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No 62,578 



TIMES 




THURSDAY OCTOBER 2 1986 


Scargill forcekuriioi^split as defence row rumbles on 


Labour fudge 
future of 

fuel 




By Philip 

The Labour Party commit- 
ted itself for the first time 
yesterday to the phasing out of 
nuclear power in Britain after 
a highly-charged debate at the 
annua] conference in Black- 
pool which saw the union 
movement again divided by 
Mr Arthur ScaigilL 

The decision of the TUC a 
month ago merely to halt the 
development of the industry 
pending a safety inquiry was 
overturned, in 'spite of a 
passionate plea by leaders of 
the other power unions on 
behalf of the workers in the 
industry. 

Labour's precise stance was 
left in a state of intended 
confusion as Mr Neil Kinnock 
won backing for his policy of a 
phased withdrawal of nuclear 
power taking decades, a fudge 
with which key figures in his 
party like Mr John Cunning- 
ham, his shadow environment 
secretary, could live. 

But his hopes of avoiding a 
split with several of the 
country's biggest union lead- 


Webster, Chief Political Correspondent 
ere pined against each other to accept an emergency resolu- 


Tomorrow 


Love to 
learn 



AsParHamerft 
prepares to debate 
sex education in . 
schools, a look at 
both sides of a 
growing 
controversy 



— — 


• The Times Portfolio 
Gold daily competition 
prize of £4,000 was 
won yesterday by Dr 
G.E. Lovatt of 
Sundridge, Kent 
Details, page 3. 

• Portfolio list, page 
23; rules and how to 
play, information 
service, page 16. 

• On Saturday the 
weekly prize will be 
£24,000, treble the 
usual amount because 
no one has won for 
the last two weeks. 


Amstrad soars 

In the four weeks since its 
launch. Amstrad s IBM- 
compatible range of business 
computers, with a basic price 
or £399. has achieved rales 
worth more than £100 million 
^ Page 17 


times short 


Indian warning 

The deputy leader of the 
ruling Indian Congress Party 
warned England's cricketers 
nol to visit South Africa this 
winter or risk ben ns I tarred 
from next year s World Cup m 
India and Pakistan Page 38 


TIMES. JOBS 


Young management trainees 
should appreciate that there is 
plemv ofroom ai the top, rays 
a former personnel chief in an 
introduction to today s six- 

„ GenCral AP ®SJ0 
section ruh 


A further list of London 
University degrees ]*P u |j 
iished today n&M 


HwbcN*»* 2-5 

Overseas 

Aft* . . 15 

Mirinfifl' J? 

BmI» «T 51 

Brahes* iM* 
Ohm M 

ChMtfBnfeljU* 
Fraium 18-J- 
Dfeurj *“ 


Leaders » 
Letters » 

Obituary M 
Umo! H 

Sport SWW* 
Theatres** 37 
TVAftrijo £ 
linivwwttes 33 

Weather 
Wilis W 


were thwarted by Mr ScaigUL 

The National Union of 
Mineworicere' leader refused 
to go along with a deal 
involving his union, the 
Transport and General 
Workers’s Union and Mr 
Kinnock under which the 
leadership agreed to back the 
NUM demand for the next 
Labour government to halt 
the nuclear power pro- 
gramme. provided the motion 
it put before the conferenc e 

Conference reports 4 
Geoffrey Smith 4 

Anger and venom 12 
Tiding article 13 

Frank Johnson 16 

was heavily qualified to 
underline that the withdrawal 
process would take several 
Labour governments to im- 
plement and not as Mr 
Scargill wanted, one five-year 
period. 

Mr Eric Hammond, general 
secretary of the electricians' 
union. Mr Bill Jordan, presi- 
dent of the engineering work- 
ers, and Mr John Edmonds, 
.general secretary of the genera] 
and- municipal workers 
(GMBATU), and other union 
leaders were angry about the 
deal and forced the conference 
managers yesterday morning 

US envoy 
steps up 
the attack 

By RobmOakley ;'t% 
Political Editor 

Mr Charles Price, the 
United States Ambassador to 
Britain, yesterday stepped up 
the American admin- 
istration's attack on the La- 
bour Party’s proposals to 
scrap Britain's nuclear weap- 
ons and close down American 
nuclear bases here. 

In his third interview in 24 
hours, Mr Price made clear the 
American alarm about -1 the 
consequences to Nato. 

He told TV-am: “It is very 
difficult for us to see and 
accept the fact that they would 
opt out and bring about the 
prospect of great disarray and 
instability in an alliance which 
has served us so well for 40 
years." 

He warned that such a 
policy was likely to lead to 
demands for the withdrawal of 
some of the 300,000 American 
troops in Europe, earning the 
immediate counter from Mr 
Kinnock: “I do not think there 
is any substantial basis for 
making these guesses.” 

Mr Price's latest comments 
underlined the Reagan 
Administration's determina- 
tion to continue condemning 
Labour's proposals right up to 
the next election, risking fur- 
ther charges of bullying. 

The Ambassador had al- 
ready flatly contradicted Mr 
Kinnock's claims that earlier 
condemnation of Labour’s 
policies by Mr Caspar Wein- 
berger. the US Defence Sec- 
retary, and his assistant, .Mr 
Richard Perle, had been 
repudiated by the White 
House. 

Labour leaders have been 
taken aback by the 
unprecedentiy high profile 
American operation and are 
still seeking the best means of 
counter-attack. But they be- 
lieve that it is a high risk 
strategy which could recoil on 
the American Government if 
they are seen by the British 
people as acting in collusion 
with the Conservatives here. 



Mr Younger: Strong attack 
on Labour defence policies* 

the defence debate that has 
dominated the party con- 
ference season and is set to be 
at die centre of the election 
campaign. 

Mr Younger said that al- 
though he welcomed the de- 
bate. the background to it was 
more sombre and sinister than 
ever before. 

He said it would not be hard 
to imagine the devastating 
affect on the Naio alliance and 
its members. 


V !V: V :<,%s 

*j, ... . 


tion giving delegates the 
chance 10 vote on the TUC 
policy of a pause in nuclear 
development, passed last 
month by only 60.000 votes. 

Their demand to be heard 
was initially resisted and it 
was only by threatening to 
take their protests to the 
conference floor, and a re- 
ported threat by Mr Ham- 
mond to pull out his union 
delegation, that they managed 
to get their motion taken. 

But it was defeated by 
4. 1 30.000 votes to 2, 150.000. 
The NUM motion was car- 
ried, along with the reserva- 
tions insisted on by Mr 
Kinnock. by 4.2 13.000 to 
2,143.000, just short of the 
two-thirds majority which 
would have made it a can- 
didate for inclusion in the 
manifesto. 

But under the leadership's 
policy which will now form 
the basis of its manifesto at the 
next election: 

O Labour will not build any 
new nuclear stations. 
m The contract for the 
Sizewell pressurized, water re- 
actor if ordered will be 
cancelled. 

• Labour will start phasing 
out existing stations be&nning 

Continued on page Z col 7 

Younger 
wades in 
lerTories 

By Peter Davenport 

Defence Correspondent 

Mr George Younger, Sec- 
retary of State for Defence, 
yesterday, attacked Labour 
Party plans for a defence 
policy without British or 
American nuclear weapons. 

He raid such suggestions 
look no account of the 
complexities of contemporary 
defence issues, adding that 
Labour intentions to close all 
US nuclear bases in this 
country would encourage 
American disengagement of 
conventional forces in 
Europe. 

He made his remarks in a 
speech, tilled "A Sense of 
Balance', to the Royal United 
Services Institute for Defence 
Studies in London, an engage- 
ment arranged some time 
previously but which pro- 
vided Mr Younger with a 
timely platform to respond to 



Across the nuclear divide: Mr Eric Hammond and Mr Arthur Scargill, who faced each other 
in the main debate at the Labour conference In Blackpool yesterday. 


Political storm over 
Hussey’s BBC post 


By Gavin Bell, Arts Correspondent 


Mrs Thatcher surprised and 
created controversy in politi- 
cal and broadcasting circles 
yesterday by appointing Mr 
Markaduke “Duke" Hussey, a 
former chief executive of 
Times Newspapers, as chair- 
man of the BBC board of gov- 
emors. 

Mr Hussey, aged 63. who 
will succeed Mr Stuart Young, 
who died in August, is ex- 
pected to take up his new post 
in November, subject to for- 
mal approval from the Queen. 

The choice was apparently 
seen on both sides of politics 
as going some way towards 
meeting increasing. . 
vaiive demands foir 
control oyer the BBC. " . 7 » 

However Mr Hussey denied 
that he would be twinging any 
personal political bias to aigu- 
ably the most important job in 
British broadcasting. 

. The reaction of his future 
colleagues was uncertain and a 
BBC source said they were 
adopting a wait-and-see atti- 
tude. However conflicting re- 
actions from Conservative 


and Labour politicians in- 
dicated a widespread view 
that Mr Hussey had been 
brought in to pursue a tough 
political line. 

Mr Gerald Howarth, MP, 
(Conservative. Cannock), wel- 
comed the appointment: “Mr 
Hussey has had experience at 
the coalface, and should have 
the right tough approach. He 
has to stamp his authority on 
the BBC from the start He 
must set about his task with 

-Bringing BBC to heel? 12 

perseverance: and not be 
hoodwinked by the. left-wing 
mafia at 'the BBC." 

But Mr Gerald Kaufrn&n, 
tire shadow Home Secretary, 
said a future Laboor.Govero- 
ment would seek to remove 
Mr Hussey. Mr Norman 
Tebbit, the Conservative Par- 
ty chairman and a . prominent 
critic of the BBC man- 
agement was understood to 
be pleased with the choice. - 
■Despite recurrent contro- 
versy over alleged left wing 


bias within the Corporation, 
some Conservative MPs be- 
lieve Mr Hussey's main task 
will be to tackle what they per- 
ceive as wasteful bureaucracy, 
sloppy editorial control and 
failure to adapt to rapidly 
changing broadcasting techno- 
logy. 

Lord Barnett the recently- 
appointed vice-chainhan, 
who was known to have been 
favoured for the post by senior 
BBC staff, was informed of the 
decision on Tuesday night 

Opinion within the Na- 
tional Union of Journalists 
was divided. Mr Bob Norris, 
the assistant general secretary, 
said he was glad ai least lhat a 
person who has had experi- 
ence had got the job, but Mr 
Jacob Ecclestone, the deputy 
general secretary, said Mr 
Hussey’s background as the 
man who closed Times News- 
papers for a year “does not 
give rise to any confidence 
that be is equipped to defend 
the public interest against 
Government interference and 
the privatisation lobby". 


US airline 
orders 100 
Airbus jets 

By Harvey Elliott 

Air Correspondent 

. In one of the biggest aircraft 
deals ever struck America's 
third biggest airline. North- 
west, last night ordered 100 
Airbus A320 passenger jets. 

The order, which is worth 
3J! billion dollars, has cata- 
pulted Airbus Industrie, in 
which British Aerospace has a 
20 per cent stake; alongside 
Boeing in the American 
giant's own backyard. 

Even Airbus Industrie and 
British Aerospace executives 
were stunned by the size of the 
order which will give an 
enormous boost to the Euro- 
pean manufacturer's battle 
with Boeing. 

The aircraft, which will be 
used on Northwest's network 
of routes within the United 
States, are scheduled for deliv- 
ery between 1990 and 1995 
and work on producing the 
wings, will guarantee, the jobs 
of thousands of. British Aero- 
space workers for that period. 

Boeing was regarded in the 
industry as the natural .choice 
for the new fleet because 
Northwest had built up a huge 
engineering network designed 
to cope with the whole range 
of Boeing jets. But Airbus 
salesmen never gave up hope 
and managed to.pui together a' 
complicated and attractive 
financial package 


Crews threaten all 
Sealink services 


By Michael HorsneH 


A threat to all Sealink ferry 
services mounted last night as 
seamen defied the company's 
decision to axe nearly 500 jobs 
on its Channel Island sailings. 

An escalation of industrial 
action by the National Union 
of Seamen, fighting the merger 
between Sealink and Channel 
Island Ferries which has led to 
the redundancies, could hit 
the company's entire fleet of 
33 ships.' 

This would mean disrup- 
tion of cross Channel services 
as well as sailings to the Isle of 
WighL the Isle of Man, Ireland 
and the Hook of Holland. 

As holidaymakers in the 
Channel Islands and France 
remained stranded yesterday. 
NUS crews continued to oc- 
cupy or prevent the move- 
ment of the four ferries. 

The sit-ins on the four 
Sealink ships were expected to 


continue at least until tomor- 
row. when a meeting between 
Mr Tony McGregor, deputy 
national secretary of the NUS. 
and Mr Bill Henderson, the 
company's director of opera- 
tions is scheduled. 

Sealink lost £11 million on 
its Channel Islands and Cher- 
bourg services last year. 

After the dispute over the 
job cuts, the Earl William 
ferry remained tied up in 
Guernsey, the Earl Harold in 
Portsmouth, tWe Earl Godwin 
in Weymouth and the Earl 
Granville in Cherbourg with 
an average of 60 crew occupy- 
ing each vessel 

Airlines put on extra flights 
to meet the shipping emer- 
gency and a private hydrofoil 
service was started between 
the Channel Islands and 
Poole. 


Shares stage recovery 


For the second day Tunning 
the London stock market 
closed on a high note yes- 
terday, recovering some of the 
ground lost in recent weeks. 

The FT 30-share index 
ended the day at its highest 
level of the session, up 24.7 at 
1.251.7. The broader FT-SE 
100 index put on 20.1 to close 
at 1,575.9. The surge in share 
prices has added £5.33 billion 


to the value of companies 
during the past 48 hours. 

The City, which had been 
looking for a 2 per cent 
increase in base rates within a 
week, now thinks the Chan- 
cellor may have ridden the 
immediate storm and will be 
able to get away with a rise of 
just 1 per cent. 

Market report, page 20 


Gas customers offered £250 stake 


By David Young 
Energy Correspondent 

More than 16 million Brit- 
ish Gas customers are to be 
guaranteed die right to buy at 
least £ 2 S 0 -worth of shares m 
the biggesl-ever Stock Ex- 
change flotation. 

The minimum investment 
is being kept low to provide an 
opportunity for the small 
investor. And there will be 
incentives for would-be 
shareholders. 

The invitation to subscribe 
will be coupled with an otter 
of discount vouchers on gas 
bills. Alternatively, sharehold- 
ers will be able to qualify for a 
lovaltv bonus of one share for 
every' ten held, provided the 
shares are held for three years. 

The offer will involve, 

, . « - rH rf* wrt Jin***! «honn morftt 


than 16 million potential ap- 
plicants in less than two weeks 

- and it wifi mop up much of 
the cash returned to unsuccess- 
ful applicamsfor Trustee Sav- 
ings Bank shares. 

Only when the sale has been 
completed win the massive 
administrative costs be 
known. 

. Meanwhile,' Sir Denis 
Rooke. chairman of British 
Gas. and his chief executive; 
Mr Bob Evans, have to sit on 
the sidelines, listening to the 
Government advisers praising 
the company 

Already the City has been 
subjected to detailed briefings 
on the prospects for; British 
Gas- Seminars have al$p been 
held in most regional centres 

- including Belfast, where gas 
is still produced from oil and 
d e»ivered,.io_thg- householder 


How the British Gas Offer Compares 


Share offer 


Minimum 

Investment 


First 

Instalment 


British Telecom (1984) £260 

British Aerospace (1985) £375 

Britwl(1985) £370 

Cable and Wireless (1985) -£29330 

TSB Group 


£100 

£200 

£200 

£150 


Priority Customer 
aneral Public 


General Public 
Britteh Gas 


£200 £1°° 

£400 £200 

not mom than £15Q To be announced 



at considerably higher cost 
than that of North Sea natural 
gas supplies on the mainland: 
- and the public for the past . 
month have been softened-up 
by paster and television 
advertising. 

The shares will go on sale in 
fate'N&vember - the 21st is 
the date favoured by the 


■Department of Energy - and 
the offer will dose early ih : 
December. 

•Trading In- British Gas 
shares will begin . in mid- 
« December and. if the projec- 
tions are correct investors will 
be able to start taking a profit 
just in time for Christmas. 

p £55 billion sale, page 17 
~ K ' T T~ 


PC Olds, the 
disabled hero, 
dies at 34 

- By Robin Young 

PC Philip Olds, who was 
shot and paralysed while tack- 
ling two gunmen two days 
before Christmas in 198*0. 
collapsed and died yesterday 
at his home inPinner.aged 34. 

PC Olds, who was awarded 
the Queen’s Gallantry MedaL 
remained, whether in a wheel- 
chair or struggling to walk 
again with electronic aids, 
bracing systems and frames, a 
very popular hero. 

He spoke frankly about his 
fate. “ It was a deliberate 
shooting, ir policemen had 
been allowed to ‘cany guns 
there would be two dead men 
and a policeman who still had 
a backbone.' 


Reagan suffers 
backlash over 
Daniloff affair 

From Michael Binyon, Washington 


President Reagan yesterday 
received Mr Nicholas Dani- 
loff at the White House, as the 
freed correspondent spoke of 
his gratitude and insisted his 
unconditional release without 
trial had vindicated him. 

On the whole, America 
reacted with approval to the 
swift series of events and 
announcement of the prepara- 
tory summit meeting in 
Iceland. 

However, some right-wing 
commentators criticized the 

exchanges and said the Rus- 
sians had done better out of 
them than the L'S. 

“It's a lerrible precedent," 
said Congressman Jack Ke- 
mp. a Republican contender 
for the 1988 presidential elec- 
tion. ~Tm afraid the Soviets 
believe they won this round, 
and that's the wrong kind of 
environment going into a 
critical high-level meeting." 

Dr Henry Kissinger, a for- 
mer Secretary of State, said he 
was “very uneasy" about the 
summit and the speed at 
which it was being set up: “I 
would not have recommended 
it." 

General Brent Scowcroft, 
national security adviser to 
former President Gerald Ford, 
also said the Administration 
did not do well and was 
prepared to pay a lot for the 
summit 

On Capiiol Hill however, 
supporters of the Administra- 
tion moved immediately to 


make political capital out of 
the announcement, which is 
seen as helping President 
Reagan in the run-up to the 
mid-term congressional elec- 
tions next month, while 
othercongressmen were pre- 
pared to reserve judgement, 

Mr Reagan admitted that he 
should not have said that it 
was the Russians who "blin- 
ked". As details of the com- 
plex deal emerge, it is clear 
that the US made significant 
concessions and was dis- 
appointed in many of its aims. 

It had hoped for the release 
of other dissidents besides Mr 

Kremlin's motives 6 
Washington View 6 
Focus on Reykjavik 6 
Leading article 13 

Orlov, including Dr David 
Gold far b, ihe ailing Jewish 
dissident 

President Reagan accepted 
the idea of an early summit 
with Mr Gorbachov less than 
a day after it was proposed to 
him in the Sonet leader's 
letter of September t9. He had 
suggested either Britain or 
.Iceland as the venue. 

Mr Reagan delivered a 
sharp protest to Mr Eduard 
Shevardnadze, the Soviet For- 
eign Minister, over the 
Danilolf affair - but sent a 
secret message the next day- 
saying he would go to Iceland 
provided the US reporter was 
freed. 


London Gorbachov 
ruled out lambasts 
as venue old guard 


From Christopher Walker 
Moscow 

President Reagan turned 
down an offer from Mr 
Mikhail Gotbachov, the Sov- 
iet leader, to use London as 
the venue for their pre-sum- 
mit meeting, apparently to 
resfrict publicity and avoid 
security problems. 

The President's decision to 
opt for Reykjavik was dis- 
closed here yesterday at a 
briefing called by the Soviet 
Foreign Ministry to spell out 
Moscow's expectations for the 
meeting and give details of the 
complex diplomatic package 
that paved the way for it 

Diplomats said later that 
one reason for publicizing Mr 
Reagan's rejection of London 
may have been to defuse 
complaints from the world's 
media over limited access 

Mr Boris Pyadyshev, the 
ministry spokesman, said that 
Mr Zakharov had returned to 
his home in Moscow and that 
no decision had been taken on 
whether to allow him to meet 
the press. 

“The question of Daniloff 
and Zakharov has been re-, 
solved successfully in the in- 
terests of both sides," he said. 


Moscow (Reuter) — Mr 
Mikhail Gorbachov, saying 
“The old is not giving up 
without a fight", yesterday 
assailed opponents of his pro- 
gramme for economic and 
moral renewal and sharply 
criticized dogmatism in Soviet 
intellectual life. 

At thejame time the policy- 
making Communist Party 
Central Committee, in a 
resolution published by Pra- 
vda. attacked bureaucrats for 
blocking much-needed ref- 
orms. 

“Bureaucratic perversions 
in the work of management, 
and lack of discipline and 
responsibility, arc all acting as 
a brake on reconstruction." 
the Central Committee said. 

Mr Gorbachov, delivering 
one of his strongest attacks yet 
on conservatives within the 
Soviet system, said the Krem- 
lin leadership's drive for re- 
newal was provoking a 
rearguard action by stalwarts 
not attuned to the need for 
change. 

The Soviet leader was 
speaking in the Kremlin at a 
conference of heads of depart- 
ments of social sciences in 
Soviet higher education ins* 
times. 



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HOME NEWS 


House price rise 
running at 12% 


House prices continued to nse denng the summer and at 
the end of last month showed an annual increase or 12 per 
cent 2 per cent higher than for the prenoas quarter, the 
Nationwide Building Society reported yesterday in its third 
quarter survey (Christopher Wannan writes). . 

Prices showed no signs of slowing down in spite 01 the 

holiday season, and in the quarter went np by 4 per cent - 

the highest summer quarter rise since 1979. if this rate of 
increase continues, the Nationwide predicts that the annul 
rate will he dose to 15 per cent, 

Mr Bernard Rorier, Nationwide'* general manager 
(housing), said that it was particularly worrying that the 
n$e was so Car ahead of ear n mgs , making it increasingly 
difficult for first-time buyers- “This underlines the urgent 
need for extending new housing finance initiatives and for 
the recreation of a viable private rented sector to copejvith 
the needs of those setting up house for the first time. 

The average London property costs more than £60,000, 
compared with jast under £40,000 in the UK as a whole. 


GLC offices for sale 


County Hall, the headquarters of the now abolished 
Greater London ConndL yesterday went on die market 
described as “London's most exciting real estate 
opportunity” by the property agents Richard Ellis. 

The first advertisements appeared in a campaign costing 
£354,000 on behalf of the London Residuary Body, whose 
task it is to dispose of the assets of the GLC. There are five 
buildings in die complex with a total gross flow area of 2J. 
million sq.ft, on an 11-acre site overlooking the Thames 
and the Houses of Parliament. 


Getty’s 
bog gift 


Mr John Paul Getty IX, 
the reclusive millionaire, 
yesterday gave £53,000 to- 
wards conserving a patch of 
rare peat bog on the Somer- 
set levels (Hugh Clayton 
writes). 

It was one of a series of 
gifts by Mr Getty towards 
saving British heritage and 
wildlife. 

The money will go into a 
£750,000 appeal launched 
in Taunton yesterday by 
Mr William Waldegrave, 
Minister for the Environ- 
ment and the Countryside, 
to pay for a wildlife refuge 
on the levels. 

Mr Getty has given away 
more than £60 million in 
the past two years. 


5,800 to 
lose jobs 


A boat 5£00 staff em- 
ployed by Northern En- 
gineering Industries, of 
Tyneside, are to lose their 
jobs in the next 15 months. 

The company said yes- 
terday that 4£00 jobs 
would go by the end of 
December, mostly at plants 
in the north of England, the 
Midlands and Scotland. 

The reductions, part of a 
£75 mfiUoa re str ucturing 
programme, wffl reduce the 
company's workforce to 
about 16,000. 

A half-year report re- 
leased yesterday showed 
that profits fell from £21.5 
million, for tiie six months 
to the end of June last year, 
to £10.6 million this year. 


GPs risk Opren costs 


Health authorities and doctors could incur financial 
penalties if they fail to respond urgently to reqoests for 
medical records in the malti- million poond Opren damages 
case, a High Court judge said yesterday. 

Mr Justice Hirst, who has the task of ensuring that more 
than 1,000 Hah"* involving the anti-arthritis drag come to 
court quickly and economically, said the response to a 
request by him in July had bees “disappointing”, with only 
150 of 650 cases now with complete records. 1 

He gave a warning that if the Opren Action Group, 
which is co-ordinating the claims, was forced to seek court 
orders to get the records, there was a “real risk” that health 
authorities and GPs could be liable for the expense. 


ToryMP 
to retire 


Sir Adam Butter (right), 
the Conservative MP for 
Bosworth and former de- 
fence, industry and North- 
ern Ireland minister, 
yesterday became the 37th 
Conservative MP to an- 
nounce their retirement at 
the next genera) election 
(Sheila Gnu writes). 

Sir Adam, aged 54 and 
the son of Lord (lab Bntier, 
said the decision was 
personal. 

General election: A Bntier 
(C) 31.663. M Fox 

(SDP/AU) 14J69, D Januer 
(Lab) 11,120. Coo nuu 
17.294, 



Yachtswoman home 


Miss Anne Miller, the Scottish yachtswoman who was 
thought to have (tied during a transatlantic crossing, sailed 
into Campbelltown on the west coast of Scotland yesterday, 
two years after leaving Bermuda. 

She was given up for dead after a cargo ship reported her 
24-foot sloop adrift 500 miles south-east of Newfoundland. 
Three weeks later she turned up safely in the Azores. She 
had collapsed below deck after a storm. 


I 


TTTF TTMES THURSDAY OCTOBER 2 1 986 


‘We don’t want to throw down gauntlets’ 

Pit peace is vital, says coal chief 

■T . ... ^ coal out of low-cost pits a 


By Ian Smith 
and Tim Jones 


Miners were yesterday 
warned to be on their best 
behaviour by Sir Robert 
Haslam, the new chairman of 
British CoaL 

His wanting came at the 
same time as the publication 
of a book which claims that 
the year-long miners* strike 
was greatly prolonged because 
of Mr Arthur ScarriU, presi- 


Without Limit, Marlin 
Adency. industrial editor of 
BBC televion news, and John 
Lloyd, formerly industrial edi- 
tor of the Financial Times and 
now editor of the New States- 
man , also suggest the strike 
may not have taken place had 
it not been for Mr Scargill. 

They claim it was a com- 
mon belief in the Govern- 
ment. the Labour movement 
and the coal board that Mr 
Scargill greatly prolonged the 


miners would help to trans- 
form an annual loss of £50 
million into a break-even 
situation by 1989, but that 
industrial action would in- 
evitably jeopardize plans for 
further investment 
He was speaking after 
suffering from BickershaH col- 
liery in Lancashire after his 
first visit underground since 


a ,™-k ma! out of low-cost pits and 
low-cost mines and new tech- k our nis- 

SS s ssssfe 

s-SSgg Esuasb 


is in its workers’ hands. A £3 
per tonne reduction in coal 
prices to the Central Electric- 
ity Generating . Board will 
mean a £400 million loss in 


nrsi vjsii unucreruuiiu amw tucou a — - — 

he took over control from Sir , profits this year at a nme when 
Ian MacGregor on Se p tember the world is awash with cneap 


deni of the National Union of spike and raised the stakes. It 
Mipeworkers, who became is also believed he turned what 


“the embodiment of the en- 
emy within". 

The authors of the book. 
The Miners Strike - Loss 


could have been a partial 
victory into a complete defeat. 

Sir Robert yesterday said 
that co-operation . from the 


Sir Robert spoke optimis- 
tically of the new mood of 
cheerful commitment and the 
£65 million cash injection the 


industry will receive this year 
for the further development of 


oil and foreign coaL 
“When people think of 
nationalized industries they 
rather tend to think in terms 
of monopoly money —but it is 
verv real money," he said 
Wuntly.“We have to get more 


nuclear, coal power stations, 
or both, that they be reassured 
that British Coal can deliver 

ilS “*Wedo not want to get into 
any game of making threats or 
throwing down gauntlets, he 
added. “But if wc let our 
customers down now salts 
will be irrevocably lost and 
this will have an immediate 
impact in cutting our planned 
capital programme. 


Marketing seen 
by Tories as key 
to poll hat-trick 


By Nicholas Wood, Political Reporter 


Conservative Party leaders 
are pinning their hopes on a 
sophisticated new marketing 
strategy to transform next 
week's Bournemouth con- 
ference into a springboard for 
a hat-trick of election vic- 
tories. 

The Central Office and its 
advertising agents, Saatchi 
and Saatchi. commissioned 
detailed opinion research 
among floating voters and 
disgruntled Tories and discov- 
ered that the party has to give 
a much sharper focus to its 
vision of the future to re- 
capture support that has 
ebbed away since the 1983 
triumph. 

It is that finding that will 
dictate die message Mrs Mar- 
garet Thatcher and her min- 
isters will try to put over to the 
country. 

Four key elements make up 
the new campaigning ap- 
proach, underpinning the 
103rd Conservative Party 
conference; 

• A conference slogan with a 
forward-looking theme, 
coined on the basis of the 
polling evidence to appeal to 
voters, who believe the Gov- 
ernment has rather lost its way 
in the past two years. 

• The co-ordination of all 


Ban on 
Libyan 
airline 


By Michael Evans 
Whitehall Correspondent 


..and a legal precedent 
for literary copywright 


The microcodes that translate computer 
language from inside the silicon chip have 
been declared literary creations. 

Another link you may have missed between 
the purely academic and the sternly economic. 

Read NEW SCIENTIST. Male the connection. 


Who said purely academic? 

newscientist 


Today and every Thursday 


AVAILABLE NOW-NEW SCIENTISTS “MAN IN SPACE," 
£L95>AT ALL GOOD NEWSAGENTS. 


ministerial speeches so that 
they encapsulate the thinking 
behind the slogan and contain 
specific “milestones" and 
“targets" spelling out the 
agenda for the rest of this term 
of office and Mrs Thatcher’s 
next administration. 

• Instant publicity material 
for the delegates. This will be 
linked to ministers’ speeches 
to remind them of the pledges 
given and to be used as 
campaigning material. 

• Advertisements in this 
Sunday's national newspapers 
promoting the conference, its 
slogan and an outline of 
Britain's future under a re- 
newed term of Conservative 
rule. 

The new approach, in- 
tended to cany the Tories into 
a “campaigning period", the 
phase before an outright elec- 
tion campaign, has been 
masterminded by Mr Norman 
Tebbit the party chairman, 
and Mr Michael Dobbs, his 
chief of staff and a former 
Saatchi and Saatchi executive. 

Mr Tebbh’s speech at the 
opening of the conference on 
Tuesday and the Prime 
Minister's dosing address on 
the Friday will hammer home 
the message of the Tories as a 
party with a mission. 



Labour’s 


fudge on 
N-power 


Continued from page 1 

with the older Magnox 

reactors. 

• The advanced gas cooled 
reactors at Heysham and 
Torn ess will not be fuelled up 
if they are not on line when 
Labour takes office. If they are 
operating they will not be 
priorities for dosure. 


Police bringing the injured intruder down from the roof 
where he had hidden in a coal banker. 


Heathrow 


Pensioner 


gunssplit 

police 


wins gun 
struggle 


Libyan Arab Airlines’ twice 
weekly flights into Heathrow 
Airport are to be banned with 
| almost immediate effect be- 
cause of involvement in ter- 
rorist activity, a Cabinet 
committee decided yesterday. 

The three key ministers. Sir 
Geoffrey Howe, Foreign Sec- 
retary, Mr Douglas Hurd, 
Home Secretary, and Mr John 
Moore, Secretary of Stale for 
Transport were unanimous in 
the decision.lt will be noted by 
the full Cabinet today. . 

Under the Libyan Arab 
Airlines' air service agree- 
ment its operating permit has 
another month to run. 

The committee decided that 
a ban oa flights from Tripoli, 
was the only course to take 
after the evidence during last 
week’s trial of Rasmi Awad. 

A wad was jailed for 25 years 
for receiving four grenades 
brought on board a Libyan 
, Arab Airlines’ aircraft 

Cost of terrorism, page 5 


By Stewart Teadler 
Crime Reporter 
Police commanders yes- 
terday rejected a call to con- 
demn the use of heavily- 
armed police patrols at 
airports, but registered anxiety 
at the implications. 

On the second day of the 
Police Superintendents’ Ass- 
ociation conference in Harm- 
gate, delegates representing 
more than Z000 officers 
turned down a motion on the 
use of sub-machine guns in- 
troduced this year to counter 
terrorism. 

After its overwhelming de- 
feat in a dosed session. Chief 
Supt Kenneth Smith, associ- 
ation secretary, said the exec- 
utive had supported the 
concern but not the call for the 
removal of support But the 
motion could not be split 
Supt Brian Mackenzie, of 
Durham, the proposer, said: 
“U was defeated but there was 
a feeling that the conference 
does wish to show concern 
about arming of police at 
airports". 


A | f mb aged 65 wrestled a 
sawn-off shotgun from a sus- 
pected bank robber and 
punched his companion in the 
face when two men burst into 
his east London council flat 
yesterday. 

One of the men escaped 
while the other climbed on to 
the roof of Mr Frankie 
Pearson's flat and held armed 
; police at bay for more than 
three hoars. 

The ' drama started at 
1230pm when a security van 
was bdd up in front of 
Barclays bank in Whitechapel 
Road. Police arrived seconds 
later and a security man gave 
chase. A shot was fired, but 
nobody was injured. 

At 1.15pm, Mr Pearson 
answered u knock on the door 
of his flat in Cotehert Avenue, 
Bethnal Green. “One of the 
men hit me with a gun or a 
helmet and I saw stars", he 
said. . 

“I went beserk and I 
punched him. His head was 
cut wide open with blood 
streaming from it l picked 
him up and threw him against 



Mr Frankie Pearson, who 
suffered fodal iqjnries. 


• The Thorp reprocessing 
plant at Sellafleld will be 
completed but not commis- 
sioned for the purpose of 
reprocessing. Instead it will be 
used for the development of 
waste disposal and storage. 

Even before the debate the 
doubts of the other power 
unions about the compromise 
deal were vindicated when Mr 
Scargill was making clear he 
thought the phase-out could 
be done in the five-year 
timescale. 

And when he moved the 
motion he infuriated the 
leadership and some in his 
own union by stating that he 
did not accept the qualifica- 
tions attached to it But he 
won an ovation by describing 
the policy of phasing out all 
nuclear plants as an election- 
winner. 

Mr Hammond, chairman of 
the TUCs energy committee, 
called on the conference not to 
rebuff the rational examina- 
tion of nudear power pro- 
posed by the TUC. In a 
notable passage of his speech 
he said that the Russians were 
building nudear stations, 
learning from Chernobyl and 
the EETPU stood with the 
Russians on the matter. 

He said that Mr ScaigUTs 
assurances that jobs would be 
safeguarded were looked upon 
by nudear workers “as £6 
notes". 

In an emotional and effec- 
tive speech Mr Jordan said 
that the TUC would not 
commit 140,000 workers to 
the dole queue 

Turning on Mr Scargill he 
said that the coal industry had 
killed 10.000 as many people 
as were killed in the nudear 


the door." Mr. Pearson was 
slightly hurt. 

Armed police arrived 
shortly after, but the injured 
man bad disappeared on to the 
roof, where he hid in a coal 
honker. 

At 2A5, armed police 
reached the roof, using lad- 
ders. They threw three stun 
grenades at a door leading to 


industry. “What is your price 
for energy, " he said. 


an enclosure, finally gaining 
access after following a trail of 


access after following a trail of 
blood. 

At 3.40, police dragged the 
man down the ladder. It was 
later confirmed that a man had 
been taken to hospitaL 
The search for the second 
fnan was continuing last night 


Crown prosecution service 


Defiant magistrate draws first blood 


By Alan Hamilton 


Miss Audrey Jennings, the 
stipendiary magistrate presid- 
ing over court two of Wells 
Street Magistrates’ Court, 
central London, was In no 
mood to have her tine wasted. 


“It is the most inefficient 
and appalling way of going 
about things I have come 
across for a long time. If any 
business was nm the way the 
courts are run, they would be 
out of business by eleven 
o'clock in the morning,'' she 
declared yesterday. 

It was the day on which the 
much maligned crown 
prosecution service officially 
replaced the police as the 
pursuer of offences in the 
courts of England and Wales, 
a day on which leeway might 

1 be granted for the fumbling 
1 inexperience of a newly-in- 
vented legal apparatus. 

However, the magistrate's 
impatience was not directed at 
Mr Andrew Briertey, the 
fresh-faced crown prosecution 
service lawyer, who had 
brought before her a youth 
charged with threatening 
behaviour and assaulting a 
police officer during a 
demonstration outside the 
Sooth African embassy in 
Trafalgar Square. 

Rather, it was directed at 
Mr Henry Blaxlaud, counsel 
for the defence, who had asked 
for an adjournment to allow 
time to gather more witnesses. 

“I shall hear this case 
today," Miss Jennings said, in 
spite of pleas that $he 


The official start of the 
crown prosecution service yes- 
terday saw discontent surface 
in prosecuting departments 
outside London because of the 
need for lawyers to be sec- 
onded to make up staffing 
shortfalls (Frances Gibb 
writes). 

This problem is worst in 
London, where the service has 
bad to find thelaigest number 
of lawyers. About 60 provin- 
cial prosecutors have been 
seconded to help get it off the 
ground. 

The secondment was placed 
on a more formal basis from 
yesterday, .although the office 
of the Director of Public 


Prosecutions has insisted that 
it will be voluntary and will 
not lead to permanent 
transfer. 

However, a number of pros- 
ecutors are concerned that a 
refusal to go may count 
against them. One Buc- 
kinghamshire lawyer said: 
“what it amounts to is that if 
we refuse to go. we will not 
have much of a career; and if 
that is not being press-ganged, 
as has been alleged, T don't 
know what is." 

MrJ V Bates, another chief 
crown prosecutor, said in a 
memorandum to his staff that 
he did not want “to require the 
secondment of lawyers”. But 


atCHsed's solicitor had been on 
holiday. 

Mr Briertey presented the 

matter as a relatively straight- 
forward punch-up during an 
anti-apartheid demonstration. 

Bat it became less straight- 
forward when his first witness, 
a police constable who made 
the arrest, admitted under 
cross-examination by the de- 
fence that be had bees born in 
Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe). 

Mr Briertey immediately 
objected. The magistrate, with 
some severity, cautioned the 
defence abort an implicit 
suggestion that the officer had 
acted in an imm o ra l manner. 

Mr Briertey then menti on e d 
the defendant's record, a mat- 
ter not normally disenssed 
before conviction. Bat this was 
allowed after it was rated that 
defence suggestions short the 
officer's motives were’serious. 


and possibly justified looking 
into the accused's background. 

Did Mr Briertey have the 
accused's previous convic- 
tions? He did. But should she 
look at them?Mr Briertey was 
aware of the tricky legal 
ground looming. “1 think tee 
prosecution case is strong 
enough without looking at 
them, madam," be said. She 
did not look at teem. 

However, Miss ' Jennings 
did allow the defence to pursue 
the Rhodesian line a tittle 
further. “Counsel for the 
prosecution seeks to be fair, to 
an extent I find not only 
commendable, but overwhel- 
ming," she said. 

It was a dear bonus point 
for tee crown prosecution ser- 
vice. Another came moments 
later when the accused was 
found gnflty. Bat then the 
magistrate asked if Mr 



Mode 


m su 


unioi 
setback 



By Tim Jones - 

Leaders of the Aori. 
zamared Engineering -.Unfa, 
meeting in Blackpool, teivt 
decided to press ahead with 
their plans 10 form a rite*, 
dominated “super ummr 
spite of an unexpected setback 
at the hands of the ew Cotrve 
of the Institution of ftp. 
fcssional Civil Servants (IPC). 

Firmly committed no high- 
technology and prepared to 
accept, after tough a^otia- 
tions. no strike agreements, 
ihe union could transcend in 
voting power even the gam 
left-dominated Transport and 
General Workers Union. 

A meeting to discuss a 
moderate alliance was set up 
last month at the TUC Con- 
gress in Brighton by, Mr Bill 
Jordan, president of the en- 
gineers, and Mr Eric Ham- 
mond. general secretary of the 
Electrical Electronic and 
Plumbing Trade Union. 

Mr Bill McCall general 
secretary of the 1PC, was 
closely involved in the scheme 
but his executive, by a large 
majority, has decided to dis- 
tance itself from the move. 


for energy, " he said. 

• Buying nudear missiles 
from France may be one way 
of establishing a “minimum 
European deterrent", Mr John 
Cartwright, the SDP defence 
spokesman said last night, as 
the Alliance began the painful 
business of repairing the dam- 
age done by the split over 
defence (Nicholas Wood 
writes). 

• Mr Neil Kinnock moved 
last night to stop the prom- 
inent left-winger, Mr Dennis 
Skinner, from becoming 
chairman of the Labour Party 
in the expected election year 
of 1987. 


The. building workers’ 
lion Ucait has also tempered 


union Ucau has also tempered 
its initial enthusiam although 
its officers are still talking 
about a possible accommoda- 
tion. 


Wapping 
delay by 


printers 


By a Staff Reporter 


The National Graphical 
Association, one of the main 
unions involved in the dispute 
with News International, has 
derided 10 delay its response 


to the company’s “best, last 
and final offer" until it learns 
the outcome of the ballot 
Sogat *82 is conducting among 
members. 

Mr Tony Dubbins, NGA 
general secretary, and col- 
leagues on the national exec- 
utive are under intense 
pressure from hard-line Lon- 
don branch activist 
the offer, which 
compensation of £! 
to be shared among 
former employees 
on strike and were 
by the cpmpany. 

The "result of 
ballot is expected 
nouneed next 
days before the c 


the company, but 
pany has frozen 


pany has frozen 
because it has no < 
in the manner in 
balloting is being 

A request by tl 
for the TUC to adr 
monitor the Sogat 
rejected. 

News Intematii 
made it dear it 
necessarily be born 
ballot result where 
gested there have b< 
in the voting procei 

In common w 
unions involved ii 
pute, the NGA is r 
recommend accept; 
offer before puiiir 
ballot Its officials 
told that if this is 
there would be nc 
holding the ballot 
would be nothing u 

If the NGA does 
hold a ballot, it cc 
quickly by organ izii 
mass meeting, but 
pany would have 
isfied that all 
involved were fre 
without 


the terms of the letter from the 
crown prosecution service 
meant that, “if there are not 
volunteers I may be required 
to volunteer people". 

He added- “I think it is 
plain that those who go to 
London and do well will have 
bonus points on their personal 
files." 

While the service is actively 
recruiting lawyers, it main- 
tains it will not lower stan- 
dards to make up the shortfall. 
The service, under which res- 
ponsibility for prosecuting 
crime is removed from the 
police to the network of public 
prosecutors, is folly opera- 
tional throughout Britain. 


IRA informer 
praised for 
his courage 


An IRA informer was 
scribed as a “strange aninaJ 
but a brave man to a jury** 
the Central Criminal- Court 
yesterday. 

Mr Roy Amlot, praised foe 
courage of Mr Raymo®® 
O’Connor, aged 50. the main 
prosecution witness in foe 
trial of Thomas Maguire, aged 
27, who denies ooaspirmS 
with others to blow up foe 
Eagle and Child Inn, near 
Weeton Army camp in Black- 
pool in 1983. , 

Mr Maguire, a university 


Briertey could sketch in tee 
accused's background to help 
her choose the most appro- 
priate sentence. He amid not. 

The bench was not amny-d 

Mr Brierley protested that 
such matters were, and always 
had been, the province of the 
probation service. Reluctantly 
the magistrate remanded the 
yorth in custody for soda! 
inquiry reports. Shorting a 
broad Glasgow obscenity, he 
was led away. 

The defence rose with tee 
Intention of objecting to the 
presentation of the youth's 
previous convictions at too 
early a stage, but as his client 
had left tee court the mag- 
istrate ruled him out of order. 
Miss Jennings then retired to 
lunch, while Mr Briertey left 
tee court with a atkfiid fat 
discreet smile. 

Leading article, page 13 


cused of conspiring wife Wj: 
rick Magee, now serving 
years for the Brighton notei 
bomb explosion and a.® 4 ® 
called Patrick Mnnay, loWo w 
up the public house in I98L 
The trial continues today. 


MP resigns 

Mr Robert KflB»8M5 
said he had been hounded out 
of politics by Militant, i®* 


signed officially yesterday,®* 
Labour MP for Knowsley 
North. A by-election & cx_ 
peered next month, ■ 


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School sports at risk 
^fter safety boycott 
by a teaching union 


THE TIMES THURSDAY OCTOBER 2 1986 


HOME NEWS 



S£ 3 £ 2 S 

TT^fc25 e ? an auih0 "ty. 

i ne local branch of the 
Shi??* Association of 

Schoolmasters/Union of 
Women Schoolteactos 
^instructed members 
boycott supervision of sports 
activities in more than 400 
Pnmwy and secondary 
schools until the city council 
S^ntees emetgJcy 0 ' fi 
Phones and adequate first aid 
v! it,e sat sports fields. 

Mrs Christine Keates, the 


By Mark Dowd, Education Reporter 


union branch secretary, said 
that two incidents had made 
the request a matter of 
urgency. 

First an ambulance 
responding to a call had been 
unable to enter one playing 
area because h was discovered 
that gates had been locked. 

More recently a teacher was 
forced to scour round local 
houses for a telephone after a 
pupil suffered an epileptic fit 
during a games lesson. 

Members of Birmingham 
City Council's education 
committee are believed to 
have offered cordless tele- 
phones as a solution, but these 


Rise of 20 % in places 
for teacher tr aining 


By Onr Education Reporter 

The intake of students for 
teacher training places at 
polytechnics and colleges is to 
“prase 20 per cent by 1989, 

Mr Kenneth Baker. Secretary 
of State for Education, said 
yesterday. 

Target numbers for trainee 
primary teachers will rise from 
last year's 7,020 to 8,617 in 
1989, and the number of 
secondary teachers is planned 
to rise from 3*985 in Septem- 
ber 1985 to 4555 in 1989. 

It is expected that funding 
for the expansion will come in 
part from the extra £54 million 
promised to polytechnics and 
colleges by Mr Baker at the 
end of August. 


Yesterday's announcement 
is based on provisional de- 
cisions made by Mr Baker's 
predecessor. Sir Keith Joseph. 

Although numbers of stu- 
dents in secondary education 
are expected to fail in the 
short-term, more teachers are 
seen to be necessary for when 
school rolls begin to expand 
again in the 1990s. 

Part of Mr Baker's diffi- 
culty, however, will be to 
attract sufficient applicants. 

Figures published by the 
University Grants Committee 
at the end of August disclosed 
a 19 per cent drop in applica- 
tions for postgraduate educa- 
tion courses. 


have been rejected on the 
grounds that they are only 
effective over short distances. 

They have also offered to 
provide teachers with a map 
locating the nearest telephone 
boxes, but this was opposed 
because the council would not 
be able to guarantee the 
phones would be immune 
from vandals. 

Mrs Keates said yesterday 
that as many as 88 per cent of 
the schools have playing fields 
which are detached from the 
main site, a factor which 
compounded the problem. 

- A large number already 
have the telephones we are 
asking for. but there are 
inadequate ground staff to 
keep many of ibe huts open." 
she said. 

Although only oue union 
has issued a boycott instruc- 
tion. Mrs Keates said that the 
NAS/UWT enjoyed the sup- 
port of other teachers, includ- 
ing the headmasters' union. 

A telling factor, moreover, 
could be that more physical 
education teachers in the Bir- 
mingham area belong to the 
NAS/UWT that any other 
union. 

A spokesman for the Bir- 
mingham branch of the Na- 
tional Union of Teachers said 
that it would not be issuing an 
instruction, but nevertheless 
predicted that its members 
would join in any action “in 
the spirit of trade union 
collective action". 

Birmingham City Council 
yesterday declined to com- 
ment 


Fixed penalties 


Instant justice hits the road 


He was young. He was 
driving. And he was, beyond 
doubt, not wearing a seatbelt 
“All you have to da," WPC 
Ruth Kettle borough explained 
to him, “is said the bottom 
half of the notice, with your 
£12, to the Central Ticket 
Office at Banbury, and if you 
do that within 28 days, that’s 
the end of the matter. 

“If you don't do it wi thin the 
time, the penalty will be 
increased by 50 per cent and it 
will be treated by the courts ns* 
an unpaid fine. OK?” . 

He nodded glumly. 

‘ This roadside" sScene ’at 
Thame, Oxfordshire; was be- 
ing repeated aO over Britain as 
police forces began for die first 
time issuing fixed penalty 
tickets for motoring offences. 


By Michael McCarthy 

The system, which is in- 
tended to dear the backlog of 
traffic cases clogging 
magistrates' courts, provides' 
fixed fines for more than 200 
infringements oftfae law of the 
road — £24 for endorsabie of- 
fences such as . speeding and 
£12 for die less serums ones, 
such as foiling to wear a 
seatbelt 

For non-endorsable of- 
fences, the motorist sends off 
£12 as if it were a parking 
ticket Endorsabie offences 
menu the licence has to be 
surrendered for the endorse- 
ment to be entered, although if 
disqualification is likely under 
the totting ep procedure, die 
case will have to go before a 
court 

PC Bob Plant, on patrol 


with WPC Kettieborough in 
the Thames valley yesterday, 
believes the system is simpler 
and foirer. 

“Fines can vary enormously 
between courts, but with the 
new system you know exactly 
what you have to pay and it's 
the same all over the country." 
He and WPC Kettieborough, 
based in Aylesbury, gave their 
first notice, a £24 speeding 
ticket to a woman driving a 
Ford Sierra estate domg 
49mph in a 30mph zone and 
the second went to a man 
driving a van without a 
seatbelt 

Their; hat trick was com- 
pleted in Thame jnst before 
die shift finished at 3pm when 
the young van driver was 
caught not using his seatbelt 


BR ‘half 
electric 
by 199 V 

By Rodney Cowton 

Half of Britain's railway 
network will have been elec- 
trified by 1991, Sir Robert 
Reid, chairman of British Rail 
said yesterday. 

That is the year in which 
electrification of the east coast 
route from London, King's 
Cross to Edinburgh will be 
completed as part of a £2,000 
million investment pro- 
gramme. 

Sir Robert was speaking 
after signing a £35 million 
contract with GEC for the 
supply of 31 of a new class of 
locomotive to operate on the 
east coast route. British Rail 
has an option to order another 
25 in 1988. The railways are 
also likely to place orders 
within the next few weeks for 
400 new passenger carnages 
for the east coast route. 

Mr Brian McCann, manag- 
ing director 1 of GEC _ trans- 
portation projects, said the 
new locomotive was being 
considered to operate on high 
speed trains through the 
Channel tunneL 

The electrified east coast 
service will operate at speeds 
of up to 140 miles per hour, 
and the new locomotives wffl 
come into- use initially on the 
route as for as Leeds in 1989, 
before being extended to Edin- 
burgh wo years later, reduc- 
ing the fastest rail journey 
time to Edinburgh by 35 
minutes to four hours. 

British Rail Engineering 
will be the mam sub- 

Sffi&KMSS 

JSS3SSSE 

of work. 


Computer 

pirates 

caught 

People making pirate copies 
of computer games have been 
caught during the last week by 
leading software producer 
(Keith Hiridley writes). 

The pirating involved re- 
view copies of new games 
circulated to magazines and 
dealers. 

The culprits were traced by 
game manufacturers, journal- 
ists and members of the trade 
itself. Court cases are 
expected. 

in -countries such as Italy, 
game pirating from review 
copies is rife. 

Mr Sandy Marchani of Bub- 
ble Bus, a company which 
produces games said: “A few 
amateurs have always copied 
review tapes, but some of 
these tried to make money out 
of it earlier this year and that 
alerted everyone.” 

Manufacturers are now 
planning to tighten controls 
on review copies. Some com- 
panies will either put security 
numbers on copies or get 
undertakings not to pass 
games on to third parties. 


Detective 
accused of 
riot lies 

A detective denied at the 
Central Criminal Court yes- 
terday that confessions, said 
to have been made by a youth 
accused of involvement m the 
Tottenham riots in north Lon- 
don, had been fabricated. 

Del Con Colin Lockwood 
also rejected a suggestion from 
Mr Noah Wemiger, for the 
defence, that he had been 
“taken over by emotion” after 
the murder of Police Con- 
stable Keith Blakelock. 

The officer told the jury: 
“Police Constable Blakelock 
and his colleagues were delib- 
erately ambushed by up to 300 
people on the Broadwater 
Farm Estate. ” 

• “Blakelock was surrounded 
and hacked to death. 

Earlier two constables gave 
eye-witness accounts of PC 
Blakelock's killing and the 
mutilation of his body “like a 
rag dolT. 

Mr Simon MaeMhin, aged 
19, of Liston Road, Totten- 
ham, denies charges of affray 
and burglary. The trial contin- 
ues today. 


‘Buy TVs and videos’ 


People are better off buying 
their televisions and video 
recorders than renting them, 
the Consumers' Association 
said yesterday. 

“Buy, don’t rent, is our 
advice today because tele- 
vision sets and videos are 
much more reliable these days 
according to our surveys, and 
the chance of having to fork' 
out a fortune in repair bills is 
remote,” a report in Which? 
magazine said. 

The same advice was given 
about telephones, provided 


consumers have the new-style j 
square sockets. 

“If you buy you win have to 
pay for your own repairs to the 
phone, but buying beats rent- 
ing so quickly that you won't 
be out of podeet even if yon 
threw your phone away and 
bought another one every 
couple of years or so. 

“With the cost of conver- 
sion to the new-style phone 
sockets costing £28.75, and if ] 
consumers are happy with 
their existing telephone, they 
might as well keep renting.” 



The Princess of Wales chats 
to a patient at the National 
Hospital for Nervons 
Diseases. 

After yesterday's visit the 
patients and staff said: “She 
was a real took." 

The Princess, who officially 
opened a new £150,000 inten- 
sive care unit, was making her 
first visit as patron of the 


hospital. 
Mr To 


Tom Oakman, chair- 
man of the hospital's board of 
governors, said: “The Princess 
chatted to more than 50 
patients and gave a great lift to 
some very Bi people.” 

The Princess and the pa- 
tients dissolved into laughter 
when Mrs Marjorie 
Canington-Bnck, aged 62, 
who is recovering from a 
spinal operation, confessed 
she had seven pints of 
Gnmness In her locker. 

Mrs Carrington-Bnck, from 
Cranford, Middlesex, said: 
“Will yon come hack and help 
me drink it tonight?” The 
Princess said she would love 
to. 


Arts funding 


Regions are poor relations 


By Gavin Bell, Arts Correspondent 


More public funds should 
be allocated to developing the 
arts in the regions, to correct 
an overwhelming concentra- 
tion of resources in London, 
according to an independent 
research report. 

The survey by the Policy 
Studies Institute, published 
yesterday, found that the cap- 
ital has double the number of 
subsidized drama perfor- 
mances, and three times more 
symphony concerts and opera 
and dance performances than 
the national average. 

Arts Council expenditure 
between 1980 and 1985 was 
even more heavily con- 
centrated in London, at five 
times the average per head for 
the regions. 

"It could be argued that 


there is scope for central 
government to devote a larger 
pan of its existing funding 
towards new developments m 
the regions.” the report said. 

The Arts Council has al- 
ready taken a step in this 
direction, by launching a pro- 
gramme in 1985 which pro- 
poses diverting an additional 
£5 million to the regions 
during two years. 

The institute report said 
that performing arts organiza- 
tions in the regions were 
producing more in terms of 
performances and the size of 
audiences than those in Lon- 
don. 

The report also criticized a 
decision in 1984-85 to ter- 
minate Housing the Arts, a 
programme which had pro- 


vided £16.5 millian in grants 
for building projects during 
the preceding 20 years. 

In a comparison of public 
expenditure on the arts per 
head of population, Britain 
came bottom of a list of six 
European countries. The UK 
figure in 1 98 1 -82 was £5.80. 
compared with £24.82 in Swe- 
den, £22.55 in France and 
£18.61 in Austria. 

However, arts bodies in 
Britain were becoming less 
dependent on public grants. 
The audience for the arts was 
estimated at 218 million in 
1983-84. The most popular 
attractions were museums and 
galleries with 58 million. The 
live arts drew 39 million 
people. 


f 40 

-&M- 

Physician 
was only 
winner 

A physician is the Mile 
winner of yesterday's Portfolio 
Gold prize of £4,000. 

Dr George Lovati. aged 64. 
of Sand ridge In Kent, has 
played the Portfolio Gidd 
game since it started in The 
Times. 

Dr Lovatt said he was “ex- 
tremely surprised" by his win. 

“i hare never won anything 
of note in my life,” he said. 

Asked what he intended us- 
ing the money for, be said: 
“I've spent it already.” 

Readers who would like to 
play the same can obtain a 
Portfolio Gold card by sending 
a stamped addressed envelope 
to: 

Portfolio Gold, 

The Times, 

PO Bov 40. 

Blackburn, 

BB1 6.U. 


PC is cleared 
of assault 

A policeman uccnM'd of 
hitting an arrested man sev- 
eral times with his truncheon 
was yesterday cleared nf an 
assanlt charge after a judge at 
Plymouth Crown Court ruled 
their was inadequate evidence 
to convict. 

Other police officers had 
told the court that IT Barry 
Smaldou hit Mr Danny 
Northey after be had been 
brought under control. 

Rescue award 

Mr Andrew Smith, n uon- 
swimmer, aged 39, of Bluom- 
field Rise, Odd Down. Bath, is 
to receive a bravery award 
from the Royal Humane Soci- 
ety for jumping into an icy 
pond and saving a baby 
strapped in a pushchair that 
had rolled into the water. 



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1.7 






LABOUR PARTY CONFERENCE 


4 HOME NEWS THE TIMES T HURSDAY OCTOBER 2 1986 

Energy debate • Aid for poor nations 

Defeat for Scargill move on nuclear fuel 


South Africa 


The attempt by Mr Arthur 
ScugHt. president of the Na- 
tional Union of Mincworkers. 
to commit the Labour Party in 
its election manifesto to phas- 
ing out ail existing nuclear 
power plants just failed in a 
series of card votes yesterday 
at the end of the debate on 
nuclear power. 

The composite motion 
which he had moved at the 
conference in Blackpool, but 
about which the national exec- 
utive committee had consid- 
erable reservations, was 
carried by 4.2 1 3.000 votes to 


4. 12 1. 000 votes to 

2. 103.000 — a majority of 
2.018.000. 

Both spokesman for the 
NEC and the shadow Cabinet 
made dear in the debate that a 
Labour Government would 
not order any new nuclear 
power stations. 

Mr ScargQL said when he 
moved a composite resolution 
that the theme of the con- 
ference had been the 
determination of policies ca- 
pable of winning the next 
election for Labour;, if that 
theme was to be continued it 


2.143.000- a majority of would have to indude the 
2.070.000 which just fell short phasing out of all nuclear 


of the two-thirds majority 
required to get the dedsion 
written into the manifesto. 


power stations in Britain. 

As wdl as the phasing out 
coupled with a minimum 


However, the Labour NEC annual coal output of 200 
policy statement Civil Nuclear million tonnes, the resolution 


Power, which envisages a 
phasing out of nuclear power 
stations over a period of 
decades, was carried by 

4.509.000 votes to 1.846.000 
— a majority of 2,663,000. 
That was well above the 
required two-thirds majority 

# Nuclear missiles 
come from a poison 
well called 

reprocessing 9 

and will help to quell the fears 
of those union leaders who, in 


called the next Labour gov- 
ernment to halt the nudear 
programme at Sellafield, 
Dounreay. Torness, Heysham 
and Stzewell. and a with- 
drawal from the European fast 
breeder reactor programme. 

It further proposed immedi- 
ate cessation of weapons grade 
nuclear material, no export of 
plutonium, halting the im- 
portation of foreign spent 
nudear fuel and waste and the 
stopping of the dumping of 
radioactive waste at sea and 
on land. 

“The case against nudear 


yesterday's impassioned de- power is overwhelming and 
bale, voiced considerable con- unanswerable", Mr Scargill 


cern for the future of workers 
in the industry and the need to 
ensure alternative jobs. 

The NUM motion empha- 


said. It was not cheaper, 
Chernobyl had proved it was 
not safe and the resolution 
would result in more, not less 


sized the need to provide jobs jobs. 

for displaced nuclear power “If we build new coal-fired 


workers as stations were 
dosed with alternative work 
in non-nuclear alternatives. 

An emergency motion, 
moved by Die electricians' 
union, was also thrown out 
even though it sought to bring 
Labour Party and TUC poli- 
cies into line. As decided at 
Brighton, the TUC wants a 
halt to any new nuclear sta- 
tions pending an exhaustive 
review. The motion was re- 
jected by 4.130.000 votes to 

2. 1 50.000 — majority against, 
1,980.000. 

A further composite motion 
moved by Copeland, the 
constituency of Dr John 
Cunningham. Labour's envir- 
onment spokesman, also fell 
and along with it the call fora 
national energy policy that 
embraced nuclear power. It 
wanted new energy policy 
proposals to be put to next 
year's party confcnrence. The 
delegates rejected this by 


stations and produce alter- 
native energy resources such 
as wind, wave, tidal geo- 
thermal and solar energy, it 
means at least 25.000 more 
jobs than currently in the 
nudear industry. It means for 
the decommissioning process 
thousands of jobs for decades 
to come." 

Mr John Aberdein, par- 
liamentary candidate for Ork- 
ney and Shetland, seconding 
the resolution, said “We are a 
pony of nudear disarmament 
Nudear missiles come from a 
poison well called reprocess- 
ing. We must not leave that 
poison well for future govern- 
ments to dip into". 

Mr Bernard Owen, Cope- 
land. moved a composite 
resolution that it was essential 
to future energy needs of 
industry in the United King- 
dom to plan and implement 
an integrated energy policy 
based on the use ofall major 


Black MPs ‘will 
work as caucus’ 

By Martin Fletcher, Political Reporter 


Black MPs returned to par- 
liament at the next election 
will form what amounts to 
their own black section within 
the Parliamentary Labour 
Party. 

The Labour conference in 
Blackpool yesterday rejected 
for the third year running the 
establishment of black sec- 
tions within the party, but 
Miss Diane Abbott, par- 
liamentary candidate for the 
safe Labour seat of Hackucy 
North, told a black sections 
fringe meeting that black MPs 
would “work together as a 
caucus". 

She claimed that this was 
essential to overcome the 
obvious “limitations" ofbeing 
a black MP. 

Other black candidates 
likely to be elected are Mr 
Bemie Grant, the leader of 
Haringey coundl. in the safe 
Tottenham seat, and Mr Paul 
Bociang. former chairman of 
the GLC police committee, in 
Brent South. 

Whi’e the Labour constitu- 
tion does not specifically out- 
law caucuses, it docs rule out 
groups with closed member- 
ships and a black caucus 
would undoubtedly be op- 
posed by the party leadership. 


THIRD WORLD 


Huge Increase in aid 
to poorest pledged 


A pledge to commit the next 
Labour government to a mas- 
sive increase in aid to develop- 
ing Third World countries, a 
relaxation of their inter- 
national debts and a readiness 
to dip into contingency re- 
serves in the even! of major 
disasters, won unanimous ap- 
proval yesterday. 

A show of hands accepted 
the establishment of a Min- 
istry of Overseas Develop- 
ment with a Cabinet seat; a 
minimum of 0.7 per cent of 
gross national product ear- 
marked as unconditional aid 
for Third World development; 
transference to the trade bud- 
get of all responsibility for 
promoting trade with the 
Third World. 

It also included participa- 
tion in a big initiative to write 
off Third-World debts and 
joint international action to 
control the activities of multi- 
national companies operating 
in the Third World, particu- 
larly in relation to employ- 
ment. and marketing 



« | BRANDT SPEECH 

If tUel Britain’s 

Party was dear. The next v*nlp |fl 

Labour government would X UJv JJA 

not order any new nuclear _ 

capacity. It would start un- It J1T0DC2H 

mediately with the phasing JjlUUB v ““ 

out of ibe Magnox stations _ A 

and would immediately order SCCtllll V 

two coal-fired stations. 

Mr Frank Cottam, General No system of common se- 
Municipal and Boilermakers’ curity waspossrble inEurope 
Union, said the country had without a British Oovemment 
been held to ransom in the playing a consmicuvc rote, 
1970 s by dependence on coaL Herr Witty B^t former 

They had had the tired de- West German Chancellor and 
rnand for 200 million tonnes present chairman of Socialist 
of coal at a cost of millions of International, sakL 


Mr NeD Kinnock, the Labour leader, congratulating Herr Willy Brandt, Che former West 
German Chancellor, after he had addressed the conference in Blackpool yesterday 


sources of energy, including 
nuclear power. 

Die resolution rejected the 
Government's reliance on 
market forces and instructed 
the NEC to institute an in- 
dependent technical review on 
the role of nuclear energy and 
report back to the 1987 
conference. 

“If coal becames absolute it 
will create an El Supremo 

# The country had 
been held to ransom 
in the 1970s by 
dependence on 
coal 9 

situation and the first action 
of the El Supremo will be total 
disregard for the TUC and to 
turn his back on the CLPs. 
They will be of no further 
use — puppets pose no threat. 
Muffin the Mule. will reside at 
Number 10 " he said. 


Mr Eric Hammond, general ceived as a cheap and dean 
secretary of the Electrical method of electricity produc- 
Bectronic, Tetecommunka- tion but as a convenient spin 
don, nod Plumbing Union off from a nuclear weapons 
and chairman of the TUC programme undemocraticaliy 
energy committee, in moving dedded upon by a Labour 
the emergency resolution call- government. Despite constant 
ing on the party to link up with denials, there were links be- 
the TUC review of nuclear tween nudear weapons and 
energy. civil nuclear power 

Mr Ron Todd, general sec- generation, 
retary of the Transport and Mr Stan Orme, MP, and 
General Workers' Union, said shadow energy secretary, said 
his union backed the NEC he supported the NEC stale- 


pounds in subsidy. It would He had opened his speech to 
mean the demise ot an conference by disclaiming any 
industry. intention of interfering in 

“h would reduce us to the Briris|l poetics, but adding 
level of a banana repuWic ^ if there was a “bright new 
without bananas. We would - « at 10 Downing Street, it 
an be bananas to take that j makfi a difference not 
roure. (laughter). only t0 people in Britain but 

TSfS among those in Europe used 
replying for the NEC, said the i^kin* to the United 
NUM resolution was gen- gJSfer a measured de- 

SS-StS? 5? nTc 

statement dearly setting out Europe needed 
the Lime-scale involved is the and successful Bn 
phasing out of nuclear power, policy because the 
It would be a decades-long bring about a ne 
process. detente, an dstpi 

Conference should oppose higher level, 
the pro-oudear resolution. j t ^35 bis con 
The emergency resolution would be 

should be remitted or without a 

opposed. common security 

Labour would not build any wou jd be no si 
new nudear power stations. If without a British 
a pressurized water reactor at having a coustruci 
Sizewell bad been ordered by ■ 
the time the party took power He wetcor 
the contract would be can- announcement ol 
celled. It would start to phase conference out ac 
out existing stations. ■ Europe they woi 

A Labour government )°°k after t ™j ir ° 
would not proceed with ther- interests, and pu 


statement and NUM motion 
calling for a properly planned 


mem which laid the basis for a 
fundamental change in 


phasing out of nudear power nuclear policy and matched 
but they did also accept the their need for electririty 


N EC reservations. There 
would be practical difficulties 
for the next Labour Govern- 
ment but the movement had a 
duty to say what would hap- 
pen to those who worked in 
the industry. 

Miss Joan Haddock, of the 
Campaign for Nuclear 
Disarmament, said that 
nuclear energy was never con- 


generation with their concern 
for the environment 

The link between civil amd 
military nudear power would 
be ended because Labour 
would stop the production of 
weapon grade plutonium. 
This would bring about an end 
to the official secrecy which 
shouded the industry. 

The position of the Labour 


6 It is a fuel of the 
past. The only 
responsible policy Is 
to phase it ont 9 , 

mal oxide processing, hut 
would continue to re-process 
Magnox fuel for the time- 
being. 

The NEC attached the high- 
est priority to ensuring work 
for those in the industry. 

Capital orders would be 
placed for new coal-fired 
power stations and miners' 
jobs would be saved. 

Nuclear power had turned 
out to be a treacherous form of 
energy with the risk of dev- 
astating accidents. Huge prob- 
lems were created by nudear 
waste. 

It was a fuel of the past and 
the only responsible policy 
was to phase it out slowly but 
surely. 


In Blackpool yesterday 
there were angry scenes as the 
conference again rejected by 
5.2 million votes to 1_2 mil- 
lion a call for the formal 
establishment of black 
sections. 

Delegates also defeated by 
5. 1 million votes to 620,000 a 
resolution criticizing as ~u re- 
elected. unaccountable and 
unrepresentative" the Black 
and Asian Advisory Commit- 
tee set up by the party 

In yesterday's debate. Miss 
Francis Curran, replying for 
the national executive 
committee on which she if the 
Young Socialists' repre- 
sentative. said: “It's the 
rcsponsiblity of the whole 
movement. Labour in govern- 
ment and the trade unions, to 
defend the rights of Mack 
workers and to make sure that 
there are policies which can 
alleviate the discrimination 
that takes place." 

Miss Pearla Boyce, New- 
ham North-West, moving the 
resolution calling for black 
sections, said that blade peo- 
ple were still seriously under- 
represented at all levels in the 
party. Blacks were tired of 
others making decisions for 
them by assumption. 


Sad defeat for a 
man of principle 

By Philip Webster, Chief Political Correspondent 


Even in the moment of his Some felt that he had never 

defeat on Tuesday Mr Eric forgiven Mr Kinnock for win- 
Heffer was claiming that his ning the party leadership in 
principles had cost him dear. 1983, a contest in which he 
Just as principle had caused was the far left's champion in 
him to walk off the platform the absence of Mr Tony Benn. 
during Mr Neil Kinnodrt But their personal antipathy 
anti-Militanl tour deforce at went back long before then, 
Bournemouth last year, and and reached its climax when 
out of the last Labour govern- Mr Kinnock took on the 


ment over the referendum on 
Britain's EEC membership in 
1975. so his refusal to bow 
down before what be saw as a 
rightward drift in die party 


Liverpool Militants last year. 

Mr Heffer’s performance 
then displeased bis union, the 
building workers, who warned 
him against a repeat. Instead 


made him pay the ultimate the depth of his disillusion 
price. was made publicly plain last 

Afterwards he sadly mused: week in his book Labour's 
“I think there is a drift to the 


Future: Socialist or SDP Mark 


right within the party. 1 have 2? in which he accused the 
been honest and open enough leadership, supported by some 
to say so." on the left, of moderating 

The trouble for Mr Heffer, a policy to make it acceptable, 
former party chairman. The book's timing with 
carpenter and joiner by trade, Labour determined this week 
was that his criticism of Mr to present its image of unity, 
Kinnock had become a little did nothing to endear Mr 
too much even for his former Heffer to his colleagues. But 
allies to take. the rift was already too deep. 


SOUTH AFRICA 



Europe needed a vigorous 
and successful British Labour 
policy because they wanted to 
bring about a new phase of 
detente, an dstpolitik on a 
higher level. 

It was his conviction that 
there would be no secure 
peace without a system of 
common security and there 
would be no such system 
without a British government 
laving a constructive role. 

He welcomed the 
announcement of a summit 
conference but added that in 
Europe they would have to 
look after their own citizens' 
interests, and pursue peace- 
preserving endeavours of their 
own. 

The Vienna talks on mutual 
balanced force reductions 
must be brought to a positive 
result; life must be put into the 
project of a nuclear-free zone 
in Europe (applause) and they 
must get rid of chemical 
weapons on both sides in a 
divided Europe. 

MOTOR INDUSTRY 

Sanctions 

warning 

toGM 

A Labour go vein men t 
might use its purchasing and 
procurement policies as a 
sancti on against General Mo- 
tors if the company continued 
retrenchment in Britain, Mr‘ 
John Smith, the party's trade 
and industry spokesman said 
in Blackpool yesterday. 

He was giving Labour’s 
endorsement to a trade union 
campaign to avert 1,700 
redundancies at the GM 
trucks division at Bedford, 
and a rundown at the Rover 
Group in Cowley. 

Mr Smith said that the crisis 
in the British motor industry 
represented another industrial 
retreat, and would mean more 
lost employment and a new 
front for imports. 

He feared that Rover Group 
under Mr Graham Day was 
embarking on a strategy of 
much lower volume-build to 
seek a niche in the market well 
below present levels. 

Rover plants at Cowley 
South; Drews Lane, Bir- 
mingham; and Llanelli, could 
be in for substantial redun- 
dancies, he added. 

Mr Smith said that Labour 
stood firmly behind Rover as 
a medium-volume car pro- 
ducer and no further slide in 
its share of the market 

Labour criticized General 
Motors for exporting profits to 
overseas plants which produce 
parts for vehicles assembled in 
Britain. 


Call to send arms defeated 


IRA condemned as 
‘murderers of Irish’ 


Mr Eric Clarke, for the 
national executive committee, 
said the present 
Government's record on the 
Third World was shameful 
and brought shame on Britain. 

Labour would reverse that 
by giving priority in overseas 
spending to the poorest coun- 
tries. the most disadvantaged 
groups within society, es- 
pecially women, and to gov- I 
ernments which had shown a 
determination to improve 
quality of life. 

There would also be a 
doubling of the aid pro-' 
gramme to reach the United 
Nations' target of spending, 
within the lifetime of the next 
Parliament he said. 

• Delegates carried 
overwhelmingly a resolution 
calling on the NEC to put 
pressure on tire United States 
to withdraw support for the 
Contra rebels in Central 
America and to condemn any 
proposals for action damaging 
to Nicaragua and its 
revolution. 


The conference overwhelm- personal boycotts on Sooth 
ingly endorsed a call for the African goods. Local anthori- 
introd action of effective and ties could impose boycotts am ^ 
mandatory sanctions against they should support the anti- 
Sonth Africa but rejected on a apartheid movement, 
show of hands a resolution Wall Street and the City of 
iksran^tbataLabourGov- were Mir mming 

ermneut should provide arms scared and investment in 
and other material support to Africa was falling. 

the revolutionary movement m 

South Africa. Mr Rob Todd, general see- 

Mr Syd Tierney of the ****7 Transport and 

Union of Shop, Distributive General Workers’ Union, who 
and Allied Workers, replying recently veiled South Africa, 
to the debate for the national said he had seen the apartheid 
executive com mi tte e, said army which beat and wounded 
suggestion over-exaggerated and murdered the bbrek major- 
not only the position of the *[- "I experienced wiut it wm 
A frican National Congress, bke to be black in South 
bot Labour's position as weO, Africa. We have to remove this 
He described the resolution as oppresive regime. 


arrogant. 


“I was not prepared for what 


Moving the first motion l saw, but that is not the end of 
railing for sanctions and ac- the story. I saw courage, 
tion through tire United Ns- tietmmuiation and hope — 
turns, the Commonwealth and courage ainmer beyond my 
the European Community, Mr understanding." 

John Jones, Technical, M . T ~ 

Administrative and Super- M«s Julie Rams, Pode, 
visarv Section of tire Ama£ «vuig tte uwoot otiling for 
gamated Engineering Union. 

said his motion spelled out tire enforced 

party's total co mmitme n t to sanctMH2S W01|M blte * 
ending apartheid. South Workers all over the world 
Africa's illegal occupation of were shocked at the death of 
Namibia, mandatory and com- the 177 miners in Sooth 


prehensive sanctions, aidi 
the front-line states, release 


Africa. They were not killed by 
an act of God but by big 


political prisoners and to the business and apartheid. Only 
ANC. a revolutionary socialist fight 

He said they could impose by black workers could create 


the conditions for ending 
apartheid. 

Mr Denis Healey, the 
shadow Foreign Secretary, 
who also recently visited 
Sooth Africa, said that in a few 
hours the American Senate 
would vote to overrule Press- 
dent Reagan's veto against 
sanctions. That would leave 
only two gover n ments in the 
world opposed to sanctions — 
the British Government and 
the West German Govern- 
ment. 

“la a year from now those 
governments will be in the 
dustbin of history." 

He said that on his return 
from South Africa he was 
more convinced than ever that 
there would be Mack majority 
rule within IS years. But that 
would only come about if the 
straggle inside South Africa 
was supported by economic 
sanctions outside South 
Africa. 

Black leaders knew that 
sanctions would hurt them in 
the short ran, but knew it was 
the only way to get the white 
regime overthrown. 

He would like to see, iu 
addition to sanctions, the sale 
of gold stocks. If every govern- 
ment bolding gold started to 
sell It it would do more to 
damage the South African 
regime than anything else. 


By Martin Fletcher, Political Reporter 

Mr Stuart BelL a Labour and attacked the vocal and 
okesmao on Northern Ire- high-profile Troops Out 
nd. shared a platform with a movement in his party's own 

TD A IwunkAf- i A ■ r * 


spokesman on Northe rn lie- high-profile Troops Out 
land, shared a platform with a movement in his party's own 
convicted IRA bomber in left wing. 

Blackpool Iasi night and de- The agreement was “a 
dared: “The perpetrators of bridge to unity" that would 
violence are not democrats let not only link the Irish and 


alone socialists. They are 
murderers of Irishmen " 

Mr Tommy Carroll is now 
an elected councillor 
representing Sinn Fein, the 
political wing of the IRA. but 
Mr Bell made clear his repug- 
nance for that organization. 


British governments but also 
give the nationalist commu- 
nity in Ulster a sympathetic 
forum in which to express its 
aspirations. 

Mr Bell committed a future 
Labour government to prov- 
iding “all the resources that 


“We roundly and totally are necessary" to fight para- 
condemn any politician or militaries in the province, to 
political party that supports improving border security and 
violence as a means to an to tightening extradition 
end, he said. procedures. 

There was no such thing as a But he also stated Labours 
legitimate target. Their end intention to repeal the Preven- 
was that of "creating widows tion of Terrorism Act, to 
and orphans, of desroyiita phasing our the Emergency 
family fife, of adding hatted Provisions Act. to haltingstrip 


and misery, piling one injus- searches and the use of robber 
lice upon another until North- bullets, and to strengthening 


appear with Mr Carrol L but he 
used the occasion to make 
dear the Labour leadership’s 


business which it is hoped to 
take today. Debates will cover 
social ownership, health care. 


moderate stance on Northern social security and taxation. 
Ireland. He hammered home welfare policies, low pay, the 
his support for the Anglo-Irish media, defence. Nonhero Ire- 
agreement as a peaceful means land, local government and 
of achieving a united Ireland sexual abuse of children. 


Conference reports by Alan Wood, Robert Morgan, John Winder, Anthony Hodges and Howard Underwood 



em Ireland is lost in a the Fair Employment Agency 

mountain of dissatisfaction. 

disillusion and disaffection." ■» 

Mr Ben had been widely l Ouay s agenda 

criticized for agreeing to There is a huge fist n f 


The debate on nudear en- 
ergy yesterday was the best 
there has yet been at this 
conference. It was a dash of 
interest and iff passion or a* 
issue of the first importance. 

On one side there was the 
belief that after Che rnoby l 
nudear power simply repre- 
sents too great a danger no 
matter what economic jus- 
tification there may be for it.- 
Some speakers made the link 
between nuclear power and 
nuclear weapons, but this was 
not a defence debate by an- 
other name. The objectio ns to 
nudear energy were more 
broadly based than that. 

On the other side it was 
argued that the dangers pre- 
sented by nuclear power jo 
Britain were as yet uncertain 
while the economic price for 
getting rid of the nudear 
industry was undeniable. 

Jobs would be lost in the 
industry itself and the con- 
sequent increase in energy 
costs would have its effects 
throughout the whole economy 
which would hardly be the best 
way to cut unem ploymen t. 

A re-run of 
TUC debate 


Therefore, • it was 
rained, there should 
thorough investigation, 
In many respects this 
re-run of the debate i 
TUC a few weeks 
miners — seeking 
for coal in meeti_„ 
energy needs - n 
against other unions 
members working it 
nudear industry. The 
then voted by a very < 
majority in favour of » 
for the outcome of a rev 
That decision was a < 
eratios yesterday. But 
been taken by such a 
mar gin at Brighton fb 
Labour conference ws 
deterred from 
resolution asking the p 
take exactly the same n 



Coming to terms 
with Chernobyl 


Whether that wQl matter 
electorally is particularly hard 
to assess at the moment 
because I do not believe that 
the British public, has yd 
reached a settled conduswn 
after the shock of CbernobyL 

My own guess is that 
unclear power may be an issue 
of over-riding importance ia a 
few constituencies at the next 
election — those that would be 
affected by the closure of 
power stations or the siting of 
nudear waste dumps. 

Elsewhere I suspect that 
there is still too much coafr 
sion for the subject to spring 
many votes, unless there wert 
either to be some new devekp- 
ment or Labour policy were to 
contribute to a general im- 
pression of a lack of realism. 

In genera! what -I befiew 
most people want from their 
politicians at this stage fef* 
sufficient awareness of pubti 6 
anxiety and a readfoess to* 
ex a m in e the -issues very 


1 i id 


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Doctors get £lm grant 
to study heredity in 
cases of heart disease 

Doctors By Pearce Wr^ht Science Editor 

K-dcd over the effea ofjaft on l ^ at fries of their elastic structures 


THE TIMES THURSDAY OCTOBER 2 1986 


HOME NEWS 


high biood pressure 'and*!?! £ er! “ p ® exerled a small in- 
Bmish Heart Foundatitm SjEl* on ^ ood Pressure, the 
nounced « is to sDend fT Sl 1 1 i' as u °y compared with 


could come from understand- 
ing bow genetic control in- 
fluences abnormalities. 


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..vumlcu it is to snend f I 7 * w * a * sucu wun 

million ftinding four studio* 5®.°? overweight or excess Narrowing of blood vessels 
looking mto the part niavedS a S2 hoL „ in the leg and neck, as well as 

heredity in heart disease y r Grant support off! million in the heart, in patients with 
The latest news about <&u ,or four poups was atherosclerosis, is a fecial 


conies 


The latest news about salt ? r four J*"** ^ rou P s atheros . 

- Jtnes from the Roval SorSv announced yesterday by the project of Dr Stephen Hump- 
of Medicine; in a Duhlicati™ R™ 15 * 1 .Heart Foundation, hries and Professor Roger 
by a panel of six heart disease rf J* Dr David Greenhalgh. of Charing Cross 

specialists. Gabon, of St Bartholomew’s Sunlcy Research Centre, in 


During a vearnmni^-r.n ^ G^ 011 « looking at individiia! 
sume up S to lS^SnS^oreSt of heart at- high risk, 

than necessary to meet the 15 < J?? c “ 1 f at,n S °“ The fourth study allied to 

needs of the body of «. m Jf nt 2 nce ,, B* netic predisposition to heart 

■ - ■ - y substances m the Wood called disease, bv Dr David Wood, at 

aMlinnnmt*.,,. ™»,^K ~ ^ Hants and 

General Hos- 


“t'-cssiary to 

The panel^^octors was ’ Q - 08110(1 disease, by DrDavic 

considering whethCTforoubH? ^I’poprotems, which tram- the Royal South l 
health rewons there w 1 2^ *£ *£$“29** °™ 



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on the amount oT^St in ^^^“Softhe hearts blood qroach 10 identifying people at 

P ^They S aEreed on the benefit* re fP°P s, 'h ,e ,f° r He is tracing the relatives of 

of a rSSon fo? body’s all men in the Southampton 

suffering hi3? WoodmSJSS Health Authority imder^the 

in addition SEft, 1 * 'dentified, then it age of 55 who die suddenly 

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sr«ss5S?s5is 

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measures and treatments of a lives is an effective way of 
important disorders of blood identifying symptom-fiee peo- 
vessels because of abnormal- p ] e at risk. 


studies increased the results 
seemed ever more contrad- 
ictory. 

However.the doctors gen- 



Michael Newbey, who hopes to interview President Reagan later this month (Photograph: Alan W'eller). 


Boy of 12 is hoping 
to interview Reagan 


A schoolboy hopes to inter- 
view President Ronald Reagan 
and British political leaders 
next month. 

Michael Newbey, aged 12, 
from Woking in Surrey, has 
also requested an interview 
with the the Soviet leader, Mr 
Mikhail Gorbachov. But he is 
still awaiting a reply. 

He became a radio presenter 
last month when he was 
selected as the “Radio Kid” by 
County Sound Radio in 
Guildford, Surrey. 

Michael said he regarded 
the opportunity to interview 
world leaders in a special 


telephone link-up with the 
radio station as “a challenge". 

He said that he would like to 
interview “controversial" peo- 
ple: “1 want to get down to the 
heart of things and find out 
what they really think." 

He is now being trained to 
interview and present on the 
air. A County Sound spokes- 
man said that the White 
House had agreed in principle 
to MkhaeTs request. 

Mr David Steel, leader of 
the Libera] Party, has already 
accepted Michael's invitation, 
and Mrs Thatcher hopes to fit 
in an interview. 


Strict security in force 
for Robinson hearing 


Six named 
for Irish 
aid board 

By David Sapsted 

The British and Irish gov- 
ernments yesterday agreed on 
the membership of the board 
to administer the multi-mil" 1 
lion pound international aid 
fund for Ireland. 

Six prominent figures, three 
from Northern Ireland and 
three from the republic, wOI 
serve on the board, set up after 
the US Congress allocated 
$120 million to redevelop- 
ment. Canada has promised 
$10 million and Australia and 
the EEC are also expected to 
contribute. * . 

Sir Charles Brett, a solicitor 
and former chairman of the 
Northern Ireland Housing 
Executive, will chair a team 
consisting of Sir Ewart Bell, 
former head of the Northern 
Ireland Civil Service; Sir Gor- 
don Booth, a former diplomat 
and director of Hanson Trust; 
Mr Michael Canavan, a 
Northern Ireland business- 
man; Mr Gerald Dempsey, 
chairman of Aer Lingus; Mr 
Neil McCann, chairman of 
Ireland's largest fruit and veg- 
etable importing company, 
and Mr Alastair McGuddan, 
chairman of Masstock (Ire- 
land) Ltd. 


Wedding 
pictures 
dispute 

The Daily Mail went to the 
High Court yesterday to stop a 
rival newspaper from using 
exclusive wedding photo- 
graphs of Mrs Deborah Bell, 
the expectant mother being 
kept on a life support 
machine. 

Mr Justice Hannan cootin- 1 
ned a temporary injunction 
granted last Monday against 
Express Newspapers, barring 
them from using the photo- 
graphs until a full hearing of a 
copyright action next 
Wednesday. - 

Mrs Bell, aged 24, a sec- 
retary, is in Middlesbrough 
General Hospital where she 
was taken last month with a 
suspected brain haemorrhage. 

Mr Alastair Wilson, for 
Mail Newspapers, told the 
judge they had paid Mr Bell a 
substantial sum for the copy- 
right to photographs of their j 
wedding day. 

Express Newspapers are 
defending the claim for 
infringement of copyright and 
oppored the continuation of 
the injunction. They claim the 
pictures were published by 
them last Friday, before the 
Daily Mail did a deal with Mr 
BelL 


A big security operation will 
be mounted by the Irish police 
and army for the court appear- 
ance today of Mr Peter Robin- 
son. MP for Belfast East, on 
charges arising from August's 
“loyalist*’ cross-border 
incursion. 

The Irish police are deter- 
mined to prevent a repeat of 
the sectarian violence which 
erupted when Mr Robinson, 
deputy leader of the Demo- 
cratic Unionist Pany (DUP). 
was remanded on £10.000 bail 
in Dundalk. Co Louth, on 
charges of assaulting police, 


;■■■ ; v\. ■=*. 


malicious damage and unlaw- 
ful assembly. 

Several hundred police will 
ring the district court in 
Ballybav. Co Monaghan, for 
today's hearing, while soldiers 
patrol border crossings 

A short, formal remand is 
expected. The Irish govern- 
ment is likely to apply later 
this month to have the case 
switched to the Special Crim- 
inal Court. Dublin. 

Mr Robinson is due to be 
accompanied by the Rev lan 
Paisley, the DUP leader, and 
the Rev Robert McCrca. MP 
for Mid LMstcr. 


Airlines 
could lose 
£694m as 
fewer fly 

By Han ey Elliott 
Air Correspondent 

The world's airlines could 
lose up to one billion dollars 
(£694 million) this year be- 
cause of a big drop in the 
number of passengers, the 
airlines' “club" lata, claims. 

Statistics compiled using 
figures from all 144 members 
show that in the year ending 
July the airlines carried 1.5 
million fewer people than the 
previous year. However, the 
number of seats for sale went 
up by 4.5 percent. 

Dr Gunter Eser, Iata’s direc- 
tor general, has now warned 
airlines: “lata members could 
incur a net loss of up to one 
billion dollars on inter- 
national services this year.” 

Pan of the blame, according 
to Dr Eser. lies with govern- 
ments and the oil industry in 
preventing the full benefits of 
the fall in fuel prices from 
being passed on to the airlines. 
He also claims that airlines 
have been slow to react to the 
decline in the number of 
passengers. A year ago they 
predicted there would be a rise 
of about 5 per cent in the 
number of people travelling 
by air. but fears of terrorism 
and an economic decline in 
pans of the world meant there 
was a drop. Yet the airlines 
put on extra seats which they 
could not fill. 

However, the overall figures 
hide large fluctuations in air- 
line fortunes. 

The financial difficulties are 
bound to lead to further 
reductions in staff, takeovers, 
mergers, bankruptcies and 
fewer new aircraft. 


OID LECTURES 
IN YOUR FIRST WEEK AT COLLEGE. 


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Add rain: 4 


The price is high, 
but it miist he paid 

The immense cost of eliminating acid rain makes governments 
reluctant to tackle it. But as Hugh Clayum, EawinoamcMt 
Correspondent, reports in the last of four articles, the cost of 
enduring it is beginning to look even higher. 


The message coming from 

politicians and environmental 
campaigners alike is that acid 
rain can be conquered. The 
argument now is all about the 
timetable and the extent of 
necessary action. 

A key admission this year 
from the Government and the 
Central Electricity Generating 
Board is that Britain does 
export some of the pollutants 
that are dearly damaging 
wildlfc and plants abroad. 

The first part of the ad- 
mission was the more 

to accep. to; 

somebody is being dama^d 

by acid than to agree that you 
are helping to drop non hum 
Britain knew years ago how to 
eliminate sulphur from power 
station fumes, and fitted 
costly cleaning equipment to 

some of its power stauons. 

The dean air laws of 30 
years ago made sure that uk 
dense and dangerous smogs 

dS once polluted l^dons 

-SSSSSSiSU 

Ke .he great 

were to be g> ve " 1 ^ * J? 1 J25S 

to make sure ttot 

did not fall on the immediate 

"^"road insuad 
but the complex atmospheric 

Sons M .&*£*£ 

rain were not mvesti^i^tor 

Swiss 

remove sulphur from the 

Ssssasi? 


sulphur removal Is gypsum, a 
principal component of plas- 
ter. The building market will 
not be able to use all the 
gypsum produced at power 
stations, and slag heaps of it 
may accumulate. 

The task of tackling the 
other main source of the I 
ingredients of add damage has i 
scarcely begun. Vehicle ex- 
hausts pump into the at- 
mosphere a collection of 
chemicals which can react in | 
the heat of the sun to increase 
the amount of ozone in the air. 
If ozone goes far above its j 

Cars are the next candidates 
for controversy abort add 
rain. Argument is centring on 
the best way of curbing their 
emiss ions i J pointing gases 
through exhaust pipes. Oners 
by fitting an exhaust filter 
called a catalytic converter and 
the other designing what tlie 
experts call a “lean-born 
engine. That wo«H emit less 

ms because it would need less 

feel for the combustion pro- 
ces s that makes it work. 

naturally-occurring level, it 
can damage plants. So can 
nitric add. which reaches the 
ground in rain or snow which 
has come down from clouds 
soused with oxides of nitrogen 
produced from the bunting 
processes in power stations, 
fectories and vehicle engines. 

The cost of tackling acid 
rain is so immense that it is 
tempting to leave it alone, we 
can still breathe, after aH 

But there is growing ev- 
idence of damage to phmis 
and wild creatures and ot a , 
steady build-up of and in sou 
since ine industrial revolu- 
tion. Even if the ingredients of 
acid rain were removed from 

the atmosphere overnight, rt 

would take decades for the i 
accumulated acid m the soil to 
dwindle- GtodndetLl 


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If you don't open a bank account 
before you get to college, your first few 
lessons may well be in economics - like it 
ornot 

Books, clubs, food and, of course, rent 
How are you going to pay out for them if 
you haven't paid myour grant cheque? 

Simple. If you open an account at 
NatWest before you start, you can have a 
cheque book and .cheque card,* and a Service- 
card** giving you easy access to the largest 


m 




NatWest 

The Action Bank 


network of cash dispensers in the country 
We'll even put £10 into your account 
What's more, if you haven't received 
your grant cheque yet, but have an LEA 
letter confirming that it's on its way, we can 
give you a temporary overdraft facility*** 
And as NatWest has more branches 
on or near campus than any other bank, 
getting at your cash will be easy. So rent is 
one subject that you won't have to worry 
about when you start college. 


The 1986 Student package terms apply to those entering fufrtime further education > 1 1986 for the first time, and who will be in receipt of an LEA award. ‘Cheque cards are available to those who are eighteen years of age or over and are in 
receipt of an award. “Provided you fill n a Seracecard application form at your local branch. —Overdrafts subject to status and conditiorts, Written credit details available from any branch of NatWest or 41 Lothbury, London EC2P 2BP. 


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« OVERSEAS NEWS ; THF TIMKS THU^AV OCTO^ 7,« , Reykjavik 

Towards a summit: • Kremlin’s motives • Relief in US • *<> cus on Key ^— 


Gorbachov confident that 


arms agreement is near 


From Christopher Walker 
Moscow 

“Gorbachov has been noth- 
ing if not consistent in recent 
months in insisting that he 
would only attend a second 
summit if he was assured that 
it would provide agreement m 
at least one area of arms 
control. In his own mind, he 
must be convinced that his 
condition will soon be 
fulfilled.” 

That verdict, delivered by a 
veteran Kremlin-watcher, on 
the Communist Party leader’s 
motives in pushing for this 
month's surprise “pre-summit 
summit" in Iceland, summed 
up the conviction here that, 
after months of laborious 
spadework, the superpowers 
are close to signing a new, 
limited disarmament treaty. 

The point was driven home 
by Mr Eduard Shevardnadze, 
the Soviet Foreign Minister, 
who is emeiging as one of ibe 
most able members of the 12- 
man Politburo. He told 
reporters at the United Na- 
tions; “The time has come for 
fundamental decisions, to see 
where, on what questions, 
there is mutual understanding 
and to prepare a draft agree- 
ment on such issues." 

His scenario of a draft 
agreement, discussed in Reyk- 
javik and then later signed in 
Washington, is the one envis- 
aged by most diplomats here 
as the likely course of events. 
Most see the Iceland get- 
together as a diplomatic plus 


for Mr Gorbachov who, ear- 
lier in the year, was snubbed 
by the White House when he 
made a similar invitation. 

TbeSoviet and American 
sides both appear anxious to 
reduce publicity in case the 
October 1 1 and 12 meeting is 
unproductive, which is why 
the US chose Iceland rather 
than the more convenient 
venue of London, which was 

suggested by Mr Gorbachov. 

A strong hint that progress 
was at last being made on 
arms control came last week 
when Mr Boris Pyadyshev, a 


to face resolute opposition 
from White House “hawks". 
As one source explained: “The 
view here is that the question 
of disarmament is so urgent 
that it is better to start 
somewhere.” 


Even on this limited topic 
reservations exist, and Mos- 
cow has suggested an interim 
accord in which each super- 
power would be able to keep 
100 warheads in Europe, 
rather than the “zero option” 
or total abolition it is seeking. 
It has also retreated from its 
earlier insistence that British 
and French nudear arsenals 
must be included in the 
equation. 

In addition to the posable 
agreement, arms control ex- 
perts here believe that .there 
remains an outside chance of 
the two governments agreeing 
to some form of limitation on 
nuclear testing if the Soviet 
side is prepared to be more 
flexible on verification. The 
recent razzmatazz surround- 
ing the opening of a Soviet 
underground testing site in- 
dicated to Western reporters 
that this was possible. 

Mr Gorbachov's enthu- 
siasm for new agreements on 
arms control is motivated by a 
complexity of factors, the 
most pressing being the dire 
state of the Soviet economy. It 


Herr Helmut Sdmtidt, die 
former West German Chan- 
cellor, said in Denmark 
tenia; that, with the US 
presidential election campaign 
on the horizon, tone was 
running out for a superpower 
agreement on arms reduction. 


spokesman for the Foreign 
Ministry, told reporters — 
then still obsessed with the 
intricacies of the Danilon 
affair - that there was a 
chance of a Soviet-Amencan 
agreement on cutting inter- 
mediate missiles in Europe. 
Yesterday he was more bull- 
ish: “We have promising pros- 
pects for an agreement, ”he 
said. 

Movement on the issue, 
although it is less important to 
the Kremlin than either space 
or strategic weapons, is seen 
by the Soviet side as easier u» 
obtain because it is less likely 


withtheir meagre. material lot 

Many Western- analysts 
claim that the Soviet economy 
is the key to Mr Gorbachov’s 
unflagging stream of peace 
initiatives. 

“As the latest announce- 
ment of electricity rationing 
shows, the economy cannot be 
resuscitated if resources are 
not switched soon from the 
massive defence sector," one 
diplomat said. The Kremlin’s 
problems have been empha- 
sized recently by its need to 
sell gold in order to reduce the 
trade deficit. 


Less widely realized tv 

those in the West who take the 

simplistic view that the Soviet 
Union is nothing but an 
international bully after world 
domination is the feverish 
desire by Mr Gorbachov to be 
seen as an equal with the US 
leader and to be treated 
similarly. 

Although some observers 
have already produced a vari- 
ety of Machiavellian theories 
to explain Mr Gorbachov's 
enthusiasm for the Iceland 
meeting, most experienced 
observers here prefer the more 
straightforward. As one West 
European diplomat explained: 
“This way, he can go before 
any Politburo doublers and 
tell them in advance what be 
will get from the second 
summit proper. If he discov- 
ers in Reykjavik that he is not 
going to get it, he will find a 
reason for not going on to 
Washington later." 


is feared by some of his 
suDDorters that the coutry 


supporters that the coutry 
could, in the long term, face 
domestic unrest if ordinary 
citizens become dissatisfied 




Mr Edurii Shevardnadze, the Soviet Foreign Minister, meeting Miss Katherine Clark, the daughter of 
. Us CWafl* 8 " counterpart, Mr Joe Clark, on his arrival in Ottawa yesterday w* 1 a working visit. 


Washington View 


Joy and sorrow of Daniloff 


Jews organize 
protest flight 
to Iceland 


Shevardnadze sees A capital 
Canadian leaders 


From John Best, Ottawa 


terrorism 


Mr Nicholas Daniloff could 
■ever have imagined the mo- 
mentous consequences of acc- 
epting that handle of papers 
from Misha, the acquaintance 
set up by the KGB to trap the 
US reporter. 

When he finally arrived 
home to a joyous welcome, he 
was a household name thr- 
oughout America. His release 
was announced by President 
Reagan to a cheering crowd in 
deepest Missouri. . 

He was met at Frankfurt 
Airport by the US ambas- 
sador, and later received by 
President Reagan. His case 
took up hours and days of 
discussion and bargaining— in 
the Politburo, in the White 
House, between the_ super- 
powers* most senior ministers. 


American passengers on a 
hijacked TWA plane. 

Americans who have never 
been overseas, who know tittle 
of the complexities of world 
affairs, were outraged that yet 
another American was being 
held, unjustly and against his 
wilL Moreover, be was being 
held by a country whose 
leaders were calling on die US 
to trust them with an agree- 
ment on nuclear weapons. 

As Mr Reagan admitted, a 
summit in such circnmstances 
would have been politically 
unacceptable here. 

But beneath all the rejoicing 
that he is home, some smalt, 
angry voices are beginning to 
be heard. What about Terry 
Anderson, the news agency 
correspondent held hostage in 


The Daniloff affair may 
have been the catalyst deter- 
mining the tuning and frame- 
work of two summit m eeti n gs 
that could eventually affect the 
lives and security ®f mankind. 


By Michael Binyoo 


For a setiHeflacmg man, this 
extraordinary breach of the 
old adage that journalists 
should report news, not make 
it, must be both galling and 
exhilarating: galling because 
of his sorrow at the dr cron- 
stances; exhilarating because, 
as he himself asked on the 
plane to Frankfort 


“Why does the Government 
of the United States and 230 
million Americans get excited 
about the outrageous kidnap- 
ping of a single American in 
Moscow? It is because in oar 
country the individual is a 
precious thing." 


But there is probably more 
to it than that There Is, in 
addition, the powerful memory 
of the Iran hostages,* linger- 
ing anger reinforced by the 
holding hostage last year of 


Beirut for well over a year? Or 
David Jacobsen, director of 
the American University Hos- 
pital in the Lebanese capital? 
Or any of the other hostages? 

Their families have pointed 
to the bitter contrast: Mr 
Danfloff reasonably treated 
(at least physically) by the 
KGB, released to the US 
ambassador, the subject of 
presidential discussions and 
daily news coverage; Mr 
Anderson, probably kept in a 
cell more cramped and humili- 
ating, under constant threat of 
death, forgotten by the press 
and apparently abandoned by 
officials in Washington with 
the excuse that “we do not 
negotiate with terrorists”. 

Mr Reagan was confronted 
with die disparity even as he 
announced the end of the 
Daniloff affair yesterday. “I 
understand the sorrow and 


grief of the families of the 
hostages," he said. 


But there was a difference. 
On the one hand, the US was 
dealing with a government 
with which it had diplomatic 
relations; on the other “we're 
dealing with faceless terror- 
ists, wfco have only through 
others issued a demand tint 
cannot be met**. 

But there was not a day that 
went by that his Admiiristra- 
tion did not make “every 
effort” to get them oaL 

The political difference is 
also aH-important Powerful 
sections mi the right were 
anxious to use the Daniloff 
affair to beat Mr Shultz and 
the State Department “prag- 
matists”, to scupper the 
possibility of arms _ control 
agreements which, might in- 
volve US concessions, to prove 
to the country that the Rus- 
sians cannot be trusted. 

On hostage-taking in the 
Middle East, the fine is even 
toughen any deal with Arab 
terrorists has to be resisted, 
whatever the cost to the hos- 
tages themselves — a line 
frequently preached by Israel 
and Its powerful friends in this 
country. 

The hostages’ families are 
not convinced. Mr Anderson’s 
aster said her brother would 
be home now if the same effort 
bad been made to free him. 

The bald fact is that while in 
each case the US is anxious to 
stand firm and avoid setting a 
precedent, it is easier to wrap 
up a package deal with Mos- 
cow ftan it is with guerrilla 
groups who want the release of 
fellow guerrillas in Arab or 
European jails. 

And whereas a superpower 
summit was at stake with Mr 
Daniloff,' the US_ has no 
pressing interest of its own to 
reach accommodation with the 
governments of Syria, Iran or 
Libya. Mr Anderson and his 
colleagues have no leverage 
back home. 


Dozens of Jews from Israel, 
Britain and the United States 
are planning to fly to Iceland 
for the preliminary super- 
power summit to protest 
against the plight of 400,000 
Jews refused exit visas from 
the Soviet Union (Nicholas 
Beeston writes). 

The Soviet Jewry Education 
and Information Centre in 
Jerusalem said the protesters, 
former “refuseniks”, human 
rights activists and relatives of 
people still in the Soviet 
Union, would charter a plane 
to Reykjavik. 

The summit fells just before 
the holiest day in the Jewish 


calendar, Yom Kippur, and 
the molesters will be acco ra- 


the protesters will be accom- 
panied by a rabbi for prayers. - 


Mr Eduard Shevardnadze, 
the Soviet Foreign Minister, 
yesterday launched into a two- 
day round of talks with Ca- 
nadian leaders on issues such 
as arms control and family 
reunification. 

Mr Shevardnadze placed a 
wreath at the National War 
Memorial here, then drove to 
a Canadian Government re- 
treat at Meecfa Lake, Quebec, 
for discussions with Mr Joe 
Clark, the Canadian External 
Affairs Minister. 

The trip to Canada — Mr 
Shevardnadze’s first — fol- 
lowed his visit to the United 
States which culminated in 
the freeing of the American 
journalist, Nicholas Daniloff 

Arriving on Tuesday, Mr 
Shevardnadze said that Sov- 
iet-US relations had improved 
“a little bit” with the settle- 


mem of the Daniloff affair, 
and the agreement by Presi- 
dent Reagan and Mr Mikhail 
Gorbachov to meet in Iceland 
later this month. 


By Nicholas Beeston, and 
Christopher Folletl in 
Copenhagen 


At the same time, he said 
there were “certainly more 
important decisions to talk 
about” than the Daniloff one, 
confirming the view that the 
Russians have their own 
distinctive goals for Mr 
Shevardnadze’s discussions. 



Mr Shevardnadze has 
scheduled two formal talks 
with Mr Clark for yesterday 
and today, lasting nearly five 
hours m all. Meetings were 
also scheduled with Mr Brian 
Mnlroney, the Prime Min- 
ister, and . other Canadian 
leaders. Arms centred and 
disarmament are high on. the 
agenda ofboth sides. . 




-J* ■% 






: 1 '• V. «•**-■* 







Security against terrorism 
may have been the. deciding 
factor in choosing Reykjavik 
as the location for this 
month’s superpower pre-sum- 
mit, Icelandic officials said 
yesterday. 

Although emphasizing that 
Iceland has always been an 
attractive East-West venue be- 
cause of its geographical po- 
sition. situated almost halfway 
between Washington and 
Moscow, this week's decision 
could have ' been clinched 
because of the island's clean 
security record. 

“To the best of ouf knowl- 
edge Mr Gorbachov suggested 
a number of European cities to 
Mr Reagan, and he selected 
Iceland,” said aseriior ^official 
in Reykjavik.' “We don't hhv* 
any' terrorists.” 

‘ Because of tbestririg of 
terrorist attacks that .have 
plagued European cities over 
the past 10 months, Iceland's 
isolation in the middle of the 
North Atlantic may have at- 
tracted the superpower 
leaders. 


