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No 62,582 


THE 



TIMES 


TUESDAY OCTOBER 7 1986 


Court told pregnant Irish woman was duped€; 

Syrian ‘link’ 
to jumbo jet £^ 5 MH| 
human bomb .ttmlSB 




By Stewart TeadJer and Nicholas Beestoa 

lomatie ' route- 15111 on a d ?P- fr° m Syrian Embassy and his l 
tomauc collision course with bavins coiianed the Syrian 


c» '■uuiie wim 

u >cslerda > after allega- 
ai I£.n y pro ^ tJtin B counsel 
fha, ,r cnir !, I Crimina] Court 
“| ai lh e. radical Arab state 
masterminded the attempted 

Sr?°? n °J ai l El Al iumbo 

jet at London s Heathrow 
Airpon in April. 

Jordanian, Nezar 
Hindawi. aged 32. is accused 
oi trying to blow up the plane 
o\ planting a bomb in the 
luggage of his pregnant Irish 
girlfriend. But as Mr 
Hindawi s trial opened the 
prosecution alleged that Mr 
Hindawi had admitted being 
given the bomb, and told to 
put n on an aircraft, how to set 
it which aircraft to put it on 
and to use a girl to cam- it. by 
officers of Svrian military 
intelligence. 

. He had also admitted being 
aided in London by officials 


from the Syrian Embassy and his girlfriend who was five- 
having contacted the Syrian and-a-half months pregnant. 
Ambassador. Dr Louipuf al- the night before the flight, 
Haydar. after the {dot failed, which was to have been the 


Mr Roy Amiot. For the beginning of a holiday before 
prosecution, said. the couple married. 

Mr Hindawi had travelled Miss Murphy was anwjt- 
to London under a false name tingly carrying the device flat 
on a Syrian passport normally would have destroyed her and 
issued to government officials, everybody else on the Td 
Mr Amlox added, and pas- Ayiy-bound plane. 

The explosive was “one of 
Jordanian accused 3 the most powerful military- 
. . ..." sivle explosives”. Mr Amlot 

sessed a visa indicating the said, and would have caused 
bearer was on official Syrian a“devastating” blast “It 


Government business. 


would have been one of the 


Mr Amlot said: “There is most callous acts of all time if 
convincing evidence be was Hindawi had succeeded,” Mr 


Today 



Homes: a 
fair deal? 

The Duke of. 
Edinburgh finds 
increasing ? 
acceptance fpr 
the changes he - 
recommended 
last year 

Out of 
Africa 

Conor Cruise 
O’Brien sees 
reduced tension 
among South 
African whites 

Fashion’s 
live wires 

Suzy Menkes in 
Milan on the 
trapeze look that 
is dominating 
new Italian 
designs 

Top of the 
form . . ■ 

The top 20 boys' 
schools, from 
Ampleforth to 
Winchester 

Tomorrow 

• Don’t miss the 
top 20 girls’ schools 

• And another 
coupon towards 
your £5 shopping 
trip to France 

Order your 
Times today 


— ( (3cdd~ 

• The Times Portfolio 
Gold daily competition 
prize of £8,000, 
double the usual 
amount because no 
one won on Saturday, 
was shared 
yesterday by two 
readers: Miss E. 

Varley of Milton Keynes 
and Mr J.R. Femant 

of Barnes, London. 
Details, page 3. 

• Portfolio list, page 

29; rules and howto 
play, information 
service, page 24. 

tfj 1 23 Obituary 22 

SSS1 * 

E35 *Sg&5" 2 ? 

SU .3-S MS" 3 


!>*☆*** 



acting in concert with agents 
of the Syrian Government” 

Neither Dr al-Haydar nor 
any of his staff would, com- 
mem last night although the 
embassy has already denied 
involvement. 

In May. three Syrian dip- 
lomats were expelled from 


Amlot said. 

The Foreign Office refused 
last night to speculate on the 
implications of the case but it 
is believed that if a direct link 
between Syria and the at- 
tempted attack is proved. 
Britain would be forced to 
take measures against Damas- 


[ London after they refused to cus in line with last month's 
waive their diplomatic immu- European commitment to 
nity and be questioned by combat terrorism. 

Scotland Yard detectives in- , 

vesiigziioe the case. Yesterday, as a wines in 

The bomb on board the El J* 1 *£» 
Al jumbo, carrying 374 pas- M “?* y described »» a barely 
sengera and crew, would have audible y e h ow M r 
exploded at 39.000ft over H, ndaw fassrt h» wodbye 
AiStria, the jury heard, had it ^ Kcsifcrow. She broke into 
not been detecred by alert El wars when she told how the 
Al security staff at Heathrow. J.b bomb was subequemly 

It was hidden in a case that disco vered ra her lug^ge. 
had been given by Hindawi to *** Am, ° l ™ “j 
Miss Ann Murphy, aged 31. Continued on page 24, col 8 


Dr Lootof al-Haydar, the Syrian Ambassador, outside bis 
embassy in Befgrave Square yesterday. (Photograph: Ros 
Drink water). 


Triend 
of the 
president 

Dr Loutouf ai-Ha\dar. Syr- 
ian .Ambassador to* London 
for the jest four years, is one 
of the country's most senior 
diplomats and is believed to 
be a dose and misted aide of 
the Syrian President Hafez al- 
.Assad. As such he has power- 
ful links with the ruling Baath 
pany. 

Dr al-Haydar has served at 
Syrian missions in Bonn and 
Moscow and at the United 
Nations. 

Tw o years ago he was tipped 
to become Minister of 
Information, but the position 
did not materialize. 

Dr Haydar. aged 46. took 
his degree at the University of 
Damascus and his doctorate 
at Moscow State University. 
He is married with one son 
and three daughters. 

Syria is the Soviet Llnion's 
closest ally and Israel's most 
remorseless enemy in the 
Middle East. Damascus is also 
the headquarters for at least 
seven radical Palestinian 
groups, including the break- 
away faction led bv Abu 
Nidal. 

The country is also a mav- 
erick among Arab states in 
that it supports (ran in the 
Gulf War againsr Iraq and 
maintains dose ties with 
Libya. 


No radiation 
leak from sub 
US is assured 

By Onr Foreign Staff 


Labour threatens 


that the United States will cut 
off the free exchange of intelli- 
gence information, crucial to 
the security of Britain and 
Nato, if the Labour Party wins 
the next general election and 
implements its unilateralist 
defence policy. 

The two countries have a 
very close intelligence rela- 
tionship which, while benefit- 
ing both, works much more to 
Britain's advantage. Even dur- 
ing. periods of cooler political 
relations, the flow of data via 
US satellitesand other sources 
has remained constant. 

But with the Labour Party 
committed to removing all US 
nuclear bases and ending the 
Polaris deterrent security 
advisers to the Government 
have given a warning that the 

US could reassess the intelli- 
gence relationship. 

One source said yesterday: 
*Tm sure that people in 
Washington are now drawing 
up papers on this question. 
For if Britain ceases to be a 
nuclear power, the Americans 
would be reluctant to provide 
us with intelligence related to 
nuclear matters.” 

Two areas causing the great- 
est concern are: The security 
agreement of 1947, which 
binds the operations of the 
Government Communica- 
tions Headquarters at 
Cheltenham ana the US Na- 
tional Security _ Agency, 
providing world-wide eaves- 
dropping on coded commu- 
nications to Warsaw Pact 
countries: and the bilateral 
arrangement for pooling 


iviurpny ucscxideu iu a oaiciy 

audible voice how Mr Tsvl-wci l/vnn 

Hindawi kissed her goodbye tJODiS IvISsd 

at Heathrow. She broke into m 

tears when she told how the IX/Q1*TllflfT 

31b .bomb was subequenxly *▼ dIX fif lll£ 
discovered in her luggage. * 

Mr Amlot said that the 9T LllCflS 
Continued on page 24, col 8 

By 11m Jones 

1 a and Craig Seaton 

nreateilS ROW yesterday 

v ** w **^ halted all car production at his 

4*1 • giant Longbridge plant in 

'"T I Birmingham after an overtime 

UV V llv ▼▼ . ban affected its join compo - 

„ , - •• . ijent ■.siippfierS; JCucas 

By Mjcfaael Evans.WhitehaBC©rrespOBdeat BectricaL _ . ■ . ^ J 

British security sendees fear information gleaned by Brit- ' More than 10,000 eniploy- 

ish and US submarine com- ees of Lucas Electrical have 
manders tracking Soviet been warned thm if they 
submarines. continue to “work without 

The exchange is crucial enthusiasm” over a pay claim 
because it helps security th«e could be job tosses, 
authorities to check . and cross The dispute couki cost up to 

check information and pro- 600 cars a day jn lost produc- 
vide different imerpretatjons non at Lopgfanage. Austin 
of what the people “on the Rover said that 2.000 writers 
ground” have observed. We would have to be laid off until 
provide a well-educated Euro- further notice as woric on 
pean analysis of what is going Minis, Metros and Rover 
on which the Americans UOOcould not continue. _ 
mi ght not be able to do..” a Mr Mike Nangle. chairman 
source said. ofLncasEteclncaFsjoinlshop 

“The Americans would suf- stewards committee, said: 
fer. too. because we have a “We were amazed when Aus- 
n umber of asses which they tin Rover said they had run 
would have difficulty in out. of parts. Our action was 
replacing, such as the GCHQ , the minimum that could be 
stations in Hong Kong and taken.” 


Election date 


Tebbit puts party 
agents on alert 

By Onr Chief Political Correspondent 

Mr Norman Tebbit last counter-productive and losing 
night put the Conservative the party votes. 


Party on the alert for a general He made clear that he was 
election in 1987. _ nor including, in hie criticism. 

• . He- tpld conservative Mr John Bencow. the' pre$ei$3 
constituency agents; at a meet- chairman of the FCS. ^ 
ing in Bournemouth on the But it was' dear that he i$' 
eve of the Tory conference, to still angry about the con- * 
gear their organizations up to troversy two months ago after 


ish and US subrnarine com- 
manders tracking Soviet 
submarines. 

' The exchange is crucial 
because it helps security 
authorities to check and cross 


peak efficiency. 


the publication of allegations. 


Next May's local elections in the magazine New Agenda, 


should be treated as a test run 
for a general election, he said, 
ordering them to fight every 


that Lord Stockton, the for- 
mer prime minister Harold 
MacMillan, was guilty of war 


seat and not to let any go by crimes because of his role in 


default 

Mr Tebbit who will use his 


the return of the Cossacks to 
Russia at the end of the 


speech at the conference today Second World War. 
{® r . 1 a T , I P' ew ^ attack on Mr Meanwhile, the Prime Min- 
Nal Kirmock and the Labour , ner arrived in Bournemouth 
Party after foeir successful lasl night ^ ^ upbeal 


week in Blackpool, 
agents of his efforts 


ool. told foe message. “We are going up and 
orts to _ oeet w are going ahead fast.” she 


Cyprus,’ 


production 


Mr NeD Kmnock. Labour unions involved, the Trans- 
leader, said during the party I - and General Workers' 


conference last week that he 
would be happy to cooperate 


Union; the General, Munici- 
pal Boilermakers and Allied 


up the party 5 organization at said.Mrs Thatcher laughed off 
the London headquarters and suggestions that she and the 
urged them to do the same at pany were worried about the 
grass-roots level. success of the Labour con- 

Durmg the meeting Mr ference. “I would not call their 
Tebbit strongly criticised die policies a success for Britain.“ 
activities of some leading she said 
figures in the. Federation of ’ . ... 


on non-nuclear matters. It is Trades Union and the Amal- 
understood that he was refer- gamaied Engineering Union 
ring in part to the continu- have all imposed overtime 
ationofibe GCHQ set-up and bans over the pay claims, 
the Sosos facility under which In addition, the while collar 
Britain and the US track unions at Lucas have decided 
Soviet submarines by under- 10 ban overtime, withdraw key 
water listening devices personnel and “work without 


Conservative Students. He 
has already warned privately 
that the organization could be 
wound up if it continued to 
cause trouble. 

He told the agents that 
while the FCS was doing good 
work in some universities the 
activities of some leaders were 


One of the issues which will 
dominate the week’s proceed- 
ings will be the government’s 
record on the Health Service. 
On arriving in Bournemouth 
yesterday Mrs Thatcher 
toured the £18 million first 
phase of the new district 
Cotrtimied on page 24*ol 5 


Washington - Pentagon of- 
ficials were analysing the pos- 
sible causes yesterday for the 
sinking of the crippled Soviet 
nuclear-powered submarine, 
whose dramatic impact comes 
only a few days before Presi- 
dent Reagan mid Mr Mikhail 
Gorbachov discuss the control 
of nuclear weapons at their 
Iceland summit. 

Analysts said the hoar, 
which finally went down at 
4 00 am. 600 miles north-east 
of Bermuda, had clearly been 
severely damaged by an explo- 
sion on Friday. 

About 24 crewmen left 
aboard were transferred to an 
accompanying Sov tel mer- 
chant vessel and there ap- 
peared to have been no further 
casualties. Asked by a reporter 
whether there was any indica- 
tion of Russia wanting to 
abandon one of (heir nuclear 
submarines, a State Depart- 
ment spokesman said; “I 
don’t know of any such 
indication.” 

An Oliver reporter said there 
had been a suggestion that 
Russia had deliberately taken 
the submarine to a deep point 
- 1 8.000 feel — to scuttle it out 
of reach of the (J& 

But the spokesman said he 
knew of no communication 
between the two superpowers 
on the subject of the boat’s 
location. 

“The sub was in inter- 
national waters throughout 
this incident.” he said, point- 
ing out that under the law of 
the sea Russia, as (he flag 
stale, retained jurisdiction 
over the vessel. 

Mr George Shultz, the Sec- 
retary of State, said on Sunday 
that US information seemed 
to confirm Mr Gorbachov's 
assurances that there would be 
no nuclear explosion, acciden- 
tal firing of missiles or leakage 
of radiation. 

There had been no detec- 
tion of radiation and ev en if 

New criticism 
Itf, of Britain 
r Oft oil prices 

From David Young, Geneva 

Opec oil nations have again 
criticized Britain for refusing 
to co-operate in cutting North 
Sea oil output to help push up 
the world price. 

Mr Rilwanu Lukman. the 
Nigerian Oil Minister and 
president of Opec, yesterday 
said Britain's policy was 
“stubborn”. It affected the 
pace of North Sea 
development 

Sheikh Ahmed Zaki Yama- 
nL the Saudi Arabian Oil 
Minister and still Opec's most 
•dominant member, said he 
still hoped the organization 
could reach a new agreement 
which would take the world 
oil price up to $17 or $19 a 
barrel 

Opec anger, page 25 


there had been some seepage it 
would have been quickly di- 
luted presenting no danger 
except m the immediate 
vicinity. 

Pentagon analysts were 
suggesting yeuerday that the 
explosion was caused by the 
volatile liquid propellant used 
by the SSN-T multiple-war- 
head missiles on board. 

•MOSCOW: Tlie Soviet 
Union last night officially 
confirmed the sinking and 
emphasized that Soviet ex- 
perts had concluded there was 
no danger of a subsequent 
nuclear explosion or radio- 
active contamination of the 
environment (Christopher 
Walker writes!. 

Shortly before 8 pm Mos- 
cow ume. Taw broke a news 
blackout on details of flic 
dramatic rescue operation 
that had lasted more than 48 
hours. 

Tass made no reference to 
the fate of the nuclear missiles 
on hoard the submannehut 
this wjs seen by Western 
experts as a tacit admission 
that they had gone down with 
the ship. 

Picture, page 7 


Fjt/eT ** 



vol 




Mrs Reagan 
will not go 
to Reykjavik 

Washington (AFP) — Mrs 
Nancy Reagan said yesterday 
that she would not go to 
Iceland for this week’s summit 
meeting, even though Mr 
Gorbachov's wife. Raisa, will 
be there. 

After a ceremony at the 
White House, when she was 
asked if she expected to go to 
Reykjavik for the meeting, she 
replied simply, “No”. 

The White House spokes- 
man. Mr Lany Speakes. said 
on Monday: “We are sur- 
prised that Mrs. Gorbachov is 
coming. It was our under-' 
standing that this meeting was 
to be brief 

The ‘presence of Mrs Reagan 
and Mrs Gorbachov caused 
wide media imcrcsi at the. 
Geneva meeting last year. 


But yesterday Dr David enthusiasm” in pursuit of the 
Owen, leader ofibeSDP and a cl ^ un - . M 
former Foreign Secretary; . J to ^ 
said: “To try to make the Mr Bob Dale ^managing three- 
intelligence thing a bargaining Lucas Electrical, says: 

lever wkh the United States is If the sanctions conunue we 
to misunderstand the shaft lose large- amounts of 

relationship. woc * ? h ! ch «" never 

replaced. • - 


Dr Owen said that the -■ h3 «. 

United Stales had cut off the . The Lucas management has 
flow of inieliiKsce to New 8* ven a warning that no talks 
Zealand after its Labour Gov- w j^ The unions will take place 
. . . . , while the overtime ban 

Continued on page 24, col 3 continues. 


Tories angry over 
‘jobs for the boys’ 

By Nicholas Wood, Political Reporter 
Mr Nicholas Ridley, the stood to have ruled out im- : 




Heathrow chaos as computer fails 


By Harvey Elliott 

Air Correspondent 


dies meeting inbound flights 
tried to find out when delayed 


Tens of thousands of airline aircraft would be arriv ing 
passengers were delayed for up while departing passengers 
STsix hours at London’s wam^ to know where their 


Heathrow airpwt JSSday aircraft was boarding, 
by a computer laulL . 

The faulL in the air traffic The computer fault came al 
control centre al West Dray- the height of the morning rush 
ton near bv. meant that arnv- and meant that instead of 
ing aircraft had to slow down handling an average of 80 


orcirie to wait their turn 10 be aircraft . an hour, air traffic 
guided in manually. controllers could cope with 

Inside the terminal build- only half that number. The 
ings there was chaosas fern- controllers are normally al- 


lowed to ' have a three-mile 
separation between aircraft 
but without the help of the 
computer, which -automati- 
cally identifies flight numbers 
on the radar screen and pro- 
vides print-outs of other vital 
information, the aircraft had 
to be kepi at least five miles 
apart. 

The Civil . Aviation 
Authority said it look more 
than two' hours to correct the 
fault. • 


Secretary of State for the 
Environment, is expected to 
come under anack tomorrow 
at the Conservative Party 
conference for his apparent 
reluctance to curb “twin- 
uacking”. the arrangement 
under which councillors hold 
office in one authority and 
work for another. 

The Widdicombe report on 
local government published 
last June warned, that the 
practice raised questions of 
political impartiality and 
recommended that the 
country's 70.000 senior coun- 
cil officials be debarred from 
standing as councillors. 

Officially, the Government 
is still consulting on the 
report's 88 recommendations 
I and will not respond until next 
! year. But Mr Ridley is under- 


plementing the twin-tracking 
calL 

He is said to be wary of 
embroiling the Government 
in another round of trench 
warfare with local councils in 
the run-up to a general 
election. 

But many representatives at 
the Bournemouth- conference 
want an immediate end to 
what they believe is a growing 
trend for Labour councils to 
hand out “jobs for the boys“. 

Nearly half the 34 motions 
submitted for tomorrow's lo- 
cal government debate de- 
mand the implementation of 
the Widdicombe report. 

The main resolution chosen 
for the debate urges the Gov- 
ernment to “take the initiative 
to curb abuses of power in 
local government”. 


Alexanders j j 
Laing&Cruickshank ! 

Corporate Finance Ltd i : 


...for growing companies 
needing specialist advice 
of the highest calibre 


Church ban after woman’s ‘illegal’ service 


Movement 


. By Clifford Longley, Religions Affairs Correspondent 
Mr Oswald Clark: chairman of the Church of England” had era! Synod's legal advisee, said 


Ordination of Women was of the council of the corpora- taken place.- 
vesterday banned until further lion, said he regretted that The Archbishop of Canter- 
notice from using Church Church House had been used bury. Dr Robert Runeie. has 
House Westminster, because “for an illegal celebration in called for an immediate 
it allnwed a woman priest to flagrant and defiant oppo- investigation. 


that on the basis of counsel’s 
opinion no women priest or- 


vices would take place in 
consecrated churches, under 
the control of a clergyman 


Alexanders Laing i 

&Cruickshank Holdings Ltd i 

T«r«i*ewr,ONAisECWfWSHOusf ! 


ft allowed a woman pnest to flagrant and (tenant oppo- 
use a room there to celebrate sition to known, recent, and 
Holy Communion. synodically confirmed 

The Corporation of Church decisions . 

He had ™«en » ft, 

PlSfSLSSS jiMSS 


to the 


Movement had not disclosed 
in advance its intention to 
hold a Communion service. 


expressing the corporations 
“great concern that an illegal 
administration of a sacrament 


called for an immediate 
investigation. 

A difference of opinion has 
emerged about the legality of 
Saturday's sen-ice. The state- 
ment from Mr Clark was 
headed “Illegal celebration of 
Holy Communion”, but the 
Dean of St Pauls, the Very 
Rev. Alan Webster, said the 
service, at which he was 
present, was “certainly legal”. 

Mr Brian Hanson, the Gen- 

:Tr7-.rrro:-r.-^”- 


dained abroad could be “law-, who was subject to canon law. 
fully authorized” to exercise a It was not apparently unlawful 


priestly ministry in the 
Church of England. 

One -senior lawyer in the 
church said that if the law had 
been broken, it was notdear 
who had broken it- The cele- 
brant. the Rev. Joyce BennetL 
was ordained in Hong Kong. 

Canon law covering ser- 
vices is almost entirely based 
on the supposition that ser- 


for individuals to purport to 
celebrate a Eucharist in 
private. 

But the fact that the service 
was held in a Chun* of 
England building, albeit not 
consecrated, and that almost 
all the members of the Move- 
ment are Anglicans, could be 
held to constitute a claim to be 
celebrating a “service of the 
Church of England”. 


For further information about our 
investment services please contact 

AG.B. Puilinger 
Piorcy House 
7 Coptholl Avenue 
London EC2R 7 BE 
Tet 01-588 2800 


AMI 0t *4 i»n UMOUBDOBlOhar ** 


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NEWS SUMMARY 


NGA to vote on 
Wapping offer 


With only two days to go before the "News International's 
final offer to settle the Wapping dispute expires, the 
National Graphical Association last night decided to ballot 
ijs members on the deal. 

- The union, whose 800 members at the company went on 
Strike eight months ago and were dismissed, has been told 
there is no point is holding a ballot unless its leaders 
recommend the offer. 

• While the NGA members were listening, to Mr Tony 
Dobbins, their general secretary at a dosed meeting in cen- 
tral London, the ballot organized by Sogat '82, the largest 
tfriion involved, ended. 

• Tbe 4,000 affected members were recommended by Mbs 
Brenda Dean, general secretary, to accept the package 
which includes compensation of £58 million, bat indica- 
tions were that there was a low turnout. 

- Hard-line left-wing Sogat activists who mounted a 
campaign for rejection are said to be delighted with the re* 
ports of a poor response. 

~ Some Sogat branches have defied (heir national leaders 
by mdndutg with ballot papers written advice urging 
ipetnbers to vote “no ". 


Meningitis virus test 


’ The Government is to give £50,000 for health tests for 
the town ofStonehouse, in the centre of the Gloucestershire 
meningitis epidemic, it was announced yesterday. 

The Sooth Western Regional Health Authority disclosed 
that Tessa Duff, aged 18 months, from Lydsey, in the For- 
est of Dean, died of meningitis at the end of last week in 
Gloucestershire Royal Infirmary, bringing to 17 the 
dnmber of meningitis deaths in the area this year. 

About six thousand parents, children and residents in 
Stoaehonse will have swabs and blood tests 


Murder 

charges 


A man who manages a 
boutique was committed for 
trial at the Central Crim- 
inal Court by Camberwell 
Magistrates' Court yes- 
terday. charged with four 
murders and two attempted 

murders. 

Mr Michael Lnpo. aged 
33, from Chelsea, south- 
west Loudon, is accused of 
killing Anthony Conolly on 
April 4 tins year in a 
British Rad shed at 
Brixton. He is also accused 
of killing three men in the 
Kensington area and 
attempting to kill two oth- 
ers in south London. 


Collision 
inquiry 


A driver with so memory 
of a nil disaster in which 
nine people died when his 
van collided with a train on 
an unmanned level crossing 
may be charged with caus- 
ing their deaths (Ian Smith 
writes). 

Mr Malcolm Ashley, 
aged 38, a cattle breeder, 
was interviewed about the 
crash at Lbckington Vil- 
lage. Humberside. 

A public inquiry into the 
disaster opens in Beverley, 
near Hull, today, and a dec- 
ision on legal action will be 
taken when it has reported. 


Indian visa deadline 


' Visitors to Britain from India, Bangladesh and Pakistan 
Will be required to have visas from Wednesday, the Home 
Office announced last night (Martin Fletcher writes). No 
deadline has been announced for visitors from two other 
Countries with historical Ihiks to the Commonwealth, 


Nigeria and Ghana. 

! Tha f)i 


The decision to introduce visa requirements was made on 
September 1, when Mr Douglas Hurd, the Home 
Secretary, made it dear that it would be swiftly 
implemented if there was a sudden influx of visitors. 

I Since then there has been a continuous increase in 
(assengers from India. Bangladesh and Pakistan, 
t French Embassy queues, page 4 " v ~ 


Juries to go in criminal damage cases 

. —I.. I Mmmnn nci 


10 


By Frances Gibb 
Legal Affairs 
Correspondent 
The Government looks set 
abandon a proposal to 
remove ihe right to jury trial 
for cases of minor theft, in 
spite of backing from some 
senior judges. 

Instead it is expected to cut 
the number of cases going to 
the crown courts by removing 


jury trial in its White Paper on 
criminal justice and it remains 
the one outstanding unsettled 
item from the package of 
measures to be contained in 
the Criminal Justice Bill next 
month. 

ft has still to go before a 
Cabinet committee but Home 
Office ministers are not in 
favour, after soundings from 
Conservative backbenchers 


the right to jury trial for a large who feel the political climate 
number of cases involving is not favourable for 


criminal damage. 

Minor theft was put for- 
ward. along with three other 
offences, from which the Gov- 
ernment proposed to remove 


such a 

controversial move. 

Instead, they are likely to 
propose that the threshold for 
criminal damage cases that 
can be heard by a jury be 


raised from £400 io £2.000. 

About 2.000 cases of crim- 
inal damage go to the crown 
court each year and it is 
estimated that at least l .000 
would remain with the mag- 
istrates if the threshold was 
raised. 

The proposal was put for- 
ward by the Law Society in its 
response to the White Paper, 
m which the Government 
outlined proposals for 
redistributing work between 
crown courts and magistrates' 
courts. 

A £2.000 level would "take 
more realistic account” of the 
cost of damage caused by 


minor offences, such as break- 
ing shop windows. It would 
also coincide with the maxi- 
mum level of compensation 
order that magistrates can 
make, the society said. 

Summary trial was appro- 
priate in the “vast majority of 
cases" because, unlike theft, 
dishonesty was not an element 
of the offences, and “convic- 
tion for it was not regarded as 
an example of moral 
turpitude**. 

Tbe society opposed 
abolishing the right to elect 
jury trial For minor theft 
although it supported tbe 
other proposals to remove 


jurv trial for common assault 
driving while disqualified and 
the unauthorized taking ot a 
motor vehicle. 

Yesterday the Magistrates 
Association said that it fa- 
voured an increase in the 
criminal damage threshold as 
a means of casing the backlog 
of cases at the crown court and 

delavs. , . . 

Dr Douglas Acres, the chair- 
man of the association, said 
that there would be some 
reduction in the work ot 
magis trates* courts with ine 
introduction of the fixed pen- 
alty scheme for motoring 

)ffe 


ot fences. 


Patten urges 



moves 


to encourage 
home letting 


By Robin Oakley, Political Editor 


Mr John Patten, tbe Min- 
ister for Housing, will today 
launch a quiet revolution to 
bring back the private land- 
lord in Britain. 

Though he will pledge the 
Government at the Conser- 
vative Party conference to 
create another million home 
owners over the next five 
years. Mr Patten accepts that 
home ownership in Britain, 
already up to 62 per cent, will 
soon bump up against the 
ceiling. Government housing 
experts believe that only 70 
per cent of the population can 
afford to be owners. 

Ministers plan therefore to 
start pitching for the votes of 
the other 30 per cent with a 
“Right to Rent" campaign 
which they hope will be as 



film lessons on cue 


: A project by Mr David Pattnam, the film director, to in- 
troduce the cinema to schools is to go ahead in spite of a 
lack of government support (Our Arts Correspondent 
writes). 

( The scheme, under which pupils at 2500 schools in 
Britain will attend screenings of important films as part of 
their studies, will be launched ou Friday with partial 
funding from the film and television industries. 

Mr lan Wall, a mm educationist who is coordinating the 
project, said yesterday it was hoped other sponsors would 
come forward during the year to make up the missing one- 
third of the £105,000 budget. 


otic 


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effective as the council 
tenants' "Right to Buy". 

The aim is to end the social 
division between owner 
occupiers and the rest of 
society. Mr Patten insists 
“there should be no more 
about renting accom- 
-joaation than there is about 
renting a TV set". 

•The strategy which he will 
outline to the Tory conference 
includes: 

• Breaking up council estates 
by encouraging tenants, build- 
ing societies and pension 
funds to manage them. 

• Winning ail party backing 
for more further hanges in the 
Rent Acl 

• Reviving the private sector 
to rent and restoring the 
housing stock by bringing in 
private money from banks, 
building societies and trusts. 

The Government is particu- 
larly concerned with the diffi- 
culties of those who would like 
to move from unemployment 


black spots but who cannot 
find or afford homes where 
the jobs are. They also want to 
do more for young people in 
inner cities who race, in Mr 
Patten's words “a degrading 
scramble for 

accommodation". _ 

In an interview with The 
Times, Mr Patten said that 
council housing empires have 
got out of controL 

“It is an absurdly difficult 
task to ask councils to manage 
a bousing stock of, say, 
100,000 houses. It is not a 
criticism of their officers. The 
scale of the task is simply too 
big. 

"The two biggest problems 
are empty properties and dis- 
repair. There are 115.000 
empty council houses and flats 
which I find deeply offensive 
They should be being used to 
house the homeless and to 
house the people in need." 

In the private sector the law 
had been so tilted against 
those who let property since 
tbe Rachmanite scandals of 
the 19605 that property own- 
ers had let their houses decay 
or taken them off the market. 

Mr Patten said: “There are 
600 to 700,000 empty private 
sector houses and flats. Many 
of these are empty because of 
the workings of the Rent AcL” 

But he will not be announc- 
ing in consequence sweeping 
changes in the Acl The Gov- 
ernment accepts the need, in 
the housing field, for oppo- 
sition agreemenL 

Mr Patten said: “We are still 
looking dosety at ways of 
reforming the Rem Acl It is 
very much on the agenda. But 
it is a matter of how you do it 
1 want to ensure a good deal 
for good private landlords — 
and there are many good ones. 
Bui I also want to gel in new 
private money to provide 
rented housing. 

“Though I want to move, I 
do not intend to move other 
than by consent because the 
Rem Act is such a political hot 
potato. 


Halifax seizes chance 
to become a developer 


By Christopher Wannan, Property Correspondent 
The Halifax Building Soci- lariy aimed 


eiy yesterday announced plans 
to build its own homes next 
year, aiming at providing 
3.000 a year by 1990. with an 
annual programme of £100 
million. 

The move is in line with 
other building societies, 
including the Nationwide, the 
Woolwich and the Anglia 
which all intend to provide 
homes from January I under 
the terms of the Building 
Societies Acl which enables 
them to offer a wider range of 
services. 


The society intends to set up 
a subsidiary development 
company which will own land 
and lead the development 
process, putting together 
schemes for housing, particu- 


at inner city 

regeneration. 

The Halifax wants to pro- 
vide a greater mixture of 
tenures than in the past 
including single person house- 
holds and units for the elderly, 
and also to find ways of 
developing private rented 
housing 

Under its new powers, the 
society has already announced 
its intention to buy a selected 
number of estate agencies and 
it will also offer personal 
loans, pensions, personal eq- 
uity plans and a more sophis- 
ticated Cardcash system. 

A special meeting will be 
held on November 24 when 
members will be asked to give 
the society authority to ex- 
ercise the new powers granted 
under the Act. 


. v*.. 





Lord Scannan talking to a rastafarian daring hts toor of Brixton. during which he called for ’positive 
discrimination to help black people jobs (Photograph: Alan Weller) 


Brixton violence warning 


Brixton will remain a breeding 
ground for violence and unrest 
unless a concerted effort is 
made to tackle the problems of 
housing and homelessness. 
Lord Scannan said yesterday. 

Fire years after be em- 
barked on an inquiry into tbe 
Brixton riots, Lord Scannan 
called for positive discrimina- 
tion to help black people in 
such fields as employment, 
education, training for jobs 
•nd housing. 

He made his remarks after 
spending two horns tonring the 


By David Sapsted 
"front line" area of Brixton in 
and around Radton Road. 
“Though much has been done, 
very modi more needs to be 
done", he said. 

“I hope racial prejudice is 
on the way ooL We have to 
eliminate racial disadvantage 
bnt I know we have not done so 

yet." 

Lord Scarman described tbe 
provision of accommodation as 
an essential human need. 
“Without it, yon will have 
disease and deprivation, and 


tbe sort of situation where 
onrest can be easily bred." 

He also said that he was 
worried by the possibility of 
"yuppies" (young, npwardly- 
mobile professionals) moving 
into Brixton. 

“1 am very frightened about 
the threat of a yuppy invasion. 
One wants to increase the 
amenities and improve the 
environment of Brixton, hot we 
want to be sore it's tbe people 
who live there who get the 
benefit". Lord Scannan said. 

Beating racism, page 4 


Call for £650m to 
halt cuts in NHS 


By Jill Sherman 
Health authorities have this does not take into account 


called for an extra £650million 
a year to prevent cuts in 
patient services and allow 
some development in the 
National Health Service. 

In a report published today, 
the National Association of 
Health Authorities criticizes 
the Government for foiling 
fully to fund NHS pay awards, 
which has meant that most 
authorities have had to use 
money earmarked for 
developmenL and some have 
had to cut patients services. 

It said that several districts 
were drawing up plans to 
reduce services, and to im- 
plement cost-saving measures. 
These included cutting back 
on staff, reducing bed num- 
bers. freezing recruitmenL 
deferring maintenance work 
And cancelling the replace- 
ment of medical and surgical 
equipment. 

The report calls for an extra 
£160 million for the hospital 
and community health ser- 
vices for next year, to meet the 
balance of the full-year cost of 
the pay awards. £390 million 
to cover general pay and 
prices, estimated at 3.75 per 
cenL and £ I OOmillion, or I per 
cenL for development 
In its White Paper on public 
expenditure last January, the 
Government planned fora 4.5 
per cent increase in the NHS 
budget in 1987-88. or an extra 
£470 million over this year's 
baseline of £10.3 billion. 

The association argues that 


new figures for inflation or the 
failure. to fund the awards. 
“The NHS has been be- 
devilled over the last few years 
by uncertainty over financing, 
primarily because we get the 
situation of pay awards agreed 
through the middle of the 
financial year, which are not 
fully funded." Mr Philip 
HunL the director, said. 

Tbe pay awards for all NHS 
staff averaged out at 5.9 per 
cent this year but health 
authorities were only allo- 
cated 4.5 per cenL leading to 
an immediate deficit of l .4 per 
cenL "We are looking for dear 
assurance that the service will 
receive sufficient resources to 
cover the Government's 
commitment to 1 per cent 
extra for service development 
and the full-year cost of the 
1986-87 pay award." he said. 

The report agrees with the 
joint delegation of the Insitute 
of Health Services Manage- 
ment the British Medical 
Association and the Royal 
College of Nursing that a 2 per 
cent overall increase is needed 
to maintain standards, but it 
takes the Government line 
that some of this should come 
from health authorities' own 
cost-improvement savings. 

This year health authorities 
have managed to find an extra 
1.6 per cenL or £150 million, 
through cost improvement 
programmes, which has 
funded most of the 
developmenL 


service 


Police were 
‘unlucky’ to 
lose bomber 


The police were “unlucky" 
to lose Patrick Magee in a car 
chase 18 months before he 
blew up the Grand HoteL 
Brighton, during the 1984 
Conservative Party Confer- 
ence, a judge said yesterday. 

Mr Justice Boreham told 
the Central Criminal Court 
that detectives had got very 
close to Magee before he 
finally gave them the slip in 
Preston, in April 1983. 

“No doubt they felt an- 
noyed to say the least and 
perhaps embarrassed", he 
said, summing up in the IRA 
conspiracy' trial of Thomas 
Maguire. 

But police had managed to 
thwart a ploL if such a plot 
existed, to blow up the Eagle 
and Child Inn. a public house 
at Weeton. near Blackpool, 
used by soldiers. 

Mr Maguire, aged 27. a 
graduate of University Col- 
lege. Dublin, denies conspir- 
ing with Magee to cause an 
explosion at the Inn. 

The jury will consider its 
verdict inda\ 


Anglo-Irish conference 


Session on security planned 


A special meeting of the 
Anglo-Irish conference is to be 
devoted to cross border se- 
curity as unhappiness mounts 
within the RUC and Govern- 
ment at the efforts of the Irish 
Republic's security forces in 
combatting terrorism. 

Mr Tom King Secretary of 
State for Northern Ireland, is 
impatient about the lack of 
progress in improving security 
co-operation and his views are 
reflected in growing private 
criticism among senior RUC 
officers. 

The British Government's 
concern at ‘the slow pace of 
changes in the Irish security 
system will be folly discussed 
at the special meeting which is 
likely to be held within a 
matter of weeks. 

It was decided to hold the 
meeting at yesterday’s session 
of the joint Anglo-Irish min- 
isterial conference, the eighth, 
which was held for the first 
lime in Dublin amidst Loyal- 
ist protests. 

The meeting delivered little 


By Richard Ford 

of an immediately visible 
nature, but it is understood 
the British Government is 
prepared to repeal the Flags 
and Emblems Act as pan ofa 
review of public order legisla- 
tion — as well as allowing 
voters bom in ihe Irish 
Republic and now resident in 
Northern Ireland to vote in 
the province's ejections. 

But it is security co-opera- 
tion. which was discussed at 
the meeting at Ivcagh House 
in Dublin, that is now of 
paramount concern to Britain. 

A recently leaked document 
ofa meeting between Sir John 
Hermon. Chief Constable of 
the RUC. and his divisional 
commanders quoted his criti- 
cisms of the Garda (Irish 
police)-RUC sources indicate 
they wish the Irish Republic's 
Taskforce to be strengthened 
io help to combat cross-border 
terrorist activity. 

Some officers believe Mr 
Charles Haughey. the oppo- 
sition Ranna Fail leader 
would be a better man 


as 


Prime Minister in the crucial 
area of security than Fine 
Gael's Dr Garret FitzGerald, 
who leads a coalition 

Loyalist mayors led by Mr 
Peter Robinson, the DUP MP 
for East Belfast protested 
outside Iveagh House, ihe 
headquarters of tbe Republic's 
Department of Foreign Affairs 
during the meeting. 

Mr Robinson said: “We are 
making it clear that no matter 
where the Anglo-Irish con- 
ference meets, the opposition 
of Unionists will continue." 

The next regular meeting of 
the conference is to consider 
security, legal matters, and 
economic and social matters. 

The Irish government is still 
pressing for the reform of the 
Diplock courts in the north 
with the substitution of three 
judges instead of the present 
one. 

But Britain is opposed to 
such a mpve. believing that to 
concede the point is an ad- 
mission that the existing sys- 
tem has been wrong. 


Blow for 
Fowler 
in poll 


By Martin Fletcher 
Political Reporter 

Mr Norman Fowler. Sec- 
retary of State for Social 
Services, faces the daunting 
challenge of addressing the 
party conference in Bourne- 
mouth tomorrow knowing 
that even among Conser- 
vative voters fewer than half 
support government policies 
on the National Health 
Service. 

Just 44 per cent of Conser- 
vative voters believe that the 
Government has the best ap- 
proach on the NHS. while 23 
per cent actually prefer 
Labour's proposals, according 
to an opinion poll in The 
London Standard yesterday. 

Among the public generally 
the poll shows that just 1 5 per 
cent support the Government 


The Conservative 
conference in 
will debate motions today on 
homes and land, privatization, 
education, social services and 
trade and industry. 


on the NHS. while 44 per cent 
support Labour and II per 
cent the Alliance. 

The NHS is one of Mrs 
Thatcher's priority areas and 
Mr Fowler is expected to use 
the conference to unveil a 
father package of measures in 
his campaign to restore public 
confidence in the health 
service. 

Only 22 per cent of those 
polled believe that the Tories 
have the best education poli- 
cies, while 31 per cent favour 
Labour's and 12 per cent the 
Alliance. 

On law and order, however, 
the Conservatives have a dear 
lead over their opponents, 
with 39 per cent compared to 
Labour's 16 percent and 8 per 
cent for the Alliance. Even 
among Labour voters 42 per 
cent prefer Toiy policies. 

The most encouraging news 
for the Government is that 
one in three of those polled 
have yet to commit them- 
selves one way or the other. 
Geoffrey Smith, page 4 


Quarry plunge 
cyclist stable 


A motor cycle scrambler 
who plunged 50ft down a 
quarry face on to rocks after 
foiling off his machine was 
stable at the Freeman Hos- 
pital. Newcastle upon Tyne, 
yesterday. 

Damien Harvey, aged 19. of 
Woodland Drive. Geadon. 
received multiple injuries in 
the accident at Sunderland. 
Other scramblers carried po- 
lice. firemen and ambulance 
men on pillions to the scene 
after emergency service ve- 
hicles could not reach iL 


Lord Lane 
fears 


‘huge wave 
of crime 5 


Bv Our Legal Affairs 
* Correspondent 

Lord Lane, the Lord Chief 
Justice, said yesterday tfet v 
"huge wave of crime'* was 
threatening to engulf Britain - 
and would create a need for 
many more courts. 

Opening a £10 mitlfcm- 
extension to court buildings fa 
Manchester he said there had 
been a general lowering 0 f 
standards. 

By comparison with today 
the 1930s. when unrrapfoy.. 
mem was proportionately « 
bad as it now. was a time of 
"unprecedented lawfulness". 

The Lord Chief Justice said 
he approached the opening of . 
the new courts with mixed 
feelings. If they were for civil - 
litigation, it meant more peo- 
ple were failing to settle thdr- 
disputes arnica Mv. 

If they were for criminal 
trials, it meant the number of 
criminals had increased and 
that the former accommoda- 
tion was inadequate. 7 .. 

He pointed out that in the 
1930s the Central Criminal 
Court had managed with four 
courts but today “there are the 
best part of two dozen" 

Lord Lane said the great 
I9tb ccnnny reformers had~ 
atiributed crime to poverty- 
and filth, appalling housing ; 
conditions, lack of metical 
care, indifferent education 
and the absence of any soda! 
services. 

“Cure those evils, they 
thought and you can dose 
down your prisons", he said. 

"The prisons were then no 
more than a staging post 
between arrest on the one 
hand and the gallows and 
transportation on the other. 

"What would they say now, 
when we have the welfare 
state, the Education Act the 
Clean Air Act. the National 
Health Service and three pris- 
oners in cells designed by 
those Victorians for ti» t 
accommodation of one?" 

He said the 1930s were 
regarded as a time of unprece- 
dented lawfulness. . : 

He added: "You had no 
need to lock your house or to 
remove the ignition key front 
your car...whcn you left »l" 


Police ‘in 


fight 


on ferry’ 


j? 


By David Sapsted 
Scotland Yard's Com- • 
plaints Investigation Bureau 
has received allegations of 
hooliganism by off-duty police 
officers on a cross-Channel 
ferry. 

Sealink says that knives 
were thrown and an attempt 


made to set fire to a feny when 

jd from -a 


last 


six officers returned 
day trip to Boulogne 
month. 

The incident has come to 
light when Sealink is increas-. 
ingly worried by violence 
caused by soccer hooligans. 
After the fighting between 
Manchester United and West 
Ham fans in August, the 
company introduced a new 
code of practice. 

Sealink says that the trouble 
occurred when the officers 
missed the Townsend 
Thoresen ferry and boarded 
the Hengist for Folkestone' 
early in the morning. 

"One officer appeared to be 
the ringleader. He refused to 
pay for a bottle of wine in the 
cafeteria and started throwing 
cutlery, including knives, at 
staff. The group then moved 
to the fast-food area where an 
attempt was made to set fire to 
a curtain." 

The captain of the Hengist 
alerted British Transport Po- 
lice who escorted the group 
out of the port. The captain 
made a formal complaint to ' 
the Metropolitan Police, as 
did crew members. 

Police Constable James - 
Hollick. aged 33. from 
Chelmsford, was cleared by. 
Portsmouth Crown Court of 
five charges yesterday of 
damaging vehicles on a Cher- 
bourg-Ponsmouth ferry last 


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Sealink dispute 
chaos continues 

There was still no settle- 
ment in sight last night to the - 
Sealink ferry dispute which 
has disrupted cross-Channel 
and Irish Sea services. As 
National Union of Seamed 
officials met senior manage--: 
ment. only the six-boat service. 

to the Isle of Wight was : 
unaffected (Tim Jones writes). 

Services between Dover and 
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Holland; Fishguard and 
Rosslare; Stranraer and Lame; 
Heysham and the Isle of Man • „ 
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mouth to the Channel Islands 
continued to be chaotic. 

Dockers at Portsmouth yes* - 

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working on the Channel 
Islands ferry Corbiere. the 
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H'.itiun (i! 

* Njk^ 

l"i; 5. 


ce in 
gilt 

Ferry, 

i:d ^ay*Ms 


. ... •. . ■ if.- 


ope ns against Jordanian accused of attempt to blast jet with 375 on board 


homenews 




have^befn 8 ? 1 'Jfoman said 10 
time bnmh*^^ 35 2 human 
MtaJ2? b J n a Jordanian’s 
■m3£ S, blow “P an Israeli 
lale^f w 5 i 0n boasA toW the 
Ce e “ f , h ?. lo ye affair ai the 
Central Criminal Court yes- 

th^ ! «^£ nn - Mur Phy, aged 32, 
JfJnsh girffnend orNezar 
Hindawi, look the oaih foa 
fellerms voice. She i 0 ld th? 
<»urt she met Mr Hindawi, a 
journalist, also aged 3Zat a 
{£*“ West EW 

naihfow Airport, and by the 

J2 d ,. of H? year ^ ** a close 
relationship with him. 

Did you love him?.” Mr 
*>oy Amlou for ihe prosecu- 
tion. asked her. “Yes, I did," 
she replied. “Did you believe 

“I d°d^ yo “ r Shc whis P«td: 

* 1 . year sfie became preg- 
nant by Mr Hindawi but 
miscarried. Miss Murphy 

. Gaunt-faced and not look- 
ing towards her former lover 
m the dock, she said that last 
January she discovered she 
was pregnant by him again, 
when she told Mr Hindawi. 
ne did not want to know 

Irfr!*: H 5- wamed me 10 s« 
nd of the thing. 

“I did not want to get rid of 

it and said I wanted to keep 

® He said he wanted 
to get married in the 
Holy Land ... 9 

the baby and myself without 
him. There was no talk about 
marriage." 

Later, about April 7. he 
suddenly appeared at her Earls 
Court flat, she told the court. 

She said he wanted to marry 
her and take her for a holiday. 
“I was surprised”, she said. “1 
agreed to get married. It 
seemed a good thing to da” 
They were to go on holiday 

Airlines to 
ban unruly 
and drunk 

Nineteen European charter 
airlines are to stop drunk and 
unruly passengers boarding 
aircraft They win mark tick- 
ets to prevent the potential 
troublemakers from transfer- 
ring to other aircraft 
The airlines, which indude 
Britannia Airways, British 
Ainours, Dan Air. Monarch, 
and Orion Airways, say that 
unruly passengers can affect 
an aircraft's safety. 

Warrant out . 

The Law Society has paid 
£44.000 from its compensa- 
tion fund to two clients of Mr 
Ian Wood, the solicitor held in 
France for whom an extra- 
dition warrant was issued 
yesterday by Sheffield mag- 
istrates alleging two offences 
of murder and one of at- 
tempted murder. 

Woman bailed 

A widow aged 38 accused of 
murdering the man who alleg- 
edly raped her was allowed 
bail at Marylebone 
Magistrates’ Court, central 
London, yesterday. She agreed 
to live at a secret address until 
the hearing resumes on 
November 17. 

Rabies tests 

A Brazilian seaman, bitten 
bv a dog in Brazil, is under- 
going tests for rabies at a Hug 
hospital after being taken til 
shortly after docking- 

TV men held 

Three men who helped 
Yorkshire Television film 
First Tuesday, a documentary 
about the execution of Mr 
Laszlo Rajk. Hungary s for- 
mer foreign minister, have 
been arrested by Hungarian 
secret police in Budapest 

Rats alert 

Rat catchers have been 
called in to Papworth Hos- 
pital. Cambridgeshire. to flg , 
nd of a colony of ro^utsm 

buildings next w 

transplant unit- A hospital 

spokesman said the transptam 

programme will not De 
affected. 

Trust buys pit , 

The National Trust is to pay 

£50.000 for a 25*ae feM ; 

containing a gwjg pn 

Dedham Vale, Suffolk, be- 
cause of its proximity to 
Salford Mill, depicted , in i 
John Constable's painting, I 
The Hay H orn. 


to Israel, she said. "He said be Hindawi had obviously trav- 
wanted to get married in died to Jordan. Italy. Poland. 
Israel, in the Holy Land, when East Germany. Rumania and 
we got over there." Bulgaria. He bad sent a post- 

Miss Murphy said she and card to Miss Murphy from 
Mr Hindawi first went to the Italy, 
wrong terminal at Heathrow. By mid-November he had 
“We got out of the taxi. left Britain again, telephoning 
Hindawi had the bag and paid his girl friend from Germany 
the taxi. We went in together, and Italy. "She was beginning 
"He pul the bag on a trolley to despair over whether there 
and asked directions for would be anything permanent 
terminal one. we walked there about their relationship." 
with him pushing the trolley. Then. Mr Aralot said. Mr 
"Then be took the bag off Hindawi appeared at her flat 
the trolley. 1 asked him what on April 7. He had flown into 

he was doing, he did not - ■ ■ 1 

answer me. I went to the £ Hmrfa wi was 

lavatory while he wafted for ar *r no s_ 

rae With Ibr bag. acting mcoDoen wim 

"He kissed me goodbye on tu6 agents Of Syria 9 
both cheeks and left me. The ■ ■ ■ ■ 

bag was still in the trolley. I London two days earlier and 
pushed it to gate 23 and got stayed at the Royal Garden 
into a lift on my own. He rad Hotel. Kensington, where 
gone because be wanted to go crew members of the Syrian 
io another terminal to catch state airline stayed, 
an earlier plana” “Despite his apparent pre- 

After the discovery of 3ib of vious lack of interest in Ann 
plastic explosives in a roller Murphy, he now told her be 
trolley allegedly given by Mr wanted to marry her and take 


trolley allegedly given by Mr 
Hindawi to Miss Murphy, the 
police, acting on the informa- 
tion of an alert receptionist at 
ihe London Visitors Hold 
arrested Mr Hindawi. 

Mr Amiot said Miss Mur- 
phy “was no suicide terrorist 
bomber. She is a single, simple 
Irish girl who came to London 
for the first time in 1984. 

"From a large family, she 
bad left school at 14, and 
worked as a machinist in 
Dublin for 10 years before 
deciding to seek work in 
London, where she started at 
the Hilton as a chambermaid. 

"In September last year she 
was sharing a flat in Kilbum 
with a number of others. She 
had met Mr Hindawi in the 
autumn of 1984, not long after 
she arrived”, Mr Amiot said. 

Mr Aralot said that from his 
Jordanian passport, later dis- 
covered in a Berlin flat. Mr 


Bamber murder trial 

Detective rebuked 
over lost’ clues 

By Michael U orsneD 


A senior defective in a 
murder Investigation was re- 
buked by the judge at the trial 
of Jeremy Bamber yesterday, 
when be admitted that vital 
dues were overlooked or lost 

The series of mishaps in the 
handling of the case meant 
that for weeks detectives per- 
sisted in the theory that the 
model Simla “Bambi” Caffell 
had shot her adoptive parents 
and twin sons with a point 22 
rifle before turning the 
weapon on herself 

Chelmsford Crown Court 
was told that it was more than 
a month after the massacre at 
the eighteenth century farm- 
house where the family lived 
that officers began to suspect 
Mr Bamber. who stood to 
inherit £436,000 from their 
deaths, had committed the 
murders. 

And it was not until Octo- 
ber 23, eleven weeks after the 
killings at White House Farm, 
Tolleshum D’Arcy, Essex, that 
a fingerprint found on the rifle 
butt was matched with Mr 
Bamber’s prims. 

Mr Bamber, aged 25. has 
denied murdering his adop- 
tive parents Nevifl and June 
Bamber. both 61, his half- 
sister Sheila, aged 27 and her 
twin six-year-old sons. ■ 

Dei. Insp. Ronald Cook, the 
senior scene-ofjcrime officer 
at the farm, admitted that a 
hair found stuck to a blood- 
stained silencer belonging to 
ihe murder weapon had been 
lost. 

The silencer itself had only 
been found three days after the 
murders by relatives of the 
family and handed to police, 
who had previously omitted 
to search the gun cupboard in 
which it was kept. 

Towards the muzzle end 
was a grey hair which was sent 
with ihe silencer to the Home 
Office forensic science lab- 
oratory at Huntingdon. 

Dei Insp Cook said that the 
laboratory had not been 

warned of the hair, which 
went missing in transit. 

The hair could have shown 
whose head had come into 
contact with the murder 
weapon but the officer bad 
failed to#rani the laboratory 
ofitsarrivaL 

Mr Justice Drake told him: 
“They should have been told, 
shouldn't they ? You know 
they should.” 

A series of other unfortu- 


nate omissions was also dis- 
closed to the jury on the third 
day of the trial. ■ - ■ 

Del. Insa Cook said 'ihai 
several weeks after the mur- 
ders he found two fingerprints 
on die point 22 semi-auto- 
matic Anscbtuz rifle and on 
October 23 identified one 
belonging to Jeremy Bamber, 
his right forefinger on the butt 
He also found a print ofSheila 
CafFdTs right hand ring finger. 

Under cross-examination 
Det. Insp. Cook admitted that 
the weapon had been handled 
by officers at the scene who 
bad omitted to wear protec- 
tive gloves. 

He agreed also that photo- 
graphs of the body of Sheila 
Caffell showed that the gun 
found across her chest at the 
scene had been moved by 
officers. 

He confirmed that for sev- 
eral weeks after the murders 
police regarded Mrs Caffell as 
the murderer. 

He said: "At the conclusion 
of the post-mortems nothing 
was said to me to alert me to 
the possibility that this may 
have been anything but a case 
of murder and suicide.” 

' Dei. Insp. Cook told the 
jury that a Bible belonging to 
Mrs June Bamber and found 
by the side of Mrs Caffell was 
not tested for fingerprints. 

He added that no examina- 
tion -was made of Mrs CaffelPs 
perfectly dean feet which the 
prosecution has alleged would 
have been dirty after carrying 
out the bloody massacre in 
different rooms of the 
farmhouse. 

He admitted that the gun 
cupboard where Nevill 
Bamber kept a number of 
weapons and ammunition had 
not been examined by police 
during initial inquiries. The 
court was told that it was three 
days after that that relatives 
who went there to collect 
valuables for safe-keeping 
discovered the bloodied si- 
lencer. 

DeL Insp. Cook could give 
no explanaion for the failure 
of police to ask Jeremy 
Bamber for specimens of his 
clothing and he went on to say ■ 
that several days passed before 
police noticed a mark made by 
a blunt instrument on the 
underside of the mantelpiece 
in the kitchen where the 
battered body of Nevill 
Bamber was found. 

The trial- continues today . 


Fan denies he was ‘fat man’ in riot 

A ** . ,„hu4i onri Miicina onpvnnc Traill 


A football supporter known 
s "the fat man” led gan$s of 
'helsea supporters in vicious 
uacks before .■«! 

ome game against Mamrh«- 

»r United, a jury at the 
: entral Criminal Court was 
)ld yesterday. . 

Mr Graham Boal. for the 

rosecution. alleged. that The 
it man’s” description fined 
crcnce Matthews, a soap 
ictal dealer who weighed 
lore than. 19 stone when 

'"hc claimed that Mr Mat- 
kws. aged 25. was “*n the 


vanguard of violence whirii 
nearly cost a publican his life. 

Mr Neil Hansen, aged 30. 
licensee of ihe Henry J Beans 
public house in King’s Road, 
Chelsea, south-west London, 
had broken beer glasses 
smashed into his face, sever- 
ing an ancry. and coitid have 
died but for prompt first aw 
given by firemen from a 
station near by. 

Mr Matthews, of Buckhold 
Road, Wandsworth, south- 
west London, denies 
of riotous assembly, affray 




and causing grievous bodily 
harm. 

Mr Boal said that trouble 
flared on December 29. 1984. 
before the match at Stamford 
Bridge where Mr Matthews 
was said to have led a charge 
of 30 fans into battle. 

Nine hours later, Mr Boal 
said. Mr Matthews was at the 
head of a smaller group who 
attacked the publican, a mem- 
ber of his staff and a customer. 

Mr Matthews was arrested 
last November and since -then 
.he had lost a lot of weight 

The trial continues today. 


wanted to marry her and take 
her on holiday to Israel She 
agreed. They hurriedly ar- 
ranged a passport for her. then 
on April IS west to a tour 
operator in Regent Street, a 
subsidiary for El AL” 

Mr Amiot alleged that Mr 
Hindawi remained outside the 
office, sending her inside with 
instructions to book a mum 
flight to Tel Aviv two days 
later. 

"She paid with money he 
provided. By then be had 
persraded her to book only 
one ticket for herselC churning 
he already had a ticket on 
another flight as bis job paid 
for his flight and be had to 
take a different route for some 
reason. 

“She was nervous and un- 
well, but he persuaded her 
they would meet in Tel Aviv 
on her arrival." 

After the flight was booked, 


he asked her to take a package 
for him in her handbag. Mr ■ifr 
Amiot said it contained an 
automatic pistol and amrau- . 
ration which was found later' 
in the grounds of Chiswick 
House, where it had been 
thrown into a pond. 

Mr Hindawi had bought HpK 
Miss Murphy a rollerbag with 
wheels saying her cases were 
too big to take. "He also had a ■1^1 
calculator which he wanted to HUgl 
take for a friend of his. They 
packed the bag and he said be 
would call for her on April 17. p Bifel w 
Hearrived in a taxi just before ppp fo 

"The time is important 
because the timer in the jjQfl 
calculator for the bomb was HEgjfS 
set at precisely 08.03 that Eftgg 
morning". Mr Amiot alleged. 

Mr Amiot said the taxi 
arrived at Heathrow about 
830 and the tinier was armed 
just after 8am simply by VShH 
connecting a battery to the 
calculator. 

Miss Murphy re m embered 
that in the taxi Mr Hindawi 
took the calculator out of the aB KSg g 
roller -bag and seemed to be 
changing the batteries. He 
seemed nervous. TSfPVI 

He then pushed the cal- 
culaior to the bottom of the 
bag. That was important be- rTT: 
cause ft would be the most 
effective place to set off the tl,Daawi 
main charge. 

At the airport Mr Hindawi the Syria 


— ^cld — 

Winner to 
start own 
business 


T«o readers 
yesterday's daily 


shared 
prize of 




. »wswVi si 


[TERMINAL. 1 






DEVICE FOUND HERE 


at 




Miss Murphy, described in court as "no suicide terrorist”; her boy friend, Mr Nezar 
Hindawi who is accused of plotting to bkm up an El .41 airliner; and (be Heathrow terminal 
scene where her baggage was checked. 


At the airport Mr Hindawi the Syrian Government and 
Lft her before she reached the acting on behalf of a group 
checkout and kissed her good- calling themselves the Jor- 
bye. She thought he was going danian Revolutionary Mo ve- 
to another terminal to catch mem". Mr Amiot said. 


his flight. 

"The Crown says he had set 
the bomb to explode in five 
hours. It would have exploded 
at 39,000 feet over Austria but 
for the most impressive alert- 
ness of El AI security officers 
at the airport. 

• “There is convincing ev- 
idence he (Hindawi) was act- 


Ex plosives were discovered 
taped to the base creating a 
false bottom. Trapped under 
the tape were some hairs 
which were microscopically 
similar to bead hair taken 
from Mr Hindawi after his 
arrest. 

When Mr Peter Gurney, an 
explosives expert, examined 


ing in concert with agents of the calculator, the securing 


screws cemented into place. 

Inside he found a timer and 
detonator had been added to 
the circuits and would have 
worked whether the calculator 
was switched on or off and 
whether anybody used it. The 
detonator was timed to go off 
at 1.04 in the afternoon. 

It would have created a 
devastating exeptosion caus- 
ing the total loss of the aircraft 
and all on board. Mr Amiot 
told the jury. 

Cross-examined by Mr Gil- 
bert Gray. QO for Mr 


Hindawi. Miss Murphy agreed 
she had loved Mr Hindawi 
very much and had believed 
he ioved her. She agreed she 
had not heard a word from 
him since his arrest. 

Mr Gray: “Did you know 
that hc has been forbidden to 
make any contact with you at 
all since his arresiT* 

Miss Murphy: “No. * 

He said the main charge was 
described as an attempt "be- 
cause. thank God. the bomb 
did not go off”. 

The trial continues today. 


yesterday s daily prize or 

Mr Reginald Fcraant, aged 
73, from sontb-west London, 
has {flayed the game since i* 
Started. 

He auk "1 just couldn't 
believe lhat I have won. As a 
matter of fact I'm still cheek- 
ing my numbers.” 

Mr Fernant, who k a retired 
Civil Servant and chartered 
surveyor, said that he WMld 
spend the money on "some 
household things” for his wife 
and on a holiday. 

The other winner is Miss 
Elspeth Varlcy, aged 30, of 
Mflton Key nes, Buckingham- 
shire. She has pbyed th£ 
game for two-and-katf months. 

Miss Varlcy, who is un- 
employed, said that she would 
use the prize money to start 
her own business. 

Readers who would like Id 
play the game can obtain a. 
Portfolio Gold card by sending 
a stamped addressed envelope 1 
to: portfolio Gold, 

The Times, 

PO Box 4ft. 

Blackburn, 

BBl 6AJ. 

Parents back 
sex education 

Sex education in schools a 
overwhelmingly supported by 
parents and children, accord- 
ing to a survey to be published 
early next year. 

A Policy' Studies Institute 
research team mierviewed 20ft 
families ia three English, 
cities. 

It shows that parents and 
children demonstrated "an al-’ 
most universal support” for 
some form of classroom tu- 
ition, often because of air 
awkwardness about sex that 
existed between them. 


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■' *»™- ‘'i «? t i? nn ;? mt n 




HOME NEWS 


THE TIMES TUESDAY OCTOBER 7 1986 


24 


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Anglicans are 
urged to grasp 



By David Cross 


■ A leading .Anglican yes- 
terday called on the church to 
Jake a more active pan in the 
drive to eradicate racism. 

The Rev John Gladwin, 
secretary of the General 
S> nod's Board for Social 
Responsibility, said the 
church had to tackle racism 
both in its own ranks and in 
the wider comuniiy. 

Mr Gladwin was speaking 
at a press conference in 
London, held to launch a 
report produced bv the Race 
Pluralism and Community 
Group, part of the social 
responsibility board. 

He said: “AH the partici- 
pants share a common desire 
to affirm and promote the 
multi-racial character of the 
church. If that task is to be 
undertaken with success then 
we must face up to and tackle 
the racism present in the 
church and in the wider 
community.” 

The report urges the 
compilation of an index of 
members of the church who 
hold positions of power and 
“who may not be sympathetic 
al all to ihc anti-racist cause. 
This would be a register of 
interests and involvements 
and these members would be 
regularly and systematically 
challenged to examine their 
actions in the light of their 
Christian commitment*". 

Another index would be 
compiled of church members 
who are sympathetic to the 
anti-racist cause and who 
could be used, lobbied and 
brought together at short no- 
tice. “This index should be 
made available to ami-racist 


groups and campaigns 
throughout the country so that 
better alliances between 
church and non-church 
groups can be builL" 

The report also says that 
Church of England workers 
should adopt “more dramatic, 
symbolic actions of protest 
and defiance” on the streets to 
combat racism. 

“We believe that in the 
present climate, rational argu- 
ments are not adequate”, the 
report says. “In the past it was 
possible to shame govern- 
ments into implementing 
small measures through ratio- 
nal argumenL 

“ However, the present gov- 
ernment has demonstrated no 
will or wish to respond to such 
argument, and therefore we 
feel, in relation to racism in 
society, that simply to repeat a 
list of recommendations is to 
miss the prime problem. 

"Wc believe that the church 
must challenge its own role in 
relation to the structures of 
power. The church needs to 
lose its respectable image and 
espouse un respectable causes. 
And this must happen at every 
level. Essentially it means 
getting out of the committee 
rooms and on to the streets” 
the report adds. 

Participants at yesterday's 
press conference said ihat the 
church had not yet decided 
how to proceed with the 
group's recommendations. 

The Rev Theo . Samuel, 
vice-chairman of the Associ- 
ation of Black Clergy, said: 
“Wc have got to discuss the 
isssucs further before we de- 
cide which strategies to use.” 



Applicants queue for hours 


It was like the first day of 
the Harrods' sale. There were 
sleeping bags, canvas chairs 
and champagne. They started 
arriving at midnighL~and by 
9 am nearly 500 people had 
gathered outside the French 
consulate in Wright's Lane. 

This has become a familiar 
scene in west London since the 
French government announced 
recently that all foreigners, 
except those from EEC coun- 
tries and Switzerland. w31 
require visas to enter the 
coantry. 

Extra staff have been ap- 
pointed to deal with the flood 
of applications bat they can 
process only 500 a day. 

This has resulted in mile- 
kmg queues stretching from 
the consulate around die cor- 
ner to the station in High 
Street Kensington; 

Yesterday it looked as if a 
mass picnic had been held 


there with rubbish strewn on 
the pavement all the way np 
the road. Piles of crushed caps 
and empty take-away con- 
tainers were the remnants of 
the hopeful applicants' 
breakfast 

Miss Maureen Preen and 
her friends arrived at midnight 
after unsuccessfully trying to 
obtain visas last Friday. 

“They told me that if we got 
here after two that we would 
not get in. So we decided to 
make a night of it; we drank 
champagne and wine and 
slept” she said. 

Miss Daniella Sullivan, who 
arrived at 5 JO am. said she 
wanted to be in Paris by the 
afternoon.“I spent the night 
listening to music, drinking 
coflee and talking to the 
friends I have made here.” she 
said. 

Miss Korina Flamma. who 
has to travel to Paris to collect 


£ 1,000 she won in a song com- 
petition, sat outside embroid- 
ering a gold costume. She too 
was turned away last Friday. 

Cheers from the crowd and 
sighs of reltef greeted officials 
who walked along the queue 15 
minutes before the. consulate 
opened and handed out raffle 
tickets numbered 501 to 1,001. 

Those who were not lucky 
enm%h lo get a ticket, have' to 
return spin today. 

Security guards at the visa 
section advise travellers, who 
have been turned away, to 
return again at 4 am. 

The French Embassy said 
that staff found it “virtually 
impossible” to cope. 

“We have even appointed 
extra staff, but it is very 
difficult” she sand. 

She said that tourists could, 
however, still obtain visas at 
French airports and at ports of 
entry. 



Mr Don Gardner, who was 
well wrapped for the wait 



Loans at favourable terms (inducting deferred 
repayments) are also available from the European Coal 
and Steel Community. 


The Plant and the technolo gy 

Industrial requirements can be met from a - • 

comprehensive range of packaged or purpose designed 
units with a variety of boiler and furnace types and 
ratings. Modem coal plant is futiy automatic with 
completely endosed handling - a concept that 
meets both the economic and 
aesthetic needs of the UK’s leading 
industrial companies. 

A final word from Malcolm 
Edwards, British Coal’s Commercial 
Director: ‘No other source of energy 
can match British Coal’s supply and 
pricing profile The Government 
Grant Scheme, which isn’t due 
to end until mid-1 987, can : 



Bowater’s papermaking site in Kent is one 
of the largest in Europe It is also a fine 
example of a company reaping the benefits of 
relying bn British Coal for its energy needs. 

The Kent mills produce a portfolio of 
papers ranging from quality gloss-coated 
grades through computer and business to 
towelling and packaging. In the process, the 
company consumes around 250,000 tonnes 
of coal a year. 

‘Paper is a very competitive business 
facing intense competition from overseas’ 
says Ted Drake, Purchasing Manager - 
Supplies. ‘And energy is a major cost. 

Oil has a history of volatile pricing and 
even though costs look attractive at the 
moment, it’s anybody^ guess what 
will happen in the next few months. 

On the other hand, prospects for 
coal remain excellent - based on 
stable, competitive pricing and 
security of supply’. 

Bowaters, like many other 
forward-thinking companies 
have chosen British Coal when 
it comes to an important 
investment in the future. 


Act now for real hel p 
with conversion costs 


A Government Grant 
Scheme currently 
supports conversion to 
coal by providing up 
to 25% of the eligible 
capital costs. 


The Conservatives won the 
last general election because 
they were Ur only party Ax 
looked fit to govern die coun- 
try. For Labour the national 

campaign was more an episode 

in the party's dhU war than a 

serious bed for power. For the 
Aifiance it was es senti al ly a 
straggle far survival. 

With the aura of the Falk- 
tends still upon her, Mrs 
Thatcher had simply, to keep 
oat of trouble in order to win. 
Policy commitments became 
not .so mac h an electoral 
requirement as a potential 
trap. So the Conservatives 
coasted to victory with - a 
campaign of orach pro- 
fessionalism and few' 
promises. 

Bat as (bey begin, the test of 
this year’s party conferences . 
today the Conservatives must 
know that fit will net be like 
that next time. After ' last 
week's performance to Black- 
pool, Laboor can no lon ger be 
siismissed as a part? anfit for 
office, whatever its pofides 


COMMENTARY 



Hopeful applicants waiting yesterday outside the French Embassy visa section in west London, (Pbotograph&Stnajt Nlcol) 

French visas 


Tories must fight 
on three fronts 


So the Conse rva tives most 
prepare -for a campaign on 
three fronts. They will have to 
figh* partly on their record, as 
every government most dm 
partly on the dangers pre- 
sented by Labour policies, as. 
distinct from labor ham- 
; petencer and partly on their 
I own positive proposals. 

Coming to an etection after 
eight, possibly even nine, 
years in office, the Conser-. 
vatives will have to dem- 
onstrate that they have natron 
out of stem The principal 
test of this conference will be 
whether the Government can 
convey the impression that it 
still has a politically appealing . 
momeirtmii. 

It most show tint it has 
fresh tasks to accomplish. But 
the British are an instinctively 
conservative people, who wiD 
not be attracted by radical 
proposals far then- own sake; 
Elections ia this oomitry are 
not won by frightening the 
voters. 

Looking at the record of the 
[Thatcher Administration ap to . 

w y 1 am struck by bow 
carefully the Government has 
followed this principle in its 
actions and by how carelessly 
it has disregarded it m some of 
its rhetoric. . 

Its most radical actions - 
trade onion kgyshtioh, sate of 
comet] booses, privatisation—, 
have all been judiciously se- 
lected. None has been directed 
against politically popnlar tar- 
gets. All has been pofiticaDy 
acceptable. ... 

11© Government, has not . 
slashed pnhlic expenditure *s. . 
might have fK^expected.JB«L 


h has talked so much about ■{ 
doing so that reductions in tbe^ 
planned l eve l of inc reas ed', 
s pending have been widely ' - 
interpreted as sw ingring cats,,:> 

So it has got the worst ot’ 
both worlds. It has received - 
the political blame b at .no -• 
economic benefit from savings^ 
that hare not been made. .4 
There is a lesson bere for 
this conference. . The tesCh 
indicate tint further 
reforms are on the way wphw” 
arousing teas that the^worM 
is to be turned upside ffewn,^ 
and the Welfare State torn 
apart- • . . 

All the signs are that nun- r 
isters will try to achieve this •” t 
double perposd by concentrate * 
teg oh the (heme '.of extending” 
individual choice. This prteH - 
dple will be appfied in thfc^ 
firids of housing, education, 
and possibly feilth- 
fn general terms tiuS seems - 

a sensiWe approach. it £T 

consistent with the direction in 
which British sodety is mov^ 1 


there are three jiriP'' 

sticks against which the im- ' 
ptementation of this principle 
should' be measured. Each 
scheme needs to offer the 
prospect of a sensible, prac- 
tical reform, rather than being 
simply a bright idea that -fits. 


Reforms without > 
fears required _ ^ 


It m4 need to be 
in a way that does net make «£*. 
sound more radical than infatf 
it is. That is a tnagfr jequater. j 
meat for an ambitions ministef £ 
aider Mrs Thatcher's expect 
tent gaze*, lint, there is a thifr^ 
borderline between aronsiag;^ 
interest and striking fear ip.*" 
the electorate. 

Finally, ministers will need 
to make ft dear Oat tint 
spending increases, which are . 
undoubtedly necessary, will her) 
selective.. Otherwise, the Cflfr , 
eminent mil look as if it hfis^ 
simply undergone a deathbed '£ 
conversion, which is hot the!" 


best .way 4 ^. win anyone's^ 
ronfidenoe, 


PARLIAMENT OCTOBER 6 1986 


T.<» 

fes 


r-v 

ini 


Hoods and masks 




on marches 


THE LORDS 



PUBLIC ORDER 


Feara that members of the - IRA 
or other, militants, and activists 
would beahle to take.. part in; 
public marches while disguised; 
in' masks, hoods or, uniforms 
and get away with ‘ it, were 
discounted by the. Gov er nm en t 
during the committee stage hi 
the House of Lords of the Publk ■ 
Order Bill. . , 


TheGovemmehtspokesraah. 
the Earl of Caithness. Minister 
of State, Home Office, explained 
that the .issue was already fully, 
covered by the BilL , 

Viscoant st Davids (Ind) raised 
the issue when he proposed . an 
amendment, which lie : hater 
withdrew, giving police paWCte' 
to prevent those in public ■ 
marches disguising themselves, ' 
as part of the conditions to be - 
imposed on public processions. 

A man took part-in a pro-' 
cession, he said, to demonstrate . 
his support for its purpose. f ' 

He is doing that just as much 
as if he wrote a tetter to The \ 
Times and signed it with his - 
name (he said). A tetter written 
to The Times signed, Anouy- ' 
mo us. would not have the same 
effect. 


Somebody marching' with a 
masked, face was not showing 
the same honesty of purpose. 

By adding a • disguise, a 
matcher was saying in effect that 
he was about to do a bad. act. In 
recent years too many pro- 
cessions had. been damaged by 


... 

live intent, often contrary to. 
wishes of the organisers. ~ m . ■ 

lord SOldn ef Dulwich (Lab) % 
said the Opposition .had ■,syifr-"' s 
pathy with the proposal which 1 ? 
was . complementary to ■ aa-'> 
amendment he ■ had- i tabled! “ 
imposing conditions .bn these 
carrying of provocative flags.,-* 
and banners. It was logical the ., 
two should go together, he sakL 
• This was particularly ' im^ 
poram in instances where- ’ 
c particular flags or banners wete 1 ''-' 
to be carried through areas ci 
where they would be considered^ » 
offensive. - •. 

The Marquess «f TweriktaftFT 
(Ind) pointed out there were .' j 
1 occasions when people; 'such 
Iranians on an -aDtirKhomrinift; 
demonstration, could put thrinV^ 
selves or their families at risk iT" 
they were to show their . feces w 
openly. _ •* V? ' \ 

; .Tlte Earl WCahhueifs said dK 
Metropolitan police, who' had** 
the greatest experience of-deaF^ 
ing with mass demonstrations.^* 
had- reported, no problems with ’ 
disguised, marchers and said,* 
they were quite satisfied -with. * 
ousting powers. -The provincial-!! 
fences had replied, that it might ’ 
be of use in thepase of aninuif ' 
rights activities who used 
masks when raiding - ummrf -*- 
establish meats, although they t 
marched undisguised. • 

The Government, -be said. M 
was satisfied that sufficient pow- I 

era already existed for the police S 

to.be able to deal with any such - * 
problems and the question of. J 
Iranian demonsOraima and otb^t 
era .who feared. reprisal&i hjyf wiS 
be taken seriously. 




People ‘frightened’ by 


a 

ss 



MINI-SUMMIT 


make it more likdy wO will be 
consulted: . 


The overwhehning majority of 
the British pbbprie 1 vtould Be 
frightened by -the defence policy 
of -the labour Party as defined 1 
by Mr Neil Kinnocfc at the party:. 


conference in Blackpool.- ^ Lady 
Young,. Minister ot Staj 


Lady. Young:- Thai- W i i 
important poim. -Those who * 
brard the. anti-American- hsJ \ 
manes made at the Labour Puny ^ 
conference Jast vfeekddriot fed* i 
these ate. *th> Britaiii’S best! r 
mieresis.- ■ *- - -• - \ * 


— jiswr of\Staje for r ^. 
Foreign, and.. Commonwealth'. 
Affairs. - .said during question c 
time exchanges in tbe House of v 
Lords. which was resuming -its- : 
sittings after its summer ‘recess. ' . 

Laid Mol toy (Lab) had asked, 
whether there would be a .state- . 
mail to the House following the 
proposed m.ini-sutnmii .in 
Iceland- ■' '.! 

Lady Yoang: It. is unusual to 
make a statement about a 
meeting at which the -Govern-'' 
mem is not present, but we will'.; 
certainly wish to keep (he House-? - , 
informed in an appropriate way. 

Lord Tfaftvuycrofit 1C>. The .- 
experience and .rcpncuion of the . 
Prime ■ Minister and '‘ftier . 
acknowledged .friendship"" and 
loyalty to the United Suites 


* * 0 ^VPtoce.Al the son.'- * 


,. M . jce « b, « a «»d as they serve!. J 

S<rS." wuld,Kali * ; 


Lady Young 7 T would 

UM. U he and hto friends would i 

8real into .1 

wnicn they are putting this"! 

lbeir anti-nuclear \ 
policy they ; would recognize the 
® v ^? e i , * li n& majority of the. ■* 
Bntisb people will fe vm- 5 
frightened fry it. - . . -■ e r- ■ 5 


Parliament today • • - i 

JjH* 8 . Housing : and^ * 




f — 


1 ' 


ff 




•I 


ft 

*4 


i 


I : : 


IV 













Mothers who work 
are more likely 
to take up smoking 


i HE T iM£S i U ESDA Y OC i GbhR 7 i »ah 


re V Sk 


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aftsssteas 

w ^ h publ,5l,e<i by the 

S em :S n EO'erameni 

2JJ** th ? 1 ■*& per cent of all 
2S52* 1n ^ ,d w Ork, with 
chudren under 10, smoke, 
compared with a national 
average of 33 percent. Thirty- 
five percent of all housewives 
with children under 10 smoke. 

But the susceptibility 10 
smoking drops sharply in 
women who have no children. 

2?L 26 V* 0011 of childless 
working women smoke and 24 
[*7 ®“K housewives with 
no children 

n JJ le Jleures published in a 
E* ** hy Dr Bobbie 
} iS?L nr' Bea ting the 
i “ l u l? rs ' which was 
launched by the British Medi- 
cal Assoication yesterday, sup- 
port her argument that the 
suain of working and having 
children « a factor in the 
clpsing gap between smoking 
‘"CJOfoce in men and women. 
- In 1961 nearly 60 per cent of 

men and 40 per cent of women 
smoked. But now nearly half 
the country's 14 million smok- 
ers are women averaging 14 


By J31 Sherman 
cigarettes a day to the man's 

Jn 1983 cigarettes IriHed 
33X00 British women tbrotgb 
heart attacks, lung cancer aid 
chronic bronchitis, the book 
claims, and lung cancer is now 
overtaking breast cancer as the 
biggest cancer-killer. 

Dr Jacobson emphasizes 
that unlike men, women are 
smoking at equal rates across 
the spectrum of social ria<=c*s 
Only 17 per cent of middle- 
class professional men smoke, 
compared with 49 per cent of 
unskilled maanzal workers. 
Elat in women this figure is 38 
per cent and 40 per cent 
respectively. 

“Social class is sriU an 
important indicator in smok- 
ing but other factors now have 
to be taken into account.'* Dr 
Jacobson said. 

“There is a new hierarchy of 
smokers. Since men do not do 
much unpaid domestic work, 
the strain of having children 
to rear as well as a paid job is 
unlikely to have much impact 
on their smoking patterns." 

Dr Jacobson claims that 
women are driven to smoking 
because they have no one to 
depend on. “Men depend on 
women. Women depend on 
cigarettes. Cigarettes are ben 
used asa safety valve, a way 


Clinical trials: 2 


Evidence of GPs’ 
cash inducements 


kbrj*. 

•Su: 

mi tadu-alifcci 

i* tv j touch 

•»«» ;»mhiiiu* 1 g 
IllJhlWf.j 
. his! Shrii 
K UlViTfl Jfc 

an-.l 

MUIv 

• twr.Mrt* I*. 

• is ilnr k 
: m.» ii ,im\ » 5r 
i’ll lx RtYrsvitJ 

1 ‘Ih. THhr.lt 

• til !:vl. 2 % P 

ins. ••iibh nr 

ii "in if, 

»•« 


In the second of two articles. JiU Skermeas looks at how- 
clinical trials are open to financial abuse 


The lack of statutory con- 
trol governing dinical trials 
can lead to abuse and there is 
growing evidence that false or 
pseudo trials are being carried 
out which have no scientific 
value and arc purely promo- 
tional exercises. 

In one recently publicized 
case doctors were allegedly 
given payments for taking part 
in a false trial to promote a 
heart drug. Salesmen were 
told to keep test' cards which 
had been completed by the 
doctors. 

The Royal CoHege of Phy- r 
smarts has received evidence - ' 
that large sums of money are 
being paid to chnicaj investi- 
gators to conduct trials and . 
that companies, partnerships 
arid individual doctors con- 
tract to carry those out. 

Those organizations or ra- 
dix (duals act as links between 
the pharmaceutical industry 
and the medical professions 
and may be purely rammer- • 
cial or associated with hos- 
pitals and universities. 

Some doctors are offered 
gifts or cash payments for 
every patient started on a 
product, and the. college beard 
that several physicians were 
offered £500 for every five 
patients treated with a new 
non-steroidal anti-inflam- 
matory drug. 

Under the colfege’s own 
code of ethics investigators are 
entitled to realistic payments 
to cover the time spent carry- 
ing out the research. But 
pavments are expected to.be 
reported to the ethics 
committees. 

The code says doctors 
should not accept payments 
for dinical trials of new drugs 
unless that has been specified 
in'the protocol. 

Similarly doctors should 
not accept payments for 
recording patients reactions 
to a licensed drug, unless that 
has been approved, or receive 
any inducement which could 
influence his professional 
assessment of the therapeutic 
* alue of a new drug. 

The Department of Heaiui 

' INVESTORS ~ 
NOW SAY 
'YES' TO THIS! 


and Social Security has re- 
cently advised that if an 
officer wishes to attend 
conference which is financed 
wholly or partially by 
commercial sources be has to 
seek approval ■ from the 
employing authority. 

Even the Association of the 
British Pharmaceutical In- 
dustry says that “no gift or 
financial inducement shall be 
offered or given to members of 
the medical profession" . 

But the advice is dearly 
bong broken by both sides 
and .there is evidence that 
doctors themselves are now 
demanding fees from drug 
companies so that they can 
attend conferences abroad or 
asking companies to provide 
free meals when they wish to 
promote products. 

The penalties to the drug 
company are small amount- 
ing to no more than a ticking 
on by the association. 

Ethics committees have no 
direct sanctions over doctors 
but if they find that then- 
advice is not heeded- or- trials 
are being carried' out without 
their knowledge they are ex- 
pected to report- the modem 
to the health authority or 
university board. 

The Royal College of Phy- 
sicians has advised members 
that 'rit is unacceptable for a 
physician to receive any gift or 
other inducements from a 
pharmaceutical company ex- 
cept those that are Inexpen- 
sive and relevant to the 
practice of medicine’-" 

It also proposes that finan- 
cial arrangements for clinical 
trials are done through the 
finance' office of- the health 
authority or university. 

To guard against false or 
pseudo trials the college says 
that doctors must ensure that 
the studies are . of scientific 
merit, that they have been 
approved by an 'independent 
ethical committee and there is 
is prior agreement with the 
company that the results may 
be submitted to journals ofthe 
physicians' choice. 

Concluded 



BRAND NEW fTODOCX 

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This offer n»oy doseinda Y s ’ 
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addr. 


TEL:- 


TA* BATE 


AGE IS) 


AUOlWTrWAmt 2 ' 41 

?} g..|S ,,i []l .- I 1-M0- UMBB A— 


Tax office 
‘wolves’ 
censured 

Women who work 1 for the 
Inland Revenue are calling for 
more official help to deal with 
sexual harassment. 

They warn women ap- 
pointed to 'whom they can 
take complaints and ; other 
personal problems. 

The Inland Revenue Staff 
Federation is pressing ' tiie 
Inland Revenue to appoint 
women equal opportunity 
officers in each tax district to 
deal with office “wolves . At 
present the only officers are 

“There is evidence- ■ that 
manv women feel unaWe. to 
approach the male - officers 
about problems concerning 
sexual harassment and health 
issues:" it says. 

Miss Liz. SyTnons, the 
federation’s assistant sec- 

rears', ays 8« 

from- women members simply 
because they want to talk to a 
woman and refuse to speak to 
anyone else. There «a lack of 
confidence in taking iLup with 

ni Tbda>- manv more women 

work in tax offices and for*!' 
cent of staff are female aged20 

to 35. Miss Symons sayi^jw 

traditional image of tne 
taxman has changed-. . 


letting off steam in a society 
that expects women to juggle 
three or four paid and unpaid 
jobs." 

Dr Jacobson will be sending 
the book and a covering letter 
to Mrs Edwma Currie, junior 
minister at the Department of 
Health. 

“Edwiaa Currie needs to 
address the issue of her own 
ignorance before die accuses 
the rest of the country ofbdng 
ignorant of health hazards. 
Her own department's re- 
search shows that people arc 
aware of the risks of s m o kin g. 
People are smoking because 
they have good reason 10 
smoke and are befog farther 
tempted by the millions spent 
on tobacco advertising each 
y ear.” 

Dr Jacobson said that she 
would also be notifying Mrs 
Currie of new statistics which 
showed that popular women’s 
magazines were breaching ibe 
Govern mem's voluntary 
agreement, drawn up last 
April, that no cigarette 
advertising should appear in 
magazines marketed at the 15- 
24 age group with a circulation 
of more than 200,000. 

The magazines m breach of 
the agreement are Company. 
Cosmopolitan, Options. Over 
21 and Woman’s World. 



Prince Charles touring the housing project with (from left) Mr Angus McCormack, Mr Rod 
Hackney, Mr Michael Conuuly, and Miss Genevieve Jones, project architect 

Royal seal for self-builders 

By Charles Knevitt, Architecture Correspondent 


The Prince of Wates yes- 
terday opened Scotland's first 
seif-band housing project 
sponsored by a local authority 
at Cotfohewi Street. Stirling. 
He mid one of the home- 
owners that he would be back 
to see It convicted. 

The scheme, which was 
praised by the Prince in his 
speech to the Institute of 
Directors’ annual convention 
last year, has pot home owner- 
ship withm the reach of dis- 
advantaged groups snefa as the 


unemployed, low paid, single 
parents and families on the 
council waiting list 

Mr Rod Hackney, a commu- 
nity architect and adviser to 
the Prince, was appointed by 
Stirling District Council to 
undertake (he scheme of 27 re- 
furbished flats and nine new 
two- and three-bedroom 
bosses on a dereftet site in 
1984. 

The Abbey National and 
Scottish building societies 


provided mortgages, with the 
council giving loans and maxi- 
mum improvement grants. By 
doing the work themsehes the 
self-bmUers will save op to 
one-third of the normal mar- 
ket cost of their homes, giving 
them a new bouse for less than 
£ 20,000 and a flat for around 
£10, 000. More than 70 
applications were received 
from those wishing to Cake 
part in the project, 

Duke calls for fairer deal 
P*ge 10 


Pop singer 
tells of 
musician’s 
last hours 

The pop singer Boy George 
toll an inquest at St Pancras. 
central London yesterday he 
believed that an American 
musician who died from a 
drugs overdose in his home 
was no longer taking drugs. 

Boy George, who gave ev- 
idence under his real name of 
George O'Dowd, told the 
bearing that Michael 
Rudeisky had come to En- 
gland for a recording session. 

Asked about Mr Rudetsky’s 
drug problems. Boy George 
said: "He said he didn't take 
anything." 

During the evening of Au- 
gust 5 they both went to the 
Gaslight rehearsal studio at 
Moat place. Bruton. 

“He seemed tired hut OK. 
He started to doze and 
slumped over bis keyboard." 

The singer S3 id that lie 
needed help from a 
nightwaichman to get Mr 
Rudetsky into a car. He took 
him to his home in Well Road. 
Hampstead, north- we si 
London. 

The singer then went to his 
other home at Si John's Wood 
and learned the next day that 
Mr Rudciskv was dead . 

Dr Peter jcrrcai. a patholo- 
gist. said that a post-mortem 
examination disclosed that 
Mr Rudetsky *s body con- 
tained a fetal level of mor- 
phine. 

Dr Douglas Chambers, the 
coroner, recorded a verdict of 
death bv misadventure. 


New drug 
attacks 
wide range 
of viruses 

By Pearce W right 
Science Editor 

The most powerful anti- 
viral agent tested in the lab- 
oratory is reported in the latest 
issue of the science magazine 
Mature. 

A research team from Bel- 
gium and Czechoslovakia 
prevents results for a new 
compound called (St-HPMPA 
for short, which show it has 
astonishing potency in attack- 
ing a wide range of viruses, 
including those causing herpes 
and allied infection, chicken 
pox and similar ill new and 
some that are known to induce 
tumouiv 

The drug has been tested on 
25 different viruses in culture 
in laboratory, stopping their 
development in concentra- 
tions which is said U> haw no 
other effect on the mamma- 
lian cells 

The report from the group 
led by Dr Erik De Clcreq. of 
the Rega Institute for Medical 
Research at Leuven Univer- 
sity. focuses on the unusual 
mechanism which they be- 
lieve is at work io make >h» 
compound «s ptiwcrtul. 

Development of effective 
ami -viral drugs ts still at an 
early wage. Bui if substances 
can be synthesized to be 
absorbed selectively into only 
the virus, u would be of 
enormous benefit to other 
scientists searching for treat- 
ments lor Aids and canrxT 


PRESS RELEASE. 

I 4th September^ 1986- 
Magnapix's latest. 

Hagnapix has today announced the release of their latest film, 
•Giving and Taking". A block-buster of a love story set in war- 
torn Ear ope, it*s. directed by William Healey and stars Jin Roberts, 
Philippa Baldwin and Karl Kretschmar-Schuldorff . 

Based on the best-selling autobiography of Belinda Ballantyne, 
"Giving and Taking" tells- the story of a young Englishwoman (played 
by BaldwinJ who is afirried to a German f Kretschmar-Schirldorff ) . ■ 

.Wien war< breaks oat, he is drafted and eventually sent to’ the Russian 
Front. ... 

WW2 Heroism.. 

During the years to come, Baldwin has more to cope with than 
three children, the. Allied boobing, the neighbours' hostility and 
the authorities' suspicions.' She also meets, and falls in love 
with, a Canadian Intelligence officer masquerading as a Swiss cultural 
attache (Roberts). 

Wien Kretschmar-Schuldorff loses bis legs to a partisan's 
grenade and is seat home, be begins to suspect that Baldwin is having 
an affair. But that is only half the truth - she is also actively 
engaged in helping Roberts with his espionage work. 

Whilst under the influence of home-made schnapps, Kretschmar- 
Schuldorff confides his languish over his wife's -infidelity to a 
neighbour, who is, unfortunately, an informer (played by the great 
old c h aracter actor, Tim Baynes).- Baynes discovers that Roberts 
is a spy, and informs on both him and Baldwin. 

Self-Sacrifice. 

Confronted by the hurt -and angry Kretschmar-Schuldorff , 

Baldwin and Roberts confess their anti-Nazi activities, just as the 
Gestapo arrive outside their apartment building to arrest them. 
Kretschmar-Schuldorff, in order to. distract the Gestapo and give 
Baldwin, Roberts and the -children time to escape across the roof, 
drags himself over to the window and throws himself out. 

In a recent interview on the'set of his next film, William 
Healey, the director, spoke at some length about "Giving and Taking". 
•I think what. first attracted me to the story was the sheer scale 
of the human sacrifice involved. First, you have old Kretschmar- 
Schuldorff defending his .country, although he disagrees with the 
policies of the Nazi party. Then Baldwin and Roberts risking 
their own lives to spy for' the Allies. And finally, of course, 
Kretschmar-5chuldorff making the ultimate sacrifice, for his wife 
and the man who had -stolen, her love. " 


BBW—8ILI&SS1 


14th September, 1986 


Magnapix's Latest, 

Magnapix has today announced the release of their latest film, 
"Giving and Taking 4 . A block-buster of a love story sat In war- 
Eu 


Jim 



torn Europe, Ifs directed by William Healey and stars 
Roberta, Philippa Baldwin and Karl Kretschmar-Schuldorff. 

Based on the 
and Taking’ 
who is mained i 

out, he is drafted and eventually sent to the Russian Front 


World War 2 Heroism. 

During the years to come, Baldwin has more to cope with than three 
children, the Allied bombing, the neighbours' hostility and the authorities' 
suspicions. She also meets, and faSs in love with, a Canadian Intelligence 
officer masquerading as a Swiss cultural attache (Roberts). 

When Kretschmar-Schuldorff loses his leas to a partisan's grenade and 
is sent home, he begins to suspect that Baldwin is having an affair. But 
that is only half the troth - she is also actively engaged in helping Roberts 
with his espionage work. 

Whilst under the influence of home-made schnapps, Kretschmar- 
Schuldorff confides his anguish over his wife's infidelity to a neighbour, 
who is, unfortunately, an informer (played by the great old character actor, 

' Roberts is a spy, and informs on 


Tim Baynes). Baynes 
both him and Baldwin. 


discovers that Roi 


Self-Sacrifice 


angry * 
nti-Nazi 


Roberts confess their anti-Nazi activities, just as the Gestapo arrive 
outside their apartment building to arrest them. Kretschmar- 
Schuldorff, in order to distract the Gestapo and give Baldwin, Roberts 
and the children time to escape across the roof, drags himself over to the 
window and throws himself out 

In a recent interview on the set of his next film, William Healey, the 
director, spoke at some length about "Giving and Taking". ’I think what 
first attracted me to the story was the sheer scale of the human sacrifice 
involved. First, you have ok/ Kretschmar-Schuldorff defending his country, 
although he dsagrees with the policies of the Nazi party. Then Baldwin and 
Roberts risking their own lives to spy for the Allies. And finally, of 
course, Kretschmar-Schuldorlt making the ultimate sacrifice, for his wife 
and the man who had stolen her love." 



All dressed up. 


At a brief glance, these two sheets are very communicate your ideas in a clear and compelling 


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THE TIMES TUESDAY OCTOBER 7 1986 


OVERSEAS NEWS 


7 



Guerrilla war worsens 

Unifil general 
challenges 
Israel to give 
up buffer zone 

From Robert Fisk, mum, southern Lebanon 

coniinuatfoJJ 1 offtS ® ^ 31183 **« ‘security 

war that is thres*».Ji^ iern ^ a was dismantled. The 
overwhelm ibe^ Unhed 8 **? W ? a, ^^^ Is ^ oca ^ 


war that 

— -•••>-<( UtUlIli 

a **» .United Na- 

““ftem Ldffi; &T ” 
rarce commander 


UN 


issued a dramatic r»n 

__ .l , puunc coax- 

tenge to the Israelis to with- r._ j , . . -- — 

draw from 45 square mites of find 0111 ™ h,ch vtew B 

ibmr T? c mues — In mrt jIip rauviinn m 9 iki 


lion is Ihe reason for the 
. ting in south Lebanon and 
that calm would be restored if 
this reason was removed. 
"There is. only one way to 


?!£ «mjHiion zone hi 
Lebanon and band the terri- 
tory over to the UN. 

H^°!f Ge u ncral Gustav 
Hagglund the Finnish UN 
commander, used the occa- 
f ,on of a medal parade for 
83*. ^ Irish Army’s 

59th Infantry Battalion to 
announce his extraordinary 
initiative, insisting that UN 
troops would be readv to 
move into die western sector 
ot the Israeli occupation zone 

the hill villages 10 miles 
inland. 

■ UN officials made no secret 
or the general's intentions. 
"Things are bogged down and 
the guerrilla war is getting- 
worse for everyone.’' one of 
them said We are trying to 
throw a rock in the pond" 

The United Nations In- 
terim Force in Lebanon 
(Unifil) came here eight years 
ago under a UN manrtm# to 
confirm the withdrawal ofls- 
nteji occupation troops after 
their 1978 invasion but, both 
before and after their second 
invasion in 1982. the Israelis 
refused to leave a buffer zone 
which runs six miles deep into 
Lebanon and which they refer 
to as their "security zone". 

The Israelis have always 
refused to allow the UN to 
complete their mandate by 
moving down to the interna- 
tional frontier, claiming UN 
troops would not be able to 
prevent guerrilla infiltration. 

This was the point General 
Hagglund took up yesterday. 
"International peace and se- 
curity cannot be restored be- 
fore Israel has ' withdrawn 
from occupied territory,” he 
said 

"The Israelis say Unifil 
cannot do the job and that 


to pul ihe question to a test. 
Why not begin with a with- 
drawal from ihe western half 

of the so-called 'security 
zone*? 

"Unifil already has a few 
positions in ibai area as well as 
its headquarters at Naqqoura 
and could deploy additional 
troops without 

The general cut short his 
vish to the Irish UN battalion 
to By by behcoptor from 
Tibnhi to the Lebanese De- 
fence Ministry at Yarze to 
seek Lebanese Government 
support for bis demand But 
whether it evokes any interest 
in Israel is another matter. 

The UN force is in no 
, position to offer future protec- 
' lion to the Christian militia- 
men who fight for land and 
live inside the occupation 
zone. Nor. on the evidence of 
a long car journey through the 
UN zone yesterday, was there 
much encouragement for be- 
lieving that Miisfifn militia- 
men can be kept out by UN 
troops. 

My car was stopped at three 
militia checkpoints inside the 
UN zone, at one of which, in 
the Finnish battalion area, 
seven gunmen in camouflage 
fatigues appeared on the road 
beside me. 

Yet the UN is being ha- 
rassed relentlessly, caught up 
in the battles across the 
occupation zone frontline that 
runs right through their own 
territory and General 
Hagghmd appears to be seek- 
ing some way ofbringing relief 

to the UN force. 

He referred yesterday to the 
killing of Lieutenant Angus 
Murphy, the Irish officer who 
was blown up by a mine in 
southern Lebanon in August, 
saying angrily that it was hard 


attacks against Israel and gen-., to accept his death as an ordi- 
erai violence would increase : nary sacrifice. 


Jerusalem jets raid 
near Syrian border 

From Ian Murray, Jerusalem 


Israeli aircraft attacked tar- 
gets scarcely 10 miles from the 
Syrian frontier just after dawn 
yesterday, bombing what was 
described here as a “head- 
quarters for terrorist organtza- 
uons of the rejectionist front”. 

The raid appears to have 
been centred on the village of 
Berqayel. some 12 miles 
north-east of Tripoli and weu 
within range of the surface-to- 
air missile (Sam) batttnes 
Syria has deployed along its 
border with Lebanon. How- 
ever. according to mil itary 
sources here, no missiles were 
fired and all the aircraft 
returned safely to base. 

The target is understood to 
be a two-storey buildup used 
bv ihe Syrian National Social- 
S party (SNSP), which has 
claimed responsibility in the 
past for suicide bombings m 
South Lebanon and for at- 
tempts to infiltrate IsraeL 

Eye-witness claims rial 
three training camps in (fat 
ferenr villages had been bit by 
Israeli aircraft were rejected 
by the sources. 


• Chairman chosen: The neu- 
tral chairman of the arbitra- 
tion court to deckle the 
sovereignty of disputed border 
areas between Israel and Egypt 
will be MrGunnar Lagergren, 
a Swedish appeal court judge 
and international arbitration 
expert, who was involved in 
the negotiations between the 
United States and Iran during 
the hostage crisis in 1980 and 
who has also been consulted 
over border disputes between 
India and Pakistan. 

He will be paid a fee of 
S300.000 (£206,000 jwhile the 
other four members will each 
be paid $100,000 over an 18- 
montb period from the first 
hearing m Geneva on Decem- 
ber 1. 

The other two neutral ar- 
bitrators are Herr Dietrich 
Schindler, a Zurich university 
law professor, and M. Pierre 
BeDet, a French legal expert. 
Israel has nominated Profes- 
sor Ruth Lapidot and Egypt 
has appointed Mr Moham- 
med Sultan, both noted inter- 
national jurists. 


Peres A-bombs pledge 


Jerusalem - Tibs week s 
Sunday Times report that 
Israel was now the world s 
sixth largestnuclear power, 
with more than 200 bombs, 
was raised byMr Shimon 
Peres, the Israeli Prime : Min- 
ister. at yesterdays Cabirat 
meeting (lan Murray writes). 

The Government was used 
io “sensational report£aJWUt 
the nudear research centre at 
Dimona and did not m*kea 
SSk of commenting on 

ttaSThe aid- lsraers E?" cy 

had noichange* It 'vouldnol 


be the first country to in- 
troduce nuclear weapons into 
the region. 

Coverage of the story here 
has been limited to correspon- 
dents from London quoting 
directly from The Sunday 
Times with the military censor 
here vetting all reports. 

• New Minister Mr Zev- 
ulun Hammer, of the National 
Religious Party, was named as 
Religious Affairs Minister, 
adding a hardliner to 
Cabinet (Reuter reports). 


the 



Sub fire 
puts focus 
on naval 
build-up 

From Christopher Walker 

Moscow 

The fire oa beard a Sonet 
nu cle ar submarine as it was 
patrolling the Atlantic some 
946 miles east tf New York 
and Washington bat Friday 
focused Western at te ntio n 
dramatically on the relentless 
naval buOd-qi being Imple- 
mented by the Kremlin's mili- 
tary planners, with emphasis 
on the missSe-carrying ander- 
water fleet. 

According to the US Gov- 
ernment jmbfkatioa- Soviet 
Military Power, the Soviet 
Union boasts the world’s larg- 
est missile s ubmarine force, 
with 62 modem vessels 
equipped between them with a 
fatal of 928 nndear-tqpped 
ndssfles. They form part of a 
navy which In numerical 
terms, fa now easily the largest 
in the world. 

The importance rives to the 
oudear submarine fleet fry Mr 
MBdutil Gorbachov and his 
senior defence a dvi ser s was 
emphasized last December 
when Admiral Sergei Gor- 
shkov, tite man who had 
master-minded the naval 
buUd-up was replaced by one 
of the pioneers of Soviet 
nuclear w arfare , the forcdnl 
Admiral Vladimir Chernavin, 
then aged 57. 

The new naval chiefs accord- 
ing to wed-placed Soviet 
sources, had been appointed 


The stricken Soviet submarine, with a damaged area showing aft of the conning tower 
wallowing east of Bermuda before sinking yesterday. 



earlier as commander of one of 
the country's first nuclear 
vessels. He later became the 
first submarine comamnder to 
lanacfa udssfles from his vessel 
whilst it was submerge d and 
canned a reputation as one of 
the pioneers of navigation 
under the polar ice. 

Xu 1966, be was awarded the 
coveted Order of Lenin for his 
part as a staff officer in the 
subm erg ed navigation of the 
world by a detachment of 
Soviet oodear submarines. 

"From the day his appoint- 
ment was k was 

dear that the development of 
the unclear submarine force 
would remain the number one 
priority,” a Western defence 
expert said. 

The costly buM-up of the 
navy, which in 1956 when 
Admiral Gorshkov first took 


charge was little more titan a 
coastal defence force, is 
thought to have been spurred 
by lie Kremlin’s humiliation 
during the Cuban missile cri- 
sis in 1962. 

Commenting on the cootion- 
mg naval g r ow t h in the 1970s 
and 1980s, one observer sank 
"What is remarkable is not so 
much its speed as its 
steadiness.’* 

The appointme nt of Ad- 
miral Cbenmvtnwas seen as a 
signal hi the West that even 
grenter priority would be given 
to new underwater nuclear 
vessels. 

Because of the obsessive 
secrecy surrounding details of 
the nuclear fleet, few accounts 
of its safety record have ever 
been made public here, which 
was why the Tass accident 
coanumyqnb at the weekend 


was unprecedented. 

However, over the past 20 
years there have been several 
reliable reports of acc i de nts on 
Soviet nadear-powered sub- 
marines. The worst was in 
August 1983, who* US iatefli- 
gence sources said that a 
submarine had sank in the 
north Pacific with the teas of 
about 90 crew. The sources 
were unable to say whether or 
not it was carrying missiles. 

Three years before that, the 
Japanese Maritime Safety 
Agency monitored ship-to- 
‘ship radio conversations in- 
dicating that nine crew had 
died in a fire on a Soviet Echo 
1 class submarine off Japan. 

In 1968 a Soviet Golf class 
midear submarine was re- 
ported to have exploded in the 
Pacific between Hawaii and 
Midway Island. 


Early screening for BBC documentary 

Britons in Moscow tell their story 


From Our Own 
Catrespendent 
Moscow 

In the wake of the DanOoff 
affair, the BBC has informed 
Whitehall that it plans to bring 
forward its screening of a 
documentary filmed earlier 
this year about the private and 
ifessional lives of British 
diplomats and jonrnaiists in 
Moscow. 

A copy of the BBC 1 film 
has been handed this week to 
Sir Bryan Cartledge, the Brit- 
ish Ambassador in Moscow, 
having been shown to a senior 
Whitehall official to deter- 
mine whether, after an agree- 
ment between the Foreign 
Office and the producer, Mr 
Richard Denton, any cuts 
were lo - be requested on 
security grounds. 

A British Embassy spokes- 
man told The Times yesterday 
that Sir Bryan had not yet 
viewed the film, winch is 
awaiting its voice-over com- 
mentary. It contains no shots 


of the "safe room” in the 
embassy basement where all 
confidential discussions are 
held to avoid Soviet qumitor- 
ing devices. 

"Because the film crews 
were given privileged access to 
the working of the embassy, it 
was decided that, although we 
would not have complete right 
of veto, we could ask for the 
removal of any passage we 
opposed on security grounds 
or because II was considered 
unbalanced. A discussion 
would then follow" the 
spokesman explained. 

A small group of British 
correspondents have also been 
given a sneak preview of the 
film, now due. to be screened 
this month, much of which is 
shot in the "fly on the wall” 
documentary style that Mr 
Denton used in his series on 
the Soviet Union. 

Much of the attention is 
focused on the difficulty for 
the British community of 
living and working under 
round-the-clock surveillance 


Mr Yuri Oriov. the freed 
Soviet dissident, was yes- 
terday resting in New York 
after his arrival on Sunday. 

The 62-year old p&jsitist 
said be was grateful for his 

freedom, but sad for the had 

and friends he left behind. “I 

have left behind my hom ela n d, 
my beloved culture, my lan- 
guage, my friends and my dear 
ones,” he said. 

by the KGB. 

Hie wife of one high-flying 
British diplomat explains that 
after two weeks in Moscow 
she learnt to disregard any 
inhibitions caused by the fact 
that her bedroom — like all 
other rooms in the Soviet Bats 
allocated to embassy staff — is 
likely to be bugged by KGB 
microphones. *T found that 
was the least of my worries,” 
she says. 

Another scene shows British 
journalists and cameramen 
being provocatively photo- 
graphed by a KGB photog- 


rapher, poring as a Soviet 
newsman, as they try to cover 
a demonstration called in 
Moscow against nuclear pow. 
er after GhemobyL 

Strident criticism of most 
British press coverage of 
events in the Soviet Union is 
voiced by Kate Clark, the 
correspondent of the com- 
munist Morning Star. She is 
particularly scathing about the 
attention paid by other British 
journalists to the activities of 
Soviet dissidents. 

But Peter Ruff BBC radio 
correspondent, points out that 
since most Muscovites are 
restricted to the Kremlin view 
of world events H is inevitable 
that most will repeat only the 
party line as laid down by Tass 
or Pravda. 

The most ironic comment 
comes from Patrick Cockburn 
of the Financial Times, who 
told his BBC interviewer con- 
fidently: "At least one knows 
that the worst that can happen 
to one as a journalist is to be 
expelled.” 


Spanish 

premier 

admits 

disarray 

From Richard Whg 
Madrid 

Senor Felipe Gonzalez, 
Prime Minister of Spain and 
the Socialist leader, has admit- 
ted for the first time to signs of 
deterioration in his own party 
now coming up to its fifth year 
in power. 

Senor Gonzalez said he is 
worried about "oligarchical 
tendencies’* among ruling 
Socialists, intolerance towards 
those who dissent, an abusive 
identification of party matters 
with interests of State, and a 
growing distance from society. 

Having won a second four- 
vear term in the June general 
elections, the parry of Setter 
Gonzalez is now troubled by 
growing divisions and serious 
policy differences, particularly 
oxer economic proWems. a 
sensitive matter for a Socialist 
government 

The Prime Minister is striv- 
ing io maintain an arbiter’s 
role in the dispute between 
Senor Alfonso Guerra, the 
deputy premier, seconded by 
Setter' Nicolas Redondo, the 
influential Socialist trade 
union leader, and Setter Mi- 
guel Boxer, the former Econ- 
omics “su perm mister”, who 
has been manifesting renewed 
political ambitions in recent 
weeks. 

One reason why the Social- 
ists are allowing themselves 
ihe luxury of disputes is ihe 
worsening disarray within the 
Opposition, despondent of 
ever winning power again 
since the election. 

Senor Gonzalez, speaking at 
a "Socialism of the 1990s" 
debate, said: "There are signs 
these problems are occurring 
within the party and vou know 
it.” 

Spain's 160.000-mcmber 
Socialist party, with about 
60.000 of them now- in public 
office, is feeling troubled on 
two fronts. 

Adaptation to realities for 
those not in office has brought 
the anguish of the “ Nato 
referendum, now perceived to 
have long-term consequences, 
and the Government’s eco* 
nomte policies, felt by many 
as ha ving meant too high costs 
for the working dass. 

The second problem is the 
leaders’ keen sense of the need 
to give the party some fresh 
ideological clothing for the 
1990s. 

This would answer those 
internal more left-wing critics 
who go on about the naked 
pragmatism of colleagues in 
office. 

Senor Gonzalez* appeal for 
tolerance amounted to putting 
down Senor Guerra, who has 
acquired greater control over 
the administration and is 
seeking to control the ideolog- 
ical debate as well. 

The Prime Minister’s for- 
mula for his party's conquest 
of power has always been to 
occupy’ part of the centre of 
the political spectrum. In eco- 
nomic terms this means back- 
ing and, if need be. protecting 
those like Senor Boyer. 

The former Economics 
Minister resigned in July I98S 
after losing a power struggle 
with Senor Guerra, retreating 
to the chairmanship of a semi- 
official bank. 


Macao 

man 

admits 

murders 

Macao (Reuter) - A Macao 
man has admitted killing a 
family of nine and their 
servant and dumping their 
dismembered limbs on a 
beach in Ihe Portuguese- 
administered territory, court 
officials said yesterday. 

They said that the man, who 
was not named, admitted that 
he poisoned restaurant owner 
Mr Cheng Lam and four 
adults in the family before 
strangling Cheng's five 
children. 

Limbs were later Found on a 
popular lounsl beach. 

11 killed 
in floods 

Manila — Heavy rains 
flooded wide areas of Manila 
and surrounding provinces, 
leaving I ! people dead and at 
least six missing, and causing 
the evacuation of about 
60.000 people. 

• Madrid: Four people are 
feared dead after floods in the 
cast coast regions of Valencia 
and Murcia, including a 20* 
monrh-old hov lorn from his 
father’s arms as his parents 
abandoned their car. 

Fiancee 

strangled 

Zurich (Reuter) — A Zurich 
court jailed a 34-year-old man 
for 2 h : years for strangling his 
fiancee at her own insistence 
after the couple had bungled 
xveral suicide attempts. 

The 24-year-old woman 
pleaded with him to strangle 
her. which he did before 
jumping out of a second-floor 
window in a final suicide 
attempt. 

Trial delay 

Dubai (Router) — The (rial 
of two Britons, Mr Mark 
Spalding, aged 19. of Jarrow, 
and Mr Michael Brown, aged 
22, of Sutton Coldfield, who 
are accused of murdering an 
Indian security guard here, 
has been adjourned until 
October 13. 

Minister fit 

Bonn — Herr Hans- Dietrich 
Genscher. the West German 
Foreign Minister, has left 
hospital five days after faint- 
ing in the Bundestag. 

Oxygen blast 

Bangkok (AP) — Three peo- 
ple, including a nurse, died 
when an oxygen tank ex- 
ploded at a hospital in the 
Borai district ofTrat province 
in eastern Thailand. 

Mzali move 

Beme (Reuter) — The for- 
mer Tunisian Prime Minister. 
Mr Mohamcd Mzali, who fled 
his country after being sacked 
in July, has been granted a 
provisional right to remain in 
Switzerland. 

Airman held 

Madrid — A magistrate has 
ordered a US airman sta- 
tioned at Torrejon air base, to 
be held for trial on a charge of 
homicide in connection with 
the fatal stabbing of a young 
Spanish man at a rock concert 
here last month. 


South African troops 
injured in mine blast 

From Michael Hornsby, Johannesburg 


Six South African Defence 
Force soldiers were injured 
yesterday when their vehicle 
detonated a landmine near the 
Mozambique bonier, accor- 
ding to the Government’s 
Bureau for Information. 

It released few other details 
about the incident, which 
occurred on a dht road in the 
KaNgwane tribal homeland 
near the hamlet of Nbuzine. A 
spokesman said it was prob- . 
able that the outlawed African 
National Congress (ANQ had 
planted the mine. 

Since the end of last year, 
there have been a dozen or so 
landmine incidents in the 
Eastern Transvaal, and along 
the border between Northern 
Transvaal and Zimbabwe, in 
which several civilians, 'white 
and black, have been killed. 

Yesterday’s landmine 
explosion appears to be the 
first in which members of the . 
Army have been wounded. 

If the ANC did 'plant the 
landmine, it would 


that it is still operating from 
Mozambique despite a pact 
signed by Pretoria and 
Maputo in 1984 under which 
both sides agreed not to 
provide aid or sanctuary to 
rebels opposed to the other. 

• Black purfy: A new Mack 
political party, formed by 
conservative churchmen and 
township councillors, was 
launched in Johannesburg 


One of the two presidents of 
the party, called the United 
Christian Conciliation Party, 
is Bishop Izak Mokoena, the 
bead of the Reformed In- 
dependent Churches Associ- 
ation, which claims some 4.5 
million members. 

Bishop Mokoena, who is 
opposed to economic sanc- 
tions, said the new party 
would be open to all who 
“abide bv Christian values” 

The bishop left last night for 
Britain where he intends. to 
promote ' the new party 
Conor Craise O’Brien, page 16 


Firm fails 
to appear 
in Bhopal 

From Michael Hamlyn 
Delhi 

The long-awaited court case 
in which the Indian Govern- 
ment is suing Union Carbide 
over the Bhopal gas tragedy of 
December 1984, which was to 
have begun yesterday, was 
adjournedafter no one from 
Union Carbide appeared. 

The Union Carbide parent 
company in Danbury;. 
Connecticut, was given until 
yesterday to file its reply. 

Counselfor the state of Ma- 
dhya Pradesh so ugh tan order 
restraining the corporation or 
its associates from tampering 
with evidence. 

The hearing will resume in 
Bhopal today. 

• NEW YORK: Last night 
Mr Edward van den Ameele. a 
spokesman for Union Carbide 
in Danbury said: "We still 
haven’t been served with the 
suiL”(Paul Vallely writes). 


Science report 


Atom-by-atom study on Holy Shroud of Turin 


B: 


Pearce Wright 
Editor 


The deoritwby the Fjpe 
aiimv the Holy Shroud m 

Sssgss 

and neutron art"******; 
w.irpment is an mdkaoon m 
in new techniques 

^Variora^rianns challenging 
the aXntfcitf of toongms 

of Christ, ha« 

<*ra lb* <*‘’”“5' ^ 

leal tests wwiM not 


only 


interfere with the sanctity of 
the shroud bat would damage 
the garment because substan- 
tial pieces of doth would need 
to have been cut off- 

New ways of examining i the 
linen shroud, which arrived m 
Turin more than 400 years 
m can be done with just a 
few threads, causing 
perceptible damage. Two ap- 
proaches are being followed. 

Carbon dating, a process 
only developed in the pastfive 
years, is the one which is 
designed to make a direct 

measurement of. when the 

doth was woven. 

The first technique for car- 


bon dating begins by boning a 
sample aider controlled con- 
ditions and collecting the car- 
bon dioxide generated in the 
process. Analysers then look 
for the different types of 
carbon from which die date of 
the material is to be cal- 
culated. - 

Working with specimens 
5,-000 times smaller than their 
predecessors, a speck of ma- 
terial, a mere one thousandth 
of a gram, can reveal to the 
new analysers the age of a 
piece of cotton. leather or wood 
to within 50 years. 

One of the groups pioneer- 
ing the procedure Is a team 


working with Dr Robert 
Hedges at the Research Lab* 
oratory foe Archaeology and 
the History of Art in Oxford. 

The scientists, and a team 
from the Atomic Energy Re- 
search Establishment at Har- 
well, have helped in the 
preparation of the inter- 
national standards for com- 
paring dates. 

Although microscopic 
amounts of material are tested, 
the apparatus for carbon dat- 
ing weighs 10 tons, in the form 
®f a three-million volt tandem 
accelerator. 

The machinery examines 
atom by atom. 


From the moment cotton or 
flax is picked and woven into 
doth, or wood is cut for 
carving an ornament the 
radioactive portion of their 
carbon content begins to 
decay. 

Instead of burning a large 
sample, and then p urifying the 
carbon by a complicated route 
before analysis is possible, the 
new equipment distinguishes 
between the carton atoms by 
virtually "weighing” them by a 
technique more familiar in 
unclear physics than in 
archaeology. The date is cal- 
culated from the ratio of the 
two forms of carbon. 


RITZITTO 
NEW ZEALAND 
THIS WINTER. 


(Wire taking off a lot) 



£100 OFF ifvSg 

Auckland and back during November 
and December. Thacs high summer in 
New Zealand, so its a orear rime for a 
holiday, or for visiting mends & family. 

£156 OFF SsS 

Wellington, during the same period: 
the Air New Zealand flight from 
Auckland is absolutely free. 


£178 OFF XS 

Christchurch -again, the connecting 
flight is free during this period. 

Included in this deal is the chance 
to stopover in Los Angeles where you 
can take advantage of our special 
Hotpac hotel rates. 

Oh, and we take off a lot quire 
literally - every Thursday, Friday and 
Sunday from Gatwick Airport. 


Discount fere to Auckland, Wellington or Christchurch. 
01 Nov-09 Dec £995. 10-25 Dec £1095. 24-31 Dec £940. 


? air new zeaiano 

The Ritz of the Skies 

The offer is valid for return flight up until il December; 1986. Bookings and payment must be made 
seven days before departure Apwcondiaowapph'-eiMuirear vwnarel agent or contact Air NewZealanJ 
on01-9J0 J4J4. ' ' 



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stay pen 
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expect tot 
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Among 
against 
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WestDc 
panicuk 
school, i 
charity : 
rates. **' 
Sherbor 
pic in i 
sidizing 
he said- 
case of 1 
for Dan 
school. 


THE TIMES TUESDAY OCTOBER 7 1986_ 



' . ■ 




Introducing free driving 

for the Under-Sixte 


Most children dream of growing up and driving 
their own care. 

Tragically, many of them never get the chance. 

Every year in Britain, more than 43,000 children are 
killed or seriously injured in road accidents. 

Those who survive to win their licences gp out on the 
roads as virtual innocents. Equipped in most cases with 
little more than basic knowledge. 

Statistically, they become “Adults!’ And thousands 
more of them are slaughtered, maimed and, more often 
than not, scarred for life. 

Year after year after year. 

It’s an unacceptable situation. And we're not 
prepared to live with it. 


So, with the blessings and co-operation of the 
Department of Transport, we plan to put accidents well 
and truly in their place. On the T. V. screen, not on the road. 

With “Interactive” Video. A computer-based break- 
through which gives children the chance to make their 
own mistakes. And to learn by them. In total safety. 

Confronted with filmed, “real-life” situations, they’ll 
make decisions and react. They’ll experience, firsthand, 
all the problems of the road. 

And they’ll see the consequences of their actions. 
Right there on the screen. 

They’ll gain invaluable experience. And one day, 
hopefully, it may save them their lives. 


with it. I The machines are being presented to local Road | to come. 

A radical new motoring policy. For road safety. For life. 

A JOINT INITIATIVE BY THE DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT .AND .GENERAL ACCIDENT IN THE INTERESTS OF ROAD SAFETY. 


Safety Officers for use in schools around the country*- 

The project’s under way- but we’re not stopping ; 
there. General Accidents commitment to Road Safety" 
exceeds £2 million. This year alone. 

On top of the Videos, that pays for major Research 
into the Psychology of Driver Behaviour, covers the cost 
of “Roadsafe Family of the Year”-our new, national 
Competition, and enables the D.O.T. to broaden the 
scope of its Advertising programme, too. ■. < V' 

Next year; we plan to do even more. And the year ; 
after. And the year after that. 

For Road Safety. For Life. 

For Today. For Tbmorrow. A nd for generations 
to come. iGeneraH 


TIT 

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1 UfcbPAV OCrOacK 7 1966 



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waiW^ li” , SUr we murky 

ss?3«rass5 

u“£°Y n * nii j* he •»» 

»&«?« 

^&£E£?3% 

hw PreSCnt p® v «nnieiit, to 

“®5|. over prime mtnis- 
J2f? p *? a Christian Demo- 
crat m the spring. 

taken io have been the price he 

g? tef® 8 ib?Ou£ 

HiH Democrats to maintain 
for him, which 
wasessemial to enable hhn to 
room his second government. 

!«mSE?B£3KS 

!J"““ ,n h « second article 
that the secret vote in Par- 
liament - which is the rule 
here - was responsible for a 


From Peter Nichols, Rome 

great part of his difficulties in 
governing the country. 

.Certainly, be has been tech- 
nically defeated in Parliament 
many times when supposed 
supporters, usually Christian 
Democrats, exploited the 
cover of secrecy to vote 
against government measures. 

They were quick to retort 
that, as far as the pact to band 
over the Prime Minister's 
office to them was concerned, 
he must go in March. On 
Saturday, Signor Craxi «*an«< 
m Signor AmaJdo Foriani, the 
Christian Democrat Deputy 
Prime Minister, to discuss the 
increasing problems between 

the two parties. 

The Christian Democrats 

face the frustrating problem of 



L'^j 


Signor Craxi: making light 
of an alleged promse. 


Anger at ‘Buy American’ Bill 

Europe-US trade 
truce threatened 

From Richard Owen, Brussels 


The fragile truce in the trade 
war between Europe and the 
United States received a jolt 
yesterday when the EEC 
threatened to retaliate against 
a planned “Buy American' 1 ' 
policy by the Pentagon. 

The spokesman for the EEC 
Commission said that if the 
"Buy American*’ Bill now 
going through Congress be- 
came law, the TweNe would 
hit back by suspending some 
provisions of Gan (General 
Agreement on Tariffs and 
Trade) and cutting down on 
European government ■ pur- 
chases from the United Stales. 

In July the EEC and the 
United States averted an al^ 
out transatlantic trade war by 
reaching interim agreement 
on agricultural quotas follow- 
ing Spanish and Portuguese 
entry into the EEC which 
Washington claimed had hit 
its exports to Europe. 

This was followed by an 
agreement on steel quotas, 
and the new-found trans- 
atlantic amity was cemented 
at the recent opening of the 
new Gan round in Uruguay. 

The Bill, which has caused 
renewed concern in Brussels, 
passed its first hurdle in the 
American House of Repre- 
sentative in August, but EEC 
officials had been hoping it 
would stop there. 


Proposed by Congressman 
James Traficam, a Democrat 
from Ohio, the Bill is designed 
to give American defence 
industry firms a competitive 
edge and reduce America's 
huge import bill. 

