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No 62,580 



Thatcher 

in face of 

sanction vote 


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,rt T1 * atcher said that despite the 

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TIMES 


SATURDAY OCTOBER 4 1986 




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de campaign against apartheid 

By Nicholas Wood, Political Reporter 
• — ■*=- me _ Minister has no emphasizing that all countries 


9 The number of London-Johannes- 
bnrg flights is to be increased to avoid 
the ban on air Hairy with Sooth Africa 

9 EEC officials said the vote would 
create pressure to strengthen its mea- 
sures imposed last month (Page 5) 


.intenUon or softening her 
opposition towards sanctions 
Sf? 1151 South Africa in the 

%l,». ah, 'S ht of lhe United States 
1,1,4 U««i & -Senate vole imposing a tough 

few WckageofmeSunS S 

*r l P na Government, it 
was disclosed yesterday. 

She believes that the Ameri- 
can move, which overturns 
President Reagan's veto and 
now becomes law. erodes the 
possibility of applying friendly 
persuasion to end the apart- 
heid system. 

She also considers there is 
much hypocrisy in the inter- 
national sanctions debate 
with, for instance, the African 
chin.. ' n r 7 **■> front-line states reluctant to 
lra,ls * ate toeir rhetoric into 
tV. - Re lh * ft- acl,on against Pretoria, 
k <nni.n>, L. There seems little doubt 
that Britain is becoming 
.increasingly isolated for its 
refusal to turn the economic 
screw on President Botha's 
Government. 

The Senate vote is also 
likely to exacerbate tensions 
between Downing Street and 
Sir Geoffrey Howe, the For- 
eign Secretary, who favours a 
stiffer line against South 
Africa. 

The Foreign Office yes- 
terday described the American 
package as a “move in the 
right direction’’ while 


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were free to cometo their own 
policy towards Pretoria. 

Mr Neil Khmock, the La- 
bour leader, said: “Mrs 
Thatcher is now totally 
stranded, as I said she was 
going to be. 

“I would like to think she 
would, on this particular 
follow the Americans ... 1 
doubt it however, because she 
has got the most perverse 
desire to give comfort to Mr 
Botha and the apartheid 
regime.” 

Mr David SteeL the Liberal 
leader, echoed Mr Kinnock’s 
assault “Yet again we are 
being treated to the imedifying 
spectacle of Mrs Thatcher 
standing side by side with 
President Reagan in splendid 
isolation while Western public 
opinion is overwhelmingly in 
favour of sanctions. “ 

Government sources retali- 
ated by poiniing out that 
Britain’s refusal to endorse a 
ban on coal imports at the 
EEC meeting of foreign min- 
isters in Brussels last month 
was backed by West Germany 
and Portugal. 

The American package in- 
cludes an embargo on imports 
of coal, iron, steel uranium, 
agricultural produce and tex- 
tiles — far tougher than EEC 


action which is limiiwd to iron 
and steel 

It also ends all new US 
investments and loans to 
South Africa and severe air 
links between the two 
countries. 

• JOHANNESBURG: 
Black political groups, trade 
unions and church leaders 
yesterday welcomed the Con- 
gress decision saying it was a 
breakthrough in the inter- 
national campaign against 
apartheid (Michael Hornsby 
writes). 

The Anglican Archbishop of 
Cape Town, the Most Rev 
Desmond Tutu, said the onus 
was now on the South African 
Government to “take the 
action we have all been 
advocating” for sanctions to 
be lifted. 

“The Senate has taken a 
moral decision. This is not 
ami-South African action, it is 
anti-injustice, anti-apartheid. 
It is pro-South Africa. It is for 
justice, freedom and 
democracy,” he declared. 

The Moderator of the 
mixed-race Coloured branch 
of the Dutch Refrained 
Church, Dr Allan Boesak, 
another clerical thorn in 
Pretoria's side, said the over- 
riding of President Reagan's 

Continued on page 20, cal '6 


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— ^cld — 
£28,000 to 
be won 

• There is £28,000 to 

be won today'm The 
Timfes Portfolio Gold 
competition. The 
weekly prize is . 
£24,000, treble the 
usual amount 
because of two 
previous weeks 
without winners, and 
there is the dafly 
prize of £4,000. 

• Yesterday's dally 
total was £8,000 
because there was 
no winner on Thursday 
and was shared by 
two readers: Mr R. 

• * Newman of Burnley, 
h Lancs, and Mrs R.M. 

; . . Beech of Lechlade, 

« --- Glos. Details, page 3. 

• Portfolio lists, 
pages 20, 25; rules and 

i-ashfr how to play, page 38. 

Hostage in 
video plea 

The kidnappers of Mr Teny 

- Anderson, the US jouroahsi 

-k abducted 19 months ago in 
3P Beirut have released a video 
ijntape in which he appeals to 
lUU"* President Reagan to belpUS 
J , ^-i hostages in Lebanon Pages 

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riiain 

isiji 


TIMES BUSINESS 


In the pipeline 

/ After TSB the City is now 
speculating on the share that 
1 investors can expect from the 
:1 ' British Gas flotation 

Family Money, page® 26 to 33 

THF inquiry 

- Trusthousc Forte’s £200 mil" 
|jon purchase of the Happy 
' Eater chain of roadside res- 

... - • taurants from Hanson Trusa is 
... • io be investigated by the 
.. Monopolies Commission 

Page 


TIMES SPORT 


Rugby ban 

Yhe Welsh Rugby Union has 
.Upended fonhe rKt of the 
„«a£n David Bjshop, the 

^omypool scrum balfwho 

troke the jaw of a NewpW 
>laver w 


. tome News 2~t 

herseas 

ipPts " 

.its . 16 

SrthsjleaftS. 
ismajses 

BsiimS 

h«s }| 

.n£»t*oids 17.M 

■iwj * 


Law Report 
Leaders 
Letters 
ONfnary 


35 
9 
9 
10 
10 

Sak Room 4 

Seoitts Jg 
Science 10 
Sport 35-3&40 
Hiea tres^c 34 
TV’ & Radio » 
Weather 20 


outright People who fhoaght 
that totally unlikely three 
years ago are how having to 
change their tune.” 

Bucked by the final rout off 
the Liverpool Militants, the 
Labour leadership emerged 


Conference reports 
Leading article 
Letters 

Frank Johnson 


4 

9 

9 

20 


Labour confident 
of outright victory 

- ^ R f PMly Webster and Martin Fletcher 

; The Labour Party yesterday -kin the next general dectionj 
rounded off its most success- 
ful conference in, years with a 
confident Mr Neil Kinnock 
declaring that it could now 
win an ounight victory at the 
next general election. 

After a week which has seen 
Labour achieve a genuine 
unity fra 1 the first time in a 
decade, Mr Kmnock’s judge- 
ment was shared by shadow 
cabinet colleagues who hith- 
erto privately declared such an 
outcome to be impossible. 

. Mr Kinnock, who ends the 
conference in a position of 
impregnable authority, said 
that he was ready for a general 
election at any time, and the 
sooner the better. 

He said that Labour had 
achieved a “solid and deter- 
mined” unity. “If it was 
cosmetic it would not be 
worth much, it would not 
withstand the first pressure. 

This unity wifl withstand all 
pressures.” 

He repeated his pledge not 
to enter a coalition with the 
Alliance parties. “What we 
then inherit will be an eco- 
nomic disaster, - and sitting 
around waiting for the needs 
of this David or that David 
would be daft” 

Mr Kinnock said: “We can 


from the conference, stage- 
managed in unprecedented 
fashion to avoid damaging 
disruption, having secured 
overwhelming backing for all 
its main policy shifts. 

The party has moved to the 
left on defence, on which it 
now has an unqualified non- 
nuclear policy. ‘ 

But h has moved quietly to 
the right on other issues. Out- 
right nationalization has been 
replaced by a concept called 
social ownership, union bal- 
lots on strikes and executive 
elections have been backed. 

The Labour leadership suf- 
fered one of its few defeats of 
the week yesterday Mien the 
conference Mocked moves to 
change the means of selecting 
MPs before the next election. 


Pretoria 
moves to 
defeat 
air ban 

By Harvey Elliott 

Air Correspondent 

South Africa is to increase 
the number of flights to 
London in a bid to get round 
tbe ban on direct air lmks with 
the United States. 

British Airways is almost 
certain to follow suit if the 
number of passengers flying 
from Johannesburg to New 
York via London justifies it. 

South African Airways flies 
four times a week between 
Johannesburg and New York, 
using Boeing 747 jumbo jets. 
Under lhe terms of an Ameri- 
can embargo they will have to 
stbp by the end of the month 
when air traffic licences are 
withdrawn. 

A South African Airways 
spokesman said last night: 
“We will be re-routing oar 
pas s engers to New York via 
London, Frankfurt. Zurich 
and Lisbon. They will be 
booked on to other airlines as 
seats are available. 

“Because of the number of 
passengers which are going to 
be diverted in this way there 
will be a need for further 
aircraft on these routes.” 

South African Airways, 
which has a monopoly on the 
Johannesburg to New York 
route since P&nAm withdrew 
two years ago. flies about 
100,000 passengers a year 
between South Africa and die 
United Slates. 

There will be considerable 
potential for airlines such as 
British Airways and British 
Caledonian to {rick up those 
passengers in London and 
take them on to any destina- 
tion in America. 

Although South Africa was 
claiming last night that tbe 
ban win not hurt tbe national 
airline, it will lead to a 
reduction in revenue just at a 
time when SAA was turning 
the comer from huge losses 
towards some profitability. 

The airline operates seven 
flights a week to Britain, while 
British Airways flies to South 
Africa nine times a week. 
Under tbe terms of the agree- 
ment either airline is free to 
operate as many'flighfs asiit 
likes, provided there £ a rough 
balance in seats avaftable =io 
each carrier. 

British Airways, concerned 
that further embargoes may be 
placed on its South African 
operafious, has asked the Cml 
Aviation Authority for a li- 
cence to fly to the 
neighbouring country iff Bo- 
tswana. 

British Caledonian has 
madea similar application bnt 
rtatmt dun this is tO 

do with sanctions. 




"Sick’ firemen investigated 


By a Staff Reporter 

A special team advised by 
Scotland Yard fees been in- 
vestigating injury claims by 
London firemen totalling £4- 
million over the past year. 

The team was formed when 
current injury claims reached 
a total of £1.5-mfllion in 
personal injury claims and 
£2.5-million in communtation 
pensions. 

A spokesman for the 
London Fire Brigade said that 
between 12 to 20 cases had 
been investigated so far and 


six claims had been contested. 
- As a result, one fireman 
-who had claimed £90,000 was 
eventually awarded only 
£ 6 , 000 . 

The surveillance unit used 
an unmarked van to observe 
the supposedly ill firefighters 
at home. In the three months 
since the investigation was 
launched 250 people were off 
sick and claiming from tbe 
brigade. 

The spokesman said that 
the brigade was “extremely 
concerned” about high levels 


of injury and long-term 
sickness. 

Although many of the £4- 
miQion pound claims were 
“genuine*, there had been 
allegations in the past which 
gave rise to suspicion about 
some daims- 

“Some members were 
claiming that they were barely 
fit to walk down the street* let 
alone work. But the investi- 
gators found them walking 
their dogs, working on their 
cars and generally getting up 
to some strenuous exercise,” 
the spokesman said. 



Still the best: Jack Nfcldans, who earlier this 
announced his retirement from fall-time tournament 
his way to victory over Jos6-Maria CHazabal in the 
world match play championship at Wentworth 
(Photograph: Ian Stewart) Report, page • 

Ferry strike talks 
called for today 

By Tim Jones 


As wildcat strikes disrupted 
Sealink’s cross Channel and 
other forty sendees yesterday, 
senior officials of the com- 
pany agreed to meet National 
Unto^ of .Seamen leaders in 
London today to ducti$s an 
end4©'tht dispute. > 

Although. the result of a 
strike, balkrt of 2,600 Sealink 
employees win not be. known 
until Monday or Tuesday, 
crewmen at Folkestone. Do- 
ver, Harwich and Holyhead 
yesterday refused to operate 
thefenies. 

Their colleagues at Wey- 
mouth, Portsmouth, Guern- 
sey and Cherbourg were 
continuing to occupy four 
other ships. 

Mr Sam McOnskie, deputy 
general secretary of the NUS, 
said yesterday: “There will be 
industrial action, but because 
of the law it will not yet be all- 
out action. It will be wildcat 
strikes." 

The union decided to 
recommend strike action after 
the company's decision to cut 
in tbe wake of 


a merger with Channel Island 
Ferries. 

More than 120 oftbe threat- 
ened jobs are held by mem- 
bers of the merchant navy 
officers' union, also holding a 
ballot on industrial action. 

NUS officials foiled yes- 
terday morning to get the crew 
of the Corbiere at Portsmouth 
to join the protest. Sailings 
from Fishguard, Isle of Man, 
Isle of wight and Stranrar 
were operating normally 
yesterday. 

The NUS dahned that 1 0 of 
Sealink’s 20 ferries operating 
out of British ports were 
affected by the dispute. 

• A national rail strike could 
be called next week in support 
of the seamen, Mr Jimmy 
Knapp, general secretary of 
the National Union of 
Raflwayraen, said yesterday 
(Richard Evans writes). 

His surprise threat was 
made during tbe dosing stages 
of the Labour conference in 
Blackpool, when he disclosed 
that 100 of his members were 
amongst those dismissed. 


Rates fear 
as pound 
falls again 

By Ridtftrd Thomson . 

The pound suffered again 
on the foreign exchanges yes- 
terday as it fell to new lows in 
the absence of central bank 
support/ 

The money markets are still 
anticipating a rise in base 
rales, perhaps as early as next 
week, to support staling de- 
spite the determination of the 
Government to hold the 
present level. 

The .pound fell to 
DM2.871 1, a record low, from 
the previous lowest level of 
DM2.8871 — on Thursday. Its 
trade- weighted index, 
measuring sterling against a 
basket of currencies, also 
reached a new low for the 
third time this week, at 68.0. 
down 0.1 from the previous 
day, before recovering to dose 
at 68.2. Another fall, page 21 


Celtic face 
fear over 
Chernobyl 

Celtic, drawn yesterday to 
play the Soviet side Dynamo 
Kiev in the second round of 
the European Cup, may re- 
quest UEFA to switch the 
second leg of the tie. ' 

Tbe Scottish champions 
were advised by the Foreign 
Office that Kiev was stilla no 
go area for visitors became of 
the effects of the Chernobyl 
disaster. 

Mr David Hay, the C&tic 
manager, said be had ex- 
pressed concern about the 
effects of radiation at Kiev 
whoa the draw was known and 
tbe dub will listen to govern- 
ment advice before they make 
plans to fly to Russia on 
November 5. 

A Celtic spokesman said 
last night that his clnb would 
be relieved if the game were 
switched to another venue. 


Prii 



* * * * -it 


By Philip Jacobson 

It seemed all wrong, on a 
glorious autumn day by the 
seaside, to be talking of bomb 
squads and sniffer dogs, of 
rooftop marksmen and armed 
police patrols. 

But this was Bournemouth 
on the eve of the Conservative 
Parry conference and ever 
since that bomb went off at 
Brighton, along the coast to 
the east, gatherings of this 
nature, are, alas, to he 
accompanied by security pp- 
era lions of ever-increasing 
scope, complexity and cost. 

Certainly Bournemouth - 
quiet, prosperous, dare one 
even sav a little prim" — will 
never have seen anything like 
»l The Young Conservatives 
were here a couple of years 
ago. the Labour Party last 
vear. 


But this is going to be the 
government, the Lady herself; 
her ministers, MPs and hard- 
core supporters, probably the 
last gathering of the faithful 
before the next general 
election. 

At the 
going to 
disruptions, and diversions, 
closures and checkpoints for 
the town and its people. That 
does not exactly thrill the 
average resident, 

Bournemouth may attract 
huge numbers of holiday- 
makers even' year, but it 
strikes one as an essential 
placid and orderly sort of 
place, not at all like raffish 
Brighton (there are no jokes 
about naughty weekends in- 
Boscombe)- 

There is also local concern 
about the cost of all this 


security. Inside estimates 
reckon about £1 million, to be 
split equally between the 
county of Dorset* that is to say 
the ratepayers, and the’ contra! 
government. - 
After a rotten summer sea- 
very least, this is ’ son, a lot of people here are 
mean a week of counting the pennies, unlike 
the Conservative Party, which 
is believed to be Kiting the 
Conference Centre for free. 

“We just hope the delegates 
will do their bit and push 
some cash around town.” the 
owner of one smart restaurant 
said. “We did not exactly gel 
filthy rich on the Labour lot 
last year.” 

Such matters of commerce, 
do now of course, concern the 
Dorset police force, gening 
ready for the son -of week that 
gives all concerned an extra 
set of ulcers. 


Standing on the steps out- 
side the Bournemouth Inter- 
national Centre, built, 
appropriately enough, in the 
red brick bunker-style, the 
county's urbane Chief Con- 
stable, Mr Brian Weight, as- 
sured journalists that he 
intended to make Mrs Mar- 
garet Thatcher and her follow- 
ers “as safe as is humanely 
possible in the context of a 
public gathering." 

Yes, there would be police 
riflemen squinting through 
telescopic sights on roofs near 
by. Yes, . everyone checking 
into local hotels was already 
being given - the onceover, and 
everyone coming in and out of 
the conference would be 
exceedingly thoroughly 
searched. Y^s. a significant 
number of police officers on 
duly next week would be 


carrying handguns. 

There was absolutely no 
truth, Mr Weight assured us, 
flicking a speck of his dash- 
ingly cut pin-striped suit, in 
rumours that men .of the 
Special Boat Squadron would 
be standing by offshore 

The photographers were 
then allowed to shoot a few 
frames of Blue, a friendly 
springer spaniel who will be 
hard at work sniffing for 
explosives from Monday- 

Over the road in the famous 
Winter Gardens, late holiday- 
makers dozed in the sun and 
Bournemouth’s well dressed 
matrons made their rounds of 
the smart shopping arcades. 

One of Mr Weight's col- 
leagues gave a would-be swim- 
mer the bad news that the 
centre's excellent pool was off- 
limits. 


Finance 

package 

favours 

police 

By Hugh Clayton 

Tbe Government told coun- 
cils yesterday that it would 
contribute an extra £1.000 
million to thrir spending next 
year. It also included in a 
complicated package of finan- 
cial measures an important 
stimulus for English councils 
to spend more on the recruit- 
ment of police officers. 

That set the police apart 
from other local government 
services for which ministers 
decided that councils did not 
need to spend as much as they- 
were expected to. 

The police were removed 
from restraints placed on 
other services after negotia- 
tions between the Department 
of the Environment and the 
Home Office. 

The total establishment for 
tbe 43 non-metropolitan po- 
lice forces in England and 
Wales in July this year was 
63.468. The number of offi- 
cers available for ordinary 
police duties was only 62.473. 
Although illness and 
secondment explained some 
of the discrepancy, most of it 
was caused by a’ shortage of 
officers below establishment. 

Although total police man- 
power has risen slightly this 
year after a slight drop in 
1985. the number of police 
cadets has dropped steadily 
from more than two million 
five years ago to fewer than 
350.000 this year. 

Tbe local government fi- 
nance package announced yes- 
terday by Mr Nicholas Ridley. 
Secretary of State for the 
Environment, continues the 
Government's policy of 
maintaining its share of coun- 
cil spending at 46 per cent 
after cutting it steadily ra the 
early 1980s. The package also 
added 3.75 per cent to current 
council spending for next year 
to briitg it up to £25,200 
mflfion. “This settlement 
should, on average, allow no 
or very low increases in rate 
bills iflocal authorities budget 
reasonably”, Mr Ridley said. 

Council finance specialists, 
who began the long task of 
working out the impact oi the 
settlement jo individual town 
halls, suggested yesterday that 
it would have .the same effect 
as foe package now operat- 
ing — that of channelling 
some grant away from the 
shires to the inner cities. 

But they agreed that the 
overall effect of the changes 
planned by Mr Ridley for next 
year would be less harsh than 
those of foe early 1980s, In the 
past two years the Conser- 
vatives have suffered a steady 
series of defeats in council 
elections, and have lost con- 
trol of several former bastions 
including Devon and foe 
London borough of 
Hillingdon. 

But Mr Ridley made it dear 
that overspending would con- 
tinue to be penalized through 
foe rate-capping of 20 Labour- 
led authorities. 


Exclusive 
next week 



In schools, 
out schools 

Finding a school 
can be a lottery, 
with crucial facts 
hard to get The 
Times serialises a 
book which gets 
behind the glossy 
brochures to ask 
key questions: 

• At up to £5,000 
a year, are you 
likely to get value 
for money? 

• Just how good 
is the headmaster? 

• What results 
does the school 
achieve? What 
are its hidden 
weaknesses? 

Mansell, 
by Hunt 



James Hunt, 
Britain’s last 
Formula One 
world champion, 
with a unique 
insider’s view of 
Nigel Mansell, 
favourite this year 

Too cheap 
to miss 



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HOME NEWS 


‘Adopt a head’ 
companies told 


Companies should develop much stronger links with 

schools and if necessary a bead teacher, Mr RMwtfa 

Baker, the Secretory of State for Education, said yesterday 
(Mark Dowd writes). “Very few employers have Wends 
who are teachers,” he sakt . _ . 

Addressing a gatheri ng of industrialists m iAindon, be 
'said there woe many people in mdnstrywho criticized the 
output of schools and yet rarely visited them or bothered to 
find oat what was going on in them. , . . „ 

■ “[ want to see more employers becoming involved with 

! schools, finding out what goes on in the classroom and 
discovering how they can help-' 4 
Mr Baker is expected to announce, at the Conservative 
Party conference in Bournemouth next Tuesday, the 
creation «f high technology schools of eatceMeace in in- 

.ner dries. 


‘Onedin’ 
port sold 


Hooligan 

appeal 


Charlestown, the Cor- 
nish port featured in the 
The Ouedia Line television 
series, has been sold for 
more than £2 million. 

Control of the 18th cen- 
tury village, which indudes 
about 160 properties and 
Homes, has been with the 
local Crowder family for 
'more than ISO years 
through their shareholding 
in the Charlestown Estate 
Company. 

The new owners, who 
'include Lord Shaftesbury, 
do not plan to develop the 
'village near St Austell, 
which is a tourist attract 
'tion- 


Bradford police released 
video tapes and photo- 
graphs yesterday of 
supporters on the terraces 
of Odsal stadium to iden- 
tify Leeds fans who started 
a file two weeks ago when 
they pushed over a fish and 
chip van. 

They appealed for any- 
one who recognized the 
supporters to contact them. 
“These people must be 
known to friends and 
famil y-" More than 60 
arrests were made at the 
game, which was halted as 
panic-stricken fans spilled 
on to the pitch because of 
the intense smoke 


Khan’s final appeal 


The leader of the Kashmir Liberation Front in Britain 
'yesterday lost his High Court battle to stay in this 
cotmtry.Mr Amaaullah Khan, who has lived in Britain 
since 1976, has one last chance to appeal. 

Mr Khan, of Luton, was last month acqmtted of 
■ possessing explosive substances with intent to endanger 
1 life, bat after the case be was served with a notice of intea- 
tion to deport him on the grounds of national security. 

His counsel Lord Gifford QC said the order was signed 
by the Home Secretary hot the decision to serve it was 
made by a member of his staff, rendering it invalid. 

Mr Justice Simon Brown's said the preliminary decision 
was properly converted into a final decision. 


US role 
for actor 


Colm Wilkinson, the 
Irish actor and singer, 
(right) has been chosen to 
lead an otherwise all- 
American cast when the 
musical Les Misembles 
transfers to Broadway 
earty next year (Gavin Bell 
writes). 

He has been playing the 
lead role in the Royal 
Shakespeare Company 
production in the West Ena 
and was selected for die 
part in spite of strong 
competition from leading 
American stars. 

La Miscrabla has ad- 
vance bookings for a year- 
long run in New York and 
Washington. 



Soap pair beat royals 


The public life of Lofty and Mkbelle of EasrEuden has 
beaten the private life of the Prince and Princess of Wales 
in the television ratings. 

Tuesday's edition of the BBC1 soap opera topped the 
ratings with 21.7 ruilliofi viewers. An audience of 18.65 mil- 
lion notched on Thursday when Lofty was jilted at the al- 
tar. The second part of the television story of the Prince and 
Princess of Wales, In Private: la Public, made by ITN, had 
an audience of 18.45 million on Monday last week. 



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THE TIMES SATURDAY OCTOBER 4 1986 


Overtime ban threat to Rover recovery 


By Craig Se ton 

Production of Kovel's new 
flagship car. the Rover 800, 
was halted yesterday when 
supplies of electrical compo- 
nents to the state-owned car 
makers ran out. 

Assembly of the car, which 
is in short supply at British 
dealers, was stopped at the 
plant at Cowley, Oxfordshire, 
because an overtime ban by 


drivers employed by the 
component supplier. Lucas, in 
supjxm of a pay claim, 
slopped deli very of headlamps 
and rear light units. 

Rover executives are 
alarmed that production of 
the. Rover 800 could be af- 
.fected again next week if the 
Lucas overtime ban 
continues. 

The shortage of compo- 


nents led yesterday to about 
1,000 workers being laid off at 
the Rover plant at 
Longbridge. Birmingham. 
Production of Metro and Mini 
600s and Rover 200s was lost. 


The lost production and lay 

offs came only a week after the 
company announced a half- 
year loss of £60 million and 
only 10 days before the motor 
show at the National Ex 


hibition Centre in Birming- 
ham. where great attention 
will be focused on Britain's 
largest volume car maker. 


v, UWILJ jjivumvwvvv — 

800s each week. Dealers have 
toH the company that they 
can sell as many as they can 
get. The car is due to be 
launched early next year in the 
lucrative United Slates mar- 
ket. where up to 30,000 are 


expected to be sold in the first 
year. 

Mr Bob Dale, managing 
director of Lucas Electrical 


representing 11 
throughout the UK. He said 
that further talks on their pay 
claim would not late place 
until industrial action had 
been halted. 

Japan sates drive, page 22 


US studying 
nuclear arms 


Stradirarius mystery 


relocation if 


ordered out 


By Peter Davenport, Defence Correspondent 


American officials con- 
ceded yesterday that afl their 
nuclear weapons could be 
removed from Britain within 
a year if a Labour government 
issued the orders on taking 
office. /j 

It would, according to 
sources, be “very difficult but 

not tin possible". 

However rather than simply 
ship the weapons across the 
Atlantic, the administration 


There is a continuing di- 
alogue between senior Labour 
politicians and officials of the 
US Embassy in London. 

Both sides are apparently 
anxious to ensure that if the 
decision comes to order the 
nuclear weapons out of the 
country, such a move could be 
achieved in an orderly manner 


would seek to negotiate to put 
manv of them in other Nato 


many of them in other Nato 
countries. 

But the inevitable boost to the 
anti-nukear lobby throughout 
Europe that would flow from 
such a derision by a British 
Government would make 
such negotiations highly 
sensitive. 

According to one source the 
fear is that a British decision 
to opt out of the nuclear dub 
would “open the flood gates" 
and that the Americans could 
find themselves fighting to 
maintain existing numbers of 
weapons, let alone persuade 
administrations, wary of ad- 
verse public reaction, to ac- 
cept more. : 

Publicly, senior members of 
the administration in Wash- 
ington will continue to issue 
warnings of the dangers they 
see in a British non-nuclear 
defence policy, but privately 
they do not expect to change 
the mind of Mr Neil Kinnock 
and his colleagues. 


The Americans continue to 
view Labour's intentions as a 
serious risk to the destabiliza- 
tion of the Nato alliance with 
the added concern that it will 
steamroller public opinion in 
the US into calls to disengage 
from Europe entirely. 


The : United States has 
35,000 service personnel in j 
the United Kingdom, fts main 
nuclear capable bases include 
Lakenheaih and Upper 
Heyford, homes of the Fills; 
Greenham Common, with its 
cruise missiles; Holy Loch, the 
only refitting base outside the 
US for Poseidon nuclear 
sumbarines; and St Mawgans, 
for the storage of nuclear 
depth charges. 



Richard Steel holding the remains of his £20 violin yesterday. 


By Robin Young 


In Brussels officials at Nato 
headquarters are monitoring 
Labour's plans closely al- 
though it was emphasized j 
yesterday that there was no I 
immediate alarm. 

Contingency plans for a 
British rejection of nudear 
weapons will be considered. 

Conference reports, page 4 


‘More say’ 
in cancer 


School fee £* 


treatment 


‘bias’ 
is denied 


Richard Steel might have 
been overjoyed on discovering 
rtut his violin bore the label of 
Antonio Stradivarins - had 
the instrument not been re- 
duced to matchwood under the 
wheels of an Alder Valle)' bus. 

The accident happened as 
Richard, aged 19, returned 
borne from Goldsmiths’ Col- 
lege, London. The violin had 
been bought for him about tea 
yean ago by his father, die 
composer Christopher Steel, 
for £20. 

Sorting through the frag- 
ments, Richard found the base 
had survived — and there, 
glued to the inside, was the 
label, in eighteenth century 


script and bearing the legend: 
Antonias Stradivarius Cre- 
monatris faciebat 1715. 

The year 1715 is raw of 
Stradivarius's most sought- 
after; from it date several of 
his finest instruments, indnd- 
ing the Alard, II Cremooesi (in 
a unseam ia the maker’s home 


By Jill Sherman 


The 150.000 women in 
! Britain suffering from breast 
cancer should have a much 
greater say in their treatment, 
a panel of health experts said 
in London yesterday . 

Women should be aware 
that there was no evidence 
that mastectomy or more 
radical surgery improved sur- 
vival rates, although this was 
still the most common form of 
treatment. 

Every year 25.000 women 
develop breast cancer and 
more than 15,000 die. But 
nine out of 10 lumps are 
benign. 

During treatment '‘the 
woman's quality of life and 
self-esteem should be dam- 
aged as little as possible. For 
most this will be limited 
surgery followed by radio- 
therapy," the panel con- 
cluded, at the end of a 
conference held by the King’s 
Fund College. 

Long-term survival could 
be improved in pre-meno- 
pause women either by 
chemotherapy or hormonal 
drugs. But courses of chemo- 
therapy needed to be six 
months only, and modem 
drugs now had fewer ride 
effects than in the past. 

* Survival rates in post- 
menopause women could be 
improved by courses of the 
drug tamoxisen. 

The panel emphasized that 
women need to have informa- 
tion about the treatments 
available, and offered counsel- 
ling. 

The panel's statement, 
which was prepared after two 
days' of papers by breast 
cancer specialists, has been 
sent co the Department of 
Health and Social Security. 


By Mark Ellis 

A Loudon private school 
yesterday defended its policy 
of charging foreign executives 
of multi-national companies a 
year’s fees in advance for their 
children's education. 

Thomas's London Day 
Schools was responding at 
Westminster County Court to 
an allegation of discrimina- 
tion. It had introduced a two- 
tier fee structure, it said, to. 
offset the financial loss caused 
by parents removing their 
children at short notice to take 
up new postings abroad. 

Senor Jose Carballo, general 
manager of the London 
branch of the Bilbao bank, 
claims that “discrimination” 
between resident English par- 
ents and foreigners is in 
breach of the Race Relations 
Act, 1976. 

Mr David Thomas, who 
with his wife Joanna is joint 
principal of the 466-pupil 
school said about three-quar- 
ters of his pupils were English 
and most ofthe remainder had 
foreign parents temporarily 
based in London. 

He said the school was faced 
with increasing fees in the face 
of competition to cover the 
loss caused by overseas par- 
ents being moved. 


town), the Rode, the Hoch- 
stein, the Titian, tbe Emperor, 
and foe Baron Knoop. 

The record price for a 
Stradivarins is 2360,000 paid 
for La Cathedrale of 1707, but 
there was an unsuccessful 
£800,000 bid for the Lady 
Blunt (1721), at the same 
Sotheby's sale last year. It is 
possible Richard had seen £1 
miiiinn crashed. 

Experts consoled him yes- 
terday, saying it was improb- 
able the violin was ' a 
Stradivarins. Labels attribut- 
ing violins to the famous 
maker are commonplace. 

Mr Adam Watson, of. 
Sotheby’s musical instrument 
deparimezd, says- they see at 
least 50 a week, and 1715,; 
being a sought after vintage, is 
most commonly forged dates. , 

“Most gennine i 

Stradirarinses are accompa- 
nied by a certificate of 
authenticity but it is always 
possible that this is a real 
one." 

As it happens, one Stradi- 


varins has survived complete 
disintegration-The Red Di- 
amood of 1732 was swept ont | 
to sea off California in the; 
1950s and found on a beach in 


pieces. Lovingly restored, it 
was sold. At Sotheby's last, 


year, though not sold, it 
attracted a £150,000 bid. 

“I really hope it was not a 
Stradivarins,” Mr Chris- 
topher Steel said yesterday, 
“because it would be awful if i 
one bad been destroyed. All 1 
want is for Richard to get 
enough compensation so that 
he can boy a decent violin with 
which to continue his studies.” 


Baby killed 


Jason Smith aged six weeks 
died in a fire at a home in 
Strode Road, Blakenhall, 
Wolverhampton, yesterday. 
His brother Wayne, aged 
three, was thrown from a 
window by his parents, Mr 
and Mis John Smith, and all 
three survived. 


Print picket jailed 
for attack on PC 


A proposal to have a dif- 
ferent level of fees for non- 
British passport holders 
produced a “rather . pained” 
response, although it was not 
intended to discriminate 
against non-British nationals 


From the start of this year a 
system of paying a year in 
advance was introduced, 
which Mr Thomas said was 
welcomed by the expatriates! 
But the rule was not applied to; 
foreign nationals who had 
lived in Britain for some time. 


A Sogat picket was jailed for 
three months yesterday by 
Soothend magistrates for 
assaulting a policeman 

Stephen Savage, aged 37, 
from West Drayton, admitted 
kicking PC John Swann, who 
was crouching over a picket 
lying on the ground, because 
he thought his friend was 
being arrested. 

In fact, the policeman was 
helping the man, who had 
been injured in fighting which 
broke out after a coachload of 
Sogat' 82 members picketed a 
John Menzies distributors in 
Southend in May. 

PC Swann needed hospital 
treatment for bruising 

Geoffrey Cadge, aged 36. 
from Borough Green. 
Seven oaks. Kent, was ordered 
to do 120 hours community 
service for assaulting a John 
Menzies employee. 

Mirror plea refused 

A High Court judge yes- 
terday refused to drop con- 
tempt of court proceedings 
against two National Graphi- 
cal Association officials with- 
out an apology. 

Mr Justice Mars-Jones said 
the Daily Mirror chapel of- 
ficials. Mr Tom Harrison and 
Mr Billy Wells, had not 
purged alleged “blatant” 
breaches of an injunction, 
which led to the loss of 
600,000 copies of the 
newspaper. 


The Mirror Group chair- 
man. Mr Robert Maxwell, 
who began the contempt ac- 
tion, asked for the matter to be 
dropped as it had been settled 
out of court to avoid souring 
the industrial relations cli- 
mate.- but the judge said that 
he could not “turn a Wind 
eye” to such “flagrant 
defiance" of an order. 

He adjourned the case for 
28 days to allow the men to 
prepare their defence. 


BR misses 
business 
deadline 


By Jonathan Miller 
Media Correspondent 


Post dispute settled 

The eight-year dispute be- 
tween the Nottingham Eve- 
ning Post and National Union 
of Journalists was formally 
ended yesterday with the sign- 
ing of an agreement between 
the NUJ . and the 
management. 

The dispute began during a 
provincial pay strike called by 
the NUJ. when the company 
dismissed 28 journalists who 
joined the action. The union 
responded by “blacking” the 
newspaper. 

The board of the Evening 
Post has agreed to offer the 
dismissed journalists their 
jobs back, although nearly all 
now have other jobs. The : 
union's negotiating rights 
have also been restored. 


“We’ve been given no de- 
tails of the business 
whatsoever”, the chief exec- 
utive of one company in- 
terested in bidding said. “We 
would like our curiosity 
satisfied." 


British Rail admitted that 
staff had been overwhelmed 
by the response to the. sale. It 
was unable to say when the 
prospectus would be issued or 
the sale completed. 

More than 50 organizations 
are interested in buying the 
company, including a group of 
BTA managers. 


The NUJ general secretary, 
Mr Harry Conroy, said: “We 
now have to look to the future 
and not live in the past." 


BTA produced £5 million 
profit for British Rail last year 
on a turnover of £10 million, 
making it one of the largest 
operators in the £54 million 
transport advertising busi- 
ness. The company also han- 
dles poster advertising for the 
National Bus Company. 


Tories call 
for sale 
of Post 
Office 


By Nicholas Wood 
Political Reporter 


A commitment to seB off 
the coal and decmdiy fa. 
dustries and the Post Offi* 
should be included in the . 
Conservative Party mamfr^ 
the Monday Gub. foe rights. ; 
wing ginger group^ ; said: 
yesterday. 

The suggestion is made in a “ 
policy pamphlet written by Mr ‘ 
George Gardiner, MP 
Reigate. who says he is dfa- .. 
appointed by the limited nut*,, 
ber of targets for privatization 
in the next parliament. 

The pamphlet aigues tfcd - 
the coal and power industries.', 
should be sold off in staged, 
with the coal-fired stations 
being sold with the supplying, 
pits. - ■ T 

And it envisages the nc*fy- 
privatized power stations - 
competing to sell electricity to 
a national grid run by a . 

residual state authority. 

The Post Office would tee" 
its letter monopoly under the ■ 
plan, which also urges iff-' . 
created franchising of British . 
Rail services. 

But the group is critical of * 
foe method used to sdf off 
British Gas. arguing that by * 
disposing of it wholesale a 1 
public monopoly is bring . 
transformed into a private ' 
one — a step that canned give 
full rein to competitive mar- 
ket forces. 

It calls for a new unit to be 
set up under the Chief Sec- i 
retary to the Treasury to diiw ^ 
up plans for privatizing foe - 
remaining state firms. 

• Mr Norman Lamoat, 
Financial Secretary to tBc r - 
Treasury, is expected to revive; 
Conservative plans to sell off ' 
the water authorities at next, 
week's party conference by. 
making their disposal a ma h i- _ 
festo commitment. 

• A Monday Gub pamphlet 
by Mr Harvey Proctor, 
Conservative MP for . 
Biliericay. warned yestenfay -- 
that race relations ia Britan 
were at the “eleventh hour* . 
and reiterated cailsfor an end 
to black immigration; a crack'* 
down on illegal immigration 
and voluntary rcseitfaneat of 
people of New Common'’ 
wealth and Pakistani origin. 


Rewards 
for pay 
restraint 


By George Hill ^ 

A cut in National (nsmttce 
contributions for employes 
who resist high wage cfaitns 
would create twice as many 
new jobs as the cuts in 
personal taxation planned by 
the Government. Mr fan 
Wrigglesworth, Social Demo- 
cratic spokesman on eco- 
nomic affairs, said yesterday. 

He told a London con- 
ference on pay that highwage , 
settlements, combined' with 


the pound's fall against - the 
dollar threatened Britain with ; 


The British Railways Board 
has missed its deadline for 
selling its advertising busi- 
ness. British Rail announced 
in early August that it wanted 
to complete the sale of British 
Transport Advertising (BTA) 
by the end of September. 

. But yesterday, prospective 
buyers had still not received a 
formal prospectus. 


a new round of inflation- 
A tax cutting Budget and a 
“cut-and-run” election ned * 


efforts to reduce unempte-;' 
raent Mr Wrigglesworth. MP ,. 


Correction. 


39. Betoiuni B M 
— SS-7S. canana W 
Cyprus 70 (MB: O 
1000: Finland Mkk 9. . 

Germany DM 3.50c < 
6Qp: CrwerjprlBO: Holland — 


gwiawiami S_Fn 3.0ft 
8000: USA SI .75; 
400. 


Architectural divisions 


Prince’s adviser in poll challenge 

« — » »- . r . O 


By Charles Knevitt, Architecture Correspondent 


Mr Rod Hackney, a commu- 
nity architect and adviser to 
the Prince of Wales, an- 
nounced yesterday that he wfll 
stand for the presidency of the 
Royal institute of British 
Architects, against Mr Ray- 
mond Andrews, the offidal 
nomination of the connefi. 

Mr Hackney’s deri s io n will 
force a ballot of (be 26,000 
British and overseas members 
of tbe institute in November 
and December. The presi- 
dency runs for two years from 
next July. 

In his manifesto Mr Hack- 
ney dams -that the architec- 
tural profession is facing its 
biggest challenge since the 
institute was founded 152 
years ago. "Time is running 
ont. A- radical approach is 
needed under strong leader- 
ships to affect the necessary 
changes." 


He referred to fee cutting, 
dubious competition, specu- 
lative work, confusing contract 
law, bad professional indem- 
nity insurance cover and bad 
education policy as examples 
of how the institute had failed 
to tackle the important issues. 

He also called for the Group 
of Eight con s truction industry 
lobby to be replaced by a 
stronger body which cotrfd 
achieve something in negotia- 
tions with the Government for 
increased capital expenditure. 

**I want to break the mould 
of the . present Riba 

establishment". 

Among Mr Hackney’s 
supporters are Mr David 
Rock, who topped a council 
poll recently; Sir Hugh Casson 
and Mr Cedrick Price. The 
other 90 people who signed his 
nomination papas - include 
leading academics; public and 


private sector architects, such 
as Mr N Keith Scott chair- 
man of BDP, and Mr Ian 
Finlay, chairman of . the 
institute's Community Arch- 
itecture Group. 

. Mr Andrews said that he | 
was “pleased to accept tbe ! 
challenge as it would be good ! 
for membership par- ! 
tiripa tron." A third candidate , 
was rumoured to be submitting j 
his nomination forms by mid- 1 
night last night but Mr 
Raymond Cedi denied that it 
was him. I 

Mr Hackney was at the j 
centre of a “divided Britain” | 
dispute last autumn when ' 
reported as quoting a private ' 
conversation with tbe Prince of i 
Wales. 

The Prince is to pay a 1 
private visit to one of Mr , 
Hackney's projects in Stirling, 
Scotland, on Monday. 


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Bamber ‘talked 

of fast car’ 
as family lay dead 


THE TIMES SATURDAY OCTOBER 4 1986 


HOME NEWS 


Jeremy Bamber, the 

V halted abou l w5 

paaSSSS 

Sipiafi 

£4553 


By Michael Horsnell 

be in a state of stock, a whisk) 
before telling police he was m 
to be interviewed. 

He added: “Jeremy said 
‘Why can’t my father come?’ I 
said, ‘Because he has been 
killed.’ He broke down a nd 
cried.” 

Earlier in the day Del 
Constable Stephen Myall told 


murder trial has aUegrtLfcL ? e ■ juT V bout *** B “”!*£ s 
the bodies nffiv* dream of a company- Porsche 

lheSSbom,Sr , S^ f wWch »« *3fa» the 
tenter, VauxhaU Astra which he 


as - ."* wMch * 

a. - 061 Constable Myall said: 

ss% J assaa 

Bamber JS* r w keep Ms mind as far 

StttMTSgS 35 

Sd te P *Mr > Bamber had arrived al 

6 1 his ^hflif tbe sceDe oftbe murders from 

‘ifembT r She,la “* borne in the hamlet of 

Cafleli, a former r^h»i»r <>««■ 


in which a means of establish- 
ing a rapport with the former 
model could be achieved m 
the event of police trying to lift 
a siege to which she was 
involved. 

The officer said: “Mr 
Bamber said that she might 
want to speak to a Dr Fer- 
guson from Harley Street who 
had treated her, and that she 
liked to be told she was 
pretty.” 

Mr Bamber had told him 
that the night before, when he 
left the 300-acre farm to go 

# Sheila’s well 

manicured hand 
could not have fired 
the weapon 9 



oamor CatfelL a former 
model, aged 27, and her twin 
i sons aged six. 

Later, a police surgeon told 
the court of an alleged family 
argument at the farmhou se 
near Tolleshunt D’Arcy, Es- 
sex, which Mr Jeremy Bamber 
reported to him in conversa- 
tion after the discovery of the 
bodies. 

Dr Iain Craig said: “The 
previous evening there had 
been considerable discussion 
about the future of the 
children. 

“Not for the first time the 
question of their being fos- 
tered had been raised and Mr 
Bamber said it had been 

6 Told his father had 
been killed, Jeremy 
broke down and 
cried 9 

alleged on occasions the chil- 
dren had suffered non-ac- 
cidental injury, in other words 
child abuse. The family was 
concerned about their welfare. 

“I asked if it had been 
reported to the police and 
social services, and hesaid no. 
He made h dear the row was 
about the twins.” • 

Mr Bamber, who also alleg- 
edly told Dr.Qaig of Ms 
sister’s mental illness, appar- 
ently vomited during the walk 
they shared.' ' 

Dr Craig, who certified the 
deaths of all five, said he gave 
Mr Bamber. who appeared to 

Moves to 
reform law 
of trespass 

Ry Frances Gibb 
Legal Affairs 
Correspondent 

Legal reforms to help land- 
owners and formers to recover 
their land more quickly from 
trespassers were ■ canvassed 
yesterday in a consultation 
paper from the Lord Chan- 
cellor's department 
In the wake of tbe problems 
caused by the Mppie. “peace 
convoy” in the summer, it sets 
out changes to civil proce- 
dures so that landowners can 
take the necessary legal steps 
more speedily and the cases 
can be heard sooner. 

At present a final order for 
possesion may be made five 
days after the application has 
been served on the trespassers, 
or sooner in urgent cases. The 
paper proposes that this 
should be cut to three days, 
with the power to shorten the 
remaining period. 

It also urges changes to 
make it easier to serve the 
application on the trespassers 
occupying the land. 

At present there is provision 
where trespassers’ names are 
not known, simply to nau the 
application on to gateposts or 
fence posts, but the former has 

to obtain a specific direction 
from the court- 
ft is proposed that this 
should be possible without the 
need to .seek the courts 
direction. _ . , 

The paper also suggests that 

most cases should be heard by 
a master or registrar instead of 
a judge, but where necessary 
cases could be transferred to 
be heard by a judge. 

The “hippie convoy 
showed present procedures io 
be too slow, too complicated. 

Similar defects .were high- 
lighted in the criminal law and 

the Home Office to 

tabled a new clause to tbe 
Public Oder Bill which ere- < 
ates a criminal offence where 
trespassers insist ao remam- . 
ing on land when asked to go. 
intend to reside there, and 
where there has been damage - 

or harassment. ■ 


Gold hanger near by after 
informing the police that his 
father had telephoned to say 
his half sister, Sheila, had gone 
berserk with a gun. 

One of the things be told 
officers, who initially believed 
Sheila had committed the 
murders before toiling hersei£ 
was that .she had, made pre- 
vious attempts on her own 
life. 

The police officer said: “He 
seemed remarkably calm 
considering the information 
relayed to us at the time. His 
demeanour never changed 
dramatically” 

Meanwhile officers from the 
tactical firearms unit of Essex 
police moved in to the eigh- 
teenth century farmhouse 
nearly four hoars after bang 
alerted to the emergency. 

Armed officers knocked 
down a kitchen door with a 
sledgehammer before moving 
in and found the body of Mr 
Nevifi Bamber with gunshot 
wounds and the rest of the 
family upstairs: the victims of 
25 shots, most of them from 
dose range. 


-^U/- i 

Winner to j 
save share j 
of prize 1 

Tho readers share yes- \ 
terday’s Portfolio Gold prize t 
of £8,000. j 

Mr Raymond Newman, * 
aged 51* • welder of Burnley, I 
Lancashire, has played the * 
Portfolio Gold game regularly < 
for the past six months. J 
He described his win as > 
“magic” 5 

Mr Newman said that he ' 
would pnt the prize money in ■ 
his bonding society account. \ 
“It is goutg to make a very nice » 
little cushion,” be said. ) 
The other winner was Mrs * 
R M Beech, of Lechbde. ‘ 
Gloucestershire. * 

Readers who wish to play * 
the game ran obtain a Port- t 
folio Gold card by sending > ’ 
stamped addressed envelope ! 
to: ■ 

Portfolio GokL 

The Times, : 

PO Box 40. 

Blackburn, ! 

BB1 6 AJ. 


home, be had left a loaded rifle 

inside the kitchen door after ...... _ ....... 

going out briefly to shoot ’* ' ■' ‘ _ BB1 6AJ. 

rabbits, thoug h in the event he Joseph Arditti (left) and Dominic Isaacs, both Med four and from Golders Green, north London, enjoying a cup of tea at tbe 

t_ sfort of theworkT sjbrgest tea party yegerday. The first cup was pougd at Oaridges Hotel, bat more than 300 parties will ProHlIPPr AM 
Under ^^-«anunation by be held m Britain during the next month to raise £100,000 for NSPCC chad protection centres. Lady Rosamund Holland- * r vUUCCr UU 
Adam? a Td that M Martm, society chairman, said there was stfll time for people to take part. (Photograph: Graham Wood) Eft Charge 


Bamber had remarked at one 
stage: “What, if anything, has 
happened in there? They are 
ail the family I have got.” 

PC Lawrence Coffins told 
the jury that for two hours, in 
ignorance of the scene inside 
the farmhouse, they chal- 
lengxl tbe household with a 
loud haiier but all they could 
bear was a dog barking inside: 

Inspector Ivor Montgomery 
told the court that after the 
initial entry of aimed officers 
into the farmhouse from the 
tactical firearms unit, police 
removed the rifle used in the 
murders from its position 
across Sheila's chest to render 
it safe. 

In doing so, they moved her 
right hand. He noticed that 
her hand was well manicured 
and dean, a sign, the prosecu- 
tion has alleged, that she could 
not have fired tbe weapon. 

Miss Julie Foakes, the 


After telling police of his daughter of a form labourer 
divorced sister's mental his- who was working for Mr 


tOTy, Mr Bamber was over- 
heard by another officer. 
Police Constable Robin 
Norcup* mattering to himself: 
*“Oh God, I bow she Me not 
done anything ally”. 

Inspector Douglas Adams 
also told the jury of seven men 
and five women about a 
conversation with Air Bamber 


Nevfll Bamber, told the jury 
that the day before the mur- 
ders, she had seen Sheila and 
her twins, Nicholas and Dan- 
iel, wanting happily through 
woods with the dog near by. 

They seemed ,to be happy 
and she found Sheila a “very 
loving sort of mother”. 

The hearing continues 


Student tells of 
knifepoint rape 


. A student was raped at 
knifepoint by a man wearing a 
“cowboy bandit” mask at the 
height of the riots in Brixton, 
south-west London, last 


scarf was worn like a “cowboy 
bandit”. 

During her ordeal she heard 
her boyfriend, who had been 
brought into the room at 


September, the Central Grim- knifepoint by another of the 
inal Court was told yesterday, gang, say, “Oh my God! not 


The student said that she 
froze with fear when the gang 
broke into a bouse in 


that!” 

The ondeal ended when the 
four mistook a car alarm fora 


StockwdL “I was so fright- police siren and fled, 
ened I was trying to think of Miss Ann Goddard, QC for 
places to hide, but I couldn't the prosecution, has alleged 
think of any,” she said. that when tbe man accused of 

One of tbe gang had taken a rape was arrested, he said: 
gold ring from her finger, “They were rich, we did not 


given to her by her grand- have enough money, 
mother. Another took her to “Your officer shot a black 
tbe sitting room to steal frtjra woman. Everyone was trying 
her handbag, white otbefs to get their own harV. Just 
ransacked the house; holding charge me.” 
her boyfriend and two other The . maw i agpH 23, has 
men at knifepoint pleaded not guilty to charges 

The giri said that when she of robbery and rape. Richard 
tried to leave, the masked man Leslie, aged 21, a presser, and 
threatened her with a knife Michael Griffiths, 22, a 
and said he was going to rape tailor’s cutter, both of Union 
her. “He told me not to look al Road, South 1 amhMh i south 


his face, _ which was half Loodon, both deny robbery, 
covered with a scarf” ' The case continues c 

She said the red-patterned Monday. 

Video camera Glaziers 

filmed raid, ‘turned to 
court told looting’ 

A- looter was arrested after Glaziers called in during tl 

being filmed ransacking a riots in Tottenham, non 
newsagents during the Brixton London, to repair damaj 
riots last year, a .court was caused by looters to a dotfa 
told. • shop were themselves stealxx 

About- 12 youths, most of property. Wood Green Crow 
whom had their faces covered Court was told yesterday. 
with scarves or handkerefaiefe, Rjcfaanj McDonald, age 
burst into the dapham High ^ __ f 


The case continues on ; 
Monday. j 

Glaziers 
‘turned to 
looting’ 

Glaziers called in during the 
riots in Tottenham, north 
London, to repair da mag e 
caused by looters to a clothes 
shop were themselves stealing 
property. Wood Green Crown 
Court was told yesterday. 

Richard McDonald, aged 
20 , an office clerk, of 


‘Wedding 9 
day ends 
in court 

A woman who became 
besotted with her solicitor 
turned up in a wedding outfit 
in a chauftear-driven limou- 
sine at his office yesterday. 

But Mrs Jenny MegfonTs 
desperate attempt for the hand 
of Mr Terry Allen once again 
landed her in Bristol Mag- 
istrates’ Coot. 

Mrs Mogford, aged 38, a 
mother of two children, fell in 
love with Mr Allen w^en he 
acted for her in her dirorte.He 
told the court that for the past 
two weeks, tbe “infatuated” 
woman had refused to leave 

him fllnin»_ 

Earfier this week, Mrs 
Mogford, of CooBistou Road, 
Patch way, Bristol, was bound 
over for six months in the sum 
of £50 after a campaign of 
pestering Mr Allen. 

The honing was delayed 
while a solictor was fond for 
Mrs Mogford, who insisted 
that only Mr Allen should 
represent her. Eventually she 
! appeared, still clutching the 
single white rose from her 
weakling sait . « . > 

She admitted breaching the 
peace and was again bomi 
over. 

Mr Malcolm Hayes, for the 
prosecution, said: “It is imder- 
stood that Mrs Mogford has 
formed the intention of utarry- 
inp Mr AJkn. . 

“It would seem that this 
morning, Mrs Mogford went 
to Mr Allen's premises — fidly 
prepared for a wedding and 
having apparently arranged 
and brought the wedding car. 

Mr Hayes added that Mrs 
Mogford refused to leave and 
the police had to be called. 

Throughout tbe hearing 
Mrs Mogford, unemployed, 
stared repeatedly at Mr Allen, 
who was sitting at the back of 
foe court. She was not repre- 
sented and declined to explain 
her actio ns. 

After foe case, Mr Aflen, 
aged 40, a married man, said: 
“1 have known her for about a 
year but in foe last couple of 
weeks for some reason she's 
got really infatuated with me. 

“She’s even camped herself 
on my front lawn, and threat- 
ened to come in and tell my 
wife that we are having an 
affair.” 

As Mrs Mogford left foe 
court, she asked: “Where is 
be? I stiD want to go out with 
him.” 

Mrs Sue Allen, the 
solicitor's wife, later said: “I 
suppose it’s an occupational 
hazard. He has told me about 
it from foe start and at first I 
roared with laughter but now it 
has gone beyond a joke.” 


Airfares 


Agreement a little nearer 


By Harvey Elliott, Air Correspondent 


Europe's transport min- 
isters inched towards an agree- 
ment aimed at liberalizing air 
fores last night 

But their progress was too 
slow for the Dutch delegation, 
which decided, in advance, 
that it was more important to 
attend the opening of a dam in 
The Netherlands. 

Mr John Moore, Secretary 
of State for Transport, who is 
president of the Council of 
Ministers this year, tried to 
put a brave face on the 
progress which had been 
made. “We established that 
we could move away from the 
two separate camps which 
were dearly developing in the 
attitude towards liberalizing 
air transport. 

“There seems to be a recog- 
nition that we now are in a 
position to pot forward a 


concrete set of proposals for 
discussion when we next meet 
in November and this could 
have considerable potential 
impact” 

Tbe ministers, meeting in 
Loudon, studied three main 
areas of potential liberaliza- 
tion. The first related to 
capacity - foe number of seats 
available on any given route 
and the market share 

Britain and The Nether- 
lands had been looking orig- 
inally for a split which would 
have allowed any one country 
to provide up to 75 per cent of 
the available seats. But this 
was fiercely resisted and h 
now seems unlikely that, at 
least in the next two years, the 
most successful airline will be 
able to provide more than 55 
percent. 

In the third year, the min- 


isters reluctantly agreed, this ! 
might rise to 60 per cent. 

Agreement was reached on I 
allowing more than one na- 
tional airline from each coun- 
try to operate on any given , 
route and for airlines to open 
up routes to regional centres. 

The third proposal dis- 
cussed yesterday, the vexed 
question of tariffs and fares, 
led to some measure of moves 
mem but with huge areas of 


Gennady Zalkowllsch, a * 
Soviet film producer, was ' 
granted £15.000 bail al * 
Horseferry Road Magistrates* ’ 
Court in London yesterday, * 
accused of handling £500.000 r 
worth of stolen Islamic works ' 
of art. • 

Mr Zalkowitscb, aged 46, * 
who lives in Fulham Road, * 
Fulham, south-west London, • 
and has prod need a BBC ‘ 
World About Vs documentary • 
on tbe Brazilian raft people, ’ 
was bailed for committal < 
proceedings after spending a - 
week in custody on remand. ; 

V 

Squash player : 


Ex-governor will 
fight ‘race’ ban 


By David Cross 


A former school governor 
who has been harmed from 
interviewing applicants for a 
headteacher’s job by the La- 
bour council in Brent, north- 
west London, said yesterday 
she was determined to reverse 
the “totally unjustified” 
decision. 

Mrs Maureen Geldman, a 
Conservative opposition 
councillor, has been accused 
of “racist body language” 
during an interview with Mr 
Hilario Surtie, the only black 


keep with my daughter.” 

Mrs Geldman said it was 
only afterwards that Mrs Ber- 
tha Joseph, a Mack Labour 
councillor, objected to her 
behaviour. “She protested 
that ft was a racist attempt to 
distract the candidate.” Her 
accusation was supported by 
Miss Soonu Engineer, Brent's 
race relations adviser, who 
was there to ensure fair play. 

Mrs Geldman, who is Jew- 
ish, said that it was ridiculous 
to accuse her of racism. “But l 


candidate for the headship of was the only Conservative in 
Fiyent Junior School, in tbe room and they always pick 


Sn r^ de SSv^ D S Woodberry Down^ Estate, 

Finsbury Park, pleaded guDty 
stock, Mr Andrew MitcheU, w ratering r>nrm & CoTon 

for the proseohon. told South- octobarTlast year. He was 


wark Crown Court.- remanded < 

Mr Mitchell said Wesley gj^ports. 
Barnet, aged 21, was the only ^ 
one whose face was shown Dunn & 
clearly on the shop’s video. worth mm 
The court heard that a Mr Nige 
community police officer im- fog, claim© 
mediately identified Mr Bar- fog the si 
net when shown tbe video properprar 
some weeks later. and friend 

A second man in the. dock, glaziers to! 
Adolf Mavour, was seen bid- themselves 

ing behind a .van by poJice 

officers answering the 999 rail I7* 
made by the shop owner. He f If 
was wearing a handkerchief 
around his neck but. denied A sohsa 

being in the shop during the National , 


October / last year. He was 
remanded on bail for a month 


Dunn & Co lost goods 
worth more than £9,000. 

Mr Nigel Lampen, defend- 
ing, claimed that those repair- 
fog the shop were stealing 
property and when McDonald 
and friends walked past the 
glaziers told them to “help 
themselves”. 



Kingsbury where her own 
children used to be pupfls. 

She concedes that she shuf- 
fled her papers and looked at 
her watch, but denies any 
racial motive. “The interviews 
were running two hours late 
and 1 had an appointment to 

Midwife in 
baby death 
reinstated 

A midwife suspended after 
being accused of “appafling 
professional judgement” in a 
report into the death of a girl 
aged three days, has returned 
to general nursing duties. 

The dead girl's father said 
after an inquest at West- 
minster, central London, yes- 
terday that he would take legal 
action unless the hospital 
carried out recommendations 
in the report after an internal 
inquiry. 

Sheree Adatia died from 
birth asphyxia in Westminster 
Hospital on March 17, after 
being transferred from 
Perivale Maternity Hospital at 
Greenford, west London. 

Tbe confidential report 
made 20 recommendations 


on us. 

She had since learnt that a 
new panel would be formed to 
interview prospective can- 
didates for the post “I have 
asked Brent council for a full 
report on the meeting and I 
fully intend to be there.” 

Maguire 
‘used by 
informer 9 

An Irishman accused of 
talcing part in an IRA bomb 
plot was “meridessly used” by 
the man he regarded as a 
father, ft was churned at the 
Central Criminal Court 
yesterday. 

Mr Michael Mansfield, for 
the defence, said Mr Thomas 
Maguire, a Dublin teacher, 
undoubtedly had sympathy 
with the republican move- 
ment, but there was no reliable 
evidence that he knew about a 
plan to blow up tbe Eagle and 
Child Inn at Weeton, near 
Blackpool. 

Mr Mansfield said Mr 
Maguire’s “father figure” — 
Mr Raymond O’Connor— 
was a liar. Mr O’Connor, a 
Irishman living in Blackpool 


disagreement still to be 
resolved. 

Mr Moore said that the aim 
remained Mill to bring real 
competition into Europe's air 
transport by 1992. 

He added: “There is a great 
deal of further work to do and 
it can only be achieved if all 
countries keep up the political 
will which was widely dem- 
onstrated today.” 

Navy fines 
athlete 
over hair 

Jim Nowak, the Olympic 
pentathlete, was found guilty 
by a Royal Navy court martial 
yesterday of disobeying an 
order to get his hair cul 

A hearing at Portsmouth 
was told that Nowak had put 
athletics ahead of his naval 
duties as a leading physical i 
trainer on HMS Nelson. i 

Nowak, aged 30, who repre- 1 
seated Britain in the 1984 
Olympics in Los Angeles, was | 
fined £300 and stripped of 
three good conduct badges. He 
was charged with disobeying 
through neglect an order to get 
his hair cut and report to a 
superior in uniform shoes. 

Nowak was accused of only 
wetting his hair after the 
orders to get it cut, and of 
wearing “American-style” 
shoes instead of service shoes. 

But he was cleared of a 
charge of disobeying an order 
to remove a broken horse box 
from HMS Dryad. 

The court was told that 
Nowak, of Portsmouth, re- 
ceived outstanding reports in 
the Falklands but had asked to 
leave the Navy to concentrate 
on the 1988 Olympics. 

“His career as an athlete has 
become more important to 
him than the Navy.” Lt Cradr 
Jeff Blackett, for the defence, 
said. 


be stole to play 


A county squash player ; 
stole £37.000 from her father's ■ 
finance company, where she t 
worked as company secretary, • 
to pay for her sport expenses, ‘ 
Worcester Crown Court was’ 
told yesterday. • 

Dawn Hicks, aged 28, of J 
High Street. Amblecote,: 
Stourbridge, West Midlands, . 
who admitted charges of theft, ‘ 
false accounting and forgery, < 
was jailed for 18 months with { 
15 months suspended. * 

Drink surgeon ■ 
loseslicence ; 

A surgeon who drove after J 
comforting a friend with can- « 
cer over a champagne dinner ; 
was yesterday banned from i 
driving and fined £200 by \ 
Horseferry Road magistrates. * 
Criton Pavlou, a > 
gynaecology expert aged 46, of ; 
Dulwich, south-east London, j 
admitted driving with excess , 
alcohol in his breath in Pirn- * 
lico when answering an enter- J 
gency call. ■ 

* 

Policeman’s ! 
shoe fetish 

A poficeman’s fantasy for • 
women’s shoes led to a series ! 
of attacks on women of all * 
ages, sometimes threatening to t 
kill them, the High Court hr" 
Edinburgh was told yesterdays* 
PC Charles Hay, aged 37, 
married with two children, 
formerly of MusseUnngh, Lo- 
thian, was jailed for five years 
after admitting 13 charges of. 
assault. ■* 

■4 

Trench death j 

A workman was buried alive 
at the Beazer construction site, - 
Worle, near Weston-super- . 
Mare, Avon, yesterday after a., 
french be was working Ib|« 
collapsed. 


Sfflf E £3 NOW 



PLUS THIS PRACTICAL 
9 ? DIAMETER 

NON STICK FRYING PAN 


concerning the training of and now an IRA informer, 
maternity Staffs alterations in told the jury that Mr Maguire, i 


Mrs Jenny Mogford, “in- 
fatuated efient”. 


procedure and changes in 
labour ward accommodation. 

In his summing up Dr Paul 
Knapraan, the coroner, said 
that there had been a series of 
“unfortunate ■ events during 
the birth”. He wondered if the 
words of censure in tbe report 
were too strong. 


aged 27. acted as go-between 

Mr Maguire, whose mother , 
lives in Blackpool, denies 
conspiring with Patrick 
Magee, the Brighton bomber, 
and with Patrick Murray and 
others to cause an explosion. 

The trial was adjourned 
until Monday. 



— i made by the shop owner. He 

School Stan was wearing a handkerchief 
^ j around his neck but. denied 

accused. <*ing in the shop during the 

Eight fonneremptoiwof a ^M^Mitcbell said that once 
private school for mentauy ^ was more familiar 
handicapped children Mavour they “might 

Pdwys appearai ^beforeNew abobcri>IelolfcB ii<rluiBOD 
aSUTo? in '^S Dg t J U ^ e *M V r BmneL unemployed, of 

commfuSsimi^^^j; SncHdL odM r»i 

Hall School in Tregynon auf ^ 32 , unemployed, ofNei- 

fog 1983 and 1984 wm norm Roa ^ Clapham. both 

court. The bench dOT^dl^ rebbenr and theft on 

therasesshouldbefrtofljntoe 28 last year. 

crown court, but adj ournec ^ continues. 

cdmminal proceedings. 


H cggpooaei n Bilnthr « HW 


A suhadmir firm of foe' 
National Freight Cbmpany 
cheated British Rafi out of 
several million pounds to in- 
crease its own profits, a court 
was told yesterday. 

Senior management of 
Fleetcare summoned 'their de- 
pot managers to a seminar at 
King’s Cross in London and 
ordered them to inflate the 
charges of wort done for 
British Ra3 by adding on costs 
for labour charges. 

Leicester Crown Court 
heard how Fleetcare had been 


nnuHoe at a loss and it wanted 
to exploit its contract far 
maintaining and servicing 
British Ran vehicles to tarn 
foe deficit mto a profit 

David Martin, aged 43, of 
Watergall, Bretton, Peter- 
borough, admitted nine 
charges of falsifying accounts 
between September 1982 and 
September 1983 when he was 
depot manager al Fteetcare’s 
Leicester branch. He was 
conditio nally discharged for 
two years. 

Mr Anthony Hacking, fin 


British Transport Police, said 
Fleetcare had a contract with 
British Rail to service and 
maintain its 7,000 vehicles. 

In September 1982, Martm 
and other depot managers 
were summoned to a seminar 
In London where they were 
told to inflate the charges. 

“In the view of tire officers 
who carried out the investiga- 
tions, this was a profitable 
fraud at all the. depots. The' 
Overall loss to British Rail, 
they estimated, was about 


several million pounds,” Mr 
Hacking said. 

Mr Gerard Bias, QC for 
the defence, said that Martin 
was stin employed by the firm 
but had left foe Leicester 
branch in 1983. 

Mr Elias said that Martin 
and his counterparts had been 
ordered to add either £5 or 5 
per cent to each invoice sent 
out He added that Martin had 
gone along with the instruc- 
tions of his bosses because he 
feared for his job if Iris depot 
had continued to run at a loss. 


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HOME NEWS 


THE TIMES SATURDAY OCTOBER 4 1986 


LABOUR PARTY CONFERENCE 


Selection system 


Charter for shipyards • Travel costs 



; r -f PptltftMMg 


No change in 
reselection 
until after 
next election 


There will be no change in 
the method of selecting par- 
liamentary candidates and 
respecting MPs until alter the 
next election, the conference 
insisted at Blackpool 
yesterday. 

Against the advice of the 
National Executive Commit- 
tee the conference carried, by 
3.549,000 votes to 2,603,000, 
a composite motion noting 
that the NEC had set up a 
working party on ^proposals 
for a new system of selection 
and rese lection, and stating 
that it was essential to main- 
tain the accountability of MPs 
so as to ensure that the 
parliamentary party carried 
out policies decided by the 
conference. 

It recognised that the issue 
of reseleciion was complex 
and that to reopen the issue 
now would seriously damage 
party unity and divert the 
party's energies. 

At present the franchise for 
voting for candidaies is con- 
fined to constituency manage- 
ment committees, although 
some party members felt that 
all members should have a 
vote. 

The NEC had promised that 
no plans for changes would be 
put forward before the next 
election and asked the con- 
ference to remit the motion. 

Mr Tom Ramage, Ryedalc, 
moving the motion, said that 
the party had been strength- 
ened by the reseleciion proce- 
dure and had gained respect in 
the country because of El It 
was difficult to understand 
why the NEC wanted to open 


new arguments and risk the 
reopening of old wounds. This 
was not the time for a re- 
examination of resele ciion. 

Mr Jobs Spelter, EETPU, 
said dial it was the proposers 
of the motion who were 
opening up the issue again. 
Why were they frightened of 
the ’proposal of one member - 
one vote to sefect candidates? 

Not everyone who did the 
work was on the management 
committee and not everyone 
on the management commit- 
tee did the work. There were 
party members who, because 
of shift work and other rea- 
sons. could not be on manage- 
ment committees, but they 
should have a vote in choos- 
ing the candidate. 

Mr John Evans, MP for St 
Helens North, replying for the 
NEC, said that between now 
and July 31 constituency par- 
ties, unions and other affili- 
ated organizations would be 
able to submit their ideas on 
reselection to the NEC work- 
ing party. 

They would be asked for 
their views on three issues: 

• the principle of changing 
the system of selection to 
include a wider franchise; 

• the preferable method of so 
doing; 

• the administrative proce- 
dures proposed by the exec- 
utive committee so that the 
NEC could bring forward 
proposals next autumn. 

He asked for the motion to 
be remitted to the NEC and 
promised dial it would be 
considered, but its movers 
pressed fora card vote. 



Labour's top table in fall voice at the end of die party conference in Blackpool yesterday: 
(from left) Mr Larry Whitty, general secretary, Mrs G3enys Kinnock, Mr Nefl Kinnock and 
Mr Chutes Tnrnock, of the rallwayraen's onion, NUR. 


SHIPBUILDING 


Scrap-and-build policy plea 


The next Labour Govern- 
ment should adopt a policy of 
scrapping British merchant 
ships and building new ones in 
British yards. Mr Dgnnis 
Skinner, MP. said when reply- 
ing for the NEC in a short 
dchatc on shipbuilding. 

He said that if the Common 
Market did not permit such a 
programme. Britain should 
leave the EEC. 

Conference unanimously 
passed a motion calling for a 
ten-point policy on shipping . 
and shipbuilding, including a 
scrap-and-build policy, public 
sector orders to be placed in 
British yards and for adoption 
of international codes of con- 
duct for all ships using British 
ports. 

The motion was moved by 
Mr Jim McFaDL General. 
Municipal and Boilermakers' 
Union, who said that it was 
nothing short of treason to 


neglect the shipping industry, 
which was vital to national 
security in war and peace. 


Mr Tom Foley, Bootle, said 
I of British ship- 


ihat revival 
building would play a big role 
in Britain's economic 
recovery. 

Miss Brenda Dench, 
prospective candidate for 
South Dorset, asked delegates 
to demonstrate to the crews of 
ferries at Weymouth who were 
refusing to leave their ships in 
protest at job losses there, that 
they should stand firm in the 
knowledge that the whole 
movement was behind their 
struggle. 

Mr Skinner. MP for 
Bolsover. said that the NEC 
unanimously accepted the 
motion without 

reservai i ons.**The shipbuild- 
ing industry has to be rescued 
from all the ravages of this 
Thatcher Government 


They had to ensure that 
British ships were built in 
Britain and end the situation 
in which Tory paymasters like 
P & O sent ships for repair to 
foreign yards. 

They should not look to the 
Common Market for help in 
restoring the industrial base, 
and with it the shipbuilding 
industry. 

“If we cannot get the sub- 
sidies right in the Common 
Market we ha veto get out,*' he 
said, turning towards Mr 
Kinnock sitting beside him. 
“and tell the Common Market 
that if we cannot build our 
own ships we are out That is 
the answer." (applause). 

They could not expect any- 
thing from the Government 
and that was why they had to 
get them oul Then they must 
have a policy of scrap and 
build. 


MEDIA DEBATE 


Curbs on foreign 
ownership sought 


Labour would develop poli- 
cies to prevent the unaccept- 
able concentration of media 
control in too few hands, Mr 
Gordon Colling told delegates 
during the debate. 

The National Executive 
Committee was to look again 
also at foe possibility of 
launching a daily newspaper 
for the Labour movement. He 
gpve a warning, however, that 
there were immense prob- 
lems, including that of the 
substantial funds that would 
be needed. 

Mr Arthur Bonner, Na- 
tional Graphical Association, 
moved a composite motion. 


‘which was accepted, calling on 
to develop - fair. 


the NEC 
practical and constructive 
proposals for foe next election 
manifesto to prohibit the 
ownership by non-United 
Kingdom based companies or 
individuals, directly or. 
through subsidiaries, of a 
controlling interest in any 
television, radio, satellite, ca- 
ble or newspaper company 
operating in the United 
Kingdom. 

The motion also sought to 
pat statutory limits on foe 
concentration of ownership in 
the media in foe interests of a 
free and pluralist press and 
broadcasting media. There 


should be practical safeguards 
to ensure that the British press 
was not in the hands of a few 
multi-national companies. 

He said that there was a 
myth that all the problems 
could be solved by new tech- 
nology. His union was notan 
enemy of new technology. The 
reverse was the case 

They should look fora more 
radical pattern of ownership, 
and consider an advertising 
levy that newspapers were 
not totally dependent on the 
amount of advertising they 
could obtain. They should 
also again consider a national 
printing corporation so that 
the state could invest in 
priming facilities and hire 
them to minority interests. 

Mr Danny Saigeant, Soci- 
ety of Graphical and Allied 
Trades ’82, said that they 
should also kill the myth that 
the British press was British. It 
was foreign and certainly not 
free. The ownership of the 
British press had become 
more and more concentrated 
in recent years. 

The media was a crucial 
influence on the kind of 
democracy there was in Brit- 
ain. It was arguably more 
powerful than ever before in 
influencing foe views of the 
people. 


CAMPAIGNING 


Clarity seen as the key 


A composite motion on 
party campaigning which said 
that the party's policies must 
be presented in a straight- 
forward, honest and easily 
understood way in the run-up 
to the general election, was 
endorsed. 

The campaign, it said, 
should centre round defence 


policy, unemployment, foe 
health service, social owner- 
ship, housing, women's rights 
and agriculture. 


Mrs Gwyneth Don woody, 
MP for Crewe and Nantwich, 
speaking for the NEC, said foe 
party had the leader, the 
policies and the presentation. 


G ' 


Some of the programmes schetWed for the 1986/87 season, starting this Sunday 


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pe Photography - 
ROALD DAHL The Worlds greatest living children‘s 

[ory w |! C r who is also the writer ofehlllingrales °£_ 
“S2T- suspense, in a 








ano Pavarotti, conducted by Lorin Maarel 


^^CGlHSATM^n.^ 


ANDY WARHOL Filmed in New York and London. 

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THE SOUTH BANK SHOW 

EDITED AND EHESENTED BTMELVTN BRAGG 

SUNDAY NIGHT AT 10-30 



Eclipse of the hard-line left 


The Labour 
ended in Blackpool yesterday 
with the party’s lord Left 
reduced to impotence. 

Its influence on foe week's 
debates extended little further 
than isolated, ritualistic di- 
atribes from foe rostrum on 
snch.issoes as police oppres- 
sion. the need for black sec- 
tions or British withdrawal 
from Northern Ireland. 

Mr Arthur ScargHTs moch- 
heralded comeback failed to 
materialize when delegates re- 
jected bis call for. the immedi- 
ate phasing out of unclear 
energy. 

The hard left's standard- 
bearer, Mr Eric Heifer, lost 
his place on the national 
executive, while the only mem- 
ber of the left-wing rampaign 
Groap to gain anew place, Mr 
Tam Dalyelt, immediately 
supported Mr. Kinnock in his 
very first vote. Barely seven 
members of the national exec- 
utive could now be said to be 
ultra left, the lowest in years. 


By Maitm Fletcher, Political Reporter 
conference torate rather than pure social- hard and soft left can somehow 


The left has been dismayed 
by the ease with which their 
former ally, Mr NeO Kinnock, 
has swung the party behind 
policies tailored to the dec- 


ism, but it must blame its own 
divisions. 

In Blackpool this week Mr 
Bean pml his colleagues 
launched a new attempt to 
form a co-ordinated left chal- 
lenge to the supremacy of the 
centre right Called Campaign 
Forum, it represents a mar- 
riage of convenience between 
the Campaign Group and La- 
bour Left Liaison -a medley of 
single-issue pressure groups 
such as blade sections, 
womens' rfahts, Troops Out, 
Gay and Lesbian Rights, and 
the Campaign for Labour 
Party Democracy. 

At a fringe meeting on 
Thursday night, Mr Betra 

grandiloquently claimed that 

Campaign Forum was “the 
most important Initiative 
within the Labour party” dur- 
ing his political career. It 
would “re-found foe Labow 
party” 

He said that its purpose was 
not to go for easy votes and 
standing ovations hot to plan 
for the long-term advance of 
true socialism 

Will Campaign Forum suc- 
ceed? Only, conceivably, if the 


find common cause again. 
Such Is the suspicion and 
acrimony that exists between 
them that they were unable 
even to a&ee on a joint slats 
for the national executiv e 
elections. 

Mr Ken Livingstone, foe 
former GLC leader, was a lone 
voice in advocating left mtity at 
the Tribune rally on Wednes- 
day night. “The test two or 
three years has seen the left at 
its worst We have turned 
inwards and fought each other. 
We must reunite foe left mi foe 
basis of the straggle for 
womens' rights, black sections 
and opposition to expulsions. 

Asked elsewhere what foe 
‘"conditions'* were for unifica- 
tion, Mr Benn dted support 
for black sections, the de- 
mands of women activists, the 
accountability of MPs, the 
removal of ail American bases 
aud opposition to expulsions. 

The soft left would baulk at 
none of those conditions save 
the test but the question of 
expulsions epitomises the fun- 
damental doctrhul differences 
between die so-called demo- 
cratic left and the Trotskyists. 


TRANSPORT 


Act giving]? 
‘freedom; 
of roads v 
deplored 





ji 


The eroaon of pubfe trans- 
port services as a result of 
Conservative policies, and foe 
Act last year which allowed &r ‘ . 
the deregulation of bos scr. ^ 
vices, were condemned in *'* 
motion carried by tire;:® 
conference. ’ 

Mr Jimmy Knapp, genefti 
secretary of the Nation^ -*• 
Union of Railwaymen.mov*; •*> 
ing the motion, said that 
British Rail had only made a”' 
profit by selling iis assets, foe.V! 
public's assets. 

The public would fas 
swingeing fere increases fa 
January. The Labour Party 
should support a cheap fiats 
policy and guarantee coo. 
cessionary feres for pension- 
ers. 

Miss Sue Human, 
Huddersfield, said that .foe 
next socialist Muustty of . 
Transport must ensure mini. - it 
mum standards of services fa ^ 
rural and urban areas - wife . a 
maximum charges, free tan, * 
port for the elderly and con- ,. M 
cessions for foe unemployed, - w 

Mr Robert Hughes, shadow 
Transport secretary, said foe- 
next Labour government- 
would repeal foe Transport 
Act 1985 and replace it with “ 
legislation to restore to local 
authorities foe rights and 
responsibilities to provide the 
services for the people who « 
needed them. f 


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replying for foe NEC, said fi ? « 
was necessary to havq an ' 
integrated transport system.; . 


IMMIGRATION 


Pressure 
for visas 
debate 


Reports by Alan Wood, Robert Morgan, Joint Winder, Anthony Hodges, Howard Underwood. 


Saleroom 


£1 note 


goes for 
£ 4,070 


By Geraldine Norman 

Sale Room Correspondent 

Christie's found itself with a 
failure on its hands when it 
offered the William H. Pbeatt 
collection of British Com- 
monwealth bank notes for 
sale. It sold £59,000 worth, but 
42 per cent was left unsold. 

Many bank notes were not 
in good condition and collec- 
tors appear to be choosy. 
Moreover, Christie’s had set 
quite ambitious valuations on 
them, after a successful sale 
last year. 

The top price of the sale was 
£2,310- (estimate £3^00 — 
£4,500) for a 1,000 shilling 
note issued in 1921 by the East 
African Currency Board in 
Mombasa. It bears foe portrait 
ofGeorgeV. 

Sotheby's sale on Thursday 
topped that price for another 
bank note. A£1 note, designed 
by John Bradbury around 
1916 but never issued, went to 
Spink ai £4,070 (estimate 
£1,800 - £L200). one of foe 
highest bank note prices on 
record. It is believed that only 
one other note of that pattern 
exists. 


Sotheby’s two-day coin sale 
made £645,727 with 6 per cent 
left unsold. A group of eigh- 
teenth century gold pattern 
coins, test pieces of designs 
that were never issued, made 
the top prices. 


A pattern five guineas of 


frve gum 

1770 made £46,200 and of 
1 777, £38,500. Both had been 
estimated by Sotheby's to 
fetch in the £25.000 - £30,000 
range and both had secured 
£20.000 when sold from the 
Douglas — Morris collection 
at Sotheby's in 1974. 


Legal aid 


Solicitors study payment by 
result as cuts threaten fees 


The Government was 
warned yesterday that the Law 
Society is to examine foe idea 
of solicitors being paid accord- 
ing to results in foe light of 
proposals to restrict legal aid 
rands. 

Lawyers in the United 
States already operate a 
contingency fee system, under 
which they take on a case for 
no fee but collect a percentage 
of any damages or compensa- 
tion won. A lost case means no 
fee. 

The announcement . that 
solicitors in England and 
Wales are considering a simi- 
lar system came at foe first 
session of the Law Society's 
council to be open to foe 
public — through the medium 
of closed-circuit television. 

Mr Rodger Pannone, a 
council member, told more 
than 60 colleagues:“lf con- 


By Frances Gibb, Legal Affairs Correspondent 


awarded to them, to a fund 
which is then used to pay for 
borderline cases or other cases 
where legal aid is not 
available. 

The council heard a vig- 
orous attack from Mr Tony 
Girling on the proposals from 
government officials to over- 
haul foe legal aid scheme: 
These would halve the 
amount of time available for 
advice to diems, he said, and 
“destroy beyond recognition" 
foe already “scarred” 24-hour 
duty solicitor scheme: 

Mr Pannone’s shot across 
foe Government's bows was 
one of foe few high points of 


the first time the pubU. 
been able to listen to the . 
society’s council since its 7 
formation in 1845. ■ 

The lifting of one of foe last 
veils of secrecy on life; ' 
profession’s doings was ^reed .. 
by a ballot of the profession 
earlier this year on foe groftri3 ° 
that it was important for 
solicitors to see their elected ■*' 
governing body at work. 

But press interest in the ; 
proceedings far outweighed , 
foat from the profession itself- 
from which only six members 
out of 45,000 tumed up to-. 
watch. • 


ventional funding is going to 
ntolo 


Consumers ‘worse off 
under centres scheme 


be capped, we have got tofook 
at alternative means. 

“We want to put down a 
marker io the ‘sacred cows’ of 
foe Lord Chancellor," he 
added in a reference to a 
recent speech by Lord 
Haiisham of St Maiyleboce 
attacking the legal profession’s 
unwillingness to reform. 

The Law Society working 
party was considering such 
options as legal expenses 
insurance, mutual insurance 
schemes, and “even a modi- 
fied contingency fee system”. 

. The Law Society is also 
likely to examine support for 
some kind of contingency 
legal aid fond, which was 
originally proposed by Justice, 
foe all-party legal rights group. 

Under such a scheme, 
successful litigants contribute 
a percentage of the costs 


Reform of foe legal aid 
system is essential, but ft 
cannot be done on foe Hi^p 
and must not be dene over- 
night, the National Coasamer 
Co until says today. 

Replacing sol icito rs with ad- 
rice centres to provide legal 
help on all civil matters — as 
recommended by foe Lord 
Chancellor's Department and 
the Treasury — would leave 
many consumers worse eft 
said the coantiL 

Air independent nationwide 
advice service shoald be estab- 
lished first with guaranteed 
fending from both central and 
local government. But such a 
network could take up to 15 
years to establish, ft adds. 

“Even then there coald still 
be strong arguments for shar- 
ing the legal aid workload 
between advice 'centres and 
solicitors." 


Solicitors wore expert fe 
matters sack as divorce- and 
pereoaal injury compensation, 
while advice centres tended to 
be more knowledgeable abort 
claims for welfare benefits, 
laadlord-teant tew, and snaB 

pl"< WK. 


We urge caution and ti®* 
for careful refaction andfaB 
debate by all concerned before 


radical changes are made fa 
foe legal aid system.”: Mr 


Michael Montague, coondt 


**nie government team faff ’ 
correctly diagnosed the mrf-/' 
ady* but it has cook ap-wftb 
foe wrong methane in sane 1 
respects.’’ . * 


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Labour would force a do- - 
bate in Parliament on foe 
decision to introduce vim: 
requirements for immigrants 
from the Indian sub-continent •..< 
and Africa, and would impose—, 
a three-line whip, Mr Gerald ;•;> 
Kanfatan, shadow Home Sec- » 
retary, told conference dele- ? 
gates, who unanimously; i 
approved an emergency . 
resolution deploring . the : 
Government's - - ; j 
announcement.' • 

. “When wecome to officers , « 
will repeal this derision as frint!- " 
of our repeal of the Immigra- . * 
non Act and the Britishv . 
Nationality Act,” he said. « i 
“Labour wifl maintain firm : y 
immigration controls, bat - : 
they will be non-racial and . » 
non-sexuaL The Labour gow 
eminent will welcome all bona. _ 
fide tourists, black and white, 
and make Britain once again a 
decent country worth 
visiting.” • 

“It would be perfectly fair if 
we imposed visa requirements 
on all those countries which 
require visas from us,” he 
said. “This is not an admin-, 
isuaiive decision; this is a 
racialist decision.” 


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Air of optimism In Moscow 

Gorbachov makes ban 
on all nuclear tests a 
top Reykjavik priority 


The Soviet u ‘ From Christopher Walker, Moscow 

indicated that it^wnnh^tS! wor id*s stockpiles of nuclear even thinner.''’ Mr Gorbachov 
making the acfaj^eaSt weapons. said. 

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Mr Boris Pyadyshev the Prescient tag&n was to find 
foreign Ministry spokesman ways of reducing the 

told a press conference here he t* 11 ® 31 ®T another work! war. 

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ebate 


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R^nabondo^SSJ 

refusal to join the unilaterai 
Soviet moratorium. 

. 5^1* Gmbachov has laid 
“own hw priorities for the 
meeting as the halting of ail 
JJJ^!f ar rests, the prevention 
ofthe raflitanzation of spaa 
mm an agreement to seane a 
^rge-scale reduction in the 


unveDing of a monument to 

the pre-war German com- 
munist leader, Ernst 

Thaelm arm, to launch a new 
attack on the US Star Wars 
programme, which he claimed 
was a step towards war. His 
comments indicated that be 

would be pressing hard in 
Iceland for this to be scr ap ped 
or modified. 

“Nowadays our duty is to 
caution the world public: the 
anns race makes the dividing 
line between peace and war 


calling lor an end to midear 
tests and for a start on 
reducing stocks of nodear 
weapons is earnest and on a 
large scale.” 

His speech to an audience 
which indoded the East Ger- 
man leader. Heir Erich 
Honecker, mentioned no 
other issues except arms con- 
trol. But officials have matte- 
dear that the Reykjavik nego- 
tiations will also cover re- 
gional questions such as 
Afghanistan. 

The Soviet leader struck a 
note of camions optimism 
about die meeting when he 
a yy r tffd that both he 
President Reagan shared a 
common objective — to start 
carrying out the initial accords 
signed during their first sum- 
mit in Geneva last November. 


Expulsion order postponed 


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From Zoriana Pysariwsky 
New York 

In what appears to be a 
concession, the US has a gre ed 
to postpone the October 1 
deadline for the recall of 25 
members of the Soviet mission 
to the United Nations. 

The American expulsion or- 
der w the Russians was one 
dimension of the Danfloff 
aflair which had been over- 
looked in the that 

followed the announcement of 
the Reykjavik meeting be- 
tween President Reagan and 
Mr Gorbachov. 

A final resolution of the 
expulsion directive win be 
made after that encounter, but 


m a press conference on 
Tuesday, Mr Edaard Shevard- 
nadze, the Soviet Foreign 
Minister, waned of “major" 
retaliatory action if the US did 
not accept a solution which 
was to Moscow's liking. 

Yesterday, Tass again 
raised the issue and accused 

the Uwfpi Ai Knm k tnifw Mi of 

attempting to interfere in the 
work of Soviet diplomats at 
the UN. 

Senor Javier Pfaez de 
CaeUac, the UN Secretary- 
General, has reded that the 
expulsion oeder is hi variation 
of the 1948 UN Headquarters 


w m a intain ed that 
Washington should have at- 


tempted to settle the dispute 
through consu ltat ion with the 

Mr Shevardnadze denied 
the American charges that the 
25 are spies, saying that many 
were experts and well-known 
diplomats who had helped him 
in prep aring for his many 
trilateral meetings a N 
York. 

There is general confusion 
as to how many of Che mission 
staff have actually left New 
York. 

Mr Shevardnadze pat the 
figure at about six or seven, 
while US officials said that 
most them had already been 
recalled by Moscow. 



Supporters of US sanctions against South Africa in solidarity; from left. Senator Edward Kennedy; Mrs Coretta Scott 
King, wife of m ordered dvfl rights leader Martin Luther King; and Mr Randall Robinson, a black rights activist 

Aftermath of sanctions votes 


Second reporter in frame-up scare 


Moscow — Less than a week 
after the release of Mr Nicho- 
las DanilofT, another Western 
correspondent said yesterday 
that he had been the victim of 
au attempt by the Soviet 
security authorities to try to 
frame him (Christopher Walk- 
er writes). 

Mr Michael Mclvor, the 
Moscow correspondent of the . 
Canadian Broadcasting Cor- 
poration. said that Irina* 
Netaikota, his Soviet trans- 
lator; bad been detained after 
what appeared to be an at- 
tempt to set him up by a man 
who telephoned his office and 
requested a meeting on the 
street ■ 

Recalling the fete of Mr 


Danfloff who had been seized 
by eight KGB men and ac- 
cused of receiving classified 
documents after responding to 
a similar invitation, 'Mr 
Mclvor asked his translator to 
attend in his place. 

“My translator told me that 
two men came up to her and 
identified themselves as from 
the oiminaT investigation 
department,” MrMcIvorsaiff 
“She was hustled into a car 
and driven to a militia station. 
The girl was bdd at the station 
for about 40 minutes. 

The incident came in a week 
in which Mr Eduard Shevard- 
nadze, the Soviet Foreign 
Minister, had been visiting 
Canada. ‘ 


Since the arrest of Mr 
Danfloff on Augnst 30, all 
Western reporters in Moscow 
have become very cautious in 
their dealing s with unofficial 
Soviet contacts. 

• Political asylum: The Soviet 
Union may grant political 
asylum to an American cancer 
specialist who requested it 
after claiming that be had, 
been persecuted by the FBI, a. : 
government spokesman said 
yesterday (AFP reports). 

The spokesman said Mr 
Eduard Shevardnadze, the 
Soviet Foreign Minister, 
raised the case of Mr Arnold 
Lokchme and his family in 
New York on September 30. 


Bitter attack on Reagan m 
Lebanon hostage’s tape 


! ruder** 

entt 

nfe« 


.. ..t 


Terry Anderson has grown 
thinner. His face is leaner, 
balanced by a large but wefl- 
trimmed beard. On a video 
tape which - his - kidnappers 
released yesterday, his fea- 
tures appeared pale. He did 
not smile once. But there was 
no doubting the message 
which the bureau chief of the 
Associated Press in Beirut — 
abducted 19 months ago on 
his way home from a game of 

tennis - was making. 

Reading from several sheets 
of paper which he held in front 
of him. Mr Anderson asked 
why President Reagan had 
taken so much trouble to 
secure the release of Nicholas 
DanilofT, the American 
journalist held in Moscow, 
while paying no attention. to 
the plight of American hos- 
tages in Lebanon. 

Whether Mr Anderson be- 
lieved the sentiments he was 
expressing or whether he had 
been ordered to repeat 
was, of course, undear. But he 
delivered his three-minute 
monologue in a clear, con- 
fident voice, only occasionally 
apparently choking 


By Robert Fisk, Middle East Correspondent 

with emotion. can Embassy in Beirut, who 

It was the first time the had been kidnapped in March, 
outside world had seen Mr 1984, had been murdered by 


Anderson since his pro-Ira- 
nian Islamic Jihad kidnappers 
had released a snapshot ofirim 
two months after his abduc- 
tion. 

Dressed in a pale yellow, 
collarless shirt and wearing his 
spectacles. Mr Anderson said: 
“After two-and-a-half years of 
empty talk and refusal to act 
on the part of the Reagan 
Adminis tration, it hurt to See 
the propaganda and bombast 
with which that Administra- 
tion solved the problem of Mr 
Danfloff a citizen like us who 
was imprisoned only a short 
time. 

“How can any official jus- 
tify the interest and the ten- 
sion and action given in that 
caseand the inattention given 
ours?" 

Mr Anderson, who was 
accompanied on the same 
tape by one of his two fellow 
hostages, Mr David Jacobsen, 
the director of the American 
University Hospital in Beirut, 
said that William Buckley, the 
political officer at the Amert- 


his captors. 

The tape was made on 
Thursday, apparently in re- 
sponse to President Reagan's 
assertion that the Danfloff 
case differed from that ofthe 
American hosta^s in Beirut 

Mr Reagan said that while 
Danfloff was held by a govern- 
ment with whom the US had 
diplomatic relations, the hos- 
tages in Lebanon were in the 
hands of “faceless terrorists”. 

Mr Anderson disputed this. 
“If our captors did not allow 
us to send these messages, we 
would soon be forgotten by all 
but our families.” 

Mr Anderson thanked his 
sister, Peggy Say, and three 
former hostaps for “working 
and praying for our release." 


pausing. 

Abducted Syrian envoy freed 


- A 


»rse 

sclief 

■ 1 \V 


Damascus (Reuter) 

Syrian diplomat, Mr Ayad ai- 
Mahmoud, abducted by gjun- 
0 men in Tehran.was no longer 
(if in the hands of HdnapP^* 


Syrian presidential 
man said yesterday. 

There was no iormai 


spokes- 


Iia- 


nian Government comment 
on the bundling of Mr 
Mahmoud by armed men into 
an ambulance as be returned 
home from the embassy on 
Thursday night Six shots woe 
fired during the envoy’s 
abduction. 



Terry Anderson as be 
shown in the videotape 


Pressure 
on EEC 
for action 

From Richard Owen 
Brussels 

The EEC Commission said 
yesterday it had no plans “for 
the lime being" to follow the 
example of the United States 
Congress and stop EEC grain 
sales to South Africa. 

But EEC officials said the 
overturning of Mr Reagan's 
veto on sanctions would in- 
crease pressure within the 
EEC for a strengthening of the 
limited measures agreed on 
September 16. 

Diplomats said there was 
likely to be pressure on both 
Britain and West Germany to 
match American action 
against Pretoria. Further de- 
mands for tough action win be 
put forward by strongly pro- 
sanctions states this month. 

Last month the foreign 
ministers, after two days of 
sharp debate, backed away 
from the full range of sanc- 
tions envisaged at The Hague 
EEC summit in June. The 
summit had proposed 
embargoes on coaL iron and 
steel and gold coins, as well as 
a ban on new investment. If a 
peace mission by Sir Geoffrey 
Howe; the Foreign Secretary, 
felled. A 

Three montls on. West 
Germany and Portugal held 
out against the coal ban and 
the detailed implementation 
of the ban on gold coins. 

Some diplomats here feel 
this was an embarrassingly 
feeble outcome, and will use 
the US example to enforce 
more hard-hitting moves. 

As EEC chairman, Britain 
took a neutral position in 
September. Bui Mis Thatcher 
made her true feelings dear by 
dismissing sanctions as in- 
effective in talks with Chan- 
cellor Kohl in Bonn almost 
before the foreign ministers 
had ended their Brussels talks. 


South Africa stands to lose 
$710m exports to US 


Economic sanctions im- 
posed against South Africa by 
the United States Congress 
would, on 198S figures, ban 
exports worth an estimated 
S710 miQion (£492 million), 
or 33 per cent, to America. 

This means that between 
four per cent and five per cent 
of South Africa's global ex- 
ports would be at risk. The US 
ts Pretoria's biggest trading 
partner, accounting for 12 per 
cent of its combined exports 
and imports. Japan comes 
next, followed by West Ger- 
many and Britain. 

There is no formal trade 
between South Africa and 
communist countries, though 
occasional barter deals are 
reported. Discreet co-ordina- 
tion by the Soviet Union and 
South Africa of their sales of 
gold and other minerals to 
Western markets is also be- 
lieved to take place. 

The following is based on 
figures from the US Com- 
merce Department supplied 
by the American Embassy in 
Pretoria. 

• Air Hntg The most im- 


From Michael Hornsby, Johannesburg 

mediately visible impact of 
the sanctions Bill will be the 
ending offending rights in the 
US for South African Airways 
which in 1984-1985 carried 
96.855 passengers and 7.472 
tons of freight between the two 
countries. 

A spokesman said that the 
airline would try to limit 
inconvenience to passengers 
by laying on extra flights to 
London, Zurich, Frankfurt 
and Lisbon to link with 
connecting flights to US. 

• Exports to US: South Af- 
rican exports of iron, steel, 
arms, ammunition, military 
vehicles and farm products 
are banned immediately: ex- 
ports of uranium, coal and 
textiles will be prohibited in 
90 days from October 2. 

According to the US Em- 
bassy, South Africa last year 
exported to the US $43.4 
million of bituminous coal, 

$78.2 million of steel, $75.3 
•million of uranium, $98 mil- 
lion of agricultural products, 

$223 minion of textiles and 
$5.5 million of pig-iron. 

• Imports from the U& Im- 


ports of petroleum, crude oiL 
munitions, nuclear technology 
and materia) are banned, as is 
the import of computers for 
use by the South African 
.Army, police or other agencies 
involved in adminislering the 
apartheid system. 

Last year, imports from the 
US amounted to SI310 mil- 
lion. of which $80 million was 
accounted for by computers, 
though what proportion of 
these sales went to the agen- 
cies covered by the sanctions 
is not clear. 

• Financial: The Congress 
Bill bans all new public and 
private loans and investments 
in South Africa, but does not 
require withdrawal of existing 
investments. US investments 
in the republic were estimated 
last year at $31300 million. 

Exempted are loans and 
credits for education, housing 
and humanitarian projects 
and investments in firms 
owned by blacks, as are short- 
term credits, rescheduling of 
existing debts and re-invest- 
ment of profits from South 
African enterprises. 


Shultz and Mugabe break the ice 


From Zoriana Pysariwsky 
New York 

Mr George Shultz, the US 
Secretary of State, yesterday 
met the Prime Minister of 
Zimbabwe, Mr Robert 
Magabe, presenting an 
opp or tunity to lessen the 
strain in relations between the 
twocomtries. 

The overture came from Mr 
Shultz, who extended an in- 
vitation after failing to include 
Mr Mugabe in talks with 
ministers of the African front- 
line states the previous day. 

Before the meeting was 
announced, Mr Mugabe told a 


press conference in a reference 
to a decision by the Reagan 
Administration to cut off $22 
million (£15 million) aid to his 
country because of its harsh 
criticism of US policy on 
South Africa, that Zimbabwe 
would “rather be pom, eat 
grass, and be sovereign." 

He promised that sanctions 
retaliation by South Africa 
against its neighbours would 
be a two-edged sword 

“Sooth Africa is more 
dependant on us than we are 
on it," Mr Mugabe said after 
praising the decision by the 
Senate to o rei taiu President 


Reagan's veto of a tough 
sanctions package. 

He said the dpnial of trans- 
port links while hurting 
neighbouring states, for exam- 
ple, would cost South Africa in 
lost rail and port revenues and 
the loss of dividends, and 
profits that would result from 
nationalization of South Af- 
rican property In Zimbabwe 
.would be tremendous. 

It was wrong, be stated, for 
Western governments to focus 
exclusively on the hardship 
sanctions would bring upon 
Pretoria's neighbours. 


Daniloff 
at Disney 
jubilee 

From Michael Binyoo 
Washington 

In an extraordinary 
combination of America's 
schmaltz and earnestness, Mr 
Warren Burger, the former 
Chief Justice, joined forces 
with Mickey Mouse yesterday 
for a Jubilee Jamboree to 
celebrate 200 years of the US 
Constitution 

The chief actor among them 
was there in spirit, sending a 
video message from the White 
House to the world's press and 
other celebrants in Orange 
County Convention Centre. 

Balloons flew as Mickey 
Moose ushered onstage the 
president of Disneywond. He 
extolled the 15 years in which 
Disaeyworid had become a 
leading tourist attraction. 

Chief Justice Barger toM 
Mickey and otters that the 
Declar a tion of Independence 
was only a promise, 
Disaeyworid, i nn ovative as 
ever, then prodoced a surprise 
- Mr Nicholas Danfloff He 
described those 13 days in a 
Moscow jafl, and sent mes- 
satgesof hope to the hostages 
ia ; Bei rut and to statesmen 
going to Iceland. 


Britain’s 
‘girls’ air 
complaints 

From Richard Owen 
tassels 

The controversial Second 
World Whores’ Congress end- 
ed yesterday with calls for the 
decriminalization of prostitu- 
tion, some noisy opposition 
from feminists and the 
remarkable daim by a l e ad in g 
campaigner for British pros- 
titutes that Mrs Thatcher’s 
economic policies had driven 
a new generation to prostitu- 
tion. They were known as 
“Thatcher’s grris." 

Despite assurances of anon- 
ymity for the delegates, 1,000 
camera bulbs flashed at the 
end of the three-day congress 
as Margo St James, a retired 
prostitute and head of the 
International Committee for 
Prostitutes' Rights presented a 
declaration calling for mea- 
sures to prevent the murder 6f 
prostitutes, the right to work 
in the “sex industry" without 
police harassment, respect for 
prostitutes' private lives and 
even their right to join a trade 
union. 

The congress, organized by 
a group or Green MEPs, was 
held at the European Par- 
liament building here. 


Cubans’ farewell fiesta shakes up Budapest 


■ri‘ 


sA' ■ 


. j 

u* 




'jc,' 


m p .;t 


Eastern Emopepartiyto W 
off its conside rable debts with 
the better-off Communist 
countries. Some 500 to 600 

Rndaoest, the tranquil these workers, oaimy em- 

H^SmWitalOOtheDan- ployed « bu.Tdina sites 

* tettle-groond a flm^ parte^ Hmig^ 


By Roger Boyes 

East European 

Correspondent 

tranquil 


ft ?,J W ;C 
w: e}C " u 

'% pi 


broken bottles ^-^ed 
throngfe the airss ««es rf 

the Hungarian police and 

by ftwa$the wots* riot to occur 
in Hangar? for sewnd years, 
and 

the tensions betweengnest- 
and there hosts 
Cornmnnist Woe. 

Cuba, a member of the 
Snriet-fed Come con trad mg 
bloc, sends its workers 


Budapest last 
week for a fiueweH fiesta to 
mark the end of their four-year 
contracts. 

It was, by most accounts, 


soon enongn the party began 
to suffer from the traditional 
problem of too few girls and 
too lunch rnra. At midnight, in 
one comer, a group of abort 36 
started to argue and thea fight 
over the availability of one of 
the giris. The brawling spread 
and soon encompassed most of 
the dance hafl. 

At the same time a couple of 
bandied : Cubans started a 
carnival in the streets, smgiag. 


and bottles. The militia with- 
drew. The riot in toe dance 
haD hotted up. 

• The authorities then called 
in police reinforcements and 
troops. The area was sur- 
rounded and seated off At- 
tacks and counter-attacks 
cootinned until 4 am; at least 
two pofleemen were seriously 
wounded. 

Many Cubans were arrested 
and a nationwide search has 
Cu- 


ts 


Tooether with carnival in ae sneers, singmg, ana a aaooawue searen 
h S yrian Hrtoends, beating make-shift drams and been l a m cfa e d for other 

w«*g^Jo tke to wbottipped in;. 

CHltore- - « .kM of ^ 

purpose entCTtanxme* centre 

pear one ' of the Budapest 

textile factories. 

The dancing was necnc 

tables were sbove J . flS fS 
nlatefl ufevfoUv smashed — but 


sound of breaking glass; a 
common en o u gh right ■ in 
Torremolinos but rare indeed 
in Eastern Europe- 
The police were called and 
the first two patrol care were 
met with a bail of cobblestones 


Guest-workers are a com- 
mon phenomenon in Eastern 
Europe. There areVtetnainese 
workers in Czechoslovakia, 
bat die majority of 
workers are Poles empi . 
on con struc ti o n sites in East doingbusiness in South Africa 


Germany, Czechoslovakia and 
Hungary. 

These are much sought- 
after jobs as the workers can 
benefit from the better con- 
sumer situation in the host 
countries. As in Western 
Europe, they live uneasily with 
their hosts. 

Their accommodation is of- 
ten poor and the need to save 
money reduces their thing 
standards to a bare minhanm. 

Funds pull-out 

Boston (Reuter) — Harvard 
University said it had di- 
vested $158.7 million (£110 
million) worth of stocks and 
bonds in eight companies 


New light on death of general 

Protests at use of 
Mafia ‘repentant’ 


From Peter Nichols, Rome 


The mass trial of alleged 
Mafia criminals in Palermo 
has seen dramatic develop- 
ments as a result of fresh 
testimony, which was greeted 
by howls of protest from the 
prisoners. 

The first dramatic session 
since the trial resumed after 
the summer recess came on 
Thursday. Gianni Melluso, 
who is classed as “repentant" 
because he has agreed to 
testify, told the court amidst 
jeers from many of the ac- 
cused that the Mafia had 
decided to kill General Carlo 
Alberto Dalfe Chiesa four 
years before he was actually 
murdered in a Palermo street 
in September 1982. 

When the general was shot 
he held the post of Prefect of 
Palermo, where he was cond- 
ucting a courageous fight 
against the Mafia. 

According to Signor Md- 
luso's testimony, two leading 
Mafia figures told him in 
Milan in 1978 that the general 
would have to go. One of them 
described him as “a great 
danger". This was Nitto Santa 
Paola, a Mafia leader from 
Catania. 

At the time. General Dafla 
Chiesa had not yet become 
Prefect of Palermo. He was in 
charge of high security prisons 
and his main work was di- 
rected against terrorists. 

This testimony could in- 
dicate closer collusion than 
has come to light so for 
between the Mafia and 
terrorists. 

This new light on the 
general's death follows allega- 
tions made in court shortly 
before the summer recess by 
members of his family that 
General Dalla Chiesa had 
been sent on his dangerous 
mission to Palermo without 
adequate political support 
from Rome, which made his 
death inevitable. 

The Dalfe Chiesa murder is 
not the only death to figure in 


these hearings. The 450 or so 
accused fece charges involving 
hundreds of murders, at- 
tempted murders and other 
forms of violence. But the new 
evidence brings out an ele- 
ment in the trial which is 
causing increasing anxiety. 

Signor Melluso made his 
name as a “repentant” in 
another mass trial, that 
against the Camorra in Na- 
ples. In that trial some 856 
people were originally ro- 
unded up. and of the 608 who 
were actually tried 349 were 
convicted and 259 acquitted. 
Of the 349 found guilty, 191 
had their sentences annulled 
on appeal, including Signor 
Enzo Tortora, a television 
personality whose principal 
accuser had been Signor 
Melluso. 

Certainly Signor Melluso's 
testimony will not carry the 
same weight in Palermo as it 
did for a time in Naples. The 
a cc used in Palermo, more- 
over. are of for greater weight 
than the defendants in the 
Camorra trial. But much of 
the Palermo evidence is also 
based on “repentance", largely 
on the testimony of Tommaso 
Buscerta, the first of the great 
Mafia leaders to testify against 
the organization. 

He appears to have been 
genuinely repelled by the new 
course which the Mafia had 
taken, but he was nevertheless 
regarded as a criminal before 
he decided to talk, and the 
whole principle of basing jus- 
tice on the word of criminals 
who offer evidence is now 
being heavily criticized. 

Finally, the Palermo court 
will have to face the humili- 
ation of seeing about half of 
the accused released in the 
second week of November 
because the hearings have 
taken too long and they must 
be freed because the time limit 
for imprisonment before sen- 
tence will have been reached. 



v. 


Shots at 
Punjab 
police 
chief 

Delhi - Sikh terrorists yes- 
terday penetrated to the heart 
of the Punjab police's defences 
and shot the slate's most 
senior policeman as he 
strolled on the lawns of the 
officers' mess with his wife 
(Michael Hamtyn writes). 

The police chief, Mr J.F. 
Ribeiro, who has claimed 
considerable recent success for 
his men against the terrorist 
gangs, was grazed on lhc 
forearm by a bullet, and his 
wife was shot in the calf A 
policeman was killed and four 
wounded before the set cn 
attackers fled. 

Meanwhile, the gunman 
who shot at Mr Rajiv Gandhi, 
the Prime Minister, on Thurs- 
day. was remanded in custody 
yesterday. 

Train hits 
rock fans 

Madrid — Two young Span- 
iards were killed by a goods 
train while listening to a rock 
concert near Tarragona, and 
10 other conccrtgoen. were 
injured { Richard W igg w rites V 

The two men killed were, 
according to one account, 
distracted by the music while 
sitting on the railway lines 
when the train approached 
without whistling 

Death blast 

Colombo - An assistant 
government agent from Sn 
Lanka's north central prov- 
ince was among four people in 
a Jeep killed by a landmine on 
the Moraw-cwa-Anuradhapura 
road. Tamil guerrillas are* 
believed to be responsible. 

Crash escape 

Naples (Reuter) — A US 
naval helicopter crashed into 
the Mediterranean during a 
training exercise, but its three 
crew members were rescued 
with only minor injuries, the 
US Sixth Fleet said. 

Poll claim 

Cairo (AP) — The Govern- 
ment says that President 
Mubarak's National Demo- 
cratic Party won 98 per cent of 
votes cast for a constitutional 
advisory body, and that an 
opposition boycott' of the 
balloting foiled. 



Strict security measures sur- 
rounded the arrival of Bar- 
oness Young, above. Minister 
of Stale at the Foreign Office, 
for an official three-day visit to 
Malta, the first important 
British ministerial visit for 10 
years. 

Visa snub 

Stockholm (Reuter) — 
France has turned down a 
request from Sweden. Nor- 
way, Iceland, Austria and 
Finland to be exempted from 
stringent new visa laws, the 
Swedish Foreign Ministry 
said. 

Steam treat 

Harare (Reuter) — Railway 
enthusiasts will soon be able 
to travel from Bulawayo to 
Victoria Falls in vintage lux- 
ury coaches hauled by a steam 
locomotive, a new Zimbab- 
wean travel company said. 

Seven hanged 

Baghdad (API - Seven gov- 
ernment employees or busin- 
essmen have been hanged for 
accepting bribes from com- 
panies that sought contracts in 
Iraq, according to a presiden- 
tial decree. 

Parcel bomb 

Bonn — A parcel bomb 
exploded at the main parcels 
sorting office in Frankfurt 
after suspicious postmen be- 
gan opening it. There were no 
injuries. 

Eta arrests 

Madrid — Spanish police 
have arrested four young men, 
suspected members of an Eta 
commando in Viiladona, near 
San Sebastian, and found a 
small arms cache in a building 
in which the People's Unity 
Party, the political wing of 
Eia. has its local office. 

Greens’ plea 

Bonn (Reuter) — The West j 
German Greens party urged— 
President Husak of CzechdSF* 
Slovakia to free seven impris-* 
oned jazz musicians and stop* 
official harassment of the the* 1 
so-called "Jazz Section". 

Shells delay id 

Moscow (Reuter) — Me 
than 500 unexploded shell 
and mines buried since 
Second World War held ul_ 
the building of a settlement for 
workers decontaminating fow 
Chernobyl nuclear power staff 3 
lion, the Army daily Krosi 
Zvezda said. 






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OVERSEAS NEWS 


THE TIMES SATURDAY OCTOBER 4 1986 


Opposition embarrasses Socialists 


Madrid resists demand 
for check on details 
of Nato membership 


The Spanish Government is 
resisting demands to inform 
Parliament on how it envis- 
ages settling the military as- 
pects of the country’s Nato 
membership. 


From Richard Wigg, Madrid 

favours foil integration into 
Nato, sai<t*The Spanish peo- 
ple are not children. Par- 
liament is not a kindergarten. 
We want direct access to the 
documents.” 


The Socialists held, and 
won. a controversial referen- 
dum on Nato membership last 
March. But now they are 
embarrassed by a demand 
which has united all shades of 
opposition, to let MPs, as 
representatives of the Spanish 
people, check whether the 
strict limits on membership 
endorsed in the referendum 
are being observed. 


If there was no intention of 
military integration by sub- 
terfuge, what were tire Social- 
ists endeavouring to hide? 


According to the proposals, 
reportedly given the nod by 
Nato defence ministers at 
their spring meeting in Brus- 
sels, the Gonzalez Govern- 
ment limits military in- 
tegration solely in the sense of 
not permitting ns troops to 
come under direct orders Bom 
Nato commanders. 


Senor Francisco Fernandez 
Ordonez, the Foreign Min- 
ister, this week adamantly 
resisted the opposition's com- 
bined assault, offering Par- 
liament instead a secret 
session in committee 
“shortly”, at which MPs 
would be informed of, but not 
allowed to see for themselves 
or take notes on, the Spanish 
proposals. 

The Government is in diffi- 
culty over the precise degree of 
its military participation in 
Nato. One of the referendum’s 
three conditions forbids mili- 
tary integration. 


It was only when a Brussels 
newsletter revealed last May 
the Madrid Government's 
outline proposals that Span- 
iards learnt of their 
Government's position 
which, as one Western dip- 
lomat later observed pri- 
vately, represents military 
integration in all but name. 


But Spain will continue to 
belong to Nato's military and 
defence planning committees 
and will set up French-style 
liaison officers with the 
commands. 


Senor Javier Rupercz, who 
was Spain's Ambassador to 
Nato when it joined the 
alliance in 1982, and is now a 
leading member of the Chris- 
tian Democrat Party, which 



Senor Narcfs Serra, the 
Defence Minister, has repeat- 
edly emphasized that the sov- 
ereignty dispute over Gib- 
raltar prevents Spain's joining 
the integrated , command 
structure. 


Senor Fernandez: resisted an 
opposition assault. 


When the present dispute 
with Parliament blew up. he 
first insisted that it was Nato 
which was demanding secrecy 
‘over the details of the Spanish 
proposals. It has emerged, 
however, that it was Spam's 
armed forces which decided in 
1982 that all details of negotia- 
tions with Nato would in 
future be top secret. 

The Government is seeking 
in Brussels a command for 
itself in Nato's Western ap- 
proaches. This, however, 
should not be directly inte- 
grated. But this would conflict 
with Nato’s existing Tberlani 
command, beaded by 
Portugal. 


Solidarity emerges 


as pressure group 


From Roger Boyes, Warsaw 


Solidarity.the Soviet bloc's 
only free trade union, has 
announced its re-birth, leav- 
ing the shadows of clandestine 
struggle to emerge as an open, 
legal pressure group for 
workers' rights. 

The declaration drawn up 
by Mr Lech Walesa and his 
fellow union leaders marks an 
important new feature in the 
political landscape of Poland. 

Both the Government and 
Solidarity are now not only 
declaring their readiness for 
dialogue - a familiar but 
largely meaningless refrain for 
the past five years — but are 
actively preparing for talks. 

The crucial initiative was 
the fleeing of 225 political 
prisoners under an amnesty. 

Solidarity and the Catholic 
Church say that previous am- 
nesties failed because there 
were not enough avenues for 
flee expression. 

The authorities are trying to 
work out ways in which 
critical opinion can be voiced 
without threatening the over- 
all hegemony of the Com- 
munist Party. 

One idea is to set up social 
consultative councils, allow- 
ing Communists. independent 
Catholics and perhaps ex- 
Sol idarity advisers to discuss 
social policy under the aegis of 
General Jaruzclski. 

The general is the party 
chief, as well as head of state, 
suggesting to the Church and 
Solidarity that the party’s idea 
of dialogue is to choose with 
whom it wants to talk and 
leave others out in the cold. 


The Government is wary off 
labelling this “pluralism” be- 
cause the Kremlin views this 
as a synonym for sapping the 
power of the Communist 
Party. 

However, some cracks are 
opening up, and Solidarity 
and the Church can see 
opportunities. The Polish 
bishops have used the new 
mood to press for more access 
to the media. Solidarity has 
come up with the idea of a 
Temporary Solidarity 
Council. 

The authorities, said the 
Solidarity declaration this 
week, “have shown that they 
are aware that their existing 
channels of communication 
with society are inadequate 
and need to be expanded”. 

The Temporary Council oft 
Solidarity is staffed on the 
national level by former 
underground leadens and at 
the regional level by a mixture 
of above-ground and under- 
ground Solidarity veterans. 
They will also deal with social 
issues, such as the decline of 
the health service, the housing 
crisis and ecological problems. 

The Government insists 
that Solidarity does not exist 
as a trade union and that 
attempts to revive it or display 
its emblems would be illegal 

Solidarity, by creating its 
new advisory councils, has 
tacitly admitted that it is no 
longer a mass union; its aim is 
to foster conditions that 
would allow free, non-Com- 
munist unions to exist 


Activist's sentence suspended 


Warsaw (AP) — A Solidar- 
ity’ activist has received a two- 
year suspended sentence from 
a military court for refusing 
military duty, a member of an 
unofficial peace group said 
The conn in Zielona Cora 
os Thursday suspended the 


sentence on Ryszaid Bonowski 
when he agreed to accept a 
call-up card if be is summoned 
to serve in the military in the 
future, Mr Jacek Czapn- 
towicz, a founder of the banned 
Freedom and Peace Move- 
ment said. 



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Ski firms 
slip up on 
Japan’s 
wet snow 


From David Watts 
Tokyo 


Japanese snow is tike no 
other, according to the com- 
pilers of a new set of safety 
standards for skis. 

The result is an avalanche of 
protests from European ski 
mannfoctarers, who have a 
large percentage of the Japa- 
nese market and daim that 
Japan's new SG (safety goods) 
mark applied to skis, boots 
and Hi ntiings is a farther trade 
harrier. 

“The Japanese say the SG 
marie applies only to 5 per cent 
of the market at the moment, 
bat we want to stamp this out 
before it suddenly becomes a 
reason to exdnde onr ski 
products,” said Mr Michael 
Lake, spokesman for the 
European Economic Coramn- 
aftv in Japan. 

The ETChas called on the 
Japanese Government to re- 
view the apptiotion of the 
mark to make it compatible 
with international standards. 

That coold sot be done 
before next spring, the Gov- 
ernment told Mr Jos Loeff, 
director-general of the EEC 
for Japan, who b concluding 
the latest set of negotiations 
with the Japanese on access 
for European wines, whiskies 
and tiquems as Veil as skis, 
boots and bindings. 

Mr Led? said he detected a 
to change” in 
taxes on imported alcohoL 

Indeed, the Prone Minister, 
Mr Yasuhiro Nakasoue, pro- 
mised Mrs Thatcher last May 
that Japan would by to put 
right unfair taxes on imported 
whisky. 

Mr Leoff win report back to 
the Council of Ministers, bat 
warned the Japanese tint he 
could not role out reprisals if 
the Parliament were not 
satisfied. 

The EEC has now called for 
more negotiations on skiing 
equipment in the margins of a 
Gait meeting in Geneva later 
this month. So Ear the Japa- 
nese response has been nou- 
comnuttaL 

The Japanese Ski Federa- 
tion claims that poor snow, 
narrow pistes and crowded 
slopes have made special stan- 
dards necessary. It argnes that 
Japanese snow is damper than 
elsewhere, leading to more 
accidents on Japanese ski 
slopes than in any other sport. 

Some 17 per cent of all 
sports accidents are on the 
slopes. 



Mr Nmr Misuari (left), leader of the Muslim separatist MNLF organization in the southern 
Philippines, embracing Mrs Tarhata Lacman, the Aqnino-appt nted Governor, at a meeting 
in Marawi City also attended by Mr AH Dimaporo, ex-President Marcos's load chieftain. 


Aquino close to bringing 14-year 
Muslim separatist war to an end 


From Keith Dalton 

Manila 


The Philippines is “inching 
towards peace” in the 14-year 
Muslim secessionist war, and 
formal ceasefire talks are dne 
to begin next month in Jedda, 
Saudi Arabia, a Government 
envoy said yesterday. 

Before then President 
Aquino is expected to meet 
another Muslim rebel leader, 
Mr Hashim Salamai, bead of 
the More Islamic Liberation 
Front (MILF), to convince him 
to join the talks, the 
President's brother-in-law and 
chief negotiator, Mr Agapito 
Aquino, said. 

Mrs. Aquino met Mr 
Salamafs rival, Mr Nar 
Misuari, chairman of the 
Moro National Liberation 
Front (MNLF), in a convent 
last month on foe far southern 
island of Jolo, where the two 
agreed on moves to aid foe 
rebellion, beginning with an 
informal trace. 

Mr Aquino said the Presi- 
dent hoped to convince the two 
rebel leaders to settle their 


differences, so they coold both 
pwond this month's formal 
ceasefire talks “with a view to 
bringing lasting peace to 
Mindanao” — the country’s 
second largest island, where 
the majority of the five million 
FUipmo Muslims live. 

The meeting between foe 
rival Muslim leaders is ex- 
pected to be held in Jedda, 
ifrom where both men, in self- 
imposed exile, have directed 
their forces. 

Since his unprecedented 
meeting with Mrs Aquino, Mr 
Misuari has consulted fellow 
Muslims on the Government's 
offer to grant autonomy to 
Muslim-dominated areas of 
Mindanao and the Snln island 
chain further south. • 

He has said he will drop his 
' lon g -s tanding demand for a 
separate Muslim state if ex- 
panded autonomy is favoured 
by the majority of Muslims. 

• Empty classes: The Com- 
munist gnerritia war has 
caused 100,000 Filipino pri- 
mary and high school pupils to 
abandon classes in the 
countryside, where fighting 


affects 64 of the country’s 73 
provinces, the Alliance of Con- 
cerned Teachers reported 
yesterday. 

Sporadic skirmishes, foe 
forced resettlement of commu- 
nities, foe nse of scarce school 
baOdings as refigee centres, a 
teacher shortage and a general 
climate of fear have persuaded 
an mcreasing number of pupils 
to stay away. 

The teachers recommended 
to foe Defence Ministry that 
military operations should be 
halted iqtmediateiy within a 
three-mile radios of schools to 
ensure the safety of pupils. 

The release of foe Affiance's 
findings coincided with a mili- 
tary report that a school 
teacher, Mrs Gficeria Baga- 
sala, was shot dead in front of 
100 primary-age pupils in 
Bate Town, ISO miles sooth of 

Manila. 


Three young women aimed 

wifo pistols “executed” foe 
teacher during the morning 
flag-raising ceremony, the 
state-run Philippine New 
Agency reported. - 


US defence talks with five countries 


Weinberger on world tour 


From Mohsin AH , 
Washington 


Mr Caspar Weinberger, the 
US Defence Secretary, leaves 
today on a three- week tour of 
China, India, Pakistan, Italy 
and Britain for talks with their 
top political and military lead- 
ers on bilateral, regional and 
global issues. 

It will be the first visit to 


strongly criticized by the La- 
bour Party for publicly attack- 
ing its defence policies. 


India, which is a leading buyer 


of Soviet arras, by a 
Defence Secretary. He will 
also inspect Indian defence 
facilities. 

Mr Weinberger has -Special 
messages from President 
Reagan for the Chinese, In- 
dian, Pakistani and Italian 
leaders, Administration of- 
ficials said. 

He will conclude his tour in 
Britain, where he has been 


Mr Weinberger, in a recent 
television interview, charged 
that the Labour Party’s anti- 
nuclear policies could lead to 
the break-up of Nato. But Mr 
Neil Kinnock, the Labour 
Party leader, has sought to 
reassure the US that his 
defence policies would not 
undermine Nato. 


The Defence Secretary will 
attend a bi-annual meeting of 
the Nato Nudear Planning 
Group at Gleneagles, Scot- 
land, on October 21 and 22. 

Mr Weinberger will stop in 
Anchorage today to make a 
speech on US policy towards 
the Asian-Pacific region. His 
address will assess the- dy- 
namic political economic and 


security developments char- 
acterizing the area- 

in Peking, be will discuss 
continuing American arms 
sales co-operation with China. 
The US recently approved the 
sale of artillery ammunition, 
technology and advanced 
avionics to Peking for the 
Chinese-built F 7 fighter. The 
two countries will also discuss 
the sale of American naval 
torpedoes. 

Mr Weinberger will also 
seek China’s views on the 
Afghanistan and Cambodia 
conflicts and on the protracted 
Iran-Iraq war. American of- 
ficials have expressed concern 
about China reportedly 
supplying arms to Iran. 

In Italy, which is a Nato 
ally, be will be able to review 
East-West relations and 
counter-terrorism measures. 


Istanbul synagogue massacre 


Israelis pledge to 
pursue attackers 

_ • — — tanKfllNH 


Israel wiU 

responsible for the attack on 
an Istanbul synagogue tost 
month “to the ends of the 
earth." Major-General Am- 
non Shahak, the commander 
of military intelligence, 
warned yesterday in the Jeru- 
salem Post. , 

“There will be absolutely no 
compromise here. But before 
you react you have to know 


prom Ian Murray, Jerusalem 
pursue those 


who you are reacting against. 
You cannot lash out bundly. 


indly. 

he said. r . 

“This is not a war of days, 
weeks or even months. Before 
we react we have to know 
more than we know now r 
especialiy. if a country is 
behind this. 

“It, too, will not come away 
dean. Therefore it is essential 
that we have a dear address 
before we act. But act we wilL 

Although General Shahak 
has said the perpetrators offoe 
raid, in which 22 people died, 
are not yet known, it is 
thought that members of the 
Abu Nidal group are prime 
suspects. 


OUI UkUq v» 

terrorist acts, including the 
attacks on Rome anti'Vteqnq 
airports in December and the 
bloody hijacking of an 
EgyptAir airliner to Mate in 
November. 

The Istanbul massacre S' 
regarded by military inteffi. 
gcnce here as bearing til foe 
hallmarks of the kind, of 
ruthkssness m which Abv 
Nidal members specialize. \ 
“We don't need any real 
evidence to do something 
against Abu Nidal,” a sopor, 
intelligence officer said. “The 
whole world will support any. 
thing we do to Abu NidaL7 
General Shah ak said there 
was widespread concern that 
the message fro m Syria's 
leadership was that hardship 
had to be endured “until the 
Zionists can be dealt with by 
the only pro-Arab nation, in 
Arab ” * 


the 


uic mou world prepared to 
suffer for the Arab cause 
He was also worried about 
the outcome of the Gulf wat 


Religious party leader 
resigns after 36 yeai^s 


Jerusalem (Reuter) — Dr 
Josef Burg, the Religious Af- 
fairs Minister, resigned from 
the Cabinet yesterday, after 
almost four decades of 
continuous service in Israeli 
governments, his office said. 

Dr Burg, aged 77, the leader 
of the National Religious 
Party (NRP), sent a letter of 
resignation to Mr Shimon 
Peres, the Prime Minister, 
ending an unbroken, 36-year 
career as a Cabinet minister. 

The German-born poli- 
tician cited age as his reason 
for stepping down, but he has 
been underpressure within his 
party to resign after its poor 
showing in foe 1984 elections, 
when it won only four seats, 
down from a high of 12 in 
1977. 


Peres' Labour 


party 

Likud bloc of Mr Yitzhak 
Shamir, the Foreign Minister, 
would form a “national unity- 
government". 

Mr Zevulun Hammer, aged 
50. a former Education and. 
Social Affairs Minister, will 
replace Dr Burg. 



Bang: a 


Dr Buig, a doctor of philos- 
1 for t 


ophy and logic, studied for foe 
rabbinate. 

Regarded as one ofthe most 
astute observers of Israeli 
politics, he predicted that Mr 


Year of the fallow land 
tests Golan settlers 


Jerusalem — “Shana Tova ~- 
A Happy New Year” Today is 
the start of the Jewish New 
Year, 5747, a particularly 
complex one for observing 
Jews living here, who must try 
to obey the religious 
commandments that foe land 
of Israel should lie Mow and 
un worked for one year in 
seven (Ian Murray writes). 

For the purposes of the 
Chief Rabbinate, the land of 
Israel also extends over the 
Golan Heights. Modem tech- 
nology has had to come to foe 
aid of the Jewish settlers there 
who want to observe Sbmitta, 
as this Mow year is called. 

The mitzva (religious 
commandment) for Shmitta 
says there must be no plough- 
ing, sowing, reaping, pruning 
or grape-gathering in Israel 
during that time. But up on 
the Golan, the settlements are 
in serious economic difficulty 
and they must carry on form- 
ing to survive. 

The answer is a self-pro- 
pelled tractor, approved by 
Rabbi Yefaezekel Daum, who 
is in chanp of Shmitta for the 
Chief Rabbinate and is him- 
self from foe Golan. 

“A man sits on the tractor 
but he is there only to stop it at 
foe end of foe row,” Rabbi 
Daum says. 



The settlements are co: 
ered by one rabbinical 
to be exempt from many of i 
year's strictures, on .foe 
grounds that full observance , 
would put their existence at 
risk and so endanger tire 
security of foe country. 

Farmers are therefore al- 
lowed to sell their land nom- 
inally to a Gentile for foe year. 

luce is sold off through the 
rabbinical courts although 
profit is not allowed. 

These relaxations are not 
accepted by many of the ultra- 
orthodox Jews, who will not 
buy Israeli-grown produce. 
Greengrocers serving these 
communities are making 
arrangements to buy only 
from Arab formers, and there 
are predictions that prices will 
rise by anything up to 50 per 
cent as a result 
Home-owners are also 
bound by foe rules and have 
complex guidelines to follow 
for gardens, flower pots and 
window boxes. 

One benefit derived from 
these rules is that watering 
must be restricted to the barest 
minimum needed to keep 
plants alive. Severe water 
rationing has already been 
introduced to restore Israel's 
dwindling supplies, and a 
follow year should help to 
build up foe natural reservoir. 


50 boat people 
rescued off 
Philippines 


San Fernando (Reuter) — 
Fifty Vietnamese refugees 
have been rescued off foe 
northern Philippines after 
drifting for more than two 
months at sea, foe military 
said yesterday. 

A spokesman said foe refu- 
gees were rescued by fisher- 
men from a boat off foe coast 
of Agoo in La Union province. 


The refugees told military 
and government officials they 
left Vietnam in July. 


Swindlers rounded up 
in Thai tourism drive 


Bangkok (Reuter) — A po- 
lice crackdown on criminals at 
important tourist spots in 
Thailand has led to a 40 per 
cent drop in complaints from 
foreign visitors, police said 
yesterday. 

Colonel Chalermdej 
Chompunut, commander of 
foe Tourist Police unit, said 
that since foe action started 
almost 400 people had been 
arrested for swindling for- 
eigners at top tourist spots 
such as foe resort island of 
Phuket, Pattaya Beach and 


Chfong Mai. 

He did not say when the 
crackdown started. 

The police had found that 
tourists were being over- 
charged, made to pay for re- 
pairs to motor scooters fitted 
with old parts and charged for 
missing scooters which had 
been stolen by the owners. 

The police drive was tinted 
at promoting Thailand’s 
Tourism Year in 1987. Tour- 
ism has topped foe country’s 
foreign exchange earnings 
in the past few years. 


Fate of four 
Iran athletes 
still unknown 


Seoul - (Renter) — The 
whereabouts of four Ira nian 
athletes, who disappeared 
during the Asian Games here 
and are rumoured to be 
seeking asylum, were still 
unknown yesterday. 

A news conference by foe 
Iraqi Consulate foiled to take 
place. Asked whether the Ira- 
nians were in his custody, the 

Irani cnnstiLw'npral u ui. 


Iraqi consul-general said: “We 
have nothing more to say”. 

A South Korean offi cial said 
his. government knew nothing 


Error that carries threat for software industry 

n n i mr_ii_i-. ’« ■■ > j • • . <>,■.. ..... • • 


FVom Paul Vallely 
New York 


Mr Jin C umming s had 
almost finished preparing the 
tender that his construction 
company was to submit for a 
muIti-million-pouRd office 
complex in Miami when he 
realized a vital figure had been 
omitted. 


Not for the first time he felt 
thankful that he had been 
persuaded to boy a personal 
computer to take the drudgery 
Out of such work. Into his 
estimate he inserted the 
$250,000 (£174,000) for gen- 
eral costs which had bees 
overlooked. It appeared on the 
screen and on the subsequent 
prim-out. which he checked 
before dispatching his bid. 

It was some time after his 
tender had been accepted that 


he realized that, although the 
computer bad inserted the 
figure, it had not added It Into 
the overall totaL He checked 
through the instruction book- 
let which came with the 
“Symphony” software pro- 
gram, and decided it was foe 
software and not himself 
which was to Marne. 

Mr Cummings is now suing 
the manufacturer. Lotus 
Development Corporation, of 
Cambridge, Massachusetts, 
for the quarter of a million 
dollars he lost on the deal. The 
case has set the US computer 
industry buzzing, for if he is 
successful the implications for 
America’s still burgeoning 
software industry will be 
dramatic. 

Lotus says that Mr 
Cummin gsmade the 
of entering the figure at foe top 


of the column instead of in the 
middle. The builder’s lawyer, 
Mr John Sqoitero, is un- 
impressed by such disti- 
nctions. 

“They deliberately market 
these programmes to the no- 
sophisticated nser. Mr 
Commingsis not an expert and 
could not be expected to know 
that foe figure should not go at 
the top. The instruction book- 
let did not make that dear,” 
Mr Squitero said. 

“A manufacturer has to be 
responsible for the quality and 
merchantability of bis prod- 
uct. There is no legal reason 
why the computer industry 
should be exempt” 

Until now software manu- 
facturers have claimed a kind 
of exemption by including a 
“limited liability” guarantee 
with their products. These 


operate in Some instances by a 
written disclaimer which acc- 
ompanies the computer disc. 

Others depend on the legal 
distinction that the purchaser 
does not boy the actual com- 
puter program but only the 
right to nse it which rireum- 
vents some of his normal 
rights as a buyer. It is these 
issues which the case wj3) 
challenge. 

JLotUS IS Currently rfanming 
as its defence that its instruc- 
tion booklet is adequate and 
that the fanlt is Mr 
Cummins's. “One would 
have to be a very unsophis- 
ticated user not to understand 
it,” a spokesman for foe firm 
said. 


