Skip to main content

Full text of "The Times , 1986, UK, English"

See other formats


No 62,583 


THE 



TIMES 


WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 8 1986 



Tory conference hears string of policy ini 




Si 


••••• « 

" .■ .,i. —'it 

Cl 




Tebbit spells 
out issues for 
next election 


By Robin Oakley and Philip Webster 

>' csler day sci out representatives and in Mr 
Tcbbit's chairman's address in 
which he made clear the 
baiilcground for the next gen- 
eral election. 


a siring oF new policy inttia- 
UJJ? 31 Conservative 
iuri> conference 



in Boume- 
¥ uk-- !o ? u PP° n Mr Norman 
Icbbit s claim that the Tories 
were the only credible party of 
government. 

Aiming 10 demonstrate that 
the party had the energy and 
anve for another five years in 
office, ministers announced: 
•An accelerated programme 
oi privatization. including the 
authorities, to bring in 
i 1 4 billion over the next three 
years. 

•A new deal for the private 
rented sector to bring 600.000 
more homes onto the market 
and to turn building societies 
and housing associations into 
large scale landlords. 

•New controls over sex 
education in schools and the 
establishment of 20 technol- 
ogy colleges in inner cities, 
funded directly by the Gov- 
ernment. the first major 
departure from the com- 
prehensive system. 
•Legislation to force councils 
to open up more services for 
tender by private companies. 

A new confidence was ev- 
ident in the mood of the Tory 


The plan is to present the 
Tory party as the only one 
offering sound defence, lower 
taxation, increased individual 
choice and a continued attack 
on inflation until it reaches 
zero. 

The Tories arc now dismiss- 
ing the Alliance as a spent 
force and feel more comfort- 
able attacking the old Labour 
enemv. Mr Tebbit, who re- 


Conference reports 

4 

Sterling dilemma 

16 

Tom Burke 

16 

Leading articles 

17 

Money supply 

21 


« ^ - *\\ 

a; £l0! 


n 


£ % 
K 


m sea 


Tomorrow 



Behind the r 
visor ... v 

Nigel Manseircbufd 
on Sunday become 
Britain's first : 
Formula One world 
champion since 
James Hunt in , 
1976. Hunt, still 
on motor racing’s 
inside track, • 
profiles Mansell 
and provides 
frank insights into 
the man and his craft 



• The £4,000 prize in 
The Times Portfolio 
Gold competition was 
shared yesterday by 
two readers — Mr 
R.P.G.Burton-West, of 
London NW11, and 
Mrs A.C.Thomas, of 
Cambridge. Details, 
page 3. . 

• There is another 

£4,000 to be won today. 
Portfolio list, page 27; 
rules and how to play, 
information service, 
page 20. 


TIMES BUSINESS 


Delay in City 

Yet another delay has hit the 
new legal framework for 
regulating the City and. 
protecting investors. It is not 
likely to take effect before 


1988 


Page 21 


* L S 


Merger near 

Wedgwood, the f* nc c ^j n ^ 
rmuo is poised to accept a 
merger with Waterford Gtes 
Jfier talks apparently mohred 

a number of problems Page -1 


tMES SPORT 


Five-year ban 

pa\ u1 Moorhead, the Na- 
tional Hum trainer, has been 
suspended for five years by the 
jockey Hub’s disciplinary 
committee for altering the 
passport* of two ^ 


Ituiut' Nr»> 
(hrWJ' 7-10 

yppiv 1* 

Art* 1 1 

(tilth v. dcaihs. 
matr&se* *n 

Busina 21-37 

Cbcss 2 

C'flurl 

Wan ., {Jr 
fValom 12-10 1 


La* Report 
Leaden 

Letters 
Obituary 
Parliament 
Property 28.29 
Sale Room 6 
Science 18 
Sport 37-40,42 
Theatres, etc 41 
TV * Radio 41 
Weather 20 


affirmed his status as a con- 
ference hero yesterday along- 
side the new Tory idol. Mr 
Kenneth Baker. Secretary of 
State for Education, dended 
socialism as a creed based on 
high taxation, nationalization, 
controls and the elimination 
of choice. 

He mocked the Alliance’s 
disarray on defence, inquiring 
if Mr David Steel, the Liberal 
leader, in laying down his 
conditions for coalition gov- 
ernment. would be demand- 
ing his party's defence policy, 
his own or Dr David Owen's. 


He said that Mr Kinnock 
had made a "fatal mis- 
judgement*’ in tying Labour to 
unilateralism and said that 
Labour's conference vote to 
slay in Nato had been ob- 
tained only by promises of 
policies calculated to break up 
Nato. 

The Ton - chairman turned 
round Mr Kinnock’s attempt 
to claim the “moral majority” 
for Labour, inquiring what 
kind of morality it was to 
undermine the alliance that 
had kept Europe safe, to 
restore the tyranny of the 
closed shop and rent a mob 
picketing, to let inflation loose 
to debauch the currency and 
to “talk about the fight against 
crime and to put the handcuffs 
on the police and not the 
criminals”. 

The new stimulus to 
privatization came from Mr 
Norman Lamont. Financial 
Secretary to the Treasury. Mr 
Lament announced fresh sales 
targets to achieve what he 
called the dream of a capital- 
owning democracy and raise 
more money for lax cuts. 

Mr Lamont disclosed that 
the Government intends in 
this and each of the next two 
years to sell businesses worth 
£4.75 billion. To achieve it the 
sale of the 10 water authorities 
in England and Wales, post- 

Con tin ued on page 20, col 4 



Baker unveils his 
school revolution 

By Nicholas Wood and Mark Dowd 

Manchester/ U ver- 


• A governors': yetjb over sex " London! 
education. -and a new poo).. 
£100 million pilot network of. 

.-funded technol- 


goverament- 
og> schools in. the big cities 
was unveiled yesterday by Mr 
Kenneth Baker as the first 
phase in a revolutionary drive 
to free schooling from local 
authority control. 

The Secretary of State for 
Education and Science was 
given a standingovation at the 
Conservative conference in 
Bournemouth afler he set out 
his vision of a school system 
dominated and run by heads 
and parents, not council 
officials. 

He said he would respond to 
public concern about the con- 
tent and spirit of sex educa- 
tion by making it the sole 
province of governing bodies. 
Amendments to this effect will 
be tabled when the Education 
Bill returns to the Commons. 

“The governing body will 
decide what, if any. son of sex 
education the school should 
offer, and whether the school 
should allow particular par- 
ents to withdraw their chil- 
dren from particular sex 
education lessons.” he said in 
a move aimed at heading off a 
backbench demand for an 
absolute right of withdrawal. 

The first of the 20 new “city 
technology colleges” will open 
in September. 1 988. They will 
be run by independent trusts, 
cater for between 750 and 
1000 pupils aged 1 1 to 18 and 
will be financed by a mixture 
of Government grants 
andprivalc sponsorship. 

More details will be an- 
nounced next Tuesday, but 


Birmingham. 
Southampton and Leicester 
are understood lo be among 
the chosen locations. 

In a key passage of his 
speech replying to a debate in 
which representatives de- 
nounced left-wing Town Hall 
control of classrooms,' Mr 
Baker, the putative wet not 
afraid to steal some of the 
right’s pci tunes, said: 

"Education can no longer be 
led by the producers — by the 
academic theorists, the 
adrnmislrators and even the 
teachers* unions. Education 
must be shaped by the users — 
by what is good for the 
individual child and what 
hopes arc held by their 
parents.” 

He told representatives that 
the schools would have a core 
curriculum made up of tech- 
nological scientific and prac- 
tical work, business studies 
and design. 

They will be open to chil- 
dren of an abilities 

In a scathing assault on the 
Labour Panv. Mr Baker de- 
rided Mr Neil Kinnock’5 new- 
found “moral majority” as 
one encompassing the “whole 
gang of fads and fanatics” in 
London. Brent. Haringey and 
Ealing. 

In the wake of controversies 
over a homosexual school- 
book. a headmaster suspended 
for allegedly striving for ex- 
cellence and bizarre accusa- 
tions of racism, he accused 
Labour councils of practising 
“bigotry masquerading as 
equality, and intolerance mas- 
querading as freedom." 


Mrs Thatcher was treated for 
a slight ankle sprain yes- 
terday. after stumbling on a 
manhole cover on her way to 
the Bournemouth conference 
centre. 

The Prime Minister was 
waving to crowds as she 
walked to the centre, after 
addressing the Conservative 
Medical Society, when she 
caught a heel in the cover and 
. fell to the ground 
, An aide said the swollen 
*ntfe wnuM nm ^ffect Mrs 
Thatcher's engagements. 

Spending 

boost 

for Lawson 

By David Smith 
. Economics Correspondent 
The Chancellor. Mr Nigel 
Lawson, received a boost yes- 
terday tn his fight to avoid a 
damaging rise in base rates. 
City analysts do not expect 
any increase this week. 

Money supply figures re- 
leased yesterday showed a 
sharp slowdown in credit. 
Bank lending rose by just £0.9 
billion last month, compared 
with a £2.5 billion average 
over the previous six months. 

The sterling M3 money 
measure increased by 1-5-1.75 
per cent last month. In the 
City, there had been fears of a 
rise of 3 per cent or more in 
the money supply. 

The pound was also a 
beneficiary of a support opera- 
tion for the dollar, fed by the 
West German central bank 
The central banks of Switzer- 
land. Austria. Denmark and 
other European countries also 
joined in buying dollars. 

The operation, which 
helped stabilize the dollar at 
around two marks, also bene- 
fited the pound. The sterling 
index, having dropped to a 
new low of 67.8 yesterday 
morning, recovered to close at 
68 . 1 . 


Rover threatens to 
end £100m deal 

By Craig Seton 

yesterday Staffordshire - where front 


Court shields El A1 man’s identity 


Unusual security measures 
were taken at the Central 
Criminal Court yesterday to 
protect the identity of an El A1 
official giving evidence on 
how he discovered a bomb 
allegedly destined for a flight 
to fel Aviv {Stewart Tendler 
writes). 

On the second day of the 
trial of Nezar Hindawi. ac- 
cused of trying to place a 


bomb on a Boeing 747 using 
the luggage of his unsuspecting 
pregnant girlfriend, a screen 
was erected in court No i so 
thal the first of a series of 
airline staff could not be seen 
by the public gallery. Press or 
unauthorized officials. 

The use of screens is very 
rare in court proceedings but 
has been used at the Central 
Criminal Court in the past to 


protect the identity of wit- 
nesses such as important po- 
lice informers. 

Yesterday a 29-year-old of- 
ficial described as “Mr A” told 
the court a bag carried by Miss 
Ann Murphy, Mr Hindawi’s 
girlfriend, lo the El AI check 
point last April was emptied 
but still seemed to be heavy. 

Girlfriend’s outburst, page 3 


Austin Rover 
threatened to pull out of a deal 
worth £100 million a year with 
Lucas, its main component 
supplier*: where on overtime 
ban ira» caused the, . state- 
■owned car makers to lay oft 
2,500 workers and halt all 
production at' its giant Bir- 
mingham" plant for three days. 

The tough warning was 
issued by Mr Lcs Wharton. 
Austin Rover’s new managing 
director, who was appointed 
only two weeks ago in a shake- 
up 'designed to pull the com- 
pany out of its loss-making 
depression. 

With lost car production at 
Austin Rover's Longbridge 
plant in Birmingham running 
at £15 million because of the 
overtime ban. Mr^ Wharton 
said- “It is for Lucas to put its 
house in order. 

“ If the situation continues 
we will be reviewing our long 
term relationship with Lucas 
with a view to finding an 
alternative supplier." 

Austin Rover fears that lay- 
offs at Longbridge could in- 
crease at the rate of up to 1 .000 
a day among its 10.000 
workforce as long as the Lucas 
dispute continues. Production 
of the company's prestige 
flagship car, the Rover 800. 
went ahead at Cowley. Ox- 
ford. yesterday, after one day's 
lost production on Friday. ■ 

Mr Wharton’s message was 
delivered as 600 workers at 
Lucas Electrical in Cannock. 


and rear lights for Austin 
Rover cars are made - walked 
out as their dispute over a 10 
percent' pay claim escalated 

An ov&time tan- by 5,500 
LucasfElectrical workers in the 
Midlands. including drivers 
delivering components, has 
halted production of Minis, 
Metros and Rover 200s at 
Austin Rover's Longbridge 
plant since Friday because no 
front and rear light units were 
being supplied. 

Mr Wharton, who was ap- 
pointed by Mr Graham Day. 
the Rover Group's tough new 
chairman, said that the lay- 
offs were a direct result of ine 
Lucas overtime ban. He de- 
scribed as “total and utter 
nonsense" a suggestion by a 
Lucas union leader that Aus- 
tin Rover was not concerned 
about the lay-offs because the 
state-owned company had an 
over-capacity in car 
production. 

He said: “It is simply a 
mischievous attempt to divert 
attention away from the 
source of the problem. 

“ Wc need to keep produc- 
ing cars to replace showroom 
stocks.” 

Austin Rover's business 
with Lucas is worth about 
£100 million a year, but the 
car manufacturer, unlike 
Fond, which also takes Lucas' 
pans, has no immediate 
source of alternative supply. 


Edmonds summoned to 
Lords over TV remarks 


presenter. 


By John Good body 

Phil Edmonds, the Middle- wife 
sex and England Test crick- 
eter. has been summoned to 
Lord's today’, only 36 hours 
before the team leaves for the 
Australia tour, to explain re- 
marks that he made on BBC 
Television's M ogan Show. 

The Test and County 
Cricket Board yesterday said 
they thought the remarks were 
“in’ very bad taste”, and 
ordered him to appear before 
the secretary’. Mr Donald 
Carr. 

Phil Edmonds was inter- 
■ewed on Monday with his 


inces by 
. David Fi 


guest 


rosL 


The pair made several jocu- 
lar comments about the 
TCCB’s ruling about players 
not giving interviews lo the 

S tress, ana also about the rule 
orbidding players' wives lo go 
to Australia for the first six 
weeks of the lour. 

Edmonds said last night “I 
do not think that any of my 
remarks on the programme 
could be construed as being in 
bad taste. It was all highly 
enjoyable." 


T imetight welcomed by Iceland’s modem woman 


Ibefcf^ 

af Utm<r '°Zu’ 

..SUMS* 
iisrrf’ 


fr * <c ☆ * * 


'iCSl/w&'s 

p-t 






From Brian James 

Reykjavik 

The former Iceland air host- 
ess who will be sharing just 
about every television screen 
in the world this weekend with 
Mrs Raisa Gorbachov- had 
only one small doubt in her 
mind: "How. well is her En- 
glish? I do not wish to do ail 
the speaking.” 

Ms Edda Gudmandsdottir. 
the wife of Iceland’s Prime 
Minister, Mr. Steingrimur 
Hermannsson. is to be hostess 
to the wife of the Soviet leader 
during the two-day summit 
mealing. Neither Soviet nor 
American authorities disguise 
the fact that Ms Gudmands- 
dottir's main task is keeping 


Mrs Gorbachov out from 
under their feet 

■‘We will have interpreters 
. of course — to say perhaps 
complicated things to each 
other.” Ms Gudmandsdottir 
said. “But I think Raisa is not 
a typical Russian. She is the 
modem woman, as I am. It 
will be better if we can speak 
directly to each other.” 

Iceland's modem woman 
reacted icily to the snooty 
reaction of a US State Depart- 
ment spokesman deploring 
Mrs Gorbachov’s presence in 
Reykjavik and insisting that 
this was no holiday for the two 
leaders but a meeting of very 
great seriousness thal permit- 
ted no distractions. 


“I have absolutely no com- 
ment al what the State Depart- 
ment think,” she said. “But 
really, some men! All I can tell 
you is that my own husband is 
very anxious for me to attend 
all his foreign visits, I do not 
become involved in bis busi- 
ness. He does not discuss with 
me what he is doing. 

“But he finds ii easier to 
relax when in the evenings he 

.-II- 



chov.- ! am sad that Nancy 
Reagan also will not come." 

Ms Gudmansdoltir con- 
firmed thal the Soviet Ambas- 
sador had seejned surprised 
about Mm Gomachov's visit. 

.A. • . . . . 


He asked her to suggest a 
programme. 

She gestured at the huge 
picture window of her superb 
home on the shores of an inleL 
“1 would like her to come and 
dine with me here. The water, 
as you see, is just 25 metres 
away. It is very beautiful, very 
peaceful. But also very open, 
and maybe the security mil 
not permit.” 

The list of items radioed lo 
Moscow on Monday for ap- 
proval includes a local perfor- 
mance of Aider, a visit to the 
wild and beautiful lake called 
Thingbellir; the original Ice- 
land sagas; the hot water 
geysers and springs; and 

- Continued on page 20, col 2 


\ 


Libyan airline 
seeks crews to 
beat embargo 

By Harvey Elliott, Air Correspondent 
Libyan Arab Airlines, which after by two diplomats in the 


is soon to be banned from 
Britain for alleged terrorist 
activities, is offering up to 
£40,000 a year tax free to 
British pilots and engineers to 
fly its two Airbus A3 10 jets. 

The aircraft, now standing 
idle at Tripoli Airport, were 
bought from British Caledo- 
nian in a controversial £75 
million agreement three 
months ago. 

Advertisements for pilots, 
first officers and engineers to 
fly the aircraft appear in the 
latest issue of Flight Inter- 
naimr.ul magazine. Applicants 
arc inv ited to apply via a box 
number lo Aviation Consul- 
tants Ltd. but enquiries in 
Britain and Europe have failed 
to find any company by that 
name. The two Airbuses were 
delivered ro Tripoli in July 
after a complex international 
arrangement involving at least 
three “front" companies and 
world-wide legal haitlcs b> 
British Caledonian to prevent 
the sale. 

But since their arrix al. they 
have been sitting on the 
airport tarmac because Libya 
has no qualified pilots and 
engineers to fly them. 

Mr John Mass, of Geneva, 
Switzerland, who contacted 
the British Airline Pilots 
Association to try lo find 
unemployed A3 10 pilots, 
without saying who would 
employ them, admitted yes- 
terday' that the employer was 
Libyan Arab Airlines. 

A Foreign Office spokes- 
man said yesterday that any- 
one who took up the job offer 
would be warned that they 
could not be guaranteed nor- 
mal consular protection. “Any 
Briton is free to work where he 
likes. But we have to tell them 
that since diplomatic relations 
were broken off we cannot 
guarantee the normal protec- 
tion of our ambassadors or 
consular offices.” he said. 

About 3.000 British pass- 

B jrt holders work in Libya, 
riiain's interests are looked 


Italian embassy in Tripoli. 

The advertisement in Flight 
International promises 
batchelor accommodation for 
an unspecified number of 
captains and first officers, as 
well as for an operations 
despatches two engine fitters, 
two E1R (electronic and 
avionics) fitters, five aircraft 
fitters and a line chief. 

Airbus Industrie, of Tou- 
louse. France, would normally 
train already qualified crew to 
operate Ihc A3 10. But they put 
a bar on Libyan recruits alter 
the United States imposed an 
embargo on the delivery of 
high technology equipment to 
Libya two years ago. 

Libya has appealed to the 
International Civil Aviation 
Organisation to lobby the US 
to end its embargo, because of 
concern, “about the shortage 
of spare pans for aircraft and 
navigational aids to maintain 
international safety require- 
ments". The Lihyans claim 
that the ban is in direct 
contravention of international 
regulations governing air 
transport, and could pul tltcir 
aircraft and passengers at risk. 

A spokesman for the Inter- 
national Federation of Airline 
Pilots said: "Clearly the han is 
biting. It concerns us because 
it would seem that political 
considerations may be out- 
weighing safely consid- 
erations. This is a parallel 
problem to the shortage of 
crews for the Airbus." 

The Airbuses will be used to 
fly throughout Europe and the 
Middle East, alter inter- 
national standards on noise 
rule out the use of the airline’s 
existing Boeing 7U7 and 727 
fleet. Intelligence experts be- 
lieve they could also be used 
as military transports. 

British Caledonian claims 
that it sold the jets to an 
international broker, who 
broke a clause in the sale 
contract by selling them on lo 
a number of other brokers and 
eventually to Libya. 


Americans die 
in Nicaragua 
plane attack 

By Oar Foreign Staff 

The Nicaraguan Army said 
yesterday that its troops shot 
down a military aircraft drop- 
ping supplies to the US- 
backed rebels in southern 
Nicaragua, killing three 
Americans and capturing a 
fourth. 

It said the survivor of the 
incident said he was a United 
States military adviser. 

However. Mr George 
Shultz, the Secretary of State, 
said yesterday thal the large 
cargo plane, shot down over 
dense jungle near the Costa 
Rica border on Sunday, had 
been hired by American civil- 
ians. 


Man cleared 
of pub 
attack plot 

Mr Thomas Maguire, aged 
27. a graduate of University 
College. Dublin, was cleared 
at the Central Criminal Court 
yesterday of plotting with 
Patrick Magee, the convicted 
Brighton bomber, to blow up a 
soldiers’ public house near 
Blackpool. 

He was alleged to have 
acted as “go-between” for a 
planned attack on the Eagle 
and Child Inn. near Weeton 
Army camp. Blackpool. 

But Mr Maguire, a teacher, 
of Milboume Street, Black- 
pool, said he was “in the dark" 
about the plot and that an IRA 
informer. Mr Raymond 
O'Connor, had lied. 

Photograph, page 2 



Barratt 

Europe's largest 

TIMESHARE 

Developers 


DO IT THE “RIGHT WAY”... 
THE BARRATT WAY!!! 

Legal file bed is trust by major UK Clearing Banks. Insurance Protection. 
Constant Man&aaBca Three “exchange systems”. Use it, rent it, exchange 
locations, seS K, bequeath It ff IS YOURS... FOREVER! 


AFTER A ONE-TIME PAYMENT AS LOW AS £2,900 


HOLIDAY 

WHEREVER . . . WHENEVER . . . FOREVER 

START HBtE IN TffiULK. 

ENGLAND SCOTLAND WALES 

ELMERS COURT, L0CHRANN0CH PLAS TALGARTH, 

ON THE SOLENT; FOREST HILLS SNOWDONIA 

. HANTS W1EM0RE NATIONAL PARK 

OR START IN 

VILLACANA. COSTA DEL SOlSRAIN IHLAPUHA, COSTA DaSOL 

THEN, IF YOU WISH, SELECT ANY OF TIE MORE 
THAN 2,000 RESORT LOCATIONS ALL OVER 
THE WORLD TO HOLIDAY ANY, OR EVERY YEAR 
...AND NEVER AGAIN MY ONE PENNY FOR THE 
ACCOMMODATION YOU USE! 

IF YOU ARE GOING TO TIMESHARE, 
DO IT THE RIGHT WAY... THE, 

BARRATT WAY 

ONE OF THE UK'S LARGEST PREMIER HOWE 
BUILDERS IS NOW ONE OF THE WORLD’S 
LARGEST TIMESHARE DEVELOPERS 

DONT MISS THIS OPPORTUNITY. THESE PRICES Will NOT BE 
ftSULABLE FOR IIWG. YOU CAN DO FT! THE START IS POSTING 
THE COUPON BEUNK OR 

Phone 01-629 2731 


■ Pleas® smri nu> in 

I 


>&BotelsKtd. GRatf HmbS^ La»4o> WIT 7*!^ 

Please M-nd me uifomuiion d ihe National Gimraay 86 and roicu* lmrh „r- I 
to* tPleaseticV) 


| [ UwhRjnnnch 


J Scotland 


Hilk 




I 


I 


llsn-J 
SPAIN 
Mi-Mj 
ben iiu>Ii 


a 


□ftv 


Ah v jr ■ 



T 4 aire_ 


[Barratt J..WTTU BARRfirfYOirRE SUR^ 



■ 

€ 


) 

t 

’ yes- 
prize 

has 

Cold 

arted 

itess. 
ng in 

vould 

Joey. 

most 
for a 

Mr 

from 

play 
Port- 
ing a 
elope 


e 


rtber 

iR*r. 

at 
adon 
Tom 
' the 

6, of 
was 
ac 
'ourt 
eing 
« of 

the 
mit- 
> on 
-liss 
»yne 
»rth 


X a 

Ter- 

liss 

the 

for 

to 

irge 

1 in 
was 


.. 




Kasparov 
near to 
all-time 
greatness 

From Raymond Keene 
Leningrad 


■Int i 

3ee< 

rman l 
ty hats to 
attack 
ty runs 
notion p 
cy assoc . 
umemcH \ 
ifermce 
inipulate 
inage de 
s or 
bbiu his 
Is me. w. 
ten the * ' 
ded, k)j ’ 

ybody it 
ey like il f 
into dis 
e of a m 
nfercnce 
itive con 
der thr 
solution 
o blase: 
dinous t 
.-bate”, 
imediate 
m show 
is been st 
> finish!” 
should at 
>r debate. 

Jann 

or the fi 
lere will 
mtative ; 
Respite r 
uring the 
.orkers i 
orapplict 
lasses. * 
nonth wa 
u 


world chess title in LenmoS 
on Monday with an easy (W 
against Anatoly Karpov, the 
challenger, in the twenty^ 
game. 

His brilliance non pots y- 
in reach of the mercurial 
American genius, Bobby % 
scher. as the greatest chan, 
pion of alL 

By drawing the gg^ 
Kasparov reached 12 point, 
which guaranteed retentions} 
his title. Nevertheless, the 
final game wQl still be played 
today, as Karpor has a (bee. 
retkal chance of tying ^ 
match if he wins. 

la the climactic game a 
Oblique approach by Karpat 
tried to throw the yomg 
champion off balance ia| 
morass of obscure midiUegaiae 


Unions launch 
Ulster battle 
against bigotry 

By Richard Ford 


A campaign against sectari- 
anism and bigotry was laun- 
ched by Northern Ireland's 
trade union .movement yes- 
terday after months of intim- 
idation on housing estates and 
building sites and in offices 
and factories. 

The tit-for-tat retaliatory 
threats by “loyalist” and 
republican paramilitaries 
have caused the loss of thou- 
sands of jobs in the construc- 
tion industry and affected 
social services in the west and 
north of Belfast. 

With intimidation in the 
workplace at its highest level 
since the worst years of the 
troubles, companies have 
taken extra precautions to 
ensure the safety of their staff. 

At least one businessman 
has made arrangements to 
transport worried workers to 
and from their home if they 
feel under threat and others 
have been holding daily meet- 
ings to reassure employees. 

Leaflets and posters, includ- 
ing some with the words 
“Intimidation is industrial 
suicide”, will be distributed 
throughout the province in 10 
days' time as part of a cam- 
paign organized by the North- 
ern Ireland committee of the 
Irish Congress of Trade 
Unions. 

Under the title “Stand to- 
gether for peace, work and 
prosperity” leaflets will also 
be sent to companies which 
will be urged to put them on 
noticeboards. 

Community groups, em- 
ployers and church leaders are 
being invited to attend a 


conference on intimidation at 
the end of the month. 

Mr A1 Mackle, chairman of 
the Northern Ireland commit- 
tee, said everyone was con- 
cerned at the sharp increase in 
sectarianism and he urged 
workers and trade unionists to 
unite against intimidation and 
reject people threatening or 
excusing violence. 

The trade unions in the 
North have a particularly 
difficult job, given the sectar- 
ian nature of politics, and 
have preferred to keep a low 
profile, but the recent upsurge 
has forced a change of tactics. 

As political unrest over the 
Anglo-Irish agreement has 
caused heightened tension in 
the province, extremists on 
both sides of the sectarian 
divide have fed off each other, 
with intimidation, threats and 
attacks against those from the 
opposite tradition. 

The Provisional IRA has 
killed six people — one in a 
case of mistaken identity — 
since launching a campaign 
of attacking people supplying 
material to the security forces: 

Other suppliers have with- 
drawn from contracts, vaying 
from rebuilding RUC bases to 
supplying milk and bread to 
policemen, after a Provisional 
warning that they would be 
considered legitimate targets 
and risked being killed. 

Loyalist paramilitaries have 
threatened Roman Catholic 
workers employed in pre- 
dominantly Unionist areas 
and shot dead one Roman 
Catholic building worker and 
plotted to kill others. 


Bn t Kasparov, playia* 
Black, struck oat with 
amazingly original Rook toer 
from moves 14 to 20. 

That involved marching fee 
Black's Queen Rook into fee 
centre of the board, swinging^ 
aggressively towards (be 
White King and then just » 
rapidly withdrawing the Rook 
to its original square. 

On the 24th more, Kasparov 
lashed ont with a pawn thrust, 
which temporarily sacrificed a 
pawn. However, on the 32nd 
move. Karpov, after sack 
anguished thought, conceded 
that he could not hoU fee 
pawn. After playing he offered 
a draw which Kasparov gladly 
accepted. 

During the past three yean 
the two have contested three 
bitter matches involving 95 
games. Kasparov has woo 13 
games and Karpov 12, wife 78 
drawn games. 

The games he won (4, 8, 14, 
16, 22) he well and truly woo, 
while one cannot avoid fee 
suspicion that Karpov’s few 
wins (5, 17, 18, 19) were die 
more to Kasparov's over- 
exhnberance and errors than 
Karpov's own brilliance. 

The level of combat was 
much superior to the classic 
Fischer-Spassky clash it 
Reykjavik. 

Kasparov, the onts pokes 
and brash 23-year-oM fan 
Baku, plans to launch a world- 
wide fear to popnburize dess. 

Meanwhile Karpov roast 
struggle to qualify for a fresh 
match next year. Early text 
year he faces another 23-jear- 
old Soviet player, Anita 
Sokolov, in Lhnres, Span. In 
the background lurks Unhurt 
Nigel Short, aged 21, the oast 
likely western c h al l e n ge r . 

The moves: 


Karpov: White 



? m 

m 

17BA7 

feW 

2o4 

b6 

1813 

16 

3 g3 

C5 

19Ng2 

W- 

4 Bg2 

Bb7 

20BD2 

m : 

500 

96 

21 Ba3 

Nc5 

6d4 

ad* 

22 Rbl 

* 1 

7 Qxd4 

Bg7 

23 Qd3 

Nc7 

8 Nc3 

d6 

24 MI4 

&5 

9 Rdl 

Nbd7 

25 0*5 

axb5 

10 b3 

Rc8 

26Nxb5 

m 

11 8D2 

0-0 

27 0x1)5 

0*6 

12Qe3 

Re8 

28 axb5 

Rb8 

13 Racl 

s6 

29 Bb2 

Rtf 

14 Bal 

Rc5 

30 b6 

m 

15 a4 

Qa8 

31 b4 

Nd7 

16 Nel 

RS 

32 Bxg7 

| 


Top universities in the 
business of research 

Industry is now providing Salford University Business 
sealer cash support for many Services Lid is now the lamest 
British universities which company of its kind in Britain 
have had to go looking for and has 50 full-time consul- 
funds since the Government tarns and full access to the 
cuts of five years ago. university staff. 

The technological univer- u . 

sities have benefited Heriot-Watt University 

mosLSalford is at the top of ncar Edmbuigh. has achieved 
the list with 1L9 per cent p ‘ ace By more sus- 

industrial support followed by la, . ned I progress. The 
Herior-Wati University near, universiiv's Principle. Dr 
Edinburgh. (8.7 per cent) and Tom Johnston, said their 
Loughborough (8.2 per cent). , was £ ue to “ihe close 

Only the top quarter of ‘* SSOCl p I,on that ihe university- 
universities break through alwavs maintained with 
five per cent industry and the professional 

Salford's position is the w a ; ' _ w - Promote our 
result of a five-year drive by rapcn,se - 
its Vice-Chancellor. Mr John Britoil cummtlv has more 
Ashwood. He called together than £500.000 in contracts 
his staffin the wake of the 44 with the university, andmanv 
percent cuts imposed in 1981 companies now prefer to let 
and told them to get out dnd university expens cam’ out 
cultivate industrial contacts some of their research rather 
and contracts. than do it themselves. 


phones. We are flows 
ything to reconnect hi* 5 
uickly as possible.” 
ast night BT engineer 
: considering hyp®®'® 


High Court rules on identity of magistrates 

9 

o aw 


By Frances Gibb 
Legal Affairs 
Correspondent 

Magistrates who keep their 
identities secret when hearing 
ravx are acting unlawfully, 
the High Court ruled 
vesterday. 

In a test case with wide, 
implications for court report- 
ing. Lord Justice Watkins, 
sitting with Mr Justice Russell 
and Mr Justice Mann, held 
that magistrates have no right 
in law to remain anonymous 
in court, and that their names 
must be given to lawyers and 
press reporters coveting cases 
in their courts. 

In a strondv-worded iudse- 


ment.- Lord Justice Watkins 
.said that the policy was. 
“inimical ‘ to the proper 
administration of justice and 
an unlawful obstruction to the 
right to know who sits in 
judgement. There is, in my 
view, no such person as the 
anonymous JP 

The case was brought by 
The Observer newspaper and 
its chief reporter. Mr David 
Lei^h. against the clerk of the 
justices at Felixstowe, Suffolk, 
one of a growing number of 
courts operating a policy of 
anonymity to protect mag- 
istrates from possible 
harassment 

1 nrrf fuctirA WatVint «iH 


that the practice was growing, 
with at least 10 courts in 
England and Wales applying 
the policy. This anonymity ol 
the person “in the seat of 
justice” could defeat the prin- 
ciple of open justice. 

He said that no court bad 
power .to take any step to 
restrict the principle of open 
justice, except to “preserve the 
ends of justice”. In his view, it 
could not be said that the ends 
of justice could in any respect 
be served by justices withhold- 
ing their names from v the 
general public. 

Dr Douglas Acres, Ma- 
gistrates* Association chair- 

mon nirl tfiu hirl alrpaHv 


adopted a resolution urging 
magistaie s not to conceal 
names unless there were 
substantial grounds for fearing 
reprisals in cases such as 
terrorism. 

The ruling was also wel- 
comed by the Guild of British 
Newspaper Editors, which 
financially supported the legal 
action. 

The Felixstowe bench, 
adopted its anonymity policy 
in the 1 970s when a magistrate 
received two threatening tele- 
phone calls after a man suf- 
fered a heart attack during 
sentencing in court. 

The Observer dial lenged the 




Felixstowe last year in which 
there was confusion among 
newspapers about an order 
banning identification ot a 
child aged 1- months in- 
volved in indecency with l- 
adults in a bath. . 

The magistrate hearing the 
case refused to be identified, 
and ihe justices' clerk would 
not release his name. 

The clerk to the Felixstowe 
justices. Mrs Stephanie Thew. 
aid that the courts judge- 
ment would be followed. | 
am sure the magistrates win 
feel as I do. that it is very 
valuable to have the guidance 
given in this case.” she said. 

I *■' Daiuirt MM 37 


lational c 
cited tha 
lot dealt * 
rND's fe 
ihe will c 
riline: **L 
rhaiabou 

• The foi 
eccentrich 
question!! 
by the 
question > 
stay pern 
Kingdom', 
expect to: 
or 10 yen 

Tres. 

Yetanofr 
the loose 
of "Bong 
the MoD 
bidders 
manage rr 
Devonpc 
Plymoutl 
isterialcc 
outh N 
chain pag 
of the b 
Foster-^ 
week am 
govemtn 
more tl 
Wheeler 
cm.” Ht 
the othc 

Loy 

Among 
against 
pool last 
West Dc 
parftcuk 
school. i 
chanty 
rates. " 
Shcrbor 
pie in 
sidizmg 
he said, 
case of 
for Dan 
school. 

1 


"V* 


TF 

!K5 

T 

SEf 

fPEi 


So: 

St Bn 
stagin 
is on 
radii 
stani.' 
biblc 
versa 
endtt 
Tynd 
as a 
ago. ‘ 
the li 
may 

been 

sersi 

iVtH 

R( 

Profi 
anne 
field 
robo 
Gres 
Brist 
new? 
bets 
at it 
at V 
lain 
mis 
thoi 
cxis 

Davrs. 

\ 


EEC charter on 
civil judgements 

Legal judgements against foreigners will be easier to 
enforce under an EEC convention which comes into force 
from January 1 next (Frances Gibb writes). 

The convention provides for the “free movement of 
judgements” between the seven member states who have 
ratified it 

A United Kingdom citizen injured in E ngl a nd by a 
French motorist will be aWe to sue in the English routs, for 
example, and enforcement will take place as if it were a 
French judgement* 

Gene rally , only judgements of the higher courts (High 
Court and above) can be enforced abroad- But under die 
convention judgements of all courts and tribunals will be 
mutually enforceable in aril and commercial matters. 

Initially the convention will apply between the United 
Kingdom and Belgium; Denmark; France; Germany; Italy, 
Luxembourg and The Netherlands. 

Ireland and Greece will follow, then Spain and PortngaL 

JY show Firearms 

for MPs charge 


The BBC has recruited 
politicians of all political 
colours to present the 
Jimmy Young Programme 
on Radio Two while Mr 
Young is on holiday. 

Mr Jeffrey Archer MP, 
deputy chairman of the 
Conservative Party, will 
present the daily two-hour 
programme of music and 
interviews during the week 
of November 10, Mr David 
Pen ha tig on. Liberal MP 
for Truro, will take over the 
following week. He will be 
followed by Mr Ken 
Livingstone, former leader 
or the GLC and a Labour 
parliamentary candidate. 


Firearms 

charge 

Two men appeared be- 
fore Boarnemonth mag- 
istrates yesterday, charged 
under the Firearms Act, 
1968, after being arrested 
on Monday outside the 
Highdiff HoteL 

Anthony Joseph Hasid, 
aged 21, a trainee manager 
at the hotel, from Corn bury 
Road, Edgware, and Simon 
John Manns, also 21, a 
chef there, were remanded 
on hail, until October 20. 

Mr Roger Smith, for the 
prosecution, said that a 
second charge could not be 
made until the weapon was 
determined to be a section 
(1) or section (5) firearm. 


Print unions decide 

The two main print unions in the dispute with News 
International will decide today whether to accept the final 
£58 million compensation offer made by die company. 

In spite of a sustained campaign for rejection waged by 
hard line militants, the result of the vote by Sogat '82, the 
largest onion involved, is expected to be dose. 

The National Graphical Association will ballot later 
today when members formerly employed by News 
International are expected to reject what the company has 
said is its final offer. 

News International said last week that it will not 


One look 
tells you 
it’s DAKS 

Sports jackets with the 
impeccable tailoring of 
DAKS fn Pune New 
Wool around £135, 
together with DAKS 
pleated Pure New 
Wool trousers 
Starting from £45. 
DAKS clothes are 
available from 
a Simpson Piccadilly, 
1 London and the 

1 best shops and 
® stores throughout 
the country. For 

^ your local stockist 
-telephone 100 for 
i Freefone DAKS. 


nwf’M i tircup pi. H Ic-.-n,- Srreei S.Vl 


on the system they had pre- 
viously rejected. 

The flight is a critical part of 
the joint evaluation process 
3greed by the French and 
British governments to reach a 
common solution. 

Final offers from Boeing 
and GEC have to be presented 
by November 6. with the 
decision on the successful bid 
expected before the year's end. 

Boeing, which has a team of 
officials in London finalizing 
its offer, was given a boost 
yesterday by the head of the 
French air force. General Ber- 
nard Capillon. He said the 
company's Awacs E-3A is the 
only aircraft suited to French 
needs. 

Although the French Gov- 
ernment is formally commit- 
ted to looking at both options 
some reports from Paris have 
indicated that the Boeing air- 
craft. which is already opera- 
tional. is the favourite, despite 
the fact that it will be much 
more expensive. 

Officials of GEC. however, 
say that it is unlikely the 
French will make a firm 
decision before knowing how 
the defence ministry intends 
to react in the 'hope of 
securing more favourable 
financial terms with a possible 
joint order. 

But Jane's, quoting French 
1 Air Force sources, said that 
I any joint approach was likely 
I to be limited to seeking a 
package deal with Britain on 
an Awacs order only. 

One problem for the 
French, who want three air- 
craft- is the availability of 
i airframes should they’ opt for 
GEC: the RAF could take less 

than the II Nimrods available 
to cany the system or it could 
be fitted to a different air- 
i frame, possiblv the Lockheed 
! C-I30. 


2,270 denied vote 
in CPSA ballot 


By Tim Jones 


The Civil and Public Ser- 
vices Association is to re-run a 
ballot for the post of general 
secretary after the disclosure 
that 2^70 members were de- 
nied voting' rights in the 
election which was won by Mr 
John Macreadie, a supporter 
of Militant Tendency. 

. Since his victory earlier this 
year, the union, which repre- 
sents 145,537 lower grade 
Gvil Servants, has been torn 
apart by accusations of ballot 
rigging and counter-claims of 
manipulation by “right wing 
cliques”. 

The number of 
disenfranchised members is 
critical because Mr 
Macreadie, who has been 
prevented from taking up his 
position, defeated his mod- 
erate rival. Mr John Ellis, by 
only 12 1 votes 

The union was told yes- 
terday that during its in- 
vestigations into alleged 
irregularities, the independent 
Electoral Reform Society had 
received an unusually large 
number of complaints within 
the 28-day period laid down 
by the balloting 
recommendations. 


In its report to the union, 
the society said it found no 
evidence of ballot rigging but 
did discover widespread 
irregularities. 

- In particular, it said, 21 
branches, with a membership 
of 2^70, did not have an 
opportunity to vote. 

1 The report, submitted to the 
union's president. Mrs Mar- 
ion Chambers, by chart ered 
accountants Haiti Dowdy, 
who act as returning officers, 
states: “In our view, it is 
unsatisfactory for the senior 
officers of CPSA to be elected 
against this background and 
the matter should be derided 
by the membership.” 

The union's national exec- 
utive committee, which is 
dominated by the right, will 
meet later this week and 
formulate plans for the elec- 
tion to be re-run. 

Mr Macreadie maintains he 
is still general secretary, but 
Mr Ellis, who is currently 
deputy general secretary, de- 
scribes himself as the “cheated 
candidate” and has forecast he 
will win a “properly con- 
ducted election”. 


Miners threaten strike 
over Kent pit closure 


By a Staff Reporter 


month, that “there must be an 
element of compromise in the 
interests of unity.” This 
shows that ministers are far 
from winning support for their 
complicated rates reform. 

The Government wants to 
replace rates with a mixture of 
a poll tax or “community 
charge” and a uniform busi- 
ness rate. The aim is to forge a 
closer link between those who 
pay for services and those who 
vote for the councillors who 
fix rates. 

The association was advised 
to reject the uniform business 
rate because it would take 
decision-making out of local 
hands and be open to “central 
manipulation” and instead 
support a “banded residents’ 
tax” fixed according to 
income. 


Miners last night threatened 
to take industrial action after 
an announcement by British 
Coal that it plans to close 
Til mans tone colliery in Kent. 

The proposal will mean the 
loss of 475 jobs at the pit 
which 12 months ago won the 
promise of a reprieve if it 
could increase output. 
Production reached a promis- 
ing 5,000 tonnes a week last 
February but has now 
slumped to under 1.000. 

According to British Coal, 
losses at the pit amount to 
£1.56 million for the first six 
months of this year, or more 
than £150 for each tonne 
extracted. 

British Coal engineers have 
said the closure is inevitable 
because of acute mining diffi- 
culties, including unpredict- 
able roof falls. 


The closure will leave Kent, 
already a mining anachronism 
because of jts position, with 
only two pits remaining: 
Betteshangri and Snowdown. 

During the miners’ strike, 
the Kent coalfield was among 
die most militant in support of 
Mr Arthur ScargiiJ. president 
of the National Union of 
Mineworkers. The closure of 
Tilmanstone will reduce the 
coalfield’s manpower to below 
1.000. compared with 2,400 
before the dispute began. 

All ofthe475 miners will be 
offered alternative 
employment. 

Last week, British Coal 
anounced the investment of 
more than £2 million in new 
pithead equipment at 
Bettes hanger. 


Patients 
exposed to 
Aids virus 

By Pearce Wright 
Science Editor 

Supplies of blood products 
to haemophiliacs from Ar- 
mour Pharmaceuticals, of 
Eastbourne, East Sussex, were 
withdrawn yesterday after 
routine tests showed two pa- 
tients had been exposed to the 
Aids virus. 

The firm, which provides a 
preparation from the United 
States that contains the blood 
dotting agent Factor VIII, has 
surrendered its licence to sell 
the product to the Department 
of Health. 

The DHSS said doubts were 
raised about the efficiency of 
the company's heat treatment 
process that forms the second 
line of defence for guarding 
against the transfer of the Aids 
virus in donated blood 
samples. 

The first line of protection is 
the testing of blood donors for 
infection. Because of the long 
incubation time now known 
to occur in some people, heat 
treatment is intended to kill 
any dormant virus. 

Imports are continuing of 
about half the cloning agents 
needed in Britain, until expan- 
sion of heal treatment equip- 
ment is complete at the main 
processing centre, the Blood 
Products Laboratory at Els- 
tree. Hertfordshire. 

One of the most promising 
drugs so far developed to 
combat Aids (acquired im- 
mune deficiency syndrome) 
will be used in Britain from 
next week. But there is enough 
to treat only 12 people. 

Not all patients are suitable 
for treatment with the drug — 
AZT — but doctors at St 
Mary’s and the Middlesex 
hospitals, in London, have the 
difficult task of choosing the 
dozen who will benefit from 
more than 200 with the 
symptoms. 

The drug has dramatically 
cut death rates among some 
Aids patiente in the US. Only 
one of 145 given the drug died, 
compared with 16 deaths 
among 1 37 patients who were 
given innocuous pills. 

Doctors emphasize that 

AZT is “not a cure”. But it 
does stop the Aids virus 
multiplying. 


EEC Bill cuts role of 
Queen, says Denning 

By Sheila Gunn, Political Staff 


Lord Denning, former Mas- 
ter of the Rolls, gave a warning 
yesterday that the Queen’s 
sovereignty would be severely 
weakened if peers approve an 
obscure and little-debated 
three-page Bill today. 

The European Communities 
(Amendment) Bill, be argued, 
radically changes die constitu- 
tion and is a step towards a 
federation of Europe. 

The Bill, the result of an 
agreement to speed up EEC 
decision-making, has been 
passing quietly through Par- 
liament this summer. A guillo- 
tine kept debate to a minimum 
and 55 amendments were 
neter discussed. 

But It faces opposition today- 
in its Lords committee stage 
from the Labour. Conservative 
and crossbenches who took the 


unusual step of calling a press 
conference yesterday. 

Lord Denning said that his 
main concern was its effect on 
the constitution. The Bill 
would mean Britain could 
block decisions of the Euro- 
pean Coancfl of Ministers only 
on rare occasions. 

“I do not want to see the 
sovereignty of the Queen and 
Parliament diminished. I fear 
the preamble & such, and hi 
such wide terms, that in time it 
may lead to the federation of 
Europe. 

“I do not say that is wrong, 
that it ought not to take place. 
But that it should have very 
much fuller consideration.” 

If the amendments of Lord 
Denning and supporters go 
through, they will enshrine in 
law the Luxembourg veto. 

Parliament, page 4 


— ITaES^Fd^hmtheDroduct he istosdL than io the thret Rs. or^drar Tie will W* HWtffig * ■ • ••» • -Trwifrrar. 



HOME NEWS 


3 


,i 






9 


. THE TIMES WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 8 1986 


i 7- 0 

rs 

a S ' 

■Hit * 

' m .V m , 

VvV?"* 

- 

:r * . “9* " 

'V,,‘ 

: . 5! " ** 

“V 

1 ‘ i ' r 'i * 

* u ^ 

iv 

t- 

' “i 

N » % 

Ml". 

■ % u.'i ’•■Vl, 

- • !.!(. !■ 


■** ;» .. 
•.vs 


,1 .. 


• I 

, v- 


F 

I 

• ! ? 
■ „(i 

, ... Kt 

i it * ■’ » 


W Oman in outburst 
at former lover in 
‘human bomb’ trial 


An . By Stewart Tendler, Crime Reporter 

scre *nu3her halSlt ’ taa ^f explosives expen said the a 
paired across tHp. 


Hp§§ 

aSgaSg 

he e Li° Ver Nezar Hindawi as 

ba^rd U 5d Sh ° U,Cd " Yo “ 

10 Mr Justice Mars- 
^“se me sir" and 
sh0ul ed at the defendant 
nigr cou,d you do this to 

Distressed and in tears, 
Mfss Murphy, who was under 

S? M eXa i? 1I lf Uon by oounsel 

!° r . Mr Hindawi. placed her 
head in her hands. The court 
was silent. 

• could be heard murter- 
m 8 ‘Oh Christ, Oh God ... I 

fnntV' 11 hiTTl "' Then She 
looked up at the Jordanian, 

who has pleaded not guilty to 
attempting to place a bomb on 
a Boeing 747 last April and 
screamed “I hate you. I hate 
you." 

.Mr Hindawi, aged 3Z sat 
without expression through- 
out the outburst. As Miss 
Murphy — described at the 
start of the case as a "single, 
simple Irish girl" - fell silent 
Mr Justice Mars-Jones told 
hep “I can understand you 
being upset but would you 
please listen to the questions 
and you will be released from 
the witness box as soon as 
possible". 

Miss Murphy collapsed af- 
ter having spent more than 
three hours in the witness box. 

At the start of the trial the 
court was told Mr Hindawi 
had allegedly placed a time 
bomb in a bag he gave to the 
girl after telling her they were 
going to Israel on holiday 
before getting married. 

At one stage yesterday an 


explosives expen said the 
bomb would have destroyed 
the aircraft and everyone on 
board. The charge was the 
equivalent of 30 band gre- 
nades exploding instantly m 
one place. 

The bomb was found by El 
AJ staff at Heathrow Airport. 
Yesterday the first of them, 
identified only as Mr A, gave 
evidence from behind a screen 
in a very rare security measure 
used to protect his identity. 

Miss Murphy had become 
distressed as she described lo 
Mr Gilbert Gray, QC for Mr 
Hindawi. being held by the 
police after El AI staff found 
the bomb. 

Armed police confronted 
her and die said: "I was very 
upset. The policemen were 
quite firm. They took me to a 
room and they showed me this 
thing, black thing, on the 
table. A sheet of something." 

She told Mr Gray she was 
taken to a police station and 
began to cry and it was then 
that she turned on Mr 
Hindawi in her outburst. 

6 She could be heard 
muttering “Oh 
Christ, Oh God ...I 
could kill him 9 

After recovering, she began 
to cry again when she agreed 
she had been finger printed. 

Later in the day special 
security arrangements were 
introduced for the first of the 
series of El Al witnesses. The 
judge told the jury the witness 
did not want to be seen other 
than by the judge, jury, coun- 
sel and defendant 

Mr A gave evidence from 
behind the screen at the edge 
of the court in line with the 
vision of the judge and jury. 
He could also be seen by 
counsel and Mr Hindawi sit- 
ting at the edge of the dock. 

The press bench was cleared 


and the man was invisible to 
the public gallery. 

Aged 29, he wrote down his 
name for foe judge before 
describing how he discovered 
foe bomb after Miss Murphy 
arrived at foe El AI checkpoint 
in terminal one at Heathrow 
Airport last April for flight 016 
to Tel Aviv. 

After Miss Murphy an- 
swered a series of questions, 
the official said, her bag was 
put through an X-ray machine 
but nothing showed up. Then 
he began to search the bag 
with his hands. * 

He told foe court: "It was 
quite heavy for an empty bag. 

I tried to pun out foe bottom 
of the bag and I discovered a 
sort of double bottom." He 
detected something plastic 
with selloiape covering it. 

He took the bag to a staff 
room and took the whole 
bottom out to see what wasr 
there. 

He found a plastic bag and 
saw "soft stuff" inside. He 
scratched foe bag with his 
finger and thought it was 
something very oily in a 
colour like yellow. He decided 
it was some sort of explosive, 
closed foe door and went in 
search of foe police. 

During the day, Mr Allen 
ftraday. a scientist with the 
Royal Armament Research 
and Development Establish- 
ment. said foe explosive in foe 
bomb was “very, very power- 
ful. rather like plasticine in 
nature". It was manufactured 
in Czechoslovakia. The explo- 
sive was triggered by a timer 
and detonator bidden in a 
Commodore scientific cal- 
culator. A battery inserted 
into foe calculator started the 
timing mechanism running 
while at the same lime allow- 
ing the calculator to be used 
quite normally. 


The case 
tomorrow. 


continues 


Bamber murder trial 


Son ‘boasted he could kill 9 


Jeremy Bamber boasted 
that he could "easily" kfll his 
parents only five months be- 
fore foe massacre offois fam- 
ily, a court was told yesterday. 

The farmer’s son allegedly 
made his remark in March last 
year at a meeting of directors 
of the family caravan bus- 
iness. 

It had been called to discuss 
intruders at the Osea Bay 
caravan site near Maldon, 
Essex. 

Mr Robert Boutflour. Mr 
Bamber's uncle, told the jury 
on the fourth day of foe 
murder trial that he had been 
talking to family members 
about tackling the problem. 

He told them: "We could go 
armed and fire and if we were 
to fire did we wish lo wound 
or kill? If we wounded we 
would be setting ourselves up 
as a target for the rest of our. 
lives. If we wished to kill we 
would be committing a crime 
which our conscience would 
not permit us to live with." 

it was at this point that 
Jeremv Bamber. aged 27. who 
has denied murdering his 
adoptive parents, step-sister 
and her twin sons, intervened. 

According to Mr Boutflour, 
Jeremy Bamber said: "Oh no. 

Lamb seized 
during French 
farm protest 

By a Staff Reporter 

The Government is to take 
no immediate action over the 
seizure of a consignment or 
British lamb by militant 
French farmers (John Young 

writes}. „ . . . _ 

* Ministry of Agriculture 
official said yesterday that the 
lamb had been bought by a 
French company, and was 
being carried in a French tony 
with a French driver. The 
lorrv was stopped south of 
Poit iers and the carcasses i were 
dragged out and reportedly 

contaminated with goto 

Although they’ have not 
succeeded in proving any 
infringement of EEC rules on 
Sir trading- ihe French form- 
cre blame overseas exports for 

worn big >” local lamb 
prices. _ 


By Michael HorsneO 
Uncle Bobby. F could easily 
kill my parents." 

Mr Boutflour added: “The 
important thing is that he Said 
he could ‘easily’ kill his par- 
ents. I was deeply shocked and . 
said ‘don’t be so stupid boy’ 
before I walked away.” 

Jeremy Bamber’s -cousin, 
Mrs Anne Eaton, earlier told 
the jury at Chelmsford Crown 
Court that Jeremy never 
agreed with shooting because 
he thought it cruel but one day 
last summer he told her he 
wanted to buy a gun and 
suggested a five-shot auto- 
matic 12-bore shotgun. 

Mrs Eaton, whose husband 
Peter sells guns, asked Mr 
Bamber why he suddenly 
wanted one and he allegedly 
replied: “I rather fancy myself - 
as a country squire and l want 
to get into shooting." 

Mrs Eaton recounted the 


I suppose. He said ‘don’t 
touch it’. We contacted police 
foal night." 

The silencer, which had 
been missed by the police 
during their search of - the 
farmhouse and was discov- 
ered only three days after foe 
murders, was not collected by 
foe police for another three 
days. 

Mr David Boutflour told 
foe court of his shock at 
discovering the guns in Mr 
Nevfll Bamber's gun cup- 
board. 

Mrs Eaton said that she 
went to comfort Jeremy 
Bamber hours after the five 
bodies were found at White 
House Farm. Tolleshunt 
D’Arcy. Essex. - 

She said he told her that 
after receiving an alleged 
emergency phone call from his 
father reporting that his step- 


discovery of the bloodied gun 'sister, Sheila CaffeU, had gone 
silencer belonging to the mur- berserk with a gun he tele- 


der weapon, a .22 semi- 
automatic Anschtuz rifle, by 
her brother David Boutflour 
at the form and its removal to 
her house near by. 

She said: “David was 
examining it and exclaimed 
‘look 8t this'. I saw something 
red. jam-like on the end, blood 


phoned foe police but an 
officer who answered took 1 1 
minutes before he would take 
foe call seriously. 

Mrs Eaton said: "I said to 
Jeremy *why didn't you dial 
999T. He said he didn't think 
it was that urgent." 

The trial continues today. 


Soccer thugs ‘left me 
scarred and disabled’ 


An American described to a 
jury yesterday the night he was 
attacked by football thugs and 
left scarred and disabled. 

Mr Neil Hansen, aged 30, 
said that his “souvenir" of a 
working visit lo England in- 
cluded more than 130 stitches, 
plastic surgery, a tendon trans- 
plant and a crippled hand. 

He told foe Central Crim- 
inal Court, he had been man- 
ager of the Henry J Beans 
public house in King's Road, 
Chelsea, south-west London, 
when attacked on December 
29, 1984. 

He claims that among his 
assailants was Terence Mat- 
thews - alleged to be “the Fat 
Man", leader of a mob of 
Chelsea supporters. “Mat- 
thews was the loudest and 
most vocal of foe lot 

“1 was trying to grab hold of 


Matthews and get away when 
someone glassed me in the 
face. Then a glass was pushed 
into my shoulder. As I broke 
free 1 received another Mow to 
thefoce. 

“It went through my cheek, 
severed an artery and broke all 
my teeth. I was struggling with 
Matthews and caught a glass 
across the thumb which sev- 
ered foe tendon and was 
probably the worst injury of 
them all in the long run." 

Mr Matthews, aged 26, a 
scrap metal dealer, of Buck- 
hold Road. Wandsworth, 
south-west London, denies 
charges of riotous assembly 
before a Chelsea v Manchester 
United match at Stamford 
Bridge, affray and causing 
grievous bodily harm to Mr 
Hansen. 

The trial continues today. 



816 stores is considering a 
series of Sunday openings on 
foe three weekends before 
Christmas. 

The company said yes- 
terday that it had no intention 
of flouting foe law, and would 
open only where there was 
local authority approval. 

In England and Wales, local 
authorities have discretion to 
aDow Sunday opening in tour- 
ist areas, Wooiworth said 
Such areas now extend well 


sorts and large cities. Bradford 
in West Yorkshire is one of a 
dozen, largely industrial cen- 
tres which have been success- 
fully promoting themselves as 
tourist destinations. 

The move is certain to 
intensify foe controversy over 
Sunday trading in which some 
councils have already pressed 
Sir Michael Havers, foe Attor- 
ney Genera L,for High Court 
actions to be taken against 
store chains which open on 
Sundays. 


Princess Anne, president of Save the Children Fond, receiving a bouquet on a visit to the 
Hopscotch Asian Women's Centre in north-west London yesterday 

Guard’s Wooiworth may open 

warning at its stores on Sundays 

train rravh B> Derek Harris, Industrial Editor 

U. dtUl vl ilBll The Wooiworth chain of beyond traditional coastal re- 
Bv Ian Smith 816 stores is considering a sorts and large cities. Bradford 

1 series of Sunday openings on in West Yorkshire is one of a 

Red lights were fl as h i n g and the three weekends before dozen, largely industrial cen- 
traffic alarms were sounding Christmas. trcs which have been success- 

at a level crossing at vpc- fully promoting themselves as 

Lockington, Humberside, sec- The nifSSLfiS jurist destinations, 

onds after a passenger tram L 1116 move » cenain 10 

ploughed into a van and was intensify foe controversy over 

derailed, lulling nine people, gJJ ™ Sunday trading in which some 

an inquiry was told yesterday. 5ocaI authority approval. councils have already pressed 

The inquiry, at Beverley, j n England and Wales, local Sir Michael Havers, foe Aitor- 
Hmnberside, was told that foe authorities have discretion to ney Genera L,for High Court 
train guard, Mr Peter Sturdy, aj] 0W Sunday opening in tour- actions to be taken against 
prevented many more deaths is i areas, Wooiworth said store chains which open on 
by running along the track Such areas now extend well . Sundays. r 

after the accident to warn I ■■■ - ■■■ '■ n ■■■ ■ 

trains travelling in the op- 
posite direction. 

A HuO to Bridlington train, 
carrying hundreds of people, 
was halted just 200 yards from 
where one of the derailed 

carnages steaddled the tine, m m m ■ ■ ■ 

nr&s'k ***, We help slu 

that be had nm along foe tine 

"because it was a busy time of lillO CPI^IP 

the morning and 1 knew other Wlf ^ ***** W %* 

trains were due". 

“Then I saw another train 
approaching and was waving 
my aims at it As it went past 
me I heard the brakes being 
applied 'and it came to a halt 
near the derailment", he said. 

The inquiry was told that 
the driver of the Bridlington to 
Hull train, Mr Harry Brown, 
aged 61, had described how he 
suddenly saw a small van on 
the crossing 250 yards abends. 

He had said that he applied 
the brakes. But foe train, with 
300 passengers on board, 
crashed into foe van, driven by 
Mr Malcolm Ashley, a local 
cattle breeder. Among the 
i victims was his faster son, 

Wayne Memke, aged II, who 
was a passenger in the van. 

The owner/operator of a 
goods delivery service and a 
, Post Office employee, who 
were both approaching the 
crossing, beard the crash and 
saw tiie red lights flashing as 
, they rushed to the scene. 

Evidence was also given that 
warning tight malfunctions in 
the Lockington area were re- 
ported to British Rafl four 
times in five months. 

The inquiry, chaired by 
Major Anthony Eng, of the 
Department of Transport's 
Rafl ways Inspectorate, is ex- 
pected to end today. 

Olds inquest 

■ An inquest into the death of 
PC Philip Olds was opened 
and adjourned yesterday at 
Hornsey coroners’ court, north 
London. PC Olds, aged 34, 

was found dead at his home in EniChem applies energy and innovati 

Pinner, Middlesex, last to help shape the many industries it serve 

Wednesday. No cause of death from automotive and fashion to packagini 

was given yesterday. _ nf j u nm p fumishinos. 


Deaths by 
cervical 
cancer ‘to 
rise 70%’ 

By Pearce Wright 
Science Editor 

The number of women in 
England and Wales who die 
from cerv ical cancer is ex- 
pected to rise by up to 70 pet 
cent over foe next 10 years, 
according to a report pub- 
lished yesterday. 

Cervical cancer is now 
responsible for 2.000 deaths a 
year in England and Wales — 
yet the report says it is easily 
detectable and the most 
preventable cancer. j 

The evidence of a growing 
"epidemic" is outlined in a 
study from foe British Medi- 
cal Association on cervical 
cancer and screening which 1 
calls for smear tests every i 
three years. They would begin 
at the start of sexual activity, 
or 20 years of age, lo 65. 

The findings ofa study into j 
ihe effectiveness of the present 
screening programme were 
outlined by Dr John Dawson, 
of foe BMA. and Mr Peter 
Hcndy-fbbs. a consultant 
gynaecologist. 

Their report says that cer- 
vical cancer can easily be | 
treated if it is found early 
enough. There is normally a 
prolonged phase before malig- 
nancy. But the death rate from 
foe condition in the 25-35 age 
group has almost doubled in 1 
(0 years. 

In addition to calling for the 
five-year interval between 
screenings, recommended by 
the Department of Health and 
Social Security four years ago. 
to be reduced to force years, 
the BMA proposes to en- 
courage more women to use 
screening serv ices. 

More than 80 per cent of the 
women who die from cervical 
cancer had not been screened. 

Dr Dawson said that in 
Britain foe national screening 
rate was unknown because foe 
DHSS did not collect foe 
appropriate information for 
that fundamental audit. More- 
over. foe Government no 
longer collected information 
on foe age breakdown of 
patients giving smears. 

The report says that treat- 
ment while tumours were still 
small results in virtually 100 
per cent effectiveness, while 
treatment of cervical cancer 
itself had only a 50 per cent 
cure rate. 

One reason for failure of foe i 
DHSS programme was the ! 
“disarray" of the scheme for 1 
computerizing call and recall 
notices. Another was foe lack 
of capacity of many screening 
laboratories. 


Winner 
plans to 
buy flat 

Two readers share yes- 
terday’s Portfolio Gold prize 
of £4,000. 

Mrs Anodise Thomas, aged 
62, from Cambridge, has 
played the Portfolio Gold 
game regularly since it started 
In The Times. 

"I am absolutely speechless. 
I have never won anything in 
my life," she said. 

Mrs Thomas said she would 
save some of the prize money. 

"Bat HI propably use most 
of it towards a deposit for a 
new flat", she said. 

The other winner is Mr 
R. P. G. Burton-West, from 
north London. 

Readers who wish to play 
the game can obtain a Port- 
folio Gold card by sending a 
stamped addressed envelope 
to: 

Portfolio Gold, 

The Times. 

PO Box 40. 

Blackburn, 

BBl 6AJ. 

Boy George 
brother on 
new charge 

Kevin O'Dowd, the brother 
of Boy George, the pop singer, 
was yesterday cleared at 
Marylebone court in London 
of conspiring to supply heroin 
to his brother, leader of the 
group Culture Club. 

But Mr O'Dowd, aged 26, of 
Well Road, Hampstead, was 
committed for trial at 
Knighstbridge Crown Court 
on a new charge of being 
concerned in the supplying of 
heroin to his brother. 

Also discharged on the 
conspiracy charge but commit- 
ted on unconditional bail on 
the new charge was Miss 
Anna Thunanng, of AJwyne 
Road, Islington, north 
London. 

Stereo La ben, aged 35, a 
builder, of Westbourne Ter- 
race, Paddington, and Miss 
Diane Feiner, aged 34. of the 
same address, were sent for 
trial accused of plotting to 
supply heroin to Boy George 
and others. 

r . Mr Luben was remanded in 
custody and Miss Feiner was 
granted £10,000 baiL 


We help shape the industries 
we serve 



Queen to lend Britannia for hard sell 

’V. _ .i .r I'ohlp ami llfl fop hnvst Mvtv of are understand to be ready fo 


By Alan Hamilton 

The Queen has agreed *» 
lend the Royal Yacht Britan- 
nia to a group of Bntsh 
businessmen during ber stote 

visit to China next week in foe 
hope that it will prove a vital 
weapon in the public relations 
armoury aimed at increasing 
lET-ith He woHd's most 

p0 ?vw“ ae 10 " Q««" ”*«* 

political leaders wPeki?fr 
Britannia will spend » 
cruising in the mouth of .foe 

S^trerireroffShawhai. 

Cto board will be 25 **** 
British industrialists, led pi 

IHames 

man of the Bntish Overseas 
Trade Board, and Sir Enc 


Sharp, chairman iff Cable and 110, the largest party of 
Wireless, hosting a seminar British businessmen to be 
•with senior Chinese trade despatched to China, and 
officials. representing Wto cw- 

. ,. fm- a panics such as GEC, British 

da&tS sell iLbe^ca Aerospace and British 

Tte busb^ The emphasis wffl be on foe 
men who use it believe that it priorities of China's present 
impresses their guests with its five-year plan: energy, trans- 
distinctiveh- British style- port, telecomumnicauons, food 
° British exporters at* «- P^.ng, 

tremelv anxious to take advan- metals. 

Sge of foe Queen’s visit, and The day after foe sea*™* 
the exceptional warmth of foe British party will meet 
Sino-British relations that has Chinese officials for totter 

existed since foe signing of the talks, centring on 25 big 

r««rv over Hong Kongs projects m the Shanghai area, 
KM* over nous J f ^ hich Wtaia to 

Srpa o rt "^M ?e-!aasftfa 


are understood to be ready for I 
signing. i 

Sir James Cleminson said 
yesterday: "There is a strong 
Idas in favour of Britain at the 
moment, and it is up to ns to. 
exploit it." 

British exports to China, 
although growing, still lag far 
behind those of other indus- 
trialized nations. 

Three years ago Britain’s 
exports were worth only 
£160 million against imports 
or£23I million. Exports in the 
first six months of 1986 were 
Hp by £100 million on foe 
same period last year, while 
imports fell slightly. 

The Queen returns from her 
Balmoral holiday today 


EniChem applies energy and innovation 
to help shape the many industries it serves, 
from automotive and fashion to packaging 
and home furnishings. 

Through close collaboration with its 
customers and end-users. EniChem tracks 
the path of its materials from production to 
conversion and their ultimate transformation 
into finished products. 

EniChem is one of Europe's largest and 
most diversified petrochemical producers, 
tt has a solid foundation of technical and 
commercial resources to help its customers 
add value to their products of today... and 
to determine the shape of things to come. 


From one integrated source flows an 
array of useful materials: basic chemicals, 
plastics, engineering polymers, synthetic 
rubber and latex, synthetic fibres, interme- 
diates for detergents, agricultural products, 
speciality and fine chemicals, pharmaceu- 
ticals and more. All available through a 
worldwide sales and distribution network. 
Can EniChem help to shape your 
business? 


** EniChem 


' EniChem (UK) Ltd. Central House. Balfour Road. Hounslow Middlesex 7W3 1JX 
Tel (01)5771100 Telex 928343 Fax (01)5721850 
Regional offices in Manchester and Dublin 



[2 



jeet 


man l 
y has la 
attack 
ty runs 
lotion p 
y assoc, 
tmetnoi \ 

fcrence 
nipulate 
nage de 
5 or 
>bit, hh 
s me, vr. 
en the 1 
ted, loj 
iibodyic f 
y like ii J 
into dis 
: of a m 
iference 

uve con 
ter tha' 
olution 
> blanc! 
iinous e 
bate", 
[mediate 
m shout 
s been si 
finish!" 
should ai 
r debate. 


3ann 


le fi 
will 


i wa 
hou 


tha 


i N 
11 r 
“L 


• The fo« 
eccentrich 
questhmn 
by the 

question i 

stay pen 
Kingdom*, 
expect to: 
or 10 ye» 


rose 

tong 

loD 


am 


Hi 


Loy 


\mong 
against 
pool Iasi 
West Dc 
particuk 
school, i 
charity 
rales. ** 
Sherbor 
pfc m 
sidizmg 
he said, 
case of 
for Dan 
school. 






HOME NEWS 


THE TTMF.SWFDNRSDAY OCTOBER 8 1986 




CONSERVATIVE PARTY CONFERENCE 


New city schools • Home ownership • Tebbit s speech 


Government 


independent 
schools’ for 


inner cities 


A pilot network of about 20 
new schools, to be called City 
Technical Colleges, would be 
set up in urban areas, includ- 
ing the disadvantaged inner 
cities, Mr Kenneth Baker, 
Secretary of Slate for Educa- 
tion and Science, told the 
Conservative Party Confer- 
ence. in Bournemouth, 
yesterday. 

To cheers from the dele- 
gates. he said the schools 
would widen parental choice 
and increase the range and 
quality of education in areas 
where they were most needed. 

They would be Govern- 
ment-funded independent 
schools run by educational 
trusts and would not be pan of 
the Local Education Auth- 
ority. Between 750-1.000 pu- 
pils. aged from 1 1 to 1 S, would 
be given a free education at 
each school. 

The schools would be fi- 
nanced by his Department 
with private-sector sponsors 
making a substantial contribu- 
tion towards the costs. The 
curriculum would have a 
strong emphasis on tech- 
nological scientific and prac- 
tical work, business studies 
and design. 

Mr Baker, who was replying 
to an education debate, said 
he would be publishing a 
booklet with fuller details next 
week and would be inviting 
potential promoters to come 
forward with proposals. He 
envisaged the first school 
would open in 1988. 

The intiative. which had the 
enthusiastic backing of the 
Prime Minister, would offer 
hope to many young people 
and their parents. This was a 
new partnership, he said. 

Mr Baker, who received a 
standing ovation, said that 
what he had been talking 
about was not just for the next 
year or the next 18 months. It 
was a vision fbr the rest of the 
century. We must lift our eyes 
to that more distant horizon, 
he said. 

After the next election, the 
Government’s aim would be 
to build on the Education Bill 
by increasing the authority of 
head teachers, giving more 
power to parents and shifting 
more spending to the schools. 


He wanted to see the basic 
elements of education the 
three Rs, restored to their 
central place in the curricu- 
lum. children taught to respect 
authority in a moral and 
disciplined framework and 
children of the inner cities 
presented with a challenge. 

Girls should get an even 
break in the new technologies 
and more young people stay 
on at 16 for education and 
training. He wanted to see 
more young people at 1 8 going 
on to college. A better-edu- 
cated nation was a more 
prosperous nation. 

There was no more im- 
portant thing in society than 
the next generation. They 
were the lamps which had to 
be lit for tomorrow, the grow- 
ing edge of the nation. 

Referring to the Govern- 
ment's Education Bill he said 
it laid down that sex education 
should be set in a moral 
framework which emphasized 
loving relationships and the 
value of family life. 

To allow parents an ab- 
solute right to withdraw their 
children from sex education 
would be a bad precedent and 
difficult to administer. 

He intended to strengthen 
the safeguards in the Educa- 
tion Bin. Control over sex 
education would be removed 
from teachers and local 
authorities and control given 
to new-style governing bodies. 

On the teachers’* pay dis- 
pute, he said the Government 
wanted to see a contract set- 
ting out the obligations of 
teachers, agreement on the 
cover they provide for absent 
colleagues and more rewards 
for good performance. 

The motion, which was 
carried, called on the Govern- 
ment to give the highest 
priority to raising standards at 
all levels of the national 
educational system. 

It was moved by Mr Guy 
Black (Brentwood and 
On gar), who said there should 
be a programme of action for- 
secondary schools, the 
establishment of a national 
minimum curriculum and the 
restoration of the critical link 
between what taxpayers pay 
and the end result. 



Mrs Thatcher applauding and Mr Tebbit acknowledging the oration that greeted his speech in Bournemouth yesterday, 


HOUSING 


Million more home 
owners in 5 years 


Britain will have one mOfion 
more home owners in the next 
five years, Mr John Patten, 
Minister for Housing, Urban 
Affairs and Construction, 
promised tbe coflference. 

“I will settle for nothing 
less", he said. He also pledged 
to revolutionize shared own- 
ership and to restore the right 
to rest 

He added that foe Govern- 
ment would not tolerate any 
longer the con tinned decline of 
free-choice renting. 

Future legislation would 
protect existing tenants bat 
wonld also restore tbe right to 
rent as the final irreversible 
fhangB, talcing housing off the 
political battleground for 
good. 

Mr Michael Irvine (par- 
liamentary candidate for Ips- 
wich), moving tbe motion, 
which was later carried, said 
that six years after its initial 
attack on the right-to-bny 
legislation, Labour had 
changed to grudging accep- 
tance of the idea, foreed on the 
party by the idea's popularity. 

One aspect of the situation 
was disappointing: the fact 
that only 4 per cent of sales 
had been of flats, and he 
welcomed Government mea- 
sures to increase such sates. 

The privately rented sector 
was particularly important to 
young people who had left' 
home but were not yet able to 
buy their own homes; to single 
parents and those wbo had left 
home after a marriage break- 


Baker speech 
condemned 
by Labour 


By Martin Fletcher 
Politic 


’olitical Reporter 


The- shadow Secretary of 
State for Education and Sci- 
ence. Mr Giles Radice. con- 
demned Mr Baker's speech as 
"deeply disappointing" and 
“totally lacking in substance". 


He said:‘“It will do nothing 
to put more books and equip- 
ment into our classrooms, to 
repair our schools or to im- 
prove the quality of teaching". 

The proposal to establish 20 
experimental technical col- 
leges in the inner cities was an 
irrelevant gimmick. 


He added: “The tragedy for 
pupils and parents is that he is 
more concerned about the 
leadership of the Tory Party 
than be is about the future of 
education". 


Today's agenda 


The conference will debate 
today energy, transport, 
health, in a motion calling for 
improved patient care, ana, in 
the afternoon, local govern- 
ment. law and order and 
defence. 



Mr John Patten: Promise of housing revolution. 


down; and to those who wanted 
to move to take np 
employment 
Mr Michael Keegan, Lam- 
beth, demanded of the Govern- 
ment a firm commitment to 
deregolate all new lettings. 

There were 700,000 empty 
properties which used to be ra 
the privately rented sector, 
sod deregulating would help to 
give a place to live to the 
unemployed who went south to 
sock vorlc* * 

Mr Michael Smith, Ports- 
mouth, Sooth, the only 
speaker against the motion, 
said that the notion that 
redaction in die stock of 
council housing was injurious 
to foe public good was a 
socialist red herring. It was 
the total housing stock that 
was significant. 

As a surveyor and a private 
landlord, he could see no 
practical way in which the 
privately rented market could 
be rejuvenated. 

Mr Tony HaU, Southamp- 
ton Test, said that deregula- 
tion of new tenancies was 
neither an easy nor a cheap 
option because it woold lead to 
higher rents which would 
mean the State paying a lot 
more in housing benefits. 

The minister shonld make it 
easier to get rid of bad tenants 
and encourage the market is 
short tenancies; 

Mr Patten said that in seven 
years the Government had 
given the country an irrevers- 
ible improvement in its hous- 
ing. 

Most people were satisfied 
with their housing, but some 
were not, and people who 
rented their homes, whether in 
the public or private sector, 
usually faced the worst prob- 
lems. 

In the past, renting had been 
a normal and respectable 
choice for everyone bat not 
now for British people. 

Tbe private sector had been 
strangled by rent controls and 
restrictions and had been 
driven into a dingy and in- 
accessible corner, flats and 
houses being kept empty 
rather than providing rented 
homes. 

That was one reason why 
there were more titan 500,000 
empty privately owned homes 
which could be rented. No 
other country had followed 
Britain down that road. It was 
a blot on the national scene. 

It was grotesque and a 
disgrace that there were more 
empty council houses than 
there were homeless. The 
Government cared enough to 
do something about that 
dreadful state of affairs. 

“In future legislation, exist- 
tenants wifi be protected: 
*s laws are already much 
stronger against bad land- 
lords. New tenants will enjoy 
proper consumer protection as 
wefl. 

Rent controls, page 5 


SOCIAL SERVICES 


Fraud and abuse 
will be cut out 


Soda! Security cheats were 
given a warning by Mr John 
Major, Minister of State for 
Social Security and tbe Dis- 
abled. The Government was 
determined to cut out fraud 
and abqse. The money to help 
the needy came from the 
taxpayer and it must be spent 
fairly, he said. 

In the last year the Govern- 
ment had dealt with 100,000 
cases and saved £120 million. 

“That is good but not good 
enough so we are stepping up 
our actions", Mr Major told 
the conference. Another 500 
staff had been appointed. 
They were sped ally trained to 
prevent and detect fraud. 

“And let me give this warn- 
ing to the cheats. When we 
detect .serious fraud we will 
not hesitate to prosecute." 

Money for the Social Se- 
curity system was willingly 
given, mostly by those on 
modest incomes. The rich 
could not finance the pro- 
gramme if every penny they 
bad was taken in tax. It was 
dishonest of Mr Roy 
Hatters! ey, the shadow Chan- 
cellor, to pretend otherwise. 


Mr Major, speaking during 
Social Services debate, bit- 


terly resented the Labour slan- 
der that Conservatives did not 
care. They had a record of care 
and of cadi, not of crocodile 
tears. - 

Ho said that Mr. Michael 
Meacfaer, Labour’s' shadow 
health minister, travelled the 
country like a p eripatetic 
Santa Qaus tittering uncosted 
promises with every speech. A 
Meacher speech was an expen- 
sive speech for he was a 
master of the blank cheque. 

“He writes it but the tax- 
payer pays ft.” 

He said last week Mr 
Meacher promised to increase 
pensions effectively to one 
half or one third of average 


pensioners, respectively. That 
was desirable bat the cost' 
could be as much as £16 
billion a year. How would that 
be met? Borrowing would 
have ruinous inflationary con- 
sequences. And if the money 
came from the* tax and Na- 


tional Insurance payer 
would increase National 
Insurance, for example, by£14 
a week for every person in 
work. 

“It is, in short, an 
unacbieveable, cynical bogus 
and dishonesty promise." 

The Government’s new So- 
cial Security system would be 
simpler. Rales had not been 
finalis ed but ' most disabled 
under' pension age would gain 
over£200 a year. Many would 
gain much more. 

- The conference carried, by 
an overwhelming majority, a 
motion commending the 
Government's reform pro- 
gramme for Social Security 
and calling on the Secretary of 
State for Social Services, Mr 
Norman Fowler, to ensure 
that benefits continued to be 
targeted towards those most in 
need, bearing in mind the 
special position of those who 
cared for the elderly and 
inform relatives, and the 
heads of one parent families. 

Mrs Margaret Fry, chair- 
man, Conservative National 
Women's Committee, moving 
the motion, said that tbe 
Government had already 
done a great deal to provide 
assistance to those most in 
need and the proposals in the 
Social Security Act, 1986, 
meant that that commitment 
would continue to be made. 

People of all parties must 
welcome the much-called-for 
reform of the welfare state 
which, because of its very 
complexity, often failed to 
give help to the very people ft 
sought to aid while on occa- 
sion providing assistance to 
perhaps less deserving cases. 

Mrs Sheila Hewitson, 
chairman, Scottish Conser- 
vative Women’s Griintil said 
that unemployment could not 
be solved until there was 
substantial economic growth 
and so people must be given 
state help. 

Dedicated men and women 
gave up their employment to 
look after elderly or infirm 
relatives. The male should 
help these carers make pro- 
vision for a pension. They 
deserved it. 


TRADE AND INDUSTRY 


‘Buy British’ appeal 


An appeal was made by Mr 
Paul Channon, Secretary of 
State for Trade and Industry 
to buy British, not simply 
because goods were British but 
because frequently British 
goods were best in quality, 
reliability and vajue for 
money. 


example.” 

They needed more people in 
industry equipped with the 
right knowledge and skills for 
the industry of tbe future. 

They had to, and were, 
improving the finks between 
education and industry. 


“It is odd that all too often", 
he said, “foreign customers 
Hgnize the quality ofBritish 
ods more than we ourselves 
do. Look ax the sales of Rover 
cars on the Continent, for 


He was proud that his 
department's spending had 
fallen by nearly half since 
1979, but within that ft was 
spending three times as much 
on research and develop- 
ment — £400 milli on. 


Tebbit attacks socialism as "creed that has had its day 9 


In a savage attack on the 
Labour Party and on social- 
ism. Mr Norman Tebbit, 
chairman of the party, said 
they bad turned their back on 
socialism In 1979. 

“We were in the lead in (be 
revolt against (hat outdated, 
discredited creed, and that 
lead is being followed across 
the world", he said. 

Mr Tebbit. accompanied by 
his wife, Margaret, was re- 
ceived with a standing ovation 
ami sat down to one. 

He said that at the end of 
the conference season the 
Conservative Party remained 
the only credible party of 
government 

Tbe first duty of any govern- 
ment. without which none 
other was possible, most be 
the defence of the realm. 
“That is an issue on which we 
have just seen the Alliance 
tear itself apart" he said. 

Mr David Steel dreamt a lot 
a boat coalitions and the con- 
ditions he would demand for 
his support. Perhaps he would 
be wise to say less about terms 
for his support of other parties 
until he could get the support 
Of bis own. 

Turning (0 Mr Kin nock, he 
said; "The more he talks the 
less he says. Bat at least he 


has committed himself to a 
defence policy, a policy that is 
bound fatally to undermine 
Nato, the alliance that has 
preserved foe peace and free- 
dom which we have enjoyed in 
West Europe for 40 years.” 

The Labour conference vote 
to stay in Nato was obtained 
only on foe promise of policies 
calculated to break up Nato. 
“Indeed, they seem more will- 
ing to trust the invaders of 
Afghanistan than our allies in 
foe defence of free Europe” he 


“For Mr Khmock that may 
be a fatal mis judgement, for 
the majority of Labour voters 
are patriots firmly in the 
moderate camp, indeed mov- 
ing further right. 

“But Labour’s activists have 
moved firmly to foe left, not 
just on defence, hot on na- 
tionalization, taxation, the 
centrally controlled economy: 
all foe old nonsenses of the 
Trots, Militants, Marxists 
and political flat-earthers of 
every kind. 

“Those policies of the far 
left are steadily becoming 
Labour policy and that is why 
the left is so quiet. Tomorrow's 
Labour Party will be further to 
foe left than ever, with one 
exception — the packaging." 


Socialists hated free enter- 
prise, distrusted democratic 
America while trusting Com- 
munist Russia. They woe for 
high taxation, nationalization, 
controls and the elimination of 
choke. 

“Socialism s a creed that 
has had its day", he said. 
“Whenever it has had its 
chance it has failed — no- 
where more than here in 
Britain." 

Tbe Prime Minister had 
made a dean break with the 
put She had pledged herself 
neither to live with nor die with 
socialism, but to turn the dock 
forward and escape from that 
dreary history of decline. 

In the past seven years, 
under her leadership, they had 
begun that task. 

It had been said that it was 
impossible to break the grip of 
inflation; impossible to break 
the non grip of foe union 
bosses. But the Government 
had done tbe impossible. 

Under socialist law tbe 
Militant ballot-riggers in foe 
Civil Service Union would 
have no fear and tbe moderate 
majority no chance. 

It was said that it wonld be 
impossible to denationalize 
foe state industries, yet they 


had denationalized about a 
score. 

“They say we have flogged 
the family silver. If family 
silver costs as much to keep 
and does as little good as those 
nationalized industries, I am 
glad I never had any myself." 

It was said that it was 
impossible to tarn back foe 
tide of socialism that had put 
Britain bottom of tbe EEC 
economic growth league. 

Last year Britain was top 
and in tbe past five years 
manufacturing growth had 
matched that of Japan. 
Britain's economic revival had 
begun to yield the wealth to 
answer other needs and to 
spend on things foe country 
needed. And they had. 

More had been spent on 
hospitals, pensions, the sick 
and disabled, more on each 
pnpfl at school more on 
defence, more on foe police 
and more on roads and 
railways. 

.AH that had been done 
within the strict limits of 
prudent financial disciplines 
which they would continue to 
keep. 

“We shall not promise yon 
any rash electoral bribes - no 
splurge of spending that would’ 
undermine all foot we have 


achieved. That would be folly 
indeed, a folly that would be 
seen as folly by the voters too”, 
be said. 

When foe voters beard foe 
sort of promises Mr 
Hattersley had made they 
knew they did not add np. The 
voters were not daft. They 
could smefl a rat whether it 
was wrapped in a red flag or 
covered in roses. 


which no decent parents wonld 
wish their children to see? 

What morality was to to let 
inflation loose once more and 
debauch foe currency and rob 
savers of the fruits of their 
providence? “Socialism may 
daim to be a moral theory, but 
we know from experience it is 
a most corrupting practice” 
he said. 

They had to roll hack 


They wore not alone in their socialism further. They had to 
fight against socialism. “The liberate more state industries 


free world is rejecting social- 
ism and following foe lead 
which you. Prime Minister, 
have given. White Mr Khmock 
threatens to reuationalize, die 
successful nations of the world 
are following our example. 
They are bolding back public 
expenditure." 

Mr Khmock, “that Johnny- 
come-Iately” had now discov- 
ered morality and claimed it 
for himself. 

Bat what morality was it to 
undermine foe alliance, re- 
store the tynumy of foe dosed 
stop and to talk about the 
fight against crime, tat put the 
handcuffs on the police and 
not tbe criminals? 

What morality was ft for foe 
Labour-con trolled Inner 
London Edacation Authority - 
to distribate explicit books 


and invigorate public services 
with competition, consumer 
choke, better management 
an d finandal disdpiine. 

They had to fight against 
inflation and continue to cut 
taxes so that people could 
spend their own money and not 
have file state do it for them. 

They had to create a climate 
for enterprise so that foe fruits 
of success could allow them to 
Improve the life of those in 
greatest need. 

“We are tbe only party 
determined to tread the road 
away from socialism towards a 
society sufficiently prosperous 
to be able not only to care, but 
to provide for those less 
fortunate. 

“Above all we are foe only 
party prepared to defend foe 
free society.” 


PRIVATIZATION 


Sales will 


bring in 
£4.75bn 


each year 


There would be a quicken- 
ing of the Governments 
privatization programme, Mr 
Norman Lamont, Financial 
Secretary to the Treasury, 
pledged to the conference. 

It would go on into foe next 
parliament and the Par- 
liament after that and no one 
would be able to reverse it. 

Replying to a monon 
supporting foe continuation ot 
the programme and calling for 
ministers to make much 
greater effort to explain its 
advantages, he said millions 
of people were waiting to join 
the “people's share club”. 

In this year and each of the 
next two years, foe Govern- 
ment intended to sell busi- 
nesses worth £4.75 billion 
each year. . 

The privatization of British 
Gas, in a few weeks time, was 
expected to be the biggest ever 
flotation on any stock market 
anywhere in the world. In- 
quiries bad been pouring in at 
an enormous rate. 

British Airways would be 
privatized early next year and 
would be followed by Rolls- 
Royce and the British Airports 
Authority in foe summer. 
Privatization of National Bus 
subsidiaries was already under 
way. 

By foe end of next year 
600,000 workers would have 
moved from the public to the 
private sector. The state sector 
of industry would have been 
reduced by more than two- 
fifths. 

Jaguar, Cable and Wireless 
and National Freight had all 
increased profits since 
privatization, be said. 

Mr Lamont said that foe 
Labour Party’s policy of social 
ownership was the policy that 
dare not speak its name — 
nationalization. 

Nationalization was not real 
public ownership at all It was 
ownership by no one, and 
where no one owned, no one 
cared. “The State is foe worst 
absentee owner of all" 

Mr Kelvin Walker (Bir- 
mingham Yardleyl moving 
the motion, which was carried 
overwhelmingly, said na- 
tionalization would mean that 
there would be only one 
employer, the Cabinet. At its 
heart, privatization was about 
trusting the people, about 
giving power to them instead 
of to . governments and 
cabinets. 


Mr Giles Harris, of foe 
National Association fbr the 
Care and Rehabilitation of 
Offenders, said tbe policy of 
privatization should be ex- 
tended to foe electricity in- 
dustry, the coal industry, foe 
water industry and to British 
Rail Mr John Kapp, secretary 
of the Bow Group energy 
committee, urged the 
privatization of power sta- 
tions. 


Mr Gay Senior, of 
Guildford Law College, won 
cheers when he urged the sale 
of what he called the Bol- 
shevik Broadcasting Corpora- 
tion. "Everything must go" 
he said. 


Ministers 
to enforce 


contracts 


Mr Nicholas Ridley, Sec- 
retary of State for the Environ- 
ment, ■ served notice on 
recalcitrant local authorities 
yesterday that the Govern- 
ment would force them to 
contract out more of their 
services. 


A reforming Government 
which had done so much to 
change attitudes within in- 
dustry must now force good 
practice upon local authorities 
which in the main still refused 
to go out to tender, Mr Ridley 
said at a Conservative Party 
fringe meeting. 

l We did it with direct 
labour, we did it with foe 
buses and the time has now 
come to add more services to 
the list", he told the Selsdon 
Group, promising to say more 
about the Government’s in- 
tentions in a speech to foe 
conference today. 

Last year only 16 per cent of 
councils contracted out a ser- 
vice at all and often a very 
small one, he said When they 
did so they often invented 
ridiculous and obstructive 
conditions of contract drawn 
to ensure that foe in-house 
operation got the job. 


Welcome for 
The Times 


The Time*. The Sunday 
Times. The Sun and News of 
the World were welcomed to 
foe conference by Mr Patrick 
Lawrence, foe chairman. 

“You will know that foe 
Labour Party last week con- 
fined them to their hotels in 
Blackpool They may have 
found foal more pleasant than 
attending foe conference but it 
is no way to run a free country 
and a free press." he said to 
applause. 


Reports by Robert Morgan, John Winder, Howard Underwood, Derek Barnett and Peter Mulligan 



The Opening day of % 
conference was not quite vto 
was expected. Before it begu 
signals were being sent byth 
Conservative hierarchy feu 
foe dominating theme was J 
be an extension of choice fo 

the individual. Within this 

broad framework a range 
new policies would be raveHed 
which would in doe 
figure prominently in the next 
manifesto. 

The first ministerial speech 
from John Patten, the jyj®. 
is ter for Housing, Urban At 
fairs and Construction, fitted 
neatly into this strategy. Hav- 
ing extended the right to In* 
so successfully, with foe pro- 
gramme for the sale of ansd 
houses, the Government g 
now eager to enconrage mote 
private renting. 

As a policy objective that 
seems to me ataofntely ri ght 
Home ownership is not safe, 
able for everybody and a huger 
supply of reasonable rested 
accommodation would also 
make it easier for people ta 
move around the country to 
find work. 


Investing with 
Labour lurking 


Bat the difficulty with gong 
very for in that direction is 
thAt there may not ta enough 
people prepared to put the? 
money into providing privtie 
rented housing so kmg as there 
is the fear of a Labour 
government coming along and 
taking it over a gain. 

This does not destroy foe 
value of the policy in both 
practical and political terns. 
But it does mean that the 
Conservatives will be hoping 
to win the election with ai 
appeal whose full credibility 
depends on die belief that 
Laboor is bomad to lose. 

Whereas Mr Patten's 
speech was folly in line with 
expectations, however, . 
Kenneth Baker’s speech was' 
both above and below expecta- 
tions. This was the first time' 
he had addressed the con- 
ference as Secretary of Stale 
for Edacation and it was die 
most important speech of the 1 
day. 

That was partly became of 
foe interest that now attaches 
to him as one of the coming 
men in the Cabinet, and still 
more because edacation has 
over the past 18 months 
become one of the most critical 
political issues. 

Mr Baker's contribution did 
not, though, fit precisely into 
any preordained schema. He 
said a good deal about the wle ' 
and importance of parents in 
education, bat not so ranch 
about extending parental 
choice. 

He had not been expected to 
come oat in favour of vouchers, 
but he did not even offer a hint 
of encouragement to the ad- 
vocates of open entry or foe 
per capita fending of schools. 

Rather than extending foe 
range (ft choke for most 
parents Mr Baker seems to be 
in trait on increasing parental 
control. There will be more 
parents on governing bodies, 
which will have sole 
responsibility for sex edaca- 
tion and be answerable to aa 
annual parents’ meeting. - 

The weakness of this ap- 
proach is that it may w* 
provide items that will accord 
so easily with the theme of an 
election manifesto. Tbe 
strength is that Mr Baker 
seems to be feeling his way 
towards an education policy 
that may be more credible, 
more in line with what most 
people in this country actually 
want and therefore possibly 
more politically attractive a® 
the long ran. 


Dictating child’s 
schooling 


Whatever the theoretical 
attractions of greater parental 
choice, there are a good BOSS 
parts of this country where 
practical considerations virtu- 
ally dictate which school a 
chUd win go to. The basis on 

wbfch Mr Baker is deternined 

finally to end the teachers ■ 
dispute will seem sensible to- 
most people in this coan try » 
he can achieve it: insisting 
linking pay and performance. 

The new City Tedraotojff 
Colleges will be available i®- 
tiaXIy to only a small minority 
of children, a mere 15,000®' 
so. But the need to do son** 
thing urgently about inner oty 
education is evident and to* 

principle could be extended. 

Some will dismiss ft* 
emphasis upon sex edacano* 
as a political gimmick, bn* 1 
suspect that it wiB Stri ke. * 
chord with many potenmu 
Tory voters. So too, abo« 
will the stress he placed upe® 
quality. 

The political question ne** 
whether Mr Baker wiB be 
to convince the country 


to tins aenerai nriatiDk- 


I 


namas 






r m rvtttiaa Mjuuur—r- 


TOE TIMES WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 8 1 986 




1 • • 1 " «::r. 

■ ' "■ %. 

‘ •' •" -’•ip'i 

: ’ ■ >■.!(■ 
•, 

' 'V ** . ■» 

•• 

•5 •••.■ I* 

■ •. •- • 

• * • a. . .}. 




. -T ~ 


... . \ 



,h » ! 

Ui... ***** „ “ 

i. ,ri 'V, ' 
u, :in * 

JlK •*/ 
‘"V 

■V,: If, 

;■ •" k 

ii. 

+ln h.,„ 

' j... 

H.-.l.... h 

• w ' -mi.,.* 

r}‘ 

!v':' : y** 

- ^'4£: 


T 'i- "ilk 

1 ‘ *»i kipg ** 


Law Commission urges 
borrowers’ charter 
to protect home buyers 


HOME NEW'S 


An ureeni By * ?rances Legal Affeirs Correspondent 

83ge ^ The land mortgge laws are laclded 

protection to i£JL 1 S? , 5 r ootonousiy difficult” the 
called for by the uSUr?” 5 IS COr ooussion says, and there is 
sion in a working an J increasingly urgent need to 

iished today. ® Pap^ pub- reform them. The “most ob- 
vious and important reason is 
the increase in home 
ownership.” 

Consumer protection for 
borrowers would particularly 
apply to a special dass of 
“protected mortgage" and the 


charter”**"^ a "borrowers’ 
ealnrfn 11 puls f 0rw ard sev- 
SS'^stomake bonSI 

smml and thm - fore to 

aSSf a Ki rales: abolishing iSS 
ESJf’f Elions 5 and 
J 1 " 8 ,os *s if die lender 

wlS jhp° rkins - ? aper - on 
rnmm Ihe 1:0111111 ission invites 
ommenL recommends two 
ys in which mortgage law 
for land and building could 

oe brought up to date: 

First, consumer protection 
rules should be *" U ” ,UUI1 
extended, made 
more logical. 

Sy onc k the technicalities 

"“d to be simplified. That 
could make conveyancing eas- 
ier by introducing a standard 
lOrm of mortgage document. 



overhauled, 
clearer and 


commission asks which loans 
should come into that 
category. 

One possibility is where an 
individual borrows money on 
his home, or on other property 
with a £15.000 limit; another 
possibility is all mortgages of 

bouses or fiats. Mortgages, working paper 99 

Among cases that would be {Stationery Office. £9.90). 


by new consumer 
protection provisions are that 
of a borrower, Mr A, who 
obtains a mortgage from 
Rumania Bank. 

The mongage deed contains 
the usual term: the bank can 
vary the interest rate from 
time to time. The bank then 
sells* the mortgage to a com- 
pany. which it ts entitled to do, 
and the company shoots the 
interest rate up by 10 percent 

The commission says one 
possible solution might be not 
to allow any transfer by the 
bank unless Mr A agrees; or 
court powers to lower interest 
which has been unreasonably 
altered. A third solution might 
be to allow variable interest 
rates only if they are index- 
linked. 

Court actions against 
defaulting borrowers have 
risen dramatically, more than 
doubling in the five years up 
to 1985 when there were more 
than 64,000. 

The Law Commission: Land 


Rent controls ‘reduce value 


By Christopher Warman, Property Correspondent 

Rent controls have caused a The British Property 
steady decline in die private Federation said Out too few 

homes were available for rent 
because the law did not permit 
private landlords to let on 
tolerable, let alone attractive, 
terms. Registered rents gave a 


rented sector from 90 per cent 
of bousing tenure in 1913 to 
kssthan jo per cent today. 
The controls, now la 

incorporated in the 1977 


tion for landlords to exert 
pressure on tenants to qmt the 
i mri t nri on said. 

In areas of Britain where 
there is no shortage of rented 
property, die phasing oat of 


Price gap 
on houses 
continues 
to widen 

By Our Property 
Correspondent 

The house price gap be- 
tween North and South has 
continued to widen in spite of 
a slow-down in house price 
inflation in the past three 
months, the Halim Building 
Society announced yesterday 
m a survey of prices. 

Its house price index shows 
that prices increased by 118 
per cent over the year to the 
end of September, compared 
with 13:6 per cent reported 
last month. During the three 
months to the end of Septem- 
ber prices rose by 15 per cent 
compared with 3.7 per cent 
during the previous three 
months, and the rate of in- 
crease in new house prices 
slowed to 10.7 per cent com- 
pared with 12.6 percent to the 
end of August 
The average house price for 
the United Kingdom stands at 
£40.475, ranging from £27.000 
for a pre-1 919 terrace bouse to 
£75.000 for a bet ween- the- 
wars detached house. But the 
regional variations again show 
a huge gap between Nonh and 
South. The average price of all 
houses in Greater London is 
£64,620 compared with 
£26,720 in Yorkshire and 
Humberside. 

In the South-east the annual 
average increase to September 
was 20 per cent and 5.5 per 
cent over the previous three 
months, with the West Mid- 
lands increases at 11.1 percent 
and 3 per cent respectively; 
Yorkshire and Humberside 


Art ***"”• ■“ LHL* B * controls, leading to an open 8.6 per cent and 23 per cent; 

m »^ed by the 1980 return of 2-3 per cent "There market, would make little Wales 8.5 per cent and 4.4 per 

nousme Art. whirn K on mrpiifTTa hi ka , lomlVnwl j-fp — - • — J I r, -. ... r - 


Act, which in- 
troduced permission for ap- 
proved landlords to build awl 
let at market rents. But almost 
no new investment was gen- 
erated by the move. 

The Duke of Edinburgh’s 
inquiry last year reported that 
organizations representing 
landlords were critical of inad- 
equate returns on investment, 
the security of tenure, and the 
resulting power which they felt 
could be wielded by tenants. 
At the same time, tenants 
complained of high costs for 
poor honsing, insecurity, 
harassment and little effective 
redress. 

The report concluded that 
the protective legislation, in- 
troduced to . prevent the 
exploitation of Rachmanism, 
was either responsible for a 
fad in rented accommodation, 
or was irrelevant as landlords 
exploited loopholes, open to 
them. w 




is no incentive to be a landlord 
on these terms and the resul- 
tant shortage makes the prob- 
lem even worse," it said. 

The Royal Institution of 
Chartered S ur vey ors (RICS) 
said in a report last month that 
the effect of statutory rent 
controls had been to reduce the 
capital value of rented prop- 
erty to about half, even less in 
some areas, than that of 
vacant possession property id* 
• similar quality. This as 
an incentive for landlords to 
sell as soon as they conld gain 
vacant possession, rather than 
reletting. 

Rent controls had also made 
die repair and maintenance of 
rented property uneconomic In 
many cases, leading to a 
decline in the standard of the 
property and a depredation of 
capital value. 

While rent controls have 
acted as a subsidy for tenants, 
thejrhave also been a tempta- 


difference as “fair” rents are 
at or near open market levels. 


cent; and Scotland 4.1 percent 
and 0.9 per cent. 



Mr John Farrell, aged 40, from Southampton, with Helen and Katie Grice, whom he freed 
from a blazing boose a year ago. Mr Farrell, a postman/driver, fought his way np to the first 
floor to rescue Helen, then three months old, and Katie, then aged nine. He was one of 17 
Post Office employees attending a lunch in London yesterday to mark, outstanding contribu- 
tions at work and in the community. Other gnests indoded a part-time postwoman who 
cyded 200 miles for charity and a letters manager whose efforts at recruiting the disabled 
have been acknowledged by the Manpower Services Commission (Photograph: Bill 

Warhnrst). 


Mothers 
hold key 
to child 
neglect 

By Jill Sherman 

The mother’s behaviour is 
the main factor behind the 
increase in child neglect, a 
senior social services officer 
said yesterday. 

Mr David Lartcr, chief so- 
cial services officer at the 
London borough of Red- 
bridge. said that neglect, 
•which now affects thousands 
of children and can lead to 
long-term physical and mental 
difficulties and sometimes 
death, was largely caused by 
deficient mothering. 

Addressing a conference on 
“the foigoticn children*' held 
by the National Society for the 
Prevention of Cruelty to Chil- 
dren as pan of its campaign on 
child neglect. Mr Laner said 
that studies had pointed to the 
mother's failure. 

“Many neglecting mothers 
arc depressed. This may not 
be helped by the father blam- 
ing his wife for failing to hold 
the family together, but it is 
the mothering capability we 
need to restore." 

Neglected children were 
those who were ignored, not 
properly fed or clothed, living 
in filthy conditions as well as 
those who never received any 
affection from their parents. 

Mr Lartcr said that other 
characteristics typical of 
neglectful parents were a dis- 
organized way of life, social 
isolation and feelings of 
worthlessness. A parent feel- 
ing aimless and apathetic 
might ultimately give up so 
that the neglected child was 
not cared for at all and left to 
die. 


PARLIAMENT OCTOBER 7 1986 


Fewer homes for 
old should be sold 


HOUSE OF LORDS 

The Government suffered de- 
feat by 12 votes on. the first 
amendment considered in the 
House of Lords on the commit- 
tee stage of the Housing and 
Planning Bill. 

This was inflicted even 
though Lord Skelmersdale, 
making his first appearance in 
the House since his promotion 
to Under Secretary of State for 
Environment, explained how 
the Government conceded that 
the right to buy rules for selling 
council houses, flats and bun- 
galows suitable for the elderly 
ought to be tightened so that not 
so many of them were sold. 

Recalling that the rules were 
last changed in 1984. be said 
that since then almost 36 per 
cent of local authority applica- 
tions for exemptions from the 
right to buy had been successful 
compared with only 1 1 per cent 
under the 1980 rules. 

The Government acce pted 
that the criteria for determining 
whether a dwelling was suitable 
for the elderly were those set out 
in the amendment moved by 
EkIv David (Lab) for the Oppo- 
sition. plus the fact that access to 
shopping and public transport 
facilities should also be taken 
tnio account. 

However, under the amend- 
ment responsibility for de- 
cisions would pass from *be 
Secretary of State for Environ- 


ment to individual landlords 
and given a free hand many 
local authorities would not hesi- 
tate to deny the right to buy in 
respect of any ground floor 
accommodation irrespective of 
its suitability for the elderly. 

He indicated he proposed to 
bring forward at the report stage 
a Government amendment to 
meet most of the points raised 
and said the Government would 
be consulting on the prescribed 
features ofa dwelling that would 
have to be taken into account. 
The Government accepted that 
the test of suitability should be 
simplified by the exclusion in 
the normal case of minor in- 
ternal design features. 

Lady David said present 
arrangements for exclusions 
were not working as they 
should. Many local authorities 
had made representranons. The 
Secretary of State appeared to be 
taking a severe view of the 
criteria set out in the 1984 
circular. 

Lady Stedman (SDP) said carry- 
ing the amendment would not 
prevent the Minister bringing 
forward his and then at the 
report stage the House could see 
if bis was better than theirs and 
if it was the House would 
happily change its mind. 

Lora Skeknersdale said he was 
proposing an order-making 
power which would prescribe 
regulations which as time went 
by might need to be changed 
■again. There would be mil 
consultation. That was the right 
way to go forward. 


Changing discounts 


In a second divison. a Govern- 
ment amendment proy idmg 
ihat changes to the pweentag* 
discount on the sale of council 

K* could be made by onto. 

«vuh Treasury consent, rather 
than through a Bill, was earned 
ill " 1 7 wK* 10 IM - Govern- 

ment majority -1 3- 

L ord JETS?* fo'S 

a mend me - sa G mn)em 

^ d d^^ inlhc 

discount structure- 

It seems ridiculous (he.»d) 
“ » a it for a suitable 


something as often as it needs 
to. 

It would not mean any less 
parliamentary control as the 
order would be subject to affir- 
mative resolution of both 
Houses as well as ha ving to 
receive Treasury approval. 

Lady David (Lab) said the 
Opposition was suspicious of 
the Government's intent Dis- 
counts fundamentally affected 
the housing strategy of local 
authorities as well as their 
financial position. 

It was hard to imagine the 
Government proposing the 
amendment if it did not intend 
to use it to raise, the level of 
discount Could it be a pre- 
election strategy? 


MentaUy-ill criminals 

A ■ ^ . _ r.n.>i* mm r i ii a haul the fl 


The Government has sentouta 
- fnr consultation to ex- 
*PL ’JSJs of preventing the 
p,0 £.S release of mentally-iH 
"offenders. Lord 

f£S>riok. 1W Government 

Allen of 

mHc ^S ute aim would be to 
3rt ’f ‘ f *■ mv agreed amendments 

jrs? Acl ,n a 


follows concern about the re- 
lease from special hospitals of 
psvchopathically disordered] pa- 
tients who may re-offend. Or 38 
such patients discharged from 
special hospitals by the mbund 
between September 1983 and 
the end of 1 985. four are known 
to have subsequently commit- 
ted serious offences. 


parliament today 

Lords <2. 30): European 
Communities (Amendment) 
Bill, committee stage. 



YOUR LIFE COVER YOUR C\SH VALUE 


IF YOU DIE 





Guaranteed 
Life Cover 



£10 


£19.652 

£40,214 

I2£E m 


£11.849 

£18.816 

£28.365 



£4.702 

£4.944 

£5.624 

£15 

18 

£30.105 

£61.604 

£113.467 


£18.151 

£28.825 

msxm\ 


Ei 

£7.203 

■Esa 

£8.616! 

£20 

mm 

£40.557 



mm 

£24.454 

Wzixm 

£58.541 


49 

WzJilZM 


£11.607 

£25 

mm 

£51.010 

r n'tiwm 

£192.264 

mm 

£30.756 


MSEK m 


mm 


wmm 

£14.559 

£30 

mm 




mm 






i«JHsa 

£15.463 

£17.590 



ease 65 

10-. 

Eumth 

£24.958 

£46.057 

£9.161 

£13.863 

£1.231 

£1.415 

£38.233 

£70.556 

£14.034 

m*mm\ 

£1.886 

£2.168 

£51.509 

£95.055 



1 £2.54L 

WM 1 W ill' 


£119.553 

£23.780 


£3.196 



£144.053 

feflU HeM 

£43.359 

1 £3.851 

£4.426 


IMrlfeBMr.fMMmBBMVaKiMnoiOTcJrtui^eafcr Tvnwni»c<iw*>*— UifnaBMl 
MMW WravjimMwcc E.uPVCSH'^avHaliawWCBm'd 

S BmTwiiwI'. tcV.wji fnaintn 

>nmmhLTMiimii» twunrami _ _ _ _ _ 

mini mim jsMWnr 1 


— sgoaenn- 

■•■artUiprf ■ ;» h i«h »i m i' imi>imiiiFii«i lnig i m l n iw]B 
Tnt«rniiam>aoMnm«Mni»miii^[rmCim(>ran3ovtfannii»Mkiminnnunoct W WWH WHi 

■muwnii twifiwiwi IMBtoav'iaiipi'vv 


AND A GROWING^^H 

CASH VALUE IF YOU DONT 



r J 


•« 


.1 


f 


r 

4 

iP 


■ * 


TAKE AMAN AGED 30... 

WANTS protection for his wife, but also wants io 
see some ash from Ins policy. He puis £20amomh 
into Linkphn. He's instantly insured for £24,454 
(guaranteed for 13 yearsV After the gnamnice 
period, his life cover increases while his premium 
stays the samel In fact, at 65, his life cover is 
£58,541. 

In the meantum*. his policy is growing in value. 
He could cash it in at 40 and receive £2j57, and at 
65 it conld be wonh £28£1I ...all tax free. 


Tha example asswtm that the aaesonauj 
pa. In fact, over the past 10 yean a monthly investor zandd have seen his fund value ackieze 
an average amatol growth rauofl4Ji%i*et. This means thaiyour future benefits could be 
much higher than tae’w shown in ihe abase table. 


SHOULD YOU choose to put your money into life insurance? Or 
should you put it into a plan that gives you a cash return? Today, with Royal 
Heritage Lmkplan, you don’t need to split your money - because Linkplan 
gives you both. 

W ITH LINKPLAN, Royal Heritage 
hare cleared away much of the confu- 
aoo surrounding Efe inmranoi good invest- 
ment plans. 

Designed ftr people wfaodotrt want m pick 
rinongh comptatedsdienies, Linkplan com- 
bines the two most-needed typesof insurance. 

First, Linkplan gives you straightforward 
Hfeinsomce. Bhintlv pua, if you die, we pay out 
io your dependants. So they have the security of 
knowing iheyTl beioohed afar finnwrwUy ' 

But what about you? Alaqy ordinary life 
insurance polities simply lake your mouejiand 
you’ll never see any of ui 

That's where Linkplan scores. 

Became, although primarily designed to 
provide a lifetime of high-level fife cover, your 
plan does acqnirea cash value, which you may 
take at any time. This starts to build up after a 
period ol 22 months, and you can cmh it in 
... totally tax free after H) years! Naturally, 

Qfce any such plan, the longer you leave your 
money in, the greater the value. In the early 
ye a rs, values will not be very high - ini daily - 
less than you hate paid in - but after a 
reasonable period you'll find you hare a 
growing asset. The rebles aboreshnwyou how 
it works. Bin for full information, return the 
coupon- 

RTeH send you a Persona] niusirariou 
showiagyouhow- much you 'recovered for if you 
die. . .and how much vou could be wonh ifvou 
warn » cash in your policy 
But more than that — weU offer you up to 
one mouth's free cover as wdl as your 
FREE Hanimwi Csimm Outfit — DO wanw 
hwv much vou choose to pay. 

. HOW THE FLAN WORKS 
Linkphn sons off as straightforward life 
insurance. 


Your life is tmmediaiely covered far a 
substantial amount, which is guaranteed fora 
number of years, depending on your present 
age. In other words, should you die within 
weeks, well payout the amount shown against 
the premium you choose- even if yotiVe only 
paid one or two premiums! . 

Then, alter this 'guaranteed period, some- 
thing very much to your advantage could 
happen. Vbu carry on paying the same pre- 
miums. But your life insurance cover should 
stan to rise! 

How? You see. we don't just hang on to 
your money We'll be purring it to good use. 

After aniniiial peri ndjihigfa propOrtlOnof 
your monthly p remiums go into the Royal 
Heritage Multiple Growth Fund, to build up 
your cash value. After the ^toiameed period*, 
your hfe corer also becomes direaly linked to 
the performance of this Fund 

And provided the Fund performs as wefl as 
expected, wour life protection will increase as 
you get dder-at no com costto you. 


Result? Your premiums bring you a guaran- 
teed amount of life cover in the early years 
...and tbe prospect c*f an increasing amount 
laret because you benefit from our investment 


expertise. And your cover continues for as long 
as you pay premiums. 

Noi only that, but your plan’s cash value 
should go on growing too! Although fund 
values can go down as well as up. you'll see from 
tbe table that your cash-in values oner the 
medium to tongteim can be high. Thousands of 
pounds, infect. 

What would you do with your cash? Home 
improvements? A new car? A boat or the 
holiday ofa lifetime? Or iust added comfort for 
your retirement? Thedtoke is yours. 

GO FOR GROWTH 

The Multiple Growth Fund is wonh over 
£39,000,000. The Fund buys stocks and 
shares around (he world . . . some high 
performers, some ‘gilt-edged* government 
securities, and also invests in property. 

So your money is put to^ work bard, always 
aiming to achieve a better return than you 
would normally expea from bank deposit 
account sor building society accounts. 

Wve shown in the table above, how 
much you'd be wwth assuming the Fund were 
id grow a 8% and 10% net pa. Over the past 
10 years a policy bolder making monthly 
contribution! would have seen his fund value 


THE HANIMEX 35HS CAMERA OUTFIT - 
YOUR KEY TO TAKING BETTER PICTURES 

When you make your first full payment, well send you 
this superb camera oaift, completely FREE. 

The Hanimex 35HS is a versatile go anywhere 
camera- it features 3 simple weather settings, 
a fool proof wind-on mechanism and a built-in 
lens cover. 

The outfit indudes: 

* a battery operated flash gun-complete 
with 2 long life batteries ^ a Fuji 35mm 
colour film £ an instruction leaflet filled with 
useful hints on how to take better pictures. 

FREE WITH LINKPLAN 



m 


RwaiHmufsr LifcAvsnrma:Lul.Brcnootrw,Pncrbc(UB{hPE5SDQ AnaDtacrtheRopIlnviinace Group. 


achieve an average annual growth nue of 
14.5% net, even though this has been a period . 
of relatively high inflation and market interest 
rates. ■.’*! 

EASYTO START 

To sun couldn't be simpler. Jus rick the 
amount on the coupon telow that you wish to, - 
contribute each month, fill in your name/-- 
address and the other details requested. Then ^ 
post the coupon to us as soon as you con to‘.<- 
ensure you wai the deadline. RememNrr, it's. " 
FREEPOST, so your envelope doesn't need a' ° 
stamp. 

Well then prepare your own Personal '' 
Illustration, and send it to you together with 
full details of LINKPLAN' 

And don't worry about a medical. Well- • 
send you a simple application requesting 4 
details ol' your height anil weight, and asking 
you three straightforward questions. Provided '* 
all these details are satisfactory, your accept- ' 
ance is guaranteed without a medical. 

Remember, in returning the coupon today; . 
yorfrt under bo obligation at all. No salesman ~ 
will call on you . . . you’ll deal direa with Royal 
Heritage confidentially, by post. And youH 
have plenty of time to consider your plan 
before you need to do a thing. 

APPLY WITHIN 10 DAYS ; 

It you an quickly and reply to us within IQ - 
da\-s\-ou'll also beetitilled-upon acceptance-, 
to two extra benefits First, voull be eligible » 
for up to ONE .MONTH S COVER FREE’ 

. . . which could be wonh up to CJO to you. Full 
details will accompany your free Personal 
Illustration. “ 

Second, vou ’ll also be eligible for 

FREE HANIMEX 35HS CAMERA 

FIT which will be sent to you entirely* 
FREE when you make your Erst full pay. 
meat - but only if the coupon below & 
received within 10 days. 

Remember, we guarantee the terms of this? 
offer if you reply withb JOdays.Ifwerepcar 
the offer we cannot guarantee that the ienn$. 
ofthe offer will remain unchanged. 

So act today to make sure you get aQ lht> 
benefits that Linkplan can offer you. ..J, 


Send within 10 days, to qualify for up to one month’s free 
Linkplan cover . . . and your FREE Elanimex Camera Outfit. 


COVER VOUCHER 


WORTH UPTO 


IF WE RECEIVE YOUR 
COUPON WITHIN 
10 DAYS Y017LLBE 
ELIGIBLE FOR UP 
TO ONE MONTH'S 
FREE COVER- WORTH 
AS MUCH AS 
SOTO YOU 


PERSONAL ILLUSTRATION REQUEST^ 

NO OBLIGATION • NO SIGNATURE • SEND NO MONEY " 

■\JTT7 Q Please send me full details of LfokpUn. I hare ticked the annum I would like io contribute each nmth and I undaviand ths suu will now 
X Dw prepare for me a FREE PERSONAL ILLUSTRATION showing what I could be »«nli. 1 uadentaud that this places me uoda- no 
ofctiguioo vriBSoeven thar no salesman win call au me and that I should sod do money amt As lam applying within lOdays please send fflt details 
of how I could qualify for up to one month's cowr FREE, plus my FREE Hanimot Camera Outfit. 

I would like to contribute each month: £10 G £15 G £20 G £25 G £30 G 


*1A 

L 

"* M 

Ci| 


Name (MrfMrs/Missr'Ms) 


First Namefs^ 


BLOCK CAPITALS, PLLAst 


Address 


Postcode 


DatcofBirth- 


□ .Mak □ Female 


DAY MONTH YEAR 


POST TODAY, WITHOUT A STAMP TO: Royal Heritage 
linkplan Adatnanaior. FREEPOST; PM c rb oreagh PE38BR. 

ii 

ROYAL 


Brokers name f if any) 


HERITAGE 




l.!NK1>UN 


ii 

•*fc 

'ui 

- j 

■ft I 

l; te 

‘■to 


AwiriMEipU.K.rtwfamonK-. 


* 
































































HOME NEWS 



ran 

i * 

Irrfi 

?ee( 

mum T 
ty has la 
attack 
ty runs 
notion p 
ry assoc, 
umeraoi \ 
iference 
inipolate 
mage tie 
s or 
bbiu his 
Is me. ws 
ten the * 
ded. lo> ' 
ybodyte 
ey like it ! 
into dis 
eofam 
inference 
itive con 
der ths 
solution 

,0 blanc. 

idinous s 
*ate" 
nmediate 
im shoui 
3 S been st 
> finish!” 
should at 
)r debate. 

3ann 

or the ft 
ttere will 
entative i 
)espite r 
luring the 
workers i 
or applies 
asses. .• 
nonth wa 
>ver phott 
oCND. F 
rational u 
etted tha 
lot dealt • 
:nd's n 

she will r 
jltine: “L 
chatabou 
• The fm 
eccen trial 
questionn 
by the 
question i 
stay pern 
Kingdom', 
expect to; 
orlOyeai 

Tres; 

Yetanoth 
the loose 
of "Bong 
UieMoD 
bidders 
manage rr 
Devonpc 
Plymoutl 
isterialct 
outh K* 
champag 
of the b- 
Foster-^ 
week ant 
govern in 
more tl 
Wheeler 
city." Ht 
the othe- 

Loy 

Among 
against 
pool last 
West Ek 
particuk 
school. ) 
chanty 
rates. " 
Shcrbor 
pic in 
sidizing 
he said, 
case of 
for Dan 
school. 


Doubts growing over 
savings from abolition 
of GLC and counties 



by Michael Evans, Whitehall Correspondent 

The Government has little local district councils who redundancies totalled about 
hope of reaching its planned have needed to expand to rope 600, but he said it would be 
savings of £ 1 00 million a year with their new responsible- “touch and go wnetner there 
after the abolition of the ities. Only 6.160 people have would be any net savings 
Greater London Council and been made redundant, of In Tyne and Wear. Mr Peter 
the six metropolitan counties, whom about 3,000 worked at Smith, general manager of the 
according to a survey carried the GLC. . residuaiy bo dy, said that 

out by The Times. One of the residuary bodies about 1 50 had b«n redundant 

Many officials involved in is even funding a special but he added : I don't think 
the complex transfer of research unit at Birmingham that the savings will be very 
responsibilities from the aboi- University to discover if any significant, 
irfied top tier of local govern- genuine savings are made over In South YOncstnre, Mr Bin 

mem to the district councils the next three years. „ Irvmfr chief executive, said 
are openlv sceptical of the Mr Peter McKay, chief ."Ther e ma y be sayings in the 
Government’s figures. executive of the West York- long term but^ it s all so 

Only Sir Godfrey Taylor, shire Residuary Body, said muddied that its impossible 
chairman of the London yesterday: "We“ve said all to say whether there will be 

Residuary Body which was set along that it would be difficult sayings. w w 

up to handle the transfer of to make savings." ’ ' 

services and assets from the However all 1 
GLC. remains confident that bodies claimed tl 


lUCol UijUILI bUUUViH nuu 7 . — ^ 

have needed to expand to rope 600, but he said it would be 
with their new responsible “touch and go” whether there 
ities. Onlv 6.160 people have would be any net savings, 
been made redundant, of In Tyne and Wear. Mr Peter 

whom about 3,000 worked at Smith, general manager of the 
the GLC. residuary body, said that 

One of the residuary bodies about 150 had wen redundant 
is even funding a special but he added :“I dont think 
research unit at Birmingham that the savings will be very 
University to discover if any significant.” 
genuine savings are made over In South Yoncsnire, Mr Bill 

*. ! _ . AvAMatilU MI/I 



big savings can be made. 

When the Government an- 
nounced its intention to get 
rid of the GLC and the 
metropolitan counties, it was 
predicted that £50 million a 
year would be saved in 
London and £50 million from 
the other six areas. 

Yesterday the Department 
of the Environment said that 
the up-to-date manpower fig- 
ures which would give a 
dearer indication of savings 
on jobs would not be made 
public until December. 

However since the seven 
coundls were abolished in 
April, most of the employees 
have found work with the 


However all the residuary 
bodies claimed that the trans- 
fer of duties has been running 
smoothly. Warnings of non- 
co-operation. political uproar 
and confusion have proved 
baseless. 

One official said that the 
whole abolition process had 
turned out to be a non-event 

In West Yorkshire, which 
includes Leeds and Bradford 
district coundls. 960 people 
have been paid redundancy 
money, property worth £1.3 
million has been sold and the 
five district coundls have 
taken on 3.000 of the county 
staff. 

In West Midlands, the 
residuary body chairman. Dr 
Malcolm Skiilicom, said 


long term but it’s all so 
muddied that it’s impossible 
to say whether there will be 

savings." 

In Greater Manchester, Mr 
Peter Hadfidd, the residuary 
body chairman, said that there 
had been 600 voluntary 
redundancies. He said it was 
too early to put a figure on the 
likely savings. 

In Merseyside, Mr Anthony 
Thompson, chief executive of 
the residuary body, said there 
had been about 200 
redundancies. 

In London, Sir Godfrey 
Taylor rejected the wide- 
spread view that redundandes 
did not signify instant savings. 
He said: “ We have made 
about £50 million savings 
already from the 3,000 redun- 
dandes. There was a huge 
bureaucracy here and we 
anticipate making greater 
savings.” 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY OCTOBER S 1986 


Damages 
win over 
Kennedy 
allegations 

A retired CIA officer, Mr 
David Phillips, won 
“substantial" libel damages in 
the High Court yesterday over 
allegations that he was in- 
volved in a conspiracy relating 
to the assassination of Presi- 
dent Kennedy. 

In May 1980, The Observer 
published two articles about 
the assassination from a book 
called Conspiracy by Anthony 
Summers. 

“Mr Phillips had given ev- 
idence to two inquiries con- 
ducted by the Congress of the 
United Slates of America in 
1975 and 1979.” his counsel, 
Mr Michael Tugendhat, QC 
told Mr Justice Davies. 

In reporting on the second 
inquiry and the report made 
by the Select Committee of 
Congress, the articles could be 
read to suggest that Mr Phil- 
lips was involved in a conspir- 
acy relating to the 
assassination, Mr Tugendhat 
said. 

The Observer had always 
accepted that there was no 
evidence to support the 
suggestion and did not intend 
such a suggestion, he said. 

The publishers of The Ob- 
server agreed to pay un- 
disclosed damages and legal 
costs. Their counsel, Mr Ste- 
phen Nathan, said they “un- 
reservedly apologized for the 
distress caused and fully ac- 
cepted that Mr Phillips was in 
no way involved in the 
assassination”. 



f : s; 





The Polish composer, Witold Lutes laws ki, age 
Society concert tonight at the Festival Hall in L 
him with the society's gold medal 


Transatlantic business 

travellers... 


I like it Flying the Atlantic in TOAs ‘ ggggf! f | 

Ambassador Class. fe : 

It makes flying on business a real pleasure lJ|jS f r 1 

Just lookatthe business of getting on the , 

plane. TOA makes itaseflbitiess as possible, i j 

Boarding cards and seat reservations (smoking > ajf | j 

or non-smoking) settled beforeyou even leave £ 

the office! p- jk vf 

Thinkof the time and trouble that 






k m i 

bj 


saves. 


m txTfifl 


Ofcourselenjc^itWlKiCDuldntlnlhat }Wj 1 

Ambassador Class cabin comfort is the j=Pl m B 

thing Ah, peace! Ite wonderful. ff§ * •; | || 

There you are, sitting comfortably in j ^ J 

the widest business class seat across 

The TWA Business Lounger. - ^ 




I- 


iiici wa uusii less Liuui igi;i. -, v „ l if 

Plentyofspacearoundyou. * 

Plenty of space to stow . ^ 

carrvon luasaffe. — 


.-<?*■ O' 






canyon luggage 
Room to stretch 
and wiggle your toes. 




Then the attention you get ^ 

A charmin g attendant offers you a 
selection of drinks, when you want them. 
Bringsyouaninterestingmenawithexcellent 
cuisine to back it up. It's real, TWA American, 
friendlyservice. 

V f lj&MM':, i^feiu say to myself. I'm on business. 

\ v'&ritf J * deserve this sort of quiet comfort All 

, i business travellers do. 

Great thing is TWA flies to over 60 

■flu* 'V- > t f ''SSij N ritiAC in I 1C TViaf malroc it 











V. ' 

•.u • w 


T ■!' ■ > 
















lira 




‘4^:/., Great thing is TWA flies to over 60 
Y dties in the US. That makes it easy to 
get where you want to go. And to 
i en i°y the Ambassador 
Class comfort that makes 
^ ^ > business travel such 

a pleasure. 




m 


...deserve the quiet comfort 
of TWA’s Ambassador Class. 


See your 


Leading the way to the USA 


TWA 




Two rivals 
battle for 
Guy’s deal 

Final details of the handing 
over of the private wing at 
Guy's Hospital London, are 
expected in the next few weeks. 

Two companies, American 
Medical International, which 
owns 12 private hospitals in 
Britain, and Hospital Cor- 
poration, the British subsid- 
iary of an American health 
care group, are now competing 
to take over the running of the 
64-bed wing. 

The successful company 
will be expected to invest 
£3 million to redevelop the 
wing, handing over a share of 
the profits to Guy's HospitaL 
The money will be used to 
upgrade facilities and convert 
the existing beds into 40 or 50 
bedrooms with private baths, 
giving an income of about 


1 I II, l.lf :K’i.: :1 dTil! iT~l VI, KT1 


The private wing, called 
Nuffield House, has slipped 
from a profit-malang concern 
bringing in £300,000 a year to 
its present position this year of 
a projected £600,000 loss. 


Nun ‘treated 
kitchen staff 
like children’ 

A nun at an old people’s 
home treated staff so badly 
that they were scared to speak 
to each other, an industrial 
tribunal was told yesterday. 

Mrs Agnes Gark, aged 32, 
of Drumoyne, Glasgow, was 
awarded £1,765 for unfair 
dismissal from her kitchen job 
at Nazareth House. 

Mrs Clark told the hearing 
i in Glasgow that Sister Philip, 
who was in charge of the 
kitchen, treated the staff like 
children. 

“She was always shouting at 
us and picking on us over 1 
trivial things,” she said. 
“Eventually we were too 
scared to speak to each other 
in case Sister Philip shouted at 
us.” 

Mrs Clark discussed the 
problem with the Mother 
Superior of the order that runs 
the home in Cardonald, Glas- 
gow. A few days later, Mrs 
Clark said, she was told by 
Sister Philip that she had been 
.replaced. 


propose to 
map genes 


An international tfstam. 
project for making t ^ J 
the whereabouts of erenJJJ 
in the body, and there ar?Z 
estimated 500,000, fa 
big excitement and 
troversy. ^ 

It is the most ambitfe*. 
scientific proposal since £ 
project to bod a mu » {S 


1 Biil t y jT 




pH; 


HB 







But tbe a microscopic amemt 
of material fbims the tn 
strands of the DNA, dean, 
ribonucleic arid, which ce* 
tains the blueprint oflife. The 
strands consist of 3,000 mft. 
lion biochemical beads twisted 
together in the double bethel 
genetic material decoded by 
Fhuicis Crick and James Wat- 
son, at Cambridge. 

The map reference ter a 
gem would be accompanied by 
an analysis of its chemical 
composition. 

Benefits would include cares 
or better treatments for a me 
than 3,000 known genetic 
illnesses, an mderstandfagaf 
why some genes go wrong an] 
cause cancer, development tf 
drags made from hamaa 
genes, and the resotatim ef 
controversies about evotobea. 

The identification of a gem 
is rare, and the location aad 
analysts of chemical make -49 
is the stuff of which Nobd 
prizes are made: That tie 
entire human “genome se- 
quence” coakl be nurarelkd ts 
part ef an international pro- 
gramme was raised at tie 
Gordon conference last year. 

Subsequently, eight work- 
shops of eminent scientists ■ 
die US and Europe bare 
debated how it might be dom. 

The parallel with the Mm 
landing was drawn by Sr 
Walter Bodmer, the geneticist 
and director of the Impend 
Cancer Research Fmd ■ 
London. He was cattim 
about a bulldozer approach tl 
research. But when Preside* 
Kennedy. set the goal to faaii 
ma n on .the Moon within t 
decade, he had been advhd 
by specialists confident tie 
technology existed. 

When President Nemo sell 
similar goal, for conquering 
cancer, there was no scientific 
advance to give the ambitim a 
foundation for success. 

In Sir Walters view, me 
missing element was the fade 
of understanding of taumu 
genetics. For him, the nap- 
ping of the complete genome is 
“the most exciting luma 
endeavour”. 

The most important discoT- 
ery this year which makes tin 
project feasible is the irsetef- 
meat of a way <rf greatly 
simplifying identifying wfakfc 
string of biochemical beads a 
the DNA forms a gene. 

Professor Leroy Hood am 
Dr Stephen Kent, of tie 
California Institute of Tech- 
nology, have manag ed tt 
mechanise the time-cons®*- 
ing method of chemically 
analysing genes, which wrn 
Nobel prizes for Professor 
Fred Sanger (Cambridge Uni- 
versity) and Professor Walter 
Gilbert (Harvard). 

Not everyone tavtived ® 

molecular biology and geaebo 

is convinced by the so-calW 


Professor James Tooze, of tie 
European Molecular Biolog 
Or ganizati on, is concerned 
about the disruptive effort <« 
other biological and rata ** 1 
research of concentrating » 
ranch effort and money on m 


Sale room 

Kentucky rifle shoots 
into the record books 

By Geraldine Norman, Sale Room Correspondent 
They made very long rifles At Sotheby’s in London J 
down in Kentucky in the bad faience table top that 


*« lMUJLMJL 1 ■v«lf t 


terday got the longest price, at 
£2 1.450, it has yet recorded for 
one of them. The pre-sale 
estimate was only £ 1,200 to 
£1,800. 

The flintlock rifle dates 
from about 1800 and has a 
barrel 45 in long with an 
attractive striped maple foil 
stock and scrolling silver inlay 
on the butt. It was a very 
accurate weapon for its day. 

The reason for the big price 
was that the rifle had survived 
m its original condition. Most 
Kentucky flintlocks were con- 
verted to percussion, with the 
result that flintlocks became 
rarities: in recent times dealers 
have busily converted the 
percussions back to flintlock 
i° a better- price. The 
Sotheby gun had avoided 
either conversion. 

There was an American 


from the US. The final battle 
was between two bidders in 
the room with Peter Finer, a 
Gloucestershire arms deafer 
carrying off the prize. 




an old aristocratic family 
bid to £57.200 
£ 8,000 to £ 12 . 000 ). » J* 
made at the small Kid ractojj 
in Germany in 1769 
elegantly painted wlbjj 
allegorical scene of 
at the crossroads by Abrahao 
Leihamer. It was bought bya 
north Gentian dealer on D*" 
half of a private collector. 

The new interest in the »»■ 
classical period was uw*’' 
lined by a Berlin vase ofaboj 

1800 . painted with gartandsw 

fruit and flowers, whtchffl*®- 
£9,900 (estimate £ 3.000 
£5.000). A Berlin Easto® 
only in high, made £V 
(estimate £1.000 to £1.500)- 

Among the prime 
the sale were two 
century blue and 
leaT drug jars. TheHm^nn 


\wumau. fcwiwwv ” - . ilfl A 

but the one froi" ^JftKSSe 
was unsold at £ 9.500 
£10.000 M £15,000). 
totalled £448.740 with w P 3 
cent left unsold; . - 


TTO V dtfiwmuhe oroduct be is to selL - than “id the ihn»~T&T or tJSt “ He wiff jive iRKWftff 


"TWTfftnn 






s, 

body J 

"‘"'■HI 
aim ./^h J’ 

:5?j5h 

: 

. tt,!sB s « ft 

■ba* ^ lL 

hu 

rri. a ' hlfl .. 

:, ”s i,r : 

; ■;•; »* 



rm 

''v 

S 


...... p! * 4, s^afc v 


t fl| 

" ,y'K ai 


~"k 




lj ! "1BK 

ih. 

*>i*3 
fiivji 
ir.nj 
!;«». 

‘ J-:*. 
ait 1 1 


L'fri .. 




•Uhl It! 


4 


t. 


XU 


r,Jr, *fcr !«. (/ 

: 

-’‘Mo* b Z* . 
•ft fcikmc •• 

-■" :■ 

C-A^VPk-a, : 

",‘ ^'f^an-ji i 

*"* frons ^ I 
4 3 ’‘’*‘ 'fMilDl W| i- 
,- ' a J,, «I riplg^ ■: 

n! ; • 
’ k1 ,,n hniM R : ' 

1 1 “ ewa! ncifrr i 
- i>? *Mcfc Nfe i 

1 Tb: j ' 

;:r - 1 ' “Zi Minr v 
• >"•-• K -..a^xj'V; 

: ‘ ini. rrjjjpsj J 1 
n J m ***i i: 4 ' 
-** 1 •••«■» iic t 

•i •*! * , .. ‘ 

*•••<’» :j( -..•t.'-.v- 
? rri>> k- 

i . •••";:»' ■!», V W 
«*- • ^ :mn >■ «• 
; b jmo, 


t’il'iS 


i. 

j:. 




■•'ft : 

"■■ 

>■• xyiir.i 
“ ••■ t IV*.- 

'"■ 5 *= ••x. 
V- 

r -«i tvt-. is«* 

ft 




.*i. » \ »«*.• 



•. -s'. V>*S : 

i £ • ' ' .i.'i—J ■ ■ 

•: • A ■■» 

.1 /• .- • Ik-* •• 
• • n "1 *h i 

■ ... - - .n ■■^ p ' 

1 - ..k -.V. "■ 

. i---P 

. i 

. ^'i.V «“* ; 

.. ..... .» w jj :r* 1 

. ... !.=■•:: *•• 
. - t. . z 


•.u;i •' 

_ . . t.; 


•»> 


. s!n^ 
| \nd' 


and Libya swap 
seven prisoners after 
secret deal on pardons 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 8 1986 


OVERSEAS NEWS 


From Peter Nichols. Rome 


superv ised by the officer who 
naa regional command in the 
arca. The officer was later 

The health or both men, 
after six years in a Libyan 
prison. — 


* 


iSSSl^- 

^"■£ c c? 

•p^pass-h.— «- 

before the Libyan° m |Sd£ l f® 0 "'- *“ aI a ,ow ebb- 

Co one! Gaddafi. deliv<W^ A«ortingioan Italian official 
Potentially embarrasrin! H h? had ^ Atm v * XTa % 

disastrous”, especially as they 
then bad no prospect of 
release. 

The other two Italians. 
Maura Piccin and Massimo 
Caporali. were serving 10-year 
sentences for possession of 
drugs. 

The Libyans released by the 
Italians were serving sen- 
tences for murder or at- 
tempted murder of fellow 
Libyans in Italy who opposed 
Colonel Gadaffi. 

Jussef Uhida fined six bul- 
lets into a Libyan business- 
man and killed him in April 
1980 on Rome's Via Veneto. 
He was first given a life 
sentence and then had this 
reduced to 26 years on appeal. 

The other two had shot at 
two Libyans in February (981 
at Rome's Fiumirino airport, 
having mistaken one of diem 
for a leading figure in the 
opposition to Colonel Gad- 
am. They were both sentenced 
to 14 years and 1 1 months. 

Both sides have maintained 
a minimum of judicial proce- 
dure by having their respec- 
tive prisoners released after 
being pardoned by the heads 
of state. 

The object of abiding by 
judicial proceedings was to 
avoid the impression of a 
simple barter arrangement of 


s P<*ch Iasi rtgh t irlhfch!* 
*™® p ecicd Wa l iack^l5j v he 

£ e S# ?a ’3S r 3 

attacks ^wii* When he “waMy 

naTion fi oi P D^ d ^ ^ the-Imer- 

Jhem i RCd CroSS - Tw O Of 

them. Signor Enzo Castelli 

wre S SJ? ?ardo Se,iciat0 * 

wvre arrested in August 19R0 

Smt SS S! of P. louin 8a«amst 
l ate sec unty. Signor was also 

charged with belonging to the 
5S 1 8emc * of a foreign 
fn 1 982 both were tried by a 

milnary coun. Signor 
SJSWS sentenced to 
dca, h« Signor Castelli given 15 
yeare. On appeal they both 
received life imprisonment 
ntc specific charts were that 
they acted as links between a 
Libyan officer planning to 
overthrow Colonel Gadaffi 
and the Egyptians. 

They were working in the 
i obruJc area on contracts 


prisoners between 

governments. i 

The Libjans had been 
pressing for the release of the 
three gunmen ever since they 
were arrested, and the Italians 
took the opportunity of 
exploiting the situation to the 
benefit of the tour Italians 
whose release they have 
Obtained. 

Where does this leave 
Italy's relations with Libya? 
The Italian view is that the 
political repercussions are un- 
likely to be of great signifi- 
cance. except for some 
domestic attacks from par- 
liamentarians here who object 
to dealings of any kind with 
Libya. 

The whole affair is seen by 
the Italian authorities as 
essentially a humanitarian 
step by them. 

The principal problem left 
to be solved between the two 
countries remains the $750 
million (£520 million) which 
the Italians estimate is owed 
by Libya to Italian 
businessmen. 

Already some Libyan assets 
have been sequestrated by the 
courts in Italy at the request of 
a company unable to obtain 
payment from Libyan auth 
on lies. The method the Ital- 
ians are trying to adopt to 
settle these bills is to take just 
enough oil from Libya to 
cover more or less the value of 
the Libyan debts. 

This has to still to be agreed 
and the Italians feel they will 
have to wait until the current 
“day of revenge" is over and 
temporarily forgotten before 
they can resume talks in ; 
reasonably calm atmosphere. 



Mr ~V itzhak Shamir. Israeli Foreign Minister, looking towards Mr Shimon Peres alter the Prime Minister's farewell 
speech in the Knes set Mr Shamir is doe to take over the premiership next week as part of an accord. Jordan talks, page 9 


Babangida 
moves on 
corruption 

By Nicholas Beestoo 

The wide-scale reshuffles in 
the Nigerian hierarchy over 
the past three weeks signals a 
move by President Babangida 
to keep his ministers “on the 
hop", according to diplomatic 
sources. 

Yesterday the military gov- 
ernment in Lagos appointed 
Rear Admiral Patrick Ko- 
shoni, the Labour Minister, tb 
Chief of the Naval Staff 
fol lowing the promotion of his 
precedessor, .Rear Adhural 
Augustus Aikhomu, to the 
country's second-highest post 
of Chief of General Siaft 
Three new ministers were 
named last month and on 
Monday five changes were 
made to the Armed Forces 
Ruling Council. 

The most dramatic change 
is the unexplained removal of 
Commodore Ebitu Ukiwe as 
Chief of General Staff His 
new post has not been an- 
nounced, and a government 
spokesman in Lagos gave no 
explanation for the demotion. 

Diplomatic sources suggest, 
however, that Gen Babangida 
hopes to keep a tight reign on 
security and corruption by 
making regular ministerial 
changes to prevent senior 
officers from becoming too 
influential in key ministries. 
Commodore Ukiwe’s demise 
follows his conspicuous ab- 
sence from the Independence 
Day parade last week. 

A Christian from the Ibo 
tribe, he embarrassed the 
Government last January 
when he said he had not been 
informed by Gen Babangida. 
who is a Muslim, of Nigeria's 
decision to join the Islamic 

Conference organization. 

Commodore Ukiwe had 
been a member of the ruling 
Supreme Military Council 
under General Mohammed 
Buhari. who was deposed in a 
coup 14 months ago. His 
removal means that Ibos nc 
longer figure in the decision- 
making military council 


Death proves a 
point in Beirut 


a warning rather than a solu- 
tion. Sheikh -Sobhi Saleh 
proved the point yesterday by 
dying -at the bands of two 
.masked gunmen on a motor 
cyde .in Sakiet eldanzier. a 
neighbourhood of high-rise 
fiats and traffic jams. 

So did the six -Christian 
militiamen, each shot in the 
back of the head, whose 


From Robert Fisk, Beirut 

Death in Beirut tends to be Was the murder of the Sheikh. 

aged 53, who came from the 
northern city of Tripoli, some 
kind of warning? 

President GemayeL who isa 
Christian Maronite. lost no 
time in posthumously giving 
the cleric the Order of the 
Cedar. Lebanon's highest 
award. A general strike was 
called in west Beirut by the 
Dahr aJ-Iftah. the Sunni re- 
ligious hierarchy. Sheikh Has- 
san Khaled, the Sunni Gfand 
Mufti, announced that fie 
would return to Beirut at once 
from Moscow to consider the 
consequences of the murder. 

There was less doubt about 
the murderers of the six 
Christians found lying in the 
river bed. They were among 
55 men listed as missing by 
the pro-Syrian Christian mi- 
litia of Elie Hobeika after their 
abortive raid into east Beirut 
almost two weeks ago. 

Their massacre — for it 
seems clear that- all have 
perished at the hands of their 
Phalangist captors, even 
though only 20 bodies have 
been discovered — spoke for 
itself. 

Of more long-term con- 
sequence was the decision 
yesterday to deploy Syrian 
military “observers" outside 
the Rashidiyeh Palestinian 
the subject of . camp south of Tyre to ensure 
in the Muslim that the ceasefire between 
Palestinian guerrillas and pro- 
Syrian Shia Muslim Amal 
militiamen is maintained. 

It is the first lime Syrian 
troops and intelligence agents 
have openly appeared south of 
Tyre — scarcely 1 2 miles from 
the Israeli frontier — and their 
deployment represents an. im- 
portant extension of Syrian 
power in Lebanon. 