S*SSr- 

„■■■ 




** 



The country only has one 
point of entry, at Keflavik 


airport, situated next to the 
US Navy’s Nato base. Se- 
curity has already been in- 
creased there and in the 
capital 

The summit will be the first 
held between US and Soviet 
heads of state in a European 
country belonging to Nato. 
Even the Soviet Union’s For- 
eign Minister, Mr Eduard 
Shevardnadze, appeared to 
recognize the security value of 
Iceland, when he joked with 
reporters and said that . be 
would feel “very safe” at the 
summit because of the “large 
US base” 


•• - '"T 

'•V •' •' i y.i ' -,.V* 


The Hotel Saga in Reykjavik, where 400 officials with the two delegations wiB stay. 


The two leaders are to meet 
at the Hotel Saga, near the 
centre of the capital, where the 
160 rooms have been booked* 


Madrid lottery 
millionaire to 


fight abortion 

Madrid - The winner of the 
biggest gambling prize ever ; 
paid out io an individual in ] 
Spain, more than 524 million ! 
pesetas (£2.7 million), will 
dedicate part of his fortune “to 
helping women bring their 
children into the world, to 
avoid abortions” (Harry 
Debclius writes). 

The fond was mentioned in 
a communique read out by a 
notary public who collected 
the huge cheque, made out 
simply to “the bearer”, at the 
state-run lottery office here on 
behalf of his„ client. 

Journalists ferreted out a 
few details; his last name is 
Lapuente. he is retired, aged 
about 70. j 


Congress compromise 
on defence spending 


From Mobsta AM, Washington 


Sudan airlift 
delayed by 
mystery hitch 


Pakistan to impose visa restriction 


US Senate and House of 
Representatives negotiators 
have agreed to set overall 1 9S7 


military spending at S291.1 
billion (about £200 billion). 


billion (about £200 billion), 
about $29 billion less than 
President Reagan’s request, a 
senior House aide said. 

The figure in effect split the 
difference between the spend- 
ing levels approved by the 


House and Senate in their 
separate versions of the 1987 < 
Pentagon bill. j 

The Senate had approved 
S29S billion and the House 
S2S7 billion in their earlier 
separate versions of the bilL 
President Reagan has 
strongly criticized Congress's 
spending total and has threat- 
ened to veto the defence bilL 


Khartoum (Reuter) — Last- 
minute snags grounded the 


Operation Rainbow relief air- 
lift to starving people in south 
Sudan yesterday. 

A statement read to report- 
ers just over an hour before 
the scheduled takeoff of a 
chartered Indonesian Cl 30 
transport plane to the south- 
ern town of Juba cited “tech- 
nical difficulties”. 


From Hasan Akhtar 
Islamabad 

The Pakistan Foreign Office 
said yesterday that the Gov- 
ernment would impose visa 
requirements for British 
visions, to match Ibe British 
Government decision to in- 
troduce the visa system for 
Pakistanis visiting Britain. 

A spokesman said that the 
visa requirement for UK pass- 
port-holders would be in- 
troduced at about the same 
time as the British Govern- 


ment visa regulations came 
into eflfett. 

He said that, except in cases 
where the Government had 
specific agreements for the 
abolition of visas, Islamabad 
introduced visa requirements 
for visitors from a number of 
countries recently, in the in- 
terests of security and to curb 
terrorism. Pakistan had pre- 
viously allowed 30-day stays 
for many visitors. 

Officials have become 
alarmed at the increasing 


Britons held in 
Costa del Sol 
drugs inquiry 

From Hairy Debetins 
Madrid 


Painted ladies gather to talk serious business 


From Richard Owen 
Brussels 


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Police arrested six Britons 
in a swoop on apartments in 
the Torremolinos area follow- 
ing months of investigation 
into drug shipments from the 
Cosw del So) to Britain, 
sources said yesterday. 

Those held were identified 
as Mr James Richardson, aged 
37. of London: Mr James 
Hicks, aged 44, of Baldock. 
Hertfordshire: Miss Julie 
Hills, aged 23. of Erith. Scot- 
land: Mr Philip Bone, aged 38. 
of Guildford. Surrey: Mr Eric 
Coulter, aged 52, of Aberdeen 
and Mr Alan Bassett, aged 38. 
of London, as well as two 
Spaniards. 

Police allegedly confiscated 
77 lb of hashish at the 
suspects' homes. 

The arrests bring to at least 
15 the number of Britons 
picked up in drug cases on the 
Costa del Sol in one month: 



One bandied prostitutes 
from almost 20 countries de- 
scended on Brussels yes- 
terday. But despite the painted 
cheeks and pink feather outfits 
they were not touting for' 

business. 

The giris — Who prefer the 
term whores — converged not 
on the red light district bid on 
the committee rooms of dm 
Enropean Parliament, where 
the Second World Whores’ 
Congress is being held until 
tomorrow with the backing of 
West German, Dutch and 
other Green MEPs. 

The air was . thick with 
double entendres. “Just a 
quickie,” a hardened but ami- 
able American hooker said to 
a baffled Italian journalist 
when be asked for an inter- 
view, and the Parliament’s 
translators struggled with the 
rendering of esoteric phrases 
such as “turning a trick" Into 
the nine official languages of 
the EEC. • 


Bat the emphasis is on 
serious issues: the law, femi- 
nism and health, including the 
risk of Aids. 

“Listen honey," said Margo 
St James, head of foe Inter- 
national Committee for 
prostitutes* Rights (1CPR), 
“we want prostitution decrimi- 
nalized. we want the stigma 
removed, and we want being a 
whore to be a legitimate and 
safe bnoness like any other." 

Some MEPS.want quite the 
reverse, however,* and a num- 
ber of British Conservative 
members objected strongly to 
the use of Enropean Par- 
liament buildings and re- 
soorcesJMrs Margaret Daly, 
Conservative MEP for Somer- 
set and Dorset West, de- 


scribed the whores' congress 
as “iudkrOBS” and the nse of 


public money as “disgusting”. 

Male MEPs came in for 
earthy ■ ridicule when they 
objected, however, with one of 
the Green group of MEPs 
observing tut some “don’t 
mind having whores in their 


beds, but don't want them in 
the corridors of power”. 

Opposition to the congress 
— the first was held in 
Amsterdam 18 months ago — 
has also come from feminist 
groups and even from pros- 
titutes theraseffes. 

The event is being boycotted 
by the English Collective of 
Prostitutes in London, which 
argues that ladies of the night 
Standing up and being counted 
merely leads to' increased 
harassment 

— M& St James, who used to 
walk the streets of San Fran- 
cisco, is now a vivacious and 
forthright retired grande dame 
of nearly SO, living m France. 
Her most withering fire is 
reserved for extreme femi- 
nists, who she says are 
prudish. 

“We are toe real feminists. 
We want independence for 
ourselves." she daimed. 

The word “whore" extends, 
in toe view of toe ICPR, to 
striptease artists and pin-up 


Sociologists and lawyers 
advising the prostitutes iden- 
tify four approaches to the 
problem in Western Europe: 
regulation, as in West Ger- 
many; toleration, as in The 
Netherlands; prohibition, as in 
Britain: and attempted aboli- 
tion, as in France. 

They say that suppression 
of prostitution is costly, in- 
efficient and probably point- 
less. . . 

Ms St James argues that 
suppression creates violence 
and unhappiness, adding that 
prostitutes provide therapy 
and compassion while placing 
themselves at risk, and are 
often unjustly stigmatized as a 
social or health danger and 
unsuitable mothers. 

The aim of toe three-day 
congress, which has also re- 
ceived £2,000 in Belgian Gov- 
ernment funding, is to per- 
suade EEC governments to. 
decriminalize prostitution, 
grant prostitutes full civil 
rights, ensure working con- 
ditions that would enable pros- 


LebanoiT 


aillJStf 


kidnai 


virtual 
set free 




led 


Beirut (Rei.isr) -r 
napped French idevisfen 
cameraman, M Jean-Mta 
Sraussi. aged 41, was fed 
vesterday. the Frcbchen&aiav 
said. 

M Sraussi was kidnapped 
on Sunday as be crossed by esr 
from Christian east Barit iq 
toe Muslim.west 


,V or 


No pardon fer: 
extremists 


Jpg* 

-•*'5 

. Irr, 

. j 


Jerusalem — No consid- 
eration is now being given td 
granting a presidential pardon 

to six Jewish “underground? 
members who are serving toqg 
terms of imprisonment fee 
their part in terrorist attack* 
on Arabs and Arab targets, (fen 
Murray writes). 

President Chaim Herzog, 
has let it be known that 
pavement demonstrations in 
support of toe six are being 
counter-productive. 


titutes “to determine their own 
hours and place of work”, and 
to make periodic health 
checks obligatory for aO citi- 
zens rather than only toe 
prostitutes themselves. 

* Ms St- James said their 
differences with the English 
prostitutes collective was one 
of tactics rather than aims. 


Police called 
in land row 




Sao Paulo (Reuter) - About' 
600 Brazilian military police 
have been called in tp m affo 
tain order in a land dispute in 
the southern state of Rio; 
Grande do SuL t ' 

The police are controlling 
more than 6,000 people - 
landless farmworkers and 
their families — to stop -them 
illegally seizing land. 




Emergency 

landing 


rights hi 

U.' Mg 


Mojave, California (Reuter) 
— The experimental aircraft 
Voyager, designed f ib fly 
around toe world .without 
refuelling, made an emergency 
landing on a final test , flight 
after losing part of. _ a 
propeller. Tbe "pilots, Dick 
Rutan and Jeana Yeager, were 
not hurt. . 


Go* * 




Kiss of death /!?-& 1 


Peking (Reuter) — A Chir 
nese bridegroom- killed ho 
new wife at a wedding recep- 
tion with a kiss on the neck 
which was so passionate and 
long it caused heart 
palpitations. / 


Hail damage 


• Bern (AP) — A fierce August 
hailstorm caused more than 
-£60 minion damage to aboiit 
40,000 cars, most of thetnjn 
Geneva; Swiss insurance efflh- 
panies^iid-' •. 

Iran quake ' 


Nicosia (AP) — The Iranian 
port of Bushehr in the Gun 
was shaken by. an earthquake 
measuring 4.1 on the Richter 
scale, but there were no .im- 
mediate reports of casualties 
or damage. 


Live corpse : 


Hong Kong (AP). —"'A 
woman aged 19 who b$d been 
certified dead was later fouivl 
alive in a mortuary and lyres 
taken to a hospital, where' toe 
was declared dead fora sefeod 


Pilot held 


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Brussels (Reuter) — Zaire 
has detained the CijbaB P®* 
of a Soviet-made MKW1 
fighter from Angola which 
crashed just inside Zairean 
territory. - .* • 


Safe wine 


Tokyo (Reuter) ’■'.yjjgj 
German wine prodcicers,Jnt 
by felling sales ■' in.T 
because of a poison scareWul 
introduce bottle labdsaayihg 
their wine is safe to driqt 


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Writer leav^ 


Mn 


number of crimes involving 
foreign nationals. 

The latest terrorist crime 
was the attempted hijacking of 
a Pan Am jumbo jet at 
Karachi airport on September 

, Meanwhile, the Pakistan 
Government has .rejected a 
Soviet allegation that it was 
involved in the murder, on 
September 16, of Colonel 
Fyodor Gorenkov, a Soviet 
military. attache, in 
Islamabad ■ 


Kuala Lumpur (AFP). ■~ m . 
Asian Wall Street ''jodrnai 
correspondent' Mr' John 
Berthelsen left here forSin^- 
pore after being expdled W 
the Government for allegedly 
posing a threat to national 
security. ■ - . 


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Dock strike 


New York (Renter)'.**'^" 
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New Speaker 

Ottawa - The fcanaxfian 
House of Commons decifid 
Mr John Fraser, a C oastf - 
vative from British Cqlnnroia. 
its a new .Speaker in a secret 
balloL. .. 


Warship visit 


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Washington , (Reuve rj ^ 
China and the united Sp® 5 


have inched agreemenifi* a 
visit by US warships to 0#®- 


She and other prostitutes’ 
tedders expressed solidarity 
with the women’s movement, 
saying “good girls have to 
stand alongside the bad girls". 

She described The Nether- 
lands and Denmark as most 
liberal in their attitudes to 
prostitution, but said that even 
in those countries there was 
star a stigma attached to the 
sex industry. 

No Belgian prostitutes are 
attending the congress, be- 
cause they fear alleged police 
persecution. .Ms St James said 
that Belgian prostitutes 
brought before the courts have 
their passports dipped so that 
they cannot leave the country. 


Kenya swoop: 

Nairobi — The Kenyan 
authorities have coXtfinbW 
that a large-scale round-op oj 
U gandans is taking'pfe** 1,1 
Kenya, and many . Ugandans 
trying td enter Kenya nay® 
been tnrafed back.- - 


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Sandpit death 

Madeira (Reuter) 'f; 
men helpinga neighbours^ 
a house were kilted haetohc® 
a sandpii collapsed dnVfe6rp* 


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Amsterdam.' .(R bukt) 

Dutch art lovef -whO'-sfeshea 


beyond- nri»*r an 
abstract painting, valued* 
more than £t -tnfilrau 9/85 
jailed-fdr eight, mopahs*. 




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— — ^ ro get rid of me first’ 

Botha pledges to keep 

separate schools and 
homes for his lifetime 


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Afiica saKi yesterday that 
compulsory racial segregation 
ofrwideatia] areas and state 
schools would not be abol- 
ished m hts lifetime 

ro Thrf«~ ,lhavet °8 eirid ol‘ 
me before you get nd of this 
principle, he told delegates at 
JJe tape provincial congress 

&ndor ,i0nalPanyin 

Mr Botha, aged ?a was 
adwessing the congress, which 
be ^ n on Monday evening 
mtd ended yesterday, on a 
senes of highly conservative 
motions calling for retention 
ofthe Group Areas Act. 

-Jn* s IS die basic legislation 
which enforces racial separa- 
tion of residential areas, and 
such .facilities as schools and 
hospitals. The Government 
does not regard the Act as 
discriminatory, arguing that it 
guarantees “self-determinat- 
ion for each racial group. 

Mr Botha described the Act 
as a cornerstone of the 
Government’s “minority pop- 
ulation policy” - a reference 
to the official view that South 


up or ttmerem minority, 
among which the whites come 
second in number to Zulus. 

Although Bantu-speaking 
blacks constitute 70 per cent 
of the population, there is no 
such thing as a black majority, 
according to Pretoria. To sus- 
tain this argument, blacks are 
subdivided on tribal lines, 
while whites are mostly 
treated as a single group. 

Under existing legislation, it 
was possible in special cases 
for individuals of one race 
group to be permitted to Eve 
in areas set aside for members 
of another. Mr Botha said, but 
he was against allowing the 
development of mixed areas. 

He argued that if people 
were free to live wherever they 
could afford a house, low- 
income white and mixed-race 
Coloured areas would become 
slums. 

“I am pleading for the poor 
when I plead for the retention 
of community life,” he 
declared. 

What Mr Botha appeared to 
be saying was that poorer 


Civil rights hit by Mourners’ 

appeal judgment 

From Our Own CorresDondent. JohanMbn 113.11 i ll lll CS 


Cml rights in South Africa, 
and the role of the courts in 
defending them, have suffered 
a severe setback as a result of 
a rating on Tuesday by the 
Appellate Division of the So- 
preme Court, which upheld the 
validity of two emergency 
regulations providing for sum- 
mary anest and detention. 

The rating, against which 
there is no farther judicial 
appeal, overturned a judgment 
by the Dmhan and Coast local 
division of the Supreme Coart 
on August II, which ftwnd 
that the wj fhtii Mfnafarid 
Powersoft the police so sweep- 
ing that Partiameat coafd not 
have intended than. 

Solves of emergency de- 
tainees were set free, and 
applications for the release of 
thousands of others were being 
prepared when. In a separate 
case on Awast 14 the -Natal 
provincial division ef^the Sn- 
prerae Court in Pietermaritz- 
burg handed down -a 
diametrically opposed judg- 
ment. 

The Appellate Division, the 
highest judicial body in dm 
land, has now railed in favour 
of the Pietermaritzburg inter- 
pretation of the law, and in so 
doing appears to have pat the 
emergency arrest and deten- 
tion provisions beyond any 
challenge in the curate. 

This means that the thou- 
sands of detainees who had 
hoped for release will remain 
in jail. The Minister of Law 
aad Order, Mr Louis Le 
Grange, who welcomed the 
Appellate Division's verdict as 
a boost fer public confidence in 
the law, has not yet said 
whether already freed de- 
tainees will be re-arrested. 

One of the regulations up- 
held by the Appellate Division 
permits any member of the 
police or Army to arrest 
without warrant, and detain 
without trial for up to 14 days, 
any person who “in the opin- 
ion of such member” is a 
threat to public order s safety 
“or that person himselT . 

The other permits th e Min - 
ister of Law and Order, “with- 
out notice to any person, by 
written notice signed by bun 
and addressed to the bead of 


the prison”, to order any 
person detained under the first 
regulation to be held beyond 
14 days far mo long as die 
emergency lasts. 

A senior lawyer involved in 
the Dothan case said yes- 
terday; “This is a serious 
setback. It shows that in the 
end, without a proper BS of 
Rights, protected by the 
cowls, the executive has enor- 
mous, and almost unlimited, 
powers to make inroads Into 
the liberty of the individual.” 

The headline “Blame the 
laws, not the courts” appeared 
yesterday over editorial com- 
ment in The Star of Jobannes- 
bug, which declared: “Legal 
loopholes wluch the courts 
may find la the emergency 
rq plMtiwn u y iemit , at heat, 
minor ameliorations or a harsh 
system.” 

h South Africa, laws 
passed by Parfiament cannot 
he tested in the courts, whose 
role is hated to mterpreting 
the ateution of Parliament 
where there is passible 
ambiguity. 

Recently, the courts have 
been much more active m 
exploiting this limited room 
for manoeuvre. 

The same situ ati on applies 
in Britain, with the crucial 
difference that the radally- 
slrnctare d South African Par- 
liament is controlled effec- 
tively by the white House of 
Assembly, which represents 
only 15 per cent of the 
population but can impose its 
wffl without Unit on the other 
85 percent 

The power to declare* state 
of emergency is conferred on 

President Botha by the Public 

Safety Act of .1953, which 
permits him to lake such 
measures as he considers 
expedient and necessary to 
maintain order and safety. 

Lawyers have tried to show 
that the Pabtic Safety Ad does 
not give Mr Botha mfanited 
powers.The Appellate Di- 
vision, in effect, has declared 
that in the matter of arrest and 
detention, the President’s 
powers are indeed without 
limit for practical purposes 
and that this was the intention 

of Parliament. 


Johannesburg (Renter) — 
Almost half of Sooth Africa's 
black miners stopped work 
yesterday in a massive show of 
solidarity to mourn 177 men 
killed in the country's worn 
gold mine disaster last month, 
an independent monitoring 
group said. 

A spokesman for the La- 
bour Monitoring Group re- 
ported that about 300.000 of 
the 650,000 miners went on 
strike with 100 per cent 
absenteeism at some mines. 

Mr Marcel Golding, pub- 
licity secretary for the black 
National Union of Mine- 
workers (NUM), bailed it as 
an unparalleled show of i 
strength by black union 
members. 

He said that no black 
employees reported for work 
at gold and coal mines in the 
Evander area, 65 miles east of | 
Johannesburg, where the men 
died from poisonous fumes at 
the Kinross gold mine. 

The miners, all but five of 
them black, died when a fire 
caused- toxic fumes to flood 
through tunnels deep under- 
ground. The NUM Mamed 
slack safety measures for the 
deaths and called in overseas 
mining experts to make a 
separate inquiry. 

But Mr Golding said the 
Kinross mine's owners. Gen- 
eral Mining Union Corpo- 
ration Ltd (Gencor), had not 
allowed them down the mine 
until last Monday. 

“That was 13 days after we 
requested permission, and is 
obviously not satisfactory,” he 
said. The experts had not 
completed their reports. 

A Gencor spokesman said 
that about 70 per cent of its 
97,000 gold mines workforce 
and about half of its 14,000 
coal miners foiled to report for 
work. The Anglo American 
Corporation said that 150,000 
of its 180,000 workers were 
absent 

• Gw battle deaths: Police 
reported yesterday that they 
had killed two suspected ter- 
rorists of the outlawed African 
National Congress (ANQ in a 
gun battle in northern Natal 
province on Tuesday (AFP 
reports). 


Stars hit the anti-pollution trail 


It is not easy to put glamour 
into toxic waste. But by the 
time California voters go to 
the polls on November 4 to 
decide whether to approve 
proposition 65, an envuoiK 

mentafist measure designed to 

crack down on polluters in the 
siate, the issue wdl have 
received a remarkable amount 

of LaS^wSend about 42top 
names in Hollywood crossed 
California in a Greyhound bus 
to try to persuade voters to 

I Fox. the Emmy- winning 
icton Whoopi Goldberg, an 
^car-nominee, and many 
more stars nutix* 
show business glitter against 
the ability of corporate a»d 
agricultural opponents of ihe 

mingliig i» • ho «E* 
hotel lobbies, coH^e “JjJ 
nuscs and even rock n 

poured in by big business to 

ssssm*— 


From Ivor Davis, Los Angeles 

gest bass drum,” noted 
Charles Haid, the Hill Street 
Blues television actor. “That 
is what we are doing That is 
what we are best at. 

The proposition, sponsored 
by environmentalists and 
Democratic political leaders, 



jane Fonda: taking waste 

campaign to the people. 

seeks to restrict the discharge 
of toxic chemicals into drink- 
ing water, to increase the 
penalties for pollutes and to 
allow citizens to enforce the 
law by taking court action. 

The toxic issue is also 
crucial to Republican Gov- 
ernor George Deukmejians 
re-election campaign in 
California. When Governor 
neukmejian first took office 
he said he planned to get tough 
with polluters. . 

But his opponents, includ- 
ing Mr Tom Bradley, the 


Mayor of Los Angeles, say the 
Governor’s efforts have been 
puny. 

ALosAi_ 
this week showed that; 
California’s hazardous waste I 
clean-up and enforcement 
pro g ramme is in turmoil and 
that all six privatdy-nm 
dumps, licensed by the 
Deukrorjian administration, 
are leaking and foil to meet US 
Government rules for safe 
disposal. 

A senior US Government! 
environmental official de- 
scribed California’s toxic 
bureaucracy as paralysed. 

The Governors regime j 
claims it is doing its best but 
says it inherited a great deal of | 
the toxic chaos from the 
previous Governor, Mr Ed- 
mund Brown, a Democrat 

Not since show business , 
luminaries hit the road for war 
bond rallies in the 1940s has 
there been such a huge celeb - 1 

rity turnout 

The famous feces have 
drawn large audiences wher- 
ever they go, and many of the 
stars promise to campaign 
until election eve. 

Their message is a harsh 
one. 

“I want to be able to drink 
the water without risking my 
life or the fives-, of my 
children,” Miss Fondatok! a 
cheering crowd at one sum. 

Miss Goldberg,, star or the. 
film The Color Purple, said: 
“The bottom line iv your: 
children are going to die if we . 
don't do something.” 


OVERSEAS NEWS 


white and Coloured areas I 
could be swamped by blacks if 
the Group Areas Act were 
abolished, whereas wealthy 
while areas would be beyond 
the financial means of all but a 
few black businessmen. 

A report on the future of the 
Group Areas Act is expected 
soon from the President’s 
Council, an advisory group, 
which is thought to favour the 
development of racial “grey 
areas”. 

In contrast to his Ternaries 
on residential areas, Mr Botha 
said he had never regarded the 
Separate Amenities Act, whi- 
ch segregates many public 
facilities from lavatories to 
buses, as practical legislation. 

The Minister of Law and 
Order. Mr Louis Le Grange, 
surprised delegates by saying 
that black and Coloured town- 
ships were so decrepit and 
squalid that it was “no wonder 
they want to throw stones 
whenever they see a police- 
man”. 

Security measures had to be 
accompanied by “social uplift- 
mem.” he said. 



Cofouei Amxra Dolan, aged 
39, commander of the Israeli 
Army's Women's Corps, who 
will be promoted to brigadier- 
general to coincide with the 
Jewish New Year t o morrow. 

Colonel Dolan will he the 
first Israeli woman to become 
a general (Reuter reports from 


Tel Aviv). 

Colonel Detail's promotion 
is expected to set a precedent 
for the advancement of other 
women who, so for, have been 
unable to get beyond the rank 
of cokmeL 

“It's an historical event,” 
the Army spokeswoman said. 


$1.4bn war 
on drugs 
approved 
by Senate 

From Christopher Thomas 
Washington 

The Senate has overwhelm- 
ingly approved a $1.4 billion 
(£950 million) anti-drug Bill, a 
bipartisan measure that re- 
flects the growing political 
importance of the drugs issue. 

The Bill sharply increases 
penalties for drug dealing and 
dears the way for military 
involvement in intercepting 
drug runners. 

But even with the universal 
approval for a tougher stand 
on drugs, the Senate could not 
agree on how to pay for the 
Bill's provisions. The House 
of Representatives has passed 
a S3 million anti-drug BilL 
and the two measures must 
now be reconciled. 

There is little profound 
difference between them, 
other than the cost, but Con- 
gress cannot agree on where 
the money should come from. 

The Senate Bill was ap- 
proved by 97 to two, but only 
after adopting a non-binding 
resolution not to cut other 
programmes to pay for the war 
on drugs. 

There is clearly little or no 
sentiment on Capitol HiD for 
raising taxes to pay for h. 
Indeed, some senators arc 
threatening to block the Bill if 
it means further cuts in social 
programmes. 

Both Senate and House 
versions provide for educa- 
tion. treatment and local law 
enforcement and measures to 
fight “designer drugs” and the 
laundering of drug money. 


Virgin Islands leader re-elected 


Road Town, British Virgin 
Islands (Reuter) — The former 
Chief Minister, Mr Cyril 
Romney, was re-elected to the 
legislative council of this Brit- 
ish colony in general elections 
on Monday. 

The elections followed the 
dissolution of the council in 


August by the Governor, Mr 
David Barwick, six days be- 
fore it was to debate a no- 
confidence motion in Mr 
Romney. 

The Opposition had called 
for his resignation because of 
his alleged connections with a 
company that was being in- 


vestigated by Scotland Yard 
and the US Drug Enforcement 
Agency in connection with the 
laundering of drug trafficking 
money. 

Mr Romney, who ran as an 
independent, was not im- 
plicated in any wrongdoing. 


Evidence in ‘dingo’ 
inquiry running 
in mother’s favour 

From Stephen Taylor, Sydney 


It has taken a long time, but 
Australia seems to be coining 
round to the view tint the 
disappearance of baby Azaria 
Chamberlain may. after all, 
have been caused by a dingo, 
or wild dog, rather than her 
mother. 

The reopened inquiry into 
this country’s most celebrated 
c riminal case has beard ev- 
idence in the past two days 
which contradicts crucial for- 
ensic science data responsible 
for convicting Mrs Undy 
'Chamberlain of her baby's 
murder, for which she was 
sentenced to life imprison- 
ment. 

The weight of evidence pro- 
duced so for at the inquiry has 
been running so strongly in 
Mrs Chamberlain's favour 
that an observer coming fresh 
to the case might be forgiven 
for wondering how she could 
ever have been found guilty. A 
majority - are coming to suspect 
what a minority have long 
claimed: that she was the 
victim of a terrible miscarriage 
of justice. 

In the latest evidence, given 
over the past two days, a 
forensic scientist testified that 
a substance found in the 
Chamberlains' car was not a 
spray of baby's Mood from a 
punctured artery - , but a bitu- 
men-based substance applied 
to the car during manufacture. 

The significance of this is 
that while the Crown never 
produced a body, a weapon or 
a motive its central hypothesis 
at the trial was that Mrs 
Chamberlain slashed Azaria's 
throat in the front seat of the 
car and that a spray pattern 
found under the dashboard 
was produced by blood. 

Mr Anthony Raymond, the 
latest of a line of forensic 
scientists involved in the case, 
said he had found no evidence 
of blood in the car. His tests 
had been applied to samples 
identified as foetal blood at the 
trial by Mrs Joy Knhl, another 


forensic scientist, whose ev- 
idence is regarded as haring 
been crncial to Mrs 
Chamber Iain's conviction. 

This new testimony will 
only add to the endless con- 
troversy surrounding the dis- 
appearance of Azaria from the 
Chamberlain family tent mi 
the night of August 17. 1980. 

Mrs Chamberlain has al- 
ways insisted on her inno- 
cence, maintaining that she 
saw a dingo emerge from the 
tent carrying Azaria in its 
jaws. The baby has not been 
seen since. 

While a small, vociferous 
group of supporters has cam- 
paigned on Mrs Chamber- 
lain’s behalf ever since, it was 
no! until she had been in 
prison for three y ears that they 
had cause to feel encouraged. 

Earlier this year the discov- 
ery in the bush of a baby's 
jacket, identified as the one 
worn by Azaria when she 
disappeared, led to Mrs 
Chamberlain's release pend- 
ing a Royal Commission 
headed by a judge. 

Testimony so for has sup- 
ported the contention that a 
dingo was capable of carrying 
away the baby, and that 
instances or dingo attacks on 
children have been recorded. 
Aboriginal trackers, who were 
not called at the trial, have 
said they found dingo tracks in 
the vicinity of the tent. 

Another witness who was 
not called at the trial said that 
within half an hour after 
Azaria was said to have been 
killed Mis Chamberlain con- 
ducted him to the car and 
opened the front door. 

■ The point made by her 
counsel is that she was not 
likely to have taken anyone to 
the scene so soon after her 
alleged crime and that the 
witness saw no sign of blood on 
the seat. 

The inquiry is expected to 
continue until December. 


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OVERSEAS NEWS 


Pan Am jumbo 
hijackers ‘had 
plan to blow it 
up in mid-air’ 


Islamabad (AP) - Hie four 
gnnmen who seized a Pan 
Americas Airways jumbo jet 
in Karachi last month were on 
8 suicide mission and may 
have been planning to blow up 

die plane m mid-air, a Paki- 

stani official said yesterday. 

• A Foreign Office spokes- 
man said the investigation 
into the hijacking of the 
Boeing 747 on September 5 
revealed evidence that the 
terrorists intended to destroy 
the plane and kill about 400 
passengers and crew members 
once they were airborne. 

' The blackens, disguised as 
airport security guards, seized 
die plane on the tarmac at 
Karachi airport as it was 
loading passengers before tak- 
ing on Tor Frankfurt and New 
York. The three-man flight 
crew escaped at the start of me 
modem, immobilizing the 
aircraft 

The 17-hour hijacking 
ended after the plane’s lights 
foiled and the terrorists det- 
onated hand grenades and 
openedjire on the passengers 
with automatic weapons, wit- 
nesses said. Twenty pas- 
sengers died. 

The spokesman said the 
evidence of the hijackers* 
intentions justified the 


Government's decision not to 
give them a flight crew. 

“Jf their demands had been 
met it would have resulted in 
the loss of all of the fives of the 
passengers,” he said. 

The spokesman said many 
questions are still unanswered 
because the alleged hijackers 
were maintaini ng “a hard 
silence,” deliberately mislead- 

D ^i» e mCT 1< had reconciled 
themselves to dying, and ap- 
peared indifferent to the death 
sentences they face if con- 
victed, he said, adding: “The 
hijackers have a rather sui- 
cidal approach to the whole 
issue”. 

The spokesman said it has 
been established that the four 
men entered Pakistan on false 
passports from Bahrain and 
other unspecified Gulf na- 
tions, and that others had 
preceded them to obtain 
weapons and information 
used in the hijacking. He said 
a fifth man, identified as 
Salman Taraki, arrested after 
the incident, appeared to be 
linked to die hijacking. 

The Federal Bureau of In- 
vestigation has arrested Cap- 
tain Abdus Salam, a Libyan 
pilot, but refused to say 
whether he was an accomplice 


The safety of the long-distance runners 


Security guards, some of the 20,000 brought in for the Asian Gaines in South Korea, lining the route of the women’s marathon in Seoul yesterday. The 
organizers and Government are miring no chances with ter ror i sm: 100,000 police and troops are on fill alert daring the event Games report, page 36. 


Anti-US protest jams Panama traffic 


Panama Cfty (Renter) - 
Pro-government demonstrat- 
ors held up traffic on a road in 
front of the US Embassy on 
the second day of anti- Ameri- 
can protests here. 


were protesting against a call 
front the US Senate last week 
for a CIA investigation of 
reports Uniting the Pana- 
manian military to drugs and 
arms trafficking and 


led by prominent members of 
the military-backed Demo- 
cratic Revolutionary Party, 


After a seven-hoar debate 
that included harsh anti- 
American statements, the Leg- 


islative Assembly 
resolution condemning the US 
foe its “dear violation of the 
principle of non-intervention". 

President Eric Arturo DeJ- 
vaDe and his 12-member Cabi- 
net signed a similar resolution, 
which was later delivered to 
the office of the US Ambas- 
sador, Mr Arthur Davis. 


The Reasons in the US 
Senate was sponsored by Sen- 
ator Jesse Heims, who was 
quoted as saying that “Pan- 
ama is op to its armpits” in 
dreg trafficking. 

Sedor Delvalle said: "We 
need to be convinced that be 
(Helms) has aO the screws in 
bis brain in the right place.” 










Rebel plea 
rejected 
by Aquino 

From Keith Dalton 
Manila 

President Aquino yesterday 
rejected demands from Com- 
munist rebels for the release of 
Mr Rodolfo Salas, who is said 
to be the chairman of the 
banned party. The President 
was warned that the arrest on 
Monday of Mr Salas, and his 
continued military detention, 
could jeopardize peace efforts. 

All troops were pul on alert 
yesterday amid military fears 
that the capture of the 
Philippines' left-wing leader 
could spark reprisals. 

The arrest of Mr Salas was a 
“normal police operation" 
and should not halt the two- 
month-old peace negotiations. 
Mr Teodoro Benigno, the 
press secretary, said. 

Lawyers of the National 
'Democratic Front, a left-wing 
alliance discussing peace 
terms with the Government, 
have demanded die release of 
Mr Salas because he is “ac- 
tively and directly'’ involved 
in the talks to end the 17-year 
insurgency. 

But Mrs Aquino rejected 
the former claim. According 
to Mr Benigno, Mr Salas was 
not one of the accredited 
negotiators and therefore 
could not claim immunity. 

The armed forces chief. 
General Fidel Ramos, ordered 
troops into rugged mountain 
terrain in the southern Phil- 
ippines yesterday to rescue 50 
tribesmen who were kid- 
napped on Sunday by Com- 
munist rebels and made to 
work on a remote communal 
farm in the southern 
Philippines. 


General Ramos: ordered 
rescue operation. 


Spanish 
police face 
corruption 
inquiry 

From Richard Wigs 
Madrid ; 
The insensitivity shown by 
the Spanish Socialist Govern, 
meat over the case of W E| 
Nani”, a Madrid criminal who 
“disappeared” while under- 
going police interrogation al- 
most three years ago, led 
yesterday to tile Opposition 
announcing that it was putting 
the matter before Spain's on*, 
bodsraau. 

If Professor Joaquin Rtfz 
Jimtaez, a highly-respected 
lawyer ^ho was chosen by aU 
parties In Parliament as 
Spain's first Defender of the 
People in 1982, agrees, he has 
the chance to examine allega- 
tions of a widespread network 
Of police corruption, going 
beyond abusive nsc of Spain's - 
anti-terrorism laws, to make 
common criminals “sing". . 

He will be forced to look Into 
charges against a dozen police 
commissioners and inspectors 
that they used criminals to 
commit bank robberies, and 
benefited from the subsequent 
selling-off of most of the homy. 

Several of the commis- 
sioners and inspectors, who 
belonged to the Bilbao, 
Santander or Madrid anti- 
robbery squads, have bees 
suspended from their duties 
while being investigated by 
fellow police chiefs and in- 
vestigating magistrates. 

Bat the judicial inquiry, re- 
opening earlier police in- 
vestigations which were mys- 
teriously dosed, is obviously 
making heavy weather of it 
In a second development . 
yesterday, it emerged that one 
magistrate working on the 
case, with a reputation for 
trying to get to the bottom of 
things, has been transferred ' 
from Madrid to a quiet 1 , 
backwater. 

Spaniards hare been hear- 
ing for weeks from die media, - 
which first disclosed the fid! • 
seriousness of die “Nani” 
case, of ugly suspicions that 
the Government of Sedor 
Felipe Gonzftlez, which won 
the 1982 elections with a 
programme which included a 
promise to give special atten- 
tion to citizens" rights, includ- 
ing habeas corpus* has 
gradually fallen into permit- 
ting Franco-style police meth- 
ods, including torture, to 
continue. 

Diario 16 and £2 Pah hare 
demanded that Spain's In- 
terior Minister, Sedor Jos4 
B&rrionuevo, should take, 
some kind of action, careftrifr 
emphasizing that the needle 
fight t e rrorism Is not the issue. 
What is at stake, they suggest, 
is whether Spain has its fist, 
case of an Argentine-style 
desapanddo. 

Bzrt when he answered ques- 
tions in Parliament last week, 
Senor Bairiounevo confined 
himself to admitting: “It is 
possible they have put a goal 
past me.” He was using a 
sporting image to explain how 
the police investigating “H 
Nani” had obtained his per- 
mission to use the aati-toror-. 
ism laws, which allow sra* 
pected terrorists, brat not 
common criminals, to be held 
for np to 10 days. 

The body of “El Nani” has 
never been recovered by Us 
family, who started legal 
proceedings in 1984, main- 
taining that he was tortnred to 
death. The police version has 
always been that he escaped 
while being taken to examine 
stolen goods. 


Malaysia expels reporter 


Kuala Lumpur (Reuter) — A 
judge yesterday rejected an 
appeal by an Asian Wail Street 
Journal reporter against • a 
government order expelling 
him from Malaysia, and said 
he must leave immediately. 

The correspondent. John 
Berthelsen, aged 48, said that 
the Acting Chief Justice,. 
Datuk: Harun Hasfiim. re- 
jected his appeal in chambers. 
The Home Ministry last 


Friday banned sales of the 
paper in Malaysia for three 
months, and said it hod 
derided to take action after 
studyingunsperified articles. 

The Deputy Home Min* 
ister, Datuk Megat Junid. bn 
Tuesday accused the paper of 
unfair reporting and said it 
had “sabotaged the country’s 
economic development" and 
“created feelings of .on- 
certainty among the peopjeT- 


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L_J EEEES EESEEeEfiSSEEEES EEBEESS' BSSESfiE 1_J ISSES- S5 !_| 









THE TIMES 


LSDAY OCTOBER 2 1986 


SPECTRUM 


Where 





y/ It is perhaps hard to 

g believe that in the 

C? biggest com muni st- 

&. controlled country 

f ^ op earth there are 

almost nine million 
privately-run small businesses. Brian James 
looks at the philosophy behind an insatiable 
thirst for success. Pictures by Graham Wood 

Part 3: The road to riches 


T en miles from the ccnire 
of Peking. 100 yards from 
the nearest house, a 
woman sat at the road- 
side. an ancient sewing machine 
between her knees. Awaiting a lift? 
No. that's her place of business 
said the guide. 

The chances of someone cycling 
past with a rent in his trousers and 
the time and yuan to pay for a 
repair would not rate highly with 
even a listening bank as a business 
venture worth backing. But there, 
says Zhang Xiaobin. we western- 
ers have it wrong. He is president 
of China Ventureieeh Investment 
Corporation, set up with 40 
million US dollars to lure our 
money into his nation's business 
life. 

Harvard-trained Mr Zhang de- 
clares: “China is an untrawled 
ocean of entrepreneurial talent. 
The man who sells rolls on sticks 
from a barrow and. yes, your lady 
with the sewing machine have the 
capacity in the China of today to 
become industrial giants." 

Exaggeration, of course? “Yes. 
of course. Yet let me give you a 
few examples from one province 
where we have done official 
studies. Four years ago the 30 
peasants of a commune began 
making electric fans. Last year 
their turnover was 30 million. 
Dollars not yuan. Three men with 
skilful hands began to build 
houses, a quick method of their 
own. They now employ 1.000 
workers and the fixed assets are SS 
million. Several old ladies, too old 
for the fields, started assembling 
boxes for a carpet factory. They 
have a business worth two million. 

“The skill common to them all 
is the ability to spot a niche and 
the mental agility to see a way to 
fill it. Docs that seriously surprise 
you? No. because you know that 
much of Hong Kong was built up 
by mainland Chinese swimming 
in to make their fortune. It was 
obvious that of the one billion left 
behind, some proportion would 
have the same entrepreneurial 
skills." Such enterprise, said Mr 
Zhang, needed foreign money and 
foreign skills, and China was 
willing to share the profits. 

While I was in China it was 
learnt that there was to be a 
follow-up to Rubik's Cube. China 
would make iL That there was to* 
be another, improved cabbage- 
patch doll. Made in China. And 
that a huge US drugs conglom- 
erate was to enter a drug-testing 
agreement: with its vast popula- 
tion China can complete clinical 
trials in a fraction of the time, 
saving money and perhaps lives. 
The building of better mousetraps 


NO CUDDLING 


R oll out the barrel: the first 
notes of this British oldie 
sounded at 7.30pm on 
the dot. and within 10 
seconds the floor of the Jin Yuan 
ballroom club was packed. As it is 
four nights a week, with a strictly- 
counted crowd of ISO couples 
present. 

There is no smoking, no drink- 
ing and precious little chatter. The 
dance is the thing. Not a lot of 
"Min jingchang la: ma?" (come 
here often?) And even less “may I 
walk you home?" A nodded 
agreement to meet in the same hall 
next week would be counted a 
courting coup in a hall where 
cuddles are out. 

From strict-tempo 1950s num- 
bers the pace quickened to a little 
rudimentary jive as the 1 0pm 
shutdown neared. But. while being 
so evidently enjoyed in its simple 
earnest way, the dancing was 
wooden, as though learnt from a 
book, or a half-remembered scene 
from a film. In Peking they waltz 
clockwise. In Shanghai, it's re- 
versed: now that's innovation. 


C hinese wine was once 
described with graphic 
accuracy as tasting like 
melted boiled sweets. But 
it is getting better. One place to 
find out was the vineyard at 
Bcijiao. The sign on the gate was 
“Sino-French Joint Venture Ltd.” 
Was this the place where the 
famous French company Remy 
Marlin was leaching China to 
make good wine? 

The Chinese, said Mr Chen 
Zhen Shan, a frosty reception 
manager, had been making wine 
for 1.000 years to his certain 
knowledge. And make it the same 
way now. But this was a Sino- 
French venture? Two engineers 
from Paris came to pul in some 
machines. That was all. 

We walked the plant. Briskly. 




rise is a labour of love 


is the motivating force in China 

today. 

The scale of China's charge into 
the entrepreneurial age is stagger- 
ing. But so consequently is the 
failure rate. In the first six months 
of this year 190.000 businesses 
ceased to exist, the onc-man-and- 
a-dog size of most of them being 
made dear by the total of only 
210,000 employees consequently 
being made jobless. However, that 
still left 8.7 million small busi- 
nesses carrying on at the end of the 
first decade of self-made men. 



ART AND CRAFT 


Open all hours: a customer waits on a stall white a cobbler at the kerbside repairs shoes and bags; jnst one of China's 8.7 million entrepreneurs 

Admired the grapes. A Chinese Could he tell us about the I ei iDi/it/rtD’C T « ■ B I the West- remember as Confucius, 
tvne. We admired the cleanliness mstine. we said, mimine the I OUKVIVUH S> lALc I He took into his first exile, on a 


Admired the grapes. A Chinese 
type. We admired the cleanliness 
of Mr Chen's plumbing, the skill 
of his bottlers and packers, that his 
26 staff turned out 600.000 bottles 
a year, and were thus an elite 
earning £40 a month. And that 55 
per cent of the wine now went for 
export. But surely if the wine was 
still being made in the old 
traditional way, and for Chinese 
taste...? Mr Chen allowed that the 
French experts had shown them 
some new tricks. 


Could he tell us abput the 
tasting, we said, miming the 
sipping, swishing and spitting 
routine. Mr Chen sniffed at the 
ideas of such a primitive testing 
system. His machine, he said, 
always got the taste right. As 
increasingly it does. The French- 
connected Dynasty Extra Dry is 
actually potable. Elsewhere in 
China. German and Italian 
viniculturists are rooting in the 
soil: Manchurian Moselle is a real 
prospect 


K ong Fan Ping did not 
really expea to survive 
unscathed when the cul- 
tural revolution of Mao 
was unleashed. He was. after all. a 
physicist and therefore a proven 
intellectual. He was also related to 
one of China's four richest pre-war 
families. And he was also a 76th 
generation descendant of a man 
called Kong FusL Whom we, in 



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Mr' 


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L ove in bloom. The man who laid out 
Peking's Ritan Park was an artist. Hie 
lake and island in the centre is a scene 
from a willow pattern plate. But trying 
to sketch what the lovers walking hand-in-hand 
over the bridges intend would attract the 
attention of the Porn Squad. Privacy in Peking's 
thin-wail housing blocks is Impossible; the 
parks have become the place to make love. 


The island, with its artificial mountain riddled 
with caves, is a songht-out spot Late-comers 
have to make do with hideouts in the bushes. 
There is a code: two entwined bicycles mean 
“kindly keep your distance". It is not so much le- 
gal as allowed: provided, that is, yon are married 
and have the lines to prove it Otherwise it's wise 
to leave dalliance over the bridge of sighs to the 
Plate People. 


the West, remember as Confucius. 

He took into his first exile, on a 
remote farm, his famous 
ancestor's respect for intellect and 
a determination not to allow his 
miad to wither as he tended pigs. 
The only printed matter available 
in the commune was a pile of 
patterns. Using them as a starting 
point he taught himself to be a 
tailor. “I think I became quite 
expert. But it was the use of. the 
mind which was important; the 
mechanics of building a suit are 
quite fascinating. 

“The name of Confucius was 
hard to bear at those times. Much 
of premier Chou's leaching and 
writing was parallel in thought to 
that of Confucius: thus it was easy 
for Mao to attack Chou obliquely 
by disgracing the words of my 
ancestor. 

Mr Kong survived the cultural 
revolution to be reinstated and 
even sent briefly to- study in 
Britain. He remembers most viv- 
idly. he says politely, the waste. “If 
in Britain a machine does not 
work, you push it aside and take 
another. In China even the most 
senior researcher must be pre- 
pared to start a day by replacing a 
fuse. There is usually only one 
machine. If it breaks you must 
repair iL" 

Mr Kong seems astonishingly 
unembinered by his ordeal under 
Mao. “We confirmed that China is 
strong enough to survive , the 
cultural revolution. Just as it will 
survive the bad parts of the 
commercial revolution which 
happens now. I believe Deng 
(China's new leader) will be 
judged by history as a man vastly 
more influential than Mao." 

But not quite the most famous 
Chinese of all time. Kong Fan 
Ping smiled. 


L i Lang became an artist 
because his father was 
afraid he would become a 
hooligan. There was no 
point in going to school, the Red 
Guards ran the place. “To stop me 
running the streets behind the 
gangs looking for iuiellecuials to 
denounce, he taught me to draw 
and paint. . 

- “Later f went to school to study 
art The Chinese way, which 
means when you paint a flower 
you begin like this. Number one 
stroke. Always. No variation. Nat 
permitted. Then stroke number 
two. There is therefore no content 
or emotion in Chinese art I 
learned to draw cubes, planes, 
faces with great precision. But 
nothing of feeling. 

- “It was as dead in its way as the 
time of the cultural revolution. 
Then all the influences that had 
come into Chinese an from the 
1920s, perspective, light and shade 
were banned There was no access 
to what books remained un burnt, 
and it was dangerous to seek them. 

' Even the 1950s Russian influence, 
all those heroic workers and 
peasants marching behind the 
flags, were abandoned" 

U is now one of Peking's small 
but growing band of experimental 
artists. “My group are fascinated 
by what we hear from the West 
But also frightened We do not 
want to get swamped by your 
ideas. Just invigorated by them. ! 
work as a stage designer. That too 
is pretty useless. Again tradition is 
everything.- You start with line 
one, just so long so broad I am 
bored Soon I must give up- But 
that too is freedom not robe state 
artist Making many, many, birds 
and flowers on screens for tourists. 
It is easy to mhke money as an 
artist in China. Harder to make a 
name, which is what 1 want."' 

J TEE CEREMONIES I 


A little lady named Li 
watched dispassionately 
as a Japanese machine 
salesman hooked his 
four wood high into the fairway on 
the left. She scuttled into the bush 
and within seconds returned his 
Pen fold No 2 She knew exactly 
where to look, but then anti! a 
while ago that was where she grew 
wheat and a sort of turnip. 

China's first post-Liberation 
golf course opened two months 
ago. Miss Li is very happy to be a 
caddy. She gets a smart primrose 
uniform, a sunhat like a 
tedtieeperV and twice as much 
(£15 a month) finding PerifcAds as 
she did hoeing turnips. After a 
month's training she no longer 
giggles when a putt is missed 
Miss U is slightly superstitious 
about die fact that the Japanese- 
owned Beijing golf course is riled 
in the valley once sacred to the 
memory of the Mmg emperors 
buried thert Few Chinese wfll 
.wrestle with their consciences, 
contemplating membership: a sin- 
gle round on tins pleasant and 
dramatically-sited course costs 
£60, say three months' gross salary 
for an army officer. 

( TOMORROW ^ 

The invisible wall 
that protects 
China’s privacy 


The Midland High Interest 
Cheque Account has the 
simplest form of access to 
your savings you can get — 
a cheque book So whenever 


Platform for memories 


® Midland 

Bank pic TT 




TOP EARNER ATTHE END OF >OUR PEN. 


Charles Wegner could have 
been in Ontario this autumn 
with Michael Bogdanov and 
the Royal Shakespeare Com- 
pany. examining the finer 
■ points of Henry V's Agincoun 
speech. Instead, he is in 
B’ackhealh with a 66-year-old 
retired Co-Op roundsman. 
Bill Welch. learning how a 
bread boy went about his 
business 50 years ago. 

Wegner. ex-RSC and ex- 
National Theatre, passed up 
the chance to tour Canada so 
that he could be “Bert" in the 
Age Exchange Theatre’s new 
production. My First Job. 
which began a two-month 
national tour last week. 

”1 saw one of the earlier 
productions — Fifty Years Ago 
— and one old fellow jumped 
up shouting; ‘That's my life! 
Why doesn't anyone know 
about that?* " 

He is the newest recruit in a 
cost of four professional actors 
who will be performing. 


The youthful years 
of elderly people 
are being revived 
on stage by a band 
of travelling players 

mainly to elderly audiences, 
plays about these old people's 
own young lives, taken from 
their own accounts and 
wrapped up in a storyline by 
Pam Schweitzer. Age 
Exchange's founder and artis- 
tic director. 

“I'd always wanted to try 
and bring the theatre into 
education, but it occurred to 
me that when I let old people 
tell their stories, they felt 
much better, it was a therapy,” 
she said. “Then ! thought that, 
because they were such good 
story-tellers, the next stop 
would be to make a play out of 
what ihev remembered." 


you need large sums of 
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i—r 1 


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Age Exchange Theatre is 
financed by grants from char- 
ities and two London bor- 
oughs. Greenwich and Lew- 
isham. and by the modest fees 
collected for each presenta- 
tion. With each production — 
there have been seven to date 

— comes a book, sold for 
between £2 and £3, which is a 
verbatim account of the sto- 
ries which nuke up the plays, 
and there are exhibitions of 
the photographs collected by 
Pam Schweitzer. 

A new spin-off is a more 
intensely therapeutic scheme, 
the Reminiscence Project. 
Twenty-three voluntary work- 
ers visit mentally and phys- 
ically frail old people in 
hospitals and nursing homes, 
gening them to act out scenes 
from their pasts. “We realized 
that it seemed to make old 
people come out of that 
dreadful depression many 
suffer," said Schweitzer. 

Having collected the old, 
people's memories, fashioned j 
a script and worked out set \ 
design ideas, there is a session j 
with those who have provided 
their pasts as material. Jean 
Bacham. 74, shows how she 
made collars when she was a 
■‘tailoress’*. and how she 
cleaned a fire-grate: Iris 
Gauge. 66. demonstrates the 
Black Bottom as she per- 
formed it as a 1930s showgirl. 

Meanwhile, musical ar- 
ranger Paula Gardiner needs 
to know the kind of songs they 
were singing. — “O. Mama. 1 
Want to Marry a Baker’s Boy” 

— and designer Becky Price 
has to know what products 
were advertised, what would 
appear above a shop window 

— “Did it actually say ‘Labour 
Exchange’?”. 

“The detail is so right, they 
lake so much care.” said Jean 
Bacham. “Watching one of 
these shows brings back so 
many things. It goes right 
through you". 

Simon Tait 

Arc Exchange Theatre is based 
at IS Camden Row, B/ackheath, 
London SEJ (01-318 9105). 


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THE TIMES THURSDAY OCTOBER 2 1986 



BOOKS 


A Longford version 

or Bunk? 

-Fiona 

MacCarthy on 
another Big 
Figure of history 



■ TO* in 

I T- J eb P te * Shore - Lady 

-A i^ n ^ilL m ® moirs ' when 

Vi^Aria- d r— e ^ rated author of 

WtfdenfedT^ % 

edhi XiiLS* P ud ? n 8s! ts accost- 
Snnw her l f i . 0st who tows down his 
^ exclaiming 
• El fflbeth.-you will do the Duke oi 
Wellington Aflionia will do- Mary 

$*"* do Wellington.” Thus is 
tnghsh history carved out ' 

ViiJJSlr* We are "OW into 
Jpe. third generation of the Longford 
line .or historical biographers. The 
new book on Emma Hamilton by 
Flora Fraser,-. Antonia Fraser’s 
danghter and- Lady Longford's 
granddaughter, turns out to be a 
very near relation of Victoria and 
Wellington and’ Mary and King 
Jwes; For those femUiar with the 
Longford way of history, there are 
few surprises m Miss Fraser’s style 
and attitude; no strildngs out, 
rethinkings, rebellions, reversals. 
To a large extent this book could 
.have been written by her grand- 
mother. The. main amazement is it 
is' so much the same again. 

Longford books have always been 
concerned with History’s Big Fig- 
ures. Kings and queens of course 
provide the most convenient basis 
for the Longford technique oi 
summing up. a certain period in 
history in terms of a single, central, 
nationally charismatic and politi- 
cally' influential lifespan. Emma 
Hamllion, although not strictly 
speaking regal, had a staggeringly 
queenly sense of power and destiny: 
arid her marriage to Sir William, 
British Minister at Naples, and 
liaison with Lord" Nelson, the Hero 
ofEngland, place her near enough to 
centre' for the formula to work. She 
is a terrific subject: extravagant, 
alluring expansive, and expanding. 
Expanding literally. By mid-life she 
was colossal, looking in fact not so 
unlike our own Queen Mother 
(another Longford subject), with the 
same enduring charm. 

. The Longford view of history has 
been.wiib us fojrso long it is easy to 
forget what an extraordinary roll- 
cair bf History’s Great Moments we 
have seen through Longford eyes. 
The. trial' of Mary Queen of Scots, 
Charles ft execution; Waterloo; the 
funeral of Queen Victoria. In Flora 
Fraser's book, there are two show- 
stoppiog set pieces; the death of 
Nelson, alias the “Kiss me. Handy” - 
scene, which Flora .Fraser handles 
with great confidence arid corape- 


BELOVED EMMA 
The Life of Emma 
Lady Hamilton 
By Flora Fraser 

Weidenfdd & Nicolson, 

£14.95 

trace; and, scarcely less effective, 
tne very first arrival of the British 
fleet and Nelson in the Bav of 
Nap es where be spends the night. 
0ec ^raed, in the shadow of Vesuvi- 
us* before being received by Lady 
Hamilton. It is strong in innuendoes 
of advancing sexual power. 

Lady Longford and desce ndants 
are tireless explorers, rather in the 
manner of the Nineteenth-Century 
English lady travellers. In her 
memoirs. Lady Longford explains 
how she imported her own canvas 
camp chair, of the sort you take on 
picnics, to the Windsor Royal 
Archives to sit on while researching. 
Queen Victoria's journals on her 
lap. 

F lora Fraser, in her peregri- 
nations around Naples, also 
has at least a metaphoric 
camp stool in her baggage 
She is a researcher of the old school, 
dogged, thorough, returning to her 
base with an enormous haul of facts. 
The only problem is — and it is 
quite a massive problem, not totally 
resolved, I think, in any Longford 
volume — it is difficult to balance 
such an outpouring of facts with a 
human interest story. The interest- 
ing humans quite soon tend to get 
submerged. 

It is frequently a case of “heads- 
musi-roll-but whose?”, the classic 
Longford sentence in volume 2 of 
Wellington, in which the author, 
showing signs of desperation, at- 
tempts to get the narrative back 
onto the rails. Flora Fraser is 
sensitive to the endemic dangers of 
her inherited profession of life-and- 
tiraes historian, foe all too real 
likelihood of missing out on life 
while you do your stint on back- 
ground, and losing sight of times 
while you concentrate on people: 
Like her predecessors she puts her 
faith in chapter titles to keep her 
readers in 'foe right direction. “Sur- 



prising Transformations”, “A 
Cruise with Consequences” Au- 
thentic Longford ese with a small 
touch of Barbara On land Long- 
ford chapter-titling merits a short 
history itself. 

The style of this book can be 
alarmingly uncertain, veering from 
the grimly academic to the Sloany. 
Scarcely a page passes without the 
word “adored”. Dauntingly exact 
accounts of royal genealogy rub 
shoulders (or cross swords) with foe 
worst historian’s cliches: continents 
in slates of flux, new Parisian eras 
dawning. There are snatches of that 
favourite old style Longfbrdian 
Lyricak 


In the spring, Rome beckoned as it 
does to aJ l those today who know 
the mauve charm of the wistarias 
falling in rich clusters over its wail. 

There is also some impossible 
Listen-with-M other language, as in 
foe descriptions of Emma’s famous 
Attitudes, marvelled at by all the 
famous visitors to Naples: 

Let us rake our seats beside Goethe 
and settle to watch the show as he 
describes it. 

It is very unrelaxing. Is this history 
or bunk? 

More to the point perhaps is foe 
whole 'question of whether this is 


amateur history or professional. No 
one seems quite certain, from Lady 
Longford onwards, if these books 
are being written for the Regius 
Professors or an audience more or 
less strayed in from Madame 
Tussaud’s. 

This is not foe brilliant book its 
publishers suggested. No book 
could be quite that. But it has a lot 
of promise, and one hopes that next 
time round Flora Fraser will take 
herself more seriously, shed foe 
Longford longueurs, as indeed her 
mother managed. At present. like 
Nelson in the Bay of Naples, she 
still seems a bit immobile, anchored 
down, becalmed. 


A romance with a 
view in Florence 


Penelope Fitzgerald’s roman- 
tic comedy is set in Italy in foe 
1950s. with the English as 
spear carriers at foe edge of 
things. It happens in and 
around the bubble city of 
Florence, with excursions to 
the harsh South, to a convent 
school in Berkshire, and dark- 
est Chelsea, and trips back- 
wards in lime to visit foe 
dying Gramsci and take in a 
bit of recent Italian history. To 
foe non-Italian, not to the 
manicra bom, foe Italians 
seem convincing people, most 
unEnglish. but with touches of 
nature that make foe whole 
world kin. 

Chiara is the innocent only 
daughter of a decayed Floren- 
tine Count with a dilapidated 
villa looking down on the 
great bubble. Barney, her best 
friend from the Berkshire 
convent is a jolly-hockey- 
sticks Sloanc who is supposed 
to be worldly-wise about men. 
Dr Salvatore Rossi, a local 
neurologist, is working-class 
from the South, and an angry 
young man. Chiara and 
Salvatore fall in love like a 
flash of lightning: and the 
main plot is w hat is to be done 
about iL in spite or Barney's 
help, and the complexities of 
the Italian class system. The 
moral of the grotesque legend 
of the stone Dwarfs on top of 
Chiara's family villa is that 
trying to make other people 
happy is not only difficult, but 
usually a disaster. 

There is Fitzgerald domes- 
tic wit about dotty relations, 
and a couple of ghastly expa- 
triate BriTuscans. There is a 
sharp little comedy around the 
wedding at the family's coun- 
try estate. And there are the 
whimsical perceptions you 
would expect: Florentines 
know their city's paintings in 
the same way that English 
children grow up with and 
know their domestic animals. 
The book is a moving as well 
as a witty account not just of 
Italians in love, but of loving 
and living for all humans. 

Perfume is a different kettle 
of slinking fish: a son of 
Inferno of foe nose and olfac- 
tory Mein Kampf. reeking 
with symbolism about foe 
darkness of foe soul, and 
parables about totalitarian- 
ism. In 1738 in Paris a fish- 
wife gives birth to a baby in a 
pile of fish guts. Her baby, 
called Grenouille, survives 
somehow- into a hellish life. 


FICTION 


PhHip Howard 

INNOCENCE 

By Penelope Fitzgerald 

fife £9.95 

PERFUME 
By Patrick Sdskind 
Translated by John 
E. Woods 

Hamah Hamilton. £9.95 

PERFECT ENGLISH 
By Paul Pickering 

iVcuicnfiid 6c Siculsnn. 

' £9.95 

with one remarkable defect 
and one remarkable gift The 
defect is that he possesses no 
body smell. But his powers of 
scent are as those of a Hyperi- 
on of hounds to those of a 
satyr with a cold. He can 
follow a seem ten miles away; 
his nose can instantly analyse 
the thousand smells of recking 
Paris. 

This genius of scent be- 
comes a sorcerer's apprentice 
of perfume, and then the 
greatest perfumer that the 
world has ever smelled. Un- 
fortunately. io make up for the 
heart of non-smelling dark- 
ness in himself, he decides to 
capture the concentrated es- 
sence of the greatest perfume 
he knows: the smell of bud- 
ding virgins, preferably red- 
headed. This essence gives 
him a power stronger than the 
money or the power of terror 
or the power of death: the 
invincible power to command 
the love of mankind This 
hyped book is strong stuff: 
disgusting in parts powerful in 
pans, a stinkcroo in pans. 1 
thought in pans ii was jolly 
silly. 

Perfect English is the name 
of a Californian God squad, 
promoting liberation theology 
in Nicaragua for foe Sandys. 
Johnny Morgan, wimp just 
down from Cambridge, comes 
out to join his sexy American 
girl friend in foe movement. 
Meet the American priest 
hooked on politics, the ex-CIA 
thug who smiles and smiles, 
ana a cast of do-gooders who 
are- singularly unsuccssful at 
doing God's word. It is poor 
man's Tom Sharpe, with 
crude red and while politics. 
The cannibalism is wittier 
than in Perfume. 




How the brothers 
love one another 


c. • • 

A founder leader of Militant, 
Mu Ted Grant, proclaims that 
its ‘ creed is Revolutionary 
Communism. That should bar 
all believers in Militant from 
membership of the Labour 
Party: hut it does not An 
adherent must be proved to be 
taking part in a Militant 
organization within the La- 
bour Party before he can be 
expelled. Wriggling is intense, 
proof is difficult, and the will 
of Labour's National Execu- 
tive is minimal . So 80,000 
Militants (Revolutionary 
Communists) roam around in 
the Labour Party. Mr Kilroy- 
Silk was persecuted enthusias- 
tically by a sizeable n amber of 
his constituency, Knowstey 
North. They wanted to dese- 
lect him and put a Militant in 
his place. . . . 

Mr . Kilroy-Silk had been 
‘ making trendy left wing noises 
since he became an MP in the 
Liverpool area in J974. Aslate 
as 1981 he abstained from 
voting for Mr Bean as Deputy 
Leader, but did not vote 
against him. He began to move 
towards Mr Khmock, which in 
a rational Labour Party would 
have been foe seal of 
But every time he defended Mr 
Kinnocb' after he became 
Leader he was howled down at 
his local party meetings. _ 

His diary of the months 
leading up to the intended 
reselectiou conference « en- 
thralling- Without .experience 
of Communist manipulation or 

union branch meet™ ami 
their anblusbum vote-fi«Wlm& 
or of the terrifying intomda-- 

tion of local Labour Partiesby 
Militants 

readers may find b 15 ““fS? 

unbelievable. It * tme: amlfoe 

foul victimization of 
able Labour MPs has driven 
Them out of their seats and 
[heir supporters away from 

j.. ahhrrt at Mr Kumock s 

gSSSfrebateoftheUrtnwol 


Woodrow Wyatt 


HARD LABOUR 

By Robert Kilroy-Silk 

Chcutod Windus,£9.95 


Militants at last year’s Labour 
Conference as a sign that help 
was on its way. It was an 
fllnsion. As the going got 
tougher Mr Kinnock accepted 
his resignation as a shadow 
spokesman in the Cbmmons 
with the scrap of consolation: 
“Keep fighting, kid. 1 * That Is 
what Mr Kilroy-Silk did but 
Mr Kinnock did not 

The disfflnsiooed Kilroy- 
Silk finally gave up the strug- 
gle in July 1986, aware that 
neither the heart of Mr 
Kinnock nor that of the La- 
bour National Executive was 
stoat enough to prevent a 
Militant or someone of equal 
menace taking over at 
Knows ley North. The new 
candidate hates Kinnock. 

Mr Kilroy-Sflk is an engag- 
ing fellow. His encounters 
with real life as it is lived in the 
Labour Party are rapidly mov- 
ing him towards the right He 
says he will not join the SDft 
which is wise of him as there is 
no political future for him 
there. After a few years be may 
find himself drawn to Mrs 
Thatcher, who is the butt of 
standard attacks in his dhuy. 
He is ambitious, and af 44 still 
has some political life in him. 
But if he is to make the grade 
with the Conservatives he w ill 
have to mature still farther 
away from slog a n izing . 

His diary is filtered with U I 
am a man of the people” 
references to foe fortunes of 
the Liverpool football dub, 
which sit unnaturally, and cast 
a feint doubt on his sincerity. 
When he becomes really hon- 
est with himself, and his 
desires to make money and a 
splash, he has the chance of 
becoming a significant person. 


Life is full of difficult choices. 
Do we present foe palm to 
Florence or Venidvfoe Prado 
or the Louvre, or — a question 
to revive spirits at foe end of a 
lamentable season — Tnunp- 
er or Bradman? The issue is 
raised directly by these two 
books. 

Peter Sharpham's biogra- 
phy lacks foe dash and grace of 
a Trumper innings. Mis 
C.B. Fry called him the “poet 
of cricket”. MrSharpham lays 
claim to being the “Slasher” 
Mackay of prose. The reader 
may not feel that foe 1909 
rhyme of an English cricket 
enthusiast is out of place 
between Mr Sharpham's 
‘ paragraphs: 

Vickery. Vickery, Vock 

The ball went over the clock. 
The knock was Vic’s, 

. He scored a six, 

Vickery. Vickery, Vock". 

Bui we get the whole sto- 
ry-all the axes — from foe 
puzzling beginning (who was 
Trumper?) to foe sad end, 
dead at 37 of Bright's disease, 
his kidneys wasted away. 

Just as Velasquez is said to 
be the painter's painter, so 
Trumper was clearly the 
batsman's batsman, and foe 
bowler's too. When Arthur 
Mailey got him om. he con- 
fessed to feeling “like a boy 
who had killed a dove". 
Wilfred Rhodes, foe man who 
dismissed him more than any 
other, thought him foe best. 
To Pelham Warner he was of 
the blood royaL and, “foe 
Governor-Generar’7 
Macartney, said simply that 
he would always have been 
proud to cany his bag. 

His dreadfully untidy bag is 
foe only thing about him that 
drew criticism. Trumper was 
as clean-cut and decent in life 
as he appears in foe admirable 
photographs that adorn this 
biography, mislabelled though 
one or two of them are. He 
belongs tb an age of cricketing 
grace. Here then is the perfect 
Knight, “cricket incarnate”. 

Trumper^ addiction to 
healthy living was as marked 
as his lack of venality. As 
Victor Daley wrote;“High 


Poets m 
pads from 
an Age 
of Grace 

Chris Patten 

. TRUMPER 
By Peter Sharpham 

Hodder & Stoughton, £12.95 

BAT AND PAD 
Writings on Australian 
Cricket 1804-1984 
Compiled by Pat Mullins 
and Philip Derriman 
Oxford, £8.95 


purpose glitters in his eye. he 
scorns foe filthy dollar.” Here 
then is foe perfect Knight, 
“cricket incarnate.”^ 
Comparing Trumper and 
Bradman, Neville Card us goes 
over foe lop in his just-about- 
tolerable way. “Bradman” he 
writes, “never goes divinely 
mad, as Trumper and Hobbs 
did in the old days, when, 
having exhausted that part of 
their skill that was rational, 
they became like men pos- 
sessed by romantic visions of 
wild and wonderful and new 
strokes m cricket” 

The best of the descriptions 
of Bradman in foe interesting 
Mullins and Derriman anthol- 
ogy are those by H.S. Alfoam 
and foe incomparable Jack 
Fingleton. Alfoam describes 
Bradman’s “small, serenely 
moving figure in its big- 
peaked green cap coming out 
of the pavilion's shadows into 
the sunshrae_.the destiny of a 
Test Match in his hands.” 
Fingleton in a. perfect little 
essay on bodyline, describes it 
accurately as “a tribute to 
Bradman’s greatness”. With- 
out Bradman, there would 
have been no bodyline. 

One of foe editors of foe 
Australian anthology draws, a 
distinction between the sports 
reporting, popular in papers in 
his own country, and the 


sports writing favoured in the 
Pommy press. There is some 
truth in this; but on the 
evidence of this- collection 
most of the best writing is by 
those who regard themselves 
unselfconsciously as reporters. 

Much of this reporting is by 
ex-playere who perhaps feel 
under less pressure to demon- 
strate 1 that they could have 
aspired to foe Booker Prize if 
only they had put their minds 
to it Trevor Bailey's descrip- 
tion of Ray Lindwall, taken 
from one of the most thought- 
ful books by a post-war player, 
is matched for directness, and, 
appropriately, pace by Richie 
Benaud's celebration of Alan 
Davidson's many virtures. It 
■is a pity that none of Mike 
Breariey's work is included. 

Fingleton is, of course, the 
best journalist among the 
former players. In his own 
contribution to the Bradman 
versus Trumper controversy, 
he comes as near as he can to 
over-writing, staying a foot or 
two inside foe boundary rads. 
But Fingleton is right It must 
indeed have seemed to specta- 
tors in Bradman's heyday that 
“he was using not so much a 
bat as an axe dripping with the 
bowler’s blood and agony.” 

There is much more to 
Australian cricket than foe 
champagne of Trumper. the 
brutal brilliance of Bradman, 
and the parade of all the other 
heroes. We cannot forget the 
sledging (abuse of foe batsman 
with intent to distract), foe 
yahoos, and foe arm-pit side 
of life. 

Mr Bob Hawke, no mean 
cricketer himself, implies in 
his introduction to the anthol- 
ogy. that we should not over- 
look this aspect of the 
Australian game if we wish to 
get the beauty of it hot. He 
cites the selectors' meeting in 
Sydney in 1912. brought to a 
premature close by Gem 
Hill's pugilistic challenge to a 
fellow selector — “You have 
been looking for a punch in 
the jaw all night and I will give 
you one.” And so he did. the 
oldest form of bodyline, it is 
useful to remember, predated 
Douglas Jardine by some 
years. I 


Fun with Boers and BOSS 


‘INSPIRES CONFIDENCE 



Christopher Ricks 

The Sunday Times 


‘Its guide to pronunciation is dearer than in any other 
dictionary 1 Philip Howard TheUmes 



and 


‘Longman gets a place on my sheiF KingsleyAmis Observer 
Ht cEo ngin g ffl Dictionary of the English language £15.95 

LONGMAN DKTIONARIES-RECOMMENDED 

phone ( 0279} 34622foryour FREE Good Dictionary Guide 

% 


He writes like old Daily 
Express leaders 

He likes short sentences. 

Often he uses one sentence 
paragraphs. 

When his man is in bed with 
a girl, some of foe sentences 
become longer, not a lot 
longer, sometimes even a bit 
soppy. But not very soppy. 

He has written an exciting 
book. 

Actually it’s very exciting 
and it’s topical and, largely 
because it's founded on cock- 
up rather than conspiracy 
theory, it has a rather spooky 
plausibility; even though, in 
the end, it's difficult to believe 
that one quite ordinary bloke 
with no experience of guerrilla 
warfare can make a monkey 
out of foe South African State 
President and foe security 
police and foe state hangman, 
old Frikkie de Kok. 

The most plausible part of 
foe story is that a stupid but 
very brave Tommy Atkins 
called Jeez Curwen is recruit- 
ed by British security and then 
forgotten, because foe old- 
fashioned amateurs who hired 
him get pensioned off and 
superseded by a new breed of 
cynical professionals, who 
give even less of a toss for him 
than his original bosses. The 
old guard let him rot in an 
Albanian prison for a decade. 
The Albanians removed his 
finger-nails: but Jeez never 
croaked. Brave man. Jeez, and 
not bright 

Not bright at alL 

Colonel Basil, who was 
none too bright either and 
appears subsequently to have 
gone completely offhis rocker, 
then drops Jeez into South 
Africa and tells him to get 
alongside these African Con- 
gress chappies. Infiltrate but 
stay out of trouble. Easier said 
than done, of course. When a 
quartet of not very competent 
blacks throw a bomb at the 
Rand Supreme Court Jeez is 
driving foe getaway van. 

It doesn’t get away. 

When he gets the inevitable 
death sentence foe powers that 
be in London manage little 
more than a mild shrug; but 
Jeez writes a letter home to the 
wife and son on whom he 
walked out (pro patria) all 
those years ago. The son. Jack, 
is employed, though not at the 
sharp end, by a demolitions 
company, when he learns 
what has become of his old 
man he starts rootling around 
among friends, contacts, ene- 
mies. Then inevitably he takes 
flight for South Africa. It is not 
that difficult to imagine what 
comes next, though Mr Sey- 
mour keeps foe “Will he? 
Won’t he” suspense going 
right to the very end. 

Although I don't always 
care for what he does with 
them. Mr Seymour obviously 
understands words and enjoys 
working with them. He even 


THRILLERS 


TimHeald 

A SONG IN THE 
MORNING 
By Gerald Seymour 

Collins Harfill, £9.95 



He has written a good 
Thriller. Very. 

writes dialogue that is more 
than narrative in inverted 
commas. 

• Death in Leningrad, by 
John Lear (Phuo, £8.95). This 
book is a gem, beautifully 
written, witty, intelligent, and 
one of the finest evocations of 
a city I have read in ages. The 
cast consists mainly of' a 
“small party of Russiamsis of 
which Ashweald was a 
member.” They have come to 
Leningrad for a month of 
courses under foe leadership 
of Carvel, who bore an “in- 
congruous — and possibly cul- 
tivated — resemblance to foe 
First Folio Portrait ofWilliam 
Shakespeare, there being no 
point at which lofry brow 
seemed to end and dome of 
head to begin.” 

All of them have secrets. 


Some have belonged to what 
this author calls “The Firm”. 
Some still do. No one is quite 
sure. There is a traitorous 
defector at large in foe city. 
Several of the group have 
mysterious connections with 
this man, who disappeared 
abruptly from Parkhurst while 
serving a 56-year sentence. 
Slowly, slowly foe extent and 
nature of these connections 
emerge against the beauty of 
domes, cupolas, and spires. 

The book's modest propor- 
tions and pretensions will no 
doubt be reflected in foe sales 
and attention it receives. If so 
it's a tragedy because it's 
worth all foe year's meretri- 
cious blockbusters bound 
together. 

• The Link, by Give Henry 
(Quartet, £10.95). This is the 
first thriller I have read about 
the connection between smok- 
ing and Lung cancer. As nei- 
ther the President of the 
United States nor Hermann 
Goering are involved it earns 
very high marks indeed fbr 
originality of conception. The 
execution is another matter 
I'm afraid, and in the end it 
seemed to boil down to a fairly 
routine tale of boardroom 
skulduggery. I have to admit 
to a malicious pleasure in the 
first sighting of David's future 
wife at lunch in the Manila 
Gub. The editor really 
shouldn't have let it through. 
Hair? “Dark brown and 
straight.” Face? “Deeply 
tanned." Complexion? 
"Flawless." Nose? 

“Patrician.' 1 Mouth? “Full 
and generous. 11 Teeth? 
“White, even.” 

I have an uneasy feeling that 
Mr Henry has been to foe 
language school run by retired 
majors - the one where they 
teach writing by numbers. 


Hard Labour 

The Political Diary of 
ROBERT KILROY-SILK 

His battle for 
reselection 

-the truth 
behind his 
resignation 

JJ&L 

jCHATTQ| £9.95 



I 


i r 








THE TIMES 
DIARY 


Bricks and 


brickbats 


Eric Hcffer. voted off Labour’s 
national executive committee this 
week, could be forgiven for blam r 


tng his own sponsoring union. Not 
onlv did Ucatu the builders' 
union, last week pass a well pub- 
licized motion censuring his con- 
ference walk-out last year buu 1 
learn, its general secretary, Albert 
Williams, wrote him a formal 
letter of warning. It expressed 
concern at Heffer’s “poor show of 
unity" in 1985 and complained 
about his leaving a recent exec- 
utive meeting equally abruptly. 
The night before bis defeat, at a 
Ucati reception attended by Neil 
Kin nock. Hcffer complained to 
Williams that it was wrong to 
publicize their differences: WU- 
liams replied that he should toe 
the line. Hefler, heedless of every 
warning, stormed off. It may not 
have been in the leadership's gift, 
but was it coincidence that the 
only new member elected to the 
NEC's union section was Ucatt’s 
Jack Rogers? 


Last straw 


Derek Hauon. unblooody and 
unbowed after the final seal was 
put on his expulsion that morning, 
spent Tuesday nighi joking with 
the troops at a Militant rally. 
Peering at a note that had just 
been passed to him. he stood up 
and told his audience, swelled by 
at least two coach loads of 
supporters from Liverpool: “I can 
cope with being thrown out of the 
Labour Party. I can cope with 
losing my job with Knowsley 
council, but I can't cope with 
Everton losing 4-1 to Liverpool 
and Ian Rush scoring a hat-trick." 


• Id no casnni spirit, with no 
bravado, one Militant in Black- 
pool bemoaned the 6.1 million 
votes in favoor of expelling fellow 
Trots from the Labour Party thus: 
“That is six million ice picks 
buried in the beads of the Liver- 
pool Labour movement" 


RIP 


After all the abuse tossed at the 


Labour party's new red nose logo 
(it's anti- Yorkshire, it's anti-ScoU. 


I find the canniest analysis in an 
article about something quite 
different in this week’s New 
Society . Discussing the greetings 
card industry. David White 
writes: “Some 70 per cent of cards 
use flowers to say whatever they 
want to say. The top flower in the 
hearts and flowers market is the 
rose. In the card industry's lan- 
guage of flowers a rose says ’i love 
you*. The rose is also a useful all 
purpose flower. If it is embossed 
on a plain white board, it can say 
‘My condolences’." 


Back to base 


Attending a press session in 
Washington on Monday with a 
group of young Chinese baseball 
players. Vice-President George 
Bush warned reporters that he 
would answer questions about 
baseball, and baseball only. That 
did not stop them. "Mr Vice- 
President." asked one. "how long 
will it be before Nick Daniloff is 
playing baseball again?" Another 
followed up: “Will he be back in 
lime for the World Series?" 


BARRY F ANTONI 





‘Free tickets for soccer tans 
should shift them' 


Do unto others 


The Labour-controlled Brent 
Council in north London yes- 
terday introduced the country's 
first mulii-laiih religious syllabus 
for schoolchildren. It treats all 
religions equally and mentions 
Chnstianiiy only once - among a 
list of religions in the appendix. 
The Rev Roger Mason. Anglican 
chairman of ihc committee 
responsible tor the syllabus, tells 
me eloquently that we must 
'adapt to local conditions" and 
abandon Christian-centred re- 
ligious studies. Not when it comes 
to his own children, however. 
Mason sends his three children of 
secondary school age well away 
from his home in Brcm to 
Greycoat Hospital, a Church of 
England school in Westminster of 
which he is a governor. 


Threesome 


Author and cricket fanatic Leslie 
Thomas celebrates a publishing 
hat trick today: the simultaneous 
publication of a new novel. The 
Adventures of Goodnight and Lov- 
ing , . about a lawyer turned hobo, a 
cricketing short story in The 
Boundary Book and a profile of Sir 
Len Hutton in Short Singles. He 
will not be at the launch of any of 
them: instead he will be address- 
ing a private lunch for Beet Street 
middle managers — on. among 
other things cricket _ 

phs 




THE TIMES THURSDAY OCTOBER 2 1986 

Blackpool: Robin Oakley samples the anger over Labour’s new ima g e, Ronald Butt on venom as be _ re . 

In slickness and in stealth 1 New bottle ’ san ^ 


_ r\* 

ft ! 



r 

. V- ■ " ■ 


The people s flag is deepest pink 

H e re really nicer than you 
think . . . 

Bemused Labour delegates at 
Blackpool this week have found 
themselves caught up in a revolu- 
tion they had never expected. This 
is not the Labour conference any 
more: it is a television-oriented 
rally complete with glossy sou- 
venir brochure. 

After all those years of gibing at 
a Labour organization which Har- 
old Wilson called the old penny 
farthing, the party at last has a 
machine that works. The red rose 
symbol - an open rose, you 
notice, and not the closed rose of 
Continental Socialism — is 
accompanied by new smooth 


typefaces and pastel backgrounds. 
But it is accompanied, zoo. by a 
ruthless stage management of 
detxues. with a pre-selection of 
speakers worthy of any Tory 
assembly. 

Neil Kinnock must no longer be 
underestimated by his opponents, 
for he has proved a quick learner. 
In his first year as leader he lost 
the battle to win one man. one 
vote reseleciion for Labour MPs. 
having not done enough to square 
the union leaders in advance. 

Now he has a control over his 
executive and. through the unions, 
over his conference, such as no 
Labour leader has enjoyed for 
years. And any reforms which 
would interfere with that control 
— such as giving the rank-and-file 
conference delegates more voting 
power in relation to the union 
blocs, or allowing women to elect 


The telephones were keeping two 
secretaries occupied in Marm- 
aduke Hussey's office yesterday. It 
was Newsnight. called one. It was 
Breakfast TK said the other. Oh. 
and the World At One were very 
anxious. 

"Tell them all sorry but no, ab- 
solutely no." said Hussey. “And 
you might add that they will not be 
getting the biggest bastard in the 
world." 

The BBC's keenness to talk to 
Duke Hussey extended for beyond 
the interviewers' eagerness for a 
contribution to their programme. 
Everyone in the organization 
needed to find out swiftly about 
the man appointed yesterday as 
chairman of the BBC at a time 
when the full force of Margaret 
Thatcher's wrath was said to be 
about to descend. Duke Hussey 
was simply not expected to be the 
man with the axe. 

Nor does he see his appoint- 
ment in quite so vivid a light- In a 
lively conversation within an hour 
of the announcement, he insisted 
he had been given no such wrist- 
slapping brief, and entered the 
post with the most open of minds. 
"Of course. I would say that, 
wouldn't I? But it happens to be 
true. Indeed, it has to be true, 
because I know so little about the 
organisation that my wife and I 
had to go through the telephone 
book to find out the address where 
I will be working. 

"As I had not set foot inside the 
place, not spoken to a soul about 
what needs doing. I would be 
rather stupid trying to define the 
solutions before I know the prob- 
lems. But I read the paper, it is 
obvious that something is not 
quite right" 

The BBC has become a stone in 
the collective shoe of the Cabinet 
The idea of any siate-fitnded body 
unaccountable for its profligate 
spending is difficult for Downing 
Street to bear worse, when from it 
comes a trickle of programmes 
riven with left-wing bias. The BBC 
was thought to have reached its 
lowest ebb when allegedly foiling 
to throw its full unquestioning 
weight behind the FalkJands cam- 
paign: to learn last week that one 
of its drama producers was now 
reported to be requiring that its 
history be recast in an even less 
favourable light was the stuff of 
which Tory nightmares are made. 

.As the Peacock Commission 
into the BBC returned with all the 
answers that Mrs Thatcher did not 
want to hear, it is unlikely that 
Duke Hussey has been chosen 
without a clear idea in someone's 
mind that he can tame an 
organization regarded as out of 
control. Hussey say's the invitation 
in a telephone call from the Home 
Secretary. Douglas Hurd, last 
Thursday amazed him. “But it is a 
post, an obligation, that cannot be 
resisted . " 

If he could not talk about what 
task awaited him. what of the 
qualities he would be bringing to 
it? Hussey thought he was an 
affable enough felaw. easy to get 
on with, had an ability to deal with 
the quirks of creative people, and 
see them through the times when 
that creativity clashed with the 
practical needs of the world. 

“ I think editors I have dealt 
with, and the surgeons and phy- 
sicians at the Royal Marsden 
where I am chairman, have much 


High tech takes over our language 
as well as our jobs. Computerese is 
changing the way we speak almost 
as fast as computers are changing 
the way we work. The trouble is 
that we amateurs often get hold of 
the wrong end of the jargon, with 
ridiculous results. 

Take the trendy phrase "the 
state of the art”. If you want to 
sound up-to-date and a sunrise 
person, you should drop it into 
your writing, or speech, with a 
slight pause to indicate admiring 
in venal commas around it at 
every opportunity. The catch- 
phrase comes from the jargons of 
computers and other high-tech 
industries. But are we quite sure 
we know what it means? 

There is no problem about the 
early use. It meant what it said; the 
present condition of knowledge or 
technology. The OED gives a 
related example from 1889: “The 
illustrations give a good idea of the 
present status of the art in the 
various methods of printing," By 


the five-member women’s section 
of the NEC without the control- 
ling hand of the union bosses - are 
ruthlessly pushed back into the 
cupboard. 

It looks good on television. It is 
reassuring. It all fits in with the 
smart new image for the Labour 
Party being chiselled out by two 
key figures behind Kinnock. the 
party's general secretary, Larry 
Whiuy. and the communications 
director, Peter Mandelson. But it 
is an operation which is brewing 
up resentment against die leader- 
ship among the people who will 
still have to knock on doors for 
Labour at the next election. They 
are by no means as convinced as 
Kinnock and his team that they 
want to be smart. 

Tour the fringe meetings in 
Blackpool and the irritation soon 
bubbles over. Keir Hardie would 
have been lucky to get info this 
conference even on a visitor’s 
ticket, said John McDonnell, one- 
time Livingston lieutenant, at the 
Labour Herald rally. The leader- 
ship. he complained, was turning 
the conference from a policy- 
making body into a media event 
It was a paradise for publicity 
agents: a vehicle for Kinnock. Six 
hundred people cheered when he 
declared: “we want to regain 
control of our conference.” 

The expulsion of Derek Hatton 
and the Liverpool Militants may 
have done wonders for Labour in 
the opinion polls. But the disci- 
pline drive has left the left 
wondering what comes nexL As 
Diane Abbott the black par- 


liamentary candidate fof Hackney 
North, put it on Monday: "If they 
came for Militant in the morning 
they’ll came for the rest of us in 
theafternoon.” 

And Tony Benn was loudly- 
applauded when be said that the 
party leadership was applying the 
old army charge of "conduct 
prejudicial to good order and 
military discipline", the sergeant- 
major's standby when be could 
not get you for anything specific ; a 
concept which only applied to the 
"other ranks". . 

Even the left does not want to 
rock the boat too hard this year 
when it can see that Labour has a 
chance of electoral victory. But the 
warning sounds are coming 
through already. “We’re all work- 
ing for a Labour victory, but not 
for a victory at any price," said 
-one rally speaker. “We can’t afford 
a triumph in which packaging is 
seen to triumph over content," 
said another. 

Benn had delegates laughing 
derisively as he read extracts from 
the rallying call he had received 
from the party’s Walworth Road 
headquarters for the conference — 
an invitation to Labour supporters 
to buy packs of Freedom and 
Fairness Campaign balloons in 
contrasting shades. 

Too much slickness makes you 
sick, is the left's approach. And 
there are more warning clouds for 
Kinnock in the way his chosen 
generals are derided by the troops. 
"John Cunningham’s socks glow 
in the dark" is good for a laugh at 
any left-wing gathering — a ref- 


Thatcher’s choice: Brian James profiles the 
ruthless grandee in the chairman’s hot seat 


Can the Duke 
bring the 
BBC to heel? 











Hussey: ‘No axeman, an open mind’ — but acknowledging that 
tilings are not as they should be within the corporation 
in common. Obsessive people, along the Embankment, and fired 
perfectionists, but not always him. So yes, he can be ruthless. He 
tuned in to matters of finance and will need to be." 
practicality. I imagine that may be The BBC according to Rees- 


in common. Obsessive people, 
perfectionists, but not always 
tuned in to matrers of finance and 
practicality. 1 imagine that may be 
true at the Beeb. I really am no 
axeman. Ask my friends.” 

1 said I might be more interested 
in asking bis enemies. Who were 
they, and what would they say? 
"Oh. not the trade union general 
secretaries, that's for sure. I think 
some of the chap fathers at The 
Times might not give me much of 
a credit rating. They might say I 
was arrogant, sharp-tempered, a 
bit hasty and impetuous when 
things go: bogged down " 

But I did talk to Hussey's 
friends. William Rees-Mogg, Edi- 
tor of The Times be— tween 1967 
and 1981. explained the relation- 
ship that developed after Hussey 
left Associated Newspapers — 
“where he could not have failed to 
become aware of the wickedness 
in human nature" — to become 
managing director at The Times. 

Editors and chief executives, he 
said, were capable of only two 
sorts of relationship. Either they 
were ghastly, in permanent con- 
flict. or they developed an under- 
standing as close as any business 
relationship is capable of being. 
“Ours was the second kind. He is 
enormously affable. He can be 
incredibly tough. I do not mean in 
a table-thumping manner. But he 
has the ability to make the hardest 
decisions. At Associated, he once 
took his best friend for a walk 


Mogg, a former governor, was in 
deep trouble. It had embraced not 
euteprise culture, but a spending 
culture. It had interpreted edi- 
torial independence as a freedom 
exercised at producer level far 
below the level of true respons- 
ibility. It was a bureaucracy out of 
comroL "I believe Duke Hussey 
has five years to get this right: If he 
foils he will leave the corporation 
in a state of deep crisis. It is odd 
that while those at the top wil 
regard his appointment with deep 
anxiety, in case he should be too 
Draconian, people at the bottom 
have already begun to question me 
on whether he wil be tough 
enough. They know, you see, the 
problems.” 

Duke Hussey, with a given 
name straight out of Wodehouse, 
a background of Rugby, Oxford 
and the Guards, and a wife who is 
a lady-in-waiting to the Queen and 
godmother to Prince William, is a 
sitting target for the left: an 
Establishment grandee, a paid-up 
member of the elitist right Ac- 
tually, he insists, he is apolitical 
has not attended a political meet- 
ing for 40 years, and if he must be 
given a niche, then it must have 
room to accommodate Gaitskell 
and Iain Macleod. 

Inevitably yesterday, the news 
of his appointment was greeted 


Art strain 


Philip Howard: new words for old 


the 1950s the technological maga- 
zines had adopted the phrase as a 
piece of pet jargon.“These brief 
reports of current research are 


reports of current research are 
presumably intended to give an 
accurate idea of the 'state of the 
art', or important ‘breakthroughs* 
in particular fields." 

At this stage, the general public 
started to pick up this shiny new 
phrase, and. as usual got it wrong. 
The professional and public 
meanings of the state of the an 
began to diverge. For technolo- 
gists. particularly those in comput- 
ers and related fields, state of the 
an implies something with facil- 
ities or techniques already known 
or developed, and not experi- 
mental or at the research-and- 
development stage. 

\ 


Here is an advertisement in The 
New York Times: "Position open 
in several areas for design of 
special purpose digital equipment 
related to high-speed, state-of-the- 
art, commercial computers." To 
the technologists, state of the art 
means the present state of play, 
which in their brisk new world 
means something that is already 
obsolescent and niddy-duddy. 

The state of the art is the 
opposite to innovative. It is not 
where the new frontiersmen, hunt- 
ing quarks or designing new 
formats to enable the Literary 
Editor to print prose in oval 
shapes, play. 

Ignorant outsiders, led by the 
Gadarene advertising industry, 
cannot believe that such a trendy 


crence to the environment spokes- 
man's support for nuclear power, 
which is not altogether 
unconnnected with the feet that 
the Sellafield nuclear plant is m nis 
constituency and the only major 
source of jobs there: _ 

Cunningham, sharp-suited, silk- 
handkerehiefed. smoothly pro 
seniabie on television and a 
master of his brief, is a prize 
proponent of Kinnock's new re- 
alism. But he is fest becoming a 
bogey man to the rank and file. So 
are the admirably outspoken 
housing spokesman. Jeff Rooter, 
and the Wykehamist education 
spokesman. Giles Radtce. Roy 
Hattersley has been some time m 
the shooting gallery already. 

But those are the men that the 
new Labour image is all abouL 
The problem for Kinnock is that 
the men and women who will 
make up his parliamentary force if 
he does win his way to No 10 are 
the ones who are touring those 
fringe meetings cheering eveiy call 
for the release of jailed miners, for 
the surcharges to be lifted from the 
Lambeth councillors and for the 
troops to be withdrawn from 
Northern Ireland. 

Some time the new Labour 
image and the reality are going to 
collide. The task for Kinnock and 
his image burnishers in the mean- 
time — a task they are performing 
well in Blackpool so for - is to 
ensure that that collision occurs 
after the next election and not 
before it 

Robin Oakley is Political Editor of 
The Times 


with rage at the Labour Party 
conference, and ribaldry on the 
pavement beneath his office win- 
dows in Grays Inn Road where a 
print union picket was camped. 
These same pavements were the 
stage when, through the winter of 
1978/79, Duke Hussey became a 


leading player in the street theatre 
of the Il-month closure of The 
Times. Night after night he would 
be seen on television screens 
limping and laughing into another 
meeting of that interminable con- 
flict. 

The limp is a legacy of a wound 
suffered at Anzio in 1943. The 20- 
year-old Grenadier Guards officer 
was hit at point-blank range by a 
burst of submachine gun fire. It 
took off his right leg, injured his 
spine, sent him to Gentian and 
British military hospitals until 
1949, and left him in steady, 
recurring pain to this day. “I don't 
think anyone had such a thing as a 
good war. I certainly had a short 
ode. I was only in action five days. 
But I have span the rest of my life 
celebrating the fact I came up 
against the worst marksmen in the 
WehnnachL” 

His huge good cheerdtiring that 
confrontation with the unions 
stemmed from his conviction, 
then firmly held, that he was 
leading the national newspaper 
industry on a path towards sanity. 
An attempt to bring new technol- 
ogy to Flea Street on an indus- 
trial-wide scale had foiled even to 
begin. "So we tried to do it alone. I 
felt it could be done - and must 
be. Though the unions told me 
‘You’ll need more than one bite at 
this cherry,’ I felt it could be 
achieved.” 

What was achieved? Hussey 
grimaced. "Well we got an agree- 
ment Which was not kept,” 

Others involved at the time 
remember it differently. "Huss- 
ey,” said one, "flew into battle 
with the unions amid a flight of 
hawks. But towards the end, he 
was up there flying pretty well 
alone. His subsequent failure to 
keep even the little he bad gained 
because of the board's fears meant 
that the sale of The Times became 
inevitable. Wapping could have 
been achieved with much less 
hostility had Hussey been sur- 
rounded by men as firm as he.” 

“At the BBC", said Rees-Mogg, 
"Hussey will be surrounded with 
mollasses. It is the way it is done. 
They will try to coat him with 
sugar and flattery, treat him like a 
queen bee. He is a communica- 
tions man. The mandarins at the 
BBC would have much liked a 
man from outside their world; 
Hussey will see through them ata 
glance”. 

He intends to give up board 
appointments at The Times and 
his connection with a radio station 
in the West Country. One of the 
posts he will retain, even with this 
new burden, will be the chairman- 
ship of the Royal Marsden Hos- 
pital. The chief executive, Miss 
Phyllis CunningtanL, said: "When 
Duke came to us 18 months ago he 
explained that he knew nothing 
about hospitals, except what it was 
to be in pain in one. For months 
afterwards be was about the place, 
poking into every comer, meeting 
not only surgeons but also record 
clerks, cooks and the man in the 
boiler room. I rather imagine that 
is how he will begin at the BBC.” 




phrase can mean something old- 
fashioned. So we use it to mean 
exactly what we want it to mean, 
neither more nor less, viz: mod- 
em. up-to-date, the latest adven- 
turous invention. For example: “It 
is still not easy to produce decent 
pictures ai such a venue, even 
when one is replete with state of 
the art cameras, long lenses and 
fast film.” 

Or. for another example from 
the inane ad from British 
Telecom, which would be better 
employed improving the service 
than inventing daft slogans: 
"We’re responsible for a host of 
other state-of-the-art innova- 
tions.” This- is to use language like 
breaking wind. 

In short, state of the art is a 
raging popularized technicality, 
like parameter, or myth, or win- 
dow of opportunity, from other 
specialities. I shall avoid the 
phrase, on the grounds that the 
language is in a terrible state of 
chassis without aggravating it. 


old whine 


Labour mav be cultivating a new 
image, but’ its basic sentiments 
remain unchanged. A speaker who 
wishes to command his audience 
must still pitch his words in 
querulous and angry tones that 
appeal to the party’s collective 
self-pitv. The argument is stiff to a 
class conflict with exploiung 
bosses and treason by scabs, to 
blacks resisting racist attacks by 
the police, to "gays” and lesbians 
who think they are discriminated 
against or to "Labour people 
suffering injustice meted out by 


-Tory" judges and magistrates. 

Throughout the conference de- 
bate on crime, for instance, the 
prevailing mood was deeply anti * 
police. A print worker. Geoffrey 
Dixon, accused the police of 
attacking blacks at St Paul’s, 
Bristol and at Brixton and 
Toxteth (“I don’t see the police 
arresting the children of the rich in 
their quest for heroin and 
cocaine"). Anne Thomas from 
Bristol (blondely Anglo-Saxon) 
warned the party not to expect 
black votes if it would not support 
blacks. Linda Bellos, the militant 
feminist leader of Lambeth Coun- 
cil. attacked the Home Office for 
inspiring the drugs raids in 
Brixton and elsewhere, and the 
media for attempting to "crim- 
inalize" the blacks. (Her fury had a 
further airing yesterday in the 
debate on "black sections” in 
which she revealingly attacked the 
separate use of “black" and 
"Asian" in the description of the 
party's Black and Asian Advisory 
Committee as “shamefully dep- 
riving us of our own self-descrip- 
tion as blacks.” 

Serious discussion about crime 
was absent. In Labour rhetoric, 
crime (whose principal victims are 
the inner city working class) is 
caused by Margaret Thatcher. 
Many speakers said so. and the 
shadow home secretary. Gerald 
Kauftnan. gave his respectability 
10 their opinion. When he was at 
last called for his few minutes on 
the lower rostrum (he is not a 
member of the national exec- 
utive). he prefaced his promise of 
more money to prevent crime 
with a characteristic example of 
intellectual slumming in order to 
appeal to his audience. Reciting 
the statistics of the crimes which 
would have been committed that 
morning, he declared: “That is 
Margaret Thatcher's criminal 
record.” 

The same attitudes pervaded 
the debate on law reform. Tony 
Benn, for the NEC, paid tribute to 
"Labour magistrates" who did 
their best and attacked "politically 
biased Tory magistrates” and 
judges who used their power 
against "Labour people”, miners, 
Greenham women, and so on. The 
injustices to “our” or "Labour” 
people (as though they were a 
breed apart) ran through the 
argument. Tony Gifford, as he 
announced himself, or otherwise 
Lord Gifford, the left-wing bar- 
rister, abandoned his more natural 
and smooth er-longued style for 
one more suitable to the occasion. 
Shouting and slabbing the air like 
a militant student orator, he 
declared that Britain needed more 
women judges and more black 


judges. (He forgot to mention “g&y ' 
judges”). Another presumably 
educated member of the Society of 
Labour Lawyers spoke of foe 
"blue-rinsed vandals" who would - : vJ ! \ 
be having at Bournemouth qog 
week for more prisons. . • >. >',i ,*:• 
Not least a deep vein of sad- ■„ »*>, * 
Americanism permeates the party. j 1 

When Neil Kinnock made the 
briefest possible reference u> Ru$-. \ . >'•; 
sia in Afghanistan, it won not a v& 
clap. His tirade against the US in j i v 
Nicaragua received huge applause. \ 

It was. in other words, the same ' - 

old party, and 1 dare say that Ms- . 
Bellos spoke for more delegates - 
than would openly admit it when, . 
after Kinnock's speech, she re- \ ; 
marked that it contained no - 
socialism, and added sadly: “I - : - 
didn’t hear any reference to class." V 

But if it wasn’t there in Kinnock's 5 . 

speech, it is there in the party, and '■ v .' ; . 
class conflict would be there - 
harassing him if he were to reach . . 

No 10. It would be coming from ;. vl 
the constituency parties, from ' T 
some of the trade union hierar- ~ ' 

chies. and it would be heavily " f 

represented among the Labour • *.-• 
MPs who would be behind him in 
Parliament. . . 

Meanwhile. Kinnock and his J ' 
colleagues seek to persuade the . 
nation that they are a very ti 
different party, a party for all J 
grievances, but also a party oF ' 
reason and moderation. He is, as - . 
he put it, in the serious business of ; ■ 

persuading people to Labour's " 
view, which of course means o '*’’, 
keeping the left quia at least on ' 
the major issues of the economy 
and state control even though " • 
they have won on defence and 
cannot be kept quiet on such ' 
social questions as crime. 

What is most significant is the • 
willingness of so many on ihe left, . . • 
especially the so-called soft left, to _ i ' ,r 
keep quiet and their reason is the - v 
most important aspect of Labour 
politics now. They are no less : _ 
desperate for power than the ' ,'v 

Labour moderates are, since they ■; 
know that if Labour does not win, '<* 
it really will be in danger of 
breaking up and precipitating the 
realignment of the left which is (or 
at any rate, was) the Alliance's 
objective. 

There are moments in Labour’s ■ 
history when the left has not bv' 
minded losing. These have been 
when it calculated, as it did after j- • . 

1974. that a period of opposition . 
would give the left a chance to 1' -. 
tighten its grip on the party. But 
sensible left-wingers also know ; J “ a " 
that if Labour does not maintain - ‘ kw r ■ 
its claim to be the alternative party _ par. . 
of government by getting power - , sr: ; . 
from time to time, its survival wffl - 

be doomed for lack of credibility, jju . 

and credibility is what this years ' _■ 

conference is about. Kinnock, .. l__/‘ . 
aided by a number of moderates. £ ■ • 
notably John Smith and John 
Cunningham, is doing a remark- - ?; 
able job in pulling all wings of his- • ut. ur 
disparate party together. But for .. Au- 
real credibility, style is no sub- ? ^ j . 
stitute for substance. ^ ^ ' 

Kinnock and his friends are ’ - 
front men for forces they know the m 
public does not want and which ^ >■ 
must be camouflaged. Is it pos- i:. , 
sible that the electorate will not see . 3ij^- 
through it? . ” ti's 




Till-: Dll IF R I 


moreover . . . Miles Kington 


Slipshod, Bristol 
fashion 




The police image has taken a 
beating recently, and although the 
police have done their best to 
restore it by staging drugs raids, 
announcing inquiries and sus- 
pending every other officer from 
duty fora while, I am not sure that 
this is the best route. 

What the public needs is re- 
assurance that the old image of a 
policeman -as an endearing, 
chuckly bobby is not entirely 
dead. If anyone made a record 
today called The Laughing Police- 
man it would not I’m afraid, sell 
many copies. This must be 
changed and (*m glad to say that 1 
have spoiled a sign, from Bristol, 
that policemen still have a sense of 
fun and eqjoy a joke as much as 
the next man. 

I first realized that the Bristol 
police were not as other forces 
when, earlier this year, they 
surrounded a house in which an 
armed gang had taken refuge and 
laid siege to it for several hours. 
When they eventually charged in, 
they found nobody there. 

Now. this by itself does not 
prove anything, and it certainly 
did not gain much publicity at the 
time. Bui. as if io prove that they 
were not to be deterred they did it 
again in the last week of August. 

An armed man had stolen 
several thousand pounds from the 
Bristol and West Building Society 
in Whiteladies Road close to the 
BBC building: when the police 
arrived they laid siege to a nearby 
house in which they were con- 
vinced the man was hiding. 

He was not. He had gone into an 
adjacent restaurant, die Res- 
taurant du Gourmet, where he not 
only ordered a meal but asked for 
a cut on his hand to be dealt with. 
The manager became suspicious 
and went to the police, busy with 
their siege, to tell them that he 
thought the man they were besieg- 
ing was actually sitting in his 
restaurant He went not once, but 
twice. On both occasions the 
police told him to go away as they 
were very busy with their siege. 

The diner turned out to be. 
indeed, the man the police were 
looking for. but by the time they 
had discovered his absence from 
the besieged bouse, he was also 
absent from the restaurant. 

/ 


This quirky sense of fun on the >■ 
part of the Bristol police was ^ 
shown at its best in the affair of the ~ 
missing corpse, which also took 
place this summer. Someone 
discovered a severed fingeriying _■* 
in a park. The police arrived and. , 
took it to a pathologist. The 
conclusion was that this finger . 
must belong to a missing body, so 
the police started scouring. the area 
and even held a press conference ■" 
to appeal for public assistance.. I 
Fifteen policemen went through 
hospital records for cases of tost 
fingers to see if any fingerless men . 
could help them with their in*. ’ 
quiries. : -j — 

Next morning the search was — 
resumed, it was called off only . 
when the forensic department 'at 
Chepstow (where the finger had .. 
been sent) telephoned -to say. that 
in their opinion the finger was * 
made of rubber. Although perhaps- 
tempted to carry on searching fora -- 
rubber corpse, the police declared ■; 
that the party was over. 

As 1 am not in Bristol all the 
time, I cannot be sure what other 
pranks the police have been opto* - 
though I quite eqjoyed reaain& 
about their discovery of chocolate 
bars containing cannabis which 
were on sale in Bristol pubs at’C a •' 
bar., These, said the police, ®o- ~ 
stituted a grave threat to children* i 
1 hope it is only the police ih_". 
Bristol who think that children gP 
around pubs paying £2 for bats a- £ 
chocolate. 