“We are a small com pany 
and if people made mistakes 
and sued ns for it, ft wouldn’t 
take too many cases before we 
had to dose,” one «M, 


Many firms are now con- 
tending that users should dou- 
ble-check work done by a 
computer. 


Mr Squitero is dismissive. 
“Double check? The reason 
people buy these computers is 
to avoid work, not to create it,” 
he said. 


But other software firms are 
worried by the repercussions 
of foe case. 


What everyone in the in- 
dustry dreads is an out-of- 
court settlement It would, Mr 
Martin Rinehart, the director 
of the Software Publishers’ 
Association, said, “leave the 
rest of its in die software 
industry with no clarification 
of the existing issues.” 


Reporters 
wounded in 
Cambodia 




(Reuter) — An 
Australian journalist has been 
shot and a Canadian newsman 
also reported wounded white 
accompanying guerrillas in 
north-west Cambodia. 

Sources said yesterday that 
Mr David Nason, aged 32, 
suffered face and chest injuries 
in clashes between Khmer 
People’s National Liberation 
Front (KPNLF) rebels and 
pro-Hanoi Cambodian troops. 

He writes for The Northern 
Territory Times in Darwin 
and The Australian of Sydney. 

The Canadian, Mr Robot 
Karniol in bis 30s, is a 
freelance for foe Far Easton 
Economic Review of Hong 
Kong. 

Less than a dozen reporters 
have crossed the heavily- 
mined border and deep into 
Cambodia since Vietnamese 
troops installed a pro-Hanoi 
government in Phnom Penh 
in 1979. 

The journalists are expected 
to arrive in Thailand for 
medical treatment They en- 
tered Cambodia with the non- 
Coramunist KPNLF rebels on 
September 1 7, hoping to reach 
Tonle Sap Lake. 

Mr Nason is the first West- 
ern journalist known to have 
been shot while on a foray into 
Cambodia with any of the. 
three groups in the United 
Nalions-backed guerrilla co- 
alition headed by Prince . 
Norodom Sihanouk. . . 




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The Big Bang: a revolution in the way money is managed produces a team of people worth £1 m 

in transfer fees and £2m in salaries 


'mimi 


OF THE CLOSET 


Revealing: happy Englishwomen 
who don’t plap their wardrobes 
but love dressing, up 


LOOK 


What lies 
in wait for 
the ‘Duke’ 
at the BBC. 


Waits 


MacGREGOR 


VICTORY 

OVER ALL THE ENEMIES WITHIN 


Where did you <ome in the Fun Run ? 






THE SUNDAY TIMES 


ALL THAT’S BEST IN BRITISH JOURNALISM 


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8 


THE TIMES SATURDAY OCTOBER 4 1986 



SPORTS 

DIARY 

Simon Barnes 


Six of the 
better 

lan Botham's instinct for drama is 
so complete that he managed to 
a last-gasp victory over Viv 
Richards without even knowing 
he was doing iL Wisden Cricket 
Monthly had decided to reward 
six-hitting batsmen in first-class 
cricket with the Basic Six 6-Hit 
Awards. By September 9, Rich- 
ards led the table with 34 sixes, 
followed by Hick, Gree nidge and 
Botham, all on 23. Botham had 
reached that figure despite missing 
two months of the season because 
of bis pot-smoking ban. Richards 
missed the last two matches of the 
season because of the troubles at 
Somerset: but his team-mate, 
Botham, also much moved by the 
county's woes, got aggressive. 

. in the penultimate match of the 
season be hit nine sixes in one 
innings. In his last innings of the 
season, on the third day of a rain- 
ruined match, Botham, wholly 
ignorant of his standing in the 6- 
hit competition, went out to bat 
and lasted only 12 tails. But in 
those 12 balls he scored 36 runs — 
with two sixes. That brought him 
level with Richards on 34. The tie- 
break factor was the highest 
number of sixes scored in a single 
innings: Botham’s freshly hit nine 
did the trick for him. The final 
table reads: Botham 34, Richards 
34, Hick 30, Greenidge 25, Uliey 
23, Warner 22, Bailey 21, 
Whitaker 21, and Stewart 20. 

Rose wars 

The Labour Party's new emblem 
is a red rose. Very tasteful This 
does not amuse the men of Rugby 
Union, not all of them solid left- 
wingers. For the England team 
play in white shirts with, em- 
broidered on the bosom, a red 
rose: a rose stunningly similar to 
the new emblem of socialism. As a 
propaganda coup, as a masterful 
piece of subliminal advertising. 
Labour's achievement is remark- 
able. But will the emblem be 
forever associated in the mind 
with glorious victories? I am sure 
the England players will be stimu- 
lated by the knowledge that they 
will now be playing for the prestige 
of the Labour Party. 


BARRY FANTONI 



‘Should appeal particnlariy to dabs 
with only a handful of supporters' 

Dark Arc 

The Arc, Europe's richest horse 

race, is run tomorrow and presents 

more problems than the Grand 
National in picking the winner. 
After prolonged meditation this 
column goes, rather conser- 
vatively, for Dancing Brave. 
Darara is the danger. 

Royal, ancient 

Don't throw away any old bits of 
golfing tat — they could be 
national treasures. Britain is to 
have a golfing museum, and in 
due course the public will be asked 
to donate dusty odds and ends for 
the greater glory of golf The 
British Golf Museum will be at St 
Andrews: the Royal and Ancient 
Golf Club already has many items 
for it, and will seek more in due , 
Course, dubs, balls, books, paint- 
ings, trophies, and all kinds of 
Other stuff that will reassure 
golfers that they are not alone in 
the universe: they are following a 
Jong and historical tradition of 
sporting folly. 

Firing the ashes 

'0 Australians, ever eager to make 
Tests against the old enemy sound 
more fatensa, are calling this 
printer’s series Clashes for the 
Ashes 

Hoddle Bros 

There’s only one Hoddle, Totten- 
ham Hotspur's supporters sigh as 
they watch their lovely Glenn 
strut his stuff. But they are wrong: 
there are two. Glenn has a brother 
called Carl, who is 19 and plays for 
Barnet in the GM Vauxhall Con- 
ference. the top league outside the 
fourdivisions. His manager. Bany 
Frv said: “He is six-foot-four, 
weighs 15 stone and looks like the 
heavyweight champion of the 
world. Bui he has good skills on 
the ball like his brother and could 
develop into a good player." 

Drive with care 

‘One does not normally think” of 
Lebanon as the ideal place for an 
international sporting event, but 
bexi weekend it is the stage for the 
Marlboro Rally des Momagnes. 
Forty cars will be taking pan in a 
1.000 km event. Won’t it be a 
little, er. dangerous? The or- 
ganizers say stiffly: “There have 
never been incidents in the past.” 


Since the post-Watergate revela- 
tions of American “coven 
action", the CIA has assumed the 
leading role in conspiracy theory 
formerly occupied by Jesuits, 
Freemasons and Jews. After the 
Soviet shooting down on Septem- 
ber 1. 1983. of the Korean airliner 
KAL007 (officially it should pbe 
KE007) it was utterly predictable 
that, since nobody on board 
survived to sue, the CIA rather 
than the Kremlin would soon be 
made the scapegoat. 

In October 1984 the Greek 
prime minister and conspiracy 
theorist. Andreas Papandreou, an- 
nounced that “the world is now 
convinced that KAL007 was on an 
espionage mission for the CIA". A 
few months later be told American 
TV that “if such a plane entered 
Greek airspace we too would have 
shot it down". (Not long after- 
wards a Soviet airliner strayed 
over the main Greek air force base 
without, however, causing a single 
fighter to scramble). In Britain the 
CIA conspiracy theory has at- 
tracted the considerable talents of 
the Oxford political scientist, 
R.W. Johnson, who suggests in his 
book Shootdown that KAL007 
was used as a probe to switch oo 
Soviet radars, whose operations 
could then be monitored by US 
intelligence. This “startling new 
theory" seduced even the Sunday 
Telegraph into reprinting its main 
findings last May. Johnson has 
none the less complained of “a 
semi-blackout" in publicity for his 
book which he attributes to an- - 
other conspiracy — this time 
“media control" by Mrs Thatcher 
(which, however, presumably 
does not extend as for left as the 
Sunday Telegraph). 

Curiously, the KGB, despite its 
monstrous record on human 
rights and an addiction to decep- 
tion operations going back over 
half a century, is now a less 
fashionable subject for conspiracy 
theorists than the CIA. Signifi- 
cantly, the Shootdown index con- 
tains numerous references to the 
CIA but not one for the KGB. 
Although only a conspiracy theo- 
rist could regard Johnson as a 
Soviet agent, the allegation that 
KAL007 was on a CIA espionage 
mission first surfaced as part of a 
Soviet disinformation campaign 
of the kind commonly involving 
Service A of the KGB's First Chief 
Directorate. 

The initial So viet reaction to the 
shooting-down of the plane, as to 
the Chernobyl disaster, was to 
deny that it had happened. Soviet 
fighters, explained Tass, had 
merely “tried to give assistance in 
directing it to the nearest airfield". 
When finally forced to admit the 
truth, the Soviet media fell back 
on the alternative strategy of using 
the CIA as a scapegoat. The 
evidence manufactured to support 
this di s-i n formatio n campaign in- 
cluded a report that Chun Byung- 
In, the captain, had boasted of 
previous intelligence missions for 
the CIA and had shown bis friends 
espionage equipment on his plane. 

The popularity of the CIA 
conspiracy theory, even in organs 
as remote from KGB control as- 
the Sunday Telegraph, can, how- 


Christopher Andrew contrasts two conflicting 
views of the KAL007 disaster and goes 
for the prosaic but commonsense approach 

CIA conspiracy 
— a theory at 
last shot down 



Shultz: an irresponsible use of military intelligence 


ever, scarcely be explained chiefly 
in terms of Soviet media 
manipulation. It has perhaps more 
to do with the popular belief, 
propagated by spy novels, that in 
the muiky world of intelligence 
nothing is ever as it seems and that 
the commonsense explanation 
cannot be the right one. One of the 
merits of Seymour Hersh’s new 
book. The Target Is Destroyed, is 
to show that the commonsense 
explanation is also much the most 
probable, that the plane strayed 
wildly off course through accident 
rather than design — probably 
pilot error in programming its 
navigation system. Failure to re- 
cover the black box makes it 
impossible to be certain what the 
error was, but Hersh shows how it 
could have happened. 

The main novelty of Hersh's 
book, however, is not his demo- 
lition of the conspiracy theory but 
his analysis of superpower re- 
action to the disaster. The initial 
Soviet response was highly con- 
fused. When KAL007 entered 
Soviet airspace, the air force 
command at Khabarovsk could 
find no secure channel of commu- 
nication to seek instructions from 
Moscow. After at least three 
attempts to communicate by code, 
it gave up and sent an un- 
scrambled message instead. After 
this confused exchange (mon- 
itored, like much else, by US 
signals intelligence) Khabarovsk 
reminded the command centre on 
Sakhalin Island (which KALOOT 


overflew) of the rules of engage- 
ment requiring visual identifica- 
tion of the intruder before 
shooting it down. Sakhalin ig- 
nored those rules. Flight 007 was 
destroyed by two missiles fired by 
a Soviet fighter pilot who failed to 
identify what he was shooting at/ 

The Soviet Union, never, of 
course, admits incompetence by 
its armed forces. What is more 
surprising is that the Reagan 
administration also refused to 
credit, at least in public, the ample 
evidence of Soviet incompetence 
provided by its own intelligence. 
Waving a secret intelligence re- 
port, George Shultz, the Secretary 
of Slate, immediately insisted 
there was no doubt that the Soviet 
air force knew exactly what it was 
doing: the Soviet pilot had identi- 
fied KAL007 as a civilian airliner 
and shot it down in cold blood. 

President Reagan took the un- 
precedented step of playing ex- 
cerpts from the' Soviet pilot's 
exchanges with his ground control 
in a dramatic television broadcast 
designed to demonstrate that 
“there is no way a pilot could 
mistake this for anything other 
than a civilian airliner". Ambas- 
sador Jeane Kirkpatrick played a 
further set of recorded excerpts at 
the United Nations. 

The certainties of all three were 
gradually undermined by ev- 
idence that the Russians had 
suspected that the plane was not a 
commercial airliner but an Ameri- 
can RC 135 intelligence aircraft. 


Not for the last time, the admin- 
istration damaged a powerful case 
against the Soviet Union by 
overstating it. The issue gradually 
shifted from Soviet responsibility 
for the deaths of 269 passengers 
and crew to the credibility of the 
American claim that the Soviet air 
force had deliberately shot down a 
civilian airliner- As it struggled to 
defend its original charge of 
deliberate, cold-blooded murder, 
the language of official spokesmen 
became increasingly tortured. 

Hersh. however, probably 
pushes his argument too far. He 
does establish that the Soviet air 
force suspected it was dealing with 
an RC 135. But he does not prove 
that it bad excluded the possibility 
that the intruder was a commer- 
cial airliner. In 1978 a Soviet 
fighter attacked another Korean 
airliner. Flight 902 from Paris to 
Seoul, also accidentally off course 
over Soviet territory. This time 
the plane's identity was dear, at 
least to the So viet fighter pilot who 
was given, and at first resisted, the 
order to shoot it down. On this 
occasion the airliner miraculously 
survived a missile attack with only 
15 passengers killed and wounded, 
and landed on a frozen lake. 

The KAL007 tragedy has large 
implications for American intelli- 
gence. In its desire to make its 
charges against the Soviet Union 
stick, the administration made 
unprecedented public use of sig- 
nals intelligence gathered by the 
NSA (the American GCHQ). It 
was almost as indiscreet earlier 
this year when it used Libyan 
intercepts as part of its campaign 
to justify its attack on Tripoli and 
Benghazi. Intelligence officers are 
entitled to feel that it is not a good 
idea to tell either the Russians or 
the Libyans about the interception 
of their communications. Presi- 
dent Reagan's use of signals 
intelligence has inevitably caused 
strains in the Anglo-American 
intelligence alliance. 

Few authors, even in the United 
States, have gained access to as 
much highly classified intelligence 
as Hersh has done. His sources 
inside and dose to US intelligence 
“risked much", as he acknowl- 
edges, in talking to him. 

They took tire risk, he believes, 
largely because of outrage at the 
administration’s misuse of intelli- 
gence. One analyst told Hersh 
that, while Shultz was claiming on 
television that the Soviet air force 
had without question deliberately 
destroyed a civilian airliner, “we 
were all saying, 'how can the son- 

of-a-bith do this he’s making 

political and corrupt use o 
intelligence" 

Once an intelligence commu- 
nity believes that its political 
masters are making partisan use of 
the material it provides, some of 
its members are bound to be 
tempted to try to put the record 
straight. 

© Ha— H—wpapen, IMS. 

Christopher Andrew is die author of 
Secret Service: The Making of the 
British Intelligence Community 
(Heinemann) and editor of Intelli- 
gence and National Security. 
Shootdown is published by Chatto & 
Wiiidus (£10.95) and The Target Is 
Destroyed by Faber (£9.95). 


uppose 

across the last years of Anthony 
CroslaiKfs life, so tragically cut 
short, a certain shadow fell? Gone 
or waning was that former self- 
assurance and inner certainty, 
amounting at one time almost to 
arrogance. In some ways he 
seemed to have become more 
human, more fallible, more genial 
more gently quizzical even in a 
way more apologetic. Yet one felt, 
perhaps wrongly, that — as once 
for another clever politician — it 
would never be glad confident 
morning again. 

If we seek a reason, perhaps we 
have already stumbled on iL Was 
it the shadow thrown by The 
Future of Socialism (1 956) and by 
its lesser successor. The Conser- 
vative Enemy (1962)? For this 
“foture of socialism" was no 
remote millennial Utopia, to be 
achieved in distant years to come 
by the patient selfless work of 
generations or. if sooner, by some 
shattering cataclysm. No. it was 
the immediate, practical and 
attainable future, to be started at 
once and to be pushed rapidly and 
effortlessly through, bringing in its 
train no paradise indeed, but 
valuable and measurable benefits 
to all save the rich and wicked few. 
It was socialism without tears. 
Crosland was thus condemned to 
live in his own future. He saw it 
and it didn't work. 

The Future of Socialism and its 
successor seemed at the time 
extremely optimistic books. All 
problems were solved or readily 
soluble, all hopes securely 
grounded. What was needed was 
boldness, “verve and determina- 
tion"; the risks were negligible. In 
1956 it was clear to him that “the 
British economy is behaving in a 
reasonably buoyant and produc- 
tive manner and there is certainly 
no sign of imminent collapse. The 
present rate of growth will 
continue." This being so. “ma- 
terial want and poverty and 
deprivation of essential goods will 
gradually cease to be a 

problem We shall want the 

advice not of the economists but 
of psychiatrists, sociologists and 
social psychiatrists." 

By 1 962 his optimism had by no 
means abated. “Something 
approaching full employment will 
be maintained in Britain", he said, 
“if only because the Conservatives 
know that a failure here would 
lead to defeat at the polls." 

At this point as elsewhere he 
displays his conviction that full 
employment can in all circum- 
stances be maintained by govern- 
ment action, such as a “continuing 
mild inflation", so swift and sure 
and harmless in its effects that it 
would be madness for any govern- 
ment not to lake it He thus 
ignores the possibility that infla- 
tion. in order to perform (or rather 
to strive vainly to perform) the 
beneficent tasks allotted to it by 
him and its other advocates, must 
become less and less mild, more 
and more rapid and progressive, 
always a little bit more than 
expected for “expected" inflation 
is discounted in advance and 
produces no effect on demand. He 


As Labour gets its policies together 
Colin Welch writes a prescient assessment 
of Anthony Crosland’s way ahead 

The socialist 
future in 
retrospect 


was fated to see an unprecedented 
inflation and high and rising 
unemployment 

What kept him so cheerful? It 
was not I fancy, any faith in any 
sort of socialism, his own son or 
any other, though I do not 
question his sincerity. No. para- 
doxical as it may sound, it seems 
rather to have 'been an incon- 
gruous. profound and comforting 
faith, itself irrational in the ability 
of capitalism somehow to keep 
going, to maintain growth and to 
enhance prosperity, even when 
deprived of all the discipline and 
rewards, the sticks and carrots 
hitherto thought essential to its 
success. 

How so? Was it not Crosland 
who first, or most memorably, 
suggested that profit need not be a 
dirty word to socialists, thus 
commending his work to an non- 
doctrinaire “men of goodwill"? It 
was indeed. Yet marie now with 
what qualifications he defends the 
profit motive. Profits and the 
market system are perfectly in 
order, yes — but only on two harsh 
conditions. One is that effective 
demand must be equalized, ie. 
that incomes must be rendered 
more equal. 

The other condition is that 
profits must be retained and not 
distributed, the penalty for the 
latter crime being swingeing tax- 
ation. This continuous “ploughing 
back” must, of course, have very 
adverse effects on the raising of 
capital for new firms and in- 
dustries. If existing firms hang on 
to all they gain, where is new risk 
capital to be found? Crosland 
everywhere neglects the needs and 
role of new businesses, and seems 
to overlook their importance to 
growth and innovation. 

Now we can readily see that the 
profits Crosland tolerates are prof- 
its which have lost much of their 
purpose, in so far as that purpose 
was to elicit and reward skill, hard 
work, risk-taking. The word 
"profit” remains but the lure, the 
reward have disappeared. Little 
reward will find its way into 
private hands; what does will 
promptly be redistributed. Tax- 
ation. he cries, must be made “to 
bile more deeply and more 
fiercely". 

Behind what Anthony Crosland 
urged may be discerned a failure 



to recognize any logical or just 
connection between production 
and distribution. He notes with 
resentment the prizes the free 
economy offers; he notes with 
some complacency the efforts it 
elicits and the wealth it creates. 
But he does not recognize, or if he 
recognizes does not emphasize, 
any link between the two. The first 
can safely be diminished, almost 
abolished, without affecting the 
supply of the latter. 

About nationalization itself his 
mind is equivocal and ambiguous. 
He reviews its past without enthu- 
siasm: “We now understand 
rather better that monopoly, even 
where it is public, has definite 
drawbacks." (Others might say 
especially where it is public for a 
public monopoly is far more 
durable than a private one. pro- 
tected as it normally is by statute 
and government interference from 
all change and competition.) 

Yet nationalization, thus firmly 
shown the door, soon comes 
clambering back in modified, but 
not less alarming, form through 
the window, ft is now id be 
“supple, flexible and relevant 
. • . to achieve certain definite 
socialist ends." Vast funds would 


accrue to the stale from that deep 
ahd-fierce taxation — ie, from the 
ruin of many independent busi- 
nesses. These funds would be used 
“generally to increase the area of 
public ownership” and to “extend 
public investment • in any 
direction " (my italics). Public 
boards would be set up to manage 
these funds and operations, at 
once “independent of the govern- 
ment in their day-to-day 
operations" and yet responsive to 
legitimate government requests, 
for instance “to play a consciously 
stabilizing role in the (stock) 
marker.” Crosland himself merci- 
lessly ridiculed the Labour Party’s 
ever-changing nationalization 
proposals which, as he said, 
constituted a vague, threat to the 
whole of private industry. 

Very well but what comfort 
could private industry derive from 
Crosland’s own approach, a blud- 
geon in both hands, taxation in 
this one, subsidized competition 
in that the first ready to fall 
everywhere, the second anywhere, 
“in any direction", setting u train 
a process which has no limit or 
term. 

Have I greatly overstated the 
case? Had he lived, Tony Crosland 
could have argued so, or indeed he 
could have rowed back and back 
until in the end his proposals were 
more in line with the “mixed-up 
variegated patterfi of ownership” 
which he thought essential to 
“guarantee personal liberty and 
the fragmentation of power.” On 
the other hand, our national 
experience in which so much has 
gone ill in ways which would have 
puzzled and disturbed Crosland 
does not suggest the case to be 
overstated. His road to socialism 
is less simple and certain than that 
of the left, more complicated and 
ambiguous, less obviously hostile 
to liberty and prosperity, the more 
insidious and ingratiating, thus all 
the harder to resist. 

How could non-socialists fail to 
be reassured by a man who calls 
not only for higher exports and 
old-age pensions but also for 
“more open-air cafes, brighter and 
gayer streets at night; later dosing 
hours for public houses, more 
local repertory theatres, better and 
more hospitable hoteliers and 
restaurateurs, brighter and cleaner 
eating houses, more riverside 
cafes, more pleasure-gardens on 
the Battersea model more murals 
and pictures in public places, 
better designs for furniture and 
pottery and women's clothes, 
statues in the centre of new 
housing estates, belter designed 
street lamps and tdephone kiosks, 
and soon ad infinitum . . .” 

What an enlivening prospect: 
Paris rather than Moscow, more 
Toulouse-Lautrec than socialist 
realism! Indeed, many non-social- 
ists have surveyed it with a certain 
bemused and hesitant goodwill, 
thinking it perhaps more friend 
than foe. as truly it contains 
elements of both. 

Adapted from an article published 
in Encounter in 1979 shortly after 
Anthony Crosland's death. 


Michael Kinsley 


Daniloffs big 
difference 


New York 

Suppose the KGB had never 
grabbed Nicholas DaniJoff. And 
suppose, in that circu m sta n ce, 
that the US' government had 
secured the liberation of two 
courageous Soviet dissidents such 
as Yuri Oriov and his wife Irina in 
exchange for nothing mean than . 
the release of a low-level Soviet 
agent such as Gennady Zakharov. 
There is no question that this 
would have been greeted by right- 
wing commentators as a brilliant., 
triumph ofhard-headed Reaganite 
diplomacy. 

After afl, the usual practice' 
when a Soviet diplomat- makes his 
spying too obvious is to evict him 
without ceremony and without 
negotiation (as Mrs Thatcher did 
by the dozen last year). It is true 
that Zakharov, unlike most, was 
operating without benefit of dip 
lo malic immunity. That may have 
been a violation of espionage 
etiquette, but it is hardly a 
distinction that lends itself to 
moral outrage: A Russian spying 
for the Soviet Union is not like an 
American spying for the Soviet 
Union. There is no reason why we 
should have wanted to send the 
hapless Zakharov to prison for 
life, especially at the cost of 
leaving Orlov in Siberia. 

AO logic suggests, therefore, that 
the actual deal that took place — - 
Zakharov for the Orlovs plus 
DaniJoff — should also be greeted 
as a Reagan triumph. We would 
happily have traded Zakharov for 
the Oriovs. Daniloff is gravy; the 
Russians gave him up for nothing. 
This strikes me as a great success. 
Yes, we have not punished the 
Russians for their outrageous 
seizure of an innocent journalist, 
just as we don’t punish them for 
afl the other things they do that 
morally offend ns. But we have . 
done what is more important 
denied item any practical benefit 
from their action, and thereby 
given them no incentive lo try the 
same stunt when the US next 
seizes a genuine spy. 

But logic is not the governing 
factor in the American reaction to 
the Daniloff deaL which is being 
greeted as a “fig leaf” (the domi- 
nant metaphor) for a president 
over eager for a summit Hard- 
liners are having fits. Even some 
liberal Democrats hove accused 
President Reagan of giving up too 
much, thereby positioning himself 
to give up too much in the more 
negotiations ahead on arms con- 
trol Reagan brings some of this 
grief on himself with his idiotic 
insistence that no deal took pfaoe. 
But there are other, equally amus- 
ing, explanations for the reaction. • 

My favourite is that the 
Daniloff story played itself out in 
the way it did because the Ameri- 


can die Russians decided to surest _ 
happened to be a journalist. This" 
contention pstn be verified almost 
sdentifically.lnl978 there was a 
g’mihr fpiyirfg- The US arrested 
two Soviet spies at the United* 
Nations. Three weeks later, in. 
Moscow, an American was^ 
dragged from his cat at a traffic. 
Kghl anH thr own into prison. Only •' 
that American was a businessman. - 
Eventually the Soviet spies were? 
released in exchange for the- 
businessman plus five dissidents .. , 
You possibly don’t even,, 
remember that episode. I didn'L It 
was reported on an inside page of 
The New York Times. The 
businessman’s name was Francis' 
Jay Crawford. Thanks to .a 
computerized data base called. 
Nestis, which stores and indexes, 
every word of the main .US*' 
newspapers and magazines, it .is/ 


Woodrow Wyatt 

A fistful of jobs 
in your pocket 


Everyone is worried about un- 
empfoyment The Labour Party 
and the Alliance play upon our 
guilt fadings to soften os into not 
complai n i n g about enormous tax 
increases to relieve unemploy- 
ment. Labour proposes that the 
nationalized industries take on a 
million workers who are not 
needed. If Labour wins the next 
election, councils are to be in- 
striicted-to employ more staff 
We are still conditioned by the 
welfare state to believe that it is 
governments which are respon- 
sible for the level of employment 
For brief periods they can have an 
effect, unnl the excess government 
spending takes its inevitable toll 
through inflation and increased 
wage demands to meet higher 
taxation, and brings the type of 
economic collapse with which we 
have become familiar. Then the 
government's spending plans are 
dramatically art and unemploy- 


ment resumes its upward path. 

There is little of permanent 
good that governments can do 
about unemployment It is not the 
government’s fault that our bal- 
ance of payments is fast deteri- 
orating and that last month saw a 
record gap between imports and 
exports. We are also to blame. We 
think sentimentally about the 
unemployed but stop short of 
personal action to help them. 

The excellent Think British 
Campaign, carrying out research 
with the Economist Intelligence 
Unit, found that the average 
couple with two children spends 
about £110 a week on consumer 
goods and services; £30 of it goes 
on imported goods. The propor- 
tion spent on British goods, sinks 
j. If the average household 
switched £5 a week from buying 
foreign to baying British, 580,000 ported, 
new jobs would be created within In IS 
two years. The consumer would 
not suffer because the British 
goods he would buy are just as 
good as the foreign. Here is 
practical; and painless philan- 
thropy within reach of everyone. 

For years after the last war 
Britain was the largest motor 
manufacturer in Europe. We 
hardly imported a car at all and 
our exports were magnificent; now 
nearly 57 per cent of our cars are. 
imported. In Japan less than I per 
cent are imported. Every, time we 
buy a foreign car we put someone 
out of work, though we may be the 
most compassionate Alliance or 
Labour supporter. If we were to 
buy 10 percent more British cars 
instead of foreign there would be 
an immediate effect on unemploy- 

menL 

We buy foreign cars for riot very 
solid reasons: fashion, impulse, . 


appearance, fitmentsAt the Tote,' 
where I am chairman, we have a=' 
rule that only British vehicles may 
be bought: a role that applies to au 
our suppiies,whercver there is a 
British equivalent. Most manage-' 
meats and individuals, as the . 
import figures show, do not 
attempt to bay British. Famous 
hottil chain* import furniture,' 
linen, china and . cutlery from 
Italy, Germany and Scandinavia. 
They could easily buy the equiva- - 
lent here. . 

fifty per cent of all men’s and 
boys’ woven shirts are imported. 
At Marks and Spencer, Bntiam’s' 
hugest retailer of shirts, all shirts 
are home produced; 75 per cart of 
Marks and Spencer footwear is. 
British made and the {apportion is 
going up, though nationwide 50. ‘ 
per cent of footwear is imported. 

Marks and Spencer are fantoos - 
for their quality and profits. By . 
taking the trouble to ensure that 
British manufacturers meet their 
quality and price standards they 
are responsible for maintaining 
much employment Some other 
lazge retailers are beginning to take 
similar pains, but most find if less 

trouble to buy from abroad. 

The European Court of Justice 
has made identification of foreign . 
goods harder fin: the -British 
customer. Anytime can come into . 
Britain from the EEC, even .if iL . 
was first bought from outside the. ' 
EEC, without any need to mark ft. 
as foreign made. The sole protec- 
tion is that it is a breach of the 
Trades Description Act to say 
something was made in Britain 
which substantially was not. All- . 
British producers should therefore 
mark their goods as British, so that- . 
the customer may understand that, ' 
not so marked are im- . 


1981 the import penetration 
of all manufactured goods was . ' 
25.5 percent. Today it is 33- per- - 
cent and rising. If we do not afl - . 
make a conscious effort to buy. . 
British, imports are forecast to go 
up by an average of 3.6 per cent a ‘ 
year, which will cause still more- 
unemployment . 

Strikes and trade union res trk>~ 
tive practices and wage increases ~<- 
without corresponding productive, 
ity are the cause ofone- million- 
more unemployed than there 
would otherwise have ._ been,- . 
according to ' Professor Patrick, v 
Minfbrd of Liverpool University's 
research group in economics. Bur 
the great mass of unemployment-^ 
is down, to us, whether as con- 
sumers or- managers. We. can 
actually do sometfung aboul it if 
instead of parading oar. con- 
sciences,- . we consciously parad^ ' 
our pockets and buy British, v • ' r \ . 

' t- 


i 


: to make a rough compari- 
son of the coverage of the. 
Crawford and Daniloff cases, The^ 
entire Crawford cycle, from arrest 
to release over several months,* 
produced 68 articles with hi? 
name in than. By comparison, up/ 
to September 23, three weeks after, 
his arrest and before all the 
surrounding his release/ 
*s name had appeared in- 
433 articles, many of them page" . 
one. (There were 17 articles 
referring to Crawford in the three, 
weeks after Danfloff s arrest — not, 
too many fewer than in the same- ' 
period after his own artest eight 
years ago.) 

There was not a peep of protest 
erven from hardliners, about- the* 
Crawford deal — even though the 
president at the time was the- 
supposedfy weak-kneed Jimmy' 
Carter. It took the Reagan admin- . 
istration a little while to discover; 
that the Daniloff story was going 
to work out differently. At first the: 
administration expected the usual; 
pressure not tollman “unfortunate 
incident” Mode the search , for 
peace, and so on. Instead, in terms- 
of press slant, this one has,iurned; 
out to be a gift for hardliners. ' 

So ft is aim amusing that 
hardliners seem to be using their, 
special leverage in this case quite 
stupidly. After afl, in the larger 
diplomatic game, the “winner” of 
a deal tike the Daniloff swap- 
depends on which ride is seena£ 
the winner. American political 
consultants have a wonderful term, 
fin* this: “spin control" (after the, 
baseball technique of putting a 
spin on the ball). What has been; 
going on in the Daniloff case is 
negative spin control: timung an' v 
actual victory into a perceived* • 
defeaL Perhaps the Russians knew - 
what they were (|aing when they ._ 
grabbed a journalist, after afl. ; . 
The author is editor qf Nete-’ 
Republic. . ' 


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Ksas 5 - 5 *-*«; 

The impact of the new 

S‘°Z “hi South 

United States -its biggest 

ihS ± ,h Sena -S rs acknow Iedge 
SS ^ ey not apart- 
held overnight. Pretoria has 
been bracing itself for the 
shock which, as President 
Reagan himself has warned, 
will probably be felt more by 
the country’s blacks than by 
anyone else But the telephone 
call which Mr “Pik" Botha so 
unwisely made to the Senate 
before the vote, reflects real 
concern in Pretoria over the 
damage 

It is equally had news for 
Britain and those other coun- 
tries wfajch have firmly op- 
posed amilar pressures in 
Europe. Whitehall has tried to 
portray the American package 
as an attempt by Washington 
to eaten up on the Europeans 
— who /introduced their own 
measuijbs last month. But 
these hardly match those now 
adopted by Congress. To a 
large extent, Britain and West 
Germany (the two nations 
most opposed to tougher mea- 
sures! have already passed the 
main pressure points. But the 
Dutch and Danish govern* 
metis will make sure that the 
sie resurfaces at the next 
ing of Community for- 
m misters in three weeks 
with a ban on coal 
)rts looking like the most 
lpting target 


It could also become bad 
news for a number of land- 
locked front-line states in 
Southern Africa, however loud 
their welcome for the outcome 
on Capitol HiJL The White 
House is prepa ring to balance 
the negative effect of sanctions 
wth proposals for increased 
'aid for Southern Africa — 
concentrating effort on re- 
gional transport But if Pre- 
toria carries out its threat to 
impose sanctions of its own on 
those countries which now 
have to channel about four- 
fifths of their external trade 
through South Africa, the re* 
gjon will need more than the 
$500 million extra aid which 
is being talked about in Wash- 
ington. 

Bui the heaviest impact of 
all should be felt m Wash- 
ington itself, where Repub- 
lican congressmen, with mid-_. 
term elections coming' lip, 
could come to regret inflicting 
on President Reagan his first 
major foreign policy reverse in 
six years. Rebellious senators 
have argued that this was an 
issue on winch ordinary 
Americans felt more deeply 
than their president. They 
wanted to be on the right side 
of history. By voting for 
sanctions. Congressmen were 
reflecting, not opposing, public 
opinion. 

The sanctions package has 
certainly left no doubt over US 
opposition to apartheid. But 
few people in the United States 
have more than a confused 
idea of the political situation 
in South Africa. That sanc- 
tions might do more harm 
than good is a danger still too 
little understood. What this 
week's events have done is to 
weaken the president’s po- 
sition just before a crucial 
summit with the Russians. It is 
arguable that the issues at the 
summit are so different that 
the sanctions vote will do him 


little harm. But it wiH have 
done him no good either. 

The entire episode dem- 
onstrates that in democratic 
politics negative opposition, 
however justified rationally, is 
rarely sufficient. A political 
leader who wishes to prevail 
must produce a positive policy 
that has prospect of meeting 
the objectives of his. oppo- 
nents. Congress was deter- 
mined to pass some package of 
measures that would have a 
real impact on South Africa. 
When Mr Reagan failed to 
outline a pr o gra mme of assis- 
tance to South Africa's blacks 
that would undermine apart- 
heid by a different and more 
hopeful route, sanctions were 
apparently the only, method of 
intervention left to them. 

Should Mr Reagan have 
tried to preempt the Senate 
vote by adopting virtually aH 
the measures in an executive 
order of his own. If that tactic 
had succeeded. Congressmen 
would have got what they 
wanted while he would have 
retained control of foreign 
policy, giving the White House* 
more flexibility in its future 
relations with Pretoria. But 
sanctions had become a sym- 
bol of opposition to apartheid 
in US politics and it is 
probable that a last- min ute 
concession from the White 
House would have made little 
or no difference. 

In the end the President 
took the view that to endorse 
sanctions now would both 
have made nonsense of his 
previous opposition and re- 
strained him from attempting 
to overturn them in the future 
if their consequences tended to 
justify his worst fears. He has 
metaphorically shrugged off 
responsibility for the new mea- 
sures. leaving Congress to take 
the rap. But whether he or the 
Senate has indeed chosen the 
right side of history, only 
history itself can reveaL 


MR KINNOCK’S MODERATION 


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IT 


ikbour began, conducted and 
fnished its conference in a 
rood of disciplined euphoria.' 
fliis was such a remarkable 
rontrast to Labour’s usual 
exhibition of ideological free- 
style wrestling that It has been 
widely heralded as an early 
portent of electoral success. 
Labour, so the theory goes, will 
enter the next election as a 
united party, devoted to mod- 
erate policies, organised by an 
efficient party machine, and 
headed by an adroit and 
personable leader in Neil 
Kin nock. 

Even allowing for the feet 
that the delegates' euphoria at 
Blackpool apparently rubbed 
off on the press and television, 
this judgement of the Labour 
conference contains much that 
is true. The conference was 
well-managed, the presenta- 
tion skilful, and Mr Kinnock’s 
personal performance assured. 
Above all the party was united 
- and other things being equal, 
a united party is more likely to 
attract the support of voters 
than a disunited one. 

The result has been a series 
of temporary' compromises 
that lean heavily to the left 
Perhaps the purest example of 
this is the decision, after a 
wholly inadequate debate, to 
phase’ out nuclear power over 
an unspecified period. The 
promise to phase out is a 
concession to the combined 
forces of the Left and the- 
miners, neatly joined in Mr 


Arthur ScaigiD, whereas the 
indefinite- chara cter of the 
phasing out period (one union 
leader suggested between 20 
and 120 years) has kept' the 
other power anions quiets 

Plainly, that is a com- 
promise that cannot be main- 
tained for long. And what is 
true for the compromise on 
nuclear power also goes for 
those on the economy, de- 
fence, foreign policy, .and 
much else. Labour’s is a 
“white-knuckle unity” main- 
tained by grim will-power 
against nature. The only ques- 
tion is whether it can survive a 
heated election campaign. 

Potentially more damaging 
to Labour is the character of its 
policies on defence and the 
economy. Even on the indul- 
gent interpretation of Mr 
Hattersley’s spending plans 
offered by the Institute of 
Fiscal Studies, Labour will 
have to find more money than 
will be raised by higher taxes 
on those earning above 
£27,000. Public opinion is 
traditionally suspicious of 
Labour’s competence in eco- 
nomic and fiscal matters — as 
older Labour MPs win recall 
from the 1959 election in 
which Hugh Gaitskell's plans 
for higher spending, depicted 
as irresponsible by the Tories, 
were a significant factor in his 
defeat 

On defence. Labour has 
firmly attached itself to a 
unilateralist policy which the 


in 

FOURTH LEADER 


voters have equally firmly 
rejected in previous elections. 
It threatens a status quo which 
has maintained peace in 
Europe at a time when wars 
have raged in areas of the 
world outside Nato’s nuclear 
umbrella. And it will be de- 
nounced not merely by Min- 
isters but by most newspapers, 
defence experts, other Oppo- 
sition parties, and even some 
former Labour Ministers, who 
remain true to their convic- 
tions in office. The chances 
must be that it will become a 
serious vote loser for Labour. 

The defence issue may also 
direct the attention of voters to 
, the more general question of 
Labour’s “moderation” which 
is largely an illusion achieved 
by moving the entire spectrum 
of Labour opinion to the Left. 
It was said by commentators 
yesterday that hard-line de- 
mands that Britain should 
leave Nato had been rejected 
by the conference. But the 
policy actually passed' — to 
remove all US nudear bases 
from Britain in the first year of 
a Labour government — would 
have been regarded as wildly 
extreme in the party of James 
Callaghan and Harold Wilson. 

Labour has changed 
dramatically — and the Black- 
pool conference ratified the 
change quietly. But it should 
not be assumed that the voters 
wifl fefi to recognise the change 
for all that. 


Unilateralism called in question 

From Viscount Trenchant 


. v 


.. V 


„ ,W ■ 


Now that the nation has 
recovered from the excess of 
bliss represented by the wed- 
ding of Prince Andrew to the 
then Miss Sarah Ferguson, a 
more critical scrutiny may 
with propriety be directed to 
one aspect of it that has 
profound ceremonial and even 
constitutional implications, it 
was reported in the Church 
Times that Miss Ferguson 
piiehted her troth m West- 
minister Abbey while puttng 
forward her left hand, contrary 
to the rubrics of the Book of 
Common Prayer, which de- 
mand the right „_ T1t 

It is a pity that Parliament 
did not attend to this innova- 
tion before the recess. That 
institution’s . augu .? t a . E ^ 1 ^t 
tical Committee has rec^uy 
required of the Church of 
England, as a P n « ^ 
consent to women bemg al 
lowed to be deacons, that a 

certain rubric be changed from 

“shall” to “may (or 1 ^ 
versa). Perhaps a similar 
adjustment to the 
marriage would take care o 

m^^^cular^ £ 

dtn n mlSn f ai" 

handed 


It is a comfort that a 
spokesperson for the Arch- 
bishop of Canterbury has 
given an assurance that wrong- 
handedness in matters of mar- 
riage ritual is not per se 
grounds for nullity. It seems 
unlikely that Miss Ferguson is 
a secret Ritualist,, trying to 
sneak sinister Italian church 
practices past the Primate of 
All England . 

But given the speed with 
which dress designers ensure 
that not-quite-carbon copies of 
the Wedding Dress were in all 
the appropriate shops next 
day, and given the alacrity 
with which a certain hair style, 
prominent at an earlier Royal 
Wedding, became overnight 
the standard in every High 
Street, it is too much to hope 
that this is the last we shall 
hear of left-handed plight- 

tro thing. . „ - 

Is it not true that Queen 
Victoria's grasping of a 

chicken drum-suck (whether 

with left or right hand is not 
reported) was the si^ial for the 
general adoption of this easy 
solution to a hitherto urcky 
challenge to manipulative 
skills? is it not also true (or was 

it just .another jibe from Ron- 
ald Knox?) that a prelatial felse 


step at a Roman Mass became 
the overnight fashion in An- 
glo-Catholic circles, who be- 
lieved the Vatican had 
introduced an extra genuflex- 
ion? 

There is therefore no weight 
in the dismissive approach to 
matters of etiquette and rubric; 
the idea that grown-ups have 
. better things to worry about 
These are the better things. 
The road that begins with an 
accidental preferring of- an 
aboui-to-be royal - left-hand 
ends with , royal weddings 
under water in swimming 
pools. And we have no reason 
to think Dr Runcie would look 
well in snorkel gear with 
rubber flippers. 

The Gown Appointments 
Commission would start 
considering candidates for his 
succession, when that comes 
due. on an entirely felse basis: 
the ability to maintain an aura 
of primacy in submarine 
circumstances. It would be 
rather better if the Archbishop 
were to revise his recent 
assurances: a wrong-handed 
approach to .marriage, he 
should say, is an ancient Royal 
Prerogative and a privilege of 
brides of naval officers, no-one 
else. 


Sir. Further to your interesting 
leader article on Tuesday, Septem- 
ber 30. on defence, and now that 
-we have had the benefit of bearing 
parts of Mr Kinnock’s speeches at 
the Labour Party conference, I 
would expect that other readers 
have been wondering, as I have, 
why such an intelligent man as Mr 
Kinnock has taken up such an 
extreme position, not only of 
unilateral nuclear disarmament 
but of forgoing any request to be 
covered by the US nudear deter- 
rent. 

I have a feeling that the answer 
must lie in two directions. 

The first is that he and his 
colleagues must believe that the 
Russians will never use nuclear 
weapons against Europe and 
presumably that they will never 
threaten their use in order to 
obtain any objective. He is en- 
titled to his opinion of the modem 
objectives from Moscow, but it 
can only be an opinion in relation 
to. an all-powerful leadership in 
the Kremlin, both present and 
future at any time- this century. 1 
bdiev&'the British -public would 
prefer, a sound insurance policy. 

The- second reason for his 
current position must, I think, be 
that he has believed those ad- 
vocates who surest that if we 
cancel Trident and use modern 
technology efficiently, and if our 
Allies will Increase conventional 
arms by some 3 per cent, then we 
would be able to deter a Russian 
conventional attack. Lord Carver 
has been an advocate of this theme 
for a long time. 

Once again, however, Mr 
Kinnock must realise that this, 
like Soviet aims, is no more than a 
thesis, a thesis which is bound to 
take the best pan of a decade to 
prove. It is a thesis which suggests 
that the trend of the past decade, 
during which the R ussians have 
tended to close the technological 
gap with the West, would be 
instantly reversed. 

When I was at the Ministry of 
Defence all concerned were ac- 
tively trying to promote the 
strengthening of conventional 
weapons by the use of modern 
technology; but I don't think any 
of those with up-to-date experi- 
ence would claim that we are 
moving substantially faster than 
the Russians at the present timi*. 

Wishful thoughts are attractive 
to politicians, but the facts at the 
moment are that in conventional 
arms in the European area the 
Russians have twice the fire power 
on land and in the air, and if we 
look globally at the two super* 
powers on the figures of the 
International Institute for Strate- 
gic Studies, we find such figures as 
US overall strength of tanks, 
13.423; USSR. 52,600. ..** ; 


In my view the Government has 
been slow and reluctant to es- 
timate the real costs of raising the 
nuclear threshhold. Unless and 
until we have again widened the 
technological gap; we need to 
double Nato’s conventional fire 
power if we are to rely on 
conventional forces to deter or 
prevent a successful Russian con- 
ventional assault 

This would not of course, mean 
doubling defence budgets because 
overheads and R & D (research 
and development) win not need to 
be substantially increased, but 
certainly, in my view, means 
something of the order of 50 per 
cent and, having done it, we are 
still open to nudear blackmail if 
we did not have either our own 
nuclear deterrent and did not 
continue to rely on and request the 
American endear deterrent 
Yours faithfully. 

TRENCHARD, 

House of Lords. 

October 2. 

From Mr Anthony Jacob* - ■ - — 
. Sir, -Why-is there Tocb astonfelP~ 
meat dial .the Liberal Party -is 
apparently equally divided be- 
tween those who favour maintain- 
ing a nuclear deterrent until such 
time as there is a substantial 
agreement on disarmament and 
those who favour no further 
development of nudear weapons 
when the present nudear weapon 
systems become obsolete? 

This problem clearly does not 
trouble either the Conservative or 
Labour parties for in the former 
case there must be 90 per cent 
support for maintaining a maxi- 
mum nuclear deterrent, including 
the development of Trident, and 
in the latter case there must be at 
least 90 per cent support for 
immediate abolition of all nudear 
weapon systems. 

It becomes abundantly clear, 
therefore, that the country is very 
nearly equally divided on this 
subject, and unlike the other two 
parties the Liberal/SDP Alliance 
gathers its support from a cross- 
section of the British electorate 
and the views within the parties 
reflect the division that exists in 
the country as a whole. 

Presumably, if Labour wins the 
next election outright it win claim 
a mandate to abolish all nuclear 
weapons and if it is then followed 
by a Conservative government 
they would reinstate nudear 
weapons. The Liberal/SDP- Alli- 
ance is seeking to find a rational 
compromise between these two 
extremes. 

Yours sincerely, 

ANTHONY JACOBS (Joint . „ ' 
Treasurer of the Liberal Party), 

9 Nottingham Terrace, NW1. 
September 29. . 


Credit where dine 

From Mr G. J. Beers 
Sir, 1 find it very sad that, 
immediately following the 
announcement of Mr Danfloffs 
release, we are subjected to an 
analysis on television as to 
whether it is Mr Reagan or Mr 
Gorbachov who has been “forced" 
to compromise and has therefore 
“dim bed down". 

In this country it is the same 
every time a public figure changes 
his or her mind, or agrees with 
something with which they have 
previously disagreed — they are 
portrayed as having been humili- 
ated, this being the word most 
frequently used. 

Why should this be? The pur- 
pose of any debate or negotiation 
is to bring about a change of mind . 
in at least one of the parties, and if 
this is achieved then surely it is to 
be welcomed and not belittled. We 
all know that in our personal fives 
we are continually- -changing our 
views or-attitudes with changing 
circumstances. This is not to- say 
that we are changing our prin- 
ciples, merely that we are being 
reasonable in reaching an accom- 
modation with our colleagues and 
neighbours. 

Why should it be that a public 
figure cannot behave in a reason- 
able manner without being deni- 
grated? It must make their work 
even more difficult than it already 
is. 

Yours faithfully, 

G. J. BEERS, 

Lameflan, 

Cherry Garden Lane, 

Maidenhead Thicket, Berkshire. 


Aids reassurance 

From Dr Felix Mann 
Sir, There has been a great deal pi 
publicity in the Press and on radio 
and television about the danger of 
contracting Aids from doctors’ 
needles. 

In my own acupuncture prac- 
tice, where needles are a sine rpta 
non. reputable practitioners use 
disposable needles, thus obviating 
an/posability of infection. 
r People needing treatment have 
the option of telephoning before- 
hand to find out whether the 
doctor to whom they are entrust- 
ing their health does or docs not 
take this elementary precaution. 
Yours sincerely, 

FELIX MANN, 

. 1 5 Devonshire Place. Wl. 
S e ptember 29. 


Oat of sight 

From Lord Craigton 
Sir. One knows the person, but 
cannot remember the name. A 
name label is worn, but foe print is 
so small or indistinct that it 
cannot be read without bending 
down and peering- thus revealing 
one’s sodal shortcoming. 

Would meeting organisers 
please provide name labels with 
the wearer's name large and dear 
enough to be read at a glance? 
Yours faithfully, 

CRAIGTON. 

36 Station Road, Egham, Surrey. 


Arrests In Prague 

From the President of the Inter- 
national Jazz Federation and 
others 

Sir, We write to express oar 
astonishment and indignation at 
.the arrest in Prague of leading 
members of the Jazz Section of the 
Musicians’ Union of Czecho- 
slovakia. As implied in your 
leader (September 29) the Jazz 
Section has been persecuted by the 
authorities for no other reason 
than that it is autonomous and 
popular. 

A State which regards itself 
threatened by a jazz dub is 
certainly not a normal member of 
the international community; and 
a State which is prepared to 
Imprison innocent people in order 
to stifle independent culture is one 
with which her Majesty’s Govern- 
ment ought not to deal as an equaL 

The Jazz Section is a member of 
the International Jazz Federation 
and we call on all members of that 
federation to express their support 
for theif "persecuted collea gu es. 
We also can on her Majesty’s 
Government to bring pressure to 
bear on the Czech authorities, 
whose action has violated the 
spirit and the letter of foe Helsinki 
accords, and put in question the 
future of cultural relations be- 
tween Czechoslovakia and the 
West. 

An opportunity to do this will 
be presented at the Helsinki 
review conference in Vienna in 
November, and it is an opportu- 
nity which must be taken. 

Yours sincerely. 

(HAR1I5 ALEXANDER (Resident, 
International Jazz Federation), 
NORMAN St JOHN-STEVAS. 
TOM STOPPARD, 

KINGSLEY AMIS. 

.194 Regent’s Park Road, NWl. 

Posthaste 

From Ml J. A- Satterr 
Sir. .-The Chairman of the Post 
Office is surely being disingenuous 
and complacent in remarking 
(letter, October 3) that the four 
letters you published were deliv- 
ered by foe next working day: 
obviously within that space of 
lime you could only publish those 
you had received- What about all 
foe other letters posted at foe same 
time and which are perhaps still in 
the course of delivery? 

I hope. Sir, you will forgive me 
if I remain sceptical and send 
these thoughts to you by telex. 
Yours faithfu lly, 

J.A.BATTEN, 

4 North Quay, 

St Peter Port, Guernsey. Cl. 

From Miss J. H. F. Great 
Sir, Would not the Chairman of 
the Post Office (report, September 
27) be compelled to revise his 
suspect figures relating to delivery 
times of letters if all dissatisfied 
recipients reported late delivery to 
their local postmaster? 

Yours faithfully. 

J. H. F. GREEN. 

Pool Meadow, 

Back Lane. Cross-in-Hand, 
HeathfiekL, Sussex. 


Appointment of 
BBC Chairman 

From Mr Leonard Miail 
Sir. Once again the appointment 
of a BBC Chairman (report, 
October 3) has been announced 
from Downing Street, apparently 
before its approval tty the Queen 
in Council. 

In foe past the Prime Minister 
used to consult foe Opposition 
before making a recommendation 
to the Monarch and the Privy 
Council of an appointment to a 
body incorporated by royal char- 
ter. This was because those so 
appointed, such as BBC gov- 
ernors, remain in office for their 
statutory terms despite changes in 
government 

Such Crown appointees cannot 
be removed for political reasons, 
although the dismissal of the 
complete board of governors of 
the BBC was contemplated on one 
occasion 20 years ago, when they 
resisted the proposal to take 
advertising on the Light Pro- 
gramme- 

Like his predecessors. Sir Alec 
Douglas-Home consulted ihe 
Opposition before putting forward 
foe name of Lord Normanbrook, 
the Iasi BBC Chairman io die in 
office before the untimely death of 
Stuan Young. However, Mien the 
news of Harold Wilson’s intention 
to switch Lord Hill of Luton from 
the chairmanship of foe Indepen- 
dent Television Authority to the 
BBC as Norman brook's successor 
leaked prematurely, there was no 
imer-party consultation. 

Lord Hill’s appointment was 
hastily announced from Downing 
Street on July 26, 1 967. the Acting 
Chairman of the BBC, Sir Robert 
Lusty, being told that the Queen 
had had to bold an emergency 
Privy Council meeting at 
Goodwood racecourse that day! In 
fact ihe Queen was put in the 
position of having formally to 
approve the appointment at a 
regular Privy Council meeting at 
Buckingham Palace two days 
later. 

It would be nice to see the 
conventions, as well as the courte- 
sies, of appointment by the Queen 
in Council, after . inter-party 
consultation, restored. 

Yours fahbftiJly, 

LEONARD M1ALL. 

Maryfidd Cottage, 

Taptow Village. 

Maidenhead, Berkshire. 

From Lord Goodman, CH 
Sir, May L from a firmly non-Tory 
viewpoint, be permitted to express 
the view thai the immoderate 
attacks on the appointment of Mr 
' “Dnfe” Hussey are iBjodged and 
extremely nnrair. It would be 
common sense to judge him by his 
performance and not by un- 
informed speculation about his 
likely attitudes. 

I can speak with a knowledge in 
depth of Mr Hussey’s character 
and behaviour. He was Deputy 
Chairman of foe Newspaper 
Publishers Association for several 
years under my chairmanship. In 
that time no one tried harder to 
create good relationships with the 
numerous unions concerned; no 
one could more inappropriately be 
regarded as a union-basher. 

I should be astonished if what- 
ever his success or otherwise in his 
new appointment, he can be 
charged with unfairness or prej- 
udice against unions or any legiti- 
mate political party. 

Yours faithfully, 

GOODMAN, 

9-1 1 Fulwood Place. 

Gray’s Inn, WC1. 

October 2. 

U nfair shares 

From Mrs Hilary Kerr 
Sir, The massive over-subscrip- 
tion of the TSB sale points to the 
likelihood of a similar application 
for shares in British Gas in 
November. Quite rightly TSB 
customers have received priority; 
British Gas have a priority scheme 
which guarantees registered cus- 
tomers at least £250 worth of 
shares (report, October 2). 

However there is one fun- 
damental difference between the 
two offers. Any one of us could 
have become a TSB customer 
before foe qualifying date and 
thereby gained priority in our 
share application. With British 
Gas this is impossible. Many of us 
are not customers through no fault 
of our own. In our case foe main is 
almost a mile away fry road, in 
others much further. 

Had we chosen not to have gas 
in foe first place, fair enough; but 
we seem to: .be discriminated 
against purely on a geographical 
basis. - 

Yours faithfully. 

HILARY KERR. 

2 Colinetie Cottages. 

Chart Lane. 

Brasied, Westerbam, Kent. 

From Mrs J. D. Chicken 
Sir, TSB pins (fetters, September 
27. 30): why not send them to 
British Gas? 

Yours faithfully. 

JEAN D. CHICKEN. 

13 Bankside Close, 

Bacup, Lancashire- 

Personal affront 

From Mr C. R. Jones 
Sir. The difference that Mr J. M. 
Meade (October 2) is seeking 
surely lies in the fact that fob 
commander of ihe ship is commu- 
nicating his situation, albeit the 
ship is m a similar state. 1 cannot 
believe that the announcement, 1 *! 
am temporarily out of action", 
indicates foe present situation of 
foe bank manager. 

Yours sincerely. 

C. R. JONES. 

24 Alhambra Road. 

Soufosea. Hampshire. 


OCTOBER 4 1873 

The Atlantic was first crossed in a 
balloon in August, 1978. The 
instigator of this earlier attempt 
was John Wise (1808-7$), He 
quarrelled with his backers and 
did not take pan in the flight, 
which was made by Washington 
Donaldson. George Lunt and 
Alfred Ford. The balloon crashed 
at New Canaan, Connecticut. 


THETRANSAlLANnC BALLOON 

VOYAGE- — Tbe process of inflat 
ing the balloon had been going on 
all day (September 12). and, as the 
afternoon advanced, it seemed as if 
everything would turn out success- 
fully. The people lounged and 
goanpped. were as patient as 
possible under the circumstances, 
and were, of course, in a state of 
high expectan cy . Presently a pretty 
large report was heard, accompa- 
nied by a nshing sound, and 
everybody looked toward the bal- 
loon, in the top of which a large 
rent was observable. Tbe escaping 
gas extended the rent still further, 
and in less than a minute the 
balloon bad entirely collapsed, the 
failure of the affair being greeted 
with a pretty general expre ss io n of 
good-humoured derision. At the 
time that the balloon bom it 
appeared to be inflated to tbe 
extent of about two- thirds or 
perhaps three-quarters its capaci 
ty. What was the actual cause of, 
the collapse is. of course, a matter 
of some doubt, and a good deal of 
surmise. Tbe inferiority of tbe 
material would appear to be the 
primary cause, and then, again, it 
is affirmed that during the process 
of inflation the netting was held 
too tight. It is certain, at eD events, 
that the balloon bulged through the 
netting, but how far this circum- 
stance may have tended toward the 
result which came about is only a 
matter of speculation. Tbe r epo rt 
era of a score of journals rushed 
around Steiner and the GoodseDs 
immediately after the collapse. All 
at once a circle was formed, with 
Mr. Steiner in the centre, and this 
central figure proceeded to explain 
the cause of the rapture. U A balloon 
of cotton," said Mr. Steiner, “of 
this sire cant be constructed 
strong enough to stand the infla- 
tion, with the wind of tbe last half 
hour" (there had been no wind to 
speak of) “a surface presenting 
4,000 square feet of canvas, equal 
to the sail of the largest ship afloat, 
and the pressure of 7,000 pounds 
[against the crown of the balloon. 
The material weighs 4,000 pounds, 
afl concentrating at tbe valve, 
don’t believe a suk balloon of the 
same size would stand the pressure, 
except enclosed in a bag of cotton, 
and without netting. No bag of this 
size haB ever been inflated, so that, 
a certain sense, it is an 
experiment. At the time of the 
explosion there was 325,000 feet of 
gas in the balloon. She parted at 
the valra, and split into three 
pieces, and turned inside out. The 
cause was not the pressure of the 
gas alone, but the breeze as welL I 
always had a doubt of the ability to 
inflate it. I thought today it waa so 
calm I could inflate it, but the wind 
coming on made it impossible.” At 
this time a knot of gentlemen were 
tearing strips from a piece of the 
balloon doth they bad somehow 
obtained, as easily as if it were 
paper. A word from any self- 
constituted leader to the crowd 
would have resulted disastrously. 
The multitude, who had shown 
great patience, would have done 
mil Aunng p to the b unding bal- 
loonists if anyone had raised a cry 
against them. As it happened they 
passed away quietly. Professor 
Wise, who was afterwards visited 
at his residence, stated that before 
the accident occurred he had an 
irreconcilable difference with the 
Messrs. Goodsell, and had alto- 
gether abandoned the idea of 
taking any further part in the 
matter, but it was' afterw a r ds 
understood between them that be 
should make the ascension. The 
difference related to his engage- 
ment with a publisher to write a 
bode to be entitled Through foe 
Air. The balloon buret, be said, 
because proper care had not been 
taken in the manufacture of the 
gas-bag. The cotton material wed 
in its construction had not been 
properly dried when it was oiled 
and varnished; instead of drying it 
indoors, it was exposed in the open 
air. This exposure had the effect of; 
injuri ng the cloth to such an extent 
as to make it too weak to bear the 
great strain to which it had to be. 
subjected. There wee other things 
used in the construction of the 
balloon, which, in his judgment^ 
were sot suited to the purpose for 
which they were designed. The 
taraed marline used for netting was 
not the kind of material he wanted. 
He bad suggested the use of soft 
flax cord, which would not chafe 
the gas-bag. This cord, however, 
was too expensive. Concerning the 
cost of the balloon. Professor Wise 
said that he had estimated that it 
would cost $5,300 60c. The present 
balloon had not cost much more 
than 84,000. He said he became 
tired of quietly battling against the 
false economy and the wdfalness of \ 
the managers of the enterprise. His 
jestions were disregarded, and 
illy entirely unheeded. But he 
had become so identified with the 
matter that he resolved to make an 
attempt, even if it resulted in a 
partial failure and hs life was 
risked. — New York Times. 


In common currency , 

From Mr Rav Ward 
Sir, In 1832, judging from . 
youTOn This Day" item about :■ 
Sir Waller Scon (September 27), . 
tbe abbreviation for “pound" (foe 
unit of currency) appears to have • 
been a lower-case italic 4 placed 
after the figure. I wonder if anyone • 
can tell me when foe capital L : 
came into use in its stylised form 
of £ and also when and how there 
came about foe puzzling practice 
of placing foe symbols for major - 
currency units — or even foe fell • 
names — before the figure? • • 
Yours faithfully, T 

RAY WARD. 

48 St George’s Avenue, N7. 



"7 - 


% 


iffc— T‘ »r * 



10 


THE TIMES SATURDAY OCTOBER 4 1986 



COURT 

CIRCULAR 

BALMORAL CASTLE 
October 3: The Queen was 
represented by Lieuienani- 
Colonel Waller Luttrcll (Her 
Majesty's Lord-Lteuienanr for 
Somerset) ai the Memorial Ser- 
vice for Colonel Cecil Mitfbrd- 
Slade (formerly Her Majesty's 
Lord-Lieutenant for Somerset) 
which was held in St Mary 
Magdalene Church. Taunton, 
today. 

The Princess Anne. Mrs Mark 
Phillips, was represented by Mr 
R.W. Drewctt. 

BUCKINGHAM PALACE 
October 3: The Duke and 
Duchess of York left Roval Air 


Force Nonholt this afternoon in 
an aircraft of The Queen's Flight 
for the Netherlands where Their 
Royal Highnesses will attend 
the opening of the West Scheldt 
Flood Barrier by The Queen of 
the Netherlands. 

Miss Helen Hughes. Wing 
Commander Adam Wise and 
Mr John Haslam are in 
attendance. 

KENSINGTON PALACE 
October 3: The Duchess of 
Gloucester. CoIonel-in-Chief. 
Royal Army Educational Corps, 
this morning received Major- 
General Lloyd Howell on his 
relinquishing the appointment 
as Representative Colonel Com- 
mandant of the Corps, and 
Major-General Anthony 
Try ihall on assuming the 
appointment. 


Memorial services 

Mr C. Bosanqnct 
The Bishop of Newcastle pro- 
nounced the blessing at a service 
of thanksgiving for the life of Mr 
Charles Bosanquel held at St 
Thomas the Martyr Church. 
Newcastle upon Tyne, yes- 
terday. The Rev David Parker 
officiated and Mr Desmond 
Harney read from .-in Adventure 
of the Spirit by A. N. Whitehead. 
Mr C. J. Bcisanqucu son. and 
Mrs Katherine Rossen. daugh- 
ter. read the lessons. 

Gofouel C IVIitforri-SIade 
The Queen was represented by 
Lieutenant-Colonel G. W. F. 
LutuelL Lord Lieutenant of 
Somerset, who also read the 
second lesson, at a memorial 
service for Colonel Cecil Mit- 
ford-Slade held yesterday at St 
Mary Magdalene. Taunton. 
Princess Anne. President of the 
Royal Bath and West and 
Southern Counties Society, was 
represented by Mr R. W. 
DrewctL 

The Rev Richard Acworth 
officiated and the Bishop of 
Taunton led the prayers. Cap- 
tain Patrick Mitford-Slade. son. 
read the first lesson and the 
Bishop of Bath and Wells gave 
an address. Field Marshal Lord 
Harding of fttfterton repre- 
sented The Light Infantry and 
Colonel 1. H. McCausland 
represented the President of the 
King's Royal Rifle Corps 
Association and the Chairman 
of the Celerci et Audax Club. 

Mr WJ. Edricb 
A memorial service for Mr Bill 
Edrich was held yesterday at St 
Clement Danes. The Rev R.N. 
Ken ward officiated and Mr F.G. 
Mann. prcsidenL Middlesex 
County Cricket Club, read the 
lesson. Mr Brian Johnston read 
from the works of R.C. Robert- 
son-Glasgow. Trevor Bailey. 
John Arlolt and Sir Neville 
Card us. Mr Denis Compton 
gave an address and Miss Anne 
Shel ion sang “A Nightingale 
Sang in Berkeley Square”. The 
Rev RJ.N. Smith led the pray- 
ers and the Right Rev LJ. 
Ashton pronounced the 
Messing. 


Service dinners 

HMS Mercury 

.Admiral Sir Richard Fitch pre- 
sided at the annual dinner of the 
officers of the Navigating and 
Direction Branch of the Royal 
Navy held last night in the 
Wardroom of HMS Mercury by 
permission of Commander P.G. 
Edger. executive officer. Ad- 
miral of the Fleet Sir Henry 
Leach was the guest of honour. 
Others present included: 

Sir Anthony Grlffm. Vice- Admirals 
Sir Dana CJunortouch. Sir John 
Webster aiid JSC Sailer: Rear- 
Admirals Sir Hinti Janlon. D M 
txhcrucy-Mazlin. B N Wilson and A 
Crow: and Ihe Captains of HMS 
Dryad and HMS Mercury 

Flag Officer Second Flotilla 
The Flag Officer Second Flo- 
tilla. ComrVianding Officers of 
Second Flotilla Ships and their 
ladies were hosts at a dinner 
held in HMS Bristol last night. 
Admiral Sir Nicholas Hunt. 
Cbm mandcr-in-C’hief Fleet, and 
Lady Hunt were the guests of 
honour. 

The King's Own Yorkshire 
Light Infantry 

Brigadier R.SiC. Preston pre- 
sided at the annual dinner of 
The King's Own Yorkshire 
Light Infamrv Regimental 
Officers' Club held last night at 
the Royal York Hotel. 

Roval Army Educational Corps 
The annual dinner of the offi- 
cers of the Royal Army Educa- 
tional Corps was held last night 
at Eliham Palace. Major-Gen- 
eral L Howell. Representative 
Colonel Commandant. Major- 
General D.E. Ryan. Director of 
Army Education. General Sir 
Richard Tram. Quarter Master 
General. General Sir Roland 
Guy. Adjutant General, were 
among those present. 

Royal Army Kay Corps 
The annual dinner of the Royal 
Army Pay Corps Officers’ Din- 
ner Club was held last night in 
the Headquarters Officers' 
Mess. Worthy Down. The Colo- 
nel CommandanL Major-Gen- 
eral O J. Kinahan presided, and 
the Paymaster in Chief. Major- 
General B.M. Bowen was 
present. 


Daniel Cohn-Sherbok 


Jewish prayers for mankind 


Today Jews throughout the world are 
celebrating the Jewish New Year. This 
ancient festival calls all Jews to an 
awareness of their moral failings through- 
out the past year. 

During the new year service a ram's 
horn is blown and its piercing sound stirs 
the conscience. On this holy day, Jews are 
to search their hearts and turn in 
repentance to their Creator. The new year 
marks the beginning of a time of self- 
examination and it is followed by 10 days 
in which Jews are to resolve to mend their 
ways. 

The climax of this period of reflection is 
the Day of Atonement, the holiest day of 
the Jewish religious year. In biblical times 
this was the day when the high priest, after 
sacrificing for lire sins of the people, 
entered the Holy of Holies in the Temple. 
Nowadays there is neither Temple nor 
sacrifice: atonement is sought instead 
through prayer and repentance. Through- 
out the day the devout fast and pray for the 
forgiveness of their sins. 

The striking feature of these prayers is 
that they are communal in nature. Though 
each Jew is commanded during the holy 
days to repent of his or her particular sins, 
the community asks for forgiveness to- 
gether. Supplications are ail in the plural. 

Thus the congregation prays: “May it be 
thv will. O Lord our God. and God of our 
fathers to forgive ail our sins, to pardon us 
all our iniquities, and to grant us 
atonement for all our transgressions". 
Here the emphasis is on communal 
responsibility. It is noi my sins which arc 
to be forgiven, but our sins: not my 
iniquity but our iniquity: not my trans- 
gressions but our transgressions. 

With one voice worshippers seek 
absolution for their evil deeds. The list of 
transgressions is recited by the whole 
congregation regardless of each 
individual's actions: 

"For the sin we have sinned before thee in 
speech.... 

For the sin we have sinned before thee 


by wronging a neighbour.... 

For ihc sin we have sinned before thee 
by despising parents and teachers... 

For the sin we have sinned before thee in 
denying and lying.... 

For the sin we have sinned before thee 
by bribery — 

For the sin we have sinned before thee in 
business.... 

For the sin we have sinned before thee 
by envy..,. 

And for all these. O God of forgiveness, 
forgive us. pardon us. gram us 
atonement". 

in the modem world with its emphasis 
on individual rights and responsibilities, 
such group confessions may seem 
anachronistic and unwarranted. 

Why. it might be asked, should one 
confess sins that one has not committed 
on esc! I? There is an important contem- 
porary response to this question. Pre- 
viously Jews lived among their own kind 
in tightly-knit groups. They were in a 
minority and the whole community was 
responsible for itself. If one member 
sinned, this reflected an all. Consequently 
everyone was concerned about every 
wrongdoing, and every Jewish sin needed 
to be atoned for by all. 

This pattern of Jewish life has now 
disappeared: the ghetto has vanished and 
Jewish villages of eastern Europe are only 
memories. Instead Jews have become full 
citizens of the countries in which they live, 
sharing all the privileges of this new role. 

Due to the influence of the media, they 
have also become pan of a global society. 
Newspapers and magazines report events 
world-wide: radio and television bind ail 
people together. The world has shrunk: it 
has become a single community in which 
all human beings. Jews and non-Jews 
alike, are aware of one another. 

Traditional Jewish life has been re- 
placed by a new structure of communal 
existence' in which all people are linked 
together through the medium of mass 
communication. Events taking place in 


one country arc immediately known 
everywhere. Catastrophes, violence, 
starvation, kidnapping and terrorism are 
instantaneously broadcast to all parts of 
the globe. 

This awareness has had a profound 
effect; for mdhy. such human tragedy 
evokes feelings of empathy ana 
responsibility. The phenomenal success of 
Band-Aid is an obvious example. It was 
the result of a world-wide concern for the 
plight of the Ethiopian people. 

As members of this global community, 
the collective “we" of the High Holy Day 
prayers has a new meaning and signifi- 
cance. The past communal consciousness 
of the Jews as a small inter-linked people 
has been superseded by a new sense of 
belonging to a world society in which 
everyone feels responsible tor everyone 
else. 

Jews are no longer able to say “we" and 
mean “we Jews”. Today we means all, 
Jews and Gentiles, black and white, rich 
and poor. In our global village, all human 
beings are brothers, and we are all our 
brothers' keepers. 

In this light il is not simply individual 
sinfulness or even the sins of the Jewish 
community that require atonement, it is 
rather wrongdoing wherever it appears. 

The sound of the ram's horn beckons 
Jews to a recognition of his new vision of 
the human family and to a universal 
concent for all people. Their prayers for 
forgiveness during these holy days are not 
for themselves alone, but tor the whole 
world. On behalf of all mankind they pray: 

“Our Father, Our King, we have sinned 
before Thee. 

-.-Our Father, Our King, we have no King 
beside Thee. 

Our Father, Our King, deal with us 
according to Thy Name. 

Our Father. Our King, renew unto us a 
happy year". 

Rabbi Daniel Cohn-Sherbok is the director 
of the Centre Jor the Study of Religion and 
Society. University of Kent at Canterbury. 


St Andrew’s Ball 

Si Andrew's Ball will be held at 
Grosvcnor House on Thursday. 
November 20. Tickets are £26 
each and will include drinks and 
breakfast. There will be a pre- 
ball session at Wandsworth 
Town Hall on Thursday. 
November 6. A beginners' eve- 
ning is on October. 30. 
Organiser's discount is available 
for parties of ten or more, paid 
for by October 20. Ball rickets 
arc available from The Sec- 
retary. PO Box 10 Alresford, 
Hampshire. 24 0QN. Tel: 01- 
405 1 197. evenings only. 


Service reception 

RAF Odiham 

Group Captain and Mrs T 
Garden received the guests at a 
reception held at RAF Odiham 
yesterday. The Lord-Lieutenant 
of Hampshire and Ladv Scott 
Air Vice-Marshal and Mrs G.A. 
White and Major-General and 
Mrs J.D.W. Goodman were 
among those present. 


Dinner 

Engineers* Company 
Colonel and Alderman Sir Ron- 
ald Gardner Thorpe. Lord 
Mavor Ioann tenens. accompa- 
nied by Lady Gardner Thorpe, 
the Sheriffs and their ladies, 
attended a dinner given by the 
Engineers’ Company last night 
at the Mansion House. Sir 
William Barlow. Master, pre- 
sided - 


Births, Marriages, Deaths and In Memoriam 


Barms, marriages. 
DEATHS and IN MEMQfflUM 
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or ictephowd rhj telephone subs- 
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pnim. .in iMHl ■'•II lti.il Ihoii tvr.l ami 
4fi\r Id Ihe poor, .md Ihou snail hai” 
in-aMirr m WMirn and ronv- rolloi. 
mr 

M M.iilh'-M. to pi 


BIRTHS 


ALMY on SepUiTibor 281b lo Jan an-j 
Paul, a son. Henry Cdiuard Durand, 
a brother lor Sophi e 
BATCMELO R-POKTEOUS On Sep. 

I ember 30lh. lo All rind Rohm, a son. 
Ql ucr W illiam. 

BRAZIER • On September I lth lo 
Vrronique mec Raoul -Duval* and 
John. .1 srroito son. James Laurtui 
Nlrolav 

BRONZE nn September 30lh. a I 
Queen Char lodes Hmouai. lo Carol 
luce Sobetscihm and Lewis a d.iunn- 

ler. Jessie .1 Millie 

CUMMINGS On Orlober im. lo Susie 
inre Wheeler 1 and Jean Marc, a 
daughter. Lk'Gimd Grace, a wrter loi 
Ollier 

EDWARDS on Seplemner 27th lo 
Char Idle nice Hoxviiii and Grrqorv. 
a daughter. Gillian Kathryn Rachel, 
a sister (or AHrtair 
flJglH On Isl Orlober 1986. in 
Fiona i nee Hendersoin and O umn. 
a daughter. Lindsey Clare A sister 
(or Domlnir 

EVANS On 2nd Orlober. (o Barbara 
i nee h non ■ and Marlin Evans, a son. 
Jnmir Richard Sidney. Australia. 
HAWKER On September Senh Gas 
tandm i nee Hemmiita< and Vaughan, 
a dauuhler. Conrtanrc Alice 
HELLER On 30Ih September, lo 
AmAnd.! i nee Bahe and John, a 
daughter. Bralrirr Ell/.ibr-ih 

KAM On September 261 h, lo Anna >nec 
Merloni and Yungyuny at l CH a 
son Gabriel, a brother for Vnvuda 
KELLY On 3rd of October, lo Janet 
Hire ShilliiMjford! and Robert . a son. 
- prirr Ross Jamn. a brother lor 
Adam 

mjskLEWSKI DUNBAR On End 

Orlober 1986. lo Sarah ince 
MrLeffiiiNll and Pawei. a son. 
Alexander Hugh Joseph 
LEONARD I bin September 1936. at 
our Ladv Of Lourdes Hospital. Oro- 
ghPfld. Co Loulh. 16 Clare and 
Simon, a ’•on 

PARKER On 25lli September, lo 
Chrfclinri mec Boise! i and Rodcnrt a 
dauuhler Lyrlri. a sister lor Manna 
and victoria 

PELHAM On Will September, m 
Bradford lo Rowcnannv Storey i and 
Groffrrv- a daughter Kalhrvn .lessi 
M Siarey 

POWELL RADCLIFFE-GENGE On 

-September 2~W. al Ihe London Ho*, 
piial io Yolanda and Tony, a m 
Lsuipnrr Chrisinpher 


RAINE On tofh September, at Ihe 
lolui Rartntffn Hrv4nl.1l. Oxford, lo 
June uier Harris) and Attlhony. a 
iWiinihter. Juliet 1-4) he) 

SPENCER ELLIS on Ortobrr 3rd. al 
Lcio-Met General. In Ian ince Foxt 
•iihI Paul, a «nn. Daniel Gwilym. 
WALTHAM on 1st Oct otter 1986. at 
Kings Collette Hospital London lo 
R.h Ih -1 iihf Stoughton Harris' and 
\111lrew. a ibiiwlil'-r Kale, a sister 
Ini lark 


DEATHS 


BISHOP On Orloher 2nd. Major H.ir 
n Qvm.iIiI M.miini >Tinn Bishop, late 
ICili Roval Lancers, husband of 
t :la\ I e Ml Ft (.11 dvih . Selkirk. Fuller 
al |irit ale 

BUSH On Srpl 2Hlh. Dear r fully. al 
krvrijl Hr~Lni.il. S*lling bourne. Dr 
Lilian Maiu-| men Fisheri aged 90. 
Vkiiinu. 01 LI. I’ol B U Bush. lale nf 
.111 Ovif *--n.ire and Brxhfff 
tiiiii-r.il Mifiway Crcmaloriuni 
12 50 Tlh Orlober So flowers 
iil'-ase. bin (loti.iiious if desired lo 
RMI 

CH APPLE On Ofloher 3rd 198o. in a 
lo-Ml mirsimi honie alter .1 long tit- 
iit-^ roiir.igeMusty honie Joy. much 
toted I win sister uf I hi- lale Joan Fit- 
nei.ii 1 hiir a «iav 9in urlober. 12 a 3 
11.111 «il Bournemouth Cremalonum. 
|'|>jw.eis rant hr senl lo Dcnc Scott, 
f'mlni.in l.nI'K - Funeral Home. 
IlniirtieiiinnJh 

COL WILL On Thursday October 2nd. 
pr.iflullv Ronnie Ft111rr.il Hopt-AJ 
Ctinrih. Shropshire oti Monday Or 
tnie-i 6ih .il 1 2 30 pm 

ELLIOTT On Oriel* r 1st 1986. al The 
Riival Marsdrn Hospiial. Surrey. 
itLnnr Peler John Elliott retired 
2/lOlh PMO Gurkha Rifles and 
R l . iifirri ad Lot til and sadly 
inr.srd hv wile Paula. Tim and Ann 
and font. Ben. Paul and Leo and sis- 
ter Kathleen Pnvatc funeral. No 
Unmet. Ootiiihoiis il dmrrd to St 
Raplwtrl H o--pi re Appeal. SI 
Aiiiiiouy's Hospiial. Cheam. Surrey. 

FLITTOM On 3rd Orlober 1 98o. alter 
lutig iiml pitniful illness, coura- 
'leou-lt home. Xi-isi Evelyn .Ktorcrt 
wife gf Medley Funeral Sen. ire al 
I uni Wedm-atas 1 81b Oelober. at 
U liipprngham Cremalonum No 
ll'rttrrs. dnnalioiis il desired, lo The 
Mane Pune Memorial Found Alum. 
28Beiur.iteSg London SW IX ROC 

HAMNETT ijn 2Q|h Seplember 19A6. 
in Hafrn'j.ilr. Sttait. lout/ by Judy. 
v« rim- ai itie Han mule Cremaion 
nni. SH.iiH.ill Cemelary. Welhcrbv 
Ril On Tiiosd.il O', loher Tlh al 2 pm 

KALDOR On Seplember 30th. peace 
liilit afli-i MsiKtrl illness al Papworth 
Hmpiial Nir hulas, much kited htr. 
Ifcind P|.iti's.t falher of Kalharme. 
Ft •■tiers. Pi-uiiv and Mary Grandfa- 
ther nl bine. Teresa. NlrLv. Lury. 
Kills. David. Turn. Paul. Ben. Joxh- 
■i.i .ukI Oiit n Family and friends 
.in- wriromr al C.imbndge Cremato- 
rium nu Mnnilay Orlober c-lh al J.TO 
pm -1 mr-nmn.il sen ice will hr Jii- 
uuiiim en l.iier 

HEMP On Id <»f or tuber, peaeelnllv. 
■il ll< hester K^iiMiiglon. Linda, 
daughter r.f Ihr l«le norlor Stephen 
Kemp. a.j*. 02 Much Interl ht rami It 
fustrr rhitijreii and [neiuts Funeral 
SK-rtire .<1 st Michael's. Lad broke 
Glut an Tuesday 7th October al 
9 50 .1 in 

LLEWELLYN JUNES On 2nd October 
19R6 p-'.i. H ully. al tier home in 

Henley. Oulrie. tsit! - m the late Ret 
vs J LJesvrltvii Joni".. in her 801 h 
visit Deal It toted mofher of EJura- 
tn-lli alid Diana. her nine 
>ir.ai4i hll.lrrn and four great grand 
iliiuqhlvrs. Cremation pm ale 
ThanksgiliiKj Sen ice and inlermenl 

■ ■I ash!-., al St James CtMirrh. Milton 
•lbhats. at 3 pm. on Saturday 181h 
(>-|oher ctmi.ilions it desired, lo the 
Priiidonr.ire Foundahon. Park Rd. 
Win* neslrr ter Th- Henley War Me 
mori.il Hospital PruivcL 

MASON- On (Jrinie-i lsl. pcacdully m 
nrr.piliil. ,\tei . of Such Hollow Wat 
inn ijn Thjnj'-i. lr'lo\nS hu-^band 
and lathi-r Funeral on Monday 61h 
Onober at R.indalte Park Cremators 
mu Lealhernejd al A 50pm Flovters 
p.in he senl M* f W Chilly. 45. 
i:inirnote Rd. Wevbridqr 


McCONNEL On Oi-loher Isl. James 
Kenneth MrCoitnrl OSO.. M B.E . 
Ml! f? harsi. Chevahrr Lrgmi d‘ 
Huiiiieui . Crms rti* Guerre. Li. Col of 
2CHh Hussars, horn 1891. loved fa 
liter nf -Jedii and grandfather. 
ruininlserwrealSI Mary de Wyche 
Phnrch Vs vrhhold. Drottwirh. 2 pm. 
Oi loher lOlh 

NAYLOR On Monday 29lh Seplember 
193b. siulriPtily Raymond, aged 57. 
deariv helot rd father of Catherine 
Fiuier.il.it I0 30am on Tuesday 7Ih 
Lirtolier al Nets- Sonlhgale Cremalo 
mini Driiiat tons, if desired, lo The 
Brilr.li Hrarl FoundaiKin 
PARKINSON On Seplrmhrr 30 h. 
verv suddenly. Robin. 01 The Lodge. 
K11 liv Cane. Bungay. Suffolk Detol 
rd hushaiHi ol Cherry Funeral 
serttre Kirbv Cane enurrh on 
Wrdnrsilriv 8lh Ortobrr al 2 30 Dm 
I lowers In Harvey Srery. Vsesl Cha 
tiets hirhv Cane by 12 noon please. 
PEIRCE on Orlober 1st 1986. sudden 
Iv. in hospital al EAsJbounvt' Harold 
Rnlierl Grultoii Pelrre \|.B.E Cafe of 
Piirhin South India and Tiverton 
Deton. Wilt be greatlv missed Fu 
nrral service fit Eastbourne 
r.innainritim on Thursday Ortnher 
Ain al 3pm Flowers lo Hauie A Son 

I Id 19 botilh SI. Ej-.liioiirni- 
Susses 

ROBINSON On IM Oclulier. Audrey 
Nessie in her 951h year widow of 
Hugh ilnrmerlv of Birkenhead 
ne.irrfullt al home in SpejdhursJ. tit 
loving r.ire and afler h.itmq Holy 
Oriiimiiinon on Isl OrioLe-r Funeral 
.11 Speiiihiir-I Church. 11 am. Fr« 
d.iv 10th October 

ROEBUCK On Ihe Isl Oelober 1986. 
al J •soiilh Dnve. Harrogale. aged 75 
years. John Gower W illiam <Jac- 
tliiesi Roeburk. husband ol Molliy 
and father of Flreabelh Ciithenne 
■mil William. Service al the Harro- 
gate r rrmaianum oil Tuesday 7th 
LH loher a I 1 p m No tellers or Row- 
er*. please 

SUTTON On Isl Orlober 19B6. ware 

I I illt. m hospital and cf o5. 
I.oubhursl Lane. Marple Bnd*je. 
Sloskporl Dr Rirhard % P Sul loo. 
ilearlt beloved husband of loan, lov- 
ing falher of Robert. Peier and 
Lliznlu-lh Service al MeHor P/C On 
Monday 6lh OclOt.*er al Z p m Inter- 
nieni at vvolt erroie Cemetery 
■Jsiraril on Tuesday 7lh Orlober al 2 
Ilia. Funeral enquires to James Al 
I**|| A Sou iDr.lev i LHI Trl* 0:632 
wAu 7 

THORLEY On Ortoljrr Jst in a Sh*:*f 
fil'iil Numnn Home Ada aged SI 
t i-ars of 1 L2inrchiii House 
Silt erd.ile Cl •’scent. Inrmerlv Ol 
Lvino Road. Dtsley Dearty loted 
v\il« of ltie lale Wilfred, very dear 
nmlher ol Geraldine jnd a much 
loteil mother in law ana grandmolh- 
el Sri tire jl Hutclufe Wood 
Creni.il on urn Sheffield on Wednes- 
day eih Oelober ai 3 » pm Cut 
IHnverv or rioualioiis for Ihe Rheu- 
matism And Arthritis Council may 
he cent i*j John Healb A Sons Funer- 
al Director'.. ShetfKld 

WILDE On 2nd October 1986. peace- 
fully. al Norlhleach Hosmlal Gerald 
W ilde. IrfBl r uneraf jl Churrft of 
si Mary Magdalene. Sherborne. 
Glouresterstnre. on Monday om Oc- 
tober 3 iOeiri 


MEMORIAL SERVICES 


TATTERS ALL Sarah Eli.'ahnin. 

itior man's mmh**r. Xleinoriat s**rv ice 
al SI James the fjri-.il Easl Hill. Poi- 
ritesier. F*.sev Saturday . lfifh 
CM loher al 1200 noon 


IN MEMORIAM - PRIVATE 


CLENCONMER Chnylopher in loving 
inemorv Emma A Mallhew 
SPIEGEL .'ark C Died Oelober Jfh 
l^. 111 Hallandale. l.S v In loving 
everlasting menu'it. will* C.er file, 
ihildren Palst an*I k'url M«rha**l 
•unl Gun Manna aim Andrew 

gr.mih hilrlr.-n Mallei \;if1ri*vi . 

Le.ih. Mu.\ and Ales -jndr.i. hreiher 
law. sisler* in !aw. nmis and 
it* -phene. 

t AP Cladv s. B \ . lormerl, of 
■MtddlCNseA Hu-jpilal Mediref SrhC'Ol 
Sth Orlober 1982 Remembered 
■ihv.iv. by friends & family . George 


Forthcoming marriages 


Mr J.N. Barnard 
and Miss AJ. Webb 
The engagement is announced 
between Joseph Nicholas, eldest 
sorr of Sir Joseph and Lady 
Barnard. ofHarlsey Hall. Nonh 
Yorkshire, and Ashley Jane, 
youngest daughter of Squadron 
Leader and Mrs David Webb, of 
Bedale. North Yorkshire. 

Mr J.S.L. Burke 
and Miss P.T. Geraghty 
The engagement is announced 
between Stephen, only son ol 
Mr and Mrs D.M. Burke, ol 
Ellington. Warwickshire, and 
Paula, third daughter of Mr and 
Mrs CJ. Geraghty. of Middles- 
brough. Cleveland. 

Mr D.G. Chapman 
and Miss L.M.C. Jones 
The engagement is announced 
between David George, younger 
son of Mr and Mre C. Chapman, 
of Aberdovev. Wales, and Lou- 
isa Mary Charlotte, elder daugh- 
ter of Mr and Mrs A. Jones, ol 
Solihull. 

Mr M.DJ. Dove 
and Miss S.R.E. Edmonds 
The engagement is announced 
between Martin, younger son ol 
Mr and Mrs John Dove, ol 
Eniswonh. Hampshire, and 
Sharon, daughter of Mr and Mrs 
Roy Edmonds, of Strcatham. 
London. 

Mr P.G. Dyer 
and Miss A J. Robertson 
The engagement is announced 
between Philip, only son of the 
fate Mr T.W. Dyer and Mrs B. 
Pitts, and stepson of Mr EA.A. 
Pitts, of Dunedin. New Zealand, 
and Alison, elder daughter ol 
Commander and Mrs F.J. 
Robertson, of Bath. 

Mr R.N. Fisher 
and Miss F.C. Hirst 
The engagement is announced 
between Robert, only son of Mr 
and Mrs HJ. Fisher, of Dor- 
chester. Dorset, and Fiona, only 
daughter of Mr and Mrs F. 
Hirst, of Cheam. Surrey. 

Mr SJ. Green 
and Miss BJ. Stirrup 
The engagement is announced 
belween Stephen, son Mr and 
Mrs John Green, of SoJihuJ). 
and Jane, daughter of the Rev 
Roger and Mrs Stirrup, of 
Fordingbridgc. Hampshire. 

Dr T.E. Harris 
and Dr C_S. Wood 
The engagement is announced 
between Timothy, son of Dr and 
Mrs F.C. Harris, of Rougham. 
Suffolk, and Caroline, younger 
daughter of Mr and Mrs K.F. 
Wood, of Leicester. 


Mr TJ.L. Keywood 
and Miss J.E. Davis 
The engagement is announced 
between Timothy, only son of 
Mr and Mrs E.K. Keywood, of 
Esher. Surrey, and Joanna, only 
daughter of Professor and Mrs 
M J. Davies, of Thornes Dinon, 
Surrey. 

Mr A.P.U. King 
and Miss SLA. Wells 
The engagement is announced 
between Alan, son of Mr and 
Mrs Christopher King, of 
Tonbridge. Kent, and Susan, 
daughter of Mr and Mrs 
Kenneth Wells. Sherborne, 
Dorset 

Mr G.M.I. Miller 
and Miss J.C. Fisher 
The engagement is announced 
between Geoffrey, younger son 
of Mr Monty Miller, of Bushey 
Heath, Hertfordshire, and the 
late Mrs Margaret Miller, and 
Joanna, younger daughter of Mr 
and Mrs Cart Fisher, of Kings- 
ton upon Thames, Surrey. 

Mr S.W. Morris 
and Miss K.M. Beeson 
The engagement is announced 
between Stuart William, son of 
Mr and Mrs Kenneth Morris, of 
Kings Heath. Birmingham, and 
Katherine Mary, daughter of 
Mrs Mary L. Beeson and the late 
Rev Colin C. Beeson, of 
South water. Sussex. 

Mr B.R. Myers 
and Miss C-R. Jones 
The engagement is announced 
between Bryan, only son of Mr 
and Mrs Keith Myers, of 
EwhuisL Surrey, and Garoline- 
Ruth. only daughter of Mr and 
Mrs A.M. Jones, of Rothley. 
Leicestershire. 

Mr P. D. Sbeerin 
and Miss P. Lees 
The engagement is announced 
between PauL elder son of Judge 
and Mrs John Sheerin, of 
Rougham. Bury St Edmunds. 
Suffolk, and Penelope, younger 
daughter of Dr and Mrs Nor- 
man Lees, of Wyraondham, 
Norfolk. 

Mr J.D. Sfaerirarn 
and Miss DJB. Gentry 
The engagement is announced 
between John, eldest son of Mr 
J. Sherburn, DFC. and Mis 
Sherburn. of Lympstone, 
Devon, and Dawn, only daugh- 
ter of Mr and Mrs C.A. Gentry, 
of Larchmere House, 
Fntienden. Kent. 

Mr J.A.K. Wigraore 
and Miss M J. Alsop 
The engagement is announced 
between John, younger son of 
Mr and Mrs Paul Wigmorc. of 
Pinner, and Margaret, elder 
daughter of Mr and Mis Keith 
Alsop. of North wood. 


Mr P.R. Wood 
and Miss J.H. Weir 
The engagement is announced 
between PauL son of Mr R.I. 
Wood, of Dels mere Park. 
Cheshire, and Mrs R. Harvey, of 
Highgaie, London, and 
Hannefce, ■ daughter of Mr and 
Mrs W.A. Weir, ofCotungham, 
Nonh Humberside. 

Mr N J.C. Worthington 
and MSss A. O'Leary 
The engagement is announced 
between Nigel, eldest son of Mr 
and Mrs D.I. Worthington, of 
Fetcham, Surrey, and Ann 
daughter of Mrs M. O’Leary and 
the late Mr J. O'Leary, of Cork 
Republic of Ireland. 

Marriage 

Canon C. Rodgers 
and Mrs T. McHale 
The marriage took place quietly 
in St Edmundsbury Cathedral 
on October 3. between Canon 
Cyril Rodgers, of Woolpit, and 
Mrs Tessa McHale, of 
Wetherden. The Bishop of 
Chelmsford, the Right Rev John 
Waine celebrated the Mass. 

Birthdays 

TODAY: Sir Peter Blaker. MP, 
64\ Sir Neville Bowman-Shaw, 
56; Sir Terence Conran. 55; Air 
Chief Marshal Sir Kenneth 
Cross, 75; Air Vice-Marshal Sir 
Peter Dixon. 79; Mr Baal 
D’OIiveira, 55; Lieutenant-Gen- 
eral Sir Robert Drew, 79; Dr F. 
Dudley Hart. 77; Mr Charlton 
Heston, 62; Sir John Hon, 74; 
Sir Michael Hordern. 75; 'Mr 
Frank Keating. 49: Sir Hector 
Monro, MP, 64; Lord 
Roborougb. 83; the Right Rev 
Dr R. D. Say. 72; Mr Justice 
Sheldon. 73; Mr F. R. H. Swann, 
82; Sir Rowland Wright. 71. 

TOMORROW: Sir Raymond 
Apcrieyard, 64; Mr Robin Bai- 
ley, 67; Colonel Sir Hugh 
Brassey. 71; Mr Sebastian de 
Ferranti, 59; Sir John Dent, 63; 
Sir Frank Francis. 85; Mr Bob 
Geklof, 35; the Right Rev 
Robert Hardy. 50; Lord 
Holdemess, 66: Major-General 
G. C. Humphreys, 87; Miss 
Gtynis Johns. 63; Mr Robert 
Kee, 67; Mr Herbert Kretzmer, 
61; Mr Bruce Millan, MP, 59; 
Sir Edward Peck, 71; Mr Donald 
Pleasence, 67; Sir Douglas 
Ranger, 70; Sir John Rodgers, 
80: Sir Richard Thompson, 74; 
Sir Richard Wflliams-Bulkeley. 
75. 

Service luncheon 

Major-General Norman 
Wheeler presided at the annual 
luncheon of the Royal Ulster 
Rifles Officers' Club held yes- 
terday at the Duke of York’s 
Headquarters, Chelsea. 


Services tomorrow 


Nineteenth Sunday 
after Trinity 

CANTERBURY CATHEDRAL: B HC; 
9 TO Sung Eurti and M; ti Sung 
Eufli. Ma*s lor Tour Voices (BvrdL 
Ate icrum corpus >Bvrdi. TJic Dean: 
5 15 E. Rrtpoiws <Btrd>. Second 
Sortie..* *B» rd*. Al»jl - ihe rtOTS 
iTomUmi. c* 30 LS. Rev P R 
Hranririd 

YORK MINSTER 8. B.-IS HC. HJ 
Sung Euch ' Dark- in Ft. Locus isle 
'BruchniTi. Canon Mirhae! Bowcnng: 
t: 30 M , Bntl“n in C*. Annual Legal 
Srr.ltr « th»* Norm Eastern Circuit. 
Mon lately Is thv dt,<>lliiia place 

■ Brahmsi. Arrhinnncp ol York J E 
•Dtson in Di. Lord I call upon lime 

■ Bair-Jow >. Canon Ralph MayJand 
S»T PALL'S CATHEDRAL B HC. 
Ri**ponw.» i Tomkins!: 1G JO M. Ju- 
bilate and Ti* D*'ura Collegium Regale 
‘HomIIv. Wr Ven Frank Hart ov. 
,l'chd<*.wm of London. 1 1 30 HC. 
Miva wciio i Wagon i. Ate verum 
corpus "Etaori. 3 1 5 E. The Gloucester 
Sen ice "How-Ha Canligue de Jeon 
Racine iFaurei. Vcrv Ret Alan 
Urwlw. Dean 

WESTMINSTER ABBEY: B. 1 1 JO 
HC IO 30 M. Collegium Regale 

■ Howrllsl. Expeclant especlavl 

■ wondt. Ret Si-tMsUan Charles. 3 E 
-Nachoteon in O' See whal lote h-ilh 
ihe Fa'ncr iMr^uleKvjhni. Ret Mans 
Rurnalshah. (j, 30 ES. Rev k'ennegy 
Thom 

SWTHVi'ABk' CATHEDRAL. 9 HC: 
i : Euch. Mivva Aolernd Chnsii 
muiv.-rp ‘Pniertrin.n Smelt ihou liasl 
lor. led iReti*). Sion's da whirrs. Sorts 
of Jerusalem *PlailivOnu*. V i n Ret 
Harold Franvhani. 3 E tSIanforu ill 
C>. I iwti** surelv tuil: ihrc an hauv: 
■Bcvte'. The Prc-vori iVerv Ret David 
L EilMUiUti 

V* EJSTMlisSSTE'R CATHEDRAL. 7. g. 
9 :2. 5 39. 7 L'l 10 3*3 SM. V(n*n 
Bret r*.. -Paiesiniiai Trim late. 'Philips! 
PeCs dnlem rrw* gnolidie iPalcslnnal. 
3 JO V 

OLELN-S C-HAPLU SI James's pal- 
are s SO HC 11.15 Sung Euch 

■ Dark r in pi. Canon A D Caesar 
Ol SEN'S CHAPCL OF THE SAVOY. 
ViCC 1 1 IS Sun<i Euch ‘Darke in Fi. 
Ihe Chaplain 

ROV AL N.AV -AL COLLEGE CHAPEL. 
Gri-entsich. SLIO- 11 Morning 
Prater, flaw down Thine ear. O LWd 
* Aren't y* From ail inai dwell below 
lh- H-.h-. • T A Walmislej, >. Roderic 
O'-eg 

Cl AMI’S CHAPEL. Vselliuglon Bar- 
rack*. !>Vt l il suing Euch. R“t C R 
vv Cilhcrl OCF 

TOWER OF LONDON. EOX « HC 
15 jl *Hiine5i F*Niival“T Dsianfuid 
in C* O clap vour hands * Vaughan 

williams ■ Jih- i.Aupljiri 
ST Cl.LMCNT DANES *R AF Church' 
VV C2 f? M HI.' 11 Euch -HarviKi 
Thank V7<*. irjgl *SMn!nrtl in Cl. Thou 
AisKtth me Earth ‘Greene ‘ R*-t Brian 
Hallrennv 

CH.APEL POV AL. H.tmpiitn Court 
Paiap. 8 30 HC. 11 Suna Eu'h 
■Darl.e in Fi. i sii down *Bmnlowi. 
Re-. John Bleow- 3 30 £ ibianlard in 


B flali. I teas glad lAskcwi. Blessed 
cil> i&atrslowl. 

ALL HALLOWS BY THE TOWER: XI 
Sung Euch. Rev Michael Beech. 
all SAINTS. Mamarvi Sr. wi: 8 and 
S LE5 LM: 1 1 KM. Msssa Breve 

• Lennox Berkeicx-i. Bright n the day 

• Brian Kelly*. Rev W H Taylor: 6 E 
and Benediction. Noble in U minor. 
Jcmi. inr very i nought of mee 
iBMrtlmri. Ihe Rev G A Reddlngton 
ALL SOLLS. Langlum Place. wiTTi: 
Ret Richard Bowes. 0.30 Informal 
borticr wiih Music. Rev John Slotl. 
CHELSEA OLD CLIRCH. SW3: 8HG 
IO Childrens Service: 1| Pariah HC 
Rev J H L Cross: 6 E Prcb Leighton 
Thomson. 

CROSVFNOB CHAPEL. Soulh 
AiNflry Street 8. IB HcT ll Suno 
Euch. Mass In E Minor * Blurt 1 nor*. 1 
y*f* glad iParrv*. Rev a W Marls. 
HOLV TRINTTY. Bromoton Road. 
SW7 8 30 HC: II SM M J AK 
Mdlar: oMKPreDJT C B CoUJn£ 
HOL> TRINlTV . Prince Consort 
Rood. SWT. 8 30 HC: 11 Choral EcSt! 
The Btstion of Fulham. 

HOLY TRINITY. Sloanc Street. SWI: 
8 3^12.10 HC: 10 30 Euch. (5 non 
H utter!:- 

ST ALBAN’S. Brooke Si. ECl: 9 30 
SM. 11 KM. CroncredomMse (Mo- 
zart*. Lei Ihe bnghl seraphim: Let 
iheirreiesiidi concerts iHondrt*. Rev ft 
J Avenl: 3 30 Euch and Benediction 

■ Nicholson in □*. Locus me (Bruck- 
ner i. Slewed dLy iBalirJowl: 6 30 LM. 
ST BRIDE'S. Fleet Street. EGA: 11 
Chnraj m and Euch (Watford Devtoj. 
Jubilate fTalben Bain. Gloria (How. 
elm. Collegium Regale. Conan John 
Dales: 6.30 Choral E. Mag and Nunc 

• Healey Wiliam. The wilderness rWcs- 
levi. Canon John dales. 

ST CL THBEnr-S. Phllbeach Gardens 
SW5 IO HC. 1 1 Sung Euch * Purcell 
in Bi. Lcl my prayer i Purcell). Rev- 
John Vine; 6 Evensong and Benedic- 
lion. 

ST GEORGE'S. Hanover Square. WI: 
8.30 HC: 1 1 Sung Euch I Whitlock In 
Gl. Ihc Reel or 

ST JAMES'S, preeadillv. WI: 8 30 
HC. 11 Sung Euch: 6 EP. 

ST JAMES'S. Sussex Gardens. W2: B 
HC: 10.30 Sunn Euch. Mls&a Brevis 

■ Berkeley i; t> E Canuclrt In FUrelandl. 
From all thal dwell iWohnlsleyk 
ST MARGARETS. Wesimlnsler. 
SWI: 11 Sung Eucti. Canon Trevor 
Beeson. 

ST MARTIN- IN-THE-F1ELDS. WC2: 
8. 9 4S. 12 30. 7.30 HC 1 16621. Uw 
Vicar 1 1 30 MP. Rev Philip Chester: 
2 49 Oilnesc Service: a Pearlies 
H.vrvrrt Feyival: 6 30 EP. Rev 
Slmtien Roberts 

ST MARY ABBOTS- Kensington. W8: 

8. 12 SO HC: 9.30 SUM Eurt- lh* 
vicar, il. IS M H662 Prayer Book'. 
Ret S H H Aciand: 6-30 E. Rev S H H 
Arlanri 

ST MAH\"S* Bourne Street. SWI: 9. 
9.45. 7 LM: 11 HM. Mtoa 3 
i.vionfi'tt'nfii. So God loved me world 
■GlbOonsi. Adoramus le iMonievcrdi). 
Prof Rowan Williams; 6.1 S E and 
Benediction 

ST MARYLEBONE. Morylebonv 
Road. WI: a. 11 HC. Moss in D 
■Morarh, The Hcavcm are idling 


■Haydni. Rev Richard McLaren: 6.30 
Mlnelrv Of Healing. Laying on « 
Hands. Mis Valerio Mafcln- 
ST MICHAEL'S. Chester Square. 
SWI : 8.13 HC: It Hartert FmOval. 
Rev D C L Prior: 7.30 informal Es. 
MT MICHAEL'S. COnthUL ECS: 11 
Sung Euch (Lev in E minor). Caudate 
Domino i PI ion 1 1. Be strong and of a 
good courage (Darke). 

ST PAUL'S. Roden Adam Street. WI; 
1 1 HC. Rev George Cassidy: 6.30. Rev 




Place. SWI: 8. 9 


91 rnvbo. "IliWi *-»■•.*. - *. a, r 

HC: 11 Solemn Luch. Communion 
Service In A flat (Basil Harwood). 
Expecians expec la vl (Charles Wood), 
Come, my Way. my Truth, nw Lire 
(Vaughan William?). Canon Gerald 
Huds on. 

ST petefts. Eaton Sauare. SWi: 
8.15 HC: io Family May*: U SM. 
Messa Brev h lAnerto). BowBhhie ear. 
O L ord (B yrd). Rev D B Tlfly». 

ST STEPHEN'S. Gloucester Road. 
SW7: 8. 9 LM. HM. Mttsa SlmnH eaj 
regnum (Guerrero). Ven K Hohte: 6 
solemn Evensong and Benediction. 

Rev P Butler. _ 

THE ANNUNCIATIO N. „ Br yanslqg 
SI reel. Wl: 1 1 SM. MBsa. 

JoannH de Deo OlaydiiX! Lattoate 
notnen Domini (Ravenscrofu. Fear 
not. O land i Elgar): 6 LM and 
Benediction. 

ST COLUMSA’S CHURCH OF. SCOT- 
LAND. Pont Street. SWI'- 11 Harvest 
Fertival and Re-dedlctias i service: 
6 30. Very Rev J F raaer Mci.jj4<gv 
CRQWN^COCRT.CHURCMjOF SCOT- 
LAND. Cover) f Garden. wCS 11.16. 
6-30 HC. Rev Kenneth G Hognrj 
THE ASSUMPTION. Warwick StreeL 
Wl: B. IO. 12. a. 6 LM: 11 SM. Missa 
niiinU toiil lUnusi. Super (lumlna 
BaDyionis ipsucscrtnak Ave verum 
■Bvrdl. 

FARM STREET. Wl: 7.30. USD. IO. 
12. IS. 4.15. 6. IS LM: 11 HM. 

THE ORATORY. Branploo Road. 
SW7: 7. B. 9. IO. 12.30. 4.30. 7 LM: 
1 1 HM. Missa Brevis In F (Moran). 
Vidi snertosam ( Hanoi k 3.30 V. Maria 

*?r Ely Place: a. 9. 
ia 12.30. 6 JO IM 11 HM. Masa In 
D iDvOrafci. m le speravt (Buxteoude): 
3 Chaldean Rile. 

AMERICAN CHURCH IN LONDON. 
Wl; II. Rev Ran F Allison. __ _ 
HINDE STREET METHODIST 
CHURCH. Wl: II. Rev Leslie OrM- 
flihs: 630. Rev smart Jordan. 
KENSINGTON UBC. Allen ^ Street. 
W8: 1 1 HC: 6 JO. Dr Kenneth Sla cK. 
RECENT SQUARE PRESBYTE3UAN 
URC. Tavistock Place. WC1: 11. Rev 
Ket m Swainc: 6 30. Rev John Mtuer. 
ST ANNE AND ST AGNES ILu- 
iheran*. Grertwm SL EE2: ll HC: T 
Hvmn Festival. 

ST JOHN'S WOOD URC. NW8: U. 

MtB» Rertrahir i Od Mam 

rtrnwu. Ave tesu Chrtste (Philips). Rev 

John Motor. - _ 

WESLEYS CHAPEL- City Road- EG& 
11. Rev Norm an Rtcnanft on. .... . 
WESTMINSTER CENTRAL HALL 
iMelhodUU. SWI: 11. Rev R JolW 
Tudor. 6-30. Rev DHwyn Banner 
WESTMINSTER CHAPEL. Bucking; 
ham Cate, SWI: 1 1. R« H T 

Kendall. 


OBITUARY 

EVA RUTTKAI 

Actress with childlike charm 


Eva Ruttkai, outstanding 
Hungarian stage and screen 
actress, died in Budapest on 
September 27. She was 58. 

In a film career lasting over 
ha tf a century she acted in 
more than 50 films displaying, 
even as an adult, a childlike 
simplicity that earned her 
countless Hungarian and for- 
eign admirers. 

Bom in 1927, she made 
both her film and stage debuts 
when she was seven: in Istvan 
Szekely’s Purple Acacia, and 
as the young Duke of York in 
Sandor Hevesi’s historic pro- 
duction of Richard HI. 

This was followed by her 
breakthrough, at the age of 19, 
in 1946, when she took over 
from KJari Tolnay, the strick- 
en star of Molnar's The'Ewan, 
at the Comedy Theatre, in the 
romantic title role that was to 
be immortalised by Grace 
Kelly in the Hollywood 
version. 

Miss Ruttkai was to. be seen 
in the same role 20 years later 
in a star-studded revival at the 
Comedy Theatre, which she 
had joined in 195! as its 


leading actress. She was also a 
regular guest at the National 
Theatre, giving her finest per- 
formances as saint Joan, Ju- 
liet and Gretchen. and in the 
plays of Molnar. Feydeau. 
Chekhov, Wilder and Tennes- 
see Williams. 

A few Hungarian film direc- 
tors, al first chary of using a 
reputedly unphotogeme ac- 
tress in starring roles, soon 
changed track when her un- 
doubted spiritual, rather than 
her unorthodox ph ysical. 
charm came to be prized 
above all. 

This ted to the creation of a 
series of “School of Ruttkai” 
movies. The highly popular A 
Glass of Beer (1955), The 
Story o/.Xfy Stupidity (1965), 
Everyday Sunday (1962). and 
The Monkey Interferes (1967) 
were followed by Bettvandthe - 
Others (1 967-70) - a television 
series m the Molnar manner 
in which, like the adult 
Elisabeth Beigner, she was 
able to go on exploiting her 
endearing childlike quality. 

She was married to the actor 

Miklos Gabor. 


MR THOMAS H. EVERETT 


Mr Thomas H. Everett, a 
■leading horticulturist who 
spent 54 years helping to 
create an urban oasis at the 
New York Botanical Garden, 
died on September 26. He was 
83. 

Born in this country, he 
joined the staff of the New 
York Botanic Garden in the 
Bronx in 1932. He rose to 
become director of horticul- 
ture and, over more than 30 
years in the post, assembled 
vast plant collections. He also 
designed and supervised the 
construction of the rock and 
rose gardens, two of the 
Garden’s -most renowned 


Everett was a prolific writer, 
and he retired in 1968 to 
devote himself to his writing. 
His magnum opus is the 10- 
volume New York Botanical 
Garden Illustrated Encyclo- 
paedia of Horticulture. 

He retained the “ title of 
senior horticultural specialist, 
and until quite recently was 
answering by telephone and 
letter plant care questions 
from members of the public. 

During his career he re-“ 
ceived many honours from 
horticultural societies, as well 
as an' honorary master’s de- 
gree from Rutgers University 
in 1959. 


features. 

SIR MAURICE DOWSE 

Major-General Sir Maurice 
Dowse, KCVO, CB, CBE, who 
died on September 24, at the 
age of 87, while on a trip to 
India with the Royal Society 
for Asian Affairs, served with 
the Royal Welsh Fusiliers and 
on the Staff at home and 
overseas from 1918 until his 
retirement in 1953. 

Maurice Brian Dowse, the 
son of a Bishop ofJjork, was 
bom on September 10, 1899, 
and educated at Wellington 
and Sandhurst He was com- 
missioned into the Royal 
Welsh Fusiliers in 1918, and 
in the following year went to 
India where he remained until 
1926. He subsequently served 
with BAOR. in India again. 


and passed through staff col- 

IC *Dunng the Second World 
War he was a staff officer in 
the 3rd Division under Mont- 
gomery, and afterwards 
served at HQ Allied land 
Forces SE Asia. 

He was on the planting 
committee for the Cordhar 
tion. and was made KCVC 
Throughout his life Douse 
cast himself as an Irishman. 
Tall in stature, he was, fran 
afar, severe in aspect; bit 
those who knew him well 
found him a genial compan- 
ion. 

He spent his later day, 
travelling abroad. 

He never married. 


MR RAYMOND NAYLOR 


Mr Raymond Naylor, who 
died on September 29 at the 
age of 57, served for nearly 30 
years as a member of the 
editorial staff of the External 
Services of the BBC. 

He will be remembered for 
his breadth of knowledge and 
interests, acerbic wit, editorial 
rigour and his elegant and 
exact literary style. 

Educated at Wakefield 
Grammar School, be won an 
exhibition to Keble College, 
Oxford, where he read history. 
He was a prominent contribu- 
tor to Isis, and became its 
news editor. 


' : On coming down from Ox- 
ford he soon joined the staff of 
the Yorkshire Post under, its 
famous editor. Sir Linton 
Andrew®, and became an as- 
sistant editor. 

After joining the BBGs 
External Services, he rose to 
the rank of senior duty, editor 
in the news department; but 
he sacrificed his career when 
he decided to take premature 
retirement in 1981 to look 
after his wife who bad become 
seriously iQ. 

On her death two. years 
lajer, he re-joined the BBC. 

He is survived by their only 
daughter. . . 


PRUDENCE GLYNN 


Miss Sandra Barwick writes: 

No doubt Prudence Glynn 
(September 26) fell victim to 
her faults - which one of us 
does not? i 

She had rare qualities, nota- 
bly a sense of fun which made 
her company a (Might, and 
expeditions with her an ad- 
venture. Her irreverence did 
not exclude herself. She con- 
sistently took herself off as 
that grande dame “The Lady - 
Winalesham”, and was 
thrilled when someone caught 
her in The Times lift, canying 
her tiara in a brown paper bag. 

In two years working for her 
as a secretary and assistant 
when she was, according to 
you. a fashion editor “feared 
and respected rather than 


loved”, I found her unfailingly 
and exceptionally kind and ' 
generous. The only dull peri- - 
ods in my job were in her 
absence. 

Her vivacity meant she was - 
less troubled by life's daily . 
inconveniences than anyone 1 . 
have known. I could have - 
booked Pru on a plane to Peru ■ 
and she would certainly have ^ 
phoned to say: “Darling, don’t 
worry - Harry Kerr and I have 
done a wonderful piece on 
street urchins. Much better 
than boring old Paris”. 

She was profoundly bored 
by the pompous, and spleu- ' 
didly contemptuous of re- 
ceived opinion - an unusual 
characteristic in a fashion r 
editor. 


Science report 


Understanding a nod 
and a wink in Europe 


By Peter Brock 


Some of the national stereo- 
types frith which we label each 
other have come mder fire in the 
most comprehensive study yet of 
hiratau emotions across national 
boundaries. 

When a Frenchman shrugs be 
is called indifferent, a hapime 
German is dabbed lavatorial and 
an Italian driver frith a glint in 
lus eye is a modern charioteer. 
The British are either idly 
reserved or rampa g in g about 
football fields. 

Teams of psychologists from 
12 European universities and 
research centres have been 
working for seven years on the 
Hral study of joy, anger, 
fear and s ad ne ss. 

The idea was born dnri n g a 
wine and cheese party at Birk- 
beck College, London where Dr 
Angela Samnofidd and Euro- 
pean colleagues were discussing 
work they were doing on non- 
verbal communication. Profes- 
sor Klaus Scherer, of Genera 
and the Jnstns-Liebig univer- 
sities. suggested die study. 

The subjects were students 
from all di aciplhtes with an age 
range of 18-35, and neve than 
1,200 took part The computers 
are still analysing the date hat 

mfoeana 


and sex - Ear more than, any of 
die other peoples - and, along 
with the Israelis and Spanish, 
e x peri enc e the greatest fear 
from aril disorder. 

Jewish Israelis sailer their 
highs and bras from news of 
national events, while Arab 
Israelis experience their stron- 
gest emotions within personal 

i rirtimwliipt. 

The Germans and Italians 
derive a lot of Joy from friend- 
ships bat the Swiss Germans 
come through as very baste 
people. They did not refer to sex 
with anything like the entire* 
siasm of the British, being 
wrapped up in scenery and 


some mtsitire 

Itive findings emerge strongly, 
te Bntisb, for mstenc 


The 

derive most pleasure from eating 


a»Ht anew among 
Ita li a ns , unlike their joys ana 
fears, were least connected with 
people and white every other 
country expressed neat tags 
about traffic, the walmw 
garded it as a chafleagei 
A dear hierarchy of etaatiom 
dmatioa emerged.- fear lasted ■ 
longer than an hour, anger fro 
minutes to a few boors, joy op 
a day and sadness, several dnj 

Source : ^Experiencing Em 
Gvsw^&W So* 
«“<*£ by K JL Scherer, H 
WaUbott and AJJ. Sammerfif 
University Pp 

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There is a place when the stars shin e all day and its 


Malibu. It doesnjt have any mains drainage and the 


other thing it smells if is money. The famous live so close 


together they haje to park their ^os on the beach. 
Douglas Thompsoqreports from the far shores of reality 


I t is 22 miles long, half a 
mile wide and mfe«t<»d 
with rats. Anna Q. Nil 
sson, a household name 
only in households who- 
sd occupants remember silent 
niovie stars, made it fam ous, 
ut she was so rat. 


and beautiful and 


persuasive. She took 
lebrity out to the beach at 
Malibu, convincing the rivjp 
leaders — who had previously 
t a Mock on “Hollywood 
people” — that they should let 
her in. They did, in exchange 
for a promise that Miss Nils- 
son would not “smoke, drink 
pr carouse 

Thai is how long ago it was. 
Malibu’s rats have four legs. 


M i mi i^m . 


aorvegious, and a propensity 
for reproducing themselves 
fvfakfa demonstrates that who- 
ever signed the pledge against 
tarousing, the rats had an 
exclusion clause. 

| But mere rats cannot keep 
the Hollywood famous away, 
nibble at night though they 
inight. scuHer by day though 
they may. Malibu, not so 
much a piece of land, more a 
Hollywood out-station, is now 
the most star-studded stretch 
of coast anywhere. You can, as 
Joan Rivers— among others— ' 
put it “lie on the sand and 
look at the stars - and vice 
versa”. 

The passport to Malibu is 
that good-old Hollywood 


imnodity, money. A million 
liars, for instance, may get 
a modest 3,600 square feet 
the beachfront and that's 
the land. If the plot 
□tains a house, any old 
iken-down house, add anr 
er million. 

That is enough to Keep out 
deadbeats and the small 
. but, to be on the safe side, 
e famous possesses of a {dot 
'austrophobic proximity to 
famous possessors of an 
cent plot seem to spend a 
l£ of their energy conspiring 
— — ■ everything from die 
ocean, the slithering 
the rattlesnakes *nri the 
tes to the murderers, the 
. dealers, the gauche star- 
and the agents. That ihey 
any energy left for 
is open to question, 
out ‘mansions’ start 
at i modest $4 milli on but if 
yoiiprefer to spend $14 mil- 
iionfthat can easily be ar- 
ranged. Then there is 
maincnance, what with the 
pain t\ peeling and the pipes 
and the wood warping 
oding the homestead 
the salt sea air of the 
Jgrey, usually pol- 
luted, Picific is a full-time job 
for a fititup wallet 
There \zre enough myths 
and legends about the occur 
pants of 'he hundreds of 
homes along Malibu’s five 
beadies and' six canyons to 
make a Hollywood publicity 


VICTORIA TONE 

Of 

THE MONTH I 


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man look uninventive by 

mmiwrknn- arirl craw rtf ttw 


stories are reputed to be 
capable of passing a lie-detec 
lor test. 

Take Alex Mass, who lit 
eraQy walked into the life of 
three-times divorced talk 
show host Johnny Orson. 
Alex amassed her undisputed 
qualities in a bikini and 
strolled past Carson's house. 
Then she scrolled past again. 
And again and again until 
Carson invited her inside. She 
is still there, Carson's “con 
slant companion.” 

- In Manbu, every day is a 
celebrity .spotter's birthday. 

: John McEnroeis there, brood- 
ing, on his . future (ft was 
“McEnroe who gave Caison 
tennis lessons as part of the 
sales price for his 
two-storey beach home w 
like most others, has an ugly 
TV satellite “dish” stuck on 
the roof). - 

Over at the Trancas Can- 
yon supermarket you can find 
Rod .Steiger standing in line, 
and most Sundays you'll see 
Larry Hagman, in a caftan, 
wandering along the beach 
and Ryan O'Neal and Pariah 
Fawcett jogging along it 

Long ago, back in AD 1000, 
Malibu was a lot safer, not to 
say saner, under the steward- 
ship of the Chumash In dians. 
In 1542 the Spaniards arrived 
out of a dear blue sea. They 
.turned out to be the 16th 
century equivalent of the 7th 
Cavalry. The indians that the 
Spanish omitted to kSl were 
forced to live apart from their 
wives' (a bint of things to 
come, perhaps). This birth 
control method offered little 
future for the Chumash tribe 
and one of their medicine men 
cast a curse on the land they 
had known as Maliwu. 

D on Jose Battolome 
Tapia was given a 
royal decree to 
raise cattle on the 
area he caOed Ran- 
cho Topango Malibu Simmi 
Sostomo Sequi, but he lost the 
documents and so missed out. 
In 1843 his widow sold the 
1 family ranch to Leon Victor 
Prudhome for “400 persons, 
200 incoin and 200 in goods.” 

In l8S? Prudhome sold to 
Irish-born Don Mateo KeOer 
for' $1,400. Keller (five lan- 
guages and Trinity College, 




_ _ .v ■ . • .• 








“cookouts” on . the - beach 
along with Brian Dpnlevy md 
Constance Bennett and Chico 
Marx. Actress Billie .Dove 
moved in. and a besotted 
Howard Hughes flew over 
every day and “bombed” her 
house with roses. 

. A child star appeared, riding 
horsebadttotrainforafilm.lt 
was called National Velvet, she 
was called Elizabeth Taylor. 
There were other future gran- 
der dames, like Candice Ber- 
gen and Liza MinelU, little 
girls with Technicolor parents 
who threw extravagant birth- 
day parties on the beach. 

Fantasy and reality live 
together in Malibu. Early 
Westerns (most starring Tom 
Mix) were made in the Malibu 
Hills and Mack Sen nett did 


some bathing beauty se- 
quences here. “Sweater Girl” 
Lana Turner lived here, as did 
Ronald and Nancy Reagan. 

Today the image is of a 
proliferation of movie stars 
making love on the beach and 
deals in the jacuzzl But the 
only obvious decadence is the 
way the money gets tossed 
around. Burt Reynolds bought 
a Malibu beach house “on 
impulse” one morning and a 
little later, fed up with it, was 
renting it out at $15,000 a 
month. Producer Jerry 
Perenchio wanted a private 
place to jog and spent 
$17 million on two acres of 
sand: no house, just sand, 
private sand. 

Barbra Streisand has a 
“compound” in Ramirez Can- 


Bing and the Bobs 


. V" 


. .Vx. 






Hot Christmas: Bmg Crosby went straight to number one 







RUT 

Ssl M 99 

fully appreciate ns bottle 

3TLE BOUQUEt 

Discount on 6 bottles or more. 

^THEVKTWWJA | 




way out of ibe Chumash curse. 
He planted vineyards and 
began shipping a quarter of a 
million gallons of wine a year. 
Hedied in 1881. 

Eleven years after that Ran- 
cho Malibu went (for 
$271000) to Boston insurance 
tycoon Frederick Rindge, a 
Harvard' man with Cote 
D’Azur visions for “The 
Malibu”. That plan was 
cursed: be died in 1 905 and his 
widow May Knight Rindge 
took over. May was very 
nearly a role model for Annie 
Get- Your Gun — she rode 
horseback, carried a gun, and 
keep out everyone from squat- 
ters to the advancing railroads 
and highways. 

In 1 925 the state of Califor- 
nia finally won right of way 
through her property and 
secured ft after a three-day 
siege by May and 40 armed 
guards. But the Roosevelt 
Highway, the original of what 
is now the Picifie Coast 
Highway — it tu ns all the way 
from San Francisco to Mexico 
- was built. And May began 
renting pans of the beach for 
cottages. 

Clark Gable arrived. He 
went duck hunting in Malibu 
with Gary Cooper. Joan 
Crawford and Douglas Fair- 
banks jun. They had 




Hot profits: Robert Bedford loved it, Bob Newhart bought it 


The first house to bo built at 
Malibu by a movie star now 
consists erf four bed rooms, . 

- a massive living ar6a, t aguest 
house with two bedrooms 
and an open plan living section 
and a three-car garage (a 
luxury on foe cramped 
beacnskJeL But its main 
attraction is unchanged - a 
■ front door faring the beach. 

192S ArmaQ. MRsson, 
stent movie star, bought foe 
land. 

1927: Librettist NadO Hbrb 
Brown ( Broadway Melody, 
Siogin ' in The Rain) bought 
Nitson's and adjacent land, 
built a house for $3,500. 

House stayed In foe Brown 
family until ... 

1942: Bought by Bing • 
Crosby for S200.000but rented 


out regularly. Tagged The 
Bing Crosby House' attracted 
customers and pushed up 
the rent 

UfaTSOs: Rented by 
Disney cartoonisrtesley . 
Ackerman [Lady and foe 
Tramp, Steeping Beauty). 
Various other major and 
minor celebrities rented the 
house LintS . . . 

1982: Bought for a' bargain' 

$1 ,850,000 by Robert Redford 
on foe proceeds of early 
successes (Butch Cassidy and . 
die Sundance Kid, The 
Sting, AH The Presidents' 

Men). 

19B4: Redford sails for $2 
million to producer-agent Jett 
Wakl. husband of singer 
Helen Reddy. 

1986: Bought by comedian 
Bob Newhart for 53 million. 




f 7 J > '“ r .* -**'§?** Hif* t ■*-' ■ ■ 

' .V* 4 *" • ^ 

(1) Bob Newhart now owns the boose that started ft aQ 

(2) Actor Rod Steiger, of the Method school, lives next door 
Q) Bob ChartofL the Rocky producer, finds sandy solace 
(4) Can singer/songwriter Joni Mitchell like it? Seemingly 


(5) Burgess Meredith, Batman penguin turned beachman 

(6) Larry Human loves it and shouts from the rooftops, left 

(7) William Blatty, Exorcist writer, worries about the smell 

One man’s Malibu 


yon which supposedly rivals 
the Hearst family castle at San 
Simeon; it contains an an 
deco house that has never 
been slept in. Ali McGraw, 
who moved to Malibu during, 
her marriage to the late Steve 
McQueen, is a veteran of the 
mud, fire and floods that 
frequently ravage the p l a c e. 
But she likes it anyway: “The 
big division in Malibu is 
between weekenders and full- 
timers. Weekenders use- 
Malibu for meditation, to be 
left alone. I use it as a small 
town. 

“I know exactly whom to 
call when my dog pees on the 
carpet. Trades-people are 
honourable and they stay year 
after year. Nobody expects to 
see Neil Diamond on the 
public beach so when he goes 
there with his son be’s not 
bothered. It's part of Malibu 
etiquette to acknowledge but 
also to ignore celebrities. And 
with - residents like Neil and 
Bob Dylan do you think the 
nest of are bothered?” 

B ut, of course, they are 
bothered — by the 
ongoing annual as- 
saults from nature. 
The brush-fire sea- 
son, just ended, brings foe 
rattlesnakes down from the 
hills (but at least the rattlers 
eat the rats). The rain follows 
the fire, naturally, and erosion 
is such that foe saturated land 
loses its grip on the planet and 
slides away. 

And while the rain pounds 
on the roof, foe Pacific surf 
pounds on the beach, bounc- 
ing in big waves that crash 
over foe tops of the sandbag 
walls the residents have franti- 
cally built. No wonder Holly- 
wood loves making disaster 
moves; half its stars are living 
through one. 

Oh, and the earth is moving 
and parts of Malibu are dip- 
ping into the sea. Erosion has 
disastrous consequences for 
the septic tanks and even oh 
peaceful warm days you can 
catch a whiff of Malibu before 
you get there. Author William 
Peter Blatty (The Exorcist) 
says: “A mass attack of di- 
arrhea would make foe whole 
coast uninhabitable.” 

The lack of a main sewer 
system is foe reason there are 
no launderettes or car washes 
in Malibu - there are also no 
hospitals, nor is there an 
undertaker. Perhaps movie 
people prefer to think that box 
office death is the worst kind 
there is. 

Whatever Malibu is, it is 
not what- it set out to be: 
America's Cote D'Azur. From 
foe moment in 1928 when 
Miss Nilsson moved in, 
quickly followed by the “It" 

f lii. Clara Bow, and Gloria 
wanson — whose swimsuit 
picture poses on the beach 
"invented” pin-ups — Malibu 
was destined to be like a 
Hollywood epic, more famous 
for its cast than its plot. 

@Tfentt NMnpapanlid 1HS 


Builder Here Baineau moved 
to Malibu In 1929 ami has 
seen titan aD come and go. He 
is the Malibu memory man: 
“In those days you could build 
a boose in a week for a couple 
of thousand dollars. And we 
were putting op one a week. 
Folks would come down from 
town for the weekend and say 
*1 want we'. I was young 
enough then to oblige them. 

“But Herb Brown (who built 
Number One Malibu Colony) 
showed the way. He had fanny 
ideas. He ased fireproof brick 
and then he buSt a wall around 
the property, n big wall that 
has helped save the property 
Bane than once.” 

Babineau recalls Bing 
Crosby’s arrival in 1942: “He 
was married to Dixie Lee then 
— there was her and aD the- 
boys. They were a little rough. 
Bing used to drink a little then 
and we’d attend up across the 
street at foe Malibu Inn after 
work". 

For Crosby it was foe 


time of foe movie Holiday /«*, 
the everlasting White 
Christmas and the second 
adventure with Bob Hope in 
The Road to Morocco. 

“Bing did some remodelling. 
Everybody who moves to 
Malibu does some remodel- 
ling. Something to do with 
their money, I suppose.” 

Babineau says that Robert 
Redford “adored the freedom" 
oTMaKIm: “It’s the attraction 
for all of these sort of people. > 
They can walk on the beach, 
go to the stores and not be 
bothered. The roughest thing 
that’s going to happen is 
somebody pointing at their 
car. 

“It's getting more like the 
old days — the niovie crowd is 
coating back in droves. Es- 
pecially producers. We've had 
five or so get here in as many 
weeks. One hit movie and they 
move to Malibu. 

“But the veterans, the ones 
that move away, they always 
come back. Can’t resist it.” 


SATURDAY 


Rich menu: 
where to eat, 
what to drink, 
new ways to 
cook — page 15 


Arts Diary 
Bridge 

17 

15 

Gartering 

OmandAbnt 

14 

13 

Chas 

15 

Op«a 

18 

Concerts 

18 

Radio 

18 

Crossword 

17 

Bedew 

17 

Donee 

18 

Rock £ Jazz 

17 

Drink 

Eating Out 

15 

15 

as& 

14 

18 

Films 

IS 

Travel 

12 

Galleries 

18 

TV films 

18 


Share with 
your family the 
beauty of the 
Lake District 

L angda te Tune Ownership in the heart of the Lake 
District National park. Far a single modest payment now 
vou and your family can enjoy a lifetime of holidays- with 
luxurious accommodation, unrivalled leisure facilities and 
breathtaking surroundings. 

Your own £130.000 Scandinavian lodge with every 
creature comfort - sauna, double whirlpool bath, superb 
leather furniture and Gaggenau equipped kitchen. 

The Pillar Club with tropical pool, squash, courts, 
hydro- spa, steam room, saunas and solaria. The immense 
choice of exciting outdoor activities that only the Lake 
District can offer. 

For now and generations to come they’re all yours at 
Langdate. Phone or return foe coupon. Ve will send your 
free 20 page brochure without obligation. 


ZO page brochure without obligation. 

Phone: Langdale (09667) 391 {24 hours). 



LANGDALE 

Share in the w 
beauty of the Lakes. 


The Lajifiiiak Partnership. Gran Lmgdnk. near Amblendc, I 

Cumbria LA22 VJD. Ttbptane: Langdale- WG67.i 391 e 

Please send mtf>aurfrre2fl {MBe odour brochure. Mira I 

_ . Mather k 


lUUlru IMBWm .L,la^ui, 











New 
Streets 
a narrm 
yestent 

After 

prices 

course 

session 


evapon 

mornii 

started 


The 
areragi 
about 1 

half bo 

to 1,79 


Bitten 
Bq Warn 
Bnstwy 
BP 

Bwrtem 

Buri'Km 

Burroug 

CmpOftS 

CanPac 

Caterpfl 
Cetanes' 
Central! 
damp* 
Chase S 
CtrniBh 
Ctiewror 
Chrysler 
Ciocorp 
Clark Et 
CocaCt 


CE 
CTmtaa 
Cmbm 
Conwrft 
Cons Ei 
CnNai 
Cons Pi 
QntrtDs 
Consnc 
CPCW 
Crane 
Cm 2d 
Dart SI 
Deere 
Delta A 
Detroit 


DowC 
DressB 
Duke F 
DuPor 
Easten 

EstmK 
Eaton i 
Bnera 
Exxon 

■sag 


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Edited by Shorn Crawford Poole 



Days of 


Australia’s v ictory in the America’s 
Cup put Perth on the jet set’s map. 
The defence has just begun, and until 
February the world will be wearing out 
t he airlanes to Western Australia. For 

those seeking escape from yachts. 


Shorn Crawford Poole suggests 
heading south through the vineyards 


ussehon. As the man 
■ V in the ..bottle-shop 
put • It: • "You 
m ■wouldn’t make 
money out of ulcers 
in this town." But atlbe end of 
a dry day on the South- 
Western Highway out of 
Perth, past the sign on the side 
of the flour mill painted by 
Bondy in person (at the time 
when Western Australia s 
best-known son was making 
his first mark on the econ- 
omy), when- the last shop 
selling “wet pets" was fer 
behind and the surrounding 
cattle country already seemed 
familiar, h spot oflunch would 
have gone down posh. 

Waroona, just a few bun- 
galows and a petrol station, 
signalled no sustenance. Har- 
vey was the next town on the 
route. The name sounded 
friendly enough, but the drab 
girl in the pizza parlour looked 
at the dock and said with no 
regret that it was too late at 
1.30. There did not seem to be 
an alternative restaurant so, 
with beer from the super- 
market and a snack from a 
petrol station on the way, we 
looked for a lane in which to 
picnic. 

The hamburger, my 
partner's choice, was livid 
with beetroot My baoon-and- 
egg burger was drenched in 
ketchup the colour of dried 
blood. Only starvation would 
have made either palatable. So 
we drank the beer and focused 

on the beauty of the scene, a 
flock of ibis lifting off from a 
marshy field to soar into the 
perfect blue of an afternoon 
thermal. 

