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Mo 62,589 


THE 



TIMES 


WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 15 1986 




Karpov offers 
deal ‘not tied 
to Star Wars 5 

8y Pb^Wehste*, OnrfPolitfcalCon«sp«ideot 

saSs* jbSskss 
s»»is® Ek3*s 

The agreement wouki not Mr Karpov was i&. 
nave to be linked to toe Ruv peatedly last night why, if a 
san t demand that the US separate deal could be con- 
snould limit research on the coved now, it had not been on 
Strategic Defence Initiative, offer at Reykjavik, 
the issue on which the summit He said the Reykjavik meet- 
ly Reykjavik collapsed. Mr wig had only lasted two days 
Viktor Karpov, the Soviet ■>*<* could not possibly have 
Union's chief negotiator at with all proposals. Any 
Geneva, said in London. 




.Anfft'+V # i r ": 


Mr Karpov's surprise state- 
ment was made at a press 
conference at the Soviet Em- 
bassy only hours after his 90- 
minute meeting with Mrs 
Margaret Thatcher. 

■ Mr Karpov was in London 
as Mr Gorbachov's personal 
emissary to Mrs Thatcher and 
was speaking with the full 
authority of the Soviet leader. 

Mr Karpov, who flips to 
Bonn today to brief the West 
German Government on the 
Reykjavik tafles, said the 
Soviet Union's proposal on 
medium-range weapons in 
Europe, raised at Reykjavik, 
was still on the table. “We do 
not deny the possibility of 
finding a solution on medium- 
range nudear weapons in 
Europe separately from space 
and nudear offensive arms,** 
hea said. 


Congress caution 7 
Weinberger praise 7 
David Hart 16 

plan for a separate agreement 
would have to be worked on 
by officials before it went 
before the leaders. . 

The Soviet Government's 
re adine ss to continue «»Brs on 
an arms agreement indicated a 
far more optimistic iHv l pos- 
itive attitude than had been 
nt in the immediate 


Mr Karpov’s visit under- 
lined the key importance 
which the Russians to 
Britain's role after Reykjavik. 

The positive tone of Mr 
Karpov, one of the new breed 
of Soviet negotiators, 
pleased British officials. “We 
were encouraged that the Rus- 
sians said then- proposals were 
still on the table,” Govern- 
ment sources said last njghL 
Although Mr Karpov gave 
Mrs Thatcher the Russian ver- 
sion of why the Reykjavik 
summit foundered and Mrs 
Thatcher backed Mr Reagan’s 
refusal to give ground on his 
Strategic Defence Initiative re- 
search programme, there was 
a notable absence of recrimm- 


Tomorrow 



Death Row 

Caries ‘be Luna, 
aged 24, fias teen 
on Death Row m a 
Texas jail for more 
than three years. 
He was due to be 
executed this 
morning but in bis. 
final hours came a 
stay of execution 
— so the waiting . 
and the uncertainty 
resumes. He talked 
to The Times about 
life and the politics 
of American death 


ation in Mr Karpov's public 
comments. 

He was clearly responding 
to the refusal of Mr Reagan to 
criticize Mr Gorbachov 

***?&<?*- his address to the American 

nation late on Monday. 

• WASHINGTON: Mr 
Karpov's suggestion of a sepa- 
rate ag re em ent on intermeefi- 
aw nmole s seems, on the fiyy 
of it, to be an astonishing 
volte-face by the Russians 
(Michael Binyon writes). It 
could be a big victory for 
President Reagan, who has 
been eager all along not to 
have a deal on medium-range 
weapons held hostage to 
agreeme n t s in space and 
strategic arms areas. 


Mr Karpov was notably 
vague on how any proposaMbr 
a separate deal coukf come 
before the resumed Geneva 
negotiations. “In what context 
and how they will be pre- 
sented at Geneva will depend 
on the results of our consid- 
eration of what happened at 
Reykjavik,” he said. 

But be added that there 
should be a speedy delibera- 
tion of the outcome of the 
weekend summit. He denied 
that the Soviet Union 





• There was no 
winner yesterday m The 
Times Portfolio GokJ 
£4,000 daily competition 
so there is £8,000 to 

be won today. 

• Portfolio fist, page 
31; how to play, 
information service, 
page 24. 


TIMES BUSINESS 


Shops clamp 

The Government is damping 
down on developers’ pro- 
posals to build large new 
shopping and leisure centres 
in the green belt Page 25 


TIMES SPORT 


British defeat 

White Crusader, the British 
yachL was beaten by New 
Zealand IV in the America’s 
Cup challenge trials off 
mantle. Australia Page 46 


TIMES FOCUS 


London University, the dig- 
est in the country, is celebrat- 
ing its 150th anniversary at a 
time of change and chaJ 
Special Report, pages 


Shultz to meet 
Shevardnadze 

Front Midtael Binyes, Washington 

Mr GeOfge" “Sridte, tiW'The table," Mr Reagan said 
American Secretary of Stale; ‘‘They won’t go away. We are 
said yesterday toe United 
Stales shohld make as muttons 
possible (hit of toe achieve- 
ments at Reykjavik, and an- 
nounced he would be meeting 
Mr Eduard Shevardnadze, toe 
Soviet Foreign Minister, in 
Vienna next month. 

They will both be there at a 
review conference on the Hel- 
sinki accords. “Fm sure well 
arrange aTneetrng,” Mr Shultz 
said on television. He noted 
that both President Reagan 
and Mr Mikhail Gorbachov 
had said their arms proposals 
remained on the table. 

He said the US would tiy 
especially to achieve at sepa- 
rate talks in Geneva the 
agreement on medium-range 
missiles in- Europe, although 
he did not know if Moscow 
would agree to that separately. 



Bank base rates 
go upl% toll% 

By Rodney Lord, Economics Editor 


off “DurnegotiatorS are head- 
ing bode to Geneva, and we 
ato prepared to go forward 
wherever and whenever the 
Soviets are ready. 

H e acknoilrnflniT , however, 
that the prospect for another 
summit was now bleak. 

“There was no indication by 
Mr Gorbachov as to when or 
whether be plans to travel to 
the United States, as we 
agreed-he would last year in 
Gepeva. I repeat tonight that 
our invitation stands mid that 
we continue to believe addi- 
tional meetings would be use- 
ful. But that is a decision the 
Soviets must make.' 

MeapwhOe Mr Donald 
Reeuj, the White House Chief 
of Staff has Quickly tempered 
his apgry outburst at Reyk- 
“It remains to be seen what javik, which re presented the 
is coupled. And I thmk we will Administration’s initial 


work on the assumption that 
has been in the picture before 
Reykjavik, that on the me- 


fbrward and we certainly 
try to do that-” 

His remarks came as the 
Administration tries to sal- 
vage as much as possible from 
the two days of abortive talks. 
President Reagan said in his 
television address that, unlik e 
in toe past, the US was now 
dealing from a position of 
strength and so had the 
opportunity to move speedily 
with the Russians toward even 
nwre breakthroughs. 

“Our ideas me out there on 


frustrations and disappoint- 
ment. He said on Monday that 
it was possible a special envoy 
would be appointed to help 
restart negotiations with 
Moscow. 

• The Slate Department said 
yesterday that toe US expul- 
sion oitier cm 25 members of j 
the Russian United Nations 
delegations still stood, but at 
the Soviet request the five 
members still in New York 
would be allowed to stay until 
October 19. By: Sunday, how- 
ever, afl would lave gone: The 
spokesman said be did not 
expect this-to affect overall 
US-Soviet relations. 


Hone News 2-5 
Overseas M# 

Appis 22.26 

Art* » 

Birth&dotfbs. 

marriages 33 
Bottoms 25-31 
Own 22 

Crosswords IA24 

Dart *6 

Events 24 
Frames 14-16 


Law Report 43 
Leaders 17 
Lfflcn 17 
OHmi? 22 

Parliament 4 
Property (8J9 
Sate Room 22 
SricMt 22 
Sport 43-4648 
TbofresAtc 47 
TV & Ratio 47 
Waiter 24 


& ft 4 6 A A 


Baker unveils 
‘buy a school’ 
pilot scheme 

A “right to buy your school” 
pledge could be included in 
the next Tory manifesto in the 
wake of the plan for 20 city 
technology colleges outlined- 
sterday by Mr Kenneth 
ker. the Secretary of State 
Mr Baker proposes that for 
his pilot scheme, groups of 
parents, businessmen, vol- 
untary bodies am! charities 
would be invited to form 
themselves into “promoters” 
and establish charitable trusts 
to take over the ownership of 
existing schools. 

The new osHeges^ page 2 


Martens offers! 
resignation in 
language row 

From Richard Owen 
Brussels 

Mr Wiifried Martens. Bel- 
gium's longest serving post- 
war prime minister, yesterday 
offered his resignation to King 
Badoum after a split in the 
ndiite Centre Right coalition 
over Belgjnm’s.Ianguage prob- 
lem proved unbridgeable. 

Mr Martens made the 
announcement before be was 
due to make's crucial speech 
on recently inflamed passions 
over the language division. 


The man and the wo man 
who can jointly claim to hold 
titular sway over one half toe 
world’s population met yes- 
terday anddiscussed whether 
you -could see England from 
the top of the Eiffel Tower. 

The Queen, who as head of 
the Commonwealth chalks up 
the round billion or so, 
lunched with Mr Deng Xiao- 
ping, the chain-smoldng 
expectorating 82-year-old 
Sichuan peasant, who, al- 
though only second in his 
hierarchy, is the strong man 
and eminence grise who roles 
12 bflhan Chinese. 

This week has been toe 
realization of an eight-year 
dream for Mr Deng that the 
pale-skinned aristocratic 
Englishwoman, whose nation 
spent nearly two centuries 
raping toe Middle Kingdom 
with- opium and gunboats 
should be a guest -in his 
country to which the British 
have now seceded all daim.- 
Their planned tryst caused 
the flunkeys of protocol some 
serious nan-biting. Would Mr 
Deng puff foul oriental smoke 
in toe Jace of the avowedly 
nonsmoking tfog tish female 
long? And if he used his brass 
spittoon five times or fewer in 
the Queen’s presence, would 
that be tantamount to 
gracieusne&T 
In the event, Mr Deng was 
gentleman enough -to honour 
toe susceptibilities of his 

guest • 

They met in a tiny pavilion 
in the Diaoyutai state guest 
house complex in the west of 
Peking where the Queen is 
staying Mr Deng emerged and 
held ora bis hand in greeting, 
beamragntightiW. 

“Thank you- for coming to 
see.and old man such as me,” 
he said through -an interpreter. 
They went inside to hold one 
of those stilled public 
conversations in front of the 

Press which are the lot of 
heads of state, but which the 
Queen has rarely been sub- 
jected-to before. 

Mr Deng kicked off with toe 
weather, saying it was good 

Continued on page 24, col 1 


Visa deadline 


The Queeu aid Duke of Edinburgh at the Great Wall yesterday. 

Great Wall 
stormed 
by Queen 

Emm Abu Hamilto n - 


Heathrow under 
siege by Asians 


By Howard Fo6ler 


Heathrow bad its busiest 
day in the atiporfs history 
yesterday with up to eight 
times the normal number of 
Asians seeking entry to the 
United Kingdom as the mid- 
night deadline for visas 
approached. 

It became dear fast night 
that immigration staff had 
seriously underestimated the 
scale of the influx. At one 
point an estimated 4,000 
Asians were queuing at im- 
migration controL 

Journalists were allowed by 
the Home Office to enter the 
immigration hall where 17 
smalL white desks were occu- 
pied fay staff continuously 
processing travel documents. 
In front of them, in several 
orderly 30-yard queues were 
some 600 people, mostly 
Bangladeshis. 

Behind, away at the arrival 
gates dose to . the aircraft 
which had brought Them to 
Britain, were a further 450 
Bangladeshis all hoping to 
come into this eountry. 

The unexpected arrival of 


hundreds more Asians on 
flights from toe Middle East 
had canght the British authori- 
ties unawares. 

“There were 200 on a 
Kuwaiti flight, as well as more 
coming in from the Gulf and 
Middle East,” Mr Andrew 
Cole, the immigration 
officers’ union leader, said 
yesterday. 

“We have more than dou- 
bled our staff today but we still 
reckon we will be working 
until the early hours and then 
everyone will have to stay in 
hotels until we can interview 
them. It was chaotic here on 
Monday and now it has gone 
way beyond that.” 

The authorities hardly ever 
refuse entry to women and 
children. While press and 
cameramen watched, several 
families were allowed through 
to meet their relatives. 

By 10pm the immigration 
staff was down to 14 from hs 
afternoon level of 65. Shortly 
before that, an Air India 
jumbo was scheduled to ar- 

Coutinued on page 24. col 3 


Ford ‘shows faith’ 
in £1.46bn stake 


By Craig Setra 

Ford is to invest £1,460 mil- 
lion in hs British operation 
over the next five years, the 
company, announced at the 
Motor Stow yesterday. 

Mr Derek Barron, toe chair- 
man and chief executive of 
Ford of Britain,-, said . ihe 
investment — half on new 
vehicles . and half - on. new 
engines and transmission — 
demonstrated the company's 
commitment to,- and faith in 
car-making in this country. 

His speech at a Motor Show 
lunch at the National Ex- 
hibition Centre. Birmingham, 
was regarded as underlining 
the company's confident po- 
sition against that of unprofit- 
able, state-owned' Austin- 
Rover and its struggle for 


survivaL . . 

Mr Barron said that the 
£SS0 million to be spent on 
new engines, to be built at 
Dagenham and Bridgend, and 
on transmissions over toe next 
five years would make Britain 
toe centre of Ford’s engine 
technology in Europe. Its 
financial commitment in Brit- 
ain over toe 10 yeais until 
1991 would be more than 
£3.000 minion. 

He said: “Ford’s faith in this 
country can be measured by 
toe money we have put into iL 
Strength has only been 
achieved by a sustained pro- 
gramme of investment and 
our stake here is now very big. 
So the prospects are good for 
Ford or Britain.” 


Kinn ock tries to restrict TV defence questions 


By Richard Evans . 

Mr Neil Kimtodcwasalthe 
centre of a “censorship" row 
Iasi night after attempting to 
dictate the terms of an inter- 
view on Labour’s controver- 
sial non-nudear defence pol- 
icy to a television current af- 
fairs programme: 

The Labour Party leader 
told producers of London 
Weekend Television’s W eek- 
end World he would only a$- 
rec to be interviewed on tins 
Sunday's programme, devot- 


ed to Labour's defence plans, 
provided questions to him 
about defence were restricted 
to 10 minutes or toe 30- 
minute interview. 

Weekend World chiefs re- 
jected the unprecedented con- 
ditions . imposed by Mr 
Kinnock and last night it 
seemed certain the Labour 
leader will not take part in the 
programme. 

Talks between Mr Kin- 
nock's office and Weekend 
World producers about a pro- 
gramme on Labour’s defence 


stance started in July and last 
week discussions centred on 
toe are* the programme 
would cover, ft was only on 
Monday that Mr Kinnock’s 
advisers suddenly insisled on 
the restriction. 

Mr Hugh . Pile, editor of 
Weekend World 1 said yester- 
day: “The stipulatiopthat Mr 
-Kinnock. has made is not toe 
kind of stipulation we would 
normally agree to. 1 intend toe - 
programme should go ahead 
Subject- to any other story 
breaking. 1 would still hope 


Mr Kinnock will agree to 
appear for the full programme. 
If he doesn’t we will be very 
interested to hear whether 
Denis Healey or Denzil Da- 
vies will be willing to appear.” 

One LWT insider said yes- 
terday that before Mr Kin- 
nock's demands were made, 
programme chiefs, were still 
undecided whether the half 
hour questioning of Mr Kin- 
nock by Mr Matthew. Parris, 
the new presenter and former 
Conservative MP. should be 
purely about defence: 


“One thing is for sure, it is 
not possible to get properly 
into a topic like defence when 
there is a 10-minute restric- 
tion on questions,” 

Mr Kinnock’s reluctance to 
be questioned closely on de- 
fence comes less than a week 
after the Prime Minister and 
Sir Geoffrey Howe, the For- 
eign Secretary, made plain 
their determination to launch 
an all-out assault on Labour's 
unilateral stance between now 
and the next general election. 

Labour strategy, page 2 


&«*■ 





The cost of borrowing rose 
by I per cent yesterday as the 
Government endorsed a rise 
in interest rates. 

The big five clearing banks, 
which now include the TSB. 
all put up their base rates from 
10 per cent to 1 1 per cent. 
Overdrafts will start at around 
16 per cent for personal 
customers. 

Mortgage rates are likely to 
go up too. Mr John Baylis. a 
genera] manager of Abbey 
National, said yesterday: “A 
mortgage rate rise of more 
than I per cent is likely. We 
will not decide before Friday. 
If there is a further rise in 
interest rates then mortgage 
rates will have to go up by 
more.” The Halifax described 
a rise as “inevitable”. 

The rise in interest rates 
comes at the end of a lengthy 
tussle m which toe Govern- 
ment has tried to stem toe 
weakness in the pound. Yes- 
terday sterling rose on the 
news from 67.3 per cent of its 
average 1975 value to 67.8 per 
cent. Bui by the close of 
trading it had fallen back to 
67.6- 

Against toe dollar sterling 
closed at Si. 4377 and against 
toe mark at Dm.2.8395. 

Speaking on the BBC World 
at One programme the Chan- 
cellor. Mr Nigel Lawson de- 
scribed toe rise in rates as “a 
bit of sound, prudent eco- 
nomic management”. He said 
a rise in rates of I per cent was 
necessary to keep “conditions 
firmly on track, to keep infla- 
tion down as it has been kept 
down as a result of the policies 
we have been pursuing”. 

Earlier during the run on 
sterling, the markets had been 
expecting a rise of 2 per cent. 
But Mr Lawson commented: 


“1 decided to waif until toe 
markets had settled down, and 
they have now settled down, 
so that the I per cent increase 
would stick.” 

Yesterday the markets 
continued to be in some doubt 
that a 1 per cent rise would be 
enough. But money market 
rates were not indicating a 
further rise. 

Opposition spokesmen 
criticised the Government's 
action which they said dem- 
onstrated the failure of the 
Government's economic poli- 
cies. Mr Roy Hatimfcy added 
that "To put off the 
announcement of the in- 
crease until after the Tory 
Party Conference, toe Gov- 
ernment spent millions of 
pounds on postponing the 
inevitable.” 

The weakness in the pound 
developed towards toe end of 
Iasi month beside weakness in 

Mortgage arrears 3 
Leading article 17 

Comment 27 

the dollar. This followed the 
US decision to cut its interest 
rales to try and stimulate the 
economy. 

Foreign exchange markets 
expected some agreement on 
the co-ordination of economic 
management among the ma- 
jor countries of the West to 
emerge from the International 
Monetary Fund meeting. The 
failure to agree caused new 
uncertainty which helped to 
undermine sterling. 

In his speech to the Conser- 
vative Party Conference last 
week Mr Lawson stressed that 
the Government would never 
take risks with inflation. But 

Continued on page 24, col 8 


Hurd puts plea on 
judges to Cabinet 

By PhiSp Webster, Chief Political Correspondent 


Mr Douglas Hurd, the 
Home Secretary, is to seek 
Cabinet support in an attempt 
to override the opposition of 
toe Lord Chancellor and 
much of toe legal profession to 
moves designed to encourage 
tougher sentencing for violent 
crimes. 

Mr Hurd wants to make it 
more difficult for judges to 
ignore guidelines already 
given by toe Court of Appeal 
to lower courts about sentenc- 
ing policy. 

He also wants the guidelines 
to be made public and- re- 
viewed periodically, and in- 
tends to include his proposals 
in toe criminal justice Bill 
planned for the next session of 
Parliament. 

However the objections of 
Lord Hailsham of St Maryle- 
bone, who is fighting toe 
measure on toe ground that it 
represents interference with 
the independence of the ju- 
diciary, prevented Mr Hurd 
from making an announce- 
ment about it at the Conser- 


vative Party conference in 
Bournemouth last week. 

Now the Home Secretary is 
expected to widen ministerial 
discussion of the issue by 
putting it on the agenda of the 
Cabinet's “H” home affairs 
committee. He seems assured 
of toe support of the Prime 
Minister. 

Under the plan, toe Judicial 
Studies Board, which is 
responsible for passing Court 
of Appeal guidance to the 
judiciary, would be given a 
statutory duty to assemble and 
publish, for the benefit of 
judges and the public a docu- 
ment containing the 
guidelines. 

Home Office ministers be- 
lieve toe measure to be nec- 
essary to allay public concern.. - 
about unduly lenient 
sentencing. 

The move follows the defeat^ 
of toe Government’s attempt v 
in 1985 to give the Attorney " 
General toe right to refer,* 
controversially lenient sen-,- -* 
fences to the Court of Appeal* 



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HOME NEWS 


Ministry to fund 
Nimrod project 


tb. Riot film ‘test’ ruling 


Harlech Television was yesterday ordered by a High 
Court judge in chambers to hand over to police unpublished 
film of the recent St Paul’s riots. 

It was seen as a test case of powers given to the police in 
the Police And Criminal Evidence Act 

It is thought BBC Television had its case adjourned in 
Bristol after agreeing hi allow police officers to view 
unpublished film. 

HTV had costs awarded against it by Mr Jostice Murray 
S rnart-Snuth-Tbe Bristol United Press and the Bristol 
Press and Picture Agency have been ordered to appear in 
court on Friday to face similar requests. Both 
organizations were taking legal advice yesterday. 


BNFL 


payout 


Soccer on 
the dole 


British Nudear Fuels 
paid £6,000 yesterday to a 
former worker who was 
dismissed for allegedly 
leaking information about 
the Seuafield reprocessing 
plant in west Cumbria. 

The settlement was 
achieved as Mr Philip 
Coney, aged 28, was due to 
take his case for unfair 
dismissal to an industrial 
tribunal. The former 
maintenance fitter was 
sacked in March for al- 
leged “misconduct”, but 
Haims it was because be 
wore Greenpeace badges 


Preston North End is to 
introduce a league tour- 
nament for teams made up 
from the town's 
unemployed. 

The dub wifi put its 
Deepdale complex, with its 
new artificial surface, at 
the disposal of the teams 
free of charge. It will also 
organize the league's fix- 
tures and provide dressing 
room accommodation and 
training facilities. The 
project wOl ran as part of a 
community involvement 
scheme with Preston Coun- 
cil. 


Unions to seek writ 


Unions representing 20,000 employees of the Royal. 
Dockyards took certain this morning to seek a writ against 
the Government. 

The 18 unions are seeking a High Court declaration that 
the Ministry of Defence has failed to consult adequately on 
the new “privatized" management off the dockyards and on 
the fall implications of the transfer of the workforce out of 
Crown service. 

The ministry, which is soon to announce the successful 
bids for the management contracts at the two yards, insists 
that it has folly complied with die terms of die Dockyard 
Services Act, although that is disputed by Lord Denning, 
die former Master of the Rolls. 


SDP gets 
a boost 


'A. > .V ' 


The Social Democrats’ 
front bench in the Hense of 
Lords was boosted yes- 
terday by the presence of 
the Duke of Devonshire, 
one of Britain's premier*# 
dnkes and a former Foreign 1 
Minister in the Macmillan 
Government (Sheila Gunn . 
writes.) £■' 

Although he has sup-v. 
ported the SDP almost 
from its inception, this was 
his first appearance on its 
benches where, he said, he 
expected to speak on for- 
eign affairs and conserva- 
tion. Aged 66, the duke 
inherited the tide in 1950, 
and a tax bOl of £5 mOfion. 




Cocaine charges 

Six people were re m a nde d in custody untO October 23 by 
magistrates at Uxbridge, west London, yesterday, charged 
with being concerned together on Sunday at Heathrow 


Airport in evading the prohibition on die importation of a 
quantity of cocaine. 

They are: Nadine Tracy Bush, aged 47, a stewardess, of 
Dovercourt Essex; Tracey Caroline Armstrong, aged 24, a 
telephonist, of Newbury Court, Hackney; Deborah Jane 
Cranston, aged 35, a housewife, of Harwich, Essex; 
Maxine Seaman, aged 26, a travel agent, of Glamis Place, 
Stepney; Christopher Joseph Bedder, aged 40, a marine 
engineer, of Snape, Suffolk, and George Arthur Stokes, 
aged 46, an asphalter, of Gtenhurst Court, Eltham. 



The Royal Bank 
of Scotland pic 


Base Rate 


The Royal Bank of Scotland 
announces that with effect 
from dose of business 
on 15 October 1986 
its Base Rate for advances 
will be increased from 10% 
to 11% per annum. 


k-rsnOmd *■* nut Sqwre.MMiui** DBXYB 

IfaK RcdtaSMUwl NB.9M12. 


TOE TIMES WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 15 1986 


Labour strategy seeks floating voters 

* — «uvipmi7P their rA 


By Nicholas Wood 
Political Reporter 


GEC Avionics fa to co ntinue its programme on the 
Nimrod Airborne Early Warning aircraft to the aid of the 
year in a joint project with the Ministry of Defence (Peter 
Davenport writes). 

Last month the ministry cat die list of contenders far 
Britain's future early war ni ng aircraft down to two, GEC 
with the Nimrod, and Boeing, with its AWACS aircraft 
which are in service with NATO. A final derision will be 
made by the end of the year 

Mr Bill Alexander, managing director of GEC Avionics, 
said: “Now we have the goal in sight it would be wrong to 
let anything deflect us from reaching it While we hare put 
the earlier technical and management problems behind as. 
There still remains a tremendous amount Of detailed work 
to be done , on the ground and in the air, to to make the 
system, and all 11 aircraft, ready far sendee. 

“We are confident that oar final offer to the MoD to com- 
plete the job wfl] show that the British system is the more 
cost-effective.” 


Labour strategists aim to 
make the Government’s 
record on public services and 
the use it bas made of North 
Sea oil revenues their number 
one target in the run-up to the 
general election, it was dis- 
closed yesterday. 

They calculate that floating 
voters are deeply anxious 
about “cuts” in areas such as 
schools and hospitals and 
repelled by shabby streets and 
buildings, the legacy, claims 
Labour, of the Thatcher years. 


oil revenues by spending the 
money on meeting the bill for 
the unemployed. 

Labour's " new strategy, 
encapsulated, in Investing in 
People, a glossy policy wo-' 
chure blooming with the new 
red rose of socialism hundred 
by Mr Neil Kinhock in 
London yesterday, will form 
the theme of speeches, party 
political broadcasts and pub- 
licity material throughout the 
pre-election period. 

Of the 75,000 copies 
primed, some 2,000 are being 
sent to “opinion formers'', 
whDe the rest will be on sale 


They also believe there are for 75p in newsagents as the 
many votes to be won by party steps up its efforts to 
persuading the electorate that rival the Tories and the Alli- 
the Government has wasted ance in the vital middle 


Storm of 

criticism 
for new 


colleges 


By Mark Dowd, Education Reporter 


A prospectus disclosing the 
fine print behind the 
Government's new technol- 
ogy schools was unveiled yes- 
terday by Mr Kenneth Baker, 
Secretary of Slate for Educa- 
tion, provoking a storm of 
criticism from the scheme's 
opponents. 


The 20 City Technology 
Colleges are scheduled to be 
established in Britain by 1990. 
They will be run by indepen- 
dent trusts who will rely on 
private sponsorship and gov- 
ernment grant for their 
income. 


It is believed that more than 
2,000 companies have already 
expressed interest in the plan. 
One of the most controversial 
features is their complete in- 
dependence from local 
authority control. 


Mr Baker, addressing a 
meeting organized by the 
Confederation of British In- 
dustry yesterday, defended his 
new plans. He said.‘“Many 
local education authorities set 
high standards. But I see no 
merit in protecting a monop- 
oly, nor in ignoring the fact 
! that many families living in 
the cities do not have access to 
the kind of schools which 
measure up to their 
ambitions.” 


Some £35-£40 million of 
new money will come from 
the DES, the rest from busi- 
ness sponsorship and educa- 
tional trusts. Colleges will 
enjoy charitable status and are 
therefore expected to be non 
profit-making. Sponsors will 
be asked to meet most of the 
capital and equipment costs. 

Tbe level of annual grant 
from central government will 
be determined on a per capita 
basis and will cover only 
“what might reasonably be 
spent on local education 
authority schools serving 
similar localities." 1 


He said there were clear 
provisions in his proposals to 
ensure that funding of the new 
colleges would be comparable 
to that of other secondary 
schools. “CTCs will not be 
islands of excellence set in 
splendid isolation,” he added. 

However, local authorities 
in particular will see in Mr 
Baker's crusade for parental 
choice seeds of a longer-term 
strategy to dilute their control 
over the provision of educa- 
tion in schools. 


This means, for example, 
that if Birmingham Gty 
Council spends a higher 
percentage of its annual rate 
support grant on secondary 
schools than Devon County 
Council, a CTC in 
Handswortfa could expect to 
gain marginally more from 
central government titan -one 
in Plymouth. CTCs will 
charge no foes. 

When choosing successful 
candidates, heads and govern- 
ing bodies of the colleges will 
look to primary schools to 
give a full account of a child's 
progress. This will probably 
include a formal report, but 
the emphasis is less on aca- 
demic achievement and more 
on motivation and suitability 
for an explicitly technically- 
oriented education. 


The Secretary of State con- 
firmed that the powers of 
appointment to each college's 
governing body would rest in 
the hands of the sponsors 
from industry. 

Mr Mike Inman, president 
of the National Association of 
Schoolmasters/Union of 
Women Teachers, said that he 
feared that local industrialists 
would exert pressure to be 
included on governing bodies. 

“This might lead to pressure 
to use the curriculum as a 
training base for particular 
jobs,” he said. 

Mr Fred Jarvis, general 
secretary of the National 
Union of Teachers, described 
the prospectus as “bogus”. He 
said it was hypocritical and 
cynical to claim that new 
opportunities will be created 
for children in the inner cities 
when 99.5 per cent of them 
will have no place in them. 

I The DES will now set up a 
special CTC unit to co-or- 
dinate and monitor bids from 


industry before deciding on 
the final locations. 


In the first three years, 
students will spend almost 50 
per cent of their time engaged 
in mathematics, design and 
science. Humanities subjects 
such as English, history and 
religious education will be 
taught separately or in various 
combinations. Years four and 
five will be similar, but incor- 
porating courses on comput- 
ing, information technology 
and knowledge of industry. 

The curriculum is perhaps 
at its most flexible in the sixth 
form. Alongside the tra- 
ditional A-levds, students can 
study for the new A/S levels, 
as well one or two-year voca- 
tional courses. These will lead 
to qualifications awarded by 
the Business and Technician 
Education Council or the City 
and Guilds of London 
Institute. 

Staff will be employed di-. 
recti y by the college governing 
bodies who will also decide 
the balance between teaching 
and non-teaching staff. Teach- 
ers will negotiate conditions of 
pay and service directly with 
the governing body. 


ground of politics with its new 
soft-sdl . techniques. 

“It enables us to put across 
the message in a much more 
coherent way and in line with 
our longer-term subsequent 
elaboration of our policies. 
There is a logic m investing m 
people' that will serve os writ 
over the next few months”, a 
senior Labour figure said. 

The document pledges La- 
bour to borrowing an extra £6 
billion, just under 2 per cent of 
gross national product, to 
reduce unemployment by a 
million over the first two years 
in power. 

This will be supplemented 
by extra cash generated by the 
scheme to repatriate British 
capital invested abroad, sav- 


ings from reduced unemploy- 
ment benefits and revenue 
from foster economic growth, 
Mr Kinnock said. 


firms modernize their plant- 
and training. 

He said: "For many years all 
of our most successful 


flr KinnocK saia. , ot our 

At the same time, the £3.6 competitors, including Japan, 
billion clawed back in higher Germany and France, nave 
taxes on individuals earning had similar financial andbust- 


DilllOU ciawea oat* u* u%i»> uenuany ui»m * :**,“*. : ■ 

taxes on individuals earning lad similar financial ana ousi- 
morc than £27.000 a year will institutions geared dt- 
boost child benefit by £3 a tectly to industrial needs. 

HMab mmeinne Iwtts week . .l 


week, pensions by £5 a week 
fora single person and £8 for a 
married couple, and benefit 
for the long-term 
unemployed. „ 

Emphasizing the “prudent 
nature of Labour’s commit- 
ments. Mr Kinnock pinned 
his hopes on two new agen- 
cies: British Enterprise, back- 
ing new companies; and a 
British Investment Bank lend- 


“Without such arrange- 
ments for dependable long- 
term finance, provided m a 
way that industry can use and 
at a price that industry can 
afford, our producers are 
fighting with one hand uca 
behind their back. 


BriiiSD urvesuneiu -■ 

mg money to help established and industry. 


behind their back. 

“That is why we must 
propel a great change in the 
relationship between finance 



The colleges wfll cater for 
between 750 and 1.000 pupils 
between the ages of 1 1 and 18. 
Each college will be a reg- 
istered independent school. 

Among the proposed sites 
are several with histories of 
inner city strife such as 
Handswortb in Birmingham, 
Moss Side in Manchester and 
St Paul's in BristoL 





Levan Merritt, aged five, with his toy gorilla Jambo yesterday. The real Jambo, at Jersey 


Zoo, stood guard over the boy, of Horsham, West Sussex, as he lay nnconsdons after falling 
into file gorillas'' pit in August. Levan, who fractured his skull and broke his left arm in two 
places, was yesterday preseated with three toy dodos when he met the zoo owners, Lee and 
Gerald Darrell, in a television studio where they were appearing in a programme about 
conservation (Photograph: Dad Miller). 


IRA backs moves 


to end MPs’ ban 


By Richard Ford 


Legal aid 
proposals 
‘naive’ 


The Provisional IRA is 
backing moves by leading 
figures in its political wing in 
the north to allow elected 
representatives to take their 
seats in the DaiL the Irish 
Republic's Parliament 


A secret meeting of tbe 
general army convention, the 
first for 17 years, gave its 
support as Provisional Sinn 
Fein prepares for a lengthy 
debate on the issue of drop- 
ping abstentionism, at its an- 
nual conference next month. 


By majorities of more than 
two-thirds tbe convention, 
including Provisional “vol- 
unteers" from the north and 
south, agreed to allow mem- 
bers to advocate and support 
those prepared to take their 
seats in the DaiL 


In an effort to reassure the 
Irish Republic's voters, who 
may fear that PSPs full-scale 
arnval on the scene may lead 
to the kind of violence experi- 
enced in the north since 1969, 
the convention affirmed the 
general order army No 8, 
which prohibits any offensive 


action against the security 
forces of the Republic. It also 
reaffirmed its support for the 
“armed struggle” as the means ] 
of bringing about British with- , 
drawa] from Ireland. 

It is expected that Mr Gerry 
Adams, Provisional Sinn Fein 
MP for West Belfast, will 
propose the motion urging tbe 
conference to drop its 
abstentionist attitude towards 
the Dail, although the policy 
will remain in force for West- 
minster and Stormont 

PSF leaders have worked 
assidiously to persuade people 
that unless the movement fa 
prepared to take seats in the 
Dail it will remain isolated 
and' without significant elec- 
toral support 

With a general election due 
in the Republic, a decision by 
PSF to abandon 
abstentionism will cause con- 
cern among the main political 
parties. PSF could win seats in 
border areas as well as taking 
votes from Fianna Fiai and 
perhaps rob them of an overall 
majority. 

Supergrass trial, page 5 


By Frances Gibb 

Proposals to overhaul the 
legal aid scheme and stream- 


line lawyers’ working practices 


are attacked by the Bor today 
as naive, ill-thought out and 
likely to mean a poorer ser- 
vice. 

In its response to the legal 
aid scrutiny report the Bar 
calls on the Government to 
reassert that it does not intend 
standards of representation to 
be lowered. 

It also challenges the Gov- 
ernment to confirm that law- 
yers who provide legal aid 
services should continue to be 
entitled by statute to fair pay 
for their work. 

The report has “foiled to 
address” the fundamental and 
central question of whether 
the public will tolerate “one 
standard of legal representa- 
tion for those who can afford 
to pay for it, and a different, 
lower standard for those who 
cannot”, it says. 

If folly implemented, the 
proposals could cause such an , 
imbalance in standards of I 
advocacy between those who > 
can afford to pay and those 
who cannot, that results of. 
cases could be effected. 

Savings should come from , 
greater efficiency and “the 
pruning out of waste”, rather 
than attempts to depress 
lawyers’ pay to levels which 
raise the spectre of legally- 
aided litigants represented by 
the “inexperienced or second- 
rate”. 


US to return Quinn 


The United States Supreme 
Court cleared the way yes- 
terday for the extradition to 
Britain of William Quinn, the 
alleged IRA bomber (Reuter 
reports). 

The court refused to hear 
Mr Quinn's appeal, which 
means that he now can be sent 
to Britain to stand trial on 
charges of murdering an off- 
duty London police constable 
in 1975 while trying to flee 
from an IRA bomb factory. 

Mr Quinn also faces charges 
that he conspired to carry out 
a London bombing campaign 


in 1974 and 1975 that in- 
volved letter bombs. 

Mr Quinn, aged 38, a native 
of San Francisco, went to 
Northern Ireland in 1971 and 
was later convicted by an Irish 
court of being a member of the ' 
IRA. 

He returned to the United j 
States in 1979 and was ar- 
rested two years later by FBI 
agents. He has remained in jail 
since his arrest 

Mr Quinn's lawyers argued , 
that the extradition treaty with 
Britain does not cover politi- | 
cal crimes. i 


Ships collide 


Two freighter ships hit each 
other and eight small yachts 
on the fog-bound river Med- 
way at Rochester. Kent yes- 1 
terday. No-one was hurt. j 


Biffen 
warning 
on ‘Tory 
Maoists’ 


W 

t #' 


xMtm 

;,iid 1 




a in 


litical Editor 


Mr John Biffen, Leader of 
the Commons, yesterday 
warned the Conservative ■ 
Party not to overdo the ideol- 
ogy if ii wanted to preserve the 
achievements of the Thatcher " 
Government's “conviction _ 
politics**. ; 

Mr Biffen said that in .-, 
reducing inflation, reforming - 
tire trade unions and spread- 
ing ownership by the safe of, 
council bouses and the - 
! privatization of nationalized 
industries, together with new 
taxation policies, the Conser- 
vative Governments since 
1979 had created a social 
market economy. 

The party had to wm the 
next election w preserve those 
achievements and to ensure 
. that thev had truly moved the - 
centre ground of British - 
politics. * 

But he gave a warning of' 
"Tory Maoists” - libertarian - 


y . i 


mini 1 ’ 


.1 f.i 


iv 

ft ft 

mil 


v ■...!• 


radicals on the Far Right who * 
seemed to want a frenetic ' 


seemed to want a frenetic ' 
perpetual revolution. He said: 
"The pursuit of Tory radical - ? 
ism can be most successful ■ 
when it marries the desire for ! 
major change with the match- - 
ing Conservative instinct for 

continuity. 

“A Tory radical approach - 
can be assisted by a brisk sense ' 
of ideology .but it will be , 
fatally imperilled if that be- - 
comes extremist zealotry". 

Giving the second Disraeli . 
lecture at the St Stephen’s " 
Gub in London, Mr Biffen - 
said the Attlee Labour Gov- 
ernment had achieved mas- - 
sive gains for the conviction 
politics of socialists deter- ' 
mined to use political meth- - 
ods to secure irreversible : 
changes in the pattern of-; 
British society. 

In the three Conservative 
parliaments which followed -** 
no attempt was made sen- - 
ously to alter the balance of * 
what had been done. 

Mrs Thatcher's effective ') 
leadership had, however given « 
conviction politics back to 
Britain. Now an election vic- 
tory was required to make 
secure those reforms. 

Mr Biffen. who was at odds 
with Torv leaders after his call 
earlier this year for a “bal- 


’ : 


limber in 


anced ticket" for the party’s 
election platform, labelled 
himself a conviction poli- 
tician, as was the Prime 
Minister, and urged that the 
next Tory Government 
should make a centrepiece of 
educational reform. 


iitness 


s\ tod ll' 


MP did not 


goose-step, 
says QC 

Mr Richard Hanley, QC, 
denied in the High Court 
yesterday allegations in a BBC 
Panorama programme that 
Mr Neil Hamilton, Conser- 
vative MP for Tatton. was 
seen goose-stepping and giv- 
ing the Nazi salute outside a 
Berlin hotel. 

He told Mr Justice Simon 
Brown and the jury: “There is 
no evidence of Mr Hamilton 
goose-stepping." But he 
admitted the MP was a ' 
“mimic” 

What the BBC had tried to 
do in the January 1984 pro- 
gramme “Maggie's Militant 
Tendency”, which linked Mr 
Hamilton and other MPs with 
an extreme right-wing' 
organization, was to prove 
guilt by association, - 

The programme's editor, 
Mr Peter fbboison. the pro- 
ducer, Mr James Hogan, the 
presenter, Mr Fred Emery, a 
reporter, Mr Michael 
Cockerell, and the BBC all 
deny libel. 

The hearing continues to- 
day. 


Boytatc Tbe Tbnot wnw 

Austria Sct> 29. eetgtum B Fra 50; 


Austria Srti 29. Betqtum B Fra 50; 
Canada §2.75; Canaries Pm 200: 
Cyprus 7o rents; Den mar k Dior" 
*000: Finland Mkk 9 (XT. France F 
8^00, W CormanvDM 3.50: CKtraRar 
feOp: Oeeco Dr 180: Holland Cl 530: 
Irish Republic 4Qp: Italy L 2.700: 


U 06: Madeira Esc I TO 
Morocco Dir 10.00: 


Norway Kr IQ. Op: Pakistan Rn 18: 
Portugal Esc 170: blnpaoarp £5 30: 
Spain Pn 200: Sweden SKr 12 . 00 : 


Switzerland S FT* s.oo: Tunisia Dm 
80.00: USA s>. 75: Yugoslavia DM 


Now we are sixty — Hipy Bthuthdy! 


Three cheers for Pooh! 
(For Who?) 

For Pooh. ■ 

(Why, what did he do?) 

I thought yon knew. The fat 
bear of very little brain and 
twee manners, who still haunts 
the nurseries of well brought 
up middle-class children, is 
celebrating his sixtieth 
birthday. 

There fa to be a party at 
London Zoo on Monday, to 
which the Queen Mother, the 
Duchess of York, and other 
lesser bear-lovers are sending 
their teddies, and children 
from Dr Baruado's and Save 
the Children will eat a 
beffelump of a cake. Children 
aged muter 16 will be allowed 
in free if they bring their 
teddies; and are accompanied 
by a paying grown-up. 

Since there is still money in 
| the old bear's boneypot, there 
| is PR razzmatazz. Methuen 
Children's Books is publish- 
ing four newish Pooh tides 
next week. Tbe Pooh Book of 
Quotations, compiled by Brian 
Sibley (£4£i), covers the 
gamut of sickly Pooh philos- 
ophy from A to B. The Pooh 
Corner Cook Book, with reci- 
pes by Katie Stewart (£1.95),* 
has Picnic and Expotition 


Foods for Tigjer, Salads and 
Health Foods for Rabbit, and 
soon. 

Poob’s Workout Book, by 
Ethan Mordden (£1.95), fa a 
work of supererogation for a 
bear who could not touch fafa 
toes and tended to get stuck in 
rabbit-boles after eating too 
much of a little something. 

The ft ’innie-the-Pooh Jour- 
nal (£3.95) has had the bril- 
liant wheeze of publishing 
pages with quotations from the 
Master and Shepard's 
drawings at the top, tearing 
blank lined spaces For Writ- 
ing Your Special Thoughts in 
Your Own Words. 

The Pooh industry fa big 
business. Seventy books have 
been published so far as spin- 
off and fall-out from Winaie- 
The-Pook, first published on 
14 October 1926. 

The AA Milne Estate fa 
the largest source of income 
for die Royal Literary Fund, 
which has been looking after 
writers who have fallen on 
hard times for two centuries: 
last year Pooh Properties 
provided it with £135^000. 

Earlier this year, M One's 
manuscript of the poems and 
Shepard's original pencil 
sketches were sold at 


£ ->£\ r o 

,(-*i 



Sotheby’s for £132,000. It is a 
sobering thought that those 
coy verses about Christopher 
Robin (and Percy, and John, 
and Mary jane, and 
Emmeline, and James James 
Morrison Morrison 
Weatherby George Dupree) 
have sold more copies than 
any other of this century’s 
poems. 

It started by accident when 
AA. Milne; the prolific play- 
wright, novelist, and journal- 
ist, and his wife decided to 
christen their baby Chris- 
topher Robin. One day 


Christopher's father knocked 
off a verse called Vespers: 
Hash! Bush! Whisper 
who dares! 

Christopher Robin is stor- 
ing his prayers. 

It was published. Then fol- 
lowed the verses for children 
of all ages below the age of 
literary consent in When We 
Were Very Young , many of 
than previewed ra Punch, of 
which Milne was a former 
assistant Editor. Then one wet 
summer, staying hi Wales, 
Milne thought yfwritmg about 
nursery animals as though 
they had come to life; and 
Pooh burst upon an astonished 
world. 

Milne later complained that 
be was known only as a 
children's writer. “Knowing 
that as far as I was concerned 
the mode was outmoded, I gave 
up writing children's books. In 
vain, England expects the 
writer, like the cobbler, to 
stick to his last” 

But this fa oot the day for 
such melancholy reflections. 
In the immortal words of Owl 
sixty years ago: HIPY PAPY 
BTHUTHDTH THUTHDA 
BTHUTHDTH! POOH! 




K 




■■ ■’SinK 


BANK 




Hr 


With effect from the close 
of business on 
Tuesday, 14th October 1986 
and until further notice, TSB 
Base Rate is increased from 
10-00% p.a. toll -00% p.a. 


facdH,es (“’eluding regulated consumer 
witl1 a rate of interest linked 

to TSB Base Rate will be varied accordingly. . 




Philip Howard 




Trustee SY i ?S s r Banks Central Board, PO Bos 33, : 
25 Milk Street, London EC2VSLU - . 


— rTt-Poren -wisam“w;jaiir- 


y, - -i 


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Illegitimate "stigma 

could be ended for 
thousands of children 


The Government is ex- 
pected to bring in laws to grant 

K-S&S&28 

year in England and Wales. 

Commission report 
published yesterday says it S 
time to end the stigma ofbeine 
bora outside wedlock for 
nearly one in five children a 

yea ^ ^F.?, do awa y with the 
word illegitimate” in legal 
documents and in legislation. 
It calls on the Government 


JS2SP a drafi BiU 10 ensure more radical report which is 
^‘i^^^alikeby likely to be^ShiS in 
taw, even tbonah there will government proposals ex- 


.... , though there will 
.still be some distinctions be- 
twen parents who are mar- 
ried and unmarried. 

Earlier this year the Gov- 
ernment indicated that it in- 
tended to act on previous 
proposals made by the Law 
Commission in 1982 to end 
the stigma of illegitimacy. 

, Now the commission has 
brought forward a second 


Law Society outlines 
model’ family court 


The campaign for a family 
comt ga i ned momentum yes- 
terday with proposals from the 
I*®w Society outlining its own 
model for a unified comrt 
system embracing all family 
Proceedings (Our Legal a£ 
fairs Correspondent writes). 

Its key features, which have 
been pot to the Lord 
Chancellor's Department, are 
the same as those put forward 
in the summer by a conference 
of judges, magistrates, reg- 
istrars and clerks, and are 
certain of wide judicial 
hacking. 

Next week the Family 
Courts Campaign is also ex- 
pected to pat out similar 
proposals representing the 
consensus of the 100 individ- 
uals and bodies which belong 
to it, indoding the Law 
Society. 

The society says there is “an 
urgent need” to reform dm 
present system by creating a 
family comt, and calls for such 
n court to be introduced as a 
“political priority". 

Under its proposals, all 
family cases now beard in the 
magistrates* domestic court, 
comity court and High Court; 
and juvenile court care 
proceedings, would be em- 
braced by a unified family 
court 

That would eliminate confu- 


sion arising from the present 
fragmented comt system, and 
separate family cases from 
other types of proceedings,' 
particularly criminal matters. 

But there would not n w d to 
be a network of new court 
the society says, 
ft® family court would n se 
existing county and 
magistrates’ court talMiags, 
except where too closely sitH- 


pected next session. 

It has re-cast its draft Bill in 
die light of a report from the 
Scottish Law Commission, 
now enshrined in legislation, 
which urged no distinction 
between children born in mar , 
riage and those outside h. 

The proposed Bill would 
ensure that as far as possible 
“The legal position of a child 
born to unmarried parents 
should be the ramp as that of 
one bora to married parents”. 

But it says that the mother 
alone should have parental 
rights and duties although the 
father should be able to ac- 
quire them by applying to the 
courts. 

That distinction between 
the legal rights of unmarried 
parents is the subject of a test 
case being heard in Strasbourg 
today before the European 
Commission of Hitman 
Rights. 

In its report yesterday the 
Law Commission says it is 
now convinced that the Scot- 



ated to criwiinal courts. tish approach is the best way I 

The society outlines exam-' to implement a policy of non- ‘ 1 


pies of bow cases mi gM be 
heard. A family court judge 
might bear souk contested 
wardship applications or other 
complex financial matters; and 
also committals for failure to 
comply with registrars' orders 
and defended divorce. 

All cfafid-care proceedings 
would go to a judge sitting with 
two lay persons, and there 
would also be hymen in 
custody and adoption applica- 
tions, if the court thought it 
necessary. 

The family court registrar, 
sitting alone or with laymen, 
would bear maintenance 
applications and some custody 
matters. Three lay members, 
to be drawn at first from 
magistrates, would deal with 
straightforward contested 
applications for nrnmtguanre 
and capital. 


discrimination. 

Its new Bill also makes a 
new general- rule that illegiti- 
mate children would auto- 
matically be included in all 
references to children in future 
legislation or legal documents, 
unless the contrary is stated, 
so there will be no need to 
single them out 

Yesterday the Children’s 
Legal Centre welcomed the 
report Miss Jenny Kuper 
said: “It is definitely a step in 
the right direction. We were 
always worried about a sub-. 1 
stitute word for 
because you inevitably still 
categorize children according 
to their birth status and 
quickly could end up with the 
same stigma.” 

The Law Commission: Illegiti- 
macy (Second Report): (Cmnd. 
99 1 3; Stationery Offioe, fkSO). 



The Dncbess of York, who 
is learning to fly, alighting 
from a single-engine Piper 
Warrior aircraft yesterday af- 
ter an hour-long training ses- 
sion at RAF Benson, in 
Oxfordshire. 

The Dncbess, who is 27 
today, will spend two or three 
days a week at the base until 
she obtains a licence. Her 
instructor is Mr Colin 
Beckwith, principal of the 
Oxford Air Training School 
and chairman of the Civil 
Aviation Authority's examin- 
ers for the private pilot's 
licence (Photographs: Julian 
Herbert). 


Austere face of mortgage possession 



Bamber in 
witness 
box today 

By Michael HorsneD 

Mr Jeremy Bamber, the 
fanner's son accused of shoot- 
ing dead five members of his 
family at theft- remote farm- 
house in Essex fast year, is 
expected, to begingivingev- 
idence at his trial today . 

He denies muidenng his 
adoptive parents Nevfll and 
June Bamber, both aged 61, 
his half-sister Sheila “BambT 
CaffeU and her twin sons, aged 
six, at White House Farm, 
ToOesbunt D’Arcy with a 22 
semi-automatic rifle. 

Several defence witnesses 
are expected to follow him 
into the witness box. 

The prosecution has alleged 
that after slaughtering his 
family Mr Bamber fooled 
police into believing that his 
sister had committed the mur- 
ders before killing herself 
The murders were allegedly 
carried out by Mr Bamber, 
aged 25, so he could inherit 
the family's £436,000 estate. 

Yesterday at Chelsrafoiti 
Crown Court a forensic sci- 
entist demonstrated with the 
German-made murder 
weapon how she bad tested 
the original police theory that 
Mrs CaffeU had killed herself. 

Miss Gfenys Howard, hold- 
ing the rifle in three different 
positions, demonstrated how 
it was only possible for her to 
haye fired the weapon with the 
silencer removed. 

She told the jury on the 
tenth day of the trial that she 
could not fire the gun with the 
silencer attached and kill her- 
self with the trajectory of shots 
through the neck and chin 
which killed Sheila CaffelL 
The jury has been told that 
the silencer, stained with Mis 
Caflfell's blood, had been fitted 
to the rifle when she received 
her fatal wounds. 

The trial continues today. 


Random test call 
on drink-driving 


(V 

i> 


i u 


■- i- 


Police to stage 
last moments . 
of girl victims 

Detectives hunting the man 
who sexually assaulted and 
strangled two Brighton school- 
girls are to siagea reconstruc- 
tion tomorrow of their tot 
known movements (David 
Sapsicd writes). 

This represents ihe_ latest 
move by Sussex police to 
catch the murderer who ab- 
ducted Nicola Fellows, aged 
10. and Karen Hadaway, aged 
nine, from the Moulsecoomb 
council estate last Thursday 
evening. _ . 

Their bodies were found 
lying side by side founder- 
growth in- Wild Park, just 
across the A27 from then- 
homes in Newtek Road, 
Brighton.the next day- 
Despite more than 
calls from people offering 
information, the police have 
yet to come up with any 
positive leads. 

They believe that the two 
friends probably knew the 
man who picked them up after 
they went to buy chips from a 
shop near by. 


By JohnGoodbody 

The police should do breath 
tests. on customers outside 
public houses on Saturday 
evenings as paxxof new legisla- 
tion against alcoholism. 

Professor Robert Kendefi- of 
the Royal College of Psychi- 
atrists said yesterday. 

Professor Keodell, launch- 
ing a report. Alcohol Our 
Favourite Drug , ■ said that 
many people drank and drove 
because they knew there was 
small chance of being stopped. 

He added: “Research has 
shown that 10 per cent of the 
male population drink and 


alcohol, giving the advice that 
a safe level of drinking for 
men in a week is the equiva- 
lent of ten and a half pints of j 
beer or 21 single measures of | 
spirit 

Women, who have a dif- 
ferent distribution of fat and 
water in the body and have 
lower body weights, should 
consume one-thira less drink 
than men to follow the 
college's guidelines. 

The college called on the 
Government to increase the 
cost of alcohol It said that an 
average Briton drinks the 


By Michael Dynes 
“Is there anyone here for the 
possession court that hasn't 
yet given me thrir name?” the 
usher cried as Oxford County 
Court prepared for its routine 
monthly bearings for re- 
possession orders. 

On the agenda yesterday 
were 20 cases of people who 
have fallen into arrears with 
their mortgage repayments. 

“It's a very short list today. 
Normally it's over 80. Very 
few of them actually come 
into court. It all happens so 
quickly. It's very sad,” the 
usher said. 

Outside the courtroom 
solicitors search frantically for 
Iheir clients. Whispered 
conversations are conducted . 
in every comer. Repre- 
sentatives of the building soci- 
eties mumble to themselves 
about the growth in re- 
possessions and arrears. 

The atmosphere of bewild- 
erment, bitterness, resignation 
and regret is punctured by the 
rollcali: “Abbey National v 
Garner, Abbey National v 
Montague and Kent, AngHa v 
Gardner and Gardner—” 

The courtroom is austere, 
clinical and anonymous. It is 


Bmldin& societies were last 
night waiting to see bow the 
markets settled before decid- 
ing whether to increase the 
mortgage rate (Christopher 
Warmaa writes). But the Hali- 
fax, the biggest society, said 
an increase seemed inevitable. 

If so, it is likely the increase 
wffl be between three-qoarters 
ami one percentage point A 
one point increase would put 

xrantTraw 

borrowed. 

On a straight 25 year mort- 
gage, the net repayment if the 
rate went op from 11 per cent 








to 12 per cent would rise from 
£153.62 to £163.14 a month on 
a £20,000 loan; from £23043 
to £244.71 on £30,000; 
from£320J0 to £34233 on 
£40,000 and £417.85 to 
£446.75 on £50,000. 

Any increase could see a 
farther rise in the number of 
repossession cases. 


10,30 in the morning and the 
defendants fife in. not sure of 
where they should sit, looking 
nervous and confused. 

The solicitors have taken 
their places in front of the 
Registrar’s Bench. Their non- 
chalence seems inappropriate, 
almost offensive, 

Mr Francis Banington- 
Ward, the registrar, moves 
rapidly to his chair. The clerk 
of court reads out the details 
of case number 8603453. 

“In the case of Abbey 


National v Garner ” the solic- 
itor representing the building 
society said, “we have arrears 
of £859.80. The defendant 
would like to request more 
time to pay off the arrears.” 
The registrar grants a three- 
month suspension order, and 
moves on to case number 
8608536. 

“Abbey National v Monta- 
gue and Kent. Arrears total 
£1,448-22. And the building 
society is seeking a re- 
possession order” the solic- 


itor said. The registrar nods 
his head and agrees to an order 
N29 — repossession in 28 
days. If. the occupants have 
not vacated the premises by 
then the building society can 
send in the bailing. 

It is now six minutes since 
proceedings began, and the 
court is examining its fifth 
case. 

By 1 1 am it is ail over. 
Eighteen of the 20 cases beard 
yesterday morning will end up 
. in repossessions in 28 days' 
time, unless the debtors can 
find the money to pay off their 
arrears, or reach an alternative 
agreement with the building 
society. 

Outside the courtroom the 
solicitors gather to tie up any 
loose ends. “This sort of thing 
is happening uniformly up 
and down the country. There 
are thousands mid thousands 
of people falling into arrears. 

“1 know that most cases are 
due to unemployment and 
marital problems, but the 
buOding societies and banks 
encourage it They are so flush 
with funds, they are willing to 
lend large sums on the flimsi- 
est of evidence about 
incomes.” he said. 


Urgent 
call for 
hepatitis 
vaccine 

By Pearce Wright 
Science Editor 

An epidemic of the hepatitis 
B virus, which attacks the 
liver and is a cause of liver 
cancer, shows signs of easing. 
The number of acute cases 
doubled from 1,000 a year to 
almost 2,000 between 1974 
and 1984. But recent figures 
show a marked fall in the 
number of cases this year. 

Nevertheless, a call was 
made yesterday by experts 
meeting at the Royal Society 
of Medicine, in London, for a 
new vaccine to be made more 
readily available in Britain to 
doctors, dentists, auxiliary 
medical staff and social work- 
ers at risk of contracting the 
disease from carriers. 

The Department of Health 
was urged to extend the 
number of groups recognized 
for automatic vaccination. 

Advisers to the Govern- 
ment identified certain police- 
men and all ambulancemen 
and prison workers, as well as 
prostitutes, drug addicts and 
homosexuals as those most at 
risk. 

The additional groups pro- 
posed by yesterday's meeting 
would add about 500,000 
people to those recognized for 
vaccination. 

The Government is con- 
cerned at the cost to the 
National Health Service. Each 
treatment costs about £34. 

Dr Elizabeth F3gan, of the 
liver unit at King's College 
Hospital, London, said the 
modern vaccines were unique 
in both their methods of 
manufacture - by genetic 
manipulation - and as the 
first effective preventive agent 
against liver cancer, one of the 
world's most common 
cancers. 

She said that the added 
‘•scourge” of another liver 
virus, which has shown signs 
of spreading in recent months, 
called hepatitis delta virus - a 
highly dangerous agent, which 
depended on the B strain to 
help it flourish - could be 
prevented by vaccinating high 
risk groups. 

Dr Fagan said that 75,000 
individuals had been vac- 
cinated in the United King- 
dom since 1982, compared 
with more than a million in 
the United States. 

She said that within one 
year of its use, the vaccine 
reduced by more than 80 per 
cent the chance of a carrier 
passing on the vims to a 
member of the high-risk 
group- . 

The automatic provision of 
vaccination to dentists and 
their staff was proposed by Dr 
Lakshman Samaranayake, of 
the Department of Oral Medi- 
cine and Pathology at Glas- 
gow Dental Hospital and 
SchooL 


drive at feast mice a week equivalent of 439 pints ofbeer 
rare over the limit” or 31 bottles of spirits an- 


when they 

Professor Kendefl, a mem- 
ber of the Royal College of 
Psychiatrists’ special commit- 
tee on alcohol-related prob- 
lems, said that in Australia 
and New Zealand, where ran- 
dom testing bad been in- 
troduced, there was a drop of 
30 per cent in the Dumber of 
fatal accidents. 

At present 1,500 people die 
on British roads each year, 
from alcohol-related 
incidents. 

Dr Brace Ritson, the chair- 
man of the committee, said 
that the book was addressed to 
those who drank moderately 
because it-was through them 
that the bulk of harm to 
humanity occurred. 

The book issues new guide- 


spin ts 

Dually, and the harm it causes 
to society costs in excess of 1 
£1,600 mil 
Deaths from alcohol-related 
disease almost doubled be- 
tween 1970 and 1986. 

The report gave a series of | 
hints on sensible drinking; 

• Do not drink every day of | 
the week. 

• Do not drink done. 

• Always put the glass down 
between sips and try to pace 
drinking to become one of the 
slower drinkers in company. 

• Do ngt use alcohol as a 
means of coping with emo- 
tional problems. 

• Do not use alcohol as a 
nightcap to aid sleep. 

Alcohol Our Favourite 
(Tavistock Publications. £13 


Knag for the consumption of hardback, £6.93 paperback). 



Firework crackdown 


The Government an- 
nounced new measures yes- 
terday to curb firework 
accidents, which injured 968 
people tot year. 

The Fireworks Safety 
Regulations of 1986, which 
came into force in August, 
introduce tougher penalties 
against retailers who sell fire- 
works to children aged under 
16. It will also increase the 


maximum penalty to £2,000 
or three months 
imprisonment. 

Throwing fireworks in the 
street .is a criminal offence. 

This year’s government safety 

lie tofoDow the basic safety 
instructions in the firework 
code and encourage organized 
displays. 


BBC plans 
more news 
in morning 

By Gavin Bell 
Arts Correspondent 
The BBC will branch its 
daytime television service with 
a Dew-look Breakfast Time 
(gramme later this month, 
th the accent on news rather 
than informal chats with 
celebrities. 

Debbie Greenwood is being 
dropped from the show, and 
Frank Boogh, her co-presenter 
wiD change his sweater and 
slacks for a salt, to lend the 
programme more authority. 

Mr Stephen Gaypole, the 
editor of Breakfast limey said 
yesterday: “With the advent of 
programmes like Terry 
Wogan's chat show and oth- 
ers, most of the 
guests are snapped up fairly 
quickly, and are seen on 
television before they get to 
the Breakfast Time or TV-am 

“So we have derided to 
concentrate on what the BBC 
is very good at, bringing news 
to the viewers.” 

Miss Greenwood was 
considered “not quite right" 
for the heavier news approach. 
She would continue to preseat 
Pint Class, a children's qmz 
show. 

The decision to present a 
different format from the rival 
TV-am, win also mean the 
departure of the newsreader 
Sue Carpenter. In fatme Mr 
Bough and two other regular 
presenters, Sally Magnussoa 
and Jeremy Paxman, wfll read 
news buQetus as welL 
Mr Mkhaei Grade, director 


not all of the programmes in 
the daytime schedule would be 
broadcast immediately, be- 
cause negotiations were 
costuming with mainn*. 

The daytime service will 
provide 1,000 hoars of pro- 
grammes over tile next year at 
a cost of £8 minion. 


Depression affects half of mothers 


Nearly half of all mothers 
suffer from some form of post- 
natal depression, according to 
a survey of 9,000 women 
throughout Britain, published 
yesterday. 

Although there was more 
consultation and advice be- 
fore the birth, a lack of post- 
natal help, particularly with 


By Trudi McIntosh 

breast feeding, left many 
mothers feeling unhappy and 
frustrated, the Parents maga- 
zine 1986 Birth Survey found. 

Forty-eight per cent of all 
mothers interviewed for the 
survey. Birth In Britain To- 
day'. said they suffered from 
postnatal depression, particu- 
larly in Wales, where 58 per 


cent of women experienced 
the condition. Thirry-nine per 
cent of the mothers who 
responded to the survey last 
May were aged between 26 
and 30. 

Birth' In Britain Today. 
Parents Magazine 1986 Birth 
Survey >, published in Parents 
Magazine, No. 128; Novem- 
ber 1986. 


J . _ 


TODAKONE IN THREE 
CLEANING CONTRACTS 
ENDS IN DIVORCE. 



Jeaning 
more man 


Cleaning contractors can breakyour bean. 

Fust of all they sweep you off your feet 

Then, when the honeymoon period is over; 
so coo it seems, is the commitment. 

There is however an office cle 
company that’s bon together now for more i 
50 years. ■ 

OCS, 

As a privately owned, family business OCS 
still hang on go some pretty old fashioned 
principles. 

Like working at a relationship and taking a 
pride in unfashionable things like industrial 


housework. That’s why OCS 
jrobably the most powerful force 
in office cleaning today. 

As a family business OCS are known for 
their unique, personal approach to supervision 
and quality control. 

The most senior OCS management are 
never remote figures either to the customer; or 
to the men and women who are trusted with 
the keys to your office building 

\We think a call to OCS on 01-242 8800 
could well make you less cynical about office 
cleaning 

Alter all before you get into bed with 
another contractor; shouldn’t you meet the 
family first? 


Office Cleaning Services Limited 

DCS Changing Venues- Unchanging Values 

HEAD OFFICE: 28-36 EAGLE STREET. LONDON. WC1R 4 AN TELEPHONE 01-242 8800 
A MEMBER OF THE OCS GROUP OF COMFAMES -THE NATION'S LEADING PROPERTY MAINTENANCE GROUP 


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Hurd faces legal fight 
over police use of 
plastic bullets and gas 


T.r. 


Mr Douglas 
’-‘Home Secretary, has a legal 
~ r> fight on his bands over plans 
~fo out-manoeuvre opposition 
by some police authorities to 
.vibe use of plastic baton rounds 
.'And CS gas. The issue will 
7 r decide the limit to a Home 
e^Secreutry’s power, 
h; The dispute centres on his 
-indecision to provide the gas 
■'^and rounds from central sup- 
plies, if the Inspectorate of 
^Constabulary said there was a 
v#eed and the equipment had 
—not been bought 

The number of police 
-authorities reluctant to make 
“CS gas and baton rounds 
^ available is said to be smalL A 
-Report to be discussed by the 
^rpolice committee of the 
Association of County Coun- 
^eils next week says that 
' Northumbria is seeking leave 
. to apply for judicial review. 
Counsel has advised there 
is a strong argument that the 
“circular containing the Home 
[■Secretary's decision exceeds 
'.legal authority in requiring the 
"police authority to obtain the 
..'equipment from a Home Of- 
iVfjce store and in authorizing 
"the provision of such equip- 
“ment to chief constables with- 
out the approval of the 


By Peter Evans, Home Affairs Correspondent 
Hurd, the .sider the Home Secretary speech 


requires statutory authority to 
issue the circular or take the 
proposed measures. 

The ACC report says: “They 
take the view that his position 
as Secretary of State is suf- 
ficient authority. They also 
take the view that if they are 
wrong in that contention. 
Section 41 of the Police Act 
1964, contrary to counsel's 
opinion, would itself afford 
the Home Secretary the nec- 
essary authority." 

Section 41 says: “The Sec- 
retary of State may provide 
and maintain, or may contrib- 
ute towards the provision or 
maintenance of, a police col- 
lege, district police training 
centres, forensic science lab- 
oratories, wireless depots and 
such other organizations and 
services as he considers nec- 
essary or expedient for 
promoting the efficiency of 
the police. 14 

Image blamed for 
lack of recruits 


to the first national 
conference of police recruiting 
officers, Mr Hogg, a former 
special constable, said: “There 
is, for example, a widely held 
belief that the police tend to 
pick unfairly on young people, 
particularly young Mack peo- 
ple, There is a belief that there 
is racial discrimination within 
the police service and that 
promotion prospects for black 
and Asian officers are poor." 


__ The Home Office has re- 
plied saying it does not con- 


The image of the police held 
by the minority communities 
is largely to blame for too few 
recruits from them, Mr Doug- 
las Hogg, Parliamentary 
Under-Secretary at the Home 
Office said yesterday. 

In an unusually frank 


Mr Hogg said those were 
among powerful deterrents to 
joining the police service. “We 
need to consider how they 
may best be overcome. 

“Racial discrimination and 
harassment, whether real or 
imagined, were dearly factors 
of great significance. I utterly 
condemn such behaviour, 
whether committed by or 

within the police service, and 1 
know that you all share my 
views. 

Mr Hogg, who announced 
the appointment of an addi- 
tional staff officer to HM 
Chief Inspector of Constabu- 
lary, said that the ethnic 
minority communities were 
under-represented in the po- 
lice service. The latest figures 
showed that fewer than seven 
police officers out of every 
1,000 came from a black or 
Asian background. 


Constable 


painting 
likely to 
fetch £lm 


By Geraldine Norman 
Sale Room Correspondent 
The most important Con- 
stable painting to come on the 
market for 30 years was 
unveiled at Christie's yes- 
terday. The work, “Flatford 
Lock and Mill" is expected to 
fetch mm than £1 million 
when it comes under the 
jammer OH November 21. 

The painting was exhibited 
at the Royal Academy hi 1812, 
and depicts the mill that 
belonged to John CoostaWe’s 
father, with the banks of the 
river Stour where be played as 
a boy and which he sketched 
often in later life. 

It is one of the artist's first 
important pictures and shows 
Him feeling his way towards 


which was to prove so fun- 
damental an influence on nine- 
teenth century landsca p e 
paintiffig. 

la a letter to Ms fiaaede he 
reconks having met Benjamin 
Wert, the president of the 
Royal Academy, after his 
accepted for 



Constable writes: “1 wished 
to know if he considered that 
mode of study as laying the 
foundation of real excellence”, 
and records West's reply: 
“ ‘Sirfsaid he)T consider that 
yon hare »«««""* if.” 

Maria BAwdi mrt have 
glowed with pride as she read 
ft. 


Mr Simon Dickinson, of Christie's, with the “lost" painting (Photograph: Chris Harris). 
The painHng has been sent ft failed to find a buyer. The Constable scholar, who ree- 

picture was returned to the 


for sale by an Ameri- 

can collector, believed to be a 
descendant of Senator WA 
Clark who Is known to have 
owned the picture in 1926. 

In that year he sent it for 
sale at the American Arts 
Association where its im- 
portance was not realized and 


family but scholars lost sight 
of ft 

In the early 1980s the 
present owner took the picture 
to the Corcoran Gallery in 
Washington to ask its opinion. 
The gallery contacted Charles 
Rhyne, America's foremost 


During our best financial year to date weve 
opened the new tube line to Terminal 4. 

VfeVe modernized 16 underground stations 
and installed five new escalator systems. 



LONDON 

REGIONAL TRANSPORT 


WteVe also introduced a new bus service, 
built a bus garage and bought 260 new buses. 

'fet we have still managed to reduce our 
government grant by a staggering £27 million 




— m 


-CFI3BIU' 


\ 


ognized the painting as the 
missing masterpiece. 

Since then it has been on 
loan to the Corcoran and was 
included in the exhibition of 
“Constable’s England” at the 
Metropolitan Museum in New 
York in 1983- 

Sale room, page 22 



Blind helped 
by textured 
pavements 


Knobbly pavements are 
coming to the aid of the blind 
and disabled (Rodney Cowton 
writes). 


After trials of more than 20 
materials the Department of 
Transport yesterday au- 
thorized local authorities to 
begin using a specially tex- 
tured paving to enable Mind 
people to tell when they had 
reached a pedestrian 
crossing.The paving has 
bumps which can be rat 
through the sole of the shoe. 

It is coloured red to assist 
partially righted people and 
will probably be used in 
conjunction with ramped 
pavement edges so that dis- 
abled people, particularly 
those in wheelchairs can more 
easily get on and off the 
pavement. 


‘Contract 
out 9 option 
over NHS 


waiting 


By JiH Sherman 


Health authorities may 
have to contract out their 
waiting fcts to the private 
sector if that proves the cheap- 
est option, Mr Tony Newton, 
the Minister for Health, said 
yesterday. 

Speaking at a conference 
held bv the independent Hos- 
pitals Croup, Mr Newton said 
that ministers would be 
considering regional health 
authority action plans to re- 
duce waiting lists, due in atthe 
end of this month, before 
issuing further guidance. 

In some cases, shorter lists 
could be achieved by better 
management and better ways 
of” administering resources, 
Mr Newton said, citing as an 
example the appointement of 
an orthopaedic bed manager 
in Bath Health Authority. 

-It may emerge that there is 
much that health authorities 
can do by making more use of 
resources available in the 
private sector. If it is cost 
effective, we hope that more 
authorities will look at this 
possibility.” Mr Newton said. 

“Health authorities have 
got to make judgements on 
whether spending resources in 
the NHS will have a more 
useful effect than spending the 
same money on contracting 
arrangements in the private 
sector.” 

