SOD ms *oh pbnmig pemvsaon a sxtand. 
To be Sold by (onto unto as a whole or n 4 lots. 

91 Juop am loader SWVf SOW fl 1-938 2 m. 

GWYNEDD CONWY VALLEY 

Coney 3 mites. Cotayo Bay 9 mies. Prashgoa country house of 
dmaer sauteed m rural arotm tem n Snowdoraa Nabonte Parte 
Suatee as 4 Bedroom Horae or 2 Bedroom House with zdtonng 2 
Bedroom hoiday or pmy urat 4 RecapDoo Rooms, CH. Offers arms! 
£30.000. 

The Estate Office, Part Pearhyn. Bangor, Gwynedd. Tefc B248 3&2S38. 

NORTH BUCKS 

Mteoe. ConeBaeta Hem Keynes & Mi. Recently renovated detached 
cartage in putty milage. KaB. Oaks, 2/3 Raceptiane. Road Mtcbea, 
Uftey. 3/4 Bedrooms. Battroam. CK Prime Mated Garden. Offers 
around ffijWD. 

« S files, OxteftL 0X1 3JS. Tefc 0865 5T1444. 



JOHN D WOOD &■ CO. 


CAMBRIDGESHIRE 


Peterborough 7 miles, London 49 minutes. 

A CHARMING AND SUBSTANTIAL FORMER VICARAGE OCCUPYING A 
DELIGHTFUL POSITION IN A SOUGHT AFTER VILLAGE. 

3 reception rooms. 6/7 bedrooms. 2 batiwooms, toveiy wailed gardens, heated swranng 
pod. stable bkKfc wxh potential lor conversion (subject to consent). 

About 2 Derate. Pricp Guide £175,000. 


BUCKS - ADJOINING 
BURNHAM BEECHES 

A DELIGHTFUL PERIOD HOUSE 
DATING FROM THE 1STH CEN- 
TURY IN A PEACEFUL SECLUDED 
SETTING. 

Reception hall, 3 reception rooms, sun 
room. 5 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, guest an- 
nexe. Beautiful gardens with stream I lowing 
through. 4 acres of Woodland. 

About SX Acres. 


BERKSHIRE - 
COOKHAM DEAN 

A LOVEL Y COUN TRY HOUSE IN AN 
IDYLLIC SETTING IN THE HEART 
OF THE THAMES VALLEY. 

3 reception moms, S bedrooms. 2 bath- 
rooms. thatched garage block. Heated 
swimming pod and delightful gardens and 
grounds. 

About 2 Acres. 


KENT - WROTHAM 

Sevenoaka 10 miles 

A FAMILY HOUSE IN A LOVELY WOODED SETTING WITH BREATHTAK- 
ING VIEWS OVER THE MEDWAY VALLEY. 

Entrance haH. drawing room, dining room, superb kitchen and breakfast area. 6 bedrooms, 
bathroom, attractive gardens, grounds and woodland. 

About 21 Acrew 


^ 23 Berkeley Square, London W1X SAL 
v TeL 01-629 9050 Telex 21242 . 


L 


3 


CLUTTONS 


Buckinghamshire, 
Denham Village 

M40/M25 1 mile. Central London 18 miles, He athr o w 
Airport 7 miles. 

An outstanding Georgian Country House set 
within beautiful secluded River intersected 
Gardens, in the bout of this picturesque 
village. 

Reception and Staircase Hall, Drawing Room, Dining 
Room. Fanndled Study, 8 Bedrooms, 4 Ba th r ooms . 

Staff Flat. 3 Bedroomcd Gardroen Cottage. Triple 
Garage. Summer House. 

Well nocked colourful Gardens with the River Misbourne 
flowing through. Orchard and Paddock. 

About 17 Acres 

Joint Agems 

Chmoos 127 Mourn Street, London Y1 Y 5 HA 

Teh 01 499 4155 and 

John D. Wood & Co. 23 Berkeley Square, London W1X SAL 

Teh 01 629 9050 


Jackson-Stops 
S’-"'— & Staff 

5 Rgioml knowledge V3L * I I 


GLOUCESTERSHIRE, 30 ACRES 

Bislnlmik. 

Period none farmhonse fop complne renovation, 
sit ua te d in a very beautiful bolMcd Cotswold vaUcy. 
8 roomed farmhouse, none outbuildings including tram. 

30 aces of pasture laid and woodland. 

Auction (ualraa sold) on 17th October. 

Apply: Jacfcaou-Stops & Staff, Dollar Street House, 
C5rCT CB Hto GL72AP. Tele p hone: (0285)3334. 


BATH 

NEWLY BUILT CITY CENTRE 
PENTHOUSE FLAT 

Large Reception and Dining Room, 4 bedrooms. aU 
with fully fitted wardrobes. 2 with ensuite bath- 
rooms. and Jacuzzi; 3rd b a throom. Superb soBd 
wood fuDy fitted kitchen. Secure garaging lor 2 cars; 
lift direct from garage. Situated beside the River 
Avon with splendid views across the city; Land- 
scaped Gardens. £245.000 

BROCHURE FROM: UTHODOMQS LTD 
SALES OFFICE 

1 Northamer Court, Grove St Bad BA2 6PE 
Tel Bath (0225) 60487 or 60006 


ENJOY A COUNTRYSIDE 
LIFESTYLE WITH RAIL 
SERVICE TO PADDINGTON 

Luxury detached 3/4 bedroom country 
homes, many with double garages and 2 
bathrooms, dining room, lounge with fire- 
places and luxury kitchen with 
appliances. 

Come and see the very best of new home 
building at Pewsey Meadows, Pewsey, 
Wiltshire. 

Telephone: 0672 62089. 



LINCOLN 4 MILES 
(FAST TRAINS TO KINGS CROSS) 
WILLOWSIDE 

An Outstanding Detached Family Huuse in lovak prime village 
HiaiiinfL 5 receptions, kitchen, utility, sauna. 4 beds. 2 hatha. Q] 
l H. >wuiud mg' pool, tennis court, lane gardens. 8 car rnraae and 
. . double za ny nlaUHO. 

Earl & La-rcnar PndeMfa). 343 Hfah Sum 
Uacota 105221 2221S. 


NORTHAMPTONSHIRE 

Canal side period bouse with about 1 acre & moor- 
ing rights. Fully modernised with HalL elkrm. 2 
Recen Rms, Full Sized billiard Rm, Study, 
Kit/Break Rm. 6 Beds. Dressing Rm. 2 Baths , 
Dble Gge. Swimming pool. Freehold. £160,000. 
Agents Bartram & Co, 88 George Row, North- 
ampton (0604) 32642. 


M4 i mfle Southern edge of 
um^e adtornwg Tamtam. 
MoOemsed penod cottage. 3 
fee. 4 beds. 2 Hath, garages, 
sratikng. 40’ pod. padfMck. 
Vi acres Gixle £185jB00. 
Dte we a m Cranfry Mom* . 

PfetelienL 
Nntanr (0635) 3S» 


MAIDB4HEAD/BRAY 

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Bm*. Fmc KU i Ban 2 
Bam FulCH Omega Laa 
Cana £132000 M nw ato 

MUMty 

Braxtons 

(0628) 74234. 


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iSVICKSS 1 























































THE TIMES WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 1 1986 



tiiMonks’ resting 
place goes 
up for sale 


l^tohavebeana 


. ,-*< 

\ 


--ttgassABQikr 

V^SSsSp. 

»8W«s say it could be divided ' ttie 
provide separate 
accommodation for two families. 

2J5JJ!. JSfSES*®* outstanding stone 
wajjed garden, surrounded by 5ft 

Farmhouse murals 

at Klmpton. 

Hertfordshire, was built as a twodbav 
njedievaJhall house, open fromfloo? 
toroof^vwth a central open hearth. By the 

suKtfmliSfi!* had , become a more 
SS® tenta l ma p°r house, and by the 17th 
centery was a farmhouse. During the 
religious controversy at this time it 
acquired remarkable murals which 

beneath Plasterwork 
until the present owner found them in 
19B3 and established their date as 1605. 
TJatousetias a reception hall, three 
™S®P t * on rooms, and five bedrooms, two 
with en suite bathrooms. It also has 
exposed wall and ceiling timbers and 
stands in more than an acre of 

SJMfi 1770118 ^ outbuildings 

including peg tile bams around a ^ 

H ‘ J * nies and'Company, 
of Harpenden, is seeking offers 
around £325.000. 


■ No 3, HaM Gardens, In Polebrook, 
near Oundle, Northamptonshire, has the 
advantage of a buiit-m nuclear fafiout 
matter. This Svriss-styio house built in 
19B2 has shutters fitted to most 
emckmm, among other unusual features. 
The three sto rey house has two 
reception rooms and three or four 
bedrooms, with a wafl maintained 
garden and a workshop- cum- 

sum merfiouso. Humberts' Stamford 
office and Goldsmith and Bass, of 
Oundle, are asking £98,500. 

New but mews 

■ London mews houses come in 

many shapes and forms, and No 34, 
Cadogan Lane, in Knightsbridge, is a 
new house bufttin the old tradition. It has 
been designed by John Simpson and 
Partners, known for their work on period 
houses, drawing on Georgian ■ 
elements from the big houses overlooking 
the. rnews. The house has a 21 ft 
recaption room running the fun width of 
the building, with three full-length sash 
windows, a (fining room, three Bedrooms, 
each with Its own bathroom, and a 
garage - which is where the mews came 
in. Fully decorated with hand-painted 
finishes, the house is for sale at £495,000 
through Winkworth’s Knightsbridge 
office. '' 



PROPERTY BOYERS' GUIDE 


COUNTRY PROPERTIES 






*Vr £;■ ’ 





CMveston Conrt at Olveston, near Bristol, is a historic house dating back to the 

13th CettUty. It stands arniri nous of tiw o r iginal • nnwfpH ami fortified manor 

on the edge of this rural village, which is nevertheless dose to the M4 ami 
M5 and 10 miles from Bristol Parkway station. The house is set in 17 acres of 
gardens and paddocks, and is flanfrml by a 16th-century gateway. It has three 
reception rooms and six bedrooms, whine outside there is a swimming pool, a 


is asking for offers of around £250,000 


The Green Belt bonanza 


A piece of rough pasture near the 
Thames just outside Oxford is about to 
provide a vivid illustration of how land 
prices can soar once planning permission 
for housebuilding bas been obtained. 

At present the 1 2.3 acres of Green Belt 
at Uttlemorc is worth about £ 20 . 000 , 
says Nigel Moor, senior partner of 
planning consultants Nigel Moor and 
Associates who act for the owners, the 
Oxford Regional Health Authority. 

But with outline p lanning permission 
from South Oxfordshire District Council 
for residential development, its value is 
now estimated at between £3 million 
and £4 million. 

The authority plans to offer the land 
for sale to housebuilders. 

Mr Moor says: “I thought we had less 
than a 50-50 chance of obtaining 
planning permission, even though the 
land has been largely unused, for a 
number of years. 1 expected that we 
would have to go lo appeal at foe very 
least." 

He said foe case underlined that, at a 
time of government cuts in many areas 
of sensitive community expenditure, 
there were opportunities for local 
authorities and statutory bodies to help 
themselves out of a financial dilemma. 

u This is Just one example of foe 
community benefiting. But millions of 
pounds could be lost elsewhere in 
foe Home Counties, and all over Britain, 
because statutory bodies are not making 
their assets work for them.” 

He believes that many such bodies 
could have valuable pieces of land lying 
dormant or doing little. 

In this case,, foe land close to foe 
Littlemore Hospital is surplus to the 
authority's requirements. With- a likely 


minimum of 12 houses to foe acre, there 
could be up to 150 new homes on the 
site, which will have a completed 
development value of some £8 million 
to £10 million. 

By coincidence, there is news of a 
parcel of land for sale for development 
dose to the other half of Oxbridge. A site 
of more than 41 acres next to foe village 
of Milton, within four miles of Cam- 
bridge, has been granted outline plan- 
ning consent with a suggested minimum 
of 300 units. 

A spokesman for the joint agents, 
BidweU and John D Wood, points out 
that demand for housing land around 
Cambridge bas been fuelled by foe area's 
rapid growth and increasing prosperity. 

“We expect offers in excess of £7 
million for foe land on the basis of recent 
sales of large sites," he said 

The development of the site, in a 
popular residential area, completes the 
proposals outlined in foe Milton District 
Council plan. The site is owned by a 
consortium of Cambridgeshire County 
Council, Gonvilleand Caius College and 
private owners. 

The expected price reflects foe fret that 
Cambridge is put of the second fastest- 
growing region in the UK in terms of 
population; second to Buckinghamshire. 

The rapid growth of “sunrise" high- 
tech industries, known as the Cambridge 
phenomenon, together with the under- 
lying economic strength of tourism, 
agriculture and academic institutions, 
has created a boom economy in and 
around Cambridge. 

As a resuh; housing is in short supply 
and -prices continue to rise rapidly, 
second only to the London area. 

... cw.l 


Hampton & Sons 


mniunmiK 

An tapMwN timber ft*m* 15ft Century 
boms ewafuBv mottontitad to fit htah- 
est apsdlicaun. tw. d mm room, 
suport) Ultt han. dating roan. 3 oad ro o m 
swtss (8 Dsdrooms to d) CriapaL 
FamtiiuiiSnfls. Sablng. Gaapng. SB 
Acme. 

Pries on Application 

BUS/ESSEX BDRflEX - BUXTtB 

A IRb Cantury (nuts with 5 bedroom 
sums, 2 funner Bedrooms and 4 recaption 
rooms. OuttaAtinos. 4 acres 
cesjioa Ftmmb 


BSKSHa, WW 8 UVE-W-TVUKS 
An sImsm Md wNMW riwmid* mat- 
dMcslns iws o rWesw ssdfsg arttt 200 * 
Rjwr (rontsflt. Hdtdrwmgreom, sateo. 
Ham room, dating roam, tnchni 
breams room. 5 principal Mdrooms. 3 
bathrooms, flat Doubts gangs. Exwtsjw 
workrooms. 1 sere. 

Pries Quids ES5DJJ00 FntMd 

MMittw STMM0BE Bl — W 
Period tauss wen 3/4 receptor) rooms, 8 
bedrooms. 4 ba mr oona. modem known 


Humberts 

Residential 



Uaind Gsortfan town iiouaa hr an sxdu- 
aht anas osar the mb. 4 recepbon 
rooms. S bedrooms. 2 bathrooms. base- 
ment Hat 
Price £295.000 


Sopert) iandr houas In fie hung brick. 3 
recepbon rooms. 6 be dro oms. 3 bath- 
rooms. Garden. Swimming pool. 

Price £300,000 


IPS 



DAYMANS 

WOOD 

Giant hams Road, Shenfield, 
Brentwood, Essex. 

Bay mans Wood is already a great 

success even though thefieautiful. . 
fine quality 4 and Soedroom 
detached nouses here were only 
announced a few months ago. 
These sumptuous properties (just 
16 hi aU) are in a private woodland 



Tl» Barnaul 4 bedroom tamo. 

setting and offer an exceptionally 

■^r^^Kitchen, fuxuiycoloured 
.bathrooms with gold plated fittings, 
double glazing, gardens designed 
by an award winning contractor phis 
many other features. 



• Prices from around 

£ 210 , 000 . 

FURNISHED SH0WH0ME 
OPEN DAILY 11am to 5pm. 

Tel: (0277) 210226. 


Affined MAIpine 

Homes 


80 Christchurch Road, 

Boumanunt 

Snotty equipped 1 A 2 
bod fi*s owsfootaop 
Boscontiw GimJtns S Puces 

bon £61.000 • Montw raU p 

of exclusive Linz 

Spats Centre nckstad. Starr 
(lot open 12-Spm awry day. 
Colow brochure from aritas 
qars. Brim B ML 
Tat B/toA (B 2 S 2 ) 291822 


SWAFFHAM • Luaiy terof Buttons - Starr Bungalow. Frees 
from £25550 _ 

BRAND NEW Gottage Styto houses In praKy coasareteon vtibgo- Prices 
tram E35J50. ... _ 

SWWTHAM - Brand new 2/3 Bad Det houses & bungalows. - Starr 
tone. Prices tad datob awttatta on ihubsl 



AVON 

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IIC. BW Mils, 


DORSET/SOMERSET BORDER 

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Mi ffan and manana 

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cttirtfWffipllib Cwj-wj Hrattd swnrvno sow Kail teams can Lad 
:-y, am ct naom sa crwnv nciiKLng anoabita. 

tarn tea CUM# lo nSABO. law taotaW 
DeDric Stamstary OSn. Tal (074H 3(9? ati 
LnM OHM. let 01429 E700. 


C!~s**ixn : m.'fs 1 Uai HM 6 m*r. 

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3 irce;W' laam t oeomom. oaifrrwn iiirtui. ooc« <nom 

7 brae setfW heariy 1(o ? mi 

DboWul c-cffn at _30 ji ■, jet 

CtSStaO FrtetaU. 

Detab. CkMCttUm OflMe. Trl K49) 655661 

(III JJiJ [NIB 1 




Creertw 15 nr/e^ Iff Ijvmjn 14 S !51 5 msev B«iW ?0 mrfi-i 

Aa U» otear ateby tena an lua b*Pm iNMaiami 



DORSET 

Dll EWin^Kinf 

A rentete. nabent *ataw tear ate a tear mttrn ote — te Mute n 
aw ow HamMetiea NUT Md Bui Slur Vtaty 

r irarrws ■aani' 5 tesean. icswi.laraiju i.xwi 04 tentiji nw.-n) 

CisJtv rJ crior 

Oifen a Be nyn a tmfM ftcteoM are ated 1 am. 

DetaOs. Bbadtefl Mas. Itl (025*1 MMX 

itti vn 


BEK 4 mm bwaatuni 5 mm M4 9 mm 
A aaktm bant ultii aaM on4n atik topak baas atetacatiw 

2 iKrrccn looms * ladooi ns . 2 Bammoms. UMUoom imram-'lvrsust 
rosm iw ce3i:ji hruag 
5 3rfiiocmi-2 VII udx art CCIOP 

Hnns acm pub H*d irrax enrt OttbuMuqs an! piddrct. 

Pncr bMe EWD - HOMO htekeM ate iM I acfte 
Denis. Cteprataw OHte. Tit (OZrti HUit 

it0'3£83 DMLBl 


Ejumwik i MK Lrwes 10 tries London 45 rules 

A «ny fite snaaie of a IM cadny WoaHw M laan a ■ arirpr nttei 
la Bw heal of Be Scab tarns. 

Glut lull 3 icretmui luont. 5 drMkws 2 tuBuooms swir duiribat 
uc/ien bums' loom damrmt dkecs. cmais 01 lira cmui irjing 
Prcmtui >J3)i Kcunumxtaiai nmamtii conne «ai n«Kmi ic ciicmcn 

Mtarmluia OuUoUjr^s. ncutao 25 OOO so n ^icbtuui sroage baceu 
tronfi nosocu. (6 nose oases). wooBand an Ouaffland 

ta d abeu 2tK acres. 

I let tale by Private Tmatyna Wteta ■ la 2 Ml 

Lams fiDcs. Tet nz73) 47B2* or 

loadte OSes. Tet 81-429 HOB. 

(16iffi83 JCHHI 


ET 48% Acres 

weoanm 4 bes Thhm s mm ass (Juocnn 26 i it, ntes 

nuotrehi lacuati nS canny stale afii.taHM M taaea d Tatar ta- 


giat. nadim 3 1 


I laagriH ate Sad edeadag la Si to ahai 4»i 


me man house, udtdi b dessaasd Grade 1 as bang a SridtoQ of batonc or 
mmreual merest, comprises 3 nctsuoa roans. 5 oedraoms. 2 bemoans, 
uaa end usual omcre. 3 badrawneri buagrioa- Rtaga of tramanal an) 
modem tarn twtdmgs. 

Pestota tad smal m d woodtad 

For safe » a Mato at la 3 Ms by PtMa Tmaly. 

DsliBE Baakotto. TanTO DHtoa. Tat (Bt23) IS4M. 


(W»4fftW) 


DORSET/WILTSHIRE BORDER 

StattistoBy hi nde. A303 7 mltos Sahsouy 21 mdes. 

A Can bnagatoa necapytag m ctovatori fie togtobar wM s aril ntoMstadL 
"I— cteba Mi abort 22 anas. 

3 reception rooms. 5 bedrooms. 2 tearooms ctoatonn. MetoaulnakBsr 
room N ambit hettng Staff acaaiimHBMH. Ganipig aid ouBnaUmBS 
Stzbtmg and reddads. Sduofng arena wd ndoor manaoe. Gnuds and 
vmodtond. 

CW7JBD Frarta U aW abort 22 aemc. 

DaHta Sbrttebay Ollce. Tit (1747) 3(92. 


HAMPSHIRE 

Dttkn 

A ant atoacOn Bad* 1 Mad pri M l — < 
toatees rertand to Mgb abrefnA 

3 recepbon roons. 5 bedrooms. 2 umaoms. 2 el 
room CU central heatoa. Gaidai. OolbuldnQS > 
Dltaft toritod for M msbeld teb abort ttKr 
DdaBK Sartteapfna Offlca. Tet (D7B3) 3055 


2 banrooms. 2 doakrooms kttben/braakM 
a. ombubtaos stable, store nd [™*rnrt . 


[04.175750 fCRRl 


COTTAGE STYLE 

Detached house in lovely rural setting 2 miles 
A3/M25. and station. 4 beds, 2 baths, 3 
receps, kit, util and dk rm, (foie gge, tell CH. 

£ 210 , 000 . 

GcKMfrick - Meech. 
Guildford (0483) 224343. 




TT 


i r>i'. ; li ' M N d ; i | : i : i • i - 


London 30 mks. Stowage 4 mies. AI (M) 5 mies, HI 9. mtas. Station 
[Hdriun] 2 mites - IQnas'Cross- A subsnn M I Grade I hstad Utaieind 
candy resalsflce n tn^ofcait sacksted greondB rtf 2s* acres. Ex- 
tmmeljr spacious accnrenadation: 5 receps. B beds, 3 btftt Approached 
wa a lorw dnye. BeaubMly tended Barden. Wwr tniita^ DmMooto 
m 3) room abovB. Ireated swatting pool Offers armnd £275JKK) Free- 
hold. Debris from; „ 

KBroy Estate Agests, Property Worfd. AB Hallows 
Bedlorti AK40 1LN, Tet B234 51781. 


»nn roonlrv 

1.1111,1, room ar niiwj ooni w 
nxn litltrt hUrirerr- 4 Ipe 

ssi-aWTSsaa 

4 


WORTH BUCtiSVlWI^ 
QiKMnpbam ,|Sp 

hsird limbci 


DE\’ON & CORN^ AIX 
TOMB W 

s '^ ? Sri M aaa 

ss^arassrs 

r^pTm-^^ s474 _ 
•uoc sum* ^'Y'S sr^ 

Mbfie cm m- 

tuitH tiuta Ljy'f’jf" - j. artr 

ss 

OCVOH rwiN 

"<*« pMUiLHiVrt * ^ 

cm 730 irf o&ga aw 


MLCOtoMWAU- 

- MW lari' rareapa* 

MH tmW HtWl 

i^ToTOflO nrtA' h rrt 


dcvon cwormrr period 
lannhv* 22 *««; 
oulbWte lO n,B 

suiterb ,i«m OBUonal fur 
ihrr 6S orrr* Oficrs la excess 
Sooooo r/H Mown 
PttaL 82 South SU Exeter 
0WS31SW6 


THATCHED COIIW - CT O h»j 
exposed Iftari * * 

bed,. Ma. W DrtWhUul par 
KSs! Sr—e "«h rtwm «W 
ponds Rural BOrtrion. t 

UMM Mil 1 fljP*. 

t;i lO.OOO. TMi 106261 6B2421 
ccOHMALL Nr Loop. 2 bedim 
al rhildrMi rumMied 

DEVON Mod 3 

Sid WOkr FIMnlrm T70236 

•srBMgSSS 

Nrt,alMS 0657 8763B3I s*nri 
t DEVON Ltotod "«■ nr ‘™- 


SUPFOLK: Detartied A nedroom. 
Graratan bouse. Lounoe. dtnlne 
loom, nr tinmen i ti/iaa 
room. DMRroonk On ihc«Wco< 
a msv limp marker town, n or 
IMkih) farmland Studio annex 
ol 4 rooms and shower Me Lo* 
oaiw for 10 mrs. workshop 
and wrtlPd paraen would 
make Ktpai.anuoue or mi oeo- 
tTp Train & bus tenlns. 
C76.50O Tet ,07281 5596 


fiSWKH Otaswm CDUimte. 
Manieslum Heelti A small 
country house sei In os re zi 
arret of woodlands. By 4ur- 
Imk. Wednesday 29 October. 3 
p m a) Cwal WPiw Ho no Ho- 
W. Unwirh AurtKweTS. 
Hanburv WUUams. 36 LUards 
Axraur Ipswicn umts, 
2156E6 


H.HORFOUK, coast 4 md» A M- 
pprii um romerswn C/H. 5 
rerrp. filled Ml. 5 bed*. 2 Baihs. > _ 

<Ktn room, patio, dnlo vge Part I LANBDON MUjSe4 bed det We- 2 


walled orounds. Quortcr acre, 
.turnon Ort 1 7ih. Long & Beck, 
i oak Street. Fakmtham. Nor- 
folk ,03281 2231 


bairn. 2 ms. ui/b'iast rm. 
wtat> sin iF'ehurcti si 27 nun) 
U 18/700 Trt 0268 416291 




LCMJGHTON 

Large detachod Georgian 
house. S years old. 5 bare. 3 
baths (2 en sutej. large 
Lounge, tege fitted 
kitchen, utttjf room. tuB 
steed bflttrd room, dook 
room. HestBd Stirinrang 

Pool 

£3SS^U0 

Teh 01-508-4338 



C0ISWOLM. 7 MUM Chrilm 
ham ai £MM 0 n Oulte 
Brauinum ramerlod bam. 
h4iu rm. dining kilt h- 

re MudV (tuts. 00b- (US CH 
wins lunnina-down to simun 
tl 46.000 10704 666111 . 



BfEOM VALLEY DroxfortL Su- 
perb new dmeloomeni. by 
Bert, (lev Homes n spacious 
rnararwr houses m imwoin ru 
ral wiling 4 beds. 2 bains. 3 
rerepv Mt/brkfsL ubHty. CH. 
dhlr urge, mow from 1/3 acre lo 
1/2 am CI52J00 to 
CISftflOO 1 <oM. 3 remain- Ap- 
plv toetlnrCoBar 1048931 3SS5 
or (04893, 3483 lafter 4 pro). 
BOURNEMOUTH, Talbot Woods. 

• Mwrudictd rtiaractcr residente 
wuh superbiv am m nlod family 
vim art Dm 32" drawing rm. 
well ild Sechenmn kUrhen. 9 
lireurv baihniK. 4 beorms. tat 
CH a ore town remrr 
(.196.000 FH PtoMC- moan 
Blarknonn Agencies Ramsey A 
fUmui Tel: 0202 761221 
HAM8UE 200 vards private 
bearh Conversion of M4IUIIC 
i«ui cennin- Grade u bsud 
toumatd viaUcs lo form 4 
house*. Carden- Oarages. 

. Mama Po«(tbK>moonnBS.Oc- 
setagers Allied Wc* Ltd- 
Oooia 730707 Agents Young 
O While sooUumMon 229332 
MR 5WANAQE Slone bum -del 
buns i ii 1 acre s/IbCs WiXWapd 
oriu nvrder am vvuh iflwr rm. 
2 lurther able beds, tainrm. s*p 
wa tew dm rm. slum-, 
roowiv roa-l DMegUud. Ita 
Wte L97.500 (0929)480670 
OORWT. Ki BierwHWI vieforl 
jn tarrah house in corners aUon 
viitoae 2 rerep. 4 beds. Can* . 
mo and ovsw C7V96C 
rrnrtwM Details Humberts. 
M ,02681 52543 


HOME FMDDIS. Hants/DOftM 
border. Seaside and New Far 
e*a Are you looking (or a 
pro periy due to a business mov e 
or reuremenr? A MHday home 
or house m improve as an In 
v Citroen i? Housenurulng is lime 
money and enpim- Let us view 
ana shortlist properties for you 
from a tperrilrauon supplied by 
you Further diuds phone 
04254,19015 


CAMFOfm cum /Poole Superb 
Bungalow- romHotMy refur 
bhhed. 4 beds. 4 bates. 5 reef, 
gas c/h. wveiy ganUm-dbl tar 
Cl 89.750 Tet. 0202 293172 



£75,000 owe 07M 253111 

I not.QW. River .Teme fronlagr 
Defcunm Bungalow 3 nntrtns 
Oi Kupeth Kile beneath Luo 
luw . f-rOle C 90000 Phld 
MtCarlnevw ,06841 2155 

LUSWW ■ btvUn Mark a while 
del 1 bed Collage wiib wgtled 
luurlni 125.000 RuvseiL Bal 
dwm «. Bnuhl 0664 BlOooo 


NEAR HITCHJN Ftv e DedrMuned 
uunilv house Lovely lounge 
Kludge kilrhen. Separate dining 
ream Ourei lane vetting in pm 
l% village School ana shops 
nrurbi C89.500. TH. Offles 
,0402701 205 


HACRJCT WOOD. Mod del chalet 
ship ipudenre 4 onjy. by 
lounge- rlkrm. GCH Gta. 
qdn/pwn drive- 1 rmle to M26 
r uin turn if reg Cl 75. COO Tet 
01 440 2406 or 01*441 6535. 

HARPENDEN Dmoner'y 5 bed 
\ * mine 2 mins siaiKm/ 
shops 25 mtm Kings X 

1145000 05827 62209 


WO INLET. 1022 Spinous del 
chaiarrer home in 1 - acre bark 
,ng onto nrWv woodland .10 
nuns walk station. Luntmti 17 
mins 4 beds. 2/3 rerepuaos 
InepLurs 2 balh lh<1 ritrpels 

A , urtains Gan Cl 70.000 

I /H Tel 01 4o2 2711 


SNEPPERTONSMOm rrurarier 
sJihki linnsr. <hwr lo Ttunm. 
Sp.Hinu, lounge* diner with 
luucmv Fuilv iilled ktlrnon 
sbiial stawf aves. Callen bedrm 
wun m suilr tainrm. 2nd 
Iwsli hi to w ludnt garaen Gta 
CM t,gOty»Tel 0032-327583 
v, kouro -afier 7 SO pm wkdays 


hahfton. -i neauiuunv proper 
lamed Hurt buiU 4 dbk- brdrmd 
del i.nmilv hv limcnod id hngn 
spn Cnuem slludli-d In 4 pm 
RU , lose 1« Milage shops * 
RiHiv Park cioaiOO 
Rednkin 1 to 943.1146 

















































COMES TO LON DO 


For the first time Sotogrande, Spain’s most prestigious country -ertte, is Aae nt ^ 

FINCASOL - The Property Experts in Southern Spain and Sotogrande s Pnncipal Agent. 


PUERTO 


CENTRO 


RNCASOL 


SOTOGRANDE 



Luxury apzrtxnents^nd now 
under construction the 
Mediterranean’s first and 
finest Marina, situated 
by Hie mouth of the 
Guadiaro River. 

There is a choice of 
1 -4 bedroom Apartments, 
Penthouses and 
FHver Houses. Berths and 
Apar tm e n t s are available in 
the new Marina. Facilities 
include a Beach Club with 
restaurant, bar, tennis and 
paddle tennis courts and an 
excellent supermarket. 


SOTOGOLF 




Asmali but exquisite 
development of 'golf 
any ' ' — 1 village' houses with patio 
- ' ■ gardens and garages. Golf 
fjto&rr? \ • '. Club membership Is 

- . included with the purchase ■ 
■ ri— «’ of a property. Located 
conveniently between 
T ? yVv7ai T r^r Sotogrande’stwo 
TeSfnrnfi^P Championship Golf 

Courses, SotogoK has its 
~ own private swimming pod, 
tennis courts and Is only 
.. ;-£? minutes away from Beach 

Clubs, shops and horse- 
. ridSng facilities. 


SOTOGRANDE 



The largest commercial 
development of Its kind on 
the Costa del Sol, promoted 
and developed by Hncasol. 
Designed in classic Moorish 
style, the centre wifl 
incorporate a shopping 
man, sports arid fitness 
centre, health dinlc, disco, 
restaurants, bars, cafes and 
extensive parking facilities. 
Superb accommodation is 
offered in lukury 
penthouses and serviced 
apartments, many with 
Mediterranean views. 


CONSTRUCTION 



Flncasoism 

The Construction Bqpai% .v 
ST§outh«m Spain, 

"HoQday Goif My* of Suet, 
“.. .they've been operatfag 
in xha Sotogrande region, 
building homes of quaMT, 
ranging fan ai 2 e and scope 
from apartments In Hit 
£30.000 bracket to menakmv 
valued « half a roUfion sod 
beyond... you'd ba hard . 
pressed to stump them tor 
design and quality. ” 


I Please send for your invitation to our forthcoming 1 

j presentation in the: | 

| MARIE ANTOINETTE SUITE - RITZ HOTEL - LONDON | f 

| on Wednesday 8th and Thursday 9th October from 11.30 am— 8 pm | < 



Further details on these exciting developments and your invitation to our forthcoming 
presentation can be obtained from Fincasol Ltd. 

^ «iv V 


p/CwoiHauuii won h— ■ -- — 

Head Office: 4 Bridge Street, Salisbury, Wiltshire SP12UC 
Telephone: 0722 26444 Telex: 47751 7 WTS G 

London Office: 18 Queen Street, Mayfair, London W1 X 7PJ 
Telephone: 01-499 6187/01-491 1670 


The finest climate in the world — TENERIFE SOUTH 

Fairways Villas — Four Owners £15,950 • Detached Fairway Villas £49,000 
Beachside Apartments From Only £23,000 

CoapknaiK d with son, sea, seamy, a Jew cosi oTBving, limned tans everything that anewer drams of- ewytadf. To complete this dra m , 
vreaaaowofiernreowbinrwoloog-awaiad IS-bi^ go If coar^ design^ tyDcnaldSt ^ofT oi^ 

Md Country OuMnot m be confused with San Golf Course), an Anglo-Camrian project, will be the lamest and most sophisticated 

developmoit in dK Canary Islands and will offer a large sdecDoa oTapartments and villas eo snn all tastes. 

— ~ p..n .wiHy mnn and luring tnmmg. Tncpenjon flights ecefy wrtnA Please telephone Sir a brochure 

BIRMINGHAM OFFICE LONDON OFFICE 

021-643 7025 (24 hrs) 01-938 2516 (24 lirs) 


^ f , ^8' *■* 



^THE ROYAL HEIGHTSL 



COUNTRY PROPERTIES 


Urge detached suae cottage, 
dating Iron* iTW E«eaont con- 
temn 2 retention room s. 3 
doable bedrooms, bathroom, 
kitchen and cal® Large 3Dc 
wtKti would c onvert to hntter 
bedrooms and tutor uom Doom 
garage Stone out buddings. Pri- 
vate garden (Was m the regon 
oi Eiaaooo 

Tat Woodstock 812061 


OXFORD rz rate. 

(Marti Station It Bits. 

A fins iBted country restjence ot 
Tudor & Jacobean per iod- Elegant 
vet manageable accnmnodann 
3 Recap Rms. 5 Bedrms. 2 
Bathrms. Substantial Bnck out- 
buddngs Private ■? acre grounds 
with netted pool Good Dec order. 
£145000 

Brooks of Oxford 
(0865) 244535. 


BETWEEN Banburv and Oxford: 
Banbury S miles. London 63 
miles. A 3/d Bedruonn-fl de- 
l.Khral emuw in on idyllic 
i in ^1 kxiilnn a mil. tram 

Dnrtrtnralftii -laatrtablr ,x«m 

■ nnri.il nxi inrludinn 2 Rerep;. 
KilrlM-ii/DmilKi Room. 2 Bath- 
ii-xu-. Garden OiHtnuldinqs 
anil iXlnNtr Slablmq. Rail'll 
P.lrldi. ks -Vh.u.1 [O' • ArtVT. HI 
■XII Oil 11s .iraniid V. 125 000 
L.iin* ro\ <v Fanners with 

Rvl.llHts. MNMMail C1»mmy . 

RiiniHirx. Own Tel: CC95 
710592 

OXFORDSHIRE - ALBUHY Ox 

■uni u m lirs Hum WvromDe 18 
linlrs. London 48 mill-. FINE 
PLRteJO «iTUNC RECTORY 
SiliMird 'll thr End ol a No- 
IIiiihhiIi Liw Overlooking 
P'HILhkI J/S RrcrpTHMi 
ItiHiins. DnnirMra Oirirra. Ol- 
tars 0/6 Hediuonr.. a AllK 
Rooms. 2 luinroanr, central 
INmIiim, UnapiM SUbUnq. 

Onlliii iWin* r. Cnlla«ra Garden* 
■■ml iKnuiids with lake -Uwui 
& S A. II- OTTERS IN THE HE 
UNIN Ol CJ25 000 SavJlls 
bdiilnin Trl iiXWn 3535; 

OXFORD It mill-. Banbury IP 
linlrs Tims- .KiloinaK] slonr 
bfllll PI-IKM1 1'OHaOC*. 

Inish'iiu-sl .inti udh 2 or 3 
Bnln.ims Ir-n-ilu-r with a vain 
■ihlr IIiiiUiiihi Silr t.nh iHillinc- 
lilaiiniiKj rf-rmis-ion fur two 
O* n li.sll .in .*Ti' in all A union 
U, InnLols IIDNnnnbi'riun. 
less in i\ .ilrl, soldi Luh- Fox 8 
Parli»->s >v lib Hv lands. Middlo- 
tnn ITN-nrv. Rjnouri . Oxon 
trl rcsis 7106*12 tmnl 
\irnls 1 1 annul A Jonn. Os 
lord TrJ DHo5 

K. OXFORDSHIRE Ertyr o( Cols 

s.niiis Slrw/lhalrH rmiaw in 
tin- pirliirrsuiip. «rll srnpil t II- 
Lnr or Honk Norton 
Rrfliminif I. n-f-r-tAl or non 
dav imnr Hall fsi Bm iviih 
i'MHi-il Dram. Sroin- lirroUnr 
■ir Uni trisi Til Kir Bain. 2 
Bids Gdn Workiawsp C/N 
r.a2 SOP \nkrr A Parlnrn. 
Hanhurv i02RS' 37501 


SCOTLAND 


West Ena Edwardian town 
house relaxing ongmal fea- 
tures. 3 putttc rooms. 5 
bedrooms (master en suite), 
luxury totehen. 3 b a t hro om s , 
bdhard room, mtegeral ga- 
rage. gas central heating, 
otters over £95.000. 

Tel 041 339 5215. 


ST -AN DREWS - Rri,rifin*il Flat 
4£. \i'n li- Lour I uilh Res Mmjr 
rill R— Iviuw rll 2 bed. 
Inuiuif nrnrni k ruilv riiii-d 
Kill In-11 Stnmh views ol Litll-v. 
In-dill se.i eti Tims] Price 
le4..’4'l liru d.nlv 2 a Tel. 
IWJ roIAS loi luntier into 
SKYSIOE. CraHiHlarhie Sub 
-L.mil. il s/iarnMi larmlKMIse 

Ta.lnulli niinL.ili-d Lovell 

uiiiiilia viplftl s.-ws 2 rerei^ 4 

1.-01 ins tdl/flinitK, bain rlo.iks 
dinuia iilililv niln. 4 ,-irre ivid 
on. I l.f" OOO 1 H 03404 268 
MOVING in SrnH.11111.' PiulfVfilOII 
,il -<-airh • Olid lir led lor 
irsiitpiiu.il / mminernal prop 
ill.— svnllivn Propertv 

sm-.u ■ n as klawklK-ad Rd Pars 
lev 041 SST 3728 


SOMERSET & AVON 


UtttQUE wrtNC ol a brae Grnr 
tuan iniiinil nniiM* in Its OWII 

nioiiiKls Panor anm vh-.so\or 
hl.-i.lips l.unnli-aanrr lO mill-. 
Biisi.ji Rain Wells Private 
f.l|is 3 briis - riYPPS . lux 
' kilrnen si. uili— runvenrd lo 
ri.UI> room "Hire vludm nnk 
sIhh‘ r.Ti 500 Full details 

onolus nn iraui-sl Tp| Temptf 

Md»I ■ P7&I > S2126 eves and 
Vv /rmts 


ON THE 
RIVER AVON 

Period 8 bed MiD 
house, between Bath 
& Bristol, in dramatic 
river position. Vh 
acres, moorings & 
fishing. 

£145.000 

APPLY 


TEL: 

BATH 333332. 


BATH 

Grade II listed 
Georgian townhonse. 
In carden square near 
Rjiyal Crescent. Original 
planeiwurk. fireplaces etc. 
full GCH. rewired, 
reptumbed. 6 bedrooms. 3 
bathrooms, fine drawing 
room, eieguit dining room. 
FliUy fitted kitchen/ break- 
fast room. Usual offices. 
Self contained 5 room flat. 
Id U5A.H) pa. or suitable 
far aged P. Sunny garden. 
Extensive cellarage. Free- 
hold often, over 1263.000. 
For brochure telephone 
Owners 0225 331 695. 


SURREY' 


TTTTTnTTPTTl 


Desnble detached VKtonan dm 
ter bouse n sought ^ter tocabon 
Fifty modgma e d retanng superb 
ongiraJ features Fiiy capeted. 
ready to move mto 
6 double bnkoeiss, master ensatn 
taftfoom 2 cloakrooms, apnia 
shewer room. 2 tl tg w t le ce pb o n s. 
dnog/tnaidasi fined kitchen, ti*y 
room, lift GCH. Large gnqe. SH 
south fang gudea pffia tj H. 
£2^50a 

TEL 01-788 2736 
01-390 0714 



COOOCM, endiMeo-Sra Marine 
imdcncr • direct sea accnv. 
Larger hair of a detached house 
of ctvaracKT SpartovK lounge, 
dining room, sun room, kllcnen. 
breakfast room, uuuty room, a 
beds, elr Double garage. Car- 
den leads ro stews to Sun 
lerrare. Winch home, hard 
standing* hoar ramp. Offers in 
iiM in regton of £160.000. Trt 
. 04243 5714 


ROTTMCOEAN Nr. Brtghlon 
Dctamrd bungalow, 3 beds. 2 
baths- lounge, dining nail, pine 
kitchen, utility room, gas CH. 
double glared, garage. SW 
garden, good family home. 
£87.600. Tef. 0273 30064 
■evenings) 


VILLARS— SWITZERLAND 


EmKoie an exdosive resort, just 70 minutes from Geneva. . . Sunshine . . . skiing 
. .stating. . . swimming . . .golf. . . horse-riding. . .sapabicsaurantsAshops. 
International schools . . .all set in wooded stoes with stunning moantam view. 
All this -and more— you wiS find ax VILLARS -a historic village with 


a sophisticated yet 


friendly atmosphere. 


IE BRISTOL 


Mnuos I mm A3/M25. yet bor- 
dsrad by metOows. Pretty 2 year 
M detached home wth 5 beds. 
2 bats. 3 receps. t/f light oak 
kddwfl/ breakfast room, teddy & 
(retie detached garage. End ol 
private avBMo. Tiufy nrenacteite 
canddum. 




New ia i ubim t o p p u rt nai ty in Swiss Seal Estate 
A —M i™ - concept m select fatty serviced a panunau wnh afl die faobtia of a luxury bofeiindoor pool 
squish, ban. laucram. etc. I ao4 room aporoncaB (roor SF I3QUQ0Q.- Up lo 80% Swia fiaascr avaibbie 
at favourable terms. 

MEET THE SWISS DEVELOPERS AT: 

THE MAYFAIR HOTEL. STRATTON STREET, LONDON WI. 
10 AM - 8 PM 2ND A 3RD OCTOBER 
10 AM - 4 PM 4TH OCTOBER 

THE CALEDONIAN HOTEL, PRINCES STREET, EDINBURGH 
10 AM - 6 PM 5TH & 6TH OCTOBER 


HILARY SCOTT UD For detaHs and appo intineiit: 

teUppra RkhmoodRaml Wnt, 


Each spodous end beouttfuSy appointed jwpeily w An Royd y fa fe t pwoq 
and security of its awn tnxudous tendsnped gmteiB. V3fas with J-5 
afVDlB pod, U1 montenantc ad secady sewites. range tram EiwlDBibSzSWnO 
ad HioirgogB ore nytriaHe. Fw o« brodane ad 01-836 5333 w caflort ear updoHe 
agert. Or ararage a penonal »sft in Ihe site. Ow offices ace open ? 
do« a wek M Atateto 773368 a 77341)). Laden Wl -jr 

D^U».ladonWC2B5W. 


MARBELLA 


RETIRE OR 
INVEST IN 
THE SUN 


From £27,500, Tenerife, Canary Islands 

Where hvatg costs are so low a couple may l«e a luxury on £5,000 pa amed a cfeitei d 
pa&bnl s ym gtm ie 65/75 deg F. winter and summer, ui a detached villa m Enghsh «*o 
uRage on the efiffs aboaa the Aflantic with panoramic views of forest and moadams. 2/3 tea. 
1/2 battrooms. choice ot 11 des^ts from E27.500-f33.500 freehold, total legal docuottoto' 
bon m UK. British dutch, bbrary and school. ResalcmBnushrepfesentaiivt Orty3tvsbO«hs 
by air from London. Brochtn on request 50p. Overseas enquiries £2. Quote Ref; taOSJI 

CHILCOTT WHITE & CO (OVERSEAS), 

125, Sooth End, Croydon, CB9 1AIL Tel: 01-688 4151 



N.W. BRISTOL 

Character detached lodge set in 
prareer (taro ottering: 4 beds. 
J receptions. 2 bahiooms ten 
sure), kreuy oak kitchen, ul 
G C>t, double gbong rod dbfa 
gwye^Set n pleasant gdns. 

lewis WHliMB S0LK3IDRS. 


Tet 0934-416451 


BATH Lux nuhoMlr In CNde 1 
Gr-orgun l<Trj(r ur nlj ronlrc 
SurrmnHlnl nv p-irkunri iStoti 

HillPl.xr UIN14WI1I Jlmb.2 

rniw.. 1/1 Ml 2 hdlhs A 7CT 
win Cl J? 503 '02251 .'^8463 


COUNTRY COYTACC In comer 
v.ilioii v iII.kc- Bristol 14 mih-v 
l.rMUluii 2 hour-. Ckw IM4/MS 
V-m5 503 TpI .02721 8751 17 


CLIFTON. LMPd hinHino. garden 

nMiMiiiHU 1 . uruv Pnuo and 
leriure Good nrrier red<rr«a| 
.•d Double tied .Urv Miung 
room, kn/hnin Lower moot 
M illAhle runvnvMili sluOla / 
In-iii. mm's 99 year I rase. 
<.45 900 Tel Ol 725 7511 
isuii/rrKini Tuesday onward 
0749 468o 


BDtSTOL Cnilcm Usled buihUmi. 
■kn Men m-nsum-rlp inset Palio 
and liTTare CmdoldiT mlero- 
iale.1 LiuiiMe hrtl . lame valUliq 
ictjin. Ml/bath Lower rlooi 
smuiiie roju rmoji Mudlo / 
histi. ami's C4S.OOO Trt 0749 
afrtO 

IDYLLIC secluded, mjrartrr mi- 
lage e miles from UKUr Carv 
liner rriv tram lo Baddingron 
large Liirinm wilh Aga. stable. 
tMl hviis- iMddork. about I 
.wre 1.120.000 Trt 0458 
50 J82 

MU.VJCRTON. L I mine ronvnrsion 
-luni- l.irm Mdns bupeeb views, 
•stge nt X ill. me Hall. 3 rereit 5 
lHsiinr- 3 iMinrms. iium. rg<. 
uak kn. ulil. Oil CH. gdn. 2 ga- 
r.iges 2 p.moorvs LI8L.OOO 
•'-■825i 44.XH93 Rorkdol Lid 


SBRTOBY OR TV 

lingue concrete & gtes wMe 
house akwgadfl 17th green is 
now for sale. Kncmn throughout 
the golfing world because of 
many TV appearances, tt has en- 
eiytreng you need «t I Vi acres & 
salmas t two propones m oee. G 
bedrms tec 

Offers £466^00 
Pfeooe: 09904-3123 


COLDNARBOUR Converted lodge 
wild magndKeni vrewv S bed- 
rooms. 5 h-anroorm. prelly 2 
ame garden inctuding pad- 
rforte. vUWnf and 

oulbuiklnvgv Freehold 

C275.000 TeLiO306i 71 1946 


VILLAGE LOCATION J 6 acres 
£400.000 3 mins Junrt 3 W3 
5 beds. 2 balhs. s rerepL Urge 
knehen and laundry, rads, ga- 
raolnu Agents. HERON & CXI 
i048e2i 20441 Open 7 days 
Similar proper lie, asailsbir. 