Further down the highway, 
the port at Bunbury was big on 
cranes and containers, short 
on quays to dangle your legs 
over, or fishing boats, or teas. 
The cliff path view from the 
headland, topped with a prop- 


erly striped lighthouse, was 
not unlike Peace haven, but 
that was no reason riot to press 
on to Bussdton. _ 

The original Ship Inn. built 
in limestone in, 1847, still 
stands within the grounds of 
today's Ship Resort Hotel. 
The public bar at the front 
commands the crossroads and 
a fin slice of local trade 
wearing shorts- Through the 
bar’s back waJL a floor-to- 
ceiling bank of glass-sided 
refrigerators chilling the tum- 
blers that every fresh beer is 
served in, those who keep the 
old ways can observe those, 
who embrace gin slings before 
dining in ties at Reagan's 
Restaurant. 

In a part of the world that 
has “veges", “veg’s” and 
“veggies" but no vegetables, 
Reagan’s quail salads and wild 
mushrooms in puff pastry 
coffins proved unexpectedly 
smooth. 

The gentrificauon of budd- 
ings, too, is as popular in 
Busselton as it is in Bamsbury. 
Where the residents of Geor- 
gian London repiaoe cornicing 
torn out by earlier improvers, 
so the householders of West- 
ern Australia are tearing the 
tiles off old roofs and putting 
back the style with corrugated 
tin. Very handsome it can 
look, too. . ■ 

Busselton’s 2km-long jetty, 
a relic of the town's whaling 
past, strides out into Geo- 
graphe ‘Bay to the delight of 
boys with fishing rods. The 
town's arts council had taken 
over the old court house, but I 
did not want to put a red spot 
on any of the pottery exhibited 
in the dock, buy a beaker from 
the glass-maker’s workshop in 
ihe cells. 9 r try on anything 
appliqu&d in the ante-room. It 
was time to drive on. 

The matrons of the Bruns- 
wick ami District ..Ladies' 


fc-t. 



sswJSS-p 

directly to c ; . 

orices start at £815 return^- 

Estdass is £3.420 rehimr 
RA-7R New 


FlfSI OoSb n 
Jetset Tours, ^6New 
Oxford Street Ig**** 1 Wd 
(01-631 0501) offers ' 

L»ii«ua naeksoaS tO Paritlfer 


^SirSation, car hire aid - 
BA direct flights. 

w Onervt I 


, „ IHtjuus. 

The Ship Resort Hotel. 
Albert Street, 


Creaming in ou the crest of a cult a Saturday morning ritual enacted by skilful ymmg men on the bare, secretive coast of Western Australia 

.. . _ . th«i mo fast to see overpriced. There is su; 


Aioen ouew. i. 

Tlw Margaret River Ho»L 

charges from about £21 angnt 
for a double room. 


Bowling Club were absorbed 
in their afternoon game as the 
road wound south and the 
names on the map began to 
team up with labels on bottles 
- Cape Men telle, Redgate, 
Leeuwin Estate, Chateau Xan- 
adu;- Sandalford and Red- 
brook. to name a few of the 
Margaret River vineyards. 

Margaret River's wide main 
street was as quiet as the grave 
on Friday night- No matter at 
all that the bedroom over- 
looked the road. The blinds, 
snapped up next morning on a 
scene of unexpected anima- 
tion. Rugged pick-ups with 
chunky tyres were vying with 
femily saloons for prime park- 


ing spots outside the em- 
porium opposite. It was the 
rural equivalent of a depart- 
ment store, selling everything 
essential for country living 
from ploughshares to feed, by 
way of rings for the noses of 
bulls to pocket-size slivers of 
Arkansas stone for sharpening 
fish hooks and pen knives. 
People went about their busi- 
ness wearing fresh Saturday 
morning shirts and open, 
neighbourly smiles. 

lust a few miles away onihe 
bare secretive coast quite 
different Saturday morning 
rituals were being honoured. 
On a headland high above the 
dunes and scrub of Calgardup 


Beach, beautifiillymusded 

HW^"SS/S sprang o^to tiidrbcraKls and 

dffldwof pink, lime and plainly reproduce oh wine labels pub 

pen winkle. danaaous, skilful and exhil- up the pnceof LeeuwinEstau 

«hey pulled their- aratingly lovely to watch, wines. 

1 boards off the roofs Small wonder that it has - — - 

become a cult 
Before be made his first 
million “I was just a beer- 
drinking surfie", said Denis 


T 

Striata tiptoed barefoot ran. Horgan? front man of the 
A crew of evil-looking dogs' Derm and Triria Horgan team 
-was ' left in charge of the jjj at j s th e envy of the stale. 


of beaten-up camper 
vans and battered 
Ameri can-length 
and headed for the 
at a tiptoed barefoot ran. 
)f evil- 


wheels. 

• In flat light on agrey sea, the 
surfers paddled out to catch 
the big waves, 20-odd seal 
heads moving patiently for- 


envy 

You will hear people say that 
wine made in the winery they 
founded, and which is today a 
front runner of the booming 
Australian wine business, is 


The Horgans are unfussec 
by the criticism. They knew 
they are making good wine 
and. if flying a foil symphonj 
orchestra from London togivi 
an open-air conceit on you, 
estate is too flash for some 
tastes, that’s lough. 

Lunch at Leeuwin stretche. 
convivially into the afternoon 
which is why 1 missed the fill 
splendour of the karri fores® 


— a spedes of eucalyptus 
which grow so tall that driving 
through them in the dark they 
took on the nightmare 
outlandishness of an iflusti* 
tion for the brothers GnmrtL: 
Karri trees and black swanp 
are on every itinerary. 

In the great natural barbouj 
of Albany, where the last 
whale was flensed m 1978, the, 
Cheynes Beach Whaling Com-i 
pany station at Frenchman] 
Bay trades on its bloody-past: 
as a museum and souvenir , 
shop. It was here in the bay;: 
that the black swans, states 
emblems and blazoned on 
beer cans, finally put in an 
appearance. 


. i.' 


(*»»«« 


t -t 


- 

•/ r •;> *1 
■ ; r-r %■ 

T: yJV'A . ; 

K ***<► 



HOLIDAYS & VILLAS 



NOW YOU CAN 
AFFORD TO 
ESCAPE TO THE] 
SUN M SPAIN! 



Setf<xilyMon8ysayeretol3(tesiTO}kjnsinSptm#W4rictusiv8,TOextotopQy 

BSJoy 6 nights- 1 month. •Scheduled daytime Ilighb-noconsoMalions. 

• Daily departures tonr Heattncw and Manchester • FuH (Bails and inslant 
canpiter reservations from your lATAtrovel qgent 
Or ring fceria London (pi) 437 5622 <30 lines); Binriingham (021) 643 1953, 
Manchester (061) 436 6444, Glasgow (041) 248 6581. 

Aflrrojar craft carte accepted Fcra**^6(WOTnimi(wra^ 


inmM, N. DEVON RsrkvW 
Htrfrl AA" CTV IB EjasulIC 
DHL CH. Carpark. Cham Of 
menu. nirKd winr ML wrti 
ilortfd bar. Autumn breaks 2 
days £(3, o Dus £8« DSU 
tot ip. Soaking for Xmas now. 
Tcfc 0698 S2279. 


tSuitolf IlfT WilltLT 


!iiRs\fnnimi 


Uwsunshini ; 


Sunscene HoOcfovs UcL 

" iMMIa — MiUMlS 


MkloikBkUukMaLb 


li WmMr looki Weak, gal awoy 
Mm it an on a Surname long 
Stay Winter away From 4 week* 
to 0 manOu. Wide ctKBce ol 
apartments in Manxea Cosa 
Blanco or The Com del Sol 
ftytmmHeaUm>*or<ir*» 
your own car 

| AKA-AIOl Bonded. AAlrweonce 
toteWKHlo (0533) 206M , 

lor ypui Smcone nwnot t»oc hum 
o> oik sour kawH agent 



SWITZERLAND 
FROM ONLY 
£99 RETURN 

Save with Swissairis 
Super Apex. 

London to Zurich or 
Geneva daify on con- 
venient afternoon 

flights. And daily 
flights to Basle 
(except Sundays). 
Book and pay 14 days 
before departure. 

Stay in Switzerland 
at least until the 
Sunday afiterarrivaL 
Bookings and full 
conditions from 
travel agents or 


IT S ALL AT 
TRAILFINDERS 


SPEEDWING 


01-4379573 


HtoridwW* tow-cart Wgbta 
The best-end we een prove H 
W04M0 Citato* «»ra7u 
CURRENT BEST BUYS 
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SYDNEY COLOMBO 

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I OWED *-* IMI*-nH 9-8 **T | 
LgartoalOHinai 

aniOMoaists 

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IdUSetoaeee 01438 3444 


SANTA'S 

LAPLAND 


£399 


-♦ Days, 3 Nights 
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Pinnish Lapland 

Depart top U:li v\ 

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tor .'orti’Jcr dcaJL* contact: 
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scheduled Xnicr’’ o' 


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76 Shaftestrory Avenue 
London WIV 7DG. 


01-439 OIBMII-4WT7S1 
Open SatexAay IOjDB-13^0 


%F1NNFHR 


TMHOMNA S4CH.T -small 6 
IhnMir Mbuih from CITI- 
C1H« 18 * BJ HolA IT Own or 
Bmrhl Iron C219 C279IHB). 7 
nwh» atTOro may w«i_Canwrfc 
day imho Tuc/Thur/Sun 
Uirowtotk Ort. Tnuftfs A 
OTOW UX HLANDSUN OJ- 
232 7482 AOTA/ATOC 
UMB mawnt Sydney 
o/w G4SO tin C700 Aunmmd 
o/w £420 no CTTO. JdDwro 
O/w UQ6 Hn £499 Ln Avar- 
Im o/w dd rtn £406 London 
ITMM CrnW 01 370 
MM T4hrtiSep«J4H« ww Vorh 
CS49 l A CW. TdfOfllO 
£3-79 Natron C3B9. fetlnry 
C7S» AurWane L749 Oarjalj 
Jrrmyn Wrrei Ol 8W 


SCANDINAVIA 

& 


Raw 


OcVApnl Hon HanwcnKI' 

S nrtits kvn D07flp and to 
AHWnrto - 9 ■' 

und 


BmetBre ttoto Hnacta tet 
Tet 0764 7BQZB. 
Dm**, Csnwta, PertW**- 
PH62JZ. 


130 
7144 

TOtmre. Grerh blantK. Aid*- 
Mnwru \illai. alto. 
prmwiA. Lnrrnav HoUtUyv 
IMlin. Ororfiu rt*J tmlanl 
hoowmn vmlura Hoedain. 
irt Ool 804 5033. 
fcilMITIHAl in I hr Cananm 

L.in*jra*f/Purrto VnUlira II 

On- 4 with £399. 0*W3 
T7l9bfr T tow way HOW ABTA 
ATOL >107 


LATM AIWP W CA Low rM 

ntohn no C48fr Lmih 
nn. Abo SrtMU Group 
Hdaiay JowrmWW _Poru 
Iran £3801 JLA 01-7473108 
LOW fMBS WOWLDWlOt 
ISA. s Arwrw. Mel and Fa; 
ELnl. s Ainra. Tray\atr. 4a 
Mjrwfrt SlrreC Wl. Ol 880 
gags tvtu Arrepirdp 

Aram. M alaga. Fan. Paima 
Mid Kim a, Xrna» mod. ew 
u-rtv. Cormany & SwHS lr C99. 
nw Pan Ol 491 3f749 fO-7% 

I OOUMM MHM/TUMKCT Wn- 
in ni-of imhv mil Pockaws/nti 
MOV OlASd 19da 24ftf err 
lirr. Ol 788 8030 ABTA 
LOW COST FUSWn MMipw 
pr.ni dMUiMllam V.llpxandrr. 
Ol OQB 4ZOS/00&2 4BT4T 
91004 ATOL 19uO 
HUUU. JAMAICA. H.YORK. 
WrorMwMi- rtn-apm Ltit-w 
RKtintond Train. 1 ftiii" SI 

RKlanond >\BTA Ol 9404OTA 
WTCNAIR S<ul salr la I iSA Ca 
rtgoran Fm Er.1 Airlraha. Call 
I hr orolmlmut'- ABTA IATA 
n nerrotrd. Tri 01 264 87tm 



rates « 

|AB74rraMoe.«m ^ gj I 


KV(uajSB7a*87ua 

IRA/BJEMGI 


CORFD BARGAINS 

BeatMul dendieo vitas rr the 
beach thfougbna oa & Kaa »m 
2-i yn lek. £229 Z eta 
Hi OcL Gal or If row. 

Also sneoal pness lor Cyons. 
Malta oiha 6nek tomb S 
Montand. Hoieis & Aiks. 

Open Sate. 81-734 2562 
Pan World Holidays. 
(S«a 81-736 2464) 


LOWEST FARES 
Pam r69 N YORK £275 

fratohKI t60 LA/SF DM 
i»i« (SO Man €330 

Nan* g nffpy fOg 

Jo Ding E«0 BngtoL 035 

Caro €205 Kaeundu W40 
ObUBobi £335 Rangoon CEO 

Hong hong £510 Catatoa £«6 

Hug* Dracounts Aesfl 
oolst 1 Ctab CIms 
SUN A SAW 
21 Mkna. LenemWI 
01-438 ZIIMMO 0537 


MENORCA 

OCT DEPTS 

Various A/ports 
Seats from 

£78 

MARSHALL SUTTON 
81-282 2188 AM 899 


DISCOUNTED FARES 
miA noro 

Jotofl/tta OOO H9B 

MaroO EOT CTO 

Can £150 CTO 

Ligns E3A) £360 

ttei'Bom CTO CTO 

BamVak £220 £350 

Douata 1420 

Afro Aston Travel Ud 

late A iSw* T 
MU»« 


NEW LOW FARES 
VORLDWBE 

£260 KARACHI 

£325 LAGOS 

£210 MAUI 

£345 HOW 

£65 SEOUL 

HONG K0NGT495 SYD/MEL 
ETANBUt £W TOKYO, 

SKTUMB TRAVEL LTD 

2 DENMAN 81 HE ET. LONDON Wl 
Tet IMN 35Z1H0B7 
MRUHE BOIOSD 


BOMBAY 

CAIRO 

DELHI 

FRATUHT 


£270 

.£330 

£283 

£105 

£005 

£765 

CTO 


DISCOUNT FAMES Wortdwlir 
01-434 0734 JupHrr TravM. 


MCOUMTED a now FAMES. 

ITC OvmSaL 07S3 867036 


Fares -rorWwntr 01-387 9100 


LOW ON Fan 19 L> 9-A Major 
Trairl Ol 48S 9257 IATA. 


COSTCUTTEHS ON IHqhb/IWi» 
lo tut opr. L4-A A moH dr-Uln*- 
Ikhb- DioUmul Tra\rt 01-730 
2201 ABTA IATA ATOL. 


1ST a, CLUB CLASS FUCMTSr 
How Otrouiih Suaworld 
TlArt 1037271 
/27IO9/27S30 


MALAGA, CAM A MES . Ol 441 

1111 Tmrlwnr. Aina. AM. 


CMJIF mom Wortnwidr. 
Haynurhil Ol 930 1399. 


swra ma amo srarauku roywa 

Ol 734 2388 ABTA ATOL 


GENERAL 


TUMttlA Fto yoia Ml May 
wlwir in *tul Miirnnir Call lor 

our hrortnire no— Timartn 
Tlrf-H Burrau. Ol 573 441 1 
AH. US CnWS Imml lam an 
him vnnliilM onvn Ol 
5H4 7371 ABTA 
hong Ham mm. SANCKOH 
U#4. hniwV* C4S7 Ollto 
ri Ol &M4 0614 ABTA. 

ROME LrJHin L9« rrajitniri 
P.-m-. toO LTV Ol 328 
33-WOI 1*1 4513 ABTA 
SVO 'MEL (MS Prttn C5*S All 
nuior r.m«'A lo Any/NZ Ol 
584 7371 ABTA 
Sl AnoCA From C4o6 01 584 
7571 ABIA 


Autumn and 
winter magic. 

Ufedt-eods or weeks, 
hoocymooDS ot second 
honeymoons. , , discover 
ihe Magic oflialy’s 
romantic cities in autumn 
or winter. 

Indulge yourself id a 
visit to Venice. Rome, 
Florence. Tuscany or 

Sorrento. Enjoy ihe food, 
the sights, the sales 
bargains. . . you deserveit. 

Call 01-749 WW for your 
FREEcolQUrBrochiire-Mwc 
ol I taly. -t? Shepherd » Bush 
Green. LncJun W12 BPS. 



Magic of 
Italy 

J %n.i v* 


CRUISE & SAIL ABROAD 


AMERICAS CUM Ctwrlrr Bnlon 
\.D HI IrromanlK 1 lot 9"tei» 
nolKhlV 4 Irrih Cl 500 MV. 
inti- rxpmrnrnS Vuaeor A 
lira 0245-445203 Ereran*, 


TURKEY luv 40- varftl mr 
u/Min auitora 

tome Mr4 0043 £74535 


HOTELS ABROAD 


VENICE 


HOTEL LA FENICE 
ET DES ARTISTES 

raw. S» Kami im 

Fine mmtBS w* from Sl Mark's 
Sqme. every amton. cosy asno- 
sphee at moderate prices. 


SELF-CATERING 
CANARY & MADEIRA 


rmnu Fi-wwoMia Mateora. 
IM floor KM. ontm wwi pod, 
(Mm from on 10 JM Fronr 
run DM TM 0209 871262 • 


SELF-CATERING 

FRANCE 


AUTUMN Breaks. L» CM» nr, 
Aimny. AUuv rtialrL rat; 
uure anarte. local MU iwfe. Tet 
■02421 6041 30/ 60S 124 


SELFCATERING 

GREECE 


CORFU Bmnn HnuiUIlM del 
villas, nr Hie bcerti. 245 pry 
LI 99 I wl. C229 2 wkSlaOcL 
CM or Him, Open SM>. Ol 
734 2062 Ran Worm Holidays. 


>.MyL 

Naxos. I» ctr.VHIaS, 
TdimusA Poreloni - . 
cUeaper. Snnpty Supen Supgy 
gmao HoUdajn. Ol 573 1933. 


CRCTCF. Ltosowa Biaads. Ctoeap 
fHqnh. villa rentals Hr. 2 mm 
HO ts. Ol *34 1947. AML AMO. 


M ODE S lux apan hot» from 
C 1 69 na 8. 1 1 . 1 B.18 OH Strann 
070SBDC814- 


SELF-CATERING ITALY 


riSRCE Apts lo rent to mural 
Vnucr Pnm from ElOSpw- 
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THE TIMES SATURDAY OCTOBER 4 1986 


TRAVEL 2 


OUT AND ABOUT 


The heart of the lost domain 


^aOrleatis 



~[n7 


(f tTiaiaifiE 

o\ 

| * Coligny 

O \ „ Client 

■3- 11 

/0 miIps 


Wandering through the Berry region of France, 
Jean Robertson found an author’s landscape 


UKlc !d,d> 

nr *as f3 

I hunks S 1 

ha* ^ i 

”> and ,3 

II , r 

nil £i.Tiw H 

' U ’-fr0B> 

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psrj?5 * 

lj n« his 

I, ld «We2 

- s 

l!1 iamst^: 

,an ,n die jw 

Un anea^ 

Pwpofiw 
I**™. ahnui t 
' u ' n thou^ 
. ,,nu ‘ >»r 
Keaganad^ 

■*»lc Ip Jlup. 
s ><t> wiskI 
■i«h Arfugi- 

ixxtiilllieujr 

Jn “unl«mt 
,h V WMCh;. 
iiMrad. inia;. 

• “nr hai \ a*. 
itaiJlitUTi 
anuiynf j. 
u he using & 
i this Q* & 

II. in !he fe 
the "uinnc'i 
I >ani1ui] ssr 

ft Mill is wtt 

:rruan pstt 
i uondcrtulr 
m:.*r lafin: 

»i* oi pulls 
'Mi.u hi«v 
n.».n:!oli rax 

lio .i rcr.int: 
f Kuwavtap 
i« tii'}* 

t t ; St« 


Chateau / iw 

•ChapeUe. {/§ 
J v:„ d’Angillon U 5 

“won -* ^ 

f v 1 ! I Bourges 

^ WA « 

1 O New 


‘■Norrlac 


, Amand r 


Nereis ■ 


t D <\w^\^ 

/<f 

fSSSS& ■ j| ^ I rnth ui.s 

£* fi . rei , Henri Alain- 

ffV— s & Grand Meaulnes many 
years ago. I have warned to see the 
countryside of ihe Berry - Hie tree 
?* his only novel. Published 
JP selected as a runner-up 

for thePnx GoncourL He was 26; but ' 
before his 27th birthday he was killed 
on the Western Front. 

His grave is unknown but his pays, 
the Cher region of the Berry, lies 
south of the Touraine and north of 
the Auvergne, between two great 
north-south arteries of France, the 
IN 10 and N7, and is by-passed by all 
out the most curious wanderer. With 
its heaths and woodlands, small fields 
neatly enclosed by thick-set hedge- 
row's, lakes, rivers, marshes and 
mists, it is a private sliver of France, 
almost undisturbed by tourism. 
Everywhere pine and birch strain 
upwards like the spires of the 
Romanesque village churches, and in 
1986 it is all much as Alain-Foumier 
knew iL 

Bourges, the regional capital, de- 
serves at least one night's stop (ideally 
at the Hotel d'Angleterre or the 
slightly cheaper Hostel! erie du Grand 
Argentier — both within walking 
distance of most sights worth seeing). 
Bourges is convenient for daily 
sorties north and south — though 1 
chose to stay in the countryside, 
returning there as the grand finale. 

Small as it is, Bourges is grand in 
every sense, from its great, frve- 
porrhed cathedral to the cobbled 
lanes and half-timbered tithe bam, 
the palaces, museums and churches. 
Les Jardins des Pres Fichaux, on the 
south-western edge of the city proffer, 
are imaginative, serene and fun. . 

We drove down. La Route Jacques- 
Coeur along a little drain of chateaux 
abbeys and churches, historic towns 
and villages, art galleries and muse- 
ums. The road has taken its name 
Irom Charles VIPs treasurer. 

Driving due south from Pans on 
the N7, we left . the highway at 
Chatillon Coligny to join the D43 en 




df‘ 


Dream land: Henri Aiain-Fonraier, who made the countryside his heroine 


route for the great international 
hunting museum at Gien. The Musee 
de la Cbasse, boused in the Chateau ' 
Gien high above the Loire, will rivet 
the anti-bloodspoit fraternity as 
much as it fascinates the hunting, 
shooting and fishing folk. The little 
town of Gien itself heavily bombed . 
in the Second World War, is a 
masterpiece of foithful yet imagi- 
native reconstruction. Sitting prettily 
on the south bank of the Loire, its 
turrets, spires and steep roofs grey 
and shining, Gien is a pleasant place 
to break a journey. 

Try dining at the Beau Rivage. a 
small traditional hotel (allow £20 
each including wine, tax and service), 
then stroll over the bridge to take bed 
and breakfast at the Solhotel which 
has a glorious view of river, town and 
chateau (about £2S for two). 

Leaving Gien you leave the Loire 
itself but not the waters (hat feed iL 
We pushed on to the Sologne, 
sustained by the Sauldre and the 
Nere, the forested hunting country 
broken by lakes and heaths, which 
figures powerfully in the escapades of 
Meautnes. But first a stop at the 


Chateau Blancafort on the banks of 
the Sauldre. to admire the classic 
jardin francais faithfully recreated 
from ahayfield by the present owner. 
La Barrone de Cramer. 

The world of Le Grand Meaulnes is 
hard to trace with accuracy, since the 
story is a blend of Alain-Foumier's 
experience as a son of the Berry and 
of its places and people. Confusion is 
compounded because he deliberately 
juggled with place names and dis- 
tances. anxious to cover his tracks 
and avoid identifying precisely. 

He went to school and spent most 
of his childhood at Ainey-Je-Vleil, in 
the countryside where the Berry and 
the Bourbonnaise meet. The Sainte 
Agathe of bis novel is still the village 
school at EpmeuiWe-Fle uriel, a few 
minutes south of Ainey. Henri's 
lather was headmaster, his mother 
cared for the infonts (M. Seural and 
Millie of the book; and it is from the 
attic of Sainte Agathe, where Henri 
slept, that Meaulnes set off on his 
wanderings. The school can still be 
visited and this year hosts a special 
exhibition of school life at the turn of 
the century. 


A few kilometres up the road is the 
Chateau Conancay, a grand party 
was held here for the village and the 
estate when Alain-Foumier was a 
boy. Thechateau was hung with lights 
and there was fancy dress and a fine 
spread on the table, all accompanied 
by music and dancing. The child 
never forgot the event and Conancay 
is one of the chateaux which his 
imagination wove into the magical 
domain in the Sologne. “which 
seemed to be run by children" and 
where la Fae Eirange took place. 

In stern contrast to chateau- 
wandering is the stark Cistercian 
abbey of Noirlac (just north of Saint- 
Amand). where the only concessions 
to the flesh are its pastoral setting, 
sweet-smelling cloisters and a wine 
cellar. The only fireplace in the vast 
stone structure is in the room that 
served the monks as a dormitory. The 
Abbey church now serves as a concert 
hall mainly for vocal music if your 
stay in the area happens to coincide 
with a performance, it is hard to think 
of a lovelier way of spending an 
evening than at this severely ascetic 
Glvndeboume. 

There is plenty of scope for good 
walking at La Verrerie. a solitary little 
palace on a lake in woodlands north 
of Bourges; and for taking a few more 
steps into the world of Alain- 
Foumier. 

He was bom at La Cbapelle- 
d'Angillon (the small house is in the 
main street but it has acquired a 
second storey since 1886) and the 
local chateau (another strand in the 
magical tapestry of La Fete Eirange) 
has a permanent exhibition of every- 
thing the owners have garnered about 
the life, times, surroundings and 
thoughts of Alain-Foumier. 

Nancay, 30km from La Verrerie 
and famous for its sables and 
observatory (the largest in France), 
was also the home of Alain- 
Foumier's father. It was here that the 
Fourniers gathered annually for a 
family holiday with the Rivieres — 
Henri's unde Florent (Florentin of 
the novel). Aunt Julie (sister to Alain- 
Foumier p£re) and his nine cousins. 
The Rivieres kept a grocery and 
cotton goods store opposite the 
church at Nancay. which can still be 
viewed. The cramped mud-floored 
rooms, peopled with lay figures, 
hardly fit the child's memory of “this 
bazaar which 1 thought would never 
come to an end of so many marvels". 


TRAVEL NOTES 


Air Franca Holidays (01-568 6981) 







Eminent man 
and Victorian 
residence 


has*- 




from £112 (phis a £5 currency 
surcharge) each fbr two people 
travelling together. The seven-night 
fly-drive package costs from £190 
each and there ts a currency 
surcharge of £3 per day. 

Saint-Amand is a convenient • 
centre for visiting the Berry south cl 
Bourges. The Hotel de la Posts 
costs about £30 for two, including 
breakfast The Chftteau de la 
Commando rie is only a few minutes' 
drive from Saint-Amand. Prices 
from E55-E85 for two; (firmer £30 each. 


7 W WW W W V 

GYPT 


Top flights for Florida 


Marvel ai the mysterious Sphinx, die Valley of the 2 

and the Tomb ofTuankhamua, or cruise on the majestic J 
Nile past ibe temples of Kamak and Luxor^ to Aswan. ^ 
You’D find details of these and 
other holidays, i nd udiog our 
brand new "Egypt and Kenya” a 
"Egypt, Jordan and Holy Lan 

tours in onr new 1986/87 brochure. For our full ^ 
lUrf range of escorted holidays, phone 01-629 0999 
JIl t or visit any Thomas Cook oi ^4 ' 

ilPll Frames Travel branch. ^ 


bfhomas^ 
gpCook 

fWHolidavs 


IT’S SO BIG 
IT COVERS 
THE WHOLE OF 
AUSTRALIA. 


Price cuts on 1987 family 
holidays in the USA are 
already beginning to appear. 
Jeisave is giving reductions of 
up to £250 for youngsters aged 
between 12 and 17 at a 
number of hotels in Florida 
and is offering flat-rate £99 
holidays for children between 
two and 1 1 on selected depar- 
tures from Gatwick and Man- 
chester to Orlando. Couples 
aged 65 and over can also save 
£ 1 00 on certain Florida flights. 
There will be no surcharges on 
bookings before January 15. 

Nilotic opera 

Thomas Cook is operating 
tours 10 Egypt next May to tie 
in with a season of perfor- 
mances of Verdi's Aida at the 
Temple of Luxor by the Arena 
di Verona Company and an 
international cast headed by 
Piacido Domingo. A seven- 
day “Discovery of Egypt" tour 
costs from £780, and a nine- 
day Nile cruise from £940. 
boih including tickets for the 
performance. An alternative 
choice is a six-day tour with 
Cbncorde flights in one direc- 
tion, priced from £1,299. 

• Knoni Travel is raramtg 
tonrs to Australia for the 
1986-87 cricket Test 


TRAVEL NEWS 


series. An 18-day tour In die 
Melbourne Test, indudJag 
a five-night stopover on Bali, 
is priced from £985. 

South Sea bobbles 

A month-tong tour of the 
South Sea islands to marie the 
bicentenary of HMS Bounty’s 
departure from England is 
being operated by Serenissima 
Travel in the New Year. The 
guest lecturer will be Glynn 
Christian, a descendant and 
biographer of Fletcher Chris- 
tian, who led the famous 
mutiny. The party will sail 
from Lima on the Soviet- 
owned cruise liner Maxim 
Gorki, calling at the islands of 
Pitcairn, Tahiti and, Tonga, 
before ending in Auckland for 
a four-day tour in New Zea- 
land. The tour departs from 
Heathrow on January 24 and 
is priced at £3.350. Informa- 
tion on 01-730 9841. 

Nice packages 

A series of low-cost charter 
flights from Gatwick to Nice, 
launched earlier this year by 
Euro .Express, is to be ex- 
tended to October 26. The 
flights, priced from £99 return. 


operate on Thursday and Sun- 
day. Fly-drive deals and 
accommodation packages in 
Nice and Cannes are also 
available. Information on 
0293 775555. 

Franc favonrs 

The French and German Na- 
tional Tourist Offices have 
both produced new brochures 
aimed at young budget-con- 
scious travellers: Young Trav- 
ellers in France and Germany 
Lire, with advice on where to 
eaL drink and stay cheaply. 
Information: French Govern- 
ment Tourist Office, 178 
Piccadilly, London WI (01- 
491 7622) and the German 
National Tourist Office. 61 
Conduit Street London Wl 
(01-734 2600). 

Philip Ray 


It is 1 864 and Thomas Carlyle, 
writer and thinker, is taking 
tea in his back dining-room 
with the novelist Geraldine 
Jewsbury. No doubt he is 
holding forth with characteris- 
tic vigour. Meanwhile, just the 
other side of the door, on the 
floor of the tiny cupboard-like 
room known at the china 
closet Mary — the latest in a 
long line of maidservants— is. 
with gritted teeth, giving birth 
to a baby. 

Just one incident in the long 
black comedy that was the 
home life or the Carlyles at 
Cheyne Row, Chelsea, where 
they spent “two and thirty 
years of hard battle against 
Fate". The baby, by the way. 
was smuggled out of the house 
that night and it was months 
before Mary's employers 
knew anything about it. 

At the best of times life was 
hard enough for the domes- 
tics. what with the incessant 
demands of Mrs C, and the 
Sage himself descending to the 
basement kitchen late at night 
to smoke and brood. The 
fastidious Jane forbade smok- 
ing above stairs, so the 
kilchenmaid would be turfed 
out of her primitive living 
quarters to wait, shivering, in 
the scullery until the master 
had composed himself for 
bed. 

-it is difficult now 10 appre- 
ciate the awe in which the 
Victorians held Thomas Car- 
lyle. Today those great diffi- 
cult volumes - Sartor 
Resartus. The French Revdu- 

CWLDREN’S BOOK WEEK: 
Various events throughout the 
country based on the theme 
"Heroes and Heroines in 
Chfldren’s Books”. 

Highlights include a Puffin 
Carnival (today, noon), and 
painting sessions and other 
entertainers (tomorrow, 1 1am- 
4pm). 

-Royal Exchange Theatre. 
Manchester, today. 
Performance: adult £1 , child 
50pr tomorrow free. Further 
information on local events 
from libraries, book shops, 
local press. 

PEARLY HARVEST 
FESTIVAL: Annual service 


non. Oiiw Cronmdl. and so 
on - are little read outside 
academic circles, but happily 
the house remains, a tall, thin 
terraced house of just after 
1 TOO. open 10 the public now 
as it has been for 90 years or 
so. 

In fact it is still an at- 
mospheric Victorian cultural 
shrine; here may be seen such 
relics of Carlyle worship as 
“the pen with which Carlyle 
wrote the last chapters of 
Frederick the GreaT, or his 
camelhair dressing-gown, his 
straw hat a plaster cast of his 
hand. .Almost every part of the 
house remains unaltered. 

The downstairs parlour is 
still precise! v the “Chelsea 
Interior" of Robert Tail's 
painting which now hangs 
there; Carlyle defiantly puffing 
a churchwarden pipe. Jane 
staring tensely into space. It 
was a good thing, someone 
remarked at the time, that 
Thomas Carlyle had married 
Jane Welsh, since this limited 
the misery to two victims 
instead of four. He had a 
point. 

Carlyle demanded absolute 
peace and quiet for his work, 
and you can still view his 
famous “sound-proof room" 
at the top of the house. Built 
with the utmost ingenuity, this 
in feet contrived to amplify 

Carlyle's House, 24 Cheyne 
Row, London SW3 (01-352 
7087) is open until the end 
of October, Wed-Sun, 
llam-Spm. 


OUTINGS 


attended by the pearly 
kings, quebns, princes and 
princesses, whose original 
function was to safeguard the 
interests of the street 
traders who elected them. 

St Martin-in-the-Fiekls, 
Trafalgar Square, London 
WC2. Tomorrow, 3pm. 

Free. 

INTERNATIONAL 
BROTHERHOOD OF 
MAGICIANS’ SHOWS: This 
morning, a programme 
especially for Children, this 
evening a gala with Paul 
Daniels and magic acts 


fi S' 

M.. : alMuii 


Presen atfam order: Carlyle's 
drawing room (lop) and the 
facade or his house in Chelsea . 

the noises from the river, and 
didn't even keep nut the cncs 
of the "demon fowls" owned 
by neighbours which had first 
driven him up there. 

Today the noise of traffic 
and aeroplanes would he' 
enough 10 madden anyone., 
but in the little walled garden! 
it is surprisingly peaceful.; 
Carlyle found the garden “of 
admirable comfort to me. in. 
the smoking way: 1 can wan-- 
dcr about in dressing-gown' 
and straw hat in it. os of old. 
and lake my pipe in peace".! 
(Without even having to oust 
a maidservant) 

The time has long gone, 
when crowds of sightseers 
would gather at the end of; 
Cheyne Row to catch a 
glimpse of the Great Man. But! 
thanks to the reverence of his 
disciples and the subsequent 
care of the National Trust* 
Carlyle has the best of' 
memorials — this odd. clut-; 
tered, fascinating house, en-" 
tirely unspoilt and absolutely, 
his own. 

Nigel Andrew 

frpm Spain, Sweden, Holland, 
Japan and Pakistan. 

Devonshire Park and 
Congress Theatres, Compton 
Street, Eastbourne 
(0323 36363). Today. l0-30am- 


QUILTERS' GUILD 
PATCHWORK EXHIBITION: 
More than 50 items, by 
hand or machine quilting, in 
patchwork or appliqud, m 
English or Italian style. 
Paisley Museum and Art 
Galleries, Renfrewshire, 
Scotland (041 8893151). 
From Mon. 10am-5pm. Free. 


Judy FrosLaug 


THE TIMES LEISURE SUIT OFFER 






^1 TT-* Lr 

Fare 

Dinkum! 

Down Under 
from £669 return. 

(Me way: from £445 




win our brochure 
mdiomhiMiyiB) 
thoe baatiftd ritiei, mine » - 
Time Off Ltd., 
Chester Close, 
London SW1X7BQ. 




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offers you some of the lowest 
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journey off in style. You can 
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to Gatwkk or central London 
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Post the coupon for full 
details, or ring us 
Pfeon (01) 831 122L 



Paportom VMnesdays 
December 1986 to Monk 1987 
This naedUa price indudes 
flights by British Airways from 
London Hwrihraw; fntaJass 
hotels; M board; writs to the 
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— BOOK NOW — 



•THE growing legions of Keep Fit 
A enthusiasts have brought about an 
increasing demand for new, comfortable 
sports and leisure wear. 

W e have selected this high quality 
^ garment designed for The Time? 

available with either deep stretch-knitorew 
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flock on the left-hand breast The trousers 
have a drawstring waist and elasticated 
ankles. Both the top and trousers are in 
grey- 

T he leisure suit is made of 50% cotton, 
50% acrylic and is fully machine 
washable. The soft fleecy lining is warm in. 
tihe winter and cool in the summer. 


' I ne wide range or sezes should suit most 
A people and are as follows: 

Small (34m-36m. chest). Medium (38in.- 
4Gm. chest). Large (42in.-44in. chest). 
Extra Large (4fint chest). 

Prices; 

£1&95^ with crew-neck top. 

£23.95 with hooded top. 

All prices are indusi ve of past and packing. Please allow 
up to2J days for delivery. If you are not satisfied nr will 
irfimd your money vwifioui question, in addition to our 
guommee you have the benefit of your fall sanatory righis 
which are not affected. 

The Times Leisure Suit Offer, Bourne Road, 
Bexley, Kent DAS WL. TO: Crayford 53316 for 
enquiries only. 


P&O Down Under Clnb, 77 New Oxford Str«L, 
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Ask for the Down Under Club brochure. 


FANTASTIC VALUE 


THE TIMES 


DIAL YOUR ORDER 

RAPID ORDERING SERVICE 
BY TELEPHONE ON 
ACCESSOR VISA 
tnonetdioaynpiefecoupcm) 

(Crayford) 0322-58011 
24 hows & day— 7 days a week 


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SI 


New 

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started 


The 

average 

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A room 


off the 


shelf? 


How anyone can become an instant 
interior designer at a new furnishing 
store where seven complete ‘looks’ are 


available at the drop of a cheque 


F urnishings are catch- 
ing up with fashion in 
the high street Jasper 
Conran and Katharine 
Hamnett have set the pace by 
opening their own shops en- 
abling customers to buy an 
entire "look” in one place. 
This week, Coloroll have done 
the same for interior design. 

They are a company known 
best for their wallpapers and 
fabrics — particularly the 
Dolly Mixtures range. Their 
new £2 million conversion of 
the former Miss Selfridge shop 
at 156 Regent Street, London 
Wl, launches a new identity 
for them as complete home 
furnishers. 

Using a selection of their 
wallpaper and fabric designs, 
they have developed seven co- 
ordinated looks for living, 
dining, bed and bathrooms 
and have bought and commis- 
sioned furniture, tableware, 
linens and accessories to go 
with each. The bonus for the 
customer is that each com- 
plete look can be bought 
without traitiog round from 
department to department to 
find complementary colours 
and textures. If you like what 
you see, it is there for the 
taking — straight off the 
shelves surrounding each 
room set 

These are presented on 
three spacious floors. In the 
basement are children's 
games, animal friezesand 
furnishings in bright primary 
colours. On the same floor are 
the smart Progressive look in 
fashionable black, white and 
chrome for chic town houses 
and the Ethnic look in rich 
earthy colours with Indian 
brass, natural basketware, 
kelims and Turkish copper. 
The Contemporary Pastel 


PLAINED GAROBIS 


we trouble-free garden. May we show 
you vital can be done with our 
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ftmit Trees and Bodies. Coerifas. 


Hedies and Bonier Amti? 96-cagc 

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AND THE HOME 

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For a free brochure phone 

01419 22S1 or write to: 


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Loadan IB 259 





A free catalogue 
to talk about. 


The new 132 page 
Suttons Seeds catalogue 
i> out now and it% a real 



conversation piece. 

There's a section on 
how to plan a small 
garden and loads of 
information on nearly 1200 
varieties of flowers and vegetables. 

Some are exclusive to Suttoos- like our new Aero- 
space Sweet Rea, which is really out of this world. 


A free holiday 
to yodel about. 


Our botanical interest 
holiday competition is out 
of this world too. Two weeks 
for two in Switzerland. 
amongst glorious Alpine 
flora, arranged by Cox & 
Kings. Your new catalogue 
has all the details. 

^ 34 HOUR ANSWERING SERVICE. RING (0372) 217207- 
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To Suttons Sen!’- UL Dept 241. 2 Cater Road. Bristol BSl i tTW, 


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CHILDREN: Roand table 

£5959, wood chairs £29.99 each 
and pointed wfltow duurs £1959 
each, «D in white. Anphr 
building game £3359 and bendy 
Juba catenriflar £1459 


look, which is expected to 
account for 25 per cent of the 
turnover, is on the ground 
floor along with the Classic 
look, offering the marbled 
lamp-bases ana classical busts 
used by professional deco- 
rators. The first floor is all 
bills and rustic charm, taking 
its tone from the Romantic 
look, represented by a brass 
four-poster and lavishly 
draped festoon curtains, and 
the Country Cottage look, 
which is full of wicker baskets 
and hand-painted jugs and 
ewers. Prices range from 99p 

to £ 1 , 000 . 

The whole effect is every- 
thing you have ever wanted 
from Habitat, Laura Ashley 
and Next all rolled into one. It 
has been masterminded by 
John Barron, the 30-year-okl 
divisional general manag er , 
who was formerly marketing 
manager of Habitat and is a 
likely new star in the firma- 
ment dominated by Terence 
Conran without challenge for 
25 years. 

Barron, having been 
'poached' for the job, was 
lucky enough to have a board 
of directors who gave him a 
free hand to put his ideas into 
practice. He earned out all his 
plans with the help of the store 
manager,, Mike Evans, and 
only two buyers, Rachel 
Braine and Elizabeth Ander- 

SOIL 

The outcome of this 
quartet's deliberations in- 
cludes a computerized cur- 
tain-making service, where 
terminals on every cash desk 
can be fed with the measure- 
ments brought in by cus- 
tomers and will calculate die 
amount and cost of tire fabric 
they choose. All fabrics are 
displayed in mini curtains to 



ETHNIG Massive i 
vessel in traditional African 
handbeatn in Anatolia 
£8959. Dried grasses from 99p 


CLASSIC, (below): 


Apollo with antiqued 
£325. Traditional chintz. 




CONTEMPORARY PASTEL: 

Basket lacquered in lilac or pink 
£1759 with a collection of duvet 
covers, pillowcases, sheets and 
valances in brigh* 
and paisleys from 



COUNTRY COTTAGE: Ce- 
ramic pitcher and bowl in a 
variety of flower design s, hand 
-painted in France. £2959 each 


PROGRESSIVE (below): 
Chrome minor, £4959, soap 
dispenser £2759, from a collec- 
tion of hi-tech fi tt in gs 


ROMANTIC: Brass foer pester bed to fit standard divans -5ft size shown £650. Brass waskstand with 

white jog and bowl £349, brass ghss topped table £199, Diana white duvet cover £4159, pillowcases 
£559 pa*, frilly cas h ion s £959 each. Drapes and festoon curtains made to measme 



show the effect of gathers and 
drapes and a makmg -up ser- 
vice promises finished cur- 
tains m three to four weeks. 
An upholstery service is avail- 
able, too. Free samples of ev- 
ery fabric, wallpaper and 
bedlinen are available and 
arrangements can be made to 
deliver orders after office 
hours and on Saturdays. John 
Banon is determined to give 
the customers what they want 
and to break away from a pre- 
set style of retailing. 


“The usual attitude to sell- 
ing tries to segment the market 
into mass and ABs. By putting 
together a collection of looks 
we are not in any particular 
income or age niche and we 
can offer popularly-priced 
fiirmshings side by side with 
the cream.” 

The Coloroll achievement 
is to present customers with 
off-the-peg interior decoration 
with a designer look. But for 
those who are able to buy 
professional expertise another 


Mecca has opened — The 
London Interim’ Designers 
Centre at 2a Battersea Park 
Road. London SW8 (01- 
627 5000). 

Here The Charles Ham- 
mond Group has built two 
spacious storeys to display the 
best fabrics and furnishings 
available from more than 40 
British and overseas com- 
panies. On the first floor, 
more rhan 3,000 printed and 
woven fabrics hang in two- 
metre lengths under natural 


light from the roof, on the 
ground floor there are eight 
room sets displaying rugs, 
garden and antique furniture, 
lamps and other famishing 
accessories. 

Clients will visit the centre 
only with an interior designer, 
but Charles Hammond also 
has a design consultancy ser- 
vice which it runs from its 
shop at 165 Soane Street, 
London SWI (01-235 2151). 
A consultation with a member 
of the design team costs £50 


and house visits can also be 
arranged for the same fee. For 
an extra £80, a colour board 
can be made up so that die 
fabrics, carpet, paints and 
other samples can be seen 
together. 

British attitudes to interior 
decoration have been in the 
doldrums for long enough. If 
only this fresh wind of change 
could get through to our ma& 
furniture manufacturers, we 
would all be able to live in our 
ideal home. 


NEWS LINES 


IN THE GARDEN 


Plum choices for perfect apples 


With a multitude of unusual varieties 


available, popularity is not the only 


criterion for fruity satisfaction and 


rediscovering the pleasures of garden trees 


Only in north Norfolk are you 


iy in non 

likefy to be offered a dish of 


oven-baked Norfolk Biffins — 
aromatic, crimson-brown ap- 
ples which look tike hot buns, 
when cooked. Grown in Nor- 
folk since the early 1800s, they 
are by no means die roost 
ancient kind. In 1629, John 
Parkinson, herbalist and 
apothecary to James L cat- 
alogued all the apples known 
to be grown at that time, many 
of which are still available 
today. 

When choosing apples for a 
garden. 1 would always in- 
clude a local variety, not 
simply out of sentiment but 
because it is likely to thrive. 
The only mature full-sized 
tree in my garden is Lane's 
Prince Albert, which origi- 
nated in a garden only four 
miles from where I live. It is a 
culinary variety, now widely 
grown, compact in form and 
regular to crop. 

Oddly enough, the two roost 
popular apples nationally. 
Cox and Brain ley, are not 
good garden varieties. Cox is 
difficult to grow, finicky about 


Leaves 

lawns 

litterless 


and that's 
notall ! 



The new Allen Scavenger Vk Smtep/ 
Bl o wtof eteam maifltaty tawo etanaqmg 
(cm* and Kner framty. effortleerty- 
Poin n d hyaw «m taw* 

Krofcsongmi. our Scavenger range 

koto « around £340 Inc. VAT tar the 
21” machine 


Sand radatr far tad detain or tar priority 
OMBMM phona OMsn (0235) S138X 



Altai Pmmt Eqtdpetant Umdad. 

Tfto Broadway. Ofcfcni. Oton OX1 1 BES 


setting fruit and only does weft 
in southern counties; Brantley 
has an iron constitution but, 
even on dwarfing stock, is a 
vigorous tree and a tripfoid (it 
needs two other compatible 
types of apple for pollination). 
\ Invaluable when planning 
which trees to grow is Law- 
rence Hills's Good Fruit 
Guide, which not only de- 
scribes many varieties, with 
notes on growing, but shows 
which nurseries stock them 
(£2.75 inc. p and p from 
HDRA. National Centre for 
Organic Gardening. Ryton- 
on-Dunsmore. Coventry CV8 
3LG). 

Modem dwarf stocks and 
the revival of old forms such 
as fens, festoons and espaliers, 
which take up only a small 
space, enable any gardener to 
grow apples and provide an 
exciting choice. A family tree 
on which three or even four 
different varieties are grafted 
on to one root stock is a useful 
form if you require only one 
tree, but needs a little more 
care with pruning to keep a 
balance. (Family Trees, Bot- 
iey. Hampshire S03 2EA, 
[04892 6680] are specialists in 
this form.) 

The pleasures of garden 
apple trees are being rediscov- 
ered; spring blossom is a joy. 
many varieties have attractive 
foliage and the trained forms 
are especially decorative. 
They are not difficult to grow 
and even the dwarf forms 
require less attention than 



WEEKEND TIPS 


many herbaceous plants. A 
good nursery is usually only 
too glad to advise on the 
cultivation and relative merits 
of different apples. 

At this time of year, fruit 
growers all over the country 
invite the public to a tasting: 
the date is decided locally so 
watch for posters and check 
your local radio and news- 
papers. I can personally 
recommend Blackmoor Nurs- 
ery, near Liss m Hampshire, 
which is holding its open day 
next Sunday (October 12) and 
plans to have about 20 dif- 
ferent kinds of apple to taste, 
including Ribston Pippin and 
Orleans Reinette (two re- 
nowned old species) and 
Greensleeves, a highly recom- 
mended modern apple. 

1 must confess to being an 
enthusiast for old apples with 
historical associations, but 
there is no doubt that some ol 
the new kinds are equally fine. 
Discovery, a- chance seedling 
raised in a private garden in 
the early 1960s, is now de- 
servedly the most popular 
early dessert apple. 


Once you have decided on 
your variety and form, place 
an order ax once in case the 
nursery runs out of stock. You 
should also plan ahead for 
planting, taking into account 
the ultimate size, light con- 
ditions and drainage. 


Though you won't be plant- 
ing until mid-November, you 
could dear the ground and 
prepare the hole. It is well 
worth the effort to dig a hole 
2ft or even 3ft square, replac- 
ing the poor subsoil with good 
loam from another part of the 
garden. Add extra humus such 
as compost, leaf-mould or 
well-rotted manure and 21b of 
bonemeal. A healthy tree 
which has bad a good start in 
life is not so susceptible to 
pests and diseases and re- 
quires less attention later. 


• Gather up dead leaves, 
especially on lawns, and put 
on compost heap — adding 
extra activator because leaves 
decay slowly. If yon have 
large quantities, make a 
separate bin adding 
activator for every six inches 
of leaves. 

• Hoe wed to make sure 
your late sown oops and 
flowers are not 
overwhelmed with weeds 

• If cats are a nuisance on 
areas planted with bulbs or 
seedlings, peg oat netting 

for protection until the ground 
firms and new growth 
makes the sofl less tempting. 

• Plant lily bulbs such as 
tiimm mertogon, L. 

Tigrinum , L Henryi , L 
Pyr eaaicu m — not madonna 
lilies. 

• Cut bade branches of 
baddleia which have flowered 
tins year to prevent them 
from becoming overgrown or 
damaged by winter winds. 

• Begin to lift Jerusalem 
artichokes. Cut the stems off 
first and strip off the 
foliage for compost 


• Pot np one or two 
parsley plants which 
have not flowered this year 
for use during the winter. 


Good fruit tree nurseries 
are: Deacons, Godshili, Isle of 
Wight PO 38 3HW (0983 
840750); Scons, Merriot, 
Somerset TA16 5 PL (0460 
72306h HigbfiekL Whitmin- 
ster. Gloucester GL2 7PL 
(0452 740266). 


Shrinking violets 


The Parma double violet was 
the height of floral fashion at 
the turn of the century, but 
now it has virtually vanished 
except from a few nurseries. 
Outdoors, it needs the protec- 
tion of a cold frame, bat it can 
be grown as a pox plant in a 
rich compost. In summer ! 
leave ihe pots outside in a' 
shady spot, while their winter 
quarters are a west-feeing 
windowsill in a cool room 
where they flower freely with 
regular feeding. 

We can still order the old 


names: Duchess De Panne, 
pale lavender, Marie Louise, 
darker and more fragrant; and 
Swanley White, as fragrant but 
slightly hardier. The problem 
is that because they were so 
well-known to everyone in 
their heyday, nobody ever 
thought to write down a foil 
description of the different 
varieties. If any reader has a 
pressed specimen, a good 
drawing made some time in 
the pest, ora detailed descrip- 
tion noted m an old diary or 
flowerbook, Christopher 


BrickelL director general of 
the Royal Horticultural Soci- 
ety, would be pleased to hear 
For a list of Parma and 
sweet violets, contact 
C. W. Groves and Son, The 
Nurseries, West Bay Road, 
Bridport, Dorset DT6 4BA 
(0308 22654). Sweet violets 
only are from Careby Manor 
Gardens. Careby, Stamford. 
Lincolnshire PE9 4EA 
(07808 1220). Please send 
stamp or large sae. 


Francesca Greeuoak 


OXUPS 

Primula “EtatSor* 

H r offer the true *1U British form, 
rmm firm seed. 
IV»» OTuiiina r yellow. lauOy 
fouuurt mud wffl Bmwsr Spring 1S8T7, 
cum l *M-.w annw 

£16JK» 1 dona. 3SS5 100 pbrfa 


C u a to mcs afafe u> coBect will find they 
c— pun lien room t—e—My. 

C£, HENDERSON A SON 
LEYDENS NURSERY 
Stick Hm, Haftfleld Read. 
Ednbrite.bal.TmWH 

Tet (0732) 863318 



FREE BROCHURE/ 

AND NET SAMPLES , 

Agnbamas Ud. 

Brochure 7B7 Chortwoods Rood,' 
East Grtnsieoti, Sussex RH19 2HG 
Ring 0342 28644(24 hours) 


Instant 

presents 

• Want to put your present 
problems behind you? A Mr 


service called PMtitt tfiq 
the worry out of giving. 

You can telephone Jm* 
OVouoghtte or Jane Shan 
(01-831 8098) what j* 
haven't had time to shop E* 
an important birthday aad< 
they will send a basket ef 
fruits, wine and chocahdas; w 
gift wrap and ddivera nonfe 
Prezzie, from a hud-made - 
perfume bottle, £18, to a 
ivory shaving set, £150. 

If you have something sp*: 
rific in mind which they da 
not have in stock dm 
find and boy the gift farm 
extra charge. They wfll aha 
remind you of future 
anniversaries. 

Prezoes, at 10 Steftn 
Avenue. London WC1 femes 
Mondays to Saturdays Kfea 
to 6pm and there fe ^ '■ 
nigh time for argent orders if 
all other times. 


Small prints 

Small is not only beantffallnt 
ingenious and time saving, 
when packaged in a 
machine called a Copy Jack, 

Measuring only 6.7fe x 
25inx 15in.il is a hand hd4 
copier with a “reading 
window" in its bead and arafi 
of beat sensitive paper in ha 
body. To copy text, the raer 
presses the middle of fee 
machine while pushing h 
slowly over the print, howag 
the end of the paper with the 
other hand. 

For writers and researehm 
it could be a boon, even at 
£299. This includes a batttiy 
recharger and live 33ft raffs 
of paper. Refills are £6 per 
pack of five. Available direct 
from lino Trading, 29 Enfori 
Street, London Wl (61-629 
6633) 


Si 




¥ 




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Wisbech ( 0945 ) 58340 / 
Mi ANYTUIE-OAYOR NIGHT ' 











THE TIMES SATURDAY OCTOBER 4 1986 


^^fo^Poole extols the 


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?rs 

i in 

m 


Game tads have such brief 
autumn and winter season 

tattUiey steal the ihutawof 
furred species hke hare whirt 

. are available all year round 
Black grouse and grey pfr- 
tndge are at thetr best for only 
tw monihs (October and 

J'lovembcr) of the fn, r 
jfttonths they are i n s eaS n 

P™ lime is lonare 
October through to Janufry’ 
and us merits are unde£ 
exploited. 

Op to die age of Six months, 
a young hare is called a Icverei 

and will weigh about two 
kilos, say four pounds. An 
adult brown hare weighs about 
three kilos or seven pounds. 

Leyerets are ideal for roasting 

and there is enough meat on a 
trimmed 500g (lib 2oz) saddle 
for mo to three people. So two 
saddles should feed six. 

■ The meat is lean and dense 
and robustly flavoured. If the 
anima| is young and properly 
jhung it will be very tender. 
*oo, and a real delicacy. A big 
saddle from an older animal 
will need barding with strips 
of fat .to keep it moist. 

Roast saddle of leveret 

' Serves two to three 

Saddle of 1 young hare 
Z tablespoons decent port 
2 tablespoons olive oil 

250ml (Bfl oz) game stock or 
water 

2 tablespoons redcunrant 
jetty 

2 tablespoons blueberries or 
bilberries 

Use heavy kitchen scissors to 
trim the ribs and a sharp 
P pointed knife to work off the 
satiny layers of whitish tissue 
which corset the saddle. Work 
carefully right down to the 
lean muscle. 

Mix the port and oil and 
turn the saddle in this mari- 
nade. Leave it to marinate for 
two to 24 hours, then roast it 


— the times cook 

!!! 0ls under-exploite d culinary virtues of hares and leverets, now in their prime 

to run with the hare 



in a prehealed moderately hot 
oven (200°C/400°F, gas mark 
6) for about 30 minutes, 
basting frequently with oil. 
This_ timing will produce a 
medium rare roast. 

Rest the saddle in a warm 
place for five minutes before 
carving. In the meantime, 
pour tiie frit from the roasting 
pan and add the stock or 
water. Over a low heat, stir to 
dissolve the caramelized pan 
juices. Stir in the jelly and, 
when it has dissolved, allow 
the sauce to reduce to about 
six tablespoons. Season it to 
laste with salt and pepper and 
stir in the blueberries or 
‘bilberries. Let them heat 
through, about one minute. 

Carve the saddle in long 
slices and serve with a spoon- 
ful of the blueberry sauce and 
a selection of vegetables 
including glazed onions. 


PSppardelle — wide ribbon 
noodles of fresh egg pasta — 
served with a rich hare sauce 
are a classic of the Italian 
kitchen. Whether the dish 
consists of a plate of noodles 
flavoured with hare sauce, or 
the balance tips towards a hare 
casserole accompanied by 
noodles, is a matter of choice. 
And the idea of a hare sauce 
may be misleading. It could be 
finely chopped, of course, but 


bite-sized chunks are more in' wine 


Hare with noodles 

Serves four 

55g (2oz) pancetta or fat 
bacon, finely chopped 
2 tablespoons otive oil 

1 medium onion, finely 

chopped 

Legs of 1 hare 

2 tablespoons flour to 

dredge 

450ml (% pint) robust red 


bacon in a wide saute pan wiih 
the oil and onion. Cook on a 
low beat until the onion is soft 
but not browned. Remove the 
onion and bacon from the 
pan. Dredge the hare in flour 
and brown it on a high heat 
Add the wine and return the 
pancetta and onions to the 
pan. Bring the mixture to the 
boil, add seasonings and 
herbs, cover and simmer till 
tender. 

An hour and a half will be 
enough if the hare is young. 
Leave iruntil quite cold, then 
lake all the meat off the bones. 
Break the meat into small 
pieces and return them to the 
sauce. Reheat and serve on 
freshly boiled buttered 
noodles. 

The one thing everyone 
knows about Mexican cooking 
is that it is heavy on chillis of 
all sons. The second univer- 
sally misunderstood fact is 
that Mexicans eat turkey with 
a chocolate sauce. That dried 
peppers and much else play a 
larger part in the sauce than 
chocolate is only revealed to 
those who visit the country, or 
who read reputable books on 
Mexican cooking — which are 
few. But the virtues of choc- 
olate as an ingredient in rich 
■savoury sauces have not been 
lost on the Italians either, as 
this swaggering casserole of 
Imre amply demonstrates. It is 
another dish to make the day 
before it is to be eaten. 


6 peppercorns, crushed 

3 juniper berries, bruised 

For the sauce 
2 tablespoons olive oa 

4 tablespoons raisins 

2 tablespoons marsala 

55g (2oz) pancetta, or fat 
bacon, chopped 


DRINK 

Fine winter 
warmers 

A selection of low-priced claret to put 
a glow on chilly October evenings 


character. 

Freshly made pappardelle 
are not widely available so, if 
you cannot face making your 
own. use fresh taglia telle. 

I have used the legs of one 
young hare for this dish and 
roasted the saddle. The whole 
hare would serve six to eight. 


Pancetta is the Italian egmva- it is needed. It freezes success- 

lent of bacon with a distinc- fully, of course. 

tive sweetcure flavour. Put the chopped pancetta or 


Sait and freshly ground 

black pepper Serves stx to eight 

1 sprig thyme 1 hare, cut in pieces 

Bov fa,,! For the marinade 

— 500ml (18ft oz) dry white 

About 450g (lib) fresh vvine 

= 2 tablespoons wine vinegar 

»r the best possible flavour, ^ 

ake the sauce the day before ] on ™- . ch PPPy 

is needed. It freezes success- 1 stick celery, chopped 

lly. of course. 1 carrot chopped 

Put the chopped pancetta or . t dove garlic, bruised 


For the bed possible flavour, 
make the sauce the day before 


peeted and deseeded 

Spngofthyme 

Bay leaf 

2 tablespoons sugar 

2 tablespoons water 

2 tablespoons wine vinegar 
30g (loz) bitter chocotale 

4 tablespoons raisins 

4 tablespoons pine nuts 

Mix all the ingredients for the 
marinade. Add the pieces of 
hare and leave it to marinate 
for 24 hours. Turn the bare 
from time to time. Plump the 
raisins in the marsala. 

Drain and dry the hare. 
Strain and reserve the 
marinade. 

Heat the oil in a fireproof 
casserole and sweat the 
pancetta or bacon. Add the 
hare pieces and brown them 
on all sides. Add the tomatoes, 
reserved marinade, thyme and 
bay leaf. Simmer, covered, for 
about two hours or until the 
hare is tender. 

when the hare is almost 
done, dissolve the sugar in the 
water, then heat to a light 
caramel. In the meantime, 
melt the chocolate in the 
vinegar. Combine the two. 
then stir in the raisins and 
pine nuts. 

Lift the pieces ot hare front 
the casserole and stir the 
chocolate mixture into the 
remaining juices. Return the 
bare and stir to coat it well. 
Reheat and serve. 

Bland accompaniments like 
pasta or polenta set off this 
robust dish. 


As the days get shorter, the new vintage of an Australian 
nights get colder and we all get Shiraz that I feel would make a 
grumpier, wine in my house- memorable alternative, 
hold rapidly becomes a neces- Brown Brothers are possibly 
siiy rather than an indulgent Australia's best- known family 
luxury. Somehow a cold un- Ann and their *$2 Shiraz is 
comfortable journey home be- easily the best Australian Shi- 
comes bearable with the raz currently available, 
thought of a warming winter Blessed with a deep vivid 
bonk patiently awaiting your purple-black colour plus that 
return. It has always been a classic spicy smoky-leathery 
mystery to roe why those bouquet that Australians often 
marketing men claim that refer to as “sweaty saddles**, 
more wine is consumed when this ‘82 Shiraz has a glorious 
it’s sunny than when it's ripe sweet juicy; taste with bags 
frosty. ol blackberi>-fiLc fruit on the 

Wine drinkers in this conn- palate. The Baines Wine Shop 
try may grumble about the at SI High Street, Barnes, 
onset of cold, rainy weather London SW 1 3 has it at £4,95, 
but on the continent, where Andree Simon. £4,95. and 
the vintage is at full tilt this Tanners, 26 Wyle Cup, 
month, similar conditions are Shrewsbury, Shropshire, 
a matter of real concern. £4.77. 

Bordeaux's vintage pros- If you are trying to keep 
peers, in particular, do not costs down this month in 
look encouraging — a pity, DcBMumom 

because up until mid-Septem- |ln| 111 IcF! 
ber. when the weather turned V/ Cj T~ ^ L ; J 

nasty, at least one Bordeaux '■(* 9 m §_ n ; j 

wine man was comparing \ * vj ■ = u lj'i| 

1986 with the magnificent *82 nJ !ij ■ = c Ifil 

vintage. If the weather clears ft /Ml lj>| 

up this month the 1986 vin- Cj <> /B\ in 

tage in Bordeaux could still be jzL $ /^B\ g ’I 

a success. But at best. Bor- Qj r| 

deaux *86 will only be a good p F I 

vintage, not a great one. JQ j jj 

All the more reason then for 

us all to take comfort in some JJ , V X I MbMPJ L h|<| 

good warming winter claret ^ F£| 

from previous years. The late. _ — M 

small crop 1980 daret vintage — — ” 

was. I think, very unfairly 

dismissed by daret buffs at the order to celebrate Christmas 
time. No one would aigue that with a bang, but still want to 
these light, quick developers drink wine regularly, 
are in the first league but their Majestic’s new wine ware- 
low prices and attractive style house at 421 New King's 
make them a most pleasur- Road. London SW6 has one of 
able vintage to drink now. the best Cotes du Rhone 
while we all wait for those Villages wines, the ‘83 vintage 
keeper years such as ‘82 and from that Rhone master Paul 
*83 to mature. Jaboulet Aine. for £3.85. This 

The Victoria Wine Com- delicious deep purple wine 
pany has the 1980 Cos du with its raspberry-like palate is 
Marquis St Julien available an ideal October wine, 
for £5.99 a boule. a not Even more of a Cotes du 
impossible price, considering Rhone bargain buy is the 
this wines deep purple black won drous *85 Chateau du 
colour, fine fruity nose and Grand Moulas from the 
sinwy well-made palate, but Ryckwacns. This deep purple 
perhaps not good value for wine with its aromatic spicy- 
money when you consider peppery bouquet backed up by 
that Majestic Wine Ware- a soft blackberry-like palate, 
houses are selling the 83 priced al jlKt £3.1 j from 
vintage for the same price. Adnams (The Crown, High 
October is also the month to Street. Southwold, Suffolk), 
think of wines to partner game should on no account be 
dishes. Pheasant and wood- missed this month, 
code are just coming into the The address of Yapp Broth- 

shops and although I think ers, mentioned In last week’s 
that burgundy still makes the column, is The Old Brewery, 
best marriage with these birds Mere, near Wiltshire. 

(as it also does with grouse and T __ 

pa nidge). I recently tasted a Jane MacQuitty 


EATING OUT 


Bigger, brighter and all got up 


There is less ceremony these days 
about the revamped Chez NIco — and 
more competition in the area 


Francis Mostay 


When Chez NIco was run by 
its founder, the eponymous 
Mr Ladenis, it was among one 
of the best restaurants in 
Britain and was the only one, I 
believe, that attracted clients 
in the way that the top places 
do in France. 

Nico’s temple of gastron- 
omy may have been rebuilt by 
his former number two. Philip 
Britain, but it still attracts the 
same sort of clientele: those 
who wish to be impressed by 
the cooking rather than those 
who wish to impress each 
^ other. However, while it used 
* to possess a sort of discreet 
intimacy and low-key theatri- 
cality — you had to ring before 
entering, the room was dim, 
you were a party to something 
near ceremonial — it is now 
more straightforward, 
brighter, bigger, ultimately 
less strange. 

It is also less subtle. The 
practice of not putting salt on 
the table, so signalling the 


primacy of the chef, is forgiv- 
able if the chef gets the salting 
right, but not if be over- 
compensates and pours too 
much of the stuff into 
dressings and^auces. . 

Philip Britain has -had a 
difficult task as Nico’s succes- 
sor. I am uncertain of how 
many dishes he has 
“inherited” and how many are 
his owm but I am certain that 
his best dishes, Whatever their 
provenance, are the more 
complicated ones, elaborate 
and savoury, such as a breast 
of duck with a (warm) cake of 
rillettes made from ns leg. The 
two limbs of the duck were in 
signal contrast and were the 
centrepieces of a very arty 
composition which included 
chicory, al derue turnips, 
steamed potatoes rolled in 
breadcrumbs (odd),' courgette 
(just one) and a superb red 
wine sauce. . 

It was a cut above a dish of 
noisettes of lamb with rose- 



mary sauce: the trouble was 
that there was no saving 
gimmick (such as the warm 
rillettes) to compensate for the 
very ordinary meat. 

Because they were also “got 
up”, the starters were both as 
good as the duck dish. One 
was a creamy and strongly 
flavoured bon din of foie gras 
with an artichoke heart 
dressed in (salty) walnut oil 
vinaigrette; the other, a not- 
loo-generous slice of a de- 
licious terrine made from 
sweetbreads and morels and 
tasting, amazingly, of both. 


CHESS 


* Annihilation 
in Leningrad 


When Kasparov shot into a 1 3- 
- point lead with hisbnlliam 
16th game. . I expected the 
world title match to be weH 
and truly over bv now How- 
ever, as I write I am still in 
Leningrad. 

Karpov, in a dramatic se- 
quence of victories, has anni- 
hilated Kasparov s advanta^ 
.and the eventual match resun 
.is now wide open, ihough 
Karpov is evidently m jj* 
psychological .ascendwt-MJ 
2 apologies, then, to the many 
readers who have wn - 
len to me during the jjo 
halves of the champion* P- 
Once I reiuni to London 1 will 
catch up with me 

correspondence. 

Here are my comments 10 
the 19ihgamc which enabled 
Karpov to equalize: 

White: - Karpov: Black: 
Kasparov. Grunfeld Dcfcnce- 
; mm arf * 

Amr. 4* 

iAftriigaroe 1 7 it was high time 

10 abandon the volauK 

/pnurfHd. ' 


:& a? 


ariation. It has a 
illation and was 

10 ice. 


An excellent move, avoiding 
exchanges and accentuating 
the poSw of White’s passed 

pawn. 

14 _ Off « MS »4T 

This loses. The best defence is 
l5...Bd7. 

.a n_A OtaS 17 J? 

iS5bS 8SS wow *• 

With complications. 

««7 »g 

is onD bb* 

ib b 
S“S S " 

if i4...Rd8 25 Bh6 wins. 

. 26 fi . B 5 

25 art 
27 BW5 

If i7...Nxg5 28 R* e8ch BxeS 
29 h4 ^ traps the knight- 

30 g™ 33 Bd* 

32 HtS “s gs Rg5d> g*p 

lif &L ss 

The ^-TSilSS 
Kasparov resigns 

resuming- 

Raymond Keene 


The Netherlands Bridge 
League has developed a happy 
knack for finding sponsors. 

Today and tomorrow 
Minihouse, a Dutch computer 
firm, is sponsoring a mara- 
thon “Pairs” contest Bui it is 
a Pairs contest with a dif- 
ference. Entries are -for 
“teams” of four players who 
play as pairs in stints.' It 
sounds ralher like Le Mans. 

Although Minihouse act as 
the main sponsor, several 
other firms support the event 
by sponsoring the individual 
teams.: This concept of shar- 
ing the cake, enables com- 
panies to . obtain brand 
exposure relatively cheaply. 
Naturally the idea is popular 
with the players. Perhaps the 
English Bridge Union could 
irv it here. 

Before ibe Marathon there 
will be a four-cornered contest 
featuring invited teams from 
the Netherlands, Canada. Bra- 
zil and Indonesia, who will 
play for the title of “Short 
Match World Champion”. 

E. Kirchoff describes an 
interesting hand from last 
Vcar’s international contest' 
' Sweden v Netherlands. 
Game all. Dealer South. 

• 7 

Z A O 104 
*• A 84 2 
4 K 643 


♦ 42 I N 
? J9 63 ' w g 
: KO.S53 W S E 
4 010 1 


* A ID 63 
; ? S2 

j 10 7 

♦ AB52 


♦ KQJS8S 
- KS7 
6 

*J37 


In the closed room, with 
the Netherlands North-South, 
ihc bidding was: 


Both these were accompanied 
by a jelly made from, I guess, 
Sauiemes and by. toasted 
cakey brioche. 

Our one sweet — a jammy, 
treacly chocolate marquise 
with orange liqueur — was 
quite astonishing. The cheese, 
that preceded it was not The 
portions — of Reblochon, 
Roquefort Brillat Savarin and 
so on — were massive, as if to 
compensate for the visible 
unripeness of the Camerabert 
and the “log” chfcvre. 

A restaurant of this stan- 
dard should not let itself down 
with lazy shopping. When two 

pay £90, attention to detail 
should be total; that sum is the 
sum you will pay if you drink 
one aperitif and the lovely 
1982 Cdte de Beaune Villages 
from Domaine Latour 
Giraud. 

One effect of Chez Nico’s 
success has been the prolifera- 
tion of restaurants on its 
doorstep in Queenstown 
Road. This little duster has 
spawned another contingent 
throughout Battersea and 
Qapham. Now ambitious 
beginners are trying their luck 
with establishments in less 
obviously promising quarters 


BRIDGE 

Lessons 
to learn 
from the 
Dutch 
sponsors 


Uufltans 

20 

NO NO 


The two - diamond bid was 
the multicoloured two dia- 
monds. usually signifying as 
here, a weak two bid in a 
major. Wesira's conservative 
response set the 'contract on 
the basis that North had a 
weak two spades opening 
.Wcsira made nine tricks. 

In the open room Per Olaf 
Sundelin. who was not play- 
ing any form of weak two 
bids, had to choose between 
passing or opening with an 
aggressive one spade. 

Predictably, he chose the 
latter. 

W N E 5 


Van Dor GttUw Motor SuncM 
VTught 

- - -14 

NO ' 2+ No 2* 

NO 3NT NO 4+ 

NO NO NO - 

Opening lead . K 


of south London where low 
costs may, of course, ' be 
.match etf-by a scarcity of local 
customers. 

1 think this is the case at La 
Petite Auberge de Saint Sarin. 
It was nearly empty the night I 
went it certainly does not 
deserve to be. The creamy 
spinach soup and the brick- 
red fish soup were equally 
good; there’s a novel and 
surprisingly good dish of 
salmon coaled in grain mus- 
tard and cream, and a rich one 
of veal with garlic, cream and 
raisins soaked in armagnac. 
Cheeses are kept in good 
condition and the sweets in- 
clude a chocolate cake which 
is a blue-blooded relation of 
Black Forest gateau. 

The place is predominantly 
brown, furnished with simple 
repro Edwardian chairs and 
decorated with plates and an 
ad hoc collection of paintings. 
It does not look bad although 
' it sounds terrible - a tape 
playing great TV themes , 
chirped repeatedly from 
somewhere. But the bill, for | 
£46, was about par. The set 
lunch at £4-50 sounds a 
tremendous bargain. 

Jonathan Meades 


Chez Ifieo, 129 
Queenstown Road, London 
SW8 (01-720 6960). Open 
Mon-Fri 12.30-2pm; Mon-Sat 
7.15-10.45pm. 7 

La Petite Auberae de 

Saint-Savin, 3 Kennington 
Lane. London SE1 1 (01-735 
7546). Open Tues-Sat 12.30- 
2pm and 7-1 1pm. 


OH 

Of 

o| 

3 

JO & 


41 


order 10 celebrate Christmas 
with a bang but still want to 
drink wine regularly. 
Majestic's new wine ware- 
house at 421 New King's 
Road, London SW6 has one of 
the best Cotes du Rhone 
Villages wines, the ‘83 vintage 
from that Rhone master Paul 
Jaboulet Aine. for £3.85. This 
delicious deep purple wine 
with its raspberry-like palate is 
an ideal October wine. 

Even more of a Cotes du 
Rhone bargain buy is the 
wondrous ‘85 Chateau du 
Grand Moulas from the 
Ryckwacns. This deep purple 
wine with its aromatic spicy- 
peppery bouquet backed up by 
a soft blackberry-like palate, 
priced at just £3.11 from 
Adnams (The Crown, High 


Jane MacQuitty 


OLD RUEDESH El M-ON-TH E-RHINE 



Sundelin won the lead with 
the OA. played a spade to the 
King and continued with the 
4Q. Muller took bis Ace and 
persisted with another dia- 
mond. Sundelin ruffed, 
cashed the crossed to 
dummy with the ^?A, and 
ruffed another diamond 10 
leave this position; 


n $ 10 * 

v * = 

5 +A85Z 


When Sundelin cashed the 
♦J. West discarded a dia- 
mond. while dummy parted 
with a dub. Everything 
depended on the play of the 
hearts. Unhappily, ralher 
than finessing the ^10. 
Sundelin elected 10 play the 
Queen. East ruffed and re- 
lumed a low dub, which 
inevitably led to one down. 

Superficially the play of the 
<7Q appears to be an unlucky 
guess. It was noL Al that 
point Sundelin knew that 
East’s original distribution 
was cither 4-3-3-3 or 4-4-3-2. 
The play of the Queen would 
succeed in the former case, the 
ien in the latter. The a priori 
expectancy of 4-4-3-2 is more 
than double that of 4-3-3-3. 
With nothing better 10 guide 
him. Sundelm should, have 
deflered to the odds. 

Jereiny Flint 


The Asbach Story 

It could easily he argued that Rucdcsheim is the 
gateway to that most beautiful pan of the River Rhine with 
its vineyards and castles. 

What is beyond dispute is that it is the home of that 
most sought after German Brandy - Aslxich Uralt. For it j 
was here, an Hind the rum of the century that Hugo M 

Asbach founded his world-famous distillery. ^ 

It takes five litres of the finest wines to produce At), 
tine single In aric of Aslxich Uralt. What it also takes is fcJ'y 
the family skill in distilling; the maturing in fj&| 

Limousin oak barrels; and of course the blending, 
handed down through generations, to create this WmM 

st >fi, mellow, golden brandy. The after dinner fell 

brandy that isn't just for after dinner. K11 

Discover it in discerning restaurants and pi 

off licences, orcomc and see us here in Ruedcsheim Wim 
fn hh Monday to mid-day Friday fora lasting. 

For further information write to: 

Weinbrennerei, Asbach & Co, 6221 1 Rucdcsheim am 
Rhein, Pi jsrfach 1 1 30, West Gcmianv. 






barf) 

ralt- 


The Great Brandy 


* 






16 



SI 


New 
Street s 
anarnn 
yesterdi 

After 

prices 

course 

session 


evapon 

mornii 

started 

The 

averse 
about f 
half bo 
to 1,79 


AMH 

ASA 

AlHedStr; 

AfcsCMm 

Alcoa 

Amaxlnc 

AmrdaH- 

AmBranc 

Am Can 

AmCynm 

AmBPw 

Am Ex prc 

Am Home 

Am Mata 

Am St mt 

Am Take 

Amoco 

Arnica St 

Asarco 

AsMandt 

AlRicWit 

Avon Pro 

BKrsTst 

Barton* 

BkolBS 

Sank oft 

BetftSw 


Bitten 
8g Warn 
BnstMyi 
BP 

BWTRXI 

Buft'ton 
Burroutf 
CmpSi 
CanRac 
CatarpA 
Cetanes 
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A little 
crop of 
horrors 


TELEVISION 


Hollywood's most celebrated 
wise buff and dead-pas joker 

was takes on board Omnibus: 

Hitchock - Sex, Murder and 
Mayhem fBBCl). 

The title of tikis second 
biographical celebration, 
covering the period of his 
American glory, echoed that of 
a lurid movie poster from its 
subject's heyday. Without, 
however, fulfilling its promise; 

it had little to offer in the 

shock-horror stakes, and in 

the case of Hitchcock's alter- 

nately sadistic and saladons 
treatment of his leading ladies, 

God's advocate never relin- 

quished the stage. 

Instead (and welcomely), 
the interviews with the old 

master and his extant servants 

concentrated on his peerless 

techniques as a cinematog- 

rapher concerned with “the 
assembly of pieces of film to 
create fright". 

1 had not realized that the 

most famous sequence from 

the Oeuvre — Janet Leigh’s 
anti-advertisement for shower 
curtains in Pshyco — was story 
boarded not by the film's 
director hot by the designer 
Saul Bass. Here we were 
shown those story boards, and 

how like sketches for a shower 

curtain advertisement they 
looked. 

There was further irony in 
the dislntentment of the diet- 

food commercial which first 

brought tiie bird-tike Tippi 
Hedren to Hitchcock's avun- 

cular notice: perhaps it is true 
that be was searching for a 

tafisnsunc Beauty who with a 
kiss might transubstantiate 
his all-too gross flesh. Such 
was his passion for dieting 
that be kept an entire ward- 
robe of suits in different sizes. 

But did Hitch have a heart 
or not? Presented, in 1979, 
with the American Film 
Institute's Life Achievement 
Award (a kind of consolation 
prize from an industry founded 
on philistinism and 
sentimentality), Hitchcock's 
habitual impersonation of an 
aldermanic Mr Potato solidi- 
fied intoa Mount Roshmoreof 
monumental impassion. 

As one of his collaborators 
put it: “He didn't want to join 
the human race.** 

Martin Cropper 

• Forty-eight major Impres- 
sionist and Post-Impressionist 
paintings from the Courtauld 
Collection will be shown in 
America at the beginning of 
next year. Among them are 
Manet’s Bar aux Folies- 


Redbrick, Channel 4’s new series about Newcastle 
University, has learnt a few tricks from EastEnders 

The students of soap 


The exhibition opens at 
Cleveland Museum of An on 
January 14. 


When Stephen Garrett told his 
friends be was making an observa- 
tional documentary series about a 
year in the life of Newcastle 
University, their faces foil and they 
offered him their condolences. The 
project obviously lacked the cock- 
tail-party potential of his previous 
assignments with Paula Yates and 
Colonel GadaffL 

"After that, my major concern 
was to make something absolutely 
compulsive,” he explains. **I de- 
cided to use the structure of a soap 
opera, to choose a small number of 
people as characters and see the 
university through their 
experience.'' 

The success of the enterprise can 
bejudged when the series, Redbrick, 
begins on Channel 4 tonight . 
Centra] to the opening episode is a 
sequence covering the appointment 
of a new lecturer in politics, which 
reveals the startlingly cruel reality 
beneath the apparent peace of this 
grove of academe. Members of the 
appointing committee appear as 
ruthless or two-faced as any Dallas 
tycoon and in the free, frank 
exchanges one candidate gets the 
thumbs-down because "be contin- 
ued to bore me to death”. 

Making an observational docu- 
mentary in the mid-Eighties is a 
little like joining a monastery in 
medieval France — a question of 
choosing one's heresy. The true 
cinema- verite religion comes over 
badly on the small screen and a 
television director is forced between 
purist style of Roger Graefs De- 
cision and Police series, and the 
audience grabbing tactics of Des- 
mond Wilcox's The Marriage. 

Stephen Garrett rejected both 


these options and decided to create 
a third. “The grainy, hardline, 
puritanical .cinema- verite style of 
filming 1 find incredibly pretentious 
and needlessly dull It also denies 
the dishonesty that lies behind all 
documentary filming, because if 
you choose that style you have to 
pretend that you aren't there, you 
aren't influencing reality and that 
you are portraying the exact truth. 
On the other hand, there is the other 
type of quirky, populist and vulgar 
documentary. Eke The Marriage, 
which is titillating, exploitative and 
disrespectful of the people who are 
the subjects. I think everyone is 
cheated in that process.” 

His decision to portray the in- 
stitution through tbeexperience of a 
handful of people was also in- 
fluenced by Sherwood Anderson's 
collection of sketches of small-town 
America, Winesburg, Ohio, which 
was first published in 1919. "At the 
end of that book you felt a real sense 
of community which had beat 
created through the eyes of individ- 
ual people.” 

Despite describing Redbrick as a 
“real life soap opera”, Garrett was 
thoroughly infected with the hair- 
shirt spirit of cinema -verite. 
Redbrick ’ s opening titles include 
shots of the film-makers to remind 
the audience of the technical pro- 
cesses involved, and the doting 
titles make it dear that the subjects 
followed were not paid, when 
students glanced edgfly at the 
camera, plainly frying that th e film- 
makers were much more intrusive 
than the proverbial fiies-on-the- 
walf those sequences were not cut. 

Once Garrett had chosen the 
students and academics who would 


be his “characters” he adhered 
religiously to the principle of s eeing 
the university through their eyes, 
sometimes in defiance of con- 
ventional journalistic values. 

“The decision to follow the 
characters gave us a different kind 
of integrity which I found a useful 
disci pine. We couldn't be sensa- 
tional for the sake of being sensa- 
tional. and I think we arrived ai a 
less partial truth than we would 
have done if we had darted willy- 
nilly into any event that glittered.” 

The major political issues 
overshadowing the series was the 
government's squeeze on higher 
education and in May I98S, shortly 
after Garrett and his team began 
their research, the University 
Grants Committee instructed New- 
castle, and every other university, to 
plan for cuts of more than 10 per 
cent. 

At Newcastle this meant the 
axeing of the Scandinavian studies 
department and the sale of the 
George Brown' collection, both of 
which lay outside Redbrick’s terms 
of reference. Instead, the series 
shows the charismatic Professor of 
Medicine, George Alberti, toiling 
through committees trying to iden- 
tify the university's most expend- 
able areas. At one point he jokes 
that the Faculty of Dentistry might 
have to go. 

Professor Alberti, whose col- 
leagues describe him as a “natural 
star”, typifies the attractive individ- 
uals selected for the programme. "I 
think they were looking for people 
with a little sparkle, something to 
give the TV, who wouldn’t be 
intimidated,” says Cotin Simpson, a 
town-and-co untry planning student 



Nothing tike a dame: lecturer Mike Clarice prepares for a panto 

poser Wilfred Josephs (incidentally 
a graduate of Newcastle’s dental 


whose unsuccessful bid to be elected 
entertainments officer is a major 
event in one episode. 

The soap-opera model was taken 
further ih«n casting colourful 
characters. Although he shot 45 
miles of film, Garrett kept se- 
quences down to two-and-a-balf 
minutes and restricted each half- 
hour programme to three or four 
story-tines. “Even naturalistic Brit- 
ish soaps only have that number of 
t hem es running concurrently, it's as 
if there is almost a natural number 
of personalities that the viewer can 
hold in the mind at any one time.” 

In addition, he was at pains to 
convey the emotional quality of 
some of the events, and decided to 
commission music from the corn- 


school.) 

Both the University and the 
television team are satisfied that 
Redbrick, the first factual TV series 
about a provincial university, con- 
veys the reality of life at Newcastle. 
However, there was one aspect of 
the institution which gave Stephen 
Garret! a problem. Demonstrations, 
discos, art classes and committees 
were the easy pan. “The greatest 
c ha llenge was to show people doing 
research and actually working. 
That's what a university is all about 
— but they are not the most 
televisual of subjects.” 

Celia Brayfield 



you know who 


Radio 3 is not much into 
celebrations, and the 40th 
anniversary of its first broad- 
cast was very much in charac- 
ter. On September 29 1946, 
Third Programme trans- 
missions opened with a 36- 
minute feature by. Stephen 
Potter and Joyce Grenfell, 
How to Listen. On September 
29, 1986 that programme was 
repeated. There followed part 
of a concert by the BBC 
Symphony Orchestra, con- 
ducted by Sir Adrian Boult, 
dating from September 1966, 
and that was it No brouhaha, 
no champagne. 

I take the point. In a time of 
universal hype, when cham- 
pagne has ceased to be a drink 
and has become the successful 
sportsman's equivalent of the 
paint aerosol — to be shake n 
vigorously and sprayed over 
anything — then you can see 
the reasons for avoiding it 

Perhaps I am being unfair 


An auction 
where you can 
even afford 
the time. 

If die prices don't pul some auctions out of your 
reach, the viewing and sale times certainly will. 
Sotheby's Conduit Street Sales are devised to fit 
in with your lifestyle. So there are evening and 
Sunday viewings, with the sale on the following 
Monday evening. 

You'll find many complete room settings of 
furniture, rugs, ceramics, silver and works of art. 
As few’ pieces, if any need restoration, they are 
ready to take home and enjoy Delivery is in- 
expensive and easily arranged on the spot. 

Visa or Access Cards are accepted. And as lots 
start from as little as £200, time won't be the only 
thingyou can afford. 



> A duir fmtn a Fcmdi Crib Wood 
wiicf.WKi VMdudiflgapwnfjrniduifKjnd 
fnurvdr chaw Eui mate CW0-L200. 


VIEWING TIMES 

Sunday 5th October . 10 am -4 pm 

Monday 6th October 9 am-2 pm 

NEXT SALE 

Monday 6th October S.30pm-9.00p m 

SOTHEBYS 

CONDUIT St 

SALEROOM 

Esmim 

26 Conduit Street. London WL Telephone (01) 4SSHH30 


RADIO 


there was more than a touch of 
sparkle to the Potter/GrenfeU 
programme, and across the 
gap of 40 years it sounded 
astonishingly fresh. “Who is 
going to listen to us?” it 
enquired apprehensively and, 
in its search for listeners, came 
upon people still painfully 
familiar io the researchers and 
programme-makers of today: 
those who simply have the 
radio on regardless; those who 
half listen . . . and then there 
was the man who could not 
find anything he wanted to 
listen to at afl. 

in defence of his position, 
this individual railed up 
sound-alikes of all be found 
detestable, the plays, the 
spontaneous discussions, the 
quizzes, the very poetical dra- 
mas. It was a quiet but sharply 
pointed send-up of radio by 
radio, the like of which you 
rarely hear these days, even if 1 
there is Tom Lubbock's In 
Ow Society (Radio 3), cur- 
rently taking a low-key but 
weU-aimed swipe at die kind 
of talks commonly given by 
philosophers and sociologists. 

In general however, the 
targets may be more abun- 
dant, larger, more grotesque , 
but they are left alone. Self- 
mockery is out, and so you can 
safely infer that insecurity is 
in. How io Listen has no 
successors. Instead we have 
Feedback, grand in its way but 
basically defensive. 

Fritz Hochwaldei's The 
Holy Experiment (Radio 4, 
Monday, repeating this after- 
noon) has had some rough 
handling over the years ami 
this production was the first to 
be performed m its original 
form. 

It concerns a Jesuit mission 
in 18th-century Paraguay. By 
its humane, if highly 
paternalistic, treatment or the 
Indians, this mission has be- 
come a huge economic and 
social success and thus a 
threat not only to the Spanish 
regime but to the rigid disci- 
pline of its order. Under 
pressure from both, the Father 
Provincial is forced to confess 
error, dose the mission and 
resign. Wounded in the ensu- 
ing riot, he dies, but on his 
deathbed be recants, rejecting 
the obedience that has brought 
him to accede to an art of 
gross inhumanity — for the 
Spaniards will now enslave 
the Indians. 

Alan Dobie was well cast as 
the Father Provincial and 
Peter Jeffrey as the emissary 
from Spain. They were able to 
flesh out two of the many 
characters which in general 
had been conceived more to 
serve the interests of a large 
theme than to develop as 
recognizable and appealing 
human bein^. 

David Wade 


Gdtterdammenmg 
Royal Opera 
House 


The intensity that had marked 
much of Siegfried was not 
entirely sustained in the last 
instalment of Welsh National 
Opera's Ring cyde. It was 
suddenly more noticeable that 
some voices were somewhat 
under-powered, that even 
Richard Armstrong and his 
gutsy orchestra could grow 
tired and a tittle casual and 
that the ideas of producer 
Goran Jarvefelt do not get any 
more exciting as the great 
conflagration approaches. 

In feet the ending was a 
feeble anti-climax. There was 
a flickering glow from some- 
thing safely offstage; a* few 
puffs of dry ice floating 
through the air, Hagen trying a 
Tosca-styie leap to oblivion, 
and finally Gutrune doing a 
Scarlett O'Hara, silhouetted 
against the new dawn and 
doubtless comforting herself 
with the thought that “tomor- 
row is another day”. 


Ring’s final lack 
of confidence 


OPERA 


Yet this Gdtterddmmenutg 
(which Radio 3 broadcasts 
this evening) also contained 
much that was good. 

There was Anne Evans’s 
Brfinnhflde: a performance of 
outstanding intelligence, not 
only in the dignified and 
credible way she acted, but 
also in the manner she nursed 
her vocal resources, so that 
Act III found her at her peak. 

Some passages lie badly for 
her — the ■ sustained low- 
register singing needed in the 
opening scene, for instance 
But where she could show her 
strengths — as in the blazing 
accusations of Act 0 — she was 

magnifi cent. 

Jeffrey Lawton’s Siegfried 
continued to be lusty and 
likeable. His swansong may 


not have been the sweetest 
ever heard, but in its great- 
hearted simplicity (and its 
abrupt and brutal termina- 
tion, in which Jarvefelt clev- 
erly contrived resonances with 
Siegmund's death) it was 
highly affecting. 

Lawton literally song him- 
self into the ground; one felt 
he had given everything. 

There was a strong Hagen 
from John Tranter a bent- 
legged. malignant manipu- 
lator, not afraid to exploit 
coarser-grained, untuneful 
sounds for dramatic effect. 
Compared with this monster, 
Gutrune (Kathryn Harries) 
and Gunther (Barry Mora) 
seemed weak-willed but 
sympathetic characters. Har- 
ries gave what turned out to be 
an especially subtle 
performance. 

The Nams’ blind gropings 
conveyed appropriate nihil- 


ism at the outset, and the 
Rhine daughters* scene also 
seemed psychologically truth- 
ful: both trios blended sweetly. 
Patricia Payne sang Wahraute 
with a big expressive range, 
but considering that her mes- 
sage is nothing less than the 
ending of the cosmic order she 
should have got her words out 
better. 

After a Rhinegold set 
vaguely in 19th-century rail- 
way architecture and a Val- 
kyrie costumed like a Prussian 
Army parade, the 
Oberie/Jarvefelt concept here 
was approximately “German 
Dark Ages”, with some ba- 
roque totem-poles dominating 
the Gibichung scenes. 

The visual incongruity of 
this Ring has been its chief 
weakness. As it continues its 
tour, however, it will impress 
audiences for its direct 
unpretentiousness. 

That coupled with its 
clearly-delivered English 
translation, may win Wagner 
new converts. 


Richard Morrison 


promise 


DANCE 


Central Ballet of 
China 

Sadler’s Wells 


I could have wished for . 
better balanced programme to 
introduce the Centra! Balk! of 

China at Sadler's Wells, bur 
the ability, cohesion and 
personality of the young danc- 
ers fully earned them their 
warm applause. 

The most popular hems 
were the two c las s ic al p^j 
which ended the evening, ifc 
second act of Swan Lake a 
given in a production by Pyon- 
Gusev. the well-known (free, 
tor from Leningrad, with an 
attractive setting by Qj 
Mudong. 

Most striking was the unity 
and polish of the corps de 
ballet, and the group 
big swans and four cygnets 
who danced with a pleasing 
freshness. 

In the first of several poten- 
tial casts, Odette, Tang Min, 
and her Siegfried. XhaugWej. 
giang. are a handsome pair 
with smooth style and good 
bearing. Their manner is pre* 
rise without looking over- 
careful bold and clear in 
detail 

In the famous showpiece 

duet from The Corsaire, Guo 
Peihui danced with warmth 
and a nice crisp attack. Xhao 
Minhua. as her admiring 
slave, had an aptly fierce 
expression to go with his 
strong and speedy pinmeots. 
forcefully 


Not such a happy 
marriage of ideas 


CAMBRIDGE 

FOOTLIGHTS 

PRESENT 

ANOTHER FINE 
MESS 

THEIR 1986 REVUE 

n-.*.>ocT«pvi 
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BOX OFFICF 01-187 %29 


The Confederacy/ 
A Betrothal 
Man in the Moon 

In a move calculated to please 
a critic's spine, the Man in the 
Moon has introduced 
comfortable individual seats 
in place of its purgatorial 
pews. It has also brought in 
Penny Plain, a new company 
dedicated to recycling the 
foundlings of En glish drama. 

The Confederacy, a ne- 
glected sit-com by Sir John 
Vanbrugh based on a French 
original comprehends the 
usual cat's-cradle of greed, 
lechery, imposture and the 
property laws. 

A pair of “money brokers” 
each fancies the other's wife; 
the wives are in alliance to 
maintain their spendthrift 
ways of life; the servants, 
again as usual, hold the pup- 
pet-strings and contrive to 
feather their own nest while 
helping an upwardly mobile 
young chancer to his intended 
fortune. 

■Frankly, it is not bard to see 
why the play has fallen by the 
wayside, with its stodgy plot- 
ting and thinly distinguished 
characterization. There is not 
enough real passion or peril 
behind the facade of cynicism 
— though it must be said that 
the thing remains one of the 
greatest dramas ever written 
by an architectural genius. 

Christopher Bridgman's 
production is a charming, 
handsomely costumed confec- 
tion whose drollery stems 
chiefly from three neat pieces 
of casting; Anne Renn as the 
1 shrewd and affected Mrs 
Gripe, Bronwen James as her 
cut-glass stepdaughter and 
John Dobson as her timorous 
suitor Mr Moneyttap. 

Lanford Wilson's new two- 
hander, A Betrothal, stars Ben 
Kingsley and Geraldine James 
as a pair of disgruntled rose- 
growers who meet in the tea- 
tent at a show where each has 
received short shrift from the 
judges. She is a petulant 
assistant school librarian from 
Chipping Camden, he a stolid 
assistant gardener from Eve- 
sham; she refers to her rose as 
“he”, he to his as “she”. 

As in the cosiest Radio 4 
plays, one can see the denoue- 
ment coming a vale away, and 


THEATRE 


the sexual subtext is ham- 
mered to death long before- 
hand. Mr Kingsley's 
Worcestershire accent is the 
chief curiosity of Alison 
Sutcliffe’s production, whose 
playing is grossly over-sig- 
nalled for so small a venue. 

It seems a shame that the 
full house which greeted A 
Betrothal could not have ex- 
tended its patronage to the 
first offering of the evening. 

Martin Cropper 

Twelfth Night 

Haymarket 

Leicester 

This late comedy is frequently 
dignified by the epithets . 
“Dark” or “Melancholy”, as 
though the Shakespeare, who 
had already got Hamlet under 
his belt, must henceforth wear 
a mourning band on his 
motley. But there surely need 
be no external excuse for 
Malvolio’s terminal bitterness 
any more than for. say, 
Jacquies' Misanthropy: some 
people are tike that 

The present Malvolio 
(Christopher Ravenscroft) is a 



■ " -ife - . 

Geraldine James and Ben Kingsley in A 'Betrothal 
posturing mini from bus first blow his fellow players of the 


appearance, which subverts 
any idea -that the piece might 
be read as his tragedy; when 
Nick Stringer's porcine Sir 
Toby Belch pounds up the 
stairs of the three-tier set to 
deliver the “cakes and ale” 
blast to the night-capped stew- 
ard, the latter seems to per- 
sonify less an adamantine 
puritinism than a reasonable 
point of view. Belch and his 
crony, Christopher Good's 
teetering Sir Andrew 
Aguecheek, really are malting 
the most dreadful row. 

In the absence of a “Dark” 
or “Melancholy” interpreta- 
tion, the coast is clear for Feste 
to make the piece his own. 
Sylvester McCoy has never 
been one to do things by 
halves; here, his elasticated 
fool indulges — sometimes 
over-indulges — m music ball 
routines which threaten to 


stage. He is, however, a dab 
hand at playing the spoons, as 
he demonstrates at the start of 
the second half. 

Ale xandra Mathie’s Viola is 
pretty thinly drawn, and the 
entangled love interest with 
Felicity Dean’s clear-voiced 
Olivia brings to mind pre- 
cisely what u should not the 
astonishing myopia of Jaco- 
bean lovers. When will we see 
a Shakespearian comedy 
where the heroine dressed as a 
boy is in fact played by a boy? 

Nancy Meckler’s produc- 
tion begins badly enough, with 
George Irving’s Orsino 
delivering his lines as though 
testing them for size, and 
memories of her atrocious 
Macbeth of last season are 
dispelled only when the mis- 
rule gets underway. 

M.C. 


CONCERT 


Sinfonietta/ 
Atherton 
Festival Hall 


It is exactly as it was last wed: 
the Britten/Tippett Festival is 
proving, at least as far as the 
South Bank concerts are con- 
cerned, a celebration without 
a crowd. And it is hard 10 see 
why. The Britten in the pro- 
gramme was his Cantata 
misericordium. Based on. the 
story of the Good Samaritan, 
this performance pinwi much 
from the controlled passion of 
Philip Langridge as the 
Samaritan, and from Stephen 
Roberts’s appealingly straight- 
forward baritone. There was 
strong sin ging , digging into the 
words, from the London 
Sinfonietta Chorus. 

For the Sinfonietta the®: 
selves, conducted by David 
Atherton, it was not quite sum 
a happy occasion. The band 
had been expanded in every 
department except the violins. 
whose weedy lone and lack or 
rhythmic life were a dis- 
appointment, as' they woe 
again in Tippett’s Second 
Symphony. But here, there 
were compensations: the solos 
from the trumpeter Graham 
Ashton, oboist Gareth Hid* 
and clarinettist Mkhad Coi- 
iins were full of life, and there 
was the right green magic m 
the quartet of horns. Aoov* 
all Mr Atherton was effec- 
tively in control 

Paul Griffiths 



PEKING OPERA 
in THE 


MONKEY KING 


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Tickets £ 3 Jj 8 ’£ft 
f 2-18 OCTOBER 738 pO 
satm* 

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mp> 


Sadler's Wfells Theatre 


He dances 
out great height in his jumps. 

For me the most interesting 
ballet was The New Year's 
Sacrifice, one act of a 
work created for the 
Ballet in 1980. It uses a 
mixture of western and Chi- 
nese techniques to transoibea 
story of feudal China into 
classical ballet. Wang Chjjtm, 
in his evening solo, reveals an 
amazingly flexible back, 
sharply accurate control and 
great breadth of movement, 
while the men in general 
display lots of acrobatic bra- 
vura, leaping with wild enejgy 
into amazing shapes. 

The vigour, variety and 
humour of the first ha& the 
pathos and sincerity of fee 
second half, may make for an 
awkward structure, naive n> 
western tastes, but they ensure 
that the ballet is constantly 
interesting, stirring at fin : 
touching later. 

By comparison, Maria Fay's 
Four Romantic Pieces, to 
unidentified music by Dvorak 
for violin and piano, looks 
vapid and conventional in its 
choreography. 

John Pertival 




WrttewUw)- 




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THE TIMES SATURDAY OCTOBER 4 1986 


?Si 

'«nn| in ^ 

b * ih| 


Live Bernstein 
, makes every 

moment count 


REVIEW 


Low sparks on high art 


LLASSiCAL 

Records 


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poser $ cello concerto. 

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KH*? ^No^CellotSSS^j^ X! enna Philharmonic Or- 
nU nuj 31 • Msfeky/Vienra* - Misch a chestra ai their glistening best. 


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Philharmonic 

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Philharmonic 

CBS IM 39671 (black dis ci. 

Tlhere seems to be something 
f w hve perfo* 
mances on record. One can 
only approve, for h is true that 
?^ il|8S0fien sound 

Ihan^SP 6 S* cuineM * rather 
than real performances. These 

two Bernstein recordings, 
made at public concerts, Ulus- 
pirate the basic advantage. You 

? e ,P um P' n e adren- 
the feeling among the 
performers that every single 
instant is critically important 
with no room for mistakes. 

Copland’s proud, broadly 
arching Third Symphony is. of 
course, meat and drink to a 
conductor like Bernstein and 
to an orchestra like the New 
> ork Philharmonic — its 
sweeping if conservative ges- 
tures very much those of a 
proud America, its heart worn 
brazenly upon its sleeve. Here 
there is an emphasis upon 
smoothness of sound rather 
than on brashness, so that 
even though the music is 
suffused with Bernstein’s own 
brand of melodrama, its dig- 
nity and its integrity is never- 
theless maintained. 

The fill-up, recorded in 
sessions, is Copland’s Quiet 
City, which is given an in- 
tensely controlled perfor- 
mance dominated by the 
trumpet playing of Philip 
Smith and the cor anglais 
playing of Thomas Stacy. 

The other Bernstein issue, 
again recorded live (and again 
blessed by a remarkable lack 
of audience noise); couples 
Schumann’s Second Sym- 


sssss 

sssssas 

vwl™ _ . - . ters fKt in and out of their 


PAPERBACKS 


The Other Half by Kenneth 
Clark (Hamish Hamftton, £5.95} 
Mom Memoire of an 
Aesthete by Harold Acton 
(Hamish Hamilton, £8.95) 


There is something famil y 
similar between the two weB- 
preserved dd gentlemen who 
smile out at us from the covers 
of these two autobiographies. 
Both are prosperous and well- 
preserved, sleek and smartly- 
suhed, protected from the 
strains and stresses that form 


There is not much Schu- 
mann around on record which 
« quite like this, but perhaps 
this composer, most of all. 
would have approved of its 
fiery tempestuousness. Cer- 
tainly he would have mar- 
velled ai the technical ex- 
cellence of the orchestral 



Bernstein: pumping adrenalin 

playing.The same passionate 
intensify more appositely per- 
vades Mischa Maisky’s read- 
ing of the turbulent cello, 
concerto. But, as happens ' 
often, the soloist is balanced 
unnaturally far forward, 1 
though be makes a thoroughly 
gorgeous sound. 

Barenboim's Schubert, with ! 
the Berlin Philharmonic Or- ! 
chestra. radiates warmth ami 
innocence above all else. This 
conductor here shows his 
knack for keeping the simple 
thirty simple, while allowing 
more complex matters seem- 
ingly acres of space without 
compromising tempos. 

Stephen Pettitt 


memoirs — many of them rich 
exiled art collectors like 
Berenson and Somerset 
Maugham. 

Clark and Acton are self- 
confessed aesthetes — a family 
dirty word. An aesthete is to 
be distinguished from the tree 
lover of art who responds to 
those things that also inspire 
artists — nature, the beauty of 
women, the omnipresence of 
God. For the aesthete a work 
of art is sufficient in itsel£ and 
the pleasure experienced in 
contemplation of it cannot be 
wholly separated from the 
excitement evoked by the 
value: A beautiful painting is 
something to be gazed at and, 
ideally, possessed. Aesthetes, 
by and large, are drawn to the 
second-rate. They prefer Os- 
car Wilde to Shakespeare, and 
Japanese prims to 
Rembrandt 

Of the two memoirists, 
Kenneth Clark is the more 
interesting and sympathetic. 
He starts the second volume 
of his autobiography at the 
beginning of the war, when he 
was still Head of the National 
Gallery, helping Myra Hess to 
launch her famous series of 
lunchtime concerts, and over- 
seeing the transportation of 
big pictures to a disused 



Discerning style: Lord Clark, who found pleasure in the contemplation of art 

mineshaft in the Welsh moon- lished in 1955. Later he Europe to the accompa 
teuts. ■ achieved unexpected and of appropriate music. 

A discerning patron, Clara world-wide fame with his It is his disarming fh 
was also a dedicated commit- television series. Civilization, about his success and ; 
tee man, who took on many in which he appeared as an failings that make hi 
quango- type appointments, urbane and fluent guide, appealing. For all h 
notably as chairman of the showing viewers round the dilion he could not 
ITA when it was first esiab- churches and galleries of being a slightly comic 


Europe to the accompaniment 
of appropriate music. 

It is his disarming frankness 
about his success and also his 
failings that make his book 
appealing. For all his eru- 
dition he could not avoid 
being a slightly comic figure 


especially when, on his tele- 
vision grand tour, he came to 
rest at the fool of some great 
masterpiece. 

At the same time there is 
something very 1 tragic about 
certain incidents in his life. 
Overcome by the adulation of 
fans while on a triumphal visit 
to America, be flees to the 
gents and dissolves into a 
flood of tears. 

One of the most extraor- 
dinary passages in any auto- 
biography is his account of a 
mystical experience that came 
to him in an Italian church 
and which, he says, left him 
with a sense of “heavenly joy” 
for several months. There was 
no doubt in his mind that he 
had felt the “finger of God” 
but he decided to ignore it. It 
was altogether too much of a 
bother. It is hard not to be 
reminded of the rich young 
man who went away sorrowful 
- ’’for he had great 
possessions”. 

Certain tell-tale sentences 
betray the hollowness and the 
inhumanity of the aesthetic 
outlook when divorced from 
ordinary human responses. 
**lt was a pleasure”, he writes 
of the Portuguese town of 
Cintra. “to walk out on to the 
main square with its collection 
of Rembrandtesque beggars”. 

But in spite of his heartless- 
ness, Clark remains more 
simpanev than his fellow- 
aesthete. Sir Harold Acton. 
Clark’s career was fairly rich 
in incident and achievement 
Acton is a dilettante who has 
never really done anything of 
consequence. His life seems to 
consist of sightseeing and 
party-going. An over-fastidi- 
ous and snobbish bachelor, he 
reminds one of Nod Coward 
without the jokes. The Lam- 
beth walk is “oafish”, the 
smell of beer detestable. 

Although he has had many 
encounters with die famous, 
he is too absorbed in himself 
to pass on much of value. 

Richard Ingrams 


ARTS DIARY 

Pressure 

points 

Harvard University has 
“leaned on” the Bodley Head 


Sweetly sensed 


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L *rwooti. 

t by 

ees 


i Salzburg Recital Kathleen 
Battld/Jameskovine. DG CO .. 
4 1 5 361 -2 (also black disc 
and cassette) 

Kathleen Battle, very much in 
opera-fanciers' ears and minds 
at the moment for her school- 
girly Zerfina in Karajan's new 
Don Giovanni, has chosen 
herself a recital programme 
which distils the very essence 
of her vocal personality. The 
voice is as light, high and fleet 
of texiure as if it were about to 
fly away any minute with the 
songsters she invoices in h°r 
Purcell. 

Even in “Music for a 
While” and “Sweeter than 
Roses" this is 'hardly, of 
course, the place to look for 
any semblance of Baroque 
style. Battle’s floating can- 
tabile, bordering at times on a 
sort of miniature vocalese, is 
more at home in Mendelssohn 
and Mozart than in Purcell or 
in Handel with Jubal's lyre. 
Both Mendelssohn’s nursery 
lullabv "Bei der Wiege” and 
his elfin scherzo of new love 
flourish with her particular 
weight of voice and ready 
intimacy, so does Mozart’s 


. little violet ditty, sweetly- 
scented but cunningly avoid- 
ing any hint of the arch. 

Just as the voice has very 
definite limits so, inevitably, 
does the expressive range of 
the recitaL Battle has chosen 
well, though, in her Faure. 
Listen, for example, to the 
finely-drawn arcs with which 
she shapes his “Roses 
d* Ispahan", and the ingenu- 
ous simplicity, echoed in 
James Levine's deftly fingered 
accompaniments, with which 
she . handles the child-like 
rhyming couplets of “En 
Priere". 

• This is a live recording 
made at the Salzburg Festival 
two years ago, yet every 
cough, breath, and clap of the 
bands is editedonL Some may 
find this a relief and, in any 
case, even in the vacuum- 
packed silence of the compact 
disc one can sense the liveli- 
ness of rapport between Battle 
and her audienc e in the final 
group of four negro spirituals. 
At this point, rire really does 
seem, for a fleeting moment, 
to hold the whole world in her 
tiny hqnri. 


Expensive Habits by Simon 
Garfield (Faber, £5.95) 

There are certain cautionary 
tales that are destined to be 
recounted in perpetuity, their 
lessons being leant so rarely 
by successive generations of 
yooth. And there are sivdy 
few areas of hraan activity 
that throw up better staff for 
deterrent n ar rative than does 
the pop nmgic badness. 

The yam I have in mind 
maybe tinged with apocrypha 
after 20 years in rirenbitiou, 
but the core of it remains fact 
This was a story I race heard 

from a source who, in the 

drcemstances, may sound un- 
likely, bnt who is nevertheless 
plausible. After aD, what 
members of an industry bn 
into their own sternest critics, 
we most accord them some 
credibility. 

A group of young musi cian s , 

virtually unknown, » travel- 
ling to a boolting in a worn-ont 
van that breaks down on the 
way. A saviour comes to their 

rescue in the form of a passing 
businessman, who arranges 
for them and their gear to be 
taken on to the date, thus 
redeeming not only their good 


4- Stings and so on, right np to 

KOn TiIHT G«»ge Michael and his 

^ contemporaries, all filing 

1 j through the foyers of the 

QA I /i record companies like a 

Gv/lU- succession of Candides. 

# These, of course, were the 

its SOlll *** faww *** vsm 

^ stalks the record business (and 

book publishing too, come to 
than the gathering dusk, the B*sP<»rtrat it will 


r » w 1 1 turned down by the 

The great and odd 


corpse of their transport and 
the gig m hand. 


be ever thus, given pop s 
peculiar enjoyment of a cotes- 


As if you hadn't gnessed, the & safes poteotia! coupled to 
band becomes fiSnoraT the^ ’ f* frwP*«* 


Shy lock exacts his hood, the 
taMoids get a good story and 
the lawyers grow rich. 

. Simon Garfield does not-tefl 
this particular story in Ins 
excellent book on the financial 
chicanery of the pop industry. 
Bnt Ami he hardly needs to, 
for his 269 pages address an 
identical theme at innocence 
exploited, bnt with such data. 

Pop deals get done, 
but the creators 
get disenfranchized 

such bitter anecdote and such 
bair-raisug chapter and verse 


name but also their fee fra the that the story of the van and 


evemug. 


acqnfres by compari- 


nce of the compact For fids he asks nothing in son the deceptive simplicity of 
ui sense the tiveli- return, save that, supposing, a parable, 
port between Battle b®t supposing they should In Garfield's pages there are 

idieneff in the final have any songs published in young Beaties ami Stones and 

ur negro «ptritnaic the future, he shall receive a Kinks and Whos, snugglin g 

ait, she really does percentage of the royalties. with ever-mounting fury 

i fleeting moment. How very equitable it seems, against the venal ways of the 
whole world in her for at this stage of the game men to whom they too trast- 
they have no track record to ingjy contracted their mask. 
ira A «,E%. A k speak of and the hit parade Tea years later comes die next 
Hi lary I'lncn appears rather less tangible wave, the Springsteens, the 


human commodity. None the 
less, the value of a book like 
this is to demonstrate, with the 
thoroughness of a vengeful 
auditor, die precise manner in 
which die deals get done, the 
Eat cats get fed and the 

gp> iHmItmHihwI. 

Perhaps the most distress- 
ing episode in the whole book 
concerns Gilbert O’Sullivan 
who, despite the appalling 
assumed name, was a 1970s 
songwriter of some talent and 
whose long litigation with his 
manager over the small matter 
of royalties seemed quite to 
knock the stuffing out of him. 

It b rather a depressing 
chronicle, largely because it is 
impossible not to conclude 
that the condition it desc ri bes 
is self-perpetuating. It does at 
least offer us that rare plea- 
sure of being able to substan- 
tiate long-had preconceptions 
about pop moguls with a 
mountain of hard fact No 
matter that it is parti pro 
jomualisxn; the targets of his 
disclosures have their own 
rewards. 

Alan Franks 


BOOKS IN BRIEF 


Alexander the Great by 
Robin Lane Fox (Penguin, 

More than 20 contemporaries 
wrote fives of Alexander, and 
not one of them survives. His 
myth still stirs us, and his 
name is part of our language. 
Robin Lane Fox’s biography 
of the last Homeric hero was 
published in hardback more 
than 20 years ago, and is this 
week Penguinned for the first 
time. The gardening 
correspondent of the Finan- 
cial Times is a serious ancient 
historian of erudition, who 
can walk with scholarship, 
and keep the common touch. 

Best SF of toe Year edited 
by Terry Carr (Goflancz, £3.95) 
A Terran expedition to a 
planet whose more or less 
humanoid inhabitants are at 
tire Bronze Age level of 


civilization. A world where Ambassador Paul van 
people five on an endless Heerden is the only South 
vertical wall, a kind of Flat- African the Quai d’Orsay will 
land set on edge, and what listen to. At the time of the 
happens when changes invade Sharpeville massacre he is 
this vertiginous state. Every- having an affair with 


The Sonnets and A Lover’s 
Complaint by Wiliam 
Shakespeare, edited by 
John Kerrigan (Penguin, £4.95) i 
The comedies are for boys; the 

■ tragedies for men; but he who 
3 aspires lobe a hero wifi end up 

with the sonnets. This new 
edition is taken from the 
“r original texts, with an in- 
trod union, a list of further 
reading, a full commentary, 
and a short account of the 
- textual problems by John , 
Kerrigan, lecturer in English 
U atSt John’s, Cambridge. It is a 
good idea to print with the 

■ sonnets A Lover’s Complaint, 
which has previously been 

[jr shoved to the touchlines of 
P* Shakespearean criticism, but 
does not intrinsically need to 
. be caviary to the general. 

5) The Ambassador by Andrfr 
a Brink (Fontana, £3.95) 
ss This triangle of public and 
at private love and hate is set m 
of Paris in the early Sixties. 


to stop publication of a star- 
tling new book. The Partner- 
ship. on the corrupt art- 
dealing aniics of Lord Duvcen 
and Bernard Berenson. 

The book, chronicling the 
multi-million pound swindle 
which the scholar Berenson 
and the entrepreneur Duveen 
ran between 1912 and 1938, 
involving the moving of fam- 
ous works of an from Europe 
to .America, was to have been 
published this month. But the 
author. Colin Simpson, who 
has spent more than IS years 
researching the subject, 
discovered recently that the 
book had not gone beyond the 
proof stage. 

The dispute is over damn- 
ing letters from the Berenson 

archive to which Harvard 
claims copyright Bui Simp- 
son points out that next year 
an American Professor, Ernest 
Samuels, is publishing a biog- 
raphy of Berenson which will 
include extracts from the 
correspondence with 
Harvard's blessing. 
“Berenson” he points out, 
“was Harvard's favourite son. 
Samuels won't be telling the 
story 1 as it really was. 1 will - 
and that’s why I've been 
leaned on.” 

Lend a hand 

An unusual reponsibifiry is 
being thrust upon visitors to 
the Benjamin Brinen sympo- 
sium at Aldebuigh today. 
Their reaction will decide 
whether a handful of pre- 
viously undiscovered songs, 
composed in the master’s 
early years, will be primed or 
merely consigned to a musical 
footnote. If the audience claps 
loudly enough. I'm told, the 
songs could be published. 

• When ft comes to 
finding* borne for itself, die 
Eureka! national children’s 
museum Isa choosy little 
organization. No fewer 
chan six prime sites have been 
turned down by the 
trustees, including a dockland 
site. Sir Terrace Conran’s 
Butler's Wharf, the Sooth 
Bank Board’s Hnngerford 
Bridge site, two spots in 
Regent's Park and another 
in Waterloo. 

Second fiddle 

Sir Yehudi Menuhin's friend, 
Luigi Alberto Bianchi, makes 
his second London debut at 
the Royal Festival Hall on 
October 21, playing 
Beethoven's violin concerto. 
Second, because his first was 




one is on permanent holiday 
in the six fabulous cities of the 
far tomorrow, but it has its 
dark side. These selected sci- 
ence fiction short stories show 
that the genre still thrives, in 


Nicolene, who is also the 
mistress of Stephen Keyter, 
his Embassy's Third Sec- 
retary. Each man in turn tells 
his story; as South Africa 
burns, Paris night fife seduces. 


spite of the increasing and hypocrisy fights with 
popularity of Tolkien fantasy humanity to a shocking 


rubbish, whh originality and 
perverted imagination. 


climax. 


Philip Howard 




Bianchi and Menuhin 

as a viola player some years 
ago. But a thief on a scooter 
stole his Amati viola, and 
instead of replacing it he came 
up with a long-bodied Stradi- 
varius violin, on which he is 
now considered a virtuoso. 

Art on HP 

A West End gallery. Blond 
Fine Art, is offering young but 
impecunious art-lovers the 
chance to purchase paintings 
on an instalment plan. For 
regular instalments of £25, 
people can buy pictures rang- 
ing from £50 to £5,000. 

Christopher Wilson 



Jlfv*' 


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Ncic i it pa perba ck 

IRIS 

MURDOCH 

SHORTLISTED FOR THE 
1985 BOOKER PRIZE 

THE GOOD 

apprentice 

'BRILLIANT... 
trilmphantia 

and 

UNSTOPPABLE 
INVENTIVE' 

- Observer 

V £3.35 • . 


True blues, melodic dreams 


JAZZ RECORDS 


Wynton Marsalis J Mood 
(CBS 57068) 

Art Fanner Portrait 
(BopBdty COP 029) 


Whereas saxophone players 
usually want to be alone with 
their rhythm section, trumpet- 
ers generally prefer the com- 
pany of an other bom. Perhaps 
this curious scarcity is what 
makes trumpet-and-rhythm 
quartets — think of Chet 
Baker. Booker Little or Fred- 
die Hubbard (with Herbie 
Hancock on Empyean Isles ) — 
sound so fresh. 


' -J 


Balladeen Wynton Marsalis 
This outstanding album 
also introduces Marcus Rob- 


ROCK RECORDS 


New Mode! Army The 
Ghost of Cain (EMI EMC 351 6) 

Whatever happened to the 
English rock group? The in- 
stitution which, more than any 
other, was responsible in the 
Sixties for transforming the 



1 luuvuiua raaaua 

ens. a pianist whose clean 
bums with his qumlel .■adone touch ^ llldd ftoughB 

tenefil r fiom a Pn»ni*»x»l 

sense of economy that comes 
m as a welcome change from the 

brittle verbosity of so many 
bass and drums: the mysten- vounB nianisw nver-in- 

*sSd6»3flfjtaS 

historical perspective 
on ^ trumpet 

« hf% 5n h « quanets ’ lislcn 10 rdssoe 

So confident is he m fits of ^ ^ Farmer, a 


minor classic from 1958 by a 

f r0l S5 o J b ^i,!?^. q )Sl2? m trumpeter whose playing has 
hts ideas that be dares to i Anj , rennwniM-i 


follow one ballad, the lulling 
“Metodique" with another. 


HP 


mg oi 

the blues, is perfectly iflus- 
traied by the fleet “Much 
Later”, in which bis succulent 
open horn is sent bowling 
along by Jeff Watts’s wire 
brushes, and by the title trade, 
in which he cunningly main- 
tains a lazy, low-lights mood 
without sacrificing an ounce 
of intellectual rigour. 


long represented the more 
thoughtful and sophisticated 
face of jazz. Tide pianist Hank 


Haynes provide discreet and 
constructive support on a 
carefully chosen repertoire. 
For a more provocative 
perspective on what Marsalis 
is doing, listen to Tutu, Miles 
Davis's new LP — but that is 
an argument we shall leave 
until next week. 

Richard Williams 


and rock 'n' roll into the genus 
“rock”, and which in the 
Seventies rejuvenated a flag- 
ging industry with one last 
surge of pmtk energy, seems of 
late to have lapsed into a 
turgid parody of its framer 
glories. 

New Model Army, a t rio 
from Bradford, have made the 
most determined effort in 
many years to redress the 
balance with their exceptional 
third album, a passionate and 
authoritative work that revives 
the spirit of rock's past, while 
casting melodies and lyrics 
into a sharp contemporary 
perspective. The Ghost of Cain 
has the zmening quality that 
nsed to distinguish theworikof 
groups when rock still had a 
sense of direction, and the 
album owes much to tire 
production work of Glyn 
Johns, whose previous clients 
indnde the RbUinc Stones, the 
Who, Led Zeppelin, and the 
Clash. 

While many of the album's 
10 original songs proceed from 
an acoustic guitar base the feel 
is, categorically elecrric 
throughout. Slade The 
Leveller's hugely untreated 
vocals are pitched hi g h m the 



Armoury; Slade and Heaton 
mrv-j ami a gamy* the (ant 
vamped chords of “All of 
This” the cracked notes and 
popping consonants lend an 
air of vulnerability to tbe 
darldy-fllnstraled narrative. 

Calloused fingers scrape 
noisDy across worn fretboards, 
and low-register guitar notes 
twang like a B-morfe sound 
track in “The Hunt”, a sin- 
ister vigilante song, while 
Robb Heaton's rolling drum 
patterns punctuate the fast 
scraping riff of “Western 
Dream" with steadily increas- 
ing momentum. 

“Poison Street” with its 
astute, romantic lyric, crack- 


CONCISE CROSSWORD NO 1071 

Prizes of the New Collins Thesaurus will be given for the first two 
correct solutions opened on Thursday, October 9. 1986. Entries 
should be addressed to The Times Concise Crossword Com- 
petition. 1 Pennington Street. London. EIX9. The winners and 
solution will be announced on Saturday, October 1 1, 1986. 

ACROSS 
1 Lady (I I) 

9 Apart (7) 

10 Aibiuary assertion 
<3.21 ■ 

11 Eccentric (3) 

13 Skater’s twisting 

jump (4) 

16 So be it (4) 

17 Cuntfi) 

18 Aicb(4) 

20 Make hazy (4) 

21 Origin (61 

22 Kind (4) 

23 Happy (4) 

25 Young flower (3) 

28 Resist authority (5) 

29 injection fluids ves- 
sel (7) 

30 Insulation rubber 
(5.0) 


I ■ ■ QQB ■ 

ina a ■ an 

■ aimi ■ 

MMsm m m aai 

■ ■ £■■■■■ 
mmmm ■ ■ -jji 
■ ■ mj j ■ 

3HH JHHI 




chorus and brief harmonica 
section, encapsulates in three 
minutes dead all the qualities 
of a perfect rock song. It is a 
rare record that can eschew 
the legacy of didtes yet so 
convincingly reaffirm the cur- 
rency of the original rock 
dream. 

David Sinclair 


DOWN 

2 Avoid cunningly (5) 

3 Commotion &2) 

4 Realize (4) 

5 Eject (4) 

6 Extremely bad (7) 

7 Zon»swr(JJ) 

8 Oppressed (I I) 

12 Referee (6) 

14 Track circuit (3) 

15 Gokhcotoured alloy 
«0 

19 Camoivea ling stork 
(7) 

20 Plead (3) 

NAME 

ADDRESS 


SOLUTION TO NO 1070 
ACROSS: 1 Affirm 5 Caviar 8 Oil 9 
Closed 10 Income II Deal II Ster- 
ling 14 Sparse 17 Stench 19!n!radjg 22 
Rope 24 Acumen 25 Eyeing 26 Din 27 
Gantry 28 Tattle 

DOWN: 2 False 3 Insular 4 Modiste 5 
Clive 6 Vocal 7 Almanac 13 Rot 15 
Panacea 16 Sea 17 Segment 18 Ear- 
nest 20 Remit 21 Dandy 23 Panel 
The winners cfprisp concise No 1065 am 
Mr Headline. Cambridge Terrace. H'ideombe 
Hill. Bath. Avon: and Mrs .4. D. Price, Rich- 
mond Road. Mountain Ash. Mid Glamorgan. 


24 Chuckle 1 5) 

25 Ink spot (4) 


26 Moist (4) 

27 Cakar(4) 


SOLUTION TO NO 1065 (last Saturday's prize concise) 
ACROSS: 1 Convolvulus 9 Artisan 10 Grebe 11 Due 13 
Idea 16 Hear 17 Slinky IS Gawp 20 Mob 21 Stanza 22 
Axle 23 Raid 25 Cow 28 Heave 29 Allegro 30 Serendipity 
DOWN: 2 Outre 3 Vast 4 Lend 5 Urge 6UkeWe 7Hm, 
taphy 8 Tetrahedron 12 Unkind 14 Asp 15 Bistro 19 w3- 
fere 20 Mar 34 Argot 25 Ccdr 26 Wand 27 Clap 






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Coca Cc 



OPERA 


STORCH SONG: Alan Opie sings 
the composer-conductor Storcn in 
Richard Strauss's 1924 opera. 
Intermezzo. Starch was intended by 
Strauss as a partial self-portrait 
and the story — of the wife of a 
famous composer who mistakenly 
believes that her husband has a 
mistress - was based on a real 
incident Scottish Opera's new 
production, sung in the EngGsh 
translation by Andrew Porter, is 
based on the one by John Cox tar 
Glynde bourne. Theatre Royal 
Glasgow (041 331 1234), Fnday. 


GALLERIES 


PUNCH LINES: George du 
■ Maurier, one of the finest of Victorian 
black-and-white artists, was an 
unsurpassed chronicler of high 
society m the pages of Punch for 
30 years until nis death in 1 896. His 
best known creation (above) was 
the social climbing Mrs Ponsonby de 
Tomkyns. He started a famous 
dynasty: his son, Gerald, was the 
actor-manager, and his grand- 
daughter is Daphne du Maurier. the 


ager,arK 

s Daphne 


laurier, the 


novelist Langtbn Gallery, Langton 
Street, London SW 10 ( 01 -352 9150), 
from Wednesday. 


BOOKS 

CIVIL SORES: Mario Vargas 
Uosa, one of the leading 
contemporary novelists of Latin • 
America, has produced in The Rea! 
Life of Alejandro Mayta (published 
on Monday by Faber & Faber at 
£9.95) a fictional portrait of a 
Trotskyist revolutionary. The book is 
set in Vargas Uosa’s native Peru 
in tiie near future and is a brilliant 
chronicle of a country which is 
being tom apart by a falling 
government an insurgency 
backed by Cuba and Bolivia and the 
United States Marines. 


BINTLEY FIRST: Lesley Collier 
and the Royal Ballet open a new 
season with a quadruple biQ which 
includes the first London 
performance of David Bmtley's 
Gaianteries, to music by Mozart The 
other items are the company’s 
premiere of Opus 19/The Dreamer 
by Jerome Robbins, to music by 
Shostakovich; a revival of Sir 
Frederick Ashton’s La Valse; and 
Robbins’s comedy. The Concert 
Royal Opera House Covent 
Garden <01-240 1066), from 
Wednesday in repertory. 


FILMS 

SEA DOG: Roman Polanski, who 
has been away from the cinema 
since directing his Thomas Hardy 
adaptation, 7ess, seven years ago, 
makes his come-back with a 
project he has long cherished. 
Pirates (PG) is an adventure 
comedy, a genre he has not tned 
before, with lots of yo-ho-ho, a 
huge Spanish galleon and Walter 
Matthau in robust form as a peg- 
legged British pirate. Cannon 
Haymarket (01-839 1527) and 
Cannon Tottenham Court Road (0T 
636 6148), from Friday. 


television 

BEWITCHED: Patricia Hodge 
plays a romantic novelist who has ar 
affair and lives to regret it in Fay 
.Weldon's story of witchcraft and 
revenge. The life and Loves of a 
She Devil . Dennis Waterman is the 
lover, and Julie T, Wallace, in her 
first big television role, is the plain 
suburban housewife who finds 
she is possessed with strange 
powers and becomes the dew of 
the title. The four-part dramatization 
is by Ted Whitehead and tee 
director is Philip Savitle. BBC2, 
Wednesday, SJ25- 10.25pm. 


TELEVISION 


A SUMMER DOWN UNDER: 
THE AMERICA’S CUP: First 
weekly report on the colourful 
multi-million pound 
extravaganza to win the 
ultimate in yacht-racing 
trophies. 

Channel 4. today, 650-7pm. 

REDBRICK: A 12-part 
“camera on the seminar room 
and haO of residence walls" 
document a iy about Newcastle 
University. An engrossing 
• opportunity to relive the trials 
and trfcu tatons of academic 
fife. 

Channel 4, today. 750- 
8.30pm. 

LOVELAW: A global report on 
attitudes to love, sex and 
marriage starts with the most 
impressionable group, 
teenagers. The camera team 
trundles through Japan, 

Kenya, India and California 
Everywhere the dream is the 
same — to cavort Bke a 
teenager, whose possession 
of an automobile guarantees 
sexual mobility and freedom. 
BBC2, tomorrow, 9.05- 
955pm. 

DALLAS: The most heralded 
shower scene since Alfred 
Hitchcock s Psycho as the 
figure of Patriot Duffy returns 
to the ratings-ailing Ewing 
family show. 

BBC1, Wed. 5850pm. 

THE DELIBERATE DEATH OF 
A POLISH PRIEST: 
Uncompromising 
dramatization by Ronald 
Harwood of the trial of four 
secret poficemen accused of 
the murder of the Sofidarity- 
supporting Father Jerzy 
PopialuszKo. Political theatre 
at its best. 

Channel 4, Wed, 10pm- 
midnight f 


JAZZ 


JIGGS WWGHAM: A former 
Kenton sideman, this US 
trombonist is partnered by 
the saxophones of Tommy 
Whittle (tonight) and Peter 
King (tomorrow). 

BulTs Head, 373 Lonsdale 
Road, London SW13 (01-576 
5241). 

DICK MORRISSEY: Vastly 
experienced (and by jazz 
peopte. rather underrated) 
tenor saxophonist now 
realigns his sights on 
straightforward hard bop, 
leading his quartet on a 
national tour. 

Tonight Exeter Arts Centre 
(0392 218188); tomorrow, 
StrathaBan Hotel, 

Birmingham (021 559 6205); 
Mon, nm Monday's Wine 
Bar. Swansea (0792 52322). 

NORMA WINSTONE: An 
elegant singer performs 
standard and original 
pieces with PhN Lee's eloquent 
guitar and Jeff Ctyne's 
bass. 

Tomorrow, Bass Clef, 1 

Hoxton Square, London El 
(01-7292476). 

PETER KING: A welcome 
showcase for a man whose 
mastery of the bebop alto 
saxophone matches practically 
any of America's better- 
known Charlie Parker 
disciples. 

Mon to Sat Ronnie Scott’s 
Club, 47 Frith Street London 
W1 (01-4390747). 

JIM MULLEN'S 
MEANTIME: Glasow's AH-Star 
Jazz Festival continues 
with Dick Morrissey's former 
partner, whose new band is 
fronted by the talented sou! 
singer Noel McCalla. 

Thurs. Mitchefl Theatre. 
Glasgow (041 552 5961).. 

CLEOLAINE: 

Accompanied, 8S ever, by the 
combo of husband John 
Dankworth. 

Fri, Fairfield Hans, Croydon 
(01-6889291). 


THEATRE 


IN PREVIEW 


LES LIAISONS 
DANGEREUSES: Christopher 
Hampton s adaptation of 
the 1 8th century novel by 
Uclos transfers to the 
West End. With Alan Rickman 
and Lindsay Duncan. 
Ambassadors (01-836 


61 1 1 ). Now in performance. 
Press night Oct 14. 

THE HOSTAGE: Nicolas 
Kent directs a new production 
of the Brendan Behan 
comedy of Anglo-Irish 
relations. 

Tricycle, 269 Kitoum High 
Road, London, SW6 (01-328 
8626). Thurs. Fri. Press 
night Oct 13. 

OPENINGS 

GHOSTS: Vanessa 
Redgrave. Tom Wilkinson, 
directed by David Thacker. 
Young Vtc <01 -928 6363). 
Previews today (matinee and 
evening), Mon. Opens 
Tues. 

MISALLIANCE: Jane 
Lapotaire, Elizabeth Spriggs. 
Brian Cox, directed by Jain 
Caird in the George Bernard 
Shaw comedy of Ideas. 
Barbican (01-628 8795/638 
8891). Preview today (matin6e 
and evening). Mon mid 
Tues. Press night Wed. 

SELECTED 

WOMAN IN MIND: 

Ayckbourn's latest foray into 
middle-class frustration. 

Julia McKenzie shines as the 
touched fantasist of the 
title. 

Vaudeville (01-836 9988). 


V, *v.v-x 


'♦ " A 


• Glenda Jackson as a ram- 
rod backed martinet in the tide 
role of The Bouse of Benutrda 
Alba, in a new tr a n sl a tio n by 
Robert David Macdonald. U 
was the last of Lorca's three 
rural tragedies, and his most 
complete and controlled ex- 
pression of the plight of 
Spanish women. Robostly 
played by Amanda Root and 
Joan Plowright as the bawdy 
old servant 

Lyric, Hammersmith (01-741 
2311). 

KAFKA'S DICK: Alan 
Bennett’s rather over- 
anteWous comic fantasy 
about literary detecbonin 
Prague stars Roger Uoyd 
Pack and Geoffrey Palmer. 
Royal Court (01-730 1 745). 

THE MAGISTRATE: 

Pinero's High Victorian farce 
about female vanity is given 
a polished, measured 
treatment With Nigel 
Hawthorne. 

Lyttelton (01-928 2252}. 