It requires the Pentagon to 
award contracts to American 
firms, provided at least 50 per 
cent of their products are 
manufactured within the Uni- 
ted States and provided then- 
bids are no more than 5 per 
cent higher than foreign bids. 

Officials said purchases of 
military hardware .provided 
for under Nato standardiza- 
tion policies were not at risk 
but European firms . would 
lose valuable contracts for the 
supply of clothing, electronics, 
foodstuffs and other goods to 
the American military. 

A second measure, pro- 
posed by Congressman Leon 
Panerta. a Democrat from 
California, specifically obliges 
the Pentagon to prefer Ameri- 
can to foreign food imports, 
and a third proposal in the 
Senate obliges the Pentagon to 
buy only American ball and 
roller bearings. 

EEC officials said the 
Commission regarded these 
measures as flagrantly protec- 
tionist and had written to the 
State Department ra Wash- 
ington to warn h of the 
consequences. 


Kohl’s party prepares 
for display of serenity 


Chancellor Kohl of West 
Germany and his Christian 
Democratic Union (CDU) 
gathered in Mainz yesterday 
io prepare for a pre-election 
conference that will be most 
notable for its serenity. . 

Mainz is famous for its 
annual Carnival of fun and 

buffoonery. . 

But there will be none of 
either in the Rheingoldhalle 
congress centre, where nearly 
800 CDU delegates will meet 
today and tomorrow, even 
though the party's slogan for 
the federal election on January 
25 can be translated as “Carry 
on Germany”. 

The delegates will be on 
their best behaviour to present 
a picture of sobnety. eamesi- 
n<£T and unity befitting a 
party born to rule 
first two virtues fit easily 
around its shoulders, and ihe 
latter is not in serious question 

31 While 1 there are someunder- 
of dissatisfaction 
wilf Herr Kohl's . leadership, 
or alleged lack of it- 

noob^usrippl^oMhepool 

° f ® n b? Sl opinion 
Jis and a further drop m 

Unemployment in 


From John England, Bonn 


September, it scents another 
election victory. 

One poll last week gave the 
CDU and its coalition part- 
ners, the Christian Social 
Union (CSU) of Herr Franz 
Josef Strauss, and the Free 
Democratic Party (FDP) of 
Herr Martin Bangemann, a 
combined vote of 53 per cent. 

Herr Strauss, however, has 
irritated the CDU by announ- 
cing that his party will enter 
the campaign with a separate 
programme. 

The CDU sees the move as 
a tactical ploy by Herr Strauss, 
who. as Bavarian Prime Min- 
ister. feces a state election on 
Sunday, to improve his 
“profile” and take yet another 
sideswipe at Herr Hans- 
Dielrich Genscher. the federal 
Foreign Minister and FDP 
member, whose post he is said 
to coveL 

• Saxony polls: Local council 
elections in Lower Saxony on 
Sundav brought losses for the 
CDU and FDP. and gains for 
the Social Democrats and the 
Greens. 

The CDU dropped 4.2 per 
cent of the total vote to lose its 
absolute majority, but with 46 
per cent it remain the stron- 
gest party. 


M Ps plan Timor trip 

By Nicholas Beeston 


h and Australian MPs 

iy applied 10 the Indo- 

Govemment for per- 
,o visit the troubled 
■ of East Timor, after 
ins of human rights 
ons by Amnesty 
ionai- 

Avebury* , lhe ct ™ r ‘ 
f the British P&r- 
U Human Rip* 
and another Bnush 
miarian. yci to j* 
are hoping to visa the 
, January jejore el*-- 
e there in July- 1987. 
rcvious application 


made by the group was re- 
jected by the Indonesian 
authorities in 1982. 

Lord Avebury said yes- 
terday: "We want to see for 
ourselves what are the con- 
ditions of ihe peop|c today 
and make our own mqumes 
about the violation of their 
human rights, including the 
right of self-determination. 

East Timor was occupied by 
Indonesia in 1975 after the 
territory's inhabitants de- 
clared independence from 
Portugal- A guerrilla war 
aMintf the occupation has 
continued ever since. 


being the hugest party in the 
country unable to use their 
massive electoral support to 
dislodge from the Prime 
Ministefs office the bead of 
the Socialist Party, which has 
only about a third of their 
voting strength. 

Signor CraxTs side of the 
com of frustration is that he is 
popular in the country and 
widely regarded as an effective 
Prime Minister, but his party 
fails to benefit from his pres- 
tige in terms of votes. Hence 
be is seen to have been 
tempted by the idea of show- 
ing that political chaos was 
such that elections are becom- 
ing unavoidable: 

He would then lead the 
country and of conrse his own 
party imo elections instead of 
handing over office to the 
Christian Democrats. If this 
hypothesis is correa the coun- 
try can expect a troubled 
period of political infighting. 

The atmosphere of iD-feel- 
ing among the coalition part- 
ners has been exacerbated by 
allegations that ihe Govern- 
ment had negotiated the re- 
lease of the hijackers ofthe 
Achille La uro cruise ship, a 
year ago. even though It was 
known that Leon KlmghofTer. 
an American passenger, had 
been murdered by them. 


Pope gets pP^ 
tumultuous r ^ 
reception 
from young 

From Diana Geddes 
Lyons 

An ecstatic crowd of 60,000 
ywmg people roared, waved 
and stamped their approval of 
the Pope in the Gerbnd foot- 
ball stadium in Lyons. 

It was an extraordinary 
experience to hear teenagers 
and people in their early 
twenties greeting with taxnal- 
rous applause the Pope's fami- 
liar bounties on the erfl of ab- 
ortion. the importance of celib- 
acy in the priesthood, the ne- 
cessity of regular church at- 
tendance, chastity before mar- _ 
rage and the sanctity of the \ - . t 

home. . \ 

Were these really the same * - £ : 
ymmg mde who had ex- The Pope] 
pressed deep doubts abort the waved I 
relevance of the Church to ^ 3 
their fives and to the modem you do if y< 
world in answer to a qnes- don't tell n 
tiozmaire organized by the do, 1m rati 
Catholic Church for the for Diving. ] 
Pope's visit? “I don't want a wide open I 
ready-made church or a “And yoi 
church which dominates the you sometii 
world like a sky-scraper. I Their qoes 
want a church which we can of the Ora 
build together," they wrote. were acted i 
“Holy Father, speak to us of on Sands] 
the Church.- but not of the young peop 
Church which you find in mwing m 
books, frill of great thoughts, forms on tin 
but rather of a Church which the stadium 
wBl help ns to live our every- heavy rhyi 
day lives- Why is it that we so moving Cgb 
often understand so tittle of Three I 
what the Church says? replied. 

“Holy Father, what would “The Chi 



Oslo sets -J 
record 8 





■'A ■' *•>. . ^ M _ r . „ 

The Pope kissing a young girl at Ars, near Lyons, yesterday daring his visit to France. He i 
prayed before relics of Saint Jean-Marie vianney, the patron saint of parish priests. 


you do if you were us? Please, 
don't tell ns what we mustn't 
do, bat rather give us reasons 
for Diving. Is me future really 
wide open before os? 

“And you. Holy Father, do 
you sometimes have doubts?" 
Their questions on the future 
of the Church and the world 
were acted out before tile Pope 
on Sunday night by 1,000 
young people in a spectacular 
moving mosaic of human 
forum on the green pitch inside 
the stadium to a background of 
heavy rhythmic musk and 
moving tights. 

Three times the Pope 
replied. 

“The Church is not a chib of 


so-called perfect men and 
women, but a gathering of 
reconciled sinners, moving to- 
ward Christ, with all those 
human weaknesses . . . 

“Participate in it simply, 
actiidy. with respect for oth- 
ers; bnng to it your music, but 
harmonize h with the concert 
of your brothers and sisters 
who are different from you ... 
France was the eldest daugh- 
ter of the Church ... we still 
expect a lot from you, the 
young people of France." 

An attentive silence de- 
scended as the Pope spoke and 
thousands of little flames from 
cigarette lighters pricked the 
darkness on the stands. domi- 


nated by a giant neon cross. 

The Pope, who had arrived 
at 6.15pm, was scheduled to 
leave the stadium in time for a 
meeting at 8pm with priests 
and nuns at the Basilica of La 
Fourviere on the other side of 
the town. But the young people 
would not let hhn go and h was 
nearly 9pm before he dis- 
appeared, ckariy delighted by 
his reception. 

• ARS: The Pope arrived here 
yesterday for a day of prayer 
and meditation ce n tre d on the 
traditional role of the parish 
priest in the French Roman 
Catholic Church (Renter re- 
ports). 


£24 billion k 
budget | 

From Tony Samstag *? 

Norway's minority Labour * 
Government yesterday dis- 
appointed political opponents 
and currency speculators 
when it unveiled a record . 
263.6 billion kroner (£24 bil- 
lion) budget for 1987 contain- +5* 
ing few of the draconian wr'. 
measures that had been ni- 
moured. 

The package contained a j 
predictable range of price * 
increases on goods and ser- *< 
'ices from alcohol to postage ?! 
and electricity, a complex j 
series of tax reforms aimed at * 
high wage earners and an * 
exhortation to cut runaway '• 
ronsumer spending. 

Mr Gunnar Beree, the in- ■j, 
nance Minister, said last year’s **J 
collapse in oil prices from $30 * J 
to SI4 a barrel had turned *5 
Norway’s 25.6 billion kroner ! *\ 
balance of payments surplus 
in 1985 to a deficit that would 
exceed 43 billion kroner next 
year. S« 

The Central Bank last week Jt* 
was forced to intervene in a 
run on the kroner, selling ' -* 
almost a billion dollars to vT 
support it against rumours of ?*, 
devaluation. The new Gov- 
cm men l of Mrs Gro Harlem ^ 
Brundtiand devalued by about 
12 per cent almost immedi- 
atcly it took office in Mayaflrr 
the collapse of a-ttnfrcMlgTn J- 
coalition 12’ 





. I \ 


- * * 4 


1913: GE INVENTS THE HOT CATHODE, 
1 HIGH VACUUM X-RAY TUBE 


1986: GE LEADS THE DEVELOPMENT OF 
MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING 


A new ray of hope 

from the people 
who pioneered X-rays 


Before the cure must come the 
diagnosis. 

Nothing has contributed more to 
quickly identifying medical conditions 
than X-rays. 

Much of the early credit for its 
success goes to William Coolidge of GE 
(USA). He helped the infant science take its 
first important steps towards becoming an 
accepted technique early this century. 

It’s a lead we've never relinquished. 


Recently, GE* has developed an 
outstanding new system for imaging that 
uses incredibly powerful magnets and radio 
waves. We’ve tilled it the Signa Magnetic 
Resonance System. And it will become the 
standard for die eighties and beyond 
because Signa offers unprecedented picture 
quality in noticeably less time. 

Just imagine, a machine that uses 
non-invasive waves and cuts diagnostic 
investigation times for patients. 


Wharever will GE, one of the world's 
Great Enterprises, think of next? 

• If you would like to know more about 
GE, write to Fiona Fvffe, Shortlands, 
Hammersmith, London W6 8BX. 


Chang ing faster than the world around us. 



« ■Trjdemaik o( General HLeanc Company ■„ USA i, not connected 
with The General lUami: Company PLC of Englaad 

AEROSPACE AIRCRAFT ENG1XES CADf CAM CAE PRODUCTS CAPACITORS ENGINEERING SERVICES FACTORY AUTOMATION SYSTEMS UAS AND STEAM TURBINES 
GLASS AND METALLURGICAL PRODUCTS INDUSTRIAL DRIVE SYSTEMS INDUSTRIAL MOTORS INFORMATION SERVICES LIGHTING PRODUCTS MEDICAL SYSTEMS PLASTICS AND SILICONES 
POWER DELIVERY EQUIPMENT RECHARGEABLE BATTERIES SEMICONDUCTORS SPECIALTY MATERIALS TUNGSTEN CARBIDE TOOLING 

L. V., - .. 





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OVERSEAS NEWS THE TIMES TUESDAY OCTOBER 7 1986 

West unhappy about medical plans I A-d 


Red Cross urged to win access 
to Afghanistan’s prisoners 


*■ . : --W " 

F . * 


! .. 




From Michael Hamlyn, Delhi 


The International Red- 
Cross is negotiating with the 
regime in Kabul to open a 
series of medical facilities to 
treat victims of the struggle 
between the armed forces of 
Afghanistan and the Soviet 
Union and the Mujahidin 
guerrillas. 

But the plans are being 
criticized by those Western 
diplomats whose reports on 
the Afghan situation are often 
made public here. They com- 
plain that the Red Cross is 
offering the medical facilities 
without gaining anything in 
return, in particular without 
gaining access to prisoners 
held in Afghan jails. 

Officials of the Inter- 
national Committee of the 
Red Cross (ICRC) are con- 


ducting negotiations over 
medical facilities through the 
local Red Crescent Society 
andfor access to prisoners 
with the Afghanistan Foreign 
Ministry. 

Red Cross officials are 
known to be anxious to treat 
Afghan wounded on purely 
humanitarian grounds. 

“They do not link because 
ihe aim is to assist the 
maximum number of victims 
of the situation. People will 
say they should put emphasis 
on the people detained, but if 
they can do something as soon 
as possible for the wounded, 
then they should do it.” 
explained a suporter of the 
ICRC point of view. 

The Red Cross has pro- 
posed to help Afghans on the 


Government side in a similar 
way to that in which they help 
the victims across the border 
in Pakistan. 

They have proposed to set 
up a workshop to help ampu- 
tees, to establish physio- 
therapy clinics, and to intro- 
duce surgical teams to treat 
the wounded. The first team 
would be in Kabul the capital 
but the ICRC is ready, if 
allowed, to establish up to four 
other teams in other centres of 
population. 

The surgical teams would 
treat anyone brought to them, 
including Afghan soldiers and 
civilians injured in any 
crossfire. They would . also 
treat any Soviet soldiers or 
Mujahidin fighters, but il 
seems unlikely that they 


A new export from Japan 


Plan to move out old people 


From David Watts 
Tokyo 

Japan may sooa be offering 
the world a new export — its 
retired pensioners. If a scheme 
being promoted by the Min- 
istry of International Trade 
and Industry goes forward, 
retired Japanese could be 
settling abroad in the 1990s. 

The Ministry has high 
hopes for the scheme, 
emphasizing that more and 
more Japanese are travelling 
abroad and -66 percent of 
executives and! their families 
who live abroad would like to 
return to the more gracious 
living they enjoy there. 

The idea, first mooted by a 
former Ambassador to Spain, 
has already got a favourable 
response from many countries 
and companies. But whQe 
Japanese retiring abroad 


would take with them rel- 
atively high pensions to spend 
in less wealthy countries, with 
probably several years of ac- 
tive life ahead of them, the 
notion of retired people living 
abroad is motivated by the fact 
that in 25 years Japan wiD 
have the world's fastest-aging 
population. 

At present there are 12.79 
million (about 10.5 per cent) of 
the population over 65 and 
ultimately' there will be only 
four “productive” adults for 
every elderly person. 

Having some of dm elderly 
move abroad would dearly 
ease the burden on Japan's 
inverted population pyramid 
bat the idea of encouraging 
them to go, so they would no 
longer be a burden on the 
welfare system, has already 
brought critici s m. 


The project, nicknamed 
“Silver Colombia” to convey 
the potential explorers' sense 
of adventure, envisages retire- 
ment communities not popu- 
lated entirely by Japanese. 
The Ministry aims to inaugu- 
rate tire first retirement village 
by 1992. 

But much will depend on 
detailed studies beginning 
next year with visits to some 
countries of southern Europe, 
Australia, New Zealand, 
Argentina and the United 
States, all of which have 
shown interest in the idea. 
Many Japanese would like to 
spend their jast days in China, 
too, the Ministry believes. 

Most retired people would 
go armed with superannuation 
payments averaging yen 21 
mfliion (£91,000) and monthly 
pensions* 


would be allowed the 
opportunity. 

Medical facilities for treat- 
ing the Afghan wounded are 
primitive and overcrowded 
and equipment given by com- 
munist countries has a history 
of not working well 

The presence of Red Cross 
teams In the country would 
undoubtedly be a morale 
boost to the regime fighters, 
who would have a better 
chance of surviving wounds. 
There have been several re- 
ports of the unwillingness of 
Afghan forces to go into battle. 

A Red Cross delegate spent 
most of the last month in the 
Afghan capital refining the 
ICRC proposals, and an an- 
swer is awaited. ' 

DeLorean 
trial jury 
is selected 

From Paid Vallely 
New York 

The jury was selected in 
Detroit yesterday in the trial 
of Mr John DeLorean on IS 
charges of racketeering, tax 
evasion and fraud connected 
with the financing of his car 
factory in Northern Ireland. 

The prosecution alleges that 
Mr DeLorean took almost S9 
million (£6 million) raised 
from European and American 
investors for research and 
design on bis gufl- winged 
sports car and spent it on 
other business ventures 
Mr DeLorean is being de- 
fended by the lawyer who 
successfully defended him 
against charges of cocaine- 
dealing in California in 1984. 




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Cattle wafting to be rescued from the roof of a boose in Scott, Kansas, where they 
after being released when flood waters thr eat e ne d the barn in which they were housed- 

Ershad bans poll demonstrations 

_ . - ■ n: .L. .I.A IhiJinniHit annmVfd HlS 


- From Ahmed Fazl 
Dhaka 

President Ershad of Bangla- 
desh yesterday banned public 
rallies and demonstrations 
opposing the October 15 elec- 
tion as leading political parties 


position, which is calling the 
election a “farce”, to organize 
a general strike on voting day. 
Rallies have also been plan- 
ned-for October 13. 

Last Sunday Sheikh Hasina 
Wazed, chief of the Awami 


the Awami 


League- led eight-party Alli- 
prepared to mount a country- ^ said she was prepared to 
wide campaign for a boycott meel -violence with violence" 
ol the polls. ;r chr> use nushed to a corner. 


President Ershad, aged 56, 
who is attempting to become 
the country's third directly- 
elected president in seven 
years, warned newspapers 
against publishing anti-poll 
reports. Violation of the ban is 
punishable by seven years in 
jail under a new martial law 
regulation. 

The ban to curb dissent 
came amid a threat by the op- 


if she was pushed to a comer. 

The Alliance, which con- 
trols about 100 seats in tfae 
330-member Parliament, 
planned to move an impeach- 
ment motion against the mili- 
tary ruler when the House re- 
convenes. 

With leading political par- 


tite Parliament approved his 
fo u r-a n d-a- hal f-year-o Id mili- 
tary rule. 

The President asked his 
supporters to ignore the oppo- 
sition boycott and vote on 
October 15. 

• Paper reappears: The Bang- 
ladesh Observer, a leading 
English language daily new- 
spaper. closed since June by a 
dispute between management 
and workers that sparked a 
nationwide strike, reappeared 
yesterday (Reuter reports). Six 
other newspapers which stop- 
ped publication during the 
walkout by more than 5.000 


W ]U1 lCJUH.il UUUUkOl . i. . . „ 

ties outside the race. President journalists and print workers 


Ershad, who is assured of a 
victory, said yesterday that he 
would end martial law after 


were still not on the streets 
even though the strike ended 
Iasi Saturday. 


battles 
its political 
warlords 

From Keith Dates - 

Maalbi 

Some 262 armed trojm, 
including private anmEs jJJ 
criminal gangs, opem- 
throughout the Philippi]*, 
police officer said yesterday 

“Half a dozen” private*, 
m us of local political wartoak 
continue to operate in rebel 
infested areas of the country 
most of them wofficialk 
established and armed by far 
ousted Marcos regime » 
auxiliary ami-communist 
tighten. Major-General Ren. 
aw de Vito, the Philippines 
Constabulary chief said. 

He told a press conference 
here that the estimated 9.200 
pang members- and -prime 
soldiers have a total arsenal of 
1 1.300 fire arms. Some 8.400 
weapons have been seized in 
military raids ordered since 
President Aquino took power 
in February . 

Communist urban guentl 
las in Manila have kilim 
seven policemen in inns 
gathering operations, ft* 
armed clashes have occurred 
so far this year, he added 

• Presidential living! Three 
guesthouses and a beach least 
owned by former President 
Marcos have been opened to 
the public and Filipinos cm 
“now experience the thrill of 
living in a presidential 
guesthouse even just for a 
while**, the Deputy Tourism 
Minister, Mrs NarzaJina lint, 
said (Reuter reports). 

For S10 (£?) curious FUipi. 
nos can sleep in -the hotifay 
bed of Mr Marcos, while for a 
dollar (hey can swim far an 
hour in his Olympic-sur 
swimming pool 

• DAVAO: Five armed men 
surrendered here yesterday 
after holding 27 members of 
four wealthy Filipino-Chroese 
families hostage for 10 hours, 
(AFP reports). 


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Peasants not for socialism 7 

Sandinistas scrap 
farming blueprint 

From Alan Tomlinson, Managna 


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Just £500 nets you a big 8%. 


Political pressures, eco- 
nomic woes ami cultural resis- 
tance to change have forced 
the Sandinista Government to 
tear up its revolutionary bine- 
print for transforming the 
Nicaraguan countryside. 

The Government has aban- 
doned its drive to press a 
backward peasantry Into giv- 
ing np wasteful and unproduc- 
tive individual forms of 
agriculture in favour of co- 
operative farming. 

State forms and production 
co-operatives have been the 
cornerstone of Sandinista 
strategy to socialize agri- 
culture and, at the same time, 
to politicize the rural masses. 

Honouring a pledge to hand 
over the bind to those who 
work it as a fundamental 
means of redistributing 
wealth, the Government has 
parcelled out more than four 
million acres of cultivated land 
to formerly landless peasants. 

However, an agreement to 
organize themselves into co- 
operatives where members 
pool their land, work, produce 
and profits and share technical 
and financial help from the 
state, has been virtually a 
condition for receiving titles to 
land confiscated or purchased 
from big landowners. 

Over the past year, and a 
half, all this has gradually 
given way to a new priority: 
securing the political loyalty of 
the country folk. This has 
meant giving them land with 
no strings attached. 

Previously, two-thirds of 
land acquired by the state was 
turned into state farms and co- 
operatives; more recently, as 
modi as 95 per cent has been 
distributed to individuals. 

One of the most powerful 
reasons for tfae change has 
been that US-backed Contra 
rebels have persuaded peas- 
ants that a Oder socialism they 
do not really own the lami. 

The Sandinistas have had to 
counter this sort of propa- 
ganda by actions rather than 
words. With the war likely to 
be prolonged following the 
approval of more US aid to the 
Contras, Managua ran QJ 
afford to allow the rebels to 
build a social base on native 
peasant scepticism. 

_ Government opponents be- 
lieve that the rural resistance 
to co-operative farming goes 
much deeper than mere poli- 
tics; they say the Sandinistas 


have tried to impose seme* 
thing alien to the peasants' 
very nature. 

“Our people are infr- 
id autistic,” said SeAor Bos- 
endo Diaz, a prominent private 
businessman. "Each one On 
to be his own boss and doomt 
like to work with ofer 
people.” 

At the July 19 Co-operative 
near Matagalpa, the form co- 
ordinator, Seftor Denis Rhas, 
seemed to confirm this analy- 
sis when he explained why be 
and his partners had decided 
to dissolve their co-operative. 

"Quite simply, we weren’t 
working well together. By 
remodelling the co-operative 
into individual plots, each ram 
works the way he wants and 
plants what be thinks brat” 

It is a fact of life the 
Sandinistas have apparently 
come to accept. Despite foe 


scarce material and finane ni 
resources throngh co-op- 
eratives, farm production has 
steadily fallen. 

The Government puts most 
of the Uame on the war far foe 

resulting food shortages, yet 
admits that the working-day 
has eroded to an avoage of 
only Four hours in some rural 
areas. 

-What we have seen is that 
we cannot impose co-op- 
era fives,” said Senor Daniel 
Nunez, president of the 
Fanners' and Cattiemens 
Union, which has stamciiif 
supported the Saudimsta rural 
programme. 

Nevertheless, the Gov- 
ernment's belated change of 
course does not signify tbe 
total abandonment of to plans 
to socialize the countryside. 

The Sandinistas are press- 
ing ahead with model co-op- 
eratives in some of ** 
country's most fertile valley 
areas, ’ hoping to win people 
over by example. 

"For underdeveloped cou- 
ntries like ours, the co-op- 
erative is obviously ■ foe 
solution, to rationalize me* 
terial resources and state slip- 
port services,” sand Se§®* 
Alonso Parras, Vice-Minister 
for Agrarian Reform. 

“However, not all the pew- 
ants are convinced of this- Bot 
as theysee co-operatives 
mechanize productiouand to 
a higher standard of 
living, they will want to 

organized.” 


If you leav-e your money in an Abbey National Higher Interest Account for 
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Rhino poachers killed 

From A Correspondent, Harare 

a of poachers rifles, an indication of if* 

S t - rh * n “ c «w esconi, n- sophistication as well as the 
'Si? ^ 1 nor i ,ern ruthlessness with which foe 
Sin teSvi whe „f Zam " Pushing war is being wied 
•JJ ^ wettawiHi- Conservationists have ww> 

? ul . A * ,ca s last alarmed by an upsurge 1 w 
viable wild population of the poaching in rccCTtmonfos. 

.u which couM lead w> to* t0 “ J 
rvwSlSL that . tow extinction of Zimbabwe s 

poachers died in a gun battle 2,000 Zambezi valley rhino* 
with game rangers and . se- erases within four vears at 
we 2’ thepresem loss rate. ’ 

« e ^i?i,K? e -^ uniber kl,,ed ^ one 30-day period in Julv 

in bcptemoer.The men were and August. 21 carcasses were 
carrying the horns of in the 


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carrying the horns of 10 
rhinoceroses, each one worth 
up to £10.000 on black mar- 
kets in the East. 

They were equipped with 
communist-manufactured 

Kalashnikov aK 47 assault 


found downstream from fo* 
Kariba hvdro-dectric dam. 
with many others- feared -to*, 
have gone ’undiscovered. - .. 

Zimbabwe has more.than.a 
quaner of Africa’s surviving 
S.000 black rhinoceroses. 




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THE TIMES TUESDAY OCTOBER 7 1986 


11 


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OVERSEAS NEWS 


THE TIMES TUESDAY OCTOBER 71986 


Kremlin negotiator in 
Peking for ninth bid 
to heal Sino-Soviet rift 


Mr Igor Rogachov. ihe 
soviet deputy Foreign Min- 
jsier. has arrived in Peking for 
■ tne ninth round of normaliza- 
tion talks between Moscow 
and Peking. 

The talks, begun four years 
ago. aim to heal the 'dip- 
lomatic and ideological rifts 
between the two communist 
superpowers that dale back to 
the early 1960s. 

The negotiations to date 
have proved unsuccessful. 
The last round was in Moscow 
w .April. 

The new round coincides 
with the visit to China of Mr 


Caspar Weinberger, the US 
Defence Secretary from Octo- 
ber 7 to II. and as Mr Mikhail 
Gorbachov, the Soviet leader, 
meets President Reagan in 
Reykjavik. Iceland, on Octo- 
ber 1 1 and 12. 

Mr Rogachov. aged 54. 
reportedly a close associate of 


From Robert Grieves. Peking 
Mr Gorbachov, speaks fluent 
Chinese and is the former 
head of the Soviet Far East 
Institute. He will meet Mr 
.Qian Qichen. ihe Chinese 
deputy Foreign Minister. 

When he arrived at Peking 
airport. Mr Rogachov said 
that ihe talks would centre on 
proposals made by Mr Gorb- 
achov in a speech at Vladi- 
vostok in July and on 
preparations for the Sino- 
Sovict border talks beginning 
next year. 

He said Soviet relations 
with China were “getting bet- 
ter year by year”. 

In his speech Mr Gorba- 
chov offered to withdraw 
most of the 60.000 Soviet 
troops in Mongolia, some 
troops from Afghanistan, and 
a “substantial number" of 
troops foam the 4.500-mile 
bonder. 

Chinese officials have re- 


iterated that they cannot re- 
establish normal relations 
with Moscow until it removes 
all its troops from Afghanistan 
and the Siberian-Manchurian 
border, and withdraws sup- 
port from the Vietnamese 
occupation of Cambodia. 

Last week, two officials of 
the Chinese Communist Party 
Central Committee liaison 
department said that party-to- 
party relations could not be 
restored until the Soviet 
Union had removed the three 
main obstacles to normal 
diplomatic relations. 

China is seeking to establish 
party-io-pany ties with Po- 
land. East Germay and other 
Warsaw Pact countries, re- 
portedly with Moscow's tacit 
approval. 

Mr Rogachov said that he 
was not certain whether the 
issue of Cambodia would 
come up at the talks. 


Chileans reject political violence 


Santiago (Reuter) - Chil- 
eans reject anti-government 
violence but also condemn the 
tough response by the nation's 
military to its opponents, an 
opinion poll published at the 
weekend revealed 


The survey, by a research tary Govemmenu while 89 
body linked to the Catholic per cent opposed ihe downing 


Church, was carried out in of power-lines which often 
June before the Government accompany protests. 


imposed the emergency mea- 
sure last month after an 


Those polled were strongly 
critical of government re- 


Morc than 60 per cent of sidem Pinochet's, 
those questioned opposed the Of those questioned in 


assassination attempt on Pre- action to opponents, with 82 
sident Pinochet's. per cent condemning the beat- 


use of a “state of siege' 
according to the poll. 


Santiago. 94 per cent rejected 


ing of demonstrators or the 
use of teargas and water 





bomb attacks against the mili- cannons to contain protests. 


Mrs Nancy Reagan, with the pianist Vladimir Horowitz, makin g lig 
podium at a White House concert as President Reagan joked a 


t of her fall from the 
rat the incident 


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’)l\ iyo 


Peace issue could 
prove prickly for 
nation’s double act 


In the second artide in his two- 
part series. Ian Murray exam- 
ines from Jerusalem the 
forthcoming handover of 
power from Mr Shimon Peres 
to Mr Yitzhak Shamir . 

One evening last week an 
angry crowd in Ashkekm 
booed and jeered Mr Shimon 
Peres as be tried to make 
himself heard. They were 
angry that he was naming a 
square after the Arab king, 
Muhammad V of Morocco, 
the day after a Jew had been 
stabbed to death by an Arab in 
Gaza. 

“Peace was bnilt on love of 
the land, and not on hatred of 
the Arabs," the Prime Min- 
ister shouted back. “Peace will 
not be murdered." 

Peace has nevertheless 
proved elusive despite the 
determined search for it by Mr 
Peres daring the two years he 
has been at the head of the 
national unity Government. It 
threatens to be at least as 
elngve under the hardline Mr 
Yitzhak Shamir when he sne- 
ceeds Mr Peres this week. It 
remains the one issue capable 
of bringing the unity Govern- 
ment down. 

In its first two years the 
Government has two major 
achievements to its credit It 
has brought down toa respect- 
able 20 per cent an inflation 
rate so high that new car 
prices sometimes had to be 
marked up twice a day. It has 
also succeeded in all bat 
pulling oat of Lebanon without 
any apparent increase in se- 
curity risks along the northern 
border. 


the peace that we prayed for. 
This will not be perdition and 
disintegration. The unity Gov- 
ernment cannot become a 
withdrawal government-” 

Mr Shamir wants peace hot 
he is only prepared to offer 
peace in return. A poll last 
month showed a hardening of 
attitudes among those who 
support him in trying to 
negotiate without making any 
territorial compromise. 

“There is no reason in the 
world that will obligate Israel 
to cede and cast off its chief 
assets and the basis of its 
security," be said last month. 
“We have prodigious strength, 
we have powerful and faithful 
allfat and above all we believe 
in the justness of oar path." 

Mr Shamir might jost bead 
in order to survive. “Usually I 
adhere to the rale that the goal 
is a permanent and stable 
thing while you have to be 
flexible regarding the means." 
he said recently. He might 
decide to let Mr Peres have his 
bead in such perilous negotia- 


The Israeli 
handover 

Part 2 


Beyond these two obvious 
achievements, mi which Mr 
Shamir is pledged to build, 
there has been patchy 
progress in the search for 
peace, which remains the 
dominant argument across the 
spectrum of Israeli politics. 

In an effort to break the 
deadlock Mr Peres has been 
extremely active in his last few 
weeks as Prime Minister. He 
arranged summits with King 
Hassan of Morocco and Presi- 
dent Mubarak of Egypt He 
continued unofficial and secret 
contact with Jordan. He sug- 
gested negotiations might con- 
tinue in an international 
conference — a phrase which 
infuriates Mr Shamir. 

It seems certain that in his 
nevr role as Foreign Minmter 
Mr Peres will do his utmost to 
build on die work he was doing 
as Prime Minister and try to 
find a way of bringing Jordan 
to the negotiating table. 

It is a near impossible task, 
even if he can persuade Mr 
Shamir to accept the idea of 
some kind of international 
conference in which negotia- 
tions would take place. 

Hie reason is that King 
Husain is bound to be pre- 
pared to offer peace only in 
return for land - in the same 
way President Sadat did be- 
fore Camp David. But Mr 
Shamir has already served 
notice that he will not even 
consider this. 

“The unity Government has 
no choice but to give a single 
answer to these plans: an 
absolute and dear W. These 
are not peace plans. It is not 


dons as the best means of 
discrediting his rfvaL 

Throughout the next 25 
months both men will be 
carefully circling each other, 
like two boxers afraid to 
attack for fear of the con- 
sequences. Both will try to 
exploit their position to win 
popularity at the expense of 
the other. Both will have'jo be 
very careful. 

For all the rhetoric they 
both must know that bringing 
down the Government would 
be political suicide. 

Despite the personal 
popularity he gained hi office. 
Mr Peres Called to improve the 
standing of the Labour Party. 
Mr Shamir is unlikely to do 
any better for the UkmL The 
pblic wants the coalition 
Government to get on with its 
job and would almost certaialy 
vote against any party seen 
response for bringing it 
down. 

There is also one banana . 
skin which could endanger 
either or both of them. This is 
the so-called Shin Bet affair. A 
police Investigation into 
whether Mr Shamir ordered 
the murder of two Palestinians 
by the counter-intelligence 
agency is now with the Attor- 
ney GeneraL 

The inquiry also looked into 
allegations that Mr Peres was 
involved in a cover-up before 
two official inquiries into the 
kffltngs. If the Attorney Gen- 
eral decides they must prove 
their innocence before the 
court, both men could fall and 
bring the Government down 
with than. 

As in so many things the two 
of them are m this together. 
Like it or not — and essentially 
they do not — the Shamir- 
Peres double act seems des- 
tined to last at least another 
two years. 

Concluded 


THE KNESSET 


Left Opposition 
Coalition Parties 
Right Opposition 


( 1 ) 

(1) Ometz 

(3) Tami / 

Shinui- / 


National Religious ... 
/ Party 


.Agudat Israel (2) 

Shas (4) 

!v“ Moresha (2) 


Number of s 
in brackets 


-Likud (41) 


(37) Labour. 


(3) Yahad. 


r«) Civil Rights ” j 

11 Movenrent MAPAM 
. ( 6 ) . 

Progressive List tor 
Peace and Democracy 

m 




v "Kach(1) 

i 

Tehrya (5) 


Canada wins 
UN medal 
for refugees 


Missionaries 
drown in 
Lake Victoria 


Geneva (AP) — Canada was 
awarded yesterday the United 
Nations-sponsored Nansen 
Medal for its open door policy 
towards refugees from all over 
the world and support of 
ofTicial and private aid 
programmes. 

M Jean-Pierre Hocfce, UN 
High Commissioner for Refu- 
gees. announcing the award, 
said: “Canada has generously 
welcomed an increasing num- 
ber of refugees" and cited 
Canadians for "outstanding 
achievements” in helping im- 


migrants fleeing persecution. 
It was the first time iht 


It was the first time the 
award went to an entire people 
since its creation in 1954. 

In 1979-1984. Canada re- 
ceived 129.000 refugees, who 
made up 23 per cent of all 
immigrants. Canada ranks 
second among industrialized 
countries in number of refu- 
gees received as a proportion 
of population. 


Kampala (AP) — Three 
European missionaries — a 
Roman Catholic priest and 
two nuns — -are presumed to 
have drowned after their small 
boat capsized in Lake Vic- 
toria. the Italian Embassy said 
yesterday. 

Another Catholic mission- 
ary in the boat Mr Karl Kalin 
of Switzerland, reached the 
Ugandan shore after a five- 
hour swim when the boat 
overturned on Saturday. 

A search was under way for 
the bodies of those missing: 
the Rev Christian Van Kassel 
of The Netherlands. Sister 
Beatrice Alarcia of Spain and 
Sister Ausilia Urgeghe of Italy. 
All worked, in Kampala. 

According to Uganda radio, 
the boat capsized as the 
missionaries struggled to re- 
move a fishing net entangled 
with the outboard engine. 

The lake is bordered by 
Uganda. Kenya and Tanzania. 


Talks on athletes’ fate 


Seoul (Reuter) — South 
Korea negotiated with Iraqi 
diplomats yesterday on the 
fate of four Iranian athletes 
who disappeared .shortly be- 
fore they wen? to return home 
from the Asian Games on 
Thursday, police sources said. 

A police officer said that he 
understood the four, all 
weight-lifters who took part in 
the Seoul Games which dosed 
1 on Sunda\. at one stage went 


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to the Iraqi consulate in Seoul. - . 

He co uld not immediately 
confirm whether the Iranians •• 
were still at the consulate. 

Iraqi consulate officials have ‘ 
declined to comment. 

The South Korean authori- • 
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THE TIMES TUESDAY OCTOBER 7 1986 


13 


MILAN FASHION by Suzy Menkes 


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J ^y’s designe rs 
have turned tv»» 

*■ °pWheadr ~" 

giving skirts a 
whirl and reviving 
the trapeze lin P 

raiang the waist and the 
feshion temperature, Italy's 
capital of style. which used ,o 
shoot from ,he hip. hasrome 

"P^^diJctctsiUtoS™ 

Broad shoulders are narrow- 

SSi«i roUSer5 and skin * are 
S^I"® °w ul and the newest 
dress is the tender trapeze 

Ver sae8 and Romeo 
^Grgii both stole the shows on 
*the opening day. Versace’s 
message came on strong from 
SLTw 11 ' ^ T , h ^ Panther-like 

Somali model Iman padded 
down the catwalk in an ultra- 
long fitted jacket over wide 
mid -calf trousers. Versace 
maestro of the slinky wrap 
dress, had loosened up as 
short skirts swirled out from 
under the hip-hugging jacket 
or whirled from the waist 

The spinning skirts of 
feather-light organza in a clean 
black and white print were 
delicious. Equally fresh were a 
trapeze in fine white linen, 
dresses with raised waists and 
cropped boleros that drew a 
^ gentler A-line. 

There were masses of other 
ideas from the designer: girlish 
gmgham evening dresses or 
slinky gowns slashed across 
the back to show undulating 
flesh: wrapped gold lame tops 
teamed with the new cropped 
pants or bold swimsuits with 
padded shoulder straps and 
sinuous metal niesh dresses 
fringed in silky jersey. 

Romeo Gigli's models and 
clothes are as innocent as 
Versace's are sophisticated: 
pale Modigliani faces and 
sweet madonna smiles above 
dresses of medieval simplic- 
ity. Even when a high-waisted 
jersey dress outlines the 
breasts or a sarong skirt splits 
at the thigh, Gigli's penitents 
seem unaware of their curves. 

The basic Gigli line — little- 
• changed since last season -r is 
the bared-shoulder sweater in 
sludgy colours above a slim 
wrapped skirt, or a long 
curving tunic jacket over nar- 
row pants. Colours are mostly 
dark, from plum to aubergine. 

New was the emphasis on 
the high-waisted cotton jersey 
dresses, chaste schoolgirl 
swimsuits and cobwebs of lace 
swaddling a strapless bodice 
or looped into a sarong skirt. 
Peach and primrose yellow — ■ 
for the jersey dresses or for 
cropped bolero cardigans — lit 
up the sombre palette. The 
effect wascharming. and mov- 
ing, but humourless. 

Karl Lagerfeld was full of 
his celebrated wit in his 
j summer collection for Fendi. 
IP He had a triumph with the 
trapeze, scooping white denim 
into panels as a “princess” 
dress that flared out into a 
swingy skirl from a narrow 
shoulder line. 

Other Lagerfeld fun. in a 
young and chirpy collecuon, 
was a Spanish Carmencita 
look that is popping up all 
over Milan. At Fendi that 
meant lace sarongs wrapped 
round high-cut black swim- 
suits and tiers of ruffled denim 

strictly for the junior market- 
The more grown-up look was 

Photographs by 
Harry Kerr 


T rapeze acts 






MILAN PEOPLE 


Picture 

story 



Gianni Varsaca (above) 
told me that he has learnt a lot 
about his work from prepar- 
ing his forthcoming Pans 
exhibition. The retrospective 
show of Versace's opulent 
photographic images, which 
includes work by fashion 
photographers Bruce We- 
ber, Irving Penn, Avedou 
and David Bailey opens 
next week at the Palais 
Galleria. Gianni says that he 
finds Penns images the 
strongest, but Weber inter- 
preted the style best. Last 
year Versace, who next week 
receives the Grande MedaHle 
de vermeil for services to 
fashion held his fashion show 
at the Victoria & Albert Mu- 
seum m London. Next year 
the V & A writ host a 
restrospective exhibition of 
the work of the Florentine 
family of Salvatore 
Ferragatno, best known for 
their super fine leather. 

Drawing book 

Anna Piaggi, (be Ion) muse and 
inspiration for Karl Lagerfeld, 
told me that the sumptuous 
book of Karl's drawings of her 
will be launched In London 
next month. The Italian fash- 
ion doye mite, striking a 
characteristically flamboyant 
note in a choker and matching 
handbag of linked piano keys 



by costume jeweller Ugo 
Corregiani. has been sketched 
in hundreds of poses and 
antique couture outfits for the 
book. Clare Rendlesham, who 
owns the Lagerfeld shop in 
London, stages a high profile 
party for Anna and Karl on 
November 12. 

Shop around 

• Giorgto ArmanPs store 
is his castle. He tells me that 
his newly opened Emporio in 
Milan — which forms a 
galleria round a central court- 
yard - is the first of a chain of 
shops throughout Italy and 
(soon) in the US and England. 

• Meanwhile Soprani, is 
launching his new Milan store 
tonight. He is now backed by 
a Japanese company. 


Parisian chic, with sculpted 
tunic jackets and the shortest 
lightest skins in town. 

Swing and ding was the 
message at By bios: Spanish 
ruffles from the hips swinging 
out on the runway to the beat 
of the cfta cfta. Quiet tobacco 
browns and a strong group in 
frilled blue denim calmed 
down the fancy dress element 
in the tiered swirling skirts 
that were almost entirely mid- 
calf. New were baby doll 
trapezes over long ruffled 


darts and cape backs on 
skinny dresses to give a sense 
of fit with movement. 

The empire line strode back 
at Mario Valentino, the 
leather house whose skins are 
as supple as doth. Designer 
Versace showed shifts with 
long or short hemlines, all 
bdted under the bust to give 
the new silhouette. Blue was 
the dominant colour in a 
collection notable — in a 
season of wild frills — for its 
simplidiy. 


One of the messages of this 
Milan is that skirts are long by 
day and short for nigbL 
Marriuccia Mandelli of 
Krizia. who usually has a 
hard-edged sexiness, had soft- 
ened all her lines, with mid- 
calf pleated skirts or wide 
culotte trousers under a fitted 
co Harless cardigan jacket as 
■her strongest fine.- 
She calls her flirty skirts in 
narrow tiers — or a fitted 
riding coat flaring out at the 
hem — her “umbrella” line. 


Short taffeta boule skins and 
long handkerchief point chi£ 
fon were both fresh evening 
looks in this confident 
collection. 

Although the clothes are 
mixed and the message varied, 
this is a very up-beat Milan. 
Missoni showed a vigorous 
collection of their distinctive 
prints and vivid colours from 
sunshine orange to fuchsia. 
Patterned dresses swirled 
from the shoulders to the knee 
or swung over slim short 


skirts- The fullness was con- 
trolled for tubular knits in a 
striking prim of writhing 
snakes and for ankle- length 
tube skins. 

Here, as elsewhere, fabric 
flipped out in ruffles, was held 
in to a high waist with a tube 
of ribbed knitting or just burst 
out into a circular hem with 
refreshing exuberance. 

• Starr Menkes repons 
from Milan on Armani, Ferre 
and Soprani on Friday 


How to go on a Continental shopping spree for just £5 



A s pecial Times offer for a bargain one-day 
tr ip across the Channel, Robin Young gives 
his tips on the best specialized shops to visit 


Unlike Britain, French and 
Belgian towns are replete win 
small shops which specialize 

in providing the very best o* 
particular foods and 

Here is a guide,, von by f port 
to the best specialist shops m 
each town. 

hdis^mbly the, be« of “the 
? Channel ports for shoppers. 
? with excellent rtjmpjjg 
dose together in the lower, 
modern pan of the town. The 
best are Phi hppe Oln- ers 
cheese shop »n rue Thiers. 


Mm 

WaterfM 

mm 



for men & 
mt taB and large, 

tram £28.25 
(p 8 p £ 2 ) 

THBEE JAY (T33J 
9 The Preand 
ftodjcwne 

Herts 


4429M/463947 

WALK. CYCLE. HSH. ^ UL? 

Send 2 * 17p 
fffoiy Wocrtre and sampi» 

iftnos. J&i- Jenram) 


Andre Lugand's patisserie 9 
Grande Rue. and the Demen 
charcurcrie at number I . 

Olivier’s Fromagene at 43 
rue Thiers supplies many of 
the south-east’s best res- 
taurants. and there are more 
than 200 varieties to choose 

,r °Lugand's cakes and pastries 
are more expensive than most 

of the rivals, but their cakes, 
chocolates and marronsgiacp 
are made with finer ingredi- 
ents and more skill. 

Derrien similarly stands 
held and shoulders above the 
town’s other dtoaMt 
with, among others, patfa and 
balloiines. trotters and tnpe. 
black and white puddings and 

slutted snails. 

The best bakery is 
Demarche*, at Je owriwof 
mes Thiers and Faidherpe. 
Ihmieh excellent loaves also 
come from wood-firedoy?™ 

aI W ffoS 

Boulogne shops worth special 
Comres^du ferry (gounnel 


Joyce MicOonUfl 



(herbs, spices and soaps) in 
rue Faidhcrbe: Magaine (silk 
lingerie). Descamps (linens). 
Bally (shoes) and Cafes 
Roussc3Ux (fresh roast coffee) 
in rue Thiers: and Sabine 
(hand-painted silks) and 
Vanheckhocl (kitchenware) in 
roe de Lille- 

Calais. 

The town has two centres. In 
select and coastal Calais Nord 



you will find the best cheese 
shop at I rue Andre Gerschel; 
a reasonable patisserie (R. 
Cousin) and charcuterie 
(Bellynck). Coffea (coffees). 
Leonidas (Belgian chocolates). 
Classe (gifts and elegant table- 
ware). Descamps (linens) and 
boutiques, all in rue Royale. 

In Calais Sud. Boulevard 
Jacquard has A la Sole 
Berckoise for fish. Lablanche 
for charcuterie. La 
Chocolaterie for chocs. Aux 
delices du Calais for cakes. 
Fonteyne for silk lingerie and 
Anny Blau for wools. Boule- 
vard Lafayette is worth hiking 
to for Au Fin Bee (cheese). 
L’Huiiricre Calaisienne (sea- 
food). Cupiltard (cookware). 
Au Sphinx (leather). A 
I* Anneau d'Or (designer acces- 
sories) and Pastel (gifts). 

Oslend 

The best cheese shop is Kaas 
Godeiicve (Wine 

Nonnenstraat). Leonidas 
(cheaper) and Godiva (belter) 
have chocolate shops in 
KapellestraaL but the sweets 
at Jacques Confiseur in Adolf 
Buylstraai are home-made. 

Zeebnigge 

Best to drive on into Bruges 
(Brugge) itself, where Leon- 
idas are in Sieensiraat and 
Godiva in Zuid Zandsiraat. (If 
you want Belgium's best choc- 
olates. Come Toisson d'Or. 
%ou have to go. to Knokkek 
The principal shops around 
Grand-Place include specialist 
lacc shops. 


This autumn, in conjunction 
with Townsend Tboresen, The 
Times is offering its readers 
a way-days to France and Bel- 
gium for ririculously low 
prices. 

From Monday, October 20 
until Sunday, November 30, 
you can take a trip from Dover 
to Calais, Boulogne, Ostend or 
Zeebrugge (or from Felixstowe 
to Zeebrugge) for £5 each plus 
another £5 for your can how- 
ever, if four or more of yon 
travel together in a single car, 
the car goes free — so the cost 
of a trip for four and a car is 
just £20 (motor-cycles do not 
qualify). Townsend Tboresen 
are not affected by industrial 
action on ferry 1 services. 

The trips are perfectly dined 
for early Christmas shoppers. 
rafaic- Boulogne and Ostend 



THE TIMES 


special offer 
in association with 


TOWNSEND 

THORESEN 



all have hypermarkets dose 
by ‘and Bruges, within easy 
reach of Zeebrugge, is an 
excellent shopping centre. 

Or you can simply spoil 
yourself. Boulogne has some of 
the best food shops bt France 
and a bustling Saturday mar- 
ket. Calais, an ancient lace 
centre, is rich in architecture 
and harbour life. Ostend is a 
busy fishing port, Zeebrugge 
has a fascinating harbour and 
is near to Bruges, which is 
probably the best preserved 
medieval city in northern 
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A booking request form plus 
sailing details wfll appear in 
Thursday's Times. In addition, 
you will require three vouchers 
per booking. Today's voucher 
appears below* further vouch- 
ers will appear tomorrow and 
on Thursday. 

>< 

This voucher may be used • 
as one ot tnree reouireo to • 
apply for The Times weoai t 
oner. It is valid ONLY lor « 
Townsend Tboresen OAY * 
RETURN pips, from Octo- • 
ber 20 lo November 30 ■ 
1988 inclusive. THREE Z 
VOUCHERS are required • 
PER BOOKING REQUEST. J 
A maximum of one car (uo • 
10 5.5m length) applies per • 
booking. The offer ooes not . 
apply lo coaches or mini- * 
Puses. The otter is made Z 
SUBJECT TO AVAILABIL- * 
ITY Alternative dates or • 
routes to tnose requested • 
may oe ottered or money * 
refunded, m the event of Z 
non availability. • 


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Paying up and playing the game 


THE 
GOOD SCHOOLS 



Part 2: Boys’ schools 
Tomorrow's war will 
be won not on the 
playing fields of 
Eton, but rather in 
the computer rooms 
of Cheltenham or of 
Aylesbury. How 
have the schools coped with the changes? In 
the second extract from their new survey, 
Amanda Atha and Sarah Drummond find 
that Britain's top 20 boys’ schools, though 
still cloistered and class-riven, continue to 
provide an unrivalled all-round education 


i 


i was while visiting boys' 
schools that we came across 
the English class system 
charging on unchecked. 
Moleswonh’s comment in 
Down with Skoof still holds good: 
"They sa wot skool are you going 
to. You say well it is one of the 
lesser known publick schools, ft is 
called Grunts ... To Eton foryou 
I suppose? It is always Eton and 
jolly good luck to them ..." 

The deep shame of going to 
Grunts is heartbreaking to behold. 
Worse: the most successful public 
schools now demand a good 
academic performance on entry 
and the poor little beggar who does 
not get into his (grand tfather's old 
school feels a failure indeed. 

"They must have a ‘name' they 
can be proud of." said Mr Vaudrey 
of Wicken Park — and an old 
school tie which can be fingered 
comfortingly in board meetings to 
come. We observed the whole 
pecking order carefuly nurtured 
not only by the schools, but by 
parents who still blindly put their 
son down for a school however 


much they hated it/didn't know 
i i/disapproved. 

Fashions in schools do change, 
however in the last century die 
Clarendon Commission listed the 
nine leading public schools as 
Charterhouse. Eton. Harrow. Mer- 
chant Taylors'. Rugby, St Paul's. 
Shrewsbury. Westminster. Win- 
chester. The list certainly would 
not look like that today. 

Some of the more farsighted 
(nervous?! of the boys’ public 
schools offer government-assisted 
(i.e. government-funded) places 
for bright but impoverished boys. 
The well-endowed boys' schools 
are in the lead in (he setting up of 
Regional Action Groups — those 
secret establishment nests of resis- 
tance to the changes promised 
from a Labour government We 
even heard sabre rattling from 
accountants, with rumours of 
buying properties abroad. 

We found the quality of educa- 
tion in boys' public schools (i.e. 
fee paying, boarding) on the whole 
to be high. Such schools are 
excellent in mainstream subjects. 


especially maths, science, history, 
and often outstanding in un- 
expected extras such as fly fishing, 
saving ospreys, declaiming Cicero 
or whatever the craze of the 
resident eccentric (such people are 
one of the great joys of English 
public schools). 

Many masters are excellent, 
though sometimes suspect in spe- 
cific areas (for example, a science 
master who can't spell, ora history 
master unaware of recent research 
on the battle of the Hellespont). 
They are dedicated in ways which 
go beyond all thought of Burnham 
or any other scale. 


B 


ullying still goes on, but 
very little of it is by 
masters, and the days in 
which new boys were 
ritually heated up like 
lobsters and tossed in laundry 
baskets Me largely over. 

Team games of the empire- 
building variety are still strong, 
but no longer as all-important, 
even in the "games" schools. We 
got the impression that some 


heads hardly dare admit that their 
schools still attach great im- 
portance to games such as rugby 
and cricket. 

The Combined Cadet Force is 
no longer compulsory at most 
schools we visited — though, to the 
amazement of heads trying to do 
away with it, it is increasing in 
popularity. Non-CCFers — and 
increasingly one and all — do 
afternoons of “granny bashing", 
an apt description of school 
community welfare services. Hard 
physical graft is out of favour 
generally, except in Scotland, as is 
corporal punishment. As David 
Jewell, now head of Haiieybury. 
said on the subject of corporal 
punishment- “If I had to resort to 
violence to keep order. 1 believe 1 
should not be teaching at all." The 
new head of Winchester, in- 
cidentally, has banned the noble 
an of boxing, as has Downside. 

Homosexuality is not un- 
common. though heads seemed 
more worried about drugs. The big 
answer to homosexuality is girls in 
the sixth form. Girls, it is said, not ■ 


L 


AMPLEFORTH 

COLLEGE 


YORK 


Vital statistics 

Pupils: 704 bora: 674 board, 30 day. 
Ages: 10-18: Roman Catholic; fee- 
paying. 


Head: Father Dominic MHroy (since 
I960). Thoughtful, pipe-smoking 
figure of dignity and calm in dynamic 
atmosphere. Like Eton, school is in 
effect ran by a triumvirate: head, 
abbot and council of parent 
Benedictine monastery. 

Academic matters: Variable. Some 
teaching excellent, some not so hot. 
Modem languages stronger here 
than at most public schools. English 
and classics have also been good. 
Religion part of pupils' everyday 
lives, in one house there is even 
compulsory time set aside for 
meditation; 'To give the boys the 
silence without which no spiritual 
growth is possible." 

Games, options, the arts: Strong 
rugby school. Games and music 
both compulsory. New design and 
technology centre helps to redress 
bias to arts. 

Background and atmosphere: 
Founded 1802. Position m one of 
the loveliest valleys of Yorkshire — 
isolation is boys' main grouse. 
Discipline based on trust individual 
conscience and confessional — a 
heavy burden lor the growing boy 
and has led to comments of oid 
boys being "bom middle-aged". 
Pupils: Scions of good RC families 
from all over the country. 

Bottom Hne: Fees £1.850 boarding, 
£1.364 day. 

Remarks: For years unquestionably 
country's top Catholic school, but 
one or two parents would now 
disagree. For all its fiberai ways, 
produces solid citizens with open 
minds on aR things except religious 
matters. 


AYLESBURY 

GRAMMAR 


AYLESBURY 

BUCKINGHAMSHIRE 


Vital statistics 
Pupfls: 1.250 boys; all day. 

Ages: 11-18; non-denominatonal; 
State. 


Head: Mr.K. D. Smith MA (since 
1967). Hugely respected and popu- 
lar head who in the 70s was in 
vanguard of successful battle to 
save Buckinghamshire's 
grammar/secondary modem sys- 
tem. His energy, enthusiasm, and 
a ttention to detail lie behind 
school's successful expansion. 
Academic matters: Strong in virtu- 
ally all departments, particularly 
applied science, thanks to head's 


approach. Best com- 
puter totalities of any UK school- 
Looking at a class of 12-year-otds 
we saw one young boy teaming to 
word-process, another computing 
statistics on Aylesbury trades- 
people at 1887, another monitoring 
satellite orbits via thev own sateUite 
tracking station, another examining 
up-to-date weather sateUite pic- 
tures. Harnessing of innovative 
techniques and enquiring minds 
extends to aH areas of their 
teaching. 

Games, options, the arts: Not 
overfly sporty, but boys excel in 
almost every area - notably in 
squash (national schools cham- 
pions tor six years out of last nine). 
Also proud of rugby prowess - two 
international under-19 caps in ‘86. 
Much involvement with community 
work. For concerts and plays boys 
collaborate with girls' high school 
next door. 

Background and atmosphere: 
Sturdy 1907 low-lying building and 
excellent purpose -butt centres for 
science, computing, geography and 
geology, and Vlth form. However, 
capitation cuts have left scars on 
the school - in parts, dim and 
dilapidated. Strong pastoral system 
-six housemasters and six heads of 
year give immediate extra help to 
anyone struggling with class or 
homework, freeing class teachers 
for job of teaching. 

The pupils: Half from Aylesbury, 
half from surrounding areas. 
Remarks: One of few old-fashioned 
"free" grammar schools left House 
prices in the area pushed up as a 
result of parents moving into orbit 


BRADFIELD 

COLLEGE 


READING. BERKSHIRE 


Vital statistics 
Pupfis: 491 boys. 5 
form): 463 board. 33 
18: C ot E; fee-paying. 


(in Vlth 
IBS 13- 


Head: Mr P. B. Smith (since sum- 
mer 1985). Very conscious of need 
to make more contact with the world 
outside. Gets cross with parents 
who say they are looking at the 
place because they want "a gentle 
country school for their sons' . 
Academic matters.- Not a very 
academic establishment Consis- 
tent A level strengths are electron- 
ics, politics and economics (Sir John 
Mott and David Owen are old boys). 
Games, options, the arts: Greek 
play (started 1890) performed in 
Greek every three years in splendid 
outdoor theatre, attracting national 
press, audiences of eight or nine 
thousand: also taken abroad. Re- 
cent musical revival: tx-weekly 
lunch-time concerts, fine choristers 
etc. Strong on visiting lecturers, 
thorough about careers advice, 
splendid trout fishing. Games are 
serious. "Boys exercise five times a 


Tony Spencer 





Relaxed, forthright, capable: James Parker, High Master of Manchester Grammar — arguably, he says, “the most selective school in the country' 


week," one master said firmly. 
Regularly wins national shooting 
competitions: cricket and tootbaU 
also exceptional. 

Background and atmosphere: 

Structured and disciplined. Beer 
available in own bar masters tend 
to turn a Mind eye to smoking at 18. 
Still, some boys do describe life 
here as "prison-tike”. Isolation in 
lovely rural setting loo much for 
some, but fine tor unsophisticated 
tratftionatists. Gowns worn in 
school (boys loathe them), corn- 
three times a week, 
iai fagging system. 

The pup Us: 20 per cent from 
overseas (mainly expats in army, 
banks, and civil service). Boys 
whose parents want them to follow 
country pursuits. 

Bottom tine: Fees: £1,990 per term 
boarding 

Remarks: Breeds a characterful, 
gritty chap. One of the best tra- 


ditional pubtic schools for boys who 
cannot cops with the real 
powerhouses. 


CANFORD 

SCHOOL 


WIMBORNE, DORSET 


Vital statistics 

Pupils: 470 boys, 60 girls in Vlth 
form: 420 board, 1 10 day. Ages: 13- 
.18; C of E: fae-peying. 





You see a bargain that 
won’t wait. And you just 
wish you’d enough 
money to buy it 
there and then. 

Weil f, you can , with 
a Save & Borrow 
Account By saving 
a certain amount, 
you can borrow up to a 
total of 30 times that 
amount — anytime — 
simply by writing a 
cheque. 


APR & 20.9*0 when you are borrowing and we 
pay 4.35% when you’re saving. (Rates are variable). 
Suitable applicants must be over 18. 

Gome and talk, or 

phone 01-200 0200 fora leaflet. 



NO WATTING. 

IF YOU SEE 
SOMETHING 
YOU NEED 
YOU CAN 
BUYJT. 



WHEN YOU NEED US WE'LL BE LISTENING 


Head: Mr Martin Marriott (since 
1967), one of the finest in (tie 
business. Opeiv-door headship - no 
one too (earful to enter. "Martm 
Marriott has made Csntord into a 
weJFrun. efficient school that deliv- 
ers the goods." say approving 
parents. Spends much time talking 
to parents, staff, pupils. 

Academic matters: competent 
They make pupils succeed at their 
own level, and help mem to reach 
their potential. Five groups of 20 in 
each age group; setted for maths. 
French. Latin. In due course top 20 
last-movers are put together and 
the rest are divided alpha 
"Better for the pupils, and we tea 
better too." 

Games, options, the arts Very 
strong on games, and very success- 
ful. Very good musra; Bournemouth 
much used for theatre and concerts: 
archaeological studies m Dorset 
Head trying to make links with local 
handicapped school: “Pupils are 
very receptive, very 
com passionate," one master notes. 
Good drama- CCF (thriving) or 
adventure training. 

Background and atmosphere: Pon- 
derous 19th-century interiors, for- 
mal grounds. An impressively weft- 
run school: alert, on the move. Head 
holds group discussions (for 12 
pupils) twice a week to discuss 
relationships - with parents, 
boys/giris. marriage, life-styles, etc. 
Could be disastrous, but it works. 
The pupfls: Solidly middle class. 
Fnendly. open, mature. Many sons 
of senior navel officers. 

Bottom fine: Fees: £1 .970 per term 
boarding. £1 .360 day 
Remarks: Traditional public school 
mat moves with the times and 
benefits much from humanistic in- 
fluence of its remarkable head. 


CHARTERHOUSE 


GODALMING, SURREY 


Vital statistics 

Pupils: 633 boys. 67 girts in Vlth 
form: 600 board. 70 day. Ages: 13- 
18: C of E; lee-pavmg. 


Head: Mr P. J. Attenborough (since 
19821. Gentle, quiet, on me shy side. 
A somewhat arfiicuti takeover 
bead's first impression was lack of 
friendliness among pupils. Feeling 
was mutual: pupils still say they find 
rum "difficult to talk to" - a marked 
contrasi to some of Ihe very open 
Carthusian staff 

Academic matters: Currently a 
front-runner Pupils daim they work 
hard - "though no one makes us”. 
Head busy promoting interest in 
classes. English the strongest sub- 
ject. followed by maths. French me 
weak link No computer studies: "It 
would ne outdated by the tuna a boy 
could use what he had leamt." Start 
lives up to reputation ol harbouring 
enthusiasts ana eccentrics. No fe- 
male teaching staff. 

Games, options, (he aria: Very 
gamesy. Hockey, shooting, sailing 
very popular, naymg fields spread 
over 100 acres, with very line 
cricket pitch. Scouts prominent (the 
is Baden-Powei! s old school). New 
muse centre with excellent practice 
rooms: orchestra has made three 
visits to Euron= *"H phonal and 
a roan scholar 


Wtitiams was 
.here)- Drama another strength, and 
.much enthusiasm lor the numerous 
productions in Ben Travers Theatre 
(another okf boy), the best theatre of 
.any pubtic school. Strong art 
de pa rtment , end good technical 
centre. Farm or forestry work 
(compulsory tor a while. 
Background and atmosphere: 
Founded in 1611 hi London, mi- 
grated in 1872 to Victorian school 
buikhngs complete with turrets and 
gothic brickwork: new houses are 
truly hideous but comfortable brick 
match-boxes. Singularly godless 
chapel. Scruffy, but not squalid, 
rooms. Buttenes on lancflngs are 
focal points for coffee-making and 
gossip, both favourite pastimes. 
Atmosphere - rare in school - of 
positive enjoyment of life and each 
other. Other schools comment that 
Carthusians suffer "a superiority 
complex-" 

The pupa*: So&fly middle class, 
ambitious, offspring of rich mer- 
chants and stockbroker-Tudor 
commuters. Chatty, open, relaxed, 
great jofnersnn, self-conf id ent 
Bottom fine: Fees: £2,052 per term 
boarding. £1.692 day. 

Remarks: One of the country's top 
public schools, has been out of 
favour but now sound and solid, 
success-orientated. Old boy net- 
work is wide and strong. 


CHELTENHAM 

COLLEGE 


CHELTENHAM. 

GLOUCESTERSHIRE 


Vital statistics 

Pupils: 528 boys. 40 girls in Vlth 
form; 390 board, 178 day. 

Ages: 13-18; C of S; fee-payng 


Head: Mr Richard Morgan (since 
1978). Since appointment 60-70 per 
cent of staff has changed and 
academic standards raisea Aims to 
raise the school tack to the status it 
enjoyed m the ‘30s. 

A ca demi c matters: Now appears to 

have a number of young teaching 
staff of very high calibre - higher 
than pupils. Strong physics depart- 
ment electronics teaching could be 
best in country. Head of English 
department is the poet Duncan 
Forbes. 

Games, options, the arts: Cricket 
strongest Art department growing 



Scholarly: Dr Eric Anderson. 
Head Master of Eton 


but stifl embryonic compared with 
strong art schools - tots of wooden- 
looking male nudes. New hi-tech 
careers centre planned, school 
keen to encourage links with 
business. 

Background end atmosphere: Vic- 
torian foundation with strong army 
links - rumoured to have more old 
boys, eaten by tigers than any otiier 
school. During past 59 years has 
off lano to keep 
has now retreated behind 
of impressive-looking 
buildings m the mkfdte of Chelten- 
ham. with through-traffic roaring 
outside the windows. 

The pupfls: Now has only about 5 
per cent service families. Majority 
from local catchment area. Old 
Chettonlans include 14 VCs. ex- 
ceeded only by Wellington. 

Bottom fine: Fees; £1,975 per term 
boarding. £1,315 day. 

Remarks: Formerly one of the top 
public schools, now at the interest- 
ing stage ot having puled its socks 
up as best it can and can go no 
further without a public relations 
jofabyp 

Cheltenham 
ground - a tad order. 


drive, the building o< a bypass round 
am, and buying back lost 


ETON COLLEGE 


WINDSOR, BERKSHIRE 


Vital statistics 

Pupils: approx 1250 boys, 1 girl; ail 
board. Ages 13-18: C of E fee- 
paying. 


Heed: Dr Eric Anderson (since 
1980). Projects sfcnpte Scottish 
schoferilness. Laconic manner to- 
tally belies steely qualities of disci- 
pline and ambition. Bon Is ruled by 
triumvirate: head, provost (Lord 
Charter® of AmtsfiekJ), vice-pro- 
vost This provides checks, bal- 
ances and stability and is a vital 
ingredient m school's steady 
successful performance. Head's 
role is executive director in charge 
of studies and dfsqphne. 

Academic metiers: Straight As. 
Attracts very best teaching staff; 
complaints limited to one or two 
specific masters/housemasters. 
Aims to Keep curriculum as broad 
as possible as long as possible. 
Pupils encouraged to do 'academic 1 
subjects: emphasis on learning to 
team rather than applied ski 0s - no 
turning out of captains of industry 
here. 

Games, o ptions, the arts: Not a& 
bnftant possibly because of sheer 
choice of things todo. Maui games: 
football, rugby, the Wall Game, 
encket, boats. “First XV unbeaten 
■84 owing to remtor cement ol three 
big Africans.” said a pupil. Many 
other sports on offer. Including 
archery, DeagSng, forcing, golf, 
)udo. sailing. Acnvlttes/options in- 
clude CCF. bricklaying, courses 
witti Thames Valley Pokes (to pick a 
few at random: and huge resources 
mean anything on offer is actually 
delivered - unlike some optimi s tic 
prospectuses). 

Background and atmosphere: 
Founded 1440 by Henry VI; meHow 
red brick buildings, grounds run 
down to the Thames. Boys still wear 
tradmonal bumtreezers (tailcoats) 
and stiff collars, which gradually 
impart stiff neck to wearer - a good 
way of teflmg OEs m later years. 
Dressing up also gets Etonians 
used to being singled out as 
different - position of the 24 board- 
ing houses dotted up and down. 
High Street means boys continually 
swarming alt over the place being 
goggled ai by tourists. AS boys have 
own rooms from start: state of 
decor variable, depending on TLC 
of parent and what test occupant 
flogged on. 

The pupfls: 45 per cent sons Of OW 
Etonians, which school claims to be 
highest percentage m the land. Also 
largish element of r>oo*s to keep up 
academic standards anflfot provide 


useful business contocts. School 


pupils from state 
Bottom fine: FeBs: £1.912 per term 
boarding, 

Remarks: Currently top afl round 
and no sign of being overtaken. 
Entrance tncky, particularly., if you 
are not of the right background 
Prep school heads regard gettinc 
boys mto Eton as equivalent d 
finding Holy Grail. Given keen sense 
of class structure in school, pupfls 
from less posh famflies can end up a 
bit chipped on shouMen most boys 
end up charming, wife immaculate 
manners and rather pleased with 
themselves- 


GLENALMOND 

COLLEGE 


piined as their academic achieve- 
ments m«nt lead one to bebeve. 
Mixture of army. Highland, strong 
Scottish links. No foreigners - they 
apply too late, and there is anyway 
“no need to sell school". No girts 
and they don't intend to taka them. 
Bottom few: £1,918 per term 
boarding. 

Renuriur Known as "the Eton of 
the North". Next few years could 
prove interesting. A good strong 
school which has deservedly upheld 
its reputation for . academic 
excellence. 


HARROW 

SCHOOL 


HARROW ON THE HILL, 
MIDDLESEX 


Vital statistics: 

Pupfls; 750 boys, ait board. Ages: 
13-18: C ot & fee-paying. . 


Head: Mr lari Beer (since 1981), 
appointed, from Lancing, where he 
was most successful, to stop tide of 
disaffection which Harrow had been 
foundering on. Energetic former 
rutgiy international, sfcghtfy abrasive 
but considered good at Ph. The sort 
of head who is doing to bring out the 
best in hts pupfls regartfless of their 
innate doziness. 

Academic matters: Improving. 
Pass rate at A level has risen. 
Trecfitionafiy s t r onges t in history, 
Engfcsh and maths. _ - 
Games, o ptio n s, the arts: Keen 
games school: the head -was anx- 
ious to get out on to the rugby field 
after lunch to cheer on the juniors. 
New sports complex with indoor 
swimming pool, sports haU. chang- 
Jjog .accommodation,, even a. social 
area. Also traditionally strong at 
drama, and debating. Most unusual 
extra is the school farm, which 
provides an school's milk aid cream 
- keen boys get up at crack of dawn 
to go and ra* cows. .. .1 
Background and atmosphere: 
Founded in 1572. Magnificent uni- 
form witti -bluere' (blue jackets), 
braid, straw hats. etc. has inspired 
generations of foshion designers 
(Coco Chanel's (over was at 
Harrow). 

The pupfls: Despite rumours to 
contrary, aft’ pupils we talked to 
chanting, petite; gentle. Boys coma 
from al over the world. 28 per Cent 
are sons of Old 


PERTHSHIRE 


Vital .statistics . 

Pupils: 190 boys, afl board. Ages 12- 
18: Episcopal; fee-payfeg. 



Head: Warden is Mr John -Museon 
(since 1972). Believes "bays flour- 
ish best within a disciplined 
framework”. Admits to being, strict, 
but also agrees that boys smoke 
occasionafly: “You see a thin blue 
tine from the shrubbery.” 

Academic ma tters : Not- a good 
school for noivinteltectiaala (prob- 
ably wouldn't get in anyway). Has 
held its reputation for years, despite 

problems with grating staff tostey.in 
remote location. 

Games, op tions, ihe arts: 
strong on rugby, many FPs 

Own nine-hole 
course; artificial ski slope, 
cricket swimming, canoeing, rock 
efimbmg. Hot on music and drama; 
pipe. band. CCF from second year, 
after two years can opt out and do 
community service locally. 

md and atmosphere 
in. 1841, its ekraant stone 
cloist e r s , chapel and nvajy are 
reminiscent of a major Engftah- 
pubiic school, and somewhat at' 
odds with the bleak . Perthshire 
httiside. -Hotchpotch of modern 
buildings housing labs, theatre, art 
rooms, work straps, superb gym, 
swimming-pool and classrooms. 
Strong army overtones, cold as halt 
in winter. 

The- pupfls: Beflabte, robust add 
weD-rnan ne red - not as weU-dtsci- 


Bottom fine: Fees: £2,075 per term 
boarding. 

Remariis; Regaining momentum-af- 
ter its fafffrom top position' in '50s 
and ’60s: "We are just starting, to 
send boys, to Harrow again," said 
one or two prep school heads. 
Potentially vary strong; do not 
underestimate. 


KING EDWARD’S 
SCHOOL 


BIRMINGHAM 


Vita# st ati s tic s • 
Pupfls: 700 boys. AS day:- Ages: 11- 
18;C of E; fee-paying. 


Haul: Chief Master- is Mr 
M. J. W. Rogers MA (since 1982). 
Secure in the knowledge- that ffe is 
funning a school for the mteffec- 
toafiy above-average, he- says: 
‘‘Such centres of excellence as ours 
are also centres of innovation." 
Strongly denies -the school is oily 
an academic -hot house. L*ed by 
parents and commands respect 

among pupfls. ; 

Academic matters: AH departments 
strong. .Excellent staff can cope with 
theuramiest of boys. No streaming 
here. Head says: "Why bother to 
create a bottom-stream mentality 
for clever -children’" By and large, 
10/11 O levels are -axpedteti, fead- 
ing to wi average- : 4 * 
levels ...some boys- take more. - 
Games, options, the arts: "Music 
hnttant . said one. mother, usual 
sports offered, also - i a 
rpititigynwrasium for badminton,. In- 
door tennis etc. IS acrosof praying 
fields, tennis courts dotted around 
the grounds. Golf, salting, fives 
offered.. CCF. scouts, community 
service. * 

Background and atmosphere: 
Edwardian foundation. Large attrac- 
tive buck buildings withe tovety old 


CONCISE CROSSWORD NO 1073 


ACROSS 

I Open air meal (6) 

5 Ignoble (4) 

8 Cake topping (5) 

9 Nomad (7) 

II Premature (8) 
n Scots hill (41 
15 Boyne Annivereaiy 

17 Goallike mammal 
(4) 

IS Go before (8) 

21 Spanish punch (7) 

22 Child's bear name (5) 

23 Young deer (4) 

24 Amcncm{61 

DOWN 
Z Imbecile (5) 

3 flip (3) 

4 Flaiiering(13) 

5 Evil spirit (4) 

6 Argued (7) 

7 l678consphaior 
15.51 

10 Tiny (5.5) 



U Wise men (4) 

M Mid-leg joint (4) 

16 Voice loss r 7) 


T9- Ooze (5) 

28 Smile (4) 

22 Storage container (3i 



SOLUTION TO NO 107’ 

ACROSS; 1 Ditto 4 Crampon 8 Drone $ Novate jfl Cmitr-L-* 
Menu 13 Hippocampus 17Ache ■ « Specific ■ 21 .Bambini 11 

bor 23 Tension 24 Every * r “ 

DOWN: I Deduce 2 Thorn 3 Overripe 4 Contraception s *.-. 
Plateau 7Naevus 12 Emaciate Mldhumw. 15-Gambu 
Scurvy 19 Fibre 20 Mini 

. ; •> 


.6 


only bolster heterosexuality, but 
-also dwindling coffers, flawing 
results and failing manners. They 
have been a great success. 

iitle of aH this applies to 
day schools, which are 
totally different animals 
both socially and 
academically. Even half- 
way houses like Westminster, 
which has weekly boarding, show 
a much more relaxed attitude to 
pastoral care. "The boys." said ex- 
head Dr John Rae. “can stand 
anything until Friday” — the 
implication being lhal wild-oaling 
at the weekend was not the 
school's problem. 

Academically, the curriculum 
tends to be narrower in day 
schools, which cannot provide the 
same opportunities as their board- 
ing equivalents: at 4-or S or 6pm 
the school empties and that is lhaL 
it is no accident, we 'jcel. that the 
strongest day schools, such as 
Manchester Grammar School, 
have the feeling of boarding 
schools. 


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[E TIMES TUESDAY OCTOBER 7 1986 


11 


SPECTRUM 




SssSi*.-* 

^ShaiSX 5 sportm9 •» 

Fees: £750 per term 

^<&SS&‘&S£ 


KING’S COLLEGE 


TAUNTON, SOMERSET 


Vital statistics 


SaSWM? 

Ssnus-jj'iffS 

fletea school should be judged not 

gsusffiUasSis^ 

2“®”* and modem language 
wo^ibut overall the k 

JJjgJ"* sound on mainstream 

gMiw> options, the arts: One of 

&^£SM£32£- 

ns a ms 

Not an architectural dory, arid 
vfews afl round are of outskirts of 
Taunton. 

The pupHs; Large local contingent 
Sfronoah army and navy element, 
ateo 75 children of surgeons or GPs. 
25 non-nationals, 20 of them Hong 
Kong Chinese. 

Bottom fine: Fees: £1.815 per term 
boarding. £1 .330 day. 

Ben*®**: Throughout the school 
there was a fading of goodness, 
though religion was not mentioned 
once. 


THE KING’S 
SCHOOL 


CANTERBURY, KENT 


Vital statistics 

Pupils: 630 boys plua 90 girls in Vlth. 
form; 600 board, 120 day. Ages: 13-. 
18: C of E; fee-paying. 


Head: Canon Anthony Phtiti p s (from 
September 1986), fallow and chap- 
lain of St John s Callage. Oxford 
since 1975. 


SSSSSF*® 

fi^fiFiSsFie 

ass 1 * 1 ?** - 

St Augustine's Abbey. 
SMn^hftros steeped in hteio^ 

conw «t8d. spying 
g wer boy s they own bedisfs. Btws 
S2"j? n 95 r **7 hi urifbrra of wing 
“■“pajw t**, scrupulously done 
up to the neck. Gds dresLid in 
Sack and white. Fbodgood 

The papas: a favourite with bar- 

hstera. toaors, diplomats and 
weanny tarmers who want their 
ntraJonspring togetatasteoftown 
me. Fnentfly and weA-mamered, 


nwiuy ana wBo-manoerea, 

“wugh parents complain disciptew 
w fax. 

Bottom Bnjt Fees: E2.050 per lenn 

boarding, £1^15 day. 

Remarks: Tratfitionai but aa av- 
gomg public school with some 
refreshing attitudes (a psychiatrist 
visits once for a week for anyone to 
coroJt "WWi afl the problems of 
spotescance. we though it a good 
M— ")- A school tar the *ght 
aesthete, but tough on the under- 
achwver. 


MANCHESTER 

GRAMMAR 


RUSHOLME, MANCHESTER 


Vital statistics 

Pupils: 1,400+ boys, all (fay. Ages 
11-18; C of E links but basicafly non- 
denommatxmal tee-paying. 


Heath HM> Msstar is Mr jjSparftar 
(since M&taebnas 1965). Relaxed, 
forthright appears able to cope with 
country 's most dynamic school 
Hcuhe ic — *■ 
everything they do. One of 
places you wfl tirtd staff cfiscussmg 
merits of different Oxbridge col- 
leges In the way prep sdmoi heads 
discuss pubic schools. Academic 
results prababhr the best in the 
country in 1Ss5 - 10 
including maths. Latin and 
had 1 00 per cent pa s s rate at A level 
- and always very near the top, 
across a broad span of subjects. 

Russian school — a 
_ . they point out aa 

50 per cent of Russian graduates 
are immediately snapped up by the 
Government) 

Games, options, the arts: Does not 
set out to be a games school but 
does welL No sports centre. No 
house system. Music good; also 
has good crafts department and 
does excafent stiverwork with own 
hat mark. FeS-waSang, trekking and 
mountaineering, starting with week- 
end camps and going on to trips aU 
over the world. 

Background • and atmosphere: 

Founded in 1515: moved to present 
Bt site in 1931 - huge red 
based round central quad: 


new boys are given a map to find 
their way atxwt Atm osphere dy- 
namic. bursting with energy, 
particularly mental energy, undorm 
<rf scrubby Hack jackets towers the 

tone a lime. 

The puptts: Cream of mteNgentsia 
from Buxton to Blackpool - not 
necessarty middle class. Bright as 
bush babies, though a bit uncouth, 
but polite and constoenoe. and 
discipline is not a major strug 
Old Mancunians range from 
Thomas de Qumcay to tastoram 
Michael Wood. 

Bottom fine: Fees: £676 a farm. A 
bargain. 

R emarks : We would bracket MSS 
with Eton as the most outsorting 
academic schools in the country. 
Entrance difficult head describes it 
as “arguably the most selective 
school Sn the country". Not the biace 
tor tote developers, those lacking in 
confidence or in need of social 


MARLBOROUGH 

COLLEGE 


MARLBOROUGH. WILTSHIRE 


Vital statistics 
Pupte: 780 boys, plus 100 girls in 
Vlth form, afl board. Ages: 13-18: C 
of E: fee paying. 


Heart Mr David Cope, formerly at 
British School in Pans, who took 
over in simmer 1986 from gentle, 
remarkable and deariy-toved Mr 
Roger Bfis n tins post which has 
been described as a'Tpavewd tor 
headmasters" owing to drtheufty of 
preserving fibers! tradition without 

slipping into anarchy- 

Acade m i c matters: Pockets of ex- 
cellence. not on the whole to the 
m ains tre am grammar schooHype 
subjects. Results not as tw' 
they might be green those 100 
giriK signs are that the school wiff In 
future go co-ed throughout Good 
an religious educ a tion, engineering, 
mugmative computer courses. 
Games, options, the sits: Top 
games school - aB main games: 
rugby, enckst, but partcutarty 
hockey. Possibly best art depart- 
ment in country, run by Robin Chads 
- whole new building erected to 
house iwn/it Smart separate ca- 
reers house, strong frame deport- 
ment. Dozens of societies. 

and atmosphere: 
in 18X3 “lor the sons of 
dergy of the Church of England" 
(only Sunday service attendance 
compulsory). Now has feel of one of 
the more gracious American 
campuses wnn sense of freedom 
and scrufftness, bulging with stu- 
dents careering about their own 
business, noise of transistors rises 
from dormitories into the night. Very 
much a question of trust rather than 
imposed discipline - which pupils 
quick to appreciate, H less quick to 
honour. Buildings higgledy- 
lovely Hi summer, and 
quarters very co m forta b le 
i boys' sixth form 
more elegant -girts* 
into boys' houses (only absdi 
unbreakable school rue: boys 
afiowed up girls' staircases). 

The pupfls: Pioneered the ad- 
misston of girts Into the VMh form in 
1968 and their dvflizing presence 
much fait in school Boys 1 parents 
pretty solidly middte class: accoun- 
tants. solicitors, also sons of offi- 
cers and clergy. Okf boys: Anthony 
Blunt, John Betjeman. 

Bottom fine: Fdes: £2JM0 per farm 
boarding. 2% per cent of fBe Income 



goes to clergymen's sons, so good 
value tar them. 

Remarks: Until recently the popular 
choice tor pupils after Eton - or 
instead of it far parents wishing to 
avoid the soda! razzmatazz and if 
the* chitoran are highly uvSvjdual. A 
recent slight wobble on the very 
difficult Morel tightrope towards 
unruliness and bad manners.' 


RADLEY 

COLLEGE 


ABINGDON. OXFORDSHIRE 


Vital statistics 
Pupils: 595 boys, afl board. Ages: 
13-18: C of E; fee-paying. 


Hottb The Warden is Mr Dennis Sift 
{since 1968). famous for cricket and 
regby prowess, respected and Bkad 
by staff, boys, parents. Other heads 
consWer him an outstanding educa- 
tionafci Mr Sfik has 
to its present status as one of the 
best schools in the country. He sees 
it as a place (or organic growtn 
rattier than radical 
b e li e v e in building on a boy's 
strengths, and introducing ton early 
to the pursuit of wcaSence." 

Academic matters: Strongly aca- 
demic: among cointry's top rtozan. 
Unusual a level subjects on otter 
include geology and Rustian. Pap 
ants ana boys confirm they do laam 
how to work here, "but less able 
boys tend to be overiookod." warns 
the mother of one such. The 
warden's English Grammar Paper 
» a twioe-termly event - traditionally 
was Latin, but Mr Silk is a pas- 
sionate defender of correct Engksh 
I: "They 


Parents dekgmed 
taft proper" - which cannot be said 
ol some tap schools. 

Gamas, options, the arta: Seriously 
ibtive. Nr 


very comp 
at hockey, 


competi ti ve. 


end has 


gamesy said 
ways wins 
heaps of rowing cups,' CCF com- 
pulsory for a spefi, then those who 
Opt out take up forestry, social 
services, martial arts. Warden jus- 
tifiably proud of the excellent new- 
(ishl design centre, with its highly 
proressionaJ and functional at- 
mosphere and anthusoistic teach- 
ers. Music school undergoing 
modernization and sniargemem. 
Background and atmosphere: 
Archetypal Gothic redbrick, spien- 
(fid lake. 800 acres of fine grounds. 
The 1979 TV series put Radley on 
the reap, boo s t i ng self-confidence, 
fflbog the books. Atmosphere tra- 
ditional and highly structured, with- 
out my of the aggressiveness that 
often goes with boys-onty public 
school Dormitories have separate 
cubicles, study bedrooms for senior 
boys: rooms are fairly chaotic, 
privacy hard come-by. Fagging 
system lingers on. PrefactoriaTranJc 
sought-after for its responsibilities 
and privileges: staff lean heavily on 
them. Warden fiercely 
Central feeding is in the 
great hath boys sit anywhere, the 
place fun of staff, wives, children. 
The pupil*: Relaxed and likeable, 
well heeled and predominantly po- 
tto. far more sophisticated and 
ctvffizad than many of their peers 
elsewhere. OM boys include Mark 
Ckrtisle. Lord Seaman, Peter Cook, 
Ted Dexter. 

Bottom fine: Fees: £1.995 per term 
boarding. 

Re ma rk s: Upwardly mobile, now 
fashtanabia top choice after Eton. 
Rare to find rfissatisfled parents. 
Boys emerge sett-confident and 
purposeful. 


ST PAUL’S 
SCHOOL 


LONDON SW13 


Vital statistic* 

Pupils: 770 boys, 1& board, 648 
day. Ages; 1&18; C of E: fae- 
paying. 


Head: High Master is Canon Peter 
Pilkington (starting September 
1986), latterly head of the King s 
School. Canterbury. Emphasizes 
twin aims of academic excellence 
and of pastoral care for irKfivKEuai 
pupil a delightful, popular man. 
Short, plump. twinWy. humourous. 
Academic matters: Ora of the tap 
academic boys' schools m me 
courary. Astonishing numbers of A 
grades for both maths and physics. 
Common programme for all boys in 
first year, thereafter continual mov- 
ing and shifting, depending on 
progress and motivation - m ac- 
cordance with outgoing High 
Master's imerem to keep boys 
stretched but nor pressurized. (That 
said, everything goes in waves, and 
recently 30 boys failed O level 
maths.) Geography exceptionally 
weft-taught High-fliers flourish: 
staff extremely tough on marking, 
aid blunt with boys and parents. 
Impressively long, detailed reports 
each nrm that can reduce the non- 
brKam to despair. 

Games, options, the arts: Two-hour 
lunch break daily during which boys 
do something non-academe - row- 
ing (impressive), music, swimming, 
ganfas. Enviable grassy acres plus 
me river, excellent indoor pool, 
fencing aatta said to be the best in 
western Europe: fives a major 
game. Craft, design and technology 
centre is a major new development 
and extremely popular. Drama ana 
music are great strengths. 
Background and atmosphere: 
Founded in 1509 by Dean Colet. 
friend of Erasmus and Thomas 
More, whose humanitarian prin- 
ciples still stand rum. Moved to 
present site in 1968. hideous but 
compact pebble-dash squared-off 
buildings with off bits of stained 
glass and statuary recalling its 
former glory. Sat m 45 acres 23 
tutors - "the most important thing 
about the school 1 , according to 
outgomg head: each has 15 boys, 
three of each year group, the key 
way to urate the parem-pu prf-sctiooi 
triangle. Parents are asked to revile 
the boy's tutor (and fas wife) to their 
house for a meal communication is 
intended to be frequent and open. 
The pttaftK Drawn from all around 
London. AU sorts, no types, in- 
credibly articulate. Old boys stretch 
from John Milton to Jonathan MOer. 
Bottom fine: Fees: £1.722 per term 
boarding, £1 .080 day. 

Remark*: Academically one of the 
best London day schools, with 
boarding element. Possibly lacks 
fizz. 


SH1PLAKE 

COLLEGE 


HENLEY-ON-THAMES 

OXFORDSHIRE 


Vital s t a tist i c s 

Pupils: 342 boys, 282 board. 60 day. 
Ages: 13-18; C of E; fee-paying. 


Heed: Mr Peter Lapping (since 
1979), extremely charming with an 
easy and a pproachable manner. 


Feels mat 1 school snocfcCn : se too 
different from home ' 

Academic matters: Copes very *e‘ 
wnti less able boys, arc? tncre with 
learning difficulties 16 pfaces per 
year fer dyslexics (booked wen m 
advance* WeU spoken at bv many 
prep heads, who use it as a standby 
tor oevs who cannot get mto their 
first chace of academic school. 
Here the below -average can shme 
Staff/pupil ratio is 19 Policy is ' to 
obtain me maximum resets *:th the 
mmuntan of fuss". No shame at- 
tached ro any number of retakes to 
achieve results. 

Games, options, the rets: Water 
sports picmmenr sailing and 
windsurfing available, does we£ at 
rowing. Sncng squasn and cncfcef. 
Rugby and hockey also plaved. 
latter m superb sports hall r sad 
weather. Drama, muse and an all 
high priorities. 

Background and atmosphere: 

Established m 1959 in a beaLtifui 
setting overlooking the Thames. 
FirmJy tradrticnally. with an empha- 
sis on developing sefl-discpiine. No 
smoking, though senior boys run 
"junior common room' wch bar. 
The pupils: Gentlemanly Dreed of 
chaps, with an overriding desire to 
get rich: stock exchange and 
marketing high on the jet) intentions. 

Bottom taw: Fees- £1 .850 per term 
boarding, £1 .175 day. 

Remark*: Certainty worm looking at 
it your son is better suited to a snail 
school with much incfivtdua: atten- 
tion. Enhanced by the undemand- 
ing and realistic approach of head. 


TONBRIDGE 

SCHOOL 


TONBRIDGE. KENT 


ve’V 'C*v non-En- 

3ich S-iak)’^ abso’uta'v out 
r-such >; „s eve- is are allowed to 
*(v fica. i-th rbusemaster s 
c-ia bev- Cow 
Cswcrey arid E M Pcste* 

Brttoei tamr Fees EV933 per term 
boarding, ft 339 day 
Remarks: ices', for the bright aft- 
rounder • mere is something tor 
everyone, "arty pressurized sc 
would nc'. is uriess Scy esn keep 
-2 eas-'y 


WESTMINSTER 

SCHOOL 


LONDON SlVl 


Vital statistics 

Pupils: 650 boys. 448 board, 294 
day Ages 13-18: C of E. tee-paymg. 


Head: Mr Christopher Everett (smee 
1975). Tall, cerebral and fainy 
daunting. 1986 chapman cl the 
Head Masters' Conference, a mag- 
istrate. cn me Ovi) Servce Selec- 
tion Board (spent 13 years m 
d'Otomatn: service) Tries to pia> 
down the idea that Tanbncge is very 
academic and sees his 50b as 
providing a challenging environ- 
ment m winch boys ?an de.eiop 
every aspect ol personally and 
talents and learn to stand on me.- 
own leet. 

Academic matter*: Jodv hard to get 
m - and once in. a boy has to work 
Good facihnes. with each depart- 
ment housed into own area Strong 
language department, ottering Rus- 
sian. Smallish classes m the lower 
scnooL and only 10 01 the upper. 
Boys say that the relationship with 
masters is excellent re me Vtth form. 
Games, options, the arts: For- 
midable cricket and rugby sides, 
playing on 100 acres of pitches. 20 
different sports mcludma racquets, 
fives, sailing and golf. Marvellous 
all-weather athletics rack. Drama 
good. too. Art popular. 

Background and atmosphere: 
Founded in 1553 and rebuilt in the 
19th century, it's a gothic mass in 
the centre of the town. Lovely 
chapel which the boys attend tour 
times a week and on Sundays . Boys 
live and eat in houses scattered 
round (ha town, though most are 
very close. Quality of life, say the 
boys, depends on which house 
you're in: some are much stricter 
than others. 

The puptis: Cheerful, polite and 
relaxed, from a wide range of 


Vita) statistics 

Pjp's Appro* 500 boys p-’us 100 
51ns. :n -.Mr torm. Apptox 330 day 
»|S. 290 wee*Jy Scarders; 48 day 
g-ns. 21 weekly {warders. Ages. 13- 
18: C of E: lee-paving 


Head: Mr Davd S-fri-tifSCaie (worn 
May 19B6) Gentfa. civilized. 
rmeuectuaL tainted sportsman. 
Took over from Dr Jam R«, one of 
the most angcia! and controversial 
figures re pus'c s:h«jJ education, 
whoso final vesture was to appoint 
a back grf as head cl scnoci. 

Academic matte re One of the most 
trgn- powered academic scnools m 
the cowintr>. comes regularly re top 
five for A iene! resu's - ail subjects 
9CMQC per ser-i pass with exception 
of geography aeneraL'v consioered 
weakest department Modem lan- 
guages rot 35 strong as it should 
Be . tz quote tcy. Os' .^proving' . 
to gua»e nuste- S: emas. mains 
and English eors.stentty very 
sppng Academic piess-na tremen- 
dous jV c? op nor let up Mi pupil 
sa'ey launched on next rong of 
ladder 

Games, options, the ana: Not so 
hot on these Docs no: centnbute 
much apart Irom rawing tc spenmg 
scene. Though .nds-’on: cncheters 
can se seen j; vv rets 0! weir 
v wem sg-3'7' siav.ng f«Ms on 
picssar.* summer cays. Keen art. 

mui-c. ccoat.nc 

Background and atmosphere: 

Fcunaod 1r62dy d..c«" EMUtteth l 
N-w fr.t c: 'C2‘ c:Mte. ump-L-ca.ly 
1*2 to Wesfrn -stt- Aroey .n wracti 
some senoo’ serv.ces a:e sM: raid 
Cidsierec as an Cxfora college but 
nttisnt 'oast cam - -.ojy. screriy. 
buMn-g at ire seams and the 
boarding r-ouses decioeiv squalid. 
Weekly boarotng system gives at- 
mesphere more of day r*“3r board- 
jig - what is done Cuts<de boarding 
hours is under parents juriGdciion 
for wmch st.it* -rut, grateful 
The pupils: Soitd.y middle-class and 
ol ambitious yuppie parents, marry 
twc-income families, also high 
quota divorced parents. Pupfis 
highly arti^n'ate. social . otten have 
thin veneer o* scphisncation. ner- 
vously bnu-an: and owing 10 
precocity, tricky fc teach. Famous 
clC boys .nciude six prime ministers. 
Tcny Been anc Andrew UoyO 
Webber 

Bottom fine: Fees. £2.075 per term 
boarding (£2,275 Vlth form). £1.350 
day (£1.475). 

Remarks: Do not send your poten- 
tial rugby international here, and do 
not expect your average ad-round 
product - weedy children will get 
weedier. Getting re (appalhngly diffi- 
cult) does not guarantee that your 
child is a genius, but re the drawing- 
rooms of Hampstead and Richmond 
a place at Westminster is rightly 
considered a leap m the right 
.direction. 


WINCHESTER 

COLLEGE 


WINCHESTER. HAMPSHIRE 


Vital statistics 
Pupils 645 bays, about 600 board, 
about 45 day. Ages 13*18. C of E: 
tee- paying 


Head: Mr James Sabben-Oara, 
former second master, took over 
from John Thom • hard act to faltow 
- re September 1985 Generafly 
considered "pleasant" and 
capable 

Academic matters: Traditionally tne 
top acaorerac school m me country 
ana re eon, -early 70s bright boys 
would go here, less gifted brothers 
to Eton. Strfl Immensety strong 
(19B5 results put Winchester sev- 
enth artet Manchester Grammar. 
Eton. etc), but may have lost its 
keen academic edge, posstov ow- 
ing to tendency to inflexibility, 
making for some resentment among 
brightest pupils. Ora Foreign Office 
parent beefed about cavaLer ap- 
proach to modem languages and 
said aid we know so per cent of 
boys take A level maths and only “a 
Iranian take Froncn Teaching 
taigeiy excellent 

Gome*, option*, the arta: Like 
other h.gh-powered schools, it ap- 
pears n forceful re extras as re 
academic matters Has reputation 
of being on lightened cn the subject 
of mainstream garnet, which, after 
the fust yer. are net compitoory- 
tovs m.iy it trwy wish, fish on the 
Itcnen instead Boys choose three 
options dg karate rowing canoe- 
ing stwrpiochnsing fives, racquets. 
bcL-rregreg - ail manner at ex once 
Does nor particulariy pride itself on 
mo a ns nevertheless has good 
muse lively drama 
Background end atmosp h ere: 
Scholars quarters date back to me 
14th centum. 3nd look uke it - pee- 
.ntestec, wen nch woma at sock, 
but hot ppec claimed very comfort- 
ing m winter wrwn an around ts 
freezing Lovely meflow oto OuAfr 
cigs die set in higgledy-piggledy 
quai-.. FcwLng et rustory and con- 
tart w-th past very tangible 
The pupils: Question in school moo 
gives a good idea Name any OW 
who inn, century has been Laid 
Mavnr ol London Editor of The 
Tme j Chairman ol the BBC. Nooei 
pr.zt-wirmer. Foreign Secretary. 
Lota Chanceirof Head of Cml 
Serve* 

Bottom fine: Fees E2.I25 per term 
bearding 

Remarks: The place to go it you 
want 3 classy education out don't 
want to stick voui neck out getting 
it Don t consider Winchester unites 
your son shows signs of real 
academic ability A breeding ground 
ot retenectuat snobbery 


.1 iJunu'J twin The Good 
Schools Guide, u Harpers & 
Queen puNteuiu >n. n 1 he pub- 
iiwetJ /»r t'.bury Prv\\ on 
Ssremher .V fprtiv£ 8 . 95 ). 

( TOMORROW ) 

Benenden to 
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THE TIMES 
DIARY 


™ , Tambo flies 


again 


Tam Dalyedl is not wasting any 
time exploiting his election to 
labour's NEC to force the 
leadership's hand on Westland, 
'one of his consuming obsessions. 
-He has written to Neil Kinnock 
asking for opposition time to 
debate the select committee report 
-on the Westland affair, which 
received only an hour’s discussion 
hi July when it was published the 
day before the parliamentary re- 
cess. He assured me that he wants 
"a lawyers' debate" led by Labour 
QCs John Smith and John Morris 
.rather than a “yah-boo affair 
between Neil and the Prime 
Minister", and he believes Kin- 
nock has no choice but to agree. 
“He will have to ask himself why 
369.000 constituency party mem- 
bers elected me — a pro-gas cooled 
reactor, pro-nuclear reprocessing, 
p^o-EEC Old Etonian — to the 
NEC if not because of my pursuit 
of the Westland affair." be says. 


Testing times 


Delegates to the Tory conference 
will have the chance to display 
their political knowledge in an 
alternative GCSE examination 
dreamt up by the right-wing 
Selsdon group. One sample ques- 
tion from the SGCE (the Selsdon 
Group Certificate of Education): 
Which country do Foreign Office 
officials work for (a) Spain 
.(b) USSR (c) UK (d) Argentina? 
Answer Hot dear, but it doesn't 
appear to be (c). Another Who is 
the leader of the Alliance — David 
SieeL Roy Jenkins. Shirley Wil- 
liams. David Owen? Trick ques- 
tion. this. Answer Nobody. Score 
nine out of ten and your “future 
political career is guaranteed", 
Iain Mays, secretary of the 
Selsdon Group, tells me. 

• Forest the rigfal-to-smoke pres- 
sure group, is taking no dunces 
with its Bournemouth fringe meet- 
ing (speaker Auberon Waugh). No 
nonsense about a cash bar or 
’‘refreshments available", “first 
-380 drinks free" is the mamlugu- 
ous come-on. 


Back door 


When he addresses the Tory 
conference. Nicholas Ridley, the 
Environment Secretary, will. I 
predict, emphasize the need for at 
least one reform: restricting local 
councils' co-option powers. In- 
tended to ensure non-partisan 
expertise, the procedure is now 
used by many left-wing councils to 
pack in supporters who have not 
made it the hard way. Take, for 
example. Labour candidates Am- 
anda Caulfield and Liz White who 
ill May failed to win election to 
Lambeth council; they have just 
found their way on to committees, 
with foil entitlement to travelling 
a[nd subsistence allowances and 
voting rights. Mary Leigh, the 
Tory leader, is spitting: “Both 
stood against me and both lost" 


BARRY FANTONI 



*Onr Jack hated crisps. He only ale 
- them to spire Edwin Carrie' 


Crowning all 


Now we know. The Queen has 
given permission for Princess 
Michael to hang on to the pro- 
ceeds from a TV adaptation of her 
book. Crowned in a Far Country, 
provided some goes to charity. In 
an interview in next month's Good 
Housekeeping she quotes Her 
Majesty as saying “Of course, of 
course, keep the money" when the 
request was put to her. However, 
the princess's publishers tell me 
that, despite the efforts of a high- 
powered agent, the TV company 
to make the series — in which she 
would provide the commentary 
“the way Alistair Cooke and Huw 
Weldon did" — has yet to be 


found. 

Duke’s hazard 

Duke Hussey. Times director and 
BBC chairman designate, had a 
nasty brush with pickets outside 
our building in Grays Inn Road, 
where he still has an office. As he 
got into a waiting car one picket 
slammed the door on his leg hard 
enough to inflict an injury. To the 
surprise of all the blow resulted in 
a metallic dang. The leg was 
Hussey's artifidal one. replacing 
that which he lost at Anzio during 
the last war. “If he had got the 
other one says Hussey, “it would 
have been very painful". 


Net value nil 


How much is Tottenham Hotspur 
star Glen Hoddle worth? Precisely 
nothing, according to the hard- 
nosed businessmen who run the 
dub, the only Football League 
member with a stock exchange 
quotation. It's not that they think 
Glen, or any of his teammates, is 
rubbish; it's just that they don’t 
count them as assets when draw- 
ing up the company balance sheet. 
**Wc write them ail off." says 
chairman Paul Bobroff PHS 


A fairer deal in housing 

by HRH the Duke of Edinburgh 


Food and shelter are the two 
primary requirements of all fam- 
ilies. yet the way they are treated 
could not be more different 
People who are financially dis- 
advantaged are given direct finan- 
cial assistance in the form of 
unemployment, supplementary 
and other benefits. In other words 
the assistance goes directly to 
people in need. 

in housing.- for some not very 
obvious reason, we have inherited 
a system whereby the subsidy goes 

to the cost of the building of. a 
house rather than to the person in 
need of a house. 

Whether this was intended or 
not, the supply of rented accom- 
modation has become restricted to 
local authorities, while house 
ownership is left to the market. 
Quite apart from this, the state of 
repair of a great proportion of our 
stock of housing is most un- 
satisfactory. 

In its report last year, the 
Inquiry into British Housing, of 
which I was chairman, tried to 
analyse the reasons for this state of 
affairs and we came to the 
conclusion — unanimously as it 
happens - that there were a num- 
ber of anomalies in the system. We 
also recognized that these were 
largely due to the accumulation of 
half a century of well-intentioned 
but disjointed legislative mea- 
sures. 

We noted three particular 
points. The virtual disappearance 
of housing for rent on the open 
market tiie absence of any institu- 
tional investment in housing, in 
contrast to such investment in 
almost every other economic 
activity; the feet that owner- 
occupiers were given subsidies, 
through tax relief on mortgage 
interest not available to tenants. 


and that the expenditure on 
repairs and improvements was 
quite inadequate to maintain the 
quality of much of the housing 
stock. 

As' a possible solution to the 
problem of the lack of institu- 
tional and private investment in 
houses for rent the inquiry pro- 
posed a rent regime based on 
capital values. If rents were to be 
linked to the valueof the property, 
then investors would be en- 
couraged to put their money into 
the provision of more and better 
homes for those unable to buy or 
who prefer to rent, perhaps for 
reasons of mobility. 

We proposed that this system of 
assessing rents should apply to all 
landlords, including local authori- 
ties, so as to create fairness 
between all tenants; if some 
council rents were a bit higher, this 
would give the local authorities 
extra resources to provide im- 
proved housing services. 

One of the reasons why house 
ownership has become so popular 
is that buying a house is a form of 
tax-free investment. The many 
economists we consulted ail 
agreed that treating loans for the 
acquisition of property differently 
from any other borrowing dis- 
torted the market and had the 
effect of discouraging private 
investment in producing accom- 
modation for renL Tenants cannot 
offset rents against their tax 
liability, and those wishing to 
purchase land or property to 
provide rented accommodation 
cannot compete with those buying 
for owner occupation. The inquiry 
therefore recommended the phas- 
ing out of this form of tax relief. 

For the less well-off who would 
be affected by the phasing out of 
tax relief on mortgage interest, the 


inquiry proposed the introduction 
of a “needs related housing 
allowance” which would target 
government support specifically 
to those with low or limited 
incomes, irrespective of whether 
they wished to be borne owners or 
tenants. This would replace the 
existing forms of personal sup- 
port including Mortgage Interest 
Relief (MIR). In the current year, 
the Treasury will forgo some 
£4.75 billion in revenue through 
MIR. Redirecting this money to 
the lower income households 
would assist first-time buyers and 
also elderly home-owners who do 
not hold a mortgage and who do 
not have the means to maintain 
and improve their properties. It 
would also help tenants with lower 
incomes to pay their rents. Such 
an allowance -seemed to us a much 
better mechanism for ©suing help 
to those most in need. We noted, 
incidentally, that MIR was of 
most benefit to those who paid the 
highest rates of tax. 

The inquiry also had a number 
of points to make concerning local 
authority bousing. We felt, in 
effect, that the proper role for 
these authorities was strategic 
rather than operational; that they 
should be “enablers and coordin- 
ators" rather than just Landlords: 
that they should be concerned 
with the “common good" rather 
than becoming more involved in 
the bousing market. Meanwhile, 
we felt that local authorities 
should have more freedom to use 
the capital resources they had 
accumulated, principally through 
the sale of council bousing, to 
carry out the urgent upgrading 
needed on so many council es- 
tates. f 

As for as maintenance and 
repairs were concerned, we came 


to the conclusion that many 
owners needed the sort of help 
which housing associations pro- 
vided in their management of low- 
cost housing for sale or rent, 

1 believe that the great value of 
the report was that it tackled and 
diseased, without prejudice, most 
of the current issues affecting the 
housing situation and has led to a 
more uninhibited debate. I think it 
has encouraged people to realize 
that there really is a chance to 
improve housing by using the 
public resources already available 
in this field and by attracting the 
very large sums of institutional 
money which could be drawn into 
bousing for tent if the right 
circumstances were to be created 
It was never likely that such far- 
reaching proposals would be ac- 
cepted overnight, even though the 

report explained carefully that our 
proposed measures should be 
phased in overa period of at least 
ten years. Nevertheless, as more 
and more people discuss our 
recommendations, it seems that 
they are being treated with greater 
sympathy. 

At a recent reunion of the 
■ members of the inquiry, I was 
pleased to note that none of them 
— and they include economists 
and bankers as well as academics 
and housing experts — felt that 
any of the proposals should be 
amended. If this group of people, 
coming from different political 
perspectives, and with different 
housing interests, can reach, and 
maintain, unanimous agreement, 
I feel that there is hope of wider 
acceptance of the possibility of 
change. I can only hope that the 
inquiry has been helpful in 
suggesting the direction which 
these changes might take. 


Conor Cruise O’Brien finds whites less tense as the violence subsides, but 


believes it may be only a lull before the fatal threshold is crossed 


Cape Town 

When leaving Cape Town at the 
end of my last visit, in November 
1985, 1 was given a cushion before 
driving out to the airport. David 
Welsh, my friend and host, ex- 
plained that cars were often stoned 
by young blacks from bridges 
crossing the airport road; if our 
windscreen was shattered, the 
cushion would protect my face . 
from flying glass. 

When I returned in the middle 
of August, David was at the 
airport to meet me. As we drove 
off towards the city. I said: “What? 
No cushion?" “You don’t need 
one any more," he replied “The 
stone-throwers have gone." 


South Africa: 
revolution with 
the brake on 


This is not to imply that South 
Africa is on the road back to 
normality. Far from it. But from 
.iht white point of view, dings 
don't seem to be going downhill 
quite as fast as they seemed to be a 
year ago. Die national state of 
emergency, declared in June, is 
seen as giving whiles a breathing 
space. Violence in the townships 
may be as intense as ever - the 
reporting restrictions make it hard 
to tell — but at least black violence 
against while has not intensified as 
fast as was feared In some places 
it has even receded as from the 
(Tape Town airport road 


Also, and this is my principal 
impression of change, whites seem 
considerably less fragmented Last 
year English speakers, especially 
business leaders, were angry with 
President Botha because his in- 
transigence was felt to be provok- 
ing the imposition of sanctions; at 
the same time, many Afrikaners 
accused him of weakness by 
truckling to foreigners and blacks. 
Now both channels of anger have 
subsided or are directed else- 
where. 



(and some of the first fumbling 
attempts have been abandoned). 

But efforts to make such attacks 
succeed are likely to be intensified 
as the pressures inside the town- 
ships build up. To many people, 
suffering from the constant atten- 
tions of the police, the people who 
can carry the war into the enemy's 
camp will be heroes. And in the 
townships, increasing numbers of 
young blacks have literally no 
other career open to them except 
that of a hero. 

That the threshold will be 
crossed seems probable. That the 
regime's initial response would 
include retaliatory violence, on a 
scale not yet attempted is safely 
predictable. Beyond that, the 
guessing gets more difficult. 


Sweeping reforms 
only under a period 
of martial law 


As far as the cleavage between 
Afrikaners and English speakers is 
concerned this seems to be 
narrowing under the pressures. 
Both now sense a common in- 
terest, a need for the other's help, 
in beating sanctions. Business 
leaders talk less about the im- 
morality of apartheid and Botha's 
unreasonableness and more in- 
dined to talk about such matters 
as harnessing the weakness of the 
rand which pushes up the price of 
imports, to motivate sanctions^ 
busting. Liberals seem somewhat 
numbed by the discovery that 
they, who have always opposed 
apartheid, are now among the 
burets of international anti-apart- 
heid campaigners. They always 
knew they were lonely in South 
Africa: now they know they are 
also lonely in the world at large. 


Nationalists on 
course to win 
the next election 


It has seemed to me. talking to 
some of them in this South 
African spring, that a temptation 
beckons: “If 1 am going to be 
rejected by the outside world 
anyway, might it not be nice to get 
a little less lonely in South Africa 
iiselfTThey are nudged in this 
direction by such things as the 
foreign boycott of South African 
academics, who are among the 
vanguard of the ami-apartheid 
movement. This, incidentally, 
helps the regime's message: “All 
whites in the same boat." 

At the same time. Botha's 
disdainful treatment 1 of the 
Commonwealth eminent persons 
group and of Sir Geoffrey Howe, 
and his declaration of the national 
slate of emergency, show him. to 
his own people, as a tough leader. 
The recent Klip River by-cicciion 
suggested that the National Party 
shou[d win a general election 
comfortably, so one is expected 
fairly soon. It will noi be this year, 
however, but next, to give ihe 
Nationalists further time to sway 
those Afrikaner voters in the 
Transvaal tempted to support the 
far right 


Afrikaners generally seem to be 
gening a bit more bullish again. 
The sharp rise in the price of gold, 
even in the shadow, or perhaps 
because of. sanctions, seems to 
some a symbol of the inherent 
soundness of the economy. That 
feeling is strengthened by a more 
positive Afrikaner view of the 
English-speaking business com- 
munity: no longer seen as “selling 
South Africa short", but increas- 
ingly as moving to put its skills, 
resources, and connections at the 
disposal of the regime (and its own 
interest) in the coming battle 
against sanctions. But more than 
anything else, the mood today 
seems to be governed by a 
recovery of confidence in the 
leadership. 

Although white South Africans 
know they are far from being out 
of the wood, indeed may never get 
out of it. the wood itself now 
appears a little less menacing. 

English speakers unburden 
themselves freely to visitors.' Afri- 
kaners are less easy going, but 
those who will talk often do so in 
an illuminating way. so it is not 
too hard to make a reasonable 
guess at prevailing moods and 
attitudes in the two white commu- 
nities. Not so with blacks, even 
with those educated blades who 
are in most frequent contact with 
whites. Such contacts, under “neo- 
apanheid". are quite common, 
but they tend to be stylized and 
dose to non-contact 

Where black leaders are articu- 
late, in a radally mixed gather- 
ing - as "student leaders" often 
are - they are likely to speak in 
unison, in accordance with the 
current ANC line. They are 
delivering a collective message, 
partidpating in a campaign. Di- 
alogue is just about possible, but 
individuals who may have 
reservations about a particular 
aspect seem expected to remain 
silent Information about moods, 
and variations of moods, is not 
expliritiy conveyed under such 
conditionsu 

My own impression is that the 
black mood for the moment is a 
bit down: in negative concordance 
to the current white mood. That 
apartheid will end. no educated 


Mack can doubt But it looks as if 
the process will be considerably 
more gradual than seemed to be 
the case a year ago. 

Today's black students realize 
they are not about to graduate into 
a post-apartheid world. They are 
going to be looking for jobs in an 
economy which will still be run by 
whites, probably a contracting 
economy — the latter partly a 
result of the demands which they 
and others are now pushing. In 
these conditions, student rhetoric 
must sound a bit hollow, even to 
student ears. And the students 
know that in the eyes of the real 
revolutionaries — the comrades in 
the townships — their own po- 
sition is at best suspect. 

The forces that seem most likely 
ultimately to destroy apartheid are 
accumulating m the townships, 
beyond the control of either 
Pretoria or the ANC headquarters 
in Lusaka. It is estimated that the 
number of black unemployed will 
be around five million by the year 
2000. That number will indude 
many thousands of young men 
who are energetic, intelligent and 
ruthless in the face of continuing 
white supremacy. But other 
revolutionary incentives, less of- 
ten noticed, will also be increas- 
ingly present. 

In such conditions, and for such 
individuals, the only path to 
personal status and power ties 
through a willingness to be seen to 
ran risks in order to inflict damage 
on the white rulers and their 
agents. In the townships, the 
burning necklace has already be- 
come a kind of status symbol: 
emblem of the grisly authority of 
those who can decide who are for 
the revolution and who against 

For the moment it is the black 
agents of white power, or those 
designated as such, who get it 
literally-, in the neck. But people 
are already speaking, laconically, 
of "the threshold": meaning the 
threshold of the white areas. That 
threshold into the white suburbs 
may not soon be crossed; and to 
cross it inflict damage, and get 
back again, would require unusual 
daring and skill. For that reason.- it 
has not yet been seriously tried 


In an earlier article on this page 
I argued that massive repression 
by the regime, involving perhaps 
thousands of black dead, could 
precipitate “limited superpower 
consensus", leading to a blockade, 
an international ultimatum and 
the capitulation of the apartheid 
regime. 

I still think that within the 
bounds of eventual possibility. 
But certainly there are other 
possibilities. In an important re- 
cent book. South Africa Without 
Apartheid: Dismantling Racial 
Domination (Masbew Miller 
Longman. Cape Town) Herbert 
Adam and Kogila Moodley say 
that the white rulers really would 
not have all that much to lose by 
agreeing to elections on a n on- 
racial basis. Such elections would 
result not in whites being 
swamped by a uniformly hostile 
black mass but in the emergence of 
many disparate forces, some of 
which, in the economic field 
especially, would have common 
ground with whites in that they 
would have something to lore, 
which is true of everyone, every- 
where. who has a job. 

All that is so. but I doubt that an 
all-white electorate can ever be 
convinced that it is so. If the South 
African leadership ever vol- 
untarily decides to effect the great 
transition. I think the thing would 
have to be done by suspending the 
constitution and operating under a 
transitory period of martial law. 
The leadership could be con- 
vinced of the need to do that by 
the predictable failure of re- 
pression to restore order, and by 
the reluctant acknowledgement 
that only a new regime, of 
recognized legitimacy, could suc- 
ceed in bringing that transition 
about 

As fra* the white electorate, it 
would, as it were, fell asleep under 
the anaesthetic of martial law and 
wake up under non-racial institu- 
tions. Thai is about the most 
favourable of possible scenarios. 
There are many others. 

I tried out these ideas in an 
address to members of the South 
African Institute of International 
Affairs in Cape Town last week. 
Reactions were mixed, and often 
lively, but generally not dismis- 
sive. I had dinner afterwards with 
three senior members both of the 
Institute and of the Afrikaner 
establishment. My impression was 
that they didn't feel inclined to 
rule out such developments, as a 
line of last resort for Aftik- 
anerdom, but that they did not 
think Afrikanerdom had as yet got 
anywhere near the stage of last 
resort 

In any case, such developments 
seem rather remote. I confess, in 
Cape Town's white suburbs this 
spring. with yei another all-white 
election on the way. But there is 
still uneasiness in the air. No one 
thinks that that symbolic cushion 
may never again be required, at 
the threshold. 


© Ttaw Nwopaparc. 1S86. 


Roger Scraton 


Enslaved by 


the media 


Had il been suggcsied 1 0 me five 
vears ago that a Conservative 
foreign secretary; might lakc part 
in discussions with OlivcrTam^ 
- presideni of the ANC. member 
of the World Peace Council (the 
mosi notorious of all Sov'etjront 
organizations) and apologia for 
organized terror - I would have 
dismissed the suggestion as wholly 
ridiculous. And had it been sug- 
gested that HM Government, 
might mat the ANC not only as a 
legitimate organization but also as 
the principal representative of the 
black people of South Africa, I 
should have supposed mysdf to be 
dealing with a case of advanced 
paranoia. 

To whatever depths of dis- 
honesty and confusion the Foreign 
Office might sink. I would have 
said, it could never be so lnaij- 
ferent to the truth as to overlook 
the distinction between the Xnosa 
and the Zulu peoples, to ignore the 
Leninist nature of the ANC and its 
largely Xhosa leadership, or to 
turn a deaf ear to such statesmen 
as Chief Buthelezi. Bishop Lek- 
anyane and Bishop Mokoena who 
repudiate the ANC and all it 
stands for. 

The feet is. however, that 
western foreign policy towards 
South Africa is now dictated by 
the media and expresses, not only 
the cavernous ignorance which 
that implies, but also the kind of 
rootless awe in the face of violence 
which is the mark of a journalistic 
mind Thai Mrs Mandela incites 
her countrymen to unspeakable 
cruelties; that Oliver Tambo 
works openly for violent revolu- 
tion; that the ANC is a terrorist 
organization, in league with the 
Communist Parry and profoundly 
hostile to western interests — such 
facts, far from exciting fear and 
disgust, exert a morbid fascination 
over the western media, whose 
denizens fall over themselves 
seeking to legitimize this new 
revolutionary movement. 

We have witnessed the phenom- 
enon many times: in the under- 
mining of the Shah; in the 
destruction of American will in 
Vietnam and Cambodia; in the 
encouragement offered to Turkish 
anarchists. At first there is a 
period of reasoned discussion. As 
time wears on. however, outrage 
begins to prevail — for outrage 
plays on our guilty feelings, and 
casts the journalist in a priest-like 
role. At a certain point to accu- 
mulated sentiment attains a criti- 
cal mass, and an uncontrollable 
explosion occurs. Thereafter it 
ceases to be possible to inject into 
the frenzy the grain of good sense 
that would quieten it. 

But the emotion lasts only so 
long as our own guilty feelings. 
Once the blacks of South Africa 


silenced and all opposition to thp 
prevailing terror liquidated m 
accordance with established Len- 
inist procedures. 

Of course, the experts tea m 
that it will be different in South 
Africa. But on what evidence do 
they base this judgement? Is ii 
likely that South Africa win folio* 
the course taken by its nca^a 
neighbours? By Angola, for fa. 
stance, where a government of 
Marxist terrorists is maintained fa 
power by the Soviet-Cuban war 
machine? Or Mozambique, wW 
a one-party dictatorship, ^ 
tained by the secret police, pre- 
sides over a starving populace? Or 
perhaps, by Zimbabwe? 

In fact it is to Zimbabwe that ihc 

experts turn for their preferred 
instance of “peaceful transition” 
So what is Mugabe now promising 
the citizens of bis proposed one. 

party “democracy"? The answer is 
contained in a single communist 
phrase: “socialist legality". **ab 
our laws." Mugabe said rcccmN 
“should be formulated in such a 
manner as would facilitate the 
restructuring of our society fa 
order to construct a Socialist 
state". The Roman-Dutch law. 
long-standing foundation of legal 
order through much of Southern 
Africa - is to be replaced by i 
system in which there will be no 
punishment but only “rehabiliia- 
tion and reorientation of criminals 
and other social deviants". 

Accordingly, the Minister of 
Justice. Eddison Zvogbo. has 
emphasized that the sure will no 
longer be bound by the decision of 
its courts. In other words, there 
will no longer be a rule of law fa 
Zimbabwe. .And where there is no 
rule of law, no individual can 
safely criticize those who hold 
power over him. Hence, under the 
new order promised by Mugabe, 
there will be no place for oppo- 
sition either inside or outside 
parliament. Nor is this surprising 
As the Soviet psychiatrists have 
discovered, nobody in his right 
mind can be opposed to socialism. 
During the transitional period, 


there may be spasmodic outbreaks 
of “social deviance"; but the 


have been "liberated" by Oliver 
lia will be 


Tambo, the media will be as 
indifferent to their sufferings as 
they are now indifferent to those 
of the people of Vietnam, where 
half a million political prisoners 
are held without trial in 150 "re- 
education" camps, where 65.000 
are estimated to have been exe-„ 
cuied since 1975, where the* 
church is persecuted, the press 


facilities will be provided (as they 
have been provided in Vietnam) 
to ensure the "reorientation" of 
those responsible. 

There will be no outcry in the 
western press. By announcing his 
wholehearted commitment to “so- 
cial justice" Mugabe has won the 
respect of the western establish- 
ment. and even an honorary 
doctorate from the University of 
Glasgow, and by loudly decrying 
apartheid, he has proved beyond 
doubt that he is not a racist, so 
facilitating his persecution of the 
people . What matter that he now 
proposes to abolish the rule of 
law — last hated remnant of colo- 
nial oppression? 

It is unfashionable to say it. but 
it may be true, that it is better even 
for a black man to be governed by 
a law in a place where be has no 
vote than to be governed lawlessly 
by a party that allows him to vote, 
but only for itself. 

The author is editor of the Salis- 
bury Review. 


moreover Miles Kington 


GotterDaimerung 

explained 


After its Covent Garden triumph, 
Welsh National Opera is about to 
go on tour with its production of 
Wagner's Ring. Now, many peo- 
ple are uninterested in opera, 
which they consider to be music 
for people who do not like music, 
and many more people do not like 
Wagner, which they consider to be 
music for people who have lost 
their religion, but even they must 
be intrigued by the idea of a Welsh 
version of the Ring. 

For them, and for all who 
cannot get tickets, I am today 
starting a brief resume of the 
Welsh Ring, to be serialized here 
for the next two weeks. 

Act One 

Wotan. the head of a large Welsh 
development company, has re- 
cently completed the construction 
of a huge leisure centre known as 
Valhalle in the mythical Welsh 
valleys. In die nearby hills live the 
gigantic warriors known as die 
Welsh rugby players, while in the 
galleries running beneath the earth 
live the dwarfs who dig up coaL, 
gold and bits of old steam engines. 

As ihe opera opens. Wotan sings 
of the hard struggle be had to raise 
money for the leisure centre, of his 
battle to overcome planning 
objections and of his fears that die 
dwarfs who work in the galleries 
will be too poor to pay to get in. He 
also sings of his recent holiday in 
far-off Spain, of the difficulty of 
understanding Welsh language 
programmes on Channel 4 and of 
the incessant rain. 

Mrs Wotan then enters and asks 
what he is singing about Wotan 
realizes that he has been singing all 
by himself with nobody listening, 
and tells her he will sing it all over 
again. Never mind about that 
says Mrs Wotan. there's someone 
at the door who wants to know 
when he is going to get the money 
he lent you to build Valhalle. 