LEATMERMKAO An excrtlenl 
and ueauiiiullv aphorrOed S 
vear old Tudor style family m- 
idenre in rfei.Ued postl on in 
prune- an-a Han. cloahToam. 
.touhle assert lounge, dining 
iraii. studv. Ivixurv Vitrtven JL 
iilililv ansi Superb master ted 
i<um -ante drc-ssiim area A 
eiiMine hiuhraom. 3 furfher 
liedroiilie. wrriri tuxurv bath- 
room Carpeted ihroughoul. 
Gas rniir.il hrvling. double ga 
rage Good sized garden 

C198.O0 O Tele phone- 0372 
5740<U 

ST CCMKES MU- Vs ey bridge. 
Surrey MmillKml lux urv 
home in Sussex style, being 
mull lo an exreplionaav herfi 
spiv and imnnir rorrrpirlton 1 
.ir re pun o'loaliitg golf toiler 
I -550.000 Mann a. Co Cnunlry 
Hou se- Dep| i0932 670771 

FREW CHAM A charming lade. 
Iiillv refiirtHshed & carpeted 3 
ix si period mum ry cohage ui 
pt-.u-i-ful rural -a-uing. Nearby 
F.imham. 1 hr Walerloa 
C79 950 Trt 1 04831 898560 

ESHERr Del mod bungalow. 4 
brxts 2 bams. 2 reeeps. clkrm. 
Ige kll iilililv . CCH. did gtoz 
dDl gun Gri dee order VS acre 
L215.rv.sl mm Ol 3980708 


cent ikssv or Rtvoygll Bay and 
Worm's Head. Siylnh spin level 
open plan arc hi I eel u rally de 
signed noose in 1 - acre. 2 double 
beds. 7 very spacious reeps. din 
Ins room, filled ML bath. More 
room, eoverrd balcony. 1600 
set. (L C75.000- .07921 205167 


DVFED Lauohame 2 miles, loo- 
don S > hours Old Rectory. 4 
beds. CH. mu buildings for coo- 
vorxron ♦ 1 acre. Sheltered 
rural \ alley C59.00O. Tel 099 
421226 leventogsi 
PEACE And Oute< la seefudnf 
Gower v lUage. duntemipted 
view over nature reserve and 
estuary lo htus beyond. Luxury 
3 bed detached house C68J2SO.' 
0222 485972 evenings. 
BANGOR (Gwynedd 1. 1973 large 
detached C57.S00 (Negollable 
re btg/ASI 0248-355270 


London SWI47JX 
Trfq*0BC 01-876 6S5S 
Tdcz 927828 


AprojaateOraraaCo paotor 
Bv' Anonvuitybaciynabesditentyilass > 
f/ aparnenretowBosraihat^'isgaalBtlDcahn 
f Fn9Bte5(itamDoqu«G0l8Ciu«yCU)ard& c . ^ 
ifecart on Marina bertn »g blihB rferod wh each nB pB dowd ^ 

,SSONESnA^M 

I PUEKTODE LA DDQUESA - COSTA DEL SOL 

tack. Itarta, OnropioinNp GoL Shops, Resfamfa t Bn PodL 
Tam ASqush » ttOrSnudlK UnJeipaw d Paring, NUOtingStnlK. 
Otey S iMra from Ghnlte AkporL 
Ttiephone: 0534 -33523 of 33524 or yyrite to: 

. CAMPBELL GILL MARKETING LTD 

g Seaton H ouse, 17-19 Saaon Race. SL Heioc Jersey. Ctratnte Islands. _ 


Main U K- Broker 


Lm noMB m dcVBrasSA, 
1884VBra*,Sntorafand. 
TdepbonE 818 4» 250 53531 
Tcfcx 456213 GESECH 







WILTSHIRE 


Detached Vtctonart 3 Bad 
House m hatquil rurat iocahon 
o'lootong vafcy. Almost 2 
seres of secluded grounds. 
Easy access to M4 Junction 16 
& Swindon. London onfyl 
hour fay tram « car. £93500. 
Tel- (0285) 69285 or (06687) 
571. Cooks Estate Agents. 


PROPERTY WANTED 


UNBENT. Flat wanted central 
London Cflo.ooo unmrtHalc 
puirtvne. Tel. (02221 733719. 


CENTRAL Pro pen Icy Revjmred 
Centra) MwAnwRl Scrum. 
Tel. 402 3928 


PROPERTY TO LET 
COUNTRY 


WANTED On long leave large 
$mmtr\ bouse /larmhmne 
CUuriMcnliirc / HerMocdymre 
/ Walcy Trt 0462 31145 <day> 
OAS2 21359 


20 YEARS ON THE 
COSTA BLANCA IS 
YOUR GUARANTEE 


Two bed VSta with sea views 
£4,000 deposi t - finance over 13 years 

Detached Villas from £28000 

SPECIAL. OFFER 

Two bed Bungalow 



& THE POST HOUSE HOTEL, LAKE VIEW, 
BRIDGE ROAD. IMPINGTON. CAMBRIDGE 

Tavnerstai 01-549 4251 

Danatuc Home, rr.in LoadoB BMKi.KmgaarM9myThamnLSanrvKTS OKA 


INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY 
COSTA DEL SOL 

A rare opportuniy to buy a most attractive large farm- 
house. with numerous outbuildings. Set in 80 acres + 
of very beautiful grounds, only a few miles inland 
between Malaga and Nerja. Costa del Sol. Owners must 
sell quickly £85,000 only 

ROCKWELL PROPERTY 
INTERNATIONAL 
0869 240674 (24 hrs) 



SPAIN & CYPRUS 


I t>v i i I I n I 

rnmwY.ird octubHTkT 



..iOam 5-.>0pn> 


ANGUS THISTLE HOTEL, MARKHTGA1T, DUNDEE 


|S \Tt Rl>.\Y 4-1 h OCTOP-FR 10.3(l;mi - 5 30pm | 


BETCKWORTH. Immar family 
i Ivvr.T, in rftll.Kjr in Kn rty aural 
lime r,iM antes* lo London A 
M25. 4 hedx. shower rm 
halhim. hill rm. Imuri Aga 
kll/ hi si mi. 24 II lounge, dining 
rm Gas CH .'omervalory. 
uuiksnop iHUe gge t acre gar 
ch-n. C 1 59.500 Bclchworlli 
.0717841 2502 


OlftLOrORD allrartrve 1962 
netne iv.ih 3/4 acre Gdn. pool, 
qreeiinuuses 4 bed. dreMlng 
mm. large drawing room, din 
jug loom kllcnen. 

romei i aiorv . Ore. a mile, SE 
CJiulioiil. trifeis about 
CiaS.WO lei >04831 892611 


WOKING. Hnrsell \ illarr 4 brd> 
ris i-phen- Balh and shower 
■ amir. Nell kllrneli Luiny 
Omriili- garage Small land 
g.nwilgildni 1 5 mmum walk 
sl.ilimi 3 miniiles shop, and 
<1 horns GCH CI55.'XO F/H 
Trt 01897 


SUSSEX 


EAST GRJNSTEAD. 

ideal lor residential or pio- 
fessanal use. hi the Histora; 
High Street XlVtti centtoy 
house. 2/3 rec. 4 mam beds. 
2 baths. 2 secondary beds. 
Gas CH. Garage, large rear 

a rt with simert) outlook. 

tecs m region £225.000 
11230. 

Poradl & Partner LfaL, 
Forest Row 
(0342 82) 2261 


1066 couwmy 

(HASTMGS) 

Enjiamm ucunie hortw egoay n 
rn> wji m-rne 3 d*e ’ 

r*cepT I'jDy fflKd IiJUASJ hnu 

or. ranurr. CCH a lew TO! 

*1» Inxn S6J front laal fefwoim 
or "j** hmc m [rrap lawg 
HUO-i «n sum auniuc « 
wum fcmeMe .aaroi 

«&9HL 

Tet B424 433138. 


- Nr Reading A 
mosi aiirariive FamHv House tn 
a sniM-rb rural silu-Uioa 2 
iriep- modr-rn kilrhm/bkfxl 
loom. J lusts. Orexsuig room. 2 
halhs Oil G H Garage Mature 
gulden To be let furnished lor 
I 2‘ \ears Lane Firs & Pact 
ner- wilh Rviands Trt 01499 
4785 


MORTGAGES 


FROM 7.9S . Low start 

xinrhirtwes/rrmerlgages. Mori- 
uauesuvei tlm 10 75-- LPIo 
JO it term KmKcaod Patmore 
Lid Ol TSSWeo. -TLv. 94*1240 
rvveasv G Rrt 190200901 


SOUTH OF ENGLAND 


PROPERTYSEARCH 

For fast efficient service 
finding heroes in the South 
West, contact 

PROPERTYSEARCH 

the prof esc raJ 
relocation company. 

0884-297946 


KING JAMES HOTEL. ST. JAMES CENTRE. 
EDINBURGH 


0562 8S51S1 


Beaches International Property Ltd.. 3/4 The Mews. 
Hagiey Han, Stourbridge. West Midlands DY9 9LQ. 


MARBELLA 

SPAIN 

30R4BEDH0USES. 
BEST POSSIBLE LOCATION 
ON MARBELLA'S 
GOLDEN MLE. 
UNRIVALLED 
BEACHSIDE SITE. 
HOUSES WITH SPACIOUS 
ACCOMMODAHON 
& SUPBIB ROOF TERRACES 
WITH VIEWS OF THE SEA 
A MOUNTAINS. 

Prices from 

£80,000 

R^n 

0927420622 


BALEARICS 


MAHON, MENORCA 

Luxury apartment 4 dou- 
ble beds. 3 b a t hr ooms 1 “*»■ s TWieine Xparlnveun 

en niirtrv larne rarnllii 1 1 L Vlll.e linm I.IS.9SO IO rime, 

EUeSir 8 ’ m °° em Horn Ihe .iHpnrl. exretlmi lam 

Kiicnen, oinfriQ area, i||p * ,fl r»arn imm hgwiv 

SS drawing room, sep- ^/ 4 "Sr«?SrSS 

arate dining room, 2 ttos ™ oi ow .-*s VJ, 
balconies. Fine view of c*N*»FisLJwa>s trr«eji ntow 

trarbour FuJtv fumtsfind ” l,,nrt ■ l,,d "wiroriiim 

P7iinnn- raf.urtS«S ,,H '■‘■•‘""“i n.v <k- l.i urn 

t/u,000. unfurnished liw iiiluini.iiioii \iuiudo ai. 

£65,000. Coloured Tj#-H41IIi > Inimir -Cart^ngr« 

brochure let cahmy um. tmmi.- souu- 

nneg -nn OCX Bn,iw, « Hnr.-* Irani 

0252 722 251. '-isiw i n t. iso coo mri me 

urn* unit .le, i-kipnienl. I’ler mt 

l " 1 '09251 SOM7 -24 hr,! 
MENORCA hew IiM of mix 300 StCANTES. Luk 

prd4k-|»«- lor sjiro m 2D loro iirv iiK r^Khw f Ohp poof 
iihnnr r. Ci Dvnnm n*. T)lw-J MOSlIum 111 UlK 


MALLORCA 
THE GOLF 
APARTMENTS 
Superb 1-3 bedroom Apts. 
Situated on your own 
private golf course. 
Anchorage Club's 
restaurant, bars and 
health spa. 

Full management and 
totting service within 
the world famous 
Bendmat estate. 

Tennis, swimming 
pool, golf dub are) 
commercial centre. 
Excellent mortgage 
finance. 

Prices from£35 1 OOQ 

to£ 75.000 

53 Upper Brook Sc, 
London W1Y IPG. 
TaL (01) 6294883 


MINORCA Fidlv- luniivhnf vudln 
.UkuliiM-nl in viirnw vill.w 
PtexWw Utdai-a Shin- of 

sivimming poo* 9>-nlal ran 
It .if I il nxiurrod Only Cl 7.500 
I I T-twrid Trt 0344 8S4269 
MALLORCA Cak> O'Ur SuonTi 
vilLv drt 5 txxfx. 2 ruin, ui 
Ix-.Tulilid urapall C.ila D-Qr civ 
ki nviniu LbO-OOCi 723 98W 


CANARY ISLANDS 


Weani«t oar house nn 2 noorv 
sumutea Of »aM mrrtq liA 
langm Mad terrace taong Sotolv 
one* L09 Fa>«nes diea rot*? sea. 
3 ige bedmts 3bwirna ««m 
bwng rm fflrtnqmi hoed M 
dry rm ourfamkh njs Man 
rttectrory maro waror w«h 30000 
Wre reserve tank Teteanone 
Lana auaar tor sw mi ron q cool 
E wgafiiy imimhec CoiM oe a- 

iflMJsJ ibK M/mes togas • 
WKWWI 

Sate wdh t ai i U l ti i ua. 
31000.000 PtSETfe 

Write 8n S3, Airedfe de 
Lurarote. Canary Islands. 



■a; 

if 

§.5 

m 

iy 


A choice of select properties on the 
Costa Bianca, south ot Alicante, from 
OSJULNome video mi brochure 
able. Tel (06284) 76800 or post coup® 
immediate response to> 

51 Wed Street. Martow. Bod & SU 
Name 



ARDECHE ite/l'rjKn Fur sale, 
xpanoip. moricvmMXi tartirmt 
i.wnilmnv iT hMimms rttrsi m 
iHxmluul Mirraundinok 

t:oO.W«i otlT rrqwig Trt OI 

7xm hbtb jflcr 7 gm. 


core fAZUR. Mohiir tiorm* 
Regomm IO nianscaunn. tftes 
6 All apfriianri-. LvhniirCn 
uhxh siii- idun/rnndrena 
Boots Trvml nvrr. C4.&00 oso 
Tel. 0304 363761 <C\«v. 


ST IHOVU i Lni cenire Amti- 
meul moffrrn fully rximpiNxi. ; 
hedroorm. 2 lukmiv qaraoe 
Vrcw mm. hilK. Nr* orarhrx 
LH7.50C 1 Trl.Evni Wends Ol 
422 1588 


CHATEAU. In me Dodurgue wilh 
IS inuiir-. m live main houvr 
nn 9 in ine vrothkin 150 
arres mlh a 17 arr* lake 
1.850.000 FF 4 ho Farm 
bouv. in ihe same regmn 
Charles Lim «1 & Marvtvad holK 
■lor>. Pnrtu.iv. uanLur. Oxon 
Trt *02357 1 4 321 Tlx 837796 
COLL \ FAX 02357 69037. 

PLATA DC PALS. Cnsia Brava 
Fully llilinsherl .mri muipprxl 
Mudlo in small mropm w«h 
IH114. lOOOnv (ram beach and 
gnir rowrve C9250 QN O 
Orl-uK Irom f.«H LK Bn ne. 
HQ illUi RI2. BFPO 34 Tel. 
01049 2114S1SS2 


ALGARVE 

PORTUGAL 

AFvbvobSxPanaraduaediOCa- 
wn uaty accne to Faro BTOPL 

-JlCTUlttUI kUOTXJOl 

-vceommodotan urge prxBsgu- 
dere. VMOimnQ ooat «Ho ntoOMf 
aecced gma* v«a tor HmmMc « 
anew rxxrwmse- 
Fmi otUb on raQtfM. 
Cornacr 

LeouniDMmyaeOnfSUS, 
8/9 Dock Streal, 
Newport. Beast 
Tet (0633) 213351. 


ALGARVE ConoerUnn Partd- 

viurse Pc u Berl v PBtWJ 

L Metvsiv .* range <8 » 

1260000 For uve bnrf. 8T b* 
Free min’. TA'- -KI*W 
4110x2 <29 hrxi 


GENERAL 


OPRUS 


TYPHUS. Properiv prahlrms 
noughi or roniemMalina Cs. 
M-nlial ailvne s VL Rrplv lo 


SOOTH OF FfiAHCE, 
MARBELLA, TQKRIFE, 
MERORGA, CYPRUS ETC 

Your own treetuMd. knuy aoan- 
ment, mb from orty ft. 694 once 
only paymeni lor 4 weeks |0tni out- 
ngfil mmershp- * uroque new 
conceoi n overseas purchase, se- 
cure uwasrmotf. unbeatable vakre 

ananroRLo 
PROPERTY 
RESSTEIL 
fretBDst (Oept n 
SmUbvI ftbrnavskfe. pvm 7m 
Tet (0784) 44234 <24 h is). 


PORTUGAL 


4RRh 


FRANCE 


eQftGURD Domouc. Numn TtlS nSHM 

mis nnnsrs a mouse-. iur T* ,, 

sale, n-nov.iledoi loin- reiKAai SI Al 

iH \lllarlive onres Pv mnle rLiiuii.j- .1 i 

L IIVIMUBIUCR ARCCHCls. 7 t«TPOXrVB OK* 
me v .. (m Hugo 87500 (tn cnmrcrtKja 
Six nns la Prxi-ne. Fr.inre vestments ana 

MCC. rsr i mversny in viperb qtBtotel! EnA 
lum k. oiti nr -ml luiue inr.irs irxv. mw wST 
*' , Ur oaiimanoi v ievvs me, ol, Irtn 

A B.IV OOsgminUI Drawim, 

ini rradnn hash et. vnr. rfkmi on 706 35588 
rtt rr 1 million or dK> 6664 
Sami OF FRANCE. 17th rrmu 
rv nrmse Reuo, ahxl by anm lo ALCARVC ISM. 
•1 hndi slamlaul KUrhen/sNIhlg ^ 

rsillnuum C40AOO inrludum .^7 

lure Ol «*an 13QH Irt .ZT- 

ROUSSILLON. »«-rv laraernarar ] 


BELLA ASSOCIATES 

Th« name for property 
in Algarvo. 

F«tmive dnee ol land farms 
for conversion, luxury Mbs. in- 
vestments ana advee. Ow hAy 
qioldted. English / Portugese 
team amat wuCaman Jean any 
awong on 8706 67932 nr B«yl 
on 186 355881. 


.1 hndi slamlaul Kilrhen/sUinig SL .. v!.' M 

li.Mii lusli m .i, ,/sl nil, sHuUm "y’.i. ^, '*'*""" ** s , 

rsillnuum . 1.40.000 inrludum 

Il lure Ol <*3h 139 H IrtVwju ..ro! 1, CHO.KW 

OUSS W .L O N. 'i-rv l.irarrtiarar | 

lei leivra-. gun-| , iiuiia-. tool tails pSSn; 1 

Pv nxii,-.. six iiulra. vea Cnnvet *¥ H . ALGARVE | 

sinn |v rienii.il C5o.rr«0 Trt “ito- i H nti .mime 

•MPA 77^19 *?«. . -mono 


prutw-iK— lor snle in 22 (ora 
rums, uhnnr G M G Propn tits 
Ol ttoh 5144 


srtixl irxMrl 0380 870520 


Sinn |s rienii.il C5cmO trt 
«X92A 77^19 

FRANCE - Ml legmir. roUirtes 
• IsilisHix irom c 10.000 II 
luini- .it.iiume yrorninr. 
\ illnliH 1.10 UI JUS i7 X A 

nraVENCE . Sdnvm John X uut 
ii.ge.Ukn L.i Tibllnxe. 
Garrirtan BAhOO liak-inn \ai 
1 J.llHi- 94 70 79 23 


i nl iililiu-rtf .uirlv .„ n j imri'mS 
Ihillis Haili rmv Valin -r.1 . JVL- 

'«>™ rlmvOv cx 

kll. In-li hruiura aiMI dintnq 

111 sims '.in rooi” r 
iknilnis .um nuvx| orrhara 
\uah-lnn ijiuliu Has fnlurus. 
Liu.1111. lsi.-4-v Iteoo 


COSTA AllSnA.’BLMCA. 1% 
& bungalows. Beach hoot A tfrf 
swatws Umouaflygooti wus. 
freeflow, from Eiifldti ' 

Wide tn 

FREEPOST, 
SOUTHAMPTON 
SOS 1BE 
or telephone: 
(0703) 558910 


Tte Tno 12 Devctopm NlW 
Hum and m»ia you w a redW 
FvNaowi ai toe Cnst Haul IM^- 
nead. Bnton Sue (Off 
3 9 « M4. WSHi tel raAfcW 
te T untsoa SCO yds an row 
SAT I A SUN 50HS88 
ItM-Jpra 

Cnmu rt wrara Caotagot V 
__ Praparv Bwtinq Cuter _ 

T«t (06284) 2193 


COSTA 8LAAGA 

1 bed acarts shared tn gti S 

2 bea aparts snared poritf.187 

I bed mwuvnrtin SU'® 

Befltear to* cost Wp** 0 ' 1 
ilights AnpcoptrttesowWy 
stroked riw iti. Pop*- * 

FEW t MWY 
8 Sttd BB Bead , rea ato jtod b*. . 
Tat 022823 2887 (*«PJ 


buuokca. Piwim topBriy ^ 
nous lintv 

■rtSH Imml ilwhaWte'*" 
siiHi-i. nurd krtiOrtv 
Sruli.gi. nraMUH mgtegjJJC 
jus) txionoonwrOd****"' 

IJlVs ruonaa^MbM 


CraifaHlrarttfl 




















































PROPERTY BUYERS’ GUIDE 


3d 



RENTALS 


JSssS® 1 

§~KSS gS*Ss Sf SWj. 

ig?ts Sag. ; acs&gs 

*■*?■ “■ SffigaaK «■ » 

.ssy?* “UBT SWW ss* “L.swTtF 


^wSEi^^rr 1 5 F»™ 
Mfp»ayiaeaand<umshnl 2nd 

flttenpb6EHa.2noodto 
Mooms + 3ni hed/stuS?2^! 

S ®J**P »*■ bam. ff 
warn w% room. 

E225 mr 

smmi Kats«GTcm sw7 

J$5S SbHbwnjtfmowi m 

sssaYSSi. 7 cs 

wt Wfl sawjmtHt bicten. Co 
MB b months +. 

£295 p. 


.-aSBSSL. 
Tis?>» BABSJPSS 

ST. MARYS TffiUCE u» town. bah. ml, UrgeLdScri 
Voy amaaim 2 bed fw n«ar nsrep/frmg room with 
L«fev«^ctow shoos a lube. J eaiH »s- fompw fatal 


-e dm nat mar 

Lane vOTca. doss shoos & h*e. ;— ~ r~w ■■*« «wm. 
^•/bnng mom. u & tea* Lonu « >«■ 

Anl "O* Mte 6 months + . . ET7S pvt 

wJsbSs., 

w'Sl.fSi'S SSJRTiSftS 

hdy mutated fmeiriSt "BOw a s, aW y room. feip L 

SL'SgU'B.-g 1 SassS'T?'!™ 1 


. 1 non dtoj 03DL 

ttfiK. age. Prater Long co let 

£225 pw. 


«ww icwpoun/tjnni pm 
prdeo. g arage, Long ce fet 
£228 pa. 


r uoi pi 


Doi^las,IycMis&Ixc^ 

PARK STREET W1 

Superb 2 bed flat 2 baths, recep, Utahan, 6 months - 
+, £475 p-w. 

EATON PLACE SW1 

Excellent ground and lower ground floor maisonette. 
2 bads, bath, fully fitted kit, dining room, recaption, 
patio, 6 months +. £425 p.w. 


HOUSES AND APARTMENTS 
TO LET 

ffml?-* “ extensive portfolio of personally inspected 
properties m all of London’s finer residential districts. 
Jptpng from one bedroom fiats at £175 a week to 
W* bedroomed booses at £1.500 a week for terms 
ot six months or longer. Company tenancies are 
generally required. 

For immedisie and professwnaJ attention. 
Telephone either our 

Hampstead Office: 01 794 1125 i 
Or Knigiitsbridge Office: 01 589 2133 j 


A — 1 DOCKLANDS 

gj^Jwdd raopewvmwE gja | 

HOUSES AID FLATS THR 0 U 6 H- 
OUT THE DOCKLANDS AREA 

RESIDENTIAL LETTING DEPARTMENT 
TEL: 81-790 9560 


j Rentals If 

WiatSdM i hew$, SW7 Sonqv Attractive He Centra* boded 3/4 
b« 5 «w. «*■ XL, among & fang ream. 2 Bams, UWy & tts. ab 
i "ggB. to ; CH L ihef Tot, Awl now for tang « la a £450 pw 
OHSIOW SO. SW7 aegw w it thi n bmutfd Sg. 2 0 Mb beds, 
danng tm mm damn am Lg tat wth all marts. Bub ft Stmer nn. 
Comm Grins. Wl HW & CH me Aval now for m tat a £375 pw. 
ousts GATE. SM7 IMy OK, God n tts HI &■ Ken Bfite Bed. Recta 
■rib (faring area. Kd wduM mete, and Bath. G» CH. Qi Vttm d El 75 
p w tor a co let 

OVMGTDff SQUARE, sW3P«K*ftjl 3rd Hnatmexc lot. 1 CWe S 1 sngle 
bemnm. RK8D. Ka MBath. U» ot Ccmn Gifts. Gs CH. L(l And 
now lor bog m in £200 pw. 



Offices eiso at Cobham. Esher. 
Horsham, Oxshott. Weybndge, Wim- 
bledon and Wokng 


Horner HHI 

MAWNGALLTt« RIGHT MOVES /JSJSn*. 

TO LET MW 
BERKSHIRE 

10 Mins M4. 30 mins London 
A secluded family residence 
situated in 64 acres offering 
luxurious accommodation, 
superb recreational facilities 
and magnificent views of the 
countryside. Short or long 
term let, available now. 

Tel: Jane Suter on Ascot 
(0990) 25218 


iHi 


BAYSWATER, W2 TOWER BROKE, SE1 


Spaaous newly decorated 
maaonano with garden. 3 
beds, baft a en suite snwr 
rm. Dbts recap, super kn. 
ch/diw. Aval b/34 £230 
P-W. 

Netting HiB Office: 

01-221 3500 


ALBERT PLACE. W8 EGERTON SONS. SW3 
Pretty house m quiet St 3 Immaculate maisonette. ; 


Mt 

Home 


Haw beautHuBy furnished or 
unfumohed top quafity 
bouses and Hats lor long Ms 
m Chelsea. Kensaigton and 
Wimbledon areas.. 


Hnmo 01-ZS 1822 01-MS 8447 
nUl I IC (CHELSEA) IHimOON) 

Property Management Services Ltd. 


ROLAND aUTOl 


Gpacnn mate 3 beds, bath, 
dbie reept kit, roof lerr. Aval 
now Long Co Let £275 p.w. 


hranac 2 dbi bed flat. 2 bath, 
due reert. fl wt Avan now Long 
Co LetMOO p.w. 

BH1UVU 

Supeib 3 dble bed Rtf. 2 btfh. 

S e dbk reept R M. Mraoe. 
oelnow Long Co Lei £E50 p.w. 


SLASHED PRICES 
mHCHISBRIDOE 

Sormamey l BMatnrmew Rmp. 
US m mu Wlr 5emred Mod 
CdM(*ie*v nrhrtwiinliiTOehtai 
SevccsnMr WadSttaniwwt 
nasrMtj lanriy sennas CitarTV.24 
Is bbw*v* CH CHW CMnemqi 
wrwini neegac Wort 
i™swttns 

E325 M fanlr 050 *■*) 
AYLESFORD A CO 
01-351 2383 


BARNES, SW13. 

Self-contaired fiat 
available immediately. 
Reception. Kitchen. 
Bathroom. One double 
bedroom. £90 per week. 
Company let 

Teh 01-878 7766. 


PfHDRY HAIAGBEST 
8FKEV6BEEN 

Offer Soiecrion tram 

currant Bsl 

W14. ES95 pw 
Laras ramify hso 
KEW.£2Upw 
Lvge Vtctorfen use 
STRAWBERRY HILL, 
Tnrickanfcam dBO pw 
ribediewnhse. 

KEW SONS. E1G0 pw 
3 bad flat 

HAM, Richmond £146 pw 
3 badmnd mod hso. 
PUTNEY tnO pw 
Mod 2 bed Hat wth balcony 
For Further dmsria 

Tot 848 4555 


CENTRAL 

LONDON. 

Property owners list your 
flats to be let by .us. We 
have the finest business 
exBctdives tar your 
property. 

0ft)35 7622 (T) 


SOUTH KEKHGTOH. 

Beaubhri. sunny maaonettB »ntb_ 
flna access to pnvate gardens. 

3 beds. 2 en sute banmoms. 
magntant receobm reams, 
ideal tor en terttring- Newly Hbc- 
oraied. new MWe tateben. 
AvallaMe now lor a mranmi 6 
mths a £2.100pm. No Merits. 
Please pimm 0908 SB K1 m 
SS252S/4SS everriags. 


tenWG YOW HOME? PRONE FOB OUH HBJPFUL BBOCHWE. 
ASffiEY BMDBB, WESIMRSTEB, SWL HgMy momneaded isparb 
w»i W adjacent Westmnsa Cait*draL CifW, podef ote. ttnao hafl. 
2 bedfooms. large siting room, tidy apprancad tauten, badrani^mm. 
Oas cm. tea p*. 

HUUMGHMI COUITr MARSNNIS. FBUMM. SW&. Overtootog Mw Parit. 
/tas newfy decorated and carpeted inansxn flat mm be seem HNl 2 
bedrooms: sting room, koten/ftw. tathmom. tffiS pw. 
SI0BROOKIMMB. FBUMM.3WS. BnidHiricoawsiaofbl ctose shops 
and tobe. Hal 1 double bedroom, lomge/ttaier. urtea batnom. Gas 
C/R KM p m. 

IBUffla PRONE KOW FOR 00ft FRS LOT. 


FINCHS 

FULHAM Large luxury 1 bed flat £120 p.w. 
FULHAM Modem 2 bed flat, ail amenities. £170 p.w. 
PUTNEY Large modem 3 bed flat Co Let £180 p.w. 

Ol 736 5505 


KENSINGTON, SW5 

Bright 4th floor flat in brand 
raw conv e rsi on - Sunny ele- 
gant Recap. FF KK. 2 Dbie 
Beds. 1 Bate, £250pw. 22S 
1972 

MAIDA VALE. W9 

Stylish Intodor desrignod fiat 
In newly re nowated penod 
house with Bt 2 Beds. 2 
Barts. 1 Racep 4 FF KB. 
E30Qpw. 722 7101. 

BAY5WATER. W2 

Smart bright & spacious 3rd 
floor flat in good piKb. 1 
Bod. Bart. FF Open plan Kit. 
Bafcony. Lge Recep. Attrac- 
tively decorated & fafnohed 
throughout E140pW. 727 
7227. 


MSKTOI PUCE. nrt. Lower 
gtl fl flat dec to very tetfi stan- 
dard. Dbie bed. recapt (fin baH. k 
ft b. Patio gdn. £165 pw. Com- 
pany Let 

MMUCO OFFICE 
01 634 7316 

iii— n cuke rencr. 

Weil dec Town JsewriiMCbded 
com grins. 3 beds, racapt/dm area 
oknsng gtes. study, fl W. 1 
bath, l sbr rm. Pam. £275 p.w. 

WEST LONDON OFFICE 
01 60S 2426 


Gascoigne-Fees 

» nw »i w ii 0 

/ •. . *" ’A 

IB— BMBHS HEMS. MB 
fawns wtin Mob Mr tea- 
mb) n dahfrieu nsdeneol m 
3 bus. 1 wen. 2 Mte. FF M 
an) ape AM m far long Co. 
UL COO |M 


beds, 2 baths. 1 reception, beds. 3 bafts. 3 reception. 
Hchen/dinmg room. £500 gw kil/b fast. 6 mths. £600 pw 
RUTLAND GATE, SW3 ROSARY GDNS, SW5 
4th floor flat 2 beds, bah. Newly refurbished flat. Bed- 
doakroom, reception, kitchen, room, reception, kitchen, bath, 
lift & porter. £400 pw £225 pw 

ORR-EWING ASSOCIATES 

01-581 8025 


BROOK GREEN, W14 

1st time on the maricet this prestigious PENTHOUSE flat a situated m 
a modem complex dose to the many amenities ol Kenssi&on. The 
accommodation comprises 1 Dbie & 2 Sgfe Beds. 2 Baits (1 en- 
sate). Cloak. Febuious Recaption Room leung to West Facing Roof 
Terrace. Fully fitted Kit/Break Room with all machines. Underground 
Car Parking. Amiable lor long Co let £650 pw. 

BRITTON POOLE 8 BURNS 
01-581 2987 


NATHAN 

WILSON&CO 

64 RQSSLYN HILL. 
LONDON NW3 1ND 
BELIZE PARK M.W3 
ChamuBg Ethanhan gardra 
flai offeriDE 2 brrfrrai, 2 
buhnns. (nozing recep ate* 
umb fireplace, modern 
kbrten (all maebraes). beaim- 
fol icduded edn- Z275p.w. 

HAMPSTEAD, N-WJ 
Bcaiinfal interior designed 
manonene. Lux kttjimer, lge 
recep with waking fireplace, 
maui bedim with enraitc 
baihitn, 3 ftaibcT bedrm, 2 
barfarm, gpeu »c Lardy 
roof len. wilh amatnn views 
of Loadan. WU futnah to 
me. £35 0 p.w . 

HAMPSTEAD, N.W3 
FitmloDt Viaormn terrace d 
bse with pario/gdn (doing 
unique accommodation. 2 
bed ran, 2 bathrmi (1 en 
unite). Dbie volume recep 
area, lge Lv./nudv country 
kintenfifining no. Newly dec 


BMV6Bn,nn 
Bare MW rod caanrog naam 
tend Mm taw * w«y an- 
umm 2 ban i mt, 
Mbs. FF U and on Art now, 
to ka, Co L*l HS ew 

ooraaont sw7 

Vwv art decnaH H n note! 
Met data b Be MOUWK t * ; 


SSandFTke am row to bag 

Co LA. £225 pw 


01-7308682 


BARKS, SW13. 

Lovely first floor flat 
o'lodidng Tliames. 
Recep. Kit Bath. One 
double and one 
single bedroom. £140 
pw.' Company let 
Tel: 01-878 7766 


HANS CRESCENT 
nOGHTSUUDGE 
I onto. S.WA 

a sAMaa a nnaaaae RAs Al 
m os anted and tonabw B> kgb 
*r*nt*» hAy Med UcAdh aad bn- 
mas MMM 

• 3 bahwm 2 anptoa. btov 
mow ctaamom. tatem ESlfaw 

a 2 katoaia duaro mrton. 2 

Mbmooc. uom £550 pw 

• 2 bahMUt. *uUb nopaat 2 
toSMano. UcMn E5D0 pw 

• 3 aakoaro nraan. toam mb. 

• bjoan om . ttanm ritowi' 
£390 pw 

• Batoom. fttapMa I M Wiwmi . 
lakea £250 pw 

C oapro i fata to» 

a * 

■letting m 


AROWB TOW 
m him pm am. vm 
BARNES, nra 

WM convotted 1st floor Rat in pe- 
riod house. Lovely taction. Eton 
a River ft Hammeraiwb Bridge 2 
Bedrooms, Louige/ Reception 
wtta men firBjte*. Wt ft &am. 
Roof Tenace Co let 1 yr El40mr 
HOLLAND PARK. W11 
Spun newly decorated garden 
flat 2 Bedmoms. Mu Recaptm 
wed equmwd W ft Bti. StyteWy 
fwnshed. Paw toads (Mo Cum- 
mini Gardens Co Ms ElBOpw 

01-229 9960 


ihrougban- 1 400 p.w. 

THIS IS A SMALL 
SELECTION OF OUR 
CUR RENT LIST INGS. 

WE RECEIVE NEW 
INSTRUCTIONS DAILY. 
CALL NOW FOR 
DETAILS. 

01-794 1161 


THE VERY BEST 
Larilinb 6 Tuaats 
cans to is for 
BELGRJWH. HAMPSTEAD. 
KBtSMGTDN. WHBtBMM 
and sradar areas. 


OVERSEAS PROPERTY 






*dSvlrU_ 








* * I . . ■' ’ 1 


\*1 nv 


. -B. r l, *'j " .-i I 4 > 
|t! "" 


Sixty-three acres of woodland and 
gardens -and only seven acres for 
development.. .that’s the Marina 
dei Este. 

A little over an hour’s drive east of 
Malaga, the Marina, with 326 berths, is 
positioned with exquisite care around a 
sheltered bay- with enticingly luxurious 
apartments in a garden setting. 

For more information, please contact our 
London sales office at 150 Regent Street, 
W1R 5FA,Tel: 01-439 6288 or the Marina 
on 010 34 58 640 400 (7 days a week). 


£tZc 


AJatoKOK Rrarkme aTGiaorata. Spate. 


SPAIN 


COSTA BLANCA- 

Visas, apartments. 
Bungalows from 
£11,000 to £260,000 

Regular inspection 

flights 

Phone: 

MOHTERftANSAII 
raoMonoNS ltd 

For brochure 
<0706) 2 1 ® 32 * 

{24 hr answer service)- 




m 


JAVEA 

\ M invlkfil kYdUM 
urn »mi h'jorft* 1 
\O.JddnlA hnh - 
- Lit%«|>i Lj»|r liW 
. |ii|i tmffcu.riirai 
4n (ij\ jnd pjrara 

uLrid^L-raTaUdd- I- 
Mfur, 1 uaL uv vumriwy 
w\iai luHi hmmbrtl** 


iw.suTvb \cr«n> 

JfiuNLTUeMW 



| COSTA DEL SOL 

BAffflHN APAHTNBSTS 
AND TOWNHOUSES 
FROM £35,000 WjgM- 
nmfCT FROM DB/Rfaffl 

Luxurious, high 2 
bedroom apo»i«*wW " ■J*® 

SR-sijS 

SSflSijac 

free inspection 
flights 

TO OUALFtO BUYERS 
mu ng miffl 

. idtAi S hwjroom 

®^gnrti--S 

SSSSs- — s 

*5* IU S JJO -4BI iTl 
CO»T* , D«j ^ 


SOTOCatANDC. supem tmual 
la,alion iu«4 atone old ocli 
rourv Four doable bnfa. wn 
mih iMlhroom. Larv Prt'^ 
garden >*iin cwimrmmi poo* 
cieaooo ono. TN Mn Ed- 
uvinh on- Ol -802 32cO 


SWITZERLAND 


Mlatonkpn 


tmi Lake Geneva 
ft MecmtMn reaorta 
WfamwBgriWPfa: 


HUH, IB a«HBl «*■; 

ss*as 

■JJSSt.OWBtW 

S?rtW6M-teB?a» ^ 


tht >w» affSREZ 

Mrirtv • J "L*55? P 00bi«i wvri. I 
iw, iw»«3 teToiaro! 

I IMIIWMI 1 


GREAT INVESTMENT 

16 wasxoro town rams arHoatvy 
life Own Honda BeauMubr bua 
wgniMdiaoto oiMiwimm 
D asai Haranhv end 300 yanto from 
m« wiMe sanoa a Tm Out oi Mei- 
c o PMedbomCDailBMUW 

wrt no money dfiwn e<toep<o)K\ 
K* sas Dy negovwwi 

FOR FREE BROCHURE CALL 
PI-4467444 
OR WRITE TO: 

RAF ENTERPRISES, 

P.0. BOX 1255, 
PFNRABfflA. 
FLORIDA 32596, USJL 


WASHINGTON, D.C. 

interested n puttagng propany 
m ihe wastengau area? 

Phase enact 

| Dhrint HMhfa#M GoBar, 
IM Estate Brake trite 
VLB ft AJL till* Ca. 

Oct 14ft. 

The BMflM B1-5M 5253 


new YORK STATE, non Cana, 
llrf. 40 arrefc ST-fiOO- anorito 
open vainwed vim 3000 
N Or.ien Aw 4 ftlv Bctu rt 
S54TU IK* ' 


TTMESHARE OVERSEAS 


YOU CAN BC A COWBOY or row- 
ipil 72 davVKVwr A pari 
owner <4 hp rt a large came 
lanrh Ui lire in an out 72 
do-> Untniure tree arfonuno- 
■Uiion ei an 1 year on iwv own 
iA.un.ma idiiie fanrti Earn 
v«ai mu will aho receive sub- 
auiiiim diiUKwto from the 

until pintrab Mmunum in 

vesbnenl SI 1. 700 00 per 
workinu inieieu limnlune 
Edineti. miemaed panm onlv 
please For infwnidiion wrao to 
T X l . Rrwuim Ud.. lbl 
King Si i eel AWTriem. Scot- 
land. Til *0224) 640889/S. 


LAND FOR SALE 


1 2 ACM rvnittmp pUM in ihefij 
nomas Lnauirles lo vliuip 
•gents, on >090B< MUW 


OVERSEAS PROPERTY 
WANTED 


ANDORRA. Warned 4 small 
a pm Irani! DHaWOHm Be 
BK 10 BOX T42 - 

WAMTXDSruU i IJM 2 twin Vll 
la nearbwne. nnueen Marbella 
a e«*hmmu let ur jotua 
•0204) -W270O 


Chanrang brand new 2 bad 
house mm from City. 6 
months + £150 p.w. Parkng 
ft garden. 

Docklands Office: 

01-538 4921 


VETRERBY HORSE. ASHHM 

place, Lena sw7 

E xc ap U o na By an i at- ii ve 1 ft 2 iwdroom flate w 
soaemua penod conversron. Each flat has ac- 
cess lo communal gardens, many have 
terraces or pnvate gardens. 

Fun £300 per week 


PALACE COURT, LOUDON V2 

Elegant and spacious 3 ft 4 bedroom apart- 
ments with Buceflem tactics ndwkng 24 
Mur porterage, laundry maid and secretarial 
services, and ctoM to Kenungton Gardena 
From cm per week 


BBtSTSL BOOSE. LOWES 

SLOAK STREET, SW1 


SanWEATStel 


Excellent newly decorated Cbawmng maisonette m 
stuao mnutes bom Sioane ciuractariui mews. 2 bes- 
Square. Avariaoie lor co-lat rooms, i rocepocn room. 1 


1yr+ £150 p.w. bunroom AvatiHa now lor 

CO let £325 pw. 

nretiA com, va motooub stseet, 

BeauMul mtenor designed BELSRAV1A SW1 
apan meiit wi eacaitew res*- Recently returoisiwd maraon- 
denual pa rt ol Kenangton 3 «tt«. 3 bedrooms. 2 racetoon 
oeorooms. poupw reoepnen rooms, i baitiroom + Sctoak- 
7° , !^ > £. hs £*: 1 «*“*ioom. roams. Avariabte now cote* 
no " v*** V* 6-2* months £400 pw. 

£500 p.w. 

. Ta »icw these properties today please rise 
Kristin, Judith ar Peter oa 01-235 9641. 


BELVEDENE PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 

To lot. Jfl super!) S hjKv fumsned Comoanv. Fgnnfy or STiaror lets mm 
mcluswe ol rates ft management! 

h Canary 4 Bad Mattson m Deauulul 

uarade Flat CStSoem. 
rad &uda Ml £495acm 
u tnaoonme £<45paa 
iUKto nai C-iZSKm. 
louse. ESTSpan 
maaonetn. GdSOpcm. 

Long or Snot ram Ms. 

FuB details. Ring 07375 51273. 


A SELECTION FROM OUR REGISTER 

6 Arlington Street. London SWLA 1RB 01-493 8222 


BROMPTON PARK, SWS 

Wro* rm retire IwutK Sirmy ? brt TUI. I irtrp. tuPi. fl hit. ML 
mtetits gym. guoi. sauu & cctouni f?0D pw 

CHELSEA. SW10 

Sctny nrwj nw ItniK OK S turn lv inrp II Hwft pjJimcS. 2 
C»r beds. 2 sain M r"J cpraiir Lull pw 

ECCLESTON SO, SW1 

Swrh Is) lb fj! o>i<abi.ig romni-nal with own irrm tl 

ftjwirx] pi wft catcony 3 bm. tuft eft.-., bar hen. hfl 
pw nra 

MAYFLOWER COURT, SE18 

MwJntn «r1 lircDraicd ntaAonrtfB with Rww W fipm hjr iftto 
rrmnnn Sunny KilCtcn w.ft machines. 2 Mi. bMb. FREE PNWMA 
E17t> pw 

GREEN ST, W1 

Sunanq 3rd fit IPtFUnttSHED nuKcnettr 2 supetb rrnrfi 3 ON* 
Me 3 b4l l » [7 mate), fl fatclvo with all nuriwv:s pnvilrkK IftU 

"** DOVER HOUSE RO. SW1S 
bnpmaMf drreiatrd tjfrtty rise CLOSE TO SWEDISH SCHOOL 
Lounge. tVjtg im. lge lutcten/biast im. 4 bedi 2 bUlt. cAl gjragr. 
gsrim £500 ow 

ROSSCOURT MANSIONS, SW1 

Mtutiirt 41b in Hat ? finds, cnatg tm. lounge, fl kdrtn wfli 
itucfinn, lum. un $750 pw 

PENNYWORN RD, SWS 
Slunrang np*ty bob pmilHnae with UaibuK mews 2 beds. Irp reap 
1i Fncbcn wth ti mac tunes oatn ^valtift 1 yt £?2b pw 
UUDLORDS Why not imp us jtBut voujeranlv in KENSNETON. 
CHELSEA, BELGRAVIA. WW8LEDQN ft PUTNEY. We Dflrt an eftCKht 
potFSSioital. but personal service 

MARVEEN SMITH ASSOCIATES 
01-727 7057/937 8801 


y KXCardale^S 

Iwr Groves 

REGanS PARK, ra 
hMM 3 Bed artmt m w 5» 
raof pbb Hnrty tehti to i ragn 
swuid. Evty w u w n g Rcmd 
EHriL Recto An. Mrt. 2 DUe 
i Beds 1 Site Bad. BKfi. CArm. 

i E42Spw Ld 8 l ton»r 

OUfflBGATE. SW7 
A sutaaon ol srowtriy hmidhed 
128 3 Bed aoaBite aU (e»r«B 
fieuHhri tort ft btfvm No n- 
pens« tos baan qand n crating 
nomes (t (togmea. kMI to 
wreBinng. __ __ 

Rwrials tom £385 - £1.430pw. 


wm 


BIRCH ft CO 
01-734 7432 


VBITMG LONDON /PAMS Allen j 
Bales & Company hair a tame ! 
MHkYfwna( llate A houses aiail- ' 
able tor t weefc4 from CZORiw 
499 1666- 


WESTMNSm MMlir 3 bed 
flat within I he Divnlon Bed 
area 2 rweMMtti rooms with 
baWonM ExreUenl comUUoo. 
MOO p w 730 5439 iTl 


WEST PUTNEY. Attract famtfy 
> hw m quirt rn id. 2 imp. a 
beds. 2 baitn. ui/brh. lituiry 
I rm. gdn Long let £260 pw. Tel 
. Pippa 788 7884 Warretrv 


YORK ESTATES are you con- 
fused, lost and bred ol lootonq 
lor a home lo rent in London? 
Don't be. telephone the rx orris 
on Ol 724 0336 


BAKER S1KCCT Inlfitoi decorM- 
rdSBed 2 He« m rial at ailaMe 
lor bnvwshatl let Call Owner 
242 3251 iTl 


BEHR « BUTCHOFF (or I usury 
properim in Si Johns Wood. Be 
rnl% Pars MaMa Vale. Swhs 
OKI A Hammlead 01-586 7561 


GLAPHAM rsrtn lube 4 mlrts 5 
bed hse Pro! na/f. Croup or m- 
dnniiiai let. Aopx c»2 per rm 
pw 828 9573/ 672 0967 e\e 


HICHBUBY Sunny Id lloor */e 
Hal ox rrtoofcirsg i e-fate Lou nor. 
dbie bed. K a B. lulls equipped, 
rmuung. £9fi pw. 01 226 o234 

KENSINGTON SWS Brrohl. 
ftmriul flat Peter Jones lur- 
nistn-fl 2 hedroomv recpl. k A 
t>. £.125 p» CM 581 4103 


BUUHLOWES ROAD Enormous B 
Bed flat in P/a 2 R eon ns. 
Kll/Din. 2 Baths. ffiSOpw. 
Ben hum « Reeses 936 3522. 