He admitted that in some 
cases the Government would 
have to assess the need for 
more resources. 

Mr Newton welcomed any 
co-operation between the 
NHS and the private sector 
and regarded it as com- 
plementary to ihe stale service 
rather than in competition 
with iu 

The growth of private acute 
hospital beds had reached a 
plateau, at best, and might be 
falling marginally. Professor 
Alan Maynard told the 
conference. 

Professor Maynard, from 
the Centre of Health Econom- 
ics at York Univeristy, 
warned the private sector that 
it would grow only if it 
controlled costs better than 
the NHS. if there were cuts in 
government spending on the 
NHS. or if there were mis- 
management in the NHS. 

The development of 
community care was an exam- 
ple. If badly managed, it could 
lead to cutbacks in the NHS 
acute sector, Professor May- 
nard said. 


PARLIAMENT OCTOBER 14 1986 


Aids may double 

every 10 months 


HEALTH 


The number of Aids cases in 
Britain might be roughly dou- 
bling every 10 months. Lady 
Trumpington, Under Secretary 
of State for Health and Social 
Security, told the Lords. 

She said that at the end of 
September there were 512 cases, 
of whom 250 died, and that the 
estimated number of those in- 
fected with the virus could be 
about 30.000. 

Lady Trtunpington told Lady 
Sharpies (O that visitors or 
those returning to the United 
Kingdom were not screened for 
Aids — acquired immune de- 
ficiency syndrome — and that 
the Government had taken no 
decision to introduce screening. 

She said the Government 
regarded control of the spread of 
this terrible disease as of the 
highest priority. Utgent action 
had been and was being taken 
on a number of fronts. These 
includ e d a public information 
campaign, additional resources 
for treatment, training for Na- 
tional Health Service staff re- 
search, - screening of blood 
donations, funding for vol- 
untary organizations and advice 
to professionals. 

“Ultimately it is the re- 
sponsibility of each and every 
one of us to ensure that our 
behaviour does not gut our- 


**Tbe Chief Medical Officer 
and health ministers are only 
too ready to go anywhere ana- 
speak on television or radio, or 
at public meetings, if invited.” 


Already £2.5 million bad been 
made available for the Aids 
information campaign, £2J 
million for the three Thames 
regions, support for the vol- 
untary sector, training and re- 
search. This was in addition to 
the resources already com- 
mitted by health authorities. 
Funding requirements, too, 
were kept under review in the 
light of developments. 


Lord Ehrya-Jones, for the 
Opposition, asked what con- 
tribution was being made to 
medical research into Aids. 


He asked whether the great 
British medical and scientific 
expertise was being adequately 
called upon to meet the serious 
challenge to the world's health. 


selves or others at risk.' 

Lady Sharpies said that the 
French had invented a machine 
which look only 10 minutes to 
screen people. Saudi Arabia, the 
Arab Emirates and India ai 
ready screened visitors. 


Lady Trumpington said the 
Government-fended Medical 
Research Council was re- 
sponsible for coordinating re- 
search on Aids in the United 
Kingdom. Twelve special pro- 
ject grants had been awarded at 
a total cost of about £1 mil lion. 
This included a contribution 
from the Health Department of 
up to £300.000 a year for 
epidemiological research and 
for the UK centre for co- 
ordinating epidemiological 
research. 


Lady Trumpington did not 
have any information about 
France or Saudi Arabia at her 
fingertips. She told Lord 
Cledwyn of Fenrhos, Leader of 
the Opposition peers, and Lord 
Avebury (L) that the incident* 
of Aids in prisons was no higher 
than outside. The greatest in- 
cidence of the disease was in the 
Greater London area. 


Lady Lane Fox (O said there 
was concern about the lack of a 
screening method for visitors 
and immigrants,. especially os it 
was believed that this would 
emphasize the heterosexual as- 
pect in transmitting this foul 
disease. 


Lady Trumpingten said 
screening visitors on a com-, 
pnehensive or selective basis 
would involve formidable prac- 
tical problems, and its effective- 
ness as a method of combating 
the spread of Aids here had been 
questioned by medical experts. 


Aids was not highly Infectious 
and isolation units were not 
considered appropriate for Aids 
patients. 


. Lord Kilmarnock (SDP) said 
it had been calculated -that in 
four years time 465 people a 
month, the equivalent of a foil 
jumbo jet, would die from Aids. 

“In view of that terrifying 
forecast is Lady Trumpington 
satisfied that the Government's 
advertising is adequate? It has 
been widely criticized as much 
too feeble, possibly for fear of 
public disapproval, and has 
failed to give sufficient informa- 
tion to prevent the spread of the 
virus. Arc sufficient funds de- 
voted to this?” 


Lord Chalfont (Ind) asked 
whether, if figures showed a 
dose relationship between Aids 
and promiscuous homosexual 
activity, the Government was 
inhibited from making that dear 
in information given to people 
to enable them to avoid this 
dreadful disease. 


Lady Tr umpin gton said the. 
Government was not so inhib- 
ited. Indeed, this was one of the 
valuable ways in which vol- 
untary organizations, which in- 
cluded the gay community, 
could help with spreading 
information. Education was the 
most important thing. 


, lady Tnunpingtoa said the 
dTcc liven css of the measures 
I was kept under review. No 
j options for the future had been 
ruled out. 


Parliament today 

House of Lords (2.30): Govern- 
ment statement on Reykjavik 
summit. National Health Ser- 
vice (Amendment) Bill, 
committee stage. 


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Trial collapses 
after woman 
supergrass 
fails to testify 

By Richard Ford 


TOE TIMES WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 15 1986 


HOME NEWS 


The use of “supergrass** 
evident* to obtain convfe- 

offences in 
Northern Ireland has received 
a further setback with the 

in wr" WOman iDfi >nner 
io testify against alleged 
accomplices. ^ 

S"? 1 ® on dte 

2JJ. 0 the Province's first 
gmale supergrass have been 
geM after the Director of 
Public Prosecutions in North- 
wn Ireland told magistrates 

“SiJf ^ not Proceeding 
with the case. 

Solicitors for another 17 
people implicated in terrorist 
crimes by Angela Whoriskey 
are confident that charges 
against their clients will be 
dropped on Friday. 

Yesterday Mr William 
McGuinness, aged 30 the 
younger brotherof Martin 
McGuinness. a leading figure 
in the Provisional Sinn Fein, 
walked free from Belfest 
Magistrates' Court after 
charges of Provisional IRA 
membership and conspiring 
with Whoriskey to murder 
police officers were 
withdrawn. 

The action by Whoriskey, 
who is serving a life sentence 
after pleading guilty to 
murdering a Royal Ulster 
Constabulary inspector four 
years ago, comes after a 
sustained camp ai g n against 
the use of supergrasses and the 
retraction of statements by at 
least 17 informers during the 
past five years. 

Whoriskey, a ged 25, im- 
plicated 20 people a year ago 


• of involvement in alleged 
terrorist crimes, and forced 
others from her home city of 
Londonderry to flee across the 
border. 

Her son, aged two, father 
Md brother disappeared from 
uieir home and she has been 
in solitary confinement at 
Maghaberry jail, Co Antrim, 
since turning informer. 

At her trial earlier this year, 
during which she admitted 39 
terrorist charges, her counsel 
said that die had become 
“sickened” by the Provision al 
IRA and was determined to 
give evidence against alleys 
associates. 

The Director of Public 
Prosecutions’ office in Belfest 
yesterday refused to comment 
on whether she had decided to 
retract her statement or was 
refusing to testify in court. 

The emergence in 1981 of 
supergrasses spread fear and 
uncertainty within the ranks 
of terrorist organizations riv- 
ing police a big psychological 
advantage, but as the numbers 
charged on the word of 
supergrasses pew so did criti- 
cism. 

Some nationalists believed 
that the lengthy periods peo- 
ple were in custody was 
effectively “internment by 
remand”. 

Trials were marked by at- 
tempts to intimidate the in- 
formers as they gave evidence 
but several important cases 
collapsed when judges dis- 
missed their evidence as un- 
reliable or delivered not guilty 
verdicts. 



Campfire cuisine being demonstrated 
iTs Cathedral central 


gardens of St Paul's 


of the 1986 British Meat Camp 

Army catering 


in the 
in die final 


Computers enlisted to cut paperwork 


Airlines in dispute 
over a £3m advert 

By Harvey Elliott, Air Correspondent 


A bitter dispute has broken 
out over a £3 million advertis- 
ing campaign currently being 
shown on television at peak 
time by the airline British 
Caledonian. 

It shows flying cabin staff 
holding a passenger by the 
hand and then letung him slip 
through their fingers, into the 
arms of a British Caledonian 
girl waiting to catch him on 
theground. 

The advertisement has an- 
gered Saatcni and Saatchy the 
advertising agency which han- 
dles a British Airways' cam- 
paign which also shows 
uniformed cabin staff flying 
around the sky to rescue 
hapless travellers. 

The agency has lodged a 
complaint with the Indepen- 
dent Television Companies 
Association (ITCA). 

“We developed this idea 
and now they are trying to use 
it to their own advantage,” Mr 
Bill Muirhead, Saatcfu’s dep- 
uty chairman, said. 

“We shall be monitoring the 
response of the ITCA vejy 
carefully and if necessary will 
lake further action to get the 
advertisement taken off the 
screens. It is a blatant attempt 
to depict British Airways.” 

He is also unhappy that the 
advertisement could play on 
the fears of passengers about 
felling from the sky and plans 
further legal action if nothing 
is done to remove it. 

But British Caledonian is 
equally determined that it 
should not be dropped. 

“It is preposterous and ludi- 
crous to say viewers could 
mistake the advertisement for 
a British Airways advert- 
isement,” Mr David Radford, 
BCaTs UK marketing man- 
ager. said. 

“We checked with the ITCA 
twice before launching the 
commercial and intend to 
keep it going for another six 
months. There is nothing 
malicious or macabre in it in 


any way, it is simply based on 
a sense of humour.” 

The advertisement is do- 
to extoll the virtues of 1 
*s door-to-door service 
and was filmed in Mexico and 
Horsham in Surrey. 

An ITCA official said: 
“Frankly we don't intend to 
do anything about iL We have 
received a complaint and we 
could, if we wished, exdude it 
from the screens if we felt ft 
was objectionable. But we 
can't agree with Saafchi and 
Saatchi that ft warrants any 
further investigation.” 

The dispute could now 
switch either to the Indepen- 
dent Broadcasting Autho 
or even the High Court. 

Saatchi and &mirhi said: 
“We are taking the problem 
very seriously, we don’t like 
being ripped off.” 

BA receives boost 
for privatization 

The booming Brazilian 
economy has enabled British 
Airways to turn loss-mating 
routes to South America into 
important profit centres. 

In the 18 months since it 
took over the routes from 
British Caledonian, the airline 
has seen both passengers and 
freight grow rapidly 

The Association of Euro- 
pean Airlines said yesterday 
that ail carriers flying to the 
South Atlantic were now 
benefiting from the extra traf- 
fic which has risen by more 
than 33 per cent in the past 
year. 

“The booming Brazilian 
economy, tariff policies lead- 
ing to lower feres and the 
resumption in growth of tour- 
ism are contributory factors” 
the association said. 

The average load fector- 
the percentage of seats filled 
on every aircraft -has risen 
from 62 per cent in 1983 to 
79.6 per cent in August this 
year. 


The British Army’s 5,000 
cooks are to get high-technol- 
ogy assistance from next year 
in their efforts to satisfy the 
appetites of the 72,000 sol- 
diers they feed around the 
world each day. 

A new computer system 
that will mean an end to the 
time-consuming mounds of 
paperwork now faced by chefs 
will be introduced in units 
from Belize to Belfest, Cyprus 
to West Germany and the 
Falklands to Hong Kong. 

Its aim is to simplify the 
task of producing more than 
200,000 hot meals a day and 
allow cooks more time at the 
stove instead ofbehind a desk. 

Aid relief 
criticized 
by Runcie 

By a Staff Reporter 

Governments failed to 
match the energy and efforts 
of voluntary organizations in 
mounting relief operations to 
deal with the great problems 
created by natural disasters, 
the Archbishop of Canterbury, 
Dr Robert Runcie, said 
yesterday. 


By Peter Davenport, Defence Correspondent 


The system has been devel- 
oped by Major Peter Jones, of 


is based at Aldershot He. 
thought of the idea while 
reading for a BSc. 

The first computers will be 
installed early next year and 
will be followed by training 
courses on how to use the new 
technology. It is expected that 
the system, called CATPAC - 
catering, planning, accounting 
and control -will save mil- 
lions of pounds and many 
man-hours. 

Major Jones received an 
award of £200 under the 
Ministry of Defence's ideas 
award scheme for developing 


the system, which will give 
cooks instant access, wherever 
they are in the world, to 
recipes, food stocks, suppliers 
and costs. 

The Army spends around 
£30 million a year on pro- 
visions for hot meals and its 
cooks can be called on to 
prepare anything from grand 
regimental dinners to meals 
on the battlefield. 

Brigadier Michael Paterson, 
director of the Army Catering 
Corps (motto “We Sustain”), 
said that the intention was to 
take the drudgery out of 
accounting and to make 
management more sophisti- 
cated. 


The system will involve 
more than 300 computers and 
related equipment and will be 
installed world-wide. The full 
cost is not known y«c 

Details were disclosed in the 
latest issue of Soldier maga- 
zine, on a page next to a strip- 
cartoon lampooning the 
gastronomic qualities of can- 
teen food. 

The Ministry of Defence 
said it was hoped the system 
would get rid of the huge 
amounts of paperwork that 
presently feced chefs, and give 
them more time for cooking. 

But would it make the end 
product any better? The min- 
istry declined to comment 


500 firms 
invited to 
sponsor 
the arts 

By Gavin Bell 
Arts Correspondent 

Mr Richard Luce, Minister 
for the Arts, has launched a 
drive to stimulate business 
sponsorship of the arts, and 
urged arts bodies to “git their 
act together" in acquiring new 
sources of private support. 

Mr Luce said yesterday that 
he was writing to 500 leading 
companies to draw their atten- 
tion to tax benefits in the last 
Budget aimed at encouraging 
donations to arts and heritage 
organizations. 

A corporate scheme in- 
troduced last July is to be 
followed next spring by a 
similar plan for individual 
employees, under which they 
can obtain tax relief for dona- 
tions up to £100 a year. 

The initiative was aimed at 
creating “a new climate for 
riving” and was part of the 
lOvcrnment’s policy of en- 
couraging self-help in the arts 
world. 

“The beauty of this scheme 
is that it is up to the arts world 
how much they can persuade 
the business world to give in 
donations or sponsorship. If 
the arts bodies get their an 
together, and approach busi- 
nesses professionally, the 
chances are they may raise 
quite a lot of money. The ball, 
to quite a considerable extent, 
is in their court,” Mr Luce 
said. 

He said he was impressed 
by the “climate of giving” in 
the United States. “It is the 
kind of dimate we would like 
to see here much more. 1 
cannot say we would move 
totally in that direction, but I 
think we have got a lot to learn 
from the Americans.” 

Hie Arts Council has said 
that current Government 
spending plans are insufficient 
and are undermining the basis 
of funding partnerships with 
local authorities and private 
sponsors. 


Jail term 
confirmed 
on PC who 
bit rival 

Richard Johnson, the Welsh 
police constable who bit off 
pan of an opponent’s ear 
during a rugby match, must 
serve bis six-month jail sen- 
tence. the Court of Appeal 
ruled in London yesterday* 
The Lord Chief Justice, 
Lord Lane, sitting with Mr 
Justice Farquharson and Mr 
Justice Roch. rejected Jan 
application by Johnson, aged 
31. of Maes-y-Coed. Mid- 
Glamorgan, for leave to ap- 
peal against the sentence. 

Lord Lane said that ihe 
sentence on Johnson, passed 
at Cardiff Crown Court ^in 
September after the PC bad 
been convicted of wounding 
with intern, was correct. ' 3 
“Unlawful violence of tins 
son on the football field nedis 
discouraging as much 
unlawful violence on the ter- 
races or. indeed, anywhere 
else.” Lord Lane said. 

Lord Lane deplored that a 
man of Johnson's potential 
should have behaved in sueff a 
way and commented trot 
David Bishop, the Welsh 
rugby international whose 
one-month jail sentence for 
punching an opponent in -foe 
face was suspended last month 
by different appeal judges, 
could consider himself luck*. 

Johnson was brought lo 
trial after an incident in the 
closing stages of a match U£t 
November between Cardiff 
and Newport police. He co- 
rned biting Mr Keith Jones, 
aged 40. m 

The maximum sentence- fir 
common assault, of wh®h 
Bishop had been convicted, 
was 12 months. Malicic 
wounding attracted a maj 
mum five-year sentence, 
offence of which Johnson 
convicted, wounding with 
tent carried a maximum Ifle 
sentence. Lord Lane said. * 
The coun was told iliat 
almost a thousand people h$I 
signed a petition protestretg 
about the sentence. 2T 


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if 


shop 

lowly 


in 


aid was only si 
Q Salvador, where at least 890 
people died after an earth- 
quake last Friday. 

“I do not fed that govern- 
ments have yet got the 
message,” he said, opening a 
conference on the logistics of 
disaster relief of which the 
English Speaking Union, in 
London, was host 

Governments did some 
good work. Dr Runcie empha- 
sized. and he praised Britain's 
recent RAF ririift to Ethiopia. 

’Bui more is required of 
governments,” he said. In the 
Sudan, volunteers had to pro- 
vide their own trucks, petrol, 
spare parts, maintenance men 
and communications. 

He added: “Overall, relief 
still arrives too skywly mid in 
insufficient quantity. Co- 
ordination is not yet right. 

“The same weaknesses have 
been shown up, as on a 
transparency, in the same 
places again and again, is one 
disaster after ano 

“It surely cannot be right 
that the world’s transport 
arrangements should depend 
to a large extent on ihe 
resources raised by the pro- 
digious efforts of a Bob 
Gekfor* 


Planning controls: 3 


Reform is the toughest step 


There were about 3,000 
planning inquiries last year, 
and all but about 1 50 of them 
lasted only a few days. It is the 
few long ones that cause most 
of the argument, and whoever 
is in power after the next 
general election is bound to do 
something to streamline them. 

U will be hard to do that and 
convince all those involved 
that their interests and rights 
have been looked after. 

The system becomes 
strained when it has to deal, 
with large projects which have 
repercussions beyond their 
immediate area. 

The Sizewell B power sta- 
tion is a good example. The 
issues discussed at the inquiry 
there concerned more than 
just local questions about the 
Impact of the new installation 
on the coastline and commu- 
nity. it proved impossible to 
hold an inquiry about a 
nuclear power station without 
some debate about the advan- 
tages and drawbacks of 
nuclear and other forms of 
fuel. 

The result at Sizewell was 
that the inquiry became al- 
most the longest ever held, 
comfortably beating such 
mxrathoa efforts as the 
fifcfvoir coalfield and the third 


There are obvious ways of streamlining the lumbering 
planning system. But as Hugh Clayton reports in the 
last of three articles , making the changes seem fair to 
all the competing interests involved will lx less easy. 



London airport, each of which 
look almost five years from 
the date of the planning 
application to the deosion by 
ministers. 

The Government predicted 
early this year that it would 
issue a derision about Sizewell 
next month, almost six years 
after the original planning 
application was issued. 

Such mammoth inquiries 
turn into inquests about gov- 
ernment policy on issues like 
nuclear power and die future 
ofair transport- If there was an 
inquiry tomorrow into a 
fourth London airport or yet 
another nuclear power station, 
the policy inquest would have 
to be held afresh. There is 
growing pressure for such 
consideraiionsof national pol- 
icy to be extracted from 
planning inquiries and consid- 
ered separately. 

The eminent team that 
recently finished investigating 
the pfenning system for the 
Nuffield Foundation called on 
the Government to set na- 
tional policy guidelines for the 


United Kingdom and not just 
for Scotland, as is done now. 

Hie risk in shortening the 
process is that the rights of j 
objectors wfrl be diluted. Fears 
or [hat have been heightened 
by the Government’s refusal 
to hold a public inquiry into 
foe Channel tunnel on the 
ground that it would take so 
long that ft would never be 
built. Successive White Papers 
have given evidence of im- 
patience among ministers 
about ihe pfenning system as a 
potential instrument for 
delaying job-creating' j 
developments. 

There is one way in which a 
Government might help to 
compensate for public sus- 
picion about any telescoping 
of the inquiry system: that it 
contributes to the costs objec- 
tors face when putting their 
case. Such assistance would be 
particularly deserved if ev- 
idence given is subsequently 
used by the Government to 
help frame policy. 

Concluded 


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OVERSEAS NEWS 


7 


Peace 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 15 1986 


prize goes to 


J ewish- American 
human rights author 




AiSSJ^ 1 ’ 'b® J e^«sh- 
riSu « Wnler 21x1 human 
campaigner, is this 
years winner of fee Nobel 

JJX P ^ ze, . l * w Norwegian 

JStedS mm ' ltee annouaced 

. J* 1 1** ritaUon the committee 
described Wiesel, a concentra- 
uornamp survivor and pro- 
lessor nominated several 
times before, as "one of the 
most important spiritual lead- 
ers and guides in an age when 
violence, repression and rac- 
ism continue to characterize 
the world” 

. The Romanian-born Ame- 
rican, aged 58, was “a mes- 
senger to mankind” whose 
message was one of peace, 
atonement and human dig- 
nity. His belief that the forces 
fighting evil in the world cohM 
be victorious was a hard-won 
belief. 

“His message is based on 
nis own personal experience of 
total humiliation and of the 
utter contempt for humanity 
shown in Hitler's death 
camps. The message is in the 
form of a testimony, repeated 
and deepened through the 
works of a great author.” 

Wiesel had widened his 


From Tony Samstag, Oslo 

concerns from the sufferings 
ofthe Jews “to embrace all 
repressed peoples and races” 
the committee said, although 

ne had taken special interestm 

Soviet Jewry. 

His selection follows several 
months of unusually heavy 
campaigning, marked by an 
equally heavy crop of ffl- 
informed press speculation, 
on behalf of Bob Geldof, the 
Insh rock-star and organizer 
of events for famine relief. 

At the weekend, Norwegian 
Radio, which is remarkably 
accurate year after year, issued 
its own shortlist of three. In 
addition to Wiesel and 
Geldof; the list included Mr 
Brian Urquhart, the British 
UN Middle East negotiator. 

Wiesel was the radio's — 
and the Norwegian press's — 
first choice, and the feet that 
Geldof had received by far the 
most letters of support from 
the public was unlikely to 
influence the decision, said 
Mr Egjl Aarvik, foreman of 
the Nobet committee. 

There were 8! nominations 
this year, 57 individuals and 
24 organizations, fin- the prize, 
the 67th, which is worth about 
£ 200 , 000 . 

Man In the news 


• WASHINGTON: Mr Wie- 
sel said yesterday the award 
would help him fight hatred 
and fanaticism throughout the 
world and would give him a 
greater forum for his life's 
work — the cause of remem- 
brance of the Holocaust 
(Mohsm Aii writes). 

Wiesel, a naturalized 
American since 1 963, said that 
one of the beneficiaries of the 
prize would be the young 
people of tjie world who 
wanted to know about the 
Holocaust 

Mr Wiesel, who lives in 
New York, has been «d fed the 
spiritual voice of the millions 
of Jews who died in World 
War Two; he craned the word 
“Holocaust” to describe the 
massacres. 

• Polish nomination: Mr 
Led) Walesa, leader of 
Solidarity, who was awarded 
the Nobel Peace Prize in 1985, 
said he was among those who 
had nominated Mr Wiesel this 
year (Reuters reported from 
Warsaw). 

Speaking from his home in 
Gdansk, Walesa said be had 
proposed Wiesel because “he 
was a man who did an 
enormous job of documenting 
what happened to the Jewish 
people during the war”. 



Mr Wiesel accepting a congratulatory loss from his ■ 

the peace prize award. Both are snrrivors of i 


Marion, after being informed of 
ieath camps. 


Congress caution as Reagan 
leaves summit door open 


From Michael Bmyoa, Washington 


Wiesel suffered a different horror 


FKe Wiesel was born in 
1928 In the town of Signet, in 
the Romanian district of Tran- 
sylvania, better known as a 
setting for Dracula-type hor- 
ror stories than for Nobel 
Peace Prize winners. But when 
the area was occupied by 
Hungary, itself under German 
occupation, dnriHg World War 
Tim, honor of altogether an- 
other kind became a reality. 

Young Elie was 16 when be 
was liberated from Bnchen- 
wald, the only one of his family 
to survive. 

He made his way to Paris, 
where he wrote his first book, 
la Nait % describmg his experi- 
ences in Bnchnwald and 
Auschwitz, a these feat has 
haunted most of fee nearly 50 
books he has written since. 

His wife is also a survivor of 
fee death camps. 

From 1972, as a professor at 
City College, New York, he 


From Onr Nordic Correspondent 

literature, philosophy 
i Judaism. 

In 1978 he h wiw a fall 
professor of philosophy and 
ethics at Boston University, 
where be travels once a week 
to teach, and fee following 
year was appointed rfcgirw—n 
of fee President's r M iw n iw i m i 
on fee Holocaust, charged 
wife collectmg information on 
fee persecution and exter- 
mination of Jews by Nazi 
Germany. 

A year ago, be broke ground 
for fee first US Holocaust 
Mnseum in Washington, buy- 
ing under the co rners to ne six 
urns containing ashes of 
victims. 

Wiesel is one of those 
figures whose mention auto- 
matically inspires respect, 
even m those who are not quite 
sure what be has done. 

In that sense, and most 
milHrg the mercurial 


defiberatriy vulgar Bob Geld- 
of; this year’s popular fav- 
ourite, he ism a long tradition 
of Nobel pri zew in ners, though 
the peace prw has seldom 
been awarded to an Individual 
whose reputation was based 
a fee w ilt ing of 


The Noiwegmn newspaper, 
Afieapostea, yesterday re- 
ported that Wiesel had S] 
Monday evening quietly in his 
skyscraper fiat on Man- 
hattan's East Side o bs e rv ing 
the Jewish New Year. 

Interviewed by telephone 
after the mmiwwiiiwii yes- 
teiday, Wiesel, asked why he 
thought he had won, replied: 
“I don't know, I don't know. 
I've written atom 300 books, 
I've given hundreds and hun- 
dreds of speeches against vi-| 
olence and racism. I'm 
sur v iv a l. A sm v i uo r and 
witness.”. 


French 
shrug off 
threat by 
President 

From Diana Geddes 
Paris 

President Mitterrand's an- 
nouncement that he would 
nol stand for a second term 
has been met by total scep- 
ticism from friends and foes 
alike. Most see his comments 
as a typical “Mitterandesque” 
lactic to ensure that his op- 
tions remain open while keep- 
ing people guesting as to ms 
real intentions. 

Nol a single French poli- 
tician or commentator has 
taken his words at face value, 
in saying that he was not a 
candidate, he simply meant 
that he could not beat one and 
the same time President and 
candidate for the presidency, 
they maintain. 

As for his comments that he 
could not for the moment 
foresee any event which would 
make him change his mind, 
had he not immediately 
hinted that anything could 
happen over the next 17 
months before the presidential 
elections are due to take place? 

M Jack Lang, the former 
Socialist Culture Minister and 
a dose friend of the President, 
said: “Francois Mitterrand re- 
mains the sole judge of 
whether he should or should 
not be a candidate. Deep 
down, many people think the 
best solution for France would 
be if Mitterrand could remain 
President for as long as pos- 
sible. 1 think that when the 
time comes, a lot of people 
will say. 'He's a good Presi- 
dent. Let's keep him'.” 

M Charles Fiterman, sec- 
retary ofthe Communist Party 
central committee, felt h wasa 
“very Minerandesque state- 
ment which in no way prej- 
udices what he will do when 
the time comes. Mitterrand is 
pretending to withdraw in 
order to keep his hands fore.” 

M Jean-Claude Gaudin. 
president of the centre-right 
UDF group in Parliament, 



President Reagan yesterday 
sarw congressional leaders to 
brief them on the outcome of 
the Reykjavik summit, a day 
after telling the nation that the 
door was still open and that 
the United States was ready to 
“pick up where we left off” in 
arms talks with the Russians. 

The President was mark- 
edly conciliatory in his nation- 
wide television address, em- 
phasizing the gains at the 
summit and the closeness of 
the two tides on almost all 
main issues. 

Within two hours of his 
broadcast, the White House 
reported that it received 3,052 
telephone calls from the pub- 
lic, with 2.544 supporting the 
President's decision and 308 
against 

The Administration is now 
putting a brave face on the 
collapse ofthe talks to prevent 
the Democrats making politi- 
cal advantage out of Mr 
Reagan's failure to achieve 
agreement. 

However, most congress- 
men have been guarded in 
their comments, and have 
been careful not to blame Mr 
Reagan or to c ri t i ci z e his 
strategic defence initiative as a 
stumbling block. 

Mr Les Aspin, Democratic 
chairman of the House armed 
services committee, said the 
SDI programme would come 
under much tougher scrutiny 


in Congress now, especially 
from those who had supported 
it rally in the belief that it was 
an important bargaining chip. 

Democratic senators have 
also voiced disappointment 
that Mr Reagan had refused to 
exchange a tangible reduction 
in strategic offensive weapons 
for a programme that was not 
even developed yet. 

Mr Reagan, though sombre 
and dearly disappointed as to 

An unidentified US citizen has 
asked for political asylum in 
New Zealand, fee Foreign 
Ministry said without giv ing 
further details (Renter reports 
from Wellington). New Zea- 
land television said feat he 
was a criminologist rfainriwg 
to have uncovered links be- 
tween the Mafia and the CIA. 

summed 19 the 11 hours of 
intensive negotiations, was 
careful not to criticize Mr 
Gorbachov personally, and 
offered several conciliatory 
gestures. But be emphasized 
that lie would continue to 
stand firm cm SDL 

“We proposed the most 
sweeping and generous arms 
control proposal in history.” 
he said. “While we parted 
company with the American 
offer still on the table, we are 
closer than ever before to 
agreements that could lead to 


a safer world without nudear 
weapons. 

“I cannot promise, nor can 
any president promise, that 
the talks in Iceland or any 
future discussions with Mr 
Gorbachov will lead in- 
evitably to great break- 
throughs or momentous treaty 
signings. 

“We will not abandon the 
guiding prinriple we took to 
Reykjavik. We prefer no 
agreement than to bring home 
a bad agreement to the United 
States.” 

Mr Reagan said he had told 
the Soviet leader he had 
promised the American peo- 
ple not to trade away SDL that 
there was no way he could tell 
them their government would 
nol protect them against 
nudear destruction. 

“1 went to Reykjavik deter- 
mined that everything was 
negotiable except two things, 
our freedom and our future,” 
be said. 

Outlining past arms control 
negotiations and the US goals, 
be said SDI was vital as an 
insurance policy that the 
Soviet Union would keep the 
commitments made at 
Reykjavik. 

“SDI is America's security 
guarantee, if the Soviets 
should — as they have done 
too often in the past — fell to 
comply wife their solemn 
commitments,” the President 
added. 


Russians 
make show 
of Afghan 
pull-out 

From Michael Hamtyn 
Delhi 

Western diplomats report 
that the Afghanistan Govern- 
ment and its Russian allies are 
getting ready to make a big, 
propaganda display of the 
withdrawal of Soviet troops, 
expected to begin today. 

Mr Mikhail Gorbachov has 
promised feat 6.000 troops 
would be pulled out of the 
country, and a series of special 
arrangements have been made 1 
for observers to watch them. 
But the diplomats express 
considerable scepticism over 
the withdrawal 
The official attitude of the 
British Foreign Office de- 
scribes the proposed pull-out 
as “a very small step forward”, 
and as of “minimal military | 
significance”. Echoing the re- 
ported remarks of Mr Caspar 
Weinberger, the US Secretary 
of State for Defence, the, 
British say that the pull-out 
itself may not be real. 

“It also seems possible that 
some of the troops withdrawn 
have been moved into Af- 
ghanistan recently.” a British 
official said. 

Western diplomatic sources 
report feat one air defence | 
unit armed with “Gecko”; 
missiles wifi be withdrawn 
from Kabul itself today. One 1 
tank regiment, one truck- 1 
borne motorized rifle regi- 
ment, and one ordinary 
infantry regiment wifi be 
flown out of Shindand air' 
base, dose to fee western city 
of HeraL 

Another tank regiment and 
another motorized rifle regi- 
ment wilt leave from Kunduz. 

A group of Western journal- 
ists has been flown into Kabul 
from Moscow to observe the 
departures, and already two 
Japanese correspondents and 
a team from West German 
television have been flown in 
to HeraL 
They were not allowed to 
spend the night in the town, 
and reported that each eve- 
ning 90 per cent of the old 


COMMENTARY 



Transatlantic as well as 
East-West relations could suf- 
fer after Reykjavik. That dan- 
ger will be all the greater if 
European opinion directs, as it 
easily may, fee wrong criti- 
cism at President Reagan. 

He is, I believe, vulnerable 
to the charge not of being 
unreasonably hawkish but of 
being diplomatically naive. 
That impression has not been 
removed by his televised 
speech to the American peo- 
ple. It is easier to understand 
why to failed to reach agree- 
ment in Reykjavik than why 
he found himself there in the 
first place. 

There seem to me two 
possible interpretations of 
Soviet tactics there which fit 
the available facts. One is feat 
this was essentially a propa- 
ganda exercise designed to 
embarrass the President and 
to widen fee gap between fee 
United States and Us Euro- 
pean allies. 

It has been obvious for some 
time that the allies do not 
share Mr Reagan's enthu- 
siasm fra his Strategic De- 
fence Initiative, and that the 
easiest way for fee Soviet 
Union to fan European misgiv- 
ings would to be to offer an 
apparently generous unclear 
arms deal on terms which it 
was confident fee President 
would not accept: fee abandon- 
meat of SDI. 

European hopes woald then 
be dashed because the United 
States insisted on keeping 
something that most Europe- 
ans did not think it should be 
bothering about anyway. 

Public relations 


town and half of fee new town , , 

was in fee hands of the aspects played UD 
Mujahidin rebels. 1 J * 


Pilot jailed| 
for illegal 


There were even fears be- 
fore fee first summit in Ge- 
neva a year ago that Mr 
Gorbachov ought be intending 
to use that meeting for just 
such a purpose. 

miM i **%**«^4 This interpretation of Reyk- 

eun im port fw* is Strengthened by fee 
O * way in which the Soviet Union 

rn,;,,- r* - played up fee public relations 

aspwts- and then broke the 
25. a British pilot, was was . PTrr Mrirlrnirt nn 'Cmul.,. 
jailed for 3* yeare hero yes- 

of ammunition and two para- 1x0 ,hrJ km "™ 


Weinberger praises stand on SDI 

“The Strategic Defence Ii 

tiative is part of the natui 

course of history, developing a J 
non-nuclear defensive weapon T nndpr dpoH 
system against intercom- I ^-Atauci Uvitlx 


From Michael Hamlyn 
Delhi 


Mr Caspar Weinberger, fee 
US Defence Secretary, yes- 
terday praised President Rea- 
gan’s stand at Reykjavik on 
fee Strategic Defence Initia- 
tive. He was disappointed that 
fee meeting had not achieved 
“deep reduction of nudear 
weapons and full verificat- 
ion", and said: “The 
President's proposal was an 
eminently reasonable, one and 
would have resulted in pre- 


cisely fee result the world 
needs.” 

He said that President 
Reagan was “entirely correct” 
in not being willing to give up 
strategic defence in response 
to Soviet promises. Mr Wein- 
berger said fee Russians were 
attempting to kill fee SDL 

• TOKYO Mr Yasuhiro 
Nakasone, the Japanese Prime 
Minister, said yesterday he 
believed the Star Wars pro- 
gramme was playing a role in 
promoting disarmament • 


chute flares into Zimbabwe (A 
Correspondent writes). 

Ovis. a former member of 
fee Rhodesian Air Force who 
emigrated to South Africa 
after independence in 1980. 
was bom in Nairobi, but holds 
a British passport. 


system against intercont- 
inental ballistic missiles.” he 
said (Reuter reports). 

• BRUSSELS! The talks 
were nol a failure, as they 
showed that Soviet arms con- 
trol positions bad changed 
significantly. Lord Carring- 
ton, Nato Secretary-General 
said yesterday (AFP reports). 


a militar y camp in sonth-west 
may not seek a second term 


Manila frees 
rebel’s wife 
and bodyguard 

From Keith Dalton 
Manila 

The. Philippines Govern- 
ment yesterday freed the wife 
and bodyguard of a top com- 
munist rebel in a deal to save 
stalled peace talks on ending 
fee left-wing rebellion from 
1 total collapse. 

Mr, Sedfrey Ordonez, the 
Solicitor-General told the Sn- 
1 preme Court the Government 
bad no objection to the release 
of Mrs Jose fina Cruz and Mr 
| Jose Concepcion, the wife and 
bodyguard of the captured 
I rebel leader, Mr Rodolfo 
Safes. 


Steel fires parting shot 
as African tour ends 

Ftan Michael Hornsby, Johannesburg 


Mr David Steel, fee Liberal 
ftuty leader, left for home last 
night after a week's tear of 
so u the rn Africa, which re- 
inforced his view feat fee 
Government in Pretoria was 
fee stumbling Mock to a 
peaceful settlement of fee 
region's problems, 

Mr Steel who last visited 
Sonfe Africa in 1971, said at a 
press coofereace at Jan Smuts 
airport, Johannesburg, feat he 
had found some bopefid as- 
pects abort the situation, “and 
some which, frankly, have 
given me cause for despair”. 


Among tire hopeful things, 
Mr Steel said, was the “great 
reservoir of genome goodwill 
between southern Africans of | 
all races”. He had crane away, 
“to my own surprise, wife a 
greater faith in fee Sonfe 
African people", which was 
not to be equated wife the 
South African Government 
He had found **a certain 
amount of fear of fee future”, 
but the only real fear for Sooth 
Africans “is fear of their own 
government's blindness, which 
is leading them on fee path to 
a long-drawn-out agony of dvil 
war”. 


Colombo (AFP) — A Tamil 
guerrilla leader suspected of | 
masterminding an attack in 
1985 on the sacred Buddhist 
city of Anuradbapura in which 
150 people died, sparicingi 
revenge killings by Buddhist 
Sinhalese, has been killed in 
dashes with security forces. 

Girls killed 

Beirut (Reuter) — A woman 
and two girls died in artillery 
clashes between Christians 
and Muslims across Beirut’s i 
“Green Line”. 

Gandhi warns 

Canberra (Reuter) - Mr 
Rajiv Gandhi, the Indian 
Prime Minister, began a visit 
aimed at forging closer politi- 
cal ties with Australia by 
warning that there was little 
time to pull South Africa from 
“conflagration”. 

Owen call 

Lisbon (Reuter) - Dr David 
Owen, the SDP leader, urged 
the European Community to 
toughen sanctions against 
South Africa by indudmg a 
ban on coal imports and direct 
air links. 


that the chances of success 
were not that high. So they 
could reasonably have cal- 
culated that the frustration 
later would be all the greater. 

The other interpretation is 
feat Mr Gorbachov is genu- 
inely concerned about SDI, is 
prepared to pay a high price to 
get rid of H, but believed that 
the only way to persuade Mr 
Reagan to accept such a deal 
was by short-cinnitiiig fee 
detailed diplomatic procedures 
and bouncing the President 
into an agreement in a face-to- 
face encounter. This inter- 
pretation is consistent with the 
belief feat it was fear of SDI 
that brought the Russians 
back to the negotiating tabic. 

These two interpretations 
are not mutually exclusive. Mr 
Gorbachov could have been 
an each-way bet: to get 
rid of SDI if he could, and to 
take the propaganda dividend 
if to could not 


The wrong way to 
reach settlement 


was convinced that M 
Mitterrand’s claim that to was 
not a candidate meant pre- 
cisely the opposite. 

“He will be a candidate, but 
he will do everything to keep 
everyone in doubt until the 
last minute. The more M 
Mitterrand says no, the more 
it will be yes.” 

M Mitterrand goes to 
London tomorrow for talks 
wife Mrs Margaret Thatcher 
on the EEC summit in the 
British capital in December, 
East-West relations after the 
Reykjavik summit, inter- 
national terrorism, and bi- 
lateral affairs. 


Villagers are 
terrorized by 
armed rustlers 

Nairobi — Armed cattle 
raiders, many of them mem- 
bers of the semi-nomadic 
Karamojong tribe, are 
terrorising a large area of 
north-eas t Uga nda (Charles 
Harrison wrires). • 

At least 50.000 Ugandans 
have abandoned their villages 
and are crowded into make- 
shift settlements near Soroti 
and Lira towns. 


Bangkok drag 
refinery shut 
in police raid 

Bangkok (Reuter) - Thai- 
land Has closed a key heroin 
refinery dose to Bangkok 
which was supplying the drug 
to Hong Kong and Western 
Europe, police said yesterday. 

Nine people and hundreds 
of pounds of chemicals and 
laboratory equipment were 
seized in a pre-dawn raid, in 
Choi Bun province. 55 miles 
south-east of Bangkok. 


California Chief Justice in the battle of her life 


From Ivor Davies, Los Angeles 
She is tall and slim, wife a been injected into the cam- 


mane of expertly-coloured 
blonde hair and a make-up job 
befitting a Hollywood matron. 
She is Chief Justice Rose Bird, 
of fee Snpreme Court of Cali- 
fornia. ami 49. who, wife two 
other judges of the court Just- 
ices Cruz Reynoso and Joseph 
Gredin, is battling for her pol- 
itical life: 

There are many issues, per- 
sonal and political feeing the 
voters of California in the No- 
vember 4 general election. 
None has stirred passions like 
fee re-election of this frail 
woman. 

To some she epitomizes 
everything they think is wrong 
with fee judicial system — 
judges who are “soft on 
crime” and care more for the 
rights of criminals than their 
victims. To others she is a 
shining example of fee inde- 
pendence of the judiciary, re- 
fusing to be influenced by pol- 
itical considerations or special 
interest pleading, motivated 
only by fee highest constitu- 
tional principles. 

Millions of dollars have 


paign- to defeat her, which 
harps constantly on the feet 
that she has overturned 59 
consecutive death penalties in 
her nine years in office, de- 
spite fee-feel that Californian 
voters have repeatedly upheld 
the death penalty for murder 
in special circumstances. 

Chief Justice Bird says she 
is neutral on the death penalty 
and makes tor derisions 
purely on the merits of each 
case. At a recent campaig n 
appearance she said: “We're 
just trying our very best to 
ensure that when someone is 
executed it is not done to re- 
elect fee judge or because 
some special interest wanted 
it. but because the person 
received a fair trial and should 
be executed under the law.” 

Bui so vindictive have the 
attacks on tor become that 
several recent public appear- 
ances by the Chief Justice had 
to be cancelled because she re- 
ceived some “very specific” 
death threats. 

.As the election nears some 
fellow jurists in California are . 



Chief Justice Rose Bird: 
fighting for her political life 

saymg that her real problems 
are personal — an inability to 
play politics, a refusal to 
manipulate the people she has 
to work with. She recently 
refused to have campaign 
pictures taken, explaining: “If 
I have a picture taken running 
with my dogs. I exploit my 
dogs. Why should I do that to 
them if I care about them?” 

A close friend and long-time 
supporter of the Chief Justice. 
Los Angeles Superior Court 
Judge Florence Bernstein, re- 
cently attacked tor friend's 


eccentricities: “Her destruc- 
tive pathological suspicion 
and need for complete control 
has caused her to run an iso- 
lated. ineffectual campaign 
that could have been won if 
she’d been willing to accept 
the help of politically experi- 
enced supporters.” 

The only concession the un- 
married Chief Justice has 
made to politics in the last 
month of her campaign has 
been a series of low-key tele- 
vision ads. written by herself, 
in which she never directly 
asks for votes but talks softly 
about the strength of fee Am- 
erican Court system and the 
necessity of avoiding its polit- 
icization. 

There is little doubt that die 
will be defeated on November 
4. She has some powerful ene- 
mies. Mr George Deukmejlan. 
California's Governor, on- 
poses her. as does the most 
powerful cleric in California. 
Archbishop Roger Mahoney 
of Los Angeles, who has called 
her “emotionally unstable and 
vindictive”. 

The Governor’s chief oppo- 
nent, Mr Tom Bradley, the 
Los Angeles Mayor, refuses to 


declare his position on the 
Bind issue. 

In an apparent attempt to 
help the underdog Chief Jus- 
tice. considered the most ma- 
ligned California public offi- 
cial since Earl Warren, The 
Las Angeles Times and the 
Los Angeles Herald-Examiner 
have run long profiles of Chief 
Justice Bird, emphasizing her 
history— an impoverished but 
brilliant child of a sins 
mother commuting 25 miles 
each day to university, fuelling 
her education by scholarships, 
rising steadily until appointed 
by Governor Jeny Brown to 
his Cabinet as Secretary of Ag- 
riculture. 

What emerges is a picture of 
a strong, brilliant but eccentric 
personality, not unlike fee 
governor who appointed her. 
but in addition fee is an 
“uppity woman”. 

One of her former law clerks 
may have spoken her political 
eulogy recently when he said: 
“She is an extraordinary per- 
son and it approaches Greek 
tragedy when certain of her 
personal qualities have gotten 
in the way of what fee could 
have accomplished”. 


Bat neither interpretation 
woald have justified Mr 
Reagan's giving np SDI at 
Reykjavik. On the first 
cons traction, the Russians 
were not. negotiating sincerely. 

On the second, they were 
asking the President to take a 
momentous decision on a 
proposition for which they had 
not prepared him after frenetic 
overnight negotiations. That is 
not the way in which settle- 
ments of such consequence 
ought to be reached. 

The trouble was that there 
was a disconnection between 
the proceedings at Reykjavik 
and the preliminary dis- 
cussions. These preliminaries 
took place at different levels: 
at the Geneva arms talks, 
between American and Soviet 
experts in Washington and 
between Mr Shultz and Mr 
Shevardnadze. 

But these conversations did 
not focus on such ambitious 
objectives as those suddenly 
pot forward by the Russians in 
Reykjavik. Before then it was 
simply a redaction, not die 
elimination of EoromissUes, 
and a cut of only 30, not 50, per 
cent in strategic arms, that 
were under consideration. It 
had not been stated that the 
Soviet Union would insist 
upon stifling SDI research 
before even agreeing to a 
Enromissile deaL 
The preparatory discussions 
had not yet sufficiently refined 
the issues to be pot to the two 
leaders. So what was Mr 
Reagan doing in Reykjavik? 
Presumably he was trusting to 
his remarkable capacity to 
charm and to persuade. But he 
left himself exposed by ignor- 
ing one of foe basic rates of 
summitry. There are no short 
cuts to agreement at the top 





8 


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Cuts in prison terms of 
priest’s killers will 
shock Polish Catholics 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 15 1986 


OVERSEAS NEWS 


The Polish authorities, in a 
32 4? wiH Profoundly 

shock the country's many 
devout Catholics, have cut the 
Jong jail sentences imposed on 

murdered Father Jerzy Pop- 
cltiszko, the Solidarity chap- 
lain. two years ago ^ 

m« e iu G< i verTncnl Wkes- 
man, Mr Jerzy Urban, said 

cl 5fW. offered 
und er an official amnesty, 
would not be extended to the 
principal killer. Captain Grze- 
J! 2 noirowski, who wiU serve 
nis tun 25-year term. 

But Piotrowski's immediate 
superior. Colonel Adam 
Pietruszka, formerly deputy 
head of the religious affairs 
department of the secret po- 
“*> had his sentence 
slashed from 25 years to 15 
Lieutenant Waldemar 
Chmielewski, who at his trial 
iq January 1985 appeared on 
the verge of a nervous break- 
down, has had his sentence 
trimmed from 15 to 10 years. 

Lieutenant Leszek Pekala, 
who served as a getaway 
driver when the priest was 
"ret kidnapped then mur- 
dered. has had his term cut 
from 14 years to either 10 or 
nine years. Mr Urban did not 
specify the precise reduction 
m the cases of the two lieut- 
enants. 


From Roger Boy es, Warsaw 

All four officers lost appeals 
to the Warsaw Supreme 
Court. 

The clemency is within the 
powers of the amnesty an- 
nounced on July 17 which 
excludes only spies, traitors 
and saboteurs, but the an- 
nouncement so close to the 
second anniversary of the 
priest’s murder will upset 
many who still travel to the 
grave of Father Popietaszko to 
pray for his canonisation. 

The leadership of the 
Catholic Church, however, 
can do little to vent its 
displeasure because the auth- 
orities at the same time an- 
nounced the freedom of the 
only imprisoned priest. Father 
Sylwester Zych. 

Shortly after the imposition 
of martial law in Poland, a 
group of students, one of 
whom has also now been 
freed, tried to snatch the gun 
of a militia sergeant in a 
Warsaw tram. The gun went 
off and the sergeant was iriiiprf 

Father Zych later .hid the 
gun in his parish safe and was 
jailed for eight years for aiding 
and abetting a murder. His 
case has often been raised with 
the authorities by the Church 
leadership, especially Arch- 
bishop Bronislaw Dabrowski, 
secretary to tbe Polish 
Episcopate. 


Last week, at a meeting of 
the Warsaw region Com- 
munist Party, the Interior 
Ministry party representative 
said that “some circles" in 
Poland were unhappy with the 
amnesty’ for political pris- 
oners. 

The cutting of the prison 
sentences on Father 
Popieluszko's murderers is 
supposed to show that the 
amnesty does not benefit only 
Solidenty. 

• Mr Urban held out a diver 
ofhope for the involvement of 
Mr Lech Walesa, the Solidar- 
ity chajrman, in the “national 
reconciliation" if he distanced 
himself from “political 
extremists" in the union, de- 
nounced the strike weapon to 
press for wage increases and 
withdrew his support for il- 
legal organisations". 

In such a situation, said Mr 
Urban in a tone that suggested 
that the event was unlikely, 
there might conceivably be a 
role for Mr Walesa. 

• The Goverment spokesman 
said that all the necessary 
licenses would be granted to a 
new independent magazine. 
Res Publico, when it was ready 
to start. The ma ga^i™* edited 
by Mr Marein KroL, a lay 
Qnholic intellectual, is aiming 
at giving a platform to mod- 
erate critics of the authorities. 


Five Mozambique 
towns fall to rebels 

From Michael Hornsby, Johannesburg 
Five small rural towns in ants have been infiitTyfed to 


m 

northern Mozambique have 
been captured by insurgents of 
tbe Mozambique National 
Resistance (MNR), according 
to South African press reports 
yesterday. 

Tens' of thousands of 
Mozambicans were said to be 
fleeing to neighbouring conn- 
tries to escape starvation and' 
intensified fighting between 
the MNR and Mozambique 
Government forces. 

According to sources m 
Maputo, the towns of Zamba, 
Mntarara and Utongne, in 
Tete Province; Gaia in Sofala 
province; and MBaage in 
Zambezia province, have been 
captured by the rebels. Mnta- 
rara, Ulongue, Cam ad M0- 
ange are close to the Malawi 
border, the southern part of 
which forms a v wedge of afien 
territory thrusting deep into 
Mozambique. 

A statement issued after a 
meeting of Mozambique and 
five other frontline states — 
Angola, Botswana, Tanzania, 
Zambia and Zimbabwe — in 
Maputo on Sunday admitted 
that “bandit gangs" had occu- 
pied ‘'frontier zones in the pro- 
vinces of Tete, So&ia and 
Zambezia". 

The frontfine states accused 
Malawi i 

Pretoria’s policy of 
ization" by allowing its terri- 
tory to be used as a spring- 
board for attacks on Mozam- 
bique. 

Malawi and tbe MNR have 
denied that Malawi is being 
used to mount guerrilla 
incursions. 

Maputo last weekend claim- 
ed Sooth African forces were 

“concentrated along the bor- 
ders with Mozambique and 
Zimbabwe and commando 


carry out acts of terrorism. 

Maputo also alleged that a 
l a ndm i ne explosion last week 
in the eastern Transvaal, dose 
to the Mozambique border, 
which Pretoria blamed on Af- 
rican National Congress guer- 
rillas operating from Mozam- 
bique, had been staged by 
Pretoria to provide a pretext to 
attack its Mack neagbbour. 

After the explo- 

sion. which wounded six white 

South African Defence Fore 
soldiers, General Magnos 
Malan, the South African 
Defence Minister, waned of 
posable reprisals, and the 
next day Pretoria prohibited 
recnritmeto of Mozambique 
workers, whose earnings are 
an important some of income 
for Maputo. 

Hus move- was seen as 
possibly pre-empting a return 
by Pretoria to fall-scale sup- 
port for tbe MNR rebels, 
which has hitherto been re- 
strained, at least formally, by 
the Nkounti non-aggression 
pact, which bmds end side to 
refrain from aiding ins urgents 

The Johannesburg Star 
newspaper quoted the Malawi 
a mbass a dor in Maputo assay- 
leg 70,000 Mozambicans had 
fled from tbe fighting b et w een 
the end of September and Oc- 
tober 10. 

During the past 18 months 
6QJM0 Mozambique refugees 
are estimated to have settled m 
the South African tribal 
“homelands" of KaNgwane, 
Gazanknln and Lebowa. 

• LISBON: An MNR 
spokesman claimed yesterday 
that they had seized Mntara- 
ra, an important town on the 
Zmw hffn river and were at- 
tacking another nearby cross- 
ing-point (Reuter reports). 


American 
‘admits’ 
to spying 

Tehran (Reuter) — Mr John 
Pattis, an American engineer 
arrested in Iran four months 
ago, has admitted having 
spied for tbe Central Intelli- 
gence Agency (C1AX Tehran 
newspapers said yesterday. 

The papers carried the tran- 
script of an interview raid to 
have been shown on Iranian 
television last night 
Mr Pattis, ami 50, from 
Aiken, South Carolina, was 
quoted as saying that he had 
worked in Iran on various 
projects since 1969. 

He is said to have supplied 
the CIA with information 
about telecommunication in- 
stallations and projects, black 
market money rates, rumours 
about the health of Ayatollah 
Khomeini, tbe I ranian leader, 
rationing, real estate juices 
and power cuts. 

At the time of his arrest be 
was working for Cosmos 
Engineers, based in Maryland, 
at Iran's main satellite ground 
station at Assadabad, south- 
west of Tehran. 

Iraqi jets attacked Assada- 
bad twice in Jane and July, 
killing two workers and 
disrupting telephone and telex 
links. Iranian officials have 
said that Mr Pattis passed on 
information which helped tbe 
Iraqis stage the raids. 

There have been no reports 
ofa triaL 

“I confess to my espionage 
activities,” the newspapers 
quoted Mr Pattis as having 
said. “Most probably I will 
spend a long time in prison." 
• KIRKUK: Iraq's oil exports 
are reported to be flowing 
normally, with no sign of 
damage to the main northern 
Kirkuk field, despite Iranian 
claims to have caused heavy 
destruction here. 


Long-term problems emerge as rescuers struggle on 

Mexico’s 
experts 


to help 
quake city 

From Paul VaBely 
Guatemala Qty 

A team of disaster special- 
ists which developed a pro- 
gramme to cope with the 
aftermath of last year's Mexi- 
can earthquake was due to 
arrive in San Salvador yes- 
terday to begin a study of the 
long-term reconstruction of 
slam areas devastated by 
Friday's earthquake. 

Not that, the short-term 
problems in the Salvadorean 
capital are yet resolved. Re- 
ports reaching neighbouring 
Guatemala tell of scores and 
perhaps hundreds of individ- 
uals stiD boned aDve in the 
rabble. 

And the hUernatioBal teams 
of rescuers were reportedly 
being hampered by occasional 
tremors which threatened to 
bring down more wreckage. 

“Of course we are doing 
what we can to help with the 
mmiwtwfp problems, but we 
have to look at how die 
situation could develop over 
the next two to three months," 
Mr Agop Kayayan, Central 
American representative for 
the United Nations Children's 
Fund (UnicefX said. 

Umcef yesterday stepped np 
its involvement in the relief 
effort by bringing in the 
Mexican team and by ferry lag 
across the border from Guate- 
mala large quantities of medi- 
cine, oxygen, blankets and 
water pafficatiou equipment. 

The team, which worked for 
Unicef in Mexico, includes an 
architect with special exper- 
tise in the co ns t r uction of 
priority urban services like 
water, sanitation and shelter, 
and a psychologist who win 
work particularly with chil- 
dren tr a umati z ed by their 
experiences in the earthquake. 

“We need to begin work on 



A boy injured in Friday’s earthquake being comforted at a makeshift open-air hospital set 
up in tbe streets of San Salvador, where tbe majority of the hospitals are now in ruins. 


the long-term problems right 
away," said Mr Kayayan. 

The Red Cross estimates 
that more than 20,000 people 
are living on the streets in San 
Salvador. “They have no shel- 
ter, no water supply and no 
sanitation," Mr Kayayan said. 
“It is only a matter of time 


before an epidemic of di- 
arrhoea breaks oat, and di- 
arrhoea is tbe biggest single 
cause of infan t mortality in 
Central America today." 

Children evacuated from the 
(City's six hospitals, all but one 
of which were destroyed or 
severely damaged in the earth- 


hospitals 
quake, are particularly vulner- 
able. “Many of them are just 
lying in tbe street," be said. 

• SAN SALVADOR: Res- 
cuers hare are losing hope of 
finding more survivors in the [ 
rubble (Renter reports). Only 
two people were rescued alive 
yesterday. 


Hand-over 
in Israel 
delayed 
by ‘tactics’ j 

From Ian Murray 
Jerusalem 

Last-minute tactical man- 
oeuvring delayed yesterday's 
planned handover of the Is- 
raeli Prime Minister’s post 
from Mr Shimon Peres of 
Labour to Mr Yitzhak Shamir 
ofUkud. 

It may now happen today, 
but could take longer and in 
the meantime Mr Peres re- 
mains caretaker of the Gov- 
ernment of national unity. 

Mr Uzi Baram, Secretary- 
General of the Labour Party, 
accused Likud of negotiating 
with ill will, and threatened to 
call a general assembly of the 
party “to decide the future of 
tbe Government" if the mat- 
ter were not satisfactorily 
settled by tomorrow. 

According to senior Likud 
sources, Labour is seeking to 
exploit the changeover to 
make sure important jobs are 
given to its political ap- 
pointees and is most con- 
cerned at Mr Shamir's 
determination to return the 
sharp-tongued Mr Yitzhak 
Modai to the Cabinet He was 
dismissed for insulting Mr 
Peres in July, and the outgoing 
Prime Minister has no wish to 
sit with him in the Cabinet 
until January at the earliest 

Labour also wants to block 
a Likud takeover of the vital 
immigration portfolios, which 
would mean bringing in Mr 
Moshe Arens to look after the 
Soviet Jewry question and 
Arab relations, and Mr Ronni 
Milo to deal with Jews in the 
rest of the world. 

Mr Peres wants Mr Yossi 
Beilin, his Cabinet Secretary, 
to be given the plum job of 
Ambassador to Washington, 
while Mr Shamir is reluctant 
to see such a key post go to one 
of tbe Labour Party's young 
wolves. 

Despite these hitches both 
sides seemed confident yes- 
terday that the handover 
would go ahead soon. 


Palme murder 
may he linked 
to Abu Nidal 

From Christopher Mosey 
Stockholm 

A 40-year-okl Swedish citi- 
zen deported from England on 
suspicion of belonging to an _ 
Abu Nidal hit squad was being 
questioned yesterday by po- 
lice about the murder m 
February of the Swedish 
Prime Minister, Olof Palme. 

The man came to Sweden 
from Jordan 

Most suspicion over the 
Palme murder involves Kurd- 
ish extremists, but a murder 
hunt spokesman in Stockholm 
said that Abu Nidal could not 
be excluded from suspicion. 


Briton on death charge 
jailed for burglary 

Dubai (Reuter) — Mark to seD tbe stolen goods and 
Spalding, aged 19, one of two- later escaped from police cus- 
- Britons on trial here for the tody. He was at large at the 


murder of a rnghtwatchman, 
has been jailed for eight years 
on unrelated charges includ- 
ing burglary, damaging prop- 
erty and escaping from 
custody. 

Spalding, from Jarrow, 
Tyne and Wear, was sen- 
tenced yesterday after having 
been found guilty of entering 
nine rooms in two hotels in 
this Gulf emirate, stealing 
gold and silver ornaments and 
causing damage to doors 
amounting to 6,750 dirhams 
(£1,171). He was caught trying 


time of the murder, which he 
and Mr Michael Brown, aged 
22, from Sutton Coldfield, 
West Midlands, have denied. 

The dead man, Mr Konia 
Bramil Jon bat, aged 32, a 
watchman, was killed in June 
outride Chicago Beach Vil- 
lage, an exclusive housing 
compound.' 

Spalding and Mr Brown 
fece tbe death penalty if 
convicted. 

The prosecution alleges that 
they killed Jonbat by running 
him over with their car. 


Optimistic note in Amnesty report 


By Caroline Moorehead 

A note of cantioas optimism 
sets the tone for Amnesty In- 
ternationa Ps 1986 annual re- 
port, published today. 

It seems that governments 
are beginning to respond to 
pressme put on them by the 
growing number of hitman 
rights groups throughout the 
world — more than 1,000 
independent organizations 
now have human rights as at 
least part of their programme 
- and ratentationaJ laws are, 
gradually being strengthened. 

The 1984 UN Convention 
Against Torture has now been 
signed by 41 governments and 
81 have ratified the Inter- 
national Covenant on Civil and 
Political Rights. 

Mach, however, remains to 

be done. The worid as describ- 
ed by Amnesty Inte rnation al 
in 1986 is still a place where 
torture is endemic, “disap- 
pearances" occur in depress- 
ing numbers, and summ a r y 

executions continue. 

Governments under attack 
have g r ow n adept at claiming 



OF CONSCIENCE 


the death penalty is also 
reported in the Caribbean and 
many Asian countries. 

In the United States 1,642 
prisoners were awaiting execu- 



aotes, in tbe name of national 
sovereignty, security or devel- 
opment. 

Some of AmnestyY appeals 
for co-operation have been met 
by accusations that the human 
rights organization is merely a 
tool of hostile pro paganda . 

The death penalty remains a 
major cause for concern 
throughout much of tbe world, 
and there are areas where its 
use appears to be on the 
increase. Daring 1985 alone 
death sentences are known to 
have been carried ooton 1,125 
prisoners in 44 countries — but 
these are only official figures 
ami the true number is cer- 
tainly much higher. 

Eighteen African countries 
carried out executions, of 
which 137 were hangings in 
South Africa. An increase in* 


death penalty seem to be 
gaining momentum. 

The use of torture continues, 
whether in order to extract 
information, or simply in a 
routine way. In Syria, for 
instance, torture is reported as 
Systematic at all stages of 
detention, while in Kuwait the 
Deputy Prime Minister has 
announced that fala-ga — 
beating on foe sides id the feet 
— will continue as long as the 
security of foe country re- 
quires it. 

Early this year Amnesty 
International celebrated its 
25th anniversary. With some 
500,000 members throughout 
foe world its membership has 
doubled in five years. 

Amncstv International ■ Report 
I9S6 (5 Roberts Place, London 
ECIR OEJ. £7.95). 


Published at £>SS 

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1 abartoir/abbaioir 

2 accommodaie/accoraodate 

3 braggodotio/bragadoccio 

4 desiccai e/dess icaie 

5 pavilion/pavillion 


ANSWER 

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10 


OVERSEAS NEWS 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 15 1986 


Five die in clashes with 
security forces as 
Bangladeshis go to polls 


Five people have died and 
more than 300 have been 
injured in violent dashes be- 
tween police and opposition 
supporters in the dosing 
stages of the presidential elec- 
tion campaign in Bangladesh. 

Security forces are on full 
alert after the killings during 
the week as the capital goes to 
the polls today to restore civil 
rights and dismantle 4 Vi years 
of army rule. 

Police said that about 25 
politicians were arrested dur- 
ing Sunday and Monday, but 
opposition sources claim that 
more than 200 people were 
detained. 

Armed policemen were 
guarding the roads to the 
university campus - an oppo- 
sition stronghold — in central 
Dhaka as scores of political 
activists went into hiding; 

More than 20 buses were set 
on fire yesterday as mobs 
exploded crackers, an increas- 
ingly popular form of protest 

General Hussain Muham- 
mad Erstad. aged 56, the 


EVot* Ahmed Fazl, Dhaka 

his 


military ruler, is 
first five-year term as 
president after having retiring 
as Army Chief But his 
credibility has been impaired 
by a boycott by two major 
opposition groups. 

Of the opposition, be said; 
*Tve tried my best to bring 
them to the polls, but it seems 
they are scared to face the 
people.” 

The opposition parties have 
a different story to telL 

“We cannot accept an elec- 
tion pre-designed to keep 
General Ershad in power,” 
said Sheikh Hasina Wazed, 
daughter and political heir of 
Sheikh Mujibur Rahman, the 
country's founder President - 
killed by dissident Army offi- 
cers in August 1975. 

Ironically, as Bangladesh 
prepares for a third attempt at 
democracy in its 15-year his- 
tory, years of it under 
military rule, the main 
campaigners for civilian gov- 
ern mem. Sheikh Hasina and 


Begum Khaleda Zia, are both 
interned in their homes. 


The two leaders have called 
a general strike during the 
nine hours of polling which 
began earlier today. 


Both were restricted from 
holding rallies in -central 
Dhaka on Monday nnffg r a 
new law which bans anti- 
electioq activities. 


Senior officials said that the 
experience of last May’s par- 
liamentary election, iir which 
more than 30 people were 
killed, has led to a toughening 
of security measures. 


“The Army can be called 
out to belp police if there is a 
need,” Major General Mah- 
mud ul Hasan, the Interior 
Minister, said. Security forces 
will be deployed at more than 
23,500 polling centres. Gen- 
eral Ershad feces It can- 
didates, including Colonel 
Sayeed Farook Rahman, a 
self-confessed assassin of 
Sheikh Mujib. 


Weinberger visit 
pleases both sides 


From Michael Hamlyn, Delhi 


Though the visit to India of 
Mr Caspar Wemberoer, the 
US Secretary of Defence, 
ended yesterday with more of 
a whimper than a bang, both 
sides expressed satisfaction 
with the progress that had 
been made. 

There were no announce- 
ments about the sale of new 
technologies, which is what 
the four-day visit had been 
about, and Mr Weinberger 
failed to turn up fora morning 
series of lectures by Indian 
defence experts about their 
perception of a threat from 
American support of Pakistan. 

Mr Weinberger, who fell ill 


He said before he left that 
relations between the US and 
India were going to be even 
better and that, “I thought it 
was a wonderful visit in every 
way.” 

He said that the US was 


going to pursue his offer of co- 
product! 


Millions 
wasted in 
Germany 


From John England 
Boon 


don of defence equip- 
ment, saying that he had seen 
“very good examples of how 
Indian manufacturers can do, 
down in Bangalore”, where he 
visited India’s aircraft and 
radar manufacturing plants. 
“We'll pursue that and I hope 
it can start working very 
soon.” 


on Monday night with one of 


India's vengeful anti-tourist 
infections, sem his deputy, Mr 
Richard Armitage, the Assis- 
tant Secretary in charge of 
international security affairs, 
to listen to the lectures, and to 
a meeting with Mr K R 
Narayanan, Minister of State 
at tbe^ordgn Ministry. 

Mr^'^Wemberger, looking 
decidedly peaky, arrived at 
Palam airport for his depar- 
ture to Pakistan more than 40 
minutes early, and lacked 
himself away in his official 
Boeing without any ceremony. 
He returned to the departure 
building briefly to say goodbye 
to the Indian service chiefs 
and senior civil servants. 


Mr Arun Singh, the Min- 
ister of State for Defence, said 
later that two things had been 
achieved. “One is a consid- 
erable increase in understand- 
ing of each other’s positions, 
perceptions, beliefs and hopes 
— a considerable degree of 
mutual respect,” he said. “We 
have identified some of the 
problems that may have be- 
come involved consequent 
upon the implementation of 
the memorandum of under- 
standing (signed last year be- 
tween India and the US on 
technology transfer). We have 
also suggested additional areas 
for collaboration in high tech- 
nology. On the whole we are 
very satisfied.” 


Iran says 1,000 killed 


Tehran (Reuter) — Iran said 
its fo 


yesterday its forces bad 
launched a two-pronged at- 
tack on Iraqi postions m the 
central Gulf war front, captur- 
ing a height and killing or 
wounding 1,000 Iraqis. 

The national news agency 
said that the commando bri- 
gade of Iraq's 21st Division 
was “totally smashed” in the 
attack on Monday night near 
the Iranian border town of 


Qasr-e Shinn, 1 10 miles 
north-east of Baghdad. 

The area is 100 miles south- 
east of Iraq's main northern 

011 centre at Kirkuk, which 
Iran said its forces had badly 
damaged on Saturday. 

• BAGHDAD: Iraq said that 

12 civilians were killed and 
many were injured in Iranian 
shelling of its southern port 
city of Basra on Monday night 
and early yesterday. 


West German ministries 
have wasted milli ons of 
taxpayers’ Deutschmarks, the 
Bundesrechn ungsbof, Ger- 
many’s public accounts com- 
mittee. reported yesterday. 

As examples, it said that the 
Defence Ministry ordered too 
many lorry cabins and 60 per 
cent of them, worth Dm 1 10 
million (£38.8 million), rusted 
in Array depots. 

The Posts Ministry printed 
too many special-issue stamps 
and had to destroy 50 million 
because of a lack of buyers. 
The stamps cost Dm 1 million. 



Accord elusive 


EEC farm policy 
threatened by 
nassive surpluses 


From Richard Owen, Luxembourg 
EEC Commission officials away with inter^regionricom- 
yesterday warned agriculture pmsaxmtor losses due tty 
infafcwre ihat their continui ng (tairyquOBa.^ 

SiSSres 0 West German ftatt Minuter,' 

„ forolurpluKs rcjeciri Mr Aodnesm'juju. 

SS^toaSninTme Snire nwnt tanaf »cani« 


basis of the Common .Agri- 
culture Policy (CAP). 

The warning came as a 
meeting of fenn ministers, 
chaired by Mr Michael 


could no longer be guaranteed. 
Bonn could not accept my 
drop in form prices- by nowa 
traditional Gentian stand- 
which last year blocked agree* 


Jopling, the Minister of* Ago- ntent on cereals. 

cuhure and current president Bniam tod noioppo* foe 
of the Farm Council, ended dany plan, but offittrilo the 
without agreement on the Commissions demand for 


Commissibh's package of 
emergency measures in ine 
dairy sector. 

It also came hard on the 
beds of a prediction by Mr 


more powers to implement it. 

Mr John Schvyn Cummer, 
Minister of State at the Min-, 
istry of Agriculture, said that ; 
failure to solve the dairy 


Nigel Lawson. Chancellor of problem was throwing doubt 
the Exchequer and current on EEC farm policy as a 


president of the Finance 
Council, that the spiralling 
cost of farm surpluses would 
blow. a gaping hole in the 
arduously-negotiated EEC 
budget for next year. 

The CAP is a system of 


whole. 

The Commission said that 
the cost of storing surpluses, 
estimated at £1 million a day; . 
now exceeded the value of the . 
stored products and that even, 
huge exports of cut-price but- . 


IHC vru u — cr — r- . — j « — 

complex subsidies designed to ter to Russia and sate of 
support farm incomes and cheap butter to the needy m 


Mr George Bush, the US vice-president, watched 
Thompson, aged 5, at the Golambos 


bis wife; Barbara, hoists aloft Rafael 
parade in Chicago. 


prices “We are all too familiar 
with the problem of food 
mountains.” one official said 
wearily, “but the surpluses 


the EEC were having little-, 
impact, partly because dany 
quotas were no longer working ; 
well and partly because Euro- 


Carlsson may intervene 
to end Swedish dispute 


From Christopher Mosey, Stockholm 


As munidpa] and state 
employees increased indus- 
trial action to disrupt life in 
Sweden yesterday, there were 
indications that the Govern- 
ment may step in. 

Mr Ingyar Carlsson, the 
Prime Minister, said that he 
would negotiate with the 
unions about the right of 
public servants to strike after 
the dispute is over, bat said 
also that there was no question 
yet of the Government using 
emejgency legislation to end 


the industrial action. 

It was as dose as Mr 
Carlsson and his Social 
Democratic Party can come to 
issuing an uftrmaium. 

Afterwards the unions sus- 
pended the work to rule and 
overtime ban that has caused 
disruptions and cancellations 
of the Stockholm under- 
ground, trains, buses and 
trams, but also announced a 
strike on Monday which will 
leave 24,000 children without 
day care centre supervision. 


Seven back from wilderness 


From Stephen Taylor, Sydney 


A group of Aborigines tiring 
in toe desert in Western 
Australia, and believed to have 
been isolated from toe OHtside 
world for about 20 years, has 
been found in toe Oatoack. 