Act Two 

Enter Mr Yamahoto. president of 
a Japanese car company, who in 
fact iem Wotan £4 million to 
build another car factory in the 
legendary Welsh valleys. He tries 
to get his money back from 
Wotan. Wotan kills him. 

Act Three 
Enter Mr Yamahoto's twin 
brother, the new president of the 
Japanese car company, who ex- 
plains to Wotan in song that it's no 
use killing Japanese car exec- 


utives, as there will always be 
another one along in a minute. 

To stave off Mr Yamahoto’s 
claim, Wotan offers to take him to 
a game of rugby between the giants 
and the dwarfs. He accepts. Mean- 
while a messenger arrives with the 
news that the Severn Bridge, the 
legendary link between Wales and 
England, has been dosed because 
of light drizzle and that nobody 
may leave or enter the country 
save by the railway tunnel built by 
the dwarfs. Wotan forecasts that 
one day the bridge will falL 


Act Four 


Before the rugby match. Terry, 
one of the giants, is found donning 
his magic cloak of invisibility 
which will prevent the referee 
from seeing any foul he commits. 
As be changes, a messenger arrives 
from the lands of the north, 
promising him £70,000 a year to 
play Rugby League. Terry says be 
will think it over during the game, 
and could he have £500 to see him 
through to the final whistle. 

Wotan arrives at the game with 
Mr Yamahoto who says he will be 
prepared to overlook that out- 
standing £4 million if Wotan will 
let him have Mrs Wotan as his 
new wife. Wotan cannot believe 
his ears and thinks there must be a 

mistranslation. Sadly, he is right 
what Mr Yamahoto is saying is 
that Mrs Wotan reminds him of 
the dusk over Fugi Yama. 

Act Five 

The game starts. Within five 
minutes the riant Terry he® 
punched one of die dwarfs in foe 
face, but goes unpenalized because 
of hfa magic cloak. Suddenly a 
hole in the ground opens and a 
troupe of dwarfs emerge from * 
secret gallery beneath the ground, 
to pelt Terry with lumps of coaL 
Soon he is entirely covered with 
coal except for one chink through 
which he pushes a message which 
says: “Don’t worry, 1 Shall be 
playing for Bradford this time nod 
week." The dwarfs set fire to foe 
coaL It starts to rain, which puts 
out the fire. Darkness fells. The 
pubs open. A Welsh merchant 
bank slowly collapses. The act 
ends as Mr Yamahoto asks Wotan 
to demonstrate Welsh rugby ^ or 
him and Wotan (Hits his thumbs 
into Mr Yamahoto’s eyes. 

{Don't miss tomorrow's instalment 
of the Welsh Ringy 


l 


pa vis.- 




run ncur rutuuT ,-- 1 mv i/iivi** 






THE TIMES TUESDAY OCTOBER 7 1986 


17 . 


1 Pennington Street, London El 9XN Telephone: 01-481 4100 


presentation, policy 

. AND the TORY FUTURE 

conftaeSce Ww win taice Mr 
the slickest, smartest anrt m,S5 Heselune’s place this year in 
expensive ever If Lav?,? 051 ?? hearts of the blue-rinse 
offer 1 soot hm a ^ brigade?) There was the West- 


left 


discussions 


^ 7 & s fe an i 

sa ^ not ,o •* 

Prenconference 

concerned with 

inr^r°" R ? nt P°hcies and 
in WT city science schools, with 

the case for Trident and the 
gj? g*™ 1 hospital waiting 
hs^ But justas much talk ha! 
h^n about presentation”, a 

word which, for ah that it is 
now “c of the most en- 
cumbered in the whole politi- 
^ lexicon, is the one which 
representatives seem most to 
wish to hear. 

The rest of the country may 
be forgiven a feeling of ennui. 

'Sreat ‘presentation" de- 
rate, to be begun by the Party 
^hairman, Mr Norman 
1 epbit, in his opening remarks 
today and to be continued in a 
foil session before the Prime 
Ministers speech on Friday, is 
a sceptic’s paradise. 

It is easy to view the pre- 
election parades (of all parties) 
as a chance to find the truth 
behind the carefully arranged 
tinsel. The political fight be- 
comes an extended conjuring 
trick in which the honours go 
to the magician who is least 
often rumbled by his audience. 
Not so much a Party as a party; 
for the serious business of 
politics, it is argued, look 
elsewhere. 

There is a degree of truth 
here. For a true picture of 
Labour it is certainly necessary - 
to look beyond the Blackpool 
roses to the unilateral disarma- 
ment. the financial profligacy 
and the extremists waiting in 
the wings. For a true picture of 
Tory' conferences it is too often 
necessary to decode speakers’ 
real concerns about policy 
from their comfortable state- 
ments about the 
Government's Mure to get its 
message across^ 

'This year at-fiounienibuth, - 
however, rather different prob- . 
lems of presentation have to be 
addressed. They are not the 
problems of the Labour Party.. 
They are not . even, the prob- 
lems of the Conservative Party 
five years ago. 

Mrs Thatcher is not, likeflMr 
Kinnock, a new leader who 
needs to show that the party is 
united behind hen she is an old 
leader who needs to show that 
she is not a one-woman band. 
Nobody can accuse of her of. 
being opposed to consumer 
choice: but when it comes to 
electing a Prime Minister she 
has to counter the charge that 
she is offering just one choice, 
herself and for the third time. 

These are uncharted waters; 
and for much of the year since 
the Party last met at the 
seaside Mrs Thatcher’s Gov- 
ernment has looked perilously 
out of its depth in them. 

There was the Westland 


land fall-out — the U-turns 
over the car industry, the 
defeats on Sunday Trading. 
They _ in turn bad less 
publicised political effects, 
most important the attempt by 
Mr Norman Tebbit to 
monopolise the manifesto- 
making process, to steal the 
chalice of Thatcherism before 
(as he mistakenly saw it) the 
cause of the Conservative right 
became irreparably damaged. 

Since the beginning of the 
Summer, matters have to 
some extent improved. The 
polls show Labour still Ming 
to break through and the 
Alliance on the retreat. Mrs 
Thatcher has ^established con- 
trol over her Party head- 
quarters. Mr Tebbit is back in 
the fold. 

The Cabinet is more united 
than it has been for many 
years. There seems to have 
been some genuine synthesis 
in the Tories’ divergent faiths: 
the radicals sounding less hos- 
tile to the role of the State, the 
consolidators sounding more 
happy to embrace the 
Government's achievements. 

Yet it has to be said that so 
for it is a somewhat subterra- 
nean synthesis. It has to be 
understood by all members of 
the Cabinet that the future 
direction of Conservative 
Government is still undear. 
The Government lacks not so 
much cohesion as coherence. 
That is the issue which the real 
"presentation debates” (the 
ones in the corridors, not the 
conference hall) have to ad- 
dress. 

Some part of the problem is 
the political role to be played 
by the Prime Minister herself 
In the past ten years she has 
identified herself strongly with 
consumer power, with an end 
to ramming down the 
customer’s neck whatsoever 
the producer wanted to pro- 
vide, with ih& beguming of the 
process (viz, Jaguar and British 
Airways) of kicking the 
country’s producers tin they 
provide what the consumer 
wants to buy. 

This has worked. Union 
members have grown sus- 
picious of union bosses. Mil- 
lions more families have 
chosen their own homes and 
their own share portfolios. 
Supermarket shoppers have 
become more choosy. But they 
are also becoming more 
choosy in the supermarket of 
political policies, where Mrs 
Thatcher is more associated 
with giving the customer what 
she thinks is right than giving 
what the customer wants. 


period of comparative stability 
electors concentrate on their 
shopping lists. They look for 
better schools, better health 
services, a better deal for the 
poor - areas where the polls 
reveal Mrs Thatcher to be no 
great personal asset 
The electorate is by its very 
nature uqgratefiiL It has a large 
number of political choices to 
turn to. There are Liberal 
answers, SDP answers in 
profusion. Labour answers, all 
with a smack of novelty. There 
is a growing band of floating 
voters, playing in a three party 
game where rules and results 
are unclear. 

The Conservatives have to 
make sure that there are 
Government answers ' too. 
That will not necessarily be 
easy. To say that consumers 
are volatile in their choices is 
not to say that they are 
consistently volatile or that 
they cannot be loyal to their 
new choices. Those many who 
have decided that Labour has 
the best policies on the Health 
Service may retain that belief 
until the reality of Labour 
government has proved other- 
wise. Much time, opportunity 
and territory has already been 
lost. 

To make up ground, for 
example on education and 
training, it is vital that the 
Government is seen as a team 
of coordinated individuals not 
of cowed ciphers. To consoli- 
date what has been regained it 
is equally vital that the Party is 
not satisfied with one 
presentational tour-de-force 
by Mr Kenneth Baker. The 
Conference slogan is "The 
Next Move Forward”. There 
are many hard moves ahead. 

Unlike Labour’s advertising 
men,Saatqhi& Saaichi do not. 
have to struggle to deceive the 
public about the very nature of 
the product on offer. They do 
not have to distract attention 
from rotten nuts in the politi- 
cal chocolate bar. The appro- 
priate analogy is not with 
consumer advertising at alL 
The marketing of Mrs 
Thatcher is more akin to 
making corporate images of oil 
majors or drug giants. Such 
campaigns are some of the 
baldest to devise. Their effi- 
cacy is the most doubtful; the 
prizes the greatest. 

The conference will hear 
Government ministers give a 
daily list of head-line grabbing 
proposals — as demanded by 
Mr Tebbit It will be told that 
the defeat of inflation is not 
just a victory in itself but a 
proof that the Government 
delivers its promises. 

The country, however, 
needs to hear more than that 
It needs to know that the 


Strong leadership can easily ' Conservative leadership has 


become tiresome if there are 
no new issues — no FalMands, 
no miners’ strike, no double- 
digit inflation, no winters of 
discontent — to make the 
voters grateful for ft. In a 


long-term promises that are 
worth making, that it has a 
vision of the future, a vision 
that of necessity will not be 
made reality by the Prime 
Minister alone. ■ 


AN ACT OF WORSHIP? 


urcb of England has to 
i live with its divisions 
ling women priests for 
- as it takes for the 
i to be resolved. It is 
og plain that this will 
b considerable 

cation in the arts of 
lanagemem. That such 
iave yet to be fully 
s well illustrated both 
weekend’s events and 
ions to them. 

Archbishop of Canler- 
fr Robert Runcie, has 
stated his "dismay” at 
ibration by a woman 
of the Church of 
[*s most sacred rite, 
>nununion, in Churcn 
Westminster, ui the 
of the annual general 
of the Movement for 
j n at ion of Women* 

Movement for 
ion of Women is 
a proscribed 
ation: indeed the 
, of church members, 
Runcie himself, share 
apal aim. Given that 
sfo- from astonishing 
l# should want an act ot 

in the course of their 

that it should be a 
ion Of the Eucharist, or 
ey should seek" an 
I woman as the cele- 
■heir choice of venue. 

■ suggests at foe 
Writable willingness to 
barrassing the church 
ies. 

[lurch authorities were 

sensed with a disagree- 
iice. If they did no*- 
!V risked seeing the 
,-ynodical govem- 
1 But reacting 


strongly might look like a 
needlessly heavy handed atti- 
tude to sincere dissent And 
that is what has happened. By 
taking the latter course, the 
Archbishop has handed the 
Movement s propaganda vic- 
tory and multiplied the pub- 
licity for its cheeky tittle coup; 
and having ordained an in- 
vestigation, he will be under 
pressure to back up Ins. strong 
words with strong action. 

The grounds of his dismay 
are their “disregard for the 
clearly understood present 
regulations” rather than the 
place they chose for it, which 
seems to commit him' to the 
wider battle. Clandestine Eu- 
charists by women priests are 
spreading, as the Movement 
has threatened they would. 

Dr. Runcie might be unwise 
to try to stamp them out, if 
that is the intention behind his 
words. Such movements 
thrive on suppression. Nor is it 
by any means as dear as he 
stated it that a woman lawfully 
ordained elsewhere in the An- 
glican Communion breaks any 
regulation she is bound by, 
when on visiting or becoming 
resident in England, she cele- 
brates a private Eucharist 

That, indeed, offers Dr 
Runcie a way out of Ms 
dilemma. What after all, is the 
basis for the claim of jurisdic- 
tion oyer her? There is no 
longer any law to stop another 
denomination worshipping 
predsely as ft pleases, nor to 
stop Anglicans participating in 
such services. The Church of 
England may well say th^stre 
is not acting as an official 
minister of foe Church of 



.England; but that is all it may 
say. On that at least' women 
priests and their supporters 
would agree. 

Nevertheless the Movement 
would do well to avoid using 
“private” services of Holy 
Communion as a battering 
ram to break down the walls 
surrounding the male priest- 
hood. To do so would be to 
belittle and degrade the Eu- 
charist itself It is a good 
instinct that shies away from 
any political or campaigning 
use of such holy rites as these, 
for the sake of protecting their 
sacredness. A good test would 
be to ask before any such 
celebration — and before any 
countering protest' or ex- 
pression of dismay - whether 
it may be bringing the service 
of Holy Communion itself 
into controversy and even into 
disrespect 

As things stand, it is by no 
means yet certain that the 
Church of England will one 
day admit women to its. min- 
isterial priesthood, and the 
theological debate has not yet 
reached a conclusive result So 
far the case has been subjected 
to the test of argument and to 
testing by synodical majority, 
wMch is an essentially intellec- 
tual and political process. - 

Supporters of women’s 
ordination argue that although 
changes in the beliefs and 
practices of the Christian tra- 
dition have sometimes oc- 
curred that way, they have also 
come about by rule-breaking 
in the- name of a higher duty. 
They should note, however, 
that unseemliness in pursuing 
their aims may lead to tactical 
victories but strategic defeat. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Remaining doubts on prosecution 


From Lord Scarman 
Sir. You are clearly right in 
commenting (third leader, Octo- 
ber 2) that prosecuting in England 
and Wales has now undergone a 
sea Change- 

Some of us wonder, however, 
whether the process of criminal 
trial and appeal is even yet 
sufficiently supported by our pre- 
trial procedures. Until the recent 
reforms introduced by the Police 
and Criminal Evidence Act 1984 
there was in our system a dan- 
gerously low level of supervision 
of the processes of arrest, 
interrogation, and charge. Even 
today the critical phase, interroga- 
tion. is in reality conducted and 
supervised only by the police 
within a police station. 

The trial and appeal process, 
which is open and judicial, has 
shown itself an uncertain in- 
strument for uncovering irregular- 
ities. and worse, in the pre-trial 
process. And judges, confronted at 
trial for the nisi time with medical 
or scientific evidence, have not 
always been able to detect its 
weaknesses. 

There is in our pre-trial proce- 
dures even today fertile ground for 
the development of injustice 
which can, and sometimes does, 
escape detection during the 
subsequent trial and appeal pro- 
cess. The Confab case, to which 
you refer, is a good example: and 
there would appear to be grounds 
for querying the justice of the 
convictions in the Guildford 
bombing case and in the Maguire 
explosives case. 

- These cases were under the old 
law. Can we be sure that the 
reforms in police procedure and in 
prosecution will suffice? I am not 
sure. Meanwhile, let us consider 


the possibility of judicial control 
of the pre-trial process, as in 
France mid other civil taw coun- 
tries. 

The cry of “inquisition" wiD go 
up. Maybe, however, an in- 
quisition process in the control of 
a judge is the logical conclusion to 
the welcome reforms of the last 
few years. 

I am. Sir, vour obedient servant, 
SCARMAN. 

House of Lords. 

October 3. 

Shortage of lawyers 

From Mr Peter Britton 
Sir. The failure of the crown 
prosecution service 10 recruit suf- 
ficient solicitors for the London 
area, as reported in Frances Gibb's 
article (September 23) may not 
just be due to insufficient 
remuneration. 

Many of your readers may not 
be aware that crown prosecutors 
will not be permitted to practise 
their skills in the crown courts. 
They will be expected to take all 
the responsibility for the admin- 
istration and preparation of crim- 
inal cases, but there has been no 
commensurate extension of their 
rights of audience. 

It is therefore perhaps hardly 
surprising that the limitations of 
the service as a meaningful career 
to solicitor advocates, coupled 
with the comparatively low levels 
of salary on offer, should create a 
shortage of suitable applicants for 
the posts available. 

Yours faith fully. 

PETER BRITTON, 

Windy Ridge. 

Brow of the Hill, 

Leziate. 

King's Lynn, Norfolk. 


Silent service 

From Rear-Admiral J. R. Hill 
Sir, David Giles in his letter 
(September 30) was wo doubt right 
in saying that the Soviet Navy has 
made advances in quietening its 
submarines and will make more. 
Bui his inference that this would 
make the British Trident force 
vulnerable does not follow. 

Western ballistic missile sub- 
marines have always been de- 
signed to be quiet, acid 
improvements continue. More to 
the point though, they can and do 
operate quietly. 

There is a world of difference 
between the detectability of a 
submarine that is being operated 
to avoid detection — the habitual 
mode of the ballistic missile 
submarine — and that of a 
submarine being employed tac- 
tically to seek out and destroy 
opposing forces, and haviogto use 
noisy speeds and unfavourable 
depths in consequence. 

Silencing of Soviet ballistic 
missile submarines win of course 
decrease their own detectability 
but as has been pointed out in 
recent academic work, this tends 
to increase the stability of the 
overall strategic balance rather 
than reduce iL Silencing of Soviet 
tactical submarines will help them 
hardly at all in their thankless task 
of searching the vast ocean spaces 
that a Trident boat can effectively 
occupy. 

A dialogue of the silent is no 
more effective than a dialogue of 
the deaf. 

Yours faithfully, 

RICHARD HILL 
Cornhin House, 

Bishop's Waltham, Hampshire. 
October 2. 

From Vice-Admiral Sir Ian 
McGeoch 

Sir, Mr David Laurent Giles is to 
be congratulated, surely, on bring- 
ing to public attention — especially 


during the political conference 
season — that characteristic of the 
submarine-launched ballistic mis- 
sile system in which its unique 
power as a deterrent to nuclear 
attack resides, namely its capacity 
for concealment. 

It is the one and only strategic 
nuclear weapon system which 
cannot be pre-emptively attacked 
with the precise timing and cer- 
tainty of success without which it 
is inconceivable that, even in 
theory, such an attack would ever 
be launched. This is midear 
deterrence par excellence. 

Does anyone believe that if the 
Japanese had been thought, let 
alone known, to possess an in- 
destructible nuclear weapon retal- 
iatory system the Americans 
would have dropped the A-bomb 
on Hiroshima? 

- The silencing of Soviet sub- 
marines to the same degree as our 
own (and comparison in this 
respect is both complex and 
dubious) could not guarantee to 
the Soviets the ability to knock out 
even one Trident submarine on 
patroL, the existence of which 
would, on the other hand, guar- 
antee for Britain powerful leverage 
in the arms control negotiations 
which must surety be pursued, for 
all our sakes, in the name of 
national security. 

Would it not be wise, therefore, 
to begin by seeking the elimina- 
tion of all the nudear weapon 
systems, airborne, land-based, or 
sea surface-based which, because 
they may be pre-emptively at- 
tacked, are deployed in equivalent 
strength by both sides and hence 
do nothing to compensate for the 
unfavourable balance of Nato’s 
conventional forces vis a vis those 
of the Warsaw Pact? 

Yours faithfully, 

IAN McGEOCH. 

Southerns, 

Castle Hedingham, 

Halstead. Essex. 

September 30. 


Dissidents in gaol 

From the General Director of 
Keston College 

Sir, After presenting an im- 
peccable argument in its first two 
columns, your leader (October 2) 
on tbe “East-West trade" in 
human lives goes off the rails in its 
final section. 

Few readers will fail to share our 
distaste at tbe principle behind 
this bargaining. In 1978 two 
Soviet spies were worth five high- 
profile, human-rights activists in 
jail. In 1986 one Soviet spy is 
worth one innocent American and 
one top dissident. The price has 
come down slightly. 

However, your claim that “the 
Gorbachov leadership has increas- 
ingly sent inconvenient individ- 
uals into emigration. There will be 
fewer and fewer people for the 
Kremlin to trade in future” is 
incomprehensible. 

There are, at the very least, 400 
religious activists still in prison or 
exile, some serving a second, or 


even a third, consecutive term 
without release. Among them 
there are many prominent names 
from the 1970s, and indeed tbe 
1960s, such as the Russian Ortho- 
dox priest, Fr Gleb Yakunin, the 
Ukrainian layman, losyp Terelya, 
and the Lithuanian Catholic 
priest, Fr Sigjtas Tamkevicuis. 
They all support the Helsinki 
principle of religious liberty. 

Besides them there are still 
thousands of political prisoners 
who must be hard put to it to 
perceive any way at all in which 
“the scene is changing". The 
Helsinki Agreement is the most 
specific charier they know, but 
under this they have for more than 
a decade sought precisely these 
generalized rights for which your 
leader calls. 

Yours faithfully. 

MICHAEL BOURDEAUX, 
General Director, 

Keston College, 

Heathfield Road, 

Keston. Kent 
October 2. 


Personal affront 

From Lieutenant R. R. Best RN 

Sir. Mr J. M. Meade’s letter 
(October 2) concerning the usage 
of tbe personal pronoun with 
regard to ships shows a degree of 
ignorance not uncommon to those 
outside the seagoing fraternity. 

The use of signals such^as “I 
have lost my steering gear" or “I 
have nm aground" refer to the 
intentions and actions of the ship 
as represented by her command- 
ing officer. Thus the personal 
pronoun is entirely appropriate m 
these drcumstances. 

Furthermore, it is long estab- 
lished nautical practice to refer to 
ships as “she" and the qualities 
they possess as “hers". This 
reflects the interest. and_ often 
unique character of the vessel ■ 
Yours aye, 

RUSSELL BEST. 

Commanding Officer, 

HMS Mentor, 

BFPO Ships. 

October 2. 


Sale of vicarages 

From The Archdeacon of Exeter 
Sir, I assume that your correspon- 
dent the Reverend J. W. Masting 
(September 27) would wish us to 
see the former rectory now used as 
a school by the Rajneesh sect as a 
typical example of a generally 
attractive bouse well integrated 
with the parish church. 

The Church m the countryside 
undoubtedly has to cope with 
substantial problems, but these 
will not be solved by asking men 
to live in houses the diocese 
cannot afford to maintain, the 
Clergy cannot afford to heat, and 
their wives find an intolerable 
burden to keep dean. 

Those such as Mr Masding, who 
seek to take us back to a golden age 
which did not exist, actually 
discourage the Church from realis- 
tically assessing and coping with 
its current problems. 

Yours faithfully. 

JOHN RICHARDS. 

12 The Close, 

Exeter. 

Devon. 


Controversy on 
student loans 

From the Principal of St David’s 
Cniversity College. Lampeter 

Sir. It is to be regretted that the 
Committee of Vice-Chancellors 
and Principals has now agreed to 
support the principle of a mixed 
system of student grants and 
loans. They mas well find that this 
is tie thick end of the wedge. 

1 say this carefully, since your 
comment (leading article, Septem- 
ber 25) immediately assumes tbe 
next logical step 

It «ould be a positively good thing if 
loans persuade them (students) to 
compare tbe relative tong-term 
advantages of different courses - 
especially since courses attracting 
commercial sponsorship will gain a 
relative advantage 
Universities will then be under 
increasing pressure to offer 
courses designed to attract 
commercial sponsorship and. by 
giving or withholding their lar- 
gesse. commercial companies will 
increasingly control both univer- 
sity admission policies and course 
contents. 

It would be naive to imagine 
that commercial companies win 
sponsor anything but commer- 
cially valuable courses or subjects, 
and students* freedom of choice 
will be artificially restricted. I 
would be interested to hear from 
any commercial company pre- 
pared to sponsor a student to toad 
a degree in classics, or Welsh, or 
philosophy, or theology. 

We are assured that Mr 
Kenneth Baker is “not overlook- 
ing the sponsorship of students by 
employers". Perhaps he. and they, 
would attempt an answer to a 
question which perplexes me: how 
many philosophers does the State 
need? 

I am, yours truly. 

BRIAN MORRIS. Principal. 
University of Wales. 

St David's University College. 
Lampeter, Dyfed. 

From the Principal and Vice- 
Chancellor of the L'nirersity of 
Strathclyde 

Sir, It is important that those who 
resist loans should understand the 
motives of those who advocate 
them. For most of us, they are a 
part ofa strategy to make possible 
the admission of many more 
students into higher education. 

They are intended to address 
the realities of the present finan- 
cial problem of students. They are 
intended to reduce the depen- 
dence of students on parental 
contributions. They are intended 
to increase tbe independence of 
students and universities gen- 
erally. 

The most damaging aspect of 
higher education in. Britain re- 
mains the low participation rate. 
To improve that, we need also to 
widen the basis on which univer- 
sities, polytechnics and colleges 
are funded, even if that is at some 
sacrifice to those already in the 
lifeboat. 

Yours sincerely, 

GRAHAM HILLS, 

Principal and Vice-Chancdlor, 
University of Strathclyde, 
McCance Building, 

16 Richmond Street, Glasgow. • 

Sr Robert Helpmann 

From Mr Leo Kersley 
Sir, Those of us who during tbe 
thirties regarded Helpmann and 
Turner as tbe two original bright 
rising stars in the British firma- 
ment of male dancers who made 
their names outside the confines 
of the Ballets Russes must have 
been pleased to see the generous 
coverage given to mark the death 
of Sir Robert in Sydney aged 77 
(Obituary. September 29). 

Two matins of feci, however, 
need comment for tire sake of 
posterity and also one matter of 
opinion, more important. Hist, 
Helpmann was never, during the 
war, “reserved as being 
indispensable". Miss (now Dame 
Ninette) de Valois was adamantly 
against asking for any male dancer 
to be exempted from war service. 

She was fortunate in having 
available Helpmann, who was 
Australian, Gordon Hamilton 
(ditto), Alexis Rassine, from 
South Africa, and David Paltenghi 
(a Swiss national), and with them 
she managed to survive the call-up 
of such dancers as Ashton. Somes, 
Ellis, Newman, Hart, Field, Carter 
and many others who were taken 
without “reservation” of any kind. 

Secondly, Helpmann only took 
leading puts “to which be was not 
naturally suited” when absolutely 
necessary: be danced the Bloc Boy 
in “Les Patineurs" twice only 
when illness would otherwise have 
caused a change of programme. 
He only danced “The Wise 
Virgins” six times in alL 
what some of us, however, who 
knew Bobby since the mid-thirties 
will be unhappy about is your 
obituary's extremely spiteful and 
superfluous comments on 
Helpmann's private life. I worked 
for the same company during the 
war years and can state from 
experience that whoever hap- 
pened to be a favoured compan- 
ion, this never in any way affected 
tire casting of his ballets, as I and 
other (married) men could bear 
witness (in contradistinction to 
some other choreographm I 
might cite). 

And insofar as "proselytising" 
goes, whenever I saw Bobby he 
was always surrounded by a mass 
of attractive young persons of both 
sexes all trying to get off with him 
(some with mote success than 
others, naturally). 

“An amusing companion, with 
an abundance of wit and feniasy"? 
Is that how we are expected to 
remember Bobby, having swal- 
lowed your previous put-down? 
Yours more in sorrow etc, 

LEO KERSLEY, 

Harlow Playhouse, 

The High. 

Harlow. Essex. 



OCTOBER 7 1892 

Shutters were closed in London 
when the death of Lord Tennyson 
(1809 92) became kronen. Pnci 
Laureate since the death of 
Wordsworth in 1850. he was 
buried in Westminster Abbey. A 
volume of kis poems, the proofs of 
which he had revised shortly 
before his death, uxu published 
posthumously 


DEATH OF 
LORD TENNYSON 






fr- 


it is with tbe deepest regret, a 
regret that will be felt throughout 
the whole of the English speaking 
world, that we announce the death 
of Lord Tennyson, which look 
place very early yesterday morning, 
at his house at Aldwnrth, near 
Haslemere... 

With the sanction of Lord 
Tennyson’s family wc are privi- 
leged to publish the foilowms 
account of Dr. Dabbs uf the 
Laureate's last illness:- 

“For some time he had been, if 
mu exactly ailing, insecure as ti* his 
general health. Sir Andrew Clark 
sounded the first note of alarm 
some months ago. and all of us were 
keenly alive to the necessity for 
extra care ... It w*a evident that 
the debility was rapidly increasing, 
and that the end was merely a 
question of time. Tbe tendency to 
fatal syncope may be said to hair 
really commenced about 10 a Jtn. on 
Wednesday, and on Thursday, 
October 6, at 1-35 a.m. the great 
poet breathed his last. 

''Nothing could have been more 
sinking than the scene during the 
lut few hours. On the bed a figure' 
of breathing marble, flooded and 
bathed in the light of the ftiU moon 
streaming through the oriel win- 
dow; his hand clasping the Shake- 
speare which he had asked for but 
recently, and which he had kept by 
him to the end; the moonlight: the 
majestic figure as he fey their, 
'drawing thicker breath', irmnt 
iblv brought to our minds hia own 
'Passing of King Arthur 1 . Hia last 
conscious words were words of love L 
addressed to his wife and son - 
words too sacred to be written 
here . . .“ 

THE POETS LIFE AND WORKS 
... He lived to a good old age; he 
did great and imperishable work; 
hia name had long been a charmed 
household word around the hearths^ 
and m the heart* of his a dmiring ^ 
countrymen, for he was eminently, 
the poet of the CeetingB and the 
affections; and if he cared for lower, 
honours and for riches, he had wont 
enough of both to satisfy hi* I 
ambition. The greatest or most| 
conspicuous men are often the 
least to be envied; but we should, 
say that few lots were more 
enviable than his. The son of a 
clergyman in affluent circum- 
stances, life from the first was' 
made smooth and pleasant to him; 
From the first he found defight in " 
congenial vocation; and his genius 
became his philosopher and gukkrJ-~ 
in the boundless realms of thef 
fancy. When most boys are drudg- 
ing at ttbe gradus. or beginning toF 
labour over the grindstone of La tire * 
verse, he wrote flowing poetry,' 
which is readable and was full of ■ 
promise for the future. The prom- 
ise was promptly recognized by 
those who were nearest and dearest" >'• 
to him; and he had never to 
complain of that lack of encourage- 
ment which may chfll the suscepti- 
ble temperament of the poet 
Perhaps the excessive partiality o£ 
his friends, though the triumphs of 
the future justified their foresight, 
may have helped to provoke the 
severity of unkindly critics. Yef 
many an aspiring and self-confi- 
dent poet would have given much 
to secure such universal notice as 
was speedily bestowed upon Ten* 
nyson. Susceptible be might be; 
like all refined and original spirits; 
but nature had gifted him witi\ 
sterner qualities as well. He had a 
self-confidence which some pro- 
nounced over-weening, and a reao, 
lute devotion to his art which rose 
superior to satire ... At one time. I 
he seemed to stand at “the parting! - 
of the ways"; and a weaker man | 
might have chosen the worse, ■ 
which would have led him down-] 
wards towards fluent mediocrity. 
Tennyson at that critical turning 
point gave proof of his good sens* 
and worldly wisdom. On calmed 
thought Ire profited by the stinging 
criticisms which had provoked him 
at first into indiscreet outbursts of 
temper ... He meditated and la* 
bound over his graceftilly polished 
work; each melodious line and 
measured couplet was the deliber- 
ate expression of his feelings; be 
wrote slowly and published leisure-, 
ly. The rich exuberances of fancy, 
were lopped and pruned; his deep- 
est sentiments were seldom ob^ 
Bcure; the loftiest flights of hi& 
philosophical mysticism rarely car- 
ried him beyond reach of th^ 
perceptions of his intefligem, 

worshippers ... 


. s 


.-i> 


Scanning die portents ’ 

From Mr Geoffrey Hall 
Sir. The reference (Dr Glces£ 
September 27) to the widespread; 
practice of testing a patient^ 
intellectual faculties by question- 
ing him about the identity & 
current heads of state reminded 
me of my father's examination, 
some years ago. V 

When asked the name of thq 
prime minister he replied: “I’m 
afraid I don't know, but i cat}, 
easily find out for you.” 

Yours faithfully, 

GEOFFREY HALL 

Cleeve Cottage. f 

Milford. Stafford. 

. '4 

Time and place J 

From Ms Sarah Houghton n 
Sir. Last Friday, on a bus in Baker 
Street, I solved chw 8 down 
“Sherlock Holmes”. I wonder 
whether your readers have exany- 
pics of similarly appropriate loca- 
tions? ^ 

Yours faithfully, 

SARAH HOUGHTON, 

31 Canfield Gardens. NW6. • ■> 

September 29. 


L 

0 


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18 


THE TIMES TUESDAY OCTOBER 7 1986 


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haste 

ctack 
runs 
tionp 
assoc 
jemoi \ 


Jann 


iThefoi 

iccentridi 

juesfionn 
jy the 
question i 
stay pern 
Kingdom: 
xpect toi 
or lOyeai 


Loy; 

Among 
against 
pool last 
West Dc 
particuh 
school, i 
charity i 
rates. ** 
Sherbor 
pte in * 
sidizing 
he said, 
case of 1 
for Dan- 
school. 


Edited by Matthew May 


COMPUTER HORIZONS/1 


The drive for 
better links 


■ Eight leading European computer firms 
have formed a company to try to hetothe push 
towards a set of common standards for 
linking different types and brands of computer- 
related equipment Called SPAG Services— 
based on the membership by the companies of 
Europe's Standards Promotion and 
Application Group — it wffl develop testing 
services with the aim of showing users that 

future information-technology products from 
different manufacturers will work with each 
other and conform to ISO standards. 

The companies involved are I CL, Olivetti, 
Siemens. Bull, Nixdorf. Philips, Thomson and 
Stet. 





Hong Kong gets a £5m Big Bang 

By Maggie McLening SB* ^5 /ASj.’ ^ ^ 

I nnrtnn Cfni.b Cv_ 





: .f ml* 4 * 


« mm 


As the London Stock Ex- 
change makes its final 




preparations for ihe Big Bang 
financial deregulation of the 





financial deregulation of the 
City at the end of this month 
Ihe Hong Kong stock ex- 
change is gearing up for a 
similar change of its own 


perhaps even more significant 

for British technology. 


for British technology. 

The new Hong Kong ex- 
change officially opened for 
trading yesterday equipped 
with a £5 million computer 
system, designed and supplied 
by Jardine Logica, a company 


Back to school hours 


■ The shortage of trained people for 
technology careers has led the University of 
London to set up a degree course geared 
specially for non-workTng parents with children 
at school. Run by Goldsmiths' College, the 
part-time course in Mathematical Studies will 
run for three days a week within school 
hours, allowing parents time to drop and collect 
children from school. 


It probably means we're in for more violent 
systems* crashes* 


jointly owned by Logica and 
Jardine. Matheson. 




•iii> 


COMPUTER BRIEFINQ 


What’s in a midframe? 


Dr Marion Kimberley, head of the 
mathematical sciences department at 
Goldsmiths', said: “Britain desperately 
needs more technically skilled people. Only 
about 15 per cent of our young people go on 
to higher education, compared to nearly 50 per 
cent in the United States. - Entrance 
requirements for the course, which will indude 
computer science and operational research, 
are decribed as flexible, with refresher courses 
available. 

• Details: 01-027171, extension 2219. 


■ Sperry, now a subsidiary of Burroughs, 
has introduced a “midframe" computer which it 
describes as combining the operating 
advantages of a mainframe with the ease of 
use of smaller systems. It is the first product 
to use a new chip set developed by Speny that 
depends on just six chips to provide 
mainframe power. 


Jardine. Matheson. 

The exchange chairman. Dr 
Ronald Li. says be intends to 
turn it into the financial centre 
of Asia, which could make it a 
permanent and expanding 
showcase for British technol- 
ogy in the Far East 

The newly-unified Hong 
Kong stock exchange is a 
merger of the Far East. Kow- 


am».SE«tn kt •£'.**- ■»’•-• 


FINANCIAL 


Four models are being introduced, ranging 
from a single processor — with up to 12 
megabytes of main storage and uo h 


megabytes of main storage and up to eight 
170 megabyte disk drives - to a multi- 


processing system with four processors. 
Prices start at £150,000. 


Funding for Al 

■ The Manpower Services Commission is 


Electronic PO 


£&2 million on developing artificial 


The money 


nee (Al) systems to help in training, 
ney, which wHI be spent between 19 


and 1990. is to go towards projects 
demonstrating the use of Al and developing 
training programmes using them. 
Developments in artificial intelligence are 
opening up new training possibilities, said the 
MSC chairman Bryan Nicholson, but he has 
warned that Britain's spending in the area was 
a drop in the ocean com pared with the £500 
million of the Japanese. 

He said: “We cannot hope to match that 
investment in terms of scale so we must ensure 
that the lessons learned in one industry are 
passed on to others." 


[with the £500 


■ The Post Office has made some tentative 
links with the growing electronic mail business, 
in a joint venture with the modem 
manufacturer, Dowty, the Royal Ma3 has 
announced a service which fete micro 
computer users send messages to telex and 
facsimile machines, or even people who do 
not have any equipment 
The software has been designed by Dowty ' 
for tie IBM PC and compatibles, as well as the 
British-built Apricot Information is 
transmitted to a central Intefpost facility, which 
will then deliver the message in a variety of 
ways, depending on how much the customer 
wants to pay. 

• Details: Telephone 0635 33009. 


loon. Kam Ngan and original 
Hong Kong Exchanges which 
will have more than 900 
dealers. 

Unlike the London Stock 
Exchange.- Hong Kong has 
never discriminated between 
brokers and jobbers, so its Big 
Bang exercise hinges mainly 
on the introduction of 
computers. Eight hundred 
booths have been equipped 
with monitors and custom- 
built dual-mode terminals de- 
signed by Logica's engineering 
and systems group linked to 
nine fault-tolerant computers 
from Tandem. 

The keyboards are unusual 
in that they do not include any 
alphabetic characters, m the 
interests of speed, displaying 
Chinese characters on high- 
resolution monitors. 

Brokers can access up to 400 
pages of information, using a 





:..*1 *** 




The new Hong Kong stock exchange: A possible showcase for British technolog}' in the Far East • 

system, about remain on the floor and to 20 most active shares is, market, equivalent to over. 
vl-c the current retain limited hours of trading however, under consideration the-counter. i f it i s approved 
rry listed stock, because they believe this and may be introduced later as by the government. HandHi)| 


s 


teletext-based system, about 
the top 20 stocks, the current 
status of every listed stock, 
and general financial statis- 
tics. Response times average 
three quarters of a second and 
this has the advantage of not 
slowing -down with more users 
because it is a broadcast 
system. 

Computerization has been a 
compromise between technol- 
ogy and tradition. In theory, 
brokers could run their entire 
business from outside the 
building, performing all trans- 
actions on line, but the ex- 
change and the securities 
commission wanted dealers to 


ERICSSON AMBASSADORS 


OTHER COMPUTER DEALERS 











Take a business problem to the average 
computer dealer, and hell probably offer you 
a computer. 

But take it to an Ericsson Ambassador 
and the computer hardware could, quite 
literally, be the last thing hell recommend. 

Ericsson Ambassadors are computer 
dealers who, like Ericsson themselves, are 
more concerned with long-term solutions 
than with quick sales. 

They’re called “Ambassadors” because 
that’s exactly what they are. 

People who have a thorough, insider s 
knowledge of the area -yet speak your 
language They are there to help you achieve 
you r goals by every means at their disposal. 

Which includes expert advice, training 
• facilities, a vast choice of software and 
computer peripherals of all kinds, from 
modems to mice and from simple printers to 
specialist plotters. 

Plus the world-renowned Ericsson 
Personal Computers, which have been 
described as “the best thought-through 
personal computer system in the world” 

So, if a word of advice, better software or 
a simple upgrade fervour existing equipment 
will give the result you want, then that’s what 
tltey’li recommend. 

And if a hardware solution is indicated, 
the system you get will be the system you 
need And nothing less. 

With computers, as with every other type 
of business decision, the more options you 
can examine, the better the solution will be. 
And your Ericsson Ambassador can show' you 
more and better options than any ordinary 
computer dealer. 

So make full use of him. 

Call Henrik Skouby nowon 021-707 
3050 for die name of vour local 
Ericsson Ambassador. — n 





ERICSSON 


Ericsson Ambassadors talk your language. 


Ericsson Information Systems 1 508 Coventry Road 
Yardlev Birmingham B25 8BN 




remain on the floor and to 
retain limited boors of trading 
because they believe this 
stimulates business. 

Dr Li says he has no plans 
for 24-hour trading or 
developing on-line inter- 
national connections with 
other exchanges. He does, 
however, have plans for vari- 
ous other extensions of the 
computer system, such as a 
central clearing system, be- 
cause this would simplify 
settlements. 

The automatic execution of 
transactions, in which buyers 
and sellers are matched in 
price and quantity by com- 
puter was rejected because 
Hong Kong brokers were wary 
of committing themselves too 
soon and typing errors. 

Automatic matching of the 


an option. 

The computer system un- 
officially went live on April 2 
because the merging of the 
four existing independently 
operated exchanges precluded 
any kind of parallel run. 

Jardine Logica organized SO 
training courses, all but one in 
Chinese, with a test at the end 
of the statutory 30 hours. 
Brokers who failed had to 
undergo further training, but 
almost all passed first time. 
Even so. Dr Li decided to wait 
six months for the formal 
launch, saying: “Because it 
involved computers, we didn't 
want to have a no-go situation 
with 6.000 people watching.** 

He also plans a secondary 


i ,'T i i i 

^ L w 1 * 


by the govern menu Handing I -- " 
small investments in bm> f , 

numbers of small enterprises lO’l * [ 1 L 
manually was impractical in !>“. ‘‘ , 
the past, but Dr Li befievesife „ T * i 
exchange's compmeraatioB tV l w l f 
could quickly ^turn this into t ’ 

thriving area and at the sang 
time assist local start-«p 
companies. 

There have already bees 
some spin-offs for Britufc . 
business from this Far Eastern !■ 
showcase. Jardine Logica has 
been invited to put in a joist 
lender with Tandem to ‘ 
computerize San Francisco's : 

Pacific slock exchange, and Dr 

Li says many other exchanges 
considering computerization 
are awaiting the Hong Koag 
opening with interest. 


ight mo 
light s$l 



a Am* '.-I 


Hi'. 


UK events 


Electronic Point of Sale Exhibition, Barbican, 


London, today until Friday 
■ Dec User Show, Barbican, 


■ Dec User Show, Barbican, London. October 
14-16(01-6081161) 

■ Computer Graphics Show, Wembley, 
London, October 15-17 

■ General Practice Computer Exhibition — 


Wembley, 


Mecfical computing, Forum Hall, Wythenshawe, 
Manchester, October 23-25 (021-525 8706) 

■ Apptewortd, Business Design Centre. Upper 
SL, London Nl. October 29 - November 1 (01- 
831 6262) 

■ Com pec, Olympia, London, November 11-14 
(01-821 5555) 


■ Micros in Design, Design Centre. Haymarim, 
London SW1, November 12 - December iS fflt- 
839 8000) 

■ Computers In the City, Barbican, London, 
November 18-20 

■ British Telecom Ne twork Strategy Con- 
ference, Sedgewick Centra .London El, Novem- 
ber 18-19(01-608 1161) 

■ CIMAP — Factory automation. National 
Exhibition Centre, Birmingham. December 1-5 

B 1-891 3426) 

High Technology in Education, Bartyten, 
London. January 21-24 (01-608 1 161) 

■ Videotex User Show, Barbican, London. 
January 28-30 (01-608 1161) 

■ CADCAM 87, Metropole Hotel, NEC, Bir- 
mingham. March 24-26 (01-608 1 161) 


letters 



a&f 




The tests that help you 
make that fi nal selection 



APTITUDE 


By Pat Sweet 


Though most people's last 
enconnter with formal testing 
methods was the 11-plns at 
school, many oompater staff 
are likely to find that aptitude, 
ability and especially 
personality tests will play an 
increasingly important role in 
data processing recruitment^ 

A study carried ont in the 
UK last year by the firm 
Occupational Services found 
that 50 per cent of employers 
use aptitude teste for entrance 
into information technology 
careers with a growing number 
of companies also using 
psychometric tests to collect 
information . about a 
candidate’s personality as part 
of the procedure for selecting 
senior staff. 

“For those people who 
haven't used computer skills 


assess concentration, staying 
power and accuracy. 

. The recruiting company is 
then presented with a two- 
word summary of the 
applicant's overall perfor- 
mance, an assessment of the 
speed with which the test was 
completed and a few para- 
graphs of text indicating 
strengths and weaknesses. 

A candidate who was unable 
to sustain concentration on 
intricate logical problems, for 


Personality tests are becoming 
increasingly important 


before, it’s an aptitude test. increasingly important 
But it can also be used to test example, would probably not 

•ka Alu1S#va0 aC haaviIa 1A L. -.2J a _ _ ■ a * 


tiie abilities of people with 10 
years' experience," said Ste- 
phen Helms, manager of test- 
ing services for BIS Applied 
Systems. 

During the past 16 years it 
has supplied its aptitude and 
ability test to 600 customers 
and now sells 8,000 tests a 
year. Its test consists of five 
problems. The first two test 
the candidate's ability to fol- 
low detailed instructions and 
simple logic in order to make 
valid deductions. 

The candidate then has to 
manipulate symbols and con- 
cepts which have been ex- 
plained in the style of a 
programming reference man- 


be considered a good bet as a 
systems software programmer. 

Some computer companies 
have now gone on to use tests 
to measure motivation and 
management potential. 
Psychometric test specialists 
Saviiie and Holdsworth offer 
multiple choice style tests 
which fall into two broad 
categories. 

The first measures aptitude 
and ability which are charac- 
terized by a clear right answer 
and a set time limit, like many 
others, they are designed to 
mimic the job the applicant 
would eventually be doing. 

The second group are a set 
of personnel questionnaires. 


ual. The final logic problems These have no correct 


as such but are designed to 
measure personality, motiva- 
tion and interests. 

Lisa Cramp, a SariBe sad 
Holdsworth senior cousritant 
said: “five years ago we woe 
asked for a lot of aptitide 
testing and not ranch personal- 
ity measurement Now we do 
fair more personality jneasare- 
ment Computing is a classic 
example, of an industry which 
is changing. 

“It’s no longer. M ®f 
backroom people who just ** 
and write programmes. 
There's a lot of stress oo 
communicating with the . met 

and bring a good, manager- Fer 
computing jobs, people are 
often most interested Ja how 
innovative a candidate is, wtut 
their career motivation b tike 

and whether they are prepare* 

to work ind e pen d ently or need 
group mvotvemeaL" , ■ 
The test essentially aris 
candidates how they wowa 
choose to behave m certain 
situations. If they have a 
project to do, do they prefer*® 
plan it all ahead, to p tea jas* 

the outline, or to take it as d 

comes? • 

Lisa Cramp said: “People 
often think they are roryg® 4 * 
at assessing someone, but * 
won't be an objective assess- 
ment They weigh ap tt® 
person against their . 

experience and prejudices, a» 

often come ap with a off 
simple classification -^-fha t 
someone appears confide®, 
for instance." 

All test suppliers print mu 

that a test scoreshenld beusra 

simply as another piece « 
descriptive Information to. *£. 
company die candidate's tine* 
record ■ and - interview 
performance. 




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19 



THE TIMES TUESDAY OCTOBER 7 1986 


, 


COMPUTER HORIZONS/2 




u 


y.l 


i J 


Economic 
gamble 
that paid 
richly 

.-government which, it 
' Sffi?’ COuW ^se taxes and 

: &S^ new «« 

■But one first-generation 
«, in Euro Pe 

Jackson, the Yorkshire-born 

2™: Computer Sw- 

;, £dSS? to the us in ^ 

•flfSr e *f mp ;L e - *** tinier of 

i™ 3 and a flat in Kew, the 
prospect of buying a house 
S? 1 woukta t cost five times 

i£JSF5* ^ C£5Q0 at 

™^? sh Ejectnc); ease of entry 
-• ?9 l ^e CS and an atavistic 
^ impulse that goes back to the 
days ol empire and probably 
beyond — that Englishmen 
have always travelled. 

.. Holding court at a Euro- 
pean conference last month of 
nis 10-year old, $100 million 
.company, Mr Jackson said: 

. ” .e brain drain to me was 
■ mainly economic - it was a 
Question of salary and what 
you could do whh it." 

He was brought up in a 
. mining village near Doncaster 
and graduated from the Royal 



Californian gold: Dare Jackson, Altos president, found wealth outside Britain 


Cote of Science in 1959. At 
English Electric he was one of 
30 graduates serving a two- 
year apprenticeship. Of the 50, 
20 subsequently went to the 
US. 

“The country lost a lot of 
talent, more than Td ever 
real i zed," be said- But he is 
dismissive of his own 
contribution: “Where there’s 
silicon there's brass. Yon 
don't have to be brilliant to 

( people ) 

By David Guest 

start something in California 
— you have to be stupid not 
to." 

In many ways Mr Jackson is 
a model Californian. He jogs, 
wears open-necked shins and 
is worth a substantial amount 
of money. But he's still a 


Pay the right money, 
get the right staff 


From A. Sandman. London 
ATfV 

John Taylor, director of 
Hewlett-Packard's new re- 
search laboratory in Bristol, 
complained in Computer Ho- 
rizons (September 23) of the 
difficulty in recruiting the 
right calibre of staff. 

Has it not struck him that 
low British salaries in ihe field 
arc lhe cause. Mr Taylor wants 
professional staff at non-pro- 
fessional salaries. 

He should ignore the fact 
that British engineers are 
cheap and pay a decent salary 
such as American engineers 

( LETTERS ) 

are paid and he will find 
recruitment will soon look up. 
From MdrkMathiason. Har- 
row. Middlesex HAS 8TD : 
You gave us details of "the 
National Computing Centre 
software testing scheme in 
Computer Horizons (Septem- 
ber 30). With 2.000 programs 
available and testing to cost an 
average £4,000 a piece, the 
scheme will generate more 
than £8 million. 

However, since testing will 
take about four weeks, there is 
a potential requirement for 
8.000 testing weeks. There is 
little doubt that delays will 
occur. 

Even before the scheme has 
started the the NCC has found 
it necessary to delay issuing 
certificates until March next 
year in order to give others in 
ihe queue a chance. 

While I acknowledge the 
need for action to improve 
software quality this scheme 
must be an inefficient and 
uneconomic way to address 
ihe issue. . 

\ simple and effective solu- 
tion would be to publish 
standards under the British 
Standards Institute and make 


them available to producer 
and purchaser alike. Packages 
which qualify can display the 
.well known and- accepted kite 
mark. 

From Alan Benjamin, Direc- 
tor, Cap Group. London 
After the ACARD report, 
headlined recently in The 
Times as Software Industry 
Doomed, comes an article m 
Computer Horizons, The 
Threat to UK Software 
{September 16). 

The article, like ACARD, 
again draws upon one segment 
of the market and confuses it 
with the success and prospects 
of the industry. 

There will never be a time 
when applications software is 
only packaged — _ indeed as the 
Computing Services Associ- 
ation recently reported pack- 
aged software revenues are 
declining especially in the US. 

System software, that which 
manages the hardware, is ei- 
ther produced by the manu- 
facturer or by independent 
companies. The latter are 
having a tough time compet- 
ing with the manufacturers 
but the feet that most hard- 
ware manufacturers are not in 
Britain is not the fault of the 
British software industry. 

Software tods are useful but 
are yielding productivity gains 
which are still modest, despite 
lhe chums being made, as for 
. some customers design func- 
tions are simple, while for 
others they are very com- 
plicated and the tools not yet 
sufficiently rigorous. 

To say that British com- 
panies ignore these tools or are 
complacent is frankly against 
the evidence. However, the 
article is consistent with our 
national disposition for self 
destruction. Thank goodness 
it is only fiction ana let us 
hope lhe investment commu- 
nity misses it. 


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British subject and would 
sooner talk about the sacking 
of Geoffrey Boycott than the 
ting of 


sacking of the San 
Charms’ auartezbactL 

“They asked me to become 
an American, but I said ‘No, 
I'm a Yorkshireman,’ why 
would you warn to change?” 

But, be said, he couldn't 
have created Altos in the UK. 
In 1965 he turned 52,000 from 
a stock option into 540.000 by 
playing the stock market. “I 
pm 55,000 into a bouse, 
borrowed 5500,000, and 
started a company,” he said. 
“It was like playing double or 
quits with your life. You can 
always San a technology com- 
pany on no money. In En- 
gland it’s not just the money, 
it's the attitude that’s got to 
change.” 

He sold that company to 
another US firm called Fertec, 
leaving himself with SI 00.000 


after paying back his venture 
capitalist. “I went back to the 
UK for a year and looked 
around to raise some money 
to sian a Hide primer com- 
pany, bat it was as difficult in 
the Seventies as it bad been m 
lhe Sixties:** 

Returning to the US he 
started Altos with his remain- 
ing funds plus 510,000 from 
the banks. “Later a venture 
capitalist put in SI million for 
5 per cent of the company,” he 
smd. 

Mr Jackson admits to 
nostalgia, saying whh one 
breath that “Palo Alto's got 
everything I want” and with 
the next: “It's as English as 
you can find in California. 

“I*d like to set up a Euro- 
pean organization for Altos 
with English headquarters, go- 
ing public if 
be said. 


through London,' 


US chip giants fight off 
strong Japanese threat 


The aggressive stance US semi-conduc- 
tor manufacturers have taken in recent 
days to thwart their overseas compet- 
itors may foreshadow the beginning of a 
new phase of chip manufacturing. 

During the past three weeks, the US 
semi-conductor giants Motorola and 
Intel have seen major new products 
evolved froth their respective 68000 and 
80386 product lines— while they both hit 
out at the Far East competitors which 
they Name for lowering the world price 
for microcomputer processor products. 

Motorola's chairman John Mitchell 
was in Britain last week visiting the 
company. He said he thought South 
Korean and other Far East-manufac- 
tured chip products have kept down the 
prices of 5e mi-conductor products in the 
short term, despite the best efforts of the 
Japanese government and individual 
Japanese companies to stop the dumping 
of their microprocessors on the US 

market. 

Intel, meanwhile, has been battling the 
Japanese electronics giant NEC in the 
courts over alleged infringements of its 
8086 microprocessor (the same com- 
puter processor type used in the IBM PC) 
in NECs V20 and V30 microprocessor. 

Intel maintains that critical portions of 
microcode embedded in the 8086 proces- 
sor were copied by NEC for the design of 
its V20 ana V3Q processors which are 
used in a number of leading Japanese 
. IBM PC-compatible desktop computers. 


Last month a US federal judge made 
an interim ruling on the case - dedaring 
that copyright did exist on the microcode 
and thus scoring a major point in favour 
of Intel, which launched the case more 
than 18 months ago. 

Intel is seeking both damages and an 
injunction which will prevent NEC from 
selling the V20 and V30 chips in the US. 
NEC claims that it created the microcode 


c 


THE WEEK 


J 


By Geof Wheelwright 

independently oi Intel and only built-in 
emulation functions so that the chip 
could be used in IBM-compatible per- 
sonal computers. 

If Intel wins the case, there could be 
major repercussions throughout the PC 
hardware business as the legal slams of 
PC done machines from several major 
Japanese business computer makers, 
including Epson, is brought into 
question. 

Perhaps more importantly for the 
long-term health ol' the semi-conductor 
industry is ihe effect these legal proceed- 
ings will have on the future of co- 
operative ventures between the world's 
electronics firms. 

NEC. the world's largest manufacturer 
of semi-conductors. has a long and 
illustrious history of co-operative chip 


development ventures with other major 
firms. If companies become too sus- 
picious of one another over copyright, 
that trust and co-opciaiion might be 
threatened. 

The issue was undoubtedly not fer 
from NECs corporate mind last week as 
negotiations with Honeywell and Bull 
continued with a view- to combine 
Honeyweirs information systems busi- 
ness with that of NEC and Bull. 

Large companies are not, however, the 
oniv target of US legal wrath. A lawsuit 
brought by the US chip manufacturer 
National Semiconductor against the 
Taipei microelectronics firm United 
Micro electronics will be heard in late 
October. 

National Semiconductor alleges that 
ihe Far East company — which b 
partially owned by the government of 
Taiwan - is selling a type of integrated 
circuit that is similar to a National 
Semiconductor chip, and thus the com- 
pany has violated a 1983 agreement 
between rhe two firms and improperly 
used confidential design and manufac- 
turing information. 

Again the spirit of Far East-West co- 
operation will undoubtedly be under 
threat by the settlement of a copycat 
dispute m the US courts. And ihe 
decision Iasi month io uphold the 
existence of copyright m microcode is 
likely to make an important difference to 
the outcome of such cases. 



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20 


THE TIMES TUESDAY OCTOBER 7 1986 



COMPUTER APPOINTMENTS 


The Dee Corporation PLC 


The Dee Corporation is a dynamic expanding organisation and 
one of the country's leading retail groups, incorporating such 
famous names as Gateway. CarrefourandLinfood in theCJK. The 
Head Office is in Buckinghamshire and the grouphas expanding 
divisions in Spain and the USA. 

Due to a recent promotion, a vacancy has arisen for a 
professional Computer Auditor to work alongside the Group 
Financial Auditor at the Head Office, initial concentration will • 
be on the auditing of systems providing ' management 
information to the group. The job offers a high degree of 
autonomy. Regular travel within the UK and occasional trips 
abroad are envisaged. 

The ideal candidate will be a confident DP professional with a • 
strong systems development background. Computer Audit or • 
IBM experience will be a definite advantage although applicants 
with other relevant skills are asked to apply- Motivation, a high 
level of intellect, strength of character and the initiative to work 
largely unsupervised are essential 

This is a challenging position for someone whose career is on 
the way up it will provide extensive contact with users and DP . 
staff, at all levels, it is a unique opportunity to experience the 
workings of a large and' successful retailing group and hence 
career prospects are excellent Company benefits are attractive 
including a generous relocation package, health insurance for 
self and family, company car for business and personal use and 
a pension scheme: 

Please call our advising Consultants 'ICON' on the 
number below for a confidential 'discussion, 
interviews can be arranged during business hours, 
or at a mutually convenient time. Please note the 
evening telephone numbers can be called until 
10.00 p.m. 


6th Floor, Empire House, 175 Piccadilly, London W1Z 9DB Telephone: 01-409 2844 (24 boms) 

Evening numbers until 10 pm: 01-311 8444 
03727-22531 


COMPUTER 

AUDIT 

Bucks - 

To£18K + 2 litre car 
+ Benefits 




PC AND MAINFRAME DEVELOPMENT 

ON-LINE DATABASES 


CENTRAL LONDON TO £16,000 

This major IBM user is one of the World’s leaders in the field of information processing for the expanding 
pharmaceutical industry. Using the latest technology it supports databases which are accessed by clients spread 
across ali five continents. In order to achieve high levels of excellence the following candidates are required: - 


1BM COBOL PROGRAMMERS 

Continuing expansion has resulted in the 
requirement for three IBM COBOL 
Programmers to join a team working on a 
range of projects including an on-line 
database retrieval system. Candidates aged 
under 30 with upwards of eighteen months 
experience, a degree (any subject) and the 
desire for career advancement are 
particularly of interest. Programmers 
wishing to move further into analysis are also 
asked to apply. 


..IBM PC PROGRAMMERS (PASCAL) 

The Company’s microcomputer software 
service requires additional expertise in the 
form of two PASCAL Programmers. Working 
on IBM PC XT and AT, there will be 
considerable involvement in micro- 
mainframe communications and extensive 
client service liaison, in order to develop 
systems to meet the clients evolving needs. 
Agecf under 30, a degree in any subject is 
required with eighteen months plus PASCAL 
experience on micros, preferably using 
MSDOSl Knowledge of Assembler, DBase HI, 
Lotus 123 or - Symphony would be 
■advantageous. 


Only apply for these positions if you have the genuine desire to make a success of your career 
in DP. This company provides a fine challenge for the confident professional, the opportunity 
to acquire new and valuable skills and a salary package which will be hard to beat anywhere. 
Benefits include annual bonus, season ticket loan, pension scheme, 4 weeks holiday. 

Please call ‘ICON* on the number below for a confidential discussion. Interviews can be 
arranged during business hours or at a mutually convenient, time. Please note the evening 
telephone numbers can be called until! 0.00 p.m. 


u 



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Evening numbers until 10 pm. 01-311 8444 

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pragramrmg ewnne m BASC or COBOL. Pratotence wdi be shown to applicants truth a basting or 
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COMPUTER HORIZONS/^ 



Suspicious shortages 
in staff surveys 


Reports and survey* suggest 
present staff shortages in most 
fields of computing and pre- 
dict unfilled computer va- 
cancies well into the future. 
What with the massive infu- 
sion of micros into data 
processing, word processing 
and management information 
systems requiring only basic 
skills to implement them, 
such trends might seem 
surprising. 

The question needs to be 
asked if such vacancies are 
real or perhaps only over- 
played by protective data 
processing departments and 
recruitment agencies? 

Staffing surveys naturally 
tend to use the existing data 
processing departments of 
large companies as their 
respondent base. The data 
processing manager is obvi- 
ously the first port of call for 
such information and their 
opinion would be solicited by 
the professional interviewers. 

But without doubting their 
integrity. what data processing 
manager worth his salt is going 
to undermine his empire with 
a possible underestimate of 
current staff loadings and 
future requirements? And 
how many managers feel 
happv admitting they have 
plenty of staff in their depart- 
ment 

There must at the least be a 
temptation to exaggerate. The 
interviewer too has a problem 
in that where there is no data 
processing manager control- 
ling a staff triangle, who do 
they approach for an opinion? 
The decentralization of 
computing facilities to busi-. 
ness function has dissolved 
the natural DP chain of 
command. 

Companies whose total 
distributed computing func- 
tion may be greater than 
others with highly centralized 


r viewpoint ) 

By William Jacot 

traditional data processing 
departments could well be left 
out of the calculations. 

Such an apparent contradic- 
tion between reported staff 
trends and the consequences 
of the micro computers 
requirements must be a 
generalization. 

How do shortages look 
within the context of the 
general trends of business 
computer technology? 

Central government, local 
government, the public util- 
ities. income tax. VAT. health 
are all now vast data process- 
ing empires with armies of 
stafT. In time, these armies too 
will demobilize, but there is a 
time lag. The computer jugger- 
nauts of yesteryear have still 
to fulfill their planning and 
implementation cycles. Re- 
ported * problems in the 
computerization of areas such 
as the DHSS and the DVLC 
suggest that it will be some 
.years yet before the obsoles- 
cent factor takes cffcct- 

The City's own Big Bang, 
with its sudden and in some 
cases, hastily planned systems 
transfers, has resulted in an 
artificial requirements peak 
with considerable local effect 
in London. Specialists in 
financial applications, 
communications and security 
are at a premium. 

Software products such as 
the operating system Unix 
breed their own expertize; the 
growth of data storage for 
database developments and 
the requirements of the Data 
Protection Act have ail in- 
fluenced staffing problems 

It is reasonable to suggest 
that there are greater shortages 
of some computer skills than 


others — but which slufls 
might the trends suggest? The 
development of software for 
micros has produced in 
woke a need for people to set 
up and implement database 
applications in-house; new 
skills are needed for the “user 
friendly" type software; soft- 
ware houses need such skills 
also, in order to develop and 
market systems for vertical 
markets. 

For the larger established 
computer installations the 
skill requirements appear to 
be more traditional: project 
managers to control events; 
systems and programniiag 
people to maintain existing 
systems and to develop new 
systems: specialists to pmh 
forward the frontiers into new 
techniques such as imegramw 
telex, lax. word processing and 
data processing into the much 
promised electronic office. 

While much of the United 
Kingdom's computer research 
and development is now 
bought-in from eastern parts, 
there still remains a basic need 
for these very special skills to 
push forward the frontiers of 
computing 

So what’s the verdict? While 
in certain locations, for the 
largest users, and in certain 
skills, shortages undoubtedly 
exist and will continue to do 
so. the suspicion must arise 
however - at least until the 
surveys provide sufficient 
qualification — that soch 
shortages arc neither as great 
or as permanent as the re- 
search would suggest and that 
the market may be being 
massaged more for the benefit 
of others than for those they 
aim to market 
William Jacot is a metnherrf 
the Association of Professional 
Computer Consultants and 
managing director of DBA 
Computer Consultants 


SENIOR 

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ANALYST 

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Putting yourself 
in the picture 


By Nick Hampshire 


The old saying that a picture is 
worth a thousand words has 
increasing truth in the field of 
business communications. 

Many companies are find- 
ing that the latest develop- 
ments in computer graphics, 
coupled with falling prices, is 
making them increasingly 
suitable for presentations in 
such area s as Financial reports; 
sales documents, equipment 
documentation and training 
or seminar material 

Graphics improve, design 
time is shortened and costs 
reduced, say the advocates. 

Computer generated graph- 
ics should also reduce errors, 
by> allowing the presentation 
materials to be directly cre- 
ated by the individual generat- 
ing the information, rather 
than by a graphics designer 
who may have little idea of 
what it is he is creating. 

The production of photo- 
graphic slides directly from 
computer generated images is 
one of the more recent 
developments. Standard 
35mm colour slides are cre- 
ated using a device like the 
Polaroid Palieie Computer 
Image Recorder which will 
take any image generated on a 
computer screen and transfer 
it to film. 


the original software authors 
have allowed for this the 
package could be useless. 

The problem is com- 
pounded because there is little 
standardization among de- 
vices like plotters — the soft- 
ware may support a plotter but 
it could be of the wrong type - 
this could render the software 
useless. 

These problems are being 
gradually becoming overcome 
by manufacturers and soft- 
ware bouses which are accept- 
ing a standard known as the 
VDI or Virtual Device Inter- 
face designed to free the 
software from having to w 
configured to different output 
hardware. 

( graphics j 


The equipment is expen- 
sive. but for those with a large 
number of slides to produce 
from computer screens, it is 
claimed to reduce the produc- 
tion costs of £20 to £30 for 
slides of computer screens to 

The problems in creating 
computer generated images 
for publication and presenta- 
tion purposes come from two 
directions. First, the limita- 
tion of avaijable software and 
second, achieving compatibil- 
ity between a variety of dif- 
ferent types of equipment and 
software. 

Compatibility is always a 
problem, but is particularly 
severe m graphics generation 
systems where many of the 
output devices are uncommon 
and therefore not supported 
by the available software. 

As an illustration of the 
compatibility problem a 
particular package may as- 
sume output to a dot matrix 
printer and a normal resolu- 
tion display. But to get the 
required quality, output 
should be to a plotter. Unless 


— 

"PlS KdefihinR the product he is io sell 


■SSTffSTSnST of'iiiat T He 


Each piece of hardware, 
which could be an output 
device like a plotter or even a 
mainframe computer, has its 
own driver routines which are 
installed in the operating sys- 
tem when the system is first 

set up. Thereafter any piece ot 
graphic software which uti- 
lises VDI should work per- 
fectiy and with no new! for 
individual tailoring to fit t® 
system. 

A survey of the market for 
computer generated presenta- 
tion graphics by the American 
consultancy Pacific Technol- 
ogy Associates daimed that in 
1 985 personal computers were 
used in the USA to create 
more than 100 million imago 
for presentation quality grapj: 
ics. This number is expectw 
to double in 1986. 

The actual market ^ Tor 
graphics equipment, soft*®? 
and services associated 
die generation of present&uon 
graphics is expected in w 

be worth $150 million in uk 
US alone. 

The report also looked^ 
the way these images wjj 
created and it showed u« 
over 65 per cent of the outpu 
was generated on plotters. 

A further 30 per cent 
^generated on graphics quahtj 
dot matrix printers like w* 
Epson FX 1 00. Of the remain 
ing 5 per cent, 3 per cent « 
output on to photograph 1, 
recording devices and. only 
per cent on to laser printers J 
can of an electronic publish 
ing system. 


rom tear jourtvr *--« -«*«- ■ 





38 


THE TIMES TUESDAY OCTOBER 7 1986 


COMPUTER HORIZONS/4 


'■^wkL 

UrJJh 

f% ,h <1 th> 

■**£?( 
«««■ N, aif S. 

;,,s * rl, lfc-w 
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^Pprn^k 7^ 

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*'* *»«i so’ M 


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nasfa 


The right pitch for a career in sales 


ies 


standards 

Tbe launch of the 1986 UK 
Computer Press Awards is 
announced today with entries 
accepted until the end of this 
mouth. 

Tjfc is the third year of the 
eyedt, sponsored jointly by The 
Times and HewJett-Rackani, 
to encourage good 
*“ ™ in -a sector with 
more than 300 publications. 

iWyear there will be eight 
categories with the additionof 
W award for tbe Computer 
P reSS P ersonality of the Year 
wwdnated by the entrants. 

Entries for the first seven 
categories must be based on 
articles, magazines, pictures 
or programmes printed or 
broadcast between November 
L 1985 and October .31. 1986. 

Editors may nominate can- 
didates who have worked on 
their magazines, or journalists 
may submit entries for 
themselves. - 

Eptry forms and a complete 
copy of the rules can be 
obtained from Horsley Asso- 
ciates, Capital House, 20-22 
Craven Road, London W2 
3PX (01-402 3347). 

The winners will be an- 
nounced at an awards cere- 
mony at Claridge's on 
V\ ednesday. November 26. 

William Pushtoo, the tele- 
vision and radio personality, 
will present the prizes which 
include engraved silver tro- 
phies. an HP Yectra desktop 
computer and printer, three 
portable compnters and print- 
ers, £1,000 worth of photo- 
graphic equipment and crates 
of champagne. 

The eight categories are: 
Computer Journal of the Year 
Computer Journalist of the 

Year {news) r f «rr’:o. * 

Computer Journalist of the 
Year (features) ■’ '• 

Computer Columnist of- die 
Year • 

Computer Photographer of die 
Year 

Best Designed Journal of the 
Year 

Technology Programme of the 
Year 

Computer Press Personality of 
the Year. 


JOBSCENE~~) 

«» . ®y Eddte.Cotiiter 

jfirtB-E 

» persuade and sell 

It’S the type of image that 

» <te*ribe someone 
who sells fora living But it is 

•wt typical or most compute 

mdiwry saks people, some of 
whom might even be a 
disaster in different sales 

environments. 

With computer sales being 
one of the highest-paid jobs in 
selling, it is not surprising that 
Purple involved fit a slightly 
different profile. Few* ordrnaiy 
salesmen can sell high- 
powered computers. 

Apart from developing their 
knowledge of computer tech- 
nology, many sales people in 
information technology have 
2 grass-roots background in a 
different profession. 

Often the sales person may 
not enter the computer in- 
dustry until his or her mid-20s 
| up to mid-3Gs. usually with 
. the intention of establishing a 
solid future professional sales 
career where their expertise 
will be applied to computing. 

Often the target wiD be the 
world of large systems — the 
lucrative earnings end of the 
computer sales market — 
where success is certainly not 
achieved through quick-fire 
patter and fooi-in-the-door 
sales methods. 

Rather, a large system sale 
usually comes as a result of a 
year or more dedicated effort 
coupled with a thorough grasp 
of the customer’s business 
needs and backed by a good 
number of years in pro- 
fessional computer sales. 

Apart from the fraught 
microcomputer high street 
sales end of the mar Ice* a 
career in computer selling can 
be financially rewarding. 
Many stories are told of 
earnings up to £250,000 in a 
good year — such cases are by 
no means rare. 

More likely though, the 
average good salesman can 
think in terms of £35,000 to 
-£50,000 a year after a number 
of years of solid sales 
experience. 

Often, even .with a good 
education and some practical 
^working experience, pref- , ■ 
erably:in data processing, you . 
will-need- to progress through ; 
the ranks —trainee, executive, 
account, manager, regional 
manager and soon — develop- 
ing your computer industry 
knowledge as you go.. 

Experienced sales people 
operating in major cqiporke . 
environments and selling mfl- 
non-poundjplus systems are in 
essence trying to sell what is 



for the future. 

At that level a solution may 
involve a total mix of hard- 
ware, software and commu- 
nications and salesmen 
usually work as pan of a team 
with other experts and other 
companies. 

Computer sales people need 
to be able to plan ahead and 
project a customer's future 
needs in line with their own 
company's expected - and 

Emphasis now on 
giving solutions 

often as vet unannounced — 
future offerings. 

To reach these sales heights, 
where earnings can be £50,000 
to £75,000 or more a year, 
OTE — On Target Earnings — 
may take up to 10 years in the 
computer sales environment. 

So where does the sales 
career start? There are a 
number of routes. 

For -someone with no 
knowledge of the computer 
industry or good knowledge of 
a particular professional mar- 
ket, the best starting point is in 
office equipment 
"Office automation sales,* 1 
said Marcus Harvey, a large- 
systemfi sales recruitment 
consultant with Weybridge- 
based Executive Science, is a 
good starting point 
“First you have to decide on 
a sales career. You need to 
make up your mind that you 
have the intelligence, con- 


office equipment and auioma- experience to be able to deal 
tion company, such as Xerox, with customers." said Mr 
and develop basic sales experi- Thompson, 
ence. From there you sand a “To start with, computer 
good chance of moving to a salesmen musi have the abil- 
major computer manufacturer ity to relate to a customer's 
where you can begin to move business problem rather than 
up the sales ladder." an understanding of what a 

In tbe early years, experi- computer does. Sales expertise 
ence will be gained in selling a is less important than business 

-r Ml « e~- If " k. 


variety of “boxes" for dif- 
ferent applications. Later, as 
you progress to larger systems, 
you will have developed the 
understanding that enables 
you to sell “solutions". 

Most of the computer in- 
dustry places the emphasis 
now on providing solutions — 


knowledge," he said. 

Highest-paid 
selling jobs 

Despite the old adage that 
good salesmen are bora, not 


and that needs knowledge of taught, Mr Thompson be- 
business applications. This lieves that only 20 per cent of 
opens up another area of entry computer salesmen have nalu- 
into the eventual large systems cal ability. Most of them 


sales arena. 

“Increasingly we are look- 
ing for people with pro- 
fessional business 

experience,” said Peter 
Thompson, head of Opera- 
tional Development at Digital 
Equipment in Reading. 

Bales experience is not ab- 
solutely necessary to enter the 
sales trainee programme at 


succeed through a combina- 
tion of training, experience 
and learning based on self- 
confidence. 

“When you are in the 
£1 00,000-plus systems sales 
bracket," he said, “smart- 
talking sales techniques will 
not get an ponder- Preparation’ 
of detailed, sometimes com- 
plex specifications and the 


DEC, but good knowledge of correct business backup, will 


an industry or profession is 
required. 

Working experience and 
qualifications m areas such as 
banking, accountancy or en- 


As most computer systems 
sales these days involve more 
than just selling hardware, 
there are possibilities to move 
into the large systems area 


Computer sales people often have a grass-roots background in a different profession 

often described as tbe solution fidence and ability to seU," he takes on sales people under 
for the future. said. the age of 25. “Below that age 

At that level a solution may “Choose a large reputable people have insufficient 


gmeering, can' stand you in from other parts of the corn- 


good stead. 

As with much of the com- 
puter industry. Digital tardy 


puter industry. 

At ICL graduates are often 
offered the opportunity to 


move into sales once they 
have been with the company 
for two or three years. Simi- 
larly. in other parts of the 
industry, graduates who have 
had several years working 
with customers chi software 
services can often make the 
move. 

"More than ever software 
bouses are developing systems 
with specific hardware in 
mind." said Anne Bowerman. 
personnel manager of Scioon. 
the BP-owned software con- 
sultancy and bureau orpuiiza- 
ikm based in Milton Keynes. 

“Frequently software com- 
panies and hardware manu- 
facturers work cooperatively 
in specific sales sectors." she 

said. 

Scicon, in common with 
most of the computer in- ! 
dusiry, organizes its sales op- 
erations into market sectors. 

Apart from industry sectors. 
Other specializations may be 
involved. ICL. for example, 
has recently established a 
specialist networks region to 
concentrate on the growing 
communications market. 

A sales person will operate 
at their level of experience 
within a sales sector. In Scicon 
they might start by selling 
boxes — modems, multi- 1 
plexors and so on — low value i 
and com mission bin high ; 
turnover products. 

Commission structures and 
salaries in tbe computer in- 
dustry are difficult to assess 
simply, it partly depends on 
what sector of tbe industry 
you are in and the degree of 
responsibility and/or experi- 
ence you have. 

Prospective sales people 
should not needlessly be de- 
terred if the basic salary seems 
low, £10,000 or less, provided 
the company is reputable. 
Most firms usually take ac- 
count of experience, or lack of 
it when fixing your on-target 
earnings. 

Likewise they should be 
wary of some companies offer- 
inga very high OTE for novice 
sales people. Pressure to reach 
almost impossible sales targets 
has frequently demoralized 
and ruined the careers of 
potentially good sales people. 

To land some of the top jobs 
later on in a sales career often 
involves close scrutiny of the 
ability to meet past sales 
targets. 

Not all computer com- 
panies operate a commission 
structure. DEC, for example, 
pays salaries without commis- 
sion but, it says, at com- 
parable rates to other OTE 
earnings in the industry. 

It also rewards, with salary 
increases based on “sales 
quality” as well as quantity 
against expected targets, both 
long and short term. 

■ For anyone moving into or 
just starting out in computer 
sales it isa long path requiring 
considerable dedication to get 
into the £30,000- plus per year 
earnings bracket. 


Outsiders can cut 
data-processing 
time and money 


( DP STAFF ) 

Life is changing in several of 
Britain's computer depart- 
ments as an increasing num- 
ber of “facilities manage- 
ment" reams move in to take 
them over. Geqf Wheel* right 
writes. 

Facilities management or 
FM, as it's known in tbe data- 
processing worid, is tbe name 
given to the business of hiring 

an outside company to handle 
a company's data-processing 
needs. 

It'sa relatively new and still 
controversial method of han- 
dling traditional computing 
tasks, but the savings that it 
claims are making a fret 
growing field. 

“The reduction in costs is 
normally around 25 per cent." 
said Mike Hawthorne, sates 
and marketing director for one . 
company ha the field. The 
Birmingham-based Data Net- 
work. argues that facilities 
management companies have 
a for more direct incentive to 
provide better (tea-processing 
performance than in-house 
departments as the company 
must prove its worth if its 
i annual contract is to be 
renewed. 

Facilities management is 
different from the heyday of 
computer bureau services be- 
fore the advem of the PC 
! which grew out of a need to 
allow small and medium-size 
businesses access to mini- 
computers and mainframe 
systems. 

Bureaux required com- 

Keeping pace 
with change 

ponies to send their work in 
for data-processing. while a 
feci lilies management com- 
pany can replace an internal 
computing department and 
provide on or off-site support 
and back-up to internal com- 
pany l«SffX 

Facilities management has 
its detractors, who suggest that 
it's a way that managements 
can perform a hatchet job on 
-computer departments while 
maintaining the appearance 
that it is improving the situa- 
tion and providing a better, 
more accountable service for 
users. 

Critics also suggest that 
while FM does remove the 
need for companies to extract 
themselves from directing 
involvement in choosing ana 
implementing computer sys- 
tems so they can spend more 
time on their mainline busi- 
ness, it also opens tbe 


company’s data management 
system to manipulation from 
an outside company which 
may know the computing side 
of tilings well, but doesn't 
understand their needs. 

The question, of course, is 
what happens to the staff 
employed in the data process- 
ing departments that an FM 
team might displace? 

Long-term work stoppages 
from such dissatisfaction 
could threaten whatever bene- 
fits FM would give that firm. 

Mr Hawthorne claims that 
in many cases the staff will 
either be hired by the facilities 
management company or find 
work elsewhere in their exist- 
ing firm. “It’s really what the 
company decides they want to 
do. we might agree to uke on 

Job prospects and 
better salary 

all the staff and then retain 
some at the sue for the transfer 
of responsibilities," be said. 

Once the FM team has done 
its job, only a few of the 
original stall taken over by the 
FM firm are likely to stay on 
the site of the company they 
used 10 work for, having being 
moved on to other jobs. 

Mr Hawthorne suggests that 
many employees like this way 
Of doing things as they have a 
higher degree of job mobility 
and promotion prospects than 
in an in-houac data-processing 
department as their experi- 
ence will be wider. 

Saving money and cutting 
the number of people on the 
payroll are not the onlv rea- 
sons why people look to FM 
contracts. 

Many companies simply 
find it difficult to keep pace 
with the changes in computer 
hardware ana software and 
find themselves distracted 
from their mainline business 
while they look at the ways in 
which they can get the most 
from their computer systems. 

The last group of people you 
might expect to be enthusias- 
tic about this idea is in-house 
data processing managers, 
whom it would appear nave 
the most to lose by the 
introduction of an FM system. 

But FM companies are so 
■desperate for employees with 
high-level experience at in- 
house DP departments that 
they can often spend a lot of 
time trying to convince com- 
puter managers that a better 
salary and prospects of 
responsibilities for a number 
— rather than just one — of the 
company's data-processing 
needs will further their careers 
a great deal more than their 
current positions. 


J.H- it: 


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COMPUTER 

APPOINTMENTS 


PROGRAMMERS/ ANALYST 
PROGRAMMERS 
£14,000 ' 

An ooistantlng oppommrt y to fcotna 

Use your IBM Mainframe experience as you develop p**a0es 
; m Cotool oi PL1 wtti CICS OH 0* CWIU SttB- 
bneresung and raned projects. axcOm prospects ana good 
taanoai fewsfris. 

Telephone Maggie Bracher on 01-439 4001 

. OFFICE— 

— SYSTEMS— 
RECRUITMENT 
—SERVICES— . 

■r-— "—m 
MMHoSnSawaaa 

w«»ooren.4»4uoi 


CITY OF LONDON POLYTECHNIC 

PRINCIPAL LECTURER 

IN COMPUTER SCIENCE 

ScJw 

Systems witliin Polytechnic. 

The 

.safesSffSSsi-w 

software engineenrtg,- 
putation «***£ ,£Sd systems and 
database daagn. and commercial 

arcI?tec,l ^ ,f ?^SuTSnSSte should otter, m 

systems- The sucoesjnui s _ ec j a g sn1 ^ computer 

addition to™** 

science, a brt^appw» edMgtianr and an on- 

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•me =^^ ,ul ,S|^Sc m S^Sr to 

Asaflcatio* If* 

'QetBhff WNh 

The Pofytechntc is an equal apt” - 


In Supply, our technical people 
think like business people. 


Everyone who works in ICL’s Supply Division has one dear objec- 
tive in mind - to keep 15,000 customers in 80 countries tolly supplied 
with whatever they need in hardware and software. 

It’s a mam mo nth task of logistics, and only the most sophisti- 
cated and responsive IT systems are capable of pulling together all 
the separate threads that go to make up an on-time delivery. 

We’re hot short of technical resources to handle that task. We’ll 
soon be installing our own new Series 39 mainframes and our DBS 
300 modular office system. And with our need to communicate with 
so many different customers and so many different suppliers, OSI 
obviously looms large in our thinking: it’s going to be the basis of 
our dedicated UK network, which win also feature X25 gateway 
protocols- for worldwide interconnection. . 

But the kind of challenges we face won’t be met by technical 
solutions alone. 

Working in Supply with ICL is also a big test of personal commit- 
ment because our Supply Division is right in the front Tine when it 
comes to maintaining and developing customer relationships. At the 
same time, it’s a business in its own right with its own commercial 
goals to reach. 

If you can make that commitment and if your consi derab le tech- 
nical skill sits in a mind that's strongly business orientated, there 
can’t be many environments as stimulating as ICL's Supply Division. 

Or many jobs as interesting as . these. 

Tactical Development Manager 
£17,500 pa 

Supply Division’s business needs are changing the whole time. 


relevant It’s a job that’s, all about managing change - change in 
systems, networks, software and hardware. 

So the most important qualification is evidence, that you've suc- 
cessfully implemented projects that achieve significant change in 
both a technical and a business sense, and with a minimum of 
disruption. We're not talking about small projects, either - 10 man- 
years or more is the sort of .size we have in mind. 


Business Analyst £15,000 pa 

Wherever the Tactical Development Manager identifies the need for 
change, your job would be to make that change happen, by setting 
up and resourcing the project team who can deliver the goods, 
either from ICL's own considerable resources, or through indepen- 
dent systems houses, or through a mixture of both. 

Once again, you'd have to satisfy business as weU as purely tech- 
nical cmeria, so we're looking for evidence that the systems you've 
already resourced and managed from design to implementation 
have made a real impact on the business concerned. 

Analyst Programmers 
£12,000 pa 

Working in Supply with ICL is all about results, so we’ll be looking 
for evidence that you can produce them in the form of a system or 
systems that you've actually programmed yourself, ideally in an ICL 
mainframe or distributed micro environment Around 3-5 years 
should have given you the depth of experience you’ll need. 

Technical Analysts £15,000 pa 

Obviously these systems win rely heaviteon real technical expertise, 
and the men and women who take on these roles will need an 
unusually creative and innovative approach in order to diagnose 
problems quickly, and come up with workable solutions. 

To make sure that they are, you’ll spend a considerable amount of 
your time talking to users, so you'll need to be able to see their point 
of view, and speak their language. 

We need people to handle these jobs at both our principal locations 
in Kidsgrove, on the edge of the Cheshire countryside, and 
Stevenage in Hertforshire. If you need to move, you'll find that 
relocation expenses are just one of the many benefits of working for 
today's ICL 

But even more attractive is the prospect of working on projects 
whose importance and influence is growing the whole time. Be- 
cause, what we’re doing in the UK today is only a forerunner of what 
we'll be doing throughout the worid tomorrow. 

If that's the sort of experience you're looking for next in your career, 
write with full details to: Steve Bell, Supply Systems Operations 
Manager, ICL. Westfields, West Avenue, Kidsgrove, Stoke-on-Trent 
ST7 fr L 


We should be talking to each other. 


(CL 


A MEMBER OF THE STC PLC GROUP 


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COURT 

AND 

SOCIAL 


COURT 

CIRCULAR 

BALMORAL CASTLE 
October & The Queen was 
represented by General Sir Ro- 
land Guy (Aide-de-Camp Gen- 
eral lo Her Majesty) at the 
Memorial Service for General 
Sir Frank Simpson (formerly. 

. Aide-de-Camp General to The 
Queen) which was held in the 
Chapel of the Royal Hospital. 
Chelsea this morning. 

BUCKINGHAM PALACE 
October 6 : The Princess Anne. 
Mrs Mark Phillips was admitted 
lo the Court of the Worshipful 
Company of Loriners as an 
Assistant today and afterwards 
was present at luncheon with the 
Court at the Worshipful Com- 
pany of Barbers' HalL Monkwell 
Square. EC 2 . 

Her Royal Highness was re- 
ceived by the Master of the 
Worshipful Company of 
Loriners (Mr Robert Bowman). 

Mcs Richard Carew Pole was 
in attendance. 

The Princess Anne. Mis Mark 
Phillips and Captain Mark Phil- 
lips this evening attended a 
dinner at the Bank of England 
and were received by the Gov- 
ernor (Mr Robin Leigh- 
Femberton). 

Mrs Richard Carew Pole and 
Lieutenant-Colonel Peter Gibbs 
were in attendance. 

CLARENCE HOUSE 
October 6 : Queen Elizabeth The 
Queen Mother was represented 
. by the Earl of Lichfield at the 
Funeral of His Highness Prince 
Georg of Denmark which was 
held in Holmens Kirke Naval 
Church. Copenhagen, this 
afternoon. 

KENSINGTON PALACE 
October 6 : The Prince of Wales 
this morning visited the 
Conquhonn Street SelFBuikt 
Project, Stirling. 

. Lieutenant-Colonel Brian 
Anderson was in attendance. 

The Princess of Wales this 
morning opened the new Kid- 
ney Dialysis Unit at the Western 
'General Hospital Crew Road 
North. Edinburgh. 

Afterwards. Her Royal High- 
ness. Patron. Help the Aged, 
attended a Reception for Staff 
.and Volunteers of Help die 
Aged in Scotland at Hopetoun 
House. South Queensferry. 
West Lothian. 

Miss Alexandra Loyd and 
Lieutenant-Commander Rich- 


ard Aylard, RN were in 
attendance. 

Their Royal Highnesses trav- 
elled in aircraft of The Queen's 
Right. 

KENSINGTON PALACE 
October 6 : The Duke of 
Gloucester this afternoon 
opened the Building Services 
Engineering Centre at . 222 
Balhara High Road. London, 
SW 1 2. In the evening His Royal 
Highness opened an Exhibition 
at the Reform Club. Pall Mali 
London. SW1. to mark the 
occasion of the Club's 
Sesouicemenanr. 

Lieutenant-Colonel Sir Simon 
Bland was in attendance. 

YORK HOUSE 
st James'S palace 
O ctober 6 : The Duke of Kent. 
Colonel. Scots Guards, today 
received Lieutenant-Colonel Ju- 
lian Lancaster, on his assuming 
command of the 2nd Battalion 
and Lieutenant-Colonel Ian 
MacKay-Dick. on bis 
relinquishing the appointment. 

The Duchess of Kent. Patron, 
today visited the Headquarters 
of the Samaritans. Uxbridge 
Road. Slough. 

Miss Sarah Partridge was in 
attendance. 


A service of thanksgiving for the 
life oTMr R.C. Wakefield will be 
held in the Chapel ofSt Michael 
and St George. St Paul's Cathe- 
dral. at 1 lam today. 

A memorial service for Mr 
Steven Watson. Principal of St 
Andrews University, will be 
held in Christ Church Cathe- 
dral. Oxford on Saturday. Octo- 
ber H. 1986. at 230 pm. 


Birthdays today 

Mr Christopher Booker. 49: Mr 
Joseph Cooper, 74; Sir Zelman 
Cowen. QC. 67: Sir Andrew 
Derbyshire. 63: Professor Har- 
old Dexter. 66 ; Air Chief Mar- 
shal Sir Peter Fletcher. 70. Dr 
Mark GirouanL SS: Lord 
Glenarlhur. 42: Mr B.M.S. 
Hoban, 65: Mr Terence 
Hodgkinson. 73: Mr Give 
James. 47: Mr Thomas 
Keneally. SI: Lieutenant-Gen- 
eral Sir Derek Lang. 73; Vice- 
Admiral Sir Aubrey Mansergh. 
88 ; Miss Yaltah Menuhin. 6 S; 
Sir Harry Platt. 100: Major- 
General Desmond Smith, 75; 
Lord Justice Stocker. 68 ; Miss 
Jayne Torvill, 29; the Most Rev 
Desmond Tutu, 55: Mr Yo Yo 
Ma. 31. 


Duke’s garniture fails 
to find a buyer 

By Gerald^ie’NxHTOui, Sale Room Correspondent 


Memorial service 

;<kMral Sir Frank Simpson 
The Queen was represented by 
General Sir Roland Guy at a 
service of thanksgiving tor the 
Jife of General Sir Frank Simp- 
son held yesterday mtheChapd 
of the Royal HospitaL Chelsea. 
The Rev A.D. Bartlett offici- 
ated. 

General Sir Hugh Beach. 

Chief Royal -Engineer, also 
representing the Order of the 
British Empire, read the lesson 
and General Sir Charles 
Richardson, representing the 
Royal Bombay Sappers and 
Miners Officers* Association. 

f ive an address. The Bishop of 
ochester was robed and in the 
sanctuary. Others present 
included: 

Lady Stmpsm-rwldowt. Mr andMre A 
E Reynolds and Mr and Mrs G Tuck 

nooMn-iaw and daughters). Mr Ste- 

phen Tuck. EMzaben,. Rebecca and 
Ruin Turk fgrandrmidmu. OUcnd J 
R Simmon (brother). Mr and Mrs C R 
Simmon ibromrr and staler -in^awL 
Mrs R M Snarman cstsm-L Mr John 
Shannon. Mr and Mis H H J Cook*. 

Oe5&. < Mr , Md l Bts^ d S t'co&t. 

V< .-aunt Shm. Alien) viscountess 
SUm. Lady Dora Pink. Lady Bract). 
Lady- Richardson. Lady Tempter. 
General Sir Rouen Fora (governor. 

Hart nnion. General Sir Reginald and 
Lady Heiwetson. General Sir Antony 
and Lady Read. General Sir George 
cooper. General Sir Nlgd PmO. 
General Sir Dudley Ward. Lieutenant- 
General Sir Ian and Lady Jacob. 
Lieutenant-General Sir William and 
Lady Pike. Lieutenant-General Sir 
Jaraes Baird. Lieutenant-General Sir 
John Read- Major-General Sir Cecil 
and Lady Smith. Major General Sr 


lASr&JS'SPr 

Lady Hood. 

Major-General and Mrs J H S 
Bowling. Major General and Mrs R E 
LLoyd. Major-General M E TleKetL 
Major General and Mrs A L Watson. 
Major-General and Mrs J wooJirtL 
Major-General R W T Britten. Major- 
General W M Broomhan. Major- 
General R CJutterbuck. Major General 
H E M L Garrett. Brigadier H J 
Hirkman (director. Royal Pioneer 
Cwis) and Mrs Hickman. Dr Alan 

mciual OokmeL 
Lieutenant -Colonel 

Philip Astiev. Mr L 

and County CtUOJ and Mr and Mrs J 
m A Carlin. 


IT Dennison (Regi- 
Royal Engineers). 
F R Bertngcr. Mrs 
L W Norfolk {Bath 


The important Continental 
ceramics offered at Christie's 
yesterday met a mixed 
reception. 

The Duke of Buodeugh's 
spectacular Sevres garniture of 
three marbled pink vases was 
left unsold at £60.000 (estimate 
£80.000-£l 20.000), while a pair 
of daptaged white Vincennes 
hunting groups soared to 
£93.500 (unpublished estimate 
£30.000-£50.000). selling to Ar- 
inin Allen, a London dealer. 

The Vincennes groups were 
extreme rarities, one depicting a 
hound attacking a wild'boar and 
the other a hound fighting a 
wolf. The original designs were 
by Ou dry but it is unclear who 
was responsible for convening 
the two dimensional design into 
a three dimensional figure at 
Vincennes. They are realized in 
a delicious creamy white por- 


celain and date from around 
1752. 

Another popular item was the 
Sevres jardiniere that had es- 
caped from Buckingham Palace. 
Hie blue pot has a band of gill 
scrolling acanthus and laurel 
round the top and Ormolu 
mounts: H sold for £28.600 
(estimate £6.000-£8.000). It still 
has the Buckingham Palace 
label on the bottom but 
Christie's had no idea when it 
had left: the consignor had 
bought it at a Hove auction in 
the late 1950s. 

The Meissen porcelain snuff 
boxes all made prices well above 
Christie’s estimates. The top 
price was £8.250 (estimate 
£3.000-£4.000) for an oval gold- 
mounted snuffbox painted with 
romantic figures in landscapes. 
The sale totalled £445.282 but 
26 per cent was left unsold. 


Luncheons 

Loriners' Company 
Princess Anne was admitted an 
Assistant to the Court of the 
Loriners* Company at a meeting 
held yesterday at Barber 
Surgeons* Hall and was a 
speaker at a luncheon held 
afterwards. Mr RAJ. Bowman. 
Master, presided, at the lun- 
cheon and Mr Alan D. Walker- 
Amou also spoke. The Master 
of the Baiters' Company and 
Mrs Foxon were among others 
present. 

National Association of Local 
Councils 

Mr Dilhvyn Miles, Chairman of 
the National Association of 
Local Councils, gave a farewell 
luncheon at the Kenilworth 
Hold yesterday in honour of the 
Duke of Grafton on his retire- 
ment as president. Baroness 
Stedman. Mr John Clark, sec- 
retary. and other honorary offi- 
cers were among those present. 

Company of GoM and Silver 
Wyre Drawers 

Mr Ronald R. Elliott Master of 
the Company of Gold and Silver 
Wyre Drawers, presided at a 
luncheon held yesterday at 
Innholders’ Hall after the quar- 
terly court. Among those 
present were: 

The Master of me tanhoMera* Com- 
pany- Mr Richard M Them. Mr 
GxJirey M Davis. Mr Peter G Nathan. 

Eviaa Health. Awards 
Professor Sir Richard Doll pre- 
sented the Evian Health Awards 
at a luncheon in aid of Birth- 
right. at the Dorchester hold on 
Monday. October 6 . The win- 
ners were: 

Pi’ofessor Griffith Edwards. Profes- 
sor A.T. CM plods. Dr Vicky Ctemenl- 
Jtonw. Heartbeat Wales. Mr Bobby 
Chart ion. Mr Pwrr HulL The Mile- 
stone Rub. Mr Nicholas Timmins and 
Mr Paul Eddington. Other sneakers al 
the luncheon were Mr* Audrey Eyton. 
Or Michael O'Donnell and Miss Diana 
Moran. 


Forthcoming 
marriages 


Mqjor H.C. Barren 
and Miss Pa. BuQaurd 
The engagement is announced 
between Hugo Barrett. 
Coldstream Guards, elder son of 
Colonel and Mrs C.M. Barrett, 
of Tuggal Hall. ChathiU. 
Northumberland, and Philippa, 
second daughter of the late Mr 
WJ. Bullard and Mrs WJ. 
Bullard. Cobham, Surrey. 

Mr J. BertUn 
and MUe F. Ravisse 
The engagement is announced 
between Julian, eider son of Mr 
and Mrs Dennis Bertlin. of 
Bldchingloy. Surrey, and Fran- 
coise. younger daughter of M 
and Mme Philippe Ravisse. of 
Toulon. France. 

Mr N.E. Brown 
and Miss NJL Crespo 
The engagement is announced 
from New York, between 
Nicholas Edward, son of Mr and 
Mrs David Brown, of Leicester, 
and Nancee Linda, daughter of 
Mr and Mrs Raymond Crespo, 
of New York. 

M PJ J. Carte 
and Miss ILL. Kreftiag 
The engagement is announced 
between Philippe, son of M and 
Mme Kerne Carle, of Meylan. 
Grenoble. France, and- Katrina, 
daughter of Mr and Mis Rudolf 
Krening. of Pynchfieid Manor. 
West Hyde. Rickmansworzh. 
Hertfordshire. 

Mr MJ. G reason 
and Miss RX. Pickfonl 
The engagement is announced 
between Michael John, son of 
Mr and Mrs William Gregson. 
ofSegboume House. Cbadwtch. 
Worcestershire, and Rebecca 
Louise, daughter of Mr and Mrs 
David PicklonL of the Red Lion 
Inn. Babcary. Somerset. 

Mr S.G. Hogan 
and Miss SA. McArdle 
The engagement is announced 
between Graham, only son of 
Mr and Mrs D. Hogan, of 
Bamber Bridge. Preston, and 
Sarah, elder daughter of Mr and 
Mis LA McArdle. of Holmes 
ChapeL Cheshire. 

Dr AJVL Hudson 
and Miss VX. de Candole 
The engagement is announced 
between Alexander, youngest 
son of Mr and Mrs Philip 
Hudson, of Kingston Gorse. 
Sussex, and Victoria, youngest 
daughter of the Rev Charles and 
Mrs de Candole, of Wimbome. 
Dorset 

Captain C. (TO. M. Kay. RHA. 
and Frokeu H-Skov 
The engagement is announced 
between Charles, elder son of 
Mr C.EM. Kay. of Richmond. 
Surrey, and Mrs Eve Kay. of 
Penzance. Cornwall and HeDc 
youngest daughter of Hr and Fr 
Svend Erik Skov. of 
Nordenskov, Denmark. 


Mr C.M. Meade 
and Miss J.C. Owen 
The engagement is announced 
between Manyn. son of Mr and 
Mrs D.G. Meade, of Yew Tree. 
High town. Merseyside, and 
Jane Caroline, daughter of Mr 
and Mrs R.W. Owen, of Tythe 
Farm. Kempston Wood-End. 
Bedfordshire. 

Mr P.E. Morris 
and Miss SJJ. Whinney 
The engagement is announced 
between Philip Bstmenu son of 
Major and Mrs Miles Morris, of 
North Quarme. Wheddon 
Cross. Somerset, and Susan 
Bluett, younger daughter of Mr 
and Mrs -Maurice Whinney. of 
West Holdrktge. North Motion, 
north Devon. 

Mr AJ. Murray 
and Miss K. Moxon 
The engagement is announced 
between Aiastair Jeffrey, youn- 
ger son of Mr and Mrs J. 
Murray, of Eden bridge. Kent, 
and Karen, youngest daughter of 
Mr and Mrs CJ\T. Moxon. of 
Doratansland. Surrey. 

Mr EJJL Squires 
and Miss V.E. Collins 
The engagement is announced 
between Edward John Hesken. 
son of Mr and Mis Christopher 
Squires. ofSionor. Oxfordshire, 
and Victoria Elizabeth, eldest 
daughter of Dr R. Douglas 
Collins, of Palm Springs. 
California, and Mis Pauline 
Collins, of Pensacola. Florida. 
United States. 


OBITUARY 

MISS STORM JAMESON 

Powerful writer with a bleak and brave g 


Mr R.C. Watson 
and Miss XJVL Lead beater 
The engagement is announced 
between Richard Colin, son of 
Mr and Mis C.M. Watson, of 
Reigaie. Surrey, and Xamhe 
Mtnette. daughter of Mr and 
Mrs R.G. Leadbeaier. of 
RedhilL Surrey. 

Mr RJ. Wolff- Vorbeck 
and Miss CUB. Trew 
The engagement is announced 
between Roger, son of Mr and 
Mrs N.R. Wolff- Vorbedc. of 
Heswall. WrrraL Cheshire, and 
Charlotte, daughter of Mr and 
Mrs AJ.P. Trew. of Merstfaam. 
Surrey. 


Mr J.PJL Womersley 
and Miss FJV1 Graham 
The engagement is announced 
between James, younger son of 
the late Mr M.T.D. Womersley. 
and of Mrs Womersley. of 
Blenheim Drive. Oxford, and 
Fiona, youngest daughter of the 
late Mr D.B. Graham and of 
Mrs Graham, of Hall Grove. 
BagshoL 


Reception 

Reform Club 

The Duke of Gloucester was 
present at a reception given last 
night by the Chairman- of the 
Reform Club. Mr GA Drain, 
on the occasion of a private view 
of an historical exhibition to 
mark the sesquicen tenary of the 
dub. The Lord Mayor locum 
lenens of Westminster was 
among others preseni- 


Dilllier 

Europe an- Atlantic Group 
The European-Aibrnic Group 
hdd a dinner last night at Sc 
Ermin's Hold in honour of Sir 
Oliver Wright. The chairman 
was the Earl ofBessborough and 
Sir Frank Roberts also spoke. 
Among those present were: 

MnnOtra of the DMomatic Corns, tiw 
Secretary-Graenii of the western 
European Union. Uie Deputy Sec- 
retary-General of the Commonwealth 
Secretariat. Baron Rolf Beck, the 
Countess of Bessoorough. Mrs E 
Dangerfipld. Lord and Lady 
OanktwsKr. Sir Reay and Lady 
Geddes. Lady Hullon. JaraueUne Lady 
KUieam. juoiih Countess of ListoweL 
kir Commodore L G P Martin. Lady 
Roberts. Baron and Baroness Robert 
Rothschild. Sir John and Lady Wilis 
and Lady wrlgM. 


Appointments 

Sir Zrimsn Cowen. QC. to be 
Chairman of the Victoria 
League for Commonwealth 
Friendsh ip from next March. 
Mr C.M. Edwards tobeacireuit 
judge on the South Eastern 
Circuit. 

Mr Arthur H. Downes to.be 
President of the Royal Photo- 
graphic Society. 

The following to be members of 
the National Council for Voca- 
tional Qualifications, under the 
chairmanship of Mr Oscar 
DeVille: 

Mr Derek Birley, Mr Clive 
Brain, Mr Gerald Briosdon, Mr 
Robert Cant, Mr Harvey Da- 
vies, Mr Ken Graham, Mrs 
Sfcefla Green. Professor Geof- 
frey HalL Mr William Hughes. 
Mr Peter Reay, Mrs Steve 
Shirley, Mr Owen Thomas and 
Mr John Walkderineu 
The Secretary of State for 
Northern Ireland has appointed 
the following to be members of 
the Standing Advisory Commis- 
sion on Human Rights: 

Professor John Darby. Mrs 
DoriU Field, Professor Tom 
Hadden, Mrs Joan McCrnm 
and M^ Alasdair MacLanghlin. 


Miss Storm Jameson (Mre 
Guv Chapman), died on Sep- 
tember 30. She was 95. . 

* She was the first with 
Rebesca West, lo assert ihe 
new independence of women 
writers in the modem age. For 
more than half a century she 
was an outstanding literary 
figure, and at a critical time in 
European history she was a 
tireless and uniquely effective 
campaigner for writers 
freedom. 

As president of the English 
section of PEN from 1938 to 
1944. she was unsparing in her 
efforts to rescue and assist 
writers from countries under 
Nazi occupation- She also 
helped many of them private- 
lv. Much that she did for 
victims of persecution was 
unknown and. therefore, un- 
sung. But her many fine 
qualities included selflessness 
in serving a cause, and disre- 
gard for personal wealth. 

The latter characteristic 
was. perhaps, rather incongru- 
ous in one who. in other 
respects, was so representative 
of her native Yorkshire. But 
her toughness, her pride and 
her strong individualism were 
of a distinctively North Coun- 
try kind. **I would not be 
beholden", was her chosen 
epitaph. 

Dedication to her wont 
contributed to the unhappi- 
ness of her first marriage, and 
certainly made her a neglectful 
mother to the son bom of it- 
who predeceased her. But she 
became a good grandmother 
to his son in later years. She 
was also a devoted wife to her 
second husband, for whose 
sake she largely eclipsed her- 
self and whose memory she 
piously cherished. 

Margaret Storm Jameson 
was bom at Whitby. York- 
shire, on January S, 1891, the 
daughter of a master-mariner 
and granddaughter of a ship- 
owner named George Galilee. 
It was an ineradicably Nordic 
stock: they had once been, she 
liked to remember, peasants 
of the sea. 

She was educated at home 
and at Leeds University, 
where she was the first woman 
to graduate in English taking, 
f moreover, a first-class degree. 
She was awarded a research 
fellowship there, and - many 
years later - an hon DLitu 

She moved from Leeds to a 
research fellowship at King's 
College London, and also 
began working, variously, as 
copy-writer, as editor of New 
Commonwealth , and as repre- 
sentative for an American 
publisher, Alfred Knopf, for 
whom over the years she 
discovered many important 
writers. In 1920, her London 
MA thesis was published as 
Modem Drama in Europe. 

Having critically admired 
Ibsen and Strindberg as essen- 
tially nineteenth century fig- 
ures, and critically dismissed 
the poetic revival on the one 


separated 





apparently dceimiiS £] 

onltu-pjjnofbcuhgiS 

puNic. Then ai Ih^S* 
she produced the ivmfLra 
JourntY (1 %‘i- 7 U] ^ 
shadowed evervihi.* 



hand and the new realism on 
the other, she came down 
wholeheartedly for Chekhov 
and placed her hopes tor the 


wntien since the' 
World War and proved? 
splendid and unroifJj- 
mg SHWiMtf io ^ 
work, it is now. mosir^Ji 
my. out of print. 

Thai she was 
Yorkshirewoman 

more than local impon-L 
for Yorkshire ■ and the £9 
Riding ahove all - JP 
the earth from whirt , 
needed to be uprooted pLL 

it retained the permanemj 
on her without which r 
would not have undosioJ 
well the terrors of disnEl 
mem and nxitlessnftjT? 1 
overtook Europe after |S 


K - . . bhe exemplified her q*. t 

dramatic future in the work of lid foal no writer could I 
Hugo von Hofmannsthal, truly international in 5 ZJ 
This raised many an English thire until he or she was *21 
eyebrow, as did her spirited m home. ■ 

and remarkably well- written Shtf , ike - . 

attack on the modern novel 50 h i ^ h-iH 1®? 
vears later {Parrhw » f nl o "he ^ristentill,^ 

1970). But she had made her 

mark. It was clear that an . «e\.* r i lv -i SSIJ 

individual taleni had am«gj ^, 0 ° mv skuH ^ I'M 
didactic, intense and truthful ... . . W| we 

of 


to the point 
embarrassment. 

.As a novelist - and a very 
prolific one - she brought to 
her fiction a rare combination 
of qualities: impassioned hu- 
manity. penetration of mind, 
and remarkable technical ac- 
complishment. Her best work 
is wonderfully readable. The 
things that she saw on her 
European joume vs for PEN 
provided invaluable raw ma- 
terial for what may come to be 
regarded as her most success- 
ful novels: Cousin Honoreand 
Europe to Let (both 1940). and 
Cloudless May ( 1944). 

Hers was a creative habit of 
autobiography, and it was^ 
only when the substance of 
autobiography had ripened in 
her mind that she discovered 
herself os a novelist, first with 
the “Mary Hansyke" se- 
quence. set in Victorian Whit- 
by ("Danesacre") and based 
on the life of her grandmother, 
and then with a second trilogy 
centred on Mary's grand- 
daughter. "Mary Harvey 

Russell’*, largely, of course. 
Miss Jameson herself. 

The Journal of Mary Hcrvcy 
Russell (1945) dropped all 
pretence at disguise and re- 
counted her own habits of 
mind and experiences during 
the years of crisis and war in a 
vein of poetic introspection 
recalling Rilke's Malic 
Laurids Brigge. (Rilke, like 
Valery, was a lifelong influ- 
ence.) It was her hope, at least 
before she had written Jour- 
ney from the North, that she 
would be judged by the 
achievement of this Journal. 

A steady stream of novels 
through the 1950s and 1960s 


into my skull, 
the Jour new “and while" J 
eyes are taking you m, t 
brain is trying 10 guess w) 
you are thinking and what * 
keep you at a safe distance 
Many people came to find ^ 
gaze too bleak, and tun* 
away from her work in i 
laier years. 

The best ofit-ihc noveko 
the 1 9 30s and 1940s. somci 
the journalism. Journey fra 
the North and Fart/uWll’cn 
- will he discovered by n 
readers, not only for its quaj 
ties of intelligent cnkitaj 
mem but also for its absdnd 
truthful retlcction5 of a toug 
mind, a furious life and 
terrible age. / 

Her last novel. There B'tf 
he a Short Interval, was pub 
1 1 shed in 1 471 and her la 
book. Sjkvking of StauM 
appeared in (974. In this le 
profound understanding r 
only of ihe writer bui 0 
French culture genenlU .4 
spoke near-perfect French.! 
revealed. 

She married, lint. Chafe 
Douglas Clarke, by whom sh 
had one son and from what 
she was divorced in 1921 Ho 
second husband, whom sk 
married the following yet 
was ihe soldier and hutorai 
Guy Chapman. He died id 
1472 and. three years later. id 
edited his autobiography..! 
Kind of Survivor, which tad 
been left in the form of noted 

Alter his retirement in itts 
from the chair of modern 
history at Leeds, she move! 
with him to Cambridge, where 
he needed to be for his wwfcj 
and there, despite her yearal 
ing for the North, she B| 
mained to the end of her life 


SIR TIMOTHY CREASEY 


Births, Marriages, . Deaths and In Memoriam 


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BIRTHS 

Soi : 

■mi - . n 

e. inie Suraburyj and RagMs. a wa. 

ol DTi' Bsnll Caflum. 

Stagin BOURNE ■ OO OctoDrt- 2nd. to Pcneto- 

nn pe tnee Low) and MMhaeL a son 

151 Thomas James, 

reaan CLANCY on Monday 29(1) Seatember 

sianil to Joanna mfe Thoms) and David, a 

k;w- daugniw. Katie. 

DIO ‘* COLV&E ■ On Octoher an. to Mazy 

verSK Am (Nee Banks-MvtftO and Jona- 

Uun. a son. Richard Lawrence, a 
5* u ~r brother tor Harry. 

Tyna CRAWLEY- On 27U) Seplember at Hie 


Norfolk and Norwicti Hossltal. to 
Char lode (nee MMer) and Henry, a 
son. Olher. A brolher for Voittt 
and Florence 

CULME-1EYMOUR On Octabn' Slh. In 
Basel, to Kann and MJchaoi. a son. 
Mxiiaei 

DAY ■ On 29th September ai SL 
nwraa's HosottaL Wimbledon, to 
Fetimy into Benson) and Andtony. a 
dauqhMr. Sophie EHzabeth Rose- 
mary. a sour tor Henry. Rannlph 
and Emily. 

FIELD. On September 23rd at Ipswich, 
lo Anion la tnee Lera?) and Gerald, a 
daughter: Emily Katherine, a stater 
(or Alexander 

FLOwnT-wu. on 3rd October at Uie 
Royal Shrewsbury Hospital, to Diane 
and Stephen, a daughter. Cairuha 
Soph ia. 

POM) - On October 2nd. lo Margaret 
ince Haltenley) and John, a son. Mi- 
chael John, a brother (o Alexandra 

HARBORD-HAMOND - On am Octo- 
ber. ai St Georoe's Hospital, to Katy 
and John, a daughter 


NOAMS- On October 4Ui lo Cure In** 
Parsons) and Jonathan a son Timo> 
Uiy. a brother for Natasha. 
UTT-Oo October a*d. co Nicola and 
Stephen- a daughter. Rose Caroline. 
KMQ - oo October Gth lo Sharon (nee 
Cannings) and Clive, a daughter 


LOVELL ■ On 3rd October, lo Virginia 
tnee weatherM) and Alan, a daugh- 
ter. Lucinda Mary, sister lo Emma. 

MACKENZIE - On October 2nd. at Si 
Peters HospUaL Chectsey. lo Fiona 
i nee Poole) and Ian. a daughter. 
Katharine Ann 

HUMPHREY- On 30th September 
1986. lo Penny and Charles, a son. 

SHAW - On October 2nd. lo Sarah <n£e 
Clark) and Martin, a daughter Sophia 
Clair Thorndike. 

SORENSEN - On October 3rd lo San- 
dra and Andrew, a daughter Lucy 
Elia, a stster far Katy. 

SUTCLIFFE - On Octtoer SUi. In Cam- 
bridge. hi Gabriefle (nee Carter) and 
John, a son. Laurence Nicholas. 

TDMKMSON - On Sunday 5th October 
1986. at Wycombe General Hospital, 
lo Sandra m6e Bail) and Chris, a 
much longed for daughter, victoria 
Louise. A sfeter for Steven. Andrew 
and Mark. 

VANE ■ On October 3rd. to Sia uiie 
van Deutekom) and Anthony, a 
daughter. Holly. 


MARRIAGES 


I - The marriage look 
place on S e p t e m b er 29th al Holy 
TlnnKy Church. Pitlochry. Pertstnre. 
or Mr. John Alexander Chance, cldesl 
son of Mr and Mrs A*!. Glance, of 
Cerrards Cross, and Mbs Margo 
Gunn, only daughter, of Mr. and Mrs 
D J- Gunn, of Doncaster. 


DEATHS 


AMSIfKHItt - On 2nd October 1986. 
Virginia WiomlU Livingstone Arm- 
strong. of 1171 Frrtiy Switzerland. 
Cherished wife of P. Livingstone 
Armstrong, and mother of Richard 
T.. Robert W.. Vtctona T. and Peter 
A. Radsrh. and Step mother at Rose- 
mary L. Armslrong. A cheerful 
memorial service will be held on 
Thursday 30th Ortober 1986 at 
6pm. In SI. Oohimoa*s Churct). in 
Ponl Street. London SW3. Ptease NO 
Flowers or mourning. (She who has 
passed on. is at peace in We Hands of 
God. and we i*to*re wilh her.) Will 
rnends able to tdlend (or Buffet Sup- 
per nearby afterwards. Mease write 
or telephone Livingstone Armstrong 
- z 171 Ferity, or irate name with OI- 
9004266 Evenings alter Sura, m lieu 
of flowers, roniribuuon to the 
Churrn of Scotland win be gratefully 
rerenod for Mission Tea Clung and 
Medical Education, m Developing 
Countries. 

■ARNETT On Ihe OU) of October 1986 
In hosHUl in Maidstone. Kenneth Pe- 
ter B. A much loved husband of Jean 
and Father of Stephen and John 
Former under Sheriff of Kem. soun- 
tor and (ale Senior Partner of 
Whitehead MonrKion end Oo. Funcr- 
alvrvire will lake place al All Saints 
Church. Maidstone on Thursday 9U» 
October al 1 1 30am. followed by pn 
\ ale rremanon 'JDonauons lb 
MaMstone branch of Cancer Re- 
search. 2d Maxwell Drive. 
Maldsione 


MME - On October 2nd. tragically. 

. as the result of a car aoctdenL Jane, 
wife of the Mt Brigadier John 
Bumv. and mother of Ann Jean, and 
Simon. Funeral al Edmgton Priory 
Church. Westbury. Wiltshire, on 
Monday October 13th al 2-45mn. 
Flowers io A.w. Mays. Westbury. 
Please. 

■ROADHURST ■ On October 6th al 
Fowey. John Kenyon, beloved hus- 
band of Qyime. loving father of 
Peter and Joanne. Funeral Service al 
Fowey Parish Church on Thursday 
9th October at 2 p.m. followed by 
Interment al Fowey Omutary. Fam- 
ily Rowers only, donations to Ueu. If 
so desired, lo The Fowey Hospital 
and Welfare comnmiee C/o Lloyds 
Bank. Fowey. or to Fowey Parish 
Churcti c/o the Rev. O. Woods. 
Fowey. 

CHORLEY On October 2nd. at home. 
Katharine. Lady Charley. Requiem 
Mass a The Church of The Carme i - 
ftrs. Kensington Church SL al 10.30 
am on Saturday lllh October. 

CLARKE . On 5th October Blanche 
Margaret (Daisy) Clarke (nee Eagles) 
aged 93 ym beloved wife and pal for 
over Ai yrc of the late Captain Eric 
Godfrey Clarke 7in Bn. Devonshire 
RegL Mo Church service short pri- 
vate service ai graveside, no flowers 

CREASEY On Sunday morning Octo- 
ber 6th al home General Sb- Timothy 
May Creasey. K.C.B. O-B-E. w.O. 
Dearly loved Husband. Father & 
Grandfalher. The Funeral Service 
wdl lake place al SL Andrew's 
Church. Betchamp SL PauL Essex, 
on Friday loth October al 2.30 pm 
for (amity & dose friends. A Memori- 
al Sen ire will be new later. 

DOmmSKA On 38th September 
1966. at the Middlesex Hospital Lon- 
don. Counless Olga Natalie. Any 
relatives should telephone Uie Hospi- 
laL on 01 636 8333. as soon as 
possible. Friends may telephone the 
hospital 'or Ol 629 0945. 

DUNMMALD - 141h Earl of In Jersey 
on 4th . Ortober. Ian. i4Ui Earl of 
Dundonald. dearly loved husband of 
Margaret and father of Douglas and 
Tanya. 

EM>ES< On Oct 3 1986. WllfrW 
George of 5 Frampton Court. Chel- 
tenham Place. London W3. 
Cremation al Mortlake Crematori- 
um, London 5W14. on Thun 9Ui Oct 
d i pm. Family flowers only, but 
donations If desired to Cancer 
Research. 

E3SAM suddenly on October 9lh 
1986. al Woodford. Maurice Sey- 
mour aged 52 years. Son of Leslie 
and the bate Grace and brother of 
'Lionel Pm ale funeral, no Dowers, 
but if desired donations for Cancer 
Research c/o Jack Warwick Funeral 
Director. 2a wallb Rd. Kettering 
8S636. 

FLETCHER On 2nd October, peace- 
fullv. al King Edward Vli Hospital. 
Muthurd. Dorothy Ann Whadcoal 
(nee GriKoni. Widow of ihe late Cap- 
Lnn George Herbert FMrner RN . in 
her 97m year Funeral service al 
Wnhorotigh Green Churrh. Tuesday 
7U) Onoher. al apm. Enquiries and 
Flowers io. W Rrytirr A- Sons 
Prluorih. Susses Tel: 42174 

SURREY ' On Ortober 6th. peacefully, 
in hospital. Vivien of OMm Mill W 
Lasitxitim. Midhursl. W Sussex. 
Dear wife of Donald, beloved mother 
of Nr- ola. Jamie and Sara. Funeral 
Service 12 noon Friday 10th October 
al SI Mary's Church, w Lailngton 
followed bv pnvaie cremation. Fam- 
ily (towns only ptease 


On October 4th at Great 
Ormond Street HospitaL Luma 
O tore, much loved bany daughter of 
Susie and PauL sisier of Emma. Be- 
loved granda tighter of Dorothy and 
Ron Cailarti. and Audnto WrtfiL po- 
nanons only to Hearts tor fOdy 
Fund at Great Ormond Street Hospi- 
tal. WC1. Service al Coiders Green 
Crematorium ai 10.45 am on 
Wednesday 8th Ortober. 

NEHRERT - On September 30Ui 1986. 
Mary Patricia of Albert Terrace 
Mews. Funeral Sen ice al St. Maryie- 
bone Cremalormm. East EM Road. 
East Finchley. N2. on Friday October 
lOtti ai 2.30 p.m. Flowers lo 
Leverton & Sons. 212 Evershofl SL 
NWi. 

RWLESON ■ On 4lh of October 1986 In 
London. Gwendoline ingieson aged 
90. widow of PtHhp Ingieson CM.a 
M.8JE M.C.. late Sudan Civil Service. 
Dear mother of Joan and grandmoth- 
er of PMIId. Robin and John. 
Service. West London Crematorium. 
NWIO Monday 13th October 
3.46pm. No Dowers mease but dona- 
Itoas lo St. Mary Abbots Hospital 
wa 

JONES -on 4th October, at Monmouth 
Hospital. Manone of 4. Whuecross 
Court- Monmouth fFormefy of 
Tenby). Funeral Service al SI. 
Mary's Church. Monmouth, on 
Wednesday 8th October, ai liam. 
followed by Cremation. No flowers 
by reauesL donations in Ueu. for the 
League of Friends. Montnotdh Hospi- 
tal. may be sera to The Henry 
Spencer Funeral Service. 16 Qen- 
dower SL Monmouth. Gwent. 

LEWIS - On Ortober SUi 1986. Mer- 
lon. dearly loved by family and 
friends. Funeral wUl lake place al 
Manchester Cremalortum on Thurs- 
day 9th Ortober. al turn. Family 
flowers only, donations if desired m 
Cancer Research. Christie's Hospital. 
Manchester, ah enquiries to T 
Broome & Sons. Tel. 061 8819161. 

LASH - On October 5th. peacefully. In 
lhe39U) yrar a) tils consecration. Ihe 
Rl.Rev.au Lash, formerly Bishop of 
Bombay- Regiuem and Interment 
HlUtetd Fnarv. Dorchester. DorseL 
Thursday October 9th. 12.00 noon. 
Tel. 030 03345 

LEAVER On Sunday Ortober Uie 5<h 
peacefully at home after a long ill- 
ness, borne wiin inspiring courage. 
Leslie Brian, in his 72nd year. Devot- 
ed husband of Dorothy and much 
loved father of Andrew No How Its 
please, but al h» miuesi chan table 
do nations to The Salvation Army- 
Funeral strike al Salisbury Crema- 
torium al 2.15pm on Monday Uw 
13U) October 

LOBS . On 30th September 1986. 
Chris, aged 76. peacefully, after 
some yearn of falling health. Most 
loving and dearly loved husband, of 
Carol (Beddington i of John's Corner. 
Rosudgeon. Penzance. Cremation 
has taken place 

MORRISON - On 2nd Ortober. peace- 
fully. al Fcrriby House. Mary 
Morrison of Beverley, aged 86. Dear 
wife of Ihe tale William Francis 
Morrison, beloved mother and 
grandmother Funeral Service al Si. 
Mary’s Church. Beverley, al 1.30pm 
■00 We dnesday 8th October. 

ROPER POWER - On October Sth 
peacefully al Oxford. May Lilian 
Elisabeth, m her 78to year Rethnem 
ai Douai Abbey. Upper 
woolhampion. Reading. 2 30pm. 
Friday Mourned by ToMe..Caiher- 
ine. Claire. Giles. Martin. Elisabeth 
and her ten grandchildren 


MEANLEY ■ On October 2nd. peaceful- 
ly after a short Illness at Shermg ha m. 
Dr. John w Ilham Meaniey Mjts-. 
L-rep.. dearly beloved husband of 
Dorothy, and much loved father of 
Jeremy and Christopher. (Funeral 
service Burgh-Parva on Friday. Oc- 
tober io. al 2pm. Flowers to Blyth's 
Funeral Services, Sheruighara. 
pteas e). 