_ h means that, save for areas 
of the Bekaa valley, the Chris- 
tian districts north of Beirut 
and the Israeli occupation 
zone in the south, there is 
scarcely a comer of Lebanon 
that is not now subject to 
Syrian influence 



Sheikh Sobhi Saleh: murder 
seen as a wanting. 

decomposing corpses were 
found in a dried-up river bed. 

The Sheikb's assassination 
is already 
speculation 
sector of west Beirut, which is 
where he- met his brutal end. 
shot in his limousine as he left 
the Khaled bin Walid mosque. 
He was the second most 
important Sunni prelate in 
Lebanon. 

The gunmen left no clue, of 
course, to their identity or 
motives. But the Sunnis of 
Beirut drew their own conclu- 
sions. Was not the minority 
but wealthy Sunni community 
being accused of supporting 
the Palestinians? Did not 
these accusations come from 
the Syrians? And did not Ike 
Syrian Army and secret police 
return to west Beirut last July? 


New bid to 
discredit 
Solidarity 

From Roger Boyes 
Warsaw 

The Polish Government, in 
an attempt to discredit union 
leaders such as Mr Zbigniew 
Bujak and Nobel laureate Mr 
Lech Walesa, has presented 
the financial balance sheets of 
the banned union. Solidarity, 
decoded by the secret police: 

The accounts, released on 
Monday, were found on com- 
puter discs snatched when 
police raided the hiding place 
of Mr Bujak. 

According to Mr Jerzy Ur- 
ban, a Government spokes- 
man. the discs — which also 
included letters from Solidar- 
ity exiles in the West — show 
that hundreds of thousands of 
pounds in Western donations 
(including a large sum from 
the US) flowed into union 
offices abroad and to the 
underground in Poland. 

Letters quoted by Mr Urban 
also revealed that the union 
had been squabbling over 
money rather than strategy. 

Officials gave copies of the 
accounts and the letters to 
Western reporters. According 
to the financial prim-out 
£300.000 was sent to help the 
Solidarity in Poland last year. 

The timing of the Govern- 
ment move is significant 
Solidarity has recently an- 
nounced the establishment of 
an advisory council which 
would, if the Government 
were willing, talk with the 
authorities. . 

But the Government has 
already banned the council 
and has therefore made it dear 
that it does not want to talk to 
its members. 

The problem of Mr Walesa 
is more delicate. The Govern- 
ment says it is now willing to 
talk- to anybody in Poland 
prepared to worit within the 
constitution for the good of 
the country. 

Mr Walesa, who is not on 
the board of the new Solidar- 
ity council would seem 10 
qualify and is internationally 
respected. But the authorities 
do not want to stir up old 
ghosts, or alarm Moscow and 
are therefore equally keen to 
discredit Mr Walesa. 

According to Mr Urban, 
those documents reveal that 
Solidarity exiles — some of 
them convicted traitors — 
have been following instruc- 
tions from the Solidarity 
leadership in Poland. 

“Will these fragments of the 
documents make anyone be- 
lieve that Walesa and Bujak 
really want sincere co-opera- 
tion and want to act within the 
socialist system for the well- 
being of Poland? They are 
people with black palates," Mr 
Urban said. 

Asked by Western reporters 
whether Mr Walesa stands a 
chance of becoming a partner 
to the Government, Mr Urban 
sai± “No I cannot imagine 
this ever happening." 


Setback for extremist leader 

FBI raids rightist cult HQ 


From Michael Bin yon, Washington 
The cuh-like organization of denounced by Mr LaRoucbe 


Mr Lyndon LaRoucbe, the 
right-wing extremist, has been 
dealt a devastating blow after 
a dawn raid on his Virginia 
headquarters by more than 
300 armed police, and court 
indictments of 1 0 of his closest 
aides on charges of credit-card 
fraud amounting to more than 
SI million (£689,000). 

The raid by agents of the 
Federal Bureau of Investiga- 
tion and other lan-eaforce- 
raeat agencies follows a two- 
year grand jury investigation 
of allegations that the 
LaRoucbe organization had 
defrauded more than 1,000 
people ' through fraudulent 
credit-card billings. 

Unauthorized charges were 
made on account numbers 
obtained when people sub- 
scribed to publications con- 
trolled by Mr LaRoucbe or 
offered contributions to his 
organization. 

The indictments, issued m 
Boston on his aides and five 
affiliated groups, were swiftly 


as “politically motivated." 

Coming only a month before 
the mid-term elections in 
which LaRooche supporters 
are running for office in sev- 
eral states, the accusations 
will further undermine the 
credibility of the eccentric 
political maverick. 

Mr LaRoucbe himself was 
not charged, hat is under 
investigation. 

The sue of the police raid, 
using tracker dogs nod marks- 
men, on the closely guarded 
LaRoucbe headquarters in 
Leesburg. 50 miles west of 
Washington, reflected concern 
that the group has a reputation 
for harassing opponents. 

The FBI obtained several 
important documents and 
financial records, which a 
Justice Department spokes- 
man said might link Mr La- 
Ronche directly with criminal 
activity. Separate investiga- 
tions are already underway in 
10 states on his organization's 
activities. 


Federal officials said the 
investigation had been 
particularly difficult as the 
LaRoucbe group had repeat- 
edly filed court motions to 
delay proceedings. 

The 30-page indictment 
quotes him telling an asso- 
ciate: “We are going to stalL 
tie them up in the courts, jnst 
keep stalling, stall and appeal, 
stall and appeal” 

Mr LaRooche. who was 
once on tbe radical left, has 
warned of a bizarre constella- 
tion of conspiracies, saying the 
US and tbe Soviet Union had 
plotted against workers, the 
Queen was head of an inter- 
national drug-trafficking ring, 
and prominent US officials 
such as Dr Henry Kissinger 
were KGB agents. 

His supporters have also 
been accused of intimidation 
by repeated telephone calls, 
often late at night, asking for 
funds. 

They call for a build-op of 
US nudear forces. 


South Africa visit not 
likely to move Steel 

From Michael Hornsby, J ohannesb urg 


Mr David Steel the leader 
of the Liberal Party, arrived 
here yesterday at the start of a 
four-day visit to South Africa, 
declaring that he would be. 
“very surprised" if he learned 
anything that would change 
his party's policy towards 
South Africa. 

A motion calling for the 
imposition of comprehensive 
mandatory economic sanc- 
tions against South Africa was 


Vienna — The Austrian Gov- 
ernment announced sanctions 
against Sooth Africa yester- 
day which conform with those 
of tbe EEC and are less severe 
than those announced by the 
US (Richard Bassett writes). 


approved by the Liberal Party 
at its assembly in Eastbourne 
at the end of last month. It was 
aigued that sanctions offered 
the last opportunity for peace- 
ful change. 

Mr Steel, who is to visit 
Durban and Cape Town, 
drove from Johannesburg's 
Jan Smuts Airport to Pretoria 
for an hour’s meeting with Mt 
PU c Botha, the South African 
Foreign Minister. 

He said he hoped to meet a 
“broad spectrum" of people 
and to talk with “every shade 
of opinion", but, mindful 
perhaps of the fete of other 
foreigners who have visited 
South Africa recently with 
that aim, he declined to say 
whom he planned to see. 

He did disclose that a 
request to visit Nelson 
Mandela, the jailed African 
National Congress (ANQ 


Titian-schooF painting original, say experts 


From Paul Vailely 
New York 

4 painting, which was 
granted an export IjcencajOT. 

Britain as bein» "of *****” 
of Titian", has been acclaimed 
as the work of the master and 
has sold here for 40 times its 

on JC' 

and ChiW with St Catherine 
a “Sd S infant S« John *e 
Bantisf, was sold at Sout- 
hs in London in Apnl for 

£33.000- . - 

This week it was announce*! 

had the painting re-e^^ed 

as an authentic 

said it for "aroand motion 

(£!J7 million) t0 ^ 

Art Museum in Fort Worth. 

Te Sm the New York art 

SSSKS 

Ss!!K*2r 

that the 41 .n by » m 
ing is a studio worn- ^ 

BotMr John B^ley.oMof 
America's leading art figmjes 
and chief conservator at the 



Detail from ‘Madonna and Child with Si Catherine and the Infant Si John the Baptist*. 


Metropolitan Museum of Art, 
is stating that the canvas is the 
work of the studio master. 

“The Titian is an absolutely 
marvellous picture" he told 
Vcw York Art . the newsletter- 
w hich announced the sale. 

American experts. » ho have 
had access to x-rays of tbe 


work say that the photographs 
reveal that the work was 
originally painted in exactly 
the same format as that of an 
acknowledged Titian in the 
National Gallery tn.kmdon. 

“Later the figure of St John 
was painted out and covered 
with a landscape. The figure 


was then moved to the op- 
posite side of the picture." said 
Mr Piero CorsinL the New 
York art dealer, who bought 
the painting at tbe London 
auction. 

Mr Corsino believes that 
the work is a preliminary 
study for the-National Gallery 


picture. “The other is far more 
finished and refined," be said. 

The credulity of the art 
world on tbe matter has been 
stretched by Mr Corsino’s 
announcement that another 
painting be acquired in tbe 
same sale which was repre- 
sented in the catalogue as 
“Studio Of Paolo Caliari called 
Paolo Veronese" is in fact also* 
by the master of the schooL 

“This has . been confirmed 
by Professor Terisio Pignatti 
of Venice, who is the leading 
expert on Veronese." Mr 
Corsfni said yesterday. An- 
other American museum was 
already interested in buying it 
at a price of about S500,000. 
The painting, “The Rape of 
Europa," cost Mr Corsini 
£12,100 at Sotheby's. The 
seller had bought it at 
Sotheby's three years before, 
identically catalogued for 
£11.550. On that occasion he 
was the only bidder on the 
picture. 

The dealer says be had no 
problems in obtaining an ex- 
port licence for the firet work. 

He said: “They still think it 
is a school painting but I have 
no doubts. I suspected as much 
as soon as I saw it. But now 
that it has been cleaned and x- 
rayed I am as certain as 
anyone can be." 


leader, had been turned down. 
He said it appeared it would 
also be difficult to meet Mrs 
Winnie Mandela, the ANC 
leader’s wife, as she was “very 
busy". 

It is known that Mr Steel 
plans to meet Chief 
Mangosuthu ButhelezL the 
powerful Zulu leader, prob- 
ably in Ulundl the capital of 
the tribal homeland of 
KwaZulu, today. Chief 
' Buthelezi. KwaZulu's Chief 
Minister, is opposed to sanc- 
tions and intensely disliked by 
more radical black leaders. 

Later today Mr Steel is to 
meet Mr Alan Paton. the 
novelist, and Professor Des- 
mond Clarence, former vice- 
chancellor of Natal 
llniversity. who is chairman 
of the so-called Natal 
“indaba" (conference), which 
is trying to draw up a folly 
democratic and multi-racial 
constitution for the province. 

Mr Paton was leader of the 
South African Liberal Party 
until it disbanded in the late 
1960s. 

• Security man killed: A gun- 
man shot dead a security force 
member in a black township 
and a black man was badly 
wounded when a crowd set 
him alight, authorities said 
yesterday (AP reports). The 
Bureau for Information said 
an officer identified as C 
Ngombane was killed when 
someone fired three shots at 
him in Joza township, outside 
Grahamstown in the eastern 
Cape Province on Monday 
nighL 

East bows to 
power of press 
at Vienna talks 

From Richard Bassett 
Vienna 

For the first time in the 
history of the negotiations on 
European secunty and co- 
operation (CSCE), the Soviet 
bloc has agreed to open some 
plenary meetings to journal- 
ists at next month's Vienna 
meeting. 

The agreement was hailed 
yesterday as a “major 
breakthrough" by Western 
delegates at the end of a two- 
week preparatory meeting in 
the Austrian capital 

"We should like to make 
CSCE a for more public pro- 
cess but until now the East has 
always resisted allowing 
journalists into any but the 
opening sessions of the 
conference." One Western 
ambassador told journalists 
yesterday. 

Next month's Vienna meet- 
ing is the follow-up to the 
Madrid conference provided 
for by the Helsinki Final An. 

Delegations from 35 Euro- 
pean Countries will attend: 
only the Albanians will not be 
represented. 

The Vienna follow-up meet- 
ing is scheduled to last half a 
year. 


We’ll fight 
warns 
Pretoria 

The South- African Defence 
Minister, General Magnus 
Maian. yesterday warned 
Mozambique of possible mili- 
tary reprisals if it continued to 
allow black nationalist guerril- 
las to operate from its soil 
(Michael Hornsby writes). 

General Maian also said 
that the time might have come 
to declare southern Africa a 
neutral zone with no military 
access for the United States or 
Russia. 

South Africa was threatened 
by an economic war by the 
United States and a revolu- 
tionary war backed by the 
Soviet Union and could not 
allow itself to be caught in a 
pincer movement. 

Pretoria wanted neither but 
would be prepared to fight 
both if it had to. General 
Maian told the South African 
Press Association. 


Chile court 
bars trial 
of 39 

for abuses 

Santiago (Reuter) - The 
Chilean Supreme Court ruled 
yesterday that a former junta 
member and 39 others, 
including three retired gen- 
erals. could not be tried in 
connection with the dis- 
appearance of communist 
leaders a decade ago. 

The court upheld an earlier 
appeals court decision ruling 
that the case was covered by a 
1978 amnesty law. 

The law decreed that se- 
curity forces could not be tried 
for abuses in the years im- 
mediately after the 1973 mili- 
tary coup. 

$7.5m US aid 
for Sudan 

Washington - The United 
States has signed an agree- 
ment giving Sudan about 
9.400 metric tonnes of aid 
worth $7.5 million t£5.2 mil- 
lion). an official of the Admin- 
istration for International 
Development (AID) said 
(Mohsin All writes). 

A formal transfer agreement 
of the food aid. mainly sor- 
ghum. was signed in Wash- 
ington on Friday, he said. 

Troops claim 

Athens — Mr Karolos 
Papoulias, the Greek Foreign 
Minister, accused Turkey ol 
reinforcing its military' pres- 
ence in northern Cyprus by 
8.000 to 9.000 men. 

Pope’s plan 

Annecy. France (Reuter) — 
The Pope called on Roman 
Catholics to follow the exam- 
ple of France's 16th century 
Saint. Francis of Sales, and 
inject new dynamism into the 
church. 

Berlin parade 

Berlin (Reuter) — Troops of 
the East German Army. Navy 
and Air Force marched 
through the centre of East 
Berlin to mark the 37ih 
anniversary of the communist 
German state. 

Swazi change 

Mbabane (Reuter) — King 
Mswati of S wazilan d has 
sacked the Prime Minister. 
Prince Bhekimpi, and re- 
placed him with the former 
Assistant Police Commis- 
sioner. Mr Sotsha Dlamini. 

Sydney charge 

Sydney (AP) — One of 
Australia's most wanted fu- 
gitives. Mr Barry Bull was 
charged with conspiracy to 
import drugs and with pass- 
port violations after being 
extradited from Austria. 

Titanic Bill 

Washington (AP) — The 
House of Representatives has 
given final approval to a Bill 
directing the Reagan Admin- 
istration to consider making 
the site of the wreck of the 
passenger liner Titanic an 
international maritime me- 
morial 

Glider crash 

Dar es Salaam (Reuter) — 
Three young Frenchmen have 
been charged in Tanzania with 
illegal entry after a hang-glider 
crashed on Mount Kili- 
manjaro, judicial sources said. 


Four years old. 
Seriously underweight 
for her age. 
Scavenging for food 
where she can find it. 
fis he’s English. 



With parents who re- 
fused to acknowledge that 
she even existed this child 
was being slowly and deli- 
berately starved. Here in 
England. 

Fortunately we found 
her in time. Yet without your 
donations we'd have been 
powerless to help. 

■£15.48 can protect a 
child for two weeks. And 
thatk the sum we’re asking 
for now 

If you can't afford quite 
that much, all donations are 
gratefully' received. 


IwBntwhdpprotecrachildand | 
eodne np’ cheque or postal order; 

* I 

£15.-0 □ £50.960 XB1880 I 

Arctss and Visa card holders may f 

debit their accounts. Nb. 



{W«»d jWrdowri.au> 
Dr A;C0ra«itRd,7\S43 
K5POC. FREEPOST. 


jiaaagj. 



KJ * L«lVjL,ruJ 1 *i J_ V* J 


i riii l iiVibo VvU/iSiidi/Ali tX IVoQ 


Christian P ornnpratic Party congress 



rm 

— 

Jnti 

jee< 

u 

rman 1 
ty has la 
attack 
ty runs 
notion p 
ty assoc , 
umeroot \ 
ifcrence 
stipulate 
mage de 
s or 
toil, his 
Is me, w: • 
len the * 
ded, ioj 
ybody tc , 
ey like ii f 
into dis 
iofara 
nfercnce 
live cop 
der tha' 
solution 
x> Wane 
dinous a 
*ate". 
timed iaie 
im show 

as been st 

ifinishP 
should at 
>r debate. 

iann 


• The fw 
eccentridi 
questions 
by the 
question i 
stay pen 
Kingdom' 
expect to: 
orlOyeai 


Loy 

Among 
against 
pool last 
West IX 
parttcuk 
school, i 
chanty 
rates. “ 
Sherbor 
pie in 
sidizing 
he said, 
case of 
for Pan 
school. 


Proft 
anno 
field 
robo 
Greg 
Britt 
new 
bers 
at it 
at v 
lain 
mist 
thoi 
exis 

DavtSi- 


On the one hand, Kohl, warns of Soviet risks 


this is the world s 


portable Cellphone 

There are more Motorola Series 8000 Cellphones in 
constant use around the world than any other portable. 

Pick one up and it’s easy to see why. 

It has a solid, reliable feel. The controls are all on 
the front and it’s as easy to use as a conventional phone. 

It’s definitely an essential business tool, and not an 
executive toy. 

Motorola Series 8000 Cellphones are truly portable. 
You are not tied to an office or a can They can be used in 
the office, in the car, on the golf course, on the train. 

In fact, you can use them almost anywhere within the 
Cellular network — which isn’t surprising as Motorola 
supply most of the hardware that makes up the Cellnet 
, operating system in the UK. 
b The Motorola 8000 package includes a battery 

\ recharger. A range of optional accessories is also 

mm So if you’d like to stay in touch, get in touch 

with Motorola today. 


APPROVED lor connection to 
telectMnmuttotiori.systems 
specified in the instrucSons for use 
subject to the coreffltons set out 
intfoettr ■ 

BAST S/1357M1E/500121 


MOTOROLA 


From John England 
Mainz 

The “new dynamic” of 
Soviet foreign policies under 
Mr Mikhail Gorbachov held 
chances of a closer coopera- 
tion between East and West, 
Chancellor Helmut Kohl said 
here yesterday. 

While welcoming the Reyk- 
javik summit between Presi- 
dent Reagan and Mr 
Gorbachov in his keynote 
speech at the annual con- 
ference of the Christian 
Democratic Union (CDU), 
Herr Kohl noted that the new 
Soviet policies around the 


t polio 
beldris 


Nevertheless, they also pre- 
sented chances that could lead 
to greater understanding, co- 
operation and, above all, im- 
portant results in disarma- 
ment and arms controls. 

“We shall use every 
opportunity, based on our 
national and alliance interests, 
to develop our relations with 
our Eastern neighbours at all 
levels,” he stated. 

Here Kohl told the con- 
ference that West German 
voters were faced with two 
choices in the forthcoming 
January elections. 

They will decide if we shall 
continue the work of renewal, 
or if the Federal Republic will 
take the path of withdrawal 
from practically everything 
that in the past decades has 
guaranteed us freedom, se- 
curity and affluence,” he said. 

The elections, he said, were 
about whether West Germany 
could maintain its place 
among the leading industrial . 
nations beyond the turn of the 
century. 

“We are the government 
party, and- we want tc remain 
so,” the Chancellor remarked. 
“We have done good work, 
and we want to oontinue it” 

Almost echoing Mrs 
Thatcher's “we are going up” 
message in Bournemouth this 
week. Here Kohl told the 780 
delegates: “It is going upwards 
in Germany. It should stay 
so.” 

In a sharp attack on the 



Herr Kohl acknowledging the applause of delegates at the CDU party congress yesterday 


'Social Democratic Party 
(SPD). Herr Kohl said: “We 
have the future in view. The 
SPD wants to return to the 
policies of yesterday.” He said 
the SPD had learnt nothing 
from their four years in oppo- 
sition. They would make the 
old mistakes again - only 
further to the len and much 
more dogmatically. 

Herr Kohl promised West 
Germans an eight-point post- 
election programme that gave 


priority to providing better 
chances for families, better 
pensions for the old. tax 
reforms to encourage private 
initiative and greater flexibil- 
ity on working hours to help 
fight unemployment 

Progress in science and 
technology would be pursued 
in order to serve people, not 
the other way around. Here 
Kohl added. 

With an eye on terrorism, 
he said state authority would 


Britain now ‘thinks Europe’ 
Chalker tells EEC critics 



From Richard Owen 
Strasbourg 

Against a background of 
'mid-term criticism of Bri- 
tain's handling of some issues 
during' its presidency of the 
EEC. which ends in Decem- 
ber, Mrs Lynda Chalker, Min- 
ister of State at the Foreign 
Office, yesterday offered a 
robust defence of Britain's 
European credentials. 

She said important changes 
going on in Europe reflected in 
part “an evolution in Britain’s 
attitude to the Community”, 
and suggested that foe 1980s 
would be seen as foe decade in 
which “we stopped talking 
about foe British problem.” 

The EEC summit in Lon- 
don in December would en- 
dorse foe British strategy for 
reducing unemployment in 
Europe and creating jobs and 
enterprise through the com- 
pletion of foe internal market, 
Mrs Chalker said. 

Britain took over the presi- 
dency of foe EEC Council of 


Ministers from The Nether- 
lands in July, and will hand it 
over to Belgium in January. 
The performance of British 
ministers in foe chair has been 
praised, not least in resolving 
budgetary issues. 

In her address at the Euro- 



Mrs Chalker defending 
Britain’s credentials. 


Mellor urges EEC to 
move on drug abuse 

Fran Our Own Correspondent, Strasbourg 


Britain yesterday imposed 
an EEC pho to fight the 
growing menace of drug abase 
to be put before EEC interior 
ministers when they meet in 
London on October 20. 

At the same time, a report 
from the European Parliament 
said the EEC shoold reduce 


Third World farmers to grow 
non-narcotic crops. 

Sir Jack Stewart-Chirk, 
Conservative MEP for Sussex 
East, who chased the parl- 
iament's Committee of Inquiry 
into drag abase in Europe, said 
that EEC contribotions to the 
United Nations Fund for Drag 
Abase Control would enable 
growers “without dramatic 
loss of income" to switch to 
alternative crops which the 
EEC coaid undertake to buy. 

Pr e s en t in g the results of foe 
inquiry, Sir Jack called for 
increased controls at Europe's 
external frontiers, especially 
in Spain and Portugal, “in 
view of the Latin- American 
connection.” 

Mr David Mellor, Minister 
of State at the Home Office, 
who recently toured Latin 
America tou -investigate foe 
drug proble m at first hand, put 
forward his own seven-point 

Angola seeks 
image boost 

Angola's Marxist Govern- 
ment has approached a British 
public relations firm to im- 
prove its image in foe West 
and fight a sophisticated 

nas^lavimbi. foe guerrilla 
leader. (Nicholas Beeston 
writes). 

The company. Pielle. is ex- 
pected to finalize an agree- 
ment soon. A prime objective 
will be to improve quality and 1 
speed of Government reports, j 


plan in an address to the 
Parliament, although this did 
not contain the Parliament's 
own proposal for subsidized 
alternative crops. 

Mr Mellor said his plan was 
intended to give foe EEC “foe 
distinct role” in combating 
drag abase. It indndes effec- 
tive controls at EEC external 
frontiers so that internal fron- 
tiers between states can be 
relaxed: effective laws in all 
EEC states to parish traffick- 
ers and police and anti-drug 
squad co-operation. 

There would also be joint 
assessments by EEC ambas- 
sadors in drug-producing 
countries; some guarantee that 
EEC aid to Third World 
countries would take account 
of those countries' efforts 
against drag abuse; a collec- 
tive strategy for reducing de- 
mand for drags among the 
young and improved treatment 
and rehabilitation for addicts. 

Sir Jack Stewart-Clark 
said there were one-and-a-half 
million heroin addicts in EEC 
countries and dras-related 
offences accounted for half of 
all arrests in Europe. 

He also pointed out that foe 
drugs trade had a world-wide 
value of £200 billion. 


peari Parliament yesterday to 
foe Kangaroo Group, a pres- 
sure group for the abolition of 
barriers to movement and 
trade, Mrs Chalker noted that 
at their meeting in London 
last month, EEC interior min- 
isters had agreed to fight ! 
terrorism “not by turning our 
backs on the goal of freer 
movement, but by better 
intelligence, tighter visa arr- 
angements and improved 
extradition procedures.” . 

But Britain has come under 
fire over two hotly-contested 
European issues: sanctions 
against South Africa and 
cheaper air feres in Europe. 

Last month. Sir Geoffrey 
Howe, the Foreign Secretary 
and President of the Council 
of Ministers, presided over a 
package of limited sanctions 
against Pretoria which was 
. widely viewed as a tame com- 
promise and harshly criticized 
by states such as The Nether- 
lands and Denmark. 

When foreign ministers of 
foe Twelve meet at foe end of 
this month in Luxembourg, 
Sir Geoffrey will come under 
renewed pressure to take a 
more active stand in favour of 
tougher sanctions to match 
those imposed by the US 
Congress. 

On air fares, there is dis- 
appointment at the watering 
down of foe commitment 
made only last month by Mr 
John Moore, the Transport 
Minister, to tackle “unjust” 
price and route-fixing cartels. 

At a special EEC meeting in 
London last week, Mr Moore 
was able onfy to secure agree- 
ment on a “first step” towards 
deregulation of air transport 
by 1 992, and foe Dutch — who 
campaigned for liberalization 
during their presidency earlier 
this year - went so far as to 
boycott foe meeting. Mr Tony 
Venables, director of foe EEC 
Consumer Group, BEUC, ac- 
cused Britain of a sell-out to 
foe airiinesL 

Yesterday, Mrs Chalker in- 
sisted that whatever the diffi- 
culties in foreign affairs, foe 
prospects for effective steps 
toward a genuine internal 
market by foe target date of 
1992 were promising, and foe 
outlook for the British presid- 
ency was bright. 

SC officials say the time- 
table for internal market de- 
cisions to reduce trade barriers 
has slipped badly and, of 100 
directives which should have 
been approved by the end of 
foe year, fewer than 50 are 
likely to be passed. 


also be strengthened. 

West Germany would re- 
main closely tied to foe West- 
ern alliance white continuing 
its efforts towards East-West 
dialogue. The main goal was 
foe reunification of Germain 
in a free and united Europe, he ! 
asserted. 

Dr Heincr Geissler, the 
CDLTs general-secretary, win 
table today the party's “Mani- . 
festo for the future” which sets 
its goals into the 1 990s. 


Ugandan 

ministers 

charged 

Kampala (Reuter) — Three ■ 
Ugandan, cabinet mmisten 
and 17 other people were • 
charged noth treason yes-', 
terday in the Kampala Chief ; 
Magistrate’s court 

• Mr Aloysios Liiga, Chirf - 
Magistrate, said the three, Mr 
Andrew Kayiira (Energy), Mr ■; 
David Lwanga (Environment) 
and Mr Evaristo Nyano 
(Commerce), had plotted to 
overthrow the Government by 
force of arms. The congw- 
ators had drawn np military 
plans for foe execution of the • 
plot, he added. - 

The other accused include 
Mr Paulo Mnwanga, the far- 
mer Vice-President of ; 
Uganda, and seven serving 
soldiers, ranging in rank from 
private to commander. 

Mr Muwangaandtwooft&e 
soldiers were absent from the 
courtroom in central Kampala. 

Mr Liiga said the coospir- ' 
acy covered a period from 
August 20 to Friday, whra 
security men of Presided 
Yoweri Museveni's National 
Resistance Army (NBA) he* . 
gan rounding up suspects with 
the arrest of Mr Kayiira after : 
breaking np a secret meetteg ; 
of Uganda Freedom Artsy . 
soldiers. 

The magistrate remanded .. 
the men in custody in Lufoa 
maximum security jail m® 
October 21. A Govennne** : 
statement at the weekend ac- 
cused the ministers, and feel? . 
others, of encouraging rebels . 
attacking NRA positions n> . 
northern Uganda. _ ’ 


Athens stands 
firm against 

Turks in EEC 

From Mario Modiano 
Athens 

Greece is "determined to 
block Turkey's full member- 
ship of foe EEC unless d..- 
complies with conditions lfflo. 
down by Athens, Mr Karows . 
Papoulias. the Foreign Mi® - , 
isler said yesterday. , 

The conditions inch»» ; 
full respect for human ngm* 
an end to threats to V 1 **! *; 
integrity, withdrawal of troop* - 
from Cyprus, revocation « - 
discriminatory legislation 
against Greeks m Turkey, anfl 
an end to opium production , 
and trafficking. _ ' 


Spanish Opposition members quit 

By Richard Wigg, Madrid 

iJKaSofS XSSr**!!!? »■“"! the pmttctonte of* ; 


The sad spectacle of Spain's 
right-wing Opposition, led by 
Seiior Manuel Fraga. tearing 
itself apart continued yes- 
terday as Seiior Jorge 
Verstrynge. former party sec- 
retary general, and three other 
prominent MFs, announced 
they were leaving the party. 

Seiior Fraga. struggling 
against daily bad news which 
yesterday saw the party's 
youth wing in Valencia quit, 
likened himself to Julius Cae- 


sar. with his former political 
protege of more than a decade 
cast as Brutus. 

As rumours grew foat fo e 
63-year-old Opposition leader 
might also be considering 
quitting Seiior Fraga ob^ 
E™* would prefer to die 
ike Don Quixote rather than 
like a traitor.” 

Sefror V erstrynge accused 
Senor Fraga of leading an 
Opposition which was really 


socialist government ■ ■ M •. 

He and his colleagues 
try, he said, to work fora oCJJ ^ 

grouping of non-sociai . 

forces, joining the 
mixed group which sits in^r 
middle of Parliament ig: 
already indudes 21 ‘ 

Democrats who broke a*** 
from Seiior '*• 

June general -deraon-tio**- , 
Fraga'spflrtynownumbO’° u 

and the socialists ISA ■ ; 


tons' *c ib* r*. <*• & - 















feks 


Peres hands 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 8 1986 


■' * 


over with 

announcement of 


OVERSEAS NEWS 


American 
Reykjavik 
briefing 


new J ordan peace talks 

^ WVV Peking (Reuter) _ tj 


On the other 


Negoaauons be tw Froni Murray, Jerusalem 

>?a J r& a s?r^^y ssss ta—«ta-i 

““Sassjg?.awS 

sfarewe " 

at changingih^£SfJ^. ajine d ne^otiaSoM* <firect “ on o» uic aiaie oi jsraei wnen -we wm neumangtothem 

nver that vraterelS V 1 }? “ a them” he^airifir^h *p assamed leadership of about some of the things that 

fenriem n 0 ?a rift^f*^ oF of Mr Sfe5.? P ^L5 e £ ei,Bfit *** “■“» government 25 will be taken up in IcKd a$ 
Quarrels and ihS^ endless SW* "5° *>» mon,hc «« *■»» "■>«* ** ■ •- " 


Peking (Reuter) — The 
United Stales Defence Sec- 
retary, Mr Caspar Weinberger, 
have behind the chance fora flew here last night to brief 
different tomorrow, a tom or- Chinese leaders on the forth- 
row of hope, a - tomorrow of coming US-Soviet summit 
peace for an people that dwell meeting in Iceland and to 
*n our region.’' bolster growing military and 

It was a proud speech. It scientific ties between Wasb- 
tegan with a gloomy descrip- region and Peking, 
tionoflhe Stale oflsrael when “We will be talking to them 


hand 


° r % P sp<wh v to a ih? e - bun! 
national J?. l J e inter- 

Mr sE? - week »«*» 

S.® set out agreed 


taet«i “» ai ~ months ago. 

StediLfrSnSr ? “ We stood bn the brink of 

speechh^TW? S,nce . t ^ e economic collapse.. We were 
jSSSLflSJ? 6811 discussed in mired in the Lebanese bog. 
?W a 2^X" ia & Worst of all 
Shamir a ppear that Mr whose faith rn the country had 
° zvxyts the idea been shaken. * 




tion and it immigra- 

ggSgS 

torta? A I Ul |f„ occu R'«i t«ri- 

™p“ed A ’ lh ^ e ^ 1 ' d ta 

■o5.“Sfc!a‘» 


* r “vvtpio luc i 

ot an international foram. 

Mr Peres said that Israel 
would be prepared to nego- 
tiate with “authentic 
Tcpresentatives , \ of 
Palestinians. They would be 
/representatives . with opin- 
ions. but without pistols, with- 
out threats, without dictates”. 

The way to peace was 
tonuous, but it was not 
Mocked. .“Two sides are 
needed for peace. There is no 
such thing as one-sided peace. 


“But peace has a third side 

-o-f, nations °f tomorrow. At Uk S tate £"SS 

negotiations 


“We launched a new era, 
the era of an Israel that once 
more lives m stability and 
with hope, an era of mutual 
tolerance: of vigorous initia- 
tive and new style, an era of 
stable economy; an era in 
wbicb we no longer need to 
demonstrate our strength to 
the world by means of 
boastfulness and 

demonstrati on.” 

NhrPeres was boasting but 
Mr Shamir, smiling from the 
front bench, did not mind. 
Next week be will be in charge. 
At the next election in two 




' ‘MslJ 

a; 




’ : " ,;i lV,! ' ». 


Sandan 

nisters 

larged 

v <-: it: i 

• r :-;- 

« :.‘4.T \jv 

■ kcBMU.Izf 

i. , . rj:' 

'■ f!f 

i. ;!v -^cV- 

-S 

■ j-’-a 

! Vn 

. • :■ <4 si Ms i 

■ if-; ..•■■■fr'fl' 
; - • 

c / L? r’ »" 

,i finish .■'* 

i ' ■ 

Ft' 4 Z.- 

• 1 - , il« ' 

; f 

„ • . f 

... 


\ 


_. T 7s 

I-.* A % ' 


.... 

■ ► 

3 L 

‘ . 

y * p- • - 

/ a . 


CllN ^ 

l'lhi 1 ’*" 


Japanese 
outcasts 
speak out 

ftom Davis Watts 
Tokyo 

^Jith his penned hair swept 
back from finely cut features 
Mr K might be any Japanese 
company man. Only the 
rather loud striped suit thaj no 
big company would tolerate 
mmics him as different 
But then dress is the least of 
Mr K s problems. He has little 
chance of getting work with 
many sizeable Japanese com- 
panies anyway because he is 
one of the country's Buraka 
outcasts. For fear of further 
acts of discrimination a wine 
him as a member of the 
Burak um in Liberation I-Mgne 
he asked foreign correspon- 
dents yesterday to use only the 
first letter of his family name 
and not to take photographs. 

_ Mr K and his fellow ac- 
tivists, who speak for several 
million Burakti in 6,000 
communities thnn^hont Ja- 
pan, are worried th^ the 
Government is about to hvto_ 
curtail their movement when 
laws to help the Buraku expire 
next spring. 

Their fears have been re- 
inforced by the recent con- 
troversial statements of both 
Mr Yasuhiro Nakasone, the 
Prime Minister, on the alleg- 
edly low educational levels of 
American minorities, and the 
former Education Minister, 
Mr Masayuki Fujio. who was 
dismissed by Mr Nakasone 
after he said the Korean dlite 
connived in the annexation of 
their country by Japan. 

“They are about to under- 
take policies similar to those 
used to suppress the Levellers 
(the precursor of the present 
organization) before the war,” 
a lawyer for the movement, 
Mr Suneo Murakoshi, said. 

Mr Fujio had “taken up the 
banner of war, aggression and 
racial discrimination. I was 
extremely happy when I saw 
that Nakasone fired Fujio . . . 
However. Nakasone revealed 
he himself is exactly the same 
kind of racist. 

“I never thought that there, 
would be discrimination 
against Burakumin in ... 
Tokyo. Working hard and 
building a home was my 
dream ... The neighbours 
told me ‘non-persons 
shouldn’t be building a 
house’." 

Anti-Buraku posters are 
pasted up round his house, 
and his children face discrim- 
ination at school. Anonymous 
come to the house 
that no one will 






fef' 




The Duke of Edinburgh 
being greeted by the British 
Ambassador to Japan, Sir 
Sydney Giffard, after his 
arrival in Tokyo yesterday. 
Prince Philip, who is presi- 
dent ' of the International 
Equestrian Federation, will 
attend a meeting of the 



•■T.Nf 1&/4W 

- 

federation's directors, which 
opens today. 

He win also have lunch with 
Emperor . Hirohito and visi t 
Tokyo racecourse during his 
six-day unofficial visit before 
leaving for China on Sunday 
to join the Queen on her 
official visit there. 


they relate to Asian security, 1 
Mr Weinberger told reporters 
at the start of his four-day 
visit 

An American official said 
the Gunese were anxious for a 
reduction in the number of 
medium-range Soviet SS20 
missiles tageied on Asia. 

Mr Weinberger said he 
would seek China's ideas on 
the Reykjavik summit 
The Defence Secretary also 
intended to brief Chinese 
leaders on the “Star Wars” 
anti-missile defence pro- 
gramme and to discuss further 
amts and military technology 
transfers to Peking. 

He met his Chinese op- 
posite number, MrZhang 
Aiping. and the Army Chief of 
Staff Genera] Yang Dezhi, 
briefly last night 
Mr Weinberger is scheduled 
to hold further talks with Mr 
Zhang today and expects to 
deliver a personal message 
from President Reagan to Mr 
Deng Xiaoping, the Chinese 
leader, tomorrow. 

The US has taken a limited 
role in China's military mod- 
ernization drive, including aid 
for a new artillery plant and 
MK 46 anti-submarine tor- 
pedoes. Washington has aiyo 
offered to’-sef] China $500 
million ,(£345 million) worth 
of sophisticated avionics for 
Chinese-built F8 fighters. 

“The basic thing s that they 
want are known and they are 
being carried out,'’ he fold 
reporters. “We try to do every- 
thing as quickly as we can.” 

Mr Weinberger’s arrival 
came a day after the resump- 
tion of talks in Peking between 
Chinese and Soviet ministers 
on improving Sino-Soviet 
relations. 

. He said he had seen no 
indication that the Soviet 
Union had moved to meet 
three Chinese demands in 
order to have better relations. 
These were Soviet withdrawal 
from Afghanistan, Soviet 
pressure on Vietnam to leave 
Cambodia, and a reduction of 
forces along the Sino-Soviet 
border. 

_ “Thus for, we have had a 
little (Soviet) rhetoric, but no 
action,” Mr Weinberger 
The Defence Secretary said 
he also intended to discuss a 
proposal for US naval ship 
visits to China , but empha- 
sized that no final agreement 
bad been struck. 

Administration officials 
told reporters that no military 
agreements or deals were ex- 
pected to be signed daring Mr 
^Weinberger’s visit, which will 
include a trip on Friday to 
China's space facility at 
Xkhang, and to Kunming, in 
south-west China, near the 
Vietnamese border. 


Teacher describes torture 


• By Caroline Moorebead 

A middle-aged teacher in 
the Chittagong Hill tracts in 
south-east Bangladesh, who 
cannot for Ms own safety be 
identified, has described bring 
tortured by soldiers seeking 
information about the Shanti 
Bahini, an armed tribal group 
in conflict with Government 
forces since the mid-1970s. 

During bis detention the 
teacher said he was kicked, 
beaten with rifle bntts, thrown 
into a deep pit of boQing water 
and hung upside down from a 
tree. Six months after his 


PRISONERS | 


OF CONSCIENCE 


Bangladesh 


or abetting waging 

against Bangladesh*. 

the number is certainly 


war 



have been 
picked up and held for inter- 
rogation for days car weeks 
According to Amnesty 

tree, six months after his I n oteT ^onaTs ^ new report, «ri«u vuiagers. 
release scars were stffl visible Two hundred tribal people, 

on his body. «“*«Pting to 

Another vflbger from the « random bysoL 


Hill Tracts People’s Sofidarity 
Association, took to attacking 
military forces in the area, as 
weD as non-tribal settlers, pro- 
voking brutal reprisals by law 
enforcement officials. 

In May Rerims said some 
6J500 people, tribal and non- 
tribal, had been killed in 12 
years. 

Ea rly in 1986 Amnesty In- 
ternational received reports of 
an increase in clashes between 

army and Shanti Bahini, 
leading _ to yet more incidents 
w reprisal against m rarmed 
tribal villagers. 


letiere 

warning .. 
marry his children. 

Few Buraku contemplate 
court action because it means 
their history will be researched 
before any hearing, remiorc- 
ing their problem. 

This threat is the one that 
hurts most Under the Japa- 
nese system of family registra- 
tions. everyone’s background 
is recorded and available for 
inspection at toum nails, in 
recent vears the Government 
has restricted access to \hese 
records, but handbooks cir- 
culate among companies giv- 
ing the names of femto 
areas from which foe Buraku 


It 


■rs 4“ 


areas irom wu«.i. zSsZ , .ii 
originate, making n dimcutt 
for them to escape^ then- 

background or to get jobs. 

The Burakumin class dates 

from the 16th and 1 7th ontiH 

ncs. when the , Sbogunate 
delineated four principal das- 
sc warriors, formers, crafls- 


snme area allege; that he bad 
been bumd with lighted ciga- 
rettes and at least one man is 
thoaefat to have died as a 
result of torture. 

These men are 
amonghundreds of unarmed 
tribal vfiagns believed to have 
been killed or tortured in the 
past 10 years. Thirty are 
known to be serving sentences 
of up to seven years for “wag- 
ing or attempting to wage war 

Rebels kidnap 
five workers 
in Suriname 

Paramaribo(AP) — The 
Suriname Government re- 
ported that rebel guerrills 
kidnapped five plantation 
workers over the weekend. 

Authorities said the 
attackers, believed directed by 
former army private Ronny 
Brunshijk, struck a zone near 
the French Guiana border,, 
abducting employees of the 
- J patamacca 


of this year. 

Successive governments, the 
report says; have tried to 
resettle people from other 
areas of Bangladesh in the 
Sparsely populated but fertile 
Chittagong Hill tracts, while 
rejecting demands from the 13 
main tribes who inhabit the 
area for any kind of autonomy. 

From foe mid-1970s on- 
wards the Shanti Bahini, foe 
armed wing of the Chittagong 


diets and many were Mind. 
Other villagers, held at army 
«»d para-military camps, were 
tortured. Amnesty Inter- 
national is now calling on the 
Ban g lade sh Government to set 
ap an independent commission 
and to make public its 


.Bangladesh: Vnlawful Killings , 
and Torture in the Chittagong ' 
Hill Tracts (Amnesty Inter- 
5 Roberts Place. 
London EC1R OEJ. £2. SOX 


Guerrillas bring 
back safely to Thailand 


ses: wamors. 

men and merchants, with, the pnvately owned P 
Buraku at the bottom in jobs oil Palm Plantation. 

' ;d. such as The guerrillas set fire to 
scavengers living quarters and service 


Buraku oi -- 

no one else wanted, 
butchers, tanners, 
and executioners. 

The classes were aWjjjwj 
with the emergence of Japan 
as a modem state from ISM- 
but persecution perei^w up 
to the Second World War. n 
noVS.lil.I955 that 


buildings on a plantation m 

Suriname’s Marowijne region. 

the Government said. The 
Post Office, a police station. 
10 homes and other installa- 
tions were also damaged by 

flUCa 

The Government-run Suri- 


was nui - “%,,««« The Uovemmeni-iuM ou.j- 

probJems of this minorny Ne ws Agency estimated 

recognized. .Measures for ^e l0 a warehouse alone 

relief were brought m but did a» (£{.03 miOionX 

little to remove the stigma. 


From Ndl Kelly 
Ifemglrnlr 

Khmer Rouge guerrillas, 
who went into Cambodia to 
rescue two Western journal- 
ists, one of them wounded, 
brought them back safely to 
Thailand yesterday. 

Three weeks ago David 
Nason, aged 32, of Darwin 
and Robert Komiol, aged 35, 
of Canada, with 100 Khmer 
Peoples National Liberation 
Front (KPNLF) guerrillas, 
went to Cambodia to report 
on the guerrilla war. 

The operation was called off 
after three days because Viet- 
namese forces ambushed the 
group. The Khmer Rouge, the 
only effective arm of the anti- 
Vietnamese resistance, was 
then called in to rescue them. 

The Australian Embassy in 
Bangkok said the Khmer 



David Nason: receiving tr- 
eatinent for his injuries. 

Rouge had provided medical 
aid and other assistance which 
had enabled the journalists to 
get back safely. The two men 
are now undergoing medical 
treatment. 



For World Leaders, the Motorola Series 8000 



in touch with your business. 

This includes the price of the battery charger; full 
documentation and a 12 month warranty. 

Backed by a fast and efficient service network, 
your Motorola 8000 Cellphone will give you years and 
years of reliable operation. 

If you want to cut down on the cost, the time and 
the hassle of keeping your lines of communication 
always open, cut the coupon now. Ot give us a ring . 

♦Price based on 80Q0S leased over 5 years ex. VAL Call and access charges not included. 





MOTOROLA NOW or COMPLETE 
THE COUPON TODAT. 



j^ease post to: FREEPOST. Motorola. Basingstoke, Hams. RG22 4BR™1 
Name I 

| Position Company 

Address 

I Bast Code 

- Office TeL No 

I Pfegse send me more information on the Wbrid's most rw nniar 
„ Cellphones — the Motorola Series SQQO. portable 


<8> 



WfS!^iTr_-Vr . 


— L 






L 2 



3ee< 


rman 1 
ty has la 
attack 
ty runs 
notion p. 
ty assoc, 
umentoi \ 
aference 
annulate 
mage de 


or 
foiuhis 

>mc, w 
sn ibe ■ : 
led, lo\ 
body to i 
y like il ( 
into dis 
of a m 
iference 
ive con 
ter tha 
olution 
I Wane! 
lino us j. 
bate", 
mediate 
n show 
5 been st 
finish!" 
hould ai 
r debate. 


3ann 


jr the fi 
ere will 
ntatrvc ; 
espite r 
tiring the 
orkers i 
ir applies 
asses. t 
tonth wa 
verphou 
> CND. F 
ational u 
;tied tha 
ot dealt • 
*ND’s fa 
he will n 
Itine: "L 
hat abou 


The foi 
ceil trick 

lestionn 
i the 
iesth»i 
ay pern 
ingdom. 
epeetto; 
r 10 yeai 


Tres 


Yetanoth 
the loose 
of ’“Bong 
the MoD 
bidders 

manage nr 
Dcvonpc 
PlymoutI 
isterialct 
outh V 
champag 
of the b’ 
Foster*^ 
week am 

govemm 

more tl 
Wheeler 
city." He 
the othe 


Lov 






TF 
IR5 
, T 


rc r 


nrEj 


So: 


St Bn 
sJagm 
isi on 
readn 
slanh 
biWe 

YCTSK 

endec 

Tynd 

as' a 

ago. ‘ 

theti 

may 

been 

servi* 

.Yen 


Rc 


\ 


PfOft 

anno 

field 

robo 

Greg 

Brisi 

newt 
bers 
at it 
ai V 
later 
misi 
ihot 
esis 
Da>n. 


10 


OVERSEAS NEWS 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 8 1986 


Afghans reject 
guerrilla offer 
of one-for-10 


prisoner, swap 


From Mklud HamJyn, Delhi 

A column oFRussian lorries the capital. The fighting 
took a wrong turning in the spread last week to tne 
. Paghman district of Afghani- Shomali Valley, to tne north 
stan, dose to the capital, of Kabul, as well. 

Kabul, and was promptly Diplomats^ rep orted wn- 
ambushed by a gang of nesting one' engagementm 
Mujahidin, according to what which 32 MIS and MEM 
Western diplomais here can helicopters bombed and strat- 
**a reliable diplomatic ed the lower ndges of tne 
source”. Paghman range south-west ot 

The Afghan guerrillas, fight- Shakhadara. MI 8 swere_seen 
mg to drive the Soviet troops landing briefly, while pairs ot 
out of their country, captured MI24s gave covering tire- 
150 Russians in the battle and Overhead an Antonov - 20 
led them off to a possibly ended, presumably acting asa 
painful captivity. They let the mobile command post, ine 
authorities know that they diplomas also saw incoming 
would be prepared to release rockets landing among agroup 


them, however, in exchange 
for Mujahidin prisoners in 
Afghim jails. They said, they 
would release one Russian in 
exchange for 10 guerrilla 
fighters. 

Diplomats in Delhi ro- 


of Government vehicles 
parked on the plain between 
Karga Lake and the hills. 

The fighting has not so fer 
been able to prevent the 
Mujahidin from operating 
within Kabul. Before the 


i/||MUUUiU> UI MVim iW" — - r — . 

ported yesterday that the A £ departure of the Russian fast 
ghan Government turned the deputy Prime Munster, Mr 


offer down, saying they would 
agree to an exchange only on a 
one-for-one basis. Negotia- 
lions are continuing. In the 
meantime, the rebels have 


Vsevolod Murakhovski, who 

was welcomed to Kabul with a 

massive car bomb explosion, 
another container stuffed with 
explosives was discovered by 


niCiUlUlUG, UK IWUVW UHTV — . - 

captured another two Rus- the police guarding the route 


sians — this time commis- 
sioned officers— in the middle 
of last week. 

The incidents were part of a 
continuing series of heavy 
dashes in the Paghman area, 
as the Afghan authorities try 
to drive the Mujahidin out of 
the district from which they 
launch their major attacks on 


his motorcade took each 
morning. 

Reports also began to come 
in this week of the heavy 
fighting around the western 
Afghan city of Herat A dip- 
lomatic report described in- 
tense fighting in the city itself 
and in western Herat prov- 
ince. 



Thai soldiers usi n g flamethrowers to bom 


jnana plants in northern Thailand- The c a mp a i g n to eradicate the drag is 
1 by funds from the United States. 


More belt-tightening news for Danes 


From Christopher Follett 
Copenhagen 

Danes have been prescribed 
yet another powerful dose of 
austerity after the Govern- 
ment imposed its third tough 
economic package within a 
year in an effort to quench 
raging domestic consumption 
and curb the runaway 
deterioration in Denmark's 
balance of payments deficit. 

The new austerity package 
was announced yesterday by 
Mr Poul Schluter, the Conser- 
vative Prime Minister. 


Its main measures are 
restrictions on domestic con- 
sumer lending in the form of 


new taxes on bank loans for 
private consumption, coupled 
with an increase in energy 
taxation designed to counter- 
balance the tell in oil prices. A 
minimum 30 per cent down- 
payment is- to be introduced 
for goods bought on hire 
purchase with new state levies 
of between 4 and 12 percent 
on credit cards and interest- 
free shopping accounts. 

The measures are to be 
offset by savings incentives. 
Private savings for buying* 
houses and funding for educa- 
tion will qualify Tor supple- 
mentary interest payments of 
4 percent by the state. 

A pension reform is also 


envisaged- In addition the 
Government is to instigate a 
programme of action to make 
Danish industry more e£> 



Mr Schluter: 
age 


fitient and competitive in 
foreign markets. 

-Denmark is one_ of the 
richest countries in the 
world,” the Prime Minister 
priri in his address, “b ut we 
consume more than we earn. 
We are the nation in the West 
with the highest foreign debt 
per inhabitant- This is totally 
unacceptable.” . 

According to Danish Gov- 
ernment estimates, last years 
record balance of payments 
deficit of 28,000 million kro- 
ner (£2,600 million) is likely to 
be exceeded in 1986, and 
Denmark's foreign debt, is 
now over 250,000 million 
kroner- 


Apply for shares 




really bank on. 


90 Day Xtra. Your Special Share Account 


Everything about the Halifax 90 Day Xtra account is spedaL 

There is no limit to the amount you can invest and you can 
open an account with just £500, which starts earning interest of 
8.00% net immediately. 

Keep your full half-yearly interest invested and the com- 
pounded annual rate climbs to 8.16%. 

Xtra interest 

Investments of £25,000 or more yield 8.25% net 

Again, if you leave your full half-yearly interest in your 
account your compounded annual rate rises to 8.42%. 

Xtra access 

To make withdrawals, just give us 90 daytf notice. 

Oryou can have instant access losing only 90 days’ interest on 
the amount withdrawn. 

Withdrawals which leave a balance of at least £5.000 can be 


made immediately_without penalt y. 

Xtra income 

Interest can be paid monthly into your Halifax Cardcash 
or Paid-Up Share account or your bank account 

Xtra safe 

You can rely on the World’s No. 1 for maximum security. 
So post the coupon and start to get something Xtra special from 
your money now. 


To : Halifax Building Society (Ref KW), Free post. Trinity Road. Halifax HXl 2BR. 
(No sump required.) 

I/Wfe enclose a cheque, no: for£ 


ti/t a 


(minimum investment £500). To be invested in a Halifax 90 Day Xtra account. 

I/We would like the interest to bedHadded to balanced paid half-yearly □paid monthly 


FULLNAMEtSJ- 


ADDRESS- 


-POSTCQDE 


StGNAIURE(S]- 


L- 


— DATE- 


HALIFAX 


THE WORLD’S NOl 


INTEREST IS COMPOUNDED TWICE- YEARLT GIVING THE COMPOUNDED ANNUAL RATE ALL INTEREST RATES QUOTED ARE VARIABLE- HALIFAX BUILDING SOCIETY TRINITY ROAD. HALIFAX HXl 2RG- 


An Indo-Chinese 



Peking helicopter 

activity on 



angers opposition 

From Michael Hamlyu, Delhi 


Antiwenanent politicians whereas ft tt ef foe 
» «Ue*Sd CM- all! 

drive J* <wl?; 
•« its border, and baa there nave otta seven im 

«f «*£*»■* 

Siotei^totiinifttato Bnew^teoatotatK 
„„ -iLvMtim Si®s&. mjwnerc- . . 

The ind*"” Government re- I adiahassooght to 

tire newspapers foe bofo disagree^ ^ 

Stalled “this grave sectocky 

has been snrpns- anmaberofcoocesriornsva! 

yrntm the news was first WhBe China his abpM 
broken by foe chief minister ttf to g p dong w ith this it frdg 
ftemath-eastern tetriioty of herefou ^ 


Amnachal Pradesh, in whose 
district it fell, Mr P Shiv 
Shankar, foe Foreign Min- 
ister, denied in Par lament 
that it had happened. A junior 
minis ter admitted some days 
later that foe hefipad indeed 
existed. _ . . 

Indian External Affairs 
Ministry officials were at that 
time engaged w _ talks in 
p ai rin g over border issnes, wt 
they did not raise the matter. 

The border with China (or 
with Tibet, which these days 
amounts to the same thing) 
has never been satisfactorily 
agreed. 

^The line to which Sir Henry 
McMahon pot his signature 
and lent his name dnmag foe 
Simla conference of 1924 — 
roughly the watershed line of 
the Himalaya range w*s 
said by Paniit Nehru m 1959 
to be “the firm frontier by 
treaty, firm by usage, firm by 

8e ^ P ftfe®: Minister was 
wrong. The McMahon fine 
was never accepted by China, 
particularly in the north-east- 
ern sector of foe frontier and 
later the two 


China really wants fa . 
trade-off. “We will accep t fe 
McMahon fine in foe eattei 
sector,” foe Chinese appear* 
be saying, “so long as 
accept that AksaiCUn fa £ 
in the west.” 

The Chinese are rehtaehn 
this pressure with a 

almost the whole of AreradM 

Pradesh, a territory a nto r fl u 
direct control of the ladfaa 
Government, which uatfl 1172 
was known as the Northman 
Frontier Arency (Nefii). 

Peking, m pursuit ^ 
policy rdhsed to grentafosfa 
an MP from AranachaL -mi 
followed this up by loigk|:% 
protest against the paeofoh. 
tion of Anmadtal athlete* h 
foe 1982 Asian Gun fa 
DelhL 

There may also be Hat 
geaatne excuse for foe Chfafo 
to have occupied foe valley - 
the S m n d n ww g On vaBey - 
becanse the Samdnraagtiiv 
is reported to hire Ini 
aangiog course. - - 

Since 1984 India has tofai. 
fished a seasonal bsemfiti 
post on die south haak eftk 


river. When they arrived tfafa 
at the beginning of Jnfa w 


VJ v. nnw I * 

and observed three heficapteb 
make a total of 39 hndfag^li 
a day. They tactfully fatt- 
drew. 

There is now an 


three years 

countries went to war over it ? . — * — 

iwdfai also quarrelled with year tksy saw foe place ocfo 
Hs northern neighbour when piri by 100 Chinese toMfifai 
the latter built a road linking 
Shirianp, and Tibet through 
Aksai Chin at the western end 
of the fine. Indian maps have 

shown Aksai Chin within fa- — ■~ a — 

dia since 1954, even though it able feeling that the loom 
was at that time under Chinese lack leverage ngainst foe Ot- 
control. 

The Indian press manages 
to keep up a chauvinistic 
attitude to this territory too, 
afthongh more academic com- 
mentators, sadi as the late Mr 

KPS Menon, have pointed — - — ~ 

out “the watershed print- finance minister, made t» 
dple on which webave heavily rial point , of attacking Gowh 
relied fn other sectors of the ment-mactivity on nklat 
frontier is, in tbe Aksai Chin when they drew up a kbH 
area, not in onr favow”. dmrge-sheet against Mr Gab- 

hfareover Aksai Chin is of dhi which was presented to At 
no importance to India President. 


nese, but commenlat an fit! 
that even so the Govenmfat 
has been strangely hdofft- 
sical about foe issue. 

Thegrwp of dissident Cm- 
grass pofitioans led bjf'% 
Pranab Mukherjee, the fa»r 



Widows in 


pilgrimage 
to Jakarta 


Jakarta (Reuter) — Twenty- 
four British war widows ar- 
rived in Jakarta yesterday to 
visit the graves of their hus- 
bands. most of whom died in 
Japanese prison camps on 
Java. 

They will be taken to a 
cemetery in the Indonesian 
capital to look fiat the graves, 
which have never been visited 
before, the British Embassy 
said. 

Since ft is still not known if 
any funeral rites were per- 
formed at the time of their 
death a funeral service for the 
soldiers wifi be held on Thurs- 
day at the cemetery. 

Ten of the widows wifi fly 
later to Ambon in the remote 
Molucca island chain for a 
similar visit to graves there. 

The nip is bang paid for by 
the British Ministry of De- 
fence- which sponsored simi- 
lar trips last year to Hong 
Kong, Japan, Thailand and 
Burma, according to Major 
Mary Bloy, who is accom- 
panying the group. 

Some British soldiers were 
killed during the evacuation of 
Allied prisoners after the Sec- 
ond world War in clashes 
with Indonesian guerrillas 
resisting the return of the 
rolony to the control of the 
Duicn. 


Aquino is 

censured 


by Enrile 


By Keith Dattofl 
Manila 


IL 


eminent ana bsuu* - - 
dom constitution, 
gests that foe abandoned 
choice of the people. _ 


Report angers Guyana 


Geoigdoiini (Beater) -The The report. t 
Guyana Government has at-, week, criticized foe 


tacked a renort 

r™~ . ‘‘-hv* ‘ -j - *vmi 

Hainan rigits group, accusing 
It of trying to smear the 
country s image. 

The report, by the Guyana 
Homan Rights Association, 
was “dearly calculated to 
smear the country, protect a 
negative image and un d er mi ne 
pnbhc confidence,” a Govern- 
ment said. 


by a local rights rittation dari^/S 
■P* accusing dent Desmond Heytes 


year in power. 


It 


fa 


1985, intolerance, ^ 
attacks on organned 
and foe reintroduc* 10 * 01 

fad*** 

Other coiapfaino 
pofice brutality 



■ ttturw 

-- ..'rfl* oB i tt.is:sa % • 

(1 f IT* i -I 

a in 

^X^h n ; ! ,:ort»ach [ ltJ . 

(rtf' '' , jfoiti rept** 1 !* i 

s, ‘ 10 j ‘‘ti* 

of I he j 

^ ‘Ltii’ *** f M ! * ^ 

gvTV - :%< **•*! .v,,— - 

. , :I v chi' tel 
fa-, JO tf 1,111 - il IV*U 






Hif»“ i 

j rri-rirt l 


!’j ft. 


SSlraw! ^ - " 


•fa, 


.. iaili»r nwdv 

** p j..-p 

", 

.jwrrJ ^rcra 

ijj hjuii- “tih '■* 


wh't!» 

j; i' 

»j'-» ' 

i H 

ill 

j*: i 1. 1 

rv VSIf.l 

in rat a 


Cosif 

Hutikiv 


te-rj Hunkfo 
— 

ihr ,n y* i Him a .’-: 

fSlim.- «J' J " ,,prn ,' ijr.l *< 

SSJfcr J I! .% 


«.»: i-v.j 


j i. 


hilll.1l HI 
va*. 

jiiuii ;i t k 
* 

;i!£ »;» r*.» 
was 


. 1 WJ! 

hi.. 


w3s .1 pri'inofoinxl 
i ir Sa, ? r " r l 

Srj.vk.m4«> 

Zp* »■>“'' J n,,,r * 

joohi t'" N 

jLjitiil nulhinc do "tin 

rL.ijui H.un! 'Ijd* 1 - the 
* re %p« , :i' , l'fe fw 

torrnu - men also 

Sw* ■■ fh 

SEa of i 

Mure l.irfii'aMr | n»'J riis.it 

ZTfJa s\mjiarh> ; . 

l gmp H-irrivm, thr 1 •«'» 

'Oil lte- 
and Hirll-manorfcd 
[ofo-fonnicr mi flH* wt. 

I fa Mode. fti'»r»rr, did 
^l yr ihicwid I»\ showing 

paj dip> frniR ihrir film. 

Urf*bicK ralunrrd lltflf 
n itpnlaiinn av a.lors. 
ffliUdonnjS ffihJiMlf f 
IkKbn-. ulion i ''in pared { 


lire i! 
i 'Lluv.’ a 

were 


wirrtia 

wimificr 

wannth 

fuming 

u*n.!anc) 
hrat rti 
Li? shr 

»hH?i p 
l lUfdiTC 


lfa oriirntal hvauli on | Nh«KUi»i 


tBBSrsinJ ihai ft any 
! ftamon'i jadcrmrns hn 
IwochIuI b% 

fatal hi', uwxi. r.irrnrd. 
flu rro»n in rt*«- mimir. 
[Bafa d«v\ m»T «*Jr» n get 
B*ith the quints side tip 


Andrew Hislop 


»;j ih.* M 
rm iron 
% o!cjo?. 

INtsi 
«hc» % 
riftocr 


Mr Juan Ponce 
Philippines Defence Mu^nj 
said yesterday that Preskt®^ 
Aquino forfeited her po|^ . 
mandate to rule when s* 
abolished the constitution a» 
proclaimed a provisifflw 
charter . _ 

This explained inertasaj 
calls for a presidenpal 
tion. Mr Emile toW a cn* 
meeting. “If that ® foe <** 
tional consensus, who am i ® 
say no?" ^ . 

Asked if -he-fpoW 3 
contender, he said: “ToJ® 
you the truth, I have no mere 
political plans." Tins®** 
laughter from an appaiow 
disbelieving audience. _ 


fcia cipljir: 'i.i: T,-n 
fc.lhr. {Vn 

ly^rj j ; ti 

liter cjvi-ir . xrr.wn. •{ 
JPKILiK? ci.t. .j ...* slia j 

pate.-i vr -.v 

|. 1U . ,. atl 
miisu of 
^Lcvd W.*-»! Vf 
v-tmorrottV • rc?:r.* 
’ter. - ":.- ' • 

2 f«'- V'j 

85?“ w-n 

'Wldlr . • s , • r . , 

'ji, 1 • 

aiS'Ats 

bj Aground 

ik? nupjr- ' n! ' 

Mifr-u 
child of 
pTpi; s'Hwik-r. 

PipS , d ,r - m there 

?*»9C -i' Jr:,,r, riSU W 
reji 


sicijn. 

iv.bi it« 

Radio 
c*cn j 
What 
Ai\ flpJU 
:hat hi 

iyncs ar 
hi\ grar 

l.LTRtlO! 

Han N 
aNtu: t 
**\\ •: 
Ciuiklh 
Sundlic 
irpl> 1 
f.cnms 
got ws 
hud *r 
got m 
ten ar 
was i- 
ambit 
Sondt 
ihc id 
nluca 
u«a u 

fdiKJ 

never 

mutt? 


CHRIS! 


1 ONDON 


her to power in FebnraY- 
Aquino took her oath of 
under the 1973 martial ** 
constitution and 
ganized a constitutwian 0 ^ 
eminent, Mr Ennfe 
"A month later she fortajw 
that mandate. She rcpo“®^ 
She threw it 



uirew ii 

creating a revolutionafy gL 
and.issuu«a ^ 




To li ( 

h] 

5nd( 


Ss, 

Vi, 

Vv.. 


TBST33^^^rteiT»'kir ' than *io .hCibVto. or rta» : 'He ‘ « *i™ Mihing-.;™ 


reftUi. w-erf" 







2 \ 


ES> , 

!fc, - ’ f >,S ^ 

**» +;£* h 

*-= ::‘^'V. 

.4- '».* ^ 

*"*•■**• 


t 


«*u 

** r. 


fell, ^ 


^IT* ^ 


- Si: ^ , 

Htfj-i, . fc.to.T ■ . 


...JJS?- 

\U...*4.- ft £ 


,. “** t I,, *-:fc 

*“ E“ a:..- *a I . 


*"*«*«.■*! 
•Ml, 


W; 

,.-7 ' ' •jo* 

... . - ‘t. 1- t. 


i\i .. 

* ••<• : 

l* .i 


• - .. •■‘v; 

:*'-■ C.v: 


‘ft»« ^ ^ ^ e'{. (> 

•*«»«. .: “ I? ,' 

^..,; 

«i-.i 4 ■' ,i< ^ m -.*■ ■■ 

<■«■,„. .y 

‘l-'V 

a*: , ' "■ I v .:-. r 

* Mr..?**** 

.t* *ti; 


fcr-. 


••■ v. Vi V 5, t 

i«:.« * *■ t: ; 

n^T . 

11:31 »■*.. 


r. --i... 

* spue li . 


^ .E\ 1 

u ■■ 

• .K * 

i 


> f , , 4 




* 

>M 


’* =VYi' .J,. 

! n 


i.» :» ■ 

MU 5^ 

< i. . 

* ' ^ . 

. \ . 


•-V . ■ 


A - K - 


fij. i 

• „ ; 

Cf 

it » ■ j 

i 

■ 

i ; 


1 - 4 '! 

a ?r ir- 

'"J ’ 

-i.. .. 




,l X* - 

'- — 1 

• — 

.* ■ ■ .* • 

l.V 

\ 

• • 1*> 


* ns 

J »-> 

y 

’■ ' S- 

; ■- - 


"■ J,,,a A' 

-V- *' 

is. > l ... 

lit J- A-. 

r* s 

s* ■ 

• :< • 

'--.s ! 

■ ii . 

s • 

-TS. 

■■■■■ 

- 1 


■S‘p- , |V 

.j. ' 


- • .. 




Vquino: 

jt'llMlff 

n Knri' 


< M: 

* ■■ - -y*t 



THE ARTS 



Another 
egg race 


TELEVISION 


fimv «0 'Writ on >D 

* fete 222* 

had^f^s 1 ran| * MasfcS^ 

El 01 * ^ on faer stomach. 

her fatest film, 
5ii^rt*e, which also 
stos her husband Sean Penn, 
pops queen of the 

POBt with the egg all 

« ho- face. Unfortunately, 
fjS^ Mri* in Hong Kong 
1 *)» a Tube spedalan 
ge ““king of the Elm, did 

“We to remove any cloying 
g* w hat Harry 
Stanton described in a recent 
interview with her as “the 
owst beautiful woman in the 
world. 

, The subject was tailor-made 
for The Tube's cocky, cynical 
amateurism which allows their 
mteniewers to drop cfai 
and microphones — as weu as 
their interviewees in it. Re- 
ports of the troubles on the set 
have already entered screen 
mythology. This summer the 
tobloids did battle with Ma- 
donna and her “movie brat” 
bnshand, poisoned pens viffi- 
iymg “the poisoned Penns” 
(as they were affectionately 
called). Furthermore, the re- 
psal by the couple to be 
interviewed by Paula Yates for 
the programme was an open 
invitation for at least some 
gentle ribbing. What we got, 
however, was a promotional 
film for Shanghai Surprise 
with, the sleek, many-costmned 
Ms Yates almost pro fessional 
in her anodyne, imptm^ 
presentation. Barely a fluff, 
certainly no Halt. 

No doubt this lame ap- 
proach had nothing to do with 
the fact that Hand Made, the 
company responsible for 
Shanghai Surprise* were also 
co-producers with Tyne-Tees 
Television of Hand Made in 
Hoag Kong. More forgivable 
was Pa ala Yates's sympathy 
for George Harrison, the 
much-harassed but still hu- 
morous and well-mannered 
trouble-shooter on the set. 
Hand Made, however, did 
their canse no good by showing 
so many dips from their film, 
none of which enhanced their 
stars' reputation as actors. 
Even Madonna's Itafianate 
floozy-chic, when compared 
with the oriental beauty on 
offer, suggested that Harry 
Dean Stanton's judgement has 
been somewhat -wgirpeir, by 
- looking at bin. ow^ wteened, 
jowl-less frown in the mirror. 
But then he does not often get 
to act with the sunny side op. 

Andrew Hislop 


Striving for integrity 


Donald Goapor 


Massage 

Lyric Studio 


Whai with a Lorca in the main 
nouse and now a new Michael 
(icons) Wilcox in the Studio, 
it is turning out a gay old 
autumn in Hammersmith. 
Gay young, rather, for Mr 
Wilcox's three-hander takes 
an intelligent excursion into 
whai Gilbert Adair has called 
“our sole surviving bias-' 
Pfeemy” -paedophilia. 
.Dodge is a railed bicycle 
builder who strikes up with a 
d i vorcee journalist on holiday 
in Benidorm. Her nine-year- 
old son accepts him as a 
father-substitute, he responds 
in kind, and on a subsequent 
camping holiday the boy initi- 
ates a sexual relationship 
which continues sporadically 
for three years. This unnatural 
tale is told to a young masseur 
called Rikki who calls at 
Dodge's shop to perform bis 
professional function, only to 
be seated at table and ordered 
to eata parodic birthday feast. 


THEATRE 


A cocky product of a 
children's home who de- 
scribes himself as “a success- 
fid. qualified, upwardly mo- 
bile rent boy”. Rikki takes all 
this m his stride while casting 
a covetous eye over the spank- 
ing new bike in the workshop. 
Rikki evinces the unbending 
morality common to all pros- 
titutes; he earns his living by 
supplying “extras” on top of 
the straight massages for 
which he is nominally hired, 
but is revolted by paedophilia. 
As be later confesses, he has 
his own personal reasons for 
this attitude, and paints a 
future for himself wherein, as 
the father of a large family, he 
would happily kill anyone 
who laid a finger on his sons. 

Into this already odd situa- 
tion bursts Jane. Dodge's for- 
mer lover, who has forbidden 
her son further contact with 
him (hence the substitute 
birthday boy> and who now 
comes hot-foot for evidence of 


criminality, which she hopes 
to collect with a hidden tape 
recorder. 

This may well sound an 
impossible position for Mr 
Wilcox to resolve — and 
indeed some of the transitions 
of mood and motivation be- 
tray a certain jerkiness. as 
though from ovenediting — 
but his production is a show- 
case of judiciously under- 
played naturalistic acting, of 
the son where you have to 
look round to make sure you 
are in feet in a theatre. The 
explosions of violence are 
especially well realized. 

David AlHster plays Dodge 
asa man who. though ruled by 
bis weaknesses, strives to 
establish the integrity of his 
love. Pamela Merrick's Jane is 
nicely uncontrolled, and Dex- 
ter Fletcher (familiar perhaps 
as the young Caravaggio in 
Derek Jarman's film) is per- 
fectly cast as the acute, sly, 
mercenary masseur. 

Martin Cropper 



Principia 
Scriptoriae 
The Pit 


Perfect casting: Dexter Fletcher (top) and David Allister in Massage 


Cost fan tntte 
Bunko Kaikan, 
Tokyo 


Tokyo wanted Mozart, and 
His Imperial Highness Prince 
Hiro wanted to see it too. So 
Cosifan tune h was for the last 
first night in the final week of 
the Royal Opera’s tour of the 
Ear East; and the silks and 
kimonos were out in Pane. 

The entry ofKiri te Kanawa 
into a cast otherwise identical 
to that in London at the end of 
last season drew a capacity 
audience: Tokyo's millions of 
audio systems have been tun- 
ing in to her voraciously, and 
this was her first and long- 
awaited operatic appearance 
here. If the thunderous ap- 
plause and yelps of delight 
were anything to go by, she did 
not disappoint 

It is quintessential Kiri: her 
first words, “ah guarda 
sorella” breathed out like a 
summer wind, and her ready 
warmth of communication 
turning to advantage the 
tendency to sing ahead of the 
beat The production, staged 
fin- the tour by Jeremy 
Sutcliffe, is not after all, one 
which probes too deeply into 
character or into the opera's 
shadows. Dame Kiri’s stage 
presence was resonant enough 
in the set's nicely sympathetic 
environment of silhouetted 
^volcanic mountain, screens 
%riiich slid and tens which 
fluttered: - ' 

“ ,■ There were times, though, 
when she really did need a 
firmer hand than Gabriele 


OPERA 


Ferro was able togive her. The 
pit is deep in this theatre, 
which was not parpose-buih 
for opera; but the consistent 
sense of unease went beyond 
shaky ensemble and corner- 
turnings to an underlying 
insecurity of tempo. Mr Ferro 
seemed to lack any deeply 
considered overview of tire 
work's dramatic and musical 
pacing. Too much was left to 
free-wheel and, with the 
exception of Walter Berry’s 
staunch Don Alfonso, the cast 
israther yo ung t o^co|?e with 

John Aler. for instance, 
needed all the help he could 
get m phrasing bis Ferrando, 
though William Shtmefl's 
Gugliehno is getting stronger 
still and can pretty much 
stand, angrily, on its own two 
feet Anne-Sofie von Otter, a 
Dorabefla more intelligent 
than her flouncy looks, knew 
exactly where she was going 
and stood firmly by her own 
entirely musical decisions. 

There is no doubt that the 
choice of conductors has been 
the weak link on this leg of the 
tour. Mark Ermler. too, who 
took over the baton for the 
Carmen which Noel Goodwin 
reviewed earlier in Seoul, 
provided a dull, featureless 
back doth for the triumphal 
return of the previously in- 
disposed Jose Carreras as Don 
Jos& But the Royal Opera 
videos are bang snapped up. 
and there is already talk of a 
return visit. 


Hilary Finch 


Fires of London 

Elizabeth Hall 

From Stone to Thom, most 
luminous of Maxwell Davies's 
vocal gems from Orkney, was 
sadly dropped from this pro- 
gramme. which left Jill 
Gomez's contribution rather 
to one side, as a recital within 
the redtaL 

Her choice of four of 
Schoenberg's cabaret songs for 
the Uberbretti. accompanied 
.by Stephen Prusiin, found a 
few surprising coincidences 
with the more high-born lieder 
Schoenberg had recently com- 
posed: that was one advantage 
of a style of delivery that 
avoided putting on the Isher- 
wood. which would in any 
case be dubiously approp r i a te 
for the Berlin of 1901-03, 
though perhaps more could 
have been made of the 
connection with Pierrot lun- 
aire. whose world is evoked at 
least by tire text of “Der 
genugsame Liebhaber”. In 
Berg's Seven Early Songs Miss. 
Gomez offered a performance 
beautifully studied in colour 
and phrasing, but the piano 
version always sounds like a 
transcription (which it almost 
certainly was), and perhaps 
her intelligence and insight 
’would have been better re- 
warded in the Op 2 set 

The Fires of London were 
left to lavish their own care, 
under, scrupulous direction 
from Nicholas Oeobury, on 
three instrumental . scores, 
including two septets by Rus- 
sians. Fortunately these were 
maximally separated in the 


CONCERTS 


programme, or else Strav- 
insky's might have made Al- 
fred Shnfrke's sound slack and 
unfocused. As this spiky 
performance had one realizing 
afresh, Stravinsky oses an 
ensemble thoroughly within 
the Scbubert-Brahms-Schoen- 
berg tradition of chamber 
music without ever reminding 
one of that tradition: Shnitke 
does not have that kind of 
intense personality. 

But his Septet of 1982 
certainly has connections with 
his “St Florian” Symphony of 
two years before, for again it is 
filled with echoes of church 
music — plainsong fragments 
and chorales— in a design that 
seems to move in ignorance of 
them, notably impelled at one 
point by a minimalist osti- 
nato. As so often, there are 
allusions to much other mu- 
sic though it is hard to know 
whether the ghostly appear- 
ances of Copland and Davies 
are by invitation or merely the 
result of modal tunes being 
played by a small ensemble. 

Plaul Griffiths 


Moscow PO/ 
Kitayenko 

Festival Hall ' 

It did not take many bars of 
Rachmaninov's Third Sym- 
phony for one to appreciate 
the Moscow Philharmonic 
Orchestra's chief asset, and 
the reason why this lush score 


had been chosen. The strings 
are superb: silky yet strong: 
drilled to unanimity, not only 
in phrasing but in every 
col (Juristic nuance. The soar- 
ing melodies in octaves were 
delivered with serene power, 
perfectly tuned. Virtuoso pas- 
sages like the last movement's 
fugato were thrown off with 
dan. and more reticent sonor- 
ities were beautifully dear. 

Unfortunately, great sym- 
phony orchestras cannot live 
by strings alone. I have rarely 
heard more raucous brass- 
playing than that which domi- 
nated — obliterated would 
perhaps be a truer description 
— the dimaxes of Tchai- 
kovsky's Francesca da Ri- 
mini. One could warm to the 
horns because their typically 
East European vibrato suited 
this repertoire, and the clari- 
net solo in Francesca was 
creamily delivered. 

How can a conductor let so 
much that is beautiful co-exist 
with the coarse and mediocre 
m an orchestra he has now 
trained for a decade? Dmitri 
Kitayenko obviously rehear- 
ses thoroughly: the precision 
of ensemble was exemplary. 
Yet there were also paradoxes 
about his interpretations. He 
whipped up foe hysteria in 
Francesca ferodously. but was 
strangely wooden handling foe 
nibato in the symphony. - - 

Nikolai Petrov was the solo- 
ist, in Prokofiev's Second Pi- 
ano Concerto, managing its 
complexities welL There was 
some discreet textural editing 
early on. but the great first 
movement cadenza was faith- 
fully played and most lucidly 


shaped. Petrov’s hard, glitter- 
ing tone was ideal for propel- 
ling the frenetic Scherzo, and 
there was something heroic 
and granite-like about his 
gradual unleashing of power 
in foe finale. 

Richard Morrison 


Keller Memorial 
Wigmore Hall/ 
Radio 3 


sician, though: I wanted to 
read modern languages and I 


Tomorrow’s o 

always thought I'd end upas a TflC PhCLTltOTfl 


Asked to explain what 71m 
Rice, Alan Ayckbourn, Don 
Black, Richard Stilgoe and 
T.S. Eliot have in common, it 
might not lake even a casual 

London theatregoer too long 

to work out that all have had . an appalling fate was the feet 
their words set to the music of that he had always written 


penine 

omqf 


Radio 3 announcer or maybe the Opera adds 3 new 
evm a drama critic.” name to an eminent 

What saved him from such 


Andrew Lloyd Webber. And 
with tomorrow's opening of 
The Phantom of the Opera at 
Her Majesty's there will be a 
new name to add to the select 
list of Webber lyricists, that of 
a 25-year-old Guildhall gradu- 
ate who now shares with- 
.Richard Stilgoe the credit for 
the Phantom libretto. 

Charles Hart, though un- 
related to the Hart who was 
half of Rodgers and. does 
come from a suitably theatri- 
cal and operatic badeground 
in that his grandparents were 
Glen By am Shaw and Angela 
Baddeley. The second child of 
an antiquarian bookseller. 
Hart went to school in 
Maidenhead and from there 
won a place at Cambridge to 
read music “I never really 
thought of myself as a mu- 


lyrics as a child, so that when 
us grandmother went into the 
London production of A Little 
Night Music a decade ago. 
Hart began to think seriously 
about the musical theatre: 

“When I was at foe 
Guildhall I sent a tape to 
Sondheim, fully expecting a 
reply hailing the next true 
genius of foe West End. All I 
got was a note saying that I 
had Thyming poison' which 
got in foe way of my charac- 
ters and plot, and of course he 
was entirely right. But my 
ambition was to be an English 
Sondheim. Being a lyricist is 
foe ideal job for a university- 
educated dilettante, because it 
uses up all the rubbish in your 
education. The English have 
never really cared for serious 
musical theatre: you wouldn't 


CHRISTIES 


LONDON 





Magnificent George II epergne by Paul ^ Lamerie, 1736^7. 

To be offered in our sale of 

Important English 

and Continental Silver 

on 17 December 1986 
Items to be included in ithis sale 
should reach us by 22 October: 

Please contact Charles Truman 
or Stephen Clarke. 



* ^ 
' " " 




list of lyricists in 
Charles Hart (right): 
interviewby . 
Sheridan Morley 

Exactly 
the type 

get a lyricist over here in- 
terested in demon barbers 
lifting razors up to spotlights, 
and yet after listening to 
virtually all foe English semes 
of foe last few years it's a relief 
to get back to Sondheim and 
Kurt WeilL” 

It was soon after leaving the 
Guildhall that Han first came 
to the notice ofLloyd Webber, 
and Cameron Mackintosh his 
producer, when both men 
were judging the Vivian Ellis 
awards: 

“I'd based a musical on 
Moil Flanders and put in a 
couple of foe songs from that, 
which got me into foe finals, 
and then we all met for a drink 
and vaguely talked about my 
working with Andrew. After 



that nothing happened for 
twelve months, so I thought 
they must have gone off foe 
idea, and I went to work as an 
assistant musical director on 
shows tike Adrian Mole and 
Blockheads. Then suddenly I 
got a tape of music in the post 
from Andrew and foe sugges- 
tion that I might tike to put 
some words to it, though he 
still didn't tell me it was for 
the Phantom. So I sent back 
some lyrics and I think what 
really appealed to Andrew was 
that I happened to have the 
same kind of typewriter as 
Tim Rice. Then Andrew sug- 
gested a meeting and 1 said I 
thought he would be too busy 
with the Phantom and be said 
it was for foe Phantom that he 


wanted foe lyrics and 1 did 
them in about three months. 
This is much more of a ‘book* 
show than some of the earlier 
rock operas, doser to Sweeney 
Todd than Evita or Superstar, 
and if it works I think it win 
get us . back to foe traditional 
values of melodrama without 
being old-fashioned. 

“Andrew is really very easy 
to work with: he’s a great 
musical structuralist, which 
meant that most of the music 
was written before I came 
along so there was already a 
very strong framework. We 
still argued over extra syllables 
or extra notes but it was tike 
bargaining at an auction and 
Andrew was very good about 
letting me win sometimes. If 
all you know of the Phantom 
are foe various Hollywood 
movies, then it's quite a - 
surprise to go back to the 
book, but we're not treating it 
like a BBC classic serial either. 
Sometimes I wish I'd had 
more time to work on this, but 
good things don't always 
emerge from writing slowly: in 
the end HI have had about 
four months, which is i sup- 
pose a crash course in lyric 
writing, but if it doesn't work 


ril go back to playing foe 
piano in the pit 
“The shadows of Andrew's 
other partners haven't hung 
too heavily over me. though I 
think Tim Rice opened up a 
lot of doors for all English 
lyricists by showing that a 
lyric didn't have to be four 
lines long and sound banal: it 
could be wordy and witty and 
contemporary, though what 
we're looking for m Phantom 
are the big emotional mo- 
ments. There are echoes here 
of Rigoletto and Beauty and 
the Beast and Hunchback of j 
Notre Dame , all packed with 
images of dark and light hell 
and heaven, good and eviL 
“What we have here is a 
Gothic tale with some remark- 
able sleight-of-hand devices 
and, thanks to Hal Prince, 
some revolutionary lighting 
and staging tricks. How well 
they will merge with this 
rather creaky plot is foe final 
test of whether foe Phantom 
actually works, but one thing 
is certain: this is not going to 
be another of the robot shows 
where foe sound is amplified 
out of recognition and all you 
really have to applaud is foe 
set.” 


Even if you were a bosom 
friend. Hans Keller was the 
kind of person who, if be 
thought something you said or 
wrote was incorrect, would say 
so in blunt terms. At foe same 
time he would offer a percep- 
tive view of what was right. 
That perception was the key to 
his immense influence. He 
fervently championed many 
causes and. in this memorial 
concert, plenty of friends, 
composers and performers 
both, were there to be heard. 

Of foe laner. foe young 
Misuy Quartet, whom Keller 
coached, provided foe eve- 
ning's most revealing experi- 
ence with their reading of 
Haydn's String Quartet, Op 
42. This was not merely neat 
and well controlled playing: it 
also oozed understanding, 
* with each participant bending 
to foe will of the music rather 
than the force of ego. Thai 
same quality was present also 
in Ida Haendel's tenacious 
performance, with Craig 
Sheppard at the piano, of 
Beethoven's C minor Violin 
Sonata. Op 30 No 2. 

Those two composers might 
have needed no special 
promoting by Keller, though 
both benefited from his illu- 
minating analyses. But we also 
heard music by three 20th-. 
century . figures, of whose 
greatness he was convinced, 
who did. One of them, his 
teacher Franz Schmidt, is still 
neglected, and foe variations 
movement from the Quintet 
for clarinet, string trio and 
piano played here by Tfaea 
King. Peter Walifisch and 
three-quarters of the Allegri 
Quartet was not really enough 
to give us much of an idea of 
him. 

The other two composers, 
Schoenberg and Britten, have 
fared radio 1 better. Schoen- 
berg's Six Pieces, Op 1 9, spoke 
their epigrammatic messages 
effectively under the fingers of 
Susan Bradshaw. Britten's 
Third Quartet, dedicated to 
Keller and played warmly by 
the Allegri, meanwhile made 
an apposite valediction for a 
great man. 

Stephen Pettitt 


Writers. . Sartre once said, 
should welcome physical dan- 
ger as a corrective io their 
over-privileged existence; and 
1 think the American play- 
wright Richard Nelson would 
agree with that, judging from 
this biting study of artistic 
citizenship. 

It is a large and wearisomely 
debatable subject which Mr 
Nelson succeeds in pinning 
down through a story, begin- 
ning in 1970. of two young 
writers flung into the gaol of a 
South American military dic- 
tatorship for distributing’ anti- 
government leaflets. One is a 
Cambridge-educated local 
boy; the other, a fasj-ialking 
American brat, with dreams of 
having his autobiographical 
novel published by City 
Lights, and who is only in foe 
country because Cuba was too 
expensive. 

Americans are held to be 
deficient in the sense of irony: 
but there could be nothing 
more savagely ironic than the 
sight of Ernesto and Bill 
moving through successive 
stages of anxiety and panic to 
physical torture, while above 
them each scene carries cap- 
tions like “Choose Your Set- 
ting Carefully*' and "‘Re- 
member It's 99*H> Perspi- 
ration” gleaned from a 
manual for aspiring writers. 

In a mood of intense dis- 
gust. western egotistic career- 
ism is put on the block; and 
finally the two bleeding boys 
comfort each other by swap- 
ping quotations from foe -An- 
glo-Saxon Seafarer. In ex- 
treme situations, real lit- 
erature docs count for some- 
thing. 

The action then moves on 
IS years to a post-revolu- 
tionary version of the same 
setting. Now it is the 
dictatorship's former Spanish 
ambassador (a poet) who is 
under arrest; and a committee 
for human rights are trying to 
secure his release. Here, wc arc 
confronted with a different 
kind of betrayal. The chair- 
man of foe committee is a 
narcissistic old fraud, more 
keen on luxury hotels and self- 
publicizing than on the art he 
is supposed to be defending. 
To his opponent, the local 
minister of culture, likewise, 
an is an irrelevance in decid- 
ing matters of political crime. 
Why should corrupt poets go 
free, and not unknown citi- 
zens whose illiteracy' is politi- 
cal crime in another form? 

Ernesto and Bill reappear in 
the second act of David 
Jones’s production, but only 
as marginal figures; and foe 
development of foe piece is 
carried much more by dose- 
packed argument and the 
ironies of history than by 
continuity* of characters. Still, 
with performances as scorch- 
ing as those of Anton Lesser 
and Sean Baker it is good to 
see them return as ghosts ot 
the former regime, meeting 
their match in Give Merrison 
as a political adversary no less 
in foe grip of a hideous past. 

Irving Wardle 



iwmamamnm nmammaratr 
ALDWYCH THEATRE 

0M3S MM CC. 0-3X96233/603 I 


‘AN EROTIC AND 
PSYCHOLOGICAL 
&IASTERPIECE.’TiMEour 

HWCjrflWgBCERO 

les liaisons 
dangereuses 


irr CHRISTOPHER HAMPTON 
DMCittBV HOWARD DAVIES 
PtWWDBvBOB CROWLEY 

with JEAN ANDERSON 
LUCY ASTON 
SUZANNE BURDEN 
LINDSAY DUNCAN 
BEA71EEDNEY 
SIMON MATTACKS 
HILTON MtRAE 
KRISTIN MILWARD 
ALAN RICKMAN 
HUGH SIMON 




^AMBASSADORS 
pamm THEATRE 

BockwoOl 838 Bill CndrCsdsOI 8381171 a ■ 
■ firs MCI 240 720028 hou 7totetajtei 



Do you only dream 
in Black & White? 

If you thought that Senra* only came in two colours, sand 
corrected. Tbe casework of each Steinway can be finisbed in a ong 
veneers and colours as wide as year imagination. From the uuderaated 
elegance of Chippendale to the vibrance at tbe fynmuf Mahogany 
iQiistramd abow. you arc assured the build quality and unsurpassed 
sound of a Sirinway -lor generations. But why dream? 

See one. touch one. pfay one. own one. 

$STEINW^Y 


Sianway Hail. 44 Mwylttooe Lme, Wigmore Street. London WL Tel: 0M87 3391. 


Please send me full Mails of Sttmway Pianos !_■ I wjuM like a demoosnarion 


Name. 




J8(WB8 


•Steinway pianos ean also be seen in Belbsi. Bolton. Cardiff. Chester. Edinburgh. 
Glasgow Higheliffe. Huddersfield. Liverpool. Manchester. Nottingham and Oxfanl. 


The Royal Ballet 




NEW SEASON OPENS TONIGHT with 
'The never failing fun of 
JEROME ROBBINS’ 
THE CONCERT...” 

The Times 

Pius ROBBINS* 

OPU S 19/ 

THE DREAMER 

DAVID BINTLEY’S 
GALANTERIES 



. . t 


•X* 




rxnan *1 
ty has la 
attack 
ty runs 
notion p 
ty assoc, 
urncmoi \ 

iference 
inipulaie 
mage de 
s or 

Writ, his 
Is me. w: 
ten the - ■. 
ded. lo; 
ybody tc . 
?y tike il ( 
into dis 
s of a m 
nference 
live cor. 
der thz 
solution 

o blanc 

dinous l 
tbate". 
imed rate 
im shoui 
as been st 
ifinishP 
should at 
rr debate. 

3anc 

or the fi 
-lerc will 
sntative : 
)espite r 
luring the 
inkers i 
or applies 
asses. -- 
nonth wa 
>ver phon 
oCND.F 
rational u 
ened tha 
tot dealt - 
CND's b 
she will n 
tltine: **L 


• The fn 
eccentridi 
gvestroon 
by the 
question I 
stay pen 


expect tot 
or 10 year 


oose 

long 

foD 


outh N 
champag 
of the b 
Foster-^ 
week am 
govemro 
more t! 
Wheeler 
city.** Hi 
the othe 

Loy 

Among 
against 
pool last 
West Dt 
particuk 
school, t 
chanty 

rates. *' 
Sherbor 
pie in 
sidizing 
he said, 
case of 
for Dan 
school. 






Prs; 




SPECTRUM 



Lock up your daughters to learn 

^ ^ thouchL the source of most of n.< 


THE 
GOOD SCHOOLS 



Part 3: Girls’ schools 
When it comes to 
educating girls, some 
schools leave a lot to 
be desired, often 
because theylufe 
short of money and 
adequate staff. But 
Amanda Atha and Sarah Drummond found 

in their new survey that despite these 

drawbacks, many pupils do well in the 
changing environment of modem schools 


G 


iris* schools depressed 
us. It was easy to knock 
them and heads, sen- 
sitive to criticism, 
invariably pointed to 
lack of endowments, lack of fee ' 
income (girls' schools .charge less) . 
and boys' schools poaching their 
sixth forms. 

We were struck, in 'the private 
sector, by a lack of direction. It is 
difficult to ascertain what many 
girlsLschools are trying to achieve: 


strongest we visited did not even 
bother to mention it. . 

Options are unimaginative. En- 
gineering projects such as assem- 
bling Meccano-type engines are 
considered outstanding feats of 
high technology. 

There is a lack of energy and, 
sometimes, a lack of interest in 
anything outside the gossip col- 
umns of Lhe Daily Mail- Male staff 
are thin-on the ground, and much 
sought after “to give some sera- 


great swathes, foe example, ciainu ■ "Wance of normality’* as one bead 

to be “academ ic“-and tcatering'fer put it. High -calibre male teachers 

- - - * 


‘high fliers** (by which theymean 
potential Oxbridge undergrad- 
uates) but are no such thing. 

Expectations are low all round- 
Even the traditional female sub- 
jects. which you might expect to 
have gown, strong over the years, 
are often rudimentary or over- 
looked as s^ond-dass-dtizen 
stuff. A head whose domestic 
sdence department is one of the 


lend to gravitate towards the 
higher expectations of boys' 

schools. , .. 

Gyms areoften small, computer 
rooms untouched, .playing fields 
tiny. Indeed the overall size of 
girls* schools is often too small to 
make economic sense: compare 
the Princess of Wales's old school 
(West Heath. 145 pupils) with the 
Prince of Wales's (Gordonstoun. 


450 - itself not exactly a giant). 
There is a tremendous feeling ot 
missing out we cannot blame 
pupils who. as soon as O-ieveis 
were over, bolted to^ **Ma > 
borough and freedom'’. Gins 
schools are simply not where the 
anion was. 

There are exceptions. Local nigh 
schools - Stamford, Aylesbury. 
Norwich. Ripon, Headington for 
example — all offer good, if 
sometimes unimaginative, gram- 
mar school type education. 

heltenharo Ladies’ — for 
I all the criticism- wc 
heard levelled at it — 
offers a breadth of 
education and a sense of 
dynamism and purpose on a par 
with major boys’ schools. North 
Foreland Lodge produces solid 
citizens who play a useful game of 
tennis. Downe House produces all 
rounders. Particular departments 


music (Felixstowe. 
Cheltenham, for 
computers (St 
electronics (The 


c 


stand out: 

Sherborne, 
example). 

Leonard's). 

Heads of girls* schools are good 
at admin, charm and discipline. 
Your daughter — outside London 
at any rate - will be kindly and 
safely locked up. One school we 
noticed requested all girls in the 
sixth form to be on the Pill — the 
request was lucked away at the 
bottom of the school clothing list. 

Girls are good at regurgitating 
what they have been fed. work 
hard and often emerge with 
clutches of O and A levels which 
would do credit to a crammer. 
Biology, ait and domestic science 
are popular. Boarding school sixth 
forms are often jolly good at giving 
little dinner parties tor boys from 
neighbouring schools. 

The biggest weakness in girls 
schools - and possibly, we 


w 


DodM»ar 


BENENDEN 

SCHOOL 


CRANBflOOK, KENT 


Vital statistics 

Pupds: approx 395 girts; aH board. 
Ages 8-18; C of E; tee-paying. 

Head: Mrs GflUan duCharme. for- 
merly head of independent co-ed 
Town School in Manhattan. Says 
she isn't going to change the school 
radically But 6 at present engaged 
m "a tittle fine tuning”. Object of 
intense interest to potential parents, 
other heads etc. one of whom 
thought she might be “too strong 
meat lor Benenoen”. 

Academic matters ; No results 
quoted. Offers Greek and according 
to parent has "excellent Latin 
teacher.” 

Games, options, the aits: Ex- 
tremely hot on these. Lacrosse 
school - also tennis (14 courts), 
squash, judo, bailer, riding. Ex- 
cellent at such skills as sewing, 
embroidery; has fashion parade on 
open day with garments made and 
modelled by the girls. 

Background and atmosphere: 
Founded 1923. Huge, elegant but 
gloomy Victorian Gothic mansion in 
200 acres: possibly grandest site 
and facilities ot any girts' public 
school in the country. Mixed-ages 
'dorrmes' encourage older girls to 
develop nanny-like sense of 
responsibility. Another parent com- 
mented that this "makes many of 
them in later life such excellent 
wives. JPs. prison visitors.” "lhe 
only school I know so ter," said 
harassed mother, “whose major 
scandal has been not drugs but the 
upper Vlth sharing a bottle of sherry 
behind the lacrosse pitches on the 
last night of term." 

The pupae: "Some very rich and 
some titled, mostly middle class." 
said the registrar (though from our 
observations, also some lower mid- 
dle). Most famous old girt: Princess 
Anne. 

Bottom Nm: Fees; £1.885 per term. 
Remarks: Excellent reputation lo- 
cally until Pnncess Anne went there. 
School then suffered terrible royal 
blight. "It was an excaffent school 
when I was there,” said pre-royal 
ex-pupil with daughter at school. “It 
had a very special atmosphere. 
Now n is not the thing it was at aH." 
The registrar commented that peo- 
ple were "just beginning to come to 
the school again for the right 
reasons." Potentially the best girts’ 
public boarding school in the cornv 

a . but needs a kick up the pants - 
ich Mrs duCharme is obviously 
only too capable of administering. 


BOLTON SCHOOL 
(GIRLS’ DIV) 


BOLTON. LANCASHIRE 


Vital statistics 

Pupds: 895 girts, plus 85 boys (4-8). 


all day Ages 4-18; nan-denomina- 
tional: fee-paying. 


Head: Mrs Margaret Spurr (smc8 
1979). Dynamic. Befieves in "en- 
couraging and developing talent — 
we've got plenty of it here”. Hot on 
girls in industry. 

Academic matters: Strongest sub- 
jects are physics and hard sciences. 
Everyone takes four A levels. 
Including general studies. Virtually 
all go on to further education. 
Games, options, the arts: Good 
games' facilities. Including 18 hard 
term Is courts. School was in last 
year's national lacrosse finals. 
Background and a t m osphere: 
Pleasant red-brick buddings, pur- 
pose-built in 1877. Bursting with 
energy. Entrepreneurial attitudes 
fiercely encouraged - for example, 
the girts ran the school themselves 
for three days last term. 

Bottom Bne: Fees: £648 per term. 
Remarks: Very strong afl-round day 
school - and, iflie many schools in 
the Mkflands and North — im- 
mensely hard-working. 


CAMDEN SCHOOL 
• FOR GIRLS . 


LONDON NW5 


Vital statistics 

Pupils: 750. all day. Ages: 11-18; 
non-denominationau state. 


Head: Mrs Noreen Manning (since 
1985). Very popular choice for one 
of the maintained sector’s most 
coveted jobs. Charming, energetic 
(mountaineering a main recreation), 
considered vary fair. 

Academic matters: Has maintained 
its academic tradition in spite of fuHy 
comprehensive intake and mbced- 
ability teaching (years one and two). 

Many staff at work in school by 7.30 

am and still going strong at 5 pm. 
Arts notably aronger than sciences, 
particularly English and art. 
Classics department considered 
good: only London comprehensive 
offering Russian as A level option. 
Careers advice a strong point 
Games, options, the arts: Defii 
not sporty but runs own for 
team and has a good gym. FuH-b'me 
dance teacher appointed 1986. 
Bursting with musical talent 
Back round and atmosphere: Vol- 
untary aided grammar school until 
1976. Buildings a hotch-potch: re- 
mains of bfitz-damaged Victorian 
main school plus inconvenient Vic- 
torian houses (listed) Inked to 
modem. centre block and new Vlth 
form building. Dramatic 1973 col- 
lapse ot assembly hall brought 
bonus of music and drama work- 
shop. Friendly, relaxed, informal 
and no rules about clothes - 
counterbalanced by tight and caring 
pastoral system. 

The pupks: Very mixed-race school. 
Fairly equally divided between 
highly articulate offspring of Cam- 
den Square and chadren from local 
council estates. 



Heather Brigstocke, Head of St Paul's Girls' School: She has such charisma, people just flock after her' 


Remarks: Ex c e p tio na l school — 
parents (wealthy} move into the 
tightly denned catchment area to be 
sure of a (dace. Fairly left-wing 
image, with some mutterings of 
radical chic, but happy as well as 
successful 


DOWNE HOUSE 


COLD ASft,~ BERKSHIRE 


day. 


" • • vital statistics 
Pupas: 410; 369 board, 41 
Ages 11-18; C Of E; fee-paying. 
Head: Miss Suzanne Farr (since 
1978). former lacrosse inter- 
national Breadth of education Is her 
pet subject Tough is the word, bu t 
has none of the stuffiness traditlon- 
ally associated with unmarried 
heads. 


THE TIMES GUERNSEY GILET 


T his pure wool *gilet' or button- 
through waistcoat is warm and prac- 
tical as well as being smart and stylish to 
wear. It is made in Guernsey from 100% 
pure new wool and has many of the 
features that make Guernsey knitwear so 
popular. 

rphe gilet is made up with a tight close 
JL knit for added warmth and wind 
resistance and the strong high-quality 
wool ensures that it is tough and hard- 
wearing. The styling is classic, with a 
ribbed crew-neck, armholes and hem, 
with the same neat ribbing knitted across 
the two patch pockets. The gilet buttons 
through from neck to hem, and is also 
characterised as a Guernsey garment by 
the small slit openings at either side of 
the deep hem. 


S uitable for both men and women, the 
gilet is ideal as a sty lish body warmer 
over shirts and tops and will team well 
with a variety of skirts and trousers. The 
Guernsey gUet is a smart high-quality 
garment that has been specially selected 
for Times readers and is available in a 
choice of navy blue or grey with black 
buttons or oatmeal with wooden but- 
tons. It may be dry cleaned or hand 
washed with care. 

Sizes: 36in. 38in, 40in, 42in, 44in. 



All prices are inclusive of post and packing. Please 
allow up to 21 days fi>r delivery. Jf you are not 
satisfied we will refimd your money without 
question. In addition to our guarantee you have the 
benefit of your full sumanry rights nhick are not 
affected. This offer can only be despatched to 
addresses in the UK. 

The Tones Guernsey GUet Offer, 

Bourne Road, Bexley, 

Kent DAS 1BL 

Teh Crayfbrd 53316 for enquiries only. 


PRICE: £3495 


T HE TIMES 


DIAL YOUR ORDER 

RAPID ORDERISG SERVICE 
BY TELEPHONE ON 

ACCESS OR VISA 
(no need to complete coupon! 

(Cray font) 0322-5801 1 
34 hours a day - 7 days a week 



Pfcucmdmc <jaEnscyGdcrf})K£3495cacli;B«ficiiBd 


COLOUR CfacH/BwSize 

term 

qaBSy requited) 


36je 

JSa 

40B 

42a 

44a 

NAVY BLUE 






GREY 






CWTMEAL 







Send ik 'E rnes Guernsey Gilet Often Bourne Road. Bexley, 
itotijMJ BLor debit mv Acces&Vis Nd 


n 


n 


I enclose CbequefPO far £. 

Guernsey GiktOffct 

Expiry dar S igmui c^. 

MriMisfMiss 

Address 


made payable to Times 


Cnytnd SMS far aqorla odj 
Reg.Ka.8M6M> 


A c ademic PM tta re: Miss Farr putted 
up wrist appeared to be a anting 
snip (only 210 pupas) and restruc- 
tured school along Wycombe fines. 
Strong on maths and Latin. Ex- 
cellent general stutSes course tar afl 
Vlth tenners. Inducing philosophy, 
psychology and child development 
(“They need to know more about 
their own intellectual functioning"). 
Computer science for all at 11. 
Bright staff, mostly young, includes 
several men. . 

Games, options, die arts: Music 
oustanefing st rengt h; 93 per cent of 
girts learn an Instrument Notmacfy 
gamesy, though there is a lot of it 
unusually wide choioe includes day- 
pigeon shooting and archery. 
Money recently poured into 
developing hobbles/activities, such 
as woodwork, canoeing, electron- 
ics. "Stfli gossip is the chief hobby 
of afl girls, head notes, not without 
humow. Post-O levels, all girts 
immediately sent on Outward 
Bound course in the Lake District — 
a roaring success. 

Background and atmosphere: 
Whitewashed buMding In curious 
hispano-Surrey style, once a private 
house, much extended. Highly 
structured, very house oriented 
Vtth f or mers allowed to be self- 
catering and give dinner parties. 
Upper Vtth are uniform-free. Lower 
Vlth have dress code, rest wear 
truly unflattering bottle green. 

The pupRa: Many old girls’ daugh- 
ters;. army and diplomatic family 
links. Bright articulate girls with well 
developed sense of curiosity. 

Bottom Bne: Fees: boarders, £1.790 

per term; £1.140. 

Remarks: One of the tew girts’ 
public schools with real breadth of 
education. Not for bluestockings or 
shrinking violets who would col- 
under pressure of so much 


GODOLPHIN AND 
LATYMER SCHOOL 


HAMMERSMITH . LONDON W6 
Vital statistics 

pupils; 700 girts, all day. Ages 11- 
18: noTHfenorninational: tee-paying. 


on t ightening 

dsmay. 
gardener. 


Head: Miss 
January 1! 
up dsciptine - fo 
SmaS, pugnacious. 

Academic matters:. _ 
damic. One of the rare girts' 
where almost any subject can be 
taught (Russian andCttnese, tor 
example): choice of 22 A level 
very strong science 
teaching; languages another 
strength. Teaches academic self- 
reliance from the start during first 
term they are taught how to use a 
wjrary - and thereafter are ex- 
pected to research individually. 
Staff are sound (all ages, bom 
sexes) but not styftsh, ana ft shows 
to the teaching, which lacks flair. 
Lots of homework; parents ex- 
pected to cooperate as wstchdogs. 
Games, options, the arts Extra- 
cumcufar activities extremely busy 
over lunchtime. As a number of staff 
put it “If it's fashionable, they’ll be 
doing it" Out of hours and out Of 
term trips, social work, visits (to 
Russia, exhibitions, the opera) all 
energettiafly pursued. Intefloctuai 
inquisitiveness a characteristic. 
Compulsory gym twice a week, and 
own playing fields nearby but 
games teachers not popular. Drama 
very strong; some revues with St 
Pauls boys. Good music (three 
choirs, two orchestras plus smaller 
groups). Impressive art 
Background and atmosphere: 
Stands to tbgr-acre site, ongtnefly 
bunt (1861) as boys’ berating 
school. Latterday extensions to- 
duda a large library, impressive 
science dock, art rooms, gym, 
computer centre. Fairly noisy and 
untidy. But for ail its famed Bberal 
progressive outlook, there’s gritty 


underneath, symbofaed 
by strict uniform. (VHh formers are 
uniform- tree, and aflowed to have 
lunch out of school) Good careers 
dscussfons. 

The pupas: Lively, questioning, 
shar p strea k. A very wide s ocial mix 
— daughters of impoverished schol- 
ars, local professionals, shop- 
keepers, intetigantaia. Oris from afl 
over London and the outskirts, and 
even taking trains in from Bucks. 
Smart clever leaders and worthy 
plodders. Manners not briKant 
styfeb-tooting girls, with a wonder- 
ful way of expressing themselves 
via the inifonn. 

Bottom tine: Fees: £765 per term. 
Remarks: One of London's best 
girts’ schools. Broad views, broad 
interests. Absolutely not the place 
for girts who are neither self- 
motivated nor self-reltant Key 
question for parents is: can you and 
your daughter cope with Owrel 
attitudes and sophistication of a 
large London day school? 


JAMES ALLEN’S 
GIRLS’ SCHOOL 
(‘JAGS’) 


LONDON SE22 


Vital stat i s ti cs 

pupa* 850 girts, all day. Age® 11- 
18: C of E: fee-paying. 


Heed: 

1984), 


Mrs 
previous 


Davies (since 
assistant head 


here. Gentle but firm, imaginative, 
Hampsteady. Thinks gtrte have an 
tobuM tendency to be too modest T 
want them to fed free to explore, to 
try out new things, to be tough - and 
not always to am to please. ' 
Academic ma tt e r s : Stimulating 
teaching. Some distinctly brainy 
girts hem, and staff tend to con- 
centrate (as usual) on the bright 
ones and herd workers. Head has 
Introduced some (much 
men to the staff. Vlth form 
here renowned for producing a 
stream of feminists. "We’re en- 
couraged to aim academically high 
here, said one pupiL (Parents 
comment that the school does not 
aim socially high: “Unfike St Paul's - 
and what a refer) 

Games, options, the arts: Activities 

plentiful strong on visits to gak- 



Joan Sadler, die Head of 

CMtenhani Ladies' College 


lenes, museums, theatres, ex- 
change visits; geography and 
science field courses: tots of incom- 
ing lecturers. Drama a great 
strength. Good playing fields, 
heated indoor swimmtag-pooL Ex- 
tremely good art — girts win 
substantia) number of foundation 
art prizes. Flourishing new design 
and technology department 
Background and atmosphere: 
Founded in 1741 , moved to present 
20-acre site in 1888; new sdence 
labs. Vlth torn block. Wbratss with 
energy and noise. Girts encouraged 
to run their own school life (recently 
re-introduced prefects, a popular 
move). But ’There’s not enough on 
careers.” some girls complain. 

The pupils: From Chelsea, Victoria. 
Stockwefl, Ctapham. Greenwich, 
Dulwich. Bfackheath and Kent. Sol- 
kfly mkkfle-dass mixed with daugh- 
ters of local intelligentsia. 

Bottom tine: Fees: £800 per term. 
Remarks: A south of the river 
version of Godolphin and Lstymer 
crossed with St Paul’s in the Inerai 
progressive tradition, going from 
strength to strength. 


KING EDWARD VI 
HIGH SCHOOL 
FOR GIRLS 


EDGBASTON, BIRMINGHAM 


Vital s t a ti s ti cs 

Pupas: 530 girls, all day. Ages 11 - 
1 8; norwJenomtoationaf; fee-paying. 


Head: Miss E. W. Evan (since 
1977). Cool calm, careful, fair- 
minded. Hopes fervently pupils will 
leave here “having acquired the 
taste of enjoyment of study for its 
own sake, and feel they are talented 
and achtovsrs - and therefore 
responsible to serve the 
community.'’ 

Academic matters: For achievers 
with high expectations. Very wide 
syllabus, breadth and depth the 
strength here: A levels balanced - a 
third taking science subjects, a third 
arts, a third mating. Alt gets do 
general studies as their fourth 
(rarefy third) A feveL Everyone takes 
Latin and maths for O level and two 
modern languages is the norm. 
Maths probably the strongest 
department of aH. More 0 levels 
often added during VKh form years: 
Russian. German and Spanish an 
regularly taken « this stage. Great 
emphasis from tire start on dis- 
cussion to class - girts are thus 
adept arguers and verbalize rs. 
Games, options, the arts: Brand 
new art block, patently under-used 
as yet Music, sports, drama aH 
strong. Some activities, eg, debat- 
ing, undertaken with adjacent Kmg 
Edward's Boys' School (some Vhft 
sifajects shared, too). Head vary 
teen on girts being practical as wan 
as academic, thus cooking, needle- 
work and a vast amount of commu- 
nity service. 

Background and atmos phere. Di- 
.rect grant school until 1976, 
Extraordinarily efiscipiined: strong 
work ethic, no larking about during 
lesson time (and not much out of C 
either). Unusually dedicated staff. 
Sloppy wok and in a ttentivnuess 
deqaty frowned upon. No prefect 
system, no head gm. no houses. 
The pupils: Solidly middle class, 
from as far away as Lichfield. 
Bromsgrove, Wohrerhaptoa. Sol*- 
hu& there's not e school in this 
league for mfles and precious few 
anywhere. 

Bottom fine: Fees: £665 per term. 
Remarks: On an academic par with 
Wycombe and St Paul s. No iqteflec- 
tual arrogance - partly a conscious 
effort by staff to get rid of any 
feelings of superiority - results to 
girts longing lor -the warmth ot 
praise. “You tend to think you’re 
’re rut outstanding,” 

one. 


THE LADIES’ 
COLLEGE 


CHELTENHAM, GLOUCESTER 


Vital statistics 

PupHs: 845 girls; 895 board, 150 
day. Ages: 1 1-1 8: C of E: tee paying. 


Head: Miss Joan Sadter (since 
1979). SmaS and determined, com- 
ments; “The important thing is. 

being so huge, so many advantages 

are given us, and because of the 
structure, no girt need feei lost our 
nte's blood is contact with the girls.” 
Academic ma tter s : "It has been 
assumed for the past 40 years or 
so", said the head, “that tfrts hare 
wili have careers." This tradition 
gives school the confidence to go 
for the tough academic 
classics aUve and wafl, also 
maths, modem languages, etc. 
Games, options, the arts: 
Outstanding In all manner of things. 
Music very strong and ambitious. 
Art also lively with pictures hanging 
on every wafl. Traditionally strong 
games school — has won Afl 
England women's national hockey 
championship. Ptos many lesser 
laurels to squash, gym. swimming, 
•lacrosse. Also cricket, sailing, etc. 
Background and atmosphere: 
Founded 1853. pioneer erf principle 
that education of girts is as Im- 
portant as that of boys. Of afl gins’ 
schools visited, possibly tha one 
which most compares with major 
boys' public schools in atmosphere 
and tar overall breadth of education. 
Houses run by house-mistresses 
who are not members of the 
teaching staff and real sense of 
going "home” to the evening to tea 
and scones. Bulkfinos to the wide 


ihoughL lhe source of most of fog 
resi - is lack of staffpower. At one 
lime as wc vent round there 
no fewer lhan 11 headships of 
major girls' schools going begging. 
Women do not warn ihe tint* 
consuming responsibility of the 
number one job. 

eekends for married 

teachers are out - 
hopeless if you ait 
trying lo "run a 
boarding school. 
Spinster heads, as the spinster 
head of The Perse pointed out, are 
a dying breed too. We noticed, 
incidentally, that this endangered 
species is often — and utterly 
wrongly - reviled by other women 
as 'unfit* to cope with the realities 
of school life. Teaching nuns are 
fewer and fewer, often because 
they have not got the qualifica- 
tions considered necessary today 
— but what a loss of loving care 
and dedicated teaching. 


Academic matters: Afl-round ao> 
derive strengths, both sciences and 
arts; maths greatly boosted by 
Hong Kong Chinese element 
present to force, phenomenally bsni 
workers; sciences generafly hdped 
by Africans and Indians who vrin 
in time for O levels Good taton 
and modem languages. "Monitor, 
tog essential for tha less bright." 
according to parents of one such 
who might have done better 
elsewhere. 


Regency and earfy Victorian streets 
of Cheltenham - civiHzed 
and. unfike boys’ school, no trai 
roaring past Uniform a smart green 
tweed which mingles well with 
CotswokJ mink of country shoppers. 
The pupds: Inrage is upper, but 
a ctual background mainly middle- 
class: daughters of farmers, aimed 
forces, dentists, company directors. 
Manners impeccable, natural, kind, 
unaffected. 

Bottom tine: Fees: £1,825 per term 
boarding. £1 280 day. 

Remarks: Our Impression is that 
this is tiie strongest overall — 
academic, arts, games — girls' 
school in country. 


MALVERN GIRLS’ 
COLLEGE 


GT MALVERN. 
WORCESTERSHIRE 


Vital s ta tis t ic s 

Pupas: 520q*rts; 458 board. 62 day. 
Ages: 11-18; C of E: fee-paying. 


Head: Currently to a state of flux - 
one disaster, foflowed by a stop- 
gap: Dr Payne, an unknown quan- 
tity. about to take over. 


Games, options, the arts: Circular 
sports dome a controversial reewn 


use. Severe lack of outdoor spans 
facilities. Very good music - hordes 
of orchestras, fine choir. Definitely s 
Christian school, emphasizing 
community work. Needlework end 
cooking popular. 

The pupils: Interesting cross-sao- 
tion soctaBy. academically, ethno- 
Popuiar with MPs aid 

Bottom fine: Fees: £1 .710 boanfru, 
£1,140 day. 

Remarks: Great strength is that It is 
all-round — and happy, too. 


NORTH FORELAND 
LODGE 


SHERFIEUMRUjODDON. 
BASINGSTOKE, HAMPSHIRE 

Vital statistics 

Pupils: approx 165 girts; afl board. 
Ages: 1 1-18; C of E; fee-paying. 

Head: Miss D. L. Matthews (since 
1984). Keen on aim stated by the 
school's first head, who stea her 
object to founding the school was to 
"provide a boarding school, Krnitad 
in numbers, for tha daughters otthe 
leisured class, where they might 
receive an education not inferior to 
that of the great girls’ public schools 
and based upon religion”. Mas 
Matthews is intelligent, doughty and 
comments on her own behalf that 
she is running “neither a oomm 
nor a prison”. 

Ac ademi c ma tter s: The first head's 
aims have not exactly been hdflted 
on the academic front yet, though! 
1985's results were relatively good 
and seven girls went on to uraventy 
(none to Oxbridge). Physics 
computing In process of 
dragged into second hati of 


by ex-Dounroay physldst ■ 
Gamas, options, the arts; Not a 
school that loses any sleep il I 
doesn't win. but stfli pays iacrossa 
and netball and is keen on temta, 
not least because, as Miss Mat- 
thews points out competence In 
tennis wM be a social asset in yuan 
to come (unlike the others)- Kean 
fencing (compulsory tor one tom)., 
Background and atmosphere: 
Moved from North Foreland in Kant 
(hence name) to present private 
house surrounded by 70 acres w 
grounds looked after by 
groundsman Georgs Armstrong 


CONCISE CROSSWORD NO 1074 


ACROSS 
1 Act correctly (6) 

4 Nape (6) 

7 Headland (4) 

8 USSR airline (8) 

9 Clerk’s tale heroine 
( 8 ) 

13 Rotten (3) 

16 Inverted comma 
(9.4) 

17 Longtime (3) 

19 Mediocre (8) 

24 Driving power (8) 

25 Disconcert (4) 

26 Cheerful (6) 

27 Alcove (6) 

DOWN 

1 Male goal (4) 

2 Dramatic exaggera- 
tion (9) 

3 Fill with pride (5) 

4 Torn strip (5) 

5 Prevalent (4) 

6 Rowers (5) 

I® Overrun (5) 

11 Scots landowner (5) 

12 Make void (5) 



mm 

b; 

i a 

i 

iaa 

Bi 

i ■ 

IlJ 

i 

SJI 

■ 

B 

IBB 

BI 

fl 

IBB 

B 

BI 

1 

1 3 

B 

BI 

! 

B 

IBBBI 


23 Sudden inspiration 
(5.4) 

14 Ditch (4) 

15 Water (4) 

18 Malevolent spirit (5) 


28 Yucca fibre (5) 

21 Object (5) 

22 Resolved to(4) 

23 Dwbeyfieki daughter 
(4) 


SOLUTION TO NO 1073 
ACROSS: 1 Picnic 5 Base 8 Icing 
Brae 15 Orangeman’s Day 17 Tahr 
Brum 23 Fawn 24 Yankee 
59y N: —S.! d ' ot 3 Nog 4 Complimentary 
Oates 10 Teeny-weeny 12 Magi 14 Knee 
Gnn 22 Bin 


9 Migrant 11 Untimely 
18 Antecede 21 Sangria 


6 Sparred 7TittjS 

19 Exude » 


Sir John Betjeman 
General MacArthur 
Kenneth More 
Doris Smith 

What do they have in common? 


Parkinson’s Disease 

every WOpeopteborn today wiH contract thi 
m their lifetime- Some wiD be famous, most 

wuinot ft strikes men and women 
Psxhans even m 



Please support - - 

Disease Society 

36 fthHand Place; London WIN3DG. Ttt 01-323 1174 


than to the' three R&ToTW 


He ttUl »Vt wjmfflBF-wr 





rurtrtew 

















THE TIMES WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 8 1986 


SPECTRUM 




M Jf-T l«y also mend 

p 1 ^®- a tSssj 

U?. - Wlth 'ranhnum supervision. 


Bottom ** Ftias: £1.675 per term. 

smart non-academic 
gS ^*"*"9 school. 'Very axSr 
s?« a parent, and "varv EES* 






jjjjjjpj 


JW 




THE PERSE 
SCHOOL FOR 
GIRLS 

ra*i=isii.r«j= 


Vital statistics 

Pupte 550, aft daw Ages: 11-18; 
NonKienomlnafionah FOeijaying. 


Hn± Mss M. FL Batsman (sines 
1B80). Bubbly, kind and good at 
organizing. Doesn't reckon to pro- 
dues a Perse product f ’eccentrics 
do -well tiered but does aspect 
every cWd to be properly educated 
with '‘pieces of paper to prove ft.” 
so that she may be able to earn a Bv- 
jng wage - “not forgetting that one 
in three win end up divorced and 
these ere the new poor.” 

Academic ma tter s. No qualms on 
this account Staff In general of very 
high caSbre. Strong science deparv 
ment, with individual classroom for 
electronics. Modem languages 
strong, with luxury of staff from 
Russia, Italy and France. "It 
shows," said a girt, “when we 


S M Sa 




|l , |I|M III | A |l| Jiiuiiill 

hiifi'JiVi'ili i 


|i> jr J fr 







Jiandai 
i mister 
.'harmed 


J^ ^rrwrg some parents, who 
consider her difficult, but she is 
praised by others (or having ,rm- 

Pjsmented improvements in 

AOKtemie matters: Non-starters in 
me academic arena probably never 
amvel here; so the assertion by girts 
Pjacea m the lower streams that 
they don t feel second-rate is what 

Russian/Latki/^rewk chofceln 
o™ year. Very* competent staff 
( tolerant outlook") sometimes 
have to battle it out with academic 
parents “thinking they know 
better". Head of music universally 
acclaimed. "Excellent*’ for 
maths/sdences. 

Games, options, the arts: Games 
not compulsory after Lower Vth. 
Good Involvement for aH in music 
and drama. Greek plays put on at 
high level. Three orchestras. 
Background and atmosphere: 
"Rather box-like, '50s-style. “Ugly 
but nice." Attractive paying fields 
on a not very large site. Blind eye 
turned to make-up and pink streaks 
in hair, though discipline definitely 
exists. 

The pupilK 50 per cent from Oxford 
itself, others from quite long but 
commutable distances, interesting 
cross-sections of society, from 
underprivileged on assisted places 
to daughters of dons, jialges, etc, 
plus a few green waffles thrown ado 
the academic deep end. 



saachsrs coming 
school (famous for 
song); older girts m 
main games but m 
“outdoor activity". 


wins, east or Brighton in 118 acres. 
A swa rm of dreary pebbtedashad 
hidings including four main 
houses" and rather cosier VHft 
form house with the usual semi- 
detached air about it of drying 
domes, piles of frozen food, gas 
stoves and domesticity. At- 
mosphere faintly scruffy and self- 
conscious. 

Tits pupds: A strange mixture of okl 
girts' daughters (posh), expats and 
non-nationals: large numbers of 
doctors' daughters. 

Bottom Eme Fees: £1,834 per term 
senior, £1,700 junior. 

Remark*: St® trailing douds of 
gkxy but now in need of dynamic 
new direction. 


ST LEONARDS 
SCHOOL 


ST ANDREWS, FIFE 


Vital statistics 
ftjpBs: Approx 435 girts; t 
360 board. 70 day: Ages: 
Scottish Epi sc opal and Chu 
Scotland: Fee-paying. 


need : Miss Martha HamBton (since 
1970). Formerly head of missionary 
school In north-east inctia. and has 
taken school group out there. 
Formidable presence, constantly on 
the go. 

Academic matters: Founded in 
1877 to provide girts with an 
education as good as that of their 
brothers - hence a strong aca- 
demic tradition. Got eight girts Into 
Oxbridge in 1884 and 1985, which 
head said was “magnifleient" — 
before teat “lucky to get one or two 
in". Enthusiastic computer studies 

master is pioneering - with acclaim 
- a new oourse In computer sldfe 
and works endlessly to keep up to 
date, overseeing vast quantities of 
new equipment 

Games, options, dm arts: Gaines 
compulsory - hockey Christmas 
term, lacrosse Easter, athletics 
summer plus tennis on aft-weather 



Vital statistics 

Pupte 383 girts. 16 day boys: 288 
board, ill day: Agex 11 - 18 : CofE: 

Fee-paying. 


Headb Mss Debcey Bums since 
1985. Charming, bright, vary quick 
and pretty — parents rave about her 
fSo unlike a headmistress!"}. 
A cade m ic matteisi A powerhouse. 
At A levels the majority take three, a 
few four, fewer two, and an do a 
minimum of one extra ncxHixamin- 

able subject to prevent specializa- 
tion. Science is exceptional, rare 
that girts do not take physics and 
chemistry at O level Careers and 
computing compulsory at Vtm form, 
an innovation. History of art and 
architecture both excaCentiy taught 
and madly popular. Very strong 
modern languages. 

Gamas, option*, the arts: De- 
servedly strong music reputation 
(over75 per emit learn at least one 
instrument; three chamber music 
groups, live choirs, two orchestras). 
Drama a major activity, arts and 



QUEEN ANNE’S 
SCHOOL 


GAVERSHAM, BERKSHIRE 


Vital statistics 


||S||i|||113 


Head: Miss Audrey M. Scott (since 
1977). Steady, thoughtful, strong 
and in control of the atuetion. Says 
it is "very Important that a eftnd 
wants to come to boardfog school - 


Vital statistics 

Pupte 446 girls, aft board; Ages: 9- 
1 8; C of E but other faiths atoos Fee- 
paying. 


Heed: Mrs Ann Longtoy (since 
1984). Friendly widow, mpressive 
speaker and rumoured to be getting 
the school on the move. 

Academic ma tt a i t: Results not 
available but school has "strong 
metfieaf tradition" and girls have 
gravitated to biology, physics and 
chemistry in which mere is a pocket 
of enthusiastic teaching. Projects 
centre for biology and physics; 
ecology course run in summer 
hoftdays: Good labs, computer 
centre. 

Games, options, the arte: Com- 
pulsory projects outside main- , 
stream subjects; pupils butt a real 
live hovercraft with sponsorship of 
ofl company. Strong art department 
with lively work, inducting dress 
design and ecUpture. Music also 
strong: high standard, critical teach- 
ing. impressive array of pert-time 



O with 35 per cent or more *A‘ 
grades. TradAonaliy strong in the 
arts and sciences. LBce Manchester 
Grammar for boys, the atmosphere 
is conducive to learning. Moths, 
physics, chemistry and (stifl, at the 
moment) Latin compulsory. 
Articulacy is all here: they are up on 
ttNdr Mm legs talking all the time. 
Games, options, the arte Olympio- 
stzed swimming pooL two. tacrosie 
pitches, eight tennis courts all used 
with panache, but the most senous 
extras are music and drama. The 
school goes about its business to a 
backgrouid of organ playing ana in 
1982 opened a beautiful theatre bi 
memory of Dame Ceka Johnson. 
Through parents and Ofo Paulinas 
the 3<moo4 also has untended and 
powerful con ta c ts , and to see on the 
noticaboard dm John Mortimer QC 
Is coming to taft to the school is 
nothing out of the ordinary. No 
cookery taught 

Background and atmosphere: 
Surpraingty spacious for a London 
school No inform but dress must 
be "a pp rop ria te". Atmos p here of 
benevoisrt di ctat orsh ip . Rules all 
contained on one yaftow card — the 
Idea bein g to avoid petty 
restriction*. 

The pupte Mostly middle class 
artefigentw—MPs* daughters, aie. 
Has a staggering U$t of famous old 
girls. They are in the process of 
setting up a network to take 
advantage. Strong Jewish (80+) 

and Muslim (20) contingants. 

Bottom Hoe: Fees: £1.025 per term. 
Remarks: Arrived preparing to find 
fault because of the groveting effect 
the school has on parents, came 
away convinced it is possibly the 
best academic independent day 
girls' school in the country. 


Winchester. Good space and facil- 
ities: new science block, music 
school, art studio, sports tan. 
Dormitories offer privacy and 
space. A tmo sp here of work and 
dtsdpHne. 

The pupibc Largely local, some Of 
parents in the services, many 
whose parents are posted abroad 
Bright pofte and happy, with an 
unlovely brown uniform (none for 
thaVWi). 

Bottom Bok Fees: £1.685 par term 
boankng. £1,069 day. 

Remarks: Remarkably rounded 
academe education which gives , 
gnts who can cope a wide breadth 
of vww. Fosters high ex p ectations. 




SHERBORNE 
SCHOOL FOR 
GIRLS 


SHERBORNE. DORSET 




Vital flirt? sties 

Pupds: 455 girts: 445 board, 10 day: 
Ages: 12-18; C of E: Fee-paying. 


Heed: Miss June Taylor (since 
1985), totafty home-grown: head 
girl, maths teacher then 
housentistress for 15 years at 
Sherborne. Very popular appoint- 
ment aft-rotmd (including with senior 
staff). Approachable, enthusiastic. 
ieveJ-hsaded. Disparages "knowl- 
edge factories". 

Academic m att er *. Sound though 
not bnffuvn. Work is steady (first 
lesson at 8 30am - a rarity) without 
being pressurized. Timetabling 
highly flexible, due to great strength 
ot music and extras offered (eg 
squash coaching). Pupte (happily) 
spoon-fed until they reach vnti 
form, when at last they are using 



1ST PAUL’S GIRLS' 

SGHOOI 


BROOK GREEN, LONDON W6 


Vital statistics 

PupAs: Approx 600 girts, all day; 
Ages: 10-18; Anglican foundation; 
Fee-paying. 


gsragggg 

k <. rt iAh d n a *' ':L ’ f 


Head: High Mistress is the famous 
Mrs Heather Brigstocke (tinea 
1974), who has now bean a head- 
mistress for 21 years. “She has 
such charisma," said a prep school 
head, "people just flock after her.'* 
Academic matter*: Amazing. Got 
56 into Oxbridge last year. Honours 
covers two huge high walls of their 
large pink Edwardian buffeting. 95 
per cent of pistils go on to 
univertsty. 30 per cent of these on 
average to Oxbridge. Pupils get 
over 90 per pent pass for both A and 


Vita] statistics 

Puptis: 410 gills: 235 board. 175 
day; Ages: 11-18; C of E; Fee- 
paying. 


Head: New head is Miss J. E. 
Jefferson, previously Head of 
Hunmanby Haft School, near 
Scarborough. 

Academic 'Matters: Every , depart- 
ment goes fuft-pett, and girts are 
kept busy In many (tractions; they 
work hard without being pressur- 
ized and dearly lore ft. Two English 
papers, French, maths and one 
science subject compulsory at O 
level 40-60 per cent at dris here do 


A level maths; classics* another 
strength. A level subjects are a free 
choice, and Vith formers often dock 

B > another language (Spanish or 
ussian. lor instance) in 0 level 
too. 

Games, options, the arts: Powerful 
on the lacrosse field; extra-curricu- 
lar activities and dubs (judo, forc- 
ing, archery, contemporary dancing, 
for instance) generate great enthu- 
siasm. Five tuft-time. 22 visiting 
music staff: the school has two 
orches t ras and 60 (yes) chamber 
groups, mainly run by the girts 
themselves- Art department in- 
cludes excellent book-binding. 
Drama very popular; good debting 
society. Home economics and 
needeworic part ofthe curriculum. 
Background and atmosphere: 
Large 1930s Queen Anne style, 
purpose-built school (founded else- 
where in 1884), somewhat bleakly 
set in the green bait Just outside 


ot music and extras offered (eg 
squash coaching). Pupte (happily) 
spoon-fed until they reach vnti 
form, when at last they are using 
bbranes. researching, note-taking 
etc on their own - compared with 
academe schools these girts lead a 
relatively sheltered academic Ufa tiff 
their last two years. Modem lan- 
guages a great strength. Russian 
(Vlth formers only) very good in- 
deed. good maths. Strong scie n ce s 
(new labs have helped). 

Gamas, option*, the arts: Music 
could weft be the reason to send 
your daughter to this school: the 
best muse department m any avis' 
school, under the remarkable Mm 
Augusta Mtier, damnunve, dynamic, 
fun. crates*. School music produc- 
tions superb and varied, and not 
only for the most talented. Head of 
PE, with proverbial foghorn voice, is 
also Second Mistress, and a pfftar of 
the place. Girts wm tots of matches 
and play hard (one of the tow girts' 
schools to ptay both lacrosse and 
hockey as major sports). Sports 
complex has a tag gym, squash 
courts etc and “car wash", as the 
cprts call the shower area. 
Background and atmosphere: 
Modelled on Cheltenham Ladies' - 
though tar smaller and less aca- 
demic with an unusually strong, 
highly competitive house system. Ml 
meals eaten in their houses ("good 
food”, volunteered several voices), 
and ages mix very freely. Upper Vlth 
have their own house, wear their 
own clothes, and can invite 
Shwtxxne boys to thek TV common 
room which may aptly name “the 
airport lounge''. Strong sense of 
purpose pervades the school and 
the girts. Discipline tightening up - 
"high time, too," from several 
parents. 

The pupte Strong Dorset. Bristol 
and West Country and London 
contingents- Daughters of the 
Estabfahment ana men in the 


professions with brothers at 
She rooms Boys'. 

Bottom tine: Fees: £l.B2S per term 
boarding. £1220 day. 

Remarks: A very good aft-round 
education, excellent for music, 
producing sensible girts. 


WYCOMBE ABBEY 
SCHOOL 


HIGH WYCOMBE, 
BUCKINGHAMSHIRE 


vital statistics 

Pupte approx 480 girls. aH board; 
Ages: 11-18; C of E.-pee-paying. 


Need: Miss Patncta Lancaster 
(since 1974). Enthusiast and leader 
with a gift for breaming Me into 
pupte and staff. She hopes mat 
each gal wd achieve some aca- 
demic qualifications, but "more than 
that i hope she win be the son ot 
person who will be a first-rate 
home-maker, mother, wife. That 
■I'm only a wife' business - absolute 
nonsense. On women bes the 
statakty of the whole ot the next 
generation ..." 

Academic matters: "Gats are 
simple." said a Sloans mother. “If 
tney'ra bright you send them to 
Wyeombe Abbey, it they're not you 
send them to Tudor Han.” Particu- 
larly Strong history, English and 
Latin. Teaching largely excellent. 
Because of high expectations has a 
tendency to Breed girls who are 
never content with themselves. 
Games, options, the arts: Not as 
strong on games as music: every 
variety of instrument taught by the 
dedicated Mss Sharp, plus other 
excellent teachers. New arts study 
centre due to open Christmas 1986. 
Strong following for amtaboufl 
house plays. Lacrosse school. 
Background and atmosphere: 
Founded m 1896. Buddings Gothic, 
on edge of High Wycombe with 
"The wall" running round, which 
some town people have seen as 
symbolic of school's keeping itself 
to itself. Pleasant grounds marred 
by rather grotty Vlth form building at 
the back. 

The pupils: Sophisticated, though 
head ana pupils shuddered at the 
thought that the school might be 
considered a bit debby. Head 
commented that most parents ware 
"from professional termites living in 
the country". Lots of brothers at 
Eton, and boys are ferried over 
regularly for dinner-parties, debates 
etc. 

Bottom line: Fees: £1,850 per term. 
Remarks: Has had long innings as 
most fashionable academic girts' 
public school. For some reason 
does not inspire the Instant paeans 
of praise of five years ago. 


.Adapted from The Good 
Schools Guide, a Harpers and 
Queen publication to he pub- 
lished by Ebury Press on 
November 3 (price £8.95). 


TOMORROW 


Co-eds: the 
best of 
both worlds 
























THE TIMES WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 8 1986 



nn 

r' 


Irrif 


3eet 


rman 3 
ly has la 
attack 
ty runs 
notion p 
ry assoc, 
umemoi \ 
iference 
nipulate 
inage de 
s or 


bbiu his 
[s me, w. 
ten the • • 
tied, !o} 
ybody ic 
ry like il j 
into dis 
2 of a in 
nferencc 
live con 
der ih£> 
solution 

0 blaocl 
dinous i 
:bate”. 

1 mediate 
id shorn 
is been st 
i finish. 1 " 
should ai 
»r debate. 


lanD 


The fen 
xeutrich 
iiestionn 
y the 
oestion i 
lay pern 
jngdom'. 
Kpecttot 
r 10 yew 


Tres 


Lov 


Among 
against 
pool tost 
West Dt 
pameuk 
school. ! 
chanty 
rates. " 
Shcrbor 
pie in 
sidiztng 
he said, 
case of 
for Dan 
school. 


Pro& 
anno 
field 
robo 
Greg 
Brisi 
new 
bers 
at it 
at V 
later 
mist 
thot 
exis 
Davrs. 


Healthy Questions. 




t 


In an area as controversial as health 
care, there are bound to be many questions. 

But when it comes to NHS medicine 
supply the answers are often assumed. If 
you want more information about British 
medicines and their contribution to the 
nation’s health and wealth, contact ABPI 
at the address below. 

Q. How does the pharmaceutical 
industry affect the UK economy? 

A. In 1985 UKpharmaceutical exports 
exceeded imports by over £830 million. , ^ jj^ygagl 

Our domestic spending on medicines 
is only half that of our major 
competitors like the US, Japan and f m -- r 

Germany. If Britain is to be able to 
afford good welfare services, we must 

be able to pay for them — pharmaceut- e; 

icals are an area in which this country is ff., 

outstandingly successful. fjj jPilllxil 

Q. What contribution to UK rafip® ^ 

employment does the pharmaceutical W 

industry make? 

A. Over 80,000 people are employed 
directly by the UK pharmaceutical 
industry. A further 250,000 to 300,000 
British jobs owe their existence indirectly 
to the pharmaceutical industry. 

Q. Why is the number of NHS cgfe 

prescriptions rising? 

A. Between 1979 and 1985 the total 
number of prescriptions dispensed in the 
UK rose by only 5%. Factors involved | 
included the ‘ageing’ of the population, 
rising unemployment and the shift to 
community care. For some groups of 
medicines, such as tranquillisers, the total j 

fell significantly. 

Q. Does the pharmaceutical industry W:-:; 

care about 'Third World’ health? 

A. Only about 10% of the UK phar- 
maceutical industry’s revenue is derived 
from the entire Third World. Yet through 
ABPI, British medicine manufacturers 
accept their responsibility to aid global 
health progress. For example, pilotprojects 
toimprovemedidnedistributionarebeing 
funded in East Africa and the Maldives. 

Q. Why should all the growth ^Si§£!2>^ 

money available to the NHS go to 
medicine costs? 

A. It does not. Since 1982 the propor- 
tion of NHS resources going to 
pharmaceuticals (costed in manufacturers’ 
prices) has stayed roughly constant Less 
than one NHS pound in ten goes on 
medicines. Some 80% of NHS medicines 




>y'' 


5arKl 


m 




are prescribed by General Practitioner 
DHSS figures show that between 19yf 
and 1984 overall spending on the fan^ 
practitioner services went up 10% moil 
than their medicine costs. 

Q. Haven’t we already got the 
medicines we need? 

A. Medicines and vaccines are not the 
only key to better health. But they have 
contributed significantly to the control <$ 
infections and the relief of disorders like 
depression, arthritis and heart disease. 

Unfortunately, 
however, many illnes- 
ses are still incurable, 
k or only partly. f 


S5>V>VC* 2NT< 


-V* r , 


K'Vbl 








ill < S J 


V*, 1 + 


-^?iH 









mi 






TSSSWS& 




few 


w o-V-‘ n si,rtuM! 
,, , v .- 'nv-fi 

"„.j Jntrii'V thei 


\ ( .■ : i , sii'itwl'® 
^>iiv ihniMv. 


Jlhi 


i.uiing ««th. t 


i _ ■ . _t 

p sj- 


: J J 


, . ,/v • 

. 

. ■"* 1 

- J.:Ji l*" 1 1 ■ ■*. 


& 
ui IT ? 


« ;viu . 
i-tiy 

.„i-« 1 

-t 1 - 5 - 1 .*T 

. ‘^4 f 1 4 

J r l ''■***' 


uf r* - .. 

■ 

%»'Z ■ 


F 


iv*--: 

F.vv^ 1 • 


treatable. Providing 
research invests? 

ment continues, ■ 

many more effective 
pharmaceuticals will be 
40 developed to help protect 

i against conditions such .® 

wM & jW-A ) cancers, multiple sderoas 

/and AIDS (Acquired ImmuiK 
( Deficiency Syndrome). ‘ 

0 Q. How much does the 

B pharmaceutical industry 
spend on research? 

A. In Britain, the pharmacetft- 
IgPi ical industry spent, in the last yea; 

over £500 million on research. 

\ Research to find cures, new treatments 

and medicines with improved therapeutic: 
profiles. Additionally, some of this money 
goes towards the necessarily high level of 
‘safety’ testing. ; .f 

Q. Isn’t the pharmaceutical industiy 
excessively profitable? 71 

A. The UK pharmaceutical industry^ 
profits from the NHS are currently below 
the average for the companies quoted in 
the “Financial Times” 500 Index. 

The UK pharmaceutical industry Has 
consistently invested more in this 
country than it has made in profit from 
the NHS. 

For further information about 
medicines and health in Britain, write to 
Gail Turner at The Association of the 
British Pharmaceutical Industry’s Health 
Information Desk, 12 Whitehall 
London SW1A 2DY or telephone flllOij 

1 m ^ A—t—t s5 BBP r/ 


* - Mv? 

■A ;i:v 
- !h«ll- 

- . u..*.»r 

i 


W- li f 


JlhvIC 


isnt^; ‘V 
rfh* \ 

ja rtr- ' - 

lions rs ?■ 
"• ■ 

;EFol 

:&V. wS ' : 
is4w«i 
ftahj) 
aito: •: 

tavwsvj: 
53 1WV. 


.* i {Ui 
: Mvf 

.! a! A 

■:? jiit* 

1 4 ! null 


r.xiStlK . 
vL*u 

fub. 

. »i IhC 
ivxicr 
• MW 

i dtni'l 
iwii 
J’Pli 


VK - 

fi.-.folt * 
vtath i 
:fic M«:v i 
..t«v 

IS** 1 ' K,<*| f 

s- 

t 

with 

r »i 

S*»C- .4 

V-.;? 

tv 
hu * 
rjrtCV Hi 
irttlmg c 
nr ,t« , 
quVHfTff! 
VI 

>il 
|*'| H\ 
iiicmU v 


tort s: 

HUcn 

KsMgan 


Consumer 


itol of ihc s *ui!i 1 j' 

^Hl ihn vtjr }:j\ mi} 
Ibe G<i« cr nnn-ix i trnni 
owiab) ihc Hijjh MutI. 
^ At fomin« «iM;nn it 
ihr i •■■iMiiRt'r 
B'lt di sin ni'il to 
® fe ctMnnirr 

Tradt- Vi ii-t.m 

nfbanii divussui ihr 
t ‘**>*< ibarii-j " .af liar 
u>nli-rr,i,r 


Them* 
war 
anti 


,8 
fireii 


*ill Kpjrk „n 
J™™ ^ hmh ".iJ.-n of 

3 * " w l> di'iMuti uf 

Ihr dc- 

iw ' t,,,, K ’ 

in Ir res it «f 
feg, _ ~ tn ^ Mipplarrv 

hi h l burdens arr 

^.■L2L PUc * d nn *iwf 

jTjWRUnufjtlurrrs, 

bat thrre 
to vurb the 
^toStats- K»r 



rWto- > n,,a '. »«> ki> 

. ,er "rfrev 


B.K u,nfcl »ni 


**Ei*in mv, 

S?K rs r j,,d 


hniu* 

. 1 1,1 h.»»r 


4^* dm , 

S^sfcihT VnH,!r *' 11 


prasi'oin,,, 


thr> one 
hUI bed 
Un, whl 
fined m 
wa&X *1 
v«» nn 
U motion 
mtn la* 
W( nnd'l 
V mn 
"ill hp 
^amrti I 
if flirt m 
Biimlx 1 



' * S:V ** 1 ’ Wi ViJ.;,' 


ox 

COA 


her on 01-930 3477. 