The four men, two women 
and a child, were naked and 
had been Ihug in traditional 
Ab ori g in al style without ap- 
parently having come into 
contact even with fidlow mem- 
ben oftbe Wankatja tribe who 
found them a week ago. 

Reports about the aomads 
are st3I filtering bad from a 
remote out-station to which 
they were persuaded to go by 
those who found them. Gov- 
ernment Aboriginal Affairs 
officials and a medical team 
are on their way to toe area. 

An official said in Perth 
yesterday that it appeared that 
the eldest of the group, a man 
aged about 70, had been 
uncomfortable about joining 
even so r udimen tary a settle- 
ment as an out-statioo, which 
usually consists of a borehole 
and a few huts. 

He is reported to have 


speared one of the women, 
believed to be his daughter, in 
toe leg, cast off toe clothes he 
had been given, and returned 
to toe desert No explanation 
is offered for toe attack on toe 
woman, who is believed fo be 
his daughter. 

Five of toe group, led by toe 
old man, are said to have 
broken away from the Wank- 
atjas, a community of about 
300 people living at Coonana, 
roughly 80 miles east of 
Kalgooriie. some 20 years ago. 

During their roaming In the 
wilderness there were two 
births, a yoimg man now aged 
about 19, and a boy of five, 
neither of whom has seen a 
motor vehicle or a white 
person. 

The nomads have been fir- 
ing in one of toe world's 
harshest environments, toe 
West Australian desert, with 
only irregular access to water 
and dependent for survival on 
killing kangaroos, rabbits and 
other wild creatures. 

An to r u potogsts believe that 


in the vastness of the Outback 
there are probably still Ab- 
origmai communities which 
have had no contact with the 
white settlement of Australia. 
Though it started almost 260 
years ago, it is largely confined 
to toe coastline. 


In September 1984 one such 
group, consisting of nine peo- 
ple, emerged from Central 
Australia, haring lived en- 
tirely in the never-never regjoa 
where the boundaries of West- 
ern Australia, South Australia 
and toe Northern Territory 
meet These people are under- 
stood to have since settled on 
an out-station. 


The most Immediate con- 
cern for the newly-emerged 
group is health. The medical 
team on its way to Kunana will 
be examining them to see 
whether in the contacts they 
have had over the past week 
they may have been exposed to 
viruses which, though com- 
monplace to urban man, could 
cause them serious illness, 
even death. 


Rockets hit 
offices 
in Tokyo 


really are gening out of pean form technology was 

i i* imnmuiM nil fhf 


control. 

A Commission spokesman 
said that every tonne of butler 
produced in the EEC was 


improving all the time. 

Britain. Denmark and The 
Netherlands called for further 
cuts in dairy quotas, but West 


going straight into interven- Germany and Ireland said 
fion - the EEC term for sur- that this was unacceptable 

lied by finan- 


from David Watts 
Tokyo 

Six crude rockets were fired 
at the Japanese Parliament 
and in the direction of the 
Prime Minister’s official res- 
idence last night. 

No serious damag e was 
done, but one rocket hit the 
building in front of the official 
residence of Mr Yasuhiro 
Nakasone. the Prime Min- 
ister. Another hit the pave- 
ment outside the Ministry of 
Foreign Affairs. 

A salvo of three rockets was 
fired from the boot of a stolen 
car outside the Tokyo District 
Prosecutor’s office and the 
others were fired from the 
boot of another car near one of 
Tokyo's most famous shrines 
m the Nagato-cho district, 
where many olitirians and 
political parties have their 
offices. The car exploded and 
caught fire. 

The rockets, made from say 
cans mounted on wooden 
rods, were similar to those 
fixed at the Emperor's palace 
and the American Embassy 
last March. Police believe that 
were the work of the radical 
left-wing Chukaku group. 

Their most recent attack 
came during the economic 
summit meeting in the spring. 

The latest raid may be a 
response to the weekend arrest 
of seven Chukaku members at 
a house in I wale prefecture in 
the north-east corner of Hon- 
shu, the main Japanese island. 

The group has used rockets 
to pro lest further expansion of 
the Narita international air- 
port and has been active in the 
campaign against the privati- 
zation of the Japanese Na- 
tional Railways. 


plus stocks — and the butter unless accompanied . 
mountain was fast approach- decompensation for 
ing 1.5 million tonnes. 

The farm ministers had 


ministers 
been told bluntly by Mr 
Lawson that CAP support 
mechanisms had to reflect 
market forces and that the 
intervention system was sup- 
posed to be a safety net 
Officials said that because 
of the cost of storing surpluses 


The Commission proposed 
a doubling of "social butter” 
subsidies, but Britain, Spun 
and The Netherlands com- 
plained that the Commission 
had provided only vague fig- 
ures plucked from the air ana 
had not proved that cheap 
butter for those on social 
security was economically 


- including 750.000 tonnes of effective and did not undercut 
beef and more than 15 million commercial butter sate. 


tonnes of cereals, as well as the 
butter and milk surpluses - 
the 1987 budget could be 
exceeded by up to £2 billion. 

Mr Lawson's warning was 
fully backed by Mr Frans 
Andriessen, the Agriculture 
Commissioner, but although 
farm ministers agreed on the 
need for urgent action, they 
found no common ground on 
details of a dairy action plan 
which would have abolished 
intervention purchases of 


On the question of sheep 
meat, Mr Gummer said that 
Britain could not accept 
French demands for an in- 
crease in aid to French sbeep 
formers because the interests 
of British sheep formers had to 
be protected. 

But Mr Gummer said that 
he was pleased M Francois 
Guillaume, the French Farm 
Minister, had accepted that 
France should pay compensa- 
tion for British sheep carcases 


III iv> V«*ABSM*r8N ^IMVIUkAnl VI UVU l\N IMUUU |U1VW|/ «1UIV MJ V«* , 

milk powder during the win- destroyed by angry French 
ter, set a strict tbreshhold on formers in Lyons this week ' 
butter purchases and done and Poitiers last week. 


Patten demands reform 
of food aid methods 


By Richard Evans, Political Correspondent 


Urgent reform rtf toe way 
toe European Community pro- 
vides food aid to developing 
countries was demanded yes- 
terday by Mr Chris Patten, 
Minister for Overseas Dev- 
elopment 

He told a London con- 
ference that the EEC food and 
programme had been criticized 
because it suffered from un- 
duly complicated bnreancrary, 
often paid scant regard to toe 
interest of producers in 
developing countries and was 
seen as a way of getting rid of 


European food smplases. 

He told die annual UK 
assembly of the European 
Community non-governmental 
organizations he wanted to see 
reform in three areas: 

• the breaking of H ub? with "• 
the Common Agricultural PoF 2 
icy so that developing conn- - 
tries received the aid they 
needed rather than food * 
Europe wanted to get rid ofi - 

• a more thorongh evaluation 
of food aid plans; 

• speeding up toe system to 
make it more effective. 


ENTERTAINMENTS 


CONCERTS 


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T 45am LONDON MOZMH 
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THEATRES 


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ME .AND MY GIRL 

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Stm * *J0 

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OOLD- 

C UmiH LAST WEp* - SUDS 
SUHDAY1 


ALDWTCH 01.836 6404/0641 

rr 01 5F* 6935. 379 6433. 741 

mw 1 no Nmi frn Flm Cat! 94 nr 
IT ZOO 7300 ■ 

UNA STUBBS 


JAMES WARWICK 
THE SECRET LIFE OF 

CARTOONS 


By Onr Barker 
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Em 7 50 Mai Wrd 9JO 

Sal 3 3 B.JO 

OPENS rOMONT AY 7pm 


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days' 940 7900 ibkq («*). oe 
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LES LIAISONS 

DANGEREUSES 

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—MAGNIFICENT— D.NUI1 

TM NOT RAPPAPORT 

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TONY AWARD BEST PLAY 

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NOW BOOKING NOV TO JAN 


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STARLIGHT EXPRESS 

“A MUSICAL THAT SURPASSES 
ANYTH MC AROUND M EVERY 
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STARLIGHT EXPRESS 

MUSk- by 

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Lynrs by RICHARD STOjGOC 
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farre by F>yd*au MISALLI- 
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387 4624 rr 380 1483. Lnul 
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Tim*, 


TAYLOR 

THE MAINTENANCE 
MAN 

A Owntuy by Ric hard Hante 

A MARITAL M AS TE RPIE CE 

—WONDERFULLY FUNNY” 

N of Btr W 

“TH* aookmst u rapturara 
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ORIRMON S 430 3916 CC 579 

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SAM COR 

RUN FOR YOUR WIFE 

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Soy OffH-ti CCOi 8368108 01- 

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\oi*d 

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STANDARD DRAMA AWARDS 

Noted 

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%«rd 

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PLAYS I PLAY ERS 
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AWARD 

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HU comedy by Rietiard Harm 
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LEND ME A TENOR 

-FILLS TIE THEATRE WITH 
THE SOUND OF LAUGHTER~ 
An American Comedy by 

Ken Ludwip 

Direrted tty David CHmore 


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18 


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ANDREW LLOYD WEBBER'S 

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OPERA 

sum IN 

MICHAEL CRAWFORD 

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Hnotirman Barton 

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in 


The National Theatre's acclaimed 
production of 

ALAN AYCKROUinrS 

A CHORUS OF 
_ DISAPPROVAL 

“ H e a rtt r ea imuty funny- Gdn 
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ULUAN 

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THE BUSINESS OF 

^murder 
6TH THRILUNG YEAR 


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KAFKA'S 

METAMORPHOSIS 

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Preview 19 Nov. Opens 20 Nov 

THE WOMEN 

by Clare Boothe Luce 


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DIANA R1GG 


A new piav 

WILDFIRE 


Preview, from 11 Nm 

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"ArlaMb Funny- S Exp 
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THE TIMES WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 15 1986 


II 


THE ARTS 



Big Mac 
politics 


MP Simon Kerslake writ»eA 
totw ofapoJogy to histamble 
opponent, Raymond GeuHL *1 

wh?i^ respect ■ wi «h the 
whole house now bolds yon,” 

he says, alluding to Gookfts 

r^irssakS 

m t M 1 ^ naU ’ s, ' fth ' 
Well-stocked with paper 
hankies for the same sequence 
jn Granada's epic adaptation, 
however, 1 found myself adoot- 
th ® sedentary position of 
™* cart, who are to be found 
slumped in expensive res- 
taurants, dubs and the House 

of Commons. 

To enjoy an Archer novel it 
K essential to Camber between 
his lines. On screen, there is 
™» such escape. Nor does the 
s 5 reen VCT sion convey any of 
the excitement of a political 
campaign. “We were really 
caught offguard this tune," 
says the outgoing Prime Mm- 
ister, alerting ns to the fact 


| TELEVISION | 


that a General Election has 
taken place. 

Lanced of such excitement. 
First Among Equals is reduced 
to the level of bored wives 
going green at excuses tike: 
“I'm sorry about tonight, it’s 
the Select Committee first 
thing." Arriving at West- 
minster, their menfolk are 
invariably greeted with news 
that that their job description 
has changed. “And give up 
Environment?" squeaked 
Charles Seymour, when or- 
dered to become a Whip. 
“What is Environment?" 
asked his brittle Sloane of a 
wife, typing out her biography 
of Lady Jane Grey with one 
finger. 

It was ati moderately well- 
acted. plnshly set and pro- 
fessionally directed by John 
Gome — but in terms of 
passion it generated the heat 
of a cold hamburger. 

No Place like Home 
(BBClX a tasteless sitcom 
scripted by Jon Watkins, de- 
pended for its laughs on 
couples undergoing a trial 
separation. The humour was 
on the level of “he is 
trying", “yes, he is, very". 
Occasionally, the acting 
reached this level too; 

Under &uTj(BBC2) contin- 
ued a pleasant series with a 
look at the West German 
training ship, Gordh Fock. 
There are few more beautiful 
sights than a boat with a full 
petticoat of sails and Brian 
Hawkins* film was an un- 
demanding tribute to this 
square-rigger. 

Nicholas 


Shakespeare 


Times critics report from London, Bristol and New York 

Comedy of drunken errors 



AtastaTMur 


The Hostage 

Tricycle 


M ountjoy prison did 
Brendan Behan the 
great favour of keeping 
him away from the bar 

. long enough to wriie his 

nrst two plays; on his release; having 
mastered the trick sober, be proceeded 
to practise it drunk. The Hostage, his 
third and most celebrated piece, is an 
opaque froth through which a darker 
undertow may fitfully be glimpsed. 

. The play was first written in Gaelic 
in 1957, and the following year an 
English version was produced under 
the aegis of Joan Uttlewood's Theatre 
Workshop. Remarkably, it has not 
been seen on the professional stage in 
London since Miss Uttlewood's re- 
vival of 1972. 

Nicolas Kent's boisterous new 
luction presents an idealized 
. leraia in the form of Saul 
Rad om sky's splendidly tatty set, 
where peeling wallpaper, exposed laths 
and rickety bannisters splashed with 
the National colours conjure up a low- 
rent Dublin brotheL 
However low the rent, none of the 
inmates can afford h — neither the 
working girls, nor the Anglo-Irish 
patriot Monsewer, nor even the ERA, 
whose arrival with a kidnapped Brit- 
ish soldier provides the piece with a 
title and a structure. Until then, the 
action resembles an overblown public- 
bar anecdote, with the brothers own- 



Through a glass, darkly: Eileen Pollock and Eric Richard in the revival of Brendan Behan's The Hostage 


ers camping out strategically at the 
foot of the stairs in order to waylay the 
defaulting tenants and to make token 
attempts at regulating the disorderii- 
ness of their house. 

At this remove, it is hard to judge 
the precise extent of Miss Uttlewood's 
rewriting, but it seems feir to say that 
Behan's acerbic view of Anglo-Irish 
relations would have been better 
served had a note of genuine menace 
been introduced. Terrorism may 
sometimes be seen as a ghastly sick 


joke, but even in a stage comedy its 
exponents ought to have substance. 
Here, the IRA come across as cartoon 
characters — obtuse and moralistically 
repressive — and the fate of the 
kidnapped soldier struggles to become 
the central concern. 

Instead, his brief affair with the 
convent-raised housemaid provides 
the only sane relationship on offer, 
and the latter's dosing speech, m 
which she upbraids the elder genera- 
tion for their selfish blindness, seems 


an odd conclusion to what has gone 
before. 

Eric Richard and Eileen Pollock 
make a decent fist of the presiding 
couple. P.G. Stephens is excellent as 
the bagpipe-playing Monsewer, and 
there is an engaging debut from 
Catherine Cusack as the not-so- 
innocent maid. Heather Tobias up- 
stages them all as the pious hussy Miss 
Gilchrist. 


Martin Cropper 


Dissident irony 


Largo Desolato 
Theatre Royal 
Bristol 


Fun from the fringe 


When I visited Vaclav Havel 
in 1969, he was being interro- 
gated by the Czech security 
police for up to seven hours a 
day (or night). It got in the way 
of his work. Since then he has 
been in and out of prison, 
thrust into mind-killing jobs, 
and generally harassed. And it 
has taken its toll. 

The occasional pieces that 
have been smuggled to the 
West are not what you would 
have predicted from the bril- 
liant young author of The 
Garden . Parly and The 
Memorandum. 

In. place of those lethally 
funny dissections of Czech 
bureaucracy, the later plays 
focus on the lonely figure of a 
victimized artist beset by petty 
officials and conformist 
acquaintancesXor^o Desolato 
is another exercise in this 
vein; but, in Tom Stoppard's 
version, it emerges as a 
wonderfully comic and unself- 
pitying piece of work: a nota- 


ROCK 


Curtis Mayfield 

Piccadilly Theatre 

Despite his lowered profile —a 
reduced touring schedule and 
only one album in the past 
four years — Curtis Mayfield 
attracts a sizeable audience of 
devout followers and glad- 
handing industry types alike. 
Both groups remember him 
with affection as the Chicago- 
born leader of The Im- 
pressions. one of the few 
r & b/soul acts to challenge 
the Sixties hegemony of the 
Stax and Motown labels, and 
later as the solo star who 
contributed to the radicalizing 
of soul music 

What the noisy contingent 
gathered round the back bar 
failed to take on board was 
that a performer of Mayfield's 
restrained and subtle grace 
needs rather quieter attention 
than that accorded to most 
rock acts: this performance, 
together with recent gigs by 
Ted Hawkins and Harvey and 
the Wallbangers, convinced 


me that many people have 
forgotten how to behave when 
faced with music played at a 
volume lower than that oft 
Frankie Goes To Hollywood. 

In his leather trousers and 
suede boots, with a few days of] 
silver growth on his chin, 
Mayfield looked like an old 
blues player, a contrast to the 
shimmering plaintive falsetto 
in which he sang a ' near- 
medley of Impressions' hits: 
“It’s Alright", a snatch of| 
“Amen" followed swiftly by f 
"I'm So Proud”. 

Backed by a sharp four piece, 
band his light, choppy guitar 
chord progressions brushed 
neatly against the musical 
fabric of the ballad “People 
Get Ready” and he even 
breathed life into the old 
Carpenters' dirge “We’ve 
Only Just Begun”. 

The best section came from 
the Superfly era. "Freddie's 
Dead” set off with a tarn funk 
riff, easily mean enough for 
the streets of 1986, and the 
ghostly instnunently textures 
of “Fra Your Pusherman” 
painted a gripping scenario 
more relevant — given today's 
expanding drug market — than 
it was in 1972. 

David Sinclair! 


ble instance of how adversity 
can sharpen the power of 
irony. 

The hero, Leopold — a 
dissident writer as usual — has 
been under surveillance for so 
long that he can think of 
nothing but the next knock on 
the door. He does not wait in 
vain. The irony is that most of 
his visitors are well-wishers. 

His mistress and assorted 
friends pop in to remind him 
of how much they expect of 
him, and express doubts as to 
whether he is quite the man he 
used to be. All they do is waste 
more of his time and intensify 
his writer's block. They are the 
real interrogators. When the 
security men do arrive, with a 
proposal to get him off the 
book, it is almost a relief 

What Have! is writing about 
is the readiness with which 
society urges some isolated 
champion to fight its battles. 
And the brilliance of the piece 
is that it extends beyond its 
own country to the civil rights 
public at large. 

Claude Whatham's produc- 
tion catches the precise at- 
mosphere of hallucinatory 
realism that Havel shares with 
Kafka. It is a visible extension 
of John MdEnery’s definitive 
Leopold, a twitchy, woe- 
begone wraith, forever haunt- 
ing the spy-hole and retreating 
to a couch with a blanket 
drawn up to his neck; al- 
together a brokenly unheroic 
figure. Of course, in the end he 
sull says no. 

Excellent supporting perfor- 
mances come from the 
schoolmasterly Barrie 
Cookson and the carnivorous 
Meg Davies. 

Irving Wardle 


The American musical may be 
gasping for breath on Broad- 
way, but Off Broadway it is 
retishing fresh air. The erst- 
while setting for the experi- 
mental is ironically home right 
sow to the comfortably 
commercial. 

Economics have cast such a 
pall over birth audiences and 
producers of Broadway musi- 
cals that they have all tot 
forgotten the tight-hearted joy 
of just having a good time 
(though Me and My Girl is a 
reminder). Olympus on My 
Mind (Lamb's Theatre) might 
once have enjoyed a Broadway 
ran, being a modest relation of 
A Fanny Thiasg Happened on 
the Way to die Forum and The 
Boys Grom Syracuse. • 

As Cole Porter did, Ind 
somewhat more seriously, hi 
Out of This World, Author- 
lyricist Barry Har man mid , 
composer Grant Stariale have 
taken the Amphitryon story 
and set it to mask — music 
which lingers not but is pleas- 
ant in the passing. Instead of 
Ptantas or Motiexe, they rite 
as their inspiration Hemrich 
Von Heist; whose Am- 
phitryon has been called the 
most heartfelt and humane of 
the trea tm e nts . So it seems in 
this verson, while being 
s hnnHane onsly a sendnp ®f 
several musical comedy 
traditions. 

The tpjp»-dad chorus has no 
soooerjintroduced itself as 
Tom, Dick and Horace when 
Delores (Rusty Riegetman) 
stumbles out She is the 
quintessential dumb chorine 
who explains that she got on- 
stage because her husband, 
Murray the Furrier, haded 
the show. 

There is also a ripe peach of 
an Aknnene by Emily Zacha- 


ries and a first-rate doubting 
of Jupiter— d la Bob Newhart 
alternately cocky and crest- 
fallen — and of Amphitryon — 
as a confused straight-man — 
by Mark Zimmerman. He is 
an understudy, which testifies 
to the quality of the 
production.. 

Lady Day at Emerson's Bar 
and Grill (Westside Arts The- 
atre) also recalls ancient 
drama — in this case tragedy. 
A few months before her 
rtgafb, jazz singer Billie 
Holliday is playing a seedy 
Philadelphia dak Explaining 
that “I gotta sing the way I 



Lady Day: Lonette McKee 

fed. I gotta sort of roam 
around and let a song fill me," 
she tells and sings of her life. 

Accompanied by a three- 
piece jazz band in IS numbers 
including “God Bless the 
Child", "Strange Fntit", 
“Them There Eyes”, and 
“T* Ain't Nobody's Biz-ness If 
I Do", Lonette McKee, as 
Billie, sings as if her voice 
were alternating woodwind in- 
struments, with an occasional 
glint of brass. She isn't haunt- 
ing tike the legend she plays. 


ami she is too yonng and much 
too beautiful to convey Billie 
Holliday in decline, but the 
substitute she makes is orig- 
inal and riveting. 

Beehive (The Village Gate) 
refers to the teased-up, puffed- 
out hairdos favoured in the 
Sixties — die era this show 
salutes. Created and directed 
by Larry Gallagher, with six 
volatik female vocalists, a six- 
piece band, am) an array of 
reminiscently hideous cos- 
tumes by David DiUe, Beehive 
zips the audience through the 
popular tones of the decade. 

The way that mask and 
performance changed to re- 
flect increasing political tur- 
moil is smxxMctiy described 
and forcefully illustrated by 
songs ran g in g from “I Hear. A 
Symphony" and “Where the 
Boys Are” to "Society's 
Child.” “Do Right Woman”, 
and “Ball and Chain". 

I hong right in there until 
they got past the Beauties. 
Then my eardnnns must have 
shot down, for voices which 
sound Qke car crashes freeze 
my tapping toes. Not so the 
largely Yuppie audience, 
which screamed right back. 

Thank goodness the 
screeches were only occasional 
in Angry Housewives (Minetta 
Lane Theatre), which played 
at die Lyric Hammersmith 
last spring. This bit of non- 
sense about displaced home- 
makers forming a punk rock 
band has a 

collegiate/coinmiinHy theatre 
quality made bearable here by 
an engaging cast and polished 
production staged by Wayne 
Cilento ana Mitchell 
Maxwell. 


Holly Hill 


A conductor at war 
with his work 


[ 


CONCERTS 


] 


Philharmonia / 
Sinopoli 

Royal Festival Hall 


If not a better concert than 
Sinopoli's on Saturday night, 
this was certainly a more 
interesting occasion, if only 
because his vision of Elgar's 
First Symphony was so end- 
lessly weird. 

Of course, one had to accept 
the complete absence of the 
long tine. Sinopoli made plain 

that condition-at -the- outset, 
dividing- the mono melody 

into several wilting phrases. 

The change from this ten- 
tative opening to the loud, 
brassy immediate reprise was 
just the first indication of this 
conductor's liking for the 
boldest possible contrast. The 
stage was set for a war between 
conducting will and almost 
everything one has hitherto 
considered Elgarian. 

Determinedly anti-tra- 
ditional performances can be 
salutary and. in little bits, this 
one was: there were sudden 
turns that were expertly 
spring-cleaned, like the swish 
of woodwind near the start of 
the finale. 

But much else suggested 
rather a failure of understand- 
ing. or else a failure to 
communicate the basics. 


Nothing is gained from the 
muddled textures that were* 
heard in the more complex, 
parts of the first movement* 
and again at the start of the 
scherzo, which was not so very . 
fast that articulation could not . 
have been an awful lot more 
precise than it was. 

Nor is there much to be said 
for a view that finds scattered, 
even tattered fragments 1 
opposing one another crudely 
in the sections of deepest 
turmoil Potential disintegra- 1 
lion is a lot more telling titan 
real incoherence. 

Once again, the essential; 
problem would seem to be' 
Sinopoli’s tastes for strong, 
beat and flexible tempo at the; 
expense of metrical frame. ! 

The alternative explanation; 
— which,! can hardly believe — 
would be that one has to grow 1 
up singing, "Half a pound of 
tuppenny rice", in order to be.* 
able to phrase Elgar's dotted; 
rhythms. 

The first half of the concen i 
included a noisy Master - ' 
singers overture and a perfor-' 
manec of Haydn's D major 
cello concerto featuring the 
Philharmonics principal An- 
drew Shu I man. 

He seemed a reluctant solo- 
ist. suggesting the shyness and 
dark tonal severity of a deep- 
ened viola, but his lack of 
exhibitionism was nice in 
some of the trickery. 

Paul Griffiths 


Bringing Weber back 
to the future 


The Age of 
Enlightenment/ 
Norrington 
QEH 


Weber is usually regarded 
retrospectively — as the 
visionary pioneer of German 
music-drama, the precursor of 
Wagner, the musician whose 
own colourful life story seems 
the very stuff of later Ro- 
mantic opera plots. 

None of this is incorrect; he 
did indeed start something 
bigger than he knew. But the 
one-sided viewpoint in- 
evitably diminishes his 
achievement; it makes his 
music seem unsatisfying’ or 
incomplete in itself 
The outstanding aspect of 
this spirited concert (one of 
too few British * events 
celebrating Weber's bi- 
centenary) - was that using 
period instruments firmly 
fixed Weber in his own age, 
not as forerunner of the future. 

In this context his progres- 
sive forays sounded even 
more astonishing. What a 
contrast, for instance, between 
the youthful Symphony No 2 

— which, for all hs quirky, 
asymmetric phrases, rests on a 
conventional base of sub- 
Haydnesque classicism — and 
the moody passions of the new 
world revealed in the Oberon 
and FreischQtz overtures. 

The Age of Enlightenment 

- the recently formed orig- 
inal-instrument orchestra, 
playing here under Roger 
Norrington's imaginative 
direction — offered many 
revelations. 

To cite just one striking 
example: Weber's generous 


melodic writing for horns is- 
usually delivered on modern - 
instruments in a creamy- 
legato. 

On the natural horn, how-> 
ever, the necessity of, 
"stopping" some notes gives it 
a more primitive, rather jag- 
ged quality. Weber obviously ; 
look this into account, for the* • 
stopped notes usually coincide - 
with stresses in the tunes. 

Major problems still remain -/ 
for “original instrumentalists" 1 
playing 19th-century rep-* 
ertoire. Balances must con-' 
stantiy be rethought — what 
happened to the flute tunes in - 
the symphony? — tuning is an 
intractable problem, and the- 
calculation of string vibrato is - 1 
a contentious matter. 

Not everything was perfect • 
here, but the exhilarating;* 
sense of adventure was*, 
infectious. • 

Three fine soloists en- 
hanced the evening. Antony' 
Play did not always get his* 
clarinet speaking with an even 
incisiveness in the Concerto 
No 1, but his timbre had 
splendid body and his 
embellishments were fon. 

Even more fun was Melvyn.. 
Tan's fortepiano playing in^ 
the F minor KonzertstUck. 
Here was an ideally flam boy-.', 
ant exponent: equal to the; 
virtuoso flourishes, yet coax-:* 
ing some surprisingly tender 
tone. 

And two majestic comribu-' 
lions came from the soprano ; 
Elizabeth Connell in glorious I 
voice for the great leaps and , 
swoops of “Ocean! thou- 
mighty monster” (Oberon), 
then revealing a delicious*' 
sotto voce in "Leise, Leise” ! 
from Der Freischiuz. \ 

Richard Morrison \ 


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DANCE 


Royal Ballet 

Covent Garden 

Whereas Jerome Robbins’s 
privileges as a guest choreog- 
rapher have resulted in his two 
ballets at Covenl Garden be-* 
mg given with a single cast, the 
works bv house choreog- 
raphers are subject to chang- 
ing distribution. Practical 
considerations dictate this - 
to cover emergencies and five 
more people roles — but zt vs 
not always artistically 
desirable. 

Ashton's La l ake, being a 
big ensemble work, has not 
suffered from having different 
soloists. Indeed, Monday 
night's trio of women (Diedre 
Evden. Tracy Brown and 
Sharon McGorian) was the 
best so for in poise and atiack. 

The ballet’s group effects 
really need a raked stage to be 
seen properly, snd 3 bi£!8Cr 
one to avoid cramping, but the 
company responded well to a 
treater use of rubato in Isaiah 
Jackson's conducting. 


Because David Bimley's 
Galarueries consists mainly of j 
solos, duets or trios, every 
dancer is crucial and an 
almost complete change of] 
soloists weakened the effect 
considerably. The best of the ; 
replacements were Phillip | 
Broomhead in the first duet 
and Ravenna Tucker in the 
first solo, but even these were 
less suited than the dancers 
the ballet was created for. 

The music comprises 
Mozart's Divertimento K205 
and Serenade K 101 - shuffled 
together, but making a smooth 
progression. Bintley has 
matched it with a fluent, apt 
arrangement of academic 
steps, sometimes with an in- 
dividual twisty as in the flur- 
ried lifts of the first trio. 

Bintley has let the music 
guide him into sequences for .| 
the featured dancers that are 
gracious, playful and gallanL 
Only the opening ensemble, 
with four women joining the 
eight soloists- looks con- 
ventional busy and too 
symmetrical; the ballet might 
be improved by reworking for 
a smaller cast, perhaps using 
the first movement only as an 
overture. 

John Perciva] 




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1 

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CAVALIER 




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THE TIMES WEDNESDAY OCTOBER i5 1986 


SPECTRUM 


s End of the 


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Old Boy 


network 


The City gravy train is nearing the end of its 
line. Markets are being thrown open, the 
— — Japanese are poised 
to pounce, and the 
new watchdogs are 
already growling. 
Bryan Appleyard, in 
his final report, looks 
at the battles ahead 


» 

» 





vr'Fi: 



LIFE OF THE VVHgELER^OEALERS 


Part 3: The threat of foreign giants 


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M ichael Hawkes, 
chairman of 
Kleinwort Benson, 
is not your average 
Big Banger- Indeed 
he seems wearied by the whole 
thing. Apart from anything else, he 
luiows that in the short term at 
least the Bang is bad news for 
profits. 

Everybody is piling money and 
personnel imo.the_London market 
but there is nothing like the level 
of business to support them. 
Something {.ike .90 per cent of all 
gilts business, for example, used to 
be handled by two jobbers. After 
October 27. there will be no less 
than 27 market makers in gilts. 

The reason is that gilts represent 
by far the biggest and tastiest 
morsel on the London Stock 
Exchange and everybody wants to 
be in there. The first problem was 
that there were far too few 
experienced' gilts dealers to staff 
the new market makersr And - in- 
this market, that is doubly im- 
portant. Short of burning £50 
notes to heat the office, there are 
few more efficient ways of losing 
money than getting your gilts 
setdemen is wrong at the end of the 
day. The millions can simply 
evaporate. 

So the gilts men suddenly found 
themselves having cash thrust into 
their hands and Porsches thrust 
into their garages. But nobody 
thinks it can last — most estimates 
suggest that only eight gilts market 
makers will survive the first Big 
Bang shakeout. 

That same shakeout may well 
also eliminate some of the smaller, 
unspecialized investment groups. 
If they fail to find a niche among 
the operations of the big dealing 
rooms, they will go to the wall. 

“Oh God. I hope they da” 
murmured Hawkes. “It’s the only 
nay everybody else will get back 
into profits." 

That should leave the six British 
top rankers plus a range of 
specialized operations. Plus, of 
course, the foreigners. From this 
point it looks clear that the 
Americans Merrill Lynch. 
Goldman Sachs. Salomon Broth- 
ers and Citicorp will continue to 
fight for London business. But. in 


addition, the Japanese have yet to 
make their move. 

This could prove critical for the 
future shape of the Gty. Nomura, 
the biggest of the big four Japanese 
investment houses, dwarfs even 
the Americans. It made £1 billion 
profit in 1985 and has a market 
capitalization of £20 billion. Its 
foundation lies in the investment 
collection boxes in millions of 
Japanese homes which Nomura, 
girls empty regularly and invest in. 
the chosen stocks of the month. 

But so far Nomura has played a 
quiet game. It has registered as a 
bank in London and become a 
member of the Stock Exchange, 
but it has not acquired any 
London dealers. The theory is that 
the Japanese are perfectly happy 
to take a very long view indeed 
and they may be waiting for the 
first or even the second Big Bang 
shakeout before they move into 
the market in a big way. 

" Even sa they may not be as 
fearful as their immense financial 
muscle suggests. Their market 
experience at home is of a highly- 
controlled environment with little 
demand for investment instinct or 
even analysis. 

British bond dealers taken on ty 
one Japanese house in London 
were startled to be given a list of 
names and telephone numbers 
and told to get on the phone and 
sell them Yen Bonds. One baffled 
recipient of one of these calls 
turned out to be a scrap dealer in 
Barking and all the others were 
equally unlikely purchasers. The 
Japanese bosses seemed to have- 
simply been flicking through the 
Yellow Pages. On die other hand, 
of course, we used to laugh at 
Japanese technology. 

In the medium term the threat 
of the foreign giants is serious for 
the British houses. In the case of 
those companies backed by a 




The Big Bang means the end of the 
oM C§y style. The 
career pattern meant that ymmg 
men joined the right firms and 
worked their way slowly upward to 
emerge in their fifties as partners 
with access to spectacular rewards. 

Throughout this process they 
were expected to wear the ngbt 
clothes. Use in appropriate houses 
and* frequently, marry the right 
wife. The young men could come 
either from Che upper classes or, 
just as frequently, they came :i 
from the East End. The Gty ™s 
traditionally adopted bright East 
TRW boys, dressed them In the 
right clothes turned them into 
dealers. They were qakk-tfamking 
and had traders' instincts. 

With the growth of the 
Euromarkets these “Barrow 
Boys” tended to more away from 
the Stock Exchange which became 
more the haunt of their languid 
“Hooray Henry” colleagues. And 
now they have been joined by the 
slicker, outward-looking, inter- 
miriwul middle-class kids who 
expect to make their fortnne by the 
age of 35. The Heurys are on the 
pin. 

For the new wbeeler-dealeis the 
idea of a tong-term career has 
largely gone. They work from 7*n 
the morning, dealing between To- 


kyo dose ana xora opera®. 
Unlike the last generation they do 
net live in the suburbs- they can't 
afford the trareBm* time. They 
lire in Chelsea and Beferaria, 
bnsih fuelling the central Loufea 
propertv boom. They drive BMW* 
or Porsches — without etttption. 

They are reckoned I t'faniMtift' 
10 years - usetlly jbepwei® Jktt/ 
ages of 25 and 35 — fiy which Nirk 
thev should have a wt^tefiH 
for the rest of thdr N wfcBvtfe^ 
City has hroaghtjhi the 


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Dealing In shares costs money. In 
the pre-Big Bang market all 
stockbrokers charged clients a 
fixed commission depending on 
the size of the deal. Big trans- 
actions of £lm pins were charged 
as tittle as 0.125 per cent while 
deals of np to £7,000 cost 1.65 per 
cent. 

But after the Bang, commission 
will be negotiable. In theory this . 
should mean that competition will 
force prices down. At the top end of 
the market this will be true — the 
big investing institutions will be 
powerful enough to shop around 
and force down their costs. 

Bat the private dient is expen- 
sive to service and his dealings are 
minute compared with those of the . 
pension funds. After die American 
stock market moved over to nego- 
tiable comraissioflS private client 
dealings actually became more 
expensive. 

So, in the short term, the Big 


Bang may me bad news for the 
small man In the longer term, 
however, ft may work to hi* 
advantage,! The reason b that the 
new technology associated with 
the Bang Mil eventually offer the 
opportunity to bey and seD shares 
through ft computer terminal ta 
soar faxhl hank. The computer 
itsetfwe&d find the best (nice for 
you and several layers of ntiddk- 
men vrooM be eliminated. Costs 
would ire COL 

For Ahe expert private investor 
who finds H worthwhile to stay u> 
the market anyway the Big Bftnx 
wffl /mean foster dealing and 
access to wider markets. For the 
smnr who expects to talk at 
length to his broker before making 
a move, the Cite will he a less 
friendly place. Talking time k 
expensive, but smaller firms may , 
sfilt be able to oblige and so will 
Specialized offshoots of the Wg 


Survival of the fittest: Michael Hawkes — ‘It’s the only way everybody else will get back into profits’ 


with a competitive international 
business. 

Meanwhile, the shocks to the 
City’s system are due to continue 
long after October 27. Next year, 
all being well, the new Financial 
Services Act will come into opera- 
tion. Again this is a product of 
recent traumas in the Square 
Mile's history. 





major bank like Barclays. 
NaiWest or Midland, thev retain 


NatWest or Midland, they retain 
the advantage of a huge capital 
base. Nevertheless, along with 
everybody else, they must fight to 
retain the loyalty of British inves- 
tors. They must hang on to the 
“placing power" to sell stock in 
Britain better than the Japanese or 
the Americans and combine that 



Sir Kenneth Benin 


‘The City’s watchdog 
will clearly err on 
the side of toughness 9 


It has always been a fun- 
damental element of the City’s 
belief in itself that its operations 
are best regulated by its own 
people. By and large, given the 
specialization and complexity of 
its operations, outsiders were pre- 
pared to accept this. Short of 
actual fraud, when the police had 
to get involved, self-regulation by 
the mandarins of the old school 
seemed the best method. 

According to your point of view 
this was either naive or cynically 
self-interested. It was naive in that 
it was based on some of the old 
Gty idealism that believed that a 
gentleman's word was always his 
bond and once a man went ted he 
would never be allowed bade in 
the Square Mile. It was self- 
interested to the extent that the 
old Gty wished to preserve its 
privileges and cosy abuses without 
outsiders interfering. 

Unfortunately in the 1970s, the 
years after the property crash and 
the secondary banking crisis, 
rulebreakers were all too obvi- 
ously getting back on the City 


gravy train. Furthermore cosy 
Gty deals were beginning to look a 


City deals were banning to look a 
tittle too flagrant. 

There were, for example, the 
dawn raids in which companies 


pounced on takeover targets, 
moping up their shares at a 
premium price in the first few 
minutes of trading. It was all good 
fun but it dearly involved 
backroom deals that cut out the 
small investor and created a 
preferential pricing system. On 
top of that there were genuine, 
full-blooded scandals like the Nor- 
ton Warburg affair which, the 
authorities seemed powerless to 
controL 

W ith recreating inter- 
nationalization 
such failures began 
to look a little 
emb ar rassing. The 
Americans, for example, operate a 
ferocious system of legal controls 
through the Securities and Ex- 
change Commission while we 
simply seemed to be muddling 
through. In 1981 John Biffen 
appointed Professor Lawrence 
Gower to look into it He pro- 
duced a report that broadly backed 
the idea of self-regulation but in a 
much tougher form. 

' Now every investment firm wiH 
have to be authorized and all their 
salesmen will have to pass an 
exam set by a new body — the 
Securities ami Investments Board 
(SIB). The SIB will be the supreme 


authority over an expected 15.000 
registered firms and beneath it will 
be a series of self-regulatory 
organizations (SROs) which wifi 
run particular sectors. In addition 
there will be recognized invest-, 
ment exchanges (RIEs) — the 
market places authorized by the 
SIB. 

Sa having deregulated its mar- 
kets with the Big Bang, the Gtpis 
about to reregulatc its control 
systems. And; re some ways the 
reregulation is almost as muck of 
an unknown quantity. Because a 
large part of the largely - self 1 
regulating mechanism remains, 
much depends on the personalities 
who operate the system.: Sir 
Kenneth Berrill, chairman of the 
SIB, is clearly going to err on the 
side of toughness. “The SIB is. 
going be much more like the 
American SEC than aJot of people 
imagine,” he says. 

In effect that means that the 
new Financial Services Act will be 
the last of many nails in the coffin 
of the old City. Gone will be the 
cosy warmth of the Old Boy 
network and the discreet firing of 
deals by ancient jobbers in gloomy 
pubs. Abuses will probably con- 
tinue but they will occur in 
fractions of a second in the bowels 


i of computers and, if discovered, 
t thev will be unravelled and in- 


j vesiigated by computers 
themselves. 

Taken alongside the Big Bang’s 
drawing together of the inter- 
national and domestic markers, it 
means that in five year’s time 
almost an the ancient, English 
febricof the Gty will have gone to 
be replaced by a folly inter- 
nationalized * financial sector: 
There win be nothing much to 
distinguish the Square Mile from 
New York or Tokyo. 

Its inhabitants will be the same ' 
rich, cloned lads and their glossy 
bosses. Barbarians all, thejr wiU 
lack the ancient, cultured patina erf* 
the old stagers with their languid 
habits and appalling arrogance. 
Another bit of Old England will 
have gone, but at least in this case 
it deserved its fate. 

Yet most people believe the 
medieval boundaries will retain 
some of their mystique. London 
remains the most concentrated 
financial centre in the world and, 
tearing themselves away from 
their computers, people still like to 
have lunch or to hustle for better 
job offers in champagne bars. 


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Scooping life’s rewards 


The new foreign editor of The 
Daily Beast is not in the least 
discomfited by suggestions 
that his face is better known 
than his name to millions of 
cinema and theatre patrons. 

Ambling about the set of a 
London Weekend Television 
production of Scoop, the ami- 
able Denholm Elliott pro- 
fessed himself quite pleased to 
be considered just a vaguely 
fern i liar face in the crowd. 

“People do come up to me 
in the street and say they enjoy 
my work, without apparently 
having a dear idea who I ara.-I 
don’t regard that as an insult, 
but rather as a compliment. I 
think to be an actor you 
should be invisible, rather 
than a celebrity playing a role. 
That, to me, is the essence of 
acting." 

Elliott’s latest role, as the 
reluctant foreign editor of 
Evelyn Waugh’s satire on 


vs" 



Fleet Street, involved a minor 
disappointment. He accepted 
the part with alacrity, after 
being told it would be filmed 
partly in Morocco, his. 
favourite country: “Then I 
discovered the character 1 play* 
doesn't go to Morocco. I was 
so furious, I went there for two 
weeks’ holiday before starting 
rehearsals." 


Elliott’s relative anonymity, 
which has survived prominent 
roles in Raiders of the Loti 
Ark, Defence of the Realm and 
the currently successful A 
Room with a View ; may be 
compromised shortly through 
an unexpected rendezvous 
with Woody Allen. 

“He first called me about 
eight years ago. ’Can you do 
an American accent?’ he 
asked. So I did ‘Hickory, 
Dickory, Dock’ over the tele- 
phone. I gather he sort of fell 
over, as my American accent 
isn’t very good, and that was 
the end of thaL” 

Alton has evidently recov- 
ered from the experience, as 
be has written a part for Elliott 
in a film due to begin produc- 
tion in New York next week. 

A fiirther blow to Elliott’s 
elusive identity is in the offing 


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with a role in Empire in the 
Sun. being, filmed in China 
later this year by Steven 
Spielberg. In the meantime, 
the winner of several BAFTA 
awards who made his first 
stage appearance in 1945 is 
enjoying a second thespian 
childhood. 

“I find I lake a very relaxed 
attitude to acting. It’s some- 
thing I enjoy doing. Em doing 
it now. ax last, in the same way 
I used to do it asa kid; when I 
was eight, dressing up for 
mummy and daddy and going 
into a fantasy world ... it 
beats work any day. 

■ “I suppose there was a time 
when I wanted to play some 
vast part in the theatre, but I 
honestly don’t now. I mean. 
I’d really rather stroll along a 
beach. I wouldn’t mind doing 


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15 



THE TIMES WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 15 1986 


* 


V • ; 


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.ethoci 

.-■-if:*.! s’* 

i ..*■ •i-v 

... -I 








WEDNESDAY PAGE 





When to save a baby’s life? 



At just three months, 

Jem Paterson (left) is 
the world's youngest 


heart-lung transplant 
patient. That he is 

M . alive is just one of 

“ e higgles” of modern meriirino ftm 


how far should we so to 
as som e 

doctojs begin to fear, gone too far already? 

jn J^idcUesbrougti General Hos- 

F.^LSh U " b0Pn teby Wcks in s>de 

in< ??" s womb. Tweniy-four- 

JS ;b0 ? h “• sS. 

rerea a brain haemorr hage when 
she was five months pregnant, is as 
unaware of , hrae 

SfJ? ?l£' e i* lh ' n S else. She is now 
^ n vLt5 p L a l*ve by machine so that 

■ chance - 
ln Harefield Hospital Jane and 
Ian Paterson spend as much tiny* 

“PpSf'Ne with their three-month- 
old baby Jem, the world’s youngest 
neart-transplant patient, now 
recovering from the operation that 
was necessary to save bis life. 

In Texas, a one-year-old boy, 
known only as baby Mitchell, is 
learning to talk, unaware of the 


‘We try everything 
we can provided it is 
the parents 9 wish, 
and we are very 
honest with them 9 


controversy that surrounds him. 
He was “born” twice — the first 
time when a surgeon took him half 
way oat of his mother's womb to 
operate so that a urinary blockage 
did not kill him before he grew to 
term. 

Three different babies, three 
different stories about survival 
against the odds. But together they 
raise a question: how far should we 
go to keep a baby alive? It is a 
question that today more and more 
people — both parents and pro- 
fessionals — are being forced to ask 
themselves. 

In Victorian times having a baby 
was a gamble with fete. Even if the 
mother survived childbirth, many 
babies failed -to reach childhood. 
Only 55 years ago, in 1931; the first 
year that perinatal mortality rates 
were calculated, there was one 
death for every 16 births; now the 
rate is about one in 80 (13 per 
1,000). Rationally we know that 
babies can still die or be bom 
handicapped, but, because the 
tragedy is no longer commonplace, 
we are not prepared emotionally 
for it to happen to us. Not only do 
we expect to be able to produce our 
2.4 children without difficulty: if 


anything does go wrong we assume 
that the wonders of medical science 
will put things right 

But there is a growing concern 
that we are moving too fast Is it 
worth risking a woman's life, not to 
mention her ability to carry sub- 
sequent children to term success- 
fully, for the sake of an operation 
that other doctors feel, as in the 
case of baby Mitchell, coukl have . 
waited? And what effect would it 
have had on the baby? Being bom 
once, after all, is supposed to be 
traumatic enough. 

Back in Middlesbrough, it is easy 
to see why those who love Deborah 
Bell want her baby to live. But what 
kind of psychological pressures will 
be put on that child as it grows up, 
what kind of counselling have the 
family received? Indeed, how 
much help and support do any 
parents get when faced with life pr 
death decisions? 

Kypros Nicolai des is senior lec- 
turer at King's College Hospital in 
London, involved in perinatal 
diagnosis and foetal therapy. Like 
many of his colleagues, be is very 
much aware of the social, and 
ethical problems raised by the 
development of new techniques 
and technology that can be used on 
very young — even unborn — 
babies. 

Dr Nicola ides said: “There has 
beep considerable discussion in the 
field about these matters. They are 
quite controversial I’ve adopted 
the attitude that we try everything 
we can provided it is the wish ofthe 
parents, and we are very honest 
with them as to the outcome for die 
baby. Perhaps adopting ■ the 
technician’s approach is an easy 
way out. We have the techniques, 
we offer them to you, you decide. 
Perhaps we are shedding 
responsibility by adopting the atti- 
tude that this is what people want”. 

He appreciates the dangers of - 
raising raise hopes. He knows that 
the recent stories about heait-Iung 
transplants or babies undergoing 
foetal surgery can be misleading. In 
fact, neither technique is likely to 
become widespread in Britain in 
the near future. Indeed, of the bat 
Mitchell case. Dr Nicolaides 
"For about five years we have 
treated similar cases by having the 
mother come to an out-patient 
clinic where we use a local an- 
aesthetic to insert a plastic tube 



into the baby's bladder and drain 
off the fluid. H the baby has a 
reversible obstruction, this can be 
corrected after birth. That way we 
can see how far the system has 
already been damaged, the trouble 
is. after the American report we are 
ndw getting mothers who feel they 
must be subjected to invasive 
techniques to save their baby. 

“My main worry is the enthu- 
siasm of people involved in the 
field. If they are investigating new 
areas, they must be enthusiastic, 
but there is a danger of being 
blinded by il Sometimes when you 
pass on your enthusiasm you pass 
on false hopes. If you know you 
have saved a baby and that child . 
spends the next 15 to 20 years on a 
kidney dialysis machine, suffering 
chronic renal failure, have we 
really succeeded in anything very 
dramatic?" 

Cliff Roberton is consultant 
paediatrician at Addenbrookes 
Hospital in Cambridge, and, like 
Kypros Nikolaides, be has doubts 
about the Mitchell case. He says: 
"Most people here feel that except 
in extreme cases the risks of 
operating under those circum- 
stances are not justified. The 
general feeling is that even when 
serious malfunctions are picked up 
antenataOy by ultrasound, you 
should keep your, hands off the 
baby m the uterus. Either what it 
has is un treatable or else it will do 


no harm to wail until 34 or 36 
weeks when you can deliver by 
Caesarian and correct the plumb- 
ing after birth." ■ 

Cliff Roberton sounds a note of 
caution about much- of baby sur- 
gery, in particular about the pros- 
pects of heart-lung transplants, and 
raises questions about the long- 
term prospects. He said: “We 


‘The general feeling 
is that you should 
always keep yonr 
hands off the baby 
in the uterus 9 


don't know bow ultimately 
successful a transplant would be. 
While ft would be useful to give 
someone o£ say, 45 an extra 10 
years, to do that foe someone of 
nought poses different philosophi- 
cal ’problems." So should they be 
done at all? "If there were enough 
donors, I would be happy for a 
small number of operations to be 
carried out on carefully selected 
patients in hi-tech centres. But you 
need five to 10 years to answer the 
question as to whether the tech- 
nique is viable.” 

* Put another way, the argument is 
not simply about how far you 


should go to keep a baby alive, but 
how you decide whether ihe quality 
of the life or the length of the life 
you have offered it is acceptable. 
Should we battle on to preserve 
some kind of life at any cost? 

Only five years ago it was 
unusual for babies who were born 
weighing less than 800 grams to 
survive. Now the survival rate is 
much better. Bui Cliff Robenon 
says: "Follow-ups seem to indicate 
that of all babies bom at low birth - 
weights about 10 percent will have 
some son of neurological deficit 
There are cases where it is possible 
to say that a very low birth weight 
baby will have such a growth 
handicap that it is probably not 
justifiable to cany on.” 

Dr Roberton also points out that 
the pressures on - parents and 
professionals are different depend- 
ing on whether a child feces a 
mental-or a physical handicap. He 
says that he has never had a parent 
question whether or not a baby 
should be operated on for a kidney 
or a bean disorder, whereas it is 
very common to question the idea 
of an operation when a neurologi- 
cal handicap is involved: "By and 
large fra inclined to go along with 
the parents’ wishes. If I had a baby 
with a major malfunction and the 
parents refused permission to op- 
erate, under most circumstances 
fd go along with that but I would 


have to be sure they were carrying 
the rest of my staff with them.” 

Better techniques of pre-natal 
diagnosis — including methods like 
chorionic biopsy and the improved 
application of ultrasound — mean 
that more and more parents will be 
asking themselves, even before 
their babies are bom, how far they 
want the medical profession to go 
to try to save their child’s life. 

Would it be better to leave it all 
to nature? Kypros Nicolaides says: 
“Nature is very clever at times, but 
also very cruel. Humanity devel- 
oped weapons to deal with snakes 
and lions, a primitive technology 
to deal with nature. We have 


‘There are grey zones 
where a lot of babies 
will die anyway and 
others will survive 
with handicaps 9 


developed medicine. As new scien- 
tific advances are made we go 
through an interim period where 
we assess new methods of treat- 
ment. We shall make mistakes, we 
shall have unreal hopes, but things 
will balance out." 

Cliff Roberton believes that no 
matter how easily baby stories tug 
the heart-strings, it would help if 
we all tried to think of newly-boms 
as no different from the rest of the 
population: "If someone is brain- 
damaged or whatever after a traffic 
accident, then, as next of kin. you 
may come to a point where you 
know you don't want them to have 
the amount of therapy that isgoing 
needlessly to prolong life for six 
months. You would say: 'I think 
it’s appropriate to turn the venti- 
lator off.' There are well-trodden 
paths down which you can go, 
whether the patient is five years or 
55 years of age. Exactly the same 
paths can be gone down whether a 
baby is a few days or a few hours 
old. It's a mistake to try to make it 
a separate issue." 

Bui for parents to make that kind 
of decision and for doctors to be 
able to offer guidance, enough 
information has to be available. As 
Dr Nicolaides says: "The difficulty 
these days is not diagnosing, but 
separating the findings. Some con- 
ditions we know are incompatible 
with life, but there are others in a 
grey zone where a lot of babies will 
die anyway and others will survive 
with handicaps. We held a meeting 
here in June when about 100 
people from centres all round the 
world came to discuss ways of co- 
ordinating activities and pooling 
data to develop better methods of 
evaluation. 

“We have never gone far enough. 
Taking the philosophical argu- 
ment the technology is with us. It's 
unrealistic to expect it to go away. 
The best thing we can do is to learn 
to use the technology in the best 
possible way.” 


©Tlwaa 


Ltd 1986 


y 


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William. 



W 


illiam Brown was 
born in February 
19 19, a dirty, scruffy, 
ve, perverse schoolboy 
[y the kind of Stuff of 
which herpesare traditionally 
made. 

The feet that this 1 1 -year- 
old walking disaster was to 
become one of literature’s 
most popular and enduring 
characters says much for the 
secret anarchy which lurks 
within us alL 

Even William’s creator. 
Richmal Crompton, regarded 
him as “that little savage" 
whom she had tried un- 
successfully to banish from 
her life. In reality, as in fiction, 
however. William refused to 
be dismissed, to the un- 
doubted relief of many future 
generations of Just ■ William 
fens. 

A chuirhgoing academic 
and lifelong spinster who de- 
scribed herself as "probably 
the. last surviving example of 
the Victorian professional 
aunt". Crompton possessed a 
finely honed sense of the 
absurd which she utilized to 
the full in her William books. 

“She was immensely like- 
able — so likeable, indeed, that 
she is something of a 
biographer's nightmare," 
writes author Mary Cadogan. 
who nevertheless has suc- 
ceeded in creating an endear- 
ing portrait of Crompton in, 
her new book, Richmal 
Crompton. The Woman Be- 
hind William, published to- 
morrow (Allen & Unwin, 
£I2.95pk 

In fact, the whole William 
saga came about almost by 
accident. Tbe-second of three 
children of a Lancaster clergy- 
man -cum-scbooUeac her, 
Crompton became a classical 
scholar and started writing ■ 


but only 
just 

Richmal Crompton’s 

scruffy schoolboy 
hero nearly met an : 
untimely end. A new 
book explains why . 

seriously only after an attack 
of polio paralysed her right leg 
and put an end to her teaching' 
career at the age of 33.- 
William was born a few years 
before that but first emerged 
in all his grubby glory in the 
adult . publication Home 
Magazine* before being trans- 
ferred to the more family- 
orientated Happy Mag. 

William, however, did npt 
catch the imagination of 
Crompton herself who, after 
only five episodes, decided 
that she had had enough of 
him. Her editor refused to 
allow her to discard her un- 
couth hero. Even so. she 
continued to regard William 
as a pot-boiler and it is ironic 
that, despite having written 4 1 
adult novels, it is for her 
William books that Richmal 
Crompton is remembered. 

William’s character was 
loosely based -upon those of 
Crompton’s younger brother. 
Jack, her sister’s son. Tommy, 
and. finally, upon her great 
nephew Edward Ash bee. No 
cine in real life, however, could 
have competed with William’s 
outrageous scrapes. 

S ays Mary Cadogan, who 
spent more than a year 
researching her biog- 
raphy: "What interested me so 
much about Richmal was her 
capacity to convey the essence 
or her terribly English 
environment so well and yet 
at the same time, make one 
aware of tbe limitations of that 
society. She obviously wrote 
about all these tilings with 
great affection and yet there 
was this sense of being able to 
laugh at them at the same 
lime." 

Cadogan was also fas- 
cinated by the lack of any 
romantic involvement in 



C FRIDAY ) 

Anorexia nervosa: how the slimmers’ 
disease has been wrongly diagnosed 



A round-up of news, 
views and information 


Boon at 
bedtime 

Once upon a time, parents 
could happily read UWe 
Black Sambo and Noddy at 
bedtime - but mothers and 
fathers now face a bewilder- 
ing and often unfamiliar array 
of children s literature So just . 
how do you choose books to 
build up a balanced library ol 
fantasy and fact for little 
ones? 

The Good Book Guide to 
Children's Books is compiled 
each year by a distinguished . 
panel of writers that includes 
Doris Lessing and Michael 
Holroyd. They have whittled 
down me thousands of books* 
published for children to a list* 
of 600 recommended titles, 
for toddlers to young teen-; 
agers. and ranging from fairy- 
tales to encycbpaedias. Its r 
"bookshop-by-post” service - 
is a particular boon to house- 
hold mothers. The guide is 
available at £4.50 (postage 
and packing included) from 
The Good Book Guide, 91 
Great Russell Street, London 
WC1B3PS. 

Quote me... 



"Critics will be keen to seize... 
on my mistakes and say it’s ■ 
because I am a woman and -! 
don’t know what I'm talking ~ 
about. In time. theyTl come 
round. Until then theyTl say 
'It’s that bird getting it wrong - 
again*.” 

Sally Jones, BBC Breakfast 
Time sportscaster 

Share alike 

First-timers who lost out tn • 
the TSB scramble can learn 
how the stock market works-* 
by joining a women's invest- 
ment club. Members meet-;: 
each month, invest smaH ... 
amounts and vote on which 
shares to buy and sell. For »- 
details contact Paula Aczel, wv 
47 Hilbre Court, South Pa- - 
rade. West Kirby. Wirral, 
Merseyside L48 3JU. 

Surrender 

For just $750, Californians 
can now enrol In a workshop to 
help them guiltlessly enjoy 

their vices. Ran by glamorous, 

blows? guru Pat Donovan and ”” 
entitled, “Do Whal Yon Love 
and Be Healthy”, tbe coarse 
promises lessons on how to ’ . 
come to terms with your bad ^ 
habits — even smoking. "" 
Heaven forbid R should catch * 
on bere~ 

« r 

Josephine Fairley 


Richmal Crompton; “likeable" 

Crompton’s life. "I really find 
that absolutely inexplicable 
and quite extraordinary." she 
says. Tm convinced that 
there was no vestige of les- 
bianism about her. although 
she had several dose friend- 
ships with women, but it does 
seem strange that she never 
seemed to even have any 
fantasies about men. I just 
wonder whether her disability 
made her inhibited and gave 
her the feeling that she was 
unattractive to men." 


C ade 
by 
mu 


adogan is also intrigued 
Crompton’s insight 
into the personalities of 
William and bis friends. "She 
did have this empathy with 
boys and boyhood, which was 
odd. In her generation, girts 
were usually brought up so 
differently from boys. It may 
have sprung from her brotiier 
but I think also that she was 
something of a lomboy - 
although rather a re pr es s ed 
one." 

Richmal Crompton was 
working on her 38lh William 
book when she died in 1969. 
aged 79. And although it was 
William, who earned her her 
fame and a comfortable life- 
stymie — more than 9ft million 
William books have been sold" 
worldwide — he did not bring 
her the academic acclaim 
which others may have felt 
was her due. 

The two headmistresses for 
whom she once worked as a 
highly skilled classics teacher 
were particularly crashing. "I 
cant understand why [her] 
books aren’t’ better “ puzzled 
one of them. The other com- 
pared them unkindly, to “a 
juggernaut’s car." . 

Sally Brompton 

gramas Ntvapapara ud IMS 



THE 

OAK ROOM 

CZMERIDIEN 

Introduces Michel Lorain 
trance’s Newest 3-Star Chef 


Michel Lorain lias recently awarded 
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announce he has lm*n retained to 
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growing reputation through Clief David 
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iKtfint-rh The Nt-v» JVviidilK Hold I 









16 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 15 1986 


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Malcolm Longair argues that as science becomes increasingly complex, scientists have a duty to explain t hemselv es 
more simply and the public to take greater trouble to understand basics and new developments alike 


Bring Einstein to the people 

... tu:* m mu more it 


T he gap between scientific 
practice and public 
understanding is widen- 
ing. The general dis- 
illusionment with 
science and scientists contrasts 
strongly with the optimism of the 
postwar years when science was 
seen as the route to a better society 
and the “white heat of technologi- 
cal revolution" was more than a 
politician's catchphrase. 

In a world more and more 
dependent upon the fruits of 
scientific research, the public 
needs greater access to the essence 
of scientific knowledge and an 
understanding of what science can 
and cannot do. At its simplest 
level, a better undemanding of 
scientific developments will help 
illumine a number of the crucial 
issues important for society at 
large, for example nuclear energy, 
the American Star Wars pro- 
gramme and the benign and 
malign use of lasers. 

It is obvious that there must be 
a profound difference between the 
language of the professional sci- 
entist and the language used in the 
communication of the essence of 
scientific understanding to non- 
scien lists. One does not have to 
understand the details of musical 


so much a pan of everyday life. 
We find, as early as 1737, a 
splendid volume bv Aigaroni, one 
of the distinguished international 
intellectuals of the early 18th 
century, entitled Newtonianismo 
per le dame providing instruction 
for ladies in Newtonian optics. In 
Mozart's Cost fan tuite, we find a 
magnetic remedy being adopted 
by Despina to revive the heavily 
disguised heroines. It is intriguing 
to note that in 1 790. the date of the 
first performance of Cosi, 
Coulomb's law which describes 
the strength of the magnetic field 
from a magnetic body was less 
than 10 years old. 

The great developments in 
electricity and magnetism took 
place over the succeeding 60 yean. 
Yet Faraday, who first recognized 
that by moving the coils of a rotor 
through a magnetic field electric 
currents are induced in a circuit 
attached to the terminals, freely, 
admitted that be could not under- 
stand the mathematics of Gauss, 
Neumann. Weber and MaxwelL 
None the less he was held in a 
position of the highest scientific 
esteem. 

It was in the middle of the 19th 


- ^ ‘ ' * ‘ v / „ 3 > * < 

- -* * v - 


V f ♦ * ^ 


„ V V 

* f - . / 


4 

* X 
* * *■ 
* * 4 






interfere just like waves, llus 
-wave-panicle" duality is one of 
the great discoveries of the 20tn 
century. A wholly new concept Ot 
physics was needed to accom- 
modate iL 


This is the point at which non- 
■ — i — — — — "" be- 


* ** * r *•* / >. V*',* v . * 4 

t si . 

X .Vi CVW * i 




VV 




century that things began to get 
out of hand. ' 


analysis to appreciate Beethoven's 
Fidm 


lio or the techniques of paint- 
ing to derive understanding and 
enlightenment from a painting of 
Titian. In the same way, there are 
scientific truths which transcend 
the technicalities by which they 
are understood by the pro- 
fessionals. 

The crux of the problem of 
communication is one of develop- 
ing a language of communication 
which is accessible to everyone but 
does not trivialize the subject or 
patronize the listener. This is the 
fight-rope which the language of 
communication must tread. I 
certainly have not solved the 
problem. ! can recognize a bril- 
liant solution when I hear some- 
one like David Attenborough in 
Life on Earth or The Living 
Planet , but I believe that it is the 
responsibility of scientists to cul- 
tivate this language of commu- 
nication. They need to do so 
because governments everywhere 
must be persuaded of the essential 
and growing role which pure 
research activity should play in 
the life of nations. 


19th centmy — era 
of the private 
gentleman scientist 


Until the mid-!9th century 
scientific knowledge had been 
accessible to the general public. 
Although the technicalities were 
for the learned journals, the 
private gentleman scientist was an 
important and respected 
figure.Newton's three great laws of 
motion of the 1680s encapsulate 
in three brief statements how 
matter moves under the action of 
forces. Nowadays, these laws have 
a naturalness and intuitive appeal 
The first law says that the 
motion of any object does not 
change unless a force acts upon it; 
the second that the change in 
motion is just proportional to the 
force acting upon it, and the third 
that, to every action, there must be 
an equal and opposite reaction. 
All forces behave in this way. The 
miracle of astronautics in sending 
the Voyager II space probe from 
Earth to Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus 
and in 1989 to Neptune is simply 
the application of Newton's laws 
but used to quite amazing pre- 
cision on the scale of the Solar 
System. In feet Voyager II was 
only able to travel as far as Saturn 
and Uranus by using the accelerat- 
ing force of gravity to pull it in the 
correct direction. Newton's laws 
apply in modified form to light 
ravs as well. 


The principal cause 
was the feet that more and mere 
advanced mathematical tools 
were needed to describe physical 
phenomena. There developed a 
breed of scientists who no longer 
performed experiments. They 
thought of themselves not as 
mathematicians but rather as 
theoretical physicists. They have 
remained with us every since. 

In the late 1860s James Clerk 
Maxwell worked out what the 
velocities of the atoms and mol- 
ecules of a gas should be. By the 
mid-nineteenth century, the 
atomic or molecular hypothesis 
concerning the nature of mytuer 
was gaining ground. A gas was 
considered to consist of a very 
large number of atomic or molecu- 
lar particles and one of the great 
challenges was to work out the 
typical velocities with which they 
moved. 

Clausius showed that the basic 
gas laws could be understood if 
gases consist of atoms but, al- 
though he could work out the 
mean velocity of the particles, he 
could not work out the distribu- 
tion of particle velocities. The 
velocity distribution discovered 
Maxwell — appropriately 
known as the Maxwellian velocity 
distribution —was the answer. Ina 
gas, heat is no m ore than the 
random velocities of the atoms of 
the gas but they do not all travel 
with the same speed. 

The implication is profound. 
Until this time, physics was 
entirely deterministic. The laws of 
physics gave a definite answer to 


considered to consist of particles 
as well as waves. It is the last two 
which give non-specialists the 
most trouble but, once their 
import is understood, the rest of 
the 20th century physics begins to 
fell into place. 

The easier of the two is the 
special theory of relativity. The 
paper itself is a remarkable 
achievement of pure theoretical 
physics in that it sets out a purely 
theoretical problem and then 
solves it with a piece of analysis 
which is elegant and economical. 

Normally, behind ail theoretical 
advances, one can point to specific 
experimental results which re- 
quired an explanation. In 
Einstein's case, the motivations 
were anomalies in the way in 
which light behaves when it is 
emitted from moving sources. 
According to classical physics, the 
velocity with which light waves 
travel should depend upon the 
motion of the observer or the 
source but this does not happen 
for light It propagates at the same 
velocity of about 300,000 
kilometres per second, no matter • 
how the source or observer are 


any well posed check problem. 
After 


Part of the accessibility of 
it for 


Newtonian science is that it forms 


Maxwell, one could no 
longer be certain if one chose a 
particle at random from the gas 
exactly what its velocity would be. 
You are allowed to state the 
probability with which you might 
find that velocity but not the 
actual velocity of any given parti- 
cle. Maxwell was fully aware of the 
feet that this concept had a 
profound impact upon our under- 
standing of thermodynamics. This 
breakthrough marks the beginning 
of statistical concepts in physics. 

But the real problems begin 
with 20th century physics, and if 
one has to identify a year which 
marks the break with the 19th 
century, it has to be 1905, when 
Einstein wrote three of the greatest 
papers in the whole of physics at 
the age of 26. 

At the time he was working as 
“technical expert third class” at 
the Swiss patent office in Bern. 
The first of these papers con- 
firmed beyond any doubt the 
molecular nature of the fluids; the 
second is the great paper on the 
theory of special relativity and the 
third, the most revolutionary of 
the three, showed that light may be 


moving. 

It is this idea which Einstein 
formally introduced in his paper 
and showed that, if you assume 
the velocity of light must always 
be the same, however the source 
or observer moves, you find a 
unique set of transformations 
which tell you how to transform 
my space and time coordinates 
into that of a colleague moving at 
a constant velocity with respect to 
me. 

The most fundamental of these 
new properties of what we must 
now call space time is that 
simultaneity is no longer an 
absolute property. Much of the 
difficulty of relativity disappears 
once the relativity of simultaneity 
is appreciated. 


When a moving 
train is twice struck 
by lightning... 


two lightning flashes hit the front 
and rear of the train. 

How do I . and my colleague 
interpret these events? I say that 
the lightning must have strode the 
two ends of the train at the same 
time. He says — “Oh, no! I 
disagree. ■ I agree that we both 
received the signal at the same 
time here but light moves ai a 
finite speed and so the light signals 
must have set off from the front 
and back ends of the train at 
different times. When they were 
emitted, the train was further bade’ 
along the track and so the back of 
the train must have been hit 
before the front". 

This is what actually happens in 
nature. Two observers moving at 
constant relative velocities cannot 
agree about the simultaneity of 
events at separated points in 
space. When we move from the 
bank on to a train we slightly mix 
up bits of space-time in going from 
one state of motion to another. ' 

There is a much more powerful 
aigumenliwhich relates directly to 
things we can measure. A remark- 
able consequence of this new set of 
relations about how we measure 
space and time in different frames 
of reference is that there also arises 
a totally new relation between the 
mass of a body and its energy 
content — Einstein's famous for- 
mula E = me 2 . This states that we 
can associate an energy E with a 
certain amount of mass m and 
vice versa. This is wholly con- 
firmed by atomic and nuclear 
explosions in which the energy 
release is associated with the mass 
difference between the initial and 
final products of the explosive 
material which is the nuclei of 
atoms. 

How can we understand this 
relation from a simple perspec- 
tive? There is a neat way of 
understanding why mass and en- 
ergy are equivalent It will be 
noted that the velocity of light acts 
as a limiting velocity. Light does 
not move fester than c if we emit it 
from a moving source but always 
has the value c. 


What happens is that as we give 
the particle more energy the mass 
of the particle has to stan increas- 
ing. Thus, by increasin g its energy, 
we increase its mass. This dem- 
onstrates how the finite velocity of 
light leads to the equivalence of 
mass and energy. 

It took much more effort to 
convince Einstein’s contemporar- 
ies of quanta than of relativity. 
The wave theory oflight had been 
extraordinarily successful in 
explaining all the phenomena of 
classical optics. Diffraction, inter- 
ference and refraction all find a 
natural explanation in terms of the 
properties of waves. It is little 
wonder that Einstein's ideas were 
distinctly unwelcome to most of 
his contemporaries. 

Why did he come to his 
different view? There remained a 
great mystery about , the form of 
the spectrum of thermal radiation. 
This is the radiation spectrum of 
matter in thermal equilibrium 
with its surroundings. 


Waves and particles: 
one of the greatest 
of recent discoveries 


Let me give an example using 
one of Einstein's fe vourite trains. 
Suppose my colleague is sitting on 
the bank of a railway line and the 
train in which I am riding passes 
him by. I sit in the middle of the 
train. At die very moment when 1 
pass him, I receive simultaneous 
light signals from the front and 
back of the train which tell me that 


Suppose we start accelerating a 
partide and keep on accelerating it 
until its velocity approaches the 
velocity oflight. The energy of the 
panicle is given simply by fcmv 2 
where m is the mass of the particle 
and v its velocity. We give the 
particle more energy as it accel- 
erates but eventually, when the 
velocity reaches values dose to the 
velocity of light something must 
go wrong. 


Einstein did something quite 
spectacular. He said, let us look at 
the difficult bit of tbe spectrum 
and see how it can be explained if 
we look at its statistical properties. 
He showed, again with great 
simplicity and elegance, that you 
could explain tbe form of the 
spectrum if you assumed the 
radiation is not made up of waves 
but of particles. Indeed, in a paper 
of 1909, he showed that the 
radiation behaves exactly like the 
particles of a Maxwellian gas when 
you ask what the fluctuations 
about the mean number of pho- 
tons are expected to be. 

Then, with a great coup de 
theatre, he says - this explains 
entirely the photoelectric effect — 
the observation that electrons are 
ejected from metals when light 
fells upon their surface. We can 
picture a partide of light, a 
photon, coming in and ejecting the 
electron from the surface. Einstein 
was able to predict the energies of 
the electrons as the wavelength of 
light changed. Only in 19I6was 
this verified precisely. 

Thus, waves behave like parti- 
cles. Do particles behave like 
waves? Yes. In a classical experi- 
ment by Davisson and Germer, it 
was shown that beams of electrons 


specialists begin to pvt up 
ca us e many phenomena now turn 
up which have no counterpart in 
our normal experience. To ob- 
serve these effects in the lab- 
oratory, highly specialized 
experiments are needed. This 
makes an essential poinL Al- 
though the theory may be difficult, 
there exist many experiments 
which demonstrate that maner 
and radiation actually behave m 
these rather peculiar ways. . 