And finally we had the recent v. 
raid on the St Paul’sarea, in which 
600 policemen spent two d*g' 
looking for drug barons and ended ^ 
up arresting four men on ~~ 
drugs charges. This caused * fi 
certain amount of rioting. UnaN* •« 
to identify all the rioters. « 
police have asked the BBC tO htfO -j. 
over their film of the incidents. S0 J ■ 


S* to v 
13 ' 

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^na;^.. • • 

wiiari^.' , 

fftlab V 


^.PRosi ct i 


'•Heir,. ■ 

•ffcs.;.'. 


SN,. 

4 in. 111 


ft-- 

V - 




over their film of the incidents^ J,' V 
far the BBC have refused, PerbaP* ^ % ';<,■ ,, 
they want to keep it for .. 


they want to keep it for £ 
programme about the Bristol 
lice, '"••• 

If I were the Bristol pti&* ^ 


would certainly want .to BQ . 

playing it for laughs. I just hoPf/;- 11 • ; . 
they don’t start taking thenMP' l ^‘d k \ /’ v "; . 


seriously at a time when '^Y :- 
could dramatically change- 
image of the police. TimeJ^g 


pvHiw- j ,| mil..- i-i , t •..( 

another empty house > 


VS' 

‘ -i’- i ■ : : 







j-Qndon El 9XN Telephone: 01-481 4100 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


nuclear AMBIGUITY 


Backward march in technology 


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prnpt*- 
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jrjdirjl- 


Sodalism has made some 

hBJoncal i claim to be a scien- S n , ** replaced by the 

al any point of frfr e ° prnem of 0031 re- 
pn^tKai decision in the La- !?[ orced ty wave, wind and 
boar Party science and reason ?{? * r ^ - in all of which 

Cjat ihe mercy of sentiment Jh!' r ^ sh ,s &ther lo their 
d industrial comenSS * fbou ^^ 


muusmai conservatism 
The tortured debate over 
nuclear power, and its out- 

51 !!-?? ? fford a Classic 


solar ene^^Vku of which 

^oughT 1S 6ther 10 lheir 

lh f° r . the Labour leadership 
there is a pragmatic need both 

2L.? 1 ?!? ami-nuclear 


f^^^bour'sauempu flood of tlep5,5SK 

ssm wrld witJ > ,t! e ™. s i**? to 


its passionate hopes. 

• Jbe Party in general is 

b 5 a tide of fear! 

*SX^J rising after 
Chernobyl, about the risks of 

techmeal error, accidents and 
even catastrophe. On the 


th-. .. . **“*pic me! 

that any commitment to im- 
mediate abandonment of 
nuclear power would spell 

energy and economic diffi- 
culties. 


sufficiently spread out to be 
acceptable. 

In Labour Party terms it was 
counted a victory that this 
policy of compromise was 
accepted yesterday by a two- 
thirds’ majority, whereas Mr 
ScargilTs motion forgetting rid 
of nuclear power in the life- 
time of the next Labour gov- 
ernment, though it had a clear 
majority, fell short of the 
required two-thirds. 

Yet in many respects this is 
a hollow victory for Mr 


Kinnock and his colleagues, 
tecnmcai error, accidents and The solution of Labour’s f° r even 'T Labour took 20 
*JEL' “ ta »rophe. On the national executive committee > ,ears 10 £ et ri d of nuclear 

otner nana, knowledgeable therefore, was the highly com- power (supposing it held office 

people in the Party, including P^x statement which was for such a ,en e lh oF time > il 

lls ftnp.rpv CTXTkt.' a*- _ X » Tin .1 I . lirnnM rftl I Aaa f U a 


peopic in me Parly, including 
us energy spokesman, Mr 
John Cunningham (who also 
* s a constituency interest), 
argue that economic and en- 
ergy needs do not allow 
nuclear power to be aban- 
doned precipitately, and that 
in any case this would not be 
justified by any sober analysis 
of the safety risks. 

The argument is further 
complicated by the conflicts of 
sectional Labour interests. On 
the one side are the three laige 
unions representing the work- 
ers in the nuclear power 
industry who are deeply op- 
posed to getting rid of nuclear 
power stations, with the loss of 
Wheir livelihoods. Against them 
ere Mr Arthur Scargill and his 
TSational Union of 
Mineworkers who argue that 
the case against nuclear power 
on safety grounds is unargu- 
able, and that nuclear power 


passed yesterday by the La- 
bour conference with the two- 
diinds] majority which makes 
it eligible for inclusion in the 
Party manifesto. It accepts the 
pnnciple of phasing out 
nuclear power but hedges this 
about with many qualifica- 
tions, particularly in respect of 
speed, which would appear to 
give a Labour government 
both discretion and flexibility 
in action. 

Labour would build no 
more nuclear power stations 
and would start by phasing out 
the old magnox reactors. But 
the whole switch by smooth 
transition to a non-nuclear 
policy could take decades, 
which is unacceptable to many 
in the Party. Though the move 
to non-nuclear energy would 
add to costs, it is argued that 
this extra addition to Labour's 
other spending plans would be 


would still face the opposition 
of nuclear workers. Any foot- 
dragging. however, would ex- 
pose it to constant harassment 
by its powerful anti-nuclear 
element who understandably 
are not encouraged by the 
breezy exhortation of Mr Eric 
Hammond of the EEPTU. that 
they should take their example 
from Russia's decision to open 
one reactor at Chernobyl. 

Those hostile to nuclear 
power rightly complain that no 
nation is an island when it 
comes to nuclear accidents. 
But they fail to draw the logical 
conclusion that the right way 
to proceed with the risks is by 
increasing international co- 
operation in respect of tech- 
nology and safety standards. 
In nuclear power as in nuclear 
weapons, a unilateralist coun- 
try has no bargaining power. 
As it is. Labour simply offers 
one more essay in ambiguity. 


THE OTHER EAST-WEST TRADE 


The imminent release of Dr 
Yuri Orlov, physicist, human 
rights campaigner and Soviet 
prisoner, has been welcomed 
throughout the West, and 
justly so. The campaign waged 
on his behalf may not have 
been as spectacular or as 
personalized as that which 
• brought Anatoli Shcharansky 
no Jerusalem, but it has been as 
dedicated and persistent!' Eight 
years of effort by Dr Orlov’s 
fellow scientists and others in 
the West have finally paid off. 

But the inclusion of Dr 
Orlov, until yesterday in exile 
in the far north-east of Siberia, 
in the diplomatic equation 
which finalized the Reykjavik 
summit, meeting is open to 
criticism. And that criticism, 
which has emanated from 
many quarters now that Dr 
Orlov's freedom seems as- 
sured, cannot be dismissed 
lightly. The morality of trading 
people for political advantage, 
.a practice which has become 
V increasingly common in East- 
West diplomacy over the 
years, is highly questionable. 

In essence, the Soviet Union 
and other repressive regimes 
are seen to be rewarded for 
policies which to our way of 
thinking are unacceptable. 
Moscow can weigh the adverse 
publicity it attracts from lock- 
ing up or otherwise harassing 
dissenters against the political 
and humanitarian kudos it 


again. And because the news 
outlets of the West and their 
customers naturally prefer the 
exception to the norm, victory 
to defeat, the few releases 
eclipse the many detentions. 

The reality of the Soviet 
Union is, however, that the 
dissident human rights move- 
ment as it was in the 1 970s is a 
thing of the past. The move- 
ment and the individuals who 
belonged to it, doping that the 
undertakings given by their 
government at Helsinki would 
facilitate a measure of demo- 
cratic change, have been 
systematically crushed by 
successive Kremlin leaders. 
For all his suffering. Dr Orlov 
is a vestige of a bygone age - 
which is probably why Mos- 
cow has let him go. 

Yet the dubious morality of 
the transaction gives the West 
no justification for passing by 
on the other side. If the Soviet 
Union chooses to sen people 
whose value abroad exceeds 
their value at home (and the 
regimes in East Germany and 
Romania are engaged in simi- 
lar transactions), then humani- 
tarian considerations dictate 
that we will buy. But we should 
at the same time ensure that 
the price demanded of the 
Soviet Union is as high as it 
can possibly be, that our 
distaste for the transaction is 
known, and that we do not 
allow those still detained to be 
forgotten. 


and humanitarian kudos n auow mose son aeiamea io oc govern me 
gains from setting them free forgotten. prison. 

PROSECUTING CHANGES 


With the promised depar- 
ture of Yuri Orlov from the 
Soviet Union next week, the 
trade in figureheads of the 
Soviet human rights’ move- 
ment is drawing to a close. The 
Gorbachov leadership has 
increasingly sent inconvenient 
individuals into emigration. 
There will bp fewer and fewer 
people for the Kremlin totrade 
in future. 

The. only, prominent Soviet 
dissidents from the 1970s still 
in captivity are Andrei Sakha- 
rov and his wife Elena Bonner, 
who live in internal exile in 
Gorky. Following the release 
of Dr Orlov into emigration, 
their eventual release (at the 
‘'right" price) cannot be ruled 
out, despite repeated Soviet 
protestations to the contrary. 
Now is the time for the West’s 
campaign on their behalf to be 
stepped up. 

This is not to neglect or 
undervalue the many people in 
the Soviet Union who dissent 
from the policies of their 
government or who, like many 
Soviet Jews, wish to emigrate. 
It is rather to recognize that the 
scene is changing and that the 
campaign for human rights in 
the Soviet Union must move 
on to the struggle for all Soviet 
citizens to be allowed to live 
where they choose and dissent 
peacefully from the view of the 
government without threat of 
prison. 


Prosecuting in England and 
Wales undergoes a sea-change 
ffliis'week with die birth of the 
crown prosecution service in 
courts throughout the country. 
This new service represents 
the biggest change m the 
criminal justice system this 
century, with the ponce 
relinquishing responsibility 
for prosecutions to a new 
salaried service of public pros- 
ecutors. For the first time the 
task of investigating crime is 
separated _ from that or 
prosecuting iL 

The service, hailed as the 
means to greater efficiency and 
economy in the criminal 
courts, has its origins in the 
Royal Commission on Crim- 
inal Procedure. That Com mi s- 
usiori was set up under Sir cyni 
■Phillips amidst widespread 
public disquiet with existing 
police procedure, and 
their dual role in the criminal 
justice process. 

Disquiet was fuelled m 
particular by the MaxweU 
Confeit murder case in which 
the Court of Appeal quashed 
the conviction of three you 
and, by implication, 

serious Questions about the 

j^ay the police had handted the 
investigations- Af 310 ^; - 

background the Co'J? 1 ® 0 " 
decided to see if a n °£ 

efficient system could be 
vised. At the same time there 
was concern about the qu ty 
of cases going to the ^ Crown 
Court Almost half of these 
result inacqudtalf 
third, are jndgfrd irecte£ ** ge 


eralfy on the grounds of in- 
sufficient evidence. 

The Commission therefore 
concluded that alongside a 
new statutory framework for 
the investigation of offences by 
police, now enshrined in the 
Police and Criminal Evidence 
Act 1984, there was need for a 
new prosecution system. Its 
birth has not been an easy one. 
There have been complaints of 
incompetence, admin- 
inistrative blunders, lost pa- 
pers and general chaos which 
have added to the delays in the 
courts rather than helping to 
reduce them. 

Some teething troubles were 
inevitable. The change, in 
London in particular where 
police formeriy undertook the 
bulk of prosecutions, has been 
traumatic; courts have had to 
adjust to lawyers, and not 
police, standing up to take 
whole case lists. But the 
revolution has been felt every- 
where. Former local authority 
prosecutors, who form the core 
of the service, have become 
civil servants, amidst com- 
plaints of red tape and poorer 
conditions of service. Some, 
formerly working alonpde 
police in the stations them- 
selves, have bad to move into 
new buildings; a sign of the 
new more independent 
relationship that prosecutors 
will have with the police. 

The most significant change 
is the independent review of 
cases by public prosecutors. 
Spying the Attorney 

Generarsguidelines.todec.de 


which should proceed. There' 
are no statistics as yet, but the 
signs are they are already 
sifting out the weaker ones. 
Initially this has added to 
delays, but in time that should 
be more than outweighed by 
the sifting of weak cases which 
will no longer clog up the 
Crown Court 

The principle of the service 
has wide public and political 
support It is an additional 
safeguard for the rights of the 
individual within the criminal 
justice system at a time when 
police powers are being ex- 
panded. It must be given time 
to be fairly judged as to 
whether it meets the Royal 
Commission's tests of fairness, 
openness and workability. 

There are still obstacles to be 
overcome, above all the short- 
foils in staffing. In London, 
where most lawyers had to be 
found, staffing levels are still 
only at half strength, and the 
system gets underway in the 
capital heavily reinforced by 
the private profession and 
prosecutors seconded from the 
provinces. It is on this that the 
service is most acutely sen- 
sitive. No-one expects, as one 
branch prosecutor put it. a 
change from one system to 
another overnight. Quality of 
recruits is more important 
than quantity. But it would be 
disastrous if staff shortages, 
administrative muddles and 
inexperience persist long 
enough ' to undermine the 
service’s whole aim of restore 
ing public confidence in the 
criminal justice system. * 


From Professor Mi no Green 
Sir. My department was chosen, 
with others, to be expanded so as 
to provide more qualified en- 
gineers in disciplines related to 
information technology (IT). To 
be selected we had to obtain strong 
indications of support from in- 
dustry in the form of cov enanted 
staff posts, gifts, etc. I spent three 
months- spearheading the 
department's efforts. Industrial 
response was. at least in part, 
generous. 

Now, because of the latest 
round of cuts, some retiring staff 
are not replaced, so the expansion 
in student numbers carries with it 
a further decrease in the 
staff/student ratio and a further 
reduction in our capacity to 
compete intellectually on the 
world stage. And what will my 
contacts in industry think now of 
all those encouraging words I 
spoke to them? 

The IT industries are the major 
technology of our age. exceeding 
sieel, cars. etc. We will be largely 
excluded from this business unless 
wc have a highly educated society, 
not just engineers, but the great 
range of professional and artisan 
skills, to grasp the opponun ities as 
they arise. 

We need education to create 
wealth and to enhance life. It 
should be remembered by all that 
we now have io earn our way in 
this world by our skills. 

Yours etc. 

MINO GREEN. 

Imperial College of Science and 
Technology, 

Department of Electrical En- 
gineering. 

Exhibition Road. SW7. 

September 26. 

Help for chemistry 

From Mr T.D. Cuipin 
Sir. Sir Ewan Jones (September 
29) refers to the UK chemical 
industry's strongly positive 
contribution to our balance of 
trade and suggests that the number 
of PhD chemists joining the 
industry from the universities, as 
highlighted by his recent survey, 
must have helped in this achieve- 
ment 

His last point about the need to 
foster such activities is especially 
topical. At this association we 
have recently completed a survey 
of graduate recruitment by 25 
member companies — mostly 
major employers — who together 
take on about 600 graduates a 
year. A dear message now emerg- 
ing from many of these companies 
is that it is becoming more and 


Oxygen in climbing 

From Dr Charles Clarke 
Sir. I share the concern of Peter 
Lloyd and his colleagues (August 
30). themselves all veterans of 
earlier expeditions to Mount Ev- 
erest (8.848 metres, 29.028 feel) of 
the risks of mountaineering at 
extreme altitudes without oxygen. 
As a member of more recent 
expeditions to peaks above 8.000 
metres (26.240 feet) 1 have had to 
take some part in the decision 
whether or not to take oxygen sets. 

There is no doubt that the 
highest peaks in the world can be 
climbed by small parties without 
supplementary oxygen and with- 
out traditional support camps. 
This has become one of the great 
challenges in the current golden 
age of high-altitude climbing. To 
succeed requires great skill, fit- 
ness, speed and resolve. Above all, 
it requires fine judgement of the 
problems involved — the very 
essence of the sport of 
mountaineering in any era. 

Lack of oxygen is the single 
most important factor contribut- 
ing to the dangers at great heights; 
it is clear to all that the spate of ac- 
cidents on K2 this year are highly 
unlikely to have taken place on 
lower mountains. 

There is perhaps insufficient 
i awareness that for much of the 
time daring a high-altitude ex- 
pedition climbers live for weeks or 
months in an atmosphere that will 
not support permanent human 
habitation, and above 3.000 me- 

Fruitless question 

From Lady Maser 
Sir. On the subject of holly bushes, 
it may interest Mr John Lee 
(September 22) and other readers 
to hear how 1 solved a similar 
problem of the flowering but non- 
fruiting holly. 

When the holly was in flower I 
cut a lusiy branch and walked wiih 
it round my neighbourhood 
comparing its flowers with those 
of other bushes in flower. The first 
few matched exactly and then I 
found one whose flowers were of 
another kind. 

I approached the owner and 
offered to swop my branch for one 
of hers, which I placed on my 
bush. The bees did the rest and 
that year I had a bush full of 
berries. 

Yours. 

Mary moser. 

3 Regent’s Park Terrace. N W 1 . 
September 23. 

Odious comparisons 

From Ms Hanne While 
Sir. How pleased I was the other 
day to learn that Denmark ( which 
is hardly ever mentioned in the 
British Press) is rated the best 
place in the world to live. 

But the joy was short-lived. In 
an editorial in your paper 
(September 17) wc were told that 
surely Denmark could not be that 
wonderful. According to the edi- 
torial. the survey must be ex- . 
tremcly unfair placing Britain in 
twelfth place. 

I happen to be one of the 9.480 
Danes living in England and to me 
there is no doubt whv Britain onlv 


more difficult to recruit top- 
quality graduates, both PhD 
chemists and also chemical, elec- 
trical and mechanical engineers. 

One recent action by govern- 
ment affecting the supply of 
school teachers seems likely to add 
to these difficulties so for as 
chemistry is concerned. In trying 
to encourage more teacher train- 
ees to opt for maths, physics or 
technology the Government has 
introduced a bursary scheme pay- 
ing £1.200 a year tax free, in 
addition to the normal grant, to 
students entering teacher training 
in these subjects. The scheme does 
not apply to those opting to teach 
chemistry, the numbers of whom 
have. I understand, fallen by a 
quarter this year. 

Surely there is a real danger that 
the bursary scheme, however well 
meant will divert ye! more can- 
didates away from chemistry’ 
leaching? 

Yours faithfully. 

DAVID CULPIN (Director. 
Technical and Economic Affairs). 
Chemical Industries Association 
Limited. 

Alembic House. 

93 Albert Embankment. SEI. 
Sepicmber 29. 

Merits of VAT 

From Mr R. J. Pcliy 
Sir. Most UK taxes — particularly 
National Insurance. PAYE*, 
corporation tax 3nd rates — are a 
tax on production and employ- 
ment. They all reduce the ability 
of UK industry to compete in 
domestic and international mar- 
kets. VAT is the one tax that docs 
not handicap UK industry. It is 
charged equally on products sold 
in the UK by foreign and domestic 
producers, h is not charged at all 
on UK exports. 

Why is this simple fan not 
recognized by the Government 
and ns opponents, all of whom 
have a reduction in unemploy- 
ment as one of their principal 
objectives? A tax system that gives 
UK industry an even chance — 
irrespective of the level of taxation 
— must surely appeal to all 
political parlies. 

If governments were to increase 
the rale of VaT whilst simulta- 
neously abolishing taxes on UK 
production, 1 suggest that the level 
of UK unemployment would de- 
cline dramatically. 

Yours faithfully. 

RICHARD J. PELLY. 

Richard Pelly and Co.. Limited. 
Lomer Cottage, 

Warn ford, 

Southampton, Hampshire. 

ires man is near his physiological 
limits. 

At these great heights the medi- 
cal and psychological effects of 
oxygen lack are of paramount 
importance, making slays of more 
than two or three days highly 
dangerous undertakings. When 
tired climbers are trapped by 
storm, as on K2. rapid deteriora- 
tion may lead to catastrophe. 

I find no easy answer to the 
question. “Should one take 
supplementary oxygen?" The 
logistic problems are great and 
lead to large and costly ex- 
peditions and “there's never 
enough oxygen at the right place at 
the right time.” The oxygen 
controversy will thus continue, 
but the choice is there. That choice 
must, however, remain that of the 
members of the team. 

1 do support the efforts being 
made by other Alpine Club mem- 
bers and The Mount Everest 
Foundation to underline these 
hazards, which are often less than 
obvious “on the hill" to the 
increasing body of younger climb- 
ers whose aspirations are to 
achieve ascents of the world's 
highest peaks. 

Yours etc. 

CHARLES CLARKE 
Union Internationale des Associ- 
ations d'Alpinisme 
Mountain Medicine Data Centre), 
St Bartholomew's Hospital. 
Department of Neurological 
Sciences. 

38 Little Britain. ECI. 

September 25. 

came twelfth. Britain is fine if you 
belong to the higher income 
bracket. It is when you are on a 
low income you need to worry: for 
example, bectuse you cannot af- 
ford to enter the private health 
service; you cannot afford to pay 
for private education and. if you 
become unemployed, the un- 
employment benefit only covers 
the basic essentials. 

Not so in Denmark, where State 
hospitals enjoy an excellent 
reputation and are extremely 
clean, where private schools are 
few and far between because they 
are not necessary, and where 
unemployment is not feared for 
financial reasons. 

But perhaps the writer of the 
editorial should visit Denmark on 
his next holiday. He might be 
pleasantly surprised. 

Yours faithfully. 

HANNE WHITE. 

14 Avondale Road. SWI4. 
September 17. 

Personal affront 

From MrJ. M. Meade 
Sir. Captain D. C. Hebron. RN. 
objects (September 25) to a com- 
puter announcing. “I am tem- 
porarily out of action", which he 
terms a misuse of the personal 
pronoun. But ships of the Royal 
Navy from time to lime fly flags 
which signify, variously. “I am in 
distress”. “I have lost my steering 
gear”, or “I have run aground". 
Where is ihe difference? 

Yours sincerely. 

J. M. MEADE. 

Manor Farm House. 

Hcdenham. 

Bungay. Suffolk. 

September 28. 


Legal advice and 
small claims 

From MrJ. C. Gnemvivd 
Sir. 1 noted with alarm and 
disbelief the article by your Legal 
Affairs Correspondent (September 
24) headed “Ban on. lawyers in 
small claims courts is suggested”. 

There is comparatively little 
wrong with the conception or the 
day-today operation of small 
cfc:ms courts. I would, however, 
venture to suggest that as the civil 
justice re view consultation paper 
is concerned in its suggestions as 
much with saving public money as 
anything else, a considerable sav- 
ing of judicial lime could be made 
by directing funds towards pub- 
licity for the notion that those 
intern on making claims would be 
well adv i sod. before embarking on 
litigation, to obtain at least a 
smattering of legal adv tee. 

This would limit the present 
large number of half-baked clatms 
and often spurious defences which 
are filed in the small claims court 
and cut down the wasted judicial 
time in sorting out the muddies 
which ensue. 

Yours faithful! v. 

J. C. GREENWOOD. 

Forrester Forrester. Solicitors. 
61 Si Mary Street. 

Chippenham. Wiltshire. 
September 25. 

From Mr Rofvn £.'tyr,v« 

Sir. It is good news, and important 
news, that the Lord Chancellor 
may at last be persuaded to bar 
lawyers from appearing in the 
small claims courts in all but 
exceptional cases. It is totally 
illogical to proclaim, as successive 
Lord Chancellors have for thirteen 
years, that legal representation is 
unnecessary in small claims while 
permitting it for those who can 
afford it and refusing legal aid to 
those who cannot. 

The small claims courts have 
demonstrated that the court needs 
io exercise more active super- 
vision over the conduct of cases 
before they reach trial. The details 
must be left to the professionals, 
but there is one striking anomaly 
with which the layman should be 
concerned. 

Small claims court hearings are 
ihc only hearings which can. and 
normal!) do. take place in private 
without any special reason having 
to be shown. The excuse for this is 
that the panics prefer it. but that 
applies to most litigants in any 
court. Wc long since learned the 
lesson that trials behind closed 
doors are open lo abuse and in fact 
the weaknesses of the present 
small claims procedure have been 
concealed because the Press and 
the public have not been able io 
drop in. as they can at any other 
court, and observe what is going 
on. 

If the small claims court proce- 
dure is to be extended, as it should 
be. the cases must be as open to 
public scrutiny as they are in the 
rest of our courts. 

Yours faithfullv. 

ROBERT EGERTON. 

Egenon Sandler. Solicitors 
and Privy Council agents, 

17-18 Dover Street, wl. 
September 24. 

Search powers 

From Lord Houghton of Sonvrhv. 
CH 

Sir. The RSPCA claim (report. 
September 26) that their inspec- 
tors should be given “similar 
powers of entry to the police” 
raises serious questions of public 
policy. The right of entry carries 
with it the right to gain entry’ by 
force and all that may follow from 
that Parliament is naturally very 
sensitive to the widening scope 
and use of incursions into our civil 
liberties. 

In the fight against crime we 
have come to tolerate more irrita- 
tions and indignities at the hands 
of growing numbers of police and 
public officials armed with these 
powers.Nevertheless. we must 
surely draw the line at extending 
them to the staff of charitable and 
other self-appointed bodies upon 
whom rests no statutory duty and 
who are not subject to supervision 
by. or accountable to. any public 
authority. 

The supportive role of these 
. bodies to law enforcement is 
valuable and enjoys wide public 
approval. I suggest it is not more 
power lo the RSPCA we need but 
a more vigorous enforcement of 
the law by the police, whose 
statutory duty it is and who 
already have the powers necessary 
for the task. 

1 am. Sir. 

HOUGHTON OF SOWERBY. 
House of Lords. 

September 29. 

■Shane* in Welsh 

From Mr Huw H. Davies 
Sir. The article. “Can TV rescue 
the language?", in your “Focus" 
supplement on Wales (September 
25) gave the impression that it was 
SiancI Pedwar Cymru, $4C. that 
first experimented with dubbing 
Hollywood films into the Welsh 
language. 

The writer refers specifically to 
the film Shane, starring Alan 
Ladd. In fact. Shane was one of 
three world-renowned feature 
films dubbed into Welsh and 
shown on HTV Wales in Septem- 
ber. 1978 — over four years prior 
to the setting up of S4C. 

While the screening of Shane in 
Welsh may have brought “howls 
of protest", as your correspondent * 
puts it. from some viewers, it was. 
nevertheless, welcomed by others 
as a bold experiment in Welsh 
language entertainment. 

Yours faithfullv. 

HUW H. DAVIES. 

Director of Programmes. 

H TV Wales. 

HTV Limited. 

The Television Centrc. 

Culverhousc Cross. Cardiff. 


ON THIS DAY 


OCTOBERS 1918 

The German offensive in the 
Second Battle of the Marne was 
halted in mid duly and an Allied 
cuuntcr-atlaek during the second 
half of the munth was successful. 
.Scu s reached Argentina more 
ijuickly than that counties 
reaction reached Britain. 


ARGENTINE JOY AT 
AL LIED VICTO RY. 

GERMAN CONSPIRACIES. 

(From Our Special 
Correspondent.) 

BUENOS AIRES. July 25. 
When brought into contact with 

the everyday life nf Buenos Aires, it 
is- difficult to believe that one is 
breathing a neutral atmosphere. 
Allied flips art* everywhere: practi- 
cally the entire Press rejoices with 
open enthusiasm at the news of the 
Allied victory , and the Fourteenth 
of July was marked by a gigantic 
procession, which passed olonp 
profusely beflagged streets, and 
which occupied more than half an 
hour in passing a given point. To- 
day there are Argentine girls in the 
streets of this capital selling (low- 
ers lor the benefit of the Allied 
wiiunded. It is, I believe, one of the 
first experiments ill the science of 
“flag -days”. hut it may he taken for 
panted that it will not be the last. 

When the news first arrived here 
uf the dramatic turn of fortune on 
the Marne and the rolling back of 
the Hun forces I was walking down 
the Calle Florida, the principal 
street of Buenos Aires, Newspaper 
buys were shouting the latest 
developments with enthusiasm, 
and at a comer of the street the 
events were being chalked up on a 
large blackboard. It might have 
been a victory fur the Argentine 
cause. As n matter of fact, evety 
Argentine in that crowded street — 
and with sufficiently good reason — 
was convinced on that point. They 
clapped each other on the back, 
and waved their hats, and on every 
side were faces that were quite 
honestly radiant. 

Il was only one of innumerable 
episodes of the kind. In Buenos 
Aires, at all events, it is difficult to 
realize that one is in the midst of a 
people who are officially neutral. 
This applies at all events, to the 
ethics of ordinary life and to the 
surface of the public existence. But 
the German is here. At odd spots 
his traces’ are discernible even 
above ground. His principal dub, 
burned and gutted by a justly 
indignant crowd, has been rebuilt; 
here and there, but rarely, you may 
catch cautiously spoken phrases in 
German, and at three or four 
street -comers are the sellers of the 
German newspapers who drawl out 
— one imagines shamefacedly — the 
words Tageblatt and La 
Union. . . they are heroic in a 
sordid fashion, for they suffer from 
a marked lack of popularity, and 
(heir voices persist with a fatigued 
sound. Nevertheless they are there, 
and they are to be reckoned . with in 
the life of Buenos Aires. 

WORKING LIKE A MOLE 

In Buenos Aires— whatever may 
be the case in some of the outer 
provinces — there is very little 
more than this that meets the eye 
of Ihe casual stroller through lie 
streets. Nevertheless, the German 
is here in his thousands. He is 
working like a mole, and his energy 
is none the less great for being 
subterranean. His policy has two 
main ends — to obtain by book or 
by crook those goods which the 
operation of the Black List is 
supposed to bar from his doors, and 
to destroy the internal communica- 
tions of the country in the hope 
that the supplies of meat and grain 
may be prevented from leaving the 
Argentine shores, and thus fail to 
reach the depots of the Allies in 
Europe. 

In the former endeavour it is 
necessary for the German to 
employ a certain number of neutral 
agents, the goods passing from one 
hand to another until it is reason- 
able to suppose that their tracks 
have been lost by those bona-fide 
British and neutral firms to whom 
the goods were consigned in the 
first instance. That the attempts 
have been fairly successful is 
attested by the regrettable fact that 
many of the German warehouses 
that in theory should be empty are 
only too amply stocked with the 
goods that enable them to continue 
their businesses in being. Against 
this it must be said that the net is 
being drawn tighter, and that the 
difficulties in smuggling goods 
through its meshes are steadily 
increasing. , . 

Without fire 

From Mr A. £. Day 
Sir. Travelling Inter-City Man- 
chester to London in a crowded 
“smoking” compartment I no- 
ticed nobody lit up or puffed away 
during the entire journey. 

Is this (a) a record, (b) becoming 
increasingly normal, (c) too slight 
a statistical base from which lo 
draw conclusions? 

Yours etc. 

A. R DAY. 

Manchester Polytechnic. 

Faculty of Community Studies, 
Department of Library and 
Information Studies. 

All Saints. Manchester. 

September 25. 

Taking it literally 

From Mr A.D. Main 
Sir. In a London bus today F saw a 
poster stating “Graffiti is vandal- 
ism — vandalism is a crime”. I 
wanted to cross out the first “is” 
and write “are”; should I have? 

Yours faithfully. 

ALEX MAIN. 

8 Caldccotc Road. 

Stilton. 

Peterborough. Cambridgeshire. 
September 25. 



sStil e- : c [ — I an? ussmnsne essfieei? cssrecs i i sbwk i i scsssgssggws, i i ****«- 



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AMR 

ASA 

Mod 

ARM 

Aft* < 

A*doa 

Amo 

Amir 

Am B 

AmC 

Am C 

Am E 

AmE 

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AmM 

Am S' 

AmT. 

Arnoc 

Anno 

Asarc 

Astda 

AlWc 

Avon 

Btn* 

Bonta 

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Bank 

Both! 

Boeoi 

BMC 

BrtJur 

Qgltt 

Brat I 

BP 

Bom 

Burt'tr 

Burro 


Contr. 

Chun 

Chase 

ChmC 

Chevr 

Chry* 

Cmcca 

Clark 

Coca' 


CM* 

Cnto’t 

Como 

Coral 

CoNa 

Const 

Crmit 

Cormr 

CPC* 

Cram 

CmZl 

Dart& 


DaStai 

Ootroi 

ngttaf 

Dam 

Dowd 

Crass 
DukBl 
Du Pa 


Emit 

Eaton 

Eowr* 

Exxon 

FodDt 


THE TIMES THURSDAY OCTOBER 2 1986 



COURT 

AND 

SOCIAL 


COURT 

CIRCULAR 


BALMORAL CASTLE 
October i: Lady Abel Smith has 
succeeded the Hon Mary Morn- 
son a* Lady In Waiting to The 
Queen. 

BUCKINGHAM PALACE 
October 1: The Princess Anne. 
Mrs Mark Phillips this after- 
noon opened and toured the 
new Unit of L & K Fertiliser 
Lid at Sharpness, 
Gloucestershire. 

Mrs Timothy Holderness 
Rod dam was in attenda n ce. 
KENSINGTON PALACE 
October 2: The Princess of 
Wales, Patron, the National 
Hospitals for Nervous Diseases, 
this morning visited the Na- 
tional Hospital. Queen Square, 
London. WCl and opened the 
Harris Intensive Care Unit. 

Viscountess Campden. Mr 
John Haslam and Lieutenant- 
Commander Richard Aylard. 
RN were in attendance. 

October l: The Princess Mar- 
garet. Countess of Snowdon, 
was present today at a Luncheon 
given for the wives of Delegates 
to the Commonwealth Par- 
liamentary Association Con- 
ference at the Royal Overseas 
League. 

The Hon Mrs Whitehead was 
in attendance. 

October 1: Princess Alice 
Duchess of Gloucester was 


represented by Mrs Michael 
Harvey at the Memorial Service 
for Str Charles Chadwyck- 
Healey which was held in 
Chelsea Old Church. Cheyne 
Walk. London SW3. today. . 

The Duke of Gloucester, 
President National Association 
of Boys' Cubs, this morning St 
A than Boys’ Village and in the 
afternoon visited Boys’ Clubs in 
the Rhondda Valley. Wales. 

His Royal Highness, who 
travelled in an aircraft of The 
Queen's Flight, was attended by 
Li-Col Sir Simon Bland. 


A memorial service for Sir 
Osbert Lancaster will be held at 
St Paul's. Covent Garden, at 
noon today. 

A memorial service for Dame 
Adelaide Doughty will be held 
at Holy Trinity, Brampton, at 
noon today . 

A memorial service for Captain 
R.E.D. Ryder. VC RN. wiU be 
held at Holy Trinity, Prince 
Consort Road. Kensington, at 2 
pm today. 

A funeral service for Elizabeth. 
Viscountess Cobham will be 
held at the parish church of St 
Peter, Budleigh Sal tenon, at 
1 1 am an Saturday. October 4. 
A service of thanksgiving for her 
life will be held at the parish 
church of St John the Baptist, 
Hagley. at noon on Sunday, 
October S. 

Sir Anthony and Lady Gfyn 
celebrate the fortieth anniver- 
sary of their marriage today. 


Luncheons 


Lord Mtsbcoa 

Lord and Lady Misheon and 
Mrs John Wickerson save a 
luncheon at the House of Lords 
yesterday for the wives of 
representatives of European. 
American and Canadian bans 
and law societies and of Euro- 
pean instiinlions attending the 
annual judges' service and the 
Lord Chancellor's breakfast on- 
the occasion of the opening of 
the new legal year. 

Institute of Chartered Accoun- 
tants in rnglanH and Wales 
Mr Derek A. Booth man. Presi- 
dent of the Institute of Char- 
tered Accountants in England 
and Wales, and members of the 
council gave a luncheon yes- 
terday at Chartered 
Accountants* HalL The guests 
were the Lord Mayor, Sir Allan 
Davis. Alderman and Sheriff 
Hugh BidweU. and aldermen 
and officers of the Corporation. 


Board of Deputies of British 
Jews 

Dr Lionel Kopelowitz, Presi- 
dent of the Board of Deputies of 
British Jews, and the honorary 
officers were hosts at a luncheon 
at Woburn House given in 
honour of Dr R.M.W. Rickett. 
Among the guests were Lord 
Boiiomley. Sir ' Immanuel 
Jakobovits and the Right Rev 
Gerald Mahon. 

Dinner 

Victor Gollance 

Miss Livia GoJlancz, chairman 
of Victor Gollancz, gave a 
dinner on September 30 at the 
Garrick Club in honour of 
JJ.M. Stewart (Michael Innes) 
on the occasion of his eightieth 
birthday. Among those present 

Mr and MrsSunon Brett. Mr and Mn 
l C Butler. MJso Lattice Conner. Mr 
RoMn Dennbton. Mr and MrsDavifl 
HoHoway. DT F D Luke. Mr Chart** 
Mon rath- Mua Jan Morris. Mr and 
Mr* P G Mudford. Mr and Mrs 
Anthony Price. Mr Hilary RuMmuin. 
Mr and Mn Michael Stewart. Mr and 
Mrs Julian Symons. Mr and Mrs 
Anthony Ttiwalto. and Miss Mary 
Kay wfimere. 


Science report 


Proof likely of gravity wave 


By Pearce Wright, Science Editor 


There is a rekindling of exdte- 
ment among astronomers in 
the possibility of detecting 
gravity wares from the col r 
lapse of a star within onr own 
galaxy or some even more 
catastrophic event in the cos- 
mos. 

The idea that poises of 
grarititional energy sweep 
through the Universe in a way 
comparable to visible light, 
and other forms of radiant 
energy from radiowaves to X- 
rays, comes from predictions 
by Einstein as put of his 
general theory of relativity. 

Observations with elaborate 
instruments over the past 25 
years have failed to see any of 
them. But a report by Dr 
Bernard Schulz, from the 
department of applied 
mathematics and at Unbmily 
College, Cardiff, claims that 
new methods being developed 
Europe and the United 


m 


States will “catch" gravity 
waves. 

If he is correct foe con- 


sequences have profound im- 
plications for scientists. It 
would give them a more ac- 
curate way of measuring dis- 
tances between objects in 
remote parts of the sky. 

Attempts to observe gravity 
waves were begun early in. the 
1960s by Dr Joseph Weber at 
the University of Maryland. 
His research team built a 
detector that consisted of an 
enormous aluminium bar, con- 
structed in a special vibration- 
proof laboratory to eliminate 
disturbances. 

' Extraordinarily sensitive 
electronic recorders watch 
continuously for the smallest 
tremor that coaid be attributed 
to a passing gravity wave. 

According to theory, a five- 
ton bar, 10 ft long, will grow 
by a maiionth of a millionth of 
a millionth of inch for a 
thousandth of a second, trader 
the influence of the gravity 
wave expected from the col- 
lapse of a star in the Milky 
Way. 


about 


That event occurs 
once every 3ft years. 

More advanced, bar > in- 
struments have been devised 
at die European Laboratory 
for Partide Physics, CERN, in 
Geneva, and at Stanford 
University, in California. The 
metal detectors were 
supercooled to prevent fiti« 
observations from agitation of 
atoms caused by small 
changes In temperature. 

The source of Dr Schotts 
newfound optimism, described 
in a paper in Nature, & the use 
of the technique of interferom- 
etry to snake gravity wave 
telescopes. 

In new apparatus designed 
to detect gravity waves, the 
pathways are np to four 
kilometres long. Dr Schutz 
concludes that because of their 
high sensitivity they w31 pick 
np more catastrophe events on 
space than the bar in- 
struments. 

Nature, Vol 323, pp 310 to 
311. 1986. 


Birthdays today 

Marshal of the RAF Sir Dermal 
Boyle. 8i Lord Davies. 46; Lord 
Justice Dillon. 61; Mr Peter 
Frankl. SI: Professor R.H. 
Graveson, QC. 75; Mr Graham 
Greene, OM, CH, 82; Mr Eric 
Hosking, 77; Lieutenant-Colo- 
nel G.W.F. LumelL 67; Mr 
Vivian Richer, 73; Mr Stuart 
Rose, 75; the Most Rev Robert 
Runcie. 65; Mr John RusselL 72; 
Mr Justice Scon, 52; Vice- 
Admiral Sir Anthony Tippett, 
58; Lord Todd. OM, 79; Mr 
Uoyd Turner, 48; Air Marsha) 
Sir Geoffrey Tuttle, 80; Profes- 
sor J.H. Whitfield. 80; Lieuten- 
ant-Colonel E.C.T. Wilson, VC, 
74. 


Judges" Service 

The Lord Chancellor read the 
at the annual Judges' 


Service held in Westminster 
Abbey yesterday to mark the 
opening of tire Michaelmas 
sittings. The Dean of West- 
minster officiated. The Lord 
Chief Justice, the Master of the 
Rolls, the President of the 
Family Division, the Vice- 
Chancellor and other judges 
attended Visiting judges and 
lawyers from overseas were also 
present. 

Lord Chancellor’s Breakfast 
was held afterwards in the Royal 
Gallery of tire House of Lords by 
permission of the Queen. 


Births, Marriages, Deaths and In Memoriam 


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BIRTHS 


BAUIW1LL - On sroteitibcr 30th to 
Cetta i nee Tun i and Jan . a daugtiler 
Frances. Lila. ttaOasm. A saner (or 
William. 

BMMETT on ScMcmber 29th 10 Ra- 
chel and Jeremv, a daughter. Lucy 
Anne Jane, a stswr for Rooert. 

BLANCHARD - On 20Ui Septe mb er 
1986. to Uzintv Marram and Mark, 
a daughter. Emma Rachel 

DESLANDES-WOOD - On October 1st 
1996. to Julie and Rirk. a son. braUi- 
er for Ben and W II ham, 

EDWARDS On August 26Ul. lo Mau 
rwn and Oatld. a son. Jonathan 
Hrnrv Rupert. 

FOOT On 26lli September, at Royal 
Free Hospital, lo Sally into Rudkin) 
and Beniamin, a son Alexander Mark 
Isaac, brother lor Joanna. 

CLYN - On 29th September to Lynn 
and Stuart, a son. Matthew wui lam. 
a brother for EUzabrth. Lucy and 
Josephine. 

HAMBUmr on September 28th to 
Emma into Longman 1 and TUiwOiy. 
a son. David Marti James. 

KOOK - On Srotemticr 29ffi *1 Harro- 
gate General Hospital U> Jamce tn£e 
Blairi and Jidlan. a son. Benia mm 
Edward. 

KMC - On September 30th. hi Char 
lone. North Carolina, to Monika into 
Boefun) and Richard, a son. 

KJtOK-PASZKOWSKA ■ On Septem- 
ber lBUi. 10 Barbara (Nee Jaszoom. 
and Andrew, a daughter. Klara 
Julianna, a staler for Stefan. 

NUUITWI - On September 30th to Fettc- 
uvandttonaoaugnip- victoria Jam 
shier for Timothy am Rebecca 

WILirR -On September 30th 1986. m 
Vancouver Canada lo Nidwlao and 
Luida into Fraseri a boy. 

SANDERS on 26th September to Mary 
■nee Hoskins) and Rupert, a daugh- 
ter. Rebecca AHc*. a sister for 
Nicholas. Louisa and Harriet 

STD YE - On 27th September, at Bos- 
ton. Massachusetts, to Susan Joan 
inee Niituno Smith) and Jonathan 
Paul, a son. David Quincy 

WOOTLBT . on 28(h September 
1986. to Vcronira irwr Konnard) and 
Jonaihon WoottOT. a son. Raoul Ed- 
ward. In New York. 


YEOWART . On September 30th, to 
Pamela and Geoffrey, a son. Mat- 
Uirw Anthony- a brother for Clare 
And Thomas. 


MARRIAGES 


MULUS i HOPKINS On 27Ui Sertem- 
ber 1986 at Coventry. Nigel to 
Waxen 


DEATHS 


WSSSS - On 20th September, at 
Caimllr. Margaret Thelma, dearly 
toced wffe of Lawrfe and adored 
moUier oi Lynne and Adrienne. Fu- 
neral Service Wednesday 8Ul 
October at 10 JO am of Si Martin of 
Tours church CnetuieM and 1140 
a.m ai Beckenham CromMortum. 

CJMimrtl A Som. 
Boundaxy Place. Sevenoaks Road. 
Ornmgtott- Kent or donations la Can- 
cer Research. 


On Friday September 
19. suddenly, at his home on die Ni- 
agara Parkway. Niagara -oo-tfte- 
Lake. Canada. John Leslie 
Sanderson. 1923-1986. 

HRQ - On 30th September 1986 In 
Istanbul. Former Secretary General 
of the Turkish Ministry of Fortes 
Affairs. Turkish Ambassador to the 
Court of St James 1957/60. Funeral 
lo be betd in Istanbul on 2nd October 
1 986. Homeaduresc Toprakta Sokak 
it. Saiacak. Uskudar. Istanbul. 
Turkey 

ROMFORD - On Tuesday September 
30th 1986. peacefully at home. 
Swing Hi u. FIMbury. Nr. Persnore. 
Ware's. James Ferguson, in hes 9ist 
Year, a beloved Husband. Father. 
Grandfather and Great Grandfather. 
Prtvwe cremation at Worcester. 
Famuy Oowen only, a memortal ser- 
vice. lo be arranged later. 

HfUNTON • On September 271b ax 
home. Ian Alexander dearly loved 
husband of Madeline axid beloved fa- 
ther of VlvJen and DbvkI and loving 
grandpa to Alice and Benjamtn. after 
a long tUness courageously borne. 

■RYAN - On September 27th suddenly 
at hdrae. John Malcolm, husband of 
the late Constance Bryan. Funeral at 
Putney Vale Crematorium Tuesday 
7th October at 11 JO a jd. Flowers to 
J H Kenyon Ltd. 132. Freston Road. 
WlO. 

COURTNEY on September 27th 1966 
at The Manor House. South mead. 
Bristol. Mary Winifred Agnes. 
M B C. J.P.. beloved wife of the tale 
Dr Robert McLean Courtney and 
very dear sister and aunt. Funeral 
service 11.30am at United Reformed 
Church. Cranbrooft Road. RedUuid. 
Bristol on Tuesday 7th October fol- 
lowed by cremation. Family flowers 
only, gtns If desired to imperial Can- 
cer Research or the Royal 
Common ireatth Society for the 
Blind. 

COWKR On 26Ui September 1986. 
peacefully lit Hatfield. Mary Evelyn, 
aged 90. formally of Jamaica. Barba- 
dos & Portugal. Daughter of wiutam 
A Hancne Cowpct. 

DALY - On September 29th peacefully 
at home. Robert Ftnbarr. of Oaygale 
Surrey. Greatly loved by tus wife 
Mary, his family and mends. Ream 
em Moss at the Holy Name Church 
Esher, toam. Monday 6th October 

ELUS - On September 29th peacefully 
In Uie John Raddtffe Hospital. Ox 
ford. Raymond, much loved husband 
of Kim. father and best friend to Sue 
and David, father -tn-Uw of Katie, 
and Uppy to Nicola. Emma. Thomas 
and Caroline. Funeral service at St 
Mary's Church. Longworth. on Mon- 
day 6th October, at 2 p.m. Followed 
by private cremation, no flowers by 
reauest please. 

QERCtt - On September 28th 1986. 
unexpectedly. Luther, betoved hus- 
band of Sonia, and darting fattier of 
Mary. Funeral on Friday. 3rd Octo- 
ber. 1.30pm. ax SL Mark Coptic 
Church. Allen Street Kensington. 
Flowers to Kenyon's and Co. 49. 
Marlows Rood. London wa. 

GRAHAM - On September 28cn 1996. 
peacefully at Oakville. Ontario. Can- 
ada. LL General Howard Douglas. 
O.C.. C.V.O.. C.B-E.. DAO., and Bar 
E D.. CD.. Q C_ born 1898. Loving 
husband of Jean Lowe. Survived by 
son Peter, of Hamilton, sister Edith 
York of Consecon. Ontario, stster-m- 
law Helen TUI of Toronto, and 
numerous nieces and nephews. A 
public Service or Commemoration 
wui be held in St John's United 
Church. Oakville. Ontario at 3.00pm 
on Wednesday. IBOt October . 

HERBERT on September 30th 1986. 
In Nazalll. Southern Turkey, in A 
rood acodenL Mary Ratrtcta. widow 
of Manl. much loved mother of Da- 
vid and Peter. 

HURST On Friday 26th September at 
Delaware House. London. Brian Des- 
mond. film producer and director. 
Funeral Tuesday 7th October at 
11.00 am. a! The West London Cre- 
matorium. Harrow Road. W2. 

LAFLA - September 29U> Kaflilerei 
Lalta. Singer, peacefully m hospital 
aged 93. Enauttes to Harrison 
BradfMd 744437. 

L AM M NEL L - On September 27th. 
peacefully at Hereford County Ho&oi- 
laL EfczObelh (Betty) Evelyn Hilda, 
beloved wile of the frle Rev. Gerald 
Laxtsdell. mother of Jeremy. Roger 
and Martin and suxer of Pal and 
Rosemary and much loved mand 
mother. Funeral si Ashford 
CarboneO Parish Church. Shropshire 
on Saturday October 4th M 12 00 
noon. Family flowers Wiy but dona 
Lions, if w»hed. lo Cancer Research 
Campaign. 2 Canton House Terraco. 
London SwiY *aR 

LAWSON - On 30th September, at 
HotxtMden House. Harrogate, 
formety ol Hkley. Ceua. wmqw ot Dr. 
Harrv Lawson. Service at St. 
Margaret’* Church likiey. on Friday 
10th October, ai 2.30pm. Followed 
by Private Cremation. 

LAYTON - On September 30th. peace- 
fttUy. Herbert aged 84. sadly mused, 
and deeply mourned, by tin betoved 
wife Minnie, knure son Kenneth, 
daughter Susan. daugMcr in- law 
Adnenne. and loving grandchildren- 
Cremation at GOkters Green Crema- 


On September 27th. peaceful- 
ly In his steep. James DewhunL 
much loved husband, fattier, grand- 
father. great grandfather and unde. 
No flowers, danaoon to. SL Jama 
Chuivri. GjNvafl. C/o the Rector. Me- 
morial Service. 22nd October, at 
11.30 at CoiwaD Church 

OFFER - On September 29th. peaceful- 
ly in a narstng home. Albert Gerald. 
F RI GS , aged 86. beloved husband 
of AUeen for 57 years. Atlher of 
Denise and Rodnoi. and much loved 
grandfather. Funeral Service at All 
Samis Church. UndSehL Sussex on 
Monday October 6th at 12.00 noon, 
followed by on vale cremation. Fam- 
ily flowas only- 

PfCKNELL. On September 29. peace- 
fully at her home. Marie There* 
betoved wile of the late Leon- 
ard. dearly loved Mother. 
Oandinather. Aunt and cherished 
friend lo many. Funeral al Si 
Michael's Church. Mere, on Monday.’ 
October 6. at 12 noon. 

POSTANS On September 26Ui 1986. 
Richard Crispin suddenly to Ms sleep 
without pain at home. Dearly loved 
husband of Ivy Joan and fbther of 
Roger. Funeral an Tuesday. October 
7th at 1.45 pm. al St Cuthberrs 
Church. Wolves Lane. N22. Fol- 
lowed by burial at New Southgate 
Cemetry. Brunswick Park Road. 
Family flowers only, but donattoitt 
in Ueu to the Royal Masonic 
Benev riant Institution- All enqidnes 
to Blake and Hortock. 27. Stiver 
S treet. E nflekL Tel: 01-363 3221. 

ROBERTS - On October I. al tits home 
tn Pinkneys Green. Union, betoved 
husband of Mart* and Unde of John. 
Funeral Tuesday October 7 
Slubbings Church 1 1.30 am. Family 
(towers only. Dona Bans .GuWe Dogs 
for the blmd c/o 32 West Street 
Marlow. Bucks 


SMTH - On September 26th 1986. al 
Roctiford HosmtaL Beme Mary aged’ 
68. of Wenctifl on Sea. Essex. Funer- 
al Service, al Southend on Sea 
Crematorium csouth Chapel), on 
Monday October 6th. at 11.15am. 
Enquiries <o S. Stfbbanfs A Sons. Fu- 
neral D ir ectors. New Road Corner. 
HadMgh. Essex. fTefc 74389). 


sqUHOES - On Monday. Senlember 
29th. Stephen George- of Harcornbe 
HUL Winterbourne, peacefuly at 
Frenctiay HospUaf. after a short Al- 
ness. Loving and dearly loved 
husband of Dorothy and Father of 
J« an-Clare and Stephanie. Funeral 
service ai St MMukTs Parish 
Chnicti. Winterbourne. Bristol on 
Thursday. 2nd October al ll .30 am. 


STEVENS on September 26th 1986. 
Gladys lately or Malawi, wmow of 
w.p. Stevens of Dublin, peacefully 
after a short Wness. A muched loved 
Mother. Grand-Mother and Great- 
Gram) Mother. Cremation at 
Moctlake Crematorium on Monday 
October Die 6th at 10.30 am. No 
flowers please, but donations tf de- 
sired lo New land’s Homes, Llntoe. 
C/O Loudoun. 2. Warwick Drive. 
Putney. London Swis 6LB 


On September 26lli 
peacefully In hospital. Phyffis Kay. of 
Wincbelsea Sussex. Widow of Die 
late wjng Commander Victor 
StreatfeOd- O.BX. And beloved si<n>- 
niaUMr of Judy and Jennifer. 
Funeral service Monday October Qlh 
2.30. pm. winoielsea Parish Church- 


On 30Ui September, peace- 
tody in Imwicti hoxpiUL Margaret; 
deeply loved wife of Meredith 
Wooldridge. Motoer of Susan. Joan 
and Robert. Grandmother of Cather- 
ine. Becky. Elizabeth. Margaret and 
Anna. Funeral Service 12-30 Mon- 
day October 6th. al Witty Church. 
Suffolk. No flowers, donations to 
WUby Church. 


MEMORIAL SERVICES 


BROWN . A Memorial Service, for Air 
Commodore Sir Vernon Brown, 
C.B.. o.b£ . WiU tie held on Friday 
3iu October 1986. at 2.3f^m. tn Uie 
Church of SL Cfarmeni Danes, 
Strand. London. 


CUmS-NALEKH - A Memorial Ser- 
vice for Judge Nigel Curtis - Raletgh. 
win take puce al SI Peter's Church. 
Hammers nu ih. on Saturday 18 th Oc- 
tober a ll 30 am 


A Mmikkim Reautem 
Mass will or t*td tor Curnbert Frtz 
tierbert at Wndimnsirr Cathedral on 
Thuruiay JOUi October al 1130 
a.m 

ti MARCHAMT - Oo November 4m. a 
Service gf Thanusgn mg will be new 
for Die life of Sm Spencer Le 
Marcnaid, a< St Margaxw's westram- 
sler, at 12.00 noon. 


UEHTAIQS 12.30. SI SopMa Greek 
Cathedral. Sunday SUt October. 


IN MEMORIAM - PRJVATE 


WHITE - A Thanksgiving Service tor 
the fife and wont of Professor Be- 


Forthcoming 

marriages 


Mr D.E. Harding 
and Miss CA. Harper 
The engagement » announced 


MtRjLR. Boyle 
and Miss F-EJVL Ramsay 
The engauinem is announced 
between Robert Boyle. Irish 
Guards, elder son of Captain 
Michael and Lady NeH Boyle, of 
Ashe, Basingstoke, and Fiona, 
youngest daughter of Colonel 

George Ramsay, of The Old 
School House, The Square, 
Elham, Kent, and Mis S.R, 
Anderson, of Lodge Farm, 
ShadingfieJd, Beocles, Suffolk. 
MrR.MJ.Lea 
and Miss ELA. Lees-SpaWing 
The engageraem is announced 
between Richard, only son of 
Vice-Admiral Sir John and Lady 
Lea of Hay ling Island, and 
Elizabeth, younger daughter of 
Rear-Admiral ana- Mis U. Lees- 
Spalding, of Wonsion, 
Winchester. 

Captain W.R. RjoHo 
and Miss AJE- Gwnness 
The engagement is announced 
between William Rollo, The 
Blues and Royals, son of Mr 
Andrew Rollo and the late Mm 
Rollo, of Cokl Blow, Oare. 
Marlborough, Wiltshire, and 
Annabel, daughter of Sir How- 
ard and Lady Guinness, of The 
Manor House, Gl&nvilles 
Wootton, Sherborne, Dorset 
Mr A-Nye 

and Miss JA. Fosnett 
The engagement is announced 
between Andri, eldest son of Mr 
and Mn John Nye, of West 
Yarmouth. Massachusetts, and 
Janina, daughter of Sir Richard 
and Lady Posnett of 
Godalming, Surrey. 

Major RJT.T. AHken 
sf 4 Miss JJO. Napier 
The engagement is announced 
between Robert .Hanbury 
Tenison Aitken, Royal Rqi- 
ment of Wales, son of Mr and 
Mrs H.K. Aitken, CroesyceiliOK. 
Gwent, and Joanna Dawn, elder 
daughter of Major-General and 
Mrs LA.H. Napier, of Mon- 
mouth, GwenL 
Mr MJLM. Beales 
and Miss A.M. McComjpU 
The engagement is announced 
between Mark Henry Maxwell, 
son of Dr John Beales, of 
Hertfordshire, and of Mis Bruce 
Dawson, of London, and Alice 
Margaret, daughter of Mr and 
Mis Christoph ex McGonigal, of 
Lamberhurst, KenL 
Mr NJL Blackley 
and Miss S.V. Farter 
The engagement is announced 
between Neil Ramsay, son of 
Major SLR. Blackley, QBE, and 
Mrs D.D. Blackley, of New 
Galloway. Scotland, and Susan 
Valerie, daughter of Mr and Mis 
K.L. Porter, of Reading, 
Berkshire. 

Mr S. Crewe 
and Miss JJE. Martin 
The engagement is announced 
between Seth, only son of Mr 
and Mis J. Crewe, of Beverley 
Close. Marlow -on -Thames, 
Buckinghamshire, and Janet 
Elizabeth, only daughter of Mr 
and Mrs PJ. Martin, of 
Bcauxfield. Whitfield, Kent. 


between Duncan Edward, son of 
Mr J.E. Harding, of Sheffield, 
South Yorkshire, and Mrs M.M. 
Thompson, of Wells, Somerset, 
and Christine Anne, daughter of 
Mr N.W. Harper, of Thorpe. 
Surrey, and the late Mis MM. 
Harper. 

Mr JJVL Haslam 
and Mbs MJ. Moore 
The engagement is announced 
between Jonathan Mark, eldest 
son of Mr and Mrs DJ. Haslam. 
of Bispbam, Lancashire, and 
Miranda Jayne, only daughter of 
Mr and Mrs BJ. Moore, of 
Kidderminster, Worcestershire. 
Mr MJFVG. Hearey 
and Miss JJVL Warbartoa 
The engagement is announced 
between Martin Fznian Grant, 
son of Mr Eamonn Heavey and 
the late Mrs Nora Heavey, of 
St realham , London, and Jane 
Margaret, elder daughter of Dr 
Wfiliam Kingston Warfaurton, 
and Mis Brenda Winifred War- 
burton, of Eastcote. Middlesex. 
Mr ELA. Kealy 
and Miss AJ. Hood 
The engagement is announced 
between Robin, younger son of 
the late Lieutenam-Gokmel 
H.L.B. Kealy and of Mrs BuE. 
Kealy, of Masham, Yorkshire, 
and Annabel, elder daughter of 
Lieutenant-Commander AJLE 

Hood, RN, and Mrs Hood, of 
Enton, Godaiming. Surrey. 
Lieuteoant-Cohmel RJ.Knox 
and Mrs AA Bailey 
The engagement is announced 
between Jeremy Knox, of 
ToOesbury, Essex, and Guoline 
Bailey, widow of Anthony Alan 
Bailey, LD5RCS. of Layer 
Marney, Essex. 

MrTJ.Laqtn 
and Miss C-J- Peacodte 
The engagement is announced 
between Tim, son of Mr and 
Mrs Teddy Langton, of Chester 
Square; London, and Caroline, 
eider daughter of Mr and Mis 
Colin Feacocke, of Cumnor 
Hill, Oxford. 


MrCJM. Milter 
and Mis TJ.V. Nicholson 
The engagement is announced 
between Graeme Miller, of 
Avening, Tetbury. Gloucester- 
shire, formerly of Banbury, and 
Teresa Nicholson, also of 
Averting, Tetbury, fonneriy of 
BrockenhuxsL 


Mr J JL.G. Neafe 
and Miss JJVL Fleming 
The engagement is announced 
between John Anthony George, 


elder son of Professor and Mrs 
J.W. Neale, of Etheringjon 
House, Hull, and Janet Mary, 
elder daughter of Mr R.S. 
Fleming, of Cuddingion, 
Buckinghamshire, and Mrs TJHL 
Green of Lyneham, Wiltshire. 

Mr TJH4. Pittas 
and Mias AJ£- Sodriades 
The e ng ag em ent is announced 
between Tbeo, only son of Mr 
and Mrs Michael Pittas, of 
Greece; and Anna, only daugh- 
ter of Mr and Mrs Louis 
Sotiriades, of London. 


Marriages 


Mr P-A. Bailey 

and Captain GS. Buckley, 
WRAC 

The marriage took place on 
Saturday, September 27, in the 
Royal Memorial Chapel Sand- 
hurst. of Lieutenant Paul An- 
thony Bailey. Royal Signals, 
elder son of Mr and Mrs Charles 
Bailey, of Cardiff, and Captain 
Caroline Susan Buckley, WRAC 
second daughter of Mrs Gillian 
Buckley, of London. The Rev 
P.T. Clemen officiated, assisted 
by the Rev P.M. Thackray. 

The bride, who was given in 
marriage by Lreutenant-Cokme] 
D.M. Brailh waite, RAOG was 
attended by Sally Btison. Ros 
Fraser, and Victoria Buckley. 
Mr Anthony Taylor was best 
man. 

A reception was bekl at 
Ted worth House; and the 
honeymoon will be spent in 
Wales. 

DrRD. Jaqnes 
and Dr SJC. Burrows 
The marriage took place on 
Saturday. September 27. at St 
Mary's Church. Beaconsfield. 
between Dr Roderick Jaques, 
eider son of Mr and Mrs David 
Jaques, of The Peek. Hong 
Kong, and Dr Sophie Burrows, 
eldest daughter of the late Dr 
Keith Burrows and of Mrs 
Burrows, of Beaconsfield, 
Berkshire. 

The bride was given in marriage 
by Iter brother. Dr Christopher 
Burrows. 


Latest wills 


Mrs Myril Olive Ashby, of 
Aylesbury, left estate valued at 
£1.174326 net. After various 
bequests she left the residue 
equally between Dr Barnaido's 
and the RNLL 

Mr Norman Briggs.' of Pendle- 
bury, Manchester, chairman of 
the Greater Manchester Police 
Authority and a key figure in the 
John Stalker inquiry, left 
£79,154 neL He died intestate. 


The Posh Ball 

The Push Ball, in aid of the 
International Spinal Research 
Trust, will be held on Friday, 
November 14, 1986. at the 
Hurlingham Cub, London, 
SW6. Application forms for 
dinner and after-dinner tickets 
are now available from the Ball 
Secretary. 60 Fcsting Road. 
London. SW15. 


Holborn Law Society 

The following have been elected 
officers of the Holborn Law 
Society for the ensuing year 
President. Mr CJ'J. Robertson; 
Vice-Presidents, Mr U.W. 
Banfces and Mr T.H. Drabble; 
Honorary Treasurer, Mr D.E 
Long: Joint Honorary Sec- 
retaries, Mr P.W. Matcham and 
Mr R.E. Selby- 


Judge retires 

Judge Ellis has retired from the 
circuit bench on the Midland 
and Oxford Circuit. 


Memorial service 


Sir Charles Chadwytik-Heatey 
Princess Alice Duchess of 
Gloucester was represented by 
Mrs Michael Harvey at a me- 
morial service for Sir Charles 
Chad wyck -Hes ley held at Chel- 
sea Old Church yesterday. Preb- 
endary C.E. Leighton Thomson 
officiated. Sir Charles 
Chadwyck-Healey. son, and Mr 
Nicholas Chaawyck* Healey 
read the lessons. Among those 
present were; 

\ i ola Lady _Gtiadwyck-HeaI*y 


LUBOQrtc and Mr and Mn Jeremy 
Nfc-uon (sons- in -law and daugtxmi. 
Mr Edward Chadwyrk-Heaity and 

Mr* Caituxine Chadwvclt-H«aMy 

iqrandrhuarem. Mn Cvrtl Holland- 
Martin i sister). Mr wiuiam Rathbonc 
ibrolher tn-fewi. Mn Patience Max- 
whl Coionei and Mrs P Maxwell. Mr 
Philip Maxweu. Mr RoMn Holland 
Martin. Mr and Mrs william 
RaitiDone. Jnr. Mr* R Oougias- 
Ponnanl. Mias K Hertiem. Mn C 
Robinson. Mr jonn LuMocfc. MT John 
NiCKSOfl. Mbs Hliarfe Mites^harp. 


and the Hon Mrs Alan Wilson. Air 
Vim-Mardiai j F Poweii. tfw Head 
master of Lanctog College and Mrs 
woodftouw. Mr John oav'enport 
“ Jonn 


■LaiKing Oub). Mr AoUvony si jonn 
Davies i Woodard Coroorauoni. Mrs 
Marlin Sleeves O Mirtvaers School. 


Pi'twcxHi). Mf»Wr Bromiey (Morgan 
Dr Amu Davies (British 


Group). 


OBITUARY 

lord kaldor 

Economist with strong political commi 


Lord Kaldor. FBA. the 
economist who was special 
adviser to Labour administra- 
tions In the 1960s and 1970s, 
died on September 3a He was 
78. 

He was one of the brightest 
in the Cambridge .constella- 
tion of post-Keynesian econo- 
mists. and throughout his 
working life he fought against 
the Amerfcm neo-classical 
school, which was undermin- 
ing what he regarded as ihe 
true Keynesian tradition. 

But bis outlook was not 
merely defensive. He made an 
important original contribu- 
tion, for instance to the theory 
of capital and the theory of 
distribution. Yet he was tar 
from being a detached student 
and expositor. His economics 
were informed by a strong 
sense of political purpose, and 
much of his career was devot- 
ed to trying, with varying 
success, to apply his theories 
in the real world. 

Whether as teacher, aca- 
demic colleague or temporary 
civil servant, he had the great 
quality of treating everyone 
alike and' arguing every point 
on its merits. He could annoy 
and irritate, but most people 
ended by feeling affection for 
him. 

Though he was exceptional- 
ly well informed, there was 
some mystery about the 
sources of his information, 
because be did not appear to 
acquire it by reading. He knew 
the classics, but did not read 
the journals. He bad a remark- 
able sense of the meaning of 
figures, without ever learning 
mathematics. 

He also had a considerable 
general culture, which was 
most apparent when he was in 
female company. His appe- 
tites were strong and conspic- 
uous. His capacity for sleep 
was extraordinary. He could 
go to sleep at any lime of day 
and in any company - during a 
convivial social occasion or a 
meeting of permanent secre- 
taries - and wake up at a 
crucial moment, which might 
be the moment his name was 
mentioned. 

Nicholas Kaldor was born 
in Budapest on May 12. 1908, 
the son of a successful lawyer. 
Despite his father's wish that 
he should follow him in the 
law, he went to Berlin to read 
economics. 

But be disliked foe place 
and in 1927, while visiting 
London, be enrolled at the 
London School of Economics. 
His talent was quickly noticed 
by Lionel (later Lord) Rob- 
bins, then a lecturer at LSE. 

His father died in the !930s 
and Kaldor then made En- 
gland his home. Shortly after 
foe war, he brought his mother 
out of Hungary to join him 
and his family. 

During the the war be held a 
research post at the infant 
National Institute of Econom- 
ic and Soda! Research. After- 




for Europe. Those were the 
days when the ECFs annual 
reports were looked forward 
lo. and when it was the one 
body where representatives of 
countries on both sides of the 
Iron Curtain wotted in co- 
operation. 

Kaldor returned to academ- 
ic life in 1949. having been 
appointed to a Fellowship at 
King's College. Cambridge. 
Three years later he was 
elected to a Readership and 
was, in 2966. awarded a 
personal Chair in Economics, 
which be held until he reached 
the retiring age in 1975. 

He had, in 1963, been 
elected a Fellow of foe British 
Academy. In 1970 he acted as 
president of the Economics 
Section of the British Assoria- 
tion, and from 1974 to 1976 he 
was president of the Royal 
Economic Society. In 1970 he 
was made an Honorary Fellow 
of the London School of 
Economics. 

But be was seldom for long 
confined to the ivory tower. 
He served on the Royal Com- 
mission for .Taxation from 
J951 to 1 955. The following 
year he published proposals 
for tax reform in India, and 
over the next few years he 
acted as economic or fiscal 
adviser to a whole series of 
countries, including Ceylon, 
Mexico, Ghana and Turkey. 

From 1964 to 1968, Kaldor 
worked as Special Adviser to 
the Chancellor of the Exche- 
quer. In this capacity, his 
effectiveness as a lucid and 
reasonable advocate on com- 
mittees quickly won him re- 
spect and influence among foe 
civil servants. 

He was the originator of 
Selective Employment Tax 
which was designed to encour- 
age the transfer of resources 
from service industries to 
production for export, but 
which turned out as well to be 
a very fruitful new channel of 
funds to the Exchequer. He 
was also the effective origina- 
tor of Capital Gains Tax. 

In 1974 he was again ap- 
pointed Special Adviser to the 
Chancellor of the Exchequer, 
and in the same year he was 
made a life peer. 


Since 1934 there Wlecn a 
flood of published work 
continued with little dhnim*. 

lion for nearly half a cemaiy 

He is one of the very few 
economists to have made 
outstanding contributions 
both to economic foceiy aod 
to economic policy. •■■■;. 

As time went on be tepded 
to leave the work of remting 
and elaborating his ideas 
mainly to bands of disciples. 
While these were still smb3 

Wing away at the detail, 

would be hot on Ibe tnaT# 
some new theory. Indeed,^ 
bis later years, the rate 
which new. and to sonw 
extent mutually inoonsisteatf 
Kaldorian growth models 
came on to the market was t 
matter of some embarrass^ 
ment to the scribes. ■ •* 

But he excelled in simple' 
powerful innovating - ideas. 
Among those were his sugges- . 
lion as early as 1939 that the 
activity of an economic syv 
icm does not oscillate about 1 
one-position of stable equOib-' 
rium, but staggers to and fro 

In his inaugural lecture as 
Professor at Cambridge in 
1966. he put forward the idea , 
that the growth-rate of an 
industrial economy depends 
on the rate of growth of its 
manufacturing sector, and 
that this in turn depended on 
foe availability both of an 
expanding market for its prod- 
ucts, and of a large source of 
additional labour. 

Kaldor will be remembered 
by his friends for his infectious 
cheerfulness, and for bis com- 
bination of clearheadedness 
and simplicity. Like many 
public figures, charming in 
their private fives, be was 
regarded as an ogre by some 
whose views were opposed to 
his, and who had not the 
advantage of knowing him 
personally. This was partly a 
tribute lo the effectiveness ofa 
number of foe policy mea- 
sures which he bad advocated. 

He was no respecter of 
persons, and the policies 
which he supported were often 
designed to enrich the com- 
munity -at foe expense of 
people who were playing a 
dominant part in foe economy 
concerned: Moreover, he had 
considerable skill in ensuring 
that there were few loopholes 
by which effects could be 
evaded 

Consequently his recom- 
mendations often led to strong : 
reactions. At one tune U 
seemed that the countries that 
attempted to implement his 
proposals usually found them- 
selves embroiled in chql*»- 
volt soon afterwards, jf .. . 

In one respect, Kalder re- 
. sembled Keynes. Uniifce Al- 
fred Marshall, he did not 
advocate measures of a 
‘'progressive” character be- 
cause of concern for the 
underdog. It was rather out of 
impatience with the mediocri- 
ty of so many of the leading 




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7 , The question was often .. . - 

wands, he was appointed chief asked, whether in foe midst of figures in politics and society, 
of foe economic planning staff all this advisory activity out- His faith was in the intdlectu- 

side foe university Kaldor 
could be making any worth- 
while contribution to learning 
and research. The fact is that, 
although his teaching-load 
was allowed to fell below the 
norm, his contribution to 
economic theory was very 
substantial, and its quality was 
improved by his outside expe- 
rience. 


of foe US strategic bombing 
survey. The staff quickly 
brought out a report which 
revealed to what extent foe 
allies had overestimated foe 
amount of damage bombing 
had inflicted on German in- 
dustry. 

Later he went to Geneva, to 
work under Gunnar Myrdal at 
the Economic Commission 


als. 

In 1934 he married Clarissa 
Goldschmidt, and their 
homes in London and Canv- 
bridge were not only the 
centres of a most affectionate 
family life, but also extended a 
welcome to economists and 
other scholars from all over 
foe world. There were four 
daughters of the marriage. 


Opera: \\ 

Descript iv 


dsll 

ep 


. ■ 


NuG 


A * 


MR LAURIER LISTER 


Mr Laurier Lister, QBE. 
actor, author, theatrical direc- 
tor and manager, died on 
September 30. He was 79. 

He will be chiefly remem- 
bered for his time at foe 
Yvonne Aroaud Theatre, 
Guildford, where; as director 
and administrator from 1964 
to 1975. he found outlet not 
only for his keen artistic sense, 
but also for his considerable 
business flair. 

Laurier Lister was born at 
Sanderstead, Surrey, on April 
22. 1907. and educated at 
Dulwich College. He trained 
as an actor at the Royal 
Academy of Dramatic An and 
made his first appearance on 
foe stage at foe Globe Theatre 
in 1925. 

The following year he ap- 
peared in Noel Coward's Easy 
Virtue at foe Duke of York’s 
before joining the Bristol Rep- 
ertory Company and then the 
Snatford-upon-Avon Festival 
Company . 

It was in 1933. while still 
pursuing an acting career, that 
Lister wrote, with Dorothy 
Massingham. his first play. 
The Soldier and the Gentle- 
woman. There followed When 
the Bough Breaks and The 
Tree, both written in collabo- 
ration with Henrietta Leslie; 


Against Our Hearts, with Max 
Adrian: and She. Too, Was 
Young ; with Hilda Vaughan, 
published in 1936 and tele- 
vised 20 years later. 

After the war, in which he 
served in foe RAF, he devised, 
directed and produced a series 
of highly successful revues, 
with such artists as Joyce 
Grenfell, Elizabeth Welch. 
Desmond WaJier-Ellis. and 
the authors and composers 
Flanders and Swann and 
Richard Adinseil. 

Tuppence Coloured (1947) 
was followed two years later 
by Oranges and Lemons - 
which included the early work 
of author Sandy Wilson - 
while Penny Plain (1951) pre- 
ceded his production of three 
revues by Flanders and 
Swann; Airs on a Shoestring 
(1953): Pay the Piper (1954); 
and Fresh Ajis(1956), 

In 1958, Lister became ar- 
tistic director of Laurence 
Olivier’s play producing com- 
pany. Here. he was responsi- 
ble for several important 
productions, including One 
More River, while later, in his 
individual capacity, he pre- 
sented a number of solo 
artists, among them Joyce 
Grenfell. Max Adrian and 
Emlyn Williams. 


In 1962. he was Olivieri? 
assistant for foe first; two 
seasons of the Chichester Fes- 
tivals. handling foe budging 
and casting of such .difl£' 
guished productions as The 
Broken Heart, Uncle Y(ut)8 
and St Joan. 

It was this all-round tauten- 
ence that Lister brougfetpfe*' 
Yvonne Arnaud Theatre. 
Through his diplomacy,.busi- 
ness sense, and higfr statwaro 
of production, he steeredti* 
new theatre out of a defipt# 
over £300,000. He attractedto 
Guildfoiti some of the 
actors, and was quick ttfester 
new talent. ; 

Lister brought to his 
ion lovaltv. tmearity at** 








MR B. D. HURST 


sion loyalty, integrity 
dedication. A quiet, unassum- 
ing man without any an™ 
flamboyance, he nevertheless 
exercised a firm resolve ® 
business matters, always 
an eye to the potential w 1 * 
mercial exploitation ofa PT°* 
duction. ’ 

Of Dutch extraction, hew 
a slight figure who retained his 
youthful appearance almost “ 
the end. He enjoyed his 
and his homemaking; te **“ 
Max Adrian, his lifelQB®®*®; 
panion, together . converts 
their cottage at SnaiH*)' 
Green, designing and 
an impressive flower 


‘-'h : 

fc--’- 




' - 


V‘ 

AMl 41 




•■7 


fer- 




rv 


Mr Brian Desmond Hurst, 
the Irish-born filtn director 
who had a long career in foe 
British cinema, died in Loo- 


i r^ ti .v, and make foe propaganda fijjj 

^“Ho'lyCodto^hil 

dcm on September 26. He was ,*£1^ 

£®MSd ar,he l ™ d ’ 

•» Ireland in 
1933 to direct two low-budeet 
Pigures. Ted Tale Heart j£d 

who loses his memory after belfwd [o^nv/him^ 

U.e Battle or Britain. A big BoSinWJS L a 


His best-known picture was 
foe romantic melodrama Dan- 
gerous Moonlight, made in 
1941 and starring Anton 
Walbrook as a Polish pianist 


Theirs Is the GhiryA 
ing among his post-W --■> 
was a 195J - verson 
Dickens's A ChristntfS GWr- 
called Scrooge. 

He returned to 



N ■<’ 


popular success, the film fea- came to England, wh"^ he 


lured Richard AddinseH's was put under 
Warsaw Concerto and 


•Ll j “ 1IC ICUI1IKU W «-t- 

the industry and he 1 World War themes 

Malta Story. <IW3»s3B- 
contract by starred Alec Guinr^ 


J Pv- 

eV : '- 

■to.® 1 it. ■ 


Associated c j" y ® wrreu ease i-i 

launched a cycle of pictures Elstree. " ° Ush Slud,os al four years later -uicd 


An rariy success was Gtam- 
Orous ^(1937). anadapra- 



• wifo concert! as their theme 
music. 

Born on February 12. 1895, lion nr , .. - 

in Castiereagh. County Down. musicaL and nu^ ^®y e flo 
he was edurated at Westmin- or ™ he 

ster. In 1922. he went to Paris leading direct^ tw ?, ?? he r P^y- The 
to study art at L'Ecole des Powelf and Mria^ H ' 0M 


romance with 

ifc. featuring the fteisw^r^ 
Louis Jouroan. In "l^?f^ 
wrote and directed h i 
ful version of J.’M*. 


He never married 




THE TIMES THURSDAY OCTOBER 2 1 986 


is 

r 


15 


THE ARTS 


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allot *» 


Television 

Away in 
life’s 
jungles 

Wjtehjiis the first put of 

«r mnr^ nSOn Guests 

(BBC2) »as hke finding one- 
self on the set of an iotenni- 
nable game of Cluedo. By (he 
ctose, one slightly wanted to 
bondle everyone into the 
conservatory, turn oar the light 
and plunge in after them, 
armed to the murderous teeth 
with lead pipe, revolver, rope 

and candlestick. 

Produced by Rosemary Hill, 
and purporting to be a tale of 
middle-aged love amongst the 
monkey-puzzles. Thomas 
Ellice's adaptation creaked 
hke the hip-joints of those 
convalescing at the Went- 
worth Guest House. They 
numbered the hypochondriac 
1 m Mr Kemp, who first felt the 
twinge on March 3, 1920; the 
bicycle freak Colonel Chase 
(played a shade too bullishly 
by, Robert Hardy); the piano- 
pounding water colourist Miss 
Howard (played by her of the 
permanently beatific grin, An- 
gela Thorne); and a couple 
who snorted sinisterly over 
their triangles of toast 
Apart from a bedside se- 
quence. between Mr Kemp and 
bis etiolated daughter, and 
Colonel. Chase's rendition of 
his .life in the jungle, this was a 
plain tale that pinked along 
with no particular charm or 
wit. 

> Wben in 1914 John WB- 
liamson showed Under the Sea 
by Photosphere on Broadway, 
the. critics “exploded in 
praise" at the first motion 
pictures ever taken of the 
ocean floor. Today, this world 
of “liquid loveliness" — as his 
hyperbolic commentary had it 
— seems curiously uninterest- 
ing. Shot in the Bahamas, 
“where monsters roam in the 
icy darkness" the footage of 
parrot fish and corals included 
in Travellers in Time (BBC2) 
failed to convey what a deep 
thrill this must have been. 
Much more interesting, so- 
ciologically, were the pictures 
of Williamson's wife typing 
away at the bottom of a 1 00- 
foot tube and his tiny daughter- 
waving through the glass at a 
. negro diver. Other choice mo- 
rn meats were the capture of a 
shark, and the sight of two 
men staggering through “the 
gripping ooze" in . primitive 
diving suits. . 

Nicholas 
Shakespeare 


THE NEW MEN AT CO VENT GARDEN: Anthony Dowell, artistic director 
of the Royal Ballet, tells John Percival of his hopes and plans for the future 

Getting back to the great tradition 


When the Royal Ballet opens its new 
spison at Covent Garden on Wednes- 
dav, wjih Anthony Dowell in charge 
as director, it will be the third major 
British dance- company to have 
changed its leadership within two 
years. Pcier Schaufuss brought about 
a quick change in London Festival 
BaUci s personnel touring schedules 
and programmes: Richard Alston 
transformed Ballet Rambert's rep- 
ertory even more quickly. By con- 
lras J- there is no change of policy 
readily apparent in the season’s 
prospectus at Covent Garden, rather 
a shin of emphasis which might grow 
more obvious if continued m future 
years. 

Dowell readily agreed when I 
suggested that was so. "OF course I 
inherited some commitments, plan- 
ned well ahead, h takes a longtime to 
make changes in an organization as 
bigas this", he said — and then, with a 
twinkle in his eye. added: “Even if I 
wanted to." 

ffc is a child of the Royal Ballet, 
brought up in its school spending 
almost all his dancing career with the 
company except for a brief serjoum 
with American Ballet Theatre. And 
his approach to his new responsibil- 
ities draws on his experience. Con- 
sequently. he says. "There were 
certain things 1 wanted to restore. I 
was eager to get back some of 
Ashton's ballets that had not been 
given lately, and i am very happy that 
he has agreed to La false and 
Symphonic Variations (The former 
is to be given on opening night, the 
other follows 10 days later.) 

Dowell has also persuaded Jerome 
Robbins to revive The Concert and to 
give the company another of his 
works, the Shostakovich Opus 79, 
subtitled The Dreamer since New 
York City Ballet showed it at Covent 
Garden in 1 979. That is not the end of 
Dowell's hopes in this area, having 
himself experienced the stimulus that 
Robbins's exigent working methods 
can bring to a dancer. “I wanted to get 
back some of the Ballanchine rep- 
ertory too. and had discussions with 
people in New York about this, but 
there wasn't a healthy slot for 
rehearsals this season, so we have 
postponed it. The Royal Ballet's 
commitments to touring are a 
complication in scheduling new 
productions." 

• Dowel! is reluctant to say anything 
yet about another major work from 
the Royal Ballet’s past which he is 
already trying to bring back into the 
repertory, perhaps next season. He 
also has new ballets to offer this, 
season • by the company’s own 
choreographers, notably David Bint- 
ley.' who has just been appointed 
resident choreographer, and in the 
longer term another three-act ballet 
by Kenneth MacMillan. 

However, his own attention at 


PhotojBpn of Anttwny Dowrilby RcaDrinfain^ 



present is concentrated on Swan 
Lake . to be given a new production in 
March. Why has he chosen to direct it 
himself? “1 have danced in a lot of 
different productions, and I am 
conscious of the changes that have 
been made, especially of the way the 
music has been altered to fit different 
needs. We want to try to do justice to 
Tchaikovsky. No. we ait not going 
back to his original thoughts, but to 
the 1895 production in St Petersburg, 
which has always been the basis of the 
Royal Ballet's productions. Professor 
Wiley has unearthed a lot of evidence 
about what it was like. 

"There are detailed notes for all 
except a couple of the dances. One of 
those is tfie waltz in the first act, 
where there are only floor 'patterns.'. 
But wc know that m the waltz the 
dancers moved stools about the stage 
and used them to form groups. We 
know, for instance, that the men 
stood-on them here, the women there. 


• ■ v;vS h ' 

ftjrr 

* i- .v 1 - v-. 1 ' ■ ■ 

As the dance is Iosl I thought of 
asking someone to re-create some- 
thing using the original patterns, but 
then I thought a choreographer might 
find that restrictive. So. with my 
experience of putting steps together in 
different contexts, I thought I might 
try to do it myself." 

The designer of the new production 
is Yolanda Sonnabend. She has done 
many ballets, but never one of the old 
classics. Dowell is enjoying their 
collaboration. “Where people will 
notice niosi difference is in the first 
act which we are setting in Russia in 
Tchaikovsky's time. The white acts, 
of course, are fairly timeless anyway, 
and Act III will take place at one of . 
.ihe costume tells which were popular 
then, so there will be dresses and 
masks from different periods and 
countries." 

The classics. Dowell insists, win 
remain one of the foundations of the 
Royal Ballet’s repertory. "Audiences 


Mint them, and they are important 
for the dancers too." But he is 
conscious that dancers also need new 
works, to know the satisfaction of 
“something created on your own 
body, where you can play a pan in its 
creation". 

Will he be looking for any other 
outside choreographer? "I want to 
travel and see what other companies 
arc doing, but first 1 have to watch our 
own dancers. When somebody is 
doing a new role I must be there, or 
they can complain 'You didn't even 
sec what 1 could do'." He makes no 
secret that standards are his chief 
concern. At the school, and in his 
early days in the company, he 
experienced a discipline and concen- 
tration which he found beneficial to 
his development. “We are living in a 
different world, but I have to find a 
way to pass on what I learnt and give 
all the dancers pride in their work." 

One contribution towards this will 
be continuing to bring in guest 
teachers. “Wc had a very generous 
gift to pay for teachers and coaches 
and have tried out a lot of different 
people. Some of them 1 did not know 
before, and I have formed my own 
opinions; there are others still to 
come. Then we shall try to have back 
those who can give something we 
need." Dowell still docs class with the 
dancers (“if only for health reasons") 
and will be up on stage with them 
whenever possible, even though “my 
selfish dancing days are over — the 
time when everything else would be 
sacrificed to preparing for a big role". 
But he will take on smaller parts. 
“Thai is the way I can relate to the 
other dancers, to be dose to them and 
understand their problems." 

He is introducing a newcomer to 
the ranks of principal dancers this 
.season. Cynthia Harvey, whom 
Dowell partnered with American 
Ballet Theatre. And there will still be 
guest stars when the opportunity 
arises. But chiefly Dowell is looking 
to his own resources. A quiet, 
thoughtful man. he looks back on His 
own dancing days and is conscious of 
good fortune in getting both new and 
standard roles, of the happy timing of 
bis American experience and of the 
importance of pattern, order, the 
right opportunity at the right time. 
Now he is the one who must plan that 
for others, the one they look to for 
guidance. He is thankful to have had 
two transitional years as associate 
director, finding oui just what the job 
emails. 

1 asked whether he could sum up 
bis hopes for the company in one 
sentence. Reflectively, he replied: “I 
was at the barre in class the other day: 

1 looked at the young boys from the 
school and thought: there's some 
good stuff here”. His warm smile 
added that he intends to make the 
best he can of it 


Opera: Welsh National in London, Scottish, English National 


Descriptive power 


rmiT 


,>k -Sill 
• i ■ i 

tflllM" 1 


Siegfried 
Covent Garden/ 
Radio 3 

With Welsh National Opera's 
Ring now three-quarters past, 
it is appropriate to consider 
more carefully the achieve^ 
meni of the conductor Rich- 
ard Armstrong and the WNO 
orchestra. A solid, pro- 
fessional achievement it cer- 
tainly is, too: there have been 
few lapses in intonation or 
ensemble, and the brass solo 
work has been particularly 
■secure. 

Conductor and players have 
seemed happiest when re- 
quired to apply raw musical 
vigour for descriptive ends. 
The giants’ entry, the killing of 
Sicgmund. the re-forging of 
Noihung: all these have in- 
spired powerful playing, and 
in Siegfried the same quality 
oi" naturalistic flair was 
brought to the Act I prelude 
(Wagner's wonderfully lugu- 
brious evocation of thick for- 
est gloom — unfortunately not 
accompanied by so much as a 
single symbolic twig on stage), 
the woodbind’s calls and the 
hero's exuberant hom fan- 
fares. 

What was still more pleas- 
ing in Siegfried . however was 
Armstrong's increasingly con- 
fident shaping of the music 
when it depicts inner emo- 
tions rather than external 
pictorialism. The Act I 
Womn/Mime confrontation 


Carmen 
Theatre Royal, 
Glasgow 

We arc rather a long way from 
the Mediterranean in Graham 
Vick’s new production ot 
Carmen for Scottish Opera. 
There is no scenery’: only a 
forbidding great square oi 
chairs around a P ,al 5 >rtI V li y 
bare boards. Even ^cos- 
tumes. by Michael Ycargm 
arc uneventful: and. though a 
performance of passion migh 
well be given within tnis 


still displayed less than Vivid 
musical differentiation be- 
tween the two characters. But 
Armstrong's pacing of Act HI 
— from a magnificently gutsy 
prelude, right through to 
Wotan's turbulent summons 
to Erda, and into his clash 
with Siegfried — was just right. 
Perhaps it is not coincidence 
that Philip Joll (Wotan) pro- 
duced easily his most impos- 
ing, characterful singing so for 
for this crucial stretch, in 
which he was matched by 
Anne Collins's splendid Erda, 
slithering worm-like across 
the floor but' mightily firm- 
bodied in voice. . 

The stage action continues 
to be hampered by Carl 
Friedrich Oberie’s cumber- 
some, ugly sets. Here the 
fashion was for great card- 
board rock-faces and massive 
promontories which the char- 
acters climbed or descended, 
presumably to demonstrate 
who had psychological super- 
iority over whom at any given 
moment. This turned the 
Siegfried/Briinnhilde meeting 
into a disconcertingly com- 
plex exercise in logistics. On 
the other hand, Goran Jar- 
vefelfs production remains 
for long periods an unpreten- 
tious piece of story-telling 
enlivened by a neat and direct 
way of handling the big set- 
pieces. Coupled with Andrew 
Porter’s English translation, it 
made for a Siegfried of un- 
usually comprehensible moti- 
vation and plot. 

Its slightly naive quality 


austerity, here the flame of the 
work bums steadily and low. 

The frequent use of the 
revolve and the excessively 
choreographed movement 
makes this a production of 
posed tableaux- while the 
staging of highly charged di- 
alogues as sit-down chats, not 
least in ihe final acu looks Hke 
a wilful avoidance of the issue. 
This is a production without 
the utterly necessary qualities 
of sharpness and risk, a 
production that is desperately 
undersexed. 

Its closest approach to 
sensuality, bizarrely enough. 



Madam Butterfly 

Coliseum 


Jeffrey Lawton’s flinging insouciance as Siegfried 


also suited Jeffrey Lawton’s 
impatient, wild-boy portrayal 
of the title-role. There was an 
uncomplicated revolutionary 
excitement about his forging 
of the sword and about his 
insouciant gesture of flinging 
gold-dust over his vanquished 
elders, matched by an heroic 
strength of vocal tone that 
only lacks a complementary 
lyrical ardour. There is some- 
thing a little studied and 
unnatural about his head- 
voice, brought out for bis 
m usings about mother. His 
dialogue with the woodbtrd 
(here sung with piping pene- 
tration by a boy treble, Simon 
Pike) was treated winningly 
Hke a huge joke, and hi$ casual 
tossing of the ring in the air at 
Act IPs conclusion, like a lad 
playing catch, nicely sym-- 


is in the powerful plaintivness 
of Jane Leslie MacKenzie as 
Micaela. Sergei Leiferkus can- 
not be blamed for the odd 
effort of a Russian matador, 
but there is also a lack of thrill, 
and finish in his voice that 
keeps his Escamillo sturdy. 
Gary Bachlund as Don Jose 
suggests much more the inno- 
cent abroad than the man 
inflamed. He has kept the 
blond locks ofhis Parsifal and 
vocally loo he seems to be 
fighting at the wrong weight 

The Carmen is Emily 
Golden, who like Mr Bach- 
lund is making her British 


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bolized his total innocence of 
its murky past 

John Harris's Mime needed 
to be less of an old rascal 
more of a real nasty — 
otherwise Siegfried becomes 
the nasty for killing him. But 
his delivery was incisive, as 
was Nicholas FolwelTs dark- 
timbrel AJ bench, whose voice 
was better focused than in 
Rhinegofd. John Tranter sang 
Fafner well though the dragon 
did seem to offer himself for 
the kin rather easily. It had 
been announced that Anne 
Evans was ill but one would 
never have known, so tenderly 
and vibrantiy did this Brunn- 
hilde greet the sunrise and her 
awakening love. 

Richard Morrison 


dfbut. She is a graduate from 
the Peter Brook version, but 
that hardly shows until her 
death. Before that point she 
acts with a flatness that gives 
the impresssion of peevish- 
ness or boredom rather than 
steaming, inner depths, and 
her singing needs more bite 
and colour too. Bui possibly 
this nonchalant interpretation 
comes partly from the pro- 
ducer. for it is certainly of a 
piece with the rest or what 
goes on. 

The chorus sings well even 
if the production prevents the 
women from living up to 
some of the most erotic music 
ever imagined (what can Mr 
Vick think the opera is 
about?), and John Mauceri 
gives sure hints of what a fine, 
precise account of the score he 
might deliver with a better 
orchestra. Anthony Burgess's 
commissioned translation has 
a few new jokes along with the 
old ones. 

Paul Griffiths 


Graham Vick's split-level 
production of Madam Butter- 
fly still has a lot going for iL As 
the new Mikado has shown. 
Stefanos Lazaridis as designer 
needs only a sniff* of Japan to 
trigger his imagination. He has 
provided a set whose symbolic 
display answers perfectly, and 
rather more gracefully, Puc- 
cini's aural signposting of the 
work's cultural dichotomy: 
the translucent shadow-play 
of white, ritual Japan above, 
and the rauricy corporeality of 
western reality below. 

With its fast-moving 
screens, constantly opening, 
closing and disclosing, this is 
the sort of artifice which 
works cleverly enough as the 
decorative veneer of a perfor- 
mance of musical and dra- 
matic substance. So it was in 
its first two years. Now its 
tendency to the simplistic and 
its inherent over-busyness do 
seem intrusive, and I fear it is 
because there is simply not 
enough to bear it up 
elsewhere.. 

Its stylishness is blunted, 
possibly due to the fact that 
Mr Vick has not been around 
this time to supervise the 
staging. What worries me 
more, though, is the lack of 
discrimination in the pit: Mi- 
chael Lloyd is too content to 
follow rather than to lead, and 
too often it is the score, rather 
than the singers, which be 
follows. As a result the or- 
chestra plays at an even, albeit 
robust, level throughout, sup- 
porting ihe cast sturdily rather 
than searchingly. 

And this cast does need that 
son of help. Rosamund Tiling, 
from Australia, makes her 
house debut as the new Butter- 
fly. The voice has all the 
decibels; but hard, glottal 
vowels at the start of a word, 
and an ungainly brittleness of 
inflexion, do little either for 
Puccini's meticulously ta- 
pered phrasing or for the 
intense vulnerability of the 
character. 

Where the orchestra too 
often fails her. David Rendall 
returning as Pinkerton, offers 
robust support. 'His is a Pin- 
kerton with little more passion 
than this Butterfly has charm: 
but the role is bonestly 
thought through and capably, 
often potently. sung. Support, 
too. is there in Anne-Marie 
Owens's matronly Suzuki and. 
obliquely, in Rodney Mac- 
ann's Sharpless. He paces his 
pan well enough: with fur- 
rowed brow he Jocks HI at ease 
with the whole business. 

Hilary Finch 

■ • i f 


Theatre 

Nicolson Fights 
Croydon 

Offstage Downstairs 


Simon Callow seems to be 
cornering the market in direct- 
ing short one-man plays about 
literary figures of the mid- 
century: last month in Edin- 
burgh he gave a piece about 
David Gascoyne, which in my 
view did not work at all; here, 
rather more successfully, he 
reclaims a curious episode in 
the career of Harold Nicolson, 
writer, wit. diplomat, etc., etc. 

Of course. Nico Ison's entire 
life was a curiosity (to himself 
as much as to others): there 
was surely a perverse logic in 
this former Independent MP 
of an almost rococo sensibility 
contesting Croydon (“a 
bloody place ... my family 
do what they can through the 
Red Cross") for the Laboar 
Party in the grim spring of, 
1 948. The script offers little by 
way of explanation of motive, 
beyond the predictable no- 
tions of honour and integrity 
seasoned with a genuine con- 
cern for the plight of the poor. 
One is left feeling that Angus 
Mackay's otherwise attentive 
impersonation of this urbane 
dilettante misses a crucial note 
oflarkiness. 

We meet Nicolson on his 
return from a rare dinner at 
the Travellers' Club to the 
cold hotel room where Her- 
bert Morrison has insisted he 
put up. In the course of writing 
letters, opening review copies, 
making Ovalline on his Baby 
Belling and elaborately pre- 
paring for bed. he delivers a 
series of observations on the 
absurdities of the election 
campaign, stitched together 
with anecdotes from his en- 
viably rich life which consort 
uneasily with his present 
situation. 

These are the usual stuff 
about trying to get conversa- 
tional change out of James 
Joyce or recommending the 
names of English duchesses to 
that hyper-snob -Proust, and 
are delivered directly to the 
house. The effect is mostly 
monotonous and manages to 
degrade the pellucid ex- 
cellence of Nico! son’s prose, 
which does not thrive on this 

S 'ecemeal treatment. And the 
ndamenla! question raised 
by all stage monologues — 
"Why is he telling us all this?" 
— remains unanswered. It is 
only in the closing minutes, 
when he reaffirms his touch- 
ing devotion to ihe absent 
Vita SackviHe-West, that the 
thing achieves a measure of 
paihos and tenderness. 

Martin Cropper 



The Danphine's inner chamber in its new guise 


Charlotte Mosley reports from Versailles on 
the restoration of ‘the world’s most 
magnificent royal residence* 

Purist perfection 


In June this years new suite of 
rooms was inaugurated at 
Versailles to coincide with Ihe 
retirement of the curator. 
Pierre Lemoine. Four months 
later his post has yet to be 
filled. This is a difficult job in 
a country where historic and 
artistic passions run high. 
Many violent quarrels have 
taken place just where art and 
politics intersect. The debate 
about the Eiffel Tower, the 
Right Bank expressway and. 
more recently, the Buren Col- 
umns at the Palais R ovale 
spring to mind. The job of 
chief curator at Versailles is as 
politically loaded as any in 
France. This no doubt ac- 
counts for the delay in naming 
a successor. 

In the meantime, the legacy 
of Lemoine's term of office 
can be seen in the redecorated 
rooms. If your last visit to 
Versailles left you surfeited 
with rich hangings, carvings 
and gilding, then these rooms 
will revive your appetite for 
the French 1 8th century. After 
eight years' patient restoration 
and the expense of some £10 
million, 38 rooms of the 
ground floor of the oldest part 
of the chateau have been put 
back to what they were in 1789 
when the royal femily left the 
palace for ever. 

The inauguration took place 
with all the pomp and cere- 
mony and huge crowds that 
befit the world's most mag- 
nificent royal residence, but it 
has had relatively little atten- 
tion from the French Press. 
The opening of a suite of 
rooms at Fontainebleau at the 
same time received wide 
coverage while Versailles see- 
med to have passed almost 
unnoticed. This is partly be- 
cause the rooms concerned 
were not designed for the 
sovereign but for his children 
and grandchilden: the Dau- 
phin and Dauphine. Madam 
Adelaide, Madam Victoire 
and Marie-Antoinette. The 
d£cor is not therefore as 
sumptuous as in the King’s 
and Queen's apartments. 

There has been a shift away 
from the spectacular and 
theatrical re-creation of a de- 
cor for some of the greatest 
events in French history to a 
purist, more an-historical 
reconstruction of the past. 
This is reflected in the new 
rooms. The furniture is only of 
the highest quality, often 
commissioned for the chateau 
itself This leaves some of the 
rooms rather bare, but no 
doubt they will be filled over 
the years and chandeliers will 
be found for the many hooks 
waiting tanializingly on the 
ceiling; — sometimes six in a 
room. The paintings and fur- 
niture are immaculately la- 


belled and follow the chron- 
ology of the rooms. Thus the 
visit begins with a delightful 
portait of Louis XIV as a a 
child by Rigaud and ends with 
Madam Vigec-Le-Brun’s fam- 
ous portrait of Marie-Ant- 
oinette. 

The most important of the 
recent restorations was the 
raising of the level of the 
marble courtyard around 
which the newly opened 
rooms radiate. In the 1830s. 
when Versailles became a 
museum under Louis- Phi- 
lippe, the courtyard and the 
rooms around it were lowered 
to the same level as the rooms 
giving on to the garden on the 
other side. This was because 
the chateau has no founda- 
tions and was suffering from 
damp. The damp may have 
been cured, but at the cost of 
distorting the proportions of 
the rooms and disfiguring the 
exquisite brick and stone fa- 
cade; the columns were left 
floating uneasily some three 
feet above the courtyard. 

There is only one area 
where the 18th-century chron- 
ology has not been respected: 
Madam Sophie's apartment 
which occupied the central 
section remains unrestored. 
Instead a long stone gallery 
designed by Le Vau in 1669 
which lies directly below the 
Hall of Mirrors has been 
rebuilt This was a bold piece 
of restoration since little re- 
mained of the gallery after 
Louis XV and Louis-Phil- 
ippe’s various transforma- 
tions. Above the doors in the 
east walls traces of a stone 
carving have been uncovered. 
The spirit of the purist has 
rightly prevented any attempt 
at re-creating the carving, but 
over the opposite doors, where 
there would have been a 
matching motif its outline has 
been suggested by stone 
blocks. These look like ted 
Mexican sculpture and the 
overdoors would have been 
better left bare. 

It will be interesting to see 
whether the next curator will 
continue to take a purist 
approach to the never-ending 
task of restoration, or whether 
there will be a swing back to 
the more flamboyant style of 
Gerald van der Kemp, curator 
until 1980. Whatever happens 
is Ukely to be controversial as 
Mme Hoog, curator of sculp- 
ture, knows to her cost. She 
would dearly like to see the 
absurd equestrian statue of 
Louis XIV in the royal court- 
yard removed. Bui all at- 
tempts to get rid of the 
monument of majesty sitting 
on a horse the size of a 
Shetland pony have met with 
threatening letters and out- 
raged telephone calls. 


The Royal Ballet 


NEW SEASON OPENS with 
'The never tailing fun of 
JEROME ROBBINS’ 
THE CONCERT...” 

The Tb 

Plus ROBBINS’ 

OPUS 19/ 

THE DREAMER 

DAVID BINTLETS 

galanteries 

(UK Premiere) 



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16 


THE TIMES THURSDAY OCTOBER 2 1986 



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Book 


B; A StafT Reporter 

"Hie Prince of Wales and 
other eminent children's writ- 
ers today launch an appeal for 
£500,0#® to keep the last great 
private collection of children's 
books in England. The Opie 
Collection, pot together over a 
fO-year period by Pieter and 
Iona Opse, contains more rt|a|> 
20,§00 books and other works 
published for children and is 
worth at least £1 million. 

The O pies started collecting 
for The Oxford Dictionary of 
Nanay Rhymes, first pub- 
lished in 1951. Their collec- 
tion growed and growed to 
lake in toys, games, oral lore 
and anything that shed Light 
on the continually fugitive 

world of children. 

They were ahead of their 
time and the market In their 
researches into the foggy 
depths of eighteenth-century 
children's titef-ature, they ac- 
quired such impossible trea- 
sures as a unique second edi- 
tion of Little Goody Two- 
Shoes (1766), a dozen or two 
lesser works glowing like new 
in their Doral-gflt bindings, 
and one of the most important ■ 
nursery-rhyme books ever 
published: Tommy Thumb’s 
Song Book, pnbtished in 1794 
and crucial to understanding 
the development of English 
nursery rhymes. 

The Opies hoped their . 
collections might form a. Mu- 
seum of Childhood, hot the 
project ended when Peter died 
in 1981 and Iona decided to 
sell the children's books as a 
whole. Oxford was the obrions 
repository, because the Dic- 
tionary of Nursery Rhymes 
started in the Bodleian, and 
the Oxford University Press 
published all the Opies' subse- 
quent books of child lore that 
grew from it Iona has offered 
die collection to the Bodleian 
for £500,000. 

The majestic strength of 
English children's literature is 
now better represented in 
collections in the United 
States than here. 

The handsome opportunity 
offered by Iona Opie will not 
come our way again. All Tom 
Thumbs, Georgie POrgies, and 
other good children will be 
keeping their sticky fingers 
crossed that the Prince of 
Wales, the other sponsors, and 
the Friends of the Bodleian 
will find enough nursery Mae- 
cenases, or geese that lay 
golden e g g s to keep the great 
collection here. 

Photographs: Harry Kerr 



and growed’ 


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Some of the books in the Opie collection, photographed in the Bodleian Library. 


Susan Claywortfa, a trainee librarian, reads LitUfe Folk (1875). 

guilty " ' v . ‘ * \ 




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A tiny book, Various Trades (1802), St Paul's Cathedral (1741) and Book 


fk.i'y 

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of Nursery Rhymes and Musk (1797) give an idea of the collection's scope. 


Today's events 


Royal engagements 

The Princess of Wales visits 
the Courtaulds Leisurewear De- 
sign Studios. 21 Redan Place. 
W2. 10.05. 

Princess Anne. President, the. 
Royal Bath and West and 
Southern Counties Society, at- 
tends the South Western Dairy 
Show. Shepton Mallet, 1 1.45. 

Princess Margaret attends a 
concert by the Massed Bands of 
the Royal Air Force, in aid of the 
Royal Air Force Benevolent 
Fund, at the Albert Hall. 7.20, 

New exhibitions 

David Shepherd's private 
collection; Sotheby's, Mag- 
dalene Street. Taunton; today & 
tomorrow. 10 to 4. Sat 10 to 12. 
(ends Oct 4). 


Exhibitions in progress 
Recent work by Claudette 
Johnson including portraits 
from Moss Side; City Art Gal- 
lery. Mosely St, Manchester. 
Mon to Sat 10 to 6. Sun 2 to 6 
(ends Oct 51. 

R-B. Cunninghame-Graham: 
an exploration of his life: Smith 
Art Gallery and Museum. Dum- 
barton Rd, Stirling: Wed to Sun 
2 to 5. Sat 10.30 to 5 (ends Oct 
26). 

Last chance to see 
Artist's 303 annual: Butiin 
Gallery. Dillington College,- 
Uminster. Somerset, 2 to 5. 