MRIR-on October 4m. 1986. Sir Hen- 
ry Thompson. C.B.. 

peacefully ai home after a long Ill- 
new. . Funeral private. Family 
(towers only bid donations. If de- 
Steed. io Cancer Research. 
STRAUSS - On October 2nd 1986. 
peacefully al the Brampton Hospital, 
alter scHness fought with formidable 
courage. Julius aged 76. deeply cher- 
ished husband of Irene, devoted and 
adored father of Jimmy. Funeral ser- 
vice at the Liberal Jewish Cemetery 
The Lodge. Potato Lane. NWIO. On 
Tuesday October 7ih al 3om. Family 
flowers only, bul donations to. Ihe 
Brampton Hospital. Special Cardiac 
Fund, would be appreciated. A me- 
morial service lo be announced 
TODD - On October 4th. peacefully at 
Dockside. New Quay. Appledore. 
North Devon. Professor Cedi 
(Sweeney) A.R CJV.. F.R.SA. aged 
74 years. Beloved husband of 
PhUUppe ex Rhodes. Maker ere and 
Benin University. Funeral Service lo 
take Place at Apptedore Churrh on 
Wednesday. Ortober 8th at 1 1 .30 am 
followed bet cremation at the North 
Devon Crentatorrara al 12.3D. Fam- 
ily (towers only please, 
na MONTAGU on October isi. 1986. 
Anne Maori Olivia van Montagu, 
suddenly m her 86th year, wife of 
Adrian and mother of John. Funeral 
al Chtnern Crematorium. 
Ammiram. on Monday. October 
L3Ui at 12.00 noon. Family Dowers 
only 

WARREN ■ SWETTENHAM - Sudden- 
ly. on sal unlay October 4Ui. Thomas 
Edward Eaton, of Can Court. 
Cirencester. Private Funeral. A Ser- 
vice of Thanksgiving al Aroppey St. 
Peter on Saiurtiav October 11th at 
11-30 a m.. No flowers, donations if 
desired w British Heart Foundation. 
WHEATLEY ■ On 4iu Ortober. very 
peacefully. Sister Ursula, religious of 
Ihe Sacred Heart, dearly loved sister 
of Joan. Yoiande. and Sheila 

R SC_J.. and a uni of Madeleine 
Sophie. Reg idem Mass al I lam. 
Thursday October 9tn. al the Con- 
v Cnl of the Sacred Heart Digbv 
Stuart College. R ©champion Lane. 
SW15. 


MEMORIAL SERVICES 


FRANCIS ■ A sen ice for Jill Francis, 
will be held in St. John's Church. 
Hyde Park Cresreni. W2. At l?.noon 
on Tue sday 3ia October 1986. 

WETTOR A service of thanksgiving 
for ine life of Wing ConwianderBUT 
Wetlon irewi. one time memner of 
600 City of London Squadron 
tR.auvAFL and founder of tocuon 
CteanuigSenTres. will be held in Un- 
church of Si Ctemenl Danes. Strand. 
wCl On Friday lOth October J986 
ai noon 


IN MEMORIAM - PRIVATE 


COMBE Babe October 7ih. 
Mam happy memories. 


198S 


General Sir Timothy 
Crease}'. KCB. OBE. who 
commanded in Northern Ire- 
land from 1977 until 1979, 
died on October 5. He was 63. 

He went lo Northern Ire- 
land ai the age of 54 with a 
reputation for toughness after 
long record in colonial 
warfare, much of it fighting 
guerrillas. His reputation 
within the Army, however, 
resied as much upon his 
uncompromising zeal in root- 
ing out inefficiency within his 
own ranks. 

With his departure from 
Ulster, he waived retirement 
and soon departed for Oman 
on a controversial final lour of 
duty for his old friend. Sultan 
Qaboos Bin Said. The Sultan 
had personally asked for 
Creasey. a request which the 
Prime Minister granted. 

Timothy May Creasey was 
bom on September 2 1. 1923. a 
soldier's son. and was educat- 
ed at Clifton College. He was 
dedicated to infantry soldier- 
ing and was commissioned 
into the Indian Army in 1942. 
serving with the 10th Baluch 
Regiment in South-East Asia. 
Italy and Greece. Four years 
later he transferred to the 
British Army and joined the 
Royal Norfolks. 

By 1955. at the age of 33. he 
was a major in the 39th 
Infantry Brigade, serving in 
Kenya during the Mau Mau 
uprising. The next year he had 
his .first taste of Ireland with 
the IRA's border campaign. 
He then went as an instructor 
at the Staff College for two 
years until 1 965. when he was 
promoted to command the 1 st 
Battalion. Royal Anglian Reg- 
iment. which was then serving 
in Aden ai the height of the 
guerrilla offensive. 

From 1968 until 1970 he 
commanded lllh Infantry 
Brigade in BAOR. He attend- 
ed the Royal College of De- 
fence Studies in 1971. and 
from 1972 to J975 was sec- 
onded to Oman as Command- 
er of the Sultan's Armed 
Forces with the rank of major- 
general. 


Creasey’s energetic tempera- 
ment - with the help of a full 
brigade of Iranian infantry 
and SAS soldiers - ensured 
that the pressure was main- 
tained against the Dhofari 
rebels and their allies. 

By the lime he left, in 
February 1975. the Sultan was 
well on his way towards re- 
establishing his' authority in 
Dhofar. and the campaign 
which Creasey had planned 
and conducted - with a combi- 
nation of puritanism and 
bluffness which concealed po- 
litical subtlety - was brought to 
a successful conclusion two 
years later. 

He then served as director 
of infantry until being ap- 
pointed GOC and Director of 
Operations in Northern Ire- 
land. It was said at the time 
that it was a mistake to send 
an officer to command in 
Northern Ireland whose expe- 
rience had been Largely gained 
in "colonial wars". Bul 
Creasey proved himself to be a 
popular and energetic com- 
mander. so far as his soldiers 
were concerned. 

As one who liked to get 
results - and to get them 
quickly - he now had to master 
a new art of warfare unlike any 
he had hitherto encountered. 

He had a tendency to press for 
a military solution, a stance 
which put him at loggerheads 
with his opposite number in 
the RUC. Sir Kenneth New- 
man. Their disagreements 
came to a head in 1979 with 
the general demanding that 
the Army take over responsi- 
bility for policing. 

Essentially a soldiers’ sol- 
dier. he was in temperament the 6th . . 

more like his political master then the 4th Cavalry Di'^ 
in the province. Mr Roy Signals Squadron. Laier. 1 ™" 
Mason. Both believed in 1920 to 1929. he rai»d ** 
speaking their minds, and they commanded 53rd Division o 
got on well together. ■ signals (TAJ. and then i » 

nts wide experience made eight vears was deputy fy 
him a natural successor to signals officer. Western Cbj- 

General Sir John Archer as C- mand During thc Secon 

m-C Untied Kingdom Land ' 

Forces in 1980. Bui he was 
soon offered the post chief of 
defence staff tn Oman, which 
he accepted without 


however, drew criticism frofl 
senior Omanis within ihe 
ministry. 

Both in appearance aw 
outlook. Creasey was a coo- 
ventional soldier who set vm 
high standards for himselfano 
others. This made him a 
limes rather demanding and 
he certainly had little time for 
officers who. he felt, were not 
taking soldiering sufficiently 
seriously. 

Nicknamed ‘‘The Bull ay 
fellow officers for his formida- 
ble size and courage, he was® 
good golfer and a keen shot. 

He married, in 1951. Ru* 
Annette Friend, who survives 
him wilh their son and daugh- 
ter (another son died young). 

SIR GODFREY 
LLEWELLYN. Bait 

Colonel Sir Godffey 
Llewellyn. Bart.. CB. Cm- 
MC. who died on October 3a 
the age of 93. was for 
years a leading figure m 
commercial and public life « 
South Wales. 

Robert Godfrey Llewellyn 
was born on May 13. 1893 . m 
was intended for the Navi: 
and went both to Osborne ana 
to Dartmouth, joining **■ 
senior service in 1906 aw 

becoming a sub-lieutenant ib 
1913. The following.^ 
however, he resigned ;n £ 
vQurof the Army, in W * ,|C ®T 
served with the Montgomery- 
shire Yeomanry Cavalry un 
J917. 

For a year he commanded 
the Brigade Signal TrWP f • 
the 6 th Mounted 


Creasey arrived in Oman at "hesitation. 

the ministry of defenec^there 


World War he was promin« 
in the Home Guard. 

After retiring from ih* ^ 
lar forces in 1937. he was 
busy with appointments 


...si union. j.j.j 

the time when thecampaign in His task was to re-organize vanQl * , Hc S So. 

e ministry nf man of the Wales and I 


the southern province of 
Dhofar was building up to a 
crescendo. His experiences in 
Aden and his previous knowl- 
edge of Indian troops stood 
him in good stead, as much of 
the Sultan's army was com- 
posed of Baluchis. 

He took over the responsi- 
bilities which had previously 
been driided between the 
army commander and the 
Sultan's defence secretary. 
There was no shortage of 
weapons or equipment, and 


mouihshire Conscrvai 1 '' 


and modernise the Sultan'c ''wuinsmie k. «(•«■■ r ^ 
°rmy. and U* «»»'«• 

with customarv vigour, living prcs,d . cm ° L n SIX ocC w «« 
.nacaornmndanon ofpala.ia! ^ MiEStfS 


splendour. He also reorga- 
nized the arms procurement 
s\stcm with the result that ho 
alone, and not the defence 
ministry s lender board, 
awarded contracts. Manx con- 
tracts vycm io British 'firms, 
but with the approval of the 
Sultan, himseff a staunch An- 
glophile. The general's style. 


His talents were well 
in 1458 as chairman Qi “ 
organizing committee , 
Empire and Common 4 ”- 
Games. 

He married, in 
Frances Doris Kennaro. 
died in 1969. There was a 
and daughter of the mar™* 




than 


will 'give' nothing -‘“cm' 


- rmmtai cuaor. TJWf K**vns* . » -**er 


THE TIMES TUESDAY OCTOBER 7 1986 


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THE ARTS 



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Animal 

passions 


television 


is an excel Jen?"*; 1 l S ames ) 

• b f rayed ^ th«?5nS 

-S5»as , Js 

; tel in the tfSry ™ 

- unfolding take the earliest 
. oPWWiimty to behave badly 

“? Uve of f unearned income. 

'rrTSFU* LesK e Thmuss 

£2* T MMfr seen last 
night, in the fourth episode, as 
® nsrng property- speculator 
a»g Young Conservative. He 

toe pigs in Animal 
Farm by at once admitting his 

^come one bf the 

G2W As the snob- 
tosh Lady Grace Fanner fjm 
Bennett) says, after Titamss 
■~ as trapped her daughter into 
“He’s paid os the 
eomphmem of wanting to join 
re .- W ith such swine as 
: l,tonss gaining power, H is 

• not surprising that the vision 
‘ o* the Reverend Simeon 
Simcox (Michael Hordern) - 
a New Jerusalem, British and 
socialist— remains unrealized. 
-£* “ “» adaptation of 
Bndeshead Revisited, John 
Mortimer is using in Paradise 
Postponed the heightened re- 
alism at which he excels. His 
craftsmanship resembles toe 
best Edwardian work, solid 
toxt also beautiful. Clothes, 

- motor cars, music (by Elgar), 

countryside, characters 
their sins, all are of toe best 
quality, which is to say rather 
more vivid seems —iwwi 

They therefore malcp good 
television. 

a James Anderton, inter- 
viewed in Famous Last Words 
(BBC2) by Peter France, sees, 
as Chief Constable of Greater 
Manchester, the wretched of 
the earth in a less iovefy 
setting. “I've seen this society 
of ours over toe last two 
decades deteriorate alarm- 
ingly", he says, tailing ns that 
we need to return to "old- 
fashioned ideas of right and 
wrong**. He himself; a Meth- 
odist lay preacher, hopes one 
day to be received into the 
Roman Catholic church. 

Christians long ago ac- 
cepted that paradise on earth 
is taking looser than antici- 
pated to . arrive. It will be 

interesting to see whether 
John Mortimer, whose works 
are full of God, will retain his 
faith in a socialism which has 
also been pat oft- 

Andrew Gimson 


A phantasmal 
presence after 
the old master 


Anthony Caro 

Waddington/Knoedler 

Stephen Cox 

Tate 

Michael Kenny 
Royal Academy 


Helaine Blmnenfeld 

Quinton Green 


Angela Conner 

Browse and Darby 


Inevitably the death of Henry 
Moore must seem like the end of an 
era, but it does also serve to turn our 
minds again to toe present and 
future of sculpture in this country. 
And, though it is only a coincidence, 
it is a very timely coincidence that 
at the moment there are a surprising 
number of new sculpture shows 
around toe West End, several in 
galleries that we do not associate 
with sculpture at alL 
Pride of place must go to the 
show, spread over three galleries m 
Cork Street (two of the Waddragton 
spaces and the Knoedler Gallery), of 
recent work by Anthony Caro (until 
October 25). Not only because he is 
obviously one of the biggest names 
in British sculpture or the post- 
Moore generations (he even began 
working as an a ssist an t in Moore's 
studio), but also, much more im- 
portantly. because this is unmistak- 
ably the best show he has made in a 
decade or so. These days we 
associate him primarily with his 
very gaunt, geometrical sculpture of 
welded steel from toe eariy Sixties, 
and forget that be began as a 
representational modeller. But even 
in the first, most uncompromising 
abstractions one could, with a bit of 
imagination, see suggestions o£ say, 
a redining human figure peeping 
through. And that phantasmal pres- 
ence has remained. 

Caro himsetfhas readily admitted 
that often his work takes some 
initial inspiration from a repre- 
sentational sculpture of the past — 
Donatello, for instance, or Classical 
Greek — even though nearly all 
evidence of that parentage is effaced - 
except for the artist himself. And 
now he seems to be going a 
significant step or two further. He 
has gone back to modelling, and has 
even produced some graceful, ai-. 
most ethereal, female nudes mod- 


GALLERIES 


died from the life: a selection was 
shown in New Year earlier in the 
year, but not yet here. 

The new show in London does, 
however, bring closer to the surface 
the r epre se ntational basis: es- 
pecially in the series of Variations 
on an Indian Theme al Knoedler, 
where the inspiration, an 11th- 
cemury Indian sculpture of Flying 
Female Warriors, is reproduced in 
the catalogue and is unmistakably 
present in the Caros, though grad- 
ually reducing in perceptibility as 
the series progresses. These works 
have a wonderful richness and 
interior tension. Elsewhere the 
manner can be monumental, as in 
the two biggest pieces. Scamander 
and Rape qfihe Sabines, or it can be 
improbably light and flighty: several 
of the table faeces not only have 
romantic titles like Sea Symphony 
and Solar Wind, but achieve an 
almost baroque quality as curls of 
metal, ap p ar ently unsupported, fly 
effortlessly through the air. 

Stephen Cox began, in the public 
eye at least, as an uncompromising 
abstractionist, and a minimalist to 
boot. But in the last few years strong 
representational elements have 
been creeping into his work also, 
often in a curiously refracted form, 
through refere n ce to such prec- 
edents as shattered antique wall- 
paintings or details of baroque 
sculpture. Last year be too turned to 
India for inspiration, spending 
some months out there preparing 
for a show in the Delhi Triennaie 
which would be mainly concaved 
and executed on toe spot. The show 
of recent work at the Tate until 
October 19 is substantially that 
Delhi show, but with some subtrac- 
tions and some additions of work 
conceived in India but completed, 
after Cox’s return to Europe. 

The Indian seems to 

have been very fruitful, giving him a 
whole new repertoire of images to 
work on. The largest pieces. Rock 
Cut and Thousand Pillared Hall, 
bear the same sort of relation to 
fragmentary Indian sculpture that 
Cox's earlier works did to relics of 
the Classical world, while in the 
smaller pieces, particularly the three 
flow-pieces called Domestic Rit- 
uals, he seems to have absorbed the 
Indian inspiration at a much deeper 
level, referring more to lines of 
Indian thought or Indian ways of' 
perceiving than to toe more super- 
ficial stylistic traits of Indian art. It 
is a fascinating development in this 
ever-fascinating artist. And, who 
knows, it may lead to a more 
relaxed and expansive approach: if 




one could reproach Cox with any- 
thing. it might be that he is just that 
little. Ml too controlled, too tastefrd, 
too buttoned-up. 

Michael Keray, showing recent 
work in the stiD-unrefuibished Di-, 
ploma Gallery of the Royal Acad- 
emy until October 19, remains true. 
to~ his' established style: the elegant 
abstractions are linked bytheir titles 
to some outside reality, as here with 
the three groups called Christ on His 
Cross: But he too has been under- 
going some changes of late: he has 


taken to carving stone, and toe 
effect is rougher and bolder than we 
have been used to hi his modelled, 
assembled or wood-carved work. 
Also, it must be said, his drawings 
are so beautiful as independent 
work that one is sometimes in grave 
danger of preferring them to the less 
intimate and manageable sculptnres 
they generally give rise to. 

In Cork Street, again, there are 
two shows by women sculptors that 
are well worth contemplation. At 
Quinton Green until toe end of the 


Representational basis coming 
closer lo the surface in Anthony 
Caro's vanished steel The Milky 
Way (1985-86, above); and a 
fruitful Indian influence revealing 
itself in Stephen Cox's granite 

week there is a modified version of. 
.toe Hdaine BhnaeafcM show 1 
wrote about enthusiastically from 
the new Whitefriara gallery in 
Coventry earlier in toe year. The 
added works continue Biumenfeld's 
progression towards complete free- 
dom of form: the extraordinary 
underwater fronds and frills of the 
newer modelled work are highly 
expressive, but she also has an 
astonishing ability to bend toe 
hardest marbles to her will, in fluid, 
vaguely anthropomorphic forms 
which change association and 
significance as one moves round 
them or as they themselves are 
moved and rearranged. 

Angela Conner, at Browse and 
Darby until October 25. shows signs 
of a disturbingly split personality. 
Her abstract pieces, most of which 
this time round involve water 
moving them or flowing through, 
over and around them, are very 
imaginative, interesting particularly 
in their conception but also very 
effectively realized in toe chosen 
materials, especially stone. On the 
other hand, her representational 
pieces, including the new version of 
the Yalta Memorial in South Ken- 
sington and the prize- winning ma- 
quette for a large sculpture at 
Louisville Airport, hardly rise 
above the level of kitsch. When she 
is good, she is very, very good, so no 
doubt we can overlook the fact that 
when she is bad 


OPERA 


Carmen 
Marlowe Theatre, 
Canterbury 


Robin Leftvre's new produc- 
tion of Carmen for Kent 
Opera is toe antithesis of 
Graham Vick's astonishing 
version for Scottish Opera. 
Mindful perhaps of the risks 
involved in doing something 
daring on tour, when invari- 
ably there are only one or two 
performances for audiences to 
assimilate new approaches, 
Lefevrc has opted for conven- 
tion garnished by some fine 
detail That applies also to 
Grant Hicks's set. a three- 
sided arcade which converts 
neatly from town square to 
cafe interior through toe addi- 
tion of a few shutters and 
vines, and then, by a process 
of subtraction, to a Gothic 
ruin for toe act that takes place 
in the gypsies* camp. 

Overall, however, the 
drama itself seems a little 
lacking in passion, partly be- 
cause most of the principal 
characters are drawn loo 
squarely. Carmen dominates 
the fate of herself and others 
rather than being seen to 
submit io external forces. But 
Ann-Marie Muhtr sings and 
acts the pan within that 
framework well enough, with 
an appropriate, slightly husky 
timbre, though unfortunately 
her accent adds to the stiffen- 
ing effect. Mirada (Meryl 
Drawer) is in both suture and 
manner a terrified schoolgirl 
rather than the symbol of 
constancy, while Escamiilo 
(Alan Oke) is scarcely the 
sinister catalyst that he should 
surely be. 

Howard Haskin's Don Jort 
in feet emerges as the central 
character. The slightly thin 
vocal quality he produced 
eariy on seemed to promise an 
anuclimacuc end, but in the 
event be showed that he had 
plenty in reserve, and he acted 
throughout with a convincing 
dignity. This Don Jost may 
lack judgement and self-con- 
trol (just as Carmen does) but 
he possesses unfailing con- 
fidence even when felling 
victim to Carmen's charms. 

The chorus work is musi- 
cally reliable if choreographi- 
cally sometimes a little 
crowded, both with people 
and incidental detail, as if 
Lefevrc were worried that he 
it not have generated 


sufficient atmosphere. And in 
toe pit Ivan Fischer, with a 
spruce though smallish or- 
chestra. pushes the score along 
at a frenetic pace, perhaps 
forgetting that Carmen is not 
about feverish passion alone, 
but about the weaker, destruc- 
tive side of mankind. 


John Russell Taylor Stephen Pettitt 


i. - 
• . .1.1.. 

. In,". - 

„ A- 

t 


^ LPO/Tennstedt 

Festival Hall/ 

V Radio 3 


If KJaus Tennstedi’s Beetho- 
ven is becoming more Mah- 
Icrian. as has been argued in 
these columns, then at least 
his Mahler is staying very 
thoroughly Mahlerian; not 
onlv in its sweep, of course, 
but" in the way this sweep is 
made to depend on an in- 
tensely felt awkwardness 
throughout the musical 
material. 

Other conductors will make 
the first movement of the 
Third Symphony stride for- 
ward as a march beset by 
obstacles, and it works very 
well that way. But Mr 
Tcnnstcdt found sounds of 
discord and hesitancy right 
from his cold. bare, slow 
treatment of the brass har- 
mony on the second page. 

There was never any doubt 
that this was a march for a 
funeral, nor was there any 
worn- that Mr Tennstedl 
would overdo the disintegra- 
tion. in spite of his nice line in 
tov sonorities up in toe treble 
(a brilliant effect of pointless 
perfection, used again in toe 
second and fifth movements) 
and despite too the wide 
degree of freedom he allowed 
to his instrumental soloists: 


CONCERTS 


toe end of this first-movement 
development made Mahler’s 
later interest in Ives seem 
obvious. 

It perhaps comes down to a 
control of nuance that allowed 
MrTennstedt to make parts of 
toe waltz as soupy as he liked 
while still leaving open the 
question of whether the feel- 
ing here is real or fake. Then 
there was the fantastic display 
of his command through all 
toe gear-changes of tempo and 
texture in the complex scher- 
zo. although so many cracking 
entries and excessively neat 
phrases gave an effect of 
contrivance, even seif-indul- 
gence, that was avoided in the 
rest of the performance. 

In toe Nietzsche song the 
brass, never quite settled all 
evening, were more perturbed 
by toe slow tempo than was 
the warmly persuasive Walt- 
raud Meier. But in toe finale 
their utterly plain chorales 
were as pure, grand and 
fulfilling as the ethereally de- 
tached. almost Vaughan Wil- 
liams-like string harmony. 
Together they enlarged the 
vision of Heaven, brightly 
introduced by the women of 
the London Philharmonic 
Choir and boys from Eton. 

Paul Griffiths 





lOxb September - 2nd November 1986 

THE ARTIST PUBLISHER 

A Survey by Coracle Press 



||jfh> Km 


uEZZm*** N-. 


crafts council gallery 

12 waerfoo place, .Lower Regent London SWlY4Ad 

iu ^ 

ADMISSION FREE 


ol» 


ROCS POWtU. WOKW*W* A Crirf ” a ° n 


Khras Tennstedt remaining 
thoroughly Mahlerian 

Jorge Bolet 
Festival Hall 

Only at this recital's conclu- 
sion was its predominantly 
serious, even slightly melan- 
choly air dispelled. That was 
when Jorge Bolet offered a 
model demonstration of pian- 
isltc virtuosity applied to 
strictly musician Jy ends: a big- 
fisted performance of Liszt’s 
Venezia e Napoli, which did 
frill justice to its lyrical as well 
as its glittering possibilities. In 
spite of his occasional "old 
school" grandiloquences, 
Bolet has never been content 
with showy facility. His choice 
here reminded one that be is 
happiest' wrestling with the 
more profound end of toe 
repertoire. - 

He began with two of 
Haydn's most intense key- 
board works: the F minor 
Andante con • variaeioni and 
the last Sonata, in E flat. 
Nowadays one generally bears 
more pointed, airy Haydn 
playing; certainly, Bolet used 
too much pedal at times. 
Perhaps he was over-com- 
pensating for toe Festival 
Hall’s dry acoustic, which he 
is known to abhor. Bat his 
obvious concern to keep the 
dynamic range within classical 
constraints was admirable. 

The technical carelessness 
which marred the sonata's 
ending was sometimes also 
apparent in Schumann's Fan- 
tasie in C. yet one never 
doubted Boiet's overall grasp 
of what this masterly but 
enigmatic work is about He 
emphasized the metrical dis- 
locations subtly, gave well- 
defined prominence to inner 
melodies that otherwise tend 
to be swallowed in the profuse 
figuration, and played the 
whole work, especially the 
final section, with a sweeping 
sense of rhapsody. 


The redial's high point, 
however, was Boiet's sen- 
sitively coloured account of 
Grieg's G minor Ballade: The 
work comprises nine vari- 
ations on a folk-song; it is a 
quintessential canvas of Nor- 
dieg loom, and not heard often 
enough. Bolet did not eschew 
its opportunities for more 
mercurial, lighter fingerwork, 
but his prime concern was to 
convey an inevitable move- 
ment towards tragedy: the 
stormy finale and its wistful 
coda set the seal on a perfor- 
mance of rare imagination. 

Richard Morrison 

Britten/Tippett 

Wigmore Hall 

Nearly five hours spent 
mostly in the company of 
music by Britten and Tippett 
gave pause for thought as well 
as a good deal of pleasure. 
Sunday's extended concert 
was toe first of eight at this 
hall during the next six weeks 
which will focus on the cham- 
ber works of toe two compos- 
ers to complement the sym- 
phonic programmes else- 
where, though the others will 
be of more conventional 
duration. 

Contrast and concord might 
have been toe theme of the 
assortment of vocal and in- 
strumental music, of which 
the two guitar works, written 
for and played by Julian 
Bream, could yield a fascinat- 
ing comparison of musical 
personality on their own. 
Britten's contemplative Noc- 
turnal, derived from John 
Dowland, and Tippett's ex- 
trovenly rhapsodic The Blue 
Guitar were both played with 
a fine virtuosity that reflected 
thoughtful attention to toe 
virtues of each. 

i The guitarist was also a 
spirited partner for Robert 
Tear in Britten's enchanting 
Songs from the Chinese, which 
date from 19S7 and beauti- 
fully add to the lilt as well as 
the spirit of Arthur Waley’s 
English translations. Mr Tear 
seemed less at ease with toe 
Siiwellian word-play of the 
composer's darkly tragic Can- 
ticle No 3, “Still Fans toe 
Rain”, though hi$ piano part- 
ner here. Paul Crossley, was 
impressively assured in Tip- 
pett's Sonata No 4. 

This most recent of Sir 
Michael's keyboard works, 
with its five highly-charged 
movements, conjures up an 
expansive sound-world of 
ideas and sonorities that 
haunr toe listener's imagina- 
tion foug after the music has 
stopped. They were matched 
in the context of this pro- 
gramme by the admirable 


consort of solo singers who 
make up the London Sinfon- 
ietta Voces, and whose 
performances of Tippett’s 
“Dance. Clarion- Air* and 
Britten's Sacred and Profane 
were a testament to toe endur- 
ing beauties of English vocal 
writing. 

Noil Goodwin 

RLPO/Bamert 
Philharmonic Hall, 
Liverpool 


It has taken some years for 
Steve Reich’s Variations for 
Winds, Strings and Keyboards 
to reach Britain, and part of 
the reason may well be ihaLa 
recording has less impact than 
a live performance. The 
concentration an orchestra 
needs in order not to lose its 
place in so many repealed 
patterns is something that 
communicates and contrib- 
utes to toe continued tension 
of the music In the work’s 
perpetual key-changes a 
wrongly placed accidental is 
more audible than in most 
music, and ft takes only a 
moment's loss of concentra- 
tion for toe rhythmic scheme 
to lose its bite. 

Another gain in a live 
performance is that it is easier 
to follow the logic of toe 
changes between and within 
the rhythmic cycles of 1.1, 8 
and finally 17 beats, and to 
hear the subtlety with which 
Reich developed those pat- 
terns. So Matthias Bamert's 
clear, almost clinical, beat was 
as helpful to toe audience as to 
the orchestra. You could 
count the beats almost as if in 
Indian music while still hear- 
ing toe broader panels more in 
terms of one of Reich's other 
declared influences. 12th-cen- 
tury organum. 

After Reich's patterns, the 
patterns in the last movement 
of Elgar’s Violin Concerto 
might have appeared in a new 
light. Sadly, however, Nigel 
Kennedy played as though be 
had done toe work several 
limes too often. He showed no 
inclination to follow toe un- 
usual lead Bamert set in toe 
opening tutti. .Too many 
phrases were played according 
to his long-established pat- 
terns with no sense of reaction 
to what toe Royal Liverpool 
Philharmonic were doing 
around him. If Bamert had 
difficulty following his idio- 
syncratic tempo-changes it 
was only too easy, to sym- 
pathize. One might have 
thought Kennedy was unwell 
had be not so cheerfully then 
played a couple of encores. 

David Fallows 


Enduring moral obligations 


The 

Representative 

Citizens’, Glasgow 


Any dramatic treatment of the 
Holocaust immediately begs 
questions — as does judging it 
on aesthetic grounds: Yet in 
some ways it can convey more 
than the documentation of 
reality to which we have 
become almost numbed by 
repetition. It is from this point 
toaz Rolf Hochbuto starts 
with The Representative 
(translated here from the Ger- 
man by Robert David Mac- 
Donald). 

The play caused great con- 
troversy when first staged 23 
years ago, Hochhuto using 
shock to drive home his 
centra] point: that we are all 
responsible for ensuring that 
atrocities that are now 
“history" may never recur. 

Hochhuto attacks the si- 
lence of Pope Pius Xn, plus 
the fact that he made no 
specific public condemnation 
of Hitler's extermination of 
toe Jews; through the voice of 
a young Jesuit, Father Fon- 
tana. Fontana’s mission to get 
the Pope io speak out on 
behalf of the Church, a moral 
obligation that he feds is 
greater than anything that 
may prevent him from doing 
so, finishes with his own 
martyrdom in Auschwitz. 

Specifically Hochhuth's 
challenge is to the Pope as the 
representative of Christ; more 
goierally his challenge is to 
him and everyone else on 
stage as represe n tative of 
mankind (MacDonald em- 
phasizes this by having the 
cast step quietly into and out 
of their allotted roles at the 
beginning and end of hts 
production). While toe play 
broaches now topical issues — 
the churches’ involvement in 
politics, toe question of figure- 
heads speaking out - it is in its 
general levelling of moral 
responsibility, its indication 
that inaction can itself, be a 
decision, that ties its enduring 
argument 

From toe extremely long 
original, MacDonald ~ has 
hewn out toe essential line, 
paring away many subplots to 
leave toe central conflict be- 
tween Fontana's action and 
toe Pope's apparent inaction. 
This seems a wise decision, yet 
in dramatic terms it does not 
really work, toe play some- 
times feeling wrongly propor- 
tioned. The production too is 
often stilted and uneasy, some 
early scenes never getting off 
toe ground - • 


THEATRE 


Those that do work, how- 
ever. are sharply effective: one 
such being the confrontation 
between Fontana (Colin 
Haigh moving from an earnest 
young man to a desperate, 
tortured one) and toe Pope. 
(flayed by Ciaran Hinds as 
painstakingly colourless and 
distanced, though politically 
astute. The meeting at Ausch- 
witz between Fontana and 
“the Doctor" (Laurance 
RudicX whose dark wit and 
intelligence fail to push Fon- 
tana beyond feith, is gro- 
tesquely effective. There are 
strong performances from 
Mark Lewis as an asben-feced 
Gerstin. toe SS soldier leading 
a double life, and Tristram 
Jeliinek. as a resolutely charm- 
ing Cardinal; but on its first 
night this uneven production 
felt very much like work in 
progress. 


Meanwhile, at Edinburgh’s 
Assembly Rooms, 7:84 Scot- 
land launched their highland 
lour of The Albannach , a 
revived but recast production 
of John McGrath’s adaptation 
of Fiona MacCtflla's novel. 
MacCoIla's original is a trib- 
ute to the beauty of tire 
Highlands and toe repressed 
spirit of music and poetry 
expressed through the tale of a 
young, spirited highlander. 
Murdo (toe Albannach), who 
ultimately stages something of 
a revolution. 

Finlay Walsh's spry new 
production has a stronger 
central casting in Vincent 
Fridl, and is tauter and fester 
than before, singing along 
through toe story to toe sus- 
tained disapproval of tire 
Kirk, whose keepers are fre- 
quently silhouetted against toe 
backdrop like black shadows. 

Sarah Hemming 


CHRISTIES 

AT SHERINGHAM HALL 

Upper Sheringham, Norfolk 

The Property of The Trustees of The late RTS. Upcher 

Sale on the Premises 

Wednesday 22 and Thursday 23 
October 1986 

On view: 

Saturday 18 and Sunday 19 October 
at 10 a.m. — 6 pan. and Monday 
20 October at 10 am. - 5 pm 

Furniture, Pictures, Ceramics 
and Silver 

During the time of the sale, Christie's 
specialists will be available by 
appointment to visit clients requiring 
advice on the sale and valuation of 
works of an. 

Catalogue available from (01) 582 1282 
and from Sheringham Hall on View and 
Sale days or from the addresses below. 



8 King Street, Sl James's, London swi y sot 
TeL pi) 839 9060 Telex: 916429 

Iain Henderson Russell, Old Bank of England Court 
Queen Street, Norwich. TeL- (0603) 614546 ' 



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of a m 
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eccentritii 
questionn 

by the 

question i 

stay peni 
Kingdom', 
expect to ! 
or 10 yea/ 


Tres 


Yet anotfc 
the loose 
of “Bong 
the MoD 
bidders 
manage it 

Devonpc 
Plymouil 
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champag 
of the bi 
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against 
pool last 
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particuU 

school i 
charily 
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pie in ‘ 
sidizing 
he said, 
ease of 
for Dan 
school. 


Sister of Beirut I Ruby celebration for ‘Woman’s Hour 


ynais 



captive says she 


will negotiate 


From Robert Fisk, Beirut 


The sister of Mr Terry 
Anderson, the American jour- 
nalist held in Lebanon by the 
pro-Iranian Islamic Jihad 
movement for 19 months, has 
written an open letter to his 
captors, offering 10 travel to 
the Lebanese capital to meet 
them to discuss her brother's 
release. 

In an unprecedented ap- 
proach to the kidnappers. Mrs 
Peggy Say - who early this 
summer travelled to Damas- 
cus to seek Syrian help in 
freeing her brother - wrote to 
Beirut’s iwo largest news- 
papers. which are carrying her 
appeal in their editions today. 

“Tell me who you are 
willing to talk to aboul Terry's 
freedom and the freedom of 
the other American hostages." 
she writes. “Please, name the 
person you would be willing to 
negotiate with. I will ask that 
person to meet with you — I 
also would be willing to come 
to Beirut to talk with you." 

Mrs Say's letter appears in 
the Beirut papers less than 24 
hours after Islamic Jihad re- 
leased videotaped messages 
from three French hostages — 
including another journalist, 
Jean Paul KaufTmann — ap- 
pealing to the French Govern- 
ment to negotiate their re- 
lease. 


French depressed 
by imprisonment 


Appeal alludes to 
Daniloff release 


Mr Anderson, who is the 
Associated Press bureau chief 
in Beirut, amteared on a 
videotape released by his kid- 
nappers last Friday, urging the 
American Government to ne- 
gotiate with his captors as tbey 
had negotiated the release of 
Nicholas DanilofT. the Amer- 
ican journalist imprisoned in 
Moscow. Mrs Say alludes to 
Mr Daniloff in her letters to 
the Beirut papers - an-Nahar 
and as-SaJir — pointing out 
that whereas Mr Danilon was 
locked up for only 30 days. Mr 
Anderson has now been held 
prisoner for more than 500 
days. 

““Since his kidnapping." she 
writes. “Terry and I have lost 
our father and our brother, 
both of whom died this year of 


Today's events 


Royal engagements * 

Princess Anne. President, the 
British Olympic Association, 
attends the launch of the 1988 
Olympic Appeal Schools Prom- 
otion. Inn on the Park Hotel. I 
Hamilton Place. Wl. 9.55; and 
then, as President, the Riding 
for the Disabled Association, 
attends a council meeting. 
Saddlers' Hall London. 1 1.10: 
later, as President, the Save the 
Children Fund, she visits the 
Hopscotch Asian Family 
Centre. S< Richard's House. 
Evcnholt Street, NWI. 2. 

The Duke of Gloucester, as 


Square. WCI. 6.45. 

The Duchess of Gloucester, 
President, the London Home 
Safety Council, attends a meet- 
ing of the Water Safety Commit- 
tee. Thames Water Authority 
headquarters. New Riverhead, 
Rosebery Avenue. EC1. J(k45. 

The Duke of Kent. Chairman, 
the Trustees of the Duke of 
Edinburgh's Commonwealth 
Conferences, attends a dinner I 
for the trustees at the Garrick ! 
Club. 7.40. 

The Duchess of Kent. Patron, 
the Arthritis and Rheumatism 
Council, visits the Clinical Re- 


The Times Crossword Puzzle No 17,170 



This puzzle was solved in a word minutes at the 1^86 na- 
tional final of the Collins Dictionaries Times Crossword 
Championship hr Mr David A nut luge, aged -I. 


across 

1 Unprofitable attachment in 
old mother's household 
(8.4). 

9 Second chance to see the 
sport when gunman is at- 
tacked on board (4-5). 

10 Peer was one of three in the 
pound (5k 

11 Officer holds up a dome (6). 

12 Gammadion, was it? Ask 
for reconstruction (8). 

13 Tcihcr the latter pan back 
round a ram's head (ft). 

IS Kind of band seen hv a road 
— “army" hand? (81. 

18 Girl's dried fruit everyone 
rejected (8). 

19 Wind snakes round about 
<b>. 

21 Having finished, send out 
return of extra work done 
(SJ. 

23 Worker let out Kipling at 
school lb). 

26 Yet it used to show the 
name of Paul's companion 
15). 

27 Many guineas won at this 
card-game (9). 

28 Enter an actor - one seen in 
a music centre (6-6). 


4 It's used to catch river fish 
(4). 

5 Evangelist has support of 
cordial Laodicean (8). 

6 Dickensian taxidermist as 
space-traveller (5). 

7 Faced being beheaded. A bit 
tricky. Give up? (8). 

8 Local tax raised without be- 
ing paid. It could create an 
explosion (6). 

14 Gambling allowed in the 
course of one's journey (S). 

16 Mississippi's capital (so- 
called) not used in prison 
consmjciion? (9). 

17 Roman priest lakes care of 
the dance (8). 

18 Quickly getting right on top 
in a riot (6). 

20 Sportswear for the honest 
village blacksmith for in- 
stance (7). 

22 A little honey that jeop- 
ardized Jonathan's life (5). 

24 Wine given to girt (5). 

25 Due to hear something from 
Horace (4). 


Solution to Puzde No 17.169 


DOWN 

1 Left for South in S ^mcn- 
can capital to find wild cat 
(7). 

2 .Make smart coppers sur- 
round the border (5). 

3 Alice's lot going crazy with 
swing (9). 

Concise Crossword page 14 


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O P a Gfi - SHE3BSS 
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0 G .S3 ESLSraSKBE 
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■JIESaHES SSGPIESSE 

n s - er a » e ■ b 

©HBHHEIHHCSE USOE 
H 0 • , S E E a 

kJ SI53E5IIt»JE5H I3_ G? 151 
U 0 : B felBIlEBBSSI 
SIEEBEE O 0 fi B , 
m n EfBrannniEnBE 


m M 



if ■ 


cancer. I thank Terry's captors 
for their personal message of 
condolence to my family but 
Terry and 1 need to be together 
to mourn our family losses 
and to pray together. As they 
lay dying, both my father and 
mv brother asked me to work 
without stopping for Terry’s 
freedom.” 

Mrs Say said earlier this 
summer that she had prom- 
ised surviving members of her 
family that she would not visit 
Beirut, but the long months of- 
her brother's captivity and his 
videotaped appeal appears to 
have made her change her 
mind. There are few foreigners 
still living in west Beirut and 
the American Government 
long ago urged US citizens to 
leave the city. 




On their videotaped appeal 
yesterday the three French 
hostages — M Kxuflmann. M 
Marcel Fontaine, the French 
Embassy vice-consul, and M 
Marcel Canon, the embassy's 
protocol officer — each ad- 
dress their families and speak 
with deep depression of their 
long and lonely imprison- 
ment. 

“ft’s long, very long - I 
cannot take it any more." M 
Fontaine says. “1 am desper- 
ate, tired and about to fall off 
the cliff. I am abandoned. I am 
completely cut off from the 
outside world. It's complete 
emptiness.” Either the French 
Government wished to free 
the hostages. M Fontaine said, 
“or they are abandoning us.” 

To his wife. M Fontaine 
said: “All that remains of me 
is skin and bones. Maybe an- 
other Christmas, another New 
Year without you. if I am not 
dead before that” Addressing 
his wife Denise, M Carton 
said that “I do not know what 
words to invent to tell you 
what 1 feel ... I am weaker 
and physically and morally 
vulnerable." 

The Islamic Jihad has de- 
manded the freeing of 17 men 
imprisoned in Kuwait for 
bombing the US and French 
embassies there in 1983. 



•'***■/ & * 


" 4 k J 

,4vvv‘ “ 



to human 
bomb 




By David Cross 


Woman's Horn ; BBC Radio 
4's daily geanftarioa to its 
female listeners, yesterday 
celebrated its fortieth anniver- 
sary with a discussion about 
whether inner dty shops 
should be licensed to sell guns 
and knives and complaints 
about last week’s feature on 
flatulence. 

On Monday, October 7, 
1946, the first programme, 
opened with “Oranges and 
Lemons" as its signature tune 
and after an introduction by a 
male presenter went on to 
discuss “Mother's Midday 
Meal” and “Putting Your Best 


Face Forward" by an expert on 
fashion and beauty. 

The only link with tbe past 
apart from tbe title of the 
programme which has re- 
mained unchanged was a re- 
run of the swashbuckling 
romance Under the Red Robe 


by Stanley Weyrnan, a late 
Victorian writer. 


The first male presenter 
gave way to a woman a few 
months after the programme 
opened and tbe housewifely 
Image nurtured by soldiers 
ret u rning home from the war 
quickly gave way to a more 
robust approach to women's 
problems. 


Labour threat 


Continued from page 1 


eminent adopted an anti- 
nuclear policy. 

“It's extremely serious and 
il's one of the things I’ve been 
going on about for years,” he 
said. 

Dr John Gilbert, a senior 
Labour member of Commons 
Defence Committee, who is in 
the United States, said that he 
believed there was no sugges- 
tion that a Labour Govern- 
ment would be seen as less 


Pdtron. attends the launching of 
the Pevsner Memorial Trust. 
Art -Workers' GoBd. 8 Queen's 


search Centre. North wick Park 
Hospital. Harrow. 2. 

Princess Michael of Kent 
visits Goldsmiths* Rair, Gold- 
smiths' Hall. 330. 

New exhibitions 
Make Room: a new installa- 
tion by Val Murray; Scott 


TV top ten 


1 E as tEn ria rs fHnra/Sw) 21 -70m 

2 EastEnare (Tuas/Sim) 18.65m 


Gallery. Pen die College, Lan- 
caster Univeristy. Bailrigg: Mon 
toFri 12 to 6. Tues 12 to 9 (ends 
Oct 23k 

Identity/Desire: representing 
the body: Collins Gallery. 
University of Strathclyde, Rich- 
mond SL Glasgow; Mon to Fri 
10 to 5. Sat 1 2 to 4 (ends Oct 31). 
Exhibitions in progress 

Contemporary Ceramics 
from La Borne, the Inter- 
national Ceramics Centre, near 
Bourges. France; Peterborough 
Museum and Art Gallery. 
Priestgate. Peterborough: Tues 
to Sat >2 noon to 5 (ends Oct 
30). 

Vanessa Robertson: woven 
Ikat rugs; Coach House Craft 
Gallery. Gawthorpe Hall. Pad- 
iham. Nr Burnley. Lancs: Mon ' 
to Sat 10 to 5. Sun 2 to 5 (ends , 
Nov 2). 

Ninth British International ; 
Prim Biennale: Cleveland Gal- ; 
Icry. Victoria Road. Middies- 1 
brooglcTues to Sat 12 noon to 7 | 
(ends Nov 1 5). j 

Repatriation focuses on the 
return to Scotland of Scon 
Manuscripts and the Pforz- 
heimer Scott Manuscripts: Na- 
tional Library or Scotland. 
George IV Bridge. Edinburgh: 
Mon to Fri 9.30 to 5. Sat 9.30 to 
I (ends Jon 10). 

Photography: includes work 
b> Tim Mercer, Eduard Piper. 
Jeremv Haslcm. Sue Cheese and 
holograms by Angela Coombcs: 
Frome Museum Gallery, 1 
North Parade. Mon to Sat 10 to 
4. dosed Thurs and Sun 
Last chance to see 


2 EasrEnore (Tuas/Sim) 18.65m 

3 Orty Foote and Horses 17.50m 

4 Howaros Way 12.40m 

5 In Swkness an) m Health 12.10m 

6 Open Al Hours 11.10m 

7 Ever Decreasing Circles 10.70m 

8 Tha Russ AOtxx Show 10.45m 

9 Animal Squad 1025m 

10 Brush Strokes 9.30m 


1 In Private, in Public; tha Prince and 
Princess ol Watts ITN 18.45m 

2 Coronation Street (Wed) Granada 
1505m 

3 Coronation Straw (Mon) Granada 
1445m 

4 Buna Dale LWT 13.85m 

5 3-2-1 Yorks*® 12.10m 

6 Crossroads (Tues) GantralliJBm 

7 Crossroads (Wad) Central 1130m 

8 Emmaroaie Farm (Tues) Yorkshire 
1120 m 

9 Dempsey and Makepeace LWT 

10 Crossroads (Thurs) Central 10.80m 


1 The Paul Daniels Magic Show 5.65m 

2 Alas Smith and Jones 545m 

3 Naked Vk»o 52ttn 

4 Moortightifig 435m 

5 True Camessions 455m 

6 MASH 4.50m 

7 The Ooa Angry Shot 4.05m 

8 Star Trek 3.60m 

9 The Two Mre Carrolls 3.40m 
10 Screenplay-. Shm Work 350m 


Channel 4 

1 Bmokside (Tues/Satl 530m 

2 BrookSiae (Mon/Sat)430m 

3 The Cosby Snow 4.oom 

4 SL Bsewhere 355m 

5 Gardens rs Calender 250m 

6 Amencan Foams* 2.60m 

7 Gawen Gins 2.55m 

8 Budgie 250m 

9 1918235m 

10 4 Whal fl's Worth 2.1 5m 
10« Hdi Smew Blues 2.15m 


Breakfast tel ev is ion: The average 


weekry figures lor audiences « peek 
times (Ywh figures m paremhests 
snowmg the reach - the number ol people 
wno viewed for ar least mree mmuies): 
BBC1: Breakfast Tmixl- Mon to Fri 
1 3m |6.Sm) 

TV -am. Good Momma Baton Mon to Fn 
2.3m (9 6m) Sal 25m (6.3m) 

Sun 23m (123m) 


Photographs taken in and 


around Sirathpefler Spa by 
T. Well wood Maxwell: The 


T. Wellwood Maxwell: The 
Pump Room. Strath peiTer, 10 , 
to 12. 2.30 to 4.30 and 7.30 to 1 

9.30. 

Music ! 

Synthessizer recital by Steve \ 
Ingham: King's HalL Newcastle j 
University. 1.10. 

Talks and lectures 
Louis Francois Roubiliac 
{ 1 702-1 762): The patronage of a 
French sculptor in 18th century 
London, by Dr Tessa Murdoch: . 
Rye Art Gallery- 107 High 

StrccL. Rye. 8. 

The architecture of Melrose 
Abbey, by Dr Richard Fawcett: 
Melrose "Parish Church Hall, 

7.30. 

General 

Book Market. Chantry Hall. 
Norwich. 10 to 5. 


Broadcasters' Audience Research Board. 


Times Portfolio Gold ruin are as 

foUowv 

1 Times Portfolio h free. Purchase 
of The Times is not a condition of 
taking pari 

2 Times PorUotto list comprises a 
group of puotir rompanM whose 
shares are llsiod on ihe Stock 


EM-nange and quoted m Tbe Times 
Stork Exrrunge prim par The 


rmNiun rompmmo ilui M “III 
rtkunr from fl.iv 1 to dav The 1st 
twhirti H numbered 1 - 441 H divided 
■mo four raiidomJv dstrtbuied groups 
of 11 stum. Eierv Portfotn card 
ronlaiie Iwo numbers from each 
group and oarh card caniains a 
uniuix 1 "*'1 ol numbers 


Parliament today 


Lords {230k Housing and 
Planning Bill, committee stage. 


£10,000 bonds 


The winning numbers in this 
month's £10.000 Premium 
Bond prizes are: I4AF 454277. 
The wmiKT lives in Worthing: 
31 AL 682858 I Luton): 16 BIN 
273104 (Cumbria): 14 WS 
7327M) (Guildford); 9XS 
I 202513 (Somerset). 


3 Timm porllolio ‘dlildmid wiU be 
the figure in p"nre wnKh nyrnhiii 
I hr* optimum men emenl in DTim II jo. 
lh«* largmi iiirrisiv or hm-mi lo») of a 
romtnnanon ol inim ilwo from oarh 
randonilv drstnruiipflonouB wlihm the 
aa viumi or l he 44 gi^rn wtwh on 
am oor* day rompnsr 17a* Times 
Porllolio list. 

4 The riailv dnidend will be 
announrM oarh day and the weekly 
ditKJefid will lx* announced earn 
Solurday in Tne Times. 

5 Times Portlollti Irsi and defaih Of 
i he dailv or weekly div Hlend will also 
Dr iiiulUMr lor insprrtion at the 
oflires of The Times 

6 If the overall pur, movement Of 
morn than one rombinaiion of shares 
cmidh l lv dividend. Ihr prfcrc will be 
iwullv dtiifh-d among m*» riaimants 
holding those rombuiatwiH of shares. 

7 All rknim .ire sutnrrt lo srrutlnv 


her ore paymmii Any Times Portfolio 
rar/l that is drfarrd. tampered with or 
inrprrwth prinlofl in Ms way will be 
diTLirm void 

8 Emoiovnes or Wrus rnrernadonaf 
Plr and it' suopunianrs and of 
Curotuint Group Unuied iprodueers 
• uul (IMrilunnr*. of Ihe card! or 
members m thmr irnmnwie families 
are noi allowed lo plav Times 
Portfolio 

9 All parlirlpani*- n ill nr Mibieri lo 
Ihi-J* Rules All uwirunmns an "how 
lo dw' 1 and "how lo riaim" v, fin her 
n.iius-hiHi in TW Times or In Times 
Portfolio rains win be deemed to rje 
PmtI Of these Rules The Eduor 
ri*M>fves I no nplU io amend Uie Rules 

10 In am dispute. The Editors 
i tension h final and. no correspou 
drpre will no enli-lM into 


£250,000 bond 


The winning number in this 
month's L250.0U0 Premium 
Bond pnw is 22WT 948217 
The winner lives in Norwich. 


Says Sne MacGregor, the 
current regular presenter: 
“Tbe programme pioneered an 
intimate and personal style. It 
has grown from being softly 
didactic to being women talk- 
ing to other women.” 

The make-up of the current 
production team certainly has 
a female bias, as the photo- 
graph testifies all too dearly, 
although about 20 per cent of 
the listeners are men. “Mai 
are never excluded bat we do 
feel there is a female perspec- 
tive which can be applied to 
any news it era or investi- 
gation,” says Sandra Chal- 
mers, the programme's editor. 



Continued from page j 
iimer and detonator ^ 
bomb were coneeatea 
calculator, alsoteHheoJV 
thewaytotheairpoiiSJ^; 
he said. Miss mftraJR 
Hindawi take-otT'die X 
culator and put m a wT 
which anivaied i 

Two separate stories,^,, 
alleging Syrian GdySS 
involvement in tw pteLiS i 
been told to pd&a ^ 
Hindawi after y ! 

Amlol said. In v the,fi !: • 
count he said hfr jod wl 
given ltebagiqSym m S| 
it contained drugs, and 
to pass it oo to tot West i 

in Israel. 

In another interidew he 

he was given the bagtw am* 

member of a Syria Anh 
airlines flight on wfcfch £ 
travelled to LotHSon. 1 

Mr Hindawi had tpld pofe, 
that after he leariiBd ©nE 
failure of the bomb gdtfe Q 

f ine direct to tte^Syma 
mbassy in Bc^rave Sqia» 
and given an euvdobe to tfe 
ambassador personafly, 
then rang Danjascits fa. 
instructions. . - r 
Mr Amlot said the and*, 
sador had apparcn% ?grmed 


editor 



.41 - ‘ 

far 




him warmly that day.” He 
added : “At the end.qf ^ 
interview with' pkfet ^ 
identified a piameiaf de 
Syrian am bassadeHjjftn pic- 
tures of a number offbeat 
people.” - 


The team prepares to go on the air with yesterday's 40th an- 
niversary programme. 1. Pat Taylor, series producer; 2- Sue 
MacGregor, presenter; 3. Jenni Murray, presenter, 4. Claire 
Selene-Gray, producer; 5. Sandra Chalmers, editor; 6. 
Susan Denny, producer; 7. Fay Evans, deputy editor; 8. Pat 


Woman stm 

n _ _ _ 1 • *- • 


McLoughlin, producer; 9. Sally Fekhnan, producer; 10. 
Ruth Adam, producer; 11. Tessa Shaw, reporter; 12. Ann 
Bolsover, producer, 13. Jo Dobry, producer. 


Council elections will be test run 


reliable in terms of intelli- 
gence matters and even the 
most extreme members of a 
Labour Government would 
not want lo damage the intelli- 
gence relationship. 

Dr Gilbert has been out- 
spoken in his condemnation 
of tbe unilateralist defence 
policy. 

Senior US politicians, 
including Democratic 
presidential candidates, have 
expressed horror at Labour's 
polities. 


Continued from page 1 


general hospital due to open in 
1988. 


Mr James Prior, the former 
Cabinet Minister, called on- 
the Prime Minister to soften 
her abrasive style in the run up 
to the general election. Mr 
Prior said that Mrs Thatcher 
must recognise that many 
people need help because they 
were not “as capable or ef- 
ficient as she is.” 


He sai±“Mrs Thatcher has 
been a remarkably successful 
Prime Minister but. naturally, 
1 wish to see the Party more in 
the centre," Mr Prior said that 
as time went on Mrs 
Thatcher's style was changing 
and becoming mellower 
“though perhaps not so 
quickly as some people would 
like.” 

■ In one of the opening 
debates at the conference to- 
day Mr John Major, the 
Minister for Social Security, is 


to challenge the Labour 
Party's costings for its plans to 
increase pensions. 

Hie Government has costed 
Mr Michael 1 Meacher's pro- 
posals to uprate pensions, by 
£5 for a single person and £8 
for a couple, and to increase 
child benefit by £3, at £5.5 
billion rather than the £3.5 
billion claimed by Labour.Mr 
Major has costed the pension 
changes agreed at last week's 
Labour conference at between 
£10 and £16 billion. 


A police rock dfrnbef uoq 
praise from colkneutt yes- 
terday after his hobfyheiped 
to save a woman fixi# sum. 
ing 150ft on to a 

Kennford, near Exete^T- 
Motor patrol coft^pifLes 
Combellack usedhsptoid har- 
nesses and otbergea^&peaai 
from his home near bjfSfeget 
the woman and feHcwefficm 


down from the bridge raffing. 


Kasparov title 


Gary Kasparov. Kjttffifcdthe 
world chess champio^n ti- 
tle in Leningrad iastmgta 
after drawing the ZJni’game 
with Anatoly Karpov;^' " ■ 




Roads 


National too ttn Wttvision programmes In 
tha weak ending Septamoor 28 : 


Wales and West: M4: Contra- 
flow between junctions 16 and 
17 (A3l02/Chippenham). M4: 
Contraflow between junctions 
34 and 35 (Rhondda/A473). 
M5: Two lanes closed in both 
directions between junction 1 1 
(Cheltenham) and 12(A3$). 

The North: M6: Roadworks 
'and lane closures on both 
carriageways between junctions 
32 and 33 (M55/Lancaster). 
M66: Traffic confined to hard 
shoulder al junction 4. M18: 
Contraflow between junction 6 
(Thome) and 7 (M62). 

Scotland: M& Outside lane 
closed east bound between junc- 
tions 17 and 15 (A82/Town- 
head): contraflow between junc- 
tions 29 and 3&(Paisley/Erskine 
bridge). M9: Contraflow be- 
tween junctions 4 and . 5 
(A80I/A905. M90: Contraflow 
between junctions 3 and 4 
(Dunfermline/Kelty. 


Weather 


NOON TOOAY Pituure a uhowa in raifllxjn FKONT5 Warm Cold' 

ttymbab of aa M 


forecast 


Pressure will remain high 
over southern Britain but 
a cold front wfll make 
slow southerly progress 
over northern England 
. and north Wales. 


6 am to midnight 


London, East Anglia, IDBcfland a : 
Mainly dry. rrast and fog patches at 
first then bright or sunny Intervals, 
perhaps a little light rain in the N 
later; wind SW fight or moderate; 
max temp 18C (64F). 

SE, central S, SW England, 
Channel Islands, S Wales: Mainly 
dry, mist or fog clearing inland but 


NOON TOOAY 


persisting on some coasts, some 
bright or sunny intervals: wind SW 
' or moderate; max temp 18 C 


The pound 


A UF 


TODAY 
London Bridge 
Aberdeen 
Awmmotdb 


E, central N England: Rather 


cloudy, occasional mainly fight rain; 
wind W moderate; max temp 16C 
(6lF). 

N Wales. NW En^and: Rather 
dwdy, outbreaks of rain, ntist and 
fog on coasts and hills; wind W fight 
or moderate; max temp 16C (61 F). 

Lake Dtattict, Isle ol Man, NE 
England, Bondars, SW Scotland, 
Northern Ireland: Cloudy with rain 
at first, becoming brighter with 
showers: wind w moderate or fresh; 
max temp 16C (61 F). 





CanSfl 

Dimpat 

Dow 

FNmoafli 

Gtoggow 


i sr* 1 




Z75030 185530 

23400 220041 

GW 339 3.18 

11.02 1042 

217410 205X0 

Hd 330 330 

196-00 186X0 

1025 8.70 

V 2.43 2J29 

USAS 150 1.43 

Yugoslavia Dnr 700X0 600X0 


LbWi 
L i v erpool 
Lowestoft 
Margate 
MRfonf Havon 


Edinburgh, Dundee, Aberdeen, 
Glasgow, Central Highlands, Mo- 
ray Firth: Sunny intervals and 


Rarss for 5mal danorainaaon hank nows 


ray Firth: Sunny Intervals and 
showers; wind W moderate or fresh; 
max temp 15C (59F). 

ME, NW Scotland, Argyll, Orkney: 
Bright intervals, rain or showers; 
wind W crash or strong; max temp 

14C157F). 

Shetland: Cloudy with rain at 
times; wind SE veenng SW fresh or 


b-Mur sky: Dr-Mue sky and cloud: c- 
CMudy: o-overcasl: f lofl: d-driiiV: h- 
hatl: mM-miS: rrain: s-snow: th- 
Ihuntk-rslomi: p-showers. 

Arrows snow Wind dlrecllon. wind 
spoed unpti) clrdotL Temperature 
centigrade. 


Portland 

Portsmouth 

Sh oroham 

Southampton 


Tees 

WT to n-on-ffag 
Tide maasurad 


HT 
73 
45 
133 
SJ 
1 22. 

55 
87 
53 

5.1 
4JJ 
5A 
7 S 
8 2. 

57 
97 
24 
43 

7.1 
7.1 
43 
'55 

23 
47 
63 
..45: 

97 
• 55 
- 43 

In itttfiwc 1 bvj 12 ®BA 


Around Britain 


omy as supptad by Barclays Bank PlC. 
Different rates apply to travellers' 


Different rates apply to t 
deques end other foreign 
business. 

Retail Prica Max: 38SX 


strong becoming moderate; max 
temp 11C(52F). 

Outtooh for t o morro w and Thure- 
day: Rain at times in the N and NW, 
but mainly dry elsewhere with some 
sunny intervals after overnight mist 


London: The FT Max closed up 173 at 
12513. 


Sun Rain 
hre in 


and fog. Temperatures rather warm 
hi the S but near normal elsewhere. 


EAST COAST 
Scarboro S3 

Bridlington 83 

Cromer 95 

LawMKrtt 73 

Clacton 93 


Sunrises: Stxi sets: 
7.11am 636 pm 


sovim coast 

Folkestone 93 
Hastings 92 


16 61 sunny 

15 59 sunny 

17 63 sunny 

18 81 Sunny 

16 61 sunny 
18 61 sunny 


Son Rain MK 
hra in C F ^ 
Ilfracombe x - .17 63 ettuj 

Tenby 55 - 

CMwyn Bay x - Jffl » 

Morocambe 9X - If |J 

Douglas 7.4 -. 15 » *■»» 


Moan rises: Moon sets: 
12.16 pm 7A8 pm 
First quarter Ocwber 10 


Easthowna 93 


Brighton 

Hi- - 
irwunty 


11 If for any reason The Tunes 
pnrro.paoe tt not putnnhed in the 


normal way Times Portfolio wju be 
susoended tor itui oay 


Lighting-up time 


How to Dbqr - DaHy Uvkhntl 
On oarh day your unique set of eight 
number, will reortseni comjnernal 
and industrial slum puuistied In The 
Times Portfolio Usi which win atmear 
on the Stark Exchange Prices pase. 

In the columns Bnn tried next lo 
yow shares note Uie mice change li- 
ar l. m pence, as ouxistied in that 
day s Times. 


London 656 pm to 6.42 am 
Bristol 7.05 pm to 6.52 am 
Etfiflbwgh 7.03pm to 859 am 
Manchester 7.02 pm to 652 am 
Penzance 7.18 pm to 7.03 am 


BogaorR 

Southsea 

Sundown 

Shankfin 

Bouraentth 

Poott 


17 63 sunny 

19 66 sunny 
17 63 sunny 

20 68 sunny 
22 72 sunny 
22 72 sunny 
19 66 sunny 

21 70 sunny 



HO WALES 


:i51K? 

I « 

. 22 72 *m 


18 £ SS 
»- 68 


Yesterday 


After listing the mice changes of 
your Mghl shores for that day. add up 
all eight snare changes to gi\e you 
your derail total thus or minus i+ or - 


Tamperaturss at midday yesterday: e. 
cloud: f. lav: r. rain: a. sun. 


_ aieck your Ov erall total against The 
Times Portfolio divhdend pubwied Ort 
the Stock Exchange Pores page. 

If vour overall total matches The 
Times Portfolio dividend you have 
won outright or a snare of the total 
prue money staled tor uut day and 
must claim your prize as Instructed 
he low 


11763 Guernsey s 1661 
S 1986 Inverness f 1559 
f ififil Jersey 
c 1763 London s 2068 


Weymouth 7.7 

Exmouih 15 

TetgnmoaOt 1.0 

Torquay 

FattttuA x 

Penzance 15 

Jersey 8.3 

Guernsey 73 

WEST COAST 
Sdfty LsJea 
Newquay 02 


20 68 sunny 
20 68 sunny 

16 61 sumy 

17 63 sunny 
17 63 bnght 

16 67 <Jvk 

17 63 Cloudy 


SCOTLAND 


Prestwick 


Time 

S to rnow ay 


17 63 fog 
23 73 sumy 
22 72 sumy 


Wkk 
Km loss 
Aberdeen 


85 - 17 63 

9.4 - 

7.7 - » «g S 

43 jn is ® 

13 xe i* S HE 

3.0 - 10'98-$SE 


4X 31 13 S 


--is 


16 61 log 
19 68 cloudy 


St. Andrews 63 D9 TS g ten 
Edkriwrgh 83 .02 -IS ^ 


NORTHERN B1ELAKD • K' 

Belfast as - IB « 


These era Sunday’s figures 


C 1661 RTnchstHr f 1B64 


Edinburgh c 1559 N e wc a stle f 16 6i 
Glasgow c 1559 RYddsway f 1661 


Abroad 


How to pfin - Weekly DtvMend 
noay Saiurc&y record your daily 


Mon tuy-Sai uro 
Partial io lotai. 


Anniversaries 


•SbOAYi c. cloud: d. drizziK l. ter: ig, fog; r, rain; s, sun: sri. snow: £#*•■**’ 


Add these lovther to determme 
your weekly Portfolio total. 

If vour total maictm tne puottshed 
weekly rimriend figure you Have won 
ouirmni or a snare or the prize money 
sLalrri lor l>vu week, end must claim 
vour prize as instructed below. 

- . _H 0 WtD Nattl 
TsH pt i anv The Times Portfolio ctahm 
toe OKo-SSm between Iftjnaoi and 
XMpn, on dm day vour overall mol 
miahu Tne Tkaei Pwtfone Dtwdond. 

no etant can be aecepud euxstda dNW 

hours. 


Births: William Land. Arch- 
bishop of Canterbury, 1633-45. 
Reading. 1573: Niels Bohr, 


C F 

* E £> 59 ™ 


fi 27 81 c*ixragn tn 11 
AtoFdna c 20 79 Corfu 5 27 


physieisu Nobel [aureate. 1922. 
Copenhagen. 1885. 


openhagen. 1885. 

Deaihs; Giovanni Guarini, 


Aignra 
Amofdm 

S 24 75 Fwo *} § 

Btorata s 36 97 Fioronce s 25 
Baroadr 5 29 Sd Fnmknxt c 16 
Barcahta s 24 75 Funchal c 24 
Bond . G enov a a 21 

JESSS?"* ,Z3 

Boiwi c 15 59 Hounu e 7 
Bwmuda- faschongic $ 28 
ftbnrts c 19 66 in ma mSk 9 22 
Bdrdo’x 5 24 75 Isonind r ig 
BonFno Jeaaan s 35 


! 2f TSDuoto 


f 17 K Dutwavnflt a 25 


pocL Venice. 1612: Edear Allan Band 
Poe. Baltimore. 1840; Oliver 

1V..4JI U,lm«r ™™> 


viiu mud lu< c your card wiui you 
when vou trh-phone. 


It vnu are unahle |q telephone 
•onwwi' rtw ran ri^itn on voui nenalt 
hut nw mini tuve vour cam and coil 
The Time* Pomona claims lino 
lirtween ihe stipulated limes. 


Weaddl Holmes, physician and 
writer. Cambridge. Massachu- 
sens. 1S94. 

Great Fire of Chicago, began. 
1871. 


f C F - 

84 Maloraa f 27 81 

52 Malaga f 25 77 Rom 

81 Italia f 26 79 Sanbrifg 
63 itaRflnw c 18 64 SPtbaa. 
77 MaxieoC* c 19 6&SaatMf 


Munich s 22 72 SbaSbYg 


Brusuis C 17 63 M bura* 
But»Prt s 17 63 Krimcni 


No imaaitMMiiy ran tx> accept no 
1m failure to contort the dam orflcr 
iot aiu reason wumn the stated 
himrs 

The above trolruruons are ap- 
plicable lo bout daily and weekly 
dividend claims 


OTIMCS NCWSPAPEHS LIMITED, 
iw. Pnuled by London Post < Print 


MM Limited of I Virginia Street. 
London EJ 9XN antf by New* 


Buoopst 

B Aires' 

Caro f 28 B2 Lts&oo 3 Xt 

S Sy T? 1 bwwno a 20 
Cbtanctt 3 22 72 L Angms- c at 
Chicago" c 19 6a Luxemag c 14 
Ch'ctiucch c II 52 Mocno 1.21 


m 17 83 L Pumas s 24 


siottaud Lid . 124 Portoun Street. 
Minima Park, fflae oow G41 IEJ 
TUiMtai . October 7. 1986 Regsiered 
a*, a newMMper at the Post -Offi'i- 


73 Mttmi" 

77 MBaa 
61 Momraar 
75 Moscow 
70 Munich 
73 Nairobi 
-ttftatoa 
82 NMf 

72 N York* 

66 Wee 
95 Oslo 

73 Paris 
95 Peking 
75 Perth 
75 Prague. 

68 favkjrifc 

88 Rbotos 
57 Rio de 
70 ianttra 


f 32 90 SPauW* 
a 23 73 Seed. 


I 28 82 Sydney ... 
aSSKTmmr * 

I 31 88 Ttfariv «■ 
f 19 MTWtolffr . 
8 24 75tW«B 1 
1 12 54 TorenW. f 
c 17 63 Tuna • 
c 15 sBVawgd* 
c 19 86 vwfnr.J 
s .17. B3 yertB»-' -*r 
s 5 41 VtanM v j^ 
s 27 81 Woito<3ffi 




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THE 



TIMES 


SPORT 43 
TELEVISION AND RADIO 4? 


TUESDAY OCTOBER 7 1986 


Executive Editor 
Kenneth Fleet 

STOCK MAR KPT ' 

PT 30 Share 
12 51.2 (+17.2) 
ft-se 100 
1578.9 (+18.1) 

209$" 8 

^ M i ( ( D + a o ta oT am) 

THE POUNn 

US Dollar 
1.4395 (-Q.Q015) 

W German mark 
2.8646 (-0.0138) 

agEsg Bhted 

Gold trade 
resumed 

Merrill Lynch, ihe major 
American brokerage house, 1 
has resumed trading South 
African gold shares, which are. 
registered in Johannesburg, 
aner a temporary suspension 
since the US sanctions bill was. 
passed in the senate Iasi week. 

A company spokesman in 
London said corporate law- 
yers had advised the Bill did 
not preclude trading in shares 
already issued, but would 
cover any issued in newly- 
noated gold mining ventures. 

Merrill is believed to do 
most of its South African gold 
share trading in American 
Depositary Receipt form, but 
uses the South African market 
when arbitrage opportunities 
arise. 

Mowlem rise 

John Mowlem, the contract- 
ing and construction company 
which took over SGB Group 
this year, yesterday reported 
16. 7 million pretax profits for 
the six months to the end of 
June, compared with 14. mil- 
lion in the same period last 
year. Turnover increased from 
£197 million to £268 million. 
The interim dividend was 
increased by 12.5 per cent to 
4.5p. 

Tempos, page 28 

Merger off 

Hie recommended offer for 
Gilbert House Investment by 
Letts Green Estate will lapse 
and Mr N M Wray, a Gilbert 
House director who now holds ' 
79.97 per cent of shares, will 
bid 18.875p cash for the 
outstanding capital. 

No referral 

The proposed acquisition 
b> Chase Corporation of Win- 
gate Property Investments will 
not be referred to the 
Monopolies and Mergers 
Commission. 

Output slows 

West German industrial 
production fell a seasonalfy- 
adjusied 0.5 per cent in -Au- 
gust from July. 

Ordnance sale 

Vickers has completed its 
agreement to buy the. Royal 
Ordnance lank business at . 
Leeds. The price will be 
determined by a formula relat- 
ing to the net asset value on 
completion date and an initial 
payment of £1 1.2 million has 
been made. 

Damages paid 

Our report of the writ issued 
b\ Mr Stuart Tarrant against 
the H all Street Journal should 
ha\e made clear that the 
publishers of the paper are not 
contesting the proceedings, 
hating published an apology 
and paid damages to Mr 
Tarrant. i 


New Opec anger 
over Britain’s 
independent role 


From David Young, Geneva 


Britain’s continued refusal 
to co-operate with the 
Organisation of Petroleum 
Exporting Countries (OPEC) 
brought renewed criticism 
from the organization 

yesterday. 

Mr ROwani Lukman, the 
Nigerian Oil Minister and 
current OPEC president, {dans 
to raise the issue with Mr 
Peter Walker, the Energy Sec- 
retary. in London during the 
next three weeks. 

He said yesterday: “I must 
emphasize that unless other 
noo-OPEC exporters contrib- 
ute their share to our efforts, 
the recent firming up in prices 
is likely to be only a temporary 
phenomenon. 

“Even when some non- 
OPEC producers accepted 
OPEC’s hand of co-operation 
Britain remained stubbornly 
dedicated to a policy of 
production maximization and 
non-cooperation in the mis- 
taken belief that a free market 
is the best approach to a 
volatile and unstable oil 
situation. . 

BBN in 
market 
debut 


“We were told thai the However, to achieve that 
North Sea producers, with a goal OPEC will have to extend 
wide industrial base, were or improve its present output 
immune to the effects of low system. A key issue is Iraq, 
oil prios. This has proved to presently exempted from the 
be a misplaced confidence. system at Iran's suggestion. 
“The cash from of oil com- Iran now wants all 13 mero- 
inies has been severely a f- bers of OPEC to be given a 
ned. Oil rigs are lying idle new quota and for that quota 
id exploration and develop- to be strictly enforced. 


fected. Oil rigs are lying idle 
and exploration and develop- 
ment have been drastically 
curtailed by budgetary cuts — 
all developments which spell 
disaster in the long term“ 
OPEC accuses countries like 
Britain of keeping oil taxation 
high and therefore not allow- 
ing the benefits of the lower oil 
price to be passed on to the 
customer at the pumps. 

The organization is trying to 
work out a new quota system 
which it hopes will convince 
the world oil market that h 
will control output and send 
up prices again. 

Sheikh Ahmed Zaki Ya- 
mani. the Saudi Arabian Oil 
Minister, said yesterday he 
hoped that prices would move 
towards SI 7 a band — pos- 
sibly SI 9. 


Mr Gholamreza Agh- 
azadeh. the Iranian Oil Min- 
ister, said: “We still think the 
price of S28 a barrel is not a 
dream but could be a reality. 
The cuts in production should 
be the same as now but the 
main concern is for Iraq's 
position. They should be 
OPEC members or not Their 
quoia should be 1.2 million 
barrels a day." 

Saudi Arabia and Kuwait 
have also indicated that they 
want the present system, 
which expires on October 31. 
to be replaced by a new quota 
agreement which would in- 
crease their production 
allowances. 



C&W group 
set to win 
Japan licence 

By Teresa Poole. Business Correspondent 


Move toward equal 
retirement ages 


Interlink joins USM 


uwut By Lawrence Lever 

By Peter Gartland Most companies will move these criteria, while over half 

Beny. Birch and Noble, the *° a common retirement age said these were their sole 
investment adviser, is coining * or men and women of 62 to reason for encouraging early 
to the Unlisted Securities according to a survey of retirement. 

Market through a placing retirement and pension prao- Redundancy costs have 
arranged by Laurence Prust. rices among 225 employers. risen by more than 40 per cent 

the stockbroker. Reward Retirement Ser- since the Government aban- 

rw,„ vices, the author of the survey, dotted the system of refunding 


Beny. Birch and Noble. Ibe 10 a common retirement age 
investment adviser, is coining f° r men ®id women of 62 to 


Market through a placing 
arranged by Laurence Prust. 
the stockbroker. 


One and a half milli on 


a placing retirement and pension prac- Redundancy costs have 
rice Prust. rices among 225 employers. risen by more than 40 per cent 

Reward Retirement Ser- since the Government a ban- 

millio n to^ihesys™olrcf™di..s 

nrrlinarv shares, renresenrine *** on . e of trends to pan of employers redundancy 

J 0 ” Rcd '“'- 

__ > ■ . retirement ages between men danev Fund. 

rxisiine shareholders for 1 15 d and women - Some 45 per cent of employ- 

"LhS Th'S has developed since era questioned said ihfy 

9 mSST recem ty rile Euro- wanted to remove blockages 
capitalization of£6.9 million. pc™ Court of Justice. making from, production lines orto 

For theyear ending January it unlawful for employers . to / retire poor performing in- 
31, BBN made a total turn- force women to -retire earlier dividuals. Twenty eight per 
over of £3.3 million, of which then male employees in simi- cent included employee pres- 

£2.7 million came from insur- lar jobs. sure for early retirement 

ance broking and financial “Indeed. 11 per cent of among their reasons, 

services and the remainder companies had already eqnal- “Pressure seems likely to 
from a 50 per cent stake in a ized retirement ages and a grow since 52 per cent of 
micro-electronics company, further 8.5 per cent were companies said there was 
Pretax profits were £597,000. actively considering doing evidence of increased era- 
P re tax profits for the year so ” the authors of the survey, 
ending January 31 1987 are which encompassed 300.000 


evidence of increased em- 
ployee demand,” the survey 
concludes. 

Other conclusions are that 
there has been “a spectacular 
increase” in the provision of 
widowers' benefits, more part- 
timers included in company 


forecast lo be not less than employees, said. Other conclusions are that 

£900.000. Forecast earnings Almost 79 per cent of there has been “a spectacular 
per share are 8.6p giving a p/e companies surveyed either al- increase” in the provision of 
ratio of 13.4. low or positively encourage widowers' benefits, more pan- 

Tbe company's origins date early retirement. “Over the timers included in company 
back to the mid-1960s when it last two years .provision has pension schemes and more 
was known as Beny. Birch spiralled. Since 1985. 8 per generous treatment of early 
and Hawksford. Its present cent of companies have in- leavers — people who switch 
identity goes back only to iroduced (or extended) a jobs, often leaving their com- 
April of this year when it scheme.” pany pension scheme behind, 

acquired the Lloyd’s insur- The most common reasons cj., i - 


acquired the Lloyd’s insur- The most common reasons 
ance broking firm of Noble for early retirement are a wish 


leavers — people who switch 
jobs, often leaving their com- 
pany pension scheme behind. 

Early leavers have benefited 


and Wilkins. to reduce overmanning 

Mr Derek Berry, the chief and/or to avoid making 
executive, says the main rea- employees redundant About 


reduce 


ro News 26 Stock Market 28 
V Tpufc dOp* M 
Money Mrkts 27 Store Prices » 

Wall Street 28 USM Prices 30 


STOCK MARKETS 

IKISU 1782-06 (+ 7 m 

SEdow 17435331 - 171 . 12 ) 


son for the USM listing is to 
. give the company a higher 
profile, which he regards as 
being more in keeping with 
the status of BEN'S corporate 
clients, which include ICL 
Marks and Spencer and 
Texaco. 

Mr Berry also said he 
regarded a USM listing as 
“stepping stone” to a full 
listing. He said that ac- 
quisitions were probable. It is 
known that BBN is keen to 
become involved in the 
reinsurance broking market. 

£50m target 

Chesterfield Properties is 
embarking on a £50 million 
commercial paper programme 
through the joint dealers S G 
Warburg and County 
NaiWesi Capital Markets, to 
achieve savings in its 
borrowings. 


MAIN PRICE CHANGES 


is to 80 per cent of employers used 

igher 


in many cases from the prac- 
tice. of abolishing actuarial 
reductions. 

Special report, pages 33 to 39 


Consumers run up 
record £ 22 bn debt 

- By David Smith, Economics Correspondent 

tpnsumers owed a Traditional hire-purchase 
record £22.56 billion at the credit has fallen behind, al- 
end of August while retail though it remains important 
sal». aJtoough revised down- in, for example, car purchases, 
warns slight! ly, were also at i n August £959 million was 
their highest levd for August advanced in fixed sum credit 
according to official figures 


published yesterday. 

New consumer credit ad- 
vanced totalled £2.68 billion 
in August slightly down on 


Retail sales volume was 
122.6 (1980 = 100) in August 
a rise of 1.4 per cent on July. 
In the latest three months. 


JSSSS?. 2084.53 (-*9-87) 

*H£2j5» 

KSbar* - 2016.4 (+ 6.5> 

SSraL. 368775 W& 

gS:CAC- 386.8 (+2.7) 

iHfSeneral 9/a 

London dosing prices Page 29 

INTEREST RATES 

London; 

ffmonth Inter^lO^ioS 
3 -month eligible WBsclO^UJ 56 ^ 
facing rate 

Pnme Rate75 *2««. 

Federal Funds n 

3-month Treasu^ BiH|5.£^5.01 % 

30 -year bonds 9fr & a= _ 9®‘ ^ 

CURRENCIES ~ 


London: 

E SI .4305 „ 

£ DM28646 
£; SwFr2 3291 

£. FFr93827 
£:Yen221.68 
£: index: 68 0 _ 
ECU £0.7271 ?6 


New Yoric 

$: £1.4380* 

$: DM15900* 

$: S»Fr1.6i95* 
$: FFr65150: 

$: Yenl 54.17* 
$■. lnctex:l0? -2 

SDR £0.843728 


RISES: 

Id 1 <37p i+13pl 

Brit Aero 476p(+1tp) 

— ataa 

Really Useful 403p (+I3p> 

Row marts B ■ 148p<+9p| 

Beecham 4l8p (+I2pj 

Man Ship 683p(+23p) 

Cable S Wireless — 302p(+i5pj 
Consolidated Gold — 8Q2p (+110) 

Gilbert House .6ip (+44oj 

FSRatcfttte 

S Jerome fl p i + £ p 

Gent SR 

Harris Q 212p(+6p) 

FALLS: 

SSB 5 ^=SS| 

8 BdS=.*PB 


GOLD 

London Fixatg: 

AM $436.50 pm4S436 90 
dose $437.50-438^0 (£304.00- 
304.751 

cSSi $438.00-43850- 


N ORTH SEA OIL 

Brent (Nov.) pm $14.10 bbl($14.50) 
* Denotes latest tradms price ^ 


the July figure of £2.72 billion, sales volume was up by 2.5 per 
Bank credit cards — Access cent on the previous three 
and Bardaycard — are now months, and by 4.5 per cent on 
easily the most important the corresponding period of 
source of consumer credit Of last year. Hie value of sales 
the £2.68 billion advanced, this year is running 8 per cent 
£1.06 billion was in this form, above 1985 levels. 

In the latest three months ... . .... 

there was a 9 percent increase Mwttf retail businesses, 

in bank credit card advances. as Marta mid Spencer, 
compared with an overall rise food and non- 

of 7 per cent in total consumer products, experienced 

credji the strongest sales rise. 


Mr Richard Gabriel, above, 
a former motor-cycle mes- 
senger, is bringing his Inter- 
Gnk Express parcels courier 
service to the Unlisted Securi- 
ties Market — the 500th 
company to join — with a price 
tag of £30 milljon ( Cliff Fel- 
tham writes). 

But it has been a bumpy 
ride. An earlier messenger 
service collapsed. Later a fire 
destroyed all financial records 
of Interlink and the business 
almost failed. 

Bat now Mr Gabriel, aged 
32, is offering 21 per cent of 
his company throngh 
Laurence Prust the stock- 
broker, at a price of I85p a 
r share, in the past three years 
pretax profits have grown - 

Pressure 
eases but 
pound dips 

By David Smith 
Economics Correspondent 

The pound slipped to a new 
low yesterday but selling pres- 
sure was noticeably down 
compared with last week. The 
City expects that the Chan- 
cellor. Mr Nigel Lawson, will 
be able to avoid a base rate 
increase this week. 

Shares recovered ground. 
The FT 30-share index rose by 
17 2 points to 1,251.2. 

The sterling index fell by 0.2 
to 68 yesterday morning and 
remained steady with some 
gentle support from the Bank 
of England. The pound 
dropped more than a pfennig 
to a record low DM2.8654 but 
was steady at S 1 .4395. 

The money and foreign 
exchange markets were quiet 
ahead of today's September 
money supply figures. 

Last week, analysts ex- 
ported a rise in the sterling M3 
measure of 3 per cent or more. 
Now the view is that the 
increase will be 2 per cent or 
less — and this will ease 
pressure for higher base rates. 

Although the public sector’s 
contribution to the sterling 
M3 rise in banking September 
is expected to have been large, 
probably around £2 billion, 
analysts anticipate an offset- 
ting fall in bank lending 
This is because the oil 
companies received £1 billion 
of repayments on advanced 
petroleum revenue tax last 
month and may have used this 
to reduce lheir borrowings. 

But dealers still expect a rise 
will be needed of around I per 
cent. Comment, page 27 


from £372.000 to more than 
£2.5 million on turnover of 
£13.7 million. 

Interlink has more than 100 
depots throughout the country, 
nearly all operated by franchi- 
sees. They collect customers' 
parcels which are taken by 
Interlink's own vehicles to a 
central warehouse. Parcels are 
then delivered to the depot 
nearest to the destination 
address. 

There are more thoa 12,000 
customers and Interlink 
claims to have between 5 and 6 
per Cent of the market, in spite 
of fierce competition from 
rivals such as TNT Overrate, 
Independent Express and 
Elan — as well as the Post 
OfBct. Tempos, page 28 

British Land 
plans £100m 
development 

British Land plans to re- 
develop its Plantation House 
building in the Gty of London 
with two adjoining freehold 
properties it has bought for 1 
£20.2 million in a 750.000 sq | 
ft, £100 million plus develop- , 
mem which could eventually 
be worth £400 million. 

The company has said 
Plantation House would be 
worth £60 million above its 
present value when redevel- 
oped. British Land would then 
have a two-acre site in a key 
location. The company says it 
may redevelop the site for one 
tenant 


Cable and Wireless yes- 
terday announced the forma- 
tion of an Anglo-United 
Stales- Japanese consortium, 
which it believes can win the 
licence to provide an alter- 
native international tele- 
communications system for 
Japan. 

The members include 
Toyota Motors. C lioh. the 
trading house, a number of 
Japanese banks, and C&W. 

Sir Eric Sharp, chairman of 
Cable and Wireless, said he 
was confident of being 
awarded the licence, because 
of the consortium's “internal 
and external strengths" which 
will also be assisted by the 
international arm of NTT, 
Japan’s dominant domestic 
carrier. 

The creation of the con- 
sortium. Kokusai Digital 
T sushi n Kikaku KX IKDTK), 
follows a positive feasibility- 
study by C Uoh and C&W. 

KDTK_ at first a formal 
Feasibility Study Company, 
will be the precursor to an 
operating company. General 
Motors declined to join the 
group but already has close 
links with the main partners. 

The fast-growing market for 
international telecommunica- 
tions traffic in and out of 
Japan is worth more than $1 
billion (£700 million) a year 
and will be opened to com- 
petition next year. 

At present there is only one 
other competitor, led by three 


of the largest Japanese trading 
houses — Mitsubishi. Mitsui, 
and Sumitomo. Yesterday, 
they were invited to take 4 
stake in KDTK, which hat 
kept back a 14 per cent 
shareholding to oner other 
Japanese companies. Such ifll 
arrangement could effectively 
ensure there are no losers and 
success for KDTK. 

KDTK. in partnership with 
Pacific Telecom Cable of th< 
US. is pbnning to install a 
new fibre optic cable linking 
Seattle and Tokyo, to come 
into operation in late 1989. 
(PTC is a joint venture be* 
tween Cable and Wireless and 
Pacific Tclcsis one of the 
largest independent telephone 
operators in the L’S ) 

Further networks would 
also be Laid to other Pacific 
Basin countries, including 
Hong Kong. K DTK’s invest- 
ment over 10 years conk] 
reach SI billion. 

C&W and C Itoh will be the 
two largest consortium mem- 
bers with 20 per cent cad). 
The others are Toyota Motors 
(10 per cent). Pacific Tclesis 
International (10 per ccniL 
Fujitsu (3 per cent). NEC (3 
per cent), Hitachi (2 per cent) 
Merrill Lynch (3 per ccntk 
other Japanese companies ( 14 
per centL and Japanese tunki 
(15 per cent), including the 
Industrial Bank of Japan, 
Daichi-Kangvo Bank, and the 
long-term credit bank of Ja* 
pan. 

Encircling the earth, page 25 


icm- 

S Hong Kong dealers 
£ fall to save face 

,000 By Graham Seujeant, Financial Editor 


The Slock Exchange of 
Hong Kong celebrated its 
formal grand opening yes- 
terday with a satellite link to 
the London Stock Exchange 
and an embarrassingly heavy 
foil in share prices. 

The Hang Seng index — 
which like the FT 30 in 
London has failed to succumb 
to a new official Slock Ex- 
change index — fell 49.87 
points to 2084.93. Dealers 
suppressed any desire to save 
face, in favour of taking heavy 
profits after a record rise 
lasting 1 1 days. 

The new exchange was first 
mooted nine years ago. The 
existence of four exchanges 
which had been spawned from 
the old Hong Kong Stock 
Exchange — and in some cases 
overtaken it — was hindering 
the Crown Colony’s develop- 
ment as a financial centre. 

It made supervision harder 
and deterred overseas com- 
panies from using Hong Kong 
for dealings or quotation in 
the Asian time zone. 

The new combined ex- 
change opened for business 
with a brand new trading floor 


on April 2. when the old 
exchan^s were closed. Floor 
trading is fully computerized. 

But the computer dealing 
facilities and trading have 
remained largely on the floor. 
In London, the new com tuned 
exchange will deal in larger 
slocks chiefly from offices, 
with floor trading mainly in 
second-line shares. 

As part of the day-long 
celebrations, British Tele- 
communications had laid on a 
satellite link between a glitter- 
ing throng of 3.000 at a 
banquet in Hong Kong and a 
glittering throng of about 100 
on the 23rd floor of the Stock 
Exchange tower in London. 

The former included the 
chairman of the Bank of 
China as principal guesL 
Mainland approval was sym- 
bolized by the gift of a plaque 

Sir Nicholas Goodison, the 
London Stock Exchange 
chairman, interviewed m 
Hong Kong, said Hong Kong's 
stock exchange reform re- 
flected the same need to invest 
in dealing technology 

Comment, page 27 


‘Steel demand to fall 2%’ 


By Edward Townsend, Indnsuni Correspondent 

Hard-pressed steelmakers replaced, by many manufao in 1 
in the EEC face a one-miUion- hirers, with other materials Holsebi 
tonne foil in demand next year, such as lightwe%ht alloys and look fo 


according to forecasts from the 
International Iron and Steel 
Institute. 

Demand for steel in the 
world’s industrialized nations 
is expected to be 315 million 
tonnes in 1987, a 2 per cent 
drop on this year and 5 per 
cent down on 1985. 

These forecasts were an- 
nounced at the opening session 
yesterday of the IISI's animal 
conference in Rio de Janeiro. 
Mr Lenhard Holschuh, the 
group's secretary general, said 
chat in spite of expectations to 
the contrary, the foil in ofl 
prices and the decline in value 
of the US dollar had not yet 
stimulated consumption aid 
investment activity id indus- 
trialized countries. 

Steel is suffering from the 
added disadvantage of being 


plastics. Fewer and longer- 
lasting vehicles have added to 
the steelmakers' problems. 

In spite of Mr Hobchnb's 
predictions, the British Steel 
Corporation remains one of 
the most successful of 
Europe's slimmed-down 
steelmakmg operations and 
could benefit most from the 
new EEC moves to liberalize 
Europe's steel market 

Britain accounted for a third 
of the EEC's 150,000 job 
losses in the five years op to 
1984 and has shed almost a 
fifth of the 3 1 million tonnes of 
capacity cuts since 1980. 

The BSC last year returned 
to profits for the first time Tn a 
decade and is set to maintain 
its eanrings record when first- 
half figures for 1986 are 
releLied next mouth. 


In Rio yesterday, Mr 
Holschuh said that the out- 
look for steelmaking up to 
1990 showed that capacities 
would continue to shrink in all 
leading industrialized coun- 
tries to 442 million tonnes, a 
drop of nearly 100 millio n 
tonnes on the 1980 figure. 

But while steel demand is 
declining in the developed 
world, consumption forecasts 
for the developing nations 
show every sign of increasing. 
Brazil Argentina, Mexico, 
Venezuela. Korea, Taiwan and 
India ail expect a growing 
demand for steeL 

Mr Holschuh said the 
Western world demand of 430 
million tonnes for 1990 would 
be about the same as for 1985. 
This would be followed by a 
“modest” growth of 0.7 per 
cent a year to about 445 
million tonnes by 1995. 


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26 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


THE TIMES TUESDAY OCTOBER 7 1986 


Pressure 
on krone 
recedes 


■Stockholm (AP-DJ) - The 
Norwegian central bank inter- 
vened only lightly yesterday in 
support of the krone, after 
significant intervention late 
last week. 

’ Scandinavian foreign ex- 
change traders said downward 
pressure on the Norw egian 
unit receded sharply from 
Friday when the Norges Bank, 
the nation's central bank, is 
estimated to have bought* 
between 4 billion and 5 billion 
kroner (between £364 million 
{fad £455 million) on the open 
market. 

I "They have succeeded in 
defending it for the time 
being," said a senior dealer in 
Oslo. 

* Dealers said the krone's 
basket index, which inversely 
pleasures the currency's value, 
spent most of the morning at 
ground 1 1 1 .60, compared 
with its Friday high of 1 12JI5. 
; One trader said speculative 
interest in the Norwegian unit 
|s about one-tenth of what it 
was on Friday. 

Traders said pressure 
against the unit may build 
jo ward the end of the week,- 
despite yesterday's calm tone, 
&s the fear of another 10 per 
cerrt devaluation by the Gov- 
ernment has not yet dis- 
sipated. The unit was de- 
valued by 12 per cent earlier 
fa is year. 

■ Market analysts blame the 
currency crisis on doubts 
pboul the new socialist 
government's ability to man- 
age the economy. 



Greater freedom for market-makers in the post Big Bang age 


Takeover Panel changes rules 


By Jc 
City 


Editor 


John Walker Haworth; 
treading carefully 


The Takeover Panel is to 
create a new class of market- 
makers and fond managers 
who will not be subject to the 
same rules in takeover bids as 
their smaller brethren. 

The changes mainly affect 
the new-style financial con- 
glomerates, created in readi- 
ness for Big Bang on October 
27. 

The new category of exempt 
dealers and investment man- 


agers will be free from some of 
the so-called “concert-party*" 
restrictions on baying and 
selling shares when other 
parts of the same conglom- 
erate are involved in a bid 
acting as banker, broker or 
financial adviser. 

These new “saperd eaters" 
will be most closely watched 
for breaches in the "Chinese 
walls", the arrangements de- 
signed to ensure that price- 
sensitive information does not 
pass from departments such as 


corporate advisers to others in 

the same conglomerate. 

“Exemptions will be 
granted on a case-by-case 
basis," said Mr John Walker- 
Haworth, director-general of 
the panel. “We shall be feeling 
our way but this is designed for 
those groups who are regularly 
in the business of advising on 
takeover bids." 

The panel is creating die 
exempt status for market- 
makers as it is concerned that 
the ability to trade in certain 


stocks might be unpaired be- 
cause of the forced withdrawal 
of a big market-maker through 
the application of the concert- 
party rales. 

This coaid happen, for in-, 
stance, when a bid is an- 
nounced, if the market-maker 
is pari of the same group as the 
broker or banker advising the 
bidding company. Under the 
proposed new roles, when a 
financial conglomerate is ad- 
vising a bidder, all dea lin g s as 
a market-maker will be pre- 


sumed to be in conceit with 
with the bidder unless the 
market-maker has been 
granted exempt status by the 
panel. 

The panel is also changing 
the rules affecting connected 
fond managers dealing for 
clients on a discretionary ba- 
sis. Once a bid has been made, 
exempt fund managers will not 
be automatically regarded as 
acting in concert and will be 
able to deal more freely for 
their discretionary clients. 


Pretax profits fall by 24% 
at Michael Peters Group 


By Lawrence Lever 


Michael Peters Croup, the 
USM-quoted design, market- 
ing and communications con- 
sultancy. yesterday 

announced a 24 per cent 
decline in pretax profits — 
down from £885.000 to 
£675.000 lor the year to June 
30 1986. 

The decline had been 
signposted in the half-year 
figures, which saw profits drop 
from £338.000 to £207.000. 
Mr Michael Peters, the chair- 
man of the company, said it 
had been "a transitional year 
lor the group". 

Traditional activities such 
as packaging and retail design 
and new product development 
"had a very successful year," 
he said. 

However, the company suf- 


fered a shake-up in its newiy- 
formed financial public rela- 
tions consultancy after the 
departure of its managing 
director. The public relations 
company bore the brunt of 
£1 50.000 losses when Michael 
Peters Group started three 
new businesses. 

Other factors contributing 
to the downturn included 
losses of £90,000 on a region- 
ally-based promotions com- 
pany. This has now been sold 
to its management for a 
nominal sum. Fixed accom- 
modation and support costs 
associated with the company's 
recent move to larger premises 
were £ 1 20.000 higher than last 
year. 

Moreover, the company re- 
ceived a contribution of only 


£40.000 from Cockade, the 
designer and constructor of 
exhibitions, which it pur- 
chased for £1.7 million in 
November 1984. 

The company has recruited 
more staff for its public rela- 
tions subsidiary and efforts 
are being made to reduce the 
seasonality of Cockade's prof- 
its performance. The results 
do not include any contribu- 
tion from PA Design, which 
was purchased fbr£Z ( million 
in June. 

Turnover was £8.9 million 
(£6.2 million), while earnings 
per share fell from £885.000 to 
£675.000. The company is 
maintaining the I.6p final 
dividend which brings the 
total dividend for the year to 
2.6p. 


Evered pays 
£3.5m for 
John Payne 


The Abdullah brothers have 
taken their Evered Holdings 
industrial conglomerate back 
on the takeover trail — but this 
time the target is much 
smaller. . 

Evered is raying £3.5 mil- 
lion for John Payne, manufao 
turer of process and packaging 
machinery for the confec- 
tionery. food, and tobacco 
industries. 

John Payne has factories in 
Winchester. Hampshire, and 
Gainsborough. Lincolnshire. 
Last year the business made a 
pretax profit of £920,000. 

The company was started in 
1975 by Mr John Payne who. 
with his family, is keeping 90 
per cent of the shares being 
issued to finance the deal for 
at least 12 months. 


Iraq seeks rescheduling 
of $500m Eurocredit 


Bahrain (Reuter) — Iraq, hit 
by its prolonged war with Iran 
and the world oil price slump, 
has asked creditor banks to 
reschedule a $500 million 
(£347 million)Ioantorelievea 
payments crisis, banking 
sources said yesterday. 

The request comes after it 
told banks that it was unable 
to make a principal payment 
of $71.25 million on the 
international bank loan, due 
at die end of last month. 

A preliminary meeting of 
hankers has already been held 
in Paris to consider Iraq's 
request, the first time a 
Eurocredit has bees brought 
into negotiations to relieve the 
country's payments crisis, the 
sources added. 

Banking sources estimate 
Iraq's total debt at $50 billion, 
made up largely of shortterm 


trade financing in the form of 
letters of credit and loans from 
Gulf Arab allies, mainly Ku- 
wait and Saudi Arabia. 

Iraq's oil exports, its prin- 
cipal source of revenue, have 
been hit by the Gulf war, now 
in its seventh year, ami by 
lower world oil prices, which 
tumbled at one point to below 
$10 a barrel from around $30 
late last year. 

The country's Eurocredit 
borrowing for balance of pay- 
ments purposes has been 
modest, totalling little more 
than $1.5 billion. U borrowed 
$500 million in March 1983 
and the same amount in 
October last year. 

Although the September 29 
payment has been missed, 
Iraq is continuing to pay 
current interest, the sources 
said. 


Brother to 
open US 
subsidiary 


Tokyo (AP-DJ) - Brother 
Industries, the Japanese mak- 
ers .of sewing machines and 
typewriters, yesterday an- 
nounced plans for a wholly- 
owned subsidiary in the 
United States to produce elec- 
tronic typewriters. 

The new company. Brother 
Industries (USA), will be set 
up in Baitleu. Tennessee, with 
production starting in June 
1987. . . 

It will be Brother Industries 
second overseas production 
base for electronic typewriters, 
following one in Britain that 
went into production in July. 

Officials said the company- 
decided to establish the US 
subsidiary because the rising 
yen had been eroding profit 
margins of Japanese products 
sold overseas. 

In 1985 Brother Industries 
exported about a third of 1-2 
million typewriters it pro- 
duced to the US. and suffered 
significantly because ■ of the 


yen's strength, according to 
officials. 


company 

Initial production at the 
Tennessee plant is set at 
150.000 units but may grow 
to 300.000. they said. 

The new company, capital- 
ized at $8 -million (£5.5 mil- 
lion), wiU start with about 200 
employees. 

Officials said Brother In- 
dustries will send 30 people 
from Japan to oversee op- 
erations 

The company plans to ac- 
quire 30 per cent of parts 
locally. 


IS THE CITY’S NEW SPECIES EQUIPPED 
TO SURVIVE IN A BIGGER POND? 


On October 27th the level of competition within 


the Gty will explode. 
(Perhaps that’s 


to compete against anyone. 
We 




i*. 


why its been called Big Bang.) 
Membership of the stock exchange has been 
thrown open to massive and aggressive international 
financial conglomerates which, for the first time, will 
be able to compete freely in the Gty’s traditional 
markets. 

And with the abolition of fixed commissions, 
there is little doubt that the competition will indeed 
be fierce, if not bloody. 

The arrival of so many experienced and financially 
powerful competitors has caused more than a little 
concern in the Gty. 

In London major new alliances have been forged 
between brokers, jobbers, bankers and investment 
managers. 

These new investment bank groups are now 
better financed, better structured and better equip- 
ped to compete in this bigger; more competitive 
market. 

But some pundits still question the ability of 
many to survive. 

One alliance, however; has unquestioned staying 
power 

Ours at Barclays de ZoeteWedd. 

While some may find their resources strained, 
we have the vast financial, technical, physical and 
human resources of the Barclays Group to enable us 


also have one of the most envied alliances. 

In de Zoete & Bevan, for example, we have one 
of London’s most respected and successful brokers. 

They were brokers to British Telecom's record- 
breaking flotation and, at the other end of the scale, 
have brought some 14 companies to the USM. 

They also have offices in Tokyo, New York and 
Hong Kong. 

And, together with Barclays Investment 
Management, have funds of over £ 9 billion under 
management. 

Then there’s Wedd Durlachei: 

For many years, they’ve been one of London’s 
largest market makers in both gilts and equities. 

And in an increasingly technical market place we 
expect their experience and knowledge to prove in- 
valuable to clients. 

Ourmerchant bank has an equally enviable record 
when it comes to innovative banking. 

Its development capital arm has, for example, 
played a key role in the increased use of the manage- 


ment buy out. It has arranged 45 over the last few 



years, including the employee buy out of the National 
Freight Corporation. 

It is also the leading merchant bank in the new 
market for sterling commerical paper 

And has an increasing reputation in other areas 
of corporate finance. 

Of course, these are only a few of the resources 
well have to make sure we’re as attractive to 
clients as any investment banking group in 
the world. 

One resource we haven’t really ex- 
plained in detail so far is our parent 
company. 

Or its 4,000 offices in 70 countries. 
Or its assets of £65 billion. 

Or; indeed, the feet that it’s been 
surviving rather well itself in a bigger 
. pond for some years now. 

To find out more about any of 
the services offered by BZ W please 
write to the Business Development 
Division, Barclays de Zoete Wfedd, 
Ebbgate House, 2 Swan Lane, 

London EC4R 3TS. Tel: 01-623 2323- 
Telex: 8812124 BZWG. 



BARCLAYS de ZOETE WEDD 


THE INVESTMENT BANKING ARM OF THE BARCLAYS GROUP 


COMPANY NEWS 


• CARR BOYD MINERALS: 
In the year to June 30 consoli- 


dated net profit jumped by 184 
to Aus$Si5 million 


per cent 
(f 2 3 million) on sales revenue 
sharply higher at Aus$ 12.54 
million (A usS 300.000). Earn- 
ings per share 10 cents (4 cents). 
The final dividend of 6 cents 
(nil) was paid on Julv 9. 

• MARLING INDUSTRIES: 
The company has acquired the 
goodwill and trading assets of 
George H Wbeatcron. a manu- 
facturer of narrow fabrics. The 
price mil be 680,000 ordinary 
shares, of which 550.000 have 
been placed on behalf of the 
vendor, plus a small, further 
payment, in cash, to be deter- 
mined by a stock valuation. 

• KW AH (J: Dividend raised to 
l.40p ( 1 .25p) for the year to 
June 30. It will be paid on Nov. 
17. Pretax profit £391.586 
(£239.651). Earnings per share 
3.39p (2.17p). 

• EPICURE HOLDINGS; The 
group's Swedish subsidiary is to 
buy Grimaldi Mekaniska 
Verkstad (GMV) of Sweden and 
its offshoot. GMV's principal 
activities are in steel finishing. 
The price will be 7 million krona 
(£709.000), with further pay- 
ments up to a maximum of 13 
million kronor, of which 4.5 
million kronor will be in Epi- 
cure shares. 

• TERN GROUP: Corton 
Beach's offer for Tern Group 
(now Beach Textiles) is un- 
conditional Acceptances have 
been received for 81.5 per cent 
of the ordinary shares. . 

• THOMAS WARRINGTON 
& SONS: Half-year to June 30 
(comparisons restated). Turn- 
over £7.32 million (£6.92 mil- 
lion). Pretax loss £195.000 (loss 
£391.000). Loss per share 6-49p 
<13.77p). 

• BOC GROUP; Cencor Inc 
and United Education and Soft- 
ware (UES) have jointly agreed 
in principle with the BOC 
Group Inc. a US offshoot of the 
BOC Group, for the acquisition 
by Cencor and UES of the Arrco 
Educational Servries Division 
of BOC. Terms were not dis- 
closed. pending certain pur- 


• LAWTEX: Total dividend 
raised to 2p (1.5p, adjusted) for 
the year to June 28. Turnover 
£20.5 million (£19.88 million). 
Pretax profit £306.000 
(£408,000). Earnings per share 
6.8p (9.5p. adjusted). 

• CHARLIE BROWNS CAR 
PART CENTRES: In the year 
to July 31. a dividend of2p(!p) 
is payable, making a total of 3p 
(Ip). With figures in £000. sales 
were 18.070 (15.257), operating 
profit 1.086 (789). interest pay- 
able 164 (181) and pretax profit 
922 (608). Earnings per share 
were 9.6p (8.1 p) and the share 
price was unchanged at 163p. 

• CLOSE BROTHERS 
GROUP: The merchant bank- 
ing group reported pretax profits 


for the year to July 31 totalling 


chase-price adjustments. 

• ASPREY; An offshoot. 


REY; 

Asprey SA Geneva, has entered 
into an agreement to purchase a 
long-leasehold interest in 23/24 
Albemarle St and 16 A. B and C 
Grafton St. London, Wl. for 
£4.25 million in cash. The 
property is being acquired as an 
investment 

• NMW COMPUTERS: First 
half of 1986. Interim dividend 
2.5p (2.4p adjusted). Turnover 
£6.8 million (£3.17 million). 
Pretax profit £989,000 


(£708,000). Earnings per share 
9.9p(7.2pa 


,9p (7-2p adjusted). 

• BERKELEY AND HAY 
HILL INVESTMENTS: The 
company is to acquire two 
investment properties fittoi 
Dominion International Group 
for £8 million. These properties 
have been independently valued 
at £8.4 million and then- addi- 
tion to Berkeley’s portfolio, 
together with the completion of 
current developments and the 
negotiation of tent reviews, will 
produce an annual, rent roll 
exceeding £3 million in 1987. 
Shareholders’ approval will be 
sought at an EGM. 

PINECHURCH US 
GROWTH FUND: No divi- 
dend (nil) for the year to Sept. 
30. Gross revenue $275,603 
(£191.000). against $516,912: 

• GOLDSMITHS GROUP: 
The group has continued the 
expansion of its jewellery di- 
vision with the purchase of five 
retail jewellery shops, bringing ■ 
tbe total to 103. Total cost was 
£969.000 cash. 

• PLM: Results for the eight 
months to end-Aug. Earnings, 
before allocation and tax. 784 
million Swedish krona (£7.96 - 
million), against 87.5 million 
krona. Sales Z 583.2 million 
krona <2386.3 million krona). 

• STOTHEKT & PITT. Whh 
figures in £000. results for the 
half year to June 30 included 
turnover of 15.657 (17.822) 
operating loss of 143 (81 profit) 
and pretax loss of 49 1 (3 12 loss). 
Loss per share was 38.0p 


( 1 2.2p). The restructuring has 
of this 


continued and as part 
programme the company is ' 
reorganizing facilities .to suit 

separate product groups. This 
has enabled the company to sell 
part of the underused victoria 
Works, Bath. The main; cause' 
for the company's decline has _ 
been the shortage -of 'working 
capital as evidenced by the. high 
level of borrowings and interest 

payments.' 


£2,509.000 against £2.171. 

It also reported capital gains, 
realized and unrealized of 
£4,791.000 against £3.631.000 
to rive a total of £7,300.000 
against £5.802.000. or a 27.4 per 
cem return on shareholders' 
funds. Merchant banking profits 
rose almost 40 per cent to 
£L47 1.000. 

• S JEROME & SONS 
(HOLDINGS):' An interim 
dividend of 4 -3p (0.83 adjusted) 
is payable for the six months to 
June 30 to reduce disparity, 
although the amount of the final 
win depend on the full year's 
results. With figures in £000. 
turnover textile home was 7.209 
(6,327). textile export 1.036 
(1.065) and electronics 1.889 
(1.711), Pretax profit amounted 
to 536 (314). Earnings per share 
were 5-84p (3.15p adjusted for 
scrip issue). 

• MICROGEN HOLDINGS: 
The company has acquired Scan 
Laser from Comshare, for 
integration' with its Laser Print- 
ing Bureau subsidiary/ for 
£400.000. Microgen has also 
purchased from Comshare a 
used Xerox 9700 laser printer 
for £75,000. Tbe business wiB be 
transferred to Scan Laser’s main 
site in east London. 

• LEDA INVESTMENT 
TRUST: On September 30, the 
net asset value ora. capital share 
was 237.9p. 

• FINE ART DEVELOP- 
MENTS The company is 
investing £1.5 million .on gra- 
vure print finishing plant at 
its Gateshead. Tyne & Wear 
subsidiary. Matador Paper 
Mills. After the successful 
marketing of the expanding 
range of gift wrap, the company 
is now investing in the latest 
technology to increase produc- 
tion at Gateshead. 

• ML HOLDINGS: The com- 
pany. and Loral Corporation 
have entered into an agreement 
undo- which Loral wifi market 
ML's Sprite remotely, piloted 
miniature helicopter for mil^ 
tary purposes in the US and ML 
will market Sprite together with 
related Loral systems in Britain, 
the EEC and Commonwealth 
countries. 

• SM ALLBONE: .Agreement 
has been reached in principle for 
the company to acquire And-So- 
To-Bed. ASTB is a specialist 
retailer of beds and bedroom- 
related furniture, concentrating 
on the luxury end of the market, 
SmaJIbone is paying £1.750.000 
on completion with three far- 
ther payments of £550.000 hi 
1988. 1989 and 1990. 

• RILEY LEISURE: No in- 

terim dividend (same) has been 
declared for the six months 
ended Jane 30. With figures in 
£000. turnover was 9.588 
(12,079).- trading profit 804 
()J85) and pretax profit 340 
(504). Earnings per share were 
0.40(2.10); 

• CHES TERFIELD PROP- 
ERTIES: The company has 
appointed SG Warburg and 
County NatWest Capita! Mar- 
kets as joint dealers on a £50 
million commercial paper pro- 
gramme. Chesterfield is con- 
fident titat it wHI benefit from 
the sayings in borrowing costs 
that can be achieved in this 
rapidly developing market- 

• BRITISH LAND: The com- 
pany has acquired 36-38 
fenchureh Street and 1-3 Mino- 

<^I*ndon. for 
£20.2 million. The two freehold 
properties occupy the key corner 
ate immediately adjacent to 
Plantation House. ihe 
company's premier City office 
Doming. 

• TURNER & NEWALL: The 

Tangy-R 

The company will operate Is -i 
division of Ftexiiah c . Tan Eve 
manufactures and marklil 
hydraulic jacks, cyffi* 5 
pumps and other accessories?,,' 
Ihe West.Midlandr^?^ 
crabon represents less than rjjr 
of Turner's net assets. ^ 


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1o.-. 



THE TIMES TUESDAY OCTOBER 7 1986 




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.VI !»” 




Telecommunications in the twenty-first century 

Q and Wireless makes 
bid to encircle the earth 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


21 


By Teresa Poole 

business C orrespondent 

feriow m nd i^ reIess and its 
n?*les long from Uie West 

iTlm Amma ' ol3 wty 

. inside it will be three work- 

mjlM'rsoropticSm^- 

T:t 0T ^ ^ diameier 

telephone ca ii s 

simultaneously. 

>s the capacity of 
modem telecommunications 
equipment that by the middle 
01 the next decade tele- 
communications traffic across 
the AUanUc and the Pacific 
could be running at ten times 
present levels without 
exhausting the facilities pres- 
ently planned by the world's 
telecommunications carriers. 

For _ once, capacity is 
expanding ^ in anticipation 
or suj I- undiscovered services 
and demands. The ability to 
transmit much greater vol- 
umes of information, at much 
higher speed, and the increas- 
ing use of computer informa- 
tion services Is expected to 
stimulate technological 
developments that will make 
today’s voice and data facil- 
ities outdated. 

C and W's grand strategy in 
this revolution is to estf»hi>?h a 
global digital highway linking 
the leading economic and 
financial centres of the world 
— London, New York, Tokyo 
and Hong Kong. The forma- 
tion of foe Kokusai Digital 
Tsushin Kikaku KK (KDTK) 
consortium, announced yes- 
terday, is a key step towards 
the goal of girdling the earth 
with a network of optical 
fibres. 

C and W operates commu- 
nications services in 27 conn- 
tries already — a link with its 
colonial past, when the com- 
pany owned and ran a large 
part of the telecommunica- 
tions facilities in the 
Commonwealth. 

By contrast, the new global 
strategy is a product of C and 
W's enthusiasm for the recent 
policies of liberalization and 
privatization pursued by the 
governments of Britain, the 



United Slates and Japan. In 
particular, the licencing by 
Japan of an alternative inter- 
national carrier opens up the 
Pacific Basin area where tele- 
communications traffic is 
growing at more than 20 per 
cent a year and at a far greater 
rate for more specialized ser- 
vices such as facsimile. 

By extending an invitation 
to the 1 members of the rival 
consortium to join KDTK. C 
and W's group is likely to 
prove politically acceptable as 
well as being financially and 
commercially the stronger 
contender. 

Sir Eric Sharp, the chairman 
and architect of bis company's 
global expansion, says that the 
supposition that KDTK will 
not win the licence does not 
even begin to float in the back 
of his mind. “Not only is it 
one of the biggest but it is one ' 
of the most dramatic projects 
that we have ever entered. ” 

Total investment by the 
consortium over ten years 
could reach $! billion (£694 
million), try which time the 
value of international tele- 
communications traffic in and 
out of Japan, is forecast to 
exceed S3 billion a year. 


Japan is relatively undevel- 
oped in international tele- 
communications and the new 
services should greatly exceed 
growth in telephony. 

Sir Eric says: “Japan needs 
more capacity and it needs 
capacity ofa different order in 
terms of quality.” KDTK 
would be able to offer leased 
circuit services by the end of 
next year using existing Padfic 
cable and satellites, enabling a 
customer base to be estab- 
lished in time for the switched 
services from 1989 onwards. 

Investment of around £330 
million will be needed for 
PPAC, the planned state-of- 
the-art cable, linking Seattle 
with Tokyo and win be split 
between Padfic Telecom Ca- 
ble (a joint venture, in which 
C and W owns 20 per cent, 
with the Californian telephone 
company. Pacific Telesis) and 
the new consortium. 

Assuming the application 
for the Japanese licence is 
successful, the cable could be 
operational in late 1989 and 
offering a full range of digital 
leased and switched services. 
Japan would then become an 
important international hub 
in C and W's global highway. 


along with the United States 
and Britain. 

Five main elements make 
up C and W's digital highway, 
each sending telecommunica- 
tions traffic to the others and 
providing a gateway to the 
next continent 

• Japan will feed traffic both 
East and West and the new 
cable will be the crucial link 
spanning the fast growing 
Padfic Basin area and Amer- 
ica. Looking to the West 
connection of Japan with 
Hong Kong and Korea, Tai- 
wan, the Philippines. China 
and other Pacific Basin coun- 
tries will follow in the nineties 
through a further network. 

• Hong Kong, where C and W 
runs both the international 
and domestic telephone com- 
panies. through Cable and 
Wireless (Hong Kong) and 
Hong Kong Telephone, still 
provides more than two-thirds 
of the company's trading prof- 
its and gives access to foe 
burgeoning market in China — 
an increasingly important 
trading partner for Japan. 

After privatization in 1981, 
C and W was expected to try 
to reduce its dependence on 
foe Crown colony bat instead 


MONEY MARKETS AND GOLD 


Bu«RatM% 

Gearing Banks 10 
Finance House 10 
Discount Market Loans % 

Overrwht High: 10 Low 7 
Week fired: 9 

Treasury Bite (Discount %) 

Buying Sefing 

2mwfi 10% 2 ninth 10% 

3 ninth 10% Smntfi 10% 

Prime Bank Bflta (Discount 1 *) 

1 ninth lO'it-S^M 2 moth itHfc-IDK 

3 mirth 10%-10% Biurffli 10%-10 , » 

Trade BBS {Discount %) 

1 mirth 10" i* 2 mnth 11 
3 mirth 11 6 mmh 11 

lineftai* (%) 

Overnight: open 8% ctosa 12 
1 week B ninth 10 *i»-10% 

1 mmh KPw-10% 9mmh 11'w-l0'*» 

3 mnth 10%-l0 rt m 12nrth 11%-11 

Local Authority Deposits (%) 

2 days 9% 7 days 9% 

1 mnth 10 3 mirth 10% 

6 mnth 10 % 12 mth 10 % 

Local Authority Bond* (%) 

1 mmh 11 %- 11 % 2 mmh 11 »- 11 % 

3 mnth 11 %- 11 K 6 mnth 11 %- 11 % 

9 mnth 11%-m 12nrfl) 1154-11% 


EURO MONEY DEPOSITS % 


7 days. 5 tW*ia 
3 mirth 5 %-SX 


7 days 454-4% 

3 mnth 4 »m-4 3 m 
French Franc 
7 days 104% 

3 mnth 9-8% 
Bertas Franc 
7 days 10-9% 

3 mnth 9-8% 
Tan 

7 days 454-4% 

3 mnth 5-4% 


COB 854-5% 
1 ninth 5%-5% 
Smith 5%-5% 
cal 5-4 
1 ninth 4*w-4'># 
6 mnth 4%-4% 
cart 87 
1 ninth 9-8% 

6 mfrth 854-8 
call 254-1% 
1 mnth 9-8% 
Bmnth 8)4-8 
cm 554-4% 
1 mirth 4 B i«/ a ra 
Bntfrth 454-4% 


GOLD 


Gofc«437.50-53850 

KKK3®§ SWon 


$10550-1(1 
Platinum 
S 810.00(242350) 
-Excludes VAT 


flSBNBIS 


ECGO 


3 mirth HHt-10% 

6 mnth 1D”<t-10' , ii,12nrth 1054-10% 

VS?.S£2bo 3 mmh 5.75-5.70 
6 nmm 5.70-5.65 1 2 mth 55*535 


Fixed Rata Starting Export Finance 
Scheme IV Average reference ra» tor 
interest period August. 6. 1986 to 
September 2. 1886 inctosiw: 9590 per 
cent 


LONDON FINANCIAL FUTURES 


nm, Month Starting 

DM 88 

Mar 87 

Jun87 - 

SePg7 

Pr^inoiCBB ^ ' SjC^j 0 0^° interest 12639 

5*1; 

Mar 87 

junS7 

^STreasury Borto 
Dec 86 


§54 

oSs 

Low 

8953 

Ctert* 

89-04 

ErttVoi 

89.40 

89.42 

8858 

8829 

247 

89.60 

09.62 

8953 


41 

89.40 

8940 

8922 

8035 

10 

0956 

8955 

8955 

89.15 

5 

NT 


— 

8850 

0 


9423 

94.13 

93.92 

9358 

97-09 


mat 8? ^ 

Jun87 


ShortGK 
0« |6 - 

Jun 87 

Mar 6? - - 

Jun 87 

Sop 67 

FTSE100 

Dec - 

Mai 


93-58 

1 96-13 

NT 


111-06 

NT 

NT 

NT 

16050 

16350 


94.16 9412 94-13 

93.93 9351 9351 

93.60 9368 9358 

97- 17^9& Stt "lg* 

96-13 96-13 96-07 

— — 95 -07 

^to^totol^i 

98- 13 96-13 - 964)7 


3026 

661 

361 

101 

6367 


1346 


187 

0 

0 


Previous — , 

111-06 11005 110-18 5746 

_ _. 110-16 0 

_ — 110-16 0 

““previous days tote) owm kner« 25S1 
161.90 160-20 16150 223 

16350 16350 16450 1 


foreign exchanges 


sterling spot and forward rates 


Market rates 


Market retat 

SstoberB 1 month 3 gart hs 

1J3S(M4400 0.55-055prBm 1.75-1.T2prem 

1.9909-15937 0.44-034prem 

32352-32396 1 %- 1 %prBm 

5S«i59«_. SJSSln 

33-56dis 
4%-4%pram 
200 - 3550 U 
45-l10da 

1-5ds 
10%*10%dtS 
4%-3»pram 
4%-4prem 
3K-3%prem 
25%-22prem 
4-3%prem 


October. 

N Vwk JS!'«ffl 

SSSSlSp 

FdM 78 «S“ 

^-ifesss Isis sasr 

1 »^ 189 .M 15 - 60 dte 

MawU 189 . 5 £ 1 B 050 , 980 . 06-198576 1 - 4 dd 

M«*an 105183-105328 4\-4*6& 

0910 92761-95927 %-%pr«n 

F?* 9 2321 - 9.8462 1 %-I%pre«n 

s, . khlm l^sRlaioi 221 . 60-22157 1 %-iprem 

Tokyo 20 . 1 MO .18 9 »- 8 prem 

Vie *wa 22268-22306 1 %- 1 Wprem 


Sff SSSSbO 232SW-0* _ 

— FthSr STERUNC HATES~ DOLLAR SPOT RATES 

gssff t*~og$ gg rz== yfesgz 

Braflictiuaw “ , ""n. 7 a»O. 73 fl 0 Canada ~ 

tSS=^ 


~:LLl..r«50.^‘« W^tG^ny i.gTBO-reieb 

(nflia — p/a SwrtZfirisnd — 9 ^ 12-22522 

baa icri "" ■■■■"" " 0417S-0.4215 NeOWriirtk® — - """ *C5180-65220 

~ --= $B 3 » 

"“IT 52^0-5.4150 '-“"7.raii5?S 

south Alrica rand 5 ^ 95 ^ 28 ® S pain . — — 


Sfflitn Africa 
y A Etkf tiam 
•uoyds Benh- 


Austria — — - 

IMee wwStod by BrarttW* * ad ExMt 


( FUTURES AND OPTIONS ) 

IPE casts erode oil 
on fresh waters 


While most of the City bolds 
its breath for October 27, Big 
Bang arrives three weeks early 
for the International Petro- 
leum Exchange (IPE). The 
IPE today launches two fa- 
tnres contracts which it hopes 
win establish it as the only 
exchange where refiners and 
consumers in the oil industry 
can hedge aU their needs. 

The two oew contracts are in 
premium fended gasoline - 
better known to most of ns as 
.fons-star petrol — and heavy 
fuel 03, which is nsed to fee 
ships am) tankers and con- 
sumed by power stations and 
industry. Respectively, they 
are derived from the top and 
bottom quality bands of the 
crude (til barrel, sitting astride 
gas oil, which is currently 
traded on the IPE. 

The idea, according to Mr 
Peter Wild Wood, chief exec- 
utive of the exchange, is that 
market users win not only be 
able to hedge a full “paper 
barreT, bet can also lake 
advantage of the ch a n gi ng 
differentials between the vari- 
ous products pouring out of the 
refineries. 

The launch of the contracts 
has two refreshing aspects not 
usually associated with some 
of London's futures markets. 

first, the contracts have 
been aggressively marketed to 
the press mid to existing users 
of the exchange and potential 
clients. Mr WOdbkmd has 
spent most of the summer 
leading an - IPE roadshow 
across Europe speaking to 
refiners, oil traders, ship- 
owners, charterers and 
eketntity-generating authori- 
ties in an effort to persuade 
them of the benefits of nsing 
the new contracts. 

Secondly, in the case of 
heavy fuel oil, London is 
launching the first contract of 
its kind, and one which may 
lead the United States mar- 
kets. rather than following 
(hem as is usually the case. 
One idea roaring from across 
the Atlantic, however, is the 
open outcry system of business 
in which traders fight for a 
piece of the action in a pit 
rather than dealing across a 
ring, 

With the usual caveats that 
precede any predictions on 
new commodity contracts, 
traders are mildly optimistic of 
success for the IPEV oew 
ventures. The heavy fuel oil 
contract Is expected to make 
the better start partly because 
of its. uniqueaess and partly 
because it is backed by a 


strong physical market. Hope- 
folly, buyers will nse the new 
instrument as a pricing tooL 

Mr Daniel Gut, a consul- 
tant to the IPE, estimate the 
market for heavy fuel oil in the 
West at about 140 million 
tonnes a year, equivalent to 
about $7 billion (£441 billion) 
at current prices. 