■Wl - SI Georprs So BrtpM. 
clean, (urntshed Mudio apart 
nwni Heiidenl Porier Co L«. 
£135 pw. Tel 589-2110/2116 
W14 Bn oh 1 2 room Hal . Quiet sin- 
gle arson preferred C95 per 
week- Tel Ol 603 9131 
(niwnpi 

W HAMPSTEAD. 3 bed 2 MUi nai 
* too' odn. £250 pw. ^ Go let. 
Other pro*® ?? 

01 p24 0404/ 626 4667 
1VAIUUU MOW Luxury nauft 
houses C200 U .000 pw Tet; 
Burvrss 581 6136 
CHELSEA ttgfcl lux brtcenv Hat. 
recep. dbie bedroom. un..Dor- 
Irr. Long lei Ol 622 SB25. 
DOCKLANDS Flah. and housn to 
let ihrooghoul rhe Docklands 
area. Trt'OI 790 9360 
■ DOCKLANDS Rate andlsousrt ip 
lei ihroughoui ihe Dortlanris 
area. Trt 01-790 9860 
M12 3 bed house. GCH. TeL esc 
"Smd OWO pan Tet. 01 446 
2828 west 

NWt. Mooeni luxura- 9 b*d 1/1 
tfad Ch. P/b block. £130 pw. 
TPM 446 202S 
Wl Nr SeKrutpes. Block w«h lift. 
lounpr. 2 dbie bedrwv all ma- 
SuSZ C22DPW 01 209 0173 
Wl- Modern pemhouse mats 2 
beds rni ras s ». Ch»e Warren 
fit tube £200 pw 389 STM. 
WIOl Kensington 2 tBJft bed l/l 
tut C*> Ctoviotube. £t«Opw 
T.P.M 446 2025 
WE LET FLATS AND MOUSES. 
Craniaci Rirhard or Mkk Dasn 
Vtoollr N Co 402 7381 
WIMBLEDON Opp Cmrnon. ? 
bed lullv lum lus flat OCX. 
Gge £650 pem 01-788 2060 


EATON NEWS WEST. SW1 
SwrymewshOBseoisepaoioei. 
bon. 2 ban. 2 inita. 2 ractHM&. 
Ucten & gnga. Aval now to 
finriM. ExnfiMwIue at £350 pw. 

WILTON ST. SW1 

Woratotnl (amdy home ol sirinon 
ml propnaons n tho heart of 
Betoam 4 bods. 4 bate. 3 recep. 

Uni till ewnrtng. b last m. 
mol ran. Aval la On a tljOOO 

01-981 7646 


HIGHGATE 

2 bod flat £150 per wMle 
t Wl. 

3 stuflo fla re. Ei3 5 perVraak 

UGH. HOLDER 
LETTING ft 
MANAGEMENT 
01 883 3255 


l l iN w bwmptdipw 

^rWlSr'” 

■ lltUiiM cnnslrr 

dm t West Brawn 
UK NKTO* MC OH BCd MMU + 
jarawms jDKBbob »K I yt + 
Co la. HU to 

hooSI 90. SM Tar bsa ad ton- 
Sto Ha to recta * l»-h + tomg 
an iosm 4 teds ?dHs M + we 
-tWtil imBDWettea Mbs 
Md r yt e Co 1U £700 to to) 
FWmBHl B. IBB Prana tot re* 
dMlteAl teiimmsu 
* dnnqannKWfi Beds idW.? 
KHrifa DM -e sea loo NCMliMr 
ri KMfa Co let. £»5 to neg 
Bswre m. sn Netot cawawi 

bn m* dose Pw Gm ur til 
reap + dnng JR9 to sm 4 mod lit 
+ j> nucteacs * tolflaunsul*. 
? bdh + UtoS. til mom. 2 iwri latr. 
gin KM I yt + Co let £3S0 to 


BAKER ST, VI 

Stunning flat offered in impec- 
cable decorative otter. 4 
bedims, triple reception. 2 bafts 
+ sbwr im + sop wC. Designer 
kiteten. MUST BE SEEN. 
Long 1st £800 pw. 

Palace Properties 
01-486 8926 


12 HERTFORD STREET, 
MAYFNR.W1 

$r*e ire pleased m nuance ftc 
aperang a t Herttoris where we tan 
oPff a selecbwi ol hnwy Studo. t 
8 2 Bed apanmeQB mvcao 6 days 
to 24 hour pwtoage. 

Mr iovto yoa Ip rame 
ateag ft view 
HERTFORDS 
01-483 0887/409 2373 


CADOGAN STREET. SWS Charmino 2 Bed flat an the lower 
ground. Newty redecorated. Sitting room. Kitdm BaUvooro. 
£250pw. 

ADAM 8 EVE MEWS. W8 Attractive period detached Mews 
i house. Sitting room with double doors to private patio (pr- 
dea Kitchen. Dirang Room. IMty Room. 4 Bedrooms. 2 
Bathrooms. Studio Room, ESOOpw. 

CADOGAN SQUARE, SW3 Large Maisonette available unfur- 
nished. Currently being redecorated. 5 Bedrooms. 3 
Bathrooms. 2 Lge Reception Rooms. £T.750pw. 


MAYFAIR, Wl 

Setedm tri rifly turastxd tunit- 
ok stedNK. sauted a om! 
reatotttotoatniiuaaHGniSH- 
mi Sa These jpwtrwws ore xt 
n a newly retoowhad Hock 
tiprexfied dnaign handsome 
woogw ran gates and a matted 
awnyairl ExnsM Wly equmd 
U S lawy stiodanl and vnuld fie 
tiariira ranto execubw settong 
Maytw band a cro mmw W i ua . 
Bereas £t^£350p» 


MONTAGUE SQUARE. Lana 2 
able Bed flat, bruit trinity fur- 

nnhrd with uruzn £390pw 
937 4999/7019 rT> 


HR HARHODS. Superb nrwtj 
done apartment, urar imp 
(Mat. doubtr bMrnam. k ana b 
paint C2500W. 589 1759 


NW4. Co lot. Suprrb fi Bnl. 2 bath 
delhw Good Road luDylldkli 
& wtuily Avad 21/10. £3S0 
pw 203 2222 'Tl 


MASKELLS 

ESTATE ACENT5 

SLOANE JIVE, SV3 

Brghi ft hhoous 3rd fir haL ML 
2 dWe bedims. T baftrm. dtam. 
recep. Indian Ami Now long 
let E300 pw 

ROSARY GDNS, SV7 

Netiy decorated 1st fir Uai tanth I 
dbte bedmv lge recap, drag rm. 
butvm with sfiwr. good kitchen 
Aval now long tet £250 pw 
107 Watton Shoal 
laadaa SW3 2HP , 
Triteptiw 01-581 2210 


RUUDA VALE. S/C. ? bdr. hi rm. 
CH. Tri. Co fa-te only LI35pw 
Trl 930 3100 \ 3204 iGmrgrl 
or 607 2631 nr* iNilui 


MAYFABI HYDE PARK. The 

mtol luxunotte tons/ short k-H 
l/o nrd& brat pnm Ol 935 
9512 m 


Condaaed on page 36 


THE 


TIMES 


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THE TIMES WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 1 1986 


^6 


can 

ssSSr* 1 ® 

sShs£j*c 

nw m « i_ an ddinti f*. 

SSMKfir inc,ude 

Custom™* J gE* number. 
partmeS* notices oe- 

i J^^^^iryou lave 3nv 

!K?5gJ g * * " wtaui* « 

■mr—^QTgtmcni once u hat 
«' n o« our 
byw^2^ lres Dtf # a nmcni 
"> mephonc on 01-481 4100. 


ANNOUNCEMEN TS 

JkLFV mfDERICK 

XNLjK- IU?4VT^*' UIUJ4M 
gr*rnw» How. 
don Xsi^ra %2. ,, "**«™- ton 
OrioC iws* TIkt ‘- *" *»M 

BONE-tef '^^aJpSSS 1 =i?«»i 

SF^^J^-WSE 

lotnta.. «T «£'?£' 

"»»i »« *m,T7?*£ ,w on or 

ei ‘P^T Jhn| i' tri mx>i 

hU 1£E, ?! Hrr ™" 

*-«■ «^5SMTftsr 

WIUrs TM K» a ptm- lo in.. Trra 

SSSvSS^sSS 

Ut«C^! ,V holHTUnr ruj M, 
lo ■ mminiMir jly riloir 

our The Ndl.ooul Bo 

prnttab! 1 .tS?- f or lhr ■ V|NI 10 
mniido ■ TOMS' iruKtitiK-. lor 

Lt; ^ ! , J^' , "* u-un >n •'ondilinns 
i Kj ng?** buy* a ma 

»»*■*** 10 The 

Tonrnanrty. Ch.nr 

P 1 * 1 : NUTA. iS. ^mv Bnud si 

London EC3M INH 

Paul Needham. *vr mve vou 
.i 4s . w-,,, ■ | rthdrf\ loie 10 Sa- 
■an Lo\r Mum. nr 


birthday 


*5- If ImiiMi vou is u ronq J 
«ni want r n no nodi u hniw 

•JJ" 1 m«ai«% hntiq uahoui mti. 

Id r.ii|nt l»i«* j v«r<inq doiiM 
uic 1 Honm i 7fh Iwrlh4dv Wild 
hn* l mm Ali*r ttofriman 


SERVICES 


ASCOT BOX lo lei Reply Box C^O 


CAPITAL CVt prrpjrr high quail 
l' rurnriiluni 1 hjc- ot <s07 
7905 

BURGLAR : FIRE PROTeCnON 

V wire rrrr srnrllv -.Vstem. 
filled in 1 Imjut Ol T* y22*S 
ntUMOBMPi Lmr or Mirnair 
All age*. arras Pair-line-. Dept 
<015> .75 Ahmoluii Rond. Lon 
don U8 Trl C‘l 'V*> IOU 
CALIBRE CVS Lid nMiMMoml 
rurnnilum Vila.- documents. 
CT-UIK Ol oM U8B 

hezm fisher nrmoDuenoNS 

SowSAL 14 Beauchamp PI. 
SWJ Ol Jo? km, twx area. 
Ol 504 414.7 Hnh surer-** rale 
Mon oo-r-5 in great rioiund 
MAHMACC A ADVICE: Bureau 
Katharine Allen >c\ foreign Of 
IP01 pri-unal inlcr* lews 7 
WdlnPI. Ml. Ol 49«< i'S5T 
INDUSTRIAL .Serial Historian 
16 Published bool* wl> Munt 
or k»n l«rm research or i.rll 
Inn rommlMMon 01L-J2 21S2 
PUBLIC SPEAKING COACHMC 
& Surer h 1. riling b\ award 
winning Piihlir "speaker 01 451 
229 2 


PERSONAL COLUMNS 


RENTALS 


FOR SALE 


■RIGHTS OF NETTLC8ED Chin- 
I ■^iirt«ila | .liirt ShiTjlnn - l fv|r k 
nniJisa fiirinlitf’i' rru*»Tr lo n rt W 

0» 11 50 dmiM su»K*s .ilmiw 

■>' ■hI.iIiIi'* iih iinmi^Jidtli’ cfcliv 

fix NHllctHfi. mstr Hralrv on 

rh.mw-. .04011 041115 

Fninnmii >nlh 10202 - 793580 

Tmpmuhi rvion 

7445 Bersrtov Um -0455> 

MO. Or 

AU. b'lirrh.iiii rtlmi <qipnlor 
iiiulilt ■ l.rt -.*■ .11 rial 1. 87 
r.id"MH Q. II on IV London Mb 3 
i*.|\*i**ii inoo.im and oOO jm 
rrnl.n Sill Oriidirr Tel wo 

mt2 

A MACmn et lfT Billiard Tabte 
Pio.ir rhurvion Cadroninnf 
IMI. rsinrd mnrlv Sal of rurv 
Malrlinni Ulr Pool Srnrmoard 
Iuk. Kilh Carpel vnr round 

Co.rxjij lOMii T7ST5*. 
FINEST Mii.ililv 1.001 tar pet. Al 
Ir.uli- pn.iv and under aLvj 
a* .iilara.. lOjv evlra law 
iiinm Mil" reluii.iliLv under hall 

prirr Clianrerv Caiprlv 

Ol 4»i5 iu;A 

SHERATON STYLE Di moo Ta 

Wev rn.irrv. vuVhn.irrtv and 
■lesVv CaU-ninv (ram Vi'illum 
rill nun I I’rniim Lira-. Boiough 
fj«era. k.-nr 073^' BoJSTy 
THE TIMES I79S-X9S6. Or her 
Idles fijf Hand nound iradv 
M prevenlalinn aba 

-smim.il »" ri: so Rommum 
Vi hm Ol r«* o3?J 

TI CKE T S FOR ANY EVERT. Cats. 

biarinmv ELvp Clv- v i.-. Me 
All IHe.lire .inrl vporTv 
Tel R.71 4nl6/rtFfl-04<lS 

A L\ / \ 1V.1 / Onirri 
CATS. CHESS. Lev Mr. All Ihe 
Hire and vporl Tel 439 I7e3 
All mamr rredil rnv 
FRIDGES ' FREEZERS. CooLcrv 
elt Call >nu hue rhea peri' B & 
s iin 01 229 loar/aJua 
YORK FLAGSTONES lor palm A 
dmeuavv LmUMIalmn vole Tel 
Ool C2i OBBl/Ool 231 6785 


MUSICAL 

INSTRUMENTS 


BRQADWOOD Grand Appro! 1 
inala-li lijo ' ■■ar- olil iron 
Iranie k.-pl in :rfirl.inl tune, 
.uni III •■\rrllenl uoodltinn 

II SiOnt >rn ue.ir nfler Trt 
022 ~ 73JA6W or 7,70815 


PIANO cm lard and Cmiard 511 
nr .iiiii Verv i»«xl rontlllion 
L1.07S<.no Ol «I7 5307 *1171 


THE PIANO WORKSHOP FREE 

rredil n\n I I.MT .APR D'.i 
Lim mleresl ran-, pier 2 lean 
• APR »5v..i 6 5 yrarv ■ APR 
I J vvnilen quoiaiionv 

I ree C.iiainque 50 it Hiohsal* 
Rnad. NWS 01 S67 7671 
2 KAUTWVL Be.-hvi.nn Grands. 

rrurveuinv nrvlnimmls aood 
prn e lor quirt, sale 586 4181 


ANIMALS & BIRDS 


LEGAL SERVICES 


CONVEYANCING bi lulli qu.ili 

HrdSolmlnrv LIW ♦ V \T anil 
viandard ■1i<hnrv.nnriili ring 
0244 310308 

US VISA MATTERS E S C.udcon 
LS lain nr 17 RuMriaJc St. 
London Wl til 456 CWI3 


WANTED 


GOOD QUALITY anlHire marhti' 
A put* HI eplac*f Trt- Ol 834 
2270 or urllr- M Oaoar 25 
SulherlaraJ SI reel. London SWI 


C2S per n/ up |n paid lor Mlier 
anrrTrv L26C per rv lor gold 
AII dUm.inil havellerv hounhl 
Mr Hail 01 160 ROM nr Wrilr 
361 Harrow Road Lond-.-n. 
Wl All Enqland coir red 
FREHCH LADY 27. «.,•*« rcnl 
nr vnarn rmlral IniMkiu Ikil. 
Nov Mile Meoeurd. 24 rue de 
Chabrol. 76010 Parrv Tel *H 
48 24 37 49 


ANTIQUES & 
COLLECTABLES 


SILVER 3 Oorrnan lant.irdi. 
8" hliHjed iKfv C.4.RCOIHI Will 
NPlH r«1 081 273 3757 letrv 


OLD bull iM .irmnur Also gieclar 
ular aremuiirj horse R ir 111911 
I.llh Kinphl Tel 02606 321 
WANTED Ldtv.1rdl.11. Vmonan 
and .ill painlcd lumilure Mr 
Avhlcn Ol 147 514*. 667e69 
Garrall Lane. LarlMidd. SW17 
PAINTING - Seavrape bv W 
Cadm.ni DaledJilI B— .1 oiler 
oirr L 500 Tel 08012 3484 
ROYAL DOULTOH Tubl Jim. 
F igunra-v ammah. dt want 
ed Ol 885 0024 


CASH IK 
ON HIGH PRICES 

by sefling your 
Jewsflety-GoB-Cotns etc. 

GANCE 

Rear ol 24 Hatton Garden. 
Linden EG1N 8BQ. 

01 242 2151. 


NEWSPAPERS 
(1 690’S- 1 890’s) 

• Original * 

• Beautifully Preserved * 
FROM £15.00 EACH. 

0492 - 31303 

E JONES 

43 OUNDONALD ROAD 
COLWYN BAY 
CLWYD LL29 7RE 


JEWELLERY TO SELL? 

LoBD estaNBUcd lam*? itof ins 
■sh U pi* chase second hand 
kmeBov *« RilQ* t3T “3' 
Sma to add to our vaned and 

rBrKJrrg cnfcctmr 

«Mk « oB R eimMnce ik- 

ARHOUR-WBCTON LTD, 

43 

Td. 01-483 8937 


DO YOU WORRY aiwut w rul u 111 
liuppeii 10 lour i»l if iou no 
fir >4. Thfitiqhi .ihnul insnranr* 
In irm id* ilie vdiTK' I ntd of III* 
lii.it vimj would rune prnv idfd 7 
bin itcnT iou drnp uv a line 
and see n lull ran 6? done and 
don't lot 9*1 In Irll us vvh.il V-rl 
ni pel you have Replv lo BOX 
<35 

CHINESE S»utr Per puppies, 
strong honed hovK* IrAined. 
lulls iinevnjiaied Parto. verv 
iriendlv 'liw. or pel KC reqtv 
leied 077783 2538/2201 
IRISH Sellers Oiulili' pups P*t 
in show poienlul Ready now 
• O Tel ■ 0039731 6R4 
KITTENS 2 ptsjple loving Bnlrvfi 
Biles lor sab- lo good homes. 
Tel 01-151 5424 levminos 


SHORT LETS 


L.e*HTort Owners 

liriuhl lumtoilolilr 2 bedroom 
L-fn-AwM ll.it .lv.ulablr- holid 
U'h On/km |nw nseau Puce 
UOin tisnpw Trt 0436 
8731 |i 

LITTLE VENICE Mod liunlshed 
1,1 iqM 1 brel flat Lei I omllts 
f.IJSp'v e\rl Tel Ol 727 6181 


SERVICED APAHIMEHIS 

ha nsnigion Co* T \ 24 tu Swr 

Teles GoJIiradum Aparlmenb 

Ol 373 6306 

LUXURY SERVICED FLATS. 

reuiral London Irom L32S pur 
Ring Town Hue Ape. J7J 3433 
LKDL LxriueJir 3 bed Oaf. new 
lura.-uprrhrcteo CH. washer 

maul Rmlh* 373 0753 


FLATSHARE 


OVERLOOK DIG KMIersca Pk 41 h 
pet son lo snare lux llal. o/r 
L55 P'v exrl Tel <3983 522192 


CLAPHAM Oomntnn 2nd orol 
ih/Si M» snare ilal. iO/Ri. 
imin lime AH mnd nw. Cl TO 
prnv xmfi Trimhin* 9167J 
5480 allrr 6 30 pm 
CLAPHAM Common BaUrrwa 
Share 1 legaul Virtoruu house. 
CH. garden, housekeeper, pro! 
onli C4o unfe. 170 lor very 
tar or double Tel 01 223 7262 
HAMPSTEAD Garden Suburb 
Prn male In share masoned* 
tv lib Arrhilerl Own room 
LI 80 pem me Tel 01 609 
9676 <day 1 

BATTERSEA V flar 3 prnf M 
share lux rial New der. fully 
lurn o/r CSC'DW *>*l TeL Ol 
585 2632 alter 60m 
CROYDON. Prc4 F. N/S to share 
mod lullv turn llal O/r Close 
lo E Crovdon BR. ClSOpem 
exrl Trl Ol 656 1668 inn 
FLATMATES Srteclive savoring 

Well .-dub nurrrturtnrx vervire 

Pl-e 1*1 lor app*. Ol 58= 5491 
31 3 Brent pi c*v Rnad. SW3 
Nl 2 n/s lo share 4 ned Use wrih 
2 where All mod roos. gdn 
LI 65 prm exrl Avail now Tel 
349 5085 jfi.n 6 pm 
STREATHAM Pro! M 284 n/s. 
p.r share Ld>n* CH Iter 
nuns BR L35 pw E.xrl Trl- Ol 
677 0495 taller 7pmt 
BARNES room & bath, own 
phone, sluire kilrhen Mon Frl 
arrl CSS P» Ol 87o 0931 
FULHAM Prof M/F n/v lullv 
lurn o/r la share Hal C180 
pt ni mri 751 4025 afUT oom 
HARLEY ftl Wl large serviced 
lied sii rnpnt Prof person Reh 
C29D pm mr 935 0292 
HARLEY SI Wl large serviced 
bed g| room Prof person. Refs 
L290 pm 1 ik- 933 0292 
MARBLE ARCH. F. own rm. £50 
pw r.iso depowl. n/s Trt 01 
260 0610 alter 6pm 
N2. Prol F 25+ n/s loe o/r m v 
.Hirer live llal All mod cons 
£40 pw exrl Tel 01 883 9949 
PUTNEY Studio flallrl in larqr 

hsnne lor quirt lad v £200 pvm 

Tel Ol 215 5457 a work I 
SHEPERDS BUSH I 24 o/r In 
h.velv CH house All Moil cent 
1229 prm me 1 Tel Ol «40 
8338 lexeui 
SW7i M/I. o/r n/s. IO snare com 
Inflame llal £55 / 66 pw me 
Trt Ol 855 1120 

W14 

lux llal as ail now Cl 70 pent 
exrl Ting Ol 602 4463 «s*x 
WANTED L rxjenllv In young Pro 1 
M repiral Lond-sn O/R Tel 
0789 68588 


GENERAL 

APPOINTMENTS 


CLUBS 


L codon School 

Bnd-ie and t'liO- 38 kimr. 
5W3 01 589 7201 


EXCHANGES 


EXCHANGE mi luxury. 4 bed 3 
lutih home in Cnnkham. Berks, 
•it erlnnl mg gob course, lor 
•innlar m Caribbean / Florida 

lam 1. in February 87 Tel 

■ 062851 22535 


LOHDON/Los AnortvS Exchange 
My luxury cm bedroom apart 
menl Central London land 
I.Mtir’' I nr atsarfmenl or 
house in L A preferably Hoilv 
wcmi Hills lor 6 12 m omits 
rnmnienrnei Nov /Dec 86. 
Phone or write T Robertson. 
Clarks 90 ud. 6o/c8 George 
h* London WIH 58G. Ol 956 
957? 


AUCTIONS & 
SALEROOMS 


BOOKS are Bloormhun's buu 
nu» I* you have Inlcreuiing- 
hoof.v |o sell, pfeqve nng David 
hlaqu .11 Hlcomshurv Book Auc 
licxw oil Ol 833 26 J7 


{WOLSEY HALL: Home study for 

OCX. D*«»*es. Prolescaons Pro- 

upreluu. Dopl AL2 Wohey Hall. 

Oxford. 0X2 6 PR Trt 0865 
£2200 i24 hr»>. 


FOR SALE 


SAVE A PILE! 

8 

Reswto Carpets 

Hentabn vrfvxi pae capgmy 

I* plan u*ous EUl m mkhiv 
U m hum yoc* 7 v» wesy 
ouasrtee It* home or oher 
44 73 as wvd Corkopbsi to* 
tie. Natural Zfi 1 ;?5 art* Best 
pire mymwp £885 per sod 
PxdK'gwds Ptos the (vgesise- 
iecitorr of plan atpenia 9 
lonflnn an btc r- e»d«i»s o* vai 
187 Iftnst Rnwmnd RpJB 

Lnrdcn SWM 

Tet 01-876 2088 

F'rt 6-Jmiies tnw» Fffliitq 


RESISTA 

CARPETS 

Special Offer 

Wenlswonn line Bnt^i Wtflrwi 
80'f- pool. 70’*. nvton Very 
heavy wwr qraxJe 13ft mde 
12 plan ootauri hqm smcl 
J13S5 per w yil + VAT 
182 Upper Richmond Rd 
Lnratofl SWM 

Tel: 01-876 2089 

Ftm Bfanaies-Eapat RHaq 


•SAY IT VTTH USE' 
SAYITWmiMARXSOirS 

and choose from hundreds of 
upn^nt and prard |un» for 
sale pi lure frem ontjr £!6 pm. 

MAf»SOI PIANOS 
Albany St, NW1 
01 S35 8682 
ArWtery Place. SE18 
01 854 4517 


AMERICAN BUYERS SEEK 

oais. DU OoBs. Tor* ^nd r«BV floin cfc **6* » F>« 
Clones. Phslw & o ftp. St urts. 
n irlirr Lace Luwis PI Hasanc mu 0 » m«ai Meres a Mnrnimo 
^8lo!w3ilsSw«El»ioarticl« krnwMW cash by rcnm ta Jeerthrr and 

o01 " ‘oS^SSn 5 Sfo* you » *?** V ?£'JT € * nU ‘' 9ttMn 

Own Mon • Sal 9 00 530 pm. 

(MM m Nh Vrtl 


m UpiLBtr OR WATCHES BY REGISTERED * 
• onernff COME IN FOR A FREE APPRAISAL I 


WRING A SPARKLE 

watt huw Austin Kaye pay top price* for good gold jewellery 

"and especially high pnees for Cartret Wan Oeef. Asprey. 
oijqan. Tiffany and old or new jeweftery set with diamonds, 
elnwakfe or rubies. W«dxes too^ A 

' a= F Z!> 4 r~. 



AUSTIN KAYE 

_.:TiCwo ft Co. Ltd. 408 Saand. London WC2R ONE 

***^1^.240 l88aor2343'^THWByrPWreofpW_ 



GRADUATES Ihfe* trainee exec 
iMips aged 21+ required lor 
rtloMished London convullan 
cx AnlKip.iUXf firal year 
earnings *£12.000 Trtephonp 
01 828 2462 


NEGOTIATOR Dynamic, hard 
working. 25/36. lo MUi aur 
yucc*»lul rental Iran Expert 
eiK-e preferred but not etenlul. 
Musi be rar owner Apptv in 
writing Qurartbi COrnlanDne. 
270 Early Cl Rd . London. SWS 
9A*> 


SALES & MARKETING 


CLASSICAL MUSIC The leading 
Com Par I Disk Centre requires 
Saie«. vlaif A good knowledge 
Of CUMral miBM- and an tnler 
evt in outer muWc ar* mrnllal. 
X ou should havr a good educa- 
tion and a 0*9 re lo progress in 
retailing Only people wtlh a 
long term commitment should 
appiv 

Conlen Simon of Berm* on Ol 
379 7cv X5 


COURSES 


OVERSEAS TRAVEL 


MEW LOW FARES 

WORLDWiOE 

AMMAN £260 KARACHI £270 
BOMBAY £325 LAGOS £J30 
CAIRO £210 MIAMI £283 
DELHI £345 HOW £105 
FRAFURT £55 SEOUL £605 
HONG KONGE49S 5YD/MEL £755 
ISTANBUL E 190 TOKYO £580 

SXYLOR0 TRAVEL LTD 

2 OeOUN STREET. LONDON Wl 

Trt: 01-439 3521/8807 

ARLME BOWED 


UP UP & AWAY 

Nairobi. Jo'Burf. Cairo. Dubai. 
Isunbul. Singapore. K.L. Delhi. 
BanakoL. How Kong. S>dne>. 
Europe. & The A men cay. 

Fhmiago TraveL 
76 Shaftesbury Avenue 
London WlV 7DG. 

01-139 0102/81-09 7751 
Open Saturday lO-WMWW 


TRAVEL W0RU3 WIDE 

Sounfl aC»«* and quunre an 
leducnq lain lurt nave i costs. 

1 st g dun etts 03727 0559 
Jtras lo CanaU U5* 6 aooo en- 
Uiaes 0377’ f35^) 
Aosl:'N2 5 <r» Fill eft 
0372742739 

Conrrwrcui Auxm roeodet 

Q 1-543 0711 

TRAvaworan. 

ABTA 72182. Renter d Be 

( ol Tmd 6 Ti 


FUGHT SAVERS 

4fHfMS ftjg l*&n (99 

*Wfi 1114 MfWCH ,-tLl 

FRA.-Uflinr iTT HEW 'TlRl £789 

«S*V» f« NCE 5119 

BW9H -.74 PWA 5H'. 

ins yaws f.\ 

4I»L53 1144 RC'Jf 1>C4 

tHIHD FID 9 V1NC5 SIPS 

HHKA \ 109 WfW» 5124 

WINGSPAN 
01-405 7082/8042 
KBI* 


o/w RTN 
Sydney £435 1755 

Auckland E420 C769 

Jo' Bug £305 £499 

Bangkok £215 £355 

Tol Avtv 6105 £195 

New York £129 £258 

Los Angeles £190 £359 

TOP DECK 
FLIGHT CENTRE 
01-370 6237 


OVERSEAS TRAVEL 


N llnncu/hots 
lo Euiop— 154 * nvw fennu 
■mr. Dmlonul Travel Ol 730 
2201 4BTA I A TA ATOL 


NOT Turkey hefldayx from 1 1 T& 
1 or 2 wkv al beam nolel-. 
J Iid/o r v-artil Ol 526 1006. Ol 
757 5691 <24 hre> 


CHEAP FLIGHTS Curue World 
wide Gill-Edge Travel. ABTA 
Ol 859 SOM. Ring Amp* 


DISCOUNT PANES Worldwide. 
Ol 454 0754 Jupiter Travel 


DISCOUNTED A CROUP FANES. 

L T C. Open SaL 0753 S6703B 


FUGNTHOOKENS Devcnunl 
Forex worldwide Ol 367 9100 


ill! Traxetwne Abu Alol. 


MOROCCO BOUND. Regent 9. 
Wl Ol 734 5307 AHTA/AloL 


SPAIN. Porluoal. Cheapi-U farcy 
Brgqtev 0» 736 8191 ATOL 


SWITZERLAND Scheduled flights 
Ol 724 2368 ABTA ATOL 


LT -Small 8 
InendU— Peimones Irom £171 
£ 189 iB 4 Bi Hoietv (Town or 
B*ach> from L219-C279 iHBu 7 
nights arc om fully Inrl Gal wick 
dav fIMhh Tue/Tbur/Sun 
Ihrounheul Ocl: Transfers 4 
airport lax ISLAND SL'N. Ol 
222 7452 ABTA /ATOL 


AIRFARE SPECIALISTS Sydney 
o/w C4SO rtn £ 760 Auckland 
O/w £420 rtn £770 Jotjuro 
o/w £306 rtn £499 Lot Angr 
lev o/w £2 lo Tin XA05. London 
Flight Centre 01 570 6532. 
AIR Tickets Soeoalnts New York 
£249 L.A £349 Toronto 
£279 Nairobi £329. Sydney 
£769 Auckland L749 Darlair 
130 Jermyn SireetOl 839 
7144 

TEHCTBTE, Greek hlanox. Algar- 
ve. Mmorra Vlllav. aib. 
pensions, la tenuis Hottdavy/- 
< I ignis. hromurB/ Instant 
bookings Venlura HeJMas's. 
Tel 061 854 9035 
LATM AMERICA. Low ml 
flights e g Rm £485. Uma 
£495 tin. Also Small Group 
Hobday Journeys, i eg Peru 
from £5601 JL A 01-747-3108 
LOW FARES WORLDWIDE 
ISA. S America Mid and Far 
East. S Africa Trayuaic. 48 
Marqarel Sheet. Wl Ol 580 
2928 fVMA AccepledV 
CYPRUS /MALTA Hotel* g, Apts 
Scheduled fftt from H'rpw 
Ring Pan WorM Holidays Open 
Sal Ol 754 2562 
EUROPE. WORLD WIDE lowmt 
fares on charier /scheduled Ills 
Piml Flight 01 631 0167 Agl 
Aid 1895 

LOW COST FLIGHTS. MoM Euro- 
pean desUnaimns Yalexander 
Ol 402 4262/0062 ABTA 

61004 ATOL 1960 
MIAMI, JAMAICA. M.YOHR. 
Worldwide cheap**! fare* 
Richmond Travel. 1 Duke Si 
Richmond ABTA Ol -940 4073. 
MPPOHAM Seal vale IO USA -Cl 
nboean-Far EasL Australia. Call 
Ihe profewkinah ABTA IATA 
cc excepted Tel Ol 294 5788 
ALICANTE. Faro. Malaga Hr. 
Durand Travel ATOL 1783. 
01 581 4641. Horeham 68641 
ALL US CI T IES . Lowest fares on 
malor vneduled carrfere. Ol 
58* 7371 ABTA 
EST Fans. Best Flight* Best 
holiday* anywhere Sky Trav- 
el 01 834 7426 ABTA 
EGYPT. Taikrr mad* holiday* 
Daily d*©» Soliman Travel 01 
370 7507 

HONG KONG £488. BANGKOK 

£369. Singapore £457 Other 
FT cute* 01584 651« ABTA 
ROME Lisbon £99 Frankfurt 
Pam £60 LTC. 01328 
3356/01 6S1 4513 ABTA 
SPAIN PORTUGAL GREECE: 
Flfghls Faklor 01-471 0047 
ATOL 1640 Acct-sv/x t*a 
SYD/MEL £635 I*nlh £666 All 
malor earner* lo Aus/NZ 01 
584 7371 ABTA. 

S. AFRICA From £46S. 01-584 
7371 ABTA. 


LOWEST FARES 
Pans OS N YORK C75 
Hjnkkrt £60 LA, SC C355 
Lagos £320 Wan* £320 
fiww* £325 Singapore CJ20 
Jodunj £460 BarxpoA £335 
Caro £205 Kairuertu CA*0 
DelOom £335 Rangoon £350 
Honq Kong £510 Cakartta £425 
Huge Discounts Avail 
on 1st It Chib Class 
SUN A SAND 
21 SwaBotr St. London Wl 
D1-4S9 7100,437 0537 


DISCOUNTED FARES 

jrn.ie rtfunt 

noa f«90 


Jobwfj-Hv 
KaeoSk 
C*fo 
L«3 
Dei Bom 
Bjngwx 
OouAI 


£275 £3W 

£150 £730 

£T*0 CM) 

£Ti*J £250 

£3 -150 

•420 


Afro Asian TravoJ Ud 
182/168 RMftrt SL Wl 
Till B1-43T 6255/5/7/8 

Lur 6 G'g:i 

LV£i ;IS4 5N:*5 


♦ALL FLIGHTS BONDED* 

♦★SAYtTs £’s Cs** 

♦ ★TOURIST CLASS* ★ 

★ ★CLUB CLASS** 

★ ★1ST CLASS** - 

★ ★AROUND THE** 

♦ ★WORLD FARES** 

•VfCy * * ■* 

3Te 9 * 6S iLk'lf * 

;iB7 * 9 4CU.HH 9 

&I.ISC 9 9 S LOlCe 9 

- '*1.2.0 9 * 'LrUIV-’CY 

9 *P7 L';^i£rt 9 

• -■/>► 9 9 Tj-'iO 9 

Vilpria 9 9 Y4U1 • 

I • * clrtlL.'** * 

£LiT 9 9 YSlATvl 9 

-Avi » 9 -‘iVPf 9 

\*;fTO 9 9 VMCC-J.-I? • 

iv.£l£' 9 9 W*V 9 

9 9 ? --AnOS-30 9 

9 9 *CljTH ~~A 9 9 

slw6ru)tra\il 

(Est'd IWl 
South Si Epvttn . Sunrv 
ni5*:'i :?5 -v:«uv:-|ip. 
rfjii '248?; :tiNT 


IT’S ALL AT - 

TRAILFINDERS 


Worldwide low-cosi Rights 

The best-ami oe can proved 

190.000 dients since 1970 

CURRENT BEST 8UYS 
Around th« world from £781 
SYDNEY COLOMBO 


PERTH 

AUCKLAND 

BANGKOK 

SINGAPORE 

HONGKONG 

DELHI! 

BOMBAY 


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JOBURG 
UMA 
GENEVA 
ISTANBUL 
NEW YORK 

LOS ANGELES 


WASmNGTON'BAOTMCRE 


\fc**7:fcu /tirtr 

42-40 Eirta Court Bead 
landon W6 &EJ 


| OPEN 9-3 HOHPfll 9-6 SAT | 

le w g I I ilJ Of-9379631 

mi 01-603 1315 
Europe/USA 01-937 5400 

IAIMmh 01-338 3444 

d — « —■ i UmrtiloM 

aara i*t* iwi;hh 


(SWITZERLAND 

FROM ONLY 

£99 RETURN 

Save with Swissair’s 

Super Apex. 

London to Zurich or 

Geneva daily on con- 

venient afternoon 
flights. And daily 
ilighis lo Basle 
(except Sundays). 
Book and pay 14days 
before departure. 

Slay in Switzerland 
al least until the 
Sunday afterarrival. 
Bookings and full 

conditions from 

travel agents or 

01-437 9573 

swisscar^y 


SELF-CATERING 


LAST MWJTE VILLAS 


•* • » -TV 


C* Travel (Tl 
43 ChMun SI 
London SW3 2PR 
Tel 581 0aS1iS34 8803 
1589 0132 brochure 24 hra) 
4«0l ABTA 


GENERAL 


WEEKEND or W**k.x Moray 
itkkw*. of 2nd Honeymoon* 
Dtvnv rr Hi* Maqtc ol luly'v ro 
nuitijr .-ill** in luluinn or 
VvllHi- r Ca ll Ol 749 7449 for 
ynui TREE cokxir brorhure 
M4W ol Itatv am T 47 Shep- 
iwtib Buvh Gran. London. 
XV 12 BPS 

TAKE TIME OFF to Pan*. Am 
uerdam. Bruw-iv Bruges. 
Cnwvi. Berne. Ijutanne. The 
Hague Dublin. Rnurn. Bou- 
(owu- a Dirpra Time Off 2a. 
I.PvwlKf dot* London 6W1X 
TBO Ol 236 8070 

CROC a MARBEJJLA Superb 
neurn HlUv A 4Db with pm 
pooh Ol 724 7-775 PUV4 HoU- 
ddVS AM 2136 


SELF-CATERING 

CARIBBEAN 


I Lux viiux. jots with 
poof* Av 4.1 Ort thru winter 
VHIoWoiW Ol 409 2838 


SELF-CATERING 

BALEARICS 


MENORCA HoMUy* departing 
Fnday/SahjTdav every week. 
Srpt/Orl from £120 Trt Ol 
309 7070 A 0622 677071 Cell 
K Holiday* Alol 1772 


SELF-CATERING 
CANARY & MADEIRA 


CANAIHES Latuarole Puerto 
drt Carmen High standard apis 
wilh pool available 30/10. Te- 
nerife 28/io no day*) 6/C 
pew* from £249 109231 

778344 Timsway Holiday*. 
ABTA ATOL 1107 


SELF-CATERING 

FRANCE 


AUTXJMN Breaks La m»i*e J or 
Annecy Alpine chalet, set I con 
lamed apart* ideal *kl hot*. Trt 
102421 604130/602124 


SELF-CATERING 

GREECE 


CORFU Bargain* Beautiful del 
villas nr Ihe bearti. 2-6 pr* 
£199 1 wk £229 2 uks In Ort. 
Gal Of H'row 01 754 2S6S Pan 
WorM Holiday* 


l rtvpom Bland*, cheap 
flights villa rental* nr Zeus 
Hot*. Ol 434 1647 AKR AJIO. 

"RHODES lux apart hot* from 
£189 pp 1.48.1 1 Oct Struma 
0706-862814“ 


SELF-CATERING 

PORTUGAL 


ALGARVE ALTERNATIVE 
The lines* house* Ice rental 73 
M .lames 51. SVv 1 01 491 

0802 

ALGARVE. Lux vlllas/apfs wnn 
peefv Sept. Ctrl A thru winter 
01 409 2838 XillaWorld 

HOUDAT BARGAINS 5.1 2.1 9.26 
»-l l.ux aero m Oly Travel 01 
580 8191 ATOL 


WINTER SPORTS 


SKI WEST - NEW! Special offer* 
onta-nupv RING FOR A DEAL! 
AKonlher ain.vringly low price* 
*jamng al £59. a*k for a ropy 
ol our bumper brortiure >0|t 
7B5 9999 AM a 69256 Alol 
1383 


POWDER BYRNE Personalised 
Ski Hvlidav* in Cnndelwald A 
Finn* Chalet. Hotels. Powder 
course. Ski Safari. W/end. 
Guide*. Ring Ol 223 0601 


sn WHIZZ. Eaaltng colour bit* 
chure Oul Nowf Chain price* fr 
£159 01 370 0999 


Top Ski Resorts. 
Lowe*i Prices Irom £59. 
ABTA Brochure Ol 602 4826. 

GREAT Skiing Hot mays. Tift Per- 
son free. January avallabUly 
Ring John Morgan now t0730) 
68621 1 24 hrti 


LONDON 


DDSedU HOUSE HOTEL. 200 

single room. 035 pw PB 172 
New Kent Rd. London. SE1 
4YT Ol 703 4175 


SITUATIONS WANTED 


LEGAL Secretary /PA e xp er t 
rnrrd artn/th. tag. (Lx. lax. 
rfr. seek* posidcm 25 tire wkly. 
Tel Ol 385 7099 


MERCEDES 


CAUFORMAN speofreanon 280 
SE. 1977 Fully loaded, a/c. 
leather, r/tunioof. muse ron- 
liol Superly Ihmunhoul Low 
mile.ine Full sere ire hrslory 
£5.500 Trt. Ol 384 7486 


DOMESTIC & CATERING 
SITUATIONS 


OVERSEAS AU PARI AGENCY 

87 Regent street London Wl 
Tel 4 jo 6534 LK/ Overseas. 
Also m hrtpv/dcms temp/perm 


Coca* £1 1.000 pa OiW 

vvailress/er t.9.000 pa Japa 
m-e sraakritg and 'xpenenerd. 
Required lor hnh class Japj 
neve rectaurant in London Trt 
Ol 499 7903 


Vv.imrd lor re 
tired gentleman in Hampstead. 
Pleasant .vrrnmimdaiion in -w 
noie. garden ILM CTO pv* 
w.— imk tree Tel 01 606 
6371 >Clav<Ot 435 6817 lEvcsi 


PARTY MCREDfAMTS Catering 
SersKe* require a very hard 
•vorkinn expertenred 2nd chef 

age d 24- lor their catering 
♦ itrneii* uv Ballrrwa 6 day 
-a.eek. ularv £10 003 Pa * 
overtime Tel Lucinda Ol 720 
•>W4 

OVERSEAS au Pair agency 87 
P earn I Sirng London W ! Tel 
4 36 n*:-J l k'/O- -iw-js Abo 
ni rtaHps/rk.nv. lemn/perm 


HOUSEKEEPERS 

Lrre-m Housekeeper lequeed 
10 care Id apartment in May- 
fair Oam room, excellent 
conditions Applicant must 
F erode ttre fughest rrterences. 
Salary £1J5-£JM net per 
vreek Apply lo 

Albemarle Nannies. 
138 New Bond Street 
London. Wl 
493 2441 


CATERING 

STAFF 

REQUIRED 

Tftt Victoria 8 Albeit Mu- 
seum new resiauian: needs 
efteetui SmK fat any agei to 
ueneraliy Help Curing ‘the 
tay. We have full nme and 

partime vacancies Beautiful 

suTDufidings and an excel- 
lent lunch provided. Please 
tmg 

Sandy on 
01 581 2159 


SUPER SECRETARIES I SUPER SECRETARIES I SUPER SECRETARIES 


Do vou have An mleresl tn Uir 
third wnrld and round tone- 
Lirul experieiKe? The Dtrertoc 
oi Ihn xponxored orgarusadon 
in SW i rant* an experienced 
P A lo provide a Cub back-up 
handling correspondence, ndn 
use* and report* ntmst 
oversea* travel Hi none* and 
some pcreonnrJ work. Vou need 
lo be oroanned and fk-xHaie 
with skill* Of 100/60 /wp lor 
this rtMUengmg opportunity 
5->l*rv £9^00 Please call 437 
6052 HoOvtones Rec Com. 


TEAM SECRETARY CSOOOtsh 
HQ of dynamir hotel group 
with i me reouuinn seek* dev 
rr and adaptable pa with good 
ccrrnmurUr alive *kllb and fart, 
accurate typing. PC with 
Wordstar Lots of perks. Will 
suit wet I groomed and ambt 
tic us 23-27 vr old Call Maura 
Thomas OFFICE ANGELS Rec 
Con* 01-630 0844 


PERSONAL SEC G9IOOt*h SWI 
wr apart* know about prayer*. 
II you're a churchgoer you'll 
love llu* opening With a senior 
rcrtesuNUc H»X a tav ravune 
with Ms vlvllor* i human not 
sptmuali Season nrket loan 
Lot* holiday* Call Angel Maura 
Thomas OFFICE ANGELS Rec 
Cons 01-630 0844 


i Current 
Legal See a 7 months oonrt She 
wants to hand over tn early Oc 
lobrr a massive CMrlMd of 
bUpallan Educated girts only. 
hw Sue. 'cos Ihe workload ts 
mentally stretching. STL. LVs. 
can Suranhe Dtoiphy- OFFICE 
ANGELS Rec Cam 01-630 

0844 


/TYP IS T £7 000 megoUrtilrt 
cnrertuL confident. arUndaie 
person with goal speaking 
v o*ce and imituniWe 
a rue lo operate busy Herald 
switchboard and give highest 
tlandantt of service to client* 
and candidate*. Goad comma 
meal Km skill* and accurate 
Ivpang exienlial Training on 
Herald given lo any candMatfi 
with several y e a r s 
as fecepUonetl/leiegltPWNL Cad 
Gienna Blarkwrtl 242 9366. 
wax a t - f uwtkf Computer com- 
pany Plrcadllly This young 
uendv environmenl requires a 
swiirhed on recenbonlst who 
will be wining to learn an there 
Is to know about IBM WP com 
pulses and in turn advance 
with (he company as they are 
expanding rapidly An training 
given Arcurale typing 
qmred Would sun ambitious 
college leaver /graduate. Salary 
£8.500 lo Marl Age 20* BED 
NADETTE OF BOND STREET 
Ol 629 1204 
MAYFAIR COSMETICS £6300. 
The MARKETING MANAGER 
of Ihls famous enmajmy is look 
trig for a brtqht young peraon 
wilh 80/46 speeds, lo look after 
him and Ms young creative 
team Vou will be helping wilh 
launching all ihetr new per- 
fumes. so lot* Of liaison With 
advertising people, designer* 
and the pre** for more Infer, 
mauon Mease contact Caroline 
King Appointments an 499- 
8070 

IftnrpM—Irt - Travel Industry 
First rtas» Rrceplionisl required 
for Uirs mamr lournl associa- 
tion. The emphasis 
meeting people, a Ihts very 
busy poQlion involves dealing 
wilh lots of vMior*. Promoting 
the rraht image lor the company 
tv essential so personal Uy and 
caceUrnl appearance are key 
requexle*. Some typing 
preferexL c£7.500 Finesse Ap- 
pointments Ltd.. 01-499 9176. 