. OUT OF TOWN 


BRISTOL:. Largo Desototoe 
New Tom Stoppard adaptation 
and translation of a play by 
Czech dissident Vaclav Hamm, 
as yet unperformed in 
Czechoslovakia. Directed by 
Claude Whatham, with John 
McEnery. 

New Vic (0272 24388). 

Opens Thurs. 

EDINBURGH: The Grand 
Edinburgh Fire Balloon: 
Premiere production of a 
play by Andrew Dallmeyer, 
about James Tytier, who 
was the first Briton to emulate 
the Montgolfier Brothers 
with a balloon fight in 1784. 
Hugh Hodgart directs. 

Royal Lyceum (031 229 
9697). Free preview Thurs. 
Opens Fri. 

STOKE ON TRENT: War 
pictures: Joint winner of the 
Mobil/Royal Exchange 
play writing competition, Tony 
Perrin’s drama centres on a 
Korean War veteran who is a 
cinema projectionist 
New Victoria Theatre. 
Newcastle-under-Lyme (0782 
615962). In repertory. 


For ticket availability, performance and opening times, 
telephone the numbers listed. Bookings: Anne Whitehouse; 
Concerts: Max Harrison: Dance: John FerdvaF, Films: 
Geoff Brown: Films on TV: Peter Way-mark: Galleries: 
Sarah Jane Checkland; Jazz: Richard Williams: 

Opera: Hilary Finch; Radio: Peter Waymark; 

Rode David Sinclair: Television: Bob Williams; 

* Theatre: Tony Patrick and Martin Cropper 


AN ENEMY OF THE PEOPLE: 
Ibsen’s play about a 
Norwegian doctor (Michael 
Williams) who ranges the 
townspeople against him. 
Radio 4, tomorrow, 250-4pm. 

HANGOVER SOUARE: Patrick 
Hamilton’s study of a 
schizophrenic bent on kiffing 
the woman he loves, set in tee 
anxious months before the 
Second World War. Radio 4, 
Mon, 10.1 5-1 050pm. 

WOMAN'S HOUR: Celebrates 
its 40th anniversary, with four 
famous names: Olive Shaptey, 
Jean Metcalfe. Marjorie 
Anderson and Sue McGregor; 
they talc about the 
pr o gramme's hamSng of 
touchy subjects and take their 
pick of the archives. 

Radio 4, Tues, 2-3pm. 

COMMON WORDS: Janet 
Maw, Norman Rodway lead 
play by Cuban-born writer 
Jose Triana which explores 
the hypocrises of conventional 
morality in Cuba around the 
turn of the century. 

Radio 3, Tues, 750-950pm. 

THE RADIO PROGRAMME: 

The wireless looks at itself . 
There are guest critics, a quiz 
and a chance for listeners to 
add their comments. 

Radio 4, Thurs, 950-IOam. 

BOOKSHELF: Returns wHh a 
new presenter, Susan Hill, to 
discuss the latest Kingsley 
Amis and chlkffen's annuals. 
Radio 4, Thurs, 4.05-4 -35pm. 


FILMS ON TV , 


HOW TO MURDER YOUR 
WIFE (1964): Jack Lemmon as 
a cartoonist with mi unwanted 
spouse. 

BBC2, tomorrow, 3-455pm. 


The one in which a house falls 
on Buster Keaton — and 
misses. 

Channel 4, Tues, 250550pm. 

PAPER MOON (1973): Tatum 
O'Neat and dad Ryan fleecing 
rich widows during the 
American depression. 

Channel 4, Tues, 9-1Q55pm. 

THE PUNCH AND JUDY MAN 

(1962): Tony Hancock’s 
melancholic portrait of a 
seaside entertainer. 

Channel 4, Thurs, 255- 
4.25pm. 

THE GOOD EARTH (1937): 
Luise Rainer, Paul Muni in 
PearlS. Buck story about 
peasant life fri China 
Channel 4, Mon, 250-Spm. 


lZEUii 




• Jean Gnbn as. the world- 
weary riDain of Jacques 
Becker’s 1954 film, Toncbez 
Pas am GrisbL It follows a 
more recent French gangster 
movie. La Balance in a new 
BBC2 venture. The F3m Club. 
The aim is to present a 
television equivalent to the art 
cincm. 

BBC2, tonight 1055-11.40 
and ll.40pm-l.15am. 


CONCERTS 


Bag SB 




Barbican Centre, SDk 
Street, London EC2 (01-628 
8795). Today, 7.45pm. 

JORGE BOLET: With 
Haydn's F minor Variations, 
Schumann's Fantasy Op 
17, Liszt’s dazzling Venezia a 
Napoli and Grieg's little- 
heard Ballade. 

Royal Festival Halt, South 
Bank, London SE1 (01-928 
3191). Tomorrow, 3.15pm. 

FROM MOSCOW: The 
Moscow Philharmonic is 
conducted by Dmitri 
Katayenko in Tchaikovsky’s 
Francesca da Rimini, 
Prokofiev's Piano Concerto No 
2 (soloist Nikolai Petrov) 
and Rachmaninov's Symphony 
No 3. 

Royal Festival Halt. Mon, 
7.30pm. 

CLEOBURY/LSO: The LSO 
conducted by Nicholas 
Cieobury in Beethoven's 
“ErOtcar Symphony, Grieg’s 
Peer Gynt Suite No 1 and 
Rachmaninov's Piano 
Concerto No 2. 

Barbican Centre. Thurs, 
7.45pm. 


DANCE 


DANCE UMBRELLA 
FESTIVAL: Five-week London 
season opens at ICA on 
Mon. Stephen Petronio and 
Dancers from the USA 
perform Wed-Fri at The Place. 
Regional performances 
starting today in Dursley, 
Gloucestershire, with Katie 
Dude and At Certini, then at 
Plymouth (Mon. Tues) and 
Bristol (Thurs, Fri). 

Full season details from 
Dance Umbrella (01-741 4040). 

CENTRAL BALLET OF 
CHINA: New p r ogram me 
starting Tues, to include 
themes from Chinese folktales 
in Maid of the Sea and Red 
Detac hmen t of Women-, 
also Anton Dolin's Variations 
for Four. 

Sadler's Wefls (01 -278 
8916). 

SCOTTISH BALLET: Peter 
Darrell's production of Giseffe 
is given at Bath today and 
Liverpool Tues-Oct 11. 

Theatre Royal, Bath 
(0225 65065). Empire, 

Liverpool (051 709 1555). 


OPERA 


ENGLISH NATIONAL OPERA: 

Akfa on Fri a! 7pm with a 
revival of John Copley’s 
production. Meanwhile Mtoado 
mays on Tues and Thurs at 
7.30pm, with Richard Angas in 
the title role. Tonight and Wed 
at 750pm, Madam Butterfly. 
Coliseum, St Martin’s Lane, 
London WC2 (01-836 3161). 

GLYNDEBOURNE TOUR: In 
Sussex tins week, Simon 
Boccanegra is directed for the 
tour by Stephen Lawless, on 
Mon and wed at 7pm. Don 
Giovanni, on Tues and Thurs 
at 7 pm, is conducted by 
Martin Jsepp. with Robert 
Hayward to the title role; and 
Albert Herring (Fri at 7pm). 
Supertitles will be projected at 
all performances of Simon 
Boccanegra and Don 
Giovanni. 

Glyndeboume. Lewes, East 
Sussex (0273-81 241 1 ). 

OPERA NORTH: Opens its 
new season with a new - 
production of the first part of 
Berlioz's Las Troyans, The 
Capture of Troy, sung to 
English. Tim Atoery directs 
and David Uoyd-Jones • 
conducts. Performances 
tonight and Thurs. On Fri. . 
Giles Havergai s production oi 
The Barber of SeviBe, and 
Sally Day's production of 
Madam Butterfly is on Wed. 
RiccoSaccani conducts. All 
performances start at 7.15pm. 
Grand Theatre, New Briggate, 
Leeds (0532-459351). 

KBIT OPERA: A new 

K ' ction of Ga/men by 
Lefevre plays at 
Tunbridge Wells on Thurs at 
750pm. On Fri. the 
company’s Coronation of 
Poppea. All performances 
start at 750pm. 

Assembly Hall, Tunbridge 
WeBs(i 


OPENINGS 


OTHER HALVES (15): Lisa 
Harrow as the lady who 
crashes through barriers of 
age. class ana colour and tails 
for a 16 -year-crfd black. 










tvi • .. 






• , •' Wi 

.'P " ^ ; 




Fanay man on a razor’s edge: brushing off the dreus sawdest, Michael Cramord practises pathos for the Paris sewers 

The phantom takes fright 

M ichael Crawford, who opens anger and fear and tenor through ft. a caricature. It is a story on .the razor's 
this week in Andrew Lloyd Everything must start from inside you.” edge, not quite going over the top into 
Webber’s £2m musical The He finds that the one-eyed itiq pii fy feme." 

Phantom nf the* Cinprn was bAmc hie halanni ansi nrfcar ivith a i-lrvoL- 


M ichael Crawford, who opens 
this week in Andrew Lloyd 
Webber’s £2m musical The 
Phantom of the Opera, was 
once voted the funniest man on tele- 
vision, but there will not be many laughs 
in his latest venture. When the make-up 
girl has finished with him there will not 
be much of Michael Crawford, either, at 
least to the naked eye. 

Chris Tucker, who turned John Hurt 
into the Elephant Mas and Antony Sher 
into Richard III, has devised another 
startling disguise that will transform 
Crawford into the beast that lurks in the 
Paris sewers. Each performance means 
two and a half hours in the make-up 
chair for Crawford and the risk that, if he 
doesn't get the stuff off afterwards, be 
will, wake up next morning with his 
eyelids stuck to the pillow. 

* But be knows the mask is only a prop: 
“You have to work out what you want 
the mask to do. You have to project 


anger and fear and tenor through ft. 
Everything must start from inside you.” 
He finds that the one-eyed di^uise 
affects his balance, and what with a cloak 
and a hood he reckons he is going to be 
hard pressed to hear the orchestra or see 
the conductor, not the ideal conditions 
in which to play the lead in a musical. “I 
suppose," he says. "I may have to end up 
carrying my own Walkman." 

Having got the externals right, 
Crawford has then to create the charac- 
ter. Yes. he has seen the famous 
portrayal of the phantom in the Lon 
Chaney silent movie It came up on 
television and he put it on video. 

“It’s a terrific film, much better than 
‘the book. Chaney played the character 
with total sinceriry and that is the only 
way to do iL You . have got to be 
absolutely true out there. The phantom 
is grotesque, he is capable of killing. But 
at the same lime the audience has to feel 
compassion for him, otherwise he is just 


L ean and fit at 45, Crawford does 
not share the actor’s common 
dread of the long run. He was in 
Billy — the musical version of 
Billy Liar — for two years and Bamum, 
on and off. for five years until this April 
He had no intention of going back into 
the theatre so soon, but when Andrew 
Uoyd Webber offered him Phantom and 
he heard the music, he jumped at it 
The Michael Crawford who sits in his 
dressing room coolly analysing his craft 
is a world away from the scatty Frank 
Spencer. He seems too composed, too 
intelligent But insecurity lurks. “Under 
this skull cap is a wilting, sweating man,” 
he says, briefly lapsing into the Spencer 
twiner. "I am a terrified phantom." 

Peter Waymark 


Cannon Tottenham Court 
Road (01-636 6148). From Fn. 

ALPINE FIRE (18): Bizarre 
story of an isolated Alpine 
family, directed by Fredi 
Murar. Winner of the Grand 
Prix at the 1985 Locarno 
FHm‘ Festival. 

Everyman (01-435 1 525). 

From Fri. 

TYNESIDE FILM 
FESTIVAL: New Spanish films 
feature heavily in the ninth 
annual festival (Oct 8-19). 
which opens on Wed wrth 
Carlos Saura's latest ballet film 
BAmorBrujo. 

Tyneside Cinema, 10/12 
Pilgrim Street. Newcastle upon 
Tyne (091 232 8289). 



GALLERIES 


IDENTITY /DESIRE: 

Contemporary artists' wem of 
the human form. 

Collins Gallery. Richmond 
Street. Glasgow (041 552 
4400). From Tues. 

ABSTRACT ART: Painting 
by Vanessa Jackson and 
sculpture by Hamisb 
Mclennan in show of worthy 
two contemporary artists. 
Castle field Gallery, 5 
Campfieto Avenue Arcade. 
Deansgate. Manchester 
(0618328034). From Fri. 

WILLIAM SCOTT: Tribute 
to the Scottish-lnsh painter. 
Scottish National Gallery of 
Modern Arts. Belford Road, 
Edinburgh (031 5568921). 
FromFn. 

DANISH SHOW: Major 
exhibition of contemporary 
Danish painting and 
sculpture. 

Mead Gallery. University of 
Warwick Arts Centre, Coventry 
(0203 523523). From today. 


SELECTED 



• BasB searches for does to 
help him solve a mysterions 
disappearance in Basil the 
Gnat Moose Detective (U), 
the latest animated feature 
from the Disney organization. 
The film presents the Holmes 
and Watson of Victorian 
London's mouse scene. The 
ntnsic is by Hairy MananL 
Odeon Leicester Square (01- 
930 6111). From Fri. 


SELECTED 


THE GOOD FATHER (15): 
Middle-class London life 
adroitly put under the 
microscope; with Anthony 
Hopkins and Jim Broadbent, 
directed by Mike Newell. 
Renoir (01-837 8402), Electric 
Screen (02-229 3694). 

TOP GUN (15k Tom Cruise 
as a cocky naval pilot 
undergoing titite training. 
Noisy, glossy and absurd, and 
one of me year's biggest 
American successes. 

Empire (01 -437 1234). 


JACKSON BROWNE: Last 
chance to catch the Catifomian 
singer/ songwriter with the 
laid-back sound and 
increasingly up-front 
politics. 

Tonight and tomorrow, 
Hammersmith Odeon. London 
W6 (01-748 4081). 

EVERYTHING BUT THE 
GIRL: Whether it is “new jazz” 
or lush country/pop. Tracey 
Thom and Ben Watt perform 
with coot stoical poise. 

Tonight, Manchester ApoHo 
(061 273 6921); Mon, Royal 


4321).' Tues. Leeds University 
(0532 439071); Thura, 

Royal Concert Hall. 
Nottingham (0602 472328k 
Fri. Birmingham Odeon (021 
6436101). 

THEHOUSEMARTIN& 




Hull's politicized punk 
answer to Freddie and the 
Dreamers. 

Tomorrow, Mayfair. 


k i fc'Xr' J ' - 


W^T^„ k lBrishton 

A barrel-chest of 
Wues from the man with the 
hardest-working guitar in 
showbusiness. 

University (0742 24076); Fri. 
DubtinNabonal Stadium (0001 

NEW MODEL ARMY: Their 

The Ghost of Cam 
tethe best news for English 

Wed. Gold Diggers • 
Chippenham [0249656444k 
Thurs. Coventry * 

Polytechnic (0203 24166). 

CURTIS MAYFIELD: 

Although he has not had a hit 
Since '^ove On Up" in 
1971 , the 44-year-old singer is 
still a master of sou! ^ 

expression. 

#M'i6^M^. LOnd0nNW 



London WI (0 

FLIGHTS OF FANTASY: 
Exhibition of architectural 
capricrios, imaginary 
projects and stage design! 


Clarendon Gallery, 8 Vigo 
Street London WI (01-439 
4557). 

SPORTING PAINTINGS: 
Annual show of hutting, 
shooting and racing subject: 
Arthur Ackerman, 3 Old 
Bond Street, London WI (01 
4937647). 


BOOKINGS 


SOUTH BANK: General 
booking opens Tues for 
November concerts, 
including first London 


Festival Opera in R ossini s 
Tancredi, and first British, 
performance of York Hotels 
Dreampiay. 

South Bar* Concert Hate, 
London SE1 (01-9283191; 
credit cards 01 -928 8800: 
information 01-928 3002). 

WHIRLIGIG THEATRE: 

Booking open for David 

Wood's TheOidManof 
Lochnagar. a musical play 
based on book by the 
Prince of Wales lor hfs two 

younger brothers, set In we 

Highlands of ScotiawL 
Nov 11-15. 

Sadler’s WMs Theatre, 
Rosebery Avenue. London 
£C1 (01-278 8916: 
information 01-278 5450). 

RAPE OF LUCRETIA: NOW 

booking, English National 
Opera production of Bmttn 
opera with Richard Van A»n 
and Jean Rigby, directed W 
Graham Vide Opens Novo. 
English National OPera, 

London Coliseum. SI Martin s 

Lane, London WC2 (01- 
8363161). 


DREAMS OF A SUMMER 

NIGHT: Hayward summer 

exhibition of Scandinavian 
painting at tiie turn of the 
century. Ends tomorrow. 
Also ending, L’amour Fou 
exhibition of 200 surrealist 


Man Ray, Hans BeBmer 


Bank, London 
9495) 

KNIT ONE, PURL ONES 
Exhibition of historic and 


hand and machine. Ends 
tomorrow. 

Victoria and Albert 
Museum. South Kensington. 
London SW7 (01-582 6371). 

ART in EXILE: Work of 
German exiles iriBrftaln, I*®" 
45. Ends tomorrow. 

Camden Arts Centre, 
Arkwright Road. London-NW3 




















ENTERTAINMENTS 


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BARBICAN TUESDAY NEKT 7 OCTOBER or 7,44 pm 

WREN ORCHESTRA 

OF LONDON 

jJ^ComliKlor: CARL DAVIS 
Piano; HOWARD SHELLEY 

SIBELIUS: Karefia Soue 

RACHMANINOV: Rhapsody on a ihemr of Paganini 
GERSHWIN: Rhapsody in Blue 
COPLAND: Rodeo 

£9 W.iSiC, £7 50, £4 BiaOflicc 01 -ft»S891'aaisros 

A Capital Kadi* CMKcn 


VICTOR HOCKHAC3ER prana ai dn BARBICAN 

WEDNESDAY NEXT « 7.30 

POPULAR CLASSICS 

KEKDEUSOHBCN OntrOR A MIDSUMMER NIGHT'S DREAM 

ma—l. — music sum* 

BRUCH ^.VKttJtN CONCERTO NO I 

DVORAK NSW WORLD SYMPHONY 

LONDON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
Cmahicnr BRAMWSLLTOVEY SbUr: AKNAfOSBFH 
£7. aO.»,fl0.50,OI.Mfawi HaB01-6}8Ba91ft»|795 


RAYMOND G UBBA Yprcscnts 

At the B ARBIC AN 

THURSDAY NEXT 9 OCTOBER at 145 pan. 

RoKxni BARBER OFSEVBXE OV. 

HR Grieg PEER GYNT SUITE 

AVI Radmtsnmov PIANO CONCERTOS 

Isr Beethoven ERCHCA SYMPHONY 

LONDON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 

CansaorHICBDUSCLBOBUKr FraUProWKEimo 

£5.5G,£6.50,£8,£M0,£l0.5ft£lL» 


SATURDAY NEXT U OCTOBER at 8 pan. 

PUCCINI GALA NIGHT 

PMb. at La Bafccmc Che GcU> Mann. & mi CHuna 
Red, 0 Sene ftnondh; Mii— M uuh I'a Id Du 
Hnmat Ghana. Lore Date Tmob Rrcn a Jaa Amman. 
Vow D’Anr. E I. in Lc S ttfle CM SeMoa O m» 
Brite* Hu tain Natm Dens, b am Bqn, 
CMt5cot 



Tonight 4 October at 7.45pm 

BRITTEN Four Sea Interludes 

finom Peter Crimes 

ELGAR CeDo Concerto 

RACHMANINOV ;_SymphonyNo 2 

ALEXANDER BAUliEedb 
ANDREW LITTON coodnuar 


© SUNDAY O OCTOBER at M0 pA. 

M ca dc h wha HEBRIDES OVERTURE 

Handel ROYAL FIREWORKS MUSIC 

Beethoven PIANO CONCERTO No. 5 

(EMPEROR) 

Moaut SYMPHONY No. 4i 

LONDON PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA 

Conductor NORMAN DEL MAR PASCAL ROGEpnno 
£5.50, iWO, £8. £9.50. £W.W. OLV) 


TUESDAY 21 OCTOBER at MS pan. 

GERSHWIN EVENING 

An American la Pario, Rhapsody in Bloc, 
I Got Rhythm Variations, 

Ptargy awl Bern Symphonic Picture 


UUI Jem BW'itaMmfe. Vila (TfeeAkny Vitafc 
MUOCMlMOWmDi— OtoitJiaM 
a«u« M.C5 so,£7.£tM 1 £e.w.now&wiHj4iowa utunanai 


[IGfOX BOC8HAUUBB m aaooc. nn Umi MUMUCAN fnn 

SATURDAY 25tli OCTOBER at 7.45 

BEETHOVEN 

LONDON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 

Coe do cron NORMAN PEL MAR Solwu: PETER FRANKL 
OVERTURE 'LEONOKE NO r. 

PIANO CONCERTO NO 3 la C MINOR. 
SYMPHONY NO • hi P. ‘PASTORAL 1 
£7, a, £v.w. Lifl.50, ai. to from HbD dhu mva» sm 


A»idi Am Tran. U Wanici 5qnarr, UMn MIT 

TOMORROW at 730 pm 
Piano Recital by 

ALASDAER CAMERON 

Works by Scarlsutx, Liszt, Debussy, 
Brahms prfSSljifl 

Tduo ft AOoa ihrtfin Iran Apm ioouxiem I Ifc l \/ | [ 

K am rOwcm MaDagnaenr |ADU.7'*1 


LUNCHTIME MUSIC IN THE CITY 
BISHOPSGATE HALL, 230 Bkhopsgaic, London LO. 
To coda* 1.05 - tUpa. A d iai n ta n limbntmn prwpranifno fl.W 


RG 


Coohnor BRIAN WRIGHT MALCOLM BBOS (mo 

£5, ££.« £8.50, £9.50,00.50 


WEDNESDAY SOCJOBSR alia pan. 

TO COMMEMORATE 

THE BATTLE OF TRAFALGAR 


WCHiTtCTlS 


ROYAL FESTIVAL HALL 


TOMORROW at 3.15 pm 

Harrison/ Paum Ltdprcsenn 

JORGE BOLET 

'The playing was altogether in a class of Its own* 
Telegram 1985 

HAYDN, SCHUMANN, GRIEG, USZT 

For deuib tee Soudi Bank pnel 

HAROLD HOLT LUOIEDpraeaa 
MONDAY NEXT 6 OCTOBER a< 7^0 

Mm ■ -Moscow 

PHILHARMONIC 

-DMITRI KTTAIENKO conductor 

TCHAIK OVSK Y Francesca da Rimini 
PROKOFIEV Piano Concerto No. 2 
(Soloist NIKOLAI PETROV) . 
RACHMANINOV Symphony No. 3 

l X £4.50^650. ft £L2, £15 Hall 0)1*2831911 C.C 101-92B 8800) 


SB WlCUOflS STFE =7 Wirt 30 F 
VAWSfff LYfiE 

BOX. CfFiCE CH 5 i,?: 4 i VJU'JHC LIST CJ 


WIGMORE HALL 


1 , ‘ '<" m 
?*;. /•? FAh'ti- 


: ;«o faintkS 


. T, 

.... *.( 


PiM** ROYAL PHILHARMONIC 
. ' SOCIETY 

- ‘vtfajfWi - Patnac Her Majesty (be Queen 

175th ANNIVERSARY SEASON 
Wednesday Next 8 October at 730 pm 
WITOLD LLJTOSLAWSKI 
conducts his Symphony No. 3 an d 
receives the Society’s GOLD MEDAL 
PHILHARMONIA ORCHESTRA 
JAMES LOUGHRAN JORGE BOLET 

See RFH Panel far MdoaiE 


P PHILHARMONIA 
Q ORCHESTRA ' 

Principal Conducton Giuseppe Sinopoli 


“IT SEEMS INEVITABLE THE 
PHILHARMONIA WILL AGAIN SET 
THE STANDARD IN LONDON THIS 
SEASON” 

1b, I iwhj 5!>.» 

GIUSEPPE SINOPOLI 

. conducts 

Saturday next 11 October at 730 

PHILHARMONIA CHORUS 

Verdh Quattm pezzi sacri 
TcbaDcovsky: Symphony No. 5 

Monday 13 October at 730 

ANDREW SHULMAN 

" Wagner: Die Mdstcrsinger - Overture 
. Haydn: Cello Concerto in D 
Elgar; Symphony No. I 



1LSO 


Tomorrow 5 October at 730pm 


r-rt; 


hT ’SS3» 


BERLIOZ Overture *Le Corsadre? 

RAVEL Pavane pour une Infante dffimte 

RAVEZ, Bol&o 


RODRIGO Concierto de Aranjuez 

RIMSKY-KORSAKOV. CapricdoE^pagnole 

CARLOS BONELL guar 
ALVARO CASSLTlO condnctnr 
Pieasenote dumgeaf conductor 


Seat Prices £1150, £9-50, 17J0. £6. £4v50 
Box Office: Td 10^ everyday iocSun 01-638 8891/628 8795 




Sunday 12 October at 730pm 

STRAUSS Four Last Songs 
BRAHMS German Requiem 

HEATUhR HARPER soprano 
STEPHEN ROBERTS barimoe 
LONDON SYMPHONY CHORUS 
RICHARD HICK0K conductor 


ILSO 


li^asday 16 October 7.45pm 




WIGMORE HALL 

SHURA 

CHERKASSKY 


(Cherkassky 75th Birthday Concert) 

nnmdJY 9 Ooobcr a 7.30 pm 

CHOPIN, BEETHOVEN ETC. 

fix daub Me Wigmoa: HaU ptad 


SUNDAY MORNING COFFEE CONCERT 

busday 19 Oaobcr ai 1 1 JO am 
BacMioe Oran Fanusy and Pogue in G moor BW’SC 
Grieg; Sanaa ant moor Op 7. Lcoard B et nKein ; Taadiesj 
Tcfa »3Mwly1 > rii«c Oxxm paapicasc at Eafov Umpa- 
Stram-Godawtlq: Wakz -TTlne. Womenaad Song 
£3.50 nx&Kfrng pragmsuneand ootfertberry 'tqnasli. 

BOX OFFICE/CREDIT CARDS 61-935 2141. 


MENDELSSOHN Overture Nbctome and Scherzo 
from A Mkhummer Nighfs Dream’ 

MENIMEXS SOHN Symphony No. 4 Ttafiaif 

TCHAIKO VSKY . Variations c» a Rococo^ Theme 
TCHAIKOVSKY i — Chpricdo ItaKen 

- RALPH KlRSCHBAUM ceso 
YURI' SIMONOV conductor 

Pteasenottdumgcof soloist 


Seat Prices £1230. 0050. £830, £6^0, £5, S3S0. 

Box Office Teh 10-8 evoydayinc.SiHi. 01-6388891/6288795 


NORMAN MEADMORE 1TD prerexus at the BARBICAN 
SATDRnAT 18 OCTOBER AT 7.45pm 

THE PmATES OF PENZANCE 

hy W S GQben and Arthur SuDivni 


THE LONDON SAVOYARDS 

Brie ShilHng. VFriea Tierney; Jnstfax Lareadex; Thamay Lxwlor, 


Cheriu Now Concert 
Mriiord Balmnbc (cmd'i Solly Gitpfai idicv'i Peter Murray idir) 




: ROYAL FESTIVAL HALL 
THURSDAY K OCTOBER 
at 730 

STRAUSS Four Lost Songs 

MAHLER_. Symphony No. 5 

SUSAN McCDLLOCH soprano ' 

• JAMES BLAIR conductor YMSO 

£250, £350, £450, £550, £7, £8-50 Hall 01-928 JIM cc 928 8800 
JOnknromceir 


£4.50, ft£zm £953050 Under M dor Mitatfphct 
Office 01-628 8795 CC0I63&8891^H 


MOZART 

BARRY TUCK WELL 

City of London Sinfonia, . 
conducted by Richard Hickox 

Horn Concertos Nos. 2 and 3 
Symphonies Nos. 29 and 40 

Barbican Centre - Next Friday 

Spoxwwvd by Join bring Cuuuiuulin lambed 
RiD decnb m Bartncan panel 


QUEEN ELIZABETH HALL 


TUESDAY NEXT 7 OCTOBER « 7*5 pan. 

MEDIO STRING QUARTET 

MARILYN TAYLOR PETER POPLE 
MICHAEL COOKSON MORAY WELSH 

SCHUBERT: Quintet m C, D.956 • 

MENDELSSOHN: Octet in E fist; Op. 20 

ftft£4,ft£6tnm Box Office D I -W8 3 1 91 CC 01 ^3 WOO 


Wednesday Neal 8 October at 7A5 pm 

ENGLISH CHAMBER 
ORCHESTRA 

Conducted by RAYMOND LEPPARD 
FRANK PETER ZIMMERMANN violin 

Mozazn BaUcz mmte Iron Uomeneo, K367 
Protafirv; Viobn Qnxno No. 2 in G bmpot. Op fa) 

- .Urnaoti .440(90 in E. K3sl and Rondo m C. RJtl 
Prab&re Symphony No I m IX Op S i*Qxdian 

Spons or ed by Goldma n Sack insernarioaol Carp. 

Tkim £350. 0-50, ft 50, ft50. £7.50 
from HaB 01-928 319] -Credir Omfa 0I-V2S »Wt A .)ge« . 


- FRIDAY 17 OCTOBER at 7A5 pjn. 

EUGENE SARBU violin 

CARMINA SARBU piano 

TOMMA SO VTTALfc Qacxmnc 
BEETHOVENi Sonoam D, Op. 12 No. I 


7 October 21 Ocnkcr 

JOHN * KATHRYN LENEHAN ROYAL COLLEGE OF VUStC 

r*»»4an CHAMBER PLAlUCSdn. k 

Mazan Nmwu m C KV21 RoJory Knrad. Ugan MimUr 

HepMtii mic lYtnr Sub; .Hnritbaohn; lulwn Vnnpfaunv 

Gcrdnrin: K.-jpso4, m Blur 
H October 28 October 

TWOOMSAK) tNDtLUUN STRING QCAKTtT 

■ Hoyik- l*aao Trx, m A BnttRE i,Wki Nn. 1 

.Bio l m n PanoTnomBOp H KijiIk (jiann m L lip riVi 7 
Pronunl fry (far Cm Mmir Sedn\ 


WESTMINSTER CATHEDRAL 

Tumday Neat 7 October at 7.30 pm 

BRITISH PREMIERE 

“Livre du Saint Sacrement” 

- Olivier Messiaen 

JENNIFER BATE Organ 

.Maikhagoali < 

Available. Gnbodml bootohop AWn-bal '< JO m 5nn 
■ TidKlemiunioKi Dido Sender 0I-3NW9 3orHttx door on llirdBv aiooncen 
Under the pmraaagr at ILE M Jacpiev Yn French .\anhamifar 
k (he nresenor « me conwoKi . 


FAIRFIELD HALL CROYDON 

BUX OFF1 12: 01-688 9291 OtEOnTHOSU 0I«U59W 

Friday 10 October 8.00 pm 

CLEO LAINE and the 
JOHN DANKWORTH QUINTET 

£5.50. ft.50. £7.50 


Wednesday 22 October &00 pm 

LONDON PHILHARMONIC 
ORCHESTRA 

PAUL FREEMAN 
ANTON KUERTI Piano 

Vorb bv filmln. MorUmtai and Stbelim 
ft'£4.i^ftftJ4lO*C«dpnrev.£i50.ft50,£4.7S,£6.£7 





Kark Lane Group proems 
_ _ « aff«w.yibnUi Vam tiinau Ptif.’BmlatrFmJ 

FACADE GALA 

nffrpmrrlMWAKUjUixchi 

Ream: 


Sponsored by NISSAN 


UK LIMITED 


'ENO Ins another wiimor bn Its hands"Pundr 


Trioe'fift £4.5fl. ft-Sp a. ft ff£»0£l£ 
A %%n LiMc irom HJJ i0l-!«» JI9I.- CC i01-*3 HSCO) A Jp3ttl 





5UmV:AllsMlsC7J0fiMi6G 


Bdx Office 

01 -836 31 6 T 
Credit Cards 
01-3405258 
Engfifth 
NtrftonalOpwn 
• London Cofaeum 

StMortin'iLene 
London WC2 



BA 

RBI 



RARBICA 

H HALL ~ 

ovemben 

BOBO 

ISO 

iwPogo 

relidi 


CecfleOusset 

Michael Tilsofi^horoas conducts 
Beethoven’s Chonal Symphony 



ilotcty Rich 


International Lunchtime Series 
starts with Kyrnig Wlia Chung ' 

19 Nov 

Beaux Aits Trio 

21 Nov 

Monteverdi Choir 

27.Nov 

English Baroque Soloists: 

John Eliot Gardiner 



BAMCAN CMHIA 


Bob Hoskins in- Mona Lisa 

from 7 Nov 

BAHHCAN ART GALLERY 

“ 

Lion Rugs /David Roberts 

from 6 Nov 



Cafl i*siw*r- 


confSmwdtteptroiw 





1 322 



JE SU1S LE CAHIER 



THE SKETCHBOOKS OF 

PICASSO 


11 September lo 19 November, 1986. Open l0-6iisih 

Royal Academy of Arts 

Piccadilly. Loudon. W 1 . Telephone 01-734 9052 

-tbe oJbttrttioa b ofgiBrittd fry Ibr Pace GaBef)’, NewYbilc 
and sponaomi by Anted can EaprevvCompBiy 


ENTERTAINMENTS 
also on page 34 














































St 


New ' 
Streets 
snaiTQi 
yesterd; 

After 

prices 

course 


evapon 

mornii 

started 

The 

averagf 
about 1 
half ho 
to 1,79 


Srden 

BgWam 

BP 

Burrton 
BurT ton 
Burroug 1 

CmpMi 

CanPac 

Cawp« 

Cetanes 

Central! 

Champ* 

Chaseh 

ChmBk 

Chaww 

Chrystei 

Otcorp 
Clark Ec 
COcaCt 


CTn*ta 

Cfflta'tn 

Comwtt 

Cans Ei 

CnNai 

Consft 

CntrlDi 

Comne 

CPCKM 

Crane 

CmZal 

Dart 4 1 

Oeme 

Delta A 

Detnxt 

Digital I 

Cfeney 

Dow 6 

Dresse 

Duka P 

Du POT 

Easton 
EstmK 
Eaton i 
Bmara 
Exxon 
■ PedOt 


YO 

As 

or 

c 


Grt 


I r 



Troubles 
of Cable 
Street 
recalled 


By David Cross 

London's East Enders will 
today commemorate the 50th 
anniversary of The Battle of 
Cable Street — the k ey tn m- 
ing point in the straggle 
against Sir Oswald Mosley 
and his fascist supporters. 

There will be marches and 
Tallis addressed by prominent 
"Labour MPs. 

- Communist and socialist 

opponents were well prepared 
■on Sunday October 4, 1936, 
when Mosley’s neatly drilled 
squads of blackshirts started 
assembling near Tower HflL 

■ Thousands of dem- 
onstrators were determined to 
.slop the march at all costs. 

“We had prepared to over- 
turn a lorry which had been 
given ns by a local lorry firm," 
says Mr Ph3 Piratic, a former 
Communist party organizer, 
■whose job was to block Cable 
Street 

At 3 JO pm precisely, Mos- 
'ley swept np to the Mbit in an 
open car to a salute of raised 
hands and shoots of: “The 
Yids. the Yids, we must get rid 
of the Ykte." 

The angry crowd 
retorted: M Go to Germany" and 
“Down with Fascism." 

Tempers were already flar- 
ing in Cable Street, where 
police tried to dear the crowds 
for Mosley and his 2J00 
troops. The officers were met 
by a hail of bottles, sticks ami 
paving stones. 

In front of the Royal Mint, 
an angry Mosley went off for 
. hurried consultations with Sir 

■ Philip Game, the Metropoli- 
: tan Police Commissioner. 

With the route to the East 
End well and truly blocked. Sir 
Philip offered the only alter- 
native — a march west along 

- the Embankment 

Between 200 and 300 people 
were injured and 84 arrests 
were made among the es- 
timated 500,000 people who 
took part in the 
demonstrations. 

Political repercussions were 
so great on Mr Stanley 
Baldwin's weak government 
tha t within a year all 
demonstrations by Mosley 
and his supporters in the East 
End were banned by law. 





■W 


The police with truncheons drawn dear the way for the fadst officer In the car. 



George Shaw (left) now aged 71, who remembers fleeing die Cable Street troubles; Mosley salutes his troops. 


Thatcher 
refuses to 
move on 
sanctions 

Continued from page 1 

veto was the “final blow 
against his policy of “con- 
structive engagement . 

The muto-raciai United 
Democratic Front (UDF). ti*® 
legal shadow of the outlawed 
African National Congress 
CANO, also welcomed the 
Senate decision, calling it a 
victory for “all those forces 
who have seen through the 
fraud” of President Botha’s 
reforms. 

Trade union leaders took a 
similar line, although the jobs 
of their members, mainly the 
better-paid urban black work- 
ers. would be most at risk if 
sanctions cause companies 
here to lay off employees. 

The biggest black trade 
union federation, the Con- 
gress of South African Trade 
Unions (Cosatu). which has 
some 500.000 members, said 
President Botha could avert 
further measures by meeting 
“the reasonable and realistic 
demands of the people”. 

Sanctions might increase 
unemployment in the short- 
term. but blacks were already 
suffering unparalleled eco- 
nomic hardship and some six 
million of them were out of 
work. Cosatu claimed. 

Businessmen yesterday ac- 
cepted the sanctions with 
resignation, many claiming 
thaz it was irrational to 
penalise the business commu- 
nity when it had had been in 
the' forefront of those pressing 
for reform. 

The chief executive ot the 
Associated Chambers of Com- 
merce, Mr Raymond Parsons, 
said businessmen would now 
have to spend more time and 
energy avoiding sanctions 
than promoting reform. 

The liberal English-lan- 
guage press, while regretting 
the Senate decision, which 
was seen as more likely to 
drive Pretoria into the laager 
than to bring about change, 
generally agreed that the Gov- 
ernment had brought sanc- 
tions on itself 
The sanctions decision has 
had no effect here on the 
currency and stock markets. 
The rand continued its slow 
recovery yesterday, helped up- 
wards by buoyant prices for 
gold and platinum. 


Frank Johnson with Labour 


THE TIMES INFORMATION SERVICE 


The Times Crossword Puzzle No 17,168 

Solution to Puzzle No 17462 Solution to Pazzle No 17467 



A prize ofThe Times Atlas of World History will be given for the 
first three correct solutions opened next Thursday. Entries 
should he addressed to: The Times. Saturday Crossword 
Competition . PO Box 4S6, Virginia Street. London El 9DD. 
The winners and solution will be published next Saturday. 

The winners of last Saturday's competition are: Mr F. E Hermes. 
Faimew Close. Cheltenham, Glas: Dr Conrad Murphy, Crosby 
Row. London SE1 ; Mr J Waller, Coed-y-Fronallt, Dolgellau, 
Gwynedd. 


Name... 


Address 



ACROSS 

1 Capacity of old vessel re- 
duced by one quarter (6). 

5 Hack writer produces 
worthless trifle (8). 

9 Intimate what might be 
done, in fact (10). 

10 Object sometimes dropped 
on pitch (4).. 

11 Singing style of latest com- 
position (8). 

12 One slew the albatross, as a 
result (6). 

13 Having started with a wilL 
you’ll find it (4). 

15 Transform rear of plane to 
fly (4.4). 

18 Party policy not one’s main 
interest ($). 

19 Punish schoolboy spectators 
(4). 

21 Boatman taking over from 
pilot (6). 

23 Display skill in flying ma- 
chines (8). 

25 Called for orange, peded? 
(4). 

26 Systematic though brief in 
examination ( 10 ). 


27 Drive off from various lees 
round 25 (8). 

28 My rhymes may be catch- 
ing, on the surface (3,3). 

DOWN 

2 Atmosphere of a native’s 
capital (5). 

3 Existing fashion (4-5). 

4 It’s barely required in some 
colonics (6). 

5 Rex at home in children's 
game (44,3.6). 

6 Puts things in black and 
white, in PM’s place (8). 

7 Northerner’s relations 
turned up just the same (5). 

8 Scientist such as Democ- 
ritus. for one (9). 

14 Waves from snow-covered 
mountains (9). 

16 Flower girl covered with 
stripes (5-4). 

17 Judge in court producing 
outcry, so to speak (8). 

20 Ringleader caught by an 
aged headmaster (6). 

22 He may be said (o have got 
the message (5). 

24 Delicate basket (5). 


Today's events 


Royal engagements 

The Duchess of Gloucester, 
Commandani-in-Chief, St John 
Ambulance Brigade in Wales, 
anends a service of rededicaiion 
in St Woolos Cathedral, 
Lycbgate, 2.55. afterwards visits 
Westfield Upper School, New- 
port, 4.30, and later anends a 
reception and dinner at the 
Angel Hotel, Cardiff 5.50. 

New Exhibitions 

The art and craft of etching: 
300 years of etching; fcllant 
House Gallery Trust, 9 North 
Pal lanl. Chichester, Tues to Sat 
10 to 5 JO (ends Oct 1 8). 

Contemporary ceramics from 
La Borne; Peterborough Mu- 
seum and Art Gallery, 
Prieslgate; Tues to Sat 12 to 5 
(ends Oct 30). 

Last chance to see 

Allison Vance: Interiors; Na- 
omi McBridge: paint effects; 
Otter Gallery. 23 Wellington 
Park, Belfast; It to 7. 

Georges Braque: illustrations 
to poems by Guillaume Apolli- 
naire; Sue AiTowsmith: Egg of 
night; Ikon Gallery, 58-72 John 
Bright St. Birmingham: 10 to 6. 
Music 

Canterbury Festival: Concert 
by the Canterbury Choral Soci- 
ety; Canterbury Cathedral, 7.30. 

Three Choirs Concert: Con- 
cert by the choirs of Ripon and 
Wakefield Cathedrals and Leeds 
Parish Church: Ripon Cathe- 
dral 7. 

General 

Poet's Choice: an evening of 
poetry with Peter Porter, 
Wingfield -College. Eye, Suffolk, 
8 . 

The poetry festival: Poetry 
recital by Stephen Spender and 
Lisa S. Aubin de Teran; 
Thoresby College, King’s Lynn, 
8 . 


Tomorrow 


Concise Crossword page 17 


New exhibitions 

Lionel Edwards R1 RCA 
1878-1966: Leicestershire Mu- 
seum and Art Gallery. New 
Walk: Mon to Thurs and Sat 10 
to 5.30. Sun 2 to 5.30 (ends Nov 
2 ). 

Last chance to see 

Storm, stream and sea: oil 
paintings and watercolours; 
Smith Art Gallery and Museum. 
Dumbarton Rd, Stirling; 2 to 5. 

Modem glass: work by 
contemporary studio glass mak- 
ers; Towneley Hall Art Gallery. 
Towneley Hall Burnley, 12 to 5. 

The An of Lepenskj Vic 
Southampton An Gallery, Civic 
Centre; 2 to 5. 

Music 

Concert by the Canterbury 
Choral Society; Canterbury 
Cathedral 7.30- 
Recital by the Exon Singers 
and Andrew Lumsden (organ); 
The chapel of St Cross, Win- 
chester. 7.30. 

Piano recital by John Ogdon: 
The Oratory School .Woodcwe, 
nr Reading. 8. 

Talks, lectures 
Furness: The edge of Lake- 
land. by Denys Vaughan. 1.30: 
Wildlife rescue, by Jane 
Raicliffe. 3.30: Lake District 
National Park Visitor Centre. 
Brockholc. Wmd e rmere. 
General 

100 Years of Music 1830- 
1930: leeiure/reciial. by Richard 
Dee ring: Brune Park School 
Military Rd. Gosport 3. 


Gardens open 


P= Plants tor Safa • . 

TODAY AND OTHER DAYS 

Hampshire: Hamacd Park Gardens, 
Basingstoke, oft A339. 100 yards N of 
Bernard Church; waned gardens, fine 
trees: P; open aH year. Tuesdays to 
Saturdays 10 to 6. Sundays 12 to 5, 
(November to February dose 5). 

Kant Great Comp Charm Wa Treat, an 
E of Boreugn Green, off A20 » Wro tham 
Heath on to Seven Mfe Lane 82016. right 
at ffrtt crossroads; 7 acres, ptantsman's 
cotiection of trees, shrubs, heathers, 
herbaceous; good autism colour; daiy 
until October 31; 11 to 6. 

Fife: HU of Tarvit. Cupar, many. unusual 
(feres, heathers, roses. This year the 
annus! plant sale nomaBf hotel at Kefte 
Casfle wfl be held here today and 


Tbresve Garden, im 

SW of Caste Douglas oil A75 to KMdand; 
school of gardening, 80 acres, tape 
coflection of plants, rose, rock, water, 
woodland, peal gardens, im*. green- 
houses; P: daily 9 to S- 

Berkshire: me Great Park. Windsor. 
The Valley Gardens. 4m S of Windsor off 
A328: 409 acres Of Mxxtland gardens, 
maoitficem autumn colour; dairy until Me 
OBcaitoer; dawn to dusk. 

Gwynedd: Eodnant Garden, 8m S of 
Cohwn Bey off A470; one of Britain's 
mom outstanding gardens: vast collection 
of trees and shams. roses, and splendid 
autumn colour daiy ixitti October 31. 10 
to5. 

Dorset: Compton Acres. Cantord Cliffs, 
Poole; a senes of gardens with herba- 
ceous, roses. suMropicai plants. Japa- 
nese garden, fine autumn colour; P; da 8y 
until October 31 ; 10J0 to 620. 
TOMORROW. 

Witts***: Lacktam Cofege of Agri- 
culture. lacock. 4m S of Chtopenham ofl 
A350; targe gardens, greenhouses, many 
interesting shrubs, nertncaous. to* 
herbs; bod viewing hide; 2 to 8. 


Anniversaries 


TODAY 

Births: Gi a mba tti sta Piranesi, 
engraver. Mestrc, Italy, 1720; 
Jean-Franco is Millet rainier, 
Gruchy. France, 1814; Rntfaer- 
ford B Hayes, 19th president of 

the USA 1877-81. Delaware, 
Ohio. 1822. 

Deaths: Saint Teresa of Avila. 
Alba de Tonnes, Spain. 1582; 
Rembrandt, Amsterdam. 1669; 
John Rennie, civil engineer, 
London. 1821: Max Planck, 
physicist. Gottingen, Germany, 
1947; Sir ' Arthur Whitten 
Brown, aviator. Swansea. 1948: 
Janis Joplin, singer. Los An- 
geles. 1970. 

The printing of Miles 
Coverdale's translation of the 
Bible was complied. 1535. The 
Boy's Brigade was founded in 
Glasgow by Sir William Smith, 
1 883. Today is the Feast of Saint 
Francis of Assisi. 

TOMORROW 
Births: Denis Diderot, 
encyclopaedist. Langres, 

France. 1713: Chester Arthur, 
2 1st president of the USA, 1881- 
84, Fairfield. Vermont. 1830. 

Deaths Jacques Offenbach, 
Paris. 1880. 

The airship R101 crashed 
near Beauvais. France. 1930. 


Roads 


Wales and West: M4-. EastDound 
carriageway closed between functions 40 
and 42, contraflow westbound. 
Comraliow between junctions 18 and 17 
(Swmoon/Crancasten. MSc Lane closures 
between junctions 1 1 and 12 , Gloucester- 
shire. 

The Norite Mft Rebutting work on both 
carriageways between iiincncma 32 and 
33. Carriageways and eta roods subject 
to Closures at junction 37. Htt Motor 
wtoereng scheme at Barton Bridge. 
Greater Manchester, avod area if 

Scotland: AS: Eastbound carriageway 
ttosed tor resurtacmg wore at tngjeston. 
diversion In operation. Aberdeen: (Sun- 
day) Resurfacing on Gt Northern Road « 
Anderson Wire. long delays Bfcety. di- 
version tar HGVs. mb: Lane closure on. 
southbound approach at Kingston Bridge 
between 030 and 12. Widih restriction on 
the off sfip to Junction IS (Anderson 
Cross). Mfc (SwtoSy) hwor Ring Road: 
Closure of UHANMUid and westboutd 
sfip toads at Craignal Dawson Caratoank 
Street and Doones Loan. 


The pound 


Bank Bank 

Buys Seas 

AnstreRaS 2^4 2%l 

Austria Sdi 2120 20L6O 

Balgkaii Ft G2L65 9L2S 

Cauda S 2JJ6 1 JST 

Danmark Kr 1700 10-70 

RntondMkk 7.44 644 

Ranee Fr 9.76 *26 

Germany Dm 3.00 2J3 

Greece Or 201-00 19&00 

Hong Kong S 1150 1150 

Ireland Pt 1.10 1-04 

Italy Lira 208000 196000 

Japan Yen 234JM 22000 

NatbertaodsOU 039 020 

Norway Kr 11JK 1045 

Portugal Esc 21000 206180 

South Africa Rd 4J» 340 

Spain Pte 19000 18000 

Sweden Kr 1030 075 

Switzerland Fr 243 229 

USAS 1.50 ..143 

Yugoslavia Dor 75000 66000 

Rates tor smal denomination bank notes 
only as suppled by Barclays Bank PLC. 
Different rates apply to travellers' 
cheques and other foreign currency 
business. 

Ratai Price Max: 3855 

London: The FT Index dosed down 120 
at 1234.0 

SbfotifloliO' 

- r &M- 

For readers who may have 
missed a copy of The Times this 
week, we repeat below the 
week's Portfolio price changes 
|£®day’s are on page 25). __ 

M Mu Tm VM Ttiw W sa W 


n 

EO 

Q 

EO 

CO 

B 




e 

EO 

El 

EO 

EO 

B 



EI 

EO 

Q 

EO 

CO 

SM 



D 

EO 

B 

EO 

EO 

B 



El 

EO 

B 

EO 

EO 

B 

jlj 


D 

EO 

B 

EO 

EO 

SM 



El 

EO 

B 

EO 

EO 

B 



El 

EO 

B 

EO 

EO 

B 



E) 

EO 

D 

EO 

EO 

B 



KQ 

EO 

B 

EO 

EO 

B 



ei 

ES 

B 

EO 

EO 

SM 



EE3 

EO 

B 

CO 

EO 

B 



10 

ES 

B 

EO 

EO 

B 



EO 

EO 

B 

EO 

EO 

B 



10 

EO 

B 

EO 

EO 

B 



SO 

EO 

B 

EO 

EO 

B 



EQ 

EO 

B 

EO 

CO 

B 



SO 

EO 

B 

EO 

EO 

B 



EO 

EO 

B 

EO 

EO 

B 



E3 

EO 

D 

EO 

EO 

B 



m 

EO 

B 

EO 

EO 

B 



m 

EO 

B 

EO 

EO 

B 



EO 

EO 

E3 

ES 

EO 

B 



m 

CO 

B 

EO 

CO 

B 



m 

EO 

□ 

EO 

CO 

SM 



m 

EO 

B 

EO 

EO 

B 



m 

EO 

B 

CO 

CD 

B 



m 

EO 

B 

EO 

CO 

B 



m 

EO 

B 

EO 

CO 

B 



EO 

EO 

B 

EO 

CO 

SI 



EH 

EO 

B 

CO 

CO 

S3 



E3 

ES 

B 

EO 

CO 

B 



E3 

EO 

D 

EO 

CO 

SI 



EO 

EO 

B 

CO 

CO 

B 



EO 

EO 

B 

ES 

CO 

S3 



EO 

EO 

B 

EO 

CO 

SI 



EH 

ES 

B 

EO 

CO 

B 



EO 

ES 

B 

EO 

CO 

B 



EO 

EO 

B 

EO 

CO 

B 



EO 

EO 

B 

CO 

CO 

SOI 



EO 

EO 

B 

EO 

CO 

B 



m 

EO 

B 

EO 

CO 

B 



EO 

EO 

B 

EO 

CO 

B 



E3 

EO 

ea 

CO 

ES 

ESI 


■i 


Weather 

forecast 

The anticyclone over the 
North Sea will persist. A 
weak frontal trough will 
affect northern areas 

6 am to midnight 

London, SE, central S, central N 
England. East Angpa, Mktaxfs, Chxrmut 
Mancie Dry, surniy periods after clear- 
ance of morning tog; wind easterly light or 
moderate; max temp 20C(68F). 

E, NE Engtemt Dry, surety periods after 
ctee r ance of early fog patches; wind 
easterly light or moder at e ; max tamp 17C 

{6 |2r England. S Watec Cloudy at times; 
toed h* end coastal drizzle ana log: wind 
easterly tight or m oderate; max temp 17C 


Roles and bow to play, page 38 


N Wales, NW Entfand, Lake DtoMct, 
tale of titan, SoRfera, Cctinbugh, Ontoe, 
Aberdeen, SW Scotland, Gteraow. C«n- 
tral MgManda, Moray Rife. Argyll, North- 
ern Ireland; MoHy dry. sunny intervals 
alter clearance of eariy tog patches; wind 
SE to S tight or moderate; max tamp 17G 

NW Scotland: Matty cloudy, same 
bright Intervals, occasional nan or drizzle 
in places; wind S moderate; max tamp 
l5CfSff£ 

Or k ney , Sfaed anrt: MaWy cloudy , some 
bright Intervals, occasion* rain or drizzle 
In places; wind S becoming mo derat e; 
max tamp 12C(54F). 

Oudook for tottonoai and Monday: On 
Sunday most places dry with bngfx or 
wnny Intervals. Thick* ctoud with occa- 
sional rain tatiowed by dry and brighter 
weather vriti cross Scotland from the 
north-west reaching Northern Ireland and 
northern England later. On Monday, wart 
from ctoud and a Bate rain In parts of the 
north at first, most places wB be dry with 
bright or sunny intervals. 


Women win in 
versatility 



The annual Labour Party 
conference ended yesterday 
with the traditional singing of 
The Red Flag. The panys 
electoral strategists hoped 
that it had also ended with 
what, in future, would be- 
come the equally traditional 
flagging of the red singers- 

The latter had flagged a lot 
since what, for them, had 
been the fun years of the late 
1970s and early 1980s. 

To raise their morale as 
eariy as possible, about 600 of 
them flocked to a fringe 
meeting Of! Monday mwit 
billed as being addressed by 
Miss Diane Abbott, who is 
extreme-sounding, female, 
and black (a hat trick which 
has secured her a par- 
liamentary candidacy in 
Hackney: by a convicted IRA 
bomber speaking on behalf of 
Provisional Sinn Fein: by Mr 
John McDonald, a figure in 
London local government 
who had quarrelled with Mr 
Kenneth Livingstone because 
he thought Mr Livingstone 
too right wing; by a rebel El 
Salvadoran: by Mr Benn: by 
Mr Scargill; and doubtless, 
but for prior engagements, by 
the Yorkshire Ripper, Patrick 
Magee who did the Brighton 
bombing, and Col Gadaffi. 

When we arrived, the less 
charismatic Miss Joan May- 
nard, a veteran MP, was 
saying that she wrote to. and 
visited, the miners impris- 
oned for offences during the 
strike. So these simple, vi- 
olent pickets were being fur- 
ther punished, by the 
attentions of a sort of Female, 
Marxist Lotd Longford. But 
there was no sign of Mr 
ScargiH or the bomber or Col 
Gadaffi, whereas the El 
Salvadoran soon succeeded 
Mrs Wise and launched into 
what look liked being at least 
an hour of vigorously-ap- 
plauded slogans about land 
reform. We fled to dinner. 

Later reports said that Mr 
Scargill had been an immense 
success and that the man 
from Sinn Fein had gone 
down like a bomb. 

The next day. Miss Linda 
Bellos - extreme-sounding, 
female, black and therefore 
the new leader of Lambeth 
council — complained during 
a delute on crime; “There is 


no race perspective 1 vttti'l.. 

Later, she addresscd-M 
fringe meeting m support#* 
private member’s * 
building safety 
difficult subject to . . 
gogic about but sbe-dH if- 
"Those who know me know 
that I will always raise 
race perspective, sbe ra^i 
"ft’s always presets.” 
that afternoon, asked on 
vision for her reaction' to ftj§ 
Kinnock’s speech, 
complained;* There was » 
lack of a dear cUi* 
perspective.” Ums showW 
her versatility. . . . 

In that game however, ft* 
highest score of the week 
achieved by Miss Nadine 
Finch, of Hackney Nonhand 
Stoke Newington, in 
Northern Ireland debate. Di- 
vide and role wos.wbat the 
imperialists did. she afa. 
"With Reagan it is the 
Contras in the coasudaBuof 
Nicaragua, "she said. “With 
Botha, it is the Bantusttns. 
With the British Empire, it is 
the loyalist supremacist 
ideology in Northern 
Ireland.” Imperialists .0 - 
Left Wing Paranoid Ctospbw 
acv Theorists XI: 3. 

Yesterday, they cheered 
one of the tew politicians for 
whom they have much time* 
Mr Dennis Skinner who, 
replying for the executive to a 
debate on shipping, promised 
that Labour would, among 
other vessels, build a couple 
for Nicaragua. Mr Kinnock, 
to whom this was un- 
doubtedly news, thought it 
wise to join in the lumutto- 
ous applause . 1 

.As previously stated hem 
we ofThe Times - because of 
the Wapping dispute - watch 
the conference in our hold 
rooms. A few years ago this 
would have been impossible. 
But Blackpool has now bene- 
fited from the coming of two 
items which, as for as the 
great northern resort is con- 
cerned. are relatively hew 
technology in these rooms: 
the television, and above ifl 
the bathroom ensuite. Pre- 
viously, one could be ft*- 
given for assuming that these 
hotels were among the Iasi la 
abolish corporal punishments 
Croissants are also now avail- 
able. Blackpool has at test, 
abandoned extremism. 



r 




•• 'i 


r 

j. . . . 


a 


High Tides 


TODAY 

AM 

HT 

m 

HT 

TOMORROW 

AM 

1 akadimi Qfjffeia 

LOfiaan nnagi 

2^2 

72 

a«5 

72 

London Bridge 

320 

Aberdeen 

2.00 

4A 

224 

42 

AlwrdMfl 

225 

AvuiuhuuPi 

820 

13 2 

624 

13j6 


628 

Bdfnt 

1158 

32 



BaKast 

12.13 

Center 

8.05 

\ZA 

8.19 

122 

Canflft 

8.43 

Devonport 

652 

5.6 

7.7 

5.7 

Dewonport 

723 

Omw 

1159 

6.9 



Domr 

12.15 

FiWi^xth 

622 

5.4 

627 

52 

Fataxxrih 

7.03 

Glasgow 

Harwich 

1.31 

12.41 

42 2.12 
42 1255 

4.3 

4.1 

Glasgow 

Harwich 

229 

1.19 

iwnucva 

1121 

7.15 

5.G 11.34 
7^ 7.43 

52 

72 

flnhihwarl 

noiviwio 

1125 

720 

Kra combe 

7.05 

92 

721 

92 

Kracombe 

7j41 

Leith 

328 

5.6 

3J# 

52 

Leah 

4.03 

LhnwpooJ 

12.01 

9.6 1222 

92 

LhMtpool 

1227 

LowffiSSun 

1024 

2£ 11.06 

2.4 


11.03 

Maigeta 

1256 

42 1258 

42 

1— gate 

1221 

MDont Haven 

7.18 

7.1 

722 

7.4 

MStord Hpven 

723 

ivutiiqiiaj 

8.06 

7.1 

622 

72 

Nowquay 

6.43 

Oban , 

7JS0 

4.1 

fL5tt 

42 


729 

Pumncc 

5.48 

5.7 

622 

52 


620 

ronrana 

826 

22 

629 

22 


9.00 

Portsmouth 

1^10 

4.7 1224 

42 


12.47 

Snordum 



12-18 

64 

Shoreham 

1221 

Southampton 



12.06 

4.7 


1i15 

Swansea 

722 

9.7 

726 

1U0 


1ST 

Tees 

427 

5JB 

456 

5.6 

Tees 

5.03 

Wlton-on-Nz* 

12.43 

42 1256 

42 

Wtton-bn-Nn 

121 


nr p« iff 
7 A 3M 74 
4.G MS- « 
105 9.12 
3J1L34 M 
124 SST *27. 

5.7 7.47 M 

6.8 1236 U 
SS 7.17- 
4^ 247 
42 1-33 

5.7 

7.7 8.1S 
9 J& 757 
5 a 4-31 
M 1258 

2.7 11.« 

4a 1J32 
7J MO- 
TS 7J» 

42 7 J2 
SI 6.45 
2.4 9.09 1B 
4*8- 1.18 *» 
03 1256 

44 1238 .*7. 
10.0 8.13 10.J 

5.7 5J31 

4u4 132 44 


-5* 

U 

4.1 

73 
as 

57. 

U 

24 
53 

74 
W 
44 
S3 

25 


::;h 


jssd 



Son rises 
7.06 am 


Sunsets; 
632 pm 


TOMORROW 


Moonrlses: Moon sets ; 
7.47 am 6.46 pm 


Hrei quarter October 10 



7.07 am 


030 pm 


MoourtssK 
9.14 am 701 


f. 


First quarter October 10 


Around Britain 


b-btuc sky: bc-blue 


.... . . . - . . wiow m- 

ihundersiorm: v-stwwers. 

Arrows snow wind direction, wind 
speed itupft) Dieted. Temperature 
cenueraoe. 


Yesterday 


Temperatures at mdday yoatentoy: c. 
doud: I. lain r. ram: s. sun. 

C F C F 

Bettes! s 16 61 Goamey s 17 63 

BYinafian itflfit Inverness c 12 54 

Blackpool s 17 63 Jmey ( 19 66 

Bristol s 19 66 London 1 16 66 

Cardiff s 17 63 NTnetefer s 17 63 

EdUxagh c 13 56 Nam es u te 1 16 61 

Oasgow c 14 57 ITnldmav s 15 59 



Max 

t C F 

- 16 61 ctoudy 

- 16 61 bright 

- 16 61 sunny 

- 17 63 bright 

- 18 64 sutny 
-xx sunny 

- 18 W aainy 

- 16 64 sunny 

- 18 64 aunttf 

- 18 64 sunny 

- 19 66 (wwy 

- 19 66 stmy 

- 17 63 surety 

- 16 64 sunny 

- 17 63 sunny 

- 19 68 sumy 

- 19 66 sunny 

- 17 63 sunny 

- 18 64 sunny 

- 17 63 sunny 

- 17 63 sunny 

- 16 B4 sunny 

- 17 63 sunny 

- 17 83 bright 


Tenby 
CatmynBay 


Sun Rain 
hrs in 
x 
3a 
x 
5.7 

7.6 - 

ENGLAND AND WALES 
London 4£ 

PhamAiipC 5J9 - 

Bristol (Ctrl) - - 

CanBff (Cm) . - 

6.1 

R3 - 

aa - 

•rwHt-TYne 19 - 

“ ' 32 JX 


Mar 
C F 
15 59 
18 61 


SCOTLAND 


Than 
Stornoway 
Un** 
Wtcfc 


06 .03 

05 - 

BS m 
2 2 .04 
7JS .14 
09 .17 

7 JO XS 


18 6VSU»y- 

15 59 «»*«*= 

19 66 .NW*’. 
17 63 *nff . 
17 63 cfcxwf 

16 59 doug 
16 61 aw«T 

15 59 

16 6i tag* ' 

17 63 briBg ' 
15 S9 0r&* 

15 59 shroteB 

13 SS dcudf 
13 56 ototgp .. 
15 59 b<W*_ 
13 55 aw? 1 . 
12 54 W* 
g 46 ahowW 
11 62 sboifero- 



Tbeneeni Tnuwlaina flpm 


Lighting-np time 


TODAY _ 

London 7.02 pm to 6-37 sm 
Bristol 7.12 pro to &4? am 
EdUAixyti 7.11 pm to 6^3 am 
Manchester 7.09 pm to S47 am 
725 pm 16 558 am 

TOMORROW . 

London 7.00 pm to &S9 am 
Bristol 7.10pm to 6-49 am 
EdMxigh 7.09 pmto6JK«n 
Manchester 7.07 pm to 6.49 am 
Penzance 753 pm to 659 am 


Abroad • 

ctoud; 4 drizzle; I. Wn Ig. tog: h. htti; r. rata: i. sun: sn. snow; ti, 

a S 77 Colog ne f 16 61 Mafonra s £ 61 Rome ' 2 



srrisco* 152 


MDDAY: c. 

Afaccto 

Mootlri 

Atex-drte 

Algiers 

Amtrdm 

Athens 

Bahrein 

Barbeds* 

Bareetoa 

Bainir 


- 25 77 Cologne 
s 25 77 Cptaai 
c 25 77 Corfu 
I 30 88 DidtOn 
s IB 81 Oubrenk 
f 23 73 Fare 

Borenoa 


16 61 Matanra 
f 12 54 Ntofega 
S 26 79 tSST 
S 15 59 titab’nw 
a 23 73 MexicoC 
9 24 75 Mamt* 
a 25 77 Man 


1 24 75 

f 12 54SF&T a SS . 


s 29 84 Frankfurt s 17 63 Monlraar 
8 23 73 FuneM ' I 23 73 Moaem 


(HT1MES NEWSPAPERS LIMITED. 
r4S6. Primed bv London Post (Pnni 
ersi Limned or i Virginia street. 
London El 9XN ancf by News 
Scotland Lid.. 124 Portman Street, 
rilnning Pam. Gmsqpw oat iEj. 
Saiurday. October «. 1986. Req- 
Mered as a newspaper at the Post 
Office. 


Bermuda' 

Biarritz 

BouTne* 

Bonfe’x 

Bnmsela 

Budapat 

BMW' 

Cairo 

CapeTn 

CWanea 

Chicago' 

Ch'duch' 


c 24 75 Geneva 
s 23 73 GMxaBar 
f 14 57 Helsinki 
c 25 77 Hong K 
c 21 70 Innurck 
C 15 59 Istanbul 
a 24 75 Jeddtoi 
l 15 59 Jotxjra* 
s 24 75 KarecM 
C 19 66 L Patinas 
C 27 31 Lisbon 
f 24 75 Locarno 
f 23 73 tuxambg 
c 17 83 L A n gel a ' 
t 25 77 Madrid 


iisasa 

5 21 70 N York* 
f 2D 68 Moe 
s 35 96 Oslo 
f 21 70 Paris 
b 30 86 Peking 
t b» TSPteSr 
s 2S 77 
3 21 70 

s 17 63 

c 19 88 Myadb 
f 23 73 Rtode J 


" — i « m mooed a bi no 

' denotes Tiursttey's figivaa are latest svatiaMa 


Santiago' 
f 31 88 Send 
s 23 73 Sntfpw 
r 14 57 S6?h0fra 
c 13 55 SMabVg 
a 22 72 ^ ^ — 
f 28 92 — 

S 27 81 IW 

f 30 86 Tanarifa 
e 21 78 Tokyo 
s 24 75 Toronto' 
f it 52 Tania • 
s 20 68 Vatabda 
s 25 77 VncSW 
a (8 64 Varied 
s 17 63 Weans 
I 2 36 Warsaw - 
S a 73 w aab’ton- i |s 
a 39102 warngto* . e » 3 
a 23 laZBfch 


r 28 # ' 
r 8; 

f i7 g; 

’ll 

f 25 J 
r * 79 

ils 

;sf 

■ill 


5 :• 

I 

V 

4' 


V 


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V 

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■-I ■ 
j' : 

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21 



hmld j 




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ihtHijj 


1 »• ifc 

,i- 

Mau-df- 
!1 “‘ 'n >H>r V 

‘‘J 1 ‘**-wvjjo» 

tern imptijg. 

J l l> rhlMyv 

Ih - mining, if. 

}| j' Lu *r 

* r » u-vm h . 
Ul.Un,!. . 
,n rur 

•n .i!n!j(vi; 

'■ -"SlU tv: 
•MHiinrshi-i. 
• s,,: -'l’; - lly^ ; 
piiiirife- 

-il'-i Jiinr 

i— 1 i 'a 



BUSINESS and finance 


THE 


'"'C'lujNl. 

* l »hri7?M 

a U‘iv bill '« 

;*■ s\ts. 

" *wS,^u 

p^'ji 

1 lil’lc * 

‘'‘■ai'?. 

liu <“ 

h' ,,r 



TIMES 


SPORT 35 
TELEVISION AND RADIO 39 


SATURDAY OCTOBER 4 1986 



Executive Editor 
Kenneth Fleet 



If 1 ^ 

'!» ,u i;< 


1233.0 (- 12 . 0 ) 

ft-seioo 

1560.8 (- 12 . 3 ) 

S9phs 

Wfisr* 

THE POtiMn 

US Dollar 

1.4410 (+ 0 . 0080 ) 

?o?o? nan "“fk 

2.8784 (+ 0 . 0038 ) 

Trade-weighted 
68.2 (- 0 . 1 ) 




V* 




M** 


k 

‘ m ' 

■ w** 
:> 




50% rise in 
Scottish 
TV profits 

Scottish Television yes- 
?f T 9 a y announced pretax prof- 
*? *** ihe half year lo June 30 
1 million, a rise of 50 per 

Advertising sales rose 1 9 4 
per cent to £31.9 million and 
sales of programmes and ser- 
• v, ces rose 50 per cent io £1.4 
million. 

shares jumped 8p to 
JJSp. encouraged by the 25 
per cent increase in the m- 
tenm dividend to 3p net. 

The company said revenue 
had been buoyant since July. 
The lower Exchequer levy of 
45 per cent, effective from 
April 1. will boost full-year 
profits substantially. 

STV sells fewer pro- 
grammes overseas than some 
other ITV contractors, so it 
will gain more from the lower 
levy. Kleinwort Grieveson, 
the stockbroker, expects a fuU- 
year saving of around £1 
million and forecasts 1986 
profits at £6.5 million. 

Spurs lose 

Tottenham Hotspur, the 
only football club listed on the 
Stock Exchange, passed hs 
final dividend for the year 
ending May 3 1 after making a 
pretax loss of £730,000 on 
turnover of £5.5 million, com- 
pared with £87,000 profits in 
1984-85 on turnover of £5.7 
million. It also passed the 
interim dividend LnTthe latest 
year. Tempos, page 22 

£8m offer 

Kennedy Brookes : is - to 
make an agreed bid for Crusts, 
the health food restaurant. 
The bid includes preference 
shares. The offer of six Ken- 
nedy shares for 11 Crusts 
shares values Ousts at £8 
million. 

Bond buys 

Mr Alan Bond's 
company, Dallhold 
men is, is payi 
(£11.1 million 
seum gold 
Bemadino County. 


Rise in base rate 
resisted as slide 
in pound goes on 

By Richard Thomson, Banking Correspondent 


The pound continued to 
retreat against most currencies 
yesterday as effective central 
bank intervention failed to 
materialize and fears of a 
substantial rise in base rates 
persisted. 

Market-makers are waiting 
for Tuesday’s money supply 
figures for September, re- 
garded as the next crucial 
indicator for movement in 
interest razes. 

Sterling fell from DM2.8767 
to DM2. 87 1 1 — a record low— 
but held steady against an 
even weaker dollar. Fears of 
central bank intervention kept 
foreign exchange markets rel- 
atively quiet, although there 
was no evidence of a move by 
the Bundesbank to support 
sterling. 

Some dealers believed the 
Bank of England had inter- 
vened early m the morning, 
bat this did not stop the 
pound sliding against the 
mark. 

Sterling’s weakness against 
continental currencies pushed 
down the trade-weighted in- 
dex, measured against a basket 
of currencies, to a new low of 
68.0 during the day from 68.1 
on Thursday, but the index 


. higher at 682. 
The dollar 
most currencies as support 
was undermined by news that 
unemployment in the US had 
risen to 7 percent. 

The dollar was at S1.4395 
against sterling, down 65 
points, and down from 
DM2.0060 to DM1.9945. 
Dealers said the fell in the 
dollar added to the weakness 
of sterling. 

Despite the determination 
of the British authorities to 
resist a rise in bank base rates, 
money market rates remained 
firm, with the key ihree- 
monih interbank rate up at 
around 1 1 per cem. 

A rise in base rates would be 
embarrassing for the Govern- 
ment before the Conservative 
Party conference next week 
and Mr Nigel Lawson’s speech 
on the economy on Thursday. 
The Government is also keen 
to keep interest rates down 
before the British Gas flotation 

September's money supply 
figures are expected to be high. 
City estimates range between 
a 2 . 25 and 3.85 per cent 
increase, with a big rise in 
bank lending widely antici- 
pated. Further uncertainty in 


the markets was caused by the 
start next week of the con- 
ference of the Organization of 
Petroleum Exporting 
Countries. 

“It is still a knife<€dge 
situation for imerest rates, 
said Mr Peter Fdiner, econo- 
mist for James Capet the 
broker.- “A combination of 
bad money supply figures and 
a further weakening in the 
pound next week would make 
a rise in base rates hard to 
resist-’" 

The Treasury issued £600 
million in three taplets yes- 
terday, with maturities rang- 
ing from 1990 to 2006. Some 
commentators suggested that 
this could mean that the 
money supply figures would 
be better than expected. 

The market's predictions on 
money supply figures have 
become increasingly pessimis- 
tic during Lhe week. 

Mr FeUner pointed out that, 
even if the figures were bad. 
they might not be as dis- 
appointing as the money mar- 
kets anticipated, easing the 
pressure on imerest rates. But 
everything would depend on 
the strength of sterling at the 
time, he added. 


US jobless up to 7 per cent 
as manfacturing suffers 


famil y 

Invest- 
_ S16 million 
for the Colos- 
project in San 
County, Califor- 
nia. The sellers are Regent 
Mining and Grants Patch 
Mining, the Australian gold 
partners. - . . 

Reuters deal 

A conditional agreement 
has been signed for Reuters to 
make an offer to acquire the 
equity of Finsbury, a private 
company operating databases 
used by financial-related 
markets. 

Homes deal 

Nationwide Leisure, the 
sports goods retailer and cara- 
van park operator is to buy a 
group of nursing and residen- 
tial homes for the elderly in a 
deal worth £4.3 million in 
rash. 


Temp® 22 
Wall Street 22 
Co News 22 
Foreign Even 22 
Comment 23 
StocL Market 23 


' MrJcts 23 


23 


Unit Trusts 
Commodities 
IISM Prices 
Share Prices 


Unemployment in the 
United States rose unexpect- 
edly to 7 per cent in Septem- 
ber from 6.8 per cent in 
August, revealing consid- 
erable weaknesses in the 
manufacturing sector. 

The poorer Department of 
Labour figures for September 
reversed the trend of three 
successive months in which 
unemployment declined, and 
revived fears that the econ- 
omy would not rebound from 
a sluggish first half 

The figures — they were 
expected to remain almost:, 
unchanged — had an immedi- . 
ate impact on financial mar- 
kets. Gitas soared in active 
New York trading in a trend 
that carried over to share 
prices even though few econo- 
mists expect a further lower- 
ing of US imerest rates at this 
time. 

The announcement pushed 
the dollar below the psycho- 
logically important level of. 
DM2 m early New York 
trading. 

White House officials, in an 


From Bailey Morris, Washington 


attempt to paint a positive 
picture of the data, said: 
“ America is in its 47th consec- 
utive month of economic 
expansion.'" But privately, 
they admitted that the rise in 
unemployment was a sharp 
setback in the run-up to the 
November elections, particu- 
larly, in the industrial Mid- 
West where it is a big political 
issue. 

Commissioner Janet Nor- 
wood, of the Bureau of Labour 
Statistics, said that the jobs 
outlook was weak last month 
in all surveys, largely because 
of the drain in US manufac- 
turing jobs which resumed 
after a brief rebound in 
AugusL 

Gains in the service sector, 
reflecting the continuing shift 
in the US economy away from 
producing industries, were not 
enough to offset the downturn 
in the industrial sector, which 
employed 30,000 fewer work- 
ers in September. 

Because of the continued 
loss of factory jobs — they 
have declined by 200,000 this 


year — the US economy has 
regained only 44 per cent of 
the manufacturing jobs lost 
during the steep 1981-1982 
recession. 

The Reagan Administration 
has been counting on 4 per 
cent growth in the second half 
of the year to relieve protec- 
tionist pressures and to dispel 
fears that the economy was 
heading for another recession. 

But few economists expect 
either robust growth or reces- 
sion in the second half. 

Mr Aubrey Zaifuto, of J 
Henry Schroder Bank & Trust' 
Company, said: “It is the same 
old story. The job growth was 
mostly in services, particu- 
larly financial services, which 
does not really come through 
to productivity.” 

Echoing comments of 
economists who have said 
that, despite the pick-up in the 
trade figures, the effects of a 
lower dollar were not yet being 
felt, Mr Stephen Slifer, of 
Lehmann Government Secur- 
ities, said: “These figures, are 
unambiguously weak." 


Ranks Hovis 
acquisitions 
cost £11. 7m 

By Richard Lander 

Northern Foods, the 
diversified food group, is to 
sell two subsidiaries which 
make ingredients for the cater- 
ing and baking industries to 
Ranks Hovis McDougall for 
£1 1.7 million in cash. 

The deal marks another step 
m Northern's strategy u> re- 
duce its gearing, which rose to 
41.5 per cent at the end of the 
year to March 31. It raised $40 
million (£27.7 million) in June 
by selling the remaining parts 
or Prestige Foods, its Ameri- 
can offshoot. 

The sale price to RHM 
covers £1.1 million of inter- 
company debts and the two 
businesses being sold are 
Goldrei, Foucard & Son and 
Turner Brothers Bakers Sun- 
dries, which together made 
pretax profits of £1.3 million' 
last year — less titan 2 per cent 
of Northern’s overall profits. 


Reagan gains clear run 
at Federal Reserve 

By Our Washington Correspondent 


market summary 


The surprise resignation of 
Mr Emmett Rice, a governor 
of the US Federal Reserve 
Board and a strong supporter 
of Mr Panl Volcker,. the 
chairman, has given President 
Reagan a rare opportunity to 
put a strong supply-side stamp 
on the US central bank. 

Mr Rice is resigning for 
“purely personal reasons” on 
December 31, three years 
before the end of his term, 
according to the letter he sent 
to the White House. His 
successor would be the fifth 
Reagan appointee to the 
powerful board. 

Only two of the seven 
governors are not Reagan 
appointees: Mr Volcker, 
whose power as chairman has 
been eroded over the past 
year, and Mr Henry Waliich 
who is in poor health. Mr 
Wallich’s term expires in 
January 1 988. completing the 
virtual turnover of Fed 


STOCK MARKETS 

dSUISL... 1771.79 (-9.42)* 

NMUri Dow . — 17241222 (+221 2)9) 

ga-BiLriJBfSS3 
USEdl 

Paris: GAC 384 ^ ‘ 

Zurich: n / a 

SKA General • 

London dosing prices page 25 

INTEREST RATES 

London: 

V 1 -T0K 

Smooth eligible MtetW-tO** 

P rate 
Prime Bata 71S% 

CURRENCIES 

I nnflME N 6 W YOtlC 

IfsiSio 

f: DM2.0784 & DM1.9900- 

£EHSl & index: 109.3 

§1 xB£3& ECU £0,726189 
IJSSS SDR £0.843130 


MAIN PRICE CHANGES 


RISES: 

Anglia Sec. Homes 
Local Lon. Praps. — 
Men vier Swain _ 


Worcester 

— 9® 

Brit Aerospace _ 

265p 

FR Group — — 

— 327p( 


Jaguar 


Useful 


TV™. 
MHtord Docks , 

FALLS: 


Glaxo 

V 

5 



Trust House Rxte 

i‘ 

Blue Circle 






Ladbroke Group 

McCorquodale 

Johnson Group 


535p(-5p) 


GOLD 


London Rxfng: 
AMS436.9T 

dose 5436, 

303.50) 

New rortc _ _ 
Come* S434.25-434.75 


,._.oo 

,50 (E302L50- 


NORTH SEA OIL 


Brent 
* Denotes 


.50bW (514.65) 
price 


dicker in his drive to- curb 
inflation to tight money poli- 
cies which were blamed for 
causing the 1981-82 recession. 


Mr Rice, the only black on 
the Board, supported Mr 
Volcker in this endeavour and 
in many cases has been even 
more outspoken on the need 
lo fight inflation. Last April, 
he. dissented in the central 
bank's decision to cut the 
discount rate and later gave a 
widely-publicized speech, en- 
titled “Is inflation licked?" 
which caused a schism among 
board members. 

Indeed, it was the Reagan- 
appointed majority which 
caused the split in February 
when, they outvoted Mr 
Volcker to cut the discount 
rate, nearly provoking his 
resignation and generating 
comments that the Volcker 
era had ended. 

White House officials said 
yesterdaythal there were no 
candidates yet to replace Mr 
Rice, whose term expires on 
January 31, 1 990. But since he 
is the only black on lhe board, 
Wbite House officials 
acknowledged that they would 
be under pressure to replace 
him with another black 
officiaL 


Fastest can in the West 


Coca-Cola yesterday unveiled 
a drink MMiing operation, 
costing more than £6 million, 
at its Milton Keynes plant. 

The investment gives Mil- 
ton .Keynes the fastest soft 
drinks fanning line, Mr 
Clans Halle, president of 
Coca-Cola International (pic- 
tured above), said at the 
opening. 

The operation will fill 


2,000 cans a urinate with 
Coca-Coin and other prod- 
ucts, including Fanta, LOt, 
Qoatro, and the diet and 
cherry versions of Coca-Coin. 

Mr Halle said: “This new 
line incorporates the latest 
technology available any- 
where. The project remains 
substantially British but in- 
cludes resources and exper- 
tise drawn from seven 
countries.” 


IMF chief 
in rates 
warning 

Washington (AP-DJ) — A 
warning against “over-reli- 
ance On exchange rate 
adjustments” to achieve a 
better balance in the current 
account positions of leading 
industrial countries was given 
yesteiday by M Jacques de 
Larosi&re, managing director 
of the International Monetary 
Fund (IMF). 

Speaking at the closing ses- 
sion of the annual meeting oi 
the IMF and the World Bank, 
M de Larostere said the large 
existing current account im- 
balances, particularly for the 
United plates. West Germany 
and Japan, are widely rec- 
ognized as a source of tension 
and instability. The leading 
industrial countries, be added, 
must move ahead with eco- 
nomic policy co-ordination to 
promote world growth and 
international economic 
stability. . 

“Failure to lake account of 
the international repercuss- 
ions of policies would lead to 
over-reliance on exchange rate 
adjustments, which could 
encourage protectionist pres- 
sures and possibly result in 
recession," he said 
He said also that finance 
ministers and central bankers 
attending the IMF-World 
Bank meeting wanted to “pre- 
vent loo much of the adjust- 
ment burden from falling on 
exchange rates." 

M de Larosi&re has an- 
nounced that he is resigning at 
the end of this year. 

Mr Barber Conable, presi- 
dent of the World Bank, said 
that the Bank’s decision to 
provide extra guarantees in 
the Mexico loan deal did not 
create a precedent. 

The $500 million (£347.2 
million) of extra guarantees 
provided by the Bank was 
crucial to the $6 billion of 
extra lending by the commer- 
cial banks to Mexico, agreed 
this week. 

But Mr Conable said that 
while the Mexico guarantees 
were necessary to complete 
this particular package, the 
World Bank was extremely 
reluctant to offer them as 'a 
matter of course. 


£lm injection 
may rescue 
Blacks Leisure 

By Alison Eadie 

Blacks Leisure Group, the 
troubled camping equipment 
retail chain, may be saved 
from receivership by the inter- 
vention of a consortium of 
investors including Mr Alan 
Thornton, former managing 
director of Lotus Shoes. 

Blacks said yesterday it had 
received proposals from Mr 
Thornton, Mr Bernard 
Garbacz and Mr Leslie Lesser, 
both chartered accountants, to 
inject £1 million of cash into 
the company and restructure 
the board. 

The board of Blacks said the 
proposals must be im- 
plemented by the close of 
business on Monday. 

Mr Thornton is the son of 
Mr Robert Thornton, the 
former Debenhams managing 
director. 

A £3.3 million bid for 
Blacks from Sears lapsed ear- 
lier this week, when Sears won 
acceptances from only 54 per 
cem of shareholders. 


Maxwell raises 
McCorquodale 
stake to 7.5% 


By Alison Eadie 

Mr Robert Maxwell pub- 
lisher of the Daily Mirror, 
yesterday kept the pot boiling 
on the McCorquodale bid 
drama by announcing he had 
raised ’ bis stake in 
McCorquodale from 5.9 per 
cent to 7 J per cent. 

Mr Maxwell’s first share 
purchase on September 29 was 
made before McCorquodale 
announced it was in talks with 
a friendly third party with a 
view to seeing off the un- 
wanted bid from Norton 
Opax. The third party is now 
thought to be ExteL the print- 
ing and information services 
group, in which Mr Maxwell 
has a 26 per cent stake. 

Mr Maxwell's second pur- 
chase of 830.000 shares was 
made on Thursday, again at 
prices well above Norton's 
cash offer of 260p a share. 

Mr Maxwell is believed to 
be keen to stop a friendly 
merger between Extel and 
McCorquodale. as he would 
like to make his own bid for 
Extel next April when permit- 
ted by takeover rules. 

Neither Extel nor 
McCorquodale has confirmed 
anv intended merger. The 
difficulty of having advisers in 
common — both companies 
have KJeinwort Benson as 



Robert Maxwell: Keen to 
prevent merger 

their merchant hank and 
Hoare Govcit as their broker 
— was thought to be delaying 
proceedings. 

The City was yesterday 
speculating that SG Warburg 
had been newly appointed to 
act as E Mel's adviser. War- 
burg. however, was not 
commenting on the 
speculation. 

McCorquodale shares eased 
?p to 276p, despite Mr 
Maxwell's continued interest. 
Norton Opax's £139 million 
bid is final and closes on 
October 16. 


US confusion over 
Pretoria gold deals 


By Richard Lander 

Leading American securi- 
ties firms which make markets 
in South African gold shares 
suspended some of their deal- 
ings yesterday as their cor- 
porate lawyers pored over the 
United States sanctions bill to 
see whether it prohibited share 
purchases. 

The bill which was passed 
on Thursday when the Senate 
overrode President Reagan's 
veto, prohibits new invest- 
ment in South Africa by 
Americans. Spokesmen for 
the American firms in London 
said that they were trying to 
establish whether buying 
shares registered in South 
Africa was breaking the law. 

"In the interests of pru- 
dence we have not traded 
directly in South African reg- 
istered gold shares. We are not 
clear if for example, we buy 
shares from South Africa to 
square a short position, that 
would be construed as a new 
investment,” Mr Allan 
Beuthin of Merrill Lynch said. 

Mr Jim Sweeney, a spokes- 
man for EF Hutton in New 
York, confirmed that his com- 
pany was taking similar action 
although other American 
firms in London decided to 
continue trading with South 
Africa. 

Both spokesman said, how- 


ever. that their companies 
were still actively trading 
South African gold shares in 
American Depositary Receipt 
(ADR) form. Mr Beuthin 
pointed out that most ot 
Merrill's London trading was 
done in ADRs — receipts 
issued by American banks 
representing ‘bundles' of 
shares — and the company was 
sure that these would be 
regarded as American in- 
struments which would not 
contravene sanctions. 

Mr Beuthin said business in 
ADRs was active yesterday as 
the precious metals prices rose 
in response to the sanctions 
bill Gold reached $441 an 
ounce on the New York 
Comex market last night but 
retreated after profit-taking in 
Europe. Platinum broke 
through the $600 level again 
to end about $18 higher at 
$606.50. 

• Rio Tinto-Zinc, which 
operates the Rossing uranium 
mine in Namibia, said that it 
did not anticipate any im- 
mediate effects from the bill 
which also prohibits the im- 
port of South African ura- 
nium. A spokesman declined 
to commeni on a news agency 
report that quoted a senior 
mine official in Namibia as 
saying “If sanctions are im- 
plemented effectively, this 
mine will close down". 


Unhappy THF face inquiry 


Bg'John Bell 


ity Editor 

Trnsthonse Forte’s £200 
milli on purchase of hotels, 
retanrants and inns from Han- 
son Trust is to be investigated 
by the Monopolies and Merg- 
ers Commission. 

The 205 outlets were for- 
merly part of the Imperial 
Group bought by Hanson 
Trust in a £3L5 billion takeover 
battle earlier this year. 

Hie decision to refer the 
THF purchase was taken by 
Mr Paul Channoa. the Trade 
Minister, in support of a 
recommendation by the Office 
of Fair Trading. 

It was immediately criti- 
cized by Mr Rocco Forte, chief 
executive of TTIF- “I am 
extremely surprised and dis- 
appointed by thedeciskm he 
said yesterday. 

The mam area of concern 
for the OFT was over the 



Lord Hanson: He shrewdly 
made sale unconditional 

effects on competition of add- 
ing the 85 former Imperial 
roadside cafes trading muter 
the Happy, Eater banner to 
THF’s 250-strong little Chef 

chain. 


«r 


It is thought that the OFT 
also wished the Monopolies 
Commission to consider the 
addition of five Welcome 
Break motorway service areas 
to the 14 currently operated by 
THF. 

“I am at a loss to see how 
the Happy Eater acquisitions 
can be a problem.” said Mr 
Forte. “There are literally 
thousands of places up and 
down the country where trav- 
ellers can stop with their 
families for a meal.” 

The commission has six 
months to complete its in- 
vestigation. If ft finds against 
THF, the group conld be 
required to divest itself of the 
Happy Eater chain, because 
the shrewd Lord Hanson made 
the sale unconditional 

“I would be disappointed 
about that but I am confident 
we could sell them for at least 
what we paid for them,” Mr 
Forte said. 


J 



GROWTH RATES 

T he average annual compound rate of growth in the price of units 
(on an offer- to-bid basis) of each of our capital growth funds 
between launch and 1st October 19S6 was as follows: 


Fund 

Launched 

Growth 

Capital 

Jun 69 

+ 15.1%p.a. 

International Growth 

Oct 76 

+25.3% p.a. 

American & General 

Apr 78 

+ 19.0%p.a. 

American Turnaround 

Oct 79 

+22.4% p.a. 

Recovery 

Apr 82 

+24.7% p.a. 

Japan & General 

Feb 84 

+26.1% p.a. 

European 

• Feb 86 

+45.6% p.a. 


Even- 7 one of these Framlingron funds has outperformed the FT 
All-Share Index, the Dow-Jones Industrial Average and the 
Standard and Poors Composite Index. 

~pach fund is fuDy described in the Framlington Unit Trust Guide 


1986. For a free copy, send us this coupon: 


To: Framlington Unit Management Limited, 
FREEPOST, London EC2B 2DL. 




Please send me a copy of the Framlington Unit Trust Guide 1986. 

Name 

Address 


T 4/10 


jv4 - ■"JVC-T:' 



24 



New 

Streets 

inanw 

yesterdt 

After 

prices 

course 

session 

pressm 

e vapors 
mornii 

started 

The 
averagi 
about I 
half bo 
to 1,79 



YO 

As 

or 

c 

c* 

J 

Grc 



I 

I 


WALL STREET 


Jobless figures hoist 
Dow in early trading 


New York (Agencies) — 
Share prices followed the bond 
market to sharply higher lew- 
els after the release of Septem- 
ber unemployment figures 
yesterday morning. 

Hie Dow Jones industrial 
average was op abort 17 
points at the 1,798 level at one 
early stage when advancing 
issues were leading declining 
shares by a better man 3-to-I 
margin. 

The US Latxmr Department 
reported that civilian un- 
employment last month rose 
0.2 percentage point to 7 per 
cent, while noo-fann employ- 
ment expanded by 1 07,000, Ear 
less than expected. 

Commenting on the third- 
quarter economy after the 


unemployment report, Mr Ben 
Laden, chief economist at T 
Rowe Price Associates of Bal- 
timore, said: “It looks pretty 
weak. As fur any e xp ecta ti ons 
of better tread, you could not 
see it in the September 


The bond market rose 
shandy higher on the news, 
supporting the argument that 
the Federal Reserve Board 
may have to lower interest 
rates farther to sthnidate stiB- 

slttggisli economic growth. 

The stock market followed 
suit, bolstered by a wide 
premium on December stock 
index futures. 

American Express rose to 
5714, np 34, and Digital Equip- 
ment to 9234. np l*s. 


Oct 

2 


sa% 

139* 


AMR 
ASA 
.AMdSignal 40 
ABttdSre 64S 
ASsCNmrs 
Alcoa 
Annex me 
Am'rdaHs 
Am Brands 
Am Can 


AmCynm'd 
iBPwr 


2’A 

36* 

14* 

22* 

42* 

83* 

74* 

27 


Am 

Am Express 56* 
Am Home 72* 
Am Mows 
AmSfrard 
AmTeteph 
Amoco 
Armco Steel 
Asarco 
Ashland Of 
At Richfield 
Avon Prods 34 
BkrsTsi NY 43* 
Banka mor 11 

Bkot&ston 39* 
Bank of NY 57* 
Beth Steel 7* 
53* 
58* 
44* 
35* 


3 

39* 

22 * 

66 * 

a 

14* 

GO* 

57* 


Brden 
l Warner 


BqW 

Bnst 


Myers 72 
BP 40 

Bufion Ind 34* 
BuriTonNffi 55* 
BumwgtH 7DK- 
CmpSefiSp 57* 
Can Pacific 11* 
Catecpfler 37% 

Cetimse .208 
Central SW 33 
Champion 28* 
Chase Man 38% 
ChmBkNY 43* 
Chevron 44* 
Chrysler 38 
Cuwap 49* 
Clark Equip 19% 
Coca Cota 35 
Colgate 38* 
CBS 122* 
ClmbnOas 43 
Cmb'tn Eng 31* 
Cornwall Ed 
Cons Edis 
CnNHGas 
Cons Power 12* 
CntrtData 26* 
Coming Gl 50 
CPCbw fit* 
Crane 27* 
Cm Zeller 52 
DartAKralt 54 X 
Deere 23* 
Delta A* 45* 
Detroit Ed 

SB? 

DowChem 


31* 

44* 

31 


16 * 

91* 

40* 

55* 

17* 


Dow 

Drtosser Ind 
Duke Power 45* 
DuPont 80 
Eastern Air 9* 
Estm Kodak 54* 
Eaton Corn 69 
Emerson B 80* 
Exxon Corp 67% 
Fed Dpt Sts 87* 
• I'fite atetet! ct 


58* 

37% 

40% 

63* 

2% 

36K 

14* 

23* 

42* 

82* 

73* 

27 

57% 

72* 

3 

39* 

22 * 

68* 

8* 

14% 

60* 

57* 

33* 

44* 

11 

39% 

57 

7* 

54* 

57* 

44'/. 

35% 
71* 
39* 
34* 
56 
69* 
56% 
11 % 
38% 
207 X 
33* 
26% 

37 

43* 

44* 

36* 

50* 

19* 

34* 

37* 

123* 

42* 

32 

32 

45 

30* 

13 

26* 

49* 

56* 

28* 

50* 

54* 

23* 

45% 

16* 

89* 

41 

54* 

17* 

45* 

80* 

9* 

54% 

69% 

81 

67* 

BB . 
itenun 



oa 

oa 


2 

J 

Firestone 

24% 

24% 

Fst Chicago 

26% 

26% 

Ftt hit Br£p 
FstPemC 

55% 

9% 

55% 

9% 

Ford 

54% 

54 

FTWacriua 

37% 

38 

GAFCorp 

33 

33% 

GTE Cora 

M% 

53% 

Gan Corp 

77% 

76* 

GanDylms 

GanBKtric 

71% 

71% 

71% 

72% 

Gen Inst 

90 

19% 

Gen AS M 

79 

79% 

Gen Motors 

68% 

68% 

GnPbLttny 

22% 

22% 

Genesco 

3% 

3% 

Gaora^Pac 

36% 

36 

QBMB 

37% 

38% 

Goodrich 

36% 

38 

Goodyear 

33% 

34% 



20% 


46% 

47% 

Gl Alt & Tac 

21% 

21% 

GrTmd 

32% 

32% 


25% 

24% 

Gufl&Wea 

67% 

63% 

Heinz HJ. 

39% 

39% 


52% 

52% 

HTett-Pkrd 

38% 

38% 

HonoywaO 

ICInds 

70% 

24 

71% 

24% 

>"9WS09 

52% 

53% 


19% 

20% 

IBM 

132% 

132% 

INCO 

13% 

13% 

hit Paper 
(nt TbITO 

68% 

48% 

68% 

49% 

truing Bank 

47V, 

47% 

jhnsn&Jtn 

64% 

64% 

Kaiser Atum 

17% 

17% 

Kerr McGee 

?7M 

27% 

KntaTyOrk 

80% 

81% 

KMtal 

47* 

46% 

Kroger 

i_fvcora 

30% 

2% 

29% 

2% 


75% 

75% 

Loddroed 

44% 

44% 

Lucky Stre 
ManH'nusr 

36% 

35% 

44% 

44% 

ManWUeCp 

£% 

2% 

Mapco 

49% 

48% 

Marine Mid 

46 

45% 

Mrt Marietta 

43 

43% 

Masco 

23% 

24% 

McOonaMS 

Si* 

56% 

McDortne* 

85 

84% 

Mead 

55% 

55% 

Merck 

100% 

100% 

Mtasta Mng 

101% 

101% 

MOW 0.1 

37% 

37% 

Monsanto 

t»% 

67% 

Woman J-P 
Motorola 

82% 

37% 

83% 

38% 

NCR Carp 

43% 

48% 

NLtodsTre 

5 

4% 

NatDistts 

40% 

40% 

NatMadEnt 

24% 

24% 

NatSmcndt 

9% 

8% ■ 

Norfolk Stti 

81% 

81% 

NWBancra 

35% 

36% 

OccidntPei 

29 

29% 

Ogden 

42% 

41% 

OhnCora 

Onwns-W 

38% 

41% 

40% 

41% 

PacGasB 

24% 

24% 

Pan Am 

6 

5% 

PemayJ.C. 

72% 

71 

Pennzoi 

62% 

61% 

Peptaco 

26% 

2ti% 


Oct 

2 


O a 
1 


Pfizer 
Phelps Dge 
FhfitoMrs 
PMfpfiPet 
Polaroid 

ppg mo 

PretrGmbl 
PbSE&G 
Raytheon 
RyntdsMet 
Rockwefltnt 
Dutch 


Sara Lee 

SFESopac 

SchlDeeger 

Scott Paper 

Seagram 

Sears Rbck 

Shel Trans 

Singer 

SmtnklnBk 

Sony 

3th Cal Ed 

U8888 

Storting Drg 
SnverraJF 
Sun Comp 
Tetodyne 
Tenrwco 

Texaco 
Texas ECW 
Texas Inst 
Texas Utte 
Textron 
TravtreCor 
TRW Inc 
UAL Inc 
UnieverNV 
UnCartMe 
UnPacCor 
Utd Brands 
USGCorp 

Uta Tectmoi 

USX Corp 
Unocal 
Jm Water 
WmerLmM 
WedsF; 


Xerox COrp 
Zenith 


57* 

20% 

67* 

10 % 

62% 

84* 

68 % 

40% 

62% 

48% 

39* 

89* 

60% 

60* 

28* 

34* 

61 

60% 

41* 

53* 

53% 

80 

18 * 

32% 

re* 

47* 

42* 

36% 

53% 

310* 

40% 

34 

29X 

108% 

32* 

56% 

43* 

91* 

58* 

210% 

20 % 

56* 

32% 

40% 

42% 

34* 

23% 

43% 

53% 

100* 

54 

35* 

59* 

40 

51* 

19* 


57* 

20* 

67* 

10 % 

02 

65* 

68 % 

40* 

62* 

47* 

38% 

89* 

80% 

60 

28* 

33% 

60* 

60* 

41% 

53% 

54 

80* 

19% 

32* 

t 

43% 

36% 

53* 

316 

40* 

34* 

30 

109 

32* 

55* 

44% 

91 

58% 

209 

21 

57* 

32 

40* 

43 

34* 

22* 

44% 

54% 

98% 

53% 

35 

59% 

40 

52 

20 


Business 
failures 
edge up 

Total business fkfluresin 
Britain during the first nine 
months of this year reached 
16.349, ait increase of 0.4 per 
cent on last year, according to 
figures produced by. Dun & 
Bradstreet, the business in- 
formation service. 

Bankruptcies among firms, 
partnerships and individuals 
rose by 387 or 7.8 per cent, in 
contrast with a 20 per cent fell 
in the same period last year, 
while company liquidations 
were down by 2.5 per cent 

For the three months to the 
end of September, the number 
of business failures in England 
and Wales declined from 
4,736 to 4,673. London and 
the South-east was the most 
affected area with a total of 
1,982 failures, followed by the 
North-west with 638. 


• BAUXITE GIFFORD JA- 
PAN TRUST: Results for the 
year to August 31 include a 
dividend of 0.4p (0.6p). payable 
on December- 8. Gross invest- 
ment income £617.832 
(£475.619). revenue before tax 
£131.189 (£113,230). cps 0.46p 
(0.72p). asset value per ordinary 
share 528. 7p (258. 6p). diluted 
asset value per ordinary share 
492.8p (245.10). 

• KOITAKL Final dividend 
Aus3.75 cents making Aus5 
cents (A*is2.5 cents) for year 
ended June 30. Unaudited eq- 
uity consolidated net profit 
AusSS- 69 million or £3.7 mil- 
lion (AusSfi.lS). eps Aus26.5 
cents (Ausl4.2 cents). 

• BRITANNIA SECURITY 
GROUP*. The group has con- 
ditionally agreed to acquire 
from Southend Securities equip- 
ment used for making up the 
security systems installed at 
customers' premises, the benefit 


Austin Rover gears up for 
big sales drive in Japan 

By Derek Harris, Industrial Editor 



Austin Rover, the Rover 
Group's volume cars subsid- 
iary, is launching a big sales 
drive in Japan. 

•The company has been 
under pressure from Mr Gra- 
ham Day, the group chairman, 
to beef up its marketing. 

Austin Rover claims to be 
the fastest-expanding im- 
porter into Japan, with sales of 
about 3,000 cans expected this 
year before the new drive 
starts. 

Imported cars account for 
only a small percentage of 
sales in Japan but tbe Mini has 
caught on as a chic vehicle for 
driving in the big cities. The 
MG Maestro is also being 
imported. 

Bui next year, 80 per cent of 
the Austin Rover range will be 


heading for Japan, including 
the Montego, which, h is 
boped^wil] sen w ett. 

Austin Rover is activating 
its two-way deal with Honda, 
the Japanese manufacturer 
with which it has a number of 
co-operative ventures, to put 
the new Rover 800 executive 
car on Japanese roads, 

Austin Rover is already 
committed to producing the 
Japanese equivalent of . the 
Rover 800 far sale in Britain 
and Honda will manufacture 
the British specification 800 
with its traditional, walnut 
finished interior, is Js 
Austin Rover 
“ substantial” sales increases 
in Japan next year 
Tbe company is strengthen- 
ing its management in Japan, 


expanding marketing promo- 
tions and its dealer network. It 
has no links with Honda on 
marketing and sales. 

Mr Masaki Takizawa. who 
previously held senior po- 
sitions with Nissan, the big 
Japanese vehicles maker, is 
being brought in as sales 
director of Austin Rover 
Japan. 

In addition to the joint 
venture involving the Rover 
800 and Honda Legend, there 
is an agreement for Austin 
Rover to manufacture gear- 
boxes at Longbridge for the 
Honda Ballade. 

The two com panics are also 
set to develop a new mid- 
Tange car and are probably 
looking to replace tbe 
and Rover 200. 


COMPANY NEWS 


of rental and maintenance 
agreements relating to that 
equipment, the benefit of agree- 
ments relating to security sys- 
tems maintained by Southend 
and Southend's debtors and 
work in progress in respect of its 
business of supplying, installing 
and maintaining security sys- 
tems. Consideration mil) be the 
allotment of 64.570 Britannia 
ordinary shares. 

• MILFORD DOCKS: No 
dividend (same) for 1985. Turn- 
over £757.000 (£1.38 million). 
Loss, before and after tax, 
£773.000 (£413,000). Loss per 
share 24.76p (13.24p). Six 
months to June 30. No interim 
dividend (same). Turnover 
£512.000 (£454,000). Loss, be- 
fore and after tax. £198,000 
(£28 i .000). Loss per share 6.35p 
(9.01 p). 

• MURRAY ELECTRONICS: 
Dividend doubled to OJlp far 
the year to July 31. It will be 


paid on Dec. 19. Pretax revenue 
£304.000 (£221,000). Earnings 
per share 0.64p (0.45p). 

• LDLLESHALL CO: Half- 
year to June 28. Interim divi- 
dend Q.75p (same), payable on 
Dec.3. Turnover £3.31 million 
(£3 million). Pretax profit 
£89.000 (£75,000). Earnings per 
share 3.5p (2.8p). The board 
reports that it is looking forward 
with greater confidence to the 
remainder of the year. 
Lilleshall's underlying strength 
has been maintained and a 
variety of options have now 


been opened up to improve 
profitability. 

• ECCLESIASTICAL 
INSURANCE OFFICE.* Half- 
year to Aug. 31. T uriiover (gross 
premiums): general £273. mil- 
lion (£23.0! million) and hie 
£6.76 million (£635 .million), 
making £33.96 million (£29.36 
million). Net premiums: general 
£19-2 million (£1539 million) 
and life £6:72 million (£6.3 
million), making £25.93 million 
(£21.59 million). Pretax profit 
£1.76 million (£2-05 million): 


LONDON FINANCIAL FUTURES 


CANADIAN PRICES 

23% 23% 

43* 44* 

13* 13* 

16% 15* 
13* 13% 
23% 23* 
26* 26* 
24* 25 
32* 31% 
45* 45* 

40* 40* 
30* 30 
83* 83* 
21 % 20 * 
28* 28* 
2.70 2-66 
37* 37* 
13% 13* 


AbitM 

Aten Alum 

AttorinSU 
Can Pacific 
Comnco 
GonBathrst 
HkiySfdCsn 
Hdsn BMin 
imaaco 
Imperial O* 
in 
Ryi 


Co 
ThmsnN'A' 
VantyCorp 
WDtrlHlram 


utOosrt iNtwenue pS 


tTndn t Unvoted 


Three Moroh stetflnfl 

Dec 86 

335 

Aft 

Low 

89.74 

CiOM 

69.12 

EatVol 

6100 



8930 

89.12 

8933 

172 

Jun 87 — — .. 

89.45 

89.10 

H 

89.50 

8930 

89.45 

89.10 

6937 

89.41 

8951 

123 

26 

0 

Dec67 _ _ 

Mar 88 



8096 

0 


Previous day’s 
Three Month Ei 

Dec 36 

Mar 67 

Jim 87 


SepB7 

US Treasure Bend 
Dec 88 . 


Mar 87 

Jun 87 


Short Gift 

Dec 86 

Mar 87 


Jun 87 


Previous day s total open Interest 23628 
94.00 94.18 93.97 94.16 5613 

mm 94.09 9345 94.06 682 

93.66 93.88 93£4 93.85 500 

93.32 93S1 9332 8152 60 

Previous day's total open interest 6333 
9802 97-18 95-24 9*07 6529 

95-05 96-15 95-05 96-10 120 

84-09 96-15 94415 96-10 40 

Previous day's total open Interest 1325 
9820 95-30 95-16 95-30 ISO 

N/T — — 95-25 — 

N/T - - - - 


Lora G«t 
DecB6 ...... 

Mar 87 — 
Jun 87 — 

Sep 87 

FT-SE100 
Dec 88 — 
Mot 87 


109-18 - 

111-05 

109-18 

110-23 

13054 

Mackid 

18974-191.09 

19028-19056 

N/T 



110-20 

0 

Mian 

198235-2004.48 

1967.17-199237 

N/T 



11040 

0 

Oslo 

103406-103708 

103202-106708 

N/T 





0 

Pans 

93888-94925 

9.4093-9.4260 


Premous day's total open interest 2444 

StTrf*n 

9.8408-93086 

93651-93791 

15930 

160.10 

15930 

160.10 

546 

Tokyo 

2209%22.«3 

22155-22230 

162.00 

162.00 

162.00 

163.10 

2 

Vienna 

20.17-20.36 

2021-2024 


FOREIGN EXCHANGES 


Storing tod* * ' c o m p are d vrift 1373 ires up at «&2{d«irV range 


OTHER STERLING RATES 


DOLLAR SPOT RATES 


Argentina ausirar 

Austraka doBar 

Bahrain dinar — 

Brazil cruzado* 

Cyprus pound 

Fauna maria 

Greece drachma _ 
Hong Kong ooOar . 

India rupee 

frag (tear . 


— 1-53*8-1.5403 Ireland 

22S5&&2694 

__ 05405-05445 
19J30-19.93 Australia 

— 0-7280-0.7380 Canada. 

— 6-9710-7.0110 Sweden 
_ 191.70-193.70 Norway . 

11J21 06-1 1-21 99 Denmark 


Kuwait (tear KD 
Malaysia doter - 
‘liiscJco peso . 


18.15-1845 west Germany 

n/a Switzerland 

0.4185-0-4225 Netherlands 

3.7675-3.7731 Prance 


108000-1 130.00 Japan 
20580-20694 


New Zealand doiar 

Saudi AraOa riya) 50800-5.4200 

rioter 3.1183-3.1227 Hong Kong, 


Singapore i 
Soirn Atria 


Africa rend 3.1884-32049 Portugal. 

UAEdrttarn 55670-&307Q Spaa — 

TJoydsBank Austria - 


. 13860-13685 
. 2.1685-2.1700 
28200-20220 

06341-016348 

.13867-13872 

6340008460 

70150-70200 
-_ 73200-73250 
.... 1.9955-13965 

- 1.6150-13180 
-- 23535-2-2545 
_ 6-5340-6.5390 
_ 15300-15330 

— 13805-13810 

4137-41.42 

.... 7.7960-7.7970 
_ 14530-14040 

13230-13230 
14.03-1435 


»tto| tete il!a!dj!!W?jtoaM| 


Building analysts 
head westwards 
to size up the US 


STERLING SPOT AND FORWARD RATES 


Market rates 

ggjy 

N York 1.4385-1.4445 
Montreai1.9940-t.9996 
Amsdam3. 2405-3.2720 
Brussels 59.47-fiO.Q6 
C'phqsn 100276-100282 
Dublin 1.0503-10808 
FranWun 2-8666-2.8951 
Lisbon 21038-21233 


Mtofcet rates 


Octobers 

1.4405-1.4415 

1.9968-13996 

33498-33542 

59JS9-5QJ1 

108507-100855 

10560-10670 

23767-20808 

21075-21233 


Zurich 23216-2-3479 


23323-23360 


O57-034pram 

0.44-034prem 

1%-i*prem 

18-15prem 

s sssr 

1*-l%prem 
61-125dts 
15-fiOdis 
par- 3.* 

4-4 %ds 

l*-%prem 

l*-1*pram 

1 *-iprem 

9%-apram 

i*-i%prem 


3 months 

1.77-1.72pretn 

1J28-1.13pnmi 

4%-4*prem 

524&NWI 

2 %- 1 %pram 

22-34d£ 

4%-4Kpram 

205-36&fts 

45-110dis 

par-5dis 

10*-I1%db 

4*-3*prera 

4*-3*prem 

3*-3%pram 

26%-awprem 

4%-3Hprvn 


Analysts fawn tite British 
building materials 5ecl0 L 5 f| 
off this weekend on a field 
trip to the big American 
interests of R edland, 
pilkington and Blue Ctroe. 
Some will visit also Mariey, 
Wolseley-Hughes and 
Costain. „ .. . . 

A trip of this kind is 
interesting for several reason 
- even before the analysts get 
their feet dirty. 

First, it is an unusual 
example of corporate co- 
operation. Redland was the 
first to come up with the idea 
but Pilkington and Blue Cir- 
cle Industries m'ftily jumped 
on the band wagon- BCI is 
also sending invitations to 
US analysts. 

Secondly, it shows a grow- 
ing awareness by companies 
of die need to show the City 
how they are spending 
money. „ 

Thirdly, the fact that they 
have businesses worth going 
all that way to see dem- 
onstrates the extent of their 
diversification away from the 
British building materials 
sector and their American 
earnings potential. 

Lastly, it indicates a more 
disciplined approach to the 
organizing of analysts’ trips. 
Brokers usually visit com- 
panies at their own initiative. 
The favoured broker often 
gains a valuable insight, thus 
making it difficult for others 
to comment usefully on their 
findings. 

Although issuing blanket 
invitations may detract from 
the immediate excitement, it 
is more worthwhile in the 
longer term. Shares in RMC 
Group have, for example, 
outperformed the market by 
more than 30 per cent since a 
trip to West Germany was 
organized last October. 

The week starts at Redland 
Worth in San .Antonio, 
Texas. Although this is un- 
doubtedly a good business 
interest, it may be over- 
shadowed by its parent's 
acquisition this week of 
Gens tar Stone for $317.5 
million (£320.5 million). 
Now, North American earn- 
ings should account for some- 
thing like a third of the group 
total. 

Moving on to Sherman in 
Texas, analysts will see 
Pilkington's glass manufac- 
turing and processing opera- 


tion. Libbey Owens Fori the 
largest supplier of 
motive glass in North Aide* 
ica. Pilkington is excited 
about the earnings potential 
of this business, ft'-wfo 
present the first set of resufe 
from LOF glass withjfi 
December's interim itsofe 
when it could account fct 
more than a ouar — *■ — 
operating profits. 

If American analysts jofa 
iheir British competitors fe i 
Atlanta on Friday, BO wig, j 
have to be on its toes tfitisftr ’ 
cope with their mats*. * 
oggrcsivc approach. BCI hfe t 
indicated already that -ft. § 
hopes to make about S8Q > 
million this year from its 0$ < 
operations, so moss of'thS'E 
information gleaned wiB bt 
by way of background, Ajv- 
alysts arc more interested iq 
the situation in Britain whete 
imports have reared 
ugly head again. 

Tottenham 
Hotspur 

**We hate TotteoL 
Hotspur" is the cry from 
Stretford End at TO. 
TrafforcL Bui Spurs 0 
hardly be liked much moor 
the City where its shares ha. _ 
never beaten the 1933 ^ Solu- 
tion price of lOOp. 

Yesterday's final results 
were predictably awful - g 
£730.000 pretax loss against g 
£653.000 profit the previous 
year, and a passed .feal 

Football was at at a lo* ebb 
last season, and Spurs suf 
fcred more than most. The 
Heysel Stadium riots meant 
that there was no European 
competition. 

The group is trying to 
reduce its dependence on the 
mercurial Glen Hoddle ef oj. 

It has moved into sportswear- 
marketing and book publbfc 
ing. while efforts are beir 
made to get the tumstil 
clicking faster at White Hart 
Lane, where overheads are 
being cuL 

All this should help, but a 
return to Europe would bet 
more valuable, and that tootof 
unlikely in the near- future. 
The shares remain a specu- 
lative punt at 73p, despite the 
attentions of Mr Irvin$| 
Brown, the American ; 
erty magnate, who has 
up a .14 per cent stake. 



\: 



UNIT LINKED INSURANCE INVESTMENTS 


These prices refer to Thursday's trading 


BU Otter Cftng YU 


401 . St Join 
01-837 0494 
LM Funds 
501*1*1 
Bwr 
OM 


London GC1V 4QE 


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ArakM 

Sqidmi 


Owl 

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Mil 
0«(X 

Bmpt Appi 

AMMETUK 
80 . Hoktartunl M. 
0202 292373 
Prepsitf Fund hie 
Do Acorn 
BMW R«J Homo 
Do Aoaan 
S HOW Fund 
Monw Fata 
Prep Fd Sw 4 

sryv 

Con* Sw 4 
Handy SV4 
ftna katkt Sat * 
Amman Snr 4 
Mi Inc Sar 4 
Maxad tea Sar 4 
Japan Sar 4 


10.76 11J 
1067 

110* 1475 
1261 T1.17 
10.4 
96 


116* 18.17 
1163 1103 
120* IB-72 
146* ISA* 
1199 14.73 
105# 
BOS 

129.7 1326 


-4LW 

-003 


-021 

3S 

-019 

4001 

-057 


Boomamoum BHS *AL 


200* 8175 
878.1 2926 
M.4 104.7 
1080 1U7 
2387 2400 
2107 2303 
218* 2816 
111* 1176 
3446 3*26 
1804 2086 
1866 3007 
17*6 1*4.1 
254.7 2*52 
ZBOJ 2905 
1106 11*2 
235.5 2476 


M6AN7LK 
3 Danaa law. Podars 
0707 *2311 
Em*V F0 4CC 
Eurocwan Fa Aoaan 
nxad ra Mx 
Old Moony Fd Ac c 
MUaiRta 
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88*4 72Q/4 
208 4 8172 
2924 3077 
2012 3116 
33*6 3520 
1009 1904 
2706 29*6 
1BB6 1*7.1 
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5076 *346 


-0 3 
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404 
+04 
401 
+02 
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-16 
416 
-15 
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-175 


-86 

-34 

-16 

+02 

415 

-02 

-Ol 

-21 

+04 

-36 


AU6B3 OWM AHURANCC 

AOAd Ortw AinniKS Swindon SNi 1EL 

0793-2*291 

Fhad hn Dap Acoan 2226 83a6 +06 

Eqdry Acoan B319 ok: -11.1 

PnXMtly Accun 3100 3327 +03 

Fm Eaat Acoan 1M5 1M6 *Z.i 

Manmd Capatf 30B.4 Ma 7 -4.1 

OOMOim 5007 537.1 -O* 

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’ Accun 3529 3715 -07 

•tom 1«M 17*6 -16 

Amar Plop Accun 12X6 1304 +06 

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237.5 2500 
1HI 1206 
1*15 1906 
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183.7 IB3.4 
1023 T07.7 
1705 1*76 
33*6 330* 
W2J0 1496 



Oar EaUun 
Smdar Ctfi 

HomSao Rd. London E7 9JB 


tana 440 
3706 390 A 

197.0 3076 
1746 1835 
2DB5 3906 
2342 34*6 
2**6 3106 

25*6 ms 

174 A 1B3B 
1«6 157A 
20*6 3104 
1*00 1BB6 
IBM 1776 
1506 1SS6 
1380 14*6 
1340 1306 
1946 305.1 
174* 184.1 
2126 2345 
1885 1905 
3315 3107 
2906 30*5 
2*4.1 34*6 
2086 2196 

1407 153.4 

1102 1246 

1QU 10*6 

94.0 996 


Go Edgad Accun 

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Japan SGan acc 2 
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• DO MW 
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SMcW 80 Accun 
Win T*cb Accun 

■ Do lnaai 

■LACK HORS* LM 


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1435 

1706 1796 
1204 1321 
128.1 13*6 
1076 1135 
19*6 1927 
1305 1427 
1*05 1806 
2146 2285 


-16 
+OI 
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+04 
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GANNOMAaBUBANCE 
l^Qjjmgc^Wto. WamMay. Middx HAS ONB 

Equayunta t*66V 

Propwty Unta E7IJ9 

EtoteJ BondfBme OH .13 4U2 

npp BuNVExac 22694 30*2 
an W EMC Una E3285 3467 


am Equay Accun 311.1 3295 
2nd Monmc/Acciim 2705 28*6 

2nd Property Aeon 2036 2153 

tod Maranao Acc 2356 2407 
tod DapoA Accun 173.1 1832 
2nd SB Accun 1721 102.1 
tod Amar Accun 2325 246.0 
tod M Minay Ac 1905 2079 
tod Wo Accun 1O0L6 1145 
2nd F«r Em Accun 184.7 2060 
tod Global Accun 965 1016 
2nd Euro Accun 1025 1086 
too Japui Accun 1105 7167 
2nd HUM Pans Ac 908 1024 
2nd Bun Pm Ac lOSD 111.1 

tod Japan pan Ac ika 121.1 

I5E SIF 1080 11*6 

Do 2 70* 766 


Sa«ry Nona. *00 AMiury BM. 

Crti Mkm Kaynaa MK9 2LA 
0906-809101 

Pioparty Fund 11*7 1516 

Money Fund 2230 2jkb 

Manapad Pud ms 422.7 

Equrty Fini 2466 5 klo 

Rood Mm Fbnd 1*0.1 M75 

Far EM Fund 21S* 2316 

nh Amar Fund i«5 1743 

NH R«UUR)M FuM 1446 161.0 

SUM Flag FWH 1236 1286 

PBR Fund 1ZL4 1296 

gJgaCALMBOr CAL jl 'T n tL ITY 
unBMATmAL 
Narrow Plate. Bnud BS2 OJH 
0272 290S66 


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-86 

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+56 

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BH OHar Cling Yltf 


Crown Brit to* A 4306 
Brawn EwAy <737 4936 

DBS Managua 1826 192* 

Growth Acouai 2086 2186 

CRUMBS! MUMMCE 
- M Surrey RH2 SBL 
! 42*24 


BVi 

M na n ra rl pari 


9*6 1014 
964 1036 
95A 1016 
934 886 
10*5 1106 
936 993 
1024 1075 

5&2 1007 
802 9S5 
9*5 1006 


-OS 

-Ol 

+0.1 

-16 

+16 

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-05 


«Mb tote Part 
UK OraonunDy 
Euro Gbporttnhr 
Nonh Amar opp 
FarEMQnp 
am Prop Stein 1 
am Prep Sanaa 2 
fixmm 
Cate 

lluaul t«— 

CAGLE STAR MURANCE 
BaOi Bora. Cto tonham. Qtouonar OUB 7LQ 
0342 521311 
Sacure Find 
ban Cup Fund 
Advanaraua Fund 
P uhau i au c a Fund 


102.1 1075 
1196 12*5 
1*15 1437 
1446 151.8 


+01 

♦Ol 

+14 

- 0.1 


EAGLE SIWVMDUNO 
1 1 nvaadnMda St London S3 
01-588 1212 

Eagto iMtad Unita 1487 154.1 

eaurrrouw 



CfWmOALIBBOH 
a HMuTa. 1 undarenUL EC3 
01433 7*00 
V*r Am ton (S) 
war Aim “ 


2872 


9824 

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231 J 233J 

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13*3 1363 

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87 A vno 

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1213 TZ17 

+02 . 


PnmuUK Eoidy 
Pitma- W&My 
P ilaw- P roper ly 
Fikna- FhadHmm 
Prim*- MtetLMud 
Mn*Can 


CONFBDBUIKMUFE 

S?-^SSf t,nfctfln,,0 " wc “ ,ME 

Manapad Fund 802.1 8387 

FiW 7*56 8055 

£20293 




Cro wn H too a. Wotong 0U21 ixw 

Uta Maaaaad Acc 3007 3226 -36 

Uta Site, Accun 2145 22*7 -09 

Ufa BWty Accun 3*3.4 3825 -86 

Uta MOW Accun 1775 1866 +05 

UtekjnTroaJAttsm 3768 3896 • -45 
Uta ted Accun S8&S ms -65 
Uta tagh too Acoan -3315 34*7 -6-9 

1014 1806 


0484 33377 
UK Equata Fund 4iu 
mramo Fund 3976 
Prapeny Fund 28*7 
nudMMtaMFM 2242 
auMK-Unkad Scs Fd 1024 
<*d Oapoan Find 1755 
nbi Amnca Amd 2285 
Far East And 27M 
Euopa Fond 22S5 
hnam an onM Find 2785 
Mead And 334.1 


*387 

41*6 

2754 

2376 

1077 

1804 

2465 

2330 

2375 

2929 

3*1.8 


^^DUkteoRHa 

UteCatfl Accun 1177 
UK Eq Accun 171.0 
SSHantanp Acoan 1*82 
UteFtead tel Accun rau 
Acc 955 
~ 1605 


+02 451 


-46 

-54 

+16 

-14 

-15 

-16 

+23 

-<25 

+09 

-06 

-25 


+ 1.1 

-06 

-15 

-1.4 


LMKOran Eq Acc «M 
LtaProparty Mam 1361 
OTA u i wonu r 

1 * 


1 Bond And 18*6 


or _ „ 

QT Plan tflgn VMM 1882 
QT Aao nSr East 22*5 
or nan Ngnh Anar 13*6 
QT Plan UK S OE 2367 
GT Han Wtortmida 2746 


10A 

1236 

1801 

1*86 

127.1 

1016 

15*3 

17*2 

I486 


S2M 7DJ 

1957 -06 

1900 -02 

2355 +85 

141.1 -*6 

2324 -36 

3833 -4.1 


..LMKOUFE 

Rond. Cnqoan CRB SBB 


UK 
Ftoa 
todn-Utew 
Caah DapcM 
propugr 

MsmaVltj 


Japan Snkr CcTa 
European 


1113 117.1 
1256 1324 
1074 113.1 
9*6 ioae 

1054 1J03 
100.4 1130 
1015 1086 
915 886 
13M 1406 
125-1 1317 
1106 1184 


CrouteMfc St OuUtert 
0892 31971 

ParthAo Fa A— 9 
Data* 

Do tew 4 
UK Equty 

S£r%? 

oa Piu» 

Do M 

Rxad M Dap 


987.1 

3924 4131 
1906 2007 
MU 14*7 
1094 1142 
ini4 ina 
M*6 1147 
1114 1174 
1597 180.1 
1426 1*96 


-09 

-21 

-06 

-03 

+ 0.1 

-07 

-06 

-06 

-05 


-47 

-2*B 

-46 

-26 

-16 

-t.t 

-15 

-1.1 

+02 

-16 

-15 


26, Prim p l Wales (toad. Bamaawuto 
020! 7B2I22 

Managed tend *075 4S9 .1 -24 

UM*y And 1857 1935 +05 

Ewtar And 3K-0 3306 -23 

Rud MBWI Find 1386 1+7.1 -05 

Proparty Fond 9125 2226 


-47 

-04 

-46 

-06 

+15 

-66 


Arearkm « Oanato 271J 2856 
toooroa 3366 3526 

tote m atoml qmto 
CapWRad 
Aaeoidry Rato 
Japan a Ganani 

OUARtoAM BOCAL EXCHMUE 
London ECS 



Da 

Dapaaiutaiw 

DoAoeua- 


.KpOE HaoMA PMhto m wwm 

2*. Fin • 

01-638 

High meant Am 


». Ftritoiay Souara. icndon ecza ioa 
S3* 5757 

2*16 20*6 -46 


BM Oflar dug CM 


oat Edgad And 
CapaaTOrowti 1 


Spatial Stuatona 
Nam A nnul Fund 
FuBaat And 
Maoagad And 
Dapoic Fund 
mnw HnPdandal 
Property And 
Managed Currency 
QKuaHaafli Cara 


*8-1 936 
23*5 2*85 
1*24 1926 
1236 1299 
2796 29*4 
2296 2427 
3826 3836 
2912 3096 
1405 1476 
1775 1086 
1285 1332 
1106 iiti 
1176 1245 


-06 

-35 

-26 

+26 

-06 

-26 

+37 

-31 

+06 

+05 

-38 


MLL SAMUEL UFE 

nlatowu : Anaacondw Hoad. Croydon 
01-088 4355 


isxr 

aam aU nnai Fund 
DotorFUM 
Caplnl Find 
ham And 
Property Senas ‘A’ 
Property Item 


“So? 1 


2*46 2574 
2382 2515 

2W7 2787 

W66 SOU 
2385 2816 
2862 3015 
2156 2275 
3495 3*87 
F*nd 2275 7X2 
Sam "A 1 2*45 27*5 

192.1 a25 
4815 4856 

287.1 2815 

171.0 1806 

3056 321.1 


Mmoad Unw 
HVlVWU Fund 
Money Sorias W 
Money Unha 

BqUJ Art _... 

Raad Hareat AM 1926 2026 
tedund Sacs Art 1045 1097 
Eunwaan Art 4327 4555 
rum Ftoa Fund 1444 1526 
Fw Am Art 38* 6 3884 
O m a aar Can Ftrt 2926 3086 
M St » Art 23*1 2466 
cureney Fine UBL2 W76 
Theft M37 1*15 


-17 

-16 

+04 

-08 

-07 

-27 

+15 

+25 

-04 

-16 

-1.1 

-26 

-20 

+02 

+05 

-30 

-25 

-OB 

+26 

+02 

-65 

+03 

-05 

-0.1 

-16 


IMFCMAL UAE OP CANADA 

HmW Uta noma, London Road, (UdfeMd 

0*83 571 2S5 


Grow* Art M 2517 2736 
IM IMdd IM 2*16 2536 
UnKUnkMiRrod W 2076 zi76 
unk Unkad S«o Cap 1876 178.7 
Unft Urkad Eq Fd 5454 574-1 
Unk Unkad Prop Fd 17*9 1855 


-16 

+16 

+06 

+0.1 

-20 

+31 


Longbow Home. 20. C Maua* St London EC1 
01-638 1731 


nop ModUtaS 1 2775 291.7 

Prop Modus* G«l 3846 4046 
Prop Mod QSi Sar 2 1776 18*6 
Prop Mod On Sar 3 177.4 19*7 
Bk* CMp Series 1 1805 2086 
Bk* CNp Sedan 2 3115 2073 
Bk* Crt Serin 3 31M 3273 
Managed Sanaa 1 9561 8927 
Mapagad Senes 2 toD4 274.1 
37 ! 2706 
2903 295-1 
13»6 1416 


Oort imaged 3 

aabrt Property 3 

QloMRndlAa 
Oabai Eqwqr 3 
sort Cuff 9 
Htoh Inc Series 3 
LAS mow 

jst 

031 

Art 

UK 


3201 330,9 
119.0 125L3 
8764 9194 


+96 

+ 12.1 

+56 

+25 

-15 

-16 

-16 

-02 

-05 

-Ol 

-46 

+04 

-OA 

-46 

♦0.1 

+3.7 


IUHUUP 

to^rtEkhtaBaini 


uSTWroi 


Naknai Rea Rid 


»52 228.7 
2+07 2808 
MSB 1975 
1403 148.1 
1987 1884 
»2 3075 
139 7 i486 
W64 2095 
846 086 
189.1 1796 
1145 1206 
725 876 
1035 1096 

U90M.B(KNKRALUNrf 

4MrtJ5jjW.tort.tate-> 

BtooSccLiM M 
Da Aram 
Cash MM 
00 Accorn 
Eu*r toteri 
Do Acoan 


H^lkOhnolOfly 


1026 1076 
UBS 1145 
037 1356 
T71J 1*06 
3794 3994 


Do Aram 
tedn-U*ed OB 
Do Accun 
WMW 
Oo Accun 
Me n eged tort 
□0 Aram 

LBQM. A QBMBUU. PROPWTY 

Si LradW earn 4TP 

01-248 9878 

L 4 Q (23) IBS 1M.4 

LONDON UFE 

109 Tmcaa SMWL BrUtoL BS1 SEA 
0272 279179 


S5-* *^7 

3016 3174 
955 1004 
1086 1146 
SMOTB 
3*00 3576 
2996 3157 

4006 4216 
mi 1*46 
2086 2196 


-63 

-16 

♦0.1 

-05 

-86 

-«6 

-05 

-15 

+07 

+4.0 


ISC 

+0.1 

+05 

-03 

+0.1 

-as 

+05 

-86 

-26 

-0.7 

-06 

-36 

-85 

-26 

-14 

-05 

-at 


391 

S3 


MMd Buck 


«l.l -11.1 

232.7 -55 

2306 +16 

m tsi 

33 

986 -27 

91.1 -84 

1027 +06 

1016 +OJ 

9*7 -16 

936 -15 

1046 -06 

9446 -107 

2*05 -87 

1775 +46 

1036 +05 

29*5 -46 

1305 -16 

MO* +06 


LOM 8 MANCHESTER OHCXIP * 

Jtturta ft*. GMer Era ids 
0392 E21SS 

torTriiat Cap- 3904 -03 

Da Aocun ‘ 45(6 
Property Cap ' 12X0 -06 


A 

to A 

w; 

■Hud A 
Index Slack A 
Inun m tato A 

fP 

..p 

p 

SUCk P 
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BU OHar Chng YU 


Do Accum 
Ftaed InuroM Cap ' 
Do Accum 

tntenuami Cap 
Do Accun 
gu Depose Cap 
Do Accon 
FtexMa Cap 
Do Accum 
Mcawynakar Art 
CapHOriMfli Art 


M*Q 


1445 

1425 

1076 

1946 

2286 

1886 

2106 

I486 

1706 

2386 

2905 

77? H 

705.1 


-02 

-1.4 

-16 

+62 

+04 

-06 

-06 

+ai 

-86 

-85 

-317 

+16 



EC3RCBO 


Hgpi YlaM Bond 
t™»i»*sd Gl Bd 
Intemadonal Bond 
Japan Bond Acc 
Japan an te Oo Acc 
U iiirail Donas 
Prop Bond Acam 
Hoc Band Accum 
F#uiy Bond Accun 


«»4 2084 
8445 2*86 
1073 1186 
1287 7352 
1381 145.1 
2155 2281 

53S5-665J5 
ACC 175.1 1846 
2915 3006 
129 .1 1388 

m* 2381 

1024 107.7 
2126 2235 


1165 121.1 
3526 3705 
2057 2160 
145.1 1525 
4115 4315 
2785 2904 
2746 2B78 
*805 


-15 

-06 

-03 .. 

. +74 .. 
+36 .. 
*02 .. 
+66 . 
+06 . 
+17 .. 
+86 .. 
+OA .. 
-82 .. 
+02 665 
-03 .. 
-06 .. 
-1S6 . 
-oo .. 
- 1.1 .. 
+02 .. 
+25 .. 