Ceramics by Paul Brown and 
paintings by Carlo Rossi; The 
Open Eye Gallery. 75 Cumber- 
land Street. Edinburgh, lOto 12. 

Musk 

Concert by the Moscow Phil- 


The Times Crossword Puzzle No 17,166 






TTX 




33 





I 





EL 


ACROSS 

1 Signal of little weight (4.5). 

6 Man perhaps makes very lit- 
tle money when retired (5). 

9 In business, company bead 
is a (air taiget (7). 

10 Saw evidence about 
nationalised concern (7). 

11 Digs around in the middle 
of Hampstead Heath (5). 

12 Primarily knights errant 
that are resolved to cheer up 
(4.5). 

14 Cook fish (3). 

15 Scene of many a union 
meeting (6,5). 

17 Showing dexterity, hanged 
third delinquent (5-6). 

19 One who works hard just to 
live, they say (3). 

20 In France I drink a second 
beer inside the city (9). 

22 “Not outT". umpire's about 
to conclude (5). 

24 No girt is rejected by daugh- 
ter — one of her best friends 
CO- 

26 Like most services today, 
acquire too many weapons 

(n . . . „ 

27 For instance, originally 
vou’d place Thebes here (5). 

28 Finish the surface of blue 
slate (5,4). 


1 little boy are 
.(5). 

to cry unhappily 


4 20's wallers may collapse 
(2.2.3. 4). 

5 Pavmenl — mine's put up 
(3X 

6 Show disapproval of the 
foot-loose assassin (5). 

7 Most newspapermen have 
time to prognosticate (7>. 

8 Coming oul one notes fuel 
running oul of lop of lank 
(9). 

13 Hereafter, mock me doing 
somersaults (7.4). 

14 Prematurely decide hearing 
in favour of the hearer (9j. 

16 Somehow, doing less clean- 
ing nearly achieves it (9). 

18 What can spread disease 
over some country (71, 

19 Ox to be found in New York 
(7». 

21 Strong liquor (5). 

23 In Rio de Janeiro, many an 
Italian can be seen <51. 

25 Fop not completely useless 
Ol. 

Solution to Puzzle No 17.165 


: don’t have this 

i (4 J). — — — 

Concise Crossword page 10 



_ — uais_ 


harmonic Orchestra; Brangwyn 
Hall. 7.30. 

Organ recital by Jonathan 
Rees-Williams; Wells Cathe- 
dral, 8. 

Piano recital by Gabriele 
Seidel: The Royal Exchange. 
Manchester. [ to 2. 

Concert by the Halle Or- 
chestra. Victoria Hall. Hanley. 
Staffs. 8. 

Canterbury Festival: recital 
by Jill Gomez (soprano): 
Gulbenkian Theatre. Canter- 
bury. 7.30. 

woobum Festival: Master 
class for guitar with Michael 
Conn. St Dunsian's Church. 
Bourne End, Bucks. 8: Jazz 
recital by George Chisholm. 
Keith Smith and Hefty Jazz. 
Briiish Legion Hail. Loudwater, 
Bucks. 8. 

Concert by the London Festi- 
val Orchestra: Chichester 
Cathedral. 7.30. 

Concert by the Bingham 
Siring Quartet. Solihnll Library 
Theatre. I. 

Recital by Sidonie Winter 
imezzo-sopranoland Nigel Fos- 
ter (pianoi. St Mary's Church. 
Aylesbury. Bucks. 1.10. 

Concert b> the IMS Prussia 
Cove Ensemble: St George's. 
Brandon Hill. Bristol I. 

Talks, lectures 
|4th century social history in 
the Cotswolds: land and people, 
by Dr Ccti3 Miller and David 
Vincr. Co is v. old Countryside 
Collection. Northleadi. Glos. 
7.3D. 

The Founding of Ballymena 
Baptist Church: Cambridge 
House Boys' School. Ballymena, 
7.30. 

Seeds arid fruits, by Roy 
Harding. 1.30: Red squirrels, by 
Cumbna Trusi for Nature 
Conservation. 3.30: Lake Dis- 
trict National Park Visitor 
Centre. Brockhole. Windcmere. 
Cumbria. 

National Garden Festival 
sculpture. Stoke. Liverpool. , 
Glasgow. Gateshead: Council 
Chamber. Gateshead Town I 
Hall. 10.30 to 4.00. 

General 

South Western Dairy Show; 
Showground. Shepton Mallei. 
Somerset. 8 to 5. 


• ‘Jr . . •• . - 1 . . 1 1 A W | 


New books — paperback 


FICTION 

A Five Year Sentence, by Bemtoa Rubens (Abacus, £3.50) 


The luck of the Vail*. 
The Stories of Ronald B 


My Life Closed Twice, by Nigel Wilfiams (Faber. £3.50) 

~r. Benson (Hogarth, £4.50) 

(Methuen, 0.95) 

Wait Until Spring, BandM. by John Fame (Panther, £SL50) 

NON-ncnON 

English Misericords, by Marshafl Land (John Murray, £9.95) 

The Godless Victorian, by Noel Annan (Chicago University. £9 .95) 

■The Satyricon. by Petra ni us, and The Apocrfocyntosn, by Seneca, 
translated and annotated by J.P. SuJBvan (Penguin Classics. £335) 

The Sonnets and A Lover's Complaint, by WiHnm Shakespeare, edited by 
John Kemgan (Penguin. £455) 

Theatre Works 1973-1985, by Tony Harrison (Penguin, £4.95) PH 


Roads 


The Midlands: Ml: Contra- 
flow continues at junction 20 
(A247 Lutterworth). Ml: 
Contraflow between junctions 
27 (A608) and 28 (A38): delays 
in rush hour. A5: Roadworks 
between Telford and the M6 
with single line traffic and 
temporary - signals. 

Wales and West: M4: Contra- 
flow between junctions 16 and 
17 (Swindon /Cirencester). M5: 
Nearside and centre lanes closed 
between junctions 1 1 and 12. 
Gloucestershire. A484: Various 
sets of roadworks continuing at 
Dy fed. Llanelli. 

The North: M6: Both carr- 
iageways and slip roads subject 
to closure at junction 37 (Cum- 
bria). M61: Construction of new 
motorway link at Walton Sum- 
mit: inside lane closures north 
and southbound. M63: Major 
widening scheme at Barton 
Bridge: avoid the area if 
possible. 

Scotland: MS: Contraflow be- 
tween Paisley and Erskine; in- 
side northbound lane closed: no 
access to M89S from the M8. 
Edinburgh: Various width res- 
trictions in 5l Mary Street at 
Holy rood, and temporary lights 
on Bonnington Rd at Tennant 
Street. A94: Temporary lights N 
and S of Forfar, care required on 
approach. 

loTonnatiot] supplied by AA 


Anniversaries 


Births: Richard DDL, reigned 
1483-85. Fotheringhay Castle. 
Northamptonshire, (452; Sir 
Edward Tylor. anthropologist, 
London. 1832: Paul von Hind- 
enbnrg, 2nd president of the 
Weimar Republic 1925-34. Po- 
sen. Prussia (Poznan, Poland), 
1847; Ferdinand Fact, Marshal 
of France, Tarbes. 1851; Sir 
William Ramsay, chemist. No- 
bel laureate 1904. Glasgow. 
1852: Mahatma Gandhi, 
Porbandar. India, 1869: Wal- 
lace Stevens, poet Reading, 
Pennsylvania. 1879. 

Deaths: Samuel Adams, poli- 
tician, Boston, Massachusetts, 
1803: Sarah Biffin (BeffinL 
miniature painter who was born 
without arms, hands or legs, 
Liverpool 1850: Jose Maria de 
Heredia, poeu Houdan. France. 
1905: Svante Arrhenius, chem- 
ist Nobel laureate 1903. Stock- 
holm. 1927; Marcel Duchamp, 
painter, Neuilly. France. 1968. 


Our address 


infomuiDn for Indus km in tiw 
T imes Inlnniidlion am te should tie 
vrm lo. TTx? Editor. TT1S. The Times. 
PO Bos 7. t Virginia Street. London. 
El 9\N. 


Tower Bridge 


Tower Bridge will be raised 
today at 2 pm and 2.30 pm. 


Weather 

forecast 


A ridge of high pressure 
will persist over south era 
Britain. A weak cold front 
over southern Scotland 
and northern England 
will move very slowly 
southwards. 


6 am to midnight 


London, S 

East Anglia, E Midlands. 

Wands: Dry, foggy start then hazy 
sunshine; wind light mainly south- 
max tamp 19C (56F). 

L SW, central N England, W 
Midlands, S Wales: Mist or fog 
patches at first then mainly dry but 
rather cloudy; wind southwesterly 
light: max temp 17C (B3F). 

N Wales, NW, NE England 
Rather doudy, a little rain in paces: 
wind westerly light or moderate; 
max temp 16C(61F). 

Lake District, Isle of Man, Bor- 
ders, Edinburgh, Dundee, Aber- 
deen, SW Scotland, Glasgow, 
Northern Ireland: A flttie ram in 
places, sunny intervals developing; 
wind westerly moderate; max temp 
14C(57F). 

Central Highlands, Moray firth, 
NE, NW Scoiend, Argyll Showers 
and sunny intervals: wind westerly 


SE, central S England^ 


t' 


sunny Intervals; wind westerly veer- 
ing northwesterly fresh or strong 
tocaHy gale; max temp 12C (54F). 

Outlook for tomorrow and Sat- 
urday: Rather doudy with some 
drizzle in the S at first otherwise thy 
with sunny periods. Ova ' 
Becoming cooler with 
frost in northern areas. 


F rank Johnson with Labour 

Fight for soul of 

commentary box 


, The main event of 
yesterday's proceedings at the 
Labour conference was the 
debate on the nuclear power 
industry. 

The debate was im- 
aoned and the arguments 
fly balanced. Or at least, 
that was how it appeared on 
television. Because the 
Wapping dispute has meant 
that we of The Times are this 
banned from the con- 
ice hall we have been 
watching it on television. 

After two days ‘in which, 
with a general election com- 
ing closer and closer, they had 
striven to present a relatively 
united front to the electorate, 
the debate on energy revealed 
once more the split which, 
after alL is what, in the eyes of 
the country. Labour con- 
ferences are traditionally 
about- the old struggle be- 
tween Sir Robin Day and Mr 
Vincent Hanna. 

As the vote was being taken 
at the end of the debate, Mr 
Arthur Scaigiil appeared 
among the swirl of delegates. 
Sir Robin- mused that the 
debate had represented some- 
thing of a bounce-back on the 
pan of Mr ScaigjlL 

Mr Hanna: “I suspect no, 
Robin.” 

Mr Hanna, who is seen as 
being on the soft left of the 
BBC. went on to say some- 
thing about there not being 
much evidence that people 
were paying much attention 
to Mr ScaigUl in the party 
now. Sir Robin (Old Right) 
bided his time. The camera 
focused on Mr W illiam Jor- 
dan, the new leader of the 
engineers' union.' who al- 
though turned 50, looks 
much younger. 

Mr Hanna referred to the 
“young** Mr Jordan, but 
added: “Well not young. 
He's a grandfather.” 

Sir Robin: “There are a lot 
of young grandfathers.” 

Mr Hanna: “I’ra not quali- 
fied to say." 

After a while^ the viewer 
becomes fascinated by this 
struggle for the soul of the 
BBC commentary box. An- 
other figure in the tense 
situation is Mr David 
Dimbleby (extreme centre). 
He pursues a Kin nock-like 
strategy of depicting himself 


as the nice one among a learn 
of brutes. But sometimes he 
shows a hint of steel. “And 

now over to Vincent Hanna , 
said Sir Robin yesterday, to 
which the reply was: “Its 
David Dimbleby, actually, as 
arranged.” 

The coverage goes on tor 
hour after hour. Some of us 
find this sort of politics 
interesting, indeed mesmeriz- 
ing. But who else is watching 
out there, one wonders? 

For no matter how 
“managed” or . moderate a 
pre-election Labour con- 
ference is. it is inevitable that 
many of the speakers will not 
be folly paid-up members of 
the human race. Yet all over 
Britain, lonely housewives 
and Norwegian au pair girls 
are being exposed to these 
proceedings as they go about 
their duties in the home. 

What did they make, for 
example, of the veteran left- 
winger, Mrs Audrey Wise, 
breaking into Spanish during 
a debate yesterday on Nica- 
ragua ana shrieking defiance 
at the Reagan-supported 
Contras with the old cry ~Ifo 
pasamn /*? 

The viewers were not to 
know, that this apparent 
Pasionaria was in reality dear 
old Audrey, formerly MP for 
un passionate Coventry South 
West, where the only recent 
civil wars have probably been 
in the local Labour Party? 

Mass tourism has ac- 
quainted the average viewer 
with the horror of “Itfo 
paella!” or “flfo rioja! ”, or no 
booze left in the whole of 
Benidorm. But who are these 
people who we're supposed 
not to let pass? More Spanish 
immigrants wanting to be 
waiters over here? Thai must 
be it 

Each morning the coverage 
is interrupted for 20 minutes 
for Play School The party 
managers can use this to 
avoid severe embarrass- 
ments. On Tuesday. Play 
School intervened just as the 
debate on gay and lesbian 
rights was starting. We re- 
turned to the conference to 
hear someone saying: “All 
those in favour, show.” Show 
what, for heaven’s sake? 
Fortunately, it was just 
hands. 




High Tides 


t£Mu£ iky: bc-fttue sky and cload; c- 
Mow d-dmzte: h- 
e-raln: s-snow: m- 
Ouinderaorm; Mhowtrs. 
Agjy yakgy wted dtremon. wind 
gwd^unjjw circled. Temperature 


TODAY 

AM 

HT 

PM 

HT 

London Bridgt 

135 

6_5 

■ 1.52 

60 

Abardeen 

1Z51 

4.0 

12/ 

40 

Avonmsuth 

7.03 

11.9 

7.17 

125 

Bstfast 

10^6 

3.1 11.03 

35 

Caitflft 

6.48 

110 

7.02 

115 

Dewnport 

530 

5.1 

5,43 

5.4 

Dow 

10.49 

BA 11.03 

6.3 

Falmouth 

5.00 

43 

5.13 

5,7 

Glasgow 

Harwich 

DeU 

4.5 

33 

1.02 

4.1 

ET* 

10.19 

806 

5^2 1028 
63 627 

SO 

70 

hiioumbQ 

555 

05 

609 

80 

Leffli 

221 

5.1 

2.49 

52 

Lhnwpoai 

11.13 

8.8 1127 

92 

Lowesteft 


24 10.01 

£3 

Btaqpite 

11.48 

4.6 


MHofd Havau 

6.09 

6^> 

822 

6.R 

N<w«W 

5^1 

6.5 

5.14 

6.6 

Oban 

6.01 

3 J 

506 

40 

Penzancn 

4.31 

52 

443 

55 

Portland 

7.02 

20 

7.02 

22 

Portsmouth 

11JS 

42 1125 

4 5 

Shoraham 

11.08 

60 1121 

60 

SoutiuBuptaa 


4.4 11.09 

43 

Smkmi 

6.11 

6.B 

623 

97 

Tms 

3.16 

5.1 

3.47 

52 

Wflon-oo-Nza 

11.40 

40 


Around Britain 



SairtaBK Son sat*: 

7.02 am BJSt pm 


5.03 am 022 pm 
New moon tomorrow 


Children's vigil 



OnSaiurdaj 3h5 children will 
begin a i»vl*.>.--hour candlelit 
vigil around the Albert Hull to 
celebrate the 4>.kh anniversary 
ol U niccf 

Volunteers v.i!l continue the 
vigil until noon on Sunday 
when lhe torch of the first earth 
run e*. ent. a global relav arrives 
in London. 


The pound 


AmtraEa S 
Austria Sch 
BoKpurn r r 

Cannes 
Donmam Kr 
Finland Mkk 
France Ft 
Germany Dm 
Greece Dr 
Hong AongS 
Ireland Pt 
Italy ura 
Japan Yen 

NeniedandaGW 
Norway Kr 
Portugal Esc 

South Africa Rd 
Spain Pta 
Sweden Kr 

Swnuertana Fr 
USAS 

yugctJavia Dnr 


Bir.H 

0U.5 

2.37 

21.50 
63.65 

207 

11.50 
7 52 
935 
1C5 

20200 
11.57 
1 117 
2110.00 
235.00 
3.44 
11.15 
213.S0 
a.W 
193.75 

1037 
248 
t St 
75C.L0 


Bank 

Sells 

225 

20.30 

03-25 

1.38 

1DJC 

702 

9.AS 

2B8 

190.00 
11.07 
VC 57 

1990.00 

221.00 
3.25 

■tLSa 

237.50 

3.40 

183.75 

9.82 

2J4 

1.44 

65000 


Bales lo>‘ sman wns-ninaiis” a*' - * nows 
onjy as suacfi^u a* Sard* is Ban* p i_C 

Di’ier-ni ri'trs iOZ'i *0 travelers 
wiMiues ar>3 vihei Cun* r icv 

Susrr.esr. 

Lamlon; The 
iZai 7 


■ ir c’WiC US 24 7 at 


Turin*. Portfolio Gold rule* are as 

fOllGMV 

1 Times Portfolio is free Purchase 

*«l Ttie Times is no* a condition of 

lihinq oarl 

2 Tunes Portfolio list comprises a 
qroup of publir companies whose 

stkir—. .ire listed on the Slock 
Esrh.'iirte and ouofed In The Times 
Evrharw pr-ces pane The 
rnmiwimes ram prising Uial list will 
rrirtiiij.- from das IO day The lt*H 
‘w h#ch is numbered I - 4J i is divided 

mil., lour rundumlv distributed groups 

ol 11 snares Every Portfolio card 
contains two numbers from each 
group and each card contains a 
urnuue in of numbers 

3 Times pnninlio 'dividend' will be 

I in- liriure in pence which represents 

i no optimum movement in prices il e 

fhc i.n-qesi increase or lowest lossi of a 

com hi nation of rignl 'lw*> from each 

rantlumlv disirmufedgmup within the 

4i sharesi of lhe 44 shares which on 

■utv one rt.r. comprise The Times 
ROTIftHiii Jisl 

4 The dells dividend will be 
.iniHiuni-eri -,nh ilav and fhe weekly 

di i.Vr.s will he announced each 
S-nuiejv in The Times 

5 T«w PiiriiniH’i lisl and deliiih. of 

lhe dail, iir weeSI], AnHKM will also 

h* a* .ii'.ihie jm inspection al the 
uiitce-. w rw- Cliw-S 

C II IP- O'er all price movement of 

mnre ih.tr. o(.»- i nmfHnalion of shares 

■ ..lull - Hi.- dp ■nrsid. lhe prize will Be 

• quail', tli. irte.1 .imuiw The rlaimanls 

h.ildmu l hiw coinhinauons of shares. 

7 411 riaims are suhiccl lo scrutiny 

n. ini., pji nn-iii An* Tunes Poruouo 

card lh.il r. »us.ir«tl. I.inipi,*ri?d with or 

■n< nrrivtiv prini.d tn any way will be 

di-rlarid void 

<3 Employees n vnu infer national 

pir and it' suCc'dianey ana of 
i-uropriiii Crriiip Limiiefl iprdducers 

and diMnhmors m iiu 1 card) or 

iniiint>-r» ui thiur immedihie families 
.ire not jl|r..s-Tl lo play Times 
Portfolio 

All p»ir|ir .p.rnl* wi|| he yulncvT IO 

fhi-M- Rnli-. All insirijrtiorw on "how 

lo plav" and "hnw lii iluin" v. net her 
pnhlnh.sl m Tr«- Tun.-, or in Times 

Pgriioiic, .- M rds will ty deemed in t>e 

p-irl »if Ihusn Pilin' The Editor 
rwrvi— lhe I Hint to amend the Rules 
IO In an» dispuli'. The Editor's 
fleeisinn final -vr-rf no correspon- 
urure will Dt; enlerml imo ( 


II If lor any reason The Times 


Hew to ptay - Mr DMdmd 

On each day your unique set of effitd 
numbers will represem commercial 

and induunal shares published in The 

Times Portfolio list which will appear 

on the block Exchange Prices page. 

in the columns provided next lo 

jour shares noie lhe price change (■* 

or -i in pence, as published in that 

day's Times. 

After listing lhe price changes of 
your eight shares for dial day. add up 
all eight share changes lo give you 

jour overall total plus or minus t+ or ■ 

i 

Check your overall total against The 
Times Portfolio dividend published on 
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li your overall total matches The 

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prne money staled for lhai day and 

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M«w 

How lo play - Weekly Dividend 
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Add these fnoelher to determine 
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If vour local mjimes lhe published 

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Haw ta dm 

Telephone The Tim Portfoflo d 
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hours 

The above Instructions are BP- 
olirahte lo noth daily and* weekly 
dll idend claims. 


Ughtmg-np tune 

London 7.07 pm to &34 am 
Bristol 7.17 pm to 8.44 am 

E din b u rafa •• 16 P" 1 to 6.49 am 

Manchester 7.14 pm to &43 am 
Penzance 7.28 pm to 6^5 am 

Yesterday 

Tempers tines at midday - yestsrday: - ^ 

doudi f, fair; r. run: s. sun. 

C F C F 

1 14 57 Quem ae y fo1457 
. c 1355 I nremeaa r 1559 

tpool c 1356 Jersey s IB 84 

Bnetof C 1661 London c 1559 

Canfifl C 1457 RTnctaater c 1254 

EcBntna^i » 14 57 Newcastle 11864 
Glasgow r 1355 gold s way c 1355 


Betttm 


Seatink travellers 


British Airways has stepped in 
to save the holidays of travellers 
stranded by the suspension of 
Sealink's Wcymoulh/Channcl 
Island service yesterday. 

All passengers holding tickets 
for ihe service issued up to 
September 30 by SeaJink UK 
will be able to travel on British 
Airways' five flights a day 
between Heathrow and Jersey 
lor which there will be no 
chargc- 

Passengers are advised to 
make a flight reservation with 
ihe airline and have their ticket 
rc-issued at any British Airways 
travel shop or airport ticket 
desk. The offer takes effect 
immediately. 


O^MES NEWSPAPERS LIMITED 
r*®t> Prrtiujl by London pasi t Prim. 

cni Limiifri at l Virginia street. 
London 1 1 RXN and by Mows. 
Stmirtiid Lid 134 Portnun Street, 
hinniini Park. Glasnpw On 1EJ. 
ThUMOV. OflOberiS. 1986. 
iMi-red as a newspaper at Uw Post 
Ofltre 



Max 
C F 

24 75 sunny 

17 83 fog 
15 59 enudy 
15 59 cfoudy 
15 59 doudy 
15 59 (M 

15 59 doudy 

16 61 dud 
16 61 dufl 
T6 61 sunny 

18 61 bright 
16 61 doudy 
15 59 (M 
15 59 doudy 
15 59 duS 


Sun Ban Max 
hre hi C F 
* - 17 63 

Tonby - - 14 57 

CotwynBay - - 14 57 

MoreaHPfap 4L0 - 15 SB 

□Mitfas - 02 12 54 

SOLANO AND WALES 
London 1.7 

B’ham Akpt 0.4 

; Bristol fotri) 02 

Cxiflff(Ctr| 

An glaaa y 0.1 

B’pooiMfpt 52 

22 


Jarsay 

Gue m a o y 7.1 
WEST COAST 
ScMy Istes IO 
02 




13 55 tog 

18 64 sunny 

19 66 sunny 
15 m (State 
13 55 ran 
13 56 ran 

17 63 bright 

20 68 bright 
23 73 winy 

21 70 sunny 

18 64 stmny 

NORTHERN HELAND 

9 4 -'20 68 surmy 


Prestwick 95 - 

Glasgow 7.3 

TVs* as 

Stornoway - 002 
LiBfwiefc • -0JQ2 

Wk* 3J7 

KMosS 6A 

A hairi M b 9.1 

Sl Andrews 7J5 

Ed nb w gb 9L5 


Ihrise are TktMdsy*s figures 


Abroad 


8HD0AY: c, doud: d, dtzzfa; I. fair; fg. log; r, rakn s, sum sn, snow; l Btundar. 


WroUT* 

Atex’dria 

Algtora 


C F 
9 28 82 Cotogua 
I 22 72 Cpfesiss 
C Oats 

G 23 73 DubBn 


C F 
A 21 70 
C 14 57 


Amrdm S 18 64 DUran* s 23 73 


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Bortrt 


Can 

CapeTn 

CWm 

Chtesgo^ 


I 22 72 Fsro 
s 36 97 Rorooce 
I 29 84 Fksokfcat 
t 19 66 Rmctm 
9) 24 75 Gtneva 
b IB 66 Gibraltar 
S 18 B4JMsMrf 
S 26 79 Hong K 
s 21 70 imrek 
a 25 77 tetenbtd 
s 17 S3 Jsddah 

8 23 73 L Potato* 
s 29 B4 Lisboa 
» 20 68 Lo ca rno 
3 24 75 L Angsts* 
0 17 63 LtoosmbB 



8 29 84 
S 27 81 
S 20 68 

-1 22 72 

s 16 61 Munich 
8 22 72 NairoU 

.1 2 US® 

8 22 72NY«fc* 
r 18 64 Me* 
*35 SS Oslo 
.1 18 61 Pm* 

C 30 06 PMda 

a 25 T7 Parti 

s 25 77 
8 20 68 

3 22 72 

.8 17 63 Mods J 


C F 
f 24 75 
) 23 73 
a 2B 79 
c 21 70 
1 24 76 
1 30 88 
5 23 73 
C 24 75 
G S 43 
s 20 88 

t 25 77 

3 27 81 

f 28 IE 

s 29 « 
S 26 79 
.'.c 12 54 
8 22 72 
8 2577 
8 16 61 
s.re 64 

a 4 39 

S 24 75 

I 22 72 


« Prow* 
Santiago* 
S Panto* 


33£l 

mm 


ToreS 

Tunis 



aranmeh s 23 73 hum 1 21 -70 iSyadb i 38100 
: doBQtes Tueatey's figtxn are latest ai 




c F 
* 26 7B 
s 19 68 
8 18 64 

( 18 64 

(g 20 68 
r 18 64 

ttl 30 68 
S 17 63 
S 18 64 
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s ZB 79 
r 19 66 
r 20 68. 
f 27 81 
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Executive Editor 
Kenneth Fleet 

| stock ma rket" " 

FT 30 Share 

1251.7 (+24.7) 

FT-SE 100 
t 1578.3 (+22.5) 

Bargains 

.22147 

USM (Datastream) 

; 122.26 (+ 0 . 35 ) * 

THE POUNn 

US Dollar 
1.4445 (-0.0025) 

W Germanmark 

2.9331 (-0.0080) 

Trade-weighted 
68.9 (-0.1) 

* BA valued 
at £lbn 

British Airways, due to be 
privatized early next year, 
could be sold od a stock 
market valuation of around 
£1.000 million, according to a 
study just published by the 
stockbrokers Phillips & Drew, 
who will be advising BA in the 
notation. 

P&D expects that BA’s prof- 
its will fan this year to around 
£125 million, compared with 
£183 million last time. Bui 
during the year to March < 
1 988. a strong recovery should 
lift profits to around £200 
milion, says P&D. 

The study also suggests that 
BA shares could be sold on a 
yield basis of. around 6 per 
cent, roughly double the av- 
erage of major listed airlines. 

Pressure eases 
over rates 

Pressure for a rise in interest 
rates again eased yesterday in 
money markets. Three-month 
money in the interbank mar- 
ket closed around 10 7/16 per 
cent compared with 10% per 
cent at the previous dose. At 
that level ihe gap between 
tank base rates and money 
market rates is regarded as 
tolerable for the time being. 
The easing of rates followed 
action by the Bank of England 
which lent at- 10 per cent for 
repayment a week today. This 
was interpreted as a clear 
signal that the authorities are 
determined to resist any im- 
mediate rise in rates. 

In the foreign exchange 
market the focus of attention 
continued to switch back from 
sterling to the dollar. Sterling’s 
effective rate closed un- 
changed at 68.9. 

Foseco drops 

: Foseco Minsep, the speci- 
ality chemicals group, yes- 
terday reported pretax profits 
for the first six months of 1986 
down 25 per cent from £17.7 
million to £13.3 million. 
Turnover in the period fell 
from £294.7 million to £276.9 
million. The interim dividend 
was maintained at £2.95p. 

Tempos, page 22. 

Abingworth up 

s Abingworth, the technol- 
ogy-oriented investment trust, 
made pretax profits of 
£504.061 in the year to June 
30. against the previous 
£446.262. The company paid 
an unchanged annual divi- 
dend of J.25p. while its net 
asset value per share declined 
•from 286p to 277p. 

Tempos, page 22 

Gibbs resigns 

Frank Gibbs has resigned 
'from the board of Northern 
Engineering Industries, which 
announced heavy job losses 
and a major restructuring on 
Tuesday. News Analysis, page 
18. 


British Gas offers 
users £250 stake 
in £5.5bn sale 

By David Young, Energy Correspondent 

More than 16 million Brit- sent om is zfte biggest-ever • Payment will be by at leas 
sh Gas customers will be direct-mail operation, with two instalments, with half 


ish Gas customers will be 
offered the guaranteed right to 
buy at least £250- worth of 
shares in the biggest stock 
market flotation so fee. 

Two million potential in- 
vestors have already made 
firm inquiries about how they 
can buy the shares — more 
than the number of share 
applications for British Tel- 
ecom. 

The heavy oversubscription 
for shares in the Trustee 
Savings Bank means that 
considerable sums of 
money drawn from savings ac- 
counts win be available for 
; investment or speculation in 
British Gas. 

Unsuccessful applicants for 
TSB shares will have their 
cheques returned just as de- 
tails of the British Gas offer 
flutter through their letter- 
boxes. 

Sir Denis Rooke, chairman 
of British Gas, is writing to 
customers explaining why be 
believes that theyshould apply 
for shares. 

Details of the offer are being 


direct-mail operation, with 
each of the 16J2 million 
British Gas domestic cus- 
tomers being invited to reg- 
ister for a priority share 
application form. 

The invitation win be .cou- 
pled with an offer of discount 
vouchers on gas bills if they 
invest. As an alternative to the 
discount vouchers — which 
offer at least £10 off quarterly 
bills — customers will be able 
to qualify for a loyalty bonus 
of one share for every 1 0 held, 
provided the shares are kept 
for three years. 

The flotation is likely to 
raise more than £5.5 billion 
for the Government. The 
Department of Energy has 
announced that 5 per cent of 
available shares will be given 
to British Gas employees and 
pensioners, and that they will 
also be allowed priority share 
purchases. 

Potential investors win be 
told that: 

• The minimum investment 
will be not more than £150 for 
100 shares. 


The Discount Bonus s ha rehol de rs quaBty ten 
Max Value of discount uouchere(E) 




summer 

winter 

summer 

winter 

summer disc. 

100 

150 

10 

_ 

_ 


10 

200 

300 

20 

_ 



20 

400 

600 

40 

_ 

- 


40 

500 

750 

40 

10 

_ 


50 

600 

900 

40 

20 

- 


60 

800 

1,200 

40 

40 

- 


BO 

1,000 

1,500 

40 

40 

20 


100 

1,500 

2,250 

40 

40 

40 

30 

150 

2400 

3,000 

40 

40 

40 

40 

40 200 


two instalments, with half 
being submitted with the 

application. 

• Individual investors can 
choose between discount 
vouchers or loyalty bonus 
shares. 

• Customers — people who 
have domestic metered sup- 
plies in their name — will be 
guaranteed £250- worth of 
shares and will have pref- 
erence for further shares if the 
offer is oversubscribed. This 
will not prevent other mem- 
bers of the same household 
applying for shares when the 
full offer for sale is made, 
probably on November 21. 

Gas consumers who want to 
buy shares will have to register 
their interest by November 
14. A pathfinder prospectus 
will be published at the end of 
this month and the shares will 
go on sale in time for trading 
to begin in the run-up to 
Christmas. 

Mr Tony Alt, a director ofN 
M Rothschild, the merchant 
bank handling the sale, said 
yesterday: “The British Gas 
share offer is going to be the 
biggest national event of its 
kind ever seen. 

“Our determination,' and 
that of the Government, is to 
ensure that everyone in this 
country has a real opportunity 
to buy British Gas shares ana 
that the share offer is simple, 
attractive and readily avail- 
able to every small investor, as 
well as to the big institutions.** 
Kenneth Fleet, page 19 



Go-ahead for £300m field 


By Our Energy Correspondent 
ThetJovemment has given . Tbe Energy Minister, Mr 


British Gas. approval to de- 
velop its South Morecambe 
gas field at a cost of £300 
million. 

Most of the. money will be 
spent in British offshore 
construction yards. Two prod- 
uction platforms and a pipe- 
line system will be needed. 

The new field will produce 
gas during peak winter de- 
mand as well as replace sup- 
plies from North Sea fields 
nearing the end of their 
commercial life. 


Alick Buchanan -Smith, who 
approved the development 
yesterday, said he^ hoped the 
British content - or the con- 
tracts would be higher than 
the present average of 70 per 
cent 

“I see every prospect of 
maintaining a strong rate of 
new gas developments in the 
UK in the years ahead,** he 
said. “Discussions with the 
companies concerned are well 
advanced on a number of new 
fields and, altogether, it is 


Government overrides 
Exchange’s objections 


By Lawrence Lever 


Comment 19 
Traded Opts 19 
Foreign £»* 19 
Stock Market 20 
Tempos 22 
Wall Street 22 


Co News, 22 
Share Prices 23 
Moan- Mrkls 19 
UnttTrasts 24 
Commodities 24 
USM PrkXS 24 


Mr Michael Howard, Min- 
ister for Consumer and Cor- 
porate Affairs, yesterday 
swept aside the Stock 
Exchange's objections to an 
industry-wide compensation 
scheme for investors who 
suffer from the insolvency or 
fraud of an investment 
business. 

“The concerns of the Stock 
Exchange, which are under- 
standable, must be overridden 
to provide the best possible 
protection for investors,** he 
said. “My primary duty is to 
ensure investor protection.” 

An amendment to the 
Financial Services Bin. tabled 
on Tuesday evening, gives tbe 
Securities and Investments 
Beard the right to impose a 
centra! compensation scheme. 

The SE opposes a central 
scheme because h believes this 
would lead to its members 
subsidizing failed investment 
businesses over which h has 
no control. It claims its own 
scheme provides belter 
protection. 

Mr Howard said: “I am 
concerned with the protec- 
tions of investors overall. The 


compensation arrangements 
in some degree or other have 
to be financed by the financial 
services industry as a whole.” 

He refused to be drawn on 
the amount of compensation 
that a central scheme should 
provide. Tbe Bill delegates 
this decision to the SIB. 

Mr Howard was talking at a 
briefing on some 350 amend- 
ments to the Bill, which have 
increased its size by half! 
“This is the. last lap of the 
marathon,” be said. 

Most of 

tbe amendments were of a 
technical nature, or were 
consequential to ensure the 
Bill represented a comprehen- 
sive statement on investor 
protection, he said. 

Other amendments include: 


likely that some 20 new 
.developments may be ap- 
proved over the next five to 
ten years.” r-* *— 

Mr Bachanan-Smrth said 
that it was dear there would 
be a need for new supplies to 
meet the needs of the British 
market from 1990 onwards. 

"It is now vital that com- 
panies turn the opportunities 
into realities through - main- 
taining ihe pace of exploration 
and appraisal, through the 
negotiation of new gas con- 
tracts.” 


Maxwell 
declares 
5.9% stake 

By Alison Eadie 

The battle for the printing 
and publishing company. 
McCorquodale, became a 
four-cornered affair yesterday 
when Mr Robert Maxwell, 
publisher of the Daily Mirror , 
announced he had acquired a 
5.9 per cent stake. 

The stake was acquired last 
Friday, before McCorquodale 
announced it: was in talks with 
a white knight It has sub- 
sequently emerged, although 
has not been confirmed, that 
the white knight is the 
publishing and information 
group ExteL, whose largest 
shareholder is Mr MaxwelL 
Mr Maxwefl’s- intervention, 
predicted in The Times yes- 


whose corporate treasurers 
carry out investment activities 
for internal financing pro- 
poses and not with the public. 


poses ana not witn me puouc, 

from the Bill’s requirement of J£?SqS? 


McCorquodale and as an at- 
tempt to block a friendly 
merger between Ex tel ana 


authorization. 

• Allowing a degree of price 
stabilization for issues of 
international securities. 


There was still no word 
yesterday from either Extd or 
McCorquodale on die ex- 
pected merger. . 


Amstrad computer 
tops £100m sales 


By John Beil, City Editor 


Mr Alan Sugar, Amstrad's chairman, yesterday with the Dying start in a qraefa more 
IBM-compatible computer. (Photograph: James Gray), contentions corporate move — 


In the four weeks since its 
hunch, Amstrad’s IBM-com- 
patiMe range of business 
comparers has achieved sales 
worth £100 mQHon or more. 

The new product, which 
takes the company into direct 
competition with the world's 

hig g i t i comparer manufac- 
turer, is another success for 
Amstrad and its fou nd er, Mr 
Alan Sagar. 

Since going public in 1980 
Amstrad’s profits have soared 
from £13 million to more than 
£75 mflHan, putting a value of 
abont £340 millioo on Mr 
Sugar's personal holding. 

He said yesterday: “Includ- 
ing International orders for oar 
new IBM-compatible, we have 
made actual and irrevocable 
forward sales of aroond 
200,000 units. 

“The machines are avail- 
able in a number oT configura- 
tions from £399 to just natter 
£1000, and bnsiness users are 
walking in off tbe street and 
buying the more expensive 
models.” 

Last year, Mr Sugar, aged 
39, overturned the 75.000- 
nnits-a-year British market 
for word processors with the 
bunch of tbe PCW-8256 
range, starting at £399. 

Daring its first eight months 
about 350,000 machines were 
sold. 

Now Amstrad is off to a 
Dying start in a ipncb more 


ser vin g the professional busi- 
ness computer user. 

At normal Amstrad profit 
margins, tbe advance sales on 
the DM-compatiUe PC-1512 
range are at more than £20 
m Otion , with the launch into 
the cracial US market 
nottaking place nntiJ Nov- 
ember. 

This represents a spectacu- 
lar start to the present year, as 
Mr Sugar repotted to share- 
holders yesterday on profits 
for the 12 months to June 30. 

It was another year of rapid 
growth, with profits ahead 
from £20.147 million to £753 
million. Earnings per share 
doubled to 27 Jp and the final 
dividend increased from 0.12p 
to 0J5p per share. 

Mr Sugar said^Onr sales 
forecast for the current year is 
very encouraging in terms of 
existing and new products, 
together with large mt- 
exploited gaps in our markets 
overseas.” 

In the City, Amstrad shares 
were little changed on the 
results. In tbe past month or so 
analysts had revised their 
forecasts upwards from about 
£65 million to about the £75 
mil li nn reported. 

Pr eliminar y estimates sug- 
gest that Amstrad could make 
upwards of £115 million in the 
present year, according to 
leading electronics sector an- 
alysts. 

Tempos, page 22 


Tensions remain over dollar 


From Bailey Morris and David Smith, Washington 


At yesterday’s session of the said that “Exchange rate 
International Monetary Fund adjustments cannot dispense 
meeting,- the big economies, with the required . improve- 
failed to agree to stabilize the men is in the underlying finan- 


dollar through systematic 
intervention In the foreign- 
exchange market The tension 
between Germany and the 
United States on tbe dollar 
question remains. 

A senior US Administration 
official said there had been no 
agreement on interest or ex- 
change rates at the IMF 
meeting. He refused to rule 
out' the possibility of further 
moves by Mr James Baker, the 
US Treasury Secretary, to 
drive tbe dollar down. 

- Mr Kiichi Miyawaza, the 
Japanese Finance Minister, 
when asked whether Japan 
had entered into an interven- 
tion pact with Europe to 


rial position”. 

He also said that a signifi- 


was not appropriate for Ger- 
many to say what the correct 
level for the dollar was. 

President Reagan, in his 
speech to the joint IMF-World 
Bank meeting, said interest 


cant reduction in Germany’s rates in the US needed to go 
trade surplus is under way and lower and other countries had 


that the economy is “again on 
a path of solid growth”. 

But the US official said the 
Administration was far from 
convinced that 3 per cent 
growth in Germany was 
sustainable. He also said it 


to act to boost growth. 

The Administration refused 
to read too much into the 


bilized the deficit, but there 
was still no evidence of any 
underlying improvement. 

Mr Baker said yesterday: 
“There is a signal opportunity 
for industrial nations in sur- 
plus to help by boosting their 
growth. I urge these countries 
to seize the moment. 

“The only way lo resolve 
the external imbalances am- 


narrowing of the trade surplus ong countries is through in- 
to Si 3.32 billion (£9 billion) in creased' growth abroad, a 


August. Officials said the 
dollar’s fen may have sta- 


creased' growth abroad, a 
greater competitiveness for 
the US dollar, or both.” 


New $6bn loan for Mexico 


Mexico and its creditor 
banks have readied agreement 
on a new 56 billion (£4.16 
billion) loan package following 


prevent the dollar from fell- torturous negotiat!®ns in 
ing, answered with a flat which Mr Paul Vokker, die 


"No”. 

. The heavy intervention in 
. the market this week by 
Germany and Britain reflects 
a short-term attempt to sta- 
bilize currencies in the wake of 
the failure to agree on new 
concrete measures here. 

It is unlikely that the Bank 
-ofEngland would have moved 
into the market purely to 
steady the doHar. Its interven- 
tion this week was an exercise 
in propping up the pound. 

Herr Gerhard Stolienberg, 
the German Finance Minister. 


ILG joins the 
holiday battle 

Mr Harry Goodman’s Inter- 
nationa] Leisure Group (ILG), 
best known for its Intasun 
subsidiary, made its bid yes- 
terday to draw level with 
Thomson Holidays, Britain's 
biggest tour operator, as tbe 
price war intensified 
ILG plans a 40 per cent 
increase in capacity to 2.4 
milGon holidays next year 
with average prices holding 
steady, plus some reductions. 
Thomson has launched nine 
brochures offering 2.25 mil- 
lion holidays but- with at least 
three brochures still to come, 
it promised “substantial” in- 
creases in planned capacity. 

Details, page 19 


United States Federal Reserve 
Board chairman, personally 
intervened. 

The con trove ratal agree- 
ment, regarded by the US 
Administration as essential to 
the success of the debt initia- 
tive of Mr James Baker, the 
Treasury Secretary, includes 
the following elements: a new 
money facility of £6 billion to 
be repaid over 12 years with a 
five-year grace period. In- 
cluded in this is a $1 billion co- 
financing with the World 
Bank. 


The World Bank, in a 
concession to commercial 
banks, has agreed to guar- 
antee 5500 million of this 
amount The package also 
includes a 5500 million 
commercial bank contingency 
fond, co-financed with toe 
World Bank, which will guar- 
antee S250 million of the totaL 
This is to be drawn on only in 
the event of Mexico’s annual 
growth rate slipping bdow 2JS 
percent. 

In addition, if oO prices sfip 
below S9 a barrel, Mexico 
could draw on a special 5600 
million oil facility, toe Inter- 
national Monetary Fund's 
contribution to the package. 

A further $1.2 bOlkm, put up 


by commercial banks to rap- 
port public and private sector 
investment, is also included. 

This portion of the agree- 
ment had been a major stick- 
ing point. Originally, the 
amount was Si. 7 billion and 
was to be part of the o0 facility 
but commercial banks balked, 
saying such financing could 
sea a dangerous precedent. 

The agreement also includes 
previously-negotiated ele- 
ments — $43.7 billion of 
previous ly-rertTnctured debt 
payable over 20 years with 
seven years of grace. Maturi- 
ties on $8.6 bfilioa. consisting 
iff new money facilities signed 
in 1983 and 1984, will remain 
the same. 



STOCK MARKETS I MAIN PRICE CHANGES 


KEjSSs 1788.81 (+21.23)* 

SSSdow.-.. 1756459 (-288.44) 
f k>n 9 5 0 ”? often m f+21 .80) 


Sydney: AO 

&£$£*»* 2001.6 (+35-4) 

s &: =ssm 

liMWeral 516.00 Isa"*) 

London dosing prices Pageza 

interest rates ~ 

London: 

3 ^nonth eligible bUls:1CFi6*10 nr» 

buying rate 
U& 

prime Rate 7ft* 

Federal Funds 
3-monifi 

30-year bonds 96' 



Redland to pay $317 million 
for American company 



Redland. the international 
building materials group, has 
entered into a conditional 
agreement to buy Genstar 
Slone, an aggregates company 
based in Maryland, for $317.5 
million (£220 million). 

Genstar is owned by 
Flintkote, an indirect wholly- 
owned subsidiary of the Ca- 
nadian company. Imasco. 

Redland also announced a 
one-for-four rights issue at 
350p, raising £181 million net 
of expenses, which will be 


By Alexandra Jackson 

apparent that Imasco wanted ■ Redland Worth then this 

11 .L. " 1J k. « 


to sell the business.” 

In the five years to Decem- 
ber 3) last year. Gcnstar’s 
operating prom and turnover 
increased from $11 million 
and $125 million to $30 
million and $185 million 
respectively. 

On this basis, the historic 
exit p/e. ratio- is about 15 
times. 

For some time Redland has 
been keen to increase its 
interests in the US. 

In 1983 it bought an -80 per 


293.00 ) 



used to pay for the large part of ^ shareholding in a Texan 
the acquisition. _ aggregates , business, Redland 

Mr Robert Napier, financial Worth. The acquisition of 
director of Redland. said: Genstar will increase the 
“Genstar Stone is a classic pmpnion of operating profits 
aggregates business with huge earned in North America from 
reserves and a high market (6 per cent in 1985-86 to 30 
shine. percent 

“We identified Genstar as a Mr Terence Murray of 
possible acquisitioa- about a Kleinwart Grieveson pointed 
year ago and sought to buy tbe to Redland*s good record in 
company from fts previous the. US. He sai±“If Redland 


would be tremendous.” 

However, he thinks it might 
lake a few years to justify the 
price. For 1987-88, the first 
full year of Genstar and 
Redland together,' he is 
forecasting pretax profits of 
£164 million.. 

On earnings per share of no 
more than 38p this represents 
a 3 per cent dilution in 
earnings. Next week Redland 
is holding an open day at 
Redland worth for British 
building materials analysts, 
giving them an opportunity to : 
increase their knowledge of: 


orth. The acquisition of the US aggregates market. 


Genstar wilt increase the 
prbprtion of operating profits 
earned in North America from 
16 per cent in 1985-86 to 30 
percent 


Genstar’s assets at Septem- 
ber 30 were $110 million. 
However, based on the find- 
ings of an independent valua- 
tion, Redland is expecting 


owners.- We were, therefore, could Ao the same thing with 


.Mr Terence Murray of goodwill to account for about 
Kleinwart Grieveson pointed ' 10 per cent of the purchase 
to Redland*s good record in prices 
.the. US. He- said:“If Redland The outlook for construo- 


ti rift-related activity in Mary- 

_LUw4 ... 


You’ve done it before, so you know die ropes. And you 
have the priceless advantage of the equity built up in your 
present home. 

Add the feet that there’s no particular shortage of funds 
for latter mortgages and you could he forgiven for thinkmff 
finding the ideal mortgage would be a piece of cake. 1 

But, of course, this isn’t so. 

It's only too easy to end up with a mortgage that may 
hdp you buy your house, but will cost you more than it should. 

Vfc are John CharcoL Britain’s largest and, dare we say, 
most enterprising independent mortgage brokers- 

'Wh have immediate access to more than 200 different 
sources of mortgage finance of all kinds. Including a whoTe 
range of mortgages that are both “Unusual and Exclusive” to 
John Cbarcol clients. 

And it’s our job id make sure that our customers get the. 
best possible mortgage at the best possible terms. 

This is even more true for larger mortgages -in excess of 
£50,000 - than iris for others. 

So, if you're contemplating a move or a remortgage, come 
and calk to us or telephone us now. 

01-589 7080. 


ft q »7TT» EafMSfWg • j>.* H PH f 









;a. *■ 


BUSINESS A ™™ FTNANCE 


the times THURSDAY OCTOBER 2 1 986 


beats forecast 


- swis. for the 148-stone Budgen 

ByA ? S0 ^^ the supermarket group, the com- 

^ i b ‘Sji% Kfiawsr profits 

STitS Tndrngi^ft^mMOO 

managing director of Asda, against a loss of £6.4 millioxt, 

. tnM.na with m 


ploughed into the confec- 
tionery division. The interim 


ter and shareholders with 


uonery envision, ine uiwnm 

advance showed the impact of offered the 

the re-organization and the their holdings free J” D 


managing atreciur ui - vvr . — : * 

has beaten its forecast, turning with contecuoneiy showing a 
in a pretax profit in the 28 £1.3 million turnround. 

■ ■ i m « _ I* I AflA Y •- --—I-* »- — — t Mia #Ldr 


the re-organization and the tneir 

benefit ofthe acquisitions of costs . One ttard ofBarkert 

James Keiller. the Dundee shareholders own fewer than 


$13m buy 

for Albert 
Fisher 


NEWS ANALYSIS 


in a pretax profit in the 28 £1.3 million turnround. 
weeks to July 1 1 of £481,000 Lossmaking activities like the Buogen is 
compared with a previous loss Lewis Meeson newsagent with the group land steps are 
of £7\5 million. chain, sold to Guinness, are benu taken to improve its 

At the time of the £69.9 no longertaggiog down the profitahhw. ^ 
nnhic ; n eroun’s orofits. ine company 


marmalade maker, and the 
candy division of Soraportex. 
Budgen- is being integrated 


At me lime or me zay.y uw Th7<vmtnanv is try 

SS;S,S ^^^ntiehein* J^STS^S 


1,000 shares. 

The offer is designed to save 
the company significant costs. 
The directors also intend to 
recommend the consolidation 
of the shares on the basis of 
one new lOp share for ten old 
Ip shares. 


COMPANY NEWS 


• MICROGEN HOLDINGS: 
Agreement has been reached tor 
the acquisition by Microgens 
subsidiary in Sweden. CapeUa. 
of the assets and goodwill 
relating to the computer output 
microfilm business of Sifier- 
Scrvice based in Stockholm, for 
expected consideration of SKr 
10.8 million (£1-05 million). _ 

• RAUMA-REPOLA: Prelimi- 
nary agreements signed for the 
sale of sawmills and plywood 
mills in eastern Finland to 
Kymmene-Siroemberg Corp 
and Sdiauman. 

• RH MORLEY: Dividend of 


1.75p for year to March 31. 
Turnover £4.46 million (£3.69 


Turnover £4.46 million (£3.69 
minion), pretax profit £225,887 
(£161.146). eps 3.79p (3.47p). 


II1IIIIVIIK r-T"- v 

(£161.146). eps 3.79p (3.47p). 

• AGA: AGA Gas has acquired 
Glendale Welding Supply m 
Canton. Ohio. Glendale sales 
totalled S3 .2 million (£2^ mtl- 

•°b!oMECHANICS INTER- 
NATIONAL: Six months to 
June 30. Turnover £109,927 
(£107.670). Loss before tax, 
depreciation and amortization 
Of goodwill £72.712 (£122.853). 
Loss for period £109,893 
(£1 59.560). Loss per share 1.32p 

•‘HAMPTON TRUST: The 
company has exchanged con- 
tracts to acquire the freehold 


interest in 14/22 Old Brompton 
Road and 5 Harrington Road. 
London SW7, and. the 50-year 
leasehold interest m 2/12 Old 
Brompton Road ana 1-10 
Egerton Court. London swy. 
Consideration to be satisfied by 
the issue of 3.6 million ordinary 
fully-paid shares. Properties val- 
ued at £1.75 mfiiou. 

• GOODHEAD PRINT 
GROUP: Mr Colin Rosser, 
chairman, said at the annual 
meeting that the first qu arters 
trading had been most success- 

fiil with profits well ahead of the 

corresponding period Iasi year. 
Some of the operations have 
produced record results. Resuns 
after the acquisition of the L0 
free newspaper titles have been 
beyond expectations, be said. 

• SHARNA WARE: Orbro 
Cash and Carry- a wholly-owned 
subsidiary, has exchanged con- 
tracts for the sale of its cash-and- 
carry store based in Marches jar 
for a consideration of £375,OUU 

• PETROGEN PETRO- 

LEUM: Year to February 28. 
Turnover $73,540 ($274,519), 
operating profit $102,607 
(SlVt.739). lass $1,897,998 
($86,509 loss), loss per share 
i2Jc(0.Sc). . .. . 

• DENCORA: No interim divi- 
dend (nil) for six months to June 


ju. Figures m tuw. Turnover 

£6.529 (£5.933). gross profit 
£1.647 (£1.41 5), other operating 
income £1 388 (£U29>- Operat- 
ing profit £2. 1 23 (£1329), profit 
before tax £740 (£672). Extraor- 
dinary profit after tax £142 (£6), 
eps pre-ex tx^irdinary items 3.5p 

(5.1 pL . 

• RACAJU The company has 
signed 50.000 subscribers for its 
Vodafone cellular radio tele- 
phone service. Mr Gerry Whent, 
the director in charge, said tins 
"strengthens greatly the profit 
forecasts for cellular radio made 
in January”- Ratal's target for 

the year to the end ofMarch was 
to have 60,000 subscribers. 

• CAPITAL AND COUN- 
TIES: The company has bought 
out all other holders in 
WcsiAmerica Properties. At 
July 31 last year when its 
property portfolio stood at $90 
million. Westamerica had net 
assets of $50.3 million, or 
$38.92 per share and in the year 
to that date made pro fits bef ore 
tax and minority interests of 
$1.8 million. 

•HONGKONG AND 

SHANGHAI BANKING 
CORPORATION: The 

corporation and Marine Mid- 
land Bank Inc have restructured 
their ownership of the CM and 
M Group, a Marine Midland 


subsidiary. Hong Kong and 


Shanghai, which isa SI percent 

shareholder in Marine Midland, 

now assumes a 51 per cent 
shareholding in CM a nd M. 
•AEROSPACE ENGINEER- 
ING: The board has exchanged 
a conditional contract for the 
purchase of Greywater, the 
holding company of two wholly- 
owned subsidiaries - one had- 
ing and the other non^trading- 
Initial consideration is 
£2,500.000 in cash. 

• BROKEN HILL PROPRI- 
ETARY: BHP, through tw 
wholly-owned, subsidiary BHP 
Finance, has arranged a USSluU 
million (£69.44 million) private 
placement of floating rate notes 
in the domestic market. The 
proceeds will be used for th e 
general corporate requirements 
of the BHP group. . 

• RTZ: Sturge Bichemicals, the 
wholly-owned subsidiary of 
RTZ Chemials. is to invest pO 
million in a new ritncaod plant 
with on-site services. The plant 

is scheduled to begin production 

in 1989. . Jir , 

• BRIDON: Bndon and Fofe- 

ereill & Harvey have announced 
that Bridon Composites has 
agreed to sell its carbon-fibre 
weaving and braiding opera- 
tions to FolhetpU for 
£400.000. . 


By Lawrence Lever 

Albeit Fisher, ihe expan- 
sionist fruit and vegetable 
distributor, yesterday an- 
nounced the purchase of an 
American food company for a 
maximum payment of 513 
million (£9 million). .... 

Fisher . is paying an initial 
$4.5 million in cash and 
shares for Tavilla, an im- 
porter. wholesaler and distrib- 
utor of fresh fruit and 
vegetables. The move fellows 
Fisher’s $15 million purchase 

of Ziff, a Massachusetts paper 

and plastic cups distributor m 
December, and confirms its 
strategy ’of establishing a 
significant food and distribu- 
tion business in the US. • 
Approximately two-thirds 
of Albert Fisheris profits m its 
February interim results came 
from its American operations. 

Tavilla has net tangible 
assets of $900,000 and a 
workforce of 103. It made 
pretax profits of $370,000 
after non-recurring „ expen- 
diture in the first half of this 
year. It is warranting that 
profits are running at not less 
than $900,000 a year. 

Ta villa's operations and 
management will merge with 
Albert Fisher’s Carnival Fruit 
subsidiary, also based in Mi- 
ami, which sells fruit and 
vegetables. 

Further payments of up to 
$8.5 million for Tavilla, of 
which at least half will be in 
Albert Fisher shares, will be 
made depending on the profits 

finmtynftd grOQD. 


Future of NEI turbine! 
awaits Sizewell verdict 

** ...... raised at turbines for such smlram. 


producing power in most pans 
of the world, in addition to 
pumping Russia's enormous 
gas reserves from Siberia to 
the European domestic mar- 
kets. It is therefore ironic that 
the greatest threat to the 

British turbine-building in- 
dustry should come from 
within Britain. _ _ 

Britain's electricity supply 
industry is desperate to order 
new generating equipment, 
but hs hands are tied until the 
Government rules on the 
outcome of the public inquiry 
into the proposed nuclear 
power station at SizewdL i 
The inspectors' report into 
the issue, scheduled for deliv- 
ery on Tuesday but which has 
suffered yet another dday, "nil 
be sent to Mr Peter Walker, 
the Energy Secretary, at the 
end of October. 

Mr Walker will decide next 
I spring at the earliest if the 
Central Hectridty Generating 
Board (CEGB) can build the 
American-designed pressur- 
ized water-cooled reactor 
(FWR) on the Suffolk coast- 


^ " a* *** _ . . . ivaie raised at turbines for such statu**. 

British-built turbines are ^ ft ;^' a “ d n !S|c inquire is A return 'to Strata- met 
■oducing power in most parts tite p * stations ratter than tf 

■ the world, in addition to in favour 0 f the large coaWiredslfftK^to 

imping Russia's enormous A ^ instanl would J«n 

is reserves from Siberia to PWR. ^ _ engineering application opposjtioattwj. 

Z. domestic mar- help to_Nortnern cup would also favour$EL 


help io_Northern tngincCTins 

Industries because the nirtnne jnw. d ]oped a pacfcjgtf 
contract worth arou^£^ 

million, will go to i nmducc to KOmwiS 


million will go to its aren- p t0 jOOm^S 

wants even- opposed to the l.OOOrawsop. 
The CEGB by full-scale generator 

tually to foUow qie S J nd sets, 

design with altay of guch smaller power stations 

are expired to find fevwa 
do es not necessaruy developing countries ate e 

. they can be built w ithout 
A decision on the enormous infrastructure ^ts. 

05 ?! rSr No large-scale site work is 

PWR reactor required and fewer heavy-lift 


expected next 
spring 


GEC would provide all the 

turbines. „ „ . „ 

NEI would hopefully win a 
share of these orders, drawing 
on its experience in designing 
and bidding for PWR-related 
turbines in other markets, 
such as Taiwan. However, the 
company could win business 


WR) on the Sufloik coast. ^Tf /h^ PWR is vetoed. 
Mr Walker has a team of even f fee PWR is vetoed. 


civil servants standing by to 
go through fee report and 

recommendations clause by 
so that a decision can 
be made as soon as possible. 

Since the Chernobyl dis- 
aster public opinion has 
swung further against nuclear 
power and the Government 
win want to make sure every 


Afar H.M. Bateman. 


The man who dkhrt deal with WebiwortGrieveson. 


Klemwort Grieveson has become such 
a strong and broadly-based international 
investment house, it doesn't make a lot of 
sense to pass us by. See, at least, if we can be 
of service to you. 

Before joining forces with Kldnwort 
Benson, Grieveson Grant was already among 
the Gty's top stockbrokers. 

And now we at Kleinwort Grieveson 
have the backing of a major merchant bank. 
In fact, by almost any yardstick, they're the 
biggest of Britain's meichant banks. 

So at Kleinwort Grieveson we aren't 


short of financial muscle. We have the 
technology you need at the sharp end of the 
business. Our spanking new trading floor at 
20 Unchurch Street is something to behold. 
And we hope you will. 

You'll also find we have the brightest 
people in the business, and we have them 
in every market. 

So we're well able to take advantage 
of world-wide deregulation, including 
Big Bang. 

International equity markets had their 
own Big Bang in April 1984, and we’ve been 


operating as an ‘International Dealer* since 
then. Thus we’re already used to the new 
environment. 

In the gilt-edged market Kleinwort 
Grieveson Charlesworth will be one of the 
new primary dealers. 

Together we offer you as complete, 
competent and competitive an investment 
service as you'll find. In whatever market 
you happen to be. 

Kleinwort Benson 

The bright people hi the right places. 


A slow down in fee nuclear 
programme would mean fee 
CEGB would have to "in- 
troduce a programme quickly 
to expand its coal-fired power 
station, network. A new 


required and fewer heavy-Uft 
cranes arc needed 

Whether such stations will 
ever be built in Britain will 
depand largely on govwruhent 
policy, and until the SizeweU 
issue has been resolved, fee* 
power engineering industry's 
management accepts that no 
firm projections can be made 
for future 

Its order book has just been 
boosted by the finalization. of 
a contract to supply two 
985 mw turbines for the Daya 
Bay nuclear power station in 
China ~ . 

The contract will provide 
fee equivalent of 20,000 man 
hours of work in British 


station, network. A new industry, but the French will 
generation of coal-fired site- supply the bulk of the value of 
lions is already on fee CEGB ^ contract — the reactors, 
drawing boards and NEI has David Youhfi 

been a traditional supplier of 



Unigate expands in US 


I Unigate, fee 'ulL""* ffiqj. 
1 and transport group, is buying 
Pnifrock Restaurants in fee 
United States for $45 million 
(£31 million). 

prufrock owns 41 res- 
taurants in Texas, Oklahoma 


Know your 
man! 


By Our City Staff 

iftpH and Colorado, specializing in 

Iiii'iiil'i Hi ' r oplrinr 

} in fee Thirty /JS* 

i million name The Black-eyeq rer 
restaurants and fee remaining 
41 res- five are called! Qixie Houses, 
klahoma Unigate operates 106-Mexi- 
can restaurants in the south- 
I em states, wife its Casa Bonita 
lUl g I chain of Taco Bueno fest-food 
H I outlets. 


Ifcm 


Protect people^*vPP^ 
and property with sS.. .. 
a Shackman ID system. 

Quick and aimpla you ran 
have a secure, tamper proof ID 
card prepared and sealed m 
less than two minutes. 

Ask about the latest top 
security AH Photo Systems. 
Shackman ID Systems 


The group has been on the 
acquisition trail in the past 
few years and has-been dispos- 
I ing of unprofitable or periph- 
eral activities. 

Its last acquisition was 
Oldacre. the Gloucestershire 
animal feeds company, 
bought for £26 million in July. 


Ri IVrt-k n.arn% 


i.i* (UMa 


Cadbury buys 

. H , IP .lL 


Sn WB TOCTPPwVV'WMWyMOrtV 

Shackman msoumants Ltd 
PO Box 23 watorswe Ctwsham 
Bucks HPSlPH "Wax; 8372*5 

contact LINDA PRICE 

Tel: (0494) 784451 


Cadbuty Sdiweppes (South 
Africa). A subsidiary o%jEfe 
confectionery and soft dimks 
group, is paying R2Z3 miluon 
(£7 million) for a South At 
rican foods company. Toe 
effect of the purchase mil be to 
reduce Cadbury's stake wits 
South African subsidiary from 
64.4 per cent to 53.1 pec amt 


ft i ■■<W1 


tatoi sr 4 lei . . : v 


Ibrra fea^flMtC 


'foE-ra ^ 


omk 






ti ou Man 
t rtuwiMik 


Jr ' ,rt | ,r -a fftfe 


. fV , _ th»r«t*ra 


j°_ N °0N FIHANCtAt 



EXCHX( 


Portnum &Mason 


Piccadilly, London Wl 
September 29th-October 4th 


You are invited to view the autumn/. ; 
winter collection and e*perienceour r 
internationally renowned 7 - 
made-to-measure tailoring service at 
Fortnum &. Mason. 


Ermenegildo Zegna is the hallmark of ; 
totally co-ordinated wardrobe. A complete 
look that can be found only in the finest ■- 
stores throughout the world. 













THE TIMES THURSDAY OCTOBER 2 1986 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 



" ' '“l v, , 

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pk j 

u, ^i .=iCp o ^ 

, ’“ i I T. ,t '•'v 
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“>*: a 



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l:.t% 



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Privatization provides a key 
flexibility to greater flscal 



/J V 


* 


A 


r« 

i 


l 


■ 


j V 

*i 5 


By Rodney Lord 

Ts ^ > ^ie , vIas U ^ Ss ll of Bui £3.2 billion of that reserve 

f °^ en ' bul >1 tffserSe k * ^ ^ aIlocaled to 

f^eful warm^ip for a increased provisioo for local 

^performance of BritSh awhomy current expradhure. 

£3.1 billion compared with 
£4.5 billion ai the start of the 
present year. 

There is some justification 
for having a smaller reserve 
this year. The large reserves of 
recent years often included 
spending, such as local 
authority spending, which the 
Government knew ftiD well 
would occur but was not 
prepared to allocate to pro- 
grammes in advance. If the 
spending is provided for in the 
programmes, then it does not 
have to come out of the 
reserve. 


Future privatization proceeds 


next month. 

*** * e . summer holidays 

B33=m2 

wned, ihe BriSSU^ 

nSS! & 0un fai by legil 
problems and Royal cS 

ttaUn,SbSS. Un5aleab,e f ° r 

^.^assjss 

consideration, but the total 
value of assets which the 
'government is committed to 


British Gas equity 
British Gas loans 
British Airways 
British Airports Auty 


Ebillion 

6.0 


Water at 
British Petroleum 
Brit Telecom equity 
Brit Telecom pref 
Total 



Stock market report, remit issues, options: page 20 


would not view this as sus- 
piciously as if the reserve were 
cut below £2te billion" 

What the privatization pro- 
gramme does offer in terms of 
macro-economic manage- 
ment is a very useful degree of 
flexibility. For. in addition to 
the new flotations lined up, 
there are very large minority’ 
holdings left in BP and British 
Telecom. The 31.7 per cent 
holding in BP is worth about 
£3 : S billion at current market 
prices and the 49.8 per cent in 
BT £5.4 billion, though no 
more BT siock can be sold 
before April 1988. 

These involve none of the 
political and organizational 


contribution to public spend- square the books? Receipts 
ing by raising electricity prices from government assets sold 
rather more than allowed for. are netted off the public- 
But Mr Peter Walker, the spending totals on the argu- hurdles of new privatizations. 
Energy Secretary, w^B not be menl lha * this is simply the although they are dependent 
slow to advance the political reverse of new assets bought, on stock market conditions. 

so any increase m pnvattza- 


The trouble with this aigu- 

privatizing is aoDTrahfoara • ment i* that it is too familiar 
billion. PPTOacmngt2S for comfort. Realism has fre- 
quently been said to have been 
introduced into the local 
authority figures. There was a 
large addition in provisions 
for the present year — and 
already council spending is 
running over. 

And there is pressure from a 
number of other spending 
programmes apart from the 
local authorities. 

Mr Kenneth Baker, the 
Education Secretary, is argu- 
ing strongly for additional 
funds to intervene in schools 
and colleges directly without 
the customary filtering thro- 
ugh the town hail. In what is 
almost certainly an election 
year, there is an overwhelming 


In view 0 f the Gov- 
ernment's <probiems over pub- 
lic spending, this is just as 
well. At the end of the day a 
faster rate of privatization 
may prove to be one of the few 
ways of keeping the commit- 
menis on public spending at 
least nominally in fine with 
the Government's commit- 
ment to fiscal prudence. 

At present the numbers 
under discussion between the 
Treasury and spending depart- 
ments in the annual public 
spending survey do not appear 
to add up. 

In 1987-88, the first year of 
the three-year period under 
discussion, a sizeable reserve 
of £6.3 billion was built into 
the planned total of £143.9 
billion agreed in the last 
survey. 

This total was confirmed — 
at least as a target rather than 
as an unequivocal commit- 
ment — by the Cabinet in July. 


political case for extra money 
for the health service. 

These and other calls can 
only be accommodated either 
by running down the reserve 
still further or by offsetting 
cuts elsewhere. It would, for 
instance, be possible to reduce 
the nationalized industries'’ 


arguments against such ac- 
tion. With reducing inflation 
$0 important a pan of the 
Government's record, it wifi 
be important to keep price 
rises to a minimum. 

The feeling in financial 
markets appears to be that 
some reduction, but not too 
much, in the reserve would be 
tolerable. 

Says Mr Gayyn Davies, UK 
economist with Goldman 
Sachs: “The market is not 
expecting the reserve to be at 
the £4-£5 billion level again, 
but it would worry if it 
dropped below £2 Yj-£ 3 billion. . 
It is expecting the public 
spending target to be exceeded 
in an election year.” 

Mr Giles Keating of Credit 
Suisse First Boston com- 
ments: “A lower degree of 
uncertainty over oil prices 
makes some reduction m the 
reserve reasonable. I think £3- 
£4 billion might be acceptable 
to the market, but there would 
be concern if it went as low as 
£1-2 billion." 

Can the privatization pro- 
gramme be increased to 


tion helps to keep down public 
spending. 

In the last survey the pro- 
jected receipts were roughly 
doubled to £4% billion in each 
year. With saleable assets 
worth up to £25 billion, it 
would be possible to increase 
the proceeds again. 

Some modest shading up- 
wards would do no more than 
recognize the higher level of 
receipts expected — both this 
year and in ftiture years. But 
there are solid arguments 
against any larger increases. 

The trick has been played 
before and is likely to be less 
effective. In any case, it is far 
from clear that privatization 
proceeds really should be 
scored as negative expenditure 
rather than money used to 
finance the Government's 
deficit. 

An increase might wen be 
viewed by the markets as 
simply a tightly-concealed in- 
crease in public spending and 
next year’s borrowing require- 
ment. Although, according to 
Mr Davies, “the markets 


There are also a number of 
less obvious assets almost 
hidden from public view. In 
addition to its equity holdi 
the Government holds pi 
ere nee stock in BT. The £250 
million redemption of the 
£750 million outstanding later 
this year will put money in ihe 
Government's pocket just as 
surely, and indeed rather more 
surely, than a public notation, 
helping to swell the proceeds 
from privatization. 

Another source of revenue 
is the £2.5 billion in loans 
British Gas owes the Govern- 
ment. As and when these are 
repaid they too will help swell 
the privatization coffers. 

The underlying logic of 
privatization has much less to 
do with sources of revenue for 
the Government, however 
convenient they prove, than 
with the efficiency of the 
industries themselves and 
with spreading ownership. 

But flexible access to binds 
which do not depend on the 
price of oil or the state of the 
gilts market is a useful buffer 
against the vagaries of eco- 
nomic fortune. 


Package holiday price war warms up 


By Derek Harris, Industrial Editor 


The price war in foreign 
package hofidays goes o« with 
a vengeance with all that 
implies for company profits 
and even snrvivaL 

The battle message was 
clear yesterday when Mr 
Harry Goodman's Inter- 
national Leisure Groap (ILG) 
followed Thomson Holidays* 
lead in Imaging out the first 
benchmark brochures for next 
summer. 

Thomson, the market lead- 
er, and DLG — best known for 
its Intrant subsidiary — are 
the biggest operators, between 
them acc oun ting for nearly 
half the summer market in 
foreign package holidays. 

They are fighting with much 
increased capacity to seize an 
even bigger share of a market 
which many believe will grow 
further next year as the 
promotional pace hots up. - 

Horizon Travel, the third 
biggest tom* operator — its 
chairman is Mr Bmce Tanner 
— intends to show its hand 
next week with a brochare, bat 
yesterday made dear it would 
pursue its policy of m a tch in g 
Thomson prices for similar 
holidays. 

Others in the mainstream 
market are expected to be 
dragged along in the Ms 
three's slipstream even though 
many in the industry believe 
that only high volumes offer 


the chance of even reasonable 
profit margins. 

Smaller operators with spe- 
cialist products are seen to be 
safe in this battle, 
becaasethen- holidaymakers 
are willing to pay the higher 
price needed for a smaller 
operation to survive. 

Already b a rgains are beiag 
brandished. Tifimoffi has a 
special promotion of a thou- 
sand holidays at 1966 prices, 
beginning at £53 fur 14 nights 

ie Majorca. 

Thomas Cook, the biggest 
retail agency chain, has cut 
holiday deposits to £10 from 
the £40 or more called for by 
torn operators. Code is sub- 
sidizing the lower deposit 

This move almost certainly 
signals more special offers 
from retail agents which, after 
a Monopolies and Mergers 
Commission investigation, are 
no longer restricted on such 
promotions. 

The big retail multiples, 
which also include Lmm Ptely 
(part of Thomson Travel), 
Piddbvds, Hogg Robinson aid 
A T Mays, will be best placed 
in this particular tattle, 
threatening the survival of 
smaller agents. 

It was Thomson which be- 
gan the price war this summer 
by slashing price levels by 
nearly a fifth, turning 1986 
into a boom year when foreijpi 



Mr Hairy Goodman: 

a bigger market share. 

holidays are estimated by 
Thomson to have gone up at 
least 20 per cent to about 73 
million. The rise could torn out 
to be nearer 25 per cent. 

At least 135 million more 
Britons have gone abroad, 
lured by giveaway offers like 
£25 holidays and then by 
prices which bronght the av- 
erage cost of a foreign package 
down from £300 in 1985 to 
£250 this summer. . 

Thomson has kept its av- 
erage price for 1987 at £250. 
Of 235 million holidays so far 
on offer (it » carrying about 2 
million holidaymakers this 
summer, double that of last 
year) 750,000 are held at the 
1986 price or reduced, 750,000 
are in a category where some 
prices are 


as much as 10 per cent in 
holidays based at four and 
five-star hotels), and as many 
again are holidays maintained 
at budget prices by rang 
simple accommodation as i 
seif-catering. 

DLG expects to double its 
self-catering capacity to ar- 
ound 800J00 holidays, be- 
cause this keeps down the cost 
of holidays. Across the group . 
. it expects prices to stay steady 
compared with this summer, 
with various areas showing 
price reductions. 

Mr Paul Brett, ■nau»E" 1 C 
director of Thomson Holidays, 
says that he is satisfied with 
the Thomson profit perfor- 
mance this year. It appears 
Gkdy that profit margins next 
summer trill not rise above the 
1986 level. 

At ILG Mr Goodman said: 
U I would look for margins next 
year as good as, if not slightly 
better than, the current year 
where profits are substantially 
up." 

Thomson and ILG are 
claiming high load factors in 
aircraft this summer. 


Mr Brett issued this warn- 
ing: “There will be growth 
next year but it will be less 
than this past summer, and so 
die going w31 be to«gher.” Mr 
Goodman thinks the same, 
forecasting a market gowth of 
about 5 per cent He, too, is 
looking to seize a bigger 
market share. 

Mr Brett sees more mergers 
in the industry as the only way 
for some com parties to survive. 

What does seem dear is that 
there is unlikely to be a repeat 
of the immense market growth 
seen this summer which found 
late bookers mopping op even 
higher-priced offerings, and so 
bailing eat lesser tour op- 
erators. It means 1987 could 
be the year of reckoning. 


running at 98 per cent or even 
more. This is a crucial factor 
in achieving profitability. 

Mr Brett said: “We are 
hoping to improve market 
share further next year and to 
achieve further economies of 
scale." Computerized booking 
efficiency gains are claimed by 
both Thomson and DUG. 


Payment late 

Dome Petroleum said a 
payment of about $400,000 
was not made as scheduled to 
Bayrische Landesbank. The 
Gentian bank had not given a 
waiver, but waivers had been 
obtained on three other loan 
facilities, on which default 
would have beep triggered by 
non-payment. 

TVS pay loan 

Television South will repay 
its 14-20 per cent unsecured 
loan stock for 1986-87 at par 
on December 31. 


LONDON FINANCIAL FUTURES 


Time Marita String 

Dec 88— 

Msr87 

Jur 87 

SoP 87 

pec 87 

Mar 88. 


8055 

89.85 

89.40 

Kff 

81131 


89.60 

89.85 

8950 


fctafc gjg * total open Interest 13177 


Hum 
Dec 86 — 
Mar 87 
JunB7 — 
>87. 


US Timur Bond 

Dec 86 — . 

Mar 87 

junBT 


SlKJrtOHl 
Dec 66 
Mar 87 — 
jun 87 ... 


iGM 
Dee! 

Mar 87 
Ju"87 


ftSewo" 

Dec 88 — — 
Mar 87 


94.03 

9393 

9372 

9339 

96-10 

Wf 


9833 

9 

112-03 

112-06 

w 

15950 

162.00 


Low CfOM- EM Vat 

89.07 89.20 6937 

89.35 89.42 252 

89J53 89.67 223 

89.40 89A7 12 

— 89.27 0 

- 89X2 0 


Prewous day"* totat open Interest 23817 
94.09 94.02 9404 5722 

93L99 9334 94-94 10 

93.77 93.72 93.72 294 

9341 9038 9338 65 

Previous total opan Merest 5646 

97-03 96-06 96-21 8038 

95-34 0 


Previous da/s total open Merest 1 172. 
96-38 96-10 9609 148 

96-04 - 0 
0 

Previous day's total opM Manet 13371 
112-14 110-11 11031 15280 

112-06 11034 110-28 15 

.11028 ’ 0 
0 


161 <40 
16230 


Previous dart total open Merest 22S2 
1583b 160.75 576 


16230 


16375 -1 


FOREIGN EXCHANGES 


STER LING SPOT AND FORWARD RATES ■ 

., MW** rates 

gSSLS if 10 oSoberl itaorift 3igpt ri» 

uvmfc ySwMMTO 1.4440-1.4450 0-55-0-52prt3tl UOT.Kfcrem 

. 23057-23085 039-OJOprem • 1.t5-130prem 

fzȣa30l2 lJMSSprem 4S-4XPMTO 

20-i5prwi 54-45pram 

110215.113365 2 *-%prem 5tt3£pr*n 

Cpjwm 1 0667-1 -0677 4pran-1dte WSdte 

Ouo»T iS-iKpran 4&4Xprem 

SgTiSSS Ito 8 «? Sfflp 

as* H&Hg ss&s gKoE* 

ST HS8 JS? kss= sass 

S WUm 11^22334 1 K-Ipnm 3*WXprem 

Tokyo agaMI gsMMl SVaSem 25S-24Spretn 

^3? gJ§Slra2 236W-23692 IS-lkpreni ■ ' 4MKpr«m 

^r^comtawdwMISTS^ _ 

" rvrnra STE RLING RATES DOLLAR SPOT RATES _ 

! ai7Do£T^o 

. &6250-2. 6270 

, 03310-0.6317 

w^-TpOund “ 73M&2-HK5 Swedm wn 

" 19430-19630 Norway — — 73850-739CU 

toast 

BSST-^r =tsssa 9 SSt=Ms^ 
SffiSSSJr ■=SHB!B S5!==S&a 

ffl&r - -ris** ja-=jaa» 

■UoyetaBan* OfEX«dBtat ... 


( COMMERCIAL PROPERTY ) 

Reinhold invests in Britain 


Mr Anders Lettstrom, man- 
aging director of Reinhold, the 
£300 million Swedish prop- 
erty, company, is in London 
today- to explain his com- 
pany's involvement with Ran- 
elagh Developments, the 
British property company set 
up by some of the former 
directors of Haslemere Estates 
after its takeover by Rod- 
amco, the Dutch company. 

Reinhold wants to establish 
a foothold in the British 
market, especially in London. 
The joint venture arrange- 
ment with Rattelagh is Rein- 


overseas op- 


hold's first 
era tion. 

The Swedish company's 
plans to find a partner in 
British property development, 
especially in the City of Lon- 
don and the West End, came 
at an opportune time for 
RaneVagh, which was looking 
for development cash. The 
joint venture means that 
Reinhold will provide funds 
to Ranelagh, enabling it to 
cany out schemes of £20 
million or more. 

. Ranelagh, which will ini- 
tially be a trading company, 


MONEY MARKETS 


. EURO MONEY DEPOSITS % 


7 day* 6S*»w- 

3 ninth G'»-5 lb iB 


7 days 4%r4» 

3mnth 4K-4H 

Ronch Franc 
7 days 8K-7X- 
3imtftBX-8 , 

S«ln Franc 
7 clays' 2X-2 

3 ninth 4tt-4 

Yon 

7 days 5fe5 
Snmh5-4i4 


can 6X-5X 

1 tenth e-5% 
fimnth 

ea« 54 

imnm 4%4» 
emfflft 4X4K 

can s»7 

Immh 8U-8 
6mnth 8-7% 

cal 2»-1S4 

1 mnft 3 ,b rt- ,J w 

6 mnili 43ift4'i« 

can 5144)4 - 

imnth 64K 
Qranth s -4ft 


Basa Bates % 

Ctaanng Banks 10 
Tnanca House 10 

Dbcotfn Mariwt Loans % 

wSCflSSsB 10 * 9 

TrcnuryBOs (Discount %) 


2mntn 10K 
3«nntti 10K 


2mntfi 1(H4 

3mnm m 


GOLD 


GoKt$4 22.75-42335 

Krooerrarer (par eon); 

S 4KL50^350(E291.MW29300J 
SowBigns' (newt 
1 101 ^>1 0235 (£70. 00-7(175 ) 
Ptsttairn 

$559.75(2387.10) 

^jffitaOesVAT 


ECGD 


Fixed Rate Sterling Export Finance 
Scheme IV Avereoe reference rata (or 
tmorau period Augusi S. 1986 to 
Septaffltw 2 , 1986 metatira: 9390 per 
cant 


imnth 10K-10 ' 2mnth fOX-lOX 
3mnth lO’^-lO'i* 6 mirth IO^m-IO 3 !* 

T 18 * Bto (Dtsceuntsq 

3mnth KPw 6mnth 10“-ia 

Iriarbanh (%). 

Orerraghn open lOctosoB 

1 week 10)4-10 6 mnth 1014-10* 

Imnth 10H-10H 9mmfi T0%-10* 

3 mnth 10’ J i#.l0"«]12iiun lO'^ie-iO^u 

Loot Authority Deposits (%) 

2 days 10 7 days 10 

imnth 10* SmnthiOH 

6 mnth IQ'A 12mft 10)4 


Locals 

1 mwn tt»-fi K 2 ninth 11)4-11* 
3mrnh 11)4-11% fimndi 11)4-11% 
Ommh 11)4-11% 12 mth 11M-1114 

3 mnth IO^m-IO'u 

Gmmh 10 ll «-1fP>«"l2mtti io ,, i6-10»« 


octal cos rw 
imnth 6.00*95 
6mntfi 3905JS 

I 


3 mnth 5 .90-5 65 
12 mth 605-6.00 


intends to establish a second 
line of finance. Its merchant 
bank adviser will soon an 
nounce a private placing of 
some of the company’s equity: 
with institutions to raise more 
than £10 million. 

Ranelagh is negotiating on 
some development possibil- 
ities in the City and West End, 
hoping to carry out schemes 
winch need refurbishment or 
intensive management 

Reinhold, which has n< 
equity in Ranelagh, specializi 
in similar kinds or develop- 
ment It sees scope in the 
London market which is not 
available to it in Stockholm. 

If property follows the eq- 
uities market there is likely to 
be an increasing amount of 
international buying and sell- 
ing. The market is only waft- 
ing fora Far Eastern company 
to make a -bid for one of 
Britain’s larger property 
companies. 

Judith Huntley 


BASE 

LENDING 

RATES 


Adam S Company. 
BCG 


Co-operative Bank. 
C. Hoare & Co 


.10.00% 

. 10 . 00 % 

- 10 . 00 % 

_10J5% 

-1DJOO% 

_taoo% 

-10X0% 


Hong Kong S Shanghai — 10.00% 

LLoyds Bank 10X0% 

Nat Westminster 10X0% 


Royal Bank of Scotland. 

TSB 

NA 


-10X0% 

.10X0% 

.moos 


COMMENT Kenneth Fleet 


The TSB a hard act for 
British Gas to follow 


The privatization production line 
moves on. The TSB cheques have 
barely been cashed, yet yesterday pie 
Government was already encouraging 
British Gas customers to take their 
seats for the November flotation. An 
astonishing 2 million have already 
expressed interesL 

Evidently, the TSB razzmatazz will 
have reminded millions who had 
forgotten about British Telecom that 
there is money to be made by ordinary 
people buying shares from the Gov- 
ernment. But British Gas is a very 
different proposition. 

Money is again being given away in 
terms of BT-style vouchers worth a 
discount of perhaps 8 per cent on the 
purchase price for small investors who 
prefer cash to bonus shares in three 
years’ lime. This is nowhere near the 
scale of giveaway in the TSB issue. 

There will be many more shares for 
sale — British Gas will be valued at the 
time of the issue at perhaps four times 
the TSB. And the threat of Labour 
renationalizaiion (absent in the TSB 
issue) will come before the sale and 
must affect the demand for shares 
once dealings start. 

Unless there is some dramatic 
change in the opinion polls in the next 
couple of months. City institutions 
are unlikely to bid up the price, even 
supposing they are unable to buy what 
they want at the flotation. Subject to 
public demand, it seems likely that big 
investors here and in the American 
and Japanese markets will be offered 
about half the issue, worth perhaps 
£2.7 billion. This is a lot of money 
even by institutional standards. 

Ministers argue that Labour's 
threat, probably in the same form of 
non-voting participation certificates 
as at BT, might act as a form of 
political underwriting, taking away 
the risk of loss. This will not cut much 
ice with the small investor who is 
more interested in the certainty of 
profit 

Already, the Government advised 
by NM Rothschild, is trawling over a 
wide area. The minimum subscrip- 
tion is 100 shares, priced at no more 
than £150. Gas consumers will have 
to put up well under £100 on the 
instalment plan. Sixteen million cus- 
tomers are being guaranteed £250 
worth, which would come to £4 billion 
if all took up the offer. 

If the prospect of instant profit is 
receding, British Gas shares will have 
to offer value for money if the issue is 
to be taken up. And that surely means 
a dividend yield of more than 7 per 
cent Slightly under 6 per cent is 
currently available on BT shares, 
which would have much more growth 
potential than British Gas in the 
absence of Labour’s takeover threat 

. Gas shares will be harder to sell on 
that basis without an intervening base 
rate cut let alone a rise. Perhaps the 
best selling point would be to compare 
the British Gas dividend yield with 
that available on index-linked gilt- 
edged stocks, which currently offer 
less than 4 per cent But that will only 
wash if British Gas can manage to 
forecast a rise in profit if not in 


historic terms then on the 
management’s preferred current cost 
accounting. The adjustments for the 
Government levy of £2.5 billion debt 
will suitably fog the figures. The TSB 
issue may conveniently fog the 
investors. 

Valuing Airways 

British Airways has its own special 
problems of valuation both for the 
City and for the army of private 
shareholders. Airlines currently form, 
but a tiny pan of most major 
institutional portfolios, and there will 
be a good deal of flying along the 
learning curve, as fund managers 
familiarize themselves with the sector. 

Major US airline slocks are heavily 
involved for the most part with 
domestic operations, and have suf- 
fered from the fierce competition that 
arose in the wake of de-regulation. 
Fares plummeted and profits crashed, 
giving way to a spate of defensive 
mergers. 

With the takeover of People’s 
Express by Texas Air, there may now 
be a period of stability, helped by the 
easing of competitive pressures and 
falling oil prices. US majors with a 
significant international presence. 
Pan Am and TWA, have both been 
through financial traumas and are 
regarded by Wall Street as high risk 
gambling counters. 

BA is more comparable to the 
major European carriers such as 
Swissair. KLM and Lufthansa. These 
tend to have a wider spread of 
operations, and enjoy the swings and 
roundabouts of good routes and bad 
more than US domestic operators 

. Nevertheless, even the Europeans 
can find their profits dominated by 
fluctuations in the dollar against other 
major currencies. Institutions are not 
likely to conclude that the quality of 
BA's earnings is of the very highest, 
with perhaps 30 per cent of its revenue 
arising in the the North and South 
American continents. 

There are some appealing aspects 
which count in BA’s ravour.The share 
sale will take place against a back- 
ground of sharply rising profits, 
according to a new study by BA’s 
stockbroker, Phillips & Drew. 

This year, the deadly combination 
of Chernobyl, the Libyan bombing 
raid and strong dollar produced barely 
a return from the plum North 
American routes, which previously 
accounted for up to 40 per cent of 
profits. Next year cannot help being 
better. 

BA is also a stock which will offer 
institutions a play on the benefits of 
falling oil prices and, says P&D, may 
have attractions as probably the only 
airline major offering a reasonable 
yield 

.On the broker’s central forecasts, 
which value BA at around £1000 
million, the shares could be sold at a 
cautious seven times earnings, to yield 
a handsome six per cent. Those 
ratings take care of most of the risks 
and should pave the way for a 
successful, if long overdue flotation. 


f Mortgage Base Rate. 





II 



.4***1*' I — l ■J'jsMfcSSflMSSS I — I M -MMS I — 1 3333333 .3533553 :3S33Sf535fSMa33a £3333 1 — I h : ;3 









20 




AMR 

& 

ABM 

Aflac 

Alcoa 
Am® 
Anrtt 
Am B 
AmC 
AnC 
AmC 
AmE 

AmH 

AtnM 

Am S' 

AmTi 

Arnoc 

Armo 

Asm 

Ashla 

AlRiC 

Awn 

BtW* 

Banki 

Bkol 

Bank 

Bom! 

Boom 

B&flC 

Brder 

BgWi 

Brest 

BP 

Bunn 

Bum 

Burro 

CmpO 


Cttft 

Coffin 

Cham 

Chase 

Chml 

Chew 

22£ 

Odea 

Ctaffi 

Coca* 

ST 

CTmbi 

Cmbt 

Com* 

Const 

CnNa 

const 

CntrlE 

Comir 

cpc a 

Crane 
CmZi 
Dart 4 
Deere 
DeR»< 
Detror 
ngdoi 
Dtsnm 

Dowd 


Duke I 
Du Po 


EstmV 

Eaton 

Emars 

Bonn 

ftdDj 


A 


THE TIMES THURSDAY OCTOBER 2 1986. 


LONDON TRADED OPTIONS 




Cala 



Puts 



Sarias 

Oct 

Jon 


Oct 

Jan 

3E. 


300 

17 

30 

38 

7 

12 

17 

C308} ** 

330 

5 

15 

SO 

30 

39 

37 

380 

1* 

4 

8 

55 

60 

63 

BP 

800 

75 

88 

117 

1* 

7 

18 

rfissj 

650 

700 

35 

9 

60 

32 

90 

62 

10 

35 

20 

42 

36 

82 

Cora Gold 

500 

82 

97 

110 

3 

16 

24 

C57BJ 

550 

600 

37 

18 

t» 

37 

77 

50 

12 

45 

Z7 

57 

TO 

£SSS! wte 

r283} 

260 

200 

300 

25 

13 

5 

35 

20 

17 

46 

35 

26 

2 

8 

22 

6 

13 

27 

10 

17 

30 


330 

* 

9 

— 

45- 

51 


ComUMon 

r287) 

280 

300 

330 

7 

2 

1 

18 

11 

6 

20 

IB 

18 

17 

34 

64 

20 

36 

54 

23 

37 

64 

CaUs&WSra 

fas* 

276 

280 

30 

"5 

42 

25 

50 

38 

4 

18 

15 

26 

5 

30 


32S 

2 

12 

27 

38 

40 

47 

owns 

600 

IIS 





1 

— 

— 

f7W3f 

6S0 

700 

65 

22 

— 

— 

10 

— 


GEC 

160 

17 

24 

30 

5 

9 

11 

Cl TO} 

180 

200 

4 

IK 

12 

5 

18 

8 

15 

32 

1/ 

32 

A 

Grand Mat 

360 


77 

82 

_ 

3 

7 

(MM) 

382 

43 


— 

2X 

— 

““ 

390 


50 

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October 1 1986. Total coafeacts 22224. €*14813. NM75B1. n tata rtyta M a e cu rifr price- 


STOCK MARKET REPORT 



Beecham value soars £158m 
on Bauman’s new medicine 


By Michael Clark and Carol Leonard 

Shares of Beecham, the outside the market, was appar- 
ently caught short of stock. 

Among the other drug 
manufacturers, Wellcome 
continued to make the most of 
prospects for its anti-Aids 
drug. ■ Last month, in an 
unprecedented move, the US 
drug authorities gave the 
group permission to prescribe 
the drug in America on com- 
passionate grounds. Some an- 
alysts claim it is only likely to 
add £9 million to profits in the 
first two yearn, but dearly has 
great potential. The group has 
been pressing home the point 
at meetings this week in the 
US. News of this has filtered 
bade to London where several 
dealers have been big buyers 
of the shares. 

The rest of the equity 
market grew in confidence as 
the prospect of an imminent 2 
per cent rise in bank base rates 
continued to fade. Mr Tim 
O'Dell, economist at Phillips 
& Drew, is now confident the 
market can stave off a 1 per 
cent rise in interest rates until 


pharmaceuticals and corn 
suraer products group, soared 
23p to 41 3p yesterday, adding 
around £158 million to its 
stock market value as Ameri- 
can-born Mr Robert Bauman, 
its newly appointed chairman, 
prepared to introduce himself 
to the City. 

Beecham is reputed to be 
paying Mr Bauman around SI 
million a year (£694,000) to 
iqject new life and direction 
into the flagging group. The 
appoinntment made him 
Britain’s second highest paid 
executive after Mr Richard 
Giordano. Last night he was 
hosting a cocktail parly for 
major fund managers at 
London's Savoy Hotel and is 
due to meet a number of 
analyse: at a similar function 
next week. 

The market is hoping for 
some good news from Mr 
Bauman, who has already 
succeeded in attracting sup- 
port for the shares from 
several of the big New York 
investment houses. Goldman 
Sachs will be publishing a 
major piece of research on the 
group later this month and 
recommending the shares to 
Lits clients . 

Miss Linda Tremaine, an- 
alyst with Savory Milln, the 
broker, says be has -already 
done a lot of public relations 
work in both the US and the 
UK. Savory Milln has also 

arranged a seminar in Paris on 
October 21 for the company at 
which Mr Bauman has agreed 
'-to speak. 

Miss Tremaine says that 
Beecham has already put for- 
sale notices up on three of its 
businesses and has received 
firm offers for Germaine 
Mooted in the US and its 
British drinks distribution 
subsidiary, Rndlater Mackie 
Todd. More than 200 
prospectuses have also been 
issued in connection with the 
sale of the home improve- 
ments division. 

News oflast night's meeting 
with the institutions took 
dealers by surprise. Robert 
Fleming, which acts as a 
market-maker in the shares 


We’d like to get 
on first name terms. 


P LEASE DON’T THINK we’re advocating 
any unseemly informality. Ear from it 
We merely wish to become the first name that 
springs to mind when you’re considering any- 
thing to do with offices, shops, or industrial and 
high-technology buildings. 

Anything, did we say? Yes, more or less. 

We’re aware thaft rather a large claim. 
However, we are rather a large practice. 
(We’ve eighty-five partners and associates, 
and over five hundred staff in the UK alone.) 

And we didn’t get big by turning down 
small jobs. In the past year, for example, 
we’ve handled instructions on units ranging 
in size from 400 square feet up. Admittedly, 
the largest is 3 million square feet, and ift true 
that much of our work is extremely large. 

As a matter of fact we think our size adds 
perspective to our experience and skills. 

Big can be beautiful too, you know. 

We’d like to put our skills at your service. And 
to begin with, let’s run through what we do. 

Our investment people handle buying and 
selling, and the funding of property development 
Our agency teams cover developing, letting 
and acquiring, as well as rent reviews and lease 
renewals. 

Our valuations group can tell you what your 
property^ worth. J 

And in these days of ‘intelligent buildings’ 
you need highly intelligent advice on manage- 
ment, maintenance, and the improvement of 
property. 

Whaft more our databank is one of the 



largest sources of commercial property informa- 
tion; which is one reason we act as consultants 
to so many clients. 

And we’re just as at home abroad. In other 
Jones Lang Wootton firms overseas there are a 
further 125 partners and L200 staffs in 35 offices, 
in 14 countries, on 4 continents. 

Whether you’re at home or abroad, laige or 
small, we’re at your service. 

If you’d like to know anything else, please 
call us on 01-493 6040. 

To begin with, just ask for Jones Lang Wbotton. 




Jones Lang 

The first name to call in commercial property. 

Chartered Surveyors. International Real Estate Consultants. 22 Hanover Square. London Wl a 2BN. Telephone: 01-493 6040. 
Kent House. Telegraph Street, Mooigate, London EC2R 7JL. Telephone: 01-638 6040. 



^ * May 1 Jun Jui Aug Sep Oct 


Investors in thin trading. The 
FT index of 30 shares rose 
24.7 to 1,251.7 as more than 
£4 billion was added to the 
value of quoted stocks. The 
broader based FT-SE 100 
ended 22.5 hfofaer at 1,578 J. 

That large hue of 4 million 
shares in Souths Industries, 
that had been around for most 
of the week, was eventually 


237J5p, 


This 

_ of profit 
ips&Drew, 


• Microsystems Group, 
which joined the USM in 
Jannary at 127p and was 
mentiooed here at 143p in 
June, may soon enjoy re- 
newed support Analysts who 
visited the company on 
Tuesday are lookup for pre- 
tax profits to rise from 
£139 million to £23 million 
this year, with more than 
£3 million in store for 1987. 
The shares dosed steady 
at 165p. 

the start of thew Conservative 
Party conference next week. 

The Bank of England was 
lending one-week money to 
discount houses at 10 per cent 
— indicating that it did not 
want any change in rates for at 
least a week. In the money 
markets three-month money 
was being lent at 10% percent, 
Vt per cent easier than the 
previous day. 

Gilts were steady, dosing 
unchanged at the short end 
and Bh lower in longs. 

All this was not lost on the 
equity market where share 
prices were chased higher by 


cleared at 
lowed an 
estimates by 
the brisker. 

British Aerospace soared 
21pto461paJternews that the 
European consortium it is part 
of has received a £3 billion 
order for 100 Airbuses from 
one of the big American 
airlines for delivery in 1989. 
That could be good news for 
BAe which was keeping tight- 
lipped. 

Hanson Trast firmed 7p to 
188p after receiving per- 
mission to quote its shares on 
Wall Street in the form of 
American Depositary Re- 
ceipts. Dealings are due to 
start in a month. 

Dealers reported selective 
support for blue chips from 
US buyers who were coming 
in for stocks like Glaxo 32p 
higher at 965p and Jagnar 1 7p 
to 523 p. The strength of the 
mark also attracted support 
for some of our big exporters 
like ia 18p higher at £10.82, 
and ConrtanMs 5p to 283p. 

The battle for control of 
McCbiqMNiale, the specialist 
printer, continued to hot up 
yesterday. The shares ad- 
vanced lOptoa new peak of 
286p as it emerged that Mr 
Robert Maxwell, publisher of 


the Dailv Mirror ; had bought 3 
million shares, or 5.9 per cent 
of the equity. He also owns 25 
per cent of ExteL the publish- 
ing and information group, 
which is emerging as a “white 
knight” for McCorquodale 

Mr Maxwell is thought to be 
interested in launching a bid 
for ExteL but is prevented 
from doing so by. the tak eover 
panel until ApriL A merger 
between Extel and 
McCorquodale would dilute 

• Greenwich Resource, 
the BoMminmg group, jumped 
12p to 130p folowiffig a 

lunch hosted by James Capd, 
its broker, for Mr Stanley 

its director, 

and the iusti t ni io BS. The 
latest report from its mines in 
the Red Sea hills of the 
Sudan, doe out tomorrow, fa 
expected to be good. “We 
told the City it would be good 
and it will be," Mr EskeU 
says. 

his holding in the former and 
make his task more difficult 
McCorquodale has already 
rejected a higher bid, worth 
£145 million, from rival Nor- 
ton Opax which was given 
permission to proceed with its 
bid last month. ExteLwhich is 
anxious to keep out of the 
clutches of Mr Maxwell, was 
unchanged at 345p, while 
Norton Opax was static at 
136p.« 

Detectives at Wood 
Mackenzie, the broker, have 
been checking through the 
share register of yet another 
company, this time 1C 


TRADITIONAL OPTIONS 



■Buctronks. TV-AM. Freah btate 
NJAjC. Investment. JE 


Dec 18 MiS 

Jan 8 Jan 19 

JWI22 Feb? 

Tricartrol MftdieOCotts, Amatrad Coimnnor 
Group, Yrnfc & Equity Trust. Siyaffi HoMnga. 
jauGokf RUnasTGASE “ 


wesomnfi. JE ButanA Ctogau QoU Mnra CASE 

Investments, Ql WSorta Wren, North Katarf Mines, DJC. Peak HcWngfc 

Orth Brown. STC, Sound OHfuston, Abeco Gwestnwnts. 


Johnson! — _ 

Put & Cat AiwUrad Consumer Electronics, York & Eqiity Trust. 


RECENT ISSUES 


EQUITIES 
AngBa Secs (1l5pJ 



Chelsea Man (125rt 
Creighton Labs (130p) 
Euro Home (I60p) 

Eva C o n st r u ct i on (I05p) 

Fletcher DwwyspQp) 
Guthrie Coro (iSOp) 
Harrison 050p) 

HHa Ergonon 


172+2 

10 

67-2 

150 

49 

128-1 

180 

128 

105-1 

68 

164+3 

158 


Hughes Food (20p) 

00p) 


Load Lon^Gp 


M6 Cash 
Marina Dev pi 
Nawage Trans . 
Sandal Perkins (1 
Scot Mtge 10Q% 
ley Letau 


Stanley 


mop) 


Thames TV <190p) 
Trass sH%)/f 2016 *97 
Untock (T 
Yetverton 

Yorkshire TV (125p) 


23 
151 
93 
85 
73 
159 +1 
E17U 
138+3 
251 +1 
294U-U 
68 
36 
138+1 


Gas-They have unearthed five ' 
groups of shareholders; 
including three nominee ac- 
counts who. between them, 
speak for 7% per cent of ibe 
equity.The two identifiable 
investors are New Z ealande r, 
Mr Ron Brierley. who ha* just 
reduced his hoJdirqj from 13 
percent to 1.3 per cent and the 
Barclay brothers who, at the 
end of the Iasi account, hud 
H per cent. A mysterious B29 
account operated by the Royal 
Bank of Scotland speak* for 

1.6 per cent. Fiekfings Nomi- 
nees has just bought an extra 
million shares taking its state 
up to 2.5pcr cent and an outfit 
called Bostex and based in 
Delaware. USA.has 1 percent 

“What's interesting is that 
both Brierley and the Barclays 
have had their stakes for some 
time and they haven't in- 
creased them. Brierley has 
actually reduced his,"5ays oil 
specialist, Mr Mike Cowlmgat 
Wood Mackenzie: "It must 
question whether they can 
really be considered as poten- 
tial bidders-” 

Shares in 1C Gas held steady 
at 5Q6p yesterday, after rising 
steadily for the past couple or 
weeks on bid speculation. 
Wood Mackenzie estimate 
that its asset value is around 
550p a share, making it worth 
no more than £8Q0million. 

Redtand tumbled 32p to 
386p on the back of a one-for- 
four rights issue at 350p to 
raise £180 million. The money 
will be put towards a £220mil- 
lion acquisition, also an- 
nounced yesterday, of an 
American aggregates business, 
based in Maryland. Its shares 
could take heart next week 
when a party of British an- 
alysts begin a two day trip to 
its operations in Texas. The 
same analysts will also be 
inspecting the American activ- 
ities of Bue Circle, up 5p at 
563p, and PUkfoton, un- 
changed at 430p. 

A circular from Green well 
Montagu, the broker, saying 
that first dealings in TSB 
shares could see the part-paid 
price soaring to 125p, put new 
life into the unofficial grey 
market The middle price 
firmed several pennies to 9 Ip. 
Licensed dealer Cleveland 
Securities said it was seeing a 
lot of selling from preferential 
shareholders and buying from 
City professionals. 

The rest of the banking 
sector was -“firmer. Midland 
put on 5pto 539p, Barclays 3p 
to 467p, Lloyds 2p to 414p 
and National Westminster 
also a couple to 514p. 


RIGHTS ISSUES 

Bartcaiay Tech F/P 210 +2 

Boots N /P _ 227+11 

Brown 4 Tawss F/P 146 

Buul N/P 8+1 

Cambium Venture N/P 3 * 

CTwtety Hunt N/P 4 

Goodhead Print N/P 5 

New Ct Net Res N/P 2+’i 

Sedgwick F/P 335 +2 

injury N/P 15 

Tiphook N/P 48 

(Issue price in brackets). 


UNITED STATES BANKRUPTCY COURT 
MIDDLE DISTRICT OF FLORIDA 
JACKSONVILLE 


DIVISION 


la rr. 

THE CHARTER COMPANY, 

CHARTER H1ERHAH0HAL FINANCE N.V„ 

Debtors 


Case Ns. 84-289-BK-J-GP 
Case He. 85-1033-BX-J-CP 


NOTICE OF VOTING PROCEDURE 
PLAN OF REORGANIZATION 


ON 


TO PARTIES IN INTEREST: 

PLEASE TAKE NOTICE thd the Disclosure Statement fried by The Charter Company and Charter 
International Finance N.V. has been approved by the United States Bankruptcy Court for the Middle District 
of Florida. 

Ballots and a copy of the Disclosure Statement should have been delivered to all holders of 8%% 
Convertible Subordinated Guaranteed Debentures Due 1994 ("Eurobonds") who filed proofs of claim. For 
those holde rs of Euro bonds w ho did not file proofs of claim, ballots, voting instructions and a copy of the 
Disclosure Statement may be obtained from the agent bank, depositories or Debtors' information agent The 
Principal agent bank, as well as indenture trustee for the Eurobonds, rsi 

bring Trust Company 

Attention: WWiam T. Curm&igham. Jr. 

Trust Department 

One W311 Street 

New York. New York 1D015 

U.SA 

(212) 635-1111 

. are in the custody of Euro-Clear Operations Ce/^r. 

f Turo-Ctear) or Cede!. SA ( *Cedel ), may arrange to obtain ballo ts , voting instructions aid a copy 
of the Disclosure statement from and cast ballots through Euro-dear or Cede) at the following addresses: 
Eva-Clear O pera tions Center, pJx. 
cfo Morgan Guaranty Trust of New York 
Attention Mr. Robert Boyd 
1040 Brussels 
Belghjm 

CedeL&A. 

Attention: Mr. Kco Wagner 
67 Bd. Gr. D. Charlotte 
P.0. BOX 1006. 

Luxembourg 

Eurobond Ittl ttos also may obtain ballots, voting instructions and Disclosure Statements from Debtors' : 
information agent at tee following address: 

Corporate Investor Cc mu^etionx, lac. 