The gasoline contract has a 
narrower cash market from 
which to feed and is being 
benched when demand for the 
product is seasonally stack. 
Dealers expect gasoline busi- 
ness to pick np when summer 
arrives, a time of more leisure 
driving. 

In the face of innate conser- 
vatism among moguls of t be oil 
industry who have shown a* 
relactance to change their 
trading habits, the IPE has 
had a struggle to establish 
itself since it was set op in 
1981. Mr Wild blood is now 
confident that they have seen 
the fight ‘There has been a 
considerable change of atti- 
tude across the industry. They 
have accepted the futures mar- 
kets as an integral part of the 
way they trade." 

So far this year the ex- 
change has sniffed beady suc- 
cess and dismal fail ore with 
both scents emanating from 
the- unprecedented fail In the 
crude price. The success has 
come in the gas o3 contract 
where price volatility has semi 
volume more than double so 
far this year — a strong omen 
for today's hunch. 

However, the depths have 
been reached in the Brent 
crude oil contract, which has 
hardly traded since the “daisy 
chain” system of endlessly 
trading cargoes in the Euro- 
pean market fell to pieces this 
year after the huge drop in 
prices. 

Undeterred, the IPE is 
proceeding slowly with what 
will be its third erode contract. 
This time it is determined to 
ensure that the baby is not 
abandoned. To this purpose, 
an advisory committee has 
been set up with repre- 
sentatives from leading oil 
companies and crude traders. 

No time scale has been fixed 
for the new crude contract, but 
several parameters have been 
outlined. Whereas the first two 
attempts were based on deliv- 
ery of small consignments in 
Rotterdam or for cash settle- 
ment. the new crude contract 
will call on traders to supply 
600,000 barrels of Brent at the 
Snllem Voe terminal. 

Richard Lander 


increased its stake in foe 
domestic company thus 
safeguarding a preeminent 
position. 

Several promising joint 
ventures have already been set 
up in China including the 
Shenda Telephone Company 
in Shenzcn which is profitable 
already after only two vears of 
operations. Although China ts 
unlikely to be a big earner in 
foe next few years, it is foe 
fastest growing telecommuni- 
cations market and offers 
enormous potential. 

• In the United States. C and 
W offers a digital highway 
linking SO cities coast to coast 
and which claims io be within 
reach of 80 per cent of foe 
business population. Through 
a complex series of agree- 
ments. C and W has leased 
capacity or invested directly 
in optical cables in 22 states. 
To the West this domestic 
network could feed into the 
planned irans- Pacific cable 
while New York would pro- 
vide foe gateway for foe 
transatlantic business. 

• PTAT is the transatlantic 
fibre cable operation in which 
C and W is likely to be in 
partnership with Nynex. one 
of the largest Bell operating 
companies in foe United 
States. 

About £480 million is to be 
invested in two underwater 
cables between New York and 
Britain, the first to be opera- 
tional in June 1989. 

Nynex’s planned takeover 
of C and W*s original partner. 
TeJ-Optik. still needs judicial 
approval but has secured the 
financial viability of the 
project — the first privately 
owned trans-Atlantic optical 
fibre system. 

As with PPAC. tele- 
communications carriers such 
as Mercury and British 
Telecom will be able to buy 
space on the cables, while 
businesses will be able to 
reserve capacity for their own 
data transmission needs. Price 
competition is expected to be 
keen. 

• On home ground. Mercury 
Commnnieatfons, C and W's 
wholly owned subsidiary, is 
foe only public telecommuni- 
cations operator licensed to 
compete with British 
Telecom. It is building foe 
first ali-digitai network in 
Europe and by foe end of this 
year about 30 British cities 
will have been connected. 

Mercury offers both domes- 
tic and international leased 
and switched services with 
direct connections into hs 
network for large business 
users and connection through 
British Telecom’s local ex- 
changes for smaller businesses 
and, by the end of the year, 
selected domestic customers. 


COMMENT Kenneth Fleet 


Will money supply 
save base rates? 


Not for the first lime. 2.30pm on a 
Tuesday is high noon for the Chan- 
cellor of the Exchequer. The Septem- 
ber money supply figures may not 
turn oul to be very good but, as long as 
they are not disastrous, ibe base-rate 
wolves may be kept from the door, at 
least for this week. 

The most important monetary in- 
dicator this week is, -of course, not 
sterling M3, the pound, or even MO. ft 
is the rate of change of Mr Lawson's 
popularity within the Conservative 
Party, as measured by the length, or 
indeed the existence, of the standing 
ovation following his Party Con- 
ference speech in Bournemouth on 
Thursday. 

The biggest contribution to that, 
clearly, will be the ability to avoid 
higher base rates between now and 
then. Today's money supply figures, 
for banking September, mark the end 
of the era. They are the last to be pro- 
duced on a banking month basis. And. 
until just before the weekend, expecta- 
tions in the City were that they would 
go out with a bang, perhaps with a 
sterling M3 rise of 3.5 per cent. 

Now. following the Bank's 
announcement of £600 million of 
taplets late on Friday, and some 
reconsideration of the figures, the 
range of guesstimates has come down. 
The average estimate last week was 
for a 3 per cent rise: yesterday it had 
come down to 2 per cent. 

There will have been a boost to 


broad money 1 growth from the public 
sector last month. Repayments of 
advanced petroleum revenue tax to 
the oil companies, which could not be 
offset by much extra funding in a dull 
market environment, probably re- 
sulted in a net public sector contribu- 
tion to sterling M3 of £2 billion. 

But the oil companies may have 
used some of these repayments to 
reduce their overdrafts, pushing bank 
tending back towards £1 billion, rather 
than the near £2 billion which has 
been the norm for most of (his year. 

A 1 .5 to 2 per cent sterling M3 rise, 
now clearly a possibility, will not 

remove the pressure on Mr Nigel 
Lawson. Indeed, if it resulted, as is 
likely, in a fall in money market rates, . 
the pound could start falling again. 

Yesterday, the sterling index re- 
mained suspiciously steady at 68.0. 
although the extent of Bank of 
England support needed to achieve 
this was. in thin markets, negligible. 
Even so. 68.0 is a new low — down 
from 68.2 at Friday's close — and is 
hardly the best point at which lo 
contemplate further the strain on the 
exchange rate in lieu of base rate 
increases. 

The best guess in the markets is that 
a base-rate rise will still be necessary 
but. in dragging things out. the Bank 
may have succeeded in grinding down 
expectations. As in January, a one- 
point rise could be enough. 


The eye of the dragon 


It is sometimes easier to see more 
clearly what is going on in your own 
back yard by looking at the same 
process taking place far away. Hong 
Kong’s Stock Exchange reforms, 
symbolically completed by the formal 
opening of the combined Stock Ex- 
change of Hong Kong yesterday, may 
seem to have little to do with the 
complex and accelerating process of 
change in London, which will cul- 
minate in Big Bang three weeks hence. 

They stemmed from the chaos of 
having four separate stock exchanges, 
as fhinese entrepreneurs split off 
from the old Hong Kong exchange to 
form their own. Two of these — the 
Far East and Ram Ngan — had 
competed so successfully that their 
leaders dominate the new exchange. 
But as technology and 24-hour 
worldwide dealing grew, internal com- 
petition became secondary to the new 
aim of competing with Singapore, and 
to some extent Tokyo, for leadership 
in trading international stocks in the 
Asian time zone. 

To compete successfully in that 
arena, Hong Kong had to offer all 
facilities under one roof and a system 
of supervision and rules that could 


inspire confidence in the outside 
world. Moreover, formal stock ex- 
changes have a common interest 
competing in the international market 
against informal and relatively un- 
supervised networks of banks and 
securities houses, which are moving 
from currencies and bonds into 
shares. 

In London's case, there was already 
internal unity but the sophistication 
of the bank-dominated Euromarkets 
posed so big a threat that the Stock Ex- 
change has had to compromise with 
the international houses grouped in 
ISRO to achieve the greater goal of a 
single centralized market. That is one 
part of the Big Bang. The changes in 
commissions, the ending of single 
capacity trading and die move to 
computer-based trading form the 
other — raising efficiency to compete 
on cost and speed. 

The problems over the sale of Flat 
shares via a Euromarket syndicate 
showed that stock exchanges still have 
advantages. But London faces a stiffer 
challenge than Hong Kong in making 
its new systems work. Perhaps it 
should borrow from the East the good 
luck ceremony of painting the eye of 
the dragon on October 27. 


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BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


THE TIMES TUESDAY OCTOBER 7 [986 


STOCK MARKET REPORT 







By Michael Clark and Carol Leonard 


The poor old jobbers were 
siarting to feel the squeeze 
jesierday as the' high level of 
activiu in the traded options 
market gave them a foretaste 
ul things to come with the Big 
Bans — now less than three 
weeks away. 

Some of the recent high- 
ll>ers among the top 30 shares 
are certainly giving them 
sleepless nights. A few of them 
were up and running again 
^esterda> on bid hopes as the 
jobbers attempted to cover the 
huge positions now being built 
up in the options market. 

Weekend comments in The 
7 Hire* were good for another 
4p on Boots at 232p. while 
Grand Metropolitan advanced 
a further !2p to 433p. The 
group is expected to announce 
the appointment of a new 
chief executive am day now 
amid growing speculation that 
it max soon become the target 
of a consortium bid. In recent 
weeks anal} sis have woken up 
to the fact that Grand Met is 
the ideal break-up situation. 
.Some have calculated that its 
break-up value is worth more 
than its entire stock market 
value of £3.5 billion. This has 
obvioush appealed to inves- 
tors wishing to take a cheap 
three-month view of the 
situtation. 

As a result of all this activity 
in the options market, dealers 
are now encountering acute 
shortages in the underlying 
stock and that could mean big 
headaches lor the jobbers if 
most investors decided to take 
up their options. 

The position is also becom- 
ing serious in Hanson Trust 
where dealers have reported 
heavy demand for the entire 
December scries. An es- 
timated 25 million Hanson, 
shares are now tied up in 
options business. Investors 
are now aware of the benefits 
of the recent Imperial ac- 
quisition. Quiiter Goodison 
has produced some encourag- 
ing figures. The price Hanson 
paid lor Imps was £2.25 
billion, and not the £ 2.8 


this disposal as an extremely 
good deal for Hanson Trust”. 

The Hanson share price 
rose 3p to 186p. 

The res! of the equity 
market scored some impres- 
sive gains hoping that the 
feared rise in interest rates had 
been postponed for tile time 
being. But the gains appeared 
artificial. Stock shortages 
drove prices higher with the 
FT index of 30 shares rising 
17.2 io to 1.251 .2. The broader 
FT-SE 100 advanced 18.1 to 
1.578.0. 

The wealthy Belzburg fam- 
ily of Canada has lifted its 
stake in Exco International, 
the money broking and finan- 
cial services group, to just 
over 10 per cent after receiv- 
ing permission to do so from 
the Bank of England. 

At the last count, the 
Bdzburgs owned 9.S per cent 
of Exco through First City 
Financial Corporation. 


LONDON FTAl , 
ALL SHARE 

IT 


EXCO’S INDEPENDENCE 
IN THE BALANCE 

A. Sourer Dj tasn turn , 


EXCO 

[international : 


JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG SEP OCT 


ft Christies, the auc- 
tioneer. has advanced I3p in 
the past week from 255p. 
near its low for the year. The 
rise has come in die middle 
of an otherwise dull trading 
year and when the com- 
pany is feeling exceptionally 
vulnerable. Word is that 
top Christies men have been 
in touch with a number of 
stockbrokers hoping to pep up 
its City image. 


billion originally mentioned. 
The sale of Courage brought in 
Cl. 5 billion against a book 
value, when it was part of 
Imperial, of around £1 billion. ■ 
Quiiter savs “We regard 


Confirmation of the 
Belzburg family stake effec- 
tively paves the way for Tan 
Sri KJioo Tcck Pual. the 
Malaysian businessman, to 
launch a full bid. He already 
owns about 29 per cent of 
Exco. but has given assurances 
not to raise his stake further, 
unless someone else built up a 
stake of more than 1 0 per cent 

Exco rose another 7p to 
235p — just lOp shy of its 
year's high — where the entire 
group is . valued at £550 
million. 

Experts are convinced that 
Tan Sri Rhoo can draw on 
enough financial resources to 
make a bid for Exco. where he 
already has a seat on the 
board.’ But some market 
observers believe that an auc- 
tion may develop for the 
company which already 


boasts a place in the front row 
of London's financial revolu- 
tion. Either way. Exco is 
certainly looking vulnerable. 

Morgan Grenfell, the mer- 
chant bank, slipped 2p to 401 p 
despite exceeding the profits 
forecast made at the time of its 
public debut this summer. 
Interim figures to June 30 
revealed pretax profits up 
from £34 million to £51.2 
million and earnings per share 
I 0 . 2 p higher at 2 Sp. 

But the share price now 
stands almost lOOp below iis 
original striking price and any 
short-term recovery prospects 
appear bleak. The fall-off in 
bid activity is expected to hit 
profits and there are fears in 
the market that a few more 
sellers of the shares are waiting 
in the wings. Until they are 
Hushed oul there is little 
prospect of a sustained rally. 

The big four high street 
clearing banks appeared a 
little firmer after last week's 
unsteady performance result- 
ing from the prospect of higher 
base rate charges. But prices at 
the close were a little below 
their best levels. 

Barclays Bank firmed 2p to 
464p as did National West- 


minster Bank at 5Q9p. after 
5I2p. Midland Bank hard- 


J-TRA D^TfON A liy3P7K3 NSk , V, ; 


First Dealings 
Sep 2? 

Oc: 6 
Oct 20 


LastOoahngs 
Oa3 
Oct 17 
0c:3t 


Last Decl a rat io n 
Dec 18 
Jan 8 
Jan 22 


For Settlement 
Jan 5 
Jan IB 
Fab 2 


Call options were taken out one 6/10/86 Blackwood Hodge. Ckitf. York Equity. TV-am. 
Norfolk Capital. GlaniieW Lawrence, Pearl Assurance. Fergatwootc. Sands* Perkins. 
Abaco. Rnme. Fine Art. Bmoil. Boots. Tozar Kemsrev. Utley. Gilbert House. Epcure 
Holdings. Ernest Jones. 

Pul Famine Boats 


ened 3p to 537p and Lloyds 
Bank, which last week bought 
lhc assets of Continental Bank 
of Canada for £100 million, 
improved 5p to 412p. 

Jaguar, the luxury car 
manufacturer, went into top 
gear, accelerating 17p to 545p 
ahead of tomorrow's launch of 
its new XJ40 series of exec- 
utive saloon cars. Analysts arc 
convinced the new car has 
great potential and should 
boost profits over the next 
couple of years. The price of 
the car at the bottom end of 
the range is expected to be 
competitive which should 
cause problems for the leading 
manufacturers of executive 
saloon cars. 

Institutional investors were 


t • RECENT-ISSUES 


EQUITIES 


Anglia Secs fl T5pl 
Appleyaifl (125p) 
BBS Design (67p) 
Beaver co <l4ap) 
Broad St (43p) 


Hughes Food (20p) 


Local Lon Gp 
M6 Cash & C (lOOp) 
Marina Dev <1 lOp) 

Miler & Samhouse (lOSp} 
Newage Trans (75pl 
radamec Group (90s) 
Sartdefl Parkins i135p) 
Scol Mtge 10Q»i =25 
Stanley Lersure (nop) 
Thames TV flSOpi 
Treas sH°gi/l 2016 =97 
Umiock f63p) 

Yelverton [38c) 

Yorkshire TV [125p) 


Chelsea Man j125pi 
Creignton Labs (130p) 
Euro Home {!60p) 

Eve Construction (I05p) 
FletJher Dennys (70p) 
Great Southern H35p) 
Guihne Corp (150p) 
Harnson (150p) 

Hille Ergonom (92p> 


23 1 ? RIGHTS ISSUES 
165 +6 

S Boots N/P 
iaa Christy Hunt F/P 
144 t? Connect! Fm N/P 
™ Good head Prim N/P 
1Rn fo Leisure time N/P 

New Ct Nar Res F/P 
Thurgar N/P 
Tilbury N/P 
ojv nphook n/p 


i issue price m brackets) 


'it LO N DO N X R A D E D ,0 PT I O Ns/^ 


Allied Lyons 
r3081 


Cans 
Oct Jan 

15 27 

2% 15 

1 4 


Puts 
Oct Jan 


40 5 13 

22 27 30 

9 53 57 


125 1 B 

85 6 18 

55 28 40 


Com Geld 
C602! 


103 115 
55 60 


Courtauios 

f-26o- 


Con yn.ci: 
1-2721 


Cafe S Wire 
1-3021 


127 r> 12 

94 3 20 

70 25 37 

46 1'.- e 

3a 7 14 

25 ' 22 26 

- 49 51 

29 15 19 

18 31 33 

12 39 59 


42 7 SQ 
30 27 34 


10 = - 
£3 - 

15 — 


— 10 — — 


I 7 22 
3% 11 

1' 4 


17 15 17 
8 32 32 


Gra-d Mel 

!-42 i. 


- 88 
53 - 

... 60 
15 4g 

155 130 
’05 135 
52 94 

22 64 


Urn; Sec 
1-3C5) 


Man. s S Spen 
C1S4I 


6heu Trans 
j-9031 


T'alalgar House 
<-2771 


112 132 
63 100 
23 63 

21 25 

9 17 

3 9 


195 2 7 

152 1 13 

112 8 22 

60 30 40 

31 5 10 

17 26 20 

10 55 56 

32 1% 5 

21 11 14 

12 27 30 

147 IV, 9 

115 4 18 

82 17 33 

37 4 3 

25 9 19 

15 25 32 


Dec Mar Jun 


Bee aw in 
1-413) 


-.0 18 23 

22 32 33 

53 58 - 

2'. 5 

7 ? 14 

18 23 25 


9 12', IE 

— 2-t 28 

45 — — 


Jaaua t 

500 

68 

87 

103 

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75 

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55 C 

34 

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600 

14 

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420 

62 

75 

67 

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1-4691 

460 

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42 

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550 

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330 

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360 

48 

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330 

28 

40 

5 ? 

15 

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77 


420 

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25 

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Series 

Nov 

Feb Moy 

Nov 

Feb May 

Bn- Aero 

420 

65 

33 

95 

2 

10 

t£ 


J 53 

35 

55 

55 

13 

if 

25 


500 

13 

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BAT inas 

360 

93 

705 




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390 

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7 "* 

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56 

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460 

17 

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29 

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Baras its 

460 

27 

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62 

13 

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£3 

1-4641 ■ 

500 

12 

27 

40 

40 

42 

47 


550 

J 

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90 

53 

Bm Telecom 

180 

8 

17 

24 

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15 

18 

1-1781 

200 

J 

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2 i 

28 

30 


220 

? 

3 

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Cadbury Schwiyjps 

160 

32 

39 

34 

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6 

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(-1781 

180 

9 

16 i 

20 

10 

11 

14 


200 

2 

9 

— 

24 

25 

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Gurneso 

300 

27 

.18 

4 S 

7 

15 

17 

i-aioi 

330 

9 

15 

25 

39 


50 


360 

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48 

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300 

80 

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360 

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380 

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390 

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110 

17 

22 

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130 

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24 

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130 

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13 

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500 

55 

72 

83 

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550 

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56 

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CSSC* 


53 55 57 

103 103 — 


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20 27 33 4 j r;-. 

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i' 700' 


120 - 
95 105 
65 80 

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•30 34 40 


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16 20 25 


125 155 
57 130 
72 105 
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Oct Nov 

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inner !5£0 50 55 

1-16.-71 1575 3S 52 

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1650 8 IS 

l?"5 •» 13 

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Jan Oct Nov Sec Jan 


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— 53 67 55 

— 75 ;0 05 

- 100 :03 


- 125 ;;e - 


October 6. 19K . Total contacts 23S6Q . Csfis 15*57 . Put* 4753 ■ ‘Underlying security price. 


holding back ahead of this 
afternoon’s sterling M3 
money supply figures, al- 
though Mr Stephen Lewis, 
chief economist at Phillips & 
Drew, the broker, reckons that 
leaks yesterday from Mr Nigel 
Lawson, the Chancellor, that 
they would not be as bad os 
some have expected, have 
already been largely dis- 


• Shares of Tesca one the 
biggest names in food retail- 
ing, continued to make the 
most out of an upgrading 
of profits by Barclays de 
Zoete Wedd, the broker. 
Apparently, it is 
now looking for interim pretax 
profits of £70 million for 
the six months to August 10, 
due next month, against 
£44.2 million last time. Other 
analysts are still looking 
for between £58 million and 
£62 million. The shares 
rose5p to 393p. 


counted among equilies."We 
could see the market going 
lower whatever the figures are 
like.” he said. Phillips & Drew 
is looking for an increase in 
money supply of l 1 /: per cent 
to 2 per cent and a rise in bank 
lending of £1.5 billion. 

“If the Government makes 
any adjustment to allow for a 
reduction in petroleum rev- 
enue tax it will seriously hit 
the quality of the figures 
announced!” says Mr Lewis. 

In the gilt market short 
stocks were unchanged while 
longs lost around Pa . after 
rising £'4 early on. 

Three-month money eased 
Msper cent to 10 7 b per cent . 
The City is now expecting a 1 
per cent increase in base rates 
sometime next week. 

Leading the way ’among 
blue chip stocks were Thorn 
EMI up I3p to 469p. !CI 13p 
to 109 7 p. Beecham I2p better 
at 4l8p. Grand Metropolitan 
up !2p at 433p. Glaxo 7p to 
J?50p. Conrlanlds 6 p to 283p 
and BTR 6 p to 2%p. 


Consolidated Gold Fields, 
the mining and quarrying 
group where Mr Hanv Oppen- 
heimer. the South African 
financier has a near 28 per 
cent stake, gained another 13p 
to 604p. The shares have risen 
from 495p on August 27. 
Stories of an impending bid 
from a consortium, possibly 
including Mr Oppenheimer, 
are again circulating and some 
watchers of the stock say that 
this time they could be true. 
Any such bid would un- 
doubtedly result, in the break- 
up of the group, which, is 
estimated to have a break-up 
value of around 720p a share, 
valuing it at £1.4 billion. . 


Shares push higher in 
moderate early trade 


New York (Reuter) - .After 
a lower start Wall Street 
shares pushed higher in mod- 
erate trading early yesterday. 

Traders said stuck index 
futures went la a premium 
which was the main reason for 
tbe turnround as buy pro- 
grammes started operating. 

Technology issues moved 
higher with a rebounding IBM 
setting the pace. 

The Dow Jones industrial 
average, which fell three 
poults at one early stage, was 
up 6.61 to 1.780.79 by mid- 
moming. 

The transport indicator 
gained 2.87 at 814.75 whDe the 
utilities average was np just 
0.06 at 199.68 and the 65 


stocks average np 2.22 at 
709.97. 

The broader Standard & 
Poor’s 500-stock index rose 
0.90 to 234.61 while the New 
York Stock Exchange 
composite index was up 0.41 to 
135.21 

Advancing shares led 
declining issues by a six-to- 
five margin on turnover of 23 
million shares. 

USX Corporation led the 
active shares, np '4 to 26 V Its 
shares have risen recently 
amid reports that the company 
is a target of corporate raiders. 

IBM, which fell 4 ? j. over the 
whole of last week, gained 2 to 
132%.. IBM and Intel Corpora- 
tion will exchange technology. 



Or 

Oc» 


Oct 

Oct 


Oct 





3 

2 


J 

AMR 

4 SA 

38 . 

59 '. 

. 

Fmesiork?- 

F^tCn-xago 

244 . 

37 

£ 4 '. 

as*-. 

Pfizer 

Phelps Oga 

57 \ 

m 

Al'-et? S*jnal 

4 t> 

4 J 

FstimBncp 

55 ’-* 

55 '. 

fW ip Mrs 

6 / 

ATi« Sl*£ 

54 l . 


FslFennC 

9 '-. 

9 ‘. 

Phillips Pet 

10 % 

Alls Chlm;s 

2 ’. 


Fort 

53 'i 

54 S 

Polaroid 

W-, 


36 ‘. 

28 ' 

FT Wadrra 

36 '* 

37 ‘<. 

PPG Ind 

64 % 

4 mT* Inc 

15 ' ( 

Wf 

GAf Got? 

SJh 

3 ft 

PrarGmtu 

6 B% 

Ain rda Hs 

33 

22 j 

GTE Corp 

58 

55 ". 

PbSE&G 

40 % 

An Brandi 

42 -. 

4 E-. 

G®n Corn 

77 

77’* 

Ra/theon 

83 

can 

83 '. 

83 *. 

Gen Dv 

72 '. 

71 V. 

Rynlds Met 

48 % 

AmCynm a 

73 '. 

74 -, 

Geneiectno 

71 ’. 

7\\ 

Rockwell Int 

39 !. 

Am El P*r 

37 -. 

27 

Gen Inst 

20 

30 

Royal Dutch 
Safeways 

88 % 

Am E*cress 

3 T II 


Gen Mils 

79 

.'9 

SO". 

Am Home 

74 --. 


Gen Motors 

68 J. 

685 i 

Sara Lee 

MV, 

Am Me :oro 

3 

3 

iGn Pb Ut ny 

22 J. 

22 V- 

SrE 5 opac 

28 '.- 

Am Si nrd 

38 ■. 

39 ' 

Genesco 

3 

3 '. 

Schl benger 

34 % 

AmTeieph 

32 ’.- 

22 ': 

Georgia Pac 

36 % 

38 % 

Scott Paper 

61 % 

Amtxx 

67 

66 '. 

GiWe 

38 % 

37 % 

Seagram 

60 


7 ’-, 

8 

Goodrich 


38 % 

Sears Rock 

41 % 

As^rco 

14 . 

14 ’, 

Goodyear 

331 . 

33 % 

SheH Trans 

53 % 

AsNanoOii 

60 '. 

60 - . 

Gould inc 

30 

30 % 

Singer 

52 % 

4 i Richfield 

57 ', 

C“* . 

Grace 

461 . 

48 ". 

Smthktn Bk 

80 % 

Avon P-odo 

34 

34 

GtAtt&Tac 

22 ’, 

21 % 

Sony 

Sth Cal Ed 

18 % 

Bkrs T-si N»" 

43 . 

4 o . 

Gr hnd 

33 

??:• 

33 % 


Eanfcamef 
5*. ol Ss Ion 
Sank o*Ny 

Bert* S’ eel 
Boeing 
Ese Cascce 
Braer 


GratnanCor 
Gull & West 
H J. 

Hercules 
H len-Pkrd 
Honeywell 


Sperry Corp 
SKI On Ohio 


StertrxjDrg 
SievensJP 
Sun Comp 
Teledyne 
Tennec-o 
Texaco 
Texas E Cor 
Texas Insi 
Texas UNs 
Textron 
TravireCor 
TRW Inc 
UALinc 
Unlever NV 
UnCartwie 
Un P AC Cor 
U Id Brands 
USGCorp 
Uld Technol 
USX Corp 
Unocal 
Jun Waller 
Wner Until 
wots Fargo 
W'stgftseEl 
Weverh'wf 
wnmpooi 
WooKvcrth 
Xerox Corp 
Zenrth 


Honeywell 

ICInds 


B; Warner 

35'. 

35% 

Ingersofl 

52% 

S3". 

Myers 

35 . 

72 

Idana Steel 

19 

19% 

BP 

39 - 

40 

IBM 

rjo'A 

132% 

■lurf ton Ind 

35 - 

34-. 

IHCO 

14% 

!3'i 

Burl ton Ntn 

56 ■ 

55 •• 

Int Paper 

68 

587 

Burroughs 

'O'. 

70'.- 

Ini Tel Tel 

49% 

4B". 

Cnpbeit Sp 

57 . 

57-. 

Irvmg Bam 

43% 

47". 

C?n Pacilic 

It - 

It . 

Jhnsn 5 Jnn 

64% 

64% 

Zaterpihe' 

27'. 

27" 

Kaiser Alum 

17% 

17% 

Chinese 

ZX ■. 

208 

Kerr McGee 

27'.. 

27% 


M ■ 

3J 

hmb •> Cirt* 

an 

80- . 

Champion 

26'. 

26 . 

K Man 

46% 

47 . 

Mar 

36 ■ 

25' 

Krone 1 

30% 

30% 

Cm =k w< 

J? . 

■i-r. 

L 1 V Coro 

i- • 

2% 

Theimn 

44 • 

44 . 

U-ror 

75% 

75% 

:-ir.Sier 

36 

J9 


4J'.a 

44 . 

Zit'Crx? 

4*. 

49 . 

LuCKy Sirs 

36 

36'.. 

Civ-. Epwe 

1?' 

i9‘ 

Man H n»er 

45 

44*. 

Coca Cola 

34 . 

25 

Martviilo Go 

2'.- 

2% 

Cc.sate 

38 . 

26% 

MaDca- 

49% 

4?% 


1Z3'. 

122 . 

htanne M#J 

46-i 

46 

Z :m3:a Gas 

42'. 

43 

Mn Marietta 

43% 

43 

Cn-3-r. Enc 

’!' . 

?! . 

Masco 

24% 

33% 

Csm.-.lth cd 

it 

31 . 

McDcnaios 

57% 

56% 

:-:ns =c.s 

4= 

44', 

McDonnet: 

84 . 

B5 

C.i Nat Gai 

30% 

31 

Mead 

55% 

55% 

:?ns Prt.-.er 

ij 

12 . 

1 1-?rcv 

99% 

100% 


C r\n Ca:a 
ZV^. .ns -31 

•lone 
C-T. 2e'!i r 
Dx-1 j Kra«J 


Oen-nEc; 


Int? 

Dupc Power 
r- Pon; 

E is*err An- 
£i!-ri NodaK 
Eaten Cc*P 
Esih-so" El 
£• won Corp 
Frf DOI 


MmslR Mng 
MODilOt 

M-:nSdPio 

Morgan ..I P 
Morr-Ma 
NCR Corp 
Nl In.v’-r. 
Nai p-.M-s 
Nar r.-u- i =.,( 
Na: 

NTi’-ntli 5rh 
NV. E'-.’ncrp 
Occ :r: bo; 
Ooeen 
OnnCoio 
■?*“ns-IH 
FaaGas Si 
D an An 
Penncv J C. 
Pemjori 
PeoiEc: 


CANADIAN PRICES 


82 Abf h 
37 \ Alcn Alum 
48! ? AlpomaSH 

5 Cart Pacific 
a Q'r Commco 
24" ConBaltwst 

9’. Hir/&d Can 
31', HtenBMm 
35’. Imasco 
39 ImpanaiOa 
42-. In Pipe 
39'* RylTrustoo 
4i '. Seagram 
247. Steel Co 

6 Thmai N ’A' 
72% vamvCorp 
62 l . vwkr Hiram 
26!', WCT 

*• s:.- bSv- I 


TEMPUS 


Morgan falls victim 
to more bad timing 


The only two to go lower 
were Blue Circle down 3p io 
550p. and Lucas 2p down at 
498p. 

in the unofficial grey mar- 
ket TSB shares slipped a 
couple of pence. Licensed 
dealer Prior Harwin was quot- 
ing a. middle price of 84p. 
Dealings are due io begin on 
Friday. 

Oils were mixed as the Opec 
meeting in Geneva got under 
way. BP, Britoil and Lasmo all 
hardened a couple of pence to 
683p. 125p and I20p respec- 
tively. while Bnrmah slipped 
3p to 354p, Shell 3p to 908p 
and Ultramar 3p to 1 58p. 1C 
Gas, where the long-heralded 
bid has still to materialize, lost 
a further 7p to 483p. 

Insurances were buoy am. 
Pearl climbed 2 Op to I458p. 
Sun Life I3p to 887p. Legal i 
and General 8 p to 241 p and ] 
the Prudential 8 p to 792p. 

Gilbert House Investments, 
the property investment and 
development group listed on 
the USM, was one of the stars 
of the dav spurting 44p to 61 p' 
as Mr Nigel Wray, a former 
financial journalist, revealed 
that he had acquired 79.97 per 
cent of the company's shares. 
News of Mr Wray's interven- 
tion boosted its capitalization 
from £5 million to more than 
£20 million in just one hour of 
trading. 

The deal has led to him j 
making a general offer to i 
shareholders of !8.S75p a 
share cash, valuing the group 
at £5.44 million, it is more 
than £1 million belter than an ' 
earlier offer from its chair- 
man, Mr Turrioo ParrctL 
through his private family I 
vehicle Letts Green Estate. ! 
which now lapses. The talk j 
after hours was that there 
could now be a Stock Ex- 
change inquiry into the share 
price mov ement of Gilbert 
House. 


.As always. Morgan Grenfell 
seems to be a victim of bad 


timing. 

One of the big stock market 
disappointments of the year 
was Morgan's share issue 
which, in retrospect,' looked 
extravagantly priced in the 
context of the existing market 
conditions. The shares never 
really recovered from this 
setback and drifted steadily 
from the 500p launch price to 
around 400p. 

Yesterday’s first set of halt 
time figures, though better 
.than forecast did not halt this 
trend. At the time of the share 
launch in late June. Morgan 
forecast first-half pretax prof- 
its of £48 million, which was 
comfortably beaten by the 
£51.2 million achieved. The 
figure compared favourably 
wuh the £ 68.8 million profit 
for the whole of last year. 

Morgan is hardly setting a 
shining example to the rest of 
the sector in not giving 
detailed information about 
iis activities — though it may 
be more forthcoming at the 
year-end. It claims that the 
contribution from banking 
and capital markets opera- 
tions and investment 
management were ahead of 
expectations. Corporate fi- . 
nance must have made a big 
contribution which may. 


if m 


aoo Mawlem 

SHARE PRICE 


Ijohnmowlem] 




^ A'- 


While Morgan's prospects 
over the long term look 
sound, the short term is likely 
to prove a bumpy ride. 


1984 1985 198& • 1 

dilution -should be under 5 


per cent Next year, on a 
forecast in excess of £40 
million, .there should not be 
any dilution at alL On next 
year’s earnings of around 
40p, the shares are oh a p/e 
ratio of tinder 10 times. 

Barrihga rights issue (gear- 
ing is more than 50 per cent) 
Mowlem provides an in- 
teresting alternative to foe 
sector’s okf favourites. 


John Mowlem 


.however, fall away somewhat 
in the second half. 


in the second half. 

With healthy profits, and 


earnings per share al,28p. up 
from 1 7.8p at lhc same time 
Iasi year, the bank is paying 
an interim dividend of 3.5p. 

I it may seem puzzling, then, 
that the market ignored all 
this and marked the shares 
down a further 2p to 401p. 

Part of the reaction was 
predictable because under the 
terms of the share issue a big 
slice of -the shareholdings, 
including directors' and in- 
stitutional holdings, were to 
be held until the interims 
came out. Thereafter they 
could be sold. Since these 
shareholding together add up 
to 65 per cent of the total a 
degree of slock market anxi- 
ety is hardly surprising. 

' The two largest holdings, 
Willis Faber's 23 per cent and 
Deutche. Bank’s 5 per cent, 
are highly unlikely to go, 
however. The smaller hold- 
ings are less predictable and 
some caution is probably 
sensible. 

Beyond this is the worry 
over Big Bang, now only 
three weeks away. The timing 
was inevitable but unfortu- 
nate since no institution with 
any significant exposure to 
the new markets can escape 
investor uncertainty 


The brothers Beck are 
pleased with Mowietn/SGB 
after last spring’s “meiBer”. 
Most of the interim pretax 
. increase of £ 2 . 7. million came 
from six weeks of SGI? which 

- is performing ahead of 
forecast 

Cost savings of £1 million 
should be- secured Dus year, 
there is scope for further 

- rationalization. -The deal also 
brings good property 
development opportunities. 

Alfred Booth is holding its * 
own and should sell 1,000 
bouses this year. Adding to 
the land bank reduced the 
pretax contribution but since . 
Booth -makes a return on 
capital of more than 20 per 
cent this is money well spent 

Technology interests are 
suffering from a poor Ameri- 
can electronics market and a 
dull outlook for international 
construction. 

Traditional bunding and 
civil engineering in Britain is 
patchy .but management 
contracting is doing wdL It 
remains difficult to get over- 
seas work,, but profits from 
the Falkland Islands' airport 
. have still to be enjoyed. 

The loss of the Dartford 
crossing contract was a dis- 
appointment but- Mowlem 
should be consoled by the fact 
that the. Docklands' STOL- 
‘ port will be a steady and 
significant contributor to 
profits. : 

Mowlem has. been invest- 
ing the cash generated by its 
more traditional activities in 
business which are not 
wholly- dependent on the 
construction industry and 
earn a good return on capitaL 
This policy, hasjenabled it to 
maintain, its position in the 
market - — . 

This year, with profits of 
around £27 million, earnings 


Interlink Express J 


Interlink Express's rgmta- 
tioa for speedy ddivery of 
. packages -and parcels is 
matched by its prompt ar- 
rival -on foe doorstep of foe- 
UnJisted Securities Market- 
after ruling off the books." to 
provide the -essential three- 
year trading record. 

The company existed rbe- 
fore this, buf as a somewhat 
accident prone p rospect us 
from Laurence Prust reveals, 
its head office unfortunately 
burnt .down, destroying all 
the financial record^ * 

But to foe credit oflts 
young chairman, Mr Richard 
Gabrieli- who also bounced 
back from foe collapse of a 
motorcycle messenger com- 
pany he bad started. . he has 
built up the Interlink service 
considerably since then. Pre- 
tax profits increased sharply" 
from £372,000 in 1 984 to £215 
million for foe year just 
ended.. 

Interlink claims to have 

around 5 and 6 per cent of foe 
market for overnight parcel 
collection and defivery., 1 t is 
aiming for 25 percent within 
the next three to four years. 

The "offer for sale of . 
3,482,500 shares at 185p.pufs 
foe business on an historic 
price earnugs ratio of 16.8. 
While it should continue to j 
do well investors may won- j 
der whether it has enjoy edits 
best years, of ^growth aind 
whether its acceleration . to- ! 
wards the USM signals tbat-ii 
too realizes this. ' 


-TCfe'Mr Alan Burgess is" 
made managing director and 
Mr Michael .Carrick. . a . 
director. 

World Trading & Shipping , 
(UK): Sir Peter Btaker be- 
comes chairman ahd Mr-. 
Jeremy Metcalfe commercial 
director. 

Vernons Organisation: Mr . 
Vernon Sangster is made 
r president Mr Kenneth Panl 
deputy chairman and joint 
chief executive; Mr Michael 
Heeley joint chief executive 
and Mr Gay Sangster a 
director. 

A&G Security Electronics: 
Mr Michael Barton becomes 
finance director. 

Barham Group: Mrs Sheila 
Kemp joins foe main board 

Orion Insurance Company: 
Mr Norman Smith becomes 
deputy chairman. 

Dowiy Group: Mr AN 
Thatcher becomes group chief 
executive, succeeding Mr • 


Demis Morgan^. Mr :BC 
Ralph becomes deputy group 
chief executive, and Mr RS 
Moore is , deputy financial 
director 

IT Institute: Dr Allan J Fox 
has been made managing 
director. ' 

Whitehall Petroleum: Mr 
Chris Buyly and Mr Alan 
Gaynor become joint manag- 
ing directors. 

Thomson Computers: Mr 
Anthony Chandor -becomes 
chairman.-- ■ 

American Express: Mr Jim 
.Lowther has been made nar 
tional sales "director. 

Klein wort Development 
Fund: Mr 1U .: HoDand- 
Bosworth .becomes a director. 

Sainsbtny’K Mr John E 
Blake becomes systems strat- 
egy and planning director.^ . . 

Martin Paterson Associates: 
Mr Ted Belmont -joins the 
board. 


British Shipbuilders: Mr X 
Charles XJmgboftom "becomes H 
a part-time member of foe 
board 


BASE 

LENDING 

RATES 


AB fl 

Adam 8 Company 

BCd 

Gtitank Sartipt^-;*. 
Consofidated Cnfs_ 

Cooperative Bank. 

C. Hoare ft .0o 

Hong Kong ft Shanghai. 

LLoyils Bank 

Hat Wesfammer 

Royal Bankof Scotland. 

TSB-J ; :■■■■ 

-Citibank NA„ : 


.ioafi 7 
.tom ", 
.taoo* ■*: 

.1075% i 
- 1000 % - 
. 1001 % 2 . 
. 10 . 00 % v 
.tom ' 
. 11100 %. £ 
. 1000 % X 

. 1 ft 00 % "*• 

jam? D 
jam; -- 


t Mwt ffy Bae kair. 


te-ww .-kr. U.*.-*i nadL-io itie A Thfiictf. E ^Jarge for tnc tfiari alpcrmraon torto t* ihc whole of the sttjre qppi ofttw Cvnpiff^. ’ 

r.*r. v-A b. «■ .n itn-r.M S-u Mu a k rsempwysed tfoi no^w*ca<jn nwfc ter Itiese soumiertobe Kkmtie^ toKuig 


EXPRESS PLG 


■I” : ~n KCailT) 


Offer for. Sale by .7 
Laurence Prust & Cb. Ltd. 


of 3.-482.500 new Qixlray Shares alf 5p each 
. at 185p per share, 
payable#! fufl on application 


41 CW'.-.OO 


JjHAPE CAPITAL 


n Ortitay 5K3re& cT bp c*h 


taed and now bwg 
. suedUtypae; 1 
« 1 1500 


TheComparrv. through its whciy-ownecl substdiary biterinL Express Parcels United, operates an’- 
owerni^htsernr.e for the coaecnon and det<xsy of parcels n Great Britan and Northern Ir^and. The 
service a operated through a franchised network olpver IDO jocaTclepois. 

The- Company s, tracing record for the three years ended 30th June 1 986 has been:- 

I ■ Years ended 30th June “ ~1 


T-ji-novei 

Profit, on ordmarv actwhes before taxaton 


1966 
■ -COOP 

*3?S2 

2598 


P^njoji^n^tF^lOtheGomp^areavalabteintheExtefStatJSlxalSeriACfisaidrapcSofT^Offer 
for Sate I on the terms of which atone apptotkms^ wffl "be consriered) together with apptatxxifbpns''" 
mar be obtained from:- - • ' ■. l , 


Imertmk Express PLC - 
22-24 Portbnd Square 
Bristol BS28RZ 


Laurence Prust & Co. LndL 
7-IIMoorgace 
LoodooEC2R6AH 
'Tek 01-606 8811 . 


jrx3iixuTiiheloHi>/wng branches of Uqyds Bar* Pic — • - 
CSCoimorePoiv 27HighSt .' • 12BothwellSt’ , 

&rmn?f^rr-. Carclii' . . Oasgow ; ' 

ESCcnil H3H5Geoi^sSt " eRdlMaD 

B‘i5td Edinburgb IxrrionSWI " 


Lloyds Bank Ftc .. 

ftngtoar'Si Department 
ksue Section PO Box 1000 
ft BtafKapEgaze 
tohcfanEC2N3U3. 


•■53 ICr^Si 
. .Mancrester , 


The appHcathm Hst will open at HM» ajn. on Friday. lOtii October 1986 and may be 
dosed at any time thereafter. 

l°fc" \ 




1 


*y\ iM 


S 1 


-1 

"S i 


i-r ? 


IV: 




- ■ s.- 




5 •*«*•.*« 




MS??- r : r’-i* rii 




‘irsr-^- : .T‘- a t. ■ 





I THE TIMES TUESDA Y OCTO BER 7 1986 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 



STOCK EXCHANGE PRICES 


Lack of stock 


ACCOUNT DAYS: Dealings began on September 29 . Dealing end this Friday. gContango day next Monday. Settlement day Oaober 

20L 

^Forward bargains are permitted on two previous business days. 


— old — 

CtTianSrawmiMii 

DAILY DIVIDEND 
£ 4,000 

Gaims required for 
+54 points 

Claimants should ring 0254-53272 


No. Granny 

)! TVS N/v" 


Cnrep 




dt-i 




Mr life 


• (r 

■•i*i iv; 


ll;. UVIMM vlfr 



BREWERIES 


*5 os 
*t 21.7 
12 

■*1 42 

-W ZOflb 

*1 4.1 

u 

.. IS* 

» 114 

U 
» 
as 

-2 JOS 

-* 230 

■ 29 

u 

4 u 
32 
*1 

-7 

.. HU 

1U 
*9 n.i 
«.i 

-3 127 


BUILDINGS AND ROADS 


Pro Cr -x ,¥W 


zsrsL", -g 

72 
114 

r 
ao 

103 
131 


Please be sore to take account 

of any owm c 


Weekly Dividend 


Please make a ooic of year daily toah 
for the weekly dividend of £ 8.000 in 
Saturday's newspaper. 


:k- ivti 



BRITISH FUNDS 




340 

.5 


65 

BO 

42 

ri 

91 

120 




t» 




Sri 


160 

19 

178 


109 

68 

98 


58 b SJ 

13 ', 

♦l'» 

01 

07 

94 

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u 

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W 

-17 

99 

22 

215 

• .. 

KU 

49 

120 


21 

1.1 

49 




289 



i> 

12 J 


U 

321 


21 

07 

345 

•*2 

36 

19 

N 

# m 

65 

33 

81 

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49 

70 

160 


18 

08 

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19 

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§£ 

m 


29 

09 

41 

9*1 

23 

16 

t =5 

-3 

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32 

401 


63 

22 

18 


18 

1.7 

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49 

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27 D 


999 

IS 

am 

Jt 

69 

156 

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28 

95 

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24 

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18 b 2 A 

170 

•i 

91 

29 

123 




82 


39 

49 

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1240 


1.7 
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34 

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240 

— — 

■ 41 
121 

275 


17.16 

228 

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179 

3 

212 

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19 

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139 

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528 

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S 7 S 

49 

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92 

39 

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72 

49 

131 


31 

29 

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144 

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m 

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07 

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171 

-2 

108 

59 

46 


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92 

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40 

730 

13 : 

252 


91 

24 

270 


23 

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271 


79 

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in 


93 

69 ' 

us 

■j' 

97 

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TM 


31 

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430 

• 1 ! 

43 

12 : 

248 


129 

52 

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92 

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129 


770 

• 45 

49 ' 

150 


39 

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S 2 sio 

S 58 244 
57 29 

aso us 

143 96 

30 3H 

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112 71 

e? »■» 

2*0 74 

SI 1 

«£ 
234 139 

eo a* 

315 207 ', 


cwt i) ma 
c« re 

OwMH PB 

tt —m 3 h< 
CM rm Cm 
Chawing 
OMiki 
a*riy Hare 


34 jut 103 
S 3 70121 


Cart Staton 
cm{m, 


Caxrm Pra 

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FINANCE AND LAND 


210 42 13 09 .. 

<«3 32 22 94 

M3 • 99 42 .. 

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£20 .. 199 09803 

233 •-2 S 7 2.4 3 M 

Sb •+V« J 13 49299 
131 ..99 43199 

1 ST 99 b 43 293 

72 13 23 .. 

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199 03 803 
17 24913 


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CHEMICALS. PLASTICS 



40 38*1 MOO H/V Purer 
235 160 MfcOCl*** 

-«t 791 frewam . . 

S MD AOCBor Om*C*i 

toe Of __ 

111 79>> Bq. DM50 ■ 

T32 KB BagdMI 
tm 112 BMOM 
H»' 57*» Hr Bwcto* 

136 82 CMang^W) 

308 «5 CreM 
no 126 CommBm. 

180 112 DOW 

M S 3 /“ 

131 WO DO D*J 

223 ITS Efci 4 SrtrtKj 

09 111 EaoN 

299 208 rpM oM reMP . 

in to in arei a fit 

453 330 Mdreon 
10l'< 72“» Hoactnl DM50 
106 88 HqtUpjd 

tl 73* Imp CMS tad 
410 333 l^onu* 
m 98 14VI 
1SV m Nook Hpfto 
169 in HfM 
10. 62 RmreefcHBg* 
179 129 flMM 
330 218 SHMBPO . 

237 i 78 wo mMS o ^ nEk 
WS 97 YMrem ctrem 


CINEMAS AND TV 




M ■ 

Vr Tim 92^- 
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ijb «bMn is* 

21 A*M» Oflria 25 

3d M3 325 

ZN MTooa . 300 

95 amoc ware n* 
SO Mm . M 

340 am gm i | q as 

. 12 8M.4 Dotaon Uh 
230 NrelMO 315 

145 Dm ic Food* IB 

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IN OBortlOAu* 280 

142 DoW 223 

1(0 COMM 180 

2ffl Dm 233 

151 M* (NbarQ IN 
238 HB1 Lo*M 258 
120 Gartnrifc t® 
188 a»an v- . 225 

06 remrtfott 152 
IN MM* . M 

191 I I ami r HMN 293 
75 Horn. FW 90 

115 taOMr Sapor MS 
494 MMMM 5W 
220 MSM 249 

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£ 

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ISO Marion M BS 

210 NOW 


154 Sown 
520 TatolUl* 

40 T>Mn«lba*09* 
295 Tmco ’ . 

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art* 2Z2 

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U 29198 
29 104 500 

11.1 24 (94 
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10 49 319 

17.1 22 192 
194 48 90 

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19.1 42 99 

97 52198 

11 2S 179 
5.7 18179 

74 98 397* 
28 22 

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10J 48149 

ma 48128 

102 44188 
22 19 295 
158 UtSI 
19 19 17.1- 
58 28179 
22 19 219 
49 29149 

12 22192 
41 91 51 

28 22219 
99 19293 

74 10 192 

29 2514.1 

58 59 82 

179 39 178 
44 19 219 

75 929*9 

28 09 229 

98 39149 

29 49 239 
114 4.1 117 

53 54198 
98 48 122 
90 39 198 

188 49106 
79 19 239 

49 32194 

521 S9lii 
.. .. 90 

92 21 224 
139 58 0.4 

1380 91 128 

97 59190 


HOTHJS AND CATERERS 


s saL—rss^ 

AMS Lon Parte Horn 325 • .. 

7«b Mont COMM 06*5.. 
67 PrtncOrWHDMh B7 


51 59 114 
99 94 93 


SqIWNW 349 
Tr iM h om Fom 153 


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•-»T 2 133 51 M 9 
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M 158 49194 

• M2 -29 190 

• . . 21 £4 U3 

21 24 07 

8 .. 27 29139 

.. 58 1,4 139 

19 28 188 
+3 79 -32 152 


DRAPERY AND STORES 


34 34 228 
25 14293 


131 +1 89 

« ^ i 8 

44 -2 14 

m 44 si 
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1 & & 

211 »4« 104 

« M V 

280 98 

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551 49 79 

81 95 

800 . . 139 

184 +4 88 

SO. -6 93 

MS *-6 26 

170 i2 S7 

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424 « 108 

56 4« 14 

143 ..57 

208 *4 10,7 

CM •*■'» 308 
985 ..308 

212 4« 65 

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127 *1 94 

231.. 88 

TOO 11.1 

236 410 109 

rSS *8 ifl 
361 48 68 

500 • .. 94 

233 42 S9 

3ZS • .. 13.1 
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110 •< 55 

209 543 49 

320 79 

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INDUSTRIALS 

A-D 








































































tUNAGEItS 

g»ft fort 


SS'F’ 

Sfb 

ssr 

UKGrowm me 
us Emananq Co's 


Msswnaiee 



*Mgouwwwnmsjsra 

SSffi'SSfSS^r 8 ** 1 ,a 

ftw Trust 


ft?"?* & Income 

1 Trust 


*»*" Tr ost 
ffyci IWWBW 
TOP Income tsi 
'.I ncome 


One Sacs Trust 

trstmaonoi 
Jwon Fund 
Ffioflc Tiuh 

Amer Spa s« 

fjca OAma Tit 
Ag ASMI Vfefcn 
Ob ORMtn 
Sroajrco's 
aid S i — a Co's 

R«ww> Trust 


2151 2291* 
12S-0 137 30 
830J SUM 
3i&4 36&B 
538L5 5?13c 
3£3 344 

2408 2565* 
1302 145.1 
142.4 1517 
271 28£« 
884 94 i 

120 4 12&2 
1914 2038 
HO 682* 
20£6 2158 
2198 234 1 
358 373« 
117 7 1254 
1514 16130 
795 84 7c 


+15 3.59 
+10 OJO 
+i 7 zea 
+24 3JD 
+4 2 310 
. . 427 
+08 588 
+0.4 521 
+05 546 
*0.1 1021 
+02 086 
+0.7 0 01 
+02 088 
-01 144 
+04 057 
+08 332 
+0.1 383 
*03 2.74 
+04 249 
+04 221 


ARBUTHNOT SECURITIES 
T31. HrePmy Paremem. London EC2A 1AY 
01-828 9878 01-280 B54QP/2/3 
Growth Ice 56 3 502 
_ Do Accum 639 e7.2 

Eastern a hid 140.1 1498a 
Do 8"» Wrtftoa&ai 730 Tana 
pnuicn a Preoatv 66.8 71.4a 
at a Ffamo feicoma 46.9 433 
_ DO Accum 79.7 83 B 

Emay UlCOWS 735 778 

Do Accun 1730 1839 

Wp TOM Income 731 7810 

Do Acorn 195 0 2085a 

815 87 1 


Dd Accum 

Do 5% Wflhftrwi 
Mflnstjed Fird 


DO _ 

SraOer Cos AOCuffl 
WMI Penny Snxro 
Ponfcfeo TM UK 
POrttQtC T3t JSOnn 
Panfoho Tit US 


75s 

848 

28.6 

935 

66.8 

92 

731 


895 

8DB 

68-3 

3350 

9990 

712s 

a 8 

757 


902 102.8 
702 738 


POrHokq TB Europe 1239 127 4 


ftJrtJofe Tst HK 


-0.1 173 
+04 1 72 
+04 081 
+02 0 91 
+02 398 
+0.1 B42 
+02 642 
-04 4.96 
-1.1 495 
-05 703 
-12 7.03 
+04 308 
+05 309 
+04 206 
-03 

. . 10.17 
-a 1 10.17 
-0.1 158 
. 0.73 
-0.7 160 
-05 0 00 
-0 1 1.07 
-09 000 
+ 0.1 0.10 


8JULUE ttFFORD 
3. Oenfintos SL 
031-225 3581 ' 
bid Ei (23 
Jen Ex 1431 
UK Ex {3D 
P M Pens M 
Pmi Pens UK 
BG Amerce 
BC Energy 

BO Inane Grertti 
BG Jaoarv 
BG Tucnnotogy 


EH3GYY 
-226 6066) 
454 S 4759 
4314 449 fl 

SOI 8 5283 
217.2 2269 
185 0 175H» 
149 3 1997 
169 6 20300 
1901 3033a 
1435 1537 


068 

020 

122 


-02 600 
-02 126 
9 37 
+19 000 
664 


BALTIC TRUST MANAGERS 
25/28 Atoermuto Sheet London W1X 4*0 
01-491 0295 


American 

Auanatan 

Japan ft General 
High mesne 
W en mi onal Trust 
(nano Gm Tst 
Gits ft Fned m 
Gutui Manats 
Sceoa) Souaeons 


45.1 

483 

-01 

0.72 

193 

£07* 

+Oft 

£58 

1108 

1105 

+ 1ft 

008 

422 

452 

*01 

627 

808 

885 

+06 

126 

*46 

47.7 

+03 

093 

19.9 

21 J* 

-Oft 

9.18 

309 

383 

+04 

2.00 

379 

40 b* 

+03 

149 


BARCLAYS UMCCSM 

Uncttn House. 252. Romtard Hd E7 

01-534 5544 


America 
Ausl Accum 
Do Income 
Carnal 
Exempt Trust 
Exfea femma 


500 


Gm ft Fixed me 
Japan ft Gen tic 
Do Acc 
Growth Accum 
Income Trust 
Leeut* Trust 
Speool Situations 


837 890 
1636 1739 
1152 1235 
655 70.1 
4103 4364 
71 4 759 • 

2234 2355 
257.0 37330 

1338 141 2a 

5059 51100 +0351032 
167.9 1785 +1.1 003 


-03 1.44 
+1.1 1.08 
+ 09 108 
+04 330 
+1.6 438 
+01 588 
+1.0 3 17 
+0 8 328 
+06 336 


Trustee Fund 
Urw Tech Accun 
Do Income 
WandwsM Trust 
'B' Tst few Fund Acc 3118 3305 
Do Inc 2033 2162 


1899 100.7 
1745 1855 
323 7 344 2 
775 834 
1376 1463a 
1867 1985 
1039 109.4 
512 54.4 
507 535 
14A2 157. 


+1 1 003 
+05 348 
+04 154 
+0.1 1.61 
+04 237 
+12 371 
+0.7 106 
+02 027 
+02 027 
. 096 

+32 350 
+15 a 60 


BAftMQ FUND MANAGStS 

PO Box 155. Beckenham. Item BR3 4X0 

01-658 9002 


Austria 
Eastern 
Eoutv ktcome 
Euooe 
Growth ft Urc 

Japan Speool 
Japan Sunrise 
Fast Euooe 
first Japan 
Frsr N Am er 
first Smaller Co's 


772 

£53 

HO 


825 

7030 

802 


134 4 1425 

805 85 00 


108.4 115.4 
885 9450 

117.5 124.9 
850 905# 
495 523 
633 683c 


+03 030 
-05 030 
+02 5.70 
-02 050 
+05 230 
-07 030 
+05 030 
-03 0B0 
+05 030 
-0 3 130 
♦07 370 


BARRMOTON MANAGEMENT 
10, Fencntnn SL London EC3 


01-623 8000 
Planned Ire 

1284 

13070 

411 

Euroseen tac 

S3S 

1022 

140 

Do Accum 

1213 

1269 

148 

Genera) me 

15£1 

161 7 

012 

Do Accun 

2074 

220ft 

012 

Gil YtalC tac 

1008 

107ft* 

10 10 

Do Accum 

170.9 

176.1* 

1010 

Htgtl Y«M IK 
oo Acoan 

8S 7 

91ft* 

5ft4 

172ft 

IB* .00 

5A4 

Japan Income 

Do Accun 

2372 

249.6 

032 

2309 

2513 

03ft 

N American Inc 

47.1 

50ft 

060 

Do Accum 

54.6 

58.0 

°o£ 

Paofc Income 

<301 

139ft C 

Do Accum 

1501 

157 6c 

032 

Brrtfe Cos tac 

787 

839 

130 

Cu Accun 

902 

99ft 

130 


BROWN SHPLEY 

9-17. ftanymourt Rd. Haywards Heath 
0444 458144 


Ftaanwi 

Smeler Co's Acc 
Do Income 
Hfeji 1 


titan Pomona Inc 
Do Acc 

North Anwnem 
Orient 


1238 13110 
2345 24130 
1433 15440 
631 6730 
713 7720 
553 50.7 
955 1025 
565 605 
81.0 863 


+05 358 
-0-7 .. 
-0.5 130 
+03 552 
+0.1 4.89 
+03 334 
+06 .. 
+02 141 
+0.1 024 


BUCXMA8TEH MANAGEMENT 

The Stock Exchange London EC2P 2JT 


fiSkxesiep me 
Genera me hi 
D o accub (4) 
Income Fima i3) 
Do Accum 13) 
M Inc t?1 

Do Accum (2) 

Smoter Inc (5l 
Do Accum (51 


485 5390 
2087 2192 
333.6 3503 
993 1045c 

1742 1036 
1360 7321a 
167 6 1757 
C1185 1227 
£1330 1306 


cs Ftmo MANAoens 

175. TOri Hotxtm. London WCitf 6PV 
01-242 IMS 

CS Joan Fund 8S.B 913 *0.1 024 


CANNON F1M) MANAOERS 

oi sSSTSrs'**' 1149 0,18 


Ontn 


Far East 

Norm Amancai 

Genu 

European 

Japan 


271 B +89 T 
3164 3366 
2237 2369 
1433 1535 
46 6 5170 
535 5650 
HI 61 Ba 


-19 303 
-1.8 359 
-95 038 
-09 050 
-02 058 
-12 132 
-02 050 


CAPELblAME5} MANAGEMENT 
PO Box 551 Boot) Madia London E£3 7 JO 
01-621 0011 

Capital 358 0 38250 

285 0 28050 
276.1 295J 


185 

536 

097 


CATER ALLEN 

1. Km MMam SL EC4N 7AU 
01-6236314 


GUI Trust 


UQ 1000 -011157 


CEHTOAL B^OQF HWffi OF 


. ..10FENGLANO 
*■ Fora Street. London ECZV 5*0 
01-568 1815 


hr? Fund 
Fixed ha 


4009 

1333 

1000 


454 
10 73 
9.70 


CHASE MANHATTAN FUND MANAOERS 
JVn BoarntpEW Street London EC2V SOP 
01-606 I 


S 5 C Special Star 543 57.9 


CHARITIES OFFICIAL MVESTMMT FIB® 
2. Foie Street. London EC2Y 5*0 
01-588 1815 

kceme 36732 0 

Accum E10712 

Depose 1000 


CLenCALHEOCAL UNIT TRUST 
MANAGERS 

Kura* Ran. Brtatttl BS2 OJH 
0600 373393 

Amur GrtwOl 225 243 

Emmy m ktcome 41.7 4440 
Liuopocn Grartn 30A 3240 
Genera Equav 37.6 405 
GN a Fixed mt COi 275 294 
G4t ft FtxM he 228 3« 09 
Index Srcurmn 24 5 295 

Jaw Growth 336 3GO 

PMgrea Gm 233 246 


.. 150 
*02 4.70 
+03 250 
+0.1 2.70 
+05 350 
+03 950 
.. 240 
+04 090 
+0.1 250 


COUNTY UT HANAOSU LTD 
161. Owamudn. London ECZV EEU 
01-726 1999 


Energy Trust 
Extra income 
Financial 
G* Strategy 
Growth bmestment 
income ft Growth 
-tooenase Growth 

Nth Airier Grow*) 

tad Ftattwety 
Smoter Co s 
GUtm Inc TM 
Special Sib Acc 


48.1 51.1 
1S67 16850 
1855 1780 
55.0 56.7 
2745 2920 
394 419 
1965 209.00 
1002 1065 
1154 122.7 
2083 221.4 
605 6430 
2815 2994 


+02 357 
+06 557 
+08 227 
. . 2.18 
+25 236 
+02 4.69 
+09 059 
-0.1 157 
+05 154 
+06 251 
+0.1 540 
+25 141 


CROWN UKT TRUST SERVICES 
Cram House. Wtafcmg GU21 1XW 
04082 5033 


Htgn incomn Trust 
Growth Trust 
Anaartcan That 


227 0 24280 
2105 2255 
1224 130.9 


538 

3.19 

0.76 


CRUSADER IBNT TWIST MANAGERS LTD 


Ream. Swrey RW 8BL 
07372 42 - 


42424 
UK Income 
UK Growth Accum 

00 Oar 

Growth 
Growth 


47.1 504 

465 496 

466 4SS 
573 615 
568 606 


+04 447 
+04 243 
+64 24S 
+03 1.83 
-01 


EFM UNIT TRUST MANAGERS 
4. Mew An crescent. EfMurgh 
031-228 3492 
Amencen Fund 
taut* Fund 
Growth 4 Inc Fund 
Hltfi Obi Fund 
tatemshanal Fund 
Reooureat Fund 


Sraltr Jap Co's Fnd 
> FuhJ 


Tcfcyo I 




(Ext Pacific 14) 
(Ex) 

Eurtdund 


708 75 7 
928 993 
121.9 1304 
106.8 113.1 
1833 2121 
213 28.0 
345 365 
1733 185.40 
1385 1434# 
1150 1187 
2906 3063a 
jmo (41 2035 2102c 
295 305 


-0.1 2-25 
+04 1.71 
*05 4.80 
+03 5.97 
+06 106 
.. 038 
-MJ5 . 
+32 050 
. 354 
.. 017 
. 032 

. . 010 
♦0.1 325 


EAGLE STAR UMT TRUST MANAGERS 
Bast Roto. Cheltenham Okuoastar GlS3 7LQ 
0242 521311 

56.0 725 
690 736 
848 904 
645 609 
653 69.6 
1058 1128 
895 955 
SI 2 54.8 
52.6 583 


UK Bstancod Inc 
Do Accum 
UK Growth Accum 
UK High me Ine 
N Amuncan Accum 
For Easam Accun 
European Accun 
UK Gift FI IK 
Do Accun 


+03 279 
+03 3.72 
+10 188 
525 
-OI 156 
+03 080 
♦18 1.12 
+03 8.77 
+03 054 


SCURAIiCE FU» MANAOaiENT LTD 
•M Centre. Heagon House. 28. Wesajm 
noon Romtard nut 3 LB 
070506866 

Endurance 10S5 11290 3.17 


BOUtTABLE UNITS AOMNSTRATKIH 
35. Fountain SL MutdiesMr 
051-236 5685 
Equable Pelican 
Hwh Incorre Trust 
GNft Fu 


__ tat 
Tsi Of lr» Trusts 
Special SrtB Trust 
NUI Amor Trust 
Far Eastern Trtra 
Ml Growth 


7I.B 

702* 

+03 

331 

750 

798 

+01 

508 

491 

5£3 

♦03 

9.07 

BM 

850 

-01 

133 

710 

758* 

♦Oft 

£51 

S59 

594* 

-0.1 

1.79 

869 

935 

-04 

0ft2 

513 

55ft 

-0.1 

1.08 


EQUITY A LAW 

Sl Gauge Hue Corporation SL Ooverdry On 
190 


02D3 5S3231 
UK Growth Accum 
Do tacomo 


itow Ik Accum 
Do In 


145 5 154.7c 
1263 1343c 
2428 2S7 0c 
194 0 2D72e 
94.0 089 
-77 9 819 


Income 

GmwFtaeo Accum 
Do income 
NCI Amw Tst Accun 1789 137 Oc 
Far East Tst Aeon US-2 I75 7e 
Euro Tst Accun 1694 1802® 

Genual Trust 231 1 245 80 


+12 382 
♦1.0 382 
♦10 483 
+13 483 
+05 921 
+05 mi 
-02 022 
-23 036 
♦05 1.14 
+1.6 387 


F A C UNIT MANAGEMENT 

1. Uuence PoutneY WO. Lnnoon EC«R OH* 

01-623 4630 


US Smtdfer Cos 
tasra Fund 
tacome Fund 
Fta Eesuan Fund 
Owtob Income 
Fried tataran 
Nannl Ras Fund 


699 7480 
1059 71320 
749 8020 
713 7500 
723 774 
57 i 61.1 
497 521 


+02 027 
-OS 035 
. 484 

+03 030 
. 353 
+08 900 
+0.1 332 


FB HVESTMEMT MANAGERS 

ISO. wear Gecrge Sc Oaogow 02 2PA 

(MI-332 3132 


Batanoao Qdi he 
Do A ccum 

income On me 
Do Accun 

Sonne Co's me 
Da Accum 


432 4400 +02 180 
442 4700 *03 .. 
38* *19 -at 900 
413 *39 -at 
488 517 -05 100 

*92 522 -0* 


FDEUTY MVESTPENT SERVICES LTD 
F*wr WoP. Tantmage. TN9 1DY 
0732 3611*4 


SEs« , ss" 


European 
Far East tac 
Gn ft Fnod mt 
Growth ft Income 
Japan Scaaol So* 
Japan 

Managed H 
Max Income Equity 

ProhrumnaJ Get 
South East Asa 
Special Sts 


692 1068 
no 355 
50.7 54 3 
27ft 296e 
*38 *66 
36 7 391 
285 29.7a 
921 99 1 
419 449 
1*28 153.7 
1*19 1928 
78 * 848# 
318 3420 
369 395a 
158.6 171 5a 


-03 096 
-02 484 
-03 141 
-03 OH 
-01 0.00 
-02 391 


•08 4 85 

+04 

+02 

-07 001 
-QJ 532 
-03 £48 
-01 032 
-15 083 


FLEMNG (ROBERT) 

Lonoon EC3A BAR 


American Exempt £3381 345.1a 
Japan Exompt £4582 4729 
Am Property Tst 510000 0 

Prooarty Trial . C2Q23.0 a 


1.97 

083 

500 

SB 


FRAMUNGTDN UNIT MANAGEMENT 
3. London tttfl Bldgs. London WaU. London 
EC2M 5NO 


01-828 5181 
Amer ft Gan tac 
Oo Accum 
Amer Tumamd Inc 
Do Accum 
Capital Tct tac 
Do Accun 
Com ft G*i ine 
Do Acoxn 
Extra ik Tsi mc 
D o A ccum 
lauxia Trust 
Do Accum 
tat Growth Fd tac 
Do Accum 
Japan ft Gen tac 
Do Accum 
Menu* Income Fd 
Recovery 
Do Accun 
European tac 
Do Accun 
HMENOS PNOVDENT MANAGERS 
Asham End. Darting. Sony 
0308 685055 
FP Eaixty Del 
[to Accum 

FP Fixed fin Otat 
Do Accum 
S ta wat a wp Drat 
Do Accum 


8M 099 Aw 

SuS 3376m 

2038 216.4 
2112 2248 
2HB 211C0 
2448 2602a 
845 900 
1128 MS B 
159.4 168 4 
1728 1B3.S 
1124 119.4 
1IB2 1258 
1568 HE. Sc 
1732 1842c 

874 928 

882 938 
SOD 850a 
1360 144.6 
148 0 157.4 
654 654 
654 66* 


- 1.1 
-10 . 
-02 12S 
126 
*0.7 201 
+09 201 
+0.1 546 
. 646 
+02 4 82 
+05 4«2 
+0.4 4.42 
+04 4 42 


-08 007 
-0.6 007 
6.07 
.. 187 
+02 157 
+08 081 
+0.8 081 


1928 204 9 
3213 341.0 
1070 1138 

1219 1296 
1679 1782 
1734 1844) 


+22 287 
+35 287 
+04 631 
+05 631 
♦ 1J 1.7B 
♦18 175 


FUNDS M COURT 

PUtac Thistae Ktagswn WCZ 

01-405 4300 

Copts) 349.4 36020 

Grom tac 145.1 1H9 

High Yield 212.4 2220# 


278 

7.74 

6.01 


GT UWT MANAGERS 
8ih Fkm. 6 Denonch 
01-283 2575 Oeaflng 
UX Cap Fnd hie 

Dp Accum 
Income Fund 
Penstan Exunpt 


US ft Genera 
Tech ft Gradti 
Japan ft Genera 
Far East ft Gan 
Euopaan Fund 
Germany Find 


be Ed. London 
01 -KB 9*31 
962 1023 
1365 1462 
767 81 Qa 
174 6 1829 
1672 1789 
53 7 575 
578 815 
2469 264.1 
1234 1320 
2718 8800 
789 81 3a 


EC2M4YJ 


♦12 390 
♦18 3.00 
+0.1 640 
+22 1 BO 
+0 8 090 
+09 100 
+03 130 
+22 010 
-09 0.40 
+23 030 
*06 080 


GAHTWORE FUND MANAGERS 
2 Ss Mary Axe. Lomtan EC3A 8BP 
01-SZ3 1212 Deling 01-623 5766 Dealing 01-623 
S6C6 

622 Ba* 

240 259 
585 630 
50 7 546 
809 720 
553 598 
47.7 51.3 


American Trust 
Austraksn Trust 
BriMl Tst Accum 
Do Drat 

Gcmmadty Share 
E uiu pea i Trust 
Extra Income Trust 


Far Eastern Trust 1562 17020 
FViad Interest Fund 25.7 27 70 
Gil Trust 244 2550 

Gotta! Fund Accum 1765 1920 
D<3 Dot 1700 1829 

Gold Shore Trust 166 179 
Hedged American 27.5 31.7 
Hoi Income Trust 1364 1488 
Hong Kang Trust 31 9 34 4 
Income Fund 729 764 

Insurance Agarroes £4599 4925 
Japan Trust 1500 1513 

Managed Ewmor 2569 267 7a 
OH ft Energy Trust 343 37.1 
Speool Sds Trust 09.1 95.9a 

UKSnarCsRecTst 7iJ 767# 


-03 030 
+02 026 
*06 192 
+05 1.92 
-01 1 17 
+02 029 
520 

-18 000 
10 35 
+02 997 
-1.0 019 
-10 0 19 
+02 1.46 
. 010 
.. 582 
-07 098 
+02 329 
+004 £14 
+0.1 OJtt 
+13 244 
158 
+04 090 
+04 086 


Q0VE1T (JOHN) UNIT MANAGEMENT 
TMronesMf Hat. 77. London won. London EC2N 
IDA 


01-588 5620 
Inti Growth 
Amoncan Gown 
American tac 
Euopaan Growth 
Gotaft WnaraB 
Japan Growth 


79 9 854 
612 655 
BOB 73 60 
2386 2555# 
460 *9 1 
1465 169 6 


+03 124 
+03 09S 
+09 443 
+14 023 
. 071 
+4.1 


ORE (MT MANAGERS 
Royal Exchange. EC3P 3DN 
01-693 9903 


GtU ft fixed mt 
Growth Equity 
GiUrttaN 


Pacific 

Property Share 
Smaaor Companies 
European Trust 


1098 114 1 
191 9 2092 
2691 2788 
1373 1461c 
2432 2S88c 
259 7 ZT53 
2096 2230c 
2609 2770 


♦06 961 
+23 2.13 
♦03 2.97 
-01 143 
+33 012 
♦04 144 
+1 6 1.7* 
+4.4 102 


GUINNESS MAHON UNIT TRUST 
MANAGERS 

PO Box 442 3Z Sl Mary-at-HiO. London EC3P 
3AJ. 


01-623 9333 


rtah I n c o me 
N Airier Trust 
Recovery 
Gil Trust 
Si Vraara tac 
9 Vncent US Glh 


*95 536c 
1018 1083a 
1965 2112c 
30.7 38 10 
82 7 653 
722 753 


Temple 6a Sm Co's 171 5 1609 
Tempie Bar USM 381 0 38900 
Euro Gtn Tsi 


-01 677 
D8E 
+03 24T 
+02 956 
+0.1 556 
-03 078 
. 352 
. 329 


HAMBRCS BAW UNIT TRUST MANAGERS 
Pieura l/T Atman. 5. Rayiagh Rd. Bremwooc 
Esse* 

0277 217916 

Hamorot Sn* Go's 1265 1368 
H a mb ros N Amw 62.7 66.7 

HamtaPS Jao ft F E 1Z72 135 3c 
Han&os Seandm 635 8660 
1 Wi rii4 
46 5 51.7 
817 869 

Homcros rtgn IK 57 0 6003 

Hambros Res Asm 57 7 614 

Hamtrcs tad 3ts 513 a? 


Hambras E uropean 
Hamaros Caradtan 


+04 1.89 
-05 029 
-07 044 
-0.1 007 
+05 053 
-05 1.55 
499 
5.76 
+01 £07 
-01 091 


HENDERSON 

1 UT 1 
Brentw ood E ases 
0277217238 
Amor n eco ray Tsi 
Amw Smakar Cos 
AusnMn 
Cacmi Growth arc 


European 
Euro 5noaar Go's 
Exn tacunv 
FmancaX Treat 
Growm Hong Kong 
Fond taterest T9 
Got TlUSt 


Oobal Reaouces 
QobU Teen 
Gkbei hi: ft Gtn 
Oota 

Hon Income Tst 
Hong Kong 
Income 8 Growth Inc 
Da Accum 


hKemascnai 
Japan Speool Sits 
Japan T9 
Nanh American 
Pncmc Smaaer Co s 
Fret ft Gut 
Reccray Tat 
Smgapom ft Matay 
SmaOW GO'S Dm 

Special Sou Ik 
D o Accun 


Euro Exempt 
GMnf Tech Exemm 
Htgnmc ouMB 


1 022 IP94 
47 5 50 Be 

751 60 40 

533 STM 
HE 8590 
2639 :338c 
104.0 Ml BC 
IHB 188 70 
1388 1493 
E0 4 643 
500 5300 
*03 *34 
86.7 7f *0 
75.0 803 
1005 1178 
60 4 643 
55.3 59 5 
1669 1806 
576 619 
1382 1*64 
266 4 2865 
1009 10650 
1723 18520 
1802 18350 
>681 160.8 
I34.9 1445 
71 9 77 70 
*49 *7.80 
933 998# 
31.6 335 
1077 1152 
127 1 1MM 
1800 192.6a 
3535 378*0 
13£3 13930 
915 963 
11B2 124 40 
1680 1775a 
B4 6 899 
173 9 1835 
1151 1222 


+02 050 
091 
+ 15 1-32 
+0* 1.83 
-a* t ea 
+30 100 
+0-7 059 
+02 * 65 
+05 £89 
52* 
. 10.10 
*03 931 
+05 0.01 
+09 193 
-01 051 
. 5 24 
+0 9 £61 
+05 558 
-1 4 1.86 
+23 358 
+45 358 
+15 *20 
+16 059 
+05 051 
+1 6 001 
-01 087 
-08 059 
-02 9.73 
+0.4 £85 
+02 £43 
-04 50* 
+02 157 
+02 1.67 
.. 307 
+15 133 
-13 028 
+0.5 500 
+£9 0 77 
-0.1 138 
-20 158 
+07 £15 


IHL SAMUEL UMT TRUST MANAGERS 
NLA Tower. AdDBccmbe Road. Croydon 
01-686 4355 01-626 8011 


Brash Trust Unca 
Copal Trust Una 
Donor Trust Una 

Euapoan Trust 
Far got Trust 
Financial Trust 
Got fixed tat tac 
De Growm 
High T« Trust 
income Trust 


Japan Tech TO 
mv4 RD30UTOB3 
Socially Trust 
Smaaer Cos 
Special S05 


5196 6525 
965 KC2 
1B06 1922 
1458 1552 
1333 1419 
350.7 373.10 
269 2B90 
40 6 435 

825 865 
785 845 
127.1 1353 
375 395 
34 8 385# 
17*2 IBS.*# 
864 9250 

675 93.1a 


-72 325 
+02 £76 
+01 £66 
+29 056 
-03 059 
+1.1 221 
-0.11023 
+03 791 
+01 530 
+01 4.79 
+15 168 
-05 006 
+13 £04 
.. 335 
.. 196 
+03 £71 


32, Onen Annas Gala. London SWIM 9AB 
01-222 1000 

IGI Bm ft O'sees 1363 1*55 +05 1.70 

« tac Plus 533 5600 +0.11090 

IB Copal Growth S£8 562» +03 £M 

Investment Tsi Fnd 69.4 739 -02 3*0 


KEY FUND MANAGERS 
35. FounaM Street. Mwichestar 
001-238 5505 or 0303-3364 
Equny 6 Gen 43 4 46.7s 

Fixed tat 61 4 56.10 

Higner tac 1190 1229 

- 47 i 50. u 

2830 2815 


+05 £00 
. 1053 
-04 529 
+02 390 
-06 150 




KLEMWORT BENSON 
20. Fatcraach SL London EC3 
01-623 8000 
Amw GnrnO) tac 
Oc Accun 

Fund tar TO IK 

Do Accum 
Y4U Inc 
Accun 

im ReeoiMry tac 
Do Accum 
Japan Growth tac 
Do Accun 
Smaner Go's tac 
Da Accun 
UK Eq Growth Ik 
D o «ccun 
Worldwide Tech tac 
Do Accum 
L ft C UNIT TRUST MANAGEMENT 
Percy House. CoOthal Aw. EC2R 7BE 
01-588 2600 

tacome Fima 423 S 4325 

tanmanonal ft Gen 2513 2565 


6££ 655 
635 674 
202 21 » 
2S 9 27 7 0 
1239 132.0 
2065 2199 
1009 1075 
1C64 1133 
104 9 1112 
105-3 1116 
1555 16400 
2030 2152 
273 28.90 
453 485 
404 4350 
40 9 43.00 


+01 132 
+0.1 .. 

. £21 


-0.4 552 
-0.7 . 

+02 £23 
+03 
+06 035 
+03 
-01 £17 
-01 

-02 001 


+0.1 134 
+03 


532 

1.05 


LEGAL! GENERAL UNIT TRUST 
MANAGERS 

5. Raywon Rood, firontwood Essex 
0277 234634 


260.7 27600 
4121 44060 
58A 625 

77.0 8£4 
113.5 121.40 
715 75.70 

83.1 895 
685 7320 
756 81.9 
605 E40 


Eoutv Dstrautnn 
Oo Accun 
Do tiuxne 
European 
Far Ecsiwii 
G* Trust 
Csaes Equty 
Natural Res 
N American Trust 
UK Special Sits 
H Bono Trust 
Japanese Trust 
Managed Trust 

LLOYDS BAM IMTHttlST MANAGERS 
Repavart Opt GamgByGaa. Wcnraig. W 
SnUfi 


+23 £49 
+35 £49 
+03 522 
+02 i.tn 
+03 0*4 
-1 6 7.G2 
+01 003 
+15 154 
-03 I5» 
+04 136 


0444 459144 
Balanced 
DO Accum 
Energy tad 
Da Accun 
Exes income 
Do Accum 
German Gtn me 
Do Accun 
taooma 
Do Accum 
tad Teen 
Do Accun 
Japan Growth 
Da Accun 
N Amw SOan 

Oo Accum 

Pacific Bssn 
Do Accun 


175 3 1B7A 
3121 333-7 
526 96.4 
592 63.30 
153.7 1643 
2772 2964 
74 8 79 9c 
740 799c 
250.4 Z76JC 
51 £7 5483C 
18*4 <972 
1926 2050 
B3.G ESA 
830 89.7 
973 104 0 
TDS.1 11£4 
13S« 1440 
1413 161.1 


+1.7 131 
+20 331 


^£60 


S mater COS ft Rk 1673 2003 
Do Accun 209.7 22*2 

WotaMOB Growth 2063 2206 
Do Accun 2900 310.1 

UK Growth Fund +65 *97 


__ £60 
+02 533 
+03 533 
+05 033 
+05 033 
+ 1 0 4.79 
+10 4.79 
♦10 036 
+00 036 
+07 002 
+07 002 
-0 2 1.06 
-03 106 
+00 ate 
+09 002 
♦ 1.6 £00 
♦18 200 
+».! 007 
+15 007 
+04 204 


LONOONft MANCHESTER 
WtasWe Part. ExMar EX5 IDS 
0392 52155 

Gotarat Trust 4£3 453 

tacomo Trust S52 37.70 

l i a a r na honal Trust 35.0 3S5 

Amencnn , 31 1 333 

Japan 455 4070 

Treat of liar &9 3150 

M ft G SECURITIES 
Three Ohm. Tower HU EC3R 6BQ 
01-626 45W 


+0.4 £70 
+at 640 
+o.t 0.10 
.. 2. co 
+02 000 

. £40 


Amor ft Gen IK 
Do Accum 
Amw Recovoty 
Do Accum 
Am Snutar Co acc 
A usvaxa Acc 


CcmmortW Acc 
C< xnpcxxaJ < 


Groitah 
Convarann Grown 
Do IK 

Dmdend Fund tac 
Do Accun 
European Acc 


3135 223 6 
1495 267 7 
2909 255.0 
2581 Z79.8 
553 580 
1122 1201 
2245 2402 
3990 *307 
318.0 3434 
1830 194 8 
4013 *25 * 
Cl 1.77 1248 
7776 SS45 


+01 148 
+01 146 
-01 059 
-01 059 
-0.4 0.47 
♦30 0 73 
+£« 2 73 
-10 3 77 
-0.7 20S 
. 602 
-15 524 
-004 524 
+25 0.77 


Extra YieM tac 
Do Acaum 
Far Eastern ik 
D o Accum 
Fund Of In* tac 
Do Acc 

Geowai Marne 
Do Accum 
c* S FnM IM 
DO Acban 
Gold income 


Da 


X' 


1 Income tac 
— 1 Accun 
ra Growth tac 
Do Accum 
M tac 
Japan Acc 
Japan Smdter Acc 
MMena ft Sen tac 
Do Accun 
Recovery Fund tac 


Do Accun 

Secure Gan tac 

Do Accun 
Smater Cos tac 
Da (kan 
Thaws Fund tac 
ensnbona tac 
Chaduid tac T 


2178 23060 
4778 50650 

1430 153 70 

1757 188 00 
2462 2590 
385.4 *085 

805.1 6+1.4 
Cl£62 1158 

565 S&3 

67 0 914 

475 500 
607 543 

3102 3319 
8402 8890 

7650 8115 
Cl £33 1107 
61 0 6+ 7c 
8476 9027 
B£8 882 
9965 589.9c 
£1355 1*88 
350 8 375.7 
45S 1 4815 
7042 7465 
£1300 14.73 
6+8.1 7005 
£1022 1103 
44£7 473.7 
1050 

3830 8876 

468.1 4780 
360 
448.4 


-0.7 514 

-15 604 
-08 148 
-0.7 1 48 
358 
-51 £58 
-20 *02 
-005*0! 
+DJ10 K 
+0510 14 
+04 £22 
+0* C22 
-ID 554 
-£7 554 
-30 104 
-004 104 
-02 650 
+92 036 
+O0 021 
-£B 419 
-006 4.19 
-1 1 347 
-1.4 347 
-10 305 
-008 305 
-01 £93 
-OOO £83 
-15 4.47 
1108 
.. 590 
-£7 401 
865 
605 


■BM BRfTNNNU UMT TRUST MANAGERS 
LTD 

- j Pa ranenL London EC2A 10) 

01 -SOB 7777 riw*ntc01.fi3a 0478(9 


Growth Qa 
Sma O w Cora 
UK Market F 
Do Accun 


GBJD 5B50 
1340 1425# 
770 02.1 • 
605 8550 


+01 042 
+04 108 
+05 152 
♦0L4 152 


General Reals 
UK Growth 
Manned tav 


304 360. 
577 615 


High tacomo Funds 
Extra me 


tac A Growth 


540 579 
240 260 
TB3.0 2055c 
1853 197.70 
17.7 1300 


.. 7.74 
+OI 6.19 
-10 423 
-06 453 
-0.1 1002 


1 Funds 

1*8.7 1660 

467 *90 

M LWOUS I4S 155 

Prop Shares BT5 god# 

Un» Energy **.7 47.7 

H TtaJ 410 437 


+2-9 221 
♦OI £12 
.. 058 
-02 1.11 
+01 105 
-0.1 006 


OMraras Growth Rad 
Amor Groatti 864 10ZJW 

Atn Growth 740 7900 

Euo Smater 173 1640 

Far East 630 574® 

tad Grow* 37.0 390c 

Ind Recnray . 1035 11040 

Jnpai Sme&r 1 


Cos 150 1600 


+14 327 
+22 154 
+04 019 
-03 078 
+00 1.49 
+04 256 
+02 .. 


Owsroau income Funds 

tad HVi tac 560 620C 

•CL Trusts 

Git 801 G9.6 


-02 401 
♦031059 


Britannia Unit Tresis 

Gam 6 Gen 200 22.1 

Amer 9noHw GO'S 202 215 

Japan Part 772 823 

Amer homo S62 6210 

Exempt 612 650 


123 
.. 044 
+1.6 . 

.. 52S 
-13 3.77 


■BM Unit That* 

Com ft Proms Met 
Do Accum 

J ‘E , i 


_ 1 Accum 
US Special Features 
DO Accun 
US Soadol tac 
Da Accum 
Erawy Exempt 
Da Accum 
European Part tac 
Do Accum 


564 6080 
5B.4 630a 
1300 1392 
131.0 1397 
662 690 
6S.9 703 
584 022 
632 67.4 
384.6 41310 
4894 52250 
900 9860 
900 96.90 


♦24 059 
+25 057 
.. 0.00 
000 
+05 0.09 
♦05 O CO 
.. 5.47 
5.47 
.. 308 
.. 3.58 
+£( 052 
+2.1 052 


KLA UMT TRUST MANAGEMENT 

98-100, SoKSng Rd. IMPmni, KWK MEM 1XX 

0822 S747SI 


-0.1 101 
+04 £17 


MA American 213 24 6 

MA General 3£8 345 

MIA taeo mn dOKi 569 003a +02 007 

MA GB Unt 2£1 23 aw +0211.11 

MIA Income 390 *080 +02 501 

ULA European 315 3300 +0.1 0-73 


MANULIFE MANAGEMENT 
SI GsorgM * 

0436 359101 
Growth Urals 
GM ft Fixed Mt 
HWh Income Unrta 

» i Yield G* um 
Grown mats. 

N American units 
Far Em Urns 
Snutar Cos find 


714 7S.90 
105.0 ioa.7 
JOBS 1150 
560 580 
137.7 1463 
670 7120 
1000 1071 
565 70.7 


£04 

709 

5 80 
864 
027 
008 

006 
209 


•ENCAPUWTTRUST 

Unicom use. 252. Romtard Rd. E7 

01-234 55*4 

131.7 140.1 +05 4.74 


Mnrnap 


mCURY FUND MANAGERS LTD 
33. K*n WBtadi Sl. EC4R BAS 
<p -3805860 
Amer (Roam 
Do Accun 
Amw I neons 
DO Accum 
European Growth 
Do Accun 


Genera 
Do Accum 
Gtt ft Fowl 
D? Accum 
mcoron 
Do Acoan 
Irttamaaonsl 
Do Accun 


^A 


Accun 
Flwrown 
Do Accun 
■oampt Dm 
Exempt Accum 



Caoni income 
Do Accun 
Gommxaiy ft Gan 
Do Accun ' 
Extra Hfcn tac 
Do Accum 
G4I A Fixed tac 
Do Accum 
»a*J 
Accun 


+00 253 
+1.1 253 
+0.7 205 
+10 255 
-01 807 
8 07 


MOLAND SANK GROUP UNIT TRUST 
MANAGERS 

Couiwpod Hsa. SlverSL Hand. SMAWd 61 3RD 
07*2 7896*2 

74.0 763 
1000 1075 
1240 133.1 
1761 1676 
560 8000 
672 7170 
507 52.9a +012 £91 
8* 0 87.70 +03 951 
1510 1810 
£670 2750 
164.1 175 0 
27T0 2895 
Japan ft Pacific 2B7.B 3OE00 +06 008 
Do Accum 3010 321 90 +00 008 

1102 117.5 
131.9 1*02 
1307 1394 


"ft’ 


Do Accun 
a paafic 
Accum 
N American tac 
Do Accun 
Euro Gdi tac 


+0.5 5.76 
+05 5.76 
♦10 402 
+1.7 


123 
-01 123 
+05 152 


ICS Hope Street Gbogsw G2 SUH 
041 221 S2S2 


Cm 


1185 12450 -02 320 

2684 28450 +10 1 10 
21 £0 2265 +0.1 12* 


NATIONAL PROViaXT PWESTMOiT 
MANAOERS 

*a Qracacnucn SL EC3F- 3HH 
01-023 4200 Ext 2BB 
NPI UK 1825 2045 

Do Accun 9100 3307 

NPi Omreeas 8100 £4900 

Do ACCUD 7475 7950a 

Far East Acc 943 100.4 

Amencen Acc 984 820 

Europssn Acs 570 80,70 

Wortcwiae Acc 595 5850 


+1.1 £80 
♦ 1 B 250 
+ 1* 0.90 
+16 090 
•0.7 0.10 
•0.1 119 
+05 000 
+0.1 £40 


notiikh trr manaoers 
PO Box *. mwah NRi 3NG 
0803 822200 


Group Trust 
tad That 


£11 82 1£*4 +0.07 3.78 

13*5 14150 +02 108 


OPPENHCBn TRUST MANAt»Bn- 
88. Cixtxxi SOHL Lanaut EC4N BAE 
dMngs 01-238 3885/6/7/8/9/0 
nwnanonN Grown 1470 1582 


kicon® ft Grow*! 
ritondred* R*c 

Amman GoaA 
Jdpkh Growth 
Eiropaan Growth 
UK Growth 
PacXc Growth 
♦kgh 1 


Do Accum 


969 8000 
907 97.0 
310 3340 
58 0 63.1 
733 784 

529 56.8 
*75 505 
33.7 38.10 

530 57.00 
985 104.60 


-0.1 070 
+0.1 297. 
+0.7 041 
-01 .. 
400 000 
-+0.4 101 
.. OT7 
+O0 .. 
♦0.1 700 
1.78 
.. 1.78 


PEARL TRUST 
252 HUlH 
01-405 8441 
Grown Fund tac 

Do Accun 

ktcome Fund 
tad Eraifiy tac 
Do Acorn 
Urw Trust tac 
Do Accun 


tfobom, 1VC1V 7EB 


893 950 
13*1 14£7 
116.7 124.10 
1320 14150 
13*0 142S0 
1250 1330 
2168 2300 


+05 £19 
+08 £19 
*05 308 
+07 151 
+07 151 
+07 ZBJ 

+10 £93 


PERPETUAL UWT TRUST 

*8- Han Street. Hwdey On Thames 

0401 E7E8B8 

tad Grown 287.7 28750 

Incane 1800 ISZ0O 

Wor ldwide Rec 1*30 1685 

Amer Growth 83.7 7i c 

tad Emwg COB 700 81J6 

F« E8XJ&W91 7B2 8*0 

Euopaan Gin 82.1 867 


♦tO 0.7S 

+OE 4 41 

+0.6 155 
-01 385 
+05 058 
+02 005 
+04 130 


pmuncuwr trusts 


222. I 
01-247 ' 
Irxerr u do na l 
Han taooma 
Com ft GN 
Far Eastarn 
North Arana 
Speool Sas 
T a cnn gtogy 
Extra Income 


Lomtan EC2 


1179 12320 
58 J 63.91 
954 10210 
1797 1335a 
1284 13570 
884 71,*a 
1108 1190 
B40 9100 


+02 074 
-02 444 
-04 598 
+03 002 
-03 054 
-00 156 
.. 800 
-05 4.74 


PRUDENTIAL UMT TRUST 
51-89. Start! HN. NOTO 
01-478 3377 
Hamm Eradtr 307.0 
European 1075 

Hotbom Comma 525 
HoBOm MUi tac 623 
Habarn fere 989 

Japanese 984 

N Amulcan 715 

Hotaorn Saw S8a 6£4 
Hdbom UK Growth 752 
Hdbun GN Trust 1760 


411.70 

1145 

550 

6620 

1062 

10250 

7S0 

884 

8400 

1849 


+48 £33 
+0.8 053 
+04 005 
+00 £85 
- 0.1 002 
+OB 005 
+OI 007 
+0.7 £10 
+10 £20 
+0.7 £05 


OULTER MANAOEMENT COMPANY 
31-45 Gresham Sl London EC2V 7LH 
01-600 4177 

Quoxfeam General <285 4559c 

Quadrant income 2331 2+feo 

Ouadram tad Pd 4047 42&B 

Quatfeam necorety 2S£8 289 00 


£51 

529 

104 

£77 


Ml R0TH8CWLD ASSET MANAQENEMT 
London EC4P 40U 


01-260 5456 
NC femme 
NC Japan 
NC Motor UK Co 
NC Smaaer Aus 
NC tanaricat tac 
Do Accun 
NC &rel* Coe 


86.1 915 
1885 1980 

481 520 

2705 ill 
2930 3140 

137.1 M50* 


NC &idfe EuogCo's 1930 2059 


NC Exempt 1 


£1180 1230c 


+05 407 
♦1.0 D0i 
+Q4 155 
+00 100 
-03 140 
-03 140 
+04 £07 
+00 0.40 
.. 908 


ROW AN uwr TRUST 

33 King W*am Street London EC4R BAE 
01-638 5678 

2240 2280C 
6660 683.0 
1715 1780 
4110 410.0 
1580 1S70 
1115 11250 
3*86 2520 


Eecufetes (. 
HK*i nud | 
Merita (3) 
fired 1 merest 
Mgh troweai 
For East (2) 


105 

£33 

682 

£25 

£84 

1300 

005 


ROYAL LME FUND UANAOBAT 
New Had Puce. Liverpool 100 JHS 
051-227 4422 

Bum Trust 505 63.7 +05 £76 

fed Trust 734 7800 .. 123 

GR Trust 247 28.0 -+0.1 804 

US Thist 31.6 3300 .. 156 

Pacific Baum Tilt 480 4800 +03 007 


20 QCton SL London EC2 
01-920 ran 

Equity DQt 1110 1100 

Do Accum 1592 1962 

Wan Income Trust 660 9250 
Do Accun 1025 10850 

US Growth 540 584 

Do Accun 554 S90 


+08 159 
+00 108 
+04 408 
+04 450 
+01 O0B 
-05 009 


ROYAL LONDON DMT TRUST MANAGERS 
Rtnu London House. Cotdwsra COi IRA 
0208 576T1B 

814 886 
1712 1B £ 2 
514 5420 
797 8170 
558 102.6 
9£4 880 
1042 11090 


Amwtcwi Groran 
Cap*# Accum 
Gw krecnw 
High femme 
Income ft Growth 
Japan Growth 
Special Sm 


♦02 085 
+1.0 £23 
+00 954 
+0.1 506 
+02 440 
♦04 003 
+10 107 


SAVE ft PROSFCR 

28, IMmwn Rd. Romtard FtMl 3LB 

iRcmrud) 070868988 

Amor Ine I Growth 685 71.1 


Caora Unas 
Conxnod<y 
European Growth 
Financial Sees 
MghRNWnUMS 
Hgii «e« Unas 


ta w s u r a n Ttirat 
Japan Growth 
japan Smalm Cm 


101.9 HKL9 
530 67J0 
11£7 1248 
976 10*5 
I7S0 1090 
1575 16840 
890 950 
884 S24C 
1000 10590 
114.1 12£0 


♦01 7.03 
-07 £05 
*03 109 
-06 049 
+00 205 
♦04 511 
+03 *03 

33 US 
S 3 as 


SCMRaOBtUNir TRUST 


0705 827733 
American Acc 
Atutrofca Acc 
EuTOpiun IK ■■ 

Do Acoan 
GN ft fixed me 
Goto Fieri tac 
Do Acoan 
feicoma 
few In t ern e 
De Accun 
jap Soar Co's Ac 
Sure ft Matey Aoc 
SmaOer Co tac Acc 
Special 9ta tac 
Do Accum 
Tonyo find tac 

Do Accum 
US Siratei Co's 4c 
UK EqiNy fere 
Do Acoan 
Far East Gm Accum 
Extra me 


128.1 1370 
80 8 8880 

1253 1350O 
1303 13930 
512 6*C® 
410 4*70 
*4.1 *7 10 

171 1 1820 
1159 123S 
l»0 1710 
1336 1420 

a:0 880 

13£7 1410 
102.8 10950 
107 2 11400 
2182 23330 
3204 235.70 

81.1 S40 
998 1057 
1550 1M7 

562 6010 
820 6600 


-02 0.7S 
♦15 088 
+08 0.93 
*00 0^ 
+01 909 
+00 106 
+00 168 
+05 826 
-02 0*5 
-03 045 
-04 000 
*04 088 
+05 1.W 
*04 066 
+04 008 
♦£S 000 
+£8 OOO 
+01 OOO 
+04 339 
+08 329 
-01 050 
.. 742 


BCMBTAR AtWETMAHAOjadEW'. 

3306 GraokSiwcn-St London EC3V 9AX 
01-623 5778/8711 


UK Boutl tac 
Do ACC 
Euo TO me 
Do Acc 

Gtatul Gti Inc 
Do ACC 


23.4 24.90 
230 2510 
285 306 
280 308 
3S.K 315 
£87 388 
1175 1225 
230 251 


-04 Ml 
-04 517 
-02 150 
-02 150 
+01 150 

.. LOO 


BCOTTOHeaUTMLe 
20 SI Anfesws Sq.,E(M 


Da Accum 


1505 15090 
2255 237.60 


561 

351 


SCOTTISH LK . 

18. « Andrexa Sq. 
031 225 ZZ11 
UK Equcy 


Ertnbugh 


Europaan 

SCOTT1SI MUTUAL 
MAKAfERS 
Its. Vtncwit I 
0*14*8 8100 


1786 18920 
1*52 15010 
1915 20*70 
2564 27420 


+1.0 156 
-02 152 
+12 ate 
+05 063 


G2 5HN 


UK Eauty 
Gdt ft Fhad 
UK 5n0r GO'S Eq- 
Euopean 
N Ana 
Poodle 


164 0 17450 
108.5 11550 
1*4-6 (5350 
£162 23010 

1109 Tiaoo 

1BS.1 197.00 


+1.7 £63 
+05 £07 
+06 £40 
♦14 0-83 
-05 1*4' 
+08 C43 


SCOTTISH IMT TRUST 

29. ChaMH So. Ednbutfi 
031-226 4372 

Pacific 670 7£3 

Worn Growth 37 0 *03 

N American 310 335 

tacome Fund 44.1 472 

European 406 486 

N Amer mc 254 2760 

UK Growth 203 3140 


Exam tac 


305 


+05 OOO 
. 014 

.. 003 
.. 605 
♦01 051 
-02 194 
.. £» 
.. 547 


SCOTTISH WIDOWS 

PO Box 90£ EAlfiurgh EH16 5BU 

031-655 6000 

. me 2205 23790 

Accum 2S15 27750 


PM Eq I 
Do Ao 


♦12 3.17 
♦14 3.17 


30. Qty Hd. Lcrexri EC1Y 
01-638 6011 


SAY 


Amw Tech ft Gen 9£3 
Pacific 185.1 

Sec Income Fnd 16£9 
Soeual StaUxxu 1903 
tad Grown 376 

A/tmicct Motors 60.0 
SmaH co s 39.1 

Japan Tech ft Gwi 109.4 
feiiwuabonat feicoDe 55 5 

wSrara ™"i 

Bxo Growth 

Euro taooma ' 482 


10000 

2390 

1740c 

210.0 

402 

720 

*100 

117.1 

590C 

87300 

35.4 

434 


-01 0*4 
-27 000 
♦1.1 4.16 
.. 149 
♦06 0J6 
-03 031 
107 

+0.1 000 
+ai mg 

+25 £25 
T01 
+02 033 
+07 460 


STANDARD UFE 

3. Gacroa Sl Effinbargh-BO 2XZ 
031 23055Z 

fereane Una M.i 255# 

Do Accun IMta 27 1 29.10 


.. £74 
♦01 274 


STEWART, nrcnr unit trust 
MANAGStS 

4£ Chartottn Sq. EGnburoh 
091-226 3Z71 


Amartcan Fund 
Do Afxun 
Do vntxfeawal 
Auuraien find 
DO Accun 
Brash Fund 
Do Accun 
p-?pf " find 
Ob Accum 
Jwrei Fund 
Do Accum 
Satan PPP 


2194 2337 
2403 2B24 
1535 164.0 
12£7 13a? 
1240 132.9 
5732 91050 
7B50 83700 
22£2 3435# 
3410 36300 
644 686* 
647 6£9a 
1689 17S7 


-02 £37 
-00 £07 
-02 £37 
♦02 101 
*03 101 
♦£3 4J9 
+3.1 409 
+£l 079 
+24 a 79 
+01 022 
♦01 022 


SUNALLUHCE 

Sun AAenoa Ha*. Hor s h a m. Susan 
0*33 56293 

3785 4027 
57.7 610 
857 954 • 
510 540 


Equity That Am 
N Am Trust Acc 
Far East Trust Acc 
WnttMde Band 


toSfS 


-01 026 
+01 843 


SIM UR OP CANADA 
204. CocMpw St reet. London SW1Y 5BH 
Oeateg ncrOl-930 26G2 . 

UK tacoma 23.1 BJJ. f-'.'i. 505 


Do Growth 


220 


£09 


m UNIT TRUSTS LTD 

Keens -Houoe. A n Oora , Heats. SPW 4PG 

0264 98769 Dealings: 0284 63432/3/4 


Amwtan tac 
Dir Accun 
Extra feaxiia tac 
Do Accun 
Gwreral Unit tac 
Do Acara 
CM ft Rxed feta 
Co Accun 


Accun 
Paallc Inc 
Do Accun 
hid tac 
Do Aoeun 
SsKood Opps too 
Do Accum 

Natural Res 

DO 


1114 1186 
1172 124.7 
1120 119.70 
1540 14300 
1530 1633 
2527 26£9 
*81 481 
61 I 637 
£100 2235 
3278 3480 
1714 1K4 
1770 1680 
3172 3400c 
4047 4305c 
627 6060 
683 .7300 
51.1 5440 
53.0 5840 


.. 1.48 
.. 148 
.. 505 
.. 503 
.. 204 
.. £S4 
.. 072 
£72 
.. 408 
.. 408 
.. 041 
.. 0.41 
.. 122 
.. 122 
.. 102 
- 152 
.. 1.91 
.. 101 


TARGET TRUST MANAGERS 
Turgot Haute, GaUMuse Rd. Aylasbwy Bocka 
5941 


TaroM I 
B29BSS 
Amw E^B 
A taoafim 
Commodity 

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710 


750 n j a 

290 310 101 

1202 1280 +04 301 


8 aFBa““;“is» 

saT 11®! 

rv«j nong <£D 

,,~7 joj e*sm 

JST 1C *S ’Hi* 

Malay ft Sngaporo 24J 2? 3 

Pa emc Inc 
Do Ramrea 
pror Share FC 
UK Cepra 
Soeoal saa 

Tecnnoiogy 
Vfeana tacomo 



Worawree Capra 1*£i 

fk Ex tS\ 30 4 m3 

> Accum f 3) 151 < 161 5 



THORNTON UNTT MANAO^LTD p-™, 

Pan House 16 finsniiry Cmaia LWWn tea* 
7DJ 

010^4 *995 

Fer East ft Gen MS g4 

jepaa ft Gen S2.I 583 

ianMwaGai *3J Sio 

Onerqal tac 

^ TDca si m 

Sft Gen 402 *30 


Are. LaMon EC3A 8BP 
6 

SeaBw Cos 


MamuaJ HoS^zTpratdtaDof*. lenra" EC4V 
3AT 

017*8 1250 ' 

American Growm 3».l *JTO 

Ganarai Growth 500 

(M Tech 425 *80 

tactwst Grown. 530 . K8 

bsome MonttV 46f f97* 

sETeS^to »0 “-8 

- Do Accun MO £6 

g~9K B Growth «3 

EnuTO CCS 614 854* 

Specie) epos 720 T7.90 


TYNDALL MANAGERS 



Do Accun 
trtl Eerrxnps 


I0SH 


UK PROVmetTUT MANAGERS 

UK House. Castle St S ek x p n y SP1 . 

0722 338242 

1140 ‘121.4’ +t* 

i8£i 1750 -..--Far 

1197 12£9 +00 


UKEqtNy 
PacrtcBeam 
N Amor 


WSWecml-m 

General BKpwiM 01-036 3053 Dw0ng Line 01- 


236 2*88 
Grow® tac 
Do Accun 
i YwU 


H St , _ 

Special Bits 
Da Aceuai 
Troane 
Co Accum 
/War ft Goo 
Do Accum 
fttasar PonUta 
Do Aecuoi 


'1770 1804* 

261 0 277.7* 

1329 2050 
1970 2099 
380 410 
392 41.7 
1300 1280* 

1950 2121 
BOD 635* 

602 M.I .. 

£3056 6202c -0M 255 
£8121 6278 -014 £55 


-08 201 
-00 251 
-00 SJ7 
-02 £37 
-02 258 
.. £68 
-01 405 
-0.4 405 

.. slot 
£08 


AWig turn Ass (5} 115.7 123 1* 

Do accun 11*3 1223 

Fdr East ft Gan tac 532 566 
. Co Accum 532 S&6 

fiao tac 470 oi.o 

DO Acc „' 470 510 


207 
.. £87 
♦ 0.1 000 
+01 000 


WAROLEYUWT mm 
Wanfiey Horn. 7, 
01-929 1532 


DmonaMra Sift Uxumn EC2 


Ananean That 
Far East 8 Gan 
tan Growth.- . 
Income Trust 
Japan GrwMh 
Smafl companies 
Tectmobgy 

Auatrare 
UK Trust 
Eudmod Grow® 
Hang Kong 


640 

K»0 

734 

6£6 

329.7 

1049 

3*4 

45.1 

1304 

592 

£64 


688 

1150* 

78J 


1396* 

1120 

309c 

4£5 

1308 

B30 

28.1 


.. 1.40 
.. 0.40 
+00 040 
+06 520 
+04 010 
+02 200 
+02 020 
+04 100 
♦17 £20 
+04 020 
-0.6 1.40 


WAVERLEY ASSET MANAGEMENT 
13. Chariot* Sq, Edfetaurgb 
081-225 1551 

Auxtrrexn Gold . 250. 270 

PkfvBMi 214 220 

Canearei BU Gtn 570 6100 

Glnnta Mae FM 81010 1050* 


♦1 3 015 
*0.7 020 
-06 007 
-03 700 


•wrnNooAUtMn' nwr manaoers 

2 Honey U EC2 BBT 
01-608 9085/B 

su Dm Gn fint 670 680 +o t tun 
USGoit BOcd-Rd- 4514 51.6 +02 . . 


IIMOaOR TRUST MANAGStS LTD 

Wmesor House. 83. Ktaoseay, London WC2B 

BSD 

01405 8331 

Com ft Eqody 479 61.0* +01 7.71 

Incuw - 53 D 56.«* 

Grow® 514 S4 70 




o Ek dtwtefcJ. c Cum tSmtJend. k Cum 
stock spM. a Ex- stock spttt. m Cum all 
(any two or mora oi aboveL a Ex ail (any 
two or more of aoove). Deafeng or 
vak/aixn Oays: (1) Monday. (2) Tuesday. 
(3) Wednesday. (4) Thursday. (6) Fnday. 
(20) 2S8i of month. (21) 2nd Thursday of 
month. (22) 1st and 3rd Watfewsday of 
month. (23) 20th . oi month. (24) 3rd 
Tuesday ctf month (23) 1st and 3rd 
Thursaayof month. (2£) ftjh Tuesday of 
month. (27) isi VSednesday of month. (28) 
Last Thursday of month. (29) 3rd narking 
day of month (30) 16th of month. (31] 1st 
working flay of month. (32) 20fh of momh. 
(33) 1st day of February. May, August, 
November. (34| Last working day of 
month. (35) 15th of month. (38) 14th of 
month. (37) 2ist of month, (38) 3rd 
Wednesday of month. (39) 2nd 
Wednesday of month. (40) Valued 
monfWy. (41) Lest Thursday of Stock 
Exchange account. (42) Lost day of 
month. |43) 2nd and 4th Wednesday of 
month. (44) Ouartefly. (45) Gth of month. 
(46) 2nd Tuesday of month. 




1985 

Higti Low Canaan-, 


Grass 
tfw YkJ 

Pnce Chy penca *« p/e 



,+1 . i'i fiVcSTMEF.'T "T^R USTS y i 


15 B : a ft m Gp 
GO *5 ATA Sweden 
130 93 Aobeyaest 
E9 33 Aoeroewi 5» Hse 
143 *5 Access SataBra 
IDS 32 Acorn Comp 

21 8'. Acres JjwsIWiV 

22 iO'i Acam Leisure 

123 96 


9 

52 

116 

SS 


06 57 120 
£1 40130 
38 3.1 165 
31 5.6 154 


461 


£9 

as 

£0 


95 61 

TO 6T 
220 1B5 


2*5 139 
30 TO 
34 18 


Airspnng 

* 


77 

80 .. 



AfeCa 

29) 


98 

33 14.1 

22 9 

IX 

Anpia Secure Hno 

t«« 

+2 

£3 

13 203 



Atattx 

tea 




338 

270 

Anctatroa 

158 


2ft 




Apt' HDkxjrapncs 

2SJ 

-2 



150 

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205 






Asoon Corem 

313 


4.4 

14 32.8 



Asexual 

HO 

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36 

7ft 59 



AStKOy 

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1*3 



11 

ASSOC Enw^y 

32 



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to 

32 



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Altos Eauomom 

128 


70 

55 118 

1*3 

88 

Automate 

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89 

9 B 155 




to 


1.4 





198 

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71 




BTS Grp 

BO 


57 

71 9* 



BeaKfed flVMmi 
Semen & Fwntsai 

88 

24': 

0+2 

64 

07 

73 02 

38 

19 

Beroons Crcos 

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Bemetay & Hay 

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&jrn»v Exo 

39 

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Bemsiey Go 

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BM 


30 

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195 

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3<wi 

40 


1.0 

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350 

P93' 

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64 




BueoTO Toys 



5ft 

£1 102 



Banana 








20 


1 1 




Bmun 

97 



6ft 68 



Bnra 

200 





Bmarm Sec 

122 


21b 

17 199 

133 

105 


250 <55 Br ao p o a ott 
59 SO Br fciana 
59 *9 Brood SI 

59 *9 Broad 51 

3SB 179 Btooferaouni 
155 115 Brown iCnartei 
3*5 <55 EPvxni (Dare+i 
9 2 Bun ReMuroei 

ioj 73 CCA Gaaones 
180 125 CML Micro 
35 S»i CPS Ccmp 
*2 a CPU Con® 

195 130 CVD 
320 B5 Cwwtanan On 
69 52 Camdeoi 


155 

57 

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2S3 

165 

225 


-5 

+2 


126 tl 73 
40 70 104 

16 31 

< 6b 3.1 
50 1 E 15.4 

35 22 2A2 

11 fib 50 80 


31 

145 

90 

65 


34 35 14.3 

28 1 8 IS I 

14 S£4 23 
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147 86 Cannon SHOW tar 14* 


350 213 Ceram TV 


120 64 Ottnosry Secs 


1*8 83 CiMcfipotai Europe 148 


rj? ras CheHea Mot 
18 S'; Orem Meirnws 

253 120 0*938 xe W 
17 B 1 ; Otat 

*0 ZS Cltywsion 
OCO *75 Otynsron 7N 
115 70 CTOSJnnl 

173 152 Oarxe Hooper 


ras 

7 

212 

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32 

560 


£9 *0 13J 

3.5 2 5 214 

20 D 58 135 
31 £7117 

13 0 

3 f £4 31.0 
30 4£9 
52 £5 i£6 
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25-. <1 CfcKWU Gc+c 25 : 

55 25 Ctaft OU Hogs *5 -2 


15 £1 02 

33 £1 21 1 


113 67 Cased E tagradB S <05 




46 


95 53 Caere Emerald 

130 21 Colne 

108 21 Codger Inc 

ITS 110 Coras Ferenoal 
S3 30 ConipsoR 
130 74 ConSUtants 
hj 38 Cons Tern ires 

343 208 Cora Microwave 
108 85 Covwni 

143 83 CAM 

415 SOB Crampnaro 
78 4ft Cranoroak 
11* 96 Owwwicx 
138 ni Cretan Lodge 

198 168 Creg rag Labs 
itn 58 Crow" TV Prom 
HI 75 Crasis 
73 43 OBE Teen 

183 1<6 DOT 
ISO 7B DJ Sec Alarms 
91 63 DfrtrtXi 

JIB ISO Dames (DY1 
8* 55 Dean ft Bowes 

29 30 04 BraB IAIM14) 

145 13* Debtor 

57 *0 Dexnar 
IJB «H Deraxxa 

US 70 Danmori* do* 

I OS es Damn WWTWl 
230 130 MW 
460 3*5 D OK* 

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58 39 EnJM 5* 

14ft <02 Ejhwj Etact Owes 114 

32': 3 Ecaonc 30 

ms 238 E^ 1 Fend 2-0 

■S S EJ* on 4 Giri « 

382 7*4 Efewage Pop* * 

148 UB Etaaran House 

100 6i Bearon* DM p 

33 s* Erne* 


32 130 


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64 
37 
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£1 57 8 
59 
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153 302 
2* 155 
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£3 M.2 
14 13 2 
7 2 92 
3-1 '75 
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202 

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20 85 

21 113 
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4.8 183 
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113 

85 

66 

230 

428 


£9 
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16 


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123 
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4 3 181 
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310 136 S' 

246 151 FK9G0 


135 

106 

300 

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I* 10 0 5 3 
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6.4 66 <2(j 


36 15 250 


1G1 140 
90 51 

42 16 

125 123 
73 to 
65 31 

203 100 
60 30 


<se i<2 

29 22 
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les 115 
255 IBS 
230 165 
3< 13 

115 *4 

103 to 
353 190 
32 21 

550 233 
ISO 116 
79 2 

148 105 
IM 73 
70 *8 
3X 253 
97 67 

320 270 
83 53 

113 SO 
113 67 

68 37 

125 70 

SS 32 
118 100 
165 1*9 
91 -3 

1*0 95 

198 133 
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Feedback 
Fwgkbrook 
Betas (kfesj 
FWtftw Dennys 
Ftaxtecn 
Ftogaf. 
floyd Oi 
Fora ft Walton 
Frauen Conn 
rresntwui 
filter 5mnn 'A' 

Gudko 
G ee iCacfT 
Geo/Rown 
Gibbon Lyons 83 

Sffltei Mow 155 

Guoofi House 81 

GfeXMi Go *4 

Gtrtwm Warran 81 

Goodhesd Print 125 

GoiAd iLaurencel 108 

Gn-byta Suftaco 65 

Great Sounwri 152 

Grewi lErnestl 138 

Oreerenen C*bta 28 

Greswsnor Sc 68 

gusngey MM* 190 

Hampden Hornocera 68 
Haney ft TOomp 215 

i tt wiodi Lumps 233 

Hewn dm 41 

Heemree <30 

Do A' LV 370 

Hendacten Pnm* 150 

Hign-Pora 185 

Hgniana Port *5 

Hoe Baew B8 

Hobson 27 

Hodgson 128 

Houwi H for oma n 125 

Homes Prwecacn 113 

Huones Food 23' 

Hunarad Bee 7- 

Sarevr 155 

Sri Teen 200 

170 


30 

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40 

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53 153 



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28 1.7 

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103 

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4 1 107 

03 170 

200 

129 

PBiBrs (Menotil 

131 +1 3 7 

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72 


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29 29 

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32 

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Israel Mock U 23 

05 Pattutogy 325 

Jequos Men 183 

Jabswn ft 

Jdfireen ft Jgrg IDS 

JonnKones Pans <00 

Jusi Rubow CD 

KLP 295 

Kara t .101x11 75 

Manyon Sees 317 

Kaeif Statems 58 


3ft 

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21 

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123 

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Systems 
Ta+r* 
LP* ma 


-3 

+3 


95 


263 

150 101 
175 45 

90 54 


55 83 


17? K 
35 9 

11B 101 
306 105 
2» 123 


99 75 


L3X30W Thomson 108 
Leisure ire 51 

Lswmw 105 

Local Lon Gp 165 
Lodge Cwe 89 

LOT ft CryCesrie n3 
L ortn Be d 170 

“06 CarJi ft Carry S3 
MMT Como 2Sft 

McLxajqntm 1 W 131 
VaraMBC Vanr»5 S3 
Mjnnsi SC 

Mtrra Dev 93 

Mxran ifionaxii im 
U topH 17 

lUy+w C"V 1 r5 
Ueadow Farm 291 
PiteOiO Teen 138 


a . 03 

60 56 1£3 

01b 61 11 1 
£5 4.2 90 
4 7 1.8 18 6 

20 A1 164 
IA9 *.7 r5J 
1 T £9 £0 
1 *S £1 <1 8 

19 52 7* 
• I 5) SI 

52 13 C 
. 25* 

3 5 129 
2 0 180 

20 33 180 
■” “ 102 


165 

131 

3S 


PlK+rr/ Tjr ICp 
DC 30 
G-jeon: 
neoanei 
Pan c Cre a 
FM*! Cry* 
Raeus 
Fonts W 

Ramus 

Ramrs+oro, 

Rni, Tone Coracf 
3 slant Major 

Riwttn 

Sccxwaa: 

P:Bb u Natan 
S*C 

Sangws r-JKO 
Sirsrjre Pe< 
S+.j^ 

Bca'-o 

5^4 : -itr.3013 

S-lLunJ-i+i- 

fiw«rf 

Sr-A-iaw^ 

S«s-e Drug Sns 
S-'’5i:n Jcm+s 
Si'trv.ay: Coma 
Sr.ua 
S.jme» 

S,rrj Care* ,n; 
Smejt- i'/.Vla.Tii 
Si-jxscra 
5K*dCn Snags 


TXtiV. 

205 

90 

32 

» 


01 


93 


79 

Ift 

1*3 

5S 

10< 

123 

02 

10 


4 6 17 172 

1.4 15 140 

8 £9 

75 80 14 ft 

Oi 09 
£9 £7 225 

137 

01 01 
OG 05 .. 
29 £9*35 
21 1 7 210 

3 1 28 23.7 

13 

43 34 173 

57 60 92 

4 6 3.1 i£9 
£i 213 


<968 

High Low 


Gross 
l*v na 
Cnga pence +» P/E 


30 


3+5 

JiC 

'j* 


53 


7311 a -is 


n 

to 

135 

IM 

IBS 

ICS 


56 


39 


80 


36 20 156 


-2 

O 

s 

e+e 


: s 2* 7 

93 69 
*3 92 
i.fi 202 


25 216 


19 9 

75 13 

:53 T35 
390 350 
139 95 
UK 71 
« 59 

76C 360 
220 ICO 
47 32 

385 231 

148 142 

153 165 
320 130 

J7 .‘3 

158 108 
124 52 

t£S 135 
W 25 
rr is 


85 


Memory Comp 15 
BMirn cn i ra megs 30 


232 


liurewr-S+ata 

Mw-vwwre wxie 

Metal Eunefen 


Ba 


MB 


M*cn*i4 Moftr.J 
E*craHttn 
M-craMHM 
MiCTOWK 
Utau :ana feme 


603 

IK 

38 

370 


Muur 5 Sanmauao 144 


ns a 


- .r2 125 


Si 


Mewarfl Biavwi 

Mm Worid 
hw»s 
M aorBse Go 
rxores ft Crane 
MCnOKfer 
MOriny IRW 
Mr»r-» IWWta-l 
M043 AdV+rpagg 
Mu&rnrtfi 
ijw.y Cera: 

■»« C! rui 
D5 ’ KIKS 


170 

35 


*3 37 K4 

5+ I575S 

4 0 29 10 0 

' 2E0 

£5 

50 167 £3 
Z< rs; 
2.4 197 

51 S0 l£2 
37 4S 1L3 

5 7 2J ifij 

2 9 03 8)! 

57 57 42 

13 SC la 9 

3 3 I 0 27 5 
32 2J 269 
‘ _ i 1 3» a 

39 108 


?S 


123 

l:« 

125 

45 

!9 

7i 


30 I62£e 

3 9 ')4 14 J 


4? J2 * 


i 

0 


1 ? : 5 ; i 

J ’ 2 5 3 

95 22 U '. 


K 14 fiflw Engiand “rops is 


95 

75 

Do IBS* ISO 

0 

10ft 

77 

73 

Newe/je Trans 

TJ 

59 

6ft 53 

21 

10 

.Urmia 

r. 



ISO 

9i 

hex irk 

140 

43 

29 132 

IW 

4E 

Nortw 

*5 

1 0 

22 4 9 

UK 

aa 

f«I5C« HCIHS 

140 

3* 

22 152 


59 


71 


23 65 

!C3 71 

33': 17 
93 58 

125 1C9 
330 175 
203 I!S 
2K 1-3 
lji in 
VC :to 
•Si 52 
US 75 
)ii 154 
1Z3 n= 
:M 90 


S -f* flui 

SW ReMurtes 

Scuts Fmsrsng 
Scwefea *utD 
Scemm 

SSiM 

SsiatJi 

SnxteM UaW 
Swri+t; Pu£. 