WWJteJrt Rd. Wa u+ a u BN1! 2DY 
0903 20(031 

UK Baity Ftrt 171.7 
DoAcoam IBIS 

Sped* She Art 131.7 
Oo Accum 1415 

Norin Amancen Fd 159.1 
Do Araan 1709 

ftert Barin Art 2*66 
Do Accun 3i«-0 
Had HaraH Art 1906 
Do Accun 3U5 
Property Art 1186 
Da Accun 1847 

Depaefl Fund 1182 
Do Aram 1216 

1725 
1885 


1806 

1935 

1387 

14S6 

1075 

1796 

302.1 

330* 

2007 

2187 

1225 

WJ3 

1196 

1200 

1014 

19*5 


Managed Art 3587 3723 




+15 

-15 

-04 

-05 

-86 

-36 

-65 

-6.7 

-09 

-1.1 

+07 

+06 

+ 0.1 

+OI 

-14 

-16 


Art* - 

tnueenmArt 

teur na flor m Art 


2ZH P 1 -* 

3273 3445 
1*86 1995 
1586 1*86 
3782 8981 


Lcrafto^aatoiFiSrcro^n 

2976 

191.7 

Monqr Market Brad 27 3.1 
Dopoah Art 2235 

Sf 

a* Managad 2E6B 

NdTOi American 1215 

Fte Eaal 2804 

MCUranoy 1885 

wngMALPROWO rtT _ 

-^aaraci! a ec*» am 

0*7523 4Q0D 

345.1 2586 
3B.1 9002 
271.J am* 
8182 2206 

295.1 SlOJ 
1226 129.1 
1*2.4 isblo 
1100 1156 
1876 1347 


UK L_ 

Oranaes EquOy 


+OI 

- 8 A 

-f.l 

+05 

-25 

-07 

-16 

-86 

+36 

+06 


-26 

-OS 


zsr 


-85 

-418 

+05 


PO Boa 4. WOriricn NR1 3NS 


21863 1859 
9085 5702 
315.1 3317 
1*7-1 207.5 
ISM 1345 
7346 


rtnigm FUnd 
MMrir AM 
Depot# fSV. 

s uaunu 

PEMLA88UUNCC 

H^totooni. WC1V 7B 


01-40 5 
terProg out 
Do Accun 
hw Emily 


FM Managed 


134.7 1415 

as a 2186 

SSI bob 

3787 3834 
3384 3575 


HVbn Sc. EC44 7ER 


3*45 3*36 
Hm Pnaanu Equky 3907 2876 

PROPERTY OROWTH 
uon Hra Croydon CR» 1LU 


01-990 
Aopsriy Art 

MXMV rm I Fun 

nd 

Monay FtotojM 


2981 

3916 

B85 

7945 

2583 

8*96 

1877 

1382 



Bug See Uta am 


+14 

+0.10 

+02 


+ 0.1 

+ 0.1 

-M6 

-a 8 

-45 


-82 


-7.1 

-89 

+ 0.1 

-SL5 

-AS 

-15 

-f.t 

+84 

+85 

+02 

+05 

-16 

-16 

-15 


-7.1 

+01 


ad OHar Cnag YU 


PftOUKKHCE CAPITAL 
30. IMrtdga Rd. W12 BPS 
01-7(0 nn 

AM Aram 10*3 1744 

kwirtAoc loss fti.r 
tewm a flonai Aram 1385 1324 
Managad Aram mo 14&5 
ftopony Aran 15*5 1989 
Money Acecm *95 945 
Spec* mu Accra) ii>.7 n76 
Japan ttCtete Acc 1116 117.1 
N Amar Aocun 914 985 
Photic Accun no 006 
Taehnotogy Aocun 10*5 1145 
Heart flu Aocun 516 546 
Japan Orem Aram 1776 197.7 
European Araan 636 976 

mamma mutual • 

25131. Meuff HB London EC2fl BB 

(MB 3232 

Managed Ord 2136 22*6 
MuuOtoHM 1*7,8 197.5 
E*W Ortl 2915 298.1 

EqiUtY toll 2+dJB 2596 

too5liWq OB Qrd 1«LB 1146 
Index Ltekad GBt M 989 10*5 
Oieu forty om 2(96 2*26 

maw 8196 2305 

1284 1365 

d 11Z7 1186 

Hxao tor QM 1362 1425 

Ftaed HUH 1187 1346 
Dapoaa Old 1216 1286 
Deport MM H89 1184 

PROVMCULUFE 
Stonge KmrtLC-tan. 


Art 


Far Eaat 


Ext™ toc ora Art 
OH Fund 20 


4316 4846 
1976 2074 
1986 2005 
4744 507.1 
2336 2476 

2326 2954 

3106 3207 
32*5 341.7 
2275 24T6 
3834 404.1 
2045 8176 
1737 1881 


-83 

*07 

-15 

-14 

+23 

+81 

-26 

-81 

-03 

-4.1 

+25 

-15 

-80 

-16 


-06 

-03 

+04 

+81 

-05 

-04 

-16 

-16 

- 0.1 

-02 

-OA 

-89 

+ 0.1 

+81 


-34 

+02 

-81 

-BB 

-14 

-45 

+174 

-87 

-86 

-89 

-87 

-24 


Whom Bare. ECM 2MH 
01-40* 9222 



flOVNLUPC H9URAHCC 

Htofta BJC 8 Usupeet LB9 3HS 

061427 (422 

Royal Start Raid 90*6 6SS4 -87 

Rcrt Uta Unk Unkad 
Etougad Art 2075 2182 -88 

Equay AM OKU 255.1 -86 

Property Art 1495 1576 +05 

jga ma aoatl Art 2974 3025 -89 

ftdfe Baste Art 1996 T7SJ -87 

Urtad Baiaa AM 1225 <296 -87 

OB tart 1524 19*4 -05 

Money Art IMS 1306 +05 

SAVE8PR09PBI 
TLAwDu^Aro LDOdonJECgM 2 QY 

SN'tev Raid 3716 3986 -02 

tea# Art A 2205 2335 +83 

Art 2729 2386 -81 

—rt BtofirRM W 6 m3 -15 

Property Art 546 576a +81 
AG Bond Art 906 965 -04 


Buwrtatwa n rae w a w i 

0709 *27733 


Managad 3721 

Deport 208' 


H 


7387 7715 -145 

' 3016 -82 

3025 -86 

2186 +81 
234.1 2494 +84 

2MJ5 3088 +05 

2314 -46 

1296 1385 +16 

3185 3846 +84 

1587 1*15 +1.1 


BU Oltar Chng Yld 


toOMM Aocun 
ncama Outo 


Stogapon ■ MM 
Stertar CoupataM 

Tokyo Fund 

IKEqnay 

CXM Wag'd Mod 
Equky PanawnCap 


Ml 384.1 
2880 2716 
2*84 2881 
8216 2326 
1181 1189 
297.7 3135 
3396 3*64 
3089 3184 
3281 34*4 
4836 5095 
8*1.7 2754 


SCOTTISH AMCABU 
1*0 St Vfacam St O to s gow 

0+1-24* 8323 

2336 30*4 
174.1 1*35 
2286 2*15 
Property 1337 1396 

Caah 1384 1436 

2296 5*16 


SCOTTISH EQUITABLE 

28 Si Ammo Sq. Bmkaflh BO 

oil *89 ran 

1016 1075 
924 97-7 
1014 1006 
1326 1394 
1195. 1846 
1506 1586 
1V74 1236 
1887 1996 

1*35 1716 


Caen 

Man-Linked 
Raao Ham 
Maed 


ssr 1 

Ti 


- 7.1 

-S4 

+06 

-82 

-16 

-107 

-76 

-75 

-56 

-114 

+06 


+86 

-26 

+05 

+ 0.1 

+04 


TYF 

+80* 

-86 

-14 

+89 

+08 

+26 

♦15 

-26 

+36 

-16 

-03 

♦14 


PO Bra 902. EdHxrti SflSSBU 
031*808 8000 


tea W 1 
htPdS 
to* AS 3 
tea Cart 
torad AM 
Eqrty Fund 

E SKMr? 


4*81 

4214 4486 
4121 4309 
1 M 6 1*96 
2350 2436 
2874 2817 
1425 1436 
2 * 0-1 2*26 


Ftaed Marat Ftrt 1786 1 BB 6 
hdmud Stack Art 1125 1185 
Caah Rund 1325 14011 


-27 

-87 

-29 

-87 

+ 8 * 

+16 

-24 

-07 

-03 

+81 


FroHahar Hra. Mdacne 
0703 334411 
M an aged Aram 
Eu«y Aram 
teunudonu Accun 

23S3 


Atagd 


TS 8 I _ 

NMEuropean 

ted Recowuy 
Odi Pho Aram 


Depart 


221-7 2335 
2275 2394 
2U6 287.7 

mo 1*24 

l«a 1887 
1226 1SB5 
1206 1334 
1*06 1584 
1384 I486 
1M6 
2081 2189 
1734 1026 
15*5 1*25 
189.1 1776 
1146 1205 
1874 1*81 


-16 

-16 

-06 

-85 

-16 

+02 

- 2.1 

-m 

-82 

-56 

-88 

-16 

+81 


EOHMltflQaaxZ 


sss 0 — 


MBS 3545 
187+ 1873 
4489 4736 ■ 
MU 3069 
20051360 
1155 1106 
1*84 1086 


+20 

+81 

♦46 

+17 

-46 

-06 

+81 


sponwiunL... 

^ M ,YE 


ftaed Werrat 
Index Uuud 


1136 

1*83 

1426 

1734 

2306 

1781 

1095 

104.1 

1125 

1689 


11*7 +82 

17758 +04 

1*818 -as 

1B76te -43 
2*3.1 +14 

1782 -45 

1180 -M 
10BJ7 +81 

1182 +81 
1985 -88 


SPSraiiflnwL 


Rw n 


Otaaguw 02 SHN 

9014 ea*5 


flam* Art 
Qrowth Am 
gogom^Art 

tope* Art ,nui 

OfelAFWtoRrt 1026 1035 
WirtJnlrt Fond 974 1026 
InMdertRaid 1 G 81 13.1 
Nor» Amaricao ft 1006 1117 
gMfc Hrt 1911 1919 

fWPWytart 1RZ6 1086 

j* nw t2 * J 

UK Snta 130.7 1375 


1145 1204 
tno 1276 
ag./ mo 

2S5* «»6 

2002 2188 


-84 

+85 

+81 

-05 

-16 

•04 

-16 

-81 

-76 

+01 

+86 

-06 


« 5 nnHPMw»fr 

oa^Boatote^BezrA 

Mart 1*56 15*4 -15 . 

tfltt 18*6 +83 . 

17*5 1846 -26 . 

w» See* S vJI ® • 

ted» Lkdrt 1087 1082 -06 

Cart 1186 1196 +69 

>1 1 ■ 

Bun ABanea hm. HoRdam. suaw 

0409 6(141 -™.wn» 

Itaragad Art 9*46 3736 
- ’Art 4482 4884 

Wares Fund »16 2944 

Utart AM M96 1*76 

Property Fund 
anunaaa rt Art 
N Amerton am 


to a ma BBrt Bond 
WoridiriOa Bon* 


2704 3M6 
3304 *476 
1147 U8X8 
1704 1784 
1736 1825 




15 347 


-25 .. 

:: 

« :: 
& :: 

4! 

-813 .. 
+0-1 063 




SUN UAE OP CANADA 
254. Codupnr SL EW1V SBN ' 
01-830 5400 

Grow* Account 7336 ' 

Manafiad Account 3181 

Etotar Aranni 3182 - 

Mage Ftrt Accum i994 1185 
EqUM Art Accon 2337 2496 
gep Art Accun 1484 180 
Raad tat ft Ace 1825 MOJ 
-kri Art Araan 771 a 29t( 
Money Art Aocun i286 1354 
todteUWScaAcc IMS 1ML2 
Pare Pens Accorat 7*7.1 

ftoa ttnga Accauai 357.1 3796 
— 111.1 TIM 


Pam Propaity 
Pant ftrt M 


toSSiM 



Pena 

XMUPCUNir 

a^Mtetortaa BftaW B899 7SL 
0272 42*911 

Managm Accun 4116 43U 
Pmpsny Acorn 2KS 2259 * 
Eqrty Aram 5339 5*84 
Ftouf fell Accum 191.6 2017 

JMBfrUnkaa Aocun nos ii*5 
CiKI Actual 1806 1984 ' ' 

Artr Earty Aram l£j 1975 
US torts Accum 132.7 139.7 
-tapnn Aram 2396 25i6 
ftdfc Arana W19 1294 • 
Far Eastern Accum 4216 4*46 
JWfWtonN Acorn 3786 3989 
US Mar Aram 989 1042 
YW Aram 1325 1395- 

Bm Cw Aram 1175 1336 
M 1736 183-1 


TMIUFEUD .-g - 

*mna Home- Andrear. Hanto. 9PW 1*0 
08*4 587M 

Manapa d Raid 1«.7 1437 -« ■' . 

Propony Hnd 1«5 12B7 +01 .- . 

ftand teurea Art 1205 1275_ =05 

Monp Art 1176 1234 - +« t-‘ 

Brty tart 1836 ms -as 


TtepuNcM«.OnMhcnmfload.A yirt i »y N rtl 
Aytartwy (Q2B8) *8(1 


Oommuty 


SSd 


GUd 


1181 1196 
726 787 
933 983 
1681 1835.. 

523 55.1 
1880 W 6 + 8 ! 
(ft (876 


+81 


+05-.. 


kSey * Singapore 

(tenansd Ctarancy 
1 Prop 


sas 

946 996 

9846 4*8. 1 "Jf"-.' 

@as 085 +04 ■' 

M36 M83 
ISl 1415 +8* - 

*+7..t *ma -M 

an 




TVMMLL A*9U(W4CC 
lO CT reynga Wd. Brteto 
0272 

3016 
*016 
334.7 
1997 

mA .. ■ 

488.1 

pwNlRM 22*4 . 

U K^uty *12.1 2235 

N A meri ca n Equay 198* 1*76 

2815 382 

W23 006” 

124.1 1307 

M4 IMS 
3*09 2*47 
ISM 2097- 
106 1196 
. 2175 3287 
2235 S9M 


-26- 


Par Eaat Ertty 
ftrt 


IB H 


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-2d 

+w 


taepany 


Sar Mu z 

sisg! 

aw ungas 


M 



01-809 80* 

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SSW” 3S93S 

ft 185.1 1818 


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sir:: 


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tec AM '2956 2(75 













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1 |fa«ed £ 
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. vj. 


■THE TIMES SATURDAY OCTOBER 4 1986 


STOCK MARKET REPORT 

mco shares rise on talk of 
bid by Tan Sri Khoo 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


COMMENT 


®y Michael Clark 


Shares of E«m * 

national, foe moiwy whal 2? ^PP™ 10 

and financial servioL 2? kcr rates - Pnces continued to drift 
rose Sp to 228p in ate- hSlS on **“* of .“Jerest, with dcal- 
trading yesterday TSSi “?.> ^ponrag only minimal 
peculation that foe selling pressure as the first 

BelzburefeEShfESS week ofthe account drew to a 

rased their houimln c L 0se ‘ ^JZ “4^ of 30 
company to above lffrJt* _ scares manag e d to close above 

Dealers ShL ^ »»swora levels oftfae day, 110 
could dear thevravfr^f t S 1 ? *»*«» tow* at 1,234.0. The 
KhooTak broader-based FT^EIOO lost 

full bid AD eyes are now focused on 

Khoo is E*cnv2Ll?i..?? “* mon *V supply 


£5°° K E®»* biggest share- 
SfijvJS 67.85 . mfljjjcm 
22S. (2 5' 97 P^r cent) and he 

bas a seat on the 

board. Previously, he had 

ESJu” 1 ^enalting to the 
woo board that he would not 

his ^ “32 

company - or bid - unless 
someone else built up a hold- 
. more .rban 1 0 per cent 
During the summer, the 
Belzbuig femily emerged as 
mg buyers of Exco and. 

• Ne ws this week the 
acquisitive Mr David Abell’s 
Snter had more than don- 
Ued its holding to 24 per cent 
m Thennax, the tonghened 
glass m a nufact urer, has cer- 
tainly created a few ripples 
among speculators. There is 

now talk that a bid of 1 70p 

a share is on the way, raining 
the L/S/Vf -quoted group at 

nearly £20 million. Thennax 
was unchange d at 136p. 

£rough their own company. 
First City Financial Corpora- 
tion. amassed a stake of 8.9 
per cent. Mr Bill Matthews, 
the managing director of Exco, 
has been quoted as saying ihat 
the Belzberg family regarded 
their holding as an 
investment 

Exco is curently valued at 
£533 million — well within the 
finandal grasp of someone 
like Tan Sn Khoo. Earlier this 
year, he emerged as one of a 
group of overseas business 
men who helped Standard 
Chartered to fight off an 
unwanted, £1.3 billion bid 
from Lloyds Bank. He stDl 
owns a 5 per cent stake in 
Standard and has since joined 
the board. 

The rest of the equity' 
market remained in the dol- 
drums, still waiting to see 


of the Imperial Group earlier slipped 7p to 276p. 


this year. Last mgm mere was grow- 

THF beat off fierce ram- ing speculation that Extel, 


shares man a g ed todose above . " j ?j| 

as worst levels of the day, 110 n : : ‘ '.■: fe 

points lower at 1^34.0. The • • • r 

broader-based FT-SE 100 lost s& \ ; ' ' r "jy - " ■ 

113 at 1,5608. / • • v V- 

AD eyes are now focused on 
next week’s money supply r-J. ■' 

figures which are expected to 82 IV'-ir '" " ' *'■ - 
decide whether interest rales ’Wr. ■ ■ ' • • •• ' 

wfll remain unchanged or jam feb mar apr ma 

ciunb. But most economists | 

now appear convinced that a 

rise of at least 1 percentage Group's restaurant and hotel 
point in hank hay rates to 1 1 chain had been referred to the 
per cent is inevitable. Monopolies Commission. 

This was underlined by THF bad already agreed with 
another shaky performance by Hanson Trust on a price of 
sterling in the foreign ex- £192 million for the chain of 
change market where the Bade 61 Happy Eater restaurants, 
of En gland js thought to have 30 Anchor Hotels, five Wet 
once again lent hs support. come Break motorway service 
It continued to lose ground areas and several Imperial 
against the German mark, but Inns which Hanson inherited 
made up some ground against after its £2.1 billion takeover 
a weak dollar rising, by about of the Imperial Group earlier 
three-quarters of a cent to dnsyear. 

I.44I0 following the latest US THF beat off fierce ram- 
unemployment figures. Its petition from Sears Holdings, 
trade-weighted index rose 0.1 Ladbroke, Whitbread and 
to 68J2 after dropping to a Scottish & Newcastle to clinch 
fresh low earlier in the day. the deaf. It was also the 
Gilts looked a little more group’s first major acquisition 
composed after this week’s since Mr Rocco Forte was 
sharp falls. Rises of up to £% appointed chief executive by 
were recorded at the longer his father in March, 1983. 
end. Hanson Trust also reacted 

Boots firmed 3p to 22Sp on badly to the news, sliding 3p to 
revived bid hopes and heavy I84p. 
ran option business. There Mr Robert Maxwell, owner 
was talk that Hanson Trust of the Daily Mirror ; has again 
had been increasing its hold- been buying more shares in 
ing in the company and both McCorqnodale, the specialist 
Alexanders Laing A. printer, which is currently the 
Cruickshank and de Zoete & target of an unwanted, £145 
Be van were reported to be big million bid from rival Norton 
buyers. Ale xander s is known Opax. He has bought 850,000 
to have acted in the past for shares, lifting his total holding 
Mr Gerald Ronson’s Heron in McCorquodale to 3.85 mD- 
Corp. Don shares, or 7 J per cent. 

But Lacas Industries spent a Mr Maxwell's interest in 
nervous day, felling by 1 lp to McCorquodale has been 
500p following an article in heightened following recent 
this column yesterday talk that the Extei Group, the 
hi g hli ghting the loss of part of news agency and publisher of 



30 Anchor Hotels, five Wd- a lot more for his stake in 
come Break motorway service McCorquodale than the 266p 


petition from Sears Holdings, 
Ladbroke, Whitbread and 
Scottish & Newcastle to clinch 


the deal. It was also the prelude to making a full Wd 
group's first major acquisition next week. Norton Opax was 


since Mr Rocco Forte was 
appointed chief executive by 
his father in March, 1983. 


Hanson Trust also reacted Horizon Travel,. the package 
badly to the news, sliding 3p to tour operator. Mr Ron 
I84p. Brieriey, the New Zealand 

Mr Robert Maxwell, owner business man, has again been 
of the Daily Mirror ; has again topping up his bolding 


had been increasing its hold- been buying more shares in through his Hong Kong-based 
ing in the company and both McCorquodale, the specialist IEP Securities, a subsidiary of 
Alexanders Laing A printer, which is currently the International Equity. He now 
Cruickshank and de Zoete A target of an unwanted, £145 speaks for 7.8 million shares - 
Be van were reported to be big million bid from rival Norton 15.64 per cent of the equity, 
buyers. Ale xander s is known Opax. He has bought 850.000 The ambitious Mr Brieriey 
to have acted in the past for shares, lifting his total holding is currently bidding £258 mil- 
Mr Gerald Ronson’s Heron in McCorquodale to 3.85 mD- Don for Ocean Transport and 
Corp. Don shares, or 7J per cent. Trading — down lp at 232p — 

Bat Lucas Industries spent a Mr Maxwell's interest in and has also built up a holding 

nervous day, felling by 1 lp to McCorquodale has been of about IS per cent in 
500p following an article in heightened following recent Ultramar, the oil exploration 
this column yesterday talk that the Extei Group, the group, 2p lower al 161 p. 
hi g hli ghting the loss of part of news agency and publisher of Now Mr Brieriey has 
a contract to supply the A320 financial information, was bought 937,500 shares (6.4 per 
Airbus with generators. thinking of becoming a while cent) in Menders, the indus- 

Trnsthouse Forte, the hotel knight. trial paints supplier. Manders 

and leisure group, was a dull Mr Maxwell is considered a responded with a jump of 1 4p 
market, felling lOp to !48p possible bidder for Extei and to 305p. 
after learning that its proposed has built up a 25 per cent Last year, he rescued Tozer 
purchase of the Imperial holding in the company. But Kemsley A Mfflbomn, which 


... then paid £i 10 million for the 
Kenning Motor Group. But, 
LTS within foe past few weeks, be 

■ i2-5 has reduced his holding in 

isssasa. 1 Imperial Continental Gas, the ' 

I ft government! subjectdfta tense bid spemb- 

§ J tion, from 23 to 1.3 per cenL 

, Shares ofIC Gas slipped 2p to 

j 491p yesterday in spite of 

.■ suggestions that a bid of 525p 

; » isontheway. 

Crusts, die USM-quoted 
restaurant chain, rose 5p to 
; 105 I05p after an agreed bid of £8 
million from Kennedy 
. -jo Brookes, the Mario & Franco 

and Wheelers restaurant and 
hotel group. _ _ 

JUN JUL AUG SEP OCT *- 5 . famriy Brpoto b ogh- 

Sam mg six ot Us snares tor every 

11 Crusts. The deal values 
he is prevented by the Take- Crusts at 1 14p a share. Ken- 
over Panel from making a foil nedy Brookes, unchanged at 
bid until April next year. Any 21 Op, has already received 
mereer between Extei and acceptances from the board of 
McCorquodale would dilute Crusts for 4.1 1 million shares, 
his holding and thwart any or 62J9 per cent of the totaL 
planned bid. Mr Maxwell paid News of foe deal foiled to 
a lot more for his stake in upset some of the regional 
McCorquodale ih?n the 266p breweries which had been 

currently being offered by - - - 

Norton Opax, butdespite this, # The Labour Party's pro- 
*■« of McCorquodale posals to renationatize British 
slipped 7p to 276p. Telecom at its original 

Last mglu there was grow- offer price of 132piTh is re- 
mg speculation that Extei, mraed to power at the next 
down 2p at 343 r had also General Election is still giving 
been buying McCorquodale cause for concern in the 
shares m the market as a market. The price - now 
prelude to making a fuD bid standing at a low of 178p- 
nexlweet Nonon Opax was hridsttsady yesterday despite 
unchan^d at I36p. Wood Mackenzie, the bro- 

Stak e-building was also tw piiwnp jJS shares 
good for a Ip rise to J21p in m behalf of one big seller. 
Horizon Travel,. foe package 

M*L ? on tipped as possible candidates 
Bneriey, the New Zealand for Kennedy Brookes, 
business man, has again been Buckley'S Brewery, in which 
topping up his bolding rival Whitbread owns a 17 per 
through his Hong Kong-based 1 cent stake, closed 5p better at 


Grand Metropolitan 
takes to the bunker 


would dilute 


£192 million for tire chain of his holding and thwart any 
61 Happy Eater restaurants, planned bid. Mr Maxwell paid 


currently being offered by 
Norton Opax, but despite this, 
shares of McCorquodale 


Last night there was grow- 


down 2p at 343p, bad also 
been buying McCorquodale 
shares in the market as a 


unchanged at I36p. 

Stake-building was also 
good for a Ip nse to !21p in 


Grand Metropolitan is in a situa- 
tion that cannot go unresolved. The 
predators have been gathering for 
some while. We know that Mr Charles 
Knapp and a group of American 
backers have been dabbling specu- 
latively in Grand Met shares with one 
hand and offering a £900 million deal 
to buy Grand Met's prestigious Inter- 
continental Hotels chain with the 
other. 

The multi-millionaire Mr Alan 
Bond has been quietly extending 
feelers behind the scenes about widen- 
ing his Australian drinks interests 
further in Britain. Were Grand Met 
amenable to the idea he would be 
delighted to do a deal. Were it not he 
might take a share of the spoils along 
with others in a break-up exercise. 

More -intriguingly, those who claim 
to know these things say that a bank as 
blue-blooded as Schraders is believed 
to be tallting to a number of parties. It 
may at this stage be a little early to de- 
scribe it as a consortium, but time will 
no doubt telL 

Not surprisingly, the City feels it 
can detect a bunker atmosphere 
developing at Grand Met HQ. The 
announcement that a new chief 
executive is to be appointed, splitting 
the roles now played by the chairman. 
Sir Stanley Grin stead, merely con- 
firms this view, as does the suggestion 
that the ace adman and takeover 


specialist Tim Bell is being recruited 
to the team. 

The difficulty faced by Sir Stanley 
and his team is that there is a yawning 
gap between the market worth of 
Grand Met and the values of the 
companies inside the group. 

The wines and spirits division, 
reckoned even by its competitors to be 
directed with masterly skill, is alone 
worth perhaps £1.7 billion, or getting 
on foe half the current capitalization 
of the whole group. 

After the Elders bid for Courage, 
Watney Mann and Truman, the 
brewing operations, plus more than 
6,000 public houses, must be worth 
£1.4 billion. Intercontinental Hotels is 
a unique property. If Mr Knapp will 
offer £900 million for the privilege of 
getting round the table, a sale price of 
over£l billion should be comfortably 
attainable. 

Throwing in some excellent US 
operations, which are producing low 
returns as yet but have great growth 
potential, it is not over-egging the 
pudding to reach a value of £5.8 
billion for the Grand Met treasure 
chest. Netting off debt would suggest a 
break-up value of 580p per share. The 
yawning gap which exists between 
that and the share price of 42 Ip is 
rather too uncomfortable for most 
major shareholders to stomach. 


Jam today. Boots tomorrow 


TRADITIONAL OPTIONS 

re 



EQUITIES 


ipi 

sSSl 


AHod Lyons 
C30S) 


nn Durnin w 

Hughes food (21 
1B8+1Z Local Lon Gp 
8-1 . L MB Cato & Cfl 
68 Marina Dev (11 
160 MBter & Sa 


08 
23'a 
159+9 
93 
83-2 
142-1 
73 
158-3 
fl7»4 
143 
254 
*937«+>« 
68 
38 42 
140 


PjB Securities, Down, de Boer 
& Duckett Mr Christopher de 
and MrJoJm MacArthnr 
me deputy chairmen, Mr 
WQUam Smith is nuik man- 
aging director and Mr Simon 
Qeeg, Mr Mraray Pnllea, Mr 
Nicholas Chamberkn, Mr 


RIGHTS ISSUES 


Boots N/P 
Brou g growe N/P 
Christy Hunt FTP 
Comtoch Fin N/P 
Goodhaad Print N/P 
Lsisurstbiw N/P 
New Cl Nat Res F/P 


New Ct Nat 
Thurgar N/P 
Tioury N/P 

Tlphook N/P 


(Issue price ki brackets}. 


LONDON TRADED OPTIONS 


Tratatasr House 






in 

LH 


pp 

nil 




F H 

WHOM 


bski 

si 

ium 



uil 



Jfrfatr 

500 

58 

77 90 

18 

23 

30 


550 

30 

48 60 

33 

42 

50 


600 

12 

23 — 

70 

75 


Thom EMt 
(*455)' 

420 

480 

50 

27 

82 75 

42 57 

4 

22 

10 

25 

18 

32 


500 

550 

12 

5 

23 35 
10 — 

47 

100 

47 

100 

55 

Tosco 

330 

75 


1 


_ 


360 

28 

38 50 

13 

22 

27 


420 

IS 

25 33 

32 

mim 

Sb 


APPOINTMENTS 


Donald Duffy, Mr 
Cnstarri and Mr Langdou 
Stevenson become directors. 

Rugby Portland 'Cement: 
Mr C P Jackson joins the 
board. 

IT Institute at Cranfidd: 
Dr Allan J Fox becomes 
managing director. 

Metcalfe Cooper Mr Heath 
Mason joins foe board. 

Jardine GlanviU: Mr David 
H3i becomes a director and 
chairman of its energy re- 
sources division. 

Streets Finandal Market- 
ing: Mr Jonathan Mitchell is 
made a director. 

Bain Dawes: Mr Stephen 
Henderson becomes a direc- 
tor. Reinsurance Worldwide 
Division. 

American Express Bank: 
Mr Michael C L James is 
elected senior vice-president 
and national treasurer. 

VaDn Pollen: Miss Caroline 
CecD becomes an associate 
director. 


MONEY MARKET 
AND GOLD 


Owing Banks 10 
Fhunca Kousa 10 


1 19p — just 5pshy of its peak 
— while JA Demush held 
steady at 177p. 

The rest of the drinks sector 
remained mixed. Grand 
Metropolitan, still waiting to 
find out foe identity of its new 
chief executive, recovered an 
early 3p fen, to close 3p higher 
at 421 p. The group is bong 
tipped as the next candidate 
for a “mega-bid.” 

Analysts have already cal- 
culated that foe break-up 
value of this leisure, brewing 
and hotel group, which in- 
dudes Watney Mann and 
Truman, is worth more than 
hs present stock market value 
of £3.5 bflDon. 


Bonar Cole Polymers: Mr J 
A Hay is made marketing 
director. ■ 

Freight Transport Associa- 
tion: Mr Tony Stanton joins 
the national executive board. 

Reader’s Digest Associa- 
tion: Mr Robin Hosie and Mr 
Andrew Lynam-Smith join the 
board. 


Waiting for jam tomorrow is fine, but 
hoping for caviar maybe the day after 
can bring unacceptable risk. Occa- 
sionally, however, the City delivers 
unusually severe verdicts on directors 
who are prudently developing cor- 
porate strategies. None has been 
treated more harshly than Boots for 
attempting a major acquisition which 
could transform its prospects in as 
little as five years. Like Grand Met, 
Boots management finds itself at bay 
before an impatient pack of City 
hounds demanding instant results — 
or dismemberment. 

There is a paradox in this. In the 
run-up to Big Bang, nowhere is the 
concept of paying a price to become a 
player in the game more clearly 
understood than in the City. Millions 
have changed hands in the corporate 
jockeying for lavourable positions on 
October 27. But as to profit, it is 
widely recognized as becoming a 
scarce commodity for a year or two. 

There was something akin to a 
shareholders’ revolt when Boots 
adopted a similar approach.; in its 
strategic ambition to become a signifi- 
cant player in the huge United States 
drugs market That market represents 
28 per cent of the world’s 
pharmaceutical sales, compared with 
Britain’s 3 per cent Moreover, it is. 
one free from government interfer- 


ence in pricing and, in terms of profit 
is even more important that the 
figures suggest 

Boots has some potentially money- 
spinning drugs coming through the 
long development and licensing pro- 
cess and had to decide on the best way 
to maximize the benefits to the 
company. The anti-arthritis treat- 
ment. Brufen. became the best selling 
drug in the US. 

The new drugs have great potential 
too. Flosequinan is due to make an 
entry in three or four years’ time on 
the US market for heart and hyperten- 
sive drugs, which is worth more than 
$2 billion. This and two or three more 
promising products will be distributed 
through the new US acquisition, Flint, 
which caused the furore in the City. At 
S555 million, it was not cheap and will 
give rise to some modest earnings 
dilution this year. But without a US 
sales force and distribution network. 
Boots would again be forced to part 
with the bulk of the benefits to others. 

Success in pharmaceuticals is elu- 
sive, but die pay-offs are massive. 
Boots’ critics should remember that 
Glaxo went through a spell of dis- 
enchantment in the City during the 
late 1970s when its shares were the 
equivalent of 37p. Now they are over 
£9. Perhaps Boots shares, at 228p, are 
good long-term value too. 


Yo 


P° 


l» 


Stria* Onto J* Dee 


25 38 43 11 15 19 


5 


65 78 90 11 17 2| 

35 45 57 30 40 4fl 

15 2S 35 70 73 80 

33 47 60 22 -28 33 

13 2S 38 55 57 8® 

x 12 _ 103 103 — 


Prim Bank BVs (Discount *4 
imnth 10’i*9*i 2 ror*i iWlO^w 
3 ninth IflPw-lOX 6 moth 1QK-10X 

Trad* BSa (Diccoucn %) 

1 mnth 10' ’» 2 ninth ill* 

3mmh 11*w Smnth 11 X 
MHtwakC*) 

Ovamtaht open 2* dbsa 7 
1 WMR9K4- S mnth 11 * w10»w 

1 mnth 10K-10U Bmnth 11X-11 

3 mnth 11-1054 12mth ll^w-ll'ie 

Local Authorfty 0 *po»R»(%) 

2 days W. 7 days s% 

1 mnth 10X Smith 10% 

Bmnth 10% l2mth 10% 


Local Authority Be 
imnth 11 %-m 
3 mnth 11%-m 
9 mnth 11%-llX 


Staffing CDs (%) 

1 mnth ID^g- 1 (Pi a 
BmMh 11-10% 
DoSarCOtrU 
imnth &S5&S0 

6 mnth 5-8S-5-BC 


2 mn&i 11%-IIX 
G truth 11 %-m 
12 rath 11 K- 11 X 

3 mnth 10%-IH 

12 rath 11 - 10 % 

Smith 5556J0 
12mth &Q5-&00 


EURO MONEY DEPOSITS % 


trim Watr Mar Jon Nov Har Jan 

200 20 27 33 4 9 13 

213 10 — — 12. — . — 

238 3 — — 24 — — 

240 — 10% 13 — 34 40 

255 


DoBar OH 6K-5K 

7day* 5«»£X Imth 5“.#- u *i 

3mnth5*»5«« 6 mnth 

Oo o t ad hwrafc cd 5-4 

7days 4 ?m4»m Imnth 4)^4% 

3 mnth 4%-4ft 6 mnth 4>»-4’» 

Franc cal 8-7 

7 days 9%-9% Imnth 9Vr9 

3mntfc9%3« finvith 3%-S% 

Swtea Franc cat 2%-1K 

7 days 4mth¥^"n 

SrrWh 4V4. 6 mnth 4%-4 

Yen call -5%4K 

7 days 5*4% - irnnh.54% 

3 mnth 54% 6 mnth 4%-4% 


llau Cafe 

mot- rto ■Wf 


1525 63 

75 

mmm 

550 45 

60 

78 

575 34 

47 

60 

600 24 

35 

50 

B25 14 

23 

40 

650 • 8 

17 

32 

675 3 

12 

23 

700 2 

6 

16 


GofctS436J5043TS0 
Knnenand* (par ednt 

S4fflj»438m(E3ofs(Mdaa9 

^ovoniigna'tneWfc 

S 1 M.0CM Q5JM (£72.00-72.75 ) 

Ptatmun 

SS 0450 0 * 2025 ) 
‘ExdudttVAT 


The Bank of England chose 
not to aDot any Treasury Bills 
at the regular Friday tender 
yesterday. 





• •/ 

\ ■. * - 



' - ■ ■ 


Instead of tucking your money away r^ularly in 
an ordinary savings account, may we suggest a much 
more interesting proposition? 

Equity & Law's new Multivestor portfolio. • 

It almost certainly contains the kind of tax- 
efficient savings plan you need right now. 

Whether you want a healthy return over just 
ten years or in the longer term. 

^ However it also contains 
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MULTQ/fsiOR like, L to need in 

1/r They cover everything 

Jr from school fees to pro- 


viding a virtually invincible tax shelter which you can 
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And with a wealth of options and bonuses, com* 
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Talk to your broker or ■ 

to your financial adviser fyjfpl | 

to find out more about ’wLJpiy 

Multivestor from Equity _ ■ 

& Law. Or contact our EC|llily&LdlW 
Marketing Information 

Services on 0494 33377. Profit from the Future. 



MULTIPENSION. MULT1PLAN. LOW-COST HOMEBUYERS PLAN. RETIREMENT SAVINGS SCHEME. UNIT TRUSTS 
EQUITY & LAW LIFE ASSURANCE SOCIETY PLGAMERSHAM ROAD. HIGH WYCOMBE, BUCKS HPrt 5AI 































BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


THE TIMES SATURDAY OCTOBER 4 1986 


THE TIMES UNIT TRUST INFORMATION SERVICE 


Ota Chng YW 















ill 



--L* 1 ai 

. T* 

"•-L'B ■ •! 1 





7 t|L| 


SSTSem. 

DO tecum ffo 

•tm nnl 

Do teeun (3) 

h* Wc g) 

Da taw fa 
C9PUBMIMB 

izs. wp Heftem. 
01442 IMS 
C8 JatMftwd 


BW OHgr Omg 'flb 


x&i Eau .. uo 
208.7 m 2 -sa aan 

3336 3G03 -S3 MO 

3S0 10U . . 4J1 

1743 1530 .. *JS 

1ES43 132.1W Q.7B 

1873 1747 OJB 

£11.81 1234 .. 274 

£1237 13. M .. 214 

LM* WC1V W 

8*3 88* -S3 02* 


Eivopun Inc o me 

FtaneU fua 


PSM«BIHBirwMU»8 
gf-SB »■ Gtagm 

041322 3132 

DJKi Mi l OSi toe 42.1 4 

Do teeun <19 4 

Income Q0> lac 399 4 


fi«S Ollor Dug vis 


817 848 +t9 280 


BM QMr Ding 1*0 


Old Ota Cnng YW 


Bd OBV CMg YV3 


1. DtnpcWta- tawy. HAS ana 
01402 687B 

OHM) 2723 3983 429 838 

tan 3174 3379 +24 383 

ta Eta 2227 2969 -23 023 

North American 1413 1903 -17 on 

OeM 433 91.7a +09 038 

Brawl 527 HI3 403 1.33 

Japan 979 8UW -17 090 

CAPS. HMtatl ■U39MW1 

PO Boa 551 Bate MBia London ECS 7JQ 

non oo«i 

3929 3709* 


271.4 2909 

CATS* AllCN 

1. tag IVtalll 6c. EC4N 7AU 

01-8236314 

am Trun 829 bo# -191294 

CCHTRAL BOARD OF taA N CT OF 

CHURCH OF EMU*) 

2 Fora Sam London EC£Y6AO 
01-988 1315 

WvRmd 4104 • ..494 

Arad H 1404 . .. 993 

D+poM 11A0 .. 9.70 

CHASE IHMKATTAN RMPMANMSte 
TZfQBi ngp v* Straat London EC2V SOP 

S 8 C SpadM 3CB 686 SIS ..086 


CLBKALMtnCALIMTTRUS? 

HANAOBRS 

ta rara tan . Btaol BSZ QJH 
0800 373383 

Arara Omfi S3 249 +03 190 

Eauay tail mean* 417 4440 +01 470 
Bnopwi OmWi 297 319« +07 290 

Omni Equty 378 409 +02 2.70 

® 3 Arad W OH 279 S7 -03 30a 

ans nod me 229 23 . ora -09 bjo 

tadte Securam 248 259 -09 2.40 

japrai O rate 316 35.7 -19 090 

MgroeGSi 239 213 +ai 230 

COUNTY unMMAOBIS LTD 

EwnlM 479 60S +08 198 

Bora Incoma 1589 16804 +19 157 

RnaneW 1615 1780 +-19 297 

OB StraWo* 59.0 588 -09 2.18 

Grant, tmmtmH 270 2919 *04 298 

weoma a awn 399 419 . . 471 

Jepunere Date 1968 20990 -69 088 

te Anrar Grown 90.7 1089 *18 188 

M Rrm 1148 1219 +09 IS 

taata CO-3 2969 2199 +12 263 

BtoMtaTM 593 6374 -0.1 645 

SpaCM Ska Ace ZSI 207.7 +08 182 

CROWN UMTTTOST SBWCE 8 
Groan Houaa. Nwm 0121 IXW 
0*892 5033 

Htfi ineoora Trura mi 244.04 -03 698 
Grown Tnm 212.7 2279 +19 316 


Dtatal SOi toe 43.1 4590 -03 190 

Do Aeaan <19 4074 -0.1 . . 

taconOabc 39.5 428 .. 590 

_ Do Aeon 419 448 . . . . 

Sataa Co's Inc 49.1 529 .. 190 

Do Aaaan «£ 527 .. .. 

WBIW WM 8 I law— MB 

RM RMk. Tontrtsca. INS IDT 
0732 381144 

Anrancan 986 tool +1.7 087 

tear Emray Wearne 328 359 +04 *9 

Anar Spaces Ska Ml 5*2 +07 1.43 

Auaata 209 S3 -02 087 

Cuuo ae n 43.1 «sj? +ae aoo 

Fkr Eta Wo 368 399 +03 394 

aw 6 Arad M 388 2S.74 -03 985 

Grown 3 Intone 929 9913 +05 492 

Jwmi SpacW Ska aio 44 1 -29 . . 

-MW 1*01 1507 -83 .. 

Mra raaad M 1407 1513 -19 091 

Max meoroe BoWy 25* 6624 +03 531 

PMHdMOn 32 9 3484 +04 248 

Scran Em Mala 389 3344 +06 033 

taK3> Ska 1605 17194 +17 094 


O Crw tejM SjB. London EC3A BAN 

A m e r i can Exnrapr E338.1 345.14 
Wpan &mo £4502 <703 
Am Proparty Tax 5100099 

Property That £28039 4 




grupoe 02 2UH 

11M T249W +13 3L20 
2819 £7094 +47 134 
2124 2287 +04 192 


48. Oaoaauata SL ECS> 3HH 

01-BS 4280 EM 280 

NPI UK 1984 2047 


NPI UK 
Do Acorni 
NPI Oram 
Dp Aceran 
Par Eta Aee 
Anrartarai Aoc 
Eutpn Aec 


1084 2047 +05 290 

3108 3309 *03 280 

005.1 MU* +03 D90 
7419 7B53W +6.1 090 
949 1009 -ZB 0.10 
§88 62.1 +08 1.10 
559 5884 +09 090 
539 5844 +03 240 


PO BM 4. ftonrfta P«1 SNQ 


£11.77 1230 +004 334 

1388 14084 +08 130 


Grate Trim 
American Truat 


2127 2273 
1213 1287 


enusAoei urn-mar iunmers ltd 

UK Income 47.1 504 +02 447 

UK Dotal AGCraa 408 403 -Ol 2-«3 

Da an 408 488 +OI 243 

Eunmn Dote 509 506 +09 133 

Fteto Groom 572 609 -07 . . 

B*UWT TRUST HANASBtS 
LMWW Craacant Etaforgh 
Oil-226 3402 



56. Camai 9*am. umden EB4N DAE 
M tagl 01-236 mSIVTItfim 
WW AO Bon W Okotat 1487 1909 +13 070 

team 6 Qmtal 57.1 01.1* +04 297 

Wortdmda Rae 084 057 +13 041 

American Growth 313 3394 +04 .. 

Japan Dotal 58.1 M 3 -13 090 

EinoMI Grate 719 709 +09 12* 

UK Date 529 506 +02 017 

Pacific Dotal 473 500 -03 . . 

Agn mat 306 9LM +04 790 

Praocal know 537 57.10 +02 1.70 

Do Accran 004 10*74 +09 ITS 


YJd 


~OM 

202 

Emm weoma 
FfaaocM 

404 


400 

152 

*07 

20 ) 

Da4ffirai 

km 

•Japan 

Mtej.dEWgapw. 

IS 

De (Irani ret 

wftSS™ 

wnitaSre 

wwmrija cwwa 

ss 


ass 

THomr 0 HUMnrw 

177 

1.77 

Pa* Hotma Id FWi 
70J 

U 1 

048 

048 

«EM(GW 
. Japan 8 Oral 

008 

1.18 

009 

000 

- Oreowi wc 

Pkmb Tata 

%*&Gan 

aoo 

2 . a iwytak Lor 
01 83*3356 

srao 

arao 

000 

fimigr ctfm 

TDUOCROMkffT 


BU Ota Cfng 



PEARL TRUST 

252. Aon Hctam. WC1 V ID 
01-408 8441 

Dotal PM tac 809 04.7 +08 Z30 

Do Accran 1537 1421 .400 290 

team Fond 1M7 T283C +02 392 

M Ertay te 1329 1404# -1.1 192 

Da Accran 133.1 M10W -1.1 192 

U4. Tnmt me 125.1 mi +04 293 

Do Accam 2103 2304 +05 296 


MteanolM* 
Od Aento 


1803 15094 
2233 2373# 


4&I HffJM. Hetay On Ttreme 


29. Oioriaoa So, EtaWrash 


FWtfE 

880 

77B 

WtarW Orated) 

37.7 

400 

N Amratcrai 

310 

XlB 

Inccrae Fuad 

440 

474 

Bnftei 

450 

4*7 

N Amra Wc 

2 S 0 

37 JM 

UK Grate 

290 

^ J| 

Extra Wc 

31.1 

nu 


2. St Mmv Axa. London BCSAl 
01 928 1212 DaaMa 01-823 570 


2 DaaRig 01-823 5708 DaoWi 0 01 823 


Americ a n Trura 
AuanoanTnoi 
Brttan Tat Accraa 
Do 0d4 


American Find 788 757 
Capera Rm 829 992 

Qmtal & te FM 1212 1307 
Hte Oral Raw 1059 1132 
womadonra Fund 1909 2118 
Ftaoucaa fM 216 25.4 
Sm* Ja Coa Fnd 844 308 
Tokyo Fund 1088 10134 

(Ex) A mar 0 1388 1*344 

te<i Japan (i 1159 118.7 
EOPBCiacffl 2986 30094 
p) Soaoer 9# (4) 2016 2102 
Uhnd 203 382 

EAOL£ STAR tfOTTRUTHANASI 
Mi Road. CMHMtaw Otoraraan 
00*2 521311 

UK Stated R 07.7 722 

Oq Acoim 00.7 733 

UK Dotai Aeaan 033 884 
UK Agn te W 043 689 
N American Apcraa 053 007 
far Eastam Aectai 1054 1124 
Eraupaan Accran 073 SIT 
UK Da 6 FT Inc 509 54 J 

Do Acorni 528 589 


+ 1.1 22 S 
+0.6 171 
+03 450 
+0 .4 590 
♦21 198 
+83 030 
-03 .. 
-09 0.00 
.. 384 
.. 0.17 
+18 032 
-33 0.10 
+04 331 


Baopaae True! 
Exsa Income Trust 
Par Eaaram Trust 
rota wrarast Fraxa 
GW Trial 

GkM Pond Accran 
Do (M 

Goa stai Thai 
Hedged Amerten 
Hte teame Dura 
Hong Kang Trust 
Weans fund 
Warawte Agraidai 
Japan tha t 

Mwbqw Ewiipj 
0* 6 Bx+by Tnat 
SpacW 503 That 
3*a«r Ca RacTai 


024 807 
232 259 
583 82.7 
50-4 543 
664 704 
5«4 508 
47 9 518 
1013 1733# 
257 27.7# 
243 2534 
1803 104.1 
1713 1049 
169 173 
204 319 
1389 1403 
32.4 343 
739 703 
£4571 4395 
1304 1881 
2508 267 6 # 
342 30.8 
803 9634 
70 70.7# 


+19 030 
+03 027 
+09 193 
+04 193 
+03 120 
+19 038 
+0.1 5.16 
+01 090 
-4.HQ35 
-03 915 
+07 818 
+08 0.10 
+04 192 
+04 010 
+4X4 530 
+09 008 
.. 027 
+037 215 
-43 090 
-02 244 
+4.1 1.00 
.. 097 
+ 0.1 080 


10 . F e nu iuai SL I 
01-823 0000 
PWnnad ftw 

European Inc 
Dg Aocran 
Ganand We 
Do Accran 
GW YWd Inc 
Do Aceran 
Mdi Two te 
Do Aceran 
taan teome 
Do Accran 
N Anrateai We 
Do Aceran 
(Woic weom a 
Do Accran 
Sta COY Wc 
Du Accran 


120.4 13070 
98.7 1013 
1192 124.7 

S I 1617 
4 2203 
1049 1072# 
1713 1709# 
B5.7 012# 
1728 1008# 
2359 2402 
237 6 2500 
403 407 
543 57.1 
1309 1378c 
1473 1558c 
78.6 B37 
932 802 


-13 4.11 
+13 151 
+ 1.0 151 
+17 3.12 
+23 312 
-0.61006 
-001080 
*03 994 
+09 994 
-52 032 
-92 032 
+08 080 


tM) MAMACEMENT LTD 
IW xa ppn Route 20 Drawn. 
I RM1 3LB 


EOUTAOU UMT 8 ADOMSTMTiaN 
35. Foratai St Mwieirata 
061-230 5889 

EqiABOto Ml 72.7 774o +03 828 

rtra. Incoma Tnta 751 798 +01 508 

QWARxadW 408 52-1 -04 BrO 

T* D W* TntaS 613 052 *02 133 


QOVETT (JOWQ UNIT MANAOEWBfT 
WWchoww Hn. 77. London WdL London EC 2 N 

IDA 

01-5815020 

Wd Dotal 798 861 +08 125 

Amrten Data 608 633 +13 096 

Amancwi Wc 875 739# +2.1440 

Ewpoaon Greta 23*9 251.1# +49 024 
Gold I Idnaraw 44.7 470 +07 0.73 

Japan Dotal 1407 157.7 -23 .. 

ORE 1MT MANAOBtS 
Ro^^n^aaPaON 


Earty DraaWodan 2003 2704* +09 230 
Do Accraa 4119 44024 +13 2.45 

Du Wcoap 503 823 -0.1 533 

Erawpaan 798 803 +19 1.11 

Far Exntm 1134 12134 -41 045 

Ok Tnat 732 77 St -1.1 7.4S 

Dteas Carry 03 1 SOS +04 093 

Nwm Has 647 6924 + 1.1 1.11 

N Amancwi nm 770 82.4 +09 138 

IK SpacW Ska 009 8*8 402 130 


LURDS SANK IdOT TRUST HANAdBB 
5R"W Dpt OonvDy-Sa*, MonWr g . Yd 


MW UMT TRUSTS 

Gcag 6 Pisdoua MM 541 5034 +03 090 

Do Accraa 509 0034 +03 090 

B n Parl o r * raid 1309 1309 .. 0.00 

Accran 1319 1307 .. 000 

US SokW Ftafcaaa 648 00.1 +09 090 

Do team 16 * 808 +92 000 

U8 SpacW WC 989 62J +07 546 

Op Accran 639 575 +07 5.48 

Emm Earaapt *7.1 41984 +1.t 890 

~0e Accraa 5029 62634 +13 396 

Euepaan Rraf te 808 0494 +19 D3* 

Do AOCUB) 808 0474 +12 00* 


9-100 Sraidwa Rd. MWdODOB. Kara MSI 4 1XX 
0622 674751 

MLA Amraten 233 347 +08 1.01 

MLA Oanardl 329 3*3 +03 2.17 

MLA W a nra Wtel 508 9094 +03 028 

MAGNUM 219 2324 ..1120 

MIA Income 303 4074 .. 052 

MLA Ewcpaan 317 3384 +09 074 


I 713 7584 

M 1059 1007 

1 Uta» 1002 1158 


» i vrau GW IM 008 008 
Greta Una 137.7 1*63 


Ind G reta Una 
N Anwnowi unS* 
Fra EM Unw 
SmrrfW Cm HbM 


1377 1409 
079 712# 
1008 107.1 
005 70? 


Sp+cw SB* Tnta 707 7934 

Ndl Amar Trial 569 5044 

Eastern Trust 889 915 


gw s PWsd n 
Greta Equg 


Property Store 

Sandra Coavwi 

Eraupaan Trust 


1104 1140 
192.1 204.4 
3008 2709 
1373. 1402 
2400 2594 
259 3 2759 
2D7 3 2212 
2567 273.1 


9-17. perrymourt «L iWyawBl Haste 
0*44 450144 

RnpncW 1229 13094 +03 2.70 

Snuara Ctfa Acc 2295 24394 +1.1 .. 

Dp Ron* 1446 15594 +07 190 

Htfi in co me 039 6T64 +02 595 

Income 729 7754 +0.1 490 

Urai PMMa Wc 589 BOB +02 335 

DO ACC 96 0 102.6 +03 .. 

Norte American 597 B1.0 +08 132 

On*** 019 875 -37 023 

BUCXMASTERWAIIAGSBfT 

Tka Srock Exoranga London BCV 2JT 

01-568 2088 


Wd Oretai 919 503 +03 190 

EOUTY+law 

^Gwags Hmt Corporation at Coventry CV1 
0201 553231 

UK O rraate A cawi 1*52 1543c +09 382 
Do weom a 126 1 134 1 c +09 392 
Honar Wc Accran 242.1 2575 c -07 + 83 
Do teoma 1949 207 3a +02 493 

OteWrad 4aa*n 815 0094 -09 B90 

Do weraaa 77.0 81 64 -14 900 

Nlh Amar Tra Aceran 1209 1370c +19 029 
Far Eta Tw Aceran 106J 1798c -10 OJD 
Eure Tat Aceran 1695 17904 +12 1.02 
Gananl Trura 2305 2*534 +13 372 

r»CIMTWMOBnT 

«■ Lcndoo re*R oba 

01-023 4080 

US Sm taar Co'a 899 7474 + 1.0 027 

CapKal Faw 1014 11384 +1.1 030 

S*”?* ^ 5 ' 1 -M 403 

FW Earaam Rmd 732 7834 -12 090 

O ta — Weoma 729 77.7 +05 352 

F— wwraat _ 505 609 ..BOO 

— Rea Fund 475 509 +08 330 


DW1NWBW6H0NW TTBUtT 
MAJUOCRS 

TO Box 4*2. 32 SI Uary-a+HR, London EC3P 


Do Accran 
Enragy Wd 
Do Accran 
Eann meat* 

□d Accran 
German on me 
Op Accran 

Income 

Do Acorn 
In* Tech 
□0 Accran 

Japan Grata 
Do accran 
N Amar « Gan 
Do Acorn 
Paotc BaaW 
Do Accran 
8*WW Coa Aflac 
Do Acorn 
W rataute Grata 
Do Aeaan 
UK Data HrtS 


1792 107 3 
1129 Ml« 
020 502# 
509 611# 
1543 1559 
2785 297 B 
732 713e 
732 702 
281 3 2703 
5143 5509 
1032 1098 
1S13 20+5 
82.7 883 
KLO 007 
073 1041 
1052 1125 
1343 I486 
1+02 1482 
107.1 200.1 
2DS4 2Z39 
2013 2179 
2083 3083 
403 408 


+07 333 
+13 133 
+45 291 
+07 281 
+03 520 
+05 520 
♦17 035 
*1.7 (L33 
+03 478 
+05 476 
+19 020 
408 036 
-29 092 
-29 002 
♦17 197 
+19 197 
-19 004 

- 1.7 aw 

+01 290 
+01 290 
+02 088 
+03 098 
+OI 280 


•BewuNrrnuBT 

IWtan Mm. 292. Hasten Rd. E7 
01-334 5544 


51-69. More BW. ware Gwwt 101 2DL 
01-470 3X77 

Hawaii EgRy 3008 41140 +1.1 830 
Eraopun 1063 1129 *29 084 

Hotean Corners 52.0 563 +06 006 

HotroreHUiWe 023 502#. .. 695 
HoK ax ii M 998 1069 +06 082 

JaprateS 968 10284 -39 006 

N AmafWwi 718 758 +09 087 

Hokrern Some Sha 023 052 . . 2.11 

Hoteom UkCretai 799 6494 +07 221 
HaWosi GW Trura T7B3 1814 - 2.1 287 

QUM»l>U8iaM»T COMPANY 
31-45 Qrwnwn SL Lorten EC2V 7LH 
01-000 4177 

DaewtOawd 4S3 *619* .. 230 

Dmdrwd Weoma 2353 2505 .. 528 

Quadrant M Fd 40*7 4259 .. 194 

OraWaM FWornwg 2407 28574 .. 288 


81 SwkBte Lana. LoodM EC4P 40U 
01-300 5*60 

NC Weoma 852 919 +03 426 

NC Joan 1858 197.6 -68 091 

NCMtaUROO 49.1 622 +03 196 

NC ScWW Am 58.1 619 +03 1.62 

NC Amralcan Wc 2718 2889 +38 130 

Do Accum 2863 8153 +49 130 

MC Smote OM 1 ST 3 14094 .. 29T 

NC Sr*# Erapp Co'S 1812 2033 +39 030 

NC Eawapt S £1169 1239 -59 020 


ROWAN I9RTTNU0T 

S3 KWg WNram Saatt. London BC4R 0AS 
0140 5670 

Amraten (41 2209 2909 

SacurOHia 9810 8039 

Mgh YWB « 1743 17901 ■ 

Wteffl 4119 4109 

Haas nraaw 1 S 68 1578 

Hgnasraaa uto 11394 .. 1 

Fra EM « 2(05 2528 


X. C«* Rd. London ECtY 2AY 
01-638 8011 

AWW IMi 0 Gap 078 10424 
PaOBe 1072 21T.0 

Sec Weoma two 1637 T749 
SpacW SBuWtalW 109.0 2129 
k« Data 383 399 

Amertan Utaa 009 733 
ante CoY 309 4224 

Japan Toon 0 Gad 1098 1172 
wwnwkow Wcont 569 009 
Etatet 5348 57194 

UK General 313 357 

Euro Dotal 409 42.0 

Era® klooraa 452 4M6 

8TAMMRDLK 

Wooaia uratt 242 2U4 

Po Accran Una* 27.1 20.14 


-19 024 
-09 090 
-17 4.10 
-39 130 
.. ato 
.. 081 
-09 18 7 
-48 090 
-08 &83 
-27 225 
-05 191 
+08 082 
+09 490 


+02 270 
+02 270 


QW Tnat 
Si v te e m Inc 


SO I 539c .. 075 

1018 107 04 +20 096 
<961 2100c -a I 232 
305 370# -02 181 
017 858 +Ol 586 


9 vteanr US Qte 728 757 
TampkOraSmOtfa 1715 1809 
JWnpw Bra USM 36*9 39114 
Era® OUT* 


' 0 1 1 *' W '■ te 


Vtk W Wi Part. Exawr EX5 IDS 
0302 52156 

Ganem) Trial 423 458 +08 370 

Pcoraa Trust 353 37 0# .. 1+0 

kMmaaonal Thral 359 303 -Ol 070 

American 31.1 313 +05 290 

Japan 45.1 403# -12 Coo 

Thai of to 289 319# .. 230 


MERCURY FUND ■ 
33. Kte lAMm S 
01-200 MOO 
Amar Greta 
□a Accran 
*mar Weoma 
Do Accran 
European Onta 
Da Acaaa 
Grata* 

Do Accum 
OH 0 Arad 
Do Accost 


Do Accran 
Do Acorn 

Raeomry 

Do Accran 
fxranra DIM 
CxaiRjt A c cuiu 


IIMaetULTP 
. GCafl 9AS 

02.1 077 
868 1019 
439 539# 
313 5694 
1009 14584 
141-5 16094 
2327 24794 
3B29 4008# 
019 822 
SIB 827 
BOB 059# 
.902 8594 
281.5 2711 
3248 3*49 
1042 19*1 
1015 2028 
1879 1009 
2006 2132 
2209 2359 
3543 3058 




+09 1.16 
+19 1.15 
+09 495 
+09 495 
+Z-I 080 
+Z3 090 
+09 286 
+09 286 
-1.0 027 
-1.1 *Z7 


MiaOECUMTCa 

Three Qunrv Toner M KW OBO 

01-026 4588 

Amor • Gan Wc 2132 220.1 *23 1 *1 

Do Accran 2400 2009 +17 138 

Alta I W Mtay 73*- 2539 +13 080 

Do Accran 2569 2711 +00 080 

Am Smalm Ca Acc 557 508 +£4 036 

Aramtee Aec 1037 iti9 +28 083 

C raum oteft Acc 221.1 2316 +3.1 178 

Compound GTtate *003 <128 +33 3.17 

CantaHM Grata 3169 3*33 +0.1 286 

Oa Wc 1039 1049 +07 *M 

Owaand FUns te 4019 4209 +19 587 

Do team £11-70 U*8 *094 527 

Eraooaan Ace 27U5 3B17 +39 190 


WKATO MWt GROUP UWT TRUST 

Cojmjma Has. StesrSL Hoad. ShaflWU si 3RD 
0743 7090*2 

Captra team* 737 709 +02 09* 

Dp Acorn 1003 1(77 0 +02 254 

Carnwny 0 Qan 121,1 1252 + 1.1 393 

-°° *« ras 1709 IB22 +13 193 

BWJMehte 572 610# ..100 

Do Accum 079 7014 -Ol 090 

GW* Readme 503 SJW -09 137 

Do Accran 035 B724 -99 097 

X VWkf 1319 1017 .. 580 

A ccran 2575 0747 ,. 6*0 

ktewa raa 17*7 +04 4.03 

sss&«a 

t/^STte +U?S 

S& zi a 


+02 89* 
+02 254 
♦17 393 
♦13 393 

.. aoo 


.. 590 
. . OBO 
+03 495 

♦0.8 4 03 


*5. Owtoda Sg. asadratte 
031-220 3271 

Aowncan Frau 217.7 2319 . +59 290 

Do Acoran 2*33 2913 +49 280 

DO W Wi Wara ra 1509 1627 +3.1 280 

AuWldan Ftmd 1105 1279 +49 103 

DO Accum 1215 1205 +4.1 190 

Brush fund 5712 61054 .. 490 

DO Acorni 7039 03494 . . 489 

Batata Fund 31*9 33724 +63 091 

DO Accran 3352 357.14 +69 091 

Japan Raid 0 59 0826 -09 022 

oa Acorn 058 05* -09 022 

GaWWFPP 1609 1757 .. .. 

SUN ALLIANCE . ■ 

SmMtecatte.1Wta-.SMta 

EqJty Treat Aco 8789 4007 +09272 

N Am Triad Aec 579 019 +08 199 

FW EM Ttara AOC 899 962 -02 080 
VtortWrtta Bond 515 347 +05 090 

KMIROPCNHM 

283. Cocfcjpw Baaot London SMTIY SBH 
Daratag nwRMO 0M2 

UK tare 232 2*9 ..594 

DO Dotal 238 049 . . 107 


UBiMrimraLTD 
Kama Ifearaa. An donar. Ha 
0204 50780 Oatagc 0054 
Aiara ten We 1115 

Os Accran 1175 

0dm Weoma toe 1129 

Dp Accraa 1303 

G ene ral UaH Wc 15*1 

Do Aax*n 2515 

G01 0 FWod Wc .4*1 

Do ACMBD 01.1 

Waamo 211.1 

Accran 3282 

Pxofcte 1718 

Do Accun 17*9 

Wd WC 3255 

Da Acorn 4029 

SfWcffld Oppo WC 629 
Oo Aaamj 803 


■NKTTMMMtJiaffr TRUST MANAOER0 

GW DM GW Rate 677 689 
US Gout Baal Fd «512 613 +oi 


The prices in tills 
section iefer to 
Thursday's trading 


UNLISTED SECURITIES;- %■' 




Ha. flPtO IRQ 
88 * 32 / 3(4 
11874 +19 138 
1248* +18 1.48 
12084 +0-1 691 
144.14 +91 591 
16*9 +09 290 

27H.1 +13 290 

4*1 -00 *73 

6*7 -08 872 

22*9 +03 498 

05*0 +04 490 

1BJ -29 031 
1870 -21 031 

04*2 +13 120 

<2*1 +17 123 

8094 +03 182 
7394 +03 192 
5074 +09 197 
5494 +09 197 


TggMHouae. Qmhoum Rd. Ayitaray Bucks 

Amar EagW 729 789 +1.1 OU 

AcaWWn TI3 209 +06 0.10 

CmamoiWy 733 712 +09 t.u 

Enomy .209-319 .. 191 

bmt 1207 1299 +1.1 890 

Baeoowt Mae Oa 1119 11 &B +09 090 


















INVESTMENT TRUSTS 


15 B'iAIHOP O'r 

60 45 ATA SN+Cdon 52 

130 93 ABOttoaSl 110 

69 33 Atentasn 9* Hm 55 

143 45 Axran SSW4W 

100 32 Acorn Comp 42 

21 0'j A cats Jawaferay IS 

22 10'r Adam LaUran 16 

123 96 Avara<ng 96 

297 20* Alma ’ 230 

168 15S AlWia Saeura Hma 180 

121 99 Aidra 108 

155 13 1 Appteraa 150 

m xssr* 1 s 

355 163 Aspen Comma 313 

’BO !1D AtakWI lit 

820 -M3 Aapray 543 

40 H Assoc Enragy 32 

233 174 ASD 175 

129 122 ASaa Egwpmant 120 

95 61 Auajmegc 33 

70 67 BaBDaaKp 60 

iff. BPP 198 

85 60 BTS Grp 80 

123 58 0+cmro WWxnO 06 

23 12 Bannsn A FOunMn 24'i 

53 31 Barmna Crepa *2 

17>I 7L Sarkaiay 4 Hay Id 
9i 26 Bra+aa> Exp 32 

245 139 Sakata Gp 230 

30 TO Bo lsafen» 10 

34 IB Bonacfiante 26 

44 40 Bpal 404 

135 SB Biaitemdi 114 

05 lM Bktamt Toys 235 

ISO 135 Soriano 135 

27 19 WnwBiafcSr 20 

210 65 8f*al 97 

300 125 Bn« . 200 

130 TS BnanrU S 4C 122 

250 155 D BWoda t ocfc 155 

59 50 Br JSWrtd 57 

59 49 Broad SI 50 

59 49 Broad 9 50 

358 170 Breokmount 288 

163 MS Do-m (Cnrale) 183 

345 195 Wyant |Dan*J 22S 

9 2 BUU Aaaoratse 2 'j 

93 73 CCA Gammas 93 

ISO 125 CML Micro T47 

30 S’- CPS Comp 6'. 

42 25 CPU Comp 20 

195 130 CUD US 1 

320 85 CraadOtafi 011 90 

69 62 Cranowen 55 

147 06 Cannon SraOl In* 7*3 

350 213 Central TV 345 1 

120 64 cnaneary Sacs 114 

143 83 CTrackpcte Fix op* 13B 

132 125 CneWea Man 128 

18 B'r Cnam Mowocs B'j 

253 120 cmranra w 200 

17 B'r Oter 10 

40 a Otyxiawi 02 

833 475 Cnyrotan Tb 550 

115 70 Ckiafmnl 71 

173 152 Oarha HOOptr 156 

25'j 11 Oogau QoW 25 U 

47 25 OuflOi Hogs 47 

113 tO Coated EJacvodax 105 

95 53 Cobra EmaraM 80 

130 21 Coma 123 

100 27 Coiorgsn te 30 

ITS 110 Comp FWancW 150 
S3 30 Oorapien 35 

130 74 C o n ara i raKi ’20 

60 38 GOna Tam ln« *5 

343 208 Cone UcretaW 270 4 

108 05 Camay « 

1*3 95 CFM OS 

415 30 a Cramprram 328 

78 48 Cranteot* SO 

114 98 Crons-** 106 

138 75 Ortton Lodga .00 

198 168 Crra^MnLobS 1» 

103 58 Croon TV Rota 71 

in 75 Crows ire 

73 *3 D8E Taefl « 

183 116 007 m 

140 78 DJ Sac a anna KM 

91 83 Daaan « • 

216 190 Danas ©V) ZB2 

8* 55 Oaan A Boota. JB 

29 20 Dr BTOB (Antea) 3*'i 

145 134 OoMor 13* • 

57 40 Oataar « 

138 105 Dancoro ‘IS 

115 70 Domwna Bae » 

108 « dm* WWian 

230 130 OWena » • 

480 345 Duck 
24'0 IB'* mnwn 17 

CM >Q Flflfl 5^ 

148 102 Baaig E lect CX*te m 

x&'zx “ • 

an zS w StWre-A- ^ 

-46 108 O a uita NeuM _ 1» • 

100 61 EManrtc DaW P BD 

5 •} .r-S 

IS is sa— 1 

51 X S3.* ” 


•+4 08 ' 6J 13B 

21 40 134 

20 11 1*5 
-1 3.1 5.8 18* 

4 *» .. .. 

2 * 

as 

20 

7.7 BO .. 
W . . 98 30 14 1 

+12 23 12 2*0 


. . -4.4 1A32B 

as 7.7 50 
142 28156 
70 

• .. IM 50 78 

70 30 110 
W . . 80 90 121 

14 21 162 

■ +3 7.1 30 162 

-0 5.7 7.1 gra 

• era 74 bo 

00 242SJ 

118 

.. .. 278 

48 

30 1.4 2*2 


10 44 101 
8 4 50 124 
50 21 182 

1.1 58 106 

60 *2 80 

2.1P 1.7 130 
128 8 1 72 
40 7.0 tora 
10 32 .. 
106 32 
50 1.7 1S.7 

36 22 230 

1106 52 80 

14 17 108 
20 <8 15.1 

1.4 224 32 

.. a .. 1*1 


29 40 132 
+1 30 28 212 

I . . 200 50 J3J 

11 2.7T3.7 

+3 .. ..121 

01 2*210 
3 H 452 
52 28212 
.. .. « .. 10 


10 21 82 
13 21 21.1 


8.1 21 Z7J 

10 10 Z33 

7 1 8150 302 

era 24 150 

17 19112 

20 26 14 I 
7ra 23 B2 
0.7a ira 112 
78 72 92 

20 30 160 

53 29220 

10 ira 121 

280 

17 10150 

21 20 80 
ira 2 M 1 B 

36 HVd 

I? 

20 63 91 
29 25 159 

54 80 01 
107914.7 40 

70 11 123 
50 13 288 

06 35 ill 

25 40 1*7 

11 27 110 
ora 1.4 220 
S3 29140 

. a .. 580 
98 25 170 
40 40 161 
23 20 11.7 

ira 1 O 0 ia 
7.1 53 110 
era 82 11 s 


Lora Go’+CBny Pncc pi's* 

101 143 FIHQnp 143 

90 51 Feedback S3 

<z ta Fragreraok «■> -1 

133 120 Plata (tea) 128 a-2 

73 63 natal Domys 88 

86 3« Ftawrai 50 

206 too Rogas KB • 

60 30 BoydOO 32 

88 04 Fore A Wasion 0* 

20 130 Forte Conn 130 -1 

112 88 FTOBhoak* 11 D 

338 210 w» Stekh 'A' 331 




85 72 G-OOon Lyon* 

165 100 Ocba Man 156 

17 11 Gtarai HouM 17 

80 32 Oocra Go 44 

186 7B Oodwn Warm 81 -2 

143 89 GoaWaadRM 125 r -3 

129 95 QoukI (Lauanca) 108 +2 

91 SB Draita Surtaca 85 

149 145 Qroat Soutfnm 148 +3 

140 118 Dmi (Em+W) 188 

38 19 BramWi CaCW 27 

115 BlYGrearonorSq 88 • 

150 180 Ouamaoy AMnOc 190 

.98 SB temporal Homacwa 88 +3 

228 133 Hamey S Thomp 210 # . . 

255 ire i ira Woe * Europe zx) • 

46 28 Hem* Care 41 

460 38V i Hrataro* *30 

390 293'r Do A" LV 370 -10 

150 1*3'1 Ha n oraaon RMe iso 
415 165 HW-FoW IBS 

205 45 Htonand Rta 45 

SI 95 M# Ergononi 88 

30-1 7 Hobson 27 +'i 

118 105 Hoogaen 118 


Groaa 
dhr TW 
i panes % P/E 

30 70 191 
12 *7 10 

30 U >50 
.. ..80 
258 .. .. 

.. .. Ill 

40 11101 

70 50 80 
27 20 154 

50 10 172 
42 30 170 
17 40 -. 
24 55113 
50 60 140 
S.1 10 170 

.. .. 8*0 
32 72 10.7 
11 30 110 

O 00 140 
52 40 *7 
30 48 112 


80 *0 70 

U 10 5*0 

2.1 24 14.1 
88 4.1 140 
17 24 210 

1.1 2.7 162 
HJ 20160 
120 13 l«0 


415 165 teT-°DW 
205 45 H u nan d Hi 

91 85 A Ergoro 


30 1 ! 7 H obaon 27 ♦'» 

118 ire Hoogaen 118 

133 105 Harem HHreman 125 

15 8 11 Z H tw raa R ra a u a u n 113 +1 

26 22 H ta tta Food 23 '4 

14 6 <r l+mtxad Bac 7'i 

168 115 Hraora Sm* 1 S 6 +Z 

2S5 IBS HraW ta lTta 195 W+6 

230 165 KSTBi 17S 

31 13 WOK 13 

115 44 md Sent Energy 65 

103 68 UUraRad 88 

353 190 w raaraope Tack 213 • .. 

32 21 bra* Uadi l) 22', -H 

*0 233 JS Psmctogv 323 

190 ns JaquM tan 180 -3 

28 2 Jaba«na 8 

149 105 JQtetaan*J«g 106 • 

150 73 J oh ua wnaa tea 100 #.. 

70 48 Jum FUtasra 80 

330 253 KU> 296 

92 57 Kam uram) 75 

320 220 Kanaon Sacs 320 

83 53 KohM Byatama 55 

113 30 Maw-Tain* 65 +10 

13 87 UFA Wd 75 

99 37 LMdW* 65 #.2 

25 70 irau*w Thonaon taa • 

a 32 Ubraa W» 52+2 

19 100 Lmrorwr 105 

159 149 Local Lon Gp 169 +g 

91 73 Ux>a* caro 99 

140 95 Uw5 (pyO+sta 113 

199 133 Larin Bec> 17B -8 

62 17 Lyuntar Pal 21 

95 77 lit Crnm * Carry 93 #.. 

260 190 MMTConp 2® +10 

160 101 McLaMSta 6 ter 120 W .. 

IS 45 Mxcrtae Mwraww 83 • . . 

S 94 Mteixt 62 • .. 

83 Mraara Oa> S3 -z 

173 92 Maran (Ronald) 16 O 

* 9 Maxarn 18 

tie im Marta cay 11 s 

306 195 Maawwr Farm 291 

230 IS Uadb Tata 138 #.. 

96 75 Matamro BS # .. 

19 9 U nw a r y Con# IS 

73 13 Uu uxi te nags 31 -2 

153 IS ta nn e r 8— i 153 +15 

390 350 Mrairdte m Wine 3B • .. 

139 S Maal Ekraaan 115 #.. 

103 71 Uacsac 62 

tS OS EStf** sS :: 

220 100 MCRHUf 100 

47 22 Meranbac 3* w .. 

385 231 Mdamxnra Wna 370 

146 142 MHar * Steam 142 -I 
193 ISS mWODwn 170 

220 130 Un Wand 205 • 

47 13 Mrranps . 

156 ■» te n ia 129 

134 82 Marta 8 Crons 119 -4 

168 127 UbbM* 138 


50 2S Motey® 

23*1 15‘i MonW I Wte m ) 
118 83 More AOnrawm 
192 125 tea man 
367 237 mrn Cbmp 
21 8 NsraCtNURas 

5'j o'i Daiwrea 


128 

lid -4 

128 

$ * 

70 

171 

250 -5 

8 r . 

1 


20 14 Nara ETOand Rapa IB 

K H OolR OO 

77 73 Nm.ag* Tran 73 

21 ID WW 11 

150 91 Naroak i*B 

190 45 Ncrtraw 45 -5 

165 83 Nora* Howb 145 -2 


30 20 19.7 

46 17 1*0 

07 30 160 

04 50 75 
10 22 210 
£1 1 1 280 
18 2i 150 
10 23.1 J.B 
. . . . 102 

*3 30 ia? 

0.7 31174 

3J 1.0 290 
70 4ra 150 
. . a . 00 
60 *6 123 
*1B 61 11.1 
20 4 2 90 

4.7 10 180 

£1 It 16.4 

140 4.7 150 

1.7 31 11 

1.4b 22 110 
10 50 74 
4.1 83 01 

*0 50 ISO 

.. 250 

30 36 120 

90 11 179 

29 33 180 
80 71 102 

3d 20 150 

31 50 : ; 
*8 20 210 

100 *3 *9 
27 43 82 

ira 1.7 2*7 


43 17 244 

*4 19 250 

*0 20 100 

44 52200 

232 . 29 

50 161 21 
18 24 1*2 

80 24 192 

63 50 152 

17 45 120 

17 23 17 7 

29 00 837 
*7 57 82 

10 59 149 

36 1.0 27 S 

32 23 280 

18 21 370 
■ 75 19 1*0 

.. r .. . 

20 16 23.7 

39 34 1*3 

21 47 ZL4 

60 

M M 84 
43 25 140 
*6 32 1+2 
.21 

! ' 77 

0 125 . 

50 60 83 


46 

1* 

75 

33 

37 

22 

293 

100 

35> 

• 23 

143 

85 

2SS 

isa 

79 

53 

158 

130 

470 

82 

82 

’0 

83 

17 

165 

80 

MS 

83 

39 

23 

110 

103 

200 

130 

77 

12 

3« 

za 

iie 

24 

73 

31 

50 

as 

178 

ns 

2*5 

80 

158 

78 

1*3 

93 

8L 

2 

&■> 

2 

3X 

158 

43 

18 

S3 

33 

ia 

85 

*0 

12 

105 

86 

62 

22 

75 

40 

42 

14 

190 

70 

87 

30 

105 

83 

US 

112 

128 

73 

40 

10 

135 

10) 

178 

110 

195 

120 


.. -- 40 

20a 70 57 

40 10 27 2 

21 60 100 
4.8 30 (35 

40 *1 1T0 
SJ 36 130 
S.1 20100 

.. a .. 230 
.. -.12 

4.7 29 isra 
300 20 533 

1.7 0.1 80 
*0 4.1 10.7 
37 20 182 


10 21 50 
*4 11 1*4 

*4 60 129 
2 * ara lira 
30 10 127 


• 80 11 180 
.. a .. 80 

48 *7 170 

1.4 10 140 

.. a . 29 

70 *5140 

• +4 0 4 09 .. 

• +6 20 30 210 

120 

01 Ol .. 

0.0 OS .. 

29 20 444 


40 20 192 
10 27 13 
3* 23 1BJ 


10 

120 

113 

148 w .. 
126 

10 -1 
348 
310 

90 # .. 

240 • . 

175 

it 

193 

ISS 

ns 

37 

143 

12 

88 

55 • . 

27 
V 
63 

170 -3 

103 

24 -'j 

63 W .. 
115 
190 
2 <a 
161 

115 

116 
155 

75 

315 • +7 

173 

95 m-4 

138 • 

-* 

<5 

1*0 

30 -I 

197 # .. 

*95 • . 

W 

235 # .. 

73 

549 

108 #-3 

335 -10 

98 

38 #-2 

84 *1 

<08 • . 


178 #-3 

B'l 
IB': 

*05 • 

GO *2 

250 -iQ 

781 
» 

25*4 

>25 

s : 2 

El 

as 

36 


21 1.7 212 

3.1 20 217 

. . . . 1.3 

4J 24 170 
5J GO 92 
40 31 129 
39 21 230 


21 1 1 

45 19 

29 10 

2.4 21 
20 22 
*8 40 

7 7 100 

46 10 

21 12 
31 30 

71 52 

16 1.7 

30 44 

41 91 

47 34 
16 50 
92 3 3 
76 17 

16 2 T 

190 80 

54 74 

260 4 7 .. 

41 8-1 
2*0 60 
64 50 11.7 

10 4.7 150 
20 36 71 
30 3 1 132 

04 27 100 

5 7b 59 132 
36 18*1.7 

1 3 7.0 149 

29 0.7 623 

11 16 530 

79 34 *4.1 

36 22170 

37 5.7 99 



8 2 10 
IBra 60 
*0 40 
0.1 02 
as as 

30 28 
120 4.1 
10 30 
30 *1 
1-f 10 

era* 6L7 


81 TH Altana S3 

96 TO OWr Q) Lon DM 1B7 
155 TO Wd 5 Gan 208 
I 00 *t TH MUM tea 135 
SB TO North Arnica 82 
118 TO PtfBe EMM 172 
140 TO Properly 175 
SON TO Tata 100 

138 TRTOWWM 164 
195 TWnpM Bw i4S 


LONDON COMHODfTY 
EXCHANffi 

G W Jojrnaon and Co report 

SUGAR {From C. CrenRoa) 
FOB 

Dec 124. &■ 23.0 

Mar 137 0-38 8 

May™ 142 6-42.4 

Au$ 147.6-46.8 

Oa 1516-50 8 

Dec 157 .6-55.0 

Vof: 1877 

COCOA 

Dec 1S3M8 

Mar 1576-75 

May 1597 96 

■h* 1017-14 

Sw 1635-32 

Dec 1857-54 

Mar 1672-69 

V 01 : - 2531 

COFFEE 

Nov.. 2220-218 

Jan 2185-180 

Mar — 2125-120 

May ..... 2115-110 

Ju' 2i3a MO 

SeD 2120-090 

"or 212tWl9a 

v Ol —.4159 

SOYABEAN 

Oct 1381-35 5 

Dae — 135.0-34 8 

F*?D - 135.0-3* 0 

13 T 0 - 36 A 

Jun - 138.0-35.8 

- 13S«3.0 

135,5-33.5 

'■a •— Nil 

international 

PETROLEUM EXCHANGE 
GASOIL 

Od .. 121 50-21 00 

M ov 127 00-26.50 

t3l.QQ-jO.75 


TOroc Secraad C8P36B 
W*i Haas DrawHc 203 

112 Trtbana 1*0 

.79 hUM Wo 03 *J 

217 USDabarna* 891 

35 Value Wo Tat 42 

« wSS&cST 0 ™* ^ 


80 19 707 
-1 UtUAI 
67 20440 
50 40290 
.- « £0482 

+2 ira 00 .. 

+f 17 10 8*8 

-1 20 £8 470 

-» *0 17 380 

*lb 80 230 
-1 110b 40 3X4 


-* 50 2.7 508 

.. 40 £04*1 

.. 150 M0 *4 

I... *3 30580 

+fc 20b 79 IM 

I .. 20 *7 010 

-1 23 £3 580 

. . 1*1b 40 8*0 


FINANCIAL TRUSTS 


TWO Step 

WQ» 


*T9 34', Amartcan Bgnw 
71 31 ArgyW 

« 21 Dvrwrai 
164 118 BtaamH Aoora 
2* m DaSy kta 
12Y Do -A - 
158 131 Bean 
173 90 Eno Trail 
247 187 BOO 

422 JS g wkta doo 

7B8 37S T iaxWi Lpuj 
B* 77 FroM dp 

s? ’s SoT^ 
SSS &*"*** 

440 SO UA) 

238 190 MIG 
» MracarWa Horn 

127 78 Pa cta, ton TW 
28*r 18 Do Maroraa 
£06 IS tadfi Nta Cowt 


+1 ira 20 37 > 

_ .. ..a .. 700 

•-1 M 50 isa 
.. 700 3J 100 

+ 1 * 700 X7 130 

^ -- 50 42SZ0 

• - - *3 £3 190 

• +« 7.1 *1 147 

• +3 30 33135 

• -- 129 U1U 

• - - 7.1 80 90 

119 

. . £8 10 370 

. . 170 £0 170 

-1 120 b 8.1 80 

•-8 250 60-70 

*1 11 340 

-5 200 70 40 

00 ora .. 
tab 80 70 


LONDON ICTAL EXCHANGE. 

UMMctelpricm 
Offlcta Turnover Sguras 
Price In £ par metric toane 
SVver W penca per troy owica 
RudaH Won * Ca. Ltd. repan 

COPPER GRADE A 

Casti 920 0-9510 

TTna Months — 943.O-B430 


STANDARD CATHODES 

Casn 8950-697 0 

Throe Monoid — 920.0-922.0 


Cash 276 0-277 0 

Three Months — 2805-2*1 0 


COMMODITIES 


SILVER SMALL 

Cosh 396.0-397.0 

Three Morals — 407JMcs.o 

vn ire 

Tone Idte 

ALUMMHJM 

Cash 8120-613.0 

Ttvse Months — B1 5.0-615.5 

Voi 2500 

Tone Snaoier 

MCKEL 

Cash 25^-2580 

Three Months 2815-2820 

Vd 60 

Tone StaMy /Quiet 

MEAT AND LIVESTOCK 

COMMISaON 

Average l a tat ock ptfaay at 
represanaiKe oanim On 
Ocaoodra 

CSrCatSa. 9229pper kghv 
(-0.83) 

G& Sheep l2307p per kg* 

* est. dead csfcase waighi 
England and WMaa: 

Canto nos. down 4.0 %. ova. 
CM*. 9l 53«+05^ 

Sneep nos. up SO j %. ave. 


SU.VER LM(S 

Cash 3960-397.0 

Three Momtw 4Q7.0-408.Q 


Scottond; 

Cattle nos. uc 10.4 %. m. 
price. 972(^(4-2.35) 

Sheep nos. up 38^ %. sue. 
pms. 124 33p(+ 12.64) 

Pro nos. n/a %. are. 
Jwee,ti/5 


LONDON BEAT FUTURES 


Fig Contract p. per Mo 
Month Open Close 
Od UnqTad 10200 

NW Unq'ted 103J30 

FM> . United 96,50 

Apr • Unq'tod 9300 

Jun Urw'ted 9800 

Aug Unqied 9800 


Pig Meet aofcfl 


LONDON MEAT FUTURES 
EXCHANGE 

Lire Cotha Contract 
D. oar Ho 

Month Open Oom 
O tt UnqTad 9600 

Nov Unqted 97.50 

Fab Unq'tad 9700 

Apr Unqted 100.00 

Jun Unqted 9900 


LONDON GRAM FUTURES 
Eper tonne 

Wheat Bariey 
Month Close Close 

<0Y 10&70 108j9a 

ion 106.80 110.10 

te i 11130 132.40 

tey 11X70 11355 

W 11 &S — 

>ep 1039$ 10050 


Vot 114 Jots 
Open ffnerast: 2525 


MgtyLow- Close 
Oa B 8 850.0-6500 850,0 


Vat 11 Me 
O pen interest Z7 

Spat market coorniemacy: 

Imkamdec 

S340dawtr1&5 on 2/10/86 


05 Oh 2/1 0^5 


ok^ CMC \JL& 















































THE TIMES SATURDAY OCTOBER 4 1 986 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


ch «± your 

W> to give *** nm» 

tins against th^°jL-P va jH total Chafe 
pnWufiwJli Xk dividend fgSj 
have won ontrkhi^nr^ Jt tnatdies you 

^ily toS 

Snaer follow « a 

back of your ft ■5™*,“* the 

cam 

w CpapM> -rnim 

'» “"ray Hen 1 JOL'r- - 


Shares continue to drift 

ACCOUNT DAYS: Dealings Iran on Monday* Dealings end next Friday. §Contango day October 13. Settlement day October 20. 

fForward bargains are permitted on two previous business days. 




aa aswan :.- a a* 

J J** g> • - . im zim 

2X S3 mSS**"* 2* •-» «• u u 

W 013 UflkX] MB -fi P« TDoa 

Si.*'”* 3 so „ ; 

•KO 220 WHO at 270 77 M m 


BREWERIES 


■in ■ mm\\ J| 



■Hr! 


T ™1 


Mar s 

Bb wo 

un— ii m 

00 V M 

VWBkaad bar 2 t& 
WHUMiO S» 
tamp 2K 


-0 US 4JJMJ 

■4 217 UUI 

-1 12 172X5 

9+2 41 4214* 

-» 2 U»> U 1 U 
+6 41 34271 

.. 71 iOlSO 

.. U4 21201 
» TU 15U 
U 112 U 
-a m vug 
*3 40 U1U 

-5 ns S3112 
.. 3S1 41 MLS 

-T 21 44113 
. . U 47 13 
-4 to a .. 

41 21141 
41 21 Ml 

*7 . . 

-1 140 41 1U 

.. 144 44141 

.. 11.1 45114 

-2 111 46 114 

.. tU 49Z7X 
127 KOI 
104 40 mi 



BUILDINGS AND ROADS 


ud uni 

147 00104 
400 41 X2 
41 042)4 
04 11 51 
01 24 117 
101 48 121 
XI 1,1241 
.. .. Ill 


U 

S XI 
t .. SA 
■ ■■ 46 
1*2 43 

.. 1J) 

-a u 
-i ii 
tS 21 


.. 31 44101 

1.7 34 09 

-2 11 04 .. 

• .. 12.1 U 10 

17.10 02 574 
»-* 171 71 M 

» - . 14 07 21.1 

*12 104 41121 

» .. 14 07304 

I .. 41 31 104 

07* oi ni 


I I — — Ii |I II on II 



K rrr- m ms 

I BKZlliU— ■ ■igreyi^g^— 





Please be sure to talc* account 
of any minus 


Weekly Dividend 


Please make a note of your daily totals 
for the weekly dividend of £24,000 in 
today's newspaper. 



BRITISH FUNDS 


142 101 

ku to a 


29 31 
U 41 

34 UUI 
U 77144 
21 41341 
72 22122 
7i um 
.. .. ai 

mo <2145 

24 31122 
107 14 121 

1*4 12187 

21 47 172 

77 4.1 122 

Ml 13002 
107 41 07 
107 a .1 07 
370 XI 

35 13 

m2 20 

74 42 

120 XI 
54 42 
71 47 _ 
m a .1 .. 

1X1 47124 
XI 101X5 

22 21121 
14 27 .. 
02 72 mo 

222 02 112 
157 12101 
23 47 Ml 
20b XI XO 
.. .. 21 
1*4 12 71 
101 33U1 
1X5 44 112 

121 42102 

J t 82 172 
5 21 181 
in as wi 

131 32171 
127 41 123 
04b XI 111 
121 31102 
11 11004 

mo 04 277 
111 41 111 
104 21102 
14 15104 
XI 30 121 
u ii au 

07 05 17 J 
22 13 104 
54 31172 


VtjgB 

HqhUM Cjrjaoy 


Ons 
*• v« 

f+r» Cng* sane* *« p,T 


FINANCE AND LAND 


M 205 MtagMA 200 11 00 .. 

104 120 tafcreiHun* 143 32 22 XO 

172*. 71*1 ArtnfpW M3 • .. II 41 .. 

211 100 IMwTMti 211 r 

20 10 tandi eot .. i*a as (ssls 

5583 IM CMmt 235 • .. 57 2437.1 

2Sb 17 Cw^rl^n 5 •" 13 51341 

MS 132 bay 9 Stan K » 01 XI 1X3 

IM 153 M«MM W7 20b XO 201 

78 82 Nretfcm* Lore* 73 11 21 .. 

•5 75 Do 9% CTO .. HO 102 .. 

148 114 W W MlMt 123 *1 

233 IM TtaMMon OtfDi IM • 


313 Ml Earn Prod 303 

221 158 EflOD in 

277 214 BO 280 

<3*1 89b Ota* 30 • 

153 lfl2b Bra 130 

90b 17V BKVOksc (AE) ■B 1 OOb +V 
104 52 Bum 75 -1 

20 N IV. BMren QJ r . -% 

381 an biomr cm* o» m -a 

am. Mb Bncsm <L*4 V Q»b +b 
IM 134 eiMMHCMI Ml 

177*i11« EMVWFMM 110 -b 
M2 112 Do BK. Prt 138 *2 

3«2 iso Bind 2D* -2 

2>4 124 Emm im 

423 312 final 3*3 -2 

55 22 Fin 30*1 

42 20 FMDB UC M 32 

143 100 Flnnar iab 120 -1 

n 40 ms knar « 

850 4M Hraa 550 -7 

07 as Ftnrea 50 

124 M RMCM M 

M 20 Fatal 32 *2 

123 n Fooany n 

41'* 27b FoCm Own M/V 32*. W-b 
Ml 157 FoOtaOM Otoior 170 

07 40 — ----- f— ] *8 

131 M OB *4 02 

385 234 QRN 231 *-5 

310 200 OR 300 

118 00 Oran Eng M -1 

IN U Quota *> 

130 111 Bm 122 

11 1.7116' i Beast. M3 -22 

344 IM Otfmma 270 -2 

505 250 OorlnoKair 200 

182 107 (taivtai HUM IM 

312 205 (tanad* 200 

H 5Ti HHM PracbUn TO 
232 134 IM Eng 3B 0-4 

102 m MH 123 -1 

205 175 HtaBa 175 

290 230 Habra 253 

4»'i 294 I ta np ra tad 43 -b 

«SS m HMtaw* 37 +1 

201 Ml Baoaon 183 -4 

188 146 Do OK OBV £182 -2 

119 M DoSWM 108'i -1 

IZTbllSV DO 10* CUI*. .. 



IMS 

nc u» cmum 


7*i 4*i ICC 0* 

54 22 who 

M *>i jastaon 
» W KCADWg 
30 M LASMO 
» HI Do UHtt 
21 0 Haw Ceun 

M IS Maw Lonoon n 
7 Tt Dtam 
28 . 11 '. oa il tal 
no M Paotnol 
M3 SO FMreoon 
3Fa 21 Kama* 
a RofoiOMM 
m m aw 

IM IB laeiwi 

07 10 temra«> 

il'i 11'* 1H CmtOT 

IS ••* Ttap« 

IS 41 Iterant 

2*0 m 

214 125 U tawire 
84 2T* waodww 


031 
9* 113 

Pncc Ogp panra P.t 


32 

Cl *'i 
10 

IM *3 
IM * *S 
1 r .. 

* 3 '. 

28 

M 

SO 

It 

iB2'i *'• 
»11 8-12 
IM a 
32 
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IS 

52 -2 

134 <2 
111 9-3 


.. 8 . 14 

1748147 40 

» 2, 


ll u u 

43 71 71 

1X0 

22S 21 ■ 
514 SO 00 
11 04 207 
ti 

.. .121 

7.1 OUT 23 

111 

71 47 51 


OVERSEAS TRADERS 


143 47 71 
1X7 SI 111 
91 31 1X2 
2 J 7.1 171 
71b XI ISO 


HwSTgpM 


r on Pago 24 


in M i Malta ' w o .. 

205 Bl my (foraan) tw 

22t 140 Hapworti Cannae 177 •-« 

201 M Kandr Ml -2 

ISO 85 HaaM (J) U4 *-12 

us m Mabgaa* 2 Job uh 

Oi 82 Hdtataaa 78 

108 88 Had Lloyd M 

280 141 HopttSnB MB 

120 H Horan 95 -1 

320 2M HuiHtaa Aaaoe va +3 

US M Hntag Gmap 108 

330 207b Hutdm Wmapoa ass 4-7 

111 111 U1 ISO 8-1 

315 185 taann US • 

295 2 *s jadoana Boom sss m .. 

153 BBb Jattkia IMh iSS 41 

815 473 Johann C H ta l SB *-fl 

243 133 jmaaon MaOhw 21* 

44V 22b JOMWBI 1 FI Mb 

340 235 Jahoan 2S® 

140 H Janaa O Shipaian 102 9-2 

133 57. Jreadm (Tteaaaa) mo 
29 21 KaHmnoo O -1 

M 25 ICafen 29b +1> 

326 IM ICainy tad * -5 

■ISO 105 Kamady Smria T23 +3 

290 230 KwKww (A) 287 « 

215 123 NaareUa 200 • 


CHEMICALS. PLASTICS 


a Mb AKZON/V Baarer KTi r .. 400 

235 ISO HM.CoUk 215 -5 31 

420 an Moita 413 -x mo 

247 m Anchor ChmnlcU 222 +1 XI 




- -iH 


ij 







5? 






W- 


111 78b 

132 102 

in in 

WO 37b 

130 02 
308 W6 

-mo -05 

HO 112 
22 b 15 
IBS 127 

131 100 
223 175 

133 111 
290 200 
171 TO 
*53 530 
101b 72b 
108 H 
11 734 

*10 333 
110 M 
15b 11’. 
IM 1U 
101 82 
17B IM 
130 218 
78 30 
237 178 
153 07 


s^asr 

GMtagm 


Da -A. 1 

OTy (Horen} 
Grata 
Bo DM 

A 0 Eread 


asr 

Norta Hydro 


SKA BPD 
W c ta ba Own 


M04*. -*• 

100 

137 -2 

07 
1TB 

2H -3 

IM 

ISO 

21b •— 1 
154 +1 

127 • 

1*1 ■ 

TIB 


BOV 

353 m+S 
111 *4 
C14b 

M4 -1 
«1 9 .. 

137 1-1 

251 *3 

40 -1 

2U 9-3 


CINEMAS AND TV 


FOODS 


111 ASDMtft ISO B42 

Zl AlpfetaDMa 25 

3M Aiwl 323 m-2 

ZN ABRMd 380 -3 

H Aaaoe FkMdaa <00 

!®2 Arena __ 522 

M Bw*» (Sdmr Q 309 • — 

u 12 Baikar 4 Dobra 14b 
230 oaw(Aor SIS .. 

140 OtarenRxXta 185 


229 BwMoid O X Vfl 251 

73 MH Ota* IM 
s« arVamUOWQ M 
142 CadtavtaMmlll 
Mfi cam HBag 175 
TOO OdORta Mb 280 
t« Do -A' 223 

180 Mm too 

220 Dm 230 

1 S 1 Ftahar (AMO IM 

230 Rth lurei 250 

120 O art te WH* IM 

180 GW 8hw«r as 
120 l lttta wo u d Fawta M3 
MS IMi - •* UB 


XS 211X4 
21 1X4910 

11.1 24 1U 
X7 21 11 J 
51 XT Oil 

17.1 UWI 
1X4 41 XI 

.. .. 234 ' 

mi 42 m 
17 52 111 
2.1 30 177 
17 20171 

74 29 802 
21 22W7 
X7 512X2 
XO 49 XI 
103 - 31 1X2 
101 40120 


75 Hm FOB 10 

US Hnta SapHr 1M- 

4M fcabad Bono 8M 

220 KwOt Sire 219 

OS Law (John 4 115 

50 Lore* (QT) 90 

506 LOW fSSf 540 

IM ttamw I tMntanQMi 
93 MM itadaSuop rn 
150 ManiMaM 2M 
210 McMW (M) (Vkta^ 27S 
1 Sib Honnn a 50 b 

250 Mta Foodo 272 

152 Nor* 4 PMcock 178 
127 Pmfe Fboda 151 
157 RHU 2® 


1S4 Soalponax 
5S TM80UM 
40 ItaavM 
AM Tara 
UataM 

218 uafamew 


OPMp MB 


103 4 stm 
31 11284 
161 X01&S 
11 11171 
50 20171 

50 toni 

47 20 140 
80 21182 
40 XI XI 
20 22 211 
Xt 17 2X4 
74 31182 
20 201X1 

51 60 82 

171 20171 
44 t02T7 
71 87 232 
20 01221 
XI 3114 1 
27 *1231 

114 X2130 
03 20185 
01 41122 
80 801X8 

HO 4.7 10.7 
71 21 231 
40 311X4 

3X1 57 til 
.. .. 81 
X3 21 22.1 
131 Bl 134 

nn 82 no 

87 50 1*1 


207 • 

M -8 


HOTELS AND CATERERS 


an iw Aflpta tv -a- 
52 27 Grjtttan 

20 fTB HIVlW 
385 283 LWT Hldb* 
350 IBB SEMTV 
273 149 TWWfV 
a 31 TSW 
25* 223 Ttareaa TV 
17S 158b TW4M 
148 104 IHtarTV 
155 137 YOfttta™ TV 


*3 U9 X9TX8 
-1 21 07 02 

-3 21 U U 

.. 210 E41X9 

40 -UO 441X1 
-3 MO XI no 
28 51120 

-V 84 30 II 
*0 XI 51 no 
80 84 XS 


RWIMM IM 11 07 670 

Grand Mat OI 0*3 tU 821X1 

Kaanady B r ontaa 208 -2 24 U1H7 

LadMta 30 B-8 180 40188 

MMIM 525 a-5 1X3 27 101 

■ MratOtattta Mb 9 .. XI 241X3 
Princa OMOItaMB B7 Xt 24 1X7 

> Oman Moil 72b ta-1 27 37 ISO 
Semr Hood* 'A* 3(2 si 14 137 

Stakta M 10 2018 I 

TnMMUto FMM 150 -■ 70 Slid 


DRAPERY AND STORES 


INDUSTRIALS 

A-D 





















•vjuHLxv 




' l T 














BANKS DISCOUNT HP 


24 14M4 
87 201X1 
20(1 24 .. 


ELECTRICALS 


350 

179 

299 

IM 

130 

M 

671 

641 

1« 

M 

3H 

172 

343 

207 

ME 

144 

zre 

190 

403 

ISO 

47 

32 

32 

aa 

440 

956 

91 

39 

510 

196 

83 

37b 

373 

263 

M 

40 

295 

T35 

4SS 

3B3 

K 

00 

380 

Z77b 

332 

237 

WP 

Ml 

2ffV 10 

423 

an 

31D 

2M 

210 

199 

174 

112 

41 

1H 

S7 

40 

m 

100 


17 

Ml 

139 


47 

22B 

191 

W 

318 

» 

« 

SI 

3S 

149 


135 

TOO 

9S2 

2U 

630 

n> 

as 

320 

205 

UO 

IH 

75 

198 

34b 

200 

W 

174 

04 

3B 

178 

91 

3* 

403 

IM 

268 

167 

30S 

SB 

TIB 

000 

Kb 8b 

353 

9SB 

33b m 

130 

TS 

an 

348 

17 

« 

51 

33b 

100 

H 

90 

a \ 

199 

no 

2*0 

.UB ' 

306 

115 

^ikf 

1GB 

MS 

■7 

3M 

196 

M3 

2M 

145 

a‘ 

94 

2 

49 

X 


M2 

31 

19 

74 

49 


32 

2fiB 

us 

m 

a 

106 

S3 

59. 

-asb 

M 

96 

499 

353 

130 

99 

» 

i 2Sb 


TT .1 SI 1*0 

80 54 2X8 
02 00120 

267D 40 1X2 
XO 74 00 
122 57101 
XO 20 1X2 
.. .. 102 
0-1 40 111 

U 40102 
U 14 BO 
M £3 9iO 
200 71111 
.. • .. 80S 
H4 SO .. 
14 22 mo 
XS 23 184 
14 30 XI 
24b 1« 347 
221 OI 134 
2* 20104 
1X1 40 114 

90 24201 
114 80123 

.. .. 982 

MO 24111 
107 *7 81 

90b S4 133 

81 £8183 

50 01107 
257a 85 83 

119111 
107 XS 117 
29 82 U 

67b 18 13JJ 
17.1 421X9 
.. f .. .. 

11 80390 

23b 80 84 
XI 50 272 

Mn 11 Ml 
BO 10 3X2 
90 44 134 
84 10988 

51 4400 

81 53 11.1 

80 50 101 
7.1 X2 82 
20 1.1200 
14b 20 77 
21 052B4 
80 31121 

171 84 144 

mi 44141 

IM* 43 ms 


171 80114 
22 27 91 
XI 46242 
71 45U7 
01 14247 
7.1 60 71 
74 20 UO 
14 07 .. 
11.1 44 106 
41 XI 112 
111 30143 

ii 20100 

071 .. 

2D 57 7.1 
mab 7.1 89 


148 +• 

71 • 


iwi 

74 *b 

231 *-V 

IS 


mi so in 

00 04 .. 

05 03 144 
80 SO XT 
7.1 XI .. 
X7 2011.1 
82 23 143 

142 42 180 
. • 9SB 
XI 80 83 
7.1 52203 
SO 102 141 
84 112(7 

ll 17 . . 
80 84 XS 
m ®i .. 

01 72 100 

20 02 71 

123 7.1 121 
XI 83*41 
84 XI 11.7 
170 7.1 84 
lOO 23 83 
50 SA 89 
XI XI 89 
47 20131 
187 1.7 203 
120 47130 
191 50 11.1 

27 20 Ml 
109 29 12.7 
20 20100 
123 82 80 
04 91 80 
M2 82111 
24 002X2 

10 27 110 

971 3.1 111 
BOO 44 .. 
82 70 .. 

0 82 .. 

70 23101 
132 SI T3.1 
Stt? 47 07 

2.7 27 81 
94 22307 
100 81140 
XI 4.1 170 
47 24122 
.. .. 400 

4Jn 83281 
97 801X4 
ra? 27110 
91 SO 77 
111 10 80 
80 XI XI 

71 xi as 

XI 1.1 211 
80 24180 

304 67141 
20 17147 

— .. 160 
127 27111 
XS 64 88 
60 XI 1X4 
IX XI 77 

11 81 ®3 
no 41120 

57 40122 
XIO 81223 
XO 42170 


OB 23 OI 
23 10288 
90 41 XI 
15B XO 00 
23 XI 82 

22 23 27! 

23 .XI SI 
SA XI 77 
11 XI 102 

141 87 111 

74 mb 120 

U XI 181 
160 XS 71 
114b 20 162 
20 29 97 
IJb 43 03 
UO 84 151 
37 20171 

27 63 XI 

143 64127 
XO SI 83 
83 11224 

43 89 73 
29 30 83 
67 S3 80 
60 40 .. 
80 7.1202 
23 45 124 
XI 1X7 40 
XS 621X1 
111 XI BO 
121 40 148 
OI 00 ISO 

mo 7.1 so 

14 43 47! 
mo 89 124 
1! 09 365 

14 31 528 

UO 81 101 
121 84 7.7 

17.1 43 101 


2ZB 

177 j 

a 

22 J 

90S 

954b i 

39V 39 i 

409 

213 

917 

7M 

338 

32B 

301 

221 

431 

219 

■04 

IBI 

934 

720 

IM 

4Z7 

349 

207 

2M 

223 

224 

113 

40 

2S7 

aib ab i 

2M 

230 1 

341 

223 1 

isv ta i 

9*3 

710 I 

453 

Ml 1 

M7 

702 1 

415 

321 ( 

474 

340 I 

449 

MO ! 

772 

620 ( 

937 

712 3 

550 

120 1 

474 

994 1 

tow 




CHA 

Carr Boyd 
Cana GdUMSb 
D a Baar* 


0 Ora 
Btawg 
E fend Gold 
E Haita Prop 
FS Con* 

n owi 

Gama- Tin 

GantMi 

Ota KSBfeg 
BFSA 

QM Ka^orei 
OoptaQ 
CbamataJi KM 
OoobM 


13b 3b 
11V630 
83 31 

58 33 

40 22 

41 22 
IM UD 
425 23B 
IBS M 
21b BV 

3GB 225 
M 39 
991 4M 
553 3H 
248 109 
9V 4V 
ISS 7 
BV 2b 
IM 150 
594 253 
205 129 
205 B5 
300 20D 
6 2V 
9S 4b 

213 S3 
75 17 

3b 4b 
Wb s 
Wb Sb 
063 213 
93 35 

140 85 

are 165 

150 91 
9b 4 b 
400 175 
87b 47b 
12b SV 
5b Zb 
MO 06 
1SV Bb 
47S 17D 
157 04 

21 15 

123 00 
00 14b 

2B 5b 
9b 4b 
009 450 
5b 2b 
142 78 

82 25b 
Mb 10b 
T2B 85 
293 2M 
M 6b 
446 170 
73b 15 


791 511 RT7 
Bb 4b WMtataag 
10b 9b Si HHana 
IBB SB SAWS 
Si 14b SouBWata 
9M 273 Sta ta tati 
133 70 StaplBaal 

138 73 Tranoll 
380 300 UWI 
B2b 31b VataRaata 
BT3 233 varanpoat 
IM 90 Vtattamta 
M 36 Vopii 
17 10b Waafeta Ota 


fb S41 
4-lb 440 

+b zn 

.. M2 
.. M2 
.. 471 

*42 >51 
J ZU 


'!? SS 

♦b 

*45 .. 

*17 120 
».. XI 
*10 Ml 


oratteA n -i 07 11 Ml 

nw isi bo uu 

FM| ttamaa} si 69 W .. 

Itamra CnttWta 373 .. at 7T101 

Wre* 430 269 99 3*7 

1 jadka (WM 35b inuiu 

Loretta 2*2 *2 171 UU6 

OeawWMn U 23 73 27 

Mason 2aon 396 80 27 77 

Do 'A* 238 U IF 7.7 

Foay Fata 145 re-3 TO U 21 

9 ana Dmnrf 40 • . . 

MM Mta 549 ■! 21 <2110 

To are Kuala * 14* -4 81 o 

Vita Cam 2(3 ■ 107 U U 


PAPER, PRINTING. ADVERT* G 


PROPERTY 


.. .. ii 

•01 71 .. 
071 M .. 
480 60 .. 


941 1X1 .. 
SA XT 321 
521 73 .. 
171 41 .. 
MS 41 .. 
801 91 .. 
401 7.1 .. 
291 281 .. 
115 87 .. 


ran Brawn hh 
NM KdBl 
OmNM 
PMg Tin 


• +3 1X4 21180 


313 128 
30b 15 
2M 114 ' 
aeu %m 1 
*W BO 
17b 7b 
H 20 1 

mb mb : 

n M : 


an Dra 
am lamp 
: Random 


-5 171 171 !! 


+20 mo u .. 
.. 220 61 .. 

+9 



fib 

.. 0 .. .. 
*90 

!! mo ii 7i 
+2 901 71 .. 

■*89 

+16 311 41 87 
+b 280 22 511 
+V 125 1X7 .. 
+S 151 161 .. 
+1b 111 XI .. 
*17 


575 +•« 411 U .. 

B»b +4b 555 84 

810 *40 Ml XI .. 

130 +13 161 101 .. 

M 41 XO 7.1 

12 

993 +30 07! Ill .. 

303 +1B 220 71 .. 

EM +V 171 81 .. 

200 +9 80 !j( .. 

240 ., 120 51 .. 

210 +24 

rob +1 b 175 1X7 .. 

SB <2 1.1 XI .. 

13b .. .. .. 

H +6 17 24 - 



780 364 
100 92 
20 10b 

130 73 
91 43 

292 2» 
280 72b 

23* 178 
155 107 
137 IM 
IS 1 
355 ISO 
146 313 
297 215 
103 70 
195 148 
193 <42 



> 04 909 


27 171 

29 

XS 1X1 


ii «i9 

64 

61 121 

171 

U 14.1 


90171 

41 

29 1X7 

85 

64 191 

79 

UBi 

29 

1.0 .. 

91 

XI 401 

17.1 

xa i9i 

2X4 

21 11.8 

901 

X4 211 

71 

XI 241 

.. XX 

XT 

24 2X0 

61 

91 BJ 


XB 5X7 

200 

X21X1 

41 

‘ X2 490 

87 

0.7 .. 

X? 

912X4 

12.1 

71 1X7 

67 

65111 

1X1 

.. 71 

621X3 

94 

XO 1X7 

XI 

113X9 

XS 

21211 

191 

91267 

131 

91261 


X6BX9 


22 21.7 

1X1 

471X1 

XI 

23 901 

21 

11861 

TOJ 

40 1X4 

Ml 

412X3 

1X7 

1.0 2(1 

X3 

40 .. 

XT 

20 226 

71 

41 101 

104 

91222 

1X7 

XI 1X9 

ii 

47 HO 

XI 

BO 1X0 

41 

22 141 

09 

09SX7 

9 J 

1.1 5X4 


14 1X3 

7.1 

09 111 

T.T 

91137 

171 

09 371 

1J 

115X6 

21 

XI 121 

1X1 

419X2 

ii 

90 991 

X2 

XI 294 

31 

21234 

XI 

09 3X7 

21 

013X1 

1.1 

02 .. 

1X2 

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29 

17 2X2 

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MOTORS AND AIRCRAFT 


Z31 91 AC 

261 138 AE 
20b 7 Matai 
IBS Kb ASPMyafd 
Mi 7T>b Ai m awng 
S3b Mb BSG 
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314 185 Boreal (CD) 
808 421 Br imam 
191 90 Br Car AocOdta 

773 109 CaRyw 
210 T9 CM IT) 

133 90 Ptatt (Qcd Fi m 

Ml 172 Etas® 

IIS 98 BW 
357 253 FR Owp 
213 125 Fort MW 


OI XI 141 „ 

124 XS 122 2U 
31 1JS2U 3» 
41 Bl 171 W 
XS* XI 123 90 

24 523KD IBS 
299 41 11.1 ® 

314 41 Ml » 
41 44 BZ MJ 
11 X5 145 »1 

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1J XI 70.6 
27 64 111 
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XT 24141 
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14 11 309 
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210 XI 141 
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121 101 71 
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04 XS 77 

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71 41114 
71 85 X2 
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89 XI 165 
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107 05 00 
11 17 1X6 


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106 5i OMM) L ama noa 
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583 335 Jaguar 
142 72 Jam 

125 SS IMA 
402 2M Lax 
205 90 Lntaare 
683 470 Lima 
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91 08 raon JOB} 

102 51 omen cmSj 
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160 

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160 


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82 

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24 


SI 


New 

streets 

ittarrm 

ttsterdi 


After 

prices 

course 

session 


evapon 

mornii 

started 


The 
averagt 
about 1 
half ho 
to 1,7$ 


BseCasi 
Brden 
BgWam 
Bran My. 
BP 

Burton 

Button 

Buroutf 

OmpoS 

CanRac 

CaterptB 

Galanas 

Central! 

Champ* 

Cnasak 

ChmBK 

Chevrar 

Chryskn 

Cffcorp 

Ctarkfe 


Ctwt« I 

CocaCc 


Ctetea 
Omb'tn 
Comwtt 
Cons Ei 
Cn Mat 
Cons Pi 
CnWDJ 
Oommc 
CPCW 
Crane 
Cm 2d 
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Deem 
Data A 
Detroit 
Ogrtall 

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DuX«P 
Du Per 
Easton 
EstmK 
Eaton i 
Emars 
Exxon 


YO 

As 


or 

c 


Grc 


r 


26 


THE TIMES SATURDAY OCTOBER 4 1 986 


Where in the world 


will you make 


money nex 



INVEST FOR GROWTH 
THROUGH CS INTERNATIONAL FUND 
FOR A FLEXIBLE, INTERNATIONAL PORTFOLIO 

THAT OFFERS YOU: 


1 . The benefits of fund management 
Vi y a leading independent house 

The CS International Fund, a U-K. authorised unit trust, is 
managed by CS. Fund Managers Ltd- part of an 
independent and highlyprofessional organisation 
responsible for £300 miffion of institutional and private 
money, of which a very significant proportion is mvested 


overseas. 


2. Only 2% initial charges 

The majority of unit trusts make an initial charge of up to 
5%. The low 2% initial charge on CS International Fund 
which applies until April 1987 means that money invested 
now works a good deal harder for ; 


Invest now for international opportunity 
To invest, please return the coupon with your cheque 
(minimum £1.000) and units will be allocated at the offer 
price then ruling. 

On 3rd October 1986 the unit offer price was 56.8p and the 
estimated gross yield 2%. 

Please bear in mind that the price of units, and the income 
from them, may go down as well as up. 

You should regard your investment as long term. 

GENERAL INFORMATION 


:you. 


5. A portfolio to beat the indices 

The specific objective of the managers is to outperform the 
Capital International World Index. The initial portfolio will 
be spread between Bonds, (with an emphasis on the 
Deutschemark and the Yen) and equities in the US, Europe, 
the UK and the Far East 


..The 

, _ .solan 

_ Her and certificates for units bought will be sent within 28 
sett temm t • ...... 

INVETMENT POWERS: The Managers may. wnhmthe limits laid down by uie 
~ r nnemoTTrade and Industry. invest mended options and secondaiy tnair/rts. 
dgeaeuns currency tfocxuacous and to borrow forth? account of the fond. 


S3 


in 2 working daw < 
working days ol 


CHARGESTUrml 15th April \9fn 
unHs. The annual charge ts ‘ 

deducted trotmhe income oft r . 

the annua] fee to the msamum 1.5% plus OT sutnect io 3 months nonce. 
COMMISSION FOR ADVISERS: Out of the mUUl charges, remuneration will he paid 
to authorised professioml advisers on appiicaJKKisbearmg their samp. 

INCOME: Dividends will be distributed to unitholders at Ran-yearW m erwk from 
1987 onwards on 15th June and 15th December Each income distribution will be 
accompanied by an Investment report from the Managers. 

MANAGER! CS. Fund Matupersltd. l2SHtgh Hdbom. London WC I VtfY 
TRUSTEE The Governor aneftompany of the Bank ofScodand. 


4, Worldwide flexibility 

The aim of the CS International Fund is capital growth from 
a portfolio invested in markets worldwide. The investment 
policy is flexible and die managers will react quickly to 


TtUs ofier Is not available to residents of die Republic oflreUnd. 


rfoCS Fund Mjtuwis Linmed 

I 125 High Hofoom. London WCIV 6 Pt TthQIJU IMfl 


changing drcumstances. The emphasis is on equity 

’ * ^ ” iwulnormaUy 


lmmimutn£1 Xn0| u) be Uivaicd 

I m theCS hxenMDonaMsmd. 

Qwjiaa should br m*de fujahje ta "CS frmd Mitagm Limard' 


t endow a cheque for X 
! oi the CShxenMOOiul Rind. 


investment and at least 60% of the portfolio 
be invested overseas.- 
Currency considerations, the relative merits of equity 
markets and individual share selection will play an 
important part in the development and implementation of 
die investment policy pursued by the managers. 

There is therefore genuine flexibility to protea the interests of unitholders 
and maximise performance. 


Sunwme 


laOCKlETTEKKEASEI 

FinaNjmeJ 

(KRUj 

Address 


I 


Postcode-^. 


MhGE^Uffjini b5Ec3l 



^ FUND MANAGERS LIMITED THE I NDIVIDUA L INVESTMENT GROUfJ 

CS INTERNATIONAL FUND 


Edited by Peter Gartland 


FAMILY MONEY/1 


Six billion in gas pipelin 


( PRIVATIZATION ) 


Hie pattern of 
discounts and bonuses is 
familiar,, but the size of 
the British Gas flotation 
distinguishes it from 
all the rest MARTIN 
BAKER looks at what 
promises to be the biggest 
boost yet to the 
Government's coffers 





British Gas is coming up for 
sale, digital flame and all. The;, 
company's determined pub- 
licity campaign waged through 
the newspapers, a mall shot of 
1 6 million customers, the 
hundreds of high street 
branches, and the already 
familiar crypto-rock video 
commercials, will all bring the 
attractions of an ambitious 
offer to our notice. 


It is the company’s stated 
)8 c 




:• .. ;• . * ' ' y * - V v ,V- ^ ■ - v - - V ’■ 



intention to make 98 per cent 
of the population aware of the 
sale at the end of November. 

“It is likely to be the hugest 
share offer of airtime,” says 
Anthony Alt, one of the 
bankers behind the 
privatization. 

The figures are virtually 
-meaningless to most people. ' 
The first half of British 
Telecom raised £3.9 billion in 
1 984. the TSB, from which the 
Government receives no 
money, has pulled hi more 
than £1.25 billion, but British 
Gas will almost certainly bring 
in more than both -put 
together. 

The precise amount of 
money the Government hopes 
to raise is not yet known, but 
conservative estimates are 
around the £6 billion mark. 

For the small investor the 
size of the company being sold 
is probably about as im- 
portant as how many times 
investors would stretch 
around the world if laid end to. 
end. More important quesr 
tions must be whether inves- 
tors should apply at all how 
likely they are to receive any 
shares, and what, if anything, 
needs to be done between now 
and the end of November. 

Should you apply? The. 
prospects for British Gas are 
not quite as wonderful as they 
seemed a year ago. At that 
time oil which is more or less 
the commodity that British 
Gas is selling to us. was 
trading at more than S25 per 
barrel. Since then the oil price 
has collapsed and recovered 
slightly to today's levels of 
around $15 per barrel. But 
.British Gas. of .course, has a 
monopoly* which hardly pro- 
motes a cost-cutting war. 

As the oil price does not 
help, the state of the Stock 
Market is doubly important. 
All the talk of bull (rising) and 
bear (falling) markets actually 
does have some significance 
for the small investor. 



Flame of hope: the commercials are expected to stimulate 


The big investors, the pen- 
don funds and insurance com- 
panies, naturally have a 
stronger appetite for shares if 
prices are generally increasing. 
Should the stock market be in 
a pronounced downward 
phase next month, investors 
may find themselves with very 
little appetite for such a big 
issue They might just choke 


It has a definite 
Telecom ring to it 


give-away. The Government 
takes the money paid for 
shares. In the case of TSB. 
shareholders own all the assets 
of the business, including the 
money they paid for their 
stake in the bank. 

The pattern of inducements 
to buy and hold British Gas 
shares definitely has a 
Telecom ring to it. Subscribers 
will be eligible for vouchers 
providing a discount on bills 
at the rate of £10 per hundred 
shares held. The alternative is 


investment on die big ^ 

metered supply. If the issue - 
turns out to be attractive’ (be 
flotation may prove. to be* 
charter for domestic quench. 
Two million applicants are 
expected to be drsappoiaied 
by the TSB issue, which wifl-i 
be -traded for the first I foe 
next Friday.- British Gas i& 
unafraid of a huge share 
register. 


. >.9 Itft 


Reward most be 
the intention 


and decide they do not want 
British Gas, and if they do the 
share price will probably falL 


a loyalty bonus — one share 
:forev 


. Some analysts say the Gov- 
ifford 


eminent cannot afford to let 
small investors suffer in this 1 
way — there will be a general 
election sooner or later. So the 
bankers may have to pitch the 
share price so low that a profit 
for everyone is guaranteed. 
But we do not know the share 
price yet only that the mini- 
mum investment will be £150 
worth of shares. 

The shares are likely to be 
paid for in instalments, so an 
outlay of less than that will -be-, 
required in the same way that 
only 50p was required as the 
first instalment of the £1 TSB 
shares. 

There are important dif- 
ferences from the TSB issue. 
The two should not be con- 
fused. British Gas. is not a 


free for every 10 shares bought 
and held for three years. 

British Gas customers are 
certain to receive shares, pro- 
vided they register their in- 
terest by contacting the British 
Gas Share Information Office 
by Novemeber 14 at the latest. 
The address is PO Box l, 
Bristol BS99 IBG (0272- 
272272). British Gas show- 
rooms also have information 
packs and registration forms. 

So far there have been two 
million inquiries, but there are 
16 million British Gas cus- 
tomers. all of whom arc 
entitled to. register and be sure 
of their shares. 

Precisely who will receive 
the priority status in house- 
holds where accommodation 
is shared is uncertain. But the 
company has made it quite 
dear that there will be only 
one- priority aplication per 


Mr All says he wants 
manv as possible” of the -MLi; 
million British Gascustonws ** 
to apply for shares. The TSfffcjg 
target was a modest ooev 
million subscription hsL.Th&, 
inference must be that life ^ 
intention is to reward British « 
Gas applicants with a Slake 
the company. 

There can be little dotitL, 
that British Gas will finish ^ 
1 986 as the company with the 
biggest share register in Bm*: ■ 
ain. How the organizers of fte & 
issue envisage mtbrmingdB 
per cent of the popubiwo 
about the sale is a 
which intrigues the 
and publicity industry. 

More Cofin WellaiKfTMare 
punk opera television 
commercials? By next month 
you will know about the 
British Gas sale whether you 
like it or hot. 


_• .s .tm 
. ** 
. nnM« 

• : •>, ota 

" • . '■ MFt; 

Jti.fiK' - 

U- tN 
! I: pMr 


i tmiprlMlffl 


. hafi 

J ■ !** ****** 

tviiMfr 

- Abu 

■■ ■***•» *< I** 
>«*$■• t*l 

- 'ft*- *4iHi 
w ri ft * * tail** 


•t m pad m : m 

.*Srn. that *1 
-. nc ms* ?•» Mm 


■«A 




Top Performer 

. . . Perpetual takes The Observer s 1985 Unit 
Trust Managers of the Year award. A richly 
deserved award. Its investment team — chairman 
Martyn Arbib, Bob Yerbury, Scott McGlashan 
and Martin Rasch — have been producing perfor- 
mance plums well for many years . . . 

..„ Bi:kiaiMia:i i>ihDec N5 


. -::x : i-;;: • : 



r 

Mggr 



Vanguard 

European Fund 




^ ■ 









Unit Trust form guide 

. . . Two groups deserve a big hand Perpetual . . . 
achieved a 100% record in both periods (one year 
and three years): All their trusts performed above 
average. ’ SUNDAY TIMES 4th May w 




The Award-Winning Team 
Moves Into Europe 


MfciTCTttKtfiJl 


h£ 


I 


4,1 


mmm 


Impressive 

. . . Fferpetual has the most impressive track record, 
hitting the top spot over the ten-year, nine-year, 
eight-year and five-year periods with two second 
places, one third, one fourth and one seventh. 

THE TIMES 5th July 




. V 


Highest Marks 

. . . Perpetual comes out of the comparison with 
the highest marks. With the sole exception of the 
International Emerging Companies portfolio, 
which falls into the near miss category, all the 
otherlong term funds in the group appear in the 
top quartUe, both over the long term as well as 
the short term. MONEY MAGAZINE August So 


Leading the way 
in Performance 

In recent years. Vanguard 
has been recognised by die press as 
the UK’s mostsuccessful small unit 
trustgroup. • ■ 

1985 and 1984: Winner of The Observer’s 
“Small Unit Thist Group of the Year” award. 
1985: Winner of Money Management's “Small 
Unit TVust Management Group of the Year” 
award. 



The aim of the fund is to provide 
the unitholder with good capital 
growth in the medium and long term. 
Please remember that the value of 
units and the income from them can go 
down as well as up. 


isii! 


In the eleven years since launching the Group's first 
unit trust in the United Kingdom. Pterpetual has earned 
an enviable reputation for consistent investment success. 

The International Growth Fund is the top authorised 
unit trust for capital growth over tire eleven year period 
since launch to the 1st September 1986. 


inoi Best Income Trust 
lTOl -Money Observer 


Smaller Unit Trust 


1984 Group of the year 

-Sunday Telegraph 


1985 ^ n * t ^' rtisl ^ rou p 


of the year 

-Observer 


1985 *^ rUSl Manages 


of the year 
-Money Msg&rine 


Jtsl 


I 


Please send me details of the Mkwng tplease tkk boxl 
1 1 International Growth Fund Q Far Eastern Growth Fund 

Q Income Fund Q European Growth Fund 

[~1 Wjrfduide Recovers Fund Q American Growth Fund 

□ Intemuiioruf Emereine pi Monthly Savings Plan * 
Companies Fund ' “ *— * i From 520 per month) 


Investing for 
Growth in Europe 

Now, the same investment team is turning 
its attention to the potential offered by Europe. 

The European Fund's portfolio wdl cover all 
the major markets of the Continentand will be 
looking for opportunities in all sectors. 

• Companies will be selected by the quality of 
their management the strength of their balance 
sheet, and above all by their growth potential. 
The Fund may also invest in bonds. 


A first dass pedigree 

Vanguard Thist Managers is a wholly-owned 
subsidiary of Capel-Cure Myers, one of the City ’s 
most respected and dynamic stockbrokers! 1 

CUM currently looks after more than £L7~bHtion 
of funds for private, institutional and pension : 
hind clients. A substantial proportion of these 
funds is invested in foreign securities. 


ActNowfora 
Special Discount ■ . > 

i *- s a 2% introductory discount until : .v 

dose of business on 17 Octoljer 198b. Please bote ~ 
that the hind will be valued daily from lstOctol^er ~A 
lHbb. and the discount will apply to the offer price <\ 
atthe daily valuation. . 


General Monnation 


n 


To: ftrperual Group. 4 s * Hun Sireci . Henlcvon-Thames. 
OxnnRGyi^ " ' ~ 


-AZ. Td: Henley-twThamcs lOWlI NSNU. 


SURNAME . 


•MU MPS MISS. 

ADDRESS _ 


HOSrO.JDE . 


U p« m nsvipi olyiwpinKtarabMi torm aeon iniet nou- will be wm. 
fnllmvM l(f »wrMtMKcui T Bwki Ubh prices and yWri>i an- <| ihiw<I in 
lli<- Fin, inrial Time-. t'n;i-ranhe«oliI Wk to thf'Mannm.'rs ji nntk-iM 
ilun tfu- minimum Hiriia-itvcalculaii-d (oh lorninlaapprasn-d hj ttav 
Dcparun«iinf Tnidf. Tht-TVint iiy ibA Di-purtnumi i ifntuli.. 

imdwinstituU.-d !■> a Omsl. An initial riwm. > vr-7%b>incltu(«.-<l in tlicnllcr 
prirv of unit-i. from nhii-h remuncrkOUB L* nayuhlo lonualificd 
inlArmi^Il.in^-ii mmu^ailalilcon rwiiK->t.TItL*anniulrh.irsi-K-^>l ai 
I 1 -;*- pkl« CAT of th,- vnlin-nl thi‘"IV,Kt m- nppu-kyl ti,a maximum t , l -JS 
pi-nnttin! in the Dt-tall. This bik-duruil from ihi- i:nr« inojim.- and is 
-ilfira L-d form tht'camm arus-vj ielrf. DLstniiuoonj wiff lie fwiiil ix'irfy 
nn ibi-'iiul t trloinT w ifai-esumatnl urnwj ii.lri IS 

tViMk-: Bandars F.ink trust Cum pan}' LimiUni.M UunUml suiw-u 
Ixu-inn ECSPSAH. 

-MaiiJt.-rs; t . m-^i li ni Trust ManatM'-Umilnl-ti.*, M»ll»rn Vwlnri, 
Lon-iim LV I A ^K1 ts-l>.-|ilivnei>I-lEIK:KU:L M.inl.-1-.-l ihs- 1 mil Tni~l 
’.ss-h-iaiiim. 


Ltd, 65 Holbom Yiadoct, : 
London ECIASEU^ TWephooe: Qk236 3053 

I 'd' ... ■ - - - - 


l/Wf wish to in vesu minimum £ikll in lie 

vanguarri European Fund at (heufforuricr T" 
rulinron receipt of mvannliraiinr, 


■ i wnwatuiwi 

rahngon receipt of myapnlwuiin. . . 

First Names i in fufli 


Surname i M r M r «*/ Miss! 
mj*Ki rm-<r>fi4.u4 ■ 
Address. 


S.B. AlUtruicJ^ji in Sepi u nitxr r Wif»nlini.~fa»dcnci iruncjnl iiw^Bc FnMMtUunbal m 
(Hj nnllcrhih«JhmL YmithooUlcinciiihcrtlu Ihe pnccrfuM,<.-anaiMfcwitb veil sup 


Member iha IhM Hum Aiwo«ion 


n >- Mi l wminlilr ti. ■■ I'fln-. 


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B 


27 


THETIMES SATURDAY OCTOBER 4 1986 




FAMILY MONEY/2 


How to get your money back 


CproTectqm 

T^ e Government has left m 
ihe Iasi minute one of t£ 
vital aspects of foe 


^rviees industry is sharply 
on the best way in 
w «»ch it should be achieved. 
.There are two options. First, 
there could be ah industry- 
W| de compensation scheme. 


Ine SR ^P e « the financial en!ai1 aH the seif-regulating 

organizations (SROs) - the 


Services Bill. 

The provisions 


For 



•nvest- 


bodies which will be p rimar ily 
regonsi We for policing an the 
different financial sectors — 
collectively compensating 
investors when an investment 
business goes bust. 

, A solution along these lines 
*s favoured by the Govern- 
mem. 'the Bank of England, 
most of the SROs and the 
... , ... — .....Hour, Securities and Investments 

Michael Howard, got round to ®da*d (SIB), the parent body 
{Hr!? •*?_ ^eRdment to the he ®W by Sir Kenneth BerrilL 
‘ * which, will oversee the SROs 

and. policing certain busi- 
nesses itself 


ment business are about as 

crucial. an aspect of investor 

protection as you could get. 

* ei ! l only on Tuesday 
evening this week that the 
Government, acting through 
rnmiaS; 



Key ran: Sir Kenneth BerriU, left, and Michael Howard 
„ The scheme is none the less 


PMi 


i- IP n. 


‘^iW 

! ' ,M " “t.m,; 

V* lire, & 

i r/ ; 

•' h '*S> a. 


d irim [* 

Mention 


Bill revising the way in which 

a compensation . scheme 

would be provided. 

Apart from the Bill, the 
question of compensation is of 
course of more than passing 
interest in the light of the. 
continuing saga of McDonald 
Wheeler Fund Management 
“nis is ihc investment 
management and advisory 
company, based in Canter- 
bury. Kent ■ which was re- 
cent * 

the Official Receiver. 

A letter to people who had 
entrusted their money to the 
company was sent out bv 
James Pope, the Official Rc- 
ccverjusi over a fortnight 
ago. These people included 
those who between them had 
invested £8.9 million in time 
managed funds operated by 
McDonald Wheeler. 

Mr Pope's letter contains 
the following news for the^c 
people: “There will be a 
substantial deficiency between 
jhe amount of the monies 
invested in the nine managed’- 
funds and the likely realizable 
value of the underlying 
assets.” 

jT . , The account of the way this 
' money was used — which is 
. . reproduced here — goes a long 
way to explaining ine plight of 
, those investing in the man- 
aged funds. 

McDonald Wheeler inves- 
tors arc on their own. There is 
nu compensation fuiid in exis- 
' tencc which applies to them. 
The intention of- the finan- 
cial Services Bill, however, is 
that there should be a 
H ’ compensation fund which 
:: would protect all investors, 

' apart from professional inves- 
' tors, who lose money through 
— the fraud or insolvency of an 
“ investment business. 

Unfortunately, the financial 


The amendment to the Bill 


an admirable one which the 
Stock -Exchange would like to 
preserve, not least because the 
paucity of claims on it has 
meant that it has been able to 
obtain insurance for the fund. 

Cynics say . the Stock Ex- 
change has had a purple patch 


tabled' on Tuesdav gives the ’««* its; fond would not 
SIB the power to' impose an J P ok so™*? if_a few member 


industry-wide scheme broadly 
along these lines, on the entire 
network of SROs. 

The alternative is to allow 
every SRO to do its. own thing. 
Jn other words, every SRO 
. ----- — • would be responsible for 

rtrr - ,n . lhe hands of producing a scheme that 
uniciai Receiver. would provide compensation 

lo investors losing money 
through the insolvency or 
fraud of one of that SRO's 
members. 

This solution is favoured by 
the Stock Exchange and a 
body called the International 
Securities Regulatory 
Organisation (ISRO), which 
represents the interests of 
large international banks and 
securities firms. ISRO and the 
Stock Exchange are planning 
to merge shortly. 

The Stock Exchange is a 
case in point. It already' has a 
good compensation scheme. 


Compensation can 
be withheld 


’■■'i.ii 

"JVtf! 


Investors who lose money 
through the failure or fraud of 
a Stock Exchange member 
firm will be able to recover the 
full amount of their loss -from 
this compensation fund. 

The Stock. Exchange is 
intending to put a ceiling on 
recoverability of £250.000 per 
investor. In addition, the 
scheme is discretionary in the • concerned; 
sense that the Stock Exchange 
can withhold compensation 
either in pan or in full, if it 
considers that the investor is 
ih some way to blame for his 
loss. 


firms failed after Big Bang. 
They also say that more would 
be made of the discretionary 
dement of the payouts if the 
fund was'faced with a rush of 
claims. 

Arguments over the op- 
timum ' way of providing 
compensation have .been 
simmering beneath the surface 
ever since the Financial Ser- 
vices BiH - was published in 
December. They blew up pub- 
licly this week. 

Both sides have valid cards 
— but the Government and the 
SIB have the whip hand. They 
have the force -of law behind 
them and h looks likely that 
they will prevail. 

So what will be the out- 
come? The likelihood is that 
we shall have a mixture. The 
SIB wants a central scheme. 
But this will pay out only 
when an SRO docs not have 
the' resources to satisfy 
compensation claims arising 
from the failure or fraud' of 
one of its members. 

The- first big question is 
what losses any- sort of 
compensation scheme will pay 
for. An investor's losses will 
include , any gains he has 
forgone or interest he could 
have earned on his money. In 
essence hd-will be able to take 
from the fund the amount he 
woukf have got had lie 
successfully brought an action 
for damages against the firm 


But what do you do until the 
compensation scheme is op- 
erational? This will not be 
until at test the middle of 
next year. How do you safe- 
guard yourself against Mc- 
Donald .Wheeler Mark II 
happening to you? 