Let us give just a few simple 
examples of the way m which the 
new ideas work. First of all. Jet us 
look at quantisation. We are used 
to the idea that we can adjust the 
energy ofa system to any value we 
like. When we deal with very small 
energy differences, however, this 
is no longer true. On the scale of 
the interior of atoms, all energies 
are not allowed. We say the energy 
levels are quantised. This is what 
produces the distinctive colours 
of for example, street lights. We 
obtain a particular wavelength or 
colour when the electrons of 
sodium atoms jump from one 
allowed energy level to another 
producing the characteristic or- 
ange glow of street lights. On a fine 
enough scale, all matter and 
radiation are quantised. We do 
not see the fine structure in 
normal life because we take av- 
erages over enormous numbers of 
waves or particles. 

The second important idea 
which comes out of the new 
quantum mechanics is the idea of 
quantum numbers. These are 
simply numbers which label the 
discrete quantised states of sys- 
tems. Again this produces a 
number of surprises — it is not 
surprising now that energy is 
quantised but this applies to 
rotation as well. It is one of the 
distinctive and key features of tbe 
quantum world that angular mo- 
mentum and rotational energy are 
quantised and. even more remark- 
able, that panides have an intrin- 
sic spin or rotation even if they are 
in their lowest possible energy 
states. 

This intrinsic rotation is very 
small, the typical amount of 
angular momentum for a partide 
being about h. It turns out that afl 
particles possess their own intrin- 
sic spin and other properties as 
well — for example, their magnetic 
moments. It is as if every partide 
had its own liule magnet asso- 
ciated with it and you cannot 
demagnetise it — it is intrinsic to 
the partide. The story of partide 
physics since the 1920s has been 
the search for new quantum 
numbers to explain the ever 
increasing amount of information 
about the fundamental building 
blocks of maner. You may well 
ask how this affects our everyday 
life. Let me give a few simple 
examples. You will recall we 
talked about the statistics of 
particle vdodties in a gas. It is not 
surprising that when we look at 
the statistics on a fine scale, we 
have to take account of quantum 
effects. 

We find that Maxwell's dis- 
tribution is the classical limit of 
two different types of quantum 
statistics. It is remarkable that 
these properties are associated 
with the intrinsic spins of the 
panides. We do not need to go 
into the details of this but it is 
important to know what these 
different types of statistics are. 

They are known as Bose-Ein- 
stein and Fermi-Dirac statistics, 
and the particles which obey these 
statistics are known as bosons and 
fermions. All panicles in nature 
are either of one type or the other. 
Put in simple terms, the fermions 


to put more than one into that 
state. The bosons hove the op- 
posite tendency — if a boson is 
aireadv in a quantum state, this 
increases the probability of an* 
other boson going into that state. 

Let us give simple examples of 
how this works out It is because 
electrons are fernifonsthai you are 
only allowed to put one electron in 
each allowable state of the atom. . 
The microchip is entirely depen- 
dent upon the feet that elections 
are fermions. 

The simplest example of the 
behaviour ofbosons is Hi the laser 
The enormous light intensities are 
obtained because the photons are 
bosons which tend to "hunt in 
packs". If the apparatus is de- 
signed to encourage the photons to 
cooperate, they will group together 
in bunches producing beams of 
extraordinary intensity of coher- 
ent light. From the 1930s to the 
present day, the number of 
“elerncntarv” particles has mul- 
tiplied. To create a new partide of 
mass m. we require an energy E 
such that E» me 2 , but there is 
more to it than this. All the 
particles have different quantum 
numbers and these have to be 
matched to conserve, not only 
energy and angular momentum, 
but all the other quantum num- 
bers which partide physicists have . 
bad to invent to explain the 
families of particles and the way 
they behave. 


Coming to terms 
with the make-up 
of the Universe 


can occupy only one single quan- 
it is forbidden 


turn state each and 


’ In the simplest case of electro- 
magnetic forces, physicists now- 
adays think in terms of the 
panides which mediate the forces. 
In the case of electromagnetism 
the mediator is our old friend the. 
photon. This is the particle which 
transmits the force to another 
charged particle. The other forces 
which hold protons, neutrons and 
nuclei together are known as the, 
strong and weak forces and these 
are also mediated. Perhaps the 
most ambitious of all modem 
theories is the attempt by 
cosmologists and particle physi- 
cists to understand the origins of 
our Universe through a synthesis 
of the best current theories of 
particle physics and the under- 
standing which astrophysicists 
have developed of the early evolu- 
tion of our Universe. In these, the 
Universe itself is the laboratory 
for testing theories of elementary 
particles at the highest energies. 

The idea is very simple in that 
the Universe cools as it expands. 
Therefore if we consider early 
enough epochs in the Universe, we 
can attain energies much higher 
than those yet accessible by other 
means. There is some hope that: 
the ultimate unification of all the 
forces of nature may come about 
in the very early Universe at the 
extremely high temperatures 
which may be attained then. If this 
were to be correct, and. candidly. I 
believe it is more of a pious hope 
than a provable theory' at the 
moment, this would represent the 
ultimate synthesis of the physics 
of the universe on the very 
smallest and very hugest scales. 

It would be folly io pretend that 
1 have more than scraped the 
surface of the problem of commu- 
nication of ideas in science. 1 have 
a vision of how it can be done but 
the execution is much more 
difficult than the concept. I am, 
however, thoroughly convinced erf 1 
the importance of the develop- 
ment of the techniques whereby 
scientific thought and ideas be- 
come the currency, if not of 
common conversation, at least of 
the educated lay person. 

The author is Astronomer Royal 
for Scotland. This artide is ex- 
tracted from his Britannica Award . 
lecture in Edinburgh last night. 


it 1 


Tales out 


of school 



Sometimes it is worth investigat- 
ing our politicians' wilder claims. 
Last month Sbiriey Williams, 
president of the SDP. gave a 
speech to the Politics Association 
in which she claimed that “on two 
occasions recently" invitations to 
speak at named schools on a non- 
party political topic were “with- 
drawn after direct intervention by 
Labour chairmen of governors". 
Recently? Alley ne's School in 
Stevenage confirms the incident 
but says it happened “two or three 
vears ago". Withdrawn? Well, not 


THE TIMES 


DIARY 


encourage team work. But new 
3M boss Ronald Baukol disagreed 
and suggested they scrapped the 
idea. His office tells me; “Our 
values are not ones of conflict and 
antagonism, but of co-operation 
and mutual benefit.” 


gramme. Now a Saturday edition 
is being plotted for the New Year, 
probably to ran between 7 and 9 
am. Saturday Today , presented 
for a number of years by Mich ad 
Aspel and featuring a barely 
comprehensible rustic who offered 
gardening advice, was put out of 
its misery in the mid-1970s. Plans 
last year to revive it fell on the 
hurdle of negotiating rates with 
tbe unions. The Bed) said yes- 
terday it had “firm hopes" of 
better hick this time. 


Fraternal 


Hit for six 


for long. And Colin Green halgh. 


head of Hills Road Sixth Form 
College- Cambridge, has since salt 
a new invitation: he says the chief 
education officer and governors 
had felt it would be feirer. pre- 
election. to invite representatives 
of the other parties as well. “I have 
been waiting for two weeks to hear 
from her office whether she is still 
available.” he says. 


Mrs Thatcher may soon find 
herself getting out of bed the 
wrong side on Saturday mornings 
too. Daily she fumes at slights, real 
or imagined, dealt her by present- 
ers of Radio Four's Today pro- 


BARRY FANTONI 


Company orders 


A group of company executives 
planning to go on an SAS adven- 
ture weekend have had to caned 
because their managing director 
does not approve. The group, 
from 3M in Bracknell, intended to 
pay about £350 each for the 
privilege of running around tbe 
grounds ofa stately home fighting 
mock guerrilla battles with ex-SAS 
men. .As well as helicopters, 
pyrotechnics and “splat” guns 
(which cover victims in blood- 
roiourcd dye) the fee also includes 
a lunch of rabbit and chicken 
roasted in a hole in the ground, 
two nights in a hotel and cham- 
pagne The supposed aim: to 



Bernard Kalb, tbe State Depart- 
ment spokesman who resigned in 
protest at the US government’s 
Libyan disinformation campaign, 
once took a more relaxed view of 
terminological inexactitudes. In 
his earlier role as diplomatic 
correspondent, he wrote a best- 
selling — and adulatory — biog- 
raphy of Henry Kissinger with ms 
brother Marvin. In their joint 
introduction, they wrote: “Any 
errors that may be found in this 
book are the fault of my brother". 


Man of letters 


‘You'll have the royal tour of China 

special, Gerald, and like it 1 

i 


A new twin to the furore 
surrounding this year’s Booker 
Prize. The chairman of the judges, 
poet and critic Anthony Thwaite, 
has been castigated by fellow 
panellists for writing a private 
letter of condolence to his 
unshonlisied pal Julian Barnes. 
The funny tiling is. I now leam.- 
that Thwaite did not in feet vole 
for the novel himself. Still, the 
Thwaites are compulsive letter- 
writers. I gather that his wife. Ann* 
sent a gushing three-pager to Paul 
Bailey, whose Gabriel s Lament 
did make the final six. * 


PHS 


Neither President Reagan nor Mr 
Gorbachov blinked at Reykjavik. 
Neither surrendered any part of 
what they see as their vital 
national interest. George Shultz, 
however, had been blinking ever 
since the arrest in Moscow of the 
American journalist Nicholas 
Daniloff It is Shultz who was 
outmanoeuvred by Eduard Shev- 
ardnadze, tbe Soviet foreign min- 
ister, not Re^an by Gorbachov. 

Unusually, the State Depart- 
ment was in almost complete 
control of negotiations with the 
Soviet Union from the moment 
Daniloff was arrested to Shultz’s 
final, gloomypress conference in 
Reykjavik. This may not have 
been an accident Soviet leaders 
know that Shultz has a strong 
desire to keep other top American 
officials out of foreign policy 
making, is very unenthusiastic 
about Star Wars, has a dangerous 
yearning to make agreements. 
Sending Shevardnadze to New 
York to negotiate over Daniloff, a 
surprise to the West at the time, 
can now be seen to have been an 
inspired move by the Soviet 
leadership. It ensured that Shultz 
was promoted willy-nilly to first 
position among President 
Reagan's advisers because he was 
the only senior US official to 
whom the Soviet Union was 
talking. 

Many of Reagan's supporters, 
both in America and in Europe, 
wondered why he agreed to the 
DanilofL Zakharov, Orlov ex- 
change. By it, the Americans 
ceded an important principle and 
lost the international initiative. 


David Hart 


Reagan really 
the winner 


The only explanation, dear now 


that Reykjavik is over, is that the 
President -had accepted advice, 
presumably from Shultz, that 
Gorbachov badly wanted an arms 
control deal. So badly that he 
could be relied on to agree to a 


reduction in intermediate range 
missiles, at the least, without 
insisting that the Americans give 
up SDl development and resting 
in return. 

Such advice demonstrates a 
frightening failure of perception. It 
is true that Gorbachov suggested 
in France, after the Geneva sum- 
mit, that he might not insist that 
an agreement on intermediate 
missiles be linked to an agreement 
on SDL But that was a year ago. 
Since then, there have been 
increasing signs that Gorbachovas 
domestic position is not as strong 
as had been assumed. The arrest of 
Daniloff was seen by many admin- 
istration officials as, at best, a 
blunder by Gorbachov, at worst, 
undertaken without his knowledge 
or consent. 

Even if Shultz cannot be en- 
tirely blamed for foiling to antici- 
pate the scope and depth of 
Gorbachov's arms control offers 
at Reykjavik, be can certainty be 
severely criticized for foiling to 
warn the President that any arms 
control agreement not linked to an 
agreement on SDI was going to be 
very difficult to achieve. The 
Soviet offer, last night, not to link 
SDI to an agreement on INF could 
have been made at Reykjavik. 
That it was not, demonstrates that 
their desire to trap President 
Reagan was greater than their 
desire for genuine arms control. 

Shultz’s failure to appreciate 


this stems from his reluctance to 
take SDI seriously — an approach 
dearly not shared by the Soviet 
leadership. 

Admiral Poindexter, President 
Reagan’s uninspired national se- 
curity adviser, said after Reyk- 
javik: “We foiled to see that a 
defensive system against ballistic 
missiles could possibly constitute 
a threat We don't understand 
what the Soviets fear in a defen- 
sive system.” 

It is this sdfeonfessed failure by 
the Admiral, a failure shared by 
Shultz, that led to the Reykjavik 
fiasco. Soviet fear of SDI is based 
on two perceptions. First, that it is 
only their military forces that 
confer first-world status on them. 
Second, knowing better than most 
that SDI research has been much 
more successful than even its most 
whole-hearted supporters hoped, 
they see their bargaining chips, 
their ballistic missies, losing 
value every day. This provides 
some explanation for Gorbach- 
ov's offer of substantial cuts in 
these missiles. 

The Soviet Union fears that its 
world status and influence will 
decline in perpetuity if SDI is 
eventually deployed. Even if the 
Soviet Union succeeds in deploy- 
ing a defensive system of its own. 
u will not restore its lost status. 
For the terms of the competition 
between East and West will have 
decisively shifted in favour of the 


West away from competition in 
building missiles towards com- 
petition in building economies: 
away from competition in war- 
head guidance technology towards 
competition in information tech- 
nology. 

If this does happen, the Soviet 
leadership will find it increasingly 
hard to divert domestic attention 
away from its failure to secure for 
its people a standard of material' 
prosperity approaching that of the 
West. 

American and European com- 
mentators are saying that Reagan 
has been put on the defensive by 
Reykjavik. They say he has been 
forced to explain why he tuned 


down Gorbachov's apparently 
oners. 


generous arms control offers. 

. to® become a too-common 
mistake io underestimate Mr 
Reagan— On his return from 

Reykjavik he told them that it was 
ms judgment that SDI research, 
jesting and development should 
oe continued as an insurance 
gainst Soviet bad foith, so ft*-, 
quenuy demonstrated over exist- . 
mg aims control agreements. The 
Amencan people will accept their 
neaoent s judgment on this issue 


. - vu uuo row** 

as they have on so many others. 
In ume, Reykjavik may well 


come to be seen as a great Reagan 
Success - Gorbachov has made 
many unretractabie concessions 
demonstrating, unequivocally, 
S*™ 5 * 1 for , an a £reemem. By bis. 
absolute refusal to countenance 
5,py senous restrictions on SDL 
Reagan may well have rendered it 
an acceptable as well as a perma- 
nent feature of tire strategic land- 
*-ape as the benefits of a transfer 
from offensive to defensive strata 
ygmentt sink in. 
api is. after all, an attempt u> - 
achieve exactly what all those who 

ESSl. ***** re®* - 

nestiy desire. Arms control- 


x 


/ 







V" .1 
. * 



THE TIMES WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 15 1986 


17 


London El 9XN Telep hone: 01-481 4100 

MR LAWSON’S LOSS 


In terms of economic managB- 

o St fortni Sht has not 
been the Government's finest 
hour. Yesterday’s rise in in- 
terest rates brings to an end a 
prolonged tussle with the 
financial markets which, with 
* hindsight, it would have been 
tetter never t0 have entered. 

One of the things which has 
distinguished this Govern- 
ment from its predecessors has 
been its wtfljneness to work 


caught up, for no very obvious 
reason, in the backwash of 
pressure on the dollar stem- 
ming from a unilateral de- 
cision by the US to lower its 
discount rate. A number of 
events were imminent such as 
the annual meeting of the 
International Monetary Fund, 
which might change market 
sentiment And, perhaps most 
important it was disagreeable 


with the grain 10 COntem Pkte a rise in in- 

L4K3»sHsr“-“* 


«* 

*9 

r 


this has shown itself in a 
reluctance to throw the weight 
of official currency reserves 
against clearly established 
market movements. Offical 
intervention was used only for 
smoothing out larger fluctua- 
tions around the trend. 

More recently, this ap- 
- Droach has been subtly altered 
policy of no intervention 
C* tiPl in circumstances where 
dear imbalances have devel- 
oped in the pattern of ex- 
change rates. The satisfactory 
execution of decisions at the 
Plaza meeting in September 
last year to encourage a fall in 
the dollar seemed to bear out 
the wisdom of this approach. 
Then in January this year, 
when sterling came under 
pressure as oil prices fell, the 
Government successfully re- 
sisted a second rise in interest 
rates that seemed inevitable. 

When pressure on the 
pound again began to build up 
two-and-a-half weeks ago there 
was a strong temptation to call 
the market's blulf once more. 
Sterling appeared to have been 


In the event, however, pres- 
sure on sterling continued and 
has proved in the end impos- 
sible to resist. The impression 
is left that the Government has 
spent large sums out of the 
reserves primarily in order to 
give the party conference a fair 
wind. 

The Government might ar- 
gue that domestic financial 
conditions did not require a 
rise in interest rates. In money 
terms the economy is growing 
considerably more slowly than 
planned, with both infla tion 
and real growth below expecta- 
tions. In addition, narrow 
measures of the money supply 
are within the target range set 
by the Government. On the 
other hand broader measures 
of money are growing very 
rapidly and there is no argu- 
ment about which way the 
exchange rate is pointing. 

In the end, as the Chancellor 
has put it, the degree of success \ 
in fighting inflation is both 
judge and jury in financial 
management. That is precisely 
why a con tinuing fall in the 



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If presentation could win gen- 
eral ejections in place of 
policy, the Labour Party might 
feel confident that it is ahead 
in the race. The days are past 
when it could jibe at the Tories, 
for their reliance on Saatchi & 
Saatchi and the ad-man’s arts. 
Nowadays Labour itself uses 
direct mailing in search of 
recruits and money, sells party 
goods (designer t-shirts and 
the like) and shows a pref- 
erence for grey over red. 

Yesterday it went a step 
further. Having recently re- 
placed its red flag by the red 
rose, it is now promoting its 
policies by means of a new 
glossy brochure, Investing in 
People . , on sale at newsagents, 
price 75p. Analysts of Labour 
policies and their implications, 
will not find anything new in 
the brochure. Its business is 
simply to re-package for mass 
consumption the policies 
which were outlined in the 
policy papers. Freedom and 
Fairness and Jobs and In- 
dustry. 

The essential message is a 
simple one, and taken at face 
value, attractive. The nation's 
most precious resource is its 
people who can ihake Britain 
efficient and competitive pro- 
vided they have the right skills, 
equipment and opportunities. 
Since at present they are 
denied all these by lack of 
investment, a Labour govern- 
ment would make this good by 
investing in industty, in public 
services, in education and in 
training. It would create jobs 
in construction, modernise the 


transport system, improve the 
environment and spend 
money on the social services, 
thus creating jobs as well as 
improving the services them- 
selves. 

Only- the active participa- 
tion of government, the voters 
are told, win make this , pos- 
sible and Labour will find' the 
investment money which the 
Conservatives have denied the 
economy. Two. new state 
boards, will oversee tim pro- 
cess. The British Investment 
Bank will give loans for indus- 
trial development, research 
and training and will partly 
draw on investment repatri- 
ated from overseas under 
threat of lost tax relief British 
Enterprise will finance new 
companies and production, 
and be a “public stake-holder” 
for what would nowadays be 
called social ownership (were 
it rashly mentioned in the 
brochure.) 

Where would the money 
come from? Since this is in 
some respects 1964 revisited, 
the answer is from growth — 
eventually. To start with, how- 
ever, the voter . is told (no 
doubt to his pleased astonish- 
ment) that all it will cost is an 
extra £6 billion in the first 
year, less than two per cent of 
the “national wealth.” Or, to 
put it another way, it means no 
more than almost doubling the 
present Public Sector Borrow- 
ing Requirement. Otherwise, 
all that is required is to lax the 
richest five per cent to pay for 
increases in social benefits. 

It is a simple message made 


more attractive with colour 
photography and a red rose on 
every page. “Investing in 
children” shows a full-page 
colour portrait of a book- 
loving but glamorous teacher. 
“Investing in the elderly” fea- 
tures two contented and dis- 
tinctly prosperous pensioners. 
But information is not - its 
business. It is dealing in 
dreams: all that is needed for 
national revival is money and 
borrowing. 

These are the policies of 
cornucopia and the apparent 
similarity to Harold Wilson’s 
offering of higher social spend- 
ing made painless by growth is 
an obvious attraction. But the 
difference between 1964 and 
1986 is not so much that we 
have seen It all before, but that 
in 1964 the tide of ideas was 
flowing with the ideal of 
planning for growth. Today 
there are many cfiscontents 
with the present Government, 
but there is no substantial 
evidence that the tide of ideas 
is really flowing against ft and 
towards Labour. Rather the 
contrary. 

Mr Kinnock is assiduous at 
marketing the Labour Party. 
Faced with these exercises in 
presentation, the Conser- 
vatives will have to reply with 
the facts of political life in 
digestible form. But the facts 
are the heart of the matter. 
Only those who believe that 
the medium counts more than 
the message are likely to feel 
that Mr Kinnock’s glossy bro- 
chure, is the answer to his 
party's needs. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Cases, for the royal prerogative? 


pound cannot be ignored. 
Some depreciation in sterling 
was inevitable and desirable 
once the fell in oil prices made 
a large hole in Britain's net 
exports. But the present fell in 
the exchange rate of about 13 
per cent is effective value 
since the end of last year is 
thought by most observers u> 
be a sufficient adjustment 

There remains the question 
of whether the level of interest 
rates in Britain — even allow- 
ing for a somewhat higher 
expected rate of inflation than 
elsewhere — need be as high as 
ft is. There are changes which 
the Chancellor could ' have 
made to the system of mone- 
tary control — and which he 
could yet announce in 
tomorrow’s speech at the Man- 
sion House — which might 
have lifted confidence and 
made the interest rate rise 
unnecessary. 

Chief among these is 
membership of the exchange 
rate mechanism of the Euro- 
pean Monetary System. Ster- 
ling is regarded in world 
markets as a volatile currency 
subject to uncertainties rang- 
ing from the price of oil to the 
colour of the government 
Membership would by no 
means remove the obligation 
on the Government to run a 
firm monetary policy — that is 
its attraction to markets. But it 
would remove a portion of the 
uncertainty premium which 
Britain is currently paying by 
staying outside. That premium 
is a high price to pay for the 
illusion of political freedom. 





THE UNMAKING OF A PRESIDENT? 






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As one French political com- 
mentator observed yesterday: 
Ask all 577 deputies in the 
i*. National Assembly what 
Mitterrand meant and you will 

get 577 different answers. Thai 
is almost as many answers as 
there are French cheeses — a 
considerable score for this 
enigmatic man who sent 
' journalists racing for the tele- 
phones on Mondayby floating 
the idea that he might not 
stand for the presidency again. 

■j “After De Gaulle, the tpost 
‘i unknowable, most mysterious 
3 of political men,” one biog- 
rapher described him a decade 
ago. Subsequent history must 
have confirmed him in that 
view. 

What President Mitterrand 
said was, on the fece of it, 
sensible enough. Invited to 
comment on the next 
presidential election m - 17 
months' time, he replied: ...all 
I can tell you is that every time 
l think about it, everything 
leads me to say*. 'No, I will not * 
be a candidate.*” He then went 
on to point out that something 
could still happen to change 
his mind. 

He will, after all. be 71 at the 
time of the 1988 election, 
which means that he would be 
78 by the end of a second 
seven-year term - slightly 
older than President Reagan 
will be when he finally moves 
out of the White House. (In 


feet President Mitterrand him- 
self has made known ins 
ambition to shorten the 
presidential, term to five 
years). His considerable intel- 
lect remains unimpaired and 
he has shown little signs of 
physical wear and tear — de- 
spite unconfirmed rumours of 
cancer treatment several years 
ago. StiU, for a septuagenarian 
to decide that enough is 
enough after seven arduous 
years in the Ely see should not 
come as any great surprise. 

Nor is it surprising that any 
politician, especially one as 
outwardly impassive as 
Mitterrand, should wish to 
keep people guessing. At 
present he is enjoying great 
popularity in the opinion polls 
— particularly since the acces- 
sion to power of M Chirac and 
the right. Instead of adopting 
an approach of partisan 
obstruction. President Mitter- 
rand has adopted a truly 
presidential role, usually leav- 
ing the business of day-to-day 
government to his Prime Mia- 
ister. By doing so he has won 
the approval of the right, to 
add to his support on the left. 
For him now to declare his 
interest in the next election 
would risk, re-entering the 
political arena with concom- 
itant loss of his high prestige. 
In these circumstances, to hold 
on to -his • hat instead of 
throwing it .into the ring is. 
rensibleiaoics. . ... - • ■ - 

ill 


Equally, by not declaring a 
definite withdrawal, he has 
avoided splitting the French 
left Michael Rocard, Laurent 
Fabius, Jean-Pierre 
Chevenement and Lionel 
Jospin are among the potential 
Socialist candidates. As long as 
President Mitterrand stands 
head and shoulders above 
anyone else, an early statement 
of intent by him might risk 
settng one against the other 
unnecesarily soon. 

On the other hand the 
President was not entirely 
non-committal in his answer. 
He left the door ajar, but not 
very much ajar. All but the 
most cynical, on reading what 
he said, would assume that in 
1988 Francois Mitterrand will 
not be among the presidential 
candidates. While he might 
change his mind ft would need 
' some unforeseen development 
to persuade him to do so. 

The feci that far from 
clarifying his position, he has 
succeeded in sowing doubt in 
minds on both sides of the 
Channel says something about 
French politics — and about 
their most accomplished prac- 
titioner. Tomorrow he comes 
to London for talks with the 
British Prime Minister. Will 
she be meeting a lame duck 
President? It is certainly hard 
to believe that that is -the 
impression fie wishes to give. 


me. 



From Lord Dev/in 
Sir. Cardinal Horae's letter (Octo- 
ber 13) and the leader in The 
Times which accompanies ftare of 
clarion quality. 

I have seen only a linle of the 
material in the Maguire and 
Guildford, cases in which convic- 
tions were 1 obtained for revolting 
acts of terrorism, but enough to 
make me doubt whether the right 
men were caught 
In the Guildford case an IRA 
gang subsequently claimed sole 
responsibility for the crime. Their 
evidence was heard by the Court 
of Appeal, which had power either 
to reject it out of hand as beyond 
if or to order a new trial by 
jury of the whole case. Instead of 
this they treated h as an issue 
which they had power to deter- 
mine themselves and - which' they 
decided against the accused. Thus 
what was truly an indivisible case 
was tried in two parts, one by a 
jury and the other by judges. 

The authority for this extraor- 
dinary procedure is said to be the 
decision by the House of Lords in 
Stafford v DPP (1974) [AC870].In 
a mure at All Souls (now printed 
in The Judge, OUP (1979). pt78) I 
criticized this decision as contrary 
to all earlier law and expressed the 


hope that the House would some 
day look at the point again. If there 
has been any rebuttal of my 
criticism, I have not seen iL 

So 1 welcome the Cardinal's 
request that these cases should be 
referred back to the Court of 
Appeal. Bui there is more to it 
than this. 

Protestations of innocence by 
prisoners are common enough. 
Support for them by distinguished 
persons is not unknown. But the 
total effect must be mountainous 
before it can command attention. 

Here it is as high as Everest. It 
has been continuous for years. It 
has been tested by a number of 
others besides the Cardinal him- 
self It is strengthened by all the 
other considerations mentioned in 
your leader. It confronts what on 


lone of this can be admitted 
and weighed by a court of law. But 
to do justice in every individual 
case is sometimes -beyond the 
reach of the law : it is the very 
thing that in the last resort the 
royal prerogative is fashioned to 
attain. 

Yours sincerely, 

DEV LJN. 

West Wick House, 

Pfiwsey. Wiltshire. 


Labour and defence 

From Professor P. G. Walsh 
Sir, The noble youtjh, NeO 
Kinnock. Blackpool 1986: “I 
would die for my country. But 1 
could never allow my country to 
die for me". 

Theodoras, nobilis et ipse 
adulescens, Passaron, Epirus, 167 
BG “I have often heard reports of 
men who died for their country. 
But our leaders are the first in 
history to propose that their 
country die for them”. (Livy 
45.26). J 

Yours with relevance; 

P. G. WALSH, 

Department of Humanity. 

The University, 

Glasgow. 

From Dr J. W. Aniens 
Sir, Professor Flew writes (Octo- 
ber 8) that there would be no 
purpose in any significant defence 
spending if Britain were to get rid 
of its nuclear weapons. 

If that is so, all but halfa dozen 
countries in the world might as 


well throw away their weapons. 

As we now know, the decision 
by this country to acquire nuclear 
weapons after the war was a close- 
run thing. One suspects that had 
the decision gone the other way. 
the very people now so fearful of 
doing away with nuclear weapons 
would have been among the first 
tp express outrage at the sugges- 
tion that the country go nuclear. 

Britain's - nuclear weapons are 
an. illusory prop, and without 
them we would soon realize that 
we could manage equally as well as 
other countries of comparable 
importance. 

As to being at the mercy pf a 
nuclear power: Chernobyl has 
shown what the effect of a direct 
conventional hit on. say. SizeweO 
might be. 

Yours faithfully, 

J. W. ARRIENS, 

Evergreen House, 

10 West End, 

Whittlesford, 

Cambridge. 

October 8. 


Winter Olympics 

From Dr Lyudomir Ivanov 
Sir. The aty of Sofia is a leading 
contender for the site of the 1992 
Winter Olympics. Your readers 
may be interested-lo learn of the 
environmental threat posed, 
should this candidature succeed, 
to Distrishko Dranishte in the 
Vhosha National Park — a rural 
conservation area fisted as a 
Unesco biosphere reserve. 

Precedent suggests that the 
threat is all too reaL The students’ 
winter games of 1983 have already 
“enriched” Distrishko Dranishte 
with a 33 km downhill piste. Its 
upper half descends the slopes of 
Malak Rezen peak amid the 
I magnificent stone rivers for which 
this mountain is famed. Hundreds 
of pods have been blown up there. 

Partly because of frequent gales . 
in tbe area, this pan of IMstrishko 
Dranishte has never actually been 
used for downhill-racing. How- 
ever, the lower section is sheltered 
by endemic spruce forest. 


Now four more courses are 
planned nearby, well inside the 
reserve. These would be crucial for 
the Alpine events and no alter- 
native sites can be found outside 
the reserve. The forests now under 
threat are of great value and 
official assurances that the clear- 
ances will be compensated for by 
afforestation elsewhere are inad- 
equate. 

Why has the basically good idea 
of betiding the Winter Olympics in 
Sofia gone so wrong? Probably 
because of the infehtitoits choice 
of the Vidosha mountains in 
preference to the Rite mountains. 
The International Olympic 
Committee, who are to decide on 
the site on October 17, may he 
delighted to have such a successor 
to Calgary 88. but should we be? 

Yours faithfully, 

LYUDOMIR IVANOV, 

Faculty of Mathematics. 

Sofia University, 

1 126 Sofia, Bulgaria. 

October 14. 


Asylnm for refugees 

From Mrs Mary Dines 
Sir, Your report from Bonn 
(September 29) about the 27,000 
asylum seekers turned back at the 
Bulgarian border seemed to imply 
that this was a matter for satisfac- 
tion. These refugees were trying to 
reach West Germany before visa 
restrictions were implemented on 
October 1. Whilst it is possibly 
unfair that West Germany should 
be expected to accommodate them 
all the international community 
as a whole, and Europe in particu- 
lar. should be ashamed, not 
jubilant. 

It seems that the majority of the 
refugees are from Iran and Iraq. 
They are people who have been 
forced to leave their homes by war 
and persecution. It is inevitable 
that they cannot remain in Tur- 
key, a Middle Eastern country 
inextricably caught up in the 
diplomatic tension resulting from 
the Iran/lraq war. Furthermore, 
many of the refugees will be 
Kurds. In Turkey itself, the Kurds, 
who constitute about a third of the 
population, are denied tbe right to 
speak their own language or 
declare their identity. 

It is urgent that the problem of 
the 27,000 - and any further 
refugee situations that shouldarise 
— should be resolved immediately 
in a humane and civilised way. 
This can only be done through an 
official programme of resettle- 
ment, with all European countries 
taking their share of the 
Yours faithfully. 

MARY DINES, 

48 Brownlow Road, NIL 


Incident in Verona 

From Mr Edward McMillan-Scott . 
MEP for York (European Demo- 
crat (Conservative)) 

Sir, Mr Christopher McCall’s sad 
tale of bag-snatching in Verona 
(October 6) highlights the private 
misery and State indifference 
which beset modern tourism. In 
only four EEC countries — Great 
Britain, Eire, France and West 
Germany — does a criminal 
injuries compensation board exist, 
available to nationals and visitors 
alike. 

Yet bag-snatching, mugging, 
terrorist attacks (like the grenade 
which severely injured four of my 
Scunthorpe constituents in Greece 
test year) frequently occur in 
tourist zones on the Mediterra- 
nean coast 

The share of tourism in the 
balance of payments for Britain m 
the. last “stable" year (unaffected 
by US decline) of 1 984 wasa credit 
Of 3.9 per cent In Italy it was 8.7, 
Greece 18, Spain 20.8 and Por- 
tugal 133 per cent with total 
receipts from international tour- 
ism of about £14 billion in those 
four countries. 

As Britain is a major “exporter” 
of tourists to the Mediterranean, . 
surely our current jpresidency of 
the EEC Council gives our min- 
isters the opportunity to press for 
the adoption of criminal injuries 
compensation schemes through- 
out the Community? 

Yours faithfully, 

EDWARD McMILLAN-SCOTT. 

7 Long Street. 

Easingwold. ■ 

York. 


Setting a test 
for schools 

From the Headmaster oj 
Ampieforth College 
Sir. All good schools (and they are 
many and varied in both main- 
tained and independent sectors) 
have been giving much thought 
lately to the principal features of 
the GCSE examination - the 
ability to evaluate complex ev- 
idence according to widely agreed 
and carefully established criteria. 

One would lave expected that a 
publication calling itself “The 
Good Schools Guide”(October 6- 
10) would measure up to the sort 
of standards expected of 16 year- 
olds, that the evidence being 
evaluated would be both extensive 
and accurate, and that tbe criteria 
for making judgments should be 
seen to be carefully established 
and widely agreed. 

The contents of the articles 
reflect assumptions rather than 
criteria. Most of these assump- 
tions are questionable and many 
of them are offensive. The implied 
attitude to the countless good 
schools in tbe maintained sector, 
which educate more than 90 per 
cent of tbe population, is wholly 
unacceptable. 

In giving such extensive cover- 
age to this topic. The Times has 
trivialised a matter which ad 
schools take extremely seriously 
and in which parents rightly 
expect guidance rather than gos- 

Yours faithfully, 

DOMINIC MILROY, 

Ampieforth College. 

York. 

October 9. 

From Dr A. V. Anionovics 
Sir. 1 was intrigued, in your 
entertaining survey of “good 
schools” how against various 
establishments such as Ben en den 
and Roedean your investigators 
noted “no results quotedT or 
“results not available”. 

For a number of years now all 
State schools have been obliged to 
publish their exam results. Are 
others exempt from this legisla- 
tion or choosing to flout it? 

Yours faithfully, 

A V. ANTONOV1CS, 

47 Kingsmead, 

Nailsea, Nr Bristol. Avon. 

Sale of water 

From Mr John A. C. Humphries 
Sir, 1 was saddened to see the 
spectre of water privatisation re- 
vived at the Conservative con- 
ference (report, October 8). 

When the Secretary of State so 
wisely ■‘postponed’’ this 
controversial subject, I was 
chairing a wide-ranging, yet very 
united, committee of objectors 
composed of rate payers, environ- 
mental groups, trade unions and 
local authorities. Opposition to 
the Government’s proposals was 
coming in from such disparate 
bodies as the CBI. the NFU, the 
National Consumers Council and 
the Association of ChiefTechnical 
Officers (who are responsible tor 
tbe public safety of our sewerage 
systems). 

All seven consumer 
consultatives in the Thames Wa- 
ter region had come out in total 
opposition. From discussions with 
a number of leading Tory poli- 
ticians it was evident in the the 
party itself there was widespread 
alarm at the size of the banana 
skin being spread before h. 

Perhaps it is significant that the 
most recent proposals have not 
come from the environmental 
Ministers, who I believe are now 
fully aware of the enormous legal 
political and financial difficulties 
which water privatisation must 
provoke. Instead it is the Treasury 
who want to mount a grubby, 
money-grabbing operation. 

When Mr Ridley so wisely 
“postponed", be remarked rather 
nicely that the Labour Party were 
furious because he had now "shot 
their fox” I am sure that the 
Treasury Ministers would not 
approve of people hunting dead 
foxes! 

Youre faithfully, 

JOHN A C. HUMPHRIES. 

Deputy Chairman, 

Council for Environmental 
Conservation. 

London Ecology Centre, 

80 York Way, Nl. 

Personal affront 

From Mr A. M. Coupland 
Sir. Whilst welcoming Lieutenant 
R.R. Best's clarification of the 
usage of the personal pronoun in 
respect of ships (October 7), I was 
rather surprised to learn from the 
Commanding Officer of HMS 
Mentor that "The use of signals 
such as "I have lost my steering 
gear" or “I have ran aground” 
refer to the intentions and actions 
of the ship as represented by her 
commanding officer" (my empha- 
sis). 

One is naturally concerned as to 
quite where HMS Mentor may at 
present be found 
Yours failhfuHv. 

A. M. COUPLAND. 

33 Bolney Avenue, 

Pcacchaven. East Sussex. 


Mosley riots 

From Mr Jeffrey Hamm 
Sir. D^vid Cross is quite mistaken 
(October 4) in stating that “all 
d em on s trations by Mosley and his 
supporters in the East End were 
banned by tew”. Within a year of 
the “Battle of Cable Street” in the 
fatter months of 1936 the Public 
Order Act was rushed through 
Parliament and came into force on 
January 1. 1937. banning political 
uniforms, but not meetings or 
marches, which continued in East 
London up to the outbreak of war. 

Your report m general created a 
rather misleading impression of 
foe events of October 4, 1 936 and 
thereafter. In 1969 I was ap- 


proached by the BBC (in my 
capacity as secretary to Sir Oswald 
Mosley at that time) for assistance 
in making their programme on the 
matter in their Yesterday’s Wit- 
ness series. In that programme, 
social worker Miss Edith Ramsay 
admitted that the opposition to 
the proposed Mosley march had 
been largely imported. She spoke 
of seeing “communists from all 
over England possibly. Certainly 
huge numbers came from Glas- 
gow. and there were Glaswegians 
at Gsmdiner's Comer". 

On the following Wednesday, 
after the. Glaswegians had re- 
turned home. Mosley led a trium- 
phant march through East 
London, to four large and enthu- 


siastic meetings. Five months 
later, in the LCC elections of 
March, 1937. Mosley candidates 
polled an average of nearly 20 per 
cent of the total votes recorded (23 
per cent in Bethnal Green) on a 
register which penalised them as at 
that time only householders were 
eligible to vote in local elections, 
and most of our young supporters 
.were living with parents or in- 
laws. 

Historical facts should now 
replace mythology. 

Yours faithfully, 

JEFFREY HAM M. Secretary, 
Action Society. 

Nash House. 

Fishponds Road. SW17. 

October .6. 



OCTOBER 15 1892 

This report tells only part of a 
four-month story which ended in 
a Conservative gain being 
reversed. On Noivmber 7 the 
losing candidate petitioned the 
Higk Court of Justice, alleging, 
among other things, mix- counting 
of votes, personation, treating, 
voting by (diene, and undue 
influence — charges that were 
later withdrawn. Lawson caked for 
a recount and a scrutiny and 
claimed the seat A recount closed 
the gap to two and the judges, 
after d scrutiny, decided that the 
true result was a tie and ordered a 
new election. On February 21, 
1893. the Colonel was unseated 
and Lawson returned with a 
majority of 242, on a new register. 
In the only other recorded tie in a 
parliamentary election, at Ash ton - 
imder-Lyne in the General 
Election of 1886, a tie was 
undisputed and the seat went to 
the Conservative on the casting 
vote of the mayor 


ELECTION INTELLIGENCE. 

THE RESULT AT CIRENCESTER. 

It was not until dose upon 11 
o’clock yesterday morning that the 
last ballot-box reached the Town- 
hall, Cirencester, and soon after- 
wards tbe counting began. Both 
the candidates, with their agents, 
were in attendance. As showing 
once more the extraordinary con- 
formation of the division, it may be 
mentioned that one ballot-box, in 
the Northern or Warwickshire 
district, had to be taken fust to 
Worcester and then to Chelten- 
ham. where it was sent on to 
Cirencester. The latest box to 
arrive, however, was one which had 
to be brought over the Cotswold 
Hills fay vehicle. Tbe morning was 
bitterly cold, and the rain fell 
pitilessly on its custodians all along 
the journey. 

The rain cleared off about noon, 
and the workers in all the district 
appeared outside the Town-hall 
wearing the party colours. The 
counting of the votes demonstrated 
the accuracy of the statements 
which have appeared in our re- 
ports. The East Leach ballot-box 
mim out almost unanimously for 
the Gladstonian, 46 against 5, or 
about that; while North Leach, 
another village close by. showed 60 
papers for Colonel Chester Master, 
and ten for Mr Lawson ... In the 
counting room a deeply interesting 
scene was to be witnessed. This 
room was the spacious apartment 
in which the large public meetings 
have been held, and the usual 
arrangements had been made to 
secure an absolutely careful count. 
The Sheriff, the Hon. Reginald 
Yorke, presided, and among those 
present were the candidates and 
their agents. Tbe counting began at 
exactly 11 and finished at a quarter 
past one, but it was not until about 
two hours later that the struggle 
over the voting papers came to an 
end. The majority was at first three 
and at the end three. 

The cause of the delay was an 
attempt of the Gladstonian agents 
to disfranchise some voters. There 
were 43 spoilt papers, the majority 
of those being for Colonel Chester 
Master. All these, however, were 
set on one side by mutual agree- 
ment. Then the Gladstonian agent, 
Mr. Winterbotham, took exception 
to papers on the Unionist side on ’ 
the pound that they were not 
rly marked, but in every in- 
stance the decision was against 
him. Haff-an-hour was spent on 
one voting paper, a voter who had 
put his cross against the mim of 
Master having happened to strike 
through the upper dividing line. A 
voter puta dot in the centre of the 
square devoted to Lawson, and put 
frill cross against Master. Over 
both these papers a somewhat 
absurd contention which was 
maintained, strange as it may 
seem. But there was no fighting 
against fate; the narrow three 
remained fixed immoveable. 

All being over the returning officer 
proceeded to tbe front of the hall, 
where there was a surging mass of 
people, and declared the result of 
the poll- 

Chester Master (C) . . . 4377 

Lawson (G) 4,274 

Majority for Unionist .... 3 

At first the great assembly hardly 
grasped tbe figures, but in a few 
seconds the blue colours were 
waved, and volley after volley of 
cheers arose. In little better than 
dumb show a vote of thanlm was 
moved to the Sheriff by Colonel 
Chester Master — who was seized 
and carried, amid a scene of good- 
humoured excitement, to a locally 
historic spot, the town pump, a 
slightly elevated granite 
platform . . .Tbe greatest sped hu- 
mour prevailed, the Gladstonians 
solacing themselves with the sug- 
gestion that there ought to be a 
scrutiny. But the scrutiny had 
already been very severe, as an 
objection had been taken on the 
Gladstonian side even to a voting 
paper on which a poor labourer had 
accidentally made a th umb 
mark . . . 


If rtrti 
*I» •! 




Time and place 

From Mr Alex M. Jacob 
Sir, Ms. S. Houghton (October 1) . 
asks for appropriate locations for 
solving Crossword clues. Fifty-' 1 
three years ago. on the morning I**,- 
followingan appendectomy, I was 
handed a puzzle. - 

The first clue I found was "Bed 
moan (anagT: the solution was ' ' 
"abdomen”. *■ 

Yours faithfully, ., u .„ 

ALEX JACOB. 

5 Hendon Hall Court, NW4. 

From Mr Gerald Thornton 
Sir. Watching Laker and Lock " ‘ 
wheeling away at The Oval years . 
ago. I was stumped by tbe due 
“Cricketing Archbishop?” The “ 
sign on the building over the road 
immediately provided the solu-*‘JC 
tion — "Archbishop Tenison’s 
Grammar School”. "V * 

Yours. — 

GERALD THORNTON. '* r 

Barton House. 

13 Tudor Road. SEI 9 . - 


.. 



THE TIMES WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 15 1986 


PROPERTY BUYERS’ GUIDE 
LONDON PROPERTIES 


MORTGAGE or REMORTGAGE 



AMG 


NEW DEVELOPMENT 

An exceptional new conversion of luxury self-contained 
flats under the direction of Flaxznan Properties Lid 


The remaining three fiats have a large Reception room 
• ideal for entertaining, folly fitted kitchen, three 
bedrooms, newly decorated, new carpeting and ready for 
immediate occupation. 



The safe 
route to 
timeshare 
holidays 


PRICES: £275,000 £360,000 
LEASES: 62 years 

SHOW FLATS OPEN EVERY DAY 10.00am-7,00pm 
All enquiries to sole agents 
FARLEY A CO 

44/46 Old Bnjanptoa Road, London SW7 
TEL: 01-589 1243 


(AMG, through dor ota blbhcd co nwai o iis with 
-all the major budding so rierirs . banks and insurance 
companies, will ensure dot yon obtain the best arcs 
I and perms, oniekljr and without fins. 


In the seco nd art icle of a two-part 
series, CHRISTOPHER 


OPEN TODAY 


FREE SOLICITOR’S COSTS 

(Conveyancing) by an established firm 
of W.l. soBdton (except stamp duty and tbe 
usual Registrar and Search fees) 

ON A TYPICAL £60.000 
PURCHASE YOU WOULD 


W ARMAN, Property 
Correspondent, looks at the 
positive side of a troubled trade 



In the north: Highland lodges on the Loch Raiwoch estate, Perthshire 
ie European Holiday Timeshare objectives, which include j 


SAVE UP TO £700 


i 




yiESfCRD 


□ 95% ADVANCES UP TO £500,000 

□ 70% NON STATUS 

□ 

_ Payments start at 7.88% djl 
□ 100% ADVANCES UP TO£ 100,000 


HILL STREET, MAYFAIR W1 

A magnificent period residence, largely 
unaltered since die 18th Century. The 
: reception rooms and principal bedroom 
states are of classic proportions with 
high ceilings, targe windows and exten- 
sive panelling. There is a luxurious self 
contained penthouse suite which has 
recently been restored and modernised 
to an exceptional standard. 

The entire property comprises: 5 recep- 
tion rooms, 5 bedrooms and 
bathrooms, large domestic kitchen. Seif 
contained 2 reception room, 2 bedroom 
penthouse. Staff accommodation. Lift. 


3 x JOINT or 3.7 x SINGLE Income 
'Tel: 01-431 0035 for Immediate quote 


40A HIGH STREET, HAMPSTEAD. NW3 


37 

SLOANE GARDENS SW1 


Paved garden. 2 Mews houses with ga- 
rages (subject to tenancies). 


rages (subject to tenancies). 

LEASEHOLD 

440 KINGS ROAD, LONDON SW10 
Tel 01-351 2383 


MILLBROOKE MORTGAG1 
+ INVESTMENT SERVICES 

235 Upper Kdimond Rd, Putney. London SWT5 2SN 

01-788 7775 (24 fan) 

100% up to £120,000 954% up to £1,000400 

10.25% 


Two show foes are now offered far sale: 

A stunning one-bedroom flat on the first floor, 
with a magnificent 20ft reception room. 

PRICE: £187,000 

A well-designed two- bedroom maisonette with 
a lovely reception room and a superb birchen. 

PRICE: £265,000 
LEASES: 60 years 
Ready for hnmndian? occupation. 
SHOW FLATS OPEN EVERY DAY 
UhOQa&k— 7 -00pm 
Sole Agents: 

FARLEY & CO 

44/46 Old Brampton Road, London SW7 
TEL: 01-589 1243 


Timesharing, now 10 years old in 
Britain, isa dever and successful concept 
for a holiday, providing the purchaser 
with a week or weeks in a resort for a 
number of years or in perpet u ity. 

It has grown quickly to a point where 
there are now 60,000 British owners, 
nearly 40 resorts in Britain and 1.500 
world-wide. And it has become more 
flexible through foe international ex- 
change organizations, enabling the 
owner to go to an equivalent property 
anywhere in the world. 

Some developers have seen it as an 
easy money ticket. But they have left 
customers dissatisfied and timeshare 
with egg on its fox; The complaints 
concern mainly hard-sell Techniques and 
poor management and maintenance. 

The industry has been trying hard to 
dean up its image and to convince 
people that it is not only an excellent way 
of enjoying holidays but also safe and 
reputable. One difficulty is in establis h - 
mg a angle voice to speak for it and 
guarantee its reputation. 

There are three organizations, busy 
trying to decide whether they are trade 
associations or consumer protection 
bodies, or both. The British- Property 
Timeshare Association, in existence 
since 1981. claims to be Europe’s largest 
timeshare association and has recently 
been joined by two large organizations — 
Hapimag and GubhoteL It aims to 
represent the industry as a whole, and is 
soon to call a conference to look at high- 
pressure selling techniques and to at- 
tempt to set standards of protection. 


The European Holiday Timeshare 
Association, which has taken some 
members from this association because 
of doubts about the stringency of its 
requirements for membership, 
emphasizes its role as a consumer 
protection organization. 

Tbe Timeshare Developere Group was 
formed this summer among «x of foe 
biggest UK developers accounting for 33 
per cent of the British timeshare market 
here and abroad. The members are 
Barratt, European Perries. Kenning At- 
lantic. Langdale. Mclnerney and 
Whnpey. plus the two exchange 
organizations Interval International and 
Resort Condominiums Internal! onaL 
The group has held talks with the 
consumer affairs section of the Depart- 
ment of Trade and Industry, including 
the minister, Michael Howard, and with 
the European Commission. 

It is now registering with the Director 
General ofFair Trading a list of common 
aims intended to prevent dubious prac- 
tices and to assure the potential buyer 
that he will not be forced to buy. 

This group intends that sales tech- 
niques shall be reasonable and fair, that 
all legal documents shall be foil, dear 
and legally verifiable, and that every 
purchase contract shall be subject to a 
cancellation period of at least five 
business days. 

Graham Williams, managing director 
of the Elliott Property and Timeshare 
Group, moved tram the BPTA to 
become chairman of the EHTA because 
he was convinced of the need for a 
consumer protection association. It has 
been able to benefit from tbe experience 
of the older association to set its 




RasMontaV re-mort ga gaB tor any purpose plus commensal mortgages 
Income 3 x Joint x 4 (Professionals) 

SfiaoaSsmg In Ist-dme buyers, u Se m ptMeO. nonstntas 105* expatriates. 
CacnpMmo within flues ween of fcxSng property 
Mm psnsian + atvBStmei* brokers 
Hemmed *7 OtOcm at JHr IMki Ms 1*0797. 


MUST SELL 

BARGAIN CHELSEA 

Sunning Mortar designed newly refcrt mis in Otfdey St we 
AfB prepared id sol wbR botonnf nwrtMfc vslusi This 8 ybc« 3 bscL 3 
battT Irene roof terrace. Ndt Kitcften home wmM norma* sail 
lor £ 2854 ) 00 +. We W9 take me beat after enrar £24ajXXL To 
reach us by Monday 2Mi October. 

Tel 01 351 7888 daytime or 01 941 2399 eve* 

NO M3BCTS 



MORTGAGE & 

FINANCIAL ADVICE 


r 


fa tire soatte stare lodges at tire St MeOian timeshare village, Cornwall 


compensation fund and a 10-day cod- 
ing-off period before buying. 

Mr Williams is confident that the tiuct 
bodies will get together. He strongly, 
believes in timesharing and says there is 
nothing lo make it essentially a doubtful 
concept. "It is in many ways a bold 
operation, and there has to be good 
management. As long as it is seen as a 
long-term commitment by the devel- 
oper. it works.” 

The resorts themselves vary enor- 
mously. but they all need something to 
attract people the year round. El lion, 
which has the Osborne at Torquay 
among its three resorts in Britain. Itkcs to. 
combine timeshare with a hotel, aid is 
doing so with its new development of 
apartments at Marine Quay. SaJcombc, 
south Devon, where the prices range 
from £2.750 to £1 1.500 per week. • 

The focus for Wimpey's St Melhon 
development in Cornwall is a champion- 
ship golf course designed by Jack 
Nicklaus. 

The Lake District isa natural pl ace fo r 
timesharing, as it caters for different 
needs in different seasons. Langdale, one 
of the most successful, with prices up to 
about £12.000. has a complete leisure, 
centre. 

Langdale is in some ways a model for 
Craigendarroch. near Balmoral, on 
Royal Deesidc. This claims to be the first 
such resort in the UK to have all its 
sports and leisure facilities, including a 
£150, (XX) dry-ski slope, ready for the fust 
owners. In its first year it has sold more 
than 600 weeks worth £3 million, and an 
integral pan of the Craigendarroch 
operation is a 23-bedroom hotel, once 
i he home of the Kciller marmalade 
family, and a country dub. 

Scotland is a favourite timesharing 
location because of the variety of its 
appeal, and it saw the first timeshare 
development in Britain - Loch Rannoch 
in foe Highlands. It was pioneered. by- 
Frank Chapman, now head of the Barratt 
Multi-Ownership operation, which in- 
dudes two other Scottish resorts - 
Dalfaber at Aviemore and Forest Hills in 
the Trossachs — and PI as Talgarth in 
north Wales. All have first-class facilities 
and there is an emphasis on the quality 
of maintenance and management 

Things can go wrong, and have gone 
wrong, with timesharing. But with care 
and discrimination, it can provide the 
holiday alternative fora lifetime. 







r**w 


SLovauane, 

Lcnaon 

ECS 


Robson 




Limited 


01-623 3495 


ST JAMES W1 

5Bi floor stuflo apwtnwnt In sought afwr posUkn. KRctWMta. 
b — era. Iona Mass. £77.500. 

KBKWnON WB 

Substantial iwnskn Sat In nxoaMnt position. RbxKM taraty 
aecom. 3)4 beds- 2/3 recaps. Krt/fftw rm, 2 bafts. rasUanta' 


BEDFORD SO. WC2 

Chnca of two 2 bed flats to quM Maws. Short leans. Pries on 


GODDARD & SMITH : 01 930 7321 



COUNTRY 


L 


A 



0 FURTHER! 


MORTGAGES FROM 10% (10.4% APR) 
'REMORTGAGES FOR ANT REASON 


We offer: 

• Mortgages with tax refief deducted at source, 
lower than Building Society rates. 

0 100% and low-start schemes for First-time 
buyers. 

0 Non-status mortgages up to 80%. 

0 Written quotations. 

0 No fees on Endowment /Pension finked. 

0 Up to 3 x joint income. 

0 fop ups to 100% (no Kmit}. 


Easy payment plan-save up to 30%, inducting 
free redundancy & sickness insurance. 


For further informati on without obligation contact 

us now at Premier House, 77 Oxford 
StrtMflt, London W1R1RB. 

PREMIERE MORTGAGE 
SERVICES LTD 
01-439 T188 - 01-857 7411 


EVENINGS 


NATHAN WILSON & CO 

64 ROSSLYN HILL, LONDON NW3 1ND 


HIGHGATE, N6 ST.JOHNS WOOD, NW8 


Soper Mooad Hoar fb* in rood- WcB tooted far w e apon this 
cm Mock offenag two modern flat a stomal on ihe 
b t J i eow. topt lounge/ dining Sth flow with M and tummy 


STRUTT &.«Vi 

PARKERS 


EAST SUSSEX - NR. LEWES 




Tha e ccommoda flon of about 11.000 aqJL comprises:- 

SiduttnSal bBaBmampius approxtonataty 23 rooms a wn xma 
throughout ttw three fears. The gardens extend to about 11 
acres with woodtond and pond. 


For Safe by Formal Under 


Leva* Office. 201 tflgh Street 
Tfll (0273) 475411 



01-629 7282 


be dro om, uy lounge/ dung » Boor «m aft and imnniy 
ana. Ixncty modern kitchen Two dooMc Uwfa a uu n. well bl- 
and bathroom. lA pa w ns rod batsman. tofc n atation 
weuriij p otion s am* cow nm i ul m and aaodan bate*. Garo- 


ld® puw. £275 pu*. bd CH * HW 

HAMPSTEAD, NW3 PRIMROSE HILL, NWl 


In ihr krai id »hc rlhji. sjm- Tocfced xmof in a qma warm 
crows let Hoar umwhu in near shops and na inpon tin 
ww lne dromne order. 2 tout? bright m odem home at 
bd roo pn . bw ft ree m wire sept- fees 3 b ed ro o m*, 2 bmhre oma , 
raw we. logr k uro p /Jinem brae open pha reception. mod- 
area witb hwety open pbn cm kaebrn (afl oactainaO. 
totetea UD mduna). Sedoded potiA. 

BELSEZE PARK, NW3 HAMPSTEAD, NW3 

IkfaRbtfal old conrae in k- Brand iw w tanay co nation in 
daded position on llmsuck *’*”!??!_ ia 

ltdL 5 bedroom. Wool gg? 5F. ” TC J. H *‘ a ^ 

wnh <Snmt l%dcm option area »aSi (nepbo. 

ksebra with aH machea cL Swcr w o i Ih m Uadwa. 

C3SO pjm. £450 par. 

THIS S3. A SdlMJ-SELECTION OF OUR CURRENT LISTINGS. 
WE RECEIVE NEW INSTRUCTIONS DAILY 
CALL HOW POK DETAILS 

01-794 1161 


WHY NOT RE-MORTGAGE 
YOUR PROPERTY 

And get the benefit qf your equity 


■k Installing Central Healing 
* Refnr bi sbment of yonr property 


* Extension of your property 
* School Fees ★ Bayba a Car 


* School Fees ★ Baying a Car 
A- Going on a holiday etc. 

NON AVAILABLE 


HIRSCH INTERNATIONAL 
(FINANCIAL SERVICES) LTD. 

One qf Europe’s Leading Mortgage Brokers 
15. Berkeley Street Laotian W1X S AE. 

Tut 01-629 5051/2 TELEX 28374 


Intemadoniil 
television 
for die 

international ii 
businessman | 
in London. 





The Businessman’s 


home from home 



Luxurious Apartments 
tor the international Im smgssman 
in this famous London building 

FOR SALE 

FROM £64,750-125 YEAR LEASES 


Soles Office Open DaBye 01-589 5100 

MON. -SAX SUNDAY ’KkaaVnon 

tikan. — fag. Una — Q jh. Eons Ot-225 2286 


Keith Cardale Graves 

0F58IQL55 


kla 

Resideitial Department 

EM 2 bed house on new development SE8J958 
SE16 Reveriey Lock, 3 bed house ‘early viewing 
recommended* £89,956 

E14 2 bed wdertide maisonette (Discount for 
tel exchange) n32JMB 



1 M Haredcny Road, Wcsftnvto. Lan 

Tdephaae 01-222 7029 


SWIP2EF 


PocktindsOnce; 
ManhWAWni India Dock, 


London EU 



.CEDAR CLOSE 

- DULWICH SEa 

Complete comfort and security 
in Retirement 

A seduded development of retirement fiats 
finished to a very high standard, and set in 
landscaped gardens off Thuriow Park Road, with 
shops and transport dose by. 

Self-contained apartments all with fitted 
kitchens, built in safety and security features, low 
cost heating, low ground rent/service charge, 
many communal facilities, phis a resident warden 
(24 hour em agency service.) 

PRICES FROM £53,950 (Special purchase > 
scheme available at reduced price) Ar 
READY FOR OCCUPANCY 
SHOWFLAT/SALES OFFICE ArJ? 


SHOWFLAT/SALES OFFICE ATA? 

TELEPHONE: 01-670 9877 

Townctoice 

01-947 7351 


SU3ANE SO, SW1 

gT MY? HQ YOU CAI BERT 

MRUnSBEB m TfflS QUALITY BUHLDflKL 


A manber ol 4 or 5 todroomed (3 bathrooms) mansion flats to W 


- ^ ? 8 | tot ^ y eapote and cumins, comptataty 

raOned . redacoretsd & raMy-to-room-into - others enpabto ol 
rtowfaslmwa to ortiar or by tha lonaras Owiraahra. 
HEStOENT PORTER, UFT ETC. 

NoPraodurea nui famnCSOOM wk 


nmto ftoroCSM par wafc 


Cpil 1TUJ l/CKICIMOTAM 


s oro hi c wmasw 


2 ^ 3 bedroo m Bats lor stt nth «cceSont ttsd tateftaw. 
w™ra. wty camwad aad new ar m non pats. 


LEASE 12S YEARS 


EIIQJOOD 


JOINT SOLE AQEM7S 


W. A. ELLIS 


01-581 8431 


01-581 7654 


CONVEYANCING £145! 

(plus VAT and dsbarsematts) 
WHATEVER THE PRICE OF THE HOUSE an uy resdan 
or ptxtinse. Senioa mduled in oar tnmpirir fized/pdcc pi 

* Conveyancing here in England and Wak* 

* 24 boor prnnraf or anroer phone service 7 days a week 

- Free colour broc hure provi d e d 

* Up ro 100% reangiaes ainnf at anih life aMi a ao ce 

- Quotations etnas itAdb or hi viidis 

* Nn mi *fflbp t w ha m mi t —in m 


01-5384321 


No need to Take time off work' an me sfsaa 

Personal, professional and feiendly service 

For Bonpy work gd a nk nr purchase £20 pbs VAT cm 

rdurfled 

Pbaoe Oorics Rounbirg A Co 
SOLICITORS 
M1-7M 9520 
Quose Ref CR14S 

56, Barj New RoadTPresnridi, Mmkse M25 tffU. 

YtmV be fUntaraiy mrpriuiS 


LUXURY PRUPERn REDUCED FOR 
IMMEDIATE SALE 



hl'TH srrc? 


Flats & Houses Wanted NOW! 

Sale Fees 1% (plus VAT) 
for aU nstrudions taken in Odnber 1986 


RANT 

& PARTNERS 



Uarah wan. Vdm India Doc*, London EM 

01-538 4321 


SUDBROOKE LODGE 
LONDON SW 


temdy Itouse loitofo mueii 

' ISSSSFUS . ; j ygp. 01 2/™ Ot an aae. Sit 101915 wan 
payd det^ careii^ retaoed m rodemsHl M cmraHv mm hen aav 

bSP SSL 01 “W*" shops mi 

Danj Rre/NKhm : Conwvamy TPSaym^Bdofl An : Gaabe . 
Rsemold sasjm 

« i OBrr SOLE AOENTS 

M FWUU » STEM S GLY8 
61-228 9174 B1-223 6111 


Fwr bedrooms. Three brtauun s . Large doing room. Even largar 
sitting room. Kddien/fafeaktast mom nidi enfter. separate oven and 
gr9. tndge. deep freeze, washing macblne and efisti washer. Ample 
sange space throughout. 6arage avalatiie. Managadantons. Reboe 
cafecdon ad "nan-avfarer. 998 yew lease, eitrooo to gd 


HOUSES AHD FUTS THROUGH 
OUT THE D0CKLAHDS AREA 


il Kenwood 


Call 01-736 9191 (weekdays). 



WATERLOO GARDENS 
MILNER SQUARE N1 


P'W^roiaand euGcassfut luxury 



s' 


- Jii *3' 

*,**C tit** 


f e , 1;:^ ^ . ... 


S- 4 V>** 


j:"'; 



FRO 

6Vj 


■!*V..r -jr-; 

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01 -42b .H3-| 


f !.\v Y 


• •, ] ... ‘ ’ 1 

: s i 


*1 N 


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1; .. . 7 
y< Yu 


i\, a. 

O i 

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■. *4i 












THE TIMES WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 1 5 1986 



PROPERTY BUYERS’ GUIDE 
LONDON PROPERTIES 



***V^-: r : 

Mr ft . ..... 

*!*•! . 
fajta'-s - 


liWof 
Iptr « 

'V. 

We#**'*. 

PINw'V 

*««*-*>*ff ■ 

* '*''•* - 
•nvA ; 


Si=S- 

JJ2SJ ^ B nbedrooms. a drawing 
stefffSJtaL din,n9 room > and ttere is a 


and moving to NoS 
The nous&has a soi 
garden. W JL EH is is 


tod cottage in 
widge, London, 
iptonshire. 

i^SISSa 


Q5XSM 


OFFICE 

WAFFMQ E.1 Superb Riverside Apartment 
Lounge. Bedroom, Fitted Kitchen. Luxury Bath- 

s! a a™ 00 *** ptaw ' "t***** 1 

PLYMOUTH WHARF E.U Styffcn Riverside 
ApartmenL Lounge, Bedroom. Fttted Kitchen. 
Fuiiy TW Bathroom, Central Heating, Entry 
Phone. Parking space. tBSJOOO. 

JAMESTOWN HAKBOUR E.14 Specious Town 
House on Quay side position. 4 Bedrooms, 
lounge. Luxury Kitchen. Bathroom & Shower 
room. Osntral Heating. Oarage. Private Mooring. 
£175.000. 

WAPPWG, E.1 Spilt Level Ret adjoining St 
Katherines Dock. 2 Large Bedrooms, Lounge. 
Ktehen/Dmer. Central Heating. £115.000, 
FMARS MEAD E.14 Recently Constructed 
Semi-Detached House. 2 Bedrooms. Lounge. 
Kiichen, Bathroom, Garden, Puking Space. 


A country mansion with Gunpowder Plot asso ciations.' Lypin tt Park 


rp4 In » 

1 he sculptor s creation 


v 

**»?■ 
*****•• V: 

u 4 - 

W**V- . 
rt«s *r '■.* 

- 


r>_* .> ■ 
V- • 
' 

fW.:,-- 

■ 

• jfcVr 1 

• 


■ St Tfrn'an s Hail, near Richmond. 

or *<shire, is not the school that 
tomed out the little horrors. It is a 

?[££| ll i J st ® 3 -,° L,Ben Anne country house 
dating from 1706 with fine pillars, * 
cornices and fireplaces restored to 
provide a comfortable family house It 
is built of stone under a tiled roof and has 
six reception rooms and six 
bedrooms. St Trinian’s stands In more 
than two acres of gardens and a 
paddock, with outbuildings and a stable 
block- The Drooertv has nfanninn 


consent for conversion to a hotel, it would 
also be suitable as a nursing home. 

Strutt & Parker's Harrogate office in 
conjunction with Renton and Renton 
of Richmond, quote a £235,000 guide 
price. 

■ The Old Parsonage at Moreton-in- 
Marsh, Gloucestershire, has been 
altered and extended since it was 
buttt in the aarty 1700s, and stands in 
waned gardens near the parish 
church. Behind its Georgian facade ate 
three reception rooms and five 
bedrooms, and adjoining ft are 
outbuflcfings, including a 
conservatory. Bftnkhom'a Moreton-itv- 
Marsh office with Lane Fox and 
Partners 1 Cirencester office are asking 
for offers around £200,000. 

Nash pair snapped up 

■ The first pair of restored John Nash 
houses in a redevelopment on the Crown 
Estate in Regent's Park, London, took 
five working days to sell from first 
inspection to exchange of contracts. 
Numbers 6 and 7, Prince Albert Road, are 
phase one of the scheme and were 
priced at £950,000 (six bedrooms, three 
reception rooms) and £1 .5m (seven 
bedrooms, four reception rooms and a 
swimming pool) respectively. 

Lassmans sold them together to an 
overseas buyer at dose to the 
combined asking price. The development 
includes nine cream stucco houses 
designed by Nash in the 1830s and one 
newly conflicted two-floor detached 
house. 


Lypiatt Park near the village of Bisley in 
Gloucestershire is a historic house dating 
front the 1 4th century and retaining 
much of its origins, although it was 
remodelled and extended in the 19ih 
century. 

For the past 29 years the house has 
been owned by the sculptor Lynn 
Chadwick, who has stamped his own 
personality firmly on it. not least in 
painting it all white. The only concession 
is the domed ceiling of the Inner haUL 
which remains painted with its star 
pattern. 

Chadwick has done much of his work 
there. The house — and the garden — are 
furnished with his metal sculptures, 
while the rooms too are testimony to his 
creations. _His marble baths, including 
one sunk into the floor, are in several 
bathrooms, and the dining hall, part of 
the original halt, has a built-in polished 
stone dining table and matching side- 
board designed by him. He also opened 
up the hall to the windows across what 
had been a passage, giving it much more 
light and creating a gallery. 

The castellations and towers give the 
impression of a feudal castle, but they 
were added later and the property began 
life as a monastic house. In 1809 Sir 
Jeffrey Wyatville remodelled the north 
front and in 1876 Thomas Henry Wyatt 
added the south-east wing. Each wing of 
the house has its own square tower, to 
one of which the chapel is attached by a 
short cloister. 

Any self-respecting historic house has 
its associations, and the library at Lypiatt 
is reputedly the scene of meetings of the 
conspirators in the Gunpowder Plot, 
based oh the connection between the 
former owners, the Tbrogmortons, and 
the plotters. Later, during the Civil Wars, 
Lypiatt was held for a time by Par- 
liamentary troops because of its im- 
portant strategic position, 500ft above 
sea lever with commanding views of the 
road from Stroud in the Severn Valley to 


Cirencester and Oxford in the Thames 
Valley. 

The Grade II* fisted house has a 
reception hall, five reception rooms, 
eight bedrooms and six bathrooms. 
There is also a self-contained annexe and 
flaL and two cottages. 

The gardens and grounds of about 10 
acres have fine views, and again Chad- 
wick has spent much time in their 
restoration and replanting, including a 
yew hedge. The kitchen gardens have 
peach and pear trees growing up the 
stable yard wall, and there are a stone 
pillared conservatory and a domed 
greenhouse. 

Chadwick and his wife are leaving 
reluctantly, to spend more time abroad, 
but he feels that be has done all he can at 
Lypiatt and needs to move on. “I really 
feel that I have been spoilt here,” he says. 

Ideal place for a buyer In 
the pop music industry 

Within the gardens is a stable block 
round an open courtyard, which dates 
from the 1 9th century and was built to 
resemble a castle. But among the main 
interests at Lypiatt are the 1 4th-century 
private chapel, a Grade I listed 13th- 
century granary which survives in 
perfect condition and has a carved stone 
ox's head as a chute for the grain, and 
also a Grade I dovecote dating from the 
1 4th century. 

Knight Frank & Rutley is expecting 
more than £1,250,000 for Lypiatt. Bill 
Yates, of the agents' country residential 
department explains it “contains a lot of 
real estate in a very good area”. He 
expects interest from Britain and over- 
seas, and believes it could appeal to 
someone in the pop music industry, as it 
could provide plenty of room for 
recording studios — or it could become a 
country house hoteL 

cw 


SURREY QUAY SE1B 1988 Built Mews Style 
House, 4 Bedrooms, Lounge, Fitted Kitchen, 
Bedroom pka Shower Room, Central Heating. 
Integral Garage. £133.000. 

LOtOON YARD E.14 Spit Level Apartment with 
Rtwer View. 3 Bedrooms, 21’ Lounge, Fitted 
Kitchen, Bathroom plus shower Room, Central 
He ating. £ 140.000. 

CUPPERS QUAY E.14 Extremely attractive 
Apart m ent on Waterside development. *L* 
Shaped Lounge, Bedroom, Fitted Kitchen, Bath- 
room, Private Mooring. £99,000, 

REVELY LOCK SE.1B Semi-Detached House in 
Pleasant Square. 2 Double Bedrooms ‘L* Shaped 
Lounge, Fitted Kitchen, Bathroom. Central Heat- 
ing, Car Port. E72JDD0. 

CUPPERS QUAY, E14 "MUST BE VIEWED” 2 
Bedroom Waterside Apartment ‘V Shaped 


£110,000. 

“LATEST LIST OF DOCKLANDS 
PROPERTY AVAILABLE 
ON REQUEST** 

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 


r07?53W53* 


Winkworth 

CENTRAL FULHAM SW6 

Superb Development of Five Exclusive Luxury Homes 












48, 49 & 50 
Evelyn Gardens 
SW7 

A luxury interior designed 
conversion of three period 
buildings in a prime 
residential area. 