■ Rec Consi 

SECRETARY/ ADMIN 
TAUT £7.000 ■ negotiable!. 

Bright, enthusiastic, confldml 
person with plenty of Initiative 
and drive to organ ise friendly, 
busy learn. Accurate typing es- 
sential. WP desirable, training 
given. Adaptable person who 
emoy* working under pre ss ure 
and grtung involved bi all as- 
pects of a computer recniKrnent 
consultancy Gad Qeima Black 
woU 242 9356. 

J OtN TNC 2 Executive* handling 
Ihe inter national side of CHy 
Adv erasing Group wiu open ip 
new A interesting area for 
youno PA/Sec prrt with some 
previous adverltsuig expert, 
enre Shorthand -typing and 
audio must be good and capart 
ly lo lake part in all aspects c* 
client hanon. c-tiaDOO -I- bo- 
nus Joyce Outness OI 689 
880 7/0010 I R ec Con st. 
PER50IWE1 C A REE R too short 
hand) £10.000 ♦ esc benefits. 
A young See is sort lo carry oid 
an admn onenlaled rale within 
ina mfluential retail company 
Involved In aO aspects of Die 
perron net function you wtn 
gam ihe exp lo bald a real ra 
reer Typing at 56 wpm A audio 
ability rat'd. Synery. ihe re 
rrullmeM consultancy. Ol 637 
9533 

ADMIN MANAGER to £14.000. 
This expanding record compa- 
ny n seeking a versatile Admin 
Manag-T carrying oul a IUx 
Imp rovennQ recnriuneM 
salaries, car ftert managrmen 
and many other aspect* of com 
pans admin, you will need good 
payroll exp and lypmq at CO 
wpm Synergy (he recruitment 
consultancy. Ol 637 9633. 
DMM/5EC £10.000 top Lon- 
don architects seek admin 
a»st/sec lo work with perso iu HJ 
manager High quality rafe han- 
dling own correspondence: 
perron net and office admin etc. 
Same payroll experience re- 
queued Accurate typing 
essential. Please call 01-493 
4466 Merry weather Adv hi & 
Srtecuon 

AUCTION HOUSE £7.000 knety 
opening for a secretary with 
some work experience, within 
this well-known company. 
Your rote ® to co-ordinate a 
specials) dept handling Items of 
histone interest Lois of variety 
and involvement Good skills 
i90/50i essential. Age 20+ . 
Please telephone 01493 5787 
Gordon Yales Consultancy 
GET WTO m £8.000 + BONUS 
six months' work experience 
behind vou7 Looking lor a 
move into Ihe bredit lights and 
I hr aciion Look no lurther 
This super tab lakes you into 
Ihe MIT* office of One Of Ihe 
Lh's most successful and M Itsh 
PR agencies Wilh good 
shorlhand/l v-reng call 01409 
1232 The Work Shop 


SEARCY THE 
CATERERS 

Seeks an adaptable 
secretary for 2 
Catering Managers. 
Accurate typing, 
rusty shorthand 
Tel Maria 01 585 0505 


A IIM1I IPailYE BECRETARY 

01.000 VOU Wdl rar*d excellent 
lypinu.' good adminMIraiion 

vkLU* and a rtirrrfid Itran per 
vmialily dealing wnn student* 
and vtMttng noxunn for Ilia 
loo Prtura bt mjl MginimtMi 

There will be lrtrohone and 
people rorKarl a* you ananue 
M nodule* and exrhanqes with 
whooK.dnxMd 60 wpm typing 
.Ur- 20-26. The Rernaunonl 
romutiv Ol 831 1220 


RA SECRETARY f* (1.000 Char 

Inq \ Cbmullaney Exer Really: 

unusual range of duties and 

task* You'D have to be adapt ' 

able and a non smoker Sorry. 

Exeetleni fmannal prosper t*. 

Call 4anrt BObmvOn OFFICE 

ANGELS Rec cons 01-629 
0777 


GERMAN Cohn** leaver secret 

tarv for small, trtendty w i Co 

Rials 5H £7.800 For lurther I 

mtortnaiion on Ihn and otherj 

v ac anew* with German pteawj 

'.HI Merrow Cmp Agy iThe Ian 

gunge spenahslkl on Oi 6361 

1487 


M EDICA L DOCTORS E7. 5 BO U h| 

Three young secretaries for 

Central London hospital. Age 

20-21 No real perks except lre-[ 

mendousty wonhwtute work 

Exceptional experience. Call 
Maura Thomas OFFICE AN 

GELS Rec Cons 01630 0844 


YOUNG AMMO SEC £7.508 

wen End p r u p erty partner 

Young. Irtendh) Inn with oc 

raxionaUv madhouse routine. 

PC with Wordstar Excellent 

Xmas bonus. Call Michele Kay 

OFFICE ANGELS Rec Con* OI 

629 0777 


VIDEO A nLM £8.500 lopnamJ 

dnlrtbulor seeks sec lo Europe 

an sales ma tuner Outtr* Itvl 

scheduling new nim releases! 

and pre-release* and pre -reteasel 

pianomg. marketing. PR etc. 

Super lob Super conn 

Benefit* include free video H- 

brary Prfxale screen mgs._ 
cinema tirrkls. health cluM 

membership etc Shorthand and! 

typing muot fd Age 21 + . 
Bwc can 01409 1232 The} 
Work Shop 
HLM CO PA £12.000 phis. A mi , 

lure Executive Secretary is sorb 

try inn company producing ma- 

lor (eat lire films lo aasai a 
CTree lor regposttole for general 
admin (moiled In merchandis- 
in') projects. proi 
management and stmtliar actls 
Hies, you will provide a luD 

supportive function. L 

90/60 wpm. Synergy. Ihe re- 
croilment consultancy. Ol 637 
9533 

LEGAL ADMM PA fno short 
hand: to Cl 0-500 aae. a young 
PA b sort to aunt ta selling up 
the new London office of Oils 
well established practice 
solved right from the outset 
you will carry out a developing 
function which wtu grve you 
lots of tnvotvement and exc exp, 
Typing al 60 wpm. audio atMl i ty 
and some legal exp are rag'd. 
Synergy. Ihe rerru U menl exm- 
Mdtanrv. 01 637 9533 
PARK LANE £7.000 besom id 
surroundings and rrtaxed ere 
alive environment make this a 
super (tret 106 The company re- 
stores old buildings lo Ihrtr 
former splendour You wiu n 
ane with dients are. 
lunches, despatch flowers, han 
die telephone calls etc. Accurate 
Is ping essential. Shorthand toe 
fid Please call 01493 4466 
Mrrrvwealher Advlg A 
Srkcllim. 


Join ora of London's lop PR 
companies as secretary to a dy 
nam* team of Accounts 
ExeculKe*. If you are willing lo 
learn and grt involved In every 
Ihmq from co nf erence 
organising and think lank' 
meetings and you have a spar- 
kling personality, then phone us 
Immediately Typing 66 wpm 
audio and WP Carol! ra king 
Appointments 499-8070 

IBGKGATE M ESG^OQ. Juhi IMS 
leading market research cornua 
ny a* secretary to an executive. 
Entoy a vanrty of serrelartaj 
and admtnrslramp duties in an 
informal atmosphere. 60 wpm 
audio ability needed Please 
telephone 01-2*0 3611/3531 
■West Endi or 01 240 3561 
fCttyV. Etoabrth Hum Recrull- 
menl Cnmullanl*. 
niTOWNri secretary £9.000 
pa. Iniernadonal company 
based In Piccadilly requires an 
expertenred secretary for a se- 
nior member of the personnel 
Ram Oootf shorthand and typ- 
ing are a mint and WP 
e x perienc e a deflnaie asseL For 
further details, ph a se contact 
Joanne Gregory. La CTrroe Rec 
Cons Ol 491 1868 


In faniasar Mayfair unices 
seek* an ejeeetiem Secretary/ 
PA aged 22* You WID ree your 
good audio skills iNo Short- 
tvandJ and be trained on a Wang 
WP A IM of prospects far ihe 
right perron Cl 1.000. BERNA 
DETTE OT BOND STREET 01- 
629 1204. 

VBUC RELATIONS lo £8000 4 
benefit* Break Mo the world of 
PR wdh mis hading retail co 
where you win gain exp you 
ran really pul lo use. Able lo 
deal with a high level of media 
liaison, you will need skills 
90/50 wpm Synergy, the re- 
cruitment consultancy. 01 637 
9633 

THEATRE AGENCY £7.000 
r pc rplKwi/ secretary remand lo 
hand l e incomin g actors , calls. 
correspondence etc Outgoing 
perwnabty and good 

short hand /typing leg rad Pd. to- 
leresl in the theatre an 
advantage Age from 19 yrs. 
Please telephone 01493 B7B7 
Gordon Vales Conudtants- 


neeoed fee lira international 
bank In the cKy Young lively 
team busy office Typing/ 
shorthand must be good. Salary 
£8.000*+ benefits inclu de 
mortgage subsidy. INTERNA- 
TIONAL SECRETARIES 01 
491 7100 

lARKETtNG ASST /SEC to 
£7000 Thl* major magartne 
puhlnhing house n seek ing a 
College Leaver to carry out a 
varied function. Involved m all 
aspects m marketing, you will 
gain useful exp. Skills 90/60 
wpm Synergy. Ihe recruitment 
consultancy. OI 637 9SS3 


FULHAM 

ESTATE AGENTS 

Rmun seocfpv wshgood 
base *k*A S auaty to atxfc an 
EnMimNM Ud be Cheer - 
U ana haw good anpoarancs 

SaWyAAE 

Tel Joflo Canto • FteU 
01381 48S5. 


CHIEF EXECUTIVE AND TOWN 
CLERK’S DEPARTMENT 

SECRETARY 
£9,129 - £9,954 inc p.a. 

Reference El 

An experienced Seceriaiy with good typing, shorthand 
jod audio skills is requried by the Heed of Adminis- 
t rat ion/ Solid lor to the CounciL Experience of word 
pnacesaing is essentiaL 

For further information contact Janet Sanders-Grose 
l Ext 71211. 

Form from Head of Personnel Services, York Howe. 
Twickenham. Tft'l 3AA (01-891 7112 or 891 7799 (24 
hours) returnable by 28th October 1986. 

London Borough of RICHMOND UPON THAMES 
(an equal opportunity employer) 


mum nmMkii riorum i 

your lanauara -Jalb daily 
suvnort a Uvety train of Irtlrnw 
lional rxrnulnn-nf romuMonU 
you mb niuadip your -own ror 
iraoMMHP. 
buvuKviv voutra and menl 
hale markrtuig rjniwmn in 
weB u». iiaMang with i* ms and 
randnlalpw Possible work 
abroad Skip* 80/60 Age 20- 
25 The Rmuliwnt Caws lW 
Ol 831 1220 


CORY /WANG aL600\KtartaafJ 
tires Buzzing en* trotunesiL) 
Oral with ruuxwnere. Krap dla 
ry Occasionally madly buy. 
LVs Call Sylvia Lang OFFICXf 
ANGELS Rec Oom Oi 
0844 


AUDIO TYPIST <8,500 Hotborai 
properly orgn seeks ospmnd 
PA Sec for ils Finance Chief. 
Good prospects. LVs. Can Olv 
Rlngrose OFFICE ANGELS Reel 
Cm Ol 629 0777 


FAMOUS STORE £8000 Youngl 
sac for Press Office Great 
lor ctially. outgoing sort- Anri 
20/21 desirable can Lynda Co-1 
hen OFFICE ANGELS Rec Com. 
01-630 0844 


YOUNG SEC £ 8000 plus exert 
lent units wilh USA grow close 
Kensington. Small loam envl 
i Oilmen! In large firm Can 
Suzanne DunptvV OFFICE AN 
GELS Rec Con* 01-630 0844 


irnccd.- managerial ouablie* 
PareHahlr practice Hartey 
Street. 936 2023 


NEW BOND STREET property 
reenpany require* young secre- 
tary i No SHi to gel Involved la 
aO aspect* of property nepoiia 
iioo. Buev, licet* environment 
accurate 40 wpm * lyptng. All 
training anon age 19+ C8S00 
BERNADETTE OF BOND ST 
01 629 1204 


£*1£00. Not a Mgtity hurt lob 4* 
secretary lo the senior partner 
o< a urge wci rohotor* as he 

handle* Company Law Age 
2B+. short nand/typtner. Cad 
377 8600 >CUyi or 439-7001 
iWnt End) Secretaries Pius 
The Secreiartdi OorauUant*. 


lo 

£8000 Suit a non-sec career 
wilh IM* leading eXhiMUan 
organiser Good computes- exp 
and typing at 46 wpm reg'd. 
Synergy. Ihe rerruUmenl cun 
sultancy. 01 637 9633. 


•DGN FINANCE High reward 
£11.000 + bonuses. Use your 
6/H ana w P skiU* to organise 
a very busy Contracts Manager 
and assBt on Ihe personnel side 
loo. Call Debbie on.Ol 379 
6060 Future aODOimmefilk. 


SEC, ruNy shorthand and Ger 
■nan helpful, wilh Al organ- 
Hauonal skill* for SWI banker*. 
Monage sub. NCP- free life In* 
A performance bonus plus S fig 
sal. wood house Rec Oous Oi 
404 4646. 


YOUR FUTURE assured! Join uns 

lively hfe amnner rant 

and use your S/H lo meef the 
challenge of a busy sales 
envlroment. £9.000 + benefits. 
Cag Lovena on: Ol 379 6060 
. Future Appointments. 


Deal Busy A mieresttng too. 
good tyring Ash El 0.000 + su 

perb bonuses. Link 1 ’•"Vfirjr 
Appes 846-9743. 

CONSULTANT gynazcotaotsl ra 
gufre* secretary to run Hartw 
Street consulting room*. Tel: Ol 
935 5098 Daytime 
FLUENT GERMAN, gd typing A 
banking exp for internal audllor 
ol City bank. cCiaooo. 846- 
9743 Link Language Appts. 
GERMAN GMJNG FA Eng/G» 
n A translating (or manage- 
ment position. cC.13.OO0. Link 
Language Appis 846-9743. 
SECRETAIRES lor AFChNrets A 
Designer*. Permaoenl A tempo- 
rary position*. AMSA Special hi 
Rec COO*. 01 734 0532 


NON-SECRETARIAL 


WP EXPERT? You have probably 
installed system* and c a rried 
oul training, and In addKMm 
have some marketing or ra 
crvdbng ski PS? B eco m e 
Rreruumrnl Ccmsultanl with 
our expanding WP operation. 
wordRiB. If you have 8 pod 
live personality and wish both 
financial and lob saosfartun 
Salon- package £16-000+ Call 
Um Cecil on 439-4344 

RECEPTIONIST £9.000. WeB 
known Property Company 
seek* person wilh polar and nal 
oral charm, for Meir new 
lircunou* omens. Q wU c n b u a rd 
experience and some typing ra 
qulred- Aged 25-40 years. OI 
683 1034 Merawh Scott 


— young City co grow 
Live-wire with good lei raaraw. 
able to type Fon/nart-Ume. 
Tratauig given N/S. 3776435 

S CRECNHm /occi ip a M o n af heoKh 
nurse r emdred for ihe Oly Tel 
OI 403 6519 


TEMPTING TIMES 


U youl 

sldrr yourself an etlle Irmp men 
why not lorn our euir team? For 
your lap skills we will pay you 
Ion rates, nol/b hoi pay and 
train you on WP Find oul more 
by ringing France* Carey on 
Ol 229 9244 Drake other 
Overload vAgyi 

FISTFUL OF DOLLARS top rate* 
paid fur wp and secretarial 
temp*. Free WP training given. 
For Ihe best deal m lown can 
Jjrktr Bodmi OS 01-493 4466 
Merrvweather Advtg A 
Selection 


A SPECIAL 
WELCOME! 


Secretaries, defies, 
copy typists audio 
secretaries, 
(minimum GOwpm 
typing) You wifl be 
well looked after by 
Rosemary Hamer 
who has run our 
temporary section 
for the last 10 years. 
For an immeefiale 
booking can 
her now on 

01-377 8600. 


Secretar ies Plus 

UndRMMfO 




MEDIA ■ FINANCE ■ ADVERTISING -SALES ■ PERSONNEL- MEDIA- FINANCE 

l Major Art Gallery 1 

c£l 0,000 1 


O. 


ur client, a respected and prestigious art gallery, needs a 
career-minded secretary to work closely with senior management in the 
day-to-day running of the gallery. 


7V 


work is demanding and varied; combining secretarial work 
with a substantial organisational content. 


1 E, 


excellent shorthand, typing and personal presentation are essen- 
tial, as are your abilities m both written and spoken communication . A 
graduate with previous work experience aged 23-30 mould be ideaL 

HAZBLL STATON 

8 GoMen Square. London Wl. 

TeL 01-439 6021. 


MEDIA -FINANCE* ADVERTISING ■ SALES ■ PERSONNEL- MEDIA*FINANCE 


LEGAL NOTICES 


IN THE MATTER of LAIN DON 
BACON SU PUE B LTD and IN 
THE MATTER OF THE 
COMPANIES ACT 1985 
NOTICE ts HEREBY GIVEN 
that me creditor* of Ihe above- 
named company. Which 6 being 
voluntarily wound unu are re- 
omred. an ar before 30 October 
1986. lo snid in Itielr fuU Chris- 
tian -and surname*. Uirtr 
add revives and descriptions, fun 
particular* of their debt* or 
claim*, and the nam* and ad 
drew* of iheir Sohator* iff ml 
lo Ihe undmiuned DAVID 
JLUAK BE CHEER FDA. Of Ar 
thur Andersen a Co. PO Bo d 65. 
1 Surrey street. London WCZR 
2NT Ihe LlautttMar of Ihe Hod 
Company antL II so required by 
noura in welling from the RM 
LUiuklaior are personally or by 
irair wirfidfi i o come in and 
prove Uirtr debts or Claim* 41 
such time and plara as ahaa be 
specified tn such notice, or In de- 
raufl thereof Uwy win be 
excluded Iran me benefit of any 
t lrv li I button made before such 
cteht* are proved 
Dated lira I7lh day of October 

1986 DJ BUCKLER 

LIQUIDATOR 


IMG TELEPH ONE C OMPANY 
LIMITED 

• In Voluntary LKmfdaboai 
and The Companies Act 1986 
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN 
that the CREDITORS of the above 
named Company are raoulred on 
or before Friday. 24 Octotaer 
1986 to send Uirtr nomas and ad- 
dresses and particulars of thefr 
drtna or riaun* lo ihe unnerstgned 
Ian Peter Phi Lrps of Arthur An- 
dersen 4 Go. PO Boot No. 65. 1 
Surrey street. London. WCZR 
2T4T. the Uauldaior of ihe sad 
Comr~nv and M so mured bv 
notice in writing Hum Ihe 
LkniidaMr are to ramie lo and 
prot e Ihekr said detns or clabm at 
such time or place a* shall be 
spec I lied in such notice or In de- 
rautl thereof they wra be 

exrtuded Irom lhe benefit of -any 

drsinnutKxi made* before such 
debts are proved. 

Dated the lOUs day of September 

IAN PETER PHILLIPS 
LIQUIDATOR 


NOTICE OF APPUCATION FOR 
A JlSnCTS LICENCE 
I. PREM SINGH, the Apottcant. . 
now rnMbw at GO Underhill 
Road. SE22 having during Ihe 
tasi ux months earned on the 
trade or calling oi Off Licence 
Manager HEREBY GWE NOTICE 
mat H h my intention to onuty at 
the LICENSING SESSIONS tor 
Wimbledon to be new st ihe Mag- 
istrate* Court at Queens Road 
Wimbledon SWI 9 on Wednesday 
15th October next for the prort- 
aouat grant to me of a Justices 

Licrnre authorising me to sefl by 

retail xikndcaung Uouor of ail dr- 
•tcnpuod* for romumphan off Ihe 
premise* situate al and known as 
227 London Rortl Mitcham 
Given under my hand this 19th 
day of September 1986 

■SANDOMS) 
226 Rye Lane Beckham 
London SEiE 
Aomorisad Agent for the 
AppbcaM 


COMPANIES ACTS. 19BS 
JINEWAY LIMITED 
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, 
pursuant lo section S88 of Ihe 
Companies Art 19B6. mat a Meet- 
ing of the Creditor* of the above- 
named Company will be held at 
43/46 Bun* Green Road. Horn- 
church. Essex chi Friday, the 3rd 
day of October 1986. 41 1030 
o'clock In the forenoon, for the 
purposes mentioned In seebom 
5B9 and 590 of Ihe said Act 
Dated this 22nd day of Sepsemncr 
1986 

BY ORDER OF THE BOARD 
J RAFFERTY 
DIRECTOR 


I. BARRY ZENITH MYERS Of 
IS GREEK STREET. LONDON 
WlV SLE. HEREBY GIVE NO- 
TICE Uiat GRAHAM WILSON 
MOL'LUN. previously Of 17/18 
Hennella Street. London WC2. 
no tongir has any authority to act 
or enter transactions on my be- 
itaH and THAT the Power of I 
Allomey given to him on SOUl 
July 1984 and evety other power 
howsoever created or conterred 
on turn have been revoked. 


RENTALS 


HENRY R JAMES Gonun in now 
on Ol 236 8861 Mr Ihe best se- 
lection of lumMmf (lot* and 
house* lo rcnl in Knighubrldoe. 
Chelsea and Keusagton <T) - 


BUNGTOM tovrty nnght and spa- 
onus well furmsfaed 2 doubtr 
bed llal £180 PW Servued. 
Vfcung professional/ company 
let only Trt Ol 609 7989 


MAYFAM rerp room. 2 bed. 
kilrhen bathroom, funushed 
flat to tel 100 yard* Gross cncr 
So Long M C3SOpw Ol 


fur 

ntshed 2 bedroom flaL gas CH. 
lullv fitted kitchen £93 pw 
4 satiable for 6 months. Trl Dr 
Hill 0233 33331 


NORTH London family home 
■ Musts ell Hill • ai aituuruni an- 
ti loi telling al C2?Sfn» neg 

PartKUlarfi hire area will' 
house m nisi class iterunrtis*- 
order mid fughesi -sundard of 
lur inline and iltlmo e Trt Ol 
Ml USD i rial ■ Ol 883 8699 
unl4 


BIO MM Cm-. W End 25 nun* 

I mix fuiiu*n*«l lor enicn.xmum 
.3 Ho- urns fitted W 6 rad*. 
2W Bath*, ullidv Laundry 
Pku im CH Dbte «ra- 2 nun* 
GoH squash Tenms A 50ah£n 
Good schools C296 pw Trt Ol 
244 7081 


MDffENATELY KEUUMED for 

wailing aprtiraiil* 2/3 8M 
Mew* houses. NOtlmg Hill 
Area Luxun 1*J or 2nd iloor 
flat rromred tor Anu-ncan hulH 
Company Orairai London 
C7S0pw CM BargrU 724 
3160 


We haie a large 

lange oi inrnnned flar* A 
hmm* for rent tn Wappmg 
BermondMU-. Umetrouye we of 
Dows Rents from Clio 
C525pw Cartel on Smith A CO 
488 9017 


HAMPSTEAD h»3 Eteganl lur 
mshert Hal in rmWenual street 
1 Imdiomii r living room. Ildly 

ctiUlPPrt] kilrhen ha Ui room. 

full CH ample slreel parking. 
Suttabte tar one raison £130 
pw Tel 794 4960 


I 1*1 floor flat m 

garden square 2 bed*. 2 
Uinv/unuB. recepoon and 
uudy/duiing kJIrtiru an ma 
mines LOT. oorler and keys to 
gdn* £60 0 pv* Goddard A 
Son lh 01 930 7321 


(LOME SQUARE Quirt sell 
carnal ned t urn tshed Hal on low 
or ground Double bedroom. 
Irving room, kitchen A balh 
room. Trt CH 1 year 

preferred £120 pw Trt 01 589 
2814 


THE LONC/SHORT trt special 
i*l* WehavealaroesefrtTionof 
l limits 1/2/3/4 Bedroom llal* 
wtlh maid service loknur de 
signed 4 crnirJtlv loc ated 
Con naught Proper lie* 727 

3050 


CHELSEA Span ora nghl newly 
deroiaied I double bedroom 
flak reception, kite hra A bdih 
room. Of A Hw Company let 
£175 pw Trt Ol 720 71 1 1 iof 
fleet & 01 730 1958 1 evenings* 


CLAPHAM South, itnl off Ciftn 
roon Beaulilul terraced collage 
3 bed*. Iiv Ing room/dlner. f ufly 
hlted knenen with aU amefUhe*. 
CH Garden 5 nun* tube Co tet 
Ohty £640 prm 01 6Z7 0393 


HAMPSTEAD Luxury antique 
l ut tinned llal. large lounge, dta) 

mg area 1 dbte bed. 1 
Mud\/s4nqlr hod Gounbv 
kilrhen Mmunum Id 1 year 
£295pw 01 794 2789 


IMTERMAtlONAL EXECUTIVES 

Ligmtly require flats A houses 
In central Loudon from £150 lo 
£2.000 pw Please call Solly 
Owen or Lorraine C am pbell on 
Ol 937 9684 


KEMSW8TON MMnous south 
facing mansion flat. 4 beds. 2 
rccpl 1 siiiriv 2 bath*, f/f 
kilrhen. Ufl/ porter 

unlurn/fum Lana Co Let 
C36S pw Trt OI 602-8683 


KENSINGTON SW7 Opp Lycee 
buum flat. 2 double bed*. 1 
baih. rh. mod tut dining room 
A racm Company tet £226 
p w Tet 458 S21 1 'Officer / 
466 0694 <e\c«l 


Wl 1 *unny 2 

bedroom rd dal. Mautdul silling 
room. balh. kitchen, newly dec 
orated. antique furniture 
Company trt £300 pw lor 1/2 
inns Tel Ol 229 0999 


LANCASTER Gale 3 mm lube 
mew* use rv mining new 
luirv eaup IdL 2 dbte beds, din 
big hail, using rm. studio, terr 
Co tel Min I year £205 pw 
Trt 262 2976 or 584 2827 


PEACE ana quirt 30 mm Lon 
dan I ned torn flat m 
farmhouse AD mod cans. Sou 
prof couple awn transport 
£300 prm Trt High Wycombe 
•04941 28132 evenings 


SWI Amen ran Style apanmefd 
wilh panoranur view* Huge 
Rerrp/Otner Approx 3511 2 
Bed*. 2 Balh* H cn-suUeL KIL 
Lqe Balcony Porter £400pw 
Codes 828 8251 


AY4HLARI F now 5 muv* Soane 
Square 2nd A 3rd floor furn 
mat* l diUbedrm.2*gfas4/rm. 
kil/dlnct. bUvrm £200 pw 
Ref* reg'd Tel Ol 730 2800 


SUPERIOR FLATS 

avail A rend for dlptomab. 
exrrultve* Long 4 Short Jrt* In I 
ail alms Unfriend & Co. 48. 
Albemarle Si Wl Ol 4996334 


18th century (M 
lane on hbtartc Richmond - 
Green 2 bedrooms, 5 annuie* 
Malian Cl80pw Co hi 01 940 
2979 


PK Beau bf id mod f/f. 1 
1*1 flr I bed fU. suit ' 
sbigte/coupte Next tube 040 
PW Ol 794 3888/0923 48849 


HAMPSTEAD dciMhtftd 1 bed flat | 
in modern Nock new Heath, i 
Porterage Co Lei £170 p.w 
Goddard A Srattb 01 930 7321 


MAYFAIR, Wl Selection at 1-6 
Bed ha Is & novrvs Long/ snort 
trt* From CZOOriw Berkeley 
Estate* 493 0887/409 2373 


C HE1 . W A Sweip ap ar t me rit 2 
iiectrm Exerttent Mork nr Tube 
Co Let C295 pw iwg 7305322 


EAST FVTNEY near lube Stagte 
Oattei own kHrhen Qtael fam- 
ily home C48PW Ol 8703900 


FULHAM Ness f/f nal 2 beds 2 
Lath* PDOf/m-m £18Spw Trt. 
01 930 4749 [Alter 6 pmi 


MAYFAIR or K errdnglon Choice 
2 uzmti sm teed 2 bed r oom* 
flats C2S0 pw 01 SB9 8223 


SLOAME GARDENS One bed 
flat ('onganr, tet only C220, 
pw Trt IO30&I 888713 


SOUTH KENS 2 dbte beds. 2 
rerps, lux. serviced flat £296 
pw Co Let 881 5109 10-7pm 


PORTLAND PLACE and Marhte , 

Arrow l Lux 2hedapl £200 
£730 pw Co or Embaasv trt* 
Mam of her 1/2/3 bed flats fr \ 
£120 £360 pw CdO 

5LZXLET CO 262 6589 


RADLCTT. Short lei Myllte 4 bed 
i oi mirv rouaqn Lge kurheo/ 
b'lasttm all rnoroines. 2 bauis. 
piea*anl ndn Meal Ml/ Mato 
line Sin £115 pw Marvecu 
smith \s*ur Ol 957 9801 


SWI. Braiugulh rrturhnhed A 
liuiMshrd 2 bed flat, close 10 k> 
i al anieniues New rarpelv 
rurlatm A kit ecpito ete Rent 
£276 pss mrt rant Howard 
Mullrt A GD Ol 236 2832 


A H AR M O NIOU S Hampstead 
home hnnurukale spackro 3 
Bra rtn llal offering lounge, fit 
ted kll OtTvr Cut TV . Gas CH 
Wad Now LlBSuw 2868040. 


AMERICAN BANK mrqralbr re 
qiurr* luxurx flah/how*. 
CTieNea. K ntqhW bndBe. Brtora- 
via aiea* UOQ £2000 pw 
Burras* Estate Aranls 681 3136 

ASHLEIGH ESTATES dHUI* 
■u lenluuLA tening In Ihe We*l 
Lnd A Crtilral London, tram 
*rotple studios la lireurMM* 
amroenl* Cumarl 4090394 «T1 

BAKER Slreel Sunerb 3 xrs oM 
nun h» A hod* 2 balh*. il 
ensiniei lounoe/dlner ku/bfcbL 
uqe (U l to /win. CCH C575 pur 
Trt 01 847 2041 /221 8276 

ELYSTAM PLACE SW3. Superb 
•audio in heart « Chelsea Dec 
A linn to very hMh Marxian] 
Mil* * mil** LI 20 pw 244 

7355 

HOLLAND Park f ully turn new 
l.-rivn house 4 bed*. 2 balh* 
*m,ifl qn«r inql gdn. £423 pw 
C n kl n overseas visitor* 6 
muiilh* mm 01 876 8616 

HOLLAND PARK. SparlMK. sun 
ru urslikwn top otooktug qd» 
\nioi tin- i.ii ra rtvep. dbl and 
ad bed* CH Newly dec" 
LIHSph Ol 229 7788. 

ROLAND com hU 7 2nd now 2 
bed iM t-iuqn roreptton Fun* 
riHeif t tkhixi inn/aMrt M 
1.500 pu nea HOLMANS 370 
«7Ht 


Live and/or 
work in a huge wharefrorae 
ware \ erv targe studio Room 
uun superb wood floor A ong 
feature* 2 Bed Ainu with en 
suite Bath or Shower Study 
Funv lilted Kll Top duality- fix 
lure* Partially- fumiHied Hid 
arttm. designer or arrhitert 
RrtM £1.250prm me Rate* + 
Healing Gurtewn Smith A Co 
488 9017 

HOLLAND PARK. overkwWmi. 
tom led lately adtolnlng. A su 
petWv ronUortahle modern nal 
In srtert iflock Two bedroom*, 
double rerrpuon room with 
large balcony kitchen, balh 
loom and even a garage C36S 
pu for a tong term rorapany 
tenant To view please tete 
Phone Genrge Kinghi The 
LeiUng Agenl 689 2133 

Ness tv drroraird. furnished 
house u-iih xparrou* double beet 
and snower/chansBiKi/exerctse 
loom 2nd bed and bath 2 me 
dium rerep*, open man Idirhen 
and dining roam, patm ALL fa 
(rtjue* within 3 min* stow walk 
Last tenant european banker 
bought house nearby £400 
onlv pw wnle reterenre reply 
to BOX C61 

DESPERATELY required lor HM 
mediate orrupabon for a period 
ot 1 4 war* lurmhed 3 bed 
flat within 5 min* walk of 
Prince* Gale SWT'wlllj luD se 
runu CSDk pa 4 bed 
teal /house wiiibii the Kerning 
ion area £25k pa Both suras 
can he paid hi rash m advance 
HOLMANS 370 6781 

W14 - Nice Ughl furnished gar 
(ten flat oil Brook Green 
Hatnroprsnulh Gbnienlral for 
Airport A Centre DM Brtroon 
KJIrnen/CTmng roam Silling 
room wun 2 sofa beds CH Nice 
person to rtean £190pw Ring 
Chanrehor 01-602-2684. be 
tore libra or between 6pm A 
7pm 

RIVERSIDE - SWI- Lux 2 bed 
apt supnhly decorated with el 
egant lunmhtngs-Lra bale onto 
Thames tram 2 xportou* thru 
rerep* A i/f Wl Bam ♦ guest 
ctaakrm. parking. 24 hr porter 
* WYuruv Weal tor mi exec 
£500 pw via Ca tet Mtal ilew 

01 405 671 1 i Mr* Lanei off hr* 
AMERICAN EXECUTIVE Seek* . 

lux lldt/hauv up ra cboodvs 
I vul fee* req Ptntltos Kay A 
Lews. South Of the Park Chrt 
sea office Ol 352 8111 or 
North of Ihe Park RegenF* 
Park oiltre Ol SB6 9882 
HOLLAND PARK. Sunny new 2 
bed decorator Hal m modern 
Mo> k os* 1 1*1* ary shelving, as 
Uque furouure luted Mlrhen 
lommunal Barden* £200 p.w 
infinites heating Company M 
Tel 727 7567 

ALWAYS an Interesting, con 
slwuIv chanqlag setevnon of 
larmshed flah A house* al rents 
from tlOOpvs COGOOps. -SJCi 
Bentaam R Reeve*. Kensinnlon 
A Central London 938 3922 
AVA K AR1X IMMEDIATELY ad 
ia<eni Hampstead Heath. MRS 
I urnished flat lecently refurbA 
Dre Dbte Bed. Sgle Bed. Rec eg 
KkB Prrt CP tet ClSOpw Tel 
D1 009 6102 <Ti 

\irtor«a 1 Hr 4 bed 
house 2 ret ot Fulti furnished 
CH all mod ran* October 9 • 
mnnlli* mimmum £700 pm 
£1 000 returnable deposit Trl 
0273506563 or 607333 
DARTMOUTH Part. NTYB At! roc 
live mod mewshse 4 beds. 2 
hath* Jqe hjunqe nrtl equipoed 
kii pgUo gge On let prrfmvd 
£200 pw Tel Ol 599 1742 af 
ter ppm / 0245 413310 
•SLHMTON Owner* pmnd spa 
rtmi* hse nr lube 3/4 date bed* 

2 ns ep* *«ietb studio wuh 
town siew* lqe hvHig area 
CH. ' tv S/latinq gdn. gge 
£230 pw 0580 712806 ' 

KCMOWrON DrtigWfte 3rd . 
flora 3 Bert iim nr tovrty 1 oenod 
home Loe Rerep kll/Brkisl 
Rm (Mh/wc Y-rtl font an * 

Uque* • [ \iep t.xfne £200pw 

Bentomi A Reel c* 938 3522 
N12. (ill«- $M semi .Gd* C/H 
New tv decorated new turiu 
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THF TIMES WLDNJbSDAY OCTOBER 1 1986 


Si'ORT 


> 


money is name of the game 


F rom where the New 
York Yacht Cab 
(NYYO stands, the 
shifting of the 
America's Cup from 
Newport to Fremantle is ah™ 
to the All England Club 
finding its championships 

evacuated to Morecambe. Not 
all Americans sympathise. 

“Losing the America's Cup 
legitimized it as an inter- 
national competition" John 
Bertrand says, “It was the best 
thing that could ' have 
happened". 

This is not the Australian 
helmsman speaking, but his 
bright-eyed namesake who, as 
tactician for the America II 
syndicate, will be attempting 
to recapture the Cup for the 
NYYG With John Kolius. his 
skipper, he represents the 
most formidable of the dozen 
rival boats obstructing White 
Crusader's path to the chal- 
lenge round. 

Not all in yachting circles 
will be applauding should 
IYYYC succeed, for no holders 
of a trophy ever so conspicu- 
ously courted failure last time 
by their devious 
sportsmanship. 

However, that was no reflec- 
tion either on Dennis Conner, 
the man they chose as defend- 
er and turned their back upon 
in the hour of his defeat, nor on 
their current representatives, 
who are bankrolled to the tune 
of Sl5m (about £10.6m) by 
Cadillac, Newsweek and 
Amway. 

Yachting is merely the 
reflection of the primary power 
of the IYYYC: money. They 
are probably the only one of 
six American syndicates here 
not hard-pressed for cash with 
four days to go to the start of 
racing. 

Kolias and Bertrand decided 
to challenge while they were 
on board a powerboat beading 
out to watch the first race 
between Conner and Australia 
II, having just lost the right to 
be defender in the ageing 
Courageous, after pushing 
Conner to the brink of losing 
his nerve. 

“With the right tool and the 
time, we knew we could do a 
job." Bertrand says. “Raring 
against him had been exciting, 
but he had the upper hand 
with his sail budget. We had to 
beat him badly even to have a 
chance of selection. The 
Australians have the right 
idea with their formal series of 
selection races." 

Bertrand is the cool bead 
behind the impetuous Kolias, 
who resigned from the cam- 
paign last year only to be 


The America’s Cup, the greatest event 
in yachting, begins on Sunday: five 
months of racing to try to wrest the 
trophy from the Australians. Who are 
Britain’s main challengers? David 
Miller, chief sports correspondent, 
reports from Fremantle. 



V-'.v */' ‘ 


reinstated at the insistence of 
his Texas backers in the 
syndicate. He made errors in 
the fleet racing world 
championship here which 
dropped him into third place 
behind Australia in and New 
Zealand. He needs Bertrand, 
but the dependence between 
these Olympic medallists is 
mutual in what may become a 
superb ail-roond boat. 

As Phil Crebbin, Crusader's 
technical director, says: “I'm 
convinced the winner of the 
Challenger series will win the 
Cup." He thinks that America 
II, Conner's Stars and Stripes 
— “on sheer experience what- 
ever his boat's capacity" — and 
New Zealand win form the 
semi-finals, with French Kiss 
pressing them all. 

K olius gets more out 
or the crew than 
anyone I’ve met. He 
has the same level 
of intensity what- 
ever the state of the race," 
Bertrand says, his own experi- 
ence being primarily as a 
single-hander with a dis- 
inclination to take orders. 
“He's the only one I've been 
happy to be with, he's superior 
and he's a teacher. Maybe he' 
gets excited, bat he lets things 
oat, he doesn't brood over an 
error for two days. He's a 
Texan and his character goes 
with the territory. I'm the 
thermostat, there to tone him 
down at times." 

America II has set the pace 
for everyone: three new boats 
built by the renowned partner- 
ship of Sparkman 

and Stephens, the first within 
a year, and the first syndicate 
to arrive in Fremantle and 
build support facilities. 

“Adjusting to the culture as 
well as the water is essential" 
Bertrand says. “It's no use 
being homesick for 
milkshakes and pizza. There 
will be a lot of stress. Remem- 
ber it took Australia seven 
attempts to come to terms with 
Newport's environment" 


What concerns Bertrand, 
like all tacticians engaged in 
the five-month game of poker, 
is the weather's variability, not 
as standard as some believe. 
He thinks the strong breezes 
of 20 knots and over may not 
come nntfl December or Janu- 
ary, and then will lighten 
a g ain by the Challenge Round. 
Their first boat US 42, was a 
test-bed which competed in the 
world championships, US 44 
was a refinement and US 46 a 
farther development of both. 

Together with Crebbin and 
others, Bertrand senses prob- 
lems within the Stars and 
Stripes camp in Conner's 'de- 
cision to trial in Hawaii rather 
than the Indian Ocean. 

“Dennis needs a lot of 
support because he needs con- 
fidence to do well," Bertrand 
says. “If he's confident he's 
fabulous, bat in Newport we 
saw his confidence s h a k en, the 
mental errors out on the water 
which were decisive." 

Crebbin asks why, under the 
influence of advisor Robert 
Hopkins following the world 
championships, Conner de- 
cided to build a fourth new 
boat for light weather. And 
everyone is asking why 
Conner, in the week before 
racing starts, is home m 
California, missing his 
syndicate's open house here on 
Sunday? Is be running out of 
funds and cajoling his 
sponsors? 

John Marshall, a quiet, 
reflective sailor who, in- 
conspicuously, will be 
Conner's mentor as 
tactician/oavigator. was 
Liberty's mains beet trimmer 
in 1983. He is in his fifth 
campaign, the third successive 
one with Conner. His com- 
ments on current finance do 
not wholly dispel the doubts: 
be talks of fund-raising “to 
meet monthly requirements", 
of money not being there as yet 
“to dose the programme". 

When NYYC chose the 
brilliant but temperamental 


* . * '••TT 



V , 

r>. . ■ 1 — ' 1 


..... . •. r*'— ' " . 

I ; j . .y.' t \, V T .. •' " ■ > ’ ' .- * • 


New Zealand's America’s Cup challenger, KZ-7 (centre), shows off with her New Zealand rivals, KZr3 (left) and KZrS 
Kolius. they left Conner, who his reputation: and this may final racelrat in th* sixth, than U 


defiantly announced his own 
syndicate a day earlier, with a 
daunting task to fund the 
technology which would prove 
he was not after all, the foQnre 
a heartless sporting public 
now rated him. 

W hen I was first 
involved, we 
were sailing the 
same kind of 
boats," Conner 
says plaintively. “Now the 
major factors are design and 
fund-raising. After 1983 1 had 
two choices: to get op and win 
it back, or stay home and fed 
sorry- for myself. There was 
only one way to go". 

He is the perfectionist, with 
13,000 horns at the helm of 12- 
metres, who knew be had done 
a fine job In 1983, and 
recognized by any but yachts- 
men, against a radical design 
which bs changed the name 
of the game. His obdurate 
answer has been to build four 
boats in the attempt to regain 


have over-reached his backers. When we didn't see the new 
Marshall is the most loyal wind mi the first fog. Denis's 
of lieutenants. Conner stayed defeat has node It caster to 
in Hawaii, he explains, be- find motivation for 1987. 
cause the weather pattern was Marshall, a decent ma n, tal ks 
consistent for evaluating new like a bridge player unsure of 
boats; the world champ ion- his partner’s hand. 

ships “found ont" the new ^ ■ hat extrovert motor 

boats of other syndicates; r ■ 'racing Californian 

sampling the Fremantle sea- ■ xom Blackaller, 

sons might have been mitypi- ■ twice Star Class 

cal and they have 10 year X world champion and 

statistics available; the final jqg; defence candidate, was 
boat US 87, is reasonably one to hide his talent 


T 


. 7 never one ro dhk ms uutau 

radical and a synihesis of a modesty skirt like 

InrcAnc Lnninf 1 Him mmnrf. .. « , ■ ■ 1. 1_— 


lessons learned; the commit- 
ment of technology is much 
larger because the Cup was 
lost on technology; “even the 
masters" are only 70 per cent 
correct on the tough match 
racing calls; that if there is a 
“fast" boat no amoant of 
helmsmans hip will stop it 
winning. 


Australia’s keeL Yet he’s be- 
ing coy about his radical USA 
ft, projected for the Golden 
Gate syndicate by the Craig 
Research Corporation's 
unique XMP-48 computer 
which costs $10,000 an hour to 
rent 

Craig sponsored Blackaller 


“The trauma for Demis in and his designers, Calderon, 
1983," he says, “was not Meldren and Mull, with 200 
losing tiie race bat being boars' free research time to 
responsible. The error that produce the most radical boat 
cost the Cup was not in the here, further from dm norm 


with unknown appendages, 

“It's very hard to compete 
against Ate gorilla syndicates 
spending $15m," Blackaller 
Mid, “if yon can’t build five 
boats on an evolutionary basis. 

"So far we’ve spent $5m. All 
syndicates ball-shit on what 
they've raised. We’re spending 
all onr money in hydro-dynam- 
ics rather than sails, and 
beading at the core of die 
America’s Cop problem. We 
won’t know until December 
bow good we are. I'd be 
surprised to see ns berst out of 
the box now. USA 11 has 
speed, and a the only boat 
here that dm park sideways!" 

It's all deddely head-on, 
however, in the camp of Auck- 
land merchant banker Mi- 
chael Fay’s Bank of New 
Zealand syndicate, and he 
spends half his time denying 
that tins is another de Savary- 
styfe personal platform: so 
often, that everyone now be- 
lieves its. 


T hree outstanding 
non-flexible glass fi- 
bre boats from a 
brilliant design team 
led by Ron HoUand 
and a crew including seven 
round-the-world yachtsmen 
with the stabilising influence 
of Mike Qulltor and Brad 
Butterworth should give Cbm 
Dickson, the 24 -year-old 
helmsman, some judgement to 
leaven strident confidence. 
The Kiwis dramatically spUt 
Australia D1 and H * “** 
world championship, and be- 
lieve they’ll win; but they lack 
12-metre match-racing experi- 
ence, and Dickson might crack 
under pressure. 

The Tf Bm syndicates, 
Costa Smendda and Italiano, 
give a Gilbert and Sullivan 
tune to the competition; over- 
flowing with sponsors and 
under-endowed with 

organisation, flamboyantly 
dressed by Gocd bnt flounder- 
ing on the water, ttey spend 
their time disputing with each 
other and interchanging rival 
helmsmen who resign once a 
week and one of whom has 
given nap to become a chef. 
They will throw marvellous 
parties and tantrums, and spill 
their talent like the wind in a 
wrinkled jib. 

Ferge Crasnianski whose 
retail business, Kis, has a £200 

nrillln a-a-year turnover, won 

his argranent with the (Inter- 
national Yacht Racing Union} 
IYRU amateurs to call his 
boat French Kiss. As he says, 
“the Cop is business." 

With the more promising of 
two French syndicates helmed 
by the rival Pajot brothers, 
Marc, France’s sailing celeb- 
rity, has no 12-metre experi- 
ence but a possible greyhound 
created by Phflipe Briaai - 
the Mozart of designers, they 
say — which went straight 
from the compnter to the water 
without tank testing. 

“We're yoanginthis kind of 
race," Marc rejot says. His 
attitude is the opposite of 
Conner's: he’s banking mu a 
fast, now modified boat, good 
in winds above 15 knots, to 
give his match-taring talents a 
chance. 

“The past doesn’t matter," 
he says. “Everything I begin 
becomes the most important to 
me. The America’s Cop is so 
-interesting became of its 
complexity. Time will teQ if we 
have the temperament". 
Indeed. 

( TOMORROW ) 

David Miller on the Austra- 
lian rivals to defend the Cap. 



Facts and figures 


^ •••* 


Dennis Conner Flying US flag 

BASKETBALL 


Barry Pickthafl's guide to the 
syndicates competing for yachting's 
richest prize. 

» GREAT BRITAIN 
Syndicate: The White Horse 
Challenge. 

Club: Royal Thames Yacht Gub. 
Challenging yacht: White Crusader. 

. Designer Ian Howleu. 

Technical director Phil Crebbin. 
Syndicate head: Graham Walker. 
Skipper Harokl Cudmore. 

Budget $7 million. 

Major sponsors: White Horse 
Whisky. British Airways, James 
Capel. British Maritime Technology, 
British Aerospace, Pentax, Airship 
Industries, Hewlett Packard, Dunlop. 
FRANCE 

Syndicate: Challenge Kis France. 
Club: Societe des Regattes 
Rochelaise. 

Challenging yacht French Kiss. 
Designer Philippe Briand. 