£6 
3.7 
.. a 
40 


Sumarira ipi 
Sw-ean p* Mesa 
5UT3CV) Cons 
7 ft £ Ssrm 
TCS Cmxta 

tvd *:-!■< 


.8!* 


272 .IK 


56 42 

14! '17 

x ;i 
199 US 
42S 2-0 


SS2 J 2tl 
125 31 


Tai “*smee 
Te;-i 9us 
T+OT 1 j~c* 
7e+c>-iwong 
To. Set uii 
T l-cm-ii 
Tie-m So* nr it 

T-54+, <='irai 
t jc MUi 

To-»n-rai, See 

t*ttb P*r"*ic-*c«i 
1 

Tni.an 

7,ri Tons * 

J'3 C-wam< 
iJC Fnona# 

uie 

.rr T“ Croc* 
oaner iFiwwi 

li'w+aia r- 
'.Vj.no Kot 
iwsew tearo 
■'■'"car 

;v«! /jr-ywro 

A'iC-01 

^>0 5vst 

.'-'BrJ - : ,*811 rie-5 
V.'r vs 


3c 

S3 

1'S 

192 

242 

15ft 

115 

176 

155 


3i 

46 

2-9 


262 

46 

TOD 


1.7 190 

09 35 4 
7 3 92 
£0 27 7 

1.7 292 
1.3 23 0 
42 160 
3.0 12.1 
31 154 
3 2 12.3 
*6 M2 
30 82 

. 48 

30 1*8 

8.7 6.7 
3.0 

4.8 132 
75 IttS 

3 4 29 0 
2 6 220 

49.0 
79 195 
. 381 

1 8 15 9 
1 5 2S 7 
15 57 

2 1 ?1 1 

4? is:) 

IOJ 75 

10 4iS 

1 2 16 5 

33 299 
52 US 
17 1? 7 

4 4 12 1 
51 07 

34 rsa 

SJ 23 4 

13 18 5 

1 7 ?i 7 

27 123 
62 6.0 
7* i£J 


117 94 
820 663 
149 IJ4 
292 TBS 
120 94 
129 98 
25* 159 

52 .- 53 

53 31 

450 364 
103 80 

855 790 
250 139 
157 108 
143 110 
364 314 
190 134 

772 43) 

206 176 
117 98 
182 118 
338 294 
IM 136 
100 75 

80 60 

119 85 
2l7 1*2 

'0 ; 8': 
3*8 287 

120 65 
SftS *8C 
193 145 
3*5 294 
129 64 't 
1*0 109 
733 *60 
IBS 123 

161 123 

162 140 

142 107 
102 68 
109 eg 
22S 115 
193 138 
330 275 
149 115 
126 97 

1*7 IJ7 
232 138 
252 1J4 



07 

Bm Empire See 
Br few 
Bnjnmr 
COTd ft Ind 
Creccwa Japan 
Deroy Ik 


Drayton Com 
Drayton Fw East 

Drayton Japan 
Dibwbs Lon 
Edfli Amw Asset 
Effenburgn 
Beane Gen 
BiglUi tar 
E ngtan SOW 

^ftT 


98 

B15 

212 

152 

134 
336 
183 
708 

135 
96 


£6 32 22.1 

318 40 383 
4A £5 34J 
09 20 572 
09 O9 7S0 
£9b 3.1 46.6 
I.5B 09 . 
30 50 304 

07 ZO 473 
27 J 4ft 28ft 
£3 14 45ft 
31.4 39 363 

00 02 .. 
12ft 04 101 


-2 

+5 

+5 


366 

165 

99 


118 

206 

10 '.- 

3!# 

95 

505 

180 


F ft C Mbonco 
FAC Pacric 
First Otanone 
firat Seta Amer 
Fint Un Gen 
Ftamng Amwresn 
Ftamng Ctatr 
Fiammg Ernarpns e 303 
fiwiang For Eos 129 
Ftamng FtocgUng 131 
Fieramg Jao*n 708 
Ftamng Mwcwtato 183 
Flaming OuerMBS 151 
Ftamng Teen 148 
Ftaoang Unr/wsol 137 
Fw Col 96 

GBC Cajanx 91 

GT uapan 222 

General Funds 187 

General Cara 305 

Qarejow Stock 138 

Gioee 116 

Goxeti Adame 130 

Gaves Dnwnal 208 

Go-on ScutaQy 248 


+2 

+5 


140 43 33ft 
1.8 09 . . 
1.4a 02 
ODB 41 347 
09 0.9 760 

4.7 33 41 5 

04 1.7 61.8 
55 £3 46 7 

2ft 2ft 60ft 
ZO 2ft 758 
£6 22 61.1 
£1 10 795 

01 10.. 
1O0 4 7 30.7 
07 9ft ao 
8ft 1.6 B2ft 
7 4 4.1 34.9 
12ft 4J 34il 
14 11 .. 

3.6 £7 50 6 

5.7 08 

50 34*2.7 

5! II 950 


1966 
High Low 


Cwnpany 


Gross 
8N YM 

Oi'ge pence % P/6 



£4 Oft .. 
OB 2.1 34ft 
04 03 4£4 


02 1ft 
154 80124 

6ft 4ft 109 
0.1 02 . . 
30 3ft AX-3 
£6 £8 .. 
12J3 4.1 .. 
9ft 39 28J 
3ft 01 11.9 
1.1 1ft 68.7 
04b 5.7 29ft 


17 1ft 79ft 

aeu a«27o 

71(1 4ft 30ft 
3ft 12 .. 
143 d 0845ft 

213 01 raft 

QftO 1ft 614 
6.7 Z9 38.7 

48 77 177 
1.1a 05 . 

49 1*809 

0 7 £3 34.8 

7.7b £1 BBft 
49 £5 51ft 
1 ft 1.1 .. 


OS 1 4 S2.1 
17 1 4ft 4£9 
B.6D S3 208 
12 4 4.7 302 


7.1 1.9 57ft 


£ib 

15608 

IFx 11' 



9 


£4b 2ft 8* 9 

1*8 118 

Sl 

K5 -1 




395 297 

Unfffljtl 

375 -a 



2ft 

Oft . 

83 68 

Scot Amaricun 



£9 

1.6 974 

’27 86 

Scoi ElMOT 




179b 09 26.8 



83 



3* 

£5 563 

530 4Q2 


520 -3 



52 

4ft 298 






4.0b £1 40ft 


SMxvO AAsnco 




23 

1ft 912 

92 88 

Secs TO Of ScalBia 88 -1 

09 


M 

£1 705 


Smatar Cps 

78 

£0 

2ft 54ft 


1868 

Hufil Low Company 


Price Q»'b» prara 


YM 

•v p/e 


102 81 
122 95 

213 ISO 
139 llWr 
101 89 
187 118 
18B 1*0 
118 9Q r i 
180 UR 
169 135 
305 237 
370 300 

214 1571| 
148 112 

95 79 

3BS 2t? 

51 3S 
33 

74 88 - 

109 80*1 


TO Aurinua S3 
TO Ota Of Lon DM109 
TO tad A tel 207 
TR Morel Rh 138 
TO Norm Amerce 82 
TO PKflc Beam 173 
TO Ftadtaj 177 

TO Teen 102 

TO Trutaea 164 

Tempi* Bar 1*5 

TtapTOOW) 279 

Ttaog Sasurep cep 350 
TTOb Ocaaott 201 

Trtxme 140 

Mba tac TA 43 

R tawen 30 


+2 

+» 


♦1 

♦2 

♦2 


13 30 32.7 

B3b 5ft2e.B 
07 £8 447 
6ft 42 23ft 
£8 £6 407 
1.4 08 - . 

07 32 38ft 
£6 £6 401 

«LO 37 304 
01b 04 253 
11 ftb 43 304 



471. 94’* 

72 81 Arojwi 
49 21 Oomreafl 

154 116 Braanna Arrow 
34 13S My tsaa 

20'. 12'. Do A' 

158 i3t Efceea 
173 90 Em Trout 

2«7 1E7 Exoo 
106 66 Expfaralton 
788 375 Frartavnan 
94' 77 From Gp 
303 183 GT Menegrenai 
151 75 Goooa (D * M) 

905 <90 ttaraeraon Aom 
218 153 ICH 


298 190 MSG 
362 252 ' 

127 78 Paafic In* f» 

28'i 18 Do Item 
205 152 8ak9i New GauR 




; coMivio DrfiEsf 



LONDON COMMODITY 
EXCHANGE 

G W Joynscn and Co report 
SUGAR (From C. Cxam&ow) 

FOB 

DOC 

Mar 

May 

Awj .. .. .. 


Oct 

Dm 

Vol 


125.6-25.4 
136 6-38 2 
1« 0-43.8 
1500-49 0 

554.0- E3.6 

161.0- 59 0 

. 653 


COCOA 

Dec 

Mar 

May . 

Jul 

5-r- 

Dic. 

Mar 

vol 


1528-27 

1SS7-8E 

1587-65 

1607-05 

1627-C3 

1649-4B 

167C-7C 

1 * 0 * 


«4 


18 


!3 

33 

C* 

5 75 
36 


1 3 


to 


li-S 

to 


• •To’ IsarTtfr 


:S3 


>2 
to 

sft a 


»o* 

36 


m+iA-ianra+r 

'9r.erTa> 

rw* Mhirt 
r^> & Eowty 
5o e-. 

£>*ra i Dynamics 


1 j£ 


:s 
3 7 


*3 81 
sa 

65 :i 7 
*7 IS 3 
JG 7 | 
Jf 132 
2' 104 
58 I- 2 
£0 21 : 

35 5 
7C 1*5 
3TC3: 

1 5 M.fl 

75 118 


9? 


62 

tw 

26 


» 7 na 

19 2.7 344 


SCO 0* 

07 19 49 


COFFEE 

Ncv 

J3ri 

Liar 

Mjy 

Jul . 

Sep 

Ndv 

VOI 


:3HF-300 
2250 -257 
2105-100 
216S-T60 
2170-140 
2170-130 
2160-120 
4583 


SOYABEAN 

Got 

D&: 

Feb 

<cr 

-Sun 

"HQ 

Cf.r 

.0' 


135.6-35.2 

133 5-330 

134 0-33.0 

1 35 5-34.5 
134 5J30 
133 5-32S 
1350-330 

225 


INTERNATIONAL 
PETROLEUM EXCHANGE 
GAS 0<L 

OC 11800-1750 

KOr. . 124.00-23.75 

Dec . . 128 75-26.50 


Jan 

Feh 

Mar 

Apr 

May 

Jun - 

Vol 


132 50-32.25 
135 50-34.25 
12S.50-28.75 
12860-20.00 
132.00-15.00 
132 00-10.00 
306 


LONDON METAL EXCHANGE 


Unofficial prices 

Officfai Tumovnr figuroo 

Price ai £ per metric tome 
Silver in pence per in>> ounce 
RuPoll WoM & Co. Ltd. report 


COPPER GRADE A 

Cash - . S22.50-923.50 

Three Months . 944 50-045 00 

Vol Steadv 

Tone - - - 1000 


STANDARD CATHODES 
Cash . . — .. . 89S.00-90i.00 
Three Months 922.00-923 00 

Vol - - — IM 

Tone We 


LEAD 

Cash . ... 279 00-279 50 

Three Montns 281.50-282.00 

Vol . 950 

Tone Qu«t 


ZINC STANDARD 

Cash .... 600 00-610.00 

Voi W 

Tone Me 


ZINC HIGH GRADE 

CGjf 629.00-630.00 

Thrpe Months 619.00-620.00 

Vol 1060 

Tone Steady 


SILVER LARGE 

Cash 395 50-396 50 

Three Months . 40600-107.00 


vw ......20 

Tone Oiset 


SILVER SMALL 

Cash 395 00-39600 

Three Months . *03.00-407 00 

Vdl M 

Tone itSe 


ALUMMDM 

Casn 797.00-798.00 

Three Months . 807.00-80&00 

Vol 3300 

Tone Steady 


NICKEL 

Casn 2555-2685 

Three Morans . ... 2605-2608 

Vol :... 642 

Tone Steady 

MEAT AND LIVESTOCK 
COMMISSION 

Average tatstock pricee at 

re prcKentPtnwmartoisoa 
Octobers . 

GB: Cattle. 92. 75p per kg Iw 
( + 1311 

C& S+reep 125. 18p par kg' 
(+ 6 . 68 ) 

G&Proi 


i. 70O6p per Lg he 

1-1-34 f 
' est dead carcase wevjtri 


England and Wales: 

Cutlte nos. up 8.0 to. ave. 
Once. 92.71p(+1.49j 
Sheep nos down 5 3 %. eve. 
pnee. 1K.08PI+6 95) 

Pig nos. down 96 ave 
pnce.70O5p(-1J6) 


ScoSand: 

Catfkjnos up92 s i.ave. 
pnce. SS.OOp [ +0.03) 
Sheep nos. uo 7 o c «. ave. 
Price, l22J4p(+EE2| 

Pm nos. down lt .1 *a>. ave. 

pncB,79 73g(+l fil) 


LONOON MEAT FUTURES 
EXCHANGE 


Pig Contract p. per Idto 


MonSi 

Oct 

Nov 

Feb 

Apr 

Jun 

Aug 


Open Close . 
Ung'ted 103.70 
Untiled . 103.90 
Unq ted 9850 
Ungtea 99.00 
Unq'ted 98^0 
Unq'ied 9800 


Pig Meat veto 


VohS 


LONDON WEATT=UTUR£S 
EXCHANGE 


Month 

ora 

Nov 
Feb 
'Apr 
Jun ' 


Live Cattle contract 
ILperkUb .- 

Open Close 
-Uncnea 9530 
Unored 9700 
Una' tad 100.00 
Ungied 101 50 
Unq'ied ~ 100.00 


- Vol- 2 


LONOON GRAIN FUTURES 
£ per tonne 

Whan Barter 1 ' 


Moran 

Nov 

Jan 

Alar 

3 P . 


Ck&a 'Oose 
106.45- . 1W2D. 

106.75. 1 iaio.. 
iit.15 - Miss 

113.50 - 1)3 40 

115.50 -. 101 J26 

100 75 ^ ~ 


Wheai .. ; 261 

Bartej 103. 


Monm 

Nov 

Feb 

■£& 

Nov 


LOFBION 

POTATO FUTURES 
£ per tonne 

Open Close 
10390 10050 

115.00 11950 

166.00 169.00 
’“W 1 85.80 

85.00 B&.00 


Vo): 686 

BSFFEX 

- G-NJ- Fraigiit Fottaca in 

WghAow ctose 
Oct 88 ' 783.0-775.0 779 n 

-fan |7 7860-780 0 7S00 

Apr 87 8350-830.0 3285 

oS w ?40 £1 40 ' 0 Pao 

Jan 86 — 

Apr 88 . 

Jul 88 - 

Vol: 21 5 lots 
Open interest 2so6 




+06 ore 

+0S 009 

♦fl.i ora 


.. 093 

. on 

-02 £31 


SUfWTTOUST MMIMEIB 

a sir - 

01 ssras 

6£2 S01 +0-7 OOC 


4ft 068 
+02 £03 
-0.1 010 
+OJ 4^5 
+C.1 Sft6 
-02 0.12 
+A3 £» 
+0J 2M 
+0 1 CftB 
-KL3 Iftfi 
. . 141 


IX 


-.‘fi 


r 


*■- 


•lv 




4 

4 


' T 


. 7-9 

-7 

■i 

- f. 

'4 


228 ( 


V 

>. 


.* 


& 


M 




W ! 
ui. 


i 




W— : : Vr 


845.0 
857 5 
957 5 
84JL5 


k&JLj.-i..-.: L. 


TANKER REPORT 

H *9 t VLow Close 
Oa«| 825.0^25,0 sag „ 


NovBB 

Dec 86 

Mar 87 

Jun 37 

5ep37 

Vcri- 10 tats 
Openihmest2S 


920.0 

937.5 

942.5 

950 JD 

aso.o 




^x)t iriadcet commentary. 

Tanker mde*.- 

829 5 down 50 or, 3/n^ag 

^frargomdot 

on 3/10/80 





} 

L 






The Channel Tunnel will be a vital link in Europe's 

communications in the 21st century. 

It will take high speed passenger trains, freight 
trains and shuttles specially built to whisk cars, coaches 
and lorries across the Channel to the Continent. 

You and your car will be able to cross the Channel 
at speeds of up to 100 mph. With the handbrake on. 

Any time, night or day. Three hundred and sixty-five 

days a year. Come fog, gales or snow. 

Thanks to one of Europe's greatest engineering 




projects of the century, you could travel non-stop from 
the heart of London to the heart of Brussels or Paris in 


about 3 hours.' Without going near an airport. 

It will run between Folkestone and Frethun near 
Calais. It will help create jobs in Britain. And help 
stimulate British trade across Europe. 

The Channel Tunnel is to be built by 
Anglo-French private enterprise at a cost 
of over 2.6 billion pounds - none of it TUNNEL ? 



provided by the taxpayer. Roll on 1993. 


TWO HOURS FIFTY MINUTES. LONDON TO PARIS THREE HOURS RFTCENMINUTB SUBJECTTOPARUAMENIARY APPROVAL 
4 TO t IMTIFn ON RFHAI F OF H fl)OH INNEL PLC AND EUROT1 INNEL SA 








2 



3ee( 


rman 1 
ty has la 
attack 
ty runs 
notion p 
ry assoc, 
umemoi \ 
ifcrence 
mipulatc 
mage de 
s or 
bbit, his 
Is me. w 
:en the * 
dcd, loj 
ybodv to 
ey like it t 
; into dis 
e of a m 
inference 

Hive cor- 
der tha 
solution 
>o blanci 
sdinous t 
ebate’*. 
nmediate 
im shout 
as been st 

j Cnishr 
should ai 
it debate. 


Banc 


r the fi 
:re will 
native ; 
spite r 
ring the 
*rkcrs i. 
- applies 


rath wa 
erphoK 
CND.F 
donal u 
ted iha 
ideal!' 
OD's N 
s win n 
ine: “L 
atabou 


• The foi 
eccen trial 

questionn 
by the 

question i 
stay pern 

Kingdom* 
expect to; 
or 10 yeas 


Tres - 


Yetanotb 

he loose 

jf^Bong 

[he MoD 

bidders 

managerr 

Devonpc 

Plymouxl 

isterialcc 

outh N’ 

champag 

of the b 

Foster-^ 

week am 

govemm 

more ti 

Wheeler 

aty." Hi 

the othe- 


Loy 


^ong, 
against 
pool Iasi 
West Dc 
particuk 
school, i 
chanty 
rales. “ 
Shcrbor 
pic in • 
sidizmg 
he said, 
case of 
for Dan 
school. 


! 






>Tf 

\" 


T 

5S* 




So: 


SiBri 

stagw 

ist on 

rcadii 

sunii 

hi We 

sersit 

endet 

Tynd 

as a 

ago. ' 

the li 

may 

been 

servi* 

.Vjii 


Rc 


Prt)fi 
anno 
field 
robo 
Greg 
Brist 
newi 
bers 
at it 
at v 
later 

11115! 

ihot. 

CMS" 


Davtv — 


THE TIMES TUESDAY OCTOBER 7 1986 



I FGAL APPOINTMENTS 



<r i C'lALB 
.;,S I'UND 


City Lawyers 


with financial market skills 


To £25,000 plus bonus 


MINDS OVER MONEY® 


Sheaison Lehman Brothers is one of the leading integrated investment 
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teaming up with our offices in New York and Tokyo, Sheaison Lehman 
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areas of investment hanking, capital markets and trading activities. 


We now seek two highly professional business-orientated young 
lawyers with up to 2/3 years post qualification experience gained in a 
City firm to augment our small legal team based in the City. 


The successful applicants will be fully involved in regulatory and 
transactional matters affecting our Group's UX and European 
businesses, liaising with senior management and outside legal counsel 
where necessary. 


This is an exciting time in the growth of a highly successful enterprise. 
If you have the ability personality and desire to make a major 
contribution, a move to Shearson Lehman Brothers represents a 
substantial career opportunity. 


Please send a resume in strict confidence to Loretta Smith, Personnel 
Manager, Shearson Lehman Brothers Limited, Winchester House, 
100 Old Broad Street, London EC2M SNS or telephone her for a 
confidential discussion on 01-628 9600. 



LEHMAN 

BROTHERS 


An American Express company 

r 



McKenna & Co 


COMMERCIAL LAWYER 


The firm requires a soJiciror of two to four years qualification 
to |nin its Commercial Dc parr meat. This department 
specialises in advising substantial corporate diems on 
matters relating to the acquisition, exploitation and 
protection of industrial property rights, the law relating to 
computers and computer software and the drafting ofa large 
winery ofVummcrci.il agreements and licences. The work 
includes both contentious and nun-contentious matters and 
experience of litigation would be an advantage. 


We are lot iking fur a lawyer tvirh ambition and a capacity 
fur hard work and with the potential to play a role in the 
development of the work of the department. 


COMPETITION LAWYER 


A solicitor of up to two years qualification is required to 
Join the firms expanding Compel it inn Law Proa ice. 


The work embraces advising substantial corporate clients 
on a large variety of matters including (he UK. and 
Community rules regarding monopolies and mergers, and 
re-sinCT/ve agreements and the provisions of the Rome Treaty 
for the free circulation of goods and services, as well as the 
conduct oflitigation in these areas before the English Courts 
and the European Court. 


The successful applicant is likely to have some relevant 
experience acquired either in London or in Brussels and an 
ability to work in French and/or German would be an 
advantage. 


Excellent salary plus usual benefits. 


Please apply in writing, enclosing detailed CV to 
R J Taylor, McKenna & Co, Inveresk House, 
l Aldwych. London. WC2R 0HR. 


NEWLY OB 1-2 YEARS 
QUALIFIED? 


THE FUTURE UES IN 
SPECIALISATION 


We may have a place for you 
to specialise in 

CONSTRUCTION LAW 


THE WORK 

■ Major budding and engineering litigation. 

’ Drafting of contracts, duty of caredaeds and 
other commercial agreements. 

Liaison with developers and contractors. 


THE REQUIREMENTS 
- Ambition, personality and enterprise. 

• Excellent academic qualifications. 

■ The ability to worit independently and in a 
team. 


Construction law experience is desirable but 
not essential. 


THE REWARD 
Our salaries and prospects are excellent We 
expect a commitment to match, if you think 
you might fit the bill, contact Andrea Bums on 
01-404 0303. 


GOULDENS 


GROUP SOLICITOR 


£22,000+ bonus + cor 


Swindon 


PHH International 


relocatianaiKlothfirpi^^^ieSS^ravicSEntryinto the European markirt is just part 


relocatioBaDd otner property n 

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providing adviceand counsel to all levels of management. - t K Q rs«,.« 

a ui«« v»r o lmiino q ualifie d solicitor and administrative stalLtne Group „ 

ose liaison with theGeneralCounsel of theCompanysUS 


Solicitor 

parent. 


[also maintain a 


An excellent compensation package is offered including f 





should send their C.V. to: Simon Cartwright. _ _ 

Limi ted, Prances House, Princes Street, Swindon SNl 2HL. 



PHH INTERNA TIONAL 


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Conveyancing 

Solicitor 


Mobil Oil Company Limited wishes to 
appoint a conveyancing solicitor in 
its Legal Department in Victoria Street 

Applications are invited from 
solicitors with at least four years? post 
qualification experience of convey- 
ancing, preferably with a law degree 
and with experience of working in 
industry. 

The job requires the ability to 
handle a variety of conveyancing 
work connected with the Company's 
marketing activities in the UK, and 
related matters. The successful 
applicant must also have business 
acumen, drive and initiative. 

Salary and benefits will fully 
reflect the responsibility of this import- 
ant position. Relocation assistance 
will be provided if necessary 

Initial replies can be brief but 
should give details of age, qualifi- 
cations, experience and present 
salary to: 

Manage; Employment ^Development, 
Mobil Oil Company Limited, 

54/60 Victoria Street, 


London SWTEBQB. 


® 


Mobil 


Ttimuss, Sainer & Webb 


In older to men the inaeasing demand for our rar^e 
of specialist legal services, the provision of which we see 
as the basis of the sustained growth of our firm, we 
need bright, ambitious lawyers (solicits and 
boiristos) with initiative. who wish to develop their 
careers in Ihe following areas:- 


»«-3 ACQUISITIONS AND MERGERS 
i CORPORATE TAXAHON 
INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY LITIGATION 
! A - . " COMMERCIAL PROPERTY LITIGATION 
+ ; PROPERTY DEVELOPMENT 

T* RETAIL PROPERTY WORK 


VCe are interested in seeing both those with expenence- 
the right people will have the prospect of looking 
forward lo an early partnersh ip - and the newly 
qualified. 

Contact Toro Marshall, our Partnership Secretary, or 
any partner you may know personally; with brief 
particulars of your background. 


TITMUSS, SAINER & WEBB 
2 SERJEANTS' INN. LONDON EG4Y III 
TELEPHONE: 01-353 5242 


\n 


LEWIS SILKIN 


COMMERCIAL SOLICITOR 


Our Commercial Department requires another enthusiastic and 
personable Solicitor. 


The successful applicant will probably be newly qualified having 
gained relevant experience during articles. He or she will work 
as part of a close team servicing a wide variety of demanding 
work for interesting clients. 


For the right person, prospects in our rapidly expanding firm are 
excellent with an attractive salary. 


Please m rite with a full curriculum vitae to: 


The Partnership Secretary 
Lewis Silkin 
83/91 Victoria Street 
London SWIH OHW 


'abriel Duffy Consultancy 


TRUST/PR0BATE- 
PARTNER DESIGNATE 


£25,000 neg 


Our client, a major City practice, is seeking a Solic- 
it less than 3 years experience of 


tor with not 
trusty probate matters. 

The right candidate must be able to show a high 
level or commitment to the expansion of this side of 
the practice and can expect to ioin the partnership in 
Ihe not too distant future. The ability to relate well 
with clients and colleagues alike is regarded as 
essential for tins highly responsible position. As the 
vacancy exists within a large firm the benefits and 
back up facilities are excellent 


C0WPANY/C0MMERCIAL £ HIGHLY NEG 


A well established and highly regarded practice in 
Lincolns Inn is seeking to recruit Company/ 
Commercial Assistants to work on a case load 
consisting of corporate finance transactions, acqui- 
sitions. reconstructions, financings, joint ventures 
and subscription agreements. 

Candidates must have excellent academic results 
and good basic commercial experience preferably 
gained with a City practice. Personality is important 
to this friendly but highly professional practice and 
rapid career progression is assured. 


GABRIEL DUFFY CONSULTANCY 

2od Row 

31 SwAanntn Row 
Londoa WtTJB 5HJ 


Daytime bkfibaoe k B& tu 831 2288 
fa e oiag x asd Weekeoh 740 B2B9 


BURGES SALMON 

BRISTOL 


PRIVATE 

CLIENT 


We need a high calibre solicitor of not 
less than two years post qualification 
experience to join a team of 3 partners 
and 6 assistant solicitors to undertake 
demanding and high quality work in our 
rapidly expanding private client depart* 
ment Experience in the fields of trust 
wills and tax planning is essential; 
expe rience in offshore and international 
work is desirable. 


Please contact 

Peter Laws at Burges Salmon, 
Narrow Quay House, Prince Street 
Bristol BS1 4AH 
(Tel: No.0272 276567) 


LEGAL APPOINTMENTS 
ALSO APPEAR 
ON PAGES 41 & 42 


PHS 1-ikfininsthe selL 


w .. 

iban'io the Three Rs. or that 


"He will give 'nothing oil 


ihinficoi xUtu’ur \ sTub.- fAMf*- »■ 


McKenna & Co 


COMMERCIAL 

CONVEYANCING PLANNING 
AND PROPERTY 
LITIGATION SOLICITORS i 


The Departments in our firm dealing with Commercial Real. - ' 
Property continue to expand and urgently need additional 
assistants. We can offer interesting work of good quality. Do 
you have the ability and enterprise to match it.* 


There are four appointments to be made: 


:■« 


Two Solicitors,' with up to two years’ experience (not 
necessarily in the specialist fields mentioned below) to join 
teams specialising in: 


• Town and Country Planning work, including appeals, 
advice, planning agreements and environmental law. 


Property Litigation including both contenriousproperty.; •• 
matters and advice on property law generally. 


• Two Solicitors with three to five years’ experience of 
commercial conveyancing (which should have included 
aspects of development work) to join: 


• the Senior Partner in rhe Department to work closely 
with him on major 
re-development schemes 


a team heavily committed to developer clients, reporting 
directly to the Partner in charge of the team. 


Please apply in writing, enclosing detailed CV to 
J B Driffield, McKenna 8c Co. Inveresk House, 

I Aldwych, London, WC2R 0HR. 




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Lawyers 


Tax Specialisation with 
Leading International Firm 



Coopers & Ly brand is a leading firm of Chartered 
Accountants and Management Consultants. We 
have a large and successful tax practice which 
deals with all aspects of personal, corporate and 
intemationa) taxation and pensions consultancy. 
We currently employ over 250 tax specialists 
(including barristers and solicitors) in our central 
London office. 

Several rapidty expanding areas of specialisation 
require additional staff with experience in legal 
practice. We seek lawyers who: 

• are under 30 years old 

• enjoy working in a lively and stimulating 
environment 

• are commercially minded and numerate 

• have good interpersonal skills 

• possess the maturity self motivation and 
technical competence to progress rapidly within 
the firm, which has a proven track record of 
promoting lawyers to associate or full director 
status. 

Weare particularly Interested In lawyers who have 
detailed working experience in the following areas; 

• UK and international corporate tax planning 

• employes compensation arrangements, in 
particular employee share acquisitions 

• employment law 

• wills, trusts and estates (including ail related tax 
aspects) ■ 

pensions. 


o^reO° mP0tit,Ve “k* ,ndudin 9 benefits is 


Interested applicants should send their full 
Curriculum Vrtae to Pat Horrocks at the address 
below quoting PC 664 


Coopers i 
&Lybrand I 
















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Co 


V'NING 


l'ORS 


T fe,-!- .of assets 
by British pea- 
son funds has risen 
f.lf^nngrateto 
„ . _ *137 billion at the 

£?nfi > hir 85 ’- COnipared wilh 
£1 0.6 billion m 1971 - a 15 

«>W increase in 14 years. 
A^attheendofJunS 
iSSf "» ,n world stock 
year, have been 
££"!■“* by PbilUps & Drew 
Management at £182 

ell S*L i Sf rease 1135 been fh- 
eiM by buoyant stock-market 

and the growth of 
Jbe industry. People are Irving' 
longer, requiring more to be 
[□vested on then- behalf, and 
both state and company pen- 
? on . schemes have been grow- 
mg in size and sophistication. 

, ,n _ 1963 pension funds 
owned 7 per cent of British 
equities compared with 10.6 
per cent owned by insurance 
companies, 9 per cent by 
investment trusts and finan- 
cial companies and 12 per 
cent by unit trusts. Institu- 
tions owned a total 27.8 per 
cent of UK equities. 

By 1985 the institutions* 
share had risen to 62 per cent 
and pension funds h«d out- 
stripped the rest owning 30 
per cent of the total a gainst 
insurance companies at 22 per 
cent, investment trusts at 6 
per cent and unit trusts at 4 
per cent 

The largest component of 
pension funds has remained in 
the private sector at about 60 ! 
per cent, but public-sector 
funds relating largely to I 
nationalized industries have j 
grown at a slightly faster rate. < 
The largest funds in exis- ^ 
tence are those belonging to 1 
the nationalized and recently 


PENwJSS 1 ^ REPORT ON 

PENSION FUND MANAGEMENT 

The billions 
waiting to 
be paid out 


privatized industries. Postel, 
tiie combined Post Office and 
British Telecom fhnd, is the 
largest of the lot by far with 
assets under management 

worth an estimated £1 1 billion 
today. 

Other mqjor funds include 
the British Rail and the 
Electricity CounciTs pension 
funds worth an estimated £5 
billion each. British Gas 
weighs m at about £3.8 billion 
and British Coal at £4.4 
billion. 

The rising scale and 
complexity of die funds have 
persuaded some trustees to 
put at least a proportion of 
their assets out to external 
management. British Rail in 
August disbanded its in-bo use 

Some assets are 
put out to other 
management 


man a g e m ent team and par- 
celled out the fond to six 
investment managers. 

The six were Warburg 
Investment Management, 
Morgan Grenfell Asset 
Management, Prudential 
Portfolio Managers, Robert 
Fleming Investment Manage- 
ment, Phillips & Drew Fund 
Management and Martin Cur- 
rie, a small Edinburgh invest- 
ment firm. 

Private pension fund trust- 
ees have acted similarly. The 
most noteworthy example so 
far is Unilever, the Anglo- 
Duich soap to margarine gi- 
ant, which announced m 
September that it was firming 
out its £1.6 biiKon pension 
fond. 

Performance of the funds is 


all-important to trustees and 
i u ltimate ly to pensioners, but 
i investment patterns have var- 
i ied widely over the years 
i according to interest rates, 
t inflation rates and govern- 
ment polities. 

The abolition of exchange 
controls in 1 979 precipitated a 
strong rise in overseas invest- 
ment from 3 percent of assets 
in 1979 to 14 per cent by the 
end of 1985. 

The weighting in gilts has 
fluctuated m line with fluc- 
tuating interest rales. In 1962 
gihs accounted for a hefty 33 
per cent of pension hind 
portfolios. They fell io a low at 
under 12 per cent in 1972, 
reflecting rising interest rates 
and a low level of net invest- 
ment 

The Government's funding 
of public spending during the 
1970s by issuing gilt-edged 
stock pushed gilts up to 26 per 
cent of pension funds by 1979, 
since when they have fatten to 
19 per cent at the end of last 
year. 

Cash reached hs zenith at 20 
per cent of assets in 1974, as 
other investment sectors lost 
their attraction following the 
secondary banking crisis and 
property crash. The weighting 
in cash has subsequently 
slipped to around 4 per cent in 
recent years. 

The 1980s have been a ] 
particularly fortuitous rim* i 
for pension funds, but the ] 
good times cannot Iasi, the ] 
pundits say. I 

Over the six years 1980- i 
1985, the average private sec- c 
tor pension fund return was 21 
per cent a year against annual 1 
wage inflation oflO per cent .c 
The 11 per cent premium was i 
unprecedented for such an n 
extended period, according to 


times 

FOCUS 


\ ^ \ \ \W\ l<s 


33 •. 


October 7, 1986 


m, A ■■ 


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XX' 


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P . A> , 

, 





• V 




mm 


Pension Fund Indicators, a 
study by Phillips & Drew 
Fund Management published 
in June. 

The 1980s contrasted 
sharply with most of the 
previous 20 years. From 1963 
to 1979 the average private 
pension fund return was 82 
per cent compared with 1 1.4 
per cent wage inflation, a 
pension fund deficit of 32 per 
cent. 

British equities in 1980- 
1985 rose 262 per cent a year 
compared with retail price 
inflation of 7.9 per cent an- 
nually. 

Though the 1980s have 


been exceptional. British eq- 
uities have provided a real 
return over a longer period 
The average return on the All- 
Share Index from 1963 to 
1 985 was 14.3 per cent, giving 
a real return ahead of price 
inflation of 5.5 per cent a year. 

Overseas investments have 
proved a mixed bag for pen- 
sion funds. The 1980s - the 
time of greatest overseas 
investment - have provided 
better returns paralleling the 
improvement on the British 
stock market 

The six years from 1980 to 
1985, for example, have pro- 


vided an average annual re- 
turn of 24.6 per cent 
marginally less than the 262 
per cent return on British 
equities. 

Overseas investment by 
pension funds has fluctuated 
according to external con- 
ditions. Investment rocketed 
to £1.7 billion, or 27 per cent 
of pension fund cash flow, in 
1982.- li then slumped to £300 
million, or 4 per cent of cash 
flow, in 1984 as pension fond 
managers shyed away from 
what was seen to be an 
overvalued dollar. The bear 
market for Japanese technol- 
ogy stocks, which had been a 


key area for UK investors, 
also caused the decline. 

Investment overseas recov- 
ered in I9S5 as previously 
neglected Europe suddenly 
came into favour. Pension 
funds discovered the attrac- 
tions of the German economy 
and its undervalued currency 
compared to sterling 

In the early years following 
the abolition of exchange con- 
trols. investment overseas had 
been concentrated in technol- 
ogy in the US and Japan, 
specialist consumer and oil 
services in the USA and 
natural resources in Canada 
and Australia. 


- ( INSIDE ^ ; 

Surpluses: the new 
legislation Page 34 • 
Fund management 1 
teams 35 * 

Men who manage your 1 
money 36 

The Big Bang 37 ; 

National Association of • 
Pension Funds 38 \ 

How the funds have ; 
performed 39 . 



a 

The returns on overseas * 
investment have been cal- * 
culaied in sterling, but without j 
taking account of currency • 
hedging. Many British pen- * 
sion funds, for example, * 
hedged against the strong ; 
dollar in 1984 and 1985 and * 
hence enhanced their returns 1 
in 1985, when sterling appro- - 
mated by 20 per cent against ; 
the dollar. 

The high returns of the 
1980 s, which have allowed • 
huge surpluses to build up in : 
many pension funds, are not - 
expected to last Phillips & 
Drew expects real returns • 
against price inflation to re- . 
vert to the lower level of 3 to 5 
per cent in the long-term. 

The real return over wages • 
is expected to fill to an 
average I to 3 per cent a year. 

Government legislation ' 
embodied in the Social Se- 
curity Acts of last year and this 
year has increased the trans- 
ferability or pensions and 
afforded protection to the • 
early leaver. The new right to . 

The money put 
into the funds 
can only rise 

personal and portable pen- 
sions will put competitive * 
pressure on company pension • 
schemes and their managers. ’ 
because employees now have ^ 
a viable alternative. 

The Government’s en- 
couragement to competition * 
among pension providers - • 
for the first time banks, unit : 
trusts and building societies 
will be allowed to provide ; 
personal pensions savings ! 
schemes - will do nothing to ' 
diminish pension-fund domi- - 
nance of investment. 

As life expectancy increases < 
and wage expectations con- • 
tinue to rise, the amount of • 
money channelled into pen- ' 
sion funds can only rise loo. • 

Alison Eadie : 



Schroders 


1 yvVift 

D nal F irfTl 


Pension Fund 
Investment Management 


When experience is essential 

Schroders was one of the first to recognise the need for specialist management services for pension funds. 

Today, after more than 30 successful years, we offer one of the most experienced teams available, 
backed by full-time research staff in London and overseas; our own investment operations 
in New York, Zurich, Sydney Singapore, Hong Kong and Tokyo; and a property management and 
investment facility active.in the UK and USA 

Schroders’ unsurpassed experience is at your disposal. Just write ortelephone. 


David Duncan, 

Schroder Investment Management Limited, 

36 Old Jewry, London EC2R 8BS. Tel: 01-382 6000. 


— *J( 

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PENSION FUND MANAGEMENT/2 


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predators 
when riches 
are unlocked 


t&esi 


Alison Eadie on the implications 


\$mMC 


of new legislation 
for pension fund surpluses 


The 1986 Budget proposals 
placing statutory controls on 
pension fund surpluses stirred 
up opposition from bodies as 
widespread as the Association 
of Consulting Actuaries, the 
Confederation of British In- 
dustry and the Trades Union 
Congress. 

The Government, however, 
has not modified its original 
proposals, which are now 
incorporated in this year's 
Finance Act 

The measures stipulate that 
pension-fund surpluses, cre- 
ated through boom stock- 
market conditions and felling 
numbers of employees in 
many large industrial com- 


panies, must be reduced to 5 
per cent over liabilities within 
five years with effect from 
April 1987. 

The reduction can be 
achieved through paying im- 
proved benefits to pensioners, 
taking pension-fund holidays 
from contributions or cash 
withdrawals from the fund 
subject to tax at 40 per cent. 

Criticism has centred on the 
5 per cent provision, which 
many actuaries and others 
believe is too narrow a mar- 
gin. Given the vagaries of 
investment performance, the 
pensions industry would have 
preferred a 10 percent margin 
over liabilities. 


There was, however, relief 
in the industry when it 
emerged chat the 
Government's proposed 
method for calculating asset 
and liability values was on the 
conservative side and not 
based on market values. 

There had been fears that 
the Government could have 
used market-based criteria, 
which would have increased 
the danger of instability in 
pension schemes due to stock- 
market volatility. Instead a 
projected income formula has 
been chosen. 

Unions have also voiced 
criticisms of several com- 
panies which have announced 


measures to comply with the 
new legislation. 

The tendency so fer has 
been to choose a mixture of 
contribution holidays and in- 
creased benefits, but some 
companies have chosen just to 
reduce funding levels — a 
move which maked them un- 
popular with the unions. 

The tax penalty on reclaim- 
ing cash has made this option 
less attractive than the others. 

Three of the biggest com- 
panies to comply with the new 
legislation so fer have been 
Grand Metropolitan, the 
brewing, hotel and leisure 
group, Lucas, the aerospace 
and motor components sup- 


plier, and Metal Box, the 
packaging and engineering 
equipment company. 

Lucas, which has made 
drastic staff cuts over the last 
few years, is taking a pensions 
holiday worth £40 million 
over' two years. ' 

Grand Met is reducing the 
surplus on its £700 million 
pension fond by more than 
£100 million through a reduc- 
tion in contributions over the 
next five years and through 
improved benefits. 

Pension contributions will 
be reduced by £10 million a 
year and benefits raised by just 
over £50 million. 

In the last financial year to 





■ »i' * : 

■» . . ■*. ■ 

.1 


Now is the lime to seriously review your pension 
fund performance and service. 

The ‘Big Bang* is creating huge financial 
conglomerates. 

Will the unwritten law be that their interest comes 
before yours? 

Thirty British pension funds will not have this 
worry. They will benefit from a completely independent 
service. 

Through Fidelity. 

Each will have proven, heavyweight domestic and 
international investment management dedicated to their 
account 

All our managers spend their time making 
investment decisions, not chasing up ‘admin 5 . 


So you get a consistently superior management 
performance. 

They have achieved a record of ‘top quartile’ 
performance for UK mainstream pension funds over the 
past three years. 

They can do the same for you. 

But then Fidelity has the advantage and resources 
of the world’s, biggest independent fund management 
group. 

For further information contact Neil Curtis or 
Richard Timberlake. We will also forward you a copy of 

our corporate video ■■ 

on request. ( 1 jd ft W 1 1 • j 




September 1985, Grand Met 
paid £363 million in pension 
rharys, or just over 10 per 
cent of pre-tax profits of 
£3473 million. The reduction 
in funding wflJ provide an 
immediate benefit to Grand 
Met's profit and loss accounts. 

The planned benefit 
improvements indude: 

• raising the widow’s pension 
from a third to half of the 
.employee’s prospective pen- 
sion; 

• raising the widower's pen- 
sion for husbands of deceased 
women employees to the same 
level as widows’ pensions; 

• improving early retirement 
pensions; 


Fidelil 


PENSIONS LTD 


25 Lcvai Lana London EC3R8LLTeteptiore0|.283<»ll. Tcloc: 88*387. 


dm. w" the^ihrse Rs. or <tal 


nothing - on 


FSniidtn unnor ■ r ^ 


• increasing pensions paid to 
pensioners and widows, which 
commenced before 1982, to 
make up for at least 90 per 
cent ofintervenmg movement 
in the retail price index. 

In addition Grand Met 
anticipated another piece of 
pensions legislation — the 
Social Security Act 1986 — by 
making membership of ns 
schemes voluntary for new 
employees from next ApnL 

Metal Box is reducing the 
suplus on its £550 million 
fund by £93 million over five 
years by a similar split of 
unproved benefits and lower 
funding. The company has 
estimated that its operating 
profits will be flattered by £6 
million to £7 million in the 
current financial year to 
March 31, 1987. 

It, too. is taking advantage 
or the opportunity provided 
by the Chancellor to repair the 
da ma ge done to employees’ 
pensions by the ravages of 
inflation. Pension payments 
are being raised by as much as 

40 per cent. 

The effect of reduced fund- 
ing to pension schemes on 
company profits is likely to be 


The money could 
fund an increase 
of 28 percent 
in net dividends 


significant Hoare Govett, the 
stockbroker, estimated that 
the profits of quoted com- 
panies could be boosted by as 


much as a cumulative 9 per contracting out of the state 
cent a year over the next five pension scheme. 


years. 

If the money were all 
distributed to shareholders, it 
could fund a 28 per cent 
increase in net dividends for 
five years. 

The stockbroker used a 
model based on 150 of the 
biggest British companies, 
which represent 70 per cent of 
the British equity market in 
capitalization terms. 

It estimated that private 
and public-sector peosios 
fond assets had a market Value 


of £175 bilhon at the _end 1 of counter-productive and un- 
Apn! compared with £20 bil- ^come 10 shareholders. 


lion 10 years ago. 

Working on the assumption 
that pension funds were fully 
funded at the end of 1 983 and 
using a conservative valuation 
method. Hoare Govett es- 
timated the surplus could be 


Ki'„ 5 . b ‘"' 0n f “ ndS ° f clause into lie pension 
. a scheme’s trust deed stipulai- 


The surplus approximated 
to a five-year holiday worth 
£2.5 billion to £3 billion a 
year, giving a 9 per cent boost 
to corporate earnings. 

Such a boost would, how- 


ing that the poison ^pill only 


goes into 
succeeds. 


In case the bid does succeed, 
and the new owner turns out 


ever, be at the upper end of to be less awful than expected 

possibilities. Mitigating fee- — 

tors would be the valuation of T-u p mnp 1 could 
overseas investments, particu- 1 panel CUUiu 


lariy American, West German 
and Japanese, which tend to 
be low-yielding. 

Increasing benefits to 
pensioners would also reduce 
the available surplus for dis- 
tribution. 

In practice the boost would 


The panel could 
say the spirit 
of Rule 21 was 
being breached 


the trustees are often given * 
let-out clause; ie, they are 


be nearer 4.5 per cent as most P ve ? die discretion not » 
companies are increasing their implement the poison put 
benefits by as much as they are lhe y «« obtain the necessary 

I - ti ■- J iko TlflW 


reducing funding. 

Hoare Govett’s research 
showed a list of companies 


assurances 

owner. 


the new 


Poison-pill measures 


whose pension-fond contribu- "bids a re^rv much 

gnsac^unx^formoredian ^ 0 f the American Okeo^ 


" per cent or rneir taxable scene, but have not caught on 

(67 Sr^t) m BritiS S to any great extent in Britain. 


space (47 per cent). Barren The prime reason for this is 


Developments (51 per cent), that the Takeover Code does 
Midland Bank (36 per cent) not allow iL The code conW- 


and TI (52 per cent including also intervene to thwart the 
the effect of reduced contribu- use of poison pills among 
ti°ns)- company pension funds. 

The measures reducing pen- - 


sion-fund surpluses in this . ^il 
year’s Finance Act, have over- d,s P® 
taken the lengthy delibera- re . m 
tions by the accounting w,t hc 
profession on how to account P rova 
for pension costs — Exposure has fx 
Draft 39 in accountants’ par- Thi 
k"** • stop 

tU39 requires any surplus pensk 
to be released to profit over has a 
the expected average length of ram. 
service of employees, thereby 
reducing companies' regular The 
contributions. ruled 

In cash-flow terms, the em- ^tiiou 
ployer still has a contributions If th 

holiday, but the effect on the fond 
profit and loss account is takeo^ 
spread over 10 to 1 2 years. panel 
ED39 comes into effect next tion 

autumn, by which time many 
companies will already have . ’ 
taken a two-year holiday from fr”** 
contributions. " the] 

The Chancellor is not the 
only person to have noticed m &V( 


Rule 21 of the code baas to* 
disposal of more than 10 per 
cent of a company’s ass«s 
without shareholders aP* 
proval once a bid appro®* 
has been received 

This could be enough w 
stop major changes ip * 
pension nmd after a 
has appeared over the do- 


The takeover panel has 
ruled on this specific issue, 
although it has discussed it. 

If the changes to the pe®* 0 ? 
fund were made beforo * 
takeover bid materialized- 
panel would have no jurisdic- 
tion. 


It would then be op j? 
shareholders to kick up a 
if they thought the Compaq 
was prejudicing their iiueres» 
in favour of pensioners. 


the growing surplus building The panel could, however, 
up m company pension funds, claim that the spirit of R 1 "* 
There has been much riia- 2 ! if nm ,»« grain! fetter. 


There has been much dis- 2J. if not its actual tetter. 
cuss i°r> of predators being being breached if; a cq®P?®7 


•■s he 


.v-mtfcv# igil 


’ fettf 


unlocking the pension riches. 

Predators can get at the 
wealth in a company pension 
scheme by winding up the 


a new one. In the process ife 
strip out the excess. 

Alternatively they can am- 
ply take a holiday fan, 
contributions and so . boom 
their profits. 

A predator could also cm 
benefits and reduce the allow- 
ance for inflation to reduce the 
amount it had to pay. 

Counter-measures by com- 
panics fearing a bid are pos- 
sible within limitations. The 
obvious defence is to increasc 
benefits and raise funding 
levels. 

Imperial Group, even be 
fore the Hanson Trust take- 
over bid, moved to. defend 
itself against a predator by 
guaranteeing pension & 
creases of 5 per cent or in line 
with inflation, ifiowerthasj 
per cent. Previously it had 
generously matched peaam 
increases to the retail price 
index, but only on an ad-hoc 
basis. Its move was designed 
to remove the discretion^ 
power in its pension funding. 


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Flooding is refativefy sim- 
ple. Employees not previously 
covered, such as part timers, 
or relatives of deceased 
employees coukl be brimgit 
into the pension scheme in 
increase its liabilities. - 




More drastic defence mea- 
sures could include milking 
the fund, or taking assets out 
of it, and flooding it with new 
members. As well as the 
holidays now countenanced 
under the Finance Act, com- 
panies can borrow from their 
pension funds. 

There are no limits on what 
can be borrowed aside from 
restrictions associated with 


Such pension fond “poison 
pills” could well scare, off 
. predators, but they could dso 
burden companies with addi- 
tional liabilities that ooold 
depress profits for years ® 
come and so end up beit® 


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Needless to say Die burgeon- 
ing pensions advisory 
dustry has invented the trigger 
mechanism to avoid this 
problem. 

The mechanism inserts a 




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attracted to companies as deliberately burdened its P*®" 
takeover taraets, on the basis sion fond to want 'Qff^ 
of the benefit to be_ had from unwanted predator : ' . 


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(iFOCUSl 


THE TIMES TUESDAY OCTOBER 7 1986 




PENSION FUND 
MANAGEMENT/3 


The key professionals 


S'mion 00 fi 1 h „ri rU " ni " s of anv 
people - of Professional 


Martin Baker examines the 
role of the trustee, 
the stockbroking adviser 
and the actuary 


WHAT ARE WE TRYING TO TELL YOU ABOUT 
OUR PENSION FUND PERFORMANCE? 

Simply that in five of the last seven years 
we have ranked in the Upper Quartiie. 

In fact, over the last five years our annual- 




I,*'.* 


monitoring device such as 
Wood Mackenzie's service. 

Most trustees meet with i j , 

their investment advisers ev- 1 “ ea return has been 22.9 c o, compared with 

S3K-£f2SJEl the Avera § e «turn of 19.3*o.‘ 

diftM 


Another duty of the trustee 
ts to ensure that the correct 
amount of pay has been 
from the 


jrom time to time helped hv dcdu . c, ed 

jrustecs. The scheme »-i|| have con . Ir ibutors' salary (the vast 
™? instituted h> a special ma J°. ri! y of pension schemes 


vided advice range between 
£4.5 and £7 million annually. 
Is it worth the money? 

Cynics would say not. Large 
organizations have their own 
internal politics, and the cost 


in 


inisi deed, the rules of which rc£ * uire ^ 10 make of remunerating a ftind man- 

" w changed onlv ujth the ? contribution). Fortunately ager (assuming the corpora- 

SST tL 'Sd'CHOTS 

rn i.- h u bcen evolved 
casting the scheme. 

irusuS<" lams musl audi| 

[J2* ,cc * r reporl on the 
*? Lme s financial health, and 
nS:^! 1 ** involved j n 


for the trustees, this duly can 
be. and normally is, delegated 
to accountants. 

Delegation is the key to 
many a successful trusteeship. 
The trustees win usually meet 
quarterly, or perhaps just 


predicting the future o^rfor- luice a ywr. Most of the day- 
mance ol the fund and' how 1(Hla >' w °rk wilt be done by 
ihe c> IS i lin g capital wealth commmee - 


should be treated. 

. cxamine ,he role of 
thr tC ke> professionals in any 

lhe ,ru «ee. the 
stockbroking adviser, and the 
aauan. 

• Trustees 

The trustees may be a colleo 
non ol individuals ora limited 
com pans t a corporate trustee ) 
whose board of directors will 
act as trustees. Another 
possibility is the Trust 
v orporation. which is a cor- 
poraie trustee with a special 
capital make-up as prescribed 
h > the Trustee Act 1*525. This 
t>pe ol trustee has certain 
extra powers, notably a mure 
Iree hand in property 
transactions. 

The trustees make the 
investments for the pension 
lund. It is they who have the 
power over the money within 
the fund. It is they who decide 
how n should be spent. Their 
hands arc fairly tightly bound 
by the Trustee Act 1925 and 
the Trustee (Investment) Act 
l g M. which defines certain 
types of permuted investment 
'n broad and narrow range. 
The idea is io prevent the 
trustees taking too great a risk 
vvith the pension fund's 
money . 

Frequently the panel of 
trustees will include a repre- 
sentative of the work force, if 
it is a company scheme. 

The running of the scheme 
is a matter of fairly gruelling 
routine for the trustees. One 
obvious difficulty is the 
establishing of.ihe entitlement 
of each and every subscriber 
to the scheme. Seemingly 
simple- matters such as 
establishing the age of contrib- 
utors can present complex 
problems if birth certificates 
are lost or are in a foreign 
language. 


According to the latest sur- 
vey of the National Associ- 
ation of Pension Funds 
(NAPFk 57 per cent of pen- 
sion schemes are piloted bv 
individual trustees, while 3& 
per cent have corporate trust- 
ees set up specially within the 


lion is prepared to pay market 
rates to attract worthwhile 
professional skills) would put 
ihat employee in the position 
of being far belter paid than 
many superiors. Hence, say 
the cynics, it is politically 
expedient to pay far more to 
outsiders as the price of not 
upsetting the domestic apple 
can. 

Those funds which are 
fanned out are usually en- 
trusted to more than one 
investment adviser. Advisers 
will be used in one of two ways 
by the pension fund's trustees. 
The first system is a straight- 



company group structure. Just 
5 per cent of pension schemes 
are managed by external cor- 
porate trustees. 

• Investment advisers 
The management of pension 
funds is divided between the 
in-house managers of the 
larger schemes, and the ex- 
ternal advisers, who can be 
investment bankers, brokers 
or belong to the nebulously 
defined group of 
“consultants". 

The trend is definitely away 
from in-bouse . to external 
investment advice. Develop- 
ments at both British Rail and 
Unilever fctve taken these 
huge funds into the open 
market. British Rail's fund, 
for example, is valued at £4.5 
billion. Estimates of the cost 
of the fund's externally pro- 


forward advisory procedure; 
the board of trustees will meet 
the advisers, sit down and talk 
investment policy. 

They may even go so far as 
to discuss which individual 
shares should be bought. The 
advisers will then go away, 
while the board of trustees 
makes the final investment 
choice. 

An increasingly popular 
method is to entrust the 
investment adviser with full 
discretion over the fund. 

Naturally there are occa- 
sions when the investment 
manager finds a need to do 
some justification of the de- 
cisions taken. Many will insist 
on an independent voice at die 
meeting — an actuarial 
assessment of performance, 
or perhaps an investment 


appointment quite difficult. 
All too often the trustees’ 
consulataiion meeting with 
their investment management 
is shunted to the bottom of the 
list of priorities. 

But trustees tend to favour 
investment managers for their 
own reasons. One experienced 
pension fund investment ad- 
viser claims that their is 
"something intangible in the 
relationship. It's not just 
numerical data that eornns 
with the trustees". 

• Actuaries 

They are the object of a 
strange amalgam of scorn, fear 
and admiration in the finan- 
cial world. Pan of the problem 
is the fan that so few people 
understand what it is they 
actually da The examinations 
set by the Institute of Ac- 
tuaries are certainly difficult 
enough — probably more 
intellectually exacting than 
any other profession's com- 
mon entrance exam. 

The actuary's wizardry is 
rooted in a mathematical 
examination of financial 
investments and contracts 
over the long term. But 
today's actuary must also 
know how to structure and 
run a pension fund, and in 
effect run a business. 

The actuary should be the 
first person to be consulted 
when a company decides to 
establish a pension scheme. 
Frequently this is not the case, 
but aciuanaJ involvement will 
inevitably come early. Ac- 
tuaries can either be consult- 
ing actuaries: ie. independent 
firms or attached to an insur- 
ance company. 

The actuary will look at the 
benefit structure most likely to 
suit the company and advise 
on what sort of legal animal 
the pension scheme should be, 
a job undertaken in more 
detail by the solicitor. 

Once the periston scheme is 
formally established, the main 
tasks of the actuary are to 
track the membership of the 
fund, decide how much 
money should come in at any 
one time, and how it should be 
apportioned. 

John Wjgley of consulting 
actuaries R. Watson, says: 
“The object of the exercise is 
to meet the level of benefits 
required.'* " 

The actuary, will 


They find our service lit-: 
you. no douhr, the> Ye rhe sorr of people w 
prefer ro be kept informed. 

If you'd like to know mote .tbout : 
we manage our pension fund*., cu!’ 
Malcolm Callaghan on OI-t-26 3434. 


That's the sort of consistent track record 
our clients appreciate. 

■souwThrviMConipdsu rtc INVESTMENT MANAGEMENT IS OUR BUSINESS. 


ViV 

: da i 


II rVl.*Tu!-!.|V Sjl," 




usually 

provide an investment mon- 
itoring service, and should 
advise the trustees on the 
merits of the investment 
managers. 


1199.8p (PRICE ONI OCTOBER 1986) 




trongline 




n pensions 



UL /t m rum PRICE M&G PERSONAL PENSION FUND (with income reinvested) 

npu i QfiRi Annual compound growth rate since launch: 18.7% 

ON 28 MAKL Compared with Retail Price Index over the same period: 1(12% 


FUND SIZE 
£204 MILLION -AT 
1 OCTOBER 1986 


M&G offers you the strength of 

* consistent long-term 
performance 

* continuity of management 

* independence 

INVESTMENT SERVICE FOR PBdON FUNDS 


* individual attention for 
each fund 

* sound management controls 

* efficient 
administrate] 





rs- 

iw 

UK 

■M 

d 

«. 

ia 

jU 

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• a 
VIr 

Ml 

It- 

: a 
tpc 


LOWER QUART H£ 


at 

Ml 

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he 


al 

art 

oft 

Of 

hr 

it- 

on 

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at 

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We would 



AGAINST IT. 

.. ’■ Some investments appear 

.•.irresistible.' 

. ■. Bur taking hold of them might 
■ nor necessarily be in your best 
.interests. 

: ' .. * „ At siich times you need 

.someone whose advice you both 

• respect and trust. Independent 

. advice, that has been the root of 
Henderson’s success. 

• ; We are a publicly quoted, 
independent company. We manage 
in vestments, and nothing else* 

, Our sole source of income, the 
fefes we earn from doing so. 
f Which requires the advice we 
. . give, not only to be excellent, but 
. also free from any conflict of interest. 

■ .It is .a combination that seems to 


be valued because the pen's 
assets we manage have grown to 
more than £2* ; billion. 

Over the last five calendar 
years the performance of all pension 
funds under our management has 
averaged +22.93-0 p.a. (+179.9 a c). 
Compared with the +20.6- o p.a. 
(+154.79-6) achieved by the average 
pension fund. 

If you are responsible for a 
pension fund, may we offer the only 
biased piece of advice we’ll ever giver 

Call Mike Anthony, on 
01-63S 5 752 Or write to him at 
Henderson Pension Fund 
Management Limited, 

26 Finsbury Square, London 
EC2A IDA. 


s 


Henderson Pension Fund Management Ltd. 






ran 

Li 


Jiril 


3ee< 


rman T 
ly has la 
attack 
ty runs 
notion p 
ry assoc 
uracmoi \ 
iferenre 
in i palate 
mage de 
s or 

bbiL his 
Is me, w. 
ien the ■ . 
ded Ion . 
ybody id . 
ey like it ( 
into dis 
cofam 
nference 
ilive con 
der tha 1 
solution 
to Mane: 
tdinous £ 
state", 
nmediate 
itn shorn 
as been st 
> finish!” 
should af 
3r debate. 


3ann 


or the fi 
lere will 

^native s 
lespite t 
uringthe 
forkers i 
)r applic 
asses, r 
ionth wa 
ver phou 
uCND, F 
ational u 
etted tha 
lot dealt ■ 
?ND’s 1/ 
he will n 
jtine: “L 
hatabou 


• The foi 
eccentrich 
qnestionn 
by the 
question i 
stay pern 
Kingdom', 
expect tot 
or 10 yeai 


Ties- 


Yetanott 
the loose 
of -Bong 
the MoD 
bidders 
managen 
Devonpc 
Plymout! 

istcrialct 
outh N‘ 
champag 
of the b 
Foster-^ 
week am 
govemm 
more ti 
Wheeler 
city." He 
the othc 


Loy 


Among 
against 
pool last 
West Dc 
particuk 
school. i 
charity 
rates. ** 
Shcrbor 
pic in 
suiizmg 
hr said, 
case of 
for Dan 
school 


PENSION FUND MANAGEMENT/4 " 


The men who deal 


in your millions 


In the past, saying you're a 
pension fund manager must 
have been a real conversation- 
stopper. Times have changed. 
Pension fund managers are no 
longer colourless individuals 
whose worst nightmares are 
about assets failing to match 
liabilities. 

The recent goings-on at 
Woolworth and Guinness 
demonstrate that they are 
prepared to stand up and be 
counted, often speaking out 
on the contentious issues fac- 
ingthe City. 

The unusual move of an 
early show of allegiance in the 
recent takeover battle from 
Merchant Bankers, Robert 
Fleming, was no doubt in- 
fluential in saving Woolworth 
from Dixons' dutches 

In this case, however, there 
was already a general feeling 
that Woolworth's manage- 
ment had not had the opportu- 
nity to show their true form. 

The Prudential is known for 
its loyalty to current manage- 
ment Peter Nowell, of 
Prudential Portfolio Man- 
agers. prefers whenever pos- 
sible “to give existing 
management a chance”. 

Indeed, some observe a 
trend which has led to a higher 
than average inddence of 
foiled bids 

Max Ward, of Edinburgh- 
based Baillic. Gifford, re- 
marks: **1 don't set out to buy 
shares in badly managed com- 
panies which are likely to be 
taken over. 1 will support the 
existing management if they 
pul up a good defence, so long 
as the bid is not absurdly 
generous.” 

The fund manager's fidu- 
ciary responsibilities must not 
be forgotten nor must the 
likely price of the shares if the 
bid foils Nicholas Taylor at 


MIM Limited is reminded of 
the Tact that “shareholders in 
Distillers had years of poor 
performance before the bid.” 

. Nevertheless, the tempta- 
tion must be avoided to think 
of a bid as a quick way to 
enhance quarterly perfor- 
mance figures 
Michael Anthony of 
Henderson Administration 
thinks that Ernest Saunders 
chairman and chief executive 
of Guinness, has been shown 
“the City equivalent of a 
Yellow Card” 

His colleague at Henderson, 
David Taylor, adds that “in an 


Pressure to give 
more information 
while fund-raising 


environment where ’my word 
is my bond’, companies can't 
say one thing and then change 
their minds” 

The opinion of Roy Peters 
of County Investment 
Management on the subject of 
Guinness is representative of 
many fund managers He says: 
”1 remain critical of the way 
the matter was handled but. at 
the end of the day. it came 
down to what could be 
achieved with Distillers” 

He believes that “in the 
future more attention will be 
raid bv institutions to this 


paid by institutions to this 
type of arrangement”. 

Vendor platings which are 
increasingly used these days 
give investors less time to 
consider the wider implica- 
tions of a deal But fund 
managers are putting pressure 
on companies and their advi- 
sors to disclose more in forma- 
tion at the time of the fund- 
raising exercise. 



> •mi'W 'v\ x’T'S-.'* 


•i-'-cr 

! 



Roy Peters of County Investment Management “Hedgmj 
the US dollar in 1985 was a prime example of the snccessfo 
use of a financial instrument in pension fond management' 


Mr Ward of Baillie. Gifford 
thinks that “investment man- 
agers generally ought to be 
more active in complaining 
about companies that raise 
money for ventures which are 
not in the shareholders' 
interests.” 

He expects a good explana- 
tion if the acquisition is going 
to dilute the company's earn- 
ings. 

Pension fund managers are 
not. of course, dealing with 
their own money. Nicholas 
Taylor of MIM makes it 
sound very heroic but is not 
alone in his objective. ”We 
are." he says, “passionately 
keen to do the best with 
clients' money.” 

Performance figures get a 
pension fund management 
organization into the initial 
beauty parade but marketing 
skills and personal rapport 
will often win the day. A few 
grey hairs also tend to put 
trustees at their ease. 

One fund manager was told 
directly that the reason he won 
a fund was because the trust- 
ees liked him. Most invest- 
ment houses, however, tend to 
build up small teams. This 
reduces the chance of loosing 
the client if the fund manager 
leaves. Though Mr Nowell of 
the Pro says: “We are less 
dependent on personalities 
that the merchant banks”, be 
admits that “there are horses 
for courses”. 

Marketing is a skill which is 
fast being learned by pension 
fund managers. In the run-up 
to Big Bang, they are all keen 
to point out what makes their 
organization different from 
the rest. Independence from 
potential conflicts of interest 
are favourite marketing ploys. 

The all-important relation- 
ship between pension fund 
managers and trustees is 
developing all the time. Fund 
managers are more aware of 
competitive pressures and 
trustees are better-informed 
and more professional. 

, Dick Withers-Green of 
Barclays de Zoete Wedd 
Investment Mangement be- 
lieves that performance- 
measurement league tables are 
putting undue pressure on 
trustees to concentrate on 
short-term performance. 

This is not, he thinks, 
wholly conducive to the well- 
being of the fond. The long- • 
term commitment of pension 
fund management should not 
be disregarded. 

Obviously it is not ideal to 
put in a bad performance in 
the first year but the relation- 
ship will usually be a long one. 
In time, considerations such 
as administrative • efficiency 










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jVffiVTs team: Alexander Reid, left; Geoff Bowling Christopher Mills; David Stevens, chairman; Stephen Barber; Nicholas Taylor, and Nicholas Johns?* 


gain importance, although 
performance never fades into 
the background. 

Pension fond > managers 
stress the role to be played by 
technical back-up. However, it 
should be seen as a way of 
complementing personal in- 
put rather than replacing it 

County Investment 
Management is not alone in 
increasing the use of computer 
models to complement 
brokers’ research. Dividend 
discount models, which are 
rarely provided by stock- 
brokers are, for example, an 
important aid to the fond 
manager. 

Financial instruments such 
as futures and options are still 
used sparingly, although fund 
managers are keen to become 
more active in these markets. 

Mr Peters ofCIM points out 
that “hedging the US dollar in 
(985 was a prime example of 
the successful use of a finan- 
cial instrument in pension 
fond management” 

The use of options and 
futures are considered ex- 
cellent ways of reducing the 
risk in 3 portfolio. However, 
some trustees still find them 
daunting. 

A more prominent role is 
favoured by fond managers in 
the international arena with 
more attention being paid to 
asset allocation. Typically a 
fund with 5 per cent of it assets 
invested internationally in 
1980 now has 25 per cent 
overseas. 

Mr Taylor of MIM points 
out “If one had invested in 
West Germany last year or 
Japan this year, it would have 
been hard to get a better 


HAMBROS 


Runaway winner 
in the pension fund 

stakes 


At Hambros our pension fund management has proved to be a consistent front airmen 

We Ve been winning for the last six years - 
just take a look at the form,’ 


THE PENSION FUND PERFORMANCE STAKES 1 




1980-1985 6 years 


1981-1985 5 years 


-1985 4 years 


1983-1985 3 years 


1984-1985 2 years 


HAMBROS 


HAMBROS 


HAMBROS 


HAMBROS 


HAMBROS 


lyear 


HAMBROS 


The odds are in our favour 

So if you want to back a winner; talk to John Cumming now. 



HAMBROS 


PENSION FUND MANAGEMENT 

41 BiJiopsgate. London EC2P 2AA Telephone: (11-588 -851 


'Source: Sedgwick .Actuarial Services Limited: Segregated Fund Investment Managers Survey 
^Cumulative annual time - weighted rates of return, repres en ting average performance of pension funds 


performance from individual 
stocks in the UK market.” 

Pension fond managers are 
traditionally thought of as 
being more disciplined than 
unit trust managers. In the 
past they have not specialized, 
although there is a move to 
manage pension fond money 


in sympathy with the board's • 
aims and aspirations. 


The significance of a close 
relationship of this kind in the 
event of a takeover bid has 


providing the necessary 
information and often lacks 
direction, quantity rather than 
qjuality appearing to win the 
day. 

Peter Nowell of Prudential 


been amply demonstrated in portfolio Managers is “happy 


recent years. 

Nicholas Taylor, of MIM 


in an increasingly specialized Limited, does not wantto hear 
way. * . 


Mr Withers-Green of 
BZWIM believes in the “cor- 
porate balanced fund 
manager”. This is when a 
number of specialist fond 
managers are overseen by an 
experienced asset mangement 
team. 

He strongly challenges the 
move favoured by some pen- 
sion fond advisers to split 
funds between a variety of 
investment organizations, 
leaving asset allocation to the 
external advisers. He says that 
in this situation "the contribu- 
tion to performance from 
asset allocation is not .being 
maximized. 

Moreover, the dient could 
find himself paying two 
management fees on the same 
assets”. 

In the past it was unusual 
for pension fund managers to 
come face to face with real 
industrialists. Now, however, 
they are insistent that it is vital 
to build up a close relationship 
with the managements of 
companies in whom they are 
investing 

Shareholdings are becoming 
larger, reflecting the growth in 
the size of funds and the 
tendency of fond managers to 
concentrate their efforts. Be- 
cause of this development, it 
is all the more important for 
substantia] shareholders to be 






information second-hand. He 
believes it is important to 
assess the management and to 
ask questions such -as “Are 
they telling the truth?”. “Are 
they likely to succeed in what 
they’ are doing?” and “Have 
they the necessary backing?’ 

Pension fond mangers are 


to see the ’me too' research 
go”. Indeed the Pro can 
afford the luxury of having 
more than 20 in-house an- 
alysts providing its own fun- 
damental research. 

Others, however, are not 
keen to duplicate 
stockbrokers’ research efforts. 

Post Big Bang there will be 
the opportunity for fund man- 
agers to be more selective in 
the brokers they patronize for 
research, although QavSd Tay- 
lor of Henderson says: “I 
won’t pay hard cash for 
brokers’ research”. 

He believes that pension 
funds should have “a small in- 
house filtering team but on the 
whole let individual fond 
managers speak to the brokers 
who they believe provide the 
best ideas.” 

Pension fund managers are 
vociferous on the subject of 
fees where various practices 
have led to a wide divergence 
of charges. 

There has been a tendency 
for hidden charges to be levied 
on the back o? continuation 
(the grouping together for 
commission purposes of busi- 
ness done in a particular stock 
through a single broker over a 
three month period) and from 
overseas stocks where it is not 
always clear what is the 
principal's cut and what is the 


many stockbrokers have bufli 
up a pension fund business 
theoretically operating on an 
advisory basis and not. there- 
fore. obliged to charge a fee. 

Instead, commission is ' 
earned in the normal way. 

Roy Peters of CiM feds 
strongly about this. He says 
“It should be dear what is 
being charged for.” He consid- 
ers that “on the whole, food 
management fees are aria- 
ficially low .” >.* - 

Big Bang will make it 
necessary for all pension fond 
managers to charge a “dean 
fee". 

With a lower rate of 


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More prominent ; 
place among the . , 
money people 


becoming more demanding of agency commission. 


the services provided. 
Stockbrokers' research, they 
think, goes only so far in 


Stockbroker-fund managers 
are the subject of much criti- 
cism. Operating in a grey area. 


commission, the view that 
fees will go up is widely held, 
among the pension fond 
management fraternity. One 
wonders, however, to what ' 
extent this is wishful thinking. 

Contrary to expectations, 
pension fund managers are 
not an amorphous mass of 
opinion less individuals. 
Commercial considerations 
and the need to perform have « 
made them adopt a mote 
prominent position in tfae- 
in vestment community. 

The role they occupy is 
more representative of the 
considerable influence that 
their clients’ shareholdings 
give them. Now they are 
girding their loins for for tile 
challenge being posed by Big 
Bang. 


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Alexandra Jackson 


GUINNESS 


WE 


MAHON 


INVESTING 


FOR TOUR 


FUTURE 


PENSIONERS’ 


FUTURE 


Ian Richards 

Guinness Mahon Investment Manag ement 




32 St Mary at Hill London EC3P 3AJ 
Telephone: 01-623 9333 
Facsimile: 01-283 4811 
Telex: 884035 



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ninfc the nroduct be is to sdL than to the Three Rs. or that 


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THE TIMES TUESDAY OCTOBER 7 1986 


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Wh^ntheBig Bang 
finally goes off 


One 0frte1n^SwJ a <iS^2“ re f 1 Croats. 
Bang has been °, f ** Bi 8 

jnd negotiations both EeS, S^Jf at,0ns 
by institutions to their cE5? 0smntfons *“» 
. Pens*ou-fnnd managers hon l » ' 

date with broker^o^ *** t0 “ego- 
dients over fees, and forL,i?^ SSM)as ' ^ 
the conglomerate t!? 1 ?"* -V ® the case of 
mana£e£entsidI^:J5 h ” e off *heir asset- 
by conflicts of inter2ts! SCreet areas mt0l,dlfid 

Fuwmdd^rtce *^ e ? ory * Tfc * 

law next imvnrh^L-ii presmnin 8 n becomes 

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actiy what will happen, and for how Iona, are 
open questions. 

On this page we set ootihe views of three dif- 
rerent types of badness in pension fund 
management the independent investment 
manager, the subsidiary of a conglomerate and 
the merchant banting inve stmen t manager. 
We also have one of the regulators oatfiaiug a 
few areas which win be of concern to pension 
fond managers. 

It is important to realize tbat none of the 
people interviewed is pr e s enting a definitive 
view, merely a few ideas of where they see the 
Changes occurring. 

Moreover, our focus has been oa dis- 
cretionary management of other people's 
money — not on the large pension finuM which 
manage all or part of their own assets. 

As well as the interviews, a few basic terms 
are defined. 

Lawrence Lever 


Words, names that matter 


Big Bang is journalistic short- 
hand for wide-reaching 
changes that will take place on 
October Jl and really for 
one or two which have already 
happened. Not to be confused 
£ith the Financial Services 
Bill, although it often is. 

Technically Big Bang takes 
in two events. The abolition of 
fixed commissions charged by 
stockbrokers on transactions 
in equities and government 
securities (gilts), and the in- 
troduction of dual capacity, 
which will allow jobbers arid 
brokers to do each other's jobs 
as well as to continue doing 
their own . 

Other developments should 
be viewed alongside Big Bang, 
and if you want to you can see 
them as part of Big Bang, too. 
No one has a monopoly on the 
definition. 

These are the opening up of 
the Slock Exchange to non- 
members and allowing out- 
siders to own 100 per cent of 
Stock Exchange firms. Both of 
these have already happened 
however. 

Big Bang's origins lie in a 
challenge by the Restrictive 
Trade Practices Court to the 
Stock Exchange's rules . 

Financial Services BQI 
This creature was born out of 
a series of investment scandals 


and a subsequent review of 
pur investor protection leg- 
islation by Professor Gower 
who found it sadly wanting. It 
purports to lay down in one 
place a comprehensive frame- 
work for protecting its inves- 
tors. The Bill provides the 
framework, leaving it largely 
up to the financial community 
to flesh this out with specific 
rules. 

The Securities and Invest- 
ments Board will be the 
ultimate rulemaker — cover- 
ing most of the areas where 
one would think protection 
was necessary. 

The government is however 
going to retain powers in 
certain areas such as insider 
dealing 

The basic premis is that all 
investment businesses will 
need to be authorized -given 
“a dog licence", as Sir Nicho- 
las Goodison. chairman of the 
Stock Exchange put it re- 
cently. Their licence can be 
issued directly from the SIB. 
who will only band them to 
those businesses it is satisfied 
are fit and proper enough to 
have them. . 

Alternatively, businesses 
can get their licence by joining 
a self-regulating organization 
— sro. These mini-bodies will 
have their own rules for their 
own members — which must 


provide protection for inves- 
tors, which is at least as good 
as that which the SIB provides 
in its own rule book. 

The pension fund managers 
will generally join an sro 
which is called 1MRO — the 
Investment Management 
Regulatory Organization. 

If you are wondering why it 
is “Regulatory” rather than 
“Regulating" as in “self- 
regulating organization*', 
that's ea$y to explain. 

The government started of! 
calling everything “self- 
regulatory** and then it 
changed its mind. 

In fact the government 
started off with a monster 
known as the SRA, which 
Stood for “self-regulatory 
association" It changed its 
mind here too. 

Best execution: 

One of the rules which the SIB 
will promulgate is the duty of 
best execution. This will in- 
volve different things depend- 
ing on the precise nature of the 
relationship between a finan- 
cial organization and its client. 

However it is in essence, 
merely a statement of the law 
of agency — in the sense that 
one must put one's client's 

Con tin tied on Page 39 



PENSION FUND MANAGEMENT/5 N 






Experts at the centre: John GittiftRS of Touche Remnant, left; Keith Percy of Phillips & Drew Fuad Management; Kate Mortimer of the Securities and 

Investments Board. Graham Cass, of bring Investment Management 


Fixed fees 

• John Gfttmgs, the direc- 
tor of Touche Remnant Pas- 
sion Fond Management, part 
of the Tooche Remnant invest- 
ment manag e me nt bouse: 

One of the more visible ways 
in which the Big Bang will 
affect ns concerns fees. 
Historically some of the 
participants, like the brokers, 
have offered a free service 
because they could take their 
reward through the commis- 
sions they earned on bargains. 

For the others there were 
two fees bases. Clients could 
pay a lower fee. what we term 
a “dirty fee" and it would be 
understood that the invest- 
ment house gained the benefit 
of continuation and aggrega- 
tion. 

Alternatively, they merely 
paid a higher fee — a “clean 
fee** — and reaped the benefits 
of continuation and aggrega- 
tion. Most of our diems opted 
for a lower direct fee. 

With the advent of nego- 
tiated commissions, most of 
the independent houses will 
be agreeing a fixed rate of 
commission for their trans- 
actions with particular bro- 
kers. Those of our diems now 
paying the lower fee will pay a 
higher direct fee but will 
benefit from the lower 
commission rates. They will 
appear to be paying more, 
because of the increase in the 
direct fee. but in overall terms 
they wiD pay less. 

Those clients on the dean 
fee will pay less because they 
will be paying the same fee, 
but lower commission. 

There has been a discernible 
increase of the proportion of 
pension-fund assets being 
managed by independents. 
The independents will be 
increasingly regarded by pen- 
sion fund trustees as desir - 
able investment managers. 

I also think that there will be 
an “outflow” of talented fund 
managers from the conglom- 
erates to the independent 


investment managers. A lot of 
the new arrangements wifi not 
be comfortable for those 
within the asset-management 
section which is considered 
something of a poor relation 
within the cooglommeraies. It 
is often viewed as less exciting 
than the broking or market- 
making side and generally a 
less significant contributor to 
their profits than say broking 
or market-making. 

The independents could 
well provide the son of 
environment that investment 
managers prefer. They may 
want to work for an organiza- 
tion where asset management 
is top — and ‘sole — pnomy. 


there is no financial incentive have to tell their customers 
linking us to the overall about them. Moreover they 
performance of the company, util not he able to put business 
In addition, there are no through a broker just to obtain 
common directors between the sofi-dollar services unless 
our board and that of the it is in the customer's interests 
market-making company. We to use that broker, 
also have our own separate h K a controversial subject 
dealing team. which is interesting - and 

To benefit from Big Bang difficult - to deal with, 
you need four attributes. The There *iU ^ mleft „ >lll6 
first is the financial! muscle to ^ >t5u ^ -fronE 

command the best pnees. VO ur customers. In other 

word ** > ou « nn ot jump in 
ex S2? C Sri£? l ! I I l, S£ ahead of your customers' or* 

JSJ Tr dcn - T * m «hr will not be easy 
Alpha stocks, where most of JO -ru*™. w .,«i An ul 

, .Qif[fif 0,nS l ° ** rule* *o curb abuses in toe use 
much more volatile. 


There will be rules saying 
that you should not “front- 
run" your customers. In other 
words, you cannot jump in 
ahead of \ our customers' or- 


Next, dealing capability ts 


As for our own dealing going to become even more 


arragemems. it looks as 
though we will be placing the 
bulk of our business through 
brokers on an agency basis — 
particularly those brokers with 
good research capabilities. 

How to win 

• Keith Percy, chairman and 
managing director of Phillips 
& Drew Fond Management 
(owned by Union rank of 
Switzerland): 

Big bang removes the distinc- 
tion between the broker, fund 
manager and others for two 
reasons. First, the broker will 
be fee-remunerated like every- 
one else. Moreover, before Big 
Bang we effectively dealt onlv 
through Phillips & Drew and 
received its research. Now we 
will have to draw on the whole 
market like everyone else. We 
are all fund managers now. 

There also has to be dear 
and proper separation of the 
fund-management side. Phil- 
lips & Drew Fund Manage- 
ment is a separate limited 
company — and geographi- 
cally separate .The market- 


important. Not only will there 
be a lot more market-makers 
around to deal with, there will 
also be negotiated 
commissions. 

Finally, you will need access 
to unbiased research or an 
unbiased approach to biased 
research. There is no doubt 
that research is becoming 
more biased. The lam players 
will receive a lot of research 
and will produce their own. 

As for costs, a pan from the 
half per cent cut in stamp 
duty, there is no doubt that 
dealing costs will fall, although 
by how much and for bow 
long. ! do not know. 

The regulators 

• Miss Kate Mortimer, direc- 
tor of policy at the Securities 
and Investments Board: 

Fund managers will have an 
interesting time dealing with 
disclosures on so-called sofi- 
dollar services. These take the 
form of a fund manager 
receiving goodies from a bro- 
ker — such as research , 


rules to curb abuses in toe use 
of suspense accounts . 

A fund manager w ill have to 
obum his client's agreement if 
he wants to put him into 
issues in which his company 
has been involved. There are 
also rules requiring disclosure 
of. and the seeking of permis- 
sion for. deals involving 
associates. 

Wc have not vet worked out 
which rales will apply to in- 
house pension fond managers. 
Pension schemes negotiated 
with insurance companies in 
such a wav that the funds may- 
be merged with the company's 
life funds do not come within 
the scope of the Financial 
Services Bill. 


The clients will, on the 
whole, be better off when wc 
go to negotiated commissions 
but 1 cannot yet say by how 
much. 

As for our dealings with the 
brokers, we will have to sieera 
course between negotiating n 
low a commission as possible 
and siiif receiving their re- 
search service. If we did not 
get the research, and therefore 
have to increase our research 
capacity, our costs and those 
of our clients, would rise. 

Pan of our deals will be 
agency deals with brokers and 
pan will be principal deals 
with market-makers or 
broker/dealers. 

If you transact an agency 
deal, the broker is responsible 
for best execution and will 
expect to receive remunera- 
tion through commission. If 
you deal with a broker's 
market-maker - a principal's 
transaction in other words — 
we will be responsible for best 
execution. 

In that case we would not 
expect to pay a commission. 
But 1 cannot be categorical 
about that. It will vary accord- 
ins to the firm. 

Best execution is not always 
going to be easy. It may he that 
the comfort factor will lead 


m many investment managers to 

flfontc Crain use an agency broker. It will be 

gam eaS)er fw us hwver lf )0U 

• Graham Cass, a director iff have a centralized dealing 


making function is in one’ software, free holidays, pay- 
building and we are in an- ment of his rent and so on — in 


other. People you used to see 
in the lift you do not see any 
more. 

Our profit is related solely to 
the performance of Phillips & 
Drew Fund Management, so 


return for putting his business 
through that broker. 

The fond manager's cus- 
tomers will often not have 
known about these arrange- 
ments. The managers will now 


Baring Investment 

Management: 

We certainly foresee a reduc- 
tion in commissions. We arc 
still negotiating with the bro- 
kers. I always preface my 
remarks to diems with “you 
do not get something for 
nothing". 

We are looking to Tecoup 
the loss of block dealing 
benefits by increasing our fee 
rate. Some clients might prefer 
instead to pay a transaction 
charge, a dealing cost attach- 
ing to each transaction, which 
would replace the loss of the 
aggregation and continuation 
benefits. 


desk where all our dealers are 
au fait with the prices in the 
market, it is easier to know 
where the best prices are. 
Without centralized dealing 
one might want to stick with 
an agency broker. 

As for conflicts of interest, 
we value our reputation and 
the brokers wc dial with value 
theirs, h all comes back lo 
people and their integrity. 
You simply cannot leu slate 
for that. If a broker “stuffs" us 
with stock which his market- 
maker is long on. he will only 
stuff us once. That is the 
sanction available to us. 


r.S .1 ;U’kMU 


WE STAY CLOSE, SO YOU STAY AHEAD 


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\bur company's pension fund is more 
likely to achieve its required objectives if your 
fund manager has the necessary time to discuss 
the strategy in detail with you. 

And your fund manager is more likely to 
have that time if he or she can draw upon the 
depth of resources provided by an expert team 
of advisers who are able to take a macro- 
economic overview of trends in world equity 
bond and currency markets 

This is the simple philosophy which at 
Charterhouse forms the foundation of our success. 

With over £25 billion funds under 


management and a consistent record of above- 
average performance, Charterhouse is one of 
the fastest growing companies in the field. 

We maintain this consistency by . 
ensuring thatyourfond manager has the time to 
stay dose to your pension fund, sothatyou stay 
ahead of your objectives. 

If you would like to learn more about 
Charterhouse pension fund management, 
please contact Nigel NXfetson, Managing 
Director Charterhouse Fund Managers Limited, 
6 New Bridge Street London EC4V 6JH or ring 
01-2484000.' 


_X. _ 

ra. — - — - • 



CHAKTERHOUSE 

* A MEMBER OF THE ROVAL 5^j\s 0 : SCOTLAND GROLT 1 * 

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outh W 
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city." Hi 
the othe 


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against 
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school, s 
chariix 
raxes. “ 
Shcrbor 
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sidizing 
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case of 
for Dun 
school. 


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Greg 
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latex 
tnisi 
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Davtx 


COMMON SENSE 


Noble Lowndes has been the top name in pensions for 50 years. In 
that time we've developed a range of services covering every 
aspect of pension scheme management -except one. We do not 
handle the day-to-day investment of client funds. So the advice we 
give on investment matters can be totally objective. This seems to 
make good sense to us. The sort of common sense which Noble 
Lowndes Investment Monitoring applies to all its services. 


STRATEGY 


Your pension fund investment requirements are unique. NLIM 
can help to define practical objectives and an effective strategy. 


SELECTION 


From our extensive knowledge, of investment houses and 
individual managers, NLIM provides independent guidance to 
help select the manager most suited to your needs. 


MEASUREMENT 


The Noble Lowndes Investment Performance Monitoring Service 
measures over 850 pension funds in the UK. It gives you all the 
information you need to measure the performance of your fund 
against your own objectives and the performance of other similar 

funds. 


To find out more about these services, 
contact Paul Haines on 01 6862466 or write to 
Noble Lowndes Investment Monitoring Limited, 

PO Box 144, Norfolk House, Wellesley Road, Croydon, CR93EB. 





PENSION FUND 
MANAGEMENT/6 


JL V/ ^ k/ 


The Little Bang facing managers 


The impact of this autumn's 
swift and radical financial’ 
changes is supposed to be 
moo severely fell by the 
smaller players. Worst-case 
forecasts of the Big Bang 
depict the Financial Services 
Bill as a veritable seal cull, 
with the big boys wielding the 
dubs. 

The pensions industry has 
its own special fears over the 
Financial Services Bill Most 
apprehension concents the 
duty to give “best advice" and 
the calls Bom consumer 
lobbyists for a mandatory and 


‘*<-1 


relatively lengthy cooling-off 
period for buyers of pension 







force on November \ ■riL, 
stipulate that trustees ifS 
funds must : provide ■ bew? 
statements for n^beri'-S 
make 3n annual 
which should inciuS^: 
actuarial statement: ■■■■■ 


'■££ 

rf.. - 


Chm2.dTOwsthatmhr7A 
per cent of pension sffiraf 






0€ 


provided this, at 
the survey, with 84 per cew 
offering audited acaffisj? 
ther automatically -w 0a nT 
quesL An actuarial natemai 
is made available 
cent of schemes.-:, r 


v 

in* 


Pension manager* 

iiwa i. * 


period for buyers of pension m .vh 

and life-assurance products. “ •’ " . ltxh „ 

But pension fond managers Henry James, NAPF director general, left; Colin Lew, NAPFs chainmm, amt jom 
are experiencing a Little Bang McLachlan, dairm of NAPFs investment committee. Mr James says; we are iaoug 
of their own. The provisions onr first truly major legislative catalyst since 1975 


Noble 

Lowndes 


tke top nme in pendens 


of their own. The provisions 
of the Social Security Acts 
(1985 and 1986) are coming 
into force. As the require- 
ments for disclosure . of 
information and portability of 
pensions begin to bite, many 
pension funds seem to be 
showing a fair amount of bare 
flesh. 

The pension funds* prin- 
ripal guide through the leg- 
islative maze is the National 
Association of Pension Funds 
(NAPF). which has 2,000 
ordinary and associate mem- 
bers. 

After a recent membership 
survey the NAPF director 
general. Henry James, had to 
admit: “An awful lot of work 
has now got to be done. We 
are facing our first truly major 
legislative catalyst since 
1975." 

The NAPF membership 
covers most of the country's 
major corporate pension 
schemes in both private and 
public sectors. Though only 43' 
per cent of members re- 
sponded to its, most recent 
survey, published this sum- 
mer, the problems feeing pen- 
sion managers are tellingly 
revealed. 

The difficulties arise from 
the mass of new legislative 


obligations and the effect 
which an amalgam of the two 
Social Securities Acts and the 
Financial Services Bill will 
have. 

In outline, the 198S Social 
Security Act requires pension 
fond managers to make cer- 
tain information available to 
members of their schemes. 
Some of the information must 
be supplied automatically, 
some must be made available 
only on request. 

This Act also requires that 
an employee's contributions 
to a pension scheme can no 
longer be frozen in quite the 
same way they once were. 

If a pension scheme mem- 
ber leaves a job and decides to 
leave his or her contributions 
in the fund, the managers of 
the scheme are obliged to 
increase the value of all 
contributions made since the 
beginning of this year. 


of an imponderable since only 
the broad outlines of its 
probable effect are yet known. 
The 1986 Act is the key to the 
ineffable pensions cliche of 
"portability”. 

The two antral ideas are 
first that no .one will be 
obliged to become a member 
ofa company pension scheme, 
and second that employees 
who do not opt for a scheme 
bought from the private sector 
should be able to transfer 
easily between different com- 
pany schemes. 

But the Act has drawn some 
fierce criticism. Many would 
argue that the greatest flaw of 


A failure to be 
tough enough on 
employers 


the legislation as it stands is . 


The increase must be 5 per the failure to be tough enough 
cent a year or the amount of cm employers. The Act im- 


the increase in retail price 
inflation, whichever is the 
smaller. Formerly, frozen 
contributions had no boost 
other than the general rise m 
the value of the pension fund. 

The 1986 Act is something 







■xii 
- ■ ■ • 



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poses no duty on employers to 
make contributions into a 
scheme for an employee who 
opts out of the company 
scheme, i.e. someone who has 
bought an independent pen- 
sion plan and is therefore 
unworried by the pension 
provisions of various group or 
company schemes. 

Company schemes involve 
the matching of employee and 
corporate contributions. 
Clearly an employee who opts 
for an independent pension 
arrangement would be foolish 
to do so while the employer 
can refuse to make a contribu- 
tion on a par with those made 
for employees opting into a 
company scheme. A refusal 
would effectively halve the 
attractions of going it alone. 

The second major drawback 
is the absence of any sharp 
definiton of how transfer val- 


ues are to be calculated. The 
regulations to the Act are not 
yet published. Because ac- 
tuaries tend to use their own 
methods of calculation in 
computing the value of an 
individual's contribution the 
government draughtsmen are 
going to have to perform a 
remarkable feat of semantic 
and actuarial skill in provid- 
ing a universal, flexible for- 
mula which keeps most people 
happy. 

The chans show the spread 
of the NAPF net, and hint at 
some of the difficulties man- 
agers face in complying with 
the new legislation. 

Chan 1 shows that four- 
fifths of all the pension 
schemes surveyed required 
members to make contribu- 
tions. In those schemes still 
contracted into the state pen- 
sion plan only 60 per cent 
made this requirement, while 
79 per cent of those contracted 
out required member 
contributions. 

If you find the idea of a non- 
contributory pension scheme 
somewhat startling, remember 
- that a pension is no more than 
deferred pay. 

What the chan doesn’t 
show is the majority of 
schemes (84 per cent) which 
make employee membership 
compulsory. The 1986 Social 
Security Act will of course 
prohibit this restriction. 

Another cause for concern 
is the few schemes (merely 38 
.per cent) which provided for 
increases on pension contribu- 
tions left in the scheme by the 
departed member. The pro- 
visions of the 1985 Act were 
not in force at the lime of the 
survey, but one must wonder 
just how many pension funds 
are breaking the law. 

' The. provisions on disci tK . 
sure of information come into 


more embarrassing pobfan 
than ensuring sehttocoS 
bers are property infenaMd 
The Financial Soviets Bin 
will require that AjvisZr 
including those who rah S 
pany pension schemes,. fiv e 
"best advice" lo -empioyL. 
seeking a pensibn.jflan, , *** 
Bui what if the c«npaw 
scheme is .by no means the 
most attractive oh the 
“The practical necessw^foj. 
companies to sen ihSf 
schemes." said MrJ Jam A 
"bur will they warn to main 
them, given the restraints 0 f 
the Financial Services BiilT 
Managers are caught far-* 
trap sprung between' & 
Department of Trade -'and 
Industry and Noniaa 
Fowler's Department?’ bf 
Health and Social Security 
One organization telfcrilfenrio 


|V : ; . 

& - 




j T|K 


v :: - 

if- 


Never before such 
an acute nqexf 
for guidance- 


offer "best advice"" for each 
and every individual,* ike 
other wants them to promote 
freed o m of pension 
arrangements. /. . 

To cap off tbe legiskoivE 
restraints the European 
is insisting that pension, phns 
provide equality between the 
sexes Notable, inequalgwei. 
ist both in retirement ages ud 
death-in -service benefits' 


Chart 3 shows that Vifoafly t ^ 


***"... > 
,*?-• • • • 

VBT-- 


all schemes provide a peraien 
for the bereaved wife if an 


for the bereaved wife Af an 
employee. Widowers farcies 
well. And the majonijf of 
pension schemes still provide 
for different retirement’ ages 
for men and women. ! ■ 

Beleaguered pension fend 
managers acd trustees have 
never had such an acute tried 
for guidance before. Thr in- 
dustry and the NAHv&ce 
testing times. 


b;.. 


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CONTRIBUTIONS 


INFORMATION 


BENEFITS 




Co ntrac t e d 
All out 

schemes { Participating 





Investment 

detafls 


PUBLIC SECTOR 


PRIVATE SECTOR 




Mil 

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report 


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CONTRIBUTORY 



Audited 

accounts 


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fllllllll NON-CONTRIBUTORY 


13 no EI3 on REQUEST 

n AUTOMATICALLY 



Widow’s pension 
plus lump sum 


SauraaHAPF! 




OLDEST PR 0 BL 


• ’ ' = " f -\ *.V • . ? v . ** 

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This is the bank more 
U.S. companies choose 
as Master Ihistee. 

















IN PENSION 


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How to offer dfents the best balance between 
potential reward and acceptable levels of risk." 

The problem Is not unusual but the way that we solve 
it is. 

In pension fund management the sheer quantity and 
complexity of the information available as a basis for 
decisions is enormous. 

So the way this information is processed is vital 
At County Investment Management we have broken 


new ground mthe use ofadvancedfinandalafiidAng 
techniques, which give our investment managers the 
framework within which ftey can make sound derisions. 
The result is an approach to investment which 
recognises the importance of the skills and the 
judgement of the individual manager, supported by 
rigorous analysis of up-to-date research from fee 
world's mam markets. 

By deploying these strengths wifein a structured and 


disciplined context our aim is to achieve superior 
aid more consistent results. 

To find nit how your fund could benefit from this 
pioneering ^proadi, ring Keith Buckie on 01-6386000. 

COUNTY 

Investment 

Management 


^ ^Sopmsticated UK Master Thist 
and Global Custody services can be 
found close by, on Lombard Street 
at The Northern Thist Company. 

You’ll find state-of-the-art soft- 
ware systems, expert and flexible 
handling of international investments 
and clear; concise reporting/accountins 
systems-all tailored to the unique 
needs of U.K. pension funds. 

For more information on how we 
ran serve your needs, please contact 
Anthony k. LeCras, Second 
Vice President. 


; 


Mr Jgl* 




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The Northern TVust Company 

38 Lombard Street, London 
Tfelephone (01) 623-1101 

HEADQUARTERS: CHICAGO. ILLINOIS 60690 




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:li. 1 


THE TIMES TUESDAY OCTOBER 7 1986 



some of ti£ 
top performers over whprfifr- 


ixpens now L Z 
managers will bcdo'Jgwdft 
ttey can achieve 

t^SA^T for ** 

hiS, n i^P? r fcrma nC e 
™foeen dazzling. It has been 

monitored bv 

r&ZZ£?S£ 


The gallop to 
keep up the 
growth rates 


«odc market at home has 
mised the profile of pension 
mnds in the City. One co*- 
sequence has also been a 
fmater - awareness in the 
OoanlTOom of the perfor- 
mance of its own pension fund 
and its ability to keep pgr* 
and even outperform, others 
in me industry. 


Last year WM analysed the 
returns of more than 1.000 
funds representing assets of 
£?0G Mon. The 
ra i e ,J>f return for the 
average UK pension fund was 
14.4 per cenL the fourth year 
significant 
UK equities produced 
the highest returns of 19.8 per 
cent with a similarly strong 
perormance coming from 


Peter Wanington at WM 
has become more conscious of 

the wav t hvc imvui i 


enjoyed by the ftmds is likely 
to sian tapering off and a 
different investment strategy 
may have to be employed. 

John Cumming is director 
of the £1.000 million of pen- 
sion funds managed by Haxn- 
bros Bank. -There is no way 
we are going to see tbe returns 
of 19 and 20 per cent which 
have become the norm over 


, '»v«P WUMUUd ut 

the way this trend has devel- 
oped: “Finance directors used 
to look at funds as something 
of a chore to be watched over 
grudgingly but today they are 
»r more aware of the effects 
that can be achieved on a 
company's bottom line by 
altering the rate of 
contributions." 


tbe last seven to eight yearsT 
he says. “We will ha 


Und oubtedly, one of the 

biggest fillips to performance 

has been the scrapping of 
^change control regulations. 
This has paved the way for a 
b’E outflow of funds on to the 
world s booming stock mar- 
kets. The year before controls 
were removed in 1979 funds 
were ° n average showing fells 
of about 12 per cent on their 
curtailed overseas portfolios. 
The year after saw rises of 
around 29 per cent on their 
investments. 


WM has also noted the 
trend towards funds being 
formed out to specialized 
managers. Already this has 
happened with the giant Brit- 
ish Rail Pension Fund, now 
managed by a stable of six 
outside teams. The Unilever 
fund is going the same way 
and interviews are now tawing 
place to select tbe outsiders. 
This is not always a reflection 
on tbe way the internal man- 
agers have handled tbe fund 


but a realization that huge 
a soft- 


These boom conditions 
abroad and tbe rise in the 


back-up resources and 
ware service are needed. 

Another factor affecting the 
drift towards employing out- 
side managers is the awareness 
diat the days of huge returns 


have a 

positive return against infla- 
tion but nothing like the 
returns we have achieved, 
which will make it more 
difficult to outperform the 
market significantly.*' 

Hambros remains a min- 
now in the pension world but 
has established an enviable 
track record. A survey con- 
ducted by Sedgwick Actuarial 
Services showed Hambros 
had the best average return 
during the past six years. One 
reason for this was hs ex- 
cellent performance last year, 
due mainly to shrewd de- 
cisions taken during 1984. 

Mr Cumming says: “We 
took the decision to begin 
directing clients towards 
European equities, particu- 
larly German. Swiss and 
Dutch. We thought prospects 
were likely to be better than in 
the United States, where we 
were worried about currency 
and economic factors, and we 
were proved right. At onetime 
we had more than doubled our 
weighting of funds in Europe 


from about 4 to 5 per cent io 
dose on 10 per cent. 

“We also adopted a fairly 
fill] investment policy. When 
we got cash we put it straight 
imo equities. But for the 
present it is a different matter. 
Returns in the last quarter, 
July to September, have been 
negative, except in overseas 
investments. For the first time 
we have a higher policy to- 
wards liquidity. 

“In tire jrasi we have been 
fully invested and it was not 
unusual to have 5 per cent 
only in cash — but not at the 
moment with the prospects of 
an election and all the un 
certainty that goes with it" 

His caution is shared by 
Stewan Aird. chief actuary 
with the Alexander S teahouse 
Group, whose pension fund 
las been another strong 
performer. 

He says that since Septem- 
ber bis funds have been 
moving to a more liquid state 
with more than 10 per cent in 
cash. At the same time be has 
been switching his invest- 
ments from being predomi- 
nantly US-based to Japan 
because he does not like the 
look of the US economy. 

Tbe record ofStenbouse has 
been based on its abilitv to 
spot good stocks. 


But he remains cautious 
about the future: “The dis- 
appointing feature of the US 
and the UK has been the 
reliance placed on consumers 
to generate economic growth. 
In both countries government 
.policies have been towards 
consumer-led growth rather 
than productive industry. 
There is plentiful credit in 
both countries, and 1 would 
prefer a policy towards a more 
restricted credit which would 
encourage industry rather 
than the consumer." 


Cliff Feltham 


From Page 37 

interests first and do the best 
possible job for him or her. 

In the case of pension fund 
managers the duty of best 
execution will not automati- 


The new words 


caUy mean that they must buy 
ids 


and sell shares for the fiinc_ 
they manage at the best price 
available in the market (Large 
funds in America thought that 
this was what the law required 
of them and the main factor in 
a drastic reduction in commis- 
sion rates when the Americans 
switched to negotiated 
commissions on May 1. 1975) 
An example of why price 
alone should not be the sole 
determinant of best execution 
is where a fund manager uses a 
broker who does not offer him 


the best price, but does pro- 
vide him with top-rate 
information on the market, fn 
the long ran the client might 
be better served by the man- 
ager payinga little more in this 
case. 


Conthraatioa: 

This is the process whereby a 
fund manager can add to- 
gether all the deals which he 
has done in the same stock 
through the same broker over 
a three-month period. By add- 
ing them all together the fund 
manager would only have to 
pay the broker the lower rates 
of commission payable on 


large transactions. 

Depending on the arrange- 
ment with bis client, he would 
either pass this benefit on or 
retain it for himself by charg- 
ing the client on the basis of 
the higher commission rates 
that would be applicable had 
the transactions not been 
grouped together. 

Continuation ends with Big 
Bang because negotiated 
commissions mean ihe end of 
the fixed scales on which it 
was based. 


Aggregation: 


continuation though working 
on the same principle that big 
is more beautiful and cheaper. 
Aggregation applies to a single 
transaction where, say, a fund 
management company buys a 
huge number of shares in one 
company, then spreads them 
around the different pension 
funds which he manages. 

As the fund manager has 
dealt in size, be will be entitled 
to the benefit of the lower 
commission rates that apply 
to large transactions. But if he 
then subsequently splits up 
the block of shares among 
several foods, aggregation al- 
lows him to charge each fond 
the higher rate of commission. 


Not to be confused .with 


LL 


Performance 
this precise makes 
investment sense 


Index tiincis are such an auraahv addition to rruditkirul fund 
management that in the US alone, they current h account S irover 
100 billion dollars of investment. 

Today, the benefits of index funds are available in Britain 
through the Legal & General Formation Index Fund 

It combines Legal & General investment expert : nc 
with the most successful and widely used American 
computer software package to create what is potential!' 
the most accurate index tracking s\ stem available 
anywhere. 

Fora Copy of our brochure or information pleasc 
coniact Barry* Holman. Index Fund?. Manager, 

Legal & General ( investment Management i 
Limited. Tel: 01-248 9678. 

Or post coupon below. 


4?-^ 

44*. ■* 1 > 


■? 



Legal & General 
ion Index Fund 


Tu ICirrv I Ii •lni.ni lihx'.v • unJ' M jii.i.^cr.I c-c.il a * kVa, *.:! ■ !i.\ •• 
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COMVVW 

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General 




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Baring Investment 
Management has 
been established 
to assume the 


An individual 

APPROACH TO 
PENSION FUND 
INVESTMENT 
MANAGEMENT 


inflation; over die 
longer term, too, our 
portfolios consistently 
out-pace the sample 


ment business ofBaringBroth^ & Ca, Urrated 
Our pen sxon fund managers ™r oook 

after portfolios totalling over £3.2 billion, form part 

of a powerful international niyesanent manage- 

mentgroup with offices in lokyo, Hong Kong, 
Seoul, Boston and Geneva. 

Baring Investment Managements fund 

SESSSKSSSSm 

their clients’ funds to perform by being in the right 

funds we manage grew at an average 

rate of over three times the rate ot 


average. 

Our approach to business means that we have 
as much to offer to medium sized and smaller funds 
as to major companies. No fond manager looks after 
more than ten funds. He therefore has time to 
establish dose working relationships with the 
trustees whose fonds he manages. So trustees get 
to know personally the team of two who are 
responsibleforthdr assets. 



For more information, please contact 
Martin Shaw; Managing Director 
Baring Investment Management Limited 

SBishopsgate, London EC2N 4AE 
Telephone: 01-283 8833- 


BARINGS 


Average fund performance? 


MOVE UP 
TO THE 



HIGHER GROUND WITH 
MURRAY JOHNSTONE 


M.J. +19*3% 

W.M. +16 0% | 


+22*3% 

- 18 - 6 % 


+29*3% 

* 213 % 1 



1985 


1982/5 


1981/5 


1984/5 ' 19835 

AVERAGE OF MURRAY JOHNSTONE PENSION Fl'XDSCOMPMEDT* 'THE W M l'l IMPUTER SERVICES WF.RUJF.. 

PERFORMANCE 


| | Once again, Murray Johnstone pension fund performance is well above the 

industry average, both cumulatively and on a year-by-year basis. 

SERVICE 

| | Our unique stock selection process thus continues to prove its value to the 

£1,600 million of pension funds we manage. Each client receives the 
highest-quality service and the personal attention of a director. 

INDEPENDENCE 

| | Investment management is our only business, and has been since 1 907 . 

Funds under our management currently total £3,000 million. We are 
completely independent, having no links with banks or stockbrokers. I n a 
changingnnancial world, this single-mindedness could well be of benefit 
to a wider range of clients. 

If you’d like to talk about improving the return on your pension fund 
investments, please contact Nicholas Prescott at the address below : 



NSTONE 


Murray Johnstone Limited, 163 Hope Street, Glasgow G2 2UH. 
Telephone; 041-221 9252. Telex: 778667. 


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PUBLIC APPOINTMENTS 


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Committee 

Administration Officer 

(LEGAL DEPARTMENT) 


There is currently on opporhjnily to join the legal staff. The walk of on 
Assistant Ifigd Adviser is varied and highly responsible, it indudes dealing 
with questions of international and European Community law drafting of 
ogreemertsond legfekition, conducting negotiations with other governments 

and international organisations and the handling of human rigte cases. On 

the Commonwealth side, work involves advising on constfutional law ond 

dealing wifoadrninisrrQtivequesIwnsco^ 

territories. 

Legal stcdfcvebasedlintnndonlxifhcMefirecpientopporfur^iesafouefseas 
travel. They may afeoservea tour of doty in one of HMAfcsans overseas and 
advise delegations at international meetings and conferences. 

Candidates must be qualified as adwoaies, barristers or soTfctois, 
preferably with experience of legal practice or legal research. Reasonable 
knowledge of French and/ar another widely used European language would 
be advantageous. 

Salary writhm the range £15£80-£2Q,830 l Starting salary according to 
qualifications and experience. Promotion (and salary range £I7 f 990-£23,940) 
could come as early as age 27. 

far farther details and an up ph ati onfam (to be returned by 31 October 
1986) write to Civil Service Commission. AJencon Link, Basingstoke, Hants 
RS2I UB, or telephone Basingstoke (0256) 468551 (answering service 
operates outside office hours). Please quote refc G/6988. 

The Gv3 Service is an equal opportunity employer 


DEPUTY 
GROUP 
ACCOUNTANT 

SALARY OP TO £14,000 plus. 

We require an enthusiastic and ambitious recently qualified 
accountant to play a leading role in managing the Authority's 
cash How, capital financing and superannuation fund accounts. 
The post will provide an excellent opportunity for career devel- 
opment and be interchangeable with other Accountant & Auditor 
posts within the department 

For further in formation, or an informal dfocusskm, please 
contact John Howes (Senior Assistant County Treasurer) on 
Lewes (0273) 475400, ext 406 or write to the County Treasurer, 
PO Box 3, County Hall, Lewes BN7 1SF. 

East Sussex b committed to equal opportunities. . . . 


To provide services to 
CDC's General Management 
Board, including the prepar- 
ation of agendas and minutes 
and subseguert administrative 
work, and to undertake a 
number of duties for CDC's 
Legal Department 

Applicants should have 
had some experience of the 

provision of services to a board 
or committee and experience 
of the general work of , — 
a company secte- rc 
tary's office would f x 
he an advantage: 

The starting salary 


for this position would be in 
therange of £8820to £12,370 
and the benefit package 
includes non-contributory 
pension scheme, tow interest 
mortgage loan and free lunches 
and medical insurance. 

Please write to Mrs. V. 
Nicholas, Senior Personnel 
Executive, Commonwealth 
Development Corporation, 

33 Hill Street, London 
— W1A3AR, quoting 
Serial 2202, ghring 
7 A brief delate of quafi- 
I fica S on s , experience 
and salary required. 




Commonwealth 
Development Corporation i 


The International 
Confederation 
of Midwives 

Applications are invited for the post of Executive Secretary, which 
wifi become vacant at the end of 1986. The post is based at the 
London headquarters of the confederation. 

Qualifications: A midwifery certificate/diploma, with additional 
evidence of experience and/or understanding of 
midwifery, preferably from a broad perspective. 
Assets: Ability to work alone and plan schedules; objec- 

cfafld £S^aadmidwifayed Matiop and prac- 
tice; secretarial and administrative sUDb, 
inducting typing; high standard of oral and writ- 
ten communication skills in English; flexibility 
for occasional weekend work and occasional work 
abroad. 

Initially, this post will be part-time (three to four days a week), 
increasing according to the needs of the confederation. Salary and 
employment contract to be negotiated with successful applicant. 
Detailed job description available, on request, from the Executive 
Secretary, International Confederation of Midwives, 57 Lower 
Belgrave Street, London SW1W 0LR. Telephone (01) 730 6137. 

' Closing date: October 13 1986. 


COMMITTEE 
OFFICER 
c. £11,000 


We are looking for someone to join the 
Personal Services Committee team to 
be the Committee administrator for the 
Social Services Committee, Fairfield 
Halls Committee and the Libraries & 
Arts Committee. Commencing salary 
according to age and experience. 

You win have had experience in draft- 
ing agendas, reports and minutes, and 
in general Committee administration; 
this post wiU give you a good 
oppotunity to further your career in a 
rewarding and challenging post You 
should have a good standard of educa- 
tion with possibly an appropriate 
professional qualification, and be able 
to communicate cfearty and concisely. 

For informal in fo rmation ring 686- 
4433, Extension 233a Cafl Extension 
2206 for application forms, returnable 
to Head of Personnel and Productivity 
Services, London Borough of Croy- 
don, Tabemer House, Park Lane, 
Croydon, CR9 3JS. 


BRITISH AGENCIES FOR 

adoption and fostering 




o 



Salary up to £21,000 
findarirs of London Weighting) 

BAAF is stoking ■ successor to Tony Hall, 
recently Appointed as Director of CCETSW. 
The successful candidate wHI be London- 
based and have proven managerial drills, a 
lively interest in chifaLcarv policy and 
practice, and the ability to lead this 
influential and developing professional 
association. 

6AAF is an Equal Opportunities Employer. 

For application form write to: The Chairman 
(E), BAAF, 11 Southwark Street, London 
SE1 IRQ, or isla phone Safly Clayton on 
01407 8HXL 

Closing date lor applications: Friday. 
31st October. 1986. Interviews will be held on 
25th/26th November, 1986. 


EDUCATION SUPPORT UNIT 
ADMNISTRAT1VE OFFICER 
£16194 - £17262 

(A higher rate coidd be considered for an 
o ut sta n d in g candidate) 

Recently established by the Government, 
the MESU is setting up its central offices 
at the University of Warwick Science Park 
in Coventry. The Unit is funded for five 
years to produce educational materials for 
schools, to provide a complementary 
information service, to support teacher- 
trainers, and to continue earlier work in 
special education. Approximately 40 
professional and support staff will be 
employed at the centre in Coventry. 

We require a well-motivated and energetic 
individual for this senior post in the 
education service - an individual able to 
tackle diverse responsibilities and able to 
respond to needs with speed, imagination 
and rigour. The working environment win 
be lively and professional. 

The successful candidate can expect to 

* become a member of the Unit’s 
Directorate 

* supervise clerical and administrative 
support within the Unit 

* exercise responsibilities for the 
accounts and for personnel 

* oversee a media support team 

" manage a Unit network on which staff 
will word process, maintain diaries 
and databases, and communicate 
externally 

The position offers a rare opportunity. 
You will not only gain further broad 
experience at a senior administrative 
level. You win also extend your current 
expertise with new technology and 
systems for the office. 

Conditions of appointment will be 
analogous to those in local government. 

Letters of application with CV should be 
sent to Mr. J. Foster, Director MESU, 
Advanced Technology Building, Science 
Park, University of Warwick, Coventry 
CV4 7EZ. Further details are available; 
please telephone 0203 416894. 

Closing date 22nd October 1986 


LEGAL APPOINTMENTS 


APPEAR 


ON PAGES 32 41 & 42 


TECHNICAL SERVICES 
MANAGER 

St Mungo Housing, one of the most successful 
charities for the homeless in London, requires 
someone experienced in bousing; development and 
administration to head its new technical services 
department. 

St Mungo presently has 10 buiktings in manage- 
ment ana 7 more in development ana a continuous 
programme of acquisition is envisaged. 

The successful applicant will provide full manage- 
ment and technical support to the association in 
newbuild. rehab and the development and manage- 
ment of building. He/she will be a member of the 
senior staff team. wiQ report to die Director and 
will attend management committee wwting g 

Salary &£l&500 
Fun her details fitum- 

Patricia Hamill 
St Mungo Housing 
217 Harrow Road 
London W2 5EH 
Telephone 01-286 1358 

Closing date for applications: 10 October 1986. 

St Mungo 
HOUSING 

forking for London’s Homeless 



BOROUGH PLANNING AND 
DEVELOPMENT DEPARTMENT 

PRINCIPAL 

ARCHITECT 

Wa are looking for a pro fes afan a ly 
quaBBad a rchitect tor this hey post 
within Archi te cts PMsion of the 
Borough Planting and 
Development Departm ent . 

Today's main chalenge for Stough 
Coundi is to design and buM major 
housing sc h em es which are 
wWtocturafiy plearing, yet MM 
the necessary planning and 
budgetary criteria. 

As a qualified Architect (RIBA pert 
III) with extensive relevant 
experience, ktaafly with local 
government you’n be aware of the 
scale of the challenge. 

YouH also be aware of the rewards 
of success, both in terms of job 
satisfaction and career 
development 

Whist your initial lasponsMUee 
as the Senior Architect vnfl be for 
large residential schemes and post 
contract work on other prefects, 
there wD be the opportunity for 
involvement in the design and 
construction of social and 
community buildings and fadities. 
Your experience should indude 
work on convex prefects. Your 
knowledge should include current 
legi s la ti on and pr act i ce . Your 
abilities should include the 
management of architecture! and 
technical staff. And your ambitions 
should include the determination to 
advance a rchitectural standards 
within strict practical briefs. 

That together with a salary of circa. 
£15,000 plus a fun range of 
benefits inducting relocation 
expanses, is what this opportunity 
offers. 

Closing date: 20th October, 1986. 
PREVIOUS APPLICANTS NEED 
NOT REAPPLY. 

For fiMthar detais and an 


Stough a/607 6 (24 hour an sw erin g 
service) or 875071 or write to the 
Personnel Section, Town Han, 
Bath Road, Slough, Berks. 

s»un. 

SLOUGH 

COUNCIL 

An equal opportunity 

employer 


WIDER-RANGING ROLES 
FOR AMBITIOUS ACCOUNTANTS 


Over a five square mile area, i ne ^ 

manages and maintains a wide range of vita^ servic^ ^^^ |rtn .^ 

fflSasssafflS^Msmsssss- 1 

ggamara msag sa sgega 

Eszs&attssssxspsisz: 

Assistant 

Chief Internal Auditor to«iMoo 

This should prove art ideal role for a forward-thinker with sound, relevant 
S^young dynamic Rnanoa Department of wem * «*£*«*** 

business systems and IT professionals. Ref. 459. 

Financial 

Administration Manager to £15,300 

To contribute to the Engineering Department’s a 

aaasgssas acggMBj!^ . 

irSrol balance of payments, and provides firet-rateexpenenMinap^tion dose 
to the operational levelin such busy and vital service areas as eng tneenng, 

transport and leisure. Ref. 460. 

Both positions, offer generous benefits including flexitime, ^ibsidi^lr^tourant. 
an active sports and so ctal dub and season ticket to an. Prospects are excellent 
wrthrn this fast-developing environment _ 

To apply please contact Stephen Wood, Personnel __ 

Kensington town Han, London W 8 7NX. Telephone 01 -937 5464 Ext 21 67. 


Tfu$f^ c Bor<nujRgf 


us ual hi i i ' smmM 


AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER 


RH0NNDA BOROUGH COUNCIL 
DEPARTMENT OF THE BOROUGH 
TECHNICAL OFFICER 

CHIEF ARCHITECT - 

POST T4 

Salary Grade: P0(38-41) - 
£13,653-£14,862 plus essential car 
and telephone allowance 

Rhormda Borough Counci is seeking an enthu- 
siastic qualified Architect with management 
abttty. 

Applicants must be Regtatered Architects, and 
should have had previous experience on local 
authority development s . The Council lodes for 
staff with flair and imagination, a strong sense 
of design and, naturally, a sound knowledge of 
buildng construction, as staff at al levels are 
encouraged to shoulder as much responstoility 
as their experience permits. 

The Rhormda Valley provides si i ncrea si ngly 
rural ised and attractive environment in which to 
five and work - within easy reach c# Cardiff City 
Centre, the Gower Pennjnsda and the Brecon 
Beacons National Park. Houstag prices are ex- 
tremely competitive. 

The Coundi has a generous relocation scheme 
offering assistance towards removal expenses. 
The Authority is an Equal Opportunities 
Employer. 

If you feel this ch aB en ging position would be 
of interest, please apply by obt aiu a ig an 
appScation form from the Personnel Officer, 
Municipal Offices, Pentre, Rhormda (Tele- 
phone: Tonypendy 434551, ExL 257), to whom 
co mple ted forms must bo r e turned by NOON 
on FRIDAY, 17th OCTOBER, 1986. 

The appointment is subject to the National 
Scheme of Conditions of Service. 

GWYN EVANS 
Chief Executive Officer 
TT 7/10 


SOUTH SHROPSHIRE 
DISTRICT COUNCIL 

APPOINTMENT OF 
SENIOR LEGAL OFFICER 

(POST SI 4) 

P.O. 1 (1-4) £11,952 - £12,894 

Apphcanons are tnviwj from quafifod and experienced 
Sectors lor this third Mr management post. 

The successful app&cant wil head the Legal Section at the 
Secretariat Function. Tlw Section, whilst small, b a very 
busy one which wderttkes 8M conreyancingand other 
land transactions, prosecutions and legation, me person 
appointed wil represent the Coundi at pt ibfc enquiries 
and gne legal advice to all other Functions as necessary 
over the whole range Of services and the poet therefore 
W® provide an excetent opportunity to gain al round 
experience at legal work or a Local Authority. 
Preference wri be given to appficants with Local 
Government ex pe ri e n ce. 

Relocation expenses of up to £1,200 together with 7S% of 
removal expenses are payable as appr op r ia te. Every 
effort wril be made to provide temporary a ccommo da tion 
where necessary. 

AppScation forms and twther detais are anitafafe at the 
address shown below fTet Ludlow 4941) returnable ty 
not later than noon on W e dne sd ay, 22od October 198& 
G. KelfeL Quel Executive. Stone House, Cone Street 
Ludlow. Shropshire SYS IDG. 

37B 


SCOTTISH AGRICULTURAL COLLEGES 

DIRECTOR OF 
SCOTTISH CENTRE FOR 
AGRICULTURAL 


Apptaaaons are Unfed tor the post of Director of the Scottish 

Centre for Agncuttura! Engineering (the former Scottish Institute 
of Agricultural Engineering) wtnch is sited at the Edinburgh 
Centre for Bund Economy, near Penicuik, 6 miles south of 
Edinburgh. 

The Drreaor w8l be responsWe to the Board of the Scottish 
Agricultural Colleges through the Principal of the East of Scot- 
land CoBege of AgricuKure for the efficient operation of a 
research and deyewpment an d teaching farifity in agriculturally 
retted empneering: marketing of the Centre's expertise: promo- 
tion of R + D contact and ccnsuSmcy work and tha provision 
of a specialist advisory service tor ties subject 

Applicants must possess a degree in a suitable branch of 
engmrermg and [have a posspakote qoMcatai or evidenced 
some degree of specialisation. A knowledge at agriculture and 
agncuitott engmeering wB be advantageous but not essential 

The salary is on the scale E1&020 - £24,302 per annun with a 
noiH&mbutory superannuation scheme, appropriate travel 
and subsiste n ce allowances, and 25 days mud leave. 

be obtained from 


FINANCIAL AND 

ADMINISTRATION MANAGER 






chanties working for the homeless thm» E h the 
development and management of hostels in 
London. Rapid expansion means we have out- 
grown our administrative and financial systems 
and we now require an experienced professional 
to take over these fhoeGons. 

The successful applicant will be an accountant 
with an a&zunis£rative background who will be 
able to channel our energies and nmfa» the best 

use of the resources available to us. He/she will 
be a member of tbe senior staff team, will report 
to the Director and wffl attend management 
committee meetings. 

Salaiy.o£174X» pa. 

Further details from.-- 

Patricia Hamill 
St Mungo Housing 
217 Harrow Road 
London W2 5EH 
Telephone 01-286 1358 

Closing date for applications: 10 October 1986 

St Mungo 
HOUSING 

Working for London’s Homeless 


Cft^y op CQRDtpp 



MANAGER- 
CARDIFF TATTOO 

£16,000 pmOm 

A Manager with a great deal of Bair, marketing alriBs 
and co-ordinatiiig ability » Deeded urgently for the 
efficient iiiGTUiiiimmt mad coat effective inuring -of 
the Cardiff Searchlight Tattoo. 

The reroonreUkaa include maifceting, infelicity aed 
public rebtnng; aponaonririp; budgetary control; H- 
aooo with the Army and other bodies; c on t racU ; 
and supervision of production and venae 
arrangements. 

The appointment is for one year contact kutUty, 
but this may be renewable fora farther two year*. 
Application farms and father details may be ob- 
tained from the Cite Personnel Officer, CSty HaB, 
Cardiff; CFl 3ND, telephone (0022) 822290. to 
whom completed applications moat be returned fry 
16th October 1986. 

Cardiff City Council is an Equal Opportunity Em- . 
player and applications are adcomed from suitably 
qualified and/or experienced people regardless of 
sex, marital status, race, retigum, colour or 
dadbUity. 



COUNTY* PLANNING 
DEPARTMENT 

ASSISTANT 
POLICY ANALYST East Sussex 

(two posts) 

Salary up to £10,164 

We are looking for two tatBffigent, setf-motivated 
and numerate graduates with relevant e xperience 
to work on a variety of in te re st ing and challenging 
topics concerned with the formation, m onit o ring 
and- review of strategic planning poffetes. 

One of the posts is mainly concerned with de- 
mographic and housing matters and the other wife 
local economic issues. Both are part of on tateS* 
gence and monitoring team that is responsMe far 
providing sound, relevant and practical advice on 
poficy issues. 

The nature of this work offers oonskferabb 
opportunities for career development 
A specific professional or academic background 
Is less important than a proven abifity to anfeyse 1 
complex Issues and to communicate cfearty. 

FOr further detafleand a ppU ca t i oa lone lei Pet 

WeBer/DavId Pamuter on Lewes (OZ73) 475400. 
exL 573 or write to Personnel Officer, Pet e * 
House, St Andrews Lane, Lewes BN7 1UR. ■ . 

Closing date: October 22. 

East Sussex is committed to equal opportunities. 


ARTICLED 

CLERK 

The ran$e of legal activities in the south 
coast regional area offers excellent experi- 
ence for a career in the Public Sector. The 
diverse and challenging range of legal issues 
arising stems from providing services to tbe 
community and our leadership in the com- 
petitive international and national con- 
ference. tourist and entertainments markets. 

We now have an opportunity for an entiraa- 
aaic and hard working graduate who' has 
already taken the Law Society's examma- 
uons and can start immediately, or for a 
graduate who is taking the examinations 
next June. 

The appointment will be for Th years, with 
an initial salary of £6,606, rising to £10,523 

Upon Qualifi cati on^ 


be retened to tbe Bororah 
Hafl, Brighton, BNI IJaL 


29801 crt.414 




S * dj*™* 5 * 0 " about tbe post please tele* 
phone Mr. RjV. Divine. 

Owing date : 24th October 1985. 