The Association of the 
British Pharm aceutical Industry* 

British Medicines and Britain’s Health 


c tll ^ 

i anH V V UE 0(41 

J; 0Ell et fine Mai 
1 in 5 
: i C A ° r cuu 

| ° A CO-OF 


JtTfI2> oroduct helstoselL than 16 the Three TST or tHT” He wur »ve wrarnig^-wr - ^ 


self 


Ma 


" ^ ° p r - n 



THE TIMES WEDNESDAY OCTOBER g W86 


15 


WF.nTMF 5 inA V PAr^F 



, s, 

a s\\. 

n,?' r, k 

'*hs* 



! 1ik, * 


*Eft, 


• -- M *\a| . 

... •« - \ 

* a nia t 1 . 

•-' v*%S 

- • “.^X 

•'■<1 J fe, 
Wlil H ,, 

• " Z* *K 

. -v 

■l.lfaKMi > 

- *--***ri\ 

. •»«, K^*: 

•• ~i . '■«« 

-- i, k- kF , 

. . M fos - 
■; "Nu’ 
: ... * ! 

■ :‘ I; aj nj. : ‘ 

. 

.'... u 

... ■’; rra ‘3J> 

-i:.' a ''\ t 

.’. J" 1 “’injr.u ip.; 
kn.ni D • 

• **«**! ** 


:»v 


’-i tis-s , 


K« »m. 

in... . 

• «*'»n 


-.i 


"'TV 

h»» 


***•+*£+ 
• * ir Sir*.; 

°»- 1 :i 

*' '*' '5. ad. i;- 
■>.!* 

‘ ' " ’•'• '■» isrv-j; 

• -- 'i-'-'-U!:,.* 

" ^.••KV ; 

• ■•■■ ‘i-rn.. ... _ 

f KIT 

■' 

./ *» - c .- r.:.-Vfc. 

?• *'•>• ®- - f. :>• 

„ *. ? • ,■•-*;■ • 

• > • • .S; i~ 


!• »VK 

■> ; »*!• -«a .;• a. 

• ‘tff'i- 
■j '•"» 

• -.\t’ 

■ ■!.•?.. \ •£■ 

■ i ■ 

.. •■*•;• 

. .- {■: , p "■' 

" . - , ■!>» 
i -,i. u; .’ 

■ j"i •':. ■' * 


> • i • 

• * ’ -'• 


» .-.N-.t!!:: .' 




*■-- 


. t ^ 


t * sh‘ u : : 
(i |U«^ 


A few friends came round, for life 



* 


Women sometimes appear to 
have more friends than, clothes, 
^ t ^h^ni iu^t as often. 

o?™^Jdship — ei1, Colin Duncan, have 
a wholly different approach to 
acquiring, an d dealing with, their best ‘pals’ 


* 


W hen I asked her, she 
a»d no. she hadn’t 
jjally seen any 
“Tends lately, except 

21 Promised themselv£ 

arRftAa.a 

sSiylunS day there w 
f h „ T J ust Annabel and 
Julia and ail the regulars. 

-JV*: sh ® “Apart from 

latefy - ^ Vm 1 566,1 any fiiends 

In what rated as a auietisb 

She had seen Tnore 
mends than most men make in a 
lifetime. When it comes to fnend- 
ship, women are wildly promis- 
cuous. They pick them up m bars 

f.!!ru res l ai;r ®; n . ls * ^ey swap friends 
with other friends, and they even 
indulge in group fHendship. In 
inese matters, men are models of 
chastity that is why we often spend 
years of dreaming, waiting for the 
right chap to come along. 

In the last few years, we have 
seen a vast reshuffle of human 
relationships which has made 
friendship easier to get at, with 
much less anxiety over such non- 
sense as skin tones, sleeping pref- 
erences and scholastic neckwear, 
i et among all this splendid 
progress, friendship between men, 
which has always been a delicate 
business, has become even more 
ticklish. 

I cannot see myself taking a pal 
on a splurge in Austin Reed. I have 
no plans to raid Calais with three 
chums. And whoever heard of a 
boys* lunch? Yet for all the 
problems, friendship between men 
has an uncomplicated warmth 
about iL 

Without the j>uli of family, 
sexual or commercial interests, you 
can spend an hour or two ambling 
around a golf course or at the pub, 
throwing darts, confident in the 
knowledge that no one will pester 
you about sales figures or a new 
frock, school fees or export drives. 

When I say friendship.- 1 don’t 
mean those howling lupine packs- 
of men you see at stag patties. Tm 
talking about the' gentle, easy 


relationships which sometimes 
blossom between men. which have 
the cosy qualities of an old 
cardigan. 

Foronce, sex. power and politics 
don’t count. I have one friend who 
longs to bear the rolling of tum- 
brils. another who thinks Norman 
Tebbitt is a dangerous pinko. 
Another. I believe, shares his 
moment of private- passion with 

young Mediterranean -waiters. 
None of this matters. We have sat 
in deckchairs at home and watched 
cricketer Imran Khan rise to his 
toes to square drive, we have spun 
for pike on a misty la k e in Sussex, 
and shared a quiet hour in the sun 
outside a friendly restaurant. 

Women find such uncontrived 
simplicity hard to believe, and 
suspect that men can gather to- 
gether only to plot some form of 
sexual insurrection. 

F or years, three of us went 
to the Greyhound every 
Sunday evening. Our 
wives were baffled by this 
arrangement In terms of 
icy amusement mine used to say: 
“Well. I expect you are going to see 
your little friends againr* She 
managed to make them sound like 
dwarfs with disgusting personal 
habits. One of the other wives 
made a show of saintly tolerance in 
the face of such pevershy: “I don’t 
care what they do.” she sighed “I 
just get on with the ironing.” 

So what did we get up to? The 
last time, as I recall, John spoke 
with affection of his begonias and 
their successful transference to 
avoid frost. This permitted Ted to 
give a brief summary of a success- 
ful fishing trip to Scotland. Pete, 
whose week had been uneventful, 
restricted himself to general com- 
ments on the quality of the beer 
and his abominable luck at domi- 
noes. We all shared in the ritual of 
feeding crisps to Pete’s dog which, 
we aD agreed, was a very fine 
specimen of its kind, if only we 
knew which kind 
AU right it might not do much 
for 'Robert Robinson and his 
friends who read out their witty 
spontaneities on Stop the Week,' 
but it was a very pleasant hour. 

' When 'they announced that 
Reagan and Gorbachov were to 



Friends indeed: Michael Hogan, left, and Adrian Metcalfe, who came to the aid of Jeffrey .Archer, centre, in troubled limes 


Jeffrey Archer, best-selling author 
and deputy chairman of the Conser- 
vative Party, does not have a best 
friend ... he Iras two. Both friend- 
ships grew out' of a shared Ion of 
athletics and a determination to 
beat enemy nations to the finishing 
line. 

Channel 4 sports commentator 
Adrian Metcalfe, farmer and 
businessman Michael Hogan, and 
Jeffrey Archer succeeded one an- 
other as President of Athletics at 
Oxford, and this three-way friend- 
ship between men of disparate 


social backgrounds has endured for 
30 years- 

It was pot to the ultimate test, 
Archer says, “when I bad my 
downfall. I went from being the 
youngest MP with everything going 
for me, to nothing. 

“Unlike many, they didn't ran 
away but appeared instantly. Both 
gave me money to pay my minor 
debts, one gave me a job and both 
were ja$t terribly, terribly loyal. 
Now they are my sounding board 
for common sense. Since my 
bankruptcy, for mrfjnrp, I>e been 


very cautions financially. Michael 
counsels me and I really listen.” 

He has also drawn on their 
individual qualities for characters 
in his books, riting them as: “In 
Michael, total integrity loyality 
to a degree I've never seen in any 
other hnman being — he’s the hero 
in A Master of Honour. And in 
Adrian, tremendous humour, wit 
and a first-class mind.” 

To Archer’s sadness, the geog- 
raphy of their lives means that the 
three see each other too rarely, but 


they speak at least once a week and 
meet np whenever possible, often to 
watch important athletics meetings 
when, to the despair of their wives, 
“we degenerate into three over- 
grown schoolboys, bringing back 
marvellous golden memories of 
when Adrian won everything.” 

All over-achievers as young men, 
they follow each other's careers 
with interest, but Archer credits 
Metcalfe with a comment summing 
up their shared attitude: “Success 
is about not being mo busy to have 
lunch with your friends.” 


meet in Iceland. 1 wondered if this 
was not merely an attempt to find 
world peace, but perhaps some- 
thing a good deal rarer and more 
illusive: a simmering male friend- 
ship. 

It has all the classical features. 
They met through business, and 
overcame a period of suspicion by 
exchanging gifts in the same way 
that sales directors send each other 
leather-bound diaries. “Thought 
you might like this dissident, Mr R. 
Very good of you Mr G. have a spy. 
Fancy a drink one evening? Meet 
you half way — bow about 
Reykjavik?” Mark rrry words, an- 
other 10 years or so and they’ll be 
calling themselves Ron and Mik 
and swapping tips on power drills. 


Because it is hard won, friend- 
ship among men is cherished. We 
won't share the secrets of our 
begonias with just anybody, you 
know. Unlike women, we have no 
wish to engage in casual relation- 
ships. 

In any case, I don’t think 
convention would allow me to go 
to the cinema with a man friend. 1 
certainly couldn't telephone a man 
and say “Hello George, we met the 
other day at Tom’s and I wondered 
if you'd like to walk your dog with 
me.” 

No doubt we are restrained by 
the fear that we may appear less 
than rigid in the wrist, but 1 think 
we are more influenced by the 
historic reluctance of British men 


to gush emotions at each other. 

No, this is not going to turn into 
one of those laments about our 
sang-froid. I don't envy Latins 
their freedom to chew each other’s 
necks and weep all over the napery. 
On the contrary, I rather admire 
the decent reticence with which 
men here construct their cautious 
friendships. 

T he convention is that 
men in Britain are al- 
lowed to meet only to 
pursue a shared interest, 
from which springs all 
those elute. It doesn't matter 
particularly whether it's squash or 
chess, or whispered government 
secrets within the panelled rooms 
of St James, so long as it provides 


the social lubrication for 
friendship. 

It can lake months, years even, 
for men to plot through the 
elaborate procedure of ignoring 
each other, casual nods, mutter 
about the weather, shake hands, 
exchange names, and then finally 
begin talking; until one day they 
arrive at the point where they can 
say. “I was talking to this chum of 
mine last night . . .” 

What else can I say? Bit 
embarrassing really. I mean, don't 
want to look soppy or anything. All 
I'm saying is. we don't make a lot 
of friends. Heavens no. But when 
we do, well, it means a lot. That's 
alL 

© Tfcnw Nu m ptii ». 19W 



BRIEFLY 


A round-up of news, 
views and information 


Mapped out 

Did yon know that 72 per cent 
of doctors in the USSR are 
women? Or realize that in 
Britain, women comprise 94 
per cent of the part-time 
workforce? Or even that 
56.400 American women had 
nose jobs during 1984? These 
are some of the wmsnal statis- 
tics from Women in the World 
(Pan, £7.95), by Joni Seager 
and Ann Olson. 

For the first time, an atlas 
pots women on the map, 
globally, focusing on topics 
such as contraception, rape, 
beauty contests and marriage, 
with charts comparing the 
relative position of women 
around the world. It is sham- 
tog to realize that women form 
half the world's population, 
one-third of its labour force — 
yet earn only 10 per cent of the 
world's income and own just 
one per cent of its property. 

A big help 

The growing acceptability of 
“the well-lunched look" 
continues to hearten larger 
women who have long la- 
mented the blind eye turned 
to their fashion plight by 
mainstream magazines. Big 
women need feel ignored no 
longer; Cachet and Extra 
Special both hit the book- 
stalls this month, devoting 
coverage to the particular 
problems women size 16 and 
over have finding unfrumpy 
fashions, plus health and diet 
advice and items of general 
interest. 


Knit kits 


With so many mothers pursu- 
ing careers, there is too little 
time to pass on to inquiring 
youngsters the homely skills 
of knitting. Taking over where 
Mummy left off are Sirdar's 
Absolute Beginners patterns, 
which sensibly assume that 
the reader does not know- one 
end of a needle from the other. 
They unravel the mysteries of 
the art with step-by-step 
instructions to guide would-be 
knitters from casting on to 
finishing off a range of simple 
bat stylish garments. Aimed 
ostensibly at teenagers, and 
priced at 65p from wool shops 
and department stores, it of- 
fers designs to suit even the 
most mature novice. 

Josephine Fairley 


Consumer minus the ‘con’ 


The defeat of die Sunday 
Trading Bill this year has not 
deterred the Government from 
venturing into the High Street 
During the coming session it 
will introduce the Consumer 
Protection Bill, designed to 
protect the customer against 
faulty goods. Trade Secretary 
Paul' Chan non discussed the 
new “shoppers' charter” at the 
Conservative conference 
vesterday. 

As ever, it will spark off 
disagreement on both sides of 
the counter, but uulike_ Sunday 
trading no deep division of 
principle is involved. The de- 
tails. however, will be hard- 
fought between the interests of 
consumers and suppliers. 
Onerous new burdens are 
about to be placed on fire 

latter, whether manufacturers, 
importers, or retailers. 

The legislation h as t hree 
main objectives: to curb the 
sale of unsafe goods, to gwe 
the customer better redress, 
and to end misleading price 
indications, otherwise known 
as bargain offers. 

The passing of the jhu, 
vears in the making, wfll mean 
that shopkeepers and their 
suppliers will face fall UabOfr 
for defects in the goods they 
handle. They will have a 
statutory duty to ensure Aral 
all the goods they sell an safe, 
under threat of prosecution it 


The next salvo in the 
war against shoddy 
and often dangerous 
goods will soon be 
fired, in Parliament 



they are not. At a stroke this 
will beef up consumer safety 
law, which at present is con- 
fined to a limited range of 
goods, such as Kke electricals, 
cots and toys. The main 
question here is whether the 
new law should extend to 
second-hand goods as welL 
A more radical innovation 
will be a new right for con- 
sumers to claim compensation 
if they are harmed by defective 
goods. They will not have to 


prove negligence; only that the 
product had a defect. More- 
over, the law of contract will 
also be by-passed. At the 
moment, if unsafe goods are 
passed on as a gift the 
recipient has no comeback. In 
future the rights which now 
apply only to the buyer wfll be 
given to all users. Customers 
can sue the shop, which wfll 
pass the claim np the chain of 
supply to the manufacturer or 
importer. 

The big argument will be 
over the so-called development 
risk dtfence. This lete the 
manufacturer off the hook if 
his product conforms to the 
state of the art He is not liable 
for unforeseeable defects. Crit- 
ics say this would rale out 
compensation in another 
thalidomide incident. 

Finally, what is a bargain? 
The Bill's aim is to ensure that 
“Bargain, 99p” truly implies 
either a price reduction or that 
the article is worth more than 
99p. 

Tbe trouble lies in tryingto 
define what is misleading. The 
Government has produced a 
code of practice, but retailers 
say it is so full of holes that it 
will become not a shoppers' 
guide bat a rogues* charter. 

John Warden 

Q Thai M wip ipw LM ttH 



Time will be short on our special offer cross- 


Channel day trip, but there are plenty of 


places for a quick but highly satisfying meal 


Choice and cheerful 



BY APPOUHMEHT TO HER MAJESTY THE QUEEN MARMALADE MANUFACTURERS ’ 

FRANK COOPER’S 

“OXFORD” 

COARSE CUT 


HRieiNAI eXIORB 

SEVILLE ORANGE MARMALADE 
and other fine Marmalades are available 
in selected 

TESCO • CULLENS • GATEWAY 
ASDA • CO-OP • SAINSBURY’S 

ALSO 

SELFRIDGES 

and other major food stores 


frank 


-^OPER LIMITED • OXFORD . ENGLAND 


Continental restaurants still 
provide an exceptional stan- 
dard of food, now hideously 
.pricey in Britain, and fixed 
menu meals do not turn ouL 
on presentation of the bilk to 
have been subject to all sons 
of hidden additional changes 
for cover, bread, service and 
lax. 

The cheapest three-course 
meals in Boulogne, for exam- 
ple. come at 38 francs 
(around £4), and are built 
around adequate steak and 
chips. If you have an hour to 
spare, book into L’Huitrifire, 
1 1 Place Lorraine (teL 
01033.21.31.35.27), a sim- 
ple, tiny dming-Tbom tucked 
behind a fish shop. The chefs 
smoked fish salad and grilled 
sole costs about £10 a person. 

If you are willing to spend 
more and have a little longer. 
La Charlotte. 1 1 rue du 
Doyen (01 0.333 1.30.I3.08X 
has an exquisite way with 
fresh fish, and La USgoise at 
10 rue Mosigny 
(010333131.61.15), serves 
nouvelle-ish menus from 
about £8. 

The best bets in the old 
town are the Haute Ville, to 
be found at 60 rue de Lille 
(01 0333 1 30.54. 1 0). and the 



strident An Bascaille La, 16 
place Godefroy de Bouillon 
(010.3331.80.5730). 

Serious gastronomes have 
the choice between the ele- 
gant La Matelote, situated at 
80 Boulevard SL-Beuve, 
(010.3331.30.17.97), where 
the specialities include scal- 
lops en papillote and feuilletfr 
of ends, or La Hostellerie de 
la Rivifire at 17 rue Gare, 
Poni-de-Briques, on the edge 


of town (01 0.33.21.32318 IX 
where the cuisine is less 
refined, more robust. 

Calais is not as richly 
endowed. The long-estab- 
lished Eaglish favourite is Le 
Channel at 3 Boulevard de la 
Resistance on the seafront 
(01 0.33.2 1.34.4230X featur- 
ing reasonably priced menus 
and solid traditional cooking. 

La Sole Meunifrre 
(010.33.21.34.43.01) next 
door is less comfortable, but a 
little cheaper. Ostend has the 
most accomplished (and 
expensive) restaurant in any 
of our Channel ports — Au 
Vigneron at Koningstraat 79 
(0 \ 0.32.59 .7048 1 6) - but you 
must wait until it reopens on 
October 31 to indulge m its 
specialities of lobster, turbot 
and sole. The best alter- 
natives are the Hostellerie 
Bretonne, Vindictivelaan 23, 
by the yacht harbour 
(01032.59.704222), and the 
Prince Charles, at Visserskaai 
19 (OI0.3239.705066X 

Zeebrugge, though short of 
shops, has a good run of 
restaurants around the fish- 
ing port. Along Rederska&i 
my first two choices would be 
Chalut and Slipway. 


Make sure you catch the French connection 


This autumn, in coqjimctioa 
with Townsend Thoresen, 
The Times is offering its 
readers a way-days to France 
and Belgium for ridiculously 
low prices. 

From Monday October 20 
until Sunday November 30 
yon -can take a trip Grom 
Dover to Galas, Boulogne, 
Ostend or Zeebrngge (or from 
Felixstowe to Zee&ragge) for 
£5 each, plus another £5 for 
your car. However, if four or 
more id 1 yon travel together in 
a single car, the car goes free 
— so the cost of a trip for four 
and a car is just £20. 
Townsend Thoresen are not 
affected by industrial action 
on feny services. 

The trips are perfectly 


tuned for early Christinas 
shoppers. Calais, Boulogne 
and Ostend all have 
hypermarkets dose by and 
Bruges, within easy reach of 
Zeebrugger is an excellent 
shopping centre. 

Or you can simply spoil 
yourself Boulogne has some 
of the best food shops in 
France and a bustling Sat- 
urday market, while Calais, 
an ancient lace centre, is rich 
in its port life. 


Ostend is, of course, a busy 
fishing port, Zeebngge has a 
fascinating harbour whilst 
Bruges is probably Northern 
Europe's best- preserved 
medieraJ city. 

A booking request form, 
plus sailing details, will 
appear in tomorrow's Timer. 
In addition, you wfll require 
three vouchers per booking. 
In addition to today's 
voucher, another will appear 
tomorrow.. 



CUBES 

from 

|££6 


Design Centre selected storage: 
Cubes to wardrobes, shelving to 
trestles- ideal for home,busl ness 
Mail-order catalogue (or visit us) 
Cu best ore 58 Pembroke Rd W8 
01-994 6016 (also SflK & Notts) 



THE TIMES 

special offer 
in association vrith 





This voucher may be used • 
as one of three required to 

offeree valid ONL\MtF 
Townsend Thoresen DAY 
RETURN tops, from Octo- 
ber 20 to November 30 
1986 inclusive. THREE 
VOUCHERS are required 
PER BOOKING REQUEST. 

A maximum ot one ear (up 
to 53m length) applies per 
booking. The offer does not 
apply to coaches or mrn»- 
b us es. The otter is made 
SUBJECT TO AVAILABILr 
1TY. Alternative dates or 
routes to those requested 
ma> be offered or money 
refunded, m the event of 
non availability. 


The Glorious Age of 
Victorian and 
Edwardian Living 

For connoisseurs and lovers of 
exceptionally splendid furniture 
and furnishings. 

An exhibition epitomised by desks 
of every shape and size, examples 
of Victorian upholstery, and 
delightful objets d'art. 
Altogether; a memorable show, not 
to be missed. Now, until October 18th. 

Furniture Theatre. Third Floor. 
Personal shoppers only. 



autumn Promotion now on. 

Order Now For 
Christmas Delivery. 



no 

pomitrr 

Foam 

we Can Suppo’ Replacement Covers At Aw Time 

TRADITIONAL UPHOLSTERY 

Direct from the maker. 

Sofas. So& Beds and Armchairs. Made 10 order !n several 
dasac designs. 

Various sizes, back heights, scar depths aod cushion 
fillings to suit you. 

Niiurai fibres only, siccl coil springs and beech frames 
throughout. 

Totally removable covers from a selection of S. OOO 
fabrics. Or SAVE 25 % by choosing from our Top 400 bought in 
bulk from names like Warner. Baker. Sanderson and Liberty. 

SPECIAL PRICES ON PROMOTIONAL FABRICS 

M ULTIYOR lT 

~ Handmade in Suffolk 

WEALSO MAK£B£AUT!FUUJ DESIGNED MADETO MEASURE CWTOWS. 
LONDON: 25ITHURLOE PLACE, S-WJ (01-589 2303) 
LONDON: 4 CAMDEN ROAD, N.WL (01-485 2623) 

• NORWICH: 99-101 PRINCE OF WALES ROAD (0603 625886) 

• CAMBRIDGE: 1 MILTON ROAD (0223 313483) 

• SUFFOLK: THE OLD MILL MELUS, EYE (0379 83413) 

• LOUGHTON. ESSEX: 165 HIGH ROAD (01*502 4123) 

• WEYBRIDGE: 66-68 CHURCH STREET (0932 59390) 

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 10-5/SUNDAY VIEWING/* EASY PARKING 




WFDNKSDAY OCTOBER 8 1986 



Ain 


spe< 

Norman 
party has 
ing aitac 
party rut 
A motior 
Tory as; 
Boumetr 
confereni 
manipuU 
manage 
this or 
Tebbit, h 
tells me, 
when the 
added. It 
anybody 
they like 
us into d 
me of a i 
confereni 
vative cc 
order tf 
resolutio 
"so blar 
tudinous 
debate”, 
im media 
him sho 
has been 
to finish! 
I should 
for debat 


Bam 


For the 
there wi 
sentatrve 
Despite 
during th 
workers 
forapplii 
passes, 
month v, 
over pho 
toCND. 
national 
retied th 
not dealt 
CND’s I 
she will 
eltine: “j 
chat abo 


• The fc 
eccentric 
questioni 
by the 
question 
stay per 
Kingdom 
expect to 
or 10 yes 


Yetanotl 

the loos* 

of“Boi^ 

the Mod 

bidders 

manager 

Devonpt 

Plymout 

istcrialo 

outh ,\ 

champaj 

of the b 

Foster-V 

week am 

govemtr 

more tl 

Wheeler 

city.** Hi 

theothe 


Loy 


Among 

against 

poo! la&t 

WesiDi 

pjnicuk 

school. 

chanty- 

rates. “ 

Sherhor 

ph* m 

Mdizing 

he said. 

caw of 

lor Dan 

school. 


Profi 
anne 
field 
robo 
Greg 
Bnsi 
ncw> 
hers 
at u 
at v 
later 
mist 
thoi 
cxis 

Davnc 



THE TIMES 
DIARY 

And so to 
co-ed? 


The governing body of Magdalene 
College. Cambridge, meets tomor- 
row night to decide whether it 
should remain Oxbridge's Iasi all- 
male college. David Calcutt, the 
Master, has circulated members 
past and present asking them 
whether admitting women under- 
graduates and fellows would fun- 
damentally change the college’s 
character. Although Calcutt hotly 
denies that the circular amounts to 
a referendum. I am told that more 
than 1 .000 replies have so for been 
received and that roughly SO per 
cent are in favour of change. 
Sponsors of the motion say that 
Magdalene's status as a male 
bastion is an anachronism that 
explains its current position at the 
bottom of the Cambridge aca- 
demic league. The resolution re- 
quires a two-thirds majority vote. 
Calculi's own position is clearly a 
sensitive issue, when I tried to 
probe him yesterday, he abruptly 
put down the telephone. 

Retiring 

Few rising politicians turn down 
invitations to appear on tele- 
vision. but Edwina Currie tells me 
that, after Monday night's app- 
earcancc on World In Action, she 
is tired of seeing herself on the box 
and is keeping her head down. "It 
was all a diversion while my boss. 
Tony Newton, was getting mar- 
ried last week." she claims of her 
recent notoriety. Can this be the 
same Edwina Currie who once 
wrote to BBC TV's Question Time 
pining for a repeat invitation? 


Fogeys all 


In search of Bournemouth night- 
life. I made my way on Monday 
evening to the South-East Young 
Conservatives discotheque. Alas, 
dancing does not seem to appeal to 
today's YCs. The dance floor 
stayed empty all evening while 
they settled down to serious talk of 
South Africa and privatization. 
Oldiimers at the conference tell 
me that such abstention was 
unknown in their younger days. 

• Anthony Beaumont-Dark , MP 
for Sellyoak, is certain to endure 
the greatest number of body- 
searches during the conference. 
He has a metal hip joint, which 
sets alarm systems ringing wher- 
e'er he goes. 


Tres Archer rules 


Who says Tory deputy chairman 
Jeffrey .Archer lacks authority? To 
the dismay of waiting photog- 
raphers. the small girl presenting 
the bouquet to Mrs Thatcher as 
she arrived at the conference hotel 
was so overcome 
by shyness that she kept her head 
bent firmly down. As Mrs 
Thatcher, in turn, leaned towards 
her. Archer look command. 
"Head up ” he ordered briskly. In 
unison the girl and Mrs Thatcher 
snapped 10 attention. 


BARRY FANTONI 


TATI 

^iN 1 






TTHEpTIMFjS 

[TORY 

HCME 

GWNER- 

SW|D 

fpLEP&E 


‘Not a seaside town. The noise of 
standing orations keeps me awake* 


Dry dock 


David Johnston, who is leading 
the management bid to take over 
Dcvenport Dockyard, tells me he 
has sent his own invitation to Alan 
Clark. Minister for Trade, follow- 
ing Gark's public statement last 
week apparently backing rivals 
Foster- Wheeler. "1 think he 
should now hear what we have to 
say." says Johnston. Clark. ! now 
Icam. did not speak after attend- 
ing a champagne reception thrown 
by Fnsicr-Whcder. as I suggested 
oh Monday. In fact his controver- 
sial comment followed a meeting 
with the American-owned con- 
sortium in his Whitehall office. 
Far from free-flowing bubbly, he 
assures me he did not even serve 
rofTce. 


Enough said 


Poet and Spectator columnist 
PJ. Kavanagh has apologized 
with characteristic elegance to 
Brendan Behan's brother. Brian, 
who had complained about Kav- 
anagh’s remark on Radio Four's 
Haw .1 Good Read that Brendan 
had died of "an excess of his own 
publicity.” Behan has received a 
letter from Kavanagh saying: "I 
curse my wandering tongue'* 


Same old Joan 


A theatrical home-coming yes- 
today for Joan Littlewood when 
she returned from France to open 
a new Actors' Centre in Manches- 
ter. It will be a base for the 
profession's legion of unemployed 
and will follow the experimental 
example of her famous Theatre 
Workshop, which she stoned in 
Manchester in the 1940s. I am 
glad to report that the now 
reclusive Littlewood has shed 
none of her old eccentricities: 
“Everybody can act. except 
actors" ( I delete the expletive), she 
declared. PHS 


The Lord Chief Justice. Lord 
Lane, is sure to attract sharp 
criticism from the ' professional 
progressives for his forthright 
suite mem that the big increase in 
crime in Britain in the last SO years 
is not the result of poverty, 
unemployment or bad housing. 
Ultra-progressives will no doubt 
deny that any such rise has 
occurred, white double locking 
their doors and sending their 
daughters to judo classes: the pink 
and soggy will continue to take 
refuge in the belief, with Lord 
Scarman. that muggers, rioters 
and rapists are bred by depriva- 
tion and environmental decay. 

The harsh truth is that Lord 
Lane is right The early 1930s. for 
all the unemployment grim pov- 
erty and squalid slums, were a 
time of remarkable though not 
quite "unprecedented lawful- 
ness." As far as one can tell it was 
but one phase of that curious 
interlude of safety and respectabil- 
ity which separated early Vic- 
torian high criminality from its 
present day counterpart. It was a 
lime when commentators as di- 
verse and radical as Geoffrey 
Gorer and George Orwell won- 
dered at the disappearance of the 
“bad old days'* when people lived 
in fear of robbery and assault. 

The sharp decline in violence 
and dishonesty in the latter half of 
the 19th century, to be followed by 
an even sharper rise during the last 
50 years, is not a purely British 
phenomenon. In Sweden the tri- 
umph of the Social Democratic 
welfare state has been accompa- 


A breathing 
spell to bring 
down crime 


by Christie Davies 


itied by a corresponding rise in 
criminality. It is a disturbing 
pauern for progressives to accept 
let alone explain. 

The fallacy of the deprivation 
thesis is that it extrapolates illicitly 
from the fret that poor, un- 
employed. and slum-dwelling peo- 
ple seem more likely to commit 
crimes than others to a view of the 
overall causes of the aggregate 
level of crime. On this view more 
wdiare. more jobs, better housing 
ought to eliminate crime. But they 
don't. During the last half century 
crime rates have climbed in good 
times and not so good times alike. 

Only in Victorian England and 
Strindbergian Sweden did levels of 
dishonesty, though not necessarily 
violence, rise in response to 
periods of dearth caused by the 
swings of the business cycle, poor 
harvests or interrupted trade. The 
steady long-term fall of crime in 
the latter halfofthe 1 9th century is 
punctuated by zigs and zags that 


reflect years of sudden prosperity 
or poverty. 

It is in fact the conventional 
progressive wisdom that is to 
blame for the lawlessness of our 
times. If you leU people often 
enough, loudly enough and 
amhoriraiive/y enough that not 
they but their economic circum- 
stances and environment are to 
blame for any crimes they may 
commit, sooner or later they will 
•half believe you. Those who 
preach this social gospel provide 
ifre morally uncertain with a 
ready-made set of excuses 


film us-pink acid that has cu- 
mulatively dissolved the 
commonsense notion that each 
individual is responsible for his or 
her crimes. 

The response of most West 
European societies, other than 
perhaps Switzerland, to the in- 
equalities believed to breed crime 
has been the creation of im- 
personal state bureaucracies that 
have destroyed the local controls 
that once kept crime in check. The 
large, disorderly comprehensive 
schooL the municipal tower 
blocks, the rate-subsidized leisure 
centre built like an aircraft carrier 
are all planned answers to prob- 
lems that in practise have only 
exacerbated them. The mad 
search for bureaucratic equality 
has destroyed the previous limited 
scal e of human life that enabled us 
to restrain one another enough to 
make urban living tolerable. 

Will we then be engulfed by a 
"huge wave of crime” as Lord 
Lane predicts? Most of the people 
who resort to violence, theft or 
vandalism are male, aged between 
15 and 25 and drawn from the 
lowest classes in society. Thanks 
to the fall in the birth rate of this 


Tom Burke 




If Lord Lane is puzzled as to the 
causes of the "lowering of 
standards" in our society that he 
so much deplores, he should read 
the reports that people like Lord 
Scarman love to write. They 
contain no answers, but within 
them and hundreds of other 
equally well-meaning government 
and academic studies lies the 


group in the 1970s there will be 
fewer young trouble-makers 
around in the immediate future 
and crime rates could level off and 
even frtL Whether we can exploit 
this brief respite to create institu-* 
lions that will tame the delinquent 
offspring of today's delinquents 
depends on our willingness to 
heed and understand Lord Lane's 
vital message. 


Tim Congdon argues that monetary growth a nd low Inflation cannot go hand In hand 
for even the question, during Tory conference week, is when the crunch will come 


Lawson’s sterling dilemma 


Sterling M3, the broad measure of 
money which includes all bank 
deposits, was once slandered, as 
the wayward mistress of the- 
governnient's financial policy. In 
fact it is proving a loyal and 
trustworthy guide to economic 
conditions. Over the last year, 
while it has risen by almost 20 per 
cent far above the already gen- 
erous official target range of 
between 1 1 and 15 per cent, the 
economy has started to display 
several classic symptoms of exces- 
sive monetary expansion. 

House prices, a key influence on 
consumer sentiment, have ad- 
vanced by 15 per cent. In some 
areas, notably London and the 
South-East, the increase has been 
much sharper, driven by the easy 
availability of monage credit The 
exchange rate has tumbled, 
particularly against the European 
currencies, with the pound's rate 
against the deutschmark down by 
25 per cent since last October. 

Neither a strong grasp of basic 
economic principles nor a pro- 
found knowledge of Britain's 
financial history since the war are 
required to understand that rapid 
house price increases and severe 
exchange rate depredation are 
likely to lead to an acceleration in 
inflation. Large house price gains 
make people feel richer and 
encourage more spending in the 
shops, which makes it easier for 
companies to raise prices; ex- 
change rate depredation not only 
adds directly to the cost of imports 
but also enables industry to put up 
prices in sterling terms with less 
fear of foreign competition. 

The Chancellor has both a 
strong grasp of basic economic 
principles and a profound knowl- 
edge of Britain’s financial history 
over the last 40 years. He is aware 
of the dangers in the present 
situation. However, in his address 
to the Conservative Party con- 
ference tomorrow he will probably 
not express great concern. 

He may confine himself to a few 
short words on the current low 
level of inflation. His largely 
uncritical audience may not want 
to hear anything much about 
inflation prospects over the next 
two or three years, which are far 
less satisfactory'. It will certainly 
not like to be told that "sound 
money", far from being an empty 
phrase, sometimes needs to be 
supported by higher interest rates. 

The City cannot be fobbed off so 
easily. In his Mansion House 
speech on October 16 Lawson will 
have to give his diagnosis of the 
latest financial troubles. As on the 
same occasion in 1984 and 1985. 
he may question the significance 
of sterling M3 as a target aggregate 
and play down the risks inherent 
in its rapid expansion, even if he 
does not now altogether trust his 
own complacency. 



In fret, sterling M3 was under 
reasonably good control until the 
spring of last year. The rate of 
growth was somewhat above the 
cautious targets which then pre- 
vailed, but at II, 12or 13percent 
a year it was not wildly excessive. 
The leap to almost 20 per cent has 
occurred during the last 18 
months, for two main reasons. 

First a remarkable boom in 
housing finance has developed, 
with every likelihood that mort- 
gage credit will be 40 per cent 
higher in 1986 than 1985. To a 
large extent this boom has been 
met by the building societies from 
their own resources. But the banks 
have also been involved, partly in 
providing funds to the building 
societies and partly in lending for 
house purchase on their own 
account As every new bank loan, 
creates a deposit and as the 
money supply is dominated by 
bank deposits, the banks' in- 
creased participation in the mon- 
gage market has made a big 
contribution to faster monetary 
growth. 

Secondly, in the middle of last 
year the government derided to 
change the tactics of financial 
management in the apparent 
belief that this would not under- 
mine its strategy of monetary 
control. It stopped "over- 
funding". a practice common in 
the early 1980s which had in- 
volved selling government debt in 


technical, but very important. A 
good argument can be made that 
the distortions were for the most 
part phantoms of the Treasury's 
imagination and. insofar as they 
existed, were trivial in relation to 


the overriding priority of mone- 
tary restraint As over- funding had 


larger amounts than the budget 
deficit. Over-funding was being 


deficit Over-funding was being 
blamed for certain distortions in 
the money markets. 

The subject is complicated and 


tary restraint As over-funding had 
been a successful method of 
neutralizing the monetary effects 
of excessive bank lending, it had 
become an essential instrument in 
the control of sterling M3. From 
this point of view, its abandon- 
ment was certain to lead to an 
acceleration in sterling M3 
growth, which is exactly what has 
happened. 

What is to be done? The 
government’s answer appears to 
be nothing, if possible. For the 
time being interest rates are not to 
be raised, the mortgage boom can 
be allowed to proceed on its merry 
way and monetary growth may 
continue at an annual rate of 
virtually 20 per cent 

This may sound foolhardy and 
ill-advised, but it is not entirely so. 
For most of 1985 and 1986 the 
international economic environ- 
ment has been unfavourable for 
industrial growth in Britain. But 
the government, freed with a 
remorseless rise in unemploy- 
ment, wants that growth badly, 
both on genera] social grounds and 
for more self-interested political 
reasons. It has therefore been glad 
to achieve, whether by design or 
not, an unsustainable spurt in 
monetary growth. . 

This is one of those cases where 
an economist's lag is the 


George Younger, the Defence 
Secretary, will rally the party 
faithful behind the Toiy Trident- 
based defence strategy at Bourne- 
mouth today while firing another 
salvo against Labour's non- 


nuclear policy;. But some oppo- 
sition politicians and defence 


sition politicians and defence 
analysis believe the Cabinet will 
not simply leave it to the voters at 
the next election to guarantee 
continuation of the programme. 

The government, they suggest, 
is speeding up the submarine 
building programme to make it 
that much harder for a non-Tory 
administration to scrap Trident 
while drawing up potentially crip- 
pling penally clauses in the con- 
tracts should it try. 

Mrs Thatcher laid the keel for 
the first of the four intended 
Trident submarines. HMS Van- 
guard, at the Vickers vaid at 
Barrow-in-Furness last ’month. 
Much of a £500 million pro- 
gramme of improvements to the 
Faslanc submarine base in Scot- 
land and the nearby Coulport 
missile station have been com- 
pleted and development work on 
the nuclear warheads for Trident 
is said to be nearing completion at 
the Atomic Weapons Research 
Establishment at Aldcrmaston. 
They will be made at the Royal 
Ordnance Factory at Burgh field, 
in Berkshire. 

Although the government will 
noi discuss production schedules 
some analysts believe that manu- 
facture of the warheads will have 


Why Trident might 
never be scrapped 


to begin soon if they are to be 
ready when the first Trident 
missiles arrive in Britain, prob- 
ably within two years of their 
becoming operational with the US 
Navy in 1989. Each missile can 
carry- up to eight warheads and 
each submarine can cany 16 
missiles, although the government 
has persistently refused to say how 
many will in fact be carried 
Analysts estimate a warhead 
production cycle of fewer than six 
a year. Warhead development and 
production accounts for 28 per 
cent of the near £10 billion Tri- 
dent programme, with £600 mil- 
lion having already been spenL If 
Labour cancelled the programme, 
existing warheads would have to 
be dismantled and ihc production 
facilities scrapped. 


Mrs Thatcher would un- 
doubtedly like to speed the pro- 
gramme but service chiefs and 
defence analysis alike concede 
that it is moving at the best 
possible rate. There is little, if 
'anything, that ihc government can 
do to chivvy it along. 


Financial penalties is the crucial 
issue in the event of cancellation. 
Vickers has negotiated a penalty 


clause guranteeing it 125 per cent 
of the value of the contract — more 
than £800 million - if it is 
cancelled before the order for the 
second submarine, now under 
discussion, is placed. American 
companies with contracts totalling 
more than £4 billion are believed 
to have negotiated similar clauses. 

Within the government it is 
insisted that these are merely the 
result of commercial negotiations 
with companies concerned about 
the loss of huge investment if long- 
term contracts are suddenly can- 
celled. but there is also acknow- 
ledgement that it would help to 
make the Trident programme that 
much harder to unravel. 

Earlier this year Ministry of 
Defence sources said that as well 
as money already spent, a further 
£1.800 million had been commu- 
ted and up to £2.000 million more 
could be committed over the next 
few years. At its heigh L Trident 
will provide work for 25.000 in 
this country. 

Spend! ng and production reach 
their peak in 1988 and will 
continue at that level for at least 
three years. It is in 1988. if Mrs 
Thatcher runs her lull lerm and 
Joses ihe election, that an anti- 


potitican's blessing. The excess 
monetary growth may stimulate 
inflation two or three years ahead, 
but in the meantime the strength 
of the demand for housing mid 
consumer goods, and the boost to 
exports from sterling’s depreci- 
ation, are good for economic 
activity. The result may even, to 
everyone's astonishment, be a 
significant fall in unemployment. 

Perhaps it was a mistake to end 
over-funding and perhaps it is 
irresponsible to let mortgage 
credit grow so fast. But perhaps 
also, through their technical mis- 
understandings. the monetary 
authorities have blundered into an 
_ altogether appropriate policy for a 
’ government anxious to reduce 
unemployment. 

The objection is that sterling 
M3 growth at annual rates of 20 
per cent cannot be reconciled with 
2 per cent inflation for ever. 
Financial markets appreciate that 
measures may be postponed for 
three months, six months or even 
a year, while the economy builds 
up a head of reflationary steam. 
But they also know that sooner or 
later, action must be taken. ' 

The most disastrous outcome 
for the government would be a 
sharp rise in interest rates, made 
obligatory by an embarrassing 
sterling crisis, just before a general 
election. The politically astute 
approach may therefore be Co jack 
up rates in the near future and 
hope to have enough time to 
reduce them before an election is 
called. There are risks in this, 
because it would aggravate the 
government's unpopularity in the 
short term. But there are afro risks 
in doing nothing, as it would be 
Micawberish to hope that some- 
thing will turn up to avert the 
wrath of the financial markets. 

The latest episode of financial 
turbulence demonst r ates, if dem- 
onstration were needed, that 
monetary policy always relies on 
discretion and judgement There 
is no mechanical formula for 
interest rate setting even in a . 
country which has had monetary 
targets, and made some pretence ; 
at achieving them, for a d e c ad e. 
Much of the uncertainty in this 
instance arises because derisions 
about interest rates and the date of 
an election are interrelated. 

If base rates are kept at 10 per 
cent (or even reduced in line with 
favourable international develop- 
ments), the economy should 
bound forward in coming months 
and the government will probably 
aim at an ejection next year, 
perhaps even as early as the 
spring. If base rates increase soon, 
it will hope to capitalize on falling 
rates in the course of 1987 and the 
election will be in early 1988. 

(g)Tfca*3 Nftwspapsra, IMS. 

The author is economics partner cf 
stockbroker L~ Afessei & Co. 


Trident government would want 
to canceL 

For the Tones the issue of 
defence will be a better election 
platform than unemployment or 
the economy. But according to 

Alliance politicians the govern- 
ment is bent on presenting the 
electorate with a straight “Trident 
or nothing” choice, they complain 
that British Aerospace has assured 
them privately that it could de- 
velop a cruise, vertical-launch 
missile that could replace Polaris 
instead of Trident but has been 
gassed by the MoD from discuss- 
ing the possibility publicly. 

David Gates, of the Department 
of Defence Studies at Aberdeen 
University, points out another 
possible side effect of Labour's 
policy. Much of the uranium 
based fuel that powers Britain’s 18 
nudear submarines, with more to 
come, is provided by the Ameri- 
cans. If Labour sends them pack- 
ing will they sill feel obliged to 
continue the arrangement? If not | 
where will the fud come from with 
a government committed to pbas- j 
ing out the civil nudear power j 
programme too? ! 

Cancellation would prove more j 
costly and complicated than La- j 
hour imagines: and should the 
Alliance figure in the next govern- 
ment it might discover that, when 
the time comes to replace Polaris. 
Trident could then be the cheapest 
option available. 


Tory pressures 
all must fight 


Peter Davenport 

Defence Correspondent 


Minisers cannot speak about our 
system of government without 
someone supposing they are mak- 
ing an immediately topical point 
Thus argued the Home Secretary, 
Douglas Hurd, in a recent speech 
- and promptly demonstrated the 
validity of his point with a vicious 
assault on Britain's vital and 
vigorous pressure groups. 

Likening them to the serpents 
embracing Laocoon, he accused 
them of acting against the general 
good: of distorting the constitu- 
tional relationship between Par- 
liament and the electorate and or 
threatening the “proper account- 
ability** of the executive. Min- 
isters. he said, must “shake 
themselves free” of this embrace. 

Coming from a member of a 
Cabinet not noted for its constitu- 
tional delicacy, this is rich. Com- 
ing from the least representative 
and most highly centralizing of 
post-war governments, it is dan- 
gerous. The trades unions having 
been broken and the autonomy of 
local authorities demolished, the 
pressure groups are dearly the 
next of this government’s or- 
ganized critics due to come under 
ihe hammer of conviction politics. 

Hurd made his speech in a week 
in which loyal Tories went to jail 
over their protest against the 
proposed dumping of nuclear 
waste and the government was 
attacked for foiling to give Kentish 
Tories a fair hearing before the 
Channel Tunnel Bill Committee, 
so the immediate cause of his 
irritation can be easily identified. 

But if he and his Cabinet 
colleagues feel besieged by pres- 
sure groups, they have only them- 
selves to Name. It is an andent 
reflex of uneasy rulers to shoot the 


‘bringers of unwelcome tidings. 
Ihe message brought by the 


The message brought by the 
growth in the number, activity 
and influence of pressure groups is 
that our system of parliamentary 
democracy is suffering an acute 
crisis of authority. 

There are 154,000 registered 
charities in Britain and perhaps as 
many local and national organiza- 
tions which do not have a charit- 
able status. Pressure groups have 
been responsible for much of the 
sodal innovation in Britain. In 
health, education and the social 
services most new developments 
in policy and practice have begun 
in organizations such as Mind 
(mental health) and Nacro (penal 
reform). An array of pressure 
groups have been. urging action on 
drugs for more than a decade. In 
the 1 960s, Shelter transformed the 
■approach to housing policy. 
Regarding the environment, 
development and disarmament, it 
-has consistently been pressure 
groups that set. the pace and 
spearheaded change. ' 

The accountability of the exec- 
utive to Parliament which Hurd 
thinks threatened is almost wholly 
bogus. Party policy is formed in 
secret by small caucuses of ac- 
tivists. assembled for reasons that 
owe at least as much to personal 
ambition, factional loyalty or 


constituency interest as they do to 
expertise or ability to define the 


expertise or ability to define the 
general interest. The results, 
blessed by ritual debates at party 


conferences, manipulated by party 
managers to eliminate the inno- 
vative or unpopular and checked 
by the leadership for ideological 
purity, are then translated into 
that peculiar code which political 
manifestos use to disguise their 
meaning. 

Decisions to build airports or 
motorways, to close schools or 
hospitals, to reorganize services or 
to rearrange institutions have 
become more and more the 
prerogative of ministers and civil 
servants remote from the people. 
The political parties, operating 
with procedures and attitudes 
appropriate to the last century, 
have foiled progressively to dose 
the gap between their decisions 
and those they affect: a vacuum 
into which the pressure groups 
have flooded in increasing num- 
bers. Unconstrained by the 
conventions of class war. they 
have become mediators between 
the rulers and the ruled. 

k is hard to see why this should 
give Hurd such offence. They 
operate, as do political parties, in 
the fore market of ideas. If what 
they offer is thought by many 
millions of our citizens, as it 
dearly is. to be worth paying for, 
why should their activities be 
constrained? A mercantilist Tory 
administration is not wdl placed 
to complain if it turns out to be 
uncompetitive in these market 
places. Nor is there refuge in the 
argument that pressure groups are 
unrepresentative. So, too, are 
political parties. Some two million 
people belong to political parties 
in Britain: for fewer than the three 
million members of environ- 
mental pressure groups alone. 

Elections may confer legitimacy 
on a government, out not 
authority. That must be earned. 
The fitilure of the politicians to 
reform their own institutions, 
while busy reforming everything 
else, makes it more difficult for 
Parliament to re-establish 
authority in the face of the well 
informed and well organized chal- 
lenges from pressure groups. 

Six measures would enor- 
mously strengthen Parliament's 
hand in the struggle to re-establish 
its authority: proportional re- 
presentation, to broaden its repre- 
sentative claims; a reformed 
second chamber which could in- 
dude many of the informed voices 
now left with no choice but to 
shout from outside: stronger select 
committees with the staff and 
power to cany out thorough 
investigations; a tripling of the 
current provision of staff for 
individual MPs; a Freedom of 
Information Act to remove the 
doak of secrecy that so stifles 
informed discussion of policy; and 
a Bill of Rights to protect the 
individual from the executive. 

Such measures would dislocate 
the chains of patronage and 
privacy which have for so long 
suppressed initiative, indepen- 
dence and enterprise in British 
politics. But the alternative is an 
endless war of attrition between an 
unreformed Parliament and an 
under-represented public. 

The author is Director of the Green 
Alliance. 


moreover . . . Miles Kington 


Waiting for the 
City crash 


Today, all you ever cared to know 
about the Big Bang. 

Q. What exactly is the Big Bang? 
A. It’s what President Reagan is 
leading up to, isn’t it? 

Q-No. 

A. WdL maybe it’s this new daily 
newspaper. Or maybe it’s the 
name of a new wine bar. 

Q. No. It’s something that’s going 
to happen to the Stock Exchange 
on October 27. 

A. If you knew thaL why on earth 
are you asking me these questions? 
Q. Because that’s my job. That’s 
why I'm called Q. I ask you 
questions, you give the answers, 
then everyone gets the picture. 

A. And that’s actually a very good 
illustration of how the Stock 
Exchange has worked up to now. 
Stockbrokers have had one role, 
jobbers have had another, and the 
whole thing has become a bit 
constricting. So when you ask, 
what does the Big Bang involve. I 
would say, abandoning the stereo- 
typed roles these people have had. 
Q. But 1 haven’t, have I? 

A. Haven’t what? 

Q. Asked you that question. About 
what the Big Bang involves. 
You're giving an answer to a 
question 1 haven’t even asked. 

A- God. you're gening impossible 
to work with. All right, ask me the 
question. 

Q. What will happen when the Big 

Bang comes? 

A. The whole of the Stock 
Exchange will be demolished by a 
huge explosion and be turned into 
a National Car Park. Afterwards, 
everyone will go home and do all 
their buying of stocks and shares 
on little green computer screens. 

Q. But if they all work at home 
nobody will need a car park in the 
City, will they? 

A. No. but NCP haven’t thought 
of that. 

Q. How did all this Big Bang stuff 
begin? 

A. When Cecil Parkinson was in 
the Cabinet he told the Stock 
Exchange that if they didn't gel rid 
of their restrictive practices, he 
would do it for them and they 
would be for the high jump. 

Q. And what happened? 

A. Well. od<Uy enough, it turned 
out to be Cecil Parkinson who was 
for the high jump. 


Q. Why didn’t they just lie low 
and hope Cedi Parkinson would 
forget all about it? 

A. Well, I suppose they knew that 
even if Cecil Parkinson forgot, 
Sarah Keays would never forget. 
So now they have rushed ail the 
changes through and the balloon 
goes up in three weeks. 

Q. From the car park? 

A. Absolutely. There will be jazz 
bands and morris dandng and an 
all-day bar and everything. ' 

Q. Why is Big Bang always written 
with two capital B’s? 

A- Because it would look silly with 
two capital Ws. Wig Wang. No, it 
doesn't look right. 

Q. Can the public buy shares in 
the Big Bang? 

A. Certainly. On October 27 the 
Big Bang will be privatized and 
two or three million ordinary 
people will turn up, crazed with 
greed and avarice, trampling each 
other to death in an effort to get 
shares, 

Q. In the car park? 

A. That's right. Unfortunately, all 
the shares win already have beeii 
doled out privately -by the people 
who ran the Stock Exchange. 

Q. Who has been most in- 
strumental in the evolution of the 
Big Bang? 

A. Duke Ellington. I would- say, 
though Count Basie and Woody 
Herman were very important, and 
we shouldn't forget Benny Good- 
man and Tommy Dorsey. 

Q- Aren't you thinking of the Big 
Band, not Big Bang? 

A. Yes. 

Q. Why? 

A. It's much more interesting; 
Also, you can tap your feet to 
Duke Ellington, but you can’t to 
the Big Bang. . 


O. What will be the main effect of 
the Big Bang on sodety? 

A. Lots more ..people will be 
making phone calls from their cars 
at high speeds, and the road death 
toll will go np. Laws will be 
introduced compelling them to 
make their phone calls from a 
large car park in the City. And lots 
of pwjple will make money from 
writing articles about the Big 
Bang. * 

Q. But will anyone be any the 
wiser? 

A. No. 


i__ _ 


, sired* 1 






‘.V rC 

1st. 


• V, 1:1 

t;» 


ib 
i h 


T ! I? 

;n,l 


il‘«i ’ 

tiftf*' 

>ir 

TcW’ ' 

'J : ' S 


ggSil'r ’ • 
fl.'l'illk • *' 
ucvui 

a\ ' 

I |t> I.!*-'' ' 

i • 1 ‘ 




: v m 

i'l l he 
itti'l 

Jc* . 

.mitt 

it 


' i.i ■■■•' - 1: - J '*■ 

hi:; :v 

•pl--."" ••• bd. 


ET " 


A PROPER 






THE TIMES WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 8 1986 


17 


1 Pennington Street, London El 9XN Telephone: 01-481 4100 

MR BAKER’S PARENT POWER 


, ! -V|, 


6 'r*. . i 




‘ J; i!» ... . * 








C;. ... 







It has long been plain that 
education (which - means in 
this context the education 
provided by the state) would 
be a priority issue for Conser- 
vative Conference repre- 
sentatives. It matters to many 
^ of them personally, and it 
matters to the great majority of 
voters who have no alternative 
but to accept for their children 
what the state provides. 

In yesterday’s debate, all the 
old anxieties were again ex- 
pressed. There was worry 
about the attempts ofleft-wing 
authorities (especially ILEA) 
to destroy voluntary aided 
schools. There was concern 
about the too great size of 
comprehensives; about money 
spent by some local authorities 
on indoctrination at the ex- 
pense of genuine education. 
There was deep anger about 
the manipulation of children 
against the wishes of their 
parents by means of corrupt- 
ing forms of sex education and 
so-called peace studies. 

But. through it all ran an 
over-riding question. How can 
parents regain responsibility 
for their children’s education 
from local authorities who 
want to use their power for 
political ends? More broadly, 
since the voucher scheme had 
been ground into the dust by 
the civil servants of the 
Department of Education 
under Sir Keith Joseph, what 
f hope remains for promoting 
parental responsibility under. 
Mr Baker? 

His speech was distinctly 
encouraging, particularly in 
respect of the two attempts he 
announced to dent the power 
of local authorities. The de- 
cision to take the decisions 
about sex education away 
from, teachers and Local 
Authorities, and to give it 
instead to the new kind of 
governing bodies (which al- . 
ready under the Education Bill 
will have much more parental 
representation) is wholly to be 
commended. 


At present, parents often 
have little or no idea what kind 
of instruction their children 
are receiving or what sort of 
books and videos are being 
used. The recent case of the so- 
called sex education book 
showing two serai-naked male 
lovers in bed with a small girl 
was a grave enough sign. 

It may not. however, be the 
worst kind of abuse. Some of 
die sex education books in use 
in schools are fun- 
damentally indecent and de- 
void of any moral standards, 
apart from a kind of bogus 
hedonism, as to be almost 
impossible to quote from in a 
newspaper. Yet children with 
malleable minds are subjected 
to them. 

Mr Baker is right to con- 
clude that there would be great 
difficulty in giving parents an 
absolute right to withdraw 
their children from sex educa- 
tion classes. In some circum- 
stances angry teachers might 
use it to shame children re- 
moved from such lessons. It is 
far better to give control of the 
material and the manner of sex 
education to governing bodies 
which, as Mr Baker plans, will 
be answerable to an annual 
parents’ meeting. 

He should also consider 
giving opportunities for mem- 
bers of governing bodies to go 
into classrooms and see for 
themselves the way m which 
this delicate subject is being 
taught. Certainly, if Labour 
MPs resist the amendment of 
the Eduction Bill to give 
governing bodies this new 
responsibility, it will be a clear 
demonstration that, despite 
Mr Kinnock’s appeal to a 
“moral majority”, his real 
obedience is to the moral 
minorities which, in many 
Labour local authorities, delib- 
erately Bout parents' wishes. 

In the long run, however, Mr 
Baker’s announcement of a 
pilot scheme of 20 new second- 
ary schools in urban areas (city 


technology colleges) may be 
far more important For these 
schools.which will have an 
emphasis on technical, scien- 
tific and practical work and 
will be government fended, 
will be run entirely indepen- 
dently by educational trusts. 
Indeed it seems that this is Mr 
Baker’s first tentative answer 
to the apparent relegation of 
the voucher scheme. 

He intends to fund the 
schools on a per capita basis in 
relation to the number of 
pupils. There seems to be no 
reason why the scheme should 
not expand as new trusts come 
forward to found new schools 
and .the Government provides 
financial support to the results 
ofgenuine local responsibility. 

It is a new permutation of 
the old voluntary aided and 
direct grant ideas, and it could 
begin to make good the 
destruction of the many qual- 
ity schools in the switch to 
massive comprehensives. The 
scheme will above all. provide 
the slate system with com- 
petition. 

It will take a good deal of 
time, however, before it is 
possible to have any clear idea 
of how lar the scheme will 
spread and in the meantime 
Mr Baker should not dismiss 
the idea of returning in the 
Tory manifesto to some vari- 
ant of the voucher scheme. 

Yesterday he showed him- 
self a strong critic of the 
educational fashions domi- 
nant since the sixties, from 
huge comprehensives, mixed 
ability teaching, the preference 
for “free expression” over 
solid learning, the destruction 
of grammar schools and pupil 
indoctrination. He took two 
significant steps towards 
reversing this trend. He should 
not fear to continue along the 
path towards greater 
responsibility for parents. For 
if he does so, he will be backed 
by the great majority of public 
opinion. 


r 

- ; .l.. 


A PROPERTY-OWNING NATION 


. ' - - 

' ... .. \ 

/ V 


3 Housing is ah area where the 
Government has lately, sue-., 
ceeded in its general attempt to : 
alter the balance from public 
to private provision. Over 60 
per cent of householders now 
own their own homes — and 
Mr John Patten, the Housing 
Minister, predicted in his 
speech to yesterday’s Conser- 
vative Conference that a fur- 
ther million people would 
purchase their homes in the 
next five years. 

What we have today is a 
well-maintained housing 
stock, concentrated in the 
private sector, which is grow- 
ing steadily though less rapidly 
than in the seventies. This 

* rests upon a financial base in 
which mortgages sustain most 
construction, and government 
money has been partly cut 
back and partly re-directed 
from construction to renova- 
tion. 

Yet problems persist The 
most distressing is the growing 
number of homeless people. 
Less visible — but a symptom 
of the same causes - are the 
16.000 householders who last 
year saw their homes re- 
possessed when they failed to 
meet mortgage interest pay- 
ments and, as the recent Home 

. Front series in the Times 

* pointed out the many thou- 
sands more who tremble on 
the brink of non-payment 

In addition. Mr Patten yes- 
terday identified three groups 
whom the present housing 
market frustrates: newly mar- 
ried couples who cannot afford 
to buv a house at prevailing 


prices: home-owners who can- modatioii that . creeping 
. not-move from North to South decontrol would make profit- 
because of vast regional cBs- able; he announced that build- 


panties in house pnees; and 
people who cannot obtain a 
council house. 

These groups, apparently 
diverse, are in feet victims of 
an inflexible market in which 
choice is effectively restricted 
to a shrinking public sector 
and an increasingly expensive 
mortgage Rent control has 
dried up the supply of private 
rented accommodation and 
forced people to buy houses 
when their circumstances 
might have made renting more 
appropriate The correspond- 
ing increased demand for 
ownership has pushed up 
house prices. And mortgage 
interest tax relief has ag- 
gravated demand and pushed 
up house prices still further. 

Mr Patten was bolder than 
most of his predecessors when 
he turned his hand to solutions 
yesterday. He did not, of 
course, propose abolishing 
mortgage tax relief — and 
rightly. The social benefits of 
widespread property owner-' 
ship outweigh the economic 
disadvantages which, anyway,' 
are. yearly less damaging as , 
inflation gradually erodes the 
value of the tax relief. Mr - 
Patten also shrank from 
wholesale abolition of rent 
control. 

He made it plain, however, 
that a future Tory government 
would gradually dismantle 
controls on new tenancies. 
And, to encourage the invest- 
ment m private rented Becom- 


ing societies and insurance 
companies would in future be 
allowed to invest directly in 
land and building. 

By themselves, those two 
reforms should do much to 
encourage a revival of the 
private rented sector over 
time. As for those who find 
current house .prices just be- 
yond their reach, he promised 
that future legislation would 
promote “shared ownership” 
— a mixture of renting and 
buying whereby the home- 
owner buys a share of his 
property. 

TTie idea is a good one, but it 
might not suit all potential 
buyers. What is needed is a 
wide range of such options. Mr 
Patten might encourage the 
banks and building societies to 
experiment more with such 
devices as fixed-interest mort- 
gages on the American pattern, 
or the Law Commission’s 
suggestion of index-linked 
mortgages. And since first- 
time buyers are generally 
embarking on their first major 
financial commitment, ' he 
might consider making a gen- 
erous grant to the Money 
Advice Centres where they 
could receive advice on both 
the best option for them and 
exactly how much they can 
reasonably afford in monthly 
payments. 

For a large minority, the 
Tory promise of a property- 
owning democracy remains a 
dream. Such measures would 
make it at least a possibility. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Implications of defence change 


A TALE OF TWO WIVES 


Eleven months ago in Geneva 
Nancy Reagan and Kajra 
Gorbachov provided a divert- 
ing spectacle as their husbands 
engaged in the serious business 
of summitry- They visited 
creches, laid wreaths and met 
for tea. This time the wives 
have entered the political 
equation. That is not necesai^ 
i!v a good omen for me 

summit. ... 

When the Reykjavik meet- 
ing was first sprung on an 
unsuspecting world, n was 

present as a stnct vwork ng 

meeting untrammelled by the 
hundreds of officials, jounial- 
ists and hangers-on who 
thronged Geneva Iasi Novem- 
ber. Rcvkjavik had been pre- 
Smd to London, we were 
told, for reasons of security 

and privacy- The summit-that- 
was-no-summit would be a 
one-to-one encounter between 
two statesmen inwni on nuk- 
ing the world a safer place. The 

less razzmatazz the better. 

A week later, the rendezvous 
in’ Reykjavik looks increas- 
ingly like a repeat performance 


of Geneva, scaled down to fit 
the smaller stage of Reykjavik, 
and there is no doubt that the 
Soviet side is making, the 
running. Two days ago Mos- 
cow announced the com- 
position of its delegation. No 
minimalism here: it includes 
Mr Gorbachov’s most senior 
advisers. The Kremlin also 
• informed the Icelandic govern- 
ment that Mr Gorbachov 
would be accompanied by his 
wife. 

Washington's annoyed re- 
sponse suggested that Raisa 
Gorbachov had not been part 
of the original scheme. It also 
suggested that White House 
officials saw more in her travel 
plans than either her own taste 
for Nordic sightseeing or her 
husband's desire for company. 
They are probably right 

Raisa Gorbachov has been a 
significant asset to her 
husband’s international diplo- 
macy. Bv her appearance and 
general demeanour, she has 
begun to transform the image 
of Soviet women in the West 
The stereotype of the over- 


weight tractor-driver in a peas- 
ant headscarf has been pushed 
into the background. Soviet 
leaders have learned how to 
. make themselves understood 
abroad, and their new first 
lady has played her part 

Raisa Gorbachov’s presence 
in Reykjavik signals that for all 
the talk of discretion and 
privacy, the Soviet side is no 
lbs interested in presentation 
at this interim summit than it 
was at Geneva. It also compels 
Washington to decide whether 
the first lady of the White 
House should hot accompany 
her husband too. 

If she does not. then Presi- 
dent Reagan could be at a 
disadvantage in terms .of 
protocol and presentation. If 
she does, however, and if — as 
isrumoured — she is the force 
behind the . President's new 
interest in peace-making, she 
might perhaps induce him to 
give loo much away. That is 
ccrtainl\ a fear in Washington. 
It mav even be part of the 
Russian calculation. 


From Professor Antony Flew 
Sir. In your leading article. 
"Labour's grand illusion" 
(September 30). you point out that 
it is the policy of the Labour Party 
not only to scrap all British 
nuclear weapons but also to 
require the US to remove all such 
weapons from our territory. You 
also note that Mr Kinnock “would 
not wish the US to protect Britain 
with nuclear weapons" because, as 
he says, “it would be immoral to 
do so.” 

So fer neither you nor your 
correspondents have asked the 
further crucial question: “Why is 
Labour still proposing to continue 
with any significant defence 
spending at all?” It cannot be for 
purposes of actual defence: not at 
any rate defence against any 
nuclear power. Fora non-nudear 
must always be at the mercy of a 
nuclear power, save to the extent 
that the Latter is somehow deterred 
from exploiting its nuclear 
capability. So what then can be the 
purpose of Labour's present prom- 
ise to continue a substantial, 
strictly non-nuclear contribution 
to Nato? 

Presumably the honest answer 
would be: "To win the election, by 
misrepresenting our policy for 
defenedessness as a policy for 
defence." Quite certainly, the 
election safely won, the calls from 
newly elected Labour MPs to 
divert such now obviously waste- 
ful spending into more congenial 
projects would prove irresistible, 
whatever the present intentions of 
Messrs Kinnock, Hattersley and 
Healey may or may not be. 

Yours faithfully. 

ANTONY FLEW. 

26 Alexandra Road. 

Reading, Berkshire. 

October I. 

From Mr Warren D. Feagins 
Sir. Critics of Labour's defence 
policy in your columns seem to 
favour a “Realpoliuk” style which 
patronizes the naivety of tinkering 
with Nato's present deployments. 
Similar arguments were fashion- 
able in the 1960s when, in fact. 
Nato and the Warsaw Pact were 
escalating nuclear capability to 
hair-trigger overkill levels. Less 
was said then (as now) about the 
risks, as evidenced by dose calls 
over Berlin and Cuba. 

The precedent of 40 uneasy 
years is a statistically unreliable 
model for the longer-term survival 
of humanity. The politicians are 
hardly likely to advertise the 
dangers, or to be frank about the 
central issue — would ordinary 
citizens/voters rather be dead than 
red? I cannot see why we should 
have any more fajth in tire efficacy _ 
of defence polic^r than . the less ' 
lethal fiimblings of politicians in 
social or economic affairs. 

In common with most ordinary 
people, my survival and that of 
my loved ones transcends political 
dogma. But, on nuclear defence, 
we are encouraged to marry 
dogma with what little informa- 
tion is available on the risks- This 
obscures the central issue, and 
since people by and large prefer 
not to think about extinction, a 
certain inertia results. 

Europe's role as the front line of 
(nuclear) defence for the USA 
appears rather obvious to every- 
one except the politicians, so I am 
gratified to observe some har- 
mony between what Mr Kinnock 
says and the rest of us feeL Indeed, 

I would be prepared to forgive the 


Labour Party hs widely acclaimed 
mismanagement of all the other 
issues just so long as it sticks to 
this one. 

Yours feilhfullv. 

W. FEAGINS.' 

46 Marquis Road. NWJ. 

October 6 . 

From Dr R.L Marshall 
Sir. Patriotism, however deeply 
favoured by Labour Party orators, 
is not their most familar resort 
and Mr Kinnock's declarations on 
it in his address to the party 
conference are ail the more nota- 
ble and welcome. And it occurs to 
me. if not to him. that they could 
have a very strong public appeal. 

Most voters base their choices 
on the general attitudes they 
perceive in the parties rather than 
on the details of policies and 
programmes and his tribute to 
“our country” and his willingness 
to make personal sacrifices for it 
will be widely attractive. 

He could well now go on to 
avow another attitude for which 
patriotism provides some en- 
couragement. From his con- 
fidence in our counuy it is a short 
step to acknowledging that other 
parties have sometimes contrib- 
uted to its values and possibilities 
and may contribute again — 
though, of course, less whole- 
heartedly or effectively than his 
own adherents. 

This acknowledgement, rather 
than the present inclination of 
each of the main parties to 
concentrate exclusively on 
denigrating or dismissing all the 
advocacies and actions of the 
other, would serve him well both 
in the improvement of the quality 
of our political life and at the polls. 
Yours faithfully. 

R. L MARSHALL. 

Holly Cottage. * 

I S Beacon Road. 

Woodhouse Eaves. Leicestershire. 
October! 

From Dr Geoffrey Lee Williams 
Sir. I believe' that Major-General 
Sir John Adand (October 3) is 
right to assert that Denis Healey 
owes an explanation to the elec- 
torate concerning his apparent 
volte-face on nuclear weapons. 

Mr Healey once argued both in 
opposition and in government 
strongly in favour of nuclear 
deterrence. His Healey theorem 
became part of the documented 
history of strategic analysis. The 
first requirement in resolving 
Nato's difficulties, he said, was to 
restore “general confidence in 
American leadership”. He stressed 
that it was necessary, also.-io have 
consultation about the deploy- 
ment and use of nuclear weapons 
to restore European confidence in 
the Alliance and America's role in 
it. Planning and consultations had 
both to be improved, argued 
Healey, if Nato was to be made 
workable. 

Like Sir John Adand, I respect 
Denis Healey, but does he deserve 
such respect today in the light of 
his weak withdrawal of his state- 
ment on BBC Television's Pan- 
orama that it was “not 
inconceivable” that Britain might 
retain nuclear weapons under a 
Labqur government? . 

Yours sincerely, 

GEOFFREY LEE WILLIAMS, 
University of Surrey. 

Department of Linguistic and 
Internationa] Studies. 

Guildford, Surrey. 

October 4. 


Soviet Jews 

From Dr T M. Ryan 
Sir. In his powerfully-argued and 
moving article ("Prisoners who 
serve no purpose”, September 26) 
Bernard Levin refers to the virtual 
absence of Jewish schools and the 
teaching of Yiddish in the USSR. 

It is worth adding that, accord- 
ing to the official census data, the 
proportion of Soviet Jews speak- 
ing the language of their national- 
ity as their mother tongue has 
registered a marked dedine — 
from 21.5 percent to 14.2 percent 
over the years 1959-79. For all 
other large ethnic groupings, apart 
from the Poles, the figures were 
above 50 per cent and usually wefl 
above that level. . . 

Unlike some nationalities* the 
Jewish population of the USSR is 
widely dispersed and highly 
urbanised. However, even when 
allowance is matte for that point, it 
is difficult to avoid the condusion 
that in the case of Soviet Jews the 
authorities have chosen to pursue 
a policy of flouting their own 
Constitution, which in article 45 
confers on dtizens the right to 
tuition in their mother tongue. 
Yours faithfully. 

MICHAEL RYAN, 

4 Hendrefoilan Drive, 

Sketty. Swansea. West Glamorgan. 
September 29. 

From Mr Robert Swann 
Sir. I am delighted that Mr 
Bernard Levin wrote so eloquently 
about the threat to Jewish culture 


in the Soviet Union. Far too often 
the problem is presented as if there 
were only two choices for Soviet 
Jews — to stop being “Jews” (in 
any meaningful sense) or to 
emigrate to Israel after the nec- 
essary diplomatic and economic 
pressure has been applied on the 
Soviet Union. 

I believe we should campaign 
equally hard for their right to be, 
in the fullest sense. Jews in the 
Soviet Union or to emigrate, if 
they wish (as the majority appar- 
ently do) to countries other than 
Israel. 

Why did Mr Arie Dulzin, 
Chairman of the International 
Council of the World Conference 
for Soviet Jews, tell his audience 
on September 9 in Paris that they 
must not work for “free 
emigration” but for “repatriation 
to Israel”? I have been told several 
times that one of the main sticking 
points holding up emigration is 
that Israel wants Moscow to agree 
that Jewish emigrants should go to . 
Israel. 

While the Russians might be 
willing to relax restrictions, they 
are not prepared to have the 
destination dictated to them. 1$ 
Zionism not. once again, proving 
itself to be something very dif- 
ferent in its objectives both to 
Judaism as a religion and to 
Jewish culture? 

Yours sincerely. 

ROBERT SWANN, 

8 rue des Volontaires, 

75015 Paris. France. 

September 26. 


Channel tunnel 

From Mr John Sharpies 
Sir. Richard Hope (October 3) 
shows a remarkable degree of 
tunnel vision. Kenneth Fleet’s 
comments (September 27) on 
Eurotunnel’s pathfinder prospec- 
tus were if anything rather gen- 
erous as there are many more 
things than a “political accident” 
that can prevent the construction 
of the umnd. 

No doubt inventors will look 
long and hard at the "gaggle of 
assumptions” which underlie 


Because of an error hi transmission, 
a reference was made in Monday's 
leading article. “Trading solutions", 
to “the regime of fixed interest 
rates" established at Breiton Woods. 
This should, of course, have read 
“the regime offixed exchange rates” 


Eurotunnel's assertions and they 
will conclude that any number of 
them may upset the viability of 
the tunnel. 

The difference between the 
tunnel and alternative, invest- 
ments is that with the tunnel all 
the eggs are in one dubious basket. ■ 
Investment in competing ports 
and ferry services will be much 
more flexible and able to respond 
to radically changing conditions. 
No amount of fiddling with 
inflation forecasts will alter this 
fundamental difference in risk 
factors. 

Yours sincerely, 

JOHN SHARPLES (Head of 
Economics & Finance). 

British Ports Association. 
Commonwealth House. 

1-19 New Oxford Street. WC1. 
October 3. 


Shift of emphasis 
in news values 

From Mr F. Griffith Dawson 
Sir, On September 25 your On 
This Day column reprinted an 
extract from the Madrid Gazette 
which had appeared in your 
distinguished newspaper in 1816. 
and described the Spanish rc- 
conquest of its rebellious colony of 
Nucva Granada, now Colombia. 

Modern readers might wonder 
why your editorial predecessor m 
181*6' included this apparently 
obscure report from a foreign 
journal in his highly-taxed four- 
page newspaper, nearly a third of 
which was devoted to advertising. 
In feet, never has the British Press 
been so interested in Latin Ameri- 
can affairs as in the years 1SI 5-25. 

During this period the Latin 
American revolt against Spanish 
colonial rule enjoyed widespread 
public support in Britain. Partially 
the sympathy derived from liberal 
political sentiments aroused by 
the French Revolution but denied 
domestic outlet by conservative 
administrations. Equally im- 
portant were commercial expecta- 
tions that upon independence the 
former colonics would provide 
vast new markets for British 
manufactures. The Press reflected 
this sympathy with varying 
degress of enthusiasm. 

The Times and its London and 
provincial competitors reported in 
detail the campaigns of the patriot 
leaders Simon Bolivar and Jose de 
San Martin, commented exten- 
sively upon the new Latin Ameri- 
can constitutions, legislation and 
trade statistics, and followed 
closely the fortunes of the 6.000 
British volunteers who had sailed 
to join the rebel forces. 

The generally sparse Press 
coverage of Latin American affairs 
today compares poorly with the 
proportionately more extensive 
column space allocated to the New 
World during the post-Waterloo 
decade. 

Yours faithfully. 

FRANK GRIFFITH DAWSON, 

3 Ehislev Avenue. Cambridge. 
October I. 

Creation of wealth 

From Professor Emeritus M. North 
Sir. Dr Digby Anderson (Septem- 
ber 30). in his “This immoral alms 
race”, omits to mention that much 
wealth is inherited and is not "the 
reward of skill, work, sacrifice and 
risk taking . . 

Anyway. Dr Anderson is too 
good a sociologist to be so naive as 
to believe that anything but a 
fraction of individual wealth de- 
rives.form these Victorian virtues, 
which are, alas, anachronisms in 
contemporary Britain. 

Yours faithfully. 

M. NORTH. 

The Lancashire Polytechnic, 
Corporation Street 
Preston, Lancashire. 

September 30. 

Radio reception 

From Professor Emeritus C. Kittef 
Sir, The BBC has asked its World 
Service listeners to fill up a m any- 
paged questionnaire to pinpoint 
listening habits during the last 
week of this month. The survey is 
fatally flawed, because it nowhere 
asks whai programs one would 
listen to if only a suitable trans- 
mission were available. 

In the Pacific and Mountain 
time zones of the United States the 
reception of the BBC is intolerable 
during most of the prime time of 7 
pm to 10 pm. often being drowned 
by The Netherlands and the USSR 
on nearby channels, and by France 
on the identical channel These 
countries, along with Germany 
and South. Africa, offer much 
better transmissions on a selection 
of frequencies during normal eve- 
ning listening hours. 

The BBC frequency charts for 
the N American service are fairy 
tales: some of the frequencies 
shown are never received and 
most of the time only one fre- 
quency is good enough to be called 
poor. My observations are made 
with a variety of serious receivers. 

The BBC programming is su- 
perb. It is wasted on the American 
air because of an unimaginative 
assignment of frequencies by the 
BBC technical staff and by an 
unrealistic allocation of resources 
by management. 

The situation has worsened 
relative to competitors in recent 
months. Recent management 
changes (and not sunspots alone) 
at Bush House appear to have 
degraded further the poor delivery 
of good service. Such a survey 
could only be proposed by people 
who do not understand the 
listener's situation. 

Yours faithfully. 

CHARLES KITTEL, 

University of California. Berkeley, 
Department of Physics. 

Berkeley. California 94720. USA. 
October 1. 


Testing times 

From Mr G. G. Watkins 
Sir. The principal threat to pine 
forests is no longer add rain, but 
the GCSE. whose administrators 
and their hangers-on are filling our 
schools with .expensively pro- 
duced brochures, pamphlets, 
forms, returns, hortatory effu- 
sions. conflicting advice, and junk 
mail. Soon there will be no room 
to sit down. 

Where is the pulp coming from? 
And the money? .And how is a 
teacher supposed to read it all in a 
working life of only 40 years? 

Do you think we could have a 
few books for the candidates to 
read, instead? 

Yours feiibfully. 

GEORGE WATKINS. 

70 Scotforth Road. 

Lancaster. 



OCTOBER 8 1863 

The letter from Charles Dickens 
( 1812- 1870) um supported try a 
dozen others covering a wide area 
of the Midlands, five of diem from 
clergymen. E. J. Lowe uui a fellow 
of the royal and other 
distinguished societies, and a 
founder of the Meteorological 
Society, 


THE EARTHQUAKE 

TO THE EDITOR OF 
THE TIMES 

Sir,- As you may think any 
accurate observation of the shock 
of earthquake which was felt in 
various parts of England 
Tuesday morning worth publishing 
I send you mine. 

I was awakened by a violent 
swaying of my bedstead from side 
to side, accompanied by a singular 
heaving motion. It was exactly as if 
some great beast had been crouch 
tag asleep under the bedstead and 
were now shaking itself and trying 
to rise. The time by my watch was 

20 minutes past three, and 1 
suppose the shuck to have lasted 
nearly a minute. The bedstead, a 
large iron one, standing nearly 
north and south, appeared to me to 
be the only piece or furniture in the 
room that was heavily shaken 
Neither the doors nor the windows 
rattled, though they rattle enough 
windy weather, this house 
standing alone, on high ground, in 
the neighbourhood of two great 
rivers. There was no noise. The air 
was very still, and much wanner 
than it had been in the earlier part 
of the night. Although the previous 
afternoon had been wet, the glass 
had not fallen. I had mentioned my 
surprise at its standing near the 
letter “i” in “Fair." and having a 
tendency to rise. It is recorded in 
the second volume of the Philo- 
sophical Transactions that the 
glass stood high at Oxford when an 
earthquake was felt there in Sep- 
tember 1683. Your faithful sen-ant. 
CHARLES DICKENS. 
Gad's-hiU-ploce, Hicham by 
Rochester, Kent, Oct. 7. 

TO THE EDITOR OF 
THE TIMES 

Sir,— A smart shock of an 
earthquake was felt here this 
morning at 3 30. Many persons 
awoke from the shaking of their 
beds and windows. At the time the 
sky was cloudless, the wind west, 
barometer stationary, and the 
temperature 31 deg. 

The motion of the earthquake 
pendulum at this Observatory was 
from W.N.W. to ESX, and the 
displacement of chalk by the 30- 
feet rod was half an inch, the index 
needle moving the chalk so as to 
leave an oval, or rather a length- 
en ed-oval hole. 

There must have been at least 
two shocks, as numerous letters 
describe the time as both 2 35 aun. 
and 3 30 a.m^ that the latter was 
the time of a severe lateral shock is 
certain, as the zero pencils on my 
atmospheric recorder marked the 
paper in a remarkable manner at 
that hour. 

Information as to the extent of 
the shock is deniable, as in all 
probability the earthquake of this 
morning was of a severe nature. 

I have the honour to be. Sir, your 
obedient servant. 

Observatory, Beeston, Oct. 6. 
E.J. LO WE. 

We have had an Earthquake. 
The men of science all tell us that 
we have every right to expect 
earthquakes. This country lies, as a 
correspondent observes, on the 
great volcanic belt. We are only a 
few links in the chain that binds 
Heck to Vesuvius, Aetna, and the 
original volcano in the Liperi 
Islands. ... 

In the “black country”, indeed, 
and throughout the Midland and 
West Midland counties, the earth- 
quake appears to have been felt the 
most. At Birmingham walls were 
seen to move, and people rose from 
their beds to see what damage had 
been done, for though the rum- 
bling, grating sound is compared to 
that of a passing waggon or train, it 
was known at once to be something 
more. At Edgbaston successive 
shocks were plainly felt, houses 
were shaken to their foundations, 
a dreadful rattle” was rather felt 
than heard, and people woke one 
another to ask the meaning. Every- 
thing around was violently agitat- 
ed. At Wolverhampton everything 
the houses vibrated to the 
external agitation- The how 
cracked and groaned as if the 
timbers had been strained. The 
policemen on duty saw the walls 
vibrate, heard everything rattle 
about them and were witnesses to 
the universal terror of the roused 
sleepers. From near Stourbridge we 
are told that a bouse quivered from 
top to bottom, the silver rattled, 
the furniture shivered, and it 
seemed as if there had been an 
explosion under the cellars. In 
South Staffordshire and East 
Worcester doors were burst open, 
crockery and furniture broken, 
docks stopped, and whole popula- 
tions brought out of their beds. At 
Cheltenham, a great diwbmftp from 
that neighbourhood, a deep rum- 
bling noise was heard, the heaviest 
furniture was shaken, fee fire-irons 
rattled, heavy stone walls were 
heard to strain and crack, and the 
boys at the College were each under 
the impression that the rest were 
engaging in making the greatest 


possible disturbance. . . . 


Identity crisis 

From Sir William Hayter 
Sir. Your correspondent, R. J. Q. 
Meyer (September 30) is wrong on 
one point- Dr Spooner was not a 
poor speller. I have read all his 
diaries and many of his letters in 
manuscript and do not recollect 
having encountered any spelling 
mistakes. 

There are other confusions, of 
course; what Spooner suffered 
from was not dyslexia but what Sir 
Ernest Barker called metaphasis. 
or transposition of sounds. 

Yours faithfully. 

WILLIAM HAYTER. 

Bassetts House, 

Stanton St. John, Oxford. 


$ 









28 


F 

t! 

St 

E 

d 

« 

ft 

P 

n 

o 

tc 

n 

n 

n 

C 

s! 

el 

cl 


e< 

<r 

b. 

si 

K 

« 

01 


Y 

th 

ol 

tb 

bi 

IT. 

D 

P 

is 

01 

d 

o: 

F 

w 


St 

rr 

V 

ci 

it 


I 


A 

Jj 

P» 

\\ 

Pi 

s. 

cl 

ra 

SI 

Pi 

S-l 

hi 

c.’ 

ft 

sc 


S 

S' 

i? 

n 

s'- 

b 

v 

e 

T 

a 

fl- 

it 

n 

b 

t* 

\ 


I 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 8 1986 



COURT 

AND 


SOCIAL 


COURT 

CIRCULAR 


BUCKINGHAM PALACE 
October 7: The Princess Anne, 
Mrs Mark Phillips, President of 
the British Olympic Associ- 
ation. this morning attended the 
launch of the 1988 Olympic 
Appeals Schools Promotion at 
the Inn on the Park Hotel, 
London. Wi. where Her Royal 
Highness was received by the 
Chairman of the Association 
(Mr Charles Palmer). 

The Princess Anne. Mrs Mark 
Phillips. President of tire Riding 
for the Disabled Association, 
subsequently attended a Coun- 
cil Meeting of the Association in 
Saddlers' Hall and was received 
by the Chairman (Mrs Patrick 
Langford). 

The Princess Anne. Mrs Mark 
Phillips. President of the Save 
the Children Fund, this after- 
noon visited the Hopscotch 
Asian Family Centre (Project 
Leader. Mrs J. Seeds) at St 
Richard's House. Eversholt 
Street. NWi. 

Her Royal Highness was re- 
ceived by the Mayor of Camden 
(Councillor Mary Cane). 

Mrs Richard Carcw Pole was 
in attendance. 


tee at the Thames Water 
Authority Headquarters. New 
Riverhead. Rosebery Avenue. 
EC1. 

Mrs Howard Page was in 
attendance. 


YORK HOUSE 
ST JAMES'S PALACE 
October 7: The Duke of Kent, as 
Chairman, this evening at- 
tended a dinner of the Trustees 
of HRH The Duke of 
Edinburgh's Commonwealth 
Study Conferences (UK Fund) 
at the Garrick Cub. London 

wci 

Sir Richard Buckley was in 
attendance: 

The Duchess of Kent, Patron 
of the Arthritis and Rheu- 
matism Council, today visited 
the Clinical Research Centre, 
Northwick Park Hospital. 
Harrow. 

Mrs David Napier was in 
attendance. 


The Queen will hold investi- 
tures at Buckingham Palace on 
Novembers. 11. 19 and 25 and 
on December 3 and 1 1. 

The Queen will open Parliament 
on November IZ 


KENSINGTON PALACE 
October 7: The Princess Mar- 
garet. Countess of Snowdon was 
present this evening at a Recep- 
tion held at Lambeth Palace by 
the Association for Spinal In- 
jury Research Rehabilitation 
and Reintegration on the 
conclusion of their appeal for 
the London Spinal Unit Sports 
Centre. 

Mrs Jane Stevens was in 
attendance. 


KENSINGTON PALACE 
October 7: The Duke of 
Gloucester, as Patron, this eve- 
ning attended the launching of 
the Pevsner Memorial Tmsi at a 
Reception at the An Workers' 
Guild. Queen Square. London 
WCI. 

Lieutenant-Colonel Sir Simon 
Bland was in attendance. 

The Duchess of Gloucester. 
President of London Home 
Satiety OounciL was present this 
morning ai the Inaugural Meet- 
ing ol the Water Safety Commit- 


The Princess of Wales will open 
the new computerised tomog- 
raphy scanner at St Thomas's 
Hospital on October IS. 
Princess Anne, Chancellor of 
London University, will attend 
a tri-service military display by 
London University units at 
Greenwich Naval College on 
October 15 and inspect the 
university naval unit vessel to 
mark the university's 1 50th 
anniversary. Later die will at- 
tend a dinner and honorary 
degree ceremony at the 
Barbican. 

Princess Anne will present long 
service badges to nurses from 


The Queen's Nursing Institute 
rapers' Hall on October 13. 


at Drapers 

The Duke of Gloucester has 
become Patron of the Pevsner 
Memorial Trust and President 
of the Gibraltar Heritage 
Society. 


A memorial service for Sir 
Folliott Sandford will be held on 
Saturday. October 25. 1986. at 
2. 1 5 pm in New College Chapel 
Oxford. 


Luncheon 


University College London 
Sir James LighthilL Provost of 
University Col lege London, pre- 
sided at a luncheon held yes- 
terday at the college to welcome 
Professor M.G. Smith, a new 
fellow. Others present included: 


Pmu-Kor DEN Davie* frbre-orovasQ. 
MrfioiOnrraa i h Baker twemarv). 
»raf«-vuor A p MaUiiA. PnVevxx m m 
W ilkin i>. Pnx>s«i B Kapferer am 
Mi D D A LcMtc 


Dinner 


London Metal Exchange 
The annual dinner of the 
London Metal Exchange was 
held last night at Grosvenor 
House. Mr Jacques Lion. Chair- 
man of the Board of the Metal 
Market & Exchange Company 
presided. Mr Robin Leigh- 
Pemberton. Governor of the 
Bank of England was the guest 
speaker. 


Service dinner 


Army Commandos 
Major-General T.B.L. Churchill 
presided at a dinner given at the 
Army and Navy Club last night 
by the Army Commandos 
Officers' Dinner Club. General 
Sir Peter Hellings was the 
principal guests. 


Reception 


Lord McGregor of Durris 
Liml NliGregor of Durris. 
Chairman of the Advertising 
Standards Authority, enter- 
tained the Code of Advertising 
Practice Committee, members 
ot the founding committee and 
past chairmen at a reception m 
the House of Lords on Monday. 
fViober 6 to mark the twenty* 
tilth anniversary of the commit- 
tee. Mr Michael Howard. QC. 
MP. and Sir Gordon Borne, QC, 
and leading members of the 
advertising industry and of con- 
sumer protection bodies were 
present. The guests were re- 
ceived by the chairman of the 
committee. Mr Anthony 
Bracking. 


Birthdays today 

The Marquess of Anglesey, 64: 
Sir John Boyd, 69; Viscount 
Caldecote. 69: Lord Caradon. 
79; Professor Garth Chapman. 
69; Sir Nicolas Cheetham, 76: 
Professor Sir Alastair Currie, 65; 
Lady Dalrymple-Champneys, 
84; Professor H E. de 
Wardener. 71; Sir Edward 
Fveleigh. 69, Lord Jusuce Fox. 
6- m. Milner Gray. 87; Profes- 
* *■ i« hard Harrison, 66. Sir 

lethcoe. 86: Mr 
Milne. 56: Dr Cesar 


m ■»** Sir Mark Otiphant, 
to Li**".- Merle Park. 49: the 


Hon Sir Peter Kamsbotham.67; 
Mr Ray Reardon. 54; Lord 
Romsey. 39; Mr Robert 
Scholey. 65; Sir Reginald SholL 
84; Mr D. R. W. Silk. 55; Mr 
Godfrey Talbot, 78; Mr Peter 
Wood, 58. 


Latest wills 


Dame Florence Marjorie 
Wilcox (Dame Anna N eagle, the 
actress), of London NW8. left 
estate valued at £147.963 net. 
She left to Mrs Odette Hallowes. 
GC. the bust of herself by Fiona 
Henriqucs "as a token of my 
admiration and affection". 


Dame Adelaide Baillieu 
Doughty, of Chelsea, formerly 
Governor of the English-Speak- 
ing Union, left estate valued at 
£219.7-15 net. 


Mr Harry Webster. o» 
Wetherby. West Yorkshire, 
farmer, left estate valued at 
£582.676 net. 


Knighthood for 
Lord Mayor-elect 


Alderman David Rowe-Ham. 
who becomes Lord Mayor next 
month, has been made a Knight 
Grand Cross of the Order of the 
British Empire. Sir David’s 
appointment was confirmed 
yesterday by the Queen. 


Horticulture 


Dahlias fight the frost 


By Alan Toogood, Horticulture Correspondent 


The current spell or mild weather Is ensuring 
plenty of colour in gardens. Dahlias bare revived 
after the earlier frosts and at the Royal 
Horticultural Society's Dower show, which 
opened at Westminster yesterday, a Urge bank of 
excellent Mooms exhibited by Ayktt Nurseries, of 
St Albans, woo a gold medaL 

Gentians are also responding to the dement 
weather by keeping their Downs open. A 
collection is being shown by Edrom Nurseries, of 
C o Miag ti a i n, Berwickshire, indeding Gentian* 
oraata which, until recent years, was thought to 
hare disappeared from cnltivatiOA- Edran also 
gained a gold medaL 

It is not ofdy flowers that are providing colour 
at this show. w. Robinson, of Forum, Lancashire, 
is showing red and yellow cherry tomatoes, red 
onions, orange squashes and pumpkins, and red- 
stemmed beet in their gold-medal exhibit, while 
the RHS Garden at Wisley, Snrrey, has a 
colourful collection of anesnal vegetables, indttd- 
ingUack radishes and white beetroots. 

There a autumn leaf colour from bonsai 
(dwarfed trees) shown by Herons Bonsai, of 
Liagfidd, Snrrey, ami 10 KaL of Louden. 

la ' the Japan Society of London's bonsai 
competition, the Chinn stone lantern, for most 
points, has been awarded Id G. Dobson. 

Alas Boiler, of Chessinrten, mm classes in the 
RHS fruit and vegetable shew for a collection of 
hardy fruits and a collection of pears. J JR. Brawn, 
of Leicester, also won classes for a collection of 


apples and pears, and dessert apples. The 
Eastoote Horacultnxnl Society took the affiliated 
societies' challenge cop far a collection of apple* 
and pears. 

In the vegetable competition, CLF t tHnw him, 
of Stanniore, Middlesex, won the Rlddefl trophy 
for a collection of mpe kinds of mmUes; and 
JJF. Branham, of Aylesbury, BnckmgtiaEsMs’©, 
led die class for six kinds of vegetables. Both 
exhibitors hare indoded red ‘Romano’ potatoes. 

Dr D. Walkey.ofTyso, Warwickshire, woo tire 
Harold Bishop memorial trophy, for most points, 
in the Alpine Gardens Society's competition. G- 
Forster, ®T Selsey, Sussex, has been awarded the 
Saunders spoon in this competition, for die best 
pan of cyclamen (Cyclamen gmatm with silvtr- 
marbled foliage). 

Exhibitors gaming most points h the various 
sections of die British National Carnation 
Society's competition were: Woodfidd Brothers, 
of Sttatiord-opon-Avou (the Allwood Brothers 

SterafT challenge cup); ^"ftriarfeitow, of 
Stockport (the Daily Mail cap); and JJFLT. 

Pepper, of Qeetboe^es (the Marquis cap). 

The following plants received the award of 
merit: perpetnaMloweirsf carnation ‘Dianne 
Hewins*, crimson-pnrpte, raised and exhibited by 
Woodfidd Brothers; and SckiznstyEs ‘‘Je nnife r*, 
pink-flowered perennial, shown by WJEL Bryant, 
of Taunton. 

The show is open today iron 10 am to 5 pm. 


Appointments 



Major-General Anthony 
Trythall to be Representative 
Colonel Commandant of the 
Royal Array Educational Corps,' 
in succession to Major-General 
Lloyd HowdL 


Memorial service 


Mr R.C. Wakefield 
A service of thanksgiving for the 
life of Mr Roger Cuthbert 
(Jumbo) Wakefield was held 
yesterday in the Chapel of St 
M ichaei and Si George. St Paul's 
Cathedral. The Rev Frank Har- 
vey officiated, assisted by the 
Rev Michael Beck. 

Sir Humphry Wakefield and 
Mr John w right read the lessons 
and the Dean of Si Paid's gave 
an address. The Ambassador of 
Sudan was represented by Mr 
O.M. Yousif. Among others 
present were: 


Mn Wakefield iwtdowj. Commander 
and Mrs WLT peppe (son-in-law and 
dtuqnim. Mr Roger_ Peppe and 


au&Odir .and Oliver. Penoe '^grand 


wmi me Dowager Lady vv, 

istster in law). Lady (Humphry) 
todM-deid. Mr and Mrs H WahefieM. 
um> Hon Mrs Clarkson WeM>. Mr and 
Mrs P-ter HensmSn. Mr and Mrs 
Ctu-eaootwT Townsend. Mr and Mn 
Je*vmy Seel. Mr and Mrs WUUam 
WahrfwM. Mr After Watefldd. 

C-dy SarkilDe. Sir Donald Hawley 
cS»<*»n Oeftnre r«w) and Lady 
Ha*— wv ar John wnohL Lady 
wniiomi U nosev Sir Hflarv Scon 
talM> mmarnunt OM Sedtwrqhun 
Oiidi and Lady Scott. Sir Ooualay 
Dual- Parke* MrWTH PepM. Mrs 
6 Wwr- Mi Adam Peppe Mrs HDD 
He, ale* von. M, Peter rucit, MJ 
Charts andoun. mi and Mrs a Kerr 
Mrv CMC Thomely Mrs Charles de 
Bumhmi. Mr and Mrs l*ul Howeu. 
Mrs j W wnqhi. Mr and Mrs David 
S'fHl Dr and Mrs John Bowtby Mrs 
lan Simpson. Major A J Green. Mr R J 
S Thomson (Sudan Government Brtv 
(sn Pension Association) and BrtoadJer 
rrasei Scon and Mr Kenneth J Burton 
l Dew Survey Association). 


Mr Henry Moore 


A service of thanksgiving for the 
life and work of Mr Henry 
Moore. OM, CH, will be held in 
Westminster Abbey at noon on 
Tuesday. November 18. 1986. 
Those wishing to attend are 
invited to apply for uckets in 
writing to: The Receiver Gen- 
eral. Room 18. 20 Dean's Yard, 
Westminster Abbey. London. 
SW ip 3P A. enclosing a stamped 
addressed envelope, by Tues- 
day November 4. Tickets will 
ported on Tuesday. November 
1 1 All are welcome io attend 


Class Sellers’ 
Company 

The following have been elected 
officers of the Glass Sellers' 
Company for the ensuing year 
Master. Mr Philip J. Wil- 
loughby: Prime Warden and 
Honorary Clerk. Mr Michael C. 
Wallis: Renter Warden. Mr 
Robert F.8. Marshall. 


Marriages 


Mr N.K. Cayzer 
and Miss H.CJR. Sykes 
The marriage took place on 
Saturday, October 4. at the 
Abbey Church. Amplefoflh, of 
Mr Nigel Cayzer. second son of 
Mr ana Mrs Anthony Galliers- 
Pratt, and Miss Henrietta Sykes, 
younger daughter of the late Sir 
Richard and Lady Sykes. Father 
Walter Maxwell Stuart OSB, 
officiated, assisted by Father M. 
Smyth and the Rev A.M. Knox. 

The bride was given in mar- 
riage by her brother, Sir Tatton 
Sykes, and was attended by Lily 
Sykes, Sophy Topley. Antonia 
Mackay, Gerald Wellesley, 
Freddie Sykes, Simon Morrison, 
Tom Naylor-Leyland, George 
Gailiers- Pratt Freddie Galliers-' 
Pratt and Cameron Douglas. 
The Hon Gerard Noel was best 
man. 

A luncheon was held at 
Sledmere House and the honey- 
moon is being spent abroad. 


Mr PC Pooling 
and Miss KJVL Harper 
Tbe marriage took place on 
September 26, in Verbier, 
Switzerland, of Mr Peter Pau- 
ling, second son of Dr Linus 
Pauling, of Honolulu, Hawaii, 
and Mine Anita Oser, of Dor- 
dogne, France, and Miss Kath- 
erine Harper, youngest daughter 
of Dr and Mrs James Harper, of 
Kirkcudbright, Scotland, 
and Miss EHena Holmes. Mr 
Simon Holmes was best m»n 
The honeymoon is being 
spent in Iceland. 


Mr F.B. Parkes 
and Mm D. Simpson 
The marriage look place on 
Saturday. September 27, 1986, 
in the Isle of Man. between Mr 
Frederick Basil Parkes. elder son 
of Sir Basil and Lady Parkes of 
Loghan-y-Yuiy, Isle of Man, 
and Mrs Diana Simpson, only 
daughter of Mr and Mrs Arthur 
Bell, of Thorn ton-le- Dale. 
Yorkshire. 


MrC Ashe 
and Mbs V. Young 
The marriage took place on 
September 27, at- St James' 
Church. Drayoot Cerne, be- 
tween Mr Christopher Ashe and 
Miss Victoria Young. 

The bride was given in mar- 
riage by her lather, and was 
attended by Miss Alice Pedersen 
and Miss Polly de Blank. Mr 
George Ashe was best man. 


Mr JJ-L Stanton 
and Mbs C.V. Dean 
The marriage took place on 
September 27, 1986. at St 
Mary's Church, Cadogan Street, 
of Mr James Stanton, younger 
son of Ueutenant-Cblonel and 
Mrs J.R.G. Stanton, of Snebton. 
Derbyshire, and Miss Clare 
Dean, second daughter of Mr 
and Mrs G.M. Dean, of Rich- 
mond. Surrey. The Rev J. Wiley 
officiated, assisted by the Rev 
N. Daughtry and the Very Rev 
F. Davys. 

The bride, who was given in 
marriage by her father, was 
attended by Miss Catharine 
Dean, Miss Sarah Boyt, Miss 
Lucy Boyt, Portia and Thomas 
Asquith, Harriet and Francis 
Atkinson, Thomas and Camilla 
Hicks. Mr Alan Cuthbert was 
best man. 

A reception was held at 30 
Pavilion Road, and the honey- 
moon will be spent in Thailand. 


Dr P.A. Holmes 
and Mbs LA. Waugh 
The marriage took place on 
Saturday, September 27, 1986. 
at the Parish Church of St 
Andrew, North Berwick, Scot- 
land, of Dr Paul Anthony 
Holmes, youngest son of Mrs 
Dorothy Holmes, and the late 
Mr Gordon Holmes. Ilkley, 
West Yorkshire, and Miss 
Elspeth Anne Waugh, elder 
daughter of Dr and Mrs W. 
Norman Waugh. North Ber- 
wick. Scotland. 

The bride, who was given in 
marriage by her father, was 
attended by Miss Kiraty Waugh 


Mr C.O. Stratton 
and Miss WJUB. Heanley 
The marriage took place on 
September 27, in Penh. Western 
Australia, of Mr Chris O. Strat- 
ton and Miss Waveney Ruth 
Baker Heanley. . Mr Richard 
Cleaver officiated. 

The bride, who was given in 
marriage by her father, was 
attended by Mrs Jacqueline 
Kentish. Mr Paul Stratton was 
best man. 


Mr T. Stratton 
and Mia N. Fidden 
The marriage took place on 
October 7, in London, between 
Mr Terence Stratton, of Rossetti 
Studios, Flood Street, and Miss 
Nicola Fidden, daughter of 
Lieutenant-Colonel and Mrs 
Philip Fidden, of Adlestrop, 
Gloucestershire. 


Mr D.G J. Gibson 

and Mrs FJ. Turner 

The marriage took' place on 

Monday. September 22. of Mr 

David Gibson and Mrs Fiona 

Turner. 


Mr JJL Sykes 
and Mbs PJVL Morris 
The marriage took place on 
Saturday, September 27, at the 
Church of The Immaculate 
Conception, Farm Street, 
London, between Mr James 
Sykes and Miss Pamela Morris. 


Forthcoming marriages 


The Earl of Wooboo 
and the Hon SJ. Bird wood 
The engagement is announced 
between Simon Frederick, son 
of the late Earl of Woolton and 
Countess Lloyd George of Dwy- 
fbr, and Sophie, only daughter 
of Lord and Lady Budwood. 


Mr A. ELM- Mitchell 
and Mbs J J, Whitcomb 
The engagement is announced 
between Adrian, second son of 
Mr and Mrs Dominic Mitchell, 
of Halford, Somerset, and Jo- 
anna. elder daughter of Major 
and Mrs Stuart Whitcomb, of 
Abbons Ann, Hampshire. 



THUMPING HEADACHE? 
TRAMIH 500 UILL SOFTEN THE BLOWS. 


In this fast and often furious world, 
the last thing you need is a headache. 

But when you have, you need a strong 
solution. Take full strength Irani l 500, for 
instance. 

Each capsule contains 500mg of para- 
cetamol, an analgesic doctors prescribe. And 
it's gentle on your stomach. 

It's fast- acting, too. 

So it'll knock out your headache in no time 



PARACETAMOL 

CAPSULES' 


WHEN THE PRESSURE'S ON, FULL-S TREN6TH TRAfUL. 500 £1 * » > « • • 


Mr C.G. Homrood 
and Mbs ELA. Jennings 
The engagement is announced 
between Christopher Graham, 
only son of Mr and Mrs BA 
Horwood, of Capetown, South 
Africa, and Esther Anne, daugh- 
ter of Mr and Mrs A.M. Jen- 
nings. of Hagley. West 
Midlands. 


Mr RJ. Moon • 

and Mbs SJ5.F. Eddls, MVO, 
The engagement is announced 
between Richard, son of Mr and 
Mrs J.F Moon, of Enfield, 
Middlesex, and Sheila, daughter 
of Lieutenant-Commander and 
Mrs G-L- Eddis, of Morestead, 
Winchester. 


Mr G.TJV. Isbecqne 
and Mile V.F.M, Vandecrax 
The engagement is announced 
between Gerard, eldest son of 
Mr and Mrs G.R. Isbecque. of 
Guiseley. West Yorkshire, and 
Valerie, eldest daughter of M 
and Mme P. Vandecnix, of 
Wimereux. France. 


Mr JJ. Pan Ion 
and Mbs L.P. S ti n d w ick 
The engagement is announced 
between John Forties, only son 
of Mrs S.M. Panton and the late 
Mr Richard Forbes Pamon. of 
Great Malvern, Worcestershire, 
and Lynda Patricia, elder 
daughter of Mr and Mrs Jack 
Sirudwick, of Beaconsfield, 
Buckinghamshire. 


Capes in P.A. Demean 
and Miss M.V. Frefel 
The engagement is announced 
between Patrick Athol! Duncan, 
Royal Horse Artillery, younger 
son of the late Major Aiholl 
Duncan. MC. and the Hon Mrs 
Duncan, of Marland House, 28 
Sloone Street. London, and 
Margrii Victoria, daughter of 
Mr and Mrs Franz Frefel. of 
Rockwood. near Lavenham. 
Suffolk, and 1001 May Tower. 7 
May Road. Hong Kong. 


MrLC- Watmore 
and MbsGLLA. Hazeltoa 
The engagement is announced 
between lan. only son of Dr and 
Mis K_A. Waimore, of Bromley. 
Kent, and Georgina, only 
daughter of Mr and Mrs G. 
Hazehon. of Maidstone. Kent. 


MrCA Zetle 
and Mbs £JL Stirling 
The engagement is announced 
between Charles Andruss. youn- 
ger son of Mr and Mrs Louis 
Zelle. of Minneapolis, United 
Stales, and Emma Elisabeth, 
elder daughter of Mr and Mrs 
Angus Stirling, of Holland Park. 
London. 


Glaziers 4 Company 

The following have been elected 
officers of the Glaziers* Com- 
pany for the ensuing year 
Master. Mr Jack Stone: Upper 
Warden. Mr TJ.C. Crocker 
Renter Warden. Mr P.G. Evans. 


Clockmakers’ 

Company 

The following have been elected 
officers of the Clockmakers" 
Company for the year 
commencing ^ January S. 1987; 
Master. Mr R.U Mellor: Senior 
Warden. Mr P.M. Vine: Renter 
Warden. Lord Munon of 
Luidislamr: Junior Warden. Mr 
\.W H»>nn 


Feltmakers’ 

Company 

The following have been elected 
officers of the Felmakets* Com- 
pany for the ensuing year: 
Master. Mr MJ. Harper; Upper 
Warden, Mr C-F.C. Simeons; 
Renter Warden. Mr EJJ>. El- 
liott; Third Warden. Mr J.L. 
Wallworth; Fourth Warden, Mr 
P.S. WinfiekL 


AbomnibaU 


The AbomnibaU. in aid of Si 
Joseph's Hospice Training. Uni L 
will take place on January 6. 
1 987. at Grosvenor House. Park 
Lane. Application forms are 
available from 01-937 0418. 


OBITUARY 


MR DENIS CAREY 
Versatile actor and director 


Mr Denis Carey, theatre 
director and actor, died op 
September 28. aj the age of 77. 

Two pieces of apparent 
good fortune tended to affect 
his reputation as a director. 
One was the vast London 

success of the disarming revue 

from Bristol, Salad Days , 
which for some slurred his 

work in the classics. The other 

__ 40 fifd 


Peter Brook’s A Midsummer 
flight's Dream. 

Bom in London on August 
3 1909. he went to St Pauls 
School and Trinity College, 
Dublin. He then should have 
entered the Irish Civil Service 
but foiled in Gaelic. 

nearly he was destined for 
the staged Between 1929 and 
1947 he gained experience at 


young company, 
30 plays 


three 


work in the classics. The other ^ 

was his appointment as first the Gate and Atoey 
director of the American Dublin; in London .and New 
Shakespeare Theatre ai Strat- York; on tour Martin 
foid, cSSioticut. where, as it Browne s Ue 

proved, he had to contend then mreadena wththe 
wth an intractable stage.. companies at the Glasgow 
He was always conscious of Citizens and the Midland, 
his Irish inheritance - his Coventry. 


mother was a celebrated Ab- 
bey Theatre actress. May 
Carey. Short and sturdy, he 
looked an Irishman; bis com- 
panies loved him for his 
scholarly, unexaggeraied di- 
rection, avoiding any son of 
trendiness. 

He undertook anything, 
whether as actor in his early 
days, or as a director in those 
middle years when his reputa- 
tion shone at the Bristol Old 
Vic and elsewhere. It was 
impossible to pin down , a 
“Carey” production; anything 
between Shakespeare and the 
muricai. Free As Air. 

Towards the end, an actor 
again, be bad a similar quiet, 
concentrated quality, visible 
when, for its world tour, he 
look over Quince and Egeus in 


He made his first real 
London mark in Irene 
Hentscbel’s production (Lyr- 
ic, Hammersmith, 1947) of 
Walter Macken’s Galway 
Handicap. Later that year, he 
was in the tragedy of the 
Resistance, Men Without 
Shadows, his tost important 
appearance as an actor for 
more than 20 years. 

That year he directed at the 
Mercury (it went later to the 
Criterion) Donagh 

MacDonagh's serio-comic 
fantasy. Happy as Larry, 
which launched him on his 
career as a director. 

After a year as associate 
director at the Arts, Salisbury, 
he went to the Bristol Okl Vic 
for a heartening period (1949- 
54) in the history of a still 


SIR ARTHUR GALSWORTHY 


elegant Two Gentlemen o) 
ftromi io the Old v w: wd a 

third, the holiday entertain- 
ment Salad Days (1954). ^to 
the Vaudeville, where it mn 
for over 2,000 performances. 

His great challenge came in 
1955 when he was . appomJ«l 
first director of the Shake- 
speare Theatre at Stratford. 
Connecticut Julius Caesar 
and The Tempest on what be 
called “a stage the size of a 
football field" and with an 
unhelpful Festival Board, 
were not successes. True, he 
had some helpful actors - 
Raymond Massey in particu- 
lar - but it was a damaging few 
months. 

He resumed his English 
career with a set of varied 
productions - among them 
Romanoff and Juliet for Peter 

Ustinov (1956) and Free As 
Air (1957) in the Salad Days 
manner. But he did not again 
have a major success. 

Later he resumed acting. At 
the Royal Court in 1970 he 
was Telyegin in Unde Vanya. 
and his work thereafter in- 
cluded - besides the Brook 
Dream - such a collector’s 
item as Ocean us in Prome- 
theus Bound (Mermaid, 1971). 

He was married to the 
actress Yvonne Coulette. 


Sir Arthur Galsworthy, 
KCMG, Ambassador to the 
Republic of Ireland from 1973 
to 1976, died yesterday at the 
age of 70. 

Arthur Norman Galsworthy 
was bom at Colwyn Bay on 
July 1, 1916, and educated at 
Emmanuel School, London, 
the Sorbonne, Hamburg Uni- 
versity and Corpus Christi, 
Cambridge. 


He joined the Colonial Of- 
fice in 1938 as an assistant 
principal, but two years later 
was commissioned in the 
Duke of York's Light Infantry. 
He transferred to the Intelli- 
gence Coups, serving in North 
Africa, Sicily and Italy. In 
1945 he was demobilised with 
the rank of lieutenant-colonel 
and returned to the Colonial 
Office. 

He was promoted assistant 


secretary sur place in J 947 and 
in 1951 was seconded as dhief 
secretary to the West African 
Inter-Territorial Secretariat at 
Accra. . He returned to the 
Colonial Office, was promot- 
ed assistant under-secretary of 
state, and in 1966 transferred 
to the Diplomatic Service. 

Three years later he was 
appointed High Commission- 
er in New Zealand. It was a 
pluralist post as Galsworthy 
also assumed diplomatic re- 
sponsibility for Pitcairn and 
Fiji, soon to become indepen- 
dent. 

His final posting was to 
Dublin in 1973, where person- 
al tragedy struck with the 
death of his wife soon after 
their arrivaL 


Galsworthy was a popular 
diplomaL He was also an 
obsessive bird-watcher. A 


DR S. D. ELLIOTT 


Dr Stuart Elliott, an out- 
standing medical bacteriolo- 
gist of the type that would 
nowadays be regarded as "old 
school”, died on September 
-17. He was 79. 

Stuart Dunsmore Elliott ob- 
tained his medical qualifica- 
tions at University College 
Hospital, London, in 1931, 
and subsequently obtained the 
diploma of public health. He 
began his career as a teaching 
officer at University College 
Hospital Medical School, 
where he became Reader. 
There he remained until 1949, 
apart from wartime 
interruptions. 

During the war he was 
seconded to the Emergency 
Public Health Service, most of 
the time as director of the 
Streptococcal Research Lab- 
oratory. After the war he was 
for six years a visiting investi- 
gator at the Rockefeller Insti- 
tute, New York, where he 
worked on rheumatic lever 


and streptococcal diseases 
with Dr Rebecca C. 
LancefiekL 


He. returned to England tn 
1955 to lake up an appoint- 
ment as assistant director of 
research in the department of 
animal pathology, Cambridge 
University, where he re- 
mained until 1966, when he 
transferred to the department 
of pathology. He maintained 
his association with the 
Rockefeller Institute and fre- 
quently spent his long vaca- 
tions working there. But he 
deliberately refused the offer 
of various chairs, in order to 
remain at Cambridge. 


He was elected Fellow of 
Corpus Christi College, Cam- 
bridge, in 1964, and three 
years later was appointed 
tutor for advanced students, a 
post thagt he held with much 
distinction until his official 
retirement in 1974.- 
He continued to be active in 
research and teaching, divid- 
ing his time between the 
department of pathology in 
Cambridge and the Rockefel- 
ler University in New York, 
producing original papers 
when he was well into bis 
seventies. 


Nearly all Elliott's research 
was concerned with the anti- 
gens of streptococci. His con- 
tributions in this field added 
considerably to the under- 
standing of the pathogenesis, 
immunity and epidemiology 
of streptococcal infections in 
both man and animals. 


Elliott’s quiet charm, 
friendly attitude and sincere 
modesty endeared him to all 
his associates. He was also a 
talented and sensitive musi- 
cian; though his natural diffi- 
dence precluded other than 
very private performances on 
bis favourite instrument the 
piano. 

He never married. 


RABBI ABRAHAM FEINBERG 


Rabbi Abraham F&nbeig, a 
Jewish leader whose outspo- 
ken criticism of American 
bombing in Vietnam earned 
him considerable obloquy in 
the United States, died at 
Reno. Nevada, cm October 5. 
He was 87. 

He was born on September 
14, 1899, at Bellaire, Ohio, 
and went to the University of 
Cincinnati where he graduat- 
ed in 1920. He spent a period 
as a radio singer in New York 
before entering Hebrew Union 
College, where he was became 
a raboi in 1924. 

For 28 years be was a rabbi 
in Toronto, where he became 
a leading spokesman in pro- 
tests against the Vietnam war. 
In 1967 he, the Rev A. J. 
Muste of America, and Bishop 
Ambrose Reeves, the anti- 
apartheid former Bishop of 
Johannesburg, went to visit 
President Ho Chi Minh in 
Hanoi as delegates of "Volun- 
teers for Peace". 

During their meeting the 


Vietnamese leader made his 
widely publicized invitation 
to President Johnson to visit 
him in Hanoi, to discuss peace 
"without his gun on his hip". 

Returning as the 
prqselytiser for a proposition 
which admittedly seemed a 
trifle vague when subjected to 
searching analysis, Feinberg 
drew on himself the fury of the 
American right, which dubbed 
him "Radical Abe” and “The 
Red Rabbi". 

■ Undaunted, he continued to 
speak out for American with- 
drawal from Vietnam, a ban 
on nuclear testing and a 
variety of cognate issues. 

He was also an active writer 
on social topics, books such as 
Storm the Gates of Jericho and 
Sex and die Pulpit being 
characteristic of his campaign- 
ing styte Latterly he had 
advocated what he called 
“gray liberation": the estab- 
lishment of dinks to teach the 
elderly how to enjoy sexual 
activity. 


In the !970s he was rabbi in 
residence at the progressive, 
protestant Glide Memorial 
Church in San Francisco. 
After the death of his first 
wife, Ruth, in 1 976, be settled 
in Reno as rabbi for the Center 
for Religion and Life at Neva- 
da University. He is survived 
by his second wife, Patricia, 
and a son and daughter of his 
first marriage. 


r *is 

T pfcATI* 

(sMEMi 


IP 




flHWM 

*•'«»■ * 


Among his 
came to 




founder member, in 1968, of 
the Diplomatic Service Orni- 
thological Society, he delight- 
ed on a. visit to Anguilla in 
observing the frigate birds 
and, on an earlier trip to the 
Falktonds. in discovering the 
breeding place of the Mack- 
browed albatross. 

He won the hearts of animal 
lovers by sending Edward, his 
aged boxer-spaniel, and 
T relawny, the family cat. on to 
New Zealand by sea to join 
him there. It was felt that the 
expense - which included pro- 
vision for a daily walk and a 
barof chocolate - was worth it 
“What else can you do for 
someone who has been part of 
your family for 12 years T* 

He married, in 1940, Mar- 
garet Agnes Hiscocks. There 
were two sons of the marriage, 
both of whom followed their 
father in diplomatic careers. 


Mr Edmond F. Kressy, who' 
with bis wife, Maryland, creat- 
ed the Lone Ranger comic 
strip from wireless scripts' in 
1937, died on October 5 at the 
age of 84. 

Born in Cleveland, Ohio, he *. 
worked successively for : the . 
State Department as art direo- 
tor of its magazine Amerika, 
which circulates in the Soviet 
Union; in the art department 
of AP, and in a poster firm. . 

After his retirement in 1973,- 
he illustrated How to Grow 
Your Own Vegetables ; written 
by his son, MichaeL : 


Science report 


Radio reveals a seal’s stamina 


British scientists have suc- 
ceeded in tmekfm grey seals 
underwater in an attempt to find 
out more about the mammaTs 
befaarmnr and feedmg habits. 
Little was known about the 
movement of seals. 


By Gareth How Davies 


One seal was followed for nine 
days daring which time it 
covered 178 auks and spent 40 
hoars underwater, swimming 
dose to the sea bottom as it 
moved to distinct 
points. 

Three seals, tagged on the 
Fame Islands off the Northnm- 
beriand coast in Aagnst were 
found to dive immediately to the 
bottom of the inshore waters, a 
maximum of 65 metres, and 
remain at that depth before 
slowly drifting np- 

They swam dose to the bot- 
tom when moving from one place 
another, remaining sub- 
merged for an average of abort 
four minutes; when the seal was 
resting, the dmation of dries was 


abort eight minutes. The longest 
tone the seals spent andenratcr 
was IZ urinates. 

A research team from the Sea 
Mammal Research Unit, which 
is pan of the Natural Enrinm- 
meat Research Council gfoed a 
JW radio bleeper to a seal's 
Ssead u a preliminary trial to 
determine it the wimwwi amid 
be successfully followed at sea. 
A transmitter was placed on its 
tack to give the team following 

m a boat a mme demited 
““cation of it* morements. 

In tee part an Inexact indfea- 

*“* be® 

obtained by fixfrtg tags on m l 

h,d 

The seal most closely followed 
is» psmmer was first tracked as 
it moved from the Fame Islands 
10 the Isle of May, a distance of 
56 miles la a 20-Hoof bmrt. 
Then, after two days rest, it 
swam from the. Isle of May np 


the Firth of Forth, BBder the 
Forth Bridge, then back out to 
sea again. 

It would go from oae resting 
Place to another, at a speed of 
fear to five knots, then bask or 
rest in the water, take an 
occasional swim, and set wt a 

few days later to another dritioct 
resting place many miles away. 
J? the past it was assumed the 
Faroe Islands seal population 
was mainly static. 

Next year the research team 
wants to find ort if other seals 
are e g tally {ar ranging and; by 
a velocity transducer, 
ascertain the speed the seals are 
making at depth. 

The main object of the re- 
search is to show where the seals 
are feeding, in order toteUwhat 
effect they are having On 
commercial fisheries- -Because 
the seals steadied this year spent 
so much time dose to' tire ‘sea 
bottom, it would appear they are 
feeding there. The scientists 
wart to test this hypothesis; 


B 


f- ‘ •" 
H. 

t" ‘ • 

II J ' • 


Ij.i 


t , nsMt. 




MtiRI \i.J > 


pu i*. 

NT-’- 


p; 


R^).l . i *». 


|Kmt r. .*• .. 

I i, . . ; mi n i 
’ .\i N.I . M .• 

KttU ■ LAWRLNCC . 




A3 1 i.r. 


* 'jf.iii 

i- j i .• 

!*•>«. 

tilUOl 

’"VTi.i.J 

J-.fi V. 

F lONklsr % 

••hii#.;., 

liAi-1 -U 


41 !. 




WHDI\ 

£ N l'lHMWIs 



— .4 


■- i 


mtsm* 

.. Wi* i 


..'i.ii M 
: iTC.JS* 
t iH*»0 


i am mm 

| A 


i ■(.' *4 

CidWfT 


| .41 i|wtf 
.'Lei: riri 


mtNrtrt 


- 4 -M 


HUM TEW ( 


1 

v ii [I, n 

; i( 

l 

;:»•* (At 

a 

■r! lim 

MfltnSK 

I . r;hn l 


sihl Mi 
I *#,»* -VWr-fV 

•.k-cllrp V 
Mkii; 

*• J r WT-» » 
!j:*’ H* 1 
M 1 

LAMNMT 


*v . 


w 


i 

I 

tv-iMlt- In 
vi * Am 

tKItfWt H 
KUi'irttin 
DOW W -fi 
HmW Jtt 
(ftarettioi 
14 BUM - 
ren t -trim* 

MWII t 


Ann And J 
vhliHin’ 

■-(’*'»4V 

kJMMAV i 


M«W h 
I M m*tn 

vrtrl Hfia 
.v t-itmM 
*«i m i 
1! » 

.1 Ws4«SL 

tom tin 

M 

.wnLiwor h 
»j>-l t«i 
tiltriun. I 
i * ir> m 
*•* 

mewl t 

IMViMI* V 

litaih aM> 
iliin 
• VI.ikRMRM 
I ?i 

( llMffh I'. 
I lir 

iiMtiir im 

•...-titi n vr* 

n* i:tiiiu(t 
Mirvl. 

“rill ItM- 
l.i fjjtt, 

MOMTAtUlf 


i r |i. 
. i 

NIXON 

l.'i-.U 


•IJSK* 

Il.»l4- 

•'fill* 
I !-• 
1 -HI 4 
iR'fl 


Nowr 

i tin \ 
Ik-t, 


' 1 . 11 , 


4 ,4 |t 
- >• 4V 
III 

Naim 


v.*\ ■ 


- I'.-.i 

'1 -llt»v 


i 4-Stl. 

">.1 lall„ . 




«V 

i>!ri , 
r,: 

.4 

;; ■ m 

- *ii.ii' 


" -i (•. 

'»-• 


■*n» 

*’*< 


"•■Cbit. ,, 

' •'*- ■ -u , 


■‘"t- ...,i 

• ■•»! I!..,.. 

: —.1 


« 1(44, 


• ««»> .1. 


, tl .4 




th , 






***** „ 


I " litO ; 









births, marriages, 

A ivt^ deaths 
and in memoriam 



THE TIMES WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 8 1986 


19 


PERSONAL COLUMNS 


!v * 1 . 


"••h. 


BAftfiCR 


LJ'Wo Win2a°5!2fC 31 

Rwuuc 1 N& rL M . ar * » HOSiKtaL lo 
^^rtT^hSSL 1 ', “M Marlin, a 
Jdm» uraa wtti UU»\. a aster for 




•ti! 


•tj. 

' ;n Hu ^ 

J r ; r, {u , c 

!fi, , *' 


"n. 'inland ™ » The 

v ssSSfmSSyiE*' 


V ®UU«C»U||D 


K 










41 'l L . 

p.., 




^ Theodora Mercy 

Amanaa iiiee n 2 n Da0I>er 7 Ui. to 

OueoiT?^^" Z 61 h at 

SUa »>- to 

iSKJSiSfUj. 0n October 

, sjs* « ■asar'Bs 

'SSw 1 !^ "Jl?“ Octobor 1986 . to 

assStt** * 

M ^rv?H 0 2|I|lf P, |22 er 2aui - ** a - 

ana m^pR, »*“'»««■ » W- 

aSy«J« "■Sw?” 1 ‘ 

R^ R r k ®"^ VJ u s ^tember al the 
•»»r nSrP ( HovwiaJ. a ebmgii- 

Zo<? »«v a MMer for Theodore and 

C Sa 8 ® A^SSf^i . 10 QlriS - 

rtauflhiw So£ 5 . h /JL a,w BwseU « 

. ^fwSK. C,M,,B * U « k » 

;;^:otSHs 

■ s, c £^“« 

■‘v.» ,. „ *- S,h5^ ° n ^^ Sepiwnber. to 

’-■■ -«;? jsStS 5 w— “ 

: 

• '**■■-». ct.i?e! S*"- IO Pnurooa (nee 

. s ; ^ "’-"t it.. Annabel Guv - a dau » h * r - 

, ; .*■ tl ■ o-n;' *™" H? l "®S 1 , « nn < r 23 tf>- lo Anne 
■■ -r •, ‘ nPe Balllnea lit and Bernard a 

Mrten ££ BemanL ■ 
'. It p" 7 m October, al toe Rosie 

•■-‘i’”. gfi.. wvlit " * t° Belinda into 

- ‘ «'*a / lor ^phfe &lm ° a a ««■ A broU “ r 

’ “ 1 " : «“! b "MSi* - ° n 17lh September 1986 . j 

.;, v , ^L Lj I? a inw Jordanj and Alec, a I 
. * '-'‘-'JSiL- Alasfair James. 

■'■■■ • - I'ltJMD , "JIS ,E * i Y, 0n Zaih September, al St 1 
- g™*rt Hoamuj. lo Catherine (nee 
-i Jones i and Paul, a daughter. 

• * P.t ' 1 th» _ Ch anoiie Damele. 

' ; . ,. n - ... M I!T? HELL ? n ^ Sewembo-. to 

. , ' l^aror. inw tJfcKsom and Charles, al 

• .Me.,. Hjalhen»-ood Asctrt. a son. Thomas 
f, { tl Charles 

J.'WTCIHELL On Monday September 
i ••* > * ? *»in. al Healherwood. Ascot to ka- 
V? ,nw Dickson) and Charles, a son. 
Thomas Charles. 

tt >? MDULE On October «h. to Kale wee ] 
ic. Rt»harnsoni and Colin, a daughter.: 

■ Rmerra. 


K.t 


h...; 


40 EL-SM 1 TH On September 26 lh ai 
, MH. Berlin, lo EUjabeto Mary rnee 
Ha'isnawei and Michael, a son. Wit- 
luni Leopold. 

*ATERSON - On the 6 (h October, at 
ih>- Countess of Chester HospHaL lo 
R.»e and Owen, a son. 

KGAK On the 15 th September 1906 . 
.t.“-j. ai SI Peter's HospIlaL Chertsey. to 


F ****KS on Saturday 4 ttr October. 

ft"" * , - a ® w “ ■ l»«cned mother of 
i nci nrta and Miranda and vnimmir 
«« 9 htcr of S*r toSd’S o^fL 
H “ n ^Serricesof Thante- 
fagL^* CWumba's. Pont SL 
London SWi on Friday lOrh Orlober 

i' f 2 And at Greyfrianr cmnth. 

Edinburgh On Tuesday lath October 
*‘ 2n ®on. No flowers but donatloo* 
L“ Cancer Research depart- 
, mem. Channo Cross Hosniat 
^ 2 °" «W«»rtes vT& 

m ntlham Palace Rd. Te! 

- On 6 th October peacefully 
M Rhentene, Warwicks Bench. 
CuUdfora. Helene Oorts aged 92 
years, widow of the tale Colonel Guy 
Westland Geddes OSO- QBE. Dl_ 
Much loved mother of Tom and the 
tote Guy Geddes and grandmother of 
Sean. Pandora. Simon. Melissa. 
Sophie, william and Alexander. Fu- 
neral Si Wnrs Church. Guildford 

5 S?V 4U ’ ° cu ** r « 2-00 pm. 
Family Dowers only to Plmms Fu- 
neral Services. GoUdford. 

MQBAU. . On 27 th September, sud- 
denly. Arthur r rands Yeomans, of 
•La Provtdencta* Hereford. Argenti- 
na. Devoted husband of Mary and 
father of Edward. Virginia. Char- 
tone. James and Atom. 

®U*«EY ■ On October 6 th. peacefully, 
in hospttaL Vivien of Costers Mill w 
Lavington, MhttiwsL W Sussex. 
Dear wtfe of Donald, beloved mother 
of Nicola. Jaime and Sara. Funeral 
Service 12 noon Friday I Oth October 
at St Mary's Church. W Lavlngion 
followed by private enroatton. Fam- 
ily flowers only please. 

HICKSON . On 4 th October. Vera fnfe 

Uncotnj. Funeral Service at Poole 
Crematorium at Spin. Friday tom 
October 

nOWWM On October 3 . of Cosfbrlh. 
wuiiam. near husband of Sheila and 
rather of Prter and Andrew. Service 
« SI. George's Church, Jesmond. 
Jtewrasd*- upon Tyne, on Thursday 
Orlober 9 th at 2 . IS pm Cremation 
follows at Sanveea Crematorium at 
3 pm. Friends, please med at rhurrb 
lor service. 

HOBSON ■ ooAth October, peacefully. 
Rose, beloved wife of Christopher 
and dearly toned mother of Mary 
Anne. Rupert. Caroline and Lixy. 

Funeral at Ad Sainte Haiuiington. on 
Friday xotb October at U am. No 
flowers but donations if desired to 
Wessex Cancer Trust. Royal South 
Hants. Hospital. Southampton. 
HOLLIS - On Monday October 6 th. 
Suddenly in HospttaL Hugh aged 76 . 
Dearly loved and greatly mourned 
by his wife Muriel, and sons. Michael 
and Richard, and their families. Fu- 
neral at- SL Andrew's Charm 
Chedwonh. on Thursday October 
9 th at 2 - 30 pm_ followed by private 
cremation. Famity dowers only 

HUNTER - On I 4 di September 1 986 ^t 
Colossi. Cyprus. J.Grag Hunter 
M-B.Ch-B.. formerly of Thebraes 
Turriff Memorial Service In St. 
Congan'S Church. Turriff, on Friday 
10 th October at 2 pm. Enoutries to 
Stewart A Watson Solicitors. Turriff. 
Tet Turriff ( 0888 ) 65 T 73 . 

M 0 USON ■ On 4 tb of October 1986 in 
London. Gwendoline ingteson aged 
90 . widow of Philip Ingleson CJMLC. 
MJJ.EM.C_ tale Sudan CKO Service. 
Dear mother of Joan and grandmoth- 
er of Philip. Robin and John. 
Service. West London Crematorium. 
NWXO Monday 13 U 1 October 
3 . 45 pm. No flowers please but dona- 
tions to SL Mary Abbots Hospital 

we. 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


HRH PRINCESS 
MICHAEL OF KENT 

WUI be stoning copies of her book 

•CROWNED IN A FAR 
COUNTRY’ 

fWridenfeid & Nieobon. £ 1256 ) 
at Hatcbants 
187 PicvadtOy Wl 

on Thursday 9 Ocibber 
1130 - I JO pm 

Stored routes gui be res e rved on 

01-439 9921 

for conecttou after 26 October. 


YOUR WILL 


rou are nwing your wtd rmv 
u>Mh of BJXSMA. we rare for an ex 
i wwr m and womra who have Hal 
!«*• n itai> tmhv of IMi raunlrv 

Lwiu*r«-v to ihp cnamnut. Bnush 
Unuurv. u Srrvlce Men's Ai 
«w. «./« MWbuM twiu. pic. to tin t 
SnMJdarto. London. BCtA WX. 


cootcr tw KING. HARAH COOKE nrr 
king. Widow. WM>of seeaeiaauon Rood 
iWliTNari. Lmtc. him M CMnwarg 
1 Asm 1900 

iC-aue about CAI.OOOl 
riMHSV RNE. HAROLD nSHBURNC. lair 
<*' t r-munon Cottapn. Wear Nrwlon. 
?wndmM|lun):«>ortoa.. <nrd three on 2LU 
Uiiturv IWi\ 

. 1C«UTMM C37jOOO> 

csnrriTHN. brynmoh Griffiths, utr- 
d 9 Wmijury Bungalows. Wmtbury 
Mrrrr. UmA. Ovfrfl. OM •> Camuitlmi 
on SOU) IriMuary >986 

■UUr anoul Cl 0.000 1 
HAMMUND. PKIUP JOHN HAMMOND. 
Ldr 04 18 Brrwrr SUrrl. LaaArrtuirvL 
krg. mfUi U Prn nu Tv. Knuon 19m Nr 

llltllF nHAU CAAftmi 

HOLMAN nrr MrLAliCJ IN ONTK 
MIXLANSV HOLMAN. 

Mi LAV CHUN. Widow, lair of T CUT 
Plarr. Cum aa. Caidtff. GLumrean. died 
Ihrrr on or shorn s&Hli Mnrrn 1990 - 

of it Duoter Owl. Dunoar Ootr. LHUr 
Mdioa. fcotdh Wirrai. CbrsMre. ok* 
(Shrslrr on 29U» D«rmbrr 1904 

»Esiak* aw si9.dooi 

NQRTHCOTT nor PONDED. LOTTY 
SJSISiSII Whr rwhr LOTTIE 
NORTHCOTT nor PONQCR. Widow. (Mr 
of Lttxrolt. 31« London Road. 
WotJiMMum. BrrMMrr. dm In 
Grewutornr. BnMun on aw> Fiemay 

lEilalri abnui ClfiDCKh 
nor CUM8IX ELIZABETH AUCt 
6MTTM nrrOMBLE.tRMtnlrr. lalrof FIU 
Sd Lodw. Uui ion »mL Utepnry. 
London LI. died Ihrrr on 3rd FrOruary 
1985 

tfEZfclUC aMuf MnOQi 

riw. km « mr aOovo namrd orr niordra 
lo jpotv to I nr Treasury Softriw iB.u.i. 
Oumt Anim-N Chamfam. SB Broadway. 
Loudon SWIM 9JU. UsIHw wlurii Ihr 
Tinawv bolirMor may lalm um lo ad 
mmurrjhr rOalr. 


QBOBC PauMTramlus I am anxious m 
homari irflow suhrrrr Ol 031 691 B 
daylinm 


A- 


Ra>.hci mee Sick) and Marlin. 

- .uuqhicr. EJnsa Naomi. 

»• i tICH ardson ' On. October 4 th. at 
Ourun Chari one's Hospital lo Janine 
'nnr m^e Spencer) and Derek 
-i • 4 '' >ijick>. a son. Thomas SamueL 
.... ...eiGEL On October SUl to Wendy 
..... 'hwCrumbariand Michael, a dau£t- 
ter. Emma Katharine. 


r-.- 7 _-i.Li. 

• y ? ■ 


MARRIAGES 


, r LANCEdSUNN The marriage took 
"" n i'K„r on September 29 Ui at Holy 
• ',■ * i i •; / 1 ii hi v Church- Plttoctuy. Pertshlre. 
„ mi mi John Alexander Gtance. eldest 
•moi of Mr and Mrs A_J. dance, of 
-- : I. -l« Hx'iTards Cross, and Miss Margo 
, .. .. i •■inn. only daughter, of Mr. and Mrs 
• ; 1 1 • i Gunn, of Doncaster 

•>j‘ ’^r WB . SARCANT ■ On October 2 . 
nucilv in Wandsworth. Ian Talbot 
I nuts to Susan Lydta Sargant. 

EARSON-ROSEM : LAWRENCE On 

thiuhrr 3 rd 1986 . at North 
. w ..'sham. Norfolk. Croup Captain 
Hmrv William Pearson 4 togers. lo 
vtis Fra nr «-4 Mary Lawrence 
IEFFER - GARUCK On October 4 lh 
■»86 ai Richmond. Surrey. Derek 
ounqer son of Mr and Mrs ATS 
■ti riicr of Corb ridge, Northumber 
ii«t lo JaneL daughter of Mrs E 
Lit lick and the late Stanley Garilck 
i Putney. London SW 15 . 


GOLDEN 

anniversaries 

LRDERfffUfiHES On October 8 th 
in Buenos Aires. John to Syi- 
i.i Now In Wellington. Ox on. 


DEATHS 


U.AMY On October 6 th. peaceful- 
al Ashburton Hospital, after a 
norl illness. Nora aged 92 yean, of 
•jr -jiburton Devon. Widow of George. 

* . \mo mother of Jack. Dick and Ml- 

* i||i met. and dearest granny of Ann. 

* nlip Peter. Richard. Marlon. 

t irtstopher. Nicholas and their ram- 
i'* Funeral Service al SI. Andrews 
lurch. Ashburton, on Thursday 
h Orlober al 2 pm. Family flowers 
in. donations if desired to. the 
5 PCC. C/o Webber & Christo- 
,pis. 26 St Lawrence Lane. 
Jiburton 

1 SEY On October 3 rd 1986 . Rum 
v- Dixon I Dearly loved wife of the 
Group Captain John Bussey. 
R £.. molher of JacguHine. moUw- 
— MW of Dai Id. and Kaigran of 
uin and Sue At her request no 
piiw. bill donations Hi lieu 
rtudleiah salierton and District 
.sT-ware c/o the Health Centre, 
i l]si::'dleign Salierton.. Devon. 

' fi ’ 1 t-tex Denis. Actor and Director. 
. . {‘"Jd'niv. on September 28 th. aged 

y'.ii ::K *“ Beloved h ‘ wb ^-SL 2 !i 2 n, GiSj 1 ' 

■ ■ - , ... Cdnire al Gotdere careen 

• a . hi «-nMioriu m on Friday 20 October 
5 1 \ I'-w am No flowers mease. 


i 


£C£MAN On October 5 th 1986 . 
ifieniv but peacefulli’ al home, 
fterirk Thomas, much loved hw- 
,u oi Elsie Funeral Service at 
rininq Crematorium on Friday 
..her IOih al g. 15 pm. Family 
vers only Please, bul donaho^to 
Barnabas Hmne^ «re of CHIllsKm* 
n-ral Service. 191 South Farm 
at. Worthing 

mOTS On OdOlKT «h. sudden- 
on Holiday. Jeffrey woodward, 
rt 54 of Ciorkhouse Lane, 
nilej ■ surrn^anil tormajr Sin- 
.,re Adored husband « 
otuurv and wonderful lalherof 
..< jrarv and Simon. A very SPe- 
pvi^on Private cremabon 

Hfi On October 3 rd 1986 pw«- 
. m hospital. James Cowan MLA. 
,„i in he SJih year R. 1 P Dear 
M im « ihe late Ellrabrth Mary 
4 i. loied and honoured by his 
iH and b )' many fnentb in many 
" including Wadham OoDege. 
school. -INST- amt Queue 

^” 5 3 ? 6 S 

rtKce 0734 790677 

MjzA - O" Orlober 4th 2986. 
Tiufty and suddenly al home. 

.Music uin i aoed 73 V*®®' ^ 
■A hirJaind of Vi. talhcr rf Bbttv 
V voiino. grand fa Iher of Danielle 
totrlte 

S- On Oft J "K? 

urui 5 rrampiw Court- Ojj' 
pure. London wa. 
al Morilalte Orrmaimi- 

we* n 0 M 
/...Vrt II desired to cancer 

.irrh 

IS&ON o« OriPOer Tth 1986 al 
hiteHoiise NurMfHi Home. OJd 

■ • jnrd 83 years, formerly of 
-.ion lodge, w'lmbtedon wht- 

i'T^ late Sir LO^Fem«on 

0 , beloved mother 
Funeral win ai Mlnttyn 
■uonum Kinds Lynn on Mon- 
fWuSr I 3 (h at 12 "«!" 

■retHW^WEriCWW.Womnj 

p^rf] or 26 Stathin R^d. 
,am Nortolk Mcmonai Ser 

. hi be hi*W m Lowdon - 11 a 

announced lalcr 


On 6 th October, peaceful, 
ty. in Addenbraokes HospitaL 
Cambridge, after a abort illness Dr. 
Kenneth Charles of Glrton. aged 76 
beloved husband of Daphne and 
dearly loved parent of Michael. Pat- 
rick. Jante and Jason. Funeral 
Service at Glrton Parish Church, on 
October 10 th al Hajtl Followed by 
private cremation, no flowera. Dona- 
tions to toe Hospice Arthur Rank 
House. MU Rd. Cambridge, or at 
church collection. 

LE BLANC - UHTH - On October 6 th. 
peacefully id hospttaL Peggy 
Blanche, beloved wife of the tate 
Thomas Eric and mother of Wlfltam. 
Ann and Timothy. Private cremation 
on Friday October KMh. Ibliowed by 
Service of Thanksgtihug 2 A 6 pan. at 
Preston Church. No. (lowers pteRse- 
JJMKEAY - On September 30 t»» 1906 . 
suddenly at home tn Gooden 
Morden. Janet Elizabeth (Me BARK- 
. ERL beloved wife of Grahun. and 
sister of Patricia (MooraL Cremation 
al Enfield Crematorium. North Lon- 
don. on Friday 10 th October at 
1 1 . 30 am. Family flowers. Donations 
if desired, to toe Salvation Array. 
LOWE • On October 6 th at Lincoln. 
Philip beloved husband of Elizabeth, 
and dear father of Catherine and Ed- 
ward. Funeral. SL Faith's Church 
Lincoln. Friday October IOih at 
11 . 16 . No flowers, but donations to 
SL Faith's or Cancer nuu nb. 
McBME - On October 4 Ui 1986 . al 
Perabore Cottage HospUaL Christine 
Edith- SRN. RSCN-. SCM_ after a 
brave struggle against Illness, fondly 
remembered by tamfly and friends. 
Funeral Service at Holy Trinity 
Church. Ecklngton. at u.lSam on 
Friday October IOih. followed by 
private burial at Coventry. Dona- 
tions If wished. In Jteu of flowers, to 
St. RtctwnTs Hospice at home. 9 Cas- 
tle Street Worcester. Enquiries to 
Perks Bros Ltd. Efcktogum. Wore*. 
Tel: 0386 7 SQ 227 . 

MONTAGUE - On October 3 rd. Leslie 
Clarence, suddenly, beloved husband 
of Margaret 

MXON - On October 6 th. at home. 

Rear Admiral Harry Desmond CJ 5 .. 