The property offers a 

rejection of spacious apartments sbouilaty 00m 

a Il.OOam^^t^tebdays 

magnificent penthouse U.00am-4.0Opmueeke£L 

spanning the development a joint detetopmemly I tarMBaffimr 

Amenities include: Pr o p erti es ltd and Ne am ere Ltd 

• 6 person passenger lift Joi nt sole agents 

• Video entryphones 

• Burglar alarms (f fARLEYy) 

■ Luxury Bosch kitchens V AfTOL 7 

• Marble tiled bathrooms ^ 5 = 5 ^ 

■ Independentgas central heating THcphmv bi-VM 1*0 iHrpiMacC 

• Carpets and curtains A 

• Balconies, terraces and FmiLuroffi 

communal gardens *kptoooe(li.jM 2 jM 


FARLEY 

w&OOL 


CLUTTONS 


THrphoocOl-SW llil 


GROSVENOR SQUARE 
MAYFAIR W1 

An impressive fourth floor apartment with spacious ac- 
commodation ktoal tar entertawing tn probebfy me most 
prestigious block of tea square. 4 Bedrooms, 3 Bath- 
rooms. 30" Drawing Boom, Separate DMng Room. 3rd 
Reception, Fitted Kitchen, CH & CHW, Lifts. 24 hr Porter- 
a^a_ete Lease 47 yews. Offers bwflad tn region of 

Sola Agents. Tel 01-€S4 6182. 

SOUTH STREET 
MAYFAIR W1 

A substantial comar family house with character requir- 
ing some attention. Principal bedroom with en suite 
dressing room and b a thro om + terrace, 2 further double 
bedrooms with en suite bathrooms, 2/3 Reception 
Rooms, Fitted Kitchen, Cloakroom and Staff accommo- 
dation of Bedroom. Bathroom, and Utfflty Room. 
Independent Gas Central Heating, Double Glazing, 
burauiar alarm etc. Lease 54 years. Often invited m 
region of ES95JD00. 

Sole Agents. Tel 01-664 6162. 

RADNOR PLACE 
HYDE PARK ESTATE W2 . 

A magnificent family house modernised to a vary high 
standard. 4 Bedrooms, 4 Bath rooms, 3 Recaption Rooms 
(including stunning 30* Lounge with roof terrace), 
Gym/Sauna. Rhea Kitchen, Cloakroom, Double Garage 
and Single Garage. Independent Gas Central Heating, 
Double Glazing, Burguiar Alarm, etc. Lease 46 years. 
£475,000. » 

Soto Agents. Tel 01-684 6162. 


= OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK — 


55 LANCASTER GATE 
Q#3LONDON W2 

24 Luxury Apartments Created to meet 
. the Demands of todays Sophisticated Buyer 

1, 2, & 3 Bedrooms £95,000 - £265,000 
★ 125 Year Leases ★ Views to Hyde Park 
★ Independent Heating & Hot \Kfatcr 
★ Video Entry Phone Security System ★ Passenger Lift 
★ Resident Porterage ★ Fully Equipped Kitchens 


□StURlIS 

01-7309291 01-7240241 


oPt> 


100% UP TO £150,000 
95% UP TO £500,000 
80% NO PROOF OF INCOME 


RING: 01-435 3138 


Windsor Mi 

Z8b Hampstead ' 




age Services 

Street NW3 1QA 




RE— MORTGAGES MORTGAGES 


No Survey Pees - No Legal Fees 
No Arrangement Fees 
Competitive Rates and Terms 
Non-Status - Any Purpose 
Endowment Linked or Tax Efficient 
Pension Schemes 

Phone Raymond Brett & Co 
Milton Keynes (0908) 368071 


PROMPT MORTGAGE OFFER 


I! 


NORTH OF THE 
THAMES 


LONDON YARD 

LAST FEW REMAINING UNITS! 


On this stunning riverside development in the heart of London 
Docklands, built amidst attractive water-gardens and alongside 
the Thames. 

CALL NOW FOR DETAILS 


A nap ti fiOB* petal residence 
occuwtna an entMUe pan a 
Dw han af tie Bxmfury Con- 
senanon ana & won easy 
reach Hi both City & West £na 
Aco» 'conunes 2 'non 
iMdrms nth hwtams en sun. 3 
fcnfeK dHe bedims. Geest 
battom. (baring on. Inge, (ge 
study, feral An on. Ige 
W/ntat rm, Bobus Pantry, pan- 
eled. mop ha*, ft* gas di 
Many ong reams. Q» areas a 
bum & rear 

Freehold EffDJUO. 
Wtakwoflh A Co 354 24fl0 


View today: London Yard 
2 Amsterdam Road 
Manchester Road 
London E14 9JB 
Telephone: 01 987 4473 


Show Complex Open 
Mon-Fri lOam-tipm 
Sats llam-5pm 
Sun 12.30pm-5pm 


PARRIS & QUIRK 
Chartered Surveyors 






MORTGAGES 

terms now available 

3tt times income ta 3 times Joint 
raceme 

100% mortgages available up to 
£100,000 (with no upper limit) 

No evidence of income required far 
loans op to £250,000 lor qtnfH|fag 

Applicants 

MIRAS facility available over £304X10 
Re-mortgages far qBafltyag porposes 

Ring 01-235 0691 

For full Information 
Open until 8pm today 

Winkworth 
Financial Services 
25a Molcomb Street /. 

London SW1 Af 


MAYFAIR 

2 excellent Investment properties 

83 yuf letfti 083*8. AIWOmW fl«*. •£* 



HMSDPE renal Mfestmnaar 
tot at tres-ta«i mcL Dmmii 
aw «w. first to. tad bt te- 
iteibaf m. rarefy 
maaeniM ana ntcsreM. large 
ramon langnd tenures). 2 
bads. Brtrawe ib>. tanen ta 
batnream. » ws. n3SJJO0. n 
atta. lor <mb safe bmwMte 
rang 01 834 5581 Inn m 
•rends) or M 839 1233 ex 466 
tmtUqtl 


CHAPELS1 DE, W2 

Outtandmg ArcttteHte- 
soiefl Freenou Mws house 


with fiauY (wares. 2 reasu 
3 beds, 2 tenscss, capon 

£315*0 

Brawn Beck FtaiaH 


A5BCTSBURV ESTATES 
30 VAMSTO'v PLACE. SW5 
0’-38 •, 6677 : 



ba wares rare ream tmng bk 
3 Bad Gun IU imk ennrmoDS 
HcaoMi £160.000. 997 par 
tee 



GARDENS, SW3 

imposing S/7 twaroom ma*- 
Eorane on ground & lower 
ground Boom. 2 magnificent 
reception rooms. < bam- 
rooinu. 39 year tease. Can 
be converted into 2 flats. 
E36CUM0. 

352 1600 (T) 


37 GUlYflJUE SQBAffi 
LMMHWC1 

hi a defiqtittui Garden Souare. 
two nswv converted 99 year 
lease two bedroom Rats, one 
three bedroom two bvmg room 
man onege. 

£77500, SBSjOOO. E1D5JB0 
Viewing tally tQGO am tn 
&00 pm. 

Tsk^kuw: 

01-449 2015 or 
01-889 3485 ID- 


LIQUIDATION SALE 
Cadogu Gardens SW3 
Enobve resdww m neriir reno- 
ntrt OuWt ng 4 UMaans. 2 
VjM. argent nxooon mores, 
raw t*®oom sore. 2 naov 

rooms, new kdcnm (at 
aookPCKL Gas C« MU wrang 
treaaa p. to arecnreHt teem- 
bertnp re pnviR garaeas wdi 
taoow ctuts Urea n sold by 
rod of Daren Lose 61 
MS. 000 . ve* br aneowmea. 
Tefc01-589 4W7. 

Soft! 306. 

RtfHbflc Ttkam Systoni 


MAIDA VALE 

121 Sittmtead home 

Badusw comrerelon 7 flats: 3 
sold. 1 BedJffiJOO). 2 Bate 

(Slkoooj. Gas CH. QuaHy 
avoughoaL 

8UV DKECT FROM DtVROPfB 
yffiVTUS HEHH6/ 
TflDBS- 8 pjn 

ST ARLCROFT LTD. 
078375161 
Office bam. 


MOtLAND PA «» K “a* 

ri^d a ww Entnum han. b«L 
vnth ruled wamnani 2 hath irrruion. bain, mV. <*.r , kH. a 
IX pnsuilci. hftMjIiful Igr (idly JaiaSr lew StJrrol 

muHm kWdin*r^»«udrt J 

Minfleardcn £169.950 TriOX £120000 Trt OI 602 1300 
731 0099 


DRUCE 


m * 


m year rent, xbww. 

• lore outgomps. 987 W ' JSh 

my, (bedroom, Z fecepftm flat hi 
,i' , mmagaess, ma*S sswoe. owte^je * c® P*™ 1 ®- 

t f-‘ SCOTT, OABDENEB A CO. 

■ r :- } 159, GkHre^tCTRd, London SW7. 

' :y D1373T882 

" CAHOMBURY Ml 

I fl* - . 4LWYNE ROW - Stymogseff < S2o5 C ta 


Style and Space in Listed Square 

GRAND OPEN DAY 
Cleveland Square 

Come and view some magnificently re- 
» stored apartments all with terraces and. 
balconies overlooking beautiful commu- 
nal gardens, ultra modem kitchens, 
luxurious -bathrooms, long leases. 
£245,000 - £355,000. 

Stow fiflts open Saturday 1 8th and 
Sunday 19th October, 10 am. - 5 pm. 


Conveyancing 

£280 by City Solicitors 

f+ VAT and disbursemems) for buying or seJfhn your tome 
m the usual way on prices 14 ) to £60,000. ftng !w quotes on 
fajher figures. 

BARRETTS SOLICITORS, 

49 QU&I mrtOM ST, LOMNW CC4 
mEPHOKEt 04446 OKI . 





tSOAXOS PreenoW 
J.S.A. Holden Matthews 
01-226 1313 and 
Hottteck Dedato 01-226 0160 


EMBANKMENT GARDENS, SffS . 022^00 
Mosi anracDw xa qureiY BcriBB On on lore ground floor or tarot 
! pmkxj icndcocl hou^i. m qiuw Crtncero c*t uw Emamkrowir. Mcamiujoo 
I t dneoawd iprgo lugh cadnged neww room m) smal wo 
I rew Z Date Jam. wjiwwWB non no gu en. SO years. . 

L 9, Gate StrMrt, SWX Tec 01-392 1484 / 


LONSDALE SQUARE N1 
GRADE II LISTED 1830’s 

Magnificent Sve floored family house set In quiet corner of a 
favoured garden square In conservation area. In superb order 
throughout, fight and otogsnt accomodation, retamng portoa 
features comprising 28 x 14' through reoepbon room. 28 x IB - 
temfly/tatchan area, master badboom/hixury batnroom suite, 
further 4 doubfe bedrooms. 2 baths. 2 tec's. 8K*y roam, etc. 60 
ft west facing surety waled garden. Gas CH and entrance 
phone/intercom on every floor. 

OFFERS M EXCESS OF £3004100 FREEHOLD 
JLSJL HOLDEN MATTHEW 226 1313 and 
HOTBLACK DESIATO 226 0160 


BATTERSEA 

Rare opportunity to purchase 3 bedroom col- 
lage. Slones throw from Chelsea, 50ft South 
feeing garden, double reception, well fitted 
kitchen & breakfast room, huge bathroom, 
good condition throughout £175,000. 
Edwin Evans. 228 0051. 


WESTMINSTER 

Exquisite 4 tiedrm flat 3 en suits ttathnns & shwr rm. 
Dbfa reception, bar. (fining rm. new fully fit kit Just 
decorated & cptd. AD amenities. £285,608 

PEMBRIDGE VILLAS W2 

A stunning 2 level apartment wWi every facility. 3 
badms. 3 recaps. 3 baths, fufiy fitted tetchan* £271508 

PHONE 01-221 2221 


CONVEYANCING 
£230+ VAT & DISBURSEMENTS 
ON REGISTERED FREEHOLD CONVEYANCING 

WE CAN ALSO SCa YOUR HOME THROUGH OUR ESTATE AGENCY 
DEPARTMENT 

WfifTTEN QUOTATIONS 4 DETAILS SUPPUED UPON REQUEST .. 

CORNH4JE & CO 
SOLICITORS 
01-729 4360 


HA W 1 01 8 tal l H M EWtui 5 
Ml Vkioom farajlv house. 3 
Mila. H*p daublr r«W. 25' rultj' 
HUM kUfhm/hroaldavl rm. 
preuy west IdCinq (WOm + po- 
lio. GCH. crmrjt location: 
£235.000 Trt Ol 7*00632 


close env *na wm Ena 2 twa 
rul in arw luxury rinotoOm™r 
dl CinWHi Amplr parking- 
Fully wruippeti and lumisttw 
lor immediate omipaoon. 
CSA.OOQ Trt OAOiVSa2«2. 


FMCMUEY ro. nark Cmreni. 
bMi strew. Mr,'. hgM ftv*t floor, 
hall house 3 bMrootn.nat New 
UKtmi. w» CH. off Mr eel park, 
toll- 94 voar I raw £68.750. Trl 
01 S46 7730 

*T. JOHNS WOOD SupertUy rr 
lurlMMiM 2 OouMr DM fomrf 
Mon Snntniuhr Own park too 
«T yran, Law witocunas 
Cl 17.000 Trl Q1 024 3540 


HjOAHEUUBI, Fulham, nrwty 
mod. Id nr. 2 fed flat. 993yrs_ 
£74. ocx) oi eai butt if» 

KBM3WOK AVENUE NW3 

Luk -dud ro *rp kil/dirwr. Igr 
Slum* 9dh. tSUJjOO Open 
Door 0) 794 6001 
MAH8LE ARCH pred a wrre. one 
heur dal -r balrony 46 vri 
C9 7.6W T HOaWNS: 750 
9937 

pnorer TEKRACE. NWS. LoitfV 
1 M Or roni fl«- 5 fk-minv rgr 
reeeg. CH- 98 yr kaar. 
E9S 9SO. ToC 01 328 S387 
nmffsac i/2 bed hats CMwi- 
.n- ov cnooldno Ihr Thame*. 
Trom C97.000. ... ■ 

Rnrrjue RmdenUBl 488 4852 
UUMMtOMI E18. BrauHful 
Croroau MlK fi Bed det house, 
in prolmtou*. pouMn. Jmmani 
tale C25SOOO. Ol 989 ST76 
ST J0HM5 WOOD OOOMnl Mnn 
Ouaini 2 room Hal ModenusetL 
No mtmcf fharvev UUKX) 
ono 28b. 9914 mm (Ti 

tncyn CARDENS VU2 Small 1 
lirdraoni nal NewlV 
modernised. ne» Udim. Boal- 
Ivnae LS8J300 083623611a 
SUTHERLAND. A\E. W9. BngW 
liew Hals Furnished, rquuwed 
and rradi- h> llic In. CfiftpM' 
TBSOOO Tel 01-402 6724 
VICTORIA i pm im n itai UU* 
of poiniiiiri Lie 126 yrt, 
US760O Tel: Hunier Cstam 
01 828 2140- 

(NIL. luxury 2 irar old 2 car 
hrd- ? bathroom flat *»tU* rar 
pad., in uuler rid de sac 
C92.000 Tel 01 221 **201 
IAUNB urtbb period ndine- Mu. 
OKI. f»nm- V 6 bed*. 33» 
louime CIO& 960 Ol 667 «ua 


HMRACULATE Balter Street area 
lial m exrrilem ranouion. Four 
oedroorm Two impuon 
room*. FuDv lllled Ulrhen 
CCH C19RSOO. TrfrWwne 
Ol 724 1545. 


MEWS rial ceniral. near Hade,' 
Street 5 vunwA rooms, wn. 

CH lorK-iw garaoe- hIUm «Hh 
Ml. rurkdre. lumllure rif 7 
year lease. Nearest offer 
CSOOOO. Tel Ol Ml 3605 


AW LONDON. IO Mint M25 25 
nuns WhI Em tntinanjltfrly 
nuuniainrd 6 bedroom ed w 
Mine 3 rern». vuperb rud kit 
GW 5 rad tnd m. Qsiwa 
qdn £ 286.000 l/h Viewms lo- 
dav 958 tfnb or 727 9703 
PAPERBAS OOTTADE Fnlhani 
Dnnmm Xi'lsh romfaeiafik- 
nome Master bed suite -r S 
warms a 2nd ham 2 rharnwnu 
rerv. nk, IImmuk pauaqaidem. 
G» CH (317.000. Tel: Ol 
381 9019/828 0972 
WESTMINSTER Brtqtil JWKTOm 
mansion nai m nrMlreil conai- 
non l/2 recHM. 3/a beds. 
Lmefl- omod features. Owner 
must «eH. Offers in Mere* Of 
LI 75 000 Tel Hunter CuaWs 

01 828 2145 

BAYSWATER WSfc, Near Orme 
souare CreJi peierHMl. Lmriy 
Ouuh rorwr lownrne 5 beds, 
uarane. gam Mon hasemeru 
L iiinademeed. C42&000 free- 
hoM Linrua Ud 602 5564. 
UNMSUMWO 2 bed manonelle 
ai iiuaae end at Kino Heurv% 
rd Pnnrpse HAL Nrw UluaJ 
Lite run. eartv sale hence 
£79.950. lei 353 1588 i work) 
ref JSH 

BAYSWATnt (cause- F/Hakrt 5 
Hoars. 3 rereps. 5 beds. 2 Mu. 

2 Pd ns. gp Ke eteosnl 

rooms, wtq Feaiurn. £355.000 
Lieu today Ol 229 5253 
CIUSVnCN W« Brhjhl wanous 2 
dhie href P/B Isi nr (la! Shared 
vdn- woi. low row remroi 
foe HR/Uibf/M4 ££7.000 Trt 

01 314 OIST < worst 
KMBtfTSmDQE, SW7. Hide 

Par*.. Superb new 3 bnlrm rid 
in n«iirv Mori. -Crnd nr Barer 
poner- 88 rears 2209.000, 

Ltnro-o Ltd 01-602 G&Sd 

MARBLE ARCH Large JO mom 
nowse lor mndmuutioD 
? nain-i-a wr * 2/a ear garage ♦ 
lurking. Rnoi irrrare ai yrs. 
C298/XX) THi Ol 4fi6 3630 

SWISS CUTTACK. - .Dm** 

fronted ground Door IU. 98 fl- 
pmajonuiden. t reams, ibrds. 

2 baths, original . features. 
£225.000 T*H OI«2d 3143 

MKOr ST superb large 4 bed. 
2 hath Hal Pre-Ilfs- Mori, 

» 1 lli roof Harden 7! yrs 
C395 000 Tel Ol 486 SoSO 


n. r' .j Ti T 


1 bedroom flat staled n the 
been ol me City, ta roof Hixe 
wfli superb whs of Rwr nd 
Lflwtan skyline.- • 

£73£0(L 

For WHing please raV. 


Oft 01-820 2406 
Sam - 7pm sev«i days a week. 


BLOOMSBURY WC1- FrrehoU 
Gmeuui lown houm- 4 M. 2 
baih. 2/3 imp and garage 
C2O&O00 Trap* Harm * Cos 
387 0077 


CCKimu. Sunny gum 6 
room, a MUM. run CCH beau- 
tiful decor, can a wan your 
romnwion. Cl 40.000 Tel: Ol 
Ki2 8698 


FULHAM. Charming fully mod I 
bed Hal Lop Polio. CCH. new 
epls *. dertjr . ffunv all ores 
feature-. tdi-DOO Ol 3850451 
■nn/wMfi 352 7000 iDavL 


FULHAM Charm mo 2 bedroom 
uilil level garden rmienun 
Hal lull ol rnarartrr iT7g.500. 

Tel Ol 386 8310 lc\cs & 
vu/eodr-i * Ol 626 8171 (days! 


GLOUCESTER ST. SW1 Smart 
2nd dr floi Receo. dm bed.. K 
4 B. md w CH Contents 
avail C8U.OOO Trl. Ol 938 
2722i da V 1 - 01 828 3058ievei 


HMHBURr f teUK 15 mm WeM 
Did a City 4 bed luxury now 
min nmen alory 6 sunny wre- 

Cl 70000 ono Ol 226 
3410 inn A h/tnbi 

FULHAM by BKhom Pk & imns 
ris Liirgfr lw> bear flM 
Cl 12.500 T HOSKINS.- 730 
9995T 

ABBEY ROAD NWb Elegant and 
vpactouv ground (nor rial wiu, 
'nrranul INIUn Huge double 
Bedroom, large reception kilctv 
en. bathroom, nau. CCH. Lise or 
vinau garden M year lease in- 
rludinq Ift share of F/H- 
£73 BOO for quKK ortv.ue sale 
Tefc 01 Site 1960 
BAPMSBURV m. Deltalful 2 
oouWp bed roomed flai present- 
ed in DTimaridate rondllnn and 
lull gf charorier Fuffy ruira 
spill level idimen. totdtfid 
ooump mwnn room, bal tv- 
room. CH C89.960 Tel Ol 
hOT 4044 iw-end gr evri 
HIGHBUBY N5 Ocevtlv.lv -HU- 

imus 2 bed garden ih» in 
quiet nilde kit Offer* through 
, l,<e«. pH. 2 dPUMe beds, belli. 
55 II amain rear m rd«n . re 
fpiilh rrdrroralrel C72JOO 
UH btVMh» 5. Knrt 01. 35(9 
0«6l 

BROMFTQN PK Fl'LHAAi Sbb 
2 interior dmigned --tuuio apart. 
nienre an Ihtv award wlrvmnq 
vile Set m PjrMjndi Swim 

nHi«l poot gym. uuna. pro ale 
nark mu al Cto9SO oi 581 
8721 (.73.950 Ol WMO» 
CAMOmum NX. Law rmuMoq 
J bedroom. S bathroom, new 
win how wnn garaae in pr<- 
v jle road L150000 rreehnw 
OtaiKfrom nnrr. Lid fVt Ol 

404 444? /oi 467 72B3 f?4 hr 
•dlirpl 


Vrrv nrariv iwmpJrtr and rexK lor abmni 'immediate wqmlro wc an- fltorid tu offer (tin outre 
mirHrnl derptepmem nl vnun Lmdmi faumes. mil located cW In the exccfirnl amemilieo uf Fulham 
ttnuutrav. 

f-'ialK- filled tn an uiw-uaUv hich spvciliraiinn. ihmr .1 fitdpigntlMlics Iralurr Pnxmpnhl Wnrhere, oith 
Neil applteorm and ounr wilh a chokr of mrpm, and lilinK They abu havr burrisr alarm* and the 
hrnrTil nf InlrcraJ range* and smart Mediated pal i. mi. central beating and NHBC Id yr nuuiA. 
We haw an hrwLsii- o in slnmgH renHnmend'ing the qualit y of dcMOi and flnidi and a» ordv Inrec feriict 
remain awibbir would an iropcnirin ai ihr earliert Pppurtunity. Viramg in easily- arranged 

ihrnueh thin office 


40 New Kings Road, London SW6. 01-731 3388 

A DEVELOPMENT BY WESTERN DEVELOPMENT LTD 


VII STHMK 
MAISONETTE 

1 st Hmc Large Spin attractive sn- 
mo ntom. douois bedroom. 
ttd*n. teffroom. Sedudefl sunny 
roof (met. Tap Ftar. 
Stndy/bfga dovUe bedroom wrtfi 
awaw pm ./tamed cettog. 
KH Share of F/H. g5yr tea 

rasjHi 

Tel : 81 221 6983 (Sasday) 

■r 727 8812 (toat fasy ij 


UDHIOKC SQUARE WX1 Ek- 
mlb' restored, luoti CeiHnped. 
raced ground floor pmod rial. 
In mis preildaou&. tranaud 
Miuaie Largr rerep dnweffy far 
Ing acres of communal garehm. 
2 Aniraoim, kitchen, oathroom. 
dNkioom 4 nan Long lease 
L139.999 Ring OI 229 6901 
bun eves a w’aav-t a-m > 


HYDE PARK Lancaster Gate 
Mod P/B Too lloor flat Very 
hrwm 2 bed*, large imp. 
kitchen b/room. WC S/Facing 
Oalronv. CH/CHW. I ill. pmale 
communal gardem/norkino 8S 
sear lease Cl 30.000 inr 
caippH/curtaim Ter OI 2e2 
8318 


NR MUSWCLL MU. - IMS. COwor 
dun terraced house in auici 
road ckm> to AloMadia Park 
Original Wed floor. 3 bedrooms, 
through reception roam. 
Ut/UPUM room, bathroom. 
CCH. pardrn £82.950 ono lor 
aide* sole TrtOl 693 3432 ipf 
ftrei OS 341 2862 K-vc-VJ 


FULHAM SWe Orbghllulb scu 
Oouv sunny wcU decorated 
nutsonerir 3 owe beds, draw 
ing room. Jin bed/dinuig. kii. 
bout Large flat roof wnn open 
' lews lot b-rrarr/poss exivn 
uon [“<.000 99 )-nm Tel ui 
776 6J71 lev rs) 


l CAMDEN ROAD, tsunawm 
Ourming 2 bedroomed rial 
w iln mug- Share ol ireehou 
and garden Reception fitted 
kilrhrn. bathroom and CCH 
Fitind carpets E69.SOO *07 
9532 home 727 61 19 wort. 


CMBWICA. Sunny mansion rial 
in sought oner block Large re 
rrMmi Double bedroom 
L us uts fated kaichen/brooMasi 
room Mod bathroom Gas CH 
Los, oulqniiMk C5&000 Tel 
Ol 747 0607 iw/piHB/pvesi 


4*4 riwW coUomp. VMal relur 
bnlied. 1 dbi. i single bm. tge 
balrony, 1 mm Bishop's Par* 
£79.600 Ol 78S 9ff97 


MAIDA VALE Randolph Aimup 
designer llal 2 beds, ihard 
Odn £99 950 Trt 01 289 4127 

HK2H8URTNS uixurs- tiling m 
a tranquil selUng. A braubfulh 
refurmshPd ta floor flat aluai 
rd In mis hnniy popular tree 
lined bwtevard wnhm a short 
distance of Highbury A Kdma- 
Km&ianan Fully fmed klirt>en. 
rarprw. double «areng and tui 
rons J beds. 17 n recrpl. 
kii/runer. bain. Of eh. ton* 
tease tl 25.000 L/H SUClUry 
A Kern CM 359 0961 . 

LITTLE VENICE. Bngbl 

an ion mi ton (low apart ronn 
f.unm si/rd. reUdrcd lo high 
e-1 si on da ids Cnormous dale 
tirffi. dining nr>. 3 bedrem. 
study /jut brttrtn. kilcften/ 
breau-n) rm Balhrm. ensmtp 
showrer rm. hammy ' Fillip- 
equipped inriuding CH hoi uq 

. tor. Ult. _ porter parking 
C 2 7 6.000 Tel 01 263 4864 

CAOOOAN CAHPPM CTQ Ma 
snnelle romprmng ground 
ituor itH-os. M*airrs. 2 mugoll) 
rent reception rooms. |arg<- 
kihben sum seperaie lou-er 
qyuuna floor tormnanfl j 
i Dram. i»m. ideal for granny 
efuldirn/sufr 39' year lease 
CS65O0O Tel Ol 3S£ loOO 
Jamieson Over Properties 


Comiafd an next page 


i 





H II ii* 1/ r: : Cirri i f » s : liUS S J > 1 !■’ ; i •{ H if \ i 1 1 i jfli i ( il 

























i-i jiiiL T )i a x! 9jiX€9Zm frj a a $ 


PROPERTY BUYERS’ GUIDE 



LONDON PROPERTIES 


COUNTRY PROPERTIES 





131 TMHTY IOAO 
■MKV88TR COMM, 

1W.17. 


An Bxccfiert convasion of G 
self cantoned 1 and 2 bedk 
mom fiats from tte elegant A 
stony Victorian bouse just 
south at Wa ndsworth Coni' 
non dose station and tube 
so only 15 mins Victoria 
mins 


VANS 
BAKER 


Superb recently converted raised 
grated floor 1 Ded/Sudm ft* n 
pond house do tings Road. 
Features marble fnpiace. good 
comcas. double doors, garden 
ne« Ready to mam mo lor 

£62,000 


Tel: 01-584 9594 (day) 
S37 3043 (eves) 


Douglas y 

&>Gadonl 


l very Hips degant tanty ft*. nead- 
«0 so me redecogo on 3 raemnan 
reams. 5 b e dr o oms. 4 HOowns, 
hi chen. dnag room, n&Uy room, 
sax* bong tetany CH. lease 3B 
years t3S?MO. 

MOORE STREET, SW3 
OebghtU panod taraty boose, witti 
gwfla i DaoUe rweobgi room 
dang room. tecBcn/breaWig t < 
room. 4 beds. 2 baths. uMV room, 
chatroom. CH F/HoU ESGOjOOO 

WESTGftTE THRACE. SW10 
Ruby excritara C« rased grand 
Door Ha Large recanon room. 2 , 
beds. 2 tens (1 ensufe). hum. 1 
CH Lease 89 ware ElSLQOO 


BEAUFORT ST, SW3 


Excellent 2/3 bedroom 
flat Batrt drawing m. 


flat fight drawing rm, 
{fining rm, kitchen. 


{fining rm. Ml 
bathroom. 89 
lease. £115400. 


Very bnqH 3ra lloor IU amh hi 
Rkoomd room, 2 douote bees, 
dnng aa. faldtea teth. CJi 
Lease 29 years £129,000 


W730 Mil 


B* mar (H tie buttng at Bae Pten- 
smonaendof HoBamiRd baUM 
accom swn rm. bathrra. 
w/ntang rm. and even room to pn( 
op Be oremghi Quest! Not only afl 
Vis. 35 pnvale goo too Immac 
enters should besom Maybe the 
owner Ml laka an ofler ■ who 


Open today 1030 U 1 pm 


ToYVNCHt MCE 


3553^ 


Lfc U a u JZ 


01-731 444S 


i^NNELTFCO. 


A BABE OFPOBTWY 


ilia jij >:r v- 


A mid InmcT Victorian cot- 


Ita which has retained much 
nf ns menu] charm and 


n in <*n final charm «»C 

Hmracler. The property nf- 


Ipbi well proportioned 

ncmmndalino til 2 

bedrnm. recep. lui bath. 
kti/dawr-The rear prim he. 
me U*hl ooxl ninny in the 
tradilmiul cnUaer Mytr. 
UTSjOUOK/H. 

01 340 4447. 


CodHignood An. N10 


Large double ironted Edrantan 
orapeny supobiy mamtaned and 
nwnmd and retanmg onqwal 
features. 6 beds. 4 recepts. toad 
brehen, modem bathroom: 
doatuoom, safety room, gas CH 
garden 


ISUKTON Nr Early Victorian 
Mfiare- home 2/3 Mb. n« 
■wwn mwo WK-lwn Original 
Icalurn ImowniWr F/H 
i I fed 500 TM 3EH 4716 


P IMLICO owner offer, qtDef. 

BfiHU I bed rut Period house 
tsr drror I m no) Hi a cham' 

cai 500 oi S2i ry>o won 
712238 No agrtls 


Norrnw hu cate s bed fioi 

ovrrloofjnq wrifm. P r«wp 
non rooms rreMwtd Formncfc 
wh* C207.S00 OI 221 1959 


CHELSEA Si 
KENSINGTON 


Qinirrf 7 bed. 4 bote- free 
nold house wilh gdn A 2 roof 
mm 1323-000 LPFEimna 
Pun 058 2222 

KlMinrsMB«C Lumjv 4 S? 

sirm House VW6.000 Bar 
nnOWh haunder* OI 584 

2551 . . . 

H tflH W Oim CATf. ChannteO 
well drcoralrd 2 bedim tut * 

Bead _ ■dSK-J sc 
C90 000 Tot 0245 557457 
SW7 Doable iron U-d lux 4 Bed- 3 
Bifftt 3 fi4ltirni H ouse F /H 
rusooo Barnroroo 

•siundm OI 584 2551 
«wf3 for rnodcmeami t-H»T 

p^ninfiou Saundm Ql S3 4 

2551 

WSO. 4 mow > inorian M * • 

gjumno itwOertiH^bonS fTr«< 

Liti balhrro 4 Mn £1*0.000 
0fio VhiUmotb 221 0330 


GARDENS, SW3 


2 Bed patio flat in need 
of further modernisation. 
73 year lease. £99,000. 

Chesterfield A Co 
01-581 5234 



GARDENS, SW7 


Stuming too floor Bat 
touring toputftui studto 
recepbon room, 2 Beds, 2 
Bams. KiyBreak Room. 
Cfla. 91 years. £225X00. 


Chesterfield & Co 
01-581 5234. 


U5JM ted you won i even haw 
He tratlc. becace Bus mroao ta u 
state too a «v B» jpoinl floor at 


HZ Beautiful, recently inlertor 
dmqned 1st floor dal with may. 

i utter nt trvlltsrd nunwd & 

Aslroiuffed 18* x 36* roof ler 
rare Oose to Hyde Parle. 4 
beds. Able recM- WUhen/ 
breakfast rm. 2 baths il en 
suiirt SZT9XKO Tel: OI 221 
1008 day or OI 229-6612 Evm 


CHELSEA SWIO Ekmam nar. 4 
good rooms f- kit A bath. 
Modernised win, original In- 
lures mainrd Gas CH. Purpose 


buiii Low amomnos. 110 year 
lease 047.000 View any 
tune Tel 01 352 5302 


HOUSEBOAT on Chctwa 
Embankment /cneyne walk un- 
usual ctiaracUT Open plan 
Pllino / dmmo roam. IdEchen 
wlh Ana cooker, bedroom and 
balhroom £46.000. Ring OI 
382 3980 


MOS W AMS WAUL mverolde 
apt on neefusne develop me m . 
Loe renew with balcony. 2 able 
beds, lux Idt & path, ro ch. ga- 
raoe. landsrawed gardens. 
£133000 i Offers* Klrobcr *■ 
k'lmber 01 878 8244. 


BASSETT HD WIO UglH. spa- 
cious artbts flat 2nd /3rd fir 
\irtorun house Studio. 3 bed. 
rrepL barb, kitchen, roof ter- 
rare 99 yr be Snare f/h A 
odd Cl 75X100 01 9 69 4 9 *4 


KENSINGTON w!4 huge raised 
ground floor ruu with pm ale 
garoen Jus* off Ken Htqh Si. 
Spare creep, la roe double bed. 
pas CH Lease 94 yn £89.950. 
Nelson Hearn Oi 937 3811 


NEVER* SQUARE SW5 Law 3 
bed 2nd nr rial menoofciaoaar 
dens. Exc ell ent rondiDon. Space 
row Lux III MIA batnrm. Gas 
CH Lease loo yes £125000 
Nelson Hearn Ql 937 381 1 


■AWHCMI EC2. Several 1 ml 2 
bedroom rials ftM- sale on 120 yr 
ream From 096500 Frank 
Harris A Co 387 0077 


HWT3 LioM 4th floor 2 bedroom 
flal in \en ronimknl sefsice 
Mock ea» parklfto. 
long lease Tel 01 586 47S3 


CHELSEA, cadooan Gardens. 
\ ew today Mapniflrenl family 
fW newly modem rsed and 
ready for immediate occupa- 
tion Arens to superb parted 
souare wsU, tennis courts. Uipe 
double rerep. Urpr dining, fined 
kilrhen. 4 beds. 2 baths it «n 
suilel I mm ense sloraor xucf 
ideal for rental Owners must 
sell C49&J300 ono OI 221 
3090 

SEMSHMITON /HOPand Pack 
view today Superbly decorat- 
ed and newly modernised mew, 
house, moments tram Holland 
Park Lange rrcetvdinuig. fitted 
kitchen. 3 able beds. 2 baUn. 
large oarage, paao. ideal for 
renua Owners must sell Imme 
dialety Offers Ins lied tor quKk 
sale CSISjOOO ono OI 221 
3090 

USOLUTILV STUBHUMS 

Houses/ Flab In Chetsea. 
Kmphbbrtape. Belgravia. Ken 

ungion Cornu) eu> Mkrtm 

from £300.000 W £2 million 
Bamnoten Saunders Ud 01 
584 2551 

■ARKSTOM CONS SW6 Slun- 
nmq first floor ua Kony Rat wlU, 
a 40 s ao* terrace 2 dMe beds. 
2 bath, mgn rrinnoed rev 26 *x 
13' sludy. kU porter. Hd. I ltd 
CH Lease 125 yeans W A. Oils. 
OI 581 7654 

CHELSEA swxo 3 bedroom 
ground and garden maisonette, 
pas cfl. some re dee necessary 
mWM location, new lease. 
Cl 25.000 Jackson Property 
ScTilm open every day Idl 7 
pm 01 351 5635 
CHE L SEA. SWIO Large iluw 
Bedroom mobomkle with dou- 
ble oarage and ©amen. Long 
lease or tree hold £210X100 
Jacksdit Property Smites 
room everyday OH 7 pnu. Tel. 
01351 6633 

STH NENSWCTOHL Super b 2 
bedroom Ral with 2 bath, m: 
20*x I** study/gallery I5*x 7* 
in new romersian Pones. Ml. 
Ind CH Lcofte 125 years 
W A DH* 581 7654 
SWIO. Superb newly mod pmd 
Hr flal wilt pretty COM Lgr 
recep. 2 beds. Ml. bate, e/s 
shower Ind gas C/H 99 yrs. 
Cl 56.000 HOLMANS. 370 
6781 

SWTS. Charmlno immac family 
hse Hi quid eul de sac 06*e 
recep. kll/bkfsl rm. 4 beds. 2 
hates. S noaks. nano _Gaa C/H 
|/H C17%000 HOLMANS- 

370 6781 

KMHUnSSfHDCE. prl» afe Mesev 
Lnwue 1 wed house wite urge 
garage spore PW* extra floor 
Freehold Cl 9000a Ol 581 
8977 rTl 

MARKHAM ST SW* 4 bed 

house? bath. 2 reee pf . ba h-ony 
wul garden. C?95.000 Free- 
hold. OI S8i 3516 or 0243 
773331 

SW6 3 bed ground floor Ral 
Nerds mmol updaung Trnjni- 
Mu opportumly a\ 51*450 
NO agents- OI TM *341 
■HDIMS 01036 1 931 iWorKi 
SWIO. Rrdun-d lor nuirk safe 
Vge | -I IU flal Recep dm area. 


3b«h. Ml. naih ind wi, C/H 
87 ire U 09.000 HOLM AML 
370 fe«fl 

$W7 AmaiilW 4 Bed. 3 Bate. 2 

Hcrro lux hurheo i4md» flat 

wiUl pm ale terrace J-3W OOO 

i l/h Bamngion feaunders Oi 
68* 2S5L 


SV5, SIS, WI4, SV16. 

Bmmg/Mng m uw? ns? 
we taw the properties & the 
buyers. 


UAUlMto 84»- - 4 6 

nnuuM tow today ■ 
01-244 7337 


lor our nw colour Indue 8 
more ntommoa Prenatal 
from ESMMO to E50MDOL 



For Quick Sato 
Tat 01-243-1342 




B> 

_ftMhTYJ 







Pi- •■■W-'r'Wi".**! 


■■MM 


: >L , tM 1 . r >* 1 ■‘-'il 










Bi'l'* 1 J IBB i 




MORTGAGES 
NEEDING HOMES: 
APPLY NOW 


Sooety - subject to status). 


v 228 7474 - 

MO NORTHCDTE ROW SW1 1 




XaTTMES gjujuf 

Wo haw a larg o sefeetton ol 
modorewBfl d coetogg s 
ranging from £87.500. » 

soveralsuportj Unto 
ChotoBa' homes ES8JXK)/ 
£120000 to the sxdusrro 
Ufcan Hoad, bBSKJns 

H/sraith bridge & tt» rtver at 

n&OOO. 



mtmm 


CURIAM South (being garden 
Hoi Rercp- l bed. 2nd 
bpd/dmmq room. New fmed 
kdrticn. bautraota. CCH. Many 
Ong lea lures. 3 mm Normrm 
LMr CB9MOO. OI 733 1727. 


At Midland, we’ve plenty 
of funds and tiiey’re available 
now, We won’t keep you hang- 
ing around for a mortgage. 
Our rate is currently 11.0% 
(APR 115%), whatever the 
size of your mortgage. Call in 
to your local branch, and you’ll 
. get a decision within a couple 
of days. 

We also lend up to 90% of 
valuation, and up to three times 
your income tor double joint 
applicants' combined income). 
And you don't even have to be 
a Midland customer 

We offer the same rate for 


endowment and repayment 
mortgages, and well give yc 


mortgages, and well give you 
a mortgage certificate to 
prove you've got the funds on 
tap. It all adds up to a better 
mortgage. 

Written details available from 
Customer Information Service, 
Freepost, Sheffield Si 1 AZ. 


IPS 


MIDLAND 




MORTGAGES 

r Midland Bank pic 1986° 


MTk.'irjfli; 


01-741 1003. 


NEMlMCiTlM Centra] mibaomr 

4 brt. 20" so rocn. large 

ku/di n*r. Date cteBkrm. GCh. 
Tcrrore Long lease JU 06.000 
ono Ol 373-2972 


SWIO By Baum Superb garden 
tea. 2 bnk. 2 oaths en suite. 
COL GO ft garden. 97 yean. 
£129.000 Pm air sale, view to- 
day Tel Ol 373 21 16 


BARNES 


A moment Bernes Common, 
encen o o nto jy wen-prosomod. 


.. tom Me. Pu«y 
moo & extended. S beds. 2 
Oaths, dble recap. b’tsmn/WL 
gas C/H. wiaong geto. F/H. 


. £210,000 
Tel: Kltson ft King, 
01-878 4842 


JUX GARDENS TERRACE, 
ws Lnrnod flat udiii 36 loot 
Wed taring garden. Rare op- 
Don unity to purchase unrood 
garden flal wturti could convert 
to two beds, receo. kU and both. 
Marvellous position, ureal Pa- 
lermo] 99 year lease 
£120000 Tot Brecldn Man- 
agement 01 736 2063 


W14 Brae* Grows. Bngm and 
marmuM 2 bed flat Lst floor. 
VardS Itam Brook Green. In cx- 
retleni order £fe9.9G0 lor ousck 
sale 01-602 2864 No age nt s. 


wdoefe sq Soe and n rm. 
Period Aatures grand roe. b/fst 
kit. lUhan btnm. 2dM bds. 120 
yra £176000 ono. 370 6615. 


MOTYMC MLL BATE • 2 bed «M 
■deal for MUnft. JUZOjOOOJLPF 
Sup Ballon 938 2222 


THE MANOR 
HOUSE PUTNEY 

3 W wd kmy IW tab 


S M einifC Imrw lb, 

aKfitadHSto. Amtoafl- 
jng. FrenOi wtoftows Mdtog 
goto targe gartton. 

£149^00 m duM 

(Wck SA. 

Tdcfil-7n HM 


HAMPSTEAD* 

H1GHGATE 


US1EB PROPERTY 
Circa 1758 . 


4 RMS WOBTiBI? 

Substantial du Kind s tM hse. 
Garage. 5 Beds. 2 huts. VS 
Rccni. Qrtng. Ck. Sapertj Study. 
F/F M/Bkfst Sep top Granny 
04. Fufly Mod. GCH. «UM 
Gta. 



! fttt. 2 bedrooms. 2 


bathrooms, bras Imng/Onag 
room, itavai fe&hsn. a® com- 


pany invs&siHffl. VVy oev dty 
Eira.OOO. NO oners. Under- 


No oners. Under' 
inn optaTHl extra. 
BsZ (ewangs oriy) 


r TOT 


JOHN D WOOD & CO. 


Speooesp ei Swroy Docks ovooor- 
ws Re novo 8 otsnvekDin sriecnon 


BUCKS - ADJOINING BURNHAM BEECHES 

A DELIGHTFUL PERU) HOUSE DATING PROM THE Z6TH CENTURY IN 
A PEACEFUL SECLUDED SETTING. 

Recaption had, 3 receptor rooms, sun room, 5 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, guest 
annexe. Beautiful gardens with stream flowing through. 

4 toei W aedhei Abate M Mam 


SURREY — WENTWORTH ESTATE 

A QUITE EXCEPTIONAL LUXURY HOUSE SET IN 5 ACRES 
Reception hall, drawing room, dining room, domestic offices, staff flat Master 
suite of bedroom, dressing room and bathroom, 2 further suites of bedroom and 
bathroom. Guest wing with gafieried hat, sitting room. 3 suites of bedroom and 
b athro o m . 

Eqteppmf to a very bigh sbadud ttmagbete. I wdici pfld Gardens tad WowtiaBd. 


23 Berkeley Square, London W1X 6AZ 
\ ToL 01-629 9090 (Ref. DCM/MPB) / 



tptosnafln 

: 

2«& 

llqilraL 





FLATS & HOUSES 


THROUGHOUT THE 
DOCKLANDS 


TEL: 790 9560 


4 storey home of immense 
charm n Hampstead Village 
NW3. Offere for the freehold 
bang sort in regnti of 
£324.000. 

Break OfliWr 81 482 5153 


HAMPSTEAO, HWB. 

2nd (Von with lag ML 1 side 
Hd. I due bad. SKxui ftiSg 
rm «A door to batamy. Fah 
ttu ok to. Bterm wiro wck 
sfcw. Sep wc Gas eb. Fnd qts. 
ans. Exc decor Loft las PPlar 
2 marc ttafeim & Zmm 
wwmL Vaytae be. 

431 3121 (T). 


1AM S5 TO I WI H WM W Fanias- 
bc 1 bed AM With one Saute 
farfna balcony an too floor of 
Mach an Dockside. Great views 
Of Docks. Thames A canary 
Wharf Reduced for muck sale 
Cl 08000 ID BidiMe garage. 


, and beauttfufl fKtmgv 
Tel0l St6 9664 Wends/eves 




UtaO CO W WOII wwdwrteed 
to very high standard detaefied 
F/H house with ruty fined hate 
auailty carpel and UKben. Oas 
log fire and central Mating. 
Bn dimmers and door lu- 
tings. d beds. 3 rente. bUum. 
downstairs cloakroom, large 
loft and cellar. 2 terraces. Front 
and large back garden. Garage. 
L179J3QO ono. Tel Ol S7B 9070 
amt 373 3928. 


CUUP1UM Park SW2 6 bed 
ramming terraced home In oid- 
ct street, in vg condteon. with 
large double rerapbon room, 
kuctien. b aii w u oi u . walk-in at- 
nr. garden a gasch. Men over 
fBMWO. best offer secures. 
Tel : Ol 671 9884 


WEST HAMPSTEAD, NW6 MM 
attractive first floor com moon 
m quief cuHMor. Sunny as- 
pect and I »e views. Two 
bedrooms. Fined hitmen. THed 
baterooro. Large reception. Bal- 
cony overlooking bark garden. 
GCH. Long lease. JCrg.ooO. TS 
weekdays 9 16 am s.16 pm 
01630 I3*a. 


PUTNEY E — AN KME WT Top 

floor flat Outstanding views 
overlooking Thames and park. 
Small balcony, double recep- 
Bo iv. 3 beds, khctwo/breakiast. 
bate sep WC. GCH. Low 
outgoings. Long lease. 
£185000. Tel Ol 788 9865 


DULWICH 


Wales Estate Agency 


ItogafeeH & elegant (tended 
bouse, houad m tote nook. 
sunng oi» Ota louqe tea En- 
ffsh Mb floonog. bush jwft 
fecnggadBI tammu— wm« 
■taMOttM. tkang rson. 5 
beds mb new Med wrarooes. 
fanny w am Bamoom + 1 oav. 



CLOSE TO 


irn: 


Charetdng Edtntiton ter- 
raced bouse wdh 26 tt 
lotaigo/tfciBr, pmo fitted 
Mtctan. 2 tags bedroo ms . 


pretty bat tn o o m , fid gas cfl 
a 50 H omannnial gantea 


ft omwwntel garden. 
Circa C1-UUM0 
Tab 882 8036 






bmiBciMate det Georgian 
style res Part. 5 

beds. £395 JOT freehold. 


2 tafrm 2 bamti aoL Brand 
now ft WL Stmtag vem 
bum ail ratms -Miwfade bai- 
cony. taWHC and. Gas find 
ch. Own gge + ras pfcng. 
K142JM Often taitad 
01-943 3032 
VIEW TODAY 


R. LONGSTAFF & Gen 


LEICESTERSHIRE About 27 Acres 
HORWMGHOLD 

Market Harborough 9 m miles. Leicester 15 miles. 
Uppingham 4 miles 






“ a rj — 


1 


A flna Country 


i Country ftoptww In Uniqua Co nswva Pon Vi 
Won Ptacnd For Dunonn (Mtn Five Packs). 
b catan i Road, Ral B Air CotmrnrtaiPm. 


_ MW BflpaMM Pmcgta RasUtanca btrit ok 

Ctostam SKmeB CoBywasian Sto». 3 RocapHn Rooms. 4 Bedrooms. 
3 Btepooms. Cararmr naued B OouHe Qtazod. StaMe Yam rod 7 
Snows. 3 Garages. Two Bedroom Groom's Rat wdfl CK. Suserb 


Snows. 3 Garages. Two Bedroom Groom's Rat with CJL Superb 
garoens. C ac e a ent grazng wth 7 padoodcs. 

Freehold tar Sale by Private Treaty with Vacant Possession. 

Fal Mails from; Sole Agaric 


IL UM6STAFF ft CO, 

5 New (toad, SPALDING. Lines. PE11 IBS. 
Tot (0775) 66766 


Moving to Shropshire? 

Too busy to see to the details? 
We will _ 


Edmnfiai 3 tied semi deL 
Onptoi taatures. £127,000 
freehold. 


01-29 9 0922 


E. SHEEN Altremir Edwardian 
end Irrract- in a uwt road retain- 
ing ongmal lealura, fireplaces, 
sunned glam Mr Podstied Stood 
floors. S3 - Dirnnh lounge- 3 
bedrooms, bateroom. bowM 
lofl. w facing garden Recent 

CH- swing. plumbing. 

£1 15000 Tel 01 876 6BS8- 


- bdp you to find the right house in the right place 

- engage a mmovab linn 

- see k> the connection of all services 

- oi&kuzc cleaning, chimney sweeping and limber treating 

- sec lo the insuDauoti of dcancal fillings 

- give advice on intcrw design and decoration 

- help yon to plan your g ar de n 

- supervise all work done 


(9743) 3*53 


HKHCATE WOOD Ou Hooks -*■ ac- 
res*. rspandawe. mod. surmv 
hse. Easy unkrpl for busy prof 
family 4 beds. |gc recs. adn. 
sauna, pfayrm. 3 rout leers 5 
age C31 5.000 Ol 444 7169 
iHl/01 920 6188 lO> 


SW2 Oaptsam Park 3 bed. 2 
recent, vicionan t e rr a ceil 
boose. OompMety refurinmwd. 
GCH. Ono. leatures. 16 x It* 
htlrhen. Mature, pretty garden. 
Close lo lubes and amenttMs. 
F/H. £77000 TM ■ Ol 733 
0049 nv/emts 6 eves) 



TWICKENHAM Riser side, fully 

OCHl ST_9 fln - Immead vac. 
POM. F/H. JU20K. 01-9402330 


House into Home 


WBVOA AND ADRIAN SIltUVtE O SWAN »U MKWSMJKT 


■OOd. £126.000.1 
746 I HI Ol 4341 
Quick sale. j 


WIMBLEDON 


IYDDMAM HU. Mod Stsactow 
3 bed flal. kb A bate mi. Redec 
teroughouL unrrvaUed views 
over London. Excellent romu- 
tton Garage. Ent ran ce phone 
£62000. 75 yr LH. 699 6756 


VtPT pretty south facing gtlt 
level I Ml wllh leafy outlook. 2 
dbl bedroom s with 
balhroont/showrr mwur. IK - 
mq room, fit led kttchrn. GCH. 
Roof lerroce £87000. Tel: Ol 
3*0 8934 


MMBLEDON VUAK Luxuri- 
ous 2 dm PB flat. Soacious and 
bngm. modem fined kitchen. 
Gas CH Overlooking image, 
bo rde r in g Common. 90 yr LH. 
£82.000 for mark- sale. TefcOI- 
947 i486 Today and Eves. 


ENJOY A COUNTRYSIDE 
LIFESTYLE WITH RAIL 
SERVICE TO PADDINGTON 


•LACKHKATH Borden. Lovely 
Edwardian ramttir home Excel- 
lent rand 6 beds. 3 recaps. 3 
baths. nudNiow. 100 fl gdn. 
Full gch £180.000 . mum be 
seen. Ol 864 3499. 


■MOCM Town House. 5 beds. 
D/Glaztng Garage. Gas CH 
£84^00 Freehold. TeJ. Ol 670 
7103 after 7pm 

LOVELY Lge DeL Vic. 6 bed. 
Hse. 09 Gdn. Presently 2 Fits. 
Bargain. £139.950. 695 4QB8 


WBUUSOH. SWU A send del 
4 Bed family house. £120.000 
F/H. 01-675 1896 m 


PAWLEY ROAD. W Hampstead. 
Newly modernised ground floor 
flat. Luxury 3 bed / 3 bate. 
Cardm. car parking 1 20 yr hr. 

£i».<KO Tel BM Turner Ol. 
486 7397 


iLAMIAM South. Fully 
modernised 2 bedroo m flat. 
Bathroom. Fully filled Idlctien. 
Near rarmon CMv la all ame- 
nities. C6&0OO. o.ivo Tel: 01 
673 4061 


PROPERTY TO LET 
LONDON 


Luxury detached 3/4 bedroom country 
homes, many with double garages and 2 
bathrooms, dining room, lounge with fire- 
places and luxury kitchen with 
appliances. 


RICHMOND & 
KINGSTON 


Come and see the very best of new home 
building at Pewsey Meadows, Pewsey, 
Wiltshire. y 


MMMATC VUML Nr Heath. 
Sparrow 1 bed IU, period 16a- 
tucrSi Fufl fleh. goad drranike 
order Loop leave £67000. Tel 
01 341 1006 iHomei OI 935 
4422 erd 3203 (Work) 


CLAMAM SW4 apactous PB 3 
bed lst Flonr Flat Bngm. quiet, 
war shops, lube amt rommon.- 
Areess to patio. GCH. £76.000. 
90‘r yr lease. T«. Ol 3S54451 
i days] & oi 676 61*6 wvni 


MAGNIFICENT 


ST JOHNS WOOD Central. Mews 
proprety 3 bm Pauogarten. 
mural heolmg. No service 
rhargre 93 ywt leave Vacant 
possesion £140000. TeL Ol 
538 2327 


Flats and houses to view in an 
esinilug new m v irqument (ram 
060000 THrthone Parm A 
Quirk 01 987 4473 


Residence of great warmth ft 
character in premer posfflon 
oft Coomte Lane B ofdy 7 mis 
Central London. 6 beds. 3 
ftaftts.4 rees. kit uti rm, dot 
treble gge. Sap offices & staff 
quarters. Superb condition 
wtoi % acres landscaped sad 


puauco swi 

One bedraranad flat in rarity 
converted period bukbag. fur- 
nshed u laoi samunJ. 1 
tagereow. MytaadUctaL 

tHa/stemer. CH, souray 


Telephone: 0672 62080. 


BERKSHIRE 


DEVON ft CORNWALL] 


rwaie BanWK. £2ffi pw neo 

Td 01 630 0463 
or 0252 722136, 


HSWllRY 2 bed flat In good or 
der Double garage, kepi 

gardens. £46000. remaining 
85 years. Tel 0636 41706. 


■EAUTWJLLY RCPURBISaeD a 

bodroorert flrsl floor flaL fudy 
filled kilctim. targe recep. PB. 
balcony, tong lease £86.950 
01 794 B888 


rilltanr Beauutul mir views. 
Liimmovo flat, d beds large 
reerp. krtchen/dJnrr. baUi/wc. 
rioaiev CH. OOtl shared free- 
hold. Cl 30000 Ol 789 4448. 


£850,000 F/H 
Details Property Choice 
01-650 2269 


NKHGATE. Modern end of ler- 
rare- house In sort after position 
on edge or Hampstead Heath. £ 
beds. 5 bfeUn. 2 Irving rooms, 
modern kitchen, double garage, 
lift . garden, newly derorairt. 
reads- 10 move Inks Around 
0*00000 Ol 242 6500 level 
Ol 600 2300 *£kl 5127 I day). 

W. HAMPSTEAD ne too fir com 
many ono imuns. On 3 levels, 
huoe rerept 3 Bntiwi ch. new 
roof. 92 vr tee COO 960 lei Ol 
431 2818 Or 629 9fed& 

HMMGATCN6 l bedroom flat 2 
large graemvo rooms. Lse ol 
Odiden Needs wort. £99^00 
lor gvirk vah- 402 6724 


l*UTMEY/whnMedon Lovely end 
terraced town hse. 5 bed. bath. 
zrr rec KIL dnUno rm. CH 
Gdm Gge Cl 18000. Fhld. 
Trl: 01 9*7 4069 Quick sole 


SOUTH OF THE 
THAMES 


(■VERSOC. 1/2 tied flats Dtred- 
U overtooking me Thames. 
Fiom £97.500. Riverside Red 
drnliol 488 4852 
rO OTTWS BEC COMMON. Lust 1 
bed (laL lerpe rerep. GCH- CpH. 
Gdn CK lo BR/rufee. long bo. 
£62 950 01 7fe7 7648 «n rsi 
BOMB WITH SEARCHMQ? Con 
toft Artnrhoar House Hunting. 
01 223 0660 

WEST Itflktr. Small terraced 
ronaqe 3 beds Gda Parking. 
C76 900 01 878 1884 


WMWA& VLLMC, fUL 

Pretty cottage in need of moo 
raring Green s rmv. knrtven g, 
WC. small gardens. Possible 
gram Freehold CE7.S00. Man- 
aomq Agents MtrtuH fbefiards 
ft On Ol 994 S5I2 
•RMBLEDON VUAK LUX 
Boom 2 Bed Garoen flat on (he 
Ridgwav Share ol (ante oar 
drei. Garage, modern knrtven. 
balhroom with tartttd. mhiik 
ron Huron tl 16000 Tel- 01 
879 0814 iHmi. 

CLAPMAM C OMMO N SWU. 1 
bed second floor flal. 1 rec wHh 
balrony.. k ana b Exr fond 
CCH Long lease Close teame- 
mues O07 5OO for quick sale 

01 947 i486 eves. 

SWU. Larger than average leir 
house. dble iwcept- kil/breaklsl 
rm. master bed with dressing 
rm and bate 3 fun her beds. 
2nd bath. reUar. mature gdn. 
LI 03. 000 Tel 01 228 1296 
PUTNEY. A braunitp family 
house hi murh sought ofler 
mod. S toroe ivrstv 2 balds « I en 
suMri. oil*, rettar. lull CH. BO II 
Hdn C2 87.00a Ol 786 6930 
VICTORIAN lerrared house In 
Kennimdon Fully moder n ised 

2 bedrooms. South faring gar 
den L89000 TMOl 7030713 
or 01701 8913 iworfci 


KEV GREER, Ksw. 

E4BSJ0Q- Stumng Surgan 
9®to n fisted hse. Itaandnzndv 
r m mnatl & aactwwL ZOO* 
Odn. Views owr Green. Drawm 
m. study, stnng im. 4 beds. 2 
tofts. Small bone kit/b fet rm. 
S/c tor rand tlr flat fl beaddul 
tonw. Mar totey 01 90 XH8 
of tatted hmn Prater 
S« 38BL 


I VERNA COURT, W8 

Itoee totof U oi Be anei sms. 
base to sawn arnnoes m Kensm- 
anf*gna 3ntrKrawiaom.3/4 
teams. iq twite rtcep. (pus 
5 teas], 3 tmrans. 1 en me. 
very lag* ktaen>wnUte mm. 
bxany. w»iuu»4ejF bansna M 
daanad wearsi carnmoy tat 
Ott RW- 

Cafi Peter as 01 930 3970. 
or 229 asa t«o) 


*r LA—OW U L M4 <JI4| a 
miles fVnod formnouse. pretty 
village 3 rec. 4 be«fe. CH. garag- 
ing. bam. ia boxes in yard, 
possible gallop access, -storage, 
workshops excess id 
£150.000. Dreweatts Country 
House Opartmeni, Newbury 
'06351 38393 of KnWU Frank 
and R utley <04061 82726 


BEDFORDSHIRE 


2 yisar oM dewrned 
4 brts. 2 rrrepnora. 
bainrerom. shower room, oa- 
CH. may garden 
I' 20 ®® for quick sale. F/H. 
Tel 01 941 S82S 'after 7pm) 


HAMKTEAO NWS. Lrvfum Hal 

fcj'sa. 2 oB *'’ “tes- « w 

bath. GCH. gun. Co Lei C210 
pw mfl Dillons 462 2277 
ST JOHNS WOOO B dble beds, 
rerep and diner. K a b. itoi 
pw 01*96 9202m 240 2851 

teOHCATE Luxury moden de 
UM-nro town house near tube 
fwswh- fumtsheo. 4 bed. 2 Date. 
1 shower, humor, lined kurh 
en. land sra pea garden, aorawd. 
t360 pw Availaole Nmrmunr 
8e Eirounies Ol S8fe 0270 
'Irani tain Onober 8oi 


m TOOOOSCTOR Ml/Mwy j 
miles Soul level del bung. 3/4 
beds. 1* acre garden exr views. 
CS6.000 0SQ56 2776. 


PLYMOUTH 

PLVMfTOfl/aoOTH DEVON 

5 ain fro H Ptjmmii trlrj ccwrrtr. 
IB mn ftnui-. 

Jmcwing ctaatcftesl gentieman's 
m m mature orourats 
of aoptux h acre. Butt 1934 
U5B drawing room. Drama 
ran. Study. BreaMas] room. 
P*Bd kitchen. Utitoy room. 
Ctoatioom. 5 ttidrooms wim 
wmy unns. Batiyoom until sep- 
arae WC. shower room/wc. 2 
prases. Amoto rajtsag storaaft 
fine Braenammenc terrace, fii 
vs c/h. Fufl doutile Btaaift 

_ .WEfflOU) ETfiftOfiO 

Tei Ptymoutl) (0752) 337948 


KBS, Burks. Hens Rdorattna? 
Conran Swrners for Kvai m 
lormalicm packs -0908 609348 


ESSEX ACCOMODATION BUREAU 

WraaKz teotnn tWMOwtaJtogTawBnflta EJ7^ 


I beonWF naranms. swmning pool, sotown BM tan £230 pw 

P5H* PIP..W OUflUTT CLBfTS. BB 

lETTnffi * raw£ J® UMUHM Wb RttllUM&aftBfT 

B1 SS8 SUB orfiKO 3U3S5 


UR WARDS X. nm M40, M*. 
M2S. M/Row LOP Mod DM Hse. 
5 mm walk sin. Sen. shoos. 30 
minsLdn Srrirul-dew 3 rec. - 
4 Bed. 2 Bain. F/F Kit. Ltdity. ! 
Corny DM Got. DbICtz. FGCH. 
EvOrtn SW UWnari Odn. 1 
w/iab POM. Terr Offers over, 
£190.009 0763 882820 


fttaar kUHKbrtdcp 
S/trovon. Detorhed family 
gouse mertoowng ctrek of 
mjw-ottux- Ejludrv Lounge din- 
■tertetn. a bedrooms, fined 
Mir hen. 2 nauiFoom*. uudy. 
SJ;,. tarage. rommaiw. 
small nutuorohie garden, south 
■a nn o sun lerrare and pub. 
C79.B00 Tel 064853 423. 


**** S miles. Gvcellenl Cornish 
Vonr larmhouM* 7 bn*. 3 
baths, filled kilrhen. CM. se- 
cluded garden -t- a 1 acre 
fMOdon. Beautiful sheltered 
vaiiev 2> rmlrs rtvivl £87.500 
‘Week SI Mai vl Q28-8Bq 39S 


driatmed home, garage, nx 
central ncaling. S bedrooms, 
■uuinrom A wr. kitchen/ 
breakfast room. lotmge/dDier. 
rtnAmm. garden £82000 T*l 
08444 4264 


C h2l < SSf°hSS' < ? 4 '^reoor 
5**° * hedroomed 
™racter home. 14 vniv old 

Sf^ l, 55L? , aj5S 


V , 


9 


Carter Jonas 

('hailmnl Survt-wirs 












M i 



pppajiip 


c 


SAVE HUNDREDS OF POUNDS 

THE TOTAL HOUSE 
PURCHASE PACKAGE 

£199 

PLUS VAT & USUAL DISBURSEMENTS 

FOR ANY SIZE PURCHASE 

OR ONLY £99 FOR REMORTGAGES 
LIMITED OFFER INCLUDES 

* ALL LEGAL FEES 

* BEST MORTGAGE 
* FREE WILL ETC 

PLUS! A PROFESSIONAL FINANCIAL 
PLANNING SERVICE INCLUDING TAX & LEGAL 
ADVICE IF REQUIRED FROM 

CITY AND SOUTH COAST 
SOLICITORS WITH A TOP 
FINANCIAL CONSULTANCY 
JOHN HEALY & CO 
84 FETTER LANE, EC4, 
01-404 4445 
66 HIGH ST, LEWES 
(0273)478022 

Quote Ret: 199-TN 



CA![RH 

SUFIRE 


?;> 

v Ilk . — ■ 


GRIFFITHS 



3l 4 


MW 


LITTLE COMBERTON 


Evesham 5 mis, Pershore 2 mis, M5 8 nriS. 
Superbly modernised Period Cottage of im- 
mense character with many ong. features 
including flagstone floor and a wealth of tim- 
ber. Principle suite comprising: Bedroom 1, 
dressing rm and bathrm: 3 further bedrms, 
shower rm/dk rm, drawing rm, dining rm with 
Ingelnook. Guest bedrm, study, well equip, 
kit, hall, GCH, dble gge. Well stocked gdns 
extending to about % acre. Offers £120,000 
F/H. Griffiths. (0386) 2981. 


DVRRANTS 

SOUTH NORFOLK 


Appealing Riverside Property with frontage lo Broads net- 
work in unique marshland situation. A i tractive 4 bed un- 
moocm iscd period bouse, buildings and marshland in oU 
8 J5 acres. By Auction on Nov. 4th. Full Particulars from 
Dunams. 10 New Moriici. Bccdcs. Tct 0502 712122. 


L. ‘-'VJ. 


THE PERIOD PROPERTY 
REGISTER 

Conagw. Cashes. Manors or Mansions. Each month 
mmdreKte ol penod homes for sale nationwide. . 
Buying or sefilng contact; 

poSsvs^sssirriS'ajD 

Tel 09905-7983/6128 


Nti 


; 

“ ■ . 


WCWOI* IWLV Esrtfsr/DawlKh 
hrti nuiniatfw^) s bmroomrt 
hnrh hoter wim and 

wrern. built idea, ioo vds , 
full' furmshnu. 1 
ton.TBO. Irl Ofeao B90 TOO ! 


SUFFOLK 


*te*te*AtJL: s/a iMxiroom dr . 
i-Kfira tninaakm iwar LMiwd ! 
IJIlrt kiimrn. 2 njlhroorm w 1 
ftonv. Wi-Mf sfMre-.nVrtqnifKvtn 
D244I CWa6Q - 0679 

cfeararenr 

ham run Mill rionv,-/ crannv 
aniii*v/ hsb. 4 bnta il rn suttni 
whk 1 il" n lu1, » tntrt Mi 
with -Wi N s hfuiinri 1 irn. 

ra^SSL?! 7 - 000 wwii 

BIOGfORO N Dnon ■Mir.inivi- 
InuiKdii tiKMi'riirsrt .'om. tro 
9.lldi<li btoal Iml 1* r.-urrewrai 
lflfe" 300 Hid*>f are! T02">7 

hv rural ihhw 

nUl1 

. nin spar an um Cl I n.* 
Gild-. £97.SQ0 <06481 li50[ll| 
®®hMl*AlAS own iHoprilt nut 
aniy ci«<n io.m ln hi bi £3 

•^TMOUTM Luviirv fiat 3 talttr . 
wH rtminh' titiritnr. lull (Xu 
L44 9SO m Hhiiwr, 0706 790fli| 


Lasurv rtiimnem fiats arid 
hunjtalowi for the dder!) in- 
dcprndvm. Sinnicd in the 
market uiwn of Bury St Ed- 
mundv a few miquics watt 
from local shops. A nc* htfiti 
class devetapemrai wtih hw- 

ury fully fined separate- 
kuubcti iiKludinp man> ctec- 
incal cMias. One and iw 
hcilrooras available. Tool to- 
dependence with security , 
cnnanci' phone. Warden oo 
call for cmyrewwtrt Pntis : 
from Apply for de* 

jailed brochure lo: Joel , 
I Homes l»a Hafief Sow. 
Bury St. Edmunds. SulWL 
let iti’W) ft.V1ft4 


: — - - 

\-sr- 

: s. r.’’ 

I v *9. ■" roi 


to 


b , 

^-a-irawA* 


A 

}\ El><* 

! ■ ’ 

■- *’"« tak, 


EAST ANGLIA 


war aylsjum 

«WF0U 

tomtrait vOMect dcsayiM cam 
leswa in to* dbaowiTSS 
***« tom- Tt» 

aMmmorammQroftReeiSiCta 
ftn wm iiow hrawer 

DramHm EuMnny tvsw Kn Am 
BrnhkKia 6 m wm t s Qikwhi Rm 
■■ ««&. uraurt <U ch luth 
mmea £9?5W rm naut ^ 

Al Wets 0603 630083. 


SUFFOLK 

•to*!. EimP Sraoti nr» s» 
Qmra tBu» tm eataiM V 
tonM stKAaran smte ■ 
ijamn Oia» on hu Cwiv 

Jnr iiitnucgcn srejdjstitf; 
J* -I Wflmwis. 4mici & 
•tunwaffi ura rkC-H tOyd'ft ' 
«uum (piagf him mjjMT trees 
Craiwregd tatea bs itocnn 
>« HUS-itiQ iFM OUl- HJ. 
Tana ft San I7S3J 




A -. “h, . 

* 1*1, % 

- C<8) Q, V < *' 


RAVISHING Wilrtrrik-vi | hi tip 
MM. IMinbTi.ktr. . IS mure 
Ldruc- toko nuudow. wuosh. 3 
nujv ntefimm prnod hmrvos 
1loi.1l * hodroonrei 7 jtro, _ 
all V19RXKW THni SW KUStl 


LAVENHAM 

l^taiuliv. nnwratn c* Ura WtaS 
fai« w> flue botift tHKted 3 
*m.w r.vtun • J OMv jut s«» 
yiiu idii Iowan. 9»ma« 

1,1 “ wo c ft huaui mucc 

saajm ' 

16827) 

Show Ham 
H J. Turner ft Soft 
0787 72833. 


■\ Oh. 
! 




A 


















































THE TIMES WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 15 1986 


PROPERTY BUYERS’ GUIDE 





COUNTRY PROPERTIES 



CHARLES CHURCH 

QUALITY HOMES OF CHARACTER 


St vu. >'• 





CATERHAM 

SURREY 

£183,000 TO £188,000 

( 0883 ) 42369 

(2 only) 


HOOK 

HAMPSHIRE 

£64,500 TO £140,000 

( 025672 ) 4145 


m&m 




tK -vi 


MONKTON 

HOUSE 

CHIPPENHAM 

WILTSHIRE 




A development of 8 luxury flats and five houses based on the conversion of Ms 
Georgian Manor (Osied grade U) set in its own parkland Ciosa to the heart of this 
busy Cotswold market town ihr 10 irtns from Paddi ng ton, wttWn easy reach of the 
M4. 

THE MAIN HOUSE has been completely restored using local stone: toe Interior 
stripped and within the framework of the house, six luxury apart m e nt s have been 
provided. 

In and around THE STABLE BLOCK 2 Aether fiats and 5 houses have been 
constructed. 

The Interior s have throughout been fitted to the highest specification. 

Prices range from £48.000 to £79,000. 

Further details bom the Oevctopers: 

Lastpress Ltd. 01-228 9547 


SUFFOLK 

VoacftSnte UOBkltnw 

catamwr mu. 

w Mucsr una court mur 



Hill »■ SynsoMhet*- 

caJly roodenused « ted period 
dot- house. waited garden. 600 
»-lt- yaragp/wortanop. com- 
mercial potential, thriving raid 
Norfolk ronservattoa image- 
£78.000. Tel: 036281 -KM. 


SUFFOLK Village a tidies New. 
market. 3 Md (Matched Horn, 
large double garage wttti poten- 
tial lor granny Rat. 1 , ’> acre 
grounds. C89.7S0. Also option 
of aajacetri derelict cottages. 
Tel: 1073622) 3263. 


nil ini 


iWiv.au 







LnuMcr lull rtoaLroont. boiler room, drawing room, dlnino room, dlntog roam. kitchen and 
SuiCrTiSroiSTaSSirooroo *1 *" radio. Central healing. Detached double garage. Canten. 