Syndicate head: Serge Crasnianski 
Skipper Marc PajoL 
Budgets 11 million. 

Major sponsors: Kis France, Comile 
Francais pour la Coupe America. 
Ville de Sete, Dept de L'Herault, 
Region de Languedoc-Roussillon 
Syndicate: Challenger Francais. 

Onh: Societe Nautique de Marseille. 
Challenging yacht Challenge France. 
Designer Daniel Andrieu. 

. Syndicate head: Christian Ciganer. 
Skipper Yves PajoL 
Budget $5 million. 


Major sponsors: Grundig France, 
Comite Francais pour La Coupe 
America, City of Marseilles. 
UNITED STATES 
Syndicate: America 1L 
Gub: New York Yacht Gub. 
Challenging yacht America II US 46- 
Designer Bill Langan (Sparkman and 
Stephens). 

Syndicate head: Thomas F Ehman 
Jnr. 

Skipper John Kolius. 

Budget Si 5 million. 

Major sponsors: Cadillac. Newsweek 
magazine. Amway Corporation, 
Arther Young, Grant Bristol-Myers, 
Chubb Insurance, 33 affiliated yacht 
dubs. 

Syndicate: Sail America. 

Club: San Diego Yacht Gub 
Challenging yacht Stars and Stripes. 
Design team: Britton Chance/Bruce 
Nelson/David Pedrick. 

Syndicate bead: Mallin Burnham. 
Skipper Dennis Conner. 

Challenging yacht Stars and Stripes 
'87. 

Budget SI2 million. 

Major sponsors: Allied Corporation, 
Allas Hotels. Ford. Signal. Menil 
Lynch, Anheuser Busch, 49 affiliated 
yacht dubs. 

Syndicate: Heart of America. 

Gub: Chicago Yacht Gub. 
Challenging yacht Heart of America. 
Design team: Graham and Sc hi age ter. 
Syndicate head: Eugene M Kinney. 
Skipper Harry 'Buddy' Melges Jnr. 


Budget $6.8. million. 

Major sponsors: MCI Telecommuni- 
cations, Ciba-Geigy. 

Syndicate: Eagle. 

Qoke Newport Harbour Yacht Gub. 
Challenging yacht Eagle. 

Designer Johan Vatentijn. 

Syndicate head: Bill Ficker. 

Skipper Rod Davis. 

Budget $8.5 million. 

Major sponsors: Carlson Travel, 
Offshore sportswear. 

Syndicate: Courageous. 

Club: Yale Corinthian Yacht Gub. 
Challenging Yacht Courageous IV. 
Designer Leonard Greene. 

Syndicate head: Leonard Greene. 
Skipper David Vietor. 

Bodget $3.5 million. 

Major sponsors: Royal Sonesta Ho- 
tel. Princess Hotels, Barber Blue Sea, 
Continental Airlines. 

Syndicate: Golden Gate Challenge. 
Gub: St Frands Yacht Gub. 
Challenging yacht USA II. 

Designer Gary MulL 
Syndicate bead: Robert D ScotL 
Skipper Tom Blackaller. 

Budget $8.5 million. 

Major sponsors: Levi. NASA, 
University of California, Stanford, 
Jaguar. Pacific 
Telesis. 

Challenging yacht Italia L 
Design team: Giorgetti and Magrini 
Syndicate head: Angelo Monassi. 
Skipper AJdo Mighacrio. 

Budget $10 million. 


Major sponsors: Aermacchi, 
Assicurazziotu Generali, Inter Ma- 
rine, Montedison, 

Gucci, Bui tool 

Syndicate: Azzurra 

Gub: Yacht Gub Costa Smeralda. 

Challenging yacht Azzurra Iff. 

Designer Andrea VallicdlL 

Syndicate head: Riccardo Bonadeo. 

Skipper Mauro Pelascbier. 

Budget $12 million. 

Major sponsors: Abarth Accessory 
Banca Nazionale del Lavoro, 
Cinzano. Honeywell, Nastro 
Azzurra, Costa Smeralda, Alitalia. 
CANADA 

Syndicate: Canada IL 
Club: Secret Cove Yacht Gub. 




't **. r 

V/_ 


Designer Bruce Kirby. 

Sjsriicate head: Marvin V MacdilL 
Skippen Terry Neilson. 

Budget $8 million. 

Major sponsors: Ca nad ia n Pacific 
Airline, Petro-Canada, Control Data. 
NEW ZEALAND 
Syndicate: BNZ Challenge. 

Gub: Royal New Zealand Yacht 
Squadron 

Challenging yacht New Zealand IIL 
Design team: Ron Holland/Bruce 
Farr/Lawrie Davidson. 

Syndicate head: Michael Fay. 
Skipper Chris Dickson. 

Budget $NZ20million 
Majm sponsors: Bank of New Zea- 
land, Subaru NJZ. Jebson Shipping, 
Lion Brewery, Air New Zealand. 


to*;*- t < 



Phil Crebbim Britain’s technical director 


Madrid match evokes 
memories for Charlton 


Bobby Chariton will have 
poignant memories of Manches- 
ter United's golden footballing 
era when their basketball team 
Tare Real Madrid at Stretford 
tonight. President of the basket- 
ball section and a soccer direc- 
tor. he is the last of the 1968 
European Cup winning team 
slil! involved directly with the 

Chariton follows the English 
basketball champions' progress 
fervently and. although missing 
the European Champions' Cup 
preliminary round, second leg. 
awav to Sporting Club Lisbon 
Ben flea on Sunday, the winning 
aggregate result was telephoned 
to his Cheshire home from 
Portugal. ... „ 

He admits: ”Il is marvellous 
for United to be involved in 
European sport with the ban on 
English soccer. This keeps our 
contacts, and we have had a long 
and friendly association with 
Real Madrid. Real must be the 
best side in Europe and we arc 
,ust starting. When we played 
them in the European Cup semi- 
final. I Ihink Of J95S. we were 

inexperienced in two-legged 
matches. We lost 3-1 and drew 
•»_ » ai Old TrafTord. 

~ Charhon scored in that game 
and 10 veare iaicr. was in the 
side that squared the account, 
-w’c knocked them out w/th a > 
i awav draw and 1-0 al home 
ind then wc beat Benfica 4-1 in 

fhe final- mt hoping usgomg o 

he the opposite wa >‘ found with 
Martin 

Clark makes Team Polycell 


Kingston slight favourites to 
begin their advance into the 
second round of the European 
Cup Winners' Cup at Tolworlh 
tonight at the expense of the 
Belgium club. Racing Maes Pills 
Mechelen (Nicholas Hailing 
writes). 

The 6fi 8in forward was 
missing last year when Kingston 
were anihilated by Maccabi Tel 
Aviv in the first round of the 
European Cup because the 
International Basketball Federa- 
tion (FI BA) banned him from 
appearing in Europe after he had 
played during the summer in an 
American professional league, 
although Clark insisted that he 
had not been paid. 

Now reinstated as an amateur 
with limned eligibility. Clark 
can play Tor his club in Europe 
bui not. insist the English Basket 
Bail .Association, for England or 
Great Britain. It is their's and 
our loss, bui fortunately no 
longer Kingston's since the 
plover proved at Portsmouth on 
Saturday that he is well on the 
way to recovering from a 

sprained heel after missing the 
opening two league games. 

Portsmouth, who are also at 
home in curopcan competition 
tonight, have injury problems 
for their Korac Cup tie against 
the Yugoslavs from Sibenka. 
Joel Moore (pulled thigh mus- 
cle). and Joe White (sprained 
ankle), arc out. leaving Dan 
Llovd. the player/coach, with 
only nine fit players including 
himself. Sibenka will be for- 
midable opponents. Eight of 
their squad are over 6ft 6in. 


RUGBY LEAGUE 

Go-ahead 
for third 
Shield tie 

The Rugby League Charity 
Shield will be staged in the Isle 
of Man again next year (Keith 
Macklin writes). 

Although some doubts were 
expressed at taking a major 
trophy to Douglas. League of- 
ficials are backing Okells Brew, 
cry in their third successive 
sponsorship of the match be- 
tween the champions and the 
Challenge Cup winners. 

A prize of£5.000 is given on a 
winner-take-all basis, and both 
clubs are given a free weekend's 
holiday on the island. 

Next year’s Shield game will 
be staged on August 23. David 
Wigham. chairman of the 
Rugby League, said: “All four 
clubs.' Wigan. Hull KR. Halifax 
and Castle ford, who have taken 
part m the Charity Shield, have 
expressed their delight with the 
chance to lake part in a compet- 
itive pre-season build-up match 
and the financial returns. 

Bruce Gark and Gary War- 
neckc. Oldham's Australian 
pair, have been cleared to pby 
in i»inighi'5 Lancashire Cup 
semi-final against Widnes. 

There arc still doubts O'er 
Stuart Raper. a third Australian, 
who is sulTcring from back- 
trouble. and Mike Taylor, the 
winger who has a hand mjury. 


SPEEDWAY 


Top three underline 
their superiority 


By Keith Macklin 


Confirmation of the first three 
placings in The world individual 
championship in Poland came 
at Bradford Iasi weekend. In a 
strong field, the Odsal cham- 
pion of champions event was 
won by Hans Nielsen, of Den- 
mark. with the British rider 
Kelvin Tatum second and an- 
other Dane. Jan Pedersen, third. 
The same three riders stood on 
the winner's rostrum in Kato- 
wice. with the small difference 
that Pedersen was runner-up in 
I ihe world final, with Tatum 
, third. 

Nielsen's victory crowned a 
magnificent end-of-scason run 
by the Dane, who has finally 
emerged from the shadow of his 
creai Danish rival Erik 
Gundersvn. to claim the un- 
disputed title of the world's best 
rider. 

in contrast. Gundersen has 
lost his spark since Katowice 
and may haw to think seriously 
about his altitude to the span 
and the quality of his bikes and 
back-up learn before the start of 
next season. The achievement 
of Taium. meanwhile, shows 
that his performance in Poland 
was no fluke and his successes 
give new hope for the long- 
awaited revival in British, 
speedway. 

It seems unlikely this revival 
will be spearheaded by Belie 
Vue. who for decades w'erc the 
dominant home irack in speed- 
way. Stuart Bam forth, who look 
over as promoter in the' 


year the Aces last won the 
championship, is worried and 
puzzled by the decline in both 
performances and attendances 
at the famous Hyde Road 
stadium. 

Bamfortii is a man of strong 
character and may not wish to 
hide behind excuses. However. 
Andy Smith has been out with a 
broken leg. Peter Carr has 
moved to Sheffield and Louis 
Carr to Ipswich, while Peter 
Collins has become a depressing 
enigma to both himself and 
Belle Vue. 

Collins recently came second 
to Gundersen in the world long- 
track championship in West 
Germany, which means that „■ 
basically’ when he chooses to 
race, there is little wrong with 
the former world champion's 
skills and power. Collins has 
rarely used full throttle for his 
team this season, and the failure 
of one of the biggest names in 
British speedway io produce the 
goods has been a major reason 
fur Belle Vue's decline. Collins 
feels so badly about it that he 
has threatened to leave the 
spon, 1 imagine, however, that 
he could rediscover his appetite 
on the continent or in the 
national league. 

Reins of power 

Captain Mark Phillips is LO 
manage a new £3 million eques- 
trian centre at the Gleneagies 
Hotel. 


730pm unless stated 
European Cup 
First round, second leg 
First leg scons In brackets 

CettfcOJ* Shamrock Bov (01 

UnWd (0) v HosonbergBk (1) — 

Bayern Mun p)v PSVEJmSiovwi (0) — 

Rabat Ajax <01 v Porto (9j - 

Austria Vienna (3) v Bsggan (0) 

Valur (ica) (0) * Juventus (7) — 

Patvr . nwios (0) * Red Star Belgrade (3) 
Dynamo Ktav (f) v Boros Siara Zagora (1) 
Baal Uacfrrd (TO v Young Boys Berne (1) 
Gormk Zabrze (0) v Ancfeftocm (7) — — 

Hon wed (1) v Broeaendbyemes (4) 

D’mo Tirana (0) v Be&lktas tatartM (2) — 

HJKHetSrtki(0)vApoal Nicosia (1) 

Dynamo Berfcn (3) v Ongryte (Swe) (B) — 

Cup Winners' Cup 
First round, second leg 

WnxtumfflvZumaatpl.--. 

Skin (S*«tz) 111 v Aberdeen (2) 

Brugge (3) vRapU Vienna M 
Baal Zaragoza (0) * Roma (2 ) 

LiKestrom (Nor) (0) v Benflca (2) 

Dynamo Bucharest (0) v NarttonTlnanafl) 

Apollon Lmaasoi <0) v Makno (B) 

Aiax(2) w Buraspcf (Tix)(0) — - 

Torpedo Moscow (Si « Vakeatasken (2) 
US LuxembS'sg :3) v Olympistios (3) — 
Spartak Tmava <01 v Sti 
Vttosha Sofia (0)v 1903 . _ 

Lokomotiv Leipzig (1) v Gtentoran (1) 
Velez Mostar (2) vVasas Budapest (i 

UEFA Cup 

First round, second leg 


TODAY’S FIXTURES 

Second dviston 

Dertw * Sunderland 

Reading w Grims&y 

Third division - - 

Cheater v Doncaster — 

Fourth efivrsion 

Exeter v Southend — . 

Hartlepool v Crewe 

Hereford v Colchester — — 

Peterborough v Cardiff — — . 

FuD Members Cup 
First round 


FA CUP: Second round qoaBfytag ro- 
pftys: Banop Auckland v riortft Srtekta: 
Brandon v W orkington: Chippenham v 
Wimbo me; Eastwood v Boode: King's 
Lynn w Hornchurch (7.45); Petertea New- 
town v Wren Rows: Rufstp Manor v 
Staines; South Bank v N ewcast le Eta 
Stan Southwick v Ashtord; Totton AFC v 
Havant. 

GM VAUXHALL CONFERENCE: QbUS- 
hsad V Frickley; Norttmoch v AMmcham; 
Weymouth v W a it in g. 

VA(JXHAU.^>PB. LEAGUE FM ®- 
vtekm: Southwick v Epsom and BmL 
Second division north: Coaler Row « 
Heyhndge Swifts: long v Vauxhal Mo- 
tors. Second dhhaaoo .scute Fotthem v 
Newbury; Pourakefc) v Dorking: 

CAPITAL LEAGUE: GKJngham v WVrtbto- 
don (1 .30). 

HULIVARr LEAGUE 

Rhyl v Witton; South Liverpool « 


. (7.15k South Woles Rotary Newbridg e. 
OrraT v Bradford and Bfogley {7/fSfc 
Swansea v Fontypooi (7.0); Wostotv 
superstore v Bristol ■ 

RUGBY LEAGUE ' 
stones 'Bitter second otvstot 

Sheffield Eagles v Huddersfield. 

OTHER SPORT 

GOLR Senior woman's British open 
amateur championship (at Longnk Mi y 
GC?. Woman's Mitsubishi Jersey open 
. tournament (at Royal Jersey GC). 
&UUNG: Mmne W after work) safes 
speed record weak (at Portend). 
SNMKER: BCE international, final sagas 
iat T rsntha m Gardens. StofcMXv-Trenq. 
BASKETBALL (80 uiiess staled): Euro- 
pean Champkme Cup: Hrst round, first 
leg: Sharp Manctear United v Real 
Madrid. Europaen CujMdnnors Cup: Rrst 
round, first tog: Team Pofvort Kmgston v 
Mechelen (BeQ. ftsopoai Korac Cup: 
Hrst round, first lea Portsmouth PC v 
Sfoenka (Yug). Bnteh 

round: Happy Eater ! 

Solent Stars; ECS Windows Bkomora 
Part v Horaespare Bohan and Bury. 


Regional 

Pkates v 


Briggs out 


Magdetxai} (0) v Athtobc Bfibao (S) 

wenuTBremen (0) v AtttDco Madrid (2) 

Sheet (2) v Jaunesse d'Eschfl) 

Feyenootd(Q)vPBcsi Munkash) 

Vitaca Gurmarws (t) v Sparta Prague (T) 

Tonno (fl) v Names (0) 

Bayer Leverkusen (4) v Kalmar It) 

Raba En Gyoer (4) v Dynono Minsk 12) 

lFKGaMJOrgtt)v Sigma Ofomouc(l) .. 

Dnepr tO)v Lege Warsaw — 

Cad Zeiss Jena (0)v Bayer llerdmgen (3) 

Wklzew Lodz(1) v Unz (1) 

Lynrtw (CO v Neuchatal Xamax (2) 

H^dul>Spht(0)v OR Crete (1) 

BaroaionaiDvFlanwtartVJorari) 

Trakia WOvdN (2) v Hfoemans (Malta) (0) 
P B'grade (0) v Borusaia M'gfetftach (i) 
Omoma 10) v Sportul Studemasc(l) — 

GatotasarayiQ) v unverautaa Craiova 0 

Standard Lege (1)vR*eka(0) 

TotuousejO) v Naples (l) 

tuc8rne(|D)v Spartak Moscow (0) „_™ 


SOUTHatH LEAGUE: Premier dMofoee 
C a mbrk iu a Chy v Worcest e r. . 

CENTRAL LEAGUE (bH 7.0k Bret dh 
vtoion: Aston Vila v Hufl; Liverpool v 
Noam Forest Mfodtrahrough v Sheffitid 
Wedne s day: Oldhem v Btock&um. Sec- 
ond dtowerc Bameiey v Scun th orpe: 
Darfington v Bradford: Nobs County- v. 
HudderoflaU: R o ther h am v Stoke: Wigan 
vWdst Bromwich Albion: York v Bolton. - 
FOOTBALL COMBINATION: Bristol 
Rovers v West Ham Crystal Palace v 
Reedkte lUHwaB v Chelsea Norwich 
v BngfUQn; Oxford United v Ipswich; 
.Tassnnam v Swindon pug. 

WESSEX LEAGUE: League Cap group 
matches; Portals v Stoksnwrat; Rwnsey- 
v Bournemouth. 

BASS NORTH-WEST COUNTIES 
LEAGUE: Aco«oton Stanley v Warn. 

RUGBY UNION 

TOUH MATCH: Leicestershire vJap8n(Bt 
Lsmeter RFC. 7.ia 
CLUB MATCHES: Aberevpn v Crass Keya 
(7 O). Bhuna v AtxetRery: UaneB v 
. Gou coster (7.0); NotBnghwn v-Coventry 


The knee injury sustained in 
winning the ‘British Open 
temamwei^u title at the week- 
end has forced -Karen Briggs, the 
world champion to puli put of 
the European team champion- 
ships in Belgrade this weekend 
(Nicolas Soames writes). 

Roy Inman, the manager, 
whose team won the bronze 
medal. last year, said yesterday: 
“This rather, diminishes our 
chances.. Injuries and next 
month's world championship 
has already forced me to include 
a number of reserves." 

Briggs's place is taken by 
.Anisah Mqhamoodally. . the 
leading junior bantamweigbi. 

aged! 7. 


| gA_ Hug hes. 
NetherwootL 
A UtdtL 


TEAfit Bantohwaigta 


M&dtamlgtit 







& 


SPORT 


)RT THE TIMES WEDNESDAY OCT OBER 1 1986 “ 

RACING: NELSON’S IMPROVING FILLY TO COME OUT BEST IN A FASCINATING CONFRONTATION FOR THE CHEVELEY PARK STAKE ^ 


■ x-5. /. 
'• *“VlK 


Minstrella can 
edge ahead 
in Newmarket 
decider 


By Mandarin (Michael Phillips) 


With both Forest Flower 
and Minstrella standing their 
ground, today's . Tattersails 
Cheveley Park Stakes at New- 
market, where the meeting is 
.being run on the July course, 
'has developed into one of the 
most fascinating confronta- 
tions of the season. The two 
have met twice already and 
the score is one alL 

Having already won at 
Newbury and Royal Ascot, 
Forest Flower drew first blood 
when she gave Minstrella, 
who was also a winner at the 
royal meeting, 21b and a three- 
quarters of a length beating in 
the Cherry Hinton Stakes 
which was run over today’s 
course and distance in July. 

However, Minstrella got her 
revenge a month later when 
the two clashed again in the 
Heinz 57 Slakes at Phoenix 
Park in Dublin. On that 
occasion there was only a 
short head in it aL the finish. 

In the meantime the big two 
have gone their separate ways: 
Minstrella back to Ireland 
where she won the Moyglare 
Stud Stakes on The Omagh 
by two and a half lengths from 
the Lowther Slakes winner 
Polonia; Forest Flower to 
Newbury where she won the 
Mill Reef Slakes by half a 
length from Shady Heights 
who is repuied to be the best 
two-year-old colt in Robert 
Armstrong's yard. 

If my interpretation of the 
form book is correct 
Minstrella has improved 
since she and Forest Flower 
last met and the Charlie 
Nelson-trained fitly is my nap. 

My line of argument takes 
in Polonia who was a mere 
one length behind the pair at 
Phoenix Park but more than 


double that distance behind 
Minstrella when they met 
again oa The Curragh. 

Whatever else happens 
Minstrella should be capable 
of taking care of Canadian 
Mill, Indian Lily and 
Shaikiya. the other members 
of ibis small, but select field. 

Indian Lily finished nearly 
eight lengths behind her in 
Ireland last month while a line 
through Linda's Magic, who 
finished third behind Ca- 
nadian Mill at Newmarket in 
July and third again to Polo- 
nia at York, suggests that my 
nap has a few pounds in hand 
of Canadian Mill now. 

Similarly, Shaikiya looks to 
be facing a steep task. At 
Doncaster she was beaten two 
lengths in the Flying Childers 
Slakes by Sizzling Melody 
who had finished about three 
lengths behind Minstrella and 
Forest Flower at Phoenix Park 
the previous month. 

No matter how he fares on 
Forest Flower, Tony Ives 
should not leave the course, 
empty-handed because 1 be- 
lieve that he has a good chance 
of winning the Never So Bold 
Fillies' Handicap on Brazzalut 
who has been a model of 
consistency this season. 

The conditions of the Rouse 
Stakesjook tailor-made to suit 
Stalker who won the Middle 
Park Slakes during this meet- 
ing 12 months ago. My selec- 
tion was jarred after 
contesting the King's Stand 
Stakes on firm ground at 
Royal Ascot but be is fine 
again now. 

Taking a line through 
Acushia and Hallgare, Stalker 
appears to have sufficient in 
hand of Storm Warning, so 




.V - *■■**■• - i 





* *T 


v 

* 

• 1 - 




One apiece and all to play for. old rivals Minstrella (left) and Forest Flower face each other 
again In the Cheveley Park Stakes at Newmarket 


much so. that it will be 
disappointing if he does not 
regain the winning iraiL 

Well that the course winner 
Roman Gunner should go in 
the Rowley Mile Nursery I 
just doubt whether he will 
manage to give I81b to Mel- 
ody Maker who impressed at 
Chester last time. 

Finally, at Brighton I give 
good chances to Bag O' 
Rhythm (2.15) and Best O 
Bunch (3.45). 

Following that heartening 
run against Trojan Song, Best 
O Bunch should account for 
the Salisbury winner Noble 
Bid in the EBF Kemp Town 
Stakes while Bag O’ Rhythm's 
overall form entitles him to a 
favourite's chance in the Race 
Hill Stakes. 


BBC’s Arc reign over 


The BBC for the firs? time in 
20 years, will not be shtowrag the 
Prix de TArc de Triomphe at 
Longchatnp oa Sunday. The big 
race will be screened exdasively 
live by Channel Four. 

Jonathan Martin, the bead of 
BBC sport, said that the Arc 
organisers had refused to deal 
with the European Broadcasting 
Union who bad previously sap- 
plied the pictures to BBC 
through the French television 
service: 

There are 27 bones left in 
Sunday’s race after yesterday’s 
forfeit stage. They iadnde the 
crack German borsc 
Acatenango, the Prix VenneOle 
winner, Danra, and lades, 
whose owners paid £25,000 each 
to make a supplementary entry. 


up Baby Turk, Fast Topaze and 
Saint Esteube. 


NEWMARKET 


3.10 TATTERSALLS CHEVELEY PARK STAKES (Group I: 2-Y-O 
Bins: £41,110: 60 (5 runners) 


Selections 

By Mandarin 

By Our Newmarket 
Correspondent 

2.0 Tyrian Princess. 

2.0 Hailey's Run 

2.35 MelodyMaker. 

235 Roman Gunner. 

110 MINSTRELLA (nap). 

3.10 Indian Lilly. 

3.40 Brazza lea. 

3-40 Zalaiia. 

4.10 Stalker. 

4.10 Storm Warning. 

4.45 Wassl Reef. 

4.45 Ambassador. 



By Michael Seely 

3.40 Cleofe. 4.10 Storm Warning. _ ; 

Guide to our new in-line racecard 

103(12} 04)432 1UHESF0RM (CD.BF) (M'S JRyfoy) B Hal 8-1 (M) BWmt(4} 68 7-2 

tacacwd number. Draw in brackets. Ste-flqure latest race). Owner hi brackets. Trainer. Age and 
iiivuv mm iRjtfnfcnrn VjmTwv H4wind. vmHil Ftidar dIus anv ettowanca. The Times 


MINSTRELLA (8-12} *1 at the same meeting {Of. £25776. good, duly 8, 10 ra nl and last time outffB) took 

MIBTRBJufls^mcmigerMS-l^teS l£v ifS&tiva wav ier at the 

Curragh (BL 0*65600. good to firm. Sept 14. 8 nmL Previously (8-11) avengad Wew ma i ta^ dete« by sh hfl 

firm. Sept 13. 6 rani 
Selection; MINSTHB1A 

340 NEVER SO BOLD FILLIES HANDICAP (£5,993: 7f) (6 runners) 


Ra ce car d number. Draw in brackets. Ste-flgrae 
form, Hone's name (B-blnkars. v-vteor. H-hood. 
Ocourse winner. D-dotance winner. CD-course 
and distance winner. BF-beaten favourite m 


latest race}. Owner in brackets. Tnuner. Age ana 
weight Rider plus any alowance. The Times 
Private Handfcappor's rating. A p proximate starting 
price. 


402 (5) 2-10200 ZALAT1A (0)jR Waugh) W Jarvis 3-B-7-. 

403 (2) 112333 BRAZ2AKA (fro Teh Tan) M Jarvis 3-S-7 - 

404 (3) 421312 BLUE GUITAR (VI (K Al-Smd) J HtrWJey 3-8-6 _ — 

406 (6) 01432 CERTAIN AWARD (BJBF) (J ABwtoxi) J W Watts 37-10 — 

407 (4) 400103 CL&FE Ms 0 Zwchail L Gurnard 3-7-7.. 

408 (1) 210212 QUAUTA«raS (V) (Ouaitalr Eng Ltd) K Stone 4-7-7 (5ex) . 


. Put Eddery M 9-2 

Three St 7-2 

Mm W99 7-2 

_. W Canon S3 6-1 

.TtHam 17 5-2 
P Brake (7) 8512-1 


Going: good to firm Draw: no adva ntage . 

2.0 LONSDALE SELLING STAKES (2-Y-O: £3.132: 7f) (22 runners) ill 


i (1m Group 
d 2nd to Non 


101 (8) 421400 COLLEGE WIZARD (Mrs C DunnatQ MTOmpMns 92 


105 <51 000 BOLD INTENTION (Mrs L Ingham) A Imffani 6-1 1 — — -"gwml 

107 (21) M CALYPSO IOD (B) (M Graham-Care) MfcfcCormacfc 6-fl WWTwrtog 

108 (4) 0 CH0ISUN(H WOP Hasten 6-11 J Sc*tty(7) 

109 (3) 00 CORLEQN (T SSs) P Hasten 8-11 — . D Ud mom 

1« (14) 8000 GEORGE HARRY (North Chas hro Tia : % D Hay dn Jones 6-11 - J 

"328 

118 (9) OMEN rr EHm> P Raslkm 8-11.- . — Q Fre nch 9 

119 P2) 00000 PEAtUiTICmjR Wn^MTompl«»8-11 GOww 

121 ID 00 StXTY MffurTES (TE0») P Haaiari 8-11-~_^ — . . — . T Wafiamr* 

122 (20) 040000 OTfAW S TAYLOR (V) (Tavtoracrf SOtem Ud) D Leslie 8-H 

123 (22) 000 STREET LBBAL (J Kenrw) R Boss WU — - rirr .._ p »t E ddery 

126 (16) 003000 COUNTESS BREE (Mrs E Jackman) K Cunninghaffl-Brown) 8-8 Pawl Eddery 

128 (17) 0 GOOFORDjj Redmond) J Winter 8-8...... 

129 (7 ) 00 fNDIAAl JU&EE (J Hoirodfl Haiwn 23K522 

130 (10) 000 JEALOUS LOVER (Mrs R Smpson)P Makfei 8-8— BTbomeon 


W Woods (3) 

— RCurant 

■11 w Wharton 

J Scatty (7) 

__ D Mckeown 

ones 8-11 JReM 

W Ryan 

W Canon 

D Price 

GDoffieM 

Q French# 

O Carter 

TWMianw 


showed Improved for m whan a short heed and toNord 
firm. Sept 24. 18 ran). CERTAW AWARD®*) a aid « 

Redcw (7f. mi3, gcxidto firm^pt 16. 30 otiL O40F 

produced best effort to dale whan (B-12) a II »d to Sir A 
SetaC&OR CLEOFE 

4.10 ROUS STAKES (£6,128: 5f) (7 runners) 


to Nortfiea (8-11) at Sundown last mak (im, ES620. i 


3 ® 

507 (3) 

IS R 

512 (1) 

513 (4) 


70 8-1 
64 20-1 
— 25-1 
96 5-1 
09 9-2 
• 99 9*4 
98 62 


US L OVER (M rs R Simpson IF 

000 LITTLE LOCWTTE (Mrs K Green) 0 A WBsen B-8 — 
004 MAIN BRAND (HocUiouhi Stud) W O Gormwi 8-8™ 


WMe wnes 

T lv«s 

SCeotheo 



to Last Stand 
GE WIZARD! 


137(11) 0 TYFBAN FWNCESS (W PonsontJy) P Cole M SCaotheo 34 10-1 

CADM HARJEY*S RUN came dosesttowetorywhen W 3rd (W) to Last Stand iMtaYamtoutticteraer 
rUrllYl tea ome out (7t, £3495. good. Sept 17. 19 ran). COLLEGE WIZARD (fn wan 2)i back in 5dL 
MAIN BRAND (8-4) 9m and CHOISUN [M) out of first 9. MILL TRIP (IV12) 21 2nd oHS to Caffiwa (9-3) ei 
Lecester darn er (7i:i25 90. hm. Sept fe) Detwflant TYRIAN NOBLE (9^) was 71 away 5th and CtfttJjON (9- 
2) out Ot first 9 STHEET LEGAL (9-0) was never near to chaBenge when 8X1 5lh to CtaMiang (9-0) m Nartmg- 
ham maiden (S, £1473, good to firm, Jt4y 28. 9 ranL JEALOUS COVER (8-1 1) was a never nearer 6th. beaten 
10’-l. to Lucayan Kraght (8-11) m Smear contest (£959. firm. Sept 8, 14 ran). MAIN BR AND (6 -4) was batten 
4«l mio 4th by Umrnnei Way (84) m Leicester darner (7l. £2590, firm. Sept 22. 15 ran). SIXTY MINUTES (9-2) 
was outpaced mm 


4.45 STAYERS HANDICAP (3-Y-O: £4^24: 2m 24yd) (9 runners) 


I (94)) m Yarmouth darner 
(8-7) was Zh back m 5m. 
d 15 to CaSmgue (9-3) m 


602 (2) 101011 

604 (9) 0-1311 


n OKI 5lh to CtvMsang (90) m Nottnig- 
(8-1 1 ) was a never nearer 6th. beaten 


605 (I) 310110 

007 (4) 11 

609 (31 2232 

C13 (51 232143 


816 (B) 1-00404 
617 (6) 031113 





S elecfion; HAILEVS RUN 


&35 ROWLEY MILE NURSERY HANDICAP (2-Y-O: £4,721: 1m) (8) 


201 (3) 21342 

202 <4) 013 


203 (2) 04230 

204 HI 124 


205 1 6) 423120 

207 (S) 10 

SOB 17) 031 




211 (8) 340003 


5 Norton 9-7 JRetd 91 7-1 

Utter) GWragg 9-1 'SlK’f’V *2 ’l"? 

4 Lumen) C Bmtam 8-9 S Cauthm 96 5-1 

Garftekl Wo«an) J W Wans Ttaea #Wtt-2 

R Hannon 8-6. .. Q Starkey 98 5-1 

Lord Porchester) W Hem 7-13 W Canon 98 10-1 

^haw) B HOta 7-ii RHttta S7 7-2 

mvestmonts Ltd) A BaWy 7-7 Abigttl Richards (7) 90 18-1 






Course specialists 



GHarmnd 

WHem 
W O'Gorman 
IBakSng 
LCuraani 
GWragg 


TRAINERS 




JOCKEYS 



Winners Runners 

Par Cent 


Wrmers Runners 

Percent 

53 

365 

14.5 

SCauthen 

79 

542 

144 

29 

228 

12.7 

Ptt Eddery 

63 

460 

1i7 

24 

197 

12£ 

W Carson 

53 

467 

11.6 

16 

136 

11# 

G Starkey 

41 

365 

iia 

28 

256 

104 

T WSkams 

12 

119 

10.1 

21 

215 

94 

Tlves 

46 

487 

.9.4 


BRIGHTON 


By Mandarin 


Selections 


By Our NewmarkeT 
Correspondent 

2.15 Bag O' Rhythm. 2. 1 5 Bag O' Rhythm 

145 HcaihgrilT. 2.45 HcathgriffL 

3.15 Foot Patrol. 3.15 Forflite. 

3.45 Best O Bunch. 3.45 Best O Bunch 

4. 1 5 Gay Appeal. 4. 2 5 Make It Sharp 

4.45 Magic Vision. 

Michael Seely's selection: 3.15 FOOT PATROL (nap). 
^^^^HicTim^^rivai^faiidira^er^stopraUue^M^lAGICVTSION^^^ 

Going: good to firm Draw: 5f-6f, low numbers best 

2.15 RACE HILL STAKES (2-Y-O: £1,786: 5f 68yd) (5 runners) 


3.45 EBF KENP TOWN STAKES (2-Y-O: £2,314: 7f) (7 runners) 

3 (6) 401 NOBLE Bn ID) (A Suiting) J Dunlap W BRaasc 87 5-2 

B (3) 02 BEST O BUNCH ® POrtjL Plgqatt 8-11 WRSwMbittr 93 7-2 

14 (2) 030 REBEL RAISBt rT Remsdcn) u Ryan 8-1 1 fl Cochrane *9S 2-1 

15 (*| 0 SAUCE OF THE SEA (T Rwustion) M Ryan 8*1 T N Day — 20-1 

17 Pi 04 SPHINQ FORWARD (KVsTDaiwtfsl Pal MhdWfl 8-11 M Robert* — 25-1 

IS (5) BETTY JAKE ffPtoJJDBnfopTS- PCook -— 12-1 

24 (7) 00 SUNBTOOGE (R Sangxlvr) M W Diddnson &-S CMcHanraa 81 6-1 


4.15 TELSCOMBE HANDICAP (£2,872: 1m 4f) (15 runners) 


2 m 3011240 ULTRA NOVA 
4 (4) 212234 BAG 
6 15) <1 DAYS UKE THESE 

12 (3) 000000 MISTER WIZARD (P Burfieftfl M Francf* 6-11 

15 ID 00 MSS JASMMe(W Cm) □ Marks B-8 


P Cota 9-4 TQntan 

nrS-3 R Cochran* 

■a — _ w fl Svrinbum 

Q’M Francis 8-11 C Rutter (3) 

tariaB-8 — ~ — — PCook 




2.45 WATERHALL SELLING HANDICAP (£1,009: im) (17 runners) 


87 5-2 
• 99 8-11 
74 9-2 
6126-1 
— 18-1 



95 10-1 
• 99 7-1 


445 STHNE STAKES (S-Y-O: £959: Im 2f) (7 runners) 


2 (91 1-00000 LONG BAY raroSkMnarlHCoBnsrdoa 4-9-8. 

3 (7) 0-00000 SPRING RmSIlIT ffiO) (Mrs J McCoH) P MaWn 5-9-7 


3 (7) o-ooooo swaNQPuRSurr 

5 (11) 000400 NELSON'S LADY ( 

6 (4) 002130 SPARKFORD LAD 

7 H4) 010002 TREMENDOUS J 

9 (10) 000004 CAIMAN Miss I 


9 (10) QOO004 CATMAN (Mrta I 

10 (121 0-00000 WtWY HOLLOW 

11 (81 43-0400 UP TOWN BOY 
13 (151 000230 «A 

17 p 000400 SKY 

18 (1) 002400 TOWS NAP HAND (T 

19 (13) 000340 CYOMEroameE" 


(Mrs J JacksarOC Hargan 54 
(A Wheaiey) 0 Smvorth 44-2 
3-8^ 


Tonkin 
I Salmon 
Debbie Wfaeafcy 
- R Guest 
GWag- 


2 (3) 0001 MAGIC VISION 

4 (If 2HWI SMNWSSXINl 
6 (5) 4303 AUCHMATEU 

9 N 0CM43 HEAD0FSCHC 
15 (4) RARE WIND (G 


00 LASHAKAJ 
000000 SANOLlAfl 


(D) (Cal F Hue-WBiam) J Dwksp 9-7 B Rous* • 99 7-4 

[O) (Mjrcwgir AT MWcttnimJ P WMwyn 3-7 N How 88 7-2 

vsim®) G Harwood 9-0 A dark 89 5-2 

XX. (R Ashdown) Pat Wtchefl 94) R Cochrane 84 6-1 

Griffin) A Tumall 94) P Waldron -33-1 


iBtackwafi) A Moore 8-11 

ra C Dickson) R Akahurst 8-11 — 


PCook 25-1 

. G Brwftraa (7) 7116-1 


H 


Course specialists 


20 (3) 0-00000 STEEL PASS 




4002 BEE-HAY 
SSffiBSSa TEEJAY 

23 (5) UNTON 

24 (16) 002400 COMPOSER OLD) (Mrs K Jadaon) M James 

3.15 ERIC SIMMS HANDICAP (£2,977: Im) (11 runners) 


G Harwood 

TRAINERS 

Winners Runners 
32 130 

Par Cant 
24.6 

WRSMdwn 

JOCKEYS 

Winners Runure 
18 73 

Par Cam 
214 

jHmdtey 

B 

33 

2 42 

TOUtw 

20 

107 

18.7 

P Cote 

30 

151 

19S 

PCOOk 

22 

197 

114 

W Hastmgs-JBass 

e 

32 

184 

AMoGSone 

20 

191 

104 

C Homan 

e 

50 

164 

J Matthias 

11 

117 . 

9.4 

C Meson 

12 

79 

154 

B Rouse 

33 

385 

8.6 


JOYFUL DANCER (D) Mstapian Refarance) W Brooks M-7 TOutan 

FANCY pan (BF) (Mrs M Ceshman) W Hasongs-Basa 3-Bfi — H Cochrane 


MAR»i HARRIER 1C) (F Htt A Moore SB-4__ — P Cook 

FQ LOONC (V) (T Queh) EB*i AMaekey 

PtKj, OF UPE (A Cunrimaham) M Pipe 3-B-3 S WW MH 


PtKj. OF UPS (A Cunrlirigham) M Pipe 3-8-8 SVfMMWth 

FOTOJTEm^l(RGortl6l>)ODuu«Xl3^-2 — 

®*LLOOM (C) p saviil) w HMtmgs-Baas 444) WRSwtabwn 

rS£Lf£I , S , JS?Lff ,B * a •- EvaS) P CmM 5*8-10 C Rutter (3) 

JJJ«^A«^raUffe v *B)RH<}«w4^-7 SDewwn 

HAUTBOY L ADY (H autboy Restaurant M MaitawCk 5-7-12 O Dickie 

SPARKLER SPOTT (D) (parkier FKeri) R Akenurst 5-7-10 (Sex) - NAdan 


9S — 
94 M 
• 99 7-1 
91 9-1 
88 — 

88 3-1 
93 12-1 

93 6-1 
97 — 

89 — 

94 6-1 


First Scottish victory for Dickinson 


Michael Dickinson saddled his first 
Fiat winner in Scotland when 
Meadowbank. who drifted in ihc market 
from 8-1 to 10-1. scored a smooth two 
lengths victory in the Strathclyde 
Maiden fillies* Stakes ai Hamilion Park 
yesterday. 


Mill Reef 
filly in 
demand at 
select sale 


Chinoiserie pro 
painful winner 




- By a Correspoodent 

The Highflyer Yearling Sales 
made ? sirady rather than 
spectacular start at Newmarket 
yesterdav and it was no until fare 
afternoon that proceedings liv- 
ened up. . . 

An altracti ve dark bay daugh- 
ter of Mill Reef caused spirited 
bidding before Lady Beaver- 
brook had the final nod at 

560.000 guineas. She had left 

disappointed bidders Cormac 
McCormack. Josh Collins and 
Ben Han bury trailing in her 
wake. This filly is oui of Elegant 
Tern who has bred that smart 
performer Elegant Air. whose 


six wins include the group two 
Tattersails Rogers Gold Cup at 
The Curragh. 

Dancing Brave’s owner, 
Khaled Abdulla, was sitting 
with his agent George Blackwell 
when they went to 220,000 

guineas for a strongly-made son 
of Be My Guest out of a half- 
sister to the royal winners 
Milford and Height of Fashion. 
This half-brother to Capo di 
Monte was sent up from the 

Tho mast own Castle Stud in 

IrelancL 

Be My Guest has enjoyed 
considerable success this year 
and includes those top rwo-year- 
olds invited Guest and Most 
Welcome among his best win- 
ners. 

Sheikh Mohammed's racing 
manager.Anihony Stroud, was 
active throughout this select 


There were no surprise omis- 
sions but Michael Stonte's 
Colors pin, Alec Stewart's 
Dnbian and the Pan! Cote- 
trained Nisnas may all take 
their chance along with the Irish 
possibles Fleur Royale, Leading 
Counsel and Saturday's 
Bland ford Stakes winner, 
Nernaln. 

The ground at Maisons-Laffitte 
was good yesterday which wfll 
please supporters of Dancing 
Brave. Bering Is in fine form but 
his big-race rider Gary Moore 
was taking it easy alter injuring 
a shoulder. He is expected to be 
bade in action tomorrow. 

Other Arc probables include 
the Ptuna-Europa-Prea runner- 


session. He bid 330,000 guineas 
for a bay son of Mill Reef, 
submitted from the Sussex Stud. 

This handsome colt was the 
fourth foal of Irish-listed winner 
Baby Brew, whose Golden 
Fleece colt, named Asfawa, sold 
for 200,000 guineas last year and 
has been placed second at 
Salisbury for Paul Cole this 
season. 

Another choice lot to attract 
plenty of interest was a brown 


Chinoiserie gave Ray 
Cochrane his 73rd winner of 
the season in the Foundation 
Stakes at Goodwood yes- 
terday, but it was certainly his 
most painful and could prove 
very expensive. 

Just after passing the post 
Chinoiserie. who had been 
running close to the rail, 
ducked slightly and Cochrane 
hit his foot 

The jockey could not walk 
when he dismounted and had 
to be virtually carried to the 
scales to weigh in. 

He felt sure his foot was 
broken, but, after examining 
Cochrane, Doctor Michael Al- 
len, the Jockey Cub’s senior 
medical adviser, said: “I can t 
tell for sure, but I don't think 
he's broken anything. He's 
now going to Chichester Hos- 
pital for an X-Ray. He ev- 
idently ran into the running 
rail and he has cut the top of 
his right foot It’s very sore, 
and I think the rail drove his 
stirrup iron into his flesh”. 

Chinoiserie. running for the 
first time since his Exiel 
triumph on this course -two 
months ago, quickened bril- 
liantly to take the lead enter- 
ing the final furlong after Boon 
Point had made the running. 
Nomrood made his move at 
the same time but could make 
no impression. 


Chinoiserie. who is dearly 
still improving, has not yg 
been taken out Saturday’s 
Cambridgeshire. 

Minus Man's flying finish m 


the George Todd Apprentice? 
Challenge Trophy 12 months 
ago was just a fraction of j 
second too late for "him to 
overhaul Longstop, but yes- 
terday he got it just right, 
despite the 21b overweight pm 
up by Ricky Morse. 

At the two-furlong marker, 
Tom Forrester and Hamper 
were battling it out dear of the 
rest, but suddenly in the last 
SO yards Minus Man new up 
to foil them both and win by a 
neck and a head. 


Minus Man, at eight one of 
c oldest horses in the race, is 


the oldest horses in the race, is 
a tribute to his trainer Bin 
Holden, who doesn't over- 
work his charges. 

Minus Man has been racing 
six seasons and this is his sixth 
success. Morse, aged 20. riding 
his 22nd career winner, said: 
~Minus Man is a good old 
horse if you catch him right, 
but if he wakes up with a 
headache you can forget him.” 

Several riders missed the 
race because of a massive 
hold-up on the M2S 'and 
Polynor was withdrawn be- 
cause no suitable jockey was 
available. 


Pile-up at Nottingham 


There was a three horse pile- 
up in the Sibthorpe Selling 
Slakes at Nottingham yesterday, 
won by the Colin Tinkler- 
trained Coro fin Lass. 


colt by Nureyev and he made 
300.000 guineas when knocked 
down to John Walsh of the 
Curragh Bloodstock Agency. 

He was acting for a Japanese 
client Hizedaku Date whose 
Persian Boy won a group one 
race in Japan this season. This 
time Stroud was the under- 
bidder. 


The horses fell as the field 
swung for home, five furlongs 
out. where Corofin Lass held a 
clear advantage, which she 
maintained to the line. 


Miss Pisa, ridden by the 
apprentice Jason Ward, fell and 
brought down Lilly's Double 
and Willy's Niece. 


Nick Carlisle, fifth on Max 
Star, said: M It all happened so 
quickly and the three horses 
went down like ninepins'*. 

George Duffidd, on Lilly's 
Double, and Stuart Webster, 
who partnered Willy's Niece, 
both walked into the weighing 
room unscathed, but Ward was 
taken to the Queens Medical 
Centre in Nottingham for X- 
rays on his left legend elbow. 

Webster said: “Willy's Niece 
fell over Miss Pisa ana George 
Du (field's mount fell over me." 


LUDLOW 


Maxim) WHem 8-11 WCaraau 8411-9 

aMnatMl Tlvea 96 84 

IrttUriB-ll Put Eddery 80 33-1 

8-11 JRM •9911-8 

Houghton 8-11 S CauHwn 88 8-1 


Selections 

By Mandarin 

2.0 Swift Ascent. 2.30 Bashful Lad. 

3.0 Adamstown. 330 Honeyman. 4.0 Baluchi. 
4.30 Mister Pitt. 


Going: hard 
2 JO RADNOR 

(7 runners) 


NOVICE HURDLE (£685: 2m) 


2 -91* SNAKE JtfYBI/aW^Jonan 5-11-7- 

3 31F SWBT ASCENT G Baking 4-11-4 HCttwatffl 

5 3231 ' FRISKY HOTCJDFb C w&dge 4-11-0— A Murahyp) 

12 394) PBftLYNErsmDER JiickasS-IO-ll-. LowamHett 


csem 

.RQuastm 


16 U TAGORE P Arthur 4-10-11 

18 P-F2 CUONOAJTrtfflp 5-160 — _ 
91 -000 TENDER GFTT Morton B-lM 


___H0wta» 
— w A Shame 

_ M (7) 


3.30 GLEN INTERNATIONAL HANDICAP HURDLE 

(Ladies: £999: 2m) 18) 

1 00-4 WWEYMANgLp) J JtalWro 4-1 1-13. Cwid f Moora j^ 

2 1-PP CAREEN ID) MPoe 5-11-7 -JWwHHa^tal^ 

1 0391 KABABnI)OH(P)J Wfeon 4-10-7 (Sex).- Mrs G Bag 

B 005- BESTWTENTTBatoS-IM Ww S Latfwtg (7) 

9 U00- ROCKMAN Mr* P Rti&y 8-lM.— -- — 

10 0-40 HASTY BlPOffrr LA RObKin 7-104) R ttt* 
,2 3-00 ^CHiaaETTE^RDi^^^ 

13 404) INSPIRED (B.D) K WIngro*o &-1&-0- Stwmwi Jamoi (7) 
5-2 RttsabWon. 3-1 Honeytnan. 4-1 Careen. 13-2 Hasty 
Import 10-1 Our CMcklatn. Best Inmnt 12-1 Rockman. 