, L.V.O.. D.L. Beloved husband of 
June and father of Sarah. Mike, and 
Kate. Funeral Service al Box Parish 
Churrh on Friday October 10 th a' 
1 . 15 pm. No (towers please. Dona- 
tions Jor Box Parish Church, c/o H. 
Menett Funeral Director*. 57 a Pick- 
wick Rd. Oonbam. Wilts 
NORTH -On October 3 rd 1986 . peace- 
fully. after a Jong ntness. Elisabeth 
Bowden of Hove. Beloved wtfe of 
Freddie. Funeral Service at The 
Downs crematorium. Brighton on 
Monday October LSth at 230 pm. 
Flowers to Attree & Kent Ltd.. 108 
Church Road. Hove. Donation* If de- 
sired to Asthma Research Council. 
300 Upper Street. London N 1 2 XXL 
PARKINSON on October 7 m peaceful- 
ly to her sleep at home after a long 
Illness Joan Helen Mary In her 68 th 
year Cherished wife of Bruce, be- 
loved mother of Vivienne and 
Maxine and dear grandmother Of 
PauL Claire and Stephen. She win be 
sadly missed by an who have known 
her- Funeral al SL Pern Church. St 
Mary Bourne on Friday 10 th Octo- 
ber at 3 . 00 pm followed, by private 
cremation. Family flowers only 
please bul donadoret. if desired, to 
Cancer Research. C/O camp Hopson 
Funeral Directors. Newbifly. Berks. 
PEDUX ■ On 6 Ui October 1986 . at Ms 
home in Cunmor Hill. Oxfordshire. 
Cyril Roy Campbell, aged 64 . 

ntEmONAST - an 6 th October 
1986 . peacefully, at home after a 
short illness, bravely borne Brigadier 
Guy Lenox. -much loved husband 
and father fortified with the Rites of 
Hoty Church. RIP. No flowers bul 
donations. If desired, to Cancer Relief 
(Scottish Office) BMA House. 7 
Drumsheugh Gardens. Edinburgh or 
Calibre Library. Talking Books tor 
ihe Blind. Aylesbury. Bucks HP 20 
1 HL 

RAY On October 3 rd 1986 . peaceful- 
ly. after a short lUnesa. Barbara 
beloved wtfe of Charles Richard and 
mother of the late Colin and or 
Jeremy She will be greatly mwed 
by so many. Funeral Service at 
■John's. Shirley church Road, air 
ley. 2 pm. On Friday October 10 th. 
Family (towers only. Donations may 
be sent to Ihe Chest Heart and 
Stroke Association. Tavistock House 
Nwih. Tavistock Souart. London 
WCl 

HOD Adrian, the writer. On OtioOer 
4 th 2986 . M lwmc.-aged 64 .- after a 
long illness. Adored * 

Elisabeth Winkler, loving and loved 
father of Jessica. Sarah- Lotose.and 
Maude Also stepfather to Julian. 
Jamte and Peter Rankin. A very spe- 
cial man- We will miss you very 
much and love 

bon ai Barn. IOih Ociobet; 1986 at 
11.20 a-m 

bormsON Suddenly, on September 
28 tn in Spain. Gerry aged 6 ® years. 
Manne Ootoglst of Modbury. Oevra- 
Funeral arran^nenBroniac 1 Earl 
Of PUThOUtn 0752 562624 . 

SMITH Bi?aLrlce fPisic) on Friday Oc 

tober 3 rd. S 

iho nark Ashtead. Beloved friend Of 

SSf’BSyS; 

dearest Aunt of Ron and Maty ™ 
son and MarioneHedgCT FUiwtow’ 
Thursday Ociober 91 h at lI- 3 oaJ>J. 
ai ^Randatb Crematorium. 

Leaiherhcad. Surftt' Ftowm to 
Randtob Crematorium 

SWANN On Ortobcr 3 rd t^sain Hos 
pH at Robert Swiimey. y d 7 0 
Cremaliou at Pulnev vote. Thursday 
§h Ortobrr ut i 30 pn> No ftowm 
to rein test, but don-tuons if deured. 

lo Caiwn Resrarrn 


MTEBMATI0NAI1.T RENOWNED inrtr- 
DmOrtil nvwrti <-uaM9tnnmL nun 
in rviour md heaiiui Unrr i960, are 
now btaWmg up a standing rducattonat 
cstubiiion on <-Mow. hoatoi and InhL 
S*H roMarl WUi iriMs wm rouM 
nMkp.wajih avoUMMe K> dpsHop and 
maintain lint umoue foandailon. De- 
laiK. Mrnhuir 043 383 2ISQ/2103. 
Wire pm*, ran arumr u murti. 
with tun .i Wlk- hrfp from tn 1 Pin* 
suppon RptHOUMMion & Mrdtnd Rp. 
VWIN b»l Willi your donMKM! or 
J*|wv PO Box 10 Radii one. Bath BAS 

W* UVEA For Lnrb CNd Promt- 
ran be provided by your wiu. Piranr 

mrtudn m beouea I lor Ttv Nauonal Bc- 
nriotmi Fund * Or Inr AM. N*w Broad 
sum Home. 36 New Broad SUM. Lon- 
don LC3M 1MH. 

HAWKES. The Hawkcs rwnQy. are 
deeply grateful for an the wonderful 
teftere they have received, fallowing 
“ft's sad death, on September 27 th 
new CANconrnn. Drsrtopm. £»». 
port non animal muiaerti SAE Xmas 
f^rd O iahm n r Q wN for a tiWfor Can 
err. Woodbury. Marlow Road. Woydo n. 
LWV CM19 5TJ 1027979 mk 

1 LM FROM WffUItt wlHr lattom. 
Kkwte roman MiWh wno . you re. 
MaMuf Reply Box B80 


BIRTHDAYS 


RATS KMLOCK U M lay. Out brlwrrn 
gw wen. Love and rangraiwaiions 
Charlie 

I TONY Beal wMu« and aa our love on 
vow ;id birthday Love from Mum. 
Dad. Tracey and.Come. 


SERVICES 


I MMJC SPCMfWB CMOMW 3 Speech 
wntina bv award wtmgng pnbdc Speak- 
er 01 431 2292 

I FMEMBMHP, Lose or Mamaoe All ages. 
*W DalcHne. ENfM iQlblU AUnqdon 
Road. London WB. Ti* 01936 toil 

| mmER MU. CW Wren's stories. Mali 
5 *? ■•sRdahce. Free imoklct: 

‘ ST ’ 8/9 Br ** ey SQ - 

|MDni MTMMMICTIOm. Send SJUE. Id 
Beaurnanip PI. SW 3. 01 26 T 6006 . Ev 
w w wre OJ 604 4142 . Hlgn succee 
rale Men 4665 In areal demand. 

[ C AL IBRE Cir* Ltd professional rumen- 
him \llae documents. DeutN: 01-631 
35 B 8 

I BUUHUARE a ADVICE Bureau Katharine 
Alien irti lomgo Diner) personal Inter- 
views-TScpIey PL Wl. 01 499 2566 . 

4 t v not P BC m CTHM t A wire 
Irer serumy aystein (Wed m 1 hour 01 - 
736 2233 . 

MUSICAL 

INSTRUMENTS I 


I V nrlgfit Plano. Beautiful. Reran* 
dll«onea. Revirun* Rich tone Cl . 200 . 
Tef.OT 969 7216 


I Grand Plano. 1926 Very 
good riaudllMti Cl. 750 o.ivo. Tel: 01 
W« o3o8 


Broadwood L'prtght 
~BurUnaiuni- Aa new Lndrr puam- 
In- Mshounr lUUjh C1AOO- Tel. 
OvvhoU 2874 

EAVESTArp.LprloM piano. Recenfly re- 
rood. irr\ good rundmon. Cl. COO. Ot- 
444 2155 

RMU- lm pmiy (maid wateut uprtohl 
piano Excel lent playing order. 1 lined 
CM3. Mini Condition. 01463 0>4& 


LEGAL SERVICES 


c ^ fKT ^E""r hv '; u * < *s i ,,ru 

vino * VAf and Standard 
drtouwmrnh. ring 0344 JIMN 

II* VNM MATTERS | hcudronifjta^ 
£17 Hohtioal*. lif, uSStdiA W6 


OVERSEAS TRAVEL 


OVERSEAS TRAVEL 


FOR SALE 


ITS ALL AT 
TRAILFINDERS 

Worldwide low-cost nights 
The best - and we on prove ti 
190 . 000 -Clients store 1970 
CURRENT BEST BUT'S 
Around the World from £781 
SYDNEY 
PERTH 


UW* Cod rare* to l JkA Major 7 ra\W 
Of d*s 9257 I \TA 


MALAGA. CANARM*. 01 

lltflflMTte -UMd >\HM 


SAVE A PILE 

al 

RESIST A CARPETS 

Melalalm idiri plr rarpriuiu 14 puui 
retnuT« Hull m taWnUy jy onae I ram 
uwfc 7 ia WPJ, mu.Jnh^fo. homrey 
■Mae U 73 an vavd CoriaidM *„k 
1*^ hdllaa) ?7E « 973 enfv Bed arm- 
atn-bneCMUSpn Und. Perten imfc. 
Phn Ihe Urar-l wtntWi of ptun , arprlMq 
w 1 notion Ait pram ruriawie of im 
IN? I apn RJrtHnood Road 
landau MW14 

Tct 01-876 2089 

I fee 1 UltuMni Expert rmatg 


AUCKLAND 
BANGKOK 
SINOAPORE 
HONG KONG 
DELHI/ 
BOMBAY 
WASHINGTON 


•SAY rr WITH MUSIC 
SAY IT WITH 

marksons 

and rkwv Irani hoadredv M uprlQM 
and wand punos lor -mle or Mre from 
oohr tin pm 

MARKSON PIANOS 

Atone SI. NWI 
Ol 935 SM2 
Artlllrrv Ptarr. SCIB 
01 854 4 fii 7 


COLOMBO 
NAIROBI 
JOTJURG 
LIMA 
GENEVA 
ISTANBUL 
NEW YORK 
LOS ANGELES 
BAUTMORE 

TRAILFINDERS 

42-48 Earls Court Road 
London WB 6 EJ 
OPEN 9 -B MON 4 T 7 I 06 SAT 
Long-Haul 01-937 9631 
and 01-603 1510 
Europe/USA 01-937 5400 
lSl/Buslnm 01-938 3444 
GcnrmHW-nl UrrmeO/BdlMrd 
l*n 1AT4 ArOL/|4£8 


*ALL FLIGHTS BONDCO* 
**sAVECi Cs r*** 

* *T0L'RIST CLASS 1 *"* 
-•wCLIB CLASS** 

♦ tr 1 ST CLASS** 
WPARCXNO THE** 
WORLD FARES** 


MCMOCeO BOUND. Beam! SI. Wl 
01 734 3307 AST-V/AM 


s. «™c* rioni Ol 5B4 7371 

VBT V 




*^nra^ A?5 eduw mof* 01724 


PERSIAN 
CARPETS 

I I 3 uvn sm and 2 iZvan wm Hjph 

otMitlv. Tatow VirytraaonaMeprire 

Rmale K> pfiitnie 

Td 01-602 8004 
anytime 


* SYDNEY 

* 

ft 

MELBOURNE 6 

> P£8TH 

ft- 

ft 

BRtSBAEC * 

• Hoswr 

* 


ADELAIDE * 

• JOBHRG 

♦ 

ft 

S AfFOCA * 

• AUCKLAND 

dr 

* 

WfUINGTDH * 

• FUI 

* 

* 

PT MORESBY * 

* eungkok 

♦ 

ft 

TOKYO * 

* SINGAPORE 


ft 


* DUBAI 

* 

ft 

BAHRAIN 6 

• IND EAST 

-ft- 

ft 

ruaua * 

* LUSAKA 

* 

* 

HARARE * 

* TORONTO 

ft- 

ft 

VANCOUVER 6 

* L ANGELES 

ft- 

ft 

MIAMI * 

* CM8KAN 

ft 

* 

S fRANCtSCO * 


TthOSlA. For vout hnhda»' where n> dm 
vimimer Call far our morhare mn%- Tu 
nnun Travel botnu. oi 573 4aii 

* u ; em m Lowed (are, on ITU__ 

** heduted nmm 01-384 7371 AST A 
TAORMINA CM3LY *Snan a Friendly— 

Prwumisliom Cl 71 CIBO.B&B. Hotels 

•Tohh Or Brwm Iron C21**C?70 ikbi 
t nupiK worn (uHv l pd CatwKh oay 

Ibom, iTue/Thur/Suni tr a ilers 4 mr 
notliur, 0(1 depamur^ ISLAND SL N 
01 222 7432 ARTA/ATOL 

°** tAUL foriome of Ihe best m, _. 
nioniv dMtments. mm and r M rure 
I" 0J O3O 5O0a MwAnur 

Out 832 2000 Ah- Travel AdVMarv 
Bureau. 

to***. Grte*. islands. Alparve. Me 
■mrra Villas, apts. pemtons. catemav 
Houmm/IMlWs brae bum/ instani 
hooLmuv venlura Hohdayt. Td OAl 
•U4 S OAS 


Shrraien dyle duMnp lunMiar 
1 U> order Over SO dtnuxi mim 


m Mllrtol. near Henley on Thames 
041115; BournemouUi 102021 
293MO. ToWum. Devon 10392871 
7443 . BHlrlnr. Oov < 0433 1 810952 . 

FINEST duality wool rarpets. Al irede 
Prirev and under, aho avallaMr 10t7s 
extra. Lame room tire rrmnanb under 

4 M SSSSf Pnrl * ° >anr ” V Caa * rt * °» 


SOUTH AMERICA 
* USA * USA * USA *U5A * 
SlMWOTLO TRAVEL 
I EsO 1909] 

58 SoP b Si. Fomw Saw 
NO 777] 77538.3530 ^7101 
&3 IS. 7402/26097 


discounted fares 


GENERAL 


JotHirg/Har 

Nngte 

£300 

return 

£490 

Nairobi 

£275 

£590 

Cairo 

£150 

£230 

L*gos 

£240 

£360 

DH/Bom 

£250 

£350 

Bdnqkot. 

£220 

£350 

DauaAi 


£420 


Beu i level, for all sohf. 
out eveoK Our rUemm lorlude mo« 
■naior ronwiiin Creoll rmrd* arneph u 
Ol 828 lo7B. 

TICKET* FOR ANY EVENT, Cats. SUr- 
to<M Cvp. Chen. u> Mis. AH Ihealre 
and saoru. 

Tel 821001 0/8280496. 
a Ex / visa / Outers 

THE TUNS I7SS-1MS. Other mm 
avaU. Hand bound ready (or pmenla- 
non also -Sundays" 02.30. 
Remember When 01-688 6323. 

BOUARD TABLE'S. OM polhhed rnahoo 
any. railed leg’s, ail ass. Also icr x 6' 
TeiOt 940 >162 

C4T*. cmi , Ln ME An tneMre 

'WHl Tel 439 1763. All mMor rrxxHl 


CHAMFAent lO rasn Joseph Perrfae 
Cuter Roy ale Bnd N.v pored France 
CM per cue 070132 719 


Afro Aslan Travel Ud 
162/168 Rrpenl SI. Wt 
TEL. 01 437 8256/6/7/fl 
Lair 6 Crone Boot. mas Welcome 

AME S /VIS A/DI NiRS 


WEEKEND or Weeks. Honeymoons 
2nd Hone, moon, Onraver the Mm 
pi IMlVx rmnanlir ones In Autumn or 
Winter Call Ol 749 7449 lor your 
reix rotour nroetuin. Maw of Italy 


TAKE TIME OFF lo Pant. Amsterdam. 
Bnmets. Bunn. Geneva. Berne. LAu 
vanne. The Hague. Dublin. Rouen. 
Boutoone & Dieppe. Time Off 2 a. Qv-t 
w Cl ove. London SH IX 780 Ol 233 
6070 


SELF CATERING 
BALEARICS 


DISCOUNT 

FUGHTS 


fcydnry 

O/W 

Rln 

£420 

£764 

A ur Stand 

£420 

£775 

Lov AngHm 

£178 

£340 

Jolting 

£346 

£485 

Bangkok 

£220 

£360 

Rio 

£282 

£504 


MENORCA Hobdays depanlng 
Fi idav /Saturday every week. On from 
020 THOI 300 7070 & 0622 677 D 71 
Cell it Hobdays. Aid 1772 . 


-ANTIQUES' ft 
COLLECTABLES 


JEWELLERY TO SELL? 

Long established family lewdiere wub 
lo purchase sreemd hand iewrdiy and 
anitoue carrtd* docks vo add n our 
varied and toternUng raUecuon. 

Write or rail in conOd«K« to:- 

Ann our- Winston Lid, 

43. Burhngton Arcade. 

London Wt 
Tel: ot 493 8937 . 


LONDON ruCKT CENTRE. 

01-370 6332 


LOWEST FARES 

Pam C69 N YORK £276 

rrankfun £60 LA/S F CMS 

Lagm C320 Mlm £320 

Nairobi CHS Slnpapeee £420 

JOharp £460 Bangkok £333 

Cara C206 Katmandu £440 

DN/Bom C33B Rangoon £360 

Hong Kong CBIO Calculi* £425 

Huge Dhrounh Avail on IM fk Aw Oats 

SUN ft SAND 

21 Swaitow SL London Wl 
OI 439 2100/437 06*7 


NEW LOW FARES 
WORLDWIDE 


SELF CATERING 
CARIBBEAN 


l-LSA_ specially rrdaird farm 
vrneduled .fits. M.T O! 560 
9872/9731 


SELF CATERING 
CANARY A MADEIRA 


Lanzai-Mr. Puerto 
Carmen. Mgb standard ants wMh pool 
available from 30 / 10 . Tenerife 28/10 
iVOdawvt vs/C prices Iretn £ 249 . 10923 ) 
778344 Timsway HoUdaya. ABTA 
ATOL 1107 


AMMAN 

£260 



BOMBAY 

css 

LAQQS 


CAIRO 

£210 

umm 

£283 

COM 

FRAFURT 

£3*5 

£65 

ROME 

SEOUL 

£M5 

£805 

EMG KONG 

£495 

SYD/MEL 

TOKYO 


ISTANBUL 

080 

£S80 


SELF CATERING 
GREECE 


CASH IN ON 
HIGH PRICES 

by stung your 
Jewenory-Odd-OKns rtc 

GANCE 

Rear of 24 Halloo Canton. 
London EC IN 8BQ 

01 242 3IS1 


HORSE CARRIAGES 
FOR SALE. 

i860 bow framed Braufldam. 
. 1900 Dutch Ctreckl. 
1902 wagonette. 

A superb wedding ouUH. 

Very rare. 

One Ml CBjOOO. 

TH 0502 2120 


KIMONQI pure Uih. AnUaue Japanese 
Kimonos I ram C82 95. Also sflk fabrics. 
Tel 0302 328279 IVHM. Onemal 
Fabrics. 9 Album PL South Parade. 
Doncaster DNl 2EC. 

CKAKT IE Cants Bought. Please contact 
Hoad. 9 St Prim Rd. Kkrklry. 
Lowestoft NR33 OLH. 0502 87758. 

WANTED Japanese Swonto. Daggers etc. 
C oHerto r rati good prices. TeL 0227- 

WANTED ow toys, bought lor cash. 
Phone John Jones. 0243 S74232. 


WANTED 


TlMMnr - Oo Sth October 1986 . Peter, 
much loved husband of Jean, at 
home, after an illness borne wuh 
courage. Cremation 1230 aa 
Partition Wood Crematorium. Har- 
low on 14th October. Donations IT 
desired for Cancer Research, may be 
sent lo A. Scales. 11 Church Street. 
Hertford. 

WWTE - On 2 nd October 1986 . al 
Lapta. Northern Cyprus. George 
Hugh, in tits 8 Bth year. Father of 
Elizabeth and Annette. Funeral has 
taken place 1 in Kyrenia. 


MEMORIAL SERVICES 


- A Memorial Service for 
James Ferguson Bomford. M.C. will 
be held ai St- John the Baptist 
Church. Ftadbury. Wort's at SL 30 
p jo. on Friday October 17 th. Donah 
Pons please to ihe RABJ. C/o 
Lloyds Bank. Hteh SL Evesham. 

POND - There will be a Service of 
Thanksohihg for the life of Professor 
Star Desmond Pond at St Paul’s 
Church. Knlgtilsbridge. London on 
Tuesday. 28 th October 1986 to IS 
noon. 

TRUSTRAM EYE - A Memorial Ser- 
vice for Douglas Trustram Eve. 
PPRICS. WUI be held In the Grave 
nor Chapel. South Audtey SL 
London Wl . On Monday 3 rd Novem- 
ber al tLSOpm. 


IN MEMORIAM - PRIVATE 


HUTTON Thinking bf Chart* and 
Brill Who died tell y*w ag®- UKe 
from Robin and GonUM. 

UUtltr- Ida. remembered with love to- 
day. your Birthday, and always. 

Fleas on 8 th October. 1984 . Dorothy 
i nee Beckwith). SwSy Missed E XJ. 


FUNERAL 

ARRANGEMENTS 


PEmCTT and HOWIE The funeral 
sere tee for the late Jams* perren and 
David Howie, will lake place on Fri- 
day October ia at 2 J 0 pm. M Great 
Si Mary's Church. Cambridge fol- 
lowed by iniermenL of the remains 
of Jftm« Perrett. at Swaffham 
BtUbeck Crmetaiy Tbmlly Oowera 
only- but donaitons may be senl lo 
Mountain Search and Rescue UK. or 
Bureau tor Overera M«WbI Ser- 
vices. C/o Mrs Sangster. Barclays 
Batik- New Market Rd. Cambridge 


Wr. an MMy (M s» 
nwrM raupte. 
would Hite to Hie with aa ebterfy 
Irartirr itodvi lor obcnil 6 months, 
wnrre tor woman rated take about 3 
hour* CnqfMi Imaom a day. Welarr 
oMVMtm. Perhaps only EngfMi 
Iwnom. and pm and btrauasl near toe 
home aK the tnartter u posUMe ia a 
«*»re tn the vovalh of Emm. cm toe 
nurd or tn London re r an - send offers 


SKYLOR D TRA VEL LTD 

2 DENUWf STREET. LONDON WT 
Tet 01-439 a&IJBOttt 
MRUME BONOED 


UP UP ft AWAY 

HalnmL Jo'Bui*. Cairo. Dohof. fsan- 
buL Singapore. Kj_ DrihL Bangkok. 
Hong Kong. Sydney. Europe. AThe 
Amrricas- 

Flamingo TraveL 

76 Shaftesbury Avenue 
London W1V7DO. 

01-439 0102/01-439 7751 
Open Saturday IOXXM3.00 


COI1CUTUM ON ntatto/hota to Cu- 
r. LTSA & mod dattoauons. 
Diplomat Travel: 01 730 2201 ABTA 
1ATA ATOL. 


CHEAP PUMTI WOridwidr Haynurket 
01 930 1366. 


MSCXKMT FAME* WwWwWr. OV-43A 
0734 Jupiter Travel 


DHCOWfllD A 6ROUP FANES. LT.C. 
Open Sal 0753 867030. 


FUOHTBOOKCNS OHraunt Farm world- 
wide 01 387 9100 


VALEXAMKK European Sun FllOhU. 
01-402 4262/0062 

Valrxandrr. CmumUWv MWHwUt 
Ol 723 2277 AbU AlOJ lata 
Atcms/Um. 


AM TVLete SpertaHs bt Ne w York £24-1 
LA C349 Torouio C279. Nairobi C32» 
Svdnrv C7S9 AucWand C?49. Darur 
>30 Jerrayn Strrrt-Ol 839 7144 


CONFM Bargains. Brauufut drt vinos nr 
beach. 2-6 prs £1991 wk. £229 2 Wfcs. 
Aho Malta * Cyprus. Gat/wrow pan 
world Holidays Ol 734 2562. 

■net UtooHI blandl. rftran fUptits. 
vdln rentals Mr Zrus Hate. Ol 434 
1647 AML Alto. 

T UM I lux apart hots from £139 pp 
8.11.13.18 Oct Slrama 0703662614- 


SELF CATERING 
PORTUGAL 


ALOARVE ALTERNATIVE. 

The finest houses lor rental- 73 si 
Jamra Si. SWt 01 491 0802- 

ALCAHVt Lex vUas/aots -with -pools. 
SepL on A thru winter 01 409 283a 
\ Ula worm 


SELF CATERING SPAIN j 


for Oimtma*. 3db A 3b rnswie + purat 
JJmateparden on polf course. From 
WOO Pw Phone; OlO 36361 81740 


WINTER SPORTS 


MU WCST - MCW eorcvai oitera on 
OWi RING FOR A DEAL AM Otorr 
anutnngly low prim BtorUno at £59. 

lor a ropy of our bumper brochure. 
'Oil 785 9999 'AbU 69286 AMI 1363. 


to 


Malaga. Faro. Palma Mid 
terms A Xmas a. ad. also Italy. Germa- 
ny 4 Suits fr £59. Peter Pan 01 491 
2749 19-71 

LATW AMERICA. Lew com fU0ife r» 
Rio £485. Lima £495 rtn. AIM Small 
oto) Hoi Way JournevAieg Peru from 
CSSOl JLA 01 7*7-3108 


Ophor A 167. Mow Aiwtonrm 
. Wl. PoHtorti. CM 8028 ZintetL 


BOON QUALITY anitoue mnw 6 ptae 
(Ireotares TH 01 834 2270 or write. 
M Dagar 25. Sutherland Siren. London 
SWI 


CZSprr or up to paU for saver artlctes. 
g*® prr or for gold. AH diamond 
►wjlterv btetoht Mr Hart Ol -960 8030 
Hwrow ftoao. London. 
W9 All Cngfcmd cuverro.- 

JKWejLlXNV. Goto, saver. Dtmocwte ur- 
o-nltv hwun Top prtres. wouams. 43 
- Lambs Conduit St WCl Ol 405 8536 . 


| ART BUYERS GUIDeT") 


PAWnfMO* A WATERCOLOURS RmtM 
FlniL Trtrirk WllUanw. Goodwin. 
Heppir 2hlkeKm. CooteV. FtektoM. 
HUfv rtc - Autumn Catatogw avaUabte 
Bruit SliifteM GaHrry. High gnerv. 
Btirtord. Oxford TM 099382 2402 


CLUBS 


fluff 

7201 


London School of Bridge and 
58 Kings Road. SW3. 01589 


SHORT LETS 


MUSIC CD APARTMENT* tn KeiMnoum 
(te r v 24 hr Kw- Teles CoUmtevam 
Vtsir intents Ol 373 0306 

LUXURY SnVtetD PLATS, rmtral Lon 
Urn. Horn L325pw Rteq Town Hw- ApCv 
573 3433 


LOW PARCS WOSLOWBC LSA. a 
.vmerira. Mid and Far EasL S Africa. 
Trayvale. *8 MargarM Street. Wl Ol 
580 2928 i\ ha Accepted I 

I U PPOWAM Seal vale to USA<^nbbran- 
rar EM-Auatraita. Can the 
profevstonal* ABTA LATA cc excepted. 
Tel Ol 264 £788 

AUGANTC, Faro. Malaga etc. Dhaodd 
Travel ATOL 1783 01681 4641. 

HorvhJm 68541 

CANARIES Spain Portugal Italy. Greece. 
Madrid ir £67 TM. 01-434 4326 ATOi- 
Air Borpamv 

rwv mSMEY WORLD SPECIAL, tort 
cor. i(L 7 days aerom. Fly /Drive ir 
C29P Peregor «895t 639*00 ABTA 

EUMK/ WORLD WIDE town! Cam On 
rhBrter/vrtieduied fits Pilot Flight Ol 
631 0167 AW Alte 1693. 

MONO MONO £488, SANBKOK £369. 
vanaannre £4ST Other r£ ciues. 01-68* 
6514 ABTA 

J LLV NEW YORK Ort fits. Coast 

lo roau C5J9 FtorWa/Now York £299 
Inrt tor Prmwr 0696 630871 

LDWCST Air Farev Europe and worn 
wide Ol R36 8622 Buckingham 
Travel 

MIAMI. JA M AI C A. MYMK. WorWwiae 
■ iM^pevl lores Richmond Travel. 1 
Duke SI mmmand ABTA 01 9*04073 


Lfvbon C99 Frankfurt FarH 
VAO LTC Ol 328 3330/01 661 
4513 ABTA 

SPAIN Portugal Canartev Greece Italy fr 
LoQ Sun wheel 01 434 4697/8 

•VTOt 1776 


SPAIN PORTUOAL 

luMn 01 ATI 0047 

Vl tts/V tto 


FU0HK 

A rot. 1640 


SVD MEL £636 Perm £566 All PUlor 
■inn. to Ain/IW? 01 584 7371 

\ 8 T\- 


ANTIQUES ft 
COLLECTABLES 


AMERICAN BUYERS SEEK 

AtiUdmmM Modern Jeweaety. WMchre. SHvrr and Plate. FurnHure. Bronzes. 
Enamels, harm, jade Pewter, ciocba. Pamtmgv. Pwc«am. cask Old Dens. Toy* 
am Teddv Bnare MC. AUtouc & P»» lOtKTs Ctoffies. Paaley and other. Shawl*, 
purtiwork OudH. mmoHre. CMtnr Jewetter v . Lore. Lnuvens. ad Masenir items 
OM muuraibovm a buironmuiaad an other iniemana arutlM bnmeebate rash 
by return for Jewettery and other Articles *rav by cost 

Our expert can ran on you- or rad personaitv without ohMauon 
open Moo Sal 900 5 30 B m 
. Qmsn Antique CUnM. 117 KmanHUm Oiunrh Street " 

■ Londo n W8 7LN Tel Ot 339 9616 

(Abo m tett vatu 


MO WKZZ EXOT1NC OFFERS! Just 
®BS ■» 1*3" for 10 entitles you u a 
TREE holiday any dalei Marne* of oto- 
er dhrewttc rer catered chateto. pores 
from Ci59n S/r £69. Ring us now 01 
370 0999 

QRCAT Swing Hobdays. 7th (tenon free. 
January avaHabllty Rlnp John Morgan 
new 10730) 68621 124 Mrs) 

E- Christmas spreiau In 
Oourchmal only £239! Fill a chBtet and 
no FREE.! Ring us for anall* Ol 244 
7333 

MOM FROM in IX* ALPCS Vender. 
[MerOjeUc. VIBars, MTOeve. Comfort, ter 
vice, great. vKUno Phone 01 602 9766. 

SMlWORLD Top Ski Resorts. Lowest 
Prices from C59 ABTA. Brochure: 01 
602 4820. 


LONDON 


Pwoou. Rome hotsl. mo wmw> 

room. £70 pw PQ jjp New Kent Rd. 
I ondon Ntl 4>T Ot 703 4175 


WALES 


MlD WALLS 

DOVEV VALLEY 

Pm. etui te.) IMh Cmlwv farnmoowm 
bvMaifinatnndr kmn vmtvanf 
ujh itmaartabir and homeh 

vpiaig. Mimrarr and aatwiM 

OflHJIth 

SPf (1 U UN (me VKS 
«-d hieteud! tedevenmn wraL £16 ere 
PHUM.PN nagtU 

RHIWLAS FARM 

TePThone {Q6S4 1 279n 


PUBLIC NOTICES 


PASTORAL MEASCRC 1983 

rtie nwtrn Com nione ri have prr 
surrd drali pauorai vrhrmra srav toinq for 


Bros 

de. tot aha rn of ndodain n mart of 
tnepanuirnunaol AbStonK Cravs. be- 
B* one ot IbeUwee panto, riwnn of Hie 
pamH Drays T urrorfc vOiebm to t u mo- 
rew. and ui rmpm of the parish rhur«h 
mm Anoe. HieeHowf hiwnu. known m 
•Amide, tita TraftoraiandltsdhposalaaD 

leptoienunt us a new piece M wtmlwp 

■ ManrhrMrr tuotrv-i. and m respert 01 Ihe 
patpdi rtnarh ol hi MMtoarl JUKI AU An 
tete. t»» mm snn mnatev Im toe 
u-moMimi of toe reuumsanj maiding, the 
nroVNM of a new ptore of wonaip on 
Ml ol the sde. and me disp osal of the 

■ eosans te Uir die iChetnsuocd Mmn 
Conn- , te the dial! vrhrmra mas be 06 
touted lion. IM* Churrh Co 


Loudon htoiP jj T to whom 
■an lesartenUtom should be seal within 
38 dm « tor luaa iranon te uw nouee 


LEGAL NOTICES 


jywuaow bulom 

Ksiictb ikenti uMrrco 

MJTICt Ilf HC4UV OVtN USM UK 

"25*^ above- nathed ramphny. 

hemp wound up sotonuntv. me 
22?““ *r*"**>" 30 day of No 
vendai 198a. to send (hew nu 

aMf parurufars te Omt ck 

f® toe uMterejpnra Alan Dmu 
f^n mnohamoi Lath am. CroaUey & Da 
'A Manhope Home no Drury Lane, 
loaaon WC28 ti»7. Itse I luuttlnf of the 
rompans. or it> Mad uirrtwf they wp 
tee uhOd fiom the uwll te any oar. 
5!!52? tosdearfore. -sum drat, are pros HI 
Dated an M das of Septe.imer lusts 

A.D KENMMCHAM 
L KX.' I DA TOP 


STACTV JO 

NOT1CC IS HCBCBV GIVEN puraumiL 
' hereon 58 8 te toe Coneunn Art. 
1985. tool a METTING te tor rretmors M 
Ihr am e wnN CMuany will br beta M 
Itte telirev te LEONARD CURTIS t CO.. 
Sdualed al 30 EASTBOURNE TERRACE 
■2*0 f-LOORl LONDON W? 6LF on Frt 
day the IOih day of Onobrf 1986 at 
1200 Orton midday, lor Ihe purpoaes 
provided lor in Simons 689 and 590. 
Hated the 26th day of September 1986 
MIL WAMSTA1N 
DIRECTOR 


COURSES 


] 


WOUHCV NALL: Home study for DOE. De 
(prees. ProtovUoov. Pros pert us. Depf 
AL2. Wohey Hall. Oxford. 0X2 6PR. 
TH 08b6 52200 1 24 nru 


FLATSHARE 


J 


mUMMSWh. lemafe 22 + to share ratn- 
lortable ftol unlxedi. £210 prm rxrl. 
TeL 01-631 5414. day or Ol 736 7130 


LUXURY spanout AM NW6. near Abbey 
mad. £66 pw. Mature protemtampl 
wanted to share. Please phone 328 
7092 tanswrrphone asalhMel- 

SOUTH HEM WB Prof female pnrlp* 2 bed 
pvmul nu WMh 1 other. New nllrd tut & 
path. AtaM limited. £79 pw. ptnato call 
002 9233. 

«KZ AttrartHe folly eautpped seV rtm- 
tamed gdn flat. OMe bednn. lounge. KU. 
hathrm. wm. S1BO pw curl. Low 
tedpotoip. Co m pa n y LM. Ol 723-2961 
tdayi or Ol 737 3795 teuetl 

EARLS COURT Female Non smoker. 
Own room in luxury Rat. AH mod 
rons/halrouy C46 P.w TeL 1 629 1633 
I Work). 

SWM Nr. Northern Une. V Large dbte 
room la lux C/M house with young city 
proK. AH mod Cons, one or 2 sharers. 
C136 a/m emu exrt. TM. Ol 223 3549 


t Selective Sharing. WMI 
e*W> Utrodurwry service Put* ui for 
appi: 01-589 5491. 313 Brampton 
Road. SWS 

DHMXT/URP RMTTOH prof uA. o/r. 
mod me. an tordttln. can. nr bus 
routes. £130 prm tort. ReTs read. 
100691 61319 


JMLPrafM/r to share 3 bra ■ 


SW11 - Professional female for 2 
bedroom basrmrm flat Kucher & Bath- 
room. C4750PW tort.Trl 01-566 1646. 


female to share tovMv (W. 
laige room W/M elc. uo nrg pw nr. 
Contort Mr Kiwi Ol 223 5236 COfllceL 


Prof. Irmiuc to mare spa 
noth flal. O/r. Ch. £40 pw ehrt TH: 
398 I IOO x 209 iWorki / 879 3480 


■» Laigp o/r tn vtrwrkan house. »B 
nuns lube. £50 P.w.extl TH. OI 741 
6434 

*** Wf HNl to share wed located two 
bed fat with 24 yr ted prof male. £140 
pm ♦ buh. th Ol 607 6801. 

CUNU Common Banerse*. She hw, 
vrrv toe twin dbte no. prof only 
CTOpw OI 238 5031 

. to ha fiat with i inter. CM. 

C46PW met. Tef 01 733 5886 IHL 387 
9781 iO>. 

■UBOMt o/r. toe how, C/H. 6 
marl BR / Tube. COO pw na-L Tetsao- 
6536 into. 

SW( prof m/l n/m to share gdn fw O/r. 
CH £60 pw. TH. 834 7333 after 6pm 


FLATSHARE 


BS LOMOOM 1/2 tentlTl ms liictLT Dmm. 
tx lukurv 2 bed rtht in QvrhraluinMJM 

J i x*w |g -Mining flat on a tumisi.i.i . 
bteto Liketv reel CS4 r*-mr? 
Wo283 734 after 6*rL ™ 


SWS mm m/i ip acr* red'd to shr tovrrv 
Ute with I pwmrr AD mod rent nr BR 
rte CSfrpwMH TH 689 9756m 2149 


W A W w au iii m i Prof f m o/r m tux 
raised Ihhiv (ter to liter ok nu- 
enmev Cof. pw th Ol 589 Jf*T 


IfllNATM Muir imuse. 0 mini tube 
UOpwmriU) Cal lovrre onfar. Trl 537 
7232 


OVAL (low toClIv Prof mate. n/» p/, 
m kn MMitove. (la. comm gdn. C5o 
pw TM 256 1090 * 384 tUr/582 
2522 rve 


SWM Own mix- room, sum prof female 
to uute hn flat. CH. w/math. garaur. 
£60 pw TH Ol 437 1432 before bpih 


El NR cm/ DerhUMs prof r. 22 * la 
sharp Mgr mod. lux. rial. Own 
*S 2 "AMih pw ran th toi 

3482 dim 7 


lemate to 


EARLS Court PiwnMonil 
sitoie (h ftol wfin 1 other. Own Im 
■ mhrd room £50 per week I nr Unite 
Tel Madia on 587 4303 I Won.) 


PC SANO Wdnlrtt lua a ft. SW aira 

voumi nu ptof 0746 71 SI > 


Prof M/F share lux 
Itol.o/r. TV etr fesraruto odn loo pw 
Lari TH Ol 731 2762 teter 5cm 

%wm VausnoH O/R Lux nwuu hua 
Ol Al faiiCI* 1 * 1 *” 1 * UOp< * p '‘ 1 Trl 

SWS Otan nertMl. mete I A h. suu nuuire 
nrof m MOte inr>. rets esanuiM. Ol 


WEST HAMPSTEAD Prof nil to shur 
»l flat o/r C31 pw C ul Ol 950671 1 
e*un 7*7 itMnl 


F. owa i 

150 iHUMwMe dmoul 
0610 aoer oom 


D/i Ol 262 


I person share He pin t home 
Telephone 603 HblS. 678 

rnr 

FMJMM. Lo gn own room to MM. MM 
share Ihhw near lube t*n pw. TH Ol 
3M5 6499 

Ml. 2nd pet son vhate IKN O/R All mM 
runs • t'JI Itenov tot illy £280 prm 
rxtl 359 8353 

*"•* hoi fern N/N small a It to CM flat 
3 nuns (uta 1 £40 pw uw 32U5TOV eve* 

OLAPMAM Pent lemate TtTs o/r. own 
bate. Ipe lanh house C45pwintl TH. 
Ol 588 9447 

SW*. Prof nr/I hl/s. 738 Ln IM Own 
room 7 month ooty U6pw. 3 TO 3221 
after opm 

ClftPWICSV. Cih oardr a n twe. uuus prof. 
O/R. or lube. Non Smoker. L30 pw 
exrl 743 1778 eves. 


IfAMMWHm. 2 Drat M/T lo share 
luxury 3 bed home All mod tom Oar 
•tell e*v 20 nuns CTOO prm Tel: Ol 
874 6907 iCsesi 

SWS. Laige. hnuai audio room, sen bath 
loom, ua latmtv home £70 pw 357 
8895. 

STVDUTHAM HtH M/r lhare fpe CM hue. 
O/R. 5 nun OR. C40pw rxrl. 077 5062 
alter 7am 

SWS. 2nd pul 10 share new house. O/R 
AH^UnMln. C4O0W exrl TH Ol 731 

Wl Lgr rm In lux nuh Suit mature prof 
man Mon lofTI C&SdwukI 9366224 


prof F o/r. gdn. CH. 
Ctow bus. HR. lube. £45 pw UkL 328 
4060 after 6 

WZ Hix Dal. am room wtte bath Id stole. 
*S,W th 01 689 3643 Way) 262 
1373 reves) 


DOMESTIC/CATERING I 
SITUATIONS 1 


DHL mud red for prtsatety 
owned famMy rhatet to MertoeL France 
Need fun bid rrspomtote ctialet ffrt. Cor . 
don btesi or rsninatenl to saltafy Ihe 
hungry tribe. None too demanding sea 
sons wm-k so only the very best need 
h» MV Mum drive Reply 10 BOX FOO 
ROOD COUNT We need nuhuskniir 
shateirprHiornuvwinler. 8KIWHU7 
OI 370 0999. 

t ma tWTW MM mud red for [amity 
Owed to Sun-ev. To I ravel wUh family 
when anroad. Smalt rouage ax own or 
rammodalion. Mum be unattartied and 
now a rurrrWk driving Itenwe. Reply 10 
Box r«. 

O^nCAS au pate agency 87 Regenl 
SwtJjnflon Wl TH 439 6634 
OK/OverPNM. Abo m.nelpx/doma 
imp/pmn 

CHALET SOILS sought by Chain 
hfoivine. 6 Ravenawood Park. 
North wood. MlhttX HA6 3PR 

DIRECTORS Lunch took iMd 20* regd by 
mural London ralering company. 01 
405 2224 

CORO ON BLEU rook required. 34 eve- 
WW per week. A msPu m. Bucks area. 
Telephone 0240 42912 10.00 M 
0.00 pm. 

SENTLEMAN retjvdrrs ho m e keeper, pood 
salary, luxury arromoduUoa. travel, im- 
mediate siart. London. Plraae send Cv. 
Reply to BOX F95. 


SITUATIONS WANTED 


Serreury/PA expreienred 
-audio Ah. wp. iu. lax. Hr. seeks pouiton 
25 IMS wkty. TM Ol 385 7099. 


PA/SCCOETARY late Inirun. exrrltanl 
skilK good orga/User ■ seeks challenging 
tab. 0530 start. Reply la BOX FSB . 


MATURE wMI eduralrd PA/Ser/bh. seeks 
pHmamitL. uunevung pmMton With in- 
volvement. Tet 01-351 1021 


GENERAL 


MA lTI A rxt V Reg. wiver. rrlurum sate. 
I am Pmauni. sum loof. Her windows, 
stereo, hjoo pno. TH: Mrs Bowies 
0923 38990 


MERCEDES 


•reg* 190 C Aidbrarue. black 
note. auto. ABS. CSR. Alloy whee*»- 
Ctertrir front windows. W/W. 
Bteupunki Toronto stereo radio cassette 
* 4 1 spetoerm. One owner FSH. 
£ 11 . 950 . TH: 406255 * 27107 


To Place Your 
Classified Advertisement 

please telephone the appropriate number listed below 
between 9 a.m and 6 pun. Monday to Friday, 
or between 9.30 a.m and 1.00 p.m on Saiindays. 

Private Advertisers 
Oi 481 4000 


01 481 3024 


Birth Marriage and Death Notices 

Birth And Death notices may be accepted over ihe telephone. 

For publication the following day please telephone by I JO pm. 

Marriage notices not appearing on the Court ft Soda! page may also be accepted by telephone. 

Trade Advertisers; 


Appointments 
Public Appointments 
Property 
Travel 

U.K. Holidays 

Motors 

Personal 

Business td Business 
Education 


01 481 4481 
01 481 1066 
01 481 1986 
01 481 1989 
01 488 3698 
01 481 4422 
01 481 1920 
01 481 1982 
01 481 1066 


Forthcoming Marriages, Weddings, etc for the 
Court and Soda] Page 

Can nor be accepted by Telephone 

Ptease send Court and Soda! Page notices loc 
The Court ft Social Editor. 

Times Newspapers LlcL, 

1 Pennington Street. 

London El 9DD 


Please allow at least 48 hours before publication. Any enquiries for the Court ft Social page mav be 
made after 10 JO sun. on 01 822 9953. 


You may use your Access. Amex, Diners or Visa card. 




i 


~> T i? 


fT-kuw,, ur*™.. ourNTA | wr t» >ri , 



Orlov in 
i surprise 

fi Reagan 

j meeting 

From Michael Binyon 
Washington 

I President Reagan yesterday 

" received Mr Yuri Orlov, the 

n . , freed Soviet dissident, at the 

Oc White House, together with 

Mr other human rights activists, 

the to demonstrate his concern for 

a lie human rights at the fbrtheom- 

&u ing preparatory summit in 

Ap Iceland. 

J he To maintain the surprise, 

uj! however, the White House 

q/ refused to confirm in advance 

{M that Mr Orlov was among 

1 those invited. 

Phi Mr Reagan's calculated ges- 

for ture will annoy the Russians, 

sut but it is intended to assuage 

Sj strong misgivings among 

rr right-wing Republicans about 

the forthcoming talks. 

1 Commentators on the right 

Phi have voiced suspicions that 

the Mr Reagan is about to “give 

noi away the shop" in Iceland, 

As' and that he will be manrcu- 

- 1 vred by Mr Gorbachov into 

5" making concessions on arms 

* control. 

tci- Mr Reagan went out of his 

(Cc way on Monday to dampen 

f speculation that he would sign 

,n s any important new arms 

K.E agreement in Reykjavik. 

Oc He also insisted that human 

gar rights. Afghanistan and freer 

pre contact between Russians and 

Americans were as important 
topics as arms control, and 
that he would emphasize US 
cm concerns forcefully to Mr 

the Gorbachov . 

Ce The White House is ex- 

I tremelv sensitive to criticism 

an » on thc'right — especially from 

K.E Mr Reagan's “old sup- 

Oc poners". as he called them. 

Gh In a characteristic remark, 

nir he insisted Iasi week that *il 

will be a cold day in Hades 
E e when 1 go soft on comm- 

unism." 

1 Meanwhile. Democrats in 

BU the House of Representatives 

have offered 10 put off a 
Pit confrontation with the 

Sal Administration over arms 

me control until next year in order 

ing to avoid undermining Mr 

— Reagan's negotiating position 

r . in Iceland. 

■ Ll * Mr Reagan has strongly 

Uni 1 denounced the House's recent 
S‘ r vote on arms control 

y?! measures. 


Today's events 


Royal engagements 

The Princess of Wales. Pa- 
tron. Help the .Aged, attends a 
performance of The Phantom of 
the Opera . Her Majesty’s The- 
atre, Haymarket, SWt, 7.55. 

Princess Anne. President, the 
Bmish Olympic Association, 
will attends their annual meet- 
ing. the Cafe Royal London. 
2.25. 

Princess Margaret visits the 
Deptford Mission and attends a 
service at St Paul's Church, 
Deptford. 6.30. 

The Duchess ofGIoucestcr. as 
Patron, attends the Starlight Ball 
in aid of the Asthma Research 
Council. Hilton hotel, London. 
8.40. 

The Duke of Kent, Vice 
Chairman, the British Overseas 
Trade Board, attends the first 


J „• JpWRTT*'-. •”T” 

?2!8S’"T. , *V ' - v*: . 

- r - " • • 






Frank Johnson with the Tories 


Wets hunted in 
manhole plot 


through its paces (left), and in profile (above). 

Sleek and stylish 
Jaguar models 
retain old names 


The unveiling today of the 
latest Jaguar models repre- 
sents oh investment of £200 
mfilion and 525 million test 
miles over a seven-year period 
on a project codenamed XJ40 
(Mark Ellis writes). 

The results are sleek and 
stylish replacements for the 
existing III series six-cylinder 
models, but retain the names — 
XJ6, Sovereign and Daimler — 
and traditional Jaguar lines. 
Only the Vl2-powered ver- 
sions of the old range will be 
continued to meet strong de- 
mand in Germany and Britain. 

With prices from £28,495 
for the flagship of the range, a 
3.6 litre six-cylinder Daimler, 
to £1(1495 for a 29 litre XJ6, 
Jaguar believes its new range 
wSU bolster Britain's reputa- 
tion as a quality car-maker. 

Sir John Egan, chairman 
and chief executive of Jaguar 
Cars, sakk “We have spent 


£200 million developing the 
car and re-etfripping our 
plants to ensure that the new 
Jaguar range will be produced 
to the highest possible stan- 
dards." 

The renowned feishing 
touches of leather, wood and 
chrome are retained, and the 
new body styling and all-alu- 
minium engines will be shown 
to the public at next weeks 
Motor Show in Binmhgham. 

Jaguar plants in Coventry 
and Birmingham will concent- 
rate on prodadng cars for the 
US, which has the largest 
luxury car market and 55 per 
cent of output wfll cross the 
Atlantic. 

The Jaguar Sovereign, with 
a 2.9 or 3.6 litre engine, will 
sell for £22,995 to £24995 and 
is designed to appeal to chief 
executives and company direc- 
tors. 


Limelight welcomed 
by Iceland's hostess 


Tebbit attacks socialism 



Continued from page 1 

Iceland's famous clothing 
boutiques. 

"I remember in London 
Raisa liked to go to Bond 
Street and HarTods.” Ms 
Gudmansdottir said. “They 
tempt me also. But here 
Iceland's sweaters are the 
most famous in the world. I do 
not think she will fail to buy." 

We returned to the theme of 
the modem woman: “I am not 
what we call in Iceland 'a red 
sock*. You know, yes, a mili- 
tant feminist . . . 

“I am proud that in Iceland 
women do not take their 


annual dinner of members of 1 
the British Agricultural Export 
Council, the Caledonian Club, 
Halkin Street, SW|. 7.40. 

The Duchess of Kent, Patron, 
attends the annual -meeting of 
UNICEF, the International 
Maritime Organisation. Albert 
Embankment. SEI, 10220. 

Last chance to see 

Recent paintings by Ian Hum- 
phreys; The Black Boy Gallery, 
14 High St, West Wycombe, 
9.30 to 5.30. 

Yorkshire Castries; City Mu- 
seum. Weston Park. Sheffield, 
10 to 5. 

Music 

Concert by the Scottish 
Chamber Orchestra; Tail Hall 
Kelso. 7.45. 

Canterbury Festival: Haipsi- 
chord recital by Trevor Pinn- 
ock; Gulbenkian Theatre. 7.30. 

Organ recital by Dr Francis 
Jackson: Bath Abbey, 8. 


husband's name when they 
marry. Perhaps some of thisr 
will interest Raisa. She can tell 
me how things differ in Russia 

’ “I am not in my husband's 
shadow. After I had chi ldre n I 
returned to work as a secretary 
to our Supreme Court I have 
many interests: I swim, I play 
the piano, I read, I go to 
concerts." 

She is nor nervous about the 
global limelight she is about to 
share. “It is a little of a 
challenge. I wish to show 
Raisa Gorbachov a little of 
Iceland. 


Gontinned from page 1 
poned in the summer, is again 
top priority. 

Under Mr Lament's time- 
table. if the Tories win a third 
term a Bill to float off the 
water authorities, raising 
about £7 billion, would be 
introduced in the first session 
of the next Parliament 

He promised the Tories bad 
a full privatization pro- 
gramme this Parliament and 
the hexL He confirmed that 
the British Airports Authority 
will be sold off in the summer, 
after the safe of British Air- 
ways early next year, and the 
Rolls-Royce and National Bus 
subsidiaries. 

Proposals to compel coun- 


cils to put more services out to 
private tender will be outlined 
today by Mr Nicholas Ridley. 
Secretary of State for the 
Environment 

In Lhe opening debate Mr 
John Patten. Minister for 
Housing, outlined plans 10 
allow building societies to 
become involved in the rent- 
ing of property, through 
shared ownership schemes. 

But he strongly hinted at 
far-reaching legislation in the 
next parliament to deregulate 
the Rent Acts to enable up to 
600.000 empty privately- 
owned homes to be rented. 

Mr Patten is considering a 
new system of registered land- 
lords freed from some Rent 


Act restrictions. He also an- 
nounced plans for a increase 
in shared ownership housing 
schemes. . 

The well-organized unity of 
the conference, which most 
Tories expea to be the last 
before the general election, 
was underlined in a fringe 
speech by Mr Peter Walker, 
the last licensed rebe’ 

But yesterday, though Mr 
Walker’ told a Tory Reform 
Group meeting that the Gov- 
ernment needed to recognise 
the aspirations of the ordinary 
family living in the semi- 
detached house, Mr Walker 
uttered nothing that could be 
construed as an attack — »the 
Government. 


The afternoon session of 
the Conservative Pam con- 
ference was getting smoothly 
under way yesterday when 
word filtered into the hall 
that the Prime Minister, 
while returning from a lunch- 
time meeting, had turned to 
wave to the crowd, and fallen 
down a manhole. 

The dries thought it outra- 
geous that amid all this 
securitv. someone had len a 
manhole uncovered. The 
wets thought it vital tnau 
with the woman safely gone 
at last now was the time to 
cover the hole. But what both 
sides needed, in these crucial 
minutes after the first reports 
of the incident, was hard 
1 information as to what had 
really happened. Otherwise. 

people might do things which 
would look embarrassing if 

! Mrs Thatcher were to climb 
back up. 

Zealous Thaicherues — 

| motivated either by genuine 
patriotism or fear of what a 
fall of the regime would mean 
for them personally — humed 
about the hall, doubtless 
assuring anyone who would 
listen that Mrs Thatcher had 
survived, had sustained only 
a minor injury, and would be 
broadcasting to the nation as 
soon as possible. 

They assured us that this 
deed was the work of a 
defeatist group of Cabinet 
ministers and other dis- 
credited privy counsellors 
who were wholly unrepresen- 
tative of our nation and our 
party. Rather than defend 
British women and children 
against atheistic Kinnockism 
at the general election, they 
were prepared to revolt 
against the leader and try to 
make a separate peace. 

The names of those respon- 
sible. and of their defendants, 
would be ever accursed, and 
made synonymous with trea- 
son. But one thing was cer- 
tain. The ministers, and 
former ministers, responsible 
for this outrage would be 
hunted down and handed 
over to the whips. 

But who were the perpetra- 
tors? Prior? On Monday 
night, there had been a 
publishers' party in London, 
attended by journalists and 
other freeloaders, in connec- 
tion with his disloyal mem- 


oirs. The trouble with uJ 
theory was Hutu at the ,5i 
Mrs Thatcher 
fateful manhole yestenS 
lunchtime, the panv 
still have been go^ H 
he been involved. Mr p? 
would surely have been wS 
ing the radio station or cE 
something similarly uscEp 

Heath? He had 
moved into a new house d 
Salisbury, not far inland fin® 
Bournemouth, where fa ^ 

W J« 8» v ‘ng dinner 
parties this week for £ 
Thatchentcs femed in ftZ 
the conference reso? 
Suspicious. 

Giimour? He made $0^ 
anti-regime pronounced! 
in the Aw Statesman at a. 
weekend. Tories don't ^ 
the Arte Statesman. Exacih- 
But the crucial thing was ihii 
the plot had failed. Thatcfa. 
ism had been saved. 

Some of the wets seemed to 
be equally active in the ban 
Clearly, they were assurim 
the wavering rank-antHflc 
that the dries were Muffin 
and that the Thatcher refaS 
had indeed fallen. Now 

the time foranti-Thaicfierites 
to proclaim a Governmental 
National Reconciliation and 
Renewal and the restoration 
of democracy. 

Despite the tense situation 
and the absence of any defi. 
nitc news. Mr Kenneth Bafcer 
went ahead with his Manned 
speech in reply to the debate 
on education. Mr Baker has 
long been thought of as a 
candidate for the leadership 
should Mrs Thatcher ever & 
down a manhole. 

But. assuming that such as 
event was long delayed, be 
had planned to make a dn 
speech. J ust his luck to be (fay 
at the very moment of fa 
wets' triumph. But it was no 
time to take chances, ft 
made the speech as he fa] 
planned it. although - in fa 
event of a Wet Restoration - 
he could always draw atten- 
tion to the absence in fa 
speech of any promise to 
bring back corporal punish- 
ment to our schools, or 
indeed capital punishment. 

Eventually, we learnt that 
Mrs Thatcher had merely 
tripped on the manhole. She 
was in the best of health. Tit 
wets, however, were not 


THE TIMES INFORMATION SERVICE 


The Times Crossword Puzzle No 17,171 



ACROSS 

1 Saturnine doctor got out of 
bed (6). 

4 Be successful in repair (4.4). 

10 Mint money Tor island (3.6). 

11 Murphy, the adviser to 
Eire's Republican leaders 
(5). 

12 Trainer sorted out the lie of 
the land (7). 

13 In this place, see concealed 
pot plants (7). 

14 Very musical when it gets 
one (5). 

15 Pledge protection (8). 

18 Broadcast about the parade 
(2.3,3). 

20 Many long for a hiding 
place (5). 

23 A game creature (7). 

25 Celebrate with hired cloth- 
ing (7). 

26 Orders sweetheart stout (5). 

27 Make an example of me? I 
'ope it's not right (9). 

28 Contestant is after two lines 
in a song (S). 

29 Burning land (61 


DOWN 

1 Details of road turned up in 
time (8). 

2 Recompenses rising artist 
with a shilling (7). 

3 Appearing in burlesque, am 
I shocked, easily shocked? 


5 A charge that is. 1 round, 
novel for author (6,8). 

6 Take pan in record (5). 

7 Ishmael not included with 
the players (7). 

8 Sorted out some 12 in the 
South West (6). 

9 Nearing journey's end. in 
more than one sense 
(2.4.4.41 

16 Music fabulous bird brings 
right into prominence (4-1- 
4). . 

17 Feeling ecstatic - that’s not 
heartless (8). 

19 Removing the bottom of 
Venetian blind is simplicity 
itself (7). 

21 Giving a name to business 

(7). 

22 A group of notes sounded in 
harmony 16). 

24 King and royal mistress 
make an announcement (5). 

Solution to Puzzle No 17.170 


I SnESTWPiaHtiSvSS 

In s m @ a 12 
iannnussEan uoasan 
ci ran [? m m ran 

0 b n h 0 

ii!n£JF3El 

a E is is r. 7 i 

Hkiid&islhtsiS £S30l3Ot=i 

E 3 B Q (71 E 

aSSSEiJilIlSE I=H=©iiWt= 
nsnnaaEBG 
■amass raiiJssoTiissn 

SEPHSEHEI? 


Concert by the Moscow Phil- 
harmonic Orchestra; Si David’s 
Had Cardiff. 7.30. 

. Concert by the Bournemouth 
Symphony Orchestra; Wessex 
Hall Poole. 7 JO 

Organ duets by Thomas Trot- 
ter and Margaret Phillips; Bir- 
mingham Town Hall 1. 

Concert by the Northern 
Sinfonia with Bradley Creswick 
(violin): Newcastle Gty HaU, 
7.45. 

Talks, lectures 

Bowden Lecture; Pompous 
Programming, by ProC Niklaus 
Wirth: Essex University, De- 
partment of Computer Science, 
Lecture Theatre Block, LTB 6/7, 
Colchester, 3. 

Theories of traffic flow, by 
Dr. M.H. Beilby: Birmingham 
University. Large Lecture The- 
atre. Physics Poynling Building, 
II. 

General 

Festival of Fun. Dover: Regi- 
mental Band of the 2nd Battal- 
ion Royal Anglian Regiment 
marches' through Dover and 
performs in Biggin St, 10.30. 12 
noon and 2.30. 

National Review of Live Art 
performance fesiivaL Midland 
Group. Nottingham; Box office: 
24'Cariton Sl Hockley. Notting- 
ham. tel: (0602) 586100 (today 
until Oct 12). 

Antiques Fair: De Grey 
Rooms. York. 3 to 9. 


Roads 


Wales and West: M4: Contra- 
flow between junctions 16 
(Swindon) and 17 (Chippen- 
ham). M4s Contraflow between 
junctions 34 and 35 (Rhondda 
and A473V MS: Two lanes 
closed in both directions be- 
tween junctions It and 12 
(Cheltenham and A38). 

The North: M6: Lane closures 
in both directions between junc- 
tions 32 and 33 (MSS and A6). 
M6: Lane closures at junction 
37 IA684J. Cumbria. MIS: 
Contraflow between junctions 6 
and 7 (Thome and M62). 

Scotland: M9: Outside lane 
closed on both carriageways 
between junctions 4 and 5 
(Laihallan and Cadgers Brae). 
A80: Northbound lane closures 
between Moltinsburn and Cum- 
bernauld. A944: Pipe laying 
along Queens Rd E of Anderson 
Drive. Aberdeen. 

Information supplied by AA 


New books — hardback 


Francois® Cachin (Thames & Hudson. £25) 

Earwtness, Fifty Characters, by Elas Canetti, translated by Joachim 
Neugroschel (Andre Deutsch. £7.95) 

Kail Kraus. Apocalyptic satirist. Culture and Catastrophe in Habsburg 
Vienna, by Edward Timms ((Yale, £20) 

The Archrtecbre of tlw Roman Empire, Volume II. An Urban Appraisal, by 
Wffiara L MacDonald (Yale, £27.50) 

The Bfind Watchmaker, by Richard Dawkins (Longman, £12.95) 


Weather 

forecast 


The Fifties, by Edmund Wilson, edited with an introduction by Lean EdeJ 
(Macmflan, £19.95) 

The Enigmatic Edwardian, The Life of Reginald 2nd Viscount Esher, by 
James Lees-MOne (SkJgwick & Jackson, £15) 

The Longest Bathe, The War at Sea 1939-45, by Richard Hough 
(WeldenfeU & Nicolson. £14.95) 

The Ratiigan Version, The Theatre of Character, by BA Young (Hamsh 
Hamilton, £1255} PH 


The pound 


Concise Crossword page 14 


Yogostam&Qnr 

Rases tor gnaa oanotn t n a oon 6enk notes 
only as suppled by Barclays Bank PLC. 

Retail Price Index; 3853 

London: The FT Index dosed up 6 1 at 


Parliament today 


Lords (130): European Co- 
mmunities (Amendment) Bill, 
committee stage. 

























BUSINESS and finance 


Executive Editor 
Kenneth Fleet 


pjpf® 


WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 8 1986 



TIMES 


SPORT 37 
TELEVISION AND RADIO 41 


fl 3? Share 

1257.3 (+6.1) 

fT-SE 100 

1592.3 (+13.4) 

E^rgains 


THE PQllMn 

US Dollar 
1 -4350 (- 0 . 0045 ) 
W German mark 
2.8686 (+0.0040) 

Jradf-weighted 
68-1 (+0.1) 


M3 money supply 
figures ease 
base rate pressure 


By David Smith 
Economics Correspondent 

Betterrthan-expected 
money supply figures eased 
the pressure for a rise rn base 
rates yesterday. No increase is 
expected ' this week. But the 
continued weakness of sterling 
— languishing near hs all-time 
lows yesterday — could still 

Sears lifts 

Ul.l» The sterling M3 money 
-f ^n/ supply measure rose by be- 

proiir I Z 70 tween 1.5 and 1.75 per cent m 
Sear C □ , /U the four weeks to September 
SdfV;5!L the 17, the Bank of England said. 

British Shoe This was well below initial 
° r ^° ratlon and William Hill market expectations of a rise 
on|donierate._ made taxable of 3 per cent or more, 
pronts in the six months to the The reaction to the figures 
, “bf °f £77 million, a was muled in financial mar- 
"f, 01 1 — 7 per cent, on sales kets. however. The Bank of 
up 6 per cent to £1.15 million. England had hinted, through 
ine star performer of the its tactic of announcing gfft- 
•group was the licensed betting edged sales last Friday, that 
snop division, which made the figures would not be as bad 
trading profits of £13.6 mil- as analysts bad feared, 
non. against £8.2 million. In the money markets, rates 

Mr Geoffrey Maitland 5 remained well above ament 
amiin. the chairman and chief base rate levels. Gilt-edged 

executive “a... : i:ZrTi.. 





: ^ execuuve. said; “Our new 

• ..■ t autumn ranges have been well 

r received, giving us an en- 

• i: : couraging start to the second 

- naif year." 

The interim dividend was 
raised to Ip from 0.9 p. 

Tempos, page 24 

Bowthorpe up 

Bowthorpe Holdings, the 
international electrical and 
electronics components! 
group, yesterday reported pre- 
tax profits for the six months 
to June 30 up from £1 1.5 
million to £13.6 million. 
Turnover increased 10 per 
cent to £70.5 million^ and an 
interim dividend of2.68p was 

- — declared, represen tinga 15 per 
cent increase on last year. 

Tempos, page 24 

Burns issue 

- • Bums-Anderson, the indus- 
Yj trial and financial services 

• group, is to raise £23-jniJfion 
\ to finance continued expan- 
- sion through a one-for- 


prices recovered immediately 
after the money supply 
announcement but then fell 
back to opening levels. 

The pound had a steadier 
day, helped indirectly by some 
concerted support for the dol- 
lar by European central banks!, 
led by the Bundesbank. The 
Bank of England supported 


J THE 
D«V MONEY 
' ' SUPPLY 

(Sterling U3, 
12-month growth rate) 


the pound when the sterling 
index dipped to a new low of 
67.8 during the morning. It 
closed at 68.1, 0.1 up on the 
day. 

The main surprise in the 
money supply figures was the 
small increase, of just £900 
million, in bank lending last 
month. This compared with 
an average rise of £2J billion 
over the previous six months. 


about £1 billion to the oil 
companies. 

This probably resulted in a 
reduction in borrowing by the 
oil companies. 

The September figures were 
hardly affected by the TSB 
flotation. The Committee of 
London and Scottish Gearing 
Banks said advances, on a 
seasonally adjusted basis, fefi 
from £1.45 billion in August 
to £475 million in September. 

The committee said there 
was evidence that deposits 
were increased in the run-up 
to the September 24 TSB sale, 
but that it had no effect on 
lending in that month. 

The details of the sterling 
M3 figures were affected by 
the Government's $4 billion 
floating rate note. 

Officials refused to be 
drawn on the amount received 
in advance, but it distorted the 
“other counterparts" element 
of sterling M3, which was an 
unusually large £1-9 billion, it 
also boosted external flows to 
the public sector, which were 
£600 million. Debt sales were 



Fresh delay in 
timetable for 
regulating Gty 


By Lawrence Lever 


Sir Arthur Bryan: talks with Waterford end amicably 

Wedgwood poised 
to accept merger 


This was associated with a just £100 million. 


very large public sector 
contribution to the money 
supply increase. The public 
sector borrowing requirement 
during the banking month was 
£2.7 billion, as the Govern- 
ment refunded advanced 
petroleum revenue tax, of 


Apology to Opec 
raises oil prices 

From David Young, Geneva 


The leading oil producing 
nations yesterday emphasized 
their determination to push 
oil prices np towards the S20 
dollar a barrel mark and 


system acceptable to all 13 
members as well asattempting 
to re-establish a system under 
which it can set an agreed 
price for its crude oil rather 


a , , . t- * K* IM W1IMJW VU IBLUVI 

succeeded in removing one of than leave prices to be set in 
the mam obstacles to setting a ihe free market by buyers and 


new output quota agreement 
- The Organization of Petro- 
leum " Exporting Countries 
(Opec) received an apology 


five rights issue to ordinary from the United Arab Emir- 
shareholders at 71p per share, ates for exceeding the current 

TP i _ u quota. Dr Mana Saeed Otalba, 

1 aplets SOlll the UAE Oil Minister, said 

Two taplets were exhausted ***** 

yesterday. They were £200 2* 000 a 

million of 10 per cent Trea- .... 

sury convertible stock 1990 market has re- 

and £200 million of 9 per cent sponded already to his re- 
convertible stock 2000. marks by sending prices up 

jth/r . i * slightly to just under the 15 
VxrandlYlet plan dollar mark. Any further in- 

Grand Metropolitan is 2^, 1 fvSS. 
arranging a million sterling 

commercial paper pro? ETSEJiSEI * mt0 
gramme. Lloyds Merchant fi«™ quota agreements. 

Bank, Morgan Guaranty and S Its President, Mr Rilwanu 
G Warburg are being ap- Lukraan, the Nigerian Oil 
pointed dealers. The- pro- Minister, raid Hat the cartel is 
gramme will complement determined to find a way of 
“xisti ng short-term .financing sending up prices by the end of 
facilities and will enable ^ u sy ear - 
Grand Met to access this Opec has two committees 
nntentiallv competitive source tiying w w ° rk °uta new quota 


million ot lu per cent trea- 
sury convertible stock 1990 
and £200 million of 9 per cent 
convertible stock 2000. 

GrandMet plan 

Grand Metropolitan is 
arranging a million sterling 
commercial paper pro- 
gramme. LJoyds Merchant 
Bank, Morgan Guaranty and S 
G Warburg are being ap- 
pointed dealers. The- pro- 
gramme will complement 
existing short-term .financing 
facilities and will enable 
Grand Mel to access this 
potentially competitive source 
of funds. 

Booth mystery 

Booth Industries says it is 
not aware of any cause for the 
recent rise in its share price.; 

USM debut 

Citygrove. the property 
company, is coming to the 
Unlisted Securities Market 
with a price tag of £6.9 
million. Hill Samuel & Co, the 
merchant bank, is to place 3 
million I Op shares at lOQp a 
share. The issue will raise £1.5 
million net. Citygrove pretax 
profits for the year to Novem- 
ber 30 of £625,000 are 

forecast. 

Co News 22 Foragii Exch 24 
fosnmeat 2J Trade d Opts 24 ; 
Tempo* 24 Share Prices 25 j 
Wall Street 24 tJ ahTmts 26 , 
murk Market 24 Conmadities 26 
Monel Mrfcts 24 USM Prices 26 | 


sellers. 

A separate committee of 
technical advisera will also 
look at the way in which 
quotas can be set and distrib- 
uted — a system of seasonal 
quotas is among the options 
being studied — and it will 
report today. 

It is understood that four 
different proposals on quota 
figures have been submitted — 
by Saudi Arabia. Kuwait, Iran 
and by Opec full-time advis- 
ers. The main difference be- 
tween them is that Iran insists 
that Iraq is brought back into ! 
the Opec system after being 
allowed to avoid a fixed quota 
for two months. 

The committee working out 
the pricing mechanism is 
understood to be looking to 
the longer-term in order to 
create a reference price system 
which can be introduced once 
a new quota agreement has 
bfeen established. 


New Turner & Newall 
bid for AE expected 

By Orar City Staff 


Speculation over a fresh bid 
from the engineering group 
Turner & Newall for AE, the 
automotive component 
group, was growing stronger in 
the City last Highl- 
it is understood that a 
Takeover Panel investigation 
into the circumstances sur- 
rounding the narrow failure of 
T&N's bid for AE has proved 
complex and wide-ranging 
and that the full Panel is to be 
convened next week. 

This is being taken as an 
indication that the Panel has 
been unable to dismiss as 
entirely without significance a 


placing of 10 million AE 
shares at 20 Ip shortly after the 
failure of the bid. 

The shares were believed to 
have been purchased for up to 
240p in the closing stages of 
the £260 million battle by 
parties hostile to T&N. 

The share sales involved 
substantial losses by the 
purchasers.The- Panel is refus- 
ing to discuss details of the 
investigation, but the belief in 
the stock market is that it 
concerned the possible exis- 
tence of a concert party in 
favour of AE*s independence. 


The 12-raonth growth rate 
of sterling M3 fell from 1 8 .5 to 
18-25 per cent last month, 
compared with the official 1 1 
to 15 percent target range. 

Narrow money, M0, rose by 
0.75 per cent last month. 

Stock market, page24 

Walker 
says no 
to CCA 

By Onr City Editor 

Mr Peter Walker, the En- 
ergy Secretary, has overruled 
British Gas on the matter of 
which amounting method will 
be preferred in the forthcom- 
ing privatization 
Sir Denis Rboke. chairman; 
. of British Gas, and his senior 
colleagues wanted to use the 
current cost accounting 
convention which gives a 
clearer picture of the effects of 
inflation on the business than 
the much more widely used 
historic cost method. 

Id its annual reports British 
Gas has published historic 
cost figures in a brief section 
following the main accounts. 

It has been known for some 
time that the company 
planned to Stick to the use of 
CCA in the prospectus for 
what win be Britain's biggest 
share sale. But there has now 
been a change of plan at Mr 
Walker’s instigation. 

It is highly likely that the 
front page of the prospectus 
will show historic cost figures 
for the share saleTbe news 
will be warmly greeted in the 
City which, except for a brief 
spell during which inflation 
was running at much higher 
levels than today, has always 
favoured historic cost figures. 

Another cosmetic side effect 
is that BG's profits appear to 
be considerably higher when 
restated in conventional 
terms. The overriding consid- 
eration has been that the army 
of small Investors, perhaps 
□umbering 6 million, who are 
expected to subscribe for Brit- 
ish Gas shares might confused 
by the use of CCA as the main 
accounting technique. 

Institutional investors are 
said to be reacting favourably 
to the series of British Gas 
road shows which started this 
week. The concept of BG as a 
share with strong defensive 
merits but with a sharp in- 
crease in profits ahead due to 
the lagged effect of cheaper oil 
is being well received. 


By John BeU, City Editor 

A merger of two of the most the chairman, Mr Faddy 
famous names in tableware Hayes, aged 55, last year, 
looked imminent last night Mr Hayes, a former head of 
The boards of the fine dihn Ford Motor Company's opera- 
group Wedgwood and Irish- dons in Ireland, has been 


based Waterford Glass were in concentrating on the group’s 
discussions in London in the core activities in fine 
afternoon and a number of glassware, 
problems were resolved. Since taking over, he has 

The talks ended amicably disposed of the group's car 
and the Wedgwood board distributorship in Ireland and 
withdrew to consider a small chain of department 
Waterford's final proposals. stores. He believes that both 
An earlier sticking point Wedgwood and Waterford 
was the number of Wedgwood Glass have much to gain from 
directors who would join the a merger, 
chairman. Sir Arthur Bryan, Wedgwood would benefit 
on the board of the combined from the strong position which 


The timetable for the new 
investor protection legislation 
to come into effect has been 
delayed again - making it the 
third lime that the Govern- 
ment has shifted its line since 
the Financial Services Bill was 
published last December. 

As a result, the new frame- 
work for regulating the City is 
not likciv to be in place before 
early IVS8. 

Officially, the Government 

still hopes that the Bill's 
regime to regulate investment 
will come into effect late next 
year. A spokesman for the 
Department of Trade and 
Industry refused to comment 
on suggestions that the time- 
table would slip into I9SS but 
said; *' We recognise tbai there 
are potential difficulties in the 
way. not least from the self- 
regulaung organizations get- 
ting themselves prepared and 
processing applications by 
members.*’ 

The Bill sets out various 
processes between its enact- 
ment and the coming into 
effect of the self-regulatory 
fra mwe work it creates. The 
Government is blaming the 
latest delay on the network of 
self-regulating organizations 
(SROM which will be policing 
most investment businesses. 

The SROs were told bv Sir 


Kenneth Berrill. chairman of 
the Securities and Invest- 
ments Board, the overall 
investment watchdog, to press 
on with formulating rale 
books for their members. 

Meanwhile the Govern- 
ment is under mounting pres- 
sure over the passage of the 
Bill through the Lords next 
week when three days have 
been sei aside for the report 
stage. More than 500 amend- 
ments have to be considered. 

ft has been severely criti- 
cized already for rushing the 
Bill through the Lords without 
allowing adequate time for its 
detail and implications to be 
considered. 

In addition to 350 govern- 
ment amendments to the Bilk 
more than 150 others will be 
tabled by oppostion peers and 
cross-benchers. Nevertheless, 
the Bill must receive Royal 
Assent by November 12. when 
the next Parliamentary ses- 
sion begins, otherwise it will 
be lost. 

Depite the number of 
amendments it is tabling, the 
Labour Party appears to take 
the view that it would prefer 
an imperfect Bill than no Bill 
at all and will not seek to 
sabotage its passage onto the 
statute book. 


Neill report delayed 
until late November 

By Alison Eadie 


group. 

The Monopolies and Merg- 


Waterford has established in 
the crucial US market, be 


ers Commission is investigate says. Mr Hayes is keen to 
mg a hostile £150 mfllimn break into the large Japanese 
takeover of Wedgwood by tableware market, where 
London International, the con- Wedgwood has established a 
Sumer products and contra- rapidly growing presence, 
ceptives business. Sir Arthur's company, set 

The reference arose through p more than 200 years ago by 

the effects on the British Josiah Wedgwood, continues 
ma rke t for china and ceramics the tradition of producing 
which- would he caused by tableware of the highest 
combating the Royal Worces- quality, 
ter Spode operations of He has been dismissive of 
London International wtb the bid from London Inter- 
Wedgwood. national 

Waterford Glass has been In the CSty, Wedgwood's 
undergoing a revival of its shares soared 57p to 453p on 


fortunes since the arrival of news of the bid talks. 

Christies ' Heat 

profits up ... ... . 

. , , , , * Hambros Bank is planning 

By Alexandra Jackson . to sell its Fielding insurance 
Christies International, the offshoot to the brokers CE 
auctioneer, yesterday reported Heath in a deal worth between 
interim pretax profits margin- £50 and £60 million, 
ally up at £723 million com- The all-share offer will re- 
pared with £7.13 million in suit in Hambros ending up 
the first half of 1985. The with a stake of around 25 per 
interim dividend is main- cent in CE Heath, 
tamed at l.5p. Fielding, a reinsurance bro- 

Tu mover fell from £34.2 p— — — — — 
million to £33 million but it JfBMUi 

was ahead after stripping out 
£2 million from CCA Gal- § 

leries, which was floated on B |m fl fl 
the Unlisted Securities Market w H 

m July, 1985. Group auction 
sales were £184 million com- BH 

pared with £187 million last 

year. ■ 

US sales were up in dollar 
terms, but they were affected 
by exchange movements. 

Notable features in the first 
half included the Nanking 
caigo, the West Dene collec- 
lion and two small sales in 
Monaco and Hong Kong. 

Despite the non-recurrence of 
these, the outlook for the 
second half is good, according 
to Christies' finance director, HMHv 
Mr Jonathan Price. ^ V 

Mr Christopher Alexander, 
of L MesseL the broker. 
expects the group to make 
approaching £14 million in 
the full year, giving earnings 
per share of 17p. 

The shares ended at 268p. 


Sir Patrick Neill's report 
into the adequacy of investor 
protection for names at 
Lloyd's is unlikely to be 
published before the end of 
November. 

The Neill committee hoped 
10 report in July. In June it 
was granted an extension until 
autumn, but was still taking 
evidence this week, and wifi 
be hard pressed to report to 
Mr Paul Channon. the Trade 
and Industry Secretary, before 
November. 

The delay is timely for 
Lloyd’s, whose new building 
will be opened by the Queen 
on November 18. 

Meanwhile the market be- 
lieves one of the changes Sir 
Patrick will call for is the 
divestment by managing 


agents, who run syndicates, of 
members' agents, who place 
names on syndicates and act 
in an advisory capacity. 

Such divestment would ad- 
vance the controversial mea- 
sures in the 1982 Lloyd's Act. 
which forced brokers to sell off 
their managing agents. The 
deadline for such divestment 
is July next year. 

A call for further divest- 
ment would affect 160 com- 
bined agents 

The Neill team has heard 
evidence from some members 
of Lloyd's unhappy about the 
concentration of underwriting 
power in the hands of a few 
combined agents. The argu- 
ment against combined agents 
is they do not give space to 
outsiders. 


Heath to make £50m buy 


By Cliff Feltham 
ker, was set up in 1975 by Mr 
Richard Fielding, a former 


Last night director Mr Chris- 
topher Sporborg said: “We are 


joint managing director of swapping an 81 per cent stake 
Heath, with financial backing in an unquoted company fora 


from Hambros. which now 
owns 81 per cent of the 
business. The balance is held 
by the management Hambros 
bad been intending to bring 
Fielding to the market itself. 


big stake in an insurance 
broking business. We have no 
intention of bidding for 100 
per cent of Heath although we 
may want to raise the stake 
later." 


mTiONRL 

EXHIBIT 


STOCK MARKETS MAIN PRICE CHANGES 


IBM acts ‘to curb cloning 9 


SIjSL — 1783.04 (-1.41)* 

iffi Dow 17604.36 (+169.03) 

SsSg\ 2162.76 (+77.831 

aSe Gen _a»2 (+2.9) 
ydney; AO 1329.4 (+18.6) 

2019.3 (+23) 

i te=™»a 

urich; 

KA General — - n / a 

sndondoshtg price* • Page 25 

INTEREST RATES 
mdom 

month eligible Hte:10V4-9H% 
jying rate 

5meRaw7fc% 

jderal Funds 514% 

monm Treaswy Bite 5.07-5.06% 

>-year bonds 9S 3 te-9S 

CURRENCIES 

imion; New York: 

514350 S: £1.4330- 

DM2 8686 S: DM2.0015* 

FFr9.3921 S: FFr6.5500* 

von220.99 

index .fifi.! S. tndex:109.5 

5j£0322938 SOR £0.845587 


. 174p +14p) 
— 7Bpi+13p) 
. 570p (+25p) 


_ 622p (+18p) 


RISES: 

Turriff Corp 

Tyzack Turner 

Bowthorpe 

Wedgwood — — 

Bass 

Grand Met 

United Biscuts 

DRG 

Jones E — 

Alexandra Workw. .. 

BAT 

BP 

Excolnt. 

Cons. Gold 

RTZ . — — 

Patera M 

J Booth — 


FALLS: f 

Siothert & Pitt «3pH0p> 

Jaguar SMpHP) 

Mcborquodate ■ |70p (-6pj 

Morgan Grenfell 38ip(-l9p) 


GOLD 

London Fixing: 

5oseW37°o6338.00 (£304.00- 
305.00) 

New YoHc M _ 

Comex $4375043840* 


NORTH SEA OIL 

Brent (Nov.) pmS14.705bl (S14y2q) 
* Denotes tetast trading price 


New York (Reuter) — Inter- 
national Business Machines 
has announced that it is to buy 
specially-designed computer 
chips from Intel Corporation 
of California, a move analysts 
said would frustrate imitators 
whose machines have cut into 
IBM's personal computer 
sales. 

Analysts said that the agree- 
ment with the Santa Clara- 
based Intel which will swap 
technology with IBM, would 
allow IBM to make further 
technological advances as well 
as providing for the develop- 
ment of the proprietary, cus- 
tomized chips. 

These chips, which are 
made in small numbers, make 
the designs of _ personal 
computers more difficult to 
copy without violating patent 
and copyright laws. . 

IBM has been losing mil- 
lions of dollars in revenues 
because of competitors, who 
have been copying the 
company's designs to produce 
so-called clones of IBM 
machines. _ 

Mr. Jay Stevens, a Dean 
Witter analyst in New York, 


said that the IBM action 
would help eventually to stop 
cloning. “If they introduce a 
proprietary version, a clone 
will have to figure out how to 
copy it and that will take some 
time." 

.An IBM spokesman s*‘d 
that the company did not 
comment on its future strat- 
egy. and he declined to say 


whether the agreement with 
Intel was an attempt to make 
cloning more diificulL 

Intel, which makes 
microprocessors for IBM's 
personal computers as well as 
for other companies manufac- 
turing IBM-compatible 
computers, said the deal “in- 
volves a technology swap." 


US to extend computer talks 


Washington (Reuter) — The 
United States will extend its 
talks with Brazil to try to 
resolve charges that Brazilian 
markets are unfairly closed to 
American computers. Mr 
Cavion Yeutter. the US trade 
representative, said yesterday. 

He said that President 
Reagan had found Brazil's 
action an unreasonable re- 
straint of trade,, but would 
extend the talks to the end of 
the year because some 
progress had been made in 
resolving the dispute. 

Mr Yeuner said that the US 
would defer any retaliatory 
action against Brazilian ex- 
ports to the US until the 


computer issue was resolved. 

US officials said that the 
delay would push the time for 
resolving the issue to beyond 
the Brazilian election in 
November, noting that the 
issue had become a heated 
political question. 

US and Brazilian officials 
have been trying to resolve the 
issue for 13 months, but Brazil 
has held firm in trying to 
shield its infant computer 
industry from competition. | 

Trade officials said thaL 
although no exports had been 
earmarked for retaliation if an 
impasse was reached, possible 
large^ could be the big 
Brazlian shipments to the US 


10th -12th S 


DERRY STREET, LONDON 

fMmission€5 00 «achday|^^^^^P 

*'«' or£g°°for 2 - 3 dayi 




»-r»* I bi.-arw | aaTiu:-* | brTa , rf 











juuoiiNcoa Ainu niNAiN^t 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 8 i986 


Middle management 
‘loses jobs and 
salaries stand still’ 


Takeover 
offer for 
Bank of 
America 


Demand for 
managers has slumped and 
salaries on offer are no higher 
than three years ago. accord- 
ing to a new review of the 
recruitment market 

The Top Pay Unit of In- 
comes Data Services (IDS), in 
a report" 1 on salaries and 
benefits, says production 
managers jobs are hard to get 
and more is being asked of 
those who go after them. 

Now that a senior produc- 
tion job is often seen as a 
stepping stone to a general 
management position, com- 
panies look for a more 
“polished*' candidate, accord- 
ing to IDS. 

The drop in advertised de- 
mand for executives, noted in 
the latest Hay-MSL index, has 
hit hard. Since the second 
quarter of last year, demand 
for them has fallen by 37 per 
cent and in the first three 
months of this year by 13 per 
cent. 

IDS warned: “Good 
production management jobs 
are thin on the ground.** 

The range of salaries for 
production managers is simi- 


By Derek Harris. Industrial Editor 

production lar to the IDS review of the production 
sector three years ago. rising 
from £10.000 in a steel tube 
company to £25.000 for a 
production director in an 
engineering business. 

Consuftants in the sector 
reported advertised salaries 
ranging from £14.000 to 
£25.000. One consultant re- 
ported a range up to £50.0 00 
for a production director in a 
large engineering company. 

Other surveys have suggested 
basic salaries of nearly 
£14.000 for production man- 
agers. and just under £16,000 
for works managers. 

Another survey last year 
suggested a 9 per cent increase 
in salaries with a median of 
more than £17.000. 1 

Pay for production man- 
agers tends to be highest in the 
fast-moving consumer goods 
industry, with a differential of 
about £3.000. 

More is being demanded of 
production executives, says 
IDS, and the production man- 
ager needs a range of skills. 

IDS said: “Production 
management is more about 
strategy than fire-fighting. The 


manager’s role 
may include procurement, 
stock and quality control and 
cost co rural.™ 


About half of the jobs 
reviewed by IDS offerwl 
company car. but in smaller 
companies this was not an 
automatic benefit. Only some 
companies paid 
bonus.though a greater 
proportion paid relocation ex 
pe rises and medical insurance. 

Executive pay increases iu 
the electronics industry were 
running at about 9 per cent 
over the year to this past 
Spring, judging from several 
recent surveys. IDS reported. 


Median salary levels were 
still higher in sales and 
marketing than for technical 
jobs, the highest scales being 
in semiconductors {£26.500) 
and computers (£24.000) al- 
though some individual maxi 
mum salaries run up to well 
over £35.000. 

*1DS Top Pay Unit Review 
68 of salaries and benefits: on 
subscription from IDS, 193 St 
John Street. London EC1V 
4LS: phone (01)250 3434. 


Confident USM celebrates 
debut of its 500th company 


The Unlisted Securities 
Market — once the ugly sister 
of the Square Mile — 
achieved another milestone 
this week with the arrival of its 
500th company. 

It was perhaps somewhat 
unfortunate that the company 
concerned, courier service 
Interlink Express — received a 
rather mixed reception, 
detracting from what was 
otherwise an occasion for a 
ceremonial uncorking of 
champagne. 

But while the reception for 
the company was mixed there 
was no disguising the ebullient 
mood on the USM itself — 
something of a turnabout 
from a few months ago when 
the pundits were predicting a 
doubtful future for the market 
when it came to terms with 
Big Bang. 

There have been wide- 
spread fears that Big Bang 
could represent the end of a 
two-way market in smaller 
companies, those with a mar- 
ket value of under £50 million. 


By Cliff Feltham 

But there are signs 
that the new financial services 
set-up in advance of the City 
revolution are preparing to 
offer a house market-making 
facility in USM stocks they 
have sponsored. 

At the same time there has 
been no slackening in the 
number of companies apply- 
ing to join the USM. now 
running at the rate of two to 
three a week. 

Many may have been en- 
couraged to come to the 
market ahead of the British 
Gas flotation which will drain 
a lot of cash out of the system. 

Others feel it is more pru- 
dent to obtain a listing before 
the general election in 
case sentiment alters 
dramatically. 

This trend was highlighted 
in a recent survey by Peat 
Marwick, the accountancy 
firm, which showed that 27 
companies joined in the sec- 
ond quarter of the year com- 
pared with seven in the first 
quarter. 


Mr Geoffrey Douglas of 
Hoare GovelL the broker, a 
keen USM follower, says that 
he is very confident about 
prospects. 

“i think there has been a lot 
of alarmist talk about the 
USM and what will happen 
after Big Bang but 1 do not see 
much changing. A lot of 
financial houses are planning 
to make a market in their own 
USM stocks which will also 
widen the interest in the 
market.™ 

Mr Peter ‘ Whitlall of 
Kieinwort Grieveson says the 
market has never been health- 
ier. He belies es many market 
makers who may find the 
going lough in some of the 
larger companies on the main 
market will look to smaller 
companies on the USM. 

However, it may be nec- 
essary vo improve liquidity 
and for some of the directors 
and families who often control 
up to 80 per cent of the shares 
in USM companies to release 
more equity on to the market. 


Decision near on shopping centres 


Town planners will decide 
next week between two rival 
schemes for a shopping centre 
at Cribbs Causeway on the 
northern outskirts of Bristol. 
Each scheme costs about £100 
million. One is advanced by a 
local developer. J T Baylis. 
which owns about 250 acres of 
land in the area, the other by 
Prudential Portfolio Man- 
agers. which is operated by 
Prudential Assurance. 

There are only four regional 
shopping centres in Britain at 
present and a Cribbs Cause- 
way development would be 


there for companies such as 
Harris Queensway, Toys R Us 
and B&Q. 


By Our City Staff 
the first in the South WesL 
The Baylis group has taken 
members and officials of 
Northavon District Planning 
Committee — which will make _ — - # 

the decision - to see regional JV125 SllOPPlIlg 
shopping centres at Brent ® 

Cross. 


North- London and 
Milton Keynes. Buckingham- 
shire. And the Prudential, 
which has Marks and Spencer 
among its backers, look a large 
party to see a Madrid centre. 

Carrefour opened a 1 10.000 
sq ft hypermarket there in 
1979 and J T Baylis has 
developed retail supermarkets 


Prudential Portfolio Man- 
agers. part of the Prudential 
Corporation, plan to develop 
a 900.000 sq ft shopping park 
on Green Belt land near the 
M25 at Orpington. Kent. Only 
1 5 per cent of the site will be 
used for retailing. The rest will 
become a nature conservation 
site. 


San Francisco (NYT) — 
Bank America Corporation, 
the California banking com- 
pany that has staggered from 
loan loss to loan loss, said it 
had received a formal offer to 
be acquired by a bank less 
than half its size. 

The company making the 
bid is the First Interstate 
Bancorp, based in Los An- 
geles. 

The complicated share swap 
would be valued at up to $2.77 
billion, which would make it 
the largest banking ac- 
quisition in American history 

The merger would also cre- 
ate a bank, with almost $170 
billion hi assets, rivalling 
Citicorp as the largest bank in 
the country. 

BankAmerica, with about 
$117 billion in assets, is the 
second-largest American 
bank, behind Citicorp, the 
New York institution that has 
$176 billion in assets. First 
Interstate is the country's 
ninth-largest bank, with as- 
sets of about $50 billion. 

The directors of 
BankAmerica said they would 
ask For more information be- 
fore considering the offer. 

Another takeover drama 
has begun on the East Coast, 
where Mr Carl Icahn, the New 
York investor, offered to pay 
$8 billion for USX Corp, 
formerly known as US Steel. 

The First Interstate pro- 
posal is the latest challenge to 
Mr Samuel H Armacost the 
embattled president and chief 
executive of BankAmerica, 
who has kept his job despite 
very large losses and a scandal 
involving real estate securities. 

BankAmerica's problems 
stem mainly from bad loans to 
foreign nations and to com- 
panies in real estate, energy 
production, agriculture and 
shipping. 

The company lost $640 
million in the second quarter, 
the second-largest loss in 
banking history, behind the 
$1.16 billion lost by the Conti- 
nental Illinois Corp in the 
second quarter of 1984. The 
losses have depressed 
BankAmerica's share price to 
near its all-time low, making it 
susceptible to a takeover. 

The offer involves a com- 
plicated exchange of shares. 
Each of BankAmerica's 153.6 
million shares of common 
stock wonld be exchanged for 
0.22 share of First Interstate 
common as well as one share 
of a new participating pref- 
erence stock that would be 
issued by the combined 
company. 

First Interstate dosed at 
$54.75 on Monday, down 37.5 
cents, on tfae New York Stock 
Exchange. That would mean 
that 0.22 shares wonld be 
worth $12 and the total of 
First Interstate common stock 
involved in the transaction 
would be worth $1.85 billion. 
BankAmerica shares dosed 
onMooday at Si 2.25. op 87.5 
cents. 

Banking industry sources 
said they thought the bank 
might consider the offer 
inadequate. 

A merger could be beneficial 
to both banks, according to 
banking industry sources. It 
would restore a dividend to 
BankAmerica shareholders 
who have seen tbe payout 
cancelled because of loan 
losses. 


Yolcker is linked with 


top post at the IMF 


From Bailey Morris, Washington 


Mr Paul Volcker. chairman 
of the United States Federal 
Reserve Board, as tbe next 
managing director of the 
International Monetary 
Fund? Preposterous as it may 
sound, the idea is taken seri- 
ously in Washington as Cen- 
tral Bank watchers ponder the 
end of the Volcker era. 

It is unlikely that Europe's 
traditional hold on the IMFs 
senior position will be broken 
but the fact that there is 
speculation suggests two 
things. Support tor the ob- 
vious European candidates is 
lukewarm. Equally important, 
events of recent months which 
have brought dramatic 
changes to the Fed bolster the 
growing consensus that 
MrVoicker is looking for an- 
other job. 

European finance ministers 
will attempt to unite behind 
an IMF candidate in Brussels 
next Monday, having toiled to 
do so last week in Wash- 
ington. That meeting that will 
cither fuel or dampen the 
speculation. But the other end 
of the rumour, that Mr 
Volcker is restless and seeks a 
change, will be more difficult 
to dispeL 

The sudden resignation last 
week of Mr Emmett Rice, a 
Federal Reserve governor and 
one of the last of the unquali- 
fied Volcker supporters, 
marks an important turning 
point at the US Central Bank. 
The only philosophical ally 
left is Mr Henry Wallicb who 
is ill and could be forced to 
leave the seven-member 
board before his terra expires 
in 1988. 

This would give President 
Reagan the rare opportunity 
to appoint five perhaps six of 
the standing governors, fur- 
ther consolidating the supply- 
side, or easy money stance of 
the board. Mr Volcker. whose 
second term expires in 1987, 
could suddenly find it difficult 
to build support for his agenda 
after ruling the Fed with an 
iron hand for almost a decade. 

Although he is said to be 
seeking another job, few ex- 
pect Mr Volcker to leave his 
powerful post before next 
August. Equally firm is tbe 
growing conviction that he 
would not accept another term 
if one was offered by the 
Reagan Administration. The 
other leading candidates are 



Paul Volcker — said to be restless and looking for a change 


Mr George Shultz, the Sec- 
retary of Slate, and Mr Ma- 
nuel H. Johnson, vice- 
chairman of the Federal 
Reserve and a former Trea- 
sury officiaL 

MrVoicker has forged an 
alliance with tbe Reagan- 
appointed majority — Mr 
Johnson, Martha Seegar, 
Wayne Angeil and Robert 
Heller — all of whom were 
sworn in this year. But the 
Central Bank has changed 
dramatically since 1979 when 
M r Volcker became chairman, 
determined to beat inflation 
with tighl-moncy policies 
many blamed for the 1981-82 
recession. The board, itself, is 
more independent 

The American economy has 
gone from bust to boom and is 
again weakening. Hie empha- 
sis of tbe Fed has shifted from 
inflation to preventing an- 
other steep recession. ■ 

Last February was a critical 
turning point which marked 
the end of Mr Volckeris 
dominance. Four of the 
Reagan appointees staged a 
palace coup, demanding that 
the Fed cut the discount rate 
to stimulate the economy 
despite Mr Volcker's assertion 
that such a move, if not 
coordinated with West Ger- 
many and Japan, would dan- 
gerously weaken the dollar. 

The majority prevailed, by a 
4-to-3 vote, and Mr Volcker 
threatened to resign. Only 
later was a face-saving com- 
promise patched together by 
MrAngell and Mr Volcker 


which allowed a deal on 
coordinated interest rate cuts. 

Having lost an important 
battle to tbe Reagan majority. 
Mr Volcker became more 
sensitive to their demands. In 
recent months, as his concern 
over the persistent United 
States trade deficit has grown, 
Mr Volcker has sided with 
them increasingly. 

Meanwhile, a list is in 
circulation of possible succes- 
sors to Mr Rice, the only Made 
on the board. He was named 
to the board by President 
Carter in 1979, the same year 
that Volcker became chair- 
man. His term expires in 
January, 1990. His resignation 
is effective on December 31. 

Most of the candidates 
mentioned as possible succes- 
sors are black officials with 
strong conservative backing 
and supply-side leanings that 
complement the views of tbe 
Reagan “gang of four”. 

They indude Mary Bush, a 
former treasury official who is 
the American alternative exec- 
utive director of the IMF. Mr 
Wendall Wilkie Gunn, a 
White House economic policy 
official who formerly worked 
for Chase Manhattan Bank, 
ProfessorWaJter Williams of 
George Mason University, 
Virginia where Mr Johnson 
taught, Mr Alan Reynolds, an 
economist for the 
polyeconomics firm in 
Morristown. New Jersey and, 
possibly, Mr Harold Black, a 
North Carolina constituent of 
Senator Jesse Helms. 


Chile set 


to stay top 
of copper 


producers 

By Richard Lander 


Chile is on course to en- 
hance its dominant: over 
world copper production dur- 
ing the next decade, according 
to a study by Mr Alan 
Davison of Shearson Lehman 
Brothers, the metal tradere. 

In his annual review or the 
copper industry. Mr Davison 
said this would be achi eved as 
new projects came on stream, 
and existing mines expanded 
their output in the public and 
private sector. 

He predicted that Chilean 
production would rise from 
1.35 million to 1-45 million 
. tonnes this year, having barely 
lopped one million tonnes at 
tbe start of tbe decade. 


Chilean mines produce cop- 
ing from 30- 


per at costs ranging . _ 

50 cents per pound, which is 
well below the current market 
price of around 60c, and are 
kept competitive by currency 
devaluations. 

Among other leading 
producers, .American copper 
companies have achieved 
large savings by forcing 
through wage reductions of 20 
per cent this year. 

Although these have been 
imposed without strikes, Mr 
Davison predicted disruption 
could happen in Canada if 
producers there followed suit. 

Mr Davison also foresaw a 
dire future for the Zambian 
copper industry, particularly if 
the. Lusaka Government car- 
ried out threats to cease 
trading with South Africa, 
which provides vital supplies 
for the mines and is tfae main 
route for copper exports: 

The review also predicts 
that copper will remain gen- 
erally within a 55-70c price 
band until the end of 1988. 
with little chance of advancing 
further until the 1990s. when 
mine capacity utilisation 
should rise to reflect the recent 
postponement of several 
significant projects. 

Looking at the .medium 
term prospects. Mr Davison 
said: “Any rallies over 70-75c 1 
will meet heavy hedge selling; 
from mining companies look- 
ing to lock in attractive prices. ' 

Conversely, prices below 
60c cannot be sustained with- 
out prompting production cut 
backs which would lighten up 
the market™ 


Estate agents to launch 
financial services group 


By Judith Hnntley, Commercial Property Correspondent 


A consortium of 10 regional 
groupings of independent es- 
tate agents is to set up a new 
financial services group. Cal- 
led Team Agencies, it could be 
worth £12 million, its mer- 
chant bank. Brown, Shipley & 
Co. said. 


Team Agencies will provide 
the 109 member firms of the 
Team Association with the 
back-up to sell mortgage- 
linked endowment insurance 
and house contents insurance. 

The Team Association, 
established in 1982. has 300 
branches which sold houses 
worth a total £2.5 billion last 
year. The Association markets 
and lists properties on a 
computer system 


Brown. Shipley is offering a 


restricted subscription for sale 
in the new operation. Legal & 
General, Scottish Life, 
Commercial Union and Nor- 
wich Union will subscribe to 
25 per cent of Team Agencies 
for £1.5 million by acquiring B 
shares. Estate agent members 
of the Team Association will 
have 55 per cent of the 
operation with A shares for 
£360.000. The merchant bank 
will hold 10 per cent and C 
shares will be available for 
staff. 

Mr Richard Putnam, the 
chairman of Team Agencies, 
said it would offer an indepen- 
dent range of products and 
maintain independent estate 
agents in the battlefor the 
lucrative spin-offs from buy- 
ing and selling houses. 


Coffee price rises 
on Brazil drought 


By Our City Staff 


Coffee prices continued up- 
wards on their roller-coaster 
ride yesterday as a report from 
a firm of brokers praticied a 
continued squeeze on supplies 
until the end of the year. 

The report, by E D and F" 
Man. said that the market was 
entering a seasonally tight 
period with roasters in 
consuming countries stepping 
up their buying before 
harvesting. 

The situation has been ag- 
gravated by the drought in 
Brazil which has forced that 
country to import coffee to 
meet local demand and to cut 
its exports. 

On the London Commodity 
Exchange January futures 
added to Monday’s £75 gains 
by rising £72 at one stage to 


£2^30 a tonne. The market 
ended off its high at£2J06 but 
New York prices were also 
sharply ahead. 

Prices on tbe London mar- 
ket have already swung up and 
down by £400 during the past 
two months on changing rears 
of ■ possible shortages and 
speculative trading by 
commodity funds. - 


• Trading id tbe two energy 
contracts launched by the 
International Petroleum Ex- 
change, an affiliate of the LCE, 
were away to a quiet start 
As exported, the heavy fuel 
oil futures made the better 
entry, with 71 contracts traded 
in the nearby November po- 
sition at prices ranging be- 
tween £71 and £73.50 a tonne. 


WORKING - LIVING • GROWING 


THURROCIf 

STRATEGICALLY 
PLACED FOR 
BIG BUSINESS 
IN A BIG HURRY- 
TO REACH UK 
AND WORLD 
MARKETS! 


SWSH) 

* u * 
KMWCH 



Rich in available land for big 
business development Soon to 
boast a multi minion pounds qiartt 
service complex on the M 25. Look 


imple 

at the map! Thurrock has the 
finest communications network in 
the UK, with motorways to air and 




• COMPANY NEWS 


• THE MERSEY DOCKS & 
HARBOUR COMPANY: In 
the half year to June, with 
figures in £000. turnover was 
25.9 1 -t <28.083). operating profit 
1 .469 ( | .842). pretax profit 
1.028 (1.416). Tax nil (400). 
Earnings per share were 5.14p 
(5.08p). There were severance 
costs of 7.485 (1.545) less repay- 
able government grants 4.267 
(1.545) and non-repayable gov- 
emment grants 3.218 (nil). 


• THE JAMES HALSTEAD 
CROUP: A final dividend of 3p 
has been declared for the year to 
June 30. making a total of 5p 
(4pl. payable December 5. Turn- 
over totalled £37.718.917 
(£35.193.9)7). profit by activity 
flooring products £3. 707.347 
(£3.315.990). leisure products 
£581.040 (£351.694) and dis- 
continued activities nil 
(£l75.b32). Group costs were 
£180.228 (£261.455). 

employees’ profits share 
£205.4C)8 (£161.530). share of 
profit of associated companies 
£25.842 (£6.435) and pretax 
profit £3.928.593 (£3.075.502). 


seaports, giving fast unfettered 
id product di 


access and product distribution to 
I your clients - worldwide. 

I Thurrock, on London's doorstep, 

J is rich in working, soda! and 

environmental resources and wide open for 


big business. 


THURROCK- WORKING. LIVING, GROWING. 
MAKE GOOD USE OF US! 


F THURROCK 
I BUSINESS 
RELOCATION 


NAME 



COMPANY 


I Fbr full details and Wsmoiv 
brochure please call “ 


0375 375122 ext. 2020 *****£** 
, or post this coupon to 
I Public Relations Office 
, Thurrock Borough 
j Council. Whitehall 


”j 


KIVLIN: The company is 
disposing of two properties 
which it owned at the time 
CMD acquired its stake in 
Rivlin and which do not fit in 
with its new strategy as a 
property business. It is also 
acquiring an interest in a City 
development. 

• HUNTING PETROLEUM: 
Six months to June 30 (compari- 
sons restated). Interim dividend 
3.5p (2.5p). Figures in £000. 
T urnover 10 1 .028 ( 1 26.2 1 2 1 . 
profit before tax 3.026 (3.181). 
(ax 1.567 (1.368). eps basic 
6.78p (8.35p) and fully diluted 
6.6Xp (7.8-lp). 

• SHEPHERD NEAME: Final 
dividend Up making 14.25p 
(I2.25p) for year to June 30. 
payable on Ociober 31. Turn- 
over £17.26 million (£15.78 
million), pretax profit £2.39 
million (£2.05 million). 

• TR PACIFIC BASIN 
INVESTMENT TRUST: Half 
year to July 31. Interim divj. 
dend 0-5p. payable on Ociober 
22. The board intends to recom- 
mend not less than Ip for the 
current year. Income £ 1 .4 1 6.5bS 
i£ 1.038.842). total revenue 
£1.489.462 I £1.1)82.68 5). rev- 
enue before tax £ 1 .00™. 8 1 6 

(£bbS. 4 lb) and cpx 0. 93p 
lO.Jbp). 


• PROCESS SYSTEMS: The 
company has conditionally 
agreed with Wcstinghouse to 
acquire its MD.4 business, en- 
gaged in the manufacture and 
sale of translators and magnetic 
tape and solid state stand-alone 
recorders, for a total of aboul 
57.5 million (£5.2 million) cash. 

• THERMAL SCIENTIFIC: 
Conditional agreement 40 pur- 
chase the assets of Uniplex 
Corporation of Meplewood. 
New Jersey, for about 
$3,800,000 cash (£2.600.000). 
About S3 million is payable on 
completion and the remaining 
S 500.000 three years thereafter. 

• DOWDING AND MILLS: 
Mr PL Hollings says in his 
annual statement that he is 
confident profits will improve 
in the current year. 

• FOBEL INTER- 

NATIONAL: The chairman. 
Mr Alan LebofT. says in his 
annual statement that the cur- 
rent year is progressing wdl and 
reserves are expected to im- 
prove sufficient!} for dividends 
to be resumed for the year ended 
December 31. 

• PERCY BILTON: Six 
months to June 30. Figures in 
£000. Interim dividend 4.2p 
|4p). turnover — excluding inter- 
company transactions — 1 1.678 
1 1 3.497). property and invest- 
ment activities 7.35™ (5.325). 
construction including housing 
73*J M.873). pretax profit 5.412 
(5.178). profit after tax 42232 
(3.49g). eps jo.5p (V. Op). 

• DALECARE: Investors in 
Industry has completed arrange- 
ments for a £4.5 million first- 
round financing for Dalecarc. a 
new healthcare group which 
plans to open a network of 
nursing homes. Must will be in 
Southern Eneiand. 

• CCA GALLERIES: Six 
months to June 30. Figures in 
£l*W. Interim dividend O.Sp. 
payable on November 17, turn- 
over 1.992 (2.0 1 9 1 . pretax profit 
223 (286). eps 3.3p (4.8p ad- 
justed). Turnover and profits for 
ihe whole year expected to show 
an improvement over 1985. 

• GREAT PORTLAND ES- 
T ATESfc The company has fur- 
ther increased the retail content 
of its property portfolio by the 
acquisition of the Toys R Us 
store in Wood Green, north 
London. 

• MORE O'FERRALL; The 
company has purchased Carlton 
poster sues for £150.000 cash. 


• PHOENIX TIMBER: Mr 
Dennis Cook, former chairman, 
has received £170.000 in 
compensation for loss of ser- 
vice. the group's accounts for 
the year to March 31 reveal. 

• NORTH BRITISH CA- 
NADIAN INVESTMENT CO: 
Six months to August 31. In- 
terim dividend 2.1 5p (2p) pay- 
able on November 1 0, eps 3.6 1 p 
(3.45p). net asset value per share 
31 l.4p (249.5p). 

• CITY VISION; The company 
and CBS/ FOX Video announce 
that the litigation relating to 
their jointly owned company, 
Vidcoserve. has been settled. 

• BROWNLEE: The board of 
Meyer International says the 
OFT has indicated that the 
acquisition of Brownlee by 
Meyer does not appear to 
qualify for investigation by the 
Monopolies and Mergers 
Commission. 

• SIEBE: Siebe's garage equip- 
ment company Tccalcmit is 
acquiring (he garage equipment 
division of GKN-Laycock En- 
gineering from November 10. 

• LEE INTERN ATIONAI : 
The company has agreed to 
acquire Delta Sound Services 
for the issue of 375.000 Lee 
ordinary shares and a cash 
payment of £300.000. 

• CITY MERCHANT 
DEVELOPERS: CMD. in 
association with the Church 
Commissioners, announced 
that contracts have been ex- 
changed for the acquisition of 
the freehold properties at 19-25 
Birrhin Lane. City ofLondon. 
from the Royal Bank of Scot- 
land. Planning consent has been 
granted for a redevelopment, 
■which is estimated to cost £47 
million and will be fully funded 
by the Church Commissioners. 

• PETER BLACK: The as- 
sets ol Pava. which manufac- 
tures toiletries at Swan age. 
Dorset, have been acquired for 
£o00.U00 cash. 

• NORSK HYDRO: The fertil- 
izer market has been under 
severe pressure during the third 
quarter and prices in the Euro- 
pean markets are unsatisfactory, 
says the company. Results from 
overseas markets continue to be 
poor. The results for the third 
quarter, and for 1 986 as a whole, 
will be considerably poorer than 
expected when the company 
presented results for the first 
half in Julv. 


• MILLIARD BROWNrThe 
company has agreed to acquire 
the equity of Ad Factors Inc. a 
US market research agency fora 
minimum of $ 1,932.000 
(£1.341 .000) and a maximum of 

54.727.000 payable by instal- 
ments over five years. The initial 
consideration of SI. 932,000 will 
be satisfied by the issue of 

850.000 new ordinary Millward 
Brown shares. 


• KEELER BRASS CO: The. 
company, a USsubsidiary of 
Babcock International and Rob- 
ert Bosch GmbH of Stuttgart. 
West Germany, have formed 
KB Lighting Inc a joint venture 
to supply headlamps to the 
American automotive 
industry.lt will develop and 
manufacture headlamps under 
licence from Bosch and has 
already been awarded a contract 
for the 1989 model year worth 
SI5 million (£10.42 million). 
Volume production will start in 
mid-1988 in Kentwood. Michi- 
gan. a suburb of Grand Rapids, 
the headquarters of Keeler 
Brass-A $14 million investment 
programme is planned for the 
new company over the next six 
years. 


• AC Holdings: For the nine 
months to June 30 (year to 
September 1985). No dividend 
(nil), turnover £1 15.012 
(£252.936). loss before tax 
£70.911 (£51.474) earnings per 
share pre-extraordinary items 
2.63p (2.57p). These items com- 
prise redundancy costs of 
£37.567 and a guarantee of 
overdraft and lease of 
£82.480-There has been a 
significant writeoff of stock and 
a substantial provision for 
liabilities in respect of the 
forfeiture of a lease. These items 
totalling £151.247 in addition to 
redundancy costs amounting to 
£37.565. are reflected in the 
accounts for the nine month 
period under review. The direc- 
tors have resolved to sell (he 
property at Thames Diuon and 
negotiations are at an advanced 
stage- The newly appointed 
auditors have qualified the ac- 
counts as a result of the loss of 
certain key accounting records 
for the period prior to April 16. 
The chairman is confident that 
the controls which have been 
instigated by the new board are 
such that this situation will noi 
be repeated. 


• ALVA INVESTMENT 
TRUST: For the six months to 
end August, interim dividend 
I.3p (same). Revenue from 
invest £44.620 (£69.9941 in- 
terest from investments £72,000 
(£ 1 0.500). interest recciveable 
£16.911 (£42.442). underwriting 
commission nil (£2,416), gross 
revenue £133.531 (£125,352). 
expenses and interest £68,531 
(£85.783). pretax profit £65.000 
(£39.569). tax £13,155 
(£I!,87l). earnings per share 
2.96p (I.S8p). net asset value 
220.4p (255.3p). 

• FALCON INDUSTRIES: 
The company has entered into 
conditional agreements with the 
Newship Group to sell the share 
capital and Wednesficld, West 
Midlands, factory of Jenks and 
Cat tell. Burgon and Ball and 
Sound Garden Tools. The agree- 
ments are conditional on the 
approval of Falcon shareholders 
at an extraordinary meeting on - 
November 1 1 . Falcon expects to 
receive a cash consideration of 
£3 • million adjustable on 
completion, so chat the net 
assets of the business to be sold 
exceed or toll below £2.725mil- 
lion. Falcon has agreed to 
recapitalise the businesses 1 o be 
sold prior to their disposal Asa 
result, the net proceeds of the 
disposal arc expected to reduce 
the Falcon Group's net borrow- 
ings by approximately £3 m 


• COMCAPr An interim divi- 
dend of 0.75p (0.60p) for six 
months ended June 30 has been 
declared. With figures in (£000): 
turnover 33.056 (25,296), gross 
profit 5.870 (4.106). profit be- 
fore tax 3.048 (2.197). tax 
(overseas) 325 '(304), minority 


interests 258 (68L earnings per 
share 1 1.76p (8.96p)_ * 


Compari- 
sons have been adjusted to 
include ihe results on a merger 
basis of Aurit Services acquired 
on December 31. 1985. The 
second . half normally experi- 
ences a higher level of activity 
and the directors are confident 
that co will . show further 
progress for the full year.The 
strength of the European cur- 
rencies in the period contributed 
£170.000' of additional profit 
compared with the correspond- 
«ng period in 1985. Since J une 
30 there has been a further 
dramatic weakening of sterling 
against the European currencies. 
• MOUN& Six months to 
June 30. Interim dividend 2.2p. 


Figures in Emillion. Turnover- 
tobacco 


-- machinery 45.7 (33:5) 
and corrugated board machin- 
5* ’ 7 - 5 U9.4). Pretax profit 4.6 
(2.5). eps I2-8p <6.8p). 

• THOMAS BORTHWICK: 

T«e , Stock Exchange official 
classification of Bonhwick has 
beoi altered from “overseas 
trader** to “food manufacturer.” 


Lgjb 


l 


'■j ;v-§ 


i fc. • 








:,^f 

-yj\ 


*■; 

Jti 

All 




i* 


-A 


V 




m 










to 


SPA BOND 


i'fflsssgsassssL, 


fEW LEAMINGTON 5RA BUILDING SOCIETY 

PO BOX I, LEAMINGTON HOUSE, 

«n.VEKTON HILL, LEAMINGTON SPA, CV32 5FE. 


Assets eyceetUfeO million. Member of the Bulldida 

•Sotiettea'Aa a Oc toRm anAIiwestoitf ftotectioft srftenL' 

. Authorised for Inveamem by TrnjteesT™ 011 *" 


V? 











f 

\ 






BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


23 


st av s '' 

a V 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 8 1986 




i>... . 


♦Vli. 




w 


rises 



..v 11 ; viK 

. '■ Hlf, I I 

' 

wjn: 

O.- 


Six of the world’s ten biggest banks are Japanese 

Bankers begin to sweat in the 
heat of the Rising Sun 


By Richard Thomson 

- an lt1 8 COTTPSnnnfto*,f 


- Mention the name of anv 
international 

presence of a British 


in the 





GROWTH OF 
JAPANESE 
BANKING 
IN THE CITY 


and 

short 


“cuniies houses in the 


Rritkh le i!" m ‘i lh ^re are few 
nm , b l nkefS Wh 0 would 
not rate the Japanese as the 
biggest long-term source of 

mariS 1,0n m tradilional 

The reaction would have 
Seen quite different only five 

bSp est a h?:. when % world's 
oiggest banks were virtually all 
American or European, and 
!^e Japanese were seen as 
solid, conservative and pre- 
occupied with their domestic 

Sw eiS ;- n a ^art^bly 
S 0 ** 1 ™* all that has 

nflhfm K- 355615 size - *“ out 
® b, 88est banks in the 
world are now Japanese. 

As Japan's trade surplus has 
grown to enormous propor- 
tions. and the US trade figures 
have turned the other way, the 
Japanese have found them- 
selves becoming the world's 
biggest creditors. The respons- 
ibility for recycling this new 
surplus falls to the Japanese 
banks. Their solution has been 
to operate as very high- vol- 
ume, low-cost lenders in sev- 
eral carefully selected areas. 
What causes most concern is 
that they are concentrating on 
the newer types of financial 
instruments where their 
aggressive pricing threatens to 
freeze out their international 
competitors. 

London is the centre for the 
international operations of 
most Japanese banks. AH 13 
Japanese city banks now have 
branches here, as do the three 
long- term credit banks and 
six out of the seven trust 
banks. They have not been 
idle. The most recent Bank of 
England Quarterly Bulletin 
says of the period since 1976: 
"The most outstanding fea- 
ture of the decade was the 
growth of the Japanese banks 
in London, particularly since 
1978. They accounted for 
more than a third of the total 
growth in UK banks' inter- 
national liabilities in the 10 
years under review, raising 
their market share from L3 pa 
cent to 31 per cent” 

Over the same period, the 
American banks, until then 
the largest foreign presence in 
London, declined from a 38 
per cent to a mere lfrper cent 
market share. The market 
share of British banks , has 
remained more or less con- 
stant at about 20 per cent. 

The very large amounts of 
money being pumped out by 



Japanese banks speak for 
themselves. The most recent 
Bank of. England lending 
statistics show sterling lending 
to the British private sector at 
the end of 1981 was a mere 
£348 million. By August this 
year, it. was £2J billion. 
Currency' lending to the pri- 
vate sector over the same 
period leaped from £2 bilion 
to £9.5 billion. 

Sterling lending by the Japa- 
nese in the monetary sector 
(mainly interbank business) 
rose from £465 million to £4 
billion, while currency inter- 
bank lending grew from £17 
billion to more than £28 
billion. Far from tailing oft 
the growth of Japanes credit is 
accelerating. 

According to their compet- 
itors. the Japanese win hands 
down on price and volume: 
They have concentrated on 
the Euromarkets and the new 
financial instruments involv- 
ing off-balance sheet risk. 
These are both areas from 
which they are not excluded 
by the Japanese version Of 
Glass-StegaU which prevents 
banks operating in equity 
securities markets. 

The evidence is patchy and. 


of Morgan Grenfell's bank 
analysts, something so small it 
is almost invisible. 

“They are providing large 
subsidies to win lead man- 
dates and dealerships," an- 
other banker said. In effect, 
they are buying their way into 
the market, both as lenders 
and as fee and commission- 
earning lead managers. 

The top eight Japanese 
banks now have close to 12 
per cent of the Eurobond 
market, compared with under 
9 per cent two years ago. Tbeir 
aggressiveness in. bidding for 


only 4 per cent of all sterling 
loans. For this reason, it is 
probably wrong to regard 
them as a threat to the British 
clearers' traditional sterling 
lending markets within the 
UK. This is generally a low- 
margin business which is, in 
any case, in decline and has 
little attraction for the 
Japanese. 

Of total lending to British 
residents, the Japanese had 
taken only 8 per cent by last 
May. Much of it was cau- 
tiously lent to high-quality 
risks such as local authorities 


business has made hackles , and building societies. 


rise. Rivals complain bitterly 
about the Japanese banks' 
practice of getting non- 
participating banks to lend 
their names to financing 
arrangements to add 
respectability. In return, the 
non-participating banks are 
paid a fee for this service. 

The only comfort their 
competitors derive from the 
situation is the thought that 
the Japanese are not .inno- 
vators. They may throw their 
money around but they do not 
know how to invent new 
instruments, the Europeans 
and Americans argue. On the 


tends to be anecdotal but it is other hand, to satisfy tbeir 


common to hear British bank- 
ers grumbling about margins 
that make no sense in pure 
profit terms. “They offer silly 
margins,” was the judgement 
of one clearing bank chair- 
man. “We cannot compete 
because they are throwing 
tbeir money into the market at 
any price," he said. “Silly 
margins" means, in the words 


high volume requirements, 
the Japanese probably do not 
need to. 

Virtually all of this business 
is in currencies other than 
sterling. The same is true of 
direct lending booked in 
London. Japanese banks took 
a quarter of the total loan 
market, or £13 billion, in 
Britain by May this year, but 


But the Japanese took 34 
per cent of the currency loan 
market earlier this year. It is 
not dear what all these loans 
were and therefore exactly 
what kind of business this is, 
though it is an indication of 
what fine pricing can achieve. 

As in other markets, bank- 
ers wony about the Japanese 
producing the “motorcycle 
effect". One said: “Having 
hammered the opposition out 
of sight, they will start jacking 
profits up again and start to 
make realistic margins on this 
business". 

The prospect that the Japa- 
nese might one day apply the 
same technique to the highly 
profitable. British retail lend- 
ing market turns . domestic 
bankers* hair grey. 

Though this may seem fan- 
ciful, several developments 
could favour it In the rel- 
atively near future, any in- 
stitution warning a ready- 
made branch network is likely 
to have the chance to. buy a 


Where the rich and famous go 
to pawn the family silver 


By Carol Leonard 

Down a darkened alley-way 
on the fringes of the City ©f 
London stand two identical 
mahogany doors. The words 
“Pledge Department," en- 
graved on frosted glass win- 
dows, are the only due to what 
lies behind. 

Inside, you find yourself In 
one of two sound-proofed 
cubbv-holes. Locking the door 
behind you, you can raise tens 
of thousands of pounds within 
minutes — with no questions 
asked. 

These thresholds have been 
crossed by Indian princes 
bearing emeralds, actresses 
with large diamonds, brokers 
with the family silver and 
.secretaries and housewives 
with nothing more than then- 
wedding rings. 

E A Barker is a 
Houndsditch pawnbroker - 
but it is unlike any other 
pawn broker. Part of the fflus- 
triuus Mappm & Web b, it is 
the only pawnbroker within 
the Square Mile. And, nn- 
likelv though it may sound, it 
is very much a part of the Chy. 
Stock market speculators 
regularly use its services to 
raise capital to back their 
fancy in the market. 

■‘During the run-up to the 
TSB flotation we hast dozens 
of people coming in to pawn 
their jewellery to buy shares, 
said Mr Roy Bragg, the 
manager, peering over, *“* 
half-rimmed gold spectacles in 
true Dickens ian-styie. 

Mr Bragg, aged 59 and * 

pawnbroker since he was 14, 

new asks customers what the 
money is for. -Sometimes they 
tell me but I never ever ask. 

He also steadfastly refuses 
to name any of his more 
famous clients. “My business 
has taken me into Backup- 
ham Palace and No. 10 
Dow ning Street — brt I J not 
going to tell you ™ Tn™ 6 

Minister was at the tune, he 

,C The service he offers “is no 
different from that of a bank 
- except that his clients are 
borrowing money without go- 
ing into debt. . , , 

“There’s no stigma attached 
any more. It’s a simple busi- 



Roy Bragg: the man who asks uo questions (Photograph: Peter Trievnor) 
ness transaction. I lend you requirement is that the auction Bardaycard, which levies an 


the money. You leave goods 
security and pay me interest. 

“It's not like the old days 
when women used to pawn 
their wedding rings just to buy 
food. Nowadays people come 
in if they have to to pay a large 
gas bill or school fees, if they 
want (o book a holiday, punt 
on a share tip or go out 
gambGng." 

One wealthy woman regu- 
larly raises up to £15,000 for 
what she calls “sweetie 
money." Mr Bragg said: "She 
sends her chauffeur over in the 
Rolls-Royce to take me back to 
her bouse so that I can give her 
the money and pick out some 
of her jewellery. Tve no idea 
what she uses the money for. 

Another customer pawns his 
diamond ring for a £600 loan 
whenever he gets a stock 
marfrAt dp. “One morning be 
was waiting for me - wh en 1 
opened up at 9 to put the ring 
in. He was back at 2pm to take 
it out and back at 4pm to but it 
in again. I guess he must have 
been given another tip." 

Mr Bragg will lend money 
on anything if it will fit into his 

storeroom ih the basement and 

provided he. can value it im- 
mediately himself - or within 
24 hours with the help of 
experts. His only other 


value of the pawned 
must be high enough to cover 
the cost of the loan. 

He has had to call in 
specialists to value a collection 
of rare books, on which the 
owner wanted to raise £40,000, 
and a Ming vase. 

But when it comes to ftting 
a price on gem stones and 
precious metals he is more 
than a match for any expert 
He can spot the difference 
between real and fake gold or 
diamonds at a distance and 
knows every “coo-man's" 
trick in the book. 

“After 45 years in the 
business I've seen just about 
everything," he said. “Some- 
times items which customers 
have paid hundreds or thou- 
sands of pounds for turn Out to 
be worthless. It can come as 
quite a shock to them." 

His biggest loan to date is 
£25.000 on a cut but unset 
fam ous diamond. But there is 
no official limit “It's entirely 
at my discretion." 

Interest is charged at 34 per 
cent on loans of up to £100 and 
30 per cent on bigger sums - 
considerably less than most 
other pawnbrokers and only a 
fe» percentage points higher 
than the 212 per cent charged 
for cash advances by 


additional 116 per cent han- 
dling fee. There are no bidden 
charges even if the items 
pawned need outside valua- 
tions. “That's my problem," 
said Mr Bragg. 

There is no mrnnm im loan 
period so, if you want to 

reclaim yon 1 possessions after 
just one mouth, you pay only 
one- twelfth of the animal in- 
terest sum. If yon borrow £500 
you are asked to sign a six- 
month contract agreeing to 
pay an interest charge of £75. 
But if you return two weeks 
later aim want to terminate the 
deal it wiD cost you just £&25. 

If, after six months you have 
not settled the bfil and have 
not renewed the contract you 
will be sent an invoke. If you 
still do not pay you wffi receive 
a letter a month later, teifing 
you where the goods will be 
sold and what the asking price 
will be. 

Once the goods have been 
sold, at an auction-in London 
or Birmingham, you will be 
seat details of the sale with a 
cheque if there is any balance 
after payment of the loan and 
interest and auctioneers' fees. 

“We sell only about 30 or 40 
lots a year, which is about 2 
per cent of our total 
intake."said Mr Bragg. 





v- 


building society. There is less 
need for a retail branch net- 
work. for instance, as tech- 
niques such as credit scoring 
make face-to-face contact less 
necessary in lending to in- 
dividuals. At the same time, 
individuals are showing less 
loyalty to their banks, and 
more price sensitivity — ex- 
actly the conditions in which 
low-cost, high-volume Japa- 
nese lending migbi thrive. 

A branch network would 
help io raise retail funds but, 
like almost all- other inter- 
national banks, the Japanese 
do not attempt to take retail 
deposits outside their domes- 
tic markets. Virtually all die 
-Japanese bank lending in 
. London is funded out of the 
interbank market, a relatively 
expensive source compared 
with retail deposits. That sim- 
ply underlines the slimness of 
Lhe margins the Japanese are 
content with on their lending 
business. 

“The Japanese are for less 
concerned with return on 
capital than Western 
bankers," said Mr Andreas 
Prindl. the managing director 
of Nomura International Fi- 
nance, the newest Japanese 
licensed deposit taker to set up 
shop in the City. 

“Cash 1 flow is less important 
to them. The Japanese banks 
aren’t under the gun to pro- 
duce big quarterly gains to pay 
high dividends, because Japa- 
nese investors don't much 
care for dividends. They want 
long-term capital growth," be 
explained. 

However, bankers from 
other countries have in- 
evitably been tempted to cry 
fouL Mr Peter Leslie, chief 
general manager of Barclays, 
became vociferous last year on 
the subject of capital require- 
ments. While Bank of England 
capital requirements are 
among the most stringent in 
the world, Japanese banks are 
allowed to get away with far 
less. 

In general, Japanese banks 
are allowed to maintain a 
capital adequacy ratio of 
around 3 per cent while most 
British and US banks labour 
under a required ratio about 
twice as high. Mr Leslie 
argued that the lower require- 
ment for the Japanese allowed 
them to lend more cheaply. 

“Thai is both right and 
wrong,” -Mr Prindl said. 
“Japanese banks are. more 
highly geared and that obvi- 
ously gives them a price 
advantage. But there are other 
restraints on them. For exam- 
ple, there are limits on quar- 
terly loan expansion, and 
limits on loan exposure to 
certain countries.” 


COMMENT Kenneth Fleet 


Markets still sceptical 
about Lawson’s stand 


Yesterday's 
fot 


money supply statistics 
for the four weeks to September 17 
may serve a more useful function than 
most of late. By confounding earlier 
dreadful expectations of sterling M3, 
they should reduce the cost of saving 
the Chancellor's face in Bournemouth 
this week by £100 million or more of 
reserves that will not have to be spent 
propping up sterling. 

l£ as seems probably, the figures 
were the last shot in Nigel Lawson's 
domestic locker, he is going to need 
foreign allies in his stand against 
higher interest rates. The markets 
have returned already to their cynical 
stance, persuaded by yesterday’s ev- 
idence that public sector borrowing is 
running above the projected £7 billion 
for the financial year; demand for 
credit has hardly begun to abate; and 
foreigners and overseas residents are 
baling out of sterling. All eyes axe 
glued again to the pound. 

Yesterday’s figures were heavily 
influenced by repayments of ad- 
vanced petroleum revenue tax by the 
Government due to the fall in the 
price of oil, which boosted public 
sector borrowing requirement to £2.7 
billion (making £7.8 billion, season- 
ally adjusted, for the financial year to 
date). Much of this was reflected in 
lower borrowings by the oil com- 
panies. or more precisely by their 
eagnemess to repay debt. In the event 
bank lending rose only £900 million 
compared with a recent norm of £2 
billion. 

Early effects of the TSB flotation are 
deemed negligible, as probably, are 
the early attempts to prop up the 
pound. Purchases of sterling in ex- 
change for reserves may be seen as 
reducing the money supply. 

All this bears little on the trend of 
credit in the economy. Mr Lawson 
himself prefers to look at the more 
austere narrow money measure MO. 
To be consistent, he should be a 
worried man. MO, targetled to rise 
between 2 and 6 per cent, jumped by 
0.75 per cent in the banking month of 
September compared with 0.S percent 
in August. It is on a rising trend from 
4.S per cent over 12 months to an 
annualized 6.5 per cent over three 
months. The markets, fortunately, do 
not think that is much of a measure. 

Future monetary statistics will be 
even more confused. The next figure 
will be for the calendar month of 
October and will be published with a 
figure for September as a whole 
distorted in diverse ways by the TSB 
issue. November will have British 
Gas: Arid, since the new figures will be 
made up on different days of the week, 
seasonal adjustments could be con- 
fused for years ahead. 

Meanwhile, life will go on. And it is 
still a better than an even bet that 
bank base rates will have to rise: next 
week rather than this, and by 1 per 


cent rather than 2. It was particularly 
noticeable that sterling, having recov- 
ered in front of the money figures, fell 
back later. Interest rates then had to 
firm up. This suggests that 1 1 per cent 
base rates may be needed to sustain 
sterling in the absence of the appear- 
ance of cavalry from the Organisation 
of Petroleum Exporting Countries, 
gathered in Geneva, or the Federal 
Reserve in Washington. 

Nationalization folly 

For the Japanese to accept the 
wisdom of an alternative inter- 
national telecommunications network 
is not. in itself, surprising. They 
understand the virtues of com- 
petition, albeit competition of the 
controlled kind in which they 
specialise, and they are second to none 
in understanding the economic value 
of the finest telecommunications sys- 
tems modern technology can oner. 
That said. Sir Eric Sharp, head of 
Cable and Wireless, was not exag- 
gerating when he called Monday “an 
historic day in the history of 
telecommunications.” 

Together with Japanese companies, 
including the powerful Toyota, and 
American companies. C and W has 
formed a consortium which is con- 
fident of becoming the second force in 
Japanese international telecommuni- 
cations. It will provide “a unique 
digital highway from the shores of 
Asia to the shores of Europe...and help 
accelerate Japan's integration into the 
world community.” 

It will also boost the status and 
earnings of C and W, a model of 
privatization at work in the real world 
of competitive business.The release of 
ambition, talent and energy which 
nationalization almost invariably sti- 
fles is to Mrs Thatcher's everlasting 
crediL 

State ownership, under the sweeter 
smelling label of social ownership, 
remains a central plank in Labour 
Party policy. The party zealots are 
bent on re-taking British Telecom, 
despite its appalling performance 
prior to deregulation and transfer to 
the private sector. The intention is to 
rake in Mercury, C and W*s vigorous, 
infant competitor to British Telecom, 
with BT. 

These threats show how little 
Labour thinking has progressed. 
Given a chance to breathe, C and W 
and to a lesser degree BT are showing 
what they are capable of achieving for 
their own and the country’s good. 
Without Mercury, a vital link in the 
structure, it is inconceivable that C 
and W would today be contemplating 
the stunning prospect of a digital 
highway encircling the globe. 

If we wish to destroy some of the 
good things that are happening in 
British industry, the formula is 
nationalization. 


Put 




brake 

on overpriced 

motor 

insurance. 

Speciallow rates for careful drivers over 40. 

Low Cost Insurance + Breakdown & Accident Rescue == Cheaper Motoring 


You get fuDy comprehensive cow with a 
major UK insurer. 

You wont lose year no claims discount If 
yon make a claim. 

Tbo receive &« friendly service -always. 
Ybn can spread yoor p a ym en t s over 12 
months. 

Your quotation Is guaranteed for one year. 


Free to a 24 hour nationwide 
breakdown and accident recovery service 
with every policy. Pita low cost optional 
foil RoadRotate giving you fast roadside 
assistance and repair, vehicle recovery, gee 
yon home service far you and your car. hire 
car to continue your tourney, overnight 
accommodation. 


Our policy Is low cost motor insurance. 
We doot believe you should pay for the 
mistakes of less careful drivers and the 
Inexperienced. 

With the toon Elite m ot ori sts : policy you 
get super value motor insurance ana all 
the benefit of a tunoomde breakdown 
service -at the right price. 


SO. IF YOU ARE OVER 40 AND DRIVE A STANDARD SALOON, 
HATCHBACKORESTATECAR. HOW MUCH COULD yOU SAVE? 
SEND FOR YOUR FREE QUOTATION TODAY (NO OBLIGATION). 


FREEPOST QUOTATION 


P- 

_ Kune — 
I Address. 


Ito I^cm4Mixii|ullfyieribeABaaClittUotwtiu , M<y tdrfvuciudin) 
fMtna.b*icfab*cfc.«utccai and luvea vein no claims no ohm cooviaiUni 
wbernu saMpcrduttoBcDCrLocucjcideBU in ibelui}jwaR.iiidoal« allow np 
W}«tepRWMtotdtawtcB!0aiid7$ioaseiujrat. 


.UB/MX&cu. 








NnKfKMrliciiad'orfluit 





— wuu UidUIdULC i LL 

l So " ate< “ ■'Jpow-Awu. CVT7 7BRI no Mjmp neqnffed) 


■-S 






-.V- 





i 

] 


1 












24 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 8 1986 


J 


STOCK MARKET REPORT 


Shares stay buoyant despite 
worries over interest rates 


The stock market celebrated 
the better-than-ex peeled 
money supply figures in style 
yesterday, but it could be left 
nursing a prize hangover when 
trading resumes today. 

After poring over the figures 
most City economists remain 
bearish and are convinced that 
a rise of I per cent in tank 
base rales is still on the way. 
The 1.6 per cent increase in 
M3 turned up to be much 
better than the figure of 3 per 
cent originally feared. 

But it may not be enough to 
lake the pressure off sterling, 
which continued to hit new 
lows on the foreign exchange 
as Opec oil ministers tried to 
thrash out an agreement on 
production quotas in Geneva. 

Its trade-weighted index hit 
67.8 before the Bank of En- 
gland stepped in to offer 
support, enabling it to make 
up some of ihe lost ground- It 
closed a net 0.1 up at 68.1, 
while its value against a 
weaker dollar slipped nearly V* 
cent to $ 1 .4350. 

Mr Tim O'Dell, economist 
with Phillips & Drew, the 
broker, said: “We are by no 
means back to the stage where 
we can comfortably say there 
is no need for a rise in interest 
rates. Another touch on the 
fiscal brake is required." 

Mr O'Dell is sure that a rise 
in interest rales is unavoid- 
able. Other brokers were 
agreeing with him last night. 

Wood Mackenzie, ihe bro- 
ker, said that the figures would 
go some way to rebuilding 
confidence. But. although the 
prospects of avoiding a rise in 
interest rates had improved, 
increased pressure on sterling 
could not be ruled out. 

But the equity market was 
content to push all this in the 
background, with investors 
chasing prices higher in a thin 
market. The FT 30-share in- 
dex finished 6.1 up at 1.257.3. 
while the broader based FT- 
SE 100 extended its lead to 
13.4 at 1.5913. 

Government securities 
sported gains of up to Dh, and 
the renewed demand was the 
signal for the Government 
broker to exhaust remaining 
supplies of two of his remain- 
ing tap stocks worth around 
£400 million. 

Consolidated Gold Fields, 
the mining finance group, 
continued to hil new heights 
with a jump of ISp to 622p, 


By Michael Clark and Carol Leonard 

helped by renewed speculative are in the form of American which includes Warburg, the 

Receipts. 


buying. A few weeks ago the 
shares were trading around 
495p until market-men heard 
whispers that someone may 
have built up a near 5 per cent 
stake. 

The company has long been 
regarded as a takeover target 
with the wealthy South Af- 
rican financier. Mr Harry 
Oppcnheimer. continuing to 
hold a 28 per cent stake 
through Minerals and Re- 
sources Corporation. 

Some dealers are hoping 
thaL as a result of the troubles 
in South Africa, he has now 
decided to invest part of his 
riches abroad and bid for the 
rest of ihe shares. Others 
favour a consortium bid fol- 
lowed by a break-up of the 
various parts which analysts 
have calculated could be 
worth around £1.4 billion, or 
720p a share, compared with 
the group's slock market 
capitalization of £1.2 billion. 

Shares of Consolidated 


•Polly Peck, (he Turkish 
mineral water to electronics 
combine, beaded by Mr 
Asil Nadir, surged 8p to 158p 
yesterday. Expect news 
within two weeks that the 
company has signed a joint 
venture agreement with a bine 
chip European company to 
market consumer products in 
Turkey. 

Gold have certainly been 
undervalued over the past few 
months, and this has been 
highlighted by the recent surge 
in the value of gold. 

Yesterday the price of the 
metal reached $442 an ounce 
before dosing unchanged at 
$436. But it was enough to 
prompt renewed support for 
gold shares after the passing of 
Die sanctions bill against 
South Africa in the United 
Stales. 

There are some fears that 
South Africa may decide to 
impose its own sanctions, 
creating market shortages. 
The big American brokers like 
E F Hutton. Shearson Ameri- 
can Express and Merrill Lynch 
have clarified the position 
about dealing in South African 
gold shares with their lawyers, 
but they are expected to 
maintain a low profile in the 
market place. 

Most of the shares they buy 


Depositary Receipts, or 
picked up via London. Few of 
them trade directly with the 
Cape. 

Among the other mining 
financials. Mineral Resources 
rose 30 cents to 820c. Gold 
Fields of South Africa $'/i to 
$l3ri and Rio-Tinto Zinc 22p 
to 689p. The big gold produc- 
ers also sported some useful 
improvements before closing 
below their best levels of the 
day. 

Platinum shares were, also 
higher although the price fin- 
ished lower on the day at $596 
an ounce. Impala Platinum 
advanced 25 cents to 1.138c 
and Rnstenburg Platinum 10 
cents to 1.138c. after 1.150c. 

Still looking for a bid. shares 
of Ex co International, the 
money broker and financial 
services group, came within a 
whisker of their year's high, 
rising 8p to 243p. This came 
after confirmation that the 
influential Belzburg family in 
Canada had lifted its holding 
to 10.4 per cent with the 
acquisition of an extra 1.5 
million shares last week. 

These latest purchases leave 
the way open for Tan Sri Khoo 
Tcck Fuat, the Malaysian 
financier, to launch a full bid, 
or to sell his 29 per cent stake 
to someone else. He is already 
a board member of both Exco 
and Standard Chartered. 

Exco is apparently making 
efforts to try and establish the 
Belzburg family's intentions. 
The company continues to 
look vulnerable, having al- 
ready ducked out of a pro- 
posed merger earlier this year 
with Morgan Grenfell, the 
merchant tank. 

Morgan Grenfell was 
experiencing a few problems 
of its own. its price tumbling 
20p to a new low of 380p after 
announcing profits earlier this 
week that exceeded the fore- 
cast made with its public 
flotation this summer. 

The shares came to the 
market at 500p and are now 
standing at a 120p discount to 
the original striking price. The 
fall-off in “mega bids'* has 
affected sentiment and there 
are stories that some of the 
original holders of Morgan 
Grenfell shares have become 
disillusioned and are prepar- 
ing to sell part of their 
holdings. 

Mercury International, 


TRADITIONAL OPTIONS 


Fust Dealing* Last Heatings Last De clarati on For Settlement 

Sep 22 Oa 3 Dec 18 Jan 5 

OcJ6 Oct 17 Jan 8 Jan 19 

Oct 20 Oct 31 Jan 22 Fab 2 

Call options mm taken out on: 7/10/88 Equity & General. Guinness Peat Poly feck. 

Docks 



Berkeley & Hay Ha. Cfcjff OH Abaco Inve st ments. Apricot Computers. Crortte Group. 
Fobei. Morgan Grants!. hranhoe Gold. 

Put Conroy PWS 

Pul & Cait Equity & General, Raine industries. 


WALL STREET 


Shares slip at start 


New York (Renter) — Wall 
Street shares moved lower in 
moderate early trading yes- 
terday. Takeover candidates 
dominated the active list after 
bids for USX Corporation and 
BankAmerica. 

Uncertainties about the 
economy, earnings and in- 
terest rates deterred investors. 

The Dow Jones industrial 
average was down 5.91 paints 
to 1.77fL54 on 35 million 
shares traded. Declining is- 


sues led advancing issues by a 
ratio of seven to four. 

USX gained IVi to 28. The 
financier, Mr Carl Icahn, has 
proposed an acquisition for 
$31 a share. BankAmerica 
rose 2 7 /* to lS'ith. 

The transportation average 
was down 2J7 points to 
819.88 and utilities, at 198.99, 
were down 1.21 points. 

Stocks were down 257 
points at 710.38. The Stan- 
dard and Poors 100 index was 
down 0.94 points at 221.44. 


AMR 

ASA 

ARied Sign. 
AH ied Sirs 
WteCWmrs 
Alcoa 
Ama* Inc 
Amrfla Hs 
Am Bunds 
Am Can 
AmCynm'd 

Am El Pwt 

Am Express 
Am Home 
Am Motors 
AmSinrd 
Am Teleph 
Amoco 
Arnica Steel 
Asarco 


Bankamer 
Bkof Bston 
Bank of NY 
Beth Steel 
Boeing 
BseCascde 
Brden 
Bg Warner 
Best Myers 
BP 

Burl ton Ind 
BurTron Ntn 
Bu 


CaferpiBer 

Celanese 

Central SW 

Champion 

Chase Man 

ClmiBkNY 

Chevron 

Chrysler 

Citicorp 

Clark Equip 

Coca Cola 


Cmb in Eng 
ComwnrtEd 
Cons EcSs 
Cn Mai Gas 
Cons Power 
Cn in Data 
CorrangGl 
CPC Inti 
Crane 

Cm Zefler 
Dan & Kraft 
Deere 
Delta A* 
Detroit Ed 
Digital Eq 
Disney 
DowChem 


Du PDnt 
Eastern Ar 


Oct 

Oa 


Oa 

Oa 


Oct 

Oct 

6 

3 


fa 

3 


6 

3 

58U 

57% 

Fires lone 

24 V. 

24% 

Pttzer 

57% 

57* 

39-4 

38% 

Fst Chicago 

27% 

27 

PtielpsDge 

20* 

19% 


40 

FstimBng) 
Fst Panne 

54* 

55% 

Phrip Mrs 
Philips Pet 

68 

67 

64S 

64% 

9% 

9% 

10% 

10'/, 

2% 

2K 

Ford 

54*i 

53V. 