311 East Pvk Street 
Moonacttie, New Jersey 07074 

ILSA . . 

(201) 440-6600 

Mri ""s* <teposit Eurobonds wite, 

o^Oepositoiy so that ballots wiflta re- 
ceived by the Debtors tabulation agent m Jacksonville. Florida, no later than November 12. 1986. Each 
depository wSI review the ballots it receives and certify to the Debtors that tee amount of Eurobonds 
delivered torts correctly stated on aach batot Eurobonds deposited by hoRiere voting to accapt or refect 
the Plan will be held by the depository until November 13T1988. ^ — 

VOTES TO ACCEPT OR REJECT THE PLAN BY A EUROBOND HOLDER WHOSE HBftB Mins in MIT 
DEF0OTZD NITH A DEPOSITORY OR WHOSE BALLOTS AIK NOT ACCOlWAW^^Al^tHUTWf 
CHTBRCATE FROM A DEPOSITORY WILL NOT BE COUNTED. DT * 








K-J-fiP 


since 


parte 

Red 




The Channel Tunnel will be a vital link in Europe's 
communications in the 21st century. 

It will take high speed passenger trains, freight 
trains and shuttles specially built to whisk cars, coaches 
and lorries across the Channel to the Continent. 

You and your car will be able to cross the Channel 
at speeds of up to 100 mph. With the handbrake on. 

Any time, night or day. Three hundred and sixty-five 

days a year. Come fog, gafes or snow. 

Thanks to one of Europe's greatest engineering 

- rriMMFTON OF THE HIGH SPEED RAIL LINE CURRENTLY PROPOSED IN PRANCE. LONDON TO BRUSSELS 
•ASSUMING COMKfTrufN ur 0Y MORGAN GRENFELL & CO LIMITED AND ROBERT. FLEMING*, 

H . . » 





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projects of the century, you could travel non-stop from 
the heart of London to the heart of Brussels or Paris in 
about 3 hours. Without going near an airport. 

It will run between Folkestone and Frethun near 


XaUIUIl}. will 


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stimulate British trade across Europe. 

The Channel Tunnel is to be built by f 
Anglo-French private enterprise at a cost ■ EURO 1 
of over 2.6 billion pounds — none of it TUNNEL 
provided by the taxpayer. Roll on 1993. 

TWO HOURS FIFTY MINUTES. LONDON TO RARtS THREE HOURS FIFTEEN MINUTES. SUBJECT TO PARLIAMENTARY APPernu i 
& CO. LIMITED ON BEHALF OF EUROTUNNEL FLC AND EUROTUNNEL SA. ^ ^AKUAMENTARY APPROVAL 





L_J cfffcCES- eeesscttseiseeE $ esejcsse- csssscg i i sikcs- as, i i *, ob - 







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I 

22 BUSINESS AND FINANCE 

THE TIMES THURSDAY OCTOBER 2 1 986 






-WALL. STREET 


Dow races ahead in 
early trading boost 


Ford and Fiat poised to 
fight for Alfa Romeo 

« ■ i: 


TEMPUS 


New York (Agencies) — 
Shares rose sharply higher in 
moderately active trading 
early yesterday. 

Market participants said 
stocks were being fuelled by a 
continued strong bond market 
and heavy buying in the airline 
stocks, which boosted the 
transport sector. 

Analysts said brokers were 
recommending airline stocks 
on reports that airline traffic 
was strong in the late summer. 


The Dow Jones industrial 
average, which was np only 
about five points shortly alter 
the opening, jumped 28.68 to 
1,796.26 around mid-morning 
when the transport indicator 
climbed 14S7 to 81525. The 
65 stocks average rose 10.48 to 
71354 

The broader New York 
Stock Exchange composite in' 
dex gained 1-52 at 13456 
while Standard & Poor’s 500- 
stock index was np 2.92 at 
234.24. 


Milan (Reuter) - Fiat, 
Italy’s biggest private indus- 
trial group, and Ford of 
Europe are ready to bid for 
control of Alfa Romeo, the 
lossmaking Italian state car 
manufacturer- analysts here 
said yesterday. 


cent stake in Alfa which it 
would raise to a controlling 5 1 
per cent in three years. 

Alfa would be nursed back 
to profit by 1990 while retain- 
ing a separate corporate 
identity. 

But Mr Giovanni Agnelli. 


Rat and Ford broke off chairman of Fiat entered die 



merger talks last year. 

. Fiat is flush with money. Its 
owners, the Agnelli family, are 
brimming with confidence af- 
ter the repurchase last week of 
the Libyan minority slake in 
Rat 

Ford is expected to submit a 


fray last week, saying Fiat 
could more than match any 
Ford offer but that it would 
not unveil its plans until Ford 
made its bid public. 

Victory for Ford, with a 3.9 
per cent share of the Italian 
market, would give it a further 


Rat is just responding defen- 
sively to a threat from a 
foreign competitor. 

An Alfa employee, who 
requested anonymity 1 , said: 
~We are scared that, if Fiat 
takes us over, we will end up 
like Lancia.*’ 

Talks between Fiat and Alfa 
last year failed, when a Rat 
plan to split Alfa into two 
operating companies was 
rejected. 

Fiat and Ford are among six 
car producers in Western 
Europe, each with a market 
share of about 12 per cent and 


Foseco Minsep counl 
cost of LTV failure! 




week after talks in London, 
officials of Finmeccanica, 
Alfa's parent company, said. 

Reports, which neither Ford 
nor Finmeccanica has denied, 
say the US company is pre- 
pared to take an initial 20 per 


Profits at 
Quest up 
to £1. 25m 

By Richard Lander 

Quest Automation, the 
Hampshire computer prod- 
ucts supplier, returned to 
profitability in the six months 
to August 31. although its 
figures were flattered by the 
inclusion of some £786,000 in 
profits originally assigned to 
the 1984-85 financial year. 

Quest whose interests range 
from laser-disc distribution to 
computer-aided design, re- 
ported pretax profits of £1.25 
million at the interim stage 
compared with a £45 1.000 loss 
in the same period last year. 

Turnover was increased 
from £6.1 million to £8.9 
million. 

Mr Alfred Stirling, the 
chairman, expects a continued 
improvement. 

Mr Sliding also said the 
company should be able to 
pay a final dividend, the first 
since 1981. Steps are also 
being taken to improve the 
group’s financial position by 
convening the 6 per cent 
preference shares to ord- 
inaries. 

With a large chunk of last 
year’s profits made on forward 
sales transferred to the interim 
figures. Quest has revised its 
1984-85 loss upwards from 
£365,000 to £1.1 million. 


its position in the home 
market would become even 
stronger. It has a 54.2 per cent 
market share. 

Fiat's interest has aroused 
suspicions among officials at 
Alfa, who say they fear that 


lop manufacturer on the 
Continent. 

Analysts say that whoever 
wins Alfa could secure an 
important psychological edge 
in the battle for market 
supremacy. 


Last offshoots of 
JMB up for sale 


By Richard Lander 


The two remaining subsid- 
iaries of Johnson Matihey 
Bankers, the banking group 
rescued from the point of 
collapse by the Bank of En- 
gland two years ago. have been 
pui up for sale. 

The businesses are Johnson 
Matihey Commodities Lim- 
ited. a ring-dealing member of 
the London Metals Exchange, 
and its New York counterpart, 
Johnson Matthey Commod- 
ities Incorporated, another 
base metal dealer, which holds 
a seat on the New York 
Mercantile Exchange. 

Baring Brothers, the mer- 
chant hankers handling the 
sale for the Bank of England, is 
prepared to sell the companies 
together or separately. 

Most of JMB, including the 


bullion, treasury and foreign 
exchange operations, was sold 
in May to Westpac. the 
Australian banking group. 
Buyers have also been found 
for the group’s insurance and 
commodity broking interests. 

The sale of the two metal 
trading groups will leave the 
Bank holding only JMB’s bad 
loan portfolio, the root cause, 
of the group’s collapse. 

Mr Charles Irvie of Barings 
said it was hoped to realize 
something more than the two 
subsidiaries' shareholders 
funds, which were put at £9.1 
million and 814.5 million 
respectively. 

He identified financial con- 
glomerates and producers and 
consumers of raw materials as 
likely buyers. 


Ulster agency boosted 


A large increase in staff for 
Ulster’s small business 
agency, the Local Enteprise 
Development Unit, was an- 
nounced yesterday by Mr 
Peter Vjggers, the Northern 
Ireland Minister for Com- 
merce and Industry. 

Recruitment has begun for 
an increase in staff from 86 to 
109. 

Mr Viggers said: “The 


LEDU has had considerable 
success in the promotion of 
new businesses but, at the 
same time, attention has to be 
paid to encouraging and 
assisting existing small busi- 
nesses to grow. 

“Even a modest increase in 
the growth of existing small 
firms would have consid- 
erable impact on employment 
in Northern Ireland.’’ 


Foseco Minsep is not enjoy- 
ing the reputation attached to 
having LTV. probably the 
biggest corporate bankrupt 
ever, as one of its major 
customers. 

The 1986 interim results 
included an exceptional 
charge of £1.6 million cover- 
ing tad debts from LTV, the 
second-largest steel producer 
in the U$. Foseco has also 
provided a quite significant 
amount above the tine to 
cover further failures among 
its dieniefe base. Deliveries 
and credit Terms are being 
closely watched for all but the 
most finanrialy-secure cus- 
tomers. 

Foseco's interim statement 
reads tike a tale of woes. US 
operations as a whole lost 
money. Problems in the steel 
industry have been well 
publicized allhough diffi- 
culties are being exacerbated 
by strikes at leading produc- 
ers such as USX and Armco. 
On the construction materi- 
als side. Gibson-Horaans has 
suffered a foil in demand for 
its oil and agricultural-related 
products. 

The proportion of Foseco's 
business related to the steel 
industry has fallen in recent 
years from around 50 per cent 
to under 25 per cent How- 
ever. this remains a volatile 
market and yesterday's re- 
sults show how a bad perfor- 
mance can affect the whole 
group's performance. 

Results from the other 
parts of the business, how- 
ever. were reasonably good. 
In Germany, new products 
led to an increase in turnover 
and profits white Britain and 
France also put in an accept- 
able performance. The Span- 
ish business suffered because 
EEC membership has led to a 
reduction in steel output. 

A fundamental review of 
the group's operations is 
under way. 

After yesterday’s dis- 
appointing results, analysis 
were busily downgrading 
their full-year forecasts to £29 
million at best (eps 17p). 
Even if earnings per share rise 
to 22.5p next year (pretax 
profits at £34 million) this 
would still only represent an 


[Log scale 


SHARE PRICE 






1 LONDON FT A I 
ALL SHARE f. 


1 1 per cent increase over the 
20.2p earned in 1980. 

There must be better 
investment opportunities 
around than this low-growth 
business which is still essen- 
tially cyclical. 

Abingworth 

Abingworth. the investment 
trust with a penchant for 
American technology com- 
panies. continues 19 be a 
share whose potential out- 
weighs its performance. 

Not only has the high- 
technology sector remained 
out of favour in the past year, 
but- the dollar has fallen 17 
percent 

Therefore. Abingworth's 
net asset value per share fell 
again, to stand at 277p on 
June 30, against 286p a year 
earlier. 

The company considers the 
net asset value could be up to 
lOOp higher if the currency 
markets were kinder. 

It hopes for better things 
this year, hopefully aided by a 
weaker pound, and is con- 
fident that brighter con- 
ditions for the technology 
sector will allow more of its 
US investments to float their 
shares. Three have done so 
since June and the company 
expects another five to 
follow. 

Fortunately, the trust has 
not pui all its eggs in one 
basket. Several successful 
British investments, which 
include restaurants and car 
spares, have distinctly low- 
technology qualities, while a 
tie-up with a Swiss venture 
capital group will let it taste 


the waters in Western 
Europe. 

Useful and growing profits 
are also earned from a ven- 
ture capital fund manage- 
ment subsidiary. 

The shares, up ! pat 21 Ip, 
look worth accumulating at a 
generous 24 per cent discount ~ 
10 assets. 

Amstrad 

Apart from the 273 per cent 
increase in pretax profits and 
100 per cent increase in final 
dividend from Alan Sugar's 
money spinning machine, 
Amstrad, the most remark- 
able feature of the figures for 
the vear to June 30 was the 
margins. - 

During a year of hectic 
growth and new product 
devlopment. Amstrad re- 
corded pretax profit margins 
on sales of almost 25 percent 

Analysis are looking for 
another year of spectacular 
expansion, with no sign of 
stress or strain in the balance 
sheet In feet the JuU ac- 
counts when published will 
probably show net cash bal- 
ances of about £60 million. 

With the IBM compatible 
range off to a Soe start and a 
string of new products in 
audio emerging into the 
shops. Amstrad looks set for 
at least £1 1 5 million profits • 

But some analysts harbour 
a feeling that Mr Sugar is 
talking the numbers down. If 
they are right and earnings 
per share emerge in the l6pto 
f 7p range, Amstrad shares 
are selling on an earnings 
multiple of about nine times. 
They look cheap. 


REPUBLIC OF GHANA 
VOLTA RIVER AUTHORITY 

NORTHERN REGION ELECTRIFICATION AND 
REINFORCEMENT OF 161-KV SYSTEM 

This notice of invitation to bid is issued by the Volta River Authority for the first phase of the 
Northern Region Electriciation and 161-kV System Reinforcement project (Phase V- Financing for 
Phase 1 has been approved by the African Development Bank. 

Participation in Phase 1 of the project is therefore open to all contracting firms who belong to the 
participant states and/or member countries of the African Development Bank. 

Phase 1 of the project comprises the supply and construction of approximately 330 km of 161-kV 
transmission lines, extension to five existing substations, two new 161/34.5/1 1.5-kV substa- 
tions, 65 km of 34.5-kV distribution lines and two new 34.5/11.5-kV substations. 

The Volta River Authority invites tenders from suitable qualified and experienced firms for Phase 1 
contracts as foilows:- 

Contract PI -1 

Supply of conductors and accessories for 330 km of new 161-kV overhead transmission line. 
Contract PI -2 

Supply of three (3) 161 /34.5 / 11.5 kV, 16/10/10 MV A Power Transformers, three (3) Grounding 
Transformers, and three (3) Auxiliary Transformers. 

Contract PI -3 

Supply of fifteen (15) SF6. 161-kV Circuit Breakers. 

Contract PI -5 

Supply and construction of transmission lines and substations consisting of the following 
packages. 

Package PI -5A 

Supply and construction of two (2) new 161/34.5/1 1.5-kV substations and 161-kV extension of 
five (5) existing substations, including the supply of the balance of plant and installation of 
equipment purchased by the Volta River Authority. 

Package PI -5B 

Clearing of right of way, design, supply and erection of towers; installation of conductors and 
accessories for 330 km of 161-kV overhead transmission line. 

Package P1-5C 

Supply and construction of 65 km of 34.5-kV lines and two (2) new 34.5/1 1.5-kV substations. 

Contractors may bid for one or any combination of the above contracts or one or any combination 
of packages under Contract PI -5. 

It is anticipated that bid documents will be available by November 3, 1986, and tenders will be re- 
ceived by February 3, 1987. 

Requests for bid documents must be accompanied by a bank draft made out in favour of Acres In- 
ternational Limited in the amount of US $150 per complete set of documents per contract. 

Requests for bid documents shall be submitted as follows 

- one copy to 

The Chief Executive 
Volta River Authority 
P.O. Box M77 
Accra, Ghana 
West Africa 
Cable: Volta Accra 

Ref: Northern Electrification and Systems Reinforcement Project 
(Phase 1) 

- one copy (with bank draft) to 
Project Manager 

Northern Electrification and System Reinforcement Project - 
Phase 1 (VRA) 

Acres International Limited 
5259 Dorchester Road 
Niagara Falls, Ontario 
Canada, L2E 6W1 
Telex: 061-5107 
Cable: Acrescan Niagara Fails 

The bid documents will be dispatched from Acres International Limited to the applicants by the 
quickest means available. 


REPUBLIC OF GHANA 
VOLTA RIVER AUTHORITY 

NORTHERN REGION ELECTRIFICATION AND 
REINFORCEMENT OF 161-KV SYSTEM 

This notice of invitation to bid is issued by the Volta River Authority for the second phase of the 
Northern Region Electrification and 161-kv System Reinforcement project (Phase 2). 

The Volta River Authority has applied for loans from the Commonwealth Development Corporation 
(CDC) and the European Investment Bank (EIB) to be used towards financing part of the Phase 2 project 
indicated below under Contracts P2-2, P2-3 and P2-5. 

Participation in this part of Phase 2 of the project is open to Tenderers from at least the member states 
of the European Economic Community (EEC) and states which are signatories of the Lome conventions. 

Phase 2 of the project comprises the supply and construction of approximately 470 km of 161-kV 
transmission lines, two new 161/34.5/1 1.5-kV substations, 108 km of 34.5-kV distribution lines, 
three (3) new 34.5/11.5-kV substations, and 11.5 kV and 415-V substations and distribution 
networks. 

The Volta River Authority invites tenders from suitable qualified and experienced firms for the following 
Phase 2 contracts: 

Contracts P2-1 

Supply of conductors and accessories for 410 km of new 161-kV overhead transmission lines. 
Contract P2-2 

Supply of three (3) 161/34.5/11.5 kV, 16/10/10 MVA Power Transformers, three (3) Grounding 
Transformers, two (2) Auxiliary Transformers, and four (4) 7.5 to 15-MVAR 161-kV reactors. 

Contract P2-3 

Supply of eleven (11) SF6, 161-kV Circuit Breakers. 

Contract P2-5 

Supply and construction of transmission lines and substations consisting of the following packages. 
Package P2-5A 

Supply and construction of two (2) new 161/34.5/1 1.5-kV substations, including the supply of the 
balance of plant and installation of equipment purchased by the Voha River Authority. 

Package P2-5B 

Clearing of right of way. design, supply, and erection of towers; supply of 60 km of 161-kV light fine 
conductors and accessories; installation of conductors and accessories for 470 km of 161-kV over- 
head transmission line. 

Package P2-5C 

Supply and construction of 108 km of 34.5-kV lines and three new 34.5/1 1-kV substations. 

Contractors may bid for one or any combination of the above contracts or one or any combination of 
packages under Contract P2-5. 

It is anticipated that bid documents will be available for the above contracts by November 3 1986 and 
tenders wiH be received by February 3, 1987. # 

Requests for bid documents must be accompanied by a bank draft made out in favour of Acres 
International Limited in the amount of $150 per complete set of documents per contract. 

Requests for bid documents shall be submitted as follows 

- one copy to 

The Chief Executive 
Volta River Authority 
P.O. Box M77 
Accra. Ghana 
West Africa 
. Cable: Volta Accra ‘ 

Ref: Northern Electrification and System Reinforcement Project 
(Phase 2) 

- one copy {with bank draft) to 
Project Manager 

Northern Electrification and System Reinforcement Project - 
Phase 2 (VRA) 

Acres International Limited 
5259 Dorchester Road, 

Niagara Falls, Ontario 
Canada, L2E 6Wl 
Telex: 061-5107 
Cable: Acrescan Niagara Falls 

The bid documents will be dispatched from Acres International Limited to the applicants bv the quickest 
means available. . . . . 

Other contracts for Phase 2 wifi be financed by the international Development Association. Invitations 
to bid on these contracts wfl! be published in due course. 




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THE TIMES T HUKSPAY OCTOBER 2 1986 


n^iMESUNIT TRUST INFORMATION SERVICE 


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2. Fan 8M4* Lsadon H2W SAQ 
01-988 1819 



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Beam* Units gO 8 M -O* 

Da Mean IMa 260 880 * -02 8 JB 


CIBNART. NORV UWT 1WCT 


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892 735* 
987 1040 
670 722 


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SSI, 5644 1312 1385 -09 *79 


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031-326 3271 

Aawncan Rind £07 

De AccuM 2380 

DO MMMl 1470 

AwkdBiFM 1182 

Do AccM 118.1 

MMh Food 5714 

Da Actum 7792 

Do Accun 33M 


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Rniul BOO 54,1 -OJ 85* 


2107 2244 
2380 232.0 
1470 1675 
1182 1230 
1181 1250 
5714 60858 
7792 mao* 
3190 3397C 
3350 357.70 
682 TOO* 
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-80 247 
-60 247 I 
-35 247 
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01-2302660 

Am Onti 907 964 

Da Acow 943 1003 

Anur Beam* JM ££ 

DO Accun 620 660* 


P i nnT— ftnll 13 6 3 14*38 


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On Accun 
DMA Raid 
Do Acorn 
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Do Aocu* 


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1410 1680* 
2815 2462* 
3900 40426 
822 830 
920 935 
606 6576 
900 9676 
2627 2794 
3250 3485 
1950 2085 
2003 2112 
1980 1970 
1980 2112 
2285 2355 
3544 3K3 


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-IO 1.13 
-82 400 

+04 aoo 
-07 S5« 
-12 254 
+05 856 
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-21 008 
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Japan A Rmflta 
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Do Accun 
Euro «1 Be 


730 770 
894 1080 
1190 1270 
HBL1 1804 
570 B1O0 
875 715e 
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840 877M 
1612 1615 
2562 2» JO 
1421 1730 
2885 8675 
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1284 1370 
1250 1342 


-05 257 
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-15 308 
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-IO 5.79 
-04 406 
-05 408 


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Do Accun 
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D o Accun 


SalacMOppi Be £4 


Do Accun 
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63*32/3/4 
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1195a -07 856 
143.1a -05 556 
1624 -05 208 

2674 -0* 203 

481 40.1 9.12 

63.7 402 9.tt 

2235 -06 458 

3485 -12 *59 

1885 -20 0^ 

1920 -27 040 

3525 -64 121 

4365 -00 1g 

9846 -04 104 
7346 -04 104 
62.16 -1.1 109 
5*0a -07 109 


a Ex CMdand c Cum dtadond. Ir Cm 
stock spit. • Ex stodt sp#L m Cum on 
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ran asm ot nwrm. tzt) 2nd Ttmretty «l 

month. ^ lot ondart «5*a6dmrot 
month. {23} 20th of month. CW 
Tuesday of month. g5) W and M 
Thursdays! monlt (26j <lh TUHdeytf 
month. (27) 1st Wodnasdayo! month. u»t 
Last Thuradoy ot monBv (Z9)3rtw*WTO 
day of month. (30) lOthorf nraatiiL ^Olw 


KpfktaS?^SMm!SS?Rd. AvMwy B»mfca 
02965841 

Asm E*0* TOO 


oay or irarui. |ou/ iw n»iM- . fwi 'r 
wvtdng day ot month. (32) 20tfi of nwmj. 
l5 day ot Fohniary. May. AW**; 

SABMIM 


Asnr EaoB 700 744 

JSSuET 180 186 

CoiwxJksr 730 na 

Enaroy 2BJ0 al.O 

Essay. 1181 1277 

EunptW spec I9B 10*4 1189 


700 744 -1.1 0.10 

160 126 -00 8.10 

735 792 -10 I.n 

290 S1.0 .. lOI 

1181 1277 .. 306 

10*4 1180 -02 070 

1115 11906 -05 896 



1 21 at ot month. jM) 3 rd 
r of month. ( 39 ) 2 nd 
r of month. ( 40 ) VaJlMd 
II) Last ■nnwdxy ot Stock 
account. ( 42 ) Lot day ol 
I aid and 4 th W adna a day ot 


Oiarterty. (45) 8th ol month, 
lesday ot month. 


UNLISTED SECURITIES 


INVESTMENT TRUSTS 


39 74 181 
17 8.1 17 


Hafat Mul 
HMdW Dwnys 


30 55180 



10 *4 10.1 

04 50 12* 
50 21 180 


1.1 Si ma 
80 82 86 


21b 1.7 20.4 
126 70 7.8 
40 65 100 
15 35 -. 
14b 28 .. 
50 14 134 

30 25234 
114b 52 70 


34 27 127 
26 17 154 

14 224 55 


220 ISO i 
112 65 

338 210 
146 3* ' 

ISO 93 

47 35 

« 72 

165 100 
17 11 

00 32 

IBB 78 
143 68 
128 95 
91 56 

1*0 IM 

39 S. 

115 81 ■* 
180 WO 
98 EB 
228 133 
2 SS 198 

48 26 

480 383' j 
390 293’> 
ISO 1*3*1 
416 185 
90S 45 

91 85 

30*1 7 
118 105 
133 KB 
158 112 
26 22 
14 6*1 

we ns 

255 186 
230 WS 

31 13 

115 44 
103 66 

363 190 

32 21 
330 233 
190 118 

26 2 
148 105 
120 73 
70 48 


Flog** 

Floyd 08 

Fttff 8 NaW I 

Ffandi Conn 


FuBtr SmBi "AT 


.. ..121 
45 21 121 
75 57 85 
27 24 185 
80 15 175 
45 35175 
27 40 . . 
24 50130 

80 80145 
3.1 35 174 


OUwl Op 

GtxmBW Bi an 

QooOiaad Pitt . 
QouU ILauunH) 
Qiwytt SuMC* 
Groan (Email] 


32 75 107. 

21 27 115 

45 34 145 
35 55 85 

20 46 115 
45 28 134 


10 32 no 
14 45 38.1 

14 28 8*4 
L9 24 375 
U BO 755 
UB 22 460 

188 no .. 

10 &8 3QJ 
17 21480 
1.7 40 200 

15 34480 

14 29 385 

u at .. 

20 84121 


Nanay A Thoap 
MMock EuapB 
Heal* Ow* 


H*U Bganom 
Hetton 


hS3m LMnanan 

Hoknaa ProMceon 
Hugnaa Food 
Hunond EBc 
Honar So* 

HUWW1 Taeh 


mo Scot Energy 


03 34185 

04 85 75 

20 22 215 

21 1.1 224 

30 21 180 
20 221 14 
. . . . 102 


Bttau c p* Tech 

HudUackU 


jafnaao 8 Jug 


Just Rubbar 
KLP 

Kart Mom) 
Kenyan Sack 
Heart Syl a m a 
Mau-TaartK 


85 29 107 
07 21 174 

23 10 290 

70 44 129 

.. • .. 03 

20 18 125 
8.1 b 21 11.1 
25 40 95 
*7 10180 

25 21 184 
WO 47 ISO 
1.7 21 21 

14 b 25 IDO 


118 67 
CO 37 
125 m 
SO 32 
118 100 
15* 149 
91 73 

140 96 
19* TO 
02 17 

95 77 
285 160 
180 101 
125 46 
90 54 
93 86 
178 92 

35 9 

116 101 
306 195 
220 123 

96 IS 

19 9 

75 13 
148 135 
380 330 
139 99 
in 71 
95 S» 

766 360 
220 100 
47 22 
385 231 
193 IBS 
220 130 
47 13 

156 106 
12* 82 
156 127 
90 a 
a** is'» 
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iso ia 
367 237 
21 C 
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a 14 
95 79 

77 73 
21 10 
150 01 
1« 50 
•IBS 63 
46 14 


LPA Bd » 

LkJdBW 63 

Uttku Thomon in 
Latur* 6r» 50 

Lamia 106 

Local Lon Op 151 


Loo 8 OyoaaUa 113 

Lortn See 101 

LmndarPM ?! 

UBCHfa 8 Cany ® 

uurComp 250 

McLaaOMB 6 Her 120 
Magnne MBaritb 63 
IBM 82 

Martna Oar 68 

MartB (NOIBM) MO 

Madoett 18 

Mqtar CBy 113 


U U 74 
*1 65 78 
55 52 135 
.. .. 815 

38 38 128 
68 35 174 
Z 9 35 185 
80 7.1 102 

38 20168 


48 332 
09 .. 
14* 85 ... 
84b *1 3*7 
06 06 775 

*7 33*2.1 

34 1J6U 
66 33 46.1 

2.0 240U 
28 £8 754 
28 22 81.1 
11 18 734 

Ol 18 . . 
168 *7 801 

17 17 6 
82 14 821 

*1 341 
453*1 






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716 

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35 

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409 

440 

SIB 

390 

Minay Vottn 
Haw Cent 

406 

416 

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1*3b 05 48.1 
215 61 385 



Msw Oarioi (M 

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15615 

212 

158 

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277 


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116 

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746 

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75 

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679 

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264 

35 335 

92 

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85 

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47>. 34', AoMricar Exprttt 
71 Si AmyB 
49 21 eoBnaad 
164 118 Brian** Anon 
M 13V DTOy MM 
20'. 12V DO 'A' 

196 131 Sam 
173 90 Erie Truer 

2*7 187 Era 

108 68 Expkmapn 
788 SIS Avrihrtn 
fl+ 77 FroatQp 
208 183 GT Ma u guneM 
181 7S Cocoa pa HI 
906 490 HandoaonAOttn 
218 193 KH 


+% 

+1 14 


298 190 MOO 
382 262 MungiMa Houaa 
127 78 paciac aw Tat • 
28V 16 DaWOrarta 
208 152 Small New Cotat 


• 89 I 
-V 708 

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• .. 48 

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• 85 

a .. 126 

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25 

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a+6 25X1 

-6 61 
.. m® 
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-1 108 85 78 


5.1 35 ■■ 
88 28 218 
no u u 

27 *3 62 

14 17257 


■Booty Comp. 19 
Mancam BO Wdg> 39 
Hmwtwi » 


MaS^ ttT m 
M a rn e K 

WMIMd J3 

M W OflBl «ra 

iietani iDO 
Mcrortne 3* 

hirmri — r kan 370 
MTO u r d Broun 170 

MwwoM an 


MeorgaBCp 130 
Menial Sn# 120 
ManaQipa 126 

tssissu 'ft. 


48 37244 
64 18 284 

*0 38102 
*4 62208 
232 .. 35 
50 145 25 

34 381*8 
88 24 192 
83 68 183 

17 45 no 

1.7 23177 
28 05637 
57 57 82 

18 55148 
U 18275 
36 21 378 
75 38 108 
.. I .. .. 
28 1-5 2*1 

35 35 158 


NMWCemp 

NuDH 
Do Wiro 


23 *6225 

. . . . 78 

35 48 86 
45 24155 
88 32 1*7 
. . . . 21 


Da^r^ 

ssssr ’ — s 

MOM** ISO 

NuroaM 50 

Noracoi Notts 1 » 

NOi Sro * Gan 23 


. . . . 7 7 

0 125 
50 88 85 


45 98194 
18 27 54 
34 22184 

.. .. 1S 4 8 



COMMODITIES 


13&5H3575 

137803650 

12S'.!0tW7JJ0 

129.00-20-00 

13280-15.00 

13*00-1500 
1835 


9LVB1 SMALL 

Cash 

Three Months 

VoJ 

Tana 


380.0-382-0 

390XKK27 

Nfl 

Us 


Shaop nos. down 56.7 %. ama. 
price. 1ia5ftK+*75 
Ptanos.n/a'&.MB. 
price, n [a 


LONDON MCT7U. EXCHANGE 


Unaffidal prices 
Official Tonwwer Ngaraa 

Pilot ta£ pm m et ri c tame 
Stearin pence per toy ounce 
Rode* Wolf & Co. Ltd. report 


ALUIH H UM 

Cash 

Three Months — 

VoJ 

Tana 


8484-849:0 
81150-819.0 
4000 


COPPER GRACE A 

Cash 9215^2*0 

Three Martha — 946S047-0 
Vrt psm 

Tone Steady 


NICKEL 

Cash 

Three Months . 

VOI 

Tone 


Pifl Cortreet p. par no 
onth Open ctow 
5 Unq. 103 JO 

w Unq. 104.50 

lb Unq. 98.50 

ir Unq. 99.00 

n Unq. 88.00 


2555-2560 
2610-2615 
84 


VohIO 

Pig Mast mfe 16 

LONDON MEAT FUTURES 









STANDARD CATHODES 

Cash 8881X99.0 

TtV6« Months — 92Z0-924.D 

Vrt — — -.75 

Tone Omta 


Awarega tatstodr prtoaa at 
raprenntatiM mariwtsoo 
October 1 


LEAD 

777-S-57&5 

Three Months — mJHBZB 

Vol — — — -IM 

Tone — Ou«T 


Gft Cattle. 91.70P per kg lw 


Lhm Carte Contract 

p. par kip 


m Open 

Ctoee 

Unq. 

9630 

Unq- 

96J30 

Unq. 

98JS0 

Unq- 

8650 

Unq. 

9650 


wp'M Qoae 
Oct 86 805.0-780X1 7868 

Jen 67 803.0-7900 78S.0 

Apr 87 84aO-84QjD 8380 

Jut 07 7500-750.0 750.0 


Jan 88 880.047&0 B72J 


mt 42i tots 

Open Merest: 2598 


zme STANDARD 

Cash 5KIWS6.0 

vol NB 

Tone . ■ ■■ — — kw 


|a^^s.78J)0p per kg hr 
■eat deed carcase wrtght 


TANKER REPORT 
Hgh/Low Qoae 
Oct 86 960.O.S3Q.O 8300 


vl>i 

^SSfflA 




2MCHK2HQRAOE 

Cash W3JX14X» 

Three Months Wftfi-TOjO 

Voi 2000 

Tone — Steady 


England and Wales: 

Cattle nos. down 89%. awe. 


to* IS has 
Open mtsmt33 


SH.VER LARGE 

Cash 380.0-382X1 

Three Months — 390*3980 


Spot market commentary: 

Tankar Index: 

86*S down 4W) on 30/9/86 


down 5X an 30/9/88 


<<t S 



































THE 


re*,. 


TIMES 




te 


W ^neeT 2 "^-- 

gene^iy 1 app™ 
a Proportion^S™^ 

positions fn anorlt,^ 80 - tauae 
a chief execuSve^and 3 ™ 1 ’ 'S Ul 
managers, it is temw- ” °^ ler 
. that ifiertitoc^<rf&^^'! ,e . 
4 «^cisoneinlS miT,Echj ' f 

trainees^who X™ ^"SE 
organization - i e ihJI/t “? e 
nn« rpcSon - ," mose who do 

P°»iWe^te^°5 
cem.will becomeachief^i?? 

such a!f 1013 l^^dozen jobs in 
*“5? ®, n - or S? m2ali on are ccmsid- 

a^SO iL% ,y *»?2n25 

level Therp C ^ nI - W J I ^eve this 
a?^Mop. ,ndKd - p,en * ° f 

Ihe^need ^ be ^. wri «en about 

Sf a? Carc ^ 11 and *ilM 
selection of recruits; much, too 

{*?£ lhe n ^ d 10 mke early steps 
to prepare those who are likely to 
r«ch senior positions. Most raan- 
i wH agree w,lh *his even if, in 
y '"stances, it proves to be 
. little more than lip-service. 

Far fewer seem to be aware of 

S^h* P^P 0 ™ 00 of trainees 
wui_ reach any particular level of 
seniority. 

At a selection board For manage- 


GENERAL APPOINTMENTS 


fflent trainee entry, a senior 
manager once said to me: "Let's 
not be too highly selective. 
Remember, we don't want them 
all to be high-flyers. We want a 
sound body of good middle man- 
agers and a few who are capable of 
going further." 

Clearly, he was nbt aware that at 
least 20 per cent and possibly up to 
40 per cent of the young persons 
selected would eventually be in 
the most senior 5 per cent of 
positions in the company. 

To 84 senior managers to whom 
I talked about this subject at 
various limes I gave an illustrative 
problem, t described an organiza- 
tion not out of line with their own 
experience. 1 gave them the data, 
though not the formula, needed to 
arrive at the answer, and i asked 
them to estimate, or hazard a 
guess, at the percentage of recruits 
who would, if all promotion was 
internal, reach the top 10 per cent 
of senior posts. 

It was not to be expected that 
many, if any at aU, would know 
how to make a mathematical 
assessment; but would they, after 
many years of seeing typical 
organizational progress, get any- 
where near the answer? 

In the rircumstances described, 
the best answer would have been 
70 per cent- A stalling outcome 


Young recruits 
should always 
appreciate that 
there really is 
room at the top, 
says Max Brolly 

was that the 84 estimates ranged 
from 0.5 per cent to 95 per cent 
No one hit on 70 per cent. Only six 
estimated a figure more than 50 
per cent. On the other hand, nearly 
a quarter guessed at 5 per cent or 
less and more than half guessed at 
15 per cent or less. 

One must admit that it is less 
easy to calculate the probability of 
promotion than, say, the probabil- 
ity of coins or dice falling in a 
particular way. Even so, it is 
difficult to account for such a 
degree of error. 

Without plunging into the 
mathematics it can be said that the 
probability of promotion depends 
on several factors — the propor- 
tion of senior posts considered. 


stapi 




the typical age of recruitment, 
promotion and retirement, and 
the level of wastage, such as loss 
by resignation. 

If these factors are varied be- 
tween extreme but realistic limits 
the probability of reaching the lop 
10 per cent of jobs could range 
from 30 to 85 per cent. How then 
did our sample of managers 
perform? Out of 84 estimates 19 
were within the range, two were 
above' it and 63 were below it. 

A high proportion of managers, 
it seems, grossly under-estimate 
the number of recruits who will be 
promoted- Yet this is surely a vital 
element in the thinking of those 
concerned with the continuing 
health and strength of the 


organization. I wonder whether 
this topic is covered by any of the 
establishments dealing with 
management training and 
education. 

In my experience not only were 
managers wide of the marie; some 
were scepticaL One responded 
brutally: "That’s impossible. Your 
figures must be wrong." 

Others, i suspect from the tone 
of the subsequent discussion, 
though less abrasive, would have 
tacitly agreed with him. The 
mathematical formula, to be 
understood and accepted, re- 
quired a level of numeracy that 
not all possessed. Practical and 
acceptable illustrations were diffi- 
cult to produce. 

These managers came, almost 
without exception, from bio- 
industrial organizations where the 
span of time between trainee 
recruitment and retirement could 
be 45 years. 

To be able to quote what 
happened in practice to annual 
intakes of trainees one would have 
to go back, in company records, to 
the recruits of more than 40 years 
ago: and be able to trace what 
happened to them alL 

Faced with astonishment 
bordering on disbelief, it would 
have been helpful to be able to 
quote figures given recently by a 


spokesman for the Foreign Office. 
The Foreign Office, it was said, 
aimed to recruit to the 7d training 
scheme — intended for graduates 
with some other career experience 
- about 20 high-calibre trainees 
every vear. preferably in their late 
twenties. Figures showed that of 
an annual intake of 20. wastage 
was between five and eight. Be- 
tween 1 1 and 14 reached ambas- 
sadorial leveL 

If wastage here is a euphemism 
for unsuitability, die probability 
of promciion to the level of 
ambassador is between 55 and 70 
per cent. If the wastage is real — 
resignation or death - the 
probability can be estimated as 8 
to 9 per cenL 

I f. as it seems, many man- 
agers underestimate to a 
shocking degree the propor- 
tion of recruits who will be 
needed, in time, for senior 
posts, then the problems of 
recruitment, selection and train- 
ing will receive less attention than 
they should. He who can keep his 
head, in management succession 
planning, "when all about are 
losing theirs" has probably failed 
to realize the immensity of the 
problem. 

With such a high proportion of 
recruits likely to reach senior 
positions it is little wonder that 


October 2, 1986 


cynical theories develop about 
promotion to the level of 
incompetence. 

Managers should be aware of 
such figures. If they find them 
alarming they can sizcably reduce 
them either by external' recruit- 
ment at a later stage (head- 
hunting) or by promoting at an 
earlier age. But while head-hunt- 
ing may solve a problem for the 
individual organization, it is of 
little help overall 

The gap successfully filled in 
one organization leaves an empty 
space in another. Nationwide it 
will not maierially reduce the 
proportion reaching senior levels. 
Early promotion would help but it 
reinforces the need for better and 
earlier training and increases the 
risk that the well trained young 
person will be head-hunted by 
someone else. 

There does not seem to be any 
single ideal solution. Every 
organization must make its own 
choice. The point made here is 
simply that, while most managers 
believe themselves to be aware of 
the problem, most really are 
oblivious to its dimensions. 

Max Brolly was Jbrmiriy hind of 
group personnel' snvices in B.\T 
Industries. He is a fellow of the 
Institute of Personnel 
Management 


n 

AD 

m 


i 


Appointments Phone: 01-481 4481 


Management shills j 
of the highest order I 


Appointments Phone: 01-481 4481 


DIRECTOR OF TECHNICAL SERVICES 


£28,851 — £31,977 p a. me. 


Graham Brown, FJLT^JL, Dip TJP-, F.RXCS., 
F.R.S.A., Barnet's present Director of Techni- 
cal Services, is retiring in May 1987- 

The Council are now seeking a successor who 
will consolidate and build upon the manage- 
ment gains already achieved from the recent 
radiarrestr u ct u ring erf the Directorate to take 
this vital group of services, with greater effect, 
towards the 2 Ja| Century. 

The Directorate covers the whole spectrum of 
Technical Services applicable to a large Lon- 
don Borough— Architecture, Engineering, 
Planning, Property Services, -Recreation, 
Works Services and Support Services— and is 
led by the Director and two Controllers, with 
an overall workforce of over 1,600, including 
the Direct Labour Organisation. 

You will need to be qualified technically but. 


hi more importantly, you must have a proven 
record of successful management at a senior 
level in a large organisation. Your experience 
will have been in either the public or private 
sectors, preferably both, and you will have 
shown a consistently high motivation to 
achieve targets which have been set 

For an informal discussion with the present 
Director. please telephone him on 446 SJ11 
ext 4401. 

Selection Interviews wdj be conducted on 
10th November 1986. 

Farther details and application forms are 
available from the Personnel Office, 16/17 
Sentinel Square, Brent Street Hendon. Lon- 
don NW4 2EN, Telephone 01 202 8282. Ext 
424 (01 202 6602 outside office hours). Please 
quote reference 602/1. 
dosing date 17th October 1986. .. 






lOflDOfl BOROUGH 




Chief Executive-Retailing 

Substantial salary and share option package 


Our client is a significant, wett-estabfished and 
profitable company in the retail sector with a turnover of 
around £200 million. 

A successor to the present Chief Executive, who will 
retire shortly, is to be appointed. The rote will be to 
strengthen further the already significant business base 
and to provide entrepreneurial leadership for the 
development of the company aver the next decade. - 

Candidates, probably m their forti^nust have 
experience irithe areas of strategy, merchandising and 


marketing. All round management skills, with a strong 
marketing bias, wholly gained in a sophisticated retail or 
consumer goods company, are essantiaL 

An extremely attractive Salary and share option 
package.® offered. 

Please write with full details. These will be forwarded 
direct to our client, who will consider them in total 
confidence. List separately those companies to whom 
your application should not be forwarded. B. G. 
Woodrow, ret BGW/A/1. 


HAY-MSL Selection and Advertising Limited, 52 Grosvenor Gardens, London SW1W OAW 

Oflfctt ktEtrcpo. the Americas. Australasia btxJ Asia ftidfc. 


CONFIDENTIAL ADVERTISING 


KRAFT 


MirsScofi 
veu/eta 
M iracel Whip 

PHILADELPHIA 

Scheibletten 

Valoval 

jocca 


Mur Gufes 
verdient 
den Ncrniei* 
KRAFT 


On the southern outskirts of Munich KRAFT has established a research 
and developing centre for its European branches. 

For our engineering department we are searching for a ^ 

Dr, of Engineering/B.Sc.Eng. 

in die special field of food process technol- 
ogy or food technology. 

We expect our future employee to show initiative in his/her work and to 
have the ability to generate new ideas in- the field of product-related, 
technical processing development He/She should also he able to plan, 
organize and carry out research programmes independently. 

The position requires some years of professional experience in the 
industry or a research institute, fluent English as weti as willingness To 
travel within Europe. 

We offer attractive conditions and various social benefits. 

Please contact Mr. Franz Bierprigl, Tel- 089/6380714. 

Send your application to the following address: 

KRAFT EUROPE R & D, Inc. 

PM l-offl c B bo* *3 OS SO - Uotamtbwgar Sir. 19> - WOO HuncheaSS- 


A chaUanging and oactfng position, with scope to reach the Board In 12-24 months and for equity participation. 

Atm* ACCOUNTANT 

W -FINANCIAL FUTURES 

CENTRAL LONDON £20,000-£30,000 + car 

EXPANDING COMPANY TRADING IN FINANCIAL AND COMMODITY FUTURES 

Applications are invited from Accountants, preferably qualified, aged 27-38, with a minimum of 3 years’ post qualification 
experience ideally in a ctxmicxfities^odrixokir^lracing organisation and an interest in systems development The 
successfid candidate, reporting to the Managing Director, wifi be responsible for the total accounting function (through a smafl 
teem), crecfit control, cash management and Raising with internal and external specialists, for the ongoing development of 
computerised systems. Important will be ensuring compliance with internal controls and procedures to ensure speedy and 
accurate operation of tiiese systems. Commercial flair, resilience and excellent communication skffls will be essential for this 
senior position in the management team. Initial salary negotiable £20,000-£30,000 + car, pension allowance, family BUPA 
and assistance wtth removal expenses if necessary. Applications m strict confidence, under reference AFF 115/TT to the 
Managing Director: A.LJP.S. 

. Opportunity to embark upon Corporate Finance careerwtth early prospects of increased responsibility and earnings. 

CORPORATE FINANCE EXECUTIVE 

CITY £16,000- £20,000 

FAST DEVELOPING MERCHANT BAW®iG ARM OF SUBSTANTIAL INTERNATIONAL FINANCIAL SERVICES GROUP 

For this demanding new appointment, the result of expansion, we seek Chartered Accountants or Solicitors, aged 23-27, 
recently qualified or with one year’s post qualification experience. A broad professional training in a leading international 
film specialising in the corporate field is essential and experience which relates to corporate finance activities or 
investigations wffl be a definite asset Working within the Corporate Finance Group, the successful cancfidate wHI be 
Involved immediately In all aspects of the work of a busy department inducting, inter-aSa, take-overs, mergers, 
acquisitions and new issues and wfll be encouraged, at an early stage to play an increasing rote with growing 
responsibilities- Total commitment is necessary together with communication skills, financial judgement plus the ability to 
make a full contribution with the minimum of direction and supervision in a fast-moving, high pressure environment Initial 
salary negotiable £1 6.000 - £20,000, mortgage subsidy, rKXvcontributory pension, free life assurance and private health 
benefits. Applications in strict confidence under reference CFE 4441/TTtothe Managing Director CJ A. 

‘Hands-on’ opportunity with scope to advance within the Compensation and Benefits function in due course or 

within the accounting area. 

ARk PAYROLL AND BENEFITS 

TION 

CTTY £12,000-£15,000 + BANKING BENEFITS 

PROMINENT MERCHANT BANK 

We invite applications from cancfidates who must have had at least 2 years’ demanding payroll administration experience 
which will have been gained either directly within the personnel function or in an accounting role in dose liaison with 
personnel This experience is likely to have been in an international banking/City environment and any formal accounting 
or part quafification wffl be a efistmet advantage. The selected candidate will join a young professional personnel team and 
be responsible for a wide range of payroll and benefits administration functions for a staff of 250; specifically this will 
include all personnel liaison, payroll processing, benefits organisation and reteted accounting reconciliation, budgeting 
and variance aspects. Essential qualities are the abilities to perform effectively from day one, to work happily and flexibly 
under pressure, to give creative accounting input to the role and to possess strong communication skills. Initial salary 
’ negotiable £12,000 - £15,000 plus excellent banking benefits Inducting mortgage subsidy. Apphcatiorfe to strict 
confidence under reference PBA 18316/TT witt be forwarded unopened to our client unless you list companies to which 
they should not be sent in a covering letter marked for the attention of the Security Manager CJ.FLA. 

ISBUBIT RECSBHTUBfT CMStJUAITTS) LBUBTED, 35 NEW BROAD STREET, LOXDQS EC2H 1NH. 
81 -588 3588 8681 -588 3578. THH: 887374. HUbCI -256 8501 ■ 

BMMBAIlW8IBEIlM8WBA88gIMICE 88 BECMIlIBn'iKfASETHEPBOIE 01-628 7538. 

WHAT DO SENIOR EXECUTIVES OVER 35 DO 
WHEN THEY REAUSE THEY’RE UNEMPLOYED? 


Gamble on finding another job K 
quickly? Look through all the job ads? I ^ 
It's hardly surprising that people fail to # , 

achieve their true potential. I | 

At Chusid Lander we believe that, V 
whether you're out of work, facing ^ 

redundancy or feel you should be doing 
better, the last thing you need is just 
another job. 

We are a group of specialist career 
consultants who, for the past thirty years 
have been helping senior executives 
earning in excess of £20,000 pA find their 
true potential and realise their objectives for 
the future. 




We've helped people change their 
lives and we know we can do the same 
for you. 

For a confidential personal 
assessment without obligation, telephone 
or write to: The Administrate!; Ref: H/t 0/1 
Chusid Lander, 35/37 Frtzroy Street 
London WIP 5AF enclosing a brief 
career summary 


LONDON 01-5806771 MANCHESTER 061-2280089 

BIRMINGHAM 021-6438102 NOTTINGHAM 094937911 

8WST0L 027222367 GLASGOW 041-3321502 

BELFAST 0232621824 

0 CHUSID LANDER 


SUCCESS 

Have you had experience of 
jobs which offer fide reward 
art no n& cam structure? 
This, was true tor ms in the 
past but I have now achieved 
success in a short time by 
building a career tooWfifl after 
clients financial affairs. 

I am seeking someone who 
would Bee to do the same, 
wtitt mu training provided. 

it you are 25-35. with or with- 
out financial experience, rail 
Pete tee m 01 484 BW3 
tor a dpnfstemol interview. 


JETRO LONDON 
JAPAN TRADE CENTRE) 

Requires RESEARCHER experienced preferred 

but not essentiaL Graduates in Economics likely 
to bo most suitable, salary according to quali- 
fications and experience. Luncheon vouchers, 
bonus scheme, season ticket loan, pension 
scheme. 

Applicants should write enclosing C.V. to; 

Mr. A Moromi 
Jetro London 

Leconfield House, Curzon St, London WlY 7FB 
. (No Agencies) 


SEASONAL JOBS AVAILABLE 
IN FRENCH ALPS 
IH BRITISH RUH SKI HOTELS 

We require Managers, Chefs. Bar staff. Kitchen 
Assistants, Domestic staff. Ski Counsellors and 
General Maintenance Staff. Positions available 
from December to April. 

For details contact Ruth Kemeys 

TOPS HOLIDAYS 

Grosvenor Hall, BotnoreRoad 
Haywards Heath, RH16 4BX 
Telephones 0444457414 









2 < 


HONOURS GRADUATES 


Seeing 


is believing? 





If you look directly at the grid, you will see a 
series or gn?v dots between the squares. They 
don’t exist. Sour eyes are being deceived by an 
optical illusion. 

Dealing with things that an? not always as 
they seem on the surtace is an everyday part of 
the Tax Inspectors' work. In assessing the tax 
liabilities of businesses of all types and sizes 
they must apply their powers of analysts and 
penxption — sometimes intuition — in reaching 
a fair conclusion. All part of a distinctive career 
of exceptional challengeand variety, which 
offers a structured and progressive path for the 
ambitious. 

Through intensive training, you will develop 
the skills of a lawyer, advocate, accountant, 
inv estigator, negotiator and manager. Within a 
lew months you can expect to 1% handling your 
own casework. After 5 years you will tv - . . • 
managing a sizeable team of staff, and in due 
course, you should be running your own tax 
district. 

Qualifications: under 36 and a First or 
Second class honours degree in any subject or 


an acceptable equivalent qualification. Final 
Year Students may apply. 

Starting salary according to qualifications 
and experience from £7320 to £>450 tor those 
aged under 26 and from £10.140 to £11,?/ 0 for 
those 2h and over. If you fulfil your promise you 



... v w. :-V 


» 


fast movers in 

tfiKi 1 


• * ; i i iT-i if- = 


: T ^ . * * t 1 1 1 




?■:<'< i i :. •>. » ■ J - & t 4 • 7]Ti *•* 




projects rangefrom specific 


on both envetope are* tetter, 
stating yowwrterretflocaaioni 








[r 

1 . 




8fO * 

■ 1 

A 1 


x v < ?*•{+ X '• 






should be earning at least £ KI.545 after 2 years 
and. 2 vears later, vou should be on a scale 


and. 2 years later, you should be on a scale 
rising from £15.815 to £19.465. Later there is the 
prospect of advancement to a scale rising to 
£24,300. Beyond this there are opportunities for 
further promotion to the most senior grades in 
the Civil Service. SALARIES HIGHER IN 
LONDON (£1365. £7b5 or £545 according to 
location). Training can usually begin at an office 
in the area of your choice. 

To find out more and tor an application form 
write to Civil Service Commission, Alencon Link, 
Basingstoke. Hants RG21 1JB, or telephone 
Basingstoke (025o| 46K55I (answering service 
operates outside office hours). 

Please quote ref: A/87/320/B1. 

The Gvil 5ervke is an equal opportunity 
employer 



HUMAN RESOURCES 


Confidential Applicant Response A Evahm&m Ud. 

I.C.G. House, Okffiekl Lane North, Greerrford. Middx. UB6 OAL. 


SENIOR INSTRUMENT/CONTROL BJ61NEERS up to £ 20,000 

Location: HOME COUNTIES 

A UK based mato-national ndostriol co rporation Beads a number of qoaBied 
enginemwhfa somid na perience of prac— bsumnan tu tion and tfeli tori ire control 


Essentia! ingraAonts in yoar background <n o ipa ri e on e of iuiknn speanoatioiB 
and sag, shot dnwfcafaty system donga, plant operation trorfdoabootie, and 
on amvaacs* of Ibe ajctnrioii nod ■ tbo csostmctioa of torn tooipeiatioe storage 
and process focSties. b ibe ago range 30 to 45, pea «H1 huvn an appropriate 
eulrement/control q wiHk otion. and preforeace wffl be gmo to Qw rterod Eny 

oemeond ioeo*of»of the bistitiito of Moosoromeot ond CootroL An onentotioo to 
prajea work aad exporieoce of tart end w* be an odroolo9£*«fi« 

ioefade a poosoa and inton at ion no s twr if necesmry. net: VK/r/w 


l*MJ 1 • ;•] t: i(tl •] K 1 1 1 1 1 1 %\‘-M [ZM (i 


SUPERSTORE HUW6B& (DESIGNATE) . to £12 JJGQ P*. 

Location; WEST COUNTHY/SOUTH WALES 

Oar rftrnT is one of the “Big Foot” in sup er s tore dti dopom t.'fru j utid 8 ""^ 

ill lenritr ttm ii|i|in : -*- n r-* -* 1 TT ""7 * ' "« MiHian who 

ba«e et (eost tbroe poors experience in retail ia o stone with o soles area exceeding 
25,000 same feet. 

la year eorly to mid twenties yoa Aoald bove o «owd knowledge of tbe dataSed 
el emeofs of raf a ff i ng and yon ann* be obit to dm a nihu t n yoor owwoneg of frooe 
dtmfap— nt io a po ii i i on of mpombBt y. Yeo sbodd have at least on A lerel 

•docatioa. and year progress into Saperstoie MoogeMot wA depend aa yeur own 

oUty reid c uun e rr id u a reeoea . , J1inM 

An raceptionatjr good cnndWote codd command a starting salary of Cl^OOp^- 
in odditioa to m excoBont benefits pock 090 . Refc Si/P/90 





* long-term corpo ra te planning in liaison with the group 
Head Office In Para. 


* Appraisal of potential acquisitions of UK ofl producing 
acreage and/or companies. 

* Short-term planning undertaken to opthntae aftertax 
returns. 




SENIOR ELECTRICAL ENGINEERS £18,000 

Location: SOUTH EAST ENGLAND , 

A major British corporation with a nt- to n totostrial and »amdocturk»g krtorerts 
■cads several engineers ot a senior level who have in depth experience of heavy (20 
M/Watt plus) motor hardware and high vaftage sy stems. 

Key areas of upengonr ore fault level calculations aid protection device denrn- 
tion. Ugh voltage system, med ium /low voltage oppficatioqi.mspectioH and 
labour supervision aad project work, h yoer "oorfy to mid thirties your back- 
yonnd most mdode an Bectrical Eugiueenog g no B fi c o tioo (cm oboofate mw m nm i of 
HNCL preferably chartered states. Yoor primary respareWty wB be the des^i 
and sp e ci fica t ion of ail the electrics for niiiipmd projects. 

"BUe chip" benefits apply, and wimre necessary, asswtaacn with rebatm w3 be 
given. RefcFM/0/89 


PHONE 01-575 7070 NOW! 


Financial Secretary 

Central London 


Todays Mothers Union is a progressive Christian 
organisation lacing contemporary moral issues such 


as unemployment and abortion, providing a 
combination of practical and spiritual support 
. The Financial Secretary is responsible for all 


financial aspects of the Society's work including 
commercial operations worth over £2 million. 


commercial operations worth over £2 million. 
Computer literacy and experience in PAYE. 
Investments, book-keeping and budgets is essential. 
Administration of the Finance Department 
supervision oi staff and liaison with volunteers 




Director of 
Occupational Health 

Service — LONDON £38.425 


demands maturity, patience and flexibility. ' 

Ideally, you wifi be an active, strong-minded 
Christian. 


Remuneration includes a salary of up to £12.060 
(reviewed annually). 26 days holiday, interest-free 


season ticket loan and contnbutory pension scheme. 

Application forms from: Carole hundred. PER 
London Central 4th Floor. Rex House. 4-12 Regent 
Street. London SWi Y 4PP. 


© 


The Mothers’ Union 


INCORPORATED BY ROYAL CHARTER 


The Occupational Health Service 
COHS) was established in June of this 
year to provide advice on all aspects of 
the occupational health care of some 
594,000 civil servants in the UK and 
overseas. The OHS is part of the Cabinet 
Office (Management and Personnel 
Office). 

The Director will develop the new org- 
anisation and its policies and establish and 
maintain a fully operational and efficient 
service providing very wide-ranging 
medical, nursing and occupational hygiene 
advice co sH government departments. 

Candidates from medical, occupetkmel 


hygiene, community health, nursing at 
administrative professions should have 
proven senior ma n a ge ment ability and 
experience and appropriate qualifications. 
Experience of (greeting professional multi- 
disciplinary teams would be particularly 
relevant. 

For further details and an application 
form fto be returned by 17 October 1986) 
write to C5vii Service CorrvTassam. Alencon 
Link. B asi n gs t ok e. Hants RG21 1 JB. or 
telephone Basingstoke (0256] 468551 
(answering service operates outside office 
hours]. Please quote ref; G/7004. 

An equal opportunity employer 




BOURN HALL CLINIC, 
Bourn Hall, 

Bourn, 

Cambridge CB3 7TR 


Consultant Gynaecologist 
(1 of 4) 


Douglas ijJ 

S= Gordon! 


Applications are invited for this wtwfetime post, com- 
mencing 1st November 1966. 


PEOPLE PERSON 
S.W3 

EXCLUSIVE STAFF AGENCY 

£150 p.w. basic suiting salary + high commission on 
monthly results + Llhs + 4 w«ks paid annual holiday is 
offered to urekss interviewers with boundless enthusi- 
asm. (uucnce and KMC of commercial interest extending 
beyond the call of the dock. 

Are range 2S-3S. «aMe record of employment references 
and eonndeni fnemliy polished p«waali«». Goad know)* 
edge Of London and Home Counties. Mcibodkal and lid* 
record keeper. Languages a bonus. Non-smoker. Alienate 
batunuys working 1 0 am- 1 pm. 

Call (H 730 SI 22 for immediate interview (candidates 
musi be already established in London area) 


£10,000 - 
£60,000 
PA 


BUtU»NG TECHNICIAN 
mtfBi to ion sniS DU growiy 
grot*) baud *i SWI Tco quaky 
rstiertal WHS&. Dromg;- 
feaoi. sowHaoon *®ng m 
nutria seonvisan EaxCtoi 


Applicants should be experienced m the treatment of 
infertility, with a particular interest in laparoscopy. 
ultrsRHKigraphy. microsurgery and in vitro 
fertilisation. 


Experienced 

negotiator 


Please send your Curriculum Vitae when writing for 
further particulars to the Medical Director. 


The key to making money 
is being in the right place 
at the ngftt time. This is 
the place now is the time. 
It you really want financial 
success. 


pnsMflt saaiy 19 rewtnwn »- 
awtiw to omsnence Seal GV m 


twang 0 apsnvce Seal GV m 

PJL ll ii g r i wi , 
Bnoompn* Pwflnnw LM, 
8 C hhwi w Cndnn, 
London SW 1 W OOH. 


A restwcefuJ and ener- 
getic person required hi 
expanding office hi the 
busy Ciapham area. A 
generous salary plus com- 
mission and other 
company benefits are of- 
fered for the right person 
wfth proven skills. 


MORTGAGE BROKERS 

IN W9 


Gafl Tom Hooper on 
81-873 8191, 


Tel Jeff Straw 
01-680 1836. 

For an appointment now 


CMaatMt P,ycM«|M lo win 

Irani "I IM > rimmuM*. prontfiim 
« .lliii fJiml.iiiir to 1 1 Kill iduaH 
.iimI r.uifl LV- nopim-nl id 
Kinrwiiir* Pkw vi id cx W 
l*..|nia I n. r,Ur>r» Vl» IKl» no 
■ (JiuhpMh n W iHJBl 1 OI 
“23 3-»3? 24HRS . 


Require another Consultant. Must be nan smoker, 
aged 23 to 28 and own. ear. Full training given 
High earning as afl leads supplied 


or write in confidence 
with c-v. to: 


Robin on 286 4644 


S3, NgMhgate Lane, 
Lofidm SW12 8PA. 




General Manager 
- Port Authority 


S Ug:ca Tr iwilqi 
aSwram 


Milford Haven 
c. £30,000+ car 


The pending reriremenr of die 
General Manager of tire Milford 
Haven Conserrancy Board creates 
the need 10 appoint his successor. 

_ The.Board's principal functions 
are to raamBrin, improve, protect and 
regulate the navigation in die Haven 
and to provide services and facilities 
to the port and harbour as it sees fit. 

The General Manager is respons- 
ible to the Board, through die Chair - 
man, and is expected to be thoroughly 
conversant with the statutory powers 
and duties of tbe Board and to direct 
its activities accordingly; to ma in tain 
good working relationships with all 
the users of, and other interests in, 
the Haven; and to run 
die Board’s operations 
in an efficient manner. H J8 

Candid at es should be 
a^d around 50 and show H . 
evidence of sound 


■s operations assistance if needec 

lent manner. H Wk Please send br 

dates should be in strict confident 

nd 50 and show H to R H Capes, 

if sound JM L^i JBk Ref: GM75/1I 

RV Personnel Services 


scholastic ability They must 
demonstrate significant success in ■' 
a business-oriented career, which 
has involved producing budgets . 
and investment plans and knowledge 
of Board-level operations, within 
an environment offering exposure 
to statutory requirements. Shipping 
knowledge or port experience is 
desirable. 

Perception, logic, seU-motivaono 
and die ability to operate with mini- 
mum support are as imponantas 
excellent administrative and com- 
munication skills. 

Salary is supported by an appro- 
priate executive benefits 

package including relocation 

V assistance if needed. 

Please send brief or, 
in strict confidence, 
to RH Capes, 

. Ref: GM75/1060/T 


Executive Search - Selection • Psychometrics - Remuneration 
& Personnel Consultancy 


Hyde Park House, 60a Krdghtsbridge, London SW1X 7LE. 
Tel: 01-235 6060 Telex.- 27874 


.^f SCXaEPB * - s : -/-- 

EURGPEENJ5E DES SATELLITES 
has an immediate opening for a , , + .:-4 


SATELLITE 
COMMUNICATIONS 
SYSTEMS ENGINEER 

Ideal candidates will have the following qualifications: 


* Degree in Electrical 
Engineering (Telecommunications) , 
* Written and oral J 
fluency in English A 
* Experience in frequency 
coordination and spectrum >5 
management for satellite 


Written applications 
with a Curriculum Vitae 


systems is a definite asset 
* 3 to 5 years experience 


3 5 years experience 
in satellite systems . 


ASTRA 


should beadressed to . . ' _ 
i Head. Communications ' 
^Engineering 
Jk SOOETE EUROPEENNE 
des SATELLITES 
63. avenue de la Liberie 
Box 1781 

L-1931 Luxembourg: 





.HJR0PTS16CHANNB.. 
IHfVISfON SAiaUTf 


Trust 

Administrator 


OurTnst, Tax and ftohare deparunov has a 
vacancy for an experienced Adminiaraior. 
The successful candidate is liWy to have mine 
teor her experience in a medium sized orlargc 
solirirors* ora c oo un t an rf office. 

Salary wiil be compamve. 

For an application form contact Jackie 


Hammond, Personnel Manager on 02-242 
2022 or write to her whh futipasonal and 
career details. 


[personal and 


1 FARRER & CO- 

66 IJXCjjf-VS noc FIELDS LONDON tVOA ai « 


JOB SEARCH- 


WdlaverWStrfoW^g 
in Slenior and. 
Mwtagnnmi aclne*e_ J* 
search wccew ttotripi 
anadvotised. job oonXC- 

To tod ont how «w ca«« 

dndotmn* 

Service* can maxaBBe 
oner .pmffeaton. 
bJ now for an 

meetini-atnoeo^dr** - 

gtUon-cr send ml#* 1 - 1 ’. 


Your fdrart oonkf . 

«*. :■■■.; ' 

■ SQoMDSaeBMxrj** .. • 
LondoaWtXjW ... . 
TctOl-mzMS • 


r C L 1 , l ^ , : ,, n 

























27 


THE TIMES THURSDAY OCTOBER 2 1986 



GFNFR A I APPOINTMENTS 




k here's; 

Wnalana j 

‘SdayVtme 

&T !Shi * ; 

•nd fetter = , 
lenodioc-, 1 
Bnclwsier, 1 

iatrj. 


is sj| 

&nj* 

r C4 ., ^ 


ager 

rity 



_ Computer 

PROFESSIONALS 

r telecontrol systems *** 
up to £24,000 -Hear 1 


is ^^^^““^SysfemsLiiniled 

InformSkm tSSwJI. advanced 

new svstenJw^S.'? ®* dCT6to P“ent of 

Supervisory P5** **** 

Sv^forneTtZ, .P 00 ^^ an d Data Acqtdsition 

industries. 32x1 Power 

As these Industries invest far the 

IJ^ l 2* ne . of ^ conntr 3 ^s top pmfa«i»» a h 
svpptymg ‘state of the art* teeffir^^^ 

«u_ Ff 110,7 seeking to expand onr team in 

Venxxux* * all Levels 
J*™nthe Company We are however; particularly 
interested m meeting career minded people with 
reievaitf experience in the following discfaBneg 

• PROJECT MANAGERS.' to manage 
eomp tes S CADfi projects fimn th*» tender 
sta ge throu gh to snccessM ngp iemtantatirw 

• TECHN ICAL MANAGERS to design 
telecontrol systems utilising Logica products 
to meet client requirements. * 

We also require a number of Software 
Engineers to participate in real time mini and 
microprocessor development projects based an 
VAX and PDP hardware. 

Logica is Britain's leading independent 
Systems House, and its sustai n ed growth provides 
ample scope for -career progression. Yon will 
normally be based at our offices in Central 
London, however opportunities may also exist to 
work at other offices in Surrey and Aberdeen. We 
offer a wide range of com pa n y benefits and 
relocation assistance where applicable. 

If yon are interested please call Frances 
Collins on 01-637 9111 ext 3756, for an 
application form or send a career; resume to her at 
Logica Energy and Industry Systems 
64 Newman Street, London W1A 4SE quoting 
reference number £15/012/86. T 


legjea 


REGIONAL" AND SMALLER : Ti | T 

FIRMS DIRECTORATE fl B-C I 

Smaller 

Firms Specialist 

Over half the CBI’s members are smaU firms and it is 
important that their views and interests are fully reflected in 
the CBTs work. The SmaSer Rrms Council, composed of 
owner-managers of smaU businesses, is the member group 
which leads in this area. 

We have a vacancy for a senior person to act as Secretary to 
the Smaller Rrms Council and who win be responsibiefor the 
development of small firms policy within the overall framework 
of CBI policy. 

The job entails contact with senior industrialists, and owner- 
managers, as well as Government officials, and requires 
someone who is able to deal effectively at this leveL He/she 
must also be able to liaise with specialist coHeagues, to 
manage committee work, and to research and write policy 
papers. The person appointed win therefore be both literate 
and articulate, a self-starter and a good member of a smafl 
team. He/she is likely to be a graduate in the late 20s to early 
30s and to have had relevant experience. 

Please reply enclosing comprehensive CV and stating present 
salary to Personnel Department, Confederation of British 
Industry, Centre Point, 103 New Oxford Street, 

London WC1 A 1DU. 


tus 


Occupational 

Psychologist 

Manchester 

package up to £25,000 including a car 

PA Personnel Services 


R\ Personnel Services, a 


within the xnteniational PA 
consulting group, provides 
more services in more countries 
fbrthc recririnneat, 

development and retention of 


competitor. 

Our larue and -well- 
established Psychometrics 
practice, with an enthusiastic 
train of professionals based in 
Birmingham, Manchester, 


achieved a reputation for 
esceBencein ibe versatility, 
quality and range of solunonsit 
tailor-makes to meet specific 
diem req uir eme n ts in 
selection, counselling and 
development of individuals and 
working groups. 

This rapidly developing 
centre of excellence is 
firmly committed to 
profitable growth, to 

maintaining tT« high 

standards, and to 


pushing back sdll further the 
bonders of current assessment 
knowledge and practice while 
remaining totafly aware of 
clients' commercial needs 
We are seeking a lively 
person to jam us m Manchester 
who will assist clients in every 
part of the public and private 
sectors. This new opportunity, 
which offers excellent 
development pr ospec ts , will 
appeal to those, probably aged 
28-40, who have a post- 
graduate qualification in 
occupational ! psychology and 
experience ofj providing a 
professional service to senior 
managem ent. 

Till* nemnn^r atinn package 

is geared to e xp e ri ence and 
qualifications and ap propriate 
benefits indude relocation 
assistance if needed. 

_ Initially, please send a 
ull cv, including; 

current salary details, 
in complete confidence, 
to Dr Lynda Gratton. 




PA Personnel Services 


Executive Search- Selection -1 
& Personnel 


• Rortunct orion 


Hyde Park House, 60a Xnightsbridge, London SW1X 7LB. 
TeL 01-235 6060 Telex; 27874 


Iff you were happy, 
you wouldn't be 
reading this 

Let's face it, if you were in o job that offered a secure future and 
exciting opportunities, yon wouldn't be reoding ads Die this. So, 
let's assume that you wait to get on in fife. You've got amb it io n. 
You wait to make more money, for yourself aid your f amil y. Yon 
want a career where you actually look forward to getting up in the 
morn i ngs. This is for you. A position with one of America's top 100 
co m p an i es . Eleven yean m the U.K. and stfil growing. We're looking 
for more people to join our soles force promoting top quality 
industrial products to established co mpan y- mas, on a regular basis. 
You've never sold before? No problem. This is not a door-to-door 
s it u at i on. We're not looking for slick, Hnooth operat o r s . We wont 
honest, bad w o rkin g people with the sort of personality that leads 
to good, long-term working relationships whh our customers. 

We'D give you ofl the training you need about our products and 
we're offering a total remuneration package that's sure to put a 
smile on your face; And, for the right person, there are management 
opportunities. Best of afl though, yoa'D see year talents appreciated 
aid rewarded. We are looking for people m the Wolverhampton/ 
B irmi ngham, Sur r ey , N. Yorks/Humberside, Exeter, Cardiff, N.W. 
London, Medway, areas. If you're betw e en 25 and 45, unhappy with 
your lot, then see what we coaid offer you. 

Telephone David Hicks on 01-482 6306/7. Ref TT/42/DS. 


OY1MA SYSTEMS 

151 Kgh Street, Southgate, London NM 6BL 


has a vacancy for a 

HEAD OF 
MARKETING 

wsssWKSS 

National Theatre, and will be in d»r|e ot an 
National Theatre advertising and .*e co- 
«Sinaiion of group and discount incentive 

SKTri! S* » «-£«-■ «“"« 

directly to the Directors Office. 

Salary and conditions will be commciBurate 
wiRie qualifications and experience of the 
successful applicant 

The National Theatre is an equal opportunity 
employer. , 

Further detans^y he 


manager 

Required at Heathrow Airport shop 

***«“/£ SKSfirSaAjr 

gSfSSMtS.W: 

iff Writing enclosing your 
CV to: „ _ . 

r ew 

* Middlesex 

Heathrow 

■telephone 01-745 T765 


THE SUNDAY TIMES 

The Sunday Times Business 
News is expanding. We seek new 
talent for a growing team:- 
Senior financial/ 

- business journalist, 
with experience and 
outstanding writing 
ability. 

Banking/fmancia] 
correspondent, with 
experience of 
economic writing. 

Write to Roger EgEn, 
Editor, Business News, 
Sunday Times, 

PO Box 481, 
Pennington Street, 
London El 9XW. 


Prestigious Jewellery Boudque 
in Bond Street 

require 

SALES MANAGER 

• 25-35 years 

- Bi-lingual French /English 
Experience in retail jewellery essential 

- good negotialUe salary 

- commission . , •• 

- BUPA.+ pension scheme 

Please apply in writing to: 

Box No. C23. . _ 


Are you earning £20,000 — £100,000 p.a. 
and seeking a new job? 

Connaught's discreet and successful Execu- 
tive Marketing Programme provides profes- 
sional excellence in helping you to identify 
those unadvertised vacancies. 

Contact us for a free and confidential 
meeting to assess if we can help you. If you 
are currently abroad ask for our Executive 
Expat Service. 

01-7343879 (24 hours) 


J ConmugH^ 


32 Savfle Row London. W1 

i Executive Job Search ProfessM 


SALES PEOPLE 

Required now for Balham and 
Clapham Estate Agency to sell 
.flats and houses. No previous ex- 
perience necessary providing you 
are personable, presentable smil- 
ing and gregarious. Energetic, 
hard working (no nine to fivers 
please), intelligent, talented and 
a car driver. Applicants aged 25 
to 35ish should apply now. 

We have four places to fill. Salary 
in the region of £12,000 p.a. 

Contact Paul Whitcher on 

01-673 8881 

any day of the week!. 


03(3(3 appointments 


TELEVISION 

PRODUCER 

“WeekinWeekOut” 

Cardiff 

£13^00— £19,115** 


An opportunity with SBC Wales to join the Unit making 
the award winning weekly 30 minute ail film, current 
affairs program me WeekinWeekOut 

Responsible to the Programme Editor, you wifl 
originate and develop programme material and 
supervise the productxvi teams. Travel throughout 
Wales, and sometimes abroad will be involved, also 
work outside normal office hours and occasionally at 
weekends. There win also be opportunities to workon 
spedaT programmes prepared by the WeekinWeek 
Outurit for BBC Wales. 

Sound editorial judgement and a practical 




RacSo N o tt in g ha m 
£8,954— £11,110* 


We are an equal 
opportunities employer 


knowledge of current affairs and the economic, social 
and pofo cal fefe of Wales are essential— as is a current 
driving licence. (Ref. 1088/T) 


Are you ayoung,ambrtious reporter with at least three 
years’ journalistic experience? If so, Radio Nottingham 
hasa vacancy that may interest you. The work is 

primarily reporting, interviewing, bulletin wilting and 
newsreading. Goodmicrophone voice and current 
driving licence essential. (Ref.2616/T) 


Relocation expanses considered. 
*PlussMow«nceofCMg0pjL*Pfci«a H o w ane»ofCSg7pA 
Contact us ImmacSaWy for appHcstkxi form (quote 
approp ria te ret. andendosoajLa.) BBC Appo intm en t* . 
London W1 A 1AA.7aL 01-927 5799. 


HMS 


THE RECRUITMENT CONSULTANTS FOR 


EXECUTIVES &. SALES PROFESSIONALS 


NATIONAL SALES MANAGER 

Director Designate. Basic salary £15.000. 
Package of £20.000+. Choice of executive cor 
Total control of small industrial sales force 
through stockists and distributors. 

Benefits include BUPA and nlc pension. 


SALES EXECUTIVES 

£ 15.000 plus excellent bonus, choice of top 
range car. Deahng primarily with France and 
Germany. Selling export sports equipment, so 
leisure goods background ideal. 

Excellent prospects for promotion. 


Take advantage of our nationwide facilities and ring your nearest branch for 
details of these and a thousand other opportunities. 


• BELFAST (ROYAL AVE) 0232 244288 • BIRMINGHAM 021 643 9988 • BOLTON 0204 381000 

• BRADFORD 0274 723703 • BRISTOL 0272 297315 • CARDIFF 0222 398131 • CHESTER 0244 46031 

• DERBY 0332 371971 • EDINBURGH 031 226 4681 • GLASGOW 041 248 2611 • LEEDS 0532 4S9361 

• LEICESTER 0533 29354 • LIVERPOOL 051 709 0111 •LUTON 0582 415711 • MANCHESTER 061 228 
6133 • MILTON KEYNES 0908 604999 • NEWCASTLE 091 261 6111 • NORTHAMPTON 
0604 37548 • NOTTINGHAM 0602 501511 • READING 0734 599755 • SHEFFIELD 0742 26373 

• WATFORD 0923 48855 • LONDON AREA: • EAUNG 01 579 5851 • CROYDON 01 681 1025 

• OXFORD CIRCUS 01 434 1941 • ILFORD 01 478 4433 • WEMBLEY 01 900 0116. 

Hestair Management Services Limited 


Chari 

12 RAVENSWX 


Charity Recruitment 


12 RAVEN380UW« GARDENS. LONDON W13BEW 

>s ^-> There’s more 
to working for a 
Charity 

Charity Recruitment is a new recruitment 
service set up to make iteasierforyou to find 
jobs in voluntary organisations and 
charities. We are interested n a wide range 
of specialisations, particularly within 
Housing, A cc omt a ncy. Book-Keeping, 
Secretarial and Fimdraisittg. All you need 
to do® register wftti us and when a suitable 
job comes up you wiQ automatically be 
considered. 

Forfurtherdetaib oftfiis free service, please 
fill in the coupon and return it to: Charity 
Recruitment, 12 Ravensboume Gardens, 
London W13 SEW. "feL- 01 -991 0094. 


Name.... 

Address. 


TRAINEE 

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE 

Executive Recruitment — I.T. 
W1 c£ 12,000 + Commission 

We are marker leaders in assignment based 
specialist recruitment, opera ring across Banking, 
Insurance, and High Tecnnolugy. Our Executive 
Search abi lines are highly respected and we have 
a reputation for producing highly innovative, 
award-winning recruitment advertising. 

To assist in the development of uur expanding, 
largely blue-chip client base, we urgently require 
nn additional Trainee Account Executive for our 
Technology division. 

Responsibilities will include canvassing new 
and existing clients, research, and monitoring the 
computer press in order to arrange for out relevant 
specialist to secure new business. 

You should be of graduate calibre and in your 
mid 20’s, with somecommeicial/Ciry experience 
which should include an understanding of the 
computer industry- Any formal telesales training 


candidate can expect to progress to Account 
Executive within a year where earnings arc 
unlimited and include a company car. 

For further information please telephone or 
write (in confidence) to Craig Millar, Associate 
Director ofTntbnnation Technology quoting 
Rd:CM057. 


Quality Assurance 

in 

Telecoms/Electronics 

. Salary range: £12,180-06.068 

BSI develops and administers a range 
ot independent third party Quaky Assur- 
ance schemes for the Telecommunications/ 
Electronics industry. The gwh of our 
Assessment and B e^st r a ii u n/Ceniflcaflon 
activities has created a cha Ben ging opportunXy 
for a SenlorGciU Heap— Offices: 

The successful appBcani wB have a deyee or 
equivalent and strong comm u rtcatlow and 
organizational stote. Sound judgement and Oie 
credblBly to operate efiecoveiy at the highest 
management level are abo essential. 

We oiler excellent benefits which Include 5 
weeks’ annual leave, subshSscdstsS restaurant, 
contributor pension scheme and social dub. 
A s si st ance towards r el ocation e xp e n ses wffl be 
considered kn approved cases. 

If you are self motivated, have the releva n t 
qualifications and experience and wattid Uce to 
make a positive contribution to the success of 
British industry, please telephone far an 
appBeatton farm or further fcifonnaaion to: 

MfeeJ. Hadala 
BSI 

Linford Wood. Mhon Keynes MK146LE 
Telephone 0908320033 


^JLIgvd 

_ Chapman _ 

1 Associates 

IntefiMtlotuil Search and Selection 

160 New Bond Street London WlYOHR 
Telephone: 01 -408 1670 


RECRUITMENT 

CONSULTANTS 

£Neg C. London 

As a loader in tha competitive market cl accoun- 
tancy recruitment we are a highly succ e ssful 
consultancy. We can offer a challenging career to 
enthusiastic indMduais. 

Continued expansion has recently created the 
need for a se&ntotivated, ambitious achiever of 
graduate calibre, preferably with a recrutment/- 
accountancy background for a Tianee/Junlor 
Consultant rote. P ros pects are excellent and we 
offer an above average incentive bonus m addi- 
tion lo a realistic basic salary. 

Phone Aim Cowel or Jane Nafior for an informal 
deficussien, or send us your c.v. 


MUSEUMS AND 
GALLERIES COMMISSION 

HEAD OF CONSERVATION UNIT 

£15,683-£20,83Q 

The Commission is seeking applications for the impor- 
tant new post of Head of the Conservation Unit. 

At the invitation of the Minister for the Arts, a national 
Conservation Unit is to to sat up. which will continue 
and develop the work begun by the Crafts Council s 
former Conservation Section. The Unit win assume an 
important role as a recognised centre of conservation 
knowledge, and will participate in the develop mom and 
co-ordination of conservation policies. It will be respon- 
sible for providing and publishing information on 
conservation and conservators (including a central 
register), education and training, as well as administra- 
tion of a conservation grants scheme. 

Applicants for the post should hold a University Degree 
and/or equivalent qualifications in practical conserva- 
tion work, and should be able to demonstrate 
substantial achievement in at least one field of con- 
servation. Proven managerial and communication skis 
w® be important in this post 

The post will be based at the Commission's Central 
London offices. Starting salary wfll be negotiable depen- 
dent on qualifications and experience. 

Further details and application forms may be obtained 
from: 

The Personnel Officer 
Museums and Galleries Commission 
7 St James's Square 
London SW1Y 4JU 

(Tel: 01-839 9340) 

Oaring date lor application: Moaday 28 October 1886 


. R l ( .K 

. RENTAL DEPT.' 
LISTS 
PUBLISHED 
NTH L Y 
01-581 1741 


SENIOR NEGOTIATOR 

CotinMd expansion risuBs n i vacancy 
Urn ttftrad ragootior wtn mȣ 
Bsw MteftM fa tmfe fentf Lotion 


rcflwtton Oy way 
mn u na w m. txnus. etc 










28 


THE TIMES THURSDAY OCTOBER 2 1986 


GENERAL APPOINTME 







Shepherd Little & Associates Ltd 

Banking Recruitment Consultants 


HEAD OF DEALER SUPPORT circa £25,000 

The emphasis in this assignment centres around attracting a sound man-manager with well 
developed leadership skis. Following on from this our cfent, a major U^. firnUsseetang 
experience If possible gamed In settlement of money market instruments and eurobonds. You 
wiitake charge InitiaHy of a team of up to twenty - there are excellent chances for further career 
development with this leading firm 

Phase contact David Uttta 


BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT ^ , 

OFFICER - PROPERTY £17,000 plus car 

As a result of expansion our client, a major U.K. S 

commercial divSon for officers experienced rn husir^dwetopment ^n^dates wiH be 
exported to have well developed credit skate and some tawwtedge of tondiro to JJ® FJJP® 11 * 
sector combined with the drive and enthusiasm to develop their own parttouo of cfieras. 

Ptaasa contact Christine Clayton 


INTERNAL AUDIT to £18,000 

Our client, a specialist banking subsidiary of a major International banking 
operations in Hong Kong, New York and Sydney. Is seeking to recruit an Irr^nal Auditor. The 
role win be number 2 in a team of 3 and is open to either Chartered Accountants or people with 
previous auditing experience from withbi a banking environment. AH areas of t he bank are 
covered by the audit team and this opening therefore represents an interesting career 
opportunity. Full banking benefits apply. 

Please contact Madeleine Price 


U.K. EQUITY SETTLEMENTS 

Two of the best known names in the City, ranking amongst the mostpowerful of toeffk&Kl mtha 
world, are building U.K. equity trading and sales divisions into their London operations. They 
seek the most talented settlements specialists In the City today - at any level. Apart from8ing{ 
knowing what a transler document ta or how the Talisman system works you must be hard 
working, dedicated and highly efficient If you can rise to the challenge of hdping to set up these 
departments, whether you have two or ten years experience, they are wrong, within reason, to 
pay whatever it costs to attract your knowledge. 

Please contact David UWe 


Ridgway House 41/42 King William Street London EC4R 9EN 
Telephone 01-626 1161 


Wm 


Recruitment Advertising 
Executive Search 
Management Selection 

International Recruitment 


178-202 Grea 
London WIN! 
8 Mathew Stre 
Tel: 051-2361 


Ourtient.LoddKcdEtectrortcsCQnTpanV.lsa 






-Sfeg 


mmSmm 


systems. 



Are you a qualified accountant? 
Are you an experienced manager? 
Are you a good communicator? 
Are you an innovator? 



CARGILL UK LIMITED 


Are you our next Finance Director? 

We are Shepherds Bush Housing Association Limited, a major charitable 
housing organisation, developing and managing homes in West London. 
With assets of over £50 millions, an annual turnover of £3 millions and a 
diverse and growing range of activities, we can provide a stimulating and 
rewarding environment in which to use your skills and experience and to 
enhance your career. 

Our Finance Director heads a Division responsible for accounting and 
financial control, personnel management and administration. As an essential 
part of the Management Team, the Finance Director has the opportunity for a 
wide involvement in the policy planning and general management of SBHA. 



FINANCIAL ACCOUNTANTS 


Salary: £21,000 p.a. upwards plus non-contributory pension and other 
benefits. 


Following on internal promotions and rapid expansion of die company, two opportu- 
nities arise to join a dynamic, commodity-trading multi-national base in West 
London. The organisation is highly computerised and extensive use is made of 

S nal computers. 

1 appointments are to work in a demanding environment assisting in the 
preparation of consolidated financial reports and budgets for management, and 
accounting for the holding company. The positions will include supervision of staff 
It is anticipated that the appointees will transfer to a tradi ng/prooessing activity 
within 2 years. Candidates should be self-starting, newly-qualified accountan ts wi th 
computer experience. A competitive salary and excellent benefits will be offered. 


If you would like further details contact: 

HACAS Re cruit ment 
2 Hertslet Road 
London N7 6PL 


who are advising the Association on this appointment 
For informal discussion contact Jeff Zitron of HACAS Recruitment on 01-609 9491 
Closing date for applications: Monday, 13th October 1986 

SBHA is implementing on Equal Opportunities Policy. 


PRODUCT 

MANAGER 


Offshore Funds 
c.£20,000 + Car 


Please send fidl curriculum vitae, in confidence, to: 

Mi. A. McDonald, Homan Res ources Department 
CARGILL UK LIMITED 
3 Shortlands, London W6 8RT 


Shepherds Bush Housing Association Ltd 


An exceptional opportunity exists for a ' 
Product Manager to assist in the further 
development of our range of af&hote funds 
and allied services, working in dose co-op- 
eration with our associated companies m 
i Europe. 

i A mqjbr responsibility wfl! be to provide a 
1 support service for our sales teams, equip- 
ping thorn to take full advantage of the 
'current, fiat-changing fin a nci al afangt e . 

challenging appointment oBs for a top 
calibre individual in the 30-40 age range 
whose background should include at least 3 
years involvement with offshore funds. Fa- 
miliarity with direct investment; fag. via a 
stockbroker) would be an additional asset, 
as would fluency in a European language. 

In return we can offer excellent career 
development prospects and a package which 
in d u de * non-contributory pension, free me 
assurance, BUPA, and profit share scheme. 

Interested? Then contact Pst Copeland at 
Hill Samuel Investment Services Limited, 
NLA Tower, 12-16 Addwcombe Road. 
Crqydon CR9 2DR, Tet 01 686 4365. 





I N V ESTM EHT SERVICES 























iTtW/TW 


PPPWiPPt foi 

|/7 

dfj iW/nl 







•j( irf( ii Stmit 


SALES MANAGER 


The following new posts have arisen In the 
Board's Economic Development Department 


Thompson Jewitt one of the U.KTs testing imamitionilirarapartaiinpiniaK, fecreatinua 
new ponwithm its <xgants£ii 'wfor a Fiekl Sates Msnagir.Ths position la opan to ropfcants 
from inside and outside the transport industry. Knowiedgs of ou busman would be m 


advantage, not essentiaL but mom important m soiling and managarial ridfc. We m 
looking for a person who Ins *• skBs to motivate and iramw a ntes fora as wefl as 


looking for a person who has tire skBs to motivate and manage a stem face as wofl as 
developing theseffing skflh of his team to gain new busness and dewk* existing business. 

Thompson Jewitt is an taentationri company with trench offices throughout the UJt The 
successful applicant would be initiaBy based at our head office teSutton-ci-AshfiBid. Our 
package indudes negotiable satay. company car. escdtart working oondWona and good 

pmpBds. 


If you think you can meet with our above requirements phrase write with your C.V. to Mr. J. 
Thompson Jawitt at 


THOMPSON JEWm 


SIF T. Common Road, Sutton -m-Aatifield, Nottingham N617 lit. 
Tab 0623 51 21 82 


HEAD OF PROJECTS 
AND PROPERTY 
DEVELOPMENT 
£14,703— £15,795 

(Pay award pending) 

Experience in raising private sector funding far 
public sector-ted projects is one of the 
requirements for this important post with an 
imaginative and go-ahead regional 
development organisation. The range of work 
includes industrial, commercial and retail 
projects, tourism and infrastructure. Sound 
knowledge of property development is needed. 


RECRUITMENT 
CONSULTANT 
CITY OF LONDON 

£ NEGOTIABLE 


Accountancy Personnel, Britain’s leading 
consultancy in the specialist recruitment of 
accountants and their staff, has a proven 
policy of continued expansion through the 
training and development of its 
consul t ants, providing unrivalled career 
opportunities with widely varied and 
challenging responsibilities. 



£15,000 - 28,000 OTE + CAR 

LBMS is a leading IT Consultancy. The UK Ckwem- 
merasandartforsysJcmsdevt^opmemSSAOriwas 
pntly developed by LBMS. Our commercial verson 
LSDM is now the most widely used method in 
The UK. 

To further increase tire productivity of this 
approach we have launched a senes of PC-based 
products. These are now bang interfaced to several 
DBMS/4GL 


The response from our large established user 
s has been overwhelming. We are now sedans a 


SALES & MARKETING 





PRESTIGE GIFT PRODUCTS CIRCA £18K + CAR 

Proven sales ability and drive coupled 
with a thorough knowledge and under- 
standing of the prestigious gift market are 
the ideal requirement for this senior sales 
appointment. This is a newly created role 
and presents an excellent opportunity to 
join a well established successful subsid- 
iary of a prominent P.L.C. 

Reporting to the General Manager you 
will spearhead the sales and marketing 
function, Co-ordinating the activities of 
an established agency team. 

A demanding and challenging role best 
suited to a mature candidate aged between 
28 and 40, located within commuting dis- 
tance of Bournemouth and Central 
London. 

Applications Ur- Mr AIL Taylor 

Crummies & Co Ltd 

2 Cromer Road 

Poote 

Dorset 

BH12 1NB 


ITT7T71 


AGENTS 


in W9 require 
another 

Negotiator. Must 
be non smoker, 
aged 23 to 28 and 
own car. Full 
training given. 

Basic, car 
allowance and 
commission. 
Adrian on 
286 6565 


base has been overwhelming. We are now seeking a 
salesman to service this demand. A comprehensive 
product and marketing support structure already 
exists. We are looking for a person to complement 
tins team with: 

■ experience of selling software development 
products to DP management. 

■ knowledge of systems analysis and design and 
ideally structured methods 

■ excdleni communications and p^sentaaon skills. 
Please send your CV plus a short summary 
outitrang such relevant experience. 

quoting Ref. ST9/86 to:- 


Tony Webb. Le ar m o nth & Burchett 
Management Systems Limited 


Evelyn House, 62 Oxford Street. 

London WIN 9LF. Telephone: 01-636 4213. 


CHARITY FUND 


h 


Urgenfly mured J«V twpbj » 
worth wttfe anti monte work m 
canoetral PUham cftnss. Curas 
Edwhone manner ana artln 
perso nality essential. Good 
lenuiosnsn. 


Tel 01-581 1597 


APPEAL DIRECTOR FOR THE 
PURCELL SCHOOL 


(Specialist school for gifted young musicians 
Patron HRH The Prince of Wales) 

Please apply in the first instance providing 
details of personal experience to ttte:- 

CMmaa ef the Appeal Ccmnfttu, 
Ref TaST 
Tire Purees School, 

_ Meant Park Read, 

ferroM-tlie-Xll MiUteMX HAl 3JS. 


EXnittCMCED ASSISTANT re- 
quired in work m irammn 
workshop tor cream* tnemny 
rgmpni)' bawl H, MUCH Kill 
Mngioii MUrv nrahiauir. 

Ptoan- tokuhonc 0T-58J SI BA 


YOUNO KMOM iqrMudr 
ptmptmIi lo train in 'Urtrnnr 

Dnui imrni >»h<*«lfiiil oual- 
iU mm i lot hum rampant 
Wav write unti tfriaik 

IQ BOV con - 

ADMMSnUTOir (4 Trainin'! 
r«rtip 'OH ' Mritiwmrpi cat I 
bn- muH to vnmuto ronr%p*- 
and mn l torn vorm taatainQ. 
Mini ton*- r^iftani buddiim 
iiwiwrinnil or training «Wif 

nutWPjrtnctri extortm** 

sn nJiK r ci? ocw * Bnnj CJ 
d»a mi* .tilth Farnuhaiwn 
i id 'Hnc cm. J7 Nru. Bond 
tilm'l Lmwon W I 


9 


The post will appeal to qualified Chartered 
Surveyors, Planners or, maybe, Accountants: a 
proven track record will put any candidate at an. 
advantage. 


We now need an additional consultant to 
assist in the growth of the overseas 
placements function of our Public Practice 
Division, and seek a personable and 
confident man or woman (25-28) with a 
background in the profession, who, after 
training will form part of a successful team. 

Contact Richard Wallace on: 
01-834 0489 


PROJECTS OFFICER 
£11,508— £12,477 

(Pay award pending) 


Accountancy Personnel 
6-8 Glen House, 
Stag Place, 
London, SWl E5AA 


The successful candidate for this post will be 
required to both initiate and examine practical 
projects with potential for development in Mid 
Wales. Projects will embrace the tourism, 
industrial commercial and retail, office and other 
sectors. 


SCOTTISH MUSEUMS COUNCIL 
DIRECTOR 
Up to c. £17,200 


NEWLY QUALIFIED ACA 
W.Middx £15,000+car 

Expansion by this specialty chemical group provides 
an opportunity for you til become involved with 


acquisitions/dlspos^s, development of European 
corporate taction, maragement reporting and 
responsibility for other FD level duties, 
ftef 886230. 


BRAND MANAGER 
W/Middx c£14,000+car 


Major FMCG manufacturer with a strong international 
flavour seek a talented, ambitious individual to back 
up their high-profits, aggressive marketing and NPD 
strategy m a key role, ft you have experience in a 
festmoving, successful atvronnwnt then this is tf# 


opportunity you aretookir ^ffr . 


TO RRD OUT MORE ABOUT THESE OR 
OTHER OPPORTUNITIES 
CONTACT US NOW. 


MANAGEMENT PERSONNEL 
2 ETON COURT 
ETON 

WINDSOR SU STY 
TELEPHONE: (0753) 854256 




SUITS BEST? 


ftofessioral Guktance and 
Asse ssm ent for aB ages. 


t5-W SKK Conn. Carttre 
2534 yn: Progress. Changes 
3554 yiK (Mw. 2nd Careen 


M denis in frai brodac- 


.CAREffi ANALYSTS 

.90 OnuGESter Pbca Wt 

■ 01-935 5452 (24 bra) 


The post needs a suitably qualified professional 
with the ability to get things done. He/she wifl 
probably be an economist or planner but 
chartered surveyors and accountants with 
relevant experience will be considered. 


The Scottish Museums Council is s ungor otoeutn) 

govErnment support u SaMl*nd'5 3 SO independenu imfrOTty 
and wear auunoniy musewns. With funding from sJicScouah 
HducaOOD Dcnuuneitl. local auihoririei and the rwirnr «- 


Appficatioti forms which ^rould be relumed by 18 
(ttober 1986 together wfth}ob d esc ription and other 

relevant irtormallon ar e avaflablo from:— 


J. E. HugtiM, Board S e cr e tar y, HHtf Wales 
Davulopimnt, LadywelHfounu, Nnwtown, Powys 
SY161J&. 


MdWMes Devetopment 


The Dfrecror iseepected to provide profigsianal and admBitf- 
rniive Imdentup to the Council n n strives lo improve itiia 
funher the quaniy of Scotland's non-uaikmal ranmns. 

Candidate s sho uld have referent aeadeink and/or profo- 
Sioaa l quahfi caiions. and experience in the field of museum 
management, and should com bine commercial acumen with 
vision and imagination. 

Cto didaics prepared U) co me on cecoodment or ftg a tented 
period will lie constkred. 

Ffar an infonnstion pack and job des cr i ptio n contact: • 
The Administrative Officer, 

Scottish Mosemns fremril 


The DevetopmenT Board lor Rural Wales 



ratfWiWKnnni ivoffwni 
romnaiiv Prior muugnmi 
4nd markrllng npnlnK, rp 
atom] SiiLarv ctO.QOO n Dili* 
p<T>* Ol 514 BSS9. 

CVS. INTERVIEW KELP MB 
•-wri KH> twrli quUMnrv 
Radnev Sv Awrwn Trt 
Bcr^lwirnMnl <tVM2T> 7S5«. 
SPSCtUGn warned to tieto run 

riutoi tn Austria Drc AMd. 

MUM In- « exerttoflt root, and 
Mwol. German. Ol 486 88bS 
CMJHE CITS ud promucnwl 
riirriruluni uuto iMcumvnla. 
DM«K Ot«SI 5588. 
cuaonctiuiM vitae uim mu™ 

to mri oil Vnrti d rmutav- 
nw rat. Trt OS9t> 606*1 1 
IHHVER rpqTl in- mmno ro tar- 
cnnira! London ddiimn. Sun 

oati* so - *. Mivtont. oi aas S 2 Z* 


PART TIME FINANCIAL 
JOURNALISM & RESEARCH 


Publisher of Financial Review seeks persons 
wtA writing ability to monitor and comment on 
U.K. and international Investment Opportuni- 
ties. ideal opening for qualified people 
wanting regular work on a flexible basis. Suc- 
cessful applicants wifl have knowledge of 
investments together with writing ability and 
experience. Remuneration wflJ be attractive to 
well qualified persons. 

Please write giving details of qualifications 
and experience to: 

James Wootten, 

World Investor, 

7-11 Lexington Street, 
London W1R 3HQ 


UNIVERSITY 

APPOINTMENTS 


ABE YOU PAID WHAT YOU ARE WORTH? 


Exciting Opportunity exi«S for 2 people (23 plot) to join die 
w«t End office or F.P.S (Martagomem) Ud -a major force m 
the financial services industry. 


Full uainmg. rapid progression into mamgemcot. equity par- 
inn pa non. rcmairaativM second to' none. 


Please call Martyu Caxuvan OK 

01 439 8431 


CO 

r 


C0RPO1 


rr\T A Ik 








































fur a 

tHr tenter 
nth'lft* IllQiJfi 
c!«*se co-tip- 
imspjmes ffi 

to promt a 
k»*i». tquip. 
ti-ita* »i tfc 
U clippie 

:aU'% l».r a I 19 
l[ | a"» r.inff 
idr nl kusi 
fr- 
it 

aw:, 
tt!i un^ua^r 

r!li carter 

■V’k i; r «huh 
Kli'51. I’rvr life 

b.;t* vhfnir 

» Ypj iiiad al 
»* n». L:rjw. 
nil;}* 

1 


'..is. Fu 
IP.* Viau 


K>ad 


Il’EL 


i p v : * r ; 


NT 

ST 

HON 

ILK 


.v.:: % i* 

t-. •! 

is.;? “ 

: *. Uir 

i-.s . .:•• 

.1 | r 

\.:i .r-n 
• 1 • • \ 

j' 

•»;' r.o 



GENERAL APPhtmtaa^^o 


A li-U * — 1» 


COMPUTER APPOINTMENTS 


* 


BRITISH FILM INSTITUTE 

Deputy Director 

Scale £26,099 -£29,567 

^-"S^^ESSJSS 

production, distribution arri^Wbition, 
^ orant-akSng.: Thera are 
^gW^staft and the operating budget is about £14 

^Deputy Director's responsibilities span all the central 
resource and admnistrative functions including finance, 
funding and development, personnel and the general 
management of the Institute. The postholder also 
deputises for and gives substantial support to the 
Erector in the formulation of the cultural polities of the 

"This is a broad based post operating in a complex, 
changing environment Applicants should therefore 
a commensurate range of administrative skills 
and experience in either the public or private sector. 

Further details and application form from 

Director, British Film Institute, 

127 Charing Cmss Rr^ t 
London WC2H QEA. 

TeL- 01-437 4355. 

CLOSING DATE 21st October 1986. 

We are an atonal nf p nmmir^c 



Career Crisis? 


You rrajftie inthe wrong job. have unfulfilled ambitions or have been made redundant 
Ois VKHviduaily tailored, guaranteed programme for senior executives will ensure that 
Ives qwctfy. To arrange a free, confidential dscussion 


you attain your career 
telephone 81-831-1110 


Executive Action 

37 Queen AnneStred- London W: 


WHO CARES 

ABOUT SOFTWARE QUALITY ? 

* '* ft) £20k Praxisdocs-Praxis cares about the qaallrvofeadh and cvct\- P iece of work that it dne«L And 

. Rnd^lRTCS dm care and anendog is worthwhile. Praxis was the first independent systems house to have 

• V.-.. ‘ been rostered under rhe BSRimich coveted quality system snndaid,BS5750. for software 

- dev elopment Thfcrcgisnaiian means that (wrdienis can rely on us ro produce what they need, when 

. / they need it, 

■ * 

• ' m j . Thai reliance depends on us, the people who work at Praxis. Praxis cares about the men and women who 

. .*•**/.* ■ /* • ■ work here Thar care can be secnin our good salaries, our well -equipped and congenial offices, amt our 

-• m relaxed and friendh- working St3ic AH of us who work at Praxis can share in the success that wphdpio 

' ' ' create, by owning shares In the company 

* We are OOw setting out on our fourth easdringandrhaUmgingyeagTCc need software engineers io help us 

’• .■/ ‘ -7-'. / ,/■ . . . • grow from 75 100 by the end ofncxESnos&en This planned growth is needed to enable us io meet the 

V increased demandfor our services and to enhance ELLA, our very successful VLSI design system, 

• ■.* - -V. • . * unmatched try any other similar prodaci in tbeworid- 

We are hlOkiflgfarageomplldied and matnr g men and women «<v>«ihawft»irf*irl iu«ia T f f l T a»wt«-h 0 t W vr 
between five and ten years experience We need them to take port in and lead a wide range of activities, 
including developing current and future IPSE*, implementing operating systems, designing distributed 
d at aba se systems and providing expertise in setting up software quality systems. 

Software Engineers 

We already have one of the foremost teams of experienced software engineers In the country but our 
•* Projects Group still needs more senior software engineers. preferably with experience in database 
. _■ applications, compilers, ICLVME and the use offorraal methods, We need people with enthusiasm, 
experience ofleariing, and the ability to pass their enthusiasm on to then- projec t and team members. 

* Our ELLA Group is looking for development staff at all Icvcb, particularly those with experience of CAE 
tools and simulator development. 

CAF. AppHratinm Fngfawjnrf Tivhnlr.! Amhiw 

'• • We need a further Technical Author to provide our clients with nyr mamft^ mHinrnfiai material 

AddldonaUy we require an Applications Engineer, with NISI design expertise, to work in our ELLA Support 
Group assisting customers with their use of ELLA. 

If you think you have the skills Praxis needs, care deeply about die work von do and want to provide our 
•V clients with the best in software development services, then telephone or write for an application form to; 

Wendc Drtakwater 
Praxis Systems pic 
20 Mamers Street 

. . t _ Bath B.M IPX 

setting standards hi 1 software Telephone Bad: (0225) 335855 (mentioning ref T/2/1 ) 


. • 




I, 









CORPORATE 



TE| 

r 1 


Outstanding opportunities 
for young professionals 
The Clients 

• International investment banks 

•Major UK stockbrokers 

The Role 

•Mergers and Acquisitions 
•New Issues 

• Management Buyouts 

•Corporate Advisory Work, 

The Candidate 

•ACA, Solicitor orBarrister, soon to qualify or 

recently qualified 

• Training with a major professional practice 
•Aged 24-27 years 

•Graduate with first class acatfemic background 
•Strong inter personal skills 

The Rewards 

• An opportunity to be at the forefront of die City revolution 
•Involvement in the immediate and future decision-making 

process of major corporations . , 

• Cteariy defined long term prospects in a challenging and 
highly competitive environment 

• High basic salary in addition to bonus and other substantial 
banking benefits 

To discuss further a career in corporate finance, please 

contact Lindsay Sngden ACA on 01 -404 575LOTwntEt» 
Michael Page City, 39-41 Parker Street, London WC2B5LH 
enclosing a curriculum vitae. Strict confidentiality assured- 




Mic hael Page City 

>mnrifwial Recruitment Consultants 


International RecniitiTHint 
London Brussels NewSfeA Paris Sydney 

AnieniberrfAddisonCbnsuhancyGKK^pPlC 


rats 

Iwy 

wpPLC 


Sales Development 
and 

Marketing Director 


fro £25,000 + car 


London 


OurcBeat part of a major hucnarioMl group: is ooe 
of the lareest and pcriodicaJ distributors -in 

the U1C It is highly profitable with an exceedingly 
high turnover. 

Reporting to the Managing Director, you will be re- 
sponsibJe for analyang tte market, directing sales 
devdopmem, including identifying the potential fix- 
new business within the UK. You must be appropri- 
ately qualified and fully e xp e ri e n ced in all aspects of 
marketing, not necessarily in the field oF magazine 
publishing although this would be an advantage. 