High Street, Barford, (WwdWdri OX8 4QI (099 382) 20S8 



WESTCUFF Spacious semi de- 
tached house in tree lined rd. 
shod walk sea a station. Vacant 
poBram of sett contained 3/a 
Drttrnxd 1st floor mao. Benefit 
Of £78 PCM rent from grd fir 
Hal. Front gdn. £66.000. Ten 
0923 26986 after am a 1 pm 


SNARESBROOK 

Ell 

Overlooking Lake 


Beautifully restored period manor house. Orra: 
1 760's. Set amidst r* acre mature old Brutish 
gardens. Featuring fuR security system, 5 bed- 
rooms, 4 bathrooms, 4 reception rooms, luxury 
kitchen/braakfast room, large cellars, Gas Cen- 
tral Heating. 

Detected Mews Cottage AvaBaMe 

£325,000 F/H 

Tel: (B) 01-505-6343 


EASTANGUA 



Unaal detected house. 14 
ncns. May ongmi tabre*. 
Gangs M 0 npzre nortsbep.. 
taaare 1 ape cartel. raft ste- 
eps lam. Sut States. IW* 
fried 9 M house). Shops 8 gt* 
eouse only 3 Trans. 


west anas. 


ISLE OF WIGHT. 

ftBly Georgian rae wit refer 
froimoe to Wooten C reek 
IHpond m in sera gdn «rdh3 
rec. B beds. tea. M etc, gpr 
t mrishop. Guide EMUOT. 


82 Pyla St. Nnpori 1 0 W. 

let 0383 - 522236. 




DETACHED Mntmgl KaBhouee 
S teds, a receptions. 2 ham- 


HANTS-JDOBSET, & 
LO.W. 



HEREFORDSHIRE, 
WORCS, & SHBOP 


SHIRE BORDER. A^targv 
Gentlemens Residence with 3 
Arm of Cardens and Grounds 
tuning spacious C/H 4 Bed 
arcomni with Granny Annexe. 
Bdbard Room. Rer Rooms. Kit. 
Bath and aporox 4 Acres enjoy- 
ing beautiful rouniry views. 
PRICE; Cl 25.000 To View: 
JACKSONS 10684) 6207 



house In private cuMMK. 5 
beds. 3rrcep. breakCan room. 2 
balls. 2 double garages, large 
garden. 9011 non boat mooring 
and slipway oil Thames. 
£366.000 one. Ten 09323 
84096 66pm. 


UNJHMKJUB Impressive de- 
tached house on large private 
Ptol. £159360. Tel NoTtltwood 
26042 


HARTLEY WIKTNEY 

Lu* new terraced character 
tee. 26‘ lounge. 3 double 
beds, l/f teoien. mod baft. 
Bch. teauttuJ Kents vOaga. SO 
yds ootl cone. dicta green 
S v£ge shoos, 45 mbs Wa- 
telM, 10 mns M3. 

£86^08 

Id 01 437 9985 at 2D May). 
025 IZB 3816 (eaoesj 


Uooo* Market Tom wanta 
Snap 15 m <S mo bmub- 
s» SuoFtfy sARtea am u 
toer Soots Tom tore BO 
Gone. * Bed. 3 Brno. F«8» fits 
•t at Mature grumfc tested 
sha pool lent Com tm 

xtssm 

0487 *13533 or *13519. 


DREWEATTS 

CHB V BLE 7 

-.mw inmih fc»er. pnumr. nt otu rbmorr. Nnrfmrv 3 nnK MJ fJISI 1 
>,W «. Imh .' lull*. >h. anMro-.-M haIMfnc . t ytej 

Trwmll*. tn 4 MfT Hctw dre»rtm rm_Vr«J»^ 10635 ) 383 W 8 
erno IJ* uf rarten Newbury 10033 ) Mlfc 

NEAR LAMBOURN 

■I i II !• I niitr— I braining [yrwri IrTWilteUW pM»' yflbp-. . 1 IW. t bnfe. rfc. 
utafc Item- i;l«in>ln»3iil|»»-iUr^lbsiiin*wi.pl™ii»imwr.MrWiri»L 

roweMte* CMmtri- Raw department Mewtmi.i (06331 SS 393 ar 
MU Frank aad Bailr> HUS) 827106. 


Trnrrn 



(Today) 3475. 


MEWMARKtT 2 mb Com&ndgr 
15 miw London 1 hour Grade 
n Ltd 6 beds. 3 baths: 6 rer 
Oak full} ill ML Oil CH DDfr 
Grge WaHrd GOm Cl 40.000 
on O Inc rarpecVrunBiiH: Quick 
Sale nmuKe Tel i065B< 
750653 


LMCOLN Lntaup. detar am 

. modem 2 ted bungalow m con- 
servation area. Dear 
C an iw dial Gcti Oden over 
£40000 Tel 0822 28986 . 


GLOUCESTERSHIRE 


WirewnN VMM, Chel- 
tenham 7 mile*. OrenreC w 9 
■mm. Oianrana asm) Grade Q 
vlllBflC house. 3 Rrregtiou 
Rooms. Kiirnen. 4 Bedrooms, 
Dressing Room. Batnroora. Ga- 
rage. Lovely arriudM Garden, 
about half an acre Regmn 
C128D0a Lane Fox & Mwn 
vvtth Rylands. Cirrncmrr Tet 
102851 3101 


SAMHUMST VILLAGE ARIbe 
Ine deiarnea House wnn 
magnKKml Cotswold vlrwv. 4 
beds. 2 reept. modem kitchen, 
OJUirm. d/slairx rtoaknn. ulblv 
rm. oarage, car porf Mature 
9*1 £88.000 0<8273Q2b4 


WEST OF Ooumier 8 M*y B 
MSO* Golf Course Character 
MHith. Piclurnour vUlanr lam 
Hv house wnn Sims, Hall. 3/4 
Rrrrpnon ran. Flitted Kiirnen 
OLm CoroeCvalpry S Bed 
loom Ball* A Shower Rms On 
CH 4Garagn. Lovely Gardens 
Orchard Paddock Stables 
059.000 Coirs. Knapp A Ken- 
redv Tudor Home. Rcds-on- 
Wye 0989 02683 


WEST DORSET. BEAMINSTEft I 
nnle. i'» acres. 15 r stone 
thatrtied bam conversion In 
countryside. Expcsed beams, 
juwiur character. 4 beds. S 
baths, lounge, dining nail, fatm- 
toutr Mirtirn. urn. elks, full 
C/H.dBlr gar 060.000. HUM- 
STRVTT 

A PARKER 0823 77261 


BOURMEMOUIli Superb Central 
lofaiwn. 2 bed lop floor apart- 
ment. lulty nited Mlcnen. 
pamwin. sraarate wc. lounge, 
large batrony wnn panoramc 
fown renlrr views, finest locp- 

value t& 9 . 9 S 0 Tei 01 660 1674 


TEWM WOOD. AvalaUr now. 4 
beds. 2 baths. CH etc. in- V acre 
In scrtudM countryside with su- 
perb iteurv Only 30 mniutm 
K-uvosCroM. £215000 ooo Tel 
003870 SOI 


faOiOOO . EUirt. eecevlional 
mararlrr family name, fabu- 
lous arcomtDodaaon plus 
attached ground floor htgft st of* 
llces. Plus attached store 
/potential railage, ideal Homes. 
10923 1 36794/01 ■ 405 4444. 

CMMHJCY WOOD. Mag del res to 
liranar rend. 4 beds. 2 bams. 3 
recros. kn/bM rm. iftte goc. 
lovely '■ acre gdn. Freofieid 
£27&ooo. Stuan LeurtK 01 
586 8692 

HADLEY WOOD. Mod del chalef- 
uyle residence. 4 hr*. Ige 
lounor. ctkm. GCH. Oge. 
gdn/ own tfnve 1 mile to M2S. 
Fully lum H Peg C175D00 Tel 
01-440 2406 or 01-441 6335. 

HARPCMDCN □fStaher'S 5 PM. 
\k home 2 nuns station/ 
shops- 25 mins Klogi X. 
£148 DOO 08827 62209 


Superb counby tarmhoose 
(ci 920) on etomad poseon 
CDffRBndng luge ven nft 
3/4 beuroores. stbng room, to- 
ng room and tege stub tang 
nder room. Full CH. W a 
taned gmen. MpmxOnstly v> 
sra, feabmg several maftre 
trass and a etfed ceuitjanL 
Spnd Ckfttaas h to nraby. 

siaooa 

Id B869 246834 frby), 
61 354 OSH (emtossL 


Geoigen country haun 00 

K OI Tam. < rams. 7 

a kMteawi rerelM 

5 . 4 DaDInnBi SQW 0 S» 
terns ceut Svnmning pod 
la al approx 8w acres. Ueal 
teniy hams or prarate 
fHMJ/Tirang home subject to 
consem. 0 Hbt 5 arowd 
£250 JOT - SOmOck Evans 
OTfQ 292693. 



Mt DOVR. Detar ned Regency 
hdvde 3 bed*. 2 megboo 
room*, tuinraom. kurhm. huge 
cellar, an 1/2 4tre pioi Com 
plctcty renovated. Orem 
Invesimeiu pmrtiiiai due to 
Chan net Ttrnnrl. £89.996 
Telephone: Priority 10304] 
831509 ar i0303> 862030 


BIOAD5TABS gurlna I bed 
rial in eleganl Georgian, min 
sion Uldi Uindirri cwposen. 
Landvrannl oardriiv Near tfv 
GCH' Garaor £31-500 UH. 
Tv I 0343 602933 eve* 


FOLKESTONE fi mK Secluded 
rooage wuh ourw. 6 beh. 4 
lerep-,. 3 both* A 3 aern. 
CUO MO Tri 0303 895173 


saps 


■ T it IU 
»iiiI friWT 


17ft Ceoney courtry hen in 3 
acres olaatura gardens «n terns 
CS)A BeaBom MB •« ndi- 
cem Cannes H aarm (Sing 
mm. aang room, modem tauten 
and raat re. ta wy bemom ndh 
enstrae dzthroom and msreg 
nun. phis 3 IreroonB and baft- 
ram in ftu. 

2nd Bov aonuted to 3 sed oob- 
arcd nats. £»■*« are a 
nou. snaUE » ranter Phs n 
com or undd euvy emut to 
resrenaal nom to 30 ptas beds. 
£3S6J6t 

TO: (6882) 65333* 


,7.' ; i Vi i ' 


Ddjgbtfal stone & ibatrtxd 
propen> b charming Hamid 
overt kag Parkland. 2 rtccp. 
Lit with \a. 5 beds. 3 baths, 
prenv gltos. Lovd> view. 
Offcri £9100a 
Vaoghan MncbeO 
with Doimoas 


S MILES 


.nilHiMl 


SuperbBamcaMaionftsuli- 
StMttt rare o( oattutagskn an 
acres. 2 Recwxrtxi Roonts. 4 
Beftms. 2 Bathms. Dble Garage 

£138£00 

Brooks of Oxford 
(0865)244535 


MONGEWELL 

h Hentey Dan fteahng sbn- 

8 He. Sopeib renovatnn of 
Melanin cottage by well 
Drops tocaftxtedora. 4 beds. 2 
(Httejl eu suts} 2 leaps, tat 
(Snattwoe ftft). UbKty mom. 


«, dL DMe garage, ts acre 
sw Views. Oilers around 
£180 JOT. Warmnpbam & Co 
0491 B 74 U 4 


nSTSHSC 5 mUC* Ml. 8 
mum Ntuunotum Luxury four 
bedroom buraaiow. stands in 
own preundv of approx '• acre.' 
•no tnriuder m sale 'j arre wim 
Hanning penmasion aPP&ed 
for Wr rrgt-irr a quirk sale Of- 
fers Cl 16.000. (0532) 672555 


RUGBY Viet Irian lows how* 4 
main beds -md other rooms ex- 
rpltem rrrrMiom and 2 baths. 
C8&Q0Q T el 0788 61 305- 


NORTH EAST 


ULVWOOO Luo WMDIS4 M. 
mo<Laev.nse. Va CH. garage, 
close to M62 & Manchester Cen- 
tre L 42-600 0706 625571 


NORTHWEST 


Boaxton. Superb locabon. pres- 
bge smtf near davetapraent of 
quSRy 2 teftrad apts. te fastem- 
abte Strmton. v to Uunmay 
Natwvk. Manchester C«y centra 
S rnttmatoBJ BfDort. Ejcc value 
stpnces oa wMi E84JOT & 
£87m FnD daOfs JA SMB 
(Hate) lid. 

081 828 2281. 




Heatoy/Heaiflnfl/Gonng Trfmgte, 
16 year oU bouse Mtetal 400 
yeai old beams. 4,000 test 
accom. of S beds. 2 bafts. 4 
recc e s . Sep bound V t n rau e. 
wOfltSlwpjRB (3 rooms SftS 
kxdui). 2 Acres Total privacy 
wrttore eata. 


a Kteweir idtaae new ump 
baoron rev ora nop ? r? 
caw i ami ? Demons tama 
bdWMRietc Gam tgw»nnb- 
eay bone n pernaaox moeue 


*1734 72367 


orere /cotswolos Sreero 

roaveried chapel In secluded 
hamlet. 4 beds. 2 baths, sump- 
tuous lounge wttb open Urr. 
tuny filled luxury Mtcfaen a 
dining room, l e i ru rw ganica. 
£126.000. Tel: 099387 570 


OXFORD 15 miles. Banbury lO 
miles. Three a dj o in ing stopg 
bum Period cotaga. 
modernised and with 2 or 3 
Bedrooms, together wmi a valu- 
able Budding Site wttb outline 
Manning Permission for two. 
Overhaf anorre mail. Auctwn 
In two Lots 4th November lun- 
tew pnvaMy some Lane Fter A 
Partners with Ryianas. Middle* 
ion Cheney. Banbury. Oxon. 
TM. 0295 710692- Jgmt 

Agents: Franklin A Jones. Ox- 
ford. TM: 0866 248666. 


o-droonrv. Iwo BalhrMAK. 
double Garage, undsraped cur. 


BEAL Hobday homo or Invest- 
ment 2 negroont senu detached 
bungalow. I? years oM. FuUy 
HUM Eiuhrai. Fined bedrooms 
with DUO doers. 3? fi lounge Me 
dnung room. IhdAgr swiamuag 
pool. 8 miles front Blackpool m 
rural village IS ratirs from me 
Lake Damn. Fufly double 
«buvd A renttatty heated. AH 
mai ns Parking for 2 can. 
C40.000 Trt. 0853 701672141. 
HT opmi A 0255 864032 (off Ke 
hmirai 


KLE HAN. MaughoM. banararair 
ITJSr a . bKfc - 2 baths, able gge. 
? '*-«re crrjoo. 

TCL 103041 61 5769 


OXFORDSHIRE 


SAH t nty and MOO extension 
4m Rone butU family 

IraiorZ recep. 4 taea 2 bam. 2 
9te-.CH NHBC. £76000 0295 
810578 


SCOTLAND 


TWt tP OA L E HUsMe Cottage. 
Barhen. near BroucDlon. near 
Btggar. Peentewhire. A modern. 
Bed Hone-buiit cMtage- 4 bed- 
rooms and 2 reception room 
etc Garden, wood and kennels 
in '< acre of land. Outstanding 
Views: unlamlPd country 

walks. Edinburgh 28 notes 
Easy arms lo M6 And South. 
Fixed Price- C42.O00 For lur- 
ihcr details ring 08994 387 

STJURMCWS - Reuremem nal 
«5 Ararie Court wan Res Mngr 
lift. Res lounge etc S bed. 
lounge- whvm & fully nued- 
kuchen Supptu views of Unu. 
faearn. sea rtr Ftwd price 
C64.2&0 View daily 2-4. Tot 
0354 76735 for further tnfo. 


ADJOirWfG MANSION 
HOUSES of historical 
interest in central 
conservation area of 
University town. Otters 
over £35,000 and 
£156,000 am hinted 
Tcf 8334 77187. 





Laiga bungalow. Lovely 
unkna my ad views. 
Farmhouse kacnen. Dining 
room. Lcxrage. Three bads. 
Crossing roam. Batroocn. 
Cenbm twatad. Largs 
gardan. Tin rranmas wels 
orGtostonbtay. E86OT0. 
Tet (0458) 33050 




■B.VERTON Georgian viuage 
hbuw. near Taunton. MS S 
■rain, toted, gaumed landing 
and fine criung*. 6 beds. 3 

recegs. Cl 11X000 08234 OOSfiO 


COURT** COTTABC In comer 
van on \ li law Bndoi 14 num 
London 2 hours. Com . M4/MI 
£9isoo Ttttcema 378117 


caivami ihm tnmi «h 
linganSommriLrvrts 3num 
fmv sis luiMilon tlmU dn- 5 
beds.-? iwo. watted rear gw 
den Conservatory Immaruoie 
riwmuan throughout Tel 
102781 782234 anfr 6pm. 


PROPERTY & RENTALS 
APPEAR ON PAGES 
38 & 39 
























































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COURT 


AND 

SOCIAL 


COURT 

CIRCULAR 


BUCKINGHAM PALACE 
October 14: His Excritency Dr 
Marcelo Martin was received in 
audience by The Prince ofWaks 
and The Princess Anne. Mrs 
' Mark Phillips, Counsellors of 
Stale acting on behalf of The 
Queen, and* presented the Let- 
ters of Recall of his predecesor 
and his own Lexters of Credence 
as Ambassador Extraordinary 
and Plenipotentiary from Costa 
Rica to the Court of St James's. 

His Excellency was accompa- 
nied by the following m em ber s 
of the Embassy, who bad the 
honour of being presented to 
Their Royal Highnesses: Senfior 
Victor Carlas (Minister Coun- 
sellor) and Scndr Jorge 
Nowalsfci (Minister Counsellor, 
Scientific and Technical Af- 
fairs). 

Sefiora Fiona Marten had the 

honour ofbeing received by The 
Prince of Wales and The Prin- 
cess Anne, Mrs Mark Phillips. 

Sir Patrick Wright (Perma- 
nent Under Secretary of State 
for Foreign and Commonwealth 
Affairs), who had the hoaour of 
being received by Their Royal 
Highnesses, was present and the 
Gentlemen of the Household in. 
Waiting were in attendance. 

Mr A.H. Wyau was received 
in audience by The Prince of 
Wales and The Princess Anne, 
Mrs Mark Phillips, Counsellors 
of Slate acting on behalf of The 


KENSINGTON PALACE 
October 14: The Prince of 
Wales, CokmeJ-in-Chief The 
Parachute Regiment, this morn- 
ing at Kensington Palace re- 
ceived Lieutenant-Colonel 
Michael Jackson upon 
relinquishing command of the 
1st Battalion, The Parachute 
Regiment, and Licutenant- 
Colond John Reith upon 
assuming command. 

■ His Royal Highness, Cblond- 
tn-Chtef, The Royal Regimeniof 
Wales, this afternoon at Ken- 
sington Palace received Lieuten- 
ant-Colonel Christopher Jones 
upon relinquishing command of 
the 3rd Battalion, The Royal 
Regiment of Wales, and 
Lieutenant-Colonel David Mor- 
gan upon assuming command. 

The Prince and Princess of 
Wales this evening attended a 
dinner given by the Variety 
Club of Great Britain at the 
Dorchester Hotel. Park Lane. 
London to launch the lift 
Education -Centres. 

Mrs Georep West and Mr 
trey Mews 


atten 


were in 


KENSINGTON PALACE 
October 14: The Princess Mar- 
garet. Countess of Snowdon, 
was present this evening at 
Ball given by American Medical 
International Health Care Lim- 
ited at Grosvenor House Hotd 
maid of the National Society for 
the Prevention of Cruelty to 
Children of which Her Royal 
Highness is President. 


Queen and kissed bands^ujxm 


his appointment as British 
Commissioner to the Republic 
of Ghana. 

Mrs Wyatt had the honour of 
being received by Their Royal 
Highnesses. 

The Prince of Wales and Tire 
Princess Anne, Mrs Mark Phil- 
lips, Counsellors of Slate acting 
on behalf of The Queen, re- 
ceived Mr Justice Henry upon 
his appointment as a Judge of 


the High Court of Justice. His 
1 Hi: 


Royal Highness conferred upon 
him the honour of Knighthood 
and invested him with the 
Insignia of a Knight Bachelor. 
The Princess Anne, Mrs Mark 


Phillips, President of the Riding 
r the Disabled Association, 


KENSINGTON PALACE 
October 14: The Duke of 
Gloucester, as President of the 
British Consultants Bureau, was 
present this evening at .the 
Annual Dinner of the CEBI 
European Committee of Con- 
sultancy Firms at Stationers' 
Hall, Ave Maria Lane, London, 
EC4. 

Lieutenant-Colonel Sir Simon 
Bland was in attendance. 

The Duchess of Gloucester 
was present this evening at a 
Gala Performance of Facade, in 
aid of The Park Lane Group, in 
the Gardens of Carfyle Square, 
London, SW 3. 

Mrs Euan McCorquodale was 
in attendance. 


for 

this afternoon visited the 
Havering Group (Chairman, 
Lady Miriam Hubbard) at 
Havering Park Riding School, 
Havering, Greater London. 

Her Royal Highness, Presi- 
dent of llie Missions (o Sea- 
men, this evening attended a 
concert in St John's, Smith 
Square in aidofThe Missions to 
Seamen. 

Mrs Malcolm Wallace was in 
attendance. 


CLARENCE HOUSE 
October 14: Queen Elizabeth 
The Queen Mother this after- 
noon visited the Tayade Print- 
ing Works of Bums and Harris 
Limited, Dundee, to mark the 
firm's Cen 


YORK HOUSE 
ST JAMES’S PALACE 
October 14: The Duchess of 
Kent, Patron of the Scottish 
Society for Mentally Handi- 
capped Children, today opened 
Rymonth Hostel, and later 
opened the new Out-Patient 
Department of St Andrews Me- 
morial Hospital, St Andrews, 
Fife. 

Her Royal Highness, who 
travelled in an aircraft of The 
Queen's Flight, was attended by 


Miss Sarah Partridge: 


tenary. 

Miss Jane Waflcer-Okeover 


was in attendance: 


The Duchess of York celebrates 
her birthday today. 

A memorial service for Dame 
Geraldine Aves will be hdd at St 
James's, Piccadilly, at 3pm 
today. 


Birthdays today 


SirGeorge Bishop. 73; MrH. M. 
Colvin. 67; the Ri| 


lit Rev G. V. 
73; Professor J. K. 
Galbraith. 78; the Very Rev E 
W. Heaton. 66; Sir John Martin. 
82; Mr George Sava. 83; Bar- 
oness Serota, 67; Lieutenant- 
General Sir William Stratton. 
83; Mr Roscoe Tanner, 34; Mr 
Justice Vinelott. 63; General Sir 
Richard Ward, 69. 


Receptions 


Migraine Trust 
The Mayor and Mayoress of 
Kensington and Chelsea, Mr 
Graham R. Dawson, Chairman 
of the Migraine Trust, and Mrs 
Dowson, and Dr F. Clifford 
Rose, symposium chairman, 
and Mrs Clifford Rose received 
the guests at a reception held last 
night at the Tara Hotel Ken- 
sington, for participants of the 
sixth international : 
symposium. 


migraine 


Institute of Marine Engineers 
A reception was held at the 
Institute of Marine Engineers 
yesterday. Dr J. Cowley, presi- 
dent, was host and presorted the 
institute's three major awards 
for 1983/86. The Denny Gold 
Medal was awarded to Mr H. 
Rush and Mr PJB. Craig, the 
Insilute Silver Medal to Mr EB. 
Shone and Mr G.G Grim and 
the Stanley Gray Award to Mr 
C.A. Bain bridge. 


Luncheons 


Poahers' Company 
Mr G E Nokes, Master of the 
Pouhers’ Company, assisted by 
Mr R. E Marshall Upper 
Warden, and Mr P. Kemp. 
Renter Warden, presided at the 
Michaelmas court luncheon 
held at Armourers' Hall yes- 
terday. Lieutenant-General Sir 
John Akehurst, Colonel and 
Alderman G- D. Spratt, Colonel 
P. D. Blyth. Mr R. Van Oss, Mr 
N. G. Wallace, Mr B. T. 
Matthews. Mr R. W. Twiddle 
and representatives of the Euro- 
pean Turkey Federation 
among the guests. 


Pipeline Industries Gold 
Mr Kenneth Roberts, President 
of the Pipeline Industries Guild, 
was host at the annual luncheon 
held yesterday at the Connaught 
Rooms. Mr MJ. Rouse, chief 
executive,. Water Research 
Centre, was the principal guest. 
Mr R. Spicer, chairman of the 
guild, also spoke. 


Service dinner 


Royal ArtSlery 

The Colonels Commandant 
Royal Regiment of Artillery 
held their annual dinner at the 
Artillery Mess, Wool- 
last night. General Sir 
Thomas Morony, Master Gun- 
ner. St James's Park, presided. 


Sale room 


By Geraldine Norman, Sale Room Correspondent 


Christie's tried to seD the collection of 
Japanese inro and netsuke . belonging to 
a Rgjgifln businessman yesterday with, 
only limited success, lie lacquer 
pouches which Japanese gen tlemen 
used Co wear suspended from their belts 
and the carved toggles that held them, 
known respectively as inro and netsnke, 
had &%at artistry lavished upon them. 

Christie's anonymous businessman 
had been coflectmg for IS years and had 
amassed an interesting collection with 
rather better inro than netsnke. The 
sate, however, only brought £109,758 
with 37 per cert left unsold. 

Christie's had given the sale a grand 
" ^ title - **The David Collection". 

explained yesterday, was 


one of the owner's Christian names and 
that was bow he wanted the sale to be 
billed. The high fad ore rate seems to 
have reflected ambitions reserve prices. 
The pieces that did sell generally 
reached high man. 

The top price of the day was £<400. 
Two of the inro were bid to that amount, 
a five-case piece decorated with South 
Sea islanders gathering coral by moon- 
light on a gold ground (estimate £2,000- 
£3,000) ami a four-case inro with gold 
plant blossom mi a vemiDimi ground 
(estimate £2,000-£3,000). 

The top price among the netsnke was 
£3£20 (estimate £1,000-£L500) far a 
boxwood carving of a frog crouching on a 


Meeting 

English-Speaking Union 
The Archbishop of Canterbury 
gave the opening address at a 
conference arranged by the 
Internationa] Peace Academy 
and the English-Speaking Union 
at Dartmouth House yesterday. 
Other speakers included: 


Lord Elton. Mr Timothy Raton. MP. 
Tr_ Edwin Brarnaii. Sir 


FleM Marshal Sir _ 

Douglas Dodda-Parker. Sir . 
Mr Davtd ^jcaas*. Mr 

Humifirays, Mr iRunea v. Ewatd. 


pump 

Ir. oi« 


Mr Terry , Wane. MfCoUn 

Brigadier tor 
Thomas w 


WetS^CMe^J _ CX-prs^ 


RttctUe. Mr Rfehard Alton. Mr Terry 
Price and Mr Hugh Nantong. 


Marriage 

Mr 1LH. Del Mar 
and Mrs EJL McLaren 
The marriage took place on 
Saturday. October II, 1986. in 


Bishop's Waltham, Hampshire, 
Mar, son 


between Mr Robin Del 
of Dr and Mis N.R. Del Mar, of 
Whchiogs, Hadley Common, 
ire, ana Mrs Eliza- 
beth McLaren (ate Ellis). 
v of Captain and Mrs 
Ellis, of Old Farm, 
Bishop's Waltham. 


Christening 

The Princess of Wales is rate of 
the sponsors far the infant 
daughter of Mr and Mrs James 
Lonsdale who was christened 
Leonora Diana Fiona by the 
Rev Ivor Marsh, assisted by the 
Rev Edward Vogel at St John 
Baptist Church, Kingstone 
Lisle, on Friday, October 10, 
1986. The other godparents are 
r Rupert Bell Mr Charles 
Butter (for whom Mr Geordie 
Grrig stood proxy). Lieutenant 
Dane Hailing, RN, Viscountess 
Garnock and the Hon Mrs 
Twiston-Davies. 


Halley memorial 

A memorial to Edmond Halley' 
will be unveiled in the doisters 
of Westminster Abbey during a 
special service on Thursday, 
November 13. 1986. at 530 pm. 
Those wishing to attend are 
invited to apply for tickets toe 
The Receiver General Room 
13, The Chapter Office, 20 
Dean’s Yard, Westminster Ab- 
bey, London, SW1P 3 PA. 
enclosing a stamped addressed 
envelope. All are welcome to 
attend. 


Service reception 

The Queen's Regiment 
Admiral of the Fleet Sir John 
Field bouse. Chief of the De- 
fence Staff, was the guest of 
honour at a reception given by 
The Queen's Regiment and the 
former Queen's Royal Surrey 
Regiment yesterday at the Tele- 
graph Inn, Putney Heath, after 
the unveiling of a plaque on the 
regiment's memorial 
commemorating the anniver- 
sary of the raising of the Tangier 
Regiment on October 14, 1661. 


Appointments 


Latest appointments include: 
Lord Justice Bingham to be a 
Privy Councillor on his appoint- 
ment as a Lord Justice of 
Appeal. 

Mr Peter Graham to be Second 
Parliamentary Counsel from 
January I. 

Mr Geoffrey Sellers to be a 
Parliamentary Counsel from 
January 1. 


Knighthoods 

forjudges 

Knighthoods have been 


have been con- 
ferred on Mr Justice Potts, Mr 
Justice Rougier and Mr Justice 
Ian Kennedy on their appoint- 
ment as Justices of the High 
Court. 



Mrs Barbara Woodhouse, die television personality, who suffered a stroke two years ago. 



Judy Kay (right), the campaign’s director (Photograph: BOi Warhnrst). 


Forthcoming marriages 


Mr D.G.G Thomson 
and Miss AJVL Maccoy 
The engagement is announced 
betwee n David, son of Preb- 
endary and Mrs Leighton 
Thomson, of Chelsea, London, 
and An ihea, daughter of Mr and 
Mrs John Maccoy, ■ of 
Hurstpierpoint, Sussex. 

Mr CJ. Vermont 
and Miss A&G. Webster 
The engagement is announced 
between Christopher, elder son 
of Mr and Mrs David Vermont, 
of Sawbridgeworth, Hertford- 
shire, and Sarah, elder daughter 
of Mr and Mrs Jeremy Webster, 
of Beaumom-cum-Moze, Essex. 


Mr AJLG J. KendaQ 
and Miss NX. Bensburg 
The engagement is announced 
between Angus, only son of Mr 


and Mrs George Langron Ken- 
of North 


dall. of North Dean, 

R i rrln nghamch ir e, and Nicola. 

youngest daughter of Mr and 
Mrs EJ. Bensburg, of Chiste- 
hurst, Kent. 


Mr &PJL Vivian 
and Miss RJL Bisseru 
The engagement is announced 
ween Simon, son of Dr and 
Mis P.C. Vivian, of Sutton 
Courtenay. Oxfordshire, and 
se, daughter of Dr and Mrs B. 
Bisseru, of Lusaka, Zambia, and 
Bromley, KenL 

Mr SJVL Warr 
and Miss J.A. Fry 
Hie engagement is announced 
between Steven, elder son of Mr 
and Mrs S.R. Warr, of Four 
Marks, Hampshire, and Jac- 
queline, elder daughter of Mr 
and Mrs A.E Fry, of Plymouth, 
Devon. 

Mr A. W3by 

aad Miss G Marshal! 

The engagement is announced 
between Andrew, only son of Mr 
Anthony Wilby, and Claire, 
younger daughter of Mr and Mrs 
lan Marshall of Woodberry 
Crescent, London N 10. 


Mr R~A. Mackey 
and Miss SX- Spink 
The engagement is announced 
between Richard Anthony, son 
of Mr and Mis Joseph Mackey, 
of Battersea, and Susannah 
Lucy, daughter of Mr Brian 
Spink and Mrs Jennie Spink, of 
Hammersmith. 


Mr AJ\ Connor 
and Miss SJ. Hobbs 
The engagement is announced 
between Adrian Paul only sou 
of Mr and Mrs B. Connor, of] 
Fiction, Manchester, and Sarah 
Jane, only daughter of Mr and 
Mrs David Hobbs, of Fetcham. 
Surrey. 


Mr RJL McLean 
and Miss EX Nelson 
The engagement is announced 
between Robert Andreas, eldest 
son of Professor Hugh McLean 
and the late Mrs Gtmlaug 
McLean of London. Ontario, 
and Erica Louise, elder daughter 
of Mr and Mrs John Nelson, of 
Milford, Surrey. 


Mr DJW. Crpokston 
and Miss HJVL MurnO 
The engagement is announced 
between David, son of Mr and 
Mrs W.H.K. Crookston, ‘ of j 
Swansea, and Helen, daughter 
of Mr A.R. ManveU, of Belfast. 


Mr A J.T. Miller 
and Miss PJ. MmDeft 
The engagement is announced 
between Andrew, son of Mr and 
Mrs John Miller, of Hertford- 
shire, and Philippa, daughter of 
the Venerable Peter and Mrs 
M alien, of Wiltshire. 


Mr J.R. Fansset-Baker 
and Miss C J. Sloan 
The engagement is announced 
between John Richard, son of | 
the late Mr Hugo Fausset-Baker 
and Mrs J.A. Fausset-Baker, of [ 
Chorteywood, and Carolyn Ju- 
dith, youngest daughter of Mr 
and Mrs D.F. Sloan, of Cheam, 
Surrey. 


Captaia RXM. Firth 
and Miss GJC. M ain w arin g- 


BACK SUFFERERS l “ 

The relief you’ve^gg^been waiting for 


WRONG 

■ Mi|Li| bed 
or aimed toed 


ilgri v m 

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idudoB 
andrcBcf 
from potato 


Years of experience 


teQ os that standard beds may not be 
right for every Inman body. If they 
provide e x cel l e n t xnpport for som eone 
of heavy btnld they’re most unlikely to 
suit anyone lighter. And vice versa. 
Either way, at least one partner may 
well exp eri en ce aches and pains. 

What’s die answer? 

A bed from the Or t h op aed ic Be d — 

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of springing to soil die needs oftadipartner exactly; to 
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spine relaxed and flexible; to help Oft the pressure off 
bases, nnsdes, tendons, nerve endin gs and jama. 


We are the experts 


All our beds are made by craftsmen and are in 
appearance pm fike top quality ‘standard 1 beds — but 
only in appearance And we do not dhaiy the caith — 
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‘standard’ bed. Became oar beds come straight from 
our factory we are able to cor oar (he rmddkmen's 
profit end keep oar prices down. 

If you have s bock problem, if your partner is heavier 
than yon or if yoa suffer from back pain — ronrary 


than you 
OBAS nw 


To find o at more with 
Post today (no stamp 


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Who are OBAS? 

Wt arc the Orthopaedic Bedding Adriany Service. 
Qttr snrgial orthopaedic terhrrlnan and oar profes- 
siraaQy qualified consultants have been responsible 
for the dtfig n of tb o o wnris rf OBAS (sm gk and 
doable) be* to spedfieanems dictated by weight, 
shape and medical history of cadi of our customers. 
This has doctors’ diagn o s is, where known. 


To OBAS; I 
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Kmc [Me Ma, Mil 



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| OBAS. OqrTTSl FREEPOST. OBAS HSE. LONDON. D'-WlC 


4BiC J 


Mr HJLT. Watiams 
and Miss NX Medd 
The engagement is announced 
between Richard, son of Mr and 
Mrs Glyn Williams, of Bryn 
Eirian. Porthmadog, Gwynedd, 
and Naialie. daughter of Dr and 
Mrs W.E Medd, of Fexerswood 
House, Gaygate, Surrey. 

Mr MJVJ. Wilson 
and Miss AJL Morgan 
The engagement is announced 
between Nicholas, only son of 
Mr and Mrs CM. Wilson, of 
Kirk by in Ash field, Notting- 
ham, and Ann, only daughter of 
Mr and Mrs J. Morgan, of New 
FarmJoch, Kilmarnock. 


Mr G-E. Nagie 
and Miss KA. Yates 
The engagement is announced 
between Garrett, son of Mr and 
Mrs Daniel Nagle, of Mitcham, 
Surrey, and Karen Ann. only 
daughter of Mr and Mis Robert 
Yates, of Form by, Lancashire. 


The engagement 
between Richard 


Mr A. Peck ham 
and Mbs A-G Filer 
The engagement is announced 
between Alexander, eldest son 
of Professor Michael Peckham 
and Professor Catherine 
Peckham, of London, and 
Anne-Caroline, elder Hanging 
of Mr James Filer, of 
Gloucestershire, and Mrs Su- 
zanne Byam Shaw, of London. 


is announced 
Lyndsay Mar- 
tin Firth, 4tb/7th Royal Dra- 
goon Guards, eldest son of 
Major and Mis M.B.C. Firth, of 
Eastcott Manor, Easterton, 
Devizes, Wiltshire, aod 
Georgiana Clare, youngest 
daughter of Mr and Mrs F.H.B. 
Mainwaring- Burton, of 

Denham Lodge, Tarrant 
Keynston, Blandford, Dorset. 


Mr GD. Jackson 
and Miss Z. Sheppard 
The engagement is announced 
between Colin, elder son of Mr 
and Mrs R.G. Jackson, of 
Maidenhead, and Zoe, younger 
daughter of Mr and Mis D.W.S. 
Sheppard, of Exeter. 


Science report 


Fresh optimism over 
whale numbers 


By Tony Samstag 


A study of bine and humpback 
whales indicates that they have 
increased their population to the 
point where they may well be out 
ef danger of extinction. 

The investigation was done off 
the SnaeteUsnes peninsafa, in 
the south west of Iceland, where 
Nordic scientists tried an in- 
genious new CKhniqne for taking 
biopsies on the mo*e to monitor 
the mammals* health. 

Dri . 

at the Uaivereity 
Sweden, used a vessel of the 
Ice la n di c Marine Research In- 
stitute to collect specimens for 
his research into the DNA of 
baleen and toothed whales. A 
harpoon armed whh a bfopsy tip 
was used to take skin samples 
15mm long ami 6mm wide 
without harming the 

The scientists identified 15 
bine and 40 to 50 humpback 
whales during the short trip, far 
more than might have been 
mpected of two protected spe- 
cies thought to be on the verge of 
extinction. Tbordur Eytborssoa, 


a foiiuef whaling captain 9Tui 
chief marksman on the ex- 
pedition, collected samples from 
three bines and eight 
humpbacks. 

Professor Arnason's work, 
based on studies of DNA ma- 
terial extracted from the cal ■ 
treated skin cells, has come dose 
to overtnrniiig some long-held 
theories of the relationships 
among different spedes of 
cetaceans. 


During die past 20 years he 
has accumulated evidence that 
toothed whales (inchuling sperm 
whales and dolphins) and baleen 
whales (bines and humpbacks), 
with their fringed homy plates 
used as a siere for feed mg, are at 
least as likely to have shared a 
common ancestor a$ to have 
evolved independently, as was 
thought originally. 


The dolphin and the (baleen) 
fia whale, for example, have 
been found to have 44 chro- 
mosomes each, and to have 
similar chromosome structures 


Dinners 


HM Government 
Mr Christopher Patten, Min- 
ister for Overseas Development, 
was host at a dinner held at 
Lancaster House yesterday in 
honour of Mr Piet Butman, 
Dutch Minister far Develop- 
ment Cooperation. 


Clovers’ Company 

The Lord Mayor and the Lady 
Mayoress, accompanied by the 
Sheriffs and their ladies, at- 
tended a dinner given by the 
Glovers' Company at the Man- 
sion House last night The 
Master. Mr Fred Caine, pre- 
sided, assisted by Mr John 
Gardner. The other guests 
included: 

Lord and Lady Sows-. Sir Rex 




hi owns or tto Glove Guild of Great 
Britain and fee Naoond AsocuDon 
of Clove Manufacturers '™ u “* ,uon 


Reform Club 

The- Economics Group of the 
Reform Club held a dinner last 
night at the dub. Mr Jeffrey 
Archer was the speaker and Mr 
Douglas Uambias was in the 
chair. 


OBITUARY 




Meagre demand for inro and netsuke 


PROFESSOR JOHN 
CLUTTON-BROCK 


tV 




Sotheby's hare now transferred their 
mixed property sates of oak furniture to 
Bffiingshnrst, their Sussex saleroon^ 
and yesterday's sale made £155^18 

with five per cent left unsold. 

This gives a more reliable reading of 
the state of the oak market than the 
Cold Overton collection sale m London 
last week, which was a special event 
The market seems healthy with a top 
p^^^W^mate £2^4,000) 
at yesterday’s rale, paid fora George H 

oak dresser of around 1730, 


Improving safety of anaesthesia 


The first two sessions of Sotheby s 
Amsterdam sale of decorative arts 
secured a total of £108,459 with 11 per 
cot left unsold. 


Professor John Clutton- 
Brock. anaesthetist, who dsd 
valuable work to make anaes- 
thesia safer for the patient, 
died on October 13. He was 

7j Born in Surrey, he was 
educated at Charterhouse. 
Trinity College, Cambridge, 
and St Bartholomew s Hospi- 
tal. After graduation, he had 
his firet post as a donor m 
Bridgwater and then went into 
general practice in Lincoln. 

Anaesthesia became a con- 
suming interest. He devoted 
much of his time to it and his 
talents were acknowledged 
with his appointment as con- 
sultant anaesthetist to Lincoln 
County Hospital. 

He later moved to Selly Oak 
Hospital. Birmingham, but 
the academic urge brought 
him back to the West Countiy 
as a lecturer in anaesthesia at 
Bristol University. 

After a few years he became 
a senior lecturer and head of 
department, aod it was natural 
that he should be the first to 
hold the chair in anaesthesia 
at Bristol in 1 965. This post he 
held with distinction and was 
appointed professor emeritus 
upon his retirement in 1975. 

Outton-Brock was an inno- 
vative researcher, possessed of 


a profoundly, inquisitive na- 
ture. His particular interest in 
the functions of the brain 
made bim one of the only 
clinical expens in tiec&o- 
encephalograpby. and he an. 
plied this knowledge a 
determining brain function 
during artificial perfhskm a 
if open hen 





the first days of open heart 
surgery. 

He devoted much of Ml 
research to safety in anaratb^ 
sia and to finding that debate 
balance between fight anaes - 
thesia and the avoidance of 


««** 


awareness in the patient. Hi 
the barbfafe: 


also investigated i 
rates which ate still common^ 
used to induce anaesthesia. As . 
a result, doses were reassessed 
and more attention paid to 
reducing the neurological ef. 
feels of surgical stimuli and 
pain. 

Ounon-Brock was a 
humorous, 
man whose company was 
always stimulating He could 
converse knowledgeably art 
wtiuly on vmually any sub- 
ject, particularly the arts, mu- 
sic and pottery. 

He leaves a widow. Joy; 
together with two sobs art 
three daughters, a son and a 
daughter of whom are from a 
previous marriage. . — 1 :_ 


"V 






DR KENNETH LAMBERT 


Dr Kenneth Lambert, ana- 
lytical psychologist and au- 
thor, who made important 
contributions to the contem- 
porary reassessment of Jung's 
theories, died on October 5. 
He was 76. 

Born in London on May 31, 
1910, to an English father and 
an Irish mother, he was edu- 
cated at Highgate School and 
Si Peter's College, Oxford. 
After his degree in philosophy, 
politics and economics be 
read divinity at Ripon Had, 
Oxford, and was ordained into 
the Church of England. 

He worked in various par- 
ishes where he became inter- 


ested in pastoral psychology. 

i World War 


During the Second World War 
he served as chaplain in the 
RAMC in India. 


the 


Mr CJ>- Arnjrtage 
and Miss ILA. Bloomer 
The engagement is announced 
between Diaries, younger sou of j 
Captain and Mrs David 
Armytage, of Sharooti Manor, 
near Fewsey. Wiltshire, and 
Katie, younger daughter of Dr 
A.GS. Bloomer, of London W2, 
and Mrs J.H. Bloomer, of 433 
Fulham Road, London SW10. 


Thereafter he left 
Church and qualified as a 
member of the Society of 
Analytical Psychology in 
1930. It was then that be met 
Jung who spoke with him on 
psychological and theological 
matters with, as Lambert later 
recalled, “a spontaneous 
frankness and an unashamed 
sense of paradox". 

Lambert's learning was in- 
formed with warmth and hu- 
mour; though usually tolerant 


the views of others he alsd 
enjoyed crossing swords m 
controversy. During his years 
as an analyst his time art 
wisdom were also in demand 
as a supervisor and lecturer. 
He wrote many papers, among 
them ‘\igape as a Therapeutic 
Fhctor tn Analysts", art a 
book, Analysis. Repair and 
Individuation. He was a fellow 
of the British Psychological 
Society and received a LirtD 
from the department of men- 
tal and moral sciences at 
Trinity College, Dublin, in 
1981 

Lambert was a leading 
member of a discussion group 
of Jungi&ns and Freudians, 
and once described himself as 
doing “bespoke analysis, tai- 
lor made for each patient". He 
was open-minded as wen as 
incisive, physically and psy- 
chologically energetic, and, » 
an anaylyst, the soul of courte- 
sy. 

He was twice married, first 
to Barbara Kirkby Mason, a 
pianist and music teacher, 
with whom be had two sons. 
This marriage was dissolved, 
and he married, second. 
Daphne Donninglon. who 
brought her daughter into the 
family and with whom he had 
a third son. 


PROFESSOR CECIL TODD 


Professor Cedi Todd, who 
died on October 4 at the age of 
74, was an artist who spent 
much of his career on the 
African continent, where he 
held teaching posts in South 
Africa. Uganda and Nigeria. 

Born in Hull on March 24, 
1912, he studied at the Royal 
College of Art and later taught 
at Poole School of Art, 


After war service with the 
Royal Artillery, he went to 
South Africa where he taught 
art at Durban Technical Col- 
lege before moving, in 1 950. to 
the chair of fine art at Rhodes 
University, Graharastown. 
There he established a reputa- 
tion as a Surrealist painter. 

In 1959 he went to Uganda 
where he became head of the 
School of Fine Art at 
Makerere University College. 
He executed many mosaics, 
ind tiding commissions for the 
National Theatre, the Bank of 
India, and a massive mosaic at 
Mulago medical faculty illus- 


trating the history of medicine 
at Mulago medical faculty. 
Also noteworthy is his por- 
trayal in the Uganda Martyrs* 
Chapel of the 25 martyrs, 
victims in the 1880s of an 
attack on the church by the 
Kabaka. Worked in soft metal 
on coarse glass windows, (his 
contribution to ecclesiastical 
an earned him a papal award. 

On his retirement from 
Makerere in 1970 Todd re-, 
turned to this country untfl. 
three years later, he went to 
Nigeria to teach at Benin 
University. His own work of 
this period was colourful and 
of a satirical con tent 
In 1976 be retired and 
returned to Britain, settling at 
Appledore, north Devon, 
where he continued to paint 
A small, alert, .man 
“Sweeney" Todd was a great 
raconteur and extremely well- 
read, frequently bringing liter-, 
ary influences to bear on his 
painting. 

He was twice married. 


MOST REV JOHN McELENEY 


The Most Rev John J. 
Mccleney, SJ, Roman Catho- 
lic Archbishop of the Diocese 
of Kingston, Jamaica, from 
1967 until 1970, died on 
October 5. He was 90. 

Born at Woburn, Massachu- 
setts, on November 13, 1895, 
he entered the Society of Jesus 
in 1918 after graduating from 
Boston College. He taught 
theology for a time before 
being posted to the 
Phillipines. He then returned 
to Massachusetts in 1937 as 
bead of the Jesuit Novitiate at 
Lenox. 

In 1942, he was appointed 


Rector of the newly-opened 

School in 


Fairfield Prepatory M 

Connecticut (later Fairfield 
University). Two years later, 
he was elected Provincial of 


the Jesuits' New England 
Province, a post which he held 
for the next six years. 

McEleney was consecrated 
bishop in 1950 and installed as 
Vicar Apostolic of Jamaica. It 
was the beginning of a Jong 
and honourable association, 
with the island and he was a 
natural and popular choice as 
the first Bishop of Kingston in 
1956. When die see became fen 
archdiocese in 1967, be was 
appointed its archbishop. j . . 

His mqjor achievement was 
increasing the number : of- 
indiginous clergy for the 
diocese's 80,000 Catholics. He 
was also a dose friend of Sir 
Alexander Bustamante, 
Jamaica's first prone minister, 
following independence . in 
1962. 


COL CHARLES FitzGERALD 


A 1 UZVirK AI Jl 

Cofo^ChaitesG FittGer- Treaty (SALT II). the Anti- . 
Id, who died at Arimeton. alK j 


— — \j. A J toXVJCi™ 

aid, who dirt at Arlington. Ballistic ^ Missile’Treaiy*' 

?\ ae * d ? e Int *nni Agreement on- 
ttjMn mftnhd, be- Strategic Offensive Arms, 
runo-uie-scenes role as an c-w- , . _ _ _ , 

^nerican spedaiist on Soviet in % G I c ^t wh0 S ad - scn ^ 
affairs and as an arms control dunng „ ^ 

negotiator. Second World War, was an. 

He co-chaired the US- ^‘Stentarmy attache in Mosk 
USSR working groups that ^ before becoming the first 

drew up the major arms pnuOT-m-crtrgeoftnelKitluw. 




drew up the 
control agreements 
1973 and 1982. 

He was also chief adviser to 
the American delegation to 
the US-Soviet commission to 
implement treaties such as the 
Strategic Arms Limitation 


Mr Szabolcs FeojM, pr0 . 
lific Hunganan composer of 
operettas, died in Budapest on 
October 1 2. He was 74. 


cow, in 1963. 

From 1964 to 1967, be was 
army attache in Moscow, and, 
{rom 1969 to 1973, a Defense 
Department adviser to the.. 
SALT delegation. 


Fortnightly Club of Cardiff 


The ceitienanr dinner of the| 
y Club 


Fortnightly Club of Cardiff, 
which first met on October 14, 
1886. was hdd last night in the 
Park Hold. Cardiff. 


He was twice director of 
Budapest's Operetta Theatre. 


pie operettas Maya (1931) 
and Riga Jancsi (1947) are 
considered his best works. 


Han Xnnchu, a vice-chair- 
man of China's National 
People's Congress Standing 
Committee, died in Peking on 
October 3. He was 74. . 

A veteran of the Sino- 
Japanese War, he rose through 
the military ranks during the 
civil war fa which the Com- 
munists triumphed fa 1949. 


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births, MARRIAGES 
deaths 

AND IN memoriam 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY OCTOBER IS 19S6 


23 


PERSONAL COLUMNS 


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ATHHiSON On October 12 a , 

IIM). to Moll Inn, Santa! 

David, a daughter, car «"uJS? 
mante to all at Ratanor^' M * ny 

<**». a rtauBWaroSIfic^ W ‘ 
Ajwndf and DavSrTtoS? 

Wro te Louse. uwwnwr. 

' 22^S?*Li l,h - “ «*« Pm- 

nSSLJ?®*^, Women and 
Children. to but (life Lovvther) and 
Davtd. a son. Darcy NtchnlK. a 
brother for JamSSuffleylr™ 5 ' 3 
BUTIMWICX . Qn October ion. » 

She«SK 3S5u2 

l ^n r l ure English) and JMin » 
* tougww. Charlotte Lot** T 
tor other • a stslrT 

CMinin.1 ■ On Sunday 12 October 
w Ron* and AndiwST a darahta 
Rosanna Katherine, a steer fL 
Barney and Poppy ®* er f0r 

Tsusw&a-- 

WHWIMM On o^ober l4Ul 198 , 
^ugSw ' Bn^7 CI H^ nd ****2!^ 

fiOLD-QpOetoDernm 1986, to Jen- 
nlfw (net Richardson) and Rkhani 

® *?£: Fearwi * a broth- 

er for A le xand er. 

J ®ra B &rrsrias 

j3Sto.. bnMhcr for Lsmret> “ « 

UUJ-TETT; On 3rd October, to Cath- 
erine infe Fume!)) and Keith, a 
daughter. Camilla Alexandra. 3 
■UrfteMOn October 13. al U* Royal 
; P* “5SJ? 1 - *® Virginia vnte PWt- 
1 Bps) and DugakL a daughter. (Matre 
Anna). 

IWqo« - On October lath, to Alteon 
(nee Edgar) and William, a daughter. 
Celia C laire, a sister (or FionaT 
WOORE- on October 9th. at ShrodeOs 
Maternity Unit. Watford General . to 
Frarees in£? Cassdy) and Jun. a 
daughler. Charlotte Marin McKean. 
PUiWMGTOti-HIIGHES . On October 
lOUt. to Julie and John, a boy Joseph 
Francts. - a brother for. Georgina 
Anne. 

SELDOM ■ On 6th October, lo Joanna 
Cnee Pantworth) and Anthony, a 
daughter. Jessica Aimee. 

STONE - On October 1st 1 986. to Ettza- 
beth <n*e Lerouuere) and Andrew, a 
son. Edward Francis George, a 
brouter for James. Thomas. WUUam 
and Rebecca 

TW5& - On 8th October 1986. to 
HemUonc wee Paton) and Tony, a 
son. Christopher Robert Victor. 
*83011 . on 9th October, lo Teresa 
<n£e Qbhs) and WBiy. a daughter. 


a*o»Se fS? S*- ^ n|w * ch - 

TT» v«y doo- tauter of 
Lindsay. Miranda and Tbhv nu 

ggrfaiheriiu tow of P acjohn 2d 
t2^L de ^ ted P»» of Sle- 

& ^LT^'f* 486 ' O' 1 ’*® 

i25u®225* “S, w ww at sl 

5™” Pwrih Chureft. Acton at 11 
a jU wouid relatives and Mends 
“““ “wanly tatima- 
uoft. FbtnJhr flowers only piwne 
2^aUan If desired may be sent for 

? >a ™n- or imperial cancer 

^°- ft * r . Raul Dav< «s- DoS 

and enquiries to The H Dale 
Services Ud.. 19 s Anchor 
Road. Sandford MOL Longton. Btekr 
on-Trwrt. TeL 0782^^66!^ 

- On October nth. M*ceft«y. 
Atoander much loved husband fa- 
™d wnndfatho-. Funeral a! Sl 

E^^ChWOiuad Church Road. 
Harpcane. Bnndnahan. on Friday 
ITOi October at u anu 1 bflowed by 
wlvaie cremation. Family flowers 
aDonE. If desired, to Medf- 
S* g ^ ‘ rtai *g 06 ety. c/o The 
27*asurw. General HospitaL 
®**B**i5t Lane. BbntloBham 4 . 

** 0*6111 . on 10 th October 198 &. 

after an illness bravely borne Marie 
«no Neuraui. loved by many 

meeting wih be 

®JMC6M - On 13th October, peaceful. 

^in hospitaL John Gerard Brendan. 
Squadron-Leader.- RjLF.lRerdJ. s»d- 

£ jy ^LyufL 1118 mniUy. Requiem 
•^atOwHcaiurch. Angel Street. 

** 11 *' m - on Monday 
20th October, tallowed by private in- 
tennou at -nmngtoTcSfS^S; 
2 2EJ?- Mease, to Brdtsh 

^ahetic AsBOdaUon H Uac ae clO . 10 
Queen Anne Street. London wi. 

*6Cmt - On October 12 th 1986. 

peacefully at OiarKon Lodge Nmng 

tone Nr. Banoury. In her 93rd 
year. Ema Ptachte (ArtU) fate of 
■nomclifte Road. Oxford. A dear 
fnend 10 many. Funeral Service at 
oxford Crematorium, on Monday 
October 20 m at 12 .noon. Flowers to. 
Bromley 6 Sons, ttflev. Oxford. tn> 
Ham. 

***■» - On Friday loth October. 
Pnautx. Composer. Doctor of 
very suddenly while on hotfctayto 
Frwtce. A Memorial Service wit) be 
held al a later dale. 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


PATRICK LEIGH 
FERMOR 

Will be signing copies of Ms second 
volume of classic travel 
WdoMography. 

•between the woods 

AND THE WATER’ 

Doha Murray. £15.95) 
al Hatchards 
187 Piccadilly Wl 

(01 439 9921) 

on Thursday 16 October 
12.30 - 1.30 pm 


THE NEW 
ADVENTURES 
of the 

BISTO KIDS 

DM you. or anyoapyoo haow worn oa 
0v> w d nuln l llkn mode Hand 
19SS 7 Rrsiy to Adrian Harmon 


BOX G09. 


MOCORUL SOWICE tor the tale 14th 

Ebrt of DundonakL is to be held at la 
Mon on Thursday 30th October. 
SL Pauls, wttjpn Place. London. 
WAR: HELP The Nabonai Bmevoient 
Fund «OT Ihc ASM to p row "TENS 
macfunra for i hr relief of pain m coodt. 
Opos bke arthritis- .060 buys a machine 
BOnairons please lo The Vanin 
Tanypandy. Chairman, nbfa. is. New 
Broad Sl_ London EC2M INH 
HEW CERVICAL CANCER 
devriopto^uoport oonaam 

search. S.A.C Christmas 

Catalogue Quepl For A Ten For Can- 
rer. Woodbury. Harlow Road. Roy bon. 
E*ex CM19 SHFjOCFTSTg 2233). 

THE DIRECTORS of LHW are Messed _ 
announce that Mr Forward of Sussex 
las won the C2.000 S ep t ember coweU 
•• non with ha entry of SI.4R 


FOR SALE 


SAY nr WITH MUSIC 
SAY IT WITH MARKSONS 

and choose from ho adied* of npogbi and 
pand p a i aa far sale or bar from only 
£lt> no. 

markson pianos 

Atony Sl NWJ 
01935 8682 
Anfflety Place, SE18 
01 854 4517 


SERVICES 


!*■ NUMNP, fnrr or Mam— All 

mem Damme. Devi (Ql6i 2S AMnsdon 
Rood. London wa TeL- 01-938 toil.. 

w«ll a SELL CMMntfi wna. mo 
U dlKMi. Sale assutance. Free booklet; 
Children's Features Kb S/9 Bexley So. 
SatfOHL M3 6D0 

BOB mtOPU C TIo m . Send SAZ 14 
Beauchamp PL SW3. 01-267 6066. Ei 
sex area oi-SOO 4142. Hnh success 
ra te. Me n 4065 Ip great demand. 

C A i lH g CVS Ltd prafcssieaai currieo- 
tom sitae documents. Details: 01-63} 


On October 10th 1986. 
al Aberdeen Maternity Hospital, to 
Robin uwte Fraser) and Robert, a son. 
Rory Fraser. 


MARRIAGES 


WASHSftOOfcPAGE . On September 
27th 1986. at LyndhursL CUve son 
of Mr and Mrs C.H. Wahbrook 
of Brock enhursL to Susan younger 
daughler of Dr and Mrs A.R.W. page 
of Ashurst. 


DEATHS 


BARNETT - On I Oth October, sudden- 
ly at home. Gladys Evelyn Barnett, 
loving widow of the late George 
_ . . " Barnett, loved and admired by her 
daughters Pal and Eileen, grandchil- 
dren Anne. Penelope. Andrew, 
Martin and Kevin and great-grand 
son Roberto. Funeral service on Fri- 
day 17th October at 3.30pm to 
Mortlake Crematorium. Family flow- 
n* only. Donations if wished lo 
, -i Arihrlbs and Rheumatism Cornell 
for Research. 41 Eagle SL London 
' WCiR OAR. 

BARNETT - On 10 th October, sudden 
if ly at home, aged 82. Gladys Evelyn 

l> Barnett, taring widow of the tale 

George Barnett, loved and admired 
by her daughters Pat and Eileen, 
grandchildren Anne. Penelope. An- 
drew. Martin and Kevin and veal- 
grand son Roberto. Funeral service 
on Friday 17th October at 3-50pm at 
Mortlake Crematorium. Family flow- 
ers only. Donations if wished to 
Arthritis and RhenmaOsnt Council 
for Research. 41 Eagle Sl London 
WCIR 4AR. 

BURSES - On 10 th October, peacefully 
al Lnsona Rest Home. Rugby. Kath- 
leen Alice of YelverlofL Northanls. 
Widow of Lestte. loved mother of 
Rosamund and Brian, decea s ed. 
Grandmother of Julian and Aitton. 
Funeral service at Ail Saints Church. 
V el vert on on Monday 20th October 
al 2.30pm. Family flowers only. Do- 
nations for AO Saints Church. 
Yetveriott may be sent to Towers 
and Son Funeral Service. Church SL 
Crick. NorUiants NN6 7TP. Tel 0788 
822349. 

CAMPBELL - On the 9Ui October 
1986. in the Queen Elizabeth 2nd 
Hospital. Welwyn Carden City. Es- 
ther Campbell (rtee Roushamj dearly 
beloved wife tor over SO years of 
Alan Campoell. Funeral at St Peter's 
Church. Tewin at awn on Thuraday 
16U) October 1986. No mourning 
and no Dowers but If desired dona- 
tions lo Dr Bamantos. 

DARWIN - On 8th October 1986. 
peacefully at WhnMedon. Katharine, 
widow of sir Charles Darwm. Ser- 
vice at 12 . Noon, on 17th October at 
St Mary's Church. Arthur Road. 
Wimbledon SW19. followed by pri- 
vate Cremation. Family flowers 
only, but donations If desired, to Help 
I he Aged. St James's Walk. London 
EC1R OBE. 

DEACON - On Friday October 10th 
1986. ku lsmay. aged 88. beloved 
■ ' Nanny lo VeneUa. Rosalind. Marcus. 

[.■ Anthony, and Tretor. Ooroettj. 

■ * Gaynor. Donations to Church Army 

Housing. 

FEAJRN - On October llth 1906. 
peacefully. Alec Feam Odr.. R.N- 
(Retired) of Hall Farm. Gressenhaa- 
Norfolk. Beloved husband of Helen. 
Funeral Service al Gressenlwll 
Church Fndav October 1 7th at 
10 45 a m. lo be followed by crema- 
tion at Sl. Faiths Crematorium. 
Norwich. No flowers but donations if 
desired for Royal Naval Association 
r/o H.H. Aldus. Funeral Directors. 
While Lion Yard. Denham. Tel. 
0362 2233/4. 

FEROUMON - On the I Oth October at 
Nazareth House. Cheltenham. Nor- 
- man Scon. Westminster priest aged 
91 . Requiem Mass 1 1 -30 Friday 17th 
October al UK* Chapel of Nazareth 
House & burial at Charlton Kings. 
Reouiescat In Pacen. 
rax -On October 13th 1986. peaceful- 
ly al home In Broadway. 
Worcestershire, after a tong lllne» 
borne with great courage and hu- 
mour. Oliver John Jenny aged 19. 
most beloved eldest son of John and 
Isabel Fox. Ill HW Street. BroM- 
way. Worcestershire and dearest 
brother to Eleanor. Beniamin. Justin. 
Ouinitn. Anthony and the late Isabel. 
The funeral wiH be held al 12 noon 
on Frxlay I7ih October i9®6 al SL 
Saviour's Roman Catholic Oiurcn. 
Leamington Road. Broadway. 

Worcestershire. Donations if desired, 
may be sent lo 'The Young Al Heart . 

■ ’■ c/o Heart Unit. Birmingham 

GlilMinrs HosplUtf. Ladywood. 

Middleway. Edgbaston. 

Birmingham. 

GALT - On October 1 2th. at St Joseph's 
Nursing Home. Danbury. Essex. Jt»- 
sie aged 90. daugnwr of Uie tote 
Reverend and Mrs Walter Gatt MLA- 
B.D.. Funeral Service m Ctotti 
Church. New London Rd^ Otetms- 
lord on Tuesday October 2lsl ,* 10 
a an. foiurered by interment al Oty of 
London Cemetery. 

4ANNAY - On October HID. 

Iv after a stroke. Eileen, dear tj^e of 
[he late Julian Haniuur and loving 
mo) her of David FUneral Private. A 
Service of Thanksgiving will be hrid 
j! Si. Michael's Chun*. . 

Tirrolfl at midday on Saturday Octo- 
ber 25U). _ 

IARDMAN - on 12IN October 1986. 
Berlw. peaceful** 

Houm*. aged 7b. Drarty 
of Squib & Lulu, crandfanerof Jane 
& Peter Cremation umaie. Church 
Sort ice at Odinam Parish Church on 
Friday 17th October al 4pm. No 
ftowen- but donations P*«»JOThe 
Marie Cune Fouodanon. 28 Betgrave 
. SSare^Svton SWt. who nursed 
him M dearly at U» end 
ENSON On October 14U. peoeoftiuy. 
ord alter a lOhfl and courageous 
struggle. SQitodren Loader F.D. 
Henson. MB.E. 2®"®***? 

please. Donation to RAF Benevolent 
Fund 


, - On 12th October 1986. 

reacefulty In a muring home. Alfred 
Sweeney aged 92 yearn, at Cemrris 

cross, a much loved father and 
grandfather. Funeral Service wOl 
owe place at SL Josephus Church, on 
Friday October 17th. at llwn. Run- 
ny nowers only, but If desired, 
dontotoos to. The League or Friends 
r/o the Secretary. Chatfonts and 

S*Z£ .%5L‘* maaL °*‘ m 

GAUUOJD-On LOU) October peacwm- 
■y. Eva Frances Graham. Funeral 
service at SL Mi cheats church. Wo- 
burn Sands. Friday 17th October, al 
llam. 

SHANKLAIO . On 13Ui October 1986. 
peacefully at Ms home. AxxUartg. 
Woodlands Terrace. Grantown-on- 
Spey. Sir Thomas Murray 
Shankland CM.O. devoted buo 
band, lather and grandfather. 
Funeral Service at SL Oofumba's 
Episcopal Church on Thursday 16th 
October at 1.30 plol. thereafter to 
Grantown New Cemetery. No (tow- 
era by reauesL aU friends 
respectfully lovdecL 


t - 9th Octoher. peacefully af- 
ter a short Idnesn. OS. (SAM) 
Spencer MAE aged 88. tormaBy of 
frchester and Christchurch RoatL 
Northampton, sadly mlased by aD Ms 
family. Funeral at AMngton Cluvch 
3pm 17th October, followed tv Pri- 
vate cremation. In lieu of flowers 
donations if wished to Sabil 
Christopher's Home. Ablagtoa Rare 
Crescent. Northampton. 


On October 13th. Kath- 
leen Frances Summers aged 84 
yean, daughter of the late R ev e re n d 
J.F. Summers of Newport Gwent 
and much tovedand devoced sister of 
Joan. FUneral Service Sl AHmbs 
C atherdraL Friday 17th October 
1986. at 11 am. fODowtng private 
aemaaon. no flower s by request but 
donations if desired to St Albans Ca- 
thedral (Fabric) . enquires to E 
Seymour & Son. 26Marlborough Rd 
St Albans. Tel 07Z7 53091. 


- On October llth 1986. at 
her home. Castle Hill House. Saffron 
Walden. Esse*. Mary, aunt of 
PauUoe and Bteabeth. Funeral ser- 
vice. SL John's Church Little 
Walden, an Friday October 17th at 
2J0pm followed by Private crema- 
tion. AM enauiries to. RPeasgwd A 
Son. Funeral Directors. Saffron Wal- 
den 23314. 


• On October 11. suddenly. 
Stanley, most dearly loved hunand 
of Olive, earner of Harvey and Tere- 
sa. father In law of Rae and Vta and 
grandad of Cassle and Chris. Funeral 
Service will be held at the Croydon 
Parish Church on Thursday October 
16 at 1 1.30 am. Family flowers only 
please. Donations tf desired to St 
Christopher's Hospice. 51. Lawrie 
Park Road. London SE26. "So he 
passed over and aB toe trumpets 
sounded tor him on the other side." 
Any enquiries Ashton Ebbutt Funer- 
al Service. Tel: 01 688 5555. 

VEDMAN - On October 12th. peaceful- 
ly In Ms steep after a long Utnees. 
Geoffrey HorefeB. much loved hus- 
band of Kay and Brother-In-Law of 
Barbara. Funeral Thursday 16th Oc- 
tober at 3pm at St John* 
Crematorium. Hermitage Rd. 
Woking. Family flowers only, dona- 
tions If wished to (he Royal Artillery 
Charitable Fund, c/o The Woking 
Funeral Sendee. 1 19-121 
Goldsworth Rd. Woktaig. Surrey. 


MEMORIAL SERVICES 


BRADFORD - A Memorial Service tor | 
Robert Danby Bradford, wui be held 
al 2.00pm on Thursday 6th Novem- 
ber. al SL John's Church. Princes 
Street. Edinburgh. 


A Memorial Service tor | 
Miss Price COOPER, mhf past 
Principal of Queen Alexandra's 
House, wm be heM on Friday October ; 
3lsl. al 2pm al Hoty Trinity Church, 
Prince Consort Road. SWT. 


A Memorial Service tor 
Rosamond. Lady Fisher of Lambeth, 
wni be held on Wednesday. 12th No- 
vember. at 12 noon in St Jama' 
Church. Bodfey Road. New Malden. 
Dust North of Uie Malden round- 
about on the KtaMston Bypass.) 

LOVELL - Antony Cttve of Lechlade 
and Compton Qtambertayne. Memo- 
rial Service of Thamcsgtvtng for Ms 
life so tragically terminated to be 
held In Compton diambertayne 
Church on Saturday 18th October at 
3.00 pm. Ail friends most welcome. 
Flower tributes to the church. Enqui- 
ries to Ronald Lever. Funeral 
Director. Teftonl 3i6. 

miSHWORTH- Memorial servteeswm 
be held on 17 October ant 1 19 Octo- 
ber 1986 al 9 JO am and 10J0 am 
respectively, in honour of Nicholas 
Andrew Rustrworth. aged 22. for- 
merly of MlUfWd. al St Stmmon and 
Judes. Hillside Road. London SW2. 


IN MEMORIAM -WAS 


Menard Chartwood. i 
SfubDingtonian and Chettontan. 
RAF.V.R Sergeant Pilot 75 Squad- 
ron FeltwelL Killed in action 15U) 
October Wl. aged 20. tlefeulmg 
our fteedom- Proudly remembered 
by his brothera and Nstera. 


IN MEMORIAM - PRIVATE | 


RAYMOND WAY. Passed away lStti 
October 1981. Ever deeply loved. 
Ever revered. Ever chertshed. Ter 
thousand thousand precious memo- 
ries. Thank you for touching many 
lives. * Your name from the palms of 
Ms hands. Eternity will not erase. 
Engraved on His heart II remains, tn 
marks of tndeUMc grace.' ‘ I shall not 
look upon His dice again'. Your wife 
Mary. 

WOOD - Rene. A dear and much loved 
Mend with many happy memories. 
Shirley 


■•AlOHAOr a ADVICE Bureau Katharine 
AHen lex fomgn Office; persona) Inter- 
views.? SMky PL Wl. Ol 499 2566. 
CN gM RM N E Off SERVICE Ow wm 
Sow Send an eleaanBy gtfl wrapped 
botOe. magma or fc rto e— wtm a dis- 
Oncuve cant bearing yoor persona! 
mes sage anywhere bi the (K. Just 
Phtme 0233 89002. 

convey ANCasa by funy ou 

ton. ClBO 4- VAT sn_ 

dhbwsetnenn ring 0244 319398. 

UP VISA MATTERS E S Ouneon US Inw- 
ver 17 BtdMrodeSL London Wl 01486 

0813. 

naUEO Pteo a Terre m Rat. UK sem 
wet. Sun professional person needing 
bus in London, tel 01834 3188. 

I TOOK Express 01-278 6961. Fbsiand rr- 
tuoe mex/lax vrvire. Accns/VIsa. 


WANTED 


SPINK 

Buy War Medals 

including Orders & Decorations 
Sptnk & Son Llralied 
6-7 King StreeL St James’s 
London SWlY 6QS 
Tel 01-930 7888 (24 hours) 

towNiiM M 66 


C2B per os no to pnM tor sever arikSss. 
£260 per az for gold. AU diamond 
jewellery bougM. Mr Hart 01-960 8030 
er Write 361 Marrow Road, l/mitnn. 
W9. AU Ehsund covered. 

BOX RSqilHED at Ascot tor oecrakanr 
days tn 1907. Write to BOX 
B89. 

JEWEUCmr. Gold. SBcer. Otmonds in’, 
gently wanted. Top Prices. WHUaans. 43 
Lambs Conduit SI WC1. Ol 406 8638. 


FOR SALE 


and Sheraton sryte dining torture 
made to Older. Over SO dUag sulies as- 
ways avaUable tor tmmediote delivery 
Nnuebed. near Henley on Timmes 
rO*9l) 64111& Bournemoum (0202) 
293580. Tomhara. Devon KJ3920T) 
7443. Berkeley. Ctos MM53) 810962. 

nsUT qmUp wool carp els . Al trad 
prices and under. aBo available 100 's 
extra. Large room fixe remnants ondar 
haii normal price. Chancery Carpets Ol 
405 0453. 

TICKET! FOR ANY EVENT, Cate. SUr- 
tighi Exp. Chess. La Mb Ail theatre 
and sports. 

TM: B21 -66I6/B2S-049G. 