Brighton 

Brighton >c a nuc;g;t' f 



— ■ y.uiwmj — TO *** tnuuir 1 * 

“PHST definin* tbe product he is to sdL than to 


that "He wilf give nothing - "on 


TffirmrlirrsonQr^ra 


























THE TIMES TUESDAY OCTOBER 7 1986 


inOo n 


lls, lMn 


•■'illn 

* r, Hlunt 

•nig 
1,l Vs l |g> 


jl Firm 


1 . axaju i f m u i ufcjun i 1 wuu\ f I 7 QO 4 1 

PUBLIC APPOINTMENTS LEGAL APPOINTMENTS 



DIRECTOR OF TECHNICAL SERVICES 


£28,851— £31 ,977 p.a. me. 


Sfe B CS' FXT - Pi ' “P T - P - FXLCi. 

cal SavtaTE 4 If**® 1 Director of' Techrri- 
Dennce s. is retrnng in May 1937 . 


rS? , 5 bm the mansge- 
achieved 6«n the recent 
o[tbe deaerate 

tmx/ar^i ? 0up °^ ■ services, with greater effect 
towards the 21st Centtccy, 


dr™ 1 * S^ces applicable to a Wa Lon- 
don Borough-Architecture, 

“"£***“? Services. IteaS 

and Support Services-and is 
ky D^ertor and two ConaoUers, with 

! v ° rkforce of over 1,600. including 
the Direct Labour Organisation. 

You will need to be qualified technically but. 


far more importantly, you must have a proven 
record of successful management at a senior 
level in a large organisation. Your experience 
will have been in other the public or private 
sectors, preferably both, ana you win have 
shown a consistently high motivation to 
achieve targets which have been set 

For an informal discussion with the present 
Director, please telephone him on 446 8511 
ext 4401. 

Selection In te rv ie w s will be conducted on 
10th November 1986. 

Further details and application forms are 
available from the Personnel Office. 16/17 
Sentinel Square, Brent Street Hendon. Lon- 
don NW4 2EN. Telephone 01 202 £252. Exl 
424 (01 202 6602 outside office hours). Please 
quote reference 602/1, 

Closing date 17th October 1986. 


UNIT 

ACCOUNTANTS 
maw - £17,488 

We are revising 
our management 
arrangements to 
meet the chal- 
lenge of 
providing better 
health care for 
the pemte of 
South Essex- 

Each of our two 
large umts re- 
ffires a qualified 
accountant with 
good communi- 
cation skills and 
the ambition to 
become a Gen- 
eral Manager or 
Finance Director. 

For tatter de- 

I— n> *. b 

District 

Personnel 

Department 

Bssfl&n 

Hospital, 


WtgUgggnYCgMMBTOTDEgMLOPPgHUggTO 
LOHDOn BOROUGH 


Teh 0268 
287611 
exl 297. 

BASILDON & 
THURROCK 
HEALTH 
AUTHORITY 




LEGAL APPOINTMENTS 


Vsi..:. iVi.V- 


PRIVATE CLIENT LITIGATOR Withers are 
looking for a young lawyer of exceptional ability 
to join the Irrigation department, which has 
expanded rapidly its commercial practice but still 
retains high quality trust, agricultural and chan- 
cery work for clients based in the UK and 
abroad A Candidates must have a good academic 
record arid the experience to assume a substantial 
caseload fordients who expect the highest stand- 
ards. It is unlikely that anyone with less than 3 
years experience will be suitable. The position 
is open both to solicitors and barristers willing to 
regya/ify A Salary .and benefits will be attract- 
ive and reflect the qualifications and experience 
of the successful candidate, who will be encour- 
aged to make this a career position A Please write 
in confidence with a curriculum vitae to our 
staff partner John Motsson at Withers, 20 Essex 
Street, London WG2R 3AL 


WITHERS 

^SOLICITORS 


LITIGATION 

SOLICITOR 

j There is a vacancy at our Banbury 
! Office for an experienced Litigation 
Solicitor. Initially to take over sub- 
stantial femily/employment/gcncral 
litigation workload. 

Excellent prospects and an attractive 
salary will be offered to the right per- 
son who will also have the 
opportunity to specialise as part of 
our Litiganon/Company/Com mercial 
team which deals with a wide range of 
interesting work. 

Please apply with C.V. to: 

D.N. Bromwich, Administration Partner, 

■ Sboosmhhs A Harrison, P.O. Box 2, 

. Compton House, Abington Street, 
Northampton, NN1 2LR. 

SHOOSmS&HARRISON 


* Meredith Scott v 

CORPORATE TAX TO £30,000 + 

We* estabfched City pr a c tice requires SoBcttor, 
preferably vHth at least 3 years related admitted 
experience and Qty trained EARLY PARTNERSHIP 
envisaged. 

COMMERCIAL PROPERTY .TO C-£30.000 

Large recognised practise requires Solictor, mini- 
mum 3 years admitted experience to join their 
ex pa nding department 

COMPANY/COMMERCIAL TO CX30.000 

Saficitor minimum 2 years admitted required by this 
respected City practice. 


PRIVATE CLIENT 


to emooo 


Professional Standards to mm 


Reporting to the Chief Executive, the Professional Standards Secretary will assume 
responsibility for a wide range of matters falling within the jurisdiction of the Professional 
Standards Committee of the General Councilof the Bar. 

This is a new and demanding post, regarded as one cjf the key appointments in the 
restructuring of the Bar’s professional governing body which comes into operation on 

Applicants should be over 30, educated to degree level.or equivalent and have a sound 
knowledge of the Law and the Legal Profession. Salary is negotiable to a maximum of 
£25 000 per annum, with a non-contributory pension. 

Abdications which must include a full Curriculum V&*e and the names of two referees, 
SSuid be’ marked 7 n Confidence' and addressed to the Chatman of the 
Professional Conduct Committee, The Senate of the inns of Court and 
toe&Tri South Square, Gray's Inn, London WC1R SEL, to be received not 

later than Monday 3 November. ^ 

Tbs ®@sa®ir®3 ©©oairaeOB ©ff 8Saa is? ®fl Isagllirad] a Wste 


Progressive Central London practice requires a high 
caBxe Solicitor up to 3 years atfrnitted- 


CONVEYANCMG 


TO C£17,000 


Recently admitted Soflcftor required by prestigious 
SW1 practice Commerc ia l bias. 

Meredith Scott Recruitment 

^ 17 Flttr Street, Lemdom EC4Y !AA. M 

W 01-5*3 MSS Pr 0*0* 7750*6 iaftrr office hemrt) J 


SOLICITOR 

Residential Conveyancing (with ample 
opportunity to build own non- 
conientious praciice) 

Newly qualified onwards with salary 
according to years of experience - 
from £1 1,000 

Good partnership prospects for the 
right applicant. 

Please send C. V to Jane Weller 

Stephens Solicitors and Property Centres, 
22 Mntarave Rd„ Sutton, 

Surrey SM2 6LE 


rDAVIES 

o Arnold 

^SCboPER^ 


Vtfc HO** 

, fll _ currently of fourteen Partners and about 120 
We arc a City firrn ' ^ “ f rtlir " n raciice is insurance and reinsurance 
su.fr- The fZne fnS^SntenL We also have 

SliK'n°d .h^n E Commercial Convincing and Company/ 
Commercial Departments. _ 

■ . _ nd steady growth, we have a wminnrog wed 
Due W rrracttoT for both experienced and newly qualified 

> throughout the ^tice° lhe energy, enthusiasm and 

lawyers of high i academic _ cai ^ stimulating environ- 

‘"-rffiSfcMSSSS %ST be required to akc on 

EESJSfwSMiv •*“* _ exaH]enL 

The rewards wiif be above averse and * " 

Please opply «i »«««» ■»* full C. I. w. 

The Recruitment Partner. 

Mr. D.J. Rogep’ 

Davies Arnold & Cooper, 

12 Bridewell Ptace, 

London. EC4V 6 AD. 


HATTEN ASPLIN CHANNER 
AND GLENNY 

GRAYS THURROCK 
SEEK 

POTENTIAL PARTNER TO 
HEAD LITIGATION DEPARTMENT 

£20,000 p.a. for suitable applicant 

Experienced solicitor sought to head Litigation team at our 
busy Essex Office (close to M25 and Dartford Tunnel). All 
aspects of litigation will come within the Applicant's control, 
with the emphasis upon Commercial, Civil and Criminal 
Litigation. 

Advocacy skills essential. 

Apply to S E Rogers - 01 594 5469 daytime, 
and 0245 421304 evenings, or in writing to 
our Barking Office at Radial House, 3/5 Ripple Road, 
Barking, Essex, IG11 7NG 


Commercial Contracts 

North Home Counties 


McDonnell Douglas Information Systems 
bmrted an? a major UK supplier of sophisticated 
Computer and Network Systems with an exten- 
sile customer base in both the Commercal art? 
Pubic Sector. Turnover m 1936 woi exceed 
£100m for the first time and continued profitable 
growth has established the Company as one of 
the country's premier information Systems 
manufacturers. 

Expansion of the UK Commercial function 
provides an exerting opportunity for a young 
Negotiator wtha strong legal background tojom 
the UK Contracts Department Ttas key rote wnS 
enable a person with confidence and atxkty to 
make a megor contribution to a team that already 
enjoys a very hqjh level of wslbliiy withrfi the 
Con^rty and vvhirii ts respected for rts combir^ 
bon of ftewbilrty and responsiveness ailed to its 


obligation to protect the Company's commercial 
interests. 

You should ideally be quahied to degree level, 
and have first hand experience of contract nego- 
tiation in a high technology environment. The 
ability to interact with Senor Managers and 
Directors of both customers and your own com- 
pany is of partudar importance. 

Vtt wrfl reward you, not only with a generous 
salary, a car and free petrol, but also with a liuly 
stimulating career move mlh opportunities to 
move ahead m a rapidly expanding organisation 

For further details telephone, or write enclosing 
tv. to: Andy Gdham, Human Resources 
Manager. McDonnell Douglas Ir-founaiion Sys- 
tems Limited. Boundary Way Hemp! Hemp- 
stead. Herts. HP2 7HU Tel 0442 61266 


_ BAPENOCH& CT. ARK — 

COMPANY/COMMERCIAL COMMERCIAL LITIGATION 

WCl ECl 

Our clMB a kratknq C.n< Lm. w.th .. rn.il.nu.,;i v 
youn ^ s °‘ ,;i,0T Vl 3i !J t* ,t ’ d Opandmg citnu hav volts a nitinbcr c-l hi.jh 

aihmwnt Hu.- tuntni fc-jm U InAv rs 
CmUxn wiil tv bn;t! anhhnr .,n.t muj 
and pm alt cumpys nunurr. jnd r- ar. oxct k.J dcr’CJianal^ ibi- ,ih:fev l.-> imriiHt.ife' j J. ni.tmruM 


and pm’alf company num.Tr. and p- jt. ivi Itj 
opportuniiy few cand^ares serkmjj early ro>p_ , nMbi , \ 
m this demanding onviranmoni. 

TAX ASSISTANT 

To £30.000 

Emerging medium sired Legal Practice seeks an 
exceptional Tax speaabst, who may be a SoUcUot. 
Hamster. Chartered Accountant or inspecror of Taxes, 
to undertake a challenging role within the Craporaie 
Tax department. Assignments wiD predonanantly be in 
the Banking area ana will encompass both Corporate 
Tax and VAT. First class prospects exist lor determined, 
ambitious carxfadaies 


demonsnate the ab lttv tn utvk.Vt.ikt' j J, ni.imfur-j 
cm *, ioadami work uyi ! utl Je: pn--s:::,- 

CAPITAL MARKETS 

From £25,000 -f Bens 

Le.tdmg U S InwMmpitl Bank v»'kx .tn 
iawvvr aged 27-32 to take up a senior pn-.inon m is 
transaction cxcnuxm group CamMitcs should h.wa- 
nlflMv experience ol hr>nd issue*.. • 4 x-a|v, ,vu! 
syndicated !,vm> ThtTt- is scope lor piogn-^»jii min 
eaher a marketing or picxluct dewkpmeni m!,\ 
Rcnrunerahon is htqble competitive wnhui die 
imvstment banking In- Id 


For details of these and other poxrortv ccmiac i imfith Farmer or John C nBa n . 

Legal and Financial Recruitment Specialists 
16-18 New Bridge St. London EC4V 6AU Telephone: 01-583 0073 


^ INTERNATIONAL 
AND CORPORATE 
TAXATION 

Sinclair Roche 4 Tempedey is a 27 partner few firm with offices in the Cfly 
Hong Kong and Singapore. 

The firm's taxation department advises the firm’s clients directUy upon the taxation 
treatment of a wide range of transactions both domestic and international A 
significant part of the department's work involves toe development of tax-based 
structures to finance lhe acquisition of ships and aircraft and ad vising as to the 
Internationa} taxation implications of banking transactions. 

We now seek an additional lawyer of three or four year's post qualification 
experience in corporate taxation to participate in the work and continuing growth of 

the department 

The successful candidate will be highly motivated and have a first class 
professional background and academic record. 

Rewards and prospects are excellent for the right candidate. 1 

Please write in the first instance wito full C.V.to: 

J. Ritchie, Esq.. 

Sinclair Roche & Tempertey. 

Stone House. 

128-140 Bishopsgate, 

London EC2M4JR 

SINCLAIR ROCHE & TEMPERLEY 


Byatt Michau & Smart 
require 

bmmercial Property Lawyers. 

BYATT MICHAU fe? SMART are seeking men and 
women of the highest calibre and are offering not only substantial 
rewards but also partnership opportunities and the challenge 
of influencing the development and direction of the firm. ■ 

The successful applicants will be joining a recently estab- 
lished and expanding five-partner firm in Central London 
serving a wide range of corporate and commercial clients, both 
public and private. The partners recognise that growth and 
prosperity depend upon the ability to provide a service that 
is perceired to be excellent. 

If you have more than one years relevant experience 
since qualifying and you would like to find ip==s— 
out more, please telephone fete r Michau on T?V/f 
0M30 1 661 or write to him at Byatt Michau 

Smart, Swan House, 37-39 High Holbom, f\S 
London WC1V 6AA 


COMMERCIAL CONVEYANCER 

Ambitious Sofeator wanted to assist expansion of 
commercial side of the practice in this prosperous 
area close lo London. Good prospects. 

Please send c.v. to: 

Tfre Partnership. Secretary 
Long mo res 
24 Castle Street • 

Hertford 

Herts SG14 1HP 


COMMOCUL CONVEY AMCKR 

n> umh iniMUjrrtiwd M Urur 

Wl.UU.-W, Cwtllwu 

oAm 0.UIW1 hhiii KilMn 12 
m-'inlr- lm rnjM prtvm Dill 

1.. ., rvis.ui.ui mj i?8i 

CONMXT w .„ , (mu ( CNnOOlc 
-iuuisom. .imi nkiiuir prrwin 
u>.»M muv< ili m« Iht> tor 
< ji « ilmix «r jiiIi unrt. Prmi 
•ns >mi *rt% pii-I Lill SliUi 
l .1 .iti-s nu ninsi oi Ij 57 5f>77 

NORTH HAMPTON: LnmntPrii.il 
I'.up i ,.u»«i ii’iiui-tl Irt- iWuti 
lTsiu.i in.»W Ml In* nt 
■ sp.'i uiu n1 iiiii-nlm^ ClMh 
a.mqvLilnp Wn. .lilhSrall Rp 
« iiiihiu ui (fi ~ orati 
I RA NC H -.riM.hir DislI'stfUllir 
Cumi.il In ji in i' Mil unit nun 

1.. 1d.,il|»,r lu.i~ l AM MTu 
|u,|'. ' U,su\ LonsuiUnls 

f , 'ilitj 


ADVOCATE lm ritmr dim nuui 
nimuul l» ilKhirr in luk Mon 
BKMVl'*'’*' 1 ^Ywmnpl OHAt- 
CONVEYANCER. c.P .1 trunku, 

■'"J'Olnrftilil, 

C*Hisuiunisc«J5 

uimiuw Mu, 

Snihsinip t>np|.u in.,,1 

"'"l Lmhi .V) m r i ik u.-s 

-'X i iiusiin.oiN (1U35 mi, 

UTIOATlONSOUCmre lm s, tf 
I--U. lilt, minium Moiv m.op. 

jJJ ^ PiTHANBrt Ul.Vi 

felWLY QUAUnCO snJH ilui |„ 
ts.ui .,ni, MHiunwruu 

,>n " rw 

TRUST ADMM MANAGER rvoo 
**••««■ J nntsl i cm BpTLsm,- 

""i rt-rumurj rtav; mo&oo 


— & 





' A 



ran 

1/ 


lm'i 

>ee< 


s or 
bbit^his 

is me. w. 

cn ibe ■ 
led, loj 
ybody tc . 

ry like il \ 

into dis 
:ofa m 
nference 
live cor 
der ths 
solution 
o Wane! 
dinous l 
; bote". 
imedtaie 
m shou - 
is been si 
(finish!" 
should at 
>r debate. 


Banri 


r the fi 
;re will 
ntaiive ; 
spite r 
iring the 
jrkers i 
r applies 
tsses. / 
onth wa 
rrphon 
CND.F 
tiional v 
tied tha 
it dealt * 
ND’s N 
ie will n 
line: “L 
taiabou 


• The foi 
eccen trier 
qoestionn 
by the 
question i 
stay pert 
Kingdom. 
expect to: 
or 10 yea: 


Tres 


Yet anotl- 
the loose 


of ‘"Bong 
the MoD 


the MoD 

bidders 

managett 

Devonpc 

Plymoutl 

isierialct 

OUth h' 

champag 
of the b 
Foster*^ 
week an< 
governm 
more tl 
Wheeler 
city." Hi 
the othc 


Lov 


Among 
against 
pool last 
WestDc 
pamcuU 
school, i 
chanty 
rates. “ 
Shcrbor 
pKr in 

suiting 
he said, 
case of 
for Dan 
school. 


Profi 
anno 
field 
robo 
Gres 
Brisi 
new? 
bers 
at it 
ai V 
later 
mist 
that 
e\is 
Davis. 


THE TIMES TUESDAY OCTOBER 7 1986 


LEGAL APPOINTMENTS IFERSONAL COLUMNS 


DONCASTER MAGISTRATES' 
COURTS COMMITTEE 

Caart Clerk under training - salary up to maximum scale 

£8,664 - £10,167 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


FOR SALE 


OVERSEAS TRAVEL I OVERSEAS TRAVEL 


as sittings « a second court house at Thome. 


WOULD nun^M rrpmente* 
In Wihtt I erniiluiwn Lid m 
I^ShaiM* not n-renllx in laurtii 

|)h',iM fiirilw ■ imlJ « , l urt tenlly 

Irlronnie Ol 457 17W 
auTEFUL iiunks w t» mtni 
ikvm ex mns nnd fji Jndr lot 
lu^rr. »m»iM C E C 
TS Kjpm On Hwm vwr Ha 
ox l irt -Win I Loir You 
T nun 


prowt^ tfworoomtf^tyif sitting with bot h toy 8 nd ^lipeocfery magratretes. as we< 
as sittings at a second court house at Thome. 

The post is designed primarily tb f the nem rfy quaffed y^«sotot^but 
cpn^d«ation»riflaiso he gwen to candrfaws who haw ata final awmuwjwnw 
! fUMuwi some heads- Articles of clerkship win be svdaWe. The fucc^sfulcentfatete 
wB receive a training programme andwork with a seraor member of staff who wB 

dark in court at the earfest opportunity and receiving a good gmuralng in court 
admmistration. After the first 6 months a person who hBS shown abjmy eaneacpeca 
SraSveasalary not less than £8,664. Further salary reviews w$ take place at 
regular emoraate. . 

Aoofcattons stawifl age. quaffications and previous experience, if any, together jot* 
trnnames and addresses of two referees should be sem to me as soon as possible. 

meet court staff by prior arrangement. 

A T Draycott 

Clerk to the Magistrates* Courts Committee 
PO Box 49 
The law Courts 
College Road 
DONCASTER 
DN 1 3 HT 


BIRTHDAYS 


RSMPOOL I S P MM Ittnr br 
nunv mnrexiute upxfor re«*u 
inw la iomr ItaHH Birtldjv 
Horn Rob. V. lm. Mm Rub. 
fVK -\iuu. Dflfrcn a Humph 


SERVICES 


CONSUMER LAWYER 


RIMUU 1 RK PfKmcnOM 

1 A wr lw seruniy wfcm 
! Ilimi in 1 Mur Ok 7302333 
FBEJfOSMP, imp or Mam»W 
All #«, OaMinp. DM 

■yioi 33 Abireiton Road. Lon 
don wa tpI. Ol 938 toil 
CAUIK CVS UO p refr raional 
rumrulum iliac dorummK 
Drttete Ol 631 3388 
MHMUNG PROCLOB - son B 
out now boforp the textile sea 
son ai 57 mm mtciaUsni 

nuratre home for addfrthe d te. 
■w sa in an« of outawdM 
nalurol beauty Started by 
nurses. to mu eltar L mydMO 
AM. pliwoUterapW nd 
mttiH mxbral omrer For U 
iinUaMiiraspMiH roman Uw 
duvetor. Cioods How, Can 
ft'ooyfr. wutt SF3 68E or IMP 
phone 074783 686. 

SELECT FMEMM. Exdoshe In 
uodurtod lor Dip muttached 
68 Maddox ShreL London Wl 
Trtephone 01^193 9957 


If you have recently qualified in dv8 law and are looking for a job which 
entails putting your knowledge to practical use, you could be the ideal 
candidate to join our young team of legal advisers. You should have an 
interest in consumer affairs, the patience to sort out problems and same 
offics experience. 

Consumer Lawyers handle die consumer cases submitted to us by members 
of our Which? Personal Service, and give advice on a variety of general 
consumer questions including. those arising from the Association’s work erai 
. publications and provide malarial for some Which? reports. They work under 
pressure but the wide variety of problems handed makes the job interesting. 

Salary wffl be on a scale rising from £1 1 .1 78 to £14,661 with scope fbr further 
progression. Benefits indude 28 days annual holiday, pension scheme, free 
He assurance and interest-fteesaason ticket loan. 

Please send a CV to: Personnel Officer 
Consumers’ Association, 14 Buckingham Street 
London WC2N 60S 


A LOAM mlh a monry Bar* guar- 
aW C2.QOO to C30000 will* 
ngrauw'tfruniv APR 18AM 
i«W« Free rntuiKteficy cm 
IT am* ffw Me coiw Dm 
IOO Irrrtonr Pern 0*0 uirtU 
a.OQora. Premier Portfolio. 
FmwM. Rraamo. 80 1BR 


UO BMra mi for IM IHUHMM4 
98 Mattox siren. London Wl 
TeWohOoe 0i-»93 9«»57 


LEGAL VICES 


amtMCME ay lofly aoau 
Redsaunton. Cl 80 + VAT and 


0244 319398. 


WANTED 




FOR SALE 


Brown Cooper 


Since its kvmatum in 19SI Brown Cooper has buih a 
tnde-rangins commercial practice with a repurarion (iv excel- 
lence. It otters the facilities of a nuxkm practice widi the 
miormal atmosphere of a smaller tirm. There is now room tor an 
additional 


SAVE A PILE! 

8 

Resists Carpets 
KbMa uriM pie one** M 
ptaB nue Box o mteUyl? 


«de Irani stack. 7 ye* mr anon- 
lee to home v otta CATS per 


-and co>mbIbi ora Ueo. Hors 

g5»g51r B«a pnee w yeh — 
£695 pet CTd Pe rteo go nfc ftoe 

548 Won ROM 
Fkog G«eo SWS 
T«fc 01-736 7561 
Frae Es*mMs-€dKH Fong 


COMMERCIAL PARTNER 


with the flair, enerev and skill* ru contribute to the growth of the 
him. possibly in a .'pecidlisr area. Applies non* are invited both 
trom solicitor with substantial experience in a highlv regarded 
pracnce anJ imm small commercial or specialist practices whose 
partners have the qualities soudit. 

Appkanons, which will he nested in aricr confidence, 
should be addressed to Michael Brown at: 


Brown Cooper 

7 Southampton Place, London WC1A 2DR 


■WCTIT* OF NCnUKD Tlw 

umrrwtr rrito Hudlm Wf- 
rulMs Oor M EngLwdts urgral 
dKMasiol 17D> and ISttiCTBlu- 
n pmod Mvlr lumUnrr. 
Mimm. nw Hrmcv on 
Thanm ioaQii mji 1 ia 
BounvTdWilti .0202) 293580. 
TOBstum M3392871 7443. 

BffMnr. CM 10483) 810982 

FINEST madly wool carprt*. Al 
tr44r pnm and wider. MM 
lOOH rxtra. Laror 
roam sop mwand under Ml 
normal oner. Ouncrrw Camera 
Ol 405 0453. 

KKIFMOERS. Bnl MM (tar 
all saUM "rub. Our dMi 
inrtudp mosl iMar Ctmaabn. 
Oran cards arrowed, oi 838 
1678. 

THE IMS 1785 I S M Other 
liars avail Hand bouM ready 
lor ww ro WMB 4w 
"Sundays" Cl 2 50. Remember 
When. 01 688 6323 


COMMERCIAL 

PROPERTY 

over £20,000 pa 


DENTAL ESTIMATES BOARD 

CHIEF 

DENTAL ADVISER 


Wc have several vacancies in industry for 
experienced conveyancers to handle a broad 
range of commercial property work. There is 
also scope in one case to handle a substantial 
amount of general commercial work. (Rec 
Cons) 


Applications aic invited from repsKtcd dental surgeons to <3 a 
ftilMunc appomimcM a the Denial Eaitnalcs Board for 
England and Wales *tart dcab wnh csimaics for dental 
i real mem under the Nauonal Kcakh Service. Applicants should 
have had aide experience in denial practice. Salary £2JL350 per 
annum. 


Forms of application and role description may be obramed from 
l he fieri to die Board. Dental Estimates Board, to rixm-nc. 
East Sussex. BN20 SAD. Closing dale for receipt of compklcd 
apphcaimi forms is Tuesday. 2Slh October 1986. 


74 Long Lane London ECT Tel: 01 606 9371 

CHAMBERS 

& PARTNERS .VT. 


COMPANY/COMMERCIAL TO £40K 

Partner designate sought by expanding Central 
London practice to take charge of good quality 
Company/Commercial workload. 


AVERY, MIDGEN & CO 

EXPERIENCED CONVEYANCER 

rci^ured in ci>pc uilh hcavi -kvUwiI ofinranrereol jnd 
MilMUiiiw! remlmual o-movannnj. onpropnair valnv ofJtttd to 
hiiUN) <|iuli5yiS fvrum Ftav wmc uuli fuB CV Ux 

Mr MJS. Harinsamm, 

Avery. Midgen & Co. 

277-281 Oxford Street. 

London WiR ILD. 


CONVEYANCING TO £20K 

Leading City practice seeks a first-class Com- 
mensal Conveyancer of up to two years PQE for 
diverse workload and a broad Ghent base. 

COMPANY/COMMERCIAL TO £22K 

Dynamic Solicitor of around two years PQE to 
undertake mainly Private Company work in a 
friendly Central London practice. 


ASA LAW 

LOCUMS 


CROYDON 

LITIGATION SOLICITOR 


Sokcuors A Lean Executives 
jMiljtile ia jff disciplines 
awwyvute. 

01-248 1139 

We wetcome enssnes trom aO 

tn rej e c t w e loeur r. won wecul 

pan une aeporantes lot te- 
men. senn tenred & omei 
commerod lawyers 
AS* U» Locsa Scnttxs 
6/7 l Male Sc. LadOk KB 
LflMOH ECOTfAS 


LITIGATION T0£19K 1 

Medium size West End practice is on the look- 
out for a dynamic Solicitor of about two years 
PQE for Commercial and Civil Litigation. 


Eeceitom o pport uni ty loram- 
Maous sobator won trvmuro ol 
3 years post puaMcanon 
expcbenca abed 2aeS. 
£15.000-00, OW (Xus com- 
pany car. wme yum UM CV to 
tademns. 11 George Street. 
Croydoa CHS INS. M PRC. 


^gw TfersmuteC AN 

CtcN enenivlwtc tn thn lanat nmhKmn Miririiinifa 


Staff specialists to the legal profession naritiwiae 
35 Aldwych. London WC2B 4JF. Td 01-242 1281 
iansaohone alter office hours} 


C| o< 




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nCHCTS FOR ANY EVCMT. CHS. 
SlaflTOW EAD. Ora U-> Mb. 
•XII Ihraur and -port- 

Trt 821 bbi 07828 0498 
■iEx/\M/ Bom 
BRUMMY DUE * Qii- xomeoie 
an or usual Tnnf-X NwxWprr 
tutm it* xrrv my innr wn* 
bom ClPflO 049231303 
OLD YOU* FLACSTOMCS. Nfr 
Ur xrlh Mf KaUMMiltf* 
Mnms Trt 10380) 8S00W 
' XV KM I 

■ajJARD TABLE'S. OH POKCfird 
nuflOOHn r«nrttoVa«» 

Atxo ia \ y Trt oi 940 use 

GAYSy CHESS, Irt MB. « V» 
flbr mm sport Trt 439 IWS 
AH major rrMH rOx 


COfTCUrtUB OH Hbpr MlW - 
IO G«tfO»r. VBA 4 "KW ArtttBa 
bom Dtutamat Train Ol 730 
2201 ABTA MTA AT0L 


mamooMiB Disroimt 
'rSJvwoiwvxmr 01 3B7 9100 


LOW Cb*l F«ros M 1 9A MiW 
TiaxH Ol 485 9237 I ATA 


1ST & CLL B CLASS FUOHTS: 
HHT Dwio untx tsomv QfM 

Traxrl tOnzTi 36097 

/97109/97538 


buuaoa. « yWE « 

till Traxrhviw • AMa AWL 


SUP njCHTS WorKtxwiite 
HavnuiUM 01 930 13o6 


■ H » pnrF«* OO OM D . Rrqpm 81. 
WX 01 734 8307 ABTA/AWL 


OKSCOUHT FARES WunfwMr. 
01 -*34 0734 J up rt er rraxrt 


■mm. PortimH OMHI [ «* »- 
BMOlb Ol 738 8191 ATOL 


ANTIQUES 

X)LLECTAB 


ABLES 


( TC OpmSH 0733857038 


smnzPUHbSrtirtMMhnntos 

01 724 3988 AST A ATOL 


ROYAL DOULTOH TOW Jo9>- 
Fiourlm^. anitneh. «*r . warn- 
od 01 8M3 0024 
WANTED JrtUimrSwonb. DM; 

vn nc enamor oxn 9~d 
nr itn Trt 037 466600 


MUSICAL 

INSTRUMENTS 


xrrv good rOMtttton. C1.900 
Trt-Ol 876 4108 ExeiWWl 


STP WWAY o OranO. Ro^yoog 
no. 16? 170. to*rrw reftutn 
JOBS C4.000. Trt:7339066. 


SHORT LETS 


Krtnmgion Col TV ?a rr t>w 
Trtrx CoJUnqham AnmtmeMs. 
Ol 373 6308. 

LUXURY SERVICED FLATS, 

mural London from C326 pw. 
Ring Town H» Art* 373 3435 


FLATSHARE 


lux IIHXrtl IUKBP Oc-f 10 rwrr. 

all luartibm. C6S Trt Ol 
589 3467 


HUMYON 8barr house- S mtn 
lubr CSOpwrwilrt Cm lexers 
only Trt B37 7232 


RSnrCHy Prrt 1 20*. rt wuw p 
flat. CM -085 pan excL TO 
249 8726 MM- 6 pm 


Fnmdfcr* Pnaton from £17* 
CJ89 iBAeV HOfrD (Town or 
Brarni rrtnu C2X9-C279 1 MB* 7 

ntHbarrem luHy mrt Catxrtrii 
day n*0hn (Tur/Thur/S*»i 
iranMcn 6 airnoTt lax. Oa 
droanuiTsJSLAND SLN Ol 
ZH 7482 AST A/ ATOL. 

TRAVEL CENTRE World Wtd* 
FliBhn xprnaLntoo m Firs*, 
dob Ctan. Erono my lo Antra 
M. SOOID A/iNa. LSA. LMXto. 
Faro. Gmn*. Abo arronmw- 
datom Swte Alps. LHDoa 
Comb. Afoirvr apsrtmmto and 
Prtvakr xHa. Trt Ol 666 7028. 
ABTA 73196. 

ADI Ttrfcrta fjprmiirH New York 
C249 L_A E349. Toronto 
£279 NMroai C329. Sytnxry 
£789 Awioato £749 DarlMr 
130 Man smwLOl 839 
7144 

CHECK ISLANDS AHOTxv. 
Mnwi. Trrxrr*fr. vrnas. Art 
D em on s Taxrrnas. Hobcteyx 

I /FUrtbs. B r on w ares/ mum 
bookann- venDn HoUAaank 
1 Trt 01 2 60 1366. 

I CRRBTKAS m Ibe Csnanes 
LanzarMo/FUerlex-rtitxn. 1 1 
Drr 4 xvertu £399. 0923 
771266 THnswav Hots ABTA 
ATOL 1107 

UXTRJ AtolDllCA. bow rasa 
mabb 0.0. Rao £435 UM 
£495 rtr Abo Small Croon 
Hobday JoamrvsMg Pera 
1 from £3601 JLA Ol 747-3108 

LOW FARES WORLD WHO: 
CSA. & Aimrlra. Mid and Far 
! East. S AIYks. TTayxrtr. 48 
aurgtm Store*. Wl Ol 580 
2928 ivtsa Acreptedl 

V ALEXANDER Einop ro n San. 
FIKpxts. Ol 402 4262/0002 
Va a e m nNt CrtnpcWKeworld- 
wMe Inx Oi 723 2277 Am 
Atrt lac Mnn/vm. 

AYXENS. Malaga. Faro. Patma. 

MM terms & Xmas ava*. also 
1 Urty. Germany 6 S—Us rr £69. 
Peter Pm Ol 491 2749 I9-7V 

C Y7 B US /MALTA HoMS 6 Ales. 
SPhns ai eg res from mydw 
R ing Pan World Holidays <H 
734 2662 


all utdm Lowest lam* on 
maior vlWnM earners. 01 
684 7371 ABTA 
REST Fare*. Sfcr FISiMs. Ben 
noiBfm-i anywhere S*V Trax- 

rt 01 834 7426 ABTA 

CMMIPES Spain PonwrtBrtY- 
Crroro. Madrid ir £67 Trt- O l; 
434 4326 ATOL Atf Bargains 
KONC MDM MW.WCMJI 
C36A. Surtew CdS7 Ca ber 

re nun oi SB* «i* abta. 
H08K LKDOD C99 FranWun 
Pam £60 LTC. ^01 328 
3536/01 66* 4613- ABTA 


rtoU* Frtdor 01-471 0047 

atol 1640 Acma/Vba. 


Brtv ir C69 SumMrL 01-434 

4897/8 ATOL 1776 
SVD/MEL £635 PrtOl JS6B. AU 
nuior ramerc 40 Ata/NZ. Ol- 
584 7371 ABTA 
S. AFRICA From £466. 01-684 
7571 ABTA. 


GENERAL 


wmnnm or Wrdo. Hooey- 
nirnii or 2nd Honeymoon* - 

Dtwoxn I he Mamr o MUgt ro- 
manor 0W1 in ABWm or 
Wmier can 01 749 7449 mr 
your FREE rotour brortrore. 
Mao* ol Italy DM* T. 47 Shep- 
herds Bxal* Own. London. 
WI2 8 PS 


SELF-CATERING 

CARIBBEAN 


l iissrin 1 1 specUEy re- 

baled lares on sch edule d fSs. 
M.T OI 980 9872/9731 


SELFCATERING 

balearks 


£23 per 07 UP lo prtd for safx-er 
arttetr-i £260 per Or lor 90M 
AB diamond Jew toery boost 11 
Mr Hart Ol 960 8030 or WrMe 
3ol Harrow Road. London. 
W9 All England roxered. 
JEWELLERY. Cold. SHxer. 
Dtmonds urgenlly wanted. Top 
pnros wimams. 43 Lambs 
ConduN s< wet 01 dos esae 
BOX nouns at Ascot tor or 
rmlonal days in 1987 wme 
SOX 889 


LUXURY roanom Hrt NVU6. near 
Abbey road. 066 pw. M a t o r e 
protrtcacmai wanted *0 share. 
Please phone 328 7092 


Mel car. IK. 7 days arram. 
Fly/Dihe rr C299 IV wp y 
<06961 639900 ABTA 


MENORCA Holidays onurons 
Frxdas/Saiwday 

Orl irom £12 0 Tel 01 509 
7070 A 0622 677071. 

Crtur Hotadpyv AMI 1772. 


SOUTH KEN MV Prat female ahr 
l«p 2 bed WmM Hat xxrtth I oth- 
er New tilled kh & naih. Axafl 
wined £79 pw PleasecaM 60S 
9233 

FLATMATES O electhe Shartng- 
wrll niao introductory sen Ice. 
PHe irl ior appl: Oi -S89 S491. 
313 Brompion Road. SW3 
6IM9IRJID1 RUSH pro< F. o/r. 
r/sm xlldre mp« equipped poirt 
rial Clow lone £200 pent. TO 
OI 740 5024 exes 
BECKENHAM Prof F to inane 
IUL dbte o/r. £250 PCM Md. 
Tel: 660 31S8 aner 6pm 


fares on charter/ j cned id ed IK*. 
PPM FVOM OI 631 0167 Art 
AM 1893. 


WeUdwior ctieaoe si faros 
Mctnnond Traxrt. I thike 3J 
RKtpnood ABTA 01 940 4075. 


SELF-CATERING 

GREECE 


WFFORAR i Seat sate 10 USkVCa 
rtboeaiFFar East Awaraua. Can 
me professionals ABTA IATA 
rr eacrepsed TO Ol 264 S788 


TUNISIA. For your MMan 
where Its pg| summer Can for : 
oar ororhure now. Tunmanl 
Traxrt Bareau. 01373 44 11 


home C32pw Telephone. 693 
8619. 608 OlOl. UKW 
; D prof female N/S. OUebedM. 
Sure luxurtom kJi/kath- EJflO 
prm Tell 01 606 8261 IBM 
NCNIMCIUM Own room * both 
In super «dn IM N/S- CGOpw 
. met. TrtXJl 970 4760 a(l 69m. 
Wfl* Chase Richmond Pk. Prof. 
2Se» share bright condy flaL 
£45 pw Trt 01 8766154 exos. 


01-681 4641. HOrOmm 68341 


CORFU Ba roams. BeauWrt del 
xHlas nr Ihe bearb 26 PW 
C199 I wk. £229 2 "BbW 
CWorH'row Ol 734 2862 Pan 
World Hobdays. 

GREECE. LJtsoaw Blank, dm 

IHNk nib ms* rtr. Zero 
HotX. Ol 434 1647 Ah*. AUO. 
■■HOPES tux man ho ts from 

ElS9ppB.lt.l£LlB Oct Sbam6 
0706868814” 


DIS COUNT FLIGHTS 


OVERSEAS TRAVEL 


Sydney 

Auckland 

LOS Angeles 
JoUufg 
Bangkok 
no 


OP* Rtn 
E420 ETS4 
£420 £775 
£178 £3*0 
£246 £465 
non £360 
£282 £504 


DtSCOUMTED FAMES 

angle n*n 
Jolwq.'Har £3re £490 

tartfl 075 £390 

Can £150 £230 

Lags £2«r £360 

Oel'Bora £791 £350 

fengiw £220 £350 

Ortrta £420 

Aina Aston IT — i Ltd 
1C/m tog not SL Wl 
ra: n-W 825B«7<k • 
UD 8 Cram Bsd rtto W etana 
MCIWSAIDERS 


LONDON FLIGHT 
CSflRE 
01-370 6332 


SIMPLY CRETE 
HERSOMSSQS 3 CHMM 
An*) Gre* toalY oHn benoM 
pn*R8 vta/andios, toi m 
pods, sorao on the bead] and 
sara tatel etoy m Bn* Cww 
Vfeges. Wb offer a wry posonal 
serwcE So dose mg tor our 
snoH. menrty hradnra 
Tat 01-994 44SZJSZ2B 
ATOL 1922 


SELF-CATERING 

PORTUGAL 


NEW UR FARES 


LOWEST FARES 
Pans EG9 N YORK £275 | 
Frankfort £80 LA/SF OSS ! 
Lam £320 Man* £320 ; 
Narnia £325 Sumin £« 20 ; 
JObwg £480 Bxrtfak £335 
Can £2QS K aumwo u cuo : 
Del/Bom £335 Rangoon £350 
Mong Kong £510 CaiCUOa £425 

Hugs Dtocmds Ami 
an 1st A Cfob Ctoas 
SUN A SAND 
21 SanSow SL London Wl 
01-4M Twiyar ess7 


MMW £280 MNM £770 

3CW9*Y £325 LAGOS S3M 

CABO £710 NAM CM 

OK Hi TJ*5 HOOE £«2 

FRAMB1 £85 ««L ffl05 

HOM NWG ECS SYO/UQ. TO 

EIWR1 TOO TOCYO £580 

SKYLOBB TRAVEL LTD 
2 BM BET, LBBGH Wl 
TA (MX TSZyKO 


WINTER SPORTS 


UP UP & AWAY 


Nairobx. Jo'BofJ.Oiro. Ctofan. 
IstartauL Sincapore. ILL. Dcftri. 
Bangkok. Hoog Koor. Sydney. 
Enropc. & The AnrerxcM. 

Fbnriago Travel, 

76 Sh aftes b ur y Await 

Loadea W 1 V 7 DG. 


GMS9 0162/91-097751 
OpraSatanby MuB0-Uj» 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


BOARD 

MEMBERSHIP 


SWITZERLAND 
FROM ONLY 
£99 RETURN 

Save with SwKsairt 
Super Apex. 

London to Zurich or | 
Geneva daily on con- 
venient afternoon 
flights. And daily 
. flights to Basle 

(except Sundays)- 

Book and pay I4days 
before departure. 

&ay in Switzerland 
ai least until the 
Sunday after arrival 
Bookings and full 
conditions from 
travel agents or 


HgLHOUM W _ 

■ Tto tol m l m MR trtriri 

& 01-584 5060(74 fox) 


01-4379573 


wtxnan poMicaf academic, 
d e termined never again to 
stand tor P ar liament. As 
nawnaly known writer 
and broadcaster 
principals only pteasa. 
Wishes pan m poftcy 
mtoung not taken female 
mambersh^L 
Reply to BOX R39 l 


WALES 


Cancer ; 

Together we can beat It. 


YOUNG MU rimrlif hxul i-xrro 
lix,-rix|iiiiriiloi ixm X merit On 
U-> fniii in LonOtm .X k«al 
i-\,r till* i- r. irxmnrd Xxith wM 
all r.mttrt <-x pm- rence m ontera I 
pr.ii nr*- b- JW« in a xuticd 
lh lil mi lutlinn Cmmrrn* 
l.i'x imliHfmu romfunx -me 
Ml ■.* nulM- imtanKrtion 
ii.irunma di-rnfn K hlnulion 
M.tqi-vnrt.lllX- to .ixxW HI JH 
•ui-.n inriudmu inMiramr end 

riibHMMl —Tx rr- E.xpcnriKF 
in ,nl >* ilu-xc .iroa- would be 

bt-HMid IHII IS D<* iswnlul bud 
dlilr ■ dMfPldtr xxHI In- vxilHm Hi 
i» lu mil in dll ativp. and ip- aMp 
iuxiuik xx mi minimum -uucrx a 
stbii mi lev. rnmpirx nulUT- 
dwl keen to «wm brtx mqjcn 

•-THI- -srtjrx romox Cl 0.000 

iK-pcinln*! on dry ,md 
C\pn i.r*r r Pksw t, nlr. cnctO* 
t»i I X In IjiHIW Brooks. SOI 
■ •■nil Irsoidirtil Hbnv. Cur 
/nil NLliHitfro IkJV 7TB 


We fond ov?r omr third oT 
dll revib h imo ibe pnrxw 
1 khi jud cure of cducor in 
difUK 

Hrlpuxh) scndingjfkma- 
tifflior nuii-d (tgirijo 


mtthnde tow con etghi& 

- £dR« can prove fe 
WOflM cSents sto3 1970 

AROtm THE WOOD 

non 1781 

SYDNEY £374 £S60 

PfcRTH £374 £000 

AUCXLAWO £390 £7 <8 

BAWGKOX £209 £385 

SI^ORE £209 £418 

WASHNQTON/ 

BALTIMORE £179 £359 

HOHQ KOMG £2*8 6W6 


MID WALES 

Dover VALLET 

IVurtoI <4d IfMi rmmir 'I 
f ra Bifo nnr ip hwnfal c unan y ri dr . I 


Imrhr rar-api ufomHUlii 
■lid lii mrli Him, ifo u *pnap . 
linspraadfoRBUimanh. 
SFEfUL Ml M BREAKS 
FM forafosu mdrtaincosi. CIS 
pwp>iXMnptrRrtu. 
BflIWLAS FAHM 
Tdopboae (06S4) 2T96 




Cancer 
Research v 
Campaign 


1 2 Cjrlion H'«w- Cct r Jl C. 
lfh-mTTi7’l0j,i >Hiif-ro 5££ il 5tR 


BOSTON I irt 1 >»,, 

«A«0a £2<2 £3S 

JO BUOG ^6 £426 

UMA £253 £«S5 

LM ANGELES •-'« ir-. 

MEW .YORK £149 £296 

GENEVA E75. £94 

0-4 EMU COURT HOAD 

Loma«« 

aHfriW* H#* evw sm 

l i H D n foi u Put 1-83 3444 


BMSB8AB, 


Fantastic penthousa Bat n tte 
Heart d KayeMgs Dtfe 
reap. 3 dUe tats. 1 sngte. 3 
bathrooms. hAy fitted Wctoa 
root terrace EiOO aw. 


MTk ATOtMSI 


Ctetea Oflte 

#1 -SR 52Tt 


British Heart Foundation 

The heart research charity. 


LOCUM. DEVON SrtbltOr if 

I rjIUKxl I'M B 17 ITKMilhS lo help 

•xi:n j x jiirtx nl xxmk iu -null 

I iii-imIIx ■■jih. in rtumnnq 
; Nadh Ik-xin Tn-xit km bum 
! jn riM-l bill nm-l tjp irfMblr 
I ,i|»l .irt.iW.ibk- Phone TutiK-x 
• “ai?? Hf-ITO Ril LME 


GENERAL 

APPOINTMENTS 


102 Gloucester Place, 
LonjonW1H4DH. 


LmCATKVf xnticilnr imrtfr JS 

I , .,illi.iunn nco-inw-K xxilh lixn 

!> M>-| r ■iuiiiix loxxii I urn 

' !Tk lli— -\ CnfTxiIljnl*. 

SOUCITIIR. Ininu qiulllird lot 
— *11.111 > MunnlilitJ llrrl SllPrl 

II. m In* lilkfattmo Cl 5.000 
IXj Wiln 'wniaMi-l Xppnmt 
i , i-iil' ■ 1, 1 5«3 5553 

SOUCTOR •-■lb -4i ,hmi tniuiiul 
ilx hiki *AM imurtnl i»w 

■ >■■■■, nlwi> i m C*a ii*xiiil 

■ ::j. XLiix iu* Virnd Prr 

Nim.l rw 1 ? HiMQt, 

YOUNG SOLICITOR KM hu-x 

II.UllP-lllli in .trill- Good 
.ifll.uiiuh-l pi l.’fc Inn \L*m I 
1* a 1,1 - 1 ivi-mtHtn <rt.x& I 


YOUR STAFF & SMOKING 


4 wwjue ocoonunf* to raanagon aM oeoann oartera to mm 
4 *-**n» Vq n lM0ng US cXHKrtHAf on dP«H6raa 1MK6IA pokras On 
p«iniAM«mn 
LOMXW saNNAIh THUS OCT 23 
EDINBURGH SBMMMfc MON OCT 27 
MANOC5TER SBHMAR; WED OCT 29 


itogCrttooHi LMaort oo W-837-iBO 
ACTION ON SMOKING AND HEALTH. 
Ml Mortimer SL London WIN 7RH 


FOR HIM 


YQUNQ SOLICITOR tx iinam»| HI 

1*1-1 Kim- in ry-yillx 

• .■Hill I Ml H-l-'K-Ml IW.Klnr lu 
: 1 ■ all XLiix M.iln \< 

I Iti-Mimrl h !;■&>■ 

TRUST TAX MANAGER. Mini 
1-tiH'i x . -,i - irkilial ,xi- n-iv- 

•— l*L>i.l K| ll-.MfllMnl HP | 

ifa.-iii-, i ifaiftniiii* il -piriH.im- 

l.I.M.I i I.IY.0CW Xh-C 

■ -nil. w.ill K— iiiiinu nl ni 5AS ; 


BBC TV 


MATRIMONIAL lm.il -M-aulixr- 
IU>|. Il,i l.l,i l.l ilk Xxa-AC-X 

i i?iHi 


n, : .^tnc tn a h» w pbx lhr xaraiy GcoM tforrdl m J *trrt uf 'Ux 
Irnihh A mfoT Xnmrtx' kibrfkKd nOmredoac ^tanb-ioh (W 
IK xbutolh- 1 lh« ifoartiirioar !<»nho kwlxpongrr. HcramVrwil 
-r-lni t» Lum xhbKx. art li-irtlaHc lo xpaL-mL Uc annul- L 
WfaxTx Inn a K«x hrtanm /" - II ajfal m P BA l Wl 
W-x.nl Hum. nrtraiuPlri X Aok 1<* 

-MY FAMILY & OTHER ANIMALS' 

CIO BBC TV. Wood Lane. 

Loudon W12 7RJ 


Wtddrng Srtto 
Omner Stats 
Bering Ttei Suits 
Swpbs to lire 
For srtB horn £30 
UPMANS WE 

DEPT 

22 Ctamg Cross Rd 
London WC2 
tto Lecester Sq tube 
01-240 2210 



“PHS - 


^n A to the' ffutxTRs. or that ' "’He "'orill give ™Shreg-. 


RENTALS 


RENTALS 


RENTALS 


CONDUIT StRfflT. Wl LhW 
■uihxi lira company Irt Mem 
ml .i Icrtc I Room. BarHiOom 

ST^rt-b-rt-tb- CH/CHW Ufl 

C2 SOOew rxtl Adrwn «“• 
( .*1 570 6775/4 


ROM ||, GT«J I 

x'TIffSl tot PO? 
^ cHTiXaiop pcm Trt 
Ol 2M qooa 


& 5 .*rT 55 S!®{S 


HENRV D JARRSConun ro now 

on Ol 235 8861 lor 1^ 
.lemon. oi tarnnhrd Pm j” 
muw to rom hi KmohiahnonJ*- 
Chrtxra and Kwwmrtr* 1 ,T} 


, . , sivid cmn oa.'} oj _ 
•book ureeh wh cwwyj 

.re co m a »n ram « 


w n» nm- SSi' uic rK 

fO0J 


«•». around floor i 
usopw H01PP •nLTfttto 
946 9447 


HOLLAND FARRs UUti I * 
(yHS fUl BM BW RI f fotCbCb 
roinppm *«th latest u*ho* 

am Conxcmwu 

Co Irt £160 pw T«.9BB»22- 


— #.« irarairti EyroAtfU. 

wrutof r «K dr0 ^ "“lSw *UnHM1PHW.t^S 

won" S^Trt 4BX aWro rtHgftm u,j2Wto 

I- 0*n» a,n Trt-93^70« fun, no ropmsn SZS-Ti* 

foraBon' Otto *w- 


AaWBeAKDOCUTIVt^rtu. 

lux ftai/boxw- uoio Cwcuw 
l xual Itr* wa PMWXSJ 
lc-7*. Irrtilb HwParV Chri 
vxa Offlrp. oi 5^ e»« J" 
North ol «» PM* W 111 ^ 
Pan. ofhro Ol 586 9882 
CUWHAM COMHOH. SjmcJ»* 
rod. 3 noth home a M W 
xtrrrt oil Common SB U rtW- 
■Mwtod with all mod «"» 
sun 5 «um al 0*5 P w «“ 
IC22H pw* Burtuiom 56» 
77*7 

HAMPSTCAD rotor ON 

jrfvHK rounm- urtiniG. 

o/looKlTO Hrrth * 1 

S) 11 Lxharod xludw bakOTO- 

kit. miirm/wr 

ax ail wo** 10* I it C95 gw 
Ovener Ol 586 4SB9 or 8» 

2321 

TACHBROOK STRECT SWk 
iSSyiSnertea mMSOBetvm 
a iranoml rotaU on. 3 m m from 

punuro sin 2 romms- 
(hmna rm. t»m. ■mowerl^i^- 
potto Lore Co Lrt C22S < w 
2*4 7363 

SM. xx»xrtx 3 twd bork e wrU* 
oaraw h Wfonl Grwro 
runan Prrtty waiirt ^atoeti- 
suprrhmOd turn Ax Ml now for 
lonpfrt C275PW Buttonam. 
SSI 7767 _ _ 

AMERICAN BARK TT 

outre-*, toa ury 
Chrtwa. Km^nnto-®^ 
xia arrox. £200^»MO pw 

BuramEPtoAtoKSBlM-to 

CAM»TOO|IIR»JL«»*S.W*^ 

OOOpw AJIniBfln* CO 499 
1666 

CH IS WICK. Lfom Mrorotowmf 
ord 2 term family hoin* rt«f 
irampon 6 ’»'<» ££& 

com Ax art now tore Jrt x-fao* 
pw Burhuuns 361 77o7 
KEMSRMrroH. WB EJreaol 3 

Brd. 2 Bath fUl SUUnO. Itemnjl 
Room. Frtly RW Kit. 
caOOow Pti •ear pnoiw JO**- 
War 938 5765 <Ti 

LANSOOWRE ROAD Wll Ifofxir 
■KShrd nouto. 6 brd. 2 batti. 


■SsSssSa 

657 082* 


mAnncmw^ 

-PPbtoW [Mm. wSSrS 
dqaro toror ftr!!22L* 

hiraims pmaii 

£128 pw 2M 7363 


m, uran st MM* 5 4** tWk? 
STTw* Gxc S86 3261 


^SjSSS&'S' 

MSX wnrti ** 

pro I **M*T*. - CI9S 
rail 602 9233. 

ram. ryMMiui EiMPi- ten 
sw5x 2hartw, ****** 

nrq. Harm* IrblR Horer: 9*6 
BU7 

umitoic lomnm/fams auto 

oompMW **'l*t?£ 

Mtociian * •““JSfiSS" 

NK lor 1 xwrtxT irom C2x»pw 
499 1665 


SUPER ^agSAMEs' 






uuNi i now uny nWrtWi 4 
u min lawn Mtafk fur 


tort 2 boU» '“wb Also m 

ntsM and 9nmU 

C4O0 pw- Homo from Home. rtqmi 
twe 9447 A39-6C 

BCtOI A BUTOIOFF forMronr m brink 
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Colt A Hanwdwd 01 386 7561 Trtoohc 
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tofttuun & Rpoxcs 938 3622. 
mu kmcs HD. Spartota bairo 
w naTfSnmhrd. I b"L CH AVADLM 
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ST MAINS WOOD SrtrrNOh afp* Rrhawr 
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tor nr tire srokmo or* r rnlat r 

prepcrtim in rongM jrtdprnno ‘ 

London areas £WO/I2.OO0n« H 

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w ,n«Mreio<x/Sui6Mon. ChmM 

fix let* £160 C250 to- Home 
homHomc: 946 9447 


87 Srorrt ShroU 
Trt 439 6534 tl 
Also ra irtHldow 


mMH/MH fowtomi - 

ORMMILUcnkhntoM 
o ataaiu m 
TrtroMOR 0932 


DOMESTIC It 
CATERING ' 
SITUATIONS WANTED 


iVABJXBLC RIRUIIIUII 
irattotf iMhMM. ramtZ 
twiim. rhrA and newMoi^? 
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CHELSEA ft ■ 
KENSINGTON 


ashed nous*. 6 ora. n “*“• t Item mm*-. ^ . 

ixror uMy room, oardm and 1 wo sroprord* Bush. Lounge / 

mnMB. I rionto Mnom. 


arms lo roirnnonW oanl-ra. 

Z 7SO pw Ol 994 SB42 
H" 1 ***** M Crmtual 3 be d 
turn maw wKh xww pomf 
pans. C2S0 PW pteo- 747 361 1 
MAYFAIR Lux 2 d/brd 4ih nr 
■erx apL AH ii«l»h» w - 
eosn pw Trt Ol 725 0272 
ST.UMU’S Lux. mad. tw-n «u- 
<ho rial. K 4 b Hfl. 11126 pw Trt 
457 7619 

NT Nr SrtfrMtoS Block wllh Hft. 
lounge. 2 dbte Dcdrm. aB ma- 
rtwteS C220PW.01 -209 0175 

AVAILABLE MOW Luxury flaUA 
bouteS C200 Cl.OOOpw Trt: 
Burma 361 6136 
3 BCD lum Rats U50 C3O0 
pw winOMon area. Home 
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Idted kitchen, double ttedroom. 
hath . CM Mr lube foOOpcm 
Ol 740 6880 

■■nil mnn Brand new dr- 
larned family house bdertor 
iieininrrl 4/6 M CSOO pw 
SSSTfrom HbOte. «6 9447. 

BIUBI innil VtLLABC. 2 bed 
rial Lounar- dimna room. New 
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Home from Home. 946 9447. 

.ran tra tt WU1MG. Flats nr 
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Hrten Watson A Oo. 380 6275. 









Ni Off KrtHtogfop -HU, 


Garden* Ttboi zn 
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property to let 

LONDON 


W W— HPW toelfotoPik 
3d tod* 2 Mm t on mm «- 


CHELSEA SW3 

CMrairag 4 bed unfcntebed 
house *i quel tocabon. 2 
reoeps. 3 trams. Mcnen + M 
apiAVKBS & gardon ES25 pw. 


For the bast 
rental s^ection of 

QUALITY 
FLATS & HOUSES 

in prime London areas 
Z7B Baris Cmrt Road. StfS. 


GENERAL 


12 HERTFORD STREET. 
HMYHUR.W1 

We ** are pissed a man the 
sn men Herttoras vrtwe « c* 
otto i setaSon ol luraiy Swtol 
& 2 Bat MRU sensed 6 dajs 

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H ERTF0H D 6 
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CEKTRAL 

LONDON. 

Property owners list your 



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have the finest business 


have the finest t 
executives for 


LEGAL LA CREME 


mh 


7622 (D 


AAjBARVE ALTERNATIVE. 

The nnrsl bouses far rental- 73 
9 James SL SWI Ol 491 
0802 

ALBARVE. Lux rtllas/apts xrtoi 
mh Sept. Ort* thru whiter. 
Ol 409 2838. YIUMKH. 


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cmc ta tt for 

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now BOWL 

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61-734 7432 


HamKn< 8 3 Gffafflffler and flaab 

Exeter 


SM WIST . Mem sprcul Offer* 
onoroup- MING FOR A DEAL! j 
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*urm« al CBt. ato for a copy , 
of our bumper brochure «0ii 


SW6. Chaining 2 bed house 
with lots of spac e. DM rec eq, 
kil/thfBng. tarn bathroom. 6 

firths +. £190 pw- 
PARSONS GREER. Attractive 
1 bed flat near tifoe. Sitting 
room. Ifft/dWw. pdio. ceflar 
Long oo let £115 pw. 

Jobs KoSaosirarfli 

01-736 MM 


Hamlins. Crammer and Hamlin, e 

associated with Trowcc, Still 
and Keding, wish to appoint an 
ASSISTANT SOLICITOR to 
their rapidly expanding Exeter branch 
office, specialising in conveyancing and 
general non-contenrious work. 

This position would suit newly 
admitted solicitor aged 25-3D. 

The successful candidate wiU be 7 

offered a compctirivc salary together 
with other usual benefits. - • 

Please send full curriculum vitae, 
in confidence to: 


7/10 b 11pm near 
MH Trt Ol 686 3414. 


SM WMZ2 EXCTTINC OF- 
ms’ Jirai mure a chafe i for 
10 nriiUm you lo a FREE hob- 
day any date* Maars of other 
■Mxroonts for catered ctaMx 
pnrex from Cl 39” S/c C 99. 
Ru m |>X no w Ol 570 0999. 

SM BONNE MKZ - Chnftmas , 
ton* hi Coxirctwxal only 
C2J9* Fin a ebairt and 90 
FRET- Bnu in lor drtsute Ol I 
244 7533 

SM TOTAL. Superb rhateN. Mb. | 
hotels in Top Fremh/Aurtrlbn 1 
RcsorUIrCOl >0952i 2fll 1 15. 

SM KorBter Luxury flat lor 6. 1 
Good rentral kxanon Trt. Oi. 
580 3«4S or 1024027) 200 ■ 

SMWORLO TOO Ski Resorts. 
Lowest pnm (rom CS9 
ABTA Brochure OL 602 4826 


BRITTEN POOLE 
& BURNS 


Peter Kails 

Hamlins, Gnastnerintd Hontlitt ■ 
8 Sotuhenthoy West, Exeter EXI 1JG 


KENSINGTON W8 

1st Poor flat nP88 2 borate bed- 
rooms Doolte receooon/dnng 
room. Stody. Btereom ensuw 
plus store room. HasJ tacaen. 
Root tcran. Ca taL £325 pw. 

COHNWAii SAKJBIS SW7 

Spaocus 2 nd floor B at 1 oa uMe 
bedroom Recrobon. kueben and 
temraora. CO lei £165 pw- 


Tet 01-581 2987 


LEGAL 

SECRETARY 

to 11,500 


UPFRfEMD 

nMMEY Mr tom sac tet 
Lwefr me ton tt 4 bedra. 2 ete- 
aanrrao fowot bad kaB2Si.sbwi 
rmKda iraOi G94 Dea^ffui gte 


£350 to 

W11. «M sow 2 teftm aptn 11 
pnasuB bk. fflte recHL U wastv 
dry toil 2 WC teC/H £165. 
PABS88S GREEN, tntadr despsd 1 
bBdrm «M otaonog Green Urn 
reap, far «aan «y. ba8i/W.C 5 
mBB tase £150 


Smart, well spoken secretory is. re- 
quired to work for a small, friendly Ann 
of solicitors in WC2. Screen, based 
with shorthand. Experience of working 
for City firm preferred. 

01-405 8853 


(Mtenw beara hen, 
a OouDte tearoom, 
fat Bsft/WC. 


Wl Steer m DeuWe ter 

?5£bo r w “■ 

01-439 5334 


WTU ftlUl / 

WKTfflM/OTT 


WebM ■ MRte sefoebon al very 
auutfwe lias and houses avarf- 
atte to let wten easy access, of 
ihe wxm. tor tong lets a van- 
«S rjwafe hwn £150 pw to 
rf.OOO elw. Ptece teL Beteda 

JWttyor Peto ScaiW wno wil 
De nappy to ooto you B«h yoor 
cntpBies. 

Hrafco Office: n-834 8991 


SOLICITORS 
OFFICE 
IN SE1 

Require sWfled legal sraretary for Partners. Very : 
good salary and prospects. 

Reply to . ”.. . :.V - • 

Lomax LLoycKlones & Company 
278 Old Kent Road 
London $E1 . . . 

01-703 6461 


NLGOTI^roH Driumtc. hard 
xxurkiiKL 2S/3S. lo ram our 
xucrrvxiui n-nldi tr«n Exited- 
«w ptrtrerrtl bul not (wnlul 
*#M fo rat Otxupr Apply rn 
txnniRL Ouf*»xni Oomrarabte 
270 Lran Q Rd . London. SVS 
9 \S 


rnailtrr Bcokrr mund lor 
IrMhiH) t k company Aphfa 

uMv nwi ro 2J* wtlb al lc«sl 
2 xfxnx ix ark rxpmcncT THr 
phone Ml AffllteM On 01 2B5 
6800 


iianager enctosmg a oop> of your C.\. or telephone t 
01-606 8835. ‘ 

Theodore 

Goddard 

16 Si \larlln's-lf-Graiiil. London KCf \ 4KJ. . 


./frjr Tocfogj 


CHANCERY LAME IfWIte 
unr. Trmpx - tt 20 -M - 
p n n u iwi b up to £10500 39. 
mddo\ SI London Wl- 01. 
A93 0046 


.... ,*» v*-4**-tj{ 
. W.k'fr-V^ 1 

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Partners’ Secretaries 

for ’ v ,. 

City Solicitors 

\\e are looking Tor 2 Secretaries - one to ftork for a Partner : 
in° up Commercial Deparfmeni and one to work Tor a . ’ ~ 

Partner In our Corporate DepartmenL You must haie 
excellent audio typing skills. We need Secretaries who arc-. 
well organized and enthusiastic about their work and who . 
can he flexible regarding (paid) overtime when necessary ^ 

iryou would enjo> being part or a progressive, hard wbrflni-'"’ 
and fricndlv firm of solicitors, please write loihe Personnel. _ y . .. 
Manager, enclosing a cop> of vour C.\. or telephone heron- ; 




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^^eportOctober 7 Tors 

Entering UK for 

working holiday 

^Shh* * Immigration v 


THE TFMHS TUESDAY OCTOBER 7 1986 LW/SPORT 

Rngby Unions week of torment: first of a two-part series examining a sport at the crossroads 

Battle lines drawn for confrontation 


JDAY 


- Before Sir John ■** Uw be had 

r . Master of ihe Rolls fiSu dsi ? n * ESS 5 tf or emptoy- 

, Dillon and U»? ?' ,c ? ***? wEnfc- 

Jbhnson ^’^Croom- 0 7J» gptemi had foods ofhis 

.:IJ^n, 8i v ra0 c Wb , r6] 

^L^" 01 irfcum betn on a !)![”■ 50 lhai Ws PropasaJsxo 

Sm 0 S mm - n '* ea,th citizen J?L!I! ,pIo > rmen! ° n *y aiose « 
• KiMd?S 1 r 1ISs,on 10 lhe United ° ored w *“* financial 

for 3 working hoiidav ^"S^menis went wrong. He 

VmS® 01 10 9 ra ? raph 30 of the tha| coaUgna job 

Siwemeni of Changes- /” '« ^department store. J 

1981 (HC 1 Jl? ppeai tribunal had said 

wort* 0 ? lhw he in «wdcd to S5f i hls pTOposais w »e coin- 
12* d “ n «8 his sux-TtE ft 1 ®^ unr «fistic. and that on 
; was directed to ensur - £L»j? ** W ™ 

jng.thai such a person did nni * men 1 U0Q of working unte^ Ire 
become a chaise on publiefuntk *1? hored. To suggest that one 
and that if h?d§ S, 0 k V" holiday 

JJS. duni l e h “ slav - it was ISa 7 P 31 Ihcn! wouW he no 
mCTdvrnctdeniahohbpurnS 155" *27!?* to work was a 
ofhaving a holiday. purpose working holidaymaker was to 
: The Court of Appeal so held nde on iis tread. That 

- wh «n allowing an appeal bvtite ) ^ “Pbefd by Mr 

applicant. Mr Badrui Ju 5i ce RussdL 

^auist a decision or Mr -T* 1 ® working holiday pro- 

Russell. given on May 9 ^qsSf v » SiOn ha d to be set besde the 
who upheld the Immigration £“*8”** roncerning visitors. 
Appral Tribunal’s dismifS] on 5f I ?8 ia P h IT The gravamen of 
October 17. 1985. ofhis Uoral para g raph ’ 85 of paragraph 

a refusal of leave to eSS ^ was lha f lbe P eT50n coming 
the United Kingdom was not to become a charge ™ 

- Mr Alner r;~» fL. t Public funds, and that he was 

plicantMiss ProriwcL? 1 * R~ "r 1 10 “!?*- excepl ' *» the case 
■& tffaoSnS5LP“ ,We ° f ■*“*“■« holidaymaker, for 
' - PPeai inbunaL work incidental to the purpose 

LORD JUSTICE DILLON a ho,ida y- The purpose was 
raid that the Immigration Ao- 1,01 10 ra *““* a person coming 
peal Tribunal had construed the ^ a workin 8 holidaymaker to 
words in paragraph 30 of the sh 21J' Jbal intended to work. 
Statement of Changes in lm - The appeal should be allowed. 

migrarinn Rules 19S3 (HC 1691 The Master of the Rolls and ‘ 
-rake only employment which Lord J a slice Croom-Johnson 
w'lt be incidental to Ureir agreed. 
nS'W imporiing that it Solicitors: Mr MJ. Rodney. 
35 ‘Pcumbcnt on the applicant Isiingiorrjpreasnry Solicitor. 

Judge’s discretion in 
matrimonial costs 

Leary v Leary The order of Mrs Justice 

Before Lord Justice Mav and 8001,1 a PP ea, «* against pro- 
Lord Justice Purchas vided. inter alia, that the luis- 

[Judgmen. given September 1 1] ^.fp^Wiotbewile the 

muirimonial sui^hac/ltfcoir^Iv of 

when awarding a fixed sum “in ^^ufri^^ irKiKaiion 

•rMSByjs's's 

Suoreme f iSlrT R f lhe J 1 ^ ^ dected to assess the 
S The Coun^jr ApM. in a for co^s nndnr Odor 62. 

Sub-rule (4) dearly imported 
•?™« PP ^ 1 M .u Martn ! the gross sum so specified 
S ^ **“? of by the court was “instead of 
f 3, ™° » M » D«tne Susan laxe d costs’*. The purpose of the 
feSt raadc by Mrs Justice ^ was to achieve the objec- 
Booth aite r the dissolunon of ^ves mentioned by foe judge, 
lhe parties mamage. namely foe avoidance of ex- 

Mr Andrew McDowall for the Dense, delay and ag gra v ati on 
husband, who appeared in per- involved in a protracted Ihiga- 
son below; Mr Peter Singer for lion arising out of taxation, 
the wife. The unlimited discretion 

f-H Sr 2vii U rJ ' C JLL, ^ by the Older had to be 

■ire miin “tcreiscd in a judicial manner. 

^ ^ appea How foe powers were lobe used 


September 20, 1893: Resolution 
proposed to the annual meeting of the 
Rugby Football Union (RFU) by J. A~ 
M iflar and M. Newsome (both York- 
shire): “That players be allowed 
compensation for bona fide loss of 
time." 

Amendment proposed by W. Can 
(RFU presidmit) and G- Rowland Hill 
(RFU secretary): “That this meeting, 
believing that -tile, above principle is 
i contrary to the tine interest of the game 
and its spirit, declines to sanction the 
same." 

The amendment was carried by 282 
votes to 136 and the Northern Union, 
which later became the Rugby League, 
esune into being two years later. 
English ruby has suffered since from 
the loss of northern players to pro- 
fessional rogby. 


In 1897 Wales withdrew from the 
International Rugby Football Board 
(IB) after complaints by the board and 
the Rngby Football Unioit over the 
proposed gift of a house to the Welsh 
player, Arthur Gould. The Welsh 
union said at the time: “We would ask 
— whether any reasonable man can 
suggest that because £500 has been 
subscribed by the admirers of an 
international football player ... he is 
therefore to be called a professional 

“We have fought hard against 
encouraging professionalism among 
our players under more trying circum- 
stances ... than any of the other 
unions and . . . with greater success 
than the English anion." The IB 
readmitted Wales the following year 
and the Welsh agreed to abide by the 
board's by-laws, while pressing for a 


uniform application of the lam on 
professionalism (my italics). 

Ninety years biter bow much has 
changed? The same bank remains to 
be fought, between those who adopt a 
moral stance without compromise or 
exception and chose who advocate an 
everyday pragmatism. The difference 
between the late nineteenth century 
and the late twentieth century is that 
the administrators of the time, unless 
they were exceptionally far-sighted, 
did not envisage sport becoming such 
an attractive business proposition; bat 
then, they were not aware of the mixed 
blessings of television. 

The lines have been drawn far 
another confrontation on the same 
issue tins week, when the International 
Board meet in London on the specific 
topic of amtleoisn. A concept of 
amateurism, moreover, drawn op by 


late Victorian gentlemen which has 
subsequently had to do for Frenchmen, 
Sooth Africa Boer, Japanese, the 
polyglot community w hich is Australia, 
for Russian and Romanian, Italian and 
Fijian. 

The representatives of England. 
Scotland, Ireland, Wales, France, New 
Zealand, Australia and South Africa 
sit down together under the chairman- 
ship of Cec Bbzey. of New Zealand. 
They know that the interpretation of 
the amateur regulations differ from 
country to country and they also know 
that the request posed by Wales in 
1898 for a “uniform application" is 
impossible to carry out in view of the 
board's lack of authority; it is essen- 
tially a law-making body, not a 
decision-taking one. 

David Hands 

Rugby Corespondent 


Now is the time for 
Union to play the 
game by the players 


The appeal should be allowed. 
The Master of the Rolls and 
Lord J a slice Croom-Jahnsoa 


By Gerald Davies, who played 46 times for Wales 


A ny discussions 
about the future sta- 
tus of rugby football 
most begin by look- 
ing at the amateur 
regulations and to question 
their relevance in this or. for 
that matter, any other age. 

Amateurism was born of a 
spirit of a time which allowed 
young men in a sex of privi- 
leged circumstances to swank 
around playing games at their 
leisure. There was nothing 
wrong with that- Unlike foot- 
ball. rooted in the so-called 
working classes, rugby's tra- 
ditional backers were of a 
I different kidney, rooted in the 
professional middle classes. 

With so much to commend 
it tbe amateur ideal has 
survived in a rough-and-uim- 
ble game. 

That amateur spirit initially 
arose casually from within the 
players. As time and social 
circumstances changed and 
people's perception of sport 
altered, so the amateur mood, 
it was felL needed to be 
protected. Consequently, it 
had to be enshrined in copious 
regulations. What an amateur 
was bad to be spelt out in 
words, and those words in the 


The order of Mrs Justice 
Booth appealed against pro- 
vided. inter alto, that foe hus- 
band should pay to foe wife tbe 
sem of £31.000 assessed as the 
costs recoverable by her from 
the husband in respect of foe 
proceedings in lbe suiL 

Without giving any indication, 
of her intention to do so tbe 
judge had elected to the 
figure for costs under Order 62. 
rule 9. 

Sub-rule (4) dearly imported 
that the gross sum so specified | 
by the court was “instead o I 
taxed costs'*. The purpose of tbe 
rule was to achieve foe objec- 
tives mentioned by foe judge, 
namely foe avoidance of ex- 
pense. delay and aggravation 
involved in a protracted litiga- 
tion arising out of taxation. 

The unlimited discretion 


the court, said that the appeal 
raised a short but important 
point relating to tbe powers of 
the court to award a fixed sum 
in costs under Order 62. rule 9. 

Rule 9(4) provided: “The 
court in awarding costs to any 
person may direct that, instead 
of taxed costs, that person shall 
be entitled. . .(b) to a gross sum 
so specified in lieu of taxed 
costs ..." . - • • _ . • 

Powers of the 
crown 
prosecutor 

Ex parte Bray 
A crown prosecutor was not 
required by rule 8 of the 
Indictments (Procedure) Rules 
(SI 1 97 1 No 2084) to support an 
application to a High Court 
judec for a voluntary bill of 
indictment with an affidavit 
deposing to the truth of the 
statements in the application, 
since section 1(6) of Lbe 
Prosecution of Offences Act 
[9fi5 conferred on crown pros- 
ecutors “all the powers of the 
Director [of Public Prosecu- 
tion!.] as to the institution and 
conduct of proceedings**. • 
The Queen's Bench Di- 
\ isional Court (Lord Justice 
Watkins and Mr Justice Ken- 
nedv) so held on October 2, 
dismissing 3n application by Mr 
Alexander Bray for leave to 
apply for judicial review by way 
of a declaration that a voluntary 
hill of indictment 
against him was null and void 
since the crown prosecutors 
application for the bill had not 
been accompanied by such an 
affidavit. 

LORD JUSTICE WATKINS 
said that the contention that 
section 1(6) conferred the pow- 
ers or the DPP on crown 
prosecutors only where they 
wore acting on foe express 
direction of the DPP would 
produce absurd results. 

It was not necessary for the 
court to decide whether tt hirf 
jurisdiction under section 9(3) 
of the Supreme Court Act 1981 
to entertain a chaUeoge ro tbe 
\ulidiiy of an mdictmenu bu 
his Lordship was doubtful 
whether it did have such juris- 
diction. 


varied from case to case and 
each case had to be considered 
on its merits. 

There had been no mis- 
carriage of justice in foecase and 
the judgie had exercised her 
discretion in a proper manner. 

Solicitors: Birkbeck 

Montagu's: Bernard Sheridan £ 
Co. 

Sex licences 
panel is not 


information or be interviewed seek or receive payment for 
for the press or broadcasting, playing the game. The debate 
He cannot take part in any on the game's future starts 
television programme or film there, 
related to the game. He cannot Once having reached that 

be paid for any of these things, position, they can address 
He cannot be paid for themselves more directly to 
participating in any com- the radical question, arising 
petition or event involving out of recent events in South 
physical athleticism or skill. Africa, as to whether the 
So. out goes Supcrsiars. He amateur ideal should be done 
cannot take pan in a com- away with altogether, 
petition to demonstrate his Some have argued it has no 
“sporting knowledge". So. the place in modern sport. It 
Rugby Union player cannot seems a tempting argument 
appear for a fee on A Question but one whose surface veneer. 
of Sport but yes. he can be on first glance, might be 
available for B/ankety Blank, attractive but which has no 
He cannot, for monetary substance, 
consideration, act in the When in 1983 the Austra- 
ca parity of lour leader. He can lian. David Lord, floated the 
do so. provided he is given idea ofa “professional rircus". 
only free accommodation and the responseof the secretary of 
subsist cure. Subsistence is de- the Welsh Rugby Union. Ray 
fined as meals and. mercifully. Williams, was that such pres- 
laundry. And why cannot sure as was then being brought 
these things be done? to bear on the game to turn 

—b ecause, in a reveal- Prof«sional was coming from . 

iog phrase of doubt- ® uls,de . ««lf and not 

ful argument “the fr° m within it- The idea that a 

the invitation to that *2 J? JJ 

person to so plav or- partiri- 1 P 0 * . * senes of 

pate is his knowledge, skill ^ und ®Li?f RUISC ^*' 



Perkins: suffered financially because of his international career 


pate is his knowledge, skill 
and prowess or his prom- 
inence in the game and but for 


hands of the punctilious man- ” mepme ano out tor 

darins assumeda greater po- . 

tency and inspired a feith SminUtraroi not uTsav Wlial would players do in 
which partly ignored The vital pSSJSSttSSenKivS between competitions? Where 
generous spim which ong- would they play? Rugby can- 

inally stimulated the game. me lo^ilSraSSSSSlit to not be arranged in the manner 
In attempting to preserve g? e Sher^orhS ri? of Grand Pm tournaments in 

the game s absolutejjunty, the , lhe ‘ r gJSi *wWch lennis or lhe , various ,our ' 

regulations encompassed mat- {g° tJ - i . . naments in golf. . 

ters which went- ] beyond ite - ' ^^by players, however, 

limns. More and more, it t ^JSIInSirSiJSnf being fallible human beings, 

strayed away from the imfossy J[ h 2fi5SS& * f were attracted by tbe idea of 

sraipmcnt lhai no nlaver WILac V"& prejudice. huina cnhciantiallv n»o»«vfar4 


world tournament, was mis- 
guidedly superficial. A foolish 
idea with a promise of fool's 
gold., 

What- would players do in 
between competitions? Where 
would they play ? Rugby can- 
not be arranged in tbe manner 
of Grand Pnx tournaments in 
tennis or die various tour- 
naments m golf. 

' The fUgby players, however. 


he had. each player had bis 
tale to tell of the glum lack of 
understanding, or the mean 
administrator and the 
moment’s incomprehensible 
pettiness; of sub-standard ho- 
tels: of wives ignored and 
hospitality refused; of quib- 
bling over the price of the 
menu and the prohibition on 


sumptuous banqueL And in 
1976 and 1980 all the medal- 
lists and those who had per- 
formed exceptionally to come 
fourth and fifth were treated, 
with their families, to a two* 
week holiday. 

With a long year of training 
and preparation ahead for all 
the top nigby players, with the 


all telephone calls home; of World Cup competition to 


Regina t Reading* Borough 
Council, Ex parte Qmedynn 
l.fri 

Regina v Same, Ex parte 
Bayley 

Regina v Same, Ex parte 
Smith and another (t/a M & 
M Holdings) ‘ 

Regina t Same, Ex parte 
Mylnm 

A panel appointed by a local 
authority to consider and deter- 
mine on its behalf applications 
for licences for sex establish- 
ments was not a judicial body. 
Only where the authority had 
acted in such a way. that it was 
dear that when the panel came 
to consider foe applications for 
licences H could not exercise 
proper discretion could the 
composition of the pane! be 
impugned for bias. 

The appointment to such a 
panel of a councillor who held 
and had expressed strong views 
as to whether in general such 
licences ought to be granted, or 
who was a member or a political 
group which had resolved that .it 
was hot in favour of such 
establishments, did not invali- 
date decisions of the panel to 
refuse to gram such licences. 

' Mr Justice Kennedy so held in 
a reserved judgment in the 
Queen's Bench- Division on 
September 26. dismissing an 
application by the proprietors of 
four sex establishments for ju- 
dicial review by way of certio- 
rari to quash decisions of 
Reading Borough Council to 
refuse them licences under sec- 
tion 2 of and Schedule 3 to foe 
Local Government (Miscella- 
neous Provisions) A a 1982. 


a judicial body * 

R^gma v Reading *Boroogb whS-gta^No^n or 

gf** & ^ Q™*!™ freedonf of iteplayer'sactiv- 

iterina V fern*. R* tiies outsufe thc nigby dub. It nl«M villi nr aminH a Iwor . 


is now a formalized dogma. 
Let us look at the tedious 


place with or against a team 
which includes a person who 


argument contained in the 12 18 001 20 amaleur - 
pages of the amateur regula- An amateur is the man who 
lions and wonder whether abides by all the regulations 
they lead to encourage an contained in the handbook- 
insidious intent on the This means that the man who . 
player’s part. Can such rig- has accepted a fee for a radio 
roarole mean very much? Can interview can no longer play 
ail those windy .passages in the park with bis pals. The 
dreamed op in smolQ' rooms man who writes in bis spare 
really stand the close scrutiny time but who is fully em- 


in the cold light of morning? 

- For example, as the reguia- 


ployed elsewhere is deemed, 
in lhe eyes of lhe authorities. 


tion smnriq in this yeaFs to be a professional, but the 
handbook, “No peraon ... person whose full-time 
shall solicit or receive either occupation it is to write or 
directly or indirectly any broadcast is an amateur, 
monetary benefit or material Such unnecessary convofu- 
reward, including the promise lions should be done away 
of any future payment, benefit with so that the regulations do 
or materia] reward whether by not appear to be the arrant 
instalments or otherwise for nonsense they presently are. 
writing a book." Further, no The International Board roust 
player can write a newspaper go back to the originar prin- 
articte. He cannot give ciple that no one & allowed to 


being substantially rewarded. 
The players could not be 
blamed for their response. 
They had for some time felt 
that the game had flourished 
and had been enriched, in all 
senses, at their expense. 

The “Big Bang" had oc- 
curred m this country in 1971 
with the Lions of that year. 
Interest had spiralled on an 
unprecedented scale so that 
with the other success which 
followed in that decade, rugby, 
with the aid of television, 
flowered as it had never done 
before as a popular sport 
More demands began to be 
made on the players, more 
time devoted to training, trav- 
elling and playing* Employers, 
too; tolerated the many ab- 
sencesand helped indirectly to 
sponsor the game. 

The international player 
who spent his evenings train- 
ing and playing his heart out. 
taking the pressure because in 
the end he loved it was made 
somehow to feel empty and 
cheated. 

With all the good moments 


the Frenchman who would be 
- allowed bis beer all night but 
forbidden bis bottle of wine. 

Each small item, 
inconsequential in itself, in 
total amounted to much dis- 
satisfaction in the end. And 
the suspicion arose that none 
ofrhis touched the man on the 
committee. The unions were 
growing fat on the profits and 
the sponsorship. They were 
getting out of touch, too. 

T he issue of amateur- 
ism was so sensitive 
no one was willing to 
discuss it openly. 
The dazzling players 
who were around in these 
islands in the 70s enriched the 
game. Ask not what rugby has 
done for them, ask instead 
what these players did for 
rugby. If the administrators 
ask themselves that question 
they may well restore the 
balance that is presently 
required. 

The players* needs must be 
catered for first, not as a mere 
afterthought Who is there 
among the Rugby Unions who 
has the foresight and. dare I 
say it. imagination to think in 
the manner of Manfred 
Ewald, the president of the 
Olympic committee in the 
German Democratic Repub- 
lic? He was reported in these 
pages as knowing how to look 
after his athletes. All those 
who do not win medals in the 
Olympics are treated to a 


come at the end, which union 
is prepared to make 3 similar 
generous gesture to its players? 
Which union thinks it appro- 
priate? 

.Although the cynics may 
doubt it. there are a few even 
in Wales who encounter such 
financial difficulties. John 
Perkins, the Welsh second 
row. for instance, never 
played for his country nor 
trained in the national squad 
without at some stage before 
or just after the international 
have 10 make up for it by 
going on an eaiiy-moniing or 
late-night shift. Going on tour 
would have been a hardship. 
Others would have been paid 
salaries, he would not. Yet he 
would have the game played 
no other way. As he sees it, it 
should remain amateur. 

There is not much will on 
lhe player's part to turn rugby 
into a professional spon. If the 
idea presents itself to him. he 
will nod in agreement. Equally 
if it does not. he isjust as likely 
to shrug it off with 
indifference. 

There are those who look 
darkly suspicious at Wales 
and think lhai money changes 
hands. Very liberal expenses, 
lhe euphemism of the time, 
may have been paid oul for 
celebration games to open this 
or that clubhouse. But it is not 
the case at club level. They 
simply cannot afford iL It is 
no more than a little to go on 
top of the player's expenses to 


make sure that he is not out of 
pocket at the end of lhe day. 
The large sums of money 
which are bandied about in 
the rumours are exaggerated. 

Cardiff are the most ama- 
leur of dubs and yet have 
attracted the greatest of play- 
ers over the years and con- 
tinue to do so. 

Rugby is no professional 
sport. While it can arouse 
great flights of fancy, and can 
create a mesmerizing and 
heroic drama, it has within it 
elements of comedy, too. It 
can be dull and boring, which 
no right-minded man would 
content plate as being remotely 
related to entertainment 
which, if professionalised, 
would be an obligation which 
rugby would find hard to 
fulfil. 

It is a game of uncertain 
morality and disdpline. It 
arouses uncertainty in the 
spectator's mind. too. What 
does go on in the ruck, maul 
and the scrum? There are 
doubts which exist on the 
interpretation of the laws. 

Hie best professional sports 
arc those that are non-body- 
contact and decisions arc 
clear-cut Grid-iron returned 
to the non-contact situation as 
soon as possible. Rugby 
league has done away with 
the contentious areas of 
lineout and ruck. There are 
too many dark anterooms in 
Rugby Union which allow for 
so much logo unseen. There is 
no infrastructure of pro- 
fessional clubs which could 
possibly sustain the cost. Nor, 
like golf and tennis, has ii a 
system of tournaments 
throughout the world. 

The game must remain, in 
its simplest terms, amateur. 
Bui now is the time for plain- 
speaking. 


World Cup the catalyst for action on principles 


Caravan site licence 


Hinks v Fleet (t/a Silver 

Sands Carawn Park) 

An agreement under which 
Fhe owner ofa caravan pktted 
his caravan throughout tfe sum- 
mer season 5L. 

caravan park gave rise ioa mere 
See entitling lhe caravan 
owner so to siauon his caravan: 
i, did not effect a bailment of foe 
v-aravan to foe sue owner, nor 

was any icrm to 

ihe agreement which wouia 


that in lhe light of foe decision 

in Haibauerv Brighton Corpora- 
tion (11954) 1 WLR 1161) he 
was driven to the conclusion 
that foe judge had been wrong to 
hold that foe plaimifTbad bailed 
foe caravan to the defendant; 
the plaintiff had obtained only a 
licence and foe defendant owed 
him no duty to take care to 
prevent the caravan being sio- 

*^Even if foe defendant had 
owed sucb a duty, liability 


n’rtuireihc site owner to lake ^ u |d have been expressly ex- 
Jvasonable cans JO avoid damage doded by foe clause m foe 
to or loss of foe caravan. agreement which provided tint 

The Court of Appeal (Lord ^ defendant would not be 
jJ.ice Mav. Lord liable for “any loss . . . however 

and Mr jUticc Hollings) so held eaused “._ 

on July 29 allowing an Direction (House 

b> foe defendanu Mr M. Bilk of Costs) 

Carav^Pai?^ Camber,. The House of Lords on July 
Sands t a j? V3n iiidement of ?4 ordered a revision of foe 

M^iksoSiity i'olm (Judge forms of bills of costs apphofofe 
Hastings t-ouniy October in judicial taxations ui foe 

■Ha""' S on Ld aW a?d^ the Ho^ The revision wouW 
—\ }J 5 J? d Brian* Stephen fpply to any eniiUeme nito cos ts 
plaintiff- M _ pjygvan created by orders or judgments 

»Srta?ioncS^ the madcon or after October! . 
“•*•*'* hnd h “ fl s,au House also ordered that 

ihc “standard basis" and “in- 
demnity basis" be mtroduced as 
the basis for wouon of .Mb 

drawn in accordance with foe 
new forms. 


When lhe International Rugby 
Football Board celebrated its cen- 
tenary this year at Heythrop Park by 
staging an international, conference, 
HARRY McKIBBlN (right) pre- 
sented a paper on -amateurism. Mr 
McKibhin. a Belfast solicitor, has 
been one of Ireland's representatives 
on the board since 1967 and is 
chairman of its emergency sub- 
committee (which has been preoccu- 
pied recently with the unofficial tour 
to South Africa by a. New Zealand 
party, during which allegations were 
made of substantial payments to the 
louring players). The following is an 
extract from Mr MclGbbin’s paper. 

I t is necessary to make ref- 
erence r to “broken time” be- 
cause the same basic problem 
still confronts rugby football 
today. In 1893, as I under- 
stand ft. Saturday was still a full 
working day. TTie- pay of the 
ordinary working man was low and 
employers would not normally, at 
that time, reimburse a- player his 





which had been siai^ --- 

gSWSSlwff'S— » 

“tORDJUSnCE MAV aid 


caused- uiat ume. reimourse a- .payer ms 

Practice Direction (House «^es if be look Saturday afternoon 
of Lords: Bills of Costs) offlo play ragtoand had not put in 
tThou* of Lords on July iuS hours Of wort 

24 ordered a ‘f jr In 1986 the pressures on players 

forms of bills of cmb apphcab« ^ infinitely greater, particularly on 
to judicial tasati ion those who are self-employed and, 

.pplfio JJenulIrmrru i° costs although Sturdy is no longer a 
Sled by orders or judgments working day. club training, Wednes- 

madc on or after October l . day and Saturday games, squad 

The House also ordered that training, proliferation of tours. top>- 
ihc “standard basis" grade and international matches 

demnity basis" be mtroducea as have all combined to increase the 
the basis for «AUon ot oms pressure ^ awa y beydnd the 
drawn in accordance imagination of tiie players and 






r- Renaissance or reformation? 

administrators of nineteenth cen- 
ii uuy England and Wales. 

Amateurism has always been a 
n way of life in rugby union and there 
is no doubt that the overwhelming 
j majority connected with the game 
lt as we know it. whether as players or 
administrators, would prefer to 
safeguard and keep it that way. 

. The first object of the inter- 
rational Rugby Football Board, 
consisting presently of eight mem- 
s ber unions, is “determining and 
a safeguarding the principles relating 
L, to amateurism in rugby football", 
a The by-laws of foe board state foal 
i- the game is an amateur one and that 
j no one is allowed to seek or receive 

f. payment or other material reward 
s for taking part in ft. 
e ft is interesting to note that-when 
i ■ the. draft revfeionjrf the regulations 
J was being introduced in 1 972 to the 
_ V i 


board foe chairman stated; “Time 
alone will tell whether these regula- 
tions are rigid enough." Fourteen 
years later there is a growing 
groundswell of opinion that the 
regulations may be too rigid, out of 
touch with modem sport and 
irrelevant to foe harsh realities of 
life today. 

Is the Encylopaedia Brittanica 
definition of ah -amateur the correct 
one for us: “One who competes for 
the love of spon and as a means of 
recreation without any motive of 
securing material gain from such 
compeution as opposed to the 
professional for whom material gain 
is a prime motive for competition"? 
Or is foe definition of Hermas 
Evans, of the Welsh Rugby Union, 
not closer to it? "An amateur is one 
who engages in foe game solely for 
the pleasure and foe physical 
mental and social benefit he derives 
therefrom and to whom rugby 
football is nothing more than 
recreation and for .which no 
remuneration is received." 

Some are asking, is an amateur 
one who does not make a. profit 
from the game but equally one who 
should- not be allowed to make a 
loss? Is the traditional view out- 
moded. that not only is there to be 
no profit from the game but if there 
is a toss it is part of the sacrifice we 
must accept to remain amateur? Are 
wc. in our zeal to keep our 
amateurism pure and untainted, 
pushing our ideals so for in present 
times that we are in real danger of 
discriminating against those who 
cannot afford foe sacrifice? This 

y 


charge of discrimination has been 
seriously made whether we shrug it 
off or not. 

The goodwill. loyalty and dedica- 
tion or international -class players 
must not be ignored or underesti- 
mated. There is no doubt in my own 
mind that foe IB members sincerely 
wish the game to remain amateur 
but a number arc seeking genuinely 
that amateur and amateurism be 
redefined to bring them more into 
line with the stresses of modern, 
everyday life. 

Compensation for broken time 
... (in one view) ... is not a 
financial or material gain — it is 
merely a reimbursement of & loss 
suffered by a player. Those advocat- 
ing fois view would approve of 
reimbursement for broken time but 
only (at the moment) during the 
specific conditions of a tour or a 
series of matches longer than, say, a 
weekend- The problem here is not a 
philosophic one for the board but 
rather foe search for an answer 
sufficiently universal in its applica- 
tion that it prevents a coach and six 
being driven through it on the 
inevitable road to veiled, if not 
outright, professionalism. 

T here can be little doubt 
that, with the advent of 
foe Webb Ellis Cup next 
year, Rugby Union foot- 
ball will never be quite the 
same again. It could be regarded as 
the catalyst for positive action to 
ensure that our amateur principles 
are not weakened. 

Without question the .amateur 
status of the game is the most 


important issue facing us at this 
time. Rugby Union football has 
remained foe great amateur rood 
only because all who arc pari or the 
game, their unions and those in 
membership of the International 
Rugby Football Board have agreed 
and accepted a common code in 
good faith and with a common 
trust. 

There are signs that this trust 
could be undermined by misinter- 
pretation or disagreement with 
some of our regulations. This must 
not happen. It is vitally important 
for foe sound development and 
future of foe game that, through 
hottest discussion, analysis and 
debate of foe problems, followed by 
sensible and prudent judgement by 
the board, that meaningful regula- 
tions relating iq amateurism can be 
agreed . confirmed and im- 
plemented by all. 

In the pan of the United King- 
dom from which I come you will 
have heard of such phrases as "no 
surrender" and "not an .inch". 
These are not necessarily tire slo- 
gans of the unthinking demagogue 
but rather foe cry of thoughtful folk 
who have something which is 
precious to them and which they 
wish to preserve inviolate. 

In the context of amateurism I 
may well be like Them and 1 will 
agree to change when I am con- 
vinced that change is in the best 
interests of Rugby Union football. 

( TOMORROW ") 

Renaissance or refonnatxon? 





=■***»££ 


SPORT 


By Mandarin 
(Michael Phillips) 

. While conceding that mak- 
ing excuses for beaten horses 
cm often prove expensive. I 
do reel that, following that 




THE TIMES TUESDAY OCTOBER 7 1986 

RACING: PULBQRQUGH TEAM CAN EXTEND WINNING RUN WITH TWO-YEAR-OLD DOUBLE AT NEWCASTLE 

Fu Lu Shou ready to recoup losses Battalion Cel 

reto-il' 1 u feWiwrivwEV.'vv': tivurMUir • * ■■■ - axe. •- c.-.v. o.-.m .y •<•* "> IIM I 


'« ■sk£'*W!i® 1:>: >< tf.-vwiwiaKMK 1 .:* 




h *i&vxsssfsssfii y x 


costly failure in the Colgate 
Junior Nursery at Hamilton 
eight days ago. Fn Lu Shoo 
should be backed to retrieve 
losses in the Brightelmstone 
Nursery at Brighton today. 
2 nd he is my. nap. . 

After being beaten 
inreequaners of a length by 
Lindsay Chamock on ^Rivers 
Secret. Fu Lu Shou's jockey. 
Tyrone Williams, had a tale of 
woe 10 tell his trainer. Patrick 
Haslam. 

This was ratified later by- 
ex per ie need race readers 
present who reported that Fu 
Lu Shou lost a good position 
early on when he had to be 
snatched up to avoid some 
scrimmaging. 

Williams rightly gave him 
plenty of time to recover and 
get balanced again but when 
he did produce him with what 
looked like a winning run two 
furlongs from home he was 
again hampered badly. 

Getting full marks for 
perseverence. he then 
switched to the outside or a 
biggish field but the winning 
post came just too soon. And 
unlucky was the unanimous 
verdicL 



» vs* 


Ichnnsa, seen here beating Skean at Doncaster, carries her penalty in today's Newcastle University Turf Club Stakes 


Faced by only six opponents 
this afternoon, it will be 
surprising if he does not enjoy 
a better run this time. For one 
by the sprinter Codswalk Fu 
Lu Shou stays remarkably 
well. This can be attributed to 
the influence of his dam. the 
Reliance mare Periliance. who 
had some useful form over a 
mile and a half in France. So 
today's distance of a mile will 
pose no problem for Fu Lu 
Shou. who might well be 
described as a winner without 
a penalty. 

Otherwise at Brighton it 
should pay to back Choritzo 
(2.15) and Inshad (4.15) to 
win their respective races 
although their prices are un- 
likely to be particularly 
appeaiing. However, coupled 
in a double to win the two 
divisions of the EBFSompting 


Maiden Stakes they should 
pay better. 

Following three successive 
seconds. Choritzo deserves 
better luck in the first di- 


vision. She was clearly up 
against it when faced by 


against it when faced by 
Scimitarra at Goodwood a 
w eek ago. 

Inshad, a 180.000 guineas 
yearling by Indian King, ran 
well enough in the race won by 
Greencastle Hill at Goodwood 
last month to suggest that she 
has the other division ax her 
mercy. 

Following his great triumph 
in Paris on Sunday with 
Dancing Brave Guy Harwood 
is again casting his net far 
afield. This should take in two 
prizes at Newcastle this after- 
noon. thanks to the efforts of 
Greville Starkey on Zarbyev 
(2. 1 5) and Old Maestro (4.4S). 

Zarbyev. mv selection for 


the EBF Polwanh Maiden 
Slakes, has been placed at 
.Ascot and Newmarket al- 
ready. His opposition this 
afternoon docs not appear to 
amount to much. Likewise. 
Old Maestro has a favourite's 
chance of winning the EBF 
Princess Maiden Slakes 
following that narrow defeat 
by Failiq at Brighton. 

Steve Cauthen will also be 
at Gosfonh Park this after- 
noon and I envisage him 
landing a double on Indian 
Orator (3.45) and Bolero 


Magic (4.15). I particularly 
like the chance of the latter 


like the chance of the latter 
who was finishing like a 
express train at Yarmouth last 
time when beaten only half a 
length by Saker. 

At Wolverhampton Peter's 
Blue, who like my nap has 
graduated from sellers to nurs- 
eries. looks poised to win his 


fourth prize in a row in the 
Staffordshire Nursery - 
Later in the afternoon I 
fancy Michaer Dickinson's 
chance of winning another 
race for Robert Sangster. this 
time with Fairy Gold. 

My selection, who will be 
ridden by Brent Thompson, is 
a beautifully bred filly by 
Golden Fleece out of the dam 
of their promising young stal- 
lion What a Guest and In- 
fantry. who has excelled racing 
in the United States 
Fairy Gold shaped like a 
stayer when I saw her finish 
fourth first time out in the race 
won by Brave Dancer at 
Salisbury. So a mile and a 
furlong, the distance of today’s 
race, should prove no 
problem. 


Equine centre 
for Ireland 


through a voluntary- levy on 
Irish bloodstock sales. 


Blinkered first time 


BRIGHTON: 2-45 Tna Rosa 
WOLVERHAMPTON: 4.0 Tjuj-Woog. 


BRIGHTON 


3.1S BRK5HTHELMSTONE NURSERY HANDICAP (2-Y-O: £2,641: 1m) (7 runners) 


By Mandarin 


Selections 


2.15 Choritzo. 

2.45 On To Glory. 

3.15 FU LU SHOU (nap). 

3.45 Touch The Sail. 

4.15 Inshad. 

4.45 Storm House. 


By Our Newmarket 
Correspondent 

2. 1 5 Choritzo. 

2.45 Minus Man. 
3.15. Fu Lu Shou, 

3.45 Touch The Sail. 

4.15 Inshad. 

4.45 — 


3 (6) 0100 STATE BALLET (V) (O Back) I Bahfing 9-7 JHatfew 94B-1 

6 17) 314004 MOWN PRESS f&SF) (Ottsrdawn Associates Ltd) D Atoutiwot 8-12 JRbH 9010-1 

7 (3) 430 BE CHEERFUL ft Waterman) J Winter 8-7 PHoMum 98FS-4 

8 IS) 400404 SAY YOU W1LLJG Noble) P Matun 04 M Robot* 9612-1 

9 (1) 020133 PARXLANOS BftiF [D Hatcfi) M Haynes 8-4- pCook *99 3-1 

11 |4) 0012 FU LU SHOU (BF) (M Tong) P Haslam B-2 TWWfen 96 4-1 

14 12) 001 VISION OF WONDER (C Cjrauf) M Usher 7-13 CRuWrp) 96 8-1 


Speedtwd (8-12) at Rsdcar (71. £2371, Arm. Sept 26. 11 ran). BE CHEERFUL’* best eflort (8-11) 31 3rd to 
Lashing (8- 1 1 ) at Yarmouth 61 mfln. £1 375. good to firm. July 1 . 9 ran). She has been ofl the course since July. 
SAY YOU W1LL(94) 21 4th to Psfefece (9-7) at Leicester (71, 1940. good. Aug 18, 17 ran). PAMOANDS BELLE 
[8-6) 1 --il 3rd to Otore Malle (8-5) at Sandown (7m if, £2532. good to firm. Sept 23. 7 ran). FU LU SHOU a 
Haydock (81) sellHVTWinner. fated to find a run whan (8-1) *il 2nd to Rivera Secret (7-8) at Harttfton (8t. £1459. 
good to rum. Sept 29. 14 ran). 

Selection: FU LU SHOU 


3.45 STEYNING SELLING HANDICAP (3-Y-O: £888: 7f) (11 runners) 


Guide to our in-line racecard 

103 1121 0-0432 TTMESFORM (COBF) (Mrs J Ryley) B HaH 9100 ...I... 


LOVE AT LAST (W Hastmcs-Bass) W Hastings-Bass 9-7 R Una* (3) 

THE UTE (S) (R Bastran) Mrss L Bower = .- — TWMwna 


TREMENDOUS JET (D.BF) 


B West (4) 


M Madgwck 9-2 ..... .... E Guest (3) 95 6-1 


Racecard number. Draw m brackets. .Sn-bg^e 
form. Horse s name [B-Mnkera. V-wsor. H-bood. 
E-eveshreW. C-couree winner. D-chsonce winner. 
CCFcoursa and distance winner. BF-beawi 


favounte in latest race. Owner m brackets. Traner. 
Age and weigh!. Rider plus any alowance. The 
Times Private Han dca peer's rating. Apprommare 
starting price. 


17 (3) 0-04204 


MISS HICKS ifp Rshar) M Ryan W — PRebbywn 89 92 

WINSONG MELODY (E Goodwin) P Ctmdel 9-0 PCoek 97 10-1 

DORADE (AO) (O Mtes Potato |un) D Money 8-1 3— B House S 94 8-1 

GOLDEN STRAW (B) (Mas M Gower) Mrs C Reevay 8-13 . — — JRrid — — 

HEAVENLY CAROL (KCuxMUPCundea 8-12 — C Rutter (3) 

SEQUESTRATION (A Rchards) C Austin 8-4 A Clark 

MKS VENEZUELA (Mrs S Popovich) B Stevens 8-3 RF« 95 — 

TOUCH THE SAIL (J BJackbarow) M Tomptans 7-13 W Woods (3) *99 — 


DORADE (1M)) (OMtes Potato |un)D Money 6-1 3 

GOLDEN STRAW (B) (Mas M Gower) Mrs C Reavey 8-13 . 


Going: firm Draw: 5f-6f low numbers best 

2.15 EBF SOMPTING MAIDEN STAKES (Div 1: 2-Y-O: £1 .031: 6f) (8 runners) 

Ion 9-0. PCoofc 71 — 

Z (b) DEGH«EHAi£|5 5gunes)MTompwns9-0. W Woods (3) — 16-T 

3 (61 04300 LAZWI (B) ( Hamden AJ Maktowri) C Benstead 9-0 B Rouse — 10-1 

5 ID 000 SPtiZAWTJMrcC Reed) Pat Mitchell 9U C Ratter (3) 67 — 

6 (7) 00 BRAZILL1AN PRINCESS (Roldvata Ltd) P Keflewey 8-1 1 T w a rns S3 4-1 

7 12) 222 CHORITZO (C Wright) R J Wiliams 8-1 1 J Reid *99 FI-2 

8 (3) 00 GOOONK3HT MASTER (A Russel) A Moore 911 M Wigham 

10 (4) 00 SALMAS (Mil, D VeasoylJ Winter 8-) 1. PRotmon 62 7-t 


Yarmouth (71. good. Sept 1 7). Earlier |B-5| beaten a head by Cooper Raring Nad (8-1) at Ayr (61. £943. good to 
tirm. July 25. 9 ran) 

Selection: TREMBIOOUS JET 


4.15 EBF SOMPTING MAIDEN STAKES (Div II: 2-Y-O: £1,109: 6f) (5 runners) 

2 (11 3000 MALAC19 LADJMrs D Smai) Rai Mtchefl 90 PBradwea — B-1 

3 1 3) 003000 STARS IN MOTION (Mrs G Ward) D Artwtnnai 90 J Reid 74 14-1 

5 (2) 0 AUNT FRANCES (D Pram) J Winter B- It B Rouse 82 198 

0 14) 00 DEEP RAPTURES (Hesmonds Stud) DLamg 8-11.. 8 Procter — 5-1 

8 15) 03 INSHAD (BF) (Hamdan Ai MaWoum) A Stewart 8-1 1 —. — — H Roberts • 99 F5-4 


of 6 to Sizzling Melody (8-H) at Royal Ascot (51. Group 3. £20086. firm. June 19). CHORITZO (6-1 1)6> 2nd to w bwowto ewKH 

SojnrtafTa (6-1 T)at Goodwood (St. 0431 . good. Sept 29. 23 rani, with GOOONKSHT MASTER 18-1 itunpiaced. FORM AU*T FRANCES (8-H) beaten 10M by Abhaaj(B-ll)at Lmgfwldffil. E1337, good. Sept 16. 13 
SA UNAS 1 8-11 MKi&ih to Veryan Bay (8-11) aai UngheM (51. E1268. good. Sept 16. 11 ran). rWIIIVf ^ inshad {S6j 31 M of 9 to Greencastle HiB (8-8) at Goodwood (6f. 2236ftgood7Sept 12) 

Selection: CHORITZO e ‘ "*■ 


Selection: INSHAD 


2-45 SALTDEAN 


3 (10) 21304)4 
5 (11) 041000 


7 (4) 038040 
14 (7) 000140 


15 p) 0-00020 

16 (8) 210432 


HANDICAP (£2,617: 1m 2f) (13 runners) 

FIRE BAY (RCD) (A Thompkms) P Haynes 5-96 

LEONHJAS (CD) IG Ward) DAiouthnot 8-9-3.. . 
SALLOOM (CO) IB Doodyj W Ha5irff.-a.is3 4-9-?. .. 
SINGING BOY (G Eden) A ttde 5-8-13. - . ... 


18 (6) B30O21 

19 (5) 00-0001 


26 (?) 400000 
31 (1) 000130 


32 (9) 00/000-0 
34 (13) 304231 
36 (12) 090000 


SALLOOM (CO) |B Doodir) W Hastfigs-Bass 4-92.. 

SINGING BOY (G Eden) A rtde 5-913. - . .... 

NASKRACKEH (8F) (B Hearse) G Harwood 3-912 .... 
FOOT PATROL (Q (Mss L Evnnsl P CundeU 98-1 1 _ 

ON TO GLORY m) (J Barber) J Duntop 3-910. ... 

TRUE WEIGHT (DIIMrs J Cundy) M M<WpwK* 4-99.. 

COSMIC FUGHT (E Peate) M Usher 392 

WtLLBE WILLBE (Mrs C Brnum) C Brmam 97-12 

FRENCH EMPtROR (O (J Ffttch-Heyes) J Ffrtch-Heyes 


7 Wtfbams 94 191 

J Rod 93 12-1 


ft Lines (3) —141 

. MFmzard 96 — 


FRENCH EMPEROR (Cl (J Ffitdi-Heyes) J Ffrtch-Heyes 4-7-12 0 Gteon — — 

INWS MAN (CJ3) (Vrhitbng Caneno&taa Ud) W Hcfiden 97-10 R Mwse (S) »99 91 
TINA ROSA (V) (S Wmgfietd Digby) D O'Donnell 3-7-7 — 


. A Clark 93 4-1 
C Rutter (3) 97 5-1 

B Reuse 94 F9? 
. E Guest (3) 93 91 

. M Wigtown — — 
MRODMi 95 — 
OGAnon — — 
R Morse (S) »99 91 


4.45 SOUTHDOWN STAKES (Amateurs: £1.648: 1m 4f) (8 runners) 

l M1 groooi HEIGHT OF SUMUBU DIR Cnachley) D ArbudWrt 5-1 1-11 M Armyti 

3 14) 200033 WILD GOffiEH (V.O) (A Rosw 0 Oughton 4-11-6 G Webster 

J (7) 0000/0-0 CAU90L0N IG Mnchefi) Pat MdchifiJ 12-11-3 EKfeione 

5 (3) 00/000-0 HNSOHRE (K Higson) A Moore 7-11-3 S Cowley (5) — 

e (5) 00/0004- HAWSER ID YftSsiM MaogwKk 4-11-0 D Madmrick 

I {6} 322393 STORM HOUSE (Mrs N Mnrs) K Brassay 4-1 1-0 T Thomson Jones SB F7-4 

8 (8) 960 KAUMPONG IA BumhamfP BuBer 4-10-11 ABurSam® — ~ 

10 (2i 00 OUR HERO (OetttJey Wood Racing Ltd) J Dunlop 3-10-9 RHutcMnsan «S9 11-4 


FORM GSO ^Jweg».o»er HyaWn (912) m h cRp at Beverley (1m 4f. E1882. 

I vrr Iin firm Sept 24. 13 rani. WILD GINGER last ran. hera. 6 weeks ago when 4*i 3n3 to (8-13) io 
Tempest Tossed I9l3)(lm 4f. £2061. firm. Aug 28. B ran). STORM HOUSE (95)had been off the trade tor a 

year pior to 61 Bam 3rd to Farm Club (97)tim2f SOyds. 0204. goodto firni. Sept22. 12 ran). CHIR TORO has, 

Bean 6m o! !2 m2 Nottingham maidens tlm 2f). larady (90) when i mi behind Bananas (96) (El 372. good. 


Aug 12. 12 rar) 
SefaKhon: STOI 


FORM BOY Dehmd Iasi tune. Earlier (951 beat Npoto (9-0] Hat Pontnfracr (St. £2582. good to 

* vlltTt firm. Aug 6. 8 ran). Last season 3rd to Super Top at Nomngham. showmg he stays the trip 


STORM HOUSE 


' ft m. Aug 6. 8 ran). Last season 3rd to Super Tnp at NonmWwni. showng he stays the trip 

NASKRACKER rtf the course s«xa early August. His best effort when (98) a 2nd to Blenders Choee (9-0) at 

Folkestone m July <1m 41. 0303. good to firm. 13 ran). FOOT PATROL 19131 2hl 2nd to Marsh Hamer 1941 
here Earter (8-0) course and distance 3rd to Hawaiian Palm (910) (£2847. firm. Sept 17. 14 ran), with fire 
BAY, winne r of th is race last year under 9st Sfc. was a away 4th (91 ». LEON RMS (97) 41 tuck 6tn and 
FRENCH EHPEROfl (7-7) behmd. ON TO GLORY [8-61 came late and last to beat Tom Forrester |9 2 ) li at 
Folkestone with LEONIDAS |981 2 ' .-) away 5th tlm 2t. £1779. firm. Sep! 9. 1 5 ran) TRUE WEIGHTS wins have 
Oath come m Amateurs races: last wne(1 1 -i| beatmg Irish Hero (12-0) II at Ftaestone I f m 2f . £1 14S. good lo 
firm. July 15. 15 rani. MMI1S MAN (91) beat Hamper (961 a neck at Goodwood last week (1m 2f App'ce. 


Course specialists 


£2526. good. Sepi 30. 22 ram. 
Selection: NASXHACXEK 


45. good (0 
i 2f App'ce. 


G Harwood 
P KtHte-uay 
Vi H-Bass 
K Brassey 


TRAINERS 

Wftnners Runners Per ceni 
32 132 24 2 

13 68 19 I 

6 3J 17.6 

8 S 14 5 


T Williams 
P COOk 
B Rouse 


JOCKEYS 

Wmners Runners Per cent 
12 TO 152 

23 200 11.5 

33 387 15 


l Oi^v qualifiers i 


(Only qualifiers) 


NEWCASTLE 


RADIO NEWCASTLE HANDICAP (£2.663: 1m md) (20) 


320300 MOORES METAL (CO) i Mooes LM) R Hobnshead 9910 ACuAane(7) 

00200U ARISTOCRAT VELVET (D| (D Wosskow) J Elfiemgton 4-910.... S Cauthefl 


Selections 


000030 BELLA 8ANUS (C.D) (R Stephen son) iv a Stopnenson 4-g-i .. M Hbxfley (3) 

022202 O I OYSTON (CD) (J Berry) J Berry 1999 JC«roa<7) 

913300 SAND-DOLLAR (BF) |G Waters) M Prescott 399 . - . GDuffloU 

090000 SHARP SHOT (D) (Wndltower Holdings) J Dunlop 599 W Carson 

030113 210 PEPPINO (C.D.BF) rC Lloyd-Jones) C Ltoyd-Jenes 598 Jube Bowfcsr pi 

031000 HEAVENLY HOOFER (D) iJ Biancn) Denys Smth 397 LChamocfi 

ooarau VERBARHM ICOt (Mrs J Ramsoem Mrs J Ramsden 696 . NON-RUNNER 
244144 SHARON'S ROYALE (0) iW Bjrcri) R Whitaker 396 . ..... K Bradshaw (S) 

303430 HENRY'S VENTURE (D Chapman) D Chapman 4-94.. . A Proud 

000000 SINGLE HAND (Q (Miss D Chnon) D Chapman 692 J CoBagban (7) 

100000 KAMAR^SS (M Brma-nj M Brmam 4-8-1 .... . K Darley 

012120 OUAUTAIRESS (V.CD) (Ouoktair Enoneermcr) K Stone 4-84) - . P Burke (7) 

33300 NORTON WARHKJH iMaj J Urtevl MH Easterby 37-12 M Wood 

04900 NEW BARfCT |R Moody) Mrs J Ramsden 4-7-11 .... Abtgafi Rtchards (7) 

000002 BAXTER GATE iMm J Pavnel J Payne 37-10 - . - A Macfcay 

400210 ROSSETT (DJ3F) (T Craqi T Crag 7-7-9 - JQimfS) 

00-000 ROCK SALT iPLewrSlV: Pearce 4-7^ M Fry 

920040 GOOD N SHARP >a Ouffietdi G Calvert 5-7-7 J Lowe 


Bv Mandarin 


2.15 Zacbycv. 

2.45 Datallia. 

3.15 Qualiiaircss. 
3-45 Indian Orator. 

4.15 Bolero Magic. 

4.45 Old Maestro. 


By Our Neivmarkei 
Correspondent 
2.(5 Schmulzig. 

2.45 Nozcl 

3.15 Sand-Dollar. 

3.45 — 

4. 1 5 Be Jero Magic. 

4.45 Dollar Seeker. 


Bv Michael Seely 

2.15 ZARBYEV (nap). 4.15 Bolero Magic. 4.45 Old Maestro. 
The Times Private Handicapper's lop rating: 4.15 BOLERO MAGIC 


in onnamj nn omram a-B-i .... _ _ . . _ . . 

S (V.CD) (Quanta it Encmeermg) K Stone * 
ffliOH iMaj j urdBV) M H Eastertjy 37-12 
r (R Moody) Mrs JRamsaen 4-7-11 


- KBn,d M 


K Darfcy 

(-90 _ . P Burke (7) 

M Wood 

Abtgafi Rtchaids(7) 


A Macfcay S3 a-i 

I Quinn (5) 94 7-1 

.... MFry — — 


Going: firm 


Draw: no significant advantage 


1 (4) 

6 PS) 

7 (10) 
10 (?) 
11 ( 12 ) 
15 (I-*) 
23 (1) 

25 1 5) 

26 (ID 

27 (7) 
JO (3) 
at ta 

34 (J31i. 
36 (6k« 

39 (9) 


00 ALVECOTE MAGIC (^) (0 Cotfans) C Trader 90 .. 
DANENSIAN (Hippotfiomo Rac^xj) M W Fasterhy 90 

000 OANSE ARABE (Mrs D Braper) A Jarws 90 

0000 FIEDOIE ASHTON (E) ILord Hanmgton) D Moriey 90 

GROSSEN (Lord Motthenst M Camacho 90 

0 KEWTtNTS LAO tKenton Utiboesl Junmv Ftagerald 90.. 

0 SCHMUIZtG (V 2uco) L Curnani <»0 . . 

0 SPRUCE BABY tfl Enwunenn) S Norton 90 

00 THE MAJN MAN (A Richards) C Bntlam 9-0 

00 7RY.MY BRAIB1V (BF) lA Oorej B HRs 90. 

WKJ.RAINE|MraiHaire)TBarron90. . 

32 ZARBYEV (BFJO Brody) G Harwood 9H .. . 
CUSHJNA (Mrs A Chapmani M Prescott 9)1 . 


00 HAPPY HARRIET iMtsSBrootriWgrsey 8-11 
MAROUETER1E iC Gokfing) J W Watrs 91 1 


161 003100 NOZETfN PtuUpSlW Jarvis 9-1. . 

(41 030022 BLACK DIAMOND (A Sotfin) A Jarm 90. 

!•» 424110 CAPRICORN BLUE JV.D) (P Asaoilhi Jcnmv FiBgwold 90 

In '010432 NAP MAJESTICA (D BomaHI M Camacho 90 
000000 TAXI MAN (Mrs O Stoewi K Stone 8-12 
IS) 300 DAVALUA (Lord Fa»hOv«fil U Mortev &-11 

320000 OPriMtSM FLAMED (C Webiier) Mrs J Ramsden 910 


. .. . M Bocfi 

80 12-7 

. HHWierO) 

54-1 

DMfcftote 

— . 

. . . R Guest 



DOorato«(7) 

— ■ 

. — — 

14-1 

RCschnw 

■7 <-l 

.. J Lowe 

91 12-1 

WCtraon 

84 10-1 

. . . G Cauihen 

98 5-1 

... M Fry 

— 16-1 

G Start ey 

• 99 F5~ 

G Outfield 

14-1 

C Dwyer 

— — 

N Connorton 

14-! 

runners) 

G Start ev 

-.J 

. . J Lowe 

85 4-1 

S Cauthen 

91 ?-2 

□ NKtaoUa 

98F6-2 

Mftrcfi 

83 12-1 

R Codwane 

• 99 91 

MBeecraft 

— 191 


3.4S HEATHFIELD HANDICAP (3-Y-O: £2.264: 2m) (7 runners) 

2 ‘7\ 313440 INDIAN ORATOR (5ne*fi Monammeffj B Hifls 97 

7 M, 004 MSHAm PALACE (Dirvi Stud LaiJ Dunlop 912 .. 

8 »2I 0002 COMAZANT ADduOa) G Harwood 6-1 1. . 

10 iol 003041 MMBLE NATIVE iBADWhlS Norton 99. 

16 lit 044304 LAKISTE (R Sangsieri .» \v Wans 8-0 

17 'S. 003403 GRATIFY. ELMefPVValwvn 7 12 

:e .4* 330202 DENALTO (A Crawford) Denys Smith 7-10 - 


.. S Cauthen 

W Carson 
. ... G Starkey 

J Lowe 

N Connorton 
N Howe 


MFty *99 12-t 


4.15 NEWCASTLE UNIVERSITY TURF CLUB STAKES (3-Y-O: £1.450: 1m If) (6 
runners! 


41 ICHNUSA |f."rs M La n O> J Dun-jp 9-4 . . 

20-0001 SHINING SKIN iMa*-jun «i Mahtoumi P v.-aiwvn 94 
22 BOLERO MAGIC |BF)iMSami3isin.3titHC«*» 90 


09000 LATRIGG LODGE (HccMey P*g C Smnti Udi N Bycroft 96 !. .. L Cfw 
0 NO IDEA (Mrs V f/oorevi -.1 H Eosiarhv n-0 u 

000000 MUSICAL AJD it Cra-.ji T C-a-J 9-1 T A Mi 


W Carson 97 2-1 
N Howe 84 5-2 
. S Cauthen • 99 F6-4 
LCfiomodk — 33-1 
U Bach — 14-1 
A Macfcay » 331 


Abdulla’s 

charge 


Celebrating in 
style with 
Dancing Brave 


GreriUe Starkey was back m 
the Dancing Brave cokrats erf 
Khated Abdulla when be 
partnered die 13-8 hioorite 
VigliottD in die Doaniagton 
Stakes at Bath yesterday, bait it 
proved another aafortmate 
experience. 

The colt did wt joap eff too 
well in the big field, and was WeD 
behind as they nu into the king 
turn at the bottom of the covse. 
He got a 'good raa an the nafl, 
®#jssg a ietoC grand, bat then 
fanmd his nay stopped in the 
straight and lad to be switched. 

Although flying at the finish, 
he only managed to reach So nth 
place, just under two lengths 
behind Battalion, who street the 
front inside the Baal furlong and 
stayed this extended mile well to 
win by a length. 

Battalion, trained by John 
Dunlop, was yet another winner 
for the in-form Brent Tho msen , 
whose contract with. Barry HQls 
finishes this season. Thomson is 
not sore yet whether hell be 
riding in Britain next year or in 
the southern hemisphere. He 
said: “Fve got to malcea decision 
soon, probably within the next 
fortnight. There are a couple of 
people I’ve pit to speak to.** 

Battalion, who was 
TlMHBsaa's 58th winner this 
season, is expected to develop 
■ into a very nsefol mile and a half 
campaigner for the Dunlop sta- 
ble next year. 


It was business as usual at 
Pulborough- yesterday as 
Coombelands Racing Stables 
a waned the return or Dancing 
Brave from, his record-breaking 
win in Sunday's Prix de P Air de 
Triomphe. . 

Guy Harwood had already 
flown -to- Dublin to scan the 
potential stars for I9S8 that will 
be on. offer at Goff's invitational 


By Michael Seely 

usual at combined with the stamina 
day as necessary to win over a mile ana 
Stables a half and that they must never 
Dancing foil to gfw>c their raining, 
breaking Using these standards, as a 


yearling sales today- 
Geoff Lawson, the. trainer’s 
brother-in-law and assistant 
trainer, had gone racing at Bath 
as . the stable attempts to beat 
Henry Cecil in the race for the 
first trainer to saddle 100 win- 
ners in 1986. 

* In their absence Chris 
Kinane, another stalwart of this 


powerful team,, was. holding the 
fort- “Dancing Brave . arrived 
back at tea-time,** be said- “He 


Gerard as a versatile and consis- 
tent colt of the highest possible 
calibre. , , 

And if you go back further 
and take Tantieme. Rrtxtt and 

Sea Bird II into consideration. 
Dancing Brave must beassesed 
as one of the eight best colts to 
have raced in Europe since the 
Second World War. 

The words versatile and 
consistent are ail important. 
Vaguely Noble, Rheingofd and 
Alleged were also impressive 
winners of the Arc. And m uk 


A £2. 2m equine centre at 
County Kildare, dedicated to 
aiding and improving Ireland's 
horse industry, was opened 
yesterday by the country’s min- 
ister for sport. Mr Sean Barrett, 
(Our Irish Racing Correspon- 
dent writes) . 