4.0 HOPTON NOVICE CHASE (El ,245: 2m) (6) 

1 3U12 SWWGLETREE (B) R Cftampion 10-12-0 ... NOftajHy 

2 1912 BALUCHI (Bn B Franz 5-11-13 PScudano* 

5 OPO- FORESTDALE C Wales 8-11-7 — HD*4 m 

7 44FF YANKEE DOODLE (BR D Barons 6-11-7 — PNkMh 

' - JMF BAtMATT{BF)DMcCan 5-11-6 KOiNra 

13 0- Dumonc LASS O OHeM 5-11-1 EHartttr 

134 Baluchi 5-2 Swfnqlttraa. 4-1 Yankee Doodto, 
)-2 Balmatt, 9-1 Forustrtata. 10-1 Dunmoro Lass. 


3- 4 Swtft Ascent, 11-4 Pennine's Prtda, 10M0 Snake 
River, 3-1 Frisky Hope, 10-1 Tender Gift. 13-1 Tagore. 

2L30 HUGH SUMNER HANDICAP CHASE (£1,632: 
3m) (5) 

3 -F12 BASHFUL LAP (COJF) M OHW 11-12-0 (7e»j 

5 «M TOQIEY STREET (CJ) C HteCaa 7-10-10-^- H terta* 

8 0P-P OAKPRME (Dl D PttdiBf 11-10-2 -Mr D PMitt 

9 SOP- PRINCELY CALL (B) (D) Mis G E Jones 13-10-1^ 

jsumm 

11 OP/O- HEraATGreamead 10-104) DMonta 

4- 5 Bashfii Lad. 52 Tootay Street 6-1 Princely Call, 
9-IMttela. 10-1 Oakprima. 

3 JO BRIDGNORTH NOVICE HURDLE (3-Y-O: £685: 
2m) (9) 

2 12 ADAMSTOWN (Dffl M Pile 11-8. P Jattaww 

3 312 BREMTRWBWlDEGBiidWgll-5 

5 1 SUNLEYSPBETS Christian 11-0 — ---.RJBeggm 

6 0 CHORISTERS DREAM (8} J Panatt 10-12 

GCttstas Jones 

8 4 DUE AND A DOLLAR AW Jones 10-12 — SJOYW8 


13-2 BaiinatL 9-i Focestfata. 10-1 Dunmoro Lass. 

4.30 RADIO SHROPSHIRE STAYERS HANDICAP 
HURDLE (£1,344: 2m If 180yd) (4) 


1 2111 METER PITT T M 7-12-3 (7es) NRanL 

3 1112 PLAZA TORO W G Turner 7-11-5 (7ax) Tracy Twasr uj 

4 4-PI PRINCESS IffiCATEP Dovs 11-11-1- MtaT Daria m 
7 OOPZ OUR BARA BOY (Y) M Chapman 6-10-0 SMfeMp) 

15-8 Motor Pitt, 2-1 Plaza Toro. 3-1 Princess Hecate. 
5-1 Our Bara Boy. 


Course specialists 

S: M Pipe. 7 winners from 36 runrtsis. 19.4%; J 


TRAINERS: M Pipe. 7 winners Iran 36 ruimois. 19.4%; J 
Spearing 7 from 63. 11.1%. (only two quafitera). 

JOCKEYS: H Davies. 16 men tram 74 rates. 21.8%; S 
Morehead. 13 ftom 72. 18JV P Scudamore. 17 from 118. 
144%; R Dunwoody. 6 from 48, 12^% J Suthem. 7 from 74. 
95%4onty liw qualttara). 


Ludlow chase declared void 


12 220 KLOSiERBRAUJ Spewing 10-1 2 SMorabead 

14 NATCHAKAHD Moorhead 10-12 — 

22 IHSS CORE R Fattens 10-7 IBs* JFeBowa 

25 1900. ROSE DUKker 10-7 BBtttef (7) 

114 Adamstown, 3-1 Brant Rtaerakte. 7-2 Suntoy Spirit, 
13-2 Klosnrljrau. 10-1 Natchakam, 16-1 others. 


The Richards Castle Handicap Chase, orip- 
inally scheduled as the final race on today's 
Ludlow progranune, has been declared void aRcr ' 
the firm going had fnghtesl away the 14 horses 
declared at the four-day stage. All the runners 
were taken out overnight. 


94 52 
87 8-1 
94 11-2 

93 7-2 

94 1Z-T 
96 8-1 

• 9910-1 
94 10-1 


Results from four meetings 


Goodwood 


CMnpgood 

2JB (im 20 1 . MINUS MAN (R Morse. 7- 

- " u Mr (A Dicks. 9-1): 3. Tom 

Carter, 5-1 favt 4. Sprfew 
_ . sock, 6-T). ALSO RAN: 11-2 


Haygate Park 16OT. Ironic (5th), 16 Dark 
Winfer, Z0 Fowl Ptay. 33 Btae O} Goid, 
Rnaron. 50 DoGSno. Lady Of Riga. Oak 
Reid. 13 ran. 2L %L ft. 1»L a. M 


DjcWnson at Wanton. Tata: £550: £1.60. 
£1.70, £1.10. OF: H-L20. CSF: £3650. 


3^0 (61)1. TUFTY LADY (PTUk. 11-2): 
2. So Kind (T Ives. 4-7 W 3. JW 
contsas* (M Hfis. 8-1). ALSO RAft 5 
Delphiraa (4di). 4 ran. w, 41, H. R 
Armstrong at Newmarket Tote £4.70. 
OF: £25f CSF: £8.73. 


Cramming. 14 Wtodbound Lass ffithL 16 

UiwMnn RalMa Oft Rb, ^ Canary, 


Morgana. Redden. 20 Big PaL Canary. 
Cosmic Wit, Daly, BecfiopeL Dandng 
Bamxi ffimj, Forenlving, Kiay Clare. 
Primrose Vray. 33 Focne. Irish Him, 
SkybooL Cheerful Times. Scarlet 
Trouper. 22 ran. NFfc No Bolder. Polynor. 
nk. hd. 1L 2, nk. W Holden at Newmarket 
Tote: £9.90: £1-90. £250. £1.10. £1.80. 
DR £43.10. CSR £6825. Tricast £32227. 
2min11^6sac. 


245 (8fl I. DUNLfft (J Lowe. 12-1fc 2 
Whtatfing Wander (A Proud. 20-1L 3. 
Roue Loufaet (A Matikay. 33-1). ALSO 
RAN: 9-4 lav SttattWaoe. 6 Ludanaga 

moeaway. iz rwe ws. 15 Brutus (btii). 
9 ran. 5*1 hd. 1ML W. W. a S Norton at 


« (6fl I. FOURWALK (R HHs. 1S-T); 2 

fav Copper Red (6m) 5 Brlmur pW4 J4 
Raxiey. 20 Ptarim Prance (Mi) GJamte 
Girt. 33 Young Cemurion, Power 01 Low. 

41. m II. KL *L Mb N 
_ at Melton Mowbray. Tote 
£18-30; £4.60. £250, £1 10. DF 
CSF:£145JH 


High Hoytand. Tote: 

£3:00. DF: £220.00. CSF: El 39.34. Tricast 
W.148J7. Green's GaMery (6-1) with- 
drawn. ran under orders - rule 4 apptes 
to an bets, deduction 1 0pm the pound. 


230 (im 21) 1, CMNOtSEHE (R 


Coctwane, 9-2): 3, Nnmruod (T Quinn, 
100JOL a Boon Point (J Hd it, i-Mi. 
ALSO RAN: 11-4 tav Ku‘ 


11-4 lav Kutrane (S 


Rackstraw, 6 Sanund Mth). 15-2 Bold 
Indian (Mi). 7 ran. 1L II. II, II. TLLCwnani 
at Nawmeriiai Tote £450; £230 £1.70. 
DF: £850. CSF: £1856. 2min 1270sec. 


215 (61] 1. DUFFER'S DANCER (N 
Connonon. 7-1 lavL; 2, Tit WUow (G 
Baxter. 14- 1): 3. Tnraiw Of Glory (O 
NWwte. 8-1); 4. Gods Solution (W Ryan, 
20-1L ALSO RAN: 8 Beecfcwood Canage. 
9 Tanfen, Henry's Venture. 10 Waroui 
Lady (5th), Thatchered. 12 Harmony Bowl, 


450 rat) 1. GALLANT GALLOS (Rl*f- 
2. AN Smith _ " 


20 Om 3ft 1. BRMMTNER (G 
It-1):2 Mltr " " — 


1 1-1X& Bafot Omm(S Dawson. 1 
aHariesune Lata (Pat Eddery, 11-4 
ALSO RAN: 100-30 Wfflhy Bank (6th). 
ActMum Mtth). 11 Sun SlreeL 14 Ac- 
curacy. 16 Detroit Sam (5th), AidoWng, 33 
Comester. 50 ItaNan Sunrise. Flaal 

9WeLl3ran.Hl,5L21,hd. — 
Q Harwood at PUfiMRiurih. Tote: El 2-80; 
£450. £2M0. eiJO. OF: £5230. CSF: 
£73JI7. Tricast: £227.96. After a stewards* 
inqury the result stood. 


33 Security 
ste RoB, Oft 


Lady (5th), Thatchered. 12 Harmony Bowi, 
14 Mademotseae Mj^jna, 16 Free Clare, 
Monrisi™. 20 Kmg CoJa. 33 Security 
Pacific. No Credftslty. Tootsta RoB, oft 
your Marie (6th). Tradesman. It s Heaven. 
20 ran. 1 V,i. nk. iy,i. nk. 11M. w Pearce at 
Hamhletan. Tote: £7.40: £320. £1.10. 
£260. £1220. DF: E1&90. CSF: E92S9. 
Tricast £725.60. 


i. AM Smith rr Ives. 138 fw* 3- 
(J Carrofl. 7-2). ALSO RAN: 11 
Golden Cajun. Our Freddie (4th). 12 B 
Deigatto. Touch O# Spoeo (Wfl. 2? 
Pwtain. 33 Garcon Nov. Graat Stands By. 

Metroman. Mont Arthur. 12 ran. NR- 
Aramor. 11. 11. 1L 21. 1W. C Boteh 
Fiaxton. Tote: £15.60; £240, £1-50,61-99- 
DF: £2220. CSF- £24 83. . 


3JD (7fl 1 . HK3NLY RBCOMMBIDEDJN 
Adams. 7-2): Z listen (Pat Eddery. 52 
-lav): 3. Mater March (Q French. 16-1). 
ALSO RAN: 6 £ 


: 6 Sunny Match, 13-21 
Codices, to Mouradedn, 14 
n rate). 20 Stzcarr AkJo, strive 


345 (71 40yd] 1. GAELIC LOVER (M 
Birch. 13-8 Jt-bv): 2. War ChOd (T 
waams. 13^ Jt-Iav): 3, Rtpster (D 
NichoOs. 16-1). Also RAN: 132 Cars 
Kefiy (4th). 8 U-Bix Copy Qth). 50 Little 
Law (Wi). B ran. 2L 155L 3t, iyil, 151. c 
Trtder at MaNon. Tote: £2^0: £170. 
£1 .10. DF: £1 .90. CSF: £429. Winner was 
bougm frr for I^OOgns. 


5J(im 50yd) 1. AKROTERIBAY p Fo*. 
6-1): 2 Rounalf {ft Has. 11-4 tav): 3. 
Jjame Breeze (M Hite. 12-1). ALSO RAJ* 
5 Spotter, 8 Commonsidr Gipsy (SdJ). 
Lukmane, 17-2 AvinasesH MdS, 9 SW 
Dancer. 11 MuOlur (6th). 20 Highland 
Land. 25 Abktian. Unos Pet I2ran. rtihd. 
LL 2L hd. nkXHott aT Basingstoke. Tote 
020. 0.70. £1.90. E2J0. ( 

CSF: £33.36. Tncast £182.76. 
PteCepoL£ 30 4JS. 


Sedgefield 


(5th). 33-T Lighting Wind. 11 ran. 1L2. hd. 
2KL 2L P CundeM at Newbury. Tote: E3JK): 
£1.60.-£1.ia £3.80. DF: £3-70. CSF: 
£12^2. Tncast £11829. low 2S583BC. 


4.15 (im 11) 1. COLLYWESTON (C 
Nuttflr.JI j 2 . Tmyainon (J Lowe. 

12-1 h 3. SLh i tWa tw n* Williams. 16-1). 
ALSORAN- 5-2 Busted Flavour (Btfi). 13-2 


4J» (7f) 1. TARTUFFE (G Starkay. 1-2 
CavL Z Me Saint (S Coutfun. 7% 3, 
Castle ward (B Thomson. 12-1). ALSO 
RAN: 16 Moore Brass (4m). wtia 
Minstrel rath)- 5 ran. %1. 121. S. 2L G 
Harwood at Puunrojgh. Tote: £1.40; 
£1 .10 £1.30. DF: £1.70. cSF: EZ53. imbi 
30.69KC. 


ALSORAN- 541 Busted Flavour (Btfi). 13-S 
gro Boy (4th). 8 Optkmsm Flamed, 33 
Njpknawas (SBi). 100 Tornggla. 8 ran. *l 


Going: firm 

_ 2.15 (2m hdle) 1 , Staranod (M Dwyar- ^ 
Q 2- Moondawn (4-6 tav): 1 
Wormed (11-1). II ran. 3L 3. C Tn» 
Tote: £4.90; £1.90. £1 10. £1.«t W 5 
£4.60. CSF- £8.68. 


Ntetatawes (Mi). 100 Tonvjgla. 8 ran. 
2%l. sh hd. 41. a Mwesoott at 
Newmarket. Tote: £3.00; £f.ia £»». 
£2.00. DF: £3^0. CSF: £16.12. 


145 (2m hdie) i. Mmuanto 
Pepper, 4-7 lav); 2. Holiday MR P-U3- 
France Mrss (10-1). 5 /an. m nrnwwj 


1. CAPTAIN HOLLY (T Ourriri. 


C3O0 

30-1); 2. 

11: 3. GBberto (PatEddery. 44 lay). ALSO 
RAN: 7-2 GeUtzt (4th). U Castfito. 33 
Saxon P^roel (6thV 66 Gold Mnones. Say 
You. Spitzabd (5&iK Lord 01 CanewdOd. 
10 ran. nk. IM. 5. 2L 3L P MaMn at 
MarfiiorougR. Tore E8M: ES-70. £1^9. 
£1.10. OF: £70.10. CSR £13349. Irrtn 
I34isac 


4A5 (im 51) 1. FOUR STAR THRUST (D 
McXeown, 4-11. z Tm Exceptional (ft 
u {xm ‘ 2- 1 «»)■ 
ALSO RAN: 6 tshkhjira (4th), 8 Parfett 

Do^te(5lhL16A^wSS yj£m 

5P (6th). 8 ran. mTSlt 

« Wathertiy. Tote: 
£840: £240, £1.20, ei.iq. DF: EBRO 
CSF: £16.74 
Placepot C40JS 


rranoe mmno-i). 5 /an. hh: ww"? 
5L 15L h Flttmw. Tele: £1.40. ?1 W 
£1.90. DF- £2.40. CSF- £340. 

3.15 (2m 41 hdie) I.TromafoatCGrtB*- 
10-11 fav); 2. Spectra Settsment 


Smart in Black m-il 5 tw. 10L 6L 

Smrth.._Tote: fl.eft £140. £140. 


£240. CSF- £347 

M5 (2m 41 hdie) 1. Hacueh i 0» * 
Orkney, 4^ lav ); & Banter Penl(2-^i 
Royal Can*t (33-1). 12 ran. 25L J * •* 
MTIW: £1 .70: £1.20. £1 10, £4.10. 
DF: £1.90. CSF- £2.45. 


Quwn. 7-^k Grey Woft Tiger (PCook. lb-. 
Ik 3, CattteCwnetfG French, 8-1). ALSO 
RAN: 9-4 fav PateSce. 5 Msidp Star 
MhL 1^-2 Mandalay Prince, 12 Mr 
CofTnan(6tti). Taka A rent (5th). 33 Percy. 
Harts Lane. 10 ran. 1 »L 21. 41. 2M.5L R J 
wwams at N o w m a ri ML Tar £640: 
£1.60. £2-00. £2.70. DF: £20.70. CSF: 
£65.06. Tricast £510.02. imin 4£47sec. 
Ptecepot £4.40 


1):3,CatttaC«net 
RAN: 9-4 fav Pate 


MORNING FLOWER (T 
y WoftTlger (PCook. Ilk 


Nottingham 

Going: firm 


Orkney, 4-6 lav); 2. Banter Peril (2 
Royal Carrot (33-1). 12 ran. 25L 


240 (im.SOytn 1 CORtWN LASS (M 
WbotL 4-1 n-iavU 2. Mascais Dream Yr 


4.15 pm 600yd ch)1. Mossy Co«* iP 
lAirtb. St 2. fimrina (74 tevjjl 
Stream (M-il 7 ran. 15L ML W * 
Stephenstm. Tote 23.40; £140, £1^0- 
DF. £2.40. CSF- £S43 


Ires. 5-1); 3. No Concern (W Newnes. all 
jt-tev). ALSO RAN - 9-2 A6ss Plisa (ft 11-2 
bw® Bay (6»i 1 1 Natons RoseJ4th). 12 
Wy s DoutM (bd). 14 Canary. 20 Caun 
Nteon. 33 AcettanhiL Max Star (Sh) 
w«y-s Niece (ML 12 ran. NR: SamS 
2- « MatooTcrt* 

£840: £2.40. £2.70, £1 80 DF: £2440. 
CSF £24.34. Bought n 1400 gw. 


Meadow hank, confidently ridden by 
David Nicholls. gaining his first win in 
the Robert Sangsier colours, soon settled 
down in front and pulled away from his 
rivals approaching (he last four furlongs. 

Veryan Bay provided Dickinson wiib 
his first success as a Bat trainer 


Hamilton 


4-4S(2m ch) 1. Rentaghost (G 
[-3; 2. Gowan HOuse Jire« g™* 


Rirers EdgB^-4). 4 ra 
Tote: £71D7 dF' £540. 


'n.Ttoioa 
£ 11 * 


Going: good " 

2-1S (M 1. MEADOWBANK (0 NichoBs. 
10-1):2. Run UWe Lady (W Ryan. 11-4 )t- 
favL 3. Jwt Kite ( Pad Eddary, 11-4 jt- 
tav). ALSO RAN: 3 Ripe Chnstma rtlhl 14 


34 (im 6f) 1. REAL MOONSHINE (M 
Roberts. 12-1); 2. Shah’s Choice rw 
Carson. 9-4): 3. River Gambler (M H«s. 7- 
1). ALSO RAN: 1 MO lav John Dorey (5th). 


uon i Lwapair (aa-i). mccotwy a 
&4 (av)7e ran, 6L KL R Suwi^Tf# 
£18-80. £240. £140. £1 40. OF - £1930 


CSF- £8545- 

Ptacepas E45JHL 


KSSSISSntil: SlsmtSfOKm Blinkered first time. 


Sw«t at Nawmjricot Tote; £2940: 
£2.80. £1Z0. DF- £1540. CSF: £36.43. 


NEWMARKET; 24 CalypSOKid. PasrtfW 
BRIGHTON: 2.45 Urson Starchy - 




.1- ^4 

'■4 ‘ - 

; • ikii. _ 


. .1 

It. N*t J i 

(M umi a 
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Hill to captain 
England for 

the first time at 
Twickenham 



C * Dty 
-' % ’Ct4V 


«:8 

-C.l J? 

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64 1 |J 


Kichard HUL the Bath 
scram half, will lead his 
country for the first time when 
[ an England XV play Japan at 
T Twickenham on October 11 
The appointment of the 25^ 
year-old Hill is also an indica- 
tion that he may captain 
England in this season's Five 
Nations championship and in 
Hie World Cup next summer. 

Against Japan he wil] have 
under him a team who have 
all been capped (no caps are 
awarded for this game) with 
the exception of Brian Moore, 
the Nottingham hooker, who 
has been knocking on the door 
since appearing in an under- 
23 party four years ago. Five 
of Hill's colleagues from Bath 
join him and a sixth, Graham 
. I)awe, is among the 
9 A replacements. 

Dawe's elevation is one of 
three surprises in the squad of 
21. Mark Bailey, who won his 
two caps in South Africa in 
1984 at the same time as Hill, 
is on the on the right wing 
rather than the left where he is 
more at home and Peter 
Wimerbonom is the replace- 
ment for the back five, which 
may prove embarrassing 
should England lose a lock 
forward during the game. 

Moreover, Bailey, aged 2S, 
has. played no rugby in this 
country this season. He has 
been abroad with Cambridge 
University playing in South 

t Korea. Thailand and Hong 
Kong and did not play for 
Wasps last weekend. Nor, 
indeed, has he been chosen for 
the club this weekend since, 
with his enhanced academic 
status at Cambridge, he doubt- 
less has a certain amount of 
preparatory work to do before 
term begins. 

-He may well have regarded 
himself as a contender for 
Underwood’s spot but now 
finds himself chosen ahead of 
Harrison. England’s right 
wing at the end of last season, 
Goodwin (Moseley) who was 
unavailable, Evans (Leicester) 
— all of whom are England 
squad members — and Smith, 
his club colleague. It is a 
curious choice and one which 
may be regarded somewhat 
wryly by Carleton. himself a 
• fc replacement, who found him- 
' self involved in an. argument 
inM'983 when he and Tnck 
(Bath), both right wings, had 
to decide who was going to 
play on the left two days 
before the game against 
Ireland. 

That apart I would not 
quarrel unduly with the se- 
lected side, since it was made 
clear at an early stage that 
England proposed to pick 
thar strongest team. Barnes 
plays stand-off half ahead of 
Andrew, helped by the met 
that his dub scrum half and 
captain is there too, and be 
would move to full back it 
Rose were forced to go on 
injured Moreover, the pres- 
of Rose means that 


Barnes need not necessarily 
kick at goal if he is stiu 
troubled by a toe injury. 

The pack . more or less 
picked itself, in the light of 
injuries and unavailability, 
with die exceptiom of hooker 
where Brain finds himself 
displaced after winning 13 
caps. He has, however, had a 
back injury recently but 
Moore, aged 24, who joined 
Nottingham from Roundhay 
and now works in a law 
practice in Nottingham, has 
been growing in stature over 
the last year. 

If Brain was discounted 
because of injury, there was 
also doubt over the availabil- 
ity of Simpson, the Sale 
hooker and perennial replace- 
ment. Therefore the selectors 
were forced to go outside the 
original squad of 40 and have 
gone for Da we who, though be 
has developed by leaps and 
bounds since joining Bath 
from Launceston last season, 
has been unable to carry out 
the hooker's primary task 
consistently, which is to win 
his own scrum ball His loose 
play and throwing in at the 
lineout are both excellent but 
he still needs to be a better 
striker for the ball before he 
can press for a place at 
international leveL 

The choice of Harding as a 
replacement is deserved, 
given the loss through retire- 
ment of Melville and the 
doubt because of injury over 
Hannaford, the other squad 
scrum half.The Bristol 
piayer.who won three caps in 
1985, has been in good form 
this season behind a develop- 
ing pack . 

Compared with foe side that 
took the field against France 
in foe last international En- 
gland played, in March, there 
are ten changes, though Hill 
and Barnes did take the field 
during that game. The survi- 
vors are Underwood - the only 
back - Chilcott, Pearce, Rich- 
aids and Rees.Wintefbottom 
played in the back row in that 
match but I would have 
thought that a bigger player, 
such as Cook of Nottingham, 
might have been given foe 
replacement’s spot so as to 
leave the back row intact in 
foe event of a tocXteaying foe 
"field. Curinusly foe reverse 
happened last season when 
England had Red m a n as a 
replacement for foe Calcutta 
Cup game and foe Bath lock 
was forced to play as a flanker 
when Hall went off injured. 

ENGLAND XV: W M H Row 


Sports Ministers 
to act against 
traffic in steroids 

From John Goodbody, Dublin 


European countries are trying 
to stop drugs used by athletes to 
improve performances from 
crossing frontiers. The 21 na- 
tions of the Council of Europe 
are to passa resolution demand- 
ing uniformity in the sale and 
distribution of drugs. 

At the moment, some drugs 
like anabolic steroids, which are 
available only on prescription in 
Britain, can be brought into the 
country with impunity. It is wdl 
known that people cross lo foe 
Continent to buy drugs, which 
can be obtained without a 
prescription in several coun- 
tries. either for their own use or 
for sale in the United Kingdom. 

A member of the British 
delegation at the fifth Con- 
ference of European Sports Min- 
isters said yesterday foal the 
resolution would make foe im- 
port of dregs more difficult 
although he stressed that Par- 
liament would have to pass 
legislation to make the system 
foolproof. 

The traffic of drugs by sports- 
men is growing. The best-known 
cum pie was the seizure by 
customs officers in Montreal in 
1983 of thousands of anabolic 
steroids, the body-building 
drug, which were found m the 
baggage of Anatoly Pissarenko. 
theSoviet Union's" world supcr- 


heavvweight weightlifting 
champion. He admitted they 
were for sale rather than for his 
own personal use and the So> ict 
Union suspended him from 
international comeptition. 

The French delegation, 
proposing the resolution, stated 
they had launched successful 
anti-doping, operations in foe 
Notd and Pas-de-CSIais regions 
and also in the south-west of 
Fiance, and that this action 
against the suppliers of drugs 
should now be extended 
internationally. 

They also urged random dope 
testing outside competition, 
something which is already 
taking place in many sports in 
Britain. 

Otto Jelhnck, the Canadian 

Sports Minister, who is attend- 
ing the three-day conference as 
an observer, said that because 
drug taking was such an urgent 
problem it needed Government 
action. He said he had already 
spoken to the ministers of 
several Communist countries 
including East Germany and 
Czechoslovakia and had re^ 
ceived agreement “in principle*’ 
- to random dope testing, which is 
particularly aimed at the detec- 
tion of steroids used in training 
so that the athlete can recover 
more quickly from intensive 
exercise. 


ASIAN GAMES 


Hffl at the helm: The Bath scram half has earned hi$ reward through meticulous dedication and ability to curb a fiery temper 

A selection offering stability 


The selection of Richard Hill as 
England captain win bring pleasure not 
only to the Bath dnb, hot in Salisbury, 
where Hill went to school and also 
played for the thriving local dnb. 

It also offers the possibility of a 
degree of stability in the job, assuming 
that Hill bolds both place and form 
throughout what will be a testing year at 
international dab leveL 

Hill came into foe England side in 

1984, when John Scott was foe national 
wintaln. Scott sBCceedwl Peter Wheeler, 
who held foe job for one season after 
both Scott and Steve Smith had taken 
over foe reigns following foe retirement 
of Bill Beaumont. 

Nigel Melville had one match as 
camta m before Paul Dodge took over in 

1985, only to be deposed by Melville East 
season. However injury has removed 


Melville, sadly, from foe scene and of 
foe side named yesterday, foe main 
alternative to Hill as captain might have 
been Salmon. 

Hill captained both Exeter University 
and the UAU representative team 
during his student days and his dedica- 
tion to making himself a better player 
was evident on tour in 1984 when be left 
England as deputy to Nick Youngs, bat 
returned from South Africa as first 
choice scrum half. 

His next three appearances all came 
as a replacement for Mdville, against 
Ireland and New Zealand in 1985 and 
against France this year. He eanfirmed 
Ms status, however, playing for the Five 
Nations against the Overseas Unions in 
the International Board centenary game 
in April, when he did immensely well 
even when his side were being 

overwhelmed. 


India’s wandering 
star is ruled out 


His appointment this season as 
Bath’s captain — the other main 
contender was Gareth Chilcott — pro- 
vided a guide for England, if the 
selectors chose to take iLThat they have 
done so indicates a degree of faith in the 
playing ability and self-control of one 
who has occasionally attracted the 
displeasure of referees by his over- 
reaction on foe field. 

HOI has recently changed jobs, having 
left the preparatory school where he was 
tf rhing to join a braiding society. His 
fhanw of jobs in rugby terms, while not 
unexpected, will be welcomed particu- 
larly if he can bring to England's cause 
foe extreme attention to detail and to 
preparation that is his own, and Bath's, 
hallmar k. 

David Hands 


Taione returns home as tour 

dropped 

By George Ace 


X MIUUV 1 

officials opt for safety first 


JLeJcestBf* S Bwjw R J to be a neck injury 
(Bath, captain); Q J Cwteott (Batnk proved to be a form 
B C Moore G u _“ prostration (David Hands 


Hopoi Taione, the Tongan 
flank forward who was iiyured 
playing for Japan against the 
Scotland XV at Murrayfield on 
Saturday, was flown home yes- 
terday. Taione, aged 29, was 
carried off with what appeared 
neck injury but later 
of nervous 


4 f 


aarmBun 

Sbas? 

Cardus’s Welsh move 


ence 


Richard Card us. who led 
Wasps to their first John Player 
Special Cup final last season, 
has left the dub and hopes to 
join a Welsh club, protably 
Gwdiffi in the near future 
1 David Hands writes). 

1 Card us. aged 30. who won 
two England caps from urn 
Roundhay clirt) in 1979, jsbeing 
moved by die firm of' brewers 
for whom he works lotheSojffii 
Wales area. He Pjayed his lasl 
game in Wasps colours for their 
Second team at the weekend. 

The Yorkshiremans forth- 
rinht play, whether in the centre 
or on the wing, has always been 


enjoyable to watch but the 
competition at centre is particu- 
larly keen at Wasps and bis 
move may relieve tire club 
selectors of one of their prob- 
lems as they try to find places for 
Simms. Lozpwsta and Pehow^ 
Card us joined Wasps in 1981. 
when they were captained by 
another rumbustious centre, 
Mark Taylor. He played for 
London against the 1983 All 
Blacks and 1984 Australians 
and, should he join Cardiff, 
would offer useful back-up to a 
side- which also possesses two 
international centres. Ring ana 
Donovan. 


writes). 

An X-ray has shown no 
damage but the tour manage- 
ment are treating the case as one 
of concussion; this effectively 
rules Taione out of the remain- 
der of the tour, which ends on 
October II- Howevtar. no 
replacement isEkdy to be called 
for with four matches left, 
including this evening’s game 
against Leicestershire at 
Leicester. 

As expected Kenney, tire 
Leicestershire captain, has been 
forced to withdraw because of 
an ankle injury- His place goes 
to Youngs, the former England 
scrum half and the county, who 
arc celebrating their centenary, 
will be led by Ian Smith. He will 
have eight ofhis colleagues from 
Leicester's senior side in the 
learn, among them two more 
internationals, Cusworth and 
Richards. 

The fourth capped pkycrin 
tire side is Orwin, the Bedford 


lode, who is included because 
Leicestershire have donated 
this an invitation side. Richards 
had to have stitches in a head 
wound after his dubs defeat 
against Harlequins on Saturday 
but expects to play. 

Japan's last visit to Leicester 
was in 1973 when they km by 
only four points to a strong 
Midland Counties side. For 
todays's match they have cho- 
sen only five of the players who 
appeared against the Scots 
(including Miyamoto, the 
replacement) and Hayashi, their 
captain, reverts to the second 
row after an outing at flanker in 
the international. 

Another side better known for 
their touring exploits make a 
rare appearance m England this 
evening when tire Penguins play 
what is hoped will be the first of 
a regular series against a Cam- 
bridge University Past and 
Present XV at Grange Road. 
The Penguins, whose last tour 
was to Bermuda in May. have 
invited three internationals to 
appear for them, including Stu- 
art Wilson, who holds New 
Zealand's record for tries scored 
in internationals. 

Cambridge themselves have 
recently returned from a Far 
East tour, ■where they drew their 
first match and won the remain- 


ing five. They select only a 
couple of players who will be 
available this term. Cough, the 
captain, and Herrod, but they 
are able to put an all-mtCT- 
national threequarter line on the 
field, served by Andrew, the 
England stand-off half now with 
Wasps. 

The Penguins, acknowledging 
the number of Blues who have 
appeared in their ranks, also 
anticipate a regular fixture with 
Oxford, but in the Lem term. 
Oxford’s season is due to start 
on Saturday with a home game 
against Henley while Cambridge 
have their regular opener 
against Cambridge City. 

LEICESTERSHIRE (Uricestw unless 

(Bodford). M RaufcM-AnioM. A Mvnott. 

DRfchBRtB. 

JAPANESE: S Mukat I SalD. E Kirtwju. T 
Yoslwo. D Murat S rtrao. H Jkuta: T 

t ^k K S& 1 h«hckv 


An Indian athlete won the 
women's 800 metres race at the 
Asian Games in Seoul yes- 
terdav. then suffered the ig- 
nominv of disqualification. 
Shiny Abraham left the Olympic 
stadium in tears after romping 
home in a record time of 2mm 
3. 36 sec. only to be told she had 
broken from her lane too soon. 

Despite a protest by India, the 
gold was awarded to Lim Cnun- 
ae. of South Korea, who finished 
a full two seconds and 20 metres 
behind. Abraham’s dis- 
appointed coach. Snraro Singh, 
said: “She did not obstruct 
anyone. It was purely an ac- 
cident and Shiny immediately 
returned to her lane as soon as 
she realized her error.” 

In the men’s events. Trial 
Mansoor provided Qatar with 
tiieir first gold medal when he 
won the 100 metres m !O30sec. 
a new Games record. The 22- 
y car-old soldier, who was given 
a rousing reception form 

25,000 crowd in the 100.000- 
capacity stadium, said: **1 taiew 
from the start of the race that I 
could win and by the half-way 
mark I knew for sure that the 
gold was mine.” 


Referee: 

PENGUINS jw 

and Pre sent): S 
ham); A Heifaen 
(Bnsloi), “ 


sUrtverwy PM* 


5 WBaon (warn gum), R 
IFCfc P Turner (Newport), J 
- Q Pearce (Northamp- 
J Want {Nottmg- 
tert. V C annon 

(London Irish). 


With one eye on the inter- 
provincial championship which 
gets underway towards the end 
of this month the Ulster selec- 
tors have decided to pul some of 
the options they have at their 
disposal under the microscope 
for Saturday’s game against 
Yorkshire at RavenbilL 

Out go the loose-head proa 
Kennedy, and the scrum-half, 
Brady, two regulars over the 
past two seasons; Anderson is 
switched from lock to No 8 to 
enable Morrison and Rogers to 
team up in the second row and 
Irwin is back at the helm as 
captain, a position he held until 
a knee injury last November 
sidelined him until the start of 
this season. He takes over from 
Anderson. 

Cowan, who played on the 
Ireland Under-25 side against a 
Canadian XV last Saturday, is 
preferred to Brady, ihe Ireland 
No 2. in all five imemauonals 
last year, while Millar is re- 
instated in the front row 


<ii 

(lnstontana): I Braumj 
(Malone); P 
Donald (Malone). J 
Duncan (Malone). C Monwon 


Rooms [Bangui). N 
Andaraon (Dungannon). 


Carr (Aids). W 


For Japan, 

Murofushi. took his fifth 
consecutive Asian Games gold 
medal - his first was in 1970 — 
with a throw of 69,20 meters in 
the men’s hammer. 

Away from the athletics sta- 
dium, South Korean archeis 
claimed four unofficial world 
bests and collected seven gold 
medals, to help their country 
edge Japan out of second place 
in the overall gold medal count. 
In total. Asian records fell in 
seven of the eight events. 

Among the Korean archers. 
Park Jung-ah and Yang Chang- 
hun each took two golds - Park 
the women’s 50 metres and 
overall individual titles, and 
Yang the men’s 50 metres and 
30 metres titles. Yang, however, 
lost the overall men’s title to 
Takayoshi Matsushita, of Ja- 
pan. Kim Jin-ho took the 
women's 30 metres title for 
Korea, who also took the men s 
and women’s team titles. 

Kim won with a score of 702. 


beating the Asian record of 696. 

In the men's competition. \ ang 
broke the Asian record for 3U 
metres by one point, scoring 705 
in the process. In the women's 
individual event. Park’s 2.634 
beat the previous Asian best of 
2,580. 

In an outstanding day for the 
South Koreans, they also won 
the first two golds awarded in 
taekwondo — a Korean martial 
art — beat India, the defending 
champions, in the womens 
hockey and prised another able 
tennis gold medal away from 
China. 

Despite that the Chinese, 
whose gold collection has al- 
ready exceeded their winning 
total of 61 four years ago. won 
seven more, three in track and 
field and four from table tennis. 

After the wild scenes which 
greeted South Korea’s victory 
last week in the mens and 
women's team table tennis 
events, there was bedlam again 
when Yoo Nam Kyu smashed 
the winning point in the men s 
singles final againstHui Jun, .of 
China, to win 21-19 21-17, 21- 
16. Undeterred, the Chinese 
went on to take the women s 

. an( j 


chioenobu singles, men’s and women is 
iff fifth ’ doubles, and mixed doubles 


tides. 

The Koreans' 34) victory over 
India for the women’s hockey 
title followed a 2-1 triumph by 
their men's team over Pakistan, 
the Olympic champions, on 
Monday. India had to settle ^for 
the bronze and Japan, who beat 
Malaysia 34L took the stiver. 

With one weight-lifting gold 
still to be decided last night, 
China led the medals table with 
74 golds, 63 silvers and 32 
bronzes. South Korea, though 
behind Japan in the total num- 
ber of medals won, had 47 golds, 
39 silvers and 56 bronzes, while 
the Japanese had 46 golds. 5- 
silvers and 55 bronzes. 

Another team to win their 
first gold medal were Lebanon. 
It came in the weight-lifting 
event when Issam El Homsi 
lifted a total of 352.5kg in the 
1 1 0kg division, beating the pre- 
vious Asian Gaines record by 
2V: kilograms. 


Hdp win provides no refuge from the sad facts 


In 



16.W7 

9 

70 17 9 

9B 

B 1 *6 

I) 

1 

II H 75 
.■1 1ST 

0 

1 B 46 

5 

04 

6 

«3 71 


the first of a two-p art senes. 

Rex Bellamy looks at the 

dwindling public interest wlucB 


is faring British tennis 


Every vear, there is one big-money 
tournament at which British players 
nocket all the prize money. They do so 
El noSodv else is allowed to. play 


persuading more people to play tennis 
rather than squash or badminton (or, 
for that matter, such other obvious 
competitors as cricket and golf)- To take 
a wide view, it does not matter a da mn 
which games people play as long as they 
play something. But those committed to 
tennis have a job to do. 


The primary job of the LTA is to 
promote and develop British tennis. 
TTiat job cannot be done adequately 
unless the game has an inviting shop 
window - that is, an inspiring example 
from British players who are inter- 
nationally prominent. Those players 
cannot be expected to match Wimble- 
don status (in the separate area of 
tournament promotion) but should be 
far more successful than they are at 
present 


i 

URCS 


1C 


, II."- 

,tn i'- '■'! 

| M -H 1 

, I ill 
' J P 
It- M 


Two schemes, new this year, are 
financially outstanding amoHg me 
because nobody else is auowea ro p»j promise progress. Raising foe 

in the Refuge Assurance^ national w, e i a i the lop is the priority of the — 

Britain’s once proud 

Sa^a-SS«SW tennis tradit ion 


m' 

nu 

so 

iH'i 


area 

competition, 


V 


-T ? 


Kitted up to £500,000 oirerfive 
years to sponsor the most laknted 
British youngsters. They are considering 
the best way to organize, and run, a 
scheme that has many precedent - fw 
example, that from which Swedish 
women's tennis is currently benefimng. 




io«r' 


ml 


lang uishing 

JghaadtedmHiton_ 

Ttle - SUC mnlv , fi?m flat for people' to ptaiy tennis throughout the 

has British ptay eIS ' mostly 'nu?- S^fis the ngreennem bnweeu the Lawn 
one week, be big fish m . Tennis Association (LTA), the All 

na ^ oM l™ n noon(??he only .snag for Engten d Chib (Wimbledon^ smdfoe 
lheirown small po „i,~mrtiftnships rnimrii. to commit £500,000 a 


A long-term plan to 


induce more 


jM'l' 

■M ' * 
!'■> - 


U1*’ 

U7 ‘f 
lilts 

51' 
•0 0 
-0 0 


# 


their ownsmau pu champ jonships 

Ijljeive liui? exposure on television. 

The snag for the TV png' • •«“£ 

cept for distinction 

t W ^ dc * " 0 r^eq 0 uent]y . public interest 
takes part. Consequen yi v ^ _ 

is concmtfotrt Mnwg g . jg g behind 

Jand British ^LH^Thind bad- 

SSSSu 

sweat themselves. 


Snorts Council, to commit 
year each, for 6 ve (a ? otaI °[ 
£7%m), to enlist the co-operation and 
finaiSil backing of local authorities m 
building 100 indoor centres with a total 
of 500 courts. 

Ian Peacock, executive director of the 


In July, within a few days, Britain lost 
a Davis Cup tie without even winning a 
set (that had happened only twice 
before, and never on grass) and the 
women's team woe beaten 3-0 by 
Denmark, who lost only one set, in the 
first round of the corresponding Federa- 
tion Cup tournament. In the United 
States championships, the five British 
competitors were all beaten by younger, 
but more highly-ranked, players. 

It would te unreasonable lo expect 
British players to rule the world. It 
would be equally unreasonable to 
' suggest that their present collective 
status as cannon fodder is anything but 
a ridiculous embarrassment to a nation 
with a once proud tennis tradition. The 
LTA cannot produce champions *- but 


they can. and must, move much foster 

Hr hJdbeen whittled down to 25 ’ in creating a climate for excellence, 

number nau . m six. The 


iswag^SfiS 


All Hus means 

Briush tenm bo ^ , no ^ 

raising 


cT'hpme 30 boroughs and, within 
ft!!™!, weeks, hoped to annoum* 
concerning six local 


a pilot project 
authorities. 


• TOMORROW: Rex Bellamy 
examines foe main problems fac- 
ing British tennis and charts the 
way ahead. 



Virginia Wade: a memory competing against the nmnemorable 


SWIMMING 

Hardcastle 
decides 
on a rest 

By a Correspondent 

Sarah Hardcastle, the Olym- 
pic double medal winner, whose 
swimming future has been m 
doubt since the summer s world 
championships m Madrid, has 
decided not to compete for 
Britain against the United Stares 
at Darlington from October 31 
to November 1. She was chosen 
for the 200 metres. 400 metres 
and SOOmeires freestyle events. 

Whether Miss Hardcastle is to 
return to raring will remain 
uncertain until the New Year. 
Mike Higgs, her Southend club 
coach, explains: “Sarah is going 
to need a lot of careful nursing 
before she can regain the state of 
mind needed to be a success 
internationally. She bas just 
completed an enjoyably relaxed 
holiday away from all the 
pressures she has had to contend 
with since becoming a world- 
class swimmer. 

“I want her to get bade to 

enjoying her swimming agai n. 
This could take three months or 
more. We must see. Sarah 
certainly will not be competing 
internationally again at least 
before the end of the year. By 
then I'm hoping she will have 
regained her old hunger for 
racing. 4 * 

It will be interesting to see 
whether the selectors call on 
June Croft, the national record 
holder who is making a reiura to 
racing after an absence of two 
years, to replace Miss 
Hardcastle for the 200 metres. 

Dodgin’s job 

Bill Dodgin. the former Ful- 
ham manager, has been ap- 
pointed _youth development 
officer at Brighton. He will work 
closely with Barry Lloyd, the 
assistant manager. 


BOXING 

Champions 
give up 
their titles 

Lloyd Honeyghan. the un- 
disputed world welterweight 
champion, and Herol _ Gra- 
ham. the European middle- 
weight title holder, from 
Sheffield, have given up their 
British titles. 

Honeyghan will be succeed- 
ed by Sylvester Mittee. of 
Bethnal Green or Kirkland 
Laing. of Nottingham, who 
were due to meet on October 
29 in a final eliminator and 
will now box for the vacant 
title. ..... , 

Graham's title ts likely to be 
contested by his close friend 
and stablemate. Brian Ander- 
son. and Tony Burke, the 
Southern Area champion, 
from Croydon. The two men 
had been nominated for the 
final eliminator for the British 
title. Had .Anderson won it is 
certain that Graham would 
not have defended against 
him. . . 

Graham, who is No 2 in the 
world middleweight rankings, 
will, however, defend his Eu- 
ropean title against Mark 
Kaylor. of West Ham, the 
world No 3. later in the year. 

Jim McDonnell is to defend 
his European featherweight 
title against the official chal- 
lenger. Valerio Nati. of Italy. 
Private negotiations for the 
contest end on November 22. 

McDonnell from Stepney, 
retained the title against -an- 
other Italian, Salvatore 
Boltiglieri. with a points vic- 
tory on the Tim Witherspoon- 
Frank Bruno world heavy- 
weight title bill at Wembley 
■Stadium in July. - 



CRICKET 


Australia have time 
enough to reveal 
their inexperience 


With only six and a half 
hours* play, this, rain-dis- 
rupted second Test match was 
the shortest in modem rimes 
and an unfortunate ano<n- 
max after the expectation 
aroused by the tied game m 
Madras. , 

The final day yesterday, 
however, was not without 
significance, remembering 
that Australia shortly meet 
England for 'the Ashes. 
McDermott, Australia's fast- 
est bowler, again foiled to lake 
a wicket and Boon and Jones, 
two of their new school of 
young batsmen, looked vul- 
nerable against spin. 

The match, inevitably, was 
drawn and was given up after 
seven mandatory overs in the 
final hour. Australia, who 
Overnight were 58 for one, 
reached 207 for three before 
Border declared and India 
scored 107 for three in the 
remaining 105 minutes. 
Vcngsarkar when he reached 
15 became the third Indian 
after Gavaskar and Viswanath 
to reach 5,000 runs in a Test 
career. 

McDermott who has not 
yet taken a wicket in a 
representative match on this 
tour, bowled off his new, 
shortened run when India had 
baited before tea. He has had 
little chance to perfect his new 
style but he looked a shadow 
of the man who took 30 
wickets against England in 
1985. The pace and hostility 
had gone and his direction, 
too. was poor. 


From Richard Streefoo, Dettl 

The meaningless . 
of the same meant that 
Gavaskar saw no cause to 
summon bis concentration. 
He was bowled m Gilbert s 
first over. Srikkanth enjoyed 
himself and pleased the crowd 
with some fierce topside 

rlTifnr >nLfl«L * 


pokes, which included a 


^* w, ** w i iuuuuoi a 

hooked six against Gilbert 
Azharuddin also played 
remarkably Reefy for a man 
whose Test place at the mo- 


AUSTRALUfcRrtttnnhBS 

GR Marsh c Renctt b Sterna — Tf 

DC Boon cManindarb Sbastri 67 

DM Jones « Arndt bShastri 29 

SR Waugh not out 39 

tTJ Zoouwnotout - S2 

Extra* 9 

Tote (Smfcts dec) 207 

FALL OF WICKETS; 1-34.2-110. 3-118. 
BOWUNCfc Kapfl Oav 14-5-Z7-0: Shanna 
8-1-34-1; Sbastri 21.4-444-2; MhMv 
19-4-54-0: Yad aw 13-1430. 

BUM: First balings 

S M Gavaskar b Gfibwt — — — 4 

K Srikkanth run out — 26 

M Azftanxttn c Zoatwer b Waufr 24 

D B Vangsarkar not out 22 

CS Panes not out — 26 

ExtrasS 

Total (3 wkts) 107 

fall of WCKET9; i-a. 2-57. 3-59. 