The SIB will decide how 
much compensation will be 
available per investor. And it 
looks likely that this will be 
around the £50.000 mark. The 
STB canvassed the idea of 


Si 


.tore demanded 
ore a withdrawal 


£30.000 per investor, bat the 
Government, which will not 
be poblicly drawn on a figure, 
thought this 


Then there is the question 
of how' much. There will 
dcfinitciy .be a ceiling on the 
amount of money that you can 
get back -from the compensa- 
tion scheme. 


Ur 


WHERE THE £8.9m WENT 



Amount (Em) 

How applied 

Comments 

4SL 

Invested by way of share 
capital or unsecured 
loans in private companies 

These imrestments are - • . 

primarily tn the nature of ' 
venture.capital 

1.8 

Invested in quoted 
securities or externally 
managed funds 

are 

1.3 

Management and 
administration charges 
- and initial fees ■ 

Paid to McDonald Wheeler 
. Fund Management Ltd . 

0.6 

Loaned to McDonald Wheeler 

Fund Management Ltd 

This morieyyvas utilized to 
finance -foe .operation of 
the compjany ' 

0.3 

Cash balances a'nd amounts 
due from stockbrokers and 
clients, net of amounts 
due to them 

. ^ 

0.7 

Unexplained differences 

StiH tinder inquiry . 


\\ i. 


as an indication of the ultimate realizations 


light this was far too low: 
The Government wants a high 
figure. Compensation, after 
all. is a vote-winning and 
emotive subject. 

Even £50,000 may not be 
enough to cover you. “It is not 
a lot when you think of the 
amounts of money people 
entrust to very small firms.” 
said one investment expert 
this week. 

- It is worth bearing in mind 
that it will be open to individ- 
ual .SROs to lop up the 
compensation limits for their 
own members by having a 
supplementary scheme of 
their own. Whether this hap- 
pens or not is another 
question. 

- Wh3t to do in the interim? 
The first thing is to appreciate 
that McDonald Wheeler was a 
member of NASD1M — the 
National Association of 
Securities Dealers and Invest- 
ment Managers. NASDIM has 
now 1 ' changed its name to 
F1MBRA — the Financial 
Intermediaries Managers and 
Brokers Regulatory Associ- 
ation - to tie in with its role as 
an SRO in the new regime: 

Neither NASDIM nor 
FI M BRA. as it now is. had or 
has a compensation scheme; 
Some luckless McDonald 
Wheeler investors appear to 
have been under the im- 
pression .that h Had. 

The second thing to appre- 
ciate is that at the moment 
membership of FIMBRA. 
which many people proudly 
boast, is not necessarily a 
guarantee of financial probity. 

• Thirdly, do not think that 
you are safe just because a 
company tells you that it runs 
separate accounts for its own 
a ijd , its clients' money. If a 
firm. -.-wants to steal your 
money, it will do so. The fact 
that the money is in a separate 
clients* account does not of its 
owil. restrict the firm's access 
io'iL 

Interestingly, there is a little 
known association which goes 
much further in protecting its 
Investors' money in a manner 
which both restricts the access 
to it of the investment firm 


MURRAY INCOME 
TRUST PLC 

MANAGERS: MURRAY JOHNSTONE LIMITED 

Results for the year ended 30 June1966 


Equity shareholders' interest 

Asset value per share ' . 

Revenue available** ordinary shareholders 

Earnings per ordinary share 

Ordinary dividend per sharer- interim 

-final 

Capitalisation issue in B ordinary share s 


1986 
£154,684,652 
185.2p 
£4,502,952 
: 5.48p 

1.80p 
. 3.6Qp 
. 3.025355% 


1985 
£112,686,767 
135.0p 
- £4.283,618 
522p 
1.70p 
3.30p 
; 3.78035% 


growthofcapitai. 

Highlights tor ltieYearended30June1>8S 

* SSSSSSa' 

|^aseof3&8%fbralHDvestment 

trusts.. . 

•SfflSSSSEB*:- 

over 1985. 

*p&i 

* 

currency exposure 


DtBhibuSonoloBWttmopwcw^^ 

1984 ‘ 1985 

Eauitles ICont) 

1984 1965 

% % 

UnHedKiftSdom 

$3.66 79^8 Irwestmaitfund - 

107.15 10926 

North Americo 

.8 ML HXffl PriorcapAalondiocrs 

I7.1SJ- (926) 

ForEdst 

2JS\ 445 Eq^shorebofclefS' interestioo. 00 1 DO 00 

Europe 

: v 6J4 5i2f - _ - . 


Other Americas , 

■ V (L80 037' * 


South Africa 


. 99A3 ioa&a .PWdwencyeqxBure 

BoQtfe 


i.£WQ % 

118873 7684 

Untied KEngdom 

North Americo 

185 525 . North America 

14673 949 

Europe 

033 - . 043 Jcpcn 

423 027 

‘FarEotf 

t7f . 040 FarEast 

7.139 462 

Jdoan 

- 027 028 Europe 

12839.. 7.98 


. .4^3 • Bin . OtherAmertcas-. 

•1241 080 

Property 

• 047 — total 

154685 • 

Net cash 

0J2 070 Percentage 

10000 10000 



and also keeps the money 
entirely separate in the event 
of a liquidation or 
receivership. 

This is the Association of 
Independent investment 
Managers. It has been in 
existence for more than 10 
years and is composed of a 
small coterie of eight invest- 
ment managers and advisers. 
There are some well known 
names — such as WestAvon 
and Perpetual Fund Managers 
included in the membership. 

Members of the AIIM must 
keep all their clients* money in 
separate custodian type ac- 
counts with well established 
banks. The money is held in 
the names of the clients and to 
the order of the clients. 

According to Anthony 
Weficr, secretary of the AIIM. 
this means in effect that the 
bank will not make payments 
out of the account without a 
written signature from the 
diem, and that the clients’ 
money does not form part of 
any receivership or liquida- 
tion should the investment 
firm collapse. 

Mr Weilcr says he has been 
unable to persuade the 
Department of Trade and 
Industry of the merits of this 
type or safeguard. He thinks, 
however, that it should be 
made obligatory for all small 
firms, below a certain size, 
which are holding clients' 
money. He also says that 
operating in this way is not 
administratively 
cumbersome. 

At the end of the day. 
common sense, asking around 
and not putting all your eggs in 
one basket, should provide a 
degree of protection. Gut feel- 
ing. too, is often a useful 
indicator. If in doubt about 
someone's credentials or bona 
fides or trustworthiness, don't 
use him. 

Lawrence Lever 


Paradise funds regained 
three years later 

C CURRENCIES ) 


The beginning of the end for 
currency funds began on 
September 15, 1983. Or so it 
seemed. 

That was the date chosen by- 
Nigel Lawson to announce a 
dampdown on offshore cur- 
rency funds by changing the 
tax rules. Up to that point, the 
great benefit for UK investors 
was that they could roll up a 
potentially onerous income 
tax liability into a minimal or 
even non-existent capital 
gains one. 

So much money bad been 
attracted into these Channel 
Islandsrbased funds in the 
early pan of 1983 that one of 
the financial institutions offer- 
ing them. Rothschild Asset 
Management, was actually 
about to celebrate Si billion of 
funds under management on 
the very day of the 
Government's dramatic 
announcement. 

The result was that the 
champagne corks stayed 
firmly in the bottles and 
Paradise was cancelled. Or 
was it? 

After three years of keeping 
a low profile on its currency 
funds Rothschild is now 
beginning lo trumpet their 
virtues once again. Maybe it 
was just a case of Paradise 
postponed. 

Rothschild now wants to 
put the historical roll-up trick 
into perspective by extolling 
the other benefits of currency 
investment. 

These benefits are twofold. 
Not only can investors get 
access to wholesale rates of 
interest in sterling or other 
major currencies — they tan 
also acquire foreign currencies 
at inter-bank rates of 
exchange. 

Not that the tax advantages 
have disappeared completely. 


By having income rolled up in 
the fund, investors can choose 
when to pay income tax — 
perhaps when they retire and 
move into a lower tax band - 
though not whether to pay 
income tax. as was the case 
before September 1983. 

Interestingly though, the 
roll-up trick is still valid in 
some countries, which is why 
Rothschild can boast inves- 
tors from as for away as the 
Falkland Islands and the 
People's Republic of China. 

Rothschild also now op- 



Lawson: 1983 dampdown 


erates a Mark II -type currency 
fund in which it is possible 
under existing legislation to 
make distributions of the in- 
terest every six months on 
which income tax is payable 
on the interest element but not 
on any currency appreciation. 
This remains subject only to 
capital gains tax. which is not 
a real tax for most individual 
investors. 

Tax mechanics aside, lhe 
fundamental question for 
investors is which currencies 
are likely to strengthen against 
sterling during the next year or 
so. On that point Rothschild's 
not entirely flippant view is 
“practically all of them”. 

In particular. Rothschild 
expects sterling to get weaker 


against the major continental 
European currencies and the 
Japanese yen. for a variety of 
economic and political 
reasons. 

In particular, runs the argu- 
ment, foreign investors, will 
not warm to the possibility of 
a Labour government because 
of what are perceived lo be 
unwelcome inflationary im- 
plications. Quite separately, 
the yen will continue to 
strengthen against sterling be- 
cause of Japan’s continuing 
and enormous current ac- 
count surplus. 

Guinness Mahon is another 

big name in the currency food 
game. Th3 view of GM's 
currency investment adviser, 
Philip Saunders, is that it is 
the harder European cur- 
rencies - the West German 
mark, the Swiss franc, the 
Dutch florin and the French 
franc, in that order - that will 
strengthen most against ster- 
ling in the months to come. 

To this list, Saunders adds 
the yen, which he feels has 
some life left in it yet, despite 
its rapid advancement since 
September 1985. 

Currency gurus seem agreed 
that sterling is entering fairly 
valued territory against Euro- 
pean currencies but that the 
pendulum may swing too far 
over to the weak side before a 
fair equilibrium is reached. 

Most of the financial in- 
stitutions which market cur- 
rency funds offer the 
alternative of a managed fund 
or individual funds where the 
investor himself chooses 
which currency' to be in. 

Unless you have a particu- 
lar reason for wanting expo- 
sure to the Danish krone or 
the Italian lira, our advice is to 
opt fora managed fund and let 
the currency experts take the 
investment strain. 

Peter Gartland 


Legal & General’s Far Eastern Trust has out-performed 
every other unit trust in its sector during 1986 ! 


Now, Legal & General 
introduce their exciting 
new Japanese Trust. 



1 EGAL & GENERAL'S new 
• Japanese Trust is the latest 
addition to our growing range 
of Unit Trusts. 

And it will be managed by 
the .same team responsible for 
the tremendous success of the 
Legal &. General Far Eastern 
Trust. 

One of the most remarkable 
features of post-war years has 
been the rapid expansion of the 
Japanese economy. With a Gross 
National Product’ totalling around 
51.2K2 billion in 1 9^*5. Japan has 
become the second largest economy 
in rite world after the US. 

The capitalisation of (he Japanese 
equity market now represents more 
Ilian one quarter of the world’s total 
share value. 

In uddition.it is widely expected 
that steps will be taken to stimulate 
the domestic economy. This may 
bring about an improvement in the 
country's infrastructure and help 
reduce the nations reliance on 
exports. 

Op portunities 

Ahead 

All this could mean exciting times 
ahead for those experienced in the 
workings of the Japanese markets. 

legal' & Generals Fund 
' Managers have the experience! And 
they've proved it handsomely’ already 
with their astonishingly successful 


Apply nowfor your 
r ‘Early Investor’ 
extra unit allocation 


See how you benefit. 


Dale 

AMOUNT INVESTED 1 

of payment 

£U100«4.999 

S5JX»S».999 

ao.00 o+ 

Between 



25"., 

B-N October 



Between 
15-28 October 

re 

1.5".. 

2".. 


PLUS 


JbcEjvm 

imvMcil ««tt Thp. aUucaliun h M 

athMnm in ihmc auJmn] J»»c 
Eartj- mwsior. wJD j!mi benefit (nun a fi\nJ (imrufimh SUppmim 
until JMh ( Moltcr KWu 


Proven performance 

from our 

management team. 


Our Far Eastern Trost^s 

K-s-asgsr 

8th October iWh- 
Ifs an exdtin& prosper. 


management of the Legal & General 
Far Eastern Trust. 

• Noiv the same team will manage 
the new Japanese Trust on behalf 
of Legal & General’s investors, 
bringing to it the same committed, 
experienced professionalism. 




Objective 
of the Trust 


The aim of the Trust is to 
maximise capital growth from 
securities quoted on the 
Japanese stock market. It is anti- 
cipated that the initial portfolio 
distribution will favour 
domestic-related stocks. 
l : p to 25"n of die Fund may 
be invested in the Tokyo Over the 
Counter Market. 

The estimated gross starting yield 
is expected to be less than l ,, .i. Tlie 
minimum investment in the Trust is 
£-1.000. 

Tim should remember that the 
price of units and the Income from 
them can go down as well us up. 

But when you look at the track 
record of our Fund Managers to date, 
you can certainly view the future 
with confidence." 

INVEST NOW AND BENEFIT 
FROM YOUR 'EARLY" INVESTOR? 

BONUS ALLOCATION. 

Complete the application form 
straight away and return it with a 
cheque for your investment - 
minimum £i,0(K) - to Legal &- 
General to receive your ‘Early 
Investor’ Bonus Allocation arid the 
fixed price of SOp per unit. 


GENERAL INFORMATION 

IXWMMENT: Yhnknmn A.I miWimcm . 
hnrMmcfir- must hr fur 4 rrriinrnum «N WHO I nn 
price- puWishal ifcnh m The Trtnci am] Ihr 
RrtuHid Umis. Cmmi nous Kwcd icnifiuac>' 
fttruanlnl within til wedu- ufpjifncm The 
Tru>< DrttJ alx> poivklo h»r imounem in iraikiJ 
ifKims vdifcct iu certain iwxhtum*. 
CHAM^Tbr pKHrfraiY eta)* bull imu die 
ntfer price h S ... Aimm! tauURnnem dtute 1‘, 
ii( itie i-jiuc of the FuoiLpiu* VAT deducted (nun 
I far tnuunr nf the hmd. «W» a pruinun m 
[ncnur thw w on ppin* thrtc mnortf.' omicr 

-The Managers rav lAr iniundlnR adju-amcn! n> 
MdauJiinr.prkrufiptD n>nr l.2^i whichcMT 
is the kvr Rrmuncniftin i> pasahk- tu qualified 
nuermedtams Kiicmxi tequo* 

' rxfiy Imesion- hutlnR unit, fnim thbidcrwifl 
nvrhc ifarir llc« d&ribtnii'n un .■MWiDetcmhrr 
PJHT and istdi MUi Nxrmfacr ihemfirT 
ihi tqh i Xi<ihcr. IWi> the u#cr ffttv of units »iB 
hr Si] pencil Jlpptaalkntslor units Rxcnnlattrr 
ihe dose datc.ol >Mh octnSermll hvdeafi at the 
<iirrem oBir prkf 

A UtM.uun uf r- W ghrn un the utfif pmv id 
uniis bmifjtuu nfa ramoitd Income 
SKUiNte SimBhrendnix; sour wmiHLaif and 
' <«.-nd ii iu ihr \bna|on> rajTntru tumlun (tic 
relinjj bid price Mill nurnullj he nude withm 
wm Horfanpiinx 

MtAHi’. EXt HANtil; sfTIjWL «v win wetenpr 
must uuumll K sJwcn [or unin In the japanor 
Him. Pfcawr tid. the box no ihc A^dhannn 
. Form aqd lull deEdh. will he vent (u w« 

HH .istTJtfn nffluts ThNa’ The IVnal Hank 
ufMKfuidpk Manners, ursd a ttcncral (i'nit 
TnN Mjsapo>A Ui Odke Teniptr 

fawn, II Oucen Vkiuna Srnw. Umihm MMN 
hTR BstiairmitnhigfamlNii. HkFMlrt. 
Mendu-rnf the I'nll hmu AysiwiatNUi. 

RtlT IPs' ,q>l)RE^i Irpd A (icnerJ (I ini Inm 
ManajsTM Uunicd. Dept DM. FSKllH rsC f ms don. 
Sunn UM'HJt 


; ; PRIORITY APPLICATION FORM 
for Legal & General’s new Japanese "frost. 


To: Legal & General (Unit Trust Managers) Limited, 
DepL DM, FREEPOST. Croydon, Surrey CR9 9EB. 

l/VSe wish iu invest hi Legal & General s 
Japanese Trust. (Minimum £1,IKX» £. 



I ] 1,'VCb claim my/ 
1 — 1 uur Early 

ImesTor Bonus. 


f I [ ■ Vie would like income 
1 — 1 lohcremvesiedinfunlXT 
units automaticalh: 


A cheque made payable «> Legal & General (t nit Trust Managers) limited is enck) 

I 1 1 ,‘AXe would like farther de- 
1 — 1 taiLs about Legal & General s 
Share Exchange Scheme. 

Pfease write to BLOCK CAPITAL K. 

Siirreim.- { Mr/Mrs Al i.w .1 

First Naine(s> in fall ... 

Address 


1 


.Postcode. 


"Sun rut Monet MaiBjjnwnt fititmio t.'J.SO, 
" ft i *nnm( r himl un ufer w bid pn«* wu dv- 
pcfwd i^rh Mfivnhrt I'lKS Iu Mh Juh IWI« 


Signatures). 


.Date. 


(In the case of a joint imrMnxmt.all must sign ) 

Name of Usual financial Adviser {if am ) 




This ofl'er is not available in residents of The Hepuhlic uf 
Ireland nor to applicants under age IS. 


Le$tl& 

benarai Tiie confidence of proven success. 

Unit Trust Managers v ^, 


■W-Clt 3 vdvi 


TSf svc~r->-. -.imiwwjHu 









New 

Streets 

anarnn 

yestenh 

After 

prices 

course 

session 

pressui 

evapon 

mornii 

started 


Tbe 

average 
about I 
half ho 
to 1,79 


AMR 

ASA 

AtadSQ* 
AHedStr; 
AftsCHm 
Alcoa 
Amu he 

Am'rdaH 

AmBranc 

Am Can 

AmCytm 

AmBPv* 

AroExprt 

Am Home 

Am Mo tt> 

AmStnrc 

AmTetep 

AmOOO 

ArmcoSt 

Asarco 

AsMand < 

At Rich fit 

Avon Pro 

BKreTst 

Banka™ 

BkOfBsi 

Bank oil 

Betti Sue 


Braen 
Bq Warn 
BnstMyi 
BP 

Buri'ton 
Burt' ton 
Bmreuo 

CmpM 

CanPac 

CatBrpdl 

Cetanes 

Central! 

Champ* 

CtussA 

CtunBk 

Chevior 

Chryslei 

CdicoiD 

Clark E* 

Coca Cl 


FAMILY MONEY/3 


A keen eye on 
share crooks 


FRAUD 


This week the first defendants 
wore prosecuted for obtaining 
British Telecom shares by 

deception. Their crime is 

known in the City as a 
multiple application — apply- 
ing for shares under several 
false names. The idea is to 
multiply the dances of gain* 
ing shares m a new share issne 
that looks as though it will be 
successful. Many a household 
pet has had an application for 

shares made in its name. 


applications, it will “send the 
names off to the Director of 
Public Prosecutions — after 
fiat it is ont of the bank's 
hands” It will be interesting 
to see if the DPP takes a 
similarly stern fine when the 
people cheated are die bank's 
shareholders rather than the 
Government. 


Until the Gover n ment began 
its privatization programme in 
earnest the multiple applica- 
tion was regarded as part and 
pared of the successful issue. 
City mores were extremely 
relaxed on this practice, but 
stopped short of open ad- 
mission or approval. The atti- 
tude to multiple applications 
mirrored tbe attitude to 
embarrassing diseases. No one 
would admit to contamination, 
but everyone seemed to know 
of someone who was 
c on t ami nated. 


British Gas is the next 

opportunity for the un- 
scrupulous. Assuming the is- 
sue is attractive enough to lure 
multiple applications, the 
British Gas issne should 
present horrendous logistical 
problems for those trying to 
police the issne. The company 
wants as many of its 16 motion 
customers as possible to sub- 
scribe. Imagine t r ying to sort 
out the dents in that crowd. 



A holiday home to work for you 


PROPERTY 


Buying a little place in the country 
and renting it out as a holiday home 
in the summer months can be one of 
the most profitable and enjoyable 
ways of investing your money. And, 
provided the house qualifies as 
furnished holiday accommodation, a 
number of valuable' tax reliefs are 
available. 


L 



Lord RoskflL’ fraud report 


doing it One application for 
everyone in the family is film, 
hot no more.** - 


Special team has 
been brought in 


But the soccess of the BT 

issue backfired on some of the 
multiple applicants. The once 
accepted practice suddenly be- 
came theft of government 
property, and the share-own- 
ing pets were suddenly 
dropped from luncheon 
converstaions. 


The major deterrent used by 
die organizers of tbe flotations 
seems to be publicity. The 
threat of proserotion and the 
constant irtfenmces that jus- 
tice wOl be swift and terrible 
are seen as the most potent 
weapons. The emphasis is on 
prevention rather titan cure, 
though the TSB did go to the 
lengths of keeping video cam- 
mas in certain branches to 
record shameless applicants. 


Tbe TSB has i de n t i fie d 
6,200 “suspect** application 
forms. The accompanying 
cheques have all been cashed 
while the process of inqui ry 
takes its course. The TSB is 
doing its best not to prejudge. 
The applications all went into 
the ballot, but the hank will be 
is no lurry to return the 
money until it is sure that the 
applicants are genuine. 

If the TSB finds multiple 


A tiny handftd were pros- 
ecuted for their BT antics — 
fewer than 10 oat of an 
original shareholders* register 
(almost certainly containing 
its fair share of cats, dogs and 
fictitious personages) of mare 
than 23 millinn 


The Government is under- 
standably keen to deal with 
frand strictly, and to be seen to 

do so- This week's Home 
Office response to Lord 
BoskOTs report on financial 
frand pnMislied earlier this 
year has set ont to st re a m l in e 
the committal procedure in 
certain cases of “serious 
fraud”, as well as proposing to 
modify the law of evidence to 
make more documentary ev- 
idence admissible, as well as 
evidence gathered abroad. 

Perhaps tbe most useful 
innovation is a special team of 
lawyers, accountants and com- 
pany law experts to liaise with 
the police in serioas fraud 
investigations. 

Tbe Home Secretary Doug- 
las Hurd called this week for 
die “combating (of) brand and 
safeguarding the probity of our 
finandal institutions’*. 


To qualify as furnished holiday 
accommodation the property must 
meet certain conditions. It must be 
situated in the United Kingdom and 
roost be let on a commercial basis. It 
must be available for holiday letting 
for at least 140 days during the tax 
year and roust be actually let for at 
least 70 days. 

In addition, during any seven- 
month period the property should not 
normally be in the same occupation 
for a continuous period of more than 
31 days. 

Although rental income is nor- 
mally taxed as investment income 
with all tbe tax disadvantages that 
this entails, income from furnished 
holiday lettings enjoys most — but not 
all — of the benefits of being taxed as 
trading income. 

What then are these tax 
advantages? 

First, you can daira capital allow- 
ances, a means of reducing tbe initial 
cost, on any items of plant and 
machinery you buy for the house. 
Plant and machinery is a surprisingly 
wide term and would normally 


HOUMY 

COTTAdtl 

TOIBX J 




iMMi 




.nil ** 


/Kwawe 




Tm suspicions - tbe owner is daimisg «i dbm** for the insaltalkM of eight confer A 




income. If it is held in the wife's 
name, wife's earned income relief is 
available. Further, if the rent is 
substantial it may be worthwhile 
malting an election for separate 
assessment in order to make use of 
the wife’s basic rate tax band. 


used for the purposes of a trade 
carried on by the vendor but need not 
necessarily be a replacement holiday 
property. If the property is given 
away, capital gains bold-over relief 
will be available on the gift 


Rent from famished 
places is earned income 


The British Gas strategy 
will be, according to a spokes- 
man, to “go a stage further 
than the TSB. We wifi explain 
what a multiple application is 
as well as wanting against 


There is, however, no guar- 
antee that multiple applica- 
tions wOI be regarded as 
serioas fraud. The Home Of- 
fice feels toe definition should 
not be committed to inflexible 
legal rules, but a serioas fraud 
would be “something which 
was both complex and size- 
able; a massive, straight- 
forward fraud would probably 
not be a serioas frand.” 


Martin Baker 


include items such as carpets, cur- 
tains and furniture as well as fixtures 
and fittings. Tbe capital allowances 
given are 25 per cent writing-down 
allowances. This contrasts with tbe 
treatment of nonqualifying fur- 
nished lettings where a wear-and-tear 
allowance of up to 10 per cent of 
rental income can be set off against 
any income tax liability. 

Another attractive feature of fur- 
nished holiday accommodation is 
that the rental is treated as earned 


This compares most favourably 
with other rental or investment 
income, which is always taxed on tbe 
husband at bis highest marginal rate 
of tax even if the income belongs to 
the wife. 


Possibly most importantly, fur- 


Al though the relevant legislation y" 
introduced only with effect fib®..*- >1 
April 6, 1982, the Inland Revenue^ 
accepts that periods of owntnhjjp . 
before this date qualify in dcftnnta. T, : 
iag the amount of r etutmhu ' Jj - 
available. 




->.w* *1 




Maximum relief of £1,000 
. available after 10 years 


And there are capital gains tax 
advantages. In particular, a capital 
gain arising cm the disposal of a 
p roperty will be eligible for roll-over 
relief ar 1 as a result an 
tax may « deferred indi 
only con ition is that a 
asset mus be bought wr 
beginning neyearbefor 
three years ftertheproi 
The repl ement ass 


nished holiday accommodation 
qualifies as a business asset for capital 
gains retirement relief Thus, pro- 
vided you are aged over 60, or are 
retiring on the grounds of ill health., 
and have owned the property for at 


There is little doubt that hogdgy V 
accommodation is now an attractive . ' j 
proposition from a tax point of vast/ igj- 
But there are some caveats for tht> L 
would-be landlord. First, the tenants^ FT- 
may not treat the property with ttfc .wi: .- 
care and respect which might 
expected from the owners. And* ofWy:- 
course. there is always the damrcof^: re- 
creating a protected tenancy under*- : 
the Rent Acts. . *’ V-- 


k-jrt r.T>i 




• t •%& 







is o nets’ 


n m 


■ * 

•** 




In the cellars of Veuve Cticquot: bottles are shaken to bring sediment to tbe neck 


‘ -s 



* fK i - ' 


•:ST< .. m 


• 1 

It’s cheers for a good 
drink at lower prices 




r 3*. 

'* ter v 

-- 


■ m 

renani' 

- i he fori 


p 



my. 


CHAMPAGNE 


’■■■*• • ' *3W ••• 

.nit '«r . -a-.- 


. *4 »***«*'*■.#'* 



■'jtsmat fiaass?*" ci-&7 st - 


j*. W'-Wk WW- 

. . ... ' .:4a 




With an increasing UK de- 
mand for champagne the 
growers started picking their 
Chardonnay grapes last Sun- 
day and both the Pinot Noir 
and Meunier on September 
30, knowing that a large 
volume was expected of good 
but not outstanding quality. 

Investors will welcome the 
price reduction of 84 centimes 
a kilo for grapes from land 
classified as 100 per cent 
quality and, with land in the 
Aube in the south of the 
growing region at only 80 per 
cent, this in part explains the 
low-priced offers for 
champagne. 

Another reason is that some 
brands may have been aged 
for only the legal minimum of 
one year compared with the 


Careful blending 
from year to year 


four to five years for non- 
vintage gmndes marques. 

The price foil at source 
follows a dramatic increase to 
23.03 francs a kilo last year. 
Current stock being shipped to 


is not as bleak as some 
shippers have suggested. 
Siodcs at the end of July were 
630 million bottles, equiva- 
lent to 3.4 years’ sales. By 
comparison, stocks were 
higher at 664 million bottles in 
July 1985. 

Pan of toe essence of fine 
champagne, other than single 
vintage, is toe careful blending 
from one year to another, just 
as from one village to another. 

Beause of toe strict laws of 
Appellation Contrdlee. which 
limit the area under vine, the 
major companies are 
collaborating to produce spar- 
kling wine outside north-east 
France. Taittinger has linked 
up with its US distributor, the 
Korbrand Corporation, to buy 
nearly ! 00 - acres in 
California’s • Napa Valley 
following Moet’s successful 
venture in toe same state with 
Domaine Chandon. 

Even more surprising is the 
link between Piper Heidsieck 
and an Indian company to 
produce champagne in west- 
ern Maharashtra, launched 
this spring under the Marquise 
de Pompadour label 

Champagne investors are 
aware of the demand for such 
sparkling wines and UK clear- 


Christie’s. says toe market is Wl 
small but strong. The - 1 
Christie’s sale on Thursday^., 
reflected this trend with keen ^ 
bidding for older vintages of 
Krug and Bollinger Tradition 
recently disgorged. * 

Since vintage hasa dedared ' 
age it commands genetaBy^a . 
higher price at auction. Gran- 
des marques of tbe 1966 
vintage were in this week’s . 7 
sale at £1 1 0 to £140 for brands . 
such as Mumm Cordon-,. 
Rouge, Charles Heidsieck and 


tli-zr: 

;■ 

■t 






' " *• * A 

r^’s . , . 


- i -* fc**iM| m. 

7, ifo,; f 

.ixiwwhr* 
to# Or 

•'-’'it Ip * 

mm 

i*** tmm 
cww- ML- 1 

-I 1 flBH 

- *y*f m 84 


grapes, is also in. demand at jr 
£220 to £300 a dozen bottles. 

US bidders at auction last,,* 
year invested particularly inf: 
Louis Roederer Cristal Kiugv 
and Dom Perignon. . . . 

With a buyer’s iO per cent-: : 
premium at auction it may he ^ 


Wine with a depth ^ 

of flavour 


‘ 


Britain is based on prices of ances are up 9. 1 per cent on 
19.03 francs in 1982, 15.53 the moving annual total to 


Investors 

.get more out of their post office. 


You migfct be surprised just how good the rates of return are when it 
comes to investment at your post office. 

Did you realise, for instance, thatthe current 31st Issue of National Savings 


Certificates guarantees a rate of return equivalent to a 7-85% compound annual 
interest rate when kept in for 5 years? Ana that it is free from UK Income Tax and 


francs in 1983. 18.07 francs in 
1984. 23.03 francs in 1986 and 
now 22.19 francs. 

Twenty-five years ago 
grapes accounted for 12 per 
cent of the final bottle price 
but today toe level is around 
50 per cent, excluding duty. 

Champagne shipments last 
year were the highest ever at 
195.4 million bottles, an in- 
crease of 3.92 per cent on 
1984. 

The reserve stock position 


June. 

There is certainly demand 
for quality champagnes, in- 
sists Richard Swanwick. the 
managing director of Lawlers 
and Champagne Henriot. He 
says Henriot’s own 257 acres 
are of good quality and will 
contribute well to their Brut 
Souverain and, for buyers who 
like a less effervescent cham- 
pagne. their Blanc de Blancs 
Cremant 

Duncan McEwan, of 


worthwhile to compare prices , 
from traditional wine mer- ^ 
chants. Among those with. «- 
good stocks are Tanners of ., M 
Shrewsbury, Shropshire, Lay. * 
and Wheeler of Colchester, ; 
Essex. Adnazns of SouthwoKL 
Suffolk, and London-based 
Findlater Madtie Todd ®» };| 
Hatch Mansfield, toe ABied 
subsidiary. . ~ : " "J <- 

For a novel surprise iff j 
A lbert Beerens’ non-vintage r ‘ 
made entirely ia the Aubeand ' ;; 
available from Bibendum. « ^ 
113 Regent's Park 
London NWL It has a depth 
of flavour that comes only Tl, 
from a single grower^ vrinc. Z* * • 
might well be a trend for the j;, 
future. r * 

Conal Gregory^ 

-QW 



4 C , 


l MIMA! 

• • • * 


*i.*W 


Capital Gains Tax? 

Or that 4th Issue Index-linked Certificates are Inflation proof and provide 
Extra Interest of 4% a year if kept for 5 years. 

What’s moreyou get the highly attractive returns on Investment Accounts. 
Deposit Bonds and Income Bonds in full without the deduction of tax at source. 
This is especially beneficial to non-taxpayers. 

These and many more opportunities are all available from the Post Office, 
They’re just some of the 150 different products and services available. 

So if you’re looking to Invest, you might find it well 
worth raking more interest. 


Get moie out of your post office 


^Office. 


CHILD BENEFIT. MILK TOKENS, RAILCARDS. PARCEL POST. GIFT TOKENS. PREMIUM BONDS, BUS TICKETS AND TRAVEL PASSES. POSTAL ORDERS. POSTMAN PAT. 

ffi i Gi-a Gi-a 


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V 





THE TIMES SATURDAY OCTOBER 4 1986 




Through 
the roof 
gently 


{BKfSS5?SSf55Si , ‘« 

^sssas: 

however, Ihm wunfe 1 ” ** N“*. 
i the yearly increase is 

$SES?9SZEr-* 

.' -yss* 

Widening trusts 

■JSW Tn ® Association. 

3§“fi^SSBffi a,u, ‘ 

Government it fsvn><n< — ** — • — 

marirof 


FAMILY MONEY/4 



S v.-. ’■ - ; me? 


continues to perform above average 
tor funds of Its kind, investors 
should see a real return. Clearly a 
case of “the price of units can go 
sideways as wefl as up”. 

Details: General Portfolio. Valley 
House, Crossbrook Sheet, Chesfttmt 
Hertfordshire EN8 8JH. 


Holiday money 


^ ndchan 9 e 


Bardaycardisnowtnthe-' 
business of distributing spending 
money. People who use the card to 
pay tor at least part of their hoflday will 
receive a discount of up to £200. 

The deal appSes only to package ■ 
holidays booked tv Holiday Club 

members with one of 37 tour 

I holders 


,,, *y n *X 

: uhi hoi. 

,,,v P°mi oflj 
V ca ' ais far: 

h ™ II* w 

'’open) 

u hith 
•Mfciii-rfc jJ: 
Jvs «K*daa».; 

d ,f njnrT^ 
» 

kin F ol fcto 
profes^' 
£ up ihr fc- 

an Friftl«, 


ffljsate taJSnSdSK 

JJ™"*™* have ghiena 

aea of <unds 

TVia I FT A ■- ■ 


AuS«^w? 0curnent PuWfehed in 

SmESSSSSISST" 

’ time ” available for 

nis members to respond to such a 

SS^^^^emandSSits 
\ with government 

Money-back ‘firsf 

"I Gartmore Funrt Manonw, io 



CS Investments is unitizing its 
Group Investors investment trust It 
win now be an in t e rnational growth 
unit trust with a i^hly competitive 
front-end toad of on^ 2 per cent, 
available up to April 15, 1987. 

The unitized fund starts on a bid 
basis but if the managers get a 
positive inflow of money, mis in 
itself should be enough for them to 
convert the fund to an offer basis 
with a consequent 6 per cent rise in 
the value of the fund. There is to 
guarantee that this w3J happen, but ifit 
does in, say, three months from 
now, It would be a worthwhile 
sweetener for investors. Check 
with the managers on this before 
investing. 

Details: CS Fund Managers Ltd. 

125 High Hotoom, London WC1V2PY. 


HoBday Club, run by travel agents 
Pages May. 

Sadly, the discount - which comes 
out of the commission earned by Page 
& Moy from the tour operators - 
does not apply to flights. You must be 
going on a package trip- The 
choice of holidays is wide, from smart 
Caribbean cruises to the 
ghastliness of outings which are in all 
But name therapy treatment for the 
sexually repressed. 


Midlands merger 

■ Appetites are voracious in the 
Midlands. The recently merged 
Birmingham Midshires Building 
Society has plans to expand still 
further. This week the boards of 
the Birmingham Mids hires and the 


Dona marketed in conjunction wit 
®®neral Portfolio Life Insurance. 

The "first” point arises from 
Gartmore 1 s guarantee that the 
money returned to investors at the end 
of the five years will be no less than 
the original investment 
It works like this. Seventy per cent 
of the lump sum invested - minimum 
£1 .000 - goes into a General 
Portfolio growth bond with the 
remaining 30 per cent being 
invested in Gartmore's Global Unit 
Trust To offer a guarantee of 
original money back after five years is 
no big deal, especially as only a 
modest level of inflation wfltreduce the 
real value of this money. 

Nevertheless, the plan shoukf appeal 
to cautious first-time investors who 
are basic rate taxpavers.ini 
provided Gartmore i 


\'vt WUD 'itns teenw£ -ra 

imsnGxre- 'iKe-jmp&tMJce- 
BfiHecmiMrf HouMrem... 



Civil Service Building Society met 
to consider a possible merger. The 
Civil Service society is something 
of a tiddler — its assets are just £43 
miHion compared with the £ 1 .700 
million of Birmingham Midshires. 

If the merger, which would require 
agreement from both sets of 
members, goes ahead, the new 
society wHI be among the biggest 15 in 
Britain. 

Heiry subject 

■ If Inheritance tax really is a 
political shuttlecock, then the sooner 
you take planning action the more 
successful it is Rely to be. That is the 
view of chartered accountants 
Dearden Farrow, who have just 
produced a 16-page pocket guide 
to IHT, the tax which Nigel Lawson 
introduced in this year's Budget as 
a replacement for capital transfer tax. 
Describing IHT as "Jekyll and Hyde 
legislator - , Dearden Farrow says that 
m the tax year 1 986-67, you hit the 
50 per cent IffT rate if you die leaving 
more than £206,030. However, in 
what the accountants calf "the curious 
logic of this legislation" individuals 
can make a gift of up to £71 ,000 
(married couples up to £142,000} 
without having to pay any tax. 

Details: A copy of Yours and heirs 
-a concise guide to Inheritance Tax is 
available free from Dearden 
Farrow, 1 Serjeants' Irm. London 
EC4YUD (01-353 2000). 


Into property 

■ Yet another financial institution 
has acquired a chain of estate 
agencies, in the continuing erosion 
of demarcation lines in the financial 
services sector. This time it is the 
turn of Laurentian Holding Company, 
whose members include Imperial 
Life and Trident Life insurance 
companies. Laurentian has 
acquired Jordans-Town and County 
Estates (Cheshire) Ltd, comprising 
22 sales offices. 

Part of the plan is that Imperial and 
Trident's life assurance, mortgage and 
pension products win be marketed 
through Jordans. Further estate 
agency acquisitions are planned. 

Joining up 

■ Increased awareness of share 
ownership in the wake of public 
flotations has led to a significant 
increase in the number of employees 
joining savings-related share 
option schemes with a view to buying 
shares in the company for which 
they work. 

So says the Yorkshire Budding 
Society, which operates around 50 
such schemes on behalf of publicly 
quoted companies. The society says 
50 per cent of eligible employees 
are now joining new schemes, 
whereas two years ago the 
average take-up was I 
cent 



IT SEEMS 
THEY’RE TALKING 
OUR LANGUAGE. 


There's one word that's common to most of 
Europe at the moment. 

Profits. 

And now. Save & Prosper - the group 
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solely in Europe -believe the time is right for a 
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Our European Income & Growth Fund 
- aiming for high growth but including high- 
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You can invest from £250 or from £20 a 
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CALL OCR FREE MONEYLINE 0N00 282 101 


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EUROPEAN INCOME 
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Hum >n>d me druik on F mupcjn locumr A linrnihi tuhl 

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This one is strictly for 



Anyone who. has*, not been 
allotted Trustee Savings Bank 
shares will still have*. chance 
to deal in them after October 
10 without necessarily 
to buy them in the 
market. This week the Stock 
Exchange announced it was 
launching an option contract 
for TSB shares. 

The aim of die contract is to 
attract more private investors 
to the options market. When 
British Telecom issued shares, 
the options contract related to 
it increased the unomt. of 
business done in options about 
sevenfold overnight. The mar- 
ket hopes to bnOd on 

Rather like driving 
a fast sports car 

that success with the popular 
TSB issue. 

But options are only for the 
serious investor. By co m pa rt- 
son with the ordinary stock 
market, options are rather like 
driving a fast sports car in- 
stead of a lumbering Daintier. 
They are more exh il a ratin g, 
bat also more painful if you 
come off the road. 

The system is complex, bnf 
the basics work Eke this. The 
TSB option contract is for 
1,000 shares, with expirt 
dates at specified tferee-aaostt 
intervals - although the first 
one, on October 22, is tess 
than a fortnight after dealing 

h^'on can boy a “calT option, 
which allows yon to bay toe 
shares underlying the 
at a specified pricefc«fore the 
contract expires. Or yon can 


buy a "puT option which 
allows yon to sell toe shares. 
.As the price of options moves 
as weUfls the raderiying share 
price, yon can sril toe options 
without actually exotistng toe 
contract 

To bay an option costs only 
a premium over the share 
price. On a call , option, yon do 
not pay the fall price of toe 
underlying shares unless you 
actually exercise the option, 
This enables yon to make a 
profit or loss on toe shares 
without having to pot ap all 
toe money needed to boy the 
shares Aeroelves. 

Sap pose the new TSB op- 
tion costs 3p a share (toe 
initial price win not actually be 

starts). One contract ofMoi 
shares costs £30, giving £600 
for 20 contracts. It is a call 
option at 80p, meaning yon can 
boy toe shares at Wfe if yon 
choose. The next day TSB 
shares rise to 85p, so yoar 
option is now worth 5p more. 
On top of that is the ‘Time 
value”, which varies, depend- 
ing on whether the market 
believes the share price will go 
higher or not. 

Let ns say the time value is 
2p. Yoar options are therefore 
worth a total of 7p a share. As 
yon boaght them at 3p, your 
profit is 4p -r a gain of well 
over 100 per cent when the 
shares themselves improved 
by less than 10 per cent. Bat if 
TSB shares had fallen in price 
the option would be worth no 
more than its tine value, say 
l:5p, in which case you would 
have made a SO per cert kiss. 

“You have to anderetend 


this market and take an active 
interest in it,” .says Geoffrey 
Chamberlain, one of its found- 
ing members; “It is one of the 
best inventions for the private 
investor. Bat if yoo particip a te 
without understanding and 
paying attention to toe system, 
you’re toe mug.” 

Bernard Reed, the Stock 
Exchange's options group 
manager, warns: “Yon must 
put a health wanting on 
options. We certainly would 
not encourage private inves-. 
tors to start off with large 
am omits in this market Don't 
.commit anything other than 
ftm money when starting, and 


Special booklet Is 
being produced 


build np from there as you gain 
experience:” 

Anyone with a gambling 
streak and a taste for intellec- 
tual challenges should contact 
the Stock Exchange for more 
information on optic as at The 
Traded Ofitions Market, The 
Stock Exchange, London 
EON I HP. The Stock Ex- 
change is 1 even prosSssciHga 
special booklet on the TSB 
option. 

But whether this market 
win ever appeal to small first 
time shareholders who h a ve 
been attracted to the TSB 
issue in their hundreds of 
thousands Is doubtful. 
Whether it should attract 
them is more doubtful stiff. 

Richard Thomson 

Banking Correspondent 



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TIMER 


Tmuw House, 5/H Mortimer Street, London, WIN 7RH 

^2^06177^ 265495 EURO G Rw 01-06 2675 

> of the Tower AssuranceGronp^ 

Name(Mr/Mrs/Mlss/Ms) — 


uur copy of the 
MASTER booklet 
fete this coupon & 
rd it to the above 
ss TODAY. 

■stner. wit! call ■ 


Address 


Postcode, 


~T47w 


Finally, from France, a French Unit Trust 


Marianne- the symbol of tho 
Repubffc of franca, was 
originally the nickname of a 
secret republican society. 
Todaysherepresentsthesplrtt , ; 
ingenuity and resource of 
France - and to Dumenilshe 
symbolizes France* new 
financial revolution onctfbe 
growth potential of the 
French economy. 



DUMENIL 

French Growth Fund 


Shrewd observers of financial markets are 
looking just across fee Charnel for fee next major 
investment opportunity. Lithe surprise when the 
French economy Is assessed to be on a 5 to 10 vaar 
grcwfo cycle when its Government Is committed to a 
share-owning democracy and offers tax incentives 
to entrepreneurs and venture capitalists. 

Within a climate of booming exports, low infla- 
tion, a strong currency and good labour relations, 
privatisations of major French Institutions will 
accelerate fee demand for share ownership in . 
Franca AH predictions suggest that a substantial 
new flow of funds into fee French stockmarket will 
cany prices buoyantly upwards. 

■Now from Durrtenir Unit Trust Management UcL 
comas Britafrfc first ever French unfflrust;. 

Dum6nil French Growth Fund 

Opportunities 

The aim of fee Fund Is outright oaprfot growth 
from an actively managed porttoflo focusing on 
Special Situations. Privatisations, Take-overs, Growth 
and . Recovery Stocks. New issues wilt also feature, 
bath an the Bouse and fee Second Marche. Part of 
fee Fifed wffl be invested in Fixed-Interest Stocks Cfed 
Convertible Bonds. 

in all these areas. Dumgnil has an undoubted 
daim to expertise. 

Dyncmtie 

Principal Investment managers to fee Fund are 
Durrteril lebte 5 A, described by Nat West Bank's 
County Securities Review as The rising star of the 
French financial marker, DurrteNI Leofe is fee 

DUMENIL 

UnitThist Management 
Limited 

54 St. James's Street, London SW1 ’IJT. 

. Telephone: 01-499 6383. 


«o. 

SoumDaaMam m. 



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■CO*weMNiwi««i 


leading French securities house specialising in bond 
portfolios; its subsidiary Cafinoc is a leading 
specialist in equities. In France the Group manages 
7 mutual funds and 5 unit trusts and a total tfprhrate 
and irsfrtutional money exceeding £1 billion. 

The nuances of fee French market demand 
an-the -ground intelligence. Through fee manage- 
ment of Dwrtenfl Lebfe. Investors in the Dum6na 
French Growth Fund wffl be certain of feat. 

Invert now at a Fixed Price 
Until October 17th. 1986. units can be pur- 
chased at the Rxed Price of lOOp with an estimated 
initial gross yield of 2.0% p.a TO invest, return fee 
coupon wife your cheque (minimum £1X00) without 
del ay. 

"fMME 

17th OCTOBER, 1986 


Remember feat the price of units and the 
income from them may go dawn as well as up. 

\bu should regard you investment as long term. 

FURTHER INFORMATION 

Buying and salting units. \bu eon buy Vm units, or sofl hose you 
taia. on any Dusmess day, al tne once* iuwq on me aov w tectme 
vour reauefcans The onces of units ana me v**a ve ouaenoa dewv m 
me tmss Vw mvructans » buy or sefl w* be comoweacwa 
rr*iedoteV H vou wish to tel you. u™k smo>v ccn&eie me 
araar»rnen.on meboc» otwui CetMicotBananMum,i tomeMorogpr, 
>ou wai recewe me hJ &a van® c i yom unb mfcip on He dov vftr 
CeiWcate caches us and a ctwtjue w« noroofy Be hxnoea 
7 woni'rigdovsoiieceoi 

* aw toed once «»es &v rno«B mon £ me otto* wJi oe clowa ec» i . 
Management ehages. An mtal cnoge of 5% 6 included m me c tor 
once onne ums moackton i%c4tneuaiueofineRjha&d6Qun*g 
tir»^tt^ina3r»c<Helux3[3narncinff^tX5Sfil Theliiisttseea 
oetrivs a mrnum cmd encuge at 2% Ocsges can ora, be 
■ncxacsed^ierJmonms wndShfxnceiDiJwnoksen 
Benunefonon a oad to queMed imewnecMnes - rates ovoJotye c-> 
moues 

Untis * am Aocumutoson unh Ai mcome s remuesr&a era reflected h 
HeUrvtPnee OnaisfMaichunrtfioiae^wBwceiveatajwoychertoTHe 
mcome mev ae t»emea to news 

Contract Notes and Certificates. Contract notes wilt db usueo or, 
neceioioftua msnuctons Urw C<?fMiccr« w« ncmofl\ r t» &-^ir 

35 warutg ctavs 3 laceot of poymew 
Manogen - Dumend Untitutf ManooementLmiea M a JOfttest 
London swiaut negated no tPussfl 
Trustees - Vfcfland Born Vusl Company Lrrwpa it Ow Jewry 
U>XttnsC2R8DL 

Capfla Goins Tax Tne Fgnd does Wl pay Canto! Genre *cv cur vr u 
may oe naste HvOuseflufWswhchdnng you overall CMpwji gams m me 
■reoMomctemoriiiJOOtDQsed mine tea year 86 87} 

Jort opptoorts should and g(vo data* seoaotefv Inte o«et r, ch*v *1 
Open to iTwesSSR Over 18 yuan otaL open to Ihe itmctenb oi me CtOiC*c I 
crwaandi I 

faDianAn8UnM'HMtMa»Bg»madtUnirted,5<St Japeshllraaf, I 

IndoaSWttUt 


I'weirtmtoinvastC IrTVrwnumCiroPjHHaDymMUFyerch 

Growth Fund ot Foed 0!ter preo ot SOOp PU* <J«r The rutmfl pncswB dOplyte 
opptoitOTieceivedaBefttwftedOttedosea 17 .W 80 WBCMmakecftequ»pavc«JteroDuiTHMUriniuaMaficgentertl^ 


• FOBEWAMtS " 

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! 

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j^SIGNATU« 

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30 


THE TIMES SATURDAY OCTOBER 4 1986 


FAMILY MONEY /5 


French speciality for 
the British investor 


CuNIT TRUSTS") 

Britain's first authorized unit 
trust to concentrate exclu- 
sively on the French stock 
niarket is to be launched this 
weekend. 

The Dumenil Growth Fund 
is to pe marketed by the 
French financial institution 
Dumenil Lebie. Hard on its 
heels in a few days from now, 
a second France-only equity 
fund will make its debut. It 
comes from the Dutch bank- 
ing group EBC AMRO. 

The minimum investment 
in the Dumenil fund is£l,000: 
£500 in the EBC AMRO fired. 
These launches highlight just 
how specialized the unit trust 
industry has become. 

Unit trust groups no longer 
make a big play of broadly 
based funds designed to maxi- 
mize the spread of risk. In- 
stead. the emphasis has 
shifted firmly towards 
specialization led by market- 
ing hype. 

Highly specialized funds 
can perform well and, pro- 
vided investors keep a sharp 
eye on price movements, they 
can make handsome profits. 

Bui you must be prepared to 
act quickly in the light of 
market movements because 
the more specialized the fund, 
the more likely it is to be either 
at the top or the bottom of the 
performance tables. The 
accompanying table illustrates 
this vividly. 

It shows that Australian 
equity unit trusts have been a 
disaster area during the past 
12 months, but have set an 
uncharacteristically cracking 
pace during September 1986. 

Funds specializing in other 
comparatively small markets, 
such as Singapore, or in highly 
volatile sectors such as gold 
rarely chart a middle course 
either. 

Single European country 
specialization, of which the 


Dumenil Lcble and EBC 
AMRO funds arc the most 
recent examples, have been 
available for just over 12 
months. The trend started in 
September I9S5 with West 
German funds and was fol- 
lowed earlier this year by a 
fund specializing in Dutch 
equities, also from EBC 
AMRO. 

Stephen Lansdown. a unit 
trust adviser, welcomes single 
European country funds be- 
cause they allow him to build 
a tailor- made portfolio for 
clients. He cautions, however, 
that because individual conti- 
nental European markets are 
relatively small the funds 
concentrating on them can get 
into difficulty much more 
quickly than a general Euro- 
pean fund 

The French market 
capitalization represents 
about only 1 5 per cent of total 
continental European 
capitalization. 


Nigel Ledeboer, of GT 
Investment Management, 
which was one of the pioneers 
of German funds, is positive 
on prospects for the French 
market. His optimism is based 
on a healthy outlook for 
corporate profits, coupled 
with the French government's 
privatization programme. 

He is also convinced that 
sterling will remain in a 
downtrend against EMS cur- 
rencies. including the French 
franc, so UK. investors could 
benefit from a currency 
realignment 

Consuelo Brooks, of the 
unit trust group Mercury 
Fund Managers, regards 
France as one of the more 
attractive European econo- 
mies for UK investors and 
said that while one should 
never be relaxed about the 
political scene in France, poli- 
tics is not a major factor m the 
investment equation now. 

So the consensus is that 



UNIT TRUST PERFORMANCE 

As at September 30, 1986 
THE BEST 

One Monfli 


One Year 


Waverfey Pac Basin +40.9 

Gartmore Australian +25.3 

Gartmore Gold Stare +25.2 

MSG Gold & General +20.8 

Schroder Gold +20.8 

Waveriey Aust Gold +20.2 

Target Gold +17.9 

M SG Aust & General +17.5 

Henderson Australian +17.4 

Barclays Unicom Aust + 1 6.8 


Legal & Gen Far East 
County Japan Growth 
Sun Lite Japan Growth 
First Eixupe 
Far East 


Baring F 
Dunedin 


BaiJ&e Gifford Europe 
Prudential Hoi bom Eur 
Sentinel Jap Tech&Gen 
Britannia Japan Pert 


+139.6 

+1363 

+124.1 

+ 110.2 

+ 110.1 

+108.2 

+108.0 

+107.2 

+107.2 

+J0S.7 


One Month 


THE WORST 


One Year 


Equitable Units N Amer -10.8 

Hambros Bank UT N Amer -10.8 

GT Unit Man Tech & Gwth -11.0 
Oppenheimer Pacific Gwt -11.1 

Save S Pros Git a Fixed -11.1 
Equity & Law (St & Fxed -11 2 

Clerical Med Git a Fxed -M2 

GT Unit Mngs US a Gen -11.6 

Lawson Fd Mgs Amer Gwth -11.6 
Thornton UK S General -17.0 


3ls Smafler Companies -12.0 

Wanfey Sm»r Companies -123 

Baltic Australian -13.9 

Hexagon Canada Growth -15.7 

TyndaO Australian Secs -15.7 

-17.6 
-17.7 


Tyndall ^ Au str ali an Secs 

B^feGiflbnd TCwb 
MIM Britannia Uni Engy -182 

Target Energy -28.5 

Target Australian -43J) 


One Month offer to offer 
One Year Otter to bid 


Source: Opal Statistics 


France represents a good, if 
speculative, opportunity for 
UK investors. 

That being so. Dumenil 
Lebie and EBC AMRO are 
unlikely to have a cosy duop- 
oly on French funds for long. 
GT said it has no plans in this 
direction, but the French bank 
Socieie Generate is working 
on launch plans for its own 
UK-based unit trust to 
specialize in the French 
markeL 

This will complement its 
existing Second Marche Fund 
which is designed mainly for 
institutional investors who 
want a stake in the French 
equivalent of the USM. 

But the dear message of 
highly specialized funds, 
whether it is France or Austra- 
lia or gold, is that you cannot 
invest your money and simply 
forget about it 

Timing of both buying and 
selling is of the essence. It is 
also vital to remember that 
highly specialized funds are 
only for your spare cash. 

That way. you will be 
delighted if your money dou- 
bles over just one year, but not 
devastated if it halves in 
value. 

Peter Gartland 


Diners who present the bill 


Eating too much take-away 
food can play havoc with your 
waistline, but finding an un- 
pleasant object in a hamburger 
and French fries is an incident 
that no one would relish. 

Earlier this year a customer 
bought several take-away por- 
tions of hamburger and chips 
from McDonald's in Waftob- 
on-Thames. Surrey. 

As he was eating the French 
fries, he discovered that his 
mouth was bleeding. He had 
cut his longue on a small 
triangular segment of glass. 
Other pieces of glass were 
found in the chips. 

The incident was reported 
to the local environmental 
health officer and a prosecu- 
tion was brought against the 
hamburger chain under Sec- 
tion 2 of the Food Act 1984. 

The Act says it is acriminal 
offence to sell "to a 
purchaser’s prejudice, any 
food which is not of the 
nature, substance or quality 
demanded by the purchaser". 

McDonald's lost the case, 
was fined £1,000 and bad to 
pay £75 costs. The company 



Misfortune among the French, fries: it cost this McDonald’s restaurant more than £1,000 


‘We did take 
precautions’ 


described the incident as a 
"freak accident”. 

A McDonald's spokesman 
said: "One of the heat bulbs 
above the fry station ex- 
ploded. It has never happened 
before. The fry station was 
immediately taken out of 
action and completely dis- 
mantled, and all the parts were 
taken away and cleaned 
"When h was put back 
together again, it was checked 
again, to ensure it was free 
from glass. A piece of glass 
must have lodged somewhere 
and worked itself loose. . 

"We did take precautions to 
the best of our ability and 
knowledge. We regret the 
incident very much." 

The environmental health 
officer confirmed that his 
inspection did not reveal any 


more pieces of glass. There' 
were also no other breaches of 
the food regulations. 

Food is subject to much 
more control than other 
goods. Recently, the owner of 
a Chinese take-away. The 
Bamboo Gardens in Cathe- . 
dial Road Cardiff, bad 22 
separate summonses issued 
against her under the food 
hygiene regulations. 

She was fined a total of 
£2.200. being £100 for every 
one of the 22 offences. She 
also had to pay £100 costs. 

Where a prosecution is 
brought by a local authority, 
the customer usually stands to 
get nothing from it. If he wants 
compensation, he will have to 
bring his own separate legal 
action. 

According to one environ- 
mental health officer, only 
about 10 to 20 per cent of 
consumers decide to pursue 
their case. In order to succeed 
a customer almost always has 
to prove negligence — in other 
words, that there was a breach 
of a duty of care owed to him, 
which caused him harm. 

in one case, a family went to 
an Indian restaurant and or- 
dered some lemonade for the 
children. They were given 
cleaning fluid instead The 
owners of the restaurant were 
successfully prosecuted by the 
local authority. 


But there were also separate 
proceedings in the High 
Court, for compensation for 
the children who drank the 
substance. One of them, who : 
had needed regular treatment 
for her throat for two years, 
was awarded £43,000. Her 
brother, who had only minor 
injuries, received £200. 

Cleaning fluid was again the 


Proving 
can 


ing negligence 
3 be difficult 


cause of a more recent claim 
for damages. A customer had 
a drink in a pub. The publican 
had just cleaned out the 
barrels with a caustic solution. 

The customer drank some 
of the beer which contained 
the solution, and he claimed 
damages from the pub for the 
terrible stomach pains and 
wony that he suffered 

His solicitor explained: “I 
was called out to the client to 
take what I was told was a 
death-bed statemenL When I 
arrived he was sitting up in 
bed watching the television! 
None the less, he was off work 
for a week. He got £300 
damages in an out-of-court 
settlement" 

Proving negligence can be 
very difficult A women re- 
cently tell over in a London 
department store. She had 


slipped on a tomato on the 
floor and fractured her hip. 

She is in her late fifties and . 
as a result of the accident she . 
will not be able to work again. 
The store argued that a tomato , 
on the floor did not mean it; 
was negligent The customer 
finally accepted £10,000 of:' 
fered by the store as a gesture 
of goodwill, but with no. 
admission of liability. 

It is not just for physical 
injury that you can claim 
damages. One solicitor said:' 
"There are many instances; 
where the injury is small but ? 
the worry is Wg. 

"In one case my client a: 
porter m a hospital, was- 
clearing up the debris. The. 
syringes that had been used in; 
an operation had not been 
packed ^away properly^ an d 

mto^ny client’s tffigh^Tfte . 
iqjury was insignificant but he = 
got £250 in an out-ofeourt 
settlement just for the wony . 
ofitalL” ; 

One final piece of advice. If i 
you do deride to bring a case ,! 
for compensation, make sure :: 
you use a solicitor specializing , ■ 
in the subject It is a com- ; 
plicated area of the law. where » 
ignorance is for from bliss. - 

Susan Fieldman 1 


Which investment offers the 
potential of a top performing 
unit trust and guarantees that 
your original investment is secure? 


More and more people are 
becoming aware of the oppor- 
tunities of investing in the 
exciting world of stocks and 
shares, but some are 
concerned that their savings 
may be at risk. 

To provide protection for 
investors Gartmore has de- 
signed Safeguard -one of the 
first Guaranteed Equity Plans 
of its kind allowing invest- 
ment in the stock markets of 
the world, safe in the know- 
ledge that the original 
investment is secure. 

How the Plan Works 
By combining in one investment the 
growth potential of a unit trust and a 
guaranteed investment with a life 
assurance company. Safeguard 
allows you to capitalise, over 5 
years, on the growth opportunities 
of investing in stocks and shares 
without risking your original 
investment 

The Guaranteed Element 
The greater part (ti8"i») of your 
mone> : is invested by General 
Portfolio to provide a guaranteed 
return after five years. 

This ensures that your original 
investment will be returned to you 
intact in five vears time. 


SAFEGUARD 



The Guaranteed Equity Plan 


The Growth Element 
The balance (3- '») of your money 
will be used to purchase units in a 
fund -the Safeguard Fund- 
established by the life assurance 
company for this Plan and invested 
exclusively in units in the Gartmore 
Global Fund. This top performing 
unit trust was launched in 1973. and 
is now valued at over£-i2 million. 

It is wdl placed to take advantage 
of investment opportunities around 
the world. 


Your Reward 

The units allocated to the growth 
element provide your profit and 
remember, your original 
investment is secure. (The price 
of the Safeguard units will be 
published daily in the Financial 
Times.) 

An investment linked to unit 
trusts can be more rew arding than 
leaving your money on deposit with 
a hank or building society. £1.000 
invested in Gartmore Global Fund 
on 1st September 1981 would now 
be worth £2 ,924’ (an average 
growth rate of approximately 24 r, . 'o 
pa) whereas the same investment in 
a building .society acoxim could be 
w orth £1.5217 Past performance 
does not guarantee future 
performance, but investors can be 
confident in Gartmore's 
international expertise. 

How do I apply? 

Simply complete the attached 
Application Form and return it with 
your cheque to your professional 
adviser or to: 

SAFEGUARD. 

General Portfolio Life I nsurancePLC. 
Valley House. Crossbrook Street, 
CheshunL Herts. EN8 8JH. 
Telephone enquiries-. 

Freephone 0800-289321 


-\rf nrcoiiH iiNcriMhhl^uir Mkimi Mjnjwnmr'nif nn .iiKunt. -•aN"» , i!ic.'nliiun 4 urc juminirjii — ttti , iVjtNrrjni 


General Information hilcKUinJ c undcru-nnen hv 
General Punhilhi Ulr InHiraner J*U: wlm i«r all I he 
O'M.’umcnair'/n In-ncril IViiniihii will alfc-i pnmfc j 

valuation ol niur piin in mpicx ami dal with any 
quc<aiiiib>llBi may jn«c 

Thr> plan h ilDqavnl in run wc Inc yearv and Unr 
guarantee r. rial yuu u lllht- cinnhrtJ m roxn c lurk nm 
k-v chan t our ■•njanil Ini iM meni ji iheendnfj In e i»r 
pm>«f nr cm pnur death Vcri-nhelev, vhnaAl a he 
nceewsary yuu may vasli in ,««ir plan urlv and vuu mil 
iwnir ihe bid value id Mwialepuard l im> alhKUinl i>* 
uwr plan. *■ itu- vurrenilcr value ul the 

yiinraiiienl demem >>l imirpUl) nhrtvti will depend on 
prevailing tmerpj rales 

Ai the end id live year, ihr Inal amount 11* your 
original invouneiii a . ,11 he returned ■>, you phiv a nim 
equal IO the Md value nf yiHir Safeguard Lmla. AXrm- 

a lively you have die option ir> rdnvoi ynur money All 

ihe details will he -cm 10 vmi Wnr ihecitdol ihcplan-n 
dial you on choo>r which option sun* vmi hrsi 
Oaips 

Tbtxe are no iranagcmenreftargc-'in die guaranlRd 
demem of vuu/ imeMmeni 

i .cnenil HiritnUumUpurdiaMrimii’m ihef Jflmnrr 
(tlutal Fund io provide rhe gnrwih demean The 


lunmitH Cikihal hind vurrcnilt Iia> an annual 
marugcriKiii Jurw id I*, pa i phi* S.\f » id Ihe value .«! 
Ihetund ptu-aiiiniuilihaipri j S' .•.■■nlhevjlne.dilu; 
j-o- njuli aleni in s ihecvsueiii units ji ihe.rlrr 
prkc The MleuuanJ I nn pnvt> •.-alcutneil f" '■merjl 
PnRhdHt uiU Hivlude ihoe chaw- 

Vmr micMmcni mil Jiiunudale uiihm Ihr pUn 
n fill her unh reinvested imnmr An dllnvi ante o made 
lurf jpnalf.jfn- Kav ar tin- raro uirreiilh jpjrhcihle-rr, 
Inc jMiuancc i.i imftums. The- will he rc1in.ul in fhv 
unit pnic vakli tiled hy '.enrral HtnliHm 

iteneml hirUiJm makes no addmmul iTLJ K recmcnl 
charats 

Her^nul ijxnion Vi persona) lahtlm in las aroc 
durmp the hvr tear irrm Fnrihi viandaid raiela'.pj'er 
iherr i- no Isihtlin in LTV either the guaranlcnl 
element nriwi ihe gran ih ri c r nc nud luurmi c* 'mem If 
too are Mihleci in higher tale Lu nr are elipNe Inr 
moimr lav age aDuu live an jddifmnai fuhililv may 
arnc. hui only when ihe pne.n.11, arc taker; \n 
e^ptanajnrv niavr.araiblvIe.inn.rjueMaml.ilneet— an. 
i/su diiNiU esersuJl niur pridesvirfLil Jd> iht 

The HnhvrhnldcTs Priilcrunn M pr, mini- 
UuiinJ hv ihctii>srmim,ii in prfaevt in usims again r 
die failure nr an iieurer In liters cm nr such a lailurr a 


•evv on prmmmr. nut he mj.j< mi aO insurers 
< nr.sv uuenlls l.eneral n>nl«has reserves ihe nghl lu 
disliwi »ueh am aims nr jlier hruelu. as mat he 
neves -an in ■ if Uer i>j meel am lets iniptrscdunUcrthis 
sei or any Mhcr kpslainm drsnaievl u> prmeei 
imrss ,rs 

This atlvcri rancm ishased trriunm.iri jmli irneral 
ISirfli .in >'. unJerdandmp -il prcsnil law and Inland 
Krvrnur pr.-.rur Vi part (hr- adicrfr-oTH-ni 
vxnsinuio an oiler The nphis ul an inicslur -lull he 
governed ,|nedv hi ihe irrms ..I Ihe r-'ls"' r»»ucil hy 
I ,en real JNirrhiliei A i'V- ihe siandard policy r. 
availaMexn request Irnm In-neral n—ll.aiu 

Bern ember that Ihe pnee id unil- and Ihe inenmc 
l’mm ihrm mat go down as well a- up 

\ eopt n| vnur eimiptcud proposal lum t» avail- 
ahlenn vsnuen request. 

Iiarnnir l.hitval himl Is a L nil Trust authnmed tn 
die ficjurrmenl of Trade and Indu-irt l.alRlore hrnj 
vunaerf. L Ur. Jed e- a vleniher ihe- I nil Trusi 
Assnetiii" m kcgHcrnl infaiglanJ No 1 1 

iiOKTallSrW"Iii'tilr fn-ufurrei' 1‘L 1 nafliJniN'lhi 
Hie I Tpjimeni nt TraeJr and Inditwn (segMered in 
Kr.-J.nd No ■i , .jis< 


To: SAFEGUARD General Portfolio Life Insurance PLC. Valley 
House. Crossbrturft Street. Cheshum, Herts EN8 8JH 


I wish IO invest Jt. 


.(minimum AI non. nonuNimum) 


Gartmore 


GARTMORE FIND MANAGERS LIMITED 


aikJ endosc mv cheque lor rhis amount pas-jhle io kiencrai Pnrnolio 
Lite Insurance PL(_ 


Full Name. Mr .Mrs Miss. 
Address 


Dale id Hirth 


lum riMdcm in ihi.-Luiu.NJ kiflalnin.iunovur I5u.-arsnlam.aiid i 
umlwTsund ihdi iht'pmpnsi] stall lorm ihe tasks id ihicmurai .1 
lx.mki.-n nnskft'andta-niTjl ftimnHi’MtiMrsiinini.k |*| f 

NrUIMRIR'iiI Pmpnscr 


Dan 

In ihei-.cm that tliechei|ue ricnvid irtncrai P inl> tin ■ is m u 
draw II I*n Iin uivoum. f JCU' lh.il ihcdrav. it hi the cheque « III lx 
dicniui in hi’ nn agctii 


68 C.4 0 



UntB You-m Contacted Us-« WBI Px» You To Da So 
UNIT TRUST 




PORTFOLIO SERVICE 
No charges. Minimum £&ooo ^ 

TELEPHONE 
YOUR ORDER 
NOW 

CHELSEA FINANCIAL SERVICES LTD 
274 Fulham Rd, London SW10 9EW 01-351 6022 


Full details contained in latesi 
issue of ihe 
CHELSEA VIEWPOINT 
Telephone or Write 
for your tree copy now. 



RE - MORTGAGES 


No Survey Fees No Legal Fees 
Competitive Institutional Rates - 
. Any Purpose 

Endowment Linked or Tax Efficient 
• Pension Schemes - ■ 

3.5 X Salary 
Interest from 10.2596 

Phone Raymond Brett & Co. 
Milton Keynes (0908) 368071 



NO NOTICE. NO PENALTIES. 


8.051 

ON £10,000 OR MORE 


NO NOTICE. NO PENALTIES. 


7802? 

ON £5,000 OR MORE 


TOP RATES.NO STRINGS 

If the bank that likes to sayyes has had to say 
no, consider the virtues of Cheltenham Golcl, the 
perfect balance of instant, penalty-free access and 
atop rate of interest You can pay in orwithdraw as 
you wish without giving notice or inclining any 
penalties whatsoever and earn up to 8.05% net* 
on £10,000 or more. r 

MONTHLY INTEREST 
If you wish you can have your interest paid 
monthly. In a Cheltenham Gold Monthly Interest 
Account amounts of £10,000 or more earn 7.77% 
net 8.05% Compounded Annual Rate* and on ' 
£5,000 or more, 7.53% net 7-80% Compounded 
Annual Rate*, still with no strings. 

You can also have the added convenience of 
running your account from the comfort of your 
home or office, post free, with our Gold By Post 
service. For an investment that’s easy to get at and 
hard to beat, you can bank on Cheltenham Gold. 

Cheltenham Gom - ! 


NO NOTICE. NO PENALTIES. 


73 or? 

ON £500 OR MORE 


lb: Cheltenham &GtoucestoBu^ ■ 

PO Box 124, FREEPOST, Cheltenham, Glos GL53 1BR. j 


UWe enclose &. 


. to open 6 Gold By Post Account 


(Minimum £500 Maximum £250000) 

I/We encloses — =_ to open aGold Monthly Interest 

Account By Post (Minimum £5,000 Maximum £250000) 

□ Please send more details. - blxxx capitals 

Full Name(s) Mr/Mrs/Miss / ■' 

Address 6Gm 

Postcode 


I 





BuhhgSodety 


CHEF OFRCE: CHELTENHAM HOUSE, CLARENCE STREET, CHELTENHAM, GLOUCESTERSHIRE, GL503JR. TEL: 0242 3616L 
Member of Oie Buildir^ Societies Association and Investors’ Protection Scheme. Assets exceed £3^00 niiilipn. 

Branches throughout ttie IK. See Yellow P^es. v ' 

■Intewsi paid aimiuily; amm rates which ro^y vaiy ^Whenlrtercs added loBccourt. • _ • ' 7 • . - 









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Fees 

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tt & Cft 
) 368071 


)ld 


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FAMILY MONEY /6 


The self-help 
groups with 


SniC 


THE TIMES SATURDAY OCTOBER 4 1986 

How muc* ^ 

wi" 


/ the tax 

advantages 

built in 


£ 


fRlEHNY 

1 socirnr 


WHHHY 

TOWN 


Nothing is certain in this 

S’*"? n«E 

inevitable, but tScaFSS 

EBT* be d «eff 

k to invest 

Scf?»,S^ odly ***& These 
institutions originally devel- 
gfdmthelastS^S 
ff‘ p Sroups for workers. 
Members contributed to a 
mutual fimd, which would 

£f v£ faeneflls in ^ event 
of sickness or death. 

— -YiH?P l 'lr n 80 ver °ment ap- 
proved of the self-help mentaf 
•ly. and, among other 
encouragemenis, allowed the 
societies a tax exemption on 
men- investments. Although 
tneir original purpose was 
subsequently superseded by 
me advent of the Welfere 
State, the tax adv antages re- 
mained, and led to the cre- 
ation of new societies in more 
recent times. 

The Inland R evenue kept a 

Single contribution 
is also poss ible 

wary eye on these to prevent 
any abuse of the privilege, and 
societies established post- 
1974 have been strictly lim- 
ited in the contracts they can 
offer. But the real body Wow, 
to new and old alike, was dealt 
two years ago, when the 
Chancellor cut the limits on 
tax-exempt business quite 
drastically. 

* .As things stand now, 
friendly societies can issue 
tax-exempt life assurance poli- 
cies with a dun assured — that 
is, the amount payable on 
death — of po more than £750. 
The standpd format is a. 10- 
year endowment policy, which 
is primary a savings plan, 
though if does include this 
small ampunt pf life cover. 

The pnmiums for this work 
out at £100 a year, or £9 a 
month, jt.is also possible, in 
some cses, to pay a single 
contribution, usually £800. 
This teused to buy a tem- 
porary jhntiity, which in turn 


BASE 

ENDING 

RATES 


ikN 


Min & Company 10 . 00 % 

But 10 JQ 0 % 

Oraik Saringst 10 J 5 % 

CdisoMated Cnfc 10 iJ 0 % 

Cfopaatiw Bank 10 - 00 % 

OHoare & Co 10 . 00 % 

tong Kong & Shanghai — 10 . 00 % 

(Loyds Bank r — 1000 % 

fat WtestnwsJBr, i — 10 X 0 % 

feal Bank of Sadfepd — m 00 % 

rSB l 10 i 00 % 

ptotank NA l HUM 

k A taWtBiJlte. 


funds the annua] p remiums. 

At the end of 10 years, the 
proceeds of the policy may be 
taken completely tax-free: 
Cashing in a plan sooner than 
that, however, wifl incur pen- 
alties. For the first seven and a 
half years, the society may 
return only p remiums paid to 
date, and at all times there is 
liable to be a deduction for 
administration charges. 

On the other hand, it is 
usually possible to continue a 
plan beyond the 10-year mark, 
and at that stage if* can be 
cashed in at any time without 
penalty. 

When it comes to investing 
funds, friendly societies do not 
have an entirely free hand, as 
50 per cent must be placed in 
so-called “narrow range” in- 
struments. These indude gilts, 
fixed-interest securities and 
local authority loans: In other 
words, safety, rather than 
speculation, is the order of the 
day. 

Within that, however, there 
are different schools of 
thought as to the level of 
safety. Some societies choose 
to invest entirely is building 
society deposits, while others 
opt for unit-linked funds, or a 
combination of the two. 

The advantage of the unit- 
linked route is that it offers the 
c hance of capital appreciation, 
while building society invest- 
ments attract only interest 
However, the initial charges 
tend to be more expensive: 
amounting sometimes to as 
much as 75 percent of the first 
year’s premium. Of course, 
nnite ran also gO down in 
value as well as up, sp the 
choice boils down to bow 
much risk the policyholder is 
prepared to accept - 

With the low premium 
lewd, friendly society policies 
would be well suited for use as 
children’s savings plans. That 
this market has not been more 
widely tapped is due to two 
factors. 

- first, the . post-1974 soci- 
eties may sell only to those 
g g-rf 18 and over. Secondly, 
the Revenue has shown a 
readiness to damp down on 
such selling by the older 
institutions. 

Towards the end of last 
year, tire Tunbridge Wells 
Equitable joined with Domin- 
ion finjmeial Managemnt to 
bring out a Baby Bond, de- 
signed for children up to 18. 

This was the usual £IOO-a-y«ar 

10-year policy, bat with the 
added advantage that if pre- 
miums were covenanted, by a 
grandparent, for instance, the 
child could claim bade the tax 
on them. 

This proved sufficiently 
popular to sell about 11,500 
contracts within a few 
months, but the very success 


proved to be its downfall. The 
Revenue forced it to be with- 
drawn, effectively on the 
grounds that children's poli- 
cies would qualify for tax 


iTE 




DIX BELGRAVIA pic 
An Asset Backed BES Property 
development and Building Company 

lx Belgravia pic will utilise funds raised by the issue for - 
70 purposes: * 

(i) 40% of funds for the Company's own property 

development (plus gearing from borrowings) 

(ii) 60 % for building construction for other 

developers on deferred payment terms 
Tax relief on your investmenr in this tax year (1986/7) 

Experienced Management investing £55,000 pari 

passu with subscribers 

61.05% priority growth to investors 

High Asset backing 

provisional Inland Revenue BES clearance obtained. 
Sponsored and monitored by the UK’s leading BES sponsor 


TOtMftenfamcnidflnBH 


am»dMtt» 10lfcror 



exemption only provided they ; 
were not ma£yf«t on a 1 
“commere i aT scale.. 

Whatever that may mean — 
and no one, inducting the 
Revenue, seems entirely sure 
- the net result is that the 
Baby Bond Ins been reissued 
as a taxable policy. It does 
include one or two extra 
options, but the mam attrac- 
tion, the tax-exempt dement, 

has been lost. 

Other societies "appear to 
have taken heed of the warn- 
ing. Tune Assurance, for 
example, was off e rin g a 
children's policy for a while, 
but has since withdrawn it 
Whhpremitun levels so low, it 
is difficult to make the prod- 
uct cost-effective if it cannot 
be widely promoted. 

The same arg um ent, of 
course, applies to plans aimed 
ai adults. The costs of market- 
ing the contracts are dis- 
proportionate to tire small 
contributions that can be 
made. 

Several hybrid 
schemes available 

However, an im port an t 
concession was panted to the 
newer societies in last year's 
finance Act. They are now 
allowed, like their older 
counterparts, to write taxable 
business. This gives them 
scope to offer plans with 
higher premiums, usually up 
to £300 a year, on a past 
taxable, part tax-exempt basis. 

Several of these hybrid 
schemes are now available. 
Some are provided in 
conjunction with an insurance 
company, such as the Twice 
Tax Free Plan offered by the 
Lancashire and Yorkshire 
Friendly Society together with 
MLA. Others, such as that of 
Family Assurance, are entirely 
in-house affairs. 

The first £100 of every 
annual premium is assigned to 
a tax-exempt fund, and fol- 
lows the s&mdard rules on 
cashing in and so forth. The 
remainder, being' taxable, is 
more flexible. At the end of 
the 10-year-tenn, premiums 
can be stopped but the money 
left invested to app rec ia te 
further, or by paying a nom- 
inal premium to keep the 
policy in force, the investor 
can take partial withdrawals, 
tax-free, as an income. 

With the higher contribu- 
tion level and greater freedom, 
the hybrid offers more scope 
than the whofly exempt pol- 
icy,. while stiO making the 
most of the tax advantages. 
Obviously, with only £100 a 
year free of tax, there are no 
fortunes to be matte at the 
Revenue’s expense. 

However, any gift from the 
taxman is worth a second 
look, and a hybrid plan in 
particular can be a worthwhile 
home for long-term savings. 

1 x 7 , Warrington 


GucaHy im'Xm lTnicut ihwy« mfce» 

money in nrw iw —. Bm jest h aw moriidepe nds ou la ving the 

liglli mr.jArumnn jyirt fj mijiiff the M Q0Bd 

-astaT, and them is a seaethexe. Thousands of people already 
make good, steady profits inv esting » M* issues and often 
nothing rise., .year after year, They 1 ia not es pecial ly ctevar or 

tig&Mnne. The New Issae Shire Guide is tte'emn^s^ady 
specialist publication devoted e i dnsrol yto new stares. 

Drop osetinetoday and we will send yodTREE details, then you 
too can enjoy the maple seam that already enables hundreds of 
iuveaens to naTirm c those profits ..^aSdr...m this exc it ing are a 
of the stock mnioet- 

P.S. Aspedalrapoa on BritfahG — ao rf al l ti» po««aiflHi— fr fa 

Hrj^lInTiT jjrntnrfwre lawifjWija 

I Ito^lawlmoe Sham Geld* Ltd, 3Iliet8txwt > £aBdciQEC4TUCU~ 

J Name *. 

| Address 

| Postcode T«ni 


y 1st > 

I Fmwrial Weekly 1 
I Harm Paterson 

V *wxd J 




Postcode. 


TOP RATE IN 90W ACCOUNTS” 

Momington 90 


:W 


* Minimum £1,000 * Immediate access 

* No-penalty withdrawals if £10,000 remains 
or 90 days notice given * Dividends paid 
half-yearly. 

Momington BuOding Society ■ 

Nobody rates you higher J 

158Kemtsh Town Road. London NW5 2BT Tet 01-485 5575. I 
Please said my app li ca ti on form ■ 


I ESU866 : 

Postcode 

^^Morindtarln«tiBintbyTnHaas.MHBSanottlHBiMn|S«daitaAHOcbdo«L 


j \ /Etna's Gilt-Edged Bond has just been voted 

l/NJ V BEST FINANCIAL PRODUCT OFTHE YEAR by the 

^ Financial WedcyMartin Paterson Award panel coming 

first in awy category, including: 

Value for money and inve^meutperfonnauce 
Jp. innovation and relevance to current market needs 
Jp Quality of product and technical design 

THE TIME TO BUY /ETNA'S GILT-EDGED BOND IS NOW 
Because: 

•Gilfsare giving more than BS real return over the current rate of inflation - 
nearly the highestever-and greater than every other maior 

industrial country 

•Phillips & Drew Fund Management have produced a performance of at least 
3%andupto 18^ higher than the 152 competing tunds over the 6 months to 
1st September 1986* 

•There is NO FRONT-END CHARGEand NO CAPITAL GAINSTAX 

•There are HUGE COSTSA'INGSoverdirea investment 

•There is ItFia year withdrawal fad fir, • FREE of basic rate tax 

INVEST NOW BEFORE INTEREST RATES FALL AGAIN! 

/EirwisL^CK JTmrItKfKT*iis/dT.iT.t^Sici,quf:ftJinsarinteBio«p Mh 

:• cq-j I. jiir,: a CX 1 009 0» jA 

/Etna LilcInsw^KrCnFpjr-, Ltd 4CI Si Uia Street Lcniw EC1 V4QE tit No ASha 

r -wrjs jr« sa- . . M> jAQli 


Please compfeteand send the coupon m an ewt:?pejdjTe^jri to Life InsunnceCcmruny Ltd A3< 

FREEPOST London EC IB INA Oiphowc-vt CuKcnwrCa:eCer.ue-dul I00dnd»Lthcopciii!ettc7 
FREEFONE /Etna The Centre isopen 8an rr Sp.-n e^cr j-eeiaa, 

Mease send me my FREE Gmdeto Gilts in J deu.bc i fiiv/Etta GILTEDGEO BOND:? 

Name-MitoXiuMu - -- Dated Bmh 


Name of usual Professional adv iset- 


/Etna 


PS HyoaarcseU<TT!rI?>'edrtK3\er!P50iiiTVin\s«n»4'.in 
please nek i hetiMWWM^alwsend^^ del di!a . 

diCtius nt*Gili- Edged Re-sim Bmd □ r 










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Ncfwopm^^^tturday 


By phooingFidelity today you can ^ 

take partin a rerolution in unit trust 
investment: - 

Seven days aweek. 

_ Now you can get that personal invest- 
ment advice you need, directly by phone. 

Outside nOTmal office hours. 

You can also buy and sell fiddity unit trusts 
at that day’s price. 

This service is available from 9 a.m- to 5 p.m. 

every weekend, and &t>m 9 ajTL to 9pjn- 

Monday to Friday. 

' Whik\\oMTnaik^iiXTv^ 

iheQydaps&flDeptEddity 

It s4pjn.and the banks are shut. 

It’s 530 pjn. and the best answeryou get 
from most trust unit groups is an answophone. 

It’s Sunday and the building societies are 
dosed. 

But Fidelity is open tor business. 

This is the importance of our new 
invesanentandadvisory service. 

Ihequestiaisyoui 

farbetterin^sttnent 

"The changing temper of world markets this 
year alone demonstrates the need for immediate, 
sound, professional and active advice. 


mg 


For example, you may well have asked 
yourself the following questions. 

Will the Japanese market regain its 

upward thrust? 

How much further has Europe to rise? 


, S 1 ! 1 ' "a, 

; 

l 0-(Zf r_ 

* ip / 





r Should I switch my investments 

in America? 

What investment opportunities are 
available through PEPsr 

You need never make a blind invest- 
ment decision again. 

For the answers just ring Fidelity. 

■feurlteanalliive^ 

As an investor, you will receive our new 
Fidelity ‘Personal Investor Account’ card. 

Using our special Callfree number quoted 
on your card, you have immediate access to 
valuable up-to-the-minute advice on whether to 
buy, sell or hold your position to your advantage. 

And remember, you don’t nave to make a 
decision - this advice service is completely 
without obligation. 

As an account holder you also benefit from 
advance notice ofour new funds, regular 
investment newsletters, and priority invitations ; 
to our Investment Seminars. 


:«r* m:t 


Chedtthe 


lepapesChedcycfurprm 

ChedcwfihEddity 


iMk lo our team ofinwiunaus 


You’ve read today’s personal finance 
columns and studied the markets. 

- You don’t have to wait until Monday to act 
Callfree Fidelity on 0800414161 for Saturday 
shopping now. 


Callfee 0800 4 J 416 L until nwdnigfctonigfr. 


JpFidelity 

MAKING MONEY MAKE MONEY 


■u*i ij — f ■: 


■? • " r - c— r.vn-D -li-a ii y T.'HO-W*. 








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Bar* oil 

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Homework 


before the 
home loan 


l£ ( MORTGAGES ) 

* In taking out a mongage you 
are borrowing a sum of money 
secured against a property, 
%* your home: You hope the 
■'u value of the property will 
" a* eventually rise. Meanwhile, 
- foe debt has to be repaid. 


can remain the same but be • 
spread over a longer period. If 
you are ’aiming to move, say, 


within five years, a repayment 
mortgage is likely to be the 


' The big advantage of buying 

a home On mortgage is that it 
provides a roof over your head 
while you pay for it At the end 
of about 25 years, or maybe 
sooner, you end up owning the 
roof and everything beneath 
it 

But there are hazards before 
reaching this happy day. Being 
homeless through non-pay- 
ment of a mortgage debt is 
unpleasant So the first move 
before taking up any offer of a 
mortgage is to work out the 
cost against present and future 
outgoings. 

You have the option of 
borrowing from building soci- 
eties, banks, insurance com- 
panies and, if you are a council 
tenant local authorities. Some 
builders, such as Wimpey and 
Ideal Homes, offer mortgage 
assistance on new homes as 
pail of a financial package, 
which includes fixed interest 
rates for the first year. 

Brokers and estate agents 
can also arrange a mortgage 
fora fee. Check that the deal is 
at least as good as you would 
get by going to lenders direct 

Loans are geared to various 
types of borrowers — singles, 
or sharers, the young, the old, 
the self-employed, low earners 
hoping to be rich tomorrow, 
and yuppies who want the 
biggest loan they can get 
today. 

Home ownership in the UK 
) exceeds 60 per cent but is up 
to 72 per cent for the 25-34 age 
'group, the highest percentage' 
of young home owners in 
Europe. 

The most common mort- 
gage is the repayment one. 

' You pay off capital and in- 
terest by equal monthly pay- 
ments until at the end of the 
loan term the debt is repaid 
entirely. Tax relief is given on 
8 loans of up to £30,000 so that 
on a mortgage rate of 11 per 
cent the net rate at 29 per cent 
tax is 7.81 per cenL 

This net amount is paid 
direct to the lending institu- 
tion which recovers the tax 
relief element from the Inland 
Revenue. Loans of more than 
£30.000 will be included in the 
(MIRAS) net payment 
arrangement from April 1987. 

The advantage of a repay- 
ment mortgage is that if 


mortgage is likely to be the 
best. 

Assuming the house value 
rises even sightly during that 
period, you should be able to 
sell with some cash in hand, 
and go up market with a bigger 
deposit 

A sub- section of repayment 
mortgages consists of the low- 
start or gross-profile ones. 
These are suitable for solic- 
itors, accountants, doctors 
and others ax the start of a 
professional career where sal- 
aries are likely to rise fairly 
quickly from the level of. say, 
an articled derk. 

More interest is paid in the 
early part of the loan and more 
tax relief thereby gained, and 
total outgoings are cheaper in 
the early years than are those 
of a constant net repayment 
mortgage. 

Rom about the 12th year of 
a low-start mortgage, the 
repayments increase. With a 
13 per cent interest rate, the 
total paid out over 25 years 
will be more than £1,000 
dearer on every £10,000 bor- 
rowed. But for those in a low- 
paid but secure job, they give a 
footing on the housing ladder. 

This type of loan is avail- 
able from most banks and as 
an option at the Halifax, 
National and Provincial, 
Guardian and Anglia B uilding 

Societies. 

Repayment mortgages used 
to be the cheapest type of 
home loans, but when mort- 
gage protection policies are 
added oh, and interest rates 
are low, certain types of 
endowment mortgage work 
out cheaper. 

This is because an endow- 
ment mortgage consists of two 
parts: the capital loan and an 
endowment policy. The for- 



Investors are offered 
the ‘forbidden fruits’ 


-r^ NG 


r» 

jv.-t* 

1- U- i 


BES 


Your house is probably your greatest investment, but have you got the loan right? 


Final sum should 
pay off the debt 


mer is taken out with a lender 
such as a bank or building 
society, the latter with an 
insurance company. 

You pay interest only on the 
capital lo your lender. This 
interest qualifies for tax relief. 
The policy premiums are paid 
to the insurance company and 
at the end of the repayment 
period you have with a sum 
which should pay off all the 
capital borrowed. 

Variants of the endowment 
mortgage, such as with-profits 


interest rates rise, repayments . and unit-linked, give higher 


sums. A with-profits policy 
adds bonuses throughout the 
life of the mortgage. Hie unit- 
linked endowment mortgage 
invests your premiums fry 
buying units in different 
funds. 

Depending on the invest- 
ment performance of the 
insurance companies, these 
endowment variants can not 
only pay off the capital bor- 
rowed ai the end of the term, 
but also give you a lump sum. 

The advantages of endow- 
ment policies are obvious; 
their disadvantages are that so 
much depends on picking out 
the right insurance company. 
The top performers in May 
1986 over a 10-year period 
were Standard Life, Scottish 
Amicable, Scottish Widows, 
Equitable, Clerical' Medical, 
RNPFN, Tunbridge Wells Eq- 
uitable, Norwich Union, 
Ecclesiastical, and Refuge 
(Money Management). 

Another disadvantage of 


endowment policies is that, 
unlike repayment mortgages, 
if you move house in, say, 
seven years or less, no part of 
your capital debt would be 
paid off You would have to 
rely on the redemption value 
of your policy for any gain, or 


Pension mortgages 
are tax-efficient 


continue with it when you 
bought another house. 

Pension mortgages are only 
for those who have taken out a 
so-called section 226 policy, 
mainly the self-employed. The 
outgoings are split between 
interest payments on the loan 
and contributions to a pension 
scheme. At retirement you gel 
a pension and a lump sum to 
pay off the capital borrowed. 

Because contributors can 
pay up to 17.5 percent of their 
earnings (20 per cent if born 
before 1934) with tax relief at 


their highest .rates, pension 
mortgage are tax-efficient, 
especially for those paying the 
highest rales of tax. 

The major disadvantages 
are that they cost more and if 
you retire early or become an 
employee you cannot get your 
hands on your money, al- 
though some companies will 
arrange loans for you. Por- 
table pension arrangements 
may extend the popularity of 
this fairly new type of 
mortgage. 

Other types of policy are 
joint mortgages. When two or 
three sharers get a loan, each 
will be entitled to the £30,000 
tax relief! 

There are also mortgages 
linked to London Inter Bank 
Offered Rate from United 
Bank of Kuwait with the 
mortgage rate at % per cent' 
above LIBOR and held for- 
three months before a change. 


Jennie Hawthorne 


A new Business Expansion 
Scheme scheduled to be 
launched next week will give 
private investors access to the 
so for forbidden fruits of 
management and leveraged 
buyouts. 

The scheme is a Johnson 
Fry invention. It is the first 
BES fond committed to invest 
in this area which is one that 
has been traditionally re- 
served for sizeable financial 
institutions with a lot of 
money to spend. 

It is potentially a very 
lucrative area too — and 
investors in the Johnson Fry 
Management and Leveraged 
Buyout Business Expansion 
Scheme could benefit 
accordingly. 

At the same time it has extra 
dangers which BES investors 
normally do notfoce. 

Management and leveraged 
buyouts simply describe ways 
of buying one company which, 
is owned by another. The 
purchasers — who could be the 
managers of the company or 
complete outriders — “buy it 
out’’ from the company that 
owns iL 

A leveraged buyout gen - 
erally describes the situation 
where a lot of money is 
borrowed to finance the pur- 
chase of the company which is 
being acquired. Typically 
these borrowings will be se- 
cured on the assets of the 
company. 

A management buyout is 
often used to describe the 
same process — except that the 
management of the company 
being purchased are buying it 
themselves from the owners. 

Deals of this kind are 
usually finan ced not just by 
bank borrowings but also by 
institutions — and the 
management of the company 
— taking an equity stake in the 
companies bring purchased. 

A mixture of debt and 
equity buys the company — 
and die Johnson Fry buyout 
fund aims to provide some of 
that equity either alone or else 
alongside equity put in by 
others. 

Typically these others 
would be other major institu- 
tions or the management of 
tbe company being bought, or 
both. 

“I want City people to 
invest in this, not unsophis- 
ticated investors,” says 
Charles Fry, chairman of 
Johnson Fry. 

This is why the minimum 
investment in the fond is 
£5.000. 



Another danger forints, 
tore is that if the buyottw 
wrong, the interests if 




debt to finance the 
may thcnbCCTme oppoaed to 
those of the BES sharefcohL. 
who have tnvesft* via ft! 

fund. 

The institutiou tnay 
want to put the company into 
receivership to effect * sale of 
the assets and recoup as much 
of its money as posotfc. 


. A 1 


If 1*9 




In fairness to Johnson Fry 
the prospectus does hi ghlig ht 
these potential risks pretty 
dearly. 


i ?■» t. 


It also says that h » possible 
that the fund will invest khat 
one buyout situation. v 




Charles Fry: ‘I want CRy 
people to invest: in this 


There is no frootread load 
chaise to investors ia the food 




Much ‘BES investment, by 
its nature as investment _ in 
unquoted companies, in- 
volves risk. This fund is 
perhaps a little riski er th an 
others although the rewards 
are potentially for greater. 

One of the reasons is that i£ 
as is likely, the BES fund 
invests alongside the manage- 
ment of a company and the 
institutions backing it, then 
the fond will have a minority 
stake only. 

The danger is that the 
company could then do some- 
thing which stops it from 
qualifying as a BES company 


— Johnson Fry wQl chant 
target companies 4 percent of 
the amount the fond invests, 
as well as taking option of up 
to 10 per cent of the stake 
which the fund trices is a 
particular company. These 

will be exercisable at die same 

price as paid by tbe fond 




- - &* H‘ ** 


±.4i «JV 


The market for buyouts is 
pretty competitive — and has 
been for a number of yean. At 
the moment than is a lot of 
money available for buyout* 
but there are not many good 
deals around. And Jahsnoa 
Fry has not, to date, effected a 

management or leveraged 
buyout 


\ ; iHist ft 


IS*-; 


UiumM 

--- m 

r 


There is a 
lot of money 
available 
for buyouts 
at the 
moment, 
but not many 
good deals 
around 


Mr Fry, however, thinks 
that the fond will benefo from 
what he terms are “Strong 
links" with Citibank NA - a 
mqjor force in buyouts both in 
zhis country and foe United 
States. Citibank has indicmed 
its support for the fund but is 
not a co-sponsor. 




-tMr.ftatfl 

M 

m 


>«•*» ***** 


Moreover, Mr Fry \ thinks 
that he will be able to rariaxw 


t hum*: 


the competitioiilby offering le 


managements 
than the big 
market are pn 


ter terms 
ere . fit the 4 
i to pay. 

i that BES 
i will have 
which wiB 


**.-«*■** ftl 

.tafceM *M 


— perhaps the managers and 
institutions decide to sell out 


They might want to expand 
into an area of activity not 
covered under foe BES legisla- 
tion, and this would mean that 
it ceased to be a BES 
company. 

Johnson Fry will usually 
have a board representative 
and it will be a forceful voice 
for tbe investors in the fund. 
But if the fund has 
onlyminority stakes that voice 
can be overruled. 


The reasoning is that BES 
investors in the fond will have 
the tax relief bonus, which wffl 
mean they win settle for a 
lower return than the imtha- 
tions would be hapgy with. 

The returns still fook pretty 
handsome — ififoey some oSL 

Potential investor4ai5 cer- 
tainly being offered feffao- 
vatrve opportunity. .HTwc 
want to invest in theg*ldo 
so with your eyes qji^The 
fond could do brifliaingaad 


r-rapM * i 


Ifri j 

- -v C»wwl*Vfc 
-** »***>*«* 




multiply your staketnaoy 
tiroes. V . • 


4WF** w w tT**! 
***• *•*«*■» i|i 
s**f****t*a 

' m 


Or you could lose foqktt- 


IwnmUn 


Hjaiuui 

« - ’9 

■“'••¥4* -f* 


NO PENALTIES INSTANT ACCESS ■ NO PENALTIES 


co 


• .-a . . 

... v _ 

■ - - » 


fit l 


CO 


U I 


UNBEATABLE! f How to become 


5 


- r - . ... 


i:_*i f-ti 

•> it « *»*| i *H 

V..» 



a stag in bed 


"■'"■*** * T 





Next time there’s a big new share issue, you 
could be among die “winners”: one of the 
“stags” - the people who buy and sell fast^ and 
make a profit! 

You don’t have to be an expert: you can do it 
with just a little bedtime reading. 

Playing the stockmarket isn’t just for city 


THE BEST 
NO STRINGS’ RATE. 


Skipton Sovereign Shares have con- 
sistently been the best ‘no-strings’ investment 
available from a major building society 

At 8.60% net on investments of £10,000 
or more, (gross equivalent 12.11% *)f 
they are out in front again. 


^VESTMENT 


£10.000 OK MOKE 

£5,000 OR MOKE 

£500 OR MQKE 

MOwnaYgnatESTgatoacroi 

£5,000 OR MOKE 

£500 OR MORE 


Sovereign 'no-strings' means you can take your money out 
withoulany notice and absolutely no losonmercst->notapennyofii. 

If you’re looking for an exceptional investment with total 
accessibility (for that money returned bom theTSB for example), then 

here it is- 


TfanrairaadlmrTMh October 

FREE POSXAL SERVICE 

1b open an account. Freepost your cheque with the 
coupon bdow or call at your local Skipion Branch. After that you 
may use the Sovereign I%st Class Serwe to pay in or withdraw by 
post as and when you wish, and we pay the postage. 


gents any more. Iris for everve 
fun - and it can be very rewat 
All you need, to get it right, 
is someone to show you what 
to do. What to buy - what to 
sell - and when. * 

One weekly magazine has 
been advising people about 
their money for longer than 
most. Investors Chronicle. 

Not just stocks and shares 
- though thousands of 
established investors look to 
us for advice on these every 
week. 

• You’ll find 

there’s a surpris- _ 

ing amount in \ 
Investors Chronicle I 
on savings and per- j 
sonai finance too ... I 


How to build up your savings faster Httw to 
get a bigger income . Play less tax. How tcSpidt 
the best Unit Trust \ y 

And if you are looking to learn about the 
stockmarket, there’s plenty here too. Should 
you go for British Gas ? What about 3Ms 
Royce ? British Airway s? And the others" .. \s 
There^s even a weekly “Absolute Beginn irsf- 
guide to explain investment in derail. ^ 
Whether you’re a novice 


INVESTORS 


or an experienced pld hand, \ 


'777 



you’ll soon pick ub a lot of 
valuable tips. AndAall from 
the comfort of your own 
bedroom! \ 

Investors Chiomqe is at 
your newsagent this Friday. 

See how it feels to make a 
bit of money. Iris easy. 




CM**' 


ostonwE TOPTveNn'UhBL'uiiiNcsoarnes 


IT SKIPTON SOVEREIGN SHARK FI 


Skipton 

Building Society 


The Difference is 


Please use block capitals. Tkk when: appropriate 
i tVOi wish in open a Sovereign Account and endosea cheque for 

r : (Max. £250,000 pet account ]. 

1 Afeu-bhuiupen a Sovereign Momhly Interest Account and 

enclose a cheque fort 

tMin.i2JU0-Maxi25ft(X»peraOT7unJ). 

Cheques should be made pay able lg Ski pton Building Society 
Please- send me more details. 


"o 


the Skipton Factor 


m LEmsTsKtnnM north s ones a rcs lbk m. m i wi 

RRtNCHES lXP«ENCtESTH110ltHtJl.TrHM.K. 
vniBtPOf THtBUILOlNC SOCIETIES ASSOCIATION 


Kara -ml (mn, tana*? hotM iwatitArn 


I EMQDE I m 

FWEHWSKrrm^ WWTH>|»W# BMJIBB 
j (WANCHSA 4\DAIjE>CIESTHICtCH0l.'T THU K I 


INSTANT ACCESS - NO PENALTIES - INSTANT ACCESS 








; -- r' - 


on 



''“"O’V . 

"'J'W'Uu,, * 
" ,ii 'iCjj 

ll,iv '"djj 

1,1 WiuJ 
* uh ' ,h « botj 

nou m aijT 

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pr, Wm ** 
u hich 
* m ncrs 
■ay* the dag*. 
d icnano* ■ 

► 

lklR S of loa 

liikc Prolog 
>6 up rt* t- 

ian Frieda 



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Kill I" ihfK* 

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ices 


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14 - 




THE TIMES SATURDAY OCiUbhR 4 iyfcb 


FAMILY MONEY/8 


Now the dial-a-share service 


big bang 


Dealers 


*? slocks and shares 


are in train! n^uT&S 

me *ods of deaSngm 
government stocks were - 

mock-up of the new- 

gwssfeas 

SSiasa'g 

go and commissions can 
t* negotiated. Second “du*i 

»” will MfisS 

lafS.. 081 ? aty K a ^vision of 
gbour between the stock- 
oroker, who gives investment 

advice and orders sharesoDM 

individual s behalf; and the 
$***■ who makes a living mrt 
tnryingamd seD- 
HJ® shares on the Stock 
exchange floor. This is known 


Since Big Ramification does buving and selling shares is a 
h t ve t -fiffiy- and expensive one. 

g™ J° ,l * Je phrase Big. involving broker, jobber and 
oang eventually became the stamp duty on purchases. 

5t£?!k °C financ * ef Given the built-in costs of this 

labour-intensive business, 
T>J’° r “® mvcnor ®>R telephone share-dealing is a 
Bang should be good news, cheap way to deal 

£TW. e TSr q S‘ This is certainlythe 
method of registering share can «peneoffl following Wdl 
deals wffl.come imo ops* Streefsown BigBaagui 1975. 
do. A trensacrion wifg «£££<>” 

Telephoning is the SSST.fiSS'Ag 


as making a market” 

A further change is the 
opening up 0 f ^ 

exchange io outsiders; the 
Japanese firm Nomura Securi- 
ties and Americans Merrill 
Lynch are now members. 

You may not think 
changes are cataclysmic, but 


uoai* wm come into opera- 
tion- A transaction wifi be 

Telephoning is the 
cheap way to deal 

effected for just a few pounds. 
One analyst says: “It should 
be very nice for the small man 
— so long as it works." 

The City has been flirting 
with the smaller investor for 
some time. Several telephone 
share-dealing services now cx- 
ist after Hoare Go vet: in- 
troduced its Dealer Call 
service in July last year. The 
majority of these provide a 
simple transaction service. 
The caller, who must have 
aleady applied for member- 
ship of the service, simply 
rings up and places the buy or 
sell order. No investment 
advice is given. 

The standard term for such 


buying and selling shares is a people with a modest amount 
“frilly” and expensive one. of money who want to deal oo 
involving broker, jobber and the Stock Exchange ” So does 
stamp duty on purchases. Redroayne Bentley, which is 
Given the built-in costs of this exceptional in that it offers “a ; 
labour-intensive business, fuff range of investment ad- j 
telephone- share-dealing is a vice at every transaction \ 
cheap way to deaL level", according to Allan 

-rhie ~ twa Collins. The introduction of 

U« .Ue* fart 

eZJftZZnL; Bane m 1975 sema **■* cbent nu ®- 

IGri nwoii Gfrifv^san’s "* dramatically from 

Share Call - available on 4 -500 to 7 ,500 tn six months. 
Freephone — chains £10 for The future for would-be 
transactions under £605, whik share owners seems fair 
Henry Cooke Lumsden’s Mar- .enough, always provided foe 
ket link has a similar charge markets do not plunge as they 
on deals up to £650. The latter have been threatening to do. 


on deals up to £650. The latter have 

Bentley's Share Card have a eo y?? sus 

ifcred eh^g Wunure, 
starting at just £5 in Market 

LMandamShnreC^ SMSE**" 
Hoare Govetl s Deal er Call aew charging structure on 
sets a minimum transaction Monday. No details are yet 
levd Maxim urns available but “charges wiU be 

vary. Market U^unj»ses a going down” says Nicholas 

52? 8 /? f „ f25;0C S: ******* Hunloke. Lei's hope share 
Dealer Call users have no set prices do not follow them, 
set limit. Nicholas Hunloke; 

of Hoare Govetl, says: “Many . Martin Baker 

transactions are above the 

£50.000 leveL” Telephone share-dealing ser- 

David Lumsden. of Henry ».ccs: Henrv Cooke Lumsden. 
Cooke Lumsden. says: “We 01-628 0411; Hoare Govetl, 
a$k our clients to set their own 01-404 0344; Kleinwort 
limits on the application form Grieveson. Freephone 0800 


Jasmin Electronics PLC 


OFFER FOR SUBSCRIPTION UNDER THE 


. Of up to 1,000.000 Ordinary Shares of 25p each 
at £1.58 per share 

Jasmin is not a start-up business but an established 
company with a profit record specialising in 'customised* 

process control, display and teletext systems for the public 
sector and major quoted corporations. 

A commission will be paid to professional 
intermediaries on allotted applications. 

Thts feki-rlrrmmi line* not cmuituk- an oltf bi utixnKr for iblTA 
jnJ Murr-. rail ix jfltoirJ punnaci utlw prpwcctos 

To: Jasmin Electronics PLC. St. Matthews Way. 

Leicester LEI 2AA. Telephone (0533) 515515- 

Please send me copies of the BES prospectus. 


Address. 


. Martin Baker 

Telephone share-dealing se r- 
*.05: Henrv Cooke Lumsden. 
01-628 0411; Hoare Govetl, I 
01-404 0344; Kleinwort ■ 
Grieveson, Freephone 0800 ; 
010101: Phillips & Drew. 01- j 


.l 7 -,- ~ iinwuiuiuuiciuiiuiauiu umitt on me appucauon lorra uneveson. rreepnone uoui 

ihinbi^t. slov ^ services is “no frills” The and then we take up bankers' 010101: Phillips & Drew, Oh 

1 °ugbandhas difficulty with such an epithet references. The number of 628 9771; Reamavne Bentley, 
, e consequences is that the whole business of people we have had to turn 0532436941 
WIU be really dramatic down is minute. We welcome 


INTEREST RATES ROUND-UP 


Banks 

Current account - no imerast pakL 
j-teposit accounts - seven days 1 
r ?5!5? d ^ withdrawals. 

JwWest 4375 per cent. National 
Girobank 435 per cent Ffaced tarm 
deposits CIO, 000 to £24399 : l 
niontfi 7.00 per cent 3 months 
7.375 par cert. 6 months 7375 per 
cent (National Westminster); 1 
month 6.634 per cent, 3 months 
6314 per cent 6 months 5314 per 
cart (Midland). Other banks may 
differ. 

„ MONEY FUNDS 

Fund Net CNAft Ttfapftone 

AitkenKume 

ronWyina SST 7.13 01 638 SOTO 
BoJ Sccttand 635 7.18 01 828 BOBO 

Bardnrs Mghar Rate 
Depow Accouie 

£1.000-13^93 ara 679 01 BBS 1587 

£10.000 S over 7410 7.19 016261667 
Catar Alton cal S82 7M 015882777 
Qutienk 

Money Mans 7j00 758 01 581 1422 
HFCTmst 7-day 7JB 7 JO 012968381 
Handaraca Money 
Mwfcat 

Ctwgua Account BS5 7.18 016385757 
L*GHfabhtDapi7J5 7J8 01 3» 3211 
UmdeWCA 720 740 Of 826 1500 
MGSHiCA 873 635 016264568 
MdandHK* 

E2.000-E9J89 675 882 074220983 

EIDmOandonr 7.00 7.19 - 074220999 
NatMtartKi0t 
[ntftwcRaswva 

£2JW-£9J99 6J8 70S 01725100 

£10,000 & ow 7 JO 7.19 . 01 7201000 
O uti ant i atoBrMonay 
MamgamantAocoua ■ 
uthWeWJOO 6Jtt 7J0 01 2369962 
owr £18006 731 7.19 Of 2369362 

Royal B of Scothnd 

Prwrfun Account 7JX> 7.19 031 S7 0201 
S4PCM 6L90 7.14 00666665 

SchntorWtog 

QjOaBESjKb 854 874 0706 827733 - 
over £10.000 873 &K 0705827733 

Tulat8RBaycal 7M 7J3 012380652 
Ti'fl 7-day 7.15 7J0 012360952 
Tyndaflcw 7.43 7J* 0272732241 


01 BBS 1587 
016281667 
015082777 

015811422 

012968391 


016385757 
01 3983211 
016381500 
016264568 


017261000 

017281000 


012369362 

012369362 


TuBut&RQeycal 7J9 7J3 012300652 
T 4 ft 7-day 7.15 7J0 O1230OM2 

Tyndaflcw 7.43 7J4 0272732341 
Tyndafl 7-day - 7 JO 7.16 0272732941 
UbTV-day 8S4 870 016B846B1 
wasMmTnist 

1 month 7J6 7J3 0752 261 1B1 

CNAR- Compounded Nat Annual Rata. 
Hguiu «a 6 m Uaat avaimiB atjw tlna of 
oSng to pna Research: D. Been 

National Savtope, Bank 
Ordinary Accounts — if a mWmum 
batence of £100 maintained for 
whole of 1988, 6 per cant interest 
p.a. for each complete month where 
balance is over £500. otherwise 3 
per cent Investment Accounts - 
10.75 per cent interest pakJ without 
deduction of tax. one month's 
notice of withdrawal, maximum 
investment £1 00.000 . 


N a tional Savings facowe Bond 
Mini mum investment* £2,000, maxi- 
mum £100,000. Merest 11.25 per 
cent variates at six weeks' notice 
paid monthly without deduction of 
tax. Repayment at 3 months* notice. 
RenaMes In first year. 

Nationa l Savings Indexed Income 
Bond 

Start rate monthly Income for first 
year, Sper cent, increased at end of 
each year to match increese in 
prices as measured by ReteS Prices 
index. Cash value remains the 
same. Income taxable, paid gross. 
Three months’ notice of withdrawal. 
MHmum investment of StSJOOO in 
miAipies of £1,000. Maximum 
£toaooo, 

National Savings 4th Indax-Unked 
Certificates 

Maximun in v estment - £5,000 
excluding hokSngs of other Issues. 
Return tax-free and finked to 
changes in the RetaB Prices Index. 
Supplement of 3.00 per cert in the 
first year, 325 per cant in the 
second, &50 per cent in the third. 
4.50 per cent ai the fourth and &00 
per cent in the fifth. Value of 
Retirement Issue Certificates pur- 
chased in October 1981, £146.76 . 
indudtao bonus and wpptanwnt 
August RP! 3855 . (The new RPI 
figure is riot announced until the 
third week of the following month). 

Nations! Savings Certificate 
31st issue. Renan totally free of 
naxooandcapitel gains tax, equiv- 
alent to an anmal Merest rate over 
the five-year term of 7.95 per cent, 
maximum investment £I0 aK) 0. 
General extension rate for holders 
of earlier . issues which, have 
reached matwHy is 8.01 
National Savings Yearly Plan 
A one-year regular savings plan 
converting into four-war savings 
certificates. .-MHmum £20 a month, 
maximum £200. Return over five 
years B.19 per cent, tax-free. 

National Savings Deposit Bond 
Minimum investment £100. maxi- 
mum £100.000. Interest 11.25 per 
cent variable at sbt weeks' notice 
cretited musty without deduction 
of tax. Repayment at three months' 
notice- Htif interest only paid on 
bonds repaid during first year. 


investment £ 1 , 000 . purchased 
through stockbroker or bank. 
Gu arante e d Income Bonds 
Return paid net of baste rate tax; 
higher rate taxpayers may have a 
further Babtoty on maturity. 1,2^4 
and 5 years New Direction 
Finance/Credit & Co m me r ce. 9 per 
cent. 

Local authority town bati bond* 
Fixed term, fixed rate investments, 
interest quoted net (paste rata tax 
deducted at source non-recUm- 
abta) lyr N or t ham pton 7.1 percent; 
2yrs ICrWees 725 par cent 3yrs 
Manchester 725 per cent min mv 
£500; 4yrs Bristol 7 per cant: 
5.6&7yrs Hereford & Worcester 7 
per cent; 8yrs Taff By 5J95 per cent; 
SSlOyrs Tati By 6^1 percent min 
Investment £1J]00 
Frattwr detsib avafiatee from Char- 
tered institute of Pubfic Finance & 
Accountancy. Loans Bureau (638 
6361 between 10am and 230pm) 
see also Presto! no 24808. 

Bufitfing Sectaries 
Ordinary share accounts — 535 per 
cent Extra interest accounts usual- 
ly pay 1-2 per cent over ordinary 
share rate. Rates quoted above are 
those most commonly offered. Indi- 
vidual buKdfog societies may quote 
different rates, interest on afl ac- 
counts paid net of basic rate tax. 
Not recttlmabto by non-t axpa yers. 

r orata n currency ilemiilTi 
Rates quoted by Rothschild's' Old 
Court International Reserves 0431 
26741. Seven days’ notice is re- 
quired for withdrawal and no charge 
is made tor switching currencies. 
Starting 940 par cent 


USdouar 5.13 par cent 

Yen 4^9 per cent 

D Mark 341 per cent 

French Franc 839 per cent 

Swiss Franc . 1.74 per cent 


INVESTORS 
NOW SAY 
'YES' TO THIS! 


12 months fixed rate in v e s t m ents 
interest 11 per cent basic rate tax 
deducted at source (can be re- 
defined by non-taxpayer), minimum. 


FIND OUT NOW 
HOW £1.000 
CAN GROW TO 
4140.000 IN 
■LIST 14 YEARS! 


Send us yutirname and address todayl By rewm, well post 

you same fesdnaring information about m a king BIG 
MONEY in unit trusts, which means you spread your 
investment over a for greater range of campamra. We^ 
also explain HOW this helpful Newsletter can be tned 
o£ AT NO COST OR RISK TOYOIL 

Unit Trust Newsletter, 3 Flea Street, London | 


BRAND NEW PRODUCE 
FIRST PUBLIC OFFERING 
LIMITED TO £3 MILLION 

Our 'Me Bonus Bond advertse- 
mert5havB attracted XmBons. 
Nob; with our brand new Secudy 
and Grwab Bond, we brag yon 
our best offer to date Investors 
nd have their money dwided to 
secure a guaranteed 1 year return 
of 15% neT onthor account with 
a tearing bufcfeig society, wrth 
the balance invested in an 
exetong new fund managed by a 
• leadns fim erf stockbrokers, 

This offer may doss fit days. 
Do not miss out 

CaU.0272 — 2769S4 

fora Resarvotion Numbec 

Mn.lm.G4jOOO -Albawcrtfitn 


I FREffOST Bristol BS15BR 

| NAME 

ADDS 


Address 


I Postcode. T4 j| 


J TAXRAtE ti -ACcBJ j 

Lwr*s&=J] 


W , 

s 

■ 

w m 

mm 

W 

feace 

telephone at any time. 

guardian 

SuiCdMosociett 

npnt TP 128 High Holbora, London WC1V 6RH 
w- 01-242 0811 (out-of-hours answerphone) 

nSsWU^ TRUSTCESWUS - 


r to 

^ to'bank 

l o ^ry j 

^ 3 Months ( 


— 

0^5 ^te 

o-2Rb 


m 


gj?S&5&g"*-» wi a- 1 

We offer yon the strengtoof^^^^^ 

* the highest reserve ratio amongst the top 
twenty societies 

sje we operate without branch offices to 
maintain the lowest cost ratio. 



EXTRA-ORDINARY SHARES 

IMMEDIATE WITHDRAWAL 

with no loss of interest or penalty 


Net % p.a * 


Effective 1 October 19S6 

Gross Equw. % pa t 


BALANCES £10,000 AND OVER 

8 . 30 %= 11 . 93 % 

BALANCES £500 (minimum) - £9,999 

8 . 15 %= 11 . 70 % 

•Base Rate tax pant. tGrossejavatent to basrc rate taxpayers. 
insiKt ccmpoumted nafi-yearY (C.A.R.) Rates are wr able 

BOLTON BUILDING SOCIETY 

23S237 BAKER STREET. LONDON NW1. TEL: 01-9350138 
24 Hour Answermg Service 
Members of the Building Societies Association, 

Trustee Status 
EstatAshed 1864 


Top Executives. 
These Equitable 
pension plans 

beat all others. 


We otter the best “with profits" pension plans 
available, by combining maximum flexibility and 
unrivalied performance. 

In foe survey* conduaed by Planned Savings 
magazine of 5 and 10 year regular premium with 
profits pension plans for top executives and other 
employees. The Equitable has come top more often 
than any othcrcompany, 

Of course foe past cannot guarantee foe future 
bur what better wav is there of judging a company 
than by a record of such consistent excellence? 

How do w e achieve these results? 

First, because as a mutual company, we have no 
shareholders to nibble away at foe profits. 

Second, we pay no commission to brokers or 
middlemen, so more of your money is invested. 

And what’s more, unlike mosr other companies 
we will not penalize you should you decide to retire 
earlier than planned — you get the full value of your 
tuna accumulated to date. 

Don’r forget thar unless you spend most ut your 
working life with the same firm, you ‘re unlikely toget 
the maximum pension, which is 2 3 ut your final 
salary. If this applies to you and you make pension 
coiunburkms ut less than 1 of your current salary 
yon could betTigible tor an Equitable top-up pension. 

So u \uu want the best all round pension plan 
available send off tlkr coupon or ‘phone Dl-Mki otil 1 
todav. 


T!*s t I .FfUf^ivysT.-l nun Sturt. Liuklm K 711 711 

V.i J. UiSirfi >:Kjiiniui! llrvi.ia I'Ijbi. L I nn link. J 

.1 k i a'* lali rn>.nU 


w- Vr M-to M.« 



■ Vtuivuiall f 

j The Equitable Life j 

I You gain because we're different. - — -J 




% 


NET 


WE CANT HOLD THE 
OFFER FOREVER 

(BUT WE’LL GUARANTEE 
THE EXTRA FOR SIX MONTHS) 


Our new Sly Month Term Share isn’t the only fixed-term 
Jump sum investment opportunity available at the moment. 

But you’ll do very well to beat our 855% net rate 

(IZO^'^gross equivalent). 

All we ask is that you invest a minimum 
of £5,000 for a minimum of ax months. 

During which period we’ll guarantee 
the 330% p^. differential over ana above 
our ordinary diare net rate. 

And we’ll even pay your interest monthly Mm 

if you wish (824%nett, 855% QAJU). _ 

\ . Not surpriangly, our newTerm Share is a limited Blip 
issue. But ids available to everyone — first come, Jmrnr 


K . □ Please send me full details of vourSix Month 

Term Share as soon as possible. DPlease send me 

r f fuJ 1 details of your higher rates of interest for UK. 
Non-Residents. 


Name. 


issue. But ids available to everyone — first come, 

firs: served - right now. H i \ /•TrTbTT?V^B T ~ Post to: Britannia Building Society, FREEP05X 

For details, simply call in to your Ini Ji PJi JyJ Newton House, Leek, Stans. ST135ND. 

Britannia brandi, or send us the coupon. *** w . -Kiiwmwcj Jifaxmii ^ Haw nm -tw, 

DON’T INVEST A PENNY UNTIL YOU’VE CHECKED WITH US 

BRITANNIA BUILDING SOCIETY, NEWTON HOUSE, LEEK, STAFFS. STI3 5RG-TEJL 0538 38513L ESTABLISHED IS56. A MEMBER OFTHE 
BUILDING SOCIETIES ASSOCIATION. FOR BRANCHES AND AGENTS SEE YOUR LOCAL DIRECTORIES. ASSETS NOW EXCEED £3300 MILLION. 


?ost Code. 


:a n—T if -x[DniLiiTrui[iMwi.-« a .q n 



New 
Street? 
i narrow 
I'esteitlt 

After 

prices 

coarse 

session 

pressor 

e vapors 
mornii 
started 


The 

averagt 
about I 
half ho 
to 1,79 


AMR 

ASA 

ABMdSg 

ARsdS&S 

AtttsChkn 

Alcoa 

Amaxlnc 

Amrda k+ 

MnBranc 

Am Can 

AmCynm 

AmBPw 

AmExpre 

Am Ham 

AmMoto 

AmSt'nn 

AmTetep 

Amoco 

AnncoSl 

Asarco 

AsMandt 

AtRicnfa 

Avon Pro 

BkrsTst 

Bantam 

BhOlBfi) 

Bank oil 

BettStfr 

Boewa 

BseCa* 

Bnten 

Bg Warn 

Oral tip 

BP 

Burt-ton 
Burl ton 
BurrouO 
Cmponfi 
CanPac 
Careip* 
Cetanes 
Central! 
Champ" 
Chase A 
ChmBk 

Clwiror 

Cftrystei 
Cwcorp 
Clark be 
OocaCf 


All classified adscnismcna 
can be accepted b> telephone 
(except Annotmcemmu). The 
deadline is 5.00pra 2 days poor 
u puMrcauoa tie 5.00pm Mon- 
day for Wednesday). Should 
you wish to send an advertise- 
ment m *ntmg please include 
vour davtune phone number. 
CUSTOMER SERVICES DE- 
PARTMENT. If you have any 
queries ot problems relating w 
your advertisement once it has 
appeared, please ttfflUCt OUT 
Customer Services Department 
by telephone on 01-481 4100. 


PERSONAL 



acknowledgements *■ 


SCARMC WrtMnrtl.limlV wish to 

ltu.nl oil ntoiuvi-, IWB' MMl 

iKtunnour, tor I heir Hotnl inft 
iihh. try* many Wim 
ruimioin of wmw(r» and 
im I tv dnuMm iwrivi-d In 
Mm-m vid lov. Ptw ormrt lhb 
intir prcanul lhanh.* 


BIRTHDAYS 


WANTED 


KILLY LOUS Cooqr.uutalions 
oil vour 371h birthday love 
Iron) II" 1 lanulv 

MBS UM WEDGEWORTH b 

inr yrui* uM loday 1 Hapn' 
anthiUv with tote Iron Mum- 
my ADO ft*Wl 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


TO JOHN ANTHONY PtCtOtt 

vour future daughter nviaw 
woiiki like In «n- vour vn 
RH-twTil d wrrulma gin lm will 
iipvpr lornrt Vpu I turnout 
lev ps you very murn Please 
contort avap The wcdduig date 
is November SPikl ITOb In To 
runto Call rulim OIOI 
*»77 0740 18. EJm Kueet. To. 
roaifn MSG ICT7 
Marie KdiMoirtll 

THE SOOTH Annual General 
Mpriirai and nxilmwi 1 «< 
bbAr-\. The hOMIer* 1 Sallor*' 
and .\irmpn', F.inuim Auorto- 
im will Dp hold al Cnurrh 
How. Westminster at S.19M 
on Thursday wh November. 
ThP President HRH PrlrKP Mr 
iiuiPi nr Kml. will prrcMr. 

MALCOLM SARGENT Cancer 
I in id lor Children. send sap for 
\iuo rard Drorhurr. b Dslgiii 
Kills of «. USD £1 TO Calm. 
U.U. DU> lo 14 Abingdon 
RoaU. wa SAI . Personal Shoo 
pprs Mourn 9 30-130. 

mow cakccr rears. 

Ltrvrtopnl Support non animal 
reseurrh. S A L Km** Card Cat- 
dHaur <jne*l 'or a leal for 
CaiKrr, Woodbury. Harlow 
HiMil Rovdon. Ewv. CMW 
&TJ -027979 32351 

WCLHAM OLD HRU reunion 
mih Mis* Krtvastosu. Sunday 
Sin 0(1. Ring >24 hni 01220 
4192/0802 

MYOSOm MKVfd you. Statu, 
Quo Wetrome Dark Lovp 
TMGC 


SERVICES 


A WHIP Irpr security snwn 
fined In 1 hour 01-73022X3 

FHKHDStBP. Love or MaiTVWf. 
All dm. arras. Dateline. OfW 
fQI6) 23 Abingdon Road. Lon- 
don we. Tel: 01-938 IOI1. 

OOHK to Auatraua/NZ for 
Xrrvr/.’ wed wmt help en- 
router rro a trained nanny and 
would be dettghled to help, in 
return lor % or my rare. Phone: 
ChrtMlnc Kelly 01-6420126. 

O RBI KMC PROBLEM — sort It 
oul now before the festive »a 
son at 57 bed specialised 
mining home for addictive dis- 
ease set in area of outstanding 
natural beauty. Staffed by 
lunn. counsellors, psychoto- 
gisL phyaottrerairtsl and 
readent medical officer. For Il- 
lustrated prospectus coo tad the 
director. Cfoudr House. Ean 
Know, wilts B P3 6BE or tde- 
phooe 074783 665. 

SELECT FRIENDS. Exclusive m- 
troduntons tor the unattached 
58 Maddox Street. London Wl. 
Telephone 01-493 9937 


Cancer! 


WHIN Df LONDON mil a TV or 
video uy day. wk or month. 
TOPS TV Ol 720 4469. 


Together we can beat It | 

Ur lunti over urn. 1 third of : 
ait research into tin* prrven- 
tiun and run- ot cancer in 
the UK. 

Help us h> teudinga dona 
lion or make a li-gacy tu* 

Cancer I?1 

sstlLj 


SELECT F1HENDS. Excludve by 
troducuom lor me unatlaclted. 
5 h Maddox Street. London Wl. 
TeKWmne 01-493 9937 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


We just pubfished our 

catekwua 10; History. 


I > Car Unit H-Hiw Vi tai 
lPv)HTT4iiai I., .niii >it SWtY 5 AB 


edition by CbuichiH, Herat 

and Napason. Please send 
us your address: 

An&qu«tel WoegensteiB, 
Smsarstmse 13. 
A-101B Yiwta, 

Tet 010 43 222 513 14 72. 


If you’ve ever called 
The Samaritans, please 
make just one more call. 


H we’ve ever helped you. Please caN Stough (p753) 
now you can help us to help 32713 or wrrte to: Davfd 


others. 

Please remember us in 
yourWill. 


Evans, The Samaritans, 

17 Uxbridge Road. Slough 
SL1 1SN for further details. 


ENTERTAINMENTS 


Centumed from page 19 


OPERA & BALLET 


COLISEUM S 836 3101 
CC 240 6758 

ENGLISH NATIONAL OKRA 

Toni 730 imm nmoy. 
Tup 7 30 Tfca IMBuNto. 


ALBERT 836 3878 PC 379 4666 
S379 6433/741 9909 Group 
836 9902 

LIMI TE D LONDON SEASON 

DAVE ALLEN LIVE 

Prmrwi from 20 Oct 
Evpv 8pm 


SADLER'S WELLS 278 8916. 
•'no CJit CC 24 Hr. 7 Day 240 
7200 ibLu Ippi. L'lUil Or I 18. CIO 
7 30. Sat 2.30 

CENTRAL BALLET OF 
CHINA 

TotLu TV Nnr W> S-cW- 
«cc/ Rmmm/FV da dan Dram 
U Omaln <ar TV Stoaptax 
Swam mr Dm QulMto/Sian 
Late (Ad Mk 

PUUNG OPERA 20 Oct 1 Nov 
01-278 OB55 lor Winter Danrp. 
■■Mo. 


ALDWYCN Ol 436 6404/0641 
cr Ol 379 6233/6453 
Ftru Call 24 hr «r 240 7300 


YNC SECRET UR OP 

CARTOONS 

8y CIIvp Barker 
arwipd'by Tudor Davtci 
df Mm Praateaa fna Oat • 

Oppnv OrtoOrr 15 at 7pm 


EVENTS 


ALBERT 836 3B7B CC 379 6566 
/64330r*SalPl 836 3962 For 
a UniMpd «wn. Tue-Frl 8pm. 

SATS B SUNS Spa * BJM 

BARBARA COOK 


HORSE OF THE YEAR SHOW 

WmttdPV ,VPIM 902 1234 Evc4 
7 OOptti Ort oil -\flv 1.30pm 
Orl 7 1 1 TIK mMlabiP all 
pnl'.nngl TimrvrkSjlnr. 


Timm "DON'T WAIT — TAKE 
THIS ALL TOO RARE COOK'S 
TOUR OF BROADWAY" D.MaU 
"A YOKE OF SPUN COLD" 


EXHIBITIONS 


CLASS ENGRAVERS Guild Alt 
■nul rvhHMIKtn. Lrtphloit 

Hxvra, Holland park Rd 

I oiubm. WI4 Orl 1 1 25 Mon 
In no sat 11 5 
ROYAL OPERA HOUSE Ol 240 
1CM6.' 1411 Main mlo 83a 

</«05 *> CT. TllMi C1-E22 60 
tiS -tmpfu mih .null on I BP ri Jl 

THE ROYAL BALLET 

Wpd Thin 7 30 

Lb V«Im- C alaaMriaa/Opte IS 
TV P n—nr TV C a nc art 

LUD<-t cast mu info 01 240 9816 


APOLLO VfCTOMA SS 828 8666 
rt: 630 6262 Party bmp B2B 
6188 TlrkrlmaMPr (T 379 1)033 
TIN Cafl cr i24hrt 240 7200 'Bfca 
Fncl Gn> Salm 930 6123 Evcv 
7 46 MAlu Tup A Sal 30 

STARLIGHT EXPRESS 

"A MUSICAL THAT SURPASSES 


8NMENW9K** □ Cj,p 

STARLIGHT EXPRESS 

Muvlr by 

ANDREW LLOYD WEBBER 
Lynrv bi RICHARD 9TILGOE 
DIMM DV TREVOR NUNN 
APPL Y DA ILY TO ROX OF FIC E 
PON RETURN* Special nmm 
Wh 4 55 no Tun null for 
WH nllzpm 

NOW BOOMMO TO MARCH 1*87 


THEATRES 


■ARBICAN Ol 628 8795/638 
8891 nr iMon-Sun lOum-Oami 

ROYAL SHAKCSPKARE 

COMPANY 


ADELPHI H36 761 1 or 240 7913 
/4 CC 741 0099/836 7368/370 
MW Urp Sah-t 930 6121 rirvl 
f .01241 m 7 Ilav CC240T200ibho 
V'l MW BOOKING TO FEB 

ME AND MY GIRL 

THL L.UV1BCTH WALK' 

KIIIMT.U 

jvmBiIIv at 7 30 Main Wed al 2 30 
A sal 4 to A H no 

“YNC HAPPBCST SNOW 
M TOWN" S Exorcvv 


prKr perfa today 2 OO A 7 30. 
Mon. Tut* 7 -lOptn. Wed 7pm 
MISALLIANCE by Snaw. red 
pure Prrfg 16-24 Oct SCENES 
FROM A MARRIAGE by 
Fpvifrwtu 



CHURCHILL Bromley 460 6677. 
Evev 7.45. M ap- Thu n A Sal 

2 JO. JUNE WltTTFTLID in THE 
RIVALS. 


ALDWVCH THEATRE 01 H36 

6404 '0641 rr Ol 370 6233 


COMEDY THEATRE 430 2S78 
CC 240 7200 Grp. OJO 6123 
“A mp aib bcMbe partna r al d p" 
Timm 


■IXPIOSIVI SICCCSS" Todav 

ANNIE GET YOUR GUN 

SLimim Sim QUATRO 
-■ D.UO.ING WIST END 
PI HI. 1 CATCH HCR TODAY" 
□ Tet 

"ONI or THL MONT DUTZVING 
scouts EVf.R" D Mail 
I mi- 7 VO IWs krd A Sal 2.30 
24 [M 7 dai rr IKK* I no on Tint 
Call Ol 240 7200 ibkq I eel 
FINAL DAY 


G«*N SUSAN 

TAYLOR P E RHA Ua ON 

THE MAINTENANCE 
MAN 

A Cemedv Dy torhard Harm 

-A MARITAL MA S TE RP IE CE 
—WONDERFULLY FUNNY" 

N of Itw W 

■The apptamo of ranturaus 
reroomlKin" □ Mall 
"Very funny indeed" SE\D 
Mon Thuarn/Sal 6.30 A a. 30 


7 METER moortnu Cannes Man- 
na. Excellenf pmUtod. DHalh. 
from immoMlien'- Lp Surtoui. 
06210 Mandebcu. Franre or 
01039-93491615. 



FOR SALE 


MUSICAL 

INSTRUMENTS 


PROPERTY TO LET 
LONDON 


AMBASSADORS OI H36 6I11 ir 
«y> 1171 Hid Gall '24 lmJ7 
■lavM 240 7200 IhMl I eel t>« 
7 30. Wed nul 3 Sal 4 A 8 

Royal StelHipFH CmmRI'i 

LE5 LIAISONS 
DANGEREUSES 

"FIGHT FDR A TICKET" 
What'v On 


COYTESLOE ■S' 928 2252 CC 
iNalMUiai TTH-jln- % nmall audl 
toriumt T oday 2 JO A 7.30 Iasi 
oerfv NKAPnK by Sarah Dan 
"K Mo#». Tue Wed. Tfmr. Frr 
7 30 THE BAY AT MCE and 


OCTOB E R SPECIALS al Tnyn. 
Got TVs from «?. Videos from 
£99 91 Lower Stoane SL. 
SWl 730 0933 


GOOD OIMLTTY Mow marble 
A pwe fbeplaow Tel: 01-834 
2270 or wrttr M. Daw 2fi. 
SoUaertand Street. London SWl 


£15 per u up M paid (or silver 
.KTirifi £2t>0 per or for sold. 
All dtamond lewrtfcry bought 
Mr Han 01-960 8030 or Write 
361 Harrow Road. London. 
W9. AH EnMand covered. 
JEWELLERY. CM. SUver. 
Dmwotii urocmiy wanted, top 
prices WUIUmv 43 Lambs 
CondUU 51 WCl 01 405 8S38. 