A planned expansion p ro gram me offers tremendous 
career oppor tu nities for the future. 

You must have the personal qualities appropriate to 
Ibis senior appointment and as a Board Member you 
will be expected to contribute to the overall manage- 
ment of the company. Ideally yon wifi be in your 
thirties and looking for c are er advancement. 

The overall package is attractive and there is also 
potential for a profit related bonus. 

Please write in stria confidence: endowing C.V. and 
Quoting reference 364 1 to DJL At kins. Managing 
Director. 


DBA 


1 9 


ASSOCIATES LTD 


RISK MANAGEMENT 
City £17-£19,000 + mortgage 


Dea S nE ‘t/SSMSteSSeORPOliAffi 

work 







Key Activities indurk; 

qqotingrS: 5774. 

London WC1X8CS 


Baring Securities Limited 

EUROPEAN 

EQUITY 

SETTLEMENTS 

A leading firm of stockbrokers requires 
experienced European Equity Settlements 
Staff of Senior and Junior Level for their 
expansion into the European Equity 
Market. Successful applicants will be 
offered a highly competitive salary plus 
generous discretionary bonus. 

Please apply in writing with full c,v. to: 

David Hughes, Esq^ 

Baring Securities Limited, 
Holland House, 

1/4 Bury Street, 

London. EC3A SDY 


rr. 


UK Banking 
Corporate Business Managers 

Up to £30,000 

We invite applications for sercra] key positions at manager level within a major European bank which has a long 
established presence in the UK. The Bank has a reputation for innovative financing techniques, and having 
restructured its activities in fine with market developments, is now embarking on an aggressive expansion 
progr am me. It theref o r e seeks several corporate business managers who will have responsibility for identifying 
potential clients and marketing both to them and to the existing chenr base, a comprehensive range of services 
including debt, liquidity, interest rate and currency management. 

Use successful candidates, probably aged 25-33, wiQ currently be involved in marketing oo medium and large 
corp orat e diems at a senior level and should ideally have 3-5 yeas* banking experience in this sector. Strong 
credit appraisal and interpersonal skills are required, together with a broad knowledge of the latest banking 
products and an ability to make an early contribution to the Bank's expansion programme. 

An attractive salary package is offered including jwofit-sharing and the usual bankbenefics. Promotion prospects 
are excellent. 

Those interested should contact Bona Coffins on 01 -404 5751 or write to her enclosing a CV, at 39-41 Parker 
Street, London WC2 B 5LH, quoting reference 3673. 


L 



Michael Page City 

International Recruitment Consultants -London Brussels NewVbdk Paris Sydney 
A member of Addison^ Consultancy Group PLC 


QUALIFIED/PART 

QUALIFIED 

ACCOUNTANT 

Req sired by small dynamic importing and 
districting company in WC2. 

Faction: to take overall responsibility in accounting 
from bookeeping to management accounts and bring 
financial expertise to the business. 

Applicants must have good understanding of 
computers, welcome pressure and task variety and 
must have the desire to contribute actively to the 
continued growth oF the company 

Good salary related to qualifications and experience. 

Ptease write mtkfuDC-V to 

Michael Bostelmann, 

Craven House, 

16 Northumberland Ave, 

London WC2N5AP 


person*}®' 


FAST TRACK ACCOUNTANTS 

ACA’S or eqmv 1980-86 Neg to £2Sk package 

We invite FIRST CLASS YOUNG QUALIFIED ACCOUNTANTS (1980-86) to 
join us fix a weekend at ft -SUPERB COUNTRY CLUB to discuss a FAST TRACK 
future both with our EXPERT RECRUITMENT TEAM and UK based diems. 

This is an unparalleled opportunity to meet representatives of very senior financial 
management of major US and UK corporations with annual turnovers circa £1,000 
m + e-g. BOC, BUNZL, DIGITAL EQUIPMENT, GILLETTE, PHILLIPS PE- 
TROLEUM, PIZZA HUT, RANK ORGANISATION, J SAINSBURY, SMITH 
KLINE BECKMAN and WHITBREAD. 

To reserve your place send, your CV and salary requirement without delay to: 

HM WINGHAM ACA 

ACCOUNTANCY APPOINTMENTS EUROPE /■ ~ ' ‘ 

Iafieratioari Bmimss Cure • 

1-3 Morbbcz Street 

London W1 . 





Accountant ^ 
Appointments 


Management 

Accountant 

£l4,000-£15,000neg South-East 

Dussek Campbell, a part of the Burmah Oil Group, 
markets a range of wax and oil-based compounds and 
a variety of timber preservatives under the well-known 
Solignum name. We are seeking a management 
accountant to develop our management information 
systems and to co-ordinate financial projections, 
budgets and the financial input to strategic plans. 

Reporting to the Financial Controller of Burmah’s 
Coating Division, you will have prime responsibility 
for management accounting within the UK company 
and a co-ordinating role for the Division worldwide. 
Activities could range from in-depth analysis of 
regular monthly financial performance to fin ancial 
appraisals of any projects related to the varied 
activities of the company. 

Candidates should be graduates aged 25 to 35 
who are at least part-qualified accountants. You 
should possess proven communication skills and, 
ideally, experience of using IBM PC/System 36 
software. You must have experience in working with 
reporting systems within an industrial organisation. 

Success in this role could lead to career 
advancement within the Burmah Group. 

Situated within the London Borough of Bexley 
there is easy access both to the M25/M2 motorways 
and to Central London. 

Please apply, enclosing full cv, to the Resources 
Manager, Dussek Campbell limited, Thames Road, 
Crayfoid. Kent DAI 4QJ. 


Burmah 


BANKING & ACCOUNTANCY APPOINTMENTS 


n 


j 






THE TIMES THURSDAY OCTOBER 2 1986 


BANKING & ACCOUNTANCY APPOINTMENTS 


sis 


an 


dpi 


annul 



Opportunities with 
a major international bank 

Up to £22,000 + banking benefits 


Lloyds Bank operates throughout 
Britain and in 46 countries around the 
world. We offer exciting opportunities to 
well qualified accountants who wish to 
develop a career in the fast changing 
financial services and banking sector. 

The successful candidates will 
join our Headquarters Finance Division 
looking initially at the UK Retail Banking 
business. You must be self motivated and 
capable of designing and implementing 
practical solutions to meet the exacting 
requirements of management. You will 
need the ability and confidence to work 
independently with people at all levels in 
the Bank 

We axe interested in hearing from 
recently qualified accountants with first 
time passes and an outstanding academic 
record. 


Salary is negotiable up to £22jOOOpa 
and the benefits include: subsidised 
mortgage and loan facilities, profit 
sharing, a contributory pension, BUPA 
and other banking related benefits. 
Career prospects are excellent 

Applicants should send full details 
of experience, qualifications and present 
salary to: 

Tony Davenport 
Manager; Financial Control 
Finance Division 
Lloyds Bank Pic 
40/66 Queen Victoria Street 
London EC4P 4EL 


SS] Lloyds 

^jBank 


OVERSEAS PROPERTY 
COMPANY RASED IN MAYFAIR 

Require an experienced 

SENIOR ACCOUNTANT 


* is conversant with land and property matters. 

* Is a chartered accountant 

* Is an instinctive entreprener. 

* Has a proven track record. 

* Capable of working on own initiative. 

* Can advise on company and taxation requirements 

* Is a good communicator, motivator and manager. 

Excellent prospects 

Salary negotiable with usual company benefits. 
Initially curriculum vitae to: 

Desmond Crews 
Crews & Co., 

15 Berkeley Street 
Mayfair 
London W1 


Tel: 01-629 0577 


r FINANCIAL ANALYST ^ 

c£ 16,000 Surrey 

An exceptional opportunity awaits an ambitious part-qua H ted accountant in this 
blue-chip organisation. Dubes indude profit pfenning, analysis and general account- 
ing. Rrst-dass communication and computer skats are essential for Otis rewarding 
career move. Ref: AC. 


c£15|000 


COMPANY ACCOUNTANT 


c. London. 


National PR frm otter excefient career development to a young outgoing individual 
with sohd accounting and some computer experience. You w9 nave Mi responsfbfl- 
Hy lor the finance section, fiasing with all areas of the company. Rah JN. 

FINANCIAL ACCOUNTANT 

edSMMO Essex. 

. Prestigious i nternational company seeks a young part-quagied accountant far Inter- 
esting financial accounting rota, varied responsfoiSbes include balance sheets, P&L 
accounts, budgets and forecasts. Good industrial experience is essential. Excetat 
benefits. Ref: AC. 

ASSISTANT ACCOUNTANT 

To £ 11,000 MdOsm 

France Division of UK leader offer chalenjing and varied rote to a young ambMous 
part-quafified. Excellent training given In m areas of accounts inducing review and 
.assessment of company reports. Previous experience essential Ran JN. 


THE COMPLETE FINANCIAL SELECTION SERVICE 

Vernon House, Sicilian Avenue, London WC1 A 2QH. Tek 01 -831 2323 




CREDIT 

CONTROLLER 

£11,000 

For design Co. in SW 
London. Must lave 

preftsaoty mJ.KJW. wiws 
include credit sancwmng + 
Controlling Wjgatran. 
Excellent opportunity tor 
someone 30+. 

CALL. MONROE 
REC. CONS. 

01 370 1562 


gWWH mu train**- for Interna 
ttonal Bank, baaed imltaUy w 
S.E London. Previous hanxlnfl 
or hoota-npuM) ran esse Mtal. 20 
* C6.aOOC9.TOO jue. Merrow 
pun .in 'iTf i nmiw MeeM- 
Bbi OI 6H 1087 


INTERNATIONAL 

APPOINTMENTS 


Urgnfly Reqabed 
mnd P fan Forem a n 


with a tost 3 yeans mpm- 
encs of bant nd madam 


motets to facge and smaB <fl- 
aroeter tape and flRfaus. To be 
responsbie for operation of 
Middle test pint tar natal 3 
mart pern) with possible ex- 
ternal id 1 year contract. 


r i 


istmrioH. 


SALES & MARKETING 


flf— MWUC The ImKh 
pvnpafl ou CMKrv regulm 
SUt staff. A good knowledge 
o f Ctwnnral muur and an UUrr- 
nl In iMIwr inuUr are eaaemlaL 
You jMuM Rate a ml edura- 
lion and a ck-tire lo pngnu In 
retailing. Only people with a 
tony (emi eomniltineiit should 
auptv 

contort Simon or Benito on 01 
378 7635 

f>/P Marketing sain. SOK * 
Mat l alt LtnuriM ttnolicly 
' Mxntful nmon i2540i Raid (o 
imp Utetr HoM/Pnwrty man- 
MNonU ♦ utn et aw rl e wee to 
- pfomoie * aoirunaliT Luxury 
Smrti* Flat Block. Tel Andrew 
01 683 IS66 (AngM reocouU 
A SOCIETY Omy • Magazine 
ivnh a uMpmon. Ref MB. 
Tfl: 821 1255 


GRADUATE 

APPOINTMENTS 


OMDfMTE OK A Levels wHh 
good many <50 +j to Tentvo 
customers and give secretarial 
hrip la man mamding com- 
pilin' romultancy wi. Chaim 
lo rnovr out of secretarial rate tf 
interested in nmpmm. r 
Ctf-OOO. Rmq OI 493 8824 
Judy Farouhanon Ltd. rftec 
const. 47 New Bond Sffvrt- 
London Wl. 


COMPUTER 

APPOINTMENTS 


mimui— ) - New York 
o p e n t n y*. AH dts c tp Bnes. Ev 
(raln rehnbuned. C.V. to; 
Darmstadt. PO. Box 333. Ra- 
dio our Station. New York. NY 
10019. 


A THOROUGHBRED AMONGST BANKS. 


EXECUTIVE CREME 


CAREERS OPEN EVENING 

PRICE WATERHOUSE & CLIENTS 


If you are a recently qualified accountant, this is an ideal opportunity foryou to 

explore career development options: 

m Within the profession as a senior in audit tax, consultancy or insolvency, in 
the UK, Europe orftirther afield. 

•Asa management consultant forthose with between two and seven 
years post-qualification experience either within or outside the profession. 
These posts will require you to demonstrate the maturity, experience and 
interpersonal skills required of senior professional advisers. 

• With FW Clients, providing openings in all areas of industry and commerce. 
Vacancies exist in Corporate finance, Internal Audit Line Accounting, 
Management Services and Project Accounting. 

To find out more about this evening to be held on Thursday16 October, 
please telephone Mike Jennings on 01-407 8989 or complete and return the 
coupon below. 


Price Waterhouse 



Please register me fertile Careers Open Evening on 16 October1986 and send me a copy of 
your Career Development brochure. 

To: Mike Jennings, NAME — — 

Price Waterfwuse, ADDRESS 

Southwark Towers, 

32 London Bridge Street, 

London SE1 9SY 

Telephone: 0 V 407 8969 ^ _ _ — ■ — 


LEGAL PA 
CONVEYANCING 
c£10,000 

We arc a mcd'rum shed and friendly firm orSotioion wiita 
pfcssnni offices in Ihc heart of Si James's. Wc currently 
have a vacancy for an experienced conveyancing 
Scneiary/PA for a charming Fanner who likes lo defcxUc 
as much as passible. Good shorthand and audio skills 
required plus WP experience (crass training onto our 
Famine system will be provided). Own office. LVs. STL 
and - reviews a year. 

flMvmBtafr 

Miss A J. Clay, 

AMHURST BROWN 
MARTIN & NICHOLSON, 

2 Dolce Street, Loudon. SWIY 6BJ 
61930 2366 

(NoAtwta) 


P JL SECRETARY 

Excellent salary & monthly bonus. 

A dynamic West End investment company 
require intelligent and committed people 
to join our team. 

Ring Alison Montgomery on 
01 409 0271 

or write to; 

Knight Williams €* Company Ltd. 
33 Cork St, London WlX 1HB. 

No Smokers! 


SOUTH HARROW - £10,500 negotiable 

We are seeking a smartly presented, personable 
PA/Secretary, (minimum A level education) with good 
secretarial skins and knowledge of wort processing to 
work for the Deputy Chatman of an expanding Property 
Development Company. Car driver essential. 

We offer salary circa £10.500, 

4 weeks holiday aid free BUPA. 

Please send your CV as soon as possible to 
Cindy Strickland 

THE RIORDAN GROUP LTD 
RIORDAN HOUSE 
23-25 NORTHOLT ROAD 
SOUTH HARROW 
MIDDLESEX, HA2 OLS 


PERSONNEL $ \ 

# RECRUITMENT CONSULTANT £ 

0 £20k PACKAGE % 

ti' Enjoy a dtatengfi? Then develop your talents wtlhn this we*- %■ 
known imemationJ Reoutnwrt Company. We will Dam you » fit 

* become pan of a successful team who are highly stated to yy 
■v matching applicant aid chert secra&nai retpjrarnwrts. 

: Based m H amm e r smith. the position demands a lugMy sell- : i 
motivated, conscientious person with a flair tor deafing with -A 
people and the ab*ty ta operate effectively under pressure. 

H you want to be pan of this tast-momg company caH ROM 
p v HWWSHJE on BT-22T 5872. ?€ 

* V» 

^ ; THE DRAKE INTERNATIONAL GROUP 


TRAVEL TO NEW YORK 
£12,000 + CAR 

If you are (poking for a big challenge, have no comretments. 
+ want a real assistants rote read on: Previdaig complete 
backup to a young dynamic MD of an International Software 
House concerned vwtft the best Pfl. Advertising + Fashion 
cos you will nave to run the whole show, deal with con- 
tracts. own correspondence, travel to New York + Europe as 
necessary. Complete confidence + an ambitious go alidad 
attitude are the key lo this spectacular job where the sky b 
tody the fomt 25+ (typing skills). 

Changes Rec Coos ox 491 1255 


PA/ADMIN 
IN GERMANY 
to €12^000 tax fraa 

Superb opportunity in South l 


Superb opportunity in South Weft 
Germany with a tame imcmatkmXl 
company dose to the French and Lux- 
cmbore borders. This Director’s PA 
mua have fluent German for lots of 
.diem contact. A unique chance lo get 
more involved in admin, tor someone 
with a sound secretarial background. 
Age 24+ dean driving licence, lax free 
salary and shopping. 


Wanted! 

CITY SEC 
WITH FRENCH 
C £12,000 + Benefits 

PcrfcclfonBU. mother to n g ue standard 
secretary whh excellent shorthand and 


typing tor US merchant bank. Superb 
working conditions in fast, booing at- 
mosphere tor the right applicant, who 
will.be 100% comm riled tea vital sup- 
portive role 10 charming (and 
desperate) boa whim corporate 
development 



| 01-491 7100 

SENIOR 
SECRETARY/ 
BUSINESSWOMAN 
£ 11,000 p-a. plus 

We are looking for 
someone to take on 
trie overall job of ad- 
ministrator, lettings 
manageress!), Telex 
operator, receptionist f 
and general 
‘gruppenfurirer 1 of a 
nevriy established 
Kensington furnished ! 

office suite complex. 

Must be smart in ev- 
ery sense of trie word 
and keen to work on 
own initiative to im- 
prove income by fl 

results achieved for H 

the company. 1 

For fall detftta caH fj_ 

Euan Cameron on 
(01) 937 8834/8830 1 — 


CITY PA~ 
TO £11,000 

The fact mat your boss 
is a good daiagator who 
wU bust ycRjr judgement 
and expect you to use 
your initiatfva makes ttiis 
the job to taka you be- 
yond a purely secretarial 
rate. If you are wefl spo- 
ken, wm presented and 
are ready to hancfie con- 
fidential work for an 
international director this 
is your opportunity. Age 
25-35 WP ex perie n ce. 

SPARES 


■Dterei m-a® 3SB 

SENIOR SEC 
£11,500 

* eftanreng group cowd 
atecur of a renownea 
KWMn vgansMon reams 
moot 5Wr#»v »*b W Biotota 
4 M smsxvtng lotv uWwg 
nw aoomanc ore) WBine# 
4IM»«5 oumi you 

U'eer nujisooiffiegrai 
, Oermcsi makmg ne3 jna noth 

po*e nwrestro ana 
»muUtmC| ConMMsare 
1 #w**vioiw«9ed3IM0j|v*». 

taMMscft 

81 631 5045 
Crawford Recraflmeo! 


> | j 01-4917100 1 

ADMINISTRATIVE 

PA/SECRETARY 

Remuneration negotiable and 
performance related c£UL500 

Required to organise and run the ad- 
ministration of a fast expanding City 
based computer company, which pro- 
vides services tO the financial 
intermediary. Word processing, to- 
gether with good all round secretarial 
skills are necessary. 

This job is what you make it. 

Ring or write Christopher PoH 
Opal Statistics, 6th Flow, 

18 Finsbury Circos, 

London, EC2 

01 588 6106 


Senior 5ec/PA 

to £12,500 

Leading fresh foods d is t ribu tor seeks Sec/ PA to 
Finance Director: This is a senior appointment re- 
quiring sound secretarial experience and profes- 
sional acumen. Based in EC! you will enjoy your 
own office, a range of forge-company benefits 
and the freedom to develop this key position. 
Trie typing burden is not onerous aria indudes 
private correspondence. Skills 100/60. Age from 
27 yrs. Please call 01-493 4466. 

mERSYWEATHER ADVERTISNG& SELECTION 


TO PLACE YOUR 
PERSONAL 
COLUMN 

ADVERTISEMENT IN 

THE 

TIMES 

TRADE ADVERTISERS 
TEL: 01-481 1920 
. ADVERTISING. ■ 

FAX NO. 01-481 9313 
TELEX'925088- " 

PRIVATE ADVEffTlSBIS r . 
TEU^ 01-481 4000 

USE YOUR‘ ACCESS OR BARCLAY CARD 


t* i 


i! •- . 

f ' 

I :: 



•W15 




THE TIMES TH URSDAY OCTOBER 2 1986 



HI 


LACE 




Plantation House, 
23 ”°od Lane, London EC3 
Tel: 01-626 55 82 


jkk ALFRED MA RKS 


SECRETARY WITH 
SHORTHAND 

An experienced secretary is required to work 
for one of the assistant secretaries of a 
professional association. This is a varied and 
interesting position which needs someone who 
has good organisational skills as well as 
shorthand, typing and word processing 
knowledge. The ability to take minites would 
also be an advantage. Age 22+ . 

■ Salary circa £9,000. 

Rease write with CV to 

Stephen Tidman, 

British Dental Association, 

■ 64 Wirapole Street, London W1M BAL 

No Agendas 


SENIOR SECRETARY 
MANAGEMENT CONSULTANTS 

lip to £9,500 p.a. 


Based m Kntohtsbridge, you wfll be utffising your short- 
hand ml typing skBs, arranging travel and undertaking 
research work. You will be relied upon to deal with 
clients, so an excellent telephone manner and smart 
appearance are essentiaL Some WP experience useftd. 
Benefits Include 4 weeks hob, LVs ana Me assurance. 

Please contact Debra Heokf, 

Alfred Maries Recruitment Consultants, 

62 Brampton Road, London SW3 
Tel: 01-584-8166 


ALFRED MARKS 


IK R8YAL ASSOCIATION HB HUHUIY AM IBUMfHTIM 

Has A vacancy for an Infonnation Officer to deal with awry 
da i tatephanaftattfir enctumts-an matters effecting ffenthtorl 
people. The abWy to type is onsdMaL 

Salary NJC Scale 3-5 (£8.001 - £10.611) 

■job Description and Appfcafcm Form statable tram the 


Office Manager 
RADAR 

25 Mortimer Street 
London, WIN SAB 

RADAR is an equal opportunities employer 


AUDI0/C0P Y/WP OPERATOR 
IMPORT AND EXPORT 

Up to £7,000 p.a. 

A moor national ratal group needs your reSafais copy end 
audtosMBs at their smart Head Office in the heat of the West 
End. Their busy import/export department has a vacancy for 
a person who enjoys working with figures end baa good 
telephone manner, smart appearance, and an abfirty jp oper- 
ate a Wang word processor. Rewards package Includes 4 
weeks hols and subsidised canteen. 

Please contact Jane Shirley, 


115, New Bond Street, London W1 
Tel: 01-493-1251 


M^ALFRED marks 


PA + 

£9,500 NEG W1 

To ao as PA to 2 Directors of lively PR Cond ""P"* 
and rut. office, ideally bemt enff -J^wiili sound adrnm and 
«c skills- Must hare kno«ledBe of wp. 

Six »«** hoK. BUPA. travel ms. 

For details *d»hoae 

Jenny Flatman 01 888 4050. 


admims%ator 

c. C11JJO0 + Mat S«0 

American Banking Group, new 
to Lo«on and in HJpa trwer 
sme ipcataxi sack an wnwsi 
nantWate whose respomoi- 
**5 «hU m tsW to « 

luc eoanssn pfctn s.__thjS 

posh™ 

me and eraflnere«dSrereury 
looking to prop®* 3 - " 8 * ‘ ,+ 

Can 01-631 5045 
Crawford 
Recruitment 


l ■ ! I I ■ d 




nTJ:<rM.v y J 



W HIJMAN 



Estate Agents with 16 offices in West 
London require a Secretary/PA to a Se- 
nior Partner based in Ealing. 

Must be well-spoken, well-presented 
and able to work on own initiative. 

Tel: Margaret A GSroy 
Personnel Manager 
on 994-7595 for 
further details 


Secretary/PA 

to Managing Director 

c £9,000 pa- + Car 

Recruitment Berkshire 

A posinon of respofttibOitY for an effidear, «tf- 
nuxtatnl individual setting meal uwdueroent. 

You mus be 

t Professional and Hard-working 
• Well educated and ambinooi 
6 Able to work under pleasure in a small tram. 
ITiou have a sense of humour and are a confident 
effeenvr communicator, phone Tina Carpenter on 
(0625) 73212 or (01 1 993 4676 (evet/wtoub) or write tee 
7»mJi^ Girting, ftecnrfti B got ^ pprialic/i, 

62 King Street, Maidenhead, 

Berkshire SL6 1£Q. 

Z UNDEL GIRLING 


HEADMASTER’S SECRETARY 

requred a boys' Preoarauxy School (Bcanftng and D ay340 pupils). Good 
aufio trpmg, ashy to runs tnsy attic* and s e cra a nal atpenence essaroaL 
Rat ivatiue. Safety by i/r ang cment 

Apply with C.V.. names, addresses and ufeptane numbers of 2 refanees to: 

The Headmaster, 

Monkton Combe Junior School, 

Bath. Avon BA2 7ET. 

(0225) 837912. 


OIL COMPANY SECRETARY 

£10,000 p.a. 

Put your WP training to good use In this wefl re- 
waroad position at the Hoad Office of a leading multi- 
national oN company in the Westminster area. 
Secretarial experience and excellent shorthand and 
typing state wfll be hiteily appreciated in a depart- 
ment offering varied duties. The exceBant salary is 
enhanced by subsidised restaurant facilities and 
generous holidays. 

Please contact Linda Hemink, 

Alfred Marks Recruitment Consultants, 
133 Victoria Street, London SW1 
Tel: 01-828 6886 


ALFRED MARKS 


SENIOR PERSONAL 
SECRETARY 

SALARY cjC1O,O0O 

We are a araaD head office ip the City, managing a 
number of companies involved in industry and 
investment. One of our young senior directors is 
looking for somebody special to organise and 
manage his busy and diverse schedule. The suc- 
cessful applicant win have excellent secretarial 
skills including solid WP/PC experience, prefera- 
bly IBM. They win be smart, weD -spoken, 
discreet and tactful, with the confidence to deal 
with people at all levels. Probable age range 25-35. 
If this is a description of you and you are looking 
for something different write with your C.V. to 
BOX CIO. 



flH«nTflcom 


RESTAURANT 

RECEPTIONIST 

Leading West End Rsh 
Brasserie requires young, 
charming, smart enthusi- 
astic, sales orientated 
receptionist- 4 evenings 
and 2 lunchtimes per 
week. Good career 

prospects within this 

expanding Company. 

PHONE 

8394880 


IMMEDIATE 

START 

In presti^ous West End bro- 
kerage for determined seif- 
motivated. over 25 yew 
olds, who require substantial 
rem u neration and excellent 
prospects. 

CaU Ms Rayburn en 

01-493 3199 


SECRETARY 

Secretarial position 
available in small London 
office of International 
professional firm tor an 
enth usi atic, hard working 
and cheerful person who 
win enjoy working as part 
of a team. Post wM 
require abftty to take own 
(native. Typing speeds 60 
wpm (Word processor 
traming wiB be provided.) 
Salary £6.000 plus LVs. 

Sari CV to: 

im Bento, 
MaMiewt-Oadei 
b temafienal (lmtdofl) LM, 
IfltermttoMl Howe. 

26 Creecfrarch Lana. Losdoa 

EC3A5E0 




SHORTHAND 

SECRETARY 

£9,500+ 

For international trading company near 
Si Pauls. Skills 100/60. some admin. 

For more details please telephone: 

01 236 3695 ex 30 


SENIOR P.A. 

UP TO £12,000 

High rewards await you at this small yet successful 
investment company in the West End. They are look- 
ing for someone who possesses management 
potential in addition to reliable WP and secretarial 
state, as much of your time will be spent assisting in 
the administrative affairs of the company, 
in addition to the generous salary, benefits include 4 
weeks hols and bonus. 

Please contact Gaye NevBJe, ■' 
Alfred Maries Recruitment Consultants, 

29 Duke Street, London W1. 

Tel: 01-486-6717. 


'ALFRED MARKS 


EA. TO GROUP 
CHAIRMAN 


^ Biwater is a leading 
international construction and 
engineering group with its modem 
head office based in Dorking, Surrey. 

& Our Group Chairman 
needs a first-dass confidential PA to 
manage effectively the secretarial and 
administrative workload. . 

The e vef changing 
priorities of this interesting and 
responsible position require a 
resourceful approach and the ability 
to stay calm and cheerful in an often 
demanding environment 

® Aged over 26 your 
experience, gained at a senior level, 
must be supported by a strong 
academic background and formal 
secretarial training (100/60). This is a 
high-profile role and a good standard 
of personal presentation and 
communication skills are essential. 

# We offer a very 
attractive salary and excellent range 
of benefits. 

$ For an application form, 
please contact Barbara Mathewson 
on 0306 888188 or send full evto 
her at Biwater Limited, 

Biwater House, Station Approach, 
Dorking, Surrey RH4 1TZ. 




Biwater 


FASHION SECRETARY 

Up to £8,000 p.a. 

Your drive and energy wfll be at home with these manu- 
facturers of quafity shoes and fashion accessories In 
Northwest London. YouU be using your excefent short- 
hand and wfll be reled upon to Base with retail outlets. 
So you must possess' a good telephone manner, to- 
with drive and energy. Benefits include 4 weeks 
LVs, and subsidised canteen. 

Please contact Margaret Widd, 

Alfred Marks Recruitment Consultants, 
Cresta House, 129 Hnchley Road, 
Swiss Cottage, London NW3. 

Tefc 01-722-2298 


ALFRED MARKS 


PUBLIC 

RELATIONS 

SW1 

* Busy MD rcqnrm nptn- 
cnccd S/H sec wishing job 
imohemret. 

Safety £9,500 

Ring Maria. Bind at 

RPL 

01 588 6722 

(agy) 


WP/SEC 

c£ 8£00 

Ideal opportunity for a 
cons o enbous and 
dedicated secretary to 
demonstrate versatility and 
organisational skins for a 
snail marketing company 
in Berkeley Square. 

Contact 

A. MJcaHeS on 
01-283 7727 


Executive Assistant 


! IfleSeaeUrToflfeCMpBaiin 
and Oak to ite Gonraon of ties 
charity is sttkmuiiepcri 

Tie pod mar nil m 

Apmored secretary willt an 
aptitodeferaspitenffhe 

attsdeothal sfe(erfe)is nafl; 

| le fekf m falter riollatK, mi 
| oohotenumkrtoftbediaritt's 
1 office, hrtabo in dnliag lift 
! donors deutnbaad special 


Caobtaes are bW> totemne 
than 23 jtars old, arid rati be able 
to ctA in a small team witoE 
isdnidoal caBtrib&lioaaod 
iaitufivc are required, Rear 
apply Kili full career and 
e rtnotka al dt iafeta- Mtufoy 
Butbr.Qfnti'Orpha 
Corporation. 37b Inf Ho Street 
lYesboi&sUt .London SHIP 3QL 


PROMOTION 
TV SALES 

EinwanSwsOKMiNni 
kcernw 1 1 lOOito i W a w» 
tac-v twnwqraiCc LV^M^es 

v*r, MU IMMner anBi 

Eic<*ww ne$ 

Loadn Tews Staff Borera 
01-B36 1934. 


CAN YOU MANAGE 
AN OFFICE? 

SALARY £9,500 IE6 

Are you seriono employment 
with lesponatatity and pros- 
pects 9 We are looking tor a 
PA to join our m tema tio na t 
office m Mayfair. Applicants 
must have excellent personal 
qualities - self motivation, 
atjifity to take rssponsdMt- 
itres. use own initiative, be 
well organised and of pleas- 
ant disposition.' languages 
useful. Please apply m writ- 
ing with cv fa 

lonane Wrftems. 

MFL Elertrontc Ltd_ 

47 Upper Grosvenor Sheet 
London W1X 9PG. 

(NO AGENCIES) 


ITALIAN 

Management 
Consultancy 
cf9A00 plus 
benefits 

A leading European 
Management Consultancy 
requires a secretary for its 
Mayfair office. 

Yon should lave first 
class shorthand/ typing/ 
W.P. skills, capacity for 
working under pressure, 
flexibility and the abihiy 
to communicate well with 
clients and colleagues flu- 
ently in English. Italian or 
a second European lan- 
|ua 0 i Preferred age 23- 


International 

Secretaries 


S0UTHERBYS 

FURNITURE 

DEPARTMENT 

Sotheby's have a 
vacancy for a secretary 
witn excellent shorthand 
and typing skills rrwn 
90/60 to work for their 
cataloguer of English 
Furniture. Varied duties 
involve contact with 
clients, arranging visits 
and helping to prepare 
valuations. Mininm 2 
years experience. Salary 
range £7250 - £8500. 
Please sead your CV Is 
Ike Pusoenel Department 
Sotheby’s, 

34-35 New Bond St 

London W1A ZAA. 


THE PROFESSIONALS 



ED 


enpbyment 


announce seme 

GOOD NEWS 

OUR NEW BRANCH WILL BE OPENING 
AND WORKING FOR YOU 
ON MONDAY 6th OCTOBER at: 

54 SOUTH MOLTON STREET (1 st FLOOR) 

Are you seeking a new challenge or a complete change 
altogether in these areas:- 
WP Secretaries; 

WP Operators; Shorthand Secretaries; 

Audio Secretaries; Copy Typists; Telex Operators; 
Accounts Clerks; Administration Secretaries. 

We are able to provide a comprehensive, confidential and 
effective recruitment service of the highest quality for 
professionals who appreciate the expertise of the 
specialist 

ff you are looking for Staff or seeking a new position 
come in and meet us. We are here to help you. 

Cal! in or telephone us now on 

01-4914610 




ED 


efnployment 


SECRETARY 

requred as soon as possible 
to tom an international eco- 
nomic consultancy based m 
WCl. You wdl be . working 
for 2 busy sale managers 
who need the assistance of 
a competent secretary. WP 
experience an advantage. 
Proficiency m Sparest) es- 
sential. Good French or 
German useful. Please 
phone for fattier informa- 
tion Renee Landaw on 
01 Z78 0414. 


PUBLISHING 

Secretary required 
for MD of book 
publishing company 
in Covent Garden. 
Good typing and 
shorthand 
essentiaL 
Please apply 
in writing to: 

Abo Brown, 
George Philip & Son, 
27a Floral St, 
London WC2E9DP 
No Agencies. 


£11,000 + BENEF IT S 
Bf-LMQUAL 
GERMAM /ENGLISH 

MSk 2530 10050‘WN»,MWe* 
earn tf gmqoa C tf» Cn Son* 
gBP OT igq wwu *> iwagr 
Uoa of yo> t*ne «a h amaoi 
ovraaw on am ktsan nom* 
-ort Not) it acerb) persnMv 

4*BC i UfO 

no* 4J7-U7S m 73i<J7n 

m Briwd TTirnf Be c«k. 

MILLER McNISH 


MEDICAL SEC/ 
ADMINISTRATOR 

Experienced Secrasry for 
busy Harley Street practice. 
Good references essential. 
£ 10.000 p.a. 

01-486 5787 


ENVIRONMENTAL SECRETARY 

Up to £9,000 p.a. 

Use your initiative to good effect with these manage- 
ment consultants deafing in environmental impact 
studies for governments and industry worldwide. WP 
skffls are essential, and cross-training can be pro- 
vided. Good telephone manner and a dear, analytical 
mind are important qualities for Joining a busy team 
on ecologicaDy important work. Benefits 
4 weeks hols and plenty of job satisfaction. 

Please contact Robert Reina, 

Alfred Marks Recruitment Consultants, 
124, Baker Street, London W1 
Tefc 01-486-1576 


ALFRED MARKS 


The Middlesex Hospital Medical School 

APPEAL ADMINISTRATIVE 
SECRETARY 

required to work for one year initially in the Appeal 
Office. The secretary will undertake a wide range of 
admmisJrative/secretarial dirties working with the Direc- 
tor. Candidates should be self-motivated, flexible and 
enthusiastic, ideally with a background in PR. Ability to 
type is essential and experience in book-keeping would 
be helpful, but not essential. Salary on the scale £7,278 
- £8.632 oer annum. Generous holidays. Please send cv 
to: Mr R P Gould. Appeal Director. Hie Middlesex Hospi- 
tal Medical School. Cleveland Street London W1. Tel: 
01-636 8333. ext 3407. 


PERSONNEL SECRETARY 

£8,500 p.a. 

Your cheerful pereonafity and personnel experience 
w 9 be regarded as assets at a successful hotel 
organisation in South West London. You'n be working 
m the personnel department assisting with recruit- 
ment This wfll involve you in interviewing candidates, 
as well as utilising your 8tiorthand,typ<ng and WP 
skills. This confidential work offers an organised, effi- 
cient person benefits including 4 weeks hols and LVs. 

Please contact Patty Harrison or Lydia France, 
Alfred Marks Recruitment Consultants, 

215 Kensington High Street, London W8 
Tefc 01-937-3603 


ALFRED MARKS 


THE TIMES 


EXECUTIVE CREME 


APPEARS EVERY THURSDA Y 

For further details 
TEL.: 01-481 4481 



l/uu 

OF 


ITU 


The Time* Classified 
colsrens *>* nsd by IJ 
million of the most affluent 
people in (be country. The 

following categories 
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Eri acitim : University 
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Comparer Hortons: Computer 
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Lettfcl Ln Crime for top legal 
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Property. Resid en tial. Town & 
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Antiques and CoilectaUes. 

THURSDAY 

GeMfil AptiOteneats: . 

Management and Executive 
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I* Cmr fete Creme aod other 
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Motors: A complete car buyer's 
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war daytime phone number. 
CUSTOMER SERVICES DE- 
PARTMEMT. If you have any 
queries Of proMon retanng to 
your advertisement onee u has 
appealed, please eonna our 
Customer Services Depaiuwnt 
by telephone on 01-401 4100- 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


rnuDRlt iwr n: \LE-jwanv 
□(IRIS Cot* ORLY uce TE4LC- 
ta louu hli' «>t (A Tnurkjw park 
P' l .irt ant Dulwirh. London 
si ?! i tint -M LiM OuN-Kh on 
pnn ireruarv t‘ M t J , 

iL slain JlMtll Clb.OOOi 
TUn iuoUwt of fhn atravc-itainrd 
■v iroupsiM to apply to lie* Tire 

sivx Nntmlor iBVj. 

.\niw - Chambers 38 Bi wdw.iv 
London SU IH “ IS liUlllW Wtorll 
iln- Th-.i-.iiiv Sown™ (MV wvr 
slrps tn .nlpunisirr llw rsUln 

DO veil llki* rhiMiifi jna mraire’’ 
OinrMIkn fhcwlir Inr Ctiil 
dim n-is a erqulalion lor Imp 
uualilv rotm alicm.il llwaln* taf* 
■ml -i vnlunlcre lo IhHb win 
nui l imrii-n-iiMi Campaign we 
mii mi pwmr* to lie omon 
•>hn tola-. HP urn. iiUrnrolllig 
,iMl rinliin ilwilleniF Form 
im n union phann Ol 241 2942 


SERVICES 


CAPITAL CV» pnikiir nnhawu 
lv nimrulum nUH 01 bO? 
7*w» 

BURGLAR : IM PROTECTION 

\ vvirr itiv srrurHv sv-vtrfn 
■ Mini ill I imu 01 730 2235 
FRIENDSHIP, Lam or Marrm 
til -hips, (lifts Ddtellnc* DnH 
•Liiei 21 vimiurtnn Road Lon 
rtm> VvH TH Ol <>38 lOI I 
CALIBRE CV*S till proInMOiul 
riuiH ilium viloc* itnrumcnfc. 
Drl.nK Ol 031 3388 
TV HOTEL loi UKliisttp rlMiior 
,ium sLivs Tldiftloinuliiin 

J.fl UillV (.IM Rllrtd PiisIMTII 

M.indirMn TH Oe-1 77A 3573 
DRINKING PROBLEM - wl It 
mil ww hnoip ll»p l«-4ivi* w 
von al 57 bPd sppnalivd 
nnrsinu honvr lot addirlm* div 
imst vi in hiim of nuKkindinq 
ll.UIV.ll DMUlV Staffed BV 
nuru-. eaurrsHlorx. psvrtvofo 
wl. ptiiMOinnapnl and 
rrsirfrnl ninlical offirrr For il 
Insiiadrd oiovpprlus contact Ihe 
■InrrliH. Cloud-i HOUM-. Ldl 
K'navle Wills SP3 OflC or tote 
plmm* 074783 055 
SELECT FRIENDS. Cxduwr in 
■•■Hlurlions lot the mMUrlnl 
58 M.iddas sum London W 1 
IrlrtMHHiP 01 9957 

NEW JUMBO Colour Cdtalogu*- 
linra Ltvp world teadinq T v 
s|mvmIis|s Now vtllh T V 
iwhipK TiuiHfomMlwn Ool 
773 3573 

HEART to HEART. Todays way 
■H mnliin Conlidriiual intro 
dur lions ihrouunoul IK tor 
I nnnklup .Mid fttarriogr Hisin 
III Hi-iiTl. 33 London Rrt. Twirl, 
mliani. MuM\ 01 ITO 3051 
SELECT rmCMOS. Exrluxivr in 
lluliirlmts loi l hr ufWMUchrd. 
58 Maddox Sum. London Wl 
t Hronoiir Ol 493 0937 


LEGAL SERVICES 


CONVEYANCING bv fully quail 
luxl Solicitor-. (1180 + \ AT and 
xlandaid linUMiinih ring 
0344 510348 


MUSICAL 

INSTRUMENTS 


PIANO ColLnd and Couard 5ft 
oi.iiiiI \rrv good ronddion 
£1.07SonO Ol o07 5307 c-\rx 


THE PIANO WORKSHOP FREE 

nndil «nrr l »rar «APR D»«1 
Low mlnnl ralrx me* 2 years 
i\PR 4 5 .1 A 3 years lAPR 
I3 3'.» te. niton quoumoov 
Free Caiatoqur 30a Hiotigalr 
Road SW5 Ol 367 7671 
Z BEAUTIFUL Brrtnlrin Grands. 
miBJium uisirionrnK good 
pner lor quick sale 580 4481 


CLUBS 


YOUNG CHELSEA BRIDGE club 
ami vhoot H840 aqr graupi 
TH Ol 373 Ib65 


SHORT LETS 


OCTOBER in London Owners- 
to mm rpmioi laMe 2 bedroom 
rtielsea flal av aitahle nobdav 
lets Orl/NM tow season Purr 
Horn Cl5Hpw Tct 0435 
873114 

SERVICED APARTMENTS In 

hi-uviugwm Col T \ 34 hr Sw. 
THrs Cnmnoham Apartment* 
Ol 373 fvSOo 

LUXURY SERVICED FLATS. 

renbat London from CS3S Jtw 
Rmq Town Hse 418x373 3433 
N3 3 nMNUh short IH 2 beds. Uv 
ing imnn. ktidien bathroom 
(W> pw i nr 34b 46B3. 
LHCN. Exclusive 3 bed IUI. new 
nun simerb rereo. CH washer, 
nwid Bitilh* 373 0753 


WANTED 


£25 per or UP lo p.ud lor silver 
■litotes £2*0 I** ot lot Hold 
Ml di.imnnd irwHIers hnuqhl 
Ml Hart Ol 4b0 MOW or Wnle 
Vbl Mairrev Road. London. 
v»-* \li LiMlaiul rnverrd 
JEWELLERY Cnkl Silver 
lhnmiuK inoenllv w.uilerl Too 
mins Williams 45 Lambs 
I TONlmt SI WCl Ol 405 8538 
RAF Oflif n wsrks small XH( run 
l.iilird IIjI neai MOD WhUelVall 
\1 ln ii ill L300 prm mi l? In 18 

mvailhs TelOI 718 0473 lOlliroi 


Spink 

RiniAUfae MoHnk 


Buy A War Medals 

todudbig OrcNm A DoeorNtao* 
Spink k Son Limited 
S-7 knip Sneer. Si JamevV 
U.ikVkv 5VV1 V bQS 
^ Tct- tll-Bjn 7MX tilt hourxi 


ANTIQUES & 
COLLECTABLE 


CHAISE LQKUE 
aad 

Z MATCH! KG CHAIRS. 

EarN Edwankan vitaie Pra- 
(esMnaUy imvaed. n 
Bei^an tapesTry Tree of Lda 


Also EOwantan Chan S25B. 

TEL40582) 862654. 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


We put 
an ad in the 
smallprint 
so you could 
stop 

another child 
making 
the headlines. 


P1e*e tend 1 dooM*?*® 
Dr. A. Cilmonr. hbKti 
rrf. 7l»).67baff«w»jSl!j 
London 


TTTF TTMF.S THURSDAY OCTOBER 2 1986 


PERSONAL COLUMNS 


TOR SALE 


OVERSEAS TRAVEL I - OVERSEAS TRAVEL 


BIG SCREENOv^-av 20 only 
?o nwli rd TW Iron* ««• 
l ultv qW- T"'*-,® 1 ‘J?'" 
Kloane 51 . SW 1 730 0933 


COSTGUTTERS OH lliqhlx/boix 

In | vrope. t SA A md-J dexlmh 
nnnx Diptomai Travel Oi 7» 
7201 AST A 1 VTA ATOL 


BRKHTS OF NETTLCMEO O 

imHnm xtorkx of 17iti i I8lh 
Cenlurv replica iu/ m lure for 
immediaie delivery InrlwtidB 
■VTlhui Brrtl. TUrnnwnh £ 
rvuyloin. wm Tillman. 
iwlllHirvI- new Henley on 

ribdlies 1 04 91 1 041115. 

Brairneinouin iO202) 2 43580. 
rum-ham- Devon I0392S71 
7443. Berkeley. Gkx rC453i 

810052 

A MAGMFKEfR BiUiard Tame. 
Pkm.pt Thurxton. cadttHHvd 
nak rarved oanrtv SH oi roes. 
KLdHiiiKi L«e Pool Srorehoard 
liorv BalK CamH surround. 
Co OOP ■ 0243i 773230 
nNEST niulllv wool rarpeW At 
Iradr pnrex and under. “* vo 

avaitohlr lOO'v exlra Laroe 
mom M/r rrmihttik under IwH 
mu nial pi ire Chancery Carpels 
01 405 0453 

SHERATON STYLE Olninq Ta- 
trim rliairs sidrboardv and 
ilexto. Calatoouev from wnnam 
1 iiiman. Crouch Lane. Borouah 
(been, knll 0732 883278. 
THE TIMES 178 5-ISOS. Olher 
liliex avail Hand bound ready 
■oi pi mentation also 

iM.>«d ii*- r i a fin Pn m um hw 


HOT Turkey holidav-x iron* «TS 
1 m 2 wkx al liearh toUrtx 
oufl /nr varhl oi 320 »005v Ol 
737 3Bol '24 MSI. 


-Sundae*." C12 60 Remember 
When OI b88 0323 
TICKETS FOR ANY EVENT. Cats. 
Hiarhohi t-xn. Chrxv Lex Mb. 
ah I he. Mi e and *porls 
TH. B21 bb lb/ 828 -04 96. 

■V E.X / Viwi / tJmerx. 
BtRTHDAT DUE T Give someone 
an ofiouval Times Newxoaper 
Haled Ihe very day they were 
, town LI? 50 0402 31303. 

OLD YORK FLAGSTONES.- rob- 
l me mIK Hr Nationwide 
drill me. TH >03801 850039 
■WlllM 

CATS. CHESS. Lex Mr All toe 
alre .vnrt gull TH 439 !7b3 
VII mainr rredil nh 
PIANO. LnviHv small upnqhl Ml 
rl.es rend Tuned L3TS Can 
an amir delivery Cl-453A)l4a 
YORK FLAGSTONES tor pABoi 4 
dnvewav-v. Liqlddalion sale. TH 
Obi 223 0681/ObL 251 6785 


FLATSHARE 


CLAPHAM Common prof female 
i im laiqe lux house, o/r. xil 
rinm. 2 ualhrmx. all amemliev 
C4b pw TH. Ot 248 981 1 ext 
241 3 day Ol o22 9©41 evev 


W3. PrH M/r lo share lux houte 
r:/H O/R doulMe Close lo AC 
Inn town lube *5 minx I CAS to* 
un-V iiuIumvc TH. Ol 942 
5HI9 irvesi 


PROF M Share house ofi Oilswir k 
Hnh Road Own room tiDO 
pun .-xr tolK TH. Oi 99S7315 
levixiimr-i 


PUTNEY - German spnakinq or 
Aineiiron lemale. O/R in luxu- 

rv river view llal. C60pw Btr 
OI 437 0434 Exl 2410 


SWS Plot r to share large room 
in xoaneus llal near lube 
L57 50 pu exrl. TH 01 373 
7473 lailer 4pmi 


CHELSEA pro! f wauled for lame 
loom m luxurious nvanonnelle. 
LSopiveXH Tel 351 0757 pm 


OVERSEAS TRAVEL 


WANTED Edwardian, lirlurun 
.nut all n-nnled lunillure Mr 
\sniun 1">I 94 7 594b bb7-Ob9 

Gan all Lane CarMield. SW 17 

ROYAL DOULTON Ton. Jugs. 
(Hni'ines amm.rts etc. wanl 
oil Ol 883 0024 


MBtOIIS 

MtfNqtf 

3/18 

4/10 

£119 

£129 

Mee 

Faro 

5/10 

5/10 

09 

£119 

Carte 

5/10 

E99 

Tfd Art « 

3/10 

on 

Nartm 

MoOT 

Usboa 

5/18 051 

6/ 18 £1291 
8/10 ee£B9] 


FOR SALE 


RESISTA 

CARPETS 

Special Offer 


Wwi t swortt i tine fctteh tWton 

80% viooL 20% nylon. Very 

beary ora* 12*t w de. 

12 pan colours from stock. 

£13.95 per sq yd + VAT 

255 Nmt RhRS field 

PBnon Green. SOT 

T«fc 01-731 2588 

fen bbnl»GvM Fung 


SAVE A PILE! 


Raista (tepafs 

HmuAin ntflier pfr arewi M 
Ulan emus fluB in wUertJr t2 
ode Wi" Hoc* 7ve>ne>jn- 
jrlff w ruprroi on« flouo 


ran CaKolad ort hies HBmi 
» 2^ oner Besi am are 
aren> 5fl* pr> scvfl Pofra 
gooes Ad t» UnjeJ SdciMfi Cf 
pfjpi iwwq * LmVAl pros 
auuvT ot uA 

25S ttn hr»B Raid 
■ Pnom Gro" 5WS 
Tft 01-731-2588 
Uft rswufes Eon Famg 


British Heart Foundation 

j Theheartresearch charity. 


102 Gloucester Place, 
LonaonwiHflDH. 


CHEAP FLIGHTS Europe world- 
wide GHIEdqe Travel. ABTA 
Oi 839 3033 Uinq An<i*e 


BEST Farm. Best nepito Best 
hOHdaw anywhere Sky Trav 
H 01 834 7426 ABTA 
HONG KONG MBS. BANGKOK 
■ C3b9 smnaooie C457 omer 
fl. fines 01 584 6014 ABTA. 
ROME IJxbon C99. Franklun 
Pans C60 LTC. 01329 
iilb/01 6B1 4513 ABTA 
SPAM PORTUGAL G REECE ; 
Flights FaUtor 01-471 0047 
ATOL 1640 Anwi/VM. 
STD/MCL C635 Perth C56S. All 
manr rarnrrx lo Aux/NZ. Ot 
684 7571 ABTA 
S. AFRICA rrort ObB. 01 584 
7371 ABTA. 


CHEAP FLIGHTS Worldwide 
Max market 01 930 1366 


DISCOUNT FARES WCTtowlde. 

Ol -434 0734 Juprter TravH 


OMCOURTED B GROUP FMRB. 

L T.v. open Sal. 0753 857035 


FUGHt BOOKERS Dtaenum 
kales woildwMle Ol 387 9100 


I LOW CoH Fares loLSV Main 
Tiavcl Ol 486 9237 IATA 


MALAGA. CA N AJHFS. Ol 441 
till Traidulw AWa AkH 


MOROCCO BOUND. Regent SI. 
Wl Ol 734 5307 ABTA/ AMI. 


SPAIN. Pori tout CtoNtpcxt lares. 
I B mules Ol 735 8191 ATOL. 


TAORMINA S*C*LV -Small 6 
li n-mllv - PrirvroiK-s from tl 71 • 
Clfl9 IB A Bi HoleK iTovsn or 
Beal hi irorn L219 C279 «HBI 7 
ntqfiis arrom lulls- inH Oalwtrk 
■lav niohts Tlie/Thur/Sun 
inrouqhaui Ort: Trarruera A 
aimorl tax ISLAND SLN. 01 
222 7452 ABT4/ATOL 
TRAVEL CENTRE World Wide 
nights soerialcunq in First. 
Oib Oaw. Economy, lo Aunlra- 


SWtt Plot person N/& to 
siwje IUI O/R BR 4 mim. W» 
letluu 1? nuns LIAO prm 
Lxrlusive TH Ol 947 4809 
i-VliH 5 W non 

TEDOINGTON. peal m. 28-r. n/s. 
own loom hi larqe furnished 
wHI cxnupped house Nr slobon. 
qmd an ess lo Oly C4S pw. 
Bo? 598b idav 1 979 6376 lev «l 
CHISWICK Prm I. n/s. o/r. to 
share lux toe tomse/qdn GCH. 
All mnt rmis C 170 PCM Exci. 
Ol 996 2006/381 6839 Eves 
CLAPHAM SW1I Lame comfort 
able loom in CM well eqinpoed 
hse Pial male C225 ocm tncl. 
TH Ol 223 9160 atler bpm 
FLATMATES Sofeciivr Snaring, 
well •■Man introductory secy ire. 
Pise IH IOC anw 01 589 5491. 
313 Bromplon Road. 5W3 
GRAD M/F Share soaCKWS rial 
5 nuns Beiuve. Crwen Tube. 
C40DW exrl TH 0707 328140 
LSI 33BO 

MM. IMalUle. resoorvwble. 
tool /or ad 2H* O/R Large 
fun ra- laud »toq* A* ail soon 
1. 170 prm i-xrl 469 33e9. 
TW1CKCNHAM 20 min W alerwro 
pror m/i In snare hrBjni CH 
rue n/i III nr n E200 prm 
I nr 024n3 3775 Ot W»2 9813. 
BECKENHAM Prof F to share 
IUI. flhie o/r. C250 PCM met 
TH 050 3158 aller 6pm 
CHISWICK. Edwardian me. QWH 
tort 0»R. nclulre. Non Smoker 
UO pw esc I 743 1778 Eye* 
CLAPHAM r. small o/r in IUI. Nr 
lube LllOprminrl Tel 01674 
31 So allot 6pm 

CLAPHAM Nrth person n/s rea to 
snare rami llal; o/r C46 pw 
OOP 3000 ex 3214 aflec 11am 
CLAPHAM COMMON o/r In \HV 
large his shared flat. C50 pw. 
TH 223 24bl leventnOM 
CLAPHAM COMMON. M/F. n/s. 
with pro* M. m lube o/r. CISO 
PCM UK Ol 622 0855 6 30pm 
HARLEY Si Wt large secured 
toxi sit loom Prol perwm RHs 
C?90 pm UK 435 0292 
HARLEY 51 Wl large xerxieed 
lre.1 sit room Prto person Rets 
E.-90 Pin inr 935 02«2 
MARBLE ARCH. Sunk- rarm in 
IruHv urnl house fial. C5I pw 
uirl Ol 439 6391 NS27 
SWB F. N/S O/R S mms lube, 
all Hind rons. E55 pw esc! Ol 
5M2 «A>98 > aller Opthi 
SWB. Large brrqhl studio room, 
wp balhroom in family home 
1,70 pw 35? 8896 
SW2 I 25* to share rami llal near 
<»*Td liairvoon O/R CI50 prm 
exrl TH 671 8090 eves. 

WX2 2 prof females share targe 
roam m luxurv nuwmrtle C35 
pw ftKh .01 7408843an6 00. 
CHELSEA Really super house 2 
gills lo share OI 351 6732 


LOWEST FARES 


Pam £60 N YOfl* £2*3 
FraNrfurr £60 LNSF CIS 
Logos £320 Mum C3Z0 
Narco* £325 Singapore £420 
Jo tug £460 Ba ngkok D36 
Cara £205 Karaanar MJ4 
DoiBton £335 Rangoon C350 
Hong Kong £510 Camas £425 
Hugo D acou n ta AvaO 
on 1st & CM) Class 
SUN A SAND 
21 SmtHom SL Ltotooo Wl 
01-439 21001437 0537 


9ydmy 
Auckland 
Jo’Burg 
Bangkok 
Tef A*fv 
New York 


0/W RTN 
£435 E75S 
E420 C789 
£305 £499 
£215 £355 
£105 £195 
£129 £258 


Los Angsta £190 £359 

TOP DECK 
FUGHT CENTRE 
01-370 6237 


DISCOUNTED FARES 
single man 

Jodur-Hr £300 Mo 

«»* rag 

Caao £150 CTO 

Lagos £2*3 060 

Bangkok £220 £350 

OouBa £420 

Afro Asian Tntral Ltd 


IU1 168 Ragan SL Wl 
TEL 01-437 82H/6/7/B 
Late & Grauo Bonk*xpW*o™ 


«ai VISA OIWRS 


GENERAL 


WEEKEND or Week*. Honey 
I moons at 2nd Hour* moons 
| Drum re Ihe Move of Maly's ro- 
1 - tnouur cities in 4utumn or 

Wintei CHI 01-749 7449 lor 
sow FREE colour brochure. 
Mamr ol Maly Depl T. «7S*u*p. 
I nerds Bush Green. London. 
I W 12 APS 

I TAKE TIME OFF to Parts. Am 

shs dam. Bnmck Brngn. 
Geneva. Berne. Lausanne. The 
I Haour D Linen Rouen, hou 
I kwne A Dieppe Time OH 2»- 
Chesler Clow . Lon don. SW1X 
780 01 235 8070 
CRETE 4 MARBCLLA Superb 
I to-arh villas A opts wtui onv 
DOOM 01 724 7776. Plena Holl- 
! claw, out 2136 


SELF-CATERING 

CARIBBEAN 


CARIBBEAN Lux villas, ants wilh 
prwls -wad Oct thru winter. 
X IIU World Ol 409 2838. 


SWITZERLAND Scheduled nights 
Ol 724 2588 ABTA ATOL 


SELF-CATERING 

BALEARICS 


MENORCA Holidays depanlnq 
Fndav /Saturday every week. 
Vhx/CM I ram CISO. Tel Ol 
JOd 7070 A 0622 677071 . C*U 
ir Hobdavs Alol 1772. 


lid. Sjoutn Alnra. U»A. Lisbon. 
faro. Geneva. AKo arromnto 
nation sum Alps. Lemon 
Coasts. AKtarve apart menu and 
private villas TH 01 059 7026 
ABTA 7319b 

AIRFARE SPECIALISTS Sydney 
o/w £420 rln C760 Auckland 
o/vv C420 rln C770 JoTiurq 
n/w f.3C6 rln £49q Lo* Auge 
Irsn/vt C216 Tin £406 London 
rimht O'litre 01 370 9332 

AIR Tickets Special fsls New York 
C.-M9 l a £549 Toronto 
1.270 Nairnto C329 Sidney 
£759 Auckland C749 Dari an 
130 Jecmv-n Street Ol 839 


SELF-CATERING 

FRANCE 


AUTUMN Breaks La. dinar nr 
Aiinrrv Aipute chafH. sed con- 
lamed aparls. Meal ski boh. TH 
i0242i b041 50/602124 


SELF-CATERING 

PORTUGAL 


MENOR C A. Tenmtc. Greek Is 
lauds. Algarve Villas Aptt 
PrnsKHis Tavernas. Holidays/ 
Flights Bror huT(~v/»o»*irw> 

V eulura Holidays. TH 0742 
331100 

CHRISTMAS in ihe Cananes 
Lan/arole/Puerio Ventura. 11 
On- 4 weeks C399. 0923 
771266 Timsway Hob ABTA 
ATOL 1107 

LATW AMERICA, low roil 
Ihqhls eg Rw £485 UlN 
C49& tin Also SmaQ Group 
HoittLiv Journeys leg Peru 

Il Dm £3501 JLA Ot 747 3108 
LOW FARES WORLDWIDE 
L6A. S Amenra. MM and Far 

Cost. 5 Alnra. TrayvaN*. 48 
Hirurrl SlreH. w I Ol 680 
?9?H 'Visa Arreplcdl 
LOW FARES TO Amerlra Aus 
IrjfiH A atm Zealand Tel. Ol 
9JO 2SSo Hermrs Travel 38 
Whitehall London swi 
ASIA 34R3X 

AMERICA FUGHTS wHh Man 
rhester drpariures Tel Travel 
Oulu- Blackburn UJ254I 
55257 ABTA 73196 
CYPRUS ' MALTA HoUHs A Apis 
Scheduled (Us Rom H'rgw 
Ring Pan World Holidays Open 
S4I Ol 734 2562 
EUROPE/WORLD WIDE towed 
lares on rhanm/wneduied n»s 
Pilot Fliqnl Ol 631 0167. Aqi 
AlOl 1R93 

LOW COST FLIGHTS. Most Euro 
poan desbualtans Nalexander 
Ol 402 4262/0052 ABTA 
61004 ATOL I960 
MIAMI. JAMAICA. N.TORK, 
Worldwide rheopesl fares 
Richmond TravH. 1 Duke St 
Richmond ABTA Ol 940 4073 
MPPONAIR Seal sale lo ISA Ca 
nMMVni For Eosi Australia Call 
Ihe wotiwsioiidls ABTA IATA 
rr exrepim Tel Ol 284 5788 
TUNISIA For your holiday 

where iK Mill summer Call lor 
our brochure now Tunisian 
TravH Bureau Ol 373 44||. 
ALICANTE. Faro. Malaga Hr 
Dm»nd Travel ATOL |7B3. 
Ol 581 4641. Horsham 98641 
ALL US CITES Lowest fares on 
nwior srheduted cantos Ol 
584 7371 ABTA 


ALGARVE ALTERNATIVE _ 
Tne Itnesl (muses lor rental. 73 
SI James SI. SWI 01 491 


ALGARVE. Lux vUUS/apts with 
pooh Sept. Orl A thru winter. 
Ol 409 2S38. villa World. 
AUTUMN Breaks in lovely fishing 
village Villas, rotlapes. arts. 
Brochure Comus ,04731 69039. 


WINTER SPORTS 


3SAT Skiing Hobdays. 7th Per 
son tree. January avadablity. 
Ring John Morgan now i0730j 
68621 >24 hryi 


SKI WEST - NEW! Special offers 
on tool IPS. RING FOR A DEAL* 
Also Other amannqtv low prices 
Marling al CS9. ask lor a COOV 
oi our luimper brorhurr iOH 
788 9999 Ahla 69266 AUK 
1583 


PRIVATE Catered ski chalet 
Steens 7/10 in Tiqnet near 
slopes. TH 01 086 3414 


SKI WMS ■ EXCITING OF- 
FERS' Just flDlng a chain for 
10 entitles you to a FREE holi- 
day any dale* Masses of other 
OJsr aunts far catered rlialetk 
Prves front tlW" S/r £69. 
Ring is now Ol 370 0999. 

SHI BONNE NBGE - ChrtNmas 
spertats to Courcheval only 
£239* FW a c hotel and 90 
FREE' Ring u> tor details Ol 
244 7333 

SKI TOTAL. Superb chalets, apts. 
hotels in Top French/ Aunrtan 
Resorts fr 861. 109321 231113. 

SKI vernier. Luxury flal lor 6 
Good central local tan Tef. Ol 
660 3446 or ,024027) 200. 

SK1WORLD Top Ski Resorts. 
Lowest Pnces from £89. 
ABTA Brochure: Ol 602 4826. 


Fmdrirt, sriMatai mi Ud 
ho 6 dayi.Bookhtfare 31 / 10 /M ta 
-UvawUalDKraBi 


OVERSEAS TRAVEL 


TRAVEL WORLD WIDE 

Swwl adw* Mfgudvce on 
muong long faii me ass. 

1S1 & duo a«S5 03/27 43559 


Xmas lo Carafe US* A g-a* en- 
sacs. 03777 43550 
AoS. fLZ S Far Eaastc 
0372 7 42739 

CummeroJ Acxaonf RBOFct 
01843 0711 

TRAVH. WORLD. 

MTK 72102. MHMr 81 OT 
tafiMtar Trawl ATnitaa. 


NEW LOW FARES 



Fly Savely 
Sept/Oct 
nights to 

F«m BARCELONA UMWD 
IBIZA MALAGA ALONIE 
ATHENS RHODES HHWKJJON 
mam oaiammi aatalya 
PUIS HUNT ODffl? OBTflUimS 
01-995 3883/4/5 
Simply Fly 

vltll 1922 


(AUTUMN « WINTER Hll 


rentals 


HARRINGTON CARDCre, 6W7 

V rrx bond value 1st Itocrflal 
ai rr tanking communal ganfetoj 
A wiih own pmale lecrace. 2 
beds, rrx rp (Umng had- study. 
II mi iwm/di. bain A *H w / 
075 pw Please conUrl bu- 
yonne Omwav a) Saunders of 
hmsunaon on 881 3b23 


NSW SUFCRB « A 2 Bedroom « 

eriiuve .voartmenls Rom 
< AAA nrm New I urn I lure Sau 
im. uimarntp. fiw pawpp 
poof Gvntnaxiura GurG Room. 
1 2 Fun Bainroomv Nr Sirtion a 

I hhaps 20 mtiis Wc-4 End A 
cm Call 464 0864/5 ‘Tl 


BEXLEYHCATM ■ London bor 
drrv | ge. lux. turn art bedroom 

dH ached maWOto-Ue. Kll/twlh- 

nui im. We Inoe. C/H. tele- 
phone, over looking goU fours*- 
L105 PW Pro! person /rouple 
oi rompanv TH. Ol JM 4466 


SLOANS SQUARE - Quin .sett 
i obtained furnished flM Oh low- 
rt ground. DCHtok- bedroom, 
hvina loom, kiifhrn A bNh- 
room. TH CH. 1 to w 
preferred tlJOnwTri Ot 689 
2814 


SUPER STUDIO wrllh greJI «le 
within Stahl of Hocrods. tor 

s om eo n e who win apprrriair a 
rarHuHv il rwone d Sihec and 
Mark ewv lran meriL C260 pw 
includes d«Uv mauf sees ire and 
oil healing and bghllnq lor • 
long term company lenant. To 
see tor. and other flats Uephoite: 
George Kntghl The Lrlboo 
Agent 689 2133. 

W14 - Nice. Ttghl fumtvhed gar 
den (To! off Brook Green. 
Hammersmith Com i'll tent for 
An por 1 4 Centre. DM Bedroom. 
Kllrheu/Duimg room. Slums 
mom with 2 sota beds. CH NKe 
person to rtran. £160pw Ring 
Chanrellor. Ol 602-2684. be- 
fore tOam or between 6pra A 
7pm. 

ELM PH Mansions SW10 Superb- 
lv fmed and beauUfudy 
presHHed flat all Kings Road. 
Dhk* bedrm. fge satmgrm with 
vda bed. 11 kit wim washmach. 
Irnkm/Ireeier. bath wilh show- 
er. rh. IH. Prcf. tong ro let. 
Oood value al £140 P.w. 244 
7563 

NEGOTIATOR. Dynamic, hard- 
working. 25/35. t« tom our 
successful reniai learn. Expen- 
enre preferred bul not esoenbaL 

Mini Be rar owner Apply in 
w ruing Quranhi ConsianUne. 
270 Earn a Ra London SW3 

9.VS 

WESTMINSTER SWI Except ton 
Hlv allrartiv c flat newly dec 4 
turn No expense spared. Meal 
lor OMe bedrm. toe rereo/ din- 
ing With balrooy. " Vfl Wilh all 

mar hi I trs 24hrs porterage, res 
la u rail I Loop ro IH £180 pw. 
244 7383 

AMERICAN EXECUTIVE Seeks 
lux flol/house: uv to CflOOpw. 

Lsual fees reo PhUUps Kay A 
Lewis. South Of Ihe fork. Chel- 
sea aflke. OI 3S2 8111 or 
North of Ihe Park Regent's 
Park Office. 01 586 9882. 
CLAPHAM C OMMON. Spacious 4 
bed. 2 ham house in prHty 
sireH off Common. Smartly 
decorated with aO mod cons. 
Suit 5 snarers al £46 pw each 

1 £226 pwk Buchanan: 361 
7767 

CRANLET CONS SW7 Superb 
soarious studio decorated to 
lugh standard Fully filled 
kitchen with all machine*, luxu- 
rv balhroom wun shower 
Long/short IH £200 pw. 
HOLMANS 370 6781. 

MARIA VALE W9 Tastefully furn 

2 stores- mews hse in gu*H lora- 
bon. 4 nedrms. 2' - baths > 1 en 
suite'. Il eat-in l*H with all ma- 
chines. uublv rm. toe L shaped 
rereo/diiuug. paved gdn. gge. 
Long co let £220 pw 244 7363 

WEST HAMPSTEAD Spacious, 
bright and rturnang 1st floor 
flat in *66. 3 dMr bedims, 
rerep/bedrmv reccp/diner. ff 
ML bath. WC gdn. Ifrt. 2<ihc 
porterage. parking- Avail 
Mimed. C200 pw neg. 244 7363 
ALWAYS an htlcresung. ran- 
jtanlly changing sHecUon of 
(urnMied ruts & houses al reals 
tram ClOOpw CbBOOpw ISK2. 
Ben ham A Reeves. Krnslngloo 
4 Central London 938 3622. 


01-584 5060(m M 


UP UP & AWAY 

Nairobi. Jo'Butj. Cairo. Dubai. 
tsunbuL Sinjatpore. KJ. Delhi. 
Bangkok. Ho™ Kon*. Sydney. 
Europe. & The Amencas. 

Flaminso Trarel, 

76 Shafte^rary Arenue 
London W1V 7DG. 

01-09 0102/01-439 7751 
Open SMwBay 1000-1300 


★AU. FUGHTS BONDED* 
**HUGE DISCOUNTS** 
★★TOURKT CLASS** 
**CLUB CLASS** 
**1ST CLASS** 
**AR0tMD THE** 
**W0RU) FARES** 


Ttie Cultural Experience’ 

to mnr ravmsmBoonmiacBpaH 
KTPnxnefbieomrgeHBe 
■M ra m iwobrieiawpnar 
Mgr fbaMtovtoS MredSCI (toa 
gPBH8f>ktaKMto«PWI 
aptor.(kp» C R R| Hd H ire l *«.«»r4 


esssss^i 

Itm WBtBttMtt TlW 


* STP’JV 

* F14TH 

* MOKfll 

* J03U°0 

* fLCvtAW 

* IUI 

* W<GVtX 

* SkEiFHS 

* 0U34 

* W £ASf 

* 

* ItHFATO 

* l ££SILE5 

* CiR.BHi'. 


SWITZERLAND 
FROM ONLY 


«• SOUTH AMtBCi 06 
* U5i » l‘S* * US* *US* * 

SUNWORLD TRAVEL 

(Erf* 1969) 

59 Snmh St. Epsom . Stum 


«im 


£99 RETURN 

Save wilh Swtssairt 
Super Apex. 
London lo Zurich or 
Geneva daily on con- 
venient afternoon 

flights. And daily 
flights to Basle 
(except Sundays). 
Book and pay 14 days 
before departure. 
Say in Switzerland 
at least until the . 
Sunday afteramvaL 
Bookings and full 
conditions from 
travel agents or 


More tow-cost flights 
via more routes 
to more destinations 
than any other agency 
PLUS 


Fast, expert. Mgh-tach 
miyicc - Ftbb worldwide 
hotel A csr hint pass 
• op to 60% tfixcotmts 
Immunisation, Insumice, 
Foreign Exchange, 
lltap A Book Shop 


42-48 Eerie Cowt Road 
London W8 6EJ 


) OPEN 9-fl UOUFm 9-C SAT I 


01-4379573 


12 lenroRD street, 

MAYFAIR.W1 

Wb art are ptoned id amm Me 


r ng w Hefrtonfc tncre w an 
a selection of knuyStoOO. 1 
1 2 Bed ooimenB meed 6 fta/s 
pw. 24 tour porterage. 

We torto «m b cant 


"STi” 

HERTF0RD8 
01-493 0887/409 2373 


PURSUE 

niGHTSBBBGE S»t 

rm UWWWBWJ Hals b HH 
tta pmwre dock oluMig Hyu* 

Pa*. 

wthn moments of Karroos. 


I 50lfM-racRiM.fecapim.sm 
i dswgim. 2/3 BatfL *wir/M 3. 2 
baths. <oe 1/1 W/blaami Mrel tor 
Pa Ejl Co Let 


bans. Ige 1/1 M/blast rm. Aval tar 
2-3 »ts. 04 XD Pa. Ek. Co LR 

STar M - ent Wl. 3 reap nns. 3 


beak 3 bate. Ige f/f M/Btat im. 
New 12 vr ease av* fien on app6- 
catan Co La cwh. 

HB1EBS8 ft HABDUG 


01 499 0868 


EARLEY 

vAca> 


WARWICK SQUARE. SWI. 

Superb 2 bed, 2nd Soar flat 
Avari mimed, fang co let, 
£20000 PW. 

PBfTWEHN ROAD. SW5. 

Afirac bit Des. 2 bed flat 
tong co let. avail immed. 
£2&.00 PW. 

QLIStS BATE, SW7. 
Centrally located, wry spa- 
exxs 2 bed flat, aw* irmied, 
bog Co Lbl £30000 PW. 

589 1244 


Keith > 
rCardale 
Groves 



* 1ELB0UWI * 

* BRJSaus * 

* AKLATO * 

* S Of IK* • 
*- aULlUTON * 
*PT MORSBY * 

* TO* TO * 
« IUMU * 

* BAHUN * 
« IMOB * 

* HSfUflF * 

* WhCOUVER * 

* HiU * 

♦SFWW3SC0 * 


SELF-CATERING 

GREECE 


RENTALS 


RENTALS 


lURU 11*11 Luwv art icon 

nniifvhnl flat, larar HMinw. din 

um 4H I dbb* hHL 1 
sludi /«ngto had Counm 
krtrtrra .Mmuman hi 1 year 
C295pw 01 794 2789 


MJFERiOn FLAIL t HOUSES 

jivaitA rend lot OPUmb. 
pxigulivrx Lorek'Mft W™ 
alt AH* I'PNK'S.ACpA* 
.Uhmwiriahl tol Ol-*99S334 


SUPER SECRETARIES 

VIDEO PRODUCTION 


SL'PER SECRETARIES 


I KENSINGTON Wll xtHW 2 
I hadromTiHl (UL baauiif to vtung 
room. bath. kUrhm. pawiyder 
I dialed. attuaue funature 
uompani in. £300 pw for 1/2 
xcarx TH: 01 220 5999 


KNtCNTSRRlDCK Cnamtng * 
wrludrd luxuo Mewx hoW* 2 
BnK B« t» L4QOj^»- 
BurttnqviTU* Lid 01-788 0B23- 


MAYFAIR. Wt Srtert kiP df 16 
Bed flats A Mto«es Looq/ShO rt 
lets Front OOftow .agkrtry 
tvldrv 493 0667/409 2373 


jjii xnieian lo 
rxerum ex In Marketoto ggg 
mtoi Handling phfltUlWhW 
i mn i, mfltfufl uunrnr^ ** 

SswwStSS 

Miwuijnrr and 4 good wme oi 
Vor2l?5 PkW ^ 
454 451? OBW Corfcill w 
ft uiinwitt ComAriLMilv 


CONPUmn ■serirlaiv/RrTep 
ih ulisi iixniurd inf vmnvfl ahft 
mm mMid r.tmPWH rnmo-ni 

m wt lk*xdW aiiKndr *HKI 

ufMid lv Ptuu irxiiiwrxl Ivn* 1 * 

sin*.- 

t\ uioca 




pH-sridaitou A lewohom- nwn 

ne. ho IV0.JW ££ 

S.U ati on oi 
Ki»gl.lu«"Wr herrrtanra. 
Pnnl hi. 1 otMton »w ' 


LANCASTER Cole 3 mtns rube. 

mews hse. cxervtbfna new. 
- itoh rqwp ML 2 dMr bed*, dm 
■nq lull, kvlnq rm. U wha . lerr. 
I'a IH Mtn 1 jigr. G29S pm 
TH 262 2976 or 584 2827 


STM BUCKS to Met due BOB 
M3Q. Ftotv furn rouagr to wns 

grounds 1 WOT ant*' C296 
turn, gdn TH 02404 2148 


SWI ideal for entertauuna. f> 
gani A brtqM ma«*ioi> fla« 
newlv det bpartoua Oblr Rerep 
irtaintng drtg features. 3 Bra*. 
2 Balm. FT KU. C49Spw 
uniurn Caolex 828 8261. 


CHELSEA Superb opdftpiMU 2 
bedim Exeeflettl into id g0* 

. Co Let £295 P*» rw* 73DS322 


MC BANC. From Til «»* 
rheah n to W - hank Je?* 
Olv xletrhant Bank* gf* 
nimrs voimg career nurture 

P L/bee wilh dediralion and im 
tiottvr to retn P»f*enl trob and 
pxf ilentrnl Phone Ot 

0851 Ann vsarrjngton ser 
Careers 


CONSULTANT ■nuudtod re 
guur-i ■■rrrrtaix to ' run 
sIk-H rwuilliua ronrttx fel Ol 

o vs boon o." moe. 


TEMPTING TIMES 


MAYFAIR or Kemwgtoa. CbOKT* 
2 xupntti xerxtred 2 brvli mu 
Hals £250 to Ol 589 8223 


C58CX Burkhum Hill Super* 3 
Bed townhouse. 2 Bath* Hr. 
Beautiful pmale Gdn Very 
rfove Butklhjr* H1B Central 
Une lube. QtfUon 697 7342. 


SOWN K*W» 2 dbk- betfk 3 
rrrpv. lux *erv teed flat C29S 
pur Co LH. 581 6109. t0-7pm 


■rtf i r ar i raver wi bark from 
houdav gnimxMfe taU-rxtavvx 
urth Ptrtisheex. 

Oruantseix. Eslah* AgenlvAd 
veitixrva and hon£ommerKai 
Covenl Garden Bureau 
fKh *a. tea 553 7696 


begin Monday »v tin 

Mnrrssml Tempnrarx TeMnrt 
t ov.sil Gitfdeu 

top nonkinov in the MjAkCW 
■ r, it Allans PuUOimo. 
Arrhiterts and Bn BatW ' ftjnk 
«v HO Fieri si CCd 3S3 7696 


NEMBY • JAMES Contort Uinow 
on Ol 235 8861 for the MN «s 
lection at furnished flats and 
houses rroU in hMahtSbridgr- 
Chettn* and Kensington in 


BAKER Street: Super* iyixdfl 
turn tee 4 bed*. 2 bath*, tl 
emuUri tounge/dmry. loL/bkixL 
gge. polio/gdn. CCH £375 pw. 
TH-01 847 2641 /22I 8276 
BAB— BBBBTHBM. Brand new 
3rd fir flat rxr block, super* 
rover view* 2 bras. 2 baths, 
rrcep. Ul. CH. C27S pw Tit.. 
Sulltv an Thomas 731 1353. 
HOLLAND Rar*. Fully furn new 
town house 4 bnk. 2 bauvs. 
small qrge. root gdn. £426 to. 
Co IH or overseas visitors. 6 
months nun. 01-876 8616. 
MDUafarON. WS Elegant 3 
Bed. 2 Both (tot SUIto* CHtoln* 

, Room Fully Fitted KK. 

CdOOpvv Please phone Jose- 
i phme 938 3755 ftl 
1 KEN SI NGTON WlO Sludio flat- 
I IM. 1 neon qtort room plus ttoin 
! kdb Fully ea topped, col TV. 

Kkxd exeeuirve/rouple. £79 
I pw TH: 01 960 1222- 
LANSOOWNE ROAD Wll Lnfur- 
nistied house. 5 bod. 2 bate, 
large fomUv room, garden and 
arrevs lo roramunM gardens. 
C7S0 pw 01 994 5042. 
VUITTNC LONDON /PAMS AUen 
Bates A Company have a large 
sHertlon of llals A house* avail. 
ante for 1 week* from £2O0pw 
499 1665. 

■DM A BUTCHOrr for luxurv 
prapertle* in SI Johns Wood. Re 
nils Park. Motes kale. Swiss 
C5WI A Hampstead 01-586 7661 
ISLINGTON lux 2 bed (UL 
lounge, k A b. shower rm. gdn. 
GCH. rat TV Fully equip U70 
pw. 242 9424 or 359 3933 
WB DHtehtrul sunny 1 bed OoL 
Lift, porter. CH mrl. Co let only 
£160 pw. Tel 01 741 1249 taf- 
ler 3omi 

boned grad fir flal to quiH 
tarjiion 2 room*, kit A Off rm. 
CISO pw TH 0892 74302 . 
ACADEMICS vramm. Flats nr 
L diversity A Bill Museum TH 
Helen wjBon A Co. 580 6275. 
AVAR-ABLE NOW Luxury Oats A 
house* £20 0 - £1.000 pw TH. 
Burgess 681 S136 
r-«toi cr» W | (ux ootrony flat, 
rerep. dote bedroom. ML pre 
ter. Long IH 01622 5626 
DOCKLANDS Flats and houses to 
IH through ted the Dorklands 
area. TlSOl 790 9660 
FULHAM Lmety flat, lounge- 
dhte bed. din/ktl. bote, w.morn. 
CI2S pw. Cd.KX 01736 5766 
CARAGE Spore tor 3 nr*. 9 yr 
Ke tor sate. Marble Arch. wt. 
Offers InvUrd. 01262 9574. 
HOLLAND PK Liuhuoi 3 bed 
turn mois wilh view. Comm 
6dm C2M PW He* 747 361 1 
SEN (OR NECIOTOR for Keodng- 
ton Estate Agenl*. See General 
aopouiimmu today. 

WL Modem penthouse mois 2 
beds Fitzrov SL Close Warren 
SI lubr. £200 pw. 388 8793. 
WZ Lux 1 bed apt to p-bJk £130 
p.w oju> Co IH only New- 
man De Very Ot 936 CT746 
WE LET FLATS AND HOIMES. 
Conlorl Rarhard or Mirk. DoxK 
Woode A Co 402 7381. 
WRBBLEDON AREA. Od selection 
hses/rtats. No fee to tenants, 
williams A Son 947 5130. 
WIM Bimow Opp Common. 2 
bed luOy furn lux flat. OOf. 
Gge. £650 pem 01-788 2860 


HOLLAND P to*, only £375 to- 
lor gurrk long IN. Braurtfufhr 
wtenor oeugneo finished ftoL 
ot* now. south taring- 2 bed- 
rooms. 2 balhroom* ensude.2 
rerepttonv dmlng hoD. ftotar 
eaurpprd large krtrhen. 24 nn 
u ortetoty. enlnr phone. CalL 
Ol 600 2136. 

DARTMOUTH Par* NWS. ARTOC- 
live. mod. mew* nse. * beds. 2 
Bate*. Ige lounge wHI eauteped 
lot Mira, oor Ca k*1 dthctthl 
UOO pw. TH: 01 539 1742 af- 
ter 6um / 0246HI3310 
*T. STEPHE N* GDN* W2 At- 
tractive 3rd floor 'with IMU 
double bed flal Good w recep- 
tion. fully hited kllrhea. 
Long/shon tet £176 peg pw. 
HOLMANS' 370 6781. 
UNFURNBMED. Superb Wl 
mew*, romoteieiy renovated. 2 
beds, lounge. KAS. date g arage. 
Ptuv triple garage with terame 
at c«.ooo no. 9 yr be. 
£49.000 TH; 01 262 9S74 
A HARMONIOUS Hampstead 
home immondole spartota 3 
Bedrm Rot offering lounge, nt- 
ted Ml. Diner. Col TV. OaW. 
Avail Now. C18SPW. 286 8040. 
AMERICAN BANK urgently re- 
outre* luxurv fiaK/houso*. 
ChrsveoL Knighubndge. O elgra 
via areav C200 £2.000 pw 
Burgewv Estate Agents 581 5136 


PEOPLE PERSON/!*** wilh IVO — ~~~ 

"•-■■siKaarS! w jaguar & daimler 

London Buss . Jrteiteh'toid 

vrtino env itonmewt. rCT.BtW to jjJS ME. 20 OOO mK ft Reg. ante 
Marl Phone 568 9851 Ann , warrants rxr 


feamnoton Srr C-irwfs 


kMir rsH 1 a i vtjrfJnD ptrl 
Site £14 995 TH thiKNi.el 
32674 <U< 021 748 6*22- 


STOP! Semor Secretaries 
have hundreds of lopsrrretan.il 
nie) do xou need a change 

wilh tetter money. Pto»e rat' 

Dehra. Trarv. Undsey « Ol 
251 8211 for on hottest talk 
about lobs available 


PUBLIC NOTICES 


OUT AND ABOUT in flnl fob 
rC7.oOO Seer /I will veal stores 
and liaise with rtteois Phone 
588 9861. Ann Wampgton Set 


MEDICAL SECRETARY, ex per 
mvred managerial ouaUtlrs for 
Poediomr protore. Hariri- 
Sheet. 935 2023. 


NON-SECRET ARIAL 


I NTE RV IE WER (or sroaB and sot 
rrsalto sec consultancy te Oly. 
SHesborkgroudfx*. Phone Mr* 
Ooddork on 668 9861 for 
more details. 


SWI MANAGEMENT CONSLL , 
TANTS £10.000 ■‘♦A Semor 
Director of Search and shit 
lion require* dedtraled PA with 
lop (MB* *100/601 a ltd or inter 
rsi in research. Cheerful and 
outgotn* with tee otnltty to te 
drtrreH oi oil (imm. tee success 
tut oOPbcant wilt enka 
Itiv oKemrnl Oi the lutoiest lev 
el. Please phone Emma Corbett 
on Oi 235 0393 Kniqhtatetgde 
Setreutric* 4 Pont St. London 
swtx 90- 


ASSI5TANT To Director Sole* - 
Europe Age 26+ Varied and 1 
interesting work, mus be able 
to work on own Jmnainc. : 
TVprtng oMlitv rssenttaL Salary 
. £8.500 PA. Kindly apply in 
wnung with C.V to Chrtsttne 
Band. Tour East interooiwnai. 
lO Carteret SUrH. London 
mwiu one? 

BANKING ANALYST European 

LuvBugrv 2 S+. €20.000 LM* 

guage staff Agy 4S5-89Z2 


■CCEPnOMST Extraordinary. 
Look after clients. hHP to 
organise lunches. Itane wilh Ihe 
rook, handle petty cosh, pour 
drink* and moke coffee, handle 

tetephanr enquires If you 

are well presented and weU ran 
krn. between the ages of 22 and 
36 and would tike an mu i *NM8 
and varied reception job. pteose 
tetephone Aitana Mgrnmto 
Limited iRomkimeni Consul ■ 
lantsi 629-9686. 


ARCHIBALD CL RRIEJSTRt-*r 
would an* to ter underrated «r 
onv person claiming to hereUled 

to the undernoted whme to* 
known adrtrew a as Matra Pteme 
conlorl the subscrtoH* when inev 
may learn s umHhmg t o Ihei r ad; 
vantage. Any person knowing rt 
the whereabouts of Ihe 

undernoted ot to any retain e to 

the underooted a asked lo contort 

Ihe subscribers:. 

Archibald Currie. Botrt ito Tra de 
Surveyor. / ornterty « 8 Cordon 
Rood, seaforth. Liverpool, and 
then ot KUdcmon. 47 Howard 

Road. Southampton „ 

Ned cure, cterk. Bostereehank. 
NrwmHn*. Ayrshire 
Alexander Currte. Mariner, 
snntetime residing al Bryngwyn. 
Both well and then at Dunvegon. 
Lddlngsfon _ 

Mary McDougoil or Currie. Fac- 
tor A commBMonrr lor Ihe 
obovementioned Alexander Cur- 
rie. residing at the some 

j^neTcume or McGowan, wife 
to COPtem w'dham McGowan. 
ShipmaHer to Ardrouian 
El irateth Cur roe or Robertson, re- 
siding at Cherrv Hill View. 
■ ark hail. Lanarkshire, wire of 
Archibald Robertson. Electrical 

Engineer. . - 

Mary Currie or Thomson. 378 
All non Street. GovanMU. OU* 
gow. wife of Allan Thomson. 
Joiner, reading Ihere 
J D BANNATYNE A 
CAMPBELL Solicitors. 

35 New SlreH. SlevCTOlon. 
Ayrshire 

Tel: 0294-53382 


PART TIME VACANCIES 


BOOKKEEPER regutred by West 
End unuronre broker*. 2 days 
to* wrrk. to tnai balance Com 

outer exnrroetuw prHeyred. 
£4.000 P4 01 409 1650. 


CONVERSATIONAL FRENCH 

usrlul WHI known French 

Company sening up L K. Divi- 
sion in Cranfoca Mtddtesex 
They require SeerNary/P A 
with enfreprenneunol state to 
mnd Starting salarx r. C7.O0O 
Suprrn prospect* for right per 
son. hitervtaUonal SenHorte*. 
01-191 71 CXI 


TRANSLATOR requtrra for En- 
glish/ Conloneese based in I 
London Total ronfldenuaUlv 1 
regutred lor business A person i 
to rorrespondanre Htgft rates , 
psxt for good guaMy work Re 
ptv to BOX BS7 . ! 

SECRETARIAL JUST, required | 
at small chanty office. SWI 26 . 
hr* per week. Audio and WP 
exnenenre C5.0CX3+ depending 
on age/expmence Te* Hilary 
Finch 01-839 5611 ext 450. 


q in fed lor presmptxis 
InlernatKmal bank Smart ap- 
praronre to very PR oriented 
poobon Skills 100/60 and 
minimum 2 years experience 
Salary package up to £12.000 
pa. Irtlrmal tonal SecTetancs. 
Ol 491 7100 


SUPER SECRETARIES 


SECRETAHE5 tor Arxhtterts 5 
Designer*. Permanent & lentpo- 
rary poulton* AMSA Speoabal 
Rer Com. Ol 734 0632 
DUTCH speaking secretary city 
ro C neg good SLID* Ol 
4044864 Carrel our Agy 


TOUR OPERATOR requires 
young person wilh enlhimoam 
and initiative to tain small 
friendly team and grt involved 
m oil aspects Typing esoential 
Esretlenl prospects and salary 
Plater send C.V. lo Seagull 
Hobdavs 46 Maddox Street 
London W1R 9PB. 


CHELSEA & 
KENSINGTON 


CENTRAL 

LONDON. 

Property owners list your 

flats to be let by us. We 

have the finest business 
executives for your 

7622 (Tl 


VIP RECEPTIONIST 

£8,500 


WELL SPOKEN Rereatiannl 
A'Ttsi ■ audio preferred I 9 
5 50 Small wrtl known 
rompanv. Ktevlswn him pro- 
ducer* and dHlrtbutor* Salary 
£8.000 Wrote with CV to Mr* 
Joan Childs. Fitteftor Ud. Ja- 
cob* WHI Mew* George Strre*. 
H‘l. 


Are yaijbnghL vrf ipotei 
recq«DR8i Mtt typng BtAy? 


WaJd you sntoy meceng and 
VMHig VP'e awMMig tee 
teteotaK. writing cams al 
genealy rrakng smite 
fcuunns reemon vm im 
smottaty? 


LLOYD'S 

UNDERWRITING 

SYNDICATE 


Secretary 


SCOTLAND 


SOUTH KEMSUGTM. 

Beouuful. stmy masonelle to* 
drect access to private gardHS. 
3 tac&. 2 a n suee ba ftnuras. 
magn/icert fecephon MB. 


ideal for etatanmn. Ncgtydac- 
oraad. rare Mm Uchea 
i Avatala mw tor a nmun 6 
mrtis al ELIOOpm. Mo agents. 

| naMrtnt WB *5 351 or 
•5ZS28/4C gmk«L 


I you are a presented, 
tnan dfy perso n «ho noted anffir 
Hrtogn pB t pui a 
EWTfBjpfhngs and can type 
arameiy B 40 «pnt then caB 
MooQuefortwthordNMsOI 
734 2567 


Cheerful hartwcfWng coOega 

leaver /saamcl fohbar required 
to woefc m happy office. 
Jt ccura fB typing and 
Shorthand or audio. 


GLASGOW 


numeracy, good Biephone 
manner and smart appear- 


manner and snail appear- 
Rice essenttaL Trainoig given 
on word processor. 


L&MUftM 
»• III V WecneHmei’if 


Please antad 
Ctaire Jdtery oq 
01 481 9601 


west &d. Edwardbn town 
house retalnng oiignal fea- 
tures. 3 puttie rooms. 5 
bedrooms (master en suite), 
luxury kitchen. 3 bathrooms, 
Wttard room, magwal ga- 
rage. gas central heating. 
Otters over £95.000. 

Tel 041 339 5215. 


JEAN WILLIAMS LTD 


VMMUIJL PMK SOT. Use of HMNH pool ari wn. Neady baft 1 
bed IW bNbn prwM development WiS fitted tt/lvino area. M imp 


Secretary 


hmstmgL pog. Company tt. £14000 par. 


nCHMOHD. IWur. spadous del. 5 bad hse. 2 recaps. WeB IM UL 
b/M mom. utty mom. Close Gemai School Long Lei £35100 
n»- 


TEDOBCT ffl l Swerb stodio « wte vwc of hwr. Rm. to btfi 
standard. Oosa to Teddigton Sata n , long LeL Sut sage person 
only. £85.00 p.*. 


Small, young firm of property consultants 
in Westminster need intelligent & capable 
secretary for audio typing, telephone, sta- 
tionery control & generally running the 
office. Salary £8750, negotiable. 


KEMSW6T0H KAMSOKS SOT.Wefltom.Sdec. 1/2 bedftaLlge 
recap. ML Bl machnes. Porterage. Close afl am entias. £22 500 pw. 


wnfim rniWE. Top lb. 2 bad fla WAD new of London. WeS 


Call Liz on 
01 222 1616. 


ina wt B ned p/b block, Ut entrance phone, pnge. E15OJO0 p.w. tad 
CH S CHW. 


01-949 2482 


PROPERTY TO LfiT 
LONDON 


STUNRIND Mill hte Hx*nL 

.1 >1 Inis «■ Mil*, t ru 

I,. ueJI MUWUMKPI 
1 iu ■xtMI.il MUM MUOttoW 

tmw Vs bn. ruby 
inUtte OI 723 4liS 


LEG AL NOTICES 


O'” 

fLs>0 

'H 1 ' 




fr* 




•V i><! 


■ Jf* 


IN THT MA OTB to LLPTDtt 
iXMRfNti LnnTtOMI Bg tlS 

rvOIKX E» HERtaV.OVKN 
teal tef rtrttara tfjhr- «Xk- 
nanwtf rWHSam. kMciikom,, 
vtouhltodl tkOBOd UB. I* 
axorof. tmrw hHtovthe POQigqy 
alOnaber l*N5 to toh8nis«w 
fun LUnvMn and surnames, amr 
*omro«-> and fteNTjMigqk. tut 
potlk-ularx to UNW OMta * 
dawns, and to r nafnrs mg gg, 
th r*se* ol Hte« atotenmftfMn 
lo (hr UM tefSto l ten DAVUS 
UEblllllt M ORO yl fCAcf 
rturvOHHi 68 a unto rruag. 
LOHdtot LL3 me LMutotoer to m. 
vaui t toftpam ana * wnwj 

M (KfKPmvUtMqHNMbtmg 
iMUHUiar are MvMjRyHw 
itvsr snuiiMv iq raw m m 
prove teett debts or CNW M 
MKh lime owl Otart* as SHU bm 

vpectiksl in such min*, to to de 
lain thereto lhr» w« 82 
pxrluaed fram tof brtwW Of mgr 
dniriMiiinti made Before such 
itrhls are Droved 
noted thro Nth ttav al Segtewbef 

^ DL MORGAN 

SKWADEN 
UOLIPATOWS 


* ; ii 


.•...% htm 

. ..iii 

.■.■-MU*’ 


nin cro Cte fCCRff O ' 
iwioa4TTS IWJTfO 
WW8 HtRESV OTVCN 

rttiruunj lo SfiCtWRi 3aV W thft 

ranZws Art. 1985. Ulto 4 
SEcnixC or tnerroditoei ice tee 
above named Cnn ww JdJg 
heid Jl ter* to fifes M LEONARD 
a CO. Ntutord toM 
t.A&TROL Rtst Tn" , i ct .®® 
r LOOK i LONDON W2 *LF On 

nmitfui- the 9th dav- df October 

tSto at iroo 

for the rmhov«.Pra*tdH| for « 

serunns sin* and a^O 

Doted tee 22*d ddv to Srotortber 

,qt,& LAOITRIPCC 

DIRterrOH 


HIUSHAW fXJNKTRl CT10N 
LIMITED 

NOTICE O HEREBY WW 
RHF AiuiR Ki SrriHw sob of inr 
SiStas ro 4rt. 19OTI mjla 
MCcmsO to uve rr editor* to the 
above named Company wta to 
nrtd ol Ihe offices to LEONARD 

rijj'ns A co . situated to so 
rASTBOLRNE TERRACE «2ND 
rlXia. inumi W2 6LF on 


FUMRTlONDON VJ'2 6LFon 

midday, for tee purweskrovd 
ed lor m 

D^lfd me 22nd lUl 01 bfWWt«nr 

1900 MA MORRIS 

DIRECTOR 


DOMESTIC & CATERING 
SITUATIONS 


OVERSEAS AU PAIR AGENCY 

87 Regeiii Sfrert.Lcrtdon Wl. 
TH 44*» oS34 LH/Overseav 
Also m nHps/dom* lemn/penn 


COOK HOUSEKEEPER Expert 
rro-nrn eutsine lor rouirip hvmg 
between IS & Clrtte Be 
a Lured lo ItavcL non-smoker. 
Prefei aniv with drtvug Hteoce. 
Cxeeiteni working rHemice*. 
Salary negMiable CaB Mr*. 
ThM on Ot 381-4585 between 
8HH -10 am 


CHARITY COMMISSION 
Chanty The Haile Concert, 
Sortety Eodowmenl Fund 
Nahooal Cteaniy 
The Durtlv CommsHiom 
pronase'lo make a Scheme for 
ten charity Cootes of llw draft 
Scheme may nr counted from 
them (nf: 223882- A I LSI oi 14 
Ryder Steed. London. SWlY 
6AH otnrruom and umteu t u xn 
may be «rnl to term wtlhllt one 


JAPANESE restaurant lit the City 
ol London maiarr* rgnmonred 
rooks a watting staff Pre* too* 
exnenenre A atotnv to xoroh 
Japanese are mrnlwti TH. Mr 
kurorolu. Ol 236 6461. 


CERTIFICATE OF 
INCORPORATION ON CHANGE 
OF NAME 

COMPANY NO 42426 
Wtmppy Merchant* untiled 
Having by xperul resolution 
r hanged IK name, ro now (nr onto 
■ oted under the name to 
CEMENT ROAOSTONE 
MERCHANTS LIMITED 

tin ned N Cdmburtot 
19th S rulerwber 1986 


quiied for totmlv in Mines 
£280 weekly Fry Skill Consul 
Unis. Aldershot TH 
0252 315369 

ENTHUSIASTIC COOK needed 
tnt delightful BCKlV ftolteWNtod 
counlrv pub near Newbury. 
0o3S 24826 2 

OVERSEAS au pair aoenrv ST 
Regent SteeH.Lottdon Wt TH 
439 0634 LK/OvHsea*. AIM 
m hHp*/iKMns irmp/pcrm 


PALACE Gardens Trrraee. WB 
CBSO.OOO Freehold A Stucco 
irornra. 6 -storey Pcood house 
with private garden Potential 
lor 2 nrdioomod. self -contained 
basemem (tat- 22 ’ dining room. 

. 25* x 21* drawing room, study. 
Luge kltehen/foimb- room 
opening on to garden. 8 bed*. 4 
baths, cloak*. uMHty room etc 
Located off Kensington Httot 
SlirH barking onto Kcnhngton 
Polar r Garden*. Trlffll 221 
3534 Hi 


CHEF 

Bderty Mad couple Dvmg in 
the iWRt o l SL James's. ' 

SWi . require fif« class Can- 
tytenud and French Culsm 
Choi living accommodation ! 
pcotfidad at very agreeable 
surroundings u requmd. 
Must be car driver. 
Appflcauon together with relv- 
ancas should do sent « 

Mr J. Farrar 
ALDERMANS HOUSE 
ALDERMANS WALK 
LONDON EC2M 3XR 
or telephone 01-256 6873. 


SITUATIONS WANTED _ 


INDEPENDANT 

CONSULTANT 


Travel Middle East Italy. 
Austria and East Europe - 5 
languages. Seeks Commisa- 
ions/Representative work - 
experienced Dept CoHecar. 
Contact Reply to BOX C57. 


ESSEX 


BRAHTREE 

Large lantav resatanca. ttatadad 
double frureed ni wM 
rational ana. 5 ms Mflr 
Bran rentre/Radway shrew 
through Liverpool Stre« 50 mnt 
Stansnsad *> how Oiive loge- 
MB. cknkraom/Wt, damg 
room 20xi3. 2 hattaer recap- 


tions. targe kitchen, waft n 
nrder. Miked ASA cooker /hot 
water, caftr/wstiop. brpe 
mg. man Indroatn 18x13. * 
further beds. badiraore/WC. HS 
Iteatara. bmegnge at rear, lad 
Stinting hunt 2 css. Frani/rew 
tawns. veg pioi Summer houa. 
shed. £>%.000 ana 
Can 9378 25367 
alter Ipa 


THE 


TIMES 


TICT OM A. SWI PAM CIESCBn, Wl 

Ashley Goidens, behind Wo- Superb flat set in pnta- 
torts SL IrnnKdWS 2 bod rfnm block cbw to d 
[ E2r‘S^ Bt reK t 5L Snwiflee Ideal torprofev- 
SSie^'^reTS^ stone. p«on. Jt^tita 
months £250 p.w. Ctose to now*OaS p.w. Viewing 
Victoria sawn. recommended. 

Ptaritea Office: Rytie park Office: 

01-934 9§M 01-202 5080 


To Place Tour 
Classified Advertisement 


CORFU Bargain*. Beautiful <frt 
vHtas nr (ho bear*. 2-6 DT* 
£199 l UL £229 2 wk* te Ort. 
Gator HYow. Ol 734 2862 Pan 
Wor la Hobday*. 

< GREECE, t. nepota Wands, cheap 
ffitoiK- villa rmtals Mr Zeus 
Hdtx Ol 434 1647 Alol. AMo. 
-RHODES in a earf hots from 
U89 bp 1.4.5.11 Ort Straraa 

0706862814- 


LONDON PROPERTY 


111 fkhj hibbst 

IU.4370 MORTGAGE OFFER 


10 . 25 % 


please telephone the appropriate number listed below 
between 9 a.m and 6 pun. Monday to Friday, 
or between 930 a.m and 1.00 p.m on Saturdays. 

Private Advertisers 

02 481 4000 

Birth Marriage and Death Notices Oi 481 3024 

Birth And Death notices may be accepted over the telephone. 
For publication the following day please telephone by 1.30 pm. 
Marriage notices not appearing on die Court & Social page may ako be 
accepted by telephone. 

Trade Advertisers: 


SIMPLY CRETE 
HEnSOWSSOS ft CHMfU 
Anti Greek fBtiy offer biafliW 

cnwfc vtiss/stooos, many vrti 
pools. Bare on ms beast aid 
some tufted way et any Oust 
V illages. We arts a way percanti 
semce. So please mg hr cw 
snub. tnentSy bnxhtn 
Tel: V1-U4 4482/5228 

ATOL 1922 


a pp o intm e nt! 

Pabfic Appointments 


1) The Interest rati wB tra Axed at 1025% per annum for 
the Aral three years at a mort ga ge on a domasbc 
property. 

2) MHmum ban £50000 


3} Msdraum 90% ol the property's purchase price or vsfua- 
tfon ttoxchetrer is the tower. 


4) meant nMUptos must be no greater than three tines the 
primary income (La. the tighep and onc» me secondary. 
(3+1 for jam borrowers!. 


Travel 

UJLKoBdays 

M e t ers 

Porsooal 

Bbhbsbi to Basloesc 

Education 


01 481 
01 481 
Ol 481 
01 481 
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01 481 
01 481 
01 481 
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SELFCATERING 


9 Loaos mb be kdied to an Btomnnent or Fenston con- 
tract mAh the Sonderd Lda Assurance C o mpany. 

81 If during the three yews a borrower wishes to transfer to 
the Bank's vanabto rate (currently 11.00%) there vrtt be 
no penafly. but they woidd be liable to revert to the 
freed rats. 


Remortgages con si dered. 


LAST MIWTE VILLAS 


Ioti»4Is« 1 Q*-e®* IMS 
Eiir opB/l f SA 01-937 5409 
IxtlBveitaen 01-838 3444 


i s*n j . a - Cirt. Dm aw 
Fj i f'-iT* •Fr'iOi taw -.ret 

i . - H*avtiT *** 

v iv>> nu ci M t u 

r ■ otai ''nxc ibMna 

*..*. . ■- e •— »r tgsr 

C v Travel ( 1 ) 

43 Csdoaxn :S 3 
LontinsSs 3 PR 
Tel SOI 0851/584 8803 
(JESS 0132 MOM* 24 *■*») 


0 IM'finDfy thee u c — Oct, Won 1388 Its. 4.1848 s 

hrenu Thee Stnkt i Q — l fb| Ltd. 

74-71 Tafeenacfc Street 
UM68 ECU 4U 
lekpfeBK 81-251 8188/8688 


Forthcoming Marriages, Weddings, ate for the 
Court and Social Pago 

Cas imI be ac ce pted by TeSepheoe 

Pfeme u«d Court and Mai Pace notice, to: 

The Court A Social Editor, 

Tims Newspapers Ltd- 
1 B ennin gton Street, 

London El 9DD 


KB. IMS OHW CUES 1 FJL SKTBnMT AlflJfl KO 
jtmjuntun nn be co a sn aai r psofosed *fih 
W toL 


Please allow al least 48 hours before publication. Any enquiries for the 
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. . . u. - |htt 

* -ii S 
r;- ^-maiTtarl 

•';€ '» <***•$* 
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• 4-'ifhe-^*«h'aro 

..■rat .0*3-*'^ 


Payl 


ata Ammon 


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SVNOlCATlt 


4 


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You may sw your Ar ea ta, Ann, Dinars or Visa card. 