BOWLING: McDermott 6-1-24-0; GBbart 
1 1-144-1; Waurfi 30-29-1; Boon 2-1-6-0: 
Jones 1-1-0-a 


Ritchie at mid*on and called 
for a sharp single. He was 
unable to beat Ritchie's 
unden *nn jerk, which hit the 
stumps direct at the howto's 
end. Two balls later 
Azharu ddin e AyH a ball be- 
hind and Zoehrer took the 
catch in front of first slip. 

In the morning Boon and 
Jones resumed Australia's in- 
nings together and were 
dearly irritated by being tied 
down by the variations of 
trajectory and pace employed 
by the three Indian spinners. 
There was slow turn available 
and the left-arm bowlers, 
Sbastri and Mamnder, and die 
off-spinner, Yadav, all showed 
how good a match it might 
have been in normal 
circumstances. 


meat might be in jeopardy. He 
has struggled a little at this 


has struggled a little at this 
level since he launched his 
career with three centuries in 
successive matches against 
England. 

The competitive edge, 
though, gradually left the 
proceedings, even if there was 
a buzz of excitement from the 
handful of spectators when 
India lost two wickets in the 
same over by Waugh. 
Srikkanth played a ball to 


FOOTBALL 


Real Madrid set their sights 
on European Cup goals 


(Reuter) — Real Madrid will 
be going all out for goals when 
they meet the Swiss champions. 


Young Bovs Berne. in the sec- 
ond leg of their European Cup 


ond leg of their European Cup 
first round tie tonight. Real, the 
19SS and 1986 UEFA Cup 
winners, trail 1-0 from the first 
leg and the dub's tough-talking 
new Dutch coach Leo 
Bccnhakker. is looking for a 
stylish victory in the Beniabeu 
stadium. 


would not be intimidated by the 
80.000 crowd in the Bernabeu 
stadium. “I saw Real play in 
Madrid before the first leg. I 


thought then, and my view 
since been reinforced, that their 
all-out attacking style was 
vulnerable to the quick break." 
he said. 


worried by the danger of over- 
confidence than the threat posed 

by PSY Eindhoven rathe second. 

teg of their European Cup first 
round tie tonight. 


The Germans won the first leg 
The Netherlands 2-0, a lead 


"If you offered me a 2-0 win 
now. I wouldn't take it," he said 


after Monday's training session. 
**Wc have an obligation to aim 
for a better result.” Beenhakker 
has named only four defenders 
in his squad of 16 and welcomes 


W Germany 
frees players 


hack the midfield player, 
Gallego and Valdano. the Ar- 
gentine World Cup forward who 
missed the first teg through 


suspension. 

Valdano will link up with the 
Mexican, Sanchez, and the 
Spanish World Cup player, 
Butragueno. who will be out to 
restore his reputation after being 
substituted during Saturday's 
unimpressive 1-0 league win 
against lowly Real Socicdad. 
Sociedad employed the same 
defensive approach Young Boys 
are likely to use to defend their 
lead and it took the six-times 
European Cup winners 75 min- 
utes to break through. 

But Young Bovs have injury 
problems. Baumann, a defend- 
er. underwent knee surgery on 
Monday and a question mark 
hangs over their midfield player. 
Gcrtschcn. who was outstanding 
against Real in Berne. He trav- 
elled with a high fever and the 


-JZrankfartf Renter) — The 
lil"*li||||)l II II Federa- 
tion ii »ii i 'Jiji ' 'i “ 

agreement 

players KarEHeinz 

Pierre Uttbarsld, who are both 
now playing for French sides, to 
be released for (he national 
team. 

F&rster, who plays for 
Olympiqae Marseilles, and 
Littbareki, of Rating CM Paris, 
moved to France this summer 
without a release daase ra then- 
contracts. 

Bat the federation said that it 
had negotiated an agreement 
with the French federation and 
tiie dubs for the players to be 
released six times a year for 
international matches. 

FOrster. their caitral defend- 
er. was the outstanding player of 
the West German team which 
reached the World Cop final in 
Mexico. Littbarski, a win ger, 
also played in the finals. 


in The Netherlands 2-0, a lead 
which should see them comfort- 
ably into the second round. But 
their midfield player. 
Maltha eus. sounded a note of 
warning when be said: “Eind- 
hoven may not have been as 
strong in the first leg as we 
expected but we most not allow 
them to dictate the play.” 
Bayern, unbeaten this season 
and top of the West German 
league, have their sights firmly 
European Cup, a 
~trQur.^Z^^* l *M Lwon in 1976. 

Udo w as 

furious at (etiing the cn a.— 
last year when Bayern went out 
in the quarter-finals to the 
Belgian dub. Andcrfccht. They 
dominated the first leg but after 
taking a two-goal lead, they 
allowed Anderiecht to score a 
late goal which eventually cost 
Bayern the tie.“It was never 
easier to win the European Cup 
than last season.” Lattek said. 


One man who hopes to take 
advantage of any defensive 
frailty is the free-scoring Dane. 
Lundc, who will be making his 


Despite the loss of their best 
player, the Danish international 
midfield player. Lerby. who 
joined Monaco this summer, 
Bayern look a class above the 
rest in West Germany as they 
showed at the weekend with a I- 
I away draw against Werder 
Bremen, equalizing when down 
to 10 men after Eder was sent 
off. 

They face PSV without the 
injured Brehme. a midfield 


Siwck. is standing by. Berne before joining Bayern and ihwir forward, Honess. 

The Swiss champions' Polish- Munich, the West German Mathy. who scored both iate 
born trainer Alexander champions. goals in Eindhoven, is also 

Mandziara. insisted his side Bayern, them selves, are more doubtful with a virus infection. 


Love at long-distance finds favour J No lack of 


County announce bans 
with American suitor 


goals for 
Bradfield 


By a Special Correspondent 


One of football's must un- 
expected marriages will be coa- 
s unrated when Newport County, 
the unfashionable and down-at- 
heel rbbd division dob, is taken 
over by Jerry Sherman. Ok 
handsome American multi-mil- 
lionaire. 

The nuptials are expected to 
be completed next weekend 
when the Transatlantic suitor. 


▼ice-drab iuun and flnanrial 
director, who resigned from the 
dab over two years ago when the 
the board demined Us advice. 


aged 35. will agree to a “dowry” 
of more than £500,000 to boW- 
ofT Newport's qoeoe of creditors 
and find another £150,000 to 
boy at least 90 per cent of the 
dab's shares. 

The formalities over, Sher- 
man, the epitomy of the self- 
made all- American, 
Swedish-born, bronzed, Monde, 

unmarried and 6ft So tail will 

realise an am bition which, un- 
like Ms fortune, grew by 
accident. 

Sherman fr om the tittle town 
of Newport (population 2,000) in 
Washington Stole knew nothing 
of Newport a Gwent when he 


Tbot ne ycroR, a Cardiff ac- 
countant and Newport's seco n d 
b i gg e st shareholder, admits to 
being sceptical when Sherman 
made the initial approach. “It all 
seemed so unlikely I couldn't 
really beUeve it” he said. “But I 
talked to a few people that met 
him and made some e n quiries 
and discovered he was a genome 
fan who wanted to pst the 


Showman In the 
nicest sense 


Became fan after 
following results 


left college to became a sports 
broadcaster in Vancouver. 

Fart of his job was reading the 
English football results. “The 
names meant nothing to me until 
I came to Newport la the third 
division,” be said. “That was ray 
home town too, so I deckled they 
were my team. I just followed 
their results every week and 1 
guess 1 became addicted." 

. When Sherman became an 
investor. Comity stayed in fab 
mind. -He saw them (day for the 
first time at Barak? four years 
ago. He was back m Britan to 
watch the last six games of last 
season and made his takeover 
t week after consulting 



dub back on its feet, bdM a 
better team and improve the 
facilities at Sotnetton Park. He 
has the financial resources and 
is a very capable nan. 

“Ferhaps he wffl not be the 
conventional football dub chair- 
man. He likes to be the 

ordinary tons. He tells them » 
call him Jerry and he listens to 

what they say. He is a bit of a 
showman bat in the nicest sense 
of the word. He has some good 
ideas for promoting the game." 
There was one nasty tremor in 

the Sherman takeover a tte mpt 
earlier this week when startled 
Newport officials heard tint he 
was being sought by police over 
an unpaid bill of £12400 at a 
London betel 

Bat that toned oat to be a 
mismiderstanding and yesterday 
Sherman and Tho ra e y cno fl were 
in coRsoftelioa again over the 
dob's reply to his offer. “There 
are one or two minor points 
needing more discussion, bat 
there does net seem to be any 
obstacle now to Jerry aGqmring 
the dob," said Th ora e ycro ft. 


Schools Football 
By George Chesterton 
There was no shortage of 
goals at the weekend as home 
team Bradfield defeated Win- 
chester 6-4 in a game of end-to- 
end excitement Winchester had 
a good first half and at halftime 
they were 3-1 up. but Bradfidd 
took conuol when Wood equal- 
ized with a fine shot from a fire 
kick. Then three more followed 
as Bradfield exerted pressure on 
the Winchester defence. 
G. -MacLure scored a consola- 
tion god in the last minute. He 
and his brother shared 
Winchester’s goals. 

Charterhouse beat Forest 3-2 
after leading 1-0 at halftime in a 
tense struggle. Although Forest 
twice drew leveL they could not 
keep the home team out and the 
deciding goal came three min- 
utes from time. 

Higfagate. visiting West- 
minster, who always looked the 
more dangerous m attack, 
notched up a 4-2 victory making 
it their fourth win in 1 1 days. 


Barry, playing only his second 
match for Highgatc. scored three 


match tor nigngatc. scored three 
| times. 

Eton beat Ardingly 3-0 m a 
game which the victors had fully 
controlled. Although Ardingly 
entertained the visitors, they are 
beset by injuries. Ludl the Eton 
captain, opened the scoring with 
a 25-yard drive from a free kick. 
From then Eton the side kept 
the match firmly in its grip. 

Malvern, who had lost to 
Higbgate earlier in the week, 
made no mistake when they 
visisted Oswestry. They went 
away with a 5-3 win but it was 
the borne team who went ahead 
after two minutes from a free 
kick taken by Payne. Thereafter 
Malvern, assisted by a penalty 
and an own-goal, went in front 
and controlled the play from 
midfield. Tetnpenon. the Mal- 
vern captain, took the score to 5- 


Both batsmen eventually 
lost patience against Shastn, 
whose figures for the morning 
period were two for 10 in eight 
overs. Boon opened his shoul- 
ders folly for the first time and 
a soaring, straight hit was 
magnificently caught by 
Marauder. The fieldsman had 
to turn round at deep mid-off 
and held a brilliant running 
catch on the boundary edge. 
Jones was beaten through the 
air and though Pandit at first 
fumbled he recovered well to 
complete the stumping. 

Border held himself bade 
and Waugh and Zoehrer 
added 89 in 26 overs before 
the declaration. Both were 
missed early on from dose 
catches against Maninder. 



m 


tft? ■ 




kr 


• ft*-'' 


w- - 




i t _ . j 


• j 


>* > . ^ ... 3 




England’s plans for World Cup are 
disrupted by defeat and injuries 


Taylor is 
voted the 


By Sydney Frislrin 


England 

Australia 


England completed their 
World Cop preparations with a 
defeat by Australia at Picketts 
Lock yesterday. The risitms 
scored twice in the second half of 
a strea noas and hard tackling 


It wm aa a fternoon of grave 
misfortaoe for England. whose 


plans went awry. Injaries raised 
a ceople of ahum with Grimley 
being hit in the face by the ball 
in the first half aad Dodds 
having to leave the Geld with a 
damaged wrist in the second. 
His injury, fortunately, is not 
serious and he expects to be fit 
by Saturday for the start of the 
World Cop. 


Despite his thumb injury, 
Batchelor had a Ml match at 
outside right- Sherwam, how- 
ever, was rep la ce d on the other 


wing by Bhama. who worked 
hard and gave way to 

Shaw. Leman's withdrawal pat 
the abort comer drill in more 
disarray, five of these awards 
having been squandered by 
En gland 

Australia, who were short of 
match practice, moved swiftly 
into the attack, Charieswovth 
Missing the mark from dose 
range in the thud mnmt*. For 
the next 10 minutes Taylor was 
kept busy in goal. 

After Grimley and Kerfy had 
received injuries England began 
to look a little more assertive 
Their first chance, however, 
arrived as fate as the 25th 
minute when Grimley lobbed the 
ball into the circle; but i«w«n 
was baffled by an awkward 
bounce. Up to that time Leman 
had been the moot fadmcriom of 
Engtaad's forwards. 

la the 30th inmate of play, 
Leman set up a chance for Keriy, 
whose shot was well saved by 
Snowden. From the dearance by 
Davies, Australia attacked 


s tron gly along the left and 
Barber had to come across to 
stop a good no by Hnwgood. 

Australia introdaced fresh 
blood into the second half with 
sub s titu tions and Hainlhmit, 
who had re p laced C hai te s wott h , 
scored in the third miimte with 
Ms Gist teach from a pass by 
ihn*, who was the best of 
Australia's fo rw a rds. 

That was the Signal for En- 
gland to come strongly into 
contention bat their attacks were 
repeatedly beaten back despite 
their ever-i ma e as in g pres s m e 
nn Hw Anstndfan defence. Bach- 
etor did some splendid work on 
the right wing. With harefy 
three mantes to go Bestall 
scored cleverly from a short 
corner to seal the match. 

England had last met Austra- 
lia at MeBjearne m 1982 when 
the match ended in a goalless 
draw after a splendid display in 
goal by Taylor. 

Richard Aggiss, the Austra- 
lian coach, was optimistic yes- 
terday abort Australia's World 


Cnp chances. “The gold medal, 
ofcosse. nibestnmg-up if we 
didn't win it," be raid. 

Australia, after wi nn ing all 
five matches at home against 
Argentina, whom he described 
as a 20-arinate ride, went into a 
training at Perth hot a 
succession of injuries marred 
their progress. "At last we have 
been able to pat it all together," 
Aggiss added. 

New Zealand, who meet En- 
gland on Saturday in the fist 
World Oqp match at neon, won a 
three-nations tournament at 
Dundee after a 1-1 draw with 
Poland. They had earlier beaten 
Scotland 4-1. 


top player 


ENGLAND: 1 TqlR D FmHoms, P 
Barter. X Dodfe (ate p Bdul). M 
Grime*. S Baackdor. lt Umm (art J 
Ste«X S Kafr, a COt, I Stenmi (K 


AUSTRALIA: N Samdea (mb A Berttk J 
Bend. C Dories. D Eva*. D Bt» (mb W 
Bknriwtkw). T Kim. G Mton. R 
CMmA to* P HaztUnrer), T 
Wakfc. C Batch. N Hmxned. 

Unpbec DC Brace (fttfaral). D Prior 
(AastnBaL 


Ian Taylor, the Great Britain, 
to gienJ and East Griastead 
goalkeeper has bees rated the 
outstanding player of toe 1985- 
86 season by toe Hockey 
Writers’ Chib (Sydney Friskin 
writes). 

The uMnccant comes on 
the eve of toe World Cap 
tearnameot in London on Sat- 
urday and means that he wins 
tire Bovrfl Player of The Year 
award which is expected to be 
presented at WiUcsden on Octo- 
ber 8 after the match b etween 
En gland and the Soviet Union. 

Over the past tone years, 
Taylor, aged 31, has won 77 
Fa pfaid caps, 49 for Great 
Britain and a 1984 Olympic 
Games bronze medaL 

Runner-op in the voting was 
Brace CmhHL, of Scotland, fol- 
lowed by Billy McConnell of 
Ireland. Taylor will receive a 
silver rase bowl and a cheqae for 
£50 to be donated to a hockey 
organisation of Ins choke. 


a-"*** 

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aSw* 'te-1 

T £ 

MwSuvp 1 ! 

*V**%*i 

i> *"» *w* 

LUV** 

".J* »<M« 
?MT 

r.' LW* 


ATHLETICS 


CYCUNG 


Runner’s fatally fast time 


From Michael Coleman, West Berlin 


Reports that the 
runner within yards of the fiiusii 
of last Monday’s Berlin Mara- 
thon had been hastened by over- 
eager race officials anxious to 
assist him to the line have been 
dismissed. 

Video recordings show that 
toe runner, Richard Newnham, 
aged 38, of British origin but a 
Berlin resident for some 10 
years, fell to the ground within 
15 yards of completing the 
course. Para-medics, of whom 
there were scores attending the 
finish, lifted him under the 
armpits and gently pulled him 
through the side barriers away 
from the oncoming mass of 
other competitors. 

He was immediately attended 
by a sports doctor who bad been 
treating him for over a year for a 
heart rhythm irregularity and 
who happened to be at the finish 
line. 

Newnham did not complete 
the course but would nave 
recorded a time in the region of 
2hr SOmin. which was well 
ahead of the 3hr 30min time the 
sports doctor. Dr Willi Heepe, 
had programmed for him. 

Newnham was a life-long 
sportsman who refused to give 
in even after being stricken by 


jbe heart complaint which Dr 
-3?^*-a£asteeating. Dr Heepe 
said: -wT^-waiit to avoid 

taking responsiDiu.j^~^L-*his. 
death. After Newnham nSs? 
come to me for treatment he got 
better and tests taken a few days 
before the race did not show any 


danger or give any indication of I 
such a tragic end. I 


w 

Irish classic attracts 
the world’s top two 


• • »*Ava*Nr- 


■- to* 

* ijr 

• ■ ■’* 


FfooJflha,BJft»clKfln, Dahlia 


“If only he would have foi- 
2^edmy advice and had run 
siowEJr^i^^jfinishing time of 
3hr 30min tm‘- ■ m 

not have happened." 


Marathon scramble 


By a Special Correspondent 


Entries for the world's biggest 
marathon ended for British 
runners yesterday. Once doors 
closed at the Nationwide Build- 
ing Society, the preliminary 
stage in toe entry procedure for 
the 1987 Mars London Mara- 
thon was over. 


But John Disley, one of the 
race directors, confirmed the 
sixth race had proved just as 
popular as ever. He said yes- 
terday: "We expect around 
40.000 applications, although 
we won't know toe final figure 
until January. 


“Very few marathons in the 
world are still growing, and the 
chances ofgaining an entry are a 


bit like being awarded shares in 
toeTSB." 

Nevertheless, the marathon, 
which the organizers still need 
to raise nearly £750.000 to stage, 
is still expected to beat its own 
world record for toe amount of 
runners. Last April, more than 
20.000. people plodded toe 26.2 
miles from Greenwich to West- 
minster Bridge, yet by Septem- 
ber 13, the Nationwide had 
received completed forms from 

27.000 hopefuls — more than 

1.000 more than Chris Brasher, 
toe race organiser, will even- 
tually accept fix’ toe race on May 
10. A spokesman for the Nation- 
wide said' yesterday: “At a 
conservative guess between 40 
and 50,000 applications were 
received." 


FOR THE RECORD 


AMERICAN FOOTBALL 


NOWm AMERICA: National Foctbal LaagUa 
WFL*: Dabs Cow&oys 31. Si Lous CanJrws 


field 6. Lancaster FKJS 9: Mount St Mary’s 8, 
Sunytnni 14: Newcaste RG5 3. Seoborah 
14: S* Wtarn Bortese 4. Royal Latin 26. 
Santmlge Eons 1 Clayesnxxs 16; Wood- 
1 » 1 » Grow II. Button a 


The top two cyclists in the 
world. Sean Kelly, of Ireland, 
and Greg LeMond. of the 
United States, are the favourites 
in toe second Tunning of toe 
"^^scan, International Classic, 
whiciiTr^?*<»riay _with a stage 
of 125 miles trouT""‘"** i a..tp 
Galway. 

LeMond has not raced since 
he pulled out of the Cititour in 
New York two weeks ago, and as 
a result, Kelly has retaken the 
■ lead from the American in the 
season-long Super Prestige Per- 
nod competition. The American 
is using toe five-day tour of 
Ireland as preparation for the 
final two classic races of the 
year, in France and Italy. 

The Nissan Classic is too new 
to be chosen as a Super Prestige 
event but following its success- 
ful debut last year, tbe 500 mile 
race should soon take its place 
among tbe world's top races. 

Starting out this morning 
from Trinity College, Dublin, 
will be the highest quality field 
that has competed rn any Brit- 
ish, or Irish, stage race. The list 
of 95 riders indudes all of 
Ireland's professionals, except 
the number two. Stephen 
Roche, who is in Italy for an 
examination of the injured knee 
ligaments that have stopped 
him racing for the third time 
this year. 


To rtftbee Roche and his 
Italian team. Ever Ready (Ire- 
land) has stepped in to sponsor 
the team, comprising the world 


• > cn 
•• 4 ‘rV "-WM 


pursuit champion. Tony Doyle, 
his fellow Englishman Sean 
Yates. Paul Kimraagc. of Ire- 
land. and two Belgian sprinters, 


•> •- ^ 

-“AMI 


lano. ana two Belgian Sprinters, 
^““^•JaJBomans and Jes Lickens. 


Leiw JiiU^Sc gwOT Oited by his 
Canadian frienuT^f^g^fiapeT. 
while Kelly’s team incluaea •— 
new Portuguese teammate, 
Acacio Da Silva. 

Other leading contenders in- 
dude Adri Van der Pod, the 
Dutchman who finished second 
behind Kelly last year, the 
former World champion Joop 
Zoetemelk. and the American 
Ron KiefeL 


Perhaps the greatest challenge 
for LeMond and Kelly wtp come 
from toe powerful Panasonic 
team 


The best hopes of a British 
success rest with the Milk Race 
winner. Joey McLoughlin, who 
needs to prove himself in top 
class company before his ANC- 
Halfords team's planned assault 
on the 1987 Tour de France. 



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KNOCK -OUT CUP; Socootf room, s«cood 
tog: Heating 45. CrwMy Heath 33 (Cradey 
won 83-73 on agyega e i. 

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THE TIMES WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 1 1986 


■44 


Today’s teleyision and radio programmes and Peter Davalle 


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6-00 Ceefax AM 

•* bsest**- 

pougn and Sally 
Magnusson in London and 

Jeremy Paxman at the 

l abour Pa rty Contarsncft 
Weather « 

!‘&23 7 - S5 ’ 8 *25«*l 
8 ^5; r egional news 
wrattierand traffic at fcS7 
7-27, 7.57 and 8.27: * 

national and international 
news at 7.00, 7.30, 8 JmT 

zSSSaS sport * 

* ■20 and 8.2Q; and a 
review of the morning 
arc I^WPers at ajr. 

Conference 
1986. Ooverageol the 
<a m ™ rd morning’s debates. 
10-30 Playschool presented by 
. _ „ Sarah Long, (r) 3 

«S??,!SS Con,e ™« 

if 8 ®- Further coverage of 
die debates in BlacKpool 
12J0 approximately 
C**fax. 

1.00 News After Noon with 

Richard Whitmore and 
Frances Coverdale 
includes news headlines 
wit subtitles. 1.25 Regional 
news. The weather 
propsects come from Bflt 
Gj'esiJWChoek-B-ShK*. 

_ „ jr) 1-45 Ceefax. 

2.00 !rfe r Party Conference 

, __ 3.52 Regional news. 

*55 Tothe. Tates of a doll. 4.10 

The Adventures of 
BuUwinkle and Rocky. 

Part four, (r) 4.15 
Heathchffe and Co. 
Cartoon series about an 
alley cat and his friends 
4-35 Hartheat Tony Hart 
introduces another 
programme in his series 
on the art of making 
pictures. 

5.00 John Craven's 
Newsround 5.10 Eureka. 

A lighthearted look at the 
'invention' of everyday 
things including, today, the 
pop-up toaster. Coca 
Cola, and the vacuum 
flask. (r]5J5 The 
FRntatones. Cartoon 
series. 

6.00 News with Nicholas 
Witchell and Philip Hayton. 
Weather. 

6.35 London Plus. 

7.00 Wogan. Tonight’s guests 
include actress Aii 
McGraw and writer Leslie 
Thomas. Music Is 
provided by Nik Kershaw. 

7.35 The Muppet Show. 

B.Q0 Dallas. J.R. finds 

happiness in the arms of 
Sue Ellen once again 
despite the temptations of 
Mandy and her collection 
of saucy photographs. On 
the business front things 
are not so rosy and J.FL 
with the price of oil 
plummeting, has to pass 
up a chance of buying-out 
a competitor. (Ceefax) 

8.45 Points of View. Barry 
Took dips into the BBC's 
mailbag. 

9.00 News with John Humphrys 
and Andrew Harvey. 
Regional news and 
weather. 

930 Animal Squad. RSPCA 
Inspector Sid Jenkins and 
his team are on the trail of 
a dog-fightmg gang, and 
they, along with 100 
policemen, stake out a 
London pub where a dog- 
light is due to take place in 
the cellar. (Ceefax) 

10.00 Sportsnlght introduced by 
Steve Rider. Tony Gubba 
reports on how Britain's 
representatives have 
fared in tonight's second 
leg matches in the three 
European football 
competitions: Barry 
Davies looks forward to 
the Men's Hockey World 
Cup in Willesden where 
England begin their 
interest in tne competition 
on Saturday with a match 
against New Zealand: and 
a preview of the Suntory 
Wprid Matchplay 
Championship which 
begins tomorrow at 
Wentworth. 

11.20 Matt Houston. The 
millionaire detective 
wakes up in his office one 
night , with his hands and 
feet bound, his clothes 
caked with mud. When he 
telephones his secretary 
he is amazed to team that 
he has been missing for a 
month. This two-part storj 
is continued next Monday 

12.10 Weather. 


tv-am 


6.15 Good Morning Britain 
presented by Jayne Irving 
end Ad nan Brown, (tews 
with Geoff Meade at 630, 
7-0$ 7 -3°, 830, 830 and 
5-00; financed news at 
£-35; sport at &40 and 
7*40; exercises at 635 and 
3*17; cartoon at 735; pop 
music at 735; and video 
report at 835. The After 
Nine guests include Jackie 
Stewart 


JTV/LONDON 


9-25 Thames news headlines, 

930 For Schools: maths -the 
number ’3' 9A2 Prose and 
poetry about playtime 939 
Maths - how shapes can 
be fitted together 10.16 
Bomb calorimetry - a 
chemistry experiment 
1033 The Prague scenery 
that influenced the poetry 
of Miroslav Hoiub 11-00 
History: November 1920 in 
Russia 1132 
charges in pitch 
melodiss 1 139 A visit to 
the Chateau de 
Montgeoffroy in the Loire 
Valley. 

12.00 Jamfe and the Magic 
Torch, (r) 12.10 Our 
Backyard, (r) 

12-30 Treasure Islands. Hits 
fourth programme in the 
series on archaeological 
treasures of Britain 
focuses on artefacts of 
Christian origin, (r) 

1.00 News at One with Leonard 
Parkin 130 Thames news 
presented by Robin 
Houston. 

130 Man in a Suitcase. McGill 
saves a young man from 
suicide and digs for the 
reasons that drove the 
man to despair. Starring 
Richard Bradford, Bid 
Owen and Rodney Bewes. 
(r) 230 Dining in France. 
Pierre Salinger waxes 
lyrical over fresh 
vegetables, olive oil and 
Mediterranean fish. 

3.00 Take the High Road. 
Inverdarrocn is causing 
Lily Taylor concern 335 
Thames news headlines 
330 Sons and Daughters. 

4.00 Thomas the Tank Engine 
and Friends, narrated by 
Ringo Starr 4.10 Road 
Runner. Cartoon 430 T- 
Bag Strikes Again. 4.45 
Horn Tight as Jacqul 
Reddin flies a hovercraft. 

5.15 Blockbusters. Bob 
Holness with another 
round of the general 
knowledge quiz for 
teenagers. . 

5.45 News with John Suchet 

6.00 Thames news 
presented by Andrew 
Gardner and John 
Andrew. 

635 Help! Viv Taylor Gee with 
news of eye care for the 
elderly. 

635 Crossroads. Jill arrives 
home to find someone in 
the house. 

7.00 The Bucfcman Treatment 
Dr Rob Buckman meets a 
number of the wealthy but 
not always healthy people 
of Texas. 

73& Coronation Street Sally 
Seddon's parents pay a 
' surprise visit. (Oracle) 

8.00 Pass the Buck. Quiz game 
for couples, presented by 
George Layton. 

830 Stinger’s Day. Comedy 
series stamng Bruce 
Forsyth as a supermarket 
manager. (Oracle). 

9.00 King and Castle. The two 
debt collectors are hired to 
retrieve a five ligure sum 
from the Hon Lisa 
Berekeiy. King is smitten 
by the beauty and 
unwisely tries to help her. 
They also have the task of 
locating the 50 year son of 
an old man who walked 
out on his wife and family 
at Christmas. 1939. 
(Oracle) 

10.00 News at Ten with Ala stair 
Burnet and Carol Barnes. 
Weather followed by 
Thames news headlines. 

1030 Snooker. Quarterfinal 
action in the BCE 
International. 

12.15 World Chess 

Championship. The latest 
news from Leningrad, 
introduced by Tony 
Ba stable. 

1235 Night Thought* from Dr 
Alan GHmour of the 
NSPCC. 



Angela Thorne: Paying 
Guests, BBCZ, 930pm 


• An instincL bom of five 
years of writing this feature, tells 
me that the high points of 
tonight's viewing are probably 
three programmes I have not 
seen. They are Daniel Vi one's 
film THE RETURN OF 
martin guerre (Channel 4, 
10.00pm) which has been 
haited as a masterpiece in so 
many quarters that 1 tend to 
think ft must have something 

[ for it ANIMAL SQUAD 
1. 930pm) which has the 
RSPCA's Sid Jenkins on the 
trail of the men who organize that 
vile sport in which dog fights 
dog; and Hermione Lee's 
interview with the American 
short-story writer Ellen Gilchrist- 
in TALKING TO WRITERS 
(Channel 4, 8.00pm) 

• I have seen — and 
moderately enjoyed - episode 
one of Thomas Effice's 
adaptation of E F Benson's 
gently comical novel PAYING 


CHOICE - 


GUESTS (BBC2, 930pm), and 
Richard Robinson's 
documentary about a pioneer of 
underwater photography, 

John wafiamson, in this week's 
edition Of TRAVELLERS IN 
TIME (BBC2, 7.40pm). Paying 
Guests unfolds at a leisurely 
pace, as befits its period ( 1923) 
and its setting (a guest house 
for people in need of the pain- 
relieving waters of the local 
spa). Such excitements as there 
are arise from winning 3s 9d 
at bridge, listening to a retired 
colonel going on ad nauseam 
about the total of miles he docks 
up every day on his pedal 
cycle, and finding kind things to 
say about the rich spinster- 
palmer who dans a “ teeny- 
weeny exhibition of my little 
pikkles. " It is an quintessentiaily 
English, and rather dotty, and 


I raiher look forward to the 
second instalment tomorrow 
night 

The Travelers in Ttmefkn 
has men going down a steel tube 
to the ocean flew in 1 914 to 
take pictures of “a world of liquid 
loveliness". The untovefy 
exceptions are man-eating 
sharks which are patently 
real, and a befiigerem octopus 
that is patently not 
• Bernard Edwards's 
maritime drama BLOW THE 
WIND (repeated on Radio 4. 
9.00pm) is a bit heavy on the 
metodramatics. but there's no 
denying that its binaural waves 
and wind and flapping canvas 
(you must listen to it through 
headphones to get the fufl 
effect) will make your eyes sting 
with the sea spray, and your 
ears ache with the howl of the 
Cape Horn gales. 

Peter Davalle 


BBC 2 


930 Ceefax. 

9.15 Daytime on Two: ways in 
which the law affects 
young people 935 Ceefax 
10. DO For tour- and five- 
year olds 10.15 The story 
of bread and how it is 
judged 1038 How 
scientists differ from their 
popular image 11.00 
Words and pictures 1 1.17 
Bodies 11.40 Basic French 
language skills. 

12.02 Maths: trigonometry 1235 
Working with a keyboard 
1348 Tne people and 
products of two Spanish 
provinces - Pfasencia and 
Logrono 1.10 Handling an 
interview concerning the 
need tor better housing 
138 Exploring Aberdeen 

2.00 Tmnkabout 2.15 What 
can a captionless picture 
communicate? 235 
Ceefax. 

3.50 Labour Party Conference 
1988 continued from BBC1. 

5.05 Ceefax 

530 News summary with 
subtitles. Weather. 

535 Harold Uoyd' Clips from 
perhaps the comedian's 
best remembered film. 
Safety Last made in 1923. 
which climaxed with a 
perilous escapade on the 
12th floor of a New York 
- building: and Hey There, a 
1918 production, (r) 

6.00 Film: Man in the Saddle 
(1951) starring Randolph 
Scott In this first film in a 
season of Scott's 
Westerns he plays a 
rancher. Owen Merritt, 
who is being hounded by 
his wealthier neighbour 
. who wants to ruin Merritt 
and take over his land. 
Directed by Andre de Toth. 

735 Music in Camera. Peter 
Maxwell Davies previews 
a new chamber music 
series, (r) 

7.40 Travellers in Time. Under 
the Sea by Photosphere, a 
film made-in 1914 in the 
dear waters of the 
Bahamas by John 
Williamson, the seif-styled 
'Originator of Undersea 
Photography', (see Choice) 

8.10 Jerry Lee Lewis. An Arena 
profile of the rock 'n' roller 
who is seen in concert in 
Bristol, (r) 

930 M*A*S*H. There is no 
middle way and Hawkeye 
and his colleagues are 
either over-worked or 
bored. On one of the latter 
occasions Hawkeye writes 
a letter to his father 
detailing the antics he gets 
up to when he has time on 
his hands, (r) 

930 ScreenPfay: Paying 
Guests. A two-part 
adaptation of 
E.F.Benson's story about 
a disparate collection of 
residents staying at 
•Wentworth' a respectable 
guest house in a 
fashionable spa town in 
1923. Starring Robert 
Hardy and Angela Thome. 
(Part two tomorrow night) 
(see Choice) 

1030 NewsnigM introduced 
from Blackpool by Donald 
MacCormick; and in 
London by Peter Snow 
and lari Smith. 1135 
Weather. 

1130 Open University: Science 
Fiction: Towards the 20th 
Century 1135 States of 
Mind: Levels of 
Intervention. Ends 1235. 


CHANNEL 4 


230 Channel 4 Racing from 
Newmarket Brough Scott 
introduces coverage of the 
Rowley Mile Nursery 
Handicap (2.35); the 
Tattersal! Cheveley Park 
Stakes (3.05); and the 
Never So Bold Fillies 
Handicap (3.40) 

4.00 Snooker. Dickie Davies 
introduces quarterfinal 
action in the BCE 
International from 
Trentham Gardens, Stoke- 
on-Trent. The 
commentators are John 
Pulman. Dennis Taylor, 
Rex Williams, Ray 
Edmonds and Mark 
Wildman. 

530 Alice. Vera's policeman 
husband resigns from the 
force because he feels 
ashamed after shooting 
himseil. After several 
hopeless job applications, 
an incident in the diner 
makes him realise where 
his talents lie. 

530 The Abbott and Costello 
Show* Bud and Lou help 
out an old friend when she 
inherits a haunted house. 
They stay with her for the 
night that is stipulated she 
must spend in the place 
before she can claim the 
inheritance. 

630 Flashback: She’s Leaving 
Home. Clips from films 
illustrating teenage pop 
culture and the free-livmg 
flower power years of the 
Sixties, (r) (Oracle) 

6.30 Conference Report. Glyn 
Mathias presents 
highlights of the day’s 
delates at the Labour 
Party Conference in 
Blackpool. 

7.00 Channel 4 News with 
Peter Sissons and Alastair 
Stewart includes a report 
on the secrets revealed by 
the demolition of the 
notorious Ronan Point 
flats. 

730 Comment The weekly 
political slot returns with 
Jeremy Hanley. 
Conservative MP for 
Richmond and Barnes. 
Weather. 

9.00 Talking to Witters. 
Hermione Lee in 
conversation with EUen 
Gilchrist (Oracle) 

830 Diverse Reports. Dr 
Malcolm Bell, a farming 
expert examines the 
future for British formers. 

9.00 The History of Psychiatry. 
The first programme in a 
season of programmes on 
various areas of mental 
health. Alternative 
comedian. John Sessions, 
discourses at length 
before an audiencs on a 
number of key texts in the 
history ol psychiatry over 
the past three centuries. 

1030 Rim: The Return of Martin 
Guerre (1 982) starring 
Gerard Depardieu as a 
16th century Frenchman 
who returns to his village 
alter spending nine years 
in military service to be 
accused of being an 
impostpr. Directed by 
Daniel Vigne. (English 
subtitles) 

1230 Rim: Person Unknown* 
(1956) Scotland Yard 
investigate the death of an 
explosives expert who, it 
seems, accidently blew 
himself up. Directed by 
Montgomery Tully. Ends 


( Radio 4 ) 

On long wave (s) Stereo cm VHF 
535 Shipping. 630 News Briefing; 
Weather. 6.10 Farming 
635 Prayer (s) 

630 Today, ind 630, 730, 

8.30 News. 645 
Business News 635. 735 
Weather. 730, 830 
News. 735. 835 sport 745 
Thought tor the Day. 

8.43 Figures in a Bygone 
Landscape. Playwright 
Don Haworth s 
autobiography, read by 
Stephen Thome (B). 837 
Weather; Travel 
930 News 

9.05 Midweek with Lfijby 
Purvesfs) 

1030 News: Gardeners' 

Question Time. Experts 
tackle questions from 
Burnham and District 
Horticultural Society (r) 

1030 Morning Story: The 
Funny Side, by Celia 
Dale. Reader: David March. 

1045 Daily Service (New Every 
Momma, page 89) (s) 

1130 News: Travel: Britain's 
Young Achievers. A 
feature about some of the 75 


i works, or triumph 
aver adversity, were 
honoured at a Radio 1 party 


11.49 Inquire Within. Experts 

tackle listeners' 


12.00 News; You and Yours. 
Consumer advice. 

1237 I'm Sony I Haven’t a 
Clue. Humphrey 
Lyttieton chairs the last in 
the present senes of 
panel games (s). 1235 
Weather 

1.00 The World At One: News 
1.40 The Archers. 135 


Shipping 
News: Wo 


230 News: woman's Hour. 

With Eleanor Bron, and 
the South African MP, Dr 
Rina Venter. 

330 News; The Afternoon 
Play. Don't Cry, by David 
Ashton. With Caroline 
Hutchinson and Joanna 
Hole. 

347 One Man and his Log. 
Continuing Barry Pi (ton's 
account or a barge tripupa 
Burgundy canal. Read by 
David Roper. 

430 News 

435 File on 4, Major issues at 
home and abroad. 

445 Kaleidoscope Extra. The 
1986 Gramophone - 
Record Awards (s). Sir 
Richard Attenborough 
makes the presentations at 
the Savoy Hotel. London 

5.00 PM. News magazine. 

530 Shipping. 535 
Weather 


630 News: Financial Report 

630 Round Britan Quiz- 
General knowledge 

contest 

7.00 News 

7.05 The Archers 

730 On The Day l was Bom. 
Larry Hams talks to 
cartoonist Mel Caiman about 
events in the world at the 
time of h>s bath in May 1931 . 

7.45 Antony Hopkins Talking 
About Music (s) 

B.15 Analysis (new series) 
Shadow on the Sun. 

Mary Goldring examines the 
state of the world's 
economy m the absence of 
the recovery that was 
supposed to follow the fall m 
oil prices. 

930 Thirty -Minute Theatre 
(stereo/binaural). Blow 
the Wind, by Bernard 
Edwards. Drama about a 
sailing-boat s attempt to 
round Cape Hom.With 
Gareth Thomas and 
Jonathan Taffer in the 
cast Recorded at sea (see 
Choice) (r) 

9.30 The English Garden. 
Poenyand prose, (s) 

9.45 Kaleidoscope. Paul 
Vaughan reports from 
the Pnx Italia at Lucca. 

10.15 A Book at Bedtime: 

Hamfley Cross, by 

R S Surtees (13). Read by 
John Franklyn-Robbms. 
1039 Weather 

1030 The World Tonight 

11.15 The Financial world 
Tonight 

1130 Mr Mane Uoyd. Robert 
Later's profile of the 
music-hall star Alec Hurley, 
whose mamage to Mane 
Uoyd broke up at the height 
of their careers. 

1230 News: Weather. 12.33 
Shipping 

VHF (available in England and 
S wales only) as above 
except 535330am 
Weather; Travel. 11.00- 

12.00 For Schools 135- 
330pm For Schools 
530-535 PM (continued). 
1230-I.l0am Schools 


Forestry U! 
Forest 


Alpine 


C Radio 3 ) 

On medium wave, and VMF/FM fm 
stereo) 

635 Weather. 7.00 News 

7.05 Concert Balakirev 

(Islamey. orchestrated by 
Caseila). Janacek (String 
Quartet No 1). Dvorak 
(Symphonic Variations, Op 
78). 830 News 
635 Concert (contd): Britten 
(Occasional Overture), 

Faure (Mirages Op 1 13, with 
Gerard Souzay, 


baritone). Mozart Piano 
Concerto No 9 
(Perahia/ECO). 930 News 

9.05 This Week's 

Composer Messiaen. 
Reccrdngs of. inter aba, O 
sacrum convivium!. 
Turangalifa in and Final ( 
TurangaMa- 
Symphonic). Repetition 
pianetaira: Adieu 
(Harawii; and Amen de la 
creation (Visions de 
i'Amen) 

1030 Richard Markham and 
David Nettie (pianos): 

Chopin [Sonata m B flat 
minor. Op 35. 

transcribed by Samt-Saens). 
and Samt-Saera s 
Variations cm theme of 
Beethoven. Op 35 
1030 Pactm and Schubert 
Nash Ensemble. Pacini 
(Octet for tmee violins, cello, 
double-bass. oboe, 
bassoon and horn). Schubert 
(String TnomB flat. D 
S81) 

1130 Matinee musicals: Ulster 
Orchestra (under 
Houlihan) With Neil Smith 
igunarj. Leigh (Agincoun 

overture). Granados (Danza 
Espanoia No 4). Douglas 
(Music for strings). Carulb 
(Guitar Concerto in Al. 
Paganini (Romanza), Walton 
(Henry V suite) 

12.30 The Essential Jazz 
Records: with Max 
Hamson. Includes Duke 
Ellington and lus 
Orchestra and Joe Venuti 
and Eddie Lang. 1.00 
News 

1.05 Concert Han- Leshe 
Howard (piano). 

Beethoven i Sonata <n A, Op 
101). Schubert i Fantasy 

in C. D 760. Wanderer) 

230 BBC Welsh SO render 
Owam Arwei Hugnes). 

With Nabufco Imai (viola), 
wauon (Viola Concerto; 
Pareta) 

230 Recoro Review: includes 
Lionel Salter comparmq 
r scoldings ol Mozart s'Pano 
Concerto No 20. and 
Julian Budden talking about 
new opera recordings <ii 
430 Choral Evensong from 
bchtietd Cathedral - live. 

435 News 

530 Midweek Choice Dvorak 
(Slavonic Rhapsody Op 
ZS No 3l. Couperin 
(Pamasse ou 
laponheose de Corelli. 
Jongen (Symphome 
concertante.for orqan and 
orchestra. Murray with 
San Francisco SO). Van 
Maldere (Symphony m G 
minor. Op 4 No 1), Elgar 
(Falstatf) 

730 Choral Voices: Yorkshire 
Bach Chou, with Jean 
Helton (cello contmuo). 
Granam Barber (organ 
contmuo). Works by Purcell. 
Georae Jeffreys. Byrd 
and Bach (the motet Lobet 
den Herm. 8WV 230) 

730 Mindful of Porridge: 
feature about the bram. 

With Professor Colin 
Blakemore.and 
Professors Jack Cowan, 

Max Cowan. John Kaas 
and Francis Cnck 

8.15 Tatyana Nikolaeva: part 
one. The Soviet pianist 
plays Medtner's Piano 
Concerto No 1. and 
Svetianov's Festive poem 
(with USSR SO under 
Svetianov) 

935 Six Continents: foreign 
radiobroadcasts, 
monitored by the BBC 
9-25 Tatyana Nikolaeva 
(contd): Mozart (Piano 
Concerto No 22, with Litovsk 
Cha mber Orchestra 
under Sondetsksis) 

10.10 London Concertante; 
with Net) Jenkins (tenor). 


Amo works including Under 
the greenwood nee), 
also Croft's canon 
Ceuadon. CPE Bach's 
Trio-Sonata in A minor, and 
Telemann's Tno-Scnata 

m G minor 

1045 in Our Society: folk by 
Frank Shoulder, amateur 
philosopher and sociologist 
(2). Presenter: Tom 
Lubbock 

11.00 Manchester cnamber 
Music recital by tCtiich- 
stem/Laredo/Rohnson 
Tno. Haydn (Piano Trio in C. 

H XV 27i and Beotnovon 
(Piano Trio in B flat, Op 97). 
11.57 News. 12.00 
Closedown. 

c Radio 2 ) 

MF (medium wave) Stereo on - 
VHF 

News on the hour. Headlines 
530am, 630, 730, 8.30. Sports 
Desks 1.05pm, 232, 3.02, 4.02, 
535. 6.02. 645 (mf only) 935 
4.00am Charles None 5.30 Ray 
Moore 730 Derek Jameson in trio 
West Midlands, at Dudley s 
Black Country Museum 930 Kan 
Brueo 11.00 Jimmy Young 
1.05pm David Jacobs 2.00 Gloria 
Hunnilord mci Racing from 
Newmarket: 3.00 Tcttersalls 
Chevely Park Stakes 330 David 
Hamdton 535 John Dunn 7.00 Fclk 
on 2 6.30 Another Dignnnce 
Indulgence. With Richard Digance 
and guests 9.00 Liston to the 
Band 935 Sports Desk 1030 
Fletcher's 50. Cyril Fietchor 
reminisces (with pianist Ronnie 
Bndqcs) 10.15 The Flying 
Pickets 10.30 the Barren Krnghts- 
in Town Tornqht 1 1.00 Joan 
Bake well 1.00am Patrick Lunt 3,00- 

4.00 A Little Nigm Mush: 

C Radio 1 ) 

MF (medium wave) Stereo on 
VHF (see below) 

News cn the hall -hour I ram 
63Ctem until 8.30pm then at 1030 
and 12.00 midnight 
5.30am Adrian John 7.00 Mike 
Smith s Brcaklasi Show 9.30 
S:mon Buies 1230pm 
Newsbeat (Frank Pam idaei 12.45 
Simon Mayo 3.00 Steve Wnghi 

5.30 Newr.beat (Frank Panridiju) 

5.45 B'uno Brookes (mcl. at 
630 a Top 30 album chart) 7.30 
Jamce Lonq 10.00-12.00 John 
Peel. VHF Stereos RADIOS 162:- 
4.00am As Rado 2 1 0. 00pm 
As Radio 1. 12.00-4.00am As Radio 
2 . 


WORLD SERVICE 


6.00 Ncwsdusk 7.00 News 7.09 TmhWy- 
Four Hours 730 Development 86 6.00 
News 8.09 Retted ions 8.15 CUracal 
Record Review 830 Outfe Unquote 930 
News 939 Review ol the British Press 

9.15 The IVwld Today 9.30 F.nanoal 
News 9.40 Lack ANvkI 9.45 A Land ot 
Sonq 10.00 News 10.01 Omnfttjs 10.30 
My Music 11.00 News 11.09 News Atuut 
Bntam 11.15 Mtematiopal Gardeners 
1L25 A Letter From Wales 1130 Mendun 
1230 Radio Newsreel 12.15 Nature 
Notebook 1235 Forming Wend 12.45 
Sports Roundup 1.00 News 138 Twenty- 
Four Hours 130 Development '66 230 
Outlook 245 Report on Retgion 330 
Redo Newsisel 3.15 Historians 330 
Patterson 430 News 439 Commentary 

4.15 Counteipouil 44S.WorM Today 630 
News 539 Letter from Wales 630 News 
839 Twenty- Four Hours 630 Siam of the 
Naton 930 News 931 Network UK 9.15 
Album Time 945 Recording of the Week 
1030 News 1039 The World Today 1035 
A Letter From wales 1030 Financial News 
1040 Reflections 1045 Sports Rounduo 

11.00 News 1139 Commentary 11.15 
Good Books 1130 Top Twenty 1230 
News 1239 News About Britain 12.15 
Radio Newsreel 1230 Patterson 1.00 
News 131 Outlook 130 Waveguide 140 
Book Choice 1.45 Growing Points m 
Science 230 News 239 Renew of the 
British Press 2.15 Network UK 230 State 
of the Nation 330 News 339 News About 
Britan 3.15 The World Today 330 
Domesday Book. 900 Years On 430 
Newsdesk 430 Classical Record Review. 
AH times tn GUT. 