APOLLO THEATRE 437 2663 

434 3598 rirM Can OI 240 7200 
Tirketmasler rr 470 6433 
Mon fri 8 00 Sal 4 30 A R 15 
Ttuhs mats 3.00 

pair, tamo 

"MASTERLY" r T 
HOWARD ROUJNS 

■■MAGMirtCEMT— DUlll 

I'M NOT RAPPAPORT 

"WoiKtefluUv twins'" D.EjiP 
JOKV W WD BEST PLAY 
15 Dakonv dik avail Today 
Mils BOOKING NOV TO JAN 


CRITERION 5 430 3216 CC 370 
6665/370 6433/741 9999 Grpv 
U56 3962 CV9S BOO. Thu mai 
2 30 Sal C 30 A 830 

■tmmstf FAROE AT ITS BEST" 

D Mail 

The Tlteoirn of Comedy Company 

DEREK ROYCE 

FOWLDS MB.I.T 


SERVICES 


Contact 

the team with the best 
experience World-wide 

ACHIEVEMENTS 


PEP TTT, NOHTHGATE 

CANTERBURY CT11BA 


TEL: 0227 4626181 


This School Fee 
Trust Plan could 
slash your 
education costs. 


' Send ro:TbeEqimaNr Life. 
FREEPOST, 4 CofemmSi., London 
EC2B2Jtiaqihoiir0M06ttlL 

Pd Rckorae deoils of the , 
Equitable School Fee Tina Plan ' 
an! in tarings on the cow of : 
education. 


Tie Equitable Life 

L_ -1tagtebnaraci*/rcififfaax— J 


OOMBBON THEATRE Bon Office 
580 8845/9662 ALL le l eph on r 
CC bomunq* HRST CALL 241tr 7 
day on 836 3428 NO BOOKBM 
FEE DTP Sales 930 6123 
DAVE CLARK’S 

TIME 

THE ULTIMATE EXPEMENCE 

CLIFF RICHARD 

4t> 'THE. ROC* STAR' 

THE PORTRAYAL OF 'AKA8H' 
BY 

LAURENCE OUVIER 

Mou rn 7 30 mu Mai 2.30 
Sal 4 & 8 16. 

SPECIAL CONGESSRMS 41 C7 all 
ports IWBI rn A Sal mm for 
DAPS. 4.18401. students A under 
16'* avail I hour Drtonc pprf 


From Orl 9 at Thurs mau only 
"The Rock Star" wW be Dcr 
■ormrd by John Qirtsllr, 

SCATS AVAIL FDR PERF TORT 



DRURY LANE THEATRE ROYAL 

Box Of nro A CC 01 836 8108.01 
2409066/7 Fh*I CaU 24hr 7 day 
rr bko* on Ol 240 7200 (no Men 
fee) TK-kwnaxlrr Ol 370 6453 
(no DK\| for] 


42ND STREET 

A SHOW FOR ALL THE FAMILY 


VWrd 

BEST MUSICAL 

STANDARD DRAMA AWARDS 

v oil'd 

BEST MUSICAL 

LAURENCE OLIVIER AWARD 

voted 

BEST MUSICAL 

FLATS A PLAYERS 
LONDON THEATRE CRITICS 
AWARD 

Lvov H O Mar. Wi-fl 3.0. Sal G O A 
8 30 Brtliued Prtfr mal Wrd*. 
Mudrni* and OAFv standby 
Group Sntr-. 030 6123 


sorruil mailnrr Ore 26 3pm 


DUCHESS S 836 8243 CC 240 
9648 CC 379 6433 4 CC 24 
hr/7 dav 240 7200Cv««H Wrd 
mal 3 Sal S A 8 


DUKE OF YORKS 836 6122 CC 
836 9837/741 9999 f 240 7200. 
Lin R Thu 3 Sal 5 A 8.30 

COMEDY OF THE YEAR 
“"“STEPPI NG^OLJT*** 

HU Control dy Rururd Harm 
Direr tort by Julia MrkVnsr 

“TRIUMPH ON TAP" sid 

"LAUGH YOURSELF SILLY” T O 
“A PERFECT DELIGHT** D Trt 

THIRD HILARIOUS YEAR 


FORTUNE b Ol tv. S 836 2238/9 
Auv 240 7200 i24lus bkg |ik>i 
M f m to Fi I H Shi a. JO Mal Thurv 
A sal SOO 

™M» -- _ KEITH 


in DOUBLE DOUBLE 

"I emovrd nvriv minute" ST 
"A rkrvar of HTKMunllry - H 

nnimdablr" Timm ls 

W tt DOUB LE DARE YOU TO 
DETECT HOW ITS DONE 


GLOVE 437 IS*>2 tV 370 6433/ 
bkg Irr IS t-ill M hr 240 7200 

Grp Sam 430 6i?3 Ein a 

Mar. wnt 3 nat 4 
ilndrrw Llovil VvebbrT Prmmi* 

LEND ME A TE NOR 

-A MASTERPIECE" Time* 
"FILLS THI. THEATRE WITH 
THE SOt'N-n Ot LAUGHTER" 
SLID 

4n Amniraai OmMy nt 
Hrtl LudWM 

Chinrtrd nv David Gilmarn 


SAM COX 

RUN FOR YOUR WIFE 

Written and dlrmnl by 
RAY COONEY 


Ovrr 1.400 Ndi IpA ttinx perl* 
"SHOULD RUN FOM UFE” S. E* 


CRCEHWKH THEATRE OI 8S8 

7TS5 FVI-.7 45. Mats bar 2 30 

. FOR IUNG AMD COUNTRY by 

Innn WiKon “A a p» n » i«ol ■ 
p liw «f« n8 G a» drama — apy 
an tto E ot Frth dipt in tiCM 
Hnm >■ Au n ti a wide 
aodfenn” O Tel **R— Hu as 
«dM h mr* r imrv 


□ LVKY 
OF 

the^B^hmes 

CLASSIFIED 


The Times Classified 
cofaaaas are read by U 
million of tbe most affluent 
people in tbe country. The 
following categories 
appear regularly each 
week and are generally 
accompanied by relevant 
editorial articles. Use the 
coupon (right), and find 
oat how easy, fast and 
economical it is to 
advertise in The Times 
Classified. 


BRIGHTS or NCmEBED The 

ullmutr rrpUrt (unuiurr w- 
cmUm.*. Our of EA9UM'* 
largrvf collrtllons of 17111 A 
ism Century pntod uvir fund- 
lure. C2 milMn stocict tor 
iRUttMiaie drtlvprv NrtOrtiM. 
near Hffticy on.Thaitw* '049IJ 
641H5. BournrmMith 10307) 
293680. Topiham. Drvon 
(0392871 7443. Bwkrtry. Glos 
(0453) 810952 


TOTAL GopmnaBra Oyrrolarr 
AnMgcr Pair R«aU pn« 
£2602 Will actrpl £575. Trf. 
073275 533 



CANCELLED Furniture Prated 
Magnificent Regency sup- din- 
ing um« m solid mdtmKny 

Individually tvandhulll. Sol^l 

brow nttM9L Untwd. Stored. 
Srrn London. iProfesRotud rx- 
armnattoo uretcomedL brailnu 
up lo lO- £475. Staff 119 up (Bl2 
£750. WMIM 14/16 £1500. 
Huge conferenee/bangueUng/ 
noa i d i oom laHr 12*3 4' ££.000 
■ L only). Maiding dairs. <uud 
mahogany hand ftntslHd £60 
rath. wnraishMl mornt 
trial rs £75 rod. Prince ot 
Wales I hand carved) wtUi sMHd 
backs £125 01-203 6027. 

FIN E ST atulltY wool carpels. At 
iradr pores and under, also 
available 100's extra. Largo 
room sae remnant* under luff 
normal price. Chancery Carp** 
OI 405 0453 


KEATTINDRS. Bern udtcu for 
all uoki-out events our cUenb 
tnrtude mosf nuuor oompanies. 
Credit card* accepted. 01-629 
1078. 


SHERATON STYLE □ bring Ta- 
Mes. cnaln. mfcoovds and 
ttskv. CatalogiMS from WllfLam 
THlman. Crouch Lane. Borough 
Cnpwt. Kent. 0732 883278. 


THE rim 1755-15**. Outer 
ntlet avail Hand bound ready 

tor presentation aho 

-Sunday*" £1250. Remember 
When. 01-688 6323 


TICKETS FOR ANT EVENT, Caw. 
StarUgtil Exp. Otess. Lr* Mi*. 
fUl theatre and mb 
Tel: 821-6616/828-0495. 

AJX / Visa / Outers. 

BHTlfMT DUE ? Che someone 
an anginal Times Newspaper 
dated me very day okv wet* 
bom. £1250. 0492-31305. 

GUERNSEY BEAR guernseys and 
laevets dv Le TrKoreur low 
pnera Col Droai-GuernsQ' Gear 
ISL Uchfietd. Sx (00261 5764. 


Me sen* etr. Nationwide 
deliveries. Tet 103801 860039 
fWIHsi. 



PIANO, Lovely small uprigtH. 1st 
das* rand- Timed £375. can 
arrange delivery. Ol -4650148. 
SNOOKER Tattle. Repro VtcL 8 
turned leg*. lO X 5. Prtv sale- 
£1/300. Tet 01 672 8380 
YORK FLAGSTOME5 for pattob & 
driveways. Ugoidauan sale. Tel 
061 223 0882/061 231 67B5 


IES & 
ABIES 


WANTED Edwardian. Victorian 
and all painted luntlltirr Mr 
Ashton 01 947 5946 667-669 
Carratt Lane. EartsfMd.Swi?. 

ROYAL DOULTON Tooy Jugs. 
Figurines, a n i m a l* , etc- wont- 
ed. 01 883 0024. 


FOR SALE 


SAVE A PILE! 
at 

Resista Carpets 


Menriodon udvei pile capd- 
miL 14 Dlam odours. Bunt in 


mg. 14 plain odours. Bunt In 
underlay 12’ wale from stock. 
7 year wear guarantee for 
tone or offica £4.75 per 
sqyd. Cortnpiast cork tiles. 
NaiuraL 275 x 275 only. Bed 


price anywhae £855 per sq. 
yd. Perikt goods. 

Plus the largest selection of 
plain lai pefrip in London. AD 
prices exclusive of VAT. 

148 Wurianrih Bridge Rd 
Parsaas Green SW6 
Tet 81-731-3388/9 

Free Es&ntes-Expcrt H&n| 


HAMP S TEAD 722 9301. Evrs 
8pm. Sal Mats 4 Jo. ASK FOB 


fi* JROON DV SMrtiy Go. -A 
«m pad kamlte ptay* im* 
wcM ptoly adtoC* STmj. 


*iBm" Tub. 


HAYMAMIET THEATRE ROYAL 

Bo-i Mlwc A OCOI 9309832. 1*1 
Calf24hr/7(layrrbkgs 240 7200 


Pritsi mm 15 Or t. Ope ns ai Ort 

DEREK JACOBI OT 


DEREK JACOBS m 

BREAKING the CODE 

by Hugh WltUcmore 

How booking . 


HAYMAMUT THEATRE TOTAL 

Boot oinre and CC Ol 930 9832 
Flrsl CaB 24 hr 7 day CC bookings 
01 240 7200. 
no til from Broadway 
-a suborn London stage dcour* 
Fmanrtal Times 

JACK LEMMON 

-■V> line a stage actor as ho I* a 
srrecn one" Today 

LONG DAY3 JOURNEY 
INTO NIGHT 

By Eugene O'Neill 
"JonaUMn Miller's DrUUanl 
produriion** Standard 
Eve* only Mon-Sal 7.30 

FINAL DAV 




THE PHANTOM OF THE 
OPERA 

sumitg 

MICHAEL CRAWFORD 

Sarah Sieve 

Brtghlnvin Barton 

Oirrrted by HAROLD PRINCE 
Evr* 7 45 Mat* Wed A Sal 3 


LONDON PALLADIUM 437 7373. 
741 9900 I no bkg leel. Flr*l Call 
24 Hr 7 Day CC 240 7200. I NO 
BKG FEE] Grp SakH 930 6123 
Tk-kelnwtler 379 6433 

THE HIT MUSICAL 
COMEDY 

CT-ORCE HEARN 
A DENIS OCILLEY 

LA CAGE AUX FOLLES 

“—A PA LLAD RBR ROAR OF 
APPROVAL" S.Trt 
Mon-Frl 7 30. Mats Wed 200 
sal 2.30 A BOO 
Stflnl ronresMons avaU at door 
Mon Fn A Sat mat * 
SEATS AVA I LAB LE FROM £730 
Now booking to AmII 1987 


LYTTELTON T 928 2252 CC 
■ National Tneotrr'* prmrpntum 
slaqei Today. Wed 2.15 llow or Ire 
hum A 746. Mon. Tue 7 45 THE 
MAGISTRATE by Pinero. Thur 
Fn 7 45 BRIG HTON BEACH 


LYRIC TMEATRC SttoflestMiry 
tve Wl Ol 437 3689/7 01-434 
ISEO 01434 1050. 01 734 

SI66/7 

COLD* BLAKELY 

“A hnlltuni A tovoovh 
ronitr pertormanre" F Timr> 


The National Theatre's acnalmed 

produriion of 

ALAN AYCKBOURN'S 

A CHORUS OF 
DISAPPROVAL 

"llrfinnfnakjngfy tunny" Gdn 
-HUartou* ." Si. Tlnm 
"A rare evening ol 
' omw eihibralHm* Tim*-. 

L v«v 7 30. Mah Weo and Sal 3 O 
UlRJP Sain 01 930 0123. 

Reduced price nuu* student A 
CAP Sfand bv 

FIRST CALL 24HR 7 DAV 
« W»« , »«0N01^ 7208 
(NO BOOKING FEE] 

WINNER OF ALL 
THE BEST COMEDY 
AWARDS FOR 1985 
NOW BOOKING UNTIL 
APRIL *87 

AND FOR S POUFS ONLY 


AS LILLIAN HUMAN IN - 

LILLIAN 

A Mai hv Wilium Lure. dUmcd 
bv Garin Redgrave. Sum Ort 12. 
19. Pt» a NOV 2 at 4pm Mon Ort 

20 at 3om Bu OMe. oow opw. 


PIANO Cotiard and CoUard. Sit 
qrand. Very good nmnoon. 
£1 .07501)0. Ol 007 0307 nn. 


FOR HER 


DARUNG _ Maw now tunc a 
lull range of wl (Ctrle* A ^R MB 
tor Xmu & tlwygin wrap tMtn 
loo. rve ym lor a «nt4e 
Mochure from WDM UtL Ba Ut 
Oarorm. Bahewen. Dertnwane. 
DEA 1ETT. 


ANIMALS '* BIRDS 


BUSH Setters. OuaUbr ptBO- Pet 
or show ptrirnUal- Beady now. 
£80. Tet. 1023975) 684 


SHORT LETS 


MEYEKN SO. swe inmncOUto 
fuihr funuaneo i dMc bed. Lge 
rec. e/h.Co. WWlS™!®® 
min. £150 pw. 01-3S2 9444. 


LUXURY SERVICED FIATS. 

central London Horn £328 pw. 
Ring Town use Airis 303 3*35 


FLATSHARE 


■t LONDON t/2 mgmsoer weeW 
Owner of luxury 2 Bed fi at m 
Chelsea mterestedln meetag 
4/5 other protoatonN* w *m a 
view to sharing UM on * 
umeshare basis, 

OPT wrefc. Td. 036283 734 af- 
ter 6pm. 


SOUTH KEN W8 Prof tomato shr 
toe 2 bed bsmni tort wlUt 1 trite- 

rr Now fitted kK A bOtteAVBH 

knracd. £79 nw. Pleose can t>02 
9233. 

FLATMATES Selective Sharing. 
Well estab imrodi>rtocv»trv*re. 
Pise irt lor aowu 0I«»1. 
313 Brotnpton Road. SW3 
5LOAMC SQ. 2 mink, prof M/F. 
wanted for lge room Ut smiry 
elegani rortson-i to OW pw. 
excl. Trt: 01-730 7013 


HU Atom Bridge Road. Large 
SC room in family house. Own 
telephone & bathroom. £50 pw 
me. Trt. OI 7 20 6581 
BECKENHAM Prof F to share 
rial, dbte o/r. £250 PCM IncL 
Tel: 660 3158 after 6pm 
LITTLE VEMCC. Young prof fin. 
k/S. 100 <1 garden. Nr tubes. 
£60 pw inn. Trb 01 723 1308 
PARSORS BREEN girl o/r. in 
mured urof IttL nr lube. £170 
pan cxri. 01-736 8242 after 2. 
5W OR Vf Flat (2/3 people) want- 
ed by prof f i25). £40 pw max. 
Tel: 01-938-3388 exur. 2207 


UAiRTRS 


double fronted n a bn toad 
resdental area. 5 mats waft 
town amtro/Rsdnv Nation; 
Omwgh Uvarpnoi Smm 50 nm. 
Sustead to loir *wa. bugs 
tail. dwtonan/Wc. dramg 
room 2fof3, 2 futtw am- 
bans. Ufir MchM. waft at 
lanJar. OK And ASA. cooker/hot 
wafer. catoifmJstuQ. lame land- 
ing. mart beriroon 18x13. 4 
furtlwr beds. toHiroom/WC. NS 
iMBere. tarn gangs al retf. Mnl 
sanding front 2 cars. Fnm/rcar 
towns, wag pJrn. Summer Mbm. 
shed. EiaunOono. 

Can 8376 25367 
after Ipfi 


LYRK IIAMMEBIMITH 01-741 
2311 IAN 1 »oto. TU 2S 
OR Cve* 7.46. Wed Mats 2.30. 
Sal Mate 4pm INC HOUSE OF 
BERNABDA ALBA by Lena. 
Willi Patricia Haw, Utodria 
Ja cb ae p B Jaaa F Wwi l a bL 
STOOlOe 01741 8701. Eves 
8pm i Mon at 7tamt World Fro- 
adero o I MASSAGE by IBA iil 
WBraa. 


MAYFAIR S CC 629 3036 MOD- 
Thu 8 Frt/Sa< 5.40 A 8.10 

RICHARD TODD u. 

-Tte Bert ThriBer tor yaanF 1 S M 

THE BUSINESS OF 
MURDER 

"An unabashed winner* S Exn 
?Seroauonar Times 

6TH THRILLING YEAR 


B RM MAID 236 5568 rr 741 
9999. First call CC 240 7200124 
Hr* 7 Qoyi Mon-Frl 8. Ses 6 * 
830 

KAFKA'S 





(PriMiwtMro food A dnnk] 


MERMAID 236 5068 rr 741 
9999. Gro Sales 930 6123 Flrsl 
(Ul 240 7200 (24 Hrs 7 Days) 
FROM OCT 21. Cve* 8pm. Sols 
6pm A 8.30 

STEVEN BERKOFF’S 

PiBllnl HBI 
SMI THE BCLGRAJKH 
Dirnl from the Haf Moon 
"A uplihUialid weapon** an 

PietiwvHie food and drink 


NATIONAL THEATRE Slh Sank 

NATIONAL THEATRE 
COMPANY 

See SEPARATE ENTR IES under 
OLIflOt / LYTTELTON / 

COTTESLOC. Cxrellenf rfirap 
MMh day* of prrtt all theatre* 
from IO am RESTAURANT (928 
2033]. EAST CAR PARK. Info 
033 0880. AIR CORD 


NEW [LONDON Drury Lane WC2 
406 0072 CC 379 6433 Eves 7.4S 
Tup A Sal 3.00 A 7.45. . 

TWE ANDREW LLOYD WEBBER 
rr A. ELIOT MUMCAL 

CATS 

APPLY DAILY TO BOX OFFICE 
FOR K L I tmiO 

Croup Book Into- 01-405 1667 or 
Ol 9X0 6123. MOW BOMUM TO 
MAT 30 1SB7. 


OUVIER T 928 2282 CC INa- 
iimui Tnpimp'vopen *iapet Today 
2 OO (low Drtrr mat) * 7.16 AIK- 
MAL FARM by Orwell, adapted 
iw Prtre Han. Mon 8 00. Tur. 
w«g| 7 16. Tnur 2.00 tlow peire 
null 4 7.16 PRAVDA - A fleet 
Street Crowd*. Frt 7.15 


PALACE THEATRE 934 0909 CC 
379 6433 F« CaU 24Hr 7Day CC 
240 7200 CTO S-Hn 9J0012-* 


LES MISERABLES 
“IF YOU CANT GET A 
TICKET - STEAL ONET* sm 

Cve* 7 30 Mate Thu 3 Sat 2J0 
lartomci* not admillPd 
until me interval 
BEAT THE TOUT S BY ENtRHR- 
B«C FOR RETURNS AT THE ROK 


PARAMOUNT (ITT TMEATRC Cl 

wind null SI. Wl. CC Ol 4S7 
031 2/8380. Rtahrori ORrian cre- 
ator al vircrtlonal Rtety Horror 
l* bark with Peter Sleeker 

u. THE NEWS 

"Wild (Wuhmmfrt TMlBlngf Cbn- 
nnurili- PMiUncT Odn. “I en toyed 
it i-nornKxisJy” Tlmry-Cxrrilcfil” 
I T. Nigblly 9 00pra. Admtnloa 
CT 50 A 1600 Frt 4 Sal 6.30 i 
a oopm. Sped el n a i ii i e n Prl A 
SM SJfoparb CLOO only 


FRDtCE OF WALES Wl 9308881 
'2rr Hoiunr 9300844/8/6. Crp 
Sale* 930 6123 Kellh Prow 
741 9999/379 6435 
1*1 Cafl 24ftr/7d4V SWO 7200 

■ALLO’ALLO 

»im me TV SHOW STARS 

From 30 Ort 

Mon-Thr a Fn a> Sal 6 30 A 8.40 


STONNWO MEWS nv Hvde Plk. 
3 d hedv 2 MBV 1 rti *U«. - 
uru/n Huge open Pte" nuiw 
tm. StHfal lo roof gdn jnd nar- 
brene sen im Fuav IrHM. 
L650 pw Oi 723 4133 


CHELSEA & 
KENSINGTON 


PALACE uan tom Terrare . wra 
tXSOJOOO FrtthM A Sfnreo- 
fronted, testorov Perio d howe 
wtm private garden Pwemtat 
for a-bearooroed. wt Kamuen 

tUMtnenl fwt £2~ dtotng roftoi. 

25" x 21* drawing room. sway. 
lane fcririte tt/umu y raam 
ctoenbig on to pwiten- S acte- Q 
saw, rtnj jk* utility room etc. 
Located on Kensington HRt 
sued oackiiiB onw 
maw Gardens. Trt.Oi 22i 
3534 m 


■vonCE n hereto «wv*n putwam 
to*P7 m U«e TBlSTtt .\ct 19|M 
mat an person havin g 3 CLAIM 
^pnt or an INTEREST in the 
ESTATE of titte' ol Itw dectw d 
peevon's is now name*, addimve* 

and deffriphott* are set out Drtow 

e. nnebv reoibced to send partte 
our* in willing o< hts clai m or 
inimMf to toe PJ"On or oerwr* 
oienumrd in r ridiwm to. Bte.de 
reasnf person concerned owore 
IM* date specified' after wtoch 
dale toe estate of the deceased 
Htupe dedrihuted by ine penonM 
reprpsenUUvB among the per- 
son* eiHiUfd Iheirto havtog 
regard Mr to the claim* and m 
m*B of wfrirTi Buy have hod 

(toner 


Litxufv home* 

anie for long •* «""• TjJ 
piea*e *H™ trw 
Cooie*. *|9 HurhinglMni palace 
Hd. SWl Ot W*t 8»X. 


SM W«» 

wan runv 

qrotndi i 
pcUL 6dn. 


HAMPSTEAD LiWttrV anllmte 

IMA JfM I OTK 5 rl1 * * 

slndv/Knrte led 

kitchen Miiumwri Wl year - 

£3Q5pw. 01 7°4 ST8° 


MAYFAIR or KeMbwfeo. Ota Me 
2 monte rarvues 3 BfBKWma 
rirt*. taoo pw oi anTanr 


. L- — J 
'.■-rr »*f' 


Wl we hav e another al 
studio fiat New it 
£135pw. 01 72* 91 




... MUMfiTON b'll rtmn y S 


mmsmm. dm a* b t aro m . 

i re v rotUriv. itHrii utcMk ok 

lorKtfilWMri Ol WDHft 


MKMM OBWttltJMi 
lux DM/hpaae. DOMMt 




SURREY' 




PURLEY Fine 4/5 bed. 2 1 ' bath 
TMot. dM 9ge. 12 ml* Loodon 
£2^000.M 668 1762 


OVERSEAS PROPERTY 


GIBRALTAR MtNMW 
view of the Bay and Scans of 
OsferaMar. .Exclusive residential 
. area. 6 Bedrooms. Lotmge. Djn- 
. cr. Tenare. Kdcnni and a fully 
fttied aalhrootns. S«ud y- Wotn- 
-shop. Garden A swuituUMi 
• Poof £170.000 TPWWB AP 
lonFox estate* LtoriW- OlO 
350 75579. 



LANCASTER GBlGh htoe- 

ST.TiJVSSBfffi 

srsMi.'rstsa?- 

Trt 262 2976 or 584 2827 


t mai mi mi- mi n i Hap « 
ha«nrt ttjeiwu M 
im office. 81 jB . HH f 
North o< me PM*. HiMHV 
Pm* otnro. Oi-W HR. 


J -h. '■ 


i : l 

l* ri-WL- 


UWOUMHW/O WNER*. H F» 
nave a nuatitv prooepv totet 
tell u» about « 9 i1rr j o1 ^ 
fniKHial A rebatete 
OuranJU ConRaOOne 01=44 
7353 


DARTMOUTH WHt NWB; ADcite 
(1VT. mod. «new» M.«MM 
tutm. Me touooe well « M MBi ft 
hu. oauo. wo. Oo hrnfejjjrgd. 
£200 pw. Tec u-aaf-iTwR 


v* 

1 -..Z V* * 


jMMWM M MWIJUMr 

p filled huai c. a bed- 2 M th. 
large umrilY room. P Woh r 
men to rOWTHOri Mb). 
E7SO pw Ol 69* M*A 


■MMIY A JAMES CMM8CI Ut now 
MTI BRIM* rite 
lemon of lurrifitt ed W P and 
Mian to rent io KnWhWoridW. 
Chelsea and Krreungmn IT) 


tOUTHKEN W8 bHtMM| 
lge Ole bed. i ww aWdM g te* 
New fined 1" * “"LW 
prof itwrer*. CJ99.8W. Nn 
can 602 9233. 


• ■ tfw 
■ -‘hH* . 

: i 


GENERAL 







DUX. ENCtusive 3 Ited 
i urn. stinerb rereo. OJ- ^ trasner. 
matd. Smth-e 373 0753. 


to Irt 12 month* mto 
T astefully fumbM * 
eoSp £175 PW. Ol 352 


COLLECTORS CARS 


DABBLER 3L5 VB. 1946. S3 k. 
dean. Jaguar Mk 8. 195S. Sen- 
Clble offer*. 0274 734231 T 



SLOAKE GARDENS 

Natty ntfurtBshed mdrtW; 
bvrty furnstad 1 do4W bol 

Bai..rotwion. go«t ««? w ‘ 
tedlotdttn wm waster dW 
bauvacm. carenl<«. ““ £ 
bxge garden. £220 pw. Co tel 
ptrt. i year. 

0306 888713. 


wL«tSd*» (WscM at 

878 3650 I Home). 


mjnoton dm 2 baa mr 
■ aunoe. k A 6. rtMwwrM. M, 
COL col TVniMf MHMjgro 
pw. 242 9*24 or 389 Wtt 


: ■*- ■-** 

"k -Sri ft 


bed bMcony tert 

nark. £200»w Me. M OK 
fwiiToSS 50664R 


DOMESTIC A CATERING 
SITUATIONS 


JAVARLK. VLHA Ot tl/13 NQf 
Uot/bam Road. SouBi arta-don. 
Surrey died on 9Bt February 
1986. Particulars IQ RAYNEB. 
DE WOLFE. Solicitor* of 
kTnosbourne House. 229-231 
High Hotbonv. London wClV 
7DA. before 5th December 1986 


DOCKLAND! FUM iwd IlMMMM 


UP P OB TUHnY lo Hve as family 
tn South Gentian country 
house, competent rider, nws 
Him chUdren and animals. 
Please write to Mrs. D. MyottL 
rfo Mrs. Ho torch. 

Farnborouah. nr. Banbt ay. 
Oxon. gatog your »*^>one 
number or te lep h one 0295 - 
89301 at die weekend 


GOLDBERG. AMICE ETHEL Of 
Flat ID. 86 Eaton Square. London 
Swi - died on 29th January 
1986. Particular* u Forsyte 
KERMAN. Solicitor of 79 New 
Cavendhh sued. London W1M 
BAQ. before SUi December 1986. 


SOUTH KBISIIIGTOH. 

BeautfuL snny n ufeo ne l te wall 
(Jjibo acess to prtwtt gardens 
3 beds, 2 ea sate taBmams, 
magnftcem lecBpmn nrona. 
Ntort forwitHtareno. IfoMy (toe- 
mated, new Mrts tafcheo. 
Avaiatde now lor a nmnun 6 
mis «t £2.100pm. NO amts. 


CENTRAL 

LONDON. 

Property owners fist y«r 
flats lo be ietby us. We 
have the finest Business 
executives for your 


8S2S2S/485 


7622 (T) 


OVERSEAS au pair agraor 87 
Repent StreefXondon WT- Trt 
439 6534 CK/Ovemeas. Also 
mtrtn/Mrn temo/pam 



Inj 

k is!l ’ r ... 




GENERAL 

APPOINTMENTS 


COURSES 


IM haw an nunufaH opening for 
a SENIOR CONSULTANT w3i 
prawn tnck neon) m mnaftml 
not esUe imagtromt ntind 
wMi expaieoce m ttmrt business. 
Please wn» m smciest confidence 
guotmgref. C200EIO 
Gtadshand Lintitad 
SL Aiphsge House 
2 For» Street 
London EC2Y 5DH 


SUMRE STIBET, SWl 
Smart tocMeor flWtmenl m «; 
duswe tocrtkxi. I baftoom. 2 
reception rooms. 1 dawftw- 
im. orirt. 3 mortta 
+ £300 p.w. 


MOTCflM STRGET, SWl 
tMumbPed second floor apart- 
mem n Brtgrara. 2 bearooms.J 




mas amt senior 


x YOUR 
o EXAMS 


DJUO Ff HOUS E. 

SUMHE ST8KT. SWl 
A very otaasaM IM m exnunrty 


“ Wttfi waded homo-study Ire 
<2 GCE. Degrees (London & 
X WtanuicJO, Professional 
^ Exams, 
fc? FraoProspedus: 

Depl. AL4. WoteevHal. 

3 53redCHC26PR. Trt: (0865) 

< 52200 (24 Ins.) 


good portaed block, owriootang 
garden square. 2 bedrooms. 1 


receptor room. 1 WHn*m. 
Araraenow tor co-W 8 months 
+ £325 (iw. 


SUMHE STflttT. *W1 
Smart, newly decorated pent- 
boose apartmere n wceflK 
block. 2 bedrooms. 2 Mflamms. 
2 reception roemi. AwMde 
now. co-id tyr + E42S P-w. 


. (Li > 

i *'.T^ ’.Si 

- .l-uK'MiBtn 

= - iib . 1 

- - ’d WAR 
. j rm8 

•• • ^ "Teo-i M9 

• -IB 

-' ,4 p«nro« M 


(SrnlcrreTE^SmTo ssrMPt 


1+myi Ml 


PBMGE EDWARD Box Outre 
734 8951 Fir*l CaU 34 Hr 7 Day* 
CC Booking 836 3464 Grp Saks 
930 6123 

Mon-Sal 8. Mat Thur* A Sal 3.00 


-A GRAND MASTER OF A 
SHOW" Newsweeic 


STRATFORD-UPON-AVON 
■07891 296623. ROYAL 

SMAKESPC/UtC COMPANY M 

mar. McM i Today 1 jo. 
Tup. Wed 7 30. Onto Totrighi 
7.30. WMat** Tale Mon 7.30. 
tmam Tberaro. FMr MaM To- 
day I 30- Tue. Wed 7.30. 
Rarer TotrigM 7.3a KJ nm tre 
Mon T..S0 


YOUNG VK 928 6363 CC 379 
6433. 3 4 7 30 4 vita only 

VANESSA REDGRAVE 

to GHOSTS by Mam Now bkg. 


Victoria SWl AuraMMUMOl - 

^"HUS. D 3TSW'» •> 


• pS^R.KWPaMHV. flpfl 


8CAFC. 1-28 October ll»'^ 

aamJMUtr -j 


Now Mehtas So Mo rohaa. 19S7 

MAT SCATS SOMETIMES 
AVAILABLE ON DAV 


THEATRE OF COMEDY 
COMPANY 

“The very bed of Britain - * cocthc 
talent** Daily Mall 
See wponup Pitine o und er: 

C M T mu re theatre/ 

3HAFTE5 BU RY TH EATRE 

or oomeuv/ 

MnDUU THEATRE/ 


YOUNG V|C STUDIO 928 6363. 
The Boa ■■ icy Thoateo in 
HAFOUINI NOW by Mark 

Heath, tve* 7.45 


GardPtt*. SW7. 584 0612- <30^'. 
TURKS OF MU - TITJ 
f i h l»rtB « Bn» H *fi . Ute:(. 
Ul 5 Ort. TtKSSat 105.30; 8 wi . 
125.30 Aam Cl. ' - - 


- tewi^r«p»^ 


ART GALLERIES 


• l“-A«4P 

r -' 


CINEMAS 






ALAN ATCKDOUWCS Now Phy 

WOMAN IN MIND 


5 Ryder SL Si Jamesl. 
SWl Trt: Ol 930 8566 


BARBICAN 1: 01-638 BBM- 
Trtiis. CL Studnd cone* tad 
perl*. Ttekets b OOMBte. REST. 
OFBRTrilll B EA S O N , SMtoW 
Pertv SB AND NANCY 118) 
6.15. BRAZIL 115)830. Today 
Kid* CXute finrtaM tetoW IW 
CARAVAN OF CHURAOS IPQI 
11. oa 230. ■- 


HuhwmifjA 

- . 


QUEBTS 01-734 1166/7/ 
0261/0120. 24lw rr 240 7200. 
Grp Sales 930 6123. 



mm 


•• r ' *n 

..aHFAllti 
•'=: rirBMF 

: * 




r --7 ■ .Hp- ■ 

r-..- R4t 
- .- AM 


I AWAY" D.Trt 


WRESTOPHEK HULL, 17 

Moteonib Street. SWl. 235- 


LOfKJOrt- Gdn 
A WONDERFLiL STAR - Mall 

MAUREEN UPMAN m 


WONDERFUL TOWN! 

.-■II Dunks will) exrilefnenr" 

S Time* "Jrei wonderful" DJExp 
MOJVSiJi 8 Mats Wed 230 Sat s 


ROYAL COURT SCC 730 1746/ 
1857. CC 24hr 7 day 240 7200 
tbkQ leei. Etm Spin. Sal Mate 

4 pm KAFKA'S DICK by Aire 
I ra i i it Bit Richard Eyre. 


VICTORIA PALACE 61-834 X31T 

CHARLIE GIRL 

Lie* 7 30 Mate Wed A Sal 2.45 
Bo* Office open daUy 9am-9pnt. 
Bookin g also available at WO 
EXTRA COST through FR5T 
CALL speetai 24 hr 7 day crvdU 
raid Booktoga 01-240 7200. 

TIGKETMASTER 01-379 6433 or 
any W HSnriUi Travel Branch 

CHARLIE GIRL 


GALLERY ID, IO Groavenor SL 
Wl. Tel: 01-491 8103. Patot- 

imn by ANDREW WA C ARA . 


■are r rieali" Stai 
PAUL NICHOLAS 
CTD CHARHSE 


SSly i i 





CHARLIE GIRL 


ART 10. GROUP SALES Bn 




friojlli*# r, 




: "%'riFEI 


iJilf % Nipwi 

. .■ :ZTm 


* V- * 

- : *-re*tHn 


GATE CWEMA Notanp H mCate. 
727 4043- Betaetirt BETTY 


fWARDWNNINC FARCE 

NOISES OFF 

Dir bv MICHAEL BLAKEMORE 




PeCCADHJLY GALLERY 16 Cork 
Si ■ Wl 629-2875 BRCHAH 
RRBCFRI Hrrrm PatottoOLUnili 
2Sih Ottober Mon-Frl L0530 
Sat* 10-12-30 


727 4043. Betaetirt BETTY 
BLUE f 1 8) 2.00 tool Son). 4. 18. 
6A5. Bl 5B. All M9I* bookrtrir. 


Da 


SAVOY THEATRE 856 8888 
Jlnl who wM be 

KILLING JESSICA 

at I ho savoy front No* 127 

BOOK HOW TO IWD OUT1 


COMEDY. Ol 379 5399 cr Ol -579 
9433/741 9999 FiM CaU 24- hr 
240 7200 (bkg leei Grp Sale* 930 
6123 


J U B HETO CBB H 379 3014/ 
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ROOKERY NOOK 

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“The fine*! (amk Iricnla of mM 
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VrifHDHAMS 836 3028 cr 379 
b56S/ 379 6433 Cros 836 3962 
Today S A 8.30 

LAST TWO MOWS 

FAYE DUNAWAY 

-Elrrtnryim" ID M—li In 
COKE A BRAVO 

By Donald Flrood 

Der cried by HAROLD PRCTER 
-A Mumriaung play. Hlerale 
end winy" Time*... “Fun of 
lumon. concern and outrage" 
Cuy Until* 


Thartteray St, W8. 937 6885. 

JACQUES KUPPERRUHH 

tomuwn. L'lUil 17 October 


FAIR hark Lane Hotel. 
Piccadilly- London Wl. 499 
6321 t-8 October. 



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lo Hm ALT. pmriniUun of 

THE PETITION 

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Oner led by FETED HALL 
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st Auurmrs oi-aso 1443 See 
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24H. yr ■< AGATHA CHMSTtr* 

THE MOUSETRAP 


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MONDAY 

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Cornwall will 
provide stern 
test for J apan 

While A! 3 !, 1 ’”* H * nas - “"*7 Correspondent 

Cornwall in E2E “WJ? N °l all of the England XV 


THE TIMES SATURDAY OCT OBER 4 1986 

OF PREPARATION FOR REPRESENTATIVE SIPES 


SPORT \ LAW 


35 


search of the. memb^ 


. - win of their tour“'' ' , u ‘ c ! 11De T s 1 _ arc m action for 
toeir only success fofi" *» «>«** tad* ~ Simon 
matches so far has he™ 5.*? Holiday, for instance, is 
against the ScotS N^l ?®J 5“**™® from a knoci on 
Midlands - theSS though he 


■HO*. 


squad 


Irt , the England 

S^PMemot^r t 

another work-out 

At the same time, the 


on Tuesday convent at oT- 

ford, .the match venue, for 

&£n rvT mt *™ Xoj y session 

fWiSj*" 1 ?*, Was PS and 
Cambridge University lock, 
has recovered from a back 
B,«W on tour Md 
hopes to take- his place for the 
students though Colin Laity 

£n,h P fe menl cenlre fora 
South Glamorgan Institute, 

has a damaged knee and 
remains doubtful. 

Japan will not find it easy at 
Redruth today. Though Corn- 
wall no longer field their many 
up-country* . representatives. 
Players like Martin, Trevaskis, 
s P u rceI? and Dawefrom Bath, 
or Pellow from Wasps, their 
rugby retains a rumbustious 
quality- which is seen on a 
2SF both in the Thom 
tMi county, championship 
and through their repre- 
sentatives in the John Player 
Special Cup. where Camborne 
and St Ives carry their banner. 


. . . — was 

undecided yesterday, may 
well miss Bath’s game 
Aberavon. Marie Bailey, the 
Wasps left wing, is putting in 
some academic time at Cam- 
bridge University. His thesis 
Combined SSand U Stuk™tIf °*l mcdiaeval Suffolk villages 

tie next Opponents for H? 85 pf 5 ce ? l en< * over 

nn I0r Japan this weekend, though he will 

be at Twickenham tomorrow, 
brushing up on the line; of 
running of a right wing as 
opposed to left, his 
position. 

Bailey confessed to an ele- 
ment of surprise at his selec- 
tion against Japan but be is no 
stranger to the right wing. He 
played there for two years 
while at Durham University 
and did so again on 
Cambridge’s recent Far East 
tour to accomodate Oti, the 
young wing who starts at 
Cambridge this term. After 
winning two En gland caps on 
lour in South Africa in 1984, 
Bailey has spent a frustrating 
couple of seasons during 
which he suffered an un- 
pleasant foot injury and then 
was forced to do duty at stand- 
off half for Cambridge. 

He also played on the right 
for Cambridge University 
Past and Present in their four- 
point win over the Penguins 



this 

have his share of possession 
next Saturday. While be, and 
bis fellow backs, go through 
their paces tomorrow, the 
forwards will work against 
Harlequins' scrummaging ma- 
chine and against a first-class 
pack of forwards. 

Indeed. Twickenham will 
be a busy place this weekend 
since Swansea parade their 
unbeaten record there against 
Harlequins today. The Harle- 
quins have been strengthened 
by the presence of Mark 
Hobley, the former England 


and 

plays in their second team 
against London Welsh Dru- 
ids. The second team is the 
place to be this week. Maurice 
Coldough, the most experi- 
enced forward in England's 
World Cup squad, was due to 
play for Swansea Athletic 
against Briton Ferry last night 
and Richard Card us, the for- 
mer England and Wasps 
centre, makes his bow in 
Cardiffs colours for the Rags 
against Newport United. 


Awel* Injuries put Hawick on spot 

stalwarts 


By George Ace 

One of "foe most potent 
partnerships in Ulster rugby, 
David Irwin and Willie Ander- 
son. captain and vice-captain, 
resumes this afternoon a gainst 
Yorkshire at Rayenhill after 
nearly ! ^months absence. Irwin 
and Anderson were the lethal 
leadership combination when 
Ulster achieved an Irish provin- 
cial recoiid of 17 consecutive 
wins at representative leveL 

That proud record ended 
earlier this- year when Queens- 
land-defeated Ulster 6-4 on a 
nighi memorable only for the 
elements — bitterly cold and 
torrential rain with the pitch a 
quagmire. Irwin and Anderson 
were both missing on that 
oeeasion-withinjiuTcs^- - --••• »-•> 

Ulster have managed to de- 
feat Yorkshire on the last two 
occasions through a late score 
and though "Yorkshire are de*- 
nied ihtir international contin- 
gent, owing to an England squad 
iraining^ession, jimmy David- 
son. the, Ulster coach, is by no . 
means complacent. 

He says’" Yorkshire are never 
an easy side tb beat and the fed 
that they are missing a few 
internationals may well prove a 
spur. Ulster are not yet firing on 
all cylinders." 

ULSTER; P' Rahwy {BaBynwraJ: T 
Ringiand {Baffymana). J H owttt (1411%). D 
twin (insjomans, ‘ eapt], X Oman 
(Historians): I Brawn (Malone). S Cawon. 
(Malone): P MBter (Baiymena), J Mc- 
Donald (MaJona), J lftCoy (Bangoft W 
Duncan | Malone). J Bogan [Bangor). O 
Morrison (MalOfW), H Cm (fll*), W 

(Go sfoiaik R 
WkMpf) (HaUfaxL J Bonder jOnM.lt 
Townend (Wakefield). C Kama (Wake- 
heW): P 
IHarrogaie). 

Sellars (Hull & E Ri 
Riding). P Buckson 
(Wakei«M). A. fttamt (HeerfnoleyL R 
Selkirk iHaadingley). S Maraball 


The most important domestic 
tournament in Scotland, the 
McEwan's National . League. 
Jacks off this afternoon and 
Hawick, The first division title- 
holders. find themselves vulner- 
able with ’ Gass, their free- 
scoring stand-off halt and 
McGaughey and Hogarth, two 
of their back row, all injured. 

Hogg. Ren wick and McGui- 
gan deputize. Their opponents 
are Jed-Forest, who are hungry 
fora win. Their only change is at 


By Jan McLaochlaa 

No 8 where Young replaces 
Lindores. Despite their mjury 
problems, Hawick should take 
advantage of being at home. 

A back injury sidelines John 
Rutherford, the international 
stand-off half, who wiD be badly 
missed by Selkirk for their 
home game with Kelso, who 
hope to make a strong case as 
title contenders. The visitors 
also have their injury problems 
and are without Baird, their 
captain, and Common, his 


TODAY'S TEAM NEWS 


. Q 

(Bedford). P 
ARtca(HuN& E 
D 


jWaheiwid). 


etwes: 0 Burnett ftraJand). 


Coventry v Leicester 

Eddte Saunders returns on the 
wing for struggling Coventry to this 
John Smith’s merit table A game 
but their casually fist remains long. 
Leicester give a debut to 
Zimbabwean-bom Hany Roberts at 
hooker. 

Moseleyv Sate • 

The second table A game sees Cox 
return to hook for Moseley, Ubogu 
remaining at prop. Sale can up 
Egan at stand-off half instead of the' 
injured Rafferty; 

Richmond v London 
Welsh 

Martin Drane, usually a stand-off 
hatforTbUback.pteyscentmfor 
Richmond in ther table B game. 
Mffls comes in at prop against the 
strong Welsh front row. 

Blackheath v Wasps 

Blackheath include Rutter and 
Vaughan in their peck after last 
weekend’s cup win. Stater plays at 
standoff subject to a fitness test 
while Wasps give Stanms his first 
chance in the senior side. 
Harlequins v Swansea 
Mark Green replaces Craxfordfsent 
off last weekend) in the Hadequhis 
front row against unbeaten 
Swansea who have TWey on the 
wing and Ian WBSams at sorum half 
instead of Robert Jones, who is 
rested. 

Cardiff v Newport 

Paul Ring, younger brother of 
Mark, plays No 8 for Cardiff in the 
absence on holiday of Scott 


Newport hope to have Morgan 
back from hoBday in their front row 
after losing forwards Rendrf and 
Rawlins in training. 

Neath v Llanelli 
Jonathan Davies misses this game 
at the Gnofl but have Wales B 
hooker, Richards available against 
LJaneffi who have beaten Bam and 
Gloucester recently. Nigel Davies 
returns at centre and Fterego to the 
pack. 

Rossiyn Park v OrreD 

Park have Agar at centre, 

i and Benny in the pack 
agOrrel forwards, 
i has recovered from an 
ankle injuries arid plays for Orrefl 
whose captain, Langford, returns. 

Bath v Aberavon 


centre partner. Wright and Tail 
are however very experienced 
deputies. 

West of Scotland, who fin- 
ished last season strongly, but 
have bad a rather indifferent 
start this year are at full strength 
for their home game with Her- 
iot5. The visitors have lost 
Hamilton and Miller, their locks 
through injury and though 
Rafferty and Meadows, the 
replacements are experienced 
players they will find it diffi cult 
to cope with Gray and Renucri 
in the lineout and this may just 
turn the game in favour of West. 

With the Richardson bro there 
suspended, Edinbnrgh 
Academicals bring Ledtie and 
Pirn to their pack and welcome 
the return of Platon, the stand- 
off, out for three weeks with 
concussion, for the game against 
Glasgow A c ad emi cal s at Rae- 
burn Place. The Glagow side 
include Ellis and Scobie in the 
form row, while Robertson is at 
lode with Jarvie. Also included 
is Porter, the former Kilmar- 
nock winger, whfle at full back 
they opt- for Mick Donald, 


Football, rugby and other fixtures 


TODAY 

FOOTBALL 

3.0 urtfwui saw) 

First division 

Chelsea v Charlton 

Coventry vAVffla 

Everton v Arsenal 


Manchester C v Leicester 

Norwich vQPR 

N ott ing ham Fv Manchester Utd 

Sheffield Wed v Oxford 

Southampton* Newcastle 

Tottenham v Luton 

Watford V West Ham 

Wimbledon v Liverpool 

Second division 

Birmingham v Barnsley 

Br ad for d v Sheffield Utd 

Brighton v Stoke 

C Palace v M&wal 

Huddersfield v Derby 

Huf v Ipswfcfi 

Plymouth v Leeds 


Reacting v Blackburn 

Shrewsbury v Grimsby 

Sunderland v Portsmouth 

WBAvOkftam 


Third division 

Blackpool v Wats^f 

Bolton v nous Co 

Brentford v Newport 

Bristol R v Chesterfield 
Chester v Bristol C 


Darlington v Bournemouth 

Doncaster v Carlisle p 

GOtngham v Bury 

PVetevFUftem 


Baxley: no stranger to the right wing 
week and mil hope to under-23 prop, who has joined 
from Coventry (after a brief ; 
interval with Wasps) 


R o therham v Middlesbrough 
York v Mansfield 


Fourth division 
Burnley v Preston 
Cardffv Crewe 


Halifax v Swansea 

Hereford v Peterborough 

Northampton v Akferahot 

Orient v Southend 

Rochdale v Exeter 


Celtic v St Mkren 

Clydebank v Dundee 

Dundee Utd v Falkirk 

Hamilton v Hibernian 

Hearts v Rangers 


wnwom unme v Ouaay; Grantham v 
Amok* OkBury land v l e ewnaww: 
SucnnCofettaia * EasMoaa Sbabnaae 
v RfldtHCn tinted; Dksston w Moor Green; 
VS Rug&yv Button. 

Boranun Wood v Ho m c twre h. Aym- 
Exmr UrsJed V BMncay; Tteury * Hrttftn; 
Levwwone M V Qxftxo Cfiy |M 
oAara CM WHttanutow Avanua v 
wwntwy; Hampton v UxSnogR Bum 
Utm BO ySamoK Quot um wim avEmn 
ana Mndw wtouv * Gnuesand >M 
NcnnaeK Lnyton/Whgau v BromUy, 
Kmatman » TT ncWo y : Stmenaae Bor- 
ough v Kngstwy: W oUng O or 
Cambnoot Cny: St NtumOcir * I 
UratedTnunet United v Dover AtNafic. 

BaunestoknvShappartMMBognor 
Regu v AoMonL Faratum * Epeon and 
Ewtft Avetoy v L M aun wa d: Wonon and 
He ratu m v Fofc ew o n e ; Hayes v CMtr- 
bury Cay; wok«>g v Toeung and Mkcrum: 
Stangbowna v Outturn; Bradawl v 
watenoorita; LmeS v 5 Wtew«dc; Hertow 
v Heoaon: Ocworan • MnDcsium: Sals- 
bury v weston-sufur-Mare; MtutuaO v 
Onauster; Ton Psntro « Barry. Maamg 
Parte « Gosporr Borougit; Ttowondgn * 
Gkucastar; Frome v Saftash umaefc 
Maxtenfuad Unoad v Ctonckmrr RxDe » 
Tsuroon: Fores Graan Rorars * BcMord. 
FA VASE; PrafaU u ny rand raptey s. 
Flixron v Skelmarsdale United; 
Roswndaia Unttad v Katsy Thanus 
PoMecnrac v Has&nm. 

GM VAUXHALL DOHf&BtCE: Al- 
tmenan v Nunateon; Bsmat y Tariord, 
Ra e uu a d v W al d st ane . Kaoanng v 
Mudstona: laadaimmtar v Weymouttt 
Nort&mch v Bosun; Runcorn v Dag- 
artfum; Scartwroogft v Bam; Stafford v 
Entiota: Stmon Utd v Oeftei na m . WaO ua 

LEAGUE: P rente dMafaxe 
Aivecnuch v Qukrutord; Corny v 
Crawley. Dvtford v teonugraw; Fiahar v 
King a LynK WB u Su S v Woraasur. 
Midland dMste Bfeton v Coraney 

Spcntns Bndmiora » BudOntfu m: lene 

Oak Rcmbts vUanhyr TydU; RuSMan v 
Halasowea Souaum AAsIoh: Andover v 
Bumliam and l lUn gdon; DunstaMa v 
Tonbndgt; Ktesitedv Httont 
VAUXHALL OPEL LEAGUE: Remiar df- 
vtatec Bartang v 
sntaon v Windsor 

Wokkigtiam v Croydon; WbrtNna 
v Yaowt; Wycombe v Btodop's SlORtofd. 
Second (Melon norttc Ctusbunt v 
W o Mrt o n; Haringay Boraugn v Tna 
Hemal Hompsteadv Boysttn; Hurtord v 
U Momra (330): Lotawvmth CC ' 


SUSSEX ROYAL ULSTER CHARTTY CUP: 
FM mM. Arwidal v Sebay. Bum# v 
WMWwtfc Bostum V Stamngton; East 
Gntwead v Burgess HJt remng v 
Cncnansr Coy. Htesrum v Tfiiee 
Bnogos. norstum YMCA v Wtfc Lanong 
v Wigmora asr. Nhdnurat ano Gasnoume 
utd v L nfl e n arapton: Newtuven v 
Oakwooo. Paacennanana T v Hassocks; 
PorfwkJ v Staxatiam. Ringmar v Hay- 
wants Hearn. Seatord v Eastbourne 
Town; sidBy Utd v FranUands VAge 
ww wqutate WORTTCW IXA &C 
rhUOMfUK BMkVM v Win TCWti 
BsnopAuckiindvHaniK»oiaiS);Bvm 


Spartans vt 
MOffTMERN 


Marmsteakta 


Bos 

BrKttn g aai Town v 
Ponattaa Cols. Oeratty 



Cekc 


Plymoutn ArgyU. Baroap U v Ctayadon; 
~ 'tv Chant 


v PhAmi 


Langae cup: Bristol 
R owt s ; Dawksh v 


LEAOUt ctwnstord v 
Woogcxa S a wa nooewcrtn vwsnam. ■ 
ThOPHY: ■■■ 




ft nPw u fc Car- 
S Bon: dukMCti v 


Scottish first division 

Airdrie v Queen of Sth 

Clyde v Morton 

Dumbar to n v Patrick 


Ber fc ti a mswd. Second dbMen eoctte 
Banwnad ATMaec v Mdnw; CnaHont St 
Paur v Easmoutna Uneacfc Cnnary v 
FhCkwea Haath; Oortaru v WhyMteetr. 
Femurn v MetropMan Axar. HarafWd 
Unoad v Marlow; Hors h am v RuOH> 
Manor: NewOury v SoutnaB; Pater ari aki 
Umed v HungenonL 

LEAGUE: Pra- 
r dWaion: BAo (Waoyrtdga) v Maidon 
vale; Crametgn v empnaed; Mekun 
Town v Godabnlng Town; MenttumvAsn 
United. Virgma Wooer v Hortey Town. 
ESSEX LEAGUE: Senior dMsfen: 
Cnelrasford * Woodlord Town; 
Sawbnagewonii v WBham Town. 
GLOOrfSmtSWRE SENIOR TROPHY: 
First rae n ifc Abnonosbury 8 S v OUand 
Ctunenham Town hm ■ 


Hot round: 
Na a niau 

v But mam. D aeenu v Purti»«. 
Bnghongses v Ranbant Colter Row v 
Harwich and PUrfcanoR; Clapton v &on 
Manor. East Ham Unead v Pennant East 
Ttwrcch v Ciacaan. Ford UM v Wawtam 
AUuy. Hal— d t Bacfcton; Heybndge 
Swdu v StWMUd: MUQon v Saffron 
wam Tpoea Unead v Cmgrora. 
Uteenhoa v Canvc y Wan d. 

COMMP CO U NTIES LEAOIE: Pie- 
mter dW a knr BAa Wayonoga v MUM 
Vale. CranMgh v Ciaomaad: MUdan 
Tdmi v Godtmna: Mamtnam v Ash 
United. 


rafcmtu iu Town v Goria amn . Heton v 
Soium Town Rangers Mwcn Town 
united V Siowmarfcai. Thettord v Co*- 
cnenr Uneed. wobeen v Bramnam 
Athlenc League Cap Fhwrwet EVOv 
« Sudbury HiwrNl Ro>en « wanon 
Uneed. Lonuson Town * Cnaaere: 
Naw ma rKW v Great Yarmauffi 
LONDON SPARTAN LEAGUE PratOMf 
dMawc: Cotmhian-Casusb v Beacons- 
Md Unead; Utyues v Reantf. League 
cu Rite rail*. Amerarum < Crwa 


Romania short 
of experience 

makes an unexpectedly eartyiwm *■ 


makes an unexpectedly early 
for Bath, who prefer Robinson to 
Spurrafl. Marfin continues to 
bolster Aberavon' s pack. 

Newbridge v Saracens 

Newbridge, who expect to have 
three New Zealanders joining them 
later this month, taka on London 
opposition for the second Saturday 
naming. Saracens give Jones his 
first senior game for a year. 

Bristol v Loudon Irish 

Geoff Crane occupies BristoTs 


are injured Irish ere without six 
regulars, O'Driscoff and Condon 
away with Connacht and four 
others unavaBable. 


Romania have announced a 
largely untried squad for their 
autumn campaign which in- 
cludes games against France in 
Bucharest and Ireland in Dub- 
lin. The selectors have included 
a handful of veterans among the 
26-strong lrne-up to strengthen a 
forward platform short of inter- 
national experience. 

SQUAD: G Roraa, M Toeder. C Popesco. 
M ZaftoKU. L Hodorta, A Lungu, Tofan. 
V Hotoan. A Domocos. V Nastasa. G Ignat 
T Coman, S Secetotnu. t Doja, C Rome, F 
Ntnor. H Ounitras. G Cnrngaa, N Versa, L 
Conatomfei. I Bucan. C Ghenn^ie. F 
Stmonca. P Petra. M Muntaanu (capQ, G 
lon- 


Deen; .... __ 

DRG; Morston Town v Wooncn Rovers; 
Sharpness v Fwtora Town; Snonwood 
tinted v Bn m soombe; Yue Town v 
Minjniifmiri 

SUBEYSfiaOR CUP: Se cead mud 
B ue MylPg Fertewh Rovers v ri w tey 
Green; Fomhem Town v Chobhem, Wesi- 
flekt v Egham Town. 

ARTHURIAN LEAGUE: Premier dMaien: 

Br entwood* v Lanong; ChotmelQ— v 

ABnw v Onon'c Put Cwtftusans: Etonans v Mehemom; 

Afloa V uueen s pane s v Ardmons fm dWetem 

v8radfl e k te ni;Weangourtens 


MtoOLfSEA 3EM0N CUP First round 
HanvraS v RoMenc Bnmsdown Rovers v 
Edgwara; North Oraentgrd v Crown and 
Manor. Nonhwood v Yaachng 


Forfar v Dunfermline 

Kilmarnock v E Fife ............. 

Montrose V Brecher 

Scottish second division 

Albion v Berwick 


Arbroath v E StJrtmg 

Cowdenbeath v Meadowbank 

Snt Johnstone v Stranraer 

Stanhsmuir v Raith 


v Harrovi an s; Wykehamists v Conans. 
SOUTH EAST COUNTIES LEAGUE: FM 
revision: Cambridge United v Norwich 
City; Cttersea v Portsmouth; GOngham v 

Stirling v Ayr Southend Untied: Ipswich * West Ham 

3 ' United; MNwal v Watford: Oram v 

Arsenal: Queen's Park Rangers v 
Cheriton Athletic; Tottenham Hotspur * 
Fulham. Second div is io n: Bristol Rovers v 
Tottenham Hotspur; Colche ste r United v 


Multipart League 
Bangor v Gainsborough 

Burton v Barrow 

Hyde v Marine . 


South a mpton {1.0k crystal 
Oxford United: Nort ha mpton 


Rhytv Morecambe 

CniMnwfculUiOCk 

HR TROTH 1 1 nsrosem mm 

Eask^jion Coney v ChortoyfFotinby v 
Consett; Brandon united v Crook; 
Horwich RMI v FwryNI AINMc : 
N8dterfMd v Radciiffle Borough: Chester- 
Le-Streetv Newcastle Blue Star BooUe v 
Penrith; Worksop v Lsytend Motors; 
■Ryhopa Community vConglBton: MoBSley 
v StslybrMge Celtic Wortangton v 
Glossop; Acc ri ng t on Stanley v Gods; 
Gretna v .Whitley Boy; South Live rpool v 
BSNngham Town: Btairrtum Synthonfa v 
Spennymoar United; Peterioe Newton v 
Tow Law; Colwyn Bay v Wteon Albion; 
Atfreton.v O s we s try ; Badworth Unttad v 
Hedne s ford; Shepehed Chart arhouGe v 
Caernarfon; Leicester Uniied v Honor; 


- v Luton: 

Southend v Rowing; Swindon v Brant, 
lord; Wimbledon v Brighton. 

CENTRAL LEAGUE: hat dMatoo: Man 
Uldv Man CSty BLOL 

FOOTBALL COWRNATION: Arsenal v 
Heating: Luton v Watford (2.0); Oxford 
Utd • Crystal Ptface; west Ham v Norwich 

WmiOFF 


Barren Rovers 

RUGBY UNION 
TOUR MATCH 

Comwalv Japan |teRedrutni(T 39). . .. 
Comacht v Canada (at Galway). ..... 

john surras merit table a 

Covemry « I moee te r -.. . . 

Mosatey vSale 

JOtM SMITHS MSUT TABLE 8 

Rchmond > Lonaon WWsh . 

CLUB MATCHES 

AlbertBery vPlymoutn^ . 

Bern v Aberavon 

Blackhead) v Wasps— 

Bns»i v London Insh 

Cambridge Urvy v Camtmoqe City ._. 

Canjtft v Newport . 

Ckfion v GUmorgan wnas 

DutAn Wandrs v Waterloo 

Ebbw VWe v Bnogend 

Esner v Penarth 

Exeter vFykte 

Gtoucesar v Bedford — 

Hafifn v Hsedstgly. 


Hariegutos vSwmsee 

Liverpool St Helens v Broughton Park 

Neath vLt " 


Nowondga v Saracens 

Nordi ei npMnshlrB v London Scottish. 
Northern v WBmstow . 


IRISH LEAGUE: Ards v DistN- Nottingham v Gostonh 


cry: Batemena v Glanaron; Carrick 
cnttonvule; Crusaders v Bangor; 
Gtomonm v Lame; Newty v Coierame: 
Porudown vUnfiekL 
NENE GROUP totrm) COUNTIES 
LEAGUE Premier divisioa: Bracidey v 
Spekflng; Eynasbury v Desboraugix 
IrthUngboroogh v AmpchB; Kempston v 
Stemnrd: Long BucMw v Btedoelc North- 
ampton Spencer v Bourne; Potion v 
Stotfoid: Rothwett v Ariesey; St Neat's v 
Hotoeach; S and LCortjy v Raunds. 


Nuneaton v Rugby 

Oxford Unvy v Henley 

Pontypool v Maesteg 

“ ddvWakeSld 

PerkvOnaB. 

vMet Potca. 


Sheffield v west Hwflepoal. 

Torquay V Cross Keys 

Vale ofujrwv Birmingham. 
SCHWEPPES: Hrxl dMatoo: 


Ayr v 


Stewans/Mel FP; Edxitxirgh Acads v 
Glasgow Acads; Hawick v Jedtorosc 


RUGBY LEAGUE 


Leigh want to swap Pinner 


The career of Harry Pinner, 
the former Great Britain cap- 
tain, may la Ibe a surprise turn 
this weekend, along with Des 
Drummond of Leigh, another 
disenchanted former interna- 
tional. Both players will miss 
tomorrow's championship mat- 
ches in which St Helens are at 
home to Wakefield Trinity and 
Leigh visit Featfcerstoae. 

Leigh have made a surprise 
oiler of a straight swap between 
Drummond, a wing, and Pinner, 
a loose forward. The St Helens 
board will reply either over the 
weekend or early next week. 
Pinner has drifted out of the St 
Helens side through injury, and 
Drummond has not trained 


By Keith Macklin 

because of a dispute at Leigh. A 
change of clubs might do both 
players good, and enable them 
to bid for a Great Britain place 
against Australia. 

St Helens, after their upset by 
Wigan in the Lancashire Cup 
semi-final, should resume their 
fluent unbeaten run at the top of 
the table against Wakefield 
Trinity, who are struggling in 
the accepted manner of all 
promoted clubs. 

Wigan lay their unbeaten 
record on the line at Warring- 
ton. With the home dub just 
beginning to re-group after early 
reverses, this could be a titanic 
battle. Warrington are quite 


capable of ending Wigan's run. 

On Humberside there will be 
the strangest local derby in 
years, with neither side doing 
much in the championship, and 
both anxious to revive flawing 
support on the terraces. Hal 
reached the final of the York- 
shire Cup on Wednesday, and 
must prove their revival is 
genuine by beating Hull Kings- 
ton Rovers, who are strangely 
out of form. 

Castteford. another unde- 
feated side, have a tough game 
at Bradford, where Terry 
-Holmes is being persuaded to 
move to loose forward from 
scrum-half 


Treaty; Enter * Sutton Town; 
K v Bentey UW: Long Eaton 
North Ftertoy. Ttncktey » 


Foratey 
United 

Annttvopa Welfare 
NORTHWEST COWnES LEAGUE: firat 
cMatoro Leak v Ham. 
GLOUCESTERSMRE SEMOR TROPHY. 
Rret round CnN uiiAu i Town v 
Rotenson s OR& StorMttfl Unttad v 
BnmseoffllMK uoraton v Woooon Rovan; 
AUnendsbury K v Ottfand Dean; rate 
Town v Manaa tth ald; Snarpnm v 
Faritw i 

HALL WE R T HELLEMC LEAGUE: 
Prem ie r d Ma iare Atmaon umeo v 
WaRngtoftt Better v Wantage: Houns- 
low v Aamgdon Town; PanM v Pagasua 
jtAWfc Then* uneed v Moms Moure. 
Vhtttg Soerta v SwafMTM. 

GREAT HLL5 WESTERN LEAGUE. Pra- 
BrwicX Manor Farm 


Mem* V Gate. SMkirk « kou. 
wataorems v Borougfvnur. West ci 
Scattaatf v Haitot's FP 
NORTHERN: BlaektAan v L«WMWjti 
Braatord A Bmgtey v Bte el Man. Cn^;pr 
v Wammgran Park. OuMn Mrancterois v 
Waterloo. Exeter v Fyfcte. FWiLn v . 
Haadngley. Harrogate v MKntesomati 
HuodmsMd v BnUntiead Para. Hnu a . 
East Rxfitig v Wcsi Ptrt ricvtNcv r. 
RoefUUte. Leak v Ecctes. Liwpnoi r J 
Hatena v Brougnton Para Lymnn vLmh 

Mancnutte v *tew BngMon. Mntov * 

Duttan Gey. Mostey * Site. NwVterf v 
wersiow, Not m q na m v Q»tortn, Oto- ■ 
Mm v Southport, Pontypudd v Waketwig. 
Preston Gra ssh oppers v Oney. Rounamy 
v Mteropotean Ponca, snemm « we-j 
HarwpooL TyMMtey v Si Mm's Oto 
Boys. Tyneoar » KenoaL Vate ot Luna v 
Baitengnam. WMnes v CalOy. Wrexnam v 
Heaton Moor 

GIROBANK LEAGUE: North Weat FM 
tivtelprv Wgton v Oaranprei Second 
Division: wart~.ngton v Egiomcnt. 
WOflungun v SAndDacti NORTH. Fast 
dmaiOK Colder Ylte v Furness. 
CoekuRMuin v Coine E Netsora Vrckors v 
Rossendite WEStiFtotAnsteK Asgutt 
v BaetiMd. Liverpool Cat! v Moore. . 
Newton « Merwysxu Potace. St Edward s 
Old Boys v Gtettr Cott CAST: First 
otwewn: Karsu v Da u sake. DW 
AHwmans v Bumage. 

HOCKEY 

MEATS WORLD CUP: at WiBasdm 
CLUB MATCHES: Bournemouth v Hjvam. 
Chelmsford v Durham Unuetsm. 
Fareham * WMa Horse A West was 
G iavesena v CtoonwUe (Kings Farm;. 
Norwtc n EMwn v Norwich Unm 
FESTIVAL: Horsham 

LACROSSE 

BRINE NORTHERN LEAGUE: Fm dh 
MUMc Ashton v Boartfman 1 Eccle;- 
Haaion Mersey vOtfStoptankam Metre 
V UnrutOA Old Huknaian* « Stock pert 
OM Whearuns v Ctandte 
BRME SOUTHERN LEAOLE Fits d* 
v n x xi : Buckram Hal v Cramturd: 
HAooft v Puriay. Hampstead • ErrfiskL 
S aoond dMxoa Hflcnm v Backanham. 
Croyoon v Barn, Opnngton • Kenton A , 
Purfey 'A' v HBcroh 'A . 

OTHER SPORT 

BASKETBALL: CartaAwg Nauonal 
League: Ffext dhtefcai ISOi Brunei and 
Crystal Pataca v CaMerdaia Ltpkvav 
Hippy Eater Bracknea v Pommoutti. 
Team Pctecea Kmqusn v BPCC Dmhv 
Rams Sharp Maiumrer unurei v FUai. 
Verdy Sunderland, Solera Suis » 
HomeSparo Bafcrt ana Buiv Secoml 
ravtnorc TF Group Oeveurd v rower 
HeiTbcn (7J0t. Just RentaRi Hhanoji % * 
Lambeth Topcots iftCfi Womair's tint ' 
deneiesiiG.Ci Brunei ana Crv'-ta- - Pai»Tj . 1 
London YMCA London YMLA Imw; * 
Pane Li Kingston v Avon NortnamruK 1 
CROQUET: CnBlienham ueekrni! 1 
tcumamfe-t: 

CYCLING N^sxnciasM: iheLmdi 

EQUESTRIANISM: Chat worth Iehm ‘ 

‘ 

GOLF: Suntory World Matchpiay • 
Champion ah ip (a! Wentwoiim. 
WorpJeub’i mu ad touraonws Mu lct • 
Communications Southern PratemofM) 
CnjitponUap; |Wan MaSmi) GC} Cvn- • 
tia Dtotend Open Mood rcuraomec Lot ■ 
woodtan Spa GC;. 

HANDBALL European Champione Cup ‘ 
(woman) First round, second leg. Wafcp , 
IwJd Metros v OSC Amsierdam (!■ tit. , 
HOCKEY: Wttteederr World Cap US&Iiv , 
Netherlands. Argermna v Pakistan Ln ■ 
gland v New Ceatand - 

ICE HOCKEY: Norwtth Union Cap Cliwi 1 
tend Bombers v Durham Wasps (6 3u:. 
Ctevetsnd Bombers v Fite Flyers (bOr 
Hateekan Laagwa Fkildwteion Stouriii 
Jets v Rchmond Flyers (5 Mi. f-undsHantf 
cnwfs V Knkcaidy Kottrois :6 30) 

ROWING: WaQmqtoia scuib 
SNOOKER: BCE Intel rulorul. Fsul 
Stages (Trentlum Gatdtns. Stoke -un 
Trent) 

VOLLEYBAU: Royal Bank of Scotland 
Man* a first dMetao- 


Capmi City * Spark Crook Log (7 01 - 
Lrvarpooi Cny v Dragonara Loads (3201. 
Malory Crofton LC v OBC Poole (630). 
Ne w cas tle (Staffs) v Spaadwto Rucanor 

(7.30) . Woman's first division. Bradford 

Mythbrmkars v Sale (1^0) Royal Baeh' 
ScMbsb leaguer Men's flrat Oytetem' 
Betthd Cndintes v Falcon Electrical Jets, ' 
Kantotii Ptsni v Murray international' 
Livingston; Dundee Krtton v Team Scot-* 
tteto Farm; Petstoy v Taunt Krystal Kiear. . 
DV-81 y East KHbridB. Woman's flrat 
dhttelon: . rm n i B B Sport I v Glasgow m- 
Bannamian; Cartuko v Lartwrt Latins.. 
Tranty v Team Scothsh Farm; Paisley 
Ladies v Whttum Contra; Inverclyde 
Provincial Insurance. r . 

TOMORROW 

FOOTBAU 

3.0 unless stated .„ 

Third division 

Swindon v Wigan _.... 

Fourth division 

Lincoln v Hartlepool 

Scunthorpe v Wolverhampton 

RUGBY UNION 

CORNWALL MERIT TABLE: Camborne v • 
Redruth. 

CLUB MATCH: W Hartlepool v.i 
Wilmstow , 

RUGBY LEAGUE 
First tfivtsfon: Barrow v Halifax . 

(2.30) : Bradford v Castleford “ 
Featherstone v Leigti__ 


(3.30) ; Hull KR v Hull; Leeds v a 
SaKord; Oldham v Widnes: St " 
Helens v Wakefield; Warrington 

v Wigan. Second dhrision:' 
Blackpool v York (2^0); Car- . 
(isle v Rochdale; Dewsbury v “ 
Bramley (3.30); Fulham v 
Keighley; Huddersfield v Don- ’ 
caster Q.30); Hunslet v Battey'** 

(3.30) : Runcorn v Workington; 
Swinton v Sheffield; 
Whitehaven v Mansfield (3.30). Vt 


Law Report October 4 1986 Queen’s Bench Division 


r : r 




Damages against insurers for concealing broker’s fraud 


Samite Keyser UUman SA v 
Skandia (UK) Insurance Co 
Lid and Others 
Same v Same 

Skandia (UK) Insurance Co 
Ltd v Credit Lyonnais Bank 
Nederland NV and Others 
Same v Chemical Bank and 
Others. - : 

Before Mr Justice Steyn 
(Judgment given September 30) 

Insurers who underwrote a 
series of loans from insured 
banks were liable in damages for 
breach of iheir duly of uttopst 
good faith io ihe banks in foiling 
to inform them of their discov- 
ery. after ihe first loan had been 
made. Dial the banks' broker 
had been fraudulent in arrang- 
ing the insurance on that loan. 

The insurers were also in 
breach of The common law duty 


of care which they owed to the 
banks by virtue of 


oanKs u> ...-V -{Iheir special 
relationship with them. 


lauunwiiK . . . 

Mr Justice Steyn sitting in ihe 
Commercial Court of 
Queen's Bench Division so held, 
imer alia* giving judgment on 
- liability for the banks. 

Kevser Ullmann SA. Credit 
Lyonnais Bank Nederland, NY- 
, American Fleicher NaUond 
j Bank, Arbuihnot Uthan & Co 
^ Lid. Banque Arabe ettaJJJ 

-- nationaledTnvestissemenisand 

, Chemi«l Bank. acuons and 

' counterclaims. in,er <t .?“£' 

i against ihe insurers. Skandj 
(UK) Insurance Co Ltd and 
Wcstgaie Insurance Co loo 

■SSks 

SlS OC Sid Mr K*nn«h 
Mwixan for the Chemical 
Bank: Mr Richard Yofte-CjC. 
mV Crawford Und^y. and Mr 
Charles Cory -Wright for the 

-BRlWW STEYN raid 
that the story was one of fraud 
in ,i massive scale. Dunng the 
StiTSw 10 -1081. Mr Jaime 

i ." 


Ballestero (said to be the scion 
of a very wealthy South Ameri- 
can family), persuaded syn- 
dicates of banks to enter into 
five separate two-year loan 
agreements with four companies 
which he owned or controlled. 

The total amount borrowed 
was 80 million Swiss francs. The 
principal securities offered in 
support of each loan were a 
pledge of gemstones valued by 
the GemmoJogisch Institm Ant- 
werpen (G1A) at SFrl98 million 
but which were worth only SFrS 
million, and a credit insurance 
policy for SFri)73 million on 
which the banks primarily re- 
lied. 

It was a condition of each of 
the loan agreements that the 
banks would only advance the 
moneys when the promised 
securities were in place. That 
necessarily involved that bind- 
ing contracts of insurance in 
stipulated sums had to be 
concluded 

The insurances were arranged 
by Ernest Noicutt & Co Ltd, a 
reputable firm of Lloyds bro- 
kers. through Iheir manager, Mr 
Roy Lee. 

The borrowing companies 
were named as the insurai 
under the policies. But the 
purpose of the insurance was to 
provide insurance protection to 
the banks in the event of a 
failure by the borrowers to repay 
the loans. The banks were either 
named as co-insured or to the 
knowledge of the insurers were 
to be assignees under the poli- 
cies. . . . 

Each policy contained a 
clause excluding liability for any 
daim arising directly or in- 
directly by the fraud of any 

person. , , 

The first loan was due for 
completion in January 1980. Mr 
Lee found it impossible to place 
the insurance as one risk and 
derided to place it in three 
layers: a primary, first excess 
and second excess layer. 

Mr Cvril Dimgaie, the senior 
underwriter of Hodge Met^ 
cantile and General Insurance 


Co Lid at the time, and later 
employed by Skandia, agreed to 
sign a slip taking 1 00 per cent on 
ihe primary layer. 

By January 30, 1980 the first 
excess layer was effectively com- 
pleted. Mr Dungate signed a 14- 
day cover note as to 7i5 per 
cent of the second layer. 

Although the insurance cover 
in respect of the second excess 
layer was plainly incompieie, 
Mr Lee issued cover notes to the 
lead bank on the loan which 
represented that the insurance 
cover in respect of all layers was 
complete. 

Relying on iheir brokers' 
cover notes, the relevant banks 
advanced SFr26-25 minion 
under the loan agreeme n t. 

Mr Lee placed most of the 
missing cover between February 
and April 1980, but early in 
June 1980, shortly before the 
Iasi 6 per cent was placed, Mr 
Dungate became fully aware 
that Mr Lee had deliberately 
deceived the banks by the issue 
of the false cover notes; and that 
following that deception there 
had been a substantial gap from 
January to June to the insurance 
cover to the potential detriment 
of the banks. 

Mr Dungate did not report the 
matter to the brokers or to his 
own superiors in Hodge. Nor 
did he inform the banks of the 
deceit of their agents. Instead, 
he proceeded to. underwrite 
further loans amounting to 
SFr53.75 million on behalf of 
Hodge, and later Skandia, after 
the discovery of Mr Lee’s deceit 

The banks were throughout 
unaware of Mr Lee’s deception 

and of any gap in theic insurance 
cover. 

In due course the borrowers 
defaulted on all the loans. Mr 
Ballestero and the funds had 
disappeared. 

The banks claimed re- 
imbursement under the insur- 
ance policies, but subsequently 
conceded that the fraud -exclu- 
sion clause applied and that the 
insurers were accordingly not 
liable under any of the policies. 


The banks then contended 
that their losses were caused by 
the insurers' failure to disclose 
to them how the banks were 
deceived by Mr Lee by the issue 
of the false cover notes. It was 
said that had the deceit been 
dis cl osed, no further loans 
would have been made and the 
loss on the first loan would have 
been averted. 

The banks alleged that the 
insurers were in breach of the 
common law duty of care or the 
duty of utmost good faith. 

h was established beyond 
doubt that the uberrima fides 
principle imposed reciprocal 
duties on the insured and in- 
surer not only to abstain from 
bad faith but to observe the 
utmost good faith by disclosing 
all material circumstances: see 
Carter v Boehm ((1766) 3 Burr 
1905). 

The duties did not arise as 
implied terms of the contract of 
insurance or by way of a 
collateral contract, they applied 
before the contract came into 
existence. 

The duty of insurers to dis- 
close covered matters peculiarly 
within their knowledge, of 
which the insurers knew the 
insured to be ignorant and 
unable to discover, but which 
were material in that they were 
calcula t ed to influence the 
insured’s derision to conclude 
the contract of insurance. 

In considering whether the 
duty of disclosure was activated 
in a given case the question 
-should be asked; Did good faith 
and fair dealing require a disclo- 
sure? 

In the present case Mr 
Dungate knew.that the policies 
of insurance were the banks' 
principal security; that the 
banks were named policy hold- 
ers or assignees of the policies; 
and that the banks rather than 
the borrowers were interested in 
the insurance. 

He knew in June 1 980 that Mr 
Lee had l<een guilty of grave 
deception of his client, sus- 
tained over many months and 


potentially highly prejudicial to 
the banks. He knew that Mr Lee 
was the banks* sole source of 
information as to the cover, past 
and future and that he could not 
be trusted. 

He knew that the banks were 
unaware of Mr Lee’s dishonest 
conduct and had no means of 
discovering n. He appreciated 
that the banks were exposed on 
the first loan and all subsequent 
transactions, particularly in the 

K of the fraud exclusion 
ie and he chose to enter into 
further contracts of insurance 
with the banks knowing that Lhe 
banks were exposed to a con- 
cealed risk. 

If good forth and foir dealing 
had any meaning at alL there 
was a clear duty on Mr Dungate 
to place the relevant feels before 
the banks. That view was re- 
inforced by the contemporary - 
morality of the market. 

The most contentious issue 
was whether the insured's only 
remedy for breach of the duty of 
good foith was the avoidance of 
the contract and a daim for 
return of the premium, or 
whether he could claim dam- 


Undue weight should not be 
given to the obiter observation 
of Mr Justice Scrunon in Glas- 
gow Assurance Corporation Ltd 
v William Symondson & Co 
((1911) 16 Com Cas 109, 121) 
that damages could not be 
claimed. 

Once it was accepted that the 
principle of utmost good faith 
imposed meaningful reciprocal 
duties on insurers and insured, 
it seemed anomalous that dam- 
ages could not be claimed for 
breach of those duties where 
that was the only effective 
remedy. 

Avoidance was almost invari- 
ably the only remedy an insurer 
needed in cases of nondisclo- 
sure. but avoidance of a policy 
and a daim for return of the 
premium would be a wholly 
ineffective remedy if; as in the 
present case; the breach of the 
duty of utmost good faith by the 


insurer caused the insured to be 
unprotected and exposed to 
great loss; 

In order to claim damages for 
breach of the obligation of good 
foith. it was incumbent on the 
insured to prove that the non- 
disclosure induced him to enter 
into the contract. 

Justice and policy consid- 
erations combined to require his 
Lordship to rule that in min- . 
cipie an insured could claim 
damages from an insurer arising 
from loss suffered by the insured 
as a result of a breach of the 
obligation of utmost good foith. 

Were the insurers under the 
common law duty of care? The 
point was a novel one. 

The observations of Lord 
WUberforce in Anns v Merton 
London Borough Council 
([1978] AC 728, 751-752) were 
still a useful guide in so far as 
they emphasised that in order to 
establish a duty of ctue in a 
novel situation, a plaintiff had 
to establish in limine the ele- 
ment of neighbourhood or 
proximity; and then in addition 
bad to satisfy the court that it 
was just and reasonable that a 
duty of care of particular scope 
should be held to exist. 

The insurers relied, inter alia, 
on the fort that the case was one 
of pure omission as precluding a 
ruling that a duty of care existed. 

English law bad always 
adopted a robust approach to 
any suggestion _ that, in the 
absence ot a special relationship, 
a person owed a legal duty to 
rescue another from financial 
harm or financial ruin. 

But the present case was 
essentially different from one of 
pure omission. The relationship 
between the parties involved 
obligations of good foith and foir 
dealing. 

Moreover, the alleged duty 
arose in the context of insurers 
who had an established business 
relationship with the banks and 
continued to transact further 
with the banks (and to make 
profits) in the knowledge that a 
risk (further dishonesty by Mr 


Lee) which was obvious to the 
insurers, was not appreciated by 
the banks and could not be 
discovered b> them. 

The relationship between the 
banks was special in nature and 
there was therefore no rule 
requiring the court to hold that 
no duty existed. -■ 

To establish liability it had to 
be shown that it was reasonably 
foreseeable by the insurers that 
there Has a manifest and ob- 
vious risk that a failure to 
disclose would lead to financial 
loss by the banks. A bare 
possibility of loss was not 
enough. 

His Lordship was satisfied 
that it was reasonably foresee- 
able that if Mr Lee's dishonesty 
was not disclosed to the banks, 
there was a manifest and ob- 
vious risk lira! the banks might 
suffer financial loss as a result of 
his future dishonesty. 

In the circumstances the 
banks had satisfied the thresh- 
old requirement of proximity 
and neighbourhood. 

In considering whether it was 
just and reasonable in all foe 
circumstances to bold that the 
suggested duty of care rested on 
the insurers, account had to be 
taken not only of the magnitude 
of the potential loss to the banks 
and foe manifest ami obvious 
character of the risk, but also foe 
nature of the burden of taking 
precautions. 

The suggested duly arose 
where Mr Dungate had received 
incontrovertible proof of foe 
broker’s deceit, not where he 
merely suspected dishonesty. 

Positive factors militated in 
favour of holding that a duty 
existed. 

First, such a derision would 
be just as between foe present 
panics. Second, the existence of 
a duty of care was consistent 
with foe requirement of good 
foith and fair dealing which 
should govern relations between 
insurer and insured. Third, it 
was reinforced by the contem- 
porary market understanding of 


an underwriter's duty in such'r 
circumstances. 

Finally, if a duly was held to- 
exist, it might help to expose ' 
and eradicate fraud in the 
London insurance market. 

Cumulatively, those policy -- 
considerations cogently sup- 
ported the existence of a duty of 
care and for all those reasons bis 
Lordship concluded that such a 
duty did exist and had been 
breached. 

It was clearly established that * 
if a full disclosure of the facts 
relating to Mr Lee’s dishonesty 
in issuing foe false cover notes 
had been made, none of the ’ 
banks would have entered into . 
any further loans after June 

But his Lordship was not 
satisfied that if the banks had u. 
discovered the deception in ■ 
June 1980, they would have 
called in the first loan. Thus, 1 '' 
there was no causal connection 
between foe insurers' breach of 
duty and foe banks' losses in 
respect of that loan. 

The banks* losses were not too 
remote, they were reasonably 
foreseeable, and there were no ' ■ 
policy considerations militating 
against the imposition of liabil- 
ity on the insurers for the losses. 

In relation to Chemical Bank ■ 
alone, their damages for breach 
of duty of care would be reduced 
by 50 per cent because, before ■* 
making their loan, they had~«9! 
received assessments of the 
gemvaluers. GIA. and their \ 
manager, Mr Verbruggen, which « 
were critical of their expertise 1 
and integrity. \ 

It followed that Hodge, being i 
vicariously liable for Mr 1 
Dungate’s non-disclosure to the 1 

banks, were liable to the rele- > 
varn. banks in respect of the • 
second but not the first loan: ! 
and that Skandia. who sub- 
sequently employed Mr 
Dungate. were liable to the ^ 
relevant banks in respect of their’ 
losses on the remaining three 
loans. 

Solicitors: Hopkins & Wood; 5r 

Slaughter & Mar, Herbert £ 
Smith. / 

zn 



"2J'i ,-y. __ . 


: — t 



New 
Street s 
inarroi 
estenfo 

After 
prices 
coarse 
session 
press® 
evapon 
mo mil 

started 

The 

averagi 
about i 
half ho 
to 1,79 


ABedStn 

AfcsCMw 

AkOB 

Amaxlnc 

Am'rdaH 

AmBranc 

Am Can 

AmCymn 

AmBPw 

Am Expn 

Am Home 

Am Moo 

AmStnrt 

AmToteC 

Amoco 

ArmcoSt 

Asarco 

Ashland < 

AlRcftfe 

Avan Pro 

BkrsTst 

Bantam 

BkoJBsi 

Bankotl 

BetftS» 


SPORT 


Eddery and Tremblant 
poised for notable 
Cambridgeshire double 

By Mandarin (Michael PhOKps) 

r Tremblant is napped to win mile and three furlongs at Mansoofs July and Gimcradt 


THE TIMES SATURDAY OCTOBER 4 1986 

RACING: CALLAGHAN’S TOP TWO-YEAR-OLD MANSOOJ TO HOLD UPPER HAND IN MIDDLE PARK STAKE S 


' Tremblant is napped to win mile an 
the William Hill Cambridge- Kemptoi 
shire Handicap at Newmarket winning 
today and thus emulate lack of s 
Sterope and Prince de Galles, the end. 
the only horses to have won beaten c 
the first leg of the autumn such act 
double twice in succession ersasDL 
since the war. Rakapos 

Baronet, with whom Trem- Before 

btant has a lot in common, equally t 
won it twice recently but with the grow 
a year in between. Stakes O' 

Like Baronet, Tremblant is Newbury 
a seasoned campaigner equal Back r 

to this sort of task. They also as his o 
hail from Epsom but from Mart she 
different stables. ers a gre 

Ron Smyth, Trem Want's 21b mo 
trainer, is a wily veteran who waltzed s 
has forgotten more than most months 2 
of us will ever know about the As for' 

game. So when he says with a will strip 
nod and a knowing wink that be was b 
he has never had a horse better lninsky 
in his life it is high time to sit way thro 
up and take notice. was his f 

Earlier this week, Smyth weeks bt 
gave this assurance about laid-offa 
Tremblant's chance: “He is in' at Ascot 
the best possible shape. He Likewi 
will low the going, last the reckoned 
distance and mark my words than he v 
he wiD stretch them aft.” i n Augu 
Yesterday his big-race Septemb 
jockey, Pat Eddery, armed is who no 


Kempton and he looked like 
winning it for a while until 
lack of stamina told towards 
the end. As it was he was still 
beaten only three lengths by 
such accomplished perform- 
ers as Dihistan, Bakharoff and 
Rakaposhi King. 

Before' that, be had run 
equally well to finish third in 
the group three Hungerford 
Stakes over seven furlongs at 
Newbury. 

Back now to what I regard 
as his optimum trip, Trem- 
blant should give his support- 
ers a great ran, carrying just 
21b more «Han omen he 
waltzed away with the prize 12 
months ago. 

As forCumanf s pair, Dallas 
will strip far fitter than when 
he was beaten two lengths by 
lninsky at Goodwood mid- 
way through last month. That 
was his first race for nearly 12 
weeks because he had to be 
laid-off after being struck into 


Likewise, A1 Bashamma is 
reckoned to be better now 
than he was at either Newbury 
in August or Doncaster in 
September as is a gross horse 
who needs plenty of hard 


J mvj, am 

weight to the case when he graft He* too, needed those 
said most emphatically that be races also after an enforced 


would not swop the ride on 
Tremblant with anybody, not 
even Dallas whom he rode to 
that convincing victory in the 
Britannia Stakes at Royal 
Ascot 

But Eddery does admit to 
bang afraid of Dallas at his 
best and waxy, too, of Luca 
CumanTs other runner, A1 
Bashaama. 

When last seen, four weeks 
ago, Tremblant put up a 
stunning performance even 
though he finished only 
fourth. The race was the group 
three September Stakes over a 


break. 

My other principal fancies 
are Pasticcio, who looked 
unlucky at Doncaster last time 
and the much unproved 
Power Bender, who could turn 
out to be a blot on ibis 
handicap even with a penalty. 

The Tattersalls Middle Park 
Stakes has all the making s qf a 
great duel between the Eddery 
brothers, Pat and Paul riding 
Mansooj and Most 
Welcomejespectively. 

Both horses boast two vic- 
tories over today's course and 
distance. In my view. 


Stakes form just gives Pat a 
fine chance of seeing off Paul- 

Later in the afternoon it 
should be Walter Swinburo’s 
turn to get a welcome boost to 
his confidence in readiness for 
tomorrow’s big date in Paris 
by winning the Sun Chariot 
Stakes on Smgletta. 

Talking of Paris, and the 
Prix de L'Arc de Triomphe, 1 
am swayed by the Gallic 
confidence behind Bering 
.who broke the track record at 
Chantilly in June when he 
won the French Derby. So he 
is dearly not devoid of either 
pace or stamina not to men- 
tion class. Furthermore, he 
has a truly classic Arc 
preparation from Criquete- 
Head and her father, Alec. 

It remains my contention 
that Dancing Brave is a mile 
and a quarter horse of the 
highest class and that Bering 
could just prove too strong for 
him in the 12th and last 
furlong tomorrow. Dancing 
Brave certainly appeared to be 
coming to the end ofhis tether 
at Ascot in July even though 
he did manage to win the King 
George VI and Queen Eliza- 
beth Diamond Stakes over 
tomorrow’s distance. 

Finally, forget not that at 
Chepstow Timeform are 
sponsoring a valuable hurdle 
race for four-year-olds to co- 
incide with the publication of 
their annual commentary on 
the past jumping season. 
Chasers and Hurdlers 85/86 
(£49.75), which is now on sale. 

There is no better way of 
brushing up one's knowledge 
in preparation for the winter 
ihan thumbing the pages of 
this scholarly review, which 
remains a must for anyone 
seriously interested in the 
sport 



Encouragement* 

the Abdulla canib 

%%Sto~^eiday. win- befom. racing, but could S 

SfTS&rvs saftatsaS 

Poilenaic and Mytens. rochnme rides the 


“jp :: Mvtens. own ncwwuit* ouuiuo m uw 

«>"»*■• ‘^rWjghir*. “Art 
lJ ivb^w Brave colours in Pht Edder> kept op |K. 
fimdivwio^of the Wesilcy sun- when complctii^ 

ss&ass a-s" : - 

and raced dear inside the final “ ' ^ 

furlong to beat the 50-1 shot Results page 38 

Tiauegrean by two fcngtfts. - 

Eddery was following up After Pnncc Orac 

Thursday's victoiy for the Mine u, c field along, talon*?*? 

stable on Valuable Witness ® Aummn Flutter and MwJ? 
the Jockey Club Cup. and Tree Eddery swept the latter iuioi£ 
aid: “Fortunately, Valuable jouj coming to the two-Hj 1 
Witness is fine this morning, marker, and drew dear to 22 
and his legs are all right- Asian Cup by two and a tSr 
Pollenate ran quite well first lengths. 

timeout Mytens stated his 
£^^f^t>osiLion was today.” IWO sweesuve vfcu3{ 

whose Bell otto, also Yonc.andagamonStL*g er<lh 
0W P**i tw confirmed at Doncaster. Tree said: *1 £5 

Ray Cochrane, injured at much closer 10 the leafo, 


Conditions favourable 
for Riyda to collect 

From our Irish Racing Correspondent 


Ron Smyth's Tremblant, who is fancied to complete a second consecutive saccess in 
Newmarket's Cambridgeshire Handicap, the fist leg of the Antonin doable 

Kalaglow colt catches the eye 


The top price of the nonrihg 
of the P«"l day of the 
Newmarket Highflyer Yearling 
Sales yesterday was 240,000 
gpriaeas paid by the local trainer 
Tom Jones for a son of the 
Ecfipse and King George winner 
Katagfow. 

This strongly made colt was 
also sought after by Kalagkw’s 
trainer, Guy Harwood, nod he 
had to settle for second place 
behind Jones, who was acting 
for Ham dan A1 Mafctoum's 
ShstdwOi Estates. _ 

This youngster Is only the 
second foal of the Michael 
Stoute- trained May Hill Stakes 
w h aaer Eacha n cl y Raised and 


her first foal, a sister to this coir, 
is in training with Willie J arris. 

Paul Webber, of the Curragh 
Bloodstock Agency, outbid an- 
other agent, George Blackwell, 
to acquire a High Top colt at 
lOdOOO guineas. He was acting 
lor a new American etient of 
Garin Pritchaxd-Gordon's sta- 
ble. This bay colt is the first foal 
of Bumpkin, winner of four 
races. 

Another mare whose first foal 
sold well was Intatti and her 
bay Sly by Stop die Music 
made 135,000 g"*"*— S>»f was 
Sought by the Saudi owner Fahd 
Salman, who outbid the 
Laatbourn trainer Ray Laing. 


NEWMARKET 


ZS5 WILLIAM HU. CAMBRIDGESHIRE HANDICAP (£37,280: 1m 
110yd) (31) 


Selections 


By Mandarin 


1.45 Girotondo. 

220 Mansooj. . 

2.55 TREMBLANT (nap). 

3.35 Singletta. 

4.05 Dry Dock. 

4.35 Beiow Zero. 


By Our Newmarket 
Correspondent 
1.45 Girotondo. 

255P^w&nder. 

3.35 Singletta. 

4.05 Norman Invader. 

4.35 Sir Arnold. 


TREMBLANT (C) (K Abdula] R Smyth 5-8-10 FWEtetay 

K-BATTBtr (Mrs M Butta) W Bsey 5-9-8 N C o — nun 

DALLAS (R DuchOiSOO) L Cumani 3-9-6 R Cochrane 

1MNSKY {Princa YazM Saud) G Harwood S-O-1 GStatay 

NAVARZATO (BF) (Marquero da HotnU] R Steamer S-M _ SCaottan 

KAKYIA (Age Khan) M SOuffl 3-S-O Cox) WRS— M a m 

PASncctou Warner) M Jarvte 3 - 8 - 1 0_ Tfaea 


By Michael Seely 

2.55 POWER BENDER (nap). 3.35 Santiki. 

The Times Private Handkapper^s top rating 255 ATOKA. 

Guide to our new in-line racecard 

103(12)' 00432 THESFORM(COLBF) (Mrs JRytay) 8 H« 9-100 B West (4) M 7-2 

Racscard number. Draw In brackets. Sx-flgura meat race). Owner In brackets. Trainer. Age and 
form. Horse's name (B-bCntcers. V-Wsor. H-bood. wagtit Rider plus any afowance. The Times 


309 (31) 1-1201 KABnriA (Age Khan) M StoutB 3^0 (5ex) WRSWrtwra 

310 (2a 222113 PAST1CCIOU Warned MJarvw 3-8-10 Thraa 

312 (123 231404 (WOMSS) SLE (Eva Lady RosabenO Lady Harms 5-8-7 B Rouse 

313 (2) 3-1202 QEOROU RtVBI (A PaiAson) Q Ooumb 3-3€ G DoMWd 

— ~ 2-21332 WAMB (Hamdan AMMdound A Stewart 3-8-S M Robarta 

013104 AL BASHAAMA (BR (SheMi BAohananad) L CUnani M-5 JRaid 

214200 SHAFT TROOPER (BI (MBrriOU Stables Lid) R WMama 34-4 _ BTbomon 
000000 QUAUTAIR FLYBl (V) (CXMAta* Engineerfcn Ltd) K Stone 44-4 PBwke(7) 

WEET THE GR^SC fflF) (P Gouiancri) O.Lang 3-8-3 WN— met 

POWBt BBOER (t5(Aodison Toob) G P-Gordon 4^3 (5ex) T Quinn 

TURFAH (BF) (HarndWl AJ-MakJtxirn 1 P Wfehvyn 3-8-2 RaM Eddery 

3UM00 AMliUllG (C) (Mrs H Camoarts) John RtzGeraU 332 Q Baxter 

311011 FM COUtflKr (Sir Q awioiti P O BWOrlh 4-3-1 G Carter 

83103 PAMB-TURF (V)(J Peorcei G Wragg 3-34) PRo Ima 


C-course winner. Ocfistance winner. CO-courae Prwsta HamScappe^s ratng. Approxim a te starting 
and distance winner. BF-bestsn favourite in price. 


Going: good to firm 


Draw, no advantage 


030100 SAMS WOOD (H WrflfflTI rompBi 5-7-12 

123402 PAL (W Norxjnj P WaAvyn 3-7-12— 

303011 R.YH0ME (C Soumgale) P CiMA 37-12 (5e*J 

021011 ALL FAIR (V) (S Onsnwrrt P Hastatn 5-7-11 

, o»a40 oowamus algcwhon (ta m Graaey) c amain 37 - 11 . neb 

1) 020020 MAMCHESTBISKYTRAM (P Bqwdtteh) D Ssworth 7-7-9 

202000 XHMJMTcnBMn^MTompidne 4-7-7 

ALflOMI (B) (RfcOquafl C Banstead 4-7-7 

ATOKA (H Kasetowaky) John RtzGeraM 4-7-7 

FOUMAtuiejB) (A SoTranKXri D ArtxAhnot 4-7-7 

PARIS TRADER (N YescwnA J Payne 4-7-7 G I 

LADY LA PAZ (G Herrkfga) P Cundril 37-7 


RPqx 

— RHMs 

- R Street 


oi re-i 

>2 40-1 
9012-1 
K7 33-1 
85 33-1 

95 31 

91 20-1 
ST 33-1 
90 20-1 
93 20-1 

92 15-1 
8740-1 
85 50-1 
*740-1 
9210-1 

90 33-1 
92 40-1 
Bt IB-1 
■9 25-1 

88 50-1 

89 33-1 

91 25-1 
9316-1 
IS 50-1 
88 40-1 
as 50-1 
B7 50-1 

• 98 25-1 
*3 50-1 
79 66-1 
8*66-1 


1.45 GARLS8ERG TROPHY (Nursery handicap: 2-Y-O: £8,701: 6fr (13 
runners) 


EODM TRBMLAIITiMl won IhM r ace MM year on the Rowley MBe ctxraeflm It. E3743g good to 
runm Bnn. Oct5. 31 ran) w«h K^ATTHtY (B-12) 14lbacfc In 18m. and QUA1JTAM H.YB1 (8-12) 41 
back in 21st. DALLAS (8-7) ran fas bast race when beating NAVARZATO (38) a tanfah at Royal Ascot 


21001 SAUCEOUBLE 
10 MACROBUN 




rrf'rTT— 

m 


53 


I Porchester) W Hem 9-7 

n)J Shaw 3-7 

32 

Ryan 9-1 _ 

Hey) C Brittain 8-1 
AlaaMd) L Cumanl 8-13, 

"BSStWJI - ** 

D Efamrtti 8-7 
raeJJWnMrOO 
Hannan) RHamon 7-7 
D Thom 7-7 — 

Cobghan 7-7 


92 5-1 
91 10-1 

Tims 91 6-1 

P RgSM a an *99 7-1 

8S 8-1 
98P4-1 
PatEddary 97 9-1 

. AMe clre y U — 

IRSwWwm 9512-1 
9514-1 
98 16-1 

93 — 
78 — 


back in 21 sl mil AS (8-7) ran fas bast race w hen b asting 
(1m£11720. firm. June 20. 24 ran) w«h MET THE GREK 
GEORGMA RJVEH(S-6) behind. KABtYLAJO-IJii an improving fi 
£11570. gcxjd to ftm. Sept 28. lOran). FAM COUNTRY won *Ai 
in beaimiAJB II at Doncasaartim. £13149. goodto flmi. 


I NAVARZATO (3Q a MnUh at Royal Ascot 
1(8-0) 9 back in 80i wdOmsKY (34) and 
fly and beat Bfaadng (3-2) by 71 at Ascot pm. 


rat Ascot last time. 


Praviously(7- 

RPLTERff-4) 


Knigtits Secrat «-1 2)1 1 wi*i XHAI (3« oul Ot contanttan. AtDKA. previously 
further p-10> when 4X1 5#i to Asteroid FWd (8^ in a Doncastar Rtad raca 


raca (1m. £11862, good. 


to Linda’s 


FORM SAUCE ENABLE (9-7) won Sandown apprentice h'cap by a Head from Victc 
rwnm E2303. good ro firm. Sect ^4. 1 1 ran). DUNMNALDab* Kfm^xon vrinner, (8- 

4thtoPfait(7-l2)atNewlxay(».£iaQ3.good.Septm.13rai4.KyvBU2ALElKl3id(8-^ 

(8-8) in IMad race. Proriously appwmce ridden when (fid not gat a dear run and beaten 441 into 3rd 

Master Rokay (8-9 M Doncaster (61. 0&66, good u fam. Sept 11 7 ran), with DERWENT' VALLEY (8-5)31 awn 
5th. SPAM9H CALM (M) won at Heydocfc by SI Own Sapnfsh Sfoper CM) (8f. £5475. good. Sbm & 23 rant 
The 3id was « back when G1ROTONOO »0lbeBt PencBSia^ianer (8-1 1)by HI at Nottnraiani(9. £959. firm, 
8. 14 ranV A PRAYBI FOR URNGSl^ won by from Mugath (948 on ttweeme Nottingham card 
, Arm. Sopt 8. 15 ran). SHADES OF MGHr (7-q won at Kempton. vAb JAISAUER (8^ 
and neck Mo 3rd and MADAM BU1A (7-7) unplaced (ft £256a good to firm. Sept 6. 18 rm). 

Tniai lion KYVERDALE 

220 TATTERSALLS MIDDLE PARK STAKES (Group 1: 2-Y-O: £33,184: ffn 

6ft (7 runners) 


325 SUN CHARIOT STAKES (Group II: ffflies: £23,487: 1m 2ft (7 runners) 

401 0 1-41301 FA* OF THE FURZE (D) JMra S Roga ra) L Brow ne (>■) 4^4 „ O Smrtwy 98 8-1 

402 «) 040010 faJRCHA50 , APBK3lASE (J Bray) R Armstrong 4-9-0 S faMw « 16-1 

403 (4) 44-3122 DUSTY DOLLAR (BF) (WaWtxjrn A) Maktoum) W Hem 3-6-7 WCnoa 96 6-1 

404 0 110001 GESSIEH (CJ) (Shafch Ahmed Al Maktpum) M Jwva 3-6-7 — Eddery 98 3-1 

405 (7) 032-020 MOOMJGHT LADY (Ftoldvaie Lafl P Kaleway 3-8-7 RCettraae 97 6-1 

406 & 21-00 OUl&IGLBI&MSobeilWtomS^—-—;. Thm » 12-7 

408 (1) 12-3011 SMGLETTA(D)(She>ch Mohammed) MStOUtt 3-8-7 WROwbMum «99F2-1 


4 JS SOLTYKOFF MAIDEN STAKES (2-Y-O C A G: £5,105: 1m) (19) 


etartJJ WBson94) 


201 (2) 111101 cRorrorscuwtco) 

202 (4) 110 GENOMZiqn (P Wane,.. 

204 (1) 31012 M ANSOO J (CD) (K Al-Safa) N CaBaflhan S-0 

205 @ 111440 IBSTS1 MAJESTIC (D) fD Jottraom^R WMams 80. 

206 (7) 11 MOST WELCOME (CO) (E Molsr) G Wragg 9-0 

207 @ 1144 RISK ME (L Nmrts) P KoBeway 80 

208 (Q 000333 WMPPET (A Richards) C Brittain 9-0 


JRaid 

T fires 

PatEddary 


09 5-1 
II 81 
• 99F84 
7812-1 
97 81 
05 181 
8414-1 
KJ 


ALTOUNTASH (Age Khan) M Stouts 90 
BREAKOUT (R R&wrduC eriOBin SO 
CALAPAEZ (R Raevesjp HasiamBO- 

• DRY DOCK m HoBogsworth) W Hem 90 

FACEVIEW (S SWwJQM Atiw 80 — 

0 GALUONS ft 

0 GMJMDADIB 

3 HABCAN(F Salman) P Cola 90 

' R Hannon 90 


POMT (WGnxtey) R Armstrong 90 

I (B Murray) D CDooneB 90 

Salman) P Cola 90 



• 99 F3-1 

14-1 






Course specialists 


455 SEVERALS HANDICAP (3-Y-O: E6,732r7f){? runners) 


ODoumb 
M Stouts 
G Harwood 
JSutcMfa 


TRAINERS JOCKEYS 

Winners Runnars Percent Winners Rumers Percent 

7 « 16 J SCauthen 80 551 14£ 

56 348 18.1 Pat Eddery 85 472 13a 

% 95? II- 6 WR9wln6um S2 378 13a 

16 in 14A G Starkey 42 370 11.4 

29 233 114 W Careon 53 467 113 

17 138 123 TWUams 13 12* 105 


HAYDOCK PARK 


ry 100900 nance PKADILLO [Dr C Emmeraan) W HaiBb 9-7 R Cochrane 8514-1 

® Bethei) R Bc*s 82 WHSwtnbum 813-1 

606 $3} 23131 SVt ARNOLD (tn (J Jarres) A Stewart 8-12 Max) M Roberta 17 4-1 

^ ^ TBfQ ^ITRamsdanlABatey BO PM Eddery • 99 P2-T 

SI? © riTtOO SEW HJQHJRJTwit**) B McMahon 8 4 Q DuffWd 94 10-1 

611 m 310-00 TOWN oesifcR (CO) (Pxjneer Bloodstock) R Armstrong 8-2 WCmon 94 8-1 

612 (9) 0-44 BOLD CB.T (J Haggerty) C Boom 8-2 R HSs 80 16-1 

617 (4) 020400 TARA MGa g s5Sa5)« Tomo^s 70 A Macfcay 91 181 

619 (2) 000004 JARROVlAN (B) (A Le Blond) TFaktiunH 7-7 HLTkoaw 9012-1 

145 BUCKLOW HILL HANDICAP (£7,876: 6f) (13 runners) 


Selections 


By Mandarin 

2.15 linn O’Dee. 

2.45 Suhailie. 

3.15 Effigy. 

3.45 Numismatist. 

4.15 Mrs Naughty. 

4.45 Beijing. 


By Our Newmarket 
Correspondent 

2.15 — 

2.45 Suhailie. 

3.15 

3.45Cani£ 

4.15 — 

4.45 Buckley. 





Michael Seely's selection: 3.15 


4.15 SALE SBJJNG STAKES (£1,440: Tm 40yd) (14 runners) 

BRAMPTON IMPERIAL (W (Mars) D Chapman 4^-4 


Going: film Draw: 6f-1m low numbers best 

2.15 BUGQHiS FARM NURSERY HANDICAP (2-Y-O: £4,740: 6f) (9 runners) 

8 (8) 12204 DOMMO FIRE (D) (Lbs P Lewis) J Dunlop 9-7 jLoam 3a F3-1 

17 An 02300 PMLChfYWL/ Morgan; D Laing 8 It 

ITACHSiOO) (Mrs J Rameden) T Barron 8-8 


BUCKS BOLT (CHF MksJJ Berry 4^4 

JANE'S BRAVE BOY (J Eddefl) D Chapman 4-9-4 

MAFTBtfMtes S Larory) M James 4^4 1_ 

MOB APEX JQ 0 GrifMia) P YartSay 4-9-1 

XYLOPHONE (Lbwphenfl D Maries 44-1 




M (C) (P LooJ A Hoatnsnead 

H BALLARD (St JOTkxtndQR Harmon 8-6 

140401 UNN CTDEE (C) (C Spera) M W Eaatartjy 
02000 BECKMOHAM^(HPKdcannQ)JLei^84 
021034 SAUNOOS LASS (D) jCSsutfR Hakter 
131301 MBS DRUMMOND D (S Murra^Grwn] N Tn5dBr8-a 



GOUffiNOBC(Jl«*ffli)M 


McOourt) M McCaun 3-8-1 1 . 
M Comocho 4-6-10 


DNkheUa 

— J Carrol (7) 

SharranJames 

JWKams 

P Cook 

— R W o rtha m 


ACo8mbm(7) 94 10-1 

.AMcGMM •» 7-2 

LChantOCk* 96 61 

5 HfariS 95 10-1 

S Dawson 91 10-1 
KbaTMder 8710-1 


SXYBRDfM BntEflnjM Bmtam 888 K Dariay 

COUNTRY CARMVAL (m (R Uoyd) W Haigh 3-6-3 JHBimro® 


Z45 HAY DOCK DREAM MILE (2-Y-O: £7,390: 1m 40yd) (3 runners) 

2 P) 11 SUMABJE (ShaAh Monammedl H Cedi 96 — 

8 (3) 0 QUESSAflD(f Lea) CBntteh 8-11..-. 


32 TBTTMHY 


(DAflnowJP COIe 8-11. 


.. WRywi • 99 FI-2 
S Perks — 20-1 
PWakfcon 91 164 


4.45 PRESTON HANDICAP (3-Y-Q: £3,434: 1m 6Q (6) 

1 (0) 312 BUCKLEY (BR (fairs A Ctepman) L CumarH 9-7 

8 (S) 00-1144 BEUWQ(D)(6nfBM Manor FtemlP COM 6-K 
14 (4) 102000 MADIS0NCTL(AZivai>are)RW?8Mtar60^. 


1 |1Q 21-0001 EHTOY 

2 (9) 032214 

11 (I® 3240-13 MALADHU 

12 (7) 200-221 TOSCANA 


3.15 BROOKE BOND OXO CHAMPIONSHIP FINAL (Handicap: Amateurs £3,782: 1m 2f 
131yd) (13 runners) 

i nra tuOOU EfflBY K Atxiufa) G Harwood 4-12-0 Amanda Harwood 10 •» 6-1 

(Mre A Fwouson) J Dimiop 3-11^ AmwPMBps 9210-1 

Jknmy RogerakT 7-9-13 A Hobson (3) 92 11-2 

Marts 5-9-12 Kelfallarim? SO 5-1 

.... __ _ _ _ cottS^e. Marine Juatar 95 6-1 

14 fflj 000000. THE LOO&E PRINCE (QuaHtalr Hotels UdtK State 4-60 .Ly£a Peace (Q 62 — 

18 rraj 0103041 WHY TUMBLE (0 Lowe) R HoSnshaad 4-87 — 97 — 

15 Of 043000 THREE BELLS (JVWatean)MMsCouri 44-7 C«a Radband (3) 92 12-1 

22 (2) 000221 MR COFFEY (Mrs B Steed] S Norton 3-8-7 — 90 6-1 

23 m 000-321 DBUUPS TROVE (B CoBnson) H Coirnrldge 5-9-7 JRflm 90F4-1 

28 0004)00 MNG OF GEMS HSten) A Jarvs 3-9-7l_ 

29 ® 000400/ AESCULAPIUS (R aiffims) R Judies 
32 (1) (TOO LIBERATED GHL [Miss G Morris) J Payne 6G7 


1) 343 EYESQHT 

2) 00-0001 LYDIA EVA 

3) 0000 MARBLEM 


lArs A Chapman) L CumarH 9-7 fl Coast 94 5-1 

then MenorFtemMP COM 8-10 PWatdran » 11-4 

(A Zwanara) R Wriakar 84)^ □ Mebwam 94 10-1 

I (Loro Lauaihiiima) R Johnson Houghton 7-T3 K D aria y S8F7-4 

Sackweq R Harmon 7-8 C Ratter #99 9-2 

i (Beechnut* Stud) R Ho NnM — 1 7-7 A CaiMie (7) S3 U-i 


Course specialists 


TRAINERS 

Winners Riemera PerCent 


92 12-1 

H Ceoi 

23 

60 

383 

U 6-1 

G Harwood 

18 

68 

265 

90F4-I 

PGote 

11 

56 

19.0 

86 — 

GPOonxm 

8 

48 

18.7 

— — 

R Houghton 

12 

75 

16.0 

75 12-1 

C BnOatn 

11 

79 

135 


Salmon wflJ hare ttds fitly 
trained by Pud Cole. 

Sure Blade'S sire Kris was 
responsible for a handsome bay 
colt from the Duke or 
Roxburgh's Floors Stud and this 
one made 150,000 gniaeas when 
bought by Lambovn-based 
Barry Hills. 

The second foal of the unrated 
mare Just You Writ was an 
attractive Mummy's Pet colt, 
who fetched 100,000 guineas 
from Sheikh Mohammed's rac- 
ing mia p r Anthony Stroud. 

Blinkered first time 

NEWMAHKER 2JK Paris-Ttef. Alqtaa. 
HAYDOCK: 3.45 Gten Kate Manx. 


The Aga Khan, who has such 
a strong presence in tomorrow’s 
Prix de 1'Arc de Tnomphe, 
spreads his interests still wider 
over the weekend. One of his 
English trainers, Fulke Johnson 
Houghton, has sent over to 
lrdand the Aga's three-year-old 
filly Riyda fora listed race at the 
Phoenix Park, the Fairy King 
Baflysheehan Stakes. 

To date. Riyda has picked up 
less than £1.000 in win money 
but she has been placed in useful 
company and it was a good 
effort on her pan to finish 
second to Gesedah at Kempion 
Park. 

The other English runner. 
Sheer Luck, is not in the same 
class but a big danger to Riyda 
would appear to be Cockney 
Ir*^ . unbeaten in three starts 
this term. However, the 91b 
allowance enjoyed by Riyda 
could give her the advantage. 

There is also an interesting 
English challenge for the group 
three CL. Weld Park Stakes. 
This is a seven-furlong pattern 


race for two->ear-oJd fillies W,. 
Dermot Wells, whose tuber s 1 
commemorated in the title, B 
always keen to have a goorf 
nmner. However, ft is askfa,, 

lot ofhis newcomer Sky Ni^b 

to win from a field that indofe 
seven previous winners. ^ 

The one that takes my r« 
here is Linda's Magic, airtX 
placed by her trainer. Rota* 
Armstrong, to win three times.' 

Her most appealing ptoe oi 
form, though, was her run in the 
Lowther Stakes at York in 
which she finished third, btata, 
a total of three lengths M j 
Pblonia.. On that occasion jfo , 
had Sea Dara behind is gfijf i 
spot and should again confirm' ' 
those plarings. 

The big attraction at Dow \\ 
palrick this afternoon win be* 
man, not a horse, as Boh 
Champion pays his first visit to' 
this north of Ireland track io : 
ride Favourable Terms in £ i 
John Turner Car Imports Vet j 
eran Jockeys' race. 


CHEPSTOW 


Selections 

By Mandarin 

240 Asia Minor. 2.35 Duke Of Milan. 3.10 Heart 
Of Stone. 3.40 Peaceful Member. 4.10 Doable 
Option. 4 .40 Six Shot. 

Going: firm 

2J} WYE NOVICE CHASE (£2^68: 2m) 

(5 runners) ' to mm 

2 UO-1 ASIA MNOR (MC Hfchkn 6-11-3 R Hyatt 

3 0010 CARO WOOD JhawtsS-lTo V Monte 

6 0PP- UFE GUARDS Harris 5-11-0 CMoon 


3 0010 CARO WOOD J Dawes 5- 11-0 « Monte 

6 OPP- UFE GUARDS Harris 5-11-0 CBon 

8 42F- MEW90MQ M OSwef 7-11-0 HOanwooriV 

11 F4« TAF R HonoBb 811-0 GDmm 

2-1 New Song. S-2 Cm Wood. 4-1 Asia Minor. 5-1 Ufa 
Guard. 12-1 Tot. 

PODM ASM MNOR (10-11) made a winning raaopaar- 
runm ones whan UaaU n g Match Malta (10-11) 21 at 
Wncanton (an. £1358. finn. Sept 18. 9 ran). CARO WOOD (1041) 
Successfal on panuRintete outing «4ta) batting Spandw Superb 
00-1) 1 )H in a safaw fart# at fortingrion (2ro «L U'cm>, £720. 
gotxl to finn. Aug 25. 6 ran). UFE GUARD was dtoppokteng to- 
wards the end of East season over the ima Mer obstacles and 
nsksa ebasing dabut today. Bast aflon last term was a 1 JM 2nd 
to Who And A Prayer at Kamptoo Cm It, £3831 . fcm. Oct 19. 6 
ran). NEW SONG (10-7) d te qu MM od and placad 2nd on 


3.10 TIMEFORM HURDLE (4-Y-0: gCTil 
£5,745: 2m) (10) 

1 tao- SOUR CLOUD (DID fadtoboft 11-10 „ RDobw*, 

2 21-1 SAFFRON LORDjpfl KanmT0 11-8 ««)._ ¥5w3 

3 211- HEART OF STOM fo) R AMHnSt 11-2 MQteM 

5 IIP- GRIMY LANE (DlbMovnaadlte. — SH nn i 

6 043- AVEBURY F Jordan 106 

7 -Ml HONEYMAN (Bjl) J Jantans 10*5 , 

11 -211 TINGLE BOJ.(Bjb)G MOora 10-1 l6a4.H 

12 1-01 COtKTLANDS fflRL W Rjher 180 

13 -111 SW1N0 TO STEEL (I^M Pipe 180(8»t)- P 

15 003- TIMBER TOOL Mrs G Jonas 1M 

52 Tlngia Bafl. 3-1 Saftron Lord. Mart OSaite. 61 

Solar Cloud. 8-1 Honayman.Swmg To StoaL 12-1 oHm. 

CODM SOLAR CLOtm. wo« baatan at Franca TO m. 
rvnm ni^liiiaBtodoninQaniafasNontobaaiSnM 
ni-0) «L and win Triumph Hurtff at Chakanlnra ai Jot*. 
£2*33S.g00d. Mar 13. 28ran). S™ONI^ni4teM«te 
teat tam to data whan boateig Watrii Oak (106) aasrS 

CQUWTLAIK>SQR4L(l0-0)3Ww*thte bat* warn. Paw (fa ll 
H eap H. £2721 ftrm. Sept 24. 10 ran) »CAHT OF SHM/IO 
10) sfaxroo martrao tetateramanl to beat Beta PaiacaM-H) 
is teStrarionL wan AVEBURY pi 4))atirtta i2laTOM(8a 
J»r.H. £3444. good » soft. Apr 19. 12 ran). HOienMWaio 
mpressraa tectonas tfas weak are tSfficuR to asms. ItolM 


Goldan DeOdous (1 1-0} at Wamrick (2m 41, £1776, firm. Sept 20, 
Bran). 

Setacttac AStA MMQR 

235 MERCEDES BENZ HANDICAP dim 
CHASE (£4^03: 3m) (7) vmw 



10 1F2* QEEA TO G Hubbard 7-100 MtetG Anayttg* 

52 Easter CarofaaL 7-2 Braadhaalli.4-1 Dufa of MBar. 6-1 
Bicktotgn Brcdga.8-1 Leodagra n ca. 12-1 otters. 



KELSO 


Selections 

By Mandarin 

215 Maelstrom. 245 Galatcta. 3.15 Alter! ca. 
3.45 Gods Law. 4.15 Siieve Fdim. 4.45 
Tromeras. 

Going: good to fimi 

215 MELROSE NOVWE HURDLE (3-Y-O: £685: 
2m) (5 runners) 

I— ■a«Ka H o i ssa« - g l h2s 

11 HIGHLAND TALE A V 52? 

I? 4 

13 VHBtES AmaSTRONORGray 109 UCHtaSa 

245 RACING POST HANDICAP HURDLE (£1.718: 
2m) (10) 


(11-1 2) wtwn wmrang by lOI from fimnta (102) M Latafa 
Heap H. £1291. laid. Oct 2.3 ran). TINGLE REU.piN51rind 
on wad « a fast run Hexham hanckcaofajRfla to boatSwpSg 
(11-8)3 (2m. eiZ7Zgoodtoflnn.Segt6.lt ran). SMM3 TO 
STEEL (10-10) beat toe improving Dalny Going (11-IQAirmn 
good style at Newton Abbot to comptote a hat-sickfte HtepK 
£2071. firm. Sept It. 6 ran). 

S afa rt lon - SUWNQ TO STEEL 

240 LODGE NOVICE HURDLE (£1 ,431: 2m 4f) 

2 0-1 PEACEFUL WMERLKamwd 511-8 IW 

6 SEAUIVUL SUN SCoia 511-2 SBtfl^ 

9 030* CORNISH MMCR T Price 7-11-2 

16 FM PGNnGUOHioinas6-11-2.. 

17 2483 SMIGPAIG (B) K Bistiop 511 
20 OPO WMBLEBALLJ Payne 8-11-2 

11-10 Peacafal Mgrnber. 7-2 SMaktag. 6-1 CDmW IBM. 
5-1 Peneg*. 20-1 Wmbiabafl, BaaudU Sun. 

4.10 ANGLER CONDITIONAL JOCKEYS SEUJN6 
HAffiMCAP HURDLE (£567: 2hi) (5) 

3 233- SOLAR UGHTMF Ytedta 6-1F7 *3* 

6 2M WTTY WRBI P) B Wdo 511-2 

7 004 GOU®l TWAIIGLE J D Robwts 5-11-2 L 

9 POO KAUMFONG P BuSar 4-lO-tO LaasateM 

9 0022 DQNNAL DEUX RLB8 4-10-10 SfaOyiM 

0-4 Goktan Triangle. 2-1 Solar Ught, 4-1 DonralDauLH 
Kitty Wren. 25-1 Katenpong. 

4.40 GRANGE HANDICAP HOLE (£1,050: &1) W 

1 10P- SR SHOT (D) LKranaid 6-120 

8 000- AHECE MrsG Jonas 6-10-10- 

12 R»- NAQARNO J Fsnlon 5100 

13 TO- B8J. HOBBS MraM Easton 14-100 

45 Six Shot 53 Anieca, 114 Nagano. 12-1 BR Hotta 

Course specialists 

TjRAINERSeL Kannwd. 11 winnara from 78 runners, 14.1*0 
NTOoteon. 7 from 74, 95%. (Only two quagars). 

JOCKEYS: P Scudamore. 27 winnars from 109 rides. 20*0 
jtowa, 13 (nan 65. 20Mi H Dmim. 14 from 94, 
torwouaiMerto. 

3*45 SYDENHAM NOVICE HURDLE (£685: 30)0’ 
1 fM GODS LAW (D) Mrs G Reveley 511-8 PIM«H. 


H BAY PRE STO T FatetaSI 4-10- 13 C 

18 002 STIBCTLY BUSINESS R Whitaker 4-10-13 


H> MAL MO D Lee 4-108 

RED DEZRREER Gray 4-108- 


»S«M£2| 

GHnta 

_9CMM*, 


iGotte Law. 5-2 Strictly Business. 7-1 Bay MQ* 
12-1 Top O’ Tt» Cream. 16-1 Rad Dsetree. 20-1 Mtao- \ 

4*15 NENTHORN NOVICE CHASE £J,16& 
2m 196yd) (9) . Z 

2 « a^rarajMW A Stephenson 6-1V8 

4 2FP- DAWN OfVBINCnnD 9-11.1 B I 

_JSBE 

-"tsf 

TGO* 

KMag 
GUM# 


t PfWN DWBI N CrJtoOn-T— 

§ PRO P CBF)F Storey S-1 1-1 

,? PgftCfGLfW Denys Sn»l 8 - 11-1 

" SSr JW.WWIOSRTate 7-11-1 

12 OOP- VAUAHT WOOD MraWlUfa 6-11-1 

. 5; ^TKAW? a J anns 511-0 

15 020 RIGHT CLOUDY P Uddla 8-1010 



„ SOwh FflNm, 7-2 Mtei Drop. 
102 Dawn Diver, 12-1 The FMBnga. 14-1t 


4-1 Pert** am 


3-1 maklor. 7-2 Galattb. 4-1 Rinamcra. 6-1 Don't Anrwv 
Me. 8-1 fright Guest 10-1 Back River, 12-i NSvrtSa! 

3.15 LEGAL A GENERAL 150th ANNIVERSARY 
HANDICAP CHASE (£2^85: 3m) ( ^ WHVCK ^ Y 

. I 

5 002 HRLOFSlW^]AjSre 
8 400- S0PWST1CATH) MrsAToratonsorikTO-O^R 

7 -*^®2? a '^2 J V?«*bwn. 4-1 HR Of Stone. 6-1 Mbs 
Mayo. 10-1 Bteckhmk Star. 14-i SopresUra^d 


^ HOfflERSYDE HANDICAP HURDLE (£8® 
2m 61) (7) 

n^SP; RfBaPWLR Man 

m GMT R Harem 5100 -—,££5. 

TO OK- RAjBBAtMteBWtetegOWMI 

7-1 aoscun. 5-1 wa^.spf*. 

f-i Beoei Parti. 12-1 others. t 

■9 

Course specialists 

K Ofarir. 12 vrinnara from 60 rumwa. l£f* 1 ’aj 
from 239. 759%: Denys SrrWOO ten » 
7 from 77. 8.1V (Only fate qwS**l ^ & 


Rosedale has fine chance in 


JOCKEYS 

Whiners Runners PerCent ' 
14 133 105 

20 214 . 82 

10 113 08 

J7 221 ?,7 | 

(Only lour qualifiers) i 


Aithough not awpnsmgiy Santiki (Wiiffo Carson) con- 
overshadovred by the Arc, there tests the group one fWm 
are some important praes likely Lydia Tesio (lm 2fi ai S 
to .be won by some of the 14 tomorrow (Sunday) where sh?S 
finush-trauied horses who nm joined by Dut^who S 
dsewhttfe m Europe this rerouted from the Arc to taSE 
weekend. this easier opportunity 

Rosedate (Tony Murray). . Nine English hor^ make the 
who missed his chance to run in journey to Norway (6r ««» 
the St Leger at Doncaster last mixed international card „ 
month when be bolted al the Qvrevoll tomorrow 
start. looks to have a great The feature is ihe fis 
chance to make amends in the Oslo Cup where Gorw^ 3- * 
Italian equivalent at Milan this Strike (John Rpiri] hsTT 
afternoon. He feces just five ceMem chance of^ regiSnS ££ 
opponents including Comme first win of the season acaini. 1 1 
fEtoile (Michael Hills). opponents whiSinSS^Ui 


this easier opportunity. 

. Nine English horses make 


opponems which indSde tSSKJdSSK 


Italian Leger : 

consistent Gulfiand .- 0*®*? 

Amine (Robert 
Hello Killiney (John 
Block Rod (John 8»y) 
the £13.749 Non«S«» gfjg . 
National (3m) in which Ben ) 
Haan, Peter Scwdamotf^f?^ 
Richard Rowe also havener 
Whatever the.- .<** 5? 
Acatcnango in 
“tuner Heinz Jeotzsdt a 4 ^ 
land one group-one, vicwy*^ , 

weekend lor S Sato tf ■g®'"- 
sian at short odd* ».**“*££ 
£16.949 Deutsches- St L*9* ^ , 


si*** 

5^ J 


¥ 


i 










*Ufi 

s 



THE TIMES SATURDAY OCTOBER 4 1986 



g ACING.STARKEV8MOUHTHABPBn'/ FM.T»».»i«Enp<.M./..j.. 1p 

Shardari looks 
best value 

to give British 




Arc triumph 

Giwiiuc By Michael Seely 

can prove^J, C ^n P S 5 arc ^ i ^tly heralded as the grca 

; ssw5a»ysfS ”sim==m 


uti,. r Sf* 
n jf: 


‘t 
i lls 


Ontybaving tasied defeat 
once from right starts in that 
controversial finish n gnimet 

SDOT«ftr^' iL* Shahrastam in the Derby, 

Trusihouse P Fort?* Dancing Brave's brilliant 
Longchamp ’ at powers of acceleration have 

Make no mistake, the I 98 fi 10 victory in the 

running of EmwU? C y “5 Guineas and in the 
turopes most Eclipse Stakes, as well -as 

against Shardari ai Ascol 
B ut basically the three-year* 
old is a “speed horse*' and, as 
sucb, is attempting lo succeed 
where Sir Ivor and Nijinsky, 
both horses of a similar type, 
foiled in 1 968 and 1970. 

He is also attempting to 
become the first colt from the 
male line of Northern Dancer 
to win the Arc. He is not well 
drawn on the outside of the 1 S 

J" J5 l,n * purposes - and the 
quartet are certain to start at a 
snort price. 

«^& n ^ plurin S his lh ree- 
year-old form when beating 
Baby Turk at Newmarket, 
pbardari was sent to Ascot 
where he ran Dancing Brave 
to ihreeq uarters of a length in 
die Kmg Ceorge VI and 
gueen Hizabeth Diamond 
Stakes. After being over- 
whelmed for speed halfway up 
the straight, the four-year- 


urabl, 

>Ileg 

iMidcai 

m ih, 

' _ iUll, , 

“ ■•"irrV, v 


S^Waiaasi 

and Dana ng Brave, the pn»- 
^ng, Shahraaant 

kSS*"' « one oftheAga 
Hi"*, four runners as 
5j™Pesmost. successful 
owner-breeder anempts to 


Ul.,! 

i.. 

lKt *»*»Htcr r 
,n 

•'rival, I 


I 

'■to 

'ran-, 


<k 


h. 

Uk. 


_ He.- 

> ihai 


,r -« HciSjj 

>MiM ajaiii ^ 


»U-KUi« X | fc 


ojd's stamina was bringing 
him i back into the argument at 
the finish. 

Shardari then showed his 
versatility when beating Trip- 
tych over an extended 10 
furlongs in the Matchmaker 
i-J-i-O (to International at York. 

Starkey was delighted with 
• ” c* his new big-race partner after 

■<? I? h * s ^n 31 pipcopener yesterday 

-■» morning “He was brilliant," 

* he said. “It took me so long to 

tfe pull him up. I thought he was 

- going down to Tyndalls for the 

. "«• papers." 

■ . -xi Eddery will be attempting to 

" r * become the only overseas 
jockey apart from Lester 
* . Piggoti to win three Arcs when 

rwiORP, !*.- he steps on board Dandng 

'^T.'w -w Brave in Longchamp's leafy 

■ paddock. And ir Dancing 

* Brave’s finishing speed gains 
this magic day afekfrist' Such" 
talented opposition, Khaled 
Abdulla's champion will be 


lOCYW 

*- r.vt. *' 

c;» 

etu:"*. 
f wn 91 


looks certain to start 
favourite. Unbeaten this sea- 
son, this top-class colt is 
trained by Christiane Head, 
one of the legendary French 
racing family, who have al- 
ready 10 Arcs between them, 

A contemptuously easy win- 
ner of the French Derby. 
Bering will be trained to the 
minute, and is described by 
his jockey. Gary Moore, as 
"possibly the horse of the 
century" However, on a line 
through Bakharoff. who fin- 
ished third at Chantilly. 
Bering's form does not read as 
good as that of the British 
challengers. 

Walter Swinbum, pre- 
viously successful on All 
Along, has elected' to ride 
Shahrastani. and if the con- 
queror of Dancing Brave at 
Epsom can find the ability 
that saw him slam Bonhomie 
by eight lengths in the Irish 
Derby, the Nijinsky colt will 
be desperately hard to over- 
come, and may make his 
disappointing performance 
- behind Dancing Brave at As- 
cot seem a 
"Shahrastani lorries better than 
ever/* says the jockey. “He’s 
grown upandbecome.a man." 

Acatanengo, the German 
champion, is undefeated m 12 
races in two seasons. A deter- 
mined front-runner by nature, 
the winner of the Grand Prix 
de . Saint-Cloud is : ideally 
drawn in stall number one. 

Yves Saint- Marlin, 15 
times champion. French 



U&wMtf 


C j. i*.": \ :• • ..'tf-tr-aE 


nightmare. Shardari, one of four Aga Khan runners for tomorrow's big 
:s better than race, is fancied to reverse Ascot's King George running with 
vkev another top British hope. Dancing Brave 


another top 

jockey, will be seeking a 
record fifth Arc win on 
Darara, the - Aga Khan’s 
comfortable winner of the 
Prix Vermeille. Those of her 
sex have won six of the last 10 
Arcs, but it will come as a 
surprise . if Darara is good 
enough to beat the colts. 


•:r. 




L :.'-Wy- 

. . 

, 

■ 

»'e 


-*t t:) 


BIG-RACE FIELD 


SELECTIONS: Mandarin (Michael PhORps^ Bering. Michael 
Seely: Shardari. The Times Private Handicapper: Shahrastani. 
Going: good to firm Draw: low numbers best 

4JZ0THFPRIX DE L’ARC DETRfOMPHEtGroup k £367^85: 1m 4f)(lS 
runners) 


1 w 

2 (5) 

3 (11> 


113001 DOnST/WtAga Knan) M Sto*»(G8) 4-9-4 
.radflpa 


fGrsan. rad epauwws. own caowft 
1-24121 SHARDARI (Aga KligrS M Swuto (GB) 


cap. wftABsasftJ 

— 


(GrBerwrthgratn swvfla and tfveactwcoa» hoops. ctaoiM rap) 
432312 BAST TURKtAlnM 


AKMMttoy 

, O Starkey 


S3 68-1 
K 7-1 


l dBam*)A 0B Royw Dopr# 44M 


A 11 

4 

id 

111111 

ACATENANGO (W Jacobs) H Jettzxh 44M 

(YeHow. ttaefc steawas. ytDow cap) 

5CMMI 

I-** 1 - 

«r.» 