...* : 1 ^ 
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tiro 


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O05« 




l||pegrees 
■ awarded 
my London 
JSJniversity 

•?;. ‘.i.; r Serbo-Croat 

*'«* ‘® ®**v and e E,i r 

" ■" . -Stf S? 3fu&. C Hutrtlln Os «S Slav 
' ' - EKrsfSSi:? /^Srte^s'gif 1 ^' a »d 

Ear Stud). Slav ana e 

- -•7 - South Asian Studies 

V -f . “ Branch U 

V Ortmtol^ami flS of 

'j- Spanish 

# «■** :*S c Butte- (Blrkoecfci. 

. . saitn (West a Cfc s 


As 


THE TIMES THURSDAY OCTOBER 2 1 986 


UNIVERSITY NEWS / SPORT 




,B3ft 'B'Ptf /Warn, c 

nw IKO: C D&SwIaS: LM 

(W^! 10 'BWDeck). A R 
l**M: C E Taylor iKCl. 

BSc 

Birkbeck College 

SEr*£ “ElSS?™ B A MU,: L " 


Hlwowanc: P Hobby: cIm^SE'cs? . 
S R Jordan: O Khan: C V fan? h a 
te« C P Lofiley: F C Marnr o a 
M aiuchniah: S CNaytor Sicnk°N i '■ 
Reed. C W CSlnrSlrTc FStoSoc- c 
R Sladdon: I M Wlnimil. C 

OwiC M Beil: P s Bruce- C D 
P*Hd: M N liMam: L L Jones-, a J 
t^e: A P Mehln: M L obhraf- R 
Permalloo: M G Rich: M VSowdnv 

EPS 8 F-U-qL Ahmed: A J Findlayr S 
L Row« a 

LLB 

London School of Economics 

CtaS 1: A P Le Sueur: A A Wtgley 
Clau 7 fphf j?- J M Abramson: K Y 
Barnes: A S F&iruotl: B Baxter: P9S 
Booth: J SBrenier: E F CasdagU: W C 
Qwy: A G Dekany: S Dodh£a; M K 
Ghosh: S A Glass!: G w Heath: S J n 
Jafar. J K Jagaal: V H Mark: J D 
Masson: D Mainer: C A MlskeUy: J 
Morgan: S M Murphy: L C Nathan: J 


M Nicot J P OTJeiil: D S Offer: K H 
Pearce: P H RobiK-Sng: B R Schaffer: 
P F bhoux: M H Sleuer S I Tan: M 
Well: c L Wickremaslrmhe: p L 
WUrock: A R WtQshaw. 

COM 7 (Uv a>: C S AmbteKc K 
Armstrong Myers; O Benkhadra: A 
Chamr. S L Choo: J F Clark: S J 
Cunltffe: S W Emmett: W J Flack: I M 
Goalen. B C Grant- M Hastitm; P H 
Hepburn: J M S Holmes: N A 
Hutchison: M A Jenkins: B K Johab R 
A Kotin: F G KydomeCs: A Layman: C 
I H Lee: M L Leona: M A C H Lim: B D 
Marrhanl: P F Merchant: J MeasenL 
W W L Mok: G T Morgan: A S L Mor- 
ris: M A Motltey: C M Murphy: S J-o 
North: L A Okunnu: B J Owen: ! 

man: T H J Shah 


I Symington: V J Tanchel. A J Teotu 

P S Thompson: M G Tlwary: 
Torrance: K wtckremasingbe: E V 


Class SHE Sherman; R J Wilkinson 

BEng 

Imperial College of Science 
and Technology^ .. .. 

Mechanical Engineering 

First Class S W Ball: j C Johns W A 
Jolly: B Lirutior: j m MichaeHs: G P 
vim j s E wytie. 

Cot lee: M P CollrelL R Cummings: j P 
P Cunoyv. R C Drewery: P A Ftosc J 
R Hall: A M Hanuliop: T O HarL A J i 
Heath: N C Hortin: E Hwang: N ingfcm 
BOA KellyA; S A Lee: A S H Lowe: , 

* s "«“ s ,5fSSS 


Minas: W J Passmore: R T Perkin: N 
P Schofield: I Smtlh: M v Solomon: C i 
M Taig: A C Tanswell: A C W Troup: | 
C J Waterhouse: JC1 


C J Waterhouse; J C Whitworth. D C 
Wong - 

CBn 7 (Mr ID: P H Arnold: B D 
Bandren: S A Bavyule A D Caffyn: D 
J Campdrfr : V K Chare R C Clarke: 
M A Clarkson; D L R Ctoyion: C J 
Dancer: F G Edwards: M G Fields; J G 
atlkev D J Green: G W Hooper. J W 
O Hosker: T J Hushee. J P Jenkins; T 
M C JennKon: I C Jones: S H C Jones: 
S D Kaye: A P Lawson: M T U: E G 
Lovvv. T a Mannan: J F Maxry: S A 
Neely; I M Petti for JM S Pickup: D H 
Seabury. M E B Sealy: M G Thomas: 
O C Westlake: S R Wilson. 

TWrtf Class: G BwnWh. C M frown: 
COB Come: J B Doyle: C M-C M 
Fang: P Flarwigan: E J G Hodnett. C C 
Mautock: D S Page: R Ray: C M SCOIL 
D S Williams. 

Pass: D M S Jones. 

MetaJiory and Materials 

First Class A Oondie; S M,Ffan os: A 
Jackson- p K Johnson: G McGurk: D 
G Robertson. 

p«. 2 CWv QiPl Chandler: I T H 
Chang: ft D Eiares: N A 

Gabriel: M P Grtmshaw: C A HUI: T M 
Jennings: D 

S j Pc-rrv: R C Rogers: A J Shaw. B R 
Sullivan; D T Sutton: M Ward: R J 
Weaver; H wneetdon: C M Woxrall. 

2 (Dhr ID: J M A Humphreys:, M 
JB Lw; L Leung Kce K»Ok: A W F 
Lo; CAP CHdlon: J I R PywowjP M 
stokes: S w G TravM. M J Turner. H 
K wong. M L Yang. 

TltM Clements. C D J: Colley. D 
I: TTew. P A. - 

Mineral Technology 

p«»« j (Dtv Q: E Blankenburgs. 
ctan 1 <W II): S E Riding. 

Mining 

Ctan 7 (Dhr D= S P Dunsun. 

Ctsss 7 fD<v U): D M Brockiebank: M J 
JM CHfjUi. LQJen «.*W 

Meh'd Mahmoud AlAQiiluni. 

Road*" J A Selwood: A D Shoreman. 

ThW Ctom J M CWU#: H DaWe: A L 
Gray: D Milllttli C B Peachey. 

Chemical Engineering 
n ■■ hub I Adamson: M D BtflMK O 

s SwE : d k ;»1 

KSuf^S M Ro^KDR^i M E 
Si” WBr: D C Williamson. 



fESti 

raw Ctsss: M F Fowkcs. P Malone: J 
A Walton 

Pass R D BKrvham. 

Electrical Engineering 
Ftm Class: S A Capeil; P A Heap: A C 
MfLcniun 

CDM 7 (Djv n: s D Bafkjg. ^ P 

E wrioni. G h Nounos. 

fe? DBM^iVTdA ® «■: M J 
butilli. 

ThW Class J Evans. N D Lewis. 
Pm B D Morrison: L H walker. 

Mechanical Engineering 
First Ctsss P C 8«an: FH Clement*. 
P J DubehSkT l O Morris. 


— ^ a n Bond won the 
— ^erica’s Cup, which 
_ begins on Su nday, for 
1983, ending a 
13 2-year domi nation by the 
A mericans. In the last of his 

scries from Fremantle, 

Chief Sports 
Correspondent, assesses 
Australia’s chances of 
retaining the trophy. 


Holders rekindle spirit of ’83 


r-T-r* *. 7Z l.'-".' rr V 1' : v 


T here was a low-key informality 
and warmth about Alan Bond's 
ultimately triumphant America's 
Cup campaign in 1981 behind 
_ ine bnck-hard dedication which 
eprtomnxd his country's approach to some 
ol the things it does well. 

Chatting to Ben Lexcen, whose untidy 
appearance tended to make him look as 
though he had called to collect the empty 
beer crates rather than supervize the course 
of yachting's first spacecraft, or spending 
five minutes with Warren Jones, the 
ubiquitous, 120-hours-a-week executive 
director, it was like finding a university 
laboratory at the bottom of the garden. The 
ramshackle old Newport pier, with its 
blistering paint, was hardly the background 
for one of the memorable sporting events of 
the century. 

Now that the trophy sits in its burgundy 
velvet-lined vault at the Royal Perth Yacht 
Club. Jones has a problem: bow can he 
preserve that mentality which helped give 
the squad their rugged underdogs' 
persistence? 

“It's a worry." Jones admits. “Your 
modem 12-metre man is spoilt, he’s 
pandered to. What we're trying to do is 
have the best of both worlds: to be big, 
powerful and resourceful, yet to retain the 
lean, mean and angry challenger's syn- 
drome. Big isn't necessarily powerful You 
can become spoilt by hardware and lose 
your desire." He is discovering the modem 
dilemma of professional sporting winners. 

There is a similarity between Jones’s 
attitude and that of Andrew Spedding, 
Crusader’s operations manager: the old 
services adage that if the men aren't 
complaining, you haven’t got it right. 

Spedding some of the time tells his 
riggers they cannot have what they warn 
just on a point of principle. “There’s no soft 
way to success.” Jones says. "Retaining the 
dynamism is difficult I don't think our 
men are getting slack, but if they were, Td 
be a signal failure. Blink, and it'll happen." 

Being a challenger is easier than defend- 
er. Bond's camp know they're on the line: 
13 challenging syndicates and three rival 
defence contenders queueing up to push 
them off the battlements: Bond, indeed, for 
all his entrepreneurial panache and .the 
substantial advantages which the Bond 
.Corporation has gained from America’s . 


Tagor: V K Thicketl: IH TgSS«,?pO 

yjgjy^D gfisipps 






* met 




1 1 11 1 111 1 1 hut iii'nim ! g—m mm t ~ r -ir 

Contrasting styles: A training barquentme is framed between two of the American yachts practising off Fremantle for their America's Cop challenge 

Cup identifieation. has become a shade able to look for varying capability so as to “When we were 3-1 down in 19S3. we Crusader- is supported on At 
jaundiced. cover the changeable weather over the five- said at breakfast before the fifth race that Hugh Treheam and Grant Szm 

He questions whether, if successful this month period. They did not have to stay as we bad the better boat and if we lost the ous members in I ^i>3. 


time, he would be willing to mount another 
defence. He was under contract to Royal 
Perth to defend the Cup if he won it in 
1 983. but is disenchanted at the sight of the 
club exploiting his achievement to make 
several million pounds and putting none of 
it back into the defence programme. 

“I'll help a future defender if I can." he 
said in a recent interview, “but it's an 
enormous commitment and next time it’s 
going to cost A$40 minion to mount a 
credible defence.” ■ 


T here is little doubt that Royal 
Perth officers fancy themselves. 
They turned up on the balcony on 
Bellevue Avenue to receive the 
Cup in Newport looking like 
Ruritanian admirals. 

The story is related how one of them 
recently told Red. Bond's forthright wife, 
that she should wear gloves when handling 
the Cup because h had taken 1 3 months to 
dean. “It took us 13 bloody years to win 
it," was the tart reply (Bond's first challenge 
was in 1970). 

For 132 years the NYYC held all the 
advantages in home waters, and the same 
now applies in one particularly significant 
aspect for Bond and the most dangerous of 
his Australian rivals, Kevin Parry's 
Taskforce syndicate. 

Whereas the challengers can switch boats 
only after the preliminary round-robin 
ending on October 20, Bond and Parry — 
assuming one or other wins the defender 
series — are each competing with two boats 
and can switch from the one that wins to 
another after the series concludes on 
January 25. They have built, respectively, 
two and three new boats and therefore are 


close to the evolutionary standard ol 
Australia II and produce an all-round boat 
like Crusader 1 and America ll's US 46. 

Bond will campaign with Australia III. 
the world championship winner, and 
Australia IV. which Lexcen describes as "a 
way-out boat”. Australia II would fit inside 
iL “This one will blitz our other two boats 
in a good breeze," Lexcen says. 

Yet is Bond's campaign on top of the 
game? They have been unnerved by 
Crusader I's recent successful trials against 
Australia II. so medium winds early next 
year could put them in a spot. Jones admits 
that III and IV have a different emphasis: 
he hopes that III is an all-rounder, and 
knows that IV cannot perform in under 10 
knots. 

- In the end the weather will dictate who 
the defender and challenger are.” Jones 
says, conceding the point made by John 
Marshall. Dennis Conner's tactician, that 
the weather is less consistent than sup- 
posed. “The honest answer is that we don't 
know with which boat we would defend the 
Cup.” Jones says. 

The drift of his reasoning, not unlike 
Conner's, and lain Murray's with 
Taskforce and Cudmore's in the British 
camp, is that ultimately the competition 
may still come down to the basic ability of a 
crew to handle the boat to its optimum in 
technologically equivalent bulls. 

“The fret is that before 1983, Lexcen was 
delivering us the tool and we didn't know 
what to do with h,” Jones says. “We had 
the better boat in 1970 with GreteL and 
probably with Australia I in 1977 and 1980. 
With our present professionalism, and 
sails, we could have won any of those three. 


“When we were 3-1 down in 19S3. we 
said at breakfast before the fifth race that 
we bad the better boat and if we lost the 
Cup. everyone in the room was guilty. Had 
we lost 4-1. everyone would have said 
Australia II was nothing special, that the 
keel didn't work — and all because our crew 
had screwed up an innovative develop- 
ment that ivar better." Indeed, the 
America's Cup might have died, instead of 
now thrusting into new areas. 

The irony is that it was Conner who 
taught the Australians how to beat him. 
After three attempts, they knew when they 
returned home in 19S0 that they had to 
match his professionalism in Freedom, an 
ordinary boat, the next time. It so 
happened that Lexcen gave them an ace. 
The question now is whether, with a double 
crew like de Savary had but for two boats 
instead of one. Bond's strength may have 
been diluted. 


J ohn Bertrand, the winning helms- 
man in Newport, thinks this may 
be so. but his opinions are less than 
reliable. Nobody in sport was a 
luckier hero, yet his book on the 
historic scries suggested that Lexcen's boat 
was not exceptional and that the Cup was 
won by his inspiration of the crew. 

Bertrand's financial haul is deeply 
resented by the remainder of the crew, and 
Bond has expensively retained him under 
contract as an adviser only, it is reckoned, 
to keep him out of the way. 

With the retirement of Bertrand, whose 
career could only have gone downwards. 
Bond has the choice of two helmsmen: -the 
placid, youthful Colin Beashel aged 25, 
who was mainsheet trimmer in 1983. and 
Gordon Lucas. 37.Beashel. who last week- 
end won the Australia Cup narrowly ahead 
of Phil Crebbin — who is only reserve for 


Crusader — is supported on Australia IV by 
Hugh Treheam and Gram Simmer. \ icion- 
ous members in 1 983. 

Jones denies emphatically that they 
would swap crews to the winning boat for 
the challenge round if 111 was the winner — 
“nobody's promised a ride'* — hut it is 
unthinkable that the Beashel-Treheam- 
Simmer combination would not sail if 
Bond defends. It could prove a problem, 
because you don't change a winning team. 

The next two or three weeks w ill show 
whether Murray, six times the 18-foot skill 
champion and skipper of Taskforce's 
confident operation with Kookaburra 1. 11 
and 111. was wise or foolish not to race the 
world championship so as to keep secure 
his design mcasuremenis.He describes as 
rubbish the criticism that his camp is short 
of 12-melrc experience, pointing out that 
ail but four in three crews have experienced 
one campaign. He helmed the painfully 
slow Advance in 1983 hut now. with 
Victory *83*s computer expert. Derek 
Garkc. on board, is almost dismissively 
confident. Kookaburra III. an amalgam of 1 
and 11. has an optimum performance in 15- 
20 knot winds but a functional range, 
Murray claims, from 10-30. 

There is a mild cynicism between the 
Kookaburra and Crusader camps. Crebbin, 
whose opinions, like his helming, arc 
related to data rather than a scat-of-the- 
pants instinct, thinks Murray is out on a 
limb and in for a shock. Murray says that 
"an educated eye can tell the British boats 
are not oplimized”.Certainly Crusader II as 
yet is not, which is why it has been 
dropped. Murray says the British have 
erred in going for a lighter boat, because he 
expects heavier weather to be influemiaL 

If the British have got much of it right, 
the America's Cup could be at Plymouth in 
two-and-a-half years' time. 


Paying attention to detail 


Symficate: America’s Cup De- ’ 
fence 19B7. 

Chib: Royal Perth YC. 
Defencfing yachts: Australia III 
and IV. 

Designer: Ben Lexcen. 
Syndicate head: Alan Bond. 
Suppers: Gordon Lucas and 
Colin BeasheL 
Budget AS$20 mason. 

Major sponsors: Swan Brew- 
ery. Amway of Australia, Mobil, 
Data General, Hong Kong and 
Shanghai Bank. 

Syndicate: Taskforce '87. 

Chib: Royal Perth VC. 
DefemSng yachts: Kookaburra 
I, tl and Ilk 

Designers: lain Murray and 
John Swarbrick. 


Barry Picktfiafl's g ui de to 
Austrafia’s defensive capacity 

Syndicate head: Kevin Parry. 
Skipper lain Murray. 
Helmsmen: Graham Freeman 
and Lawrie Smith- 
Budget: AS$20 million. 

Major sponsors: Parry Corp, 
Channel 7 TV, Digital Tech 
Rentals, Nike, Fosters Lager. 
Syndic a te: South Australia. 
Cub: Royal South Australian 
Yacht Squadron. 

Defending yacht: South 
Australia. 

Designer: Ben Lexcen. 
Symfic a te heed: Graham G 
Spurting. 


Stopper. John Savage. 

Budget AS$8 million. 

Major sponsors: S Australia 
Government, Mitsubishi 
Australia. Wootworth, Corfu 
Jeans, Sip ’n’ Save, Australian 
National Railways. 

Symficate: Eastern Australia. 
Club: Royal Sydney Yacht 
Squadron. 

Defend in g yacht Steak ’n’ 
Kidney. ' 

Designer: Peter Cote. 
Syndicate head: Syd Rscrier. 
Stopper Gary Sheard. 

Budget AS$5 mflBon. 

Major sponsors: Macquarie 
Broadcasting, ScrfcaL Pens, 
Carbonrib Office Supplies, 
NewsPlus. 


SYNDICATES PREPARE FOR FIVE-MONTH WAR OF ATTRITION 




3.25 

nautical- 

miles 


START 


,2nautical 
i miles 


'FINISH. 


1' 


-2 nautical mites - 


WESTERN 

AUSTRALIA 


ism 



^AMERICA’S CUP ^ 
^DEFENCE 
^COURSES WM 


&Rottnest ; 
island Z 


INDIAN! 

‘ocean? 




Fremantle 


Sunday's start of the challenger ibe oppwtafty,Jf 

ju^rinn trials and the final _ wish ’ <?. ***“■*. - 


Australia IV, and die Parry 
group, who have matched Bond 
dollar for dollar darfaig their 
two-year preparations, may yet 


trials and the final tney WKO, TO exchange we may yet 

^ UflB A2S«- lr Srmitl-Frtmary, evolutionary Howfrtt-desfgned decide to enter all three of tbar 
Cop White Cnsader for HoWs Murray/Swarbrick-designed 


When it comes 
to pushing 

the boat out 

White Horse 

leads the way. 


syndicates wmte v.msacw vx 

iWaSiii "ill pone gained mwMte 
down bMS, rigs uderew, T^ lop fiKB' PO.m- t ainng 
daring the series. yschts =eetmWobe«-of-seYen 


Kookaberras. ’ 

The defence trials have been 
divided info three ro rad-robins 
with one point being awarded for 
each win doriae the initial series 
ending oe October 30. two points 


oarms.*™—- between Deanbtr 2» 

The venae for each of these SdJarmary 7 before the two «*fing on Octrtcr30. two points 

two- boat races » ® nuoi protagonists fight it out in a daring foe second beats between 

Roads final round of races between November 9 nnd 21, w hen alt the 

bleached white bwh janmuy 13 and 23 to deride who rorsmeetrach iod»«M twice, and 

Rottnest Island- £3l w fcnwd to meet the JpiJB when they battle 

contested over “S^***^ Australians for the Cap. wrth e ach oth er on jhroe occa- 

mile Olympic coaises, though sioos during the final ronnd 

Si shortened to three Kfe benre«, DeSmbee 1 end 20. 

^“4 hens dnnn* If 

preliminaries- a needle match between 

The 13 challengers from six A i ail Rond's world champion- 






s Irishman: ‘ H 7 _ 1 “ “ be racing for 

SSh.’tvJr* > ST Louis Vuittmi Cui^ meet 

. pad, other once daring 
The following civil fygJS’S the throe early 
students of Impenal Collc^o' ^ ran WtheCoste £*«ra™J 
Science and Technology sh°uw YftCht a ofr Juries 

have been classified as class - . gin during foe fire* sera 

SWu- «. P— 4 °" Sdinn "I 2£ 

September 29: s pojnte in. and I 2 prsfor 

STaseeWBUjaftSEi JSSrtTiSHrttJS 

fnillHi BGOliBlKOW 1 ': yflLaCM E ” . . Th r_| rnaod between 

JKU Mnen . > * ,y.Sifl.gmU!i. crucial fomi ^ 

ttlSXM BEtltSS December 2 and 19. After 


P° ,,,ts totand-t^ptsfor 

{Nqvember2«Ol9)»«4Bpra t!ie 


. * k ■ i .n me ivp ivu uuau uku mm 

Yadit (brec timts 

•fh Draonher 27 and January 8 In 

Alan Bond's world ^cfliampum- h* semi-finals when five bomts 


THE 


Australia HI and 


the semi-finals when five points 
will be awarded to each winner. 


“ — r — . _ n "m ik »"uircu iu «acn niuun. 

nnokabam lor ILrepr^eoi^ The top two are then matched in 
foe Taskforce 10 yynd»cate , best-of-sine decider between 
beaded by h» arch-rival, Kevin -lBOTar y 14 amj 25, leaving foe 
Parry. eventnal winner with a fire-day 

Unlike the challenging syn- break before defeadhig - the 
dicates, foe four defence groups Royal. Perth Yacht Club's three- 
have been encouraged to master year lease on foe “Ante Mug” in 
as many 12 -metxes as- possible foe final best-oFsevew Cop races 


CHALLENGE 


White Horse Scotch Whisky. The major sponsor of the 
1987 British America’s Cup Challenge. 




for their trials. As w«Q as 
Australia III. Bond has entered 
the larger Lexcen-designed 


■gainst - the sncce s s f al chal- 
lenger betw een January 31 and 
February 15. 

U... .... . . 


" ’’wavvo 4 - c rrSAe 








34 


SPORT 


THE TIMES THURSDAY OCTOBER 2 1986 


Take Valuable 
Witness to 


extend winning 
run to seven 


RACING: K INGSCLERE FILLY CONFIRMS SUPERIORITY OVER OLD RIVAL WITH EMPHATIC CHEVELEY PARK STAKES TRIUMPH 

Balding lavishes 
highest praise 
on Forest Flower 


By Mandarin (Michael Phillips) 

Having been reassured by take the riding honours with a 


Pht Eddery that the ground at 
Newmarket is perfect. Jeremy 
Tree has decided to let Vain- 
able Witness take his chance 
tn the Jockey Club Cup at 
Newmarket this afternoon 
and this grand stayer is con- 
fidently selected to extend his 
winning sequence to seven. 

Unbeaten since the 1984 
Cesarewitch. Valuable Wit- 
ness has few peers in this type 
of race and it is hard to 
envisage any of today's three 
rivals troubling him. Indeed 
he has had one of that trio. 
Spicy Story, behind him in 
both his victories this season 
at Ascot and York. 

Phardame, the winner of 
the Jockey Club Stakes on the 
Rowley Mile course in the 
spring, is not the most consis- 
tent of performers. He has 
won only one of his six 
subsequent races and that was 
in Belgium. 

Tale Quale, the runaway 
winner of the race twelve 
months ago. will be bidding to 
win the trophy a seventh time 
in 18 years for the Candy and 
Barnett families, who have 
enjoyed such success with 
High Line. Nicholas Bill and 
Centreline. However. Tale 
Quale has yet to recapture that 
form and is held by Spicy 
Story on Goodwood Cup run- 
ning behind Longboat. 

Elsewhere on today’s some- 
what disappointing card, it 
may pay to follow Willie 
Carson, who looks poised to 


double on Chili bang (3.5) and 
Khozdar (4. 1 0). 

Chili bang, my selection for 
the Bloodstock and General 
insurance Nursery, is cur- 
rently on a high. He has made 
all the running to win his last 
two races at Windsor and Ayr 
and 1 think that his excellent 
early pace will enable him to 
keep out of trouble in a biggish 
ficld- 

That was certainly the case 
last time out at Ayr. In 
contrast, the favourite. 
Sandall Park, who opposes 
him again this afternoon, got 
into all the trouble there was 
going and looked desperately 
unlucky not to finish closer 
than fifth. Whether he would 
have beaten Chiiibang with a 
clear run is debatable, 
however. 

On 61b better terms Sandall 
Park will be fancied to give 
Mick Easterby another strike 
but I still prefer Chiiibang who 
has obviously inherited the 
speed and tenacity of both his 
sire. Formidable, and his ma- 
ternal grandsire. Sky master. 

It was on today's course that 
Khozdar won both his races as 
a three-year-old. Now I think 
that he can regain the winning 
trail by landing the Choke 
Jade Stakes at the expense of 
Queen's Soldier and Beldale 
Star. 

Last time out Khozdar 
acquitted himself well when 
he finished third behind the 
leading Cambridgeshire hope. 



Forest Flower survived an 
objection and a stewards’ in- 
quiry to -assert her superiority 
over her okl rival, Minstrella, in 
the TaoersalTs Chevdey Park 
Stakes at Newmarket yesterday. 
Paul Mellon's supremely gallant 
filly is now joint favourite at 8-1 
with Invited Guest for next 
spring's 1.000 Guineas. 

“This is the best filly I've ever 
trained." said a triumphant Ian 
Balding afterwards. “She’s quite 
exceptional and much better 
than Mrs Penny was at the same 
stage of her career." Mrs Penny 
captured yesterday's group one 
race for the trainer in 1979 and 
then went on to win the Prix de 
Diane and Prix Vermeiite the 
following season. 

Forest Flower's 
heart- warm i 

sight to watch. Tony 1 
strained the filly on the rails as 
Canadian Mill and Indian Lily 


Flower's victory was a 
lining and thrilling 
watch. Tony Ives re- 


made the early r unning . When 
the jockey pulled 


Verd-Antique (right), seen here winning at Newmarket in May, returns to Headquarters for today's Choke Jade Stakes 


Power Bender, ai Newbury. 
But that race was over only 10 
furlongs. Being a half-brother 
to that redoubtable stayer. 
Andress, Khozdar is likely to 
appreciate the longer distance 
of today's race. 

it is of no little significance 
that Steve Cauihen switched 
yesterday from the one time 
classic hope. Verd-Antique, 
who has been off the course 
since the beginning of May. to 
Henry Cecil's other runner, 
Queen's Soldier. 

The only time that Easy 
Line, who is my choice to win 
the Stalker Handicap, has 
been beaten in his last five 
races was when he ran over 
seven furlongs. 

After experimenting twice 
at the distance without suc- 
his trainer. Patrick 


cess. 


Haslam. came to the conclu- 
sion that the son of Swing 
Easy' was. like his sire, a 
sprinter pure and simple. The 
subsequent switch back to six 
furlongs was promptly re- 
warded with victories at 
Hamilton and Yarmouth and 
now 1 think that today's race 
looks another suitable 
opportunity. 

Today's nap is entrusted to 
Gold Fee in the EBF Alington 
Maiden Fillies Stakes. She will 
be in the capable hands of 
Grevitle Starkey, who has 
come in for this enviable ride 
because Ray Cochrane injured 
a leg at Goodwood on 
Tuesday. 

Gold Fee started favourite 
for the Stable. Stud and Farm 
Stakes at Newbury last month, 
but ran green and only fin- 


ished third. Now she will be 
sharper for that experience 
and capable, in my judgement, 
of beating the fancied new- 
comers, Picnicing and 
Nuryana. The former is a half- 
sister to that fast horse. Preco- 
cious. who was never beaten 
before a leg injury cut short his 
career. 

At Fontwell 1 can give Steve 
Smith Eccles a good chance of 
landing a double for last 
season's champion trainer, 
Nick Henderson, on Deep 
Echo (3.0) and Fib (4.30). 

Debt -Follower, trained by 
another leading Lam bo urn 
personality. Jenny Pitman, is 
taken to follow up his win at 
Devon eight days ago by 
making his fitness tell in the 
Downion Novices' Chase at 
Ludlow. 


Colorspin 
taken out 


Twenty horses stood their 
ground after yestoday's forfeit 
stage for the Trnsthonse Forte 
Prix de I'Arc de Triomphe and it 
appears that there wOI be a field 
of !5 or 16 for Sunday's big race 
at-Longchamp. 

Michael Stoute has with- 
drawn Colorspin and Pan! Cole 
has decided against running 
Nisnas. Walter Swiaburn has 
yet to choose between Shantari 
and Shahrastaui but Tony 
Kimberley will, in any event, 
partner Dflustan. 

Ongoing Situation (Arias 
Rouse). Centauri (Brent Thom- 
son) and Rumboogie (Yves 
Saint-Martin) are the chal- 
lengers for today's Prix Eclipse 
at Saint-Cloud. 


Forest Flower 
outto launch her attack, the pair 
came very dose to John Reid 
and Minstrella, the favourite. 

Both fillies quickened taring 
down the hill into the dip on the 
July course, but Forest Flower 
lengthened her stride impres- 
sively in the final 100 yards to 
win by 2V: lengths with Shaikiya 
the same distance away third. 

Charlie Nelson took his defeat 
in sporting fashion. “I don't like 
otpecting and I didn't really 
mind which way it went,” be 
said. “But John was adamant 
that Forest Flower had bumped 
them and also forced him to 
make a move too eaity, which 
definitely doesn’t suit the filly. 
However, she's already won two 
group ones and I'm now going to 
train her for the Fred Darling 
and the Guineas next year." 

The camera patrol film 
-showed clearly that Forest 
Flower had collided with the 
favourite when making her 
move, causing Minstrella to lose 
her footing. She was also bruised 
after the race and was reported 


for the strongly- 


first teg of the autumn double, 
! from 


came 


Ron Smyth. “Trem- 

blani is in great form." said the 
Epsom trainer. “If be wins or 
runs well he'll go for the 
Champion but otherwise he’ll be 
retired to stud". 


Brent Thomson's remarkable 
run of success continued when 
the Australian drove Last Dance 
io a narrow win over Elegant 
Isle and Mon Coeur in the 
Rowley Mite Nursery. This 
victory gave Richard Hannon, 
the trainer, his 50th success of 
the campaign, his best ever 
total 


NEWMARKET 


Guide to our new in-line racecard 


103 (12] 0-0432 TIMESFOnW (CD.BF) fMrsJRyiey] B Had 9-10-0 . 


B West (4) 18 7-2 


Selections 


Bv Mandarin 


2.00 Tiklas. 

2.35 Easy Line. 

3.05 Chiiibang. 

3.40 Valuable Witness. 
4.10 Khozdar. 

4.40 GOLD FEE (nap). 


By Our Newmarket 
Correspondent 
100 Tiklas. 

2.35 Easy Line. 

3.05 Silvers Era. 

3.40 — 

4.10 Verd-Antique. 

4.40 Gold Fee. 


Racecard number. Draw si brackets. Six-figure 
form. Horse's name (S-Wmkers. V-wsor. H-fwxxJ. 
C-coursa winner. D-dstance miner. CD-course 
and distance winner. BF-beaien favourite m 


latest race). Owner m brackets. Trainer. 


i and 


weight Rider plus any allowance Tlw^Tinies 


Private Harxfccapper's rating. Approxim a te starting 
price. 


(8-3) ran or 
LE YOUNG MAN 


By Michael Seely 

235 Easy Line. 3.5 CHILIBAING (nap). 4.40 Gold Fee. 

The Times Private Han di capper’s top rating: 3.5 Sheer Royalty. 


«W» at Ascot (61, £7538. good to firm. Sept 25. 10 ran). FICKLE 
back in 4th. CLAHENTtA (7-8) 41 2nd of 13 to Pont (7-12) at Newbury (51. 21 
INOiGO (8-4). running best race lor some tune, was 21 away 5m. 


Septa 10 
getactei 

lOtoDeningDee 

led for 5f but Rntsiied 2*1 
I. good. Sept 20). MOON 


3.40 JOCKEY CLUB CUP (Group 111: £18,884: 2m 24yd) (4 runners) 


Going: good to firm Draw: no advantage 

2.0 BOSCAWEN SELLING STAKES (2-Y-O: £2,637: 1m) (14 runners) 

212000 BOLD DffFERENtt (T Morny WWharton 8-1 3 . CDwgtr 


401 

402 

404 

405 


01 013340 PHARDANTElS Karmen G Harwood 4-9-7 

■ - WITNESS (S Nrarahos) J Tree 6-9-5 _... 


101. (71 
102 ( 10 ) 
104 (12) 

106 i!S 


00 AGAOBT ALL OODSjS Moan KSmne 8-11 


107 

109 

110 
111 
112 
114 


(I 

(4) 

pi 

pi 


00000 MNGSWOOO RES0P; 

0 OBI DOS (Mrs H Demefrtou) J Hmdtey 
0 PENNY FORUM (The Forum Ltd) J SutcMfe 8-11 
000 ROCKY HORROR (K Bethel) RBraaB-M 


0 Etsworth B-11 . — _ 

11 . 


92 8-1 


(4 1 1111-11 VALUABLE 

(1) 303204 SPICY STORY (P Mellon) t Balding 

(2) 1-04004 TALE QUALE |R Barnett) H Candy 


.. G Starkey 08 9-2 

Pat Eddery *99 4-5 

. S Carthen 92 7-2 

W Nemos 92 9-2 


AMcGtona 

MKBs 

RHOa 


84 8-1 
— 10-1 


115 (11) 

!i“ § 

118 (G1 


00 SAN JUAN SONG (A BMey)B Stevens 6-11. 

000 SQUIQGLE (J Mfler) M Tompkins 8-11 

000 T1PTREEJP Cock) R Hannon 8-11 

00 I’VE NO DEA (Mrs D Manner) P Hasten (Ml. 


(Mrs D Magmerj P Hasten B-t 
TCHUP(Mre L Luce- Smith) R 
r (H Stovratas) P Hasten M_ 


0 PASS THE CAT 
00 RUWl VALLEY (H Stavratas) P Hasten I 


Hannon 84L 


Pat Eddery 
_ A Mackey 
. N rammer 
.. 6 Starkey 
G French 


— 10-1 


FARM PHAROAIfTE (9-6) Bltast o>5 to Arc Hope AcaMnengop«)BtBaden-Baden(lin4f.fi466ia 
1 unwi good. SBpt 7). Earner (9-8) 7i 4th lo BakharoH (8-3) at Newbury (1m 50 with SPICY STORY (9-2) 
17rl away 5th of B. Poor to that when frying longest trip to dote. (9-8) 14W 3rd to Rakeposhi King (8-12) at 
LmgfiaW (1m 6f. £15790, good. Jidy 1ZJ. TAJJ= QUALE (9-3) poor 5th of 6. VALUABLE WITNESS (8-6) effortless 
27jlYdrk wemer from Majasbaan (8-1) with SPICY STORY agaxi below par, back m 4th 1 2m. £7492 
19. 6 ran), to 1985 VALUABLE WI TNES S (9-0) won GoodwOOd Cup byS from 


043434 TIKLAS Oris F Durr) FDur 86 
WOQOBERRY - 


00 


(D HobtM BuHng Ltd) D Lrtng 8-8 . 


_ S Carthen — 8-1 
— TWHems 84 8-1 
-WNewnee a99 9-2 
S Whitworth S3 — 


only attempt at 2 mfles since. 
S election ; Vi 


; VALUABLE WITNESS. 


when about 51 Bth (7-12) to 
'ALts 


4.10 CHOKE JADE STAKES (£6.243: 1m 4f) (7 runners) 


MNGSWOOO RESOPi 
0) behind Thurman (9-0) at 
good 71 radon at Lercester 

^ (9-0) In YarTnoutfimkiden{7f. £964^0008. Sept iBIiVTHEEiSlIJnovtemarer 

Bth. beaten 6W. befinf Swift Purchase (9-1) m Sandown seder [7f, £3882. good. Aug 3T ' 

LEY poor last of 7 or Beverley RL5f|. previously (9-1 l)8ftl 7th to King Knutson m maiden 
Aug 23. 9 ran). TIKLAS below form m 7f nursery last tone. (7-7) had been HI 3rd to Johnn 
(1m 50yds. £1706, firm. Sept 8, 11 ran). 


event at Nottingham 
S e le ct i o n: TIKLAS 


(8-1 1 )r» 

3a 18 ran). RJWTVAL- 
hero (61. £37B3. good. 
Wl 3rd to Johnny Sharp (7-7) hi seniar 


501 

502 

503 

505 

506 
510 
512 


010330 CHAUMERE (VJD) (C Booth) R J Wffianw 5-9-5.. 


20-1000 BELDALE STAR (D) (A Solomons) G Harwood 3-8-11- 
120-303 KHOZDAR (CD) (SheritfiMohammedl W Ham 46-11... 


Three 


G Starkey 
W Canon 


„„ ..12 VERD-ANTIQUE (C.BFJ (Sheihh Mohammed) H Cecil 38-11 W Ryan 

31-1120 QUEEN'S SOUMER (OBF) iShmkh Mohammed) H Cool W... S CaullMn 
000030 NORFOLK SONATA (K Bethel) R Boss 3-8-3 


P Cook 


334320 ROBBAMA (B) (SheWi A AI MaMoum) J Ountap 3-8-3 Pat Eddery 


8312-1 
98 4-1 
90 5-1 
• 99 3-f 
97 9-4 
89 20-1 
86 6-1 


245 STALKER HANDICAP (3-Y-O: £2£98: 6f) {17 runners) 



110020 POSSEDYNO (C) (Derhdey Wood] D^Bsworth 9-7 
Y(D){TJei 


140000 TOUCH OF GREY (D) (T Jennings) D Them 9-3 . 


S Carthen 


1-000 iLLURUfEUX (MahKxxn Ai Maktoum) M Albina 9-0 . 
40-0200 TUFUH (0| (H Al-Makloun) A Stewart 90. 

022432 FLUTTERY (BFTIH Keck) G WraOC I 
200410 IflEROON MELODY (B6)(J Smith) F 
030030 GREEN DOLLAR ( 

242000 CRETE CARGOI 


|8-11._... 


WRS vrinbwn 
Pat Eddery 
M Roberts 


j R Sheather 8-0 . 
j Ltd) B Gubby 8-9— 
i Arirude) R J Wiliams 8-8. 


0 P nfikl e<wi 
” nuirtCAKI 


002200 TAX-ROY (D) (J Smth) B McMahon B-6 

2-00200 RIVIERA SCENE (G Yates) J Dunlop 8-2 


2-00200 RIVIERA SCENE (G Yates) J ^ 

014311 EASY L«E(D)[BLasala)P_Has»m 8-1 (7ex) 

002122 ZUUJKNKSHTfl 
13Z30Q 
000303 


96 11-2 

97 — 
92 10-1 
96 — 
90 12-1 

98 6-1 

95 — 

96 — 

94 8-1 

96 10-1 
98 8-1 

97 5-1 

95 12-1 
• 99 8-1 

92 — 
A CuDiene (7) 89 — 

G Carter 95 — 


I on anything done 
1tofirm. Aug24.6 
_ , T3ran). VERD- 

i May and has not been out smes (lm 41. £2642jx»d to 
t (8-2) 1541 runner-up to Nonas at Goodwood. Bfl OALE 
STAR (8-8) about II away Glh and NORFOLK SONATA (8-21 last 018 (lm 41. £15738, firm. Aug 1). ROBBAMA, 

blinkered lor the first time here. (8-6) was Beaten 31 by Kenanga (8-9) at Pontefract (lm 41, £2236, good to firm, 


Aug 6. 4 ran). 
S etecMo n. 


BELDALE STAR 


. AShoults(5) 

N Adams 

ACterk 

S Perks 


4.40 EBF ALINGTON MAIDEN FILLIES STAKES (2-Y-O: £4,981: 6f) (22 runners) 


G Daffleld 


T! 

. Pert Eddery 
— S Dawson 

W Canon 

M Thomas 


s-HXMO OUR TILLY (O) (Mrs F Aflen) W Jarvis 7-T! 

000000 YOUNG PUGGYID CoppenhaH) R Hofllnshaad 7-8 
02-0110 CASBAH CURL (D£F) IH Hughes) MSmyty 7-7 „ 

FORM POSSEDYNO and TOUCH O F GREY were both weu beaten bereMHatoate at Ascot I6n on Sat- 
r vnm urtlav. Previously POSSEDYNO (9-0) looked to have xnproved when a 2nd to FWeor (8-11) at 
.Sept 19. 10 ran). tatEEN DOLLAR put up best recant effort when (8-1 1)3 K 3rd to 


Nawbunr [5f. £4561. good. Sept 19. 10 ran). GREEN DOLLAR put up best i 

Pilot Jef (8-12) in a rest run Yarmouth Stakes evert (01. £3174. good to firm. Aug 20. 6 ran). EASY LB£ 
penalised but improving, last time |9-7) beat Taylor 01 Soham (8-10) 2fc at Yarmouth («. £2550. good. Sept 16. 
10 ran). CROMCS QUALITY shows a preference for easygnound and (8-9) was 1 vj 3rd to Coppenmfl Lad (8-0) 
at Goodwood (Sf. £2763. good to firm. Sept 13.10 ran), MEROONHELOOY (9-7) bask in 5th there. earter(B-7) 
beat Arelrox Lad (9-n 1 Wat Chester (61. £341 3. good to soft. Aug 29. 13 ran). RIVIERA SCENE (8-1 3) was last 
at Goodwood. Earfier in the season (9-1) excellent 1KI 2nd to Chummy's Pet (8-10) at Windsor with 
POSSEDYNO (9-5) a neck away 3rd without ttie benefit of a race and ZULU knight (8-12) betxnd (6t. £2885. 
good to firm, June 30. 14 ran). 

Selection: POSSEDYNO 

15 BLOODSTOCK & GENERAL INSURANCE NURSERY HANDICAP 
(2-Y-O: £6,118: 5f) (16 runners) 


602 (20) 
804 (7) 

605 (51 

606 (It) 

607 (131 

610 (3) 

611 (161 

613 (IS) 

614 (12) 

615 (22) 

616 (14) 
6»7 (6) 

618 (17) 

619 14) 
621 (2) 
622 110) 

623 (8) 

624 (IS) 

625 (11 

626 (9) 

627 (T9) 
629 (21) 


CAVEKHSH QUEEN (W Norton! L P^gott 8-11. 


COURTWOOO (E G Wragg 8-1 

DIANES BEST (J Lfpsonl w Casey B-11 


3 GOLD FEE (BF) (A Balzannij L Cumani 8-11 . 


... . T Nee — 14-1 
G Sexton — — 

G Starkey «99 9-2 


ICE CHOCOLATE (C Snack) W Janns 8-1 1 WNewnea 

0 JUST A PICNIC (Nbss H Gevers) G Pmchard-Goroon 8-1 1 G IMHIeld 

JUST MINE (Mrs 0 Swmtxxml J Winter B-11 W RSwmtwm 16 

XASHAPOUR (Mrs P Hamsl L Cumani 8-11 PHaraMetl 

LAKE TANA |H Keck) G Wraag B-11 R HBa 

LULLABY BASY (Mrs WMcApmD MOdey 8-11 M Wigham 


— 12-1 
— 12-1 


NURYANA (Srr P Opoertfiemier) G Wrang B-11 
PENELOPE STRAWBCRY |D Johnscnjl- Cumara I 


l Johnson)! 
PtCNiCWa (Lord TavrsTOCkl H Ceal 8-11 


B-11. 


— P 


RGoest 


POUR LTTAUE (D Montagu) J Dunlop 8-1 1 


S Carthen 
T Orton 


— 1(M 

— 16-1 
— 9-1 


SHAFT OF SUNLIGHT lMr» R Kemard) P Walwyn 8-11 Part Eddery 

StRIUS RIVER (H Kartell B HB& 8-11 M Hats 


SWEPT AWAY (Sheikn fAtnammed) W Hem 8-11 

TABELUNA (S Cooper) D Bswonh 8-11 

TARSA |M OtWQaiM Altwa 8-11 


W Careen 

AMcGkm 


— 16-1 

— 7-1 

— 9-1 


. Pat Eddery 

URJWAN (H AMutaktoumi H Thomson Jones 8-11 A Murray 


VALENTINE SONG (Chevetey Pare Stud) J Winter 8-11 A Mackey 

03 WATERED SKJK (Mrs J Kowni M E Francis 8-11 C Rutter 


86 10-1 
— 6-1 


PODM GOLDPEE(8-8)COrtdnotouit*enfinallurionowheii3'Al3rdtoMaigrflin(7f. E8679, good. Sept 
■ 19. 27 ran). JUST A PICNIC (8-1 liabn backward and tailed off behind Aratxan Sheik (9-0) here 


f7». £3919. good. 
Ston« (8-8) at York (i 


112030 
201 


02104 BALTIC SHORE (D) (Shmkh Mohammed) M StortB M 

913002 SAMEEK (D) (H AJ-Maktoum) H Arnistrono 9-3 S 

12010 NAIVE CHARM (^j K teheQ R Boss 8-12 — Pa 


143210 KHOWG^^CktotglJ W Watts 8-10 


010 VIVALDI ( 


301 (13) 

302 @ 

304 (9) 

« 

308 (15 

309 (14) 

311 

312 (»> 

314 0 
815 (6) 

318 (IB 

310 @ 

^ (ia 400341 Sfi LVEBS 
(1) 100000 OfOOLK 


Bdm9-7. 


J Reid 


G Steitury 

M A Giles (7) 

S Carthen 
Pet Eddegr 
Three 


Payne) W Jarvis 8-6 M MBs 

OIDOn i*OONtlBli«SO(BJlKRRi 


l Rtchamst C Bnttam 8-4 


41011 


aauBANG roriwra h J 0urt °e s- 1 P™*- 

GOOD GAME (R Psrcivali K Stone 7-13 — 


Gf 

W Carson 


80 — 
88 6-1 
87 — 
82 14-1 

94 6-1 
92 8-1 
91 — 

95 — 


1. 14 ran) LULLABY BABY (8-3) was outpaced from han-way when Bth of 11 to Lucky 
. £41 49yjoocMo soft Sept 3). SHAFT Of SUNUGHT shoukJ improve Oi^itover nearer 6th. 


bearen a. behind Imagmary Sky (9-0) ai Newoury (Sf. £3373. good. Sept 20. 14 ran). TARSA (8-1 1 ) showed 
rood speed when 3".-i 5th to At Risk (8-1 1) at Yarmouth (Sf, £1590. goad. Sept 18.19 ran). 

No form sdeeboa 

Course specialists 


TRAINERS 


JOCKEYS 


041002 SlEBtHHM 
032002 CLARENT1A (Mrs N 


326 



ns) M Usher 7-10 


C Rutter (3) 


CaHagnarr I 
Thom 7-7._. 


97 S-1 


WiraieTS 

Humers 

Percent 


Winners 

Runners 

PerCent 

89 — 

H C«al 

91 

3*7 

262 

S Y/rnlwortn 

B 

54 

142 

• 99 B-l 

M Stoute 

56 

347 

16.1 

S Cauthen 

79 

S42 

14.6 

S3 12-1 

G Harwood 

53 

365 

1*5 

S Dawson 

10 

72 

136 

97 10-1 

J Sotofte 

16 

111 

14.4 

Pat Eoderv 

63 

460 

13.7 

93 10-1 

HCanay 

17 

126 

13.5 

W R Swrtxim 

52 

376 

136 

87 12-T 

D Elsworth 

8 

64 

12Jj 

A Clark 

9 

75 

12.0 


Newmarket 

acceptors 

. ntninillllflT C 


WILLIAM HILL KWtflmT 5TAXES- 
Group I: 2-Y-O ColKandFnSes: 7hAjdaL 
^Sn Sheik. 

Brusdue. Catxtt. Oasslc 

ChSlm, Harlem Sh ufha*^ y4e k a. Htwey 
fwtw. HydrauNc Power, .55*?! 

Masasuc. Moment Of Trutfi. Moments ijt 
. Attitude Pokxxa. Rtsk Me, 
$£%* N anS£rHumboog«. SakrtB 

SaSMffigSBWBS 


ai Nawmantat 17 October- 
DUBAI CHAMPION STWE&OWt 

SJIfAstertxd Fted. 

ISS: o £ ffl? n boSS£ K Sd. dUSIS 

fSh Of S»rt. Ge»»f>- 

SamtEste^ 




U'Etote- Cg^f^J^ver. Ftos 


WW T* S*. 'Stwart 


*£T s ri££r tee. 

SsSyssw« s 




Results from three meetings 


Newmarket 


Going: good to firm 

28 (70 1. TYRIAN PRWCESS IS 
Carthen. 15-2): 2. Hailey^ Run (W r 
15-2K 3. Jonite (W Carson, iz-tj. 


£1.40. E2.40 DF: £7.60. CSF E20.13. 
Inxn 2G.07sec 

4.10 (SO 1. FAYHUZ (Pat Eddery. 4-1). 2 
Storm Warning (W Carson. 10-11 lav/; 3. 
Petrovi ch (B Thomson. 6-11 ALSO RAN: 5 
Stafcer. it Ardrox Lad («mi. 14 aii is 


£1 60. £3 10 DF. 
Tricast £4817 


£3 70 CSF- £1178. 


RAN: 7-2 lav frvfian JuMae (4th). 8 MiB 
a lows Lower. 


Trip- Street Ladd' 15th). 10 Jeak 
Mam Brand. Snety Mmutes. 14 George 
Harry. 16 Col logo Wizard. 20 Godford. 
Lima Lochetse. Omen. Peartbc. Sonant's 
Taylor 25 Bold Intention. Chotsun (6th). 
Corteon. Keel. Countess Bree. Calypso 
Kid. 22 ran. \l. M. V.l. 31. ha P Cole at 
Whaicombe. Tote £6.80: £2 00. £2.00. 
E7 10. DF- £10.90. CSF: £69.79. Irmn 
2S.26sec Bought m 7.000 gns. 

2J5 (im)1. LAST DANCE (B Thomson. 


Forgiven (5th). 50 Sxnta Ridge i6mi. 7 ran. 
“ I O German at 


nk. 3L II. II. II. W 
Newmarket. Tore: £<>.80. £200. £1 30 DF 
£350. CSF- £8 05. 58 97sec 
4.45 (2m 24yO| 1. CAP DEL MONO (A 
ClarK 5-1 ). 2. Ambassador (T Iwes. 8- 1 j: 3. 
Spartan Vefley (B Thomson. 1 1-2). ALSO 


3-45 1711 I. REBEL RAISER (P Rcfem- 
son. 7-j tavj. 2. Norte Bid (B Rouse. 100- 
JOr. j. Best O Bunch (IV R Swwmoum. 9-1/ 
ALSC 1 RAN. 10 Sun bridge i5thj. 14 Befry 
Jane i4jhl SO Sauce Oi The Sea. Spring 
Forward iBtnt 7 ran 2 ,1 6t.2".i. '.1. 71. M 


Ryan at Newwmarket Tore £2 5C. £1^0. 
£140 DF £2 80. CSF. £7 34 


• The last two races wore abandoned 
due to poor wsiMity. 


RAN. 93jt-lav Coinage |4mj. Wasst Rest 
(6ml. 13-2 Seven hhis. 8 Temote walk, zo 


Ludlow 


7-1). 2. Elegant fete (T Ives. 8 - 17 . 3. Mon 
ftAN:4p- 


Coeur (S Cautnan. io-n. ALSO I 
lav Roman Gunner. Counter Attack. 9 
Mekiday Makar (4tn). 6 Dr Brtaaco (5th). 
2S Caehnette i5tn>. B ran. sh hd. hd. 2%. 
hd. dead heat R Hannon at MarStorough 
Tote £8 30: £2.00. £2.20. £2.10. OF- 
£14 60 CSF £4269. 1mm 41. Msec. After 
a stewards inquiry result stands. 


Saafuur (5th). 33 Happy Breed. 9 ran. '.i. 
41. nk. 2’.-i. Vii G Harwood at Puiborouch 
Tote £450: £1.10. £250. £220. DF. 
£1160. CSF £3849 3mm 31 70sec. 
Jackpot: £17.71150. Plaeepofc £325q 


Brighton 


3.10 TATTERSALLS CHEVELEY PARK 
STAKES (Group l 2-Y-O fAes: 
£41.110:611 


FOREST FLOWER ch f fry Green Forest - 
- 18-1 1 


Leap uvrty |P Malkin) E 
8) 


I Tlvea (13- 


1 


M il litre Si ro I by The Mfrisfrrt - Ffiqht 

Dancer (E Evans) Eti ijr- " 


Red (1 MO lavj 2 
Canadian MB br f by Mb Reef - Per 
Excellence (Maktoum AI Maktoum) 8-1 1 
W Carson (7-11 3 

ALSO RAN- 14 ShBkiya (4th). 40 Incsn 
L4y(5tti) 5 ran. 2V.-1. 2WI. 2SI. 31 iBaJdmg 
at Kmgbctee Tote: win ESSO. Places; 
fi1.10.ll20. OF- £1 40. CSF: E3 5t. 1mm 
l2.50sec. An otjjectiCr bv the second to 
the wmner and a stewards mqurfy result 
stands 


Going: firm 
2.15(51 66yd> 1. ULTRA NOVA iTOwrm. 
7-2|. 2. Days Like These IW R awinburn. 
3-1). 3. Bag OHhythm (P Robmson 4-5 
fav) ALSO RAN 66 Misier Wiza.-d (5th;. 
Miss Jasmine 4th 5 ran 2M 3 i.3i. ’. t P 
Cote at wrutcombe Tote. £210: £120 
£1 60 OF £2.70 CSF. £12.45. 

2.45(1m) 1 . TEEJAY(G Bardwetl. 25-1 1 . 
2. Tremendous Jet (R Guest, 7-5 lav); 3. 
Ileathyiiir (G Starkey. 13-2): 4. Lena Bay 
|M Runnier. 12-t i. ALSO RAn. 7 Bee-Kav- 
Ess. 9 Nelson s Laoy. io Spar* hard Lad. 
Up Town Bay (Sttii. t-i Caiman. Union 
Starchy. 16 Cvgne (6th) 20 Spring Pursun. 
Tom s Nap Hand tur|. Steei Pass. Com- 
poser. 33 Wmfly HoBOw. Sky Manner 77 
ran 31. 3. II. Til. nk. P Sevan ai 
imoreier Tote £29.60: E6 90 £2 00 £1. SO 
£5.40. OF: 180 7Q. CSF £10904. Tnca« 
£609.49 No bid 


3.40 (70 1. CLEOFE (T Wrifiams. 7-2h 2. 
’ “ ’ 1 1-2). 3 Blue Guitar (M 


Bnuzaka (T Ives. 

HiHs. 5-2 >Bv| ALSO RAN: 4 Certain 
Aware 1 6 th). 9-2 Zalata (4th). 12 
QuaMaireSS (6th) 6 ran. i ! -1, 41. nk. 31. sh 
hd. L Cumani ai Newmarket Tote: £3 20: 


3.15 (Imi I MARSH HARRIER (P Cock. 
5-2 fav)-. Z Fort Patrol (C Rutter 7-25. 3. 
Faney Pan iG Starkey. 13-21. ALSO RAN 
8 Portfire (6rhl 9 Scarcer Spurt (Sltn. 14 
Fm Loono. F U B O* Lie |4th|, joy*ul 
Dancer. Salloom. 16 Uk*y Starios:. 
Haurtxty Lady Mran 2M.il. M.8I \i a 
M oore at BnqnicKi. Tote: £3.30: El.tO. 


Going: nard 

Z0i2rr. 1 Snake River iC Smith. 
i3-9i.2 Swih Ascent iB-1 1 tavi 3. Tender 
Gif:i4Q-l) 6 ran HR Pemiyne s Fnde 5i. 
101 F Jordan Tote £2.50. £1.10. £1 20. 
DF- £2 10 CSF £2 99 
2.30 (3m am Toohry Street tH Davies. 
S-4 rt-i3V). 2 Pashiyi Lad i5-i rt-tavi. 3. 
Oakpnme (33-tj 4 ran. NR Metrta. 2\-i. 
301 CYJale s Tote t2.40.DF £1.50 CSF: 
£2 93. 

3.0 <2m hfllei 1. Adarasrtown (P 
Suoamye 54 ravi 2 Ereni Riverside 
19-2; 3 Tinsel Rose i5Q-l\ 0 ran. NR: 
Dime And * Dakar 2M. i2t. V. P®e Tote. 
£1 7Q. £1,30. £2 ID. £13 3). DF. £4.40. 
CSF £7 01 

3J0 iZm nciei i. Honeyman (Candy 
Moore. 7<4t. 2 Hasty Impcn MD-1 ■: 3. 
RasaWhon it >8 iav» 7 ran NR: 
Roc^man 20l. *.l J Jenkins Tore. £2 70: 
£130. £6 00. DF £21.30 CSF £17 50. 

4J)|2mcMi BatechMPScuaamoie.J* 
5 (avt. 2. Batman fS-Zi. 3 Fores Wai<? n3- 
2i- 5 ran.NR Yankee Doodle. 2M. Si. B 
Preece Tote £1.50. El 10 . £1 50. OF- 
£2 20 C?F £3 19. 

_ MOiominaOyQhdlen Mister Pitt IN 
-earn. 7-41. 2. Plaza Tc.ro (--2i. 3 
Prmcess Hecate 15-4 taw Aran 2M. 301 
T BiH T 0 ;e £2.10. DF. £2 “0. CSF £T IS 
Piaeepeu £15.85 


Blinkered first time 


NEWMARKET: 2 0 K.ngs«o« RiSOflaJ. 
4 IQ Robbama. 


Lypheor colt 
wins plenty 
of admirers 


By A Special Correspoadent 


The highlight of the morning 
session on the second day of the 
Newmarket Hightlvcr Yearling 
Sales was an attractive coll by 
L>pheor. He commanded the 
interest of several top bidders 
including Michael Goodbody. 
of the Makioums' Gains- 
borough stud. Susan PiggoiL 
dreorge Blackwell and Charles Si 
George. However. James 
Delahookc had the final nod ai 
3lHl.Ui.lO guineas. 

Dclahooke was acting for a 
group of owners who have 
horses in training with Guy 
Harwood. “He's a super in- 
dividual and by a world class 
stallion.** said Dclahooke. 

Lypheor spent one season at 
stud in Ireland, and from his 
first crop of 24 foals, sired the 
group one winners. Royal Hero- 
ine and Tolomco. He then went 
to Japan before being bought to 
stand at the Gainsway Stud in 

Kentucky where he died earlier 
this year. Del ahooke's purchase 
is the second foal of the winner 
Fabulous Salt whose first prod- 
ucl Elusive Icicle, is in training 
with Michael Sioutc. 

During the morning 57 lots 
were sold for 2.27 i.OHO guineas, 
averaging 39.S42 guineas. 


FONTWELL. PARK 


&30SIDLESHAM SELLING HURDLE (4-Y-O: £888: 

2m2f)(8) 


Selections 

By Mandarin 

2.0 Prasina Maria. 2.30 Fast Flight. 3.0 

Echo. 3.30 Gulphar. 4.0 The Royal Connie. 4. 

Fib. 


2 0341 GULPHAR J Jenkins 11-0 

3 DP-3 JU8TCANDDD AVfitem 11-0- 


. jWtrita 


8 000- TROMN GOO RAkatmst 11-0 OMcKaom 

9 0041 UI8PEH THE STARS (HOP) J FBch-Hsyes 11-0 

10 04P- WARRIOR UNCLE DRortnson 11-0 — MrDRoMnttn 

11 WF- G0LDBI JUNE DTudter 10-6 CGray 

£2 -303 GREAT OWING A Davison 106 RRom 


Going; good to firm 

2jQ EARTHAM NOVICE HURDLE (3-Y-O: 2m 2f) 
(6 runners) 


13 2-F1 UN0RBJ3 LADY W Ktmv 106. 


SSMMoa 


3-1 Under The Stare, 4-J Gulphar, 5-1 Just CareKd. 

6-1 Trojen God, 8-1 UngfleM Lady, Great Owtng„ 


1 PRASMA MAT1A N GasrtM 1V2 

13 SE£MTRUNMMG(BF) PMtchel 11-2 

22 BtAHtANNEVtUEfBiNCaiartian 10-10 DMaryiiy ( 

022 CUCKOO IN IICI^TDBtMOrth 10-10 RAmott 

SAXON BAZAAR M Usher 10-10 CBrnmi 


ROmmody 
ISteriW W 


SOFT SHOE SHUFFLE MM BSandareilMO W Monti 


40 BOSHAM NOVICE CHASE (£1,472: 
3m 2f 110yd) (5) 

1 3221 MGHTYMSASTBIW Kemp 8-11-6 SSMxfrm 

2 -IO THE ROYAL COMBE (Q Mbs L Bower 7-11-fl 

3 P-FP BROWNIHORNWGMDjnier 10-11-0 A Shape 


11-8 Prasina Matia, 3-1 SDenf Rimkig. 7-2 Saxon Bazaar. 

Iran Nevrte. 


. MrCltansdon 


7-1 QKkoo In The Nest. 12-1 Biafran I 


230 ‘NICKEL COHT CHALLENGE CUP (E2£3& 
2m 2f 110yd) (8) • 

2 23-4 RUNMNG COMMENT R Hodges 13-11-7 JM* 

5 100- TARN NGasefoa 8-10-13^-: PSc mte n w e 


6 00-0 NO HACK C Reap 7-1 1-0. 

10 -PQ2 UTOPIAN G Boo 8-11-0- 

Evens Mlgtity Disaster. 1IXF30 Utopian, 4-1 The. Royal 

Connie, 8-1 No Hack, 14-1 Brownthom. 


(£685: 


8 F141 FAST FLIGHT (CO) JFfitcli-Heyes lt-106 


.7 42-3 LKTM AMERICAN (CO.HF1T ForaEar 9-10-t 

... . LHereqrP) 

8 32U0 DONAGHMOYIE (CD£F) Mss L Bower 9-10-1 


4J0 BHJJNGHURST NOVICE HURDLE 
2m 21) (1C) . 

2 1 BEL OSCAR (CO) C^MkHnan 4-11-3 VHcfentt 

OP-1 

os/o 


I N Hnteson 4-11-3. 


3 OP-1 mvoi\ 

4 00/0 DLEMATIIB Mrs NSraMi 5-10-12- 

5 0 LIGHT TT« LOT JJankms 5-10-12— 


- T 


11 3823 ABAUGHTfS) Ms M Thomas 8-100. NON-RUN 
18 -U30 STRAIGHT UNE N Wheeler 13-10-0 — MrNWhartar 
17 P-03 WESTERING HOME □ GnSHU 12-1041 R 

2-1 

7-1 Tam, 


6 PPO- HALF A BUCK W Komp 4-1 0-11 

7 KMQSBROOKWWWAnan 4-10-11 M 

8 2 UVEW HOPE (BFjDMuray-Smitfl 4-10-11 


SSnHiEcrtM 

CBnma 

J White 


RJBaggae 


10 


FRtBSXY IASS B Wise 8-107. 


Latin American. 3-1 Fast FSgftt 7-2 Running Contntert, 

n. 12-1 Dcnefl hr noyne. 16-1 Westering Hama. 

3.0 RANK CHALLENGE CUP (£2^06: 2m 2f) (6) 

1 -U13 SLEVELUACHRAKBaley 8-11-10 

fifr-TTbomsco Jones 

3 430- TARAS CHARIOT (CD) P Mitchel 5-11-2. RDommody 


11 2PF- caOliARElTA G Gracey 7-I0-7-. 
13. RBiDSLEYGRB. A Ingham 7-10-7. 


HrTIbomaan Jones 
Ri 


7-4 Uve In Hope, MFh 3-1 Bel Oscar. 7-1 UghtTheLcB. 
12-1 GroOaretta, 14-1 Randslay Sri. 16-1 others. 

Course specialists 


4011-3 DEEP ECHO N Henderson 6-11-0.- 

7 0-22 ZACCJO (BF) S Dow 8-10-0 

8 406 TIC DIPLOMAT W Kamp B-IOO. 

30 5-106 


10 330- STEAMY DOughm 5-H 


SSaiBiEodu 

ROmt(7) 
SSbBston 
_ P Double 


TRAMERS: N Henderson. 8 winners from 37 nmn, 

BswonhJ from 37. 185%;J Jenkins. 18 from 108. 16.7%; Miss 


J from 80.10^%. lour 


13-8 Deep Ertto.,3-1 Taras Chariot 5-1 Steve Luadva. 
6-1 Zacoo. 8-1 The Diplomat 10-1 Steamy. 


JOCKEYS: S Smkfr Ecctes, & wftnere from 43 nrte, 186%; R 

Dunwoody. 17 from 104. 163%; R Rowe. 27 from 1 73. 15.8%; R 

GoWstefli. 13 from 131. 95%; R Rowel. 7 vrimars from 88 rides. 
8.1%. (Only five queffiras). 


TAUNTON 


Selections 

By Mandarin 

2.15 London Contact 2.45 High Reef. 
Golden Match. 3.45 Coral Harbour. 
HounstouL 4.45 Milanessa. 


X45 GAY SHEPPARD. 
(£1,648: 2m 1ft (2) 

5 -314 TOP GOLD (D) R I 


HANDICAP HURDLE 


7-11-7. 


7 163 CORAL HARBOUR (BflWarde 4-11-3. 
4-5 Coral Harbour, Evens Top Goto. 


3.15 

4.15 


|: hard 

2.15 6ICKNOLLER NOVICE HURDLE (3-Y-O: £508: 
2m If) (6 runners) 

I 2310 LONDON CONTACT MRpe 11-10 PI 


4.15 NORTON FITZWARREN NOVICE HURDLE 
(£576: 2m 3f) (10) 

4 006 OtCTXDBiniCRiDliam 7-10-12 SMcNaB 


D M onte (7} 
FOwnQ 


ESS-JAY-ESS B Stevens 1 16 . 
00 RAVEL370N J Honeyball 116 — 
THE GODFATHER P Baiey 11-CL 
THORNRULLAH J Bndgar 116 — 
H08J NOA P Bowden 106 


. SMorahead 
H KknoB 
RDwateH) 


006 DICTA DBf (B) C Bonham 7-10-12 

5 -rn MMCURt DANCER N Thomson 5-10-12 

7 0022 HOUNSKHirmOPresf 8-10-12 B 

8 03 01 ITS FOR YOU W Reed 6-10-12 DWonoacotl 

11 PF6 PEHTTGHJ J Thomas 6-10-12 Mr T Jones 

13 4340 MA0H WARRIOR (0 A Barrow 4-10-11 JHnst 

14 4003 RAZZLE DAZZLE BOY WRWBtams 4-10-11 _A 

18 360 DISTANT SOUND R Diddn 5-10-7 0 Jones 

20 0P0- RUDANSCA B VOnn WO-7 NON-flUNNB} 

21 OOP- WWIE PENNY (B) Mbs M Ungaro 6-10-7 

MrTWchal(7) 


15-8 London Contact. 100-30 Ravetstoa 7-2 Ro® Noa. 13- 
2 Ess-Jay-Ess. 12-1 The GodfaBiar. Thomruflah. 


2-1 Hounsttut 5-2 Razzte Dazzle . 
B-l Distant Sound. 14-1 Dicta Don. 25-1 


Boy. 7-2 Maori warrior. 
IPbmlgfii - 


,33-1 othera. 


2.45 CHARD NOVICE SELLING HURDLE (£388: 
2m 11) (6) 

3 -200 FOREVER M0 (V)R Road 4-1 16 M Hoad (7) 

4 463 MGHRBEF mucker 5-1 16 — „SMcNte 1 


7 POO- RUSSEU. FLYER (B)R Hoad 4-11-1 

8 POO- TAIFfl Frost 4-116 

9 OOP- ITALIAN SPRING D Jenny 5-106 


445 KfNGSTON-ST-MARY HANDICAP CHASE 
(£1,980: 3m 10 (8) 

4 0P44 JIMMY IHFF(D) J Warrits 14-11-7 — 

6 0232 MILANESSA G PYrat 9-10-12 BPuwel 

7 6M FWAL CLEAR J Old 8-10-10 C Uewvdyn (7) 

8 -440 GREY TARCtoM (CO) JBnteer 14-10-7 UKimM 

rSDUOTORJiaigTlM SMcfrM 


9F4U4 SWHTI 


6-4 High Reef. 7-2 Forever Me. 5-1 Nicety Mealy. 6-1 Tad. 
16-1 Russel Flyer. 20-1 Itafian Spring. 


- JWng7 

10 POO- NWS ABWAH (Q D Scott 7-10-3 Mrs R 


By Michael Seely 

to be suffering from internal 
Heeding. “It must have been a 
difficult decision for the 
stewards," said Reid later. 1 
havea feeling ihat if the distance 
had been only a neck and not 2w 
lengths we would have got the 
race.” 


Sired as she is by Green Forest 
and being out of Lea^^tveiy, 


who finished third in the Oaks, 
Forest Flower is sure to stay a 
mile next year. "She’s only 14 
hands 3'ri inches high." the 
trainer concluded. “You can 
never be certain whether fillies 
are going to train on. but there's 
no reason why she shouldn't." 
The 1.000 Guineas favourite is 
one of 30 horses that Mellon has 
in training at Kingsdere. 

After Luca Cumani had 


watched Tyrone Williams bring 
vith a well-timed run to 


Cleofe writ 

beat Brazzaka in the Never So 
Bold Fillies Handicap, the New- 


market trainer said that riding 

y-fancied 


i in Saturday’s Cambridge- 
shire had not yet been 


finalized. 

"I don't know yet whether Ray 
Cochrane will be fit enough after 
his accident at Goodwood on 
Tuesday," said the trainer. 
"He's having physio treatment 
again tonight and we should 
know by Friday." 

Good news regarding Trem- 
blant, who is favourite ai 8-1 to 
repeat last year's victory in the 


$*. 


■A 

v 


11 P-PP SAB I (B^Q) N Thomson 
^■BY BUMPS 


12 320P BILLY 


12-106. 


C Poptorn 8-106- 


. 0 Monte 


KJ .* 


3.15 GR UNWICK NOVICE CHASE (£1,675: 2m 3f) 
(5) 

SMorehntf 
PBkMafWd 


«. Milawssa. 7-2 Jimmy MW, 11-8 

Sweet Sokctor, 8-1 BUy Bumps. 12-1 Grey TanjUn. 


t 

v 

a 

i 

t 


4 D43U CHIEF BLAOCFOOT JOM 7-1 1-S 

5 UP4P OKJOLY BEAR N Artfto 8-116 . 

6 30F3 GOLDEN MATCH (B) Mrs S HemOraw 8-1 16. BPowei 

13 0F6 SALTHOUSECPopftsm 9-116 PMctmte 

15 0430 STQRia GOTO PWte 8-116 INSWnt(7) 


Coarse specialists 


1 16 Golden Match, 7-4 Chief BtacAfOOt. 1 16 Stories GokL 
10-1 Cudrty Bear. 33-1 Safrhouse. 


TRAINERS: M Pipe, 27 temcra from 157.1 7.2%: J Old, Shorn ^ - 
60.10.0 %: R Hodges. 10 from 108. 9.3%. (Orty tftrea quaWteraL ’* 
JOCKEYS: P Navas. 8 winners from^ ^52 rides, IP “ 

Rtehaitta, 11 from ®. 12v4%; B PotwA B from 83. 96%. (Only -«■ 
three quakfrora). 


1 

N 


LUDLOW 


3L30 DOWNTDN NOVICE CHASE (£1,294: 3m) (B) 

1 M /1 DEBT FOLLOWER Mrs J Pt&nan B-11-5 

4 0DP1 NORTH DOWN B Presas 10-11-5 J 


Selections 

By Mandarin 


7 PW- Ott«JETHEDANCH pWMOte 9-10-13 PDetW^ 
COMO LODGE W Mm PO-13 SJCTNoN . 


8 PP6 

15 4F0B GOLDEN NBNNA B Fooey 6-106 


17 604 BBSS PRAGUE O L WMams 12-106 . 


. A Webb 
. R Crank 


i0 Splendid Magnolia. 2.30 Tierenee. 3.0 


Charlie. 3.30 
Honeyman. 


Debt Follower. 4.0 Fogar. 


— FWoww, 4-1 North Down, 7-T Como Lodge. 

10-1 Miss Pmpje. 16-1 Golden Medina. ■ 


4-0 WISTANSTOW NOVICE HURDLE (£685: 2m) . 


(9J 


Going: hard 


2.0 STRETTON CONDITIONAL JOCKEYS 
SELLING HURDLE (£743: 2m) (7 runners) 

2 006 EXTRUDE BCamUdnB-1 1-10 AI 

3 /OI- KSTVM8lAGE(D)STcvr 6-1 1-10 T1 

8 0 THE CHAUCEWEUL M James 4-11-7 Sh 

It 01 SPtEMXD MAGNOLIA MRpa 3-10-12 Jl 

13 0322 S1S> ON HDrte 3-106 □ Landau 

15 00 L OW RAT ION K Bridgwater 3-106-- KRyan 

17 0204 RUPERTS OAUGHTORMCeStel 3-106 — 


1 0100 DISCOVER GOLD (Q£F) K Bridgwater 5-116 

WVMteln 

3 -030 BYRNES GROVE (V)DGBndotto 7-116 PSwttn . 

4 U4- POGAR □ Uurray-Smttfr 4-1 16 SShcnreed - 

T 400 MR PANA CHE MttaaBan 4-116 SHteMp) - 

8 0 OSTENTATIOUS CWWdman 4-116 SGteXMtH ’ 

9 063 PEAT Mis A Hewttt 4-116 MWIteM . 

10 40*- RB) BOLT C Holmes 4-11 6 TWaR ~ 

13 00 TRACK MARSHALL DLWBtens 4-1 16 BCnrt 

15 600 TEN0B1 GUT T Morton 6-106_^ MBewteyfl) ■ 

96_Peat. 11-4 Fggw. 5-I. Tfgck Marshal, 6-1 Bymee •- 




Grave. 8-1 Red Boit ItflTandar Gift. 14-1 olhers. 


8-1 


5-4 


Magnolia. 3-4 Sap On. 8-1 Misty Mkage. 

1. 10-1 Rupert s Daughter, iB-1 others. 


4J0 ASHFORD HANDICAP HURDLE (£1,290: 2m) ; 




Z30 INVERSION HAM3ICAP CHASE (£1581: 2m) 


(5) 


20041 HONEYMAN AIRJjeteteS 4-11-12 (54*) St 

4 3J0- UTTLE LONDON Sri T Morton 7-1 1-2 — M Bowlby Q 

5 6W BATON MATCH. (mM Chepman 6 - 10-12 S ltecfriig (7) 

8 30B- tVANTEHT Bffltey &-106 B Doming 


24 0-U1 SB BADSWOR1H(D)TLaxfan 8-11-12. 
S -110 T1ERENS (D) T BH 8-1 1-10„ 


Evens Honeymen. 34- Baton. Match. 7-2 Uttto London, ■ 
1 «-i tranter. 


27 0244 IttHG-LOU (B^D) J Edwards 11-116 

29 3FD- MR MOUffiiaOlNGaseiW 7-106 

210 O00P KAY HARKER (4 MraM Thomas 9-104.- S 


. R( 

P Barioa 


Course spedalists 


54 Sir Badsworth. 2-1 Twnanee. 9-2 Ring-Lew. 12-1 Mr 
Mouse. Kay Harker. 


TRAiNHlSfcl Edwards. 11 wteners from 54 rues, 204%;** Pipe. .- 
7 from 36. 194%; D GanMfo J .11 from 74, 143%. (Only three , t . 


: P Barton. 8 tenners from 75 rides. 1 0.7%; j Suthem, ■- 
7 from 74.918%. (Only two qyaMtera). - 


3-0 ELTON NOVICE HURDLE (£685: 2m 5ft (6) 

1 2103 LUCKY CHARLIE J Jerfons 6-1 1-7__^ SShenned 

2® ' 


6 030 GOLDEN BAVARDTCaMnef 5-11-0— . PCaldwefl( 

7.440F MAJIBAMLLM Pipe 5-116 HDm 

BOPPO SENORMAGMRCOMreMBaUoge 9-116 N Babbage 
12 002- OJEN60Y-BOY A James 4-19(3"; Stem 


• An electronic display board, giving in forma- L ^ 
lion on runners, nders and results has bom " 
erected at Oieitenhaih' and wili be osed. for the 
first time next Wednesday and Thursday to. '. 
replace the traditional number-boani in the*;* 
idock-.The board consists. of.IJOO seven-inch 




. 8-11 Lucky Charfe, 4-1 

9-1 Majuta HA. 10-1 Coul WoBoh. 25-1 



\ 


r. 5-1 GoW Bward. 

MegrXficO- 


high Huo rescent characters. It wiH also provide * 
information on Tote betting, including up-to-the- ^ 


minute shows. 


- i, 




f 




d five 

ders. 

* 3C- 
them, 

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•liable 

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a extra 

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sed in 
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Alingai 

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» Poten- 

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:r rising 

topic of 
ubtion. 

around 
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unday racing can be 
? winner for Britain 


THE TIMES THURSDAY OCTOBER 2 1986 


SPORT 


35 


r^!«^n]astyear, 22 minion 
-JggPilh ad at leasTone bet with a 
a ^_ -~--S5 ^ They created an annual 

. sport has such r^z — g? orse racing. No other 

%the week1^^~^^ e - tte most 

as tennis, cricket, golf 


jggpg - . ■ Sunday. Racing is now deep 


I 


in 


to be onen mi 

— ; Michael Seely reports. 



**! Sunday 35,000 
peepers mending ihou- 
^nds of British visitors, will 
tnrong into the colourful 


is 

f 


for thetitle of champion of EuropTlt is 

femp y he° f lhC MX de Pte 
Tens of millions of television viewers 

will also be- watching the world’s 

In France a “«al of 
£16 million will be wagered, £10 million 
of which win be invested on the Tierce 
m an attempt to forecast the first three 
home. Three per cent of the £16 million 
^ P u . 1 1*®^ into French racing. 
Britain is the only country, apart from 
New Zealand, where the racetracks are 
empty on Sundays. Most other sports 
have for years been deliberately flouting 
the lord’s Day Observance Act of 1780, 
which prohibits the opening on the 
Sabbath of “any house, room- or other 
place” for the purposes of entertain- 
ment or amusement to which the public 
is admitted by the payment of money or 
* y tickets sold Tor money. 

At Wimbledon in June, Boris Becker 
won his singles tennis title in front ofa 
■ capacity crowd. At Brands Hatch in. 
July. Nigel Mansell captured the British 
motor-racing Grand Prix. Both of these 
events took place on Sundays, in direct 
contravention of the law. 

When the first regular staging of 
major sport on Sunday in Britain 
started with cricket's John Player 
Special League in 1969, elaborate 
subterfuges, such as charging for cars or 
programmes only, were adopted. And 
even. now most stadiums have one free 
entrance, tucked away in a corner where 
no one can find rL 

Wimbledon is the cleverest of all in 
that all seats are sold in advance and 
although admission on the day is free, it. 
benefits no one, for it is impossible to 
watch the matches without a ticket 
Before the surprise rejection of the 
Sunday Shopping BiH by Parliament 
'least -May, the Jockey Cub, aware of the 
desirability ofintrddurinf^anaay rac-' ; 
ing - with the twin objectivesof 
increasing attendances andof attracting 
a new section of the leisure market — set 
up a working party; who,’ on balance, 
were strongly in favour provided that it 
was found to be financially viable. . 

I he chairman of the committee 
1 was General Sir Cedi Blacker, 
the deputy senior steward of 
the Jockey Club. Every bit as 
tough and formidable a 
character as his rank would suggest, the 
General is starting a new campaign. He . 
will be meeting leaders of the Church 
next week and he will be canvassing 
MPs and other interested parties. 

He -says; “We understand that many 
of the opponents of the Shops Bill, in 
Aboth political and church circles, are not 
Unwilling to contemplate less drastic 
changes in the British Sunday, despite 
their opposition to the Bill. 

“We are canvassing support far the 
introduction of racing on a limited 
number of Sundays, realizing that , 
however limited or experimental such a 
period might be. Parliament would sail 
have to change the law to allow betting 
on Sundays. . , . . 

*it is much too early to forecast what 
success we are likely to have. It has not 
surprised us that the first objection 
raised is to the opening of betting shops, 
and thus to the authorization of on- 
course betting on Sundays. It could be 


thm we shall have to face the choice 
between Sunday racing with on-course 
betting only or no Sunday racing ai alL” 
General Blacker highlights the 
anomalies in betting: “The fact that it is 
legal to have a telephone bet on credit 
on Sunday, or to go to a casino or 
amusement arcade, means that gam- 
bling on Sunday already takes place in 
practice with the law’s approval. But 
this is of no help to the prospect of 



T 


General Blacken canvassing support 

Sunday racing. The law as it stands, and 
the lack of political will to change it, 
form the roadblock which denies us this 
prospect” 

Whatever success attends the efforts 
of General Blacker and his committee, 
the lack of wholehearted support from 
every section of the industry is not 
altogether surprising. People are always 
resistant to change and when a new 
move is in prospect they are inclined to 
take a self-interested viewpoint 

Doubters of the probable success of 
Sunday racing in this country should 
listen to Jonathan Iram, the dynamic 
head of the Phoenix FM trade in 
Ireland, where, three weeks ago, a crowd 
• of 12,880 watched Park Express beat an 
international field in> the Phoenix 
- Champion Stakes. 

' “Sunday racing over here has been a 
phenomenal success and has fulfilled all 
our, expectations,” he says. “We were 
slightly dreading this September, as the 
presence of Lester Piggott and 
Commanche Run had been suchadraw 
last year. But people still came and (he 
attendance was double that on the 
Saturday. And this was despite the 
counter-attraction of the hurling final 
which drew a crowd of around 60,000 to 
70,000. 

“However, it’s no good just sitting on 
your backside. Sunday racing is still like 
a baby. It needs careful nursing. We 
mounted a high-powered promotional 
campaign again this year, on the radio, 
television, backs of buses and afl over 

to families who are on fee look-ouffor 
something to do on a free day. 

“The principal scope lies in attracting 
families. So paramount emphasis has to . 
be placed on non-racu^ activities. We 
had a Rastafarian band, a jazz band, 
-clowns and mime artists. And.you have 
to have a highly sophisticated play- 
ground for children, so the parents can 
have a bet and take a cup of tea, 
knowing that -the children are being 
looked after and kept happy." 

Both this year and in 1985, the Irish 
Turf Oub permitted only 12 fixtures. “I 
don't think there’s room for more than 


16 to 20 meetings a year.'* comments 
Irwin. “There are not all that many 
'suitable Sundays. And as &r as the 
metropolitan tracks are concerned, 
must stress the emphasis of having 
race of international calibre. People w! 
are not all that knowledgeable about 
racing want to come to watch men and 
horses they have heard about.” ■ 

rain concluded: “The longer Brit- 
ain has to put off halting Sum 
racing, the more will it be to our 
advantage. More and more people 
are coming over here on Sundays. 
And I must stress how natural it seems 
to be racing on that day. 

“The irony of it all is that the 
churches are playing to full houses in the 
mornings. And in the afternoons people 
are allowed to hunt shoot, fish, race or 
do anything they like.” 

Irish -racing does notpresent an exact 
parallel to Britain's: in are the tracks do 

not benefit from off-course betting. 
Tins, of course, is why the betting 
industry in Britain is slightly lukewarm 
about the project: would the extra 
turnover justify the extra expense of 
opening the shops on Sundays. 

Racecourses, even the most en- 
trepreneurial, entertain si milar doubts. 
John Sanderson, derkofthe course and 
racecourse manager at York and Thirst, 
says: “This is a complex problem. As far 
as York is concerned, we would not 
want Sunday racing before the Ebor 
meeting, as both our June and July 
Saturdays are so lucrative. And if we 
stage (Item on Sundays, the meetings 
abroad would be competing for our top 
jockeys and horses.** 

Tim Neligan, head of United Race- 
courses, who control Sandown, 
Kempton and Epsom, comments: “We 
wouldn't want to transfer Eclipse or 
Whitbread Gold Cup day, for example, 
to a Sunday, as they already attract 
capacity crowds. And on a normal 
Sunday I can't see us getting more than 
about 8,000. 

ut I can see Sunday racing 
being a big success out in the 
country, at Goodwood for 
example. People love to go out 
for the day m their care. And 
country trades like Cartmd 
crowds of 15,000 to 




smallw 

could attract 
16,000. 

A very different point of view is 
expressed by Guy Harwood, whose 
Allez Milord won the big race in 
Cologne last Sunday and whose Danc- 
ing Brave is one of the favourites for the 
Arc. 

“It would be mad to turn down 
chances of catering for the public's 
leisure activities and also of generating 
funds for extra prize money, which is 
- still at such a low rate in this country,** 
Harwood says. “People who are against 
tt are just apathetic and lazy.** 

Another breath of fresh air came from 
Sir Woodrow Wyatt, the buccaneering 
and imaginative chairman of the Total- 
isator Board. “I am sure racecourses are 
being far too conservative. People 
would flock to tracks like Sandown in 
fine weather. They’ve been to stately 
homes and safari parks a thousand 
times and are bored stiffby them. 

bvioudy, it is going to be 
impossible to get the betting 
! shops opened and on-course 
betting permitted without an 
Act of Parliament But if all 
else fails. I'd like to see one or two 
meetings without betting. And then the 
pressure of public demand might have 
some effect on the powers that be. 

“You’d have to have rows of tele- 
phone boxes outside the course for 
credit ctiems to ring up the bookmakers. 
Tbere’d obviously be some illegal 
betting as well. But anything’s better 
than sitting back and doing nothing.” 

Let General .Blacker, a total realist 
and experienced political in-fighter, 
have the last word 

“Of course we know that we need a 
change in the Gaming Act of 1963 
before anything is possible. But I fed it 
would be madness to let the matter drop 
until British racing is permitted to enjoy 
the same opportunities as foreign 
racing, opportunities which other sports 
in this country already use to attract 
public support away from racing.” 

( TOMORROW > 

The Views from the Betting Levy 
Board and'the bookmakers. 


O 



Price is 


at the Newmarket Yearling 
guineas for a Mill Reef filly 


The prices skyrocket when 
mystery tangles with power 


The day the Highflyer Year- 
Bug Sales begin at Newmarket 
is the day that a cabal of 
mysteries aid the 
might of money meet - like all 
other days in racing. This is 
Europe’s most important year- 
ling sale: there will be plenty 
of winners among the pop- 
ped, sweating, spwly-Iegged 
ttie wonders that go under 
the hammer this week. Quite 
certainly there wfl] also be a 
barrel-load of losers. 

“Well-made workmanlike 
hone sire starting to do well in 
Amencak bid if you want hah 
twenty-five thousand h the 
gate twenty-six twenty-seven 
fresh biddah twenty-eight 
twenty-eight I seU_ hah now, 
she’s aa athlete mice waOsah I 
sell hak mow...” 

Anyone of these could 
fetch a good price,” Teddy 
Beckett, of fee British Blood- 
stock Agency, said. It only 
takes two determined bid- 
ders.” “/ give this adt away 
if a ao money ai forty-fire 
thousand ...” 

No money? The 
fines of the Udders 
impassive, the occasional cat- 
alogue discreetly raised - 
“thank you sir and forty-six, 
and seven . . . and over the 
of decorous dealing 
came the pig-like whinnying of 
the horses, prancing the sell- 
ing ring In fright at the expres- 
sionless men of power who 
offi f i mN them as they en- 
tered to meet their destinies. 

The conditions of sale in the 
catalogue are a mixture of the 
uncompromising rules of the 
marketplace and the deepest 
and most arcane aspects of 
equine lore: “There is no terra 
implied in any sale that any lot 
is of merchantable quality or is 
fit for any particular -purpose 
The description colt or 
horse does not exdnde a rig or 
crypt-orchid.” It wouldn't, 
would it? (A crypt-orchid is, I 


r mmn+r- I 

pi > I Simon 
m I Barnes 


read, a male animal “in which 
one or both testes do not 
descend into the scrotum from 
tite abdomen at the usual 
time.” (Now you know.) 

These yearlings that fetch 
such fancy money - Lady 
Beaverbrook spent more than 
half a mDIiou on a sweet little 
thing tm Tuesday — have never 
been trained, never had so 
mach as a saddle on them. You 
buy entirely on two magic 
ingredients: pedigree and con- 
formation. ‘ Lady Beaver-' 
brook's tittle blade filly with 
its lovely white star has Mill 
Reef as a father and as a 
mother, adaugfaterofSea Bird 
DL. Those bloodlines are not so 
ranch aristocratic as royaL 
lineage is of vital importance: 
racing people believe that 
coronets knocked kind hearts 
into a cocked hat, and that 
simple faith is nothing along- 
side Northern Dancer blood. 

Another lot: “Fabfdoasly 
bred, rotten horse,” Beckett 
said. On paper a winner all the 
way: “Yon can’t race paper.” 
This is where the conforma- 
tion, the magic part, conies in. 
You most make up your mind 
from a brief inspection of the 
horse standing still, and then 
wanting a few yards. You want 
everything to be straight and 
firm and tine. Yon feel the 
horse’s legs, make a mystic 
pass over the withers, feel the 
gullet for roominess, then you 
make a hieroglyphic in yonr 
f l ptn g Be , thank (he grot 
and walk away with that 
special Newmarket blank ex- 
pression on your lace. Out of 
earshot, yon murmur to your 
companion: “Horrid little 
horse” or “Don’t like that 
front leg.” 


Or perhaps yon resolve to 
have a go. The bidding goes 
on, and the prices flash up 
behind the auctioneer in guin- 
eas, Irish guineas, US dollars 
and French francs. Eternally 
flickering and frittering away: 
“Who’s got a hundred for hah 
she’U make it good gracious me 
t thought tbere’d be a show of 
bands one hundred thank you 
and five in the gate Habitat 
filly look at hah she’s an 
athlete one hundred and ten on 
the rail and fifteen in the gate 
and twenty fresh biddah ...” 

For the breeders and sellers 
it is a day of joys or heart- 
breaks. The pride of the yard 
might go for nothing on a 
massed negative whim: or if 
two people bo di have a fancy 
for the same horse, it can make 
a fortune. As for the buyers, 
they know their joys or heart- 
breaks are yet to come. Many 
of these lovely tittle horses wO! 
be disasters. A few win not. 
Many people there think they 
are malting an investment. 
They are not. They are buying 
a dream. Such dreams axe not 
cheap. But I will have a wager 
that even Lady Beaverbrook. 
with her half-a-mfllion quids' 
worth, thinks her dream is 
cheap at the price. 


Britain get 
their 
way over 
SA plan 

From John Good body 
Dublin 

Britain yesterday staved off a 
threat at the Council of Europe 
that the Government would 
have to step in io slop any 
competitors visiting South Af- 
rica for sports events. 

The British delegation, sup- 
ported by West Germany and 
France, successfully opposed 
Sweden's resolution that, logi- 
cally. would have obliged the 
Government to withdraw the 
passports of individuals intend- 
ing to visit South Africa. The 
vision of Immigration officers at 
Heathrow taking away the pass- 
ports from a British Lions rugby 
team bound ibr Johannesburg is 
now an illusion. 

Instead a compromise resolu- 
tion submitted by Ireland, 
which has all the bite of the 1977 
GlcncagJes declaration, seems 
certain m be passed at today’s 
final session of the fifth con- 
ference of European sports min- 
isters, attended by 21 countries. 

This resolves that govern- 
ments take “all possible action 
to encourage their sports federa- 
tions to break all sports links 
with sports bodies, teams and 
sponspersons in South Africa". 
In other words it is status qua 
with Nlr Richard Tracey, die 
Sports Minister, trying to dis- 
suade bodies from touring 
South Africa, usually without 
effect. For many competitors 
the lure of the Krugerrand is 
more powerful than the criti- 
cism oi'lhe British Government. 

A speech by Mr Tracey, read 
out in the minister's absence, 
made clear the Government's 
stance. “We recognize that in 
our free society it must be the 
spons bodies and sportsmen 
w ho take the final decision. That 
in no way lessens our commit- 
ment; but in the United King- 
dom wc simply do not have — 
and would not wish to have — 
the powers to prevent law- 
abiding citizens from coming 
and going as they please.” 

Because of the stiff opposition 
to Sweden’s original proposal, a 
compromise resolution was in- 
evitable. The Council of Europe 
likes unanimity rather than 
disagreement. 

Britain will propose today 
that if a competitor is founa 
guilty of taking drugs the pen- 
alty should be a lire ban with a 
minimum of four years in 
certain cases. This has the 
support here of Prince 
Alexandre de M erode, chairman 
of the International Olympic 
Committee's medical 
commission. 

In the past there have been 
examples of competitors who 
have been found “positive” 
being quickly reinstated. Martti 
Vainto. stripped of his Olympic 
1 0.000 metres silver medal in 
1984 for taking anabolic ste- 
roids. was this year reinstated 
and competed in the European 
athletics championships. An 18- 
month ban is totally insufficient 
and also allows a competitor a* 
period of training without being 
subjected to tests, which can 
completely defeat the object of 
imposing any penalty. 

Britain's proposal will give 
moral support to those members 
of the International Olympic 
Committee working towards 
suffer penalties for drug-taking. 
A minimum four-year ban win 
effectively end most 
competitors' international car 
reere and disqualify them from 
one Olympic Games. It is about 
time the IOC took a lead on this 
maner. 


Whitewash fears 
as squad is named 


When the name of the big 
forward, Martin Bella, was an- 
nounced in the Australian tour- 
ing party, many pnndits 
described his selection as a 
surprise. No one in Halifax was 
surprised, since the denizens of 
Thrum Hall well remember 
Bella the powerful, bustling and 
wtaole-bearted Aw* 
strength and solidity to tire 
Halifax front row during Ok 
great revival two seasonsago. 

At loose forward in that 
was a raw young AnstratijUL 

Dave Ij npm ack, who lOreBeHau 

was brought to 

Halifax president, Dand Brook, 
and proved to be one oft - mjw* 

lively back row forwards m the 

Eagfe ls game. Langmack too 
has made the Kangaroo wty- 
Bella and Laogmack are tw® 

3fef the “Anttfo-AnsfruU-Js “ 

the touring squad, which 
ht Britain next week frwr 
ntatcfc tour, ddenm^tot^ 
the record of the MM 19** 
Kangaroos who 
When (be party was 
at the weekend there was a i«“ 
to Ypot the familfar t*m£ 
players who have 
outstanding twriribotions ^ . 
British rugby league dwrmg 

recent seasons. 

The captain fe the b« 
faod stand-off halt 
Lewis, who played a spell wrth 
Wakefield Tri&J*rtbo««Pj^ 
£g np ion many *** <* 

Trinity to major frtaropbs^J 
the 1*2 tour be pWg 

fiddle to Brett Kenny, thesty^ 

half back whosc pc^^t 
running and 

passra motivated Wign S d»al- 
league's rootributkm 

ory irf perpetual "****£ 

Sterling, whose rewni 



RUGBY LEAGUI 
DIARY 

Keith MackKn 


Australia was one of the reasons 
for the slide from power of Hnfl. 
Sterling never stops thinking or 
moving and tris comring intefli- 
eence is just as potent a force us 
bis ball fesrflwg and courage in 
the thick of the battle. He wffl be 
badly if ids. injured 

shoulder takes time to heaL 

At Knowlsey Road, St Helens 

supporters are wsmdtmag how 

many points the protifie Safals 

would bare rattled up ram 
season with - the linge 
policeman. Mai Menmga, fa the 
JSrtma rogw elephant on the 
charge with the regby beam and 
hamiling skills of a h um a n . 
Meninga became a folk hero at 
St Helens and, circumstances 
willing, be wiU be back again 
next season. 

At Wigan they remember 
Greg Dowling, a strong Ttmoing 
front -rower, and Widnes 
supporters will briefly vrekome 
back another formidable for- 
ward, Noel Cleat Leeds, who 
are having a rough tine « 


back to the time when 
Grothe was naming fa 
Head ing ley. scattering defeod- 


kcpThim from producing bis 
best form. 

Tt,f« and other Australians 
have injected life into fee British 
name during the past fewyenre. 
Sdi t iraJlmgoodte*»f«“ 
artioss even if their pres- 
ence fa this cosntry threaten? 
great Britain with another se- 
ries whitewash- 


HOCKEY 

Sardarback 
in favour 

'Karachi (Reuter) — Pakistan, 
reeling from Sunday's storming 
defeat by South Korea, have 
recalled Hasan Sardar. their 
excellent centre forward, ibr the 
World Cup -in London 
tomorrow. 

. Sardar. aged 28. considered 
by some to be the Diego 
Maradona of . hockey, . was 
dropped from the team in 
August, a decision which earned 
uproar.-JBut Pakistan's 2-1 de- 
feat by uhianicied South Korea 
in ih^ final of the, Asian Games 
in Seoul give? Jura a chance to 
add to bis ISO caps. 

Sardar was lop scorer m the 
sides- which brought,- Pakistan 
the 1982 world crown, the J984 
Olympic and the 1982 Asian 
Games titles. 


TODAY’S FIXTURES 


FOOTBALL 
CamUL-LfiAOUE: smoad -amok 

v Btadtotf (7.0). 


___ flHftHTF- AFA 

Triaua V NttWSst (Lloyds Bank. Bacfc- 
anhafl). 7J0) 

GOLF 

Marian's MBsuttstt Jersey Open (at 
Royal Jamay 

mixed foursomes (at u *~“ 

Sunfayy World Matth, . 

pa Wentworth); Gad Foundation schoote' 

laamchornMnsbipslttABMik 

OTHER SPORT 

BASKETBALL: 

n> Cup: IMmd. SraMn 
BSCP Londbn v DBS Vienna (M). 
Brito* Mawanc Regional ramfc JuH 
Rentes Rhondda vSuindOR Rakers. 
CVCUNCfc Nissan OM*ic (fttoand). 
EQUESTRIANS**: Chatswonti HOW 

sauna Johnnie Wetter world eeatog 
speed rooord week (Portend). 
SNOOKER: BCE International (at 
Trenthem Gardens. StolaHm-Treog, 
SPEEDWAY: Brtttej ' 


assn. Nteanal Lwk Arana Ease* v 
Peterborough {7.15k 


GOLF 


Amateurs compete for less 


The average amateur golfer 
will be forced to take a “pay cut” 
in 1987 under the new rules of 
amateur status to be introduced 
by the Royal and Ancient Golf 
Club of Si Andrew’s on January 
I. Ah amendment has increased 
the limit for a prize, or prize 
voucher, by £20 to £170, but this 
will apply only for events of 
more than two rounds. The 
amended rule states for the first 
time that “for an event of two 
rounds or less, the prize wtO be 
£110". 

An amateur competing in an 
18-hole pro-am wilt for in- 
stance. only be able to accept a 
prize to ihevalueof£l 10; m the 
past, sponsors have been able to 
offer tofts up to the value of 
£150. 

The Royal and Ancient are 
also continudng to base their 


By MitcbeU Platts 

calculations on the value of the 
pound being more than two- 
thirds of a US dollar. So the 
prize limits for events outside 
Great Britain and Ireland will be 
$400. for those of more than two 
rounds: and $260 for any other 
event. 

It also clarifies the purpose of 
a voucher. In future, a voucher 
may only be handed toa retailer 
In exchange for goods purchased 
whereas, in the past, it has not 
been unknown for a player to 
exchange a voucher for cash. 

The Royal and Andem has 
aim announced controlled lib- 
eralization of expenses to allow 
a dub. as well as a national or 

county onion, to. nominate 
promising players to receive 
expenses in individual events, 
not exceeding 20 competitive 


days in a calendar year, so as to 
gain experience. 

A new exception' to allow 
sponsors to pay expenses in a 
handicap event, which has been' 
approved by the governing body 
ofgoIC will enable finals of such 
events to take place in faraway 
places such as Bermuda within 
the framework of the rules. Even 
so. the prizes to be won in such 
events will have to conform 
with the new limits, and it will 
no longer be permitted to win a 
prize of an expenses-paid trip to 
take pan in a golf competition. 

It has also been made clear 
that if a player awaiting' 
reinstatement is allowed to enter 
a competition .solely among 
members ofa club of which he » 
a member, he may win a prize. 
But this is a maner for his dub 
to decide 


Rule change after bottle escape bid 

By John Hesoessy 


feter Alliss and Bruce 
Critchley have spanned the 
years in selecting their teams for 
the second match next Thursday 
between Ryder Cup and Walker 
at Royal 


Cup players 
Ports. DeaL 


Cinque 


Included is Hany Bradshaw, 
who played in the Ryder Cup 
matches of 1951 1955 and 1957 
and who claimed a special niche 
m the history of the game after 
an modem during the 1949 
Open championship. 

Bradshaw's ball became 
lodged in a bottle and, without 
waiting for a ruling, be smashed 
through the glass and advanced 


the ball some 30 yards. As a 
result the rule was changed to 
allow a free drop. Bobby Locke * 
beat Bradshaw in a play-off for 
the title. 

Laddie Lucas, at 71 two years 
younger than Bradshaw, has 
other claims to fame. The 
amateur counterpart of IhCteft- 
banded Bob Charies has a string 
of decorations and has found 
timeto write books and sit in the 
House of Commons. 

The fledgling, at 35. is Roddy 
Carr, son of the three-times 
Amateur champion from Dub- 
lin who played heroically in the 
Walker Cup victory of 1971 


with 3% points out of 4. Father 
and son will be playing 
The “Grand Match”, as the 
event is called, takes the form of 
two series of six foursomes. 

ORDER OF flay: Morning (Rider cup 
names first): P AMss and Btua v B 
Cdtdtey and PHedg«s(S.<)0):C Clark and 
J Martin «G Maries and I Hutthaon (9.07): 
J Jacobs end J Paraon « 0 Frame and L 
Lucas (9-i4jb Qrtunt end N Wood v P 
Bento and ICakMlffl^iKH Bannennan 
and H Bradshaw v j Carr and R Amar 
(&28): P Butter and PMBbvQ Cosh and ft 
Can {9-35). Afternoon: B Hurt and tt 
Banrwrtnan v Q Marks and P 


11.4a P ASM and Jpwton v l Hutewon 
Md f CaW**o«-CU^ J Jacobs and N 
wood v j Can- and 0. Frame fi-59L 
HBradshew and P MUs v l Lucas and B 
Crttemey (2-06* G Hunt and C Cterk v R 
Carr and P Had 


V CERTIFIED DIVIDENDS 


AB (flvManda subject to resoutiny. All matches for Sept 27th 


LITTLEWOODS LIVERPOOL 







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ii^yjAX-iv > *■ • 


BIG CATCH 


£2-2MILUI?H 


TREBLE CHANCE PAYING 6 DIVIDENDS 


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21 PTS £0-65 

dhridemtttoenrti ejVsp. 


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4 DRAWS £6-35 

10 HOMES.... £410-40 
4AWAYS £34-30 

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A 



SPORT 


THF TIMES THURSDAY OCTOBER 2 1986 


FOOTBALL 


Johnston 
issues 
shock for 
Celtic 


Mo ' Johnston. SccjfonMTs 
international forward, shocked 
Cdtic last nighias they prepared 
for the European Cup winner* 
dash with Shamrock Rovers. 
He wants. to return to England 
tbeb’iaow on 10 Europe. 

Johnston, whose contract 

with Celtic is upwthe end ofthe 
year said: “Manchester United 
are in trouble and if ttay want I 

me ro shoot them out of it I will 

be only 100 happy to oblige. 

While at Watford Johnston 
scored 26 goals in 36 games. “1 
am an even better player now. I 
am fitter, stronger and sharper, 
ft- depends on what happens 
when my contract comes up for 
renewal with Celtic. If they do 
not set me up for what I believe I 

am worth 1 would like to move 
on. United is my first choice. 

“I had one try at English 
football but I was not ready for 
it, [ would love to be big nit zn 
England and then perhaps move 
on to Europe." 

This talk rs bound to unsettle 
Celtic. It was the second off the 
park upset for the club within 24 
nouns. . ... _ 

■ The leaking of tbeir bid for 
Steve ■ Clarice, the St Mirran 
defender, led to a bitter attack 
from their manager, Alex Miller, 
and overshadowed the prepara- 
tions for last night's match. 


Harford is 
target as 
Falco goes 


■ By dire White 
David Pleat, the Tottenham 


Hotspur manager, will streng- 
then his hand fora new forward 


by some £3 SOlOOO when the sale 
of Mark Falco to Watford goes 


of Mark Falco to Watford goes 
through this morning. It wiu be 
thesecond highest fee Watford 


have paid, bringing tbeir expen- 
diture this season to more than 
halfa million pounds. . 

Top -of Pleat's target list is 
bound to be Mick Harford, his 
leading scorer - Iasi -season when 
Pleat., managed Luton Town. 
Spurs had hoped to be given a 
preview of Harford this week- 
end when Luton visit. But the 


piayer is still not match fit after 
undergoing a knee mxntioa. 
Pleat will need only confirma- 


: operation, 
oly confirm 


tion of Harford's return to good 
health before bidding for a 


player he regards as. the best 
No? 9 ■ in the -English pme. 
Tottenham have had . to depend 
to .an unhealthy degree this 
season oh the . opportunism of 
Clive Allen, who has scored nine 
of> their meagre League haul of 
10 -goals- Harford and Allen 
hunting together must excite 
Pteau 

. Watford, too. had serious 
attacking problems, also scoring 
only '10 League grals. Graham 
Taylor, the manager, has chas- 
tised .Bfissen. his former En- 
gland forward. for bis reluctance 
to shoot, lie said: "When your 
main striker won't shoot, it 
affects team morale." 


Tuesday's results 






m i 






GOLF: NICKLAUS DREAMS OF HOW NICE 


still on the 
prowl and just 
as dangerous 


HORSE TRIALS 

Some luck 
at last 
for Capt 
Phillips 

By JannyMacArthtn - 


boxing 


McGuigan would 
not lack a mentor 


By George Ace 

. ute a punch, that he had a row 

Barry, McOuigm. tl* fomff “lunflron and ircmmdoiB 

lorid featherweight chamP 1 ?"- Jg^bihty. 