RBC1 WALES: 535pm-030 
DDVJ. witts Today. 635-730 
(jdoqinais. 1130- 


FO«r 



730 Reporting Scotland. 1030-1130 
Sportscwie: fiiropean Footbefl. 
NORTHERN IRELAND: 535pm-5L40 
Today's Sport. 540-630 Inside Ul- 
ster. 635-730 The Video Picture Show. 
1030-11.10 SportsnghL FOottaB: 

Lintieid v Rosantxirc and previews of 6th 
Men's Hockey World Civ and the 
Suntory World Matcbptay god. 11.10- 
1230 Matt Houston. 1230 - 123Sam 
News and weather- ENGLAND: 935pm- 
730 Regional news magazines. 

tor NORTHERN IRELAND: 1140am- 
1230 Ceefax 

CHANNEL a* London a"*** 

ynwwiCL i230pm-130 Bygones 
130 News 130 Short Story Theatre 
230-230 Problem Page 330-430 Young 
Doctors 630435 Channel Report 
12.1 5am Closedown. 

ANGLIA L °°4on ««apt 

nnuun I230pm-130 Look WWio's 


Talking 130 News 130-230 Country 
Practice 630435 About AngEa 12.15am 
Suffolk Angle. Closedown. 


W REGIONAL TELEVISION VARIATIONS 1 

GRAN AD A M London ex ' 

WWWJtUH cept 1230(1111-140 

Ter Green Bottea 1^0 Granada Re- 
portfl 1.30-240 RanCoO and HopWrk (De- 
ceased) 340-4.00 Young Doctors 

640 Granada Reports 640445^ This is - 
Your Right 1215am Ctoaadcwm. 

TVS A* tendon except 1230pm- 
140 Bygones 140 News 140 
Short Story Theatre 200-230 ProO- 
tefn Page 130^40 Yourw Doctora S40- 
045 Coast to Coast 1215am 

Company. Ctosedown. 

ULSTER London except: 
u r° lcn 1230pm-l40 Something 
io Treasure 140 Lunchwne 140- 
230 Country Practice 340-440 WHd 
World oi Arsmals 640-645 Good 
EwwMjUluer 1215am News. 

GRAMPIAN 

Thars Hollywood 140 News 140- 
230 Country Practice 640-645 North To 
nigra 1215am News. Closedown. 

TYNE TEES SffSSS^m 

CENTRAL Aa London except 
were 1 riQk I230pm-1.00 Some- 
thng m Treasure 120 News 140- 
230 Scarecrow and Mrs Kng 640 
Crossroads 225-740 News 1215am 

Naw Avengers 1.15am Comedy Tonight 
1.40 Jobtiner 240 Closedown. 

SCOTTISH -KSSu. 

Blue Hal 140 News 140-230 Court- 
try Practice 340 Thai's Hotvwood 340- 
440 Survival 640 Scottuid Today 

640-740 Sortey Maclean at 751 folSem 
Lbs Call 1220 Sorley Madman at 7S 

1230 Closedown. 

Orpnanscf rheWdd 140 News 14S 
Where the Jobs Are 140-230 Ccuitry 
Practce 640-645 Northern Life 

1215am God insafe and Out. Closedown 

YORKSHIRE M 

Luncnume Lnre 140 News 14QK230 

The Baron 840-645 Calendar 1215am 
That's HoOywood 1245-640 Muse 

BORDER *■ LortOon axcepc 

With.. 140 News 140-230 Coun- 
try Practice 3.00 Country Ways 340-4.00 
Young Doctors 640^45 

Lookarouno 1215am Closedown. 


TSW ** London except 
1 - 123tan-t30 Gardens tor All 

130 News 13&2J0 Country Prac- 
tice 5.15 Gus Honeytiin 530-545 Cross- 
roads 630 Today South West 530- 
730 Emmerdale Farm 12.15am 
Postscript, Closedown. 

HTV WEST AsLDnclonB, ‘- 

m w wco i. ,230^.00 
Gardening Time 130 News 130-230 
Cham pons 630-635 News 12.15am 
Closedown. 

HTV WALES SrtSZr SSSm 

1230 Schools 5. 00pm-635 Wales at 
Six. 

S4C Starts: 11 . 10 am Gweid A 

- siarad 1135 Ftenesm 1230 Fim: 
Bit ol Divorce mem 130pm Gong 
Snow ZOO Ftaiabaiam 2.15 Interval 230 
Racing 430 Snooker 4.55 Tnaau 
Trevor 530 1 Could Do That 630 
Brook side 630 Barry Setback 7.00 
Newyddon Saab 730 BwyO V Baa: Bwyd 
I Bwy’ 830 Geraint Griffiths - Nol Ar 
Y Stryd 835 PehDioed Wrecsamv 
Zwneq 9.15 Helen Yn Y Gwaed 945 
Fam- Gnost Breakers 1130 Diverse Re- 
ports 1130 Labour Conlarenca 
1230am Closedown. 


ENTERTAINMENTS) 


CONCERTS 


LONDON BRASS VIRTUOSI 

ranMcmr DAVID HONEY BALL 

S.*h%K CrKpian 5lwle-Perki»s 

Mir had llvxl - Trombone Henry Lmrtber - FtBRo Horn 
*.lh UPPER NORWOOD BAND 
Si. James's rhmrh, PiccadiBy 
FRIDAY 3RD OCTOBER IW6 830 P.M- 

Programme Includes: 

V.K. PREMIERE HE,-«E »NATA TO OTOOTTON1 
VI iM)VT OVKRTt Bk Mwc I* Ra)« rWJ™, 
n r! ? H ItJSm -v- Ur 1IOXV VRD BLkkE SMxM. 
SniVSOHKD BY" PBO-BRASJ. LTD. 

Tickets £S. CL50 from Ticfcef 
01 - 17*1 Credit Tan! Bookings 9— -9pm 7 d»y* 


USIE flinCHglTBA. nm* 
Hku-i dii. »»tlh tei men 
lu.ulliUll^ — — 


ROYAL FESTIVAL HALL Ot 

sTJl 13 W HUOO lOWj 1 

Huya WeRnuMA. Ctaefc 

jgSUmS"'Xmr"«»£5' 




ROYAL FESTIVAL HALL 01 

<1 QMt AMO O TmiHfil 
7 JOwilte 

■r 


\ V 


OPERA & BALLET 


COLISEUM S RM> 

lull « 7 00 ■ fw. 

FIa«^ imiurr 7 30 T “ 

HU trade- 


tSS^irrtt4SK3S5 

AN AMOCbMwAL °F 

OKRA 

WELSH NATIONAL 
OPERA 

SEl-STO-'S. 

**** ,h,i. rr tiew ° <Uv 
UOLCF’S VHGLLS 

centralballet o p 



■ LekelAjrt gk 

. rexiiw opgra 

s Autumn 


THEATRES 


ADELFHI H3A 7011 « 3fO TJIS 
tj n: 74i wo9/H3ti 7M8/37V 

(an »JO rirM 

fill! kkthl 7 JltfMJp .bMj 
m-l MlVv IKJOMNC TO I LB 
1W7 

ME AND MY GIRL 

Yiii i vkiarm w.iik 

MINICAI 

NjuIiIIi .Il 7 JO Mills WHlJl SJX> 
A Sil k HCO 

“THE RAWEST SHOW 
EM TOWIf H 
TbMtra Air CnOUiHMd 


BARBARA COOk 
TiISaLLTW rare COVH’S 

CU imil* 

DAVE AUDJUVE 

I'lMlevs limn SO CXi 

tio HP*" 


ytC SECRET LIFE OF 

CARTOONS 

Bi rllir Ba rjav 

m, auu pn vtewr “*■ *** “ 


ALOWVCH thcat« 

"Mmgag" 

i ,os t 90 Mar* wed *. 

5,^27 - d.,i i< ixwwiwi on r } ra 


AMBASSADORS O] HJo bl 1 1 <( 
KVi 1171 I 11-4 I -ill 124 his/T 
:MH mnn (Mil irm FROM 
TOUT lif. 7 AO. Sal 4 A H 

Rvyai UtUmpun Cmpm/i 

LES LIAISONS 
DANGEREUSES 

“FIGHT FOR A TKAET 

VMII Oil 


APOLLO THEATRE 437 MU 

j.U S5WM 1 11^ 1^11 Ol 540 7500 

iHlHMbMn •• 370 0415 
Vnn In HlMsjl 4 30 A H ID 

I hill-, nwk 3 OO 
PAUL SCOFIELD 
-M 1S1 1 Rl T “ I V. 
HOWARD ROLLIH5 
-WWNII K l M “ 11 Mjril 

rM NOT RAPPAPORT 

''Vi.iiiiIpiIiiIH I unm "• I> LX!> 

HINT All IHI» BI-ST PI. W 

LI iMhoni wah .nail Tmlav 

MIH MMHiINC NO\ JAN 


APOLLO VICTORIA SK USB 8665 
IT. mrt npos Pam- Bk«n «28 
Dim liikrtnwJM n JN <>333 
lil-li-^nci <541111 240 7500 iBfcg 
■I nil Up S.11I-. 030 0153 tin 
7 4E Mills I up A H4I 3 0 

STARLIGHT EXPRESS 

“A MUSICAL THAT SURPASSES 
ANYTHWO AROUND IN EVERT 
MMENSfOir* n I \P 

STARLIGHT EXPRESS 

Mush m 

AMWI ta 1 1 OITA WEBBER 
I vl Us IH Kl CHARI I STILOllE 
INrnlnMn THTMIB NL'NN' 
APPLY DAILY TO BOX OFFICE 
ran RETURNS Btxnnl nxini 
wins 4 Cfi on Tups mats lor 
viuer mwm . 

NOW BOOKWC TO MARCH 11M 


BARBICAN Ol USB 87R&/038 

KNI M , Mon-Sun lOam-eoinl 

ROYAL SHAKESPEARE 
COMPANY 

BARBICAN THEATRE red 
Pthp ports (omnr. Frt Mon A 
lliur 7 JOnm. Sal 500 A 7 SO 

MISALLIANCE l>v 6M w...rwl. 

nrir<- ports 16-5n on WUfft 

FROM A MARfBABC by 
initftin ' 

THE pit tom io tku TJOem 

PRIHC1PIA SCRVTORUlE Bill 

Wli I'l-nnwh’lllflunl NfIMII 

lO-iM on nnai Pnis THE 

DEAD MONKEY liv Wrk Darkr. 


CHURCHILL Brnmlrv 460 6677. 

■ ir-, 745, Ma lt TTvu rs a Sal 
?,V>. JUNE WHfTfiyXD in THE 
RIVALS. 


COMEDY THEATRE 930 2S7B 
txr. MO 7500 Orp, 9JO 6Ifi3 

“A newt hdfciB P M !■ « » » »" 
Tlnw 

JOHN ALOERTON 
, CWEN SUSAN 

TAYLOR PENHAUOON 

THE MAINTENANCE 
MAN 

A L*m«rv 

HI MARITAL MASTERPIECE 
*WO»KllFUU.Y rUNNY" 

MKmow 

-nv aiwlKUM' of r *5*“ 1 row 
rrertpiuon" D Mali 
-\m mnnv ll¥»«l SX» 
Mnn THU B m/liat 5 30 A 8.30 


COTTESLOE ■S’ 958 2ZS a CC 
IN.UMH4 TTi«ur^i smao aum 

HIM 7 30 THE BAY AT NKS 
. in d wRcoueo CHBjpn 1 sg 
Mum rn 7 * 7 JO 

UU prrlk NEArTOt J*"’ 
Sm A sa*-td 
pUlonn pnrt 41 IMS C230 


CRmmON s 0.10 35lo CC 379 

oT„»r. 370 o4 il. 741 vw Clin. 

M-lii I up. H DO I hu m.U 

7 Ul s-il S -VI A H Kl 
“BRITISH FARCE AT ITS BEST" 
Il 31.111 

■IIh- llu'iilifiil i jkiwIi Onupum 

DEREK NOYCE 

row lus 

ALFRED MARKS 
ANITA JACKI 


SAM COX 

RUN TOR YOUR WIFE 

\\ I lilt'll •Hid dlirrlnt bv 
II \\ i'-CK>M V 

(lii I .Ann HAg-watUne pnl, 
“SHOULD RUN FOR UFE“ S I s 


DOMINION THEATRE Bm OUR . 

SHU KHJS/OBoS ALL IcItdIxhiH 

(T IHM4.UMIS FIRST CALL S4hr 7t 

tL.l nu Xto ?45H NO BOOtUNG] 

FEE Civ Sain 930 0153 
DAVE CLARK** 

TIME 

THE ULTIMATE CXPOHCMCE 

CUFF RICHARD 

,\S -T1U ROCK KTAR 1 
1111 PORIHTYAI Ol ■■\K.\HH1 
BS 

LAURENCE OUVIER 

■ Mini Hi 7.30 THU M.,1 2 30 
Sdi s a n so. 

SPECIAL CONCESSIONS al C7al4 

|H-,|N I'Vrtil 111 A Sal Mrs Im 

0 IPS. I IWK. sliMrnls A UIMUY 

III s - al.ill 1 limn brfan* prrU" 

ni.uui- Haw BoMikis to April ‘87. 

1 mm im 9 at Thuis lints eu» 

■■ Ihf Ilii k Slar” will, DP DM 

I am ml ih- John cnrhlk* 

I iwm isrl a sul p wk 4 « B IS, 
SEATS AVAR. FOR PERF TOUT 


DONMAR WAREHOUSE 240| 
USX «: S7D 0509/6433 
PERRIER PICK OF THE FMNCS 

TBb Mtaale 7 30 RoRwwt Prw- 

ullh 


<1 rinar IM). 4pm Rvy 
im-liii-r Kami Hi l i t 1 1 pm Tlw 

Happy End 


DRUrV LANE TWATRC ROYAL 

BnvCHlIrr-A OCOl&Se 8108. Ol 

540R0OO/7. m%l C.1I1 ?4tlt 7 iku 

,i M.ir- an Ol 340 7500 (■» bko 

livl TV krtniMM Ol S7D 0433 

(no hku frrl 
Dwte MroHL'* 

42ND STREET 

A SHOW rOR ALL TME FAMILY 
Wnmt #1 Hi tfc* b«4 
MrOsoI Award* tar ERB4 

vwril 

BEST MUSICAL 

STANDARD DRAMA AWARDS 

wM 

BEST MUSICAL 

LAURENCE OLIVIER AWARD 

IMF* 

BEST MUSICAL 

PLATS A PLAYERS 
LONDON THEATRE CRITICS 
AWARD 

I » m 8 O Mol* Will 3 O. Sal 3.0 & 

R30 RrhurrU vrtrr mol Wcdh 

MlMflin ami OAWi Mandbv 
Group' Saif-, 930 6193 

BOOH NOW FOR XMAS 
.. Hpcrbil malum- Drr 20 3om 


DUCHESS S 836 8543 QG 200 

OMB CC .576 tAZ 3 i CC 54 

tlf /7 dn- 240 7500 8 WOO 

. mol 3 Sal 3 A B 

- - NO SEX. PLEASE . 

WETtC BRITISH 


DUKE OF YORKS Kto 3175 O' 

H.l<> UH.57, 741 4W,BW 7500 

I \a M rim 3 S4l 5 A H 30 

COMEDY OF THE YEAR 

Standard Drama Award 1384 

STEPPING OUT 

lid Cimmh Hi KnIuiiI Hams 
I HI -1 ml In lulu 6b hlfl/lC 

-TRIUMPH ON TAP” sra 

-LAUGH YOURSELF SILLY** 1 U 
-A PERFECT DCLMinr* D Trl 

THIRD HILARIOUS YEAR 


FORTUNE II Ol CX- S K3o 253H/6 

tin 540 770(1 ■74lii's hku Irri 

Abut III 1 ,1 H S,|| H 50 Mai T11 ill-. 

A S.il 300 

RULA KEITH 

LENSKA DRMKE 

in DOUBLE DOUBLE 

-I numrii ««v mmuir" sr 

“ \ < hnsji id nhniliinilrv - is 
miivsiLilili>" lunrs LSI 

WE DOUBLE DARE YOU .TO 
DETECT HOW ITS DONE 


437 I S9S. CC 3TO Mii.' 
bku In- Isi ('.ill 54 hr 540 7200 
CIKi sub«, no 0173. Firs 8 
Mats Vvrrt 3 Sal 4 
-\ih1i>-h l liml tortum Prrsrols 

LEND ME A TENOR 

"A MASTERPIECE" Tunis 
■■mis nil im \ niL with 
mi SIM Ml oi utaiTur 
KI4P 

\n \nimrM CMHnft' tv 
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ln«W bv Imihi Ctimoro 


GREENWICH THEATRE Ol BSR 

77S5 I !•- T 46. Mali Sal 5 30 

FOR KING AMD COUNTRY In 

Jidin kiNm “Ac pawarfnl a 

diadbi d Bwa dr— a a» any 

an Cha EncHak Masv in r*a-1 

Im ~ dm 
D Trt 

Tunis. 


HAMPSTEAD 755 6301 Tws 
jton . Sni_ M ats 4 JO ASK FOR 
THE MOON 6>- Sfciria y Cn. “A 

■ sisy 

*^——9 w— — w IfTWs 


HAYMARKET THEATRE ROYAL 

Box olltrr a CCOl 630 1-4 

am S4hi /7*lav«r bkvi 240 7200 

Prmilrnnl5 0n Own-, 21 Or I 

MMX JACOB) in 

BREAKING the CODE 

bv Hugh wtiutmore 


HAYMARKET THEATRE ROYAL 

B«w mill i* and CC 01 930 9837. 

I iisi Can 2d hr 7«kiv CCbookuw 

Ol 240 7200. 

. IJUrrt nam BroMlufiav 
■A vdwrti kondati itiF drtMd" 
Fliwutt-tal Tllms 

% JACK LEMMON 

■•V, Him .i wmp arm * w»a 
nmi ow“ Todav 

in 

LONG DAY’S JOURNEY 
INTO NIGHT 

Bv Emma OImmi 
"JonoUmn MlllrtS bnUuuit 
praduriMHi” standard 
hr, OOB- Mon-Hal 7 Jo 


HER MAJE5TYS. IldinuiM Ol 

K Va 5«'>44 <4 : In krlniasln 376 

ni M i ii-i fall it. pan 7500 

ANDREW LLOYD WEBBER'S 

NEW MUSICAL 

THE PHANTOM OFTHE 
OPERA 

NUinmi ■ 

MICHAEL CRAWFORD 

Sn.ih Hlrif- 

Ibiulilnian Ballou 

lliinlniai IIARUI.U PRINCL 

I in 7 46 M.ils Mod A .Sal 3 

NOW PREVIEWING Onw. <* 

Oil .Il 7pm 


LONDON PALLADIUM 437 7373. 

741 (M<M ,11)1 hf>!| Irol I ind can 

74 III 7 I Nil <x: 740 7200 [NO 
BHQ FEE1 dip S.ihs «SO 0153 
1 h ki-lnknln .37*1 D433 

THE HIT MUSICAL 
COMEDY 

<» ORU. Hf.ARN 
A IX rv.Ei Ul ILLLY 

LA CAGE AUX F0LLES 

“_A P ALLAJ MUM ROAR OF 
APPROVAL” S Trt 

Mon I il 7 .30 Map, Wrd 2.00 
sal 3 SO A 0 OO 
si, Nil iiHicrWoip. mail, al dooi 
Mi* I II 4 Sill IIIAK 
SCATS AVAILABLE FROM C730 
Min lNHM.lnq la April 19B7 


LYRIC HAMMERSMITH Ol 741 

2J1I A Id M M«N. TH 25 

Oct I iis 745. Wrd Map. 2 30. 

H.X Mah. 4pm THE HOUSE OF 

BERNARDA ALBA h»- Lorca. 

Vtilh Patricia Nayom. Mc n da 
lack con A Ah PtowrttM. 
STUDIO: Ol 741 8701. Fram 
Tomor nrsBpin iOrl b M 7pml 


In NBcbaol WBcax. 


LYRIC THEATRE aurtlrsBim 
hi Ol 437 3b 8o/7 Ol 434 
1 550 Ol 434 4050. Ol 734 

Sloo/7 

COLIN BLAKELY 

“A lirUlum A tiiinintv 
inmH pniwiuaihV I". Tlnm 
in 

Tin- rsainnal TniMlroS urnauwd 
wonurtHm o< 

ALAN AYCKBOURN'S 

A CHORUS OF 
DISAPPROVAL 

-M<mi liHivknmtv luimk" Crfn 
“1 Illarions. - <* Tinus 
“A nirr isitiiihi o t 
innui i^loLualidn'' Turps 
I \in 7 30. M.iK W«1 .ind Hal 3 O. 
Ump Halis Ol 930 0123. 

ttrdur>-d pnr- nwh StUdMil A 
UAP M.uvJ-bv 

FIRST CALL 24HR 7 DAY 
CC BOOKMOS ON Ol 240 7200 
(NO BOOKING FEE} 

WINNER OF ALL 
THE BEST COMEDY 
AWARDS FOR 1985 
NOW BOOKING UNTIL 
APRIL ‘87 

AND FOR S PERIS ONLY 
FRANCE* DE LA TOUR 
AS LILUAN BELLMAN M 

LILLIAN 

1 piny bv WinUmi L»r»*. (Derm 
bv Cm hi RntairaiP. Hun» Ort 12. 
in 5b A KOI 7 al 4om- Man On 

0O al 3MU Bax OMM mm apan. 


LYTTELTON V 928 22SS CC 
■Naliwud ITwvilrrX ptwronlum 
•dugri Tcclav 7 13 How prirc mat: 
A 7.4fi. Tumor 7 4fi. Fn 2.00 now 
min* HUM- BRIGHTON BEACH 
MEMOIRS uv N(1I Htmoti Fn. 
Man. |Tu> 7 4B. sal 2 IS How 
nnro null A 7 43 THE 


MAYFAIR s <x: 62« 303e Mon 
mu h ni.sai 5 40 a h io 

RICHARD TODD m 

“Tba Bmt ThrMar <ar »*ar«“ S M 

THE BUSINESS OF 
MURDER „ 

**\« ■Ul.lll.l-h'Hl MUM” S Lmi 
■■ sns.ilKin.il** Tunis 

6TH THRILLING YEAR 


NATIONAL THEATRE Nn Bank 

NATIONAL THEATRE 
COMP ANY . 

s^- SEPARATE ENTR IES und<-i 
OLIVIER' LYTTELTON , 
COTTESLOE. LsrHInil rhrap 
wsii* ,uiv» tif otn*. ai i nr. m vs 
mill III .im RESTAURANT [028 
2UL1L EA5Y CAR PARK. Inlo 
toM i IMHO. MR COND 


NEW LONDON Dnnv Lan- WC? 

4050072 |"C 37Ci 0433 Llr-. 7.45 

I la- A SU 300 A 745 

THE ANDREW LLOYD W EBBE R 
/TJS. ELIOT MUSICAL 

CATS 

APPLY DAILY TO BOX OFFICE 
FOR RETURNS 

(III hid Ibinklnuv Ol 405 1507 Ol 

ill U30 0125 HOW RfMMUNG TO 

MAY 30 1907. 


OLIVOS *S* «*2a TBS 2 CC IN3 
liimal I ln>ili i ,, ‘. opm staHiri Toii'l. 

I'minn. Ill 7 IS K.U ?0O IlOW 
pil. '■ iiul. A 7 15 ANIMAL FARM 
lx (inn-11, adapt rd in 1 P«rr Hall. 
Minn H 00. Tin* 7 15 PftAVDA - A 
Flact Slrmrt C i— dy. 


PALACE THEATRE 43d OW CC. 
376 o4.V3 I si rim 24Hr 7Dav CC 
240 720) (an Sales *»3G t-123 

THE MIMICAL SENSATION 

LES MISERABLE 
“IF YOU CANT GET A 
TICKET- STEAL ONE" mo 

i » IS 7 30 Mali rnu A Hal 2 M 
I aiivnnms nol admllUVI 
unlit Iho inlonnl 

BEAT THE TOUTS BY ENQUtR- 
MB FOR RETURNS AT TME BOX 
OFFICE 


PARAMOUNT CITY THEATRE Cl 

UiMlIilill M. hi CC Ol 437 
*v5l?/H3BO Rfctianl O'Brien rn*- 
aim m wnsaDotml Rorkv Honor 
slum- r, Ksrk with PatarStmhar 

in THE NEWS 

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42 


WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 1 1986 


Glasgow pair 
to lead the 

march-past 


The five Scottish clubs who 
contest second kg ties in the 
three European competitions 
tonight are all hopeful of 
finding their way through to 
the second round draw, 
which are to be made in 
Switzerland on Friday. 

Celtic and Bangers have the 
strongest bridgeheads into 
Europe and. although both are 
being affected by injury, they 
should prove too good for 
their opponents, who cannot 
compete in terms of style, 
class and skill. While David 
Hay, the manager of Celtic 
who beat Shamrock Rovers 1- 
0 in the first leg, warns that: 
“Teams are never more 
vulnerable than when they 
think a tie is all over”, he 
assures his allegiance of 
supporters, who will pack 
Rarkhead tonight, that victory 
is assured if Celtic apply 
themselves as effectively as 
they did against Falkirk on 
Saturday. 

He is expected to change the 
tactics for the second leg. In 
Dublin — “Where we were 
lucky to win,” be reflected — 
Celtic, who play best when 
mounting spectacular attacks, 
adopted a negative 44-2 
formation. Although they 
have to rule out Smith, the 
promising winger who could 
have been in contention for a 
place in the team, because of a 
twisted knee, they wfl] revert 
to a 4-3-3 line-up to exploit the 
fierce-raiding talents of John- 
ston. McCIair. and Mclnalley. 

Rangers' injuries are more 
serious than those of their 
Glasgow rivals as the new hero 


By Hugh Taylor 

of Ibrox, the unorthodox 
winger McMinn, will be ab- 
sent because of a foot injury 
and the competent Fraser is 
also unlikely to play. Not- 
withstanding these problems, 

Barcelona look 
to Lineker 

Cekma, Spain (Reuter) — 
Barcelona are pinning their 
hopes on the pace and power of 
the England forward Gary 
Lineker to take them into the 
second round of UEFA Cap at 
the expense of Flamurtaii 
Vlora, of Albania, tonight 

The Spanish side, beaten 
finalists in last season's Euro- 
pean Cup, were held to a 
surprise 1-1 draw in Albania 
in the first leg two weeks ago, 
with the Barcelona substitute, 
Vigo scoring the equalizer only 
five minutes from time. 
Lineker, who joined Barcelona 
from Everton after finishing 
lop scorer at the World Cop 
finals in Mexico, scored his 
fourth league goal in the 2-2 
draw with Athletic Bilbao on 
Saturday. 

Other previews, page 40 

Rangers have the resources to 
overcome Tampere, taking to 
Finland the bolster of a 4-0 
win in the first leg. 

Any danger that Rangers 
will suffer from complacency 
has been eradicated by 
Graeme Souness, the player- 
manager, who labelled the first 
leg performance as “sloppy” 
and demands that more goals 


must be scored in a command- 
ingdisplay tonight. 

The future in Europe of the 
three other Scottish sides, 
Aberdeen, Heart of Midlo- 
thian and Dundee United, is 
more finely balanced. Hearts 
and Aberdeen retain a narrow 
advantage while United are in 
arrears. Bui there is no 
thought of defeat in any of the 
camps as the three prepare for 
difficult games. 

Aberdeen, who lead Sion 2- 
1 in the European Cup 
Winners’ Cup, were the only 
one of the Scottish quintet to 
have lost on Saiuiday, but 
Alex Ferguson is not de- 
pressed. 

Although Dukla Prague are 
faltering in the Czecho- 
slovakian league, they played 
so well against Hearts at 
Tynecastie in the first teg of 
their UEFA Cup tie. that they 
were applauded off the field by 
the Scottish supporters. 
Hearts may have been fortu- 
nate to win 3-2 but Alex 
MacDonald, the manager, is 
not unduly apprehensive 
about playing in Prague to- 
night. He is convinced that his 
side, having gained experience 
in Europe, can frustrate Dukla 
and even snatch a goal 

Dundee United, too. think 
they have the ability to win at 
Tannadice, even though Lens 
have a 1-0 lead from the first 
leg of their UEFA Cup tie in 
France. If United lose, h will' 
be the first time in eight years 
that they have failed to go 
through an opening round in 
European competitions. 


Luckless Linfield No special 
under pressure 


T infjpld have played 44 
games in major European 
competitions since their initial 
encounter against Kamra- 
lema. the then Swedish cham- 
pions. in 1959. But it is 
doubtful if the Belfast Blues 
have ever approached a tie — 
they play Rosenborg, of Nor- 
way. tonight in their first 
round, second fog European 
cup game at Windsor Park 
trailing 1-0 — under so much 
pressure to achieve a result. 

An appalling start to the 
season, has seen Linfield suf- 
fer seven defeats in eight 
games. Roy Coyle, manager at 
Windsor Park for ten seasons, 
is so perplexed that be has no 
ready explanation for the cur- 
rent lack of success. He says: 
“Wc are creating chances 
without scoring the goals. 
There is nothing wrong with 
the players' attitude or ap- 
proach and ! remain optimis- 
tic about our chances against 
Rosenborg.” 


By George Ace 


Linfield. despite their cur- 
rent lack of form, are the only 
Irish club with a realistic 
chance of making progress in 
the European competitions. 
Shamrock Rovers, Glentoran, 
and Coleraine all foiled to 
exploit home advantage in 
first leg ties and Galway 
United race a 5-1 deficit after a 
visit to Groningen, of The 
Netherlands, a fortnight ago. 

• The Republic of Ireland will 
play Poland in Warsaw on 
November 1 1 The match was 
organized at the request of 
Jack Chariton, the manager, 
and falls between the 
Republic's two European 
Championship games against 
Scotland on October 15 and 
February 18. 

• Tommy Wright, the Scot- 
land forward, plays his first 
full game for Leeds United for 
almost a year in tonight's Full 
Members Cup first round tie 
against Bradford Gty at 
Elland Road. 


r- 


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measures 
for Cup tie 

Leeds United will take nor- 
mal security precautions for 
their Full Members Cup, first 
round, tie against Bradford 
City at Elland Road today. 
Their secretary, David Dowse, 
said: "Strict segregation 
arrangements, as usual, will be 
used, but we are not expecting 
a big crowd”. 

When the two sides met in 
the second division at the 
Odsal stadium earlier this 
month, crowd trouble resulted 
in 60 arrests and a subsequent 
Football Association inquiry, 
whose findings are expected to 
be announced next week. 
Leeds, one of the best-sup- 
ported sides in the second 
division with an average 
home crowd of more than 
14.000. do not expea even 
half that number for today's 
match. 

• Johnny Melgod, Notting- 
ham Forest's stylish central 
defender, has been instructed 
by manager Brian Clough to 
avoid risking further cautions 
for dissent and the inevitable 
FA ban they would bring 
(Dennis Shaw writes). The 
talented Dutchman has been 
booked three times .twice for 
making comments to the 
referee. 

Gough fears he will lose his 
inspirational defender for a 
spell if he collects more cau- 
tions. “It is foolish for him to 
risk a suspension like this. I 
could understand it if he were 
the rough, rough type but he 
shies away from this side of 
the game.” 


Cutbacks 
forcing 
a decline 

Sport in Northern Ireland is 
facing a cash crisis following a 
series of cutbacks by the 
province's department of 
education. 

The Sports Council for 
Northern Ireland, in its 
twelfth annual report pub- 
lished yesterday, claimed that 
grant aid from government 
has declined by £240,000. or 
22 per cent, in real terms over 
the past right years and that 
the long term view is 
pessimistic. 

The council's report adds 
that it is seriously concerned 
by its lack of financial re- 
sources to meet its 
responsibilities. 

Victor Hasten, the chair- 
man. said: “There are signs in 
empty and derelict school 
playing fields, reductions in 
swimming instructions, and 
low levels of fitness and 
physical skill among young 
people, reported by coaches 
and teachers, which give 
grounds to be concerned for 
the future. 

“Spon is adversely affected 
by our social, political and 
economic environment 

“ Bur rhe council firmly 
believes that, with improved 
financial support, sport could 
make an even greater 
contribution to the quality of 
life in Northern Ireland." 


THE < 08 ^ TIMES 


SPORT 


’• O* “ i JC* : " • ' ***** 

^ v- : 'i.'. *. ;y • 


First published in 1785 


; ; . • 



Hit and miss: Pandit takes evasive action as Zoehrer, of Australia, moves on to an unbeaten 
52 during the rain-ruined Delhi Test match which ended yesterday. Report page 40 


GOLF 


Clark has chance to boost 
international reputation 


Howard Clark will once 
again vigorously pursue inter- 
national recognition when be 
swings into action in the 
Suntory. world . match-play 
championship first round 
against Sandy Lyle at Went- 
worth tomorrow. 

Clark accepted his pairing 
with Lyle, who won the Open 
Championship last year, as 
another opportunity to dem- 
onstrate his ability against an 
opponent generally consid- 
ered to be the finest British 
player since Tony Jacklin. 

More importantly, he 
knows that by moving past 
Lyle he could eventually 
progress to a semi-final match 
against Severiano Ballesteros, 
which would clearly offer him 
another chance to increase his 
reputation abroad. 

Clark is understandably agi- 
tated by the lack of worldwide 
response to his achievements 
in finishing third in the Euro- 
pean Order of Merit in 1984, 
then winning the World Cup 
individual title last year. “At 
least I've got another chance 
to show what I can do,” he 
said. “Sandy is a very dan- 
gerous player to get as a fust- 
round opponent. He is capable 
of making a birdie at any hole. 
But that is the draw and I've 
got to live with it. 

“It might be a diched 
outlook but I’ve got to take 
one match at a time. I know 
how to play this course, 
because I won the PGA 
Championship here in 1984, 


By Mitchell Platts 

Suntory draw 

FIRST' ROUND: N Price (SA) » R Davis 
(Ausk H -dark (OB) v A Ljrte (G8); J M 
btazebel (Sp) v L Waddns (US); Joe Onto 
(Jep) v B Cranihm (US). 

SECOND ROUND: S Baasstaros (Sp) v 
Price or Oavta: T Nakafma (JapHi) v Clarii 
or Lyle: J Wcktaus (US) y Otazabal or 
WadUts; G Norman (Aio) v Ozatt or 
Cranshaw- 

and I felt I was unfortunate to 
lose to Corey Pavin in the 
world match-play champion- 
ship later that year. 

Even Lyle admitted: “I'm 
not happy with the draw but 
I'll accept it I think it's a pity 
that the two British players 
here this week have to meet in 
the first round.” 

Clark has the advantage of 
knowing that in his last two 
head-on collisions with Lyle 
he has. come out the winner. 
He overcame Lyle in a play- 
off for the Glasgow Open last 
year then beat him in the 
semi-finals of the Epson grand 
prix earlier this season. 

Hie problem for Clark is 
whether he can remain 
unflustered throughout a 36- 
hole confrontation which is 
likely to prove the leading 
first-day attraction, with Greg 
Norman, Jack Nicklaus and 
Ballesteros, the defending 
champion, seeded through to 
the second round. 

“1’ve learned to handle my 
own bad play because I know I 
can rectify that,” said Clark. 
“But I do sometimes get 
annoyed by outside distrac- 
tions which divert my atten- 


tion and cause me to lose 
concentration. I know it's 
something that I must 
overcome.” 

Clark began this season by 
winning the Madrid and Span- 
ish Opens in quick succession. 
“It gave me hopes of grandeur, 
but in the end it has become 
an extra-learning year,” he 
explained. “It put pressure on 
me starting the season so fast, 
because I suddenly realized 
that if I didn't keep it up then I 
could only go down from No 1 
place in the Order of Merit. 

“Seve went past me.but I'm 
still hoping to finish the 
season in second place m the 
Order of Merit. It could rive 
me the chance of a first 
invitation to the US Masters, 
though 1 know that a victory 
here would surely help that 
cause.” 

Jose- Maria Olazabal, the 
young Spaniard who won the 
European Masters last month, 
feces the indomitable Lanny 
Wadkins of the United States 
in an intriguing fust-round 
encounter. 


Evans answers 

Maurice Evans, the Oxford 
Untied manager, has been asked 
lo explain to the Football 
Association comments be made 
after the march against Arsenal 
at Highbury on September 20. 
when he criticized John Martin, 
the referee, for dismissing 
Jeremy Charles and taking no 
action against Steve Williams 
who. he said, committed an 
illegal tackle on Charles which 
led to the sending off. 


Thomson flies British flag 


Muriel Thomsom. the for- 
mer Curtis Cup player from 
Aberdeen, hailed a strong 
overseas challenge to share the 
lead after the first round of the 
£20.000 Mitsubishi Colt Cars 
Jersey open championship at 
Royal Jersey yesterday. 

Miss Thomson, winner of 
two tournaments already this 
season, returned a one-under- 
par round of 70 to pull 


New blow 
for Budd 

Johannesburg (Reuter) — 
Zola Budd is suffering from a 
hamstring injury which is 
more serious that first sus- 
pected. Pieter Labuschagne. 
her coach, said yesterday. 
Budd has been hampered by 
the injury for several weeks 
and struggled during the latter 
part of the European athletics 
season when she foiled to 
finish in the first three places 
in several races. 

Mini power 

Tim Thomson Jones will be 
presented with a British Ley- 
land Mini at Haydock Park on 
Saturday following the £4.000 
Brooke Bond Oxo amateur 
horseriders championship fi- 
nal. Thomson Jones, who 
clinched his third title by 
finishing third on Golden 
Fancy at Redcar last weekend, 
will partner Rimah for his 
father in Saturday's finale. 


alongside Corrine Dibnah. of 
Australia, and Pe ggy Conley, 
from the United States. 

The Scottish professional 
lost a great chance of taking 
the outright lead when she 
drove out of bounds to run up 
a double-bogey seven at the 
ninth hole, the last of her 
round. Earlier, Miss Thom- 
son. who started her round 
from the tenth, birdied four of 


SPORT IN BRIEF 



the first seven holes in her 
inward half. 

A pull of 1 2 feet for a birdie 
at the first started her move 
and she holed putts of six 
yards for further birdies at the 
third, fourth, and seventh 
holes. Miss Conley, a former 
United States junior cham- 
pion. had threatened to 
spreadeagle the field . But she 
faded in the rising breeze over 
the last nine holesi. 


Hall foiled 

Darren Hall's rankings 
clash against with Steve 
Baddeley in the Railcard team 
badminton challenge match 
today is off. Hall, the national 
champion and joint England 
No 3. damaged ankle liga- 
ments in practice yesterday 
and will miss the first of the 
seven-match series at Hemel 
Hempstead. 

Hall, aged 22. from 
Chingford. Essex, was hoping 
to move up the rankings with 
a victory over the England 
No 1 


Budd: New setback 

t 

Record falls 

After 14 years of supremacy n . 
in speed, yachts have given KCWlUfF UD 
way to windsurfers. The world ® * 

sailing speed record commit- 


tee have ratified the 38.86 
knots set by Pascal Maka. of 
France, in Sotavento. in the 
Canary Isles, in July. The 
record had been held since 
1972 by Tim Coleman, who. 
with his Crossbow I and II 
yachts, had constantly held off 
all other challenges. 


A new motor racing formula 
aimed at the newcomer and 
the low budget driver, is being 
introduced at the Brands 
Hatch circuit. Formula First is 
for 120 mph cars of simple 
design, powered by a 1600cc 
Fora engine through a stan- 
dard gearbox, which will sell 
for only £5.995 complete. 



McGuiga 
moves to 
court action 


By George Ace 


Barry McGuigan, the for- 
mer World Boxing Associ- 
ation featherweight champion, 
filed a High Court action in 
the Northern Ireland courts 
yesterday with a view to 
severing his links with his 
manag er B. J. Eastwood. 

The news comes as no real 
surprise. But it is, neverthe- 
less, a sad day for Irish sport 
that a partnership that scaled 
the heights from a May night 
in Dublin m 1981 when 
McGuigan threw his first 
punches for pay is now in such 
disarray. 

Shortly after the euphoria 
which gripped Ireland when 
McGuigan relieved Eusebio 
Pedroza, from Panama, of his 
World Boxing Association 
(WBA) title in London a year 
htf June the hitherto hanno- 
nioos relationship between 
boxer and manager began to 
show signs, not readily 
discernible to the public at 
large, that all was not well. 
And despite two successful if 
somewhat laboured defences 
of his crown (ate in 1985 and 
early* this year the portents 
were such to suggest the 
partnership was heading for if 
not already in trouble. 

What happened in Las Ve- 
gas last June when McGuigan 
lost his title to the 22-year-old 
Texan, Steve Cruz, and since 
made it all too obvious that 
McGuigan had boxed his last 
contest under the Eastwood 
banner. Both the principals 
denied that ail was not well 
and Eastwood was adamant 
that McGuigan was only tak- 
ing a welt-earned rest before 
rtpfMing on his future while 
McGuigan was buzzing 
around proving that with or 


SNOOKER 


Thorburn has his 
anger in control 

By a Special Correspondent 


Cliff Thorburn, the worid 
No 2, angered at allegations 
by Alex Higgins that he takes 
cocaine, diverted his aggres- 
sion into a commanding 5-1 
victory over Cliff Wilson to 
earn himself a place in the 
semi-finals of the BCE tour- 
nament at Stoke yesterday. 

After Thorburn had turned 
in a polished performance to 
stay on course to successfully 
defend his title, he refused to 
discuss his thoughts on the 
allegations made by Higgins. 

Ranked by Robert Winsor, 
his manager, Thorburn said: 
“All I can say is that a 
complaint will be lodged with 
the World Professional Bil- 
liards and Snooker Associ- 
ation very shortly." 

Although Thorburn suc- 
ceeded in hiding his emotions, 
he is known to be furious at 
the allegations which seem 
certain to signal more trouble 
for Higgins. Just a week ago. 
the Irishman was fined £2.000 
following incidents at the 
Mercantile Credit Classic 
tournament earlier this year — 
and indications from the 
Board are that they are taking 
a dim view of this latest jolt to 
the sport. 

However Thorburn. aiming 
to win the first of six ranking 
tournaments this season, re- 
fused to let the furore affect his 
form. He said: “I'm here to 
win this tournament and my 
concentration is pretty good.” 

It was not too clever, 
though, when in the opening 
frame he made an un- 
characteristic mistake to allow 
Wilson a 1-0 lead. Having hit 
back from 58-0 down. 


SQUASH RACKETS 


Hickox takes title and 
claims new record 


By Colin McQuillan 


Jamie Hickox. the Surrey- 
based Anglo-Canadian, has 
won his fourth successive Blue 
Stratos British Under-23 
closed championship display- 
ing roughly equal proportions 
of skill, triumph and relief. 

“It is good to have the 
record of four wins, which will 
be hard to beau” Hickock said 
after defeating Robert Owen 
of Warwickshire 9-3. 9-5. 9-1 
in an inventive 41-minute 
final at Lamb's Club. London, 
on Monday evening.“Bui I am 
even more pleased that this is 
the last time 1 have to came 
out to be shot at by the best 
young players in the country,” 
he said 

Hickox knows from his own 
career around the inter- 
national professional circuit 
how easy it is to challenge the 
established order as a young 
player with nothing to lose 
and everything to gain in 
picking-off the odd star player. 

“I did not play well this year 
until rhe finaL when my 
a tracking three- wall nick shot 
began to groove against Rob- 
ert. Earlier, especially against 
Del Harris in the semi-hnal. I 


just had to settle down arid 
work my way out of troubk 
he said. 

Experience was a vital fac- 
tor in hou unpredictable con- 
ditions. Hickox likes the heat, 
which creates a liveliness * n 
the ball from which be <** 
manufacture a range:-;®} 
extraordinary angles * od 
flicks. He was also able KJ 
compose himself fora leoguff 
nap on a foirly puNieso® 
while Owen Was still fighting 
his way through London s 
traffic to reach the m 05 * 
important match of Iris career 

There was no deemng-oj 
coun. however. After.® 
fiercely competed optftig 
spell of six points, ihe fuw' 
tuned boasting of the' chan*" 
pion stretched Owen *beyo°“ 
his own capabilities. It was 9 
case of men and boys. . 

There remains the Unaw- 

23 Open championsh ip If 
January, a Far tocher priffO' 
siiion "in which TJickmc^® 

one remaining chance to ma*' 

a lastina mark., then ne 


without his worid mm he 
was still Ireland's finMgg 
sporting son. 

The McGuigan family 
pointed the finger at Eastwood 
as being solely responsible for 
Barry defending his tide k 
Las Vegas while Eastwood 
was inserting that he oaly 
negotiated for McGmgaawhat 
McGuigan wanted and that 
was a purse dose to a mflGoa 
dollars for a tide defence hi the 
gambling city. 

Who was to Marne is do 
longer relevant: the champion 
lost his title and if Eastwood's 
judgment was at Curit— and he 
was not alone in thinking 
McGuigan only had to turn up 
to win — then everyone b 
entitled to one mistake. That . 
may be too simplistic a theory 
and there may be more than a 
grain of truth in the widely 
held view that, in the final 
analysis. McGuigan traded 
his title for the dollars. He 
cannot be Mamed fra* that and 
when Fernando Sosa, his orig- 
inal opponent in Las Vegas 
withdrew, and Steve Cruz 
rame in as i substitute the 
sporting press were justified in 
asking: Steve who? It didn't 
look all that big a risk even if 
McGuigan '$ performance 
against Danilo Cabrera In 
Dublin last February was 
away below Iris form on the 
way up. 

What the High Coart action 
will reveal is a matter for 
conjecture; that the whole 
affair is finally going to be 
washed in public is a matter of 
great regret. Eastwood and 
McGuigan had a lot going for 
them most of the way over the 
past five years 


Thorburn reached 46 after 
some patient break buil 
but after sinking the last? 
decided to go for black 
starting on the colours. AS he 
cued, his famed concentration 
went awry and the cue. ball 
ended on the floor to give 
Wilson a winning start to the 
match. 

But that was his only costly 
indiscretion as he then reeled 
off five successive frames, to 
stay in contention for the 
£35.000 winner's prize. 

Wilson, who sacrifices a 
virtually non-existent safety 
game, to show off his potting 
prowess, handed Thorhura a 
3-1 interval lead after he made 
a terrible hash of the fourth 
frame. He led 68-66, but tried 
an ambitious double cushion 
shot on the black which didn't 
come off. That left Thorburn 
with the simple task of potting 
an easy black to snatch the 
frame 73-68. 

At that point all the balls 
were washed with the' dry . 
atmosphere resulting in sev- 
eral strange kicks, but it made 
no difference to Wilson who 
saw the Canadian knock in a 
break of 67 as he collected foe 
two frames needed for view* 
RESULT: Quarter-final: C Tft&twn 
(Can) bt C Wilson (Wan, 5-l. pw? 
scores (Thorburn first): 46-74,3*- 
11, 68-19. 7S-6S, 85-Z 46-23. - - 

Peters oat 

Gary Peters, the Reading 
defender, will be out oF action 
for at least ten days' «u» 
hamstring and achilte tawpn 
trouble. Peters, who has bad 
leg encased in plaster to immo- 
bilize the injury, will mis at 
least three games.