AXx / Visa / - 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


3 


26 Y«« Anniversary Ape Ml 

BLOND MclNDOE 
CENTRE 

1961-1988 

Your supp ort is vit al tafta : 
conttuiigreseareti into the 
probtens of raedion of 
trasp la m s of heart. Mdney. 
cornea, and skin, twatmant of 
bums, and Its causes of many 
sorious dseases. Founded in ■ 
memory of Sr Ardiibafd Mdndoa. 

DmsOms Is AppMh Orerin. 

EAST 6RMSTEA0 MEDICAL 
RESEARCH TRUST 

, W. Sussex, MflS 30Z 


ANTTOUESA ’1 
COLUSCTABLES I 


Best Uckete tor aU soW- 
oi4 nous, our cbsMs meiude most 

mSSFiSg "*' ^ m * tewrt - 

THE TBSCS msim Other bars 
sratl. Hand bound ready for pressn x a. 
don 1 - also “sunasys". rt?.m 
Rmember when. (U-65S 63B3. 

A hO— LE BriMh Mack kittens. Excel- 
kni pedigree. Regtaurad and inonuaiaiL 
Tel: 021 578-2440 

CATS, CtffSS, Los MB. All theatre and 
sport. Tel 489 1763. Afl mBor CredU 
ok 

OBM Horend Assontx Vsrtous dtans- 
service piece*. HbK Price. 01 984 7390 
iDaymw f). 

W —RS /f RI i ZE Rt. Cookers, etc. Can 
you buy cheaper? 8 * S Lid. 01 229 
1 907/8466. 

NAME A STAR for s lored one. Telephone 
01-462 0919 for details of Has m Ornate 

YORK FLACSIMES for Pbtto & drive- 
way*. Uoubtaoon sale. Tel 061 223 
0881/061 231 6783- 

MAfl Mm catT Dttflard table, watotfl one 
Victorian scoreboard) Tel Ol 940 1192. 


CASH IN ON 
HIGH PRICES 

by MM your 
Jrwrtieiy-Gold Goins etc 

GANCE 

Rrar of 24 Hauoa Garden. 
London EC IN 880 

01-242 3151 


FLATSHARE 


BATmEA/CLAPNAM ProT -drl 10 
share luxury flat, own room, msiure aU 
tocdWes Cl 70 pern- TeLO 1-350 1090 
ta/shonri 


OVERSEAS TRAVEL 


! m/f afrlg dare comfort- 
able RaL M- tube 3 Bfi. AH mod m-s. 
£46 pw rxCL Tel Ol 486 5886 ex DKH 
iLostlr) <d) 946 6586 tek 


Frimte red'd to mare lux 

me wasn/marti. dah/wwi. gdn. own 
room. From Cnc p.. . t«I£» 223 0604 


LOWEST FARES 

Parts £69 N YORK 

Frankfort £60 LA/ST 

Lagos £320 Hum 

Nairobi £325 Singapore 

Jd burs £460 Bangkok 

Cairo nos kubmi 

Drt/Bom £336 Rangoon 

HomKm UIO Catnda £425 

Kmp DHroanh Aiaa an 19 3- Qxb Cbs 

SUN Sl SAND 

21 Swallow SL London Wl 
01-439 2I0Q/437 0657 


£278 
£395 
£320 
£420 
£336 
£440 1 
I £350 


t Srtrrthr Snarbia. Wen 
eslab Introductory MTV Ire. Pfcr m for 
BPPtlOl -5898491. 313 Brpmpipn Road. 
SWB 


NAHTTONHU. near nation. Prof Male, 
non snoker for farota Dome. Bed. 
brankiM and evenmg meaL Mon - Fri. 
TO 01 977 1808 afire 630. 


MM CHURCH ST W6 «h person 27a- 
0 It. £160 Mn bet Tec nam on- 
wans 01-437 7062 after 5pm 01-937 
0446 


MENORCA 

HALF TERM AVAILABILITY 
IT OCT FROM £120 
Vflas. ML Imran. 

11 resorts. 

Dims Fndavs/santrtJayi 

CELTIC HOLIDAYS 
0622 677071 or 
0622 677076 124 tm. 

ATOL 1792. 


JEWELLERY TO SELL? 

Long otabiJstiea famBy iewrMers wtrti 
to punmaoe second hand jewrtlery 
and anttou# cn rela pe dodo lo add to 
our varied and inurtSDag coOeclion. 
wme or can in con f Meuce to;- 

Arm our- Winston Ltd- 

45 . Buritogton A ream. * 
Lead on Wl 
Tel; Ol 493 8937. 


NEWSPAPERS 

(1690V189(rs) 


FROM £18.00 EACH. 

0492 - 31303 

£ JONES 

48 DUNDONALD ROAD 
COLWYN BAY 
CLWYD LL29 7RE 


sets. Authrnncated wltn let nol 6 histo- 
ry ClBO per see. delivered 6 London. 
01 -5*1 4863 day A eventoos. 
WANTED Edwardian. Victorian mtd Ml 
pamied hmture. Mr Astuon 01 947 
5946. 667-669 Garratt Lane. EMkdMd. 
SW17. 

B OM£E A rshefl side tabu- C.1B70. £850 
obo Privately owned. Tel Wrvbrtow 
10932)96876. 

3EM BOMM, hand craned m 
liory/Malactitte. £350 each. TO: 
10483) 57 1309 le v emngs) 

CNNV Farthing Bteycte tor sale. West 
Susarx. TN: (07982) 2081. 

WANTED OM toys. bougM tor caan. 
Phone John Jones. 0243 674232. 


MUSICAL 

INSTRUMENTS 


STEMWAY Baby Grand model O serial 
number 244266. 7/4 oriave. case me 
Mpny. square legs. Ivory keys, an 
original ports, aitorc. Ml 080277182a 


■BCHSIEM Upright plana, btoac. offers 
In the region of ISBO, IN *0246) 78015 
eves. 


THE PIANO 

over i year (APR Obi Low (Merest 
rales over 2 years (APR 939) A Syears 
(APR 12.24 b) Written anniaWms. Free 
C ata logu e . 30> Hlghgate Road. NWS. 
01-26 7 767 1. 

2 NEAimna. Baramm Gramb. mooi- 
rians instruments, good price tor quick 
sale . 886 4981 JD 

NMmRMD Mtaor UortgM rnwipe PL 
ano. Excrtotl staying orderJuned. 
£795. Mbit rmtoPtnn 01-453 014a. 
HUTOH Beoutkul 6 ft 6 grand. Mori- 
rians imtnnaiL £2^00oao. Tel 01 
262 1806 or 0263 713078. 


YACHTS, PLANES A 
SPORTING 


PINT SALK or Charier. TV Ketch, fun 
crew. three double its two a mt . 

Tlfaron area. Please roman Mrs Ann 

Kelly at RMhaUroa Castle. Mvan. Op. 
Meath RfpuDUr Of t i r ial Id or Tele- 
phone aim on 40803 between tee hours 
of 11 am. to 8 e ra. M oi Mbiy lo Friday 


SWX Is Prof mate, own tor am room bi lux 
bouse with garden. £60 pw Inc btitt & 
nfcw tM 

Prof ra/r. n/s. loa o/r lo mare 
wtm t other, gar 8R. but _ 

£45 P W. Ol 878 8897 Eves. 

BATTYMCAi Male/fanatc to 

house. AD ame niti e s . Own room. £48 
pw. Tel: 5650203 sevrsL 
BATTOSCA PARK am person w mare 
luxury RaL O/n. ESS pw exclusive 
TCL0983 522192 

-DLACXREATM H3 O/R tn shmed house 
tdoclorl £140 PCm. 01888 0863. 
CLCAVCR SQ Kerximpinn. 2nd female, 
o/r. nr tube. £151 pm. exci. TeL oi 735 
3800. 

PUIT / Home Share for I or 2 Ctonbndpe 
Graduates, f 22. convenient central Lon- 
don TO: 0232668740 
f MUCO.Prol N/S. 2335 Share Vgrisah. 
o/R * ensultr tauv £78 pw. 01-382 
0359 a fter a 

PUTNEY Own room, share with owner. 
BR 8 mins, tube lO imps. £140 pan plus 
bob. Ol 788 6936. 

MB S. Stair roam in noesr. lor M/r. 
N/S. 5 mini station. £160 pcm. 947 
89*6 oner SJO PJB. 

WT. Luxury spacious ftaf. prof M/F. own 
very large double room. N/s. nr tube. 
£50 pw- Tel Ol 840 6029 after 7pm 
WU Cosy room in cte. ML share kit 
with one other, sum prof female. £38pw 
ex cL Ph one Mark 7360297 (toys. 
WANTED. Young pro f essional female 
seeks n/s lux RaL central area. Cal 
Owner. TebOl-7255713 x 221 . 

WEST WEN: prof m. n/s. 22-28. o/r. tn 
CH lux RaL nr tube. Cl 57 pan exd Tel: 
01-603 2790 (after 6A8) 


NEW LOW FARES 
WORLDWIDE 


AMUAH 

S360 

KARACHI 

£270 

BOMBAY 

IW 

LAGOS 

CSX 

CAMt> 

£710 

isua 


DELHI 

£3*5 

ROUE 

£106 

PHAFliRT 

£S5 

SEOUL 


HONG KONG 

t«5 

SVDMEL 


STANSU. 

nn 

TOKYO 

£560 


SKYLOR D TR AVEL LTD 

2 OBIMAN STREET. U3HO0H Wl 
Tat 01-429 3V1I8007 
MRLME BOWSED 


TRAVEL WORLD WIDE 

Soend aduoc ta psntaapr cm nthtemg loos 
tool Ba.rl roh 
lu £ did, dan QJ73? 4MS». 

Tout lo Canada t’S 4Ajronp mqmnrv 

toifliZ* Far fan of. 
a)T»)-C739 

fowsBcmnl Iccosaupccdka 
OI-MJtnil. 

TRAVEL WORLD. 

A8TA 72)02. Mamba tri ttk tattSsft of 
Travel & Toursbl 


FLATSHARE 


UP UP & AWAY 

Nairobi, jo-suro. Cairo. Dobal. 
Istanbul. Singapore. K.L_ DriM. 
Bangkok. Hong KOag. Sydney. 
Enrppe. A The Americas 

Flamingo Travel, 

76 Snaftevbury Avenue 
London Wl V 7DC 

01*439 0102/01-439 7751 
Open Saturday 10.00-13.00 


WALTHAMSTOW Gmln tube. 8fi. 20 mtn 
’West End aty. large room, ad prates- 
stenai m/f. CTV. iei_ au tacotuea. £tss 
pan. inrt. phto deparehirnaWeL TefcOl 
509 2182 


PROP F mare 3 bed lux town housr near 
Wimbledon Common & soixhnrtd (one. 
£165 pan 4- MBs. Start Nov ring 01-628 
7799 <w) 01-788 7093 0U. 


sets Nr city, pro f eautooal mafe/femalr to 
snare houae. awn 2 moms. £180 pan 
exd. Teh 01-639 8246 (after 630 pm) 


BARBADOS 

My boss owns a fhbolous fta&y 
staffed vttta wtth pool on ttie West 
Coast Due lo recent cancdtatlon 
we now have vacancies tor the 
month of November. Normal rental 
is £2600 pa- week e xchaOn g 
airfares for 6 people. WO) do for 
£1700. Also available honeymoon 
cottoae sl ee ps 2. Rent £400 p.w. 
exdudtng airfares. 


jnffWICH. Share arrhUrrtS comCoriable 
hour. Near lubr. £22Sprm exd Tct 
996 62*9. 


For further details & 
ca!L- 


brochures 


FULHAM dose to tube. Praf/famate. n/s. 
o/r. Monday u> Friday. £1*0 pcm no. 
Tel: Ol 731 1664. 


Sandra YeOowley 
during Office hours on 
021-233 1200 or write bx- 
87 Camden Street. Hockley. 
Btmdngham 81 3DE. 


SW6 Stngte Prat M/F to dm comfort- 
able 3 ben house, o/r. £180 pan Plus 
MBs YetOl-sei 1461 after 6 pm 


DOMESTIC/CATERING 

SITUATIONS 


2 CHALET 8RU required (p ref era b ly 
IrtehOU to run holiday bowse In Stas 
ski resort. Apply In willing lo Luna 
Prorertte*. 26 Chester now. 

SWt. 


— -/COON. V. ns. presort reo to S ve- 
in - London arra. Su are scran, and up 
saury offered lo appucaM* wMn good 
ref*, agr lo 56 years. Telephone Mrs 
HMrtH n so n Jeeves (LCD AOY) Ol 82B 
2063 or Ol 80S 4346. 


SICILY 

AUTUMN BARGAINS 
Treat yourself to Ous exceptional op- 
portunity of a special end of season 
otter tn TAORS4B4A. one ol the 
world's most elegant resorts. 

21 October 15 rrigNs £209 

23 Oriooer 13 rdghls £229 

28 OctotXT 8 tab £179 

30 October 6 ntghls £169 

2 November 3 nights £139 

Futty tori of daytane Catwkk RMMs 
BAR a tcon u local trans f e i s A afrpsrt 
taxes. NO HIDDEN EXTRAS. 

ISLAND SUN, 

82 BucUnghsm Cne. London stiri£6PD. 

01-222 7452 

ABTA/ATOL 1907 
Member ol Brmsn khad Assays pk fim 




StreeLLandan Wl. 

UK/OO 

■emP/Berm 
CHALET atm LS WSM ttv 
MDRtoe. 6 Ravenswood 
llo rthw ood. Wkd> HM BPR 


.. 6534. 

mJielps/daras ■ 




DISCOUNT FLIGHTS 


PORSCHE 


Lot Angstos 

JoTxxq . 


£420 

£178 

£246 

£220 


Rtn 

£764 

£775 

£340 

8485 

£350 

£504 


•St BCTWga - Auguc, 81. White martini 
■Irtoe. Marti leather, rear raoHcr. Only 
42XDO mMrs. 2 owners. FSH. superb 
w . a«3BO a bargain. Tel. 0028 


LONDON FLIGHT 
CENTRE 
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OVERSEAS TRAVEL 


SHORT LETS 


6197 Super mews houae. ? bed. tony far- 
Prtbed - toe CH/CHW. £190 pw TO 
<02801 703796 or 01-244 756a 


LUXUNY SOVKCD FLATS, central Lon- 
don from £325 pw. Rtap Town Hse AMs 
373 3433 


Col T.v. 24 hr Sw. TrMX. CoBtnglwm 
AmrtmeniB. 01-373 6806. 


CLUBS 


cum. 

7201. 


London Sehool of Bridpo and 
SB Kings Rood. SW3. 01-589 


AMERICAN BUYERS SEEK. 

Anomie and M o dern Jewellery. Watches. Silver and Ptate. Fundraro. D romes. 
Dnaarb. Kanes. Jade. Pewter. Ctorio. Paintinm. Poroataln. Cla ss. Old Dobs. Toys 
and Teddy Bears etc. Antique 6 Pre 1940's Ctethes. Pabtey and oi per. Shawls . 
Patchwork QcXtts. sametere. Cosume Jewdtefy. Lacs. LtonensTaB lU S Wic Beans. 
Ota muNtal boxes 6 t iBtrum e ms and all other toi er saunu rtnu. immediate casb 
by Minn for Jewellery and other Articles sent by dob. 

Our expert can call on yea. or cab parsonally wflnout ob U pa tinn 
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LOsxton W8 7LN. Tri 01 229 9618 
(Abo In New York) 


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. What do they have in common? 


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130 Jcrmyn SbocLOl 839 7144 


DISCOUNTED FARES 

Return Return 

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Del /Bombay £360 MlanU £330 
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AST A 


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OPEN 9-9 MON-FW 96 SAT 
Long- Haul 01-937 9631 
and 01-603 ISIS 
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lst/Bustnep* 01-938 3444 
CoiHniM Drented/Bondri) 
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SUNW0R1D TRAVEL 
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SO son) SL Epsom . Sorry 
[037271 C7S36'?5S3D.'?71D9, ; 
2S31S,?4aKna)97 


LOW Com Fares to USA. Malar Travel. 
Ol 486 9237. UTA. 


Ol 734 6307. AST 


Regent S 
A/Alal. 


t. AFRICA From £465. 01-584 7371 


STAHL Portugal Cheapest fares. Btootes. 
Ol 735 8191. ATOL- 


1ST. CIUO 6 Economy Ctea. Sbrcial 
lares. KTT Teh 01-930 1366. 


STAIN T0KTU8AL GREECE: flights 
Faldor 01-471 0047 ATOL 1640. 
Acress/vcai 

UT/CLU8 economy IHgnts wortrtwtdr. 
Comet Travel. 01 454 1091. ABTA 

IATA 

SYD/MEL £635 Perm £666. AU raptor 
earners to Aus/NZ. 01-684 7371 
ABTA. 

TUMEIA. For your houday where Ks stHl 
summer Cau lor Our brochure now. Tu- 
Msun Travel Bureau. 01-573 4411 . 


anwu. Gears a. Seals Int Ol 434 


AU us am. Lowest (ares on mator 
scheduled carrtera. 01-584 7371. ABTA 


GENERAL 


WEEKEND or Weeks. Honeymoons or 
2nd Honeymoons.. Dtacover the Marie 
of Hate's rcavanuc aues In Autumn or 
Winter. CHI 01-749 7449 (Or VOW- 
FREE colour brochure. Magic of Rote 
DeM T. 47 Shepherds Bush Green. Lon- 
don. W12 BPS. 

TAKE TIME OFF to Rprk. An m erttani. 
Br u ssels. Bru g es . Geneva. Berne. Lau- 
sanne. The Hague. Dttoltn. Rouen. 
BoutarA Dieppe. Time Off. 2a. Ches- 
ter ClMe. London. SW1X 780. 01-Z3G 
8070. 


SELF-GATERING 
CANARY & MADEIRA 


Puerto del 

Carmen. HM) standard apts with pool 

oiaUabte Dorn 30/10. Tenerife 28/10. 

todays). S/C prices Iftxn £249. (0923) 
778344. Tinaway Hobdays. ABTA 
ATOL 1107 


SELFGATERING 

GREECE 


CORFU Baroainr. Beautiful del vIDas nr 
beach. 2-6 pre £199 1 wk. £229 2 whs. 
Abo Malta A Cyprus. Cai/HTow. Pan 
World Holidays Ol 73* 2562. 

BIODCS Late booking bargains lux anan 
bob from £159p.p 15.1822^6 Oct. 
Tec Stroma 0706 8628145. ' 


SELFGATERING 

PORTUGAL 


ALGARVE. Lux \1Bat wqh pooK Ort.* 
tori, wuiK-t Cutter, wetcome. Ol 409 
2838 VHlaWorid. 

ALGARVE ALTERNATIVE. 

The finni houses tor rental. 73 Sl 
James a. SWi. Dl 491 OBOO. 


SELFGATERING SPAIN 


Ouirl Muster- warm \ alley 
aowi, rdg. geH Apt sip 4 / 5 . Bearn 
Mmorar to rams. From £80 pw- 0604 
S87313. 


VINTER SPORTS 


LE SKI 

BEST VALUE IN COURCHEVEL 

Sr Vr ■ touH eubkhed tarn udi ctofet, NU 
AxtvniBr riSMSUftSilriWyei rC‘ el our 
W 55 iw frtssw uu gW lUysr J nn nr 
v«>b bta & >iMom tone a w pcnoM stat 
t» ra oMtog 5 <nys 3 ta *n ter. * ra> 
wntt pnm nm bi t BtAl HUOftY 
Hweta a ori fi pa ton oactu: ■ icu ran I Dr 
0*-4WP°Wt 

LE SKI 
0484 548996 


stu WEST - new: Special offer* on 
9inJPk RING TOR A DEAL! AKO tSMT 
taind) low prim surfing <N £59. 
at* lor a ropy oi our bumper brochure. 
<011786 9999 AIM* M0S6 AIM 1383. 


SKI BEACH Villas Switzerland. 
France. Andorra & Uie llaban Dolo- 
miln at unbeatable prices & 
generous group discounts. Ring m oa 
tO»5> 511113 ABTA 1415X ATOL 
38 IB. 

ski whizz - cxcrrjMQ orrrat&< Jim 
iiUing a roairi lor 10 rniitv-i vou to a 
FREE nolMkU- any datef Masnol HR- 
er dnrounb lor rater mi rtwlclv gum 
Irom C159« S/C £59. Rta la now 01 
370 0999 

SKI BONNE NEWE ■ ChwplnwnpetlaW In 
Court hei 41 unit £239> FiU a rtutet ana 
no free* Ring in lor OHan ai 244 
7333. 


Meribebe. libn Megme Comfort, rer- 
wre great, tiling Phone Ot 602 9766. 
SKI TRAC ER- Superb S/C m Tigm-i La 
Plagne Deux Alpes a Megne Prices 
from only £591 01 244 7551 


LAKE DISTRICT 


AUTUMN In the Lake Dnlrirl Seif Cater 
mg art om modal .on steeps 2/4 to M 
■025721 o3>34 


LONDON 


DRISCOU. HOUSE HOTEL. 200 dnrir 
room, CTO pw PB. 1 72 New Kent Rd. 
London. SCI 4 NT. Ol 703 4175 


PUBLIC NOTICES 


ALCOCK. CCOROE HCNR’, ALCOCte 
late oi 99 susrroate Poynion Road. SI. 
LronamOn Sra. Cast Sussex. Cbco There 
00 13tn May 1986 

I Estate about £70.0001 
CLCAVCR Otherwise JACKSON. 
GEORGE WILLIAM CLEAVER otherwise 
GEORGE WILLIAM JACKSON late 01 87 
Omer sum. Co\ entry. Wed Midland*, 
died mere on I5!h December 1985 

1 Estate about C33.00O, 
MARSHALL. HARRY MARSHALL lair Of 
33 wnberh Road Ktog'*- Lynn. Norfolk, 
■bed Al Kmgl Lynn on 29th June 1986 
(Estate about £23u000i 
MARS HALL. OLIVE MARSHALL. SPIN- 
STER tare oi 53 Bvron Avenue. Manor 
Park. London E12. died At piwmw Ell. 
OP 8 U 1 November 1985 

1 Estate about £39.490) 
WIDDOWS. KATHLEEN ELMS 
WIDDOWS otherwoe KATHERINE 
ELI B WIDDOWS. spinster late oi rial 
t. 8 81. Georges Road. Worthing. East 
Starx. dted to Worthing on 1 1 in January 
ft 

(Eatatn ctfnuf Ci? noO) 
The kin of the above named are requested 
to apply 10 me Treasury Solid lor <B v . 1 . 
Ouren Anne's Chambers. 28 Broadway. 
London SWiH 9JS. faUmq wim the 
Treasury Sohrtlor may lake steps lo 
adnunmer the estate. 


PASTORAL MEASURE 1983 
The Churrh Co n m miu u ri have pro- 
pared dran pastoral Hlwmn pros uung f or 
dretarahoni Ol redundanrv to reepert or 
me oar nn r burro oi vmor and for rare 
and mauiienanre by the Redundant 
Churrim rund Otereiotd dtorewl and N1 
rewtci m me raurrh of St Leonard. Houm 
to the pansh of Pmtwold with HolOn . 
ilmnirr damn Coon of uie draft 

ybeme s may be obtained from the cawryn 
comm now ere, i MHMnk. London 
SWIP 3 JZ to Whom any rrprraenlaUons 
should be seni vnitiin 28 days ol Ihe ptad. 

raita oi itus nol ter. 


LEGAL NOTICES 


IN THE MATTER OF THE COPtPAMES 
ACT 1985 
and 

IN THE MATTER OF WOODHAIL 
FINANCE LIMITED 
Taw natter, mat by outer of uie Lreds 
Dasutn RNiwy dated the 6ih day of 
October 1986. NevlD Fraser Shearman oi 
utham Oossm- 6 Davis. Stanhope 
House. 110 Drury Lane. London WC2B 
5ST has been appointed Liquidator of the 
above named company, wan a Commuted 
of Inspection 

Dated Hus 6 dar of October 1986 

N.F. SHEARMAN 
LIQUIDATOR 


COURSES 


IWOLSEY HALLi Home study for OCE. De- 
grees. Profes sio ns. Prospectus. Dept 
AL2. Woiscy HULL Oxford. 0X2 OPR. 
Tel 0865 62200 124 hrsL 


« UgbB/bou to Eu- 
rope. USA * most destinations, 
□iptomai Travel: 01-730 2201. ABTA 
IATA ATOL. 


CHEAP FU8MV5 Worldwide. Hnymarte* 
01-930 1366. 


W J CO W f T FARES Worldwide: 
0734 Jus Per Travel. 


DISCOUNTED A I 

open SaL 0763 867055. 


wide. 01-387 9100 


TRAVEL 

speriabslng m 1st. Ctab Class, econom y 
to Ataraua-Soutti Africa. USA. Lwoon. 


Alps. Lisbon Ooaaa. Atarve Ask * prt- 
—\fGE ABTA 73196 


vale vtoos. -Ol 656 1 


ME (BALL for some of Uie bast deals to 
mgML apartment*, hoteta and car Mrs. 
Tri Loooo n Oi 636 5000. Manchester 
061 832 2000. Air Travel Advisory 


HoUdays/rUohts. brochures/ 

bookings. Ventura Hobdays. Tel 061 
834 5053. 


01-402 4262/0002 

VatexasxteT. Cumseuthp wortdwtoe 
fares- 01-783 8277. Abte AtOI lata 
Acreto/VKa. 


nights with i .. 

turn 4 atso South Africa 6 New 
Zealand. Tel T ravel Centre. Btadkbum 
102661 63257 ABTA 73195 


LXflN MROMCA. Low totX flights e.g. 
Rto £485. Lima £495 rtn. Abe SmaB 
Croup Hobday Journeysaeg Peru Irom 
£350) JLA 01-747-3106 


LOW FARES WORLfMriDE . USA. S 
Amenta. Mm and F3r Eml S Africa. 
Trays ate. 48 Margarri Street Wl. 01 
580 2908 (Visa Accepted) 

■KAMI, JAMAICA, M.YORK. Worldwide 
desuuttobs. For ok> eneape« tares, try 
us la. B sj unuud Travel. 1 DokeShra. 
Rtchroond Surrey. ABTA Ot^aO 4073. 
l — o mcr Seat sate k> USA-Cartobran- 
Far EastAustratu. CbO the 
professionals ABTA IATA cc excepted. 
TO 01 254 5788 

ALICANTE. Faro. Malaga etc. Dfenond 
Travel ATOL 1783. 01-681 *341. 
Honnam 685*1 

MMDS. Malaga. Fhnx Pama. MU 
terras & Xmas, abo featy. Oermany A 
Swtts fr £59. Peter Pan Ol 491 Z749 
■UUKAM Reran, Fares Bangkok. MonO- 
u. Horn Kong. India. Ausraueia. Rina, 
dobnrrresl 01 737 2162/2212. abta. 
CMUR B Spain Portugal Italy. OwtP. 
Madrid fr C67. Tel: 01 -43a 4386 ATOL. 
An- Barca is 

EUROPE / WORLD WM lowest tares on 
rltanef/scheduM fits. Pitot Flignt oi 
631 0167. Agl A lot 1893. 

HONC KONG £488, BANGKOK £369. 
Singapore C4S7. Other Ft cues. 01-584 
6514 ABTA. 

LOWEST Air Fares Europe and world 
Wide Ol 836 8622 Buckingham 
Travel. 

OKIE Lhbon £99. Frankfort Pans £ 60 . 
LTC. 01328 3336/01 651 4513. 

ABTA 

SPAIN Portugal Canaries Greece Italy fr 
£69. SunwhceL 01-434 459T/& 

ATOL 1776 


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% 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 15 1986 


Queen takes the 
Great Wall in 
her easy stride 


1 Continued from page 1 

bit a liule dry; better to have 
it moisten as in London. 

1 “I have been to Paris, where 
'I was told that from the top of 
•'lfie Eiffel tower it was possible 
to see England I went op the 
tower twice, but both times 
the weather was very bad” 

- It was the Queen's turn. 
Dressed in a purple outfit, and 
looking much more at ease 
than the day before when, 
; dearly jet-lagged she bad a 
similar meeting with president 
.Li. rite explained: “The Eiffel 
•tower is a tong way from 
! England. 1 don't think it is 
'possible to see England from 
; there.” 

/ Such is the stuff of stage 
.diplomacy. Earlier, at a meet- 
ing with Hu Yaobang, general 
secretary of the Communist 
Baity in the Zbongbai lake 
compound, the public 
conversation was at much the 
same level. 

- * Mr Hu asked a slightly 
surprised Duke of Edinburgh: 
“How is his royal 
highnessTThe Duke, who had 
been preoccupied with staring 
at his hands, replied: “I think 
I'm quite well. 1 expect to be 
better the longer I stay.” 

Mr Hu was determined to 
discover the welfare of other 
members of the Royal family, 
“flow is your sister. Princess 
Margaret?" he asked “She is 
very well indeed” said the 
Queen, possibly a mite 
Surprised 

- It was time for the Queen to 
take the initiative. “There is a 
-great deal to do and see in a 
very short time,” she offered 
' “China is a vast country," 
Mr Hu replied “There are not 
so many modernized things to 
see, but there are a lot of 
historical relics.” 

Mr Hu recalled that, during 
bis visit to London in June, 
the Queen had expressed a 
desire to come to China more 
than once. “That would be 
.very nice indeed” said the 
Queen. 

“I hope I have the honour of 
accompanying you”, replied 
Mr Hu, knowing full well that 
he is the favourite to become 
tjie next leader. 

Lunch was spent with Mr 
Mr Deng, in the company of 
the Duke, Sir Geoffrey and 
Lady Howe. The meal was 
-reported to be a pleasant and 
„ proper occasion, 'with no 
spitting. 

As soon as the last course 
was demolished, Mr Deng lit 
up one of his Panda brand 
cigarettes with what was de- 
scribed by Mr Michael Shea, 
the Queen's press secretary, as 
“obvious enjoyment." 

- Tn the afternoon the Queen 


Today’s events 

Royal engagements 
Queen Elizabeth the Queen 
Mother visits Queen Elizabeth 


visited a kindergarten, and 
bad a formal meeting with Mr 
Zhao Ziyang, the premier. 
Between such formalities she 
was given the opportunity to 
undertake what must be one 

of her nmdMra SSSf™*** 

in the event she walked on 
the Great Wall of China, as 
much for the benefit of a live 
British breakfast-time tele- 
vision as for her own pleasure. 

The walk once 6200 miles 
long and with 3,750 miles still 
standing to majke it the only 
creation of man visible from 
an orbiting spacecraft, lies 40 
miles north of Peking, bestrid- 
ing the jagged range of moun- 
tains guarding China's old 
northern frontier. 

All world leaders who visit 
Peking are allowed a ritual 
burst of breathlessness on the 
wall, but the Queen walked 
further than most, without 
showing any sign of 
exhaustion. 

She emerged from her black 
Mercedes clutching her Leica 
camera and abandoning her 
coat in the gentle warm breeze 
that blew in from Mongolia. 

She strode out in the com- 
pany of Mr Chen Xitoug, 
mayor of Peking, followed by 
her husband, her Foreign Sec- 
retary, and a mildly perspiring 
retinue of forty. 

It was intended that she 
should cover a 300-yard sec- 
tion, slopping at the second 
turret before the walkway took 
an upward lunge at a 1 in 3 
gradient But one does not 
enjoy this experience every 
day, and she pressed on for 
another 100 yards up a slope 
culminating in a flight of 
exceptionally steep steps. 

She had changed into sen- 
sible court shoes with rubber 
soles, and achieved the third 
tower, about 3,500 feet above 
sea level, without difficulty. 
At the top she said to no one in 
particular “It will be much 
worse going down than com- 
ing up.” 

The Queen remarked how 
well preserved and restored 
the trail was. On the way 
down, die stopped twice in 
front of a huge posse of British 
and Chinese photographers 
for a prearranged pose, and for 
a photograph that trill un- 
doubtedly circle the globe, just 
as the picture of President 
Nixon did when he made a 
similar, but shorter, foray. 

At the top she stopped to 
take pictures, while Sir Geof- 
frey snapped her. Having 
completed a half-mile ex- 
pedition the Queen had 
outwalled presidents Nixon 
and Reagan, and came down 
showing no signs of strain. 


Court, Frttercaira, Kincardine- 
shire, 3. 

The Prince of Wales, Patron, 
British Police Himalayan Ex- 
pedition 1986. receives- mem- 
bers of the expedition, Ken- 


The Times Crossword Puzzle No 17,177 



This puzzle was finished within SO minutes by 13 of the 22 
competitors in the national final of the Collins Dictionaries Times 
Crossword Championship. 

ACROSS 4 Young Henry has one 

1 Sullen expression c*f objection to fish (7). 

annoyance in Commons (8). 6 Nymphs from a seaside 

5 To be consistent,. Hero in resort (9). 

Mitch Ado is seen in church ^ Mrs Dombey sounds tied up 
(6). with husband (5). 

10 Blooming early, and quite g Prize for the best battery? 

unfinished (5). (3-3). 

11 Modifying directions in a 9 Concentrate on providing a 

legacy (9). complete range (6). 

12 Son of bun bears love 15 He imerrupis member, a 

makes a friend for Antony Conservative — a Lord's 

(9).. idea? (3.6). 

13 Indian governor sent back 17 ifs said to destroy' kind of 

in run out (5). weed in Lhe quad, for 

14 Man with another service to example (9). 

take uses prayer beads (7). jg Endymion not written in 
16 The iron maiden in Latin but sung in Scotland 

Sardou's play (6). (8). 

19 Cut wood and got laid off 3) This Blue is on the board 

' ( 6 ). ( 6 ). 

21 The son of chairs children 21 Format is sensitive part for 
never have enough of (7). the Fauvist (7). 

23 Character dropped by Eliza 22 Tree featured in ballads by 
(5). sailor about love ( 6 ). 

25 Our mother church abroad 24 French recognition for 

. (5,4). British heavyweight on 

27 Jibs at son forming points (5). j 

. instrumental group (9). 26 Digs out hundreds of little ; 

28 Specificagainst fever? By no creatures (5). j 

means (3). 

29 5wiwiof(3-3r ra ti0Uble ~ SolHti<wtoP,nrieNo17 ^ 

30 Dance on points in 
.'. contemporary programme 

<S). 


DOWN 

- In Judge turns extremely catty 
about archdeacon's intensity 
of belief (S). 

2 Logical basis for action 
Malvolio would approve of? 

• 

<3 Amulet, no end vanegated, 
used by Moslem doctors (5). 


Concise Crossword page 14 


Solution to Puzzle No 17,176 


iS05i=;a*i 

B 5 13 IS S H P 

iflnssisfflyEyE trusts 

e zs 13 » e is w n 

1-3 «! h n a n a 
ilJSOEnBTillSkJ LV3EGEHI3 
m (3 (31 PI CJ B n 13 
■JHJEJI2S- .arawiBCdi 
13 rn re S ra ; gi E 
iut lii wtiS j ^ 

E (51 E E E B a & 

sienna ■ 

■■ rs S (=? 0 13 S3 



Thg flmriftnj wif for relatives arriving frpm Indian snh-amtinentai liHidon Heathrow's crowded Terminal 3. yesterday. (Photographs: Peter Tnevuor) 


Heathrow under siege as 
Asians seek admission 


Continued from page 1 

rive; making impossible the 
task of clearing the backlog 

last nighL 

Mr Cole pointed to the 12 
green-walled cubicles where 
would-be immigrants face a 
second interview. “They are 
working flat out in there and 
we can't see that stopping for a 
few days yet,” he said. “The 
process will have to be that 
those we cannot see on one 
day will have to spend the 
night in a hotel or even 
sleeping here in the airport 
until we have seen everyone 
sorted out” 

A 3, 000-strong crowd of 
Asians waiting for friends and 
relatives had built up at 
Terminal 3 last night, with 
police patrolling the lounges. 

Unprecedented numbers of 
would-be visitors, predomi- 
nately from Bangladesh, have 
been held for questioning 
about their reasons for entry 
to Britain over, the weekend. 
As a result, those in the 


terminal's lounges expecting 
to meet them have waited up 
to four days, usually sleeping 
on floors. 

The necessity for visitors 
from Pakistan. India and 
Bangladesh to carry visas 
came as a result of pleas from 
immigration staff who found 
it difficult to cope with the 
high level of visitors. 

“Normally on a Tuesday we 
would expect about 500 peo- 
ple to arrive from the Asian 
sub-continent,” Mr Tony 
Roberts, of the Immigration 
Services Union, said. The 
union represents most of the 
260 staff at Heathrow. 

“We have refused 180 peo- 
ple in the last two days and 
they must go back home. This 
is the most ever. Our job is 
made more difficult because 
we have decided 10 process 
everyone who comes in, how- 
ever long it takes, rather than 
grant them temporary ad- 
mission and hope that they 


don’t disappear once in the 
country”. 

The majority of those trying 
to come into the country to 
beat the visa deadline nave 
been young, single 
Bangladeshi males. 

“Last week on one aircraft 
alone we have 130 young men 
all claiming to be computer 
operators but on further 
questioning, it turned out that 
they had never seen a com- 
puter in their lives”, one 
immigration officer said 

“But having said that, we 
feel sony for all the families 
waiting in the arrivals lounge 
but the sheer weight of num- 
bers makes it impossible for us 
to say bow soon we can deal 
with the person they are 
waiting for.” 

Already this year 400 Asian 
have absconded during their 
temporary admission to Brit- 
ain. Immigration staff say 
that, suiprisngly. only a hand- 
fid of the latest batch have 
tried to run away c 





An immigrant has her passport checked by an official. 


Base rates 
up 1% as 
Lawson 
relents 

Continued from page I 

this failed to reassure markets 
sufficiently. 

Attention is now focussed 
on the Chancellor's annual 
speech at the Mansion House 
which he delivers tomorrow 
but this is viewed as less 
critical following the rise in 
interest rates. 

The Government's main 
concern about the foil in the 
pound is lhe effect on infla- 
tion. Currently inflation is at 
its lowest for nearly 20 years « 
14 per cent. Ministers are 
anxious to ensure that this 
achievement is not 
jeopardised, particularly 
ahead of an election, 

Industry was dismayed yes- 
terday at the rising cost of 
funds for investment. Sir Ter- 
ence Beckett, director-genetal 
of the Confederation ofBritish 
Industry commented: “With 
America's growth foiling off, 
the rest of the world, including 
Britain, needs lower not 
higher interest rates.” 

• Shadow Chancellor Roy 
Hauersley last night accused 
Mr Lawson offering pofiticaRv 
corrupt by deliberately defy- 
ing yesterday’s interest rate 
increase until after last week's 
Conservative party con- 
ference (Our Political 
Correspondent writes). 

The cost of the postpone- 
ment was about £1 billion of 
taxpayers' money which bad 
been used to buy sterling to 
support the pound. 

The Chancellor had known 
10 days ago that interest rates 
had to go up but put off the in- 
evitable choice “because he 
wanted to produce the best 
possible result for his own 
party at bis own party 
conference.” 

The Gov e rn me nt's entire 
economic policy was mis- 
conceived and required rad- 
ical change. “But the worst 
possible outcome for the Brit- 
ish economy and people is to 
run a wrong policy, but not 
even to run that honestly - to 
run it in a politicaly corrupt 
way to protect the interests of 
the Conservative party”, he 
said. 

Mr David PenhaJigon. the 
economic spokesman for the 
Liberal Party, last night chal- 
lenged Mr Lawson to “come 
dean” on the cost of support- 
ing the pound and delaying 
the interest rate increase until 
after the Tory conference. 

“Taxpayers' money, .has 
been used to protect the 
Conservative party' during its 
conference. Over £1 billion 
has been spent propping up a 
sinking pound and saving Mr 
Lawson's face until the con- 
ference was safely over. ” 


THE TIMES INFORMATION SERVICE 


singion Palace, 1 130. 

The Princess of Wales opens 
the new computerized tomog- 
raphy scanner, St Thomas's 
Hospital. Lambeth Palace Rd, 
SEI, 10. IS. 

Princess Anne presents the 
awards at the BeautffUl Britain 
in Bloom ceremony. Vintners’ 
Hall, 1135: and as Chancellor, 
the University of London, at- 
tends a tri-service military dis- 
play. by University of London 
Units, Greenwich Naval Col- 
lege. 1.30: later she attends a 
dinner and honorary degree 
ceremony, the Barbican, 735. 

Princess Alice, Duchess of 
Gloucester. Patron, the 
Embroiderers' Guild, visits the 
guild's headquarters, Hampton 
Court Palace, 2.45. 

The Duke of Gloucester, 
President, the British Consul- 
tarns Bureau, attends a recep- 
tion, Banqueting House, White- 
hall 7. 

The Duke of Kent, Vice- 
Chairman. the British Overseas 
Trade Board, attends the Bir- ' 
mi ogham International Motor 
Show. National Exhibition Cen- : 
ire. 10.40: and then visits Burn ; 
Tube. Solihull. 225: and Lucas, 
Cookson Syalon. Solihull. 325. 

The Duchess of Kent visits 
the headquarters of the Marie 
Curie Memorial Foundation, 
Be (grave Square. 230. 

New exhibition 
Ernest Willows: Welsh airship 
pioneer: Welsh Industrial ana 
Maritime Museum. Bute St, 
Cardiff; Tues to Sat 10 to 5. Sun 
230 to 5 (ends Jan 31). 
Exhibitions in progress 
The Ice Age in East Anglia; 
Natural History Museurh, High 
Sl Colchester; Mon to Fri 10 to 
1 and 2 to 5. Sat 10 to 1 and 2 to 
4 (ends Nov 9). 

Sir Richard Colt Hoare of 
Siourhead: artist and patron; 
Devizes Museum, 41 Long St; 
Tues to Sal 11 to I and 2 to 4 , 
(ends Nov 29). 

Last chance to see 
Caribbean Focus: photo- ! 
graphs of work life - Caribbean 
style; Library. Granby St, 
Loughborough, 930 to 7.30. 
Music 

Piano recital by Alvin 
Moisey". Drotarich High School 
Ombersley Rd, 7.30- 
Piano recital by Nicholas 
Capaldi; Buckingham Univer- 
sity. Radclifie Centre. Church 
SL 1.15. 

Piano rental by Janusz 
Piotrovicz StcchJey. lung's Hall 
Newcastle upon Tyne. 8 . 

Recital by the Archdule Trio; 
Belvoir Room. Charles Wilson 
Building. Leicester University. 
1 . 10 . 

Talks, lectures 
is a little radiation good for 
you?, by ProC J.H. Fremlin; 
Birmingham University. Largs 
Lecture Theatre. Physics Poyni- 


New books — hardback 


The Literary Enters selection of interesting books pubfishodtttitf week 
AT S EHot Conwlon. bv F.B. Pinion (MacmEBan £2730) 

Ban Jenson, His Lilia andVVorks, by RosaEnd Mites (Routtedge & Kogan. 
Paul £1945) 

Be t w ee n The Wood s a nd The Water. by Patrick Lekft Farmer (John Mur- 


Cbaracter Parts, by John Mortimer (Viking, £10.95) 

Evelyn Waugh, The Buriy Years 1903-1939, by Martin Starm 

Nfca Harnett, Queen of Bohemia, by Denise Hooker (Constabl 
Mchmal Cro mpto n. The Woman Behind WBttam. by Mary 

(Alton & Unwin, £12^5) 

The M usee Picasso. Rarta. catalogued by Marie-Laura BesnardM 
Mich&e Fflctet, and H6tine Socket (Thames SHudson, £25) 

The Oxford Book of Travel Verse, chosen and eefted by Kevin 
Holland (Oxford, £1230) 


Starmard (Dent, 

nstabte,£15) 
Mary Cadogan 


Anniversaries 

Births: Virgil near Mantua. 
Italy. 70 BC; Friedrich Nietzcfce, 
Rddcen. Germany, 1844: John 
L- SnlBvan, heavyweight boxing 
champion. Roxbury, Massachu- 
setts. 1858; Sir Pelham (P.G.) 
Wodeboese, Guildford. Surrey. 
1881. 

Deaths: Raymond Poincare, 
President of France. 1913-20, 
Paris. 1934: Pierre Laval Vichy i 
government leader, executed. 
Freshes. 1945: Hermann Gor- 
ing, Nazi leader, committed 
suicide, Nuremberg. 1946. 
James McAoley, poet. Mel- 
bourne. 1976. 

Today is the Feast of the Saint 
Theresa of Avila, founder of the 
reformed Carmelites. 

The Gregorian calendar 
promulgated by Pope Gregory 
XIII came into effect — October 
5 was reckoned as the 15th. 

1 582. Great Britain adopted it in 
1752. 

The pound 


Australia S 

Austria Seta 
BfltghsnFr 
Canada S 
n—nmfcKr 


Germany Dai 
Greece ur ■ 
Hong Kong $ 
fcefaodPl 
Italy Ura 

Japans Y«n 

MOnriafldsGM 

Norway Kr 
Portugal Eac 
South Africa Rd 
Spain Pta 
Sweden KT 
Switzerland Fr 
USAS 

Yugoslavia Dor 


Bank 
Sols 
2205 
19J5 
5X50 
1.962 
10SG 

6J7 

5.15 
2.795 

IS&QO 
HUS 
1M4 
19X00 
219X0 

3.15 
1031 
2045 

3.70 3.10 

IMjOO 
1022 067 

243 &29 

IMS 1-425 

70000 60000 


Roads 

The Midlands: Ml: Contra- 
flow between junctions 22 and 
23 (A50/Loughborough). Ml: 
Contraflow between junctions 
27 and 28 (A608/Mansfiefd). 
M5: Two lanes only in each 
direction between junctions 4 
(Bromsgrove) and 5 (Droit- 
wich). 

Wales and West: M4: Contra- 
flow on westbound carriageway 
between junctions 15 (Swindon) 
and 1 7 (Chippenham). M5: Two 
lanes dosed on northbound i 
carriageway between junctions : 
II and 12 (Cheltenham and j 
Gloucester) A4& Carriageway 
restrictions between Briton 
Ferry and Baglan. -West Gla- 
morgan. 

The North: M3: Lane closures 
between junctions 35 and 36 
(A629/A61). A1 (M* Contra- 
flow on southbound carriage- 
way at Bowbum interchange. Co 
Durham. M& Lane closures on 
both carriageways at junction 37 
(SedberghL Cumbria. 

Scotland: A77: Lane dosures 
ai Newton Meams. Renfrew- 
shire. A7: Construction of new 
roundabout at lhe junction with 
Gilmerton Station Rd. Lothian. 
A8fc Outside lane closed from 
the M9 at Bannockburn to 
Haggs Interchange. Glasgow 
bound. 

Information supplied by AA 

Tower Bridge 

Tower Bridge win be raised 
today at 1 .35 pm. 


Weather 

forecast 

A trough of low pressure 
over southeastern areas 
will soon move away E as 
pressure builds across 
southern areas. A show- 
ery W to SW airstream 
will cover the NW. 

6 am to midnight 

London, SE England, East An- 
glia, Channel Islands: Cloudy and 
misty at first with some rate in 
places, -dry later with sunny inter- 
vals; wind moderate N decreasing 
tertan max temp 15C (59F)- 

Central S. E, SW, NW, central N, 
ME England, Mfdands, Wales: Diy 
with sunny or dear periods; wind 
moderate N becoming light 'and 
variable; max tamp 16C(61F). 

Lake District, Isle of Man, SW 
Scottand, Glasgow, No rthern Ire- 
land: Sunny or dear intervals, 
perhaps an isolated shower; wind 
NW to W light or moderate; max 
temp 14C(57F). 

Borders, E di nburgh, Dundee, 
Aberdeen: Mainly dry sunny or 
dear intervals; wind W to SW 
moderate; max temp 13C (55F). 

Central Highlands, Morey Rrth, 
NE, NW Scotland, Argyll, Orkney, 
Shetland: Sunny intervals and scat- 
tered showers; wind W to SW 
moderate to fresh; max temp 12C 
(54F). 

OuBoofc far tomorrow and Friday: 


! NOON TODAY Arrant* b tkown m ratKbcna FRONTS Worn 


firm. 


mm 


■t /rs-> . 






v . -J / J-Wc 


NOON TOOAY 


High Tides 


[Sirs 


1020 |T3 tegnC 

r. 




TOOAY AM 

London Bridge 1&37 

Aberdeen 10.05 

Avonmouth 622 


Canftfl 

Devoftpcn 
Dover 
Falmouth 
GhHnper 
Harwich 10.49 

HoMwad 9.44 

Hul 5.IG 

Wracombe 5.10 

LeW» 1.30 

Liverpool 1032 

Lowestoft 8.03 

Marga te 11.04 

MMordHawn 5.26 
MNKpnr 420 

Oban S27 

Pe nra nca 4.09 

Portend 6.03 

Portsmouth 10.47 

S horeh am 1027 

Southampton 1021 
Sw ans— 525 

Tea 234 

WTton-omtae 10.46 
TWe fmaainad in a— 


Mlw sky: iky and cloud: e- 

cfoudy: Qhoierrasi. r /ow d-drtzzle: h- 
nail: nu&i-mm: r-ralru mikmi th- 
ihundcrstorm: p showerft. 

Arrows snow wtnd «r«tai. Wind 
'wnl imohi circled, 'renmenrure 
renugrade. 


HT PM HT 
t7 1.00 6.7 

4.0 1250 4.6 

11J 6.43 " 12.5 

32 1029 OS. 
102 628 116 

5.0 522 5.4 

62 1055 62 

4.8 4^2 52 
1213 A2 

32 1123 -AO 

5.1 9.49 S5 

6.8 &05 ,09 

03 520 08 

52 2. OS S3 
07 10.45 92 

23 9.19 22 
43 1124 42 

62 5.44 08 

04 427 6-8 

3.4 531 as 

5.1 424 52 

1.9 OIB 22 

42 1029 4.4 

62 1049 S3 

4.5 1021 42 

02 522 ftl 
5.0 3.18 5.1 
32 1121 4.1 

w: 1mx32>onL 


rain later. Temperatures near nor- 
mal, but some overnight frost in the 
S. 


n 


Sun rises: 
724 am 


Rates lor oral denommatton conk notes 


ins Building. 1 1. 

You. your camera and the 
Lake District, by John Bunch: 
National Park Visitor Centre, 
Brockhole. Windermere. 1. 

General 

Sotheby's Antique Advisory 
day: Bowood House. Chine, i 
Wiltshire. 10.30 to 1 and 1.30 to 1 
3.30. i 


‘busman. 

Retail Price indue 3852 

tandoh: The ATlndw closed down 121 
8112523. 

Parliament today 

Lords (2.30): Government 
statement on the Reykjavik 
Summit. National Health Ser- 
vice (Ammendmem) BiH com- 
mittee stage. 

Visa ruling 

Citizens of Bangladesh. India 
and Pakistan will fie required to 
carry visas when entering the 
United Kingdom from today. 


— ^old— 

_ PortMH - IwW Is ploy 

Mondav Saiurdjy rwerd your dady 
Portfolio total. 

Add these together to determtae 
your weekly Portfolio total. 

If your total raauhn the published 
weekly dividend figure you nave won 
vMitnohl or a share of the prtee money 
stated for mat week, and must claim 
your prize as Instruaea^ betow. 

i 

Ufttrioms 

No ctahns can M acuptod outskfa tMM 
mm. / 

You must hase your card with you 
when you telephone. 

If you are unable to telephone 
someone else ran claim on your oenaif 
hul I hey must have your card and call 
The Tunes Portfolio claims line 
between the stipulated times. 

No rpsoattsiwaiy can be accepted 
for failure to contact the claims office 
for any reason within me stated 
hours. 

The aboce instructions are w- 
pHtaMr to both daily and weekly 
dividend claim. 


Son sets: 
6.06 pm 


ra M Moonmts: Moon met: 

4.19 am 524 pm 
Pull moan: October T7 


Lighting-up time 

London 628 pm EO 626 am 
Bristol 6.48pm to 7.05 am 
EdWM tf l 6.43 pm to 7.15 am 
MnctmlnrB.43pmto7.07 am 
Pen a nce 7.02 pm to 7.15 am 

Yesterday 

Temperatures at midday yestsnlnr a 
doud; f. te«r. r. rain; s. sun. 

C F C F 

Belfast f 1355 Guernsey 1 1559 


Sun Rain 
hrs In 

Scacbcno 

Brtdfington 

Cramer 

L mwwt n ft 02 
Cbcinn 2.0 

Faftmtono 4.9 


E eetho u m e 
Brighton 

WB3*B1 
Bognor R 
Souttnee 
Sandown 
Bounw u Mi 
Smnaga 
Weymouth 

Ejoncuth 

Tolgnmouth 

Tcoquay 

Falmouth 

Penzance 

Jersey 

Guernsey 


Around Britain 


H fra o om too 

Teifay 

CWwynBey 

Motecenfae 

London 

SSS^* 

Canfiff 




Sun Rom Max 
hrs in C F 
■ - T7 83 tog 

- - 14 57 drnxfjr 

’ - 16 fll doudy 

- - 14 57 <wt - 

22 - 17 83 bnght 

- .07 14 57 tog 

• ■ 15 59 tog ’ 

- .02 14 57 tog 

- .01 15 59 (tools 

• - 15 59 fog . 

• .02 15 59 CM 

0.1 .03 15 59 IM - 

02 - 14 57 (Hi 


N’ctt-n-Tyna 02 - 14 57 chi 

5,9 - 14 57 Bright 

5.4 - 15 59 bright 

5.2 - 15 50 sunm 

. .... . X5 - 12 54 bnght 

Preftek 36 - H 57 aright 

Stornoway 12 .Qi n 54 drutZM 

Titee 34 - i3 55 strmy 

WW 42 - 13 55 sunny 

BMtast i.i - M 57 .douay 

Ttrase wo itendays figure* 


BYmgbem c 1558 Imerness S1457 
Badmool c 1559 Jersey r 1661 
Bristol c 15S9 London s 1966 
Carditf r1457 Wn ch o to f C1457 
Ednbugb r 1355 Hewc ea tl e c 1355 
Glasgow 61457 mUdsway c 1355 


Abroad 


dl thwaa; t fw ffl. fag; r. rate; s. sun: an. snow; t. tender 


Naval College closed 

The. Royal Naval College at 
Greenwich, together with the 
Riverside Walk on the northern 
boundary.- will be closed to the 
public today. 


g* NEWSPAPERS LIMITED 
Pri«'r<i tiy London Post > Print 
trsiLimtted m : i Mrainia Steen. 
London El 9 XN And by iwhim 
Ltd.. 124 Port man Street, 
KimunQ Park, glkqow C41 iej. 
Wednesda y. October is. 19§to 
RMteUcroi as a newspaper at the Post 


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Bermuda" s 
Bfarrlfa 
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B Aires' 1 
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IS ol 2*225* 8 25 77 Mbra s 20 SB 

?o w ® J9 §§ tetotraar c 13 S5 - _ 


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26 79 Geneva 
17 63 Glbrafter 
19 66 Hetertd 
26 79 HongK 
|4 75 Inndrch 
2t 70 Mntuil 
15 59 Jeddah 

17 ra te228‘ 

1 • 0*2 unefu 


f 22 72 Moscow 

G 19 66 Munich 
f 23 73 Nairobi 
e 9 48 Nates 
5 29 84 NUN 
s 20 68 N York' 

> If » Nko 
G 34 93 Oslo 
3 29 82 Parts 
3 31 88 Peking 


S Sl c 23 73 PeJiShi 

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22 72 UAngate - s 24 75 
8 46 Luxembg I 19 fig Modej 
12 54 Madrid 6 18 64 ng£r 


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BflflQfafi Monday stojres am teri rtympit 


9 12 54 Straeb’m 9 18 
s 19 66 Sydaoy a 23 
f 27 81 Tatter t 23 
s 25 77 Tal svtv c 25 
s 32 SO Tanerife e -24 
c 17 63 Tokyo 9 Q 
t 23 73 Toronto' e it 
C ID 50 Tunis . • I » 

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s 20 68 VondVer t 12 
c 17 63 Venka 4 19 
B 15 59 Vienna s 17 
f 3 37 Warsaw 9 18 1 
f 23 73 Waahtoa' r W 1 
C 21 70 WeTMWI C 1 *m 
9 36 97 ZWid) > 16 1 



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business and finance 


THE 



TIMES 


25 

\ 

SPORT 43 
TELEVISION AND RADIO 47 


Executive Editor 
Kenneth Fleet 

STOCK market 

PJ 30 Share 
1262.3 (-13.1) 

FT-SE 100 
1592.5 (-19.8) 

S ns 

the pouwn 

us Dollar 
1-4365 (+0.0025) 

WGermanmafk 

2.8349 (-0.0023) 

aar 

OTTbid 
cleared 

TTie Department of Trade 
and Industry has cleared the 
way for Mr Ron Brierley. the 
New Zealand entrepreneur, to 
bid for Ocean Transport and 
Trading by not referring his 
hostile bid to the Monopolies 
and Mergers Commission 
(Richard Lander writes). 

The £258 million cash bid 
values OTT shares at 225p 
each. They closed at 232p 
yesterday. Ip weaker. 

| _ Ocean, which has been 
diversifying out of shipping, 
announced yesterday it was 
buying two analytical lab- 
oratories in the US for 54.8 
million. 

Crystalate in 
US purchase 

Crystalate Holdings, the 
rationalized electronics group, 
is paying $30.6 million (£21.4 
million) for RPD, a US elec- 
tronic components company 
based in North Carolina. 

Slightly more than half of j 
the purchase price is to be 
funded by a placing of S.6 
million new Crystalate shares 
at 183p each. The placing has 
a 100 per cent clawback in 
favour of existing sharehold- 
ers. The balance of £1 1 million 
will come from Crystalate's 
cash resources. 

Apex offer 

The Apex Group, a New 
Zealand company 48 per cent 
owned by Kupe Investments, 
will today make a J60p per 
share tender offer for 23.42 
million shares in Property 
Holding and Investment 
Trust, . 

Paterson up 

Paterson Zochonis, the 
West African trader, reported 
pretax profits up 10 per cent to 
£42.3 million on turnover 1 
down 13 per cent to £242 
million for the year to May 31. 
The dividend is increased by | 
10 per cent to 6.5p net 

Tempos, page 27 

LIG abroad 

London International 
Group is launching a deposi- 
tory receipts facility in the US 
next month, to broaden its 
international shareholding. 
Each depositary receipt will 
represent 5 shares. 

Seafood deal 

Hillsdown Holdings is acq- 
uiring a minority interest in 
Clearwater Fine Foods, a Ca- 
nadian seafood company, and 
a 51 percent stake in Sea Farm 
(Shearwater), a British pro- 
cessed fish producer. 

CU unit trust 

Commercial Union Assur- 
ance is to set up a unit trust 
company, increasing its 
expansion into financial 
vices 


WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 15 1986 


Bank to run trial 
gilt auctions 
early next year 

By Richard Thomson, Banking Correspondent 

25? y&r “trancbettes" when farther Although h does not rale 

issues of easting stock are 


ive warning tint it 
conducting experi- 
ments early next year m pit 
auctions, similar to auction s 
of US government bonds. 

Ft also outlined proposals 
for the way it would raise 
funds m the gilt-edged market 
once the market structure had 
changed after October 27. 

In a consultative document 
entitled The Future Structure 
Qfjhe Gilt Edged Market 
Official Operations , the Rank 
outlined its plans for using 
traditional gflt funding tech- 
niques after the market 
changes from a system of 
brokers and jobbers to one. 
with 27 primary marfryf 
makers. 

Its aim of maintaining a 
stable and liquid market wiD 
remain paramount, but 
greater flexibility is required 
to accommodate the larger 
number of market part- 
icipants. 

The present system of 
tendering for gilts, when mar- 
ket participants bid for new 
stock against a secret 
price set by the Bank, 


made, will continue. 

Market-makers will be able 
to bid for tap stocks 
tranche ties on an indi vidual 
or tender basis. If a angle 
market-maker bids for stock 
independently, he should be 
able to benefit from his initia- 
tive and is likely to be given 
stock at his {nice. 

However, if a number of 
market-makers — likely to 
mean roore than three or four 
— make simultaneous bids, 
the Bank will hold an im- 
promptu tender. AD bidders 
will be told they are in a tender 
and asked to submit no more 
than four bids. 

The Bank will be prep are d 
to receive bids 10 minutes 
before the market opens at 
9am and to complete the 
process within the following 
10 minutes. 

The possibility of using the 
new interdealer brokers in the 
system bad been suggested, 
but the paper makes clear that 
the Bank does not intend to 
use them. 


out using them in the future, it : 
believes that to use them so j 
early would risk damagin g foe 
development of the IDBs into 
useful participants in the 
market 

The Bank said that the new 
system had been tried as part 
of the gilt market rehearsal 10 
days ago and had worked with 

considerable success. 

The paper outlines pro- 
posals for the way market- 
makers will be able to switch 
different stocks with the Bank 
and adjustments in the way it 
will buy stock in the secondary 
market. 

The Bank said that it in- 
tended to discuss a system of I 
auctioning gibs with market- 
makers before the end of foe- 
year, with the aim of trying it 
out next spring. 

An auction system would be 
used alongside the present 
systems used by the Bank, but 
it said that auctions had the 
advantage of greater certainty 
over timing allowing a more 
predictable flow of funding 
Comment, page 27 



Mr John Gunn, the new chief executive of British & Commonwealth Shipping, seated, with 
three new directors, from left, M r Charles Cary-Ehres, Mr Julian I ^> t and Mr Pptgr Colrfie 


Industrial output stagnates 
despite increased spending 

By David Smith, Economics Correspondent 


Industrial production in 
Britain remains fiat, according 
to the latest official figures. 
The sluggishness of domestic 
output, taken in conjunction 
with buoyant consumer spen- 
ding explains the recent ran 
of large trade deficits. 

Manufacturing output fell 
by 0.3 ]ter cent in August. ' 
Output in the engineering, 
metals, vehicle production, 
and food, drink and tobacco 
industries dedmed. 

In the June-August period, 
manufacturing output was up 
by 0.6 per cent compared with 
the previous three months. 


but broadly unchanged on the 
corresponding period last 
year. Officials said that the 
undertyira trend for manufac- 
turing is flat 

Industrial production as a 
whole, including North Sea oil 
output, rose by 0.6 per cent in 
August, mainly due to a 2.6 
per cent rise in energy output. 
But in the latest three months, 
industrial production was 
down by 03 per cent. Bs level 
was 1 per cent up on the 
correspondug period . last 
year. 

The figures show that foe 
pause in economic activity 


UK PRODUCTION 





was continuing over foe sum- 
mer. Most wonyingly. output 
of the consumer goods in- 
dustry was flat— up by just 0.5 
per cent in the latest three 
months — while consumer 
spending has been growing at 
a rate of 4-5 per cent 

Chemicals output, helped 
by the pound’s fall, rose 3 per 
cent In the Jun&August pe- 
riod; metals output was up by 
2 per cent and output of other 
maniifartiiring industries fOSe 
by 1 per cent. But output of 
engineering and allied in- 
dustries; food, drink mid to-' 
bacco and clothing was little 
changed. 

Manufacturing output has 
still not regained foe level it 
reached in foe second quarter 
of last year, although indus- 
trial production as a whole is 
slightly higher. Even so, the 
evidence is growing that a 
cyclical peak in economic 
activity was reached in spring 
1985. 

Since the last trough m 
industrial output in foe first 
quarter of 1981, total produc- 
tion industries’ output has 
risen by 14.9 per cent and 
manufacturing output by 122 
per cent 


Opec near 
to final 
meeting on 
oil quotas 

From David Young 
Geneva 

The 13 Opec ofl ministers 
are now locked in an intense 
round of what one described 
yesterday as “c&mel trading” 
to finalize a new quota agree- 
ment to increase the world (til 
price. 

By today Opec hopes to be 
in a position to call a full 
mi aisle rial meeting to discuss 
approval for foe new quota 
system. 

The committee formed to 
work on the system is going 
through foe delegations in 
alphabetical order. By last 
night it had had discussions 
with the first from Algeria 
to Iraq. 

Today it wiD meet the 
remaining seven states includ- 
ing both Kuwait and Saudi 
Arabia, who are determined to 
have the- new system unani- 
mously approved 

Sheik Ahmed Tab' Yamani 
said yesterday that his coun- 
try was determined that the 
current state of comparative 
stability in foe oil markets 
should be maintained. 

Both the Saudi Arabian and 
the Kuwaiti oil ministers have 
been told by their beads of 
state to insist on a new system 
to replace and buOd on the 
current arrangements in- 
troduced two months ago, 
which led to prices moving 
from $ 10 to $1 5 a barrel. 

The Opec target of $17 to 
$19 a band oil by foe end of 
the year still remains in force. 
News Analysis, page 26 


ser- 


Nem AwUysisM 
Co News 26 
Appointments 26 
Comment 27 
Tempos 27 
Stock Market 28 
Wall Street 28 


MeuyMiits2$ 
Foreign Each 28 
Traded Opts 28 1 
Unit Trusts 38 1 
Commodities 30' 
USM Prices 38 
Share Prices 31 


TV-am profits 
on target with 
rise of 135% 

- By Alison Eadie 

TV-am. the independent 
breakfast television company 
which came to foe Unlisted 
Securities Market in July, 
made pretax profits in the six 
months to July 31 of just 
under £4 million, a rise of 1 35 
per cent on the previous first- 
halfs £1.69 million. 

The company is well on 
target to meet its forecast,, 
made at foe time of foe 
flotation, of pretax profits of 
at least £7.5 million in the year 
to foe end of January. 

Advertising remains buoy- 
ant, TV-am said. 

The shares eased 8p to 
187p, compared with an offer 
price of 130p. The issue was 
nearly 10 times subscribed 
and shares have reached a 
high in recent weeks of 19Sp. 


Peachey £10m profits 
match record level 


MARKET SUMMARY 


STOCK MARKETS 

BXlSLs 180259 (+4.22)* 

nSSdow 1731M7 (-20.66) 

COTtmerzbank — 1985-8{+19.1) 

BnKsBte 
General 

Paris: GAC 388.1 (-0.6) 

Zurich: , 

SKA General n/a 

London dosing prices Page31 

INTEREST RATES 

London: 

Bank Base: 11% 

3 -month interbank 11 
3-month eflgibte bfflsrtOUio-ltPiiflb 
buying rate 

Prime Rate 75 
Federal Funds 
3-month Treasury 
38-year bonds B4 ,, j."94 ,3 r- 

CURRENCIES 

London: New Yortc 

£$14565 ft 21.4375* 

E.DM2J349 

£: SwFr 2 -3 T9 9 ft SwFr]-6l»- 
£: FFr9.2906 ftFFrfeWff’ 

£ Yen22i U0 & Yenl 53.89 

£■ index: 67.6 ft Index; 1 08 £ 

ECO £0.733818 SDR £0.849422 


MAIN PRICE CHANGES 


RISES: 

US 


Whitbread *A* 

JEE 
J Wa 

Mfcrcxease 


334p(+10p) 
281p (+13p) 
75p (+14p) 
IS^ISpj 


105p(+10p] 

Thomson T-Une 291p (+1 

British A Comm. 255p(+1 

A&PAppiedore 205p(+2 


FALLS: 

Blue Circle 

BP. 

Grand Met 
PUkington 

Conroy Pet 

Shan ■ w. —— 
Reed Executive — 
Saattrt & Saatchi _ 

London & Bfin 

Wamford Inv. 

Cable & Wretess _ 
RTZ 


568p(-13p] 
665p (-20p 

930p MOp 

446p MOp 

sk 

SS™ 


GOLD 


London Ftxfnre 
AM 

dose $429, 

299.25 ) 

New York: 

Comae S42&25-425.75* 


.75 (£298.75- 


NORTH SEA OIL 


Brant 
"Denotes 


.15 bbWSiSJtS) 

i price , 


Bating 


The Peachey 
Corporation is showing pretax 
profits of £10.23 million fix- 
foe year ended June 24 1986, 
almost equal to foe record 
level of £1 0.29 million for the 
previous financial year. 

Net asset value has risen by 
10 per cent, to 358p per share 
over foe same period the 
previous year. Net renial in- 
come rose by 45 per cent to 
£1 1.20 million. 

This figure reflects a year’s 
benefit from foe £28^ million 
hase of a property port- 
from Lloyds Bank Prop- 
Company in May 1985, 
the £16.02 million pur- 
chase of a mainly retail port- 
folio from Legal & General, 
the insurance company, at the 
beginning of this year. It is 
unlikely to be repealed next 
year. 

Mr John Brown, the com- 
pany’s managing director, ex- 
pects profits to fall by 10 per 


By Judith Huntley 

Property cent next year, on this year's 
exceptional figures. 

• Not only is rental income 
unlikely to rise so much, but 
foe windfall profits from sell- 
ing Peachey’s former primary 
interest, residential property, 
wflj disappear. 

The portfolio revaluation 
shows an increase of 6.73 per 
cent, with property assets 
exceeding £180 million. 

Carnaby Street in London's 
West End, which accounts for 
18 per cent of the portfolio, 
has increased in value from 
£20 million to £34 million in 
two and a half years. Rents 
there have gone up from £35 a 
sq ft to about £75 a sq ft since 
Peachey bought the estate. 


The issue means its earnings 
per share are down to 19.7p 
from 2J.7p on an enlarged 
share issue. The final dividend 
will be 9p per share compared 
with 8pm 1985. 


Glaxo claims 
10% of 
UK market 

By Alexandra Jackson 

Glaxo Holdings announced 
yesterday that it has a 10 per 
cent stare of the British 
pharmaceuticals market, 
unique achievement in a ma- 
jor market It is now the ninth 
biggest pharmaceuticals 
company. 

Ite anti-ulcer product ran- 
itidine, principally marketed 
as the drug Zantac, has a 49 
per cent world market share. 

The company’s pretax prof- 
its for the year to the end of 
June rose from £402.9 million 
to £611.6 million. 

Earnings per share rose 
from 37.4p to 54. Ip. A final 
dividend of lOp was declared 
making a total of I4p for the 
year compared to lOpin 1984- 
85. An exceptional charge of 
£15 million was taken above 
foe line associated with the 
recall of goods by Farley 
Health Products. 

Tempos, page 27 


More power to Lloyd’s chief 


Lloyd's Insurance market 
yesterday announced font new 
power to initiate spot checks 
on underwriting agents and 
brokers wiD be vested in Mr 
Alan Lord, foe chief executive 
and deputy chairman of foe 

market, who is an outsider and 
not a market member. 

Announcing foe formation 
of a general review depart- 
ment, Mr Lord said foe mea- 
sure would bring Lloyd's into 
fine with developments at 
other self-regulatory organiza- 
tions. The review department 
will monitor compliance with 
Lloyd's regulations and cany 
oot spot checks if there is 
prhna facie evidence of some- 
thing wrong, Mr Lord said 

He denied that foe move was 
made to placate Sir Patrick 
Neill, who is presently con- 
dacting a government-commis- 
sioned inquiry into the 
adequacy of arrestor proteo 


By Alison Eadie 

tion at Lloyd's. He said foe 
move bad been under consid- 
eration since hast autumn. 

He said there had been no 
opposition to foe chief exec- 
utive assuming foe power to 
launch reviews on market 
members without having to 
dear foe matter with foe 
chairman, who is a market 
member. 

The balance of power be- 
tween outsiders and market 
members on the ruling council 
of UoydTs is a fine one. Some 
believe it win be crodal in 
deciding whether Lloyd's 
stays outside foe jurisdiction 
of the Securities and Invest- 
ment Board, or whether it is 
brought into line with other 
SROs which are subject to its 

rule. 

Lloyd’s also announced yes- 
terday that subscriptions and 
central fund contributions 
would remain unchanged for 


foe fourth successive year. 
However, Mr Lord added that 
foe central fund's weeds would 
be reassessed after a settle- 
ment on foe PCW problem 
which, he hoped, would be 
reached by foe end of this 
year. The fund has set aside 
£235 million to meet PCW 
names' losses. 

Mr Colin Hart dm former 
active underwriter of syn- 
dicates owned by Alexander 


Howden, foe broker, has been 
expelled from Lloyd's and 
fined £175,000 with £80,000 
costs. He was found guilty on 
eight counts including dis- 
honest misappropriation of 
money belonging to foe syn- 
dicates a»l dishonestly writ- 
ing sham stop-toss policies. 

Other members involved in 
foe Howden affair, including 
Mr Kenneth Grab, foe former 
chairman of Howden, have 
been disciplined by Lloyd's. 

17 years later, page 27 


Gunn takes the 
helm at B&C 

By Cliff Feltham 

Less than a year after join- into new ventures even if it 


'J' 

mg the board. Mr John Gunn 
yesterday rook over as chief 
executive of British & 
Commonwealth Shipping, the 
aviation and financial services 
group. 

His promotion is part of a 
big reshuffle which signals the 
end of foe Cayzer dynasty — 
which has been involved with 
the business for more than 100 
years — and an aggressive 
expansion likely to lead to 
acquisitions. 