66* 

64% 

364 

36% 

FT Wactrva 

36% 

33* 

38* 

PPG bid 

64* 

64% 

154 

15% 

GAFCorp 

33% 

PrctrGmtJl 

69% 

68* 

23% 

23 

GTECorp 

55% 

56 

PtJSESG 

40% 


43 ‘A 

42* 

Gen Cep 

76% 

77 

Raytheon 

63% 

63 

83 

82% 

Gen Dy (IKS 

73 

72% 

RynldsMol 

46% 

46% 

74 

73* 

GenBectric 

71* 

71* 

Rockwell lm 

40 

39* 

27 V, 

27% 

Genirat 

19V. 


Royal Dutch 

89% 

88% 

56v- 

55% 

Gen Mis 

78 

79 

59% 

60% 

75 

74% 

Gen Motors 

wii 

68% 

Sara Lee 

61% 

61% 

3 

3 

GnPbUlny 


22% 

SFESopac 

28% 

28% 

38-> 

38% 

Genesco 

3 

3 

Scnibergor 

34% 

34% 

22’i 

22% 

GeoigiaPec 

36v, 

36% 

Scon Paper 

61* 

61% 

66'. 

67 

GOete 

39 

38* 

Seagram 

60 

60 

7S 

7% 

Goodrich 

39 

38% 


40* 

41% 

15 

14* 

Goodyear 
Gould Inc 

33% 

33* 

Shell Trans 

52% 

52% 

60^ 

60% 

19% 

20 

Singer 
SmtnkJn Be 

49% 

52% 

58 Sr 

57% 

Grace 

4«% 

46% 

80* 

80% 

33% 

34 

Gt Alt & Tac 

23% 

22% 

SthCalEd 

19% 

18". 

44 V, 

43% 

Grhnd 

33% 

33 

33% 

32% 

m 

11*/. 

Gruman Cor 

25* 

25% 

Sperry Corp 
StdOdCho 


75% 

39% 

39% 

GuH&West 

63* 

62 

47% 

47 

57% 

57% 

Heinz |U. 

wi'ia 

39* 

Sterling Din 

42% 

42 

7% 

7% 

Hercules 

53% 

53% 

36% 

36* 

54 'A 

53% 

Hien-Pkra 

38% 

38% 

Sun Comp 

54 

53* 

58t 

44% 

58% 

44% 

Honeywel 

iCiiws 

/0% 

24". 

70% 

24% 

Teledyne 

311% 

40% 

312 

40% 

34*4 

35% 

(ngersoll 
intend Steel 

52* 

52* 


33* 

33% 

72* 

35% 

18% 

19 

Texas E Cor 

29% 

30 

39% 

39% 

IBM 

133 1 ', 

130% 


112% 

110V.- 

35* 

35% 


14% 

.14% 


33 

33* 

57V. 

56% 

bit Paper 
int TelTei 

67* 

68 


56 

56 

70% 

70% 

49% 

49% 

Travlrs Cor 

44% 

43* 

58 S 

57* 

Innng Bank 

48* 

48* 

TRW Inc 

93* 

92* 

11% 

11% 

Jhnsn A Jhn 

63% 

64% 

UAL Inc 

58* 

58* 

37* 

37* 

Kaiser Alum 

17% 

17* 

Unlever NV 

211% 

210 

215V ; 

206% 

Kerr McGee 

27% 

27* 


20* 

20?. 

33* 

33V, 

KmdTyClrk 

80 

80 

UnPacCor 

5/y, 

56% 

26 

26% 

K Man 

45 V, 

46% 


34 

34* 

37% 

36% 

Kroger 

LT.v. Corp 

30* 

30% 

USGCorp 

41V. 

43* 

41% 

43% 

43S 

2!i 

25 

Utd Tachnol 

42* 

45V. 

44% 

Luton 

75% 

75% 

USX Corp 

26% 

26". 

37% 

36% 

Lockneeo 

44% 

44* 


23% 

23* 

48 

49 

Lucky Sirs 
Man H'nver 

36% 

36 

JwnWalsar 

42% 

43". 

20 

19% 

44% 

45 

Bin i 

54 

53* 

35% 

34% 

ManvifleCp 

2% 

2", 

Webs Fargo 

W'sigftseB 

102% 

100* 

38% 

38* 

: s.-pco 

49* 

49% 

54 K 

53?. 

123% 

123% 

Marine Mid 

47% 

48% 

Woyerh ser 

35 V, 

35'. 

42% 

42'. 

Mrt Manana 

43* 

43% 

TOarloool 

61 

SO* 

32 

31 % 

Masco 

24 

24% 

Wootworln 

40 

40 

3T% 

31% 

McDonalds 

59% 

57* 

Xerox Corp 

52* 

51% 

45% 

45 

McOormefl 

84% 

84% 

Zenrth 

20 

20 


30. 


56 

55* 




12* 

13 

Merck 

101% 

96% 




27 

28% 

MeistaMng 

100* 

100% 




50% 

59% 

50% 

60% 

MOW 04 
Monsanto 

37 1 ! 

69% 

37% 

69* 

CANADIAN PRICES 

28% 

28% 

Morgan J.P. 

84 'i 

83% 

Atxttx 

23% 

22* 

50% 

5m. 

Motorola 

37% 

38 

Akn Alum 

43% 

43% 

55% 

55 

NCR Corp 

47'A 

47% 


13% 

13'. 

23 

23% 

NLIndstrs 

5% 

5% 

Can Pacsfc 

16% 

1 8'-.- 

47 

4b’> 

NatDiSt&5 

41% 

41 

Conwwo 

m 

13?:- 

\S\ 

16% 

NatMedEnl 

24% 

24% 

CwBatwsi 

23% 

23?, 

92% 

92% 

NaiSmcndl 

9% 

9% 

Hkr/SaJCan 

26% 

26% 

41% 

40% 

Noriotk Srh 

82', 

81 

HdsnBMw 

24% 

24". 

55% 

54% 

NWBannp 

J5% 

35*1 


34 

33% 

17% 

171. 

Ocodm Pet 

29 1 . 

29 


44*4 

45'j 

45% 

7 RV. 

45W 

79 

Ogden 

Qlri Corp 

44 

39V. 

44% 

39’. 

In Pipe 

Ryl TrusKO 

40V, 

29* 


9 

9 

Owens-ffl 


4D'v 

Seagram 

«*'/, 

83 i 

55". 

to 

PacGasB 

24% 

24 

21% 

23?. 

W% 

68% 

Pan Am 

5% 

b'V 


ZU’, 

27?-: 

01% 

81 

P»noay J.C. 

71% 

72% 

Vanty Ccxp 
Wlkr Hiram 

2.65 

2.65 

66% 

67% 

Pennztw 

82% 

62' i 

3/!'. 

37% 

flfeS 

87'. 

Pepisco 

2t>% 

26* 

WCT 

13* 

13 

- e-- 


. ■ •• 

- ■- n 

- B 

. - . 1 1 <-c yv. • -• 


merchant bank. Akroyd & 
Sm it hers, the jobber, and 
Rowe & Pitman, the broker, 
recovered an early fail to 
finish all-square at 300p. 

Norwich Union Insurance 
has increased its stake after 
converting its holding of 7.58 
per cent cumulative pref- 
erence shares. It now speaks 
for 7.91 million shares, or 5.4 
per cctil 

Hambros slipped 2p to 
223p. It is in talks with C E 
Heath, the insurance broker,, 
to buy its subsidiary. Fielding 
Insurance. C E Heath finned 
5p to 449p. 

Jobbers marked sharply 
higher the price of Tyzack 
Turner, which makes indus- 
trial knives and blades, after 
learning that two of its biggest 
shareholders had received ap- 
proaches for their shares. 

Tyzack has confimed that 
Boston Investment Manage- 
ment Group and Ayre MailetL 
both controlled by Tyzack 

• Shares of United Bis- 
cuits have nnderperfbnned the 
market in the last three 
months. Yesterday, the price 
dim bed 7p to 229p, com- 
pared with a year's low of 
217p, after a meeting with 
fund managers arranged by its 
joint broker Rowe & Pit- 
man. However, some are 
donbtfall that the rally can 
be maintained. 

directors and accounting for 
32.06 per cent of the equity, 
have been offered 75p a share 
by a mystery suitor, valuing 
the entire company at nearly 
£2.5 million. 

Tyzack finished I Op up at a 
new peak of 75p. after hitting 
83p earlier in the day. 

Leaders were firm with 
Asda increasing 4p to 158p. 
BTR advanced 4p to 300p, 
British Telecom the same to 
182p and 1C3 7p to 1104p. 
Edging downwards were 
Thom EMI, off 5p at 464p, 
Glaxo 3p lower at 947p and 
BOC 4p down at 302p. 

Bine Circle, the cement and 
building materials group, 
climbed 6p to 556p on the 
news that Mr James 
McColgan will be replacing 
Mr Keith Court on the main 
board and as chief executive 
of the cement division. 

Oils had a good day on the 
back of the Opec meeting in 


RECENT ISSUES 


Geneva. BP climbed 8p to 
691p. Britoil Sp to 133p, 
Enterprise 6p to i44p. Shell 
5pto 913pand Ultramar 3p to 
161 p. I C Gas, which has 
become a perpetual bid tip. 
recovered from recent bouts 
of profit-taking, gaining 8p to 
49 Ip. 

On the “grey market" 
partly-paid TSB shares finned 
a few pennies to a middle price 
of around 90p- The rest of the 
banking sector was mixed. 
Midland improved a couple to 
S39p while Lloyds lost 3p to 
409p. Barclays and National 
Westminster were unchanged. 

Among composite insurers 
General Accident and Guard- 
ian Royal each put on 7p to 
809p and 789p respectively, as 
did Royal Insurance and Son 
Alliance to 779p and 669p. 
Commercial Union finned 5p 
to 277p. 

Burns- Anderson, the mini- 
merchant bank baaed in Man- 
chester, fell just 2p to 78p 
despite a one-for-five rights 
issue at 71 p to raise £2.3 
million to fund further expan- 
sion into financial services. 
The company has forecast 
profits of £1.7 million for the 
present year, against £900,000 
last time, which would bring 
its p/e ratio down from 18 to 
13.8. 

Grand Metropolitan, the 
brewing and hotels company, 
gained I Op to 443p. as specu- 
lative stories about takeover 
bids continued to circulate. 
Laing & Cnitekshank, the 
broker, was said to have been 
bidding for stock in the mar- 
ket. and some gossips liked to 
think that it was on behalf of 
its regular client. Mr Gerald 
Ronson. 

A couple of American bro- 
kers were also seen to be 
buying. Sector specialists at 
Wood Mackenzie, the Scottish, 
broker, estimate that the stock 
is worth £6 a share in break-up 

But they say that, without a 
bid. it is only worth around 
420p, and they have switched 
their recommendation from a 
“buy" to a “hold” 

Other brewers did almost as 
well. Allied Lyons recovered 
5p tp 41 3p, Bass 8p to 695p 
and Guinness 5p to 318p. 

Storehouse led the way in 
the retail sector, rising lOp to 
310p. Ernest Jones, the jewel- 
ler. gained 8p to 84p, Rainers 
7p to 216p and W H Smith A 
shares 4p to 262p. 


( TEMPUS ) 

Betting shops lead 
the field at Sears 


Sears, long seen as the 
lumbering giant ofthe British 
high street, did not produce 
any surprises in its interim 
figures to dispel that view. 

Preiax profits of £77 mil- 
lion were much as expected, 
after accounting for the £3.5 
million above the line 
contribution from the sale of 
the stake in Central Tele- 
vision. 

The breakdown of profits 
provided more interest. 
Stores showed an &3 per cent 
dip in trading profit as the 
downturn in American tour- 
ists hit Sefridges and Lewis's 
stores had to bear the disnip- 
tions and costs of refurbish- 
menL 

The multiple fashion di- 
vision. however, did wefl 
boosted by a star perfor- 
mance from Wallis, whose 
separates were just what the 
public wanted. 

Fosters was also in for a full 
six months against four the 
previous halt which added 
an extra £1 million. 

Footwear trading profits 
were 2 per cent higher, which 
included a 7.5 per cent 
improvement in Europe and 
a small loss in the United 
Slates. 

Cost cutting in Europe is 
dearly bearing fruit and a 
similar exercise is now under- 
way in the US. 

The most exciting news 
came from the betting 
shops which raced away to a 
66 per cent improvement 
over the previous first half 

The Belgian acquisition of 
360 shops chipped in an 
estimated £750,000, which 
still left a hefty 56.7 per cent 
improvement at William 
Hilt. 

With betting shops becom- 
ing more comfortable for 
punters and satellite tele- 
vision coming on stream next 
the fortunes of the 
>kies look set to continue 
their climb. 

The second halfhas started 
wdl with a perceptible return 
of American visitors. The 
autumnal nip at the start of 
September helped fashion 
sales, although warm weather 
now is not welcome. 

Full-year profits should 
come out about £210 million 
giving a prospective price 
earnings ratio of 12.8. 

The discount to the stores 
sector persists and the 
prospective yield at 4.6 per 
cent is for more generous 
than anything dse on offer. 

There is no bid speculation 


in the share price and with 
the Pickard factor yet to be 
felt - Mr Michael Pickard 
joined the group as deputy 
chief executive from Septem- 
ber 1 — the shares could 
present a buying opportunity. 

Telephone Rentals 

There are no complaints 
from Telephone Rentals 
about poorly performing 
overseas subsidiaries or the 
dismal state of the South 
African economy. The 
group's interim profits fea- 
ture a 40 per cent rise in 
profits from abroad in the 
first half of 1986 and the 
succesful flotation of its 
South African unit. ' 

Unfortunately for TR, 
which sells and hires a wide 
of telecommunication 
related equipment, the 
news from its main home 
base is less sparkling. The 
British telecom market's ver- 
sion of Big Bang — liberaliza- 
tion and the float of BT — has 
provided plenty of scope for 
TR to prove itself but -has 
allowed competitors new and 
old to do the same. 

TR is fating a realistic 
view of its difficulties and is 
encouraging the City not to 
expea anything too exciting 
for the full year. Interim 
pretax profits were up 12 per 
cent at £7.8 million and 
analysts are now looting for 
£17 million for the full year. 
However a higher tax charge 
and an expanded share base 
following last year's purchase 
of Cass will probably leave 
earning^ unchanged. 

The shares, 3p lower at 
175p, stand on a prospective 
p/e ratio of 13 and appear to 
have little upward potential 
However a number of factors 
should limit downside risk, 
including the healthy rental 
and maintenance sides, a 6.4 
per cent gross yield and a 
whole crop of rumoured 
predators from the 
Britishetoctronics industry. 

Bowthorpe 


fragmented in te ™ at * on £! 
markets. Broadly based by 
activity, area and cu^orner 
type, it is thus protected from 
major swings in the market. 

The company’s record 
shows that this strai 
works. Between 1981 
1985, il achieved average 
compound growth in pretax 
profits and earnings per snare 
of 19.5 per cent and 20.3 per 
cent respectively. The av- 
erage return on operating 
assets over the period was 
comfortably over 40 per cent, 

Organic growth is running 
at just under 20 per cent per 
annum . A fifth of group 
profits is earned by btwi- 
nesses acquired since 1980. 
Bowthorpe aims to buy com- 
panies on pretax 
price/earnings ratios ot 
around seven times. As one 
might imagine, these are hard 
to come' by, mating it diffi- 
cult for thegroup to spend its 


Holdings 


Bowthorpe thinks its 
management is die best in the 
world at running small com- 
panies which are active in the 
multinational arena. Not 

supri singly, therefore, with _ 

the exception of its commod- shares may not race ahead in 
ity-oriented cable ties opera-' "the short term but are rightly 
lion, the group is made up of considered to be the perfect 
niche businesses operating in ; core holding in the sector; 


In the first half of 1986, 
however, Bowthorpe made 
several acquisitions 

costing£12.6 million in all. It 
will continue to look for 
specific opportunities in the 
UK and US to augment 
existing businesses. The 
group also wants to increase 
its exposure to instrumenta- 
tion (currently around 
5 per cent of turnover). 

Rather paradoxically, a 
change of government should 
increase Bowlhorpe’s defence 
business (over 25 per cent of 
the whole). A cancellation of 
Trident would lead to higher 
spending on conventional 
weapons. A boost to the 
construction industy would 
also be beneficial 

It is hard to find fault with 
Bowthorpe. Of its 40-odd 
companies, ail but three 
small onesare doing welL 
Without signifying anything 
spectacular, it is encouraging 
to note that trading in the 
second half is, so far, ahead of 
expectations. Margins are 
-widening even though prices 
are under pressure. There is 
scope to cut costs further. 

Bowthorpe’s 1986 profits 
will be up a predictable 20 per 
cent to £28 million. The 
shares are selling on a 
price/earnings ratio of 15.8 
times— high compared to the 
bombed out stocks in the 
sector — but fair given tbe 
quality of earnings. Tbe 


EQUITIES 

B0B Design (67p) 
Beaver co (145p) 

Broad Si (43p) 

CHel sea Man (125p) 
Creighton Labs (130p) 
Euro Home (160p) 

Eve Construction (1Q5p) 
Fletcher Dennys (7to) 
Great Southern (I35p) 
Guthrie Cora (150p) 
Hamson (I50p) 
hBte Ergonom (92p) 


Hughes Food (20p) 

Local Lon Gfc 

190 M8 Cash & C (lOOp) 

9 +1 Marina D«v ftlOp) 

68 Marlborough Tech (iiOp) 
ISO Mfltor & Santhousa (705p) 
St Newage Trans (75p) 

127 -t Radamec Gp (90p) 

195 +7 Sandal Perkins (I35p) 

128 +3 Scot Mtge 100% sg 

106 Stanley Leisure (11 Op) 

67 -1 Thames TV (190p) 

153 -1-1 Tress sH%i/l 2016 *97 

158 +1 UnSock (63 d) 

160 +2 Yetverton (33p) 

90 +2 Yorkshire TV (125p) 


24 + 1 ! 
170+5 
93 
83 
121 
144 
73 
90 

161 +1 
£17’« 
143 
261 +4 
£93 7 b 
69+1 
37 
140 


RIGHTS ISSUES 

Banro bids N/P 
Boots N/P 
Christy Hunt F/P 
Cornwell Fin N/P 
Goodhead Print N/P 
Leteuretkne N/P . 
New Ct Nat fas F/P 
Ptatignum N, 

Thurqar " 

Tflbufy I 
Tiphook 


im N/P 
■ N/F 
N/P 
i N/P 


21 

234 +2 
30 
£1 
7 

7-1 

7 

1 

5'*-1 

13 

47-2 


(issue price in brackets). 


LONDON TRADED OPTIONS 


Series 


Cate 
Oct Jan 


Puts 

Apr Oct Jan Ape 


Allied Lyons 

300 

15 

28 

40 

4 

11 

13 

C3131 

330 

2% 

16 

23 

23 

25 

30 

360 

1 

4 

10 

50 

55 

58 

BP 

600 

98 

115 

133 

1 

5 

12 

(-693) 

650 

48 

75 

93 

3 

15 

30 

700 

1/ 

38 

55 

23 

35 

53 

ConsGoM 

500 

127 

135 

147 

1 

11 

15 

(*622) 

550 

77 

9/ 

114 

2 

17 

25 

600 

32 

62 

80 

10 

30 

45 

CounauWs 

260 

25 

36 

48 

1% 

6 

9 

(•283) 

280 

10 

24 

34 

7 

13 

IB 

300 

2 

lb 

24 

22 

25 

21 


330 

% 

9 

— 

49 

51 

— 

Com Union 

280 

8 

21 

29 

11 

15 

IB 

r777) 

300 

1* 

13 

18 

25 

28 

30 

330 

1 

b 

12 

54 

54 

55 

CaW? S Wire 

275 

40 





% 





1*309) 

280 


50 

63 

— 

10 

15 


. 17 

32 

46 

5% 

17 

23 


325 

4 

1b 

30 

22 

38 

3b 


600 

113 




1 




(-6981 

650 

63 



7 

— 

— - 

700 

17 

— 

— 

10 

_ 

— 

Gee 

160 

16 

22 

28 

4 

8 

12 

C170) 

180 

3% 

11 

18 

13 

15 

20 

200 

1% 

4 

9 

30 

32 

38 

Grand Met 

360 

— 

98 

105 



1 

4 

(•4431 

382 

62 

— 

— 

% 

— 

— 

390 



70 

77 

— 

6 

a 



25 

47 

57 

3 

15 

18 

ici 


165 

190 

202 

2 

7 

ii 

rno7i 

iKTi .J 

115 

144 

157 

2 

12 

20 

1050 

65 

104 

117 

6 

22 

32 


1100 

25 

64 

85 

IB 

37 

52 

Land Sec 

300 

11 

23 

31 

5 

10 

13 

(-307) 

330 

2 

10 

17 

25 

27 

28 

360 

1 

4 

10 

55 

55 

55 

MarKs 8 Span 

180 

16 

24 

32 

1% 

5 

6 

(•195) 

200 

5 

15 

21 

11 

14 

17 

220 

1 

6 

12 

28 

29 

32 

SfaeH Trans 

600 

EE1 

cm 

155 

IV, 

9 

13 

(•913) 

850 

70 

107 

123 

4 

15 

27 

900 

28 

70 

88 

12 

32 

43 


260 

19 

29 

37 

4 

10 

15 

C275) 

280 

b 

17 

24 

9 

20 

24 

300 

2 

8 

15 

26 

33 

38 


Series 

Dec 

Mar 

Jon 

Dee 

Mar 

Jun 

Beeeriam 

360 

65 

73 



4 

8 



(■4161 

390 

40 

53 

67 

9 

18 

23 

420 

25 

4U 

4/ 

25 

33 

38 


460 

10 

22 

— 

52 

57 

— 


200 

38 

53 

56 

IV, 

4 

7 

(•235) 

220 

24 

38 

42 

5 

» 

12 

240 

IJ'i 

23 

30 

14 

18 

22 

BTR 

280 

3fl 

40 

47 

9 

12 

17 

[•2981 

300 


28 

37 


22 

37 

333 

5 

— 

— 

38 

— 

— 

Bass 

650 

73 

85 

100 

10 

17 

22 

(•6951 

700 

36 

5J 

Mi 

23 

37 

45 

750 

1/ 

30 

38 

faO 

66 

77 

BUM Circle 

550 

33 

47 

62 

20 

37 

32 

(-556) 

600 

1? 

28 

35 

50 

52 

55 

650 

5 

12 

— 

98 

98 

— 

Oe Beers 

650 

100 

125 

_ 

13 

25 

— 

1*7201 

700 

73 

TOO 

110 

34 

4b 

65 

750 

46 

70 

85 

60 

80 

95 


800 

26 

50 

— 

95 

110 

— 

Dmans 

300 

wrm 

60 

__ 

3 

4 


(-338) 

330 

?S 

36 

46 

11 

14 

IB 

360 

14 

20 

36 

28 

32 

36 

GKN 

240 

27 

39 

48 

6 

1? 

is 

(■254) 


18 

28 

35 

16 

20 

25 


9 

18 

26 

28 

31 

36 


300 

3 


— 

47 

47 


Oia.no 

wo 

92 

133 

163 

24 

4? 

55 

I-9S3) 

950 

65 

Ea 

135 

45 

S3 

75 

1000 

42 

30 

110 

75 

rm 

100 


1050 

25 

55 

— 

110 

El 


Hanson 

150 

33 

39 


I'i 

4 



TIBS) 

180 

ia\- 

24 

Em 

5'-'. 

9 

13 


aw 

8% 14- 

18 

1/ 

19 

21 


- 








Calls Rite 

Series Dec Mar Jut Dee Mar Jan 


Jaguar 


500 63 32 38 15 20 27 

550 33 50 68 27 40 47 

600 12 27 — 62 70 - 


Thom EMI 

420 

62 

75 

87 

3 

14 

14 

(•467) 

460 

•A 

52 

65 

17 

22 

27 


500 

15 

28 

40 

40 

42 

45 


550 

5 

12 

— 

87 

98 


Tesco 

330 

77 

_ 


1 



(*393) 

360 

48 

60 

wmm 

4 

8 

_ 


390 

28 

40 

54 

13 

20 

25 


420 

IS 

25 

33 

28 

30 

38 


Series 

km 

Feb 

J5SL 

Nm 

Feb Itey 

Bnt Aero 

-420 

65 

83 

95 

3 

nr 

15 

(■475) 

460 

3b 

53 

87 

13 

20 

25 


500 

12 

32 

45 

35 

40 

45 

BAT bids 

360 

100 

113 


% 

IK- 


(’453) 

390 

70 

85 

93 

1» 

S 

8 


420 

45 

58 

65 

6 

12 

15 


460 

18 

31 

43 

20 

37 

32 

Barclays 

460 

27 

50 

62 

12 

18 

23 

(■464) 

500 

12 

27 

40 

40 

42 

47 


550 

3 

ID 

1/ 

90 

90 

92 

Snt Telecom 

180 

m 

20 

25 

7 

13 

16 

(182) 


3 

8 

16 

SB 

26 

28 



1 

3% 

11 

40 

40 

40 

Cadbury Sctnupps 160 

23 

30 

34 

2 

6 

9 

(179) 

180 

9 

16 

20 

9 

11 

14 


200 

3 

B 

— 

23 

24 

— 


300 

28 

38 

48 

6 

13 

15 

r3l8) 

330 

10 

16 

27 

18 

25 

28 


360 

4 

/ 

12 

45 

</ 

50 

Imperial Gr 

300 

80 



1 




330 

faO 

— 


1% 


— 


360 

25 

— ■ 

— 

B 

— 

— 

LadbroKB 

330 

27 

40 

47 

3 

10 

13 

(■351) 

380 

11 

18 

27 

18 

2S 

32 


390 

3 

10 

14 

45 

bO 

55 

LA5M0 

110 

23 

30 

37 

4 

10 

12 

1125) 

120 

14 

23 

30 

8 

14 

18 


130 

6 

12 

20 

15 

20 

23 


500 

52 

70 

80 

7 

11 

15 

(■539) 

550 

XI 

40 

52 

25 

30 

35 


GOO 

6 

17 

21 

65 

65 

67 

PSO 

460 

53 

70 


3 

7 



rsos) 

500 

24 

45 

sa 

18 

23 

28 


550 

4 

18 

30 

48 

52 

58 


GOO 

1W 



98 



Fiscal 

160 

7% 

16 

21 

15 

20 

20 

(150) 

180 

3 

8 

12 

32 

32 

34 


200 

IV, 

3 

/ 

52 

52 

52 

RTZ 

550 

145 

152 


2 

7 



CMS) 

600 

95 

112 

117 

5 

10 

24 


650 

52 

75 

95 

11 

2S 

42 


700 

28 

48 


30 

47 


Waal Reels 

70 

18 

21 

27 

2 

5 

6% 

rata 

80 

10% 

15% 

19% 

5% 

9% 

11 


90 

5W 

10% 

13 

10 

14% 

16 


Series 

Nov 

Mar 

Jun 

NOV 

Mar 

Jim 

Lonrho 

200 

26 

36 

37 

3 

a" 


C217) 

218 

14 



9 




236 

5 

_ 


21 





240 

— 

12 

18 


30 

38 


255 

2 



38 





r?i 


CHI 


Tr 11'.*« 1991 

100 

2% 

2* 

3V. 

* 

I’m 

tm 


102 

1*.., 

'■■* 

2* 

i% 

?* 

2».i> 



n •* 

Vi. 

r.» 

3 

3% 

«» 

Tr 11%% 03/07 


4 

5% 

6*.. 

!*.# 

«M 

3%. 


108 

3 

«v,. 

5».« 

2 

3% 



110 

2 

3> 

4* 

3% 




112 

1% 

2* 

3?* 

4% 




114 

'v-e 

' M >b 


8% 

7* 

7% 


lie 


1% 

2* 

7% 

8% 

9% 



23 





El 


FT-SE 

Index 


1 


in 




■m 



I Ajii 



I 





f-'- 1 










1 



|*1 












B.l|| 

E- a 


1 


£ -■ J 

■ !>l 


K*' c l 









■:tr| 




ft tuB 



r-5l 


fill 





October 7, 1986. Total contracts 27701 . Cate 21727. Puts 5977. "Undortying security price. 


FOREIGN EXCHANGES 


STERLING SPOT AND FORWARD RATES 


— a rtritm a s 

oSsxr 

N York 1.4335-1.4380 
Montreal 1.9680-1.9950 

Ants'dam32275-&Z751 

Brusasts 592060.15 
Cphgen 10.7580-10*130 
Duwfir 1.0443-1.0627 
Frankfurt2A5352J»» 
Lisbon 207.50-20096 

Madrid 188.10-191 .75 

Mltan 1973.70-2006JJ0 
Oslo 10.4990-1 0-5970 

PWlS 9 -3480-9. 4856 

SOtfrim 9.8190-9-9050 
Tokyo 220.44422J20 
Wanna 20.05-20.40 
Zuncti 23241-23640 


October 7 
1.4345-1.4356 

1-9885-U990B 

32444-33488 

5058^970 

108145-108292 

1JWO-1.0570 

28709-2.8743 

20835-209 94 

1 BOOB-1 9035 
188435-1991 JD4 

105321-103486 

04103-04269 

SJS892-94I533 

22091-22128 

2020-2024 

23381-23399 


0564L54prwn. 

0.42U33pram 

Ift-IXpnm 

18-ISprem 

tEST* 4 ** 8 

IK-Ittprem 

es-issdfc 

15-flOdte 
tyrant-KOs 


iXprem 
IK-iprera 
m-7%pram 
IX-IXpram 

3i ei*o flin d Mco m p— d waft 1975 was n> at SOI (dey*a range 57. 8 4W 1) . 


IJS-UOpram 

123-IJMpram 

4K-4Xpfam 

53W4pam 

1V%pnm 

34-mM 

4K-4Xpram 

200370dfei 

45-IIOdh 

1-«ta 

10%-12dfat 

SIMKpnm 

5K-4Kprm 

3X-3Kprem 

24%-2TXfnm 

4-3Xpnm 


OTHER ST ERLING RATES 

Argentina austral’ 

Australia doter 
Bahrain (finar 
Brant cruzado* 

rinana manca 

Green drachma 
Hong Kong dollar 
(rate rupee 

Iraq dinar _ 

Kuwait dinar KO 
Malaysia doSar 

Mexico peso — 

New Zealand doter 
Saucfl Aratxa njsJ 

Singapore doter 3.1132-3.1169 

South Africa rand 3.185*32023 

U AEdkftam 5259552995 

'Lloyds Bank 


DOLLAR SPOT RATES 



Rates nppSed by Barefcqm Bank HOFEX and CxML 


MONEY MARKETS AND GOLD 


BeseRatee% 

Gearing Banks 10 
Finance House 10 
Hacount Market Loans % 

Treasury Hte (Discount %) 

2 mJ3? 1W 1014 

3 mritti ion 3 irmth 10K 


EURO MONEY DEPOSITS % 


Deter 

7 days S"i«-5K 
3rmth 514-5* 


7 days 4K-4X 

3mnth 4 »m-4»ib 

Fren ch Frenc 
7 days 9)4-8 
Sfimttr 9-8* 


1325 2S-°' a !S-‘ 2mnth fOH-9K 
3 ninth 10 K- 10 * 6mmh 10K-10K 

Trade Ms (Discount %) 
immh 10 K 2 mndi 10 * 

3 moth 10* Bmntft 10 % 
hiterbenk (%) 

Overnight: open 8H close 11 
I week 108* 3 mirth iOKr-lO°u 

1 mnth 10»i«-iav gmnSi 10V10* 
3mnth 10K-I0 ll is 12inth 1054-10* 
Lm« Authority Depnte (%^ 


7 days lft-1* 
3 mnth 4-3% 
Yen 

7 days 454-4* 
3 mnth 5-4* 


caO 654-5* 

1 mnth 614-5* 

6 mnth 5X-5K 
call 5-4 
1 mnth 4K-4K 
6 mnth 4&-4K 
call 8-7 
1 ninth BX-9 
fimnei ex-854 
at 2%-TX 
1 mnth 3V4-8X ■ 
6 mndi 4„'.9-3 ra i B 
CM 5X-4K 
1 mnth 4 «ib/ u » 

6 mnth 4 *-t* 


GOLD 


2 days 9 
immh 10 
6 mnth 10* 


7 days _ 
Snsnh 1054 
12rmh 10* 



1 mnth 11 - 10 * 

3 mnth 11-10* 

9 mirth 11-10* 
Starting CDs (%) 

1 mnth 10 5 w10 , w 
6 mnth 10".«-I0i'a 

Deter CDs CM 
1 mnth SJ95-5A0 
6 mnth 5JD4LE5 


2 mnth 11-10* 

6 mnth 11-10* 
12mth 11-10* 

3 mnth 1054-10)4 
12mth 1 0X-1 OK 

3 mnth 5.70-5.65 
12mth 53S-530 


SI 0339-1 04^50 ( 
Ptotkwm 

S 59530 (£41530). 
■EwkideaVAT 


ECGD 


Fnced Rate Sterling Export Fin ance 
jSetreme IV ,Awrage mfarence rate tor 


LONDON FINANCIAL FUTURES 


Tin council 
criticized by 
Governor 

By Lawrence Lever 

The Governor of the Bank 
of England, Mr Robin Leigb- 
Pembenoo, last night criti- 
cised tbe 22 member 
governments of the Inter- 
national Tin Council for fail- 
ing to honour the ITCs debts 
after its £90Q'miIlum collapse 
last October. 

Mr Leigh Pemberton's criti- 
cism. in a speech at the annual 
dinner of the London Metal 
Exchange, is bis first in public. 

He saick'Tt must surely be 
considered extremely regret- 
table that the International 
Tin Council, an organization 
which was after ail a creature 
of governments, should de- 
fault on its obligations.*^ 

Bin he praised moves by the 
British Gov ern ment tq. per- 
suade other member govern- 
ments to participate in a 
financial settlement of the 
ITCs debts. Britain, whose 
share of the ITCs debts is 
limited to 4 per cent, failed to 
achieve the settlement. Mr 
Leigh-Pemberton said: “As 
long ago as 1943, the. Inter- 
national Labour Office identi- 
fied intergovernmental 
commodity regulation as a 
potentially important tool of 
trade policy. More signifi- 
cantly, in 1974 the United 
Nations General Assembly 
bought international 
commodity agreements to the 
centre stage of international 
trade policy. The (sixth Inter- 
national Tin) Agreement must 
thus be seen as an instrument 
which had been sanctioned at 
, *“8hest international 
lever. 

"Mr Michael Arnold, the 
former-receiver of the NUM 
E* 1 ® represents Tinco 
Realisations, a group of 1 1 tin 
brokers with losses of between 
£160 and £400 million, said 
yesterday that the governor's 
remarks were “interesting but 
Ser?’ 1 , take us any 




TIMM Month Staring 

Dec 86 _J. 

Mar 87 

Jun 87 

Sep 87 

Dec 87 8910 

Mar 68 

! total 


SfiS 


89.02 


t»30 8938 

"9.10 8910 


9.18 


time 

OecSS 
Mar 87 

JUfiff7 

3 87 

Treasury Bond 

Dec 88. 


B4J22 

94.11 

8338 

8337 


Mar 87 

Jon S7 


Sheri Gtit 
Dec86 — 
Mar 87 — 
Jon 87 

G»' 

Dec! 

Mar 87 — 
Jun87 — 

f^ 7 wb , “ 

Dec 86 ... 
Mar 87 


V 

95-42 

W 

110-17 

110-25 


10130 

16530 


16 
13 

a 

94.17 34.11 94.12 ZT9 . 

M3S 9339 9330 112 

93.62 9337 “ 9337 sg 

Prerims day 'a total mmjnuraM 6943 
97-04 96- M 96-15 3468 

— ‘ — 95-18 0 

— — 94-18 0 . 

Prariot»day> total open htorest 1382 
9505 S6-e Wu 232 

— . — . 9554 0 

— — — 0 

Previous day^ wtal openintsm«"i3738 
111*24 11008 11505 13600 

111-01 11521 11523 .25 

— — 11523 0 

— — — 0 , 

Pravkxa day 1 * ton open Irtenst 2580 

16330 1B1.W 40& 

1GSJ50 WS.00 16545 - S '- 



lending 

RATES 

Ajtat & Company 

-1000% 

-32-225 


1Q7Cqr 

CoosoWatBd CrtsIZI” 
jMPmfiwBa* 

Jib 

-10Q« 

mnn« 

G. Hoars fc Cn: 

-32® 

- 1000 % 

mivw 

■gWgotete-- 
Bank of Scotland 

- 1U -WS 

.1000% 

- 1000 % 

-1DJVA 

Citibank ha . 

t iwiage fcae Bae. 

-1000% 


'V 


\ 



























ad 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 8 1986 


• < 

; 

,, ;; i'inv. •%' 

S > 

1 KA 

. u^. 

1 :: . . •'Vm*'- 
■•a V> 

... .“*111 V.' 

.:V;‘ ^ 

■ v ,:>«> 

• <• ' HI ,/ 

• '■ "l -. 1 L. " 

'■ .“7 . 1 “ 

1 I . 1 'l 

■m:.,,.. f,.. 

' Tj Iir,. 

-t.V'**,' 

■ ... 

•. . . 

.. i"„ 

• . 

‘ "''"MW 


_ TO STAY AHEAD IN BUSINESS 
YOU HAVE TO INVEST IN THE LATEST 

EQUIPMENT. 


' >\ !' ... 1 
. - • ' Jr- 


’ " 1 1 -Iw!. 


1 '-‘-‘ft t, 
’ * .J ^ 

' ' "■ *£ I. > 

i:-V 

V . 


'in COS? 
•iticizdt 
( itivcn 


t {s it that Wedgwood, The 

\ ^ a *^ ax Ending Society and Marks 
• ^ Spencer, are more successful than 

most British businesses? 

Look at how they spend their money 
find you fl see one of the main reasons. 

All of them invest heavily in 
the most up-to-date, technologically 
advanced equipment available: 

Young People. 

Of course these companies recog- 
nise the importance of computers and 

i . 

robots, but they know their future 
depends more upon properly trained 
employees. (Even machines need 
people to operate them.) 

So they’ve decided to train eager 
16 and 17 year olds now. 

They find it makes sense to pass on 
the skills their, firm will need to stay 
ahead in business. Otherwise they 
might end up like so many companies 
who have to headhunt talent from out- 
side, only to find it’s not there. 

Youth training is nothing new to 
companies like Marks & Spencer. 

They've practised it since starting 
out 102 years ago. But even today you 
don’t have to be a mega-corporation to 
train young people. 

Among the 100,000 companies 
already with the YTS are firms like 
Swallow Frames & Cycles of Basildon. 
They have a staff of 5. 

They’ll invest in the YTS, even if it 
strains their resources, because they 
know a two year commitment to the 
trainee can keep paying them interest 
for many years to come. 

Find out how you can install the 

¥■ 

new 1986 model YTS trainee in your 
company by writing to Peter Burbridge, 
MSC Freepost, Sheffield S3 7ZZ. 

In the long run you’ll find young 
people the most valuable equipment 
you ever invested in. 


:,sT. 






•o 


V 




/.if" 


-?> 


- «■> 


A. 


v-; = 








'm 

‘55 




'MM 


*N. 










/A 


v 




r m 








..‘3 














• V.' ' 


* " !? v ‘ ji’ V - -*■ 


MEMORY OF OVER 2,048 
MEGABYTES. (LARGER 
THAN A£17M COMPUTER.) 


UNEQUALLED VISUAL 
RESPONSE MECHANISM. 

HIGHLY SOPHISTICATED 
LISTENING DEVICE. 


HIGH PRECISION 
HANDLING^pEyiCfc : ■ 


1 UIVU ■ . K -.. 

SVSTEMApjLABLE; 


easy manoeuvrability: 

(ADJUSTABLE IN OVER : 
2,000 WAYS.) 


CONSUMES NO FOSSIL 
FUELS OR ELECTRICITY. 






flCITON 

FORUMS 


i ■ >±1 






BUSINESS AND FINANCE 



THE TIMES WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 8 1986^ 


THE TIMES UNIT TRUST INFORMATION SERVICE 



HO OP*f Cunp T*I 


BO Olbn Owg IK 


BWOMHUI IQM 


190. «M Gauge ft Qwgow 02 2** 
04KS3J3132 

DBhneptf GOifce 432 468* 

0a Aeon 4*2 47.0# +03 

toewOp he 394 418 -O’ 500 

Do tain 41 J 439 -At 

Sana Co'i kc 4U 9iJ -OS 180 
Da Aeon 402 523 *04 

nreurr HVESTMerrsatwcEE lto 
r mt wan Tanugg no imr 
0732 361144 

Anoncso *aa lOfljJ -03 030 

MMknm 3M 355 -MW 
uu* spatial sn «J fta -02 \« 
Auatmaa 274 29.6c HU MB 

EMn 403 403 -OT 030 

WrTastlnc 307 ®.l -02 Ml 

Ota A Re ad tat 205 g.7# 988 

Grown A meona 82 1 901 -03 435 

Mm Spnl 849 412 442 +04 

jEE 1432 153.7 +02 

turaasd tat >415 1522 -07 021 

MreftaaflEatay 704 (KM -03 522 
pn*HMf« G* 318 342# -03 248 
ScunEaHAsla 309 392# -01 022 
Speed Sin. 1982 1712* -12 083 


-02 391 

928 

-02 425 
+04 
+02 
-07 001 


BGSVBLj 


AmonGNi Extm £338.1 845.1# 
Japan Exempt £4583 4722 
Mi Prooany TM 6HM008 

Property Ttoat £20332 • 





_ __ . AH, London 

01+323 12)2 DaatogOi-ezs 5768 Basing 01-623 


W tt * 1 


MOBUYjgHgnCTglMTTWOtT 

STS 5 & 

118S T243# -03 320 

2868 26*8# +1.8 1.10 

ISTcob 2283 +01 >» 

NATIONAL PROVlOOW MMEflKNT 

3 fSSgS,tf,aB 3 f»« 

01223 4200 Ext 289 

IM uk IK9 204.8 +1 1 230 


sr&r*” IM? 

SSSTo*** ss 9?? e 

KHMcenMnmr _ 


upf uk 1923 204.8 +1 1 080 

Oo Mean. 3108 3307 +18 ZJO 

NR OranM* 9)02 8402# +14 090 

Do «Sm 7473 7950* +12 090 

FvEMMC 9U 1004 27 010 

mm£mc 384 823 -01 110 

SmSi mo 570 607# +05 080 

Wor£>«* Acc 533 583* +01 8.40 

NomnCMdrMMMORS 
PO B ox * N onreft fW WG 
0803 822200 

One Trust C1132 12.44 +007 176 

Mmol 1342 1412# +02 131 

gmMomiwsrMMMmBrr 
66, C*won SbmL London EC*N 6*E 
Swp 01-238 3805W7flra0 

147.9 1582 -0.1 070 

559 609# +01 287 
907 97.0 +07 041 

312 334# -Oil .. 
500 62.1 +08 020 

733 794 +04 1.21 

529 602 .017 

472 805 +03 . 

337 38.1# +0.1 720 
S32 57M 1.70 

003 1042# 1,78 


AHtaMMc 

EonpMi Ok 
D o Accun 
g*l RkaOM 
GoMFund me 
DoA taw 
WCB4 
M mnnw 
□o Aeon . 
Jap Sn#r 0or» A« 

saws. 

Sow# SW I* 

Do Aeon, 

Toayo Fax! inc 

unsro.** 

fa East (Si Accoro 
Em me 


08.1 W» 
002 KM 

oo 3 mo* 
1303 1303* 
513 5*0# 
412 447# 

44.1 471# 
1711 1829 
1199 1239 
1509 1712 

030 *426 
812 862 

1307 vns 
1020 1099# 
1073 1142* 
3183 2333# 
2204 2337# 

31 t 542 
900 1007 

1559 1697 
583 801* 
622 803# 


+07 2.M 
+89 276 
mi 193 
130 


-02 070 
+13 000 

rSSS" 

•01 BOB 
+02 120 
•06 
+02 
*42 045 
•03 045 
-04 ooo 
*44 098 
+05 lU 
+04 098 
♦04 090 
+33 090 
+22 0.00 
4«1 000 
*#.( 339 
+02 339 
-01 050 
742 


scnrrABAMOT-isMMtawefr 

3MB Oncachuth Si London ECOT 
01-423 $776/0711 



UK Egwy o« 

Oa Ace 

&jro tb me 
Do Aa 
Oowan me 
DO Acc 


234 2(9* 
335 3&1# 
238 $02 
282 348 

235 305 
28.7 302 


-04 517 
-04 617 
-02 120 
-a* too 

*91 100 
+0.1 1.00 
42® 
190 


PEARL TRUST 
232. nn Home 







Gfeowtn mod me 
Do Aeon 

meonw M 

M Booty Inc 
Do Accun 
Um That me 
Do Aeon 


BU 059 +35 2.19 

134.1 1427 +05 319 

T1A7 124.1# 405 350 
1322 1413# +07 121 
I34J) M25w +07 121 
1235 1332 +07 293 

2188 2305 +13 293 


KHPCTUM.DNn"1M#r 

46. mnSw omnyOininwo 

90)1 576858 


muwfc» Rk 
Aim r QoMti 
MBMnCo'i 
F# EaatOwtti 
rum— n cth 


267.7 2873# 
MOO 1924# 
1400 1061 

867 712 
139 912 
702 840 
62.1 86J 


PROUWCUMT TR USTS 
322. euiMn. umaon EC2 

01-247 754477 


Mfib noma 
Con* A OH 
Ft Emm 
Horn Amsrlcon 


117.9 1203# 
. 597 B32n 
904 102.1# 
179.7 1303# 
1254 1357# 
994 714* 
1102 1199 
#42 


+19 078 

+02 4.41 
+08 135 
-41 096 
+05 056 
+02 02S 
404 130 


+02 374 
-02 4.44 
-04 5JH 
+05 002 
-03 0.6* 
-02 126 
090 
-05 474 


MmgM Sxunpt 1V7.9 1219 490 

py+J Him 23-fi 251 1-<X> 

jCCrrnSHBXHTABIX 
3S, St Andrews S 3 Edwwtf. 

031-550 9101 

M man. um 1503 1599# U1 

Do AGQMI 2233 2375# 321 

dComsMUHi9i<Es nwrt» 

13 a Andrew. So, EdUMgh 
031 225 2211 

UK Bx+ty 1782 1882# +12 186 

£JS£i 1459 1551# -22 132 

SEte 1913 2S4J# +12 OOO 

SSnan 2564 2743# +08 053 

geWHW M UTUAL OWES I HEW 

«HS25 at OM00W G2 5KAI 
0*1-248 6100 , 




£5 S 5 ^^1 

M7 £* +05 I mgmrn fay g®5 «s 

mg 729 -01 117* m*#Md«al 8 Onri 2515 2505 
503 636 +02 029 


EurepMn Pert me 90S 982# +0-1 092 
Do Mcun son 9 69# +2-1 090 




IK Earn 1849 1742# 

(£ tn+d 1092 1155# 

ScfiiSr&SBl 

Eum#l 2*63 2301# 

ȣ****> iron 1130# 

pnk 185-1 1070# 

acorrawmi mw . 

23 Chwiotn So. Edhtwon 
031-226 4372 

padfle 07.6 722 

Ko- « 

KeSS^i 2 ? S 5 

eSmeM 406 499 

M*5Si «: a* 276# 

UK Qrrwrti M3 JI4# 

Extra me 308 339# 

SCOTTISH WIDOWS 

PO Box «E. EOtor*. SH16 56U 

031-855 6000 

pop Bq me ^5 SS5 

On Acam 2619 2772# 


+17 293 
+05 027 
+06 240 
+1 4 093 
-03 144 

+02 049 


+02 090 
0.14 
003 
6.06 
+01 031 
-02 12* 
2.15 
947 


+12 3.17 
+14 3.17 


Rd. London BCTY 2Ar 


Anr nm 8 Gen 
PK0C 

Sec income Fad 
Spec# SBwdon. 
moSwdi 
AntsncwT U|gn 

SrnH Co « 

jepen Tech a Q#i 
Il MHH BBMl moon* 

SSn. 

EoroOmwth 
Euro mcame 


903 103.0# 
MSI 20B0 
1029 1743c 
1063 2.09 
375 402 
000 722 
39.1 419# 

100.4 1171 
559 582e 
5363 5732# 
331 3S.4 
40.6 43.4 
4 62 40.4# 


312 344 
729 734 


99- 10 0 senamown. I 
0022 874761 
MLA Amarkan 
■OA OenerU 
MLA We m miond 
MLA a Ur* 

MLA Incoma 
MLA Eimpean 


MakMOne. KaO ME14 txx 

203 242 -0.1 191 

329 345 +04 217 

569 003# +02 097 
22.1 234# +0*1111 


35l Fomin SL Mancheuw 


QtWZTr(JOW£) UMTIMWAiG CM Pfr 
Wtactmxa# HM. 77 London WML Lomkai GC2N 
IDA 

01288 5820 

tad Grower 792 654 +03 1*4 

Amnean Gnmtti si2 B35 +09 095 

Amman Inc 608 735# +09 443 

European Growth 2382 2369# +14 023 
GoU a Mtaenle 4&0 48.1 0.71 

Japan Growth 1405 1592 +4.1 

ORC UNIT MANAGERS 
Royal Bomenge. EC3P 3DN 
01408 8903 

CM a Awl tat ms 114.1 +06 821 

Growth E#4hr 1013 209* +23 2.(3 

GhrM 309.1 2782 +02 297 

1373 1401c 
2*32 2508c 
250 * 2 709 


Mam DDL e#ing#y4M. Wonotag, w 


GnMOiUm 
ana Fixed tat 
Htah tacoma UM# 
.Si i mekiaom 
MQrown um 
W Ame r ic a n IMi 
ftr Eat UHn 
Soar On And 


714 752# 
1059 1007 
1083 1153 
563 583 
137.7 1483 
879 712# 
1003 1071 
605 707 


St Swatara Lane. Uxrdan EC4P 4DU 
0V48D 5438 

NC tacon# 86.1 813 +05 437 

NC Japan 1885 1883 +19 (L01 

NCMaaUKCB +9.1 62 * +04 195 

NCSmSmAl# 629 +02 1 JO 

NC Amman me 2709 2801 -02 1.40 

Do Aecun 2993 31*3 -99 1.40 

NC Smear Con U71 MS3# +94 297 

NCSrror&nopCo* 1333 2069 +98 040 

NC EwatS 21189 1239c 928 

ROWAN IMT TRUST 

33 King MOtn Sbml London EC+fi 8AS 
01-636 9678 

M 22*9 2209c 


•TAMDAKIUR 

3. Gauge St. EdtaMgn EH2 2XZ 
031 225 2SS2 

femme Una 24.1 269# 

DoAGCUnima 27 1 281# 

STEWART. IVORY UMT TRUST 
MANAGERS 

46. CticnaH Sq. EMnDuign 
031-228 3271 

Amman Bind 2194 2333 

Do Accam 7*6* 2624 

Do MOnnwaf 1533 1649 


-0.1 0*4 
-27 0.00 
+1.1 4.18 
1.48 

+01 0.18 
-03 0*1 
1.07 
+01 (LOO 
♦fl-i on 
+23 228 
131 
+02 032 
+07 490 


2*4 
+0.1 2.74 


EquOMe PWkmn 
m kaam Tnm 
(mt 8 Fund fee 
TROf fewTiusta 
Sped# 9 b Trim 
Mi Amor Tout 
Far Eanam Tnm 
km Growth 


713 703# +09 331 
750 793 +0.1 990 

49.1 5*3 ‘ +03 SlOT 

81.1 039 -0.1 133 

71.0 753# +03 251 
S58 504# -Ol 1J79 
803 925 -04 032 

613 65* -0.1 199 


Padfle 

Proparty Share 







LxU 

l v r'ff 




i 


■M 


EQUITY * LAW 

St Gouge Hae Corporation SL Comae* CVt 
ISO 

0203 553231 

UK GrowOi Aecun 1*53 154.7c +1* 332 
Do taam 1363 UM3c +19 332 
HOW rnc Accun 2*29 2570a +19 493 
Bo mam 19*1 2073c +19 *33 
G#a(HnM Aecun 0+ 0 958 +05 9*1 

Op morn 779 819 +05 021 

Ntn AmerTM AOGUM 1209 1370 e -03 022 
FV Ean 1# Accun 1053 175.7c -23 038 
Sta> Tat Accun 1604 1903# +03 1.14 

General That 231 1 2*59# +13 387 

FA CIMir MANAGEMENT 

l. Lataenm Pouawy t#L London GC4R OBA 

01-823 4880 

US Smu# Oo's 899 7*8# +03 027 

Capital Ford 1063 1133# -03 035 
UonaM 749 803# 494 

Far Easton Find 719 76.0# +03 030 

Omraeas Inam 723 774 333 

Fbwo feearast 57 1 611 +08 990 

OWtaAnl 467 52.1 +01 33Z 


SmtOr Oa n g a iae 2088 2239a +19 1.74 
Bmn Hint 2009 2779 +44 192 

BU 99 0 98 M AHON UWTTRUST 
MANACKRS 

To Bax 443. 32 St M#y+*H9. London BOP 

3AJ. 

01-823 9333 

legh mam 489 533c -0.1 677 

N Amor Treat Ida ma# 038 

RnDOvmy 1983 2112c +03 242 

on Huat 387 301# +02 956 

SI vmom hie 827 853 +0.1 556 

St VMcem US on 722 763 -03 0.78 


Do Accun 

Brea meat# 

Do Accun 
German Get he 
Do Accun 
horn 
Do Accun 
Pdltcft 
Do Accun 
Japan Grown 
bo Accun 
N Amor A Gan 
Do Accam 
PKMeeuta 
Do Accun 
SnaOr CM 8 Rac 
Do Accun 
WtarMMda Growth 
DO Accuh 
UK atatah FMd 


1753 1874 
312-1 3387 
528 584 
593 033# 
1537 16*9 
2773 2984 
743 709c 
743 7190 
2804 2783c 
5127 5463c 
18*4 1973 
1933 2068 
033 894 
039 89.7 
073 10*9 
1061 1124 
135.4 14*8 
14T3 181.1 
1873 2003 
2097 2243 
2063 2203 
2900 mi 
465 497 


+17 631 
+69 631 
-02 £80 
-03 290 
+03 538 
+03 538 
+05 038 
+05 033 
+19 479 
+19 479 
+1.0 038 
+09 038 
+07 092 
+07 002 
-02 190 
-03 196 
+09 092 
+09 002 
+19 290 
+19 290 
+1.1 097 
+13 037 
+64 2D* 


MKNCAPIMTTRQtr 

Unicom Haa. 252. Roodud Rd. E7 

01-234 5544 

Madcap 1317 1*01 +03 *74 

MBKURV POND MAHAOERB LTD 
36 Mna IHwn SL EC4R SAG 
01-200 2860 

Auer Growth 929 073 +0.1 1*4 

Do Accun 953 101.7 + 0-1 134 

Am# mom sslb &6i# -61 *34 

Do Accun 533 587# +0-1 43« 

Burapaen Growth 1392 (4S9# -05 072 

- Do Accun U4.1 1562# -03 672 


2194 2337 
2*63 2624 
1569 1349 
1227 1307 
1*43 1329 
5733 8105# 
7068 037.0# 
3223 3*33# 
3419 303.6# 
644 0031 
6*7 8690 
1669 1767 


-03 227 
-03 237 
-0* 237 
+62 191 
+03 1.01 
+23 *30 
+61 4® 
+21 079 
+24 0.70 
+61 032 
+0.1 032 


Tamp# Bar Sai Got 1715 1809 
Tamp# Bar USM 3819 3809# 
EuD GO* Til 


I0NDON 6 MANOMeSTBI 
WhtahOa Pare. Examr EXS IDS 
0392 52155 

QanarMThiH «3 453 +04870 

morn Thai 562 37.7# +0.1 640 

munadOBM Thai 360 283 +0.1 070 

American , 81.1 363 ..200 


GatorM 
Do Accun 
Gar A Fixed 
Do Accun 
mom 
DO Accun 
t m a m a i ig n ci 
Do Acorn 
Japan 
bo Accun 
Raotwey 
Do Accam 
Bangi DU 
Cnarept Aocua 


139* 1409# 
144.1 1562# 
2324 2473# 
3813 4869# 
82.1 820 
025 964 
809 BOO# 
903 mo# 
2062 2009 
3265 3*73 
18X9 1379 
1863 2024 
1069 ZHLOc 
2007 21650 
2263 2355 
35*4 3663 


+9-1 134 
+0.1 13* 
-0.1 *84 
+61 *84 
-65 072 
-03 0.72 
+03 211 
+1.4 231 
+03 619 
+03 619 
+02 +90 
+62 *80 
+68 687 
+04 037 
-03 090 
-63 090 
+33 243 
+13 243 

392 


AuMreRan Ftmd 
Do Accun 
BnCtati Fund 
Do Aocum 
Banpean Fund 
DO Arxun 
Japan Fuel 
Do Accun 
SalnBPPP 


SUNAUiANCI 

arm a—hm Me. Muehaw. Ou aai x 
OMI 88293 

Equity That Aee 3768 4827 +64 238 

Ntan TruM Aoc 57 7 B1J -03 148 

Far But That Acc 807 954 -8J 628 

WertMM Band 51 3 549 +61 643 

8UNL9E OF CANADA 

634, Coctapur StreaL London SW1Y SON 

Deo*# ntBOt-930 2602 

UK loam 211 247 U8 

DO Growth 229 34 4 399 

T96UNU Tl«um LTD 

Kean* Houbo. Andaur. Keata, SPM IPG 

0284 68780 DeMig c 02B««43^3/4 



BRITISH rLf-NDS 


+84 288 
-03 148 
-01 028 
+61 643 


SETS i'Uitdrr 


61.1 383 ..200 

465 467# +62 OOO 
289 319# 240 


+60 090 
+01 032 


Thai of few 269 319# 

M AGS&CUVTSB 
Tim Obh, Tow# HR BOR BOO 
01-820 4588 


01-020 4588 
Are# A Gen Inc 
Do Aeon 
Are# Decenary 
Do Accun 


2168 2293 
*499 2677 
2360 wu« 
2S61 2703 


Am ttn Ohr CO Acc 563 569 

Austraa Ace 112* mi 

Cmnoaty Acc 22*6 2403 

Ganpoano Grornti 6968 4307 

Oomwcn Grown 6160 6*34 

Do he 1*33 1943 

Dhrfdend Ftmd Inc 4013 4264 

Do Accun £11.77 1348 -094 53* 

Braean Acc Z773 2943 4*3 077 


AoMdcan te 
Do Accun 
e«a Income tao 
00 Accun 
GanaiM UnIHnc 
Do Accun 
G*A Atadtae 
Do Aecun 
mom 
Aecun 
Padfle me 
Do Aecun 

mo me 

Do Aocimt 
S ejooa d Oppo me 
Do Accun 
NafcrW Rea 
Do Accun 


111.4 1168 
1173 1*47 
1123 1197# 
13*9 1465# 
1583 1863 
2527 2889 
461 461 
•1 1 037 
2100 2233 
327.8 8468 
1714 1824 
1774 1863 
3273 3460c 
4047 4305c 
827 668# 
003 739# 
51.1 5*4# 
539 884# 



The prices in t 
section refer to. . 
Monday's tradin{ 


• Ex tlMdend. c Cum dhadant k Cm 
stock spM. 3 Ex suck spilt MiCta* 
(any two or more o( atxml.s&ra (■? 
two or more ol atxxe}. Doifcg or 
valuahon Days: (D Monday {&$#»* 
Wettoestiiy. W Tlwraday pf ft#R 
(20) 25m o< month (2t) 2mrH|0«kvol 
month. (2a 1 st and 3rd Wedricrihol 
month, (a) 20th oi month. 4M M 
Tuesday of month. (25) 1st ado M 
Thursday, of month. (25) 4ft TtiitoJ 
month (27) 1st Wednesday of iaiMh.|a) 
Last Thursday o) monm. C^Snlyiattfl 
day ol month. (30) 16thormoqb.JS1IM 
working day or month. (32) 20fc tfiMOlL 
(33) In day of February. May 
November. (34) Last wwf™.ft» d 
month. (S) ;5tfi of month pfrMRtf 
month. (37) 21 st of man « W 
Wedrtosaay of month H# W 
Wednesday of month (*0) -4jj « t 
monthly. (41) Last Thursday of*S»» 
Exchange atxounL (4^ Lbs* dqi rf 
month. (43) 2nd aixf 4ft WetMtdVOf 


month (43 
month (441 
(48) 2nd T 


*1 Quarter* (45) 6ft oftacoh 
Tuesday of month 


UNLISTED SECURITIES 


Mfln Low Company 


15 B 1 
S3 43 
130 83 
69 33 

143 45 

100 3? 
21 8‘ 
S’ 10 
13 JO 
WT TO* 
.90 1W 

i?i eg 

105 131 
290 r.O 
250 IBS 
355 163 

no no 

63J 4+3 
40 16 

?J3 1?4 

129 123 

05 01 

?a 67 

2TB 189 
05 68 
133 58 

re I? 

53 31 

1»V 7\ 

9. re 

345 139 
30 .a 

34 ia 

44 40 

135 B0 
335 165 
ISO 133 
rr 19 

210 85 

300 135 

130 ’S 
350 155 

» 50 

59 49 

59 «9 
358 178 
165 115 
345 195 

9 2 

103 73 

190 13S 
36 V* 
4 3 25 

195 130 

330 » 

69 65 

1*9 M 
350 213 
in 6a 

146 83 

i» ia 
IB B'i 
2S3 120 
17 S': 

tf « 
603 +75 
115 70 
in is! 
» 11 
is a 

113 B7 

35 S3 

130 :r 
100 ft 
its no 

53 30 
1* ” 

60 38 
543 208 

<08 B 

1+3 93 
415 306 
78 « 

114 06 

196 75 
108 189 
103 U 

111 75 
73 43 

183 116 
140 78 
91 63 
na .so 
oa 55 

a a 

145 133 
57 *0 
138 105 

115 70 
186 « 
a 5 130 
460 5*5 

24 r 1«-.- 
» 39 
1*8 IDS 
32‘: 0 
JZ3 236 
43 22 
38* 2*4 
148 Tto 
ll» 61 
33 2* 

1# 2 . 

215 122 

112 103 

3io toa 


(Naas 
t*v YM 

Pm Qiga panes % P/E 


161 140 


140 




90 5 l 

FaaaDotSi 

53 


10 

74 19.1 

42 18 

133 123 

Fargeeroofe 

Rafea (Mrs) 

21 

130 

+1 

• 

17 

61 1.7 

73 63 

Hardier Dunya 

V 

-1 

35 

5 + 155 

ns 3 i 

Ftaxreoi 

50 



68 

206 in 


*« 

• 

256 


60 30 

FtoyOW 

3 * 

+2 


_ IM 

88 8 * 

Fua A Waaton 

8 + 

-1 

*3 

5 . 161 

220 130 

Randi Cam 

143 

♦13 

75 

62 95 

112 65 


110 


Z7 

29 164 

338 210 

FtOar S am A 

331 


58 

15 175 

1*8 0 * 


145 

• +3 

*3 

38 17.4 

ISO 93 
47 35 

ayas 

«a 

4A 


17 

2 * 

48 

85 72 

Bttwn Lyons 

83 


All 

68 M 5 

.65 100 

G 4 X» blur 

155 


51 

35 170 

M 11 

G*>an House 

64 

+3 



GO 32 

Gkbat GO 

44 


35 

7310.7 

186 78 


81 


31 


143 86 

Gootneeo PraC 

129 

f 

43 

34 148 

126 95 

Gould (Laurancaj 

108 


55 

*0 67 

91 98 

Granyta Surface 

65 


10 

45 113 

153 1 *S 

Gran Soumrn 

151 



+6 HI 

140 118 

Grew (Bnanj 

138 


*9 

35 134 



27 




115 01 1 

i Growwwr Sq 

88 

• 

85 

95 70 

190 180 

Guairaw Aflame 

rao 


39 

1.8 568 

00 58 

Hamaowi Homacara 88 



£4 Ml 

228 133 

H *r*f 4 mo»np 

225 



18168 

255 196 


233 



£4 215 

40 26 

Haaan Cara 

41 




*80 383 V Haawttaa 

430 


125 

28 160 

390 2 S 3 V Do -A LV 

370 


125 

35 145 


150 




415 165 

HMvPoftl 

185 


6.1 

17 105 

205 45 

91 85 


90 

-2 

£9 

13 1*4 






120 ito 
131 UN 
158 112 

Hodaaon 

HcMlI HjtWR 

Ufe^baarara (M*a> 4 awa 

118 

t» 

113 

-2 

38 

4 A 

2 L 5 197 
U 160 

26 22 

rexflim Fooo 

24 

+ i 

0.7 

20 173 

14 5 ‘J Humsran 0 ac 





166 113 

Fhanar Saotar 

16 S 


35 

25 215 

255 IBS 
230 185 

Muiflawn Tech 

INSTEM 

200 

170 

• 

£1 

35 

11 241 
2 ! 148 

31 13 

kntK 

13 

-1 

38 

21 l 16 

115 44 

tad Soot Brergy 

85 



105 

103 80 






363 190 

Htrauctw Taai 

213 

• 

85 

38107 

32 21 

iMck Q 

23 


0.7 

10 178 

350 233 

J& Pstndogy 

325 


35 

1.0 295 

190 116 

Jniea Van 

185 


79 

45 165 

26 2 

Jaoaans 

8 


< 

i 05 

148 105 

JOnwAJOrg 

109 

•-3 

68 

57 128 

m 73 

Jrtinuonas PasnB 

too 

• 

Alt) 6.1 11 1 

70 48 


MR 


25 

*2 98 

33 d 253 

KLP 

296 


4 r 

18 165 

to 87 

Kent wain 

IS 


23 

31 164 

320 220 

Kenyon Sara 


+3 

149 

*7 159 

03 S3 

K®ssS SyHUTtJ 

99 

-a 

17 

ai 61 

113 50 
113 67 

uare-Tuaai 
lpa ind 

70 

75 

+6 

14 b 28 120 

66 37 






125 70 

Lwtu* Thomam 

108 

• 

55 

55130 

S 32 

Lesasa to 

51 



254 

no in 

Imbbt 

lto 


35 


170 149 

Local Ltn Gp 

1/0 

+3 

58 

29191 

91 73 

Letup Cars 

86 

-a 

29 

34 178 

140 95 

Lon A Bytasds 

113 


80 


1 S 8 133 

Loot Ski 

17 fi 

-3 

38 

28 15.4 

82 17 
95 n 

Lnanc# Rat 

M 6 Cash 5 Carry 

21 

to 

• 

51 

55 

260 160 

WAT Cure 

258 


66 

28 21.7 

160 101 

MdJtaQHai A Mar 

120 

• 

108 

85 AS 

125 +5 

Uagnaac 4 fe*Ok 

U 

• 

£7 

*5 85 

M 54 

AUsaiwt 

»* 

• +4 

14 

15 398 

to 83 


83 



176 92 

Marta (Ronald) 

in 


47 

28 215 

35 9 

uaroonin 

17 



ii« .ft 

&tejterC*y 

115 


43 

37 2*4 


* 4 aadgwFi m 

2 Si 


54 


220 123 

Maoa Taen 

136 

•-a 

+8 

29 90 

98 » 

MaOwwa 



44 

95 208 

75 13 

MaaoryCdflip 
ta 4 raajci_M Htogt 

15 

30 


£33 

50 

25 



isa 




390 350 

tag to 

Menyoaiwi was 

360 

• +6 

as 

24 1 B 5 

102 71 

Matsse 

82 


37 


» .£ 

MdiMUatnl 

75 


17 



McreMn 





ZD too 




57 


47 22 






385 231 

Oosunre# he 

370 


16 


148 142 







1 » 




220 130 

tsss Wwta 

205 


79 

39 108 






158 lto 

uavgau Gp 

123 


30 

I S 228 


Monas A Crana 



38 

34 1*5 



124 

_] 

50 25 

MoiUytOU 

45 


31 



Moms (wreara 





Moa Aarencae 

n 


35 





-4 



367 SJ 7 

NMN Damp 

263 

-a 

86 


2i 6 

Naw Cl Nat Hoi 

8 


21 

S'. O'. 

Co Wrnu 

1 



20 14 
95 79 

MaEMHnn 16 

Do IQV. no 


77 

77 73 

Hungs ire® 

73 


50 

85 63 


NWISU 

12 

+i 


150 ft 

Ner*n+ 

W 8 




rao +5 

Nortuai 

*5 


10 

22 *9 

m to 

Noracot hoMs 

143 

*5 

34 

24 1 ST 

- - - 


108 n 

38'r 17'« 

03 98 

125 toa 
5 » 175 
250 ISO 
200 110 
13* 111 
130 in 
IA* 92 
148 15 
285 194 
Z 05 115 
’88 90 
145 70 

272 J lto 

99 63 
SB *2 _ 
1+5 113 Tod 
50 30 

l» 138 
MB 270 
98 00 

280 MO 
78 +3 

580 +20 
135 93 
38S 339 

A £ 

ioa 8 i 
no a 

19 14 

£i 3 

10 4 + 

27'» 10': 

490 06 
90 48 
23D 151 
220 148 
98 63 

4 4 
158 118 

w a 

(P 30 
69 25 

10* s M‘. 

37 16 


HQ H Low 

0* AMa 
era A«au 
124 Are# Treat 
289 Aug Artur Sac 
94 AdMlOc Aanata 
98 Banhare 
169 Barry 
'» S3 

31 Br Bnptaa Sac 
86* »i«r 

00 ftunur 
700 Con* A tad 
130 Cmacanr Japn 
100 Darby few 
110 Do cap 
314 Drayton Con 
134 Drayton Fw Eaar 
42D Drayton Japan 
178 OurdMLon 
08 m Am# AasM 

110 Edfefcrgn 
284 Bactflc Gm 
136 EnaWcn UK 
76 BvjHB Son 

06 F4C AOanoa 
M2 FAC Paavo 
V r» Oral CharloiM 
207 First Scot Soar 
<0 flnfUnGan 
4S0 nandag Aeuncan 
140 Hwi#g Oao# 

284 Flautig EntarorlM 
W: Ganfeng Far Earn! 
109 Runfeg FtadSpng 
480 fimwio Jiao 

123 nmng Hu cai a a 

128 Racing Q u ar g a ai 
140 Flarotg Taoi 

107 Ranfenn UnMtsN 

01 Rr 63 


Wca Orga 

114 +1 

003 #+3 

128 +1 
370 +7 
100 #+1 
«8 +4 


96 +1 

820 +5 

213 +1 

IE 

13* 

330 +2 

188 +3 

TIB +2 
195 

90 

142 +1 

308 

105 

100 #+1 
99 +1 

ITS 

208 #+Z 

10V 

322 +e 
05 

903 -2 

180 

308 +a 

130 +1 

132 »1 

710 +2 

163 

162 #+1 
148 -2 

139 #+2 

97 +1 

91 


#v YM 
panca % pg 
36 32 223 

31 A 4J0 30A 
4* 3535.1 

AS H 68l3 ' 
09 OS 7 K 3 
3SD 30 48.1 
lJ5b 0.6 . 

ao as saws 

07 20 +73 

212 *5 285 
35 13 *6 0 
31+ 35 3S8 
05 02 

125 A* 18.1 

1*8 45 332 

15 U 
1.4* 02 

am> *i 3*7 

02 02 76.6 

*7 35+15 
64 1.7 815 
A5 3548.1 
an 2ja«05 
2J0 26707 

25 22 811 
2.1 Id 803 
Ol 10 
15 0 4-7 300 

6.7 02 ao 
M 15825 

74 41 3*8 

126 *23*2 

14 1.1 

35 2.7 S1.0 

57 05 

95 34 42.1 

36 £8132 

35 25942 

2.18 15S75 
248 £5 065 


Low Congany 


ta* Yu 

PitcaQfga otnoa % P/0 


<5 saw™! 

100V TR Natural Raa 130 

» TR Norm America 63 

!!2 IH i*** 1» 

1+0 TR Proparty 179 

90V TH TaST 103 - 

W9 TRThuraro 187 

i» Tona+t Bar i4fl 

^ Thorgmorion 200 

300 Throg Sacuad Cap 350 

2K* 5S5“ os""* zo* 

79 Tiyt**Mt lac 93V 

STI 7 OS Dobanan 281 

36 VakN Me Tat 42 

S WjfagB Aaouc# MV 
ra impact 83 

mv Wltan 100 

286 Yaoaion 335 


ass 

3 si 

:: ps 

+1 1158 <!*« 

as* 

erf! 

-1 * Jilt 45 W 


FINANCIAL TRUSTS 


LONDON COMMODITY 
EXCHANGE 

- GW Joynson sod Co report 

SUGAR (From C. Czamfkow) 

- 1254-25^ 

— 138.6-38.4 

1A3.8-13J 

MIMU 

153.6-52^ 

- itoJ(wao 

957 


94J&-T7JJ 
9 hO- 7 7JS 
1WW-7&0 
1000-783) 


COMMODITIES 


SILVER LARGE 

S? = r-. 3905^TJ 

Three Month® 4010401.5 


Shoep nos. ddwr 8.8 %. i 



COPES 


NOV _ . 

Jan . ...„ 

2370365' 

..... 2335-330 

Mar — 
May- 

2265-260 

—.mm.. 223fl>Ma 

JUT- »„ 

Sop 

Nov 

UIIU., ttgjvm) 

2220-215 

222&-210 

2220-200 


LONDON NOETAL EXCHANGE 

Unoffldalpricm 
Official TUmcmr figures 
Prioa In E par metric tonne 
SKer in pence par troy nmee 
Rudoif Wolf A Co. Lid. report 
CORPS! GRADEA 

Cash 926 XWaft 5 

Three Months 94 & 044&0 


SOYABEAN 

rvt 


nap 


Feb 

134 0 - 33.5 



Aug 

Oct — 

Vofc 

131 M 2 J) 

13 S 5-330 


_WTE RNAT)QNAL 
PETROLEUM EXCHANGE 
GASCUNEjiEAVY RIB. OB. 
2 ® 73 . 5 - 73.0 





MEAT AM 3 LIVESTOCK 
COMMISSION 

Awarogefetotpck prices at 
representative matfcats on 
Oetebar 7 

O: tttfle, 9 E 20 p per kg tw 

Oft Sheep 126.1 Op per tar 
(+Ra 9 j 

^^ 8 . 775*0 per Xglw 
■ est dead carcase weight 
England and Watea: 

CMUo nos. (town 3.1 Vn* 


ON-LFrelglrtiw 

"^SSSTiSS 


Apr 87 83&MS&E. 


OCT87 Sj 


Cash mm 6295-6300 

Throe Months 61955200 


109.00 110 js 


10075 ■ 101 .25 


Oct Mt tawwap 


VOfc 13 W 6 . 
Openmsirastzn 


* 

h$>‘ 

h 

is 

KSL-* 1 

it 5 v- 

^ SfS. 

ii If 





















































:;•» , 




* *■» 


% ■- 

J-: 3 ' 

r. ***- K *».' : 

•• >;$> 


* ** 

'■« > 




. * >** 

; j i - \! %. 


k ■ t 


at ._ •• 

•*»■■■_ I*. . 


v I 

’ «-. 




- . * X 

- fc . £* ' 
'•»: ’. ’» 


■i- .: t 




L--'. .*•» 

81 • 1 


■• • ■■ A*fl - . . - 

k <+. •: 


- • 

. . • . “'■ft,.* 


■ ' ’ * !, **'«*»*^ir 




** *• ■* ».<■ »4wai]. 


* l' I }••!’. !••'!. 
-•• •■ '.-."“ !.\ • 






— vva'vwf/' 

-9W- 

m fn„. . 


ft ghv 5i?H?2!5 ^ ***** «— 

HP 10 give vn?!^ ™ 0ven *n ts. Add ibem 

this AdJTinr P^ran ioSl Chedt 

PMJS” S* ££' divKtatf Vg 
Mvf non miir l P®®e If. if ranches von 
da.lv 

Pack of vour card vHH 1 pro ®™5 00 the 

rr nra 


■- 1 vurom, “ 

Cnrep lay* 

|- 3 [ “rMlrwood Rtod, 


• 

j *| Eurt^-rm 

Lilwiftn FflntV 

ttacmalf 


|L> Alim 

1 tr kMr — 

Breweries 

— 




r.l ° rowp 




Ekcbimh 


1 IN Ul Hnm~. — 

Eteanals 

, 

1 1 ll Um| Pg — 

lj-1 Dowiy ■ 

OQ 

— 

|- IJ | Noictw 

Motors Arrrwrfi 
Industrials L-R 

— 

i-‘-| WntMl lAnhum ~~ 

LiM ’ 

industrials S-Z 


1 ‘Dj faJcno — 

IndQstmJt E-K 

— 

1J— IConi MatKHim- 



IJ S I %M1 

1 iyJ 4nrv|| — 

Indosnals a-D 


Lil Wanders — 

BoildingjRoads 

— 

Circle ~~ 

Bnddingjtoads 

— 

1 J4 I Burmaft 

Oil 

— 


Property 


* -*1 ‘ aiToll 

Tobaccos 


1 ' 'I Ford Motor 

MoiorvAvitafl 


1 a J Prrnwirt Hides 



IfT Cordon /J» 

Indusinais S-Z 


■JliL rerainc Maih 

Industrials E-K 


1-jJ t Lo*' A Bonar 

Industrials L-R 


1 TNT 1 “ 

Industrials S-Z 


1 "J Siebc 

Industrials S-Z 


1^4 4B Eka “ 

Electricals 


L‘'j Br Benzol 

Cbtrmical&J’tas 


1 ^1 Dixons Gtd 



1 , 7J Gem SR 

Drapery .Stores 


1 U Benlox 

Industrials a-D 


■ .i^j Hoii Llovd 

CbomcafcJtiB 


1-mi %CRS " ' 

PapetPrinLAdv 


I *11 Hamraejson 

Propeny 


M'J Crwiher (J1 1 Textile* I 

— 


Textiles i | 

-mcteci 1 A 


Please be sure to fcaite account 
of iny minus signs 


Weeklj Dividend 


Please make a note of your daily ratals 
for the weekly dividend of CLQOO in 


1 MM 

TOE 

WEB 

mi 

m 

sa 


□ 




= 


u 


BRITISH FUNDS 


mgl Low Swell 


Crnga jfil 




SHORTS (Under five 

09 94'. ben t» 1989 

103 95'i Bodi 13V% 1997 

100 % Vita ciO'*% utr 

97*. 92 1 . Bocfi 2V% 19B7 
101 ’a 05%E*tft 10*1% 1967 
98% EHFond 6%* 198X67 
101'* ass Tnas ib% N67 
97V BOVTVms 3% 1997 

104 V MVITOaa 12% 1997 
* Traaa 7%% - 


Years) 

09 

100% 

9ft 

97% +% 

99V 

»•• 

99V 

09V 

101 •+% 


25 in 

J&2 10332 
103 10706 
vk 0.030 
ms in™ 
65 MM 
10.1 tons 
u sin 
119 m»I 



104V 03% Ben 

OTClrriH 

-Jftft-V 
87% +V 
81% 4% 

-• W8 



102% 9*% Traaa 
94% 86 V Trane 
i02v 92V Traaa 

BFr?ffr ii TvJ 

109 

39 

m 

1 ’ 

9V* ISM- 

97V •+% 

26 

11 m 


107N rov Traaa 11 v% UK 

100V +v 

114 

11951 


105% 95V TYaas 10V% 100 

8ft +■« 

107 

11963 


104V KVEioti 

10% 1808 

87 +V 

109 

11923 


111V MVEnta 

10V% 100 

100V -■» 

102 

10475 


lOT’r M Excti 
93>. MVTTOU 

11% 180 

09V +'< 

114 

11J0 

- 

5% 1B8S-8B 

80%« 

59 

8948 


103% K% Traaa 

C9'i% 180 

«%•+% 

89 

11945 


92 Oftltaa 

8% 180 

07V +% 

34 

650( 


ii*v itnu Haw 

13% 1SBB 

104% +% 

124 

11916 


0V 76 , .Ea» 

2'J% MOO 

79% » 

XI 

1970 


I08V 84V Baft 
T13V100 Bata 

11% 1990 

99V +% 

11 1 

11 147 


UV% 1080 

10ft +'. 


114(3 


KV 7ftTrau 

. » W90 

83V •+% 

840 


100% BB'« Trial 

BV% 1087-90 

Oft +% 

66 

10263 


KM-. B2 1 <nau 
ii2 v 98 Treat 

10% 1900 

» •+% 

104 

11976 


ll%% 1881 

101% 4% 

119 

11927 


04 V 84V Fund 

5%% 1867-81 

87% 

66 

2190 


lift 97". Excti 

11% 1081 

Bft*4V 

114 

11 170 


KV 78 Traaa 

8% 1901 

79%(t+T% 

36 

— 


FIVE TO FIFTEEN YEARS 

119V 103 TIMS lft% 1BK 108V +V 
107V 91'. TIMS 10% 1992 
10ft 92 V TIMS CIO V%UB2 
117V 100% Ball 12V% 1992 
123V 102 1 .- Each 13V% 1922 
100 93 r w Tims 10% 1993 
12T%103%Tnaaa 12 * 1 % 1W3 
91V 79’. Fund 0% 1983 
IS 110 V Tims T3%* 1993 
133’. 10SV Tims 1*V% IBM 
122V 97V Bat) 12V% IBM 
127 . 106% E«3i t3'j% 1994 
103V 89V him 9% IBM 
120 10DVTM89 12% 1995 . 

78V 68 V Gm 9% 1990-96 
110V OlVBan 10U% 1995 
125 107VHMS 12%% 1995 
133 V 112 V Tims 14% 1996 
103*> 97 Tress 9% 1 BBM 8 
142V IM Tiara 15%% 1998 
130V 110V Ban 13-1% 1998 
8 *V 74'iHonsM 3% 1998 
106V 92V Con* 10% 1996 
131 110 Tress 12W5 1997 
I UV 93V Baft 10V% 1897 
101 V 79 V Tres* 6V% 1997 
142 V 118V BOH 15% IW 
av 71 Tress BV% 190500 
107V 83V Baft 9V% If 


97V a+v 

10*V +V 

IN'. 4-V 

96V •+% 
106V +V 
84>i +V 
111 % 4 % 
1187. +% 
106V ♦% 

invo+v 

«JV +V 
104 *V 
74V *44. 

-iSF ft 
'ft A 

122 V •+% 
Ill's +% 
79*. +V 

■s s 

00% +% 



m 


H2-. 94V Con* 10W 

l 33 V 111 VTres» 1 25* SS2 

98 87 6 Conw 9% 2000 

lOVs BP* Cam Sni% 2001 

Tran l^bir 


’ii 3 

96V *V 
114V +V 

i ES 


TiO 11 131 

im nne 

109 11953 
11.7 111W 
12S 11985 

104 10919 
11.7 11179 

71 99M 

12J 11287 
12.4 11123 
113 I1J05 
12.1 11903 
103 10981 
1t3 11.178 
•43 INI 
107 11911 
117 11117 

121 11.230 
109 10716 
129 11313 
113 THIS 

107 10344 
113 HIM 
109 10369 
100 10719 

122 HJ07 

89 10.434 

105 10328 
121 11337 
113 11904 
103 10335 
119 10979 
107 10771 
103 10781 
11-4 101964 

10803 

103 10044 

104 10573 
113 11188 


OVER FIFTEEN YEARS 

..lip 04 • Om 10% 2002 95V •+ . 

I24V 103V Ench '2% IW. 4. 

109 • 90 TreM 9V% 2002 93V *V 

112 


93v Tress io%ara 


123': liw • i.o“ ■■ 

11 ?v 94V Tress 10 % 200* 
60V 48*. Fund 3-i% IBHD 
lOBV f t%a04 

IDO*. PCT 1 * Con* 9-1% 2006 

SR 9£f«* * g» 

134. 1 12% Tress 12 - J% *»0Wg 
95V 79V Tress 

I07v 60 Con* WaW, n 
— ( 04 *. Tress li%% 

S3 VTISM B'»% 20D7 


•V *« 
35’. ♦*. 
47V *V 
30 +V 
25 *■'. 

24*1 4-V 


f: S 

li S--I 3 S R a 

1» 118VEMSI 12% 2013-17 liy. 4-V 

UNDATED 

m 35vConsMs *% 

« S'« wer In 3 V% 

Oi. 44 '.Conv 3-i% 

■u*. 29'. Tress 3% 

5 .! 24VOjnsoi8|V% 

J4'. Tisss 2 V% 

INDEX-UNKED 
,n 114 % Tress 0. Z% 19B 
90'- TVnM & 2 % 19W 
ir> 1 O 0 1 ' TWU BL 2 % |996 

ff; KS«S 

'£4 79 V tJS 2 Jv% ^3 

,57 ^4TreS112V%Sm 

»v « - Treas IL 2 W. M 16 

«■.- Tress nawaoat 


105% 

+V 

109 


05% 

+V 

104 


51 

♦ V 

89 

2167 

KVS+V 

109 

'r^ 

KVte+V 

109 

100% 

114% 

+v 

+ 'l 

104 

109 


80% 

•M^X 

93 

■!:V 

04V 

+ v 



100% 

♦'l 

109- 


0 

122% 

+v 

+v 

109 

T19 



93 9347 

93 10M8 
104 10225 


100 
IOO 
7 A 
109 
109 
10.1 


121 

+1 

XI 


105% 

+% 

29 


116V 


25 

irV.Cv 

100 

+•• 

11 


08% 


XI 


IK 


2.7 


67% 


12 

•C 

103 


39 

TC • 

85% 


32 

ft-y. 

93% 


32 

t’ 

or. 


27 

-C; 

* • 

32 



BANKS DISCOUNT HP 


c 

251 196 nwMW) , 

85 BS AnsOtcner Wsreyl 

299 1» iSSJSZL 

I2'p 7 ■ ”****"”,^7. F ■ 


1 


Bv* 0 . W»d 
Bans Uun* fwsi 
BO* L*«» W 
Bank a Seodand 
Bsidsys 
Bsaew i sHi 
Eftown SNpsw 

Cater ASM 
w-i jf Csutei 
S.; 5 % cross ManMMft 

^ SSS°£ns was* 

80 49 Pvn Bank Sw iss 

116 «'i 

280 .715 : DnuteCftS t** 

-il’.a W" 

Gomrt *w 
OumnsasPsat 
Manama 
HOSaffloK 
HR SAt “ 
jostef 
n«9 * 

K#n»mn Hanson 

Lon sen 
Mscmv tea 
On 6% A 
tMW. 

ira, L * 

NM WMt 

Onoresr. 

Piowte« 

OU OM 


260 171 
II 6 
260 2 » 
469 36* 

7*0 410 
438 

58V * 


319 3* s 

102 66 

*30 326 
74 55 
520 JIB 
108 136 
570 gr 
484 2W 
91 56 

4Jb i2’5 
153 100 
559 4)1 
415 3» 
371 Igl 
6» «« 
122 90 
4*8 260 



33 „ 

67 83 

3.6 12* 

*3 JO 
S3 73 
43 

UZ10 

t.f 11 7 

%% 

5 3«3 


‘*i 3n U303 

-20 

+, ° £76 64 S3 
4.1 SBS S3 03 
■ 1 18® 93103 

n« in «t 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 8 1986 


STOCK EXCHANGE PRICES 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


Equities advance continues 

ACCOUNT DAYS: Dealings began op September 29 . Dealings end this Fnday. §Contango day next Monday. Settlement dav October 20 

gFotwaid bargains are permitted on two previous business days. 


1985 

ttgll U» Company 


Cress 

„ a» w 

Pres Cftgsptncs % 


PfE 


139 HB RoMOadUMd 123 
MO 390 PM M dTSGOI 328 
8 SV Searaests eru 

894 «9 sonocan BBS 
918 BIS Unon 656 

77V 43 V VMS FSrao “ 

330 £30 Wbtrust 


171V »+TV 
Z70 


71 63113 

143 4.4 B£ 

iu iim 

4&4 E£ 18 

5£S 73E73 

77 23133 


BREWERIES 
















cowpan* 

Pncn Cnge ewe 

% P/E 

sre 

£36 

MCC 

MO 


15.7 


138 

M 

B5R 

W 


££ 

XT XS 

147 

ItB 

Bta 

122 

+2 

ISO 

10 

Barbate 

133 

-2 



as 

379 

Bownoraa 

57D 

+» 

' 109 

1.IH7 

SHJ 

T77V Br Tteaeaa 

IIP 

+4 

HU 


117 

75 

Bran Bohmi Kan 

m 


59b SI 09 

19 

152 

11V 

82 

BbgnWA 

14 

«4 

+% 

01 

08 

07 264 

08 &j< 

30 

277 

Cktea I Wirelaaa 

309 

+5 

66 

29 169 

318 

10 

CataOnaga Eton 

218 

•+3 

109 

*9 HI 


1S * * 

regn Ure Cbmoanr 


Gre« 

„ _ H W 

Pres Oiytw. % 



DO 7V% CPF 

COMM 


37 37 
226 149 
190 21 

352 209 
346 250 Grey 
266 140 Oyatstaa. 
79 49 Date Bass 
190 147 Dmsaor* 
55 29 Dawftmt 


ISO 

49 

209 

123 

321 

345 

m 

61 

180 


% %■ Wl_ 

T79 MB (MnooreenDw 

see iso kSTtad 

114 77 

39* *17 

are 131 SA 

33* 183 SCOti 
540 353 Won 

318 228 00 IT 

251 IBB MSSMte 
553 410 WMmftB Olu S D 
330 195 Ytaong 


S3 28 DO A 

365 £82 Deono 
58 37 Dasgte g 8 I 
212 m Duo** 

445 360 
85 48 


M3 53113 
It* 44 141 
+2 11.1 4 A 113 

410 11.1 43113 
108 49 27 A 

42 147 2A 193 

104 &6 198 


BUILDINGS AND ROADS 



192 128 


1CH.I 


253 . 

275 SOS Bre ySSao ud Ml 153 
91 61 Br Dretang 77 

29 ia Bremi ( Jartson 22 
a 37 BRMteM 72 

VB 84 Biysnl 114 

27 7 MM t MM 7V 

158 130 CaMMadRoCMV ISO 
128 88 CMwiMlata^* 101 

131 60 Comar Grp 128 

590 4*9 COM SIS 

4M zm Oomvnoa 420 

185 124 Croudi (Osrak] 15* 
124 M Daw dEtowoM HO 
137 72 OougmCFftO 116 

MB S3 Bntt. 108 

93 75 Pflb 85 

71-5* Do A 5* 

172 51 Fsdanred Hag n2 
70 5* FMan Gp 88 

M 90 Goafarn 92 

131 109 G*0a > Oanay Onl 12* 

l 

67 

sss 

42 

172 


• 40 


•-2 

•-a 


41 


• 44 


143 86 HAT 
313 58 HakcaiBar 
258 TUB Hanomon 
» 42 HMMn-Sbiar 
2 14 144 Hmootl M 
643 *28 Higg* S HM 
44 23V HowredSM 
196 128 torn* John 

Janos U] t Sens 


m 


9 i a 

429 290 

23 IS 

JOS 178 

t» 101 


DO 'A 


Lamrencs JWM m] 

Mbim l South 


_ - item uiv «4V 

210 181 UaretMt (PMtax] 1M 
151 98 Un & Hsreal 1*1 

448 304 $ % 


m 226 McCantiy 
272 171 MspN- j* 

38 23 mar rSMotey) 

130 150 Mo* {AJ 
*** 306 Moream usreg 
ms 798 PteasreiO 

213 163 Notangbsa Bdcft 
249 ns Paream 
110 78 pftosnix 
305 285 Poetens 
S 88 440 RMC 

432 310 ROM 

323 188 RSDamkl. 

191 13SV HugOgr CsmM 
142 87 Shares t Fteftw 
M TV Smart (J) 

SIS 3«2 Tsnme 
348 . 238V Taytor Moretew 
.175 191 reuyGres' 
436 328 TM t AIMU 

. 1 « N . 

.186 138 p 
381 195 VtxapM* 

2X3 248 MO • 

95 .68 Wmtoo(D 
2M 172 «Mte BMS - 
I 67 WBOnre Brat 
155 41 WHOM 
290 157 Wfion (GanM 
225 120 VAapty Mom® 


118 UIU 
42 M4 U142 
Ola £L2 102 
4-1 6.1 £9 192 

+10 128 2J1S4 
102 13M3 
44 1L6 8.1 <45 

a . E.0 . 

107 8J 8j9 
44 71 17S 

au «oiM 
ai m jj 

146 SO 2*0 
*3 60141 

SO 53363 

u 

47 3.1 
40 40 . 

30 20 184 
•410 250 *3 96 
U ZO 11 J 
00 57117 
80 70 105 
37t> 20 212 
SO 40 20.1 
20 29110 
25 39 87 
50 40 IIO j 
» 54 87 190 

60 70 147 

28 21 340 

70 22120 
54 40129 | 

+2 “ 

48 100 45 137 

24 30110 

10.1 50124 
184 02164 

l 29 40 ICO 

7.1 4.1 129 

> 143 13 609 

I 107 11 97 

I 107 3.1 07 

57b 11 74 
SO 80 75 
102 20110 
74 4925L2 
120 4.1 119 
14 40 214 
70 4.1 ISO 
0.1 11 . 

Ill 47124 

4.1 10 122 
69 30 12.1 
14 37 
23 70.— , 

217 SOI VS 
157 19 113 , 
90 471*0 
80b 4.1 80 
20 

11 * 60 70 
20.9 2214.1 
115 40120, 
123 49103 
97 1817.1' 
35 £0 190 | 
18b 151891 
a +2 130 30170 

+2 127 40124 

r+3 840 54118 

■ 125 10 lit 

• 15 15 804 

+18 100 57213 

» 150. 40 HO 

• M4 10 M3 

14 l0 104 
12 20120 
>4 1.8 19 2*9 

07 OS 17-9 
12 19 189 
SO 30112 


28 
310 
41 
123 
405 

sa 

_ _ S3 

337 £27 Ena# Ugmg 275 

380 £55 Eunrfwn 270 

::: w Fmn Baa 155 

196 «2 OHM 98 

51 M FCM8ftl.Tfldl 42 

226 156 GEC 170 

160 90 Graswner 123 

114 go HuancBaa 83 

>M *6 jSL 50 

358 zzs las Bjg nal 5 p pnwi238 

255 175 Jona* SSDad 240 

200 85 Kooa 275 

323 220 Lae H ah O re an on 226 

220 124 Loans 212 

423 27D UTSM 34B 

195 US Maos * IBS 


75 

18 

528 

168 


*3 


+5 

+2 

-1 


4.1 

IS 

IB 


! 51V Mere BS 

_J 80 uore Focus 
*20 305 Mcregan 
3V 2*. MM 
SB 33 MdMMM Bad 
85 30 Mreay Baa 

313 238 N uB Sii 8X«i^ 
105V 74 NS 
~ 13 ' 


Piurea Fto5%% 


188 189 P9 HsmsHonre 
32 M * 

184V 114 

17V 13 

280 183 P1k» 

190 120 Do 'A U6 1 
218 IK PtaaaM 
24% 15V Do ADR 25 

M « 

234 148 RMUBtre 

815 445 , 

5* 30V Jan) 

m 98 STC 
218 142 sons M 
134 79 9 IM “ 

16% 12 V TDK 


2.1 1 1 M 1 

119 

35 12115 
2.1 07 110 

59 19 343 

19 39120 
49 70 209 
1.0 08 
16 50 15 

1.8 17 13 
ZO 092DJ 

23 50 106 
13 SO 
23197 
1 7 715 

40 17 HO 
89b 33 113 

60 20 140 
11 20 153 

24 25 ISO 
19b SA 170 

u UIU 

18 44 too 
1.7 SA 18 

19 04 

121 &o an, 

17.1b 53 574 
179 79 SO 
14 0721 1 
154 44127 

1.4 00 239 

49 19 174 

07s 09 120 

71 10 2(0 

01 09 818 
03 0.7 556 
2DD 14 83 
79b 100 108 
S3 

28 00 £28 
48 24 
07b SO 114 


+1 


£ S gre-"" S 

88 85V BsiMg pn n 

™ “ g—W MOIM M 

3® 193 CBSrter Cons 268 

8(0 510 Chamnog wn 

*S ®!S ssy" » 

57 29 CnrWy hum 30 

SI ’2 0*r*a { 0 «menij 238 

530 380 Conan (A) w® 

216 141 cuaraa Gp 202 

20V 8 CDretenM Tsdl 8 , 

112 Tt Concarene M -2 

91 »V Stebonoy 91 +4 

570 356 CDaum 443 +3 

m gvffl”” n •-* 

S3 fa sys« « 

s a sssn'rssr % 

2MV112V amm 3%% C148V +3 

80 32 DSC 54 # 

2S S’ 1 g* 8 225 • 

*®. g*W 268 +3 

2 1 IT* S*" B»% 

J9 5 P«»*w 6 Mai A 55 42 

OT 178 era 8 Na rnsn 273 

£? ™ 2?7 12 s *1 

388 231 Da La Rm 320 +5 

m U 9 Dm iK • 

Sf IS g?»Ml Sasipteo 27 s +6 

3rt5 1M Paaore re 215 • 

23 17 De*M HM 21V 

3^, i«0 Mama 218 +7 

102V 13 Dofttna Park 88V 

110 80 Dam M -f 

iso “ SSf 1 " 11 " IS .i 

s ss D E n -r , » s 


E-K 


313 MS Esmre Proa 509 

221 158 EObre 181 

277 214 E» 283 

43V 29V EM 38 

153 tOE'i Baca 133 

30V 17% Baaraba (AE) -B* C30V 
— 52 EBoa (B) 75 


42 


140 47 79 
107 U IIS 
99 30 144 
27 71179 
79b 59 US 


US 36 

529 374 Thom EMJ 
255 170 Thorp* [FW> 


350 SOB UB 
Z73 170 Urtndi 
285 135 UUI 

no in uui 

sis 320 va ms mm 

323 225 Volax 
100 50 Wamn UiMMin 
103 75 WMMOHh Sad 
310 230 nhdaMH FUng 
ITS 99 IMgtel (Hsnry) 


£125 

-1 

sre 

49 

£16% 




237 

• 

62 

XS 106 

iia 

a +2 

18 

54 89 

m 

■ 

79 

49139 

*17% 




128 

-3 

XI 

24167 

48 

-2 


. 236 

ISO 


43 

291X0 

505 

• 

320 

U 119 

3B 

+v 

07 

U 06 

148 

+3 

XI 

14 1XB 

IK 

-4 

60 

49 803 

80 


07 

00 106 

*15% 




175 

-6 

KLO 

X? 136 

40 


25 

69 29 

454 

-5 

2S4 

*4 330 

MO 

-12 

XI 

26 119 

270 


25 

00 166 

32B 

-a 

70 

24 225 

ITS 

+2 

66 

66 >20 

XX, 


XT 

49 U 

150 


XI 

84 1X4 

440 

•+10 

49 

14 264 

MB 


129 

&2 89 

0 


49 

89 171 

80 



122 

270 

• 

1X0 

44 119 

150 


XB 

24 - 


129 


FINANCE AND LAND 


•+* 


+1 


+1 


2(8 205 Abtagwmi 
194 128 Aflfesn Huns 
178% 71V A lM BteflMBI 
211 108 Bartdav Tacft 
28 18 CmNi 

283 104 CaMOfSr 
*3 18 Cnmar 

29V T7 EqdlyflGan 
185 132 hny 8 Slsis 
19* 133 MOMM 
78 82 NatHarns LOiBS 

95 78 006% 

H8 114 Na mureh re 
223 188 TteopMon QMb 


210 

M3 

137 

211 

Z2D 

233 

28 

2BV 

188 

188 

72- 

C78 

US 

IBS 


19 09 . 
22 29 10 
18 59 

189 18809 
57 24 818 

18 45 389 

18 48118 
18b 47 318 

19 29 

aao toa 


*n 282 EodSft CNoa an 30* 

;.IIV 18V Ertcwn IM) *8* 03*. 

18* 134 BVdnaHbuM 148 

177V TT7V rimnaan FSnM 118 

142 1U Do 5% Pil 1*0 

3(2 ISO band 218 

214 1M ExpamM 170 

423 312 Enat 33* 

M 22 Freer 44 

42 28 Faadre Arete M 

143 108 Fmar uhj 

75 40 FVa htw 

BM 408 Fttona SID 

87 30 FttEMOm SS 

TS* M FknaMCSW 88 

38 roM 84 

10 81 Fbgarty m 

V 87v FtXsa Grare> KPW 32* 


GKN 

319 

118 88 

10 99 

Iffl 111 

111758V GteM 847 

34* 19* Ornred 272 

505 230 Gomg Kair 2MJ 

182 107 Gremphn HUga 181 

312 208 QfSSi 2M 

0 BBV HUM PVadaMM 78 

_ 184 MB Em am 

162 123 HM juf 123 

265 175 Ha«a 180 

200 230 
46 23V 

49 20 

801 HI 

Do 8% Cm HM 

... __ OoS»75tS| 110 

1Z7V115V DO W% UZ3 

260 m li aw resrea MO 


+1 


48 17 189 
10 18 
111 U U-T 
a® a* 
as os 144 

+V 68 57 18 

+2 71 51 

+6 57 29119 

+2 28 59145 

-4 141 UIU 

+5 . * 879 



ITS HreSTpMU 30 
421 HMhar sSowir *«8 
160 SO HMteV 103 

205 81 Hsr (Nbnm) ITS 
221 140 Hapaonb CaoMc 10 



XI 

U 19 


71 

XB 209 


69 

102142 

+2 


19 854 


16 

17 


66 

■4 69 

+1 

09 

09 . 


11 

79 109 

• 

20 

42 75 

+1 

129 

76 (29 



69 041 


64 

45 11.7 


170 

76 IS 


10.0 

80 89 


59 

B4 66 


2.1 

XI 69 


47 

36 139 

-a 

137 

1.7*54 


129 

47136 


US 

&3 11 1 

*2 

57 

39 163 


IOO 

361X0 


29 

33 106 

• 

HU 

89 05 


54 

59 03 

+5 

149 

75 119 

-3 

24 

19 276 

-1 

19 

34 U4 

+1 



+2 


39167 

+3 

mo 

49 

♦1% 

02 

75 


201 

155 




*V -V 


FmancM Treats appear 00 Page 26 

FOODS 


iM 


45 


IK 10 ASDA4NP 
37 21 AMna DrMcs 
S6U 301 ta»9 
30 20 AS fiDod 
10 0 Aa*OC Haftaiiaa 
007 519 Arens - 
400 MO Baatt (Bbtesy Q 
16% 12 Barkar S Dobaon 
380 280 BarlAQI 
•201 146 BareeRFbMte 

in k "• — r 
10 H5 Baiasn 
255 228 BarMoMAtW 
ISO 73 Bk 
130 54 m 
tK 142 


(BVR 


CHEMICALS, PLASTICS 


48 UV AKZO N/V Dearer E45 

235 MM CbMOa 220 

428 291 Amarehan 40 

2+7 193 Anchor Owndcal 


158 10 0TP 
ill 78V Baysr OHO 
132 102 BMgdan 
10 1U BnrtCnare* 

TOO 57V Br Brend 
136 92 £a£a(W) 

30 3*5 OWN* 

10 135 Cm* Brei 

10 112 Do -A 1 
Z2V 15 toy (Hanoi) 

10 127 Croo* - 

'531 t®J Do DM 
223 175 ES* S C wnM 
10 111 Bnda 
a» 208 FoaaoiAflnsap 
171 U3 H a Masd Ham 
453 330 Mcnon 
101 '. 73 % Hoacoat DM50 
10 n Hob Uoyd 

11 734 tap Cbnni tad 
410 333 Lapdrte 
118 » LsW 
15V 11% Honk Mjdro 

10 118 PI0U _ 

108 62 Haatsook Mdga 
170 10 RarabU 
330 216 8MABTO _ 

73 X Susana a«aa*n 

237 T7B WoMaaMnan* 20 
10 87 Yorksars Chare 10 


10 +1 
E104V +V 


1«3 

oo 

118 

267 

IM 

150 

0% 

154 

US 

184 

118 

217 

in 

400 

20ZV 

MS 

*11 

371 

112 

*13 

167 

10 

07 


40 -4 


+V 

+8 

•+l 

+1 

-IV 


•*0 18 

38 19 23.1 
IOO 24 22.1 
11 27189 
84 47 169 
w u .. 
113 25 M3 
18b 49 118 
128 

51 48 189 

107 48100 
10 44103 
■4 44 84 
19 47 79 
109 15110 
139 

64 49149 
47 44127 
129 89 21 
7.1 49139 
09 55103 


57 

483 


13110 
„ 44124 
129 24164 
34 43 113 
09 

23 19219 
27 *4124 
37 27 173 

579 

114 59 2*7 
43 32 189 


270 1® CWorria 
241 T42 DO "A’ 

280 160 Coaana 
280 220 Dm 
201 151 Fhftar (Mbart) 

316 238 Baft LOM* 

167 120 Girtnftate 

263 10 Gkaa GftMsr 

10 UB HszteiMadRMdB 10 
250 10 HMftte 
323 161 NMMI M0S 
112 TO Hrens Rm 
UB no nmr Banter 
587 48* Ire land Fracas 
282 220 Mbs 
115 85 Laos frtoftn 9 
TOO -0 LOMMQF) 

620 50 Low (Mil) 

areas (Banwr 
130 0 Maat Trad* Supp 
236 IM HMhHM 
39 210 McftOM (9« (VkH 
82V 51V Hremre 

300 258 NawFood* 

198 152 iknftt B PHBOCfc IM 
165 127 Part; Fooda 151 

270 >157 RHM 843 


10 

•+4 

. 49 

29 179 

25 


29 

104 500 . 

330 

• 46 

11.1 

34 1X5 

302 

+2 

- 67 

20 HJ 

10B 


■45 

47319 

M 


33 167. 

30 


184 

'49 16- 

14% 

4% 


21* ' 

320 

+6 

1X1 

4.1 11 

10 


X7 

69 189 

0 

-a 

% 

36171 

153 

+6 

37163 

£55 

•41 

m 

• 

TH 

46 

74 

67819 

80 


26 

22167 

1176 

•+T 

87 

49 806 

175 


66 

49 09- 

20 

+6 

109 

39 1X2 

223 


109 

49 1X8 

WO 




80 

‘ +2 

109 

44109 

10 


39 

17 259 

281 

45 

160 

17 1X1 

125 

• 

19 

1917.1 

225 


59 

29172 

10 

+4 

29 

19 224 

10 


47 

26140 

an 


69 

22116 

SB 

• 

49 

11 11 

10 


39 

22 216 

SS7 

• 

00 

17369 

20 

+10 

74 

20106 

115 


26 

29 HI 

SO 


59 

56 62 

540 


179 

39179 

M3 

• . 

44 

19 219 

no 

•+TO 

79 

56 289 

015 

• +2 

26 

09 2X4 

225 

• 

69 

06 149 


10 122 HUim» Job 
91 62 Holla Brea 

106 0 HoBLbpf 
287 148 Hoptenm 
120 0 Hoaafan 
320 234 MaatagAam 
115 0 HoraM GmD 
345 207V reman Whampoa 345 
10 118 M US 

sis 10 Koran isa 

295 2*5 Jacksons Bourn 250 
10 8|y 'Mo Mate 10 

615 *73' Johnson CHanara 530 
8*3 133 Joftnann UMihay 215 
44V 22V Johnson « FB 81 

3(6 236 Johnston ESS 

10 0 Janao 2 Sntasrei 10* 
132 67 Joudre fTTinraaa) 10 

2» 21 Krteswreo 2* 

0 » K ®toe» 0‘ 

-325 MB KsKoytnd 00 

no 10 Kama* antes 123 
20 £30 jtteteww^g — 


213 US 


200 


+2 

•+1 

• +3 
+7 

• +5 

-t 

+3 

+3 

-1 

-9 

+2 

+34 

•-1 


•4® 


•+a 


0 n . 
79 13 07 
122 59128 
207 47 89 
27 29 12 

14 39307 
109 97189 

11 39 189 
47 39137 
.. 389 
49a 57 213 
57 89128 
187 37119 
89 18 77 
114 39 U 
16 89 89 

79 11 128 

2.1 12 212 

68 64128 

314 

69 

>59 
107 * 39111 

15 59 89 
59 5.1 144 
14 59 89 
19 67 217 

114 4.1 129 
57 48122 
214 10 224 
69 49179 


8i$ 


LB 


iS US- 1 


iflL 


58 


426 344 MnduyW 410 +4 

183 122 Stereasn toi MO) .-145 
MB IS* somponu 233 

80 520 -owa UK 50 

TO 40 Tavanar Htetodga 0 
428 265 Taaoo 3B3 

an 216 IMgato _ 80+8 

260 216 UCOBtcua* 220 +7 

in 10 WMKHBPMM ira +1 


27 49239 
114 49149 
69 34 HO 
ID 40122 
10 39166 
110 49108 
7.0 19 218 
49 22 164 

32.1 57 TLB 

69 

13 2.122.4 
168 49125 
139b 59 124 
07 54209 


CINEMAS AND TV 


20 178 *>«»* TV A 
5E 27 Gram 
MO 176 MTV I 
3BB 263 LWT 1 . 
350 168 Scot TV 
Z73 149 1VSN/V 
47 31 TW 

261 223 TftanstTV 
TT5 156V tV4M 
146 104 UStor TV 
10 137 YQdaftfes TV 


20 


U9 

49 HB 

43 

-1 

80 

87 89 

208 


1X1 

56 86 

. 30 

-a 

219 

5* 169 

335 

-a 

150 

47 119 

235 

-s 

143 

XI 119 

47 

+4 

29 

59120 

• 170 


64 

39 

MS 

-3 

80 

2S 

se 

HO 


80 


HOTELS AND CATERERS 


10 0 Fdandhr HotoK 138 19 07 679 

06 GranolM 443 +10 125 39 M9 

J0 Ktenadf Breokao 213 «6 24 1.1 ii.ffl 

381 312 LaObnjM Ml *+6 169 46 117 

506 4 JO Ion Part Hotel m *+5 1*9 27 m 

100 rev Mart Burtons 86 V • 21 24 143 

10 67 PitocaOlWHoate 0 -1 21 24 139 

79 5BV Owam Moat 72V • 27 37 158 

405 3*8 Savor Hotato 'A 348 59 14 13.7 

81 SB Bum _ 0 19 29 110 

208 1*9 Thramooa* Fons 10 +2 79 5.1 154 


38 22 UM 
158V118 Ure 
323 189 So 
75 42 Lmtox 

mv *1 

MO 0 
0 54 

73 0 Ltojd 

35 23 la*- 
20 179 Un 
1*5 « DOOM 
ra 59 V Lon 4 Who 
20 158 LonM 
2*0 199V Low c Sonar 
423 30 ML HOga 
118 M MS M 
_4B S MY HeUnga 
360 256 ktocuXrs PhUU 
10 121 
78 *3 

.— 10 

130 78 Itegnaka 
710 *0 MrecnteterENp 
78 a Manoteiaan Bnan 
0 81 Itefg 

143 0 MnM (Untoy) 

IM HH Matte Boa 

194 128 Maul Ctoiures 
91 SS Maitem 

7BV *5 MEhaB COW 
125 70 Mkchal 

195 1»S l*ren 
318 212 Morgan 
42 20v H a y asna 
218 UB NOBU) 


37 

120 

213 

0 

0 

137 


• +1 

• 0 


+v 


MV 

27V 
212 
US 

75V +V 
216 +2 
2» 8+4 


08 22 89 
28 23289 
89 44 64 
Z 8 46 19 
39 5.1 12 
22 23284 
28 52 59 
54 79 74 
19 18 10UI3 

H2 67119 


W 

45V 


131 •« 


KB • 
663 
81 
0 
10 
10 
UB 
73 
48V 
1« 


Human Tanks 
NabW 6 Lute 


iS K 

« 1 

MO 

2EB 10 OMco Bba Mach 
446 2*7 Ptofcat Knol 'A- 
9% 525 PtelUft JT 


+v 

+3 

+5 

• -V 
-3 

• +1 

•-2 

+2 

+4 


30 •-3 


74 99 139 
89 11 162 

79b 22152 
- 1148 29152 

-2 29 89 19 

+3V 19b 49U9 

166 14 159 
3.7 29174 
27 59 21 
149 14 10J 

55 57 18 
18 19 23.1 

42 70 72 
£5 29 12 
57 69 62 

15 71 £04 
D 49124 


•+3 


3S 

149 

116 

50 


g mo 
48 
44*89 

B 124 
374 

43109 




DRAPERY AND STORES 


INDUSTRIALS 

A-D 


naScConav 


197 n 

Z7V 14 


ArtMr Day 


98 79 BOMft (Jamas) A 


18 2V 

680 367 Body -Shop 


70 525 Brown (N) 


'U 


Sr 


276 

134 

0 

415 

462 

313 


a JRjmJA US 
DAKS 9nw» A ms 





in 10 Fbw An Dsv 
CSV 51 Fctd .insta ll 
20 183 FonWntear 
4W 310 
B* SO 
10 BB 

y 172 

16V ISO 
11V721 

30 J 19Q 

24 V Haians W London 

45 ae nom 

IK IK HOUM a Lteo ao 
74 Jonas EMI 
44 24 U«™ 

IK 110V LCP 
£35 135 L+aCoopar 


103 

170 

62 

193 

424 

BO 

148 

206 

mv 

ME 

212 

MV 

<1 

154 

8* 

39V 

137 

231 

700 


830 875 
360 10 
231 183 
sa 283 
835 W 
297 IK 


81 55 
130 10 
234 10 

an 220 

179 10 
SO 31 
148V1B2 
964 234 

E S 

n 7* 

385 265 

*2 1 22 -fjrnna aOTB * 

WSS? 

sa ssau 

93S <30 Wbomortfi 



183 

10 

30 

10 

10 

805 



46 

24 124 

-V 

39 

54 229 

+1 

29 

14 285 


26 

491X5 


39 

29 276 

-V 

89 

04 687 

.-2 

IA 

23 4X3 


1X1 

XT 283 

+2 

XB 

24 109 


32 

26 B 6 


XI 

59 179 

• 

1X1 

29 187 


179 

iS 136 

• +2 

104 


• 

X7 

SI 06 


89 

39 113 

• 

12 

1.7 189 

+2 

*9 

13 249 



T-A IRA 


25 

49 IOO 


189 


-2 

89 

f,? yi-ii 

-2 

89 

17 0 

• 

20 

TJ 


17 

34 mo 


83 

49 89 


106 

25 mi 

+4 

14 

20 38.1 

+1 

57 

39112 


107 

52 459 


306 

2.1 199 


309 

39 139 


69 

XI 169 


29 

04 09 


XI 

79 1X8 


1X0 

79119 

+8 

59 

89 139 

• -1 

1 1 

20 21$ 


64 

89100 


69 

2910.1 


111 

19 8X7 


107 

49 1X4 

-! 

59 

202X2 

+a 

XO 

16 143 

• 

64 

17 217 

+2 

59 

29 196 

• 

1X1 

491X9 

•-V 

11 


+2 

Xb 

40 789 

•47 

49 

29 279 


70 

25 276 


79 

34 127 



■K I 1 

+2V 

49 

43147 

• 44 

18 

39 159 

• 

17 

1215.6 

+a 

49 

B-TliTQ 


11 

11 1E6 

410 

110 

25 1X5 



218 

+2 



• 

41 

-IV 

79 

17 249 

22 

4 3 1X9 

•2 


289 

*9 

Vi 

14324 
29 162 

168 

24 

• 

220b 

3J T3J 

| 


20 178 AAH 
10 ABB 
130 0 AIM 

871 541 APV 
110 0 
178 


»» 


*7 


ST * ^’* LjC * y 
510 10 AuBr EDO 8% 
Vi Awn 




220 

•+1 

ill 

591X4 

179 

■ 

99 

54 289 

IM 


60 

66 126 

55S 

• +2 

25,7b 46 100 

n 

-1 

86 

79 60 

213 

-3 

1X2 

57 109 

315 

+tt 

89 

27 152 

10 



102 

240 


1X1 

40 T16 

187 

+2 

89 

49 103 

■46 

-4 

06 

14 67 

as 

-1 

06 

24 65 

410 


289 

79 119 

0 

-a 

6 

899 

187 


114 

59 . 

0 


14 

22 111 

375 


69 

23 US 

43 


14 

33 45 

T79 

• 

X*b 19 MJ 

an 

+2 

226 

86 ms 

re 

• 42 

28 

15107 

3B* 

-4 

141 

*7 115 

300 

44 

99 

39 209 

167 

• 

114 

69129 

T7V 

—V 


569 

387 


199 

54 116 

2 91 

-4 

107 

49 IS 

10 

r-% 

99b 56 126 


603 383 
38 If 
M3 0 
674 332 

520 140 „ 

14 775 PftOto-Ma 
40 311 ~ 

„ 51 
30 185 
326 215 
314 236 

164 82 

190 118 W 
10 T23 
S89 421 
115 
UB 95 


0 

10 

609 

460 

*12 


tolar Oradbun 320 


Duflnm 

eh Huga 


in 

10 


-5 

• +2 

-6 

+» 

•9 


600 606 RaddOB 

2*5 118 

411 200 

20 182V Raw kk 
173 IK RMyon 
81 » RanoM 

T£b 0 Raabnc 
520 9*5 Hauure 
40V 21 “ 


0 >g 

. ana Sana 10 

RaadRa (Bt BrtdM » 



1» 1« 

W S3 

0 

1ST S3 
01 181 
53 30 

1» 105 

mb iro 

3 ov 

1G2 116 ftotorti 

1» 0 “ 


777 

10 

378 

271 

10 

50 

123 

503 

MV 

IM 


• -* 


"STa 


(T h o m a al 318 

41 +1 


II 129118 
59 U 121 
119 ID »JB 
129 47159 

n 

109 
19 
HU 
19 
1.4 
132 
12.1 
171 

114 u mo 

639 

99 16167 
26.8 4.7 13.0 
29 04 0.1 
75 09 311 
118 4 A 119 
4.1 58121 
109 48 U2 

29 03301 

217 78 203 
19 03229 

1* 49 119 
39 £7 219 

225 45176 

79 47 127 
1.7 19 64 
233 XI 169 
23 13 11 0 

84 17 T79 

19 4.1 129 
29 II 79 
64 12 U2 

14 1.1210 

14 4.111.1 
43 urns 
59 19 99 
S 214 
39 39 119 
4X7 


W 


ns •-? 

103 t-6 

-2% 

UB *-2 


13 

13 


18 73 
10 7.1 
1 1 

81 68 97 
28 29259 



— { €f<dd — 


©nreeoNtenpnptnUtohrf 

DAILY DIVIDEND 

£4 ,°°0 

Claims required for 
+38 points 

Claimants shonld ring 025+S3272 


p.i* 


190 „ 

i+gh Low Company 


Gross 

OH YKJ 

*noc Cbgcpanco V PJE 


IMS 

regn tew Company 


Gnus 
•w no 

Pm Diga psm % P/E 


• 04 

34 18109 
18 70 U.1 
59 UIU 
+10 114 61 M7 
207 17 123 
73 29 I1 1 
s 102 
15 27559 
109 72 12 
154 11 

71 39 15.7 


59 57134 
19 14 211 

119 29 129 
U *4 259 

43 11 m 3 

1*9 37 I1D 
39 19169 
69 4912.1 
119 56 »4 
■m 25 

07 19 
29 1909 

lit 69 112 

32 59 
144 52 67 
59 59 68 
157 42114 
M 59 69 
114 XI 1X8 
104 49 83 
06 29 842 
72 34 1X5 
1.4 64 127 
71 6517.1 
79 72 121 

21 ■ 

64 69149 
14 84 129 


s-z 


._ 7B 

153 MV 

£00 105 BnnMflMB IM . - 178 
174 134 Btacfc MTDW US +2 

::: itb aitkpmri ms 

si 3* Bacnou Hodoa *7V #-v 
376 -7 

far 


ELECTRICALS 



ilis:a5r 

-74 4 



B6 

29 1X7 

+5 

179 

13 149 

+2 

10.1 

. 0 

49113 

•+5 

1X6 

11 109 

• 

179 

89114 


39 

37 02 


21 

49 242 


79 

491X7 


05 

14 2*7 

•+4 

71 

57 73 


74 

25165 


14 

07 


111 

44 109 


49 

49115 

•41 

+3 

119 

32 M£ 

r 

15 

071 

29105 


0 17 9 
274 10 SakTTkrty 

BO *9 Saoia Qcn 

m W3 Sate 1 

1« 1S!0 " 

170 M 
IM 122 
154 1« 

nvi 

™,S 

703 SUM 
SSV 32 Sfcrthrtd 
303 1B0 Emian Eng 
i*g nvstiHoWMd 
500 3* 


30 BB Stodft. 

IK Spaor 

i« m " 

118 80 
in a Sre-Comp 
510 3*5 StewKy 


S 53 H 

* 1 1 

aS J « 

T7V 4 AidMXKrtC >»** 

220 1*6 Ante 80 '71 


>2 

+3 


149 .49 171 
2.1 1 D 323 

05 0* 13.8 

050 08 8.8 
545 

4,, “JS 

23 12117 



120 H CMimw 

0v 25V C awawn 

4-; Canste & Bk*u 



29 54 79 
103 19 92 

49[ 11 149 
ItA 49 132 
39 15 228 
49 5.1 118 
25s 29 149 
24 17 3*7 
*8* 49111 
21* 48 
49 <4 92. 
14 49149' 
a 109 



UV UV Unktesr 
00% 58% IWswrfMO 
£96 212 Vteor 
MO £0 Wcrtra 
10 IK tfoor Predaaa 
i65 ia mum 
20*%U4V . . 

163 10 vsa 
£0S 118 W5L 
10 121 WteCK 
Z45 IM Wagon 1 
0V 0 WaEiir (C&W) 

144 0 ■“ 

10 WO 


nav 4% 552 89171 

on -v 


378 

117 

T3» 

ClTOV 

140 

10 

123 


-1 

•-2 


79 28 07 
209 59 HU 
71 69 99 
23 1.7 24.1 


6.1 58 


£ 


m 364 Staaday 
10 90 Storregm 
20 170 S m cin a ka • 

S2 iS 


154 68 Wat 
251 i» — 

59V UV 
110 0 
tu 78 
20 210 
IM K 

2B3 177 umaanff 
UB 125 Mku (Jama) 
740 3K WBKttaHkiga 
iw 12 0 WOK Go 
50 426 W clulli 
8* 0 wood tkmrt) 

46 0 Wood (6W) 

B3 43V WBoano u aa 6 Rh 
M 51 Wynawaw i Eng 
178 1H Young pi) 


*2 44 39 124 

2ZB 121 19119 

0V -V 21 37 21 J 

116 •-* 19 19179 

U* • _ 5.1 9.1 aa 

m +57 149 12 144 

•t +1 49 49 Tl 

1X9 89 18210 

31V +V 116 

78 49 69271 

107 7J 74 149 

WO • 39 15169 

10 +2 79 79 U 

2Z7 +1 HA 69 119 

IM • 06 72 06 

580 +6 09 343(9 

10 U 67*62 

sa +5 159 28 116 

67 +z 29 54 179 

40+2 142 

70 • 490 61 119 

» • £9 IS 97 

10 *2 51 4.7101 


7V 4V 

M S£ 
M *V 
£8 U 
30 0 
300 BOV 
21 6 
40 IS 
7 2V 

av «v 

no 0 

143 00 

37V 21 
63% W 
970 653 
US 10 
*7 IB 
21V 11V 
17 6V 
10 41 
280 0 
211 US 
0 28V 


CCOi 


KGADflBtog 
LASMO 
Do Irtti 
NawOnut 
NawLoMOn Oi 
Onanore 
01 Saarttt 


+v 


noyai DWHi 


M rerean 
TH Enatw 

Ta 


Tom Einpa 


34 

6 

10 

US +5 

150 *-10 

6 r 

as 

3V 

27 -V 

34 

BO 

31 +2 
IK +V 
Bis a+5 

134 

3* *Z 
12 +V 
U *3 
54 +3 

UB 

161 •♦3 

42 +<| 


• 31 

174*139 42 
K7 -no 

21 


21 

49 


62 29 
72 76 
189 

226 33 
514 59 09 
69 64 307 
22 
119 

71SU.1 24 
302 

75 47 SO 


OVERSEAS TRADERS 


0 31 Bonnwok 


+1 


INSURANCE 


228 177 AMayUlB 
0 22 Alax6 Ain 

«ss 554% Am Vara 
£8% a Are Gao 


Ms zre con umcn 
30i 20 Equty B Law 
<31 213 FAI 
BS* 701 Gan AOCkKnt 
85* 720 ORE 
708 *27 Hateft C E 
348 267 Hogg town* 

I 222 Lagte 4 Gan 
224 173 London 6 Man 
««3 257 Lon UK DM 
68% av Mm B Melon 


15% U _ 

*42 716 Pi u awtete 
453 381 
087 782 
415 R1 Sadprt* Gp 
474 3*6 Stowatt WriCQ 
*45 340 Skip* Htoga 
772 520 S«n Uan 
827 772 GUI UK 
SSO UQ Traaa Kdte w te y 
474 394 maat Faoar 


356 «*5 


♦7 

+7 

+5 


18 59 
10 38 


00 39 

69 24 3(9 


M 127 Cntongicn 151 

107 75 Frtay (Jam) 81 *3 

356 325 Hunan CraaflM 373 

«5o 303 awncaps *0 

37 0-i jam nang 35V 

2X1 m Lowho Z1S +4 

52 3* OcaaA WSaen a 

254 ISO P tearaon Zocn 235 

£B0 IM Do ■*■ 20 >3 

MS 10 PMy Part 1» «*B 

0 30 Sana Dteby 0 te+1 

580 5*3 Steal Brea 9*5 

23* 61 Toxar Ka ma tey MO *2 

£18 193 YuKCaSO 216 • 


17 13 159 
HU 60 1X3 

18 73 

326 7.7 166 

259 59 3*7 

17b 48 1X2 
171 79 107 

XB 69 81 
16 XT 77 
It 17 76 
79 47 30 

228 42119 

0a 

107 10 ISO 


114 


*14 V 


771 +7 

3*5 at 

464 **6 

380 +3 

SO* -7 

as* a-4 

18S • 

aV2 *+3 


349 48 209 

425 6*229 

349 79 17 
117 41 139 
129 11 309 
60 49 74 
949 16127 

2» 47 

49 110 
*9 1 89 
01 49 
316 401 
20 4 59 
09 59 839 
171b 50 W4 
117 14 111 
UOn 2901 
275 41 102 

314 40 
59 XT T9 
U9 17 310 


PAPER. PRINTING. ADVERT* G 


LEISURE 


Bter 6 WA -A- 
K im/ 6 Has 
Prent WMkar 



22D 12B 
IM 0 
34 

22S IM 
<10 325 ----- 
KV W ORA 54 

M 60 Hurbuoar Brooks 60 

US n HMrnTiml 121 

131 M IU Ltetert 113 

UO 33 JUUnal Mdg* 50 

too 137 Las Ml 10 

10 10 i i id wim a r MO 

381 Z7B W—uanra 3U 

403 30 RaaSy UaaW 403 

8fi 38 FBtey Laiiura £S 

236 T31 Sana Hnaont 131 

380 155 SanwaKon Gp 155 

143 119 Staniay LaKura 143 

74 51 Tottenham Hatepur 73 

10 U8V ZMMrt 10 


160 77 102 

M2 

70 49 1X7 
U UIU 
no 49109 
XI 28164 
454 
79 

63 59 98 
7 1 69109 

14 UIU 
XS £9159 


9*6 

10 

SO 

336 

54 

IM 

m 

367 

310 

10 

10 

3(0 


314 

10 

570 

01 


IM 

40 


Aadnoa Cons 


05 Assoc Pm 
31 Aus A Mbore 
Hte Banur ecnwtea) 


Banning 
Do BtfV 


10 

172 *”***■’» 
360 

U 

173 and L, 

■6 Good RoMOons 




L»rt HB 6 B 
... IW McOuraHOOtea 
145 0 More OHM 


oC 




110 

B 

20 


00 

178 

ITS 

186 

670 

300 


7» 

m 

146 

01 

at 

378 

270 

10 


• -2 
-2 


+0 


• +6 

-3 


-t 

+6 


SU 

570 


25B IM Brian 


40 19 £02 

10 29 

16 31 HI 

IS 381X8 

*9 38 

109 11 878 

690 £4 114 
MOO 77213 
79 19 446 

70 40 at 
17s 30 09 
89 1 I 08 

120 tons 
39 11 61 
09 4B 119 
39 29154 

71 12 9B 
119 42168 

U UIU 
48 60 IM 
14 07 166 

70 4.7260 
1600 60 16 

17 49 

• • 29228 

69 3909 

11 49 161 
17n 42 11.7 

07 


111 

111 


39 129 
49116 
. S 2X1 
69 5911 1 
X* 22 12 
49 12 

■ * . 1X2 

71 69107 


20 

215 

75 

185 

201 

05 


VUn Pusan 

Mm 

W 


200 
10 
40 

118 

230 Wabnougn 
30 WOTS^ 


BOO 


129b 

16 

3ZJ 

■20 

410 

228 

>7 

184 

101V 


90 

69 


80 

-7 

47 

20 


7U 

+5 

TD4 

40 

HM 

ISO 

-A 

17 

11 

307 

M 




HU 

170 


74 

44 


870 

• 

•7 

39 

135 

90 

+5 





PROPERTY 


■hv MV Abaco 


MINING 


TftnO Amj 
63 31 Are GaU 

SS- S3 AAH 

40 22 MdMd 

41 22 Do A- 

196 10 Asm Mum 
<25 zx iftraan 
10 0 Brecfcu) 

21% 8% Burnt 
358 20 CHA 
80 0 Cmr Boyd 

■22 *08 Con* CcMBatea 
553 314 Da Basn 
248 IDS 

■V *v 

lav r 
m, r. outran 
280 150 EDapoat 
564 256 Bnfiwd 
205 128 B Oro 
205 85 EMten 

30 200 E rare SOU 

5 2% E RM Prep 

8V 4% F6 Ctm 

213 03 FS Dav 
75 TT CSWtof Tta 
■% 4 V Qanbte 
10V 8 GOO Mhtag 
10% 5V GfSA 
T« SU OMKateonB 
B3 X Gopsng 
Ml 85 Qmantecfi Has 
STS 10 OrooMte 
UB 81 tonpkto Areas 
ft 4% harmony 
« 175 ttarttea 
87V 47% Jtamntaa 
12V 8% Kicnm 
ft 2% Wool 

1*0 0 Istete 
13% ft UPanon 
<73 170 Lotted# 

157 M 
28 16 
123 80 

63 14V 

0 SV 

ft *v 

80 «0 won 
5% 2 V MW WtS 
142 73 N6l BRteao Mi 

TO 2SV NHI Kterart 
24'. 10% OttetosBo* 

10 0 to a fe rVi 
05 2M Pako WBBaand 
a ft Rand Mnaa Ud 
*45 170 Hand Moat Prep 
73V 18 Rendtaoai 
371 20 RanKon 
781 511 RTZ 
8a 4% Roatanug 
10V ft S8 Katana 
10 0 BAUM 

31 14% Sottervool 
5» 273 BHfcrtten 
UB TO ©ssgte Bail 

73 TTOntin 
50 30 Mate 
KV 31V vote Roate 
B13 233 lMtoflpOSt 
10 SS WaktoSkl 
35 Vbaaia 

.17 10V Wankte CUBary 


s 


*10% 549 52 

S© +2 445 64 

ES* +1V 271 59 

ns 142 18 

Z36 142 19 

19) . 475 889 

375 40 789 21 1 

MS +7 289 179 

CUV +v 3R 184 

^ 3 . 

822 •+!■ 889 59 17.7 
463 46 110 17 

220 49 19 

£8% 4% 020 119 

£11 V +v UX 109 

E8V 4% 

273 +U - 

403 +16' 129 24 

203 • . IS 33 14.1 

103 +S 149 73 
00 +0 210 69 

rav +v 

MG +6 

V. +V 009 77 ^ 

Eft ♦% 879 

£8 . 489 

TO3 440 . . 

0 . 209 529 

142 +6 - 

2® 47 549 113 . 

US 54 17 329 

Eft 4% KB 7.8 

3B3 +15 179 42 

£76 +v :m «. 

nv A Mt U 

E5% ■+% 4QJ3 79 

103 46 289 212 

HIV +% 115 108 

463 +U 

ltt +4 

20 

0 179 173 

S3 +6 

6 

f»V *v . 

3S0 +10 109 19 

MV +V 239 XI 

127 +11 

70 *7 

E22V +V 

« -0 m 

295 +7 

tISV 

287 129 43 79 

£72 +1V 01 73 

371 +W 

80 +22 814 49 8.1 

E7% 2M 33 584 

0% +V 125 134 

120 +6 1X0 159 

£28% +1% lit XI 

305 +17 

TO 


3U 10 Wtetetn Arena 
30V 15 te am a n Oaap 
218 IU Waaiam Mtong 
20 108 MM (tend Cota 
“ 0 WMm Creak 

17% 7V VMDktes 

0 0 WBHtate 

16 V 10% 2aredte Coppar 
71 r -■ ■ J " 


516 


138 

54 

14 

sre 


218 

270 

20 

rov 

35 

13V 


« 4M U 
4% 666 as 

+22 5«9 69 
+8 169 •SSJ9 

43 60 71 

+1 

*11 670 117 
♦12 zm 73 
+V 171 11 
+6 39 14 

+20 120 44 
+14 

+% 175 1X2 

1.1 XI 

+3 17 19 - 



280 10 
10 » 
« 

” 875 
705 475 
156 125 
31 17V 

ITS M2 


1 Country 


28 09 

29 304 
XI 2X8 
09 36.7 
09 0.1 
02 

53HJ 
18 204 
13 313 
59118 
33 0.1 
39 111 

15817 

2.7 819 

7.7 1X2 

21 409 

33 383 

34 2X2 
29 01 
23 509 
67 17 


MOTORS AND AIRCRAFT 


SHIPPING 


231 61 AC 
m 10 ae 
20V 7 


163 75V Aopteymd 

141 TOV Armstrong 
53V MV mQ 


ItArtS 
Br Car Auctions 


Sfc 


<J2dk*yJ 


314 10 
NS 421 
151 0 

273 MB 
215 T» 

10 » 

Ml 172 DM 
115 0 ERF 
357 253 FR Group 
213 IS tod Motor 
0 0 “ ' 
2B6 211 
H6 Bt 
IM 0 
90S 333 
50 335 
142 72 

IS 0 


Gas* prank 0} 0 

Ganwte Mcaor 20 


221 

217 

•1 

WTO 49105 

M 


275 

10 

• +1 

■9b 85 14 

IU 

41 

21 34 15 

50V 

+1 

17b 341X9 
1 

119 43 152 

277 


<70 

• -6 

234 XO 86 

no 

+1 

56 37 149 

2 * 


76 36 - 

184 


XI XI 89 

90 


64 85 60 

207 

+4 

79 36 142 

TO 

-3 

*6 

329 


46 14 2X1 

in 

+3 

79 37 

98 

+2 

49 45119 

298 

♦1 

259 109 

n 

+3 



312V 187 Aaaoo Br Pom 
386 718 Br Co m mon— teto 
30 00 Ctecdoma 
430 305 OMtCft 
B* 51 

BBS 40 Grreg 

r l a rp oc 


PD 


TO 54V . 

UV 5 Lyto 
41 S Mcnmy Docks 

MO IBO Ocaan Transport 
576 428 PtO DIB 
10 0 Ruxkiim 

334 127 Upptxx* 

380 380 Tuitou* Scott 


2TB 

20 

415 

61 

5HJ 

87 

SV 

0 

232 

505 

150 


• 77 27 UB 

-2 71 39 112 

71 39359 

■ 121 £9117 

• +4 49 7B111 

214 12 4X8 

• 4* 110 79 511 

a as 

39 

• U *2107 

• +4 289 59 149 

7.1 47339 

r _ 6.1 21 1X4 
+U 129 34 5X2 


SHOES AND LEATHER 


Jaa rtpi 

tMk-n 


61 

678 
Ml 
IU 

3S 

- i« 

69 470 LU086 40 

141 111 toy 0 iu 

si u n 

■m si au 

71 28 ROWS 0 

77 43 Supra 70 

110 5$ WagBand 78 

65 0 woodbaad ponaat 0 


40 


XB 47 18 
39 07 

127 23 112 
11 14 16 

14 28117 
151 47168 

76 *8119 
157 12 08 
64 64 109 

64 84 18 
49 47 1X8 

24 481X4 
49 59271 

14 1-7 139 


360 290 Rt 
208 145 

*S K 

218 10 Latobart Howarth 10 
:: 0 Wanda 6 Baton SO 
118 02 Proam 112 

157 111 Strong 6 FKftar 146 
273 10 Styto 10 




X3 118 

... Vo™ 

8 49 89 
79 189 
15 49 77 
129 87 16 
B4 X3M.1 


TEXTILES 


NEWSPAPERS AND 
PUBLISHERS 




172 MO ACOOrd 160 

280 10 Aaaoo Book H5 

30 £0 Aaase m ipw ir sss 

315 280 BMC* (A8Q 383 

730 515 mate 00 

HE 440 cetnfOao *40 

383 05 DO -A- 01 

145 78 BMP A- 181 

are 300 HmPiaWkfl 300 

MO B Hooff COUtoa* 220 

30 10 hoapandam 285 

404 HTftonmOn 50 +2 

1T?B20 Naw> totemtetoote £17 <i • 
80 445 Oocput 485 os 

Ul 112 PotOBi m b Sod 02 ■ 

4GS 220 Tnofflf M 40 8-4 

40 20 UMWaWMpm 30 *+fl 


+1 

•S 


44 29189 

62 89139 
69 2917.1 
M9 49189 
389 56189 
114 29189 
114 28 1X8 
3.1 24 214 

289 17159 

US 57 HO 
129 41 
149 XS 159 
128 07 
1(U XI 179 
57 49 07 
229 52129 
229 82 K7 


TNT 

250 M TEL Thanste 
535 30 Taco 
0V 0 IMKMCnaa 
6% 5 TabOk 
0 84 Tata 
170 118 T« mags ■ 
Ttwd Mb 
■ nonmOn Y-4Jn# 


349 MS TraMgar 
MS 200 TMnsooiL 
195 U* Transootl Dov 
OV TrteMM 
M SO Tnteut 
144 78 TMax 
Ml 75 Danar 6 Naaral 
10 75 umgmto 


12 17253 
US 68 79 
1X7 14 102 
99 XI 1X8 
815 

11 12 5X7 

29 2.1 
117 86 63 
16 1 6 1>9 


1» 82 Ampcl 

0 9 Aran Eoaagy 

Alteaete taoontt 
AH 01660 
Br totem 
BrtrtteOI 
30 30 Br Bcnao 
S3 18 Bryson 
210 08 Mol 
419 20 Bunted 
" *8 MaCqal 
M canwy^^ 
m Oa«M 
M Oyda 
ik m mrngm 
0 0 nradaad 

itarBagy 

„IWN »** 

Cote PM 
at Yla tew n Baa 
Hambm 
M tkaitaq 

810 271 1C Gad 


IM 

15 

14 

80 



01 

• +8 

416 

79 75 

18V 




30 

78 

133 

+3 

286 

74127 

• +l 

89 

79 39 

30 

*4 

162 

SI 119 

SB 

* 4 

19 

67 109 

125 

+1 

71 

17 9.1 

0 

+V 


862 

44 

.3 

XI 

49 59 

M4 

1X1 

84 S3 

40 

-4 



54 




325 




30 

+1 

14 

47 119 

n 


29 

49 

a% 




1 38 


U9 

99 11 

401 

+0 

136 

46 1X6 


B73 206V AJBad TSNt 
300 IM Mote Brea 
IK 87 - Bate* 

113 0 ~ 

31 16 

1*4 123 Br Uoto 
127 60 BUtert 6 Lltoto 

78V 53-j Coraft 
315 190 Cantata 
IK 7* Crawmarp) 
zre 196 unreal 

57 42 Dtexon 

m 87 DrutanoM 
60 S Dm m 
HD 0 Rater fjotu) 

IU 0 Gukal Breatebbre 
57 0 HI lJjuu AbkM 

W 8? SSnrte 

210 90 

97 47 

108 IK Lamore 
101 10 ‘ 

124 M 

101 72 , ... 

115 71 Uaefcay (HoH 

22 10 5«an^^ 

10 94 toteand’A 
<7 0 Rutted 
10 TOO SECT 
10 72V Sakars 
IK 133 Stator 
70 40 SmtaMww M 
0V 11 GtoddMB 'A 
10 SS Taaaad Jonsy 

0 Tamtam 
.rev Teatte 

Yorktytte 


280 

228 

IK 

112 

28 +1 

« # 

BBV «+V 

282 -1 


£ 


MG 

M2 

M 

128 

40 
78 
0 
3* 

117 

T4fi 

87 
1B6 
10 
114 
67 
70S 
18 

MS 

41 
IK 
IB 
MB 

M 

28 

MO 

175 

88 

250 


43 


+8 

+1 


*6 


-V 

-1 

>-l 

+5 


-3 

+•* 


107 4.1 179 
189 44 Ml 
88 6.1 84 
62 72129 
209 

8Jn 15 10 

7.1 72 224 

17 89 
M 33 U 
49 291X4 
68 17U4 
17 19362 

57 M3 54 
XO 7.1 11 
79 11 71 


10 

43 

59 

64 

69 

14 

62 

17 


43 107 
30273 
52 89 
28189 
491X2 
12 18 
84 169 
15149 
a 54 
69 XI 167 
19 59 IS 
79 59 74 
66 34 84 
74 5910J 
38 11 59 

U XB 85 
89 49119 
M 17 11 
109 49 74 


TOBACCOS 


% •;? « 

153 *+5 18 89 54 





itt'-u.’ 1 r]*t I rrto 







■ ^ •• 

41 

‘I4i 

■■■ 


2.6 





PROPERTY BUYERS’ GUIDE 
LONDON PROPERTIES 


Bernard Walsh 



HOUSES 


swim KENSBrGTOH S.W.7. A freehold, nomtasemem famiy house, stated a owet.Mew_c*oe .B die 
BohDos 5 Bedrooms- 3 Bafflnwrer Lxge OauHe Aeceowrr “MWoomBtChm SttK Uga BoafTtrrace: 
Gantor Central Heating Superb oacorauue urns. Otters m excess of E550.HH mn n ncwtt excewn carpets, 
aitare. etc. 

HYDE MM. Wi A Laron Comer House. fiaifl WB*.An 

gsss aoomi: 

§SK fBAtasSUMRSunS MU 

Lease. E4ZH000 inducing carpets, etc. 

RXHAIL S.W. 6 . Freehold. House Mh 3 Bedrooms: 2 Bathrooms: Urge Reaaun Room: Neely Rued 
Kdtittn/Owr. Centra! Healing: Paw Garage £140.000 




OFFICE 

COMPASS POINT, E14 New Development of 


‘> ni ;ii iTk: 


^¥*71 


equesL Prices Fran £209.000. 

WAPPfNG, E.1 Spa Level Flat situated on 
Popular Development 2 Bedrooms, Lounge, Fit- 
ted Kitchen/Diner. Bathroom. Parking, Residents 
Mutt-Gym. £79,000. 

CALEDONIAN WHARF, E14 Newly Con- 
structed Terraced House. 2 Bedrooms, Lounge, 
Fitted Kitchen, Bathroom with Coloured Sufte, 
Gas Central Heating, Parking Space. £83^00. 

WAPPfNG, E.1 Spacious Apartment h Vic- 
torian warehouse Conversion. 2T Lounge, Pitted 
Kitchen, Bedroom, Luxury Bathroom, Gas Central 
Heating, Basement Parnng. £87,500. 

QUAY, SE16 Newly Built 




Bedrooms, Lounge, Oak Fitted Kitchen, 
room, Gas Central Heating. £130^00. 
LONDON YARD, El 4 Spit Level Riverside 
Apartment. 3 Bedro o ms, 22* Lounge, Fitted 
Kitchen, Bathroom, Gas Central Heating, Doubts 
Glazed Windows. £140,000. 