The bloodstock segment of 
(he industry represents a £500m 
business, which directly em- 
ploys more than 12.000 people 
and indirectly another 12.000. 
has provided the lion's share of 
the funding for the new centre 


Irish bloodstock sales. 

The board of governors is 
chaired by Paddy McGrath and 
includes both past and present 
senior stewards of the Turf 
Gub. Denis McCarthy and Lord 
Hemphill. The centre has lab- 
oratories for both diagnosive 
and research. 


Starkey had better leek in the 
following event, the Morris 
Dancer Handicap, when be 
farced a dead-heat on 
Harwood's 6-5 favourite, Elbnry v 
Park, with a 20-1 chance. Super 
Punk. 

Starkey claimed an outright 

victory lor the Pnlboroogh star 
Me when El Conquistador ended 
a frustrating run of three consec- 
utive seconds by beating 
Tigerwood by half a length in 
the Westmorland Handicap. 

El Conquistador is a son of the 

1978 Derby- winner .Shirley 
Heights, out or a half-sister to 
Mountam Lodge and this was 
his first-ever success. 

• Ladbrokes have reduced 
Sneak Preview’s Tote 
Cesa rewitch odds from 25-1 to 
14-1 folio whig the six-year-old's 
Wolverhampton victory yes- 
terday. Bannerol is 10-1 joint 
favourite (from 14-1) with Floyd 
and Pactolus. 


came back by road -and boat via ' 
Dover.” ••••.•■ 

Kinane said: “We’ll remem- 
ber yesterday, an our. lives. The 
sight of all tbose riassrc winners 
spread across the track was 
fantastic. As soon as be was past 
the post, I rushed down to the 
local off licence to buy four 
crates of champagne and all the 
beer Lha l I could get imom year. 
We then had quite a party on the 
lawn." 

Sunday licensing laws must 
have gone temporarily by the 
board in leafy Sussex m sym- 
pathy with the epoch-making, 
events in Paris. £ 

Dancing Brave will now be 
prepared for an attempt to 
repeat Pebbles’s 1985 victory for 
Britain m ibe $2m one and a 
half mile event oh turf at Santa 
Anita on November I. when 
Sonic Lady and Double 
Schwarz, Sunday's Prix de 
I'Abbaye winner, wDI be other 
home-trained contenders for the 
world’s most valuable day's 
racing. 

Khaied Abdulla's champion 
will travel to California with his 
reputation boosted sky-high af- 
ter Study's win. So with Par 
Eddery's accolade as "the best 
horse T have ever ridden" still 
ringing in our ovef-exched ears, 
now is the time for an attempted - 
evaluation of his merit 

The criteria by which great 
horses have always been judged 
are that they must possess 
sufficient speed for a mile. 


12 years Grundy, Troy. 
Sbsrgsr. Golden Fleece and Slip 
Anchor have been outstanding 
winners of the Derby- But with 
the possible exception of 


as much speed over a mile as 
Dancing Brave. 


What made last Sunday's 
ictorv unkiue was its style. 


victory unique was its' style. 
Never ra living memory has a 
horse coroe from so for back to 
overwhelm so many winners of 
group one races. It was certainly 
the highest calibre field for an . 
Arc since Sea Bird II beat 
.Diatonic II and Reliance in 
1965, 

Those who bought shares in 
Dancing Brave when he was 
syndicated for £ 1 4m must now 

their shrewd ness^ The value of 
the grandson of the prepotent 
Northern Dancer has certain 
soared overnight. But talk of. 
him now being worth' as ranch 
as £30m is pie in the sky. 

The value of stallion shares 
has fallen in the past three years 
and is now more in line to what 
prices yearlings can command 

The average at last week's 
Highflyer sale declined for the 
third year running from its 1984 
peak of 92,520 guineas to 77,636 
guineas. It will, therefore, be 
interesting to see if this week’s 
Goffs sales are able to reverse 
the worldwide trend ■ for the 
third consecutive year, as their 
1985 average showed a slight 
increase over the 1984 figure of 
35.472 Irish punts. 


WOLVERHAMPTON 


Selections 

By Mandarin 

2.0 Nabras. 2.30 Mitala Maria- 3.0 Peter's Blue. 
3.30 Fairy Gold. 4.0 Cieofe. 4.30 Jacqiu Joy. 

By Our Newmarket Correspondent 
2.0 Nabras. 230 G G Magic. 3.0 Blazing High. 
3.30 Ivory Fields. 4.0 lyamski. 4.30 Bonny Light. 


&30 EBF BUSHBURY MAIDEN FILLIES STAKES 

(2-Y-O: £1.132: 1m If) (\ 1) 

2 0 AUMWH Thomson Ams'9t1 A Many 1 

• 3 0 APFEALMGDWCe<MJarra9tt. TLn>9 

7 0 DGXA ROB8UM Pipe 8-11 SWtertiS 

8 4 FMHY GOLD MW Dichsison 8-11 BTbonacpS 

9 03 IVOHVmDSM Starts 911 WRSmtan T! 

11 M LAGTA J Dontop 911 O fitter 2 

12 MfSSPENGUMWHSStiflgfrfiUs911 H Wv7 

16 0 SCATma> SHOWERS OBsmrtii 911 AMcGtoM 4 

. 18 TRBAL PAGEANT IMoOishb 911 GMeMoIO 

19 0 TRIVIA PWafiwn 911 PorfEdtinyC 

20 0 VEST7U. FLAME (Balding 911 Ttwsl 


9-4 ivory Fitts. 3-1 Fairy Goto, 91 Appaafiqg Dancer, 
Scattered Stiowws, 91 Jthstal Ramu, KMLagta. 12-1 others. 


Going: film (good to firm on Gtrafgbt course) 

Draw: 5f, high numbers best 

2.0 EBF BUSHBURY MAIDEN FILUES STAKES 

(2-Y-O: 21 ,145: 1 m If) (14 runners) 

3 (M 

4 oo 


10 BOSCOBEL OAK FILLIES HANDICAP (3-Y-O: 
£2,166: 7I)(17) . 



■PHttNatHI 
HG Safer 17 
WRSwrtww4 


7-4 Nabras. 3-1 

Detach DefighL 91 ( 


s Pride. 5-1 La Vie &i Rose. 9! 
>-Bas. 191 Russian Lullaby. 


1 1031 CLE0FE(D)L 

2 0000 IVORY 
• 3 3W lYAHSHW 

8 1600 CORRALS JOY J 

9 010 PE1HFrmfinGBaUng94 J WW — J 7 

12 0136 T7U-WONG (B&) M Pipe S-t SWttwerthS 

13 2000 FESTIVITY DArtwtfmot 9-0 G Carter 16 

14 0020 CANAPMN GUEST H Candy 9-0 WNmmJ 

15 0024 NATUA P Makin 913 : TCWrelO 

16 0000 8U1YB3E KINGDOM fl Hcttshuad 9T3_ S Pafix 14 

19 OMO CELESTIAL DRIVER Hanoi 8-41 AMcGfcmett 

22 0040 MAOBIOraB-LE MAGMA S Norton 8-8 M His 13 

23 00W AITCHAWOUBEETOUT Barron 69 : Tttafi 

73 2340 AtMABHJJNA(BF) G Wragg 8-6 — RMfel 

28 0081 BROADHURST Qfl J Eftiimon 96(6«x) . A Moray 2 

30 0010 HAYWAMIVJLfiiF) B HMi 94 BTtafeon9 

31 0023 SKELTON (DlMWEasMtay 69 Rau(Eddoyt2 


Z30 FINAL FLING SELLING STAKES (3-Y-O: 
£893: 1m 6f 110yd) (9) 

1 0421 GG MAGIC DMofey 92 A Moray 7 


4-1 Oeofe. 91- Natt. 91 (yamsW,91 SheOan. Tta Wong. 
191 Canadian Quest. 12-i Petray. Haywtt. 14-1 othora. 


2 4301 LffiAKATY (C) M McCouft 9T3 

3 CHARIOTS OF FIRE D Tuchar 911 ADJcfcs(7)4 

5 0024 REDALLY WWtartwi 911 : — 2 

7 0000 TWER GATE R HoUtoshsad 911 PDa4too(7)1 

10 4004 GORLAMNGO A Ja>nes66 —6 

11 IOVE YOU ROSY Mrs GRewMyM —3 

13 0230 MITALA MARIA A Stawart 98. WRSwMibrS 

18 -002 TTRANMSE B McMahon 66 

94 Mitala Maria, 7-2 G G Magic. 92 Tyrannise, 7-1 
Lrsakaty. 91 RwJaRy, 191 others. 


.. A Moray 7 
RWamfenS 
, ADicta(7)« 

Pftiitoo(7) t 


430 AUTUMN HANDICAP (3-Y-O: £1^83: Sf) (15) 


2 0012 BONNY LIGHT 

3 930 HNGSRHGO 

4 OMO MRALAIASSI 
6 3041 COME TO THE 


QRStea*ar97 AfihonRs(q7 

enteyM JWtatl 

l) B Mrffetwn 913 JHMo{5)12 

ALL R Hannon 6-11 (7ax) 

BThooson* 

C Bansttt 9i0_ W R Srtntaat 11 


3.0 STAFFORDSHIRE NURSERY HANDICAP 

(2-Y-O: £1.965: 51) (11) 

4 034U 



7 ooio MUHTARn«mcBenstBad9iO— WRMutaat-n 

8 004t MERRYMOUES M McCDuR 68 RMmkanl 

9 0000 ARDENT PARTlB»RHoWar»7 SOaramfi 

10 0204 STMeO© 00*097 — s ; Tim 13 

11 4000 BRDGEOF GOLDP)TBanxn9S MCarMe.10 

. « 4234 NAGBI L Banatt 91 PH«mi4 

16 40W - LEFT RKfiff (D) Mra N MKaulay 66 RHBil5 

18 0000 SKYLHyEn Mre C Reawy 7-13— GDfcMt « 

(9 20W NOimBSl LAD mil Hod 7-13 NAfemfi 

22 00» TAMALWUS TO H CoAiwdga 7-9 BCttttyS 

23 0212 JACOUIJOY CT K (wry78_ GBardrai (7)2 

73 Bonny LigM, 9-2 Cana To The Ban. Mesrvmotoa. s-1 ' 

Muhtaris. 91 LrtfffighL Ttenaipais, 191 Nogsro. 12-1 others. 


p warn 14 
— RHfeal5 
-GDttMM 
. NAOanfi 


11-4 Peter's Btoe. 4-1 Absolution. 91 Stivers Ere, 7-1 
Nason's Song. 91 Blazing High. 191 Oi Your Princess. 


Course specialists 

TRAINERS: J HMtey 5 winners train 20 -runners, 264%; j 
Dunlop 11 from 51. 21.6%: S Norton 6lrom 38. 21iRb:M 9totdft 
10 tom 49, ZMSfc (only 4 quaafiere). 

JOCKEYS: T Quinn 11 winners Irani 66 rides. 16J%: W R 
Swinbum 11 frotn>. 15^%(octfy 2quaHiere)- 


DEVON & EXETER 


Selections 

By Mandarin 

2.0 Royal Rehearsal. 2.30 Five Quarters. 

3.0 Allied Newcastle. 3.30 Coral Harbour. 

4.0 Leading ArtiSL 4.30Turcy Boy. 

Going: firm 


2.0 SCOTS P INE NOVICE HURDLE (£494: 2m If) 
(7 runners) 






2 064 

3 0-W 

4 POOS 

8 
7 

9 309 
13 

5-2 Mao About Ya. 91 Royal Rehearsal. 9-2 
lY-2 Needwood Leader, 8-1 Grtdan Triangle. 12-1 Cc 


2.30 SITKA SPRUCE NOVICE SELLING HURDLE 

(3-Y-O: £385: 2m If) (6) 

t 104 ANGEL DRUMMER A Ingham 199 KCapten(7) 


04 ANGQ. DRUMMER A Ingham 199. 

0 CROWN COLONY Mrs A Kraft 197- 
F0 fiJRFtZYCALWVWlams 197..—,.. 


3-0 DEVON FUELS DUCHY OF CORNWALL CUP 
HANDICAP CHASE (£3,798: 2m 6f) (5) 

-2--1F1 ALUED NBVCASTLED Bsworth 911-7 ; C Brawl 

3 640 R1MMMG COMMSfrffFJR Hodgw 1S-1WL JVlSE 
9 -KW AFRICAN STAR R Roa9197 ^^ 

11 2232 THE-FLOORLAYER J Befcar 9197 Lltawjm 

72 MP TOWN SPECIAL D R Tucker 7-1 97 I SMriMM 

- . AOttl Newcaata, 92 The Ftooriayer. 7-2 Afrfcai s m. 

91 Running Comment, 20-1 Town Special. 

3.30 HAPPY EATER FAMLY RESTAURANT 
HANDICAP HURDLE (£1,710: 2m II) (fi) fW, T ni 

2 920 TIGHT TURN (CtLBFIfl Hon T-n-7 . t 

3 1« B^-LTWEST RHoSns9l 1-6 „ H FffcrSj 

S .-081 CORALHARSOUR ftSTwarflte 4-19)2 geO 

? ss aBsss^ss^'BsS 

71 /W) BRULOWAY Frsiwr 1 
9-4 Coral Hartjour. 114 San Carlos, 9-2 p— ^ 
11-2 Rying Officer, 7-1 Tight Turn. 191 Btfdtoma* 

4.0 DEVONAW . RADIO CHALLBIGE CUP 
HANDICAP CHASE (£1.662: 

3 -344 LEND9IG ARTISTfCl Nfittiee 17-11-7 PSetMlM^ 

I £ 

j SS 


3 re MR RZVC AL W W Htoins 197.. — PHtaraeoBlTI 

a NELSONSUPERYANXEE P Hastsm 197 5 Kdghfev 

7 03 RVE QUAR TERS LCotiaffl 162 PfaS 

10 030 REPETITIVE M Pipe 10-2 PScndnm 

9-4 Repfetiw. 11-4 Five Quaners. 4 -t Angel Dnnnmer. 
-1 Nelson Suparyankea. 14-1 Crown Colony. J91 Mr FLncaL 


.B fPn- HOafcHtHutN L Cotirefl 8-190 GeoraeKnjaM 

5-4 Lading Artist 92 CaWo Harnta, 4-1 RW 
91 Lerey DU3L1A-1 RoMbergen, **""■ 


Superyanhee. 74-1 Crown Colony. 791 bVHrycaL 

Course specialists 



AM SOOTS PME NOVICE HURDLE (Dw IP: £497- 
2m 1 ft (8) - . . 

1 91 CHRCQTS SUPPER 
5 -204 MBDUN TMtANG M 

8 p-a TUBCY SOYA tnghwn 5 - 10 - 

9 0 TYRO PRINCE R CurM 4-1 0-12 

70 P00- CAROLINE RANGER R ttodgas9197 

12 940 LAOYKBXANEmNGfeSra4-1o!7 

13 BOM MBS SWCLAB T PRoaars 9197 -j-L 

14 09 UMCORH6RED JD Roberts S-IP-7 - 

_ . S-2CtirHt y>jaigper. 11-4 Lady-KMane, 4-7 Mto- 
91 Uneomerad.91ToTey Boy. 191 MfcJdtin TTvw^ 


Costly Pelf disappoints behind Another Guest 


Course specialists 

EHS JOCKEYS 


: PRINCESS MAIDEN STAKES (2-Y-O: £3.1 34: Ira md) (13 runners) 

004 ANGEL CITY (C Humfitii j Dunlop 9-0 . . . wcwton 


Pelf, who cost £lJ&m guineas as a yearling, 
proved just as disappointing when tried over the 
minimum distance at Wohorhamptna yesterday 
as she had done over six furl o ngs on foarpreyions 
occasions. 




Cftanvooei 
H Csol 

j Ountap 

B.Wtfc 


TRAINEHS 

Utfiima^! Hurttiers Per cent 


9 

23 

39.1 

It 

30 

36.7 

12 

34 

35 3 

12 

5J 

22.2 


(Only qoafiJicrs) 


S r«r. 

Winners 

15 

flunno-s 

45 

Per COT 
32 7 

•1 • 1; 

G StdtHey 

5 

34 

250 

' •4* 

M&rcli ‘ 

29 

205 

To 4 

23 

GDuft'tt 

13 

nr 

fl 1 

24 

N Gcinnonon 

12 

it' 

10 3 

2: .’i 

L Cnamocii 

14 

146 

S.5 

3J i)0i 


004 ANGflLCITY iC MumC'Tiri) J Dumao90 . 

BAVARDAGE iC Bume) N Bvnoh 90 

w bo«afortune-,M''.'.j Hoy,aroi0 Money 90. . 

0032 DOLLAR SEEKER (BF) (T K a, or 90.. . 

0000 GOLDEN TREE iMrj P fcnqi j Et-iermaon 9-0 

0 JAZZ DANCER iM's D &aiieri a Jar-.i? 9-0 
0040 JJ JIMMY .J 5 J iran'e, Lrj. J.t H Easreitv 9-0 . 

02 OLD MAESTRO (BF) iSK^i.r JJanaimwer u Horocoo 9-0 
000 REEF OF GOLD fCob: M L^'nost C Bn"tain 9-0 

03 SNAAN iStvyrn MORammegi H Cecil &-0 

0 STRAY NO MORE ftlr, j aanwer*i T Barron 90 

0 STRONG SEA U Hexumi u h taswftv id .. 

DAFFODIL iLaoy Mairlonaic*Bu;narjn) m Prescott 9il " 


. cower 
R Guest 
R Cochrane 
. K Darley 
D Niche*! 
... MBvch 

- G Starkey 

. . JLtWN* 

- S Cauthen 
. M Fry 


• SO 3 -1 
93 12-1 
« 7-2 


K Hodgson 
GDuflidd 


Sheikh Mohammed’s filly, 7-4 hrauntt for the 
first division of the Dediey Maiden Stakes, 
chased Sriterpan for the first three furlongs, after 
which (he pair weakened and Another Guest and 
Wantage Park took command. 

Another Guest, with (he advantage of a ran oyer 
her rival, quickly gained die upper hand to heat . 

■ Mick Ryan's newcomer a length’ and « half. 
Another Guest who cost only 6.000 guineas, was 
a 20-1 shot, aad her success under the apprentice 


Sheather's horses have only struck form m 

W * ««**■ — 1 .1- fe» wnT^Tta 

winpexs.tiirs season. lores he who laraaehed 
Cochrane, the new. first Jockey for Laca CumW 
on his career, andSheafo^ Is bopWhe^^ 

lU cm. Onnhc - ^ =»» tfo 


the same for Shonhs.’ • 810 

Petros Seventy, ak' aB-the-wgy wjiner « 

RiTvprlpv loci mABflh. me ILi 


Beverley last omtfu w 6-4 Ctvourita Cnr Jr 
Serfgetev NHrs«y S^^ Handirep. ^ g 

Maikmorlirf nill iftart L w t fifliu Zr™ _ 


Newmarket col* again led from start fo ftSLi, 7? 
the bands of Tyrone Williams. IUM *» 





p I: 

t 

1*4 • 


*&. ■■ 


tf ; 








I £ jl* 

■s?', I (• 'T 

- 3 ‘ L* 

• % - . - 

i 


i 




THE TIMES TUESDAY OCTOBER 7 1986 




| ^_J*gciDg Brave dons his Sunday best to lay on a feast 

English abstinence forgotten in 
m one moment of sheer delight 


SPORT 


i s aS55 ! ® 


’ uw * ; 
"ft 1 : 

X ' V '\ nT l 1 

' ,n VnN' 

TfljlS 


; ,:1 : 

‘■‘•“'lift mJ 1 : 

»w h5{ 

l’jsn cvisw|l 
11 ;,s J 'omwjj 1 

• *** 

llu unfiinunj. 
n ikMnivmr - 


; The continental Smidavk 

: 

S 5 ' r- Y gf?y ** *»ve picked a better 

ftu P™? 1 .duaanche thaT^ or* 

Ifi » goueJlt really was a feast day ada?S 

hw’ «f^^^ t T B8SJ “ SI,wt - Itw astliedav 

T "Jf** j**se race was ran: the Prir 
J W, * r Are: de Trioinpbe-And ft wS 
j] w^OufQuestipn. the finest day of TOort 

W L is ■ See ? ftis " S*** m reality ot^ d 

N SSTSS® 1 l* 25 *«««■ than** Wort? 
n J. cap. better tiwq the European athletics 

iu J championships, better even than the da v 
Tewm Irregulars beat BBC Children's 
a SBnday «** 

r **, Such magic is what 
Sj racing is all about 

'mu : — ; — 

f k JJjastheborse race of a lifetime and. 






BOXING 

Christie’s 
chance to 
move up in 
the world 

By Srikmnar Sen 
■ Boxing Correspondent 

Errol ’ Christie will get his 
chance io move up in the world 
when he mceeis the world 
No. 6. the Irish-born Scan 
. Mannion. of ibe United States, 
at Alexandra Pavilion on Octo- 
ber 29. Man niert. who was born 
in Connemara, emigrated to 
Boston 10 years ago and las 
never boxed in Europe. He is a 
good class boxer and a win 
could lift Christie into ibe top 10 
in theworid. 


FOOTBALL 


Fulham tighten 
defences for 
‘red monster’ 


By Clive White 


If Fulham gain promotion 
this season they may have their 
nightmarish experience at 
Anfictd m the LitikwoodsCupa 
fortnight ago to thank for it. 
Instead of wallowing iu sdPpity 
after their 104 record defeat, 
they took a very close look at 
their defensive play, and they 
have been unbeaten in liter 
three games since. 

Just how successful the 
rehabilitation has been we wiH 
see tonight at Craven Cottage 
when they come face to face 
again with the “red monster*’ in 
the' return leg of the second 
round tie. '“.After the imttal 
shock we decided to gp back to 


tighten Altobelli 

:es for . !}?<* 

Mister’ m Itahan 

!Sr ler squad 

Rome (AP> - After the 
fonder, is doubtful with a bod World Cup debacle m Mexico. 
hccL Alessandro Altobelli vatd he 

Rush, who restricted himself would never play for Italy again, 
to a mere brace in the firs leg. but yesterday, a' day after wor- 


may be happy with jus one mg three gosh for Inter-Milamt 
tonight — his 200th in domestic their 4-1 win over Roma, mam 
com petition. “Short of tying his critics say the anker is a *iui 
shoelaces together I don't know pan of any future national team 
ho* we can stop him.” “Only Liverpool has cvn 
Lewingtou conceded. Bui Liver- humiliated me us much,' 
pool, who include a few young- Roma's Swedish coach. Svci 
son in tbeir squad like .Alex. Eriksson, said. He managed 
Watson, the younger brother of Portugal's Bcnfica when iht 
Evenon's Dave and Bran Moo- powerful English side pul foot 
nc>. should be less severe tins goals in the Iberian team's net 


- .ui v gauopM into the final furlong, eight 
: abreast, with eyes buigm & WrfIs 
cvisua 1 fiaringi manes flowing and jockeys 
11 "orJc^JiU a set of berserk monkeys in 

' u, ' h Pita** “f® a®*** to conjure something extra, 
•‘c l*ru M r « The greatest sight in racing is that 
unfiiTiuiifc when, as all horses are string 

n “®t out, another cruises by as if the rest 

ul rtvurdj ‘ *“ w ®r® standmg stilL Such magic is what 
. “■ racing is aQ about. 

■innkhklS This is what happened. A horse went 
•n.iit Mr Rk}^' past that tidal wave of horses as if it 
V|J . . Kx *t * were stationary. That was Bering, the 
.« o-iiapH-ji, top French bone, and what a fine horse 
uu iti too; he found the extra gear, that almost 
ul '•iancij hr fe mythical quality, the abifity to quicken 
irsi tlink vm. and then quicken again, which the men 

v,!uv ’turn Pf in the know can *tnra of foot’. It was a 
iivr jv;j ^ marveUous performance. 

**' I U M;..£ But even as be stormed past, there 

•* :!>. J t came yet another horse, a horse that 
possessed, unbelievably, impossibly, yet 
i i„ rj another gear. Jbe ace of trumps was 
!i'.» iraix* , " tse * f trumped by a power outside the 
i.i, pa’ pwside the rules. It seemed, of 

.o ti urtiicn t both Physics and biology. A marvel was 
’*■ -v.ivaix^ topped by a still greater marvel as 
... .T. Dandng Brave sped, like an arrow, to 

! •“ rictory. lt lifted the- heart, it left you 

t ,y.* limp, it filled you with joy. And Tdidn't 
” 1 , Pfc have a centime on the race; either. 

^ Dancmg Brave proved himself to be 
. u;iv not jnst a champion, hot; I think, a very 
• mu- • •*ni nit. great one. We wffl boast about haring 

* seen him. He has won the 240ft 

. .: ' caii'Ho ^ Guineas, the Eclipse, the Diamond and 
i now this. His failure m 4be Derby, in- 
. « which he finished like a train in second 

v%; place can, perhaps, be pat down to the 


v ' '-ffi-.-vitfe « 

Striking it rich: Eddery, the winning jockey, with attendant Dallas o3 tycoons 




quirkiness of the Epsom track. I beard a 
theory, from one learned in horse fore, 
that Dancing Brave, unbalanced by the 
twists «wl tarns at Epsom, changed his 
leading fog coming down the hffl and, in 
that instant, lost the m omen t um he 
needed to catch Sbahrastaai before the 
finishing post intervened. Certainly, on 
sensible trades, be has been unbeatable. 

And on Sunday he ran a glorious race 
on a glorious day: a golden day of an In- 
dian summer that was doing its best to 
make up for the proper summer that 
seemed to hare been cancelled iu e ar l y 

July. The Parisiens were all gleaming in 

the sun, in beautiful condition as they 
strolled around the paddock, the women 
striving tbeir utmost to outdo the horses; 
glossy, impeccably turned out, trained to 
a hair, glamorously connected and quite 
beautifully bred. The gentlemen, over- 
elegant to English eyes, wore chapeaux 
mefoa, dove-grey suits and looked like a 
bunch of understudies for Steed in The 
Aremgers. 

. We are not allowed sack treats in 
England, not on Sundays. On Smdays, 
the English most be bored, that is the ' 
- law. The E»» gH«h Sunday is charac- 
terized not by the firings you do, but by 
the things you don't do and are not 
allowed to do. People don't work, sot 
because they hare better firings to do but 
because it is the Englishman's right and 
duty to be bored out of Ms mind all day 
an Sunday. Because of this, I doft 
suppose there wili ever be Sunday raring 
in England. 


The English beOeve that raring is 
sinful, you see. Perhaps that is the secret 
of its appeaL 1 foil to see the sin, myself, 
in watching a marvellous horse perform- 
ing deeds of wonder. People also believe 
that gambling is sinfoL It's net eves 
enjoyable. It is winning that is enjoy- 
able. Mostly, gambling is an exciting 
way of making yourself depressed. 
Perhaps it is our Protestant heritage 
that tells us that gambling is not part of 
righteous money-making, and is there- 
fore wrong, and that the idea of haring a 
nice time cm Sunday is scandalously 

hw m ural. 

It was stffl an Englishman's dimanche 
last weekend. The race was invented h 
1920 to celebrate the end of the war and 
“to demonstrate the quality of French- 
bred horses ris-a-vis representatives of 
foreign breeding*'. Mostly it has done 
just that. En gland had only won six 
before the weekend, Italy lire, Ireland 
four and Germany one. The other 48 
hare aO been picked np by the French. 
But it would hare been a sour French- 
man that begrudged Dancing Brave his 
wondrous win last Sunday. 

Now, it is the custom among journal- 
ists to invent remarks “overheard” in 
the crowd. I give ay word that the 
following remarks from an mknown 
Frenchman are utterly genuine: “Qud 
be! ArcT be said. “Quel jockey! Quel 
cberal! Phenomriier It was a Sunday to 
treasure for ever. 


f*1i. iriir’r nrfr.ni. ft. ■ -mi UK ICV muiom in 

w£r£?* «** remrn *8 <> r *be second 

N?Ti(i lhf JJSf ff roond tte “ Aftcr *** ""tial 

J 1 \jfiJZF3L vZrJn ***** ** decided » «o tack to 
Christie can beat him be wjD Essies io our defending.” Ray 

Lcwiopon. ihc manager. sa2 
£ ** Wc werc 50 conscious of Rush 
ihai our full backs were trying to 

£ cover the central defenders, AB 

. w M m **“ Liverpool did was play it out k> 

ratings ai — ihemng and wait for the crosses 

, _ . . to come pouring over. 

The real Chnsuc has not yet -since then our fuR barks 
mimed in the dure contests have stayed out wide and cfosed 
the Coventry raiddlewighi has down tbeir winecn. Liverpool's 
sm* 6 “S eight-round defiat finishing, thou^u was fontastic 
by Mark Eaylor last year. “If I The* are such a great one-touch 
can turn Manmon over iu the ieara.“ 
vintage- Chrwie style. I’ll be The pla^ra have had to ham 

right there. Christie said to live with themselves again 
yesterday. and to withstand the sniggers 

and taunts. One or two of them 
Mannion went 15 rounds have complained of being called 
with Mike McCaJIum. the Dudley after the comic star of 
World Boxing Association light- the film “Ten**. “I've told them 
middleweight champion, in ihai it's a one-off game now and 
1984. That performance looks to go out and enjoy it. I just hope 
even better today as none of that if things go wrong after a 
McCallum’s subsequent title couple of minutes they don't 
opponents have lasted the drop their heads.” Lewington 
distance. said. “Frankly I'll be dad when 

they this tie is out of the way. 
However. Mannion moved hopefully some good may 
up io middleweight recently and ® ul . 

has won his three contests at Fulham s defence will show 
that weight. Now that the tin- changes from the one so abused 
disputed world middleweight Iasi time. Marshall, who was an 
champion. Marvin Hader. is emergency cenmr half then, goes 
expected to retire after his multi- back to midfield. Cot.. Tike 
million dollar bout with Sugar Hopkins, the Welsh intcr- 
Ray Leonard in April. Mannion nauonal defender, is recovering 
himself has world title pceicn- J 0 ™ 3 cartilage operation and 
sions. Angelo Dundee, who will Parker, tbeir best known de- 
be in Mannion's comer ays: 

“Christie's people must be crazy TlimAV* KaaI 
to take this guy. On his night he A IlCl H/HL J 
can lick any middleweight in the 

top 10” Bv a Special ( 


time - not forgetting, of course. 

that away gods count double. 

Bob Saxton is another man- 
ager trying to recover his senses 
after his Wacklum Berets side 
were beaten 4-0 on Saturday at 
Rending. He has given himself 
24 boms to cod down before 
selecting the side » free Queen’s 
Park Rangers at Ewood Part 
tonight. Saxton, whose side are 
only J-2 down, nxt "We have 
to slop making it easy for people 
to net goals again*! us.” Oxford 
I'McLwho play at Cllflnglrem. 
have the perfect remedy for 
their 6-1 defeat at Hillsborough 
— a 64) cushion from the first 

^l— cherter L'aftrd. in the 
process of renewing their con- 
fidence. will be without Olsen 
away lo Part Vale and. more 
important, at home to Sheffield 
Wednesday on Saturday. Olsen 
required 10 stitches yesterday m 
a training accident w hich opens 
the way tar the return of Barnes, 
the former England winger, for 
his first game since March. Ron 
Atkinson. Ibe United manager, 
eager to siring together a few 
victories, will probably resist the 
temptation to replace Olsen 
with another midfield player. 

Ere no w, slowly recovering 
from injuries, welcome back 
Harper and Foiston gainst 
Newport Corny, while West 
Hast, at home to Prestos, may 
recall McAlister for his first 
senior game since April. 1 084. 
Paries nas influenza. 


Turner back in harness 


By a Special Correspondent 


Abo on the bill will be the 
stylish Tyrrell Bigs, of the US. 
the Los Angeles Olympic gold 
medal winner. Biggs is unbeaten 
in 1 1 contests. His opponent is 
yet to be named. 


Simon Barnes 


Griffiths back 

Mike Griffiths, who has not 
pla yed basketball this season for 
Solent Stars because of a 
contractual dispute, has settled 
his differences and will stay wfth i 
the south coast dub. They 
expect to have the England 
international back in their 
squad for Saturday's Quisberg 
National League first division 
game at Calderdale. 


Graham Tuner, sucked by 
Aston Villa three weeks ago, 
re turn ed to football today as 
manager of Wotrerfcanxpcoa 
Wanderers. 24 horns after the 
dismissal of Brian Little. Ms 
Molinemc predecessor. Little 
has served the dub iu a back 
seat capacity since Wolves woe 
palled back from the brink of 
closure jnst before the start of 

Richard Horadea, the Wotver- 
hamptoa chairman, and Jack 
Harris, his only other director, 
will name Turner as their man at 
a Press con fe rence this morning. 
The former Shrewsbury player 


manager was sacked by VBIa the 
day after Ms side had been 
ravaged 641 by Forest at Not- 
tingham. a defeat that left (beta 
at the feet of the first 


la just over 12 mouths he had 
signed nine p laye r s for £2.61 m, 
£lm in excess of sales, but 
results had gone drastically 
against him as had a lengthy 
injury list. 

Homdeu's choke of Turner is 
oot surprising. The Wolves 
cfcairmaa is from Shrewsbury 
and supported Ms heme town 
dub and Wolves as a y^f 0 " 


»«g three goal* for Inter-Milan m 
tbeir 4-1 win over Roma, man* 
critics say the anker » a vital 
pan of any future national {cam. 

"Only Liverpool ha* ever 
humiliated me us much,” 
Roma's Swedish coach. Sven 
Enksson, said. He managed 
PonugaTs Bcnfica when the 
powerful English side pul four 
goals in ihe Iberian team's net. 
“Altobelli is not the kind of 
player that comes along every 
day.” said Omar Sivon. an 
Ansrnuman whom Italian fens 
rate as one of ihe greatest 
foreigners to have graced then 
championship. 

Intcr-Mi tan moved into joint 
third place in the with Avellino 
with five points, one potm 
behind Napoli and Como and 
two behind (tic champions. 
Jut-emus, who have seven. 

Altobelli** performance came 
three days after Italy's new 
coach. Azelio Victm. had talked 
tile tall forward into returning to 
the national squad for 
Wednesday's vxhtbuton game 
with Greece in Bologna. “I'm 
ready to play or stay on the 
bench. The coach ha* plenty of 
young players he wants to try 
out.” Altobelli. aged .*1. said. 

Vjom. who succeeded Earn 
Bearcat after the Italian team 
failure »n the World Cup. has 
summoned several young play- 
ers in an effort to rejuvenate iIk 
I talian **Muc team" in advance 
of qualifying matches of the 
European championship* 

Newcomen info the Italian 
team were Stcfano Toccani. the 
Juvcntus goalkeeper, the mid- 
field player, Giuseppe Giannmi. 
of Roma, the forwards. Roberto 
Donadom, of Milan and 
Roberto Maneini. of 
Sampdoria. and the defender*. 
Da no Bonetli. of Milan and 
Giovanm Franctni. of Torino 
The only veterans left in the 
team, in addition to Ahohdli. 
were Salvatore Bagni. of Napoli. 
Giuseppe Bergomi. of Inter- 
Milan and Antonio Cabrini. of 
Juvcntus. 

Diego Maradona managed to 
put aside his oft-thc-freld prob- 
lem* to lift Napoli into second 
place in the Italian league. 
Napoli beat Torino 3-1. 

“His left foot blessed the three 
plays that produced goals,” 
Rome's mass-circulation sports 
daily. Comctv della Sport, re- 
ported. In one dynamic action, 
the Argentine dribbled from 
midfield, dashed past one de- 
fender. who in desperation 
puffed his shirt, rode a dan- 
gerous waist-high tackle from a 
second and fired the ball at the 
goalkeeper, whose save was then 
knocked in by a Neapolitan 
attacker. 


i^rMtua tv- 

* IVTI-JV f 


RACING RESULTS 

.Roth • ■ T art £270: £2 

xMtUI • fajacsREia; 


RUGBY UNION 


FOR THE RECORD 


Celtic given radiation advice 


Going: firm 

2j 0 pm a 50yd} 1. MOtWTTUHSLE- 


RKtng.4-ty. 3. Dancing 
1} ALSO RAN: 9-4 lav MBer*4 TttB (484. 

- 9-2Rotynor(SthJ.33FanwaBl«h).6ran. 

- NR- pjrtric* John Lyons, stihd.shbd.fht 
nK. 23. R Hannon at MarttxxDugh. Tola; 
E550; £1.80. £2.60- DF: Etl Sb. CSF: 

SASfi 2-30 (im 8yd) 1. I BATTALION (0 

•MDiw e^.wibl aias 

A X. Eiw ChMning Graae. 33 Ocean Hound, 
StuOWaFre. 50 Gtmnar Swam. Rochas. 


■Taut £270: £2,201 £1.10. £150 Dft 
ia3B.csRDoi^r . , . 

44S{7l)f<Man{RHas.341MBV):2. 
Pdanturs Choica (3 Brown. 11-2): a 
Vantxmn (U Fry. 20-1). ALSO RAN: 3 jt- 
tov Oran Jaaer Mdi). 6 Old Eras t«s). B 
Lisianthus. to Accustomed. 14 
Cragandanoc b . 15th). Bootxtony. 20 
Moos Future. 10 ran. 3L 11. a Z*L W. H 
Thomson Jones at Newmarket Tola: 
£4-00: £12a £a_40. £37a DF: £10L5a 
CSft feMA THeaac £2S44a 


ie^wi Hayashi is 

My ALSO RAM3jh a aw* 

'kss.ar,! fairiihar 

h). GoOrtony. 20 T1 

l 3L II. 21.254L W. H a.a 

with venue 


ATHLETICS 


BASKETBALL 




Wolverhampton 


. By Darid Hands 
Rugby Correspondent 


Tool 17 
< 21. v f L J 
■> m in r 


at Arundel. Tot* £4 JO: 
i.40. OF: 51250. CSF: 


fgH 


22.10. £7.10. 25.40. OF: 5125a CSF- 
144.06- Tote £1090: E2.10. £250. £1.1 a Off: 

10 ilm 8yd) I.OSM SUPER PUMC(C £71,00. CSFi E232.62. 

Rutter, 20- T) aid ELBURY PARK . (G 250 pm) 1. PETROS SEVBfTT 
Starkey. 3. No naaWW gy wafoms. 6-4 favfc 2. Wctoria. for m 

Carson. 7-2L ALSO RAW: 9 Fawn CMXjl e*oO. 12-1): 1 Princwn WcMoo OS 
Hansom (580. )2 FloatJrm tost* (jW«. Duttxbd. 12-1). ALSO RAIt5 Blow For 
Putiam Mtfs. 16 Fi<» OT Uta. M udrtL Homs (4tttL 6 Corofin Lass j«*. 7 Hnkn 
Swift's Pau 20 Fouz. 25 Stemda-kA Design. 10 Lag taideJSff^. 12 Defile 
ittvl. 66 WW-Y-Pwsa. 13 ran. NR: Cowt 25 Rom Of Tudor. Mghfand 

iown.dd4rt.lW, 21. i hi, 3L S««er Punk, csuxaln. Santo Ptticas* 11 ran. wrtftjiy 
M Fetharsm-Gocoey at tot ^ ajwy bar rft. *1 

Parte. G Harwood at PulboroogH Tote: Nawmartiat Ja». Qja £150. £251 
Super Punk £13201 Eburyj** £.20; £i 70 DF: £1420 CSf:&QJ4. Trtcast 
Super Punk E4 41 Sbury ArtcH.to. Mo El5i;88. Bought m for 5200 guineas. 
Restrain 35 pm a IlOytfl J. SNEAK PREVIEW 

Punk lEhnM jR CuronL 2-1 lav); 2.Tgr»crodWMfc(ML 

Sr^er PWk E1<-16- Tnrast^SifomRmk. Thomas _ 33.7); 3. pin Encore (G Bacdar. 

, Etoury Park and No 6-1 L ALSO RAN: 5-2 Harradura pm). 8 

t Efoury Paik Super Ptsik and No Restraint Twpeze Ariel. 10 Owen's Prtda-. 12 
£38.61. ■ Alacazam (6th). Sound Ddfononpih). B 

3J0flm3f I50wfl 1. MtOKT YFIAa t^J r^. Nk. U U W. ffl. * 

. Rmd ii-4i-2.MakaPeaca{WNm«nes.7- Kingston* Warren. Tote £ 2 50; £1.10. 

1 54 ^SKoks fP« gdoy. 45 DF: £2950- CSF: £4001. 

^ALS0R^ 1 92fo^B^»Pl«hK gjo nm 4T) 1. TUWeUC 

13-2 Artistic CMUBtan flww 5-i);a BBMrrtOua*l(TA«s.4^);3,fom 

t6th).6ran-^U.^l.l»l.ia.*-DB^5^ Fbr VoarWUatM LTbomas, 100-30 fan). 

- iMivg gwftgatiaa -snaiinan 

LS^SSSa nw cSaon. 33-9-. ALSO Matey at Naw ma rtiaiTotegBgO ^g-ig. 

SSSSSKSS 

mmsJi Jonas f Newnwl^. swwarts mqwry «* <*eg**i to 

£1 70- £1 30. £1.40. OF: £1 Jr- second. • • 

£2*6 44} (5f) 1. KB’T WAITINO {M Wigham. 

g^ n £,S,. f S^SSk ^ 1 

£4555 OOtlnTtfl 1.BlCKBtMAN(QtXr»Bld, 

Edinburgh 

Codirane. 4-11 fod; 2. t fWgP ^SLyi Rad BBly. 15 ran. wrf 

J: ^S^rmI* 0 ^ 

Sffao Plwniw WJBD £450- CSF: 

P20. DFr £1.40. CSF: £2-78. Ptartpot E^iOS. 




OokfF firm (straight course, good to firm) The Japanese go mto the 
25{5Qi.ANOTHBtQUE8T(AShoufls. penultimate game of tbeir eigbl- 
Pvnk^ notewor. 14- match tour, sponsored by 
Toshiba, at Oxford today when 

Jest iwrg. zo i-rtmlay Parlao n, Garcon **J*y • *”*** ^ COnilmi^ Ea- 
mo« (4jhl otympte chaflongar.9 ran. dm. gland Students. It will be hke 


7-4 tav Pelt 
Jast-ISM, 


£655. ' 

PiacapoC £45.95 


played at Iffley Road for Major 
Stanley’s XV wo years ago and 
whose dub. Kobe Steel, was 
hosted off on tour in February 
this year. 

Hayashi. aged 26, has missed 
only one game on tour — that 
against Cornwall last Saturday 
—when Fujita fed die side from 
hooker, and he has varied bis i 
position from lock to back row. 
He appears today in the second 
row alongside Sakuraba. aged 
19. who has played so weU while 
making his second national tour 
within five months. 

The win over Cornwall will 
have lifted Japanese spirits and 
their teamwork will pose prob- 
lems for . a student side which 
had its first collective workout 
on Sunday/They worked again 
yesterday, under the discerning 
eye of John Robins who, as weft 
as coaching them, is also chair- 
man of the student selectors. 

There have been two aroettd- 
menf5io the side, the first on the 
right wing where Haniman has 
replaced the unavailable Nel- 
$on-W3]idms. Harrhnan won 
bis blue for Cambridge last 
season and made a distinct 
impression on his first outing 
for Harlequins against Leicester 
10 days ago. Since Oli plays on 



Critic have called radiation 
experts to help decide whether it 
is safe to visit Dyuaum Kiev, 60 
mite from the nuclear reactor 
accident area at Chernobyl, for 
tbeir second round European 
Cup tie. 

Jack McGinn, the Critic 
chairman, confirmed yesterday 
that the dub has contacted a 
group of experts throughout 
Britain who act as worldwide 
radiation watchdogs. 

Meanwhile David Hay, the 
Critic manager, is in trouble 
with the Sr A following his 
criticism of Bob Valentine: the 
Dundee referee, after the Skol 
Cup tie at Aberdeen on Septem- 
ber 3. 

Hay has been summoned to 


appear before the SFA’s exec- 
utive and general purposes 
committee to explain his com- 
ments. The SFA have also 
dismissed his suggestion that 
Valentine should never again 
take charge ofa Celtic game. 

While Celtic worry over their 
problems, the aristocrats of 
Europe are back in charge after 
impressive weekend perfor- 
mances. Ajax Amsterdam and 
Barc el o na have swept 10 the top 
of the Dutch and Spanish 
leagues. 

Ajax. European Cup winners 
in 1971. 1972 and 1973, 

thrashed Fortrma Sittard 6-2, 
thanks to a hat-trick from John 
Bosnian, to move ahead of PSV 


Eindhoven on goal difference. 
The champions convincingly 
beat Dra Bosch 2-1. but now 
have to contend with Ajax 
seeking a record 23rd cham- 
pionship. 

Bordeaux, the French cham- 
pions in 1984 and 1985. re- 
placed Paris Saint Germain at 
the top of the first division after 
beating last year's champions 2- 
0 in an Ul-tcmpercd game. 
Bordeaux cracked the Saint 
Germain defence through Phi- 
lippe Vereruysse. the midfield 
player, and Zlatko Vujovic. the 
Yugoslav forward. With Mar- 
seille, the former leaders losing 
2-0 at Sochaux, Bordeaux now 
lead the table by two points. 


EUROPEAN LEAGUE RESULTS 


Won Lsi Pet GB 


NATIONAL LEAOUE 
EaotDMsfon 

Now York Melt 100 

PMadaMtii PtUfos^ 66 
Sttxu&CanMs 79 


Mo n t re a l Expos 
OwagoCuia 

ftssughnretn 

West DMtiofi 

Houston Askos 
Cnonnre Rads 
SanFrancteo 
San Diego Padres 
LA Dodgers 
.Atlanta Breves 


54 567 
75 534 21» 
92 ** 


76 63 .484 29& 


96 66 593 
86 76 531 10 
83 79 512 13 
74 W .457 22 
73 89 .451 23 
72 » 447 23» 


ctwstuu Ifc onunaey-a r. Maon „ 
DesDoroogfi 22. Fores ft Oover 9. Sutton 
Valence 3. OwrfWfi ft Kmgl. Tatraon ift 
Duka rt York's RW 1ft Cnafoam Mouse 3; 
D teanere B. Denatone ft Emauid S6, 
HaOefdMfnre' Aske'a. huciaa ft EnM 
Pal* 13. cUMsmqre 9: r rerti v rwn 1 
Morefcn 4: OenaftnonO 14. Loreto L. 
(Vssnun's 2S. Ipiwcn 1ft Gufertora RCS30. 

“ XV tt GwFwreitwy 6. 

.. Hab er OaUtenT ABMfa. 

Efem 10. CM»n Ooatwh. Barry 6; 

»%& D gT&5.rss5-i; 

srejs^sssas.'ssg 

Eflwart a Bad) ifl. Monkon Combe 4; 
Edward's r wr a; l 3. King henry M 


AUSTRIAN: Wfonar SponcU) 5. Bs- 
a n s ta dt ft VOM 4. OAK 2 Austria 
Ktogenlurt 1. Admire Wadrer 2: FC Tyrol 
2. motrtt tAarere 4; Stixm Gras 1. Law ft 
Rapto Vienna 4. Vienna 1. Landiap 
nnaMnwa: 1. Auatria Mama. (4 pitynd 
&pts: 2. Rapid MentUL 14, 21;3, FCTpoL 
14.19. 

BELGMM: Ghent ft Charleroi ft Barenem 
0. MotentteW ft Sarertg 2. Korvfk 1; 
Mteagam 1. Srentfarf Uaga ft Antwam 1 . 
UWake ft FC Lrega Si Racing Jet 0; 
Cwde Bruges 0. Lokeran a Anaertadrt 5. 
Bewscftca a Bererea 2, Club Bruges 2. 
Leedktg tx xl tton *: 1. CU> BrugeftftIO: 
Andertecirt. 9. Bereran. ft 9 
BUtOAmAM: States 4. Dkn U rorgred 1; 
Bsroa Z Sredats 1: Pirn 1 . vtosfta ft 
Lokomotiv Soda 2. S8wan 1; Bur 3. Vretsa 

0. LokanMKOY Ptotekv ». Spartak Hawn 1; 
Chamornorsts ft Trekia a Spartak Kama 
6. Akademik ft Uadfog paaWoiw: 1 . 

Stew, ft ia a vaoSalT tS^MUft 

ft Ift 

CZECHOSLOVAK: Quids Banefis Bysafoa 

1 . OAC Dumjska SfrBCa 1: Skoda PtanT. 
DuWa Prague 1: Sparta Prague ft Dynamo 
Ceske Budajwioe ft Sparrek Tmwra ft 
RH Cnefi l; Pisatfta Nitre 2. Bank 
Ostrava 2: Sigma Otomouc 3. States 
Prague ft TJ WcotecaS. Taban PreaovO; 


Bchu u M Pregue Z ZVL ZBna 0. 
Laedfoa meWana: 1 . Span* Prague. 8. 
14; ft Ahamaro Prague, ft 12; 3, Bank 


14; ft dbhaouns Pregua. ft Ift 3. Bank 
Ostrava, ft 9 

DUTCH: Aox A na a arflam ft Fortuna 
SERard ft AZE7 Atotaar 0, Vaendam ft 
FC Umett ft Go Altead EagteS ft 
Faynnoord RottanJam 3, tons itottar- 
dam ft PC Dan Boscti 1. rev Eindhoven 
ft PEC Zwolaft Eacatsnrft FC Twente 0. 
FC Dan Haag ft FC Groningen 3. Haartam 
1; VW Vfcrfo 0. Rorja -fc 4. Leading 
ppeMo er A(n. ift 1&2. PSV. 10. T6: ft 
FC Den Bosch. 10, 15 
EAST QBUKAN: Vorvreerts Frankhm 1. 
9tMriR«aa 1: Roi-waas Erfort ft Dynamo 
Dresden 0t Fon s chw a Oachofswerda 0. 
Sam Brenoenourg i: kHagdaOura 1. Can 
Zeiss Jena ft Dynamo Benin 0. Lokomotiv 
Letpeg 1: Enerow Cotmus ft VMsmul Aue 
ft Kart-M*x-Sas ft Ureon Bertn 1. 
UaWg peaMeae: 1. Lnkattv Laquig. 
7.11; ?. Dynamo Berth. 7. 10; ft Cart 
Zetss Jena. 7.9. 

FRENCH: rece 1. Monaco ft Nantes ft 
Tomouatl: Rennes 1. Lera Z SonseauiZ 
Pans &G ft Sochaux ft Marsaoe 0. Le 
Havre3. Nancy ft Mac l.Sart Etienne 1; 
RC Pane ft Bren ft Ufo 1. Auxena 1: 


Bordeaux. 1ft 1ft I 
543.1ft 15. 


Pnvys. Special Guest 

Si^toPrimeJtogww-^gH students. 

,n d»e pack Slade, of London 
Sffsjnan^. jMBfor- « r *t, N S University, las bad to withdraw 
Mv Aimadets ig. ijM. ^ \ after breakinea bone in hb hand 

ogo^: £850- CSF: playing for Blackheaxh at the 
g»%.S&S:ifc ■ weekend. Edwards, the Rasslyn 

pLcmt £G53LQSi Park lock, who is due to start at 

Oxford University this term. 
.Southwell .has joined the squad. 


12FM» 

Mrattine 


2.45 (51) 1. AOtA« WptoAjJ 
» Sweet Ere (L C b—qti LjH, 

Ever So Sharp (J C*n*JML*gy 
Uri 7 Nxuomv Nkdm. Eastern Oasis. 8 


SreimMUKh SOMOlor Master 12 

mi f 8 tfBMS*SHiS 8 * 

tou^rtmft? t.i50 guineas. 

115 (i«l 4f) 1. FOIWSTAR 

teaown.ll^teit^Soree^tO 

aaiHwwsSK 

'. no. R wnfcakar at^WBJJwSt 

.. 3 10. EftOO. 30 After 

SF: £3351 Wcast gtS/ JU- 
Biwras mjiary. resiA^Xt 

jTA£redagJ ®^ 8d ?ro 

- 12140. CSF. £12162- „ 

Ais 

»amocH. 7-21- 2. EMrt"* Vw woods. 


— — ESftOS. rare JOCK. W no 15 uue (D aan at 

Oxford University this term. 
Southwell .basjoined the squad 

n Three members of last year s 

KHjenkms. Cambridge pack join forces 
again: Combe, now Richmond's 
hS)£r. Stileman (Haricquins) 
JSflSSWABJOL 1 ! and O'Leary (Wasps). The fai- 
df. C3.80- CSF: £11- 26. ■ _ ier. at 6ft 8in. should lower over 

■■ MfjSS 1 1'tSSTiisSiLS his opponents and it wifi be 
ggS'mlzfTt ren. % + instructive to sec once roort 

^£ , -& 1 00: £1.60. £35°. £1-50- OF: Japanese lineout ploys. 

gfoaCSF:£lft37. COkBJNe} ENGLAito STtm &ffTft J 

Mflrefa , p sSasss^s 

iMM 10L 5L B Preasa. Tote ^ and Mosatey). P Combe {Gantoridge 
S'Sv Sift raSo DF: £3.70. CSFr A 

£1.60: El- 1 ”- roumam universty). T Marwn (Word 

mi fyMf-% ^ MorvaJ (P Tuck, university ] .W Siileman (Cambridge 
_ M? v Fmder Vm* ft JWirty and Hartequms). 8 OUw 


AMBUCAN LEAGUE 

EastDnMoo 

Boston Red Scat 35 66 590 

Near YOrk Yankees 90 72 556 5 

DeeoBTqsrs - 87 75 537 W 
Toronto BkaJtys 85 78 531 W 

Cteveted Mens 84 78- 519 11K 

Mlwaukae Brewers 77 64 A7618 

BaJtnwreOrotea 73 69 A51 22K 

West DMskm 

iCBttOTMMpb 32 70 568 
TeeasRangera 87 ^ 537 5 

, Kzreat Cay Royals 76 86 ASB 16 

OaMMAtMen 7B 86 AS ifi 

! CbcagoWhteSnc 72 90 .444 20 

kkmesoBTvm 7l 91 ^35 21 

SwtfoMirews 67 K .414 25 

r& * ptnxnoge. & - fitan Hand. 

GOLF 

COLUMBUS. OeorgtK SogOwm open tow 
wm PM scans tefoss nawO: 2GK 
F WSdsMxn. 67. 67. 88, 67. 271: Qfeaer. 



1 is®-®--- 


Three members of last year’s . VPfrrtmm rr — 

Cambridge pack join forees ^=P**W-<*-e™***i- 
again; Combe, now Rkhmond’s rim c 

hooker. Stileman (Haricquins) ^ - -- 

and O'Leary (Wasps). The fen- 

ter. at 6ft.8in. should tower over f wonsworm. 67. 67. 88 ^rzhuoAtcnK. 
his opponents and it wifi be njzvjtJ 
instructive 10 sec once more 

Japanese lineout ploys. re. to. 67. 75 . jbww. to. 69.65.68 . 271 b 

—uJp! smqerrft J 

*™ > L | “*"*"■ 71 70 “■ ® scons Z7fc K 
Sro**"- 69. 72. BB. 66 

R RydSKI ( word 06 GOLF FOUW^TKM SCHOOLS 

(tombndOBUjwere^^ CWWPtOHSHV: At Oonr. 233: Booar 

Johnson <Chdord lfon «aty and Norttf Ac atem y . ChMm. WtSCoknXws HS. 
amptOT). S Robens (Oxford IWvwsit* CJy«a»* zSTsi AtoyiuB HS. Ghnw 
and Orral): V UDogu (Btfirangtam Urever- bo*i ntnOualr D Rnow (DwKQn GS1773 
gjty and Mcsfltey). P Combe (CBmtindgB m WUmc M: Mom Sroti Form CattegB: 
Savwsnv and Richmond). A Midns 234: L*n«n HS. tot hdwMntl P msw 

S Mukac 1 Sam. E Rutsiifo. S 1 TRIATHLON 


ft Pcremun GS 21. esnep 

7: QEGS Wilutm U. Nwi- 

osM RQS 8: Queen's. Taunon ift VWkng- 

Freshmen 9: Rcdreft ft Retard Lander 
Rood's 4. Roodng 36: Raigm GS 1ft 
Cawnan ift Rochester Mam SB. Ctarnam 
GS ft Aaksn 0. waaraon HS 44 : Si ABans 
1 C ciinrcMju* 11): Si Owroni 9, JuddftSJ 

Ware 52. St Btnodct's. Easng 4. 

St Joseoh's Aadorev 1ft Wtnwoon 6. a 
josspn's. ktevneh g._ Brentwood 1ft Sr 
Lawrence I Kenl OoT 


Swtiargh 12 Bradford GS 12: Savanosta 
CoHe sZB: Wwn Pant 38. RMallBiSnooonr 
1 & Kofly 3ft Sherttomo 31. Conford B. 
S4COUS 1ft Si Pete’s. York t&Stonytaret 
22. St Amekn's Bxkenhead 4: Skwe 14. 
Rfidey 1ft' T aomn 6. Cnrtft Brecon 27. 

Tnxoift E«eter Co> JO: mnuck 6. 
woreesw t& Woks Cutaorai ft Cottons 
1ft WootBucktedirLPljiwOUji 7; Worcester 
RGS 26- Benop Vtaor* 21; Wrekm 7. 
BrensgjTjve SO: Mxksop 19. Wetoaek >6: 
Wofinzs. Si Jem's. La at tarfd ft Brtan- 
tnd i2.Si Edwanfs. Lkwpooi 12. Bristol GS 
12. Wfdfte 14. 


SHOOTING 




tSSEFraSSn (K ^"slBSzwS | Hirao, S OwkK K jggp J 1 *”■ X ] face TWAiwim laown 

afanfiyPP^J*!?- . I IShSil I mi. 3 ettexwlirei-ftftiaRretwwew 

SO. E Backer (USL ai 64 W. 


Referee: "R Ctartre (ScodandL 


BlSLEY: RAF tew 
1. C Hockloy. # 

Lans-Joyffl. 287 

Hockey. 4 3r 2 7- — < — -■ — - 

Snarmsn. 428. CM Meew 1. Cfly. 1596:2. 
Monh London. 1JW Bata tom V Uoyte 
1 147.2 Matwest 1-140:1 Bark of Engcantt 
1.12S 


HANDBALL 

eUROPEAR CMAtnONS CUP! woeiere rtrei 
mind, second. leir wakaMd Mens 11. 
OSC Am n rdun iKUm 25 Amsrerami wn 

^WlSo^ek 8S26.«utaafiefd23-. 
AsMond21. Wolves Po6> 1ft - 


POOLS FORECAST bv Paul Newman 


Tarquejr vHaMax. WbMe 


GMVAUXHALL 

CONFERENCE 

1 Ban v OageMBin 
t EnktatvAlWnfli a m 
1 Kiiditarv t vRuocom 

1 Weymoutfiv WBtaUto n e 


X Aberdeen v Dundee U 
t OydeMnk v HaoUton 
X Dindee v Cctoc 
1 Heero v SI Mateo 
1 ModwnwIvFaftrt 
1 Rangers v Hfoeman 

SCOTTISH FRSr 

1 Aifdna v East File 

2 ftyde v Duntermkne 
1 Fortar v Dumtanon 

X Montrose v tUnamodi 
1 Morton v Brecnei 
lOolsnvPanxfc 

SCOTTISH SECOND 

1 Ayr vStoteousenwe 
1 Berwick vArbroaBi 
^EStrtnavAiaon 
X n notat — cvAloa 
Not on c o upo ns: Queen’s 
Pant v Cowdenbeanr. 

Run v Sl Johnstone: 

Stranraer v Surfing. 

TREBLE CHANCE (Mme teams): Luton. 
Manchester timed. Oxford. BKfetwn. : 
Demy. Gnrastty. AkMrtfioi, Wrexftsm. 
Aperoeen. Dundee, Montrose. 
Me a d o w Mn k. 

BEST DRAWS: Luton DettM. Smta 
Wrekham. Aberdeen. 

AWAY& Everton. Notongbam Forest 
Bristol Rovers. Norltianipion, 
Dtoriermfine 

HOMES; LreetpooL Snefftao Utetea Notts 
County. Exeter. Pneiboroagn. Swansea. 
MtoftROne. Weymouih. Hearts. Rangers, 
Avdne . Q u ea n otBie South. 

PSED 0008; Henae: Notts County. 
Exeter. Swansea. Hearts. Rangers. 

LWlon, CffiRff HOW*i NOnn- 

amptoo. Draw Derby. Wrexham. 
A berd e aD . 


FIRST DtVtSXX 

1 Arsenal vWWterd 

1 AVHavgt f npex i 

2 Chertton v Everton 
2 Looestor v Nosm F 

1 Uverpool v Toctenhem 
X Luton v Norwich 
X Man u v Sheffield W 
1 Newcastle v Man C 
X Oxford v C o ro n a r y 
1 OPR v VMmbtedcn 

1 West Ham vettesea 

SECOND DtVtStOK 

2 Bamstey v Bradford 
XBtaddwnvWBA 
XDertjyvNua 

X Gnmsby v Plymouth 
X Ipmich v Bnghton 
1 Leeds vCFtaKz 
1 UAwtf v Shrewsbury 
1 Oteam v Sunderland 
1 FortsmthvBmiundoara 
1 Sheffield U v Reawg 
1 Stoke vHeddersflekT 

TNHDDIVM0N 

1 Bristol CvYOilt 
ICartntavDartnatoft 
1 Cheswftj v Port vale 
1 FuramvSwmdon 
1 Mwafiefo v Brentford 

1 Newport v Chester 

1 Notts Co V Rodwlnm 
XWafoalv Boson 

2 WfoM v Bnstoi R 

Not an coupon* any v 
Doncaster; Middles- 
brou^i v atacfcpoot 

FOURTH DtVtSXM 

X Aldershot v Burnley 
1 Exe»r v uncoin 
1 Peterboro v Rochdale 

1 Prason v CwOridge U 

2 Stockport v Nfoampton 
1 Swamaa v Scunthorpe 
x Wrexham vC&rddf 
Net on co u pons : Crewe v 
Onent (Frewt Hartepooi 
v Hereford (Friday); Sotim- 
end v C0Klw5tor (Friday); 


GREEK: AEK Z ApoBon Alhene Z 
Ktoamana r. Ans 5; rimnna 1 Vwrtn 1: 
Dox» ft irekks I; OFI Z Ethnkcos ft 
PawwM 1. Oiagoras ft Paok 4. 
Oiympreko* 1. Lairtnn p o aW en e. 1, 
Paok. 5. ft 2. OFI. 4, 8: 2. Irekbs. 5. 7. 
HUNGARIAN: BakaactfiDa 0. Pecs ft 
Debrecen 3. Eger 1: Szombatftsiyi 
Haudas 0. Snfok 0: Videoton 0. Umu 
D azsa 1; FTC 2. Dunauvarosi 1: Te!a- 
banya Z Raba E10 Gyro 0; MTK VM 4. 
vases Budapest 1; hoimm Budapest 3. 
Zataegameg 2. L»ud « rj potato**: 1. 
Lbpesu Dosa. 9. ift 2. Farencvaroe, 9 
111 MTK VM. 9. 12 
ITAUAN: Ascdfi 0. Aveihnd 1. Atalamt el 
Bergamo 1. Empok 0: Como 1. Brescia ft 
Fiorentna ft Udinese 1; Intema&onaia 4. 
Roma 1: Juvaotus ft Mian ft Napob 1 
Torino 1. Varooa 1. Sampdona 1. Leadfog 
poaUam: 1 . Jnwentus, 4. 7: Z Napofi. 4. £ 
3. Como. a. B 

POLISH: LKS Lodi 1. Ruch CKWOw ft 
Lech Poznan 2. Lochre Gdansk 1: Potoma 
Byioml Stai Mwiac3: Gom* Wattazych 

0. VMzew Lodz ft Zagtew Liten 2. 
OVmpre Poznan ft GKS Kotovrice 6. Motor 
Lubfao ft Lama W ar a za wa 2. Pooon 
Szczecin 0 Goto* Zabrzn 0. S&sk 
Wroclaw 0. L e a d ing p c w Mdci ta 1. Pogon. 
TO. 15; 1 Stas*, ift 14; 3. Goto* Z atm. 
10.9 

PORTUGUESE: Porto 5. Poremonan se ft 
Benha 1. Gutoiaraes ft Braga ft 
BotenensM I.FaroraclRiOAirelEim 

1. craves z varan Z Acaoenaca ft 
Panaflmlkoe Z Lansse i; Bdbwmb 1. 
Sporting 1. I aadlna g a aMana 5 1. 
Beienenses. 7. 12. 2. MTO, 7, 1£ 3. 
Puna 7. 11. 

ROMANIAN: SIMine Off 2. CUNapoca 1; 
FC Brasov 1, PetroU Ptoresb ft Buzau 1. 
Vi«on» Bucnamn ft Flacare Moran ft 

Gam ft Rapid Bucharest 1. Staaua 1; 
Sportol Bucharest 4. Cortenul Hunefloara 
ft Dinamo Bucharest 7. Chena Ranmcu 
vacea ft Bacau 1. Unwerseataa Cranva 0. 
Laedfog posHfonc 1. Statue. 7. 11 2. 
Dmamo. 7. 10:1 Bacau 7.9. 

SPANISH: Cadtf 3. Sabadta 1: Rato 
Mtaorca 1. Seteda i; Racing 2. AlHeK 
BAao 1. Borcefona 1 ReN VaSadofid ft 
Osastma 1. Real Madrid 0; Real Soaadad 
1 Espanal 3: Real Bete 1 Real Munaa V. 
Real Zaragoza 1 Las Palmas V. Adam 
Madrid 1. Sportmq 0. Lsadmg ppaWans, 
Barc e lon a . 7. 11: Z Real Maond, 7, ift 1 
AOsaco Madrid. 7,9. 

SWEDtSH; AIK 1 Brage 0; Oturgardan 1 
Effsborg 0. IFX Gftworg ft Mstno 1. 
Haknstad Z Orgrefo ft Npntopain 0. 
Kalmar l: Ostv 0. Hananaftty oT Fmai 
Maibons; 1, Mataw, 22. 37: 2. tFK 
OMmorft22.31iAlK.22.25. 

SWISS: Sr Gaean 0. Baste ft Zurich Z 
BeRrum Z Locarno ft Grasshoppers 2; 
Lucerne fi. La Chaux-oe4fonds 1: Neu- 
chaiei Xamax 1. Servette 1: SteiZ Yoiaw 
Boys 1: Vevey 0. Amu Z Wamngan f. 
Laustome 1- LcadiagpoakidaK 1. Son, 9. 
15. Z Neuchetei Xamax. 9. 14: Gress- 
tapaers.9, 14. 

mffrGEnMAN: FC Hontourg 1. Kaaare- 
taJtem 1. wakfoof Manonami 1. Borussia 
Momhengladbach 1: Bawm Muich 1 
Boctwn 2: Scrialke 2. Cologne 4; Stutt- 
gart 1. Nuremberg 1; Bayer Uerdnaen 1, 
Hambug SV ft Btau-Waos Bartn 2, 
Exitracm Frankfort Z Banssa Dortmuifo 
4. Fortuna Dueuetdorf l; Bayer Lever- 
kusen 4, Weidar Bremen 1. Undtan 
peahto na : 1, Bayern Munich. S7l&2. 
»yar Uverkusaa 9. 13: 1 Stwigart. 9. 

Bg&fiSBfRRsam 


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YACHTING: BRITISH CREW SAIL FLAWLESSLY IN SECOND AMERICA’S CUP TRIAL 


Crusader sweeps to convincing 
victory as wind conditions ease 

From Barry Pickthall genoa winches. Crusader rivals yesterday, was more New Zealand. Italia an 
Fremantle * A..« Ik* ik«M tin ATI th« mllnunno nmnwirl u a rtant l aw that flw 


After a day of breakages on 
Sunday, Harold Cudmoreand 
bis crew made certain that 
there were no slip-ups aboard 
Britain's America's Cup hope. 
White Crusader, yesterday, 
and sailing a flawless race, 
they beat the much-fancied 
Canada U by a convincing 
margin of 1mm ISsec. 

Conditions proved much 
lighter for the second-round 
races in the Louis Vuition- 
sponsored challenger trials, 
and there was a one-hour 
delay before the anemometer 
crept up to eight knots, leaving 
the race committee no option 
but to set an abbreviated 
Olympic course shortened to 
18 miles. Cudmore began in 
fine style, out-foxing the 
Canadians moments before 
the start and forcing Terry 
Neilson. the skipper, to tack 
away to .port, leaving White 
Crusader free to gain a four- 
second jump at the favoured 
end of the line. 

But that good work ap- 


genoa winches. Crusader 
swept on out towards the 
favoured wind-bend on the 
left-hand side of the course. 

Twenty minutes later the 
race was as good as won. As 
the two 12 metre yachts came 
together once more, the Cru- 
sader crew, helped by a IS 
degree change m the wind 
direction, had pulled out a 
four-advantage, which they 
increased to a 45 second safety 
margin in the tacking dud that 
ensued to the first weather 
mark. The Bruce Kirby-de- 
signed Canadian 12-metre, 
which had given the New 


rivals yesterday, was more 
than made upon the following 
windward leg when White 
Crusader pulled out a lmiu 
22sec advantage, after the 
Canadians compounded their 
position by misjudging the 
mark. Thereafter. Crusader 
lost 29 seconds on the two 
following reaching legs but 
went on to win by a majestic 
margin as winds increased to 
15 knots. 

In the other heats yesterday, 
Tom Blackalier gained some 
recompence for his loss to 
Crusader on Sunday when his 
USA beat his fetlow-Ameri- 


A case for name-dropping 


The international jury, who have yet to sit in judgment to de- 
ckle whether any of the America's Cup yacht names contravene 

rule 26 , which outlaws titles with conunerdal ovaHoaes, has 

called for all syndicates to produce the names and logos of all 
their sponsors by Spa today (Barry Pidrthall writes). 

Britain's White Crusader, which changed its same last month 
when White Horse whisky pumped £1.1 m into the challenge, 
has its name painted on the side of the boat in a very -similar 
style to the White Horse label and nay well be outlawed if die 
committee decide to set an example during this series. 


New Zealand. Italia an- 
nounced yesterday that they 
expect to switch to their 
radical design, Italia II, for the 
second series in November if • 
modifications to the boat, 
which have included moving 
the mast forward 4ft 6in in an 
effort to lessen weather helm, 
prove successful. 

The closest match of the 
day. however, W3S between 
Marc Pajot's French Kiss and 
the Rod Davis-skippered Ea- 
gle. Both crews came ashore in 

an exhausted stale after their 
mammoth, 91 -tack duel 
which the French won by a 
mere 27sec. 

RESULTS: Hut t New Z atari KZ7 
tttsjil New ZesbMl VS). Zhr 44ato 2scc, 

M Hoik 17 (YCIttiiuoL 2*M2. Wtntaag 
Ma rgi n: 56*ec. Hat 2; USA. ISM 

WtanfcM manta &M, Heat K Wtae 
Confer K24 (RoVaJ Thane* YU 
23&S3. M Carafe U KC2 (Kayo! Now 
S mam YSL 3M0JO. Mata uioiu l n. L-17. 
Hoot 4c Frock Kin FT (Sock* da 


00 * '1 ^ 




HPP KocfaUxs). 334541. hi Eotfc 
USM (Newport Hntaar VCV MftjL 
Winona mnjfet 6J3. Hoot 5: Stan ate 
Strtpc*\jS5ft(|ra Diet* VO 2J45S. bt 
Anon lldtVCCi»»taSie«olfe).3ja.l3. 




A 'i?v. 


pea red undone shortly after- 
wards by a timeless shin in the 
wind that handed the advan- 
tage back to Canada II, for 
when the two yachts met once 
more, Cudmore was forced to 
call helmsman Chris Law to 
lack to leeward, then point 
high into the wind to 
encourage the Canadians to go 
about. The tactic worked and, 
as the opposing grinders 
worked up a sweat on their 


York Yacht Club's America II 
a severe fright on Sunday 
before falling behind when her 
mainsail split, clawed back 14 
seconds on the following run, 
confirming that White Cru- 
sader, as Cudmore put it later, 
remains M a bit off pace 
downwind". 

That deficiency, which 
Britain's skipper blamed on 
the fact they bad chosen 
smaller spinnakers than their 


cans, aboard Courageous IV, 
by 8min 4sec — the largest 
margin of the day. Heart of 
America came out train 44sec 
ahead of Challenge France 
and Dennis Conner’s Stars & 
Stripes chalked up her second 
win in this initial rouiKferobin 
series, this time with a 3min 
1 9sec gain over the Aga Khan- 
backed Azzurra crew. 

Their fellow Italians from 
Genoa, sailing Italia, lost to 


VCJi M9-38. bt 

FramrFS&ocfcK Nonfat fe 

L 2* 1 .22. Wtatangntvgta: 144. 

TMMrS RACES: Wide Orate* » 
AMrka II: Eok * Stan a Scrtacc USA t 
N ew ZeataMfcHcot of America * Canada 
U; Frock Kbb * Cemgtara IV; Aran* 
ltaBL DELL QUAY 9C: EMMPrtM OBM 
m ati ng : 1. D Ktar. E21099 ffVSCk 3. I- 
Matthews. E21416 (S9Q: 3. D Guos. Z1102 


(WLSCJ. 4. 0 Hoonaon. E2023S (A 
ShaSow. E20330 (FPSO 







Venue change 




Zurich (Reuter) — The Swiss 
resort of Davos will replace 
Ebnat-Kappel in hosting the 
men's World Cup Alpine ski 
giant slalom on January 6. 




a marefaon Canada 1 1 as they jockey for portion at the start 


TENNIS 


SQUASH RACKETS 


CRICKET 


Australia through 
to Davis Cup final 


Brisbane (Reuter) - Pat Cash 
secured Australia's place in the 
Davis Cup final against Sweden 
in December when he beat Brad 
Gilbert, of the United States, in 
the decisive singles contest yes- 
terday. That gave Australia an 
unbeatable 3-1 lead before the 
final match of the semi-final-tie 
was washed out by rain with 
Paul McNamee. or Australia, 
leading Tim Mayotte. 6-3. 2-5. 

Cash, on the way back from a 
serious back injury which saw 
his world ranking (hop dramati- 
cally. brat Gil ben 3-6. 6-2. 6-3. 
6-4. in a tense match. Cash, who 
in the three previous days of the 
tie had played 120 games of 
singles and doubles, was ac- 
cused by the American of 
employing delaying tactics on 
his serve. Cash countered by 
claiming Gilbert had attempted 
to “quick serve" him at least 20 
times, but denied he had retali- 
ated by using stalling tactics. 

“Gilbert jusi tosses the ball up 
and whacks it whether you are 
ready or not I wasn’t having 
anything to do with that." Cash 
said. His low ranking may 
-hinder his preparations Tor the 
final againsr Sweden, in Md- 
boume from December 19-21, 


as die only home tournament he 
can play in before then, without 
pre-qualifying. is the Sydney 
indoor event. 

Australia met Sweden in the 
1983 Davis Cup final in Mel- 
bourne. a thrilling contest which 
they won 3-2. On that occasion. 
Cash dinched the tie, beating 
Joakim Nystrom in the first 
reverse singles. 


Cannons in 
position 
at high noon 


Border hopes to include Reid 


From Richard Streetoa, Rajkot 


By Colin McQuillan 


RESULTS: Daub Da MtaHbuta At 
Brisbane Austrteu Di Umnd Sons, 3-1 
(Australian namos tost}: P Cash bt B 
(fatal 3-6. 6-2, 6-3, 6-4; P McNamee lad 
T Mayotte. 6-2, 2-6, match abandoned - 
nan. At Prague: Sweden bt Czechd- 
stovakla. 4-1. 


OTHER DAVIS CUP RESULTS: World 
group ratagfetan playoffs: At Eason: 
West Germany M Ecuador. 5-0. At 
Bwcahma: Spain bt New Zealand. 5-0. At 
Defbfc India M Soviet Union. 4-1. At 
Asuncion: Paraguay M Denmark. 3-2. 
Ecuador. Nsw Zealand. Soviet Union and 
Denmark relegated to 2nnal play In 1S87. 
Zonal fi nals: Bwopeen zone A: At 
MontpeKer France bt Austria, *-1. Eu»- 
pean zone Bs At St OsAsm Israel bt 
Switzertand. 4-1. American zone: At 


Santiago: Argentina M CMe. 4-1. Eastern 
am tawt At Seotfe South Korea load 


am Isiat At Soot* South Korea toad 
Japan, 2d. Ranee. Israel, Argentina and 
Soutfi Korea or Japan promoted to world 


Cannons Chib, the fashion- 
able sports and health centre 
built into the arches of London's 
Cannon Street station, won bat 
season's American Express pre- 
mier league by the narrowest of 
margins and at considerable 
corporate expense. 

At lunchtime today Cannons ! 
begin their 1986-87 defence of 
the National League tide, this 
time backed by a new sponsor- 
ship deal with Inter City, the 
high speed passenger service | 
nm by British Rafl. 

British squash boomed in the ! 
1970s. developing from a small ; 
elitist game based in public ! 
schools and private dabs Into a 
classless aad largely commercial 
sport enthraiasdcally pursued 
by some three million players in 
more than 33)00 dubs around 
the country. 


Gary Oliver, maaager of Can- 
ons Club, is one of many to 


group to 19HT. 

HEW OHLEAWS: WB m n ’g b um— it 


States fct*fc M Navratilova (US) bt P 
Shnwr (US). S-1. 4«. fi-2. Oodbtea flMfc 
S ParWiomenta) and L Savchenko (USSR) 
bt G Reynolds and A Snath (US). 6-3, 3-6. 
6-3. 


Kodes speaks his mind 


From Richard Evans, Prague 


Platitudes are not on the 
menu when Jan Kodes speaks at 
official functions. The Expo 58 _ 
restaurant offered a panoramic ' 
view of one of the world’s most 
beautiful cities and by the time 
the toasts were over at the 
dinner to mark the conclusion ' 
of Czechoslovakia's disappoint- 
ing Da vis Cup semi-final against 
Sweden here, Kodes's views on 


his own players, the Swedish 
captain and the British officials 


captain and the British officials 
were equally dear. 

After wishing Sweden success. 


After wishing Sweden success, 
the Occh captain said: “As for 
our tram I was disappointed 


with our players in the singles. I 
do not think dun a player ofhigh 


do not think dun a player ofhigh 
world ranking like Miloslav 
Mecir should panicon court and 
I think Milan Srejber should 
think seriously about his behav- 
iour if he wants to achieve real 


success. 

Afterwards, the 1973 Wimble- 
don champion, whose fighting 
qualities were never questioned 
during his playing days, told me 
*“UV miiM nnt Hr» anvthinv with 


Mecir when he played Kent 
Carlsson. He was so nervous it 
was ridiculous." 

In his speech Kodes had also 
stated his displeasure over the 
last-minute substitution of 
Carlsson. who had injured his 
back, with Michael Pemfors. 
who went on to give Sweden the 
tic by beating Srejber. 

Publicly Kodes actually 
congratulated Colonel Peter 
Webster and his umpires on 
their performance. However, he 
had been apoplectic when -Mal- 
colm Huntingdon was des- 
ignated to take over from a 
nervous foot-fault judge to- 
wards the end ofSrcjber's match 
with Stefan Ed berg and pro- 
ceeded to penalize the Czech at 
five-all in the fifth set. 

Only Tomas Smid. the hero of 
Saturday's doubles, was 
unfiisscd. “What did you 
expect?" he shrugged. “They are 


English. At Wimbledon they 
will do that to you on match 


*We could not do anything with 


will do that to you on match 
point after four hours on the 
centre court." 


BASKETBALL 


Good win in new home 


By Nicholas Harling 

A new era beckoned at the more than we anticipated." 
weekend when Crystal Palace. Noi the least of those p 
now known as Brunei aad lems is finding a coach. Br 
Crystal Palace London after lost David Titmuss to 
iheir merger wnth the university- England job and Jim Guyi 
based club in the summer, walked out of Palace and ba* 


Noi the least of those prob- 
lems is finding a coach. Brunei 
lost David Titmuss to the 


played their lira home game of ball altogether. 


England job and Jim Guymon 
walked out of Palace and baskci- 


I out of Palace and basket- 


the season in the ultimate 
confines of the students sports 
complex at Uxbridge. 

The court, cramped and 


Although Palace have lost last 
year's two outstanding Ameri- 
cans Bubba Jennings and Tom 

Seaman, the newly amal- 


con fusing with its multitude of ga mated club now have so many 
different-coloured markings for outstanding players that Paul 


other sports, is a world away 
from the National Recreation 
Centre's luxurious facilities, but 
judging from Saturday's 
comfortable 89-78 win over 
newly promoted Caldcniale. 
Palace, with the assistance of the 
players they have inherited from 
Brunei will adjust quickly to the 
new surroundings of their home 
from home. For the club will 
continue to play alternate home 
fixtures back in London SEI9 
and the annual world invitation 
club championships wilt take 
place, contrary to recent 
speculation, between December 
30 and January 4. 

Still, the move represents a 
big step in the future of a chib 
who were founded as Oki 
Suttonians in 1966. after which 
for the next nine years they 


continued to play in a variety of 
tenuis until they went to Ctys- 


tcnucs until they went to Crys- 
tal Palace- 

David Last, who helped 
found the dub a$ an Old Sution 
Grammar schoolboy and who is 
still a director, said: “We are 
very pleased with the wav things 
are developing. Things like this 
lake three to six months to bed 
down bui the problems are no 


Stimpson. the England captain, 
failed to make Saturday’s starl- 
ing five. By the time he came on 
they were well on the way to 

victory, the most satisfying as- 
pect of which was that Mick 
Belt, another of Palace's En- 
gland internationals, finished 
top scorer with 24 points. 

There could well be a rival 
here to the big three of Team 
Polycell Kingston. Portsmouth 
and Sharp Manchester United, 
all of whom won on Saturday 
before setting out to the conti- 
nent for their away legs in the 
three European competitions 
this week. Kingston, who face 
Raring Maes Pus Mechelen in 
Belgium today, leading by eight 
points in the European Cup 
winners' Cup. thrashed Derby 

Portsmouth, who visit 
Zibenka of Yugoslavia. 20 
points up in the Korac Cup 
tomorrow, were far too good for 
Happy Eater BracknriL but 
Manchester United who go to 
Real Madrid on Thursday, eight 
points adrift in the European 
Cup. were given a fright by Reg 
Vardy Sunderland. .As it was, 
the league champions scraped 
home 78-75. .. 


nous Club, is one of many to 
believe that the sport is 
approaching another surge. 

“We are much more than jast 
a squash dob at C a n non s, hot ' 
we are determined to be iafhwn- j 
till in the growth of the game as : 
it reaches the inte rnationa l ! 
proportions it traely deserves," i 
Oliver says. ] 

If be can impress a few | 
members and satisfy a few ; 
sponsors, neither Gary Oliver j 
nor the Jack Chia international : 
hotel and health dob chain for 1 
which be works will be dis- ; 
pleased. 

The Squash Rackets Associ- 
ation owns its own transparent 
showcoart. a de mou nt ab le Per- 
spex version, and there are 
permanent glass courts in far off 
luxury venues such as Cairo and 
Muscat. 

Nefl Harvey and Ian Robin- 
son, two of Oliver's professkmal 
players, actually own the Can- 
nons glass court through a new 
company. Tetecnnrt. (bonded on 
Jack Chia resources. 

They spent most of the sum- 
mer potting the deal together ; 
aad anticipate home fixtures for , 
their own team, at Innchthnes to i 
soot City workers. 

Today, though, they convert 
back from businessmen to play- 
era, leading Inter City-Cannons 
against newly promoted Vise© 
Monroe, from Ossett, York- 
shire. 

Seven of (he world's top 10 
players are registered among the 
109 or so professnraals named 
for the tea P re mi er League 
dobs. The undefeated world 
champion, Jahangir tu«", does 
not feature hot the third ranked 
New Zealander, Stuart Daven- 
port, plays trader Skol Lager 
sponsorship at Leicester. 

The former world No. 2 Chris 
Dittmar of Australia plays for 
Visco Monroe. Cawain Briars 
plays with Greg Pollard for 
Home Ales at Nottingham, and 
rite British champion, JPhilip 
Kenyon, joins Kelvin Smith for 
British Air Poondstretcher at 
Dronings Mill. 

Even the Village Club from 
Prestwick. Manchester, came in 
a$ late replacement for Arm ley 
complete with support from 
Arrow sportsdothes for a squad 
iaduding Ross Thorne, of 
Australia. 

Only Ardleigh HalL the Es- 
sex dob rescued from redevelop- 
ment this Sommer by a 
members' bay-oat. Chapel 
AUerton and Manchester 
Northern are currently without 
foil seasonal sponsorship. Yet 
they still boast such players as. 
respectively, Del Harris, David 
Pearson and Geoff Williams. 

In two seasons the national 
league has become crucially 
important to squash. No top 
player can affoni to miss the 
c om pe ti tion offered by a league 
place. Leading dabs are spend- 
ing huge sums to get into tbe 
race and to win. American 
Express have plainly played the 
card for which everyone hi the 
game was waiting. 

TOfJArs HX7URES. /rw Crtf Cennons v 
Vaco Monroe. Crape* AUerton v Ardleigh 
Hath Hate West County v Manchester 
Northern; Pouxfenretcfter Dunrangs v 
Arrow VQtage: Skol Lecester v Home Ales 
Nott in g ha m, 

VOLLEYBALL 


India and Australia play iheir 
sixth and final one-day match 
here today when it is hoped the 
atmosphere will be less 
controversial than in the pre- 
vious game at Ahmedabad on 
Sunday. Apart from the dread- 
fully biased crowd there were 
dashes between players, with 
accusations of cheating that 
followed the recall of Madan Lai 
to the wicket when an umpire 
charged his mind about the 
legality of an outfield catch by 
Marsh. 

David Boon, the Australian 
vice-captain and a central figure 
in the furore, explained what 
happened. Marsh, he said, was 
90 per cent certain the catch was 
properly taken. The ball would 
not have gone into his funds as 
cleanly as it did if it had 
bounced, he said. Marsh, how- 
ever, did mention his slight 
uncertainly to Border, who 
spoke to the umpires. Madan 
Lai was given out but the 
umpire changed his mind when 
Shasui. the non-striker kept 
pushing the fieldsman’s doubt. 

Boon, who was eventually 


ordered away by Border, said be 
had been angry that the umpire 
bad proved “impressionable”. 
He admitted he lost control fora 
few minutes as he argued with 
the Indian official and hoped it 
would not happen again. In 
addition to apologizing to the 
umpire. Boon also apologized to 
Border and the Australian 
manager. 

Some of the tension, which 
might have been present today 
could be absent remembering 
that India have gained a win- 
ning 3-1 lead in the series, with 
one match abandoned through 
rain. The cricket, of course, will 
. remain highly competitive but 
Australian eyes are now fixed 
firmly on the third and last Test 
in Bombay on Wednesday week. 
After this the Australians return 
home and are anxious to have a 
convincing victory behind them 
before they meet England. 

Bonder was indisposed yes- 
terday when the touring team 
flew to Rajkot after an overnight 
stop in Bombay. Rajkot is a 
small semi-industrial town 
where Mahatma Gandhi was 


brought up — his father was 
Chief Minister - and where 
Ranji went to school. Hundreds 
lined tbe narrow streets as the 
Australians drove from the air- 
port. The bus threading its way 


carefully past numerous cows 
and bullocks that roam finely. 


and bullocks that roam finely. 

Battier hopes to play and so 
does Reid, the left arm fast 
medium bowler who continues 
to struggle with a virus. India 
could retain Gopal Sharma, the 
off spinner, in their side. If 
Vengsarkar’s injury allows him 
to ptav, Azharuddin might be 


omitted. 


Imran to lead 


Pakistan 


Getty boost for future 


By John Woodcock, Cricket Correspondent 


With increasingly less cricket 
being played in the schools, 
especially in the state system, it 
is excellent news that John Paul 
Getty Jnr has given £380,000 to 
help create the Arundel Castle 
Cricket Foundation. Registered 
as a charitable organization, the 
foundation will aim to provide 
cricket and cricket coaching for 
young people who might other- 
wise have little or no opportu- 
nity of playing the game. 


Getty's affection for cricket 
has already enabled MCC to go 
ahead with rebuilding the 


Mound stand at Lord's. Now it 
has guaranteed the future of 
cricket at Arundel in a way that 
fills an urgent need. 

Two indoor nets are to be 
built there, and wtiat has long 
been one of the loveliest 
grounds in the world could well 
become one of England's chief 
cricket nurseries. It will beset up 
and administered by John Bar- 
clay. captain of Sussex for the 
last six years. A happier me- 
morial to the last Duke of 
Norfolk, who was such a patron 
of the game, there could hardly 
be. 


Lahore (Reuter) — Tbe Paki- 
stan all-rounder. Imran Khan, 
will lead his country against the 
touring West Indies in the series 
beginning later this month. 
Pakistani cricket board officials 
said yesterday. They said selec- 
tors decided to retain Imran as 
captain , 

. The West Indies team, due to 
begin the tour on October 10. 
will play three Tests, five one- 
day internationals and three 
three-day games in Pakistan. 

The officials said they had 
received a letter from the West 
Indies board yesterday confirm- 
ing Pakistan's tour of West 
Indies in March 1988. 


BASEBALL 


NORTH AMERICA: KMgaal Uagoa: Chicago 
Cubs 8. Si Lous Cardrab l.NewYorhmb 
9. Pmsauron Pirares ft PfiiadeiprKiPWiesZ. 
Montreal Expos 1 (10 moms* San Dngo 
Padres 2. Chcanati Rads 1. Houston Astras 
4. Atlanta Braves 1; San Francisco Stores 11. 
Las Angelas Dodgers Z American League; 
New York Yankees 7. Boston Rad So* 0: 
Cleveland Indians 4, Seattle Manner Z 
iMwatAee taewws 2. Tmoreo Btue Jays i 
ISrei garnet Mlwatoin Brewere 4. Taranto 
Btoe Jays 3 (second garnet: Denab Tigers 6. 
Baltimore Onokss 3; Mrmesota Twins 3. 
Oacago Wtote Sox 0: Tens Rangers 7, 
CaHoma Angsts 4: Oakland Amines 6. 
Kansas Cny Royals 0. 


AMERICAN FOOTBALL 


KARATE 


Atlanta lose record 


New York (AP) — Atlanta 
Falcons took the National Foot- 
ball League's best offense and a 
4-0 record into their game 
against Philadelphia Eagles. The 
Eagles’ offense struggled early 
on, but Junior Tautalatasi and 
Ron Johnson turned short 


RESULTS: PMmMphia 


Packers 28: U» 


Great kick 
for Charles 


Kansas Crty Ctaafs 17' wastmgton Red- 
skins 14. New Ortsms Sunts 6: Now 


Orleans saints 6: New 


By Nicholas Soames 


England Patriots 34, Miami Dolphins 7; 
Cleveland Browns 27. Pittsburgh Stators 


passes into lone gains to set up a 
touchdown and a field goal late 


touchdown and a field goal late 
in the first half. In the end. 
Atlanta's defeat was fairly com- 
prehensive. the margin being 
16-0. 


Cleveland Brawns 27. Rttstxirali Staetors 
24: New York Gama 13. St Lous 
ConSnato ft Denver Broncos 29. Dallas 
Gontnys 14 met): Los Angeles Rams 26. 
Tampa Bay Buccaneers 20: New York 
Jets 1 *. Buffalo BAs 13: San Francisco 
49ers 35. kv&anapoOs Cotes 14. 


AMETUG4N CONFERENCE 


EaaaemOMtaan W 
New Yak Jets 4 
N Eng Patriots 3 
Buffalo BAs 1 

Miami Dototam 1 
(ntaanapoiis Colts 0 

CrMOmton W 
Cincinnati Bengats 3 
Cleveland Browns 3 
Houston Oitora 1 
Pittsburgh Stators i 
MtaMrn Oitafen W 
Denver Broncos 5 
SttaWo SeahawVs 3 
Kansas Oty Cnwfs 3 
LA Raiders 2 

San D Chargers j 


PF PA 

125 109 
138 81 
104 106 

126 176 
41 148 


»»WMlCOiraifflCF 

EtanOMta W L Pa PF PA 
Wash ReOgons 5 0 1.00 114 67 

New York Qiantt 4 1 800 95 70 


Wash Redstarts 
New York Giane 


New York Gone 4 1 800 95 70 
Oates Cowboys 3 2 .600 142 108 
PhtadettM Eagles 2 3 .400 61 107 
St Lous Cardkmb 0 5 .000 46 tlO 


PF PA 
121 142 
118 138 
93 99 
63 125 


Central Ohrtakm 

Chicago Bears 


•V L Pet PF PA 
5 0 1.00 146 60 


Minnesota Wrings 3 2 .600 106 60 


DetoMLxms 
Tampa Bay Sues 


2 3.400 85 102 
1 4200 81 123 


Vic Charles, the oldest mem- 
ber of Britain's successful squad, 
kicked his way through to the 
one international title that had 
eluded him in a 1 2-year senior 
competitive record — the world 
individual heavyweight title. 

Competing on the last day of 
the world championships in 
Sydney. Australia, yesterday be 
brushed aside all foreign oppo- 
sition on the way to the final — 
and then watched GeofT 
Thompson, bis team colleague 
and friend, do the same in the 
other side of the draw. 

So. as many had predicted. 


Graen Bay Packers 0 S .000 GO 156 


the world heavyweight final was 
an action replay ofthe English 


L Pa PF PA 
01.00 148 87 

1 .750 105 67 

2 .600 105 91 

3 400 92 92 
3 250 97 95 


W L ^ PF PA 
Attorns Falcons 4 1 soo 124 94 

e? a i!5 ,a S5 Rams * 1 ■«» 1® 84 

San frari 49ere 4 1 .800 138 70 

NewQrtSaaits 1 4 .200 74 101 


TODAY’S FIXTURES 


FOOTBALL 

KScfc-Off 7 JO unless stated 


UtflBWOPd* Cup 
Second round, first I 


Second round, first leg 
w«avMiiwi6L:._ 


Second round, second teg 

FrstJeg scores m Brackets 
Bvmngham (2) v Mddtesbrough (2) 

BtacMWmillvQPRia 

Bury (0) v Crystal PatocetO) 

Fyinam |0) v Lwarnooi (JO)— — 


Gfenghatn (01 v Ortxd DM (6)- 
Qnmsby (0) v Hul (1) 


G nmfoyjQ) y Hultl 

fpswicn ffly Scuntnorpe 

Newport (0) v Evengn (4J 

Portsm0t«i(2)vW«i(liam(11.M- 

Port Vale (0) v Man uto (2) 

Roctxuto(i) v Watford (i) 

Rotnertiam (2) v Coventry (3) 

srwfftow uw p) v Bravo city (2) 

wen Brom (1J v Dertjy (4j 

West Ham (i)v Preston (1) 

Wtmbteaon (i> v Cambridge Uld (i) (7.45] 


Epsom and EwaR * Maktertwatt Oxford 
City v ffnehtoy: TRjuiy v Biflencay; Walton 
and Hertaiam v Soultrwictc Second 
tMskxi north: Hamel Hempswad * 
Vwjxhaii Motors; Hertford v Saffron 
WakMrc Wwtfne * Barton flows (7.45): 
wotvenon v Barton Rows. Second 
division south: Cambertey v Chfiftsey: 
Egnam v Dorking: Hungerfort v craifom 
St Peter; Southai * Met Ptfce: 
Whytotoate v Feitnam. 

SOUTHERN LEAGUE: MaSrad rSwfctafc 
Rusrxtoan v Coventry Soorang. 
MULTIPART LEAGUE: Burton v Burton: 
Gainsborough v Hum: Manns v Rhyl: 
Mcrecwnoe v Cooney: wmorr v Matfock- 
CENTRAL LEAGUE: Pint dMotae 
Evenon v Moatosttough (7 0L Sheffield 
Wed. v StoKHjrtana 

FOOTBALL COMBINATION: Swindon v 
Chelsea (230). Doncaster v Darfington 
(7.001 


an action replay ofthe English 
championships in March with 
two superbly fit and versatile 
competitors trying to find a way 
through defences they both 
knew only too well. 

For three minutes the two 
men. who both stand well over 
6ft. shot in tbe punches and 
kicks but were unable to score. A 
time extension with lira score 
taking the match for renewed 
effort from both and. as in 
England, it was Charles who 
found the gap with a swift round 
house kick that was given a 
waza-ari score. 

The result was not only 
popular but had an element of 
poetic, justice: at age 32. Vic 
Charles is regarding this year as 
his last competitive season al- 
though he has not formally 
announced his retirement. 

“1 am absolutely delighted 



wipe a 
a key fU 
Norman c 


By Mitchell Platts 


Greg Norman hfcWfchted * 
growing problem in sport ' with 
his calculated assessment on 
boot crowd behaviour only- urin- 
ates after defeating Sandy Lyle 
Suntory world 

championship at Wentworth on 

^He* «d: "In ®w«*mU people 
have been hart, and eYefl kiited, 
and, while I'm not calling “e 

eat of hand. Let's makecertam 
new that everybody continues to 

understand the values of golf 
and appreciate what the game » 

all about." . t . 

Norman's insistence that he 
will not return to defend the tide 
was almost certainly ao orw- 
reaction, but his swipe at Sandy 
Lyle for not intervening was 
nnforaive»bl«- 

Yet Norman had a pomL and 
be chose to make it, though 1 
expect that he will return to 
Wentworth in 1987. However, 
he will reqoire assurances^ or 
coarse, that the crowd will be 
better behaved. 


appor that he hasovt,^. 

JtrssRg 

situation on the fanrevv 

was the victim 

heckler dorino (he 1 »a"* 

ShinneopSTKV 1 ^ 
Norman (farted' aowil . 
side of the fainfcre mmi , 1 

lafar aihnikoit ■ 6 . 


•• •• 

■* 


lie* 3WS 

tffnv ad 
•t. 

n 


fill 
4?* ten 






tofVwJUre 


The problem for the org- 
anizers from that standpoint 


Marshalling of 
highest calibre 



side of the faintas — j a * 
later ad m itt e d, 

became inYohreJi* * 

,h * £5 

. Norman also 
that he Kcafl«dl~NM?s[ 
being placed under ” 
sore. f>y in mi, 
during the AastratiuOpfa? 
years ago, ... 

I can "Bdetstut; ham. 
Norman making:* 
attempt to suffocate wET! 
growing problem n tew, 2 
»l«b.l r «,Ulr 
laresghont the- dm «w , 
prafoabinty '«T hmm sawfe 
becoxuiug OYir-zealoa*.^^ 

The mganfaera face foe m 
lent of prodndng * 
successfal event inl987tk2 
they might he 
impose tighter aondS?.fei 
in order to better — rrt„ , 
behavionr of the omarity 
spectators who seared 

championship for Naifoto. 

Whether or net fltejr nfoj. 
to introduce sock saa£fore» 
year conM depend to 
returning. For if (hr Aastefi 


fe:-.: 


C- , .T 


ffai 

»» ^ 


£,r 


■ ’ . 

-■ 



10.18 

.viiitoMi 111 

ftt 


12 
n* 
t 30 fan 


EL* 9 *' .. 


U.-4 

t 30 Ml 
4^ 


is that even Norman acknowK returning. For if fa 
edned that the marshalling was does carry out: Ms tl 
of the highest calibre. “The* defend the title, (fan, 
stewards did a great job." Nor- an additional bvrdea' on 
man said. “It was the best tournament. - gj; 

marshalling INe ever seen at a The irony is-thtt Mark Me- Sc* 
golf coarse." Cormack nmnbera Nor^iu ^ 

Whether or net tbe stewards client, » Ms Iiffn ailhto : 
will be able to impose them- Management jChm* h fa &*.: 
selves still farther by catching responsible for oetoactiu ^ ^ 
the culprits and escorting them Australian's offcoafa^Qg, 
from the coarse is questionable. The retnra 
Wbeo Nick Faldo’s ball was after 15 years 
dearly knocked back from be- record crowd which - ; 

hind a green in a previous world the Wentworth fafnmyg. Am- 


cS''- ... 



SSr. 


T 'ii 
i 1 >f- 

Or r+i^fUto 

l-fi.Ute. 

j-aa 

re 

uTtof*** 


hind a green in a previous world die Wentworth hinaji Ann k?-' 
match-play championship, the ably the finest player tetein , %■ k ‘ >,« 
spectator who marred that he commanded, the ««» Act ■~ l ** ; 
match with Graham Marsh, ___ 

another Australian, escaped be- ** teclL^bS^Iriffl SSjP - 
fore the stewards were aware of 


another Australian, escaped be- 
fore the stewards were aware of 
what had happened. 

It was unfair on this occasion 
for Norman to link his praise for 
tbe s te wards with associating 
some of the Mame on Lyle for 
not speaking to the crowd. Lyle 
showed commendable patience 
by not rising to tbe bait, though 
he offered the opinion that there 
might have been additional sup- 
port for him from certain spec- 
tators talking through their 
pockets. Yet more spectators are 
likely to have backed Norman to 
win than Lyte. 

My opinion is that Norman 
looked exceedingly tired 
throughout the championship. 
That is hardly surprising Follow- 
ing the astonishing year he has 
enjoyed. He has been uader 
conslderable pressure and be is 
dearly in need of a rest from the 
fairways. 

■' There wffl always be support 
for a favourite “son" such as 
Lyle and match-play golf in- 
evitably sparks a greater feeling 
of passion among the crowd than 
routrae stroke-play. . 

Norman, 'has always been 
complimentary of the European 
scene, s tress in g that ft provided 
him with a good grinding to go 
on to a successful career m the 
United States, and on this 
occasion the bottom line would 


iIhck ww, im we wai xcct f \ '' ' 
something really apfKu^toSta *Lr- 
this show next year," aataffitirf >.*:/ 
said. NkUmnsstresaedatWcat 
worth that he was. ob]j jAbt 5*3 r 
because it fitted Into lift nfa 
ule — te was risUBKotow is.--’ - 
which he isdesigaiagiflfenir 
— and tint be fo 

sponsors one" for not appafa 

in the 20th anniversary fa ^ 

pionship in 1983;ftficUMi ai 

now consider that hr Eh fa fu* ■ 


t 

3,30 M 
Mnfato 

4 1st gw 

430 TtaWftfo 

.IM 

Tito 

i iitnahut 
CA* 

Ifa 


Hi 

IV* 


Top names needed 
to keep status 



his does. 

If Norman and Nkkkis at 
absent next year, -fan tk 
organizers will need toafeactri 
ofthe lTftT mujrr rlnifain k 
order to m'mfa flfectaay- 
iohship's original itopfion tl 
bring together tbe wiuwi lad- 
ing golfers in i for 

sonset of the season. . ' 

There has rarely facabAd 
appearance money ar tbe fail 
match-play d nn jiiiinfa h 
with a prize ' ted - af «tif 
£180,009 this year, wftfcfc&n 
increase of only £36.009 ha 
four years ago, it ■ ft nte 
certainly laggmg. beUad titer 
prestige events. 





lUNHM^Nk 
rntimridfeM 
ttofc for'— “ 
itoti 


All the best for Bell’s 


mi 


The world’s leading golfers 
will be sought for the Bell's 
Scotch Open, to be played at 
Gleneagles on July 8 to M next 


year, with increased prize 
money of more than £200.000 


money of more than £200.000 
(Mitchell Platts writes). 

The tournament's director. 
Alan Callan. said: “I will attend 
the lop events like the US 
Masters and the US Open with a 
view to canvassing the top 
.Americans to compete, as our 
new date is immediately before 
the British Open at Muirfield.” 

Rob— Hermans, managing 
director of Bell's, said: “We 
were extremely pleased with our 
first major venture into golf 


sponsorship j n Glasgow fob fc 
year, and we are now expawtaq E 
into what we hope will becomes K 
truly imemational evehL We IT 
want to attract more' of for 
world stars, and we hope » ^ 
export the TV pictures to Jspao;^ 
and America." „ k 
B ell's have entered iato i C 
three-year agreement with foe L 
promoters, the ; Keiih Prow* f 


Agency, and the hope is fod 
Gleneagles will, become ■* 


Gleneagles will, become ^ 
permanent venue .for 
championship. The lea dragftw 
players. olhCTwise hot exempt 
will receive an automatic p*®* 
port into the Open.Chainpito' 
ship the following week.- 


3 00 ta* 

^'.vwfteg 

>100 Ptf«t 
tpfa 

fetoPUu .. 

A^hwiingta 

:x'A *m 

•o jo Hamm 

»T».lv 1p fa > 

mum 

r "« „ 

r --. MrHUT f f 
‘•Ltlljlfatl 

-r 

iq Hmmm 

-'■‘Osftfaiifaieafi 


NighiTMl fahfa 


ICE HOCKEY 


Jeffrey downs Eagles- 


SUNMF.NTS 


By Norman de Mesqmta “ ^ 

The struaure of the Norwich Streatimm and SdilmIL 


••■•iiTtD hum 

.... V -i \ \i\l 


Union Cup — five first division 
teams involved with 10 from the 
premier division — leads to 
some predictable and onesided 
scorelines. This weekend had its 
share and Mike Jeffrey scored a 
record 20 points (12 goals and 
eight assists) as MurayfieM 
Racers embarrassed Glasgow 
Eagles 25-1 on Sunday. This 
followed Glasgow’s 24-6 defeat 
at home io Fife Flyers on 
Saturday, which clinched Flyers’ 
place in next month’s final. 

Durham Wasps — 7-3 winners 


had a remarkable game m-tkj 
South London rink. v. ■' 
■ The lead changed bantkfo 1 ^ 
times in the first two perio»j“ 
the end of which Streathan i Mg 
a 5-4 edge. The third penw 
brought seven goals mu*™* 
six minutes. But peuaB* 5 
proved SolihuITs undoing-’ 
Sixteen different 
into the score sheet in WbiOff 
Warriors’ annihilation 
Sunderland Chiefs: white® 
division one of the “as***;- 
League. Slough Jets scoiedp 
for the second time in asrr»» 


C • , L /V *«•' 

-Pit— ’ »«.•!# 4 _*• * T 




»» ■ * 41 tt 


at Cleveland on Saturday - for the second time in as ^rnatt 
seemed likely to sew up the matches, although they 
England north division at Peter- their first home game bero™ 
borough on Sunday, but the first closed doors. Tbe Sim# jj® 
division side ran up a remark- has yet to be granted a"mjp 
able five-goal lead by the end of certificate. ^ 

«ie first period and led 64) RESULTS: wmteiMHCuBO^ 
through the second. 




LV w **‘ : ,s - ' >uto 


They should still win their Wasps arouSnfeWtins 
division, but the outcome in Barons ft Wfttay 
England south is far from 
prediaable. Home and away vSrc Skw^i Jets 
victories over Lee Valley Lions asurdertaroOiefsJ.toioaieqK^ 

took Telford Tigers, in the first 
d. viaon. io .he top of ihe ubte 

with a two-point lead over Snu na mnMn Wtann* B. r WordCftY 8-^. 


„ . 


'“4>, *'• 

; ■.. .. 


ENTERTAINMENTS 




even though nothing can be so 
difficult as a world final against 
a team-mate whom you like and 


Couriapcd from page 47 


FA TROPHY: Pint qnaHying round 
ne p taya: AsMoro * Bognor Reger. Brom' 
ley v Leywfi WirwatE: Cantertwry v Hayes. 
Candown v Maiowhsad. Davftf v Tfcanet, 
Hornchurch v Boraftam Wood; LaBther- 


RUGBY UNION 

TOUR MATCH: Combined EngftSh StO- 
denis v Jaran to Htlay Road, Oxtoid, 5fo 
CLUB MATCHES: Abwaron u Ponarth 
(7.6}: He^Ongtey v Money: Newport v 
Barbarians (7.0): Treoegar v RontypnOd 
170). 


oocon uoettnar^swtf'f ; 

■ OJO Hllllnu «0 4BWT--: 


respect After three minutes 1 
bad tried nearly everythin r i 


CINEMAS 


PARIS: Men's mhM chonaanslap: Ftafc 
Umwa States a USSR 3-1 <12-15. 15-11. 15- 


8 15-iZ* Itaid place povoft Buioana R 
Biaw 3-0 1 16-14 15-5 1561 


Runcora: StaHora v Gateshead: T 
Norvnqh: WWdSUra v WMkng. 
VAUXHALL-OPEL LEAGUE: Premier di- 
vision: Bromley v Croydon; Harrow v 
tVycotnbo. HHttin v Slough Brat dirinOK 
Basftkm * Grays. Bracknea * U4jaoge: 


OTHER SPORT 

BASKETBALL: British masters regional 
round: Brunei and Crystal Palace v Hwnai 
aw-wattora Royats i6.0j: Homaspara 
Baton ana Bnry vOntianiOetas. 


bad tried nearly everything I 
knew and in the end I just 
thought ihat if the round house 
kick worked in England it may 
work again down under— and it 
did. 

The day drew disappointment 
however for Pat McKay, aged 
29. a light-heavvweighL who , 
failed io win his third world tide i 
in succession. Though j 


LDCESIrnt SOU ARK THEATRE 

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iwukJlilr in aa>ann - 

UMOIOK QMEHA 57V i014 _ 
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■pn. nim m l oo i so 

M .55 


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47 


Today’s television and radio programmes and Peter DavauF^ 


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IS 




BBC 1 


§■00 Ceefax AM. 

6 ‘ 50 bE5?2m& Wlth Franfc 

and Debbie 

§K£K‘ P "» 

. Sas-Swaa 

SS? 0naln8w s- 

national and international 
W at 7-00. 7 jo, 

7 jo and B . 20 ; and a 
revrew °t the morninc 
" ew ^persat8J7. 
S^^omerrtamsare 

ine adult and adolesoem 

phone-in Advice Lines- 

g agape ft™ ayni 


Wi O'N- 
**» iWjfr • 
jSkSitr 
h 'C’V*' 

V 

*” ^nnsnan. 

» 8,05 £°Uf«vative Party 
■ "Ku Conference 1986. The 

gt* V.. opening session of the 

awT v te, - Conference, including 

“w tii^S , V JJ^Mpn tones and 

ssjfSst'saRs?- 

a.,J;VV Allsop. 

Conset inure runy 

Conference 1986. 15L30 
- nn j^wjmatetyCeofax. 
1-00 News After Noon with 
Richard Whitmore and 
Laurie Mayer, includes 
news headlines with 
subtitles 1 js Regional 
news and weather, ijo 
B agpuss. A See-Saw 

— M 


Ain. M 

10 ‘ S0 Conservative Party 

drf >v k2H 
' ,,hh 

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l awm\K lt 7* v- . 

“•“W OV 

'■“ll 

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or - ~. r-i gce-savr 

programme for the verv 
oan Jpung.(r)i.4SCeefax. 
2-20 Conservative Party 
Conference 1986. The 
debates on education and 

W^al eart(Wu> 4 m 


TV-AM 


6.15 Good Morning Britain 

presented by Anne 
“amond and Mike Morris. 
News with Gordon 

KfrasiS 0 - 

financial news at 6J5s 
sport at &40 and 7AO; 
exercfies at 6_K and 9.17; 
Joan Coffins interview at 
7.15, 8.15 and 8.45; 
carton al 7J5;pop moac 
atTJS; and Jem Barnett's 
. postbag at 8-35; The After 
t*»e guests include 
Virginia McKenna and Bin 
Travers. 


ITV/LONDON 


9-25 Thames news headtoes. 
MO For Schools: the 

generation of electricity 
SJB Why saying ’please* 

and ’than* you helps 
relationships 1(U» The 

school doctor and tea 
community policeman 
1&26 Where do party 
pobhGS fit into pofitics? 
10-48 Geography: waves 
and beaches 11.10 The 
Pied Piper of Hamlin 
11J7 The dangers of 
eating too many sweet 
foods 11.44 Part two of 
the drama, The Night 
Swimmers. 

1200 Tickle on the Tom. (r) 

12.10 Rainbow, (r) 1230 
TheSuffivsns. 

1-00 N«ws at One 1.20 Thames 
news presented by Robin 
Houston. 

UO 



. • The Times 's Roger Boyes, 

writing from Budapest in 
yesterday's edition of this 
newspaper, provided a 
comprehensive curtain-raiser . 
lO WHEN LUO YOU LAST SEE 
MY FATHER? {TV. 10 JOpmJ, 
the October edteon of Yorkshire 
Television's First Tuesday. 
Boyes pieced together me Ife 
and death and times of 
Laszlo Rak. farmer Hiraarian 
Foreign Master and interior 
Minister, hanged m 1949 for 
spying and treason. What 
First Tuesdevdoes tonight - no 
less comprehensively than 
Boyss’s article —is to piece 
together the attempts of 
Rajk’s son (also Laszlo) to 
.estetfsh the truth of h® 
father's death. Ctearfy. the son 
has not accepted, as full and 
final restitution, the official 
rehabilitation of his father by 
the leaders of a more liberal 


CHOICE 


conclusion mat ns tamer was 
a Mar who helped to build Ms 
country on a he. Laszlo Rajk 
Junior, now actively involved with 

oppositos&cfsMn coaxing 
the truth ( or what oust pass 
for the truth) from some of the 

men whose Bves interfaced 
with Laszlo Rajk Seniors. No 
definitive answer emerges to 
the question that stiU hangs over 
theRaJkeaseiwnyhe 
confessed to crk nes of w hich, 

^ ntty. he was innocent. 

Inference must be - and it 
was also Boyes s opinion in 
yesterday's Times -mat, 
disorientated by torture, he 
would not relnquish the prinopal 
tenet of tes political 
phaosophy: the party was always 
right 


> Bajle Fast Tuesday. Hungary in tee post-Stalin • The orty sad thing about 

e rrv. 10J0pm Ufa. Before craning tothe PAPBIHOON (Channel 4. 


9.00om) s that, as ft sho^s 
director Peter Bogdanovich at 
the height of Ms powers, rt 
underfmes how disastrous has 
been Ms subsequent fas from 
grace. Few comeoes so 
brAantty evoked the sitftt 
and sounds of tneir penod as did 
ftwwAcmrtwMchthehrt 
songs of me 1930s curled round 
the characters tea so much 
nbbon, and the black-end-white 
photography of Laszlo 
Kovec, with ns bngnt skyscapes 
and long, empty roads, 
stntandy framed tne adventures 
ot the Bible- selling con-man 
(Ryan O'Neal) and ha mne-yeer- 
o id partner m cnme (O'Neal a 
daughter Tatum). The 
contribution made tw Tatum 
O'Neal to the success of Paper 
Moon is incalculable. So wefl 

did she suggest the shtobomess 
of juvenile resentment that 
sha pracncafly elevated precocity 
to the realms ot tagh art 

Peter Davalle 


iCt'ntrni 


lltl 


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ihtef 

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v- ■ suuwain 

. .. social services a 5 2 

"•ufct.- - Regional news. ■ 

3 -55 Jinibo end the Jet Set 
,k - Cartoon series, (r) 44M 

The Chuddehounds. (r) 
*■£> Captain Caveman, (r) 
4J0 Beat the Teacher. 
Paul Jones with another 
round of the pupils versus 
teachers quiz game 4J0 
Rentaghost frt 
5 JO John Craven’s 

Newsround 5.10 Grange 
Hill- Episode one of me 
drama serial set in a 
secondary comprehensive 
„ school. (r)(Ceelax) 

5- 35 The Horse of the Year 
Show from Wembley 
Arena. 

6.00 News with Nicholas 
Witchell and Frances • 
Coverdaie. Weather. 

6- 35 London Plus. 

7.00 Telly Addicts. Back ter the 
fourth time are the 
Woodards of PontypooL 
Their challengers are the 
Cleaver family from 
Birmingham. Presented by 
Noel Edmonds. 

7 JO EastEnders. Dr Legg is 
offered help in return ter a 
favour; Mary has difficulty 
finding a babysitter for 
Annie; and Pauline has 
plans to increase the 
family's Income. (Ceefax) 
8-00 Open Ad Hours. In a 
desperate attempt to gain 
entry to Nurse Gladys' a 
bedroom Arkwright 
hatches a plot that can 
only succeed with the 
connivance of Granvkte. (r) 
(Ceefax)' - 

.30 HdpL Comedy series 
about a trio of unemployed 
Liverpudlians, tonight 
coming to grips with a 
vacant allotment (Ceefax) 
9JQ News with John Humphrys 
and Andrew Harvey- 
Regional news and 
weather. 

9.30 Big DeaL When Robby 
discovers that his 


230 Daytime. Sarali Kennedy 
chairs a studio rfiscussten 
on naratbours - good and 
bad. Tne guests mckide a 
psychologist, an 
environmental health 
officer, and a mediator. 
3J0 Heirloom. Chinese 
pottery is this week's 
object of the antiques 
programme. 

325 Thames news headlines 
3J0 Tbe Young Doctors. 
Medical cbama serial set in 
a larg e Australian city 
hospttaL 
4 JO The Giddy Game Show. 
The first of a new series 
starring Bernard 
Bresslaw. Redvers Kye 
and Richard Vernon 4.10 
The Trap Door. An 
animated adventure 420 
CJLB. Episode three of 
tee adventure serial 4A5 
Splash. Surfing in 
Cornwall: and a behind- 
the-scenes look at a new 
animated Watt Disney film. 
5.15 See Skating. The Stive! 
British Junior 
Championships from Lee 
Valley Ice Centre. 

5.45 News 6J0 Thames news. 
625 Reporting London. 

Graham Adcficott 
discows that irradiated 
food has been on sale in 
Britain iftegaJty and 
investigates cfeims teat 
food treated by gamma 
rays is untested and 
potentially dangerous. 

7 JO Emmeitfale Farm. Hard 
work at harvest time. 

7 JO George and MBdred. A 
famfy conference decides 
that nffidrerfs amd 
mother is too old to five on 
her own and that she must 
stay at the Ropers. 

George disagrees with the 
daemon, (r) 

8J0 The Giumbleweeds Party 
Time . Music and comedy 
from tee frantic five. 

9.00 First Among Equals. 
Episode two of the drama 


on his cousin who has 
recemty been released 
from prison. (Ceefax) 

10.20 Film 86. Barry Norman 

reviews Roman Polanski’s 
Pirates; and Tom Brooks 
discovers what Dudley 
Moore was doing on tne 
0E2. 

•llOJQ The Horse of the Year 
Show from Wembley 
Arena featuring the 
Hoochst Foxhunter 
Championship and the 
Modem Alarms Cup. 

11.40 The Making of the Forty- 
The story behind the re- 
launch tomorrow of 
Jaguar's XJ40 model- 
12.10 Weather. 


J s novel about tee 
political progress of four 
new members of 
parflamenL (Oracle) 

10J0 News at Ten and weather 
followed by Thames news 
heedSnas. 

1030 First Tuesday: When Did 
You Last See My Father? 
The story of Laszlo Rajk’s 
search ter tee truth about 
Ms father's execution in 
1949 after a show trial in 
Hungary, (see Choice) 
riJO Hammer House of 

Mystery and Suspense: 
Black Carrion. An 
investigative journalist 
discovers why two famous 
pop singers of the Sixties 

disappeared. Starring 

Season Hubfey.(r) 

1255 Night" 


BBC 2 


8J0 Ghartmr. Parveen Mirza 
meets two Asian women 
Who have set-up feeir own 

businesses -restaurateur 
U5haSharma,and 
KaushaJya Pabts who 
owns a heafth centra. 

935 Ceefax. 

935 DeytimeeuTwoetee 
~ i World 

. ^jlnGrax 

252 Drawing ate! 

flowers and! 

10.15 The story of a girl on 
a country holiday who 
befriends a badger 1038 
Why observation is a vttal 
pan of a scientist's We 
11 JO Making a tree book 
with leaf patterns 11.17 
Children of the 1860s 
exploited in the brick fi eld s 
1 lAOWondermaths 1137 
M a the ma t i c a l 
Investigations: Pascal's 
Triangle; and mazes 1216 
Maths: numbers 1240 The 
role of members of 
rfiamentUS 


B 


'esterday'snews in 
Frratch (ends at 1 3te 138 
A visit to a museum 200 
Fbr the very young. 

215 Ceefax. 

330 Con — iv e tive Petty 
Confere nc e 1986. The 
debate on trade sid 
industry. 

530 News stannary with 
subtitles, weather. 

535 Harold Uoyd* Excerpts 
from Ms 1927 comedy The 
Kid Brother; and Take a 
Chance, made in 1918. (r) 

6.00 No Lintitm. Videos, films, 
and tee top pop music, as 
well as a visit to the 
Thames Barrier. 

630 Buddy . The final episode 
of tne drama serial about a 
young man living with his 
thief father who has 
deserted by his wife. 
7.15 Under Sett features Bristol 
Charnel Pilot Cutters. At 
the turn of the century they 
numbered hundreds, now 
only a few remain and they 
are prized possessions. 
The cameras joined one of 
them, the Baroque, as she 
cruised along the Dutch 
coast last summer. 

735 I— ues ot Law. The third 
in "Michael 

„ 's series on the 

current state of EngKsh 
law examines the reasons 
why few people know their 
legal rights. 

8J0 Floyd on Food. Keith 

teSgowFfctodcan b® 80 ^ 
prepared only in a weft- 
equipped kitchen, (first 
shewn on BBC South 
West). 

830 Top Gear. WMarn 
WooBard test drives tee 
Citreon AX; Chris Goffey 
tries the new Jaguar XJ6; 
and also investigates if the 
depreciation rate of a car 
should be a major factor to 
consider when buying a 
new car. 

9.00 FBnc The Irishman (1978) 
starring Michael Craig and 
Simon Burke. The story of 
afamiiy IMnqin 
Queenslarximthe 


230 Htoc Steamboat BMJf 

(1928) starring Buster 
Keaton. Sflert comedy 
abottt a precious young 
man who returns from 
coflege to find Mmseif in a 
overborn battle between 
Ms father and the local 'Mr 


330 fn My Experience. Mavis 
Nicholson tafcs to Dame 
Atida Maikova about her 
fife and career. The last of 
the series. 

430 Studio 80. Musical 
entert a inment featuring 
Dionne Warwick and a 
- musical item on Frank 
Sinatra 

SJ0 Bewit ch e d . After he wwas 
rude to her Endore us- 
her magical powers to turn 
Oarrin into a perfect 
gentleman. 

530 Make It Pay. Wood 
sculpture and glass and 
metal engraving are the 
crafts examined by 
Stephen Atkinson in the 
penultimate progr amm e of 
his series on hobbies that 
could be made profitable. 

6J0 BSSS— k teid the Big 
Wide Worid. The second 
and final part of the 
dramatized advice series 
designed to help those 
leaving home for the first 
time. 

630 Co n ference Report G*yn 
Mathias reports from 
Bournemouth on the day’s 
debates at the 
Conservative Parly 
Conference. 

7 JO Channel 4 News. 

7 30 Comment from Dr Bobbie 
Jacobson, an enti- 


1 fellow in health 
promotion. Weather. 

8J0 Brookside. Shelia has 
trouble with a double- 
I salesman; ' 
(promises to 
mend Ms ways; and a 
probation officer cals 
about the spare room at 
Pat’s and Terry’s. - 
830 4 What ffs Worth. 
Consumer affairs series 
presented by Pmny 
Junor. BA B reckon 
Inv e sti ga t e s the safety 
factor of fizzy drinks 
bottles; John 
Stoneborough tracks 
down a Manchester man 
with seven bogus removal 
firms; and David Stafford 
(fiscovers the Which? best 
buy in smaO radios. 

9.00 F9m: Paper Moon* (1973) 
starring Ryan O'Neal, 
Tatum O'Neal and 
Madeline Khan. Comedy 
set in the American mid- 
west in 1936. Directed by 
Peterr 


HandM ^ ee -^ 3i08 ) 


Twenties coming to 
with a change' 


ng to grips 
inwondng 
ght about by 


methods brought about 1 
the arrival of motor 
transport Directed by 
Donald Crombie. 

10.45 New inight intro duced by 
Peter Snow from 
Bournemouth. 

11^0 Weather. 


1255 Hand Made in Hong Kong. 
A behind-the-scenes 
report by Paula Yates oh 
the making of the Hm 
Shanghai Surprise, 
starring Madonna, on 
location in London and 
Hong Kong. 

1130 To Ciom For Comfort. 
American domestic 
comedy series starting 
Ted Knight as the 
possessive tether of 
attractive daughters. 
Tonight Ws wife’s old 
flame pays a visit and is 
immediately attracted to 
one of her daughters. 

Ends at 1222 


( Radio 4 


On long wave, (s) Stereo on VHF 
535 Srtpptog. too News Briefing; 
Western. 6.16 farming 
&25 Prayer (9) 

S30 Today, heftao. 730, 

830 News. 6.45 
Business News. 635. 735 
Weather. 7 JO, 8J0 
News. 730 Letters 735, 13S 
Sport. 736 Thought tor 
the Day. 835 Yesterday in 
Parfiemam.837 
We