By Mitchell Platts 

Jack Nicklaus, back for the "Thai does not mean I 
23rd Suntory match-play wouldn't like to. sit down on 


mmm 

I mm 


championship, starting at Sunday night and say how it 
Wentworth today, has been was at 46 years old to play 
confounding his critics and three 36 holes matches in 
dumbfounding the analysts successive days and come out 
for so long it almost seems he winning, lam striking the ball 


has been playing golf since the very well and I’ve put my 
days of hickory shafts and flying right elbow back in - 
gutta-percha balls. it's there — and I'm- not going 


He has been habitually 
taunted by temerarious 
suggestions that his career was 
over; harangued for taking an 
excessive time to execute 
shots questioned on the wis- 
dom of playing with a wCkL 
flying right elbow. 

The most hurtful swipes 
were thrown when as a pudgy 
new recruit from the amateur 
ranks in the early 1960s he had 
the audacity to deliver the 


Tee-off times 


First round 

U0 and 1 JO: R Darts 

Winner top 
&ffl® wd i 
Otszabal (Sp). Wfinrer to ptoy 4 


SluLmJ -MSe B Cmohaw lUSJvi N Onto 
(Japan). Winner |o ploy G Norman (Aus). 


sledgehammer Wows, cour- 
tesy of his immense driving 
power, which sent a legend, 
Arnold Palmer, towards a 
technical knockout. 

Nicklaus, the crew-cut up- 
start, compelled by his own 
figure to promote an ungainly 
image fay tramping the courses 
in baggy trousers even if the 


it s there — and I nr not going 
to leave it out again. 1 ” 

Nicklaus, like the other 
leading seeds. Tommy 
Nakajima, of Japan. 
Ballesteros and Norman, has 
the advantage of not being 
required for the first round 

Norman, predictably, is 
bristling with confidence. He 
is not ecstatic about the West 
course playing so short, 
reasoning that everyone will 
have an equal chance, but 
having paced himself through 
the most prosperous of golfing 
years he is still eager to win the 
title, and another small matter 
of £50.000. for a third tune. 

"My daughter, Morgan, has 
her birthday on Sunday and 
when 1 asked her what she 
would like she said: 'Daddy, I 
want the trophy*. That is what 
I call real pressure. But I love 
(his tournament, it is unique 
and it has stood the test of 
time, and 1 am ready to play. 


mm 


Mm 


Perplexed: master muses (Photograph: Hugh Kentledge) 




upturned jockey cap was a 
personal choke, became the 
innocent victim of fairway 
antagonists. They held up life- 
size cut-outs of the dashing 
Palmer and screamed at 
Nicklaus: "Come on. Fatso, 
duck-hook it into the rough." 

Such intense public hostility 
suggested that while Nicklaus, 
who began his love affair with 
the game at the age of 10 was 
married to golf he was some 
way from consummating a 
relationship with the galleries. 
He won them over, of course, 
mid,. 15 years after his last 
appearance at Wentworth, the 
"bear" has returned to con- 
firm that, white the modem 
giants might be Severiano 
Ballesteros and Greg Nonnan, 
he remains die one, true, 
eternal favourite. 

Nicklaus, who might need 
to beat Norman then 
Ballesteros to repeat his vic- 
tory of 1970, said: "I am still 
senous about my golf but I 
don't consider that I am still a 
serious contender. Winning 
the US Masters in April 
allowed me to leave the tom- 
on a high note. I don't play as 
well as 1 used to play and I am 
no longer making golf the 
number one thing in my life. I 
think that is the sensible thing 
to do. 


SCREEN SPORT SUPER CUP: Htefc 
S«p*d tor Emton 1. Liverpool 4 
(LnHHpoolvwn7^onasgregBl4- 
Hiu.wcw»cns'ciir. nut Hint * 111*11 

I.etWfMdUMZ. 

SECOND DtvmON: Btodfcum 1. Plym 

antfl 2. 

THMD OW8MM: «M*pog< & PW W l 
0: Baton T. CMstMoM Z Brantford 0 

aa&$s#,ii»s gw 

I.* Swindon Q, Newport * CwMo. pp. 
Notts Couw 3 . BrtsMl Rovers ttRotn 
arinm 0. Wigan Z WabaA 1, Futwm 1 
Yorti Z Bourmw-O. 

FOURTH DIVISION: Halifax 3 
Noithnipton 6; Lincoln 2. Oitont 0 



It may be tempting to. but 
Capl Mark Phillips, who has 
missed three major three-day 
events this year 
hiiuiy to his horses, looks set for. 
a otaage of luck at this weeks 
Chatswonh Audi Horae Trials. 

Capl Pbillips-who is attempt- 
ing a second successive win. ra 
riding Bold Approafo. agd 7. 
and Caruer. aged 10. Camer. 
lent to the Range Royer ream by 

Emea and Sarah TedeyHaJL 
sliftpid give him the best chance 
of retaining the trophy he won 
on Distinctive. 

Cartier was the runner-up at 
I his first three-day eyem-ai 

Osberton a year ago and in June 
be finished seventh at his . first 
international three-day event in 
Lexington- Kentucky. 

Chatswonh, which has earned 
official international stams after 
last year's successful inaugural 
running of the three-day event, 
should provide an appropriate 
challenge at this stage of 
Carrier's career. T he ev ent be- 
gins today with dressagt. 

The three events from which 
CRpt Phillips has had to with- 
draw were the world champion- 
ships in May, BuigbJey, in early 
September and the Polish 
championship two weeks ago. 
All three were won by Virginia 
Leog but. as she is without a 
horse for Chatswonh, it could 
well be the turn for Jon Evans 
and The Cotdwainer, another 
member of the Range Rover 
team, lo return to winning ways. 
They won their first three-day 
event at Windsor in May mid 
come to Chatswonh after being 
consistently placed throughout 
the season. 

tan. Static, who is having his 
busiest, and most successful 
season, is another likely con- 
tender. Although his ride this 
week, Kmgarth. aged 9. has 
never competed in a three-day 
event before. Stark is a rifted 
ho r s ema n who wps part of the 
winning team at the Polish 
championships with Sir Watne. 

Anne-Marie Taylor, fifth at 
the world cha m pionships in 
May is another who is using 
Chatswonh as a first three-day 
event for an inexperienced 
horse: She rides Mrs Shirley 
Marier’s Bolebec Miter, who 
won at Bounon last Sunday — 
his first time in an advanced 
Ha«- Miss Taylor’s former ride, 
Jimney Cricket, owned by Col 
Harold Selby, is going well for 
Diana Clapnam, his new rider. 


commaiKKa “yv 1 — h - 
persistent regularity 
Son the boxing scene and 
acquired British. European and 
world titles. Now that he has 

*ed his tito ite 


even pti.vi _ 

X£nfo£ure that be was not 


Hieh Conn 

His mip^r^H^Coun ^ for a long 

aaiona^^BJ&mwood,^ _ ^ 


nutter cun -rr 

VW..U0..— . j, his best if his rchtiotidup 

his every whim, be itrahy " nSnaaer is strained, and 
driving. or hosting a television pow that whav hasp, 

chat show. come to hght in the last day or sb 

• ... l fMfrme firVP * Italir 


action against » j timer 

manager ^ «sure anotiw umc McCarthy be i«- 

spaw of headlines and open - U king ov cr the 


spate ot neaaimcs — 

doors to speculation about what 
the future may hold for the 
Cyclone from Clones. 

Burt McCarthy, the London 


tone uuui viuuw 

urt McCarthy, the London 
boxing, manager, has no ifoubi 
that McGuigan could once again he 

-McGuigM. « o« of themost 


j. 

manager in these **0 

would nor jump ar the chance. 


woukfnor jump ar the chance." 
he said. "So for as 1 am 
concerned, if McGuigan be- 


rule foe featherweight division «*nihcranhavca 


SBMifiKss: 

Saesisss 

proved that night that he could the nog- 


Champagne time 
for the champion 


By Srikumstr Sen, Boxing Correspondent 
t lAwt Hnrtrwhan. Britain's ports that Ite has foiy children 
new°^jndisputed J^f**?** 11 

SaWSSfiSE 

S«s. Yorii 10 a 

champagne wckxmie. for m mv kids." 


Honeyghan. wearing his 
International Boxing Federation 
(JBF) bell, emerged from the 
customs hall at Heathrow air- 


and presents for all my kids. 

Honeyghan went .on to say 
that he was considering quitting 
Britain for New York. “I am just 
going to go home and think ; 


hall broke into spontaneous 
applause. 

Popping champagne corks 
and displaying a banner 
proclaiming Honeyghan foe 
champion, his two sisters, Jessie 
and RowaL shrieked as they 
game him a welcome hug. 

As he placed his other two 
world title belts on his proud 
mother Evanene and father 


leaving England-^ I'm going to 
dunk about it seriously. 

-I won’t be packing and 
leaving: I am just going away to 
try to be a better fighter. I want 

to try and have a fight by the end 
of the year so l want to go to the 

States and train. I'll be defend- 
ing foe IBF belt first," 

Asked for his reaction about 
Colin Jones's statements that he 
wants to fight Honeyghan. the 
champion said: "Colin Jones 


ASIAN GAMES 


China set for 
gold record 


mower c«ikuc wu ““"-t champion said: ^.oun joiks 
S ylvester, Honeyghan said: l has got to earn the right to fight 
am going to be the champion of Hotroghan. AH he wants 

the world for a very long time, to do is 10 fight world 
"lam so glad for the tens and champiooship^its.He’s not 
foal everyone here in London is had another .fight- Cwra Jones 
so happy. I am just looking has got to wait nis turn, 
forward to seeing my kids." Honeyghan nid that he 

^ — * — ■■ would be resting for the nott two 


Honeyghan. aged 26, imtnedi- y»~ ; — -t - 

ately confirmed newspaper re- weeks before training again. 

De Wit pounds Stokes* 
in one-sided contest 





Hole 

Yards 

Par Holt 

Yanis 

~Pm 

1 

471 

4 

10 

188 


2 

155 

3 

11 

376 


3 

452 

4 

12 

483 


4 

501 ‘ 


13 

441 

4 

5 

191 

3 

14 

179 


6 

344 

4 

15 

466 


7 

399 

4 

18 

380 


8 

.388 


17 

571. 

5 

9 

450 

4 

18 

502 

5 

Out 

3361 

35 

In 

3584 

37 




TONI 

6945 

72 


: s* i ■ . **7. ' 3. r A? L7 f yr r . ^ | 


Seoul (AP) — Eriko Asai led a 
1-2 Japanese sweep yesterday In 
foe first women's marathon of 
the Games, while China pro- 
pored 10 set a record for the 
most most gold medals won. LI 
Weinan, of China, won the 
men's discus, so China now 
have 75 gold medals with 20 
gold medals to be decided. 
Japan holds the record with 77 
in the 1966 Games. 

In the 1982 Gaines in New 
Delhi, China pushed Japan 
from first place in Asian sports 
for the first tune, winning 61 
golds. This time, the host South 
Koreans are threatening to take 
over foe No. 2 position from the 
Japanese. 


TENNIS: IN SEARCH OF A CATALYST TO SPARK BRITAIN’S LONG-AWAITED REVIVAL 


Scunthorpe i. Cambridge 1: Swansea 2 
AManriotl: Torquay 0. Stodoot C 
Tramneraa, Bumtoyi: Wdtoas 1. Preatoi 

a 


EUROPEAN CIIP: flat round, wcend 
to^Vitkortco 1, Pant St GermNn 0 (agff 

EUNOHAM CUP WaaenS’ cup: Bor- 
dMux 4 . Watortord 0 MV M). 


Garrison 
makes it 
look easy 

New Orleans (Reuter) — Zin 


A galv anizing force is needed that 
can make things happen quickly 


Edmonton (AP) - A relaxed 
Wtltie de Wit sbbwed more 
punching variety, better defence 
and improved inside fighting 
ability on Tuesday in pounding 
out a unanimous 10-ronnd de- 
cision oyer the American, An- 
drew Stokes, in a bloody, non- 
title heavyweight match. 

**My iiwfightinghas improved 
a lot since June, de Wit, foe 
Omwiiawi champion, said after 
running his record to 13-0-1. 
"Defensively I wasn't setting hh 

with anything," 

Thai summed up what was 
probably de Wit's best bout 
since 'turning professional after 
winning a silver medal in the 
1984 Olympics. 


De Wit constantly found him- 
self fighting from close quarters 
and he did so effectively. Al- 
though Stokes -landed some 
solid, quick com binations at the 
breaks, de Wit did more damage 
with his' punishing body attack. 
And although he caught de Wit 


New Orleans (Reuter) — Zina 
Garrison, of the United States, 
cruised into thesecond round of 


There are two separate five- 
year projects to put British 
temris on its feet, at atetaj cost 


UUOW IIIW IKCXWW 1 IUIWU Ul aTM nOlUi. Qnn ttinut 

the $150,000 (about £104,000) S i th£ 

women's tournament here but 

tuui.ibi «r .i potential ana me «na taw- 


women's tournament here but 
Svetlana Parkhomenko, of foe 
Soviet Union, and the Ameri- 
can. Robin White, were given 
stem tests. 

Miss Garrison, the fourth 
seed, had little difficulty in 
ousting a fellow American. 


ages 100 more Moor centres. 
Seen together, they are an 
attempt to solve the old chicken 
and egg puzzle. 

There can be no cad min g 
i mpr ovement at the top unless 
British tennis becomes a year- 


In the second cf two ortides on 
British tennis. REX BELLAMY, 
our Tennis Correspondent, 
examines the problems Joeing 
the domestic game and maps die 
way ahead. 


had the qwafities of heart trad schools and the mfcan masses. 


with a lot of dose shots, few of 
Stokes's hardest -blows found 
their target. 

It was Stokes's first fight in 18 
months and it showed as de Wit 
look advantage of his dull ring 
movement ana tuning. 

Using a combination of quick 
counter-punching, superior in- 
side power and some surprising 
right-hand leads, de Wit con- 
stantly kept Stokes off balance. 
He also landed numerous hard 
lefts, showing no ill effects of the 
forearm injury that forced this 
fight to be postponed from test 
month. 

"He was probably my tough- 
est competition so for, but I 
think I handled him easily," de. 
Wit said. if 

De Wit punished Stokes in 
every round but it wasn't until 
the tenth that he finally knocked 
him down. Right-hand leads to 
the ribs twice sent Stokes to the 
canvas. But Stokes managed to 
finish foe fight. 


mind to pash tbeir abilities t» They need year-vnand ptayfeg 


the utmost limits. The failure of 
the present crop of British 


players to de the same is partly 
tbeir own fault. But as foe 


swpsfiifla S5 £=mEb 

was challenged all foe way by 

KSi'SteSfn ■**— P* ”.- 0 - driftin g into <<hcr 
nn-n.dK sports. Conversely, saefc mass 


was challenged all foe way by 
Cammy MacGregor, of the 
United States, before winning 7- 
6. 5-7. 6-3, in two hours and 17 
minutes. 

Miss MacGregor, aged 17, 
chased everything, made few 
unforced errors and refused to 
give up. After (osirw; the first set 
tiebreaker 7-2 and falling behind 
5-2 in the second set. Miss 
MacGregor, who turned pro- 
fessional six weeks ago, took the 
next five games to force a third 
set. 

"1 got a little over cautious at 
5-2." Miss White, who is ranked 
I$ih in the world, said. "I didn't 
play smart and she volleyed 
extremely wdL She didn't ramie 
the kind of loose errors that I 
expected." 


appeal demands the inspiring 
example of intern at ional suc- 
cess. Other than hints of distinc- 
tion from the doubles team of Jo 
Dmie and Anne Hobbs, there is 
net roach hope of that. 

* By international standards 
1986 has been particularly dis- 
appointing. In 1977, when 
women's world rankings were 
introduced, Virginia Wade was 
fourth and Susan Barker fifth. 
At present no British woman 
looks capable or invading the top 
ten. SbnBarty. a decade age four 
British men were ranked be- 
tween 17th and 80th in the 


world, which was a canse of 
Mercedes Fbz, of Argentina, concern rather sati s f action, 
began well against Miss Today the position is even 
Parkhomenko, taking the first worse. The ®aty British man hi 


well ag 
imenko. ta 


nnst Miss 
ing the first 


set. but the Russian came foe top 109. John Uoyd, has 
roaring back to take the match retired from singles co m p eti t i on 


5-7. 6-1. 6-0. Miss 

Parkhomenko- has not played 
indoors since March and said: 
"It took me a while to adjust” 


Miss and wBl not be tanked mnch 


It is strikingly evident that 
during a 10-year period ander a 


revised, more professionally or- 
ganized regime at the Lawn 
Tennis A sso ci a t io n, Britain's 
international stock has fallen. 
That may be a coincidence. On 
the other hand the LTA may be 
bogged down in the detail of 
cantioos and belated leug-tenn 
planning at a -time -when the 
British game needs a gatraniz- 
ing force that can make things 
happen fast. 

Most people play games far 
fan rather than profit. One area 
' in which British tennis has 
failed is in ridding n confused 
minority (present and potential 
professionals) of foe —tew 

attitude that tennis is no more 
than a game. [B es ides being fan, 
it can also be a well-paid job 
demanding total commitmen t 
and self-belief. In adversity, 
British professionals too often 
hug thw, in»wi« gfamly and 
feo& For erases, implying they 
are doing their best bat win 
probably lose — and that it does 
nor orach matter because tennis 
is only a game. ~ 

The tikes of Shirley Bloomer, 
Angela Mortimer. Bffly Knight 
and Roger Taytor (even more to 
foe point. Jonah Ba rr ington in' 
squash) went to the top, or near 
it, oot because the angels show- 
ered them with technical '.and 
physical gifts, bat becanse they 


thew own fault. But as the 
governing' body of foe British 
game, the LTA cannot escape 
criticism. 


It - is fair to point out that 
daring almost two decades of 


facilities, coaching, assapetitfess. 
and incentives. More dobs and 
parks authorities must make n 
fas of able and ambitions 
jamjars and — with the help of 
the LTA - provide . renter 
tnition and appraisal fram^ itin- 
erant district and regMoal 
coaches. 


DIVING 


Prestige event rescued 


business and formerly backward 
tenuis nations had more scope 
than Britain far advancement. 
Most of them also have better 
donates than Britain and. less 
competition from other summer 
sports and other racket sports. 
Bat none of them has Britain's 
tennis tradition and resources — 
fa terms of population and 
financial backing. 

AD critidsa of foe LTA rests 
on the basis that Britain's 
remarkable pnbfic interest in 
tennis — chiefly evident daring 
Wimbledon — and the national 
game's enviable wealth have not 
been effectively dnumetiaL The 
doods of apathy have yet to be 
dispelled Grom most schools, 
parks and dabs. Yoang families 
who might have been tennis 
players have turned to squash, 
badminton or table teams - 
Moor sports that demand less 
space and are more cost- 

efficient. . 


At aft lev el s, players mast be 
taught to play shots in point- 
winoing sequences, rather than 
in isolation. At the top, British 
te e nag ers wffl not become good 
enough to make ends meet on 
the international torn miless 
they first go through the foes of 
a domestic competitive environ- 
ment far more fierce than these 
smouldering today. 


Britain's biggest diving inter- 
national of the year, threatened 
with cancellation because of a 
lack of sponsorship, has been 
rescued by foe Amateur Swim- 
ming Association (a Special 
Correspondent writes). Follow- 
ing a plea by the national diving 
committee that foe staging of 
foe event was of vital im- 
portance to the development of 


the sport m this country, the 
ASA have agreed to underwrite 
the contest, which takes place at 
Crystal Palace on November 22 
and 23. 

Countries invited to send 
teams of men and women lo foe 
annual event are China, foe 


Soviet Union, Canada and fof j 
United Slates, who mav inrinrif' 


United States, who may include^ 
Greg Louganis. 


For foe LTA, that means 
dramming up ware competitors 
and more tonraanunts. For the 
players, ft means treating every 
match as if Iran Lendl er 
Martina Navratitora were at the 
other end of the comf — and 
could be beaten. The system 
cannot produce champions. It 
can only create a fertile environ- 
ment. Ultimately the ' flame of 
ambition can only be fu ell e d 
from within. 


Defence dividend 

Turin (AP) — Bernardo 
Pinango. of Venezuela, the 
World Boxing Association 
bantamweight champion, will 
receive a purse of J 70.000 for 
putting his title at stake against 
foe Italian challenger, dm De 
Leva, on Saturday night. 


Call for videos 


Munich (Reuter) — Huge 
video screens capable of replay- 


ing match highlights should 
installed in West German fix 


installed in West German foot- 
ball stadiums for the 1988 
European championship, Franz 
Beckenbauer, foe national team 
manager, says. 


ENTERTAINMENTS 

Continued Iran none 37 




Where is the galvanizing force 
that can beat all these odds? At 
foe lower levels the basis of 
recruitment must be widened 
faster, especially among primary 


It is difficult to think of 
another British sport In which 
the opportunities far a reward- 
ing career are so- ohrioos yet 
attract so few competent young 
athletes. It is equally difficult to 
think of another British sport 
that has so ranch money to spend 
and so fittie to show far ft. 






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d Peter Davalle 


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P* .SESgL 1 With Frank 
‘ and Sally - 

l S~® SDn .'fi London and 
^ forZS^,?^ 001 

"* . ®-®l regional news,- 
** ' yf®i , WBnd'triffic at £57 
*r- ‘^-27. 7-57. and 8 JS7: . 

*i nationatend international 

* 2®^ at ?-po.7 jo. aSo/- 

■tf • ■ WO and 5.00; sport at 

* • 7-20 and BJOiiSda*. 
reyraw of the momino 

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ft 05 p «ty Corterenw 

5" S^ W " W! ' 

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: • coverage of 

M the debates in BlackoooL ' 
^,30 approximately ■ PD01 - ■ 
intenwtmnalGolf. The 
„5- Sumory WortdWatch Play 

t . . fjantes Coverdale and - 
“<*3 Stuart. Includes c 
• -news headlines with • • 
sub Wes 1.25 -Regional 
news and weather. 1 JO 
Mop and SmW.(r) 1.45 

Caefax. 

Conference 
■£*_ 2.3 ®®t &62 -Regional news. 
*55 Scragtag and His Tea 


. imiiwibei oarrymora won 
■' the tale of The Man Who 
Made Custard 4:15 Beat 
the Teacher. Paul Jones 
with another round of the 
teachers versus pupils 
quiz game. 4J30 Dunge 
and Dragons. Jr) 

*•55 John envoi's- 1 
r- -Newsround.5.15 Blip 
Pater: Janet, Ellis reports 
fc - ■ from the last of the Depot 
«> . Auctions in aid of the 
V.« Lend-arvEar Campaign 
-■L andfroraTpe Hprary. ' *.- 
'.fundetf by ihe Campaign. • 
. w -which is-stocked with -me * 
•; latest equipment for 

7 children with hearing 
£*■ - problems. (Ceefdx>5J5 > ■ “ 
-* TheFHntstoneo. 

•GJO News with Nicholas 
*- Wrtchell and Philip Hayton.- 
-■* • Weather. • 

8-35 London Pius. 

*K00 Top offoe Pops 
I* presented by Mike Smith.- 
*7.30 feastEnders-; The fruit and 
t: ■ vegetable show features 
intense rivalry between 
..■? Tom and Arthur. . . 

6.00 Tomorrow's World. Peter 
r - r Macann tries the smoke 

ar hoods which could have .' 

saved many of the fives - V.. 
lost In the Manchester - ■ 
Airport disaster, Maggie . ‘ 
Phllbin rs-ib Iceland to 
. discoyer hbw the 
• popufatiortcan predict a . . 

. volcanic eruption? Howard J 
Stabteford tests a new 
. permanent fastening; Arid 
judftirHaqn examines an 


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X-r^y; device that is 
’instantly rd-usabkh " *• ' 
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8.30 Lmnyffomy.Tonite.A 
.blacfc and white film . 
traidng the fortune of. . 
accountant Desmond tSirra 

• ' trom the timc he stops' off 

the boat fomi’ Jamaica in ' 

. , 1955, determined to find " 
r; ‘ fBaneertdfortiine'as'an : 

accounts-tSerk in Dudley. 

. . (Ceefax) “ 

- 'iQvOO Newswm Jctoo-Humphrys 
91 andAndrewHanrayi !-: -v . 
.Regional newsano-. i- 

W30tildT a 4 ■. . 

^-9.30 fnSIcknesarand hi Heattti. 

AW and Arthur find - 
* ' themselves in themondy 

• whenAW acquires a jacket f 

■ plastered With battle , - 

ribbons and js pushed - .r 
: around la Bse's 

«tv ■ -wheelchair by Arthur,. 
^8.00 Conference Question , 
Time. Sir RoWn D6y s . 
,y 4 guests in Blackpool etra 
David HurtkattTtoy - 
.k - Hattersley; Norman 
a'’ Tebbit', and Shirley . 

. . . .WiHiams. ... 

■iJjJOTHm 86. Barry Normam . 

, reviews Anthony- 

- Hopkins’s film. The Good 
•" -• Father and Tonr Brooks, 

' m New York, interviews- 
»' * Tom Cruise, star of the 
successful Top Gun. 

“11J0 The Moww Makers. A 
file of Ste 


-f. 

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S.=- 


Iin wmiivi — - - - 

profile of aanley Ho. a 

wealthy man who made 
his money by buying 
casinos, (r) . . 


4£.00 Weather, 


T.V- AM 


6-15 Good Morning. Britain 
. Presented by Anne 
; Diamond and Adrian 
grewn. News with Gordon- 

safGastfavir 

financial news at 6 L 3 & 
sport at 8^0 and 7 * 8 ; 

werosesatt5Sendii7r 

SSEBUSSSfr- 

“‘“H at 8js.T?ie After ' 


Wme guest is Claire 
Rayner who answers . 
Problem letters from one- 

parent families. 


MV/LONDON 


S’® 2?®?^ neW8 fieatiffnes. 
3J0 For Schools: what 

happens when a pati^tis 
admitted to the Emergency 

. tSSSiS 37 

Story. Just You Wait! 334. 

The dangefs.of eatirfatoo 
manysweetfoodSia.1T- 
Part two of the dramatized 
verelon of the musical 

• story; Peter and the Wolf 
10.23 Human biology and 
'health education 1045 
Putting product design 

* into historical perspective 
11.03 Part one of Betsy 

- Byare's drama. TTie Night 

Swimmers. 11.20 - 

Blindness and methods 
used to alleviate the 
condition 1137 The Way 
We Used to Live: Bank 
Holidays. - 

12.00 Thomas the Tank Engine 
and Friends, (r) 12.10- 
Puddle Lane, (r) 1230 The 
SulSvans. Drama serial 
about an Australian family 
during -the Forties. - 
1 . 0 p News at One with Leonard 
^ -Parkin 130 Thames news. 
1-30 Levkas Man. Drama 
. - serial, set in Graced, about 
a man looking for h£s 
missing archaeologist 
' father. (r)235 Hon® 
Cookery Club. Egg 'n' 
Vegetable Bake.lrt . 

2.30 Daytime. Sarah Kennedy 
chairs a studio discussion 
on nuclear power ^Among 
the antis is Jonathon 
Porritt among the pros - 
those whose livelihood 
depends on the industry 
3.00 Take the High Road 
3.25 Thames news 
headlines 330 Sons and 
Daughters. . 

430 Flicks. Christopher , • > 
LilUcrap with- the tale of A. 

- Story, A Story. 4.10 Road 
Rtrnner. Cartoon, (r) 430 
Animefs in Action... 
Animals who wear armour 
tor protedion: 4.45 > - 
Chocky's Challenge: Part 

• two of the serial about a . ■ 
visitor horn outer space . 
who only appears before. . 
chfldran she beHevss she 
can trust- 

5.15 Blockbusters: General 
knowledge quiz game for ’ 


Bob I 

545 NewswitWdhnSuChet . 

&OD Thames news: ■ 

635 Hefpfyiv Taylor Gee with ' 
news(Of Phbbc Aaion, a 
self-help group. •’*..« 
635 Crossroads. McoBi.hstea 
successful nigh^outwito 
. Sam: . i ; ■ 

7.00 Emmerdale Farm: Amos 
bi- beflsves he iqthovictim of 
a witch's curse. 1 : : 

730 FrestvFJelds, WPBam • . 
.j.erriyesJwraefromfoe . 

expianation but she is riot 
inthergoodtobe 
oonvtoced v ((>adeJ - , i. 
JL00 FRir: Men of the Dragon 
‘ (1974)Ajmaderfofv 
.television martial arts' 
adyehtufo about a bfbttter 
who goes In search of his 
kidhappdd^ster, and tier 
abductors who are going 
to sen her info the white 
slave trade. Starring Jated 
Martiri, Robert ftd arid • 
Katie Saylor. DfrectBdhy 


Harry Falk. 
This W* 


930 This Week: The Next 
Prftne Minister? Jonathan 
Dimbleby siterviews Neil 
Kkmock. • 

10.00 News at Ten with Alastak 
Bumetand Sandy GalE 
Weather, followed by . . 
Thames news headmes. 
1030 Snooker. The first 
semifinal of tbs BCE 
International Iran 
Trentham Gardens, Stoke- 
on-Trent 
12.15 Night Thoughts, . 


• BOOKMARK returns 
tonight (BBC2. 8.15pm) with Ian 
Hamilton still at the helm. He 
has shown himself to be the 
most unobtrusive of anchor 
men. Not tv fun the celebrity 
aura. -He is the scene-setter 
par excellence, and a sensitive 
interrogator. It's true that we 
know no more about him than we 
did when he first appeared in 

Bookmark. But - and isn’t this 

what matters most? - thanks 
to his knack of putting literary 
types at their ease, we now 
know much more than we 

thought we know about them. 


AjN. WOson: a profile in 

Boo lunar k.on BBC2, 8.15pm 


something m him that longs 
to be a samt As for Brodsky, if 
you want a singte-sentenos 
explanation of his banishment 
from the Soviet Ureon. you 

need look no further than his 
definition of poetry as 
something that engenders a 
higher form of ethics. 

• PRISONERS IN THE 
HOME (BBC2, 7.45pm) does not 
make comfortable viewing. 

That shouldn’t surprise you 
Judge for yourself lonidn as you because It deals with a form 

watch the profiles of AN of dementia "Alzheimer's 

wason and the exiled Soviet ooet Disease -that robs people of 

their personality and turns their 
relatives into permanent 
nurses. The tragedy of the 
disease is that it does not 
only affect the elderly, as we 
have fondly imagined. 


I the exiled Soviet poet 
Joseph Brodsky. Wilson is 
presented as a man with no 
sense of Ms own image 
(Hamilton's kindred spirit?}. It is 
difficult to reconcile other 
people's conflicting images of 
him - as "swfistic" writer of 
book reviews, and as man with 


but that it can also i 
pre-senile. 


i at the 


• isn't mere anywhere on 
television you can turn to tonight 
for a laugh? Try the JuUa 
McKenzie/Anton Rodgers sit- 
com FRESH FIELDS (fTV, 
730pm) — the guffaw echoed of 
comedy. Or. if you prefer the 
well-bred chuckle, try the final 
instalment of E.F. Benson's 
PAYING GUESTS (BBC2. 
9.30pm). 

• WOMAN'S HOUR (Radio 
4. 2.00pm) has an intensely 
human and political interview 
with Winnie Mandela, wife of the 
failed-for-fife leader of the 
African National Congress. Sue 
MacGregor extracts from her 
the most plausible explanation i 
have yet heard about what 

she really meant by her notorious 
comment about the 
deployment of necklaces and 
matchstidcs in the war her 
tallow blacks are waging against 
the State. 

Peter Davalle 


BBC 2 


930 Ceefax. 

935 Daytime on Two: part two 
of toe adventure serial in 
'.Franch9J52Econofnics:a' 
question of choice 10.15 A 
history of bread and how it 
. fejudged by today’s 
experts 1038 History - the 
Liverpool to Manchester 
raDway fine 1130 
Thinkabout 11.18 
Choosing at course at a 


11.40 The food we eat and how 
it is produced. 12.12 Why 
- television can only give 
toe illusion of reanty 12-45 
Darwin and evolution 1JJ5 
French conversation 138 
Manufacturing industries 
in Wales 2JW Making and 
modelling 2.15 Music time. 
235. International Golf: toe 
Suntory World Match Play 

■ Championship, Introduced 
. by Harry Carpenter from 
the West Course, 
Wentworth. The 
commentators are Peter 
Miss, Calve Clark, Bruce 
Crttohiey, Alex Haiy and 
Tony Jacklin. 

3.50 Labou* Party Conference 
198s: Further coverage ol 
the debates In Blackpool. 

5- 05 International Golf. More 

match play from 
Wentworth. 

6- 00 Star Trek. Is Captain Kirk 

endangering his 
spacecraft and crew by 
turning his attentions to 
. -r the exotic EJaan? The 

Klingon war party with an 
„ eye on Enterprise certajrfy 
hope so. Stabing Wflflam. 

. . Shatner, Leonard Nimoy 
.. : and France Nuyen. (r) 

6.45 River Journeys. Christina 
Dodwefl travels across 

■_ Papua New Guinea 
finishing up with a rafting 
* expedition attempting tne 

■ first descent of the 
notorious Wahgi River, (r) 
(Ceefax) 

7.45 Open^accPr aon e re m 
the Home. This first of a 
pew series examines. the 

- ... problems of families of 
- Alzheimer's Disease'-. • 

*. t fqaw^jn. . 

’^fiserent age groupsl(see 
.rchoteei’ 

8.15 ^Bookmark presented by_; 
Ian ftamilton.'A new series 
' begins with a profile qf 
Russian emigre Joseph 1 
Brodsky ana eointerview 
With AlN.WasonatTws .i 
■Oxford home. (sb& Choice) 
930 Alas South and Jones. ' 
Comedy sketches and a 
daopand meaningful 
•' conversation featuring ■ 


‘ melancholy Mel and 
jitiHUe 


hoiyfl 

Gjm. 


930 

/Guests. The second and - 
final part of the .... 

_ dramatization of 
E-F-Behson's novel about 
the visitors staying at the 
■Wentworto' guesthouse 
in a fashionable spa town. 
1030 Newsnight introduced by 
Donald MacCormlck at the 
Labour Party Conference 
in Blackpool; and Ian 
Smith lr London. - 
1135 Weather. • 

1130 IntefiMtiMierooff. 

’s 


. play in the Suntory WPrid 
Match Play Championship 
at Wentworth, Introduced 
by Harry Carpenter. 

12.10 GpmUmveraity: Brazil - 
. Facing the 80s. Ends at 
12^0. 


230 Channel 4 Racing from 
Newmarket. Brough Scott 
introduces coverage of toe 
- StaHc9r.H9ndlQap.fi 
the Bloodstock and 
General Insurance Stakes 
(3.05); and toe Jockey 
Club Cup (3.40). The race 
commentators are 
Graham Goode and 
Raleigh Gilbert. 

4-00 Snooker. The first 
semifinal of the BCE 
International, introduced 
by Dickie Davies. The 
commentators at 
Trentham Gardens. Stoke- 
on-Trent, are John 
Putman. Dennis Taylor, 
Ray Edmonds. Mark 
Wwtman and Rex 
WiHiams. 

530 Fare The Crazy World of 
Laurel md Hsnfy* (1964) 

A compilation of the 
funniest films made by toe 
comedy team during toe 
years 1928 to 1938, 
including Towed in the 
Hotel. Way Out West, and 
toe Oscar-winning Music 
Box. 

630 Conference Report Glyn 
Mathias presents 
-highlights of toe day's 
debates at the Labour 
Party Conference in 
Blackpool. 

7.00 Charnel 4 News with 
Peter Sissons and Alastair 
Stewart. 

730 Comment from Partha 
Goswani, a campaigner on 
behalf of Minorities in the 
European Community. 
Weather. 

8.00 Equinox: Now Eat Thiel A 
an 


1 food 

business. The film follows 
toe development of an 
idea for a new food - a 
savoury-filled croissant 
comet -to cater for a 
society that is increasingly 
abandoning the traditional 
/sMown meal for what, as 
. /ope person in the 
. programme describes 
them, greater numbers of 

9l 00 Oh^^diri^^Amdrican” 
dorriestfocomedy series 
starring MadeJeJneKahn 
md James Stoyan. . 

930 Tha Madness Museum. A 
'dramatized, black 
account of a day In the 
of the Rev Dr Skipton at 
his asylum In I860. Part of 
the Channel'sMind's Eye 
season exploring mental 
health- With Ken 
Campbell, John Sessions, 
David Rappaport, and 
Tracy Harper. (Oracle) 
1045 Beyond Belief. With the 
Jewish New Year two 
days3way Anthony Clare 

examines what It Is lflra to 
be Jewish, either orthodox 
or reform, in Britain today. 
How dose are toe ties 
between religion and the 
homeland? And how 
strong a force is Zionism? 
11.15 Relative Strangers. 
Comedy series about a 
father and toe teenage 
son he never knew he 
had. Tonight, father has to 
lay down toe law about 
two living as cheaply as 
one. (r) 

11.45 Studio 80. Musical 

entertainment inducting a 
feature on Marilyn 
Monroe. The guest is 
Dionne Warwick. Ends at 
12ia 


( Radio 4 3 

On 1 tong wave (s) Stereo on VHF 
535 Stopping. 830 News Briefing; 
Weather. 6.10 Farming. 

635 Prayer (s) 

630 Today, ind 630, 730, 

830 News. 6-45 
Business News. 635, 735 
Weather. 7.00, 8.00 
News. 735, 835 Sport. 7.45 
Thought for the Day 
843 Figures In A Bygone 
Landscape. Haworth's 
autobiography (9). Reader: 
Stephen Thorne. 837 
Weather; Travel 
930 News 

9.0S On The Day I Was Bom. 

Larry Hams talks to 
cartoonist Mel Caiman (r) 

930 The Natural History 
Programme. Fergus 
Keening reports on the World 
Wildlife Fund's 25th 
anniversary celebrations in 
Assisi. 

1030 News; The Good Book. 

Brian Redhead gives 
listeners' reactions to his 
journey thro ugh the Bade 

1030 Morning Sttxy; A Visit at 
Morning, by Reardon 
Conner. Reader Trudy Kelly. 
10.45 An Act ol Worship (s) 

1130 News; Travel; Analysis. 
Shadow On The Sun. 

Mary GoWnng on the state of 
toe world economy. 

1148 Time For Verse. Tne 
theme is children. 

Presented by Roy Fuller. 
1237 Round Britain Quiz. 

General knowledge (r) 

1235 Weather 

130 The World at One: News 
1.40 The Archers. 135 
Shipping 

230 News; Woman's Hour. 
Indudes an interview . 
with Winnie Mandela. 

330 News: The Afternoon 
Play. Shrubbery With 
Violence, by Simon Moss. 
Comedy about bank 
robbers. With John Rye, 

Marie Straker and Jim 
McManus (s) 

430 News 
4-05 A Good Read. 

Paperbacks, discussed 
by Brian Gear, Valeria Grove 
and Richerd North.. -.' 

435 Kaleidoscope, tndodes a ' 
special feature on thtf ; 

ProcItaHaJr) 

530 PM.-New* magazine. - 
530 Shipping. 555 
weather 

■630 News; Financial report . 

630 Lega),Decant. Honest .. 

• and Trustful. Martin 
Jarvis and Christopher 
Godwin ih'foe comedy v 


senes set in an advertising 

7.00 E ,W 

7.05 The Archers 

730 Arty Answers? Listeners' 
comments on last week's 
Any Questions? 

740 The immortal Behemian. 
The Me and muse of 
Puccini, with Norman 
Rodway as the 
composer ( 1 ) 

840 The Prophetic ideal. 

Chief Rabbi S» Immanuel 
Jafcobovrts talks to Bernard 
Jackson about the 
brotherhood of man on the 
occasion ot the Jewish 
New Vear. 

9.00 Does He Take Sugar? 

For disabled listeners. 

930 The Archive Auction. 
Edward Bbshen searches 
the BBC Sound Archives for 
the radio heroes ol his 
childhood. 

945 Kaleidoscope. Includes 
comment on the film Tha 
Good Father, and the 
Scottish Opera 
production of Carmen 

10.15 A Book at Bedtime. 

Handley Cross by 

R S Sunees. Read by John 
Frankfyn-flobbms. 1029 
Weather 

1030 The World Tonight 

11.15 The Financial World 
Tonight 

1130 The Other Orient 

Express. Mike Baker 
travels on Canada's 
transcontinental railway 
in its centenary year. 

1230 News; weather 1233 


Shipping 

VHF (availabtei a 

S Wales only) as above 


tin England and 


except i535-630am 
Weather; Travel. 935- 
1045 For Schools. 1 130- 
12.00 For Schools. 135- 
3.00pm For Schools. 530- 
S-55 PM (continued). 
1230-I.10am Schools Nrght- 
time Broadcasting - 
Radio Geography: 1230 
Tropical Forest. 1230 
Medico City — After the 
Earthquake. . 

( Radio 3 ) 

On VHF/FM (in starpo) and meefium 
wave 

635. Open University. Until 
635am. Life in a railway '■ 
factory ' 

635 Weather. 730 News 
735 Conoert Straoss-(Wtae, 
Woman aixLSong waltz), ■ 

Debussy (Vkrtin Sonata: 
Nevau and Nevsu), Falla . 

(S amor bruja. with Huguette 
Tourangeau. mezzo). 
^LOONews . 

835 Concert (dontd): Bizet 


{L Anesietw Suite no 1). 
Bodge (Three Tagore 
Songs: Sarah Wainer). 
Milhaud 1 Le Camsval d'Aix, 
with Claude Herffer. 
ptanoL 9.00 News 
935 This Week's Composer 
Messiaen. GifT.am wetr 
(organ (plays Consecration. 
Communion. Some 
(Masse de la Rente cote), and 
Yvonne Lon 3 d 
ipianoipiays Le irequet rieur. 
. Also a performance cl El 
exspecto resurrectionem 
mcrtuocum) 

1030 Albion Ensemble: 

Bossier (Wind Quintet m 
E flat). Rossmi (Quartet No 
4i. Taffaner 1 Wind Ouunei 
inGmmo:) 

1030 Sot Continents: foreign 
radiobroadcasts, 
monitored by the BBC 
11.10 Russian piano music 
Piers Lane plays works 

by Glazunov (Variations in F 
sharp minor), 

Racnmantnov (Prelude tn D. 
Op 23 No 4). 

Tchaikovsky (Variattons in F, 
Op 19 No 6) 

1130 Mid-century American 
music: BBC Scottish SO 


(fnumph of St Joan). 

\%gd Thomson Louisiana 
Story suite)- 130 News 
135 Birmingham Concert: 
Kennotn SH&to (wota). 
Anthony Goldstone (piano). 
Beethoven (Sonata in D. 

Op 12 N0 1). Sgar (Sonata in 
Ernmor. Op 82} 

230 Flute tnos: David Butt 
(flute), Ross Pople (cello). 
Roscmane Wngm (piano). 
Antoony Hedges's Op 
99. and Haydn 5 H XV 17 
230 Patrick Piggotr Endelbon 
Smng Quartet play the 
Quartet No3 

3.15 Dances ot Nature: 

LEcoJed Orpbee play 
ballet music by Jean-Fery 
Rebel 

330 BBC Ptofliaimonc (under 
Gyorgy LeheU Bart Ok 
(Muse for strifes, 
percussion and celestaL 
Hav On 1 Symphony No 104). 
435 News 

530 Mainly tor Pleasure: 

Geoffrey Norris '5 
selection ot recorded music 
6.30 Bandstand- Band ol the 
Royal Arttilery. Vaughan 
Wiluams (English Falk Song 
suite). Wooiienden ( 
Gallimaufry) 

7.00 Still Managing to Fiddle: 
Roger wngm talks to the 
76-year-old violinist Josef 
Gmqold v) 

730 BBC Welsh SO | under Sir 
Charles Groves). With 
Howard Shetley (piano). Part 
I. Nielsen (Helios 
overture). Grieg (Piano 
Concerto) 

8.15 The Turkish Letters: 



Winnie Mandela: Radio 4, 2pm 


Neville Jason reads from 
the memoirs ot Ogier 
Gfuselin de Busbecq (rj 
835 Concert (part two). 

Sibefaus (Symphony No 
21 

935 Songs and insirumenial 
mufjc ol the Trpuveres- 
Sequentia perform works by 
Cononde Bethune. Gace . 
Brule. Blondel de Neste. 

- Adam de la Hone 
10.00 Mus>c m our Time: 

Michael Fjnrussy plays 
some of hts piano works 
1035 Ties Desmond Hogan 
reads his own short story 
11.15 Beethoven: Melos 

Quartet ol Stutlgau. - - 

Siring Cuanct m C minor. Op 
131. 1137 News. 12.00 
Closedown . 

C Radio 2 ) 

MF (medium wave). Stereo on 
VHF isee Rada i). 

News on the hour. Headfioes 
5.30am. 630. 7.30. 830. Sports 
Desks 1.05pm, 2.02, 332, *32, 
5.05, 602, 6.45 imfonM.935" •*' 
4.008m Charles Move 5.30 Ray 
Moore 7 30 Derek Jameson 930 , 
Ken Bruce 11.00 Jnvny Young ■■ 
(mcl food information) i-Ofipm 
Da md Jacobs 2.05 Gtona . 

Huniford 330 David Hamilton 535 
John Dunn 7.00 Wally Why! on . 1 
introduces Country Club 9.00 
Rhythm and Blues (with Paul 
Jones) 935 Sports Desk TO.DOTbu 
Good Human Guide. With the 
Natonal Revue Company 1030 
Star Sound Cmema Film 
magazine, presented by Nick 
Jackson 11.00 Jean BakowaU 
1.00am Patrick Lunt 330-4.00 A 
Little Night Music 

C Radio 1 ) 


MF (medium wave) Stereo on 
VHF (sec bekm) 

News on the halt-hour from 
6.30am until 830pm, then at 1030 
and 12.00 midnight 
5.30 Adrian John 7.00 Mike 
Smith s Breakfast Snow 930 . 
Simon Bates. Tma Turner talks 
about her tiled) 12.30pm 
Newsbeat (Steve Annett) 12.45 
Simon Mayo 3.00 Steve Wncm 530 
Nows beat (Steve Annett) 5.45 
Bruno Broshes 730 Janice Long 

9.00 City to City Mark Page 
dnves around Liverpool 10.DO- 

12.00 Andy Kershaw VHF VHF . 
stereo Radios 1 and 2> 4.00am As 
Radio 2. 10.00pm As Radio 1. 

12. 00-4. 00am As Radio 2 


WORLD SERVICE 


&.00 Nawsdesk 7.00 Ntm 730 Twenty. 
Four Hours 730 Folk m the Moasin World 
7.45 Network UK 530 News B.09 Refine, 
bans B.15 Couiwv ayte 830 John Petit 
930 News 939 Rbviow of the Brmsn 
Press 5.15 The World Today 9J0 Feum 
bai News 9.40 Look Ahead 9.45 Growing 
Pottos n Science 10.00 News 1031 The 
Savoy Operas 1030 Panarsen 11.00 
News 1139 News About Bntwn 11.15 
New Ideas 1135 A Letter From England 
1230 Radio Newsreel 12.15 Too Twenty 
12-45 Sports Roundup 130 News ix» 
Twenty-Four HOWS 1 JO Network.UK 145 
A Land ol Song 230 OuUpofc 2.4S A 
Decade ot Hits 300 Radte Newsreel 3.19 
The Pleasure s Yous 430 Ylmni *39 
Commentary 4. 15 State on he NaoonC45 
The World Today 5.00 News 539- Lenef 
from England 030 News 030 Twenty. 
FOur Hours 030 Business Metiers 930 
News 931 Book Choice 935 . m the 
Meantime B.15 A Jolly Good5how 1039 
News 1039 Thf Worid Today 1035 A 
Letter From England 1030 financial 
News 1040 -m£aftMt--‘«B4S?$oits 
. H30 Newel VMM 

31.15 jiardMUMTiavy PrtiBamrttfl.t . 
MatUfe Notebook ' , n.40^Famiew i VWHfl 
1230 News 1239 News About Bntam 
J2.15 Radio Newsreel ■12JDrMusic.«ow 
l:0p- Newar13l .Oudopk lJO A Land ol 
Song .145 Bodk Chctta T^O In -nip 
Meantime 230 News 239 ftovlaW of tm 
British teess XISTrHiihp-feb TtohonbW 
2JQ Abenteen ln»matl<XMi'Yf^tnr " 
val loo News 339 -News About / 

5.15 vVondToday aJOBustnesS k 

430. Newsdftsk 430 Cdurny SMa. Afl 
tones In GMT. • 


FREQUENCIES: Radio t 
92 J5; Radio 4: 200kHz/1500nr. 


m; Radio 2 693kHz/433m; 909kHz/330m? Radio. 3: 1215kH^ 
LBCSli 52kHz.' - -- 


Hz/261 m: VHF 97^; <^pttafc1548kHz/194fri: V5HF95.8;: BBC 
1458kHz/206m: VHF 94.9; Worid Service: MF 648kHz/463m. 


7m:VHF-9d- 
Londoiu 


dwting Togefhsr 1230-1235 News 
and weather SCOTLAND: E35pni-730 
Reporting Scotland 1130-1230 
Ttoee'* Company l230-1230au The 
Money Makers 1230-1235 Weatfier 

NORTTfQtN MELAM): S36pn-£40 

Todays Sport 540-400 tisfae Ulster 

635-730YeTel Me That 030930 As I 
Roved out 1230-f235an As I Roved 

Out 1230-1235era News and weather 
ENGLAND: B35pm'73D Regional 

newsmagazines 

HTVWESTjjggggg^ 


REGIONAL TELEVISION VARIATIONS 


Practice 830-536 News 1030 
VMekantf Outlook 1035 MtestTMaVWaak 
1130 Snooker 12.15am Ctosedown 

HTV WALES T y — - 

Wales B30po>-635 Wales at 9x 

O Wales This Week 1130 Words 

end tyusic 11 30 - 1 2 . 1 5am Snooker 


cepc 130pm News 

130-230 Man ilia Surtiase 030- 
035 North Tonight 12.15em News. 
Closedown. 


channel 

Home Cookery 136-230 Riptide 
530-430 Country GP 030435 Ctmnal 
Report 12.16am Untouchables. 


Rip- 


Coast to Coast 1Zi5em Untouchables 
1.16 Company. Ctosedown. 

130 News 130-230 Tim Baron 530 
Crossroads 535-730 News tLISam 
Jobfinder 1.15 Closedown. 

ANGLIA 

The Baron B30635 About AMka 
730-730 Ma and My GH 1030 Secret 
Worlds 1130 Snooker 12.15m 
Church in the CtassrooaL Cknadowh. 

border 

Randan & Hopkkk (liecsasedj 330 
Parlour Game 330-430 Young Doctors 
630-535 Lookamund 12.15m 
Ctosedown. 


RRANADA As London bx- 

croc 130pm Granada 
Repons 130530 A Country Piae- 
ace 3 30-4. 0 0 Young Doctors 9-00 Gktna- 
da Reports B30-635 This is Your 
Right 12.15 Ckweaowa 

S4C H.i0m Hyn O Fyd 1130 

Ca« A ChnaTB 1230 Fane Pin-Up 
Get 130pm Gong Show 230 
Ffatabetsm 2.15 Interval 230 Raang 430 
Snooker 530 Straeon Y Byd 530 
Abbon and Costsao Snow 630 
Brooksxte 830 4 What It's Worth 
730 Newydtoon Saah 730 Pentymora 
035 Ar Y Flodd 035 Dnas 9L10 HU 
Street Blues 1035 film Return ol Martin 
Guerre 1230 Labour Conference 
1230m Closedown. 

YORKSHIRE ^13 

Lunchtime Live 130 News 130-230 
Yetiow Rose 630-635 CaWndar 13.16am 
Jazz 1246430 Muse Box 


SCOTTISH 

.130-230 Tucker's Wmi aoO'FVtto-- - 
winners 3304Jid'Smiggte- ElendBth Jbe 
Sea 630-635 Scotiara Today 730- -< 
730 Take the Ffigh Roafl SOO SCofflStr 
Report 030-930 iAwnum'10,00 v v 
. Scotton News Headtine»-12.15em Crirop 
Desk-1220 Let Call 1235am Sortey • 
Maclean at 75 1235 Ciosedowrt — ■ 

135 Lookaround 130-230 RandaS 
and Hopkirk ( Docnasect) 630.835 Nottn- 
emUfe12.15amGodlnMlBiirdOut,. , 
Ctosedown. 

ULSTER 4* London except: ' 
UUOI Cn lB 20 pai LoncntkM.130- 
230 FWty Fifty. 330-430 Dlffrent 
Strokes 6.0) Good Eventog UKter 635*. 

Pokce Six 1030 Coumerpomt 
1130 Snooker 12.15am News, 
Ctosedown. , ( 

TfiW ** London except.l30pm . 
•LSxL News 130-230 Tucker's WMch 
5.15-545 Connections 6.D0 Today .. 
South West 630 Action South West 636- 
. M0 Carson's Law 12.15am Post- , 
script .1230 Closedown 




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",s%TsnS szVJssr 

BARBARA COOR 

S^S™»r35« r o»S l ’» 

CUniMs 


II PTW T aaa M 7 H rr S7R 6066 

UMfTXDLONtMM SEASON 
ONLY 

DAVE ALJUENUVE - 

pm iimas from 30 on 
nStscSreruKOF- 

CARTOONS 

Bt an* earkw- ^ ■ - 

Hrff Pr*« * Oci » 

Opens Or r. 15 


ALDWVCH TNXATWt Or -836 

-EVPtcSrfesfoSs- Tour 

ANNIE GET YOUR GUN 

Sirta bOATRO 

.. n-vfZUNC WEST END - 
DEBIT CATCH HCR TODAV 

■ONfcOr THt l^TM^YlNC 
Si-onts EVER TJAtao . 
n 7 30 Mats wrd g SM 2 30 

mni 7 itav « huoklnu on Flril 

sa S a iieiW 0 72O0.toa.f«-. 

LAST 3 PAYS 

AMBASSADORS Ol a* Jill rr 

MJrjiYi, nru C«l «» nrj£J 

, H “uW 72oo, 

y jo. vt «i mal 5. J* 4 & 

hfri Sink r iww ^ 1 C w« e« nr» 

LE5 LIAISONS 

DANGEREUffiS 

•TKHT FOR A TKtUffT" 

■ What'* On ■ _ i 


APOLLO VICYOinA SS99866S 
■CC 630 tfib 2 PBTUf BKW 828 
6188 TK-krlmaMt-r rr Svn &J55 

Fun Can tr C?Atoi 2 flQ 7200iBkQ 

Ferl Cro salr» 930 6123 E\M 

7 as Man Tor 4 Sal 5.0 

STARLIGHT EXPRESS 

-A MUSICAL THAT WW PASSES 


mm mm oh ~~ n e» 

STARLIGHT "EXPRESS 

ijm Mink by. 

ANOHEVV LLO'lT) WEBBER 
Lyrtcn t|V RICHARD STU.GOE 

. DUKIM bv TREVOR MINN 

APPCY DAILY TO BOX OPPWE 

FOR- HCTtlHIIS Spmal WofW 

stomal CS.«n TuM.nwvrw . 

sm lor riltirm 

NOW BOOIUHG -TO MARCtt XMT 


BARBICAN Ol 62S 0796/630 

8891 rr. iMon4un lOanv^wn- 

■ ROYAL MAWUOkH 

CWPMT 

. iAMllCAN THEATRE mi 

prt« oerH lonX. fomor. Mcfo.- 
Ti»M 7 50pm. SM 2.00 & TJO. 
Wvd 7.30pm MHMLLUNCC m‘ 

Shaw, rrtl porn wrti iW^ 

on SEWS pROM A MAR. 
RUUC bv Frydnu 1 
• -THE PIT HxiT. ipnor. 53L MOn. 

. W«l A Thun 7.3C kxn ' Turs 
Tpm ntOHNpn 9CMFTORIAE 

Onion Premier bv Rimard Nel- 

son. I (Vi 8 -On Fifwl Ports TNE 
DEAD MONKEY by (Ark Darke 


CHURCHILL Sramkv 460 6677. 

. Eies 74Si Ma s Thin s A Sal 

PJOl JUNE WHRFKLD tn THE 
RIVALS. 


swftTOamsCT 

TH-t.rtnanJrt.rr OTO MM ' 

Men Fi > HW-M' *»* ai6 
Tnnrt nui** XOO 
PAUL SCOPBELD 
■■si VSTCRIV' F T 
HOWARD POLAJM 
-M lOMOGEh T ««»«_ 

TM NOT RAPPAPORT 

• wmicIrrtuMv nnim 
■rpKV \v» \Rt» Bi^T to \i 
lSb.*oni V'f!. . 


COMEDY THEATRE 0302570 

■■CC 240 7200 Cna 930 6123 

-AeBHkMtolJWhmltor 

i. Timm _ - 

■ . JOHN ALKSTOI) 

OWEN 0415AM 

TAYLOR . PENHALWON 

THE MAINTENANCE 
..MAN 

■ _WOHDdtrULLY FUNNY” 

k’B IWW. 

-TtH> appiauw of rroiiBwa 

.. . rrroqMMB 1 ’ OMM 

- lunnj- mdmr 9Iw 

Men Tnu 8 Fn/Sar 3304.0 30 


corrcsLoc v wa zzsz CC 
■iwnoiMi Tnrwtie's ■JJ’* 11 -aDa* 
khami Ton'I. M«kTgL»M 

730 THE BAT At MCE.and 

wrechoi tees to; o»* 

.Sarr. Tamar 740 SjVlwmr 
.730 tMl l»rt« MfAPW Dto 
Toni 6 pm A Owr OhaBljI.Rfc 
«5 min pieKarra port 3H..IKK 
C2.00 . .. . 


emTGRKM a 930 

060 B /379 6433/741 9W9 Gnn 

Sin 3062 eoa. Tbv 

‘‘WmOH FARCE- AT IT5 BEST- 

D-Mair . 

TtH'-Thoalrr of CenWV CWWW 

OEHEK . . ■S 2 f f| 

FOHHJtt - MILLS 

* “"ALFRED 
ARtTA .■ - J 

RUN FOR YQUR WPS 

Wr«fl*n- anil aimSPOiM - -- 

P\> OKI 


DOMJNKM THEATRE Box Office 
seo 8805/9562 AIL IrteotKMie 
CC POOkbiM FIRST CALL 2 a nr 7 

dal- on 836 2428. NO BOOKING 

FEE Grp Sam 930 6123 
DAVE CLARK'* 

TIME 

THE ULTIMATE CXPWMOKE 

CUFF RICHARD 

AS -THE ROCK STAR" 

THE PORTRAYAL OF -AKASH- 

. BY 

LAURENCE OLIVIER 

MOn Frt 7 JO Thu MM 2 30 . 
SM 5 & 8 JO 

SPECIAL CONCESSIONS at CTaU 
prrfs nfivl Frt L SM nn for 
OAPS- LB40L PuPnb It under 
. 16 ”i a\a»l l hour before perfor 
manrr Nw Rd dhin a to April *R7. 
From Ol 9 at TIurrs mat* onto 
-The Rork Star - Wfll be per 
formed b\ John ChrMie. 
Fiwi Ori 4 Sat pe rt* 4 a B.iS 
SEATS AVAIL FOR PERP.HNTT 


WARnomr mq 
8230 q q 379 6566/ 6433 

RMin PKX OF THE rMMOC 
Thto WM: 7 JO IhBMi Pre- 

Mlll ‘ * ‘ 


irrtnqr 191. ton Ra* H 
(Perrier Nomi LI pro tkr 


DRURY LANE THEATRE ROYAL 

BOX Office A OC 01-836 8106. Ol-. 

24O9066/T. Flrel Can 24|ir 7 day 

rc bkB* on Ol 240 7200 (PO tots 

fee) Ttckrtmaner Ol 379 6053 

1 oS&Z 
42ND STREET 

A SHOW FOR ALL THE FAMILY 
v Whkitrdf aR «h Mft 
Md ilnf AmMt tor IBM 

. vwed 

BEST MUSICAL 

STANDARD DRAMA AWARDS 
• ; voted . 

■ BEST MUSICAL 

LAURENCE DUVKR AWARD 

voted ■ 

' ■ 'BEST MUSICAL ■' - 

PLAYS to FLAY ERS 
'LONDON THCATRE CRITICS 
AWARD 

& OS too Mah Wed SO. SM B O A 
a 30 Reduced pore nw Wed*. 
Students and OAP 1 sanonr 
Group botes 030 6123 
ROOK NOW FOR XMAST 
Special nuuner Dec 26 Sura 


DUCHESS S 836 8303 OC 240 

9648 CC 579 6433 L CC 24 

If r/7 dav 240 7200 Cvo* 8 Wed 

mal 3 Sal 3 


DUKE OF YORKS 636 5122 0C 

B36 9837/741 9999/240 7200. 

Ftes 8 Thu 3 Sat 6 & 8 JO , 

COMEDY OF. THE YEAR 

4tn—**r-* Dm Amm* 1MM 

STEPPING OUT 

HN Oanwdy- by RtrMM Harr** 
tx red ed by Julia McKenzie 

“TRIUMPH ON TAP” su 

«(JUICH YOURSELF SOLLY” TO 
-A PERFECT DKlManr* D- Trl 

third hilarious year 


FUMI UME B Of CCS 8362238/9 

AOV £40 7200 1 24 hr* bko fret 
MOB 10 FM a Sot 8 30 MM Tnurt 
. - ■ A 6U .&00 

SOU .. IQEt tH 

LEJUHA OMUL 

in DOUBLE-DOUBLE 

-I enwi-ed ««V 4 llll»llto“ 

-,v raair ei wtioouiuirv - to - 

unbeaiable" Times ES 

WE DOUBLE BARE YOU TO 


437 1692. OC 579*433/ 
Utg fee in Call 24 nr 240 7200. 
Ore Sates 930 6123. Lies 8 

Mats Wed 3 Sat «. 
Andrew Uoyd Webber Present* 

LEN D ME A TE NOR 

“A MASTERPIECE” Times 
-FILLS THE THEATRE WITH 

THE SOUND OF LAUGHTER** 

S-Ejcp 

An American Comedy by 
Ken Ludwig 

re reeled by David oumorV 


GREENWICH THEATRE 01-858 

TTB 6 . Eves 7 45. Mat* Sal 230 

FOR KMC AND COUNTRY' by 

John Wilson. “A* 



HAMPSTEAD 132 9301. Eves 

■ 8 pm. SM Mat* 430. ASK FOR 

THE MOON by SMrlay Om. “A 

-Beee U IMto jetitiV Tm* 


HAYMARKET THEATRE ROYAL 

Box Office ACC 01-930 9832. 1 st 

can aenr/7 day cc bkgs 240 7200 

PrevB f rom is On. Opens SI Oci 

DEREK JACOB! In 

- BREAKING the CODE 

by Hugn Whitmore 


HAYMARKET THEATRE ROYAL 

Bert Ohm- and OC Ol 930 9532. 

First OUT 24 hr 7 day CC booking* 
Ol 240 7300. 

Dtrrrl thorn Broadway 
“A suberb London state debut** 
Financial Tiroes 

JACK LEMMON . 

**A4 line a otooe actor a* he to a 
screen one** -Today 

LONG DAY 5 * JOURNEY 
INTO NIGHT 

By Eugene o*Ne<n 
-Jonathan MUterts brtWanL 
product ton" standard 
Eves onto Man-5al 7 JO 

LAST 3 DAYS 


HER MakstVs. RayeurkM. Ol 

639 2244 CC.Ttrkeunaurr 379 
6131 Tint CHI CC 240 7200 

ANDR EW LL OYP WER BE R*» 
WW MUSICAL 

THE PHANTOM . OF THE 
OPERA 

Starrino 


_ Sarah Stove 

■ Bmtilnum Banon 

Dl reeled Bv HAROLD PRINCE 

-Lyre Tafi Man wed a Sat 3 

HOW PRCVUMNC Opens 9 
On at 7pm. 


LONDON PALLADIUM 457 7373. 

741 9999 <no bka fee). Flrel CMI 

2* H r 7 D ay CC 240 720a (MB 

RKB FIE) Ore Sated 936 0123. 
TlrtoHmatter 379 0433 

THE HIT MUSICAL 

COMEDY ■ 

GEORGE HEARTS' 

■A JOENte OV1LLBY .. 

LA-CAGE AUX POLES 

!— A PALLADIUM ROAR 6P 
-*• APPROVAL” S.TN 
MoB-rn 7.30. Mots Wed 2.00 
• . Sat a 30 A- B OO 

StdM roncmMom. avail, at dour 
--“on fn a Sal mats 
SEAT* AVAILABLE FROM ETJHI 


LYRIC HAMMEKSMini OL741 
2311 A*IW —*■ *«- IB 29 

Ort Eves 7 46. Wert MJto 2 

Sal Mats 4pm THE HOUSE OF 

BERMAROA ALBA bv. Una. 

With Patricia Hayes, CM ' 

• Mbm to Jwe* PtmrtohL 
SlUDKh 01741 8701. Eves 

8pm 1 Mon at 7pmi Wmm Pre- 

Stora to MASSASE by Mkfcael 


LYRIC THEATRE SMtestoury 

Ave W1 Ol 437 3686/7 01-434 
ISfiO. 01-434 1060. 01-734 

5l66/7 COtJM BLAKELY 

“A brilliant 6 Joyously 
comic performance" F. Times 

The National Theatre's acclaimed 

production, at 


A CHORUS OF 
DISAPPROVAL _ 

- Heart Dreotunoto funny - Odn 
-Hilarious. S- Tunes 
“A rare evening of 
comic exhilaration- Times 
Evas 7 30. M4U Wed and Sal 3.0. 
Cn»P Soles 01-930 6123. 

Reduced price mart »udenl 

0/ nMT CALL 24**R 7MY 
CC ROOKM6S ON OS Z«B 7200 

(NO BOOKRM PZE) 

WINNER OF ALL 
THE BEST COMEDY 
AWARDS FOR I98S . 
NOW BOOKING UNTIL 
APRILS 

AND FIJI* 5 POFIOJET 

FRANSES DC LA TOUR 
AS LILLIAN MELUHAMOf 

LILLIAN 

A Play by William Luce, directed 
bv Conn Redgrave. Sum Oci 12. 
19. 264 Nov g rtf pm. Mon Oct 
30 at 3om. ■« owe® 


LYTTELTON «B 22S2 CC 

1 National TtvraDP*4_PTOvcertinn 
suon Toni T'OS Totnor -900 
itovv price mal l BRJCHTriH 
BEACH MEhRMRS by Neil SlmCKv 
Totnor. Mon. Tue 7^5. Sal. Wed 

2 15 1 tow price mart) 4 7.46 THE 


MAYFAIR S CC 629 3036. Mon- 
Thu 8 Fri/Sai 6.40 4 8.10 

RICHARD TODDm 

"Tlae B«t TfariBer fer 7444*** S M 

.THE BUSINESS OF 
MURDER c 

M An winner" S Exp 

"SftHBUOiMr Tiro** 

6TH THRILLING YEAR 


MERMAID 236 8348 re 741 

9999 FirrtCuirCC 340 7300124 
Hrt 7 Daj-I Mon-Fn B. Sal b le 
8 JO 

KAPHA'S 

METAMORPHOSIS 

cugrd by 

StevenBERKOFF 

-THE HOST EXCYTVNG 
THEATRICAL EVEIRMC M THE 


1 CUrnto. 

LAST 3 WEEKS'S 
(PnMimiie rood 4 drink) 


MEHMAIO 236 fififte rr Id] 
9999. Grp Sale* .930 6123 fir*t 
Call 240 7200 i24 Hn 7 Days] 
FROM OCT 21. Eve* ftwo. Bats 
6pm & &30 

STEVEN BERKOFFS 


Dlrect.from wve H3M Moon 

“A ■ertiteMcatod irt f SM 


__.Erc Uteaut loort.and^drhih 


NATIONAL THEATRE 81 Bank 

NATIONAL THEATRE 
COM PANY 

See SEPARATE onnes wider 
QLjV MR/LTTtELTOH/ • 
COTTCSLOC. Excellent cheap 

seals day* of bhh all Uwafre* 

from 10 am. RESTAURANT [928 

3033). EASY CAR PAWK, Info 

633 0880 AM COMB 


NEW LONDON Dntry Lane WC2 
406 0072 CC 379 6433 Ev re 7.4ft 
Tue & S al 3 0 0 A 7. 45. , 

THE ANDREW LLOYD WEBBER' 
/TJL ELIOT MUSICAL 

CATS 

APPLY DAILY TO BOX OPPtCE 


croup Bookme* 01-406 1667 or 
01-930 6123 NOW BOOKINO TO 
MAT M IK/. 


OLIVER *S* 938 2362 CC (Na 
uonal TheaueM open stagei Toni. 
Totnor 7 15. SM 2 00 now price 

mall A 7.16 ANDiAL FARM by 

Orweu. adapted by Peter Hatl 
Mon 8.00. Tue. Wed 7 16 

PKAVPA-AFI— t S toat C u Bid y . 


PALACE THEATRE «* 0409 CC 
379 6433 Fu Call 24Kr 7Day CC 
240 7200 Grp Sale* 930 6123 
THE MUSICAL SENSATION 

LES MISERABLE 
“IF YOU CANT GET A 
TICKET- STEAL ONETsm 

Eve* 7.30 Mats Thu A Sal 2 39 
LrteTonvm Ml admitted 
unUI the interval 

BEAT THE TOUTS BY ENQUm- 
MC FOR RETURNS AT THE BOX 
OFFICE. 


PARAMOUNT CITY TIBATItE G> 

Windmill I SI. Wl CC 01 437 
6312/8380. Richard C 
alar or MTisaiiwial rtorky Honor 
Show a Wfl Vrtui P«*r - - 

m THE NEWS 

“WOO raioeranre 1 Thrlllinar Con- 
iinuattv- nonimo*' Odn. "I en toyed 
II mormoiKlv** Time* "Ejfrellenl - 
F.T. Nignnv 9.00pm. Admrtston 
£7.60 A CS 00 Fn A Sal 6.50 A 
900pm Special cokomIop Plrt to 
Sal LM parts CLM idr 


PHMCE EDWARD Box Office 
734 8961 Flrel Can 24 Hr 7 Day* 
rr Booking B36 346* Grp Sain 
930 6123 

Mon-Sal 8. MU TnuisASrt-300 

CHESS 

A GRAND MASTER OF A 
SHOW” Newsweek 

Nan* PoektoK IP March ZB, 1S«7 

MAT SEATS SOMETIMES 
AVAILABLE ON DAY 


FRDtcC OF WALES 01-930 8681 
/2CC Holllne 930 0844/6/6 Cre 
-Stall*. 930 6123 Nrtlh Prownel 
741 9999/379 6*33. Flrel Call 24 
hr 7 dav 240 7200 mo bko fe«*i 
TOE-TA P P M C OOOD* f». MBU 

“SEVEN BRIDES FOR 
SEVEN- BROTHERS” 

1W BLOret BUSTER MUSH 


“I DEFY ANYONE HOT TO 
ENJOY IT" F.TImw.i . 
“SEVENTH HEAVEN* E Shorter 
Eve* 7 30. Mat Thut A sai 3. 
Lait oka pektr la M tear 


PMNCE OF WALES Wl 930868! 
/S re HOthne 930 0844/5 .’ 6. Grp 
S4to* 930 6123 Keith Plow 
741 9999/379 6433 
1*1 Call 24hr/7day 240 7200 

’AlLO’ALLO 

v-llh Ihe TV SHOW STARS 
From 30 Orl 

Mon-Thr a Fn A Sol 630 A 8.40 


QUEEN'S 01734 1166/7/ 
0261/0120 Z4hr CY 240 7200 
Grp Store 930 6123 

BEST MUSICAL Bi 
LONDON** Can 
A WONDERFUL STAR" Mau 

MAUREEN LIPMAN - 


WONDERR.IL TOWN! 

“II ripple* with exclK-rm-nr" 

S Times “Jim wonderful*" D.Exp 
Mon -Sal 8 Mats Wed 2 30 Sal S 


ROYAL COURT S CC 730 1745/ 

1867. OC 24hr 7 dav 240 7200 

■pkp teei. Eve* 8pm. Sal Mal* 

4MB KAFKA’S DICK by Alan 
Do- Richard Evre 


SAVOY 01-6X6 8888 CC 01 379 
6219. 836 0479 CvMUnpv 7 45 
Man Wed 3. Sal S A 8.30 
LAST S WEEKS ENDS NOV 1 
CHRISTOPHER GODWIN 
STEPHANIE HICH 

COLE PADDICX 

M ICHAE L COCHRANE 
COLETTE T1MOTHV 

GLCXSON CARLTON 

MICHAEL ntAYKS 
AWARD- WINNING FARCE 

NOISES OFF 

rar by MICHAEL BLAhXMORC 


THEATRE OP 
COMEDY. 01-379 53*9 rrtii 379 

6433/741 9999 Tirst CaH 24-to, 

240 7200 IM.0 tort crp Sale* 930 
6123 

“Packed eawac 

Trie Theaur of Comedy Co 

to.riLt.to, 

TOM IAN 

C O URTEN A Y OCOLVY 

PEGGY MOUNT 


ROOKERY NOOK 

bvr Bon Traver* 
plrerted by Mark Klnvtpa 


LBC 

ManFli 8 wed M51 3 sat S BC A 
830. 


SWTORWIY THEATRE OP 
COMEDY. 01 -379 3399 rr Or-379 
M33/741 9999 Fine call 24hr 
240 7S00 <bkfl reel Crp Sates 930 
6123 

Mon-Fn 6. Wed M41 3. Sal SOO A 
8.30 

THEATRE OP COMEDY CO * 

“The fine*! ronwr latent* of mod- 
ern time*— .■□.Mailt 
. in 

.-A vim, up revival - ibebrst 1 nave 
over wen iTunrsi 

ROOKERY NOOK 

" - Ihe-RUKi fetebralnl arf torn 
Timm farrer* Sgcrtiun 


CTJBARTHFS 01-836 1443. Sue 

tut CC NO 379 6433 LVOV 8 0 

' Tore 2 afi. Sal S O and B 0- 

?*»> yr a* AGATHA CHMSTtiK** 

THE MOUSETRAP 


STRAND 836 2660 CC 836 
4143/5190 741 9VB9. Tirol CaU 
24 Hr 7 Dav rr ZM 7200 Crp 
Sale* 930 6123 

CABARET 

-The ahnrpMt. mart u phte U tal 
ad. to i l (hythnie — »tea l na* 

" ■” ' Std 


Siamng 

WAYNE SLEEP 

rerened A CJnuroqnpheif by 

CMfa n Lynn* 

MOM Frt 7 45. Mal Wed 3.00 
rial a JO A 8 IS 

NO SCAT PfHCC MCKZAH 
BEST VALUE IN WEST W 
BOOKING NOW UPTO JAH"S7 


STRATFORD-UPON-AVON 

1 0789 1 295623. ROYAL 
SHAKESPEARE COMPANY dl 

ftST*. Drum Today l 30. Sal 

7 30. Winter** TMa Tonlphf 

7 30 Kchand B Tontor 7 30. 

Sal 1 30. Swa n Theatre. R awer 

Todav I SO. Sal 7 Jo. fUacmnn 

TontotH 7.30 Fair Maid Tomor 
7 30 SM 1 30 


THEATRE OF COMEDY 
COMPANY 

"Tito very brel ot Bruton'* romtr 
lalenC. Dtoli- Mail 
See irMu ir rninn under 

ewirwoa theatre/ 
SHAFTESBURY THEATRE 
OF COMEDY/ 
mOTEHAU. THEATRE/ 


VAUDEVILLE rin OtUfi- a CC. 

836 9987 -SMS FteB call CC. 24 

hn 240 7200 i Mm leei Evut 8.0. 

Mail Wed 2.30. Sal G.O. 830 

JULIA MCKENZIE 
MARTIN JARVIS * - 


JOKPWNE TEWSON tn 
ALAN AYCKBOURN'S New Ptoy 

WOMAN IN MI ND 

**TMS MUST BE THE FUNNIEST 
PLAY M LONDON. IT IE ALSO 
THE MOST DtSTtMWB*' S.Trt 
“ALAN AYCKBOURN IS WRIT. 
MC AT HB BEST** . S Time* 
“JULIA McKEKXIE GIVES A 
P ERF ORMANCE TO TAKE THE 
BREATH AWAY** D.Trl 


VtCTOMA PALACE 01-8341317 

CH.\RUE girl 

Eve* 7 SO MahiJArti A SuU 2.46 
Bov Of lire open dally 9am-9pm 
Bookniq tha avallablP at MO 
EXTRA COST Uvreurti FIRST 
CALL voeriai 24hr 7 day ctkUI 
rant ho o kurev • 01-240 7200. 
-nCKETMASm Ol -379 6433 dr 
ani vv HAnuin Travel Branch 

CHARLIE GIRL 

“Fteawaeka, Pawfalm to 
Pahtdeaa Frieotfly" Standard 
PAUL NICHOLAS * 

■ CTD CHARKSC 
DORA BRYAN 
NICHOLAS PARSO NS 
MARK WTHTCRh 

CHARLIE- GIRL 

FABULOUS PARTY RATES MOW 
AVAILABLE BOOKING TO JANU- 
ARY 10. GROUP SALES Boa 
OWcn 01 MO 8129 


WESTMINSTER 01-834 0283/4 
rr- SM 0048 FlrUrrAlr tr 200 
7300 A rr 741 9999/379 6435 
Grp* MO 6123. Eves J aS.-Wed. 

- -MaM.~S.KM E J BIS 

NY REE DAWN PORT ER 
DERMOT . -PETER 

WAJ-SH > - BYRNE 

In FRANCIS OUMUHKE'G 

DEADLY NIGHTCAP ;. 

“VrtY beat nl ThrtBara^ 1KI KR T 
TO IHE WEST MINST ER**. D Tel 
“_MUCH BETT ER ■ THAN 
AGATHA CWnSTlE" Wlwts On 


YOUNG VIC SIR 6365 .CC 579 
6433. Toni 7.30 4 vie mm* 

. VANKSA REDGRAVE 

in GHOSTS bv toren Kdu bis- 


WHITEHALL SW1 .Q| «o 

77657834 4065 CC ,r Of 3T9 
0565 / 6433 . 741 Orta, Ol 

836 3902 M «1 Fn 8 00. Wed Mat 
3 Ofi Sal* 5004 . K.SO. 

THEATRE OP COMEDY pt reran 

WHEN WE ARE MARRIED 

• Bv J B Prw-Jte> 

Dwrrted bv RhviU Care 

*rrou WILL NOT FIND A move 
. PLEASURABLE EVEMNQ ANY 
WHERE M LONDON,, OR XHE 
WORLD** S Ctunea. : 


WYNDHAMS 836 SlJPfl rr 370 
> 3965 / 379 6433 Crp* B 36 3062 
Toot TomnT 8. Sal 6 3.8 JO 

LAST FOUR KHI . , 

FAYE DUNAWAY . 

“tier ft hv uvq— MaiU lie 

CntCE-A BRAVO . 


DVrCIrO M 

■■A Rimulatinri plav. mnale 
and wmvr TimK --fvih, «i 
M« w. eonrvrn and mairaqp" 
.. ■ CUV land* 


WYNDHAHrS * 836 -UCO-rr 579 
6565/6033/ HI Call 24 hr* 7. dav* 
240, 1300/741. 9004. Cirpa <U6 
3962.-831 3771 RtDUttD 

PRICE PREVIEW OCT 7. open* 
Orl B Lire B. Sal nuts 3 • 

JOHN ROSEMARY 
MILLS m • , HARRIS 

In tha H.T. irednrtlan aT 

THE PETITION 

by BRIA N CLA RK .. 
Dirmrd hv PETER NALL 
•SEARnU* IMPACT* S.TWM. 


YOUNG VIC ST(JDf0*928 6363 
The t lb aai ti a r y ' Tbanira in 
NAPOLEON MOM by -Mark 
Heath Eves 74S 


ART GALLERIES 


BtirnSN JJBHAR^f.Gl ftu^ou-si 
VV£f Tlv Ititiviidlivmto THE 
CITY, IN MAPS ,.ito >> rrlrnra 
linn ul ST AUGUSmir OF 
HIPPO. 354-430, Mfln Sa) Ifr 
O Suit* 2 30 - 6 \dm.fine.- 


PISCMER-pfNE ART an tCmijM . 
W J.imreN SKI 839 36q;. 
(ONE POTTERS - Htr Conn. 
Fiilrii. Hrratnvon. Raebimi 
-. (VniimvA. elf Lniii lo on 
Moil rii 10 5 30 


PARKIN GALLERY II Mnlronih 
SI LI<<V<IOI< sui 236.8144. 

SUMMER EXMlmON. 


TA TE G ALLERY. Millhdlik SVv 1 
STEPHEN COX Sbutn IihImii 
V iiIMPlixkni VTSeifre* In- 
III 19 Oi i SOL LnHtt srterfed 
Pi ml* J a TP \ nlil 30 Kov. 

liun fiee Kk< 1 v* ID S SO 
tour- ? 5 50 Rreouk*a Hilo.* 

Ol H2M 7128. * *■ - 


THACKERAY GALLERY 18 
Th.u Weiav St. Ivu 937 5H83 
JACQUES KUPFERMAMN- . 
Pimiiiiihis i mil- 17 Qrltfhet 


THE PARK LANE ANTK|UES 
FAIR Pan. lmii* Hoirt. 

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THURSDAY OCTOBER 2 1986 


Frizzell, the club's assistant 
manager for the last three 
years, as their new manager. 
Frizzell, the fifteenth manager 
at Maine Road since the war, 
replaces Billy McNeill and 
will have a two-year contract. 

“Our main concern was 
stability.’* Peter Swales, the 
chairman, said on announcing 
the appointment "It would 
have been ridiculous to have 
gone outside for a manager, 
which is always a chancy 
business anyway, when we 
had an obvious choice on our 
doorstep." 

The appointment may not 
be universally popular with 
the fans — Swales conceded 
that 70 per cent of the letters 
he had received advocated the 
choice of Tommy Docherty — 
but it is an apt recognition of 
City's circumstances after the 
heady extravagances of the 
1970s. The club did not 
interview any other applicant 

"It was the least difficult 
decision of the seven appoint- 
ments since I've been 
chairman.” Swales added, 
providing an unfortunate echo 
of his comment on the choice 
of John Benson, which he said 
then “was unanimous, which 
is unusual for us". Benson 
lasted six months. 

That knowledge is unlikely 
to deter Frizzell, who is in 
stark contrast to most of his 
flamboyant predecessors. A 
dour, small Scot he is more of 
a carpet-slipper manager than 
a champagne and gold bracelet 
man. preferring cigarettes to 
cigars. 

He is. however, said to be 
popular with Lhe players, and 


Rangers' notorious plastic sur- 
face. he said: “They tell me 
this is where the game’s future 
lies. If so I'm glad I'm gening 
on a bit But we were pleased 
to gel a point — usually the 
only thing we get out of 
London is the train from 
Euston." 

That humour will un- 
doubtedly be needed in the 
attempt to restore confidence 

Tickets only 

Ticket restrictions are being 
introduced for Leeds United's 
next four away matches in the 
second division. Although 
Leeds are still waiting to hear 
from the FA about their plea to 
bring back a selective ban on 
ticket sales, Plymouth Argyle, 
Grimsby Town, MQlwali and 
Birmin gham City gone ahead 
and made their matches with 
the Yorkshire dub all-ticket. 

to a team already in deep 
depression. City’s record of 
only one win in their last 23 
games, with only five goals 
scored in their nine games this 
season, three of them in a 10- 
minute burst on the opening 
day. demonstrates the extent 
of'the task facing their new 
manager. 

Frizzell concedes that goal 
scoring is his major priority. 
He is. however, a careful 
operator in the transfer mar- 
ket. as both his Scottish birth 
and years with Oldham dic- 
tate. and although he watched 
Colin Pascoe. of Swansea, on 
Tuesday, he was not interested 
in the reported fee of 
£ 200 . 000 . 


Luck of the Irish runs out as 
East Germans march on 


By Stuart Jones, Football Correspondent 


It was the usual tale for the 
Irish in Europe yesterday. 
They gained honour in defeat 
Both Glentoran, in the Cup- 
Winners’ Cup, and Coleraine, 
in the UEFA Cup, resisted 
stubbornly in East Germany 
and their dismissal from the 
first round of the competitions 
was not confirmed until the 
handshakes had been 
exchanged. 

Glentoran, who had drawn 
against Lokomotiv Leipzig two 
weeks ago. fell behind after 36 
minutes but remained in 
contention until Richter 
added a second in the final 
minute. Although Cleary, who 
was responsible for 
Glentonm's goal in the first 
leg. shook the bar, Lokomotiv 
were so dominant that they 
were awarded IS comers to 
the Irishmen's none. 

Coleraine subsided shortly 
before the interval in 
Brandenburg. Jeske nodding 


Stahl into an overall lead. East 
German superiority was as 
evident but the Irish refused 
to yield. Heart of Midlothian, 
representing Scotland in the 
UEFA Cup. went out by an 
even narrower margin in Hun- 
gary. Dukla Prague, for whom 
Griga scored 10 minutes after 
the interval, went through on 
the away goals rule. 

Universitatea Craiova's 
visit to Istanbul opened with 
the quickest strike of the day 
and closed on a note ot 
disgrace. Bicu extended their 
aggregate lead within a minute 
and even though Cunevt 
equalised for Galatasaray on 
the hour, their path to the 
second round of the UEFA 
Cup seemed serene enough. 

But Lung, the captain and 
goalkeeper of the Romanian 
side, remained anything but 
calm. With five minutes left, 
he became so incensed after 
conceding a disputed second 


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goal that his extravagant dis- 
play of dissent persuaded Lo 
Bello, a controversial referee 
from Italy, to send him off. 

Universitatea held on with- 
out their leader but their 
fellow countrymen. Dynamo 
Bucharest were surprisingly 
knocked out of the Cup- 
Winners’ Cup. Camaiaru, an 
international centre forward 
built along the lines of a 
spider, gained their lone 
consolation against Nentori of 
Tirana, who started with a 
goal from Minga and finished 
with another from Josa. 

Porto, the Portuguese cham- 
pions who had overpowered 
their Maltese opponents in the 
European Cup a fortnight ago, 
merely stretched their muscles 
in the afternoon sunshine in 
Valetta. To the nine goals they 
had already scored at home 
against Rabat Ajax, they 
added only one more, from 
Sousa 10 minutes from time. 

CYCLING 

Challenge 
for local 
favourite 

From John WQcockson 
Galway 

Eric Vanderaerden. of Bel- 
gium. and his Panasonic team 
threw down a strong challenge 
to the home favourite. Sean 
Kelly, in the Nissan Inter- 
national Classic yesterday. All 
five of the Panasonic riders 
engineered a sprint victory for 
the Belgian at the end of Lhe 
127-mile first stage. 

His Australian team col- 
league. Phil Anderson, set the 
final ball rolling when he 
attacked entering damp, dark 
Galway with two laps of a 2.5- 
mile circuit in the town centre 
remaining. 

“Phil’s attack was good for 
me.” Vanderaerden said. 
Vanderaerden won the points 
championship in the Tour de 
France in Kelly’s absence this 
year. “Kelly had to chase and I 
was ready to make the sprint.” 

The pursuit of Anderson by 
Kelly and his Swiss team 
colleague. Stephan Joho. com- 
bined with six sharp corners, 
caused the 90-strong field to 
split- There was at least one 
crash and 21 riders joined the 
Australian as the bell sounded 
for the final lap. 

With half a mile remaining 
there was an attack by another 
Panasonic man. Teun Van 
Vliet. the Dutchman who won 
in Galway with a similar 
move in last year's race. 
Realizing he was not going to 
win. Van Vlier stayed at the 
front, leading Vanderaerden. 

The small time bonuses 
awarded for the leaders al- 
lowed Vanderaerden to take 
the overall lead by one second 
from Kelly. 

RESULTS; Stage m (Dublin to Galway. 
127 rruhMj- i. E vanoeraetcen iBell. Shr 
J5*IWI 32»e Z S Kelly ffrei: 3. S Joho 
iSwitrt *. M Emott (GB): 5. C Bomans 
(Bel), o. A Van aer Poet (Netni; 7. S Bauer 
(Can). &. P Thomas (GB« 9. J beckons 
(Bel); tfl. C McCann tlroj. an sane time. 



SPORT 


City playing safe 
as Frizzell 
is put in charge 

By Peter Ball 

Manchester City have opted behind the quiet image there For the moment the most 
tor stabthty and thrift. Yes- are occasional glimpses of a likely moves will be depar- 
terdayr they confirmed the pawky wit. After an early lures — negotiations with Ful- 


the move of Steve Kinsey to 
America. He is expected even- 
tually to bring in a younger 
assistant 

A forward with Morton and 
then Oldham Athletic, with 
whom he spent 22 years as 
player and then manager. 
Frizzell has served a long 
apprenticeship in the ways of 
managing a club on a shoe- 
string. Swales, however, who 
confessed to be “touchy” 
about constant references to 
City's financial position, said 
that Frizzell would have some 
money to spend — “if it is for 
the right man.” 

That is unlikely to frighten 
Frizzell, whose eye for a 
bargain and for developing 
young talent provides his best 
testimonial. When he took 
over at Oldham as caretaker- 
manager at the beginning of 
1970. the club had reached its 
lowest ebb. In serious finan- 
cial trouble, they were facing 
the threat of applying for re- 
election for a second 
successive year. 

Re-election was avoided, 
and the following season Old- 
ham gained promotion. After 
two years of consolidation, 
they won the third division 
championship in 1974. They 
have been in the second 
division ever since, Frizzell's 
ability to buy cheap and sell 
profitably keeping the club on 
an even keeL In 1982 they 
madc their most serious stab 
at promotion to division one 
until injuries to key players led 
to a decline and they finished 
in mid-table. In the event 
Frizzell was sacked. 



India warn any 
trip to SA may 
isolate England 

From Richard Streeton, Delhi 


Happiness: LJoyd Honeyphan shares his jnbillation at winning the undisputed world welter- 
weight boxing championship with his family and friends yesterday. Report, page 36 


RUGBY UNION 


GOLF 


Cornwall will lack 
their captain 

By David Hands, Rugby Correspondent 


Chris Alcock. the Royal 
Navy full back and captain of 
Cornwall, will miss his 
county's game against the 
Japanese at Redruth on Sat- 
urday. Alcock has broken a 
bone in his wrist, though he 
should be fit to play in the 
Thorn EMI county 
championship. 

His place in the team goes to 
Buzza. the Redruth and 
Loughborough University 
stand-off half and Cornwall 
will be led by Howarth, the 
Plymouth Albion flank for- 
ward. Howarth has not been 
available in Cornwall's three 
warm-up games thus far be- 
cause of naval duties. 

The county also extend a 
warm welcome back to Conn, 
who appeared 66 times for 
Cornwall before emigrating to 
South Africa three years ago. 
He played many times at lock 
but now appears at No 8 
representing St Ives, whom he 
now captains and coaches. 

Unfortunately, prepara- 
tions have not gone as hoped: 
Cornwall have lost all three 


games so far. against Edin- 
burgh. an invitation XV 
raised by David East and. last 
Monday, a strong Crawshay's 
Welsh team. After they have 
played Japan there ts one 
further game, against the 
Royal Navy on October 28, 
before Cornwall begin their 
county programme against 
Berkshire on November 8. 

Warwickshire, the county 
champions, play their annual 
friendly with Glamorgan at 
Maesteg on Monday evening. 

Robbins, capped by En- 
gland at No. 8 last season, 
remains Warwickshire's cap- 
tain but he will be without the 
two Thomases on Monday. 
Paul, the flank, forward, is 
recovering from an operation 
and Steve, the scrum half, has 
not recovered from a domestic 
accident. 

CORNWALL (V Japanese. Redruth): A 



Rule (Camborne); J May (Redruth). M 
Westran IHayteL R Keast (Reckuth), S 
Ughtfoot(F8VtHXith), P EttNt (Redruth), A 
Cook (Haytei, B Ho w arth (Plymouth 
Albion, capq. R Cortn (St Ives). 


Old Canadian story 


By a Correspondent 

Leinster....................... 13 

Canadians 3 

While the Canadian touring 
team are still without a win in 
Ireland Leinster, successful at 
Lansdowne Road yesterday by 
a goal, a try and a penalty lo a 
penalty, will derive minimum 
satisfaction from this resuiL 

For the Canadians it 
waswas a repeat of past events 
— an inability to kick penalties 
at moderate range, added to a 
lack of penetration at half- 
back and in the centre. They 
had out-half McLean to thank 
for their solitary penalty and 
could only watch with regret 
as three earlier attempts were 
wide by narrow margins. 

Leinster, calling on 10 inter- 
nationals and making their 
first appearance of the season, 
led 13-3 at half-time but still 
have much to do before the 
stan of the Irish provincial 
championship. 


Davis in 
a tussle 

Steve Davis, the former 
world snooker champion, was 
given a fright in the BCE 
International at Stoke yes- 
terday when Eugene Hughes, 
of Ireland, moved within one 
frame of victory and a place in 
the semi-finals. 

Davis, struggling to find his 
form, led 2-1 before his oppo- 
nent reeled off three succes- 
sive frames to take a 4-2 lead. 
But. with typical determin- 
ation. Davis took the seventh 
frame with a break of 74. then 
won the last of the afternoon's 
session to level the match 

Change balls 

The OvaJ. home of Surrey 
County Cricket Club, is about 
to become the venue for an 
entirely different ball game. 
On October 12. Australian 
Rules football will be staged at 
ihc ground when two top clubs 
from the Victoria Football 
League - Carlton and North 
Melbourne - will compete in 
a match to be screened live to 
Australia. The game will last 
three hours and starts at 
1.30pm. 


Leinster opened with a try 
by Mullen after solid approach 
work by the half-backs and 
Murphy at full-back. Murphy 
converted and later kicked a 
long-range penalty after Kear- 
ney had rounded offa spirited 
counter-attack with a try in 
the comer. 

LEINSTER: J Murphy (Qrpysfooes); J 
Sewcn (Dubfen University), B Mullen 
^Oxford University). P Clinch 
'Lansdowne). H GaHagher (Greystones); A 
Ward (Greystones). A Doyle (Greystones. 
sapuinj: P Qrr (On Wesfeyl, H Hartxson 
.Bective Rangers). 0 Fitzgerald 
Lansdotme). J Sermon (Sherries). P 
-xtfms (Lansdowne). P Kenny (Wander- 
3iSL D Spring (Lansdowne). H Kearney 
Wanderers). 

CANADIANS: M Wyatt P Palmer, M 
3artun. S McTavtsh. J Leckey. P McLean, 
i Smart E Evans. K Svoboda. W Handson. 
H oe Goede (captasi). R van den Brink. R 
=rame. G Ennis. R Radu. 

Referee: R Megson (Scotland). 

Collins to quit 

Peter Collins, aged 32, Belle 
Vue's former world speedway 
champion, is to retire at the end 
of the season. He said: “1 am not 
enjoying the sport and feel it is 
the right time to quiL I am not 
interested in dropping down 
into the National League.” 


SPORT IN BRIEF 


Kurina Douglas from Bris- 
tol, opened up a two strokes 
lead at the half-way stage of 
the £20,000 Mitsubishi Colt 
Cars Jersey open champion- 
ship at Royal Jersey yesterday. 

After a persistent sea mist 
had delayed the start for five 
hours Miss Douglas, 26, shot a 
four under par 67 for a 36 
holes aggregate of 138. This 
leaves the West Country pro- 
fessional two strokes clear of 
Australia's Corinne Dibnah 
.with three other overseas chal- 
lengers one stroke further 
behind. 

When a shotgun start was 
introduced in an attempt to 
make up lost time Miss Doug- 
las. without a tour win since 
1984. opened her round with 
three putts on the ninth green 
for a bogey six. 

But she then turned on be 
style with five biidies in the 
next nine holes as she covered 
the inward half in 31. 

The lowest round of the day 
came from Italy's Federica 
Dassu who never exceeded 
par in a career best 65 which 
pulled her into a share of third 
place. 

LEADING SCORES: (QB and Wand 
13 ^ K Doufltas (71-67). 

140:C[>bnah 
ISA) 75, 66; 


Any county cricketer who 
wishes to be chosen for 
England's World Cvp team in 
iasdia and Pakistan thi* time 
next year should avoid visiting 
Sooth Africa in the coming 
winter, whether to coach or for 
any other reason. That warn- 
ing was issued here yesterday 
by Mr N. K.P. Salve, the 
deputy leader of the rating 

Congress parliamentary party 
in the Indian Upper House, 
who is also chairman of the 
World' Cnp organizing 

Mr Salve intends to ap- 
proach England's delegate 
when the International 
Cricket Conference (ICC) 
holds a special meeting in 
Delhi on November 3 and 4 to 
make final arrangements for 
the 1987 tournament. “Any 
Sooth African visits would be 
unwise in a delicate situation,” 
he said. 

“I am not only trying to 
ensure that the World Cop 
takes place without con- 
troversy. but it is far more 
serious even than that. We are 
more anxious that nothing 
should happen which might 
leave En gland isolated from 
the rest of the world cricket 

family H’-n gtawd, Australia 
and New Zealand, or 
anybody.” 

Mr Salve, a Former presi- 
dent of the Board of Control 
for Cricket in India, gave his 
first British interview to The 
Times since plans for the 
World Cnp on the sab-conti- 
nent took definite shape. He 
said India and Pakistan had 
warned the ICC that their 
governments retained the pre- 
rogative to refuse entry to any 
individuals with Sastii African 
connections. 

He believed that England's 
Test and County Cricket 
Board had acted appropriately 
with the three-year ban on 
their Sooth African rebels. 

“We feel the slate is dear,” 
be said. “The question of 
going to South Africa to coach 
has now bees raised and I am 


fearful that it would not be 
acceptable. By speaki ng now- 
worries in the future can M 
avoided. I ardently feel it is a 
risk for any player to go. 

Mr Salve hopes to appeal to 

Mr J. G. W. Davies, the ont; 
going MCC president and ICC 
cismrguaffi, who was officially 
succeeded by Colin Cowdrey 
yesterday. The Indians believe 
Mr Davies is still coming to 
Delhi next month for the 
conference and wish to ask 
him to persuade potential 
England players not to en- 
danger their future. 

“This is a matter,” Mr 
Salve said, “where we must 
hit fttan to man. It might be 
unprecedented, but I shall 
‘plead 1 special exemption from 
normal channels to show how 
important I feel it is. I shall 
ask Mr Davies to ask the 
players to *play it safe and not 
to rock the boat-* 

“There cannot be too many 
players involved, but embar- 
rassment most be avoided. We 
have had enough of that at the 
Commonwealth Games. 11 

Mr Salve, a former Indian 
cabinet minister for urines and 
steel and a taxation lawyer ami 
accountant, said he was aware 
of England's restraint of trade 
laws. “What must also be 
remembered,” he said, “is the 
bard, political reality that no 
democratic government can 
take measures which woald be 
against the general view of the 

peopled* 

Mr Salve feds that the 
South African issue Is a bigger 
danger to the World Cup than 
any risk that the two host 
countries might fall out There 
is regular friction between 
India and Pakistan over the 
Punjab, border disputes and 
other issues. “Both cricket 
authorities are quite conscious . 
of the political situation. 

“1 can tell yon, however, 
that both Mr Bgpv Gandhi, 
Oiff Prime Minister, and Presi- 
dent Zia U1 Haq. of Pakistan, 
have pledged frill support. 11 


Rehearsal £7.5 million 



for Cup 
over rate 

Delhi — After the second 
Test match wash-out, the first 
thing to be mentioned about 
today’s fourth one-day inter- 
national between India and 
Australia is that the weather 
forecast is good- For neutrals, 
an interesting side issue will be 
to see if the team bowling first 
manages to complete the re- 
quired 50 overs in the 3M> 
hours before lunch (Richard 
Streeton writes). 

Fifty overs are planned in 
next year's World Cup but 
neither team has managed to 
reach this figure in the three 
games played so for this 
season. Each match has be- 
come a 47-over contest with 
India the dilatory culprits 
twice and Australia once. In 
India, the innings in one-day 
games are separated by lunch, 
with the side bowling first 
effectively settling the match's 
duration. 

India have nominated the 
same 15 players summoned 
for the third one-day inter- 
national at Hyderabad, which 
immediately followed the tied 
Test at Madras. Rain washed 
out that match halfway 
through. 

MDfA tfronfc KapS Dev (capQ. S M 
Gavaskar. K Srifckanth, Raman Lambs, □ 
BVanosarkar. M Aztiarudctti. R Stvstri, C 
ctwtan Sftarma, Manindor Singh. 
Lai, R M H Bimy. fi P Sngh, Gopal 
StwiiB. R Poonawtfa. 

AUSTRALIA (from): A R Border (cart), D 
Boon. G Mantwws. B Reid, G Marsh, C 
McDarraotL S Waugh. R Bright G Rttahto, 
T zoehrer, □ Jones, S Daws. G Dyer. M 
VoUeta. D GBjart. 


raised for 
World Cap 

The World Cup organizers 
revealed in Delhi yesterday that 
are planning to spend a stagger- 
ing £7.5 million (Richard Stre- 
eton writes). 

India are reluctant to disclose 
how much Reliance Industries 
Limited, the * sponsors, are 
contributing but it is believed to 
approach £3 million. Reliance, 
the Indian textile and industrial 
conglomerate made by far the 
biggest bid. 

The whining team wilT receive 
the Reliance Cup and £30.000 
and the company has all rights 
to sundry merchandising, and 
priority on the grounds for 
advertising purposes. The gov- 
ernment-owned .television ser- 
vices in India and Pakistan have 
the domestic coverage rights; 
overseas screening is being 
fought over with Australia's 
Channel 9 due in Delhi next 
week. 

The seven Test-playing na- 
tions are guaranteed £200,000 
each, while Zimbabwe, the 
associate ICC members, receive 
£175.000. 

India have spumed direct 
financial help from the govern- 
ment, though foreign exchange 
control limns have been waived 
for£1.8 million. Instead the 
organizers, will receive set pay- 
ments from the local associ- 
ations staging the matches. 

Anyone, though, who has seen 
Calcutta’s dreadful problems, 
who must raise £1 .5 million.wili 
find some of these figures mind- 
boggling. No countries are more 
fanatical about their cricket than , 
India and Pakistan, who dearly 
see the tournament as a chance 
to show the world what they can 
do. although the organizers still 
have problems 



Winning run 

Bulgaria qualified for the 
final round of four at the 
men’s world volleyball 
championship in Toulouse 
yesterday, with a 3-0 victory 
over China. They join the 
United States and the Soviet 
Union, with France and Brazil 
competing for the final place. 

Back on road 

Ari Vatanen. of Finland, the 
former world rally champion 
who was badly injured in a 
crash in Argentina in July of 
last year, is contemplating a 
comeback. 


Botham is barred from 
television appearance 


By Marcos Williams 


Allan Lamb; fit again Flllld FaisCfS 


AH clear 


Allan Lamb has put an end 
to fears that his knee injury 
would rule him out of the 
England's forthcoming .Ashes 
series in Australia. The South 
African-born batsman, who 
cracked a cartilage in his right 
knee when he ran into an 
advertising hoarding during 
the Texaco Trophy match 
against New Zealand at 
Headinglcy in lhe summer, 
said last night: “The injury is 
coming along slowly, but it’s 
going to be OK for ihi lour.” 


Yorkshire County Cricket 
Cub are hoping to raise 
£500.000 in the next year to 
finance the development and 
running of an indoor cricket 
school near their Headingley 
headquarters, 

Huish named 

David Huish has been 
named as captain of the 
Professional Golfers’ Associ- 
ation for 1988. Huish. Great 
Britain and Ireland’s most 
capped player at the PGA Cup 
leveL will succeed Peter AIUssJ 


The Test and County . 
Cricket Board have barred Ian 
Botham from taking part in 
Thames Television’s Midweek 
Sport Special next Wednes- 
day. Botham was to have been 
interviewed live on the pro- 
gramme. which will be broad- 
cast the night before England 
depart for their winter tour of 
Australia, but the players’ 
contracts forbid them to write 
or broadcast about the tour. 

Trevor East executive pro- 
ducer of the programme, 
booked Botham through the . 
player's agent several weeks 
ago. BuL last week. Botham 
signed his tour contract which 
meant that the TCCBTs per- 
mission had to be secured for 
him to appear on the , 
program me-This was refused. 

Botham himself flew to 
Kuwait yesterday morning to 
play for a World XI against a 
Pakistan XI in two. one-day, 
benefit matches for the Paki- 
stani leg spinner, Abdul Qadir. 

Mr East said: “I wem- 
through all the right channels 
and it was done in good faith. 
Ian Botham is the most in-, 
leresting person in English 
cricket mid people would like 
to see and hear him just before 
the team leaves for Australia.” 
He stressed that Botham 


would have been asked only 
about cricketing aspects of the 
tour, and not about any of the 
recent controversies, in which 
he has been involved with 
England and his county. 
Somerset- But be admitted 
that he believed Botham's 
coiitraciural obligations to the 
TCCB would not begin until 
the tour had actually started. 

Peter Lush, public relations 
and marketing manager of the 
TCCB and manager of the 
forthcoming tour, said that if a 
major interview was required 
about the tour, h should be 
with the captain. Mike 
Gatling, and assistant man- 
ager. Micky Stewart, and not 
with Botham. 

The World party of 14 in 
Kuwait also includes Vivian 
Richards and Martin Crowe, 
■who with Botham — and the 
West Indian fast bowler, Joel 
Gamer - are at the centre of 
the controversy currently 

dividing Somerset 
WORLU » w-ixCt. I V A RK*erdH fcWHain). 

R B FUdwdson. M 0 Manhafl (West 
fO(fle8);)T Botham, GAGaqch/BTOBniJ). 

M D, Crowe. J VC o ow f NwZaainS. R O 3 
Hotend [AostrafigL LAD Mendte. A \ 
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Badsha (Bangladam. 

PAKISTAN ftront): torw Khan, Jawed 


PAKISTAN from* Irww Khan, Jawed 
Miamteti. MudasMrNazar, Motnm Khan. 
Abdul dear, SaMm Matt. Wasan Attain. 
Ratnaw- Rate, Taustf Ahmed, . Osatm 
Omar. Zakir Khan, Manaoor Bat*. 
Z<dqvnain.ABZ2a. , , • £,