CUPPERS QUAY, E14 2/3 Bedroom Quay 
Side House. Lounge, Fitted Kitchen, Luxury Bath- 
room, Gas Central Heating. Private Morning. 
£1554300. 

COMPASS POINT, E14 Now under Con- 
struction, 4 Bedroom Houses on Riverside 
Development Fufl Details on Request £125,000. 

LURALDA GARDENS, El 4 Luxury Riverside 
Apartment overlooking GREENWICH PALACE. 2 
Double Bedrooms, ar Lounge, Fitted Kitchen. 
Bathroom, Stiower Room, Central Heating, Ga- 
rage. £159.500. 

CLIPPERS QUAY, E14 Fabulous 2 Bedroom 
Quay Side Apartment V Shaped Lounge, Fitted 
Kitchen, Bathroom. Central Heating. Mooring. 
£ 112 ^ 00 . 

OPEN 7 DAYS A 


r0H5\T8WOT 



12 FINCHLEY ROAD, ST JOHN’S WOOD. LONDON NWS 6EB 
TEL: 01-588 6999 

sr Johns wood, min - tin pw hampsthd. mn-QNw 

Gd sow acctvnmoaanon on Oft floor modem P /8 Large fla on 2nd floor In n location anth lowly 


block l*t/tnnnge 
1 Bed. recto, ft tot bath, prtung. 
SWISS COTTAGE, NWS - £380 pm 


2 bods, fg men. fit M. tatt, sap vc. partang 
ST JOHNS WOOO. NOT - E5SR pw 



fuU y fum BMHHiouse aval now n qd cond Ex vata Newly moderrued house ai pnme location dm Id 
for money. all amemoes. 

4 Beds. Ig receo. Bl fat/dmg area, 2 bwhs. sep dkr. 4 Beds. 2 leceps, fidfy Of tat, 3 teds, gar den. 


MILLBROOKE MORTGAGE 
+ INVESTMENT SERVICES 

235 Upper Richmond Rd. Putney, London SW15 2SN 

01-788 7775 (24 hrs) 

100% up to 0120,000 95-0% up to £1,000,000 

10.25% 

Residential re-mortgages for any purpose plus commercial mortgages 

Income 3 x Joint x 4 (Professionals) 

Speaakstng in tgt-me buyers, satt-emptmad. non-status 1CLS% e x p a t riat e s. 
Completion wttnm dime weeks 0 * finding property 
Also pension * frwesanent brokers 

Ucmw bp otricm at Fair Hairing Ho. 190797. 



Correspondent, is the 
of two articles 

Tiraeshare. a method of owning weekly 
periods In a property at a holiday resort, 
is big business. There are now 1,800 
resorts worldwide. 38 in the UK, 
for more than a million owners. 60,000 
of them British. ; , . 

It remains controversial, largely be- 
cause of a few developers and agents who 
continue to operate an unacceptably 
hard-sell technique to persuade people to 
buy. and there have been too many 
reports this year of such activity, 
particularly in Portugal, to suggest that 
this problem is solved. 

The tiraeshare industry has been 
trying to get to grips with the problem, 
but different objectives have meant that 
it has been unable to come together 
under one banner, and now there are 
three main umbrella orga n i z at i ons. 

But while the focus has been on 
timeshare — or multi-ownership or time 
ownership as it is also known — there are 

Non-profit-making and 
owned by shareholders 

alternatives to this form of holiday 
ownership, and before looking at the 
latest situation in timesharing, these are 
worth considering. 

Hapimag. a company based in 
Switzerland, has 1.700 holiday apart- 
ments in 1 1 countries worth about £100 
million. It has 40,000 members, but 
there is no suggestion that they own any 
propety or part of a property. Hapimag is 
a non-profit-making organization owned 
by its shareholding members, who 
qualify for a holiday at one of the resorts 
according to their shareholding. 

The minimum investment of around 
£2,000 buys 12 points and that could 
provide up to three weeks' holiday in the 
low season at most of the resorts. The 
most expensive weeks cost 24 points, 
which means forgoing one year’s 
holiday. 

A villa apartment in Majorca in 
February costs four points, Tenerife in 
October 16 points and August on the 
Cote d'Azur 24 points. Shareholders can 
either store up their (joints for up to five 
years or borrow one year in advance. 
There is an annual charge for foe 
maintenance of the properties paid by all 
members in proportion to their shares. 

One of the- most unusual Hapimag 


Perfect peace: foe Lodi Monzievaird Chalets near Crieff, Perthshire 


resorts is in eastern Finland at 
Punkasalmi, in the middle of the Finnish 
lake district, where the log cabins are 
hidden in more than 100 acres of 
woodland overlooking a lake. 

It provides a holiday of peace, walking 
swimming sailing fishing and saunas. 
The large sauna by the lake enables the 
participant to leap into the beautifully 
clear and icy cold water as often as he 
likes, until the body's pores are opening 
and closing at wilL For the more 
adventurous, the Russian border is not 
for away, and a little advance planning 
could enable the visitor to spend some 
time in Leningrad. 

Hapimag with resorts all over Europe, 
is now negotiating to turn Dunrobin 
Castle in Scotland into its first resort in 
the country. Details of Hapimag are 
available ffom Comser International, 
Orantecq House. Fairview Road, 
Timperley, Cheshire (061-904 9750). 

Scotland is popular for all forms of 
time ownership, and near Crieff Perth- 
shire; Loch Monzievaird Chalets offers a 
variation on the theme — one-quaner 
ownership. Overlooking the loch, which 
is available for fishing 10 new Scandina- 
vian-style timber chalets have been 
completed, and give the quiet resort the 
look of Finland with hills. The two- 
bed room or three-bedroom chalets, 
some with saunas, are fully furnished 
and well fined, and the cost for a quarter 
share is £9,950 for two-bedrooms and 
£1 1,500 for three bedrooms. 

In addition, there is an annual 
management foe of £500, part of which 
goes to a replacement fund. The quarter- 
year does not consist of three consec- 
utive months, but is spread through the 
year, and it revolves the following year to 
give all owners the opportunity of 
savouring all seasons. The quarter share 
gives owners a title deed and a stake in 
the appreciation of foe property, and 
mongages of up to 85 per cent are 
available for the purchase. 

Most owners do not require their 
chalet for the full time, and can let it 
through the resident managers of the 
development, Alan and ’ Elizabeth 
Colquhoun, with excellent prospects of a 


good return, as many people come back 
year after year - a sure indication of its 
attractions. 

Unlike timeshare resorts, -it does not 
have elaborate facilities on site. Ratter it 
is a base, though there is plenty of 
walking to be done within its boundaries. 
The surrounding countryside offers a 
wide range of walking climbing riding 
golfing — and the Gienturret Distillery, 
reputedly Scotland's oldest, is a mere 
sta gge r down the road. Details can be 
obtained from Loch Monzievaird Cha- 
lets. Crieff Perthshire (0764 2586). 

The Holiday Property Bond is a 
scheme started three years ago, on 

An increasing value for 
the holdings of members 

simitar lines to the Hapimag concept It 
is an investment in holiday homes and 
prime securities, and interest on the 
securities is used for the upkeep of die 
properties. Bonds are purchased ' in 
denominations off 100. with a minimim 
initial investment of £1,000 - and 
£1.000 buys 1,000 points a year. That is 
enough to buy a week m Spain or 
England in January. The cost goes up to 
more than 6.000 points in St Maxi me on 
the Cote D’Azur in August 

Holiday Property Bond, for which the 
Villa Owners Hub. High Street New- 
market Suffolk, is the main UK; agent, 
now has properties in Spain, Portugal, 
Lanzarote, Tenerife. Cyprus. Scotland, 
Austria and England and has just bought 
a chateau in Bnttany. It has now reacted 
£10 million in income from more than 
2,000 British investors and continues to 
expand, with plans for property in 
Tuscany and Malta. 

Both Holiday Property Bond and 
Hapimag show an increasing value for 
the holdings of their members. They give 
flexibility in holidays - they’ claim more 
so than timesharing — and make a virtue 
of offering “trouble-free” holiday 
investments. 

• Next week: The latest views within aad 
about timesharing itself 


; Salter Rex 




DMYTUH GMH 8 B. Jim Soe rft cutn WKXW5 tax DM KUaxrad mawsen MWt- 
mmi Cus« Mira i«o van* tor. sam. awry ante won*, pies' own. 
Uauv Mum Ibiwwi RcannvwM 87 v tzTUW 9011 KENTS 
SOOTH HEHSMaTM. SW7 StMCOlE. two tj» Hju (M iimw -vaflneM 
rffwttsw Oar mm Mjso*cw» it tfO numj >«■. sM*. tonw>M 
■«™ l *° *" '*“* 5"wns pfcis WtwnoHi GCH LA Hr »i He BM W 
GUDM0W MODEM. SOUTH K&L ShMiim DM l*»» HKWV 1*5 Nw IM «Wl» 
UiirmW q jrara uftn Dora IWU. MrOranQ. M) DErfC! 60* 7S *1 We tftUM 
comnnEU) embems. swre ol su*«w two Me w mama «e <#eo 
mvtm outnra MoAh ora mm UM. mm tax bets. ftmCH 
Ffci m rm tnOM 65 y In- Qlws wwgi n»JW- 

EOWnHU MMKM SOI. Satan dw in (imaMe me. irtnssn fra Door 
cuter bm Mcon, ltd hm tamtam toiut gwov Soufflem «m mm use d 
mvmnq ganVm Sim el Hamm 1180600 . 

DMYT0* GMtDENS. SWM Jon menwd bn* ttitoh two (Me bed Ox ftwwge 
Mttru "Muowi gxfxtat Onm h*f meetM nqt, met esupped uewn. 
Pnkw Ldi Stair a ImuI nSHM. 

SOUTH KBBWCTW. SW7. IxcMen iu*M ctannq) hffl Hon Many bR. SWO 
rroi 196 • U ONr DM MH W knmacuate BMomM. GCH tonm MSeanL ' 
U V lie HUM SOU AGENTS 

WTHCMT RWO. SWM. [taa*ue mi Unh dfc fial Rat Om m Sum imp. 
■JO> own] jfei kBU> WCW* M Mil GCH luig use. KriJUU SOLE AGENTS 
144 Old Brompton Road SW 7 4 NB 




. MORTGAGES 

INTEREST RATES FROM 

8.4 % 

i*.:~ A.P.Ri 


MORTGAGE & 
ITNANG1AL ADVICE 




1b 



MORTGAGE or REMORTGAGE 


AMG 














I AMG, tlirtwgh thrir nuhlishrd conneciious with 
•all ihc major building wcietici, banka and insurance 
comfuniCT. will ensure that you obtain the bwt ratw 
: and remit, uuicklv and without fuss. 



FREE SOLICITORS COSTS 



PURCHASE YOU WOULD 


SAVE UP TO £700 


§ ^ TO £moo ° 

□ a < W , ?FART in s?M Uircd, 

_ Payments start at 7.88% p.a. 

□ 100% ADVANCES UP TO £100,000 

3 x JOINT or 3.7 x SINGLE income 
Tel: 01-431 0035 for immediate quote 


■KIA HIGH STREET, HAMPSTEAD. NW3 


Services. 

Telephone 01-379 3452 
Centric House 
391 The Strand 
London WC2R OLT 

OVERSEAS 
FINANCIAL D 
SERVICES 


Brant & Partners Doddaads 
Residential Department 

E14 3 bed house on presage development £99,995 
El« Luxury 4 bed town house unth 55* Private 
Mooring E19EL500 

SE16 Immaculate 3 bed house 15' Lnge 15' 
Jotchen/diner £89,950 

El Cosy 1 bed flat with balcony (F/H) £73^00 


G n/VNT i 


Marsh VUafl. Vltost India Dock.Ujndon El 4 

01-538 4321 




Robson 

Limited 


. FerA7w'i:e 

Finsrccs. Lite 
M', -rjn;e. 
Persians 
lr-.e%t-r t rr 
AT.'Cf. 

acrylic 1-13 

01*623 3495 


5 S 25 S 3 S 53 




DRUCE 


are just what you need to 
Live Graciously. 

Watch This Space! 


bayswatfrOI-724 1222 


WHY NOT RE-MORTGAGE 
YOUR PROPERTY 

Anrf get the benefit qfyour equity 

★ Installing Cbniral Healing 

* Refurbutunem of your property 
* Extension of your property 
* School Fees * Buying a Car 

* Going on a holiday etc 

A OK ST.-t7li MORTGAGES AVAILABLE 

HIRSCH INTERNATIONAL 
(FINANCIAL SERVICES) LTD. 

One of Europe's Leading Mongage Brokers 
_ . . 15. Berteley Sown, London W1X 5A.E. 

Tel: 01-629 5051/2 TELEX 28374 


PROPERTY MRRfiERS, CONSULTANTS 

PratKrU3 curwtty avaMfie to let or sefi in tfta NWB. SW1. and Wl 
seas. A ora hie. picas son fram £350 pw tar renois. pros start 
hum E275D00 for sales. For hatter deals, please comae 
Hariingdon & Leinster Enterprises Ltd, 
4th floor, 3 Clifford St, 

London W1X IRA. 

Tel: 01-734 1128/882 691 S 


11 1 I 1 k i ■ : 1 1 te ‘;l 


Winkworth 
Financial Services 

25a Motcomb Street 
London SW| 


'iriiTir 


Residential Department 
Fists & Houses Wanted NOW! 

Sale Fees 1% (plus VAT) 
for all instructions taken in October 1986 


GRAND OPENING SUNDAY 


55 LANCASTER GATE 
0^3 LONDON W2<2^S> 

24 Luxury Apartments Created to meet 
the Demands of Todays Sophisticated Buyer 

1, 2, & 3 Bedrooms £95,000- £265,000 

★ 13 Year Leases ★ Views ro Hyde Park 
★ Independent Heating & Hut Water 
★ Video Entry Phone Security System 
★ Resident Porterage ★ Fully Equipped Kitchens 


. SHOW FI AT OPES DAILY 
r.Djys j'UVck- : t0.00.iin - 6.00pi 




01-730 9291 


01-7240241 


RANT 

& PARTNERS 


DocManOB C3THCK 

Marsh WM. Wbsi imaa Dock. London EH 

01-538 4321 


CHARTERHOUSE SQUARE 
LONDON, EC1 

IMPOSING RESIDENTIAL BLOCK 
EXCELLENT REFURBISHMENT 
POTENTIAL 

FREEHOLD FOR SALE 

ALL ENQUIRIES 

DRIVERS JONAS 
01-930 9731 

Ref: EFH/RJM 



106 Horscferrj Rand. Wes tminst er. London SW1P 2EF 
Telephone: 01-222 7020 

■KTXaBTa,SXt. Chamaiq penod house n quiet location. 4 Beds. Z 
Baft*. 2 Ramps 2 Km. Cw*9. Pane. Gas CH. £245.000 laasahohl 
OSSE amt V CMKMS, swi. Unique Duplex Hat beautiliily 
mooeoxseP w ftgii stanoaro. 2 nae Beds, 2 Bam® |i en-sute). Good 
Reeapneaige SuperMy fitted Wi + Dmng Area Own Gas CH. Private 
Entrance Wrtttl fwgn security msec BntryphofB. 12S rears Keenly priced 


{^Gascoigne-Peesl lahgford place nws 

AHac^ Hone Aerno*^ I I _ 


37 GRANVILUE SQUARE 
LONDON WC1 

In a delighttui Garden Square, two newly converted 
99 year (ease two bedroom flats, one three bedroom 
two bvmg room maisonette. Mewing today. 

Telephone: 499 2015 or 889 3495 (T). 


DOWELL LLOYD 




hoehampton Substantial attractive house m aunt road. 8 

beds. 3 rrapnens. 2 turns, ctoaks. Gas CH.twm garage, pteas- 

ant oarQen £260.000 F/H. 

SIUEATHMI WLL Large property requring nKdenxsatiOn, 5 
Decs. 3 recepuons. kucfnn. scuflery. bam & oka. £120.000. F/H. 

Telephone 01-788 7470 


A Black Hone Apmcy . 

RODMMPnw. Having DOtenOafftn father extension, defcghftd Tudor 
ism aei nause tel. lounge, drag room, ttdwn. efia rath ««. 4 beds, 
teth. top# bngen gge. i00 FT rrar gataea £300.000. 
iHITHY. Mdtan ot 3 in Sytvai setting. Entrance ha*, drawng room, 
dung room, loaften. tanriy room. 2 ueds. 2 baths, gangs. Wes taong 
garaen. e/pftone. E260.7SQ 

01-876 7575 ' 


CONVEYANCING 
£230+ VAT & DISBURSEMENTS 
ON REGISTERED FREEHOLD CONVEYANCING 

« CAN ALSO SELL V0UR HOME THROUGH OUR ESTATE AGENCY 
DEPARTMENT 

WRITTEN quotations a details suppueo upon REQUEST 

CORNILUE & CO 
SOLICITORS 
01-729 4360 


An exceptional period residence Circa. 1850 m prime loca- 
tion only irons httoi American school The house cotnbews 
penoo TBMures wxn l aw day hnuni ano off era a finhly 
bflivxJusJ home. 5 beds, 3 twins, drawing room. Omnq room 
consonrertory ano a 30ft mjianed games room. Fuly fitted 
Mcnen. F/h pnee on applea&on 


Ellis & Co. 01-723 8955 


MARBLE ARCH ESTATES 

120 EDGEWAHE ROAD, LONDON W2 
01-724 5500 

CUFTON ROAD wg 2 bad mas 1 ZS year lease. E 10 WBO 
cfscrawf *® 85 W 2. 4 bed. heeftoU house, opposto Hyde ft* 

Z4J3.UW 

^£T CWHT EOGEWAfE RQA 0 WZ MaOcmsed SOMM-W 
ease £ 42,000 I 

WE SPECIALISE. IN LONG AND SHORT TSM LETTBIfi- 


JOHN SPENCER 
01-995 8904 

£IpS) CK ' W4m ° nr ” mab nw ^ **- £36JW0 “ 

^>4 View Dnvc. Stunning del ns wt m 
01 sertudrd gmth 6 beds. 4 haihs. 2 te reerps. kii/fimAy 

&K C riS!'^w.ooa &dfCI ° ^ tombtd - 

cS ) l'(w pA ^' W4 - 3 w i «w e - W* 1 

CHISWICK. W4. Superb 4 bedreom »«■ 
ho*». w,ih 7 ir south garden io I he nver. OliSKUL 


■ FROM 


GODDARD & SMITH 

SWI. 2 bed mews house in tranquil setting 
close River. Recap, kit, bath, roof terrace, Gas 
CH. £195,000 L/H. 

WC1. Tottenham Court Rd 2 mins, choice of 
two 2 bed flats in quiet Mews. £79,500 & 
£82,500. 

01-930 7321 


i s*, ! Building better homes 

I EATON PLACE. SWI DRAYTON GMDEHS. SWte . f A|) | 

Degam 3ftl 4tt hw marionrite m BngftL nmrtv decorated too Roar | I Wl LjOnOOllOrS 

9 SS K ?Sc'W : iorSM 4 2 m J* bto * 3 ■* 2 | Contactuson 0486270818 


Beds 2 Rec r Bam Kit Croak xa Bair 

34 YEARS E24950Q 86 Yean . £162400 

firogtebttoBt OfSer CMtote Office 

81 Z35 4166 01 352 1866 


■ i^i , tu 

rmmm 


* 100% UP TO £150,000 
■k 95% UP TO £500,000 

* 80% NO PROOF OF INCOME 

* 4 X SINGLE INCOME 

* 3 X JOINT INCOME 

free 

SURVEY 

RING: 01-435 3138 

For ~~1 

InuuaiiLit* 

Quota 

Windsor Mortgage Services 

28b Hampstead High Street NW3 IQA 


KNIGHTSBRIOGE 

imnueUBte » nw 

moi bwn « 
toiai iTOJemeaBon nri* **7 
MtarmWIMPCa* **"",, 
cenmnxim 

Batwoam. MOartw 00 ®?^. 
wrany nut** 

jaari E195CU0 »«*»»»" 
Maw» ram Nell at****": 

Gfpea curtJ«i**4»***“ 
hDipy frrtWS- 
TeLOl 5M488J 



















29 



THE TIMES WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 8 1986 


RESIDENTIAL PROPERTY/2 


£1 -5m tag on 
good living 
by the park 

SSSSBBT 

ssSSsmp*- 

furttus^ bedroom suites and two 




<S,r}f - i‘ni 


H- 


K 


further bedrwms 31 

“"'g^SSsR^^v^Br 8 - 

81 Le ®-on-SofenL 

SS^Wiftia 

■ . . , ■ ssrssskrS 1 - 

, ; Homes on the hill 

- * I5r« e iilh eta ^ ed houses °n seven 
.lv.H" i .i. V SSS£S 1 u SI ,! B'W fonT »d part o! the 

■-. ® 3r 2? ft * °[ Wrtanhurst. the mansion 

' 1 ■ -> i : f n»fmi ^. H .'9 h gate West Hill, shows there Is no 
■t Itlju. end m sight to the demand for very 
expensive London properties. 

. A,til ough the show house has only 
. ; recently been completed, 1 2 of the 

1 • t S U ^n S ^ S !! n 9 from £750.000 to 
.„. ' E1 -250.000, have been sold to British and 

- 2y®^| 0 as buyers. The development 
• • w Highfields Grove, Is by the Rosehaugh 

; copartnership, which bought the land 
: . ■p r mor ® lhan £7 million. The remaininq 

.■?:*. [wuses are being sold through 
.- Hampton and Sons' Hampstead office. 

. . it 1 ® houses, in six styles, have two 

' reception rooms and four or five 
bedrooms, with individually 
landscaped gardens. 

■ Los Altos ought to be in Spain, but 
it is a modem and luxurious home on the 
edge of Bulstrode Park, Gemtrds 
Cross, Buckinghamshire, bunt in the 
style of a Spanish ranch, it has two 
reception rooms, four bedrooms and a 
guest annexe, with a gymnasium 
complex, several outbuildings - and a 
helicopter hangar and helipad. The 
price is around £750,000 through SavSs. 

Luxury in the east wing 

■ For the Englishman who wishes a 
castle to be his home, Beedings Castle, 
built over 1 8 years from 1890, could 
be the answer, it is being converted into 
several apartments, the first of which, 
in the east wing, is now for sale. The east 
wing incorporates the tower rooms at 



Chapel Cottage, at Market Weston, near Diss, Norfolk, is a 16th-century Grade 
II listed bonding which has within its one acre of gnmnds a converted Methodist 
chapel with two bedrooms and a reception rooms. The cottage, restored by its 
present owner, is of timber frame construction and has a new Norfolk reed 
thatched roof with a life expectancy of 80 years. It has two reception rooms and 
two bedrooms, and retains its exposed beams and studs. The chapel has a cove- 
nant preventing its nse as a boarding house or for the sale of alcohol, but other- 
wise it is ideal as extra accommodation or for letting as a holiday home. Strutt & 
Parker's Norwich office is asking for offers of more t han £95,000 


Battle of the Baskervilles 


•-’i 


In a spine-chilling sequel to last week's 
article about houses with famous 
connections, it looks as if .the notorious 
case of The Hound of the Baskervilles 
may have to be reopened as the result of 
new evidence which has come to light 
among the mansions bordering 
Dartmoor. 

There are now two claimants to the 
name of Baskerville Hall where Sherlock 
Holmes first investigated the terrifying 
story and discovered “the footprints of a 
gigantic hound”. 

The case has been complicated by this 
new twist in the last few days when — 
ominously perhaps — both properties 
were put up for sale. First Brook Manor, 
near Buckfastleigh on the southern edge 
of Dartmoor, came to the market 
through Strutt & Parker in association 
with Michel more Hughes, on behalf of 
92-year-old Gilbert Pie, who has lived 
there with his wife since 1950. 

The agents proudly proclaimed that 
the property was the Baskerville Hall of 
Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's story. But as 
soon as be heard of the claim, Nigel 
Paige, a solicitor, who owns nearby 
Hayford Hall, three miles from 
Buckfastleigh. issued a statement saying 
his house was in fact Baskerville HalL 

The facts to be laid before Hobnes, 
who might regard the case as being at 
least a two-pipe problem, are these. 
Brook Manor, set in 97 acres of 
woodland, and for sale at £210,000. was 
built in 1656 for the Royalist Richard 


great black horse through the woods, 
chased by bell hounds. 

These black hounds were believed to 
race over Dartmoor and howl around 
Brook House, and “to this day", the 
agents chillingly report, there is a stone 
enclosure to the side of the stables 
resembling a kennel which could have 
been used for such an animal. 

Hayford Hall has the support of the 
American Baker Street Society for its 
claim to be Baskerville Hall. It is a 
Gothic-style ball, dating from the Edwar- 
dian era. is set in 36 acres, and has an 

The story was based 
on a number of houses’ 

asking price of around £300,000 through 
Jackson-Stops & Staffs Exeter office. 

Mr Paige says research has backed up 
that view. He maintains: “I think we 
have the best claim. Brook Manor is not 
near enough to the edge of the moor to be 
the right house." 

Bringing further evidence on behalf of 
Brook Manor. Robin Thomas, of Strutt 
& Parker, says Conan Doyle had 
originally intended to call the book The 
Hound of the Cabetls after the notorious 
landowner, and wrote it after coming 
down to Devon and hearing of him. 

Mr Thomas then becomes quite Dr 
Watson-like in his uncertainty and wish 
to please: "We know that the Sherlock 
Holmes story is fiction, not fact, but that 
it certainly interests people thinking of 


H A w: . 


Cabell, a man so disliked that when be 
™ buritd in the Byckfimleigh church- ^iteboLStl tokfteaojj-™ 
~ tnuiarrie tho .Qnirth an* Mnrth rwne yard the locals placed a large stone on his rased on a number of houses. I do not 

head to ensure that be could not escape 
to haunt the neighbourhood. 

The legend is that in spite of the 
precautions, "Dirty Dick" was believed 
to have escaped from his tomb .to ride his 


v 


towards the South and North Downs. 

The split-level apartment has a 25ft sitting 
room, a hexagonal breakfast room, a 
master bedroom suite and two further 
bedrooms. King &-Chase more's 
Pulborough office is asking £125,000. 


think any one of us can say we are the 
only Baskerville HalL" Until, of course, 
someone — the new owner perhaps — 
finds the footprints of a gigantic hound. 

cw 


Conveyancing 

£280 by City Solicitors 


(-4- VAT and disbursements) lor 
in the usual way on prices up to 

higher figures. 

BARRETTS 
49 Duel Mcnmu sr. London 

TELEPHONE: 01-2*4 0591 


or selling your tome 
Ring for quotes on. 



- V 


1 ' ) V i- 




*■ !!• 


LONDON ORBS EB 

5up>ft> Hil» V* Mixed 
mure n aid lesdemm 
inert dose m London 
Feld} Ihc prewtty las 
Own Ml» mMMMM 
UvouOMid to o irav hqh 
SUndvd mrtodmg modem 
lend Utntn jnd uBmom 
A/ rumnodjMt tom onses 3 
uwr beoj (Mown lecqmn 
mm. hKhen.itoro room. 
Mlfunoni utM* room gM 
am GCH Miqral tenues 
tnmutfM r H (1 15000 

ISLINGTON N1 

Defapffil ? oed nuRJMta 
*ilh ouatn n JtUCM Nlty 
V, bmac ? dUe beds 
impugn sang room 

Lrirhm dm tetmoan 4011 

moKA GCw togra tea 
tups (iceitem 
1B89M 


BEAUTY 

Tranquffity - Space. 2 
unique period 
cottages - see under 
Hertfordshire. 

Sole Agents 
Bairstow Eves 

0992 38467. 


mNS 

BAKER 


Ihb * 




-M IV. If* 


01-354 0066J 

<3line*> f 


KENSINGTCWWa 
PALACE GARDENS 
TERRACE 
2 Bed Gmden 
Mateonefe _ 

O^iicrt Dneci Sale 
VC* TiWr 

01-727 0471 W 
0734 744369 


north of the 

THAMES 


\ I.II1K Itoif I* * °° ” 7 


rik i .yc HiMip 3 hfdroonwfi 
Ol oo S 37C« 


£87.eOO. Trl 




'T 

oVsev 47SS. 


SW6 r-N-M """SJSftiL & 


TrtOi 2B-»dia? 


W2 




maRBLC ancm 

TS» 


. nidied. pnu^Sfd 

’"S' Trt Ol 0724 

(ALHW ariN' I^ 1 * 1 

;!!;• r'uo->^ 0,so7J05S 


MOITAGUE SQUARE, 

ffl 

FQten&dy avert) graomJ & 
lo«r groml floor flat I 
Reap. 3 Beds. Batti PQt Lse 
17 years, lease wttramn 
avaftaWe to B7 yen. 
CtSBJMB 

CkestarfleM ft Co 
01-581 5234. 


EALING 
W5 

tut BKnaooail double frortari pentf 
rwtentt to faced) condo™ flmuglh 
oul 3 retepwm moms. Wcben/hnnk 
on. dmv mom. flody, 4 beds, 2 
bams, daafc.sfudc room, same 
garden mauu 5325 D00 


Sole 


loots: Hex Ne8 
-221 2800 


SW1 

4 Bed, 2 
ftatfuly 
modernised. Quiet txa 
dose amenities. 

£235,000. ~ 
View Today 
01-834 1066. 


BMOMimaH r^URM SW6 Sutters 
h mmt mxvrr> 2 me 
jpui iiwni wild 2 urhaie bel 
ron^-v un and monilor 
vnmirnMiw snwWMWiin 
rxrftnnp auard winning 
oomcfli on bthtk" «*(*■ adjar^nf 
la n-ddmls vwimming noaL 
mui» and m m- <«. CM/wrd al 
rralfMir nnff for Q«Wk sate 
Cl 19.990 Tcf D7(»5 48SS2 
v>r»i,(wh or dan after Apm 


LAOmOKE SQUARE Wll - Elf 

qanilv rnuiml. nigh munvd. 
raised around floor period Hal. 
in Inis pmiitnoo*. iranquu 
sqnarr Larw rprrpdirrclly far 
inq an rs of rommunal part ten*. 
2 nntrooms. kiimni. baltiroorn. 
fioakroom A HalL Long tew. 
CIJ9.099 sn>s Ol 229 6901 
earn, mm A Wdavs un i 


CAMMN TOWH NW1 Law 

Shop/Siudlo/Ganrrv plus 2 
■ml/; rrrroijon. Iilltnno and 
fell hr mm MabKtnrtl*. 3 t>w- 
mml rooms and W. Gas 
Crnlr.il Him ling. ftlKd farfrftL 
niuood dproralnr order. Prcily 
garrfon ciaS.OOO Frrrnold. 
TH Ol 267 ia«5 


HARLEY s*. 2 mm* walk. Po- 
iNhllid J1W nr sliidio apt., vru k 
a n/ 100m. MU and P or, £'L 
C 59.000 lo inrlnde fgnipnfe. 38 
\i ksisp 723 0272 


RYDE PARK. 2 mlm. OunMng 

ia*te4uiii innoidicd nai- wccp- 

HMiis «S7 09.000 ano. 

Trl Ol 724 B727 


KliNOTOH cwjroaliv 
non*' 1 ini pimali* sate; F/H. 
nnh 2 iMlh. filled kjl. uunW- 
oi h mi Cardrii. Oners ojw 
50000 Trl 01 262 70BO 


SOUTHAMPTON NOW WC1- 

mod p/B work .urn. wn»: 
C/H«r C82^00 Frank Hams 
a Co 387 0077 


SWISS COTTAOC SuprrtJ gardrn 
hIl r«.rmiionan>- 
3 own. 2 r«- 
bHlhv p.ni« «mnv W«*"- 

,i im> Cl 66 000 .-Ol 6BS 


■mil am* RO Wl fl OWIlW 

SSLJin VrrHlnginn H*** 
•jFZL Vrf^d doumr r«op 

udiT t icntn «°^Jf*SSwS 

w fe/fe lanno fld» 

Cto'5 500 — ® 

ni pos 5181 
STUNHWe CR^“ 

limdO" Fdmili t Jo f^ toomv . 

^%8/SSm^V^ 1531 
ittnli 


DPBROOK MEWS 

W2 

A large mens bouse, in res)- 
tan) conSbm. ctosa a 
I anrxfer Bate rfeuhlw menpr 
kn/ break nn. 3 beds. 2 Mta. 
tenace. 4 me. ritefwkl 

nam 
Max NeH 
81-221 2818 


EAUNC Common WB drt 1930 Tb 

matioub mod «unny house vnui 

kctfudcd wrsi farmg gdn. a dwr 
bW. lux baih. 2 rrerp*. blast 
room. klL rtk rm. mlrancv 
porrn. Exn-imu ratetenUBi no- 
uuon Ium a frw mins walk o t 
Ealing Co m mon Station 
Cl 89.960 I /lid. TH 993 2908 


MIS Suntu- doublr (Tooted Vic- 
torian «rra with gar ago 
AHraohelv roodemtsed. wood 
burning doiK. ' nry ttow 

Clrvioin Park, transport. Own* 
2 douidr ■Mill coins, reception. 
kiirimi/iHnor. bamraom. pfH- 
IV qaidcn. C72.SOO TH Ol 254 
3592 i nonw) 


MMZMG 

ARCfVTKT DESIGNED 
MAISONETTE 
0n3/4JM& ziaCttmvtmo 
iHttnn lAcumn rtd. lul n- 
ndiM street 2 bnkam wh 
■nh^iqr. 2 Mlnoas. Dm- 
Be hwg space «th 
Vra) rod. Bndge to root tw- 
race. etc. Vc. More be Hat 
rnm M Vm mta V OBajM 

Tel 017X7 


FINCHLEY N3 

Lanje EdwanSm upon buR 
gnund floor Bat 2 beds, eepe-' 
me dMng room t kunge. h 
Rood decorative order. Gas CH. 
Own No m art Eo a noB. 


Long 


m950 

01-346 5941 


PARADISE IN 
NW1 

Looey 5 floor period tenets 
house nes Regent s FWi Mlh 5 
rooms. 2 bathrooms, pine 
knehtm. real sun tenace. 60 It 
garden fitted Quality carats. 
Ready id move an Freehold. 
£250001 Tet 01-380 1292 a 
01-402 2231. No agents. 


HAmmSNHlH Sl Pwn-D So. 

Consmaiton Arm. Attracthe- 

hr modrnusrd lKI«d Regency 

icnarrd house 1 on 4 floors. 4 

brds. 3 recite. bHIra. stiowtr 

rm. idle hm /breakfast rm. W 

faring garden. C24&000 Tel: 

01-748-8340 


MW3 SwK, Gooagr. Ltnow op- 
pomuntv lo purchase below 
market Pfira Modem town 
name 3/4 Ortfc. 2 oalhv. 53 n 
recepUon. kurhen/dlner. doak- 
rnom A garden. C186XOO TM. 
Ol 7S2 7468 or Mr Sberman - 
olive Ol 831 7411 


CfmtvHCtL Superb 2d w bed. i*c 
Door flat ronierston. Edwarm- 
an- original IMIum. tree- lined 
mittC. ten 1 nose wsnow. and 
Turnham Green lube. Large 
•rerep. k and fe drw, ra 
OCH and tong lease. C92800. 
Tel OI 747 0761 1H1 


FULHAM Hnirrcombe Aw-SWfe. 
Alirarm r. landly hw wjlli roof 
Intaro Recenily moOccrUBcd. 4 

did b«K 2 talhs. dni rerrp. din- 
ing rm. ML wo we. GCH. 
Sunns sw gdn. Clow nus. W». 

shoos Freedom C22S.OOO. 

TeLOl 736-WM. Velw today. 


KW3 PARLIAMENT HHl Fields. 
Chamung Mr house m quleleii- 
Main 3 bed*. lAnizd baUi. lux 
Unsr. 29M rrr onto seel paito. 
Mt/ dm; clkr.-’ reot pdn. 
ci 53.000 i/nta. oi ass 009s 


BLOOMSBURY off Owen Souav 
HCl Bnalil 2 bed 4/Hh Hr 
nus In P/B Work nvertooWng 
ramm qdie. 92 irv^C6&500 
loi tfiWte Mil- Tel: 405 2229 
BLOOMSBURY, WC» An Pnusi 
al & spanous 1 Bed Hal wtinina 
modem D.b Work. 96 yr tee. 
C7BiOO. Bally Ski era Good 
696 273te 

CHtSWICX W4. 3 eleganl Wlori- 
an homes in suprrb tend 
Mirrimi. sartabk 1 A spanoui 
arrom All C230000 
dai wmuitan Poner 994 1000- 
DCVONSHMXTer. W2. VWwhL 

prriiy and spariou* 2 nnrm 3W 
nr nai tepteii and bah in siur- 
ro per tort Wdg. ISO 9» »»- 
nOJWO Tel -OI 433 0934 
BAYSWATER wa. Smierb 
ptimodemMeri S h"d lanu br 
house wlin piannning permis- 
sion toe 2 bed mews, houje al 
mar wnh ornate arrrss Free 
hotel C395XOO. Homes! 957 
S693 

BAVSWATCR W2. Ts*BT Ornr 
Mnuaie Oiuei dcUghUid end o< 
terrace town house. SMl ga- 
rage. garden. Non basecneciL 
NenN rrno^imn Cmaloolm 
iial Fiertwtel L42&000. 
Linross Lid 602 5564. 
ISUNBTON. MJL Supe rb 1 bed 
»i in presumous unwhowwi 
.mue lube a all oilier amemlHH 
Lu% lulls Ml kit. Ige ret cp. dbte 
hed. 1 hain Oi Small Wtio 
rpa 350 i/h SHdJci' * teem 
539 tJOe.1 


KT. West End. 
Super 2 brdi flat in P.B. btock. 
Oow Cunon Si and ad ament- 
lies Fulls' lid. kU. battv 
rer/din Gas C.H_ i . long lie. 
Communal roof gdn. V. gd ■ 
rand CI75.000 Cor. guicit isle. 
Ol 636 1194 .TL 


ELLERBY ST- Fulham, sunning 
large house etow to Btonops Pk. 
5 beds. 3 halbs. dbie rerep. dm. 
my cm. comers . rlkim. cellar a 
sitnr cellar W SouUl faring 
grin.- GCH. C315XIOO FH.-Xlew 
Today 01 736 0406 


IMMACULATE Baker Street arm 
Hal in e\cell«ii conflUMfe Four 
bedrooms Two rwvolion 
looms- Fully ruled knrhen. 
GCH C19&S0Q. Telephone. 
01 724 1343. 


Superb proportions 48' Stereo. 
3 Bed SuHm. Terr's to E&w. 
At Ml Ur bnmedtole occupg- 
1WIS |_se 909 years. C630 XMO. 
BUorbard EsUlm 246 eBll. - 


Atots- Man- 
sions -\ ' cry spartenn 7lh floor 
2 bed rut In weMKHouk Work. 
1* BaUis. mi. Owe Rwep. Lee 
68 vis. (2SQ.OOO. Blanchard 
F slates 245 681 1 


MA1DA VALE GfO floor DAI with 
Prtlio. 1 dW bedrm. recpL kitch- 
en. haUirm. GCH Oerorawd lo 
a man standard. Oow load fa- 
i ihlk-s. 125 -ST lease To met ode 
lUliqw- U2.600 1-289-3473 


ATHLETE REQUBKD Capable of 
(InnUma 3 flights of sum to 
ania/mg Kensington lUrt. l«V 
spar uHntsilb 3 beds. bath. elks. 
2 good sued receptions, lid IdL 
CH.ponereu- long fen Priced 
to sell at u 40.000 Te| Stesar- 
sons London 01-499 2104 
PAPCMA6 OOTTAOC - Fulham 
Drstaners. sisiun camtorubte 
home Master hed suite * 3 
►worms A 2na bath 2 manning 
iwsfikv i tommipauo gardens. 
Gas CH- C2J 7.000. Tot 01 
3B1 9019/828 0972 
CHISWICK MM 3 Pegant Mrton. 
an houses in superb condition. 
nUenm sartawe and snarKws 
at r onimmialton. All C234DCO 
Vm lodas. VkrMunan Pener 
<>1 994 1000 " 


WDiCHMORE HILL N21 

Impouiv detached oner heum 3 
tupr mt pw rooms, h bedrooms 
fasten halifonm. Lucbcn 30d mom- 
wji room Laundn and nher om- 
hoikhigv Fidh tiled gumming pool 
eaikfeM pb.4 sakv. double gaape 
ami ilmc noiufle pnJcss. nopens 
epsds disides mio pams auumno- 
itaiinp rK_ pbomns perinroioa for 
lauineuaA me. 

fXfcfs new C5CUTO 

Td 07872 64145. 


UMHTSBflDGE 

DsUttU manor dtognid ltd 
on ab floor of this Sis wll nn 
purpon bon btock. Entrants 
hah. Horep. 1 bedroom, fated 
fasten wth Nett MphnxL 
hath. Ut porangs. CH S CHW. 
67 year tease. £129.000 lo n- 
i canaw, anm m sow 
fauns. 

. 01 584 4893 


FULHAM, SW6. 

Buparb fldn flat DUa bed- 
room, boauhfid raoapbon, 
lux bathrm, landscaped 
30" gda Quiet rcL o&ir 
tube & shops E6&950. 

’ Ring Vanstons 
7 days a w wfc 
01-736 9822 


(OODSESTWi. Lse mats on lop 
1 ih. J beds. recepL ltd 
kll/Oine. censers alary an roof 
3 pauMMyof extra Floor. Low 
outgoings. 95 year lease. 
C 155.000 For mack sole Tel Oi 
274 363S BSun & wkday esesj 


MOL HHA village- A deUghtfU 

'period cottage. Refurbished to 

an exceptionally Mgh mnrtard. 

2 bertu a reran, rutty lUteid 

kill ben and bathroom. SlUn- 

mrw laart garden. CIBOlOOO 

fmenoid. TM. 346 7242 


2 bed. ground/ tower 
ground maeoneue. Unusual po- 
tential (or magus r appreciation. 
Presuge Mock oppose* Prun- 
IW HID. ClZfeOOO, Ssibjecl to 
romrarl. Ring: Marcy on Ol 
986 3711. Mon - Frt. 


NW8. Lge 7th 
Or Dal in prrwg blk on Avenue 
Rd- Krais total mod. uil per- 
irr. 4 beds. 3 baths. klL dbl* 
rerep. rfK. 2 basre. 2 gg*s. store 
rm. views 999 ypt £460000 
Part: Lons A Co 722 9793 


CANON BURY IQ: Preny gdn ftaL 
barkmg on the AJwynrv In eie- 
gam Georgian lerrace Own 
entranre. 2 Beds. bath. Vil/dus- 
rr. men. 92 it lease C92XXU. 
359-O500 / 2360114. 


ROAD, «M New 
returns stores- Terr \ it Use 4 

DM* Beds. 16' mod Fll Kil SO" 
Cdii- Mtns lime klewhig a 
Mw C1S6JOOO. CornOUe A Go 
485 2943 

OWKCR, W4. Sumniti0 gdn 
fUl many ortg features. Huge 
rerm. -lux kx & bam. mu 
badcra. prfsotr BO" south taring 
OdiL C72.9E0. View (Adas' 
W huraan Porter 993 3335. 

(UMMCmrem. Best Para 3rd A 
.4ih floor mabonene. 3 bed 
rootra. tertare. ronunuiul 
gardens Period house. Snare of 
tael ireehMd- £160000. TM. 01 

727 4355. . 

fflWto Ontel Cumberland 
blreet Snanous early Victorian 
ivi floor bateeny flat 1 bed. 1 
bath, kunuro/dbung. wmj urtv 
irotltooe d sati ng room. C8S.OOO 
TM 821 9770 (HI 264 4327IWI 

HAMILTOM TERRACE NWS 2 
bedroom luxury flat. 2 rerav 
Jl*6 rooms, study. Mlrhen. 
bauwootnjang lease C17&000 
lef 286 7268 no Agents. 

WAJDA \ ALE W9. Nmly eons 
lux com bid mUKwflp, 33 ft 
,inep. 3 imh. 2 baths, (tdrv ni 
ted kil. roof tenw Cl 67 600 
Howard Estates- oi 289 0104. 

HARM VALE W9. Exrrpttonaly 
l»Hdt Mandard new com 2nd 
i tool Ur. 3 beds, 1 rec. ML/b'fast 
rm. bellnm. CH. C87EOO. 
.0>anv ll|e%. 01 221 4936. 

MAMA VALE jmCkw mm Rat. 
3 bed dM recn. a Uh/tiwww. 
nev, fid kn/tikiMi nm GCH bai 
tnnv tong, lease c 170.000 oi 
806 9927 

-SWl. Burvrogtwnn Gate, qum 
and um 3rd uoer 2 bed flaL 
Reads to walk in to. 80 xr tw 
Otfert in mren oi Cl 19500 
Trt- Hunter Evutev 828 2143. 


PROPERTY BUYERS’ GUIDE 
LONDON PROPERTIES 



ARE YOU A FIRST 
TIME BUYER? 

W» House Pinas si London tdP 
Wadi BwUng Society or Bank 
PflNKfes fla ctomest rowt 


Wes’ Mare are me best buys 
n London? do i need a sumey* 
The Fra Tone Home Boyers M- 
wory Sam s me ONLY 
ntependea agency wfach wwks 
for the buyer and art lire scHei. 

FIRST THE HOME 
BUYER'S ADVISORY 
SERVICE 

18 Squaw Phca, LoMfam 
W1H5WH 
Write erlefephcDC 
81*7298881 Mteroflks 
keen B1-2& %46} 
lor a leafleL 


SW6 

Al ELEfiUT H8BSE OH 
TK reiBBSKOKN 
ESTATE 

Re tud 4 yean ago id m 
etarang sianaaia cun gndy 
irrangsdas Jipsoous 
receon. 3 double bem 2 
Meweii en Mai urge 
kfleben/ DteakiaAi room cent, 
gas cb. auimng not <aoog 
paeeagaoen. 

Can roacitv be adapted ro 

provne S etd&. 3 onha. 


S32SJDBB FREEHOLD 

Tet 01 736 7974 



FINCHLEY 812 

Large fflnafy home, 5 beds. 2 
bat hs, Edw ar d ia n terrace , 
convenient to Bfl emenities. 
hd GCH. email garden, qual- 
ity carpets and curtains, 
o uiaca no n g value at 
n2sswi 

FDR QUICK SALE. 

NO AISffTS. 

TEL 81 - 445-2369 


GROVE PARK 
CHISWICK W4 

I'Dqucdci hvrm in 1 onr of tr- 
•tadol pbn. hO hfth. .1 boiby .1 
■crept. Ip-liL IMrnr.OdS.pkat 

III on. Indoor healed wtun pooL 
{JSttun 

9953355 
VimriBS today 
JOHN SPENCER 


PRIRCESS GATE 
MEWS, SV7 

Doobie-Eronied mews bouse in 
quiet desirable location. 
Ideal for conversion. 

£400,000 Freehold 

Sole Agaric 
Cheviot Properties Lid. 

Tab BMSS 3M3/493 3335 


SV 1 fiARBBI S 88 A 8 E 

Stunning Penthouse 
Maisoneita 3 bed, Imge 
sitflnfl/iflning room, 2 bath, 2 
superb root tBrraces. 

116 years base. 
Qmixn 

HARRIOTTS 

C Cana SfeseL Lsnda* SW1 

81 828 3665 


CLOSE CITY ft 
WEST Era 


Luxury 2 bed fM n near 
fesefeprasa at Canton. Amnia 
putang, hOy furoabed and 
eqnppBl. For iromatbate 
otxupatni w fumeiw) lancg. 


Trib 81-487 8017 
m 11031 52142 


MACFARLANE 

ROAD, 

W12 

A 3 Bad Victorian House with 
much dander n need of near 
rorf & a few mnor improve- 
ments. Dbla Sitting Rm. 
Kft/DWno Rm, Batbrm, Gdn. 

Freehold EllBiQO. 
Ashton Stoah & Day 602 6611. 


MAGNIFICENT 

1 bedroom flat situated in the 
heart of the City. Roof terrace 
wfrti superb views of River 
and London skyline. £75.000. 
FOr viewing please ca& 

Jacfcaan Property 
Services me 01-908 2406 
9am - 7pm 
seven days a week. 


HOLLAND PARR W14 . MmI 
pied a terre. Entrance haU. b«L 
irtcWKWi bath. wp. w.c . krt A 
garage 92 year lease. Share of 
(rrehafld. Furniture axauabte. 
Cl 20.000. Tel : Ol 602 1300 


W1 - Off Harley SI in QUM loca- 
Iton. wartmH 1 bedroom fUl in 
nrestigtoui P/B btortc. C7S.ca» 
lor milrti suh> Phone alter Turn 
Ol 630 7594. 


BRYAMCTOM SQ, WL A beaull- 
lutly Her flat m tubsunctal blk. 
2 beds. bath, cloak, dbte recep. 
oatao- gge. 98 m. £245X00. 
Park Lord A Co 722 9793 


CENTRAL Sunny guM 6 urge 
rooms. 2 oalhy, flip GCH. bNte 
mul deror. can await your 
rornplruon. Ciaaooa Td. Ol 
262 8698. 


cm or LONDOR EC2 and EC4. 
(Mertian of flats for sale en 
Inna leases From C70.000. For 
fuU deteris phone Frank Harris 
A Co: 387 0077. 


ASSET ROAD NW6. Degani and 
sponouft ground floor flat wnh 
ocitfatal leal ures. Huge double 
bedroom, large nreegbon. Uicta- 
en. bathroom . halL GCH. Use of 
small garden. 98 year lease In 
rlubna Vk share of F/H. 
C73J500 ForqUrfkpmalcs^e. 
Tel: Ol 528 1930 ■ 

LfTTLE VENN* Randolph Oes- 
rent. Totally refurfautied taring 
oi «■ Gdns wlih arena la 3 acre 
Comm Gdns. 3 BMN. 2 New 
Brit*. I nuiur ML Dtntog Hall. 
2CHI Rer. Beady* to move into. 
123 rears: 1 22 5000. Sunday 
103 870 J70A. WM«» 499 
9981 iTl. 

f, «w— nun HIT WD. 

I nmodernard 3 nv rial abase 
*bl»». New 99 it fae. C30.000. 

nank Hams & co svi txm. 
CITY to nuns wtek oho near tube 
1 2. Un 2 bedroom nai in con- 
torted mill house. £64-950 tor 
quirk sate. Trt Ol 729 8660 
FULHAM 2 bed 1st IR flat. 19' 
S/tte'mg Terr Open. plan spin 
hi kil/bUM A rrerp GCH. B4|7 
he C85 CW TlM-OI 731 3177 
LAROK V1CTOMAN hw. Carden. 
Bannrann Road. Gftis wtcfc. 
C253000 T HOSKINS. 730 
9937 


MAIDA VALE 

121 SuOKrinri Ammbs 

Ewtosw coovwsior 7 flat 3 
SOU 1 Bed l? 66.0001 2 Beds 
lEl35000)di3 beds 
(£1651100) CasCH Ouabty 
rtvougboul 

EUV 035 JT FROM MvtlCftfl 

VEWTWEvaMf 

TRRUMJOml 

STARUCROFTLm 
078375161 
OfEc* bom. 


LA. SHAW 
& PTNRS 

Caveat Ganteo, WC2 Spa- 
cious studio rial vrith taige 
krtchflfi/dnno room, on 3rd 
floor of tuily refurbished 
buiklfflg Long lease. E87.50C. 
COVENT GARDEN. WC2 2 
bedroom M on 3rd and 4ft 
floore. in need ol smno 
modomisatwfl. Long 
£ 110,000 

01 240 2255 


sins 

I PARSONS GREEN SW6. 1 

large unmodemsed ihaontn tee 

on 3 ifaiin dose PsL lube and 
stews. 0>nn3i eatings, doors, v 

dado etc 5 bedrooms. 3 ra*p- 

tens. Mdien. bathroom. 2 WCs.1 

40 Wh Ucno gdn EJ59500 F/H. 


Putney 
0 j -7S9 SOC 



MORTGAGES tk 
REMORTGAGES @ 

10-25% 

n>% KORTGAGES MMUBL 
3 k M toc c mo or 
&75 x man a- 1. 

Any purpose. Froo advice. . 
Td 01-247 312a 


71. 


LG P. 

FraV “ 

LotfN El 60*. 


PALMERS GREEN 

Mmntatm 5 bafcamwd house 
tonacaMi All bedrooms fated 
Mti n/robes Master bed wth 
Isge m sate bathroom 16 sq ft 
ks MdKO/brkst bar. Doable oa- 
rage (etadne doors). CH. hRy 
double gtezed. ElBSiDO F/H. 

Tri 01-249 6014/5 (day). 
81* 882 5273 (eves). 


ENCHANTING 

HAMMERSMITH 

COT TAGE 

On flaw Horn completely reno- 
vated throughout 3 bate, large 
thro reception. 2 WCl 1 into. 1 
shower, urge smy garden. Ctoto 
pvt. tube and amenBos. 
FREEHOLD n5fcOM 
Tet 01-749 1614 


W2 

1 MW MARBLE ARCH 

1 double bedroom flat 
UHra modern block. 1 
recaption room, fitted 
kitchen, bathroom. CH, 
CHW, lift, porterage. 
£92,000. 

TEL’ 01-202.9175 


BARBICAN, EC2 

A unique 2/3 Bed flat on the 
1st floor of > popular p.h. 
btock. Attractive vims over 
the lake. Excellent condition 
throughouL South toeing bal- 
cony. 12S yr tee. £132,500. 

Batty Steven Good 
636 Z 736 


CHELSEA & 
KENSINGTON 


CHELSEA SWiO. Ideal ptetko- 
lerre 2nd floor period property 
recently decoraifd inrougnom. 
Recrp 17x16. fully en tapped 
new kite hen. large dotarie bed. 
lux Utah, good storage, gas 
CH/CHW. new roof. 84 year 
lease. C6Z.OOO for quick sale. 
Trt Ol 362 0802 levesk. OI 393 
7305 i day). 


Holland Park 
Wll. Superb start MM pent- 
house maaoneite on too Iwo 
(MOTH of fine period buHding 
ch pTlootdnu nurture communal 
gardens. 3 bedrooms. 2 bath- 
iwni tape reception, all In 
excellent rondJIKin. 99 year 
lease Cl 76.000. Trt 01-384 
1419 Anytime 


SOUTH KOMtCTOH flal for sale 

22 year lease vKlorian buUduib- 

\ lews, of Albert HalL totally re 

decorated. 2 bedrooms, deeply 

tivlKh. El 10.000 including aU 

machinn new carnet ecL red- 

den I porin’, communal gardens, 
rum Mrs Anderson OI 
9379673. 


nrZGEOMUE W14. Bright man- 
sun fiat. 3 beds, lounge. <11 rang 
room, large weU lined kitchen, 
modern fully uied bathroom 
and guesi wc Gas CH- good 
decoraine order. Long ww. 
oners around £140.000 Trt. 
01 603 5550 


LUXURY 2 bed ground no or flat, 
reception, kllcnen/dlner. gas 
central hnmna. own rear large 
palto in secluded cottage over- 
looking gardens aL from, rural 
aweci. near Bfanop - * Park 
L83000 ono. Trt Ot 570 4868 
or Ol 373 2972. 


W2 Oov to Ken Gdns. fnCfetabO' 
btunrang grouM floor flat. Peri- 
od leauiras. ornate plaster work 
etc. high retime? A superbly 
hand panned. 20 it rerep. 2 
beds, t barn. 1 shower 
Cl 60.000 Trt 01 727 3659 
(day i Ol 573 4989 rnesj 


HWTh REMUHGTOW, 5W7 Ex- 
rrMional loo floor lamily not 
2040 SO FI rime to aU ameni- 
ties. 5 Rrreps. Kli/Bisi Rm. 4 
Beds. 2 Baths, dke. LUL Lse 92 

STS CKXJ.OOO. Blaochard Es- 
tates 246 6811. 


KCNSUtCTON W1A tnunanUale 
Penlhouse flal in modern block 
lusi off Wen High Street. 3 beds. 
2 natle. double recap huge pn- 
sale roof terrace t36‘x 247 Lifr. 
Lease 92 yrs. C2 10,000 Nebdn 
Hearn 01 957 381 1 
CHILDS PLACE SW5 ImnuruUI* 
l an ills nmrsr. 4 bedrooms. 2 
bal hi corns, double reception, 
laioe kiirnen/dlner. Gas CH. 
Freehold Cl 79.95a Nebon 
Hearn 01 937 3S11 
UtDBROKC CROVC Wll. light 
and spar tout V tied nat over. 
looking pnsale gardens. Large 
recepuon. study, kil and bain. 
CH. CHW. CB4^00 ■ Immediate 
sale POM. Trt 01 727 9013. 

3 BEDROOM mi teonett*. lst/2nd 
floor In Ouecnsgaie area. 2 
Haiti, large recco- to need of 
sUuhl modernlsdlton. 

Cl 97.000 01-681 4178 in. 
CMELSCA «W3 Superb 2 Bed 
Flal. ughb atari, exceflenl «*»- 
dilitai. Ujwowaoiitgs 84 yeark 
Only ei 59. coo. Tel Ol £83 
6117 

MARKHAM ST SW3 « bed 

houses turn. 2 rnrept. tutcanv 
small oardm. C29&.000 Free- 
htad. Ot 6BI 9616 OT 0243 
773SS1 

SWG 3 Bed ground floor ftaL 
Needs minor updating. Tremen- 
dous opportunity at C74.960. 
No agents. 01-794 4341 

i Home l. 01 636 1931 fWorki 
SW3L BnuH newly mod ground 
fir flat Reeve. S beds. kit. bath- 
cKuk. pm eana Comm Gdm 
120 vis. Cl 39.500. 
HOLMANS. 370 6781 


KEISINGTOX fiDMS V8 

Awtelaroi jfno(lfreehotorii6 
Don wth some tragmtaw 
nans and a ostgMui ornipt* 
cms U» jart The house Is at 
attest used twieong but woofa 
be sweatee far conversion mm 
kmiry Uats sutpa hi the isal 
conur.L Otters are SMted ffl tee 
regain ot £SOGlGO 0 teCy vasas 
and tor the Freesac nasesL 

All aantaE to Wendy Ktew to 
Partn Stdaiia, Sole Ages! 

01 229 2404. 


WORLDS END 
KINGS ROAD 
SWIO 

Sutwra reranr nmened rased 
ground ftocr I bed:SUfa> tut m 
perm nous* on kings ftaaa. 
FeBures m^Ste omt 

enmees. doutee coots, gautei 
ms. Rady to mine n» tar 

£624)00 

Tet 01-584 9584 (day) 
937 3043 (eves) 


FARMER STREET W8 

One of the most appeal- 
ing areas of Kensington, 
Filgate Vftoage, offers a 
residential aniK»phere 
of great charm and char- 
acter. This spacious 
west facing house offers 
practical and adaptable 
accommodation. Dtote 
recap, dining rm. 4 beds. 
ML bath, cloaks. 
Gas CH. Freehold. 
£230000 

MARSH AID 
PARSONS 

01 S37 9622/6091 


GARDEN SQUARE 
KENSINGTON 

taMftal ™"' cafamtn j 
CrtXMTC r jrjFCC a-Oeie * ’{■ 
tre pin «gg i v n vi ueua jen 
nr.im’ klM taLirn 19tl3raocm 
aqh Uk fi inn A ensure ™r' 
m cbJe iteor-eig mth-tot: 
?bfa*vra Hrwi inmeo#* 
DOMto vwg rUL SiTbOOO 

TaiDI 373 3249. 


SL 0 A 8 E SQUABE 
A ISA. 

ConVtxtehto taniy period 
freehold bouse, dose Kmgs 
Rust and 5hiane Soars. 4 
bed, 2 bah . 2 reap, targe 
Mdien. duals, unity. GCH. 

garage. 

mats arond IWOJMO. 

Tel 01 589 7241. 


EMMSMORE GARDENS. 
SW7 

Large flat in p/b block. 
Dtile Recep. WL 3 Beds. 
3 Baths, £295,000. 

Casa 4 Co 

2M 5757 or 0927S 6392 
(Ttetari- 


KERSHKTON W8 

Charming garden floor flat in 
sort attar location, tuxunously 
dacoratad compris i ng 2 bods. 
2 taaths, oioak rm, dbiB raqiL 
fitted idtehan. 2 patio ganlem 
& access to camifflai gar- 
dens. Long Isasa for sau & 
share ot treahoid. 

£185,000 

Tel: 01-370-5280 


M3CUFFE SQDARE 

First and SKond floor naisoo- 
ota. CMsnndra period recap 
2011 alK 3 Ms, 2 bates. 
taBhen, CH, 3 batames. 

tnuoa. 

Tehtohofla 
21-373 3501 ons 
91-481 0058 day. 


SW5. 

CNds Place. Unque 4 bed- 
room 3 storey Victor* houn, 
2 bate/ wc's 2 sap 
reception, tat/b fst room, ex- 
cellent itecorsiive condition, 
folly modernised. Fldt Mot 
sell at ET7&950. 

•Thackeray’s 
01-244- 7586/5. 


| CHELSEA 

Imtnan d ata. 
flat i 

GtttSfflS. 
£149.500. 

Allen Bates & Co 
01-499 4010 


SW5. 

ExrriWtu tocailon. Cxlremety 
bngm flal Laroe racepuon 2 

(vrtnxxns KLtcfmt Bathroom. 
Real letiucv GM Oi. £137^X50. 
370 296S after 12. 


FAHU1AY MANSIONS Queens 
aub Cardens 3 Bed. Reception 
Rm. KIL Bath. Lie of prHale 
Gdm 3 Tcnnlv Court. Low 
CHUwttngv Cl 19.000. James 
Anltionv A CD Ol Ml 4133. 


BRAMHAM CONS. Lge mamion 
flat. 3 beds. 2 baths ■ 1 en suitei. 
tslewli dnwife drcoraied 
Ready to move ui. Long lease. 
£215.000. Trt. 01 373 9271 


KENHMCTON. WB 2 bedroom 
itat. 65ti pri\ate batcony Bar 
gafn- CB6.000 724 7639 or 
0896 692824. fTl 


■KBCUFFE sq Sob gnd ft IttL 
Period fra lures grand ret. b/fsi 
PH, Italian bthm. 2 dbl Mk 120 
yn £175.000 ono. 370 5613. 


SW7 Beautiful mcfaia ftaL 1 
bed. retro, krt. baih. \iews. ka- 
uri*. £89.900. tor amtlr star. 
Ol 573 6884 iHI 438 3064 <WJ 


HOLLAND PARK 2 bed tower 
tpnd flat. Bargain £.135.000 
724 7633 or 0836 593824. 


WB. Large 2 bed flat to sought 
after Wotk offering UgM and 

quirt arromiiKHUIlrai. 

Cl 89.950 Emma Pirn: 938 
3222 iTl 

FLOOD STREET 3 dbl* bedr flat. 
2 good rereos Lge kllcn Share 
T.H. C925XOO. T. HOSMKS- 
730 9937 

HOTTiMCmj. GATE. CKarmmq 
urtl deroratnl 2 bedrm flat in 
Lonsdale Road. Long be 
£90.000. Trt: 0245 3S74S7. 
SW7. Superb around flr ftai to 
pan sq Recep. bed. ML bam. 
Ind C/H 95 yrs. £94.950. 
HOLMANS. 370 6781. 

SW7. Uninar 4Ui fir flal rttflv 
Rmg. ku/bkfsi rm. 2 bnk. 
baui. C/H. 85 m. £.165000. 
HOLMANS. 370 6781. 

ML Lovrtv 3 bed modem mal- 
sonrue wtlh ariu garden pear 
lube Cl 19.950. Sue Btaum: 
938 2222 <Ti 


HAMPSTEAD & 
HIGHGATE 


HAMPflTCAD NWS Urge man 
.saon flal. 2nd ttoor. 3 be*. 2 
tidlfe. GCH . new tilled kil. etr 
LOng lease * f. h khare. To ut 
euide. Ail.rarpefe A runainv 
C2 15.000 Phone. 01^354352 
HAMPSTEAD Garden suherfaboe 
(trt LlfMLBOO Freebtad. 3 
bettrm senu house, garagr. 
GCH. Carden LwM enrafa- 
bon Trl Ot -202-3103 pm 


:&Tiveadale 

HIGHGATE 

N6 


Gradell 



fBatures. Situated in 
dasinaWe pqgWgn wMt 
debghtfid seduded 
msterv gdn. 3 bedmts, 2 
bsthrms. 3 recaption 
roono. kitchen, 
doakroom, cottar. 
FfDthOtd. £22fUKXL 
Ref 5/32208. 
01-348 8131 


HIGHGATE 

Stomp* Road. Kenwood Eoep- 
tonal house wte bexmtui iirge 

gecen whch cauid be used tor 
redwetemw or tor e sonrate 
aCdunal pneetty Freehold. 

Sab f ntM often only 

■rite ta PJB. Bex 174, 

Liarifa Hfi 4DQ 

tv wwlitmt ta trtra. 


HIGHGATE. K6 

V» J— .f— nr . kr: -ir.-i Is^ik 

Ltrt f 140533 

THE PARK. W 

~.<-r idi«r trr-rprr Sf»i BT ^ 
■v-j'. r s* Or CM a iC UB 

fO&NGATE BOflDSi 

SB«i 

I.7-. J Kr-~. fcirtX cad S 
tic-yu rmr {> f’-Jkito 

BATry S7IVENS GOOD 
01-348 3424 


_ i A 2 storey 
ON- Honied semi del me in 
wed order 4/5 Red*. 
Baut/MG 2nd WC. 3 Reran, 
hil Cedar, xr Gdn. CXriel Rd 
CMv Mrahoalo Tube 
£165 000 CQRMLLiC A CO 
4H5 2945 


BANK CurbOdtially 
koanous luvurv 2nd floor Uai 3 

doubte rush. 7 balhv 1 tried 
kilrhen ,'Sllnrnlnn.outli. 
M IT true LITflOOO Trt Ot 
sab 5320 i home I Ol 481 5441 
uMIK*i 


RMHOATi: WOOD OuUooto ■* K- 
cra. r«nandablr. mod. worry 
liw Law usketa lor busy prof 
lantdk 4 beds, toe rtep. pun. 
uuru. ptayrm 2 rota irm 4. 
W UIDOOO Ot 444 7169 
<H>/OI 920 6188 <OI 


WEST MAMRCTBADb FvrrOenl 
Munoir. mansion flat. Many 
original fralum buenor dp. 
vgnrd 3 Wf bedreoms. 2S ft 
recrp/diraiM room. Lirgr kilrfi 
en. turn separate (loabroem 
£148 750. Tel 431 1889. 


ST JOHNS WOOD Central. Mewi 
properly 3 brtfe. rtaito garden, 
rrirtru ncaimg No smicr 
rlunm 93 years lease. Vacant 
nraevon £140.000. Tel: Oi- 
338 2327 


HtiOBROSC MU Cnanrung tow- 
er grd lb rial DM bed. nrep. 
ku/baln GCH. Ratio. Lease 93 
vrv £69.500 Ol 72z 2014 
tint w/rndv 603 0920 Day. 


W. HAMRSTEAD toe top fir cum . 
many ono teaiuies. On 3 levels, 
hoge receirt. 3 beds. gas cti. new 
root, 92 yr be C99.9SO tel Ol 
431 2818 OT 625 9648. 

MMMGATE and Kings X Lovrty 
new rams Irom £57.600. Trt 
01-449 1515/01-278 0036. 


SOUTH OF THE 
THAMES 


RIVERSIDE 

location SW8 

Wjsoiuteiy gonjeous 1 boriroom 
kooy flat ratable with pan- 
tvairec vims of Wvw. £120000. 
For wevonjjpteM oil 
fcua Prepnty 


tanka us 

01-928 2406 

Sam - 7tm sawn days a week 


WANDSWORTH COMMON 
SW18 

Spac. awe Vot nu mqufat ma- 
toaoni ModwaivgawMSCH. 
naw roof. ftropM doora. auatao- 
■aad cfflc * aitn iwcptLotig 
toonres trapocas Dtriarec 
C79« 12) Ufa . no kri/D las. calar. 5 
DPtems bWi/WC. WL gdn 
£139950 F/H 


01-174 2211/170 6518 


SW11 

^®este SspsgL 

V. bhdois w ra. 2 Bate 
11 will efesoa Stone /WC) 
am Batfam. lge Krt V, Lm 
tenge. Gas CH E87AU. N ew 
lease Low Dntgongs. 

Eves ft Weekends 
088388 2235. 


BARNES COMMON rnurrtv mod 
lo iery total aiandant del F/H 
houw won Italy lined hwh 
ouairtj, carper and idictien. 
Bim dltnmen. and door fit 
bugs. 4 beds. 3 rents. bOirm. 
dmiBlan cloakroom, large 
lofi and cellar. 2 terraces. From 
and large bark garden. Garage 
GCH For quick sale £179.000 
Trt Ol 878 9070 and 3733928. 


FULHAM Superbly d pro ra t e d, 
newly modem feed. tpacMut 
Yiclonan house in «uM road 
tarqe UHiMr rereptwn. dmmg 
loom. Ium tilled kjicneti. pauo. 
2 large double beds, dressing 
room, clove lo BhImps Park and 
all amen E 1 25 OOO. View Sun- 
day 12th only. Call Ol 731 
5578 alter 9am Sunday. 


BARNES. Bee erteyRq Fully mod 
etruanl earh- Victorian serai del 
1 ami tv house close Cfanunon 
and Station 4 brtts. 2 batos 1 1 
en suilei. double drawing room, 
well lined kil/bUM room, toll 
gas CH 65 II Wrstetley gar 
dm Freehold £285.000. icnson 
A King. Ol 878 4942. 


BARNCS. Lillie cnehea. Exrep- 
l tonally pretty, tuny mod and 
well niesmled virforian hum 
2 beds. baib. spanous rerep.' 
kiirtirn. nuov. gas C/H. South 
faring palm garden F/H 
£125.000. Kltson A King Ol 
878 4942. 


PUTMEY EMBANKMENT Too 

Hoar flal. Outstanding slews 
oserfookinq Thames and park 
Small bail on v. double retro 
non. 3 oeds. kdrnen'hreaktasl. 
hath, sep WC. GCH. Low 
omooinm Long lease. 
Cl 85.000 Trt 01-788 9856 
WEST PUTNEY suptib semi de- 
tached house, in short quirt 
road, nose lo Riser. t> brds2 
baihs. 2 rerepu. kil/ break, rrt 
ku 8C Uesi lacing garden 
£289X00 irrelieM Tel today oi 
785 »9G thereat ler waned A 
Co Ol 785 6222. 

SW15 Redurase Road. Channtna 
period serai. 4 beds. 2 bam. 3 

rerepi- ku/break. ronsetvaiofy. 

SO- qarden. CHI sireel parking. 
L26O.000 Warren ft Co Ol 785 

9222 

MORGANS WALK SWU First 
floor with mrr ciew. luxury 2 
bedroom modern flat. 122 

year* U 40.000. day o» 3252 
etr 585 1292 

PHD A name SE1 1 bed flat 
ronMcdMii rny A Won End 91 

vear lease CJ 1.500 Ol 403 
7721 etc* Ol 828 7799 s 236 
«Us-. 

putney Ntrtonan 1 bedroom 
flal Laron viiing room, double 
bedroom, bathroom, kitchen. 
GCH CS4 OCO Trt: Home 01 
870 5431 Work 107573102544 
STMATHAMt Hamfeome uimly 
house Ch»e Tooling Common. 
3 i if ins. 3 bams. 6 beds, lge 
widen Cots mien I toy. 
£169 960 Trt.Ol «77- 1 028 
WEST PUTNEY ■ Nr nter and 
rnmmcin- Lovefs - Edwardian 
toe. 4 bnK2 baihs. dtrie rrcps. 
21 kii/dTrasm. prem- mu. 
£155.000. Tel: Ol 789 2207. 
PUTNEY Heath luxury & bed ora 
lit mansion des rtopmeni- 
rttiuasn and Tennrt courts 
£99.600 T« Ol 70S 2143 


4 * -ro- 



lls TRINITY ROOD 
VUBSWMTH COMMBH, 
SJr.17. 

An exceflenl commaon of 6 
sett contained I and 2 bed ■ 
room flits from ihs elegant 4 
storey Vctorian housa AW 
south ol Wandsworth Com- 
mon dose station mi tufg 
so urtv 15 irons Victoria 20 
nvns Wy. 

rt®i stwJanl ol finish, ftori 
kitchens, entiyuhone. raartte 
tiled bathrooms, carpels 
throughout fiaraoes for wte 
separately - off sheet paAmg 
avaWe- 

Pncas horn 
£55.000 to £79,500 

Viewing wtfi vwne 

Sunday Oa iZtti 
10 am to 1 pm 

Derate and brochm 
available flora 
Bete-Ctaftorod Surveyors 

(95% mortrapes available 
from me Halifax BuUfflg 

Society • sotHKt to stasis). 

228 7474 * 

MNORTHCOTCItOAPSWII 


Daniel Smith 


rnmant axm. m Smmt nw 

tot am ‘igno Bwrt *nn ‘-rm 
MV. DMT Bra Our Hun IM 
M RM Vdn lura Ifew Hrirw 
r H CHW HrsPim IrrmnGfe 
Mpoa lea* i.to ns if. tone 
Mrtjwaa mu. nw imum 

Mi 'Jar. itmxin mnr U*ews 
ruafe l Ram ns Onaglta Mb 
num CH bra Ow l ipW f 
mw 

DU KGOWL KB cuonriM 

uranuoo ui me rw Run, rta 3 
isrls TM* *Vtu un ta fl nwal 

(Mm*-, sue nn.Mi cnmere k 

Into I rrr l*iro IMBUJrarh 
CAHKfMUt MW HMD. « 
Mr reaatme krov raaaaefab 
r.wtran ? Bnb Wfa Rf«e f dn 
inrtiM am ch c«m ' 

Irjsr. ft yn, I.TJC I 


IWiOO 


157 KLNSISCTOS LaNKSLI) 

01-582 5550 


LOVELY 

OUTLOOK 

Emim rm ljuci. ■* nw ?M>fl 
to) pir t Tt.fr n j .on? Hfijn cl Jii 
if-rr'jiod.av mm wmr 
ILuv r lOf.lea [Jiv-rnr. !■:*> 
l-rui'i uiiy i.\> ■ ikimrjtnr, 

ryMin i.mm wl> mUc s.isn 

OUiss ISQrnmnkiUMi«<-.«n» 
isc f'<0 tr 1V7UH 1 gran *rn 
nutivr -jiijr jfitv Me, jne w,- 

iT'i Yd'ci-s 

mmnuwi OCH .nd >uny > 
iS7f«i 

Te) 61 672 5426. 

■a agate pit***. 


EARLSFIELD 

Newly mntofnsed groiiNi floor 
flat. 1 bed. recaption, fitted 
Metal, batteum. geti & own 
gafflOL 67 year lease. 

£47,950 
Tri : 947 7584 
(weekends or after 
6pm weekdays) 


GREENWICH 
VICTORIAN 
TERRACED HOUSE 

Rat frofaed. Grate I feted area. 
Oosa *B ameretas. 3 Detenu. 2 
retention. Ucteo. bafrnn. New 
real. Dbanting and wong 100 n 
S/taong garden bat to in GCH 
CM&JDDfl 

Dr olar tor qriefe nk. 
Tat; Vt-m 1662/2(7 «7B 


MAGNIFICENT 

6 bed family house within 
division bell overtookinQ 
park and tennis courts. Near 
2 tubes (or West End and 

City. Genuinely und 
for quick sale at El 
Tefc582 5507 (home) 
491 2233 (office). 


PUTNEY HILL, 
SW15, 

2nd floor fl» to mUm fand- 
wat»tapn wteeMaw.3bHa. 
2 recep nai fatenen. beovoom. 
oepwC-upOoxioan nrega. 
g»CH £110000- 

Ptwne 788 1917. 


CLAPHAM COMMON 

A HARE OPPORTUNITY 
Subsantite dbl ftnto s/det tea. 
Baage- 5 Beds. 2 bates, 29- 
Recap. Dintig. CBl SuoHb study. 
F/F KUCUsi Sep ti» Grainy 
Its. Rny Mod. GCH. Waited 
Gdns. 

ttSSJOO Ko Chain 

§1-482-2328/33 

01-622-0208 


BATTERSEA. OitoMWng Park 
■war Rhw. Superb, my m- 
noi» m floor 1 bedroom fiaL 
C as. CH Meal Pted-de-lerre. 
£73.500 ' Irw today 01-228 
2309 Tbereafier He Morgan 
and Co. 01-930 3222, 


CLAPHAM. Between Ibe com- 
rnonsi. Broorawood Road 
TM Ta red nouse 3 Beds. 2 
receW. Newly aecoraied & car- 
Prtrd. New kltcben. XT garden 
No chain. Oukk sale. 
£103000. Trt: Ol 228 2073 


BLACKHEATH Borders. Lmely 


Edwardian (aimly home. EwH- 
lent rand. & beds. 3 reran. 3 
Min. coach house. 100 11 gdn. 
ruU orb. £180.000. Must be 
seen. Ol 8S4 3499 


SPACIOUS STOCK WELL. Out- 
Standing V«1 & bedt/2 baihs 
hse * tain. Ortgmal features: 9 
llrratares! Hand-made kNchen. 
W- deroranon. For gum sale 
£166.000 Trt. 733-0169 6pm 


PUTNEY. SmrtMK 2 bed flat near 
Pumev Heath, large recewioti. 
PKfbani communal garden. 
Long Irav. snare freehold. 
£70000 Ol 788 6039. 


OVAL 3 Bed Modern bouse. I 
recpL lounge/diner. MKhffl. 
bam. who garden. GCH. 
£70.000 Tell 01-627-1271 


PUTNEY Panoramit rherilew .3 
bdnn nai. Garrho h ns rm. gc h. 
dWeolM Cl 30,000 6116 . Trt: 
Ol 789 0823 


_ FLU. Heater Es - 
Jfae Sueerb sglil In rl flat In dbl 
ftomro virtorian hseo/loakinq 
Tooung Beck Common. 2 lge 
beds, lge nung rm with 
i tuned Malrrwe onlo split In el 
flvi77.il nod ku/dinlng rm area 
imnuctaale condition. 99 yr 
j* W - C79.9S0. THAI -416- 
0809 mes 1/07 85-77787 <dayl. 
VO* teLStll UKMin 3 bed- 
rrom Regency cottage in 
commotion area, sera me 
•artwd. full of r Karan cr and 
J bedrooms. Z men- 
tmi. 2 Utah rooms, kilchen and 
I ^yr/ w garden. Cl 25.000 
uBtman 

f ^ W O ti Sto W B L 10 Mins. Ex- 
rrotmnu tun Hr nai. 100 yds 
HiH Pk. SE14. too 
flragw V£i au in- «rro- 
-SS!f ,1 £:.S?'J5y m 011 uu - titiip 

5H?.V P”- ,w «“■ ready, 

tp-lneln. Long be. CSO.OOO. 
BWXWfa 01691 8?31^S5S 

vS^SP - *!! Rom Trrr » c « 

sin&rtaa house dose 
“™™n Common- 4 bed- 
rooms . q bauirooms. double 
rwTOion room, knrhen. West 
lacing garden. Quick up r , 
totored C115J300 Ring: John 
— a 01 seg nm 


CondmKd an 




31 


□ 



rks. 


n). 


720)80 


b fam. 

taOBfe 
Uttj. w 
to and 
9 8b- 
uaia. 
49143 
«> 


'lodge 
5 0*d- 

soy 2 

m- 

and 

•rooid 

946 


ovety 

bed*. 

lining 

mien. 

S 83 


. Ocer 
rv. 4 
W«n. 

5*"- 


rS5“ 

000. 


an*. 
M 3 
6 to 

Tjdb 

OT. 

.«e 



&sat 


i tih, » liw ifcS Vici/McSDAi Cv/i oBcR o i'yoo 


PROPERTY BUYERS’ GUIDE 


COUNTRY PROPERTIES 



Lane Fox & Partners 

.with Rylands 


CUT OUT WASTED JOURNEYS 
AND DIFFICULT NEGOTIATIONS 
Ur Fox 

are pleased to announce the opening of 

A Property Bnyiog Scrota 

Minch miB rhb&zb oi Ming and pudosng Property at 
£25(1000+ to sir individual requremants 

The Department w# be run by 


a tanner of the tom ppeneneed n ail aspects of VataKn. Ppcta 
and 5eNni Cowmy Properties wttb die tMoing al ow Couny Offices 
Butoag Saver Department 

for briber faforanBoa rinse cosrtwt 
The LMdaa Oflte: aV®47dB 


HAHPSmRE/BfflKSHIRE BORDER - 157 ACRES 

Hearing 5 mbs. M4 3 miles. London 40 rote 

A RNE SMALL COWTTHV ESTATE 

HaivrfjiiisjjrSuaW m itnl surotRdngs bontering te Ramr Loddoo. or 

edge a wage 

M present a teutfolly Ion and inn STUD FARM 
- Also ideal lor smal beef Farm 

Awaetiw nan House -4 beds. 2 baths 

Superb STABLE YARD mth 57 Bans. 

Rate) Paddocks. 2 Cottages. Cana Fsbng. 


Christopher Stepbeasw htemS— I Ltd Tel: 848839 B54 
Um fn A Partners att flyfaeds Tefc 01-499 4785 


HAMPSHIRE - NR BASINGSTOKE 

Oddw S nides. Rearing IB miles. M3 2 mfles. London 48 miles 

A DELIGHTFUL LISTED FAMILY HOUSE 

mealy Hurled on Ute edge ot a popular milage, yet secluded In its om 

item gartens 

4 Httagriw Rooms. Cefar. Playroom. 6/7 Bedrooms. 3 Batnmms. Od- 

Ued centra] heating 

Useful tatuUmgs iKiuring sabfcng. Attractive matin grtens. 

About 2** Acres 

LoKtou Ofltac 01-499 4786 


WILTSHIRE - 55 ACRES 
Near Mafanestory 

Tritny 5 indes. Chippenham 10 miles. M4 6 mdes. 

LISTED GEORGIAN FAHMNOUSE WITH OUTBUILDINGS 
USD LAUD 

4 Reception Rooms. 7 Bedrooms, 2 Bdbrooms. 

Od lied Central Heatoig. 

Waded Garden. 

Abont 55 acres 

Cfctacestor OtHcc 8285 3101 


OXFORDSHIRE - ABOUT 102 ACRES 


London 47 intos. Heattew 35 nries, M40 Motoroay 5 mies, Otartl 6 
mfes. Meat Saturn 8 nrtss. 

A RUE TUDOR MANOH HOUSE 

in a neaofet and saduded station. 

4 Reason Roams. Domestic Offices, prindpai Bedroom Mte 2 Bath- 
rooms ft Dressing Room. 6 fritter main Mam A 3 further Baboons. 
Santo. Sutwb Gardens wth Wm (rangne. tweed Swimkn Pool tart 
Toms .Cowl. Soart Court. Garage Buck, Stable YanfwSft B Loose 
Bans: Tradtdmaf F a mbutengs. 4 Cottages. rate) Paddocks. Right. 


Jatit Safe Agmb: Bentrd Thorpe & Putao. TM: 01-499 6353 
Lane Fm A F ette r s «d8i Ryfnds 8295 710SR 


Bamgstoke 6 ate. Heading if mfles. London 50 ndtos 
HCHANTHG MDL HOUSE AND HU. COTTAGE 

atsw uspa'itsaitta 


Rest Class M Cottage 

Fffil SALE AS A WHOLE OR M TWO LOTS 

Lwfn Office: 01-499 4785 


Basingstoke 8 mdes. M3 Mofmoy 4 ales. London 55 mte 
A DELIGHTFUL FORMES STABLE BLOCK 


m naart tor 
Rooms. 0 


In an ew epbo n Wy quirt and peaceful station. WHhjd 
mmvsnn no a superb country tone wih 3 Re 
Bedrooms. 3 Bathrooms and seo-ctnuned Annexe. 

About 5 Acres 

For Sato by teflon (adess prevtously sold} 
Wtorfiartnr Office 0982 59999 


NORTH OXFORDSHIRE 

Bantny 5 mte (Maid 19 ales, London 65 mire 
A DBTHI8URHQ) 6E0R8MN HOUSE 
Witt outstanding ran 

4 Racepbon Rooms. 6 Bedrooms, 4 Bathrooms. Stall Ft*. 

Ln^r timbered Garden. Heatod PnoL hard Torts Court. Foot Bedroom 
Cottage. 

Stable Btacfc. Garage A Hat ParidmL 
About IS Aon 


Ttt 8295 58484 
wt Tat 1295 7*592 


C.G.GRIEVE & CO 

GALLOWAY . 

TO LET 

Superb Adams mansion facing m» - 2 self vAjiiU hmd 2 end 3 
bettoompd flats tor tong Wirt teastog. PtrmMwo or urttnbfwL 
Central Hatting. Separate gmges. 

Apply; C G Grieve 
Chartered Surveyors 
196 King Street 
Castle Douglas 
DG7 1DB 

Telephone: 0556 2964 


saviixs 


BERKSHIRE — Windsor Forest 
Wmdsor4mifa M4M(Xorway6mite, 
London 25 miles. 




JOII\ D WOOD CO. 


HAMPSHIRE 

NR HARTLEY WINTNEY 

THE MAJOR AND VICTORIAN PORTION 
OF A CHARMING COUNTRY HOUSE. TO 
PROVIDE 5 BEDROOMS AND 3 BATH- 
ROOMS AND SET IN 1.5 ACRES OF 
DELIGHTFUL AND SECLUDED GARDENS 
AND GROUNDS. 

23 Bevfcatoy Square. London W1X SAL 
Tata 01-429 SOSO (Rof. DCM/MPB) 


. ;• .v • = • •• ■ ; • v • v . • • 


H^ant listed Gecugjan mansion in 
^rdens and widun easy reach of Central 

London and Heathrow Airport. 

Halt 3 reception rooms, study, 

8 bedrooms. Flat. 

Garaging and outbuddingi 
Gardens and grounds. 

Cottage. 

About 2^4 acres- 

AVAILABLE AS A WHOLE OR IN 2 LOTS. 


20 Gravenor HiD, Berkeley Square. London W IX OHQ 

01-4998644 



Superb Southern Views to 
Downs and Coast 

Choice Georgian Bendrarce 
in East Sussex 


Lass Fa A Futon 



MAIDENHEAD 0628 74433 


THE FAST MOVING 
II MORTGAGE SERVICE. || 


COUNTRY 

HOUSES 

ASSOCIATION 

LIMITED 




At Midland, we don't see 
why you shouldn’t buy die 
home you want now; before 
the price goes up. Tb speed 
your savings well lend up to 
90% of the valuation price, and 
up to three times your income 
(or twice joint applicants’ 
combined income). You don’t 
even have to be a Midland 
customer 

We also move fast (an 
answer in principle within a 
couple of days). We have just 
one interest rate (currently 
11.07a, APR 11.5%), no 

d) MIDLAND 
MORTGAGES 

Tvinu tks 

r Midland Bank pic IWfr 


matter what the size of your 
mortgage or whether you 
choose endowment or repay- 
ment And well give you a 
certificate to prove we’re 
prepared to lend. It all adds 
up to a better mortgage. 

Written details available horn 
Customer Information Service, 
Freepost Sheffield Si 1 AZ. 


"Well make you feel 
more at home" If 



afto) 41 kingsway 

LONDON WG2B 6UB 
TELEPHONE 01-836 1624 


CAREFREE 

RETIREMENT 

Private apartments for long-term 
occupation are available in our 
historic houses each of which is 
set within extensive private 
grounds. 

The properties are easily accessi- 
ble and are situated in Kent, 
Stmey, Sussex, Essex, Oxford- 
shire, Berkshire, Wiltshire and 
Devon. 

All have been tastefully converted 
to provide hmny living whilst re- 
taining their original character 
and atmosphere. 

All services including meals, 
cleaning and heating are provided 
by Resident Administrators. 
Write or telephone fox our illus- 
trated brochure. 



Humberts 

Residential 




4i^r«teWb«l^ 

jsj * 


DOnaT/wn-TSW^^SI 

A303 i«*mte &&ngfam 24 mte (U»rijn/M^ 

Wa carton 5 rtrs . .. ^ 

A MCte awl *«» ■■ *•* Nre* 1 F»»" ■ 

ZZ aeon 4 hrt, 

S4 - m need Of tamamut cumjawng aw 2000 w a of 
jeconnwbfiOft. _ . _ 


iui tering wttDtonnngPwnwsw tor tetefWfflprt*B|riw3000 
aft »rtb pat d tf» Itei Sm 

Mart 5 acres rwweww 

Lai 3: 

Pasture anurwbng to abM 9** beret 

«*.!**»*»«. m/9ZVJK9 


hahpshibe 

Wdd 2 nate London S3 ste* Wtetao l fwut 

A UtBgfiHal comtty hotel toe grirt wro^dtog te, 


s Kcratm) rooms. 6 bedrooms. * tadwomi 2 rSoABSOre*. UMr, 
start stfwg room. Gas central betem Saif cottage. Gera^ng. Gastoa. 
woodaod and paddock. 


Mate P«toi*Srtd Oflte Tjtt (0730) W8 
nd Leedoe Oflte Tit 01421 87M 


OM3DG*) 



Enranoe haU. 4 reception rooms. krtAen/broiMllt room. HtAy room, 
master bedroom Mtfi ca sutt bathroom and Mpnato WC. 4 hater 
bedrooms. 2 baUmnm. . ... ^ 

Double garage. Kanl terns court Hated sutormog pool ttS flrtt- 
contnwd pool bouse Garden, grounds and wddotte 
Fro Ste Freehold cA ab teSgacret. 

Oettte HatteM Oflte Tafc (OTOTt) 79381 



Soutt Haring. 

ipntoiia f fliiliiroi rwhiiimi riTi- rYir -^-^ r 
to toe Deane. 

5 racepbon rotnn,BbariiMfl«, 4 battrooms.rtetooom,Utoban/brirtl- 
last room. 04 canhal kertna. Kvd tens court. 


North Oxford 
Conservation Area 

A mfaritaniial Vldoriu detected boose with large 
aonth facing walled gnr d end ftiRy moderniaed tn 
recent yean and aatnatel ia Crick Road in Mm 
c on eervetion area <rf North Oxford. 


Vo&buk, Reception Hid, M a gnifi c ent Double 
Reception Room. Stmfcr, Breakfast Room, K itchen. 

Qoakroam, 6 Bedroome, Batbroacn, Up-Staira 
Qoaknxno suitable for cw . ’einan to 2nd Bathroom. 
Eartausise C n fla ra gB. 

Bfatme Walled Gardens. Gampe. 

Freehold 

OfXexs Invited in the region at £820,000 
23 Beannurat Street, Oxford 0X1 2NF 

Tel: (0865) 246611 


0Hn» la mm 1 OW9 ItialnM <ri> aieel 2 Acte 
Delate PatooftaH Oflte Trt: p73l) 15415 

(Z3/0213/JEF/OJQW1 


WEST SUSSEX 

Me roRhairitoa inafly heam dtoeM to a moat nanghl aflw efltogt al 
•a Inafl at tot sate Dwn 

Bdrance porch, re c ephon ML dtoing room, rbeang room, kacben. 3 
he r kw ra. battreom. Garage. Ganton eflh atetw wa of swartetd 
and tanntaad. 

OHw MM to toe regte M t148AM FreaMM 
Delate FtenUM Oflte Tat (9730) 854 IS 

(23/0195/CDGW) 


Hemal Hompsaad 3 mte St Atoms 5 mte Watford 6 rote 





OXFORI 

£175,000 TO 1 
(0865) $4 


3 mceptiw roarm. 5 bedrooms. 2 brthnmm (plus atonro room), 
cloakroom. Utcten/biaaMaa roan. uOMy room. Oil canttal boning. 
Gauging. outtaUrigsniJ mddocka. 1M coat Gndon. gronte aid 


LONDON PRO PER U E 



DULWICH 


Uge dncM Vctaran taeaty 
tew ne at te wefl Saroab 3 
Kcxntion rowns. b "6 borioores, 

lege gran HS&000 rreenott 
Voflcer & Voiker 
01-761 6223 


DmWWn/Hmw Htn Bmititm 5 
nrUriH \ Irtarun nut of 
muiu> Mini- orvnrwu inuum. 
wjirm (UHdm. ci 25.000 th. 
or rrjoi-r'j 


RICHMOND A 
KINGSTON 


/Ke» Enchannng bow 
amdowed Vesonan cooagt n 
dekghifal & tnsual senmg 

a mmutes bom Old Deer 
A Stn K lounge, htted 
tardien. nttty rm. 2 bedmo 4 
1st il> bathroom. Garden. 
£105.009. 

Taylor Dixon Porter 
01-831 1282 


ST. OMMMErS Evrflrtil 
rmuu> wuh a doutito 
hnlronm. ? rrrrpucro. tulh 
room., tornr Wrhm leddHre Itt 
paw •urdrn. ftrfl gas mitral 
ivjUikj Minutn Halk non m 
n, flawi jim auw itw <uimm 
and iindrrqrnund In oood fflw 
unit ottxi IlHWklMt. 
rjnrK Wrtudrd C1J9.0S0 
tn 01 8W 3067 


■OCMJTroWl, '•Rlortan town 
hnmo s/a bnh. 1 uiffimuilr 
Mimin. 2/3 mtai uliltu. 
iwriMMii <hhh kUrtw. |vn 
nd tuUuoom. narluim waiim 
WWm UWOW Trt OI 048 
0097 mn & urrkntdM 



CLOSE TO 
RICHMOND BRIDGE 

Ctianmng Edwardian ur- 
raced house wrti 26 It 
toungn/dner. pine fitted 
kitchen. 2 large bedrooms, 
pretty bathroom, hi ges ch 
& 50 h orn am e nta l garden. 
Cbca £110000 
Tafc mtt 8038 


ST HMSAHITS Wtorun maa 
*rm\U'. war Mb w i ii wm PjtV 
and Station 3 OM&. Itnmgp. lor 
knrhon/aumr. tuoirm. pmxr 
wd. OCH Original (Ntwn 
t7 1.930 Trt OI 892 0278 



WIMBLEDON 


SUrns ami mn atunmnd tn 
5M20 Mjarr ereroom with 
pritam lukonv B*dioom 2 
»nn nHHr unwrf Lnurv 
wittowi Immaruiatc throwh 
out OCH dour SR. C8O.000 
IrL OI 900 9497 IC\CSI 


PROPERTY TO LET 
LONDON 


CUUNUU* Sturwus altrartitc 4 
braroom Houu> Large rww 
bon. lulls mini Ijvnrn a 
ounng room CU to m from 
hoirtnUrr Omnnaiw la Hr 

fnrrt. or tnlahl wit vp » 4 

minMcnji turn czso pw 
Trt OI 720 1130 


wmw, UMtem Lw trtrenon 
M 1.2.5 MW MiJial tor lane 
at than wm im C12&-C3O0 
|t k. nail liw No Irr lo 
inuMius. Trt Crawm PnantOi 
h AT 4783 


HAMPSTEAD Lin FUL OntMU* 
IianiliiTi* Laror Munqr. irrr. 
dUUNlMA dhk-bnd. bath. Ill 

Lrt taoo m> t« oi Ail 
5585 







































31 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 8 1 986 


PROPERTY BUYERS’ GUIDE 


COUNTRY PROPERTIES 


CHAR 





V i 


% % 




S CHURCH 


QUALITY HOMES OF CHARACTER 


■\.-= - -• - : •- . . 


OXFORD 

£175,000 TO £240,000 
(0865) 54243 


YATELEY CAMBERLEY SURREY 
£50,000 TO £139,000 
TEL (0252) 879808 


HOOK HAMPSHIRE 
£64,000 TO £138,000 
TEL (025672) 4145 


DEVON & CORNWALL 




Devon 

South Hams - 

Sioke Fleming. 

Dartmouth-* mile*. 

A classical Georgian 

Listed Manor House with 
beautiful garden*, rins e to 
the coast. 

? reception rooms. Idicben/ 
hrcaklast room, 4 bedrooms, 

1 unh bathroom and dressing 
room en suite, further 
taihroom. 2nd floor smd® 
and bedroom. 

taMH*r .■/*«* with 

2 bedrooms bathroom. 

2 reception roonK “d Idteften. 
i /a/ with bedroom, shower. 

Ining room/kitchcn. COach 

House. Beautiiul Cardens, 
arboretum and paddock. 

In ail about 5 acres. 


ft Staff; 
iy'We«. 


StOMwtat 9 mfcs - CnMxtBH 
21 mfles rat# poW coney 
bouse m hmly ratal senna 
Goorl family scanmmt*stoM- 
Snfiles. GjhJbcs ft ffaddodctol 
abort 3 eens. 5 BHfcnms. BM 
{ Stover. 4 neoeoun Roan. 
8 m Bony ft Patton. 
Cwnud 

Tel: 0787 72391. 


SOUTH COTSWOLO/ 



MOKFOUt ROMM Homing. 
MOO bungalow 3 bad. Gas CM. 
tM wagr- Ugr of uDrat «■ 
fpikut decorative order. 
CS8JOOO Tcii 106031 860383 


IAMRRHME 7 m. "Luxury new 
how. doUghHut s maw-. 5 MOL 
3 baths. Mtrhefi . iKUUy room, 
studs*, danwq room, lam 
tounpe. CH. DM one. 1 • acre Bar- 
den. NHBC. Liverpool Si i 
hour Cl 27.300. OZXJ 840090. 





HghcHffo. 

“Steamer Point" 

Prestiges new hones - 8 
inAndiri deagns. 4/5 
bedraons, 2 bdhtDons (one 
en swtel, doable garao. 

But! to highest 
speri fimta s m BtttohB 
fnarc Off with news across 
CMsBtnth Bay to the Isle 
Ot WOW. 2» miles tram 
town cofte and station nth 
ifiract ssvee to Waterloo. 
PRKXS FROM £145^)00 



it icqamdL ( oaudnaMr pomni 
fWcn m am nf LyjJXft Imrnc- 
duir Pmamm avaibbk lUef: 
TRil 

TEST VALLEY 
VILLAGE 

Nr. Soxfchndrr I nuta. 4 todi- 
imul prowl ram mtb IUI rtunina 
arramwao tie cumrrwo* to 4 Bed 
1 Hath. 4 Rcvrp Hoow m jbh nadci 
1 ■ an acre Pmnnvni & autanitr 

piNWra Irtrrkwijnf brnitmd W 

ten. Plnt eprelr rSin) iRcf- TJG|. 
AUSTIN ft WYATT 
(KEFTJG) 

TEL: 04893 £333. 


Prowting 



(DOCMoaC Near KtngsonPoe 
"tSZTZr w-rtwd lamuv 
m„iw’ !■» rt loofciiw trwl « 
>-.k unih*’ LMi 

IIH i | mini. 4 urdrooms- nueo 
. -14 udr one. rwwnaioiy. 

■m.H, 


ITOiCenwy tarmbouso Sdrto 
beds unbeieOMBncir.mniaii}- 
nes&Csn Loags Braottn ah og 
newsouarCofeievatovsrtmap- 
pnmnaaety 3 acres. TM noura 
was two man km ed to an enaap- 

wxiaty ragti uanflaid by ttw (jmRjf 
loi ©years* used nrmaeey so b 
funcremu farmhouse WrjuW oro- 
eM tmn lensraM reueroonio ib 
origins, trai AM' 

4 S noatrl rfitoge rariil Rho hi 



VUMC Family Home. 6"? 

mUrs Rtrswjn-Wye. 9 ^.- 

Gloucester RmurtOMe IM- 
nout 196<n wtui 6 Bedrooms. 
33(1 Drawing Room. 

loungr/Dfiung Rm. Breakfast 
Rm. KIL SStower/Olim. 
Balhrm OH CM. DMr Oarage. 
Level Garden. C8&500- Coles. 
Knapp ft Kennedy. Tudor 
House. RfrKon-Wyr. 0989 



78582. Eato/VtotoadL 







irownwiui ArcWleo dengn 
4/3 bedrooms. S baths. 3 W- 
lets, dbt gawd, gas C/H. 
Freehold , v. acre property 500 
yards gotf dub. G rains sin. as 
mots Kino's X. i mUe At (Ml. 
WHit 5 trrnUb grnd. floor 
rooms, atus fined Hums, am 
ty. dbl garage. 1 st floor can 
mcindrs/c IUI it reouued Near 
£140000. Trtn0462> 684041. 




mm 


HANTSJX)RSET, & 
LO.W. 



ESSEX/SUFFOLK 

BORDER 


""^ Ca Hto H er- 

, - Pi«c ibtw t 9 * 1 ** 1 

‘. , l>r ’ amt wwh Cmra 


HOCKLEY 

Brauftf Urtacwa wsilr P» 
arrei m wosonec «ww 4 «i- 
usaiq io“ro mraersw: 3 too 
Bowi* ♦ St3i«nu«0 WB"Y 
Abtht Swohimg Deo f n GOt 
lL.dnw Si » nms am Ms 

MttPt •TdOOOQ 3a DCk S*. 

Phone 01-580 7301 
WNkdn Ewnta or 
B1-S31 nil Wwiteys. 


WESTCUFF soadous KtrH dr- 
hirtwd how in tree Irnedrt 
snort walk wo 8 station, karani 
msafvuon of W« ronulned V« 
bedrmrd 1 st floor mflfc. BenefH 
at C75 PCM rent I rum pm fir 
IUI rronl otto- C£OOO. Rti 
0923 MSSb after Spm ** BW 


BLACKWATER Estuary. UnwUJ 
nmdnn rotuge dylr 3 bed 
wow. wi/dUKT. shower. 2 
WCv utvllir 

urns. Ouirk Sale C63JJ00 Tel 
Od21 B60570 




Belles (8794) 518237. 




tsge hAmy aparonmt sftatnl ir 
(yoiHlsoltearasi5ffiB{i ganlens. 
4 mnlM want town cmb* and 
bt acfa.3 be ds, j tuB tialb rqonrs . 2 
acqnan mans, fitted Wdan 
rath fob and eye tori own eto. 
Pirate Saras® to tbe garteta. 
fesfecaiy. in vety good dacoratwa 
Oder. £78.000. ftarafl sM as 
3omg abroad. 

TELS202 76037B 


eUBLET New Form. Charnraig 
fully rrfurtiUiMd new form 

thatched rouapr. L'nm-alled po- 
sition. Soanous acromadauon. 

Lovely imwom garden. Oa- 
rage. Loose box. £ 196 . 000 . 
Further details Rtnpwoad 
■CHZSl 070771 


MMOE5TDr4 miles. 16th Cen- 
tury Thatched Cottage. Lounge 
with Ingle-nook fireplace. KJlrh- 
m. Shower/WC. Exposed 
brains throughout- 2/3 beds. 
CCH Garage Secluded garden. 
Chum rural location. £&&A0O. 
•03051 BS2150 


KADUY DOWN: 3 bed. IndlVMf- 
ual design bungalow, aniannr 
garden, garage Mam senves. 
OCM. erase N.T. beauty wofs 
and A3. London 40 mls- 
£93.000. Tel: (042&I 714949. 



CHAMIWB del family res. 2 
tmles tram tunc 91 Ml/ MW . 
Comp 3 iron rooms line 2911 
lounge), kit rhm C22fU- uttHty 
room. « do**- beds. 9 bub- 
rooms. double oampe. 
ExK«hF weft stocked garden 
piia orchanl. Superb dec order. 
For auKk Bk u CliaOOO. TM 
DoddS On 0533 774031 


O.nu'iKliliw: 





Henley /Reaing/Gomg Triaogta. 
18 year old bouse boft tfloo 
year old beams 4,000 fact 
accom. el 5 beds. 2 baths, 4 
receps. Sa faukfag d pangs. 
dOksMp 4 tut |3 rooms. Wb 8> 
bgbci l 2. toes . Total ptmacy 
wtbout iMiUtiOft. 


XIBTSmt B ratleo Ml. S 
miles NotUnghwn. Luxury four 
bedroom bcatgalow. sta n ds tat 
own grounds of approx tt acre, 
also ntrtuded in sale acre with 
Manning petrnlssMa applied 
lor We reouirr a quick sale Of- 
fers Cl 15X00. (0532) 672330 


T«L HaeBsg ea 0731 72X57 


mnOV Property In neon of de- 
lightful Tudor vtUage. dose to 
Dracm Station 132 mim to Pad- 
dtngtoni. Oxford la mHn 6 
bed*. 2 baths (1 ensuUel. 3 
remxk rarmhouse MUhen. tn- 
gtmook fireplace and a wealth 
ol expos e d beams Set in ' tol an 
acre with healed swrannt 
pod Cl 83 000 Freehold. TM. 
0233 816629 (days) 






SCOTLAND 





WOBCS, A 


CANFORO CUFF* /PooJe Supcrh 
bunbMow rpoiMMefy rMur 
twinl. 4 beds. 4 bam. 3 rm. 
or. r/h. lately gardetL dM gar 
C 189.760 TM- 0902 993179 


OHUMCHAM 4 Sxl hoiw. 1 en 

snim Hfiowcr roam. ae> CH. dbt 

nuiR miVeUb. ? IftOUTL 
irom kjp^tw CoiOOO Tfl 
■074701 4830 


SURREY/HANTS 
(Nr Favnham) 

Victorian Osacft House ta wiy 
rural IK acres. 3 beds, bain 
w/e. 2 ret. MU, ubMy. 2nd 
w/c. Wattoo 55 mins, loaal tor 
eriargement. 

£145)000 
0420 22498 or 
0252 878445 (Office) 


rmaWWDOD Charming. haW- 
umbered rouage. in rxcroUnnal 
Marti 4 whUn Mltage. Ucted. 2 
beds. BroutMid hand-made 
wood kitchen. Garden. 
C31-60O nmac: 105447) 696. 


HBTIMK LDHjOW - CIw caslle 
/rnerDelkjhtfui. character ne- 
mm hsc Rrreo. lounge. 5 beds. 
*“*!»:■ Cm rh. Aga. 2 gge* 
CufUKO often,. TeCOSBd 3965 



Tit OW 202173 


HOLVEHDEH LAVNC Grade R 
’ hsied 18th Century Kentish 
rarmhouse of great charm & 
character 3 beds. 2 baths. 3 
rend <2 witn togfenootoi. targe 
lined kitchen. utUUf row. CH. 
IV) ims wtth_ oultmniHngs. 
U 90.000 *7977-728 teses ft 
wkendsi 0572 366314 may) 


NORTH EAST 


ATnuCIWC modem detached 
how. 20 mins Neweaoieu 
Tyne centre but in rural area. 3 
brinies. 2 wtth fitted lurntture. 
2 bathrms. rtoala. uwoge. dth. 
log rm. utility rm. ftXl ch. 
gardens, patio, me ranw and 
Winds. C47JOO tM 0207 

646364. 


S W SCOTLAHD 

ExcepUonally attractive ft 
tamUly dec Mb ad sued 
ah ft useful ootbiaiDS or 

Dams, c bswms. idosz. ns 
ae. AH procqirt ms hno 
beaaBU vwk. 

SJL TkonsoB ft Oa 
Td 1556 2973. 



GLOUCESTERSHIRE 


HERenm CITY .£ imm. Marie 
T hime utode a. deuched resi- 
dence. 4 bed. a roc. . ktUhen/ 
bath, ctoaks. utHMv. 
S 3 , ndw nam. hr* acre. 
CB6DQ0 0432 79 915 


HERTF01DSHIRE 



NORTH TOST 


IDEAL Hobday heme or.tnvest- 
mtui a b e droom semi detarned 
bungalow t2 yrors od. FuBy 
filled kiiihen Filled bedrooms 
with nano doors 52 II lounges 
dtnmg room Moot swimming 
po&i a mueti from Btartipooi m 
rural ullage ta imie» trom the 
Lakr Disinrt. FuUy double, 
glared 6 remratiy Maud. AO 
maun Parking for 2 cars. 
C 40.000- TH 0953 7D1679 taf- 
lerdpml ft 0253 864032 lof fire- 
Itoursi 


STJkMtOCWS - neUremml Ftaf 
46 Argyte Court with RrnMngr 
MIL Res lounge etc. 2 bed. 
lounge, bthrm ft fully filled 
kitchen. Superb slews of Links, 
beach, sea nr. fixed price 
G64.250. View dady 2-4. Tcfc 
0354 76735 for further fatfd. 

SUMMSAT OcVney Peaceful Is. 
Dnd retreat. Easy access plane 
or boat, an sen tees. C 6 Q. 000 . 
OeiutguMted free hold proper- 
tv TM <086761 279 

ROYAL Devote Holiday Home: 
Alwvne Village. 3 beds. 1 iwm 
mod kii ft bath. gdn. Wpodrtdie' 
CH. C34A30. 0339-2866 


BATH Lux nuKcmme in Cnde I 
Crorqun terronr m nty centre. 
tiurrMmded by parkland <Swn 
Mill Plan* lansdowm 3 beds. 2 
inretk t/t kil. 2 bams a TOT 
gun U 43.500 I022$) 338462 


BATH \trtortan 5* bed family 
house. gavrn. d/garag e. in toil' 
h- ullage 5m east of Balh. IAS 
arre mature Harden. Cll 7.000. 

Phone 01 950 2366. 



COVE FARNBOROUGH HAMPSHIRE 
£41,000 TO £130,000 
(0252) 521727 


DHQIIC MHO or 4 large Geor- 
gian country house hi Ra own 
grounds. Panoramic views over 
McndlB*. Eauldtuance ta mues 
BrtsloJ. Bath. WMB. Private 
trim. 3 beds.. 9 recemu tax 
kitchen, slabtrs converted to 
dark room ■ offtreMudldi. work- 
shop. C73.BOO. fub details - 
photos on mant. Trt.Tmudc 
Claud < 0761) S2126. eves and 
w/ends. 


BATMi Unrty- railed. 3 Storey 
Georgian house. Modern Ihino. 
period features. 4 beds. 2 bams, 
study. Minty, cedars, etc. etc. 
Superb vetws. easy rommuUno. 
Often £120000. Tel: (022S) 
834907. 


SURREY 


BfOUHLL On cm( of North 
Downs. M25 4 in He*. Central 
section of fme Hxgewc y / Vic- 
torian mansion wtui panoramic 
southerly news. B beds. 3 
■mn- Mr rm. noth A shower 
rm. riles, kitchen, thy cetlan. 
garage .own H acres wtlhtn 
estate. 08 ch. £176.000 FH let 
073784 2306 


THAME* MT70M Gtanv. Sc* 
nous Thdor style deuicMd 
sell m a m uhi cd famdy house 
set In 1 1 arre. in nrfertvr Pri- 
vate Estate. Large halL 2 
rereos. Breakfast rm. fully fil- 
led kitchen, utility rm. a beds, tt 
baths ii mi tut [cl gw CH. ga- 
rage. attractive south facing 
gdn. £3l6uWOTeiOl 39B670O 


MIDDLESEX 


DETACHED bungalow set In I COUNTRY COTTaAE In corarr 


sought after semi nut pos. 3 Ige 
itdrmv 2 bin me- - i rn-sulie. V 
[ge kit with extensive rum 
l til room, lor lounge AU age. 
C6&000. Tei 04S74 61680. 


i.ilion Mllaqe Bristol 14 miles. 
London 9 hours cons. M4/M5 
OOftfiOO TeiuOSTSI 8781 IT 



nUMHpncBMgiMlNji 

with raaenukrem views. 5 bed- 
rooms. 3 bathromus. pretty 2 
acre garde n tnrtnd mg rm. 
oocks. staMbig «ui 
putbuiMinss. Freehold 

C27BJOOO TeUO306) 711946 


WMM Nr Codatmlng tos-My 
yirtgrta rottnge 3 double 
hauiroAM, Using room, dtadno 
roam, kitchen, urge garden. 
CT3.7S 0. T W Kto l Wg 
«aS8». mttl 042879 4493. 


C16&O00. Tet bOt -660-7806! 































































PROPERTY BUYERS’ GUIDE 


OVERSEAS PROPERTIES 


17 Montpelier Street, London SW7 1HG 
Tel: 01-589 5400 Bath: 0225-559035 
Manchester: 061-834 3386 



t rance: (95) 65 09 96 
Portugal: (89) 3559 9 
Spain: (51 ) 480508 


I PORTUGAL - Algarve 

Old Village. VOamoura 

A beautiful village in classical style. 

• 2x18 bole golf courses, 1,000 
berth marina, tennis, and riding. 

• Cnino. dnena and nightclubs* 

• Full management, rental, and 
maid service. 

• Apartments £24,000, terrace 
apartments £47,000, penthouse 
maisonettes £62,000, town 
bouses with terraces £78,000, 
Pailadian villas £170,000. 


'SOUTH OF TRANCE L 

. Antibes - Valbonne I 

Mont d'Azur. Route de Biot 
Unrivalled panoramic views tx> the coast 
and mountains. A luxurious private estate 
of spacious and beautifully designed 
country houses. 20 mins, to Mice and 
Cannes; 5 mins, to Blot and Valbonne. 

• Golf, riding, and marinas nearby. 

• 4/5 bedrooms. 2/3 reception 
rooms, enclosed courtyard, large 
garden, swimming pool, and maid 
service. 2.50CM>00 FF. 


EXHIBITION 


LONDON 


WILMSLOW 



The Hyde Park Hotel, 
Knightsbridge. London 

TODAY 

Be on Wednesday 2 2nd October 
Valley Lodge HoteL WOmsIow, Che s h ire 
TODAY 

All times 10-30 am - 8-00 pm. 

Montpelier International provides continuing 
management services, at these developments 
for aD owners. 


VERBIER. SWITZERLAND 


Luxury apartments in this world famous top 
resort Summer and Winter siding. 


( SOUTH OF FRANCE 

1 St, Tropez - Cavala ire | 

Croix Vahner - Super Valmer 
Provencal villas set in the tranquillity of 
a wooded green zone with stunning 
views to the lies dTtyfires. 

• The best be ad les of the South of 
France mhmtes away. 

• GoK, tennis, and marina nearby. 

• 3 bedroom houses, large 40m 
terraces, maid service. 850.Q00 FF. 


I SOUTH OF SPAIN - Almeria ; 

Post VMage. Ahwerimar 
The resort of AJmerimar is on the 
unspoilt Smith Eastern coast of Spain 
and ei^oys its mildest winters. 

• Once only opportunity to purchase 
freehold penthouse waterfront 
property with large roof terraces 


views - £57.000. 
balcony apartments 
£37.000. 

• A mature champion* 
ship golf course. 




Wi 


p R E s E N T 5 

* — LAMANGA-- 


These luxury properties are ideally situated 
near extensive leisure, sporting and shopping facilities. 

With over 3.000 hours of sunshine recorded annually 
and our ten years experience in the area, you and 
your family are assured of: 

A HOLIDAY HOME FROM HOME 


The finest chmate m the world — TENERIFE SOUTH 

Fairways Villas — Four Owners £15,950 "Detached Fairway Villas £49,000 
Beachside Apartments From Only £23,000 

Cot&ptanexKed frith ron, sea, scenery; a low cost ofHving, limited taxes everything that one ever (beams of — acctpt gotC Tb complete tins dram, 
we can now offer not one bnirtrolcng^wiiad l8-bofeB°^c«g^<lgjgncd by Po Mld S Kg lofCotaniPeflnln>^led&l^ro»ri, London, wtoo created 
this coarse in Singapore. Ihn cm also relax ai ihe 19di, plav temris,B 0 swimming, hone riding or jut admire the Unions tows. The AmariBa Golf 
nod Country Club (not to be confused with San Miguel Golf Game), on Angfe-Csnarian project, «31 be the Ingot and mnn sophisticated 
devdopmeiu in tbe Canary Islands and wffl ofier a large adectwn of apartments and nils to amt all tastes. 

Fnfl maiBEemegt and letting inaate. Inycctioa fligfao emy wedeend. Plcaactelqifaoaefiir a brodnne . 


BIRMINGHAM OFFICE 

021-643 7025 (24 hrs) 


IjONDON OFFICE 

01-938 2510 (24 hrs) 


ST. MAJCTDTS BOOSE. HULt JUNG, BIRMlNGHA+lBiSDr. 



ISTUDI05 FROM £8.500 
I I BEDROOM FROM £15.000 
I 2 BEDROOM FROM £20.000 
I 3 BEDROOM FROM £26.000 
1 COMMERCIALS FROM £20.000 


I TIMESHARE FROM £500 - £2.750 
I INTERNATIONAL EXCHANGE 
I INSPECTION VISITS 
I GUARANTEED RENTAL 



Th e Spanish developers will be displaying their 
scale models of the properties and sites at:- 
BQURNEMOUTH The Wessex Hotel. Westdiff Rd 
Sat II &Sun 175a- II AM TO 6PM 
FARNBOROUCH The Queens Hotel 
'Mon’lTda - iTAw TO 8 PM 
CAMBEPLEY CDC Leisure Offices 


Thes U 6 Wed 19 Oct - 1 1 AM TO 8 PM 
LONDON The Property Exhibition 
Cumberland Hotel. Marble Arch 
Fri 17 OCT - 10 AM 108 PM Sat 18 Oct & 
Sun |o Oct -10 AM TO 7 PM 

CRAWLEY Ideal Home Exhibition 
Leisu re Centre- Fn 17 Oct -12 TO 8 PM 
Sat 18 Oct - 10 .AM TO 8 PM 
Sun 19 Oct -10 AM TO 6 PM 


Biaiml 


For free information package and video (VH Sr Beta i contact 

David Gibson. CDC Leisure. Cop peri op. 45 Upper talk Road. Camberfey. Surrey GUI'S 2EF ® 
Telephone Cambedey i027oioa , »877 -Fleer COJMi 023272 124 hour answering service* - — 

I wuU 6*r turner nrfivnuimn jbflvl U Muityu G>sfJ BLukiJ SnuM I 

Nu’nw ■ 

AJJros ■ 


DO YOU WANT A HOME FOR CHRISTMAS? 

TORREVIEJA (ALICANTE) 

The mt properties nMe* cobU be ART ready tar Cbrittem - U yea tst qoUtyt 
2-taedroomd vifla in 250 sq mein ptats: E15J5IX) approx. 

2-takaxned villa in 400 sq metre plats: EZ1J500 approx. 


bad. bungaitM £23, 
: Spent offer on tamed bu 
12 ndy- 1 


fetsfsf ftmisiKiS aid nrady to voft in wiA tandtafe deeds, 
and 2 bad E2O5D0 anrnK 




FreWpfly iMpniam. 

OVERSEAS 

W &ftteoate ovasuin PROPERTIES LTD 
345 GRAYS MR ROAD, LONDON WC1X 8PE TELEPHONE 01-833 3830 


FUST 


VHS □ or Brtd □ lift apprupwi,- tin I 


PROPERTY CONSULTANTS LTD 

TORREVIEJA 

COSTA BLANCA SPAIN 

Near the bead) a! La Zend 1 bed nnrts -- - - ciji« 

2 bed houm. . E23JS35 

p&oflpbl 1 and 2 bed teals : : : — : tan £15400 

Luany 3 bed houses on bead) al ^mrianar __£41.460 

Tom "Bsr/fkstamm "Snaps 
‘18 Mb Cott Course ‘Lastly Bodes 

Properties on Grit Cana — tan £21,000 

Esabtened busmssas ___tan £21.500 

All Properties Gauufleed & Bale md 260 ttasjt 

BALDWIN & HONEYGOLD 

27 COUSfiE STHST, WORCESra 
Tot 0905 512535 

24-tnur mserpbooe FW iter sets serin 


COSTA BLANCA & COSTA DEL SOL 


Buy direct A save money 

Villas, bungalows, townhouses, apartments 
We offer value for money in prime positions 
from £10,000 to £100,000 

CaB far brochures and further inform a tion : 

INTERVENTAS ESPANA S.A. 

Group Caja Territorial de Madrid, 145 Oxford Street, London WI. 
Tel: 01-434 0484 (24 hrs answering service) 


CASAS YOUR HOME M TH SUN 

KW PROPERTIES IN SPAIN - COSTA Da SOL 
MAfflELLA — PUERTO BANDS — ESTEPOMA 

ApartmBnts/VBas/Town Houses available 
cctmCTa from B23JOOO up to £150,000 (Freehold) 
CjtTMNA Free inspection ffgtna to purchasers. 

Mortgage faafaties evstable. Buyers' 
legal and financial rights My protected. 

Please contact: Casas EspaAa Ltd., Concorde House. 


43b High St. BarkaigsfcJe. Word, 
Essex fee 2AD Tab (01) 551 


6825/6884 


OVERSEAS 


DoeccnoH flmht 

loth October Ski apart 
mjnt* Vinar* M Ol 486 
8811 .Osbornes SoacKore. 


BALEARIC’S 


COUNTRY PROPERTIES 


F ARMS & 
SMALLHOLDINGS 



MICHELMORE 


(0626) 54242 
(0803) 865116 


■ t I 


TRENDWELL FARM, 

SOUTH MILTON, NR KEVGSB RIDGE, 
SOUTH DEVON 

A VALUABLE COASTAL FARM OF 165 ACRES with 
attractive period bouse of manageable proportions in an 
ana of “outstanding natural beauty" including part of 
South Milton Ley. 

The land, mainly gently sloping arable, extends down to 
ibe beach al Thuneslone Sands. 

The traditional farm buildings are suitable for conversion 
to holiday use (subject to permissions). 

BY AUCTION, 22ND OCTOBER 1986 
AS A WHOLE OR IN LOTS. 


30 ACRE 

Part Wooded Rot tor sum 
rssxItftCB m very attractive COiMty 
saang on crest of Norm Doans 
close to M2S inienwaans and 
Walton Head) S# Cksme. Aucdor 
tab Nawmber. 



SUSSEX 


KTlBUtab Oax Orchard 43 
“225: For so*. E-v SurtcHk 
SJnouw Good Mrrn ^dW 
rtSor* In tire rcoton or W&.oo° 
- S»F» I or Udl WUUb- 



Nr wer & ffltcetam shops. 2 mts 
M25. I mte *3. hhr ro 

HWtooe. Gatwx* & tansy 
Sam da. 3 beds. 2 recta. 2 
we's. kttchan dbie suit wooden 
firs. 90 secluded hedged rear 
careen tab. shed 4 nri trees. 
Sde garden, appb tree. Ross 
tngo garage for eraatsan Needs 
deoxabira. Have vacant Idur 
waeng. Musi set soon. 

Oners votM £30.000 

Stag NOW Mr Martin 
0932 87534 





Late Bmmsy bBesa wflh 
baseman ftal hi Bri^Aoa's 
most pnstlpiB terrace 

» BuJm 2 te t m i n n *i toinjc oanj 
rm OCTUd heacts Uy ea u m c <1 
iGOupe even n i* a owe heew etci 
au n»ms wm seiuen taepers 
I i"n u terete 

• une cantmM oeemni ne ' 
lien^ ioriri#v«u«wi uw ' 

Mum VnvuK S E rvnctntjopn^n 
TO nvi-er S owl, M*e (am *K 

n« o «d ousms rostnti bocs .in 
nduc&we onto itMugpiu 



RYE 


rmrrr rv 


NEAR RYE 

Sodudad character house 
wtth2K acres, magnificent 
tows, 3 Rec, 4/6 Bads. 2 
Bests. Heated S/pooL 
£2ia000 Offers. 
SOLE AGENTS. 
BRAXTONS, 
NoriNam (07974) 2366. 


WALES 


■UMKUIIV. larv a bedreomed 
umUy how Hi mevmficent » 
rludM l jnr grounds. Lately 
Kenner vaDer ,-Ulage. Mentior- 
Mffll S mts. Swindon 1? mb. 
Paddington SS mins. ...... 

Cwde Cl 90JD00. Dennis 
Pocock a Drrweu. 
Maritwrough I0672< 5S«7I 



DALES Farmhouse win, to acres 
a sublet Adlg. collage tar con- 
\cmon. C145.000 0&3fi 63790 




Fully modern read Town 
House, ideal as second 
home. Magnificent views 
over River Rather end Rom- 
ney Marsh. 2 Rec. 2 Bad. En 
suite Bath. Shower- Attic 
bedroom. 3 cotfftyanl Gas 
CH. £59,000 Offers. 

Braxtons (079 74) 2386 


aOTTHCOtM Nr Bnghlon. 
□eurnrd Bungalow, a beds. 2 
Mim. lounge, amn, hau. woe 
kilmen. mibi, room, ws CH. 
double glazed, garage. VW 
garden good fanny Dome 
C87.50O th oarrs mom 
> nrnlnw 


larhed house Whi racing 

Lmrti sea and downy i wm d 

heds Iunuh Kflrhei. kninge. 
dinrr. 2 eioaUx. winrsom. Dou 
Me granng. CCH Garage Good 
<**■ garden CIS. 500 Tel. 
■0273. 300860 <Ei«i 


rural detached 
riitmmiMM mtagr or 

l"em Tunhridge bells 4 
twtonrie 5 rTcep rmy 

hedrins. 2 ham*, mature gdn 
with pond Car poet cn 
Cl!5 0>» OAJ5? 2753 
■IHOKTQM: tffi renlral, 1 beg 
flat Close slanon. w .front and 
'haps Cood decora tt\r order 
US £00 Trt; >0273) 734X7^ 


SOWER FOntSWJUC. Maon.fl 
new i lews Ol Rhos&lb Bay and 
Worm s Head Stylish *oul level 

open plan arrtnteci orally de- 
vanned house in '■ acre 2 double 
beds. 2 very spanous reem. din- 
ing room, fined lot. bath, store 
room, covered balcony. 1600 
so. n. C7&0OO. lOTBSi 2051 67 


nr AKIKAVDMr. allrac 
ttve 2 bedroom s«m detached 
rotlage with a large garden in 

Ihe beautiful Mdrumw Valley, 
al Ihe fool ol ihe Black Mow* 
Mans. U&OOO ono For detwb 
phone 0073 890526 


perb viewy detarned Georgian 
Si vie residence. spacious 
lounge, dmm roam, fined 
kitchen, tour bedrooms, oath- 
room in superb decorative 
order, hraublui laumed gar- 
dens. greenhouse vng garden, 
lull gas C-lwaniK CS9.SOO 
o.n o TH day ume 0267 
226208 rv rnm«B 0267 2322Se 

UPPER SWANSEA Valley At- 
tractive 5 ne d cottage CH. 
Partly dni glazed Freehold. 
C27 000 Canl-sils neg. lObWi 
8WM1 jllcr opm / w/md. 

BANCH3R i Gwvnedd I lOrj lam* 
detarned CST.SO0 .Negotiable 
re Sna/AS> 0248 555270 


•ANTED in Lopoon FIN. lounge 
2 hed. sludv 2 WCv Cnder 
C99.99B Tel 01-262 8339 


PROPERTY TO LET 
COUNTRY 


SWOmW - 6 Bed period Rest- 
drier Mill 5 Bathroom*. Dole 
Garage & Lge Swimming pool. 
Ga* C/H CtnoObcm mctiKne 
Hales A Gardner G L Sworder 
& boos. Bishops Stortfora 0279 

52A41 


NJt 9TANSTEAD; Character, de 
tarried, country house 6 beds. 
3 receps. 5 bauts. rh. >. acre 
garden, s'wimmmg pool £175 
weevil Trt Ol 502 1717 


IV ANTED On long lease targe 
founln Itoiae /farmhouse 
Gloureslersliire / Heretordshtre 
/ wales Trt &152 31 1-iS idtu ■ 
(MW 21559 


I.V I , I | 


MALLORCA 

The Anchorage 

Europe's most 
prastigioos 
private devstoproent. 
Superb 1*5 bedroom 
w a t ersi de Apartments. 

* Clubhouse. 
Restaurants, Jacuzzi 
& sauna. 

* Tennis, windsurfing 
8i swimming. 

* Full management, 
letting & financial 
services. 

* Private Golf course 
& Apartments. 

* Prices from .£64, 750 
to over af 300.000. 

53 Upper Brook St., 
London W1Y IPG. 

TeL (01) 629-0883 


MAJORCA. 

15 mrnutas from Cala 0'Or 
ana the Sea «i beautiful sa- 
chtdfld countryside vrih nne 
views tewards the Sea. Reno- 
vated farmhouse wth 3M 
bedrooms. acres. E75.000 
freehold. Choice of 5 sttes 
awateWe. each 3K acres » 
build your own country house. 
Project management service : 
jwafltae. Ptal prfcea from 
£15000 B0 Z25JJOO freehold. 

Contact Rlcbanl Abel 
01-485 0389. 



WILTSHIRE 


WHENEND Mini Chilkr Vd 
Ms. drunwd period cotugc. 3 
bcos. pan CH. garden, narking. 
CStJMQollm acmuid lor ur 
iv compiMion Trt orzs 
742«og/2187g 


BdOUf IUM PARK SWO vnorl 
l ird 2nd floor flat a/ looking 
iiuirl. verier gro>llidi ..lift in 
■■lur rnmplrv lmmi-4i,|r 
ciupanct lulls lurmvhPd ii re- 
diniM Otters CSSflM Tel 
tnijos iiiidI 5 pih 02102 42g6 
I fir II (MBS 21758* 

Dcvraes •sr ZltM modrrn tv 

rmlrrt itrtigiw-j rgsldm bull. 
2/3rd iirrh Ngn'csliir Peace 
fin lumlrt Broulllul SH-WS 
1 3m \l a 12m BH (.90.000 
■0222. 22917 


MORTGAGES 


PROM 7J9*V. L9u Mart. 
Morlqm-v/rrmorlgagr,. Mori 
g*jes oi rr Clm. tOTS». I'p to 
50 vi trim 'U-vh.odd Patmore 
Lid Ol JlSMM.iTh. 441)210 
nv.vs»sv G Bel I **0200901 



HOUSE HUNTING 

For fast efficient personal 
serves finding homes In the 
South West, contact 

PROPERTY SEARCH 

the Dfoteswiai 
relocation company. 

0884-259381 

0884-257946 


Luxury apartment 4 double 
beds. 3 bathrooms 1 en 
suite, large modem Ktchen. 
dmng area, loop drawing 
room, separate dining room. 
2 balconies. Fine view of 
hatopur. Rilly furnished 
£70.000: unfurnished 
£65.000. Coloured brochure 

TeL- 0252 722 251. 


"5*5!*“ £*»*“«*«« m B 

artrv nr-u bathroom and krtrh- 
“ 3 / ■* b«fc living room. 

"W" L k 

■r.. c Tr-^P°J!? w l h or Spam 
Trt iMeOb 5229 


CANARY ISLANDS 


TQMtare SOUTH Thr- beti <h> 
vnoouwuis on san Migurt Coll 
COUP- overlooking ya. or *u- 
l*Tb propnbrt. by Kuti Kddrad. 
rtu"iii to nrsv Marina, nr Las 
■inwrirjs Tri Gran Sdl Proper 
nr s iOTTg' 25587 ,2a hr), 
•1BOP \ lurtnbrt TlW bsctutr 


- -i 


COSTA DEL AZAHAR 
(MR. GANDIA) 

LARGE BEACH PBfTHOUSE APARTMB1T. This vary 
spacious penthouse apartment occupies ihe top floor 
of a prestigious six storey apartment block which Is 
situated on the most beautfftd natural sandy beach aU 
set to private gardens. Tte accommodation comprises 
3 double bedroras wHh fitted wardrobes, two fdyfled 
mid fitted bathrooms, large lounge with balcony over- 
tooWng beach, tod Sad and fitted kitchen with en-eulte 
utSty room with washing machine. Futy furnished to a 
very high standard. FREEHOLD £28,000. 

Our local Spanish Office provides a fad aftor-aatos ser- 
vice. Forfufl dattfs and our cokxr 
brochure telephone Refer Davies 
ILK. Sales Director, on 01-546 
Z706. or wfta to: Asetur Propar- ^ 

ti es, Cou rtney Houee, S tation 
Aproaefa. Ncrbteod, Kln gstoo-upon- ataoVs 

Thniies, Sivray KT13QL SSSE 


MAJORCA 

- in the exclusive area of 

ILLETAS 

superior two bed, two bathroom 
apartments with superb views, 
from only 

£ 41,000 

Contact: 

MMI Properties Limited, 

1 14 Anerley Park, 
LONDON SE20 8NU 
TcLOl-676 9105 (24his) ' 


: 5 



si 

pu 

pe 


COSTA BLANCA a 

£10^100 Id £MJ»0 FREEHOLD' $ 

* Lmy «ta. twuriiira ant awtraras 
. 4r 10 |Mff prate. InaifM rtwri ad 

Sr UK v Spsta rampiOB (aJBHs 
*.M.preqnta ctesa m fte'tea 
‘ *~Bri» to ihe Ngtat Stabta 

* FtHunog tafy eedfoal Mehns 

* Ono Mngud stall in Spat 

de k after safes snira 
Home vkteo end brochure 
Tel (06284) 78800 (24 hrs) 

Si west street, Marine 


PUEBtD HOUSES 
AB*\KTWEi\rn» 


CLUBSI 


PUHBIO HOUSES 
AflWMENnns 



A British Development 

Owned. Developed. Managodand maintained by the Robert K. 
Frands Group who abo offer 
legaL mortgage a banking 


Pu« fu i ti m doratea* M i colour 


The Robarr K. Ft*icB Group IMud 
Oxyron Horn Dnytan OadifeHer 

WfH Sumac PO 2D SEW 

WL Chchour (0243) 77» I 


20 YEARS ON THE 
COSTA BLANCA IS 
YOUR GUARANTEE 




BBauMul 3 badroomed 
w«b, large codas, lowly 
garden plus suwAmkig 
pori ter residents of this 
exclusive smoB devriop- 
ment Of 24*300- 
TeJ 03323 47251 


CVMIIS. praimb . problem*. 
Bought or conic rauUUng. Es- 
vmtMt Mvicr SAC RfptS' to 
BOX £<U 


bcdroomed ouaUtv apartments. 
Small coastal resort. Maerao. 
cent rtiHrMtiiKM nan 
opportunuy Front C3Q.000. 
Robert Oomira i07Se> tiBMl 
























































THE TIMES WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 8 1986 


PROPERTY BUYERS’ GUIDE 




RENTALS 



Quraishi 
Constantine 


Jeering that personal & 


maaonoiteift 

2 bah. 






1*322 5 2 


270 Earls Court Rri SW5. 01-244 7353 


GEORGE KNIGHT 

I he I.ettimz Agent 


HOUSES. AND APARTMENTS 
TO LET 

We have an extensive portfolio of penonafly inspected 
impatittmj aO of London's finer reudenitt} districts, 
ranging from one bedroom flats at £175 a week 10 


of six mooihs or longer. Company lcnandes are 
generally required. 

For imme diate and pro&ssiotia] anari m. 
Telephone either our 

Hampstead Office; OX 704 1125 
Or Knightsfeidge Office; 01 SS9 2133 



JOHN D WOOD N CO 


ESSEX - NR COLCHESTER 
TO LET 

Colchester 4 miles, London 55 rmfej 
IMPOSING GEORGIAN HOUSE SET IN QUIET 
PARK LIKE GROUNDS. 

Arcrepfoi rooms. Ucfam/brnkfetf room. 3 pmopte bedroom/ 
tehioom ate. 2 (after beAooms. mg rath 4 bedrooms and 
3 nceptare. 3 befroenwd stable comae. 

83 B e rt il e y Square, London W1X SAL 
TnL 01420 9090 (Rof. CPTD/DEG) 



BROIIPTON PARK, SW6 

Ntocbw U m new datriopmem wh pang pool complex. 1 Bad. 

feted Kdfibm. Song Hoom & SmaH Baton*. Bxttrocm. flTOpn. 

QUEENSQATE, SW7 

Bond MarOa nteow Ocs^nm Bmmiro d 2 Btdrms. 2 Battem 
Setng Boon ft Kscften/Dnw. AuaUaUe unfumtsted. £350pw. 

GAROLDS TERRACE, SW3 

Newly reftrtstied boose. 3 Bedmts. 2 Battens. 2 tthactiM Reap 
Rooms, feted Kn t Gardan. AnbUa tanshed or wfa enW io d . 
£7D0pK 




>1 \l \ I ISVS 



Horner 




Renting property? 

No problem! 

We're the largest rentals agency 

Outside London dosfing in top quality 

house and apartment tenancies, 
short or long term. Backed by more 
than 25 years’ spedaSsed experi- 
ence. our qualified negotiators offer 
a fun show-round service to proper- 
ties in Surrey. Susax, Berks and 
S.W. London. 

Please phone; 037284 3811, quot- 
ing re! TT/8 



to Tut* Kiitiwn wnti aH macks. nod 

£290 pw im 


ESTATE AGENTS 




3P5X5535SS1 


magiwiceni manson Bat nftos master arte ot NHoy irn & 

n ij22S d J c S 1 “- Cjlt - hn - tonenar port ipShSeas. tan m 
M«HWn PUCE. SUMNE SQUABE. SW3. HgMymwnt. UuT^r- 
powrty soaenus conversion Hat otters, a superb 2 bedrooms (steeps 4J. 

* ft* 8 - On* ***** and bathroom. My £250 pw. 


neat.futie arnj shops. Eajoisaely funkshed. 3 bedrooms. double meepboa 
oned kitchen, bathroom, pretty garfea CM pw. 

TElANTg PWHg RW FOR «M HtEE UW. 


CHESTERTONS 

w — ft K S I l> E X T 1 A L ^ 


U l-3»9 a 122 IPW 


LITTLE YHBCE, W9 

Simply ebanang one bedroom flat 
m aew penod mwom naang 
many ongnal features nctotag 
cormeng and tnpte. lame dbte 
neap im lumstud x> me ngbest 
stntaoL double bed. writ faed- 
te te tWL bHbmoot £175 p.w. 
HBHLY RECOMMENDED. 

UXtc VWee OMck S1-2SS 4632 


MAYFAIR, 

VI 

An erfremefr attmro seated 
floor feflyfumrtMl flat sorted hi 
the Heart ot Maytag awm use q) 1 
double bedroom, battroo m . n- 
optoa and toteben. E3o0 p.w. 

Mayfair OttkC 8162* 4ST3 


Hampton & Sons 



6 Arlington Street, London SWlA 1RB 


01-493 


£ 


mP unnsMBSE. 

I I IV**' BoganflyfumlstMd 

■ / V% mafeonatte. 3 bad. 3 both and 
I I huge roof taraco. Company 

tat only. lywr+.E7S0 per 

Ilf-* 


A CUKCi 


Fulham 
0W36 5503 


barnard 

marcus 


WNDGOR war. UTM. Bmtub Iff. 

'■trma it n n* n mnyi. tnd 
McJn Dec wtn vite 2 hmi hwMi 

mu pueci Belli rtuo&n aoh ttnace. If 
U 4 dojli JJ» p« Cos nt? 

WEST LONDON OFFICE 
01 602 2421 

TEMPtnar ro. swn Amro* 3 

tMistenuor UuaixdMsaieltetL 

• ww beds. m*t baib. nrap. H fat 
CJftto GCH DHw E 160 pw Lmg Ca 
Lei 

SOUTH LONDON OFFEE 
01 627 0393 


^ Pto Estates 


Putnev 
01-739 5004 


Property Management Services Ltd. 


LANDLORDS AND TENANTS 

We have aad ttqoine propenks in MayUr. Ecnfegtea. Chelsea. 
Ptfaqr. VWMa and similar areas. We ofler a professional, 
efficient, baj pcsnnal service ensuring mb managed properties. 
RING US NOW. 

MARVEEN SMITH ASSOCIATES 
017277957/9379801 
10 Aabrey Walk, London W8 



ESSEX ACCOMMODATION BUREAU 

ISLE OF DOGS 

Luxury 3 bed My tan. flat- Long Co Let £250 p.w 

ST KATHERINES DOCK 

Rw Lux 1 bad apts. ndeo enoy phone, own wmim pool, 
sofenum/sauna ate. £250 p.w roe. el al teolbes. 
nnKRIY lUMTS HOMED fob extbkik ust of ouutv cubits, 
fhe unran sbmce Wtnnu hmusemsit sbwe 

TEL: 01 558 5292 or 0860 354365 


. ¥ 

»4i ’WCiJttt 

RBKUFFE GONX. mra 

EuccOmt 1st fla ttai tarttoKiBStaig 
swaws & syirt* aaxnt 2 obk 
bens lge rpawnofi. Wtbtn & taWian. . 
AwJ row tin fe irnbs 4 £225 w ‘ 

LOWHDfS saswt - 
Supci itf fxiMottastainioatkia-- 
hon urafy *aw«a) Mh Ms ol 
**fw> m owrs ft aorcots. 2 batt. 2 
Mfbk l itcffloon. bichtn/ bbffim. 

K*t 8 POOff f 175 B» «*J CH,Wf. 

01-581 7640, 

j,, • *ry 

i , t ■ r < 

. «re>— >.v=x: 

01-774 3100 CT-E31 7S^5 

ilMiM 

WESTMINSTER SWX Anrarttvo 
ufl! nmternWHI lurntUted 3rd 

1 

■ 

lloor fkti m ruiutofi btork 
nouhte tef. i<ire. FT kllcttetv. 
•-tSCpi. Co tel hrofcrmL Tele- 
■•hom* 07977 215 


SABANtjj 


• t.-'XT 

ii«r 

- “ ' tew •' 

u bfTEP 

v- 




ALSCRT Bndoc- ROML Ballnvu. 
Tim irll .'onunnM sludio (Im. 
B«f mi. beihreom. knenemw 
■rnniu.ini kH COO pw To) 
0C58 5SO*kl 


BAYSWATER W2 Nrwly Off. S 
nniininiiral Loimerisou Ppdi. 
kn a iMih. (iiiPd rarnrts. CH. 
r(M T\ phew, in aiim cul Of 
mw t!75 pm Trt OJ 727 9744 


BCAintRJL Braiwd Gcorgun 
L'ona>r ixvr Saffron Walden. 
Uail.tNr I«l Of NmomUer. I 
Ikhi Liw'ipool SI SlaUOn. CA60 . 
i.m TW 0797 30017 


W2 Ln» I IwM apl in p b B. LI JO 
i> ■% ono On W onljv New 
nun O' 'wW WS 0746 
Wft M -iPliri»to*h> aim* ••■rth Ufl. 

totiiK*-. fc dbic iKdTnh. ill I ro* 

U»p» oi 209 0173 

Wll. crur mine 25 

9aupi>\ ‘Bln Ch C130 P>* 

TPM 4*» SOM 



BELGRAVIA 

THREE TANTALISING GAROEN FLATS 
All recaidiy fitted and furnished. Two bedrooms, two bath- 
rooms are! modem kitchen. Large reception mom wth from 
and rear balconies. Separate root panfens and GARAGES to 
each flat A variable for sot months, company let 

D HOLDINGS: 

01-408 0880 



Lanety. begH la and 2ed tar mat 
Maty OK art dbte and angle 
beam Lane mine n. seper mod 
u. teOmieB. Mint bow. Lmg do 

u vSMtsnBisn 

Luge ins on 3 Boon m sq»b post- 
am ffigM rooBi aril aqrapal 
Uchen. dntele aw S*gle beibins. At- 
be rtaMtateML bate na. rteaai 
im. Mol now. Leap Let £300 p.w. 

m watem am. - 

— . IsadM SW3 2HP .. 
Tiliibiaa: it 581 2216 


FINCH’S 


RUBSTM KL (UMom) A tagi fapr hsr, 4 bads. 2 bam dstwetg no. deang 
im OSe gge. gdn tfum system Co LB Of Embisiy. K50 pw 
SHSN iHjcrwioKl RaM Very Urge hu 4 bid tee. 2 MBs. tm W. gm (gadaw 


supetau Date age E«25ow 
BAUMS Uta In* 3 bed Use 12 mn sin) Co Let ShM-LVO Lets E200 pw 
reiucr Uny rage A bed fM malaokeig iwer. Lux u. 5 m Pib or Ca Let 
£290 pw 

FUUUM Luge bnry moden 3 bed house. Co LeL £20 pw 

T«fc 01-788 4448 or 01-736 9905 


CHELSEA 


01-370 4329 


Superb 4/5 budroamd hoare 
in the most cental location. 
Attractive garden. EG7S per. 
Co W. 


3 bed house in villaoe loca- 
tion. Clou to all amenities. 
£200 pw. 

miHT U 8 B I CO : 

. BEGIIIIVE UTTMB8 

01-748 3224 


lurmsiiM flat- oansen mrL 
DouMc bedroorn. dining room, 
•nun* room. CH metoded. Sun 
nrofneUMwl rewm. Cl 25 pw. 
TH: 748 5360. 