6 

(81 

i 3-03042 


MHtiSpfiwua 


Jit 


1 .«.' 


chilis 


\*CU 


(131 
(3) 
( 2 ) 
(8) 
1 » ( 10 ) 

12 (IS) 

13 (9) 

14 (14) 

15 (12) 


40-2001 


kMn.wRmi 
i|pr 


i O O'Brien fh»} 4-4M 


(HeO a*M wW8 dumiwa. «m Shew) 
041142 IADES (A I ” 


SIAM . .. 

(Rm. wMa shovss. rad «n«] 

212323 TMFTYCH(AClor«)W. Bteneooo 4-9-1 


VWhams) F Bowdn 4-0-4 


9 

10 


3111-21 iiEHSEY(D wnoerewln) Pi Blancon# 4-W — 
132111 & > CA%.F m )J CMtan .4 4 .1 — 
112111 3-0-11 

^UHR^Sn^^^0?KAan) M SbjuIb (08)30-11 


AOOwrt 07 50-1 
9810-1 


8? 33-1 
85 66-1 


_ C Roche 87 50-1 

ALaqum 00 66-1 

. ACwdMD 9420-1 

FHaad 80 23-1 


2-11114 

31-1111 


-1211 


^Sjo(Mn ?A tS S* 1^0 c Head 08-11 

SjSrtAi^i K^^ ^Br n4»re3*0 
(Green, rad epautansB.grwi cap) 


FOn — 68-1 

MEdctay 98 04 


WRSMobum • 99 7-1 
0 Moore 97 F2-1 


YSaW Mirttn 95 12-1 


• Tt» odds displayed in our Arc card ana the latest British prices. On the pari-tnutuerf, (he Aga 
Khan s tour runners wBI be coipied. Channel 4’s presenwwnbMns at tlOand Indudranscord- 
inos of the Pnx de CAbbaye end Prix Marcel Boussac In addition to live coverage ol the Arc. 


k-jF 


ings ol the 

FORM 

Had premoustw won by Brtwrtir Mad 

ssife«ft3s«Bag?sr 



cm* 


41. n 52488. poodLJ Wy 
m 4th and t a pa»jwna W« 
BRAVE (9-0) m the Dertynni 4j- 
month, won t)» Prontfi l 
J une 6.13 ran). DMARV 
£71989. goodrosojt Sept t' 
Crtertow, PAHCB4Q BRAVE 


i. 8 ran). 


(8-ltkwOtiaMkw^r SHARDARI (9-0) 3X1 
l further vwaySth. IADES (9-4) 111 2nd ot 10 Id 
10 ran). BABY TURK (91)a snort neefc 
401. MERSEY was hawng first run m A4ejr 
11) last month (im 41). First erne out (8-13) nm 
yds. £41667, good. May 4. 10 ran) uriOi SAINT 
gme nan three pieces ai (Usances ol HI Hand 
Sew on by «l from SHARDARI (9-7) at Ascot Pm 

uck. a tWOW-tonuSHAHRASTAW (8-8)51 back 

firtfwr sway 5th. Eartfw SHAHRASTANI (90) beat DANCJNO 
•good. June 4m l7 ren^ BERMQ an easy LorwaWnp wmner l«! 
by 1 hi non) AHajran M in Btacora bme flm «. 038145. good u firm, 
nr^jrovedto w« LonBChanv’*^ VermeBe by 51 trom Retoy (92) (lm4t. 


B ran) **rth TWFTYQI (9-4) 3rd. 
CWET 


Stoute set for two more 
prizes at Longchamp 

. Michael Stoute, the trainer of Shardari and 
Shahrastani. can, enjoy u afternoon of glory by 
also winning bis' second Prix de i’Abbaye, with 
Green Desert, and the Prix Marcel Boussac with 
Milligram, Michael Seely writes. 

Unfavourably drawn In stall 10. Green Desert, 
the winner of the July Cop and the Vernons 
Sprint Cop, faces no easy task over five furlongs, 
not only against his fellow British challengers. 
Hallgaie and Donbic Schwartz, bat also against 
Pari®!i. Premiere Cuvee, and Baiser Vole, the 
winner of the French 1,000 Guineas. 

Milligram showed herself to be a filly of classic 
potential when winning her only start at Newbury, 
and can now repeat Midway Lady's success in this 
group one race for two-year-old fillies 

Z55 PRIX MARCEL BOUSSAC (Group 
L- 2-y-o Rules: £39,618: 1m) (1 1) 


04 COIMAUQHT ROSE L Browne Mre)B-9 ... OStartuey 10 
112 SAKURA RBHO P-L BnnoanB 8-9 Y SNnHUaitla IS 


1 13 CAOEAUX (TAME Mma C Heed 8-9 GW Moore 1 

2 11 PWNCE88E Dll BOURG R TouBan 8-9 D VtanW tl 

3 1 BMT At WASH A Fabre 8-9 PMBUwyS 

4 312 SOT PRINCESS JCuinraon Jr 8-9 _ MPkMpporeBB 

5 14 THREE G£NERATXW<jMkMiaes8-fi J Vote:.:juez2 

6 1 MUJORAM M Sou» (GB) 8-fl WRSwMbwn3 

7 1312 POLOWA J Boigsr Wit) 8-8 CAs«us9m7 

8 131 WESQWFBoutnM F Hoad 4 

9 4123 WHAKILYRICF Bourn 89 E Saint-Mania 9 

10 ‘ 

11 1112 

9-2 MiesQje and Whakfyrtc (coupiod), 3-1 Sakura Boiko. 4- 
1 Poiorea. 8i MAgram. Shy Prmces*. 14-1 cMws. 

335 PRIX DE L’ ABBA YE (Group t 
£34,499:50(13) 

1 2131 GREEN DESERT U SKMB <G8) 3911 

WRSwUwalO 

2 0000 SHARP ROMANCE BHsnbuy «3B) 34-11 >. F Head 4 

3 0033 PROUDEST HOUR J SuHwann (USA) 4-9-11 

P Robinson 9 

4 3121 HALLGAIE USES Hal |GB) 89-11 GSMuy13 

6 0233 COMRADE M ARMS PLOM 44-11 _ CAamvaaanB 

6 2124 DOUBLE SCHWARTZ CNenon (68)54-11 

PotEddoiy 1 

7 0410 (3UCXET BALL J Fetows 34-1 1 A GAM 7 

8 011 NORTHERN EXPRESS T Stack (Ire) 89-11 

SCauUmll 

9 3-41 PARUU J Cwnfawion Jr 544 MPMpfiarea 6 

10 0031 ROSE OF THE SEA G MAnsWes 894 J Vataaqtwi 12 

11 -201 PRBUERE CUVEE J Pease 444 GGuionad2 

12 1432 BAISER VOLE MmeC Head 894 GW Moore 3 

13 -122 BATAVE P-t Sancone 894 YSMo-UartiaS 

54 Green Osaert, 3-1 Haa&M. 4-1 Pahoft. 5-1 rwvt^k. 

Schwartz, 181 Baser vote. 12-1 Brave. 14-1 others. 


hope. Dancing 

The excitement will rise 10 a 
crescendo as the best horses in 
Europe, and probably in the 
world, duel for supremacy in 
the home straight but those 
who back Shardari each way at 
7-1 before they leave for Paris 
are assured of a run for their 
money 


CRICKET 

New plea 
for slow 
over-rate 
penalty 

From Richard Streetim 
Delhi 

The Australians will make a 
renewed idea for monetary fines 
10 be introduced when they 
meed Indian officials today in 
Ahmedabad about slow over- 
rates in the present onc-day 
iniermuionm! scries. A fining 
system has already been rejected 
once by the Indians but Alsn 
Crompton, the Australian man- 
tes no reason why ibe 
lying conditions should not 
be amended in mid-tour. 

“Hues have worked well in 
Australia. And even the West 
Indian fast bowlers meet their 
quota of oven. If anybody has 
struggled at times, it has been 
Australia" be said. At Mr 
Crompton'S suggestion, the of- 
ficials of (he two teams will meet 
first and the captains will only 
be called in after common 
agreement, hopefully, has been 
reached. 

Bobby Simpson, the Austra- 
lian cricket manager, who on 
Thursday attacked Kapil Dev. 
the Indian captain, for slowing 
down India's over-rate for tac- 
tical reasons, will join Mr 
Crompton at the meeting. The 
Indians will be represented by 
Ranbir Singh, the Indian 
Cricket Board secretary, and 
Abbas A) i Baig, a former Oxford 
blue, who is manager of the 
Indian one-day team. 

Mr Crompton is anxious to 
secure a definite agreement that 
something will be done. “Mind 
you. it might prove to be a 
‘paper tiger' if they say they will 
bowl 50 overs and then fail 10 do 
so." He said there were two 
other alternatives to fines, 
though neither would be 
satisfactory. 

One was' lo continue the 
morning innings into the lunch 
interval, until 50 overs were 
reached, so that the fielding side 
were losing a rest period. This 
was not ideal as there might be 
times, for some reason, when 
the batting side were at fault 
The second was to add penalty 
runs to the opposition’s total for 
each over below 50 not reached. 
'That, though, would add 
further element of artificiality 
into what is already an artificial 
form of cricket" he said. 

The stipulated SO overs 
Indian one-day internationals 
has only been achieved three 
times in 26 matches. India twice 
managed to do it against Sri 
Lanka in 1982-83. and once 
against England two years ago. It 
is not possible in this country to 
start play before 9.30 am be- 
|' cause of overnight dew. and the 
light fades steadily from 4.30 
pm onwards. 

Kapil Dev. meanwhile, de- 
scribed Simpson's criticisms as 
“pathetic" for a man who had 
played so much cricket. 

India have made one change 
in their 15-sirong party for the 
final two one-day matches 
against Australia at Ahmedabad 
tomorrow and Rajkot on Tues- 
day. Rajinder Singh Ghai. a 
seam bowler, replaces the fast 
bowler. Chetan Sharma. who 
has a leg injury. Rajinder might 
play msieaa of Madan LaL or 
Binny, whose overs were expen- 
sive in Thursday's match. 

Pakistan give 
World XI 
a trouncing 

Kuwait (Reuter) — A Paki- 
stan XI trounced a world selec- 
tion team who were depleted by 
the absence of three West Indies 
Test players in the first of two 
one-day cricket benefit matches. 
The Pakistanis, inspired by leg- 
spinner and match beneficiary 
Abdul Qadir's four for 23. 
dismissed the World XI for 149 
in 29.2 overs and completed an 
eight-wicket win at 150 for two 
from 27 overs. 

With Viv Richards, Malcolm 
Marshall and Richie Richard- 
son. the West Indians, delayed 
at Rome airport, Ian Botham 
captained the world team who 
had 10 indude Graham Roope, 
the manager, and former Surrey 
and England batsman. 

After Botham won the toss, 
his learn were soon in trouble 
against the Pakistan attack. 
Graham Gooch was caught and 
bowled by Wasim Akram for 
three and Martin Crowe, of New 
Zealand, was removed by Qadir 
for only four.Qadir cut through 
the world team's batting and 
only the Sri Lankans, Aravinda 
de Silva (40), Duleep Mendis 
(34) and Ariuna Ranaumga (36) 
played confidently. Botham hit 
a typically whirlwind 17, includ- 
ing three boundaries. 

SCORES: Worm » 149; PaMstM X1 150 
tar 2 (Mudassar Nazar 69. Moftsn Khan 
58). 


FOOTBALL 


Brown the answer to a 
chairman’s prayer 


Loyally is a word that h M 
much oat of place m today’s 
football vocabulary as bade 
forward or wiag bait Even 
m ana gers sometimes “transfer" 
t fafl ii rt hg with the same lack of 
attachment as ||m> 
among Onr players. It is a 
wonder anyone stays around 
kmg enough to warrant a 
te stimonia l. 

Words like loyalty and integ- 
rity are liable to gel the user 
some funny looks. At best they 
are ■ quaint reminder of t 
chivalrous past. To find a man- 
ager with such qualities now- 
adays is as ran as watching 
Manchester United win on tele- 
vision. Add to these attributes 
those of detenmnatioa. percep- 
tion and p rudence , and you have 
the answer to every chairman's 


By Clive White 
There is no pmsare npoo Urn to 
ac c ele rate the process. "Laurie 
M cM wy tokt me it's nothing 
imawil to find half a dozen 
national newspaper re p or ter s 
sitting on his doorstep. 1 have 
never had that and I deal want 
it," Brown said. "There's tire 
birth of a new era bere now that 
onr stand has been rebufit after 
the fire. WtVe a young squad of 
players and there’s no reason 
why (bey can't go from strength 
to strength." 

It win be nice to think that 
Norwich can emulate the 
achievements of there neigh- 
bours Ipswich, hi the early 80s; 

birt such (airy tales air returning 
more and more into the realm of 
fantasy as the Watsons of this 


Imotor racing 

Britain’s title assured 

From a Special Correspondent, Fuji 


:.a” 


H!*P 


i-iali* 


While Nigel Mansell still has 
to wail a week for bis chanceto 
clinch the form ufa one thivera 
title in Mexico. Bn lain should 
have a motor racing world 

champion tomorrow when 
Derek Bdl and Derek Wanwk 
contest the final round of uie 
World Sports Prototype 

Championship. . . : 

pe ll, the reigning champion, 

and his German team 

Hans Stuck, have led the senes 
since taking their _ works 
Rothmans Poreche to vicioiTai 


. Mo* 1 ” iB April, but a late chary — 

hy the Silk Cut Jaguar dnver, launch of the new XJ40 road 

Warwick, has brought bun to just a few days away, viet 
within 13 points of the title- T® would indeed be sweet for the 

win ihechamponship. Watwroj 


After the first practice session 
both Warwick and his team 
colleague. Eddie Cheever, were 
wdJ down the field, which is 
headed by the private Bran 
Moiorspori Foreches, from 
Switzerland. The BeU/Slucfc car 
is third fastest, despite the 
handicap of the extra weight of 
the new ABS anti-lock braking 
system, which is bring raced for 
the first dme. 

The team championship is as 
dose a contest as that for 
drivers, with Porsche, Brun and 
Jaguar in contention. With the 

v 1 road car 

victory 


win uk , 

f .it'l 1 will have to win or finish secono 
rj 1 Ar in Jafrarc with Bdl out of ibe top 

• % has been a difficult year for 

Warwick, who. 

— drive with the Tom 

• • 1 ■' i Walklnshaw-managed Jaguar 

. . team 'after failing » * 

- fSmub one place 
■ !!jng of the season- Following 
[hcdcaih of Bio de Angehs in a 
testing accident in May. he 
for Uf Brabham tear* 
wt Uie car has Proved to te 
uncompetitive and he has failed 
:o score any points. 


British manufacturer. 

Hnt Stnto PracOc e.TtowK J.F 
jgOnad/S Ddsns (Brun Porectwl in« 

SW®6 

0 NafcaMo (Mon* Nteflun), 
i:1&91:'6- P GnmzanSP Ba rtta JJoe rt 
Porocne). ^ja ifi. D- WMi/J 
(jjTYWrs (S* Cut Jaguar). 1:18JR 

PiluartU ChHpioMtt) ftaWooK 1. 

Bauau* “IBwkMfianunw 
JtfinsM/OiclrartS S9. 

j^Fbpatnck fotafio 30- 


JUDO 

Paying a price 
for success 

By Nicolas Soames 

Victory in the European dub 
champions bips could place 
Britain's leading competitive 
side, Wolverhampton, in serious 
financial difficulties according 
to their coach Malcdm Abbotts. 
Abbotts, speaking 00 his way to 
Belgrade, where four of the 
dub's boys are fighting in the 
European team championships 
this weekend, said that having 
convincingly beaten the top 
Dutch side , Ninjemeg, in The 
Netherlands last week. Ire was 
hoping for a home draw m the 
secotsd round on November 1. 

“But 1 now understand that 

even if we are drawn at hmne, we 

are committed to paying for 
flights, accommodation and 
subsistence for three officials," 
said Abbotts. “ Had 1 known 
this, the Wolverhampton Judo 
ClBb would not have entered the 

championships." 

“No assistance has 

been allocated by tire British 
Judo Association, so we have 
approached our local council for 
help — *"d if we don't get that, I 
don't know what we will do. It is 
obviously going to gel more 
difficult with each round but I 
can't tell my boys to go out aim 
fose." 


KARATE 


Silver for bruised but 
unbowed Miss Samuel 


By Nicolas Soames 

Molly Samuel, the British 
middleweight, aged 25, won an 
unexpected silver medal on the 
first day of the world champion- 
ships in Sydney, Australia yes- 
terday despite bring hampered 
by a shoulder injury sustained in 
pre-competition training. And 
Yvette Bryao, from Bir- 
mingham. added a second world 
bronze medal to the one she 
won two years ago in the 
heavyweight division. 

With punches being her main 
strength. Miss Samuel had to 
work around a badly. bruised 
right shoulder, but still managed 
to sweep past her Japanese 
opponent in the first round, and 
followed that by victories over 
opponents from Taiwan and 
Norway. 

The final, against Sari Ny- 
beck, the Finn, who won a- 
bronze medal in * the previous 
worid championships, was- a 
closely fought and high-scoring 
affair. The East London woman 
found her ability, to block and 


counter Nyfc 
her painful 
though she foi , 
last minute, she 


Nybeck restricted by 
shoulder, and 
it back in (he 
5-4. 


Nevertheless, tire result com- 
ing after winning the European 
championships, confirms that 
Mtss'Samud has taken over the. 
mantle of Beveriey Morris, the 
former European champion, 
who retired last year, in style. 

Today Britain's outstanding 
men's team fight lo retain the 
team title woo in the. past two 
world championships. Ticky 
Donovan, the British team man- 
ager. has. as expected, relied on 

experience rather than youth in 

his choice of the seven-man 
team, from which five will be 
chosen to contest each round. 

The team contains Vic 
Charles, the oldest member of 
the British squad, the heavy- 
weight, aged 32, and Pat Mo 
Kay, the world light- 
heavyweight champion, aged 
29. Tne other members are Jeoff 
Thompson Mervyn Etienne and 
Mike Bailsman, all heavy- 
weights, Getry Fleming, alight- 

heavy weight, and Alistair 

Mitchell, a nuddleweight. . 

All fought in the last world j 
championships, except Mncb- 
dL of Scotland, who is given 
preference to Willy Thomas, the 
youthfully talented European 
light-middleweight champion. 


Brown has mvtre l 
most of the prayers of Norwich 
City dutirmeo in his seven yean 
as manager and live years before 

that as assistant to the egotis- 
tical John Bond. Twice his own 
smaller ego has been punctured 
by relegation and each time he 
bus immediately retaliated it by 
gaining promotion. 

This summer, having regained 
first division status he lad to 
accede to the transfer wishes of 
his two best players who found 
loyalty blocking their progress. 
Yet so effectively has Brown 
plugged the boles that should 
Norwich win at home against 
Queen's Park Rangers on Sat- 
urday and Nottingham Forest 
witness at dose hand one of 
those rare United victories. East 
Anglia will take over the leader- 
ship of the first division for the 
first time since those happy days 
of Bobby Robson and bis Ips- 
wich team. 

One might question, after all 
these years at Cairow Rood 
Brown's ambition and seif-coo- 
iideoce. lie refutes though that 
be is lacking in either, merely 
content with his lot. Those tug 
dubs impatient for success 
should have Brown at the top of 
their target list - whBe they 
remain at the bottom of bis. “I 
don't envy people like Ron 
Atkinson.** be said. “1 think 
they have one heck of a job to 
please so many people. 1 appre- 
ciate the challenge and the 
desire to have a go at it. but for 
the moment I have got enough to 
do looking after Norwich City." 

In rural Norfolk Brown's 
teams are given time to blossom. 



Brown: loyalty and integrity 
world are drawn inexorably 
towards the bigger dries. 

Bat. as Brown said, not even 
the big dubs can bold on to their 
captures. "Liverpool, Everton 
and Manchester United have 
had to let go of Rush. Lineker 
and Hughes respec tiv ely. Every- 
body has a price. WedadaT want 
to sell Watson or Woods. The 
two Literpoots and Lolled were 
the only three dabs that W atson 
was ever interested in leaving ns 
to join. His departure was the 
one that hart more. When 
Kendall cue in with that 
astronomical offer 1 had to tell 
Dave. Otherwise he'd have got 
to hear about it, felt let down and 
then I don't think I'd have had a 
player. The board asked me 
‘How do you value someone like 
that'. I said ‘WelL he's worth a 
million'. “Weft, that's what we'll 
ask.* they said." 

Norwich could hardly refuse 
such a handsome profit. They 
received nearly £1.6m for two 
players who cost them £215.000 


b now appR-dating nicely in the 
bank and available for tavest- 
ment in more players, bat Brown 
said: “I don't intend n spend 
that sort of money. I don't think 
it’s right to spend, say £800,000 
oa a player. Not for the we 

are." 

Brown bought modestly in the 
summer, signing EUlon mad 
Hodgson from SgmJeriand and 
exchanging Durban for Putney 
from Ipswich, though ail bare 
. been absent recently through 
injury. The Initial success In tne 
first division - five wins, two 
draws and one defeat — has b«« 
achieved with a team which 
bears link resemblance to the 

one which carried off the Mtjk 
Cop two years ago. Only Brace 
and Barham remain from that 
ride. 

Bcnsuad could not be Culled* 
Brown said, since succeedi n g 
Woods and Brace has taken over 
Watson's mantle as captain 
better than be had expected. 
Brown has been Involved hi a 
couple of strange comings and 
goings recently. If there b 
anything more out of the or- 
dinary than the sale of 
England's number two goal- 
keeper to Glasgow Rangers. It b 
the proposed purchase of the 
Scotland under- 2 1 goalkeeper. 
Brian Gunn, from Abe r deen. 
Brown realises that he needs 
more cover. He is still hoping to 
boy Butter* orih, on loan from 
Nottingham Forest and another 
left-sided player. 

Brown knows that such beady 
times canuot last. It is perhaps 
not completely without signifi- 
cance that Norwich's opponents 
so far have all been stationed in 
the bottom half of the table. But 
Brown b n man who takes 
satisfaction from success other 
than on the field. “Everybody’* 
working very hard, 
endeavouring to make sure we 
stay in the ftrat division this 
time. They're 'a pleasure to be 
with," says Brown who puts 
great store by relationships. “A 
couple of years ago John Lyall 
was rumoured to be joining 
Queen's Park Rangers whOr 
reports had me on my way to 
West Ham. Watson and some of 
the others came to me and said: 
‘You're not going to West Ham 
are you — not if yon want a at to 
sign that new contract*. Now 
how could 1'lef them down after 
that?" 


Spot check on Forest power 


By Clive White 

Ron Atkinson can rest easy. If 
Brian Gough is to be believed, 
Manchester United should find 
winning at the Gty Ground 
today like taking candy from a 
baby. Gough, trying and failing 
to divert attention from his 
magnetic young Nottingham 
Forest side, said yesterday: "Ev- 
ery away match is like a school 
outing and acne is a bigger 
problem to us at the moment 
than injuries." 

As in all Gough's more 
outrageous statements there is 
an element of truth in what he 
says. Injuries are the least of 
Forest’s problems — what few 
they have. That is as well 
because if there is one aspect of 
their championship credentials 
— self-proclaimed or not — 
which are as yet untested, it is 
the limitations of their squad 
strength. Today they welcome 
back Walker after an ankle 
injury forced Gough to make 
his first change of the season last 
week. 

It is enough to make Atkinson 
weep. His entire first-choice 
midfield has been hit by injuries 
this season and three of them, 
Robson, Moses and Whiteside 
have required surgery. 


Bui Gough affords Atkinson 
no sympathy. "I can't be con- 
cerned if they lose and Atkinson 
is in the dole queue on Monday. 
It's the taw of the jungle. United 
are the biggest dub in Europe 
and 1 think Ron will puli out of 
trouble." 

The young and inexperienced 
Fleming, who took over from 
Mdnafiy in January, is probably 
the only weak link in the Forest 
first XI in a position where 
Anderson once gave them such 
strength. 

Atkinson must hope that the 
return of the lively _Otien in 
place of Moses will break 
through here. “This is the only 
change because all I feel we are 
lacking is a lucky break." Atkin- 
son said. Whiteside, operating 
in his more accustomed inside 
midfidd position, should also 
be an improvement. 

But United will need consid- 
erably more finesse than they 
showed during their assaults on 
the Gietsea goal if they are to 
break out of a rut of one victoiy 
in eight matches. If Fleming is 
due a serious examination by 
Olsen, it is nothing compared to 
that which Albiston, given a 
harrowing time by Nevin, faces 
from the supercharged Carr, 
Forest's new. nippy model. 


United's lack of understand- 
ing and alertness at the centre of 
defence is probably the root 
cause of their troubles and 
Atkinson has again left this area 
of life tormented team un- 
touched. It does not bear think- 
ing what damage Birtles. Webb 
ana company might do after 
their recent six-goal riot at 
Chelsea. 

It does not bear thinking from 
Davenport's point of view, too. 
He said yesterday: "I've no 
regrets about making the move, 
but I must admit I've been 
watching Forest’s pro g re ss with 
an envy. I'm hoping a breath of 
the T rent air might put me back 
on the goal trail" Curious how 
he has been a Alined with the 
same impotence in front of goal 
as that which plagued Birtles, 
his former teammate. 

Gough, pu blicly at least, does 
not concur with the joyful 
predictions being made every- 
where on behalf of his pro- 
digious learn. "A season is nine 
months of blood and sweat." he 
said. "To talk about us winning 
the championship at this stage 
of the season is daft." You might 
as well back us to win the Boat 
Race.** 

It makes a change from asking 
Gough to walk on water. 


WEEKEND TEAM NEWS 


Chelsea v Charlton 
MacDonald, on loan to Chariton 
from Gtasgow Rangers, wifl mate 
his debut rf Stuart's ankle does 
not recover. Chelsea are unfikely to 
be changed. 

Coventry v A Villa 

Gray and Waters are included 
in VSfla's squad for the first time this 
season but are in need of 
match practice. Evans (ankle) and 
Hunt (knee) must prove their 
fitness. Coventry have their eyes on 
second place. 

Everton v Arsenal 
Merson. 18. b deputing with 
AHinson the vacancy caused by 
Nicholas's knee injury. Everton. 
whose injuries seem endless, hope 
to field a team. 

Manchester C v Leicester 

Jimmy Frizzell Manchester 
City's new manager, opts for youth 
alter one wmmzi league 
mes. Beckford is dropped and 
rrita, making his league debut, 
and Moukfen come In. Leicester 
check on Mauchian (thigh; and 
Moran (hamstring). 

Norwich v QPR 
Wtoams plays his 400th leagua 
game in an unchanged Norwich 
skla. Crook is again substitute. 

Fiill club draw 
for Europe 

Zurich —The full draw of 
matches to be played oa a home 
and away basis ou October 22 
and November 5 with the first 
named teams at home in the 
first leg is: 

EUROPEAN cup: Real Madrid v 
Juventus: Vrttovice v Porto: Ros- 
enborg v Red Star Belgrade: Bayern 
Munich v Austria Vienna; Anderncht 
Stsaua Bucharest; Celtic v Dy- 
namo Kiev; Broenby v Dynamo 
Berlin; BesMas Istanbul v Apoel 
Nicosia. 

UEFA CU Pi Groningen v NeuchatsJ 
Xamax: Beveren v Athlete Bilbao: 
Rangers v Bcavtsta; Widzew Lodz v 
Uenfingen; Leoa Warsaw v Inter 
Milan; Attetico Madrid v Vitoria 
Gumtaraes: Feyencord Rotterdam v 
sngtaroaeh; Ghent v Spor- 
anfasc: Raba Bo Gyoer v 
Torino; DukJa Prague v Lever- 
kussen; Barcelona v Sporting Lis- 
bon; Hajduk Soft v Tralaa Ptovdhr: 
" ' v Liege; Gothenburg v 
npurcr Spartak Moscow v 
Toulouse; Dundee United v Uni 
Craiova. 

CUP WINNERS' CUP: Lokomotiv 
Leipzig v Rapid Vienna; Real Zara- 
goza v Wrexham; Vrtosha Sofia v 
Velez Mostarj Torpedo Moscow v 
: Katowice v Sion: Benfica 
Mux; Nentori Tirana v 
Malmo: Ajax Amste rd am v Olym- 
plakos Piraeus. 


Nottm F t Manchester U 

United bring back Otsen tor 
Moses in an attempt to halt tha 
sHe. Walker returns tor Forest 
in place of Fairdough. 

Sheff Wed v Oxford 
Slatter takes over Shotton, who 
has a back injury, whde Perryman 
has recovered to fiR Oxford's 
sweeper rote. Snodin. who was 
concussed at Watford a 
fortmgnt ago. is mduded in 
Wednesday's 1 6-man squad. 

So'tofi v Newcastle 
Wright the England centre 
ba«. is poised to play fas first 

match since breaking his H~ ~ 
ApriL Jordan continues to i . 
in place o( the injured Wallace 
and Dermis is doubtM with a knee 
injury. A stomach bug rules out 
Roeder. Newcastle's captain, but 
Whitehurst who has yet to 
score, is recalled. 

Tottenham v Luton 
Tottenham havs lost Clive Aten 
with a hamstring strain and call up 
reserve strikers. Close and 
Howells. Luton, without the 

suspended Brian Stein, debate 
whether to risk Harford before he is 
match fit. Mare North stands by. 


Watford v West Ham 
West Ham. without the injured 
Martin (who is also suspended) and 
Pike, name Kevin Kean as 
substitute at a ground where Ms 
father. Mfica, was a player. 

Watford persevere with Bfissett and 
Barnes in their lack-lustre 
attack. 

Wimbledon v Liverpool 

Dalglish, who has a back injury, 
includes himself in die Liverpool 
squad along with Durrin, a 
reserve striker, and Hooper. 
Wimbledon keep the same 
team. 


French thank 
Sainsbury 

The French government has 
honoured Sainsbury, the 
supermarket cham, for help- 
ing to diminish the French 
wine lake by selling bottles at* 
bargain prices. 

Mr Allan Cheesman, direc- 
tor of Sainsbory's wine depart- 
ment, has been invested with 
the Ordre da Merite Agricole 


United sign O’Brien 


tui 


Manchester United have i 
21 -year-old Liam O'Brien, from 
Shamrock Rovers. United will 
pay £50.000 immediately and 
then instalments of up to an- 
other £100.000 as the midfield 
player makes a set number of 
appearances. 

O'Brien, an unemployed fil- 
ter. already has one full inters 
national cap and is in the 
Republic of Ireland squad for 
the European championship 
match against Scotland on Octo- 
ber 15. 

• Neville Bosworth and Harry 
Parkes yesterday resigned from 
the board of second division 
Birmingham City in a continu- 
ation of the upheavals which 
began when chair man Ken 
Wbeldon bought control of the 
dub fast December.# Johnny 
Melgod. the Nottingham Forest 
sweeper, has been recalled to the 
Netherlands' international 
squad for their next European 
championship qualifying game 
in Hungary on October 15. 
Meigod has been requested to 
report for training by the Dutch 
FA on the same day that Forest 
play Brighton in the first round, 
second leg of the Unlewoods 
Cup, but win probably fly out to 


the Netherlands on the follow, 
ing morning. 

• Gary Hooiickin, the long- 
serving defender with the sec- 
ond division leaders, Oldham 
Athletic, yesterday submitted a 
transfer request after be was 
dropped from the team to play 
at West Bromwich Albion to- 
day. Hooiickin. who is 32 years 
old, joined Oldham straight 
from school 13 years ago and 
has made more than 200 League 
appearances for the dub. 

• Micky Droy has agreed new 
terms and will stay with Crystal 
Palace until the end of the 
season. The 35-year okl defend- 
er began the season on a three- 
month contract. 

Crystal Palace yesterday an- 
nounced that tne dub had 
agreed to a three-year sponsor- 
ship deal worth £100.000 with 
the local video retailers, 
AVR/A1I Star. 

transfer-listed 
has re- 
move to 


• Portsmouth's 
striker. Nick Mi 
a £S 0 .i 


iected 

Walsa 


'akall 

• Jimmy Rimraer, the goal- 
keeper. is to join Luton after 
being given a free transfer by 
Swansea Gty in the summer. ' 



SPORT 


THE TIMES SATURDAY OCTOBER 4 1986 


YACHTING 


Easy opener for 
Crusader as 
Opponents steer 
if into trouble 

From Barry Pickthall, Fremantle 


. Harry Cudmore and his 
witish crew aboard White 
Crusader open their account 
in the/ America's Cup trials 
tomorrow-in what looks to be 
an -easy, match against the 
radical Gary Mull designed 
■ USA- H. skippered by Tom 
BlackaHer. from San 
Francisco. 

: ^Whife the British squad 
giving their Howlett 
design a final onceover yes- 
terday, after winning 13 of 
llieir 14 informal races against 
other- contenders during the 
past fortnight, the Golden 
Gate challengers were still 
puzzling how to solve the 
steering problems with their 
twin-ruddered USA 11. 

- -.The boat, which had to be 
cu.t-.in Half and have an Sc- 
inch fillet welded on in mid- 
ships - after- sagging out of 
shape during construction, is 
'one of the first 12-metre 
designs to be. fined with 
nidders at both bow and stern. 
But according to the American 
commentator Gary Jobson. 
-who crewed for Blackaller 
-aboard .the . unsuccessful 
American 12-metre defender 
three years ago. it will take 
another month before the 
crew have the two foils linked 
up correctly. 

Racing out in Gage Roads 
over two separate courses, the 
five-month long Clip pro- 
gramme opens tomorrow with 
.Yves Pajot’s little-rated Chal- 
lenge France racing against the 
American -entered Eagle, from 
Newport .Harbour Yacht 
Club. California skippered by 
the Olympic Games gold 
medallist Rod Davis, and a 
head-to-head between the Aga 
Khan's Azzurra and the Marc 
Pajot skippered French Kiss, 
whose -crew spent, the day 
'touching up paintwork after 
colliding with Canada II dur- 
ing a practice start on- Thurs- 
day. 

. In other matches tomorrow 
Dennis Conner's Stars and 


Stripes '87 meets Italia L. 
Canada 11 race against the 
highly-rated America II. skip- 
pered by John Kolius, and the 
New Zealander Chris Dixon, 
aged 24. the youngest skipper 
in the series, has wbat prom- 
ises to be a fascinating duel 
against the American Buddy 
Melges. who. at the age of 57, 
is the oldest and perhaps 
wiliest helmsman in the com- 
petition steering Heart of 
America. 

With 13 challengers 
competing in this first prelimi- 
nary round, which continues 
until October 20, the Coura- 
geous syndicate, racing the 1 1- 
year-otd highly modified 
former Cup winner Coura- 
geous. gained a bye. 

In London, the Tote, who 
have been running a book on 
the outcome of the America's 
Cup for (he past year, up- 
graded their odds this week to 
reflect the heavy bets now 
being placed on the Ameri- 
cans, who replace Australia as 
evens favourites. Cudmore 
and his crew remain in third 
place though the odds here 
have lengthened a point to 6- 
I. 

Off-course betting carries a 
jail sentence in Australia but 
that has not hindered an 
unofficial book (run by a 
bookmaker codenamed 
“Dock Rat"), who places the 
Bond syndicate as favourite 
finalist among the defenders 
and America II among the 
challengers. 

• The latest Tote odds for ttte America's 
Cop are (earner odds in brackets): USA (6 
d) Evans favourites. Australia 5-a (Evens). 
Great Bmam 6-1 (5-1). New Zealand 8-1 
(20-1). Italy 12-1 (8-1), France 12-1 (10-1). 
Canada 16-1 (261) Dock Rifs odds tar 
the defenders: Bond Syndicate 7-1, 
Kookaburra 9-1. South Australia 26-1. 
Steak n Kidney 66-1. Chaiengan: Amer- 
ica II 9-2. New Zealand 6 - 1 . Stars and 
Stnpes 13-2. French Kiss 8 - 1 . White 
Crusader 12 - 1 . Eagle 20-1. Canada N 20- 
1 . USA 2S-1. Heart of America 33-1. Kaha 
33-1. Azzurra 50-1. Challenge France 66 - 
1 . Courageous - write your own beket. 

• Tomorrow's races: Challenge France v 
Eagle. Azzwra v French Kiss. Stars and 
Stnpes v Kaba. White Crusader v USA. 
New Zealand v Heart of America. Canada 
H v America H. Courageous IV - bye. 


A challenge for rivals 

By a Special Correspondent 


Six boats in the Silk Cut 
multihull challenge race, which 
starts today off Brighton, will 
. carry their nation's colours in a 
special team competition be- 
tween old yachting rivals, the 
British and.the French. 

The British team consists of 
the 60 ft trimaran. Red Star, 
skippered by Don Wood, and 
the two brightest stars of British 
mullihull racing. Apricot and 
Paragon, also 60 ft trimarans. 
Tony : Bultimore will skipper 
Apricot as usual but. for 
mnltihull enthusiasts, the re- 
-appearance of Paragon under 
Mike Whipp will be a welcome 
sight. No sponsor could be 
found' in Britain for the boat and 
K was thought she had been sold 
' into French hands. Whipp has 


ASIAN GAMES 

ATHLETICS: Ftatec Man 200m i. C Jao- 
kaun IS Korl. 20.7lsec SjOOOnc 1 . K Jono- 
yoon(SK 6 r). I3nwi SOKteoc (Gamas racortf) 
w oman. iSOOnr 1 . l Ctmn-ae (S Kon. 
42t38 100m tMdtes: 1. C Kara (Ohio). 
1178. 10km wate 1. G Pmg (OWial. 

: 40s ac Discus: 1, H Xuera (Ana). 5128m 
(Gani es ■n wndt 

■ BASKETBALL *ta* One 77. South Korea 
74 (Ctmawngold medal South Korea sMvar. 
Ph 4 *x»ws. bronze) 

JUQO. Mi dMl i nIMll (under 88 kW 1. P 
Kvunfrtio (S Kor) HaW-heavyv nl gM funder 
Mkgfc r. HHyuog- roots Korl 
TAEKWOWPOr MlddW ■ Light (under B3ktt 1. 
- L Kc^hong (S KorV HeevywwgM |M 83 m)): 
t.JtSauwwXSKor). 

TENWS: Men's Mind dmttes final: Y Jsi- 
Moand L Jurpjsoon (S Kor) bl Y Ww and Z Ni 

VOLLEYBALL Women: Japan bt Indonesia, 
15-0. 15-1. 15-1. Cn«!a M South Korea. 15-7. 
161: 15,7 (CIMu nn goU. Japan sever. 
Sbuih Korea bronze) 

.WRESTUMG: Freestyle Mt 48kg: 1 . M 

Tarkan (Iran). S7kg: 1. A Mahemmadtan (ban) 
68 kg: 1. KSoo-hwan(SKort 82kg; I.OHyo- 
ChouS (S Kor) 100 kg 1 . S Ksttar (imta). 

BASEBALL 

NORTH AMERICA: Natkmal L ea g u e . (1(8 
Housm Astros 2 . Son Franosoo Gams i; 
New vorx -Mets 8 . Montreal Expos 2. (13) 
Cncaviab Reds fi. Atlanta Braves 4. Puts- 
Burgh .Pirates 5. Si Lou* Cardnais 1 
American Leagmc New York Yankees 6 . 
eosion Red Sox 1. DetroH Tgas Z M»waa- 
kee Brewers I. ( 10 ) Chicago WWe So» 8 
Mmesota Twms 4. Texas Rangers ift 
Cafiftrrw AngeK 9 

Marathon bonus 

. Chicago (AP) — Officials of 
(he. Chicago marathon an- 
nounced yesterday that a 
$56,000 bonus will be paid to 
men and women runners with 
WoHd-besl times in the race, on 
October 26. The bonuses will be 
in addition to the $285,000 cash 
purse -to be. divided among the 
top 20 male and leading IS 
female finishers. • 


evidently been able to hold onto 
her for this race, but it may be 
her last appearance under Brit- 
ish colours. 

The Freijch team consists of 
Eric Tabariy. in the 75 ft 
trimaran Cote d'Or. Phillipe 
Poupon. in Fleury Michon. 
another 75 ft trimaran, and 
relative newcomer Jean le Can 
in the Formula 40 trimaran. 
Biscuits Canireau. , 

Overall, the 14-boat fleet 
includes some of the most 
famous names in sponsored 
sailing com pci in go ver a 
controversial course, which 
lakes them through the Dover 
Strait and up the Thames, with 
the yachts expected to arrive 
under London's Tower Bridge 
around midday tomorrow. 

FOR THE RECORD 


BASKETBALL 

EUROPEAN CLUB COMPETITIONS: first 
round, fiat Iras; Mao's Champion Clubs' 
Cup: AMi(Swsi95.Zbrqov<uBmoiCz1 HO: 
Am Thessaloniki (Grl 115, Sunav OSKnd 
(Bel) 77. Pliiy (Swte) 91. Maceat* Tel An* 
I hi) 102: Manchester U rated (Ena) 7B. Real 
Madrid (Spl 86 : Sauna Bucharest (Rom) 80. 
Zakpmts Kaunas (USSR) 107: Partaani Tirana 
(At» 63. Ban Beam are Orrhez (Frt 73. 
Women's C ha mpion Chibs' Cop: Canos 
Natacon Madrid (So) 59. Stada Frances 




Versales (Fr) 82. Esperance PuSy (Swrtr) B 2 . 
Partuan Belgrade fYug) 12 ft Royal Charles 
Quxfl Brussels (Bsfl fOZ. Snorfnq Luxem- 
bourg (Lux) Kt Crystal Palace 
Vwnna (Austna) 85 Women's flora 
BAC Urande (Fr) 91. PanaOimafiios (Gr). 56. 
Banner Wtmerta) |W0l 68 . VWeurtHnrw (Fr) 
56. U 8 C Web (Austria) 54. Uonttafrand (Fr) 
96. Megas Alexandres (GO 39. Kecskemet 
IHungi 101 

RUGBY UNION 

SCHOOLS MATCH: USC 7. IM Hfl 12 


cumrawiB. O enr cim Soathern open loir- 
nament First round (US unless stated): 65c L 
KEnMe. J Thorpe. G 6 : B Cole ISA). P Stewart J 
C Snead. M Donald. DRummels 67: w Grady 
lAusL K Fergus. 0 PoAey. K Knox. B KracerL 
B Waduns. B Gankier. T 5wckmann British 
Ptecmga: 69: K Brawn 76: P Oosterhure. 
NAGOYA. 




merit Second round (Japanese unless stal- 
ed): 136: T Kawada. 69. 67 137: M Kuramoto, 
68 69 138: M Ozaki. 75 61 134 G Marsh 
(Ausl 68 . 7t: T Gale (Ausl 73. 66 : K Inoua. 68 . 
71 Other scores 141: 0 POM (US). 72. 69 
IASS B Jones (Ausl. 75 67: L bang-Huan 
iTaiwani. 68 74 143: 0 1st* (USL 7f 71: C 
Tze-lArm (TabwanL 74. 69. C T. - 
fWwwfcBS,?* T4* B Langet (WG). 72. 
WAIBMLLE: Irish profssMna| -‘ - 
ship: Lnodkw thud round scores: 

Smyth. 66 . BE. 74. 21 ft C O Connof Snr. 73. 
69.74. 219: L Hrans. 75. 71. 73. 

22t 0 Jonas. 74775. 73. J RoOnscn. 73. 75. 
74. N Drew. 75. 72. 75 .223: P McGuok. 79 73. 
71 22S: E Jones. 80. 71. 74. J Yonng.73. 73. 
75: J Puroel. 72. 77. 78. K Moms. 7G.72. 77; E 
Doyle (CariowL 73. 75. 77 
JwSCV: WPCA open e hsn apk ms hlp (G 6 and 
Ireland unless staredt 278: K Douglas. 71.67. 
7I.G9(E3J)00). 294: PCcWevflJSC 70. 71. 72. 


2S4:PConiev 
nah lAustnal 


70.71.72. 
70. 76. 69 


D Dowtng. 73,76. 65. 73 


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‘ • # « . " ” »"*.*■ #; ‘ ’* ''I 

Cash leaps forward to counter a backhand from Mayotte in the Davis Cup match 

GOLF 

Dubious reward for holders 


Hilary Kaye and Donald 
Longmuir. the holders, came 
safely through the second round 
of the Worplesdon mixed four- 
somes yesterday, having had a 
bye in the firsL Their dubious 
reward is a match this morning 
against (he formidable combina- 
tion of Carole and Ian Caldwell. 
If that were not likely to be 
ordeal enough. Linda Bayman. 
twice a former winner and 
Martin Christmas, twice a 
Walker Cup player, probably lie 
in wait this afternoon. 

It may be as well. then, for 
' them to savour success while 
they may. and certainly iheir 
match yesterday, against the 
rcccnily-wed Diana and Colin 
Walpole, gave both them, and 
their opponents, great pleasure 
on another golden day stolen 
from what used to be known as 
high summer. 

It is modest convention on 
these occasions lo attribute a 
victory to the sterling qualities 
of one's partner. Mrs Kaye and 
Longmuir. once of Scotland but 
now of Hertfordshire, were 
refreshingly honest joyfully 
recounting each other's 
misdemeanours as well as their 
own. such as there were in the 4 
and 3 victory. The Walpole s 
were slow into their stride and 
were three down after six holes; 
the seventh, too. lay at 
Hen fordsh ire's mercy but 
Longmuir. in his own words, 
“failed c\cn to hit the Hole from 
18 inches." 

Longmuir. tongue in cheek, 
then described successive holes 


FOOTBALL 

FOOTBALL COMBINATION: Tottennam , 
Hotspur 4. Swdon Town 1 
EUROPEAN CUP-WINNERS' CUP: Fbst 
round, second leg: GKS Katowice 1. Fram 
Reykjavik 0 (ago:4-0) 

SCHOOLS MATCH: Eton 2. Matvwn 1 


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By John Hennessy 

as though he might have missed 
his way lo Wentworth. He 
“played a glorious shot just 
short of the eighth." after Mre 
Kaye had found a bunker, and 
then “holed a super putt after 
she had scrambled one up the 
hill." Three putts on the ninth 
and 10th hampered the 
Walpoles' recovery, but a per- 
fect four won the 1 2th and three 
Hertfordshire putts surrendered 
the 13th. The 14th. however, 
settled the issue. Mrs Kaye's 
putt from 40 feet was rattling 
along at such speed that 
Longmuir “wouldn't have liked 
the one back." But he was 
spared ihal harrowing experi- 
ence by the ball’s sudden di5r 
appearance into the hole. 

. Patricia Johnson, surely the 
best player in the British Isles 
this year, and Neil Roderick, a 
Welsh international, were much 
too strong at the bottom of the 
draw for Aileen Secrett and 
Jeremy Fricker. They were four 
up alter five holes and. though 
Miss Johnson played two indif- 
ferent shots to lose the sixth to a 
five, they recovered the lead at 
the eighth, improved it with a 
four at the long tenth, and 
profited from the wanderings of 
their opponents in the trees at 
(he next. 

With the defeat of Jill 
Thornhill and her partner. Stu- 
art Robson, now apparently 
more dedicated to horses than 
golf courses. Jill Nicolson and 
Bernard White, individual Sur- 
rey champions last year and this 
respectively, emerged as the 


chief challengers to Miss John- 
son and Roderick. 

RESULTS: FM round: MissT Craik and P 
R L Hughes M . 2 and 1 ; Miss C Dufly and 
L Hawkins bt Mis& C Hayfar and K 
Robnson. 1 hoiK Mrs J Hamilton and J 
Fsiriw bf Miss S Wood and 0 Hart, 2 and 1 : 
Mrs M F WBtam&on and W E Griffith M 
Mrs J P Rendered and H J Gttttns. 7 and 
5; Miss D Mamotl and JCulumbt Mrs A E 
Taylor and A J Weis. 1 hole: Mrs □ M 
Stock ana R J (Hwtson bt Mis M H Onon 
and M H Dixon, at the 1 9Un Mrs J TTumtiM 
and S F Rouon bt Mrs C M Baitey and LT 
Baiey. 1 hole: Mrs J K CoSngham and G S 
Metvttte bt Mss J Guntnp ana P A J Battte. 

6 and 5: Miss H Wheelar and D Wheeler bt 
Miss S Johnson and S Hicks. 2 and 1 : Mrs 
j Tate and J Gan bt Mis E Roberts and R 
Messervy. 2 and 1 : Mis M Perma and J R 
WaNanshaw bt Mrs S Bui and A J 
Ranted. 3 and 2: Mbs K Hamdga and J 
Hamdge M Mrs A E Gems and C L 
Edginton. at the 19th: Miss S Prosser and 
K Wooidndge bt Mre B WHertun and C S 
Martyn. 2 and 1. Mrs J Nicolson and B 
wmte w Miss l Van Reman and A I L 
Weils. 4 and 3; Mrs D Hanson and A N 
WHkamson bt Mrs L Davies and I W Boyd. 
2 and 1 . 

Second Round Mrs H Kaye and D 
Longmuir bt Mis C Wakxw and C 
Walpole. 4 and 3: Mrs C A Catewail and I 
Cakfvrai bt Mbs S Cousins and J G Btyth, 

5 and 3: Mss M Mamson and T F M Bebb 
bt C W M Jones and Mrs P Bit ngton. 1 
hole: Mrs L Bayman and M JOvkMmasbt 
Mrs D Aytwm and A Heron. 2 and 1 : Mss 
Crak and Hughes bt Mrs B Mansfield and 
G J Cottngham, 5 and 4; Miss (tatty and 
Hawkns bl Mrs Hamilton and Farts. 3 
and 1 : Mis WiUamson and Griffith M Miss 
Marriott and Culten. 2 and 1 : Mrs Stock 
and Bibetson bt Mrs Thomhfl and 
Robson, 3 and 2. Mrs A Lanrezac and J J 
N Capian bt Mis Codingtiam ancTMetv&e. 

2 and i : Mas Wheeler and Wheeler bt Mrs 
Tate and Gari. 7 and 6 : Mss Hamdge and 
Harriage beat Mrs Penna and 
WaHunshaw. 3 and Z Mrs Ncoison and 
White beat Mas Prosser end wooteidga, 

6 and 5: Mrs C Strtng md D W Frame 

beat Mrs Henson and Vtfaftamson, 3 and 1 : 
Abs R Walks and B K Turner wafted over 
Mrs C Langtea and T O’Brien beat Miss S 
Hayllsr and B Henderson .3 and 1: Miss P , 
Johnson and R N Roderick beat Miss A 
Secron and JDS Fucker. 6 and 5 I 


HORSE TRIALS 


TENNIS 

Carlsson 

puts 

Mecirin 

a spin 

From Richard Evans, 
Prague 

Kent Carlsson, a swirling 
Dervish of a player, who smears 
his ground strokes with exces- 
sive top spin, made a mockery 
of Miloslav Medr’s renowned 
dominance over Swedish play- 
ers by beating the Czech 6-0, 6-2, 
&>4 in the opening rubber of the 
NEC Davis Cup semi-final here 
at the Sivanice Stadium. Ste&n 
Ed berg then extended Sweden's 
lead by beating Milan Srejber 3- 
6. 6-4, 6-3. 4-6. 7-5. 

Mats Wilander, Joakim 
Nystrom and Andera Jarryd, all 
live in fear of Mecir’s smooth 
and beguiling stroke play, but all 
three, either through choice or 
injury, were not available for 
singles selection here. So more 
by luck than good judgement 
Hans Olsson, the Swedish cap- 
tain, came up with the Swede 
Mecir would have wanted to 
play least By the time Carlsson 
had won the first nine games of 
the match, h. was easy to see 
why. 

Carlsson is an- engagingly 
bright 18-year-«kl with a boring 
but wickedly effective game 
specifically designed to drive 
opponents to the point of sui- 
cide on slow day. 

.Mecir, who looks sleepy at the 
best of times, seemed bandy 
awake when Carlsson started 
fizzing his top spin ground 
strokes at him just after 10 JO 
am. With some balls rearingand 
kicking bead high. Merir round 
it impossible to glide into the 
ball with the kind of sweetly 
timed precision that carried him 
to the US Open final. 

Every time he tried to accel- 
erate the speed of the racket's 
head during a rally he found 
himself lasing control of the 
viciously spinning balL For the 
first half-hour Medr was having 
trouble winning points, let alone 
games. 

Carlsson. a skinny young man 
who seems to dangle on the 
string of a demented puppeteer 
as he wails to receive serves with 
limbs twitching in all directions, 
did exceptionally well to main- 
tain the pressure on such a 
talented opponent considering 
this was his Davis Cup debut. 

Suffering a momentary loss of 
concentration he dropped serve 
to love in the fourth game of the 
second set and twice came 
within a point of allowing Mecir 
a second break back at 2-3. 

Mecir's brave attempts to gel 
into the net might have changed 
the psychological balance of the 
match had he been able to level 
the second set at 3-3. 

But in the end nothing could 
prevent Carlsson from claiming 
this remarkable victory. 


■Mm K Canaan 
ML 62764. Sacand 


HOCKEY 


FRA0U& Danis Cob: SM 
«atoa v S w eden, first ■&• 
(SUM) M M Mear (CO. 6ft 


aMm S Edbara (Sm) bt M Srafiw. 34L 6 
4. 6-3. 4-6. 7-5 nfintiumtaoii CtOChOlllOM 


UaftSwedsnZ. 


• On the opening day of the 
Davis Cup semi-final between 
Australia and the United Slates 
in Brisbane yesterday, Paul 
McNamee (Australia) beat Brad 
Gilbert (US ) 2-6. 6-3, 3-6, 64). 
6-1. Rain stopped play in the 
game between Rat Cash (Austra- 
lia) v Tim Mayotte (US) which 
ended 4-6. 2-1. - Match position: 
'Australia lead 1-0. 

B W19D A MC. Dada Cup P M C un*. A ua ba i a e 
IMad Stmt FM aMm P McNamoe 

(Aus)bt B GifeanjUS). 2-663. 3-6.64. 6-1. 
SocondaMmT Mayotte (US) leads P Cosh 
(Ausl. 64, 1 -2 (ram). MMetipotttlaa: Australia 
1 . United Stains 0. 


Miss Mason hopes for better luck 

By Jenny MacArthnr 


SPEEDWAY 

BRITISH LEAGUE Shelf**] 40. Coventry 36. 
Ipsmcit 40. Raatkng 38. 

NATIONAL LEAGUE Long Eaton 41. Arena 
Essei 36: Wtratedon 47. Boston 31. Arena 
Esse* 44 . Petarftorcugn 34. LkocSesOMucn 
45. Milaentiall 33 


SNOOKER 

STOKE BCE un ei nati o na l tournament 
Semi-final date revAte C Tnorsum iCam a P 
Fiancwco (SAj. 9-7 


TENNIS 

ST GALL. S w> Ze tlan d: Davis Cup: Empean 
Zone B Mb Switzerland v (sis at 3 
GhcLstexiflsObi J HiaseMSwral. 63 1-6.6- 
S 10-12. 11-9: A Mansart t l«i di H 
GuentnaiO (Swazi. 7-5. 6-3. Final result: 
SuntrenaiW 1. Israel 4. 

DELHI Darts Cup world group Megaton 
play-off: Mia « Sana! Union (Indian rutr.es 
brst): V Amntnq bl A Qiesnofcgv. 6- 1 . 6-4 . 64. 
R Knsfuantw * Zverev. 3-6. 3-6. 6-0. 6-1. 5-4 
Hatch posAon: hw-a 2. Sonet Umar a 
ESSEN. West Ger ma ny; Dana Cup wortd 
group rnktgeton match: West Germany « 
Ecuador BBocker(WGiorR ViaeiiEcui 6-1 
6-4. 10-8. Match position: 'Afesi Germany 1. 
Ecuador 0 

BARCELONA: Darts Cup: Wortd group 
relegation play-off: Spain v Now Zealand: f 
Luna (So) tA S Guv (NZ>. 6-3 9-7. 6-1 E , 
Sanchez bt B De*n 62. 60. 61 Match 
position: Span Z New Zealand 0 
LOOSORE C HT. The NethnlandK Women's 
Dutch open indoor mphy: Second roiaid: H 
Sukova (Czl M r Hobday (USL 6Z 63: N 
jaqerman(Neth)bt ACrohiGBi 2-6 7-5.63. 

N Hernman (Fr) Di k MaWe»a <3UI 62.62 N 
TaiUMl (Fr) til C Sure iSwuzi 5-3. 62. C 
Tamriei (FitDt A KoEkdvalCz). 67.6-4.5-4. S 
Hai*a (WGt bt S Larean |Dem. 6-2. 4-6. 63 
PALERMO, Italy: Grand Pnx tournament C 
Mezzadn (IllBi P Cane (hi. 62. 62 . C ApnS tlij 
tn H Maiuuawski (USl 7-6. 7-5 


Claire Mason and The Artful 
Dodger, who suffered a bad fall 
at Burghley jusi one month ago. 
have taken over the lead at the 
end of the dressage phase of the 
Chatsworth Audi Horse Trials 
in Derbyshire. They are just 
ove'r ihree marks ahead of 
Thursday's overnight leaders, 
Ros Be\an and Horton Point. 

Jon Evans, who produced a 
beautifully relaxed and correct 
tesi on The Cordwaincr yes- 
terday. has moved into third 
place. Evans is based ai 
Gatcombe Park with Capt Mark 
Phillips, whose own test yes- 
terday on Cartier has left him 
equal sixth. The top seven riders 
have less than seven points 
between them, which will not 
allow for much margin for error 
on today's cross-country course. 
Miss Mason's polished test on 

Yesterday’s 

Newmarket 

Going: good lo torn 

2.0 f7n 1. POLLENATE I Pal Eddery. 5- 
1 ). 2. TKpiegreen (R Fox . SO- 1 ): 3. Magical 
Lace (B Thomson. 20 - 1 ). ALSO RAN: 7-2 
fav SiiHouette Dancer. 7 Oxynwron. 9 
Pitchfork (5tfif. 10 StaMo. 12 Sv James- 
trwn fGlti). 16 HusWuan. Prtlle. 20 Cabot, 
Riot Squad. Huntung Steps. Talus. 2S 
Penny PracBce 33 Arauan Raflwood. 
Bronze Buck. Insfi Sailor (4rti). Manly Boy. 
Pck Of The Pack. Suivez Mol. Trapper. Ci 
S*amo. Mayroru. Paraenka. 50 Riverooat 
Party. Whng Park 27 ran. 3. 1 ‘.-I. M. M. II. 

J Tree at Becknampion Tote: ESJ0: 
£2.10. £53.60. £7 70. DF (winner or 
second with any other horser £2 40 CSF: 
£232.37 Irwn 2733sec. 

2.35 (Im2f) 1 . MYTENS (Pal Eddery. 611 . 
2. Asian Cup IG Slant ey. 4-1): 3. 
Bastinado (T Ivk. 14 -I). ALSO RAN: 62 
fav BiiieL 5 Nattdtya (4th). 11 Prince Oac 
(6tni. 14 Marshal Macdonald (5m). 16 
Icaro. 20 Autumn Rutter. Cigar. 10 ran. 
NR- Captain s Nece. 2'..(. ho. tO. 2' ( l nk 
J Tree at Becfcnampion. Tote: £5 70: 
£1.50. £1.50. £3.10. OF: £9.80 CSF. 
£28 14 Tncast £285.72. 2mm 05 33sec. 
3.10 (7f) 1. IMPERIAL FRONTIER (G 
Starkey. 15-8 fart; a. Arabian She* (T 
Ives. 2-11. 3 Hahecz (W R Swmoum. 14.1) 

3 ALSO RAH: 7-2 Hendeka (5m). 162 
Ome (4m). 33 Lack A Style (6th). 50 
Aibasar. 7 ran. NR: UAeage Bank 1 \-l. 
VAShhd 61.21. LCumani at Ne-annarkeL 
1 Tote. £290- £1 40 £t 60. DF £2.80. CSF 
, £582 Imin 2623sec. After a stewards' 
■nouiry Ome was reiegated from Hurd 
Dace to fourth and Natieez promoted to 
third place 

3.40 (tm 4!| 1 . ISLAND SET |R Cochrane. 
10630 favt. 2. VerartS (T Ives. 11-11: 3. 
Tender Type fA Mack ay 12-1). ALSO 
RAN- 10 klym. Sir Percy. TeBrttO (4ih). 11 
Saryan. 12 Ben Ad hem (5tn). Lundy tu. 
Wika Hope (6m). 14 Eijoiito Peggy 
Carolyn. 33 Thorny RostL Jazar. General 
ConcordB 15 ran 11 . fiL 2. M. 11A L 
Cumam a: NemnarkeL Tote £3.50: £1.60. 
£2 20. £3.90 DF. £860 CSF: £3623 
Tncast £351.15. 2mm 30.07SW 

f-W l^MBLA |R Cochrane. 611 
lav|. 2. SantaUa Mae (G Startey S-2Y. 3. 
Rtnowcrtul Falcon (T Oum. 62) ALSO 
ran. 11 SnHii5OneCtaii4th).20Ja2&QS 
(5ih). 33 SaSy Says So (6th). 6 ran. NR: 
Tanouma. Nk S'.'il. Bl. 31 . 21 L Cumam at 
Nawmarkai Tote: £1 JO: £1.30. £1.80. DF: 
££60. CSF; £424, 1mm 41.07SBC. 


her 12-year-old gelding, owned 
by The MacConnal-Mason Gal- 
lery. earned consistently high 
marks from all three judges — 
the West German, Erika Ander- 
sen. awarding her the maximum 
mark of 10 for her hall- Miss 
Mason is now hoping for better 
luck today than she bad at 
Burghley where she fell at the 
Brandy Glass fence. She has 
been practising over a similar 
type of fence and has also been 
back to her 'trainer, Lars 
Seder holm, with whom she was 
based for six years. 

Nigel Taylor, who is lying 
ninth and 12th on Croan and 
Ace respectively, attributes his 
remarkable improvement in the 
dressage phase to the Danish 
trainer, Eric Theilgaard. with 
whom he has been having 
lessons. Taylor, an experienced 


cross-country rider, will pose a 
considerable threat to the lead- 
ers today. So. too, will Diana ; 
Clapham on Jimney Cricket ! 
She only took over the ride on 
Colonel Harold Selby’s 10-year- 
old gelding a month ago but has 
already struck up a rapport with 
him. 

The steep terrain at 
Chatsworth will put a premium 
on fitness for today's course, 
which has been designed by 
Michael Tucker. The going ts 
firm but sand has been put down 
on some of the hard patches. 
RESULTS: After J w i y 1. The Artful 
Dodger (C Mason), 35-6pts: 2. Horton 
Pomt (R Bevan). 39: 3. The Cordwalnor (J 
Evans). 39-2; 4, Botetoc MBer (A-M 
Taylor), 39.4: 5. C-Angte (C Barite). 41.4.- 
S equaL Two's 
and Cartier (M 
Cnckot (D C 
Taylor). 47A 
Ftowea).4&a 


results from three meetings 


440 (71) I. TWEETER (G Starkey. 61); 2 , 
Bashoyer (W R Swrtwn, 61); ft 
Bracoma (R Fox. 33-1). ALSO RAN: 5-2 
lav Pillar of Wisdom (5th). 8 Indian 
Skimmer (4th). B Trapeze Dancer, 11 
Knockando. 33 Ardasfw, Big Red. Kirpan, 
Traroski. Prince Newport, 50 Boy Jamie. 
Fashionably Forties. Flutter Money. Glass 
Castle- Mark Angelo. Mighty Glow. 
Rath drum. Dappng, Floral Cnams ( 8 B 1 L 
21 ran. Hi. an lid. %L 3L 1 SL G Harwood 
al PuttJorough. Tote: £8.00: £2.80. £1.80. 
£1350 DF: £850. CSF: £2187. Imin 
27. 37 sec 

Jackpot £133-10; Rscepot £5080 

Haydock Park 

Going: turn 

2-15 (im 21 131yd) 1 . NOBLE FLUE (G 
Doffieu. i61l:Z Rare Legend IN Day. 16 
1 ): 3. Di we mioa (S Whitworth. 7-1). ALSO 


RAN: 13-8 fav NmoKhka (4th). 9 Lt», 10 
Indian Love Song (5thL Loroef. Needle 
Sharp S<t Bnaas. 14 Mrs Uartwanng 
f6thL 25 Little Token. Mane's Vaienbne. 
33 Papon. Worth Oebatmg. 14 ran. NR. 
Chabenka. 1 V,l hd. 3L 1 htL J Duritop 
at Anunort. Tote: £16.80: £300. £6.40. 
£2.40 DF: £285.40 CSF: £151.90. 2mm 
14 62sec. 

2.45 (60 1. WEBSTERS FEAST <W 
Wharton. 61k 2. Jacqsl Joy (G Bardwd. 
13-21. 3. Spanish infanta (J WJSams. 26 
II. ALSO RAN: 100-30 tav Cooper Racing 
Nail ffifti). 62 Lydia Languish (4th). 6 
Career Madness. 8 Low Ffyw. 10 Motty 
Parma ge. 12 Ken SrttaH. 14 Gutsy. 18 Le 
Mans. 20 Austma (5th), 25 Cracon Girl. 
Shy Mistress. 14 ran. NR: Avada. Double 
Cnai. Fast TaxL SI. nk. 3L W. 31. M 
McCormack at Wantage. Ton: £14.90; 
£4.90. £2.30. £9.90. DF: EB8.10. CSF: 
£68.46 1mm 1461S0& No ML 



England have a 
hard task in 
their first game 


Going: firm 


Hereford 


Tots: £1.80. DF: £2J». CSF: 




3.45 (1m 40ydn. AUCMNATE (A Gterk. 
16U: 2. Mafyaasah (R Guest 8-13 fav): 2. 


Starmaat (Vv Carson. 10-1 j. ALSO RAN: 6 
AJchaasteyeh (5th). 8 Sticky Greene (4(h), 
14 Naoussa (6th). 20 Pets Marsh. 7 ran. 
NR: Fountan 01 Youth. ftL3L3L 2HJ, 54L 


NR; Fountain 01 Youth. hL3L3L 2 'M, S4L 
G Harwood at Putaorouflti. Tote: £11.00: 
£3.50. £1.40. DF: £7.01. CSF: £18-70. 
lmm 43J0sac. 


3j 0 (2m Mte) 1. Rushtnoor (P 
Scudamore. 2-9 ttef): 2. Battwwst (4-1); 3. 
Tasftonya m-iL 4 ran. 20. &. R Peacock. 
Tote: Cf.lft Dft £1.40. CSF: £1.77. 

3JQ (3m it ch) 1, Late wgH Extra (B 
PoweH- 2-5 tev): 2. Athena S5- (B-IX 3. 
Feme The Spur(5-2). 3 ran. dtet dtet K 
Baitey. Tote: £1^0. OR £24)0. CSF. £327. 

44) {3m If hdte) 1. Hudalca (Mr* H 
Noonan, 7-2t 2. See Bed (4-fi fav); 3. Fata 
Momana (MML 10 ran. 41, 12L B 

cantedoe. Tow SA 50 : OJ, £ 1 . 10 , 

eaSO DF- E2.10. CSF E8.28. THcwt 
£91.05. 

44n (SM 41 ett) 1 . Beau Never (A 
Sharpe, 10-11 fav); 2, Mr Bui (7-11; 3, 
Safflng Byp-1). 7 ran. 2(8, nk. W GTwner. 
Tom: teM: £1 JO. E5J20. DF ESJft CSF 
£7.32. 

&0 (2m 8aQ 1. Water Erton sundr U 


The sixth World Cup hockey 
tournament begins at WilJesden 
this morning with what is 
expected to be a coknirfui 
opening ceremony. The pomp 
and circumstance win soon give 
way to serious competition 
when England meet New Zea- 
land at noon. 

The England management 
took a dose took on Thursday at 
New Zealand, who played a 
training match against Australia 
at Picketts Lock, tbe Australians 
snatching a 3-2 win in tbe 
closing minutes. Assessing tbe 

S hty of the New Zealanders, 
in Wbalky, tbe England 
manager, 'said: “Their basic 
skills are good. They are quick 
on tbe breaks and should be 
very bard to beat." 

He thought that Peter Dari, 
New Zealand’s most skimil 
forward, could be . su ppre s sed 
but never entirely subdued. 

The good news is that En- 
gland have solved their injury 
problems and are free from 
aches and pains. Discussing the 
team's Cup p rosp ec ts , Whalley 
added: “Because 1 know they 
could do so much for the future 


By Sydney Fristin 

p hockey of English hockey the thought 
rVihesdea - almost frightens me. I am rainy 
what is pleased with the way^ things 
coknirfui nave gone and we have done as 
he pomp much as we can-” 
goougrve An early goal today from open 
npetition play by Keriy or from a short 


—Jay they will pL, . 

the Soviet Union, Pakistan and 
The Netherlands, in that order. 
And a quick total of six points 
from the first three matches 
should fortify them for the two 

crucial engagements against The 

Netherlands and Pakistan. 
These two sides could deprive 
England of a place in the semi- 
finals. . ' „ . ■ 

In tbe remaining Group A 
. matches today The Netherlands 

take on tbeJSoviet Union . 
TOMORROWS MATCHES: Ataffate v 
Cwradapm Indtav Poland (fUBfc Spain 
v West Germany (&30). 


chairman of the British Olympic 
Association, not Dick Palmer, 
the BOA secretary. 


WEEKEND TV, RADIO 

Saturday radio and TV. I AJgyAftJ 

Continued from Joeing page [ tiao-i 2 P 0 Jack Hufcurriiaaqpte 

I Tatra ottlte U n expected lOJBSnoctar 


WORLD SERVICE 



Tatra of the Unexpeaed 1038 Snooker 
l2JOteo At the End at the Dey, 
doeedpe m. ■ 

SzS mSST jM5Equbx» 4.15085.15 
nun Fratura* MOGtetarwr CM- 

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11.15 Frtends 114E Ffcn: CMtnHce 
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CENTRAL 


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HTV WALES 

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BORDER agSSW 

American Hero mOOpei TM rf the 
Unexpactad tOJB Bnootar IZJDhi 
C tosodown. 




REGIONAL TV 
SATURDAY 
8SClS»St£»|§9K l ». 

5.165Jppm Soottteh News and 
Sportfl-169L45 Sportscom. IMS-11 JS 

ram: Wat Golfl.1l5M2.Bra rare 
Crisis bi Mid-Air (George Poppard) 12J5- 
lAOem Weather Close. N0MHBH 
BBAND, 4JS-6Q5m Northern treiaml 
Results S.118-SJ0 Hews 120- 
IJSra Nam HaaBrnw and WasMier 
Close. BtGLANO.&1S-&20pm Lon- 
don— Sport. South-west— SpotlUit 
sport and News. Afl Other Engfeh w 
gtens - Ragtontf News and Span. 

CHANNEL 

liaO-tfUM) T ew e haw ka nn£F^ 
Huey Lewis and The Item IM 
Closed own. 

SCOTTISH ^ London ex- 

CeptataScarfet IftOO Tates of itwUnex- 
peoed HLSD awoker UUOraUte 
CM 12L3BSodey MadeenatTSUMO 
CUsedown 


Sunday radio awl TV 

Continued from facing page 

1 *®?£55' **- 5JH» WB 
and 10.02. 

AOOam David YamaH BJOO 
Steve Truekwe 7 Roger Ftoyte 

ROS Melodies for You (BSC 
Concert Orchestra) Introduced by 
Richard Baker 11 jn Teddy 
Johnson 240pm Benny Qneen 3L00 
Alan DeO COO Rac&igfrom 
Longchamp (Prix deTAroda . 
Tnomphe) 4J0 You Can Sina 



GRANADA Sg?S^„„ 

1tezan2.15|»-2AB Banson 
i&JOra Special Squad l-SOCfeeedmm. 

YORKSHIRE 

tt00 Planet o» the ApralftOOpe* 

Tates of the Unexpected UL30 Snooker 
12JlteraA00 Musk: Box. 

ULSTER AsLomteieeeepc 

yi-j 1 cxi iijDuFefcdtwGH 
11.10-l2J»Knigm Rider 4J5pw- 
Sl» Sports Results mODTslu of the 
Unexpected 1030 Smokflr 12J0ra 
Men, Cksadom. . 

TVS 




REGIONAL TV 
SUNDAY 

Bicisassssfae 


with Sunday Soapbox (tefc 228 
1884) 7JH) IrsAFmny 
Business. Cavan O'Connor looks 
back 7 JO Grand Hotel (from 
Grand Hotai. Brighton) 8^0 Sunday 
Half-Hour from the Dunmttar 
Parish Church, Grampian ROD You* 
Hundred Best Tunes (Alan 
Keith) HL05 Songa from the Shows 
1045 Nevfla Dfckte at the Plano 
IIjOO Sounds of jazz (Peter 





FtacepocCUB 


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C Radio 1 ) 

MF (medium wave). Stereo on 
VHFfsee betowk 
News on die hafUnur untB 
11J30am, then 2^0pm, 330. 4J0, 

7 JO, 9L30, 12j 00 midnight 
BJJQam Mark Page 8JOQ Peter 
PoweA 10JX) Mike Read 12J30pn 
J)mmy Savte's “Old Record*.' 

Ch*. Hit records from 1982, 76 
and 70 2J0 Vintage American 
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Stones wtth a concert recorded 
in America in 1974 &30 Radio 1 
More Time 4JM)ObartbusterB 
(Bruno Brookes) 5X0 Top 40 . 

(Bruno Brookes) 7X0 Anne 
Nightingale Request Show 9X0 
Robbie Vincent 11X0-12XR ' 

The Rankin’ Miss P (wtth Cutture TWiHC TcrensAaLondanex- 
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Mofra Anderson Sings. 4X0 As <**■ 

Radio1.12XIMX0amAsRado2. 


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UP Newadrak 7X0 Naira -7X9 Trtonty- 
Four Hours 7X0 Fram Ow Own Corra- 
nondent 7X0 Wmgukta 1X0 Wtarid 
wo 8X9 Ralteoora 8.15 T1» 
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11X9 News Ahour Britain 11.15 Bwp Our 
Own Corrsnonoant 12X0 Cteaaic Pop 
ConcsrtTZXOQraMng Potets In Scianoa 
1 2A6 Spms RouniulXO Haws 1XO 
TWanty-Four Hours 130 Globa ThaateK 
An Enemy at Ow Peopte 8X0 Radio 
Newsreel 3.15 Spor te teOrtd 4X0 Nora 
4X0 Commantary 4.18 The Domaaday 
Book - 900 Year* On 448 Latter from 
Apiaries 6XO Nam OXO Raflscdona 8X0 
News 8X8 Tteanty-Faur Hours UI 
Sunday Had Hour 9X0 News BX1 Short 
' suy a is tlw Pteaswa'a Ybin 10 x 0 
Nam 10X9 Lake Wttwoon-Daya IOXS 
Book Choice 18X0 Htetatei Review 
RL40 Refiectiora HUS Sports ROundue 
11X0 NaM 11X8 Commray 1115 
Latter Fran Amartaa 11X0 TMng the 
Waters 12X0 New* 12X0 News About 
Briteki 12.18 FtedoNawaraai 12X0 Gtaba 
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News 2X8 Review of flw Brtteh Prate 

2.15 PaaDtes 1 Chutes 2Xfr Soanco te 
Action 2X0 News 3X9 News About Britain 

3.15 Goad Books 3X0 Anrittng Goss 
4X0 Nawsdetet 4X0 Far Wtxm oio M 
ToBs. M Urns in GMT. ■ . 





tZXtaConpanr.CkEndoML 






THE TIMES SATURDAY OCTOBER 4 1986 3 c, 

Sati 


ay 

Weekend television and radio programmes 
Edited by Peter Dear and Peter Davalle 


ay 


BBC 1 - 


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' Vrttr Bob WHson; 12.45 
" ■ 31x1 weather; 12.55. 

^5, 140 arid 3.15 Gott* 

• H < Si?Hl2!® ry . Wortd “*** 
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atWHiesden;lJ5 1 2J0 

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Gtwpatow; 4.40 Final 
Score. 

505 

_ fport/Regional news. 
5o|»W Rat* The Series. 

5,45 SHR* 110 ^ Episode five 
ofttie 1 4-part adventure, 
too T naI of a .Time Lord. 

._ ganlng Colin Baker. 

%6.10 The Noel Edmonds Late 
Late Breakfast Show. 
this first of a new series 
includes a daring Whirty 
-.-Wheel cable car rescue 
Performed by Philip Bailey, 
an ambulanceman from 
Northumberland 

7 -°° Every Second Counts. 
Comedy quiz game 

7- 40 The Russ AbtiotShow. 

Comedy and music from 
Mr Abbot and his guests, 
Les Dennis. Bella Embera 
and Maggie Moone. 
(Ceefax) 

8- 10 Casually. Drama series 

set on the night shift of a 
Posy hospital's Casualty 
Department This evening 
.. among the patients they 
deal wnh Is a drug addict 
who has -taken an 
overdose .{Ceefax) 

9.00 News and Sport. With Jan 
Learning. Weather. 

9.15 FUm: Wet Gold (1984) A 
made-for-television 
adventure about a group 
of young people who fall 
out because of greed after j 
they discover a sunken 
'wreck with a cargo of gold. 
Directed by Dick Lowry. 

10.50 Btott on the Landscape. 
The final episode and naif 
the village nas been 
destroyed by a crane, 
following which Dundridge 
. is questioned by the 
police.' MeanwtiBe^Blott 
arms him self to the Wit 
ready for any eventuality. 

■* <r) (Ceefax) 

11.45 Film: Crisis In Afid- Air 
(1979) A made for 
television drama starring 
George Peppard ason air- 
' controller whose troubles 
on professional and . 

I private fronts are 

compoundedhya hljaked. 
bus and a crippled ’plane. 
Directed by Walter ' 
Grauman. 

1.20 Weather# 


ITV/LONDON 


9-25 No 73. Entertainment for 
theybungll.QDKnfght 
Rider. Ntehaal Kragft 
enters KITT m a tough, 
2300 mHe road race for 
vehicles using anything 
• but petrol as bef. But 
someone is trying to 

„ sabotaga the event Why? 

1^00 News with Nicholas Owen. 

12L05 Saint and Greavsie. Ian 
and Jimmy discuss the 
■ week's football news and 
took forward to this 
afternoon's matches 1230 
Wrestling. Three bouts 
from The Floral Hafl. 

Southport 

1-20 Afrwoff. Hawke is asked to 

help spring a young man 

from prison. 2.15 the . 
Cuckoo Waltz. Vintage 
comedy series, (r) 

£45 Snooker. The first of three 
sessions of the final of the 
BCE International, 
introduced by Dickie 
Davies from Trentham 
Gardens, Stoke-on-Trent 

4.45 Results. 

535 Blockbusters. Bob 

Hotness presents another 
round of the general 
knowledge game for 
teenagers. 

535 TheA-Teara.The'mob' 
try to take over a smafl 
town and the intrepid tow* 
are asked to assist in 
removing them from the 
area. (Oracle) 

630 Blind Date. A lighthearted 
look at what happens on 
blind dates. Presented by 
CSRa Black. 

7.15 Copy Cats. Comedy 
impressions from a 
talented team headed by 
Bobby Davro. 

7.45 3-2-1. Game show with, 
this week, an oriental 
marie theme presented by 




•• - -V JlW LY ’ 'W< 

. — Mgancy . * 


Lady Wedgwood: The Secret L3e of Paintings, on BBC 2, 620pm 


9.00 Ceefax 945 


230 Film: 


45 Open 
.130 Cl 


Ceefax. 

at 


include Loma Dallas, The 
Great Soprendo. Shahid 
Malik, and Tom Pepper. 
(Oracle) 

845 News and sport 

930 Dempsey and 

Makepeace. The two SI10 
agents have the task of 
finding a kidnapped mne- 
y ear-rid before a drugs 
trial begins in which tne 
girl's mother is a key 
prosecution witness. 
(Oracle) 

1030 LWT News headfires 
foitowed by Match of the 
Day. Highlights from one 
of London’s top Division 
One matches played this 
afternoon. The 
commentators Brian 

Moore. 

1045 Snooker. The second of 
the three session best-of- 
23 frames final of the BCE 
Intomafional, from - 
Trentham Gardens, Stoke- 
on-Trent 

1230 Special Stated. Gang . 
warfare in Melbourne - 
keeps the Squad busy. - 
: 130 B&sln Conceit A - rr 
performance by Sigue 
Stoue Sputnik. 

145 Night Thoughts. . 


Nuremberg- (1961) 
starring Spencer Tracy. An 
' Oscar-wmning film, set in 
1948, about the trial of 
four German judges 
charged with crimes 1 
against humanity. Directed 
by Stanley Kramer. 

435 New3nigM to China. John 
Tusa reports.*) 

5-50 Worfd Chess Report The 
latest news on the series 

between Gary Kasparov 
and Anatoly Karpov as the 
contest reaches Os dimax. 

630 Hie Secret Lift of 
Paintings. The first of a 
new senes, presented by 
Lady Wedgwood, 
exploring the hidden 
meanings of five paintings, 
beginning with 
Hieronymus Bosch’s 
Christ crowned with 
thorns. 

730 NewsView with Jan 

Leeming and Moira Stuart. 
Weather. 

740 Saturday Review 
introduced by Russell 
Davies. Hugh Sykes 
- reports on the state of 
Britain's newspapers and 
taBcs to Andreas Whittam 
Smith, editor ofThe 
Independent; sculptor 
Dawd Nash discusses his 
work in Grizedaie Forest; 
and Sir Michael Tippett 
talks about the music of 
Sir Benjamin Britten. 

B3Q One Village in China. The 
second of three films about 
the vdiage and the people 

of Long Sow examines the 
villages history over the 
past lour decades. 

9.10 totemsbonal Goff. 
High&ghts of today's 
semifinals of the Suntory 
World Match play 


10.00 The FHmCMx a double 
bid of French gangster 
movies beginning with La 
balance ft 982) starring 
Nathalie Bays. A thriHer 
about the police, 
prostitutes, pimps and 
in fo rmers. Directed by 
Bob S warn. (English 
subtitles). Foitowed by, at 
1140 Tottchez pas au 
grtebi-{1953) sterling 
Jean Gabfn and Jeanne 
Moreau. A successful thief 
has his dreams of retiring 
on his latest pickings 
shattered when his young 
accomplice begins to 
* boast about the bullion 

' robbery. Directed by 
Jacques Becker. (English 
subtitles) Ends at 135. 


CHANNEL 4 


1.05 The Hoaber Btoob 
tfighway. Cartoon. 

130 Channel 4 Racing from 
N ewm a r ke t. The 
Cartsberg Trophy (1.45): 
the TattersaHs Middle Park 
Stakes (230k and the 
WiBtomHHf 

Cambridge shire Handicap 

(255) 

330 ram: The Bfo Broadcast 
of 1838* (1935) starring 
Jackie Oakie. Henry 
Wadsworth and George 

Burns. Musical comedy 
about two entertainers 
who operate their own 
independent radio station. 
DrectBd by Norman 

Taili ng 

535 Brookside. (r) (Oracle) 

6.00 Right to Reply- The 
Channel 4 Inquiry into the 
future of the Atlantic 
Alliance is accused of 
being pro-Naio 
propaganda. 

: 630 The Great Australian Boat 
Race: The America’s Cup. 
The first of 18 
programmes following the 
fortunes of the 
yachtsjostlingtochatenge 
Australia for the trophy in 
five months time. 

7.00 News summary and 
weather foitowed by 7 
Days. A new senes begins 
with a two-pan report on 
the Taize, the religious 
community in France to be 
visited by the Pope 
tomorrow. 

730 Redbrick. Part one of a 12 
programme series about 
the people of Newcastle 

University, opening in the 
summer of 1985, with the 
arrival of two 
undergraduates and the 
keenly contested race for 
the post of politics 
lecturer. (Oracle) 

830 The Orchestra. Part two of 
the series In which mime 
artist Jufian Joy-Chagrin, 
exploits the world of 
classical music. 

930 Paradise Postponed. A 
repeat of episode three fn 
which Lesha Tltmuss 
.. pursues his political career 
and takes a wife. (Oracle) 
1030 HHI Street Blues. A drug 
addict thief takes a woman 
hostage after he is 
arrested. (Oracle) 

10-55 Saturday Almost Live. 
Alternative comedy show 


8-55 Ptsy School 9.15 Articles 
of Forth with Mary Hall, 
director of the Multi-Faith 
Resource Urn in 
Bfrrrwi^am 930 Thta Is 
the Day. A simple rebgious 
service from a viewer's 
home in Taunton. 

1030 Aslan Magazine. The 
world of ballet as seen 
through the eyes ot Nicola 
Katrak, a principal dancer 
with the Satfier’s Weds 
Royal Baftet 

1030 I nterna tio nal Golf. The 
final ol tne Suntory World 
Match PiayChampionsnip. 

1230 Sign Extra. The Open 
Space programme Snap 
Judgements, adapted for 
the nearing impaired . 

1235 Farming. In recent months 
farm machinery 
manufacturers and 
dealers have gone 
bankrupt foNowing a loss 
of confidence in the 
farming community. Dan 
Cherrington looks at 
examples and questions 
industiy leaders on the 
future for the machinery 
trade. 1238 Weather. 

130 THs Week Next Week. 
David Dimbieby talks to 
Norman Tebbit 230 
EaetEndera. (r) (Ceefax) 

330 Suoday Grandstand 
introduced by Stave Rider, 
international Golf: the 
final of the Suntory World 
Match Ptey Championship 
at Wentworth: and Motor 
Racing: the British Racing 
Drivers’ Club 
Championship Rnafs from 
Sflverstone. 

5.15 Rolf Harris Cartoon Time. 

545 Pet Watch Includes a 

dachshund whose spinal 
problems have been cured 
By acupuncture. 

6.15 life lin e. Clift Michel more 
and Maggie Phtfom report 
on the latest chanty news; 
Selina Scott appeals on 
behalf of the National Star 
Centre for Disabled Youth 
in Cheltenham. 

635 News with Jan Leeming. 
Weather. 

635 Songs of Praise 
celebrates its 25th 
birthday. (Ceefax) 

7.15 Ever Decreasing Circles. 
Martin faces hts next door 
neighbour m a 
Roundheads and 
Cavaliers bottle at a local 
chanty fete. (Ceefax) 

745 Howards’ Way. Episode 
six of the 13-prt drama 
serial set among the 
sailing folk of the south 
coast (Ceefax) 

835 Only Fools and Horses- In 
this final episode ot the 
series Del is offered 
lucrative employment In 
Australia, if he accepts 
what wfll happen to 
Rodders and Uncle? 
(Ceefax) 

935 Death is Part of the 

Process. The second and 
final part of the drama 
about a group of South 
African oussidents who 
have turned to violence 
after peaceful means have 
failed to squash apartheid. 


635 TV-am begins with Sunday 
Commenc 730 Are You 
Awake Yet?: 735 The 
Wide Awake CkiD. 

830 David Frost on Simday 
includes news with 
Angrew Smvnons and the 
mommg newsoapers 
reviewed by Derek 
Jameson. Tne guests 


Stephenson. 

1135 Fine Abbott and CostoBo 
Meet thoKaier, Boris 
• Karloff. Gomedy thriHer . 
about strange goings-on 
in an unusual-hotel 
Directed by Charles T 
Barton. Ends at 130. 


(Cd6fsx) 

1035 News with Jan Leeming. 
Weather. 

1040 Heart of the Matter. Is 

’Qu&fty-Adfusted Life . _ 
Year" a welcome 
improvement or a danger 
which threatens us aB? 

11.15 Discovering Animals. The 
. fourth of eight 
programmes on the 
mammals of Britain, (r) 

1140 Rhode. American 

domesti c comedy series. 

12.05 SSeather. 


FREQUENCIES: 
92.5; Radio 4: 2 
1458kHz/206m: 


INALU 

\l)W 

i 

: - 1.6 

A.'Hl’ 

? n 

1 1 itfroiV 1 - 

- ■«' 
• ■! X** 




. : ■ 

v'..v5"r<: 




=s;; ;..:f 

■'Lw* 1 . 


( Radio 4 ) 

On long wave. (sVStBieo on VHF | 
535 Shipping. 630 News Briefing: 
Weather. 6.10 Preluda 
Music (s). 630 News: 

Farming. 630 Prayer. 

635 Weather; Travel • 

730 News. 7.10 Today's 

Papers. 7.1S On.Your - 
Farm: Report from the 
Fanning and Forestry 
conference, Loughborough. 
7.45 In Perspective, with 
„• Rosemary Hariffl 730 
Down to Earth (gardening). 
7.55 Weather. Travel 
830 News. 8.10 Today's 

- Papers. 8.15 Spoilon 4 
848 Breakaway (new series) 

Travel and leisure 
programme Ind 837 
Weather. Travel 830 

- News 

930 News Stand- Martin 
Wainwrigh t reye ws toe 
weekly magazines.' 

1035 Conference Special. 

Liberal MP Simon 
Huches reports on the 
• Labour Party conference 
in Blackpool. 

1030 Loose Ends wi th Ne d 
snemn and guests. 

11.30 From Our Own 

Correspondent. Lire and 
politics abroad. 

12.00 News: Money Box (new 
series) „ . 

1237 After Henry. Comedy 

series stamngPnmelte 
Scales as the widow. T235 
Weather - 

l!?0 AnyQuesttons? wjto Dr 
Rhodes Boyscn MP. 

Omian Reynolds. Joe^ Ashton 
MP. Simon Hughes MP. 

From Blackpool (r). 135 

230 NelwlSie Afternoon 
. Ray. The Holy 
Experxnent oyFritt 

Hoch waiter, ada^dby 
. Basil Ashmore. Drama about 
Jesuits in 1 8th century _ _ 
1^ Ameritg-Cartmduites 
Alan Dobte. rarer jtejey 
and Alfred Burke. (rKs) 

330 News: Travel: 
international 

. Assignment BBC. . 

- comaspondente report 

reports on the paints 

of two programmes 


445 Mamblisofa Fox- -5 
Hunting Man. Siegfried - 
Sassoon's novel abridged In 
7 parts, read by Stephen 
MacDonald (f) 

530 The LMrraWwW. Phil 
Drabble, Bob Sobbings 
and Chris Mead tackle 
questions from Rutland 


535 week Entfing. Satirical 
Sketches. 530 Shipping 
Forecast S5S Weather 

. 630 News; Sports Round-up 
635 Stop the week with 
Robert Robinson (s) 1 
730 Saturday^figtrt Theatre. - 
Regency Buck, by - 
Georgette Heyer.with 
Bbaoeth Proud, Simon' 
Shepherd and Gary Cady. 
830 Baker’6 Dozen. Richard 
Baker with records (s) 

930 Thrfierl Peter Lovesey’s 
Rough Oder, read by - 
. - David March (2). 938 
Weather 

1030 News 

10.15 Evening Sendee (s) 

1030 Opinions (new series) * 
Ethical, moral and 
religious issues of the week 

1130 llcienca Now. Presented 
by Peter Evans. 

1130 Ira 700 MHfon BilUon 
- Lira Radio Show. A 
special European etfitkxi of 
The MMon (found Radio 
Show • 

.1230 News: Weather. 1233 

VHF (avaHable in England and 
SWates only) as above 
except 535-63Qwn 
Weather; TraveL 135- 
230pm Programme News. 
430-830 Optkjns: 430 
Rambles in Ireland- 430 
Bramwavas.530LocaHy 
Speakgig530PorAqui. 

C Radio 3 ) 

635 weather, 730 News 

735 Aubade:Rossir»i (Barber 
of Seville overture), 

Glaztrov (Violin Concerto,- 
wtth Heifetz, so kkst), ■ 
Torroba (Sonata tnanerajor 
four guitars and 


Puccmi (O mtobaobino cara 
• Kiri te Kanawa), Jariadek 
(Cunning Litas Vixen suite). 
930 News 

935 Record Review: with 
Paul Vaughan. Includes 
Alan EUyth comparing 
recordings of Wafer's 
Sieotried 

10.15 Stereo Release: 
Beethoven^fog 
Quartet in G. Op 18 No 2 
(Brandis Quanefi, and 
String Quartet in B flat Op 
' 130 (Melos Quartet of 
Stuttgart) 

1136 Cleveland Orchestra 
(under Levj), with 
Cleveland Orchestra Chorus 
and Monique Duphil 

' NcfllWee Chonwes^ 1 * 0 ^ 
on abocaf texts. 12.05 
Interval-reading. 12.10 
Sessions (Piano Concarto)- 
130 News 

1.MI Endeflton String Quartet 
Mozart (String Quartet to 
A. K4S4 and String Quartet 
toD, K575) 

2.10 Jofwi Ogdon (pteno): 
RawstoomefFour 
Bagatelles), ras (Pimo 
Sonata No 1), McCabe 
(Three Improm p tus), Ogdon 
.(Sonata super Boris 


- 930 Fish at the Door eating ■ 
■ and drinking anthology. 

With Stephen Thome, 

Richard Demngton and 
Michael N Harbour 
940 Twilight of the Gods: Act 
3 

11.10 The Jazz Pianist 
Charles Fox presents 

Byarda«Howara?tiiey. 
1137 News. 1230 
Closedown. 




ai 


Radio 2 


MF (medaon wave). Stereo on 
VHF(see Radiol) 

News on the hour unfl 130pra, 
tiian 330, 630, 7.00 and hourly 
from 1030. Sports Desks 
1132am, 1032pm 
430am David ysmall 630 
Steve Truetove 835 David Jacobs 
1030 Sounds of the 60s 1130 
Afoum Tune (Peter Clayton) 1 30pm 
The Good Human Gukte. with 
the National Revue Company 130 
Sport on 2. includes Football - 


sogno di Doretta: KM te 
Kanawa). Strauss (Sere) 


to E flat). Mozart (Sonata - 
in a K448: PeraNa/ Lupu). 
Nielsen (tone poem Pan 
and Syrinx), Busoni 
(Divertimento, Op52), 


. Beemoven: Amsterdam 
C on cert g ebouw play the 
Symphony No 8. Interval 
reedtog at 025: At 330, 
Beethoven's Symphony 
No 7 

430 Ceflo and piano: Roman. 
Jabkmski and Krystina 
Boractoska. Honegger 
(Sonata), Debussy 
(Sonata in D minor), 
Ptaszynska (Moon 
Flowers) . 

530 The Ring of the Nfbehmg. 
The Wenh National 

Opera production of . 
Vregner'sTwBIght of the 

Gods, from Royal Opera 

House. Cast includes 
Arme Evans, Jeffrey Lawton, 
Barry Mora. Nicholas 
Folwelt Richard Armstrong 
conducts the Orchestra 

of trie Welsh National Opera. 
Prologue and Act 1 
7.15 Critics' Forum: with 
Christopher Frayfing in 

1 the chair .Topics include the 
BBC2 series The Story of 


(Wimbiedoo v LiverpooL 
Nottingham Forest v 
Manchester United), Racing from 
NewmarKet and Golf (Suntory - 
World Match Play Championship). 
530 Sports Report Classified 
football results 630 Bram of Sport 
1986 (new series) 630 The 
Press Gang, quiz, chaired by Giyn 
Worship 73d Three In a Row. 
Stuart Hall presents the quiz from 
Clitheroe. Lancashire 730 Gala 
Concert from Royal Festival rial, 
tod 830-840* Interval. Bob 
SmfieWon 'Our Kind of Radto’ a 


Sound. (BBC Radio orchestra 
strings) 1035 Martin Kelner 
1235am Night Owls (pave Getfy) 
130 Jean C$aBis 330-430 
Nortfing Rendezvous. 


Radiol 


at toe National Theatre 
835 TwdfghtoMheGods. Act 2 


630am Mark Page 830 Peter 
PoweH 1030 Dave Lee Travis 
130pm Adrian Juste 230 City 
to City. Mark Page is driven around 
Glasgow by Midge Ure 330 The 
American chart Show with Gary 
Byrd 530 Saturday Live (Andy 
Kershaw) 730 Stolon Mayo 930- 
1230 Midnight Runners Show 
with Dbde Peach. VHF Stereo 
Rerfios 1 * 2^ 430am As Radio 
Z 1.00pm As Radio 1. 73tM30am 
AS Ram) 2. . 

Radio continues on facing 
page, with Regional 71 


Radio 4 


On long wave. (S) Stereo on VHF. 

535 Shipping. 630 News Briefing; 
Weather. 8.10 Prelude (s) 

630 News: Morning Has 
Broken (hymns). 635 
Weather; Travel 

730 News. 7.10 Sunday 
■ Papers. 7.15 Apna Hi 
Ghar Samajhiye. 745 Bei$. 
730 Turning Over New 
Leaves. 735 Weather; 

Travel. 

830 News. 8.10 Sunday 
Papers 

8.15 Sunday. Religious news 
and views. 

830 David Bellamy appeals 
on behalf ot the Marine 
Conservation Society. 835 
Weather; Travel 

9.00 News. 8.10 Sunday 
Papers 

9.15 Latter from America, by 
Alistair Cooke. 

930 Momtog Service from the 
Basilica ol St Francis, 

Assisi. 

10.15 The Archers. Omnibus 
edition. 

11.15 Pick of the Week. 

Highlights of recent 
programmes, presented by 
Margaret Howard (s) 

12.15 Desert Island Discs. Sir 
lan MacGregor in 
conversation with Michael 
Parkinson (s) 1235 
Weather 

1.00 The World This 
Weekend: News. 135 
Stepping 

230 News: Gardenere’ 

Question Time. Experts 
tackle questions sent in by 
post 

230 Globe Theatre. An 

Enemy of the People, by 
tosen. Simultaneous 
transmission with BBC 
Work! Service. With Michael 
Williams. Ronald Pickup 
and John Moffett (s) 

430 News: Coming of Age. 

Three 18 year olds from 
Northern Ireland d iscuss 
their attitudes to the 
troubles, toe police and the 
army. 

430 The Natural History 
Programme. Fergus 
Keding on the events taking 
place In Assisi to 
celebrate the World WBdltfe 


Jameson. Tne guests 
indude lan MacGregor. 


f ~ ITV/LONDON 1 


Vicious Boys investigate 
toe node art 935 Roger 
Ramjet Cartoon. 9.45 
Bugs Bunny. Cartoon. 

(030 Morning Worship from the 
Church of St John the 
Evangelist Metone. 
Belfast 11.00 Getting On. 
Northampton shoemakers 
remember when tfwr 
town was toe centre of the 
boot and shoe business 
1130 Working for a 
Bettar Ufa. The co- 
operatives, (r) 

12-00 Weekend World. What is 
toe Tory message to beat 
the next General Election? 
Matthew Pams talks to 

Douglas Hurd. 130 PoBca 

Five. 1.15 European FoBt 
Talas. The Vixen and the 
Hare 130 The Smurfs, (r) 

230 LWT Nows headmas 
followed by The Htanan 
Factor. A new senes 
begins with the story of 
Jane, a young housewife 
from Coanor, a small town 
in Derbyshire, who 
appears to bear tne 
Stigmata, the sores and 
wounds or the crucified 
Christ, on the palms of her 
hands. 

230 Snooker. The last session 
of the final of tne BCE 
International, introduced 
by Dickie Davies Irom 
Trentham Gardens. Stoke- 
on-Trent. 

6.00 Bullseye. Darts and 

general knowledge game 

K esanted by Jvn Bowen, 
twi with Nicholas Owen. 
6.40 Highway. Sir Harry 

Secombe <s to Lynton and 
Lynmouth. 

7.15 Child's Play presented by 
Michael Aspel. Lynda 
Beftmghamand Gary 
WUmot try to decipher 
children's descriptions of 
everyday words. 

7.45 Live from the PfceacMy. 
Variety show introduced 
by Jinmy Tarbuck. among 
those on tonight's bill are 
Neil Sedaka, Phyllis DHIer. 
Brian Conley, Dave Evans, 
and Peter Piper. 

8.45 News. 

930 Inside Story. Episode two 
of tne drama serial about 
the behind-the-scenes 
battle to gain control of a 
Fleet Street Sunday 
newspaper. Starring Roy 
Marsden, Francesca Annis 
and Harry Andrews. 

10.00 Spitting Image. Satirical 
comedy mouthed by cruel 
latex models. 

1030 The South Bank Show. 
The first of a new series 
finds Metvyn Bragg at the 
Oxfordshire home of John 
Mortimer who talks about 
his facility to interweave 
fact with fiction in his 
novels; • • 

1130 LWT News headlines 
followed by End of 
Empire. The first of a new 
senes examining the 
gradual dissolution of the 
British Empire. 

1230 CaWomta Highways. The 
' history, culture and sights 
of toe West Coast of toe 
United States. 

1235 Night Thoughts. 


Fund's 25th anniversary. 

530 News; Travel 

535 Down Your Way. Brian 
Johnston visits 
PetarsfMd, Hampshire. 530 
Shipping. 535 Weather 

6.00 News 

6.15 Weekend Woman's 
Hour. Highlights of the 
past week's programmes. 

7.00 NOstromo.Part5ota 
six-part dramatization of 
Conrad's novel (s) 

830 A Good Read. 

Papemacks, discussed 
by Bnan Gear, Valane Grove 
and Richard Norm. 

830 Museum Choice. 

Kenneth Hudson and 
Ken Livingstone visit the 
Natural History Museum 
in South Kensington. 

9.00 News; Father Brown 
Stores (new senes). 
Dramatized by John 
Scotney, with Andrew 

• Sachs as Father Brown (s) 

930 M«s North s Obsession. 
Bnan Geer tells the story 
of Marianne North, a 
remarkable traveller. 935 
Weather; Travel 

1030 News 

10.15 You the Jury. The 
Commonwealth is no 
longer important is the 
motion debated, with 
Andrew Alexander and Alva 
Clarke. Chaired by Dick 
TavemeQC. 

1130 Before the Ending of the 
Day. The late evening 
Office of Compline (BBC 
Singers). 

11.15 Music from the People. 
20th-century revival of 
English folk song. 

11.45 Short Stones. Roses in 
Decern oer. by Dr G 
Bare team. Reader: Garard 
Green 

1230 News; Weather. 1233 

VHF (avalaDie In England and 
S Wales only) as above 
except: S3&6.00am 





(avaiaofe In England and 
S Wales only) as above 
except: S3&6.00am 
Weather; TraveL 730- 
830 Open University: 730 
The Hndu Temple . 730 
The Enlightenment. 7.40 
Popular CiAure. 1-f5- 
2.00pm Programme News 
430-630 Options: 430 
The Education Roadshow 
530 Don Quixote. 


New York City Balkt hi Fancy Free, on Channel 4, 9.15pm 


9.00 Ceefax. 

130 International Golf . The 
final ottna Suntory World 
Match Ptey Championship 
from toe West Course, 

Wentworth. 

3.00 Fane How to Murder Yoor 
WHe (1964) samng Jack 
Lemmon and Vima Usi. 
Comedy about a 

successful bachelor 
cartoomst who lives as he 
likes witn tne help of h«s 
faitnfu! manservant. One 
morning ne wakes up with 
a heavy hangover and a 
wife he cannot remember 
acquiring. With Terry- 
Thomas- Directed by 
Richard Qume. 

4.55 Music to Camera. The first 
of 2< recitals is be shown 
over a penod of six 
months. Kire Te Kanawa 
and » artist Roger 
Vignolas perform songs by 
Faure and Duparc. Uszi s 
setting ot texts by Victor 
Huge. Gounod s Jewel 
Song, and a selection from 
Carttaioube s Songs of toe 
Auvergne. Recorded m tne 
Signet Library. Edinburgh. 

5.45 The Lion ana the Dragon. 
The first of two 
programmes examining 
what !:te was like for 
Britons living in China in 
the Twenties and Thirties, 
in 

630 The Money Pro gra mme, 
presented by Bnan 
Widiake and Valerie 
Smgleton, examines how 
Room Hamilton banted to 
keep afloat his £3 (tuition 
furniture business. 

7.15 All Change at Eve rcra e c h 
Junction. Ex -engine 
driver, Donald Beale, and 
his fireman. Peter Smith, 
remember the golden age 
of steam on the Somerset 
and Dorset line, (r) 

7.45 The Natural Worfd: 
Leopard - a Darkness in 
the Grass. This first of a 
new senes is a portrait by 
award-wmmng 
cameraman Hugh Miles of 
a female leopard and her 
three cubs. 

840 Jazz at the 100 Club. A 
concert featuring the Pizza 
Express All Stars; the Stan 
Tracey Quartet; and Five- 

935 L<wetaw. r Vha first of a 
new series about the love 
lives of people aU over the 
world, beginning with 
Young Love. (Caetax) 

935 to t am atiooal Goff. 

Highlights of toe final of the 
Suntory World Match Ptey 
Championship. 

1025 PBoc A Wedding (1978) 
starring Desi Amaz Jr. and 
Carol Burnett. A comedy 
drama about toe guests 
and the principals at a 
lavish society wedding in 
the United States. . 
Directed by Robert 
Altman. Ends at 1230 


635 weather. 7.00 News 
735 Vivaldi's Venice: 

recordings ot Concerto in 
A minor for strings. RV 161. 
Violin Concerto to E Op 3 
No 12, RV 265. Concerto in 
G. for flute, two violins, 
confrnuo, RV 102, and Dixit 
Dbminus.RV594 
630 Edwin Fischer (piano and 
conductor). Mono 
recordings of 8ach'$ 
Concerto in C, BWV 
1064. Brahms's intermezzo 
inEflatOp117Nol. 
Schubert's Moment Musical 
in A flat. 0780 No 6). and 
Beethoven's Sonata in F 
minor. Op 57. 9u00 News 
935 Your Concert Choice: 
Lalande (Second 
Fantasy). Frederick toe Great 
(Symphony m D major). 

Bach (Cantata No 1 87). 
Brahms (Viohn Concerto, 
with Ginette Neveu, sokxst) 
1030 Music Weekly: with 
Michael Oliver. Includes 
a conversation witn Klaus 
Termstect, and John 
Deatonoge on Franz 
ScnrnKttandthe 
Apocalpyse 


Haydn (Sonata m A flat. 

H XVI 448). Schumann 
(Sonata in F sharp mnor. 

Op 1 1). Schubert (Sonata in 
G. D. 894- interval 
reading at 1235 
1230 BBC Invitation 

Concert Ulster Orchestra 
(under Thomson), with 
Michael Co&ns (ctermet), 
Hugh Tirmey (piano). 
Beethoven (Rums of 
Atoens overture), Stanford 
(Clarinet Concerto in A 
minor. Op 60), Liszt 
(Fantasia on themes 
from Beethoven's Ruins of 
Athens), Branros 
(Serenade No 2 in A. Op 16). 
interval reading at 130 

2.15 The Living Poet Fleur 
Adcock reads her own 
verse 

235 Beethoven and Debussy. 
Alban Berg QuanM. 
Beethoven (Quartet in B flat 
major. Op 18 no S), 

Quartet in C major. Op 59 No 
3. end Debussy s Quartet 


CHANNEL 4 


1230 Major League BaseboB. 
The first aTa new seras. 
An introduction to the 
rules of toe spon which 
will be covered on this 
Channel. Presented by 
Martm Tyler. 

2.00 Everybody Here. 

Multicultural entertainment 

fortoeyoung.fr) 

235 FBm: Roman Scandals' 
(1933) starrinq Eddie 
Cantor. Musical comedy 
about a delivery boy wfx> 
dreams he is sieve in 
Ancient Rome. Directed by 
Frank Tuttle. 

4.10 Channel 4 Racing 
International: The 

Trusthouoe Forte Prfx do 
P Arc da Tnomphe. 
presented by Brough 
Scon. The commentator is 
Graham Goode. 

4.45 A Una Bit of Magic 

Realised. A btoqraphy of 
William Fox Tatbot, the 
lather ol photography, 
presented by Sir Roy 
Strong, (r) 

5.15 News summery and 
weather lonowed by 
Fifties Features. This third 
and final programme of 
the series about the 
women working in the 
Bnrtsh film industry in the 
Fifties examines what 
became ol the 'wicked 
ladies' 

630 American FootbaB. The 
Atlanta Falcons at toe 
Tampa Bay Buccaneers 

7.15 Chasing Rainbows - A 
Nation and Its Music. The 
fourth programme tn 
Jeremy Marre’s series 
examrang popular music 

and entertainment in 
England. This evening - 
the relationship between 
music end work. 

8.15 Pillar ot Fire. Part lour of 
the history of Zionism 
reviews the period 
immediately preceding toe 
Second world War when 
toe renewed outbreak of 
toe Arab Revolt led toe 
British Government to 
withdraw its support tor 
the recommended 
partition plan. 

9.15 Choreography by Jerome 
Robbins. The New York - 
Ballet recorded at the 
New York State Theatre, 
perform two ballets by the 
celebrated American - 
choreographer, Jerome 
Robbins - Fancy Free, his - 
first ballet, performed in 
1944; and Antique 

. Epigraphs, created four - 
decades later. - 
1020 FBm: Yield to the Night* 
(1956) starring Diana Dors 
in perhaps her finest 
performance -that of a . 
young woman condemned 
to the gallows for shooting . 
dead tne woman who . 
stole her lover. Directed . 

■ by J.Lee Thompson.' Ends 

ai12.1Q. 


part 10 ot Roger 
Nichols's senes about -the 
musical Itte ot Pans after • 
toe First world War, Today: 
1926-7 (r) 

6.15 Koilsch String Quartet: 

Wort (Italian Serenade). 
Schoenberg (Quartet No 2 In 
F sharp minor, with 
Gifford, soprano). Scnuben 
(Quartet movement in C 
motor, 0703) 

7.00 Uszt and the piano: Run 
Woo Psik(piano).ScherzD 
and March, and Baflade No 2 
inBmmor 

730 MaMen Symphony No 3. 
London Philharmonic 
Orchestra (under Tennstedt). 
with London 

Prulharmon'ic Choir (ladies 
section). Eton Boys' Choir - 
ana Waltraud Meier (mezzo) 
920 Hymn to Demeten David 
Constantine's verse 
translation of toe Homeric 
hymn. Narrator: Jill 
Baicon. Music by Nigel 
Osboma. Performed by 
Lornano 

1030 Bath Festival: Peter HU 
(piano). George 
Bervamin (piano). Messiaen. . 
(Visions del' Amen) 

1130 The Lute Group. Ayres, 

mad ng ate and 

instrumental worics by 
composers including 
Boessest Dow! and and 
Hume v 

1137 News. 1230 Closedown. 



Radio 2 


MF (medium wave), stereo on 
VHF(seeRadx)t). 

News on the hour (except 
830pm). GOLF: (Suntory World 
Matchplfly Championship). 
Reports at 1132am, 1232pm, 


Radio continues on facing 

gage, with Regional TV 





WHISKY 


SCOTLAND’S 
NUMBER ONE 
QUALITY 
SCOTCH WHISKY 


1 










SATURDAY OCTOBER 4 1986 


British hopes are 
still alive after 


Lyle’s late stand 


By Mitchell Platts 


Sandy Lyle recovered from 
the brink of defeat in the 
Sunlory world match-play 
championship at Wentworth 
yesterday as Severiano 
Ballesteros beat a hasty, and 
unexpected. retreaL 

Lyle extended the excite- 
ment on an afternoon of high 
drama by dramatically claw- 
ing his way to a 38-hole 
victory over Tommy 
Nakajima. of Japan, after 
being two down with only two 
holes to play. He moved 
through when Nakajima took 
four 10 get down from the edge 
at the second extra hole, then 
said: “I'm absolutely shat- 
tered. It was a tremendous 
match, a joy to play in.'* 

Lyle will not. as might have 
been expected, meet 
Ballesteros in the semi-finals 
today but Rodger Davis, of 
Australia. Davis delivered the 
most surprising result of the 
quarter-finals by inflicting a 
crushing 7 and 6 defeat on 
Ballesteros, the defending 
champion. 

Jack Nicklaus. however, 
will take on Greg Norman in 
the other semi-final. Nicklaus 
made a mockery of his own 
contention that he could no 
longer be regarded a serious 
contender by producing golfof 
the highest calibre to beat the 
young Spaniard. Jose-Maria 
Olazabal. S and 4. Norman 
lacked his usual authority but 
he still comfortably overcame 
Japan's Joe Ozaki. 4 and 2. 

The bill of fare on offer at 
Wentworth yesterday looked 
inviting from the moment the 
sun penetrated the early 
morning haze and. between 
them, the players served up a 
delicious variety of intense 
competitiveness and virtuoso 
shot-making. 

Lyle and Nakajima reserved 
the biggest treat for the record 


record of 18 birdies and four 
eagles established by Tony 
Jacklin and Lee Trevino in 
1972. 

Jacklin eventually lost that 
pulsating contest but Lyle's 
I Ith-hour victory keeps alive 
the prospect of a first British 
success in a championship. 


Second round results 

R Pam (Aus) bt S BaBestaros (Sp). 7 
and 6 

5 Lyte (OB) bt T Nakajima (Japan) ai 38tfi 

J rfadauE (US) M J-M Oiazaoal (Sp). 5 
and 4 

G Norman (Aus) bt N Ozaki (Japan), 4 
and 2 


5 =37 
4* =32 = 


Morning 

BaBesteros 

4 3 5 4*3 4 
3 4 4* 4 2*3 
Davis 

5 3 5 4*2*3* 

3 4 4* 4 2*4 

Afternoon 

Ballesteros 

43 4 635 45 4 = 38 

3 4 4* 

Davis 

4 3 4 4*2* 4 
3 3* 4* 


69 


4 4 
3* 5 


4 =34 
4* = 33 = 


67 


4 3* 4 = 32 


Morning 

Nakapma 

5 3 3* 3t2 4 4 4 4 = 32 

3 4 3t 4 3 4 4 4* 4* =33 = 65 

Lyte 

4 2* 4 4*3 3* 4 4 4 = 32 

3 4 4* 3*3 4 3* 5 4 = 33= 65 

Afternoon 

Nakapma 

4 4 4 4*2*4 3* 4 3* = 32 
2*3* 4* 4 2*4 4 5 4* = 32= 64 
Lyte 

4 2* 3* 3t2*3* 3* 5 5 = 30 
3 4 4* 5 34 4 4* 3f =34=64 
* equals birdie t equals eagle 
Semi-final draw 

R Davis v S Lyle: Nicklaus v Norman 


crowd of 16.330 by gathering 
foi 


27 birdies and four eagles 
between them in an extraor- 
dinary encounter. It exceeded 
the previous world match play 


which is now in its 23rd year. 
There was little to choose 
between Lyle and Nakajima in 
the morning, when both play- 
ers were round in 65. as they 
exchanged each of the first six 
holes, then four more on the 
inward half, to eventually 
come into lunch all square. 

Lyle, however, quickly dis- 
tanced himself from 
Nakajima in the afternoon by 
equalling another world 


match play record. He col- 
lected five birdies and one 
eagle in a glorious run from 
the second hole, by which 
time he was four up. 
Nakajima then launched a 
dramatic counter-attack by 
winning four holes in a row' 
from the eighth. Then he 
moved ahead when Lyle took 
three putts at the 1 3th. and he 
stretched his advantage by 
holing firom fully 40 feet for a 
two at the uphill 14th. 

Lyle reached the 17th still 
two down. He won that hole 
with a pitch to five feel for a 
birdie, then squared the match 
by making a pun of 45 feet 
across the last green for an 
eagle three after Nakajima had 
put his approach into a 
bunker. 

Davis progressed as 
Ballesteros, suffering from a 
cold relinquished another of 
the crowns he so cherishes. 
Bui it is turning out to be a 
vintage year for the affable r 
Davis. He won the PGA 
championship at Wentworth 
in May. then helped Australia 
lo victory in the Dunhill Cup 
at St Andrew’s last week. He 
said: “I quit the game six years 

r . when I was suffering from 
yips, but a business ven- 
ture failed and I was hurt 
financially to the tune of 
£160.000. so I had to come 
back. I am glad that I did." 

Davis was in command 
after winning the ninth hole in 
the morning to move three 
holes ahead and Ballesteros 
was unable to elbow his way 
back in the afternoon when 
Davis added a further five 
birdies to the seven that he 
collected in the morning. 

Nicklaus struck the ball 
with such purity that Olazabal 
was unable to arrest his slide 
after falling four behind after 
nine holes against the US 
Masters champion. 

Card of coarse 

West course, Wentworth 
Hole Yds Par Hole Yds Par 


Douglas dazzles at last 


Kitrina Douglas, the former 
British amateur champion 
from Bristol ended a two-year 
lean spell by winning the 
Mitsubishi Colt Cars Jersey 
Open championship at Royal 
Jersey yesterday. 

Miss" Douglas set a tour- 


nament record with a final 
round of 69, including five 
birdies, for a six under par 
aggregate of 278 to be six 
strokes clear of Peggy Conley, 
the American challenger, and 
collect the £3.000 winner's 
cheque. 


1 

471 

4 

10 

186 

3 

2 

155 

3 

11 

376 

4 

3 

452 

4 

12 

483 

5 

4 

501 

5 

13 

441 

4 

5 

1 91 

3 

14 

179 

3 

6 

344 

4 

15 

466 

4 

7 

399 

4 

18 

380 

4 

8 

398 

4 

17 

571 

5 

9 

450 

4 

18 

502 

5 

Out 

3.361 

35 

In 

3584 

37 


Total yardage: 6.945 Pan 72 


RACING 


No luck of the draw 


Dancing Brave. Britain's 
leading contender for the Prix 
de I'Arc de Triomphe, has 
been given the worst possible 
draw for tomorrow’s race at 
Longchamp. 

The colt's trainer. Guy 
Harwood, said at Newmarket 
yesterday: “How unlucky can 
you be. He's my first Arc 
runner and gets drawn 15 of 
15. I'm also unhappy to hear 
that, contrary to reports, they 


at 


watered the course 
. Longchamp yesterday." 

The other British chal- 
lengers — Shahrastani, 
Shardari and Dihtsian — are 
better drawn in stalls nine, 
five and four respectively. 
Bering, the No.l French hope, 
is drawn 14. 

The official going is good to 
firm. 

Arc card and preview, page 37 
Other racing, pages 36 and 38 


SHOOTING 


Five-year 
ban for 
McDonald 


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COT5WOLDS 

MAJORCA 

BOGNOR 

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tax now, decides 
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could help. 

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But don't sleep on it. Post the coupon, today. 
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j UfU INVESTME NTS E R V ICES I 

[ T4/10J86YH 1 


By John Good body 

The Scottish Shooting 
Council has banned Robin 
McDonald, the pistol marks- 
man. for five years because he 
took beta-blockers during the 
Commonwealth Games last 
July. McDonald, aged 56. is 
the first Briton to be found 
positive for dope in any sport 
at either the Olympic or 
Commonwealth Games. He 
had said he had been taking 
the drug under prescription 
for a heart condition for 10 
years. 

But McDonald has told The 
Times that he had signed a 
form before the random test in 
Edinburgh stating that he had 
taken no form of medication 
before the event 

Beia-blockers were banned 
Mav 1985 bv the Inter- 


in 


national Shooting Union 
(UIT) because of widespread 
misuse by marksmen seeking 
to stop tremors and slow their 
heart beats. 


First pubfisbedto 1785 


SPORT 



SNOOKER 


Hughes fights 
back after 
setback 


early 


By a Correspondent 

Eugene Hughes, who beat 
the three-times world cham- 
pion Steve Davis in the pre- 
vious round, revealed his 
determination to reach the 
BCE £175,000 international 
final as he recovered from a 
slow start to lead Neal Foolds 
their semi-final match at 


Stoke yesterday. 

Hughes, who comes from 
Dublin but is based in Ilford, 
responded to the problem of 
losing the opening two frames 
to take four of the next five for 
a 4-3 interval lead 

With the scores level at 2-2 
at the first interval. Hughes 
maintained his form after the 
break to take the next two for a 
4-2 lead. Thar pot the match 

favourite in (rouble for be 
knew a 5-2 deficit after the 
first session would give him a 
major task against a player in 
such confident form. But 
Foulds. despite seeing Hughes 
make a break of 38. responded 
with a 46 to take the final 
frame of (he session 71-39 to 
irai! by jost a single game with 
10 more frames to play. 



Happy in his work: Lyle enjoys himself at Wentworth yesterday (Photograph: lan Stewart) 


RUGBY UNION 


Bishop suspended but he 
will seek ‘justice’ in court 


By David Hands, Rugby Correspondent 


The Welsh Rugby Union 
announced yesterday that 
David Bishop, the Pontypool 
scrum half, has been sus- 
pended from playing rugby 
until September 1 nexl year, 
but this is unlikely to be the 
Iasi we shall hear of this whole 
sorry affair. Bishop, who will 
be 26 this month, is prepared 
to go to court in an attempt to 
avert what he sees as a 
miscarriage of justice. 

The union met on Thursday 
evening to hear the advice of 
Lheir disciplinary committee, 
who met earlier in the week 
after it had been established 
that Bishop's one-month jail 
sentence - imposed in Septem- 
ber by Newport crown court 
after Bishop had pleaded 
guilty to a chaige of common 
assault on Chris Jarman, the 
Newbridge lock - had been 
suspended for a year by the 
Appeal Court in London. 

Ray Williams, the WRU 
secretary, said that the union 
suspension(efTective from 
October 2 to August 31) was 
not imposed solely because 
Bishop had appeared in court 


on a charge arising from 
violence on the rugby field. It 
was also, Mr Williams said, 
because he had originally de- 
nied involvement in the in- 
cident in which Jarman was 
punched unconscious. It was 
“conduct prejudicial to the 
interests of the union and the 
game". 

At the same time the WRU 
castigated Pontypool and Old 
Illtydians for selecting Bishop 
to play for them at a time 
when his appeal was still to be 
heard: “It is accepted that 
technically there was no rea- 
son why Bishop could not play 
but the whole issue was so 
sensitive that it would have 
been prudent not to have 
selected him until the matter 
had been folly settled,"Mr 
Williams said. 

Predictably the player him- 
self. who was capped by Wales 
against Australia in 1984, was 
shocked and dismayed.''! am 
prepared to take this all the 
way to get some sort of lair 
play,"Bishop said. “I have al- 
ready told my solicitor I want 
to lake the WRU lo court if 


Australia defer SA tour 


The Australian Rugby 
Union deferred yesterday a 
decision on whether to accept 
an invitation to tour South 
Africa next year (David 
Hands writes). No decision 
will be made until after an 
ARU delegation has met Bill 
Hayden, the Minister for For- 
eign Affairs, and possibly not 
until next year. 

Many of the leading players 
wish to go and .Alan Jones, 
their coach, would be happy to 
make an official tour that 
wish would be strengthened if 
Australia were to emerge next 
June as world champions, 
since South Africa have not 


been invited to participate in 
the World Cup. 

Australia also have a tour to 
Argentina next autumn in the 
pipeline. Clearly their pop- 
ularity is high; ironically they 
have invited the Soviet Union 
for a five-match tour next 
iding 
national at the 
Ground on May 1 7 — six days 
before Australia's first World 
Cup match, against England. 

Wales have confirmed that 
the United Slates Eagles wiiJ 
visit in November, 1987, and 
will play one international for 
which Wales will award full 
caps. 


year, ending in a full inter- 
ne Sydney Cricket 


lhat is the only way to get 
them to change their mind. It 
is a travesty as far as I am 
concerned. To be banned until 
next season has knocked me 
for six.” 

According to the WRU, 
however, there is no 
appeaL“He cannot appeal 
against the decision,”Mr Wil- 
liams said, “it -is final. We 
have consulted our honorary 
solicitor on this matter." 

The decision means that not 
only will Pontypool lose a fine 
player and one capable of 
lifting his team out of the 
common run, but Wales, even 
if they wished to do so, are 
unable to choose him in their 
squad for next year's World 
Cup in Australasia. Not that 
such considerations should 
have had any part in the 
WRU’s decision nor, rightly, 
have they. 

It is a brave decision, en- 
tirely consistent with their 
declared hard-line policy 
against violence on the rugby 
field and it is to be applauded 
It may be said that Bishop is, 
in any case, distinctly fortu- 
nate to be at liberty today; be 
pleaded not guilty in court to 
assault causing actual bodily 
harm, a charge which might 
have attracted a greater 
punishment 

The claims of natural justice 
being violated do not stand up 
either. It has been said that 
Bishop is being punished 
twice, by the court and by the 
union; this, of course, happens 
every day. People who com- 
mit robbery and are caught 
lose both their liberty and 
their livelihood; people who 
commit traffic offences may 
Jose, money, licence and, in 
some cases, livelihood. We all 
have responsibility for our 
actions and must bear the 
consequences. 


CYCLING 


Kelly takes overall lead in classic 


Sean Kelly twice survived 
mechanical problems yes- 
terda\ to emerge as the leader 
of the Nissan Classic at the 
end of a demanding day's 
racing. “I had to lake the lead 
otherwise they wouldn't have 
let me into Carrick 
tomorrow." quipped the rider 
from Carrick-on-Suir. after 
oui-spriniing the overnight 
leader Sieve Bauer, of Canada. 


From John Wilcocksoo, Cork 
at the top of the crowd-choked 
St Patrick's Hill in Cork. 

Phil Anderson was the 
magnificent winner of the 
afternoon's 63-mile stage from 
Killamey. but the Australian 


was still badly placed overall 
because he lost an irredeem- 
able four minutes to Kelly and 
Bauer in the savage 56-mile 


leg around the Ring of Kerry 
earlier in the day. 

RESULTS: Stage Sfc Tralee to lOBamey. 
56 mBas: 1, K Andersen, Den. 2 hns IB mm 
36 sec 2.T Van Vhet, Noth, at 59 seconds: 
3. S Kelly, Ira: 4. S Bauer. Can: 6. R Kwfai. 
US: 6. A Timms. G B: 7. A Van Her Pots', 
Nefli: 8. G LeMond. US afl same tfme: 9, j 
McLougMn. 68 at 1 40: 10. S Joho. Switz 
at SOI. Stage SB: KAamey 10 CorK. 63 
mtos: 1. P Anderson. Austr. 3 hr* 03 mm 

39 see a A Doyte.G8aM.01; 3. Ke*r» 

1.3«; 4. M guott. GB: 5, Van VM both 
tmOvml positions: 1. Kaly: Z 


Bauer same time; 3. Van VBet at 8 sec 4. 

van der Poel at 15 sees. 

end 


SPORT IN BRIEF 


Hudson is 
rebuffed 


Tim Hudson. Lancashire's 
millionaire cricket supporter, 
has lost his fight to oust the 
county club chairman. Cedric 
Rhoades. Hudson wanted to 
take oi er at Old Trafford and 
tried to persuade Ian Botham 
and Viv Richards to play for 
Lancashire for two years. 

Both players expressed sur- 
prise at some of Hudson's 
claims and now the Lan- 
cashire committee have ral- 
lied around Rhoades, saying. 
"We ha\e considered" the 
Hudson affair and entirely 
repudiate his statements." 
The said the chairman “en- 
joys the full confidence of the 
committee." 



which the team to play France 
B at Pontypridd on October 
25 will be chosen. Holland, 


aged 25. plays for Glamorgan 
Warn 


tenderers. 

SQUAD: 


(PontypoaQ. N DsvtoJUaneA). K Jems 
(South Wales PoUce). E HoBand (Qtemg - 1 


gan Wanderers). S Dsvtos lUanrt). G 

John (CartMn. PWBams (Newbridge). J 

Griffiths (Uariaffi). Forwards: A Puchu u n 


Hudson: misses out 


Running plan 


'(Lkmaffi). . _ _ . 

(UaneOI). D EdmntaflUaeHBg). P Francis 

(Maestro). L Delaney (UnraBH). S Davies 
(South Wales Ponce). O Pm (UanefiQ. w 
Matthews (QbwVau). P May ((JanetH). K 
M os eley (Pontypool). A Owen (Bndoend), 
R Cotins (South wales Poke). G Jones 
(UanefO. ft Webster (Swansea). P Pugh 
(Neath). A Carter (Pontypool). M Jones 


Title bout 


Brian Anderson (Sheffield) 
meets Tony Burke (Croydon), 
in Belfast, on October 29. for 
the vacant British middle- 
weight title. 


Rob de Castella. the world 
champion, win run in the New 
York City marathon for the 
first time next month when he 
seeks to enhance his reputa- 
tion as one of the great long- 
distance runners. He has won 
eight of the 14 marathons he 
has run over eight years, 
including this year's Boston 
and Commonwealth events. 


Team award 


Eamonn Holland, a centre 
with rugby qualifications for 
Ireland and Wales, is included 
in the Welsh B squad from 


The Avia Watches Woman 
Golfer of the Year award has 
been won by the Britain and 
Ireland Curtis Cup team and 
their captain Diane Bailey. 
They were the first team from 
Britain and Ireland to win in 
America when they beat the 
United States 13-5 in Kansas 
last August Tony Jacklin, 
captain of Europe’s winning 
Ryder Cup team last year, will 
present the trophy. 



if\ ix 


Pleat caught in 
middle after 
Claesen stalls 


By Clive White 

The alleged “needle” natch 
between Tottenham Hotspur 
and Luton Town has been 
blunted by die loss of leading 
forwards on both sides. David 
Pleat, very much the man in 
the middle today, sealed the 
deal which took Mark Fakoto 
Watford yesterday knowing 
Clive Alien, his leading 
goalscorer had received a 
hamstring iujary in training. 

Pleat was then disappointed 
when Nico Claeses, the Bel- 
gian international, asked him 
for time to think over his 
proposed £600,000 transfer. 

On the day Lotos hope to 
welcome Harford for his first 
game since a knee operation in 


Suspension for 
Stein of Luton 


the summer, they will be 
without Brian Stein, his fellow 
forward, because of suspen- 
sion. Luton will decide this 
morning • whether to risk 
Harford, who has played in 
two reserve games in the last 
week. Marc North stands on 
reserve duty. 

Howells, with only one 
appearance at Hillsborough 
last seaon when he scored, 
cooks in for AHeaJPleat said 
of the Claesen deal: ^Standard 
liege are prepared to do a 
ieal hat the player still has 
one or two things to sort oat in 

his contract If be comes, 
great If not then good luck to 

him- " 

Pleat, who resigned as man- 
ager of Luton four months ago 
amid animosity, said the game 
meant nothing spedaL “i 
want to take the fear oat of the 
game and entertain," he said. 
That might have been more 
possible if Tottenham followed 
Loton and operated a ban on 
visiting supporters. 

The Luton players will not 
want for incentives. They may 
also have a few ideas as to 
where Pleat should spend 
some of feat £350,000 from 
the sale of Falco should the 
Claesen deal not go through. 
John Moore, Luton’s man- 
ager, admitted yesterday: 
'■“Some of them might think 
they want to show their old 
boss that they're worth 
buying." 

Pleat will need little 
convincing of the talent con- 
tained m bis oM Luton side, 
whose impressive defeat of 
Tottenham in this fixture last 
season most have gone some 
way to helping Pleatsecure his 
new £90,000 a year post. ■ 

He must be grateful, too, not 
to be caught up in another of 
Luton's contentious schemes. 
The controversy of their arti- 
ficial pitch was- minor com- 


“My job, Hke David’s before 
me, is to protect our -yoimg- 
sters as best 1 can. That’s why 
I bought Wilson 


Pressure too great 
on young players 


and McDonagfa to ward off the 
possibility of having to pitch a 
youth player Into tire first 
team. The trouble is in the 
English game yon don’t have 
the time to wait for -them. The 
pressures are too great My 
kids are practising now, bat in 
five years time I might not be 
here to see it That’S why we 
don’t have the spccess we 
ought to at national kvd. We 
don't allow our youngsters to 
practise enough before they 
transfer that skill to 
competition.” 

For the moment he is trying 
to shield his senior players, 
too, from the sumnmdmg 
political storm. “I just wish 
they would let the dob get on 
with what they are trying to do 
and give ns a little harking. 
People must make a judge- 
ment are we doing something 
that’s worthwhile or not" 


Celtic to Souness is 


face 

Russians 


worry 
at Rangers 


Celtic found themselves fac- 
ing the most formidable 
assignment of their European 
Cup history following the 
draw yesterday when they 
were drawn to meet Dynamo 
Kiev in the second round of 
this year’s tournament The 
Russians are the most feared 
team in the competition and 
are old enemies of Celtic, 

The first legofthetiewillbe 
played at Parkhead on Octo- 
ber 22, which is something not 
to Celtic's liking. The Scots are 
also expected lo ask UEFA to 
investigate the situation in 
Kiev following the Chernobyl 
explosion and guarantee that 
it is safe for players to take 
part in a match there 
Kiev provide the Soviets 
with the bulk of their national 
side. They are holders of the 
European Cup Winners' Cup 
and defeated . the strong 
Bulgarian team, Berne Stara 
Zagora. in the first round of 
this season's competition. 

Celtic remember Kiev with 
a tinge of apprehension. The 
season after the Scots had 
become the first British dub to 
take the European Cup, they 
were knocked out in the first 
round of the premier tour- 
nament by the Russians 
Rangers have been more 
fortunate than their Glasgow 
rivals, having been drawn at 
Ibrox against Boa vista, of 
Portugal in the second round 
of the UEFA Cup. Dundee 
United ’s manager. Jim 
McLean, has mixed feelings 
about his dub's UEFA Cup- 
tie with University Craiova of 
Romania. Wrexham, who had 
an easy win over Zurrieq, of 
Malta will' find it much more 
difficult in the second round 
of the European Cup Winners' 
Cup when they meet Real 
Zaragoza, of Spain. 

The most glamorous tie of 
them all will be the European 
Cup match between Real Ma- 
drid and Juventus. The Span- 
ish champions, who have won 

the UEFA Cup for the last two 
seasons, and the Italian league 
leaders would certainly .have 
provided a thrilling final in 
Vienna next May. One of the 
two, however, now feces 
dmination before the com- 
petition is reduced to the last 
eight dubs. 


With both teams eager to 
regain the favour of their 
passionate supporters after 
cheerless displays in Europe, 
even more verve can be expec- 
ted in Scotland 7 s match of the 
day between- Heart of Midlo- 
thian and Rangers at Tyne- 
castie {Hugh Taylor writes). 

A match which is invariably 
exciting should this afternoon 
ensure a fascinating contrast 
in style, a reversal ironically, 
of the patterns the Hearts and 
Rangers of old used to weave. 
Now Rangers indulge in more 
leisurely elegance while the 
core of steel in the determined 
Hearts bears resemblance to 
the stalwart Ibrox sides of 
yestetyear. 

For Rangers, much will 
depend on whether Graeme 
Souness is fit, although Rang- 
ers also have worries over 
Fraser, Ferguson, Durrani and 
McMinn. Hearts may be with- 
out Foster, their eager for- 
ward, but there is hope Kidd, 
that redoubtable defender, 
will be ready. . 


There is unlikely to be a 
change at the top. Even with- 
out Narey, who is injured, 
lee Unit 


Dundee United should have 
tittle difficulty, following their 
latest triumph in Europe in 
beating Falkirk at Tannadice 
and staying in the lead. They 
showed in their defeat of Lens 
in the UEFA Cup that the 
quiet revolution mounted by 
Jim McLean, the manager, is 
succeeding. 


Celtic are likely to retain 
Shepherd, who played against 
Shamrock Rovers in the Euro- 
pean Cup; to meet St Mirren 
at Paisley. Although the Saints 
have improved, they are not 
expected to stop opponents 
who have seldom felled re- 
cently to win this fixture. 


Aberdeen are consoling 
themselves with the though 
foat their surprising exit from 
Europe can enhance their 
championship prospects. And 

they should restore confidence 

by beating Motherwell at 
Pittodrie. But their Injury list 
has been extended by a severe 
injury . id Mitchell, their 
promising defender, and Weir 
the hueniational “