WremMTMMUL EXECUTTVIS 

ITgcnlbr mmnre nue A houses 
m rwtrai London from Cl 50 io 
C2.00Q im Plrasr can S*oj 
Own or Lorrainr Cemobca an 
Ol 957 9684 


KENS1IISTOH SPMoae soaUi 
IM-ing mansion liro « brds. 2 
rrrpL 1 ctudi-. 3 baths: l/f 
HVfhrm. llfif porter, 

unium/fnm Loro Co Let. 
C565 DW TrL 01602S680 


SWISS COTTAfHL Superb new 2 
iwd dal. r/f kU. video e/phe me. 
oi Long or inon tn. izzs pw. 
brtmed FtaB 486 9144. 


SWISS Collage AUranneZbcd 

rncwiiv urw riWL k A b. 
mdrp rh & rti— 1 Cl 20 pw. Co. 
1 4 hoteiav lei. Tel . 794 8989 
937 MSI The number to remem 
her tthrn wUng -besi .rental 
wwrlm in rmiral ad nnme 
. London areas C150/C2.000PW 


OteMTSMWOBE 1st Hoot fM In 
wnlrn vouare. 2 beds. 2 
oaus/muz). imp ana 
study/ctming. hH^II machines. 
I m. porter and keys » gdns. 
£576 pw. Goddanl & Smtth. 
01 930 7321 



UVURSIBB Mans Cl. Nr ettv.su 
per* iniuu- 2 dWe bed fum 
masofwile. parking, guns. gvm. 
Cl 70 PW rxr Td 0980 38893 
eiev 

*HUK IPUMMFI Superb paw 
now Rtmmand Bark Gilev 2 
iwep. 4 beds preitji oar Gas 
ch Gge. Lana IM. £300 pw. Tel 
PTOJM 788 7804 Warrrn. 


**fli W*. Mansion ftei nr 
Tube wile high ceUbags and fun 
tmgOi miidowi Z dole beds, 
iwep. ku w/diyer. bahrm. un. 
porter, video Crtry phone. Go 
Long LeL 6 mtlw *. G2TO p.w. 
Goddard A Smith. Ol 930 
7321. 


BUYFABt Low 9 d/bed 4th fir 
sen apt. All eurMncs. Cb leL 
C250 rw Tel Ol 723 0272 


HR Hfumoos. superb dal. Large 
nwrni. double bedroom- patto, 
C220pw 389 1789. 

SOHO. 1 dUe bed fully fum flat 
■ for Co in. Grh. roof terrace. 
Cl 60 pw 01-247 0971 «t»g 


UUB«W55*rvtrrdslDtfe bach- 
elor fteL 2 muw Pier line. 
Studio room. Knybatti/wc. 
GPO phone. Ideal tar single e>- 
emive. CM pw. 01-998 7Z77. 


EMCtUUtmeO tsih cenhtrv cot- 
Uge on Mstonr RKMaond 
Green. 2 bedrooms. 5 mtnutes 
km io n- CiaOpw. Go let. Ol 940 
2979 


OVERSEAS PROPERTIES 


COSTA DEL SOL 

Malaga to Harbella 

Superb investment of 
holiday and residential 
homes. We twe an 

extensive fet oJ 
new/resaleprop«bM 

tronibo.DOd.Attracm<e 

SXBSS&Bl 

inspection ffighls. 

For ourcoiouf-bro^ure: 

Tel (0273) 29907 

or write ^ 

IBStrCA PROPERTIES Un 

1b Caste surare. 

I BrigMort. Susm. 


•sraasL , 5S5a ! ss 

.-■.ah i |.ii«jr DrdrooTO- * 

0 s^Lal-Mbii P drawing 
n,Uhk. .JJTJ ,r |Jpran-. rtimira 
'ZZ tXSue wSrs. filled 

xTaSr ajssym 


TTiiTT^iTTr 


JUNGLES NEAR 
MOJACAR 

COSTA AUIHWy0LAHCA. VAas & 
bmwlows. Beach ftO« & Inland 
sduanwis- Unu5ua*ygtHxl wine, 
freehold, ham ELuJOO 
Write w. 

IUU-0JS) 
FREEPOST. 
SOUTHAMPTON 
SOS 1BE 
or telephone: 
(0703) 558910 


M ARBCL Lfl-CALS E'MDA 

2 year bW luar? f&Pi floor 
k-fla-agimneni n rtse uiey* 
flevebontere HPrire no I- *« 
W. 2 beds. 3jrtte nmCTM^g 
ttorme. BSWWbf HmsbeL La«- 
sufed gfiom «h 2 (w* 

*&SA%**** 

07S2-7991M 
or 798738 







TBS twws leLTUlllTl Com- 
pteie range of properties teoker 
60 wtmrr/Minwr resortv Eb: 

. Vfftner. vtHarv Lake Lucerne. 
Bernese- Otxrtaad Me. contact 
HUary Sron Property. 422 Ln- 
per Rtctimond Road .WcsL 
London SWL4. Teb 01-876 


PALMBCACM FlerMa. 3 bed taw 
oo •• arrr. nr golf course. 
£120000 I /hold. 01-640-1783 




For Sale in 


Single-room to 
4-room flats. 
SFr 118‘OOa 


Avaflabie as of 
December 1986 



CALPe COST* KUUec*. Haro 
rhanre 10 araulre fMiMd 
Tlmrsharv- rr-utes in popular 
Mark at baroato nuev tmoub 
from JandmL S LyMon-Ger 
den v Lislo ti. Sudbury. Suffolk. 
Tel 0787 73672 


UMCMLE Umntiare Vkanlrd. 
Meek 30 or 33- 1 or 9 bed- 

rooms TM 0783 392637 

pkrtnmr>. 


KU Shepherds Bush. Lounge/ 
lined kKrtien. double bedroom, 
bath . CH. Kr tube. COOOpcm. 
Ol 740 0880. 


Wl. Loieb’ 9 bed mews cottage. 
Onb* E mins walk to Marble 
Arrh. C2BO pw OoM.Ch.Tei 
tsektlrd Fla is 486 9144. 

Wl. nurhte Arch. Superb newty 
der and lumtaltod l«nj bed- 
room fteL ugiu and aory. 
ClBOim.-. TH Ot 937 SSI 1- 
WAMTCD MW 3 prof people. 8/C 
flal /home. Company LeL area 
£120 pw. TH. Day 01-278- 
2206 dr ElK 01-460-4333 
WWtE OML Brand new de- 
lartwd family- house, huerior 
desired. 4/S UHL CflOO pw. 
Home from Home: 946 «*t. 
WIMBLEDON VB.UW. 2 bed 
flal. Lounge, tuning room. New- 

t' dec Long IN £175 pw. 
Home (torn Home:. 946 9447. 
ACAPCeaeCS nttTMC. Flab nr I 
■L nhenio * Bril Museum. TM , 
Hetefi Wabop A Co. 0806275. 

* SKUCTMH of 1 / 2/3 Bod dan 
m Kern 3 Cmi uwdoo. All 
prters .937 4999 rTL 

*vu*ble NOW Luxury flats & 
tew*e*t200 Cl DOO pw. TrL 
Butom 081 6136 

* BCD fum nets Cl SO . C300 

u-unUedon area. Home 
horn Home. 946 9447 
CM1JCA hnmar lux balcony 
ltd. LAM rerep. dbl bMlrm. bn. 
potter. Long IH *1 6226826 
OOUBEK CRON LUX 3 bed 
with iMroar. In exriusite an 
£230 pw Ten 01-460 6397. 
HOU*NB nc Lnnsual 3 brd 
I urn nuft unh Mew. Comm 
Odnn C2S0 Fb* Keg. 747 361 1 
* rt tX* MP ML KNMty COIM in- 
ridus I brd flat. Full route Go 
W. LteOpw. Tut 01-741 9577. 
■MBHTMBNICE. 1 dbte bed. 
Hum. CH. ku/ dmer 1 yp. 
£140 pu. Trt 01-686 2062 


F.WIUFP iMpna9rmenl Ser- 
vifnl Ud r rouble propentes 
CmtraL Sown and W«L Lou- 
don Arras for wattag 
appuranls 01 221 8838. 


mOCBWW ML SW7 large 
«u*M 2 dM bed OaL reception 
town. luichrn. baihroam. 
drawing roam. 6 mths -s. £155 
pw. TH Ot 684 3162. 


MNRV « MBK* Contact amow 
on Ol 238 88M lor l he best de- 
tection of f (uprated fiats and 
houses lo rent in KMghtsorMgr.. 
CtiHsea aad Kensington <T> 


NOLLANS PARKi Lsirty I du 
bed nm Big reception, kitchen 
routeped with latest tocbnoL 
ow Com enient parklnp. Long 
Go IH. ClOOpvf. TM:935-76Z£ 


SOOTH KEM v/a. URUUIM. I 
fee dbte bed. I small dbte bed 
New filled kit 4 bihrm. $uu 
prof snarers. £195 pw. Please 
rsdl 002 9233. 


SW1 ramxo *nrarove iw 2 
bedim, rrnx/dmfng. k& B. lor 
rained lo a Mgh standard. £760 
pm Company Lrt TH: 01-834- 
1026 


KM * BUTCHOPP for luxury 
properties In Si John* wood. Re 
ents Parte. Mail Vale. Swiss 
Cod 3 HaiWMlMd 01-686 756* 


union mm Matraonsswh. 
Large eieoanl 2 bed apL. ail 
amrm. C2SO p.w. Finch's. Ol 
736 3505. 

CITY PLAT 2 rooms klb.u» 
fui FI. 3 rear tease. £Sl 9SO 
pan. Co Let Only. Grant A 
Plus Ol 629 6901 


Flats Galore/ 

Fremfor Utfiogs. 
Luxury 

accommodafion io 

aU London areas. 

01-387 

1866. 


RURLMCKAW CT, SWS. Superi- 
or 2 dbte bed DM on riser from. 
2 recs mod kik be rood. 
Gge OoM-stn. A\all now. 096 
pw SI urges 788 4851. 


I5 LKTTOW knety bright and wa- 
rtous wHI furnished 2 double 
bed iteL Cl 80 pw Servked- 
VHKig enindmi/ company 
IH only. TH. 01 609 7989 


KEMSMSTTMi W8 Nr tube, new- 
iv decorated funusbed IUL dM 
bed. lounge, k A u. CH. Ufl por- 
ter. Co let only, caoo pent Tet 
• Ol 285 9060 r*t222. 


12 UEHTFOfD STREET, 
MAYFMR.W1 

*fc an an otacd to mnea Hie 
ooemio ol Henfofds Mm m can 
ofleraselecHRdUMiySlDiko. 1 
& 2 Bed Awtment* onod 6 days 
p*. 24 boor pomge. 
ViMk|MliCM 




Property owners list yuur 
fiats to be let by us. We 
have the finest business 
executives for your 


m* 


7622 CD 




KENMNnON 2 Lgr Bedims * 
Dressing Room/3rd Bedroom. 
Dbte Rerrp. K82B. LUL Lse of 
Gardens. C32SPW. Btrch A CO 
734 7432. 


I BWH l WIU B Bt Large balcony 
ilaL 3 rooms. Mirhen A bath- 
room. CH from £150 pw. For 
furflirr details TH: 01-589 
5401 after 3om Wednesday 


MAYFAIR Top tux apartment In 
preeitaous Mock. 1 / 2 beds. 1/ 
2 reropL 2 bath- Available for 
long co. leL caOOpw. 24hr por- 
Kragp. PH ring «9t 3609. 


ST lOMtS WOOD Ught ipackms 
newly decorated fully funusbed 
Tuxurv rut. 3 beds- 2 batm. 
DUe rrcep. Fuels' fM InL £350 
pw. No agents. TH Ol 8863992 


WKMM FLATS A HOUSES 

avail A mod. for diplomats, 
rwulhrs Long A short lets In 
ad areas Uofnend d Co. 48. 
Albemarle St Wl. 01-499 6330. 


■MW GREEN WA - Charming 
let Or fiaL rer. dtnrnt. 1 d Me/1 
sgte bdrm. ch. Oote tube. Res. 
pkg. £130 pw. TH 1 01 748' 
5084. 


E MB A S SY Ligrony rroulre* one 
bedroom fiat for a long tet 
Cl OO p.w. Has rales. Tote- 
Pftoocroi 723 1787 


MONTMac SQUARE. EWHtanL 
rwullve. 1 be d ro om IUL Dr- 
ugner- £400 pw. Lang 
Company leL Trt 9367622. 


PIMLICO attractive, tax flat. 1 
dbte brd. recepL k A b. 
ClJOp w Co mpany tet pre- 
ferred. 0732 832323. 


fOOe sn e O TOW tamtthed tar tn 
secluded sauarr. FuUy I urn 
Reecn. 2 dole Ml study. 2 
baths, rlks. KtL utility. C37B pw 
Wanng A Ntehohon 01-460 
0143 


RAMXTT snort we A bed cottage 
m rural area but nose lo MI 
and BR station Large recep. 
ktirneo/dmer. both, garden. 
£115 p.w Marveen Smith 
ASSOC Ol 937 9801 
Wl 1 HUH SW1S. Exr end 
terr mod towntae 2 rocs, a 
beds. 2 baths, pd fud idt/bTsl 
rm. WHI dec 6 flint. Cdn. Gge. 
Co M. Avail now. £300 pw. 
Si urge. 788 4691 
AMERICAN BAMS urgently re- 
quires luxury natv/housrs, 
ChrtMva. Hraghharldgr. Belgra- 
via areas. C 200 - C 2 -OOQ pw. 
Burge-* Estate Agents 681 8136 
AMERICAN Processors A Ihrtr 
I amities reuure flats A houses 
Irom October /Nov ember. From 
4 weeks 10 1 year. Bruanraa 
FtesktenOH Lotting* 938 3780. 
BARNES. Tasteful ty decorated 
hoove 4 beds, thru Inge/ dining 
rm. kitchen. Bam. Ftailo garden. 
Long IH £273 pw. TH Ptppa 
788 7884 Warrens. 

BARNES. Lop del 4 bed hse facing 
Common. 2 reran*. hIL bfsL 2 
Whv. gge ow Baroes stn. 
C37Spw tnrgardner. Please Mi 
JV Ud 6! 949 2482. 


HAMPSTEAD swier flat maul in 
Idviur rounov wittng. 
o /looking Heath & golf course 
30 II L-*haprd studio, balcony, 
ku. Mhrtn/wr. CH. phone. 
Avail now for I It. CSB pw 
Owner Ol 586 4889 OT 883 
2321. 

OEORCUN Howe In E9. 3 mUes 
from my FuOy lurnMied. 5 
dbte bedrooms. 2 reception's, 
dtmnu room. I a By eq ui pped 
Lite ben. bamroom and cloak- 
roam CITS pw. 01-906 9370 

HOLLAND Park, sunny IlaL 41- 
traruvrts- I urn 6 newly see. 
n /looking pm gardens. Large 
1 ere*. and dbte beds, good 
KAH. CH dose lube. CITS pw. 
Tel Ol 229 7788 


Ei 5 o,» to «sr rta " 

shoutalong lets 

MANY HOLIDAY FLATS 
AVAILABLE 

Tel: 01-488 8828 


Wl Harley SI MH* 3 dbl beds. 2 
baths, recep. F/furn. Entry ph. 
C250pw. Co IH- Sharing. Day 
631 1369 Eve 586 3281. 


WMBUM1H Luxury secluded 2 
bed. 2 bath garden apartment. 
Funy furnhhrd. garage, two 
per* Tel. 879 0801 


W — UPCR Oho common. 2 
bed tax flat. Supcrtuy for- 
n«ted.Gge Caso pem for I yr. 
TH Ol 582 2236 tevrtt. 


SW10 Carden flaL 1 bed. IUL 
baih. I reran, gas Qi. ClUpw. 
ro tel A ref reach Ol 3824017. 


SW1B. OrootK) Poor 2 bed flat. 
CISC pw. Home from Ho w e . 
946 9447. 


MCHAMFTON. Detached bmfty 
house in lovHy teaiy road near 
Putney Heath. Four/ the bed- 
rooms. two/Utree reception, 
two bathrooms and garaging 
for two ran. as well as a gar- 
don. would sum family on long 
term company tenancy M C575 
ph week. To view rtng Georgr 
Kntgtl Tne Letting Agent, em 

RTVSnsne • Ban. un 2 bed 
aoL superbly decorated wnh h- 
hphh (ocHshuigs- Lge bale onto 
Thames from 2 spacious thrti 
reraps 4 i/1 kit. Bam * guest 
rtoakrm. parking. 24 hr porter 
* senility Ideal for Ini exec. 
£800 pw. via Co tet. Must view. 
01-4056711 rMrs Lanei ofT hra 

A MEHI AN EXECUTIVE Seek* 
hi* llat/hooee: up to CSOOpw. 
L vial roes reo. PtiHttpe Kay & 
Lewis. South of tne Park. Chef- 
sea office. 01-382 8111 or 
North of the (tack. RrgnTs 
Park office. 01-886 9882. 


GENERAL APPOINTMENTS 



EXPERIENCED 

FURNISHED 

LETTINGS 

NEGOTIATOR 

Marsh & Parsons, one of London’s leading estate 

agents, require a negotiator with a proven track 
record ana good knowledge of furnished rentals 
to join their busy and expanding famished de- 
partment The successful candidate will be hard 
working and capable, with a sense of humour ami 
team spirit arid be based in our Kensington 
office. 

Please contact Fiona Dunlop on 
01-937 8760. No Agencies. 



TWEE TUMI EXECUTIVES 

remitted. £74100 nco. regulated 
*»*rnlnta scheme. Probable first 
waoo °- «*■ 


nr 

THE TIMES 

CLASSIFIED 


MONDAY 


The Times Classified 

colmmsare read by 13 
million of the most affloeat 
people in the cerotry. The 


appear regiuany eacn 

week and are generally 

accompanied by referent 
editorial articles. Use the 
coupon (right), and find 
out how easy, last and 

economical it b to 
advertise in The Times 
Classified. 


HiritiM: University 
Appointments. Prep St PBMic - 
5droot Appointments. . 
Educational Courses. 
Scholarships and Fellowships 

la Ofaae de h Crime aad other 
secretarial appointments; 

TUESDAY 

flmmr nirimf. Compmer 
AppoiiunKfflts with edhonal - 
Lmri Ap pilllMi n U ; Stdichofi. 
Commercial Lawym. Lc*al 
Officers. Private & Public 
Praaict 

UpBi La Crtme for lop legal 

set/darics. 

PuMcSecttr AMataMab. 



FRIDAY 

Rfewrr A complete car bnyert 
oiide with edrioriaL 
Riiferts t» Barinesc Business 
opportunities, ftaaefrises etc, 
with editorial. 

Rcstawaat GaMc, (MontUy) 


SATURDAY 

Overms and UK Haiidns: 

viuas/Couage*. Hotels. Righis 

etc. 


I FAMOUS PERSONAL COLUMN, 
RENTALS. APPEARS EVERY DAY 


Fpl in the coupon and attach il to your a d vertiseme nt , written on a Mp tiat c 
P*eec of paper, allowing 28 letters and spaces per line: 

Rates ans Linage £4.00 per 1'me (min. i lines): Boxed Dispby £23 per single 
column centimetre; Court A Soda! £6 per Kite. All rates subject to i5% VAk 
S m* to; SWriey Manotis. Gronp Cbosffled AdvcrtiseaKfll MaaHn, Duet 
Newsmpen Lad, POBux 484, Vtqpali Street, London El 9D& 

Name^ 


Tcfcphoae (Daytime) Due of insertion.,.. 

(Phase aOow three working days prior to insertion dale.) 
Use your Access, Visa, Aims or Dhen cards. 













































































THE TIMES WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 8 1986 



LA CREME DE LA CREME 


An altogether 
brighter future ~ 

SECRETARIES TO... 


DEVELOPMENT DIRECTOR c. £10.000 


CHIEF ACCOUNTANT c. £9.000 


PERSONNEL MANAGER c. £8,200 


EXCELLENT BENEFITS • BRAND NEW OFFICES 
LINCOLN’S 'INN FIELDS 

Wouldn't R be nice to wake up each morning and actually look 
forward to going to work? 

Working for our client would mate every day a brighter 
prospect altogether. The company is a growing force in 
independent hospital management Not too big. not too small, 
they can truly be described as young, dynamic and highly 
successful ... a fact reflected in their lovely new offices near 
Lincoln's Inn Reids (dose to both Hoi bom and Chancery Lane 
tubes). 

They're looking for three bright secretaries worthy of 
the excellent rewards on offer. 

One, as Secretary/RA for their DEVELOPMENT 
DIRECTOR will need the organisational skills to ensure the 
smooth running of the office In the Director's absence; 
dealing with enquiries, handling correspondence and generally 
keeping him informed on project progress. Additionally this 
Secretary will act as Deputy Admin. Assistant, ensuring the 
smooth running of cleaning and building maintenance services. 

The second as Secretary/RA for their CHIEF ACCOUNTANT, 
will take care of Petty Cash and die company’s credit 
cards, to addition to a wide range of typing and WP. Thai’s why 
they'd prefer someone with two or three years' experience 
in a Rnance/Accounting environment 

For the PERSONNEL vacancy the need is not so much for 
specialist experience as for good all round skills, plenty of 
enthusiasm and toe personality to fit into a small, friendly team. 

ALL positions call for 100/60 shorthandAyping speeds as 
well as audio and WP experience. The salaries quoted are 
subject to review after o months, and are supported by 
outstanding benefits including subsidised lunches and season 
ticket loan together with free health insurance, a mortgage 
subsidy and a pension scheme after a qualifying period. 

Feeling better already? Then phone Stephen Diner on 01- 
631 0111 dunrtg office hours who’ll tell you more. Alternatively 
write with fuH details to him at: JM Management Services, 
Columbia House, 69 Aldwych, London WC2B4DX. 

It^SI MANAGEMENT 
Jr\\ SERVICES 


ifjQlW' AT OUR 

V^T NEW OFFICES IN 

54 SOUTH MOLTON STREET 

(1st Floor) 

ON 15th OCTOBER 12-3 pjn. 
FOR A CHEESE AND 
WINE PARTY 


IF YOU ARE LOOKING FOR STAFF 
COME IN AND MEET US. 

WE ARE HERE 
TO HELP YOU. 


ED 


employment 




DIRECTORS’ SECRETARIES 


Top Jobs for Top People 

£14,000 COMMUNICATIONS 

This is a high visibility job for an Executive Secretary to join one of the 
largest global Finance Houses. Working alongside tbe Director of In- 



CHAIRMAITS SEC 
£9,500 + 

Do you wM an opportunity to 
tecone part ft a wfl-cstaWslud 
ya progressive Fasfttm Company 
vhnc your top state mil be eb- 
bed to fr o tup ■ you 
oiydurng & getting on Mil peo- 
ple tben life ■ the pti for ytnL 


‘ CITY: 01-4812345 

albbatt 


EXEC PA/SECS 
£9,800 - £13,080 

0ft efcnts are ana ft (stag 
MBtftam Battl es « tte Qty. Due to 
npansrai A career development 
they now rajutre several bp-top 
PA/Secs. V you have after Auln. 
SH or WP opWence jjr hat 

noted SI Uftnapcroent/Ctenoan 
level develop you fid* to due 
fftatta pewitaL Exd pals in- 
cUfa a tetel mortgage. STLS 

| CITY: 01-4812345 


win oe tong and toe role will range across conferences, train mg, and 
communkaiioo with a major focus on getting things right 

£11,000 PERSONNEL 

if you are an ambitious younjg Secretary looking for a career then we have 
just the job for you! Working as an integral pari of the team in tbe 
exceedingly busy Personnel Department of a vast American Rank , the 
work will centre on an important administrative support role. Secretarial 
skills must be good. 


01-629 9323 


BILINGUAL 

SECRETARIES 

PARIS .NEC 

A bilingual secretary with total fluency in ftcnch 

and EogBshT^ht by the Gka»ral 

th» Paris based international bank. Applicants 

should be well presented, discreet and po«a» 

excellent skills, including previous Wf 

experience. 

TOKYO NEG 

A unique opportunity has arisen with® the Tokyo 
ha«»ri representative office of an mternatwnai 
hank, airrently expanding and ^committed to 
involvement in the aocunties market. They 
require a trilingual secretary with fluency ® 
Japanese, English and German to provide 
secretarial administrative support for their 
Chief Representative. 

CITY NEG 

A City based Italian tank seeks to recnata 
bilingual secretary with fluent Italian. Aged 
fanrikfatwt should have fast, accurate sborthana 
a«d typing rhlh and previous WP experience. 

Please contact 

AEaon MeGmgan, Jonathan Wren . 
Tatanutinwl Ltd, (Bifingnal Secretarial 

IX^NDOn'eCSM 1266 


Jonathan Wren 
4^ International Ltd 

r T S Qanamg 


‘ ELECTRICITY SUPPLY NOMINEES 


GROUP SECRETARY 

£8£18 to £9,773 pa me. 

Electricity Supply Nominees is the prop- 
erty investment company of the Electricity 
Supply Industry Pension Scheme. 

We are looking for an experienced short- 
hand and audto typist with a Bvety 
personality and a general knowledge of 
secretarial duties to look after a small 
group of young surveyors with aH their 
meeting and travel arrangements etc.. 
Wordpiex 95 system is also to use and 
training would be given if necessary. 
Please write to confidence with CV and 
current salary quoting reference 100/TT 
to: David Webb, Recruitme nt Officer, The 
Electricity Counci, 30 MHbanfc, London 
SW1P 4RD. ' 

Tfm OmkI las an Equal Opportunity 
_ PotKY and i r o t com es appfcstfcns Horn 

/S \ — / 

asoRiancduNaL 


r CfifOJDE Kind 

GOURMET LUNCHES - MAYFAIR 

c£1 0,000 

Ths tap putakc property com pl y estabfistmd in t entu sti c 
offiras. are a a ar ertog tor a s enior s ecre ta ry to work ta foek 
dev el opment ftre cta r - Exerting ttings are happen i ng now as 
the pfenning appeals have cram to fruition] You must haw a 
sobd conanarcial bacfcfyowid and mrce ia nt state. 55 wpm 
typng. audio and WP needed. Age 22-30. 

CONFERENCES & BANQUETS 
£9,000 


Long Term 
Temp 


if you enjoy temping but need toe 
security of guaranteed work 
throughout the winter and beyond, 
then do call us immediately to 
discuss an indefinite assignment 
with a major British pic The role is 
50% secretarial/50% admin, and 
needs excellent typing and WP 
skills (pref. Wordstar). Age: 22-26. 



Head Hunters 
£9,500 + Bonus 

Assist toe senior partner handling 
high profile appointments within toe 
Government and TV industry. This 
is an involved and challenging up- 
front position. Extensive client 
contact 

Skids: 55 typing, some shorthand, 
will train on WP. graduate pref. 
Age: mid 20’s. 


£9,000 


Absolutely superb oppor- 
tunity tor bright 2nd 
jobber to join the tost 
moving world of televi- 
sion and broadcasting. 
Fust class secretarial 
skMs essential (100/50) 
plus the abtity to 
organise and Raise with 
cefebrmes and top man- 
agement Excellent 
benefits and prospects 
(or a weti presented com- 
petent PA. 

01-930 8207 


TV SEC 
£9,080 

The chief executive of 
the European TV dept of 
this tot Broadcasting Co 
is looking tor a bnght 
cheerful 2nd Jobber 22+ 
with good sec sfcMs (90/ 
50) to assist him and his 
team. Vary friendly atmo- 
sphere. Lots of efient 
liaison. Wil train on WP. 
Languages hetpfuL Exc 
career opportunity. 

01-930 8207 



Join this top imariialionai hotel g 
in ge n et e i ng new butanete tor « 
quettog department This very 
needs a speedy secretary who s 
people. No sh orthan d or aufto. 


group and become RwoNad 
met conferences and ben- 


£9,000 

Vice president re top In- 
ternational film Co needs 
a bright compete n t and 
oonscientiouB Sec 21+ 
with good skMs (100/60) 
who can operate in a de- 
mendtog and creative 
enwonmant Opportu- 
nity for plenty of 
involvement and increas- 
ing level of responstoity 
if you ran handle it Exc 
parka and bans. 

01-930 8207 


partment This very young, succ es sful teem 
eedy secretary who enjoys typing and taking to 
sh orthan d or auttio. WP training given. 

pl ena t el ephone 01-499 8070 

46 Old Bond Stresf London W.L A 

CARQUNE XUS SECRETARIAL APPMfTMBnS^^^ 


1 


Highly Dynamic 

to £14,000 

Excellent opening for a hard-working, high-flying 
po-getier. The company is small, srawinu fast at the 
leadinfl edge of ‘big bang’ expansion. As Sec to MD 
you will operate in a fasi-rnoving. challenging 
environment. Benefits, like prospects, an? 
exceptional \fet End-based. Lansuayes useful. 
A-levd- Graduate education essential. Skills 100 70. 
Please call 01 -40? 1232. 

IffiraMM ReiTuttnxfii CuitsilUob 


SENIOR SEC 
TV/LEISURE 
GROUP 
£11,500 

A duimn] tore toml ilvedv 
ft a mm ti Wnaxn 
topnoW itqms jaw ste 
wtey are to prater a W 

raMrasrej&j Mree; 

tract ano eoracs aowK 
qno iWwp carer Tlaa 
an integral aeoson rating *ea 
and wftk «i praa ntanstng 
and swMaonj |tou»i w 
Wary to to aptd 30-teycK 
ftordeMs c*i 

01 631 5045 
'Crawford 
BecnDtuwttt 


SECRETARY 

c£11,00Qpa 

, Directors of an International 
property company with a 
small attractive West End 
office in tte Cavendish Sq 
area require a person with 
shorthand/aste. Skills 
100/60. A ple a sant outgo- 
ing personality and good 
telephone manner. 

01-580 7413 


barnard 

marcus 


require well peresented 
secretary/asststant able to 
work on mtOativs & as pert 
Of a smafl rapidly expanding 
department mill ritghty cn> 
gressne lam. £8,000 p.i 

Ring 002 5581 
No Agencies 


WORD PROCESSING 
SECRETARY 

Required tor exproding ma- 
rine offshore and en^neenrq 
consultaicy. to work in newly 
acquired period oft ires dose 
to Cfranrg Cross to SH re* 
owed but candidates should 
nave fast accurate tvtmg. Age 
21+. Salary £8.000 pa + 
chnstmas bonus. 

Contact 
Kim Coates on 
01-930 6545 

No Agencies 


PERSONNEL 

PA ADMOUSTRATQR 

£104)00 

Vow rood aCmrr . trafion no 
D ewe skills «n1 te ustt men 
wiv trv aiafting me aeoc or 

I luge irtmaoona cwnpulBr 
CWTOW Vour PA; S« SUIS 
•te re usrti oo-n m me tme 
woiiana ttise* w«ti you toss 
e i rtynjmc Maro»nq Ch- 
/ecor a ms orrann Trie rest 
mtawr wote delegate 
wort uta leuid (or trie demn- 
inenul scaeaues Cwrow^ 
nolle a rwjr ana yaw DfOTV 
akN to useC to monate ne 
sWi 

Ca8 tee Thau* Ostemsta 
« 11-831 860. 


BE SHAKEN NOT 

STIRRED 

FOR UP TO S12JBM 

Inrematianai and tang«tat}- 
lenefl. ffe lamas torts 
anamv seeLs too resconafiJe. 
aaoucmir seaeunes win are 
unfiawadte. amast mflesa&gabJe 
and muld aaxeoate The wei- 
comni atmosonne o i these 
anntuue. modem rdfices n 
SW1 AJtnhutts needed - noato- 
<H. style WP are snonharal 
Frencn useful Age 25 ♦. 

To ajmetee an pawe. dease 
canbd Lrdsay Anderson a 
Rosemary WwleU an Ot 631 
090? 



Ctt-SW + tatfoog beseras 

Maw Cm <w* see* tfrafland see 

ttm-ei fm «ws pgstatoS 

Eocitm-owwas 

CaU Dwicfc mchDtfaan 
01-248 8181. 




For InteraatiQirel Co. 

An American Com- 
pany with luxurious 
offices in Central Lon- 
don needs you if you 
have a high tevd of 
education and are look- 
ing for a temporary 
position dial is really 
different. Ai least *A' 
level standard and pref- 
erably ‘Graduate' will 
quality yon for com- 
puter training if you 
need it and a job full of 
variety including tele- 
phone and clerical 
work. Ages 19-24. 

Bernadette 
of Bond St. 

«*C'V>V"«*K Consultants 
la K uamtnxkg » 


itoTn^ti nbaowy cl i fratOi 
Cmjp rA ConoanKS raearedmeen- 
tral London (AUxnune sreei] s 

enutg tar an f ceewne Assotftt (or 

aspnoOBRL 

TtoswxessuacpkantwStocwr 

JU vat ft XC bench mwber 

wno* anpteioiy btngwl EngisO 
ismtei aio bthmi) 
.InamtsofliDDftetefttoftasftn- 
nai sMsi%ng. Tete at) sty 
rteDeiHjwterotowaaweiw). 

efte ft sm4« acawang ano to afte 

to deal mth Sr ken «j Bmes. 

A WWl wtfi prewous wring b- 
w»«a ra n Ba* tSeosaes 
ftpmntatri or Brakn «8 to 
praOTyvOfttatt 
A wn-w pm taftem oorts) nay 
Deconsilered. 

nnsMter IK Bn ttaater W. 
ltenmts.8MiUwy.75Ml 
Parts Ceasn 69. fftttt 


Corent Garda 

dULOflO 

TOW rasponsftOty tor 
rhe running of this 
w pand i tq 
“"TWty. A* (he MD s 
PAyajwM«ss«ttoiin 
a raw venture, there- 
fore ptenty of scope. A 
■me of hwnoift and 
9Aod typmg. nga 


NINA CAMPBELL LTD 

TWO SECRETARIES 0RGENTLY HEEDED 
FOR TWO DIRECTORS 

As wel as looking after Mr wte bteig and ccmpiteft) 
orgarasmg them, you writ also bo respertsirie for the day to 
day rurratg of the office, and other general secretariat du- 
bos. 

it IS essential, therefore, to have the toOowtng quaBties:- 

ExceCenr secretarief sktts and org artsa lfonat atXtay with a 
good tetephone mannar. Must tie of an adaptable, easy 
gong and good humoured dtsposmon. and be able to cope 
under pressure when the need anses. 

tt you feel you til ttw description please send yotr C.V with a 
covering letter to:- 

A.D Stanbury Esq., 

Nina Campbell Ltd., 

9 Walton ST., 

London S-W3 2JP 


INSURE YOUR FUTURE 

£12,000 

A start q> srtuatioB offers total involvement 
d envmd s quick wits, efficiency and versatility from 
it’s P-A_/Off»ce Administrator. Two successful City 
businessmen have recently joined forces in a new 
financial venue and need such a person. Whilst they 
concentrate an developing and packaging new busi- 
ness, they will rely on yon to set up and ran the 
office, provide PJL support and general secretarial 
back-up. City awarene ss and immaculate presenta- 
tion are crucial as is education to ‘A* level French 
and German usefaL Age 25-35. Please telephone 588 
3535 

Crone Corkill 


RECRUITMENT CONSULTANTS 


SECRETARY 

Small friendly firm of City Headhunters 
seek a versatile, qualified and capable sec- 
retary. The job will include word 
processing and administrative responsibil- 
ities. An excellent telephone manner is 
essential. First class salary and benefits. 

Call Victoria between 9am & 7pm 
on 01-283 9801 


25 + EXPERIENCED PA 

Secretary for the Chairman of private com- 
pany, small HQ, family office Marble Arch. 
Salary negotiable. 

For further d e ta fl a cal 

01-724 3325 


PROSPECTS 

<*8,000 + Benefits 

TT» DeaAng Department 
o< a leadng In terna t io nal 
Bank is one of the most 
noting places to start a 

working career. 

The Bank in question is 
expanding in the London 
martiet and is currently 
seekmg sctwoHeavers 
with a career in banking 
in view. 

nubility, together with 
the aMrty to contribute to 
a inreiy and successful 
team, are anpoftant, 
white typing end 
secretarial skdb are an 
advantage. 

You wMba aged 17-20 
with a minimum ol five 
'O’-Levete. including 
English and Mathematics. 

CITY OFFICE 
728 8491 


- XL* ■ JJL ii r 


cc*ON'.Si_ CO.V5UL: A\’S . 


More than a 
Receptionist ... 

£ 10,000 

22-25 yrs. 

The company are the largest 
wine importers m the UK with 
prestigious offices ill Mayfair 
where their senior level marr- 
dgemcni staff are based. Tbe 
an phase bon meeting people, 
many from abroad, and 
requires, someone w rth French 
ur German, excellent appear 
anee and minimal typing. You 

will be involved in assisting at 
press launches, booking the 
VIP dining awn. some super 
vision of staff plus administra- 
tion The com pan v look after 
their staff and are keen to 
develop this new pnuiion. An 
exctHluni opportunity for 
someone with some pres uus 
e x perience now looking in 
step nun a more demanding 
and responsible role . 

QM098T75 




SHORTHAND 

SECRETARIES 

Urgenily needed for Insure architects in 
Coveni Garden. Interesting positions. 
Aged 20-30. 

Salary c£l 0,000 

Telephone 01 585 0391 

(No agencies) 


FRENCH COSMETIC HOUSE 
PA TO MD *£10,000 

Senior PA/5 ec with 100 + sh^yping required for Tbe MD of 
this go-ahead .Company. Previous Director level experience 
necessary & French usefiiL Company situated in w| and 
gives excellent perils. 

For more details please telephone 01 499 5406. 

SUSAN HAMILTON PERSONNEL SfflVICES 



ST JAMES'S 
FINE ART DEALERS 

Receptionist required to 
greet diems, operate 
simple switchboard, do 
basic book-keeping and 
occasional typing. A 
knowledge of French 
and/or German would 
be most useful. 
Starting salary £7300. 

Reply io BOX F91 


£14,000 


PA to newly appointed CM 
Eaaatow. «y stoettroters. 
Financial/ City experience 
essential together with ex- 
cellent presentation and 
Experience at senior level, 
sums 100/70 Age 25-35 

430 1551/2653 


Dulcie Simpson 

Appointments Ltd 


Secretary 

Salary £9,000 

cpsG is a small research oi^nnisation 

foundedthis year to help develop reseani 

with our lh«e {mjfesaOtialS»ffi^c&« 
them "ill 


Sc secreory will spend less otneOT 

conventioSl 

jobs. We viU ato expect the pason^. 

keeping (both physical filing and osin| 


and making arrangements for staff travel and. 

organising SPSO workshops “dsorunars. 
We are looking fora flexible individual. 


1 

Mi 


secretarial skills. «*0 would enjoy *OTk®8 
with a snail group, and hop«i to devdop ner 

or his career towards administrative or 
executive positions. 

The job is based in tbe pleasant Londrat 
offices of our hos* organisation. The 

Technicai Change Centre. 

For further particular: please contacc 

Peter Healey 

Science Policy Support Group - 
114 Cromwell Road, London SW74ES 
Ifefc 01-373 7171. 



Ptease said your G.V. to: 

MBm DelorM teuton 
Macbven PuMrt un LMtod 
Madam Housa 
Scarbrook Road 
Croydon 
CR9 1QH 


e rmr 

itenmui'vcjirafrt t.rviup l :<! 



Secretary/PA 

c.£1 0,000 per annum 

J E Hanger and Company Limited a light 
engineering company involved in the manu- 
facture of medical products requires a . 
professional Secretary/PA for their Managing 
Director at their head office situated in 
Roehampton, London SW15. 

Naturally a position ifice this requires a special 
person, someone with good shorthand and 
typing sJdUs along with word processing 
experience which have been tested and proven 
at the highesMeveL A smart appearance with 
the abffity to be cfiscreet are also' essential. 

For this exciting and important position a salary 
of c£l 0,000 per annum is offered for a 36% 
hour week along with five weeks holiday per 
year, a contributory pension and fife assurance 
scheme together with other fringe benefits. 

If you are interested in finding out about this 
position please send a fuH cv to Mr S.A East 
Employee Relations & Safety Manager, 

teJHanger 

Roehampton Lane, 

London SW15 5PL 


J E Meager is m equal oppettaoitics employer 


£12,000 pa 

Personal Assstant/Secrtiaty with knowledge of French to 
work for dynamic boss of internteonaf heattnrare conww. 
Initiative, a keen sense of humour. personaSty and fienbitey 
are vital n orter to play a key rale m this rapidly «paixbi 0 ■ 
company. 

Please tehtefuwe Shelagii AreeO, : 


58 Fleet Street, 
Lmdoa EC4T IK 
01-583 1661 



£12,088 Reg. 


Tte Chairman and Manag- 
ing Director of an 
expanding specialised 
consultancy is nesting a 
capable PA who enjoys 
tosmroWty and tiroes 
at a busy worti load. Their 
clients are well estab- 
lished am) International 
and you wHJ be lacing at 
top level. Age 23-35. 
.State 100/60. 

01-499 0032 

Senior 

Secretaries 


£14,000 

They've started and In- 
vestment Fund. The tram 
comprises three pros sou 
situated in a tovety -Bel- 
gravia house. To be pan 
of this team y ou m ost 
have superb secretarial 
skills, a background, in. 
banking, be quick on your 
feet and aHe to cope with 
an extremely hectic- pace 
and still mxmuin antm- 
raffed exterior. 


DIRECTORS' 

SECRETARIES 


01-429 9323 


STRUCTURE 
2000 


ra/aa E3J.000 + 
TOP PA/sec £13,000 
*A6KMEPA £11,000 
PUBUSHWS PA £9.500 
™«S/TV £8.500 
PiVCARffll ' £8,500 
OaUKTOHS 57^00 


01 409 0744 « - 


Band Street 

If you have a Warm 
smile, -love greeting 
aod.wrtcaanng presti- 
g»us dtcraeOe- and 
famous people then 
tins re-vamped s al oon 
needs two of jouJ 

Some accume typing, 
good telephohe ran- 


p recaution 

£7,W»i-++ .■ 
and £5,000+4-4-- 
Age 19-23. 

Bernadette 
of Bond St 

■ R*aur(m«titConxD<t*nti 

«■ SiWtoratacM 




s< 

■II B' 


M 

K- 


i - , .. 
■ - 


, !i:i1 -• ' 






Director I 
inPut 
£9,50£ 


UTVIV - ..... 

« aortic. 

? l(| Mr 0t-,- . , . 

* ... 
Sr ■ ,p,; 

fftenrra-.,,. .. 

2: topvrurrt. • 
c-:,- 

5f*h*i«v-A v... 


‘W* 























THE TIMES WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 8 1986 


y, 






. . 

* • s-» 


» s 


: \\ 

\ \\ 2 




Jim- 






• ■ - Washington . . . Singapore . . . 

nfniS^U- C ?i. nfaerra ” as a Secretary in the 
UpiomatJc Servioe. these are just some of 

Afte? *1?? 5 o h,ch you °ouW be posted, 
voif^w? 2 years in central London 
you could be sent anywhere 

excitina the wor,d - tt ' s an 

cAumng, otten unique role - with 

c e e n,? e PP0 0 ? n i i n t y * wrtSSS atThe 

ariHinn t 'ntsrnationai events 
adding that extra career dimerasoa 

Oneludfng^|®" h a9e ^JSiJ" ,t !' « <«*» 3 'O' levels 

experience you / TSv Un9 JS? 8] and 3 J»"* 
of 100 worn y u J/ •> must have a minimum 

audio plus30 wpm ° r 120 wpm 

^ctenQ 0 Lonri l nn' SL^ 11 enjoy a 9°^ ca reer Package 
£8.891 Dlus n ^? n ^S art,na saJary of £7.672 rising to 

addition of £400. a skill 

uo P to?i e 3in f i^ 71 and Proficiency allowances 
w ,24 ®- London, hostel accommodation 
arranged. Once overseas Caged 21+) 
you can look forward to free fully furnished 
accommodation plus an allowance 
to cover the extra cost of living 





u 


v®/ 


.... _ — INC CAU a MAt Ul IIVIIIU 

for 'anguagefproricienc^ 0 ' and " a " owanoe 

5® opportunities to team foreign 
□rariM^m d *? transfer to the Executive 
above a Sa ^ ary 80316 to £10 - 817 and 

Opportunities also exist for shorthand, audio 
PpPy typists aged 16+. Academic quali- 
Tications and experience not essential. 

further details and application form please 

Secretarial Recruitment Personnel Policy Department. 
«*»on and Commonwealth Office, Room 316. 
centra Buildings. Matthew Parker Street London 
SW1H 9NW. Tel: 01-210 8101/8 122. 

The Foreign and Commonwealth 
rorcignand Office^ an equal opportunities 

Commonwealth 
Office 


Temporary Temporary Temporary 

if you p» «r professional team of Secretaries 
W caa offer hwtwtffate book ings with the 
most prestiges companies. Whether yoa 
have SHORTHAND, AUDIO. COPY TYPING or 
WP skSs, yean find oar placements are dis- 
fiscBy ffifertnfi Ring nr drop into any of pm 
offices TODAY. 

Permanent Permanent Permanent 
ON THE CARDS £11,000 

Young MJ>. has made it to the top quickly, now 
Secretarial sJd&a are needed to keep him there. Hu- 
mour is essential, whan it doesn't affect efficiency 
and high sta nd a rd s . Confidant decision makers apply 
to Ref: (B1) 562/390 

ON THE BOX! £10,000 

Used to working at a Senior Secretarial level? Focus 
hw attention on a pressurised Job in Television 
{where a cafrn personally is necessary to run a de- 
partment smoothly. Ref: <A1) 552/40001 

ON THE JOB! to £10,000 

Its not surprising that Personnel work is so poptiar. 
as Ms position is a challenging .career move requiring 
sound Secretarial experience. Plenty of scope to de- 
velop within a national organisation. Rah (81) 
558/40003 

PHONE OR CALL NOW! 

19/23 Oxford St, W 1 Tel: 437 9030 
131/133 Cannon St, EC4 Tel: 626 8315 
185 Victoria St SW1 Tel: 828 3845 
22 Wormwood St, EC2 Tel: 638 3846 


GbreBent sn extremely suzessfid French 
investment hanks seeking an expenerved PA 
to w?f* fix the mas? seraer men m therLondon 

oftC« *tx> $ heady jrwhrtn marketing 
opeatcns. The position carries both s&us and 
lesponsiify.sDthePAshoukihMah^ tstan dent 

d Fienchm order to p&nse efltaenty fcs hectic 
business ndpmate life. There sapeatdeat of 
tiert Ism and extensne conga Mtm the 
ofgatfsabon. 

The idea! canddate should be pleasant outgoing 

antffieattft \rtto sound skBs{En&sh shorthand) 3nd 
prs^abfy a rea^nsedi^dio^ionin French 
Bantogexpenenceepmferredbutnatessentai 


Agenbaror3S-3D The package includes 
bonuses, insurance and immediale IF57L 

Pfease telephone 01-439 6477 


MacBIainNas 




ADMINISTRATIVE A CLERICAL 
PERSONNEL LIMITED 

3G Mew Broad Street, London EC2PV1 INH 
Tel: OJ-S8S 3576 Tele* : 80737*3 





A responsible position, managing a smafl team. 

HEAD RECEPTIONIST 

London EC2 c£9, 000 -£12,000 

LARGE CITY FIRM OF SOLICITORS 

For trts key appointment, we would like to meet experienced Receptionists aged 
28-35 with the poise, presence and maturity to manage our client's busy Reception 
area. The successful candidate wkl head a team of three Receptionists responsible 
for greeting clients, booking meeting rooms (which are in continual demand) and 
managing the conference room facilities, Including limited catering. Most i m port an t 
is the ability to maintain a friendly, efficient service tor both lawyers and clients in a 
busy, professional environment Thera wHl be scope to use initiative and flatr in this 
expanding practice, which has the latest high-tech office equipment. Initial salary 
negotiable c£9, 000-El 2£00 +■ contributory pension, free He assurance and free 
medical insurance. Applications, in confidence, under reference HR296HT, to the 
Managing Director- 


lTTK i cumcu M3SMB. IMTIB. SS, WE* ttOM STREET, UMMM EC2M ItoB. 
1BEHHE: B1-5N 3SM m BI-MI 397B. TELEX: B7374. FIX: SI-Z5K 9591 


AU SECOURS! 

c£12,000 + bonus 

On behalf of a major US- international investment bank 
with superb offices near Liverpool Street, we seek a 
secretary with fluency in both written and spoken French 
and English. 

Working for a charming Director covering French-speaking 
Europe, your language skills will be crucial in dealing with 
appointments, travel arrangements and general secretarial 
duties. You will also be involved in me preparation of 
material for various lectures and seminars. The ability to 
exercise your own judgement and. to work under pressure 
is a must, as is'Uie capacity to enjoy your work. Good 
shorthand and typing in both languages are required and 
banking experience would be preferred. Please telephone 
5883535. 

We currently have a wide oariety of language vacancies for 
secretaries at all levels. 

Crone Corkill 

RECRUITMENT CONSULTANTS 


PolyGram Video 

FEATURE FILM/MUSIC VIDEO 

WP/SECRETARY 

Polygram Video, a young go-ahead company Is 
looking for a bright and capable secretary (23+) 
to work for the Head of Legal and Business 
Affairs Involving Bcenc&e agreements, produo- 
lions and artists agreements and copyright 
clearances; a fufl secretarial role. 

Fast accurate typing is essentia! as is good 
shorthand (80 wpm} and autfo, experience of 
word processing would be an advantage, pref- 
erably Philips 5020. cross-training given if 
necessary. 

This is an excellent opportunity lor a good en- 
thusiastic secretary who enjoys WP to enter the 
world of entertainment at senior management 
level We offer an attractive salary and benefits 
which include LVs, STL, Xmas bonus, free 
product and 5 weeks hoOday. , 

Please write with current CV ta Salty Ml, 
Polygram Video, 1 Rockley Road. Shepherds 
Bush W14. Tel: 743 9111. 

(NO AGENCIES) 


CAMERON CHOAT & PARTNERS 
PR AND MARKETING 
CONSULTANTS 
SECRETARIES 

We are rapidly expanding and need bright efficient Secretaries 
to join our young company located in modem stylish offices 
near Gloucester Road tube. Must be able to deal with clients at 
aU levels. Fast accurate typing and good organisational skills 
are therefore essential. WP experience an advantage but win 
train. 

Account Directors’/Executives’ Secretaries £8.400 p.a 

Salaries win be paid also with 2 bonuses p.a. + BUPA 

Write with C.V. or telephone Jenny McGrory 
Cameron Choat & Partners 
Bury House, 126/128 Cromwell Road 
London SW7 4ET 
Tel: 01-373 4537 
No Agencies 


PERSONNEL £10-£1 1,000 

involvement and interest offered by a major group in 
s SW1 as secretary to their Personnel Manager, includ- 
ing teaming their personnel computer system. 

‘ Shorthand + WP. 

PRIVATE 

SECRETARY £12,000 

My Lord deals with politicians and Captains o( indus- 
try. You, as tvs assistant will organise functions and 
supervise office and domestic staff. Fast shorthand 
please. SW1. 

PUBLISHING £9,500 

You enjoy woriong unsupervised and to deadlines 
Your positive attitude and highly commercial or finan- 
cial background will suit the Finance Director of this 
major Wi Publishing House. 

NO PORRIDGE! £11,000 

A rare opportunity tor you to 'break into' a bank 
(without banking experience) it you are financially 
minded, as secretary to the Chief Executive of an 
American Bank in the City. Shorthand, 25-35. 

CHAIRMAN £12,000+ 

Top PA with excellent skills. 25-33. for a major City 
Insurance Company. Mortgage subsidy, travel assis- 
tance. Spats Club membership. 

Dry 377 8600 West End 4397001 


Secretaries Plus 

P TheSecretarialConsiiltarits | 


EXECUTIVE PA/SECRETARY 

A Senior Consultant In an international execu- 
tive search firm based in the West End' 
requires a first-class PA, with exceSent secre- 
tarial and communication skills. An 
opportunity for enthusiastic person seeking 
totei Involvement and responsibility in a de- 
manding, sometimes stressful environment 
Candidates with the quafifications and experi- 
ence for this position are likely to be aged 28 
plus. 

. Salary from £11,000 pa. 

F« farther details call Claire Sack 
01 930 9090 

(No Agencies) 


SUPERPERSON PA 
£15,000 

A nature se cr etary (35-45) is needed who can "set up” and run a 
new office in ibe West Ead. Must have a sound c omm er ci al/ 
financial „ wdl as cxccUeat secretarial UniK 

£10,000 + MORTGAGE 
PA IN MARKETING 

Laiie City based American Corporation requires a PA secretary 
(aged 24+) with some markeunj skids and computer bunvietfce. 
A fantastic opportunity to join a really super company. 

Tel OI 486 7897 

CAVENDISH PERSONNEL ' 


Bl— LHGUAL 
SEC/PA £9,300. 

Head id K Department of a Lead- 
mg Cay Co. e seekre Sec/PA woh 
languages Mo wStese M^om- 
seas omiliMu. arrwgo nmoi, 
ah fagtts. notes etc {taping 
persocurty. engw team aert and 
be ate u us* WP and Auto when 
necessity 

anedtea 

01 734 MSB. 
STOCKTON ASSOC 
HC CONS. 


ITALIAN - FINANCE 

Eq>. Mngoal See i armed to work tni several Managers Snonrond m 
after tuijn or English is es'.nrtui tern wmU be {Hefitred hramieoa" >rl 
WP s an assn as s tennis eip m pie financial i«m Aql 25-3W 
Ct 10/300 AAE plus benefits 

DANISH 

Irnemamte Bar* seeks e»p Ser PA tnft ertfin Danish a bwn Gnman 
ana Oanun lowoik (m a Durum n nv Corpuatr f mance aica vtm mh 
using a V/P phis n» and be rvetwtS lo lake an all genrtai set n:ii«t mo 
shomand) There is also me possiUay ni n.tvH aftoadi te ODD * * 

GERMAN - RANKING 

we an only tave several vacames m Imemanonal Bonking im eifter 
pm oi Entjksh m l secs Work eipenente |m*> 1yi| phis q«d skills 
' t h& Banking enpaie assets) essential Salanes raige frat; EB.OUO 


(EnflS'hi 

funo 


GERMAN - SOLICITORS 

K you want to be a Parmei s Ser/PA raftr than a typtsi Uns e me pib hv 
you! As a Getmarun;i, you mil be usng Enj anl Qer stortband as *e0 as 
you general leoal hnowtedne ana be nvohed m promowmal work Age 
35+FliZJOO 

FRENCH 

Sec dr Diechoa Hngue Qin a le franca* comma bngie mafemeBe 30 
ans+. PeBte eon dynamnue. &en mtrnduie mini hnantarf. Rompue 
reUbODs haul nrueau |S ans+) pow cksmele sefeett momiale Sim ir + 
ang ntep e ns a W f. Precise, ftsome el etbcaee c£13D00 
FRENCH in SOUTH KEN 
Nms rechenftnns teone sec. tengue pow travad vane oans k dotname 
fmanoer. Ce pose anphgue: expenence cwnmeroale (mm 1 tel. 
stteo/dadytt an aralas. W.P. el una ataude flexible 22 ans+ E8J00 

BOYCE BILINGUAL 
OI 236 5501 

EMPAGV Vacancies open mSc/tenate 


ADMIN SECRETARY 

This leading Mayfair Property Company with many 
prestigious clients requires a Secretary with flair for 
organising and administration. You will be assisting the 
Partner who makes the decisions and has overall control 
of the administration of the company. This would suit 
those wishing to develop their admin, abilities rather 
than secretarial and to work at a senior level. 

Skills 80/50. £10,000. Age 22+. 


SpeoiaUdtsfarthe 18-25 year olds 


PR FOR COLLEGE LEAVER 

Excellent opening for bright college leaver 10 step into the . 
dynamic world of PR in a leading West End company. In this 
busy department you will be learning about all aspects of PR 
and exhibitions. They require a Secretary who will fit into a 
lively environment and is willing to learn’. 

Ideal for those who are available immediately 01*4999175 
or are working as a temporary at present " i6HAW0versq wi 
Skills 80/50. £7.500. Age 18-^20. 

APPONTMeiTS LTD 



Director level PA role 
in Publishing 
£9,50£-£10,000 

This is a prime opportunity to use your secretarial 
skills (100/60) and WP aptitude to full advantage 
and develop vour career in the fast-moving arena of 
business publishing. , 

Apart from giving firet-class secretarial support, you 
will need to be well-organised m setting up 
— 1 v™w mig will entail 

any. so weli- 

be essential. 

The opportunity to get involved in and be 
responsible tor a variety of projects will also be an 
integral part of your job. 

You should be 'A' level or degree educated and aged 
21-28 Ideally you will have 2 years experience, 
however, your background will be less important 
tiuri perswaiity andf self-motwated approach. 

The Company package will include 5 weeks holidays 

and a season ticket loan scheme. 

Ptease write, with cvto_ 

Linda Graham or Amia BancesctMi 

JffiSSElSSSSfciisb-. 

LONDON, W1A2HG, 

TelOl 4394242 




YfULTILINGLIAI 

-LVJL rrirm jL* 





FRENCH: Bi-fingual secretary with English 
and French qhaTthrwi plug bags of enthusiasm 
and flexibility to work with and deputise for 
Chairman** A ssistant. A very bi-lingnal, exciting 
job for which a certain amount of experience it 
necessary. 'Mayfair. £8-£lQ/)00, plus overtime. 
GERMAN: Near Heathrow you will find a most 
original office blending old and new. A senior 
Manager is looking for an experienced (25+), dip- 
lomatic tri-ingoal secretary who is a good 
organiser. Shorthand is desirable, audio essential. 
c£S,500 and amazing holidays. , 

FRENCH & GERMAN: Fluency in both, 
phis English shorthand and word processing? 
Tri-lingnal PA/aeoetary with orgamring ability to 
work in the test- moving, non-dockwatching Capi- 
tal Markets area of a Merchant Bank in the City. 
Salary could be around £10,500 plus overtime, aae. 

_ 01 8363794 

Tl Charing Cross Road, London WC2H OlS 


BLOOMSBURY HEALTH AUTHORITY 
COMMUNITY SERVICES UNIT 

Personal 

Assistant/Secretary 
to Unit 

General Manager 

Experienced secretary required to provide sup- 
port to our newly appointed UGM. 

Apqficants should be good communicators with 
proven organisational ability and be used to act- 
ing at management level. Excellent audio-typing 
along with the usual secretarial skills are of 
course, essentiaL 

This te a demanding post but we can offer the 
right applicant a challenging key role position. 
Salary £7689 - £9695 (Pay award pending) 
Appfication forms and job description form 
Community Personnel, 64 Upper Montagu 
Street, Wi. Telephone 935 2152. 24 Hour 
service, (quoting ref. CUB74) 

Cfosfng date 24th October 1988 
Working Towards Equal Opportunities 



+ as" 

£ 12,000 

How do >w describe how good 
mo mb iS 7 Do V* sail wta 

ite company e» 
mo rs the very beSKmiw" 
software firm « BnBm? TJJ 
the job involves travel » tte 
USAandirNancPAnywyJJft 

post & only for a defcatait 

mrnwnts and topnwketv^ / 

business wp**™*, 

John on 01 434 0030 


PERSONAL PA 
UP TO £1^000 
+ BENEFITS! 

A true astisrant role wth quirt 
American to successful mi 
company with offices in New 
York md Bermuda. He travels 
quite a W so there are plenty 
of opportunities to -run tfrings 
and Mp tes cGerts. 80/40 
wp.AvBiynlceiobvHthaiwy 
race man. 

CaH Amanda on 01 434 0030. 


EXCLUSIVELY MAYFAIR 

to £12,000 

This prestigious. Internationally famous pri- 
vate dub needs a competent secretary for 
their Chairman. Working with another P.A. 
you need the confidence and presence to 
deal at the highest levels and the maturity 
and experience to handle a pressurised rote. 
Skirts 80/60, ‘A’ level education and outgo- 
ing personality necessary. Smart offices. 
Age 22-25. Please ring - 

437 6032 

Alternatively - if you want to temp white we 
search for the right job for you, ring Fiona 
NOW! 

HOBSTONES 

A JfcnccAurrMENicoNSuuwrs AJ 


£13,000 

PA SECRETARY SW15 

Our clients are an American Computer Company 
presently based in Putney, but will be shortly 
moving to larger offices in Chiswick. Doe to their 
expansion a dynamic PA is sought to work along- 
side lie Director of operations. This is a senior 
post and as such win cany a great deal of re5 P °. p ‘ 
sibilhy with it As well as the usual secretarial 
skills an outgoing personality together with a 
background in sales is desirable. Excellent benefits 
are offered. Please write enclosing a detailed 
curriculum vitae or telephone: 

ABLEMAN APPOINTMENTS 
2 Disraeli Road, 

Putney, 

SW15 2DS 
01-785 6364 

(24 hour answering service) 



SECRETARIAL RECRUITMENT 
CONSULTANTS 


Top Industry PA 
to £12,000 + profit share 

An Executive Director overseeing the 
operational function of in-store credit 
facilities within this major retailing 
group needs an experienced PA with 
previous senior board level experi- 
ence. You will have excellent short- 
hand and typing, be well versed in 
organising business meetings and 
travel arrangements and be able to 
respond to confidential enquiries in 
your boss's absence. You are likely to 
be aged 26-35. 

For further information please contact 
Joanne Gregory. 


01-491 1868 





/MEDIA & ADVERTISING 


TOP CREATIVE JOBS 



PUBLIC RELATIONS £10,000 24+ 

A leading PR Consultancy needs a 
bright secretary with organisational 
skills, commitment and a sense of hu- 
mour to assist one of their Board 
Directors. SkiHs: 100/60 

TELEVISION £9.750 20+ 

The Marketing Department of this 
organisation servicing the independent TV 
sector are looking for an enthusiastic secre- 
tary with skills of at least 90/60. Working with 
a small team you win be educated to ‘A level 
standard and have at least 1 years experience. 

ADVERTISING ASSISTANT £9,000 22+ 

Exciting and fully involving assistant’s role work- 
ing alongside the new business Director in this 
ftop City agency. Lots of hard work and scope. 
SkiHs: 60 wpm typing 

CONSUMER ADVERTISING £9.500 21+ 

An expanding agency based in Knightsbridge 
need a flexible ana efficient secretary to work for 
an account handling team. Some advertising ex- 
perience would be helpful. Skills: 80/60 

491 8775 

RecraitHient Consultants 


RECEPTIONIST/ 
TELEPHONIST 
25 to 40 
£8,250 

Oar diem, leaden in ihdr 
Add. tahse ibe impor- 
tance of ibis Firs personal 
and verbal comae! ibeir 
clients have with their 
firm. They are. therefore, 
seeking someone with a- 
ecllenl prcsenlalkra, ■ 
wcicomifla smile, oreani- 
stuonal ability, and above 
an a telephone and per- 
sonal manner which will 
rcfleci ibe quality of [heir 
service. 


BANKING 
£12- £14,000 

+ 

Overtime 

As secretary to this 
very busy European 
Director you will need 
to ayoy pressure and 
the necessarily long 
hoars involved. 

A high standard of 
typing and W.P skills, 
80 shorthand and an 
‘A* level education, 
though nor Manda- 
tory. would be pre- 
ferred. Ideal age 25 to 


A 


TOP TEMPS 
WITH 

linguistic 

SKILLS 

Po you speak 3 second European 

ShS^d. typing. WP. Audio- 
Take your pick. 

EK ffSESS 

now 


EUROPEAN MANAGEMENT 
CONSULTANTS 
e.£9,000 phis benefits 

A l eadi ng European manag emen t 
consultancy requires a super secre- 
tory for ns Mayteir office 
You should have 1st class WP skills 
as well as shorthand and typing and 
a capacity for wortii* under pra- 
sure. Flexibility and ft* ability to 
communicate well with djg» 
colleagues fluently m Englislt. Ital- 
ian or any second European 
language. 


CITY P JL 
WITH FRENCH 

c.£12,QOO plus beuefits 

Professional mother tongue stan- 
dard secretary with exceUan skills 
(shorthand and typing) for U-S. 
merchant bank. Superb working 
conditions m test buzzing atmo- 
sphere for the right applicant who 
will be 1001b committed to a vital 
supportive role to charming (and 
desperate) boss within corporate 
development 


TRILINGUAL PX 
GERMAN/FRENCH 

package c£13,000 ; 

This prestigious bank in the City is 
looking for a senior trilingual secre- 
tary tor their Capital Markets 
Department Most important o 
your ability to work as part of a 
team. Languages must be fluent as 
lots of outgoing correspondence 
needs to be translated. Skills of 
100/60 and a sense of loyalty will be 
expected. 






Bond Street 

£ 10,000 

Small, upmarket property consultancy 
seeks well-presented Sec' PA for Director 
and Associate. Winking from smart, modem 
surroundings you will organise meetings, 
travel itineraries, correspondence and 
admin while maintaining vital telephone 
liaison with clients. You should have sound 
secretarial experience, a cool head and a 
professional approach. Age 23+. Please 
telephone 01-493 5787. 


GORDONYATES 


Rfcrtmntcti! Cmeullanb 



International Secretaries |^) International Secretaries 


01-4917100 


01-4917100 


J[ 


01-4917100 


PA TO 
YOUNG CO. 
DIRECTOR 

Challenging position in 
busy studio servicing 
leading advertising agen- 
cies. Must be ca pable of 
administration, shorthand 
useful but not sssBmiaL 
Salary 10-12K 

Ring Leander on 
01-831 8118 


WP OP SW1 

friemfly co. require 
WP OP. Co. Will X 
trail with good acarate 
typing skits. Must have 
tega experience. Age up 
to 45 years. 

££10,500 + axe bene- 
fits + pay review in 
January. 

rang Joyce Paney at 

RPL 

588 6722 

(Agy) 


INTERESTING JOBS IN HAPPY OFFICE 

Two secretaries/stiorUiand twists wanted to join small, 
dose knit staff in the London office of the 

GAS CONSUMERS COUNCIL 

Ono will wffc for the Dnwot and par ora tar the Cftumaq of tta Condi 
as wB as asastmg with some anmnw work. 

The after wifi be a tort fnflav Boor ftiUe Altars Off car aid pan time 

secreay to a seflo menrner u I trie operatons stetf 

As oat of a sinal team vou will otten to called upon u use n> ram 

the carols iWUfc mm vmg on won nocKos JS 

es 






V 


36 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 8 1986 


LA CREME DE LA CREME 


SECRETARY/PA TO MARKET 
DEVELOPMENT DIRECTOR 

Tupperware is a successful and intemationafly-^enowned 
direct-selling company of high-quality plastic housewares. 

We are expanding our Market Development activities and are 
looking for a Secretary/PA to our new Market Development 
Director. 

The ideal candidate win have excellent shorthand and typing 
skills together with a confident and articulate telephone 
manner. Education to ‘A' level standard is desirable together 
with previous experience in marketing. 

Preference will be given to candidates who are numerate and 
have had experience of word-processing and possibly other 
micro computer software. 

In addition to an excellent salary we offen- 

★ Annual Bonus * 4 Weeks 3 Holiday * Luncheon Vouchers 

There is scope for advancement in this position. If you are 
ambitious and are looking for total involvement, please write, . 
enclosing your c.v., to Ian Laurie, Sales Administration 
Director, Tupperware U.K. & Ireland, 130 College Road, 
Harrow, Middlesex HA1 1BQ. 


Why 

MacBlain Nash? 

• Immediate work 

• &mpetitb;erales.aMafwMay pay 

scheme throughout the winter 

• The pick of tfiebest assignments inhondon 

• Professional and personal service 
Telephone Liz B arratt today 
for the latest assignments 
on 01-439 0601. 

MacBlain 



3rd Floor; Cacrtegtab Boom. 
oaRtpatSMUnatoWIRdB. 

(Entrance in BaKmta Pi. above Ibarfa Airways-] 



PA Phis £12,000 

This senior position within one of Europe’* leading 
management consultancies offers the combination 
of PA work, diem liaison and administration. You 
win be working for a young dynamic consu ltant 
who in*obes his PA in all aspects of client research 
and consultancy work as well as executive 
recruitment Secretarial skills are important bat 
presentation, a sense of humour and the ability to 
organise in a diptomatk way are also essential 

qualities. 

Age: 25-35 Skills 90/60 + audio 

Chairman’s Secretary £9,500+ 

This is a rare and exciting opportunity for a young 
secretary to catapult herself to the top of the 
secret a ri a l ladder. Working dosdy with a senior PA 
you will report directly to Chairman of this public 
company and have your own areas of responsibility. ■ 
You will need at least a year’s experience and the 
ability to handle administration and establish 
priorities in a prestigious bur demanding position. 
Secretarial skills, telephone manner and 
p rese ntati on must be impeccable. 

Age: 20-25 Skills 100/60 

«HECRUITMEHT 5GARR1CKSrREEr 



€ 0 M P A N 


C0VENT GARDEN 
Y TEL 01-831 1220 


101-5849033 

TtafflEH jjWWWi 

■ saaenm* 

flECnUOTKffT 


TlNAKCE W/E £17,000 paefage 

A dynamic group of young Ankara wowkj 
within International finance market* are tor*— 
far a PA to work for the rwad of one of 
teams. You will be using 
organisational sttab to t he l 
i; fag Ns meetings and seminars 
]\ and abroad and need to be wea spoken and 

1 confldart so as to deal effectively with Wa fap 
Jew! efforts. ExceSent presemation.sofne Wonj 
processing experience and an twy to 
with early starts are essentiaL Speeds 
Age 

ADVERTISING *12,008 

i A we# known advertising agency wfth a 

I huzzy atmosphere and an exciting wen — 

I looking for a top level P A/secretary to assist 

I one of their account handling directors. You . 
I need to be Bvety, hard working and have excel; I 
lent secretarial strife so as to leave as much! 
time as possfale to work on personal projects, | 
deal with clients and attend meetings. Speeds ] 
100>6Q min. Age 21-25. " I 

II pLaseo^kKanMarvierfurMe^rr. 


i x: 




BILLIONAIRE TOUCH 


£13^)08 + 3 MONTHS REVIEW 


this rteresting role 


S8J0O8+++ 


TRAVa BUG PA WITH DANISH AND GERMAN 
(NO SHORTHAND) 

Travel to Denmark aid Genrany if you are reasonably fluent In both I 
will asset an ending team o) m. traders developing a new dept in I 
Merchant Bank based in the City where your prospects ate SUPERB. Reasonable 
typing is necc. WP exp an asset Excellent benefits and bonus guaraneed. 

LIE BACK AND RELAX £11,500 + Bows + perks 

Wotting a ctarman leva! this position is for a anstuaa Sc type PA who enjoys the 
title tut ' without die pressure. Good Sflcndarraf skflts necessary together with a good 
education. Age immaterial. 

CUMB TO THE TOP £10500 + INCREDIBLE BONUS 

This famous Merchant Bank have a rare admiral yiv* position where your career 
dettcafion and ottuiasm wtti cany you tarwaid qtecldy. Congttely nm the show 
for ttas dynamic Executive where your reasonable sec skids a re reffisred. 




01-283 3464 

Secretarial & Commercial Div. 
City Recruitment Consultants, 
58 Houndsditch, London 
EC3A7DL 


Chief Executive^ 
Secretary Arabian Gulf 

AltractiveTax Free Salary + B enefi ts 

This key rote is far a wefl established and successfal company operating m the 
energy sector in a popular part of the Arabian Gulf. 

The need is for a Senior Secretary with high interpersonal skffis and wide 
secr^arial experience, Inckidirig general admin s trati on. to work for th e North 
American Chief Executive. Candidates aged 28-40 should have a proven 
record of secretarial experience at Director lewd. Good organisational strife 
end Initiative are amongst the personal quefiBes sought and previous 
overseas experience would be an advantage. 

Attractive tax free salary for dtecussfon, plus benefits inducing free 
accommodation, transport allowance, medical cover and regular ILK. leave 
with air fares paid 

Please write- in confidence -with fufl career detafls to Rosatind Pascott-Oay, 
quoting ref. A.1 195/5. 

MSL Advertising. 52 Qrcrevanor Gardens, London SW1W CAW. 

Oltlcealn Europe, tho Americas, Australasia and Ado ftuSTte 


iTiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiTi 



ADMINISTRATOR 

£10,000 

Opportunity to get off the 
secretarial treadmills— 

We are a young, dynamic computer training and 
consulting company in Central London and our 
Technical Manager is looking for a persona! 
assistant to act as Technical Administrator. 

In this position, you wBl be resp onsi ble for the 
scheduling, navel and hotel arran g e m en ts for our 
team of technical professionals, as wefl as assisting 
-in the day to day organisation of the department. 

He is seeking someone in their mid to late 
twenties who brings with them enthusiasm, 
flexibility and exceptional organisational sfalk and 
will have ideally been working in a secretarial/ 
admin, role in an automated office environment. 

/’lease telephone John Boom on 01-637 2182 


jj 


EALING COLLEGE OF 
HIGHER EDUCATION 

School of Business 
Administration 

SL/LII In Secretarial 
Studies with Spanish 

good commando! Spanish to teach post A towel and pot*, 
graduate students. 

The post telenabto (ran 1st January 1987 or a* soon 



Salary (inclusive of London 
SL: £13,725 to a possible max of £1 
Lib £9,705 to £14,766 

forms and further details from Tlw Personnel Office, 
— of Higher Education. SL Mary's Road. Ealng, 
F. 

Ckwtaa date: 17th October IMS. 


race, cOpric origin, unit u rina ti o n. dfrataity or 
raopottoMMy tor mpiiHiww. 


Advertising 


MARKETING CHIC 

£ 10,000 

The Bar tor aborting atd assessing mtu n wUuu Is essaotial in thte 
beamahonal Mwteung Dw&oa. As ore ml tin rates toremoa beady and 
jwrfwne houses, you MB lie prwidkn U sacm&riai aid admin support to 
a dynamic Dnctor. ff you as sell assured. Beattie with w oufp*a 
peraonHy phase ring for details. 90/50 + WP. Excetmt fringe benefits 


WEST END SECRETARY 

Requmd tor Memtionte Auction house to wott m busy tee arts 
tnenL Must be evenenced and able to watt under pressure, 
secretarial sfcdis and tefegtane manner essontte. 

Written ^piraBw wflh C.V to 
San Water 
Chririles’s 

1 Kteg Street, S.W.1 

No ‘ ' 


SECRETARY IN 
MAfflCETING DEPT 
£ 8 £ 0 Q + Perks - SW 1 

This nndy established de- 
pvtnwnt in a fively. 
successful write and spirit 
company is loolang lor a 
bright young secretory. 

You wil false until the mar- 
keting and sales teams and 
be inrohtd with your own 
project and resetedi work. 
Tins would sut an inteiFigeat 
candidate (possibly a gradu- 
ate) who is cammenaaHy 
motivated and has W.P. or 
computer experience. Rusty 
shorthand. Typing 50 wpm. 


PA IN 
PROPERTY 
to £11,000 SW1 

This up market Estate 
Agency is looking for an 
excellent PA to help rut 
their house department 
so if you are looking for 
ad m ini s tration, efientoon- 
tact the chance to take 
responsibility and use 
your initiative then this is 
the jab for you. You wH 
also need immaculate 
presentation and top 
class secretarial skills. 
Age preferred 25/35. 






BANKING AGE 23++ 
to £12,000 + mortgage subsidy 

’I’ hr rewards are high and ihe pmspca i in dx Gqr 
cxcelkm wfaeo you join rh« hank as 

nodny to a senior executive. He is rapoasibie for the 
whabiisnation of the bank and needs a bright young seere- 
taty with a flair for admin and a g ing up systems. Free 
fores to work. 100/60 skills and WP ability nrrririi 

THE HEIGHT OF FASHION 
to £12,000 + large bonus 


•OI-3SI3SISI 


^toteiin-32g3SB 


Your ad m i n/orgin banonal drills will be bvaknlrie a yon 
enjoy a foil PA role Promos board level experie n c e and 
100/50 skills essentiaL Please tdepbooe 01 210 3531 

Elizobeth Hunt 

-RecfljimentConsuftcrts- 
B Gotwenof Sreet London W! 


SUPER SECRETARIES 


Taste in Art 

£9,000 

Small ’West End art gallery specialising in 
impressionist prints, bronzes and books 
seeks well-educated Secretary/ Assistant 
\ou will enjoy variety and responsibilit}; 
handling basic design and layout of 
advertising copy in addition to looking 
alter photography and record-keeping. 
Smart presentation and good work record 
essentiaL Skills 90/50. Please telephone 
01-493 5787. 


GORDON-YATES 


Rnruraxw CmkuIuui 


CHIEF EXECUTIVE’S PA 

IPSWICH TO £14,000 

The Chief Executive of one of the major 
companies in the area needs a highly 
motivated and career orientated 
secretary/PA. The successful candidate will 
have worked at a similar level in 
industry/commerce. enjoy taking executive 
decisions and be educated to at least ‘A’ 
level. Relocation expenses win be paid if 
a p pro p riate. Speeds 90/60. Aged 25-43. 

CONOID AID DAVES 
RECRUITMENT U 1 L 
35 Bmtmi Place Wf. 01-483 7789 



COMPUTER CHALLENGE 
£11,000+ Middx 

Do you have enthusiasm, drive and the magical 
ability to do today's work by yesterday!. The 
Managing Director of this growing software sales 
company is looking for a Personal Assistant who 
will take on as much as he can delegate and more. 
He travels a good deal so you will be his contact 
point in the London office, and efficiency, initia- 
tive and commitment are vital in this involving 
job. Senior level experience some shorthand, 60 
typing and familiarity with WP/computers. Age 
*26-40. Driver preferred. 434 4512. 

Crone Corkill 

RECRUITMENT CONSULTANTS 


ms? 



Market Research 

£9,500 

Creative ideas — creative research — creative 
planning — cool judgement. This is an intriguing 
field and an intriguing company. Young and 
well-established, they handle top-name accounts 
throughout UK business. As consultancy sec you 
will liaise, delegate and prioritise, working closely 
with research analysts and executives. Good typing.' 
rusty shorthand requested. Please call 01-409 1232. 
Rerruibiirnt Cunoultanli 


COLLEGE LEAVER OPPORTUNITIES 

Yoa don't josi want any job - you «nl advice on the London 
job natal and career p ro grecM OMOppcttuitaicc. AH oar coa- 
aikanu have a p enon nd w a m g cmeM background and wffl 
actively hdpyon make the right the deorion for YOU. Some 
caneat opasags we- 

ADMIN ASSISTANT/*!* - No shorthand, bat strong 
1 personality and good typing wtjag with an extrovert young 
secretary for a famous product sales team in Victoria. Deal 
with charts. oo-onUnatc ap po iao ncntt, WiHX train to Digital. 
£7.000. 

JUNIOR SECRETARY with shorthand for Marketing Itept 
of travel company in Wl. XhJOO. 

FAST MOVING ENVIRONMENT - wort with the MD*s 
secretary in the dealing area ofa targe City Company. Accurate 
sbonluod typing- £7.000. 

City 377 8600 WfestEnd 439 7001 


Secretaries Plus 

I TheSeci&mialCansutimits'l 


TWO 

SECRETARIES 
Wl c.£8£00 

We need ten smart, wefl 
spoken aN-raundera aged 
21-32. who have good typ- 
ing speeds (45 wpm 
accurate) on a memory type- 
writer. together with 
experience of telephone 
work and general admn. We 
are a small but my bosy 
Ma n a g emen t Consultancy 
stunted doss tho Oxford 
crois and need poaple who 
are tootdng (or gw oppotu- 
ndy to use tter mtiative and 
to become more Involved. 
Telephone Andrew Smith on 
81 629 8677 


FILM CO. 

Unflappable dOSckot 
secretary with good 
shorthand and typing 
required for busy 
international 
Idevision/film 
company. Other ’ 
language desirable. 


Call Katri 
01 629 0500 


SECRETARY FOR 
AMERICAN LAW FIRM 

London Branch Office near St Pauls baa 6 month pod- 
linn (which may become permanent). Audio. Iasi and 
accurate typing and good organisational skills essential: 
Wang word processing helpful Standard hours with 
occasional paid overtime. 4 weeks annual holiday. 
E&500 negotiable, according to experience. 

Please write e nd osh t g CV to Bingham, Dana & GonkL, 
5 Cbeapside, London. EC2V 6AA. 

No agencies please 


5ec/PAtoMD 

£10,500 

The company is Cty-bosed, producing high 
grade printing for a vary prestigious ‘blue chip' 
clientele. As Sec/M to their charming lady MD 
you will work sybsfonfajfy on your own 
initiative, handling liaison from shop-floor to 
VIP client, coordinating office odmrn, 
Appointments etc end developing a rate on fhe 
personnel side. Accurate audio typing reauested- 
Age 22+. Please call 01-493 4466. 

MERRYWEATHEE ADVERTISING £ SELECTION 


£10,000+ 

FOR SEC/ASSISTAMT 

mite adne HttsiMBonalOjvfnra 
Yni will need skate ot 80, '50 + 
WP Good weenmun and aMty 
id mtt under pressure m the hn 
team envooniucnL 

Umtoa TM8 StoH Bureau 

01-836 1994. 


*A TO 
DffiECTOfl 

^ fcj * rrej* Proem 

r . ■■ 

r ,ii EH 

b-ka%- iwwnwc 

v.i -► s*r ■><-» nf'-'-nr m< jCLtmuie 
?u-. -i'll .ffliiicq :o in: 

tforirtsie Bartow Tm*L 
48 U vcH ngnm Gate, 
tiwdan SW1E BBS. 

01-828 4S3B 


PA/SECRETARIES 
£9,000 - £11,000 
TELECOM GOLD LIMITED 

The marks leaders n ileeaonc mad mh presronua offices near 
Londm Bmtae requre a senw towi stqntoad seaoay to wott for 
Bw General ^Isaov and an ewenojeed seacuy to work (or a Here 
of Dmson Ertfifcnf boiefits are oKered. For (unJw detato and an 
applsataon form ptozse eofier comet 

■ Helen Jmes oa 01-403 6777 
or seal her your CV to: 

00-68 SI Thomas SL Lon den SET 30(1 


/PA 

Cl O-EOO + Co. BVfMflS. Wf 
wfd a bnqh) Indh Muai wfWng 
tob imoHnwni A mththw 
P" 6 With WP or sh/tvp 
tUIta. The pont. mvMvrw work 
tnq in a IKety tMcrmUonsi 
m\ ir oomc n l mmJiw a young 
MarXMmg vm> prHMM. Yon 
w*H Hr Uablng w(in Euopm & 
Nt-wyon. A bawd tn our preflt- 
guww W End European HQ 
Lauquavm or ISM. WANG. PC 
lywm LnowMgr useful. 
CasardaM Ol aSS noil 


Tfm ounung wKt> a MMIuMnw 
Dlirrtar in Mayfair rnjutres a 
!torubk>. pxlRnfd PA (no 
vwrUMmii u landlf Hw 6M 
or man* admtmsiTaiK'c raww t 
Airand promortonal curt 
Palm and p rem lunctm. 
«««* Iraming days and ran 
rnrws and kwv afwr U» 
nsmmv noi oompMmt copy 
tepinq. 2 A*. rCTJSOO Ring 
S8AUXM MmdKii Soon 
RNnillmm 


CAR WWW or SponMi cClCLSOO. 
Join inis lop MrnutWnu Ctry 
bank and me yoar nurnl Cnr 
man and good Knowledge at 
SpamVi as mroiary lo two nr. 
nu»n SiohV nmt+ns 
■nriudr [Ypo um lo wort and 
nnnuiOf sidmdr 90/60 lUlk 
and tap antHiY BMW re«S» 
l-laptiom- Ol 2d0 3611/3531 
1WN E 11 QI ot Ol 2*0 SBS1 
icnvi. riimnMn K«mii rmtuh 
mnH ConMUiantt. 

HAMPSTEAD C9/XI0 Wny com- 
muia wtirn >tju cm* work 
loraUi lor nits larW roiwnwT 
<«hmij' Etnm- a busy and 
'unwi dav a i-ou Help M* up 
ftxmwin wonsonMP tor sport 
mg fti-nts and proudr 
walanal support- SO wpm au- 
dio rtftMru ■ orntM. PWasa 
Manhona Ol 2*0 3511/3831 
<UM End) or Ol RdO 3561 
(ClIVL EllfahoUl Huai HSfTBll- 
»«HI Conswuws. 

A SUPER PJL/S«t <W y W- 
iv u i nnm- waciuno wtui 
I He Nrw Produrti Manager of 
Monnnmi S'*! dnnks Co. 
Good ami mw <morttanl IBM 
PC Mud itnr ronlKMU nrr 
umalilv auk- to handh 1 rtMH 
Hanon and tlaod in lor nuDage- 
ment dun no dnmm abroad 
C tl 1.000 * (ring* bamHfns. 
Jos tv Cunm 3BV 8807/0010 
■«« Cons i 

C. £J uoe pm. Junior Mbrfcrtmp 
nimrtnr or dHtoMful SWI 
dtmVv. Co trek a PA/Spr/ 
MWIAud lypra SSf wMh flu 
ml ri«wh OOdd Engtisn 
Qmnhand Mum. *nw audio, 
and tap >uin rra» tfami Per 
'onaliis rnihinum and i ram 
'Wnl uiu hr appn-nWd and re- 
uaiord bpuper iraw DmMb 
■knri- Cuinrwt &89 8877/0010 
‘W w cons i 

C TOLE CS risun PuMtshiiw. 
taim a drfsn or ddmuMM uus 
tanrw rmoHTwt nroup Oiler 
mu all I hr dsnanuo Of HIM 
Itm ctaadluirt hoW Uial pager 

and all llu> -nudrap' aitUM of a 
tiVMitfinr puUiraUan The «. 
lues arr HOI grrai. Ml Un- 
■Nanm-s - air irrr* svnh'oood sve 

Malta tap Imlie Mills on Ol 

o?l oavo Otjkf Person mH 
Vyp ri 


CC UH E LEAVER Keratnguas. 
£7.000 ■* 1 momim mtr a bo- 
nus at CHTlMHnas. Th*s French 
company toutdsiM your knowl 
edge of French piin yew lively 
and toauBKKc nature lo a* 
two very young charming 
Frenctunep in reMWrcts. Sitorl 
hand and accurate typing 
Training on an IKK PC In UUs 
new career post- Age I8+. Her- 
nadetic of Bond Street 01-829 
1200 . 


BAW U II IRMM irMInguad 
PA/tecraary I2S-301 with per- 
fect Oanbji and fluent Centum, 
lo aiaM tjceeuth e OSrector and 
mmt ut busy CUy office Re- 
roonttble and varied work. w*-s 
' rewarded. MuM-Ungual Ser- 
vlcrs rreeruttmew conmtantu 
01-838 37M/G- 


■mr n ttl/MC C9.O0O - re- 
aulfed hy oMesuoiiau-d 
charity nr WnUntanr Abbey. 

Super working environment 

roMbtmng an mtemtmg secro- 

larial rate wHh lots of variety 

and peoptr-coalacL No short 

hand. Some work imnacr 

end good typing reouested. Age 

2tK Pleat* vine* home 0149S 
5787 Oordoo Vakd 
Gontfottmdf 

AUB*0 SRCM TARV/PER- 

SONAL ASSISTANT. Harley 
Street- £0.000-0 1 XIOO. Harley 
Siren CMSUlUM requlTM deco- 
ra led audio secretary /pergonal 
assistant to not and organbe a 
tatty consulting practice In Ms 
Own house Wiut thing- hi staff, 
and to manage Ms personal af 
tans tn London and country 
Phone 383 9295. 

C Clipoa * bonus Young mid 
SOS ronsullaiH of SWi Mai* 
agenwiti cnnsidianis needs a 
PA SM-2SU*I WHh good typing 
and audio who ts also numeral* 
and can tubl with for 


Of accounts- AM WP exp use 
fill twin crtm-traini Super Co 
fringe neneftts Joyce Ctdness 
Ol 589 8807/0010 iflec 

Cons-i 

muci UCAVCR PUBLISH- 
BUG C7000 Start your c ar eer 
In puMHtiuKi assisting Ute Pula- 
bitty Manager of this Mi 
known rompany involved m 
all aspects of the pubitrlty funr- 
INW LOU ivtll arrange author 
lours and so ranch more Typ- 
ing at GO wpm t«* audio 
read Synergy, the rec 


rarntdtanry- Ol 637 9433 
MESMM CoMuHanry W14 or 
gently rptnure a lively 
Intel 1 Men I and hardvrarking 
person lo knit Die team as 
weirtary/receouootsi. Accu- 
rate lining essential too vfpni) 
clean drtvtng Brenre preferred. 
Salon tram C7.SOO pa plus 
profl ^ sharing Conurt 
Debber/Mctaok’ on Ol 381 
02 H 

ECAL ABMM PA (no short 
hand! to Cl 0.500 w A youtq 
PA ts sort toiBlM hi setung up 
a ties* London office You will 
ram ou a fmetoptno- admin 
andsrr runrtlon wtiirti will give 
smi kHs g| imolvrmetil and rxr 
nv Tvd lug at 60 wpm. audio 
aoutti and some legal exp req’d 
Svnergv the remdlment coo- 
sulUnrv Ol 637 9BiS 
OtlXCI LCAVCR-CHARmr 
C7?78 Thts rnendly charm ts 
seeking a j-oung Sec lo carry 
rail o sorted people QrtenUlnl 
funrtton earning out a role 
which whi iitrhide conference 
or*, von wtu bequntnQKMr em 
Skills 90/40 mnn. Synergy the 
rec raitmenl consullancy Ol 
t»S7 9S5S 

FAST accurate audio typist/word 
processor 1 ivoretsliii mmfred 
tn xmail incnoly nrm of Man- 
:unq Agents in) Sarsryars- 
salan neg SendCS lo D Pitch 
ft Workman Cnaimaon 6 
Partners. Marhei Arrh House. 
0068 Seimour Steel. London 
W 1H Mr Tel 7» 0146 

6 CIHHAN 5PK SECRETARY to 
assist Broker of Ini OU Or* 
Good spoken German Erajttsh 
Vh and some Ciis exp regie red 
1 ™ Hie- mm post in a heenr 
siiimiUtiiHi emnronmrni 
1.10000 • perks Metros, tmj> 
tos 1 Ihr Lmemage Spenabslsi 

Ol nSo 1487 


ROMAN - SALES. Sales co-onh- 
nalor with German to work as 
part of a learn in irsrly Wl sales 
office Process orders, ttatse 
wiui rflenfs and use im native to 
lie lulL BO wpm typing ns. 
Sales mwd exp prel Mrrrow 
Emp Agy (The Language Son- 
naostsi 01-636 1487 


PART-HHE. A very taw Chair- 
man regimes a p a with Public 
•cttool background and expert 
encr at Director level lo worts 
for mm Bom hfs mews House to 
Wl. a morntaBB per week. Vou 
wtu need lo be weo educated, 
reasonabty nuraeraie. wttn 
SUU* 80/60 Age 28/00. Senior 
Secretaries. 01-499 0092. 


ormx AOMN SJIjOOO. Dnn- 
op your admin ski Os over -a 
broad from wftnm lids unusual 
poHfMn. tafltli your own 
mpastuutm. you wtfl be on 
Ihe way lo an exec career. 
SMBs 90/66 worn Synergy, me 
recrt atnMT H consunaocy. Ol 
637 9633. 

MJUWETART wanted 4 days a 
w eek to run office of AMMuarl- 
an Booksetlerr' Aoaodatlaa. 
Word processing snub and book 
trade e x per i e n ce preferred. 
Wrue lor lob wrHVaUn to: 
PrcsmcML ASA. Suite 2. 26 
Charing Cross Road. London 
WC2H OOC 
SHSerwi fntemtmg and var- 
led post, tn addition lo your sec 
dimes you win be malm dtning 
durles. client iwsm etr Must 
be afbtr 10 work on own intoa- 
Ute TMs could be your first 
step 10 Ihe PA world C-C6.600. 
+ man- rxr bens. Ring Joyce at 
RPL S88 ST22 iAgy) 
fELL SPOKCN Recepuonht 
/tvpnl uudto pre f erred I 
6 30 Small wan known 
company. lefeviston film pro- 
duren and dtsIrUMMars. Salary 
ca.000 write with CV re Mrs 
Joan Clitlds. FUmf-dr Lid. Ja- 
cobs wen Mews. George Street. 
Wl 

COLLEGE Leaver secretary tor 
(rtntdly Internatio n al Recruit 
mem Coremluncy Ability to 
naive wWi rtiemv and candi- 
dates essential + WlWIve S 
SHTurato shonltano/ typing. 
C7.000- casco A CP REC 

CONS 01 -638 8987/0680 
ITALIAN EngHth secretary tor 
prestigious American Bank- 
worklno fee 2 lUHanS. 
snortfund/iypmg tn Lngflvh 
with fluent and wrtuen lutun 
C. LI. 500 Tel CMrv Allaway 
430 1551/2663 Dulrte Stanp- 

son APnts 

SECRETARY/PA wmtpg 10 ac 

ergt mponsIbUhy for 
tnlerrstlng post. WZ Artists 
lUanagrrareM Oonwuny Good 
Mlars for ewnetired person 
wttn fast shorthand typing. 
Telephone 009-4817 
WE vnu. MARRY- your nog 
I tonal all round sum and 
hnntfKUtate presenlalton with a 
top Wh in Stat/& or Wl/8 
wm not contact us. now for a 
rtial Ring Belgravia. Mrs 
Piows H4 2S44 
COPY rtpM tea ThB Bank ts 
seeking a oood Irpel tor one at 
thrti drptv Suri person aged hr- 
tween 17 05 years S)U» 
C7.000 + bewfMs Ring Maria 
At RP1 OH 688 6722 ipgy) 
PAfrtSR PA /SEC no a/h tor Ex 
erutive Direct or Varied dimes 
mf lutfing rtMH Uatson + travel 
CH.OOO + ewrl perks Mcrrow 
Imp Am (The Language sue 
nalhM 01 636- 1487 
CKRMAH RI4JHCUAL Cwcuthe 
set with oil *+8h S/H in both 
bums three lor level exp 
51 3.040 * perks UHk Lcn 
quagp Appanlnmik for aa 
Lunguaue Jobs 8469743 
SECRETARY WITH SH far per 
son net adnunKiroiion Ip 
< omulUng engmeer v wi Good 
rtf in vlf starter C9.000 + 
reom vnate taooemouve Rer 

C5WIS Ol 40a 4O0a 

AUDIO PA. tlt.000 la run 
small I nmfon ofhrn of 4+P91 
to sVl 10. lot ' 2 (Ur prion 
Uoralfiotpe Bw Caps Ol 404 
464a 

RIGItlHML Design get for Mar 
hrtinu Co Iso SH Run offKP & 
high aimm nutleBl C7.eOO+ 
levies. CaD Natalia TED Aus 
Ol 736 98S7 , 


PERSONNEL 

SECRETARY 

MMIMIcalan 4 
• Beatal Sdnais . - 

Experienced Socretery required 
for He Staflbig Officar it hny 
Staffing Office at SL Ttanass 
Campus. Accurate typing, 
mairty audio is MMOteri, rotii a 
(ttHsart tefeptaw manner and 
abttty to commuocate uftii 
staff a t afl fevete. Wonfpo- 
cessng an atvaraage (Traning 
grnn). 

Salary E8^1 -£8511 per 
mwn mdnstoe lor 36 hour 
■uk pks orofiriency aflov- 
unces tor recognised 
c art Mta tes. 


OMZism 
3ZH 


^ef ie , nriemc a 
ST1/P/121. 


. E9JOOO for «v 
accretary with s 
shorthand. rrraMpg of Wang 
WP i for this young go-ahead 
cranmunlcaOtifK company 
Fneociy and soctaMe crowd of 
rmptoyees. Career proapec w for 
secretary wtlh toKtaUve and 
good organisational stalls. Age 
01+ Bernadette of Bond Strew 
Ol 609 1204 


PCRMNHEL ASST (no snort- 
handl Ctaooo + exc benefits. 
Bidtd a career In personnel with 
lids traiuraiial recap company 
Involved In responsible person 
nrt activities, you win cany ora 
a role which win gnr you me 
rtep lo go on lo great ihWps. 
Typing al 66 wpm A audio atU- 
Ify reel'll. Syneruy. the 
ictruuimu cunudiancy. Ol 
637 9033. 


COSMETICS Wefl known 
beauty house specialising to 
products for young people, re- 
dm rec on-ute-bau young 
Secretary loamst their Market 
mg Manager rmmirehir fat 
Iravwictey. As wa as provtd. 
Ing toll secretarial support, yon 
wm be mpoimbtetor ordering 
kMnples and dealing with ton- 
ing suppliers. ExreltesU first Mj 
and good salary for coUege leav- 
er Age 18-20. DenefUs include 
40*. dtaco un t on ci m m a n y 
produrta. SMA» 8CVSO Finesse 
Appoint meats Ltd 01-499 
91 7S. fWe c Cons.) 

AMeOtlY Dmetopmcof t* i 
boom induMry m Ontnd LOn 
don and you can VMn U nl J 
hen lor level An moahr who 
is overseeing one of the most 
•mportam and prevUgMus 
BroWcVv on One m eT needsak/h 

Serrwary who can handle a tot 
of admin and client ranucl 
This ta a excelleni coporTunity 
to be involved af first hand In 
the changing face of London 
ProoaMy aged in yotr early 
Iweniirs ihe em isaged salary is 
rC930O Pirate contact Cuban 
El wood 491 1866 La Creme Be 
c niBiw nt consul Unts. 

A VERY RARE opportunity to 
kdii a Sales Promotion Gocnpa 
m- as your second move You 
will need some shorthand and 
good lyptng ana above all a 

very willing and enthusiastic 

approach to a I ram envlron- 
ntem The company has 
npoyed mrmHUe raowtfi and 
if ypu tain them now you will 
be steoptng ohm a career ladder 
where the potential is HmitiMS. 

19-22 me satorv 
tarCO.000. Please contarl^oan 
narom 01 491 1868 La Creme 
Rwutunem Consultants 

PSIVAIB Koallh Care is one of 
1 no tabiesi expanding industries 
tn Ibe LK The Director rrspon- 
s4ble_ lor new hospnal 
devetoafnrol of Ihis leading m- 
leciuiiMMl grouD iw* a good 
orgaimer wim workable <80 
tapmi s/n and arcurale typing. 
He looks lo hh PA lo contribute 
ramirunivr Wees and WHI cer 
tainly paw. on as much 
responsifaiHly to he ran Aged 
Mrailv mid affs ihe salary K 
Cl 0.000 PMase rontacl GUUon 
Eiwood 491 1868 La Creme ne 
rtum u eitl C onsol la nb 

oner fXEeunvev pa UKJ 

sliorthanai (-C11000 * one 

benefits TheCmef Exertdhedf 
inn well known company 6 
seeking a PA lo became m 
solved tn a varied and 
rmpowile (unrtion Performing 
anaoimnraipwiin unJeemahA- 
sc. on wemarw dunes, mere 
wiU be ransiderable snspe fpr 
•nywifi T thing at 50 wpm plus 
lota « nultaltvr reg'd S v nergy 

ine rrmiilmcm ronsuiiann- Ol 
637 9533 

rO X.LE O Eleavei your social life 
and cams- start herei PpMUai 
oflires. Ihe best ol equmnenL 
hraudes of bright voting people. 
Mhukxn sports A leisure (acitl 
l*e> null tout sparkling 
petsdiiaiiit Good *0‘ levels and 
HOtvpm snorihand The. b an 
eoonnoH-v raid prestigmin com 
pans who will one -a true 
lateet and tiaimna Ceil lodas 
J-eku- Vrtta on 01621 0496 
tRake nnsonnei Aoenn 


CITY OF L OW * 

Administrative 

Assistant 

rotgttod in tiw Laid Mmofs 
Dtary Officii. Dubes Indude 
aU correspondence retotfng 
to Lon! Mayor's onmgita 
merits and boaidnm a me 
ouse. wig 


Mansion House. 


sue- 


19-23. should tiswe tho 
. to dOal wriiti paqpto at 
aB levels and a flame ap- 
proach to work- A non- 
smoker would Da preferred 

Salary £8980 pj. htducfing 
London WgtoMjna aiow- 
anoe. LT ana BR Season 
TWcat Loan avaBaUe. 

Phnsa apply in wiring wflh 
U Cunndum VStaB by 20 
Octobir to tho AwWant Pri- 
vate Secretary lo Tha RL 
Hoa The Lore Mayor. The . 
Mansion House. London 
EC4N 8BH. 


C9400 + Bonus PtoWKxb 
U nwuonai firm of rotulu 
search ronsmuim needs an n 
penenred person for Ihw 
vwiichboani. Dude* Include 
grecflng iHion and orderi n g 
■axis and courtcra. Age 28-40. 
Smart appearance, nprrb ot- 
ficcs. Please call 434 4S12 
Crone OarkUi tweruument 
Consultant. 


OFFICE 

ASSISTANT 

City Dealing Company rs- 
qrares a genera! assistant n 
it's commurwahons depart- 
ment voting to Itase vrith 
staff at aB teveis. Wocdd sut 
20 to 30 year oW vrith general 
teteptione/rifice skills and k- 
curate record keeping abMy. 
Saiay c£7.QD0 + benente 
and good prospects. CVs to 
Margaret TharaUm, 
Sam New Coart PLC, 
Cbetwynd h mate, 

24 St Swfhem Late, 
ECffl 0AE 


Eaggg 

soughl by trading nuMnoM re- 
search company You should be 
Might, self -motivated And Mon- 
ty accurate, wttn good lytxng. 
Wen End based For uecalis 
phase rail Ol -493 6787 Gordon 
' airs COrautlanry 
COHVEYAMCWC SEC soughl bs 
wortd name m buUdtng eon- 
aroction Aotoraing mb 
handling high grade chew con- 
tort YauMtouMbrefActcMami 
responsible in approach, wtlh 
ewrtenrt* m legal conrayanc 
Mg WP knowledge desirable 
Salary CiaoOOpbra large com 
Party nenmis. mrasr call OL- 
49i J466 Menyweaifw Advtg 
A Srfeetion 

RET imo Design C8300 . 

A-oung adverUslng/deiigA w 

seek 2nd tobber secretary You 

unit emoy ad-rouna tmotve- 
mem in a smart, trendy, 
expanding environment. Beau- 
uiui PKrtKUUy offices. Benefits 

tor unvote health srneme. No 

shorthand. Accurate typing 
Pleaie letephone Ol 495 ST87 
Gorgon S ates consultancy 
WWr nol try Polyglot! who may 
hnl have aba -Ungual pon to sun 
shut e-kperienre and language 
Po ‘ vo, °* ^ 


— See ciOjOOO 

sought by maior miernabonai 
rompany Bated m meir Ham- 
merunim HQ you wtH handle 
presemauon work, layouts etc. 
international liaison and co-or 
dinauon You should be brtghL 
oubMi\ wtm lots of fiuihuKe. 
SMW 'S' 60 22-28. Please 

‘il 0 . 1 Mrrryw rather 

Adtlg & Srtertion 
RO SHOfrnwKD ctaooo audio 

jre soughl by wettanUMMvM 

End property company. 
Wort. mg for two dcUghttut 
managers vou wm ngoy a 
1 rrtewd emironmcru 

and a wide range of beneftu. 
r*st. amirate audio typing n 

S?". I SL Al ¥ 2& * 13 P*daw taf 

01 409 ISM The Work Shop. 
**-CEPTKJNlH 07.000 soughl 
rn T\ A Oiedlre designers Her- 
jdd swtirhooard Some lyptng 
140 uppi nsrnual Aor 20+ 
Mease IN Ol -409 1232 The 
jjo™ !jnop 

V ST. I rll l,s '' ,f cs - 80 ° 

wen End merrrvam bank seek 
wr 10 lUrefior and 
ridm You should iw cheertul. 
rapabh- and rrttabie. Ideally 
4ddre«. No 
VwrUuiid Good typing. Age 

=SS-> p * ria ^. l rtrtHione Ol 4VO 

j>rar7 Cordon Yates 
Consultancy 

CONi UINif. Oroaiwers' Secre- 
tort <Urata usefuli Successful 
nwrtm tevearrn rompany tn 
rlLi* 1 ’ 0 conierences m 
rurope need an outgoing confl- 
dem secrriarv lo mwi and 
dfoaiuv thrtr lively young re- 
srarrh team Lots of phone 

work UinrlMVgUHWC <ihv- 
P* 1 “fe- 50* Up * WPi. 
4 ieveta. 3! m sw ew. Abe 

fPS 100 p,ra “" fa" 

*37 ton HoMonn rec cons. 

to. PA lO MD. 
^0 4 carver In tad 

cn aliniHfe uonm em 
^ Ul »4 TtD Abv 01736 9KV7 
KktWB q fo r aic bums & 
pragnors Perfiunem A irmpg- 
N*i\ positions A sisa Spenattsi 
Rei Cons 01 VJ4 Q5S2 
DAMtSH. EHCUSH PA. City, 

toT ®" f 

* ”• ra ** v '4* Ihcta Staff 

Resrra 

.S’SSSi L - U * 9 uape Staff 

th 48589S2 


IK COMPAIY VI 

laooiies coraoetB«. reiitte raqj; 
tafy wW eoxBert typing aod SH 
sfiwits to be fsspofisSfiO to 2 Ek- 
tKUHS aid pfovw back-w for or 
Km sales lean. Excgrim ottn- 
ftw to ton about tte mne M. 
Salary accmdra to expeMnea. 
Ptrase jhmer. 

^Vl Claire Gonfam-Bram 

01-637 0387 


TEMPTING TIMES 


NON-SECRETAMAt 


HUT JUST reccptton duBO Ml 
real career prospects are of 
fervd by nus j-ouna 
dynamic computer company 
near PwadiUy Training Bh™ 
on a personal coropotrr so «»» 
arrurale lyptnp usful + IBeaOd- 
l[y to help with Inwr 
iratnlm. null snotsoud pbcorv 
Aor 22+ caoooe flenadrtle 
of Bond Street 01429 120* 


UBtUUOJUH uiuwit hy IWdlnb 
maqa/ine pumnner No for™* 
guauilealkHr. required 1 I* 
lhod«.u aporearn plus 
essenltat row hours per 
me Bars per week Salary W 
G5.7SO Please IrWPflWe 01 
493 5787 cordon Votes 

COnsuiianrs 

EXCLUSIVE designer knKwear 
ronipam in SV*3 regURM f” 
inususik and rettable prew 
Who efitov* worlJlW irtOl re® 
Ok- lo help nm ortr VW. !» 4 
days per sm. Hour* 10*5 
6 pm. auernaie SaUirdars Trt 
OV 9S7 60SS 

t ruraills mtuwrd Ptvn Brnc 
tSerrewn/PA oin 30 lor SI 
James VI Dealer Mud ®T 
oruumsen with good siionnand 
f -*rh start Rrniv wHh Ck 
leferenresto BeptV 10 BOX FB 






M*i and Hv irtJf ks E.yod 6m 
*Wer yourwiran etlie (rmplbcn 
why not nn our etlie team- For 
voor top skHta we v+UTpay you 
lop rates, itot/8 M nrm 
iraln 1 ou on WP Find cm* iewr 
by nmanu Frances Carry on 
Ol Z29 9244 Drake Office 
Overtoad Agy . 


f»T 


■{* 


V.- 


-s, 

a-!". 




UflMHWrT 

You have al KM 2 years Prr 
sormrt Management vwrtRnre 
wuh ihe emptiara on recruii 
mmi coupled with a pootOve. . ■ 
nol irrepressible, peraanauw 

A* a Rrsnaunem Cow** 1 
Martng peravaneM 
lour naro work and espertae 
wm rain vou Mb saacfactMn 
and earnings of «« « 
Cl Ei 000 can Lvn Cecil of Sec 
relanrs Plus on 439-7001 

WP EXKRTT You nave nr onabtn 
Mivkdied sysietns and canted 
out irainino. and in addttmi 
have some marketing or re 
rruMing sum? .Bcrome * 
Rrmuimml Corauttanl 
our expanding WP operabW- 
w-ordPius. k vou have a. paw 
the pervmattu and wnh boo 
f mallei gl and fob rotoWbrai 
Saiarv package CI60O0+ C« 
Lvn Cecil on aJdJSaa 

ADmb hs t w tor inperttuf cd to 
sawihe Sales Cffkre 
edge of computer Industry ano 
wp skins Good romminiKhn 
Minimum -A - tavef standard 
Agr 26* TO CIO.OOO ««> “ 
miervi bench is LfjKta 
Anderson APmNMITieiitt 9W 
2222 

EDUCATED English «♦ 
rna a lb p mm 1 veaf . w 
trenen arbiorrrata larnibf JJ 
Pdrtv Wortd pg knowie«C« 
french noctilul Handwr«"» 
anSiiaUans «■ phtao. » 
CONSLLTLfL 17 London wl 
T onbridge. Kent TNIO 3AB 

■OOKKEEHR futb- eKBertrWrt) 
to inal balance \ AT reitorej 
rash book, salaries elc 
roinlder experienced p*rl W* 
n Write with full C v ia BOX 
GOO 


PART TIME VACANCIES 




■ s . 





] 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 8 1986 


LAW/SPORT 



Anonymity of 
justices is 
declared unlawful 


Rugby Union at the crossroads: part 2 of The Times analysis of the amateurism debate 


Why talent should have its reward 


S David Hands 
_ y Correspondent 




: ggJJJ rWhrtDWB Jnstices,' 
txjwwe Leigh andAiSh^ 
Pf^re Lord Justice WatVim 
{*r .Justice- Russell and ^ 
Jusuce Mann and Mr 

judgment given October 77 

- visio^r P~- 

\ 

and any memSFZl 

, JSSMSS w 6-.? 

V Ju&nsnL kn0W wh0 - h 

- A&ss jsa** 

SSi? iSL? !is W^SnuMr 

- Ch u reporter of 
IJ£J 3 r e T r ' which ^ also 
anStri\ d lhe a PP'ication. The 
f£Pvf l on was supported bv 

%! - d ° f BrfliSh Ne ^ 
paper Editors and the 

Association of British Ediiore. 

i ne applicant sought judicial 
review m the form X mSS 

Fwfv «Iv rccil ? s the clerk 10 e>e 

f j?i lxs,0we Justices to disclose 
ihl "fil" 65 - chairman and 

2l!fV u T who tried 

* '■ , San gs ,er in April 
a declaration that the 
7. f '!* Justices, who also 
at at Imwich and Woodbridge, 
jPwuhhold the names of jus- 
1 Uc ? “u nn B the hearing of cases, 
and afterwards, from the public 
and the press was unlawful. 

Mr Geoffrey Robertson and 
Miss Heather Williams for the 
applicant; Mr Andrew Mansden 
tor the justices. 

LORD JUSTICE WATKINS 
Mid that there was no doubt in 
nis mind that the policy of the 
relixstowe Justices was of acute 
concern to the press, the more so 
because n was being adopted in 
an increasing number of other 
magistrates’ courts and it in- 
troduced into the realm of 
public justice a previously un- 
heard-of anonymity of a num- 
ber of those who had taken an 
oath to discharge iL This was a 
unique anonymity in discharge 
of the judicial function. 

The applicant contended that 

1 the general rule that justice 
must be administered in public 
in order to allow scrutiny of the 
behaviour of those who sat in 
judgment demanded that their 
identity be known by notice 
outside the courtroom or made 
available on proper inquiry; 

2 that the right of the press to 
publish fair and accurate reports 
of proceedings could not prop- 
erly be exercised unless it in- 
cluded a right to know the 
justices' names and their clerk 
had a duty to supply that 
information to bona fide mem- 
bers of the press; 

3 that the justices had a statu- 
tory duty to sit in public at a ' 
known time and place; 

4 that the subordinate policy of 
the clerks to the Fielixstowe 
Justices to refuse to disclose the 
identity of the justices was in 
this case unlawful in that no . 
reasonable clerk to justices 
could have made it. and upon an 
occasion in question there were 
no exceptional circumstances 
which could be said to justify - 
refusal: 

5 thai the refusal to disclose, and - 
the general policy it arose from, 
failed to lake account of the 
open justice principle and pub- 
lic interest in court proceedings 
and took account of such irrele- 


jusiice had been oomroemed 
upon on many occasions. No 
one could doubt that bis pres- 
ence in court for the purpose of 
reporting proceeding coo- 
ducted therein was indispens- 
able. Without him, bow was the 
public to be informed of bow 
justice was being administered 
in our courts? 

It was to be noted from 
observations made by Lord 
Diplock in Attorney General v 
Livelier Magazine Ltd (ax p449) 
uiai not only must nothing be 
done to discourage the fair and 
accurate reporting of proceed- 
ings in court, but that no 
exercise of fee inherent power of 
the court to control the conduct 
of proceedings must depart from 
the general rule of open justice 
to any greater extent than the 
coun reasonably believed h- 
necessary in order to serve the 
ends ofjusuoe. 

His Lordship could not see 


R enaissance or reforma- 
tion? Which way will 
ragby jo over toe next 
decade? Do we want the 
game to blossom, to be 
- played at its highest pitch on 
■ international occasions, an example 
: to all aspirants at whatever level? Or 
[ should we first ensure that all the 
evils perceived as having crept into 
i the game are eradicated? Should the 
I Augean stables be swept dean? 

■ Whatever course one favours, 

> there is a prerequisite. The Inter- 
national Rugby Football Board, 
meeting this week in London to 
discuss amateurism, are not Hercu- 
■ les. so whatever action they decide 
upon is irrelevant — unless they 
have the power to cany it through. 
Even before the board members 
discuss the topic upon winch they 
are all convened, they must im- 
plement a disciplinary code, com- 
mon to all and the means to enforce 
iL 

If we are going to have inter- 
. national competition — and dearly 
we are — then there should be 
guidelines for every compering na- 
tion to follow, insofar as its individ- 
ual means allow. At the moment, 
the existing guidelines are being 
contorted in every conceivable way 
to allow for greater preparation; if 
.you are a strong enough rugby- 
playing nation, invariably you get 
away with most infractions; if you 
are one of the weaker countries, you 
cannot, m all probability, afford 
special provisions anyway. 

We have come a long way since 
the regulations on amateurism were 
first framed. Upon leaving 
Murrayfield last season, in the wake 
of England's record defeat against 
Scotland, a leading member of the 
Rugby Football Union said to me 
“Remember, it’s only a game’* 
Morally, of course, he was right; no 
pastime in which men pursue a 
funny-shaped ball about a field is 
worth a light compared with some 
of the major issues with which we 
should be concerned. 

Even allowing for the ennobling 
aspect which sport retains, permit- 
ting those of ns who ambled through 
the coarsest of rugby, or tennis, or 
cricket, to identify with the bat 
expression of our chosen sport; even 
allowing for the unifying effect 
which sport may have in a world 
which politicians sometimes seem' 
intent upon dividing; even allowing 
for sport as an ait which, at its 
highest point, it may reach, its 
importance should not be super- 
devated. 

B ut in practical terms, sport - 
is a business. It was 
refereed to thus by the 
senior vice-president of 
the RFU earlier this sea- 
son and I wonder ifhemay not have 
bad his knuckles rapped for saying 
sa,T>ut it is true. How else can yon 
describe something which attracts 
so- much money, both through 
paying customers and sponsorship? 

This is not the world which 
Victorian administrators envisaged. 

A world in which the heroes of sport 
are paid disproportionate sums lor 
their skills, sums to which rugby 
players do not necessarily aspire but 
which make them aware of their ] 
worth as entertainers. Many leading 1 
players over the past decade have ' 
nurtured this seed of player as 1 
entertainer and h will not go away 
just because individuals .who ] 
administrate the modern game wish • 
it so. • 

So what does refbnnation in- 1 
volve? It depends largely on one’s { 
point of view. If reform means to 1 
make better, that could be inter- ' 
preted : as the restoration of tra- 
ditional values, of the pure concept 1 
of amateurism wi th in the game, 1 
placed on so high a pinnacle and so 1 


how ft could properly be said 
that the ends of justice could in 
any respect be served by justices 
withholding their names from 
the general public oral the very 
least, from those who essentially 
were concerned with the 
proceedings, namely the parries 
to them, their legal repre- 
sentatives and the mess present 
hi court 10 report those proceed- 
ings. 

There was nowhere to Jbe 
found any statutory provision 
or rule which entitled justices to 
anonymity in . any circu mstance. 
The namiiK of a justice was 
scarcely referred to in legisla- 
tion. 

His Lordship had found two 
instances ofit. By section 8(4) of 
the Magistrates' Courts Act 
1980 a report of committal 
proceedings might be published 
which contained the identity of 
the cotm and the names of the 
examining justices. Rule 36 of 
the Magistrates' Courts Rules 1 
(SI 1981 No 552a I)) provided 
that any record kept in pursu- 
ance of the rule in domestic 
proceedings should indicate the 
names of the justices constitut- 
ing the court by which a decision 
was made. 

White some forms of protec- 
tion against intrusion into pri- 
vacy were available and (men 
used where necessary, there 
could not in ■ principle be any 
justification far a policy the 
purpose of which was to keep 
secret the names of justices. 

Collective responsibility was 
not a good and suffidem reason 
10 defat the principle which his 
Lordship believed to prevail, 
that where open justice pre- 
vailed. so should those who did 
justice be known. 

His Lordship would regard, 
and believed the general public 
would regard a policy such as 
that... maintained by the 
rtiixstowe Justices and their 
derk 10 be inimical to the proper 
administration of justice, and an 
unwarranted . and unlawful 
obstruction to the right to know 
who sat in judgment 
In dealing with the applicant's 
locus standi in his application 
for mandamja, the appropriate 
approach in this case was for the 
court, in using its undoubted 
discretion, to decide the ques- 
tion of sufficient interest on 
each application primarily 
within its factual context 
The applicant had not beat 
present in court during the 
SangsteriraL His initial inquiry 
about the case 10 thecteric to the 


van* maittrrs as the possibility of justices was made by telephone 
personal embarrassment to the 10 his deputy some three- weeks 


chairman, the standards of court 
reporting, the possibility of un~ 
welcome approaches to justices 
and the desire to emphasize that 
decision-making was collective; 

- ■ 6 that it could not be a mailer 
for the discretion of the justices 
10 decide whether or not to 
disclose their identities. In so far 
as the clerk might have a 
discretion to decide on the bona 
fides of an inquirer lhat decision 
was rc viewable on general prin- 
ciples by this court 

The basic proposition argued 
for by counsel for the justices 
• was that undeT the common law. 

justices had power to control 
■ proceedings in their own courts: 
see Attorney General y Leveller 
Maeazinc Ltd and Others 
(119791 AC 440) and R r 

ftl.il.*; 'JL , ■ _ f Fv nnrtt> Fv- 


later. 

It was the: applicant's inten- 
tion 10 write an article 
commenting on certain aspects 
of the case including the already 
reported decision by or on 
behalf of the chairman of the 
bench which tried the case, to 
refuse to divulge Jus name to a 
Daily Telegraph reporter at Ibe 
court 

It did not seem to .his Lord- 
ship that The identity of the 
justices was essential or even 
material. 

For those reasons the ap- 
plicant failed to show that be 
had a sufficient interest in the 
disclosure of the justices* names, 
and it followed that be was not 
entitled to mandamus. 

Different considerations ap- 







Burning issue: this year's controversial series between Sonth Africa and the rebel New Zealanders brought the professionalism argument to a head 

much abused. It could be inter-* talent may thrive, free of external fingers at each other, saving: “We representative occasions because 

'f 0, y ie * u means doing what know what goes on in your there are very few clubs who have 

SrSJff r ^ bls j 1 !."Lr stan< i^5 s Eusbrnd ? selectors have urged this country." We have all beard the the money available to make cash or 

rt,, whic if season, ffyingthe playets the best in stories, now handed down as gospel material inducements 10 players, 

historically, have been one of hotels, bill of fere, tickerinv arranop- v.. ... 




of skin and discipline, which, 
historically, have been one of 
rugby's virtues but appear now, in 
Britain at least to be in decline. 

I am inclined to think that what 
we should hope for is renaissance, 
the rebirth of a game sadly at odd s 
with itself in some areas of (he globe 
but played in others ata speed and a 
standard which has all too rarely 
teen emulated. We.shouId also bear 
in mind that the younger nations 
will wish to imitate the successful 
countries, to play rugby as they have 
seen Australians, South Africans or 
Frenchmen play it 
To do so, they will discover how 
those countries go about their 
preparation, how they administrate 
and finance their game, and they 
will go back home and mould their 
findings to their individual circum- 
stances. If you are involved in sport 
at the highest level you are in- 
volved to win. otherwise there is 
little point in keeping the score. 

So professional rugby? No, thank 
you. We are looking, no doubt, at 
compromise on the amateur rules as 
they now exist, but those, rules do 
not meet every possible concept of 
amateurism. They cut across no 
geographical and sociological bar- 
riers. Players will still come to the 
game because they enjoy its physical 
challenge; its wonderful team ethos 
(which should still be cherished 
despite the barrage of fire under 
which it sometimes comes), its 
social appeal the intellectual 
complexities which it presents. 

The game is wide enough to 
encapsulate every player's am- 
bitions. of however low or high an 
order, but the higher you go, the 
more time and effort is required. 
That is where we start drawing, not 
necessarily dividing lines which 
separate the two per cent from the 
98 per cent, but refining lines so that 
the talents of the fortunate two per 
cent can be recognized for the 
improvement, or pleasure, of the 
other 98 per cent 
Recognition of talent does not 
mean paying for it directly. The 
main endeavour is to try to create . 
the circumstances in which the 


talent may thrive, tree of external 
worries. It means doing what 
England's selectors have urged this 
season, giving the players the best in 
hotels, bill of fare, ticketing arrange- 
ments, accommodation for wives 
and girlfriends, a multitude of little 
things which mean a Iol It also 
means taking stock of players' 
employers so that they do not feel 
ill-used when their employee is, 
once again, not at his post 

I t means allowing a player to 
use, so far as he is able, the 
feme his skills have won him 
because his moment in the 
limelight will be all too fleet- 
ing. There were tales from South 
Africa, during the tour of the New 
Zealand Cavaliers last summer, of 
players being “hired" to appear in 
hospitality boxes at the behest of 
commercial firms eager to please 
potential clients. Whether such tales 
were true, I do not know, but, 
frankly, I find it hard to believe that 
anyone would be prepared to pay a 
lot of money for the sometimes 
dubious pleasures of talking to an 
international sportsman. 

It is the occasion and the game 
that draws crowds, not the individ- 
uals themselves because they can 
always be replaced. No matter how 
good one generation of players may 
be, the game remains long after they 
have gone, their memory gilded by 
time. 

However, if players are asked to 
open shops, to speak on public 
occasions, to advertise their sport 
(because, otherwise, they would not 
have been asked in the first place), I 
do not see why they should not 
receive reasonable, expenses for 
doing so. They are not going to 
make a fortune out of it and it is 
some compensation for the hours of 
driving up and down motorways, 
working out in long winter eve- 
nings, excusing oneself yet again for 
leaving work early and arriving 
home late; 

It will also acknowledge a situa- 
tion which already exists and which 
no one is going to stop while there 
are individuals, or dubs, prepared 
to offer money for such services. No 
good will be done if members of the 
board this week start pointing 


fingers at each other, saving: “We 
know what goes on in your 
country." We have all beard the 
stories, now handed down as gospel 
about those countries which are 
sinks of iniquity and those which 
are pure as driven snow, I doubt if 
there is troth at either extremity and 
I suggest that all the leading 
countries are much closer, in terms 
of common players’ practices, than 
is always acknowledged. 

What we seek is to play the game, 
and to play it welL In that way we 
encourage others to play rugby, too. 
Why adopt a professional class of 
administrator and then divorce him 
from the top end of the playing 
community? Why not put those 
who are considered the test in 
technical terms of preparation — 
that is, your professional coaching 
staff — alongside those who are 
deemed your playing test? It does 
not necessarily make your amateur 
coach or selector redundant — and. 
goodness me, those individuals 
pour vast reserves of time and 
thought into the game and get 
scarcely an item of credit — but if 
other amateur sports can employ 
.professional personnel to coach 
their teams, I do not think rugby 
will lose face by doing the same. 

What is an amateur after all? One 
who is not paid for his playing 
performance; Every player comes to 
the game knowing he will not be 
paid for his 80 minutes of rugby; he 
treats the game as a diversion and, if 
someone offers him a job on die 
strength of his ability as a player and 
the public acclaim he receives 
therefrom, no one grumbles. 

Put in its most basic terms, ifl am 
an unemployed carpenter with a 
high public profile because of my 
ability to play a game and someone 
offers me a job worth £15,000 a 
year, is that so very different from 
taking money from an advertiser 
who wishes to put my face on bis . 
product or being paid to speak at a 
dinner? 

Moreoever. it should be possible 
for every country to regulate the 
actions of players when it comes to 
training and preparing for games — 
and by games we are talking only of 


representative occasions because 
there are very few clubs who have 
the money available to make cash or 
material inducements 10 players. 
Certainly very little can be done to 
circumscribe extramural activities 
without the participation of the 
beneficiaries themselves. 

It still seems to me slightly 
ludicrous that the acme of the 
British game hitherto has been the 
British Lions tour, in which chosen 
players act like professional sports- 
men for four, eight or 10 weeks ami 
are paid, at the present rate. £105 a 
week on a tour in which everything 
relating to accommodation, and 
much of the hospitality, is already 
paid for by the host union. 

T he anomalies are too wide- 
spread to ignore. The ama- 
teur regulations must be 
simplified, they must 
make allowance for the 
ability of leading sportsmen to 
capitalize upon their feme, but they 
must be enforced. There must be an 
official in every country with direct 
access to an International Board 
secretariat and standing officials; 
the board must reserve the power to 
deckle, define and deny. 

Otherwise we will have a game 
played in disunity, a game abused 
by any country which has a mind to, 
and discord will be the name of the 
game. I wonder who the strong man 
will be this week among the 
International Board members, to 
stand up and take the others with 
him down an unfamiliar road, 
because I do not think we can 
continue our aimless meandering. 

Terry McLean, my much-re- 
spected New Zealand colleague and 
sometime contributor to this news- 
paper, wrote recently of his 
country’s rugby; “The national 
passion for the game has dimin- 
ished. What with illicit tours and 
violence in play and want of 
decisiveness in dealing with pro- 
fessional, or quasi-professional, 
activities, the charm of the game has 
been weakened.” If lhat is true of 
New Zealand, then we should all 
look to our powder. Most of all. the 
Internationa] Board, who are sit- 
ting, like it or not on the powder 
keg- 


Game will prosper so long 
as it remains amateur 


tFE ,. t „^FvZrfeEv- . plied for ^ declaration in 

Ufa** which it was sought to chalkmge 

ans ({ 1 974j OB 759). vhe jav/fyoess Q f the policy of 

. m controlling thnr owl ^ ^ ^ ^ 


proceedings justio* 
good reasons choose to remain 
anonymous. No siamte. rule or 
convention demanded that they 
might not refuse to disclose 

,d h would be irresponsible to 
dent that discretion k»J>«Uos 
seeing that some 

ro improper behaviour by or on 

{vhnlfofihose ihey had adjwh- 
caicd upon and otiiers 
wrongly approached by ine 


^Twus not Ihe 
^■maintained, the tusU^ Policy 
■P^pcnerally lo refuse bona Itae 
^a-qucsi* /or disclosure of *e 


^Thc applicant bad ! tost notij- 
* hv heinc denied the name of 
S®^r!San%ndhadnoia.d 
r . -Jha? benefit would arise from 

, also submit 

' .J Sat there was something to 

■ ' ^ 'S for withholding .he 

iamc- of justices pnor to a 
' f hal t he prosecution 

"Sd p b? dented ihTopponu; 

\ -/■ choosing which court 

& w 0U Tli£ W hear a 

“HTloSp 

* * ffThc'patJi? in- 
• - XTn .he f administration of 


Different considerations ap- Sbiggy Konno (right) is duur- 
. plied for the declaration in mail qf the Japanese Rugbv 
which it was sought to challenge Union and manager qf their 
the Tawfidness of the pobev of tour tQ Scotland and 

OThSTof Entfmi.Hebxmt mytfth'' 
administration of Justice as a dston RFU am has managed 
whole, the policy ofroutioe non- tours to (few Zealand, Austra- 
disclosure adopted by the ha, England, ft ales. Italy and 
Felixstowe bench and their Canada. He was his country’s 
derk. shared in one form or delegate to the International 
another by a wowing number of Board centenary conference 

durin $ which he- offered the 
u hTs’rSlfo that thoughts of one whose country 

the application before this court & Outside the hoard though it 
was brought either by the ap- 1 has some 3.000 clubs and 
plicant himself or possibly by would doubtless be an auto- 
the press through hi m as guard- malic choice for the recently- 
iaxts of the public i nterest i n the devised category iff associate 
maintenance and preservation membership of the board: 

of open justice in magistrates — - 

courts, a mailer of vital epueem “Rugby is by % robust 

in the administration of jusoo. guM testing to thefal] physfeae 
In the context of the unlawful ^ fitness, whs and wjjL For 
use of power ^^Hit junsdic- *««ss n«by football demands 
non which his Lordship took the ^ huli faiwl «ad w— drip 
policy of the F&ixsiowe Justices bet eves more; if ft is tosarrire 
and their derk to be, a ^public & ^ amateur aunt, it needs to 
spirited citizen — per Lord be pined far the right spirit 
Denning. Master of the Rolls, m wtuefajl regret to say, nstertiog 
R r inland Revenue Comma * to be ignored . or perhaps 
sinners. Ex parte. National forgotten. 

Federation of Self Employed _ ^ 

and Small Businesses Ltd . The g ape itedl is mqweten- 

M 1 OB 407, 422) - would ^, l ^^" arow f’ tb ^ ls 
have a sufficient interest in the I 

SSTStSBJK 

SoSiess of his pm- 

nosevwapparem and he had a I ^ odow a.confasien 

SSffidSfl S mihesuljat 



part k jpmtfng, aH kinds of races, 
white, black, yellow, brown, all 
kinds of reUgwBS and speaking 
many different languages; on top 
of that they all came from 
different grades of rugby. How- 
ever, these di ffe rences made no 
difference; the games were all 
highly competitive and in the 
evening players and officials 
from the different countries 
gathered, talking, singing, 
laughing and drinking into the 
early boors of the m^ramg-jnst 
plain regby players. There I 
realised now important ft is far 
the game to remain amateur. 

Tie Japanese mrion will ad- 
here strictly to the amateur code. 


sufficient interest in uw subject 
matter of the application, and 
accordingly the declaration 
•would be granted, 

Solicitors: Bindraan & ftn- 
ners; Wes thorp. Ward and 
Catchpole. Ipswich. 


MOTORS AD^RTlSEMEN-r IN 


THE 


jSffgm MW* 

^OVtOTISUW 
PAX MO. 


ntb 

o*-*m 


41-401 KM* 


use you** **c*=es» 


Shoo id this happen regby CoM- 
ball would cometohave different 
meanings to different people.. 

Amt}', and goodwill are more 
important than the result of any 
particular match as they endure 
long after the match has been 
forgotten. Sach friendship be- 
tween people is the cement of 

unifying influence ail over the 
weriA, it provide* a common 
bond between people of all races, 
all classes and all levels of 

intelligence Milling to respect 
die ethics as well as the laws of 
thegame. 

In the Hong Kook sevens this ' 
year there were 24 countries . 


other anions may be - though I 
realise that it may be a more 
difficult problem for the Inter- 
national Board countries to ad- 
dress . especially throe countries 
where regby j$ their major sport 
and it Is imperative feat they 
maintain a leading position in 
the world of rugby. 

The problems that endanger 
rugby .concern a handful of. 
players and we cannot sacrifice 
ail the other rugby players fast 
for a few'. If there should he any 
players in Japan ‘who violate the 
code, the Japan RFU is pre- 
pared to take a very strong 
attitude and we wHl suspend 
those players completely from 
rugby ritin; If we wfsfa to 
preserve those principles, only a 
very strong attitude can make It 


FwslWe and once we aUow a 
loosened interpretation, there 
will be no end to what may 
happen. 

Although sponsorship under 
conditions has been permitted 
by the International Board for 
some years, the Japanese RFU 
still do not permit any sponsor- 
ship for their games mr tour- 
naments although Japanese 
firms are sponsors for rugby in 
various other contones, we also 
do not permit national or dab 
teams to accept free emtipment 
and will not allow kit. to be 
donated by manufacturers. 

Perhaps we are over-sensitive 
in these matters but it is onr 
belief that we should maintain 
the non-sponsorship stance as 
long ss onr onion can finance 
itself without oatslde help. How- 
ever we do have a situation la 
Japan which other conn tries 
may not take as purely amatenr. 
Most of onr players work for 
huge companies and are gben 
tune off with pay oa any of the 
. tonrs on which they are asked to 
go. All these companies have 
teams of thefa- own and are very 
tmderstand n m. If the companies 
do not want the players to go on 
tour we will disconrage the 
players concerned from going 
and even take action to see they 
are not selected. The companies 
have been very co-operative wife 
onr union and we make sure we 
do not abuse their good in- 
tentions. We do not even give 
daily allowances to players on 
overseas tonrs. We feel that as 
long as they are being given time 
off wife pay by then- employers, 
daily allowances become extra 
income which they shoeM not 
accept Any allowances received 
are pooled and used for reaslow 
dinners or parties. 

I think that as long as we are 
determined to keep rugby as an 
amatear game. It will continue to 
prosper. The real rewards of the 
game do not rest in the silver 
caps and championships bat In 
the enjoyment and lasting 
friendships of individual players 
— nothing more and nothing 


Time to lift 
the burden 
on players 

Andy Dalton, sometime captain 
of official and lutofnciai New 
Zealand teams: “They have got 
10 come down to a reimburse- 
ment situation where it’s going 
to cost players nothing to play. 
At present it’s a game in which 
you have to have a benefactor — 
either a jolly good business to 
fall back on or an employer who 
is going to support you." They 
are not going to keep players in 
the game for any length of time 
while they (the players) are 
suffering an economic burden.” 
Albert Ferrasse, president of the 
French Rugby Federation: “1 
have been most concerned 
about the feasibility of a 
continuing co-existence between 
the amateur rugby status which I 
believe is. and remains, para- 
mount to the ethos of the game 
and the economic restraints on 
playecs at the top leveL” 

Alan Jones, coach to Australia: 
“It's not professionalism for a 
player's out-of-pocket expenses 
to be paid for attending an extra 
training session. No person 
should be paid for playing the 
game but no person should be 
out of pocket as a result of 
playing." 

Bob Watkins, president ef the 
United States Rugby Union: 
“We must modernize the sys- 
tem in relation to the demands 
and direction of the sport. This 
does not mean abandon the 
amateur philosophy but mote 
likely . a non-professional 
compromise.” 

Andy Ripley, Rroslyn Park, 
England and British Lions No. 8 
ami occasional poet: “There is, 
of course, a cost involved in 
change- The cost would be the 
loss of something thirty intan- 
gible — something to do wife 
doing one’s best, not being too 
concerned about numbers, 
about enjoying oneself and mak- 
ing friends. Which is a heavy 
price but it is less heavy than 
having Ihe lop end of the game 
hijacked, by people whose sole 
interest is their immediate net 
proftL" 


Irish yearn for a 
return to integrity 


By Chris Than 

“Some have made attempts to 
single out* Ireland as intransi- 
gent and out of touch, firing in 
an ivory tower. That's for from 
tree. We fire in the real world. 
We want to preserve the amateur 
principles of the game bat we 
recognize the pressures and the 
economic realities of onr time." 

The speaker is Sir Ewart Bell 
(right), president of the Irish 
Rugby Union and a man not 
unaccustomed to diplomacy in 
his role as oae of Northern 
Ireland's most dis ti ng u ished 
civil servants. It is his anion who 
have been cited most frequently 
as standing oat against change, 
against the World Cop, 

Has Irish feel that the Inter- 
national Board most be given 
teeth, to which end they have pot 

forward a set of proposals which. 
If adopted, could have far- 
reaching consequences. There 
has been a significant change in 
the Irish position and Sir Ewart 
acknowledges it "The XRFU 
hare, wrongly, resisted changes 
which have been legitimate, like 
writing books. T always believed 
feat players coming to tire end of 
their playing careers should be 
allowed to share their knowledge 
of the game." 

There is compromise, too, on 
the vexed question of broken 
time, as expressed by Jimmy 
Nelson, the IRFU treasurer: 
“We are not mpriitst broken 
time," he said. “We don't want 
to hare players oat of pocket at 
the end of a tonr, hot what we 
wouldn't have is people making 
money out of rngby. We are not 
prepared to turn fee game 
upside down for the sake of the 
top 150 players in fee world. 

An International Board able 
to control developments within 
the world of rugby is the answer 
to tine present predicament in Sir 
Ewart's view: “Control means 
resources, staff, expertise and 
authority. If yon have resources 
and expertise you naturally 
command authority." But he 
believes, too, feat one of the 
functions of this week’s meeting 
wHl .be to rebuild confidence 



badly shaken by the New Zea- 
land Cavaliers tour to South 
Africa d uring the summer. 

“That old relationship, fee 
dub of gentlemen, has broken 
down," be said. “In order to 
carry oa we must first rebuild 
this relationship, re-establish 
the principles which had gov- 
erned our activity. There most 
be trust, there most be integrity, 
there most be organization." 

There Is little sympathy in 
Ireland for Sooth Africa's part 
in that tour. "We understand the 
d iffi cu lty rngby is facing in 
South Africa because of fee 
political situation ont there," Sir 
Ewart said. ’We went on tour to 
tiie republic in 1981 and came in 
for a lot of critidsm, but we did it 
regardless. We had sympathy 
and feelings for onr opposite 
numbers in South Africa and for 
their attempts to achieve racially 
integrated rugby. Bm a lot of 
that sympathy and feeling for 
them has dissipated now be- 
cause integrity has broken 
down." 

Whether Ireland's proposals 
for the future go far enough 
remains to be seen. What maybe 
regarded as a shift fa their 
position regarding amateurism 
may. be perceived by others as 
wnnng too late. Asked about 
this. Sir Ewart hesitated. "Yes'* 
he said after some thought, "it 
may. be fate for fee She™ 
«w« for fee 

northern one." 


SPORT 


RACING: 


Orient Line to 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 8 1986 — ■ / .1' — 

MINSTPELLA’S CONNECTIONS LODGE OBJECTION TO JOCKEY CLUB OVER NEW MARKET DECISION . " 

US prize Bannerol doubt is 


keep Eddery 
and Hannon in 
the limelight 


By Mandarin (Michael Phillips) 


Ridden by Pal Eddery, 
whose sang froid. strength and 
overall judgment has never 
been seen in a more vivid light- 
than it was in Paris on Sunday 
when he won the Prix dc 
i’Abbayc on Double Schwartz 
m addition to the Arc on 
Dancing Brave. Orient Une is 
napped to continue trainer 
Richard Hannon's own 
memorable season by winning 
the BBC Radio Leeds Stakes 
at York today. 

From the first crop of 
Capricorn Unc. whose better 
achievements included a vic- 
tory' m the Lonsdale Stakes on 
Knavesmire in the summer of 


'82. Orient Line proved that 
toda\"s distance of seven fur- 


longs was well within his range 
when he won a similar nursery 
at Newbury last month. That 
followed a victory over a 
furlong shorter at Folkestone, 
where Eddery was his partner. 

Normally ' 1 would think 
twice about plumping for a 
horse whose weight has been 
increased by a penalty as great 
as 101b. But in this instance 1 
do not hesitate to suggest that 
Orient Line is the type to defy- 
that penally and win his third 
race in succession. 

Even with this penalty, he is 
still marginally better in in 
today 's race with 8sl 1 i lb than 
he is in a similar race at Ascot 
on Friday at Ascot where the 
handi capper has had lime to 
reassess him in light of that 
Newbury- win. No wonder 
then that Hannon has settled 
for today's opportunity. 

With " only two races on 
which to base a judgement. 
Ring Krimson may also have 
been under-rated. He could do 
no more than win at New- 
market in August when he 
accounted for the hot 
favourite Green Veil. How- 
ever at a difference of 51b l 
much prefer Orient Line in 
this instance. 


Earlier in the afternoon 
Eddery can also win the BBC 
Radio York Maiden Auction 
Slakes on Silk Topper who 
revealed a degree of promise 
first time out at Newbury 
when he finished seventh in 
the race won by New Attitude. 

Later in the day. though, I 
am inclined to wonder 
whether Mill Plantation, the 
champion elect's ride in the 
BBC Radio Cleveland Handi- 
cap. will manage to beat John 
Dunlop's chosen repre- 
sentative, Lyphlaw. 

Significantly. Dunlop has 
decided to run this improving 
colt, who has won his last two 
races at Ripon and Ayr, 
instead of his other four-day 
acceptor. Sultan Mobamed, 
who looked to have an even 
better chance following that 
authoritative victory in a 
much more valuable race run 
over the same course and 
distance at the previous 
meeting. 

With the ground riding 



may lore 


(1* 

, to 


old to 

Britis 



. -V . 


good and fast, RotherfkJd 
Greys, who showed such a 


Greys, who showed such a 
blistering turn of foot to beat 
Clantime, Imperial Jade and 
Dublin Lad on the course in 
July, can make a triumphant 
return in the Barclays Unicorn 
Trophy, even with his weight 
bolstered by a penalty he 
picked up for winning a 
similar race at Goodwood 10 
days ago. 

On the jumping front. 
Cheltenham's first meeting of 
the season features the re- 
appearance of Charcoal Wally 
in the Studd Challenge Cup 
Chase. Charcoal Wally ac- 
counted for all but Oregon 
Trail in that memorable race 
for the Arkle Challenge Tro- 
phy on the first day of this 
year's National Hunt festival 
way back in March. 

Well that I expea to see him 
go on ground that he relishes 



European Cegarewitch hopes 

CuSSCrS From Michael Seely, Naas 

By Christopher GoiUding Kha.lcd ^^^g’*** 

For the first time fefa year. a but a nomination fee wflnE 

reeders" Cap race wfll be ran pus wm in ftrtj. fixed In doe course fe £ 


Charcoal Wally, who makes his seasonal wrapp Aarance at rTyottonham today in preparation 
for a tilt at the Breeders’ Cup Chase in Maryland on November 1 
and clearly suits his free- experienced Mark Bradstock. victory achieved despite the 

mamVa p,.il, T Mill him ..X. C..IL. ha nimriiminMl onrl ctrrm- 


running style, I still doubt him 
giving 121b to Captain Dawn, 
who has already run up a 
treble at Fontwell this 
autumn. 

By finishing second to 
Peariyman in the Grand An- 
nual Challenge Cup on the 
first day of the same festival 
meeting. Captain Dawn too 
showed that the formidable 
Cheltenham fences hold no 
terrors for him. And now he 
has fitness on his side. 

Qoncormick, ridden by the 


who is Fulke Walwyn’s assis- 
tant at Saxon House in Upper 
Lam bo urn. is my selection to 
win the Ajax Amateur Riders 
Handicap Chase following 
that heartening run behind 
Scots Nogger at Huntingdon 
where his jumping was a 
revelation. 

PeUincoart who won a 
tough handicap on the Flat at 
Brighton in July, could hardly 
have begun the jumping sea- 
son better than when he won 
first time out at Warwick, a 


fact he overjumped and stum- 
bled on landing over' the last 
hurdle. 

Now 1 expea him to prove 
too strong for New Romney in 
the first division of the 
Gotheringxon Novices' Hur- 
dle, even though the latter ran 
well first time out against 
Parang at Stratford. New 
Romney tends to pull too hard 
for his own good and 1 think 
that he wfll be a sitting duck 
when PeUincoart comes to 
challenge. 


By Christopher Goolding 

For the first tine this year, a 
Breeders' Cop race will be mn 
for steeplechasers. The era* 
wfll take (dace at Fair Hill, 
north Maryland, «a Noresaber 
1. The three British entries are 
Very Promising, Insdtar and 
Charcoal Wally. 

The two mOe three fortongs 
race win be ran ever 16 photic 
fences with the wfauer receiving 
£84500 and prize moneyja- 
tended down to sixth place. The 
top prize in England last season 
was £57,000 for the Grand 
National matter. 

Very Promising fa the class 
horse of the English trie. David 
Nicholson, his trainer, sanfc 
“The prize money a ttrac t ed « 

to the race but Z am waiting to 
see if the Americans will bdp ns 
with the travel expenses before I 

decide whether or not to ran. 
They hare offered the Emopean 
horses a total of $20400, whit* 
docs not come to a lot if that is 

divided between half a dozen 
horses. It wfll cost as areand 
£20,000 to send him. 

“It fa a good track. I was over 
there for the jockeys’ c ha llen ge 
two years ago. I think N ation a l 
Hunt racing in America needs os 
— they are trying to pat it on the 
map. We wifl know in a ample of 
weeks if we are going. If not we 
go for the Mnd tes o n Gold Cpp 
at Cheltenham. After all, what is 
the point of paying £20,000 to 
win £80,000, when I can pay 
£200 and win £20^00 here.” 

No firm decision has been 
made regarding Insular, who 
carries the colons of the Qoeen 
on the Flat and the Mae and bnff 
silks of die Qween Mother over 
the jumps. 

Ian Balding, the gelding's 
trainer, said yesterday: “ We 
have not made np oar minds yet. 
He will ran on the Flat at the 
weekend and may bareanontfag 
over bardies to see if he is in top 
form.” 

■ Charcoal Wally, trained in the 
West Coontry by Ron Hodges, 
makes his seasonal debat today 
at Cheltenham in the Sfadd 
Challenge Handicap Chase. 
Hodges- said: “The owner. 


in the Tote Cfesarewitch at 

' N “ sa«rt»y «- 


Guy Harwood .£1 

Gofe Sales in Mkiwe that the 
Hnoressive winner of ro? 
three races was likdyio 
second leg of the autumn 


d0 -Bannerol is coughing and 


must be regarded as a very 
doubtful runner, 

Pu thorough trainer. Brtghtnff 
and Shipboume are also un- 
likely to go so QConqu 1 ®^ 
could bemy only starter m the 

^IrOTfirming that Dancing 
Brave has arrived home in 
tremendous fettle, 
commented: “We won\]*«>; 
ing anything serious with him 

fora day or two until he has had 
a slight rest”. 

Abdulla was also inspecting 
yearlings with Jeremy Tree and 
Grant Pritchard-Gordon. his 


manager. “Sunday was ^a 
marvellous day, he saia. i 
shall be very lucky if I ever own 
a coll like him again.” , . 

Discussing his decision to 
replace Grcville Starkey with 


Pai Eddery, he said: “It was a 
very, very hard thing to do. The 
Breeders' Cup was foremost in 
my mind as Pat knows the sharp 
American tracks so welL And 


don’t forget I have to consider 
my duty to the shareholders as 
well as to such a brilliant colt . 

Talking about his decision to 
syndicate Dancing Brave for 
$500,000 a share before the 
King George VI and Queen 
Elizabeth Diamond Stakes, 
Abdulla went on: “Stallions are 
over-priced. I decided to be 
realistic and give the horse every 

chance of getting as many good 


mares as possible. Of course he'* 
worth much more after the Ait 
but a nomination fee will (J 
fixed In doe course by 
syndicate comtnitttfcT't 

Both Abdulla : and the 
Maktoum brothers mn to be 
congratulated on their wewng, 
icy. Both Rainbow Qom aut 
Green Desert, for example, 
reasonably, priced at £25^098 per 

nomination. ■ 

Vincent O'Brien, the mmxtn 
trainer of the post-war«r< 
in agreement with Abdtt&a'&Arc 
decision. “He had no choice hut 
to put Pat up.” O'Bricu'said. 
“He rode the bone wife sacb 

sublime confidence arid wife 
such an iron nerve. Tttnfcufe 
difference between the' top ud '- 
the very top men.” 

Luca Dunam was sfeau fee 
sale: Dtscusanghfaptamforhis 
promising two-yeaiKtfd, fee . 
Newmarket traihersaid *3 stall 
choose between While 
and Gold Fee for the Rockfct 
Stakes at Newmarket and the 
Roehfbrd Thompson Safees 
Newbury. Imperial Frontier wfll 
also go to Newbury for the 
Horns Hill Stakes*.” Curoani 
added that Dallas, his 
Cambridgeshire winner, wqqH ( 

not run again this year. 

Before feavingha home in fee 
Isle of Man to fly to the sskt . 
Robert Sangster said: “TVe got 
to try and nod 35' yearlings to 
send to' Michael. DfokiasOuat 
Man ton. This time I'm going to 
put the emphasis mo redo speed 
and less on sta m i n a , when it 
comes to picking them. It’s been 
putting too much pressure on 
him. having sent bnn so much 
backward stock.” To dale fee 
former champion National 
Hunt trainer has only seat out 
three winners Grom- his £jf 
million training complex, in 
Wiltshire . - 




Cheveley Park appeal 


James Mtnsefl, is keen to so. 
We gather fee track and fee 


We gather fee track and fee 
Hkdy fast grand will stf him.” 

A strung entry from Ireland, is . 
made op of H erbert United, 
Winning Nora, The Rfaht 
.Touch and Sen Of Ivor. The 
French have 10 horses entered, 
fee best of which fa Gacfco. - 


The connections ol 
Minstrdla. who finished second 
to Forest Flower in the Cheveley 
Park Stakes at Newmarket last 
week, have derided to appeal 
against the result. A dale has not 
yet been fixed for the inquiry. 

At Newmarket. John Reid, 
Minstrdla's jockey, lodged an 
objection for “bumping and 
booing at the two-nirlong 
marker." The stewards allowed 
the result to stand but Reid had 
his deposit returned. 


-Charlie Nelson, MinstreOa** 
trainer, commented' at. Goi& 
sales in Ireland last-night “No 
one likes objecting but the inks 
are very strong about fee dif- 
ference between deliberate and 
accidental interference. My 
solicitor, Matthew McQoy, 
made the decision on behalf at 
the owner, myself -and fee 
jockey, after he - watched fee 
camera patrol film at Pbrtman 
Square Don't forget, they made 
the rules, not us. 


YORK 


3.15 BARCLAYS UNICORN TROPHY HANDICAP (£4.149: 5f) (12 runners} 


By Mandarin 


Selections 


(9) noun H Of HE RFtBJ) OREYS (CP1(Mrg D Gl e i» on)A kflda4-(M3(7ttx)J Lroph(7) 

(1) 030X100 ALL IS FORGIVEN (CO.B) (Mra I Neman) DThwn 6-9-1 0___ OjWM 

ffi 423420 BQLUN EMLY (V,CD) (Mrs N Westbrook) M H EastBriw 5-9-1 MM 


2.15 Its Been Rumoured. 

2.45 Silk Trooper. 

3. 1 5 Rothcrficld Greys. 

3.45 ORIENT LINE (nap). 
*15 Casilc Rock. 

4.45 Lyphlaw. 


By Our Newmarket 
Correspondent 

2.15 — 

2.45 Silk Trooper. 

3. 1 5 Rotherfield Greys. 

3.45 King Krimson. 

4.15 Galesa. 

4.45 Samhaan. 


10 (6) 103000 BE LYRICAL (D) (J Greetham) G 


Moorhead banned for five years 




13 (3) 200010 CHINA GOLD (D) (Mrs D tobotaon) Miss L S*»Bi 7-0-4 

14 (4) 2-00340 STEEL CYGNET (D) (R Coomb#) PM Mitchai 3*3 

15 (12) 032003 MBIIAN START (CO) (Mrs J Haul) T Barron 3-8-3 

16 (10) 301000 GEORGE WfLLtAM (D) (C Maden) M McCourt 5-8-2 

17 ni) 112000 MUSIC MACmCO)) (A Pita) PHaMam 5-8-2 

18 (8) 311300 CELTIC BIRO (0) (J Cooks) A BaMng 0-7-13 

13 (5) 000482 TOBERMORY Rot (CD) (C LonqboOom) R, WMafcor 0-7-12 
20 (2) 040040 PSKJOOA (BJ3) (H Chariton) I Vickers 8-7-a 


. a DuflMd 
, M Wood 3 

JRoM 

. W Canon 
BThomon 
TWMw 
.AHKkqr 


NCaritato *99 S-2 
wtao0(7) W 


CADM ROTHBRHELD GREYS 
runm Gnartwowl. STEEL CVf 


By Michael Sedy 
3.15 Bollin Emily. 3.45 Orient Line. 4.45 LYPHLAW (nap). 

The Times Private Handicapper's top rating: 4.45 MAGIC TOWER (nap). 


1 him i I'l.in i 

4) Moakerang quickly altar laadna through ttw 'first quartar-ndo (51, £3047, good, Sept 29. 14 
EMILY sOi lowing for her Oral mn of the season. (&8) ctwsefl home Fahw Tore (8-2) at 41 <£ 
Portland at Doncaswr (53f. £13148. aood. Sent 11, 23 ranL GEORGE WUiAMone wfiidrmwi 


Portland at Doncaster (5Jf. £13148. good. Sept 1 1, 23 ranL GEORGE 
there, eartter (8-7) baat Jaclde BWrp-KQXIaiSandowitM, £3158. got 
6)bflnkarodr - - ~ - 


Aral Brae when 1 ward to 


Guide to our in-line racecard 

103 (12) 04M32 T1MESFORM (CD.BF) (Mre JRytoy)BHaa 9-104) 


RambSng F 
tarastow 


5(,£315&goo 
Fftrer (9-3) at 


8t4ldtataho8 in the 
Kfeawn under ontas 
BERIAU START (9- 
LUC BMP (Q-2) and 
13 I 


CHINA GOLD (8-7) weakentno In the dosing ataaea to Bd Wi and fth respeatv8ly(5t. £3424, firm, bet 3, 13 
ran). TOBE R MORY BOY <7-1 (f) 31 runner-up to Ftoyafa Boy P-11)at Kaydocfc (61. £7816. Hrm. Oct 4. 13 ran). 
flUcU o pj TOBBBWORYBOt 


David Moorhead has bad his 
licence to train suspended for 
five years by the Jockey Club's 
disciplinary committee after an 
inquiry at For tman Square yes- 
terday. Moorhead was found to 
have altered the passports of 
two hones. 

The trainer admitted being in 
breach of rule 201(v) and 
201 (vl) and was also found to be 
In breach of rule 220(ui). These 
rules relate to “deliberately or 
overtly misleading the Jockey 


Club; being guilty of conspiring 
to orconnivingat any comiptor 
fraudulent practice in relation to 
raring; and damaging the in- 
terests of horse racing/’ 
Moorhead began his racing 
career as an amateur jockey in 
Ireland, where be became cham- 
pion. After five years be turned 
professional, and shortly after- 
wards moved to Britain to ride 
for Ken Oliver. He turned 
free fence after a couple of 
seasons, but after a bad fell at 


Perth In 1975 retired from fee 
saddle. 

He began training - at 
Middleham two years later and 
enjoyed his best season last term 
with 10 winners. Moorhead 
recently moved to Bill Clay's dd ^ 
yard iij Uttoxeter with 26 Flat 
an<f rational Hunt horses. 

• At a separate inquiry. Mark 
Usher was fined - £1,000 for 
running horses which had not 
been m his stable for fee 
required two weeks. 


is set lilt ini 
gt for (low nh 


B Watt (4) 8S 


3A5 BBC RADIO LEEDS NURSERY HANDICAP (2-Y-O: £3,724: 71) (10 runners} 


Racecard number Draw n brackets. S** -figure 
term <F-fei P-pulted up U-unaeawd nder B- 
broogm down S-shpped up. Rnrelused). Horse s 
name (B-bfankers. V-wsor H-bood- E-ave3fnokL C- 
course wmnei D-dstance winner CD-course and 


cOatancs winner. BF-beatan favourttt hi latest 
race). Owner hi brackets. Trainer. Age end 


wagtiL Rider plus any atowance. The Tones 
Private Handicapper's rating. Approximate starting 
price. 


Going: good to firm Draw: low numbers best' 

2.15 BBC RADIO SHEFFIELD SELLING STAKES (2-Y-Ch £4.172: 6f) (23 runners) 


000010 PILGRIM PRINCE (D) (C Cyzer) M LKtier 9-3.. . 


4221® THE MAGUE (D) (Miss L SrtXUI) Miss L SUdaM 9-3 Paid I 

000002 WHISTLING WONDER (M Bnttam) M Bnttaai M A Monro 

rrs _ B£EN RU JS9M RED l T Remsdenl R Smpcon 9-0 S WMtwortti 

201000 LADY BEHAVE D (Mr: E Jackman) R Hannon 94) Pei Eddery 

300000 SWYNPORO PRINCESS IQuaUar Hotels Lid) K Stone 9-0 G Brown 

003 BURCROfT iR Lee| H WNtaher 8-1 1. D McKeoim 


EUEWTHOHPE iHippofliomo Hacwq) M W Easteitiy 8-11 MMndiey(3) — 

340000 GWYNBROOK (B) (Mrs E Rhind) M w EaserOy 8- 11 PRobnaon 88 


HARRYAKEB IH Atkinson) W Hawn 8-11 N Day 

000 HIGHLAND LOOGE | W Ponsonov) P Cole 8-11 TOobb 

0000 MR B ERKEL EY (B) iCoumy PropertiesS Dev Ltd) C Tinkler 8-11 MBtafi 

000000 TAKE EFFECT (M Bmmni M Bnttam 6-11 KOaitey 

004 WHITE OF RB(XOi (B)tP DurkaniM McCormack 8-11 W Wharton 

OOOOW GARDENIA LADY |B) iWSpttklT Barron S-B ONkbota 

OOOOOO JEAN JEANIE (B) (H Taylorl J Rawlanos B-8 j Lowe 

00342 LEVEN LASS (SF| (Mn D Lambl I Vickers 38 R Cocfarme 

UNG GOLD lA Wanoni M H Easferpy B-fl K Hodgsea 

200400 OUR HORIZON (P Thompson-hUI) T Barron 84 N Carlisle 

0 RAUNCHY RITA (T WhrttieU) I Vekers8-B R Cochrane 

3330 RHA8D0MANCER IR Hantov) j w Watts 8-8 T Ives 



Brighton results 

Gofev ton 

2.15 m 1, CHORnZOfJ Raid. 1-2 find; 
Bradfian Princess (T WHanu, 7-1k a, 
- — Ratonon,6-1L ALSORAN:16 


7-lk 3. Map MatasOca ® Mchcis. 9-4 
(av). also raSiTS Swrta 6 


Nazal Mill). 16 Optimism Ramad(60i), 20 
Taxi Iww7 tan. 21, 3L 4L t*. tOL Jra» 
RtzaeraU at Matton. Tote: ELBO: £1.40, 
£230. DF: £830. CSF: £3047. 2mta 
09.779BC. 

3.15 (1u4 1, SHAROtTS ROYALE 


Abnaohition, TO On Yor Pttaoasi 
Mam Music (StM. 20 Johnhaina, ZS 
Bearer. 33 Mr Mumbles («4 II ran. ^ 
1L lM.tohd. 1L R StobtaatMMdtaML 
TOM: £6.70; £230. £220. £2.10. OF. 
£9.10. CSF £25.09.Tricast £13186. . 


(1m IQ 1. IVORY REUS (W R 
m. 1 1-8 X Scattarad aww 


— — 8 ml a, n. sfi ha. i kl a. .. - 

WKams at Newmarket Take £130; 
£1.10, £140. £1.70. DF. £3-50. CSF. 
£4^7. 

245 (1m 2Q 1 . MMUS MAN (R Marae, 4- 
1): 2, Am I Rakal (C Ruder. 3. 
NaikrackartA Clark, 15-2). ALSO RAN: 3 
fav On To Gtory (8BA 4 Fhe Bay, 14 True 
WeidhL Leonidas (Son. 16 WMm WHm 
( 4th). 80 Salooni; 33 Cosmic FUgW. 
French Emperor, 50 TTna Race. 12 ran. 
HR: Singing Boy. hd, 3, «. W. 7. W 
HcMen et NwnwkeL Tota: £530; £1.70 
£1.70, £1.80. DF E72U CSF £2248. 
Tricast £12375. 


_ Swstom; 11-8 fai^-2, 1 

Bradshaw. 10-1); 8. Sharp Shot (W are (A McGlone 12-1 k 3, A apafel g 
f Ctireon. 16-1):3, Saad-Dotar(0 Dultfidd, Danp^ 6-1 RA^3 Fata 
£ 15-2h 4. Good N Sharp (J Low#. 10-1). Gold (4W. 7 Vestal name, 12 TrMa, 1* 


Qfston. Zk) Pepptao (6th). It Moores 
MetaL 14 Artistocrai VetveL Baxtargsta. 




Bafta Bams. Haanarty Hoofer, 16 
RossetLSincM Hand. 80 Henry's Venture, 

I7n .. airea a 0*C IhMtnh lflfwel i II faljtaae Diw 
MslHlBSS, nORDfl fiHHOT, NOW DW" 

netj5th). Rock SalL 19 ran. 1 KL XLlid, 21. 
1L R Whitaker at WMhartw. Toes: £1340; 
£240. £3.40. £200. £3.40. DF: £176.00. 
CSF £157.64. Tricast: £1.170.79. Imin 






00 SALOP ROUGE IB) |P Dcmerryl W Haajn M SLnma 

39 (191 020200 SHADY BLADE (B)|M Ham K Stone 8^8 C Dwyer 79 

PORM ns BEEN RUMOUREDiB-fll tracked from 33/1 to 11/1 before beating LEVS# LASS (8-8)1 Til at 
rwrl1 " Yarmouth (61. £887 good Sflpl 16, 1 2 mnl. LEVEN LASS (8-11) had previously Unshed 51 withal 


10 lo Pnm (9-01 «1 Hamtton mjtten |5(. £685. good. Sepi 1). SR BERKLEY (9-0). Hnkered for me brat time 
here '.i Cock n 5th BURCROFT (B- ill. uowty jway, ran on to tavsn 21 3rd to Derwent Vatay (6-11) >1 seMer 
over course and distance (£5681. aood to firm. Aug 20. 20 ran). WHITE OF MORN (WM 4SI 4th lo Smging 
Fanner 1 6-1 1) m moderate BjTti maiden i5t £1918. qood to firm. Sent 23. 13 rani. OUR HORIZON (8-7) 7tfi ai 
nuiwty last imu ume wnti SWYNFORD PRINCESS 17-10) DerwxL first tune out IB-5) tast-llrashiig 3 2nd to 
Cr Oilers CJmr (B-B1 at Beverley l5f. £908. gccxl May 17. 2 2 rani RHABDOMANCER (8-7) was head back m 3rd 
and THE HAGUE (B-8l out Crt hrst 9 Selection: BURCTOFT. 


4.15 BBC RADIO HUMBERSIDE STAKES (3-Y-O: £3277: 1m6f)(8 runners) 

2 (Q 022031 

4 m o 

5 ffi 04)2 

i a 30 

9 (7) 03 

15 (4) fflMK 

17 (3) 030004 

FC 

3rd. 

3.7i 
a-mi 
11 ram. 

S e l e ction : GALESA 




2.45 BBC RADIO YORK MAIDEN AUCTION STAKES (2-Y-O: £4,357: 1m) (16 runners) 


00 NIGHT VISITOR iRacogoem Clufil M McCormock 8-1 1 

0 SILK TOPPER iH Hcrtwni W Ha^ngs-Bass 8-11- . — 

BOCATOWER (J Aucbn) G Harwood 8-8 

30 BUCKR* MCLUSUOA lAOoAil LMl J ToHef $-8 

044 MAC'S MAESTRO (B) iM kKOcmnetf) W O Gorman 8-8 .. 

00 MAKING HtSTORY «M fou^wkl M AKnV) 8-6 ... 

0 SPOILED BRAT IJ Att-urol L Pwqon 8-8 ... .. 

«0 BEAT STREET IR Rurfurdsl C Orrttam 6S 

40 BOLD TANGENT (T.inqenr Industries Ltd) M Usher 8-5 . . .. 

24 BRWURlkV',MHagcasiJWWarti,a-ii. . . 

00 DRESS UP(T Kmdonj M H Eaaorbv 8-S 

00*00 FOURTH LAO IMPS L 03v«t R Hjimon B-5 

000 SAY YOU IT Samkirenl P.d Muctiek 8-5 

300 IN A SPM (R Hntnu M Brittain 8-2 

0 LONDON CRIES (Mr JolRvds Jun| B Hitts 6-3 

00 MR CHRIS CAKE MAKER (COL 44 Food? Ltd) M NaugWon 6-2.. 


W Wharton 74 — 
Pat Eddery — F9-4 
.. G Starkey — 10-1 
GOuflMd SS — 

T firaa 82 7-2 

R Cochrane 76 12-1 
. SCautben 93 — 

TWUama 93 6-1 

C Rutter (3) • 99 — 
B Thomson 87 9-2 

.. .. M Birch 

.. W Canon 89 — 

.. . J Red 

R Dailey 86 — 

_.... M Mb — 8-1 

R KBs — 


4.45 BBC RADIO CLEVELAND HANDICAP (E2J72: 1m 2f 110yd) (6 runners) 

4 (2) KMO10 MILL PLANTATION (C) (E MoBert G Wragg 7-9-7 Pal Eddery 

8 (31 003311 LYPHLAW (Sheikh MoWrwd) J Dirtop3-M W Careen 

9 (0) 418)132 HAWAHDEN (BJBF) (A Oore) B H*3 3-8-13 BThoraon 

10 (5) 213230 SAMHAAN (BWOZawawfl El Hanbuv 4-8-11 R Cochrane 

19 (4) 040234 MAGIC TOWER (Mh. S M Cwrtngtwv&nhW C Brttaki 3-7-12 TWMtana 

20 (6) 000000- THE LOD&: PRWCE (Quattalr HMts LBfl K Stone 47-11 PBnfw(7) 


3.15 (1m) 1, STATE BALLET (J 
aahkn, 7-1): 2. Be ChewWjP Robin- 
son, 10-1);3.PartdMMf>BeRa(POool( a 3- 
1). ALSO RAN: 74 My Fu Lu Siou Stii 6 
Weron Press. 10 Vision Of Wonder ffiffij. 
12 say You VWU404. 7 ran. lid, 8W. 9. 2L 
2XL I Balding at KkwsctaB- Tolc: £650; 
£3.10. ESAUuF E2Z90. CSF £8090. 

345 (7h 1 , THE UTE (T Wnoms, 4-1 ); 2. 
Golden Straw (J Reid, lO-lk 3. Timnen- 
dons Jet (E Guest, 4-1L ALSO RAN: 3 lav 
Miss (ticks (4th). 5 Touch The Sa*. 6 
Oorada (6th). Heaven^ Carol, 20 Mas 
Venezuela fern). Wlnsong Melody. 26 
Sequestration. 10 ran. NR: Love At Last 
nil. nk. 2L 2J4L 2L ICn L Bower at 
AJresford. Toe: £3Lfi0: £140. E1J0. 
£im DF £32-50. CSF £4441. Tricast: 
£163.99. Winner sold to N J Huxley for 
3JE>30gns. 

4.15 * 

tor):?. 


resuK stood. 

346 (2m) 1. NIMBLE NATIVE (J Lowe. 


21. 21. 1XC 21. 11. M Stoute at 

Tote: £2.10; £1.30, £1.90, £1.10. OF 
£11.90. CSF £20.18 
40(71)1. IYAMSKI(WRSv4nbum.8-i); 
- Canadian Guest (W Nawnas, 12-ttS 
A nw ahe Mn a (R HBa. 8-1L ALSO 
1taCleofa.4SI(elton.6fU5a.9l- r — 
10 Tzu-Wong. 12 Ivory Gu8«fa. U 
Drive, IS Mademoiiflta Magra. 




i (M Fry, 114 lavt 3. 
(W Careon. 6-1). ALSO 


RAN: 9-2 Indian Orator (SBi “ " 

Comazant(Gth). 7 Gratify (4tfiL 12 

7ran.thhd.4L 1KI.4L 1KLS Norton at 


High Hntand. Totr £330; El JO, £1.80. 
DF £450. CSF; £1473 3min 3415sec. 

415 (1m II) 1, BOLERO MAGIC (S 
Cauthen, 1-2 lav): 2, Ichanaa (W Carson, 
4-1 k 3, Shitting Skin (N Howe. 11-2). 
ALSO RAN: 33 No Idea (5tfi). 100 Latriaa 
Lodge (6thL Musical Aid <4Si|. 6 ran. 1»L 
0,48. 8 Cecfl at New ma rket Tote: 


- - , 15 ran. 

Corrals Joy, BnoadhuraL XL 1KL1XL2L 
1KL W> rastings^ass . at N ew nari ta. 
Tote: £9.90: E160. £310. £363 OF 
£16483 CSF; E109J7. Tricast £75738. 
430 (5Q1, BONNY UGOrnA ShOUhS^ 

‘-■uxwi 


ward for 


£366. 1m 5651 sec. 

_ 445 (lirt 1. DOLLAR SSKB1 (R 
Cochrane. 9-2): 3 Angel Chy (W Carson. 
7-IJfcS, Golden Ttae (K Barley, 14-T 
ALSO RAN: 10-11 (av 0« Maestro fflthL . 
Sraan (5th), 12 Dafk-c-l. 14 Reel Of Goto, 
rn y 4th). 25 Stitxr- ““ ■*» 


go Of Gold, tonsil 1 m. 

Slanfco.33KinQsRing.SJtytin-T5ran.21iL 
hd, 1KL 2L2L R SheatinratlletanarM. 
To»: £4.80; £1.60, 1243 £*.43 Oft 
^380. CSF: £31.77. Tricaat: E1BM8. 
Rncapoh E29443 

Devon & Exeter 

Gataptim 


sp ttcw«v 




Jimmy, Stray No More, 
tage. 3L DM. 2L hd. KL 

rfcet Tola: E4.7D: £1-70. 

£420. DF. £9.40. CSF £37.63 

Irnto 42.42sec. 

Ptacepoh £12395 



Newmarket Tote: £1/43 £1-13 £373 DF 
£453 CSF £945. 


445 (101 41) 1. STORM HOUSE (Mr T 
Thomson Jones. 10-11 fav); 2 . Our Hero 
(Mr R Hutchinson. 2-lt 3 Hataht Of 


(Mr R Hutchinson. 2-1): 3 Height Of 
Samaer OMr M Amwtsge. 7-1). ALSO 
RAN: 9 wid (Bnger Mils Hawser (5thL 


CO DIUI SILK TOPPER IS- 1 11 VnuM improve on a 1W /m to New ennuoe i^r-uj ox rrawuuiy »«,. ■ 
runivi good ro firm Aun 16. 27 rani. BUCKRA MELLISUGA put up he best effort first time out (9-01 


Course specialists 


66 Hl mocTB (Btti). Kafimponn 7 ran. I 
Cafisoloa 2L shfaL 5M/ 12. f&. KBras 
U Upper Lemboum. To»K £1.73 £1 
£1.73 DF: £2.00. CSF- £3-11. 
Pleeepoh £1480 


Wolverhampton 

Gotojp straight course, good to fan. 
round, ram 

En-Sn (G Baxter, 7-2 JMay). ALSO RAN: 


Powetl, 4-6fav);3 
3, Golden Thar ' 
Kennant Tote: 

£523 CSF £801 
220 (2m If bdto) t. 
Caplen. 11-10 fay); 2, Mr 
Reoettow (9-2). 6 ran. 1 


*■ 

It. " , 

-iV • 


wiwn 1 3rd '10 Roman Gunni.f i9-0i m a Newmarket maiden (71. £4484. good. Aug 22. 16 ran). MAKING 
HISTORY 18-111 was Sid a snaac backward when 8M 9th lo Three Tads (8-11) at Lecaster (1m. £96*. firm, 
Sopr ;? 16 rani SPOILED BRAT (9-01 rmde signilicant lale headway when 4'->i 5th to the wefl regarded Noble 
Mimarei at Lptcootor >71. CC794. firm Sept 23. 19 ran) BOLD TANGENT (94)) was running on over 61 at 
Goodwood fast time when n Sih to Native Dress (9-01 (£2335. good. Sept 29, 18 ran). BRIMUR (8-1 1) ran green 
ai Npttinqnam iBIl bohmd Fourwalk betiw nidged on a l ’..-1 2nd to Murphy (8-1 1) at Cattenck (7T. E822. good. 
AUQ14 (2 ram Setection' BUCKRA MELLISUGA 


Selection 1 BUCKRA MELLISUGA 


J Dunlop 
GWragg 
PCokt 

BHanbury 
BHAs 
J Hmdkjy 


TRAINERS 

Winnere Runners Per Cent 

» 195 30.5 P WEddery 

13 65 230 W Carson 

9 50 180 T Own 

11 62 177 RHifa 

3* 177 130 T fires 

8 61 13.1 MHte 


177 RHifa 

13.8 T. 1 **? 


JOCKEYS 

Winners Runners Percent 
59 298 19.8 

57 297 190 

B 45 170 

7 43 . 133 

19 175 16.3 

10 63 ISO 


Newcastle 


CHELTENHAM 


2.110 Pellmcoun. 
2.35 Ooncormick. 
3.10 High Renown. 


Selections 

B> Mandarin 


3.45 Polly's Pal. 

4 JO Captain Dawn- 
4.55 Paris Match. 


Going: firm 

2.0 G0THERINGT0N NOVICE HURDLE (Div I: £1.402: 2m) (5 runners) 

1 OFOO-1 DON PIPER iR Panaw J Jenkra 4-1 1-6 - JWMto 

2 0-1 PELLMC0URT (0) |A Spen») R Akehurst 4-1 1-6 RDmtadOdy 

4 P0-2 NEW ROMNEVlR A E Bail Lid) FWrter 4-11-1 _ PScudmera 


4 PO-2 NEW ROirn«Y|R A E Bait Ud) FWrter 4-11-1 — PSCUdwera 

10 0- SCHLEMMER )P Hcpkmsi 0 EiingW 4-11-0... — MPenen 

!J GREAT AUNT SALLY IT BatievlTBatay 5-1310 _ BDovritogp) 

2.35 AJAX HANDICAP CHASE (Amateurs: £3.194: 2m 4f) (12 runners) 

3 20300- WILT YEOMAN (COltMrsHAhvani J Gifford 7-11 -7_ T Grantham (4) 

4 12JPOO-2 CLONCORMCK (CO) IM Bradstockl F Waiiuyn 11-11-5.. . . Ill Bradstock (7) 

5 12-2212 GOWAN HOUSE (DJ3F) (J Wafcurl W A StoDhenson 7-11-5 T Reed 

6 012-043 TAKEFENCE IBJ3) tMru M Henriquesi M Henriques 8-10-13 M Amytage (7) 

7 P3F22-1 BOOK OF KELLS (01 iR Beeson) J Bundell I *-10-13 T Thomson Jones 

9 4-2B4U0 FOOT STICK IT Geakci G Baksng 10-137 — AGaafcefT) 

10 00/142-4 KB.TON.HMtM Tory) P Tory 10-1043. - XToryQ 

It 00-003P FLAMING THKiJ PPirnioni PO Connor 8- UW) MRfchafricm 

i: 440P-P3 QAKPMME (B) Ip PitclMfl D FlCher 11-104) D Pilcher (7) 


» 3-1 
84 9-4 
• 99F6-4 
— 10-1 
14-1 


3.10 RAPID SHAVE-CLOSE SHAVE HANDICAP HURDLE (£2,674: 3m 1ft (9 nirmere) 

2 ®SPG!?J!: HS* RENOWN (CO) rDewfresh Mushrooms) J Jenkins 6-11-12 S Sherwood 91 7 

l rSiT N W G Batanq 6-1 V3--— — GBrarSey » 4 

§ B " ID 1 J Baun^NS-VV-a (6ex) D Dutton 90 RJ 

I ff07*L CRAFTSMAN (B)(M Ingram) Mrs N Smith 5-10-12 - Jessica C-Jones (7) 89 - 

J S^ s 2Y ra ^l MK ° [ N>^) wvl 5P mmanB * 10 ‘ 1 ' 1 P Scudamore 9613 

U PLATA TORO (D Fisher) W Tumef7-10-1tT Tracy Tomer m *99 & 

(fl fasten MSs A Funks® fl-10-6 — DWonnactdt (7) 89 8 

18 004420 ASTON BAMt (B) (R Wngfa) P Hobbs 5-lM SHo^nd 76- 

3-45 COLGATE-PALMOLIVE HANDICAP CHASE (£3.70(h 3m) (8 runners) 

\ CRACK A JOKE (D RantSelT KI7-11-9(6ex) — RCnnk 97 4. 

3 * 1™ (Mrs F K wh Ofaerll-11-7 R Dmanody 94 5- 

i FW««r 941-r — Mr C Brooks (4) «99 3 

I JWiesj s Payne Mi-4 UM— — — B Storey 97 F& 

S ROLLED tamp weedom C wesson MM — J Host 97 7- 

I EifSf ggiA_( G Hubbard) G Hubttad 7-10-7 — Mm G Aimyfaae (4) 9514- 

,5 “PW2; SSifiP 1 (W Gala) J afford 7-IM RRevre 91 4- 

10 OyiPO-F CONCLUSIVE (R Shaw) J Jenkjns 7-104 J Wltitai 8210- 


91 7-2 

90 4-1 
90F3-1 

89 

9613-1 
• 99 S-1 
89 8-1 
H 10-1 
76 — 


Going: firm 

Harnet. Denenatav Danae Aratoe. Predme 
Ashton. Gnnsen. 14 ran. NR: AbecMa 
Uflglc. W. 2W. 1)H. a 2L G Harwood at 
TWe: £ 150: £1.10. Cl .40. 
wr £230. CSF £4.42. in*, 
aMMoAfler a stewards’ inquiry the 


Mw (G Baxter, 7-2JMav): ALSO RAN: 
7-2 8-fav Emfly’s Pride. 4 La Vto En Rose. 
7 Joara. lONabne(Mi). l6Karonga.20 

y~4 14 ran. «L nk. 3L 5L 1«. P 
Cote at tMwcomhe. Tot* £10.10; £330. 
£158. £150. DF £17.10. CSF £80-13. 


CSF £1943. 

3-0 ®TI & till l, nmHH wm . . . T- 
WMto.7-1):2. AHed Newcastle (1-3 toff; 3- 
African Star (12-1L 5 ran. 9. d htJT 
Hodges. Tow: ESjfib: £180, E1.10. OF 
£3JXTcSF£gL50- 

. 8JB (2m i« hefle) 1. Sen Cwtae.ptay 
ttotalL 4-1); 2, Ttad-Tum A 

Coral Harbour t£lL 8 ran. 41 251 A 
Ingham. Tow- £3-80: £2J30, £150.' DP 


' v - -. . 


V*'* 


toatom. Tow: E3-8C 
saro. CSF £15.17. 




« 110yd) 1. LOVE YOU ROSY 
(PtuiEddmy. 14-^2. Mlttt. Mari. (WR 


*• ® G Magic (K 
RAN: 5 Lfra*a^ 
^1). !4GOFWigof4jh). 20 TtoerGtaB 
^i^ S3 Chariow offira. 7 ran. NR: 
R edafly. Ty rannise. 1KL 4L 10L 81. 2L Mrs 

&3s’sa. s g^si?^s:-@' 

£27.18. Bought m iOOOgns.- 


48 (3m if ch) I. Wror Wanior fS 

matM»****» 


>:*• • 
■ • ■ 

&-:> 


285 pm 28 TjCAPRIOORN BLUE (S 
Cautiwi. 3-1K & Bfach Dfamond (J Low. 


“J58L NATOfirSSOWgH Brown, 
Sjfc2. gut.QnA Hyer (D Brown. 4-1): 3. 

7-U: ALSO RAN: 
7-2 tn Peter-fi Btoe. H-28ttztag Ffigb.8 


.430 Qm If hdte) t, I 
Gray. 10-1K 2, Ttircy B 
Carofine Ranger (40-1 L I 
Rogers. Tem-taaW; t2J 
DF^O-ia CSF £30.17. 
PfacepotOT^. 


1L 8 ran. 4L 


Cl.m£2.BG 




Blinkered first time 


YORK: 2.15 Nfr Berkeley, JMn JetaM. 
Salop Rouge. 3. 15 Botin Brriy. 


PERTH 


Selections 

By Mandarin 

2.15 Balnenno. 2.45 Jondaie. 3.15 Trotneros. 
3.45 Glory Snatcher. 4.15 Isftkhm 4.45 Tumble 
Jim. 


345 UTHAM HANDICAP CHASE (£1,545: 3m) (4) ' 

1 140 KUMON SUNSHME (BA03H D-Y90BM1 S-1M ' 

c Hartm* . 

5 2134 MaERB((CfeG Mom 11-109 * 

5-1 tomcher. 7-4 Kumon SuraWw. 3-1 M e l erta. .; 




is 


• « 8-1 
S8F3-1 
93 4-1 
92 6-1 


420 STOOD CHALLENGE CUP HANDICAP CHASE (£3343: 2m) (6 runners) 

X WARCOAL WALLY (D)yMureeti)RH0d9« 7-11-10 BPoweN 96 3-1 

\ 5®SI*2f , !? ST fK*rs S SMltman) T BaMM 8-11-1 Pax) G Hater (4) 94 3-1 

\ 204-117 CAP TAI N DAWN (P Hopwns) J Otitord 10-10-12 A Rom! 65 F2-1 

5 mi iDwirtiia) Denys Smtn 8-104 a Stringer 96 8-1 

d jSmuPS ICD1 IH Hrckmanl R Hckman 6-10^ JBrnra K 14-1 

8 410BP-3 NORTH YARD (O) (Unity Firm Hoi Can Ud) P Hobbs TD-1(M GMeriuS *09 10-1 

455 GOTHERINGTON NOVICE HURDLE (Div It £1 .31 0: 2m) (3 runners) 

§ *2252" 5““?EE^PFoiinFWfiitor 8-11-1 — P fl f, ■ ! ■ «>■■ a«9 3-1 

c 320t ^ APPEAL (Mrs jjRqbtosonlDLwaams 4-1 1-0 _ h<w 97 8-1 

6 2 PARIS MATCH u Ross) JJenkms 4-1 l-O.. — J Wlste 97F44 


w FQP04X) CRAWFORD CROSS (Mrs P Tory) T Tory 12 10-0 Mrs R Vickery 

IS 340&0 CARRKS6H4 WLL iSoorrswordS Ud) J S King 15-10*0 .. BBu G Armytage 
140000 TUN3XNBERG (Mrs £ Mitcn&l>N Mucnet iS-lO-O .... 


BUG Armytage (4) 
TMncbe8(7) 


Course specialists 


3 2M04- KAMADEE (Mrs P Foul) F Winter 8-11-1 -- 

5 3290- CCKOTr AFreAL. fMrs J Robinson) O L W8oms«-ll-0_„ 

6 2 PARIS MATCH u Ross) J Jenkins 4-1 1-0.. 


TRAINERS 

Wtttwrs Rumwrs Par Cent 


F VVrmar 

38 

l9d 

195 

F Wjlavr 

22 

137 

181 

J Gifford 

18 

308 

87 

(Only qualifiers) 





R Rowe 
p Scudamore 
SMorsneTd 
(only quoti her sj 


JOCKEYS 

Winners Runners 
13 131 

22 230 

S 109 


PBrCent 

99 

96 

83 


• Tony Ives, suspended for four days for careless riding at Wolverhampton on Mon- 
da). was again in trouble wife fee stewards at fee Midlands course yesterday. The 

■ Ai * L-rM urac liniiH fCO uuSaL Id aAa _ A . _ _ ft * * »«’-l 


appointment next season as first jockey 


Royal trainer. Ian Balding. 


Going; firm 

2-15 BRIDGEND JUVENILE NOVICE HURDLE 

(3-Y-O: £885: 2m) (3 runners) 

2 DHLS AHEAD G Moore 11-0 MRmoad 

4 SHARK FIGHTER D McCain 11-0 KDoofan 

5 2 BALNBBNQ Denys Snta. IM - AtSSj 

*-5 Batoerirax 7-4 80s Ahaad, 7-2 Shark Rghar. 

245 TULLOCH NOVICE CHASE (£1,156: 2m) 0) 

| J®«ALE J ftsdbume 9-tl-S HtaSBradfami 

5 M ^WHEA K Mbs Z Green 6-ll-fi DHotat 

7 OP/ THE G0B3EL Mrs WTufee 7-11-5 TGDon 

4-7 Jond&le. 5-1 Mdferesk. 16-1 Tha GoesaL 

3.15 TENNENTS HANDICAP HURDLE (£1,643: 
2m 4ft (3) 

« w VcSfM 9-11-7 Hr K Anderson (7) 

S S5S ^M. Da "l ra SmWi 5-11-4 C Grant 

7 303- TOMMY GE (Cfe Ms J Goodfetaw 7414 JKKtam 
8-11 Pounemos. 154 Tromeros. lOOOO Tommy Gb. 


415 CRAIGIE NOVICE HURDLE (£685: 2m 4ft ® : 

2 03-1 0O93tALCHANP0S(C) JBridDU«n9 5-1V5 ‘ 

n 2 « ®22^Wta*ORetatey4.1W_*. J F3£rart . 

w- S5SSK«CP»tarwFl3 Ktoohti . 

« SHESHOONS LAST W McGttie 6-KM3 . 

.17 0-9P 90VERBCN LAD(B)G Moore mklZ^Hl iSS 

6-1 ^ Sortreign Lrt- ; 

6-1 Sheshoora Last. 12-1 BunswarK. 


445 MUIRTON HANDICAP CHASE (£1^7&2m)(2) 


i is : 

1-5 Tunibte Jtou 9-2 MiBary Crown, 


Course spetialisti?- 


i, 1 ? 


jwwajtSBSsiBr'-** 


1 4 ^ 




39 


id 


•“if 




THE TIMES WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 8 1986 

Facilities provide a key to the deve lopment of talent 

Coe out to open doors 

to British success 


Coe 


probablv 


■ , 
li.. 




i , 

' * v. 

. -v 


il 


J n. 


'■'■ft* 




' J L'.-. . 


Sebasiian 

sioppJd by being 

an emmv ”?Wing round 

ground K > n, f " 1 ': a ! c s P° ns 

has done rr^T ck lhan he 

HoSj.'MI lo have won 
lilies ran £ c '■• 500 metres 
ground 3 ")^ ev,cted from a 

hoTf„' h r e Me 
lc « recognizabK^ 3 3nd 

the SiSn 3 'S^airman of 

than Cou . nciL rathCT 
fecilfe "?£? seeing training 

in\aluahip h £ cx Penence was 

work U fil e :J He o approaches h “ 

■2, °; lh ® Spons Council 
2,' f e quiet commit- 

thm h! d uttenuon to detail 

aSJj J T? rked his “Meries 

ld?h'.r B hesa Vs: “Whatever 
,s ‘ n tandem with the 

l" sg^ ltisnQIa °^ 

Insight into needs 
of competito rs 

nivi? .^airmanship of the 
;;7™P' C Review, which de- 

uietf r- Bnta,n s needs for the 

i Games and resulted in a 
million grant from, the 
5>pyrts Council and a £1.5 
million sponsorship from the 
Minet Group, has already 
given him wide-ranging in- 
sight into the requirements of 

manv competitors. Personal 0 o 

experience adds to the picture. ^The public is sometimes 
.k pnonl V 15 ihcilities, both ignorant of what is happening 
inc provision for -specialist here, although I do not think 
acti\ ines and the best use of 
those facilities that already 
exist. 

“Too many facilities lie 
dormant for much of the 
time." Coe said. “We will be 
knocking on the door of 
industry. Some of the best 
grounds, to which I have gone 
across hedges and through 
hedgerows, belong to. say, 
some of the larger insurance 
outfits in London. 

“The question is: how can 
an ordinary punter get on 
facilities which may be used 
only a couple of days a week? 


By John Goodbody 

The answer is often that you 
cannot.” 

The importance of the dual 
use of facilities, with the 
public being able to play sport 
on those grounds owned by 
educational establishments 
and companies, is not new. 
“Buu” Coe said, “it has not 
been as successful as we would 
like. It is still a joke, still a 
farce." 

Coe. who has ■’ been an 
international athlete for 10 
seasons and a member of the 
Sports Council since 1983, 
points out there has been a 
massive improvement in the 
number and type of facilities. 

“Most people m most bor- 
oughs can train on synthetic 
surfaces and yon could not 
have said that ra 1976. But 
there is still a need for large 
indoor halls and specialist 
areas like cycling tracks." 

He is particularly sensitive 
to specialist demands because 
of his experience with the 
Olympic -Review and the 
Sports Council's relationship 
with the governing bodies. 

“Pan of my appointment 
was to help the Council get 
even closer to the governing 
bodies. Of course, we give 
them grant aid but we want a 
full relationship with them, 
partly because they can help 
us in our strategy of mass 
participation.” 

Another large segment of 
his work will be promoting the 
general image of the Council 


accountable to the public be- 
cause public finance is in- 
volved. But he also thinks the 
Sports Council must put their 
case strongly for increased 
Government aid. 

"Sport has not always made 
its case to the best of its 
ability. 

Not playing the 
political game 

“The best example is the 
huge discrepancy between the 
Arts Council grant and the 
Sports Council grant. Wehave 
tended not to play the political 
game.” 

Coe does not believe that 
sport is more entitled to 
Government money lhan the 
arts or any other area of public 
spending. It is rather that 
when you are in the arena for 
resources you have to provide 
the figures and facts and 
financial reasons that 
strengthen your case. “We are 
not preaching to the 
converted.” 

He is used to the experience 
of converting people to his 
views by amassing in- 
controvertible evidence. In 
1984. many people did not 
think Coe could recover from 
illness to retain bis Olympic 
title. The Sports Council have 
an unyielding character as a 
vice-chairman. 


%• 

*/**fr-4»**fr*‘ 

m- 



Sebastian Coe: creating die right image 


people think badly of us. 

“The Sports Council is a 
good story. We have a lot of 
sporting and technical ability 
here, men like John Smith, the 
chairman, and Trevor Brook- 
ing from football. Jim 
Cochrane from tennis and 
Charles Palmer, the chairman 
of the British Olympic 
Association.” 

Coe believes the 32-mem- 
ber Council who stand be- 
tween the Government and 
the individual sports bodies 
and whose annual report is 
published tomorrow, must be 


When ageing is in the mind 


Sebastian Coe, who cele- 
brated his 30th birthday last 
week, will make no final 
decision until at least next 
month about whether he win 
continue his international ca- 
reer (John Good body writes). 

“At the moment J am plan- 
ning to compete in 1987,” Coe 
said- “I am restarting training 
and I will see how It goes. 

“1 tend to be slightly dismis- 
sive of age. As one physiolo- 
gist I know says, ‘Age is a 
number, not a state of fitness.' 
Western coon tries are mes- 
merized by age. In the United 


States If yon have not made it 
by the age of 30, then that is it 
in sporting terms.” 

Coe points out that last 
season he came within a stride 
of the 1,500 metres world 
record in his fastest time for 
five seasons. “And there is 
genuinely nothing in my train- 
ing that I am less capable of 
doing than I was five or six 
years ago.” he said. “The only 
thing 1 wfll concede, and that 
only marginally, is the diffi- 
culty of being able to stack 
tight np together seven races 
in nine days, like in Los 


Angeles for the 800 and 1,500 
metres.” 

Coe sees no trouble in 
combining his regular work for 
the Sports Council and the 
Health Education Council 
with his athletic career. “Run- 
ning has always been part of 
an integrated day. I could not 
cope with just training." 

But be says there is also the 
consideration of whether he 
wants to submit himself to 
another routine for next year's 
world championships in 
Rome. 


SKIING 


in coiiL 
k’izee; 
iovcnr 


Swiss set ultimate 
test for downhill 

From a Special ^ori-espondent, Crains Mdnfaa»~ u r~*: 


it 


Racers in the wometfs down- 
hill ai ihe “world alpine 
championships here early next 
vear must negotiate the most 
difficult course to be found 
anv where, warns- Walter Loser, 
a senior executive of the Swiss 
organizing committee. 

The women's track, which is 
under construction, includes a 
hair-raising “S" bend which be 
savs will, test technical skills to 
extreme limits. An important 
warning indeed for competitors 
touching 70mph. 

The course snakes 2.45km 
and drops 665m to the same 
finish as the men. whose down- 
hill will be over a nearby, 
siraighter 3.67km .course, drop- 
ping ^81 m. 

Organizers of the champion- 
ships are expecting promotion 
io cost about flOmillion- 
Among the first international 
companies to become involved 


is Guinness, who have .com* 
pleted a £500,000 sponsorship 
this week 

Grans Montana is fast becom- 
ing one of Switzerland's fore- 
most . centres for sporting 
activity; Local authorities have 
spent mote than £100 minion in 
three years to provide facilities 
to appeal internationally. A 
nine-hole golf course, designed 
by Jack NJcklaiis, is being 
constructed and preparation is 
also well advanced in the build- 
ing of an ice rink and huge 
dome-covered tennis courts. 

They are also building a cable 
car system to take skiers io the 
top of Belba-Lui, the start of the 
men's downhill, while to ensure 
there will be plenty of snow 
during tbe world championships 
a computerized piping system is 
being installed to provide arti- 
ficial snow. 


BADMINTON 

Baddeley gets 
high seed 
after success 

'Steve Baddeley. England's top 
men's player, has been rewarded 
foragooaron of results by bang 
seeded joint 146. 3 for the 
British Airways Masters tour- 
nament in London, from Octo- 
ber 22 to 26. it is the Sussex left- 
handers highest seeded position 
for a Category One Grand Prix, 
and tbe Commonwealth Games 
champion shares the seeding 
position with Misbun Stkek. 

look Sctgjarta Indonesia’s 
World Cup champion, is tbe 
favourite, with Morten Frost, of 
Denmark, as second seed for tbe 
event, which begins at the 
Kensington leisure centre then 
moves to the Albert Haft. 

There is a surprise m the 
women's seedings with Sumiko 
Kitada, of Japan, gening the 
No. 1 position in preference to 
Helen Troke, of Southampton. 
SEEDWQS. Mas 1, 1 Sugiano (IndoJ: 2, M 
Fran (Dwifc equal 3. S Baddetby (Eng) and 
M Sk»k (Malay}; 5 to 8 Sza Yu (Aus), L 

K (tndo). E Kumawan (indo) Z 
K9ma). Woman: 1. 8 Kitada 
(Japan): Z HTrofca (Eng); equal 3. K 
Larsen (Den) and Z YUH (China). 


Just reward for Eastbourne 


Eastbourne's triumph In 
clinching the National League 
rifle is fitting reward for the 
learn which has had more than 
its share of bad blows in recent 
tears. The Eagles won in style 
with three wins in three matches 
.»vcr the weekend. The first was 
it Hackney on Friday, and then 
in Sunday on their own tiny 
Arlington circuit they beat New- 
■asile and then Hackney in a 
louble-header. 

I he outstanding performerou 
■iunda* was a youngster-Martin 
itougard. son of the Eastbomie 
i remoter and former Uimbte- 
lon rider. Bob *>»«»»***> 
.inched up 26 points m the »» 
■cliches and successfully de- 
roded his Silver Helmetm 
allies against Dave Rjackburn, 
f Newcastle, and Alan 
logridge, of Hackney. 

The recent history of Ead- 
uurne has been chequered, to 
a , the least. They were mem- 
e’r-i of the British 
US5, but because of contractual 
ifGcullies wilb cert" 11 nders 



SPEEDWAY 

Keith Mackfin 


the promoters decided to drop 
down to the National League. 

They immediately , won the 
Challenge Cup by defeating the 
1985 champions Ellesmere Port 
over two legs, but tbe Eagles will 
regard this season's champion- 
ship as a much greater achieve- 
ment. They have had to use a 
rider replacement for most of the 
season after Colin Richardson 
was involved in a crash at 
Exeter. Richardson sustained 
injuries which at first threatened 
his life hot las since made a 
remarkable recovery and could 
well take bis place in the 
Eastbourne team for the Knock- 
pntCup final against M u d enhall 
later this month. 

MUdenhall will be without the 
services of Rob Henry, who bad 
a bad fall in the match against 
Arena. Essex a fortnight ago. 


Henry Is in hospital with severe 
spinal injuries which have cast a 
doubt over his riding future. He 
had planned to retire at tbe end 
of this season. 

Eastbourne deserve their suc- 
cess If only because they have 
put such vision and faith into 
their junior track next to the 
main arena. On Sunday lunch- 
times schoolboy hopefuls turn 
up to take a spin on the junior 
track is tbe hope of taking tbe 
first steps towards a career in 
speedway. 

Martin Dongard and Dean 
Standring are two of the East- 
bourne team who have pro- 
gressed from the 100m track 
riding 50ce bikes, aad one of , the 
great names in the sport, Dave 
Jessup, a former world No. 2, 
also started oat in similar fash- 
ion. Jessup will be riding against 
Eastbourne in the Knockout Cup 
final after dropping down from 
the British- League last year to 
bead the National League av- 
erages with Mudenhall. 


SQUASH RACKETS 

Robinson enjoys high 
speed with Intercity 


The first day of the 1986-87 
American Express premier 
league was, like the curate's egg, 
good in parts for Ian Robinson, 
the manager and fourth string 
player for yesterday’s victorious 
ItneiCiTy-Cannons leant. 

Robinson, at 34, has realized 
bis fondest dreams in squash. As 
marketing director of Tdecourt 
limited, be is the new co-owner 
of the only a D- transparent glass 
showcourt in Britain, now 
permanently situated at Can- 
nons Club under the arches of 
London's Cannon Street 
station. 

He has moved into a manage- 
ment and expansion role in his 
game, leaving coaching matters 
to bis team captain and 
Telecourt partner, Neil Harvey, 
and claims his competitive 
squash is more enjoyable than 
for many years. 

On the other hand Robinson 
was the only InterCity-Cannons 
loser against Visco-Monroe, the 
newly promoted Yorksh ire cl ub. 
finishing exhausted 6-9. 9-0. 9- 
10, 8-10 to Steve Bateman. And 
just 18 hours earlier he lost the 
Yorksh ire county final to Ashley 


Naylor. 


o cap it all, as fourth string 
yesterday he- played on an 
outside dosed court while his 
colleagues performed happily in 
front of a packed house of 300 
spectators on his glass court. 


By Colin MpQirillan . 

Cannons Club won the na- 
tional league championship last 
season while Robinson was 
managing the now-defunct 
Arm ley side from Leeds. He 
joined Cannons to launch bis 
court operation with Harvey 
under the corporate banner of 
tbe dub and with team sponsor- 
ship from British Rail high- 
speed passenger service. 

“It has been a very demand- 
ing summer, finalizing the new 
arrangements at Cannons, 
building the court and preparing 
for the national league,” Robin- 
son said after yesterday’s defeat 
“And 1 have discovered that at 
my age four days of continuous 
high-level squash is a touch too 
Haiti." 

Robinson is, nevertheless, 
pleased with his situation. “1 am 
just where I always wanted to be 
at this sine of my career. 
Playing has become a joy again 
because I only go on court to 
complete. 1 could not miss the 
Yorkshire championship. I have 
played in it 14 times and won 
eight times. But right now I wish 
I bad taken a quiet six-day 
training approach to the 
season's first day.” 


CRICKET 


RESULTS: (Cannons players first}: J 
HKtax M T nWansod, 1-ft, $5. B-& 9-4; D 
Lee b» M Mactosn. 9*S. 9MJ. B-5: N Norway 
OS C WHstrop, 3-Z 8-2, 9-0: 1 Robinson 
lost to S Bateman, 64), 9-0. M0. 8 - 10 ; R 
Graham bt J Utoy. 9-1, SHL 9-0. 


Kenyon drops a place 


Phil ixenyi 
champion, .has slipped from 
third io fourth place in ihe latest 
world grand prix rankings. His 
place has been taken by Ross 
Thorne.’ of Australia, who has 
moved up four places. 

Ross Norm a a, of New Zea- 
land. maintains' his lead at the 
top with Jahangir Khan, the 
world champion, climbing from 
sixth to second. The biggest leap 


is made by Rodney Martin, aged 
20, from Australia, wbo has 
moved from 22nd to eighth after 
his recent Hong Kong open 
success. 

RANKINGS; fop 1ft 1. R Norman 




ft Thome (Aus). 1.5624; 4. P Kenyon 
. 1.434; 5. 6 Davenport (NZ), 1 50k5; 


(Eng). 1 .434; 5. S Davenport (NZ), 1 
6. TNancanowMus}, 1.194-6; 7. R Martin 
(Aus). 1.076: B. Oamar Zairian 
1.051 B: 9. C Robertson (Aus), 1 ' 

G Brats (Eng). 1A01. 


a.pst 


TODAY’S FIXTURES 



cor makers con match the charisma behi nd the three 

“““"•“"“S3 



Donimissit 


AT YOUR NEWSAGENT 65P. 


FOOTBALL 

Kick-oH 730 ontesa stated 
LMtawowte Cup 
Second round, sacond leg 
First leg scorn In txtekats 

Aston VRta m v Rsaifino 111.. 

Cbeisea (Q)t 

Leeds (2) v( . 

Man C«y (0) <r Southern) ( 

Newcastle f 

Nonncfi (0) v I 


Nottm Forest (0) v Brighton ( 

Stoke ( 1 ) V StfWrtbunr (2).„ 

SwUidon(0)vSoutbenip(on(3).. 
Tottenham 0) v BftftiAy (2) (745). 



Scottish premier division 

Celtic v Hearts 


Dundee LKd v Motfwrwefl 

Falkirk v Aberdeen 

Hamiton v Dundee 

Hibernian v Clydebank 

St Mirren v Rangers — , 

Scottish first division 

BrecWn City v Airdrfe J 

Dunfermline v Dumbarton 

East Fife v Montrose 

Morton v KHmamock 

Partck v Forfar Ath 

Queen -of Sth v Clyde 

FA TROPHY: Rut round nnUfrtin 
Mptay* Cattfaton Town v Rytwpe 
Community 07451: Caernarfon Townv 
Shepsned Cnansrtxwa,- Saitash urn v 
Frame (7 45) 

GM VAUXHALL CONFERENCE: Boston 
Utd v Ntfaam Cheltenham v Bath: 
Kettanngv Kxtteumnsur: Maktetore v 
BifiaW. Scarborough Y AiHnenam, Way- 
TnoumvBamat. . 

VAUXHALL -OPEL LEAGUE: Premier <*- 
viaien: YdovH v Famborougn. 
MULTIPART LEAGUE: Oswestry v Ban- 
— f J5S2HS2T .* southpore 


SOUTHERN LEAGUE: Soidhefn dMskm: 
Woodlord v Thanet 

FA YOUTH CUP: Second uuaHyfaig 
round: Maidenhead v. Uxbridge. 
CENTRAL LEAGUE: first dMaiort: Black- 
burn V Aston VBa (7.0; Sheffield Utd » 
Newcastle. Second mNon: 

Barnsley (7.0K Boftoo v N 
(7.01: Doncaster v Dartngton 
HuddersftoM v Pori Vale: Scumhoipe v 
Grimsby. Postponed: wm Brom v YorK. 

football Combination: Crystal Pal- 
ace V OPR: Miawnfl * Fuftam (Z0), 

COUNTY ANTRIM SHIELD: FtaaL 
Gtantoran * Gtanmgn (at the OvaL 730). 

RUGBY UNION 

THORN-EMJ COUNTY CHAMPIONSHIP: 
Norm Mtdtentfc y Notts. Lines and Darbys 

E l Mosetoy. 7.15): Staffordshire y 
uraGtareme (at Burton-on-Trem. 7.15). 
CLUB MATCHES: Bath v South Wales 
FDhoa (7.15); Bndgend v Cardiff (7.15): 
Bnstof v MMropoiafl Police (7.15): Caov 
bnoge unweratty v SLMarys HcotBat 
Surrey v Bnttth Rofcoe (hnber Court); 
Hariequmo v Louphb<xough Students (at 
Stoop Memory Ground, 5.1ft Newbodge 
v Neath (7.15); Ortel v Obey (7.15): 
Portypooi r Gloucester (7.0). 

OTHER SPORT 

BASKETBALL: British rasters. 
itHmd: IF Cleveland vCajderdaM _ 
era; Lambetn Topcats v CBS Cenfanans 
Cdcnoner f^caierRidemv Pew- 
borouqh Jets (8.0): Swaafon ftelws v 
Happy Eamr BraefcneO Pirates (B.0). 
BOXING: RAF v Southern Commas (at 
Ko«a). 

EQUESTRIANISM: Horse of tf» Year 
Show (at WaWiey Arena). 

SNOOKER: Tannems UK Open, preilml- 
narv rounds (at wfecteo Coroi caubs n 
Bury. Man cnetnv. ttewwnJoWBews. 
Marsayside. woiwstar. Laeaswr. Saf- 
ton. Merseysue] 

TENNIS: Refuge Aasowaob national 
: (at Teltorci Rsequm 

am — - - 


Border is 
still in 
the driving 
seat 

From Richard Sireeton 
Rajkot 

Allan Border, with a calm 
assured 91 not out steered 
Australia to victory over India 
here yesterday m the sixth and 
final onc-day international. In 
perfect batting conditions, the 
tourists urere left to make 261 in 
48 overs and Border made 
cenain there was no faltering as 
they ran out winners by seven 
wickets with nine balls to spare. 

India, put in to bat. reached a 
good score, thanks to a forceful 
century from Lam ha - the man 
of the series - and hard hitting 
from Kapil Dev, who reached 
50 in 26 halls. Unfortunately for 
India, however, the all-rounder 
was unable to field or bow! 
because of cramp in the calf. Yet 
bow much some lacklustre 
bowling from ihe others was due 
to India having already d inched 
the series was hard to gauge. 

The Indians won three 
matches and lost two, with one 
match abandoned through rain. 
At their best they remain for- 
midably equipped for limited- 
overs cricket, certainly in their 
own country. They have also 
introduced a new dimension 
into this type of game by rel> ing 
heavily on slow bowling. To 
watch Shasxri and Maninder 
Singh, the two left-arm spinners, 
subdue opponents intent on 
attack, turns back the dock a 
long way. 

This young Australian team 
depend a great deal on Border, 
and once again he was magnifi- 
cent. He made room against tbe 
spinners to square drive freely 
and though always careful, he 
kept the total mounting with a 
mixture of deft and punishing 
strokes. Australia needed 68 
from the last 10 overs and 21 
from five when Border finally 
fell able to cut loose. At the 
finish he took 16 olT a Madan 
Lai over to settle the game. 

Ritchie partnered Border 
through the dosing stages, but 
everyone who got to the wicket 
made an important 
contribution. 

While bowlipg, Australia 
failed to reach 15 overs before 
lunch but sympathy was with 
them, as the temperature 
readied the high nineties. Un- 
deterred. Lamba. playing with 
increasing confidence, reached 
his chanceless century out of 
167 in the 38th over. He drove 
two axes off Matthews, the off- 
spinner. and faced 118 balls 
before, swinging wildly, he was 
bowled by Reid. 

Kapil Dev needed to make 
amends after a change of mind 
left Shastri stranded and run 
oul In the right mood Kapil can 
pull and drive with almost as 
much force at Botham. 
McDermott was recalled for the 
45ih over and it cost 24 runs, 
including two sixes by Kapil 
over raid-wicket. 

IMMA 

K Srikkanlti c McDermott b Mstttwws 23 
FtlambabRoM 102 

MAxtmudiftinaiout..-^-. 28 

DVsnoianarcMBrihb.WMigh^.— 2S 
Kapil Dev Rm b Waugh ■ . 58 

R Shasm run out — — — . 2 

ICSPanUB rotom 14 

Madan Lai not out -- 1 

Extras (b l.lb 5. wl) 7 

Total(6wKts,48owre). —260 

Maninder Singh, Rapnder Singh Ghai and 

RPSnghdkTnotbBL 

FALL OF WICKETS; 1-59.2-143,3-179.4- 

191. 5200, 6-259. 

BOWLING: Davis WF34-0. McDermott 0- 
1-61-0. Waugh 10- 1-50-2. Matthews OO- 
51-1, Re« 100-48-1. Border 20-1 0-0. 
AUSTRALIA 

G R Marsh run out — — 39 

D C Boon st Pandit b Shastri 39 

D M Jones c Lamba b R P SMgh .55 

■A R Border not out ... — -91 

G M fbtcfw notout 35 

Extras (lb 4) 4 


Total (3wtds. 463 overs) . 


.263 


FALL OF WICKETS: 1-68, 2-85. 3-176. 
GRJ Matthews SR waudh,SPDavts,G 
fC Dyer. D R Gflbert andC McOermott did 
not baL 

BOWUNG: Madan Lai 60-500. R P Singh 
9A-0-58-1. Ghai 63-0-374), Shashi 100- 
5D-1, Maninder Singh 1IMMB-0. 
Srtkkanth 2-0-1 1-0. Azharuddbi 03-04-0. 


SPORT 

YACHTING 


Crusader beaten 
after a daring 
American gambit 

From Barry PtcLthaU, Fremantle 


The bubble of euphoria 
surrounding Ihe British 
America's Cup challenge may 
not ta\c bursL but it was 
certainty threatened tcsierday 
when the New York Yacht 
Club’s 12-metre. America II. 
skippered by John Koims. of 
Texas, meted out a first defeat tc 
Harold Cudmorc and his crew 
on the third day of the initial 
round-robin trials. 

The margin of that win — 
lmin 27scc - does belie the 
dose-fought battle that raged 
between the two yachts during 
the first pan of the race when 
nothing divided White Crusader 
from her .American rival 
through 26 light tacks up the 
initial beat The next time they 
came together however. John 
Bertrand, the tactician aboard 
America II. judged bis boat 
could just cross ahead on port, 
and Kolius. who admitted after- 
wards that it had been such a 
dose cal! he had not dared to 
look, finally gained the upper 
fund. 

The British problems were 
compounded when a genua 
sheet fouled during the nett 
tack, and when the Americans 
pulled ofl* a perfect spinnaker 
gybe, set around the weather 
mark, to gain even more dis- 
tance at the sian of the following 
run, we might just as well have 
all gone home. Having rounded 
23sec astern at this first mark. 
Crusader dropped a further 
2 1 sec behind on tbe mo — the 
worst point of sail for this 
How-leu design — and was 1 min 
lOsec adnfi when they reached 
the top of the course on the 
second time round. 

As the winds increased from 
eight to 14 knots, the British 
crew did. at UxtsL gam some 
reassurance from the fact that 
they matched the Americans' 
speed on the final run. cutting 

dow-n the g3p to below a minute, 
before falling out of phase with 
one windshifi to drop a further 
30$ec on the final beat 

But as Dennis Conner, whose 
Stars and Stripes gained her 
third successive win. this time 
against Eagle, put it last night: 

“Even if y ou win all twelve races 
in tbis series, the points are 
worth only one race in Decem- 
ber. so no one will be too pleased 
if they win. nor too despondent 
if they lose.” 

Certainly, it will take more 
than one defeat to temper 


Cudmore's confidence. After 
three hard races so far in this 
series, the buoyant Irishman 
said he thought it was timu to 
have an easy one, then leant 
across towards Conner and 
called: “How about ti tomor- 
row. Dennis?” referring, of 
course, to their promising head- 
to-head battle- today. 

Other challengers to maintain 
a clean slate so far in these Louis 
Yuuton-sponsored trials ore 
Ncu Zealand IV, which won an 
easy lmin 42scc victory over the 
tw m-ruddered USA after skip- 
per Tom Blaekaller shot the 
sun early, giv ing away close to a 
minute returning to the line, and 
French Kiss, which gained a 
walk-over after the American 
opponent. Courageous IV. re- 
tired when her huadsiay sheave 
box. set in the bow, began to 
disintegrate. 

Canada II chalked up her first 

win m the series with a 2min 

.Ihsec victory over Heart of 
America, skippered by Buddy 
Nidges, and Italia's crew, which, 
like their Italian counterparts 
aboard A^zurra III. have so far 
both failed tu impress, gained 
the most convincing victory of 
the day uitli a 5min I Owe «Hn 
over the Cosia Smcralda new. 
who must now he contemplat- 
■tng bringing out the more 
radical Azzurra IV for the 
second round-robin senes in 
November. 

’ RESULTS 

HEAT 1: Stan ana Stupes US$5 (US!.3hr 
?4m<Ji 55src. 9t Eagle UStiOfUSI. 337 55. 
Winning maram: 3mm 
HEATS AmcNU U US46 (US) 331 35. bt 
VttiiW C<uMdf( H24 \GBl. 3-3302 Wtev 
mng n w p y a ii 137. 

HEAT 3: Now Zealand __ , 

W USA USB1 tUSL 329 


gin. 1 42 
« 4: C 


K^riNZLaZ&H. 


HEAT 4: GanaOa 0 KC? (Can). 3-24 09. H 
heart a! Ameren USS1 lli! 


Wi 

HEAT 


|USI. 3 7645 
Fiendt kea F7 (Fi). 323 71. M 


Cauravaus US76 (US) ictved 
HEAT "6; laba >7 utt 32604. M Azrum 
1)0(11). 3-3i 14. Wuwmg margn: S ID- 

TODAY'S RACES 

WMM Crusader v Slam A Stripes; New 
Zealand v French Kiss. USA v America U. 
CnaHcngo Franca v Canada It Axzurra W 
v Heart ol America; Courageous v Eagle. 

SCHEDULE 

Chadanger eirntnaMow: October S-2ft 
Pieumnary tni round-robn. 

November 2-19: Second round-rotMi. 
December 2-19: Thud round- roOm. 
December 2SUanuery 7: SemLhnab 
(t«sl ol seven) January 13-23: Feois 
(best ot went 

Detonder eliminatio n: October 113ft 
Prehmnary senes, (rat nxmcFfotan; 
November 9-21: Second round-room. 
De ce mber 2-20: Third round-rob*v 
December 27 statuary ft Serro-finats. 
January 14-25: Final (best of nine) 
Amenca’a Cop: January 31-rmd Fobruary 
(bast of seven). 


Jeantot closes gap 


The flying Frenchman. Phi- 
lippe Jeantot, winner of the first 
BOC solo race around the world 
in 1983, pulled up into second 
place ahead of a countryman, 
Guy Bernardi n. for the first time 
since this second global event 
began from Newport, Rhode 
Island, on August 30 (Barry 
Pickthall writes). 

With fewer than 1,000 miles 
to cover to Ope Town, the first 
compulsory stop, Jeantot’s 60ft 
Dumas-designed Credit 
Agricole III is little more than a 
day behind the fleet leader, John 
Martin, sailing the South Af- 
rican entry. Tuna Marine 
Voonrekker. 

Earlier this week, Martin, who 
led the fleet out of Newport and 
had benefited considerably by 
taking an extreme easterly 
course, became ensnared by the 
high pressure system centred 
over the Sougi Atlantic but he 
got going again yesterday and 
was expecting to reach Cape 
Town on Saturday. 

French sailora hold five of the 
first six placings. a number that 
includes Jacques de Roux, the 


leading class two entrant, with 
his SOfi Skoicm IV in fourth 
position. He holds a 413-mile 
lead over his American class two 
rival. Mike Plant. 

Harry Mitchell, of Britain, 
aged 62, the oldest competitor 
among the remaining 23. was 
back in 21st place, 180 miles 
south or the Equator yesterday, 
but having a dose tussle with 
Takeo Shimada, of Japan, 21 
miles further from the Cape. 

Today, John Biddlecombe, of 
Australia, who sustained a seri- 
ous groin injury when he fcU 
through the forward hatch of his 
class one entry, ACI Crusader, 
four days out from Newport, is 
expected to rejoin the race from 
Bermuda where he has spent the 
past three weeks adding a lead 
bulb to the keel of his boaL 

LEADING POSITIONS (msas to Capa 
Town m brackets): 1, J Msnln - Tima 
Marino Voonrekker (SA). 769 mfles; 2. P 
Jeantot - Owft Agricota in (Ft), l.KJi; 3, 
G Bamardm - Biscuts Lu (Fr), 1 371 ; 4. T 
Lamazou - Fcuraus D'Aquuame Iff), 

1 354. Class two: 1, J de Row - Skaam 
IV (Fr). 1,345: 2. M Plant - Alroo 
Distributor. 1,738; 3. R KonkoMU - 
Declaration ol independence. 2.000: 4, J 
vanden Heede -Let's Go (Fr), 2.052: nth 
H MitctuH - Double Cross, (UK), 3J368. 



WIN THE TOTAL 
AUDIO/ VISUAL SYSTEM FROM 

— DRAKKARNOIR— 

TKEjSCTCV EUtoOWNG RANGE FOR MLS 



Choose from the Drakkar Noir range of After Shave or 
Eau de Toilette and pick up jour entry leaflet now. 

.Available at all l eading department stores and chemists. 
Closing date for entries 
30th November 1986. 

For details of 
JVC equipment 
telephone 
01-4913909. 





Drakkar INoir bvTWfum?; GuvLarodie Paris. 


--narait xxomtutosiT] 


-V 





HOCKEY: SPAIN SPRING ANOTHER WORLD CUP SURPRISE 




Clash with 
Soviets 
can fortify 
England 

England, with 
foil points from iHB iB^ 
two matches, 
meet the Soviet 
Unkm today in 
Group A of the 
World Cop tournament full of 
confidence after beating New 
Zealand and Argentina (Syd- 
ney Frisian writes). A win for 
England would fortify them for 
the two more testing matches 
against Pakistan and The 
Netherlands. 

Colin Whalley, the England 
manager, said: “I am happy 
with the way things have gone, 
although I was a little dis- 
appointed with our perfor- 
mance against Argentina. 
Still, jt is the result that 
matters and if we play as we 
did against New Zealand we 
ought to beat the Soviet 
Union.*' 

England are likely to keep 
the same side that defeated 
Argentina except that Bhanra 
might come in as a substitute 
for Batchelor on the right 
wing. At some time England 
could bring on Shaw whose 
entrance usually pots new life 
into the attack. 

The Soviet Union who lost 
their first match to the Dutch 
and were a little lucky to brat 
New Zealand I-fl are not an 
easy side to brat. Their de- 
fence is so nod and they axe 
dangerons on the breaks. 

England have met (he Soviet 
Union three times and share a 
win apiece with one match 
drawn. They have retained 
more or less the same squad 
that helped them to win the 
silver medal in the 1983 
European championship in 
Amsterdam when they lost the 
fund on penalty strokes to The 
Netherlands after an exciting 
4-4 draw. 

England have not forgotten 
that they lost 1-0. to the Soviet 
Union at Wiilesden in last 
year's quadrangular tour- 
nament and will do their best 
to avenge that defeat. 

Yesterdays results 

World Cup 
Group B 

SPAM (2) 2 MOfA (t) 1 
XEscude. I Escudo Somaya j 

AUSTRALIA (1) 2 W GER- t 

MANY (2) 2 ] 
MWon. anrmgft a t n Reck. Fischer 


First sending 
off merely 
compounds the 
Indian demise 


By Sydney Frisian begin India's task of 

reconstruction. 

Spain 2 Spain, themselves, had 

India ..... 1 done some rough tackling and 

■ Figar. a substitute for Roca. 

Yet another unexpected re- '^ vei, <Sy? ,0 *S Kl hSf 
suit was achieved in the sixth H^ ing 
World Cup tournament at begun a t^illiant run |orards 

Wiilesden yesterday when In- ^ e . 
dia. at one time complete M^lgosa also ^ fj 1 ® 

masters of this game, were y el [°* card fqr dangerous 
beaten by Spain, who en- wckhng. ... , . 

hanced their chances in group -*^5 r India had squandered 
B with their total of three 
points from two matches. P“ l s ]?® in 10 &oa ) s 
_. . . - _ , shot from an acute angle just 

This second defeat for India mining ihe far post. He was 

— they had lost 1-0 to Poland p^pia^ almost immediately 

— leaves them with only a slim ^ p lgar 

chanre of qualifying for the p^* a short 

"‘"Eft* 3 comer for obstruction shortly 

accepted after die match by jjef one j,j$ ^ and Figar, the 
their manager, Doraiswamy man he injured, was replaced 
Murtny. 5y Gomez. Although they 

But the talking point of the were reduced to 10 men. India [ 
match was the first red card of came strongly into the match 



■ v <gr ; > j 




iiL fpl® illllliB If, - jpgl 


. «; >• y» <4 $ 


v‘* >••• ■ 

: o 

- : -w 

- Shi 


Full stretch: Carvalho, of India, is too late with bis tackle to stop die Spanish forward, Oliva (Photograph: Hugh Routledge) 


• - - >* ' - v >i •«. X* *?. - 

m+f&mZpi 

IMlPllIP 


mm 


bloom, on 


1 1 ‘\w777z^ 


Oms Bailey. ofNoribJtawwf 

18. Sue McCarthy {AvcbSTaSc 

Simpkro (I^ctyeghnek 
Kaye Hand mertohm^ au 

17 wCTCthe first phyws to dS 

seeded blood in the R$w 
Assurance national cbamnC2r 
ships ai Telford yesterday. TW 
successes acre overshadowed 
by a failure, however, thatra 
Nick Brown (Cheshire), aged 2? 


Andrew Castle, seeded fond, 
three hours and 13 minute. 

Gastieisthel 
who took Mats 

sets at Wimbledon and^riaved 
for Britain in the DnvjsCupfe 
against Australia. BroWaifted t Q 


I r *#*• l»)l> 1 >lm i*i>LL>L«i* >• ) 1 1 




the tournament. handed to the 
Indian right back. Pargat 
Singh, in the second half. 
Tackling Figar from behind, 
he struck him on the head 
with his stick and was sent off. 


and their efforts nearly 
brought them a goal but the 
Spanish goalkeeper stopped a 
stinging shot from Shahid. 

The fate of Pargat Singh 
rests with the technical dele- 


GOLF 


OLYMPIC GAMES 


He had been in trouble earlier bul he could be sus- 
when he was given the yellow, ^ ndcd al leas t for one match . 

SrfflRSSS; CKAaaaeiKti 


temporary suspension, card m 
the first half for a threatening 
gesture. 

While he was on the Dench, 
Pargat had time to watch the 


Foreigners 
are on a 
par in US 


Signs of a Seoul boycott 

Berlin (AP) - East Rothenburg, the cyclist and OJ^pic Committee officiate ^ ]£? matchl^NSSwSS 
mys state-run news me- speed skater, told Junge Welt said they had bran told by tnmr nervous about. Until tl» 

ve ignored the just-con- newspaper on Monday. East German counterparts that p wasn’t making him bit 


rargat nao ume io waicn me carvaioa Hsnfeep Singh, e Suonrat 
match being won and lost- m Ckwro, Mohammad 

Spain took the lead in the 25th S^iawSiniR kto*** 
minute when Ignatio Escude flra&nd). 
started a run through the _ .. 

middle and passed 1o his • Australia drew 2-2 with 

brother Xavier, who beat the 

goalkeeper from dose in. “SL£ 


Matgosa. j Gare fa - Mauri anq j c Pnon, j Severiano Ballesteros will Jw 

Maigosa, X Escude, C Roca, M Da Pbz, J able to plot 

MUA: n S Rawai, Pargat Sngh, far 1987 following the aanounce- 
Molrindar Pal StaA M Somaya. J meat of new resulatiaBS Cor 

player, on tw US PC A 

Strafud. Bahvtnder Sfriak. I ®? r ' 

Jc*ira*:LG«a« (France) and RttmMck Ballesteros, banned for 1986 

by the US Tour for to 

• Anglia dmw 2-2 

West Germany in an exciting wfllbeabletosdectoneofdirra 
group B match at Wiilesden options open to foreign gotten. 


Spanish joy was shortlived, 
however, for India drew level 
barely a minute later. Tikken 
Singh centred from the right 
and Somaya. who bad come 
up to reinforce the attack, 
slotted the ball home. 

Six minutes before half- 
time. Spain's corner drill 
found expression in one magic 
moment when Ignatio Escude 
put his stick to a perfect slop 
by Dc Paz and scooped the 
1»U high into the net. Pargat 
Singh was then recalled to 


FOOTBALL 


yesterday Australia began well 
with Mitton putting them in 
the lead after running on to a 




Moreover the US Coagress 
have ruled that foreign athletes 
who participate in events that 
art charity orient at ed — which 


minutes later, a superb solo , 
run by Blocher found Rede all those < 
on his own and, despite being 122 tt 
challenged, he managed to United 
scramble the ball in. Rk ( 

In the 21st minute. West T”?V* 
Germany went ahead from a 
short corner converted by nate th 
Fischer but three minutes into that all 
the second half Birmingham treated 
levelled by convening a pen- IS the i 
alty stroke- players 


Tonr events — will not have 
those days counted against the 
122 they are allotted In the 


Luton can expect support 


Luton arc confident they will Millichip is not a member of the 
receive a sympathetic hearing 13-man committee, but has 
today when they seek per- made ft dear that he will attend 
mission to enforce their ban on the meeting and emphasize his 
visiting supporters in the FA belief that Luton should not be 
Cup. Despite the Football discouraged. 


League's refusal to accept that 
ten in the Linlewoods Cup, 
Luton's campaign against booli- 


Under FA Cup rules, a visit- 
ing dub is entitled to 25 percent 
of all accommodation for which 


ganism has already received tickets are issued, but this 
wholehearted backing from the allowance can be reduced, or 
F.Vs top brass. . even waived, in special tircum- 

Ben Millichip. the FA chair- stances. Unlike the League, who 
man, and the secretary. Ted have not monitored Luton’s 
Croker, are strongly m favour of “home members only” experi- 
Luurn s stance, and their views menu the FA sent an official 
arc hkcly to be echoed by the delegation to Kenilworth Road 
challenge cup committee, to assess its effect 

Walters back in tjie 
running for Villa 

Mark Walters, the England Wimbledon’s game against 
undcr-21 international, will Cambridge United at Rough 
make his first appearance of the Lane. 

season tonight when Aston Villa Middles broogb. the third di- 
play Reading in the Lilllcwoods vision leaders, arc unchanged 
Cup second round second leg against Birmingham at St 
tic. Waiters, a winger, dislocated Andrew's, as are Blackburn, 


Millichip and Lionel Smart 
were among officials who 
watched Luton’s recent home 
game with ArsenaL They were 
particularly impressed when the 
crowd followed, to the letter, a 
request for a minute’s silence in 
memory of Harry Hasten. 
David Evans, the Luton chair- 
man, is prepared to withdraw 
the club from football's most 
prestigious knockout com- 
petition if they are not allowed 
to keep their ban. but the FA are 
conscious of both Government 
and public opinion and seem 
likely to back any action which 
will help curb crowd trouble. 

Turner takes 
control 
at Wolves 


Graham Turner is back in , 
League football, as manager of 
Wolverhampton Wanderers, 


Rk Cteson, far the US PGA 
Tour, said: M In the light of that 
decision the policy board ratified 
their earlier decision to elimi- 
nate the home country rule, so 
that all foreign players are now 
treated equally, and reaffirm at 
IS the number of events fareifp 
players need to participate in to 
receive unlimited conflicting 
event releases to play on their 
home circuits.” 

Ballesteros, or any ether for- 
eign player, may now elect to 
take tear membership and 
pa rtic ipa te in 15 events, so 
receiv i ng wntimfrpn event re- 
leases or, by playing in fewer 
than 15 events, forfeit that 
chance and apply to the coamus- 
shmer for a release. 

Foreign players who have not 
previously joined the tour may 
elect to participate as non- 
members and then compete in a 
maxim mn of Gve co-sponsored 
events each year, pins approved 
events soch as the US Masters, 
US Open and US PGA 
Championship and indodmg the 
World Series of GoK 

If Ballest er os wants a pro- 
longed campaign in the United 
States be can play in 15 
tournaments but he wfll prob- 
ably settle for the easier option 
ottered to non-members who wBl 
seek playing spots through 
sponsors exemptions. 

Ken Schofield, executive 
director of the PGA European 
Tour, said: M I get the hnpressaoa 
that they’ve tried to be accom- 
modating. We can certainly ran 
oar tour under those regulations 


East Berlin (AP) — East 
Germany’s state-run news me- 
dia have ignored the just-con- 
cluded Asian Games m Seoul, 
prompting fears among athletes 
that the communist nation 
might boycott the 1988 Olym- 
pics in the South Korean capital. 

**It is anything but a good sign 
when nothing is reported on the 
dress rehearsal for the 1988 
Olympics” one sports source 
here said. “There is fear again 
that communist nations wifi 
boycott the Seoul Olympics.” 
another source having connec- 
tions with the athletes, said. 

Both sources talked to Asso- 
ciated Press on condition that 
they not be further identified for 
fear of reprisals by communist 
authorities. 

While ignoring the Asian 
Games, which ended in Seoul 
last weekend, one newspaper 
carried an interview with a 
leading female athlete who said 
she was aiming to start in both 
the summer and winter Olym- 
pics. “It is my dream to start in 
both winter and summer 
Olymtcs in 1988.” Christa 


Ro then burg, the cyclist and 
speed skater, told Junge Welt 
newspaper on Monday. 

The newspaper did not men- 
tion where the winter and 
summer Olympics were sched- 
uled to be held but quoted her as 
saying: “I have adapted my 
training and my life to my aim 
of a double Olympic start.” The 
winter Olympics will be held in 
Calgary. Canada. 

Rolhenburg is the cycling 
sprint world champion who also 
won the silver medal in the 
world speed skating champion- 
ships this year. Aged 26, she 
started her career as a speed 
skater and has broken six world 
records. She recently started 
competing in cycling events. 

Soviet-bloc nations publicly 
have remained non-committal 
about their participation in the 
Seoul Games. They support the 
communist North Korea in its 
disputes with South Korea. East 
Germany's latest edition of the 
official encyclopaedia refers to 
South Korea's territory as 
“occupied land". 

In August West German 

RUGBY UNION 


won the 1982 prototype fa 
these championships, phyed 
doubles for Britain in the Euro- 
pean team championship tht 
following year, and partneied 
David Felgate in a doubter win 
over Ken Flach and Robert 
Scguso at Wimbledon in 1985. 

That last achievement a 
bonus, as Brown gave . up ftjj. 
time tennis in 1984 because Ik 
could not make ends mceL He 
coached in Belgium and France 
and then came home to work fa 
six months before moving. 10 
coach at the David Lloyd chib 

Hounslow. 

“1 was nervous.” Grade said 


the communist nation was 
preparing one of its strongest 
teams ever for the Seoul Olym- 
pics. North Korea has threat- 
ened to call for a boycott of the 
Seoul Games unless it is 
awarded the right to stage some 
events. 

Talks on jointly staging tire 
Games are wring on under the 
auspices or the international 
Olympic Committee, who are 
trying to avert a third successive 
Olympic boycott. Only Cuba so 
far has publicly said it would 
join a threatened boycott led by 
North Korea. 

Jensen moves 

Diissddorf (Reuter) — For- 
luua Dussddorf. the bottom 
dub in the West German first 
division, have signed the Dan- 
ish forward. Henrik-Ravn Jen- 
sen, on loan until the end of the 
season. Jensen, aged 21. has 
been playing for Vejle in 
Denmark's first division. 


end, I wasn't making him hit 
enough balls on the big pomfe I 
hadnr played a match for five or 
six weeks and wasn't match 
tight. I am now. That «u a 
perfect match to start with — hot 
what I wanted, hut just what I 
needed.” 

Castle's concentration wan- 
tiered, too. A line judge was 
familiar (“I kept thinking I 
know that guy.”) The tine judge 
was Terence Rigby, an actor 
remembered from ibc Z Can 
series. 

Virginia Wade flew in from 
the past and California, where 
she won both singles said dou- 
bles in an over-35 event on 
Sunday (she beat - somebody 
called Billie Jean King* bul, in 
the process, pulled a stomach 
muscle that forced ter to retire 
from her match yesterday). 
Roger Taylor came from 
Wimbledon and Ken Readier, 
titai renowned Australian, 
popped over from Sough. On 
the initiative of Sue Mqpptn, the 
women's national team man- 
Fletcher is working with 


:T.~Ti rltl n'..)TTi';l '[-< 


Page turns over a new leaf 




By David Hands, Rugby Correspondent 


a shoulder in August, but is now beaten 4-0 at Reading last 
back to fitness. weekend, for their game against 

Give Allen, scorer of 10 goals Queen's Park Rangers 
for Tottenham Hotspur this .... . . . 

season, is expected to return to „ I , in *!? ai ”'. . V™. 


Gillingham, who lost 


Tte side for tonight's visit of *e first leg. 

Barnsley to White Hart Lane. P« g y . 


after missing Saturday's goalless 
draw with Luton because of a 

hamstring injury. 

Barnsley, meanwhile, were in 
a quandary yesterday, with Al- 
lan Clarke, their manager, 
spending much of the day trying 
to get a Central League game 
postponed- Only 3-2 down from 
the first leg. Clarke could not 
finalize his side until he knew 
whether he also hod to send a 
reserve side to Blackpool. With 
only IS full-time professionals, 
he said: "I'm having enough 
trouble finding 13 for Spurs, let 
alone another 13 for 
Blackpool.” 

Andy Jones. Pori Vale's top 
scorer, has declared himself fit 
for his side's big match against 
Manchester United at Vale 
Park, while John Fashanu. trou- 
bled by a kidney injury, faces a 
fitness test before the 


have put their reserve goal- ,, I nea 
keeper- Mark Beeney, aged 18. 
on stand-by because Ron l°. Mo 
Hillyard may be ruled out by a relega 
hamstring injury. Another teen- Tur 
ager who could make his first- to the 
team debut is Damian Hespi 
Atkinson, of Ipswich —who take Wml 
on Scunthorpe bury j 

Paul Hardyman. the . 
Portmouth full-back returns of- SJJ fls " 
ter serving a one-match suspen- 
sion for the match against 
Wrexham at Fratton Park. ^ cx 7 : 
Portsmouth, who lead 2-1 from P 0 * 01 - 
the first leg. ' have reduced • New 
admission charges by a third in foot oi 
an attempt to boost falling signed 


just 23 days after being dis- 
missed as manager of Aston 
Villa, who are struggling in the 
first division. 

He takes over from Brian 
Little, who was dismissed at the 
weekend after less than two 
months in charge. Little had 
lifted the Molioeux dub to 
eleventh in the fourth division 
following last season's 
relegation. 

Turner, aged 39. is no stnutger 
to the League's lower regions. 
He spent his playing career with 
Wrexham. Chester and Shrews- 
bury and as Shrewsbury man- 
ager led them to the third 
division title in 1979. He said: 
“It was a bitter blow to leave 
Villa, and a setback 10 my 
career. I am anxious to prove a 
point” 

• Newcastle, struggling at the 
foot of the first division, have 


thought that 
Australia and Japan wili fed the 
same. I believe world golf should 
welcome this announcement.” 


Jacko Page, five times 
England’s scrum half in -1971 
and 1975, wili captain North 
Midlands when they begin an- 
other county championship 
campaign this evening. The 
championship, sponsored by 
Thorn EMI. starts in the Mid- 
lands. with the London and 
northern counties joining in 
next week. 

Ptige, now -39, app e ars at 
M osdey, where North Midlands 
entertain Notts, Lines and Der- 
bys, the runners-up in the 1985 
final, in which the three counties 
fielded whai was essentially a 
Nottingham efub side. Now they 
draw from the dub’s second 
team and from junior sides. 

That is a logical course which 
is certain to develop when the 
English dub championship be- 
gins next season. It extends the 
experience of players from such 
clubs as Paviors, the Not- 
tinghamshire and Three Coun- 
ties Cup holders, who have four 
players at Moseley, including 


the captain and scrum half 
Give Rossin. Paviors play a 
second-round Jphn Player Spe- 
cial Cup tie against Durham 
Gty on October 25. 

. Leicest ers hire’s experience is 
similar, though they have been 
greatly affected by injury and 
unavailability in selecting the 
team to play Staffordshire at 
Burton this evening They have 
depended much cm Leicester’s 
second team but have players 
from Wesileigh, Hinckley, 
Gadby Wyggs and Market 
Boswortfa in the side, so many 
other players being unavailable. 

They would have fielded 
David Hope, of Stoneygale, at 
full back after his fine perfor- 
mance for Leicestershire in theft- 
win over the Japanese last week 
but he received a facial wound 
during his dub's County Cup 
defeat against Hinckley at the 
weekend. 

Warwickshire, the county 
champions, received something 
of a set-back to their prepara- 


tions when they went down 38-4 
to Glamorgan at Maesteg on 
Monday, evening Colin Laity, 
the South Glamorgan Institute 
and Neath centre, who has 
English qualifications, was one 
of the try scorers for Glamorgan 
while Warwickshire have an- 
other week to ponder their team 
to play the three counties next 
Tuesday. At much the same 
time Gloucestershire, semi- 
finalists last year, squeezed past 
Menmonthshire 22-1 9. ' 

Surrey, who open against 
Middlesex next Wednesday, 
play a warm-up game against 
British Police at Imber Court 
this evening They -have lured 
Ackford away from tite Police in 
a team containing seven 
Rossi yn Park players, of wffom 
Jermyn plays at centre rather 
than in his dub position of 
stand-off half. Surrey also in- 
clude two Basingstoke players, 
Guyatt and Evans, at centre and 
hooker respectively, both of 
them having left Richmond. 


appin, who has 
worked with the Lawn Tennis 
Association since 1979. was 
bubbling with optimism. *Tm 
looking at a larger group ji 
young players than ever before,” 
she said. “That’s healthy — and 
most of them are more am- 
bitious, technically and phys- 
ically better equipped, and more 
professional than any other 
group 1 have been involved with 
since 1979 ” 









| : tAijnb 






ATHLETICS 


EQUESTRIANISM 


’w 2 tecu in Two yield positive tests 

_ * Indian and is (Reuter) — The chamoionshiiK in Treawm 


attendances. 

The West Ham goal 
Phil Parkcs. has shaken 


forward. 


goalkeeper. 
iken off the 


Jackson, aged 20. from the 
Scottish second division club. 
Mcadowbank Thistle, for 


effects of influenza and looks £40.000. Jackson was yesterday 
certain to maintain his ever- named in the Scottish Under-21 
present record of the last two international squad for next 
seasons in tonight’s match Tuesday's match against the 
against Preston. Republic of Ireland in Dundalk. 


SCHOOLS FOOTBALL 


Goal-hungry Malvern 


By George Chesterton 

Mah/em 5 

Charterhouse.^., — — 1 


Lancing hold 

the net. Jenkins pulled one back onto earn 
for Charterhouse before half- , , 

gj5 r “ IMo » ihe ba|1 ™ d ' double boost 

After the interval the pace Lancing ought to be satisfied 
quickened but Charterhouse with their efforts this past week 
were not able to reduce the after coming away from WIik 1 “w»mis*jrreyiMCB8ny, _ 
deficit Lunt. of Malvern, came Chester with a l-l draw and UrT-i d£SL m - ~ c 


Malvern. entertaining 
Charterhouse on a balmy au- 
tumn afternoon, were convinc- 
ing winners after an early scare. 
After only seconds 
Charterhouse hit the crossbar 
but Malvern rallied and before 
the game was a minute old. 
Rcibeck. in the Charterhouse 
goal, saved well from a header 
by Temperton. 

Douglas-Pennam opened (he 
scoring in the tenth minute 
when picked up a through pass, 
ran into the area and gave 
Rcibeck little chance with his 
shot. Minutes later Lunt con- 
trolled a high, bouncing pass 
and lobbed into the net to make 
it 2-0. 

The third goal had an air of 
luck about it when a punched 
clearance rebounded rocket-Iikc 
from the forehead of Ball into 


Geoffrey Marks will captain 
the British and Irish Walker 
Cup team to play die Americans 
U S onnin gd a le on May 27 and 
28 next year. 

The Royal and Ancient, who 
announced bis appointment yes- 
terday, said that the squad 
would be chosen daring the first 
week of December 

Marks, from Madefey In 
Cheshire, re p re s ented his coun- 
try at boy, yoath and foil 
international level, and was in 
die Walker Cop team in 1949 
and 1971. His best champion- 
ship performance was when be 
finished second in the English 
Open Amateur stroke play event 
in 1973 and 1975. 


TENNIS 


mrotgfcRetBge nteoMt rtrtwpioreWm: 
MerTs arate F%si R»re N (Choh- 

|Curte iBortsj tit H McGunass (Ess®^. 7-6. 

P.WIWkui bi j WMafcM 
7 1i HBfaw (Durum K S 

Wvg (Awo>. W. 7-5; C Bafcy {Norm) tft M 
Aowwon iLmcsj 6-« 6-«; J Onr (Sussaxl W 

(Yorks) bt A. Brea (Chesrtrefc «. 

FtWjw (Dorset} HA Evans (Dartjw). 7-6. 6-3. 
= * tl yg n jBar | tf bfO SaosW (Swrwl &-*. 

** 7 ; 5 ',? S^JHwts) bt M Peehey 
7-S. 6^, Women's 
rotBtt R Bny (IMdx) CM S EJmod 

pwg. (Lercsl tx D Scfausmon 
(MMd.6q.6-1.SLoastmora(5Wans|tnS 
uiregotem ttofW). 6-1. act X Had 
[ wSGo oman (Surrey). 7-5. 34.&&Q coin 
(Middx) UAHII (Devon). W. 6-1: A NWpfll 
iL artcs) H C BMdiay (Essex). M. 6-1; J 
Lang^(Sur8yiMdBenytto«teJ.*a.7-& 


Indianapolis (Reuter) — The 
shot putter, Darren Crawford, 
and the javelin thrower. Tom 
Jadwin. have been suspended by 
The Athletics Congress (TAQ 
for using banned drugs, the 
United States governing athlet- 
ics body said yesterday. 

Jadwin. aged 28, tested pos- 
itive for testosterone from a 
sample taken during the US 
outdoor championships in Eu- 
gene. Oregon, in June. Jadwin. 
who a year eariier was runner-up 
in the javelin at the national 
championships, placed sixth in 
Eugene. 

Crawford, aged 1 8. returned a 
positive test lor steroids from a 
sample taken at the US junior 

FOR THE RECORD 

^GJr-3. 7-& C Ottawa tArffl bt H RMWacfw 
W. 7-5; J Swaon Owe} M It 
tens (Yig). 6-7. 7-B. 6-2. 

SEOUL d»is Cup; £u»ffl Zone flmfc 
DoatKK Yoo .Sn-Swi and (Cm Bono-Soo (S 
Kweal Wl M Swa» and Takeucn (Japan). 4- 
6. frl. fr4 , 6-2. 

SCOTTSDALE Arizona: SeottwUfc man* 
cpwc FV« roasd (US urtasi stated): G 


close to scoring when he hit the 
post from 25 yards but it was 
Johnson-Marshall. who had 
worked hard throughout, who 
was rewarded when he gathered 
a long pass, turned quickly and 
shot from 20 yards for (he brat 

goal of the match. Ten minutes match against Charterhouse and 
later he showed excellent con- Selman pul them two ahead 
trol in the area before scoring his from a Iree-kick. Gray pulled 
second goal of the game and one back for the visitors but 
Malvern's fifth. Lancing managed to hold on to 

MALVERN: M 06WXT C Haworttl. F KlKpfl, lhC ‘ r ,Cad - 
M Drummond, J Damnaon. G URL F , 

smiBi. A Tempnnan. d Baa, h Dowias- Wellingborough defeated 
Pjwnant S JahnsoiHWarsfraii (sag: E. Reptou for the second vear 
Tramann). running in a match where there 

CHMnERHOUS&JRdbedcRGoodMtt. was never much between the 
A hwmee. S Meftstram, A Zfcrws. M sid«_ Thom.-vr-mfi ih» 


darfc(SvSSw l ).6-3.&4. 

L Onra MobrL . 6-2. fr3. V.Late 

T^CgqjjCWKI. 6-2. 
amett CnropMn tadoarwomerfa muhm- 
nw«i Rist round: P Huxr (Austa) bt I 
ICsI. 6-3. 5-4 n Herrwnan (ft) M J 
(Aosl. bd. 8-2. L Qarrono (« W A? 


CHARTERHOUffijjRflfceck.RGood«w. was never much between the 
Stavsns. b Dow (sue. c Whmneyk lending goal to make it 2- 1 with 


defeating Charterhouse 2-1 
(George Chesterton writes). 

Simpson put Lancing ahead at 
Winchester and it was onlv near 

the end of an even match that w ,, TOtre , LUgtBntJ 

Mac La re equalized. Lancing f mckowti (in s-i 7-5; KMatomSuOMS 
scored first again in their home | itw SwSSf- c&f “ a 

Poetti (Austral 5-7 6-1 6-1 

(BmiJ boat P« MadradO 

(Brazxj 7-5 7-6 

2 M Wtomar (S«r.3.B Wft 575 
s Y Noah (Fr|; & h Leeonta 
lftl.,7 JCpnoora lUStS JNys 

mAA&W S833.7S.3. 
SSHS?/ 011 $5M tea 4 SGralflMGL 

Sggg a. 5 P SntTVBr lUSi SU&B80: 8. H 
tC*J. S3«.B7£t 7. C KondHttacb 


S 7-& U M P Flen-™ 6-3 . 3«. frl S 

Daots HC ICUtte M. ft; K Cum, ta B 
SVH#t 6-2. 6* D Pflta M U Laaert SO. 8-1 . 6- 

BARCaONA: Bd AH ta i tnsnrewnt T 

g»^SBa?JS SESS"4a! 

AMERICAN FOOTBALL 

NORTH AlffMCA; NR; Seafla Saatawks 
33. Ssnasgo Charters 7 

BADMINTON ~ 

TOH BH I DOE :Ridcnfl« wrw iclia B rt niL. 8rauo 
BMdatoy s. inn » M*e Tredoatfs taas 

11-7. MMAubtaM Tradann and N Per™ 
tn * Goqdg wa C Jifts 1ST 15-12. (ton’s 
BMdatoy bt G Uten 15-11 1M. 
WoMrtdoretaK JAs and Gowars bt Pany 
*JC Oa»]< 1S-7. 15-4. (ton's toter 
1223® «J M *iw W Goode and Baddrtey 

•M. W 


championships in Towson, 
Maryland, in June. Both ath- 
letes have been banned from 
further competition this season. 
Under international rules, the 
suspensions from trade and field 
competition could be for life. 

• SEOUL (AP) — The heavy- 
weight boxer. Daljit Singh, of 
India, has been deprived of the 
silver medal awarded to him in 
the recent Asian Games after a 
drag test. 

Games officials said that the 
Korea Advanced Institute of 
Science and Technology con- 
ducted the test, but they would 
not specify what kind of drug 
was involved. The silver medal 
was awarded to Kauser Abbas, 
of Pakistan. 


SPEEDWAY 


BrttehLreme Reaong 43 jj Andersson 1 1 . 
M H0KM3V stsmwon 35 (J Nfean .13. P 

SM3P. .I* (towrasde 39 

(D Btackbum 12. P Stsab 9). htdcSes* 

Sj. Other 

E«ter M (B Cr*e 13. S Ashop 1IJ. Young 
teBdwsta*a«a 49 (R Mmatt is. L Jedefc 


SNOOKB) 


CMMiwoigtpfc At Nawton 

Wo reastg-uB 


football 

MULTIPART lEAfflK; Honrtch 0. Bbiw 1; 

srabe 


Great exit by Fisher 


By Jenny MacArthnr 

James Fisher, who has been a Toweriands 
member of two Nation Cup triumphed 


teams this summer, produced 
an astonishing turn of fool on 


Toweriands Anglezarke. Pyrafr 
triumphed after a tremendous 
race against the dock in tbe-15-. 
horse jump-off. The rules sate 


- Show yesterday to foe rider “who completes foe 

TH? Stakes from first round of any two Raffles 

i°^JV'^ hltak - er Ncxi Sa» Classic competitions without 
, , . . incurring any faults, and wins 

unSSSflS'Sr! 00 ^ 

SEU 5 R 3 &. 3 Bf 8 £ „ *** **** 

— a performance all foe more duatiner he mterpn 
creditable as Hasty Exit does not IP* 1 

normally compete in speed Wem . tH cy after at 
classes. This year, how^^ he would ^ 

most of Rsher’s winning has ^ 

been at foreign shows and be has t ? ~ y, *“** . tb ® n 
not won enough money in ?!R£ir -S' 11 ” . *** 

Bmam to qualify for foe big wfochwU make its- 
classes this week. morning. 

Peter Charles (Meninandjask 
Nick Skelton (Raffles Airborne), 
and Malcolm Pyrah (Tower- 
latxls Fire Fox), three of the four 
nders who compete on foe w 
North American circuit this KwoKt a 33.7c 3 t 
autumn, finished third, fourth schockamohie). a 3<i4. 
and fifth. tertMitor ehy urto MW iB 


As Pyrah hod already won one 
qualifier he interpreted the rules 
as meaning that if he won at 
Wembley after another dear 
round he would win foe car- 
Pyrah took legal advice yes- 
terday and then lodged his 
appeal with the committee 
which will make its decision this 
morning. 

RESULTOftamre Mm 1. Hasty BtMJ 
Oftts. 4B.88MC3: g. Nwt -S« 
(J Whitaker), 0. *932. f 
Chartes). 0. 5U8- M- 
Toweriands Angtez^ 


(M PyraW. Q. 3188: 2. Nad R ely 

PCwM. a 33.74: 3. ItoXt WtHfj 


2, Qptoatot (T 

132.6; 3, Cannon 
12ft Sp»> 


2. muni 
CAPITAL LI 


GOLF 

jtorert SY- . S3862 38. 10 T iSeBs&f 
tw? "SSPS. S fate $143^15. 108. K 
SONY^ftANxtNG S; 1 G Norman (Aral. 

liSfnJr. 8 , 1 «EF s ! Br ? '^W- T-00«: 3- B 

r^iger jwgj 1 004 . 4 . j riaKauma um jsDl 

7 H Sultonm Si 576 8. L Warfare (USl 
2S,|J Wacon M* 10 C Sb^o 


Roterae: T mbps pwcrceateq. 


10 minutes toga 


rwO]S3n 8 GSaMpri (Ara)S20a.11 1 

SW^MlAusr SIBiSSi l£ 

1US1 Si 75839 

TOULOUSE: Ihrl raid ata 
Bm raonctj Brown iuStbtHScbrettrlWG). 


^^LEACJ*: Orem 0. Sourer Utdi | 
HACOAfl LEAGUE Bowrenoush 2. Heietord j 

VAUXHAL L OPS. t£AOUfe Fret dhraom 
Stereiaga Bora 1. Knanuy Town 4. 
SMMd «Mm north ft*stonTL cmsham 
UK) 2 

sover LEMue Aram Vveran 1 Torpedo 

Moscow 0: Dynamo Moscow 0 MoUfei 
Khartovft Dynamo Kle* 1 Dynamo Ttttai 3: 
spanra MgC W» 2 stakhtyor Donetsk ft 
Oemomores Odasse 0 Zattre VBws 2: 
teremottrak 2 Torpedo Kuan t: Dnepr 

BaeiaWiSaaus 

ARGSITINIAN LEAGUE bKrtuto (Codorat 

t Independ en w 2: R aong (Coraoba) 
UaWMdaWmBBTOftNwwrsCWteyBt. 
ftwr pub ft Fwo Carri Oeste 0. Tafaras 
fCau a ma. Raong exoa^Roeano Cemu 3.- 

BocaJinoraO UraonftPUnnM3.ainiB3b 
Esgorna U Ptea 4. v* ex 3a team 1. 
Ar 9 Mon« Jireora 0. Deoorara urarao Z 
T wnoen e y l & araanw» da la Baa 1. 
Oaponno Espanoi 0 


autumn, hntshed third, fourth Schockamowak 0. 8 *j 94. Horebrafeafir 

and fifth. tochuntor cfaM^tomtitoK 1. SouthwoB 

J ^BSSssss 

were not Shortly before he 
lodged an appeal with foe Show 

committee concerning foe 

£1 6.000 Ran^ Rover which he * ** » « 4ib jg q* ar ' 

aaeataaga 

f entertainments 1 

Cwted from nc* M 1 


CINEMAS 



836 0601 MuinriraMc 
mm « 1 00 3 3o 6.00 

PiBg . 



OOEM MA T MAmtet 

76971 MOM USA 118) Sep 
pn> 4» Mr 2 ia 6.00 a 40 ah 
wftimiatoiBMvwct Ac- 
yw and . Va n KlaPhm 
Mokings wtrom*. 


eil y 9XJ &S0 l 
.^**** ,l ® Sop proof 
gw? . Wa. O aBir 1X0 4.10 
booh** In art- 
JbwW Cara mr Line 
^wb/VW>/ Anew *» 

8» W», *» hours*. 

sums avafiaUa 
"•“■toy an Drrfit 


a5?T» KS 1 ArtCK 033 
SSLV ***** »l» 8*p proas 
DaUy 1.10 4 jo 
WWuc crt orica nr SU- 

t ara howm. IMV: 

noMeia. OAPX * 


aooe ooA.iwsen . 

1 Z!*-P «cui*o PTiteAW- 

?"■ an. ran. at .■ 

_ ? ld«£0<L30U9 - 

2. WtoNwrtl T(M MOOD Mr 
WBrianini M 2.50 MS 
flfg 9 00 S EATS U OOKAmg. •, 
LAST EVE. PEW 


: ■- 




s. 


4\. - 

t*. ■ 




■ 

Vr> 






Put Jj- 

*'*aphj 

} iU fii % i> ^*1 

: ’"X 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY OCTOBER $ 1986 



and 


BBC 1 


6 ‘ M &* AM - NeWS 
S.50^®.^ 

SaMs-'"'* 
asfSSsfa 

®&TSSSSf 
S«fBS55!wS 

national and 
ial news at 7.00 

Spo 5“ ^5 aniuftnd 


’s television and radio programmes 


41 


Edited by Peter Dear 
and Peter Davalle 


SSQbSqF 

, &*asr 

05 Party 

inference 1986. 
rebates on energy and 

ID -in £, arte P ort. yy 

Sjf. Presented by 

Party 

SgJwotMM.Tta 

SKMSP*"** 
« SSKK&Si. 
i§SRSU3B, 

with subtitles 1.2$ 

Regional news. The 
weather detaas come from 
1-30 Chock- 
s' Block. A See-Saw 
programme for the very 

2-20 W1- 4 * Ceefax. 

20 Conservative Party 
Conference 1988. The 
debates on local 
government and law and 
IM 3*52 Regional news. 

5L*" 1 ® Ttie Adventures 
of BuJ twinkle and Rocky 
Episode five, (r) 4.15 
Heathcfiff arid Co. 

Cartoon adventures of an 
alley cat 4£5 Hartbeat- 
Tne art of making pictures, 
with Tony Hart and Joanna 
Kirx. 

5.00 John Craven's 

Newsround 5JJ5 Eureka. 

A lighthearted look at the 
invention' of everyday 
things including the tape 
recorder, the 

5.35 

Show from Wamble 
Arena indudes the 
Pony of the Year 

Championship. Introduced 


TV-AM 


6.15 Good Morning Britain 
presented by Jayne Irving 
and Mfce Morris. News 
with Gordon Honeycomb* 
at 640, 7.00, 7.30,840, 
640 and 400; financial 
news at 645j sport at 6.40 
and 7M; exercises at &S5 
and 9.17; Joan Coffins 
interview at 7.15, &15 and 
845; cartoon at 745; pop 
music at 745c and video 
report at 845C Tbe After 
Nma guests include 
Emmerdate Farm actress 
' Jean Rogers, and, 
cfiscussfnga post viral 
infection. Dr SvkJDetvm. 


ITV/LONDON 


ft25 Thames news headlines. 
940 For Schools elementary 
maths 942 Methods used 
to alleviate blindness 959 
Maths: directions 10.16 



• Easy enough to talk about 
romance being natty at its most 
radiant when you're a slim, 
coofly smouldering beauty of a 
nwik-dad prize-wmnlng 
novefet, straffing with your new 
lover along the moonlight 
coast t owards your converted 
“flraiKiuse home complete 
wan not and cold running 
manservant Not so easy 
thougMo keep thinking beautiful 
tnougnts when you're the 
decayed wife, and you're hefty 
and clumsy and have four 
Haary molM on your face. 
Although me poor creature 
Win episode one of FSy 
weWonsextraonSnarytate 
THE LIFE AND LOVES OF A SHE 


DEVIL (BBC2, 945pm), that •Surpri 
j»optBuke her survive by waiting notiiingfo 


CHOICE 


luxurious seductress. A 
revenge, story, then. And a 
-mordant comedy. And a love 

/.And a pathetic tragedy. 
, as the weeks progess, 
heaven knows what else 
besides. I enjoyed She Devil 
because it is refreshingly 
unpredictable. I reserve 
Judgment on Julie T Wallace's 
vengeful wife. Ether she has 
perfected the art of self- 
effacement or her 

inexperience (this is her first 
major role on television) is 
showing through. 
Surpramcjtythere is 


Jnfie T Wallace: in die Fay 
Weldon serial, BBC2. 9.25pm 


ire are strong (not to 

say homfic) indications that 

not only is she not going to waft 
that tong, but that she herself 

is going a settle scores with the 


Dewf’s bold visual 
. in part one of the 
documehtaryseries THE 
TROUBLE WITH SEX (8BC2. 
1045). although during the 
troubled young couple s 
sessions with two sex therapists, 


there is a great deal of 
explicit taw about close 
encounters of the bedroom 
kind. The object of the 
counselling is expressed as 
the refinement of sfciBs that are 
the physical equivalents of 
culinary know-how: i.e. good 
cooks avoiding serving burnt 
potatoes and soggy cabbage. An 
inelegant phrase, out 
charectenstic of this senes' 
commendably down-to-earth 
approach. 

• Also recommended: 

ANIMAL SQUAD (BBCl, 

9.30pm). which, though about 
the death of a zoo, keeps us in 
suspense to the very last 
minute about which of the 
animals must die too.... 

BEHIND THE BAMBOO 
SCREEN (B8C2, 8.05pm) is 
about Chinese TV. not 
politics. We 1 0am that they need 
not always be the same thing. 


mechanism of alkane 
. bromination 1033 The 
Befle of Amherst -part one 
of a two-part one-woman 
drama starring Claire 
Bloom 1140 History: the 
reign of n Duce 1 142 The 

Red Piper of Hamefin 

1149 Exploring the fertile 
valley of the River Authkxi 
in the Loire. 

1240 The Giddy Gama Show, (r) 
12-10 Our Backyard, (rt 
1240 Treasure Islands: Spoils 
of War. Robert Ersklne 
examines reminders of 
past battles on these 
shores including a recent 
important find - a war-like 
„ Anglo-Saxon bebnet. (r) 
140 News at One 140 Thames 



6.00 


by David Vine. 



lews with Nicholas 
wttcheil and Frances 
Coverdale. Weather. 

- 6.35 London Plus presented by 
John Stapleton. Linda 
Mitchell, and Caroline 
Righton. 

7.00 Wogan. David Rost 
introduces Jackie Coffins. 
Uttle Richard, and Rory 
Bremner and Steve Steen 
who preview the 
Reagan/Gorbachov 
summit meeting. Pius a 
song from Pla Zadora. 

7.35 The Muppet Show with 
guest, Leo Sayer. 

8.00 Dallas. The last episode of 
the current series and 
Pam receives a shock 
when she opens the 
shower door on her 
wedding moming^aBd J.R. 
tries to get the better of 
double-dealing Angelica, 
and puts two lives at risk. 
(Ceefax) 

8.50 Points of View. Barry 
Took with another 
selection of letters from 
the BBC's postbag. 

9.00 News wfth John Humphry's 
and Andrew Harvey. 
Regional news and 
weather. 

9.30 Animal Squad. This week, 
RSPCA Chief Inspector 
Sid Jenkins and his team 
are seen in a race against 
time to re-house animals 
from Knaresborough Zoo 
which was forced to close 
down when Harrogate 
District Council refused to 
renew its licence, (see 
Choice) (Ceefax) 

0.15 SportsnigM introduced by 
Steve Rider. The Horse of 
the Year Show featuring 
the Norwich Union 
Leading Jumper of the 
Year; and International , 
Hockey: the World Cup' 
from willesden. 

145 Rhode. Domestic comedy 
series from the United 
States, (r) 

1.50 Weather. 


140 Man to a Suitcase. McGill 
arranges a meeting 
between two old Spanish 
Civil War comrades. With 
Rupert Davies and Cyril 
Shaps. (0240 Dining fri 
France. Pierre Salinger 
meets chef Jacques 

Maximin. 

340 Take the FOgh Road. 
Drama serial set on a 
Scottish highland estate 
345 Thames news 
headlines 340 Sons and 
Daughters. 

440 Thomas the Tank Engine 
' and Friends. Ringo Starr 
narrates two more stories 
4.10 The Trap Door. 
Animated adventure series 
440 T-BagStrftes Again 
445 Hold Tight! InteN 
school quiz plus pop 
music from Amaaifu and 
Screaming Blue Messiahs. 
5.15 Blockbusters. General 
knowledge quiz game for 
teenagers. Introduced by 
Bob Holness. 

545 News 640 Thames news 

wfth Andrew Gardner and 
Tricfa Ingrams. 

645 Help! Viv Taylor Gee with - 
an up-date on the 
ctaaring-up of the Grand 
Union Canal; and news of 
benevolent charities. 

645 Crossroads. Ski and Mrs 
Meacher are struck by 
Cupid's darts. 

7.00 The Budonan Treatment 
Rob Buckman visits 
- Ontario. 

740 Coron a tion Street 

(Oracle) - 

840 Pass the Buck. Quiz game 
for couples presented by 
George Layton. 

840 Sfingeris Day. Comedy 
series starring Bruce 
Forsyth as a supermarket 
manager. (Oracle) 

ft 00 King and Castle, tntfs 
final story of the series 
Ronald King has to 
persuade a rival debt 
coBectmg agency to leave 
the area because they are 
running him out of 
business. (Oracle} 

1040 Nows at Ten and weather 
followed by Thames news 
headlines. 

1040 Midweek Sport Special 
introduced by Nick Owen. 
There are highlights from 
the RealMadrid v 
Barcelona dash, and a 
profile of Barcelona's 
Gary Lin 


BBC 2 


940 Ceefax. 

9.15 Daytime on Two: 

;in Glasgow 
: 10.00 For four- 
and five-year olds 10.15 
The nature of paper and 
how it is made 1048 
Science: colour 1140 
Words and pictures for the 
very young ti.17 Heads, 
boc&es, and legs 1140 
Basic French I 
skills. 

1242 Matftsrtrigonometry 1245 
Working at a Garden 
Centre 1248 Getting 
around in Spain 1.10 
Analysing an interview 
1-38 

industries in< 

240 TMnkabOut 2.15 
Making a documentary. 

245 Ceefax. 

340 Conservative Party 
Conference 1985. The 
debate on defence. 

540 News summary with 
subtitles. Weather. 

545 Harold Lloyd* Excerpts 
from two of the 
comedian's film made in 
191 9 - Ask Father and 
Captain Kidd's Kids, (r) 

640 FHm: Seventh Cavalry 


CHANNEL 4 


240 FHm: Thoroughly Modem 
Ifiity (1967) starring Julie 
Andrews and MaryTyter 
Moore. Musical comedy, 
set in Twenties New York, 
about two innocents who 

' find romance after first 

brushing wtth Mrs Meers 
(Beatrice Lillie) who 
operates a white slave 
trading racket. Directed by 
George Roy Hill. 

540 ABceuThe final 

programme of the series, 
end after Mel sells his 
tiner to a property 
developer, he. his staff, 
and regular customers, 
reflect on the good times 
they have had together. 

540 Ttm Abbott and Costefio 
Show" Their landlord 
complains about the row 
when Bud and Lou throws 
party tor their friend 

HNIary. 

640 Flashback: We Are What 
Wa Are. This final 
programme of the series 
examines the dominant 
style of Seventies 
television and at the 
feminist films which 

I the style. (Oracle) 


Radio 4 


On long wave, (s) Stereo on VHP 
ft® Shipping. 6.00 News Briefing: 
Weather, B.1D Farming. 


640 


.740, 


and BaAara Hate. 
Captain Tom Benson is 
accused of cowardice 
after he escapes from the 
. Battle of Little Big Horn. In 

order to prove his bravery 
he volunteers tor an 
impossible task - 

^^«a?Sist8r^Sn the 
massacre site. Directed by 
Joseph H Lewis. 

7.10 lOOGrem Sporting 
Moments. The 1975 
Wimbledon Men's I 
Final between the l._. 
Jimmy Connors, and 
Arthur Ashe. 

745 TraveHerafnTImasBy 
Sledge Across 
Greenland. The story of 
the 1930 expedition to 
Greenland by the German 
scientist Allred Wegener 
which was Intended to be 
a year-long study of the 
meteorology, geology, and 
glaciology of the ice-cap. 
,845 Behind tne Bamboo 
v Screen. In this firstof two. 
programmes David Jesse! 
examines China's 
television industry. 

840 M-A*S*HL Hawkeye's 
romantic picnic wtth a 
pretty nurse is abruptly 
halted by a sniper who 
then turns his a ttentions to 
the rest of the 4077th 
personnel, creating panic 
among the medics, (r) 

925 Tha Life and Loves of a 
She Devil Episode one of 
a four-part dramatization 


3 ary Lineker; i 
from tonight's! 

Cup competition. 

1140 World Chess 
' Championship. The 
closing games in 
Leningrad. 

1245 That’s HoOywood. A 

selection from the scariest 
films. 

1240 Night Thoughts. 


by Tea Whitehead of Fay 
Weldon's novel about a 
deserted wife who wreaks 
. revenge on her errant 
husband to a diabolocaJ 
- manner. Starring Dennis 
Waterman, Patricia Hodge, 
and Jidie T WaSace. 
(Ceefax) (see Choice) 

1045 The Trotmte with Sex. The 
first of an eight-part series 
dealing with a variety of 


i 10-55 


sexual (Sffkxrtties and the 
help that is avaBabte to 
overcome the problems. 
This programme examines 
the world of the sex 
t herapis t (see Choice) 
Nowsnlght i 


640 Conference Report Gtyn 
Mathias Introduces 
highlights from the day's 
proceedings at the 
Conservative Party 
Conference in Bournemouth. 
740 Channel 4 News. 

740 Comment The political 
slot this week is taken by 
Giles Ractice the Shadow 
Secretary of State for 
Education. Weather. 

840 Talking to Writers. 

Hermione Lee in 
conversation with Yehuda 
Amlchal, Israel's leading 
poet who has a selection 
of his poetry published in 
Britain this week. (Oracle) 
840 Diverse Reports: Mfiton 
Keynes - Bursting the Red 
Batioon. Paul Clmord, a 
former housing officer with 
theMBton Keynes 
Development Corporation, 
reveals that the losers in 
the New Towns' battle 
torfresh population are the 
manual workers who have 
Otttechanceofftmflng-a* — 
job and even less of a 
hope of finding 
accommodation. 
ftOO" Down the Line. The first of 
a new series examining 
current events from a 
Scottish pomt-of- view. 
Malcolm Rjfkind 
comments on the state of 
the Conservative Party in 
Scotland; there is a report 
on the Scottish end of the 
teachers' pay dispute; the 
story of how colour 
television reached the bie 
of Skye almost 20 years ' 
after everywhere else; and 
a review of Edinburgh's 
arts and architecture. 

1040 TheDefiberatoDeatttofa 
Polish Priest A 
dramatized reconstruction 
of the trial of the Polish 
security officers accused 
of murdering Father Jerzy 
Popieluszko. Written by 
Ronald Harwood from a 
transcript of the 


Business News. 645,745 

Weather. 7.00. BJDO 
News- 745, B45 Sport 7.45 
Thought for the Day. B45 
Yesterday in Parliament. 
847 Weather; Travel 
940 News 

AOS Midweek with Li&by 
Purvests) 

1040 News; Gardeners' 

Question Tune. Experts 
answer listeners' queries (rl 
1040 Morning Story: A Story 
of a Good Dog, by James 
Stephens. Reader Robert 

Rietiy. 

1045 Daily Service (New Every 
Morning, page 11{Q{s) 

1140 News; Travel: The Last 
Crusade: Recollections 
of the Jarrow March in 
October 1936, when 200 
men marched to London as 
a protest against 
unemploymenLThelr story is 
told In the 
commemorative 
documentary. 

1148 Enquire Within. Experts 
tackle listeners' 
questions. 

1240 News: You and Yours. 

Consumer advice. 

1247 Father Brown Stories by 
GK Chesterton (1) The 
Perishing of the Pendraaons. 
With Andrew Sachs in 
the title role (r) (s) 1245 
Weather 

140 The World At One; News 
1.40 The Archers. 14S 
Shipping 

240 News; Woman's Hour. 
Includes an interview 
with Prinoess Michael of 
Kent. 

340 News; The Afternoon 
Play: There's Rosemary, 
That's For Remembrance, by 
Helen Walker. With Avril 
Clark and Deborah Joel (s) 
347 One Man and His Log. 
Continuing Barry PSton’s 
account of a barae trip up a 
Burgundy canal. Read by 
David Roper. 

440 News 
445 File on 4 (r) 

445 Kaleidoscope Bdra. The 
Cheltenham Festival ot 
Literature. 

540 PM. News magazine. 

. 540_Shipplng. 545 
Weather 

640 News; Financial Report 
640 Round Britain Quiz. Irena 
Thomas and Eric Komv 
Fred Mctxffis and Jack 
Jones. 

740 News 
7.05 The Archers 


740 fn Business [new series]. 

With Peter Smith. 

745 Antony Hopkins Talking 
About Music. An 
Hu5trated lecture (s) 

8.15 Analysis: A Giant Leap 
for Europe. David 
Wheeler examines the 
issues mat wdl dominate 
European space poGcy for 
the next two decades. 

9-00 Thirty-Mmute Theatre. 

Before the Roses, by 
Stephen Shorn. With Andrew I 
Livingstone and Diana 
Whnley (rXs) 

940 Further Up The Tyne In A 
Flummox. Leonard 
Barras reads one of his own 
stones. 

9.45 Kaleidoscope. Includes 
comment on Innocence 
at the Gate Theatre, Dublin, 
and John Updike's book 
Roger s Version. 

10.15 A Book at Bedtime: 

Hangover Square (3). 

Read by Nick Dunning. 1QJ25 
Weather 

1040 The World Tonight 

11.15 The Financial world 
Tonight 

1140 Today in Parliament 

1145 Music At Night ftiul 
Crossley plays piano 
music by Poulenc (s) 

1240 News; Weather. 1233 

VHF (avarfattem England and 


Slovak PO under uoor 
Pesek. 

1040 Beaux Arts Tna Haydn 
(Piano Too in A. H XV 
181. and Snerana (Piano Tno 
inGrmnpr, Op 15) 

10.45 Mozart and Gounod: 

Albion Wind Ensemble. 
Mozart (Serenade in C 
minor, k 388), Gounod 
(Petite sympnorxej 
11-30 Macnee Musicale: BBC 
Concert Orchestra 
(under Seaman), with Philip 
Martin (piano). Vaughan 
WiSoms (The Wasps 
overture). Deirus (On 
hearing the first cuckoo in 
spring). Litotff (Scherzo: 
Concerto Sympncimque No 
4), Elgar (Overture. 

Serenade and fAtrch. The 
Wand of Youth), 

Schumann (Aufschwung; 
Warum?: Traumes 
Wi-rer. Fantasy Pieces, Op 
12), Tchaikovsky (Scene. 
Danse des cygnes. Vatse. 
from Swan Lake) 

12.30 The Essential Jazz 
Records: Max Ham son 
with recordings by. inter aka, 
the Modem Jazz C 
and Duke Bbngton and his 
Orchestra. 140 News 
145 Concert Hail: Hamah 
Milne (piano) . Haydn 
(Sonata m C, H XVI 50), 
McCabe (Variations. Op 
221. Chopin ( Impromptu in G 
flat Op5i, and 
Polonaise-fantasy m A flat. 

Op 61) 

240 Raphael Ensemble: 

Lennox Berkeley (String 
Tr.o Op 19). Bridge (Sextet m 
Eflatl 

240 Record Review: with 
Paul Vaughan kndudees 
Alan Bfytn comparing 
recordings ot Wagner's 
Siegfried, and Richard 


& 

S Wales only) as above 
except 5454.00am Weather; 
Travel. 1140-1240 For 
Schools: 11.00 Sinong 
Together (s) n.20 Junior 
Drama Workshop (s) 1 1 .40 
Reading Comer (s) 11.50 
Poetry Corner. 1.45-340pm 
For Schools: 1.55 
Listening Comer (s) 2.05 


Using Unemployment. 540- 
545PM (Continued). 
12.30-1.l0am Schools Night- 
time Broadcasts 
Deutsch fur die I 


440 Choral Evensong, from 
Manchester Cathedral. 

445 News 
540 Midweek Chase. 

Cmiarcsa (Inrennezzo 
grace so. H maesva di 
cappella), Reger 
(Variations and fugue on 
theme by Bactr 
Alexander Sobodyamk, 

S 3 no), Mozart (Horn 
umret m E flaL K 407, with 
Sebastian Huber, horn). 
Tippett isong-chcie The 
Heart's Assurance, with 
Peter Pears, tenor). Wagner 
(Tristan and Isolde 
symphonic synthesis, arr 
Stokowski) 

7.00 Choral Voices: Exon 
Singers (under 
Christopher Tolley). Victoria 
(Ave Mana. and motet 
Vadam. et orcurmbo 
enmatem). Mendelssohn 
(Six anthems. Op 79) 

740 Siren Song: play with 
music by Stephen 
and Jenny Sprmce. \ 

Nichola McAufiffe as 
June de Mauptn, and Gwen 
Cherrell, Edward de 
Souza. Bruce Ltddmgton. Oz 
Clarke in the cast 
8.40 French Music- old style. 


att 


( Radio 3 


645 Weather. 7.00 News 
745 Concert Rossini (La 
cambiale di matrimonio 
overture), Boccherini (Ceflo 
Concerto in D, G 479: 
Rostropovich, soloist}, 
Mozart (Ruhesanft, 

Saide, with Popp .soprano), 

MfiT" 0 . 

845 Concert (continued): 

Bertiaz (Rob Roy - 
overture), Chaussan ( 
Poeme, with Ginette 
Neveu, vtofln. In mono), 
Debussy (fberfa, Images). 
940 News 
945 This week's Composer 
Franz Schmidt. 

Symphony No 3, pteyed by 



Nichola McAoliffe Siren Sons, 
on Radio 3, 7 JOpm 


Vmceni d mety's Suite in 
D, Op 24. wun Jean -Francois 
Partlard CO ond solo 
mstrumentaSsis 
9.00 Philharmortia Orchestra 
(under James Loughran 
and Witold Lutoslawskl. With 
Jorge Scdet (piano). Part 
one. Beethoven 
(Consecration of the ; 
House overture, and Piano , 
Concerto No 5) 

9.55 Sifc Continents. Angus 
McDarmid with foreign 
radio broadcasts, monitored 
by the BBC 

10.15 Concert: part two. 

Lutostawski’s Symphony 
No 3 ( under the composer) 
11.00 Manchester Chamber 
Concert Lindsay String 
Ouartet. Haydn (String 
Quartet mG, Op 54 No 
1). and Mendelssohn (String 
Quartet in EnaL Op 12). 

1147 News. 1240 
Closedown. 

( Radio 2 > 

MF (medium wave). Stereo on 
VHF (see Radiol) 

News on the hour. Sports 
Desks 1.05pm. 2.02. 342. 4.02, 

5.05. 6.02, 6.45 (ml only). 945 
plus Horse of me Yoar show at 
1142pm 

4.00am Charles Nove 540 Ray 
Moore 740 Derek Jameson 9.30 
Ken Bruce 11.00 Jimmy Young 

145pm David Jacobs 240 Gloria 

Hunniford 340 David Hamilton 
5.05 John Dunn 7.00 Folk On 2 840 
Another Digancc Indulgence. 

Richard D^ance and guests 940 
National Brass Band contest ot 
Great Bmam 1986. From the Royat 
Albert Hall. London. 945 Sports 
Desk 10.00 Can l Take That Agasi? 
[new senes] The blunders that 
happen when broadcasting doesn't ' 
go as planned 10.15 The Flying 
Pickets 1040 The Barron Knights: 

In Town Tonight 11.00 Brian 
Matthew 1.00am Richard Clegg 
340-4.00 A Lmlo Night Music 

( Radio 1 ) 

MF (medium wave) VHF in 
stereo ( see end ol Radio Itstmgal) 
News on tne hall-hour from 
640am until 840pm then el 1040 
and 1240 midnight 
540am Adrian John 740 Mike 
Smith s Breakfast Show 9.30 
Smon Bates 1240 Newsbeai 
(Frank Patridge] 12-45 Gary Davies 
340 Steve Wright 540 
Newsbeai (Frank ParmdgB) 5.45 
Bruno Brookes find Top 30 
album chan) 740 Jamco Long 
1040-12.00 John Peel. VHF 
Stereo Radios 1 & 2; - 4.00am As 
Raido 2. 1040pm As Radio V 
1240-4.00am As Radio 2. 

WORLD SERVICE 

640 Newsdesk 740 News 7.09 Tweniy- 
Four Hours B40 News SOB Raftocttons 

5.15 Classical Record Review U0 Quota, 
Urxwote 940 Nows 949 Fhmaw oltha 
Brmon Press 9.15 Tha world Today 940 
Financial News (L40 Look Ahead M5 
Lyncs and Lymans 1040 Nows 1041 
Ortinffius 11040 My Musk 1140 News 
11.09 News About Britain 11.15 Imarra- 
Bonai GerdMws 114S A Letter Rom 
Wales 1240 Radio Newsreel 12.1 S Nature 
Notebook 12-25 The Farming Work! 1245 
Spans Roumkra 140 News 149 Twenty 
Four Hows 140 Development Bfi 240 
Outlook 24S Report on Religion 340. 
Rato Newsreel 3.15 Hbaonm 340 
Jants'a Frayn 440 News 4.09 Commart- . 
toy 4.1 5 Coumeipoim us The World 
1°*/ 54? N»« 549 Uttar from Walts 
M0 News 149 Twenty-Four Hours 940 
Aarignment M0 News 941 Network UK 
*•15 Album Tune 0.46 Reoonflng o( tha 
Week 1040 News 1049 Tha WOW Today 
102SA Latter From Walaa 1040 Financw 
News 1040 Raeectkxtt 10.45 Sports 

iwsfltisri'asrBS 

1240 News 1249 News About Briatn 

12.15 RwSo Newsreel 1240 Jarvis's 
Frayn 140 News 141 Outlook 140 
wavaauido 140 Book Choice IAS Grew- 
rig Points in Science 240 News 249- 
Rwlewof Miel British Press 2.15 Network 
UK 230 Assignment 340 News 340 
News About Brnain 3.15 340 The Domes- 
g^ friori^ Yaars On «40 Newsdaak 

GMT. 


Ctaaslcaj Record Review. AH brnas la 


™053kH2 

92.5; RacSo 4s 2 T 
1458kHz/206nt 




BBCim 


545pOwS.«J 
y 646-740 Jufce 


Peter Snow 

11^0 Weather. 


introduced by 


12.00 Fim: The Case of the 
River Morgue* (1956) 
Scotland Yaitii investigate 
thsmystery of abody 
stolen from a mortuary. 



WalmTodavC4t 

1145-1145 Hm *86 1155-1240 
News SCOTLAND: <L%pm-7.00 Raport- 
Scottand. NORTHERN IRELAND: 

Sport 540-640 Iraida Ul- 

-740 Video Ptctwe Stow 
1140-1145 News ENGLAND: 645pm- 
740 Region al newsmagazines. 

ULSTER A; London except: 

UlsmrB4S Qoas roada 1140 That's Hol- 
lywood 1210am News. Closedown. 

GRANADA AaLt y>on |W -, M 

Tbo Greer Bottles tjSKSranaSaRa^ 
porttt3p-2» ftmdaS and Hopttk (Da- 
C8Mad)34M40 Young Doctors 
fr 00 SSPprt*^ C»«45^ Thm [ S 

Your Right 1140 Huntar 1235am 

TVS ^epdon 

Short Sta 

rim ^0* SJWJJO Youra Doctres 640- 

635 Coast to Coast 1 M0 Mona Usa 

-the Picture 1210am Company, 


REGIONAL TELEVISION VARfATIONS 


SCOTTISH 

*4B TOoumiy Practice 640445 


ANGUAgSSSSSffimo, 

Taamg 140 News 140-230 Country 
Practice 640-645 About AngHa 1M0 
Darts 1240am Suftoflc Angle, 

Closedown. 

C4C 1 1.10am GweM a Sivad 
SSs, 1145 Ranestri 1145 IntarvBl 
1245pm Fim; Manpoww 200 Pup- 
pet Show 236 The Arabs 340 Flastoack 
445 PWabaiafii 6.15 Cadwran 440 
SmyriTS 445 Triciau Trevor 540 1 Could 
Do That 640 Brookskto 6 l 30 Bany 

Setback and the Big Wida World 740 

Nawyddlon Saith 740 Or Gogiadd 1 
WWfcrd 840 Geraint GnffiSis- 'Notary 
Stiyd S40 Halem Yn Y Gwud 045 
Fin: Paper Moor 1140 Diverse Reports 
1140 Conservative Conference 

1200 Closedown. 

YORKSHIRE 

UnMtora Live 140(1^^1^^30 


toe 1215am Soney Madean at 75 1240 

Ciosadown. 

HTVWEST ^^^- 

- . cspi- lUOpnhlJX) 

Gardening Time 140 News 140-230 
crampons 640045 News 1140 Talas 
from the Darksme 1210am 
Closedown. 

HTV WALES 

M40 Schools 640p!»«45 Wales at 

Lookemufld 1M0 Stow Exraess 

1210am Closedown. 


TYNE TEES Asjgonto- 

TS^ W London except 

vwgSRgSSSKS” 1 

gSSjBBBgaaP"- 

740Emmentale Farm 1140 Hotel 
1235am PostacnpL Ctoaeoown. 

GRAMPIAN „ 

That's HoSywood ^ 


75 1225 Closedown. 




ENTERTAINMENTS 


CONCERTS 


lAffBICAN HALL 628 8796/638 
Hxni Tnn 1 7 46 Luadau Sym- 
phony P n.h r M m . Bramwei 
1 ... n rond. Anna Joseph 

I H.|ll. 


EVENTS 


KMtse'OP TH£ YEAR SHOW 

V..-mr,|i-i Ai fw 902 1234 Eim 
7 i . ">p i i , O* i 6 11 Aftl 1 3011111 
7 11 TkR nailaHr mi 
~ ,k, rpl-t m-. r A Sal nr 


EXHIBmONS 


OLPSMITHS' FAIR. SILV ER * 
JEWELLERY BY SELECTED 

dcskmers for sale. 6 I I 

.Hlofrr, lOIMi Mon-Ffl 117 
^ji 1 1 5 OolihrelilM 1 Han 
I ,»»4rf Ljnr London CC7 Ad 
Irw Tub# SI Paul^k 


AOCLFM 836 781 1 or 240 7923 

/4 CC 741 9900/836 7308/379 

6433 Cm Sales 930 6123 Flm 

Call 24nr 7 day CC 240 7200 tbkg 

fra NOW BOOKING TO FEB 
1987 

ME AND MY GIRL 

THE LAMBETH WALK 
MUSICAL 
iwonm ai 730 Mas wni at 230 
«SH4»i 8.00 


-- 6 OT 8796/638 

SB9 tj«- 

COMPART 

BARBICAN THEATRE ml 

prey p«li lorn Tpm. locnor 
200 t 7 JO — SAI nawer by 
St>aw. rrd. p tlcr nrr B 16-24 
OjISCEm FROM A MAR- 
RIAGE by Fndnu 
TIM PIT lorn, lamer 7.30pm 
MKNCVfA sem PTOflSAE BK6 
Wi PnemNTf by Richard 
Nrgon. iO-ia Oef Final Pctfs 
THE DEAD MONKEY by Nick 
Dark* 


M TOWN" S enna 
Theatre Air C aaN M i n d 


CHUHe«LL Bromley 460 6677. 
evw MEJMB THun *- Sal 
230. DAISY PULLS IT OFF. 


OPERA & BALLET 


COLISEUM S 836 3161 
rc i-40 5268 

ENGLISH NATTONAL OTERA 

I, ml 7 30 Madam Botterfly, 

I nittVl 7.50 Ik# made. 


JYAL OPERA HOUSC Ol 240 

■ IQU Mdra* ini" 85c 
... CC l-h-krt* El-ias.so 

. \mrl’i mviI' ■ l * a11 00 1,10 d4> 

the royal ballet 

I.iii'I To* nor 7 30 

, vatw fiaianteriM/apaa IS 
flu BrMMr-Thi Cencert 

,|loi i .l.lii w info Ol 240 9819 




'IDLER'S WELLS 27A 8916 
Tull IT 24 Hr 7 Clay 24C 
.■J«Pk*irre» LnlllOri 18 E.ci 
T JO lor Male 2 30 

CENTRAL BALLET OF 
CHINA 

a Tom nr W - . . 

(Ad X)/ Tha At 

KMG OPERA 26 Oct 1 NM 

•t H ,ti, 5S for Winter Danrt 
into 


theatres 


»™ V nS-S.74 7 , 6 5S^^ 

UIW T«L^Cra«ASON 

ONLY 

DAVE ALLEN UVE 

pji»iinu-% liom 20 OH 
| \r\ Horn 


Fn XKiES WARimCK 

THE SECRET Urt OF 

CARTOONS 

i llv One SJIke 
-.in*-* ii-*i in tuitniQaiig’ 

, A r dina (real ™ a 

, 1 . orlolw 1 5 al 7pm 


ALBERT 836 3878 rr 579 6S65 
/6433CTP Sam S36 3962 Ua- 
tn 19 O cW S.r.TW Frl Sana. 
SAYS A SUNS Spa A US 

BARBARA COOK 

THE LLBOnr 
Timm “DON'T WATT-TAKE 
THIS ALL TOO RARE COOK’S 

TOUR OF RROADWAY” D. M*U 

“A VOICE OT SPUN COLD" 

C Limit, 


' 930 2S78 
OC 240 7200. CrtK 930 6123 

-Times 


ALBERT 836 3B7S rr 379 6365 
/ 379 64331/741 9999 Croup 
Sain 836 3962 


TAYLOR 

THE MAINTENANCE 
MAN 

A Comedy hy Rtc hard Harrta 

“A MARITAL HUtlRniCC 
_ WONDCRmU-Y FUNNY” 

N Ol UN- W 

"The a p pla uw ol radiums 
rrcoendien” D Mafl 
-Very funny Indeed" S.E3CP 

Mon - thu a Fn/sai 5JO arSjo 


ONLY 

DAVE ALLEN UVE 

Pm lewn from 20 Ort 
tin 8 pm 


Ol 836 61 1: 

83o tin Firm Call 124 tm/7 
D.i.-Ii 240 7200 ihkp M Esn 
7 SO. Wed mar 3. Sat 4 d 8 

Skahacpaara Company's 


ICOTTESLOC *P 928 22EB CC 
■Miaul TMawi smaU audi 
i onion I Toot. Tomor. Frl 7 JO. 
Sai 230 A 7 30 THE BAY AT 
MCE and WRECKED ECGS Mr 
□and Harr Mon. Tur 7 30 
THE AMERICAN CLOCK. TotV 
6 pm Honiw B irtp i irt la. AS 
mm pratform prtf Ml Uib C 2.00 


LES LIAISONS 
DANGEREUSK 

“rtOHT FOR A IICKET’ 

Whal's On 


APOLLO THEATRE *137 2603 

434 3698 First Call 01 -240 7200 
TkHrimauiT rr 579 6*53 
Mon Frl 8 00 Sat 4.30 A 8.15 
Thun mais 3 CO - 
PAUL SCOFIELD 
MASTERLY- FT 
HOWARD ROLLINS 
-MAGNIFICENT" D.MMl 

TM NOT RAPPAPORT 

-Wonderfully lormy" D Exp 
TONI - AWARD BEST PLAY 
r \ balnwiy mb util Today 
NOW BOOKING NOV TO JAN 


CHfTattON S 930 3216 CC 379 
6565/579 6433/741 9999 C»PC 
836 5962 d* 600. ThU mat 
8-30. sal S30 A 830 

-BRITISH FARCE AT ITS- BEST** 

D Mall 

•Tho Threuw of OomMy Comww 

ROYCE 

FOWLDS 


ANITA JACK! 

CKAHANt HM 

BAM COX 

RUN FOR YOUR WIFE 

written and dirmrd by 
HAY COONEY 
Over 1.400 i Mi i ii IHM prrli 
•SHOULD RUN raKLVr*S EX 


APeUO VtCTOHA ss toe 8665 
CC i>U 6262 Party B ko a 828 
6188 TlrkrlnusUf f