As part of the friendly 
handover of power, Mr Gunn, 
aged 44, who created the 
successful Exco money 
broking company, plans a 
complete review of the busi- 
ness which could lead to the 
disposal of around £200 mil- 
lion of unwanted assets and an 
expansion of its activities. 

Mr Gunn said that the 
ageing board — still headed by 
Lord Cayzer. aged 76 — had 
recognized the need for new 
blood. He said the family 
interests, represented through 
Caledonia Investments which 
owns 46 per cent of B&C was 
prepared to back the move 


meant dilution of its own 
equity. 

“The thrust will be to refine 
the business down to identi- 
fiable areas so that we have 
fewer but larger businesses 
which, where possible, wifi be 
subsidiaries rather than 
associates," Mr Gunn said. 

Mr Gunn would not discuss 
his own service contract but 
said he had joined the com- 
pany last year on a 
“handshake". However, it was 
likely that if the business 
performed well this year, his 
pay package, together with 
options, could be worth about 
£500.000. 

As part of the boardroom 
shake-up, Mr Gunn is joined 
by Mr Charles Cary-Elwes, 
corporate development man- 
ager of the group, and exec- 
utives from three of its 
offshoots, Mr Julian Lee, 
chairman of Kaines Corpora- 
tion, the commodities trader, 
Mr Peter Goldie, chief exec- 
utive of Abaco, the finance 
house, and Mr Paul Myners. 
chief executive of Gartmore 
Investment Management 


Clamp 
on new 
retail 
centres 

By Judith Himtiey 
Commercial 

Property Correspondent 

The Government yesterday 
launched an attack on the 
plethora of proposals from 
developers to build large shop- 
ping and leisure centres in the 
green belt. 

Mr William Waldegrave, 
Minister for foe Environment, 
Countryside and Planning, 
told a Confederation of British 
Industry conference in 
London that the Government 
will make a new order to 
councils requiring them to 
consult the Environment 
Department before granting 
planning permission for any 
retail development of more 
than 250.000 sq ft- 

Mr Waldegrave gave this 
warning: “The promoters of 
some of the wilder schemes 
have no reason to think that 
they will succeecd in breach- 
ing green belt policy. We are 
not opposed to new methods 
of retailing but they do not 
belong in the green belt." 

He said: “We will not 
necessarily call in the applica- 
tions notified to us under die 
new direction. But we con- 
sider it right that we should 
have a dear opportunity to 
weigh up the need to call in." 

The conference, jointly 
sponsored by Edward 
Erdman, the firm of survey- 
ors, was told that 27 million sq 
ft of additional retailing was in 
the pipeline already and that it 
was just the tip of the iceberg. 
Many schemes proposed for 
the green belt and outside are 
for large out-of-town schemes 
and their impact on estab- 
lished town centres is causing 
concern. 

The move comes in the 
week which saw the opening 
of Europe's largest oul-of- 
town shopping and leisure 
centre at Gateshead. Tyne & 
Wear. The 2 million sq ft 
Metrocentre was opened by 
Mr Nicholas Ridley, Secretary 
of State for the Environment.' 
on Monday. 

The Metrocentre did not 
have to go through the usual 
planning hurdles because it is 
in an enterprise zone where 
the planning system is sim- 
plified to promote 
development. 


Rough diamond price rises by 7% 


The Central Selling 
Organization, the South Af- 
rican cartel which markets 80 
per cent of the world's di- 
amonds, yesterday announced 
a 7 per cent rise in the price of 
rough stones, its second in- 
crease in six months. 

The rise confirmed the 
rapid improvement in the 
diamond market this year 
after the severe slump in the 
early part of the decade when 
investment demand 
collapsed. 


By Richard Lander 

A spokesman for the CSO, 
pan of the De Beers group, 
said sales have been helped 
considerably this year by the 
fall in the dollar's value which 
has made polished diamonds 
cheaper outside the United 
States, particular^ in Japan, a 
major user of large stones. 

The CSO has already re- 
ported sales of $1.2 billion 
(£836 million) in the first half 
of 1986. 45 per cent higher 
than a year earlier. 


Prices will be raised for all 
grades of diamonds except the 
lowest quality boart and drill- 
ing varieties from the year’s 
penultimate sight or session 
on November 3. 

The previous increase, 
which averaged I'h per cent, 
came into effect in May; 
Before that, selling prices had 
been held for three years as De 
Beers battled to restore the 
market to order by withhold- 
ing stones from foe London 
sights. 


Joh n ^lareofs £ ,v 

m <*tgagp. 

Wouldn’t It be marvellous if you could choose how much you 
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It is possible. John ChareoTs new flexible mortgage is quite 
unique. 

It combines the advantages of a fixed Interest/floating 
interest mortgage with the possibility of reducing the monthly 
payment without prior notice. 

UnKke other mortgages, which either have a fixed interest 
rate or one that floats up and down depending on foe market, our 
new mortgage gives yon a choice. . 

You may opt fora floating rate and then change your mor tage 
to a fixed rate at a month's notice. More interesting, you may opt 
to defer up to 30% of foe payments whenever you wish. 

This means you can choose to pay less if foe interest rate rises. 
Or if your other commitments rise. 

If your other expenses come down, or your income climbs 
temporarily you may opt to pay more. 

Our new mortgage is available to everyone who is looking to 
borrow between £15.001 and £250.000, up to 3.5 times a single 
income. 

It is available to purchase properties up te 100% of their 
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enquiry 

la short, if your income is flexible, if your outgoings are 
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Telephone us on 01-589 7080 for our brochure or to make 
an appointment. 



INDEPENDENT MORH 'M ;K I?K< JKEKS 
Mercury House. J y5 Knigtasbridee. London RW7 lRE.'fel:UK t M*>70S0. 




BUSINESS AND FINANCE 

BASS 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 15 1986 


BassPLC 

Turnover in year ending 
10 September M6* £1410800.000 
Source- Annual Report ■>' I 2/S5 


WHITBREAD 

Whitbread and Company PLC 
Tumorer in year ending 
i Match I960; £1.533,000000. 
Source; Annual Report 5/0/ 86. 


sw: K 


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= AFCOR* 

INVESTMENTS LIMITED I 

T he private investors' dealerj 


Pilkington 
to buy 
Swedlow 

i 

Los Angeles (Reuter) — 
Swedlow, the Californian 
company which mates pans 
for high-performance aircraft, 
has pulled out of an agreement 
to merge with PPG Industries 
of Pittsburgh. 

The company will instead 
join forces with the British 
glass manufacturer, : 
Pilkington. 

Swedlow said it had ended 
the agreement to be bought by 
PPGIndustries and agreed to 
an offer by Pilkington Hold- 
ings Inc. 

The PPG agreement, which 
was readied in August last 1 
year, called for a sale price of i 
$32.60 a share. But the trans- 
action was delayed by the 
Federal Trade Commission, 
which challenged it on anti- 
trust grounds, Swedlow said. 

The company said that the 
terms of the Pilkington offer 
were essentially the same as 
those contained in the PPG 
agreement and provided 
additionally for a share price 
of $33-40 if the merger were 
completed on or after January 
1 of next year. 

Swedlow shareholders hold- 
ing about 49 per cent of the 
company's shares, are ex- 
pected to agree to sell to 
Pilkington at the same price. 

They also plan to give the 
buyer a proxy to vote those 
shares when the proposed 
transaction is submitted to 
shareholders, the company 
said. 

Swediow’s board is to meet 
today to consider the offer, a 
spokesman for the company 
said. 


Bahrain plans full 
stock exchange to 
boost its economy 


Bahrain (Reuter) — Bah- 
rain's Cabinet is expected to 
give the go-ahead by the end of 
December for the Gulf state's 
first foil stock exchange, to 
enhance its status as a leading 
regional financial centre, a 
government adviser said. 

Mr Fawzd Behzad. stock 
exchange adviser at the Com- 
merce and Agriculture Min- 
istry, said a trading floor for 
the exchange would be opened 
after new legislation had been 
sanctioned. 

“We are awaiting the de- 
cision of the Ministerial Legal 

Committee We expect 

this before the end of 1986," 
he said. 

Bankers see plans to set up a 
slock exchange as an integral 
part of the Cabinet’s package, 
unveiled in August, to stimu- 
late the domestic economy. 

Bahrain — although a minor 
oil producer — has been hit 
like other Gulf states by Ming 
oil prices and a regional 


.economic downturn. 

Some international banks, 
which helped to make Bahrain 
a regional financial centre 
during the oil-boom days of 
the 1970s and 1980s, have 
been reducing staff because 
accumulated had loans are 
proving a severe drag on 
profits. 

The new exchange is ex- 
pected to boost Bahrain's 
economy. It could attract cap- 
ital from other Gulf states, 
paticularty Kuwait, where 
confidence in shares suffered 
with the $9S billion (£67 
billion) crash of its unofficial 
stock market in 1982. 

Although Bahrain has 
grown into a leading financial 
centre, with 170 local and 
international banks crowded 
into a sea-front area, its stock 
market has remained severely 
underdeveloped, bankers say. 

At present the market is 
partly 'in the hands of 17 
licensed brokers: local bus- 


inessmen operating by tele- 
phone mainly from tiie souk, 
or market area, of the old 

town. . . . _ . 

But most trading in the 34 
Bahraini companies is earned 
out by investors directly, and 

often Ms to be registered. 

The new legislation wu 
require all transactions to be 
conducted through brokers 
licensed by foe exchange. 

Mr Behzad said that m the 
medium-term the exch ange 
would try to foster bigger 
brokerage firms with stronger 
capital backing. This would 
enable them to conduct larger 
share transactions. 

The stan will be modest, Mr 
Behzad said. But later, the 
stock exchange hoard will 
consider listing ofoer com- 
panies based in other Gulf., 
states. 

In a third stage, probably 
further away, the market in- 
tends to invite multi-national 
firms to seek listings. 


Thatcher’s man helps in sell-offs 


The . Government's 
privatization programme has 
resulted in growing advisory 
business overseas. 

NM Rothschild has been 
made adviser to the Turkish 
government for the privatiza- 
tion of tire pulp and paper 
industry, and to tire Jamaican 
government for tire privatiza- 
tion of the island’s largest 


bank, tire National Conuner- 
dal Bank. 

The fM|n handling the con- 
tracts is headed by a director, 
Mr John Redwood, formerly 
head of Mrs Thatcher’s policy 
unit. 

The flotation of Jamaica's 
National Commercial Bank 
involves expanding the 
island's stock market before 


the shares can be sokL Wider 
share ownership is an im- 
portant aspect of state asset 
sales, and wffl appeal to the 
governments embarking on 
privatization. 

Rothschild's co n tracts show 
privatization is gaining 
popularity in tire developing 
countries. 


News analysis 


Why Opec refuses to force the 
pace to help West out of a spot 


While the 13 Opec nations 
struggle in Geneva to find a 
new output quota system to 
drive oil prices bade upwards 
the oil consumers are left to . 
dip nervously in and out of the 
spot markets to maintain their 
supplies. 

The industrialized world's 
view of Opec’s apparent in- 
decision is that it typifies an 
organization which has lost 
not only control of the world 
oil market but control of Its 
own membership. 

The Opec view is .that its 
indecision is a sign that it is 
taking the issues before it 
more seriously than ever be- 
fore. It also feels it needs to 
emerge from the Geneva 
meeting with a new quota 
system which will be fair to all 
its members, which can be 
easily enforced and which will 
allow just enough oil to come 
on to the market each month 
to meet demand and gradually 
move the price upwards. 

However, can such an 
organization realistically 
achieve such aims? Two of its 
members. Iran and Iraq, have 
been involved in a long and 
bloody war and even as the 
delegates from the two coun- 
tries sit opposite each other at 
the Geneva conference table 
news of strike and counter- 
strike emerges from Tehran 
and Baghdad. 

Some of its member coun- 
tries are among, the poorest in 
the world while others are 
undoubtedly the richest, 
which makes it difficult to 
believe that they share the 
same economic goals and 
have the same revenue needs 
from their oil fields. 

It is such diverse factors 
which make it difficult for the 
Opec president Mr Rilwani 
Lukmam the Nigerian oil . 
minister, to force the pace 
towards the early announce- 


From David Young in Genera 


ment that the ofl and stock 
markets are awaiting. 

White he is among the most 
able of the 13 oil ministers in 
Opec, his elevation to the 
presidency after only months 
as his country’s oil minister is 
in itself a manifestation of the 
internal problems the cartel 
feces. He is one of only three 
ministers — the other two are 
Dr Subroto, the Indonesian; 
and Dr Arturo Grisanti from 
Venezuela — who are politi- 
cally acceptable to both ban 
and Iraq. 

The argument over the cri- 
teria which should be used to 
work out how new quotas 
should be distributed also 
indicates the differing atti- 
tudes among each delegation. 
The basis for the new system is 
that each country should be 
allocated a fixed percentage of 
an overall output ceiling set 
regularly by Opec to reflect 
demand. 

Although seeming a simple 
solution it would be a signifi- 
cant breakthrough. It would 
mean that ministers could 
take a day rather than weeks to 
give the oil market the news it 
needs to base its pricing 
decisions. 

However, how the percent- 
ages should be calculated is 
proving a seemingly impos- 
sible task. Libya, for instance, 
suggested that among the fac- 
tors considered should be 
population in relation to land 
area — a suggestion which 
would mean a considerably 
larger share of the overall 
ceiling for itsel£ 

Kuwait, in an attempt to get 
the discussions back on to a 
more serious footing, high- 
lighted the trivializalion of the 
discussions by countering that 
its percentage should be linked 
to the number of air 


conditioning units it has, or if 
that was not acceptable the 
number of are tickets Kuwaitis 
bought each year to escape 
from the summer heaL 

For a brief period some of 
the delegations thought that 
the Kuwait oil minister was 
being serious, but his sugges- 
tions served their purpose and 
talks are now centred around 
such issues as levels of re-, 
serves, historical production 
and the technical ability to 
produce ofl. 

As one delegate put it “We 
are now trying to many the 
science of economics with the 
art of politics'". 

That Opec is, this time, 
serious in finding a firm 
solution rather than its tra- 
ditional fudge and com- 
promise, was put forcefully by 
its president, Mr iukmaii. He 
is due in London in just over a 
week and if he is to have any 
success in winning support or 
even sympathy for the Opec 
position from Britain's Energy 
Secretary, Mr Peter Walker, 
be will have to arrive as the 
head of an organization which 
has shown it can act 
positively. 

He said in Geneva that he 
still hopes that Britain will 
follow Norway’s lead and co- 
operate with production cuts 
to ease the oversupply 
situation. 

“Even more important than 
any psychological impact 
Norway’s action has tad, is 
the feet that an industrialized 
country has thought it wise, 
proper and justified to regu- 
late the supply of oil on the 
market. 

“This is very significant, 
coming as it did at a time 
when other industrialized 
countries who produce oil are 
spreading ideology orientated 


concepts of the so-called free 
market being the best tool to 
achieve equilibrium in the 
supply and demand in the 
world oiL 

“ History tells us that even 
in a free market economy like 
the United States government 
intervention was once nec- 
essary to regulate oil supplies 
in a way which matched them 
to demand. 

“It is also a well known 
historical feet that when the 
world oil trade was dominated 
by the major international oil 
companies, prior to Opec’s 
price takeover, the formation 
of the price structure and 
stability in the market were 
achieved through regulatory 
planning of the amount of oft 
supply entering international 
trade.” 

Mr Lukin an is still con- 
fident that the Opec system 
which will emerge from Ge- 
neva will be hailed as a 
significant step forward 

He said: “It should be 
reiterated that oil market 
stability is no longer our sole 
responsibility. Hus must be 
clearly understood. 

“In the type of situation 
which we have recently 
experienced in foe oil industry 
there are no winners or losers. 
Experience has shown that 
today’s winners could well be 
tomorrow's losers. It is in our 
best interest to break the 
vicious circle through di- 
alogue and co-operation 
among Opec producers, non- 
Opec producers and 
consumers.” 

Whether Mr Lukman's 
hopes of a new agreement will 
be fulfilled today remains to 
be seen, but other delegates 
feel that foe time has come to 
take a firm decision. One of 
the Venezuelans said: “If we 
are here in Geneva any longer 
the Swiss will ask us to apply 
for resident’s permits." 


• WIDNEY: The company has 
entered into a conditional agree- 
ment for the acquisition of 
Imlok, from Imhof-Bedco Stan- 
dard Products, for 050.000. the 
consideration to be satisfied by 
the issue of 833,334 new 
Widney ordinary shares. Imlok 
business will be transferred to 
Widney’s Birmingham factory. 

• EEL: Industrial Equity Ltd is 
raising Au^ 10620 million (£47 
miHion)through a placement of 
IS million shares at AusS7.08 
each to widen its institutional 
shareholder base and provide 
funds for expanson. 

•UEfe Interim dividend 2.lp 
(2pL payable on December I. 
Six months to July 31. Figures 
in £000. Turnover 50.614 
(42.615), operating profit 8.25 S 
(7.1 84). profit before tax 7.160 
(5.710). profit after tax 4.439 
(3,426) and eps 8.4p (6.5p). 

• FLEDGELING JAPAN 
INVESTMENT CO. Net asset 
value per share 179 yen ( 
£0.8126). 

• BM GROUP: Final dividend 
0.99p (G.99p) making l.65p 
(1.65p) for the year to June 30 
(15 months to June 30). Figures 


Allied Irish Banks: Sir Doug- 
las Morpeth joins the board as 
a non-executive director. 

Wistedu Mr Mike KeDy 
joins the board. 

Jardine Glanvill; Mr Mau- 
rice Brackenreed Johnston be- 
comes deputy chairman, and 
Mr Didk Cards is made 
managing director, marine 
division. 

CV Nova: Mr Mark Billing 
becomes managing director. 


in £0 00. Turnover 36,494 
(29.055) and eps I0.7p (6.4p). 

• S LYLES: Final dividend 3p 
malting 5.75p (5. 5p). payable on 
January S. Year to June 30. 
Figures in £000. Turnover 
1 5.891 ( 1 5,698k operating profit 
725 (546L pretax prom 552 
(390) and eps 9.00p (5.20pl. 

• SMITH & NEPHEW: Of the 
110.580.093 new ordinary 
shares placed by Kleinwort Ben- 
son with institutional investors 
in connection with the proposed 
acquisition of Richards. 
37.213.308 have been recalled 
by shareholders. All valid 
shareholders' applications have 
been accepted in folL 

• ALEXANDRA 
WORKWEAR: Results for 28 
weeks ended August 16 (28 
weeks ended Aug 10). Interim 
2.75p (2.25p), payable on 
November 28. Figures in £000. 
Turnover 17.292 (13.744). trad- 
ing profit Z204 (1.633), profit 
before tax 1.941 (1.510) and eps 

11. Op (8.2p). ^ 

• MICROLEASE: Six months 
to August 31. Interim dividend 
lp (same), payable on Decem- 
ber 2. Figures in £000- Turnover 


APPOINTMENTS 


_ Kingsgrange Products: Mr 
Stuart Tarrant joins the board 
as group finance director. 

Normans (Budleigh): Mr 
Patrick Morris becomes 
managing director from 
November 1. 

Royle Communications: 
Miss Sosan Grice has been 
made managing director. 

Brian Woodhead & Co: Mr 
Robin Cooke becomes a 
director. 


2.010 (1.984), pretax profit 330 
(400) and eps 6.3p (7. Ip). 

• HAMMERSON PROP- 
ERTY: The company has com- 
pleted the purchase of Slone 
House. 128/140 Bishopsgaie, 
London_EC2. Plans for a 
redevelopment or comprehen- 
sive refurbishment are under 
consideration, but it is unlikely 
that work will start before 1988 
on foie expiry of current ten- 
ancies. Estimated total develop- 
ment costs are £40 million. 

• CEMENT-ROAD STONE: 

The company's subsidiary. Ce- 
mem-Roadstone Nederland, 
has acquired 80 per cent of 
Hems Holding Co. a pivaidy- 
owned Dutch fencing company. 
Total consideration is FI 23.8 
million (Ir£7.8 million or £73 
million). ‘ 

• WARTSILA: Eight months 
to August 31. Group net sales 
4.1 billion Finnish marks or 
£573 million (approximately 
same as in 1985). Group order 
books total FM5.8 billion (FM7 
billion at end 1 985). Total group 
n« sales for the year expected to 
reach FM6.2 billion, an increase 
of 10 per cent. 


British Telecom: Mr Mi- 
chael L Ford has been made 
British Telecom Int- 
ernational's first resident 
director. North America, and 
president of British Telecom 
International Inc , New York. 
He also joins the board of 
Dialcom Inc. 

Korn Ferry International- 
Mr Michael Brandon joins the 
board. 


• DOBSON PARE: The com- 
pany has sold its Australian 
generator set manufacturing 
business, carried on under the 
name of Powriitc Generators, to 
GG Kay and Co. The consid- 
eration will be £339,000, pay- 
able by instalments over a year. 

• NATIONAL FREIGHT 
CONSORTIUM: The con- 
sortium is to acquire the dis- 
tribution activities of Birds Eye 
Walls. This division has a 
turnover of £40 million and 
operates a national, tem- 
perature-controlled distribution 
service from seven regional 
locations. 

• THE CRONTTE GROUP: 
Directors have noted a rise in 
the price of the company's 
ordinary stares but are unable 
to explain the reason for the 
increase. 


BASE 

LENDING 

RATES 


ion joins the 


ABN iom 

Adam & Company 104 0 % 

BCG 11.00% 

Citibank Sawnost 1095% 

Consofidated Crts —10.00% 

Co-operative Bank 10.00% 

C. Hoare & Co 1 (UJ 0 % 

Hong Kong & Shanghai __ 11 . 00 % 

Lloyds Bank 11.00% 

Nat Westminster 11.00% 

Royal Bank of Scotland 11JXK 

TSB 11.00% 

Citibank NA -—11.00% 

f Mortgage Bate Bate. 


Company backing 
for charities 

rises to £193m 

By Teresa Poole, Business Correspondent 

^f*donSonor fiotTmiS “pSshipjctounicd for 
according to estimates £30 imihon. advertising £20 . 
nt'hlished yesterday. million, joint promotions £3 .. 

IBMuK Holdings, the million, secondments £10 mfl- i 


IBM UK Holdings, the million, secondments £10 mil- i 

most generous donor, was one lion, and I there was an ud- 
ofeiRhi companies which gave quantifiable but . substantial . 
£1 million or more. benefit from gifts in kind. „ 

rpjh donations appear to A Guide to Company 67*- 
have increased slightly and tng. which compiled tte de-^ 
there has been a move by foils of the 1.000 IMgcst> 
several larger companies to- donors, says that few corn- 
wards genuine donations pot- panics give very much. 

JL The 100th contributor. 

The top 200 companies Racal Electronics, donated , 
gave a total of £45 million in £i 17.OOO amlonjv35 com- ; 


their 1984*5 financial years, panics gave £300.000 or more. I 
up from £34 million two years John Lainj^is commended 
previously when overall com- for a fund-raising drive which * 
tuny support was worth £132 raised more than £600,000 for .* 
million. the NSPCC. 

But straight cash donations » ,4 Guide to Company 

account for only about half the Giving, edited by Michael 
total support. Norton, published by the Dir* ■ 

There has been a sharp ectory of Social Change 
increase in help from com- (£12.50). 

COMPANY DONATIONS ■ 

Amount <£ miUtan) and percentage given by 
foe top 10 donors in 1984/85 


•Profit Donation 


1 IBM UK Holdings Ud 

2 British Petroleum Co pic 

3 Barclays pic 

4 National Westminster Bank pic 

5 Marks & Spencer pic 

6 Shell UK Ltd 

7 Imperial Chemical Industries pic 

8 Unilever pfe 

9 Rank Xerox Ltd 

10 Distillers Co pk: 

- denotes pre-tax profits 


. 521 

2.30 

0.44 

3,613 

1.79 

0.05 

854 

1.73 

0.20 • 

804 

1.46 

0.16 * 

303 

1.45 

0.48 

2^273 

1.35 

0.06 ' 

912 

1.30 

0.14 

391 

1.00 

026 

112 

0.80 

071 

236 

0.76 

0.43 . 


BES company to raise 
£1.7m for hotel project 


By Lawrence Lerer 

Country Resort Hotels, a development 
Business Expansion Scheme substantial l 
company, is raising up to £1.7 The minim 
million to aquire, develop and for the schem 
relaunch an hotel atHickstead, this level thei 
West Sussex. Sponsored by will come to 
! John Fiy, the mini-financial the funds rai 
services group, Contry Resort maximum £ 
is the first hotel-bared BES raised the co 
company to be launched this 9.8 per cent . 
year. Country R 


development project with 
substantial bank borrowings 

The minimum subscription 
for tbe scheme is £850«0 CrX At . 
this level the costs of the issue 
will come to 13.5 per cent of 
the funds raised, while if the 
maximum £1.7 million is 
raised the costs ammourn to 
9.8 per cent. 

Country Resort Hotels is 


The BES gives investors tax linked with two previous ho- 
retief on investments of up to id-bared BES issues - Resort 


£40,000 a year in certain types 
of unquoted company. 
Substantial amendments to 


Hotels which raised £1.9 mil- 
lion in 1984 and Coastal 
Resort Hotels which raised 


the scheme in this year’s £852^)00 last year. Resort 
Finance Act, were thought to Hotels win be managing the 
have eliminate d the asset- hotel which Country Resort 
backed BES companies— such Holds Is intending to aquire. 
as hold and pub-based ven- Mr Charles Fry, chairman 
tuxes — which had come to of Johnson Fry, said yesterday 
dominate the scheme. that he expected “ a USM 

r Country Resort Hotels will, flotation for Country Resort 
however, have to combine its Hotels within five years. 



Clydesdale Bank PLC 


BASE 

RATE 


Clydesdale Bank PLC 
announces that with 
effect from 1 5th October 
1986 its Base Rate for 
lending is being 
increased 

from 10% to 11% 
per annum. 


TSB OR NO TSB 
YOU'LL GAIN WITH L&Y 

IF YOU WERE LUCKY. . . should you sell or hold VourTSB? For advice 

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OFFERCLOSES 20TH OCTOBER. 

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Steelmen 
urge 
British 
hard line 

in the battle to quicken the 

Ma&ss:;?- 

I™ coaunitiiieiit to the 
foil re-introduction of “free 
market forces”. 

Sled consumers have taken 
advantage of the British Steel 
Corporation’s refnrn to 
prolitabn.t> to try to stiffen 
the Government's resolve to 
resist pressure for a continu- 
ation of the complicated Euro- 
pean Economic Omummlty 
production quota system. 

They say the quotas have 
kept pnces artificially hick 
hare prevented the closure of 
uneconomic steel rolling 
capacity, and dented the 
competitiveness of the steel- 
using indnstries. 

In advance of next Mon- 
day’s crucial Council of Min- 
isters meeting in Lnxembonrg, 
at which industry ministers 
hope to thrash out a fi iwl 
agreement for 1987, the Brit- 
ish Iron and Steel Consumers' 
Council (BRISCO has made 
strong representations to Mr 
Giles Shaw, Minister of State 
for the Department of Trade 
and Industry, who win preside 
over the mee ting, 

Market forces 


Mr John Safford, director of 
the BRISCC, said: “As we see 
it, his attitude will be an 
important test of the extent iff 
the DTI's commitment to 
increasing the role iff market 
forces.” 

Mr Shaw may find Mawif 
in a predicament On Novem- 
ber 12, the BSC is to announce 
its half-year figures- These 
will show that it is likely to 
make further profits, bet this 
could be jeopardized if there is 
a relaxation of controls. 

The BRISCC says, how- 
ever “Refusal by the British 
Government to endorse the 
EEC's latest proposals for the 
abolition of quotas would be 
generally seen as a reduction 
of their commitment to the 
wider operation of market 
forces. 

“At a time when Britain 
holds the presidency of the 
Conned of Ministers, it would 
also represent a setback to the 
prospers iff achieving, im- 
portant EEC objectives — the 
creation of a competitive and 
financially viable steel in- 
dustry and a more competitive 
EEC econoroy^eneraBy.” 

In the nuMp/to the next 
general election, Mr Shaw 
may face different pressures. 
Further competition for the 
BSC may lead to irresistible 
pressure for more capacity 
cuts. The Ravenscraig rolling 
mill, near Motherwell, is the 
most vulnerable and its demise 
oould be a considerable vote 
loser. 

Production cut 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 1 5 1986 

Rival trading centres force dramatic changes on Wall St 

Young men take the strain 
in scramble to compete 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


27 


By BaSey Morris 

in Washington 



The BRISCCs latest out- 
burst follows the EEC’s pro- 
posals to scrap production 
quotas on a further 20 per cat 
of the industry's output from 
the beginning of next year. 
Four product categories are 
covered: galvanised sheet; 
light sections; wire rod and 
merchant bars. 

The council hopes that the 
slack demand for steel in 
Europe will pick up by the end 
of the year although Eurofer, 
the cartel of steel producers, 
has been less confident It has 
also been concerned by the 
upsurge in competition from 
non-EEC steel indnstries. 

British steel consumers say 
it is in the interests of produc- 
ers as well as users to have a 
progressive relaxation of con- 
trols. This, says the BRISCC, 
will lead to “a gradual adjust- 
ment to market forces rather 
than a trig bang in December 
1987 wheu the steel regime is 
due to ad”. 

Slate subsidies 

There is no economic sense 
in protecting the steel industry 
of the European Coal and 
Steel Community (ECSC), the 
BRISCC has told Mr Shaw, in 
ways which damage its domes- 
tic customers. 

Consumers stress that pro- 
tectionist measures were in- 
troduced by the EEC to allow 
steel makers to restructure. 
Two years later, production 
and delivery quotas were 
added. But recently, the coun- 
cil estimated a need to elimi- 
nate 25 million tonnes of hot 
rolling capacity — 17 per cent 
of European output The users 
say that to make this happen 
is “to expose the producers to 
market forces”. 

Steel producers have 
warned of the impact on 
businesses of a decline ini 
prices, but the BRISCC es- 
timates that total costs iff 
British producers have dipped 
by £l5-£20 per tonne between 
1985 and the first eight 
norths iff 1986. 

While the consumers say 
hey accept the concern of the 
British producers over the 
•ffect of past state subsidies to 
•thers, they add that most of 
he handouts were to cover the 
octal cost of redundancies, 
nd that now' they need to cut 
ssociafed costs to restore 
icir viability by 1988. 

Edward Townsend 

industrial Correspondent 


. Eleven years after weather- 
! JJ8 Bi « Bang, on May 

Day 1975, Wall Street is again 
undergoing a dramatic re- 
structuring. 

In the name of “risk” with 
an eye on the world financial 
market, venerable firms are 
expanding rapidly and femfl- 
Ef„“? es ’ synonymous with 
Wall Street post-dere gula tion, 
are being shunted aside. 

The emphasis is on youth, 
speed, risk, and deals of all 
varieties. Even the most staid 
firms are moving into “junk 
bonds”, leveraged buy-outs 
and other deals they would 
not have touched four years 
ago. 

A high-level o fficial of 
Lazand Freres sakk “This is a 
moving business. If you stand 
still, you perish.” Anticipated 
new competition from Lon- 
don, Japan and other financial 
centres bas forced entrenched 
firms, such as Goldman Sachs. 
known reverently on the 
Street as “The Partnership”, 
to restructure its operations. 

The 117-year-old firm, one 
of the most profitable on WaS 
Street, recently established a 
new products group and 
launched a big hiring cam- 
paign, breaking a longstanding 
rule of shunning ou ts i d ers. 

“We had to gel rid of our 
image of extreme caution 
while retaining our traditional 
business,” a senior nffirial 
said. 

In a deal that dazzled Wail 
Street, Goldman became the 
first entrenched investment 
banker to bring East and West 
together, through a tentative 
agreement with Japan's big 
Sumitomo Bank. 

The deal, subject to ap- 



The trading floor of fhe New 
mescal! 


for greater emp 

proval by US regulatory 
authorities, would give Gold- 
man $500 million (£348 mil- 
lion) in equity capital for its 
expansion campaign. 
Sumitomo, as a limited part- 
ner of Goldman, would earn 
up to 12J per cent of its 
profits but, more important, it 
would gain a long-sought toe- 
hold on Wall Street. 

Although Sumitomo is pay- 
ing dearly for the privilege of 
providing Goldman with an 
estimated 34 per cent of hs 
total equity capital, it is 
profiting. 

Mr John Gutfineund, the 
chairman of the rival Salomon 
Brothers, said: “I think 
Goldman Sachs is making a 
very shrewd move - but it Is a 
smart move for Sumitomo 
too. It shows the astute intelli- 
gence of the Japanese in 
recognizing that one of the 
best businesses to be in. over 
the longterm, will be financial 
services.” 

Salomon Brothers is also 
making changes that will place 
h better in the increasingly 
global battle for new business. 

Last week, in a big reshuffle 


v York Stock Exchange; Rapid 

basis on youth, speed and risk. 


of its senior management, 
Salomon demoted Dr Henry 
Kaufman, its famous, almost 
legendary, economist, from 
the lofty perch of vice- 
chairman. 

In announcing the ehawgp? 
which affect a new crop of 
younger managers, Mr Gut- 
treund said the restructuring 
reflected Dr Kaufman's age. 
59, and “the changes going on 
here in which younger man- 
agers are being promoted over 
older ones”. 

The highly-publicized 
changes in the large invest- 
ment firms are paralleled in 
banks and lesser known 
securities companies. 

Chemical Bank announced 
the appointments of Mr John 
Howland- J ackson and Mr Cy- 
rus Ardetan to key positions in 
London, saying the promo- 
tions were part of its effort to 
become a “major player in 
world corporate finance and 
capital market activities”. 

■ Wall Street's scramble to 
compete is driven in part by 
fear that it will miss an 
opportunity; in pan by a belief 
that New York will remain the 


centre of the world financial 
market; and in pan by the 
exotic spread of new financial 
instruments which have chan- 
ged the face of investment 

Over the last turbulent year, 
in which the value of shs . 
traded on the New York Stock 
Exchange exceeded for the 
first time the $1,000 billion 
mark, new financial in- 
struments have played a big 
role. The trend has given rise 
to a new breed of financier in 
the image of Mr Michael 
Milken, aged 40, of Drexd 
Burnham Lambert, the un- 
challenged leader in “junk 
bond” financing. 

Mr Milken is widely re- 
garded as a master producer of 
investment paper. He is cred- 
ited with building a machine 
that converted equity, which 
was unwanted, into bonds 
which were wanted, providing 
a windfall for money man- 
agers faced with faiUng in- 
terest rates. 

In the process be made both 
himself and his firm rich. Mr 
•Milken has accumulated 
personal fortune estimated at 
$500 million. 

It is the Milkens of Wall 
Street who are sparking ven- 
erable institutions like Gold- 
man Sachs to acL 

In general, the great stirrings 
in New York are prompted by 
the belief that over the next 
five years there will be an 
invasion of Wall Street rival- 
ling that of London in 
anticipation of Big Bang. 

Mr Richard B Fisher, the 
president of Morgan Stanley, 
said: “I expect to see a wave of 
non-US firms establishing a 
major presence here. 

“Most American firms have 
already set up bases in London 
and Tokyo but the big London 
and Tokyo firms are not yet 
well established in New 
York.” 


Read all about Cromer — 17 years late 


Mr Alan Lord, chief executive 
of Lloyd's, . yesterday an- 
nounced that the controver- 
sial and never published 
Cromer report will be made 
available to those who want a 
copy, 17 years after it was 
completed. 

Critics of the insurance 
market argue that, had Lloyd's 
heeded the Cromer recom- 
mendations. the worst of the 
scandals of the last 15 years 
would never have happened. 
Although many of the recom- 
mendations were incor- 
porated into the 1982 Lloyd's 
Act, several are still bones of 
contention. 

The derision by Lloyd's 


Council to allow a public 
airing will help to lay to rest 
allegations that Lloyd's was 
suppressing the report because 
some of its recommendations 
were so unpalatable. 

The ruling committee of 
Lloyd's in 1968 commis- 
sioned the Eari of Cromer to 
investigate what should be 
done to encourage and main- 
tain an efficient and profitable 
market. 

One of the main anomolies 
Cromer drew attention to was 
“the degree of bitterness felt 
by some outside names called 
recently to draw heavily on 
their personal capital to meet 
underwriting losses whilst 


seemingly the earning power 
of underwriting agents and 
brokers was less affected by 
such losses.” 

Cromer argued strongly for 
some form of deficit clause in 
agency agreements, Le. agents 
who creamed off profit 
commission in good years 
should be made to share in the 
losses of bad years. Deficit 
clauses have still not been 
accepted at Lloyd's. 

The report also drew atten- 
tion to the anomaly of limited 
liability companies owning 
unlimited liability businesses 

Cromer said: “We see little 
justification for an agent 
participating in profits on a 


basis, perhaps commensurate 
with the entrepreneurial role 
of the underwriter, for merely 
managerial services. 

Where agency businesses 
were owned by companies 
with shareholders, Corner 
said:“Names may be regarded 
as sometimes supplying the 
funds to enable others to share 
in the profits of the 
syndicate.” 

On an agent's remunera- 
tion:- “His participation in 
syndicate profits should be 
substantially less than the 20 
per cent often quoted as 
average.” 

Alison Eadie 


COMMENT Kenneth Fleet 


Lawson and Bank do 
not see eye to eye 


Rarely in the annals of Britain's long 
and turbulent monetary history can a 
rise in interest rates inspired by the 
authorities have been greeted with 
such unanimity. The phrase on 
everyone's lips was that yesterday's 
one-point rise in base rates was a clear 
case of too little too late. 

These were not empty words, as the 
behaviour of sterling, interbank rates 
(all above 1 1 per cent, from a week to 
a year ahead) and gilt-edged stocks 
(down) testified. More significantly, 
the Bank of England studiously 
refrained from underwriting the new 
rates structure by dealing in the 
market. The City smells disunity 
between the Chancellor and the Bank 
on the timing and the size of the 
increase in base rates. This would be 
bad news indeed. 

The timing of yesterday’s rise, 
officially, was chosen because the 
Bank had decided that the financial 
markets had at last settled down. With 
no great pressure in the money 
markets or in the foreign exchange 
market, both Chancellor and Bank 
could stand back and take a consid- 
ered view of what son of rise in rates 
was required. 

As an explanation, it does not really 
wash. Yesterday was also the first day 
after the Conservative Party con- 
ference that the Chancellor was back 
behind his desk — Monday having 
been taken up with the EEC finance 
ministers meeting in Luxembourg. 

Base rates rose, after the conference 
but before the Mansion House speech. 
And the timing ought to tell us two 
things. The first is that the Chancellor 
does not have any monetary tricks up 
his sleeve for Thursday's banquet. 
The second is that the key to sterling's 
entry into the exchange rate mecha- 
nism of the European Monetary 
System remains firmly locked in the 
cupboard at Number 10 Downing 
Street 

The base rate rise thus had the 
perverse effect of removing a potential 
sterling prop. The pound's dull perfor- 
mance after the increase — the sterling 
index closed at 67:6 from 67.5 on 
Monday — was testimony to this. 

Mr Lawson's political sensitivities, 
and the straitjacket that these have 
placed upon the Bank of England's 
freedom of action, have created the 
worst of all possible worlds. The 
Chancellor suggested yesterday that, 
by delaying, he has limited the rise in 
base rates to 1 per cent This was 
probably the case a week ago but was 
for from true yesterday. At the first 
hint of sterling weakness, the markets 
will be baying for another one-point 
rise in rates. The gilt market, down by 
well above a point yesterday, was 
shocked by the Bank's move and* 
certainly thinks so. 

The timing of the rate rise, just as a 


view was beginning to develop in the 
markets that the Government might 
be able to ride this one out, achieved a 
high rating on the Richter scale of 
perceived official ineptitude. 

From this low point, the 
Chancellor’s credibility in the City, 
like base rates, can only go higher. 

Gilts at auction 

What do you do with 27 new gilt- 
edged market-makers? If you are the 
Bank of England, the answer is a Iol 
A fter decades of operating an un- 
changed system of issuing gilts, the 
new market structure has suddenly 
given the Bank a range of options. 

As early as next spring, once the 
new gilts market had settled into some 
kind of rhythm, the Bank expects to 
try out a system of auctioning gilts, 
similar to government bond auctions 
in the US, to complement the 
traditional tender and tap system. In 
the old market, auctions were hardly a 
practicable possibility: with separately 
and strongly capitalised primary mar- 
ket makers — several of which are 
already familiar with the US system — 
the way is open. 

The tender system has its merits. 
Principally, it gives greater control 
over the terms of an issue, because the 
issuer can choose his moment to 
launch stock on to the market. Even 
here the Bank maintains certain 
disciplines — such as never selling into 
a falling market — to minimize the 
risk of disruption. 

Under the US system, which is the 
system the Bank favours, regular 
auctions are held monthly, with only a 
slight flexibility in timing to avoid 
things like bank holidays. You no 
longer choose your market conditions 
with the same precision, but you do 
know when you will receive your next 
slug of money. 

There are still plenty of details to be 
thrashed out before the experiments 
start and discussions with market- 
makers will begin before 
Christmas. What the Bank wants is a 
mixture of systems in the gills market. 
It insists that there is no conclusive 
evidence to show that either tenders 
and taps on the one hand, and 
auctions on the other, are cheaper and 
more efficient 

But having the choice of which to 
use could prove important in the 
future. At present with a fully funded 
borrowing requirement, the tra- 
ditional system can cope without 
strain. I£ however, the order of the 
day was to fund a huge borrowing 
requirement, the regularity of funding 
would become paramount. It is hard 
to see howHhe US government deficit 
could be funded without a heavy 
reliance on the auctioning system for 
government bonds. 


( TEMPUS ) 

Glaxo’s performance gives 
no support to Cassandras 


Although Glaxo is still 
producing superb results, 
some people in the City are 
going through a rare bout of 
far-sightedness and are 
worrying about “life after 
Zantac”. 

This has been responsible 
for the fell in Glaxo's rating 
from more than twice the 
market average multiple to a 
modest premium to the mar- 
ket of about 20 per cent 

Beats are looking around 
for ammunition. There is an 
armoury in the theory that 
ulcers are caused by bacteria. 
This could mean that they 
could be kept in check by 
antibiotics rather than Ha 
antagonists. Although far 
frojn proven, this could dull 
Zantac's longer-term perfor- 
mance, particularly in the 
field of maintenance therapy. 

In the meantime, the out- 
look for Glaxo seems good- 
The disposal ofless profitable 
operations has widened gross 
margins by 10 percentage 
points to 35 per cent Goce 
business margins are also 
improving. 

The world market share of 
Zantac and associated prod- 
ucts is nearly 50 per cent; 
sales are more than £600 
million a year. Glaxo expects 
to continue to improve its 
market positions and to bene- 
fit from the 20 per cent 
overall animal growth in the 
market. 

Zantac's market share is 
growing in every country but 
Japan, where strong com- 
petition has emerged from 
Yamanouchi’s anti-olcer 
drug, Caster. However, there 
are doubts whether Merck, 
which is marketing Gaster 
outside Japan, will invest 
enough in the marketing of 
the drug io make it a serious 
threat to Zantac in the inter- 
national arena. 

Plan of the £550 million- 
plus in Glaxo’s coffers will 
probably be used to build a 
stronger position in the 
American and Japanese mar- 
kets. 

Small acquisitions are a 
possibility but the group has 
always favoured organic 
growth. It is difficult to find 
businesses earning 35 per 
cent gross margins and a 56 
per cent return on capital 
employed. Capital expen- 
diture and research and 
development expenditure 
also rate priority 


Glaxo should make £750 
million this year rising to 
£930 next year. On earnings 
per share of 65p and 78p 
respectively, the shares can- 
not; by any stretch of the 
imagination, be considered 
expensive. It may be some 
time, therefore, before the 
Cassandras are proved right. 

Paterson 

Zochonis 

Paterson Zochonis could 
never be charged with bring 
imprudent or profligate. Per- 
haps its extreme financial 
caution is bred out of its high 
exposure (around 50 per cent) 
to the Nigerian economy, one 
of the less stable in the world. 

Sound financial manage- 
ment has allowed the group 
to bufld up liquid resources of 
more than £120 million, 
nearly equal to shareholders’ 
funds and greater than its 
market capitalization of £1 10 
million. 

Yet the company has never 
been accorded anything more 
than a derisory 
price/earnings multiple in the 
London flock market And 
the Jeremiahs who have pre- 
dicted nothing but ill-fortune 
out of this alliance with 
Nigeria will no doubt take 
grim pleasure from the latest 
set of results. 

-The trading result for the 
year to May 31 showed a 
decline of 8 per cent The 
worldwide progress made by 
Cussons, its subsidiary, and a 
steady result in Nigeria in 
local currency terms were 
more than wiped out by the 
fall in the value of the naira of 
30 per cent over the period. 
However, the company was 
able both to increase its 
investment income and to 
reduce interest paid to give an 
increase in pretax profit of 
nearly 10 per cent to £422 
million. A currency transla- 
tion deficit of £16-7 million 
was dealt with through 
reserves. 

Worse was yet to come. 
Nigeria introduced a free 
market for its currency last 
month. A floating naira 
proved to be more of a 
sinking naira — felling from 
the official rate of61p to I5p. 

To account for this post- 
balance sheet event, Paterson 
Zochonis has taken a £29 


million write-off against its 
reserves. Tbe impact oh the 
next set of interim results will 
be severe, but the group is 
more sanguine about tbe 
outcome for the second halt 

A freer market within Ni- 
geria and the inflation which 
the company believes will 
accompany the currency 
devaluation could bring 
higher sales and maig in y . 

The political risks remain, 
but the company is finan- 
cially very strong. The mul- 
tiple of just over 6 discounts 
all but the worst 

Harrisons & 
Crosfield 

The chemicals interests of 
Harrisons & Crosfield have 
ridden to the rescue after a 
poor crop in the plantations. 
With palm oil profits at their 
lowest level for half a century, 
the plantation division 
earned only £5.3 million for 
the company in the first half 

This figure is almost 66 per 
cent down on last year and a 
mere pittance when com- 
pared with earnings of £49.4 
million in 1984. 

Overall, pretax profits were 
down almost 20 per cent at 
£25.6 .million. An improve- 
ment in Harrisons' chemical 
manufacturing, businesses, 
supported by better results 
from distribution, limit ed the 


American operations re- 
main troublesome, with lia- 
bility insurance costs follow- 
ing the Bhopal disaster and 
continuing restructuring 
costs on the distribution side. 

The chemicals division, 
Pauls, the animal feed and 
malt group, acquired last 
year, and a recovery in the 
palm oil price are generating 
mild optimism over the 
company's second halt But 
City analysts are less sure — 
Pauls, they point out, op- 
erates in competitive fields, 
and palm oil rates are well 
below last year. 

The full-year pretax figure 
is barely changed at £60 
million, and the shares, down 
2p at 37lp, stand on a p/e 
ratio of more ihan 12. That 
rating leaves little room for 
an upward move, but with a 
gross yieldof 7-6 percent, the 
downside is not great either. 



INTERIM STATEMENT 

1986 

1985 

1985 

1985 

(tauudmd) 

Six months 
toS&thJxne 

Six months 
to 30th June 
resuned 

Horn 
31a December 
restated 

Year to 

3 la December 
as originally 
reported 
£ millssn 


£ million 

£ fruition 

£ million 

Group profit before interest and taxation 

36.3 

39.6 

8L7 

77.8 

Group profit before taxation 

25.6 

3L3 

62.1 

58.5 

Group profit after taxation 

16.2 

17.5 

39.3 

37.0 

Earnings for Ordinary shareholders 

15.8 

17.2 

39.0 

36.7 

Earnings per Ordinary share 

12.1p 

13.7p 

30. 4p 

28.6p 


OKDOUKt uiVUMBKD Tbe ba Sectored «n a*mo> dmdead aT4Jp per for 

LM6 (6j4p pa thvr mrt^taa; eke itteed en o g ti lcomcg £$.9tB oo (hr tcoied Ordma/y 
ripCT i of £lSO,*WrH. The imo tm drndmd p«d o rayto ai 19S5 so* 4.5j> per «fa*r 
OHDEf £S. 9 ol 

The Hpit <*idcnd >9 bf pridaa 8d> Detmbcr 1906. Tbe b» fi» lodging 

tmakn wd be 7«b Noeeabcr SK 
NOTOS: 1 . bate Gone* ac 


■tmbru«dia<ie»>ttrfwai«»,a nwwm »CTiy»ail«iBtn w er» ie« adK r»rti inn»K»rda;|iiar 

end <4ite lionet prod [br ie— pnet aconmeB—wjnwnw^ «««»■* ibn — i 

kmndidet 
t u> m At m (Death m 


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las }n Mb«r £0 >n *>( 


ndAnadnttninii 


£ far IWIm ben ado** 6ns 2ad April W. ibr dwr of inewi 

J then —b-fin^ndibr unrea l in tttreMunnDnMlnUgMt uen d*et TkBnn 

BnbmoorfdaPnato T"d* ~i ort|— H) rrfii— nf mrr it i rr inr wnbtMimnirfabe im 
■hthbwr bmfltdn^ fat nd aibfain 


Results and Prospects 

Prices for od pain products fell to their lowest level in real 
terms for nearly Sty years. This, and pocr prices for some of our 
other crops, cured the severe deefine in Plmtaiians Division 
profits. However tonnages of aD major crops and palm products 
in particular showed a materia] increase ower the same period in 
1985. Crops in die second half of the year continue to be wefl up 
to the record levels of last year and recently commodity pices 
have shown some advance. The set-back, in ptontatioos 
operations earlier in tbe year is thus ntw being afiset in pan by 
the better crops and by fee upward movement in commodity 
prices, partKnkriy of o0 palm products, although results of this 
Division are tax yet running at the level of last jear. 


app ro v e m ent in aD seams su p porte d abo by better profits, in 
operating currency terms, from the majority of the distribution 
units. These enhanced results should be sustained in the second 
balf of tbe year bat foe cost of insurance in North America fix' 
product and pabbe EabiHty has become a heavy burden. 

Currency translation rata have affected profitability of 
Tinflh-r operationfc coupled with tbe caniinumg downturn in 
mining activity However, expemrion in foe USA is mewing 
forward on a satisfactory baas. 

Fred vohrmeg have imp ro v ed in Pauls Agriculture to produce 
inatased pr nfi*»h iKry ftaifc waped the benefit of con redno 

tioa and has had a good year so fim The flavours and fragrances 


business now trades under foe name of Felton TOxldwide and 
indudes the operations acquired from Fehon International for 
the full period; this section continues to progress. Telford foods 
has fulfilled the optimism referred to in foe 1985 report. 

Although Umber and Building Supplies was affected by 
severe winter weather in the opening months, the remedial 
action taken in 1985 coupled with higher off-take in the second 
quarter produced improved results. This better performance has 
continued into the third quarter. 

General Trading suffered from die downturn in commodity 
prices which affected both the UK commodity operations and 
the for Eastern trading business. Some improvement is ccpected 

m ifw half 

In common with umoy international groups our accounting 
poBcy rdadng to the translation of werseas results has been 
changed from the use of period end exchange rates to average 
exchange rales for foe rdevanl period (see Note 1 above). The 
relative weakness against sterling of the US dollar, and most of 
those currencies in which oar overseas Group co mpand operate, 
has produced reduced income in sterling terms due to the effect 
of exchang e movements. If tte mveragp PTtfwmgy raiw? for >hp grr 
months to 30th June 1985 bad been applied in the overseas 
profits for the first half of 1986, Group profit before taxation 
would have been increased by £2.5 million to become 
£28.1 million- 


Divisional Profits 

1986 

1985 

1985 

1985 

fim:tnriiwgGr*9tlnretfrtlalidcimipaun) 

Six months 

Sixmo#* 

Year io 



to 30th June 

a>30thjt ine 
ftitnlrd 

31a December 
nsaied 

31aDtttmber 

reported 



£aaSuw 


£ndBum 

Plantations 

S3 

14.5 

29.5 

271 

Chemicals and Industrial 

14.9 

2Z0 

19.8 

18.7 

fouls (see Note 2 above) 

7 9 

L7 

10.0 

10.0 

Timber and BuOding Supplies 

43 

3J 

7.7 

7.6 

General Trading 

2.9 

41 

5.9 

5.7 

Finance 

L0 

3.7 

6.6 

6.6 

Property disposals 

— 

0.5 

2.2 

21 

Group profit before interest and taxation 

363 

39.6 

8L7 

77.8 




HARRISONS & CROSFIELD PLC, 1-4 GREAT TOWER STREET, LONDON EC3R 5AB 


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28 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 15 1986 


STOCK MARKET REPORT 


'*■ 




Pilkington Brothers maybe target 


;h>. 


of £1 .2 billion RTZ acquisition 


s'* 

>4 


By Michael Clark and Carol Leonard 


Rio Tinto-Zinc, the mining 
finance company, is believed 
to have been buying shares in 
Brothentfhe glass 


comfortably raise their gearing 
back np to SO per cent' giving 
them £400,000, and they 
could raise a further £1 trillion 

manufacturer, and may by issuing paper.** 

launch a full bid soon. Mr Worthington says RTZ 

At private lunches with has now become trid-vulner- 
various stockbroking firms in able itself and .will have to 
i> the City, Sir Alasw Frame, -make its move fast. 

* '* chairman of RTZ has rer RTZ already owns Borax, 
*■.» vealed that the company is on which produces a basic raw 
i . the brink of making a major material used in the man u fa o- 
acquisition which will add a ture of glass, it also owns 
new fourth leg to the business. ' Everest Doubling Glazing and 
y The news earlier this week last year it bought Pennsylva- 
that RTZ had reduced its nia Glass Sand,the largest 
; holding in CRA t the Austra- producer of silica sand in the 
lian mining group, torn 52.3 US, another key ingredient of 
ir percent to 49_percent, is seen 
as a move paving the way for a 
big acquisition.lt adds around 
■J £20 million to RTZ’s net 



Jan Feb Mer Apr May Jun JuJ Aug Sep Oct 


had hitherto been die hot 
favourite target, is being rated 
out by sector experts at Laing 
& Crnickshank, the broker, as 
being too expensive. 

Pearl is capitalized at £530 
million and would set a pred- 
ator bade by as much as £700 
million. London and Man- 
chester on the other hand is 
valued in the market at a more 
affordable £210 million, Ref- 
nge at £180 million and 
Britannic at £155 million. 

"The TSB is sitting on £680 
million and has another 
tranche of £680 million com- 


Marler Estates, the prop- 
erty developer, advanced an- 
other 5p to 51 5p - just 40p 
shy of the year’s peak- follow- 
ing confirmation that Mr 
Teny Ramsden’s privately- 
owned investment house. 
Glen International had been 
adding to its holding. This 
time he has snapped up 60.000 
shares for an undisclosed pnee 
lifting his total holding m 
Marier to 133 million shares, 
or 18.02 percent 
Gten is unlikely to make a 
full bid for Marier, but is 
obviously impressed with the 


65 per cent to 40 per 

* * cent. 

“Pilkington would cost 
: v around £13 trilbon,” says Mr 
< Euan Worthington, the top 
; - mining analyst at L Messel 
the broker, arid RTZ could 
■' easily afford it “They could 


Hoare Govett, looker to 
RTZ, has recently become 
markedly bullish about 
Pilkington and is known to 
have been a trig buyer of the 
stock, claiming it is buying for 
a number of institutions. 

Pilldogton has been closely 
monitoring its share register 
and says it can not yet find any 
evidence of an RTZ presence 
— with the exception of RTZ 


Lloyds BanJk 

mi J im 



Lloyds Bank Pic has increased 
its Base Rate from 10 per cent to 
11 per cent pa. with effect from 
Tuesday, 14 October 1986. 


All facilities (including regulated consumer credit 
agreements) with a race of interest linked to Lloyds 
Bank Base Race will be varied accordingly. 


The change in Base Rate will also be applied from 
the same date by the United Kingdom branch of: 
The National Bank of New Zealand Limited. 



Lloyds 

Bank 


A THOROUGHBRED AMONGST BANKS. 


Lloyds Bank Pfc, 71 Lombard Sneer. London ECJP3BS. •* 

1 . 


ML National 
Westminster 


Bank PLC 


NatWest announces that 
with effect from 
Wednesday, 15th October, 
1986, 

its Base Rate 
is increased from 
10.00% to 11.00% per annum. 


All facilities (including regulated consumer credit 
agreements) with a rate of interest linked to 
NatWest Base Rate will be varied accordingly. 


41 Lothbury London EC2P 2BP 



Coutts &. Co. announce that their 
Base Rate is increased from 
10.00% to II .00% per annum with effect 
from the 15tn October, 1986 
until further notice. 


All facilities I including regulated consumer credit agreement}) 
with a rate linked wCowp Bwe Rate will be varied accordingly 


The Deposit Rates on monies subject 
to seven days notice of withdrawal 
areasfollows:- 


7.00% per annum Gross* 

5.00% per annum Net (the Gross Equivalent 
of which is 7-04% per annum to 
a basic rate tax payer). 

Rates are subject to variation and 
interest is paid half-yearly in 
June and December. 

*Noi ordinarilv available to individual* who are UK residents • 

440 Strand, London. WC2R 0QS 


Metals North which bolds just 

10 shares. 

RTZ refuses to talk. “We 
never comment on market 
rumours and we can make no 
comment on any shareholding 
we might have,” said a 

spokesman. 

RTZ shares fed 27p to 682p 
yesterday, with the market 
tumbling and as Australian 
speculators, who bought stock 
last week on the back of leaks 
about the CRA deal, sold their 
holdings. Pilkington eased 15p 
to 463p. 

News of the 1 per cent 
increase in base rates, to II 
per cent, came at 12.30 pm 
and sent the equity market 
spiralling downwards. The FT 
30-share index closed 13.1 
lower at 12623 and the 
broader FT-SE 100 index was 
down 19.8 at 1592.5. City 
economists think the Chan- 
cellor may yet have to raise 
rates by another L per cent but 
say the increases are likely to 
be temporary. 

“In a couple of' months’ 
time, once confidence has 
been restored in the market, I 
think we could see rates 
coming down again,” says Mr 
Mark Cliffe, chief economist 
at CapeLCure Myers, the bro- 
ker. The City is now waiting 
with baited breath for the 
Chancellor’s Mansion House 
speedh tomorrow evening and 
the inflation figures on Friday. 


re- 


Money market rates 
sponded by increasing 
cent to J J% per cent and _ 
which moved up £% at the 
long end immediately after the 
announcement, ended the day 
£l 3 s easier in the longs and 
£7* easier in the shorts. 


IUUH.UC U1 UKHJ IUU11UU Win- — j r. . ,..,.,1,1,1 

mg in next year, but we think groups potential. Jt wmmuy 
unlikdythai it would owns both Cetera 

- - ■ Clubs Stamford Bridge sta- 

Fulham Football 


• Blue Arrow, the dean- 
hog to employment agency, 
eased 2p to 38 lp but could 
soon be in for a re-rating. 
County Securities has sort 
out a efrodar saying that the 
shares are underralaed 
and coaid reach 450p once die 

rights issue has been di- 
gested. Its profits forecast has 
also bees upgraded, to 
£18.5 motion for 1987, 

a gain*# £ H 7 millina for the 

current year. 


Among blue-chip stocks, 
Blue Grde fen hardest, down 
13p at S68p. Grand Met fell 
lOp to 446 p, as did Thorn 
EMI at454p. British Telecom 
lost 6p to 186p, CEC 6p to 
170p. ICT 5p to 1 102p and 
BICC 5p to 248 p. 

The life insurance sector 
held up better than most with 
London and Manchester, the 
Exeter-based group, leading 
the way. Its shares spurted lOp 
to 220p before drifting bade 
with the market to a 5p gain at 
198p. Talk is that it is one of 
the most likdy targets for the 
TSB. Pearl Insurance. which 


it is unlikely that it 
commit almost half their pot 
of gold to just one life 
company,” says Mr David 
Threadgcrid, a top insurance 
analyst at Laing & 
Crucikshank. “It would imply 
an enormous commitment to 
insurance when they have 
already gone on record as 
saying they might like to buy a 
building society and other 
financial service businesses as 
wefl.” 

Pearl, nevertheless, gained 
5p to 1468p, Refuge 2p to 
388p whilst Britannic dipped 
3p to 799p. 

The partly-paid TSB shares 
held up well, easing just a 
penny in busy two-way trade 
to 834 &pl 

Carton ftorh. the over-the- 
counter stock being shaped op 
for an introduction to toe 
USM next spring by Mr Mike 
Keen, its ambitious chairman, 
finned a couple of pence to 
48p yesterday. Its offer for 
Tern, toe fully-quoted shirt 
maker, went unconditional 
last week and Cdrton now 
spades fix* more than 90 per 
cenL Because Cotton has not 
yet been trading for three 
years Tern will have to return 
to the OTC for a short spdL 


diura and 

Cub’s Craven Cottage ground 
which Marier already has 
plans to redevelop. Some es- 
timates say the group’s assets 
per share are worth almost 
700p. j 


• Note the recent strength 
of USM-q noted Ecobric 
Holdings, toe demolition 
and cast iron processing 
group, which has risen 
from 29p to 37p over toe past 
week. We can expect news 
sooa that Mr Michael Eaton, 
former director of toe 

NCB, is about to be appointed 
chief executive. There are 
also whispers of a possible 
rights issue. The price 
slipped 2p to 35p. 


Despite losses of £223,000 
last year compared with a 
pretax profit toe previous year 
of £648,000, toe group’s pros- 
pects appear bright. This has 
not gone unnoticed in toe City 
where toe shares are attracting 
growing institutional support 
Meanwhile, rival Babcock 
International, toe engineer, 
finned 2p to 1 76p ahead of a 
visit by brokers later today. 


RECENT ISSUES 


EQUITIES 


Anpa Sacs 
Apntayard (1! . . 
Beaverco (H5p) 

Broad St (43p) 

Cnetua Man (1! 
Crwgmon Lets (l; 

Eure Home (i60p) 

Eve Construction CT05p) 
Great Southern (i35p) 
Guthrie Core (iSOp) 
Ham son (iSOp ) 

HugfJs^Food 1 $Op) 


Local Lon^Gp 


M6 Cash A C (i00p) 
Marina Dev (llOp) 


M g rtl ju i uugl i Tech (110g)^ 


MMr B Santhouse 
Nowag o Trens (75p) 
Raoamec Gp f 
Sandal Pertans 
Scot Mtge 1 


191 
17 +2 
ISO 
50-1 
12S 
196 
143 
106 
165-1 
177 +1 
160 
90 
"24 
190 
90 
80-3 
125 4-1 
157+3 
74+1 
90 
163 
£19»a+2* 


Stanley Lsfaure fllOp) 
TS8J Group (i00p) 
Thames TV (IMp) 
Trees steW/l 2016 *97 
Undock (63p> 

Yehwton @Bp) 
Yoritshra TV <1250) 


142 

834-1 

280 

E93»*+'* 


38+1 

147+2 


RIGHTS ISSUES 


Beazar CH N/P 
Bunz) F/P 

Bums-Anderson N/P 
Comtach Rn N/P • 
Goodhead Print N/P 
Lawiwwe (WJater N/P 
Laumu t m e N/P 
Norfo flt Cap N/P 


Pamsh (Jt) N IP 
N/P 


Plangnum 
Tlbtiry N/P 
(issue price In brac kets) . 


lti-1% 

193 

4-1 

Pi-* 

9+2 

1 

3-2 

1* 

4tf 

1 

28+2 


LONDON FINANCIAL FUTURES 


ThreeH 

Dec 86. 
Mar 87. 
Jun 87 . 
S*o87 . 
Dec 87 . 
Mar 88. 


®S 

8933 

89.59 

BUST 


PnvKxsdayV total open interest 12499 


Thw M oats 

Dec 86 

Mir 87 

Jun87 

Sap 87 


94.16 
94J07 
33.86 
S3. 5* 


Sli 

LM 

Ctoaa 

EMW 

88-73 

88.77 

7843 

8933 

89.09 

89.13 

358 

89^9 

8938 

89.43 

214 

BUST 

8922 

8924 

125 


89.10 

0 



88J0 

0 

Previous days total 
94.18 94.14 

open rarest 23282 

94.16 3372 

94.08 

9436 

9436 

249 

3337 

9334 

8335 

136 

9334 

9332 

8333 

42 


US Tree wy Boa if 

Dec 86 

MV 87 

Jun 87 


95-19 


9605 


Previous day's l 
95-12 


94-22 

9342 


4382 

0 

0 


Short OK 
Dec 86 — 
Mar 87 

Jiai 87 __ 


9645 

9 


Previous 
96-10 


s total 


85-58 


106 

0 

0 


1373 


LonaOi 
Dec 96. 
Mar 87. 
Jon 87 . 
Sap 87. 


111-OB 

111-02 


» 


Rtorious 
111-19 1i 
111-08 11025 


11006 

11003 

11003 


17002 
IS 
0 
0 


FT-6E100 
Ok 88 — . 
Mar 87 


184.40 

UfT 


Previous day's 
164B0 16QL2I 


d open Intareat 2810 
IflhSO 717 
163B0 0 



On and after 14th October, 1986 
Standard Chartered Bank’s Base Rate 
for tending is being increased from 
10JK 1% to 11.00% 


Deposit Rates are Gross Merest Net in ferest 


/days’ notice 

6m 


21 days? notice 

7.69% 

5.75% 


Interest paid half-yearly 


Standard Chartoed Bank 

Head Office 38 Bishopsgate, London EC2N 4DE 
TeL 01-280 7500 Telex 885951 


Hill Samuel 

Base Rate 


With effect from the close of business on 
15th October, 1986, Hfi! Samuel’s Base 
Rate 

for lending will be increased 
from 10% to 11% per annum. 

DEMAND DEPOSrT ACCOUNTS 

Depositors not liable to deduction 
for basic rate tax 
6.69% per annum gross. 
Depositors liable to deduction 
for basic rate tax 
5% per annum net 
7.04% per annum gross equivalent 
Interest to be paid quarterly and 
rates are subject to variation. 



Hill Samuel & Co. Limited 

100 Wbod Street, London EC2P2A1. 
Telephone: 01-628 8011. 


TRADITIONAL OPTIONS 


RritOologt 
Oct 6 
Oa 20 
Nov 3 

Ofl opflo ot wore 


For SoOwneat 
Oa 77 Jan 8 Jan 19 

0031 Jan 22 Fab 2 

Nov 14 Jar 5 Jan 16 

out me 14/10/86 TS 8. ChartorM. Purl. Gurmess Peat 


Boot*. Rret Cbaritm Bnrawck. Scare. Common Bros. Jams. J.WBkes, Phoenix 
Tanoar, Banka, Ataon, Amsaad, PoKy Peck, Commerce) Ureon. 

PUCTS8. 

Put 6 Cafc Paart.TSB. 


WALL STREET 


Oil shares in early dip 


New York (Reuter) r Wail 
Street shares were mow ® 
early trading yesterday as off 
shares, under pressure &ttm 
possible difficulties with the 
producthm agreemou of the 
Aryfinisarion of Petroleum 


Exporting Countries, moved 
lower. 

The Dow Jones industrial 
average gained 3 point* to 
1,802. Advances kd deefinn 
by five to foe* as volume 
indeed up to 21 mHjfoa shares. 


Oct 

13 


OCT 

10 


AMR 

ASA 

Afted Signal 

ArtoaSns 

APsOUmrs 

A>caa 

Amavtoc 

AmreaHs 

Am Brandt 

Am Can 

AmCynm'o 

AfflEfPwr 

Am Express 

AmHoma 

AmMoiore 

AmSrmd 

AmTataph 

Amoco 

Anoco Stoat 

Asarco 
AsMandOl 
At RcnhaM 
Avon Prods 
BfcreTstNY 
Banktmar 
BkofBston 
Bank of NY 
BattSnai 

BsaCaaeda 
Brtan 
Bg Warner 
gtai My ara 


BWftontod 

BwTtonNtn 

■Bumxigris 

CmpoeSsp 

CstPacAc 

CawrpWw 

Celamsa 

Central SW 

CtampKsn 

CnasaMan 

CtmBkNV 

Chevron 

CnrysUr 

CitKOfp 

Dark Equip 

Coca Colt 


CMMGu 
Cmti'tnEng 
ComwRhto 
Cons Etta 
Cn Nai Gas 
ConsPovrer 
OntriOen 
Gl 


Comma C 
CPC ft* 


Crane 
Cm Ze _ 
DanSKratt 

Deere 
DettaAir 
OewortBJ 
DtgffiUEq 
Deney 
Dow Own 
Oasssrlnd 
Ouks Power 
Du Para 
Eastern Air 
Btm Kodak 


EmaraonS 
Exxon Oorp 
PeoDotSai 


• (>« a 


59% $9% 

38% 38> 
41% 41 
68% 6BH 
3% 9S 
36% 36% 
U% 14% 
25 2*% 

43% 43% 
85% 85% 
75% 74% 
27% 27% 
57% 57% 
77% 76% 
3 3 

41 41 

23% 23% 
68% 66% 
7% 7 

14% 14% 
60% 60% 
57% 58% 
33% 34 
43% 44 
14% 14% 

39% »% 
57% 57% 
7% 7% 

52% 52% 
56% 58 
44% 44% 
35 3S 
74% 74% 
39% 40 
38% 37% 
61% 61% 
70% 70 
58% 58% 
11 % 11 % 
37% 37% 
205 206% 

33% 33% 
26% 25% 
36% 36% 

43% 43% 

43% 43% 

37 38% 

48% 48% 
20% 19% 
35% 35% 

38% 38% 
127% 127% 
43 42% 

31% 31% 
31% 31% 
45 44% 

30% 30% 
13 13 

25% 25 

51% 50% 

70 67% 

28% 28% 
50% 50% 
55% 55% 
23% 2*% 
48% 47% 

16% 16% 
90% 90% 
41% 40% 

54% 54% 

18% 18% 
44% 44% 

81% BOS 
8 % 8 % 
56 56 

69% 69% 
80 80S 

66 % 66 % 
88 % 88 % 
TT 


Oct 

13 


Oct 

10 


Fttmnt 

FsiCrecago 

FsjtraSncp 

PomC 

Fore 

FTwadw* 
gap core 
GTE Core 

Gan core 


GenDymcs 
EJeaoc 


Gen 

Gan MW 
Gen Mas 

Gan Moms 
GnPOUtny 


Georg* Pac 

Gnaw 

Goodrich 

Goodyear 

GOUkfac 


Ire 

Orea.^. 

GtAtC&TW 

Grttod 

GiumtnCer 

Grf&WMt 

Hertz HJ. 

H erc u les 

Htao-Ptod 

Honeywe* 

1 C tore 

tngareaO 
toSndStoel 
BM 
MCO 


*”l3ri 


bvrtgBankl 

JhnsnB Jim 
Kaiser Alum 
Karr McGee 
KmblyChk 

iKMan^H 


Kroger 
L-TVCorp 
UBon 
Lockheed 
Lucky Sn 
UwHiiW 
ManvOeQ) 
MaocO 
Manna Mid 
MriMeneoe 


McDonalds 

McOoonaH 

Mead 

Merck 

MmsuMng 

MOM 04 

Monsanto 

Morgan JJ*. 

Motoroa 

NCR Care 

NLlndstre 

NtoOtsdre 

NxTMeaBrr 

NttSmcndt 

NoriORSth 

NWBenap 
Occam Pel 


Ogden 

oGnCorp 

Owen*-lS 


PreQesB 
Pan Am 
Penney J.C. 
Pennant 


"5T 

27% 

54% 

Vt 

54% 

36 

34% 

55 

77 

73ft 

74% 

19% 

77% 

67% 

22% 

3% 

38% 

39% 

40% 

38% 

20 

51% 

22 

32% 

24% 

94% 

41ft 

52% 

38% 

87% 

25 

52% 

19% 

1» 

13% 

raft 

51ft 

47% 

65% 

17% 

28% 

80% 

47% 

30% 

2% 

78% 

44% 

35% 

45% 

2ft 

50% 

46% 

42% 

25% 

59% 

83% 

55% 

102% 

103% 

38% 

89% 

83% 

38 

44% 

6 

43% 

24% 

9% 

34% 

34% 

23% 

42% 

403 

40 

24 

5% 

74% 


as 

27% 

5« 

9% 

53% 

37% 

34ft 

54ft 

77ft 

73ft 

73ft 

19 
78 
87% 
22 % 

3ft 

38% 

39% 

41 

35ft 

20 
5t« 
21 % 
32 
24ft 
63 

41 
S2X 

3L* 

87% 

24ft 

53 

18ft 

123ft 

1&* 

67% 

51ft 

47% 

65% 

17% 

29% 

80% 

48ft 

30ft 

2* 

75% 

43% 

35 

45% 

2% 

60% 

47% 

42 
25% 
60% 
83% 
55% 

102ft 

102ft 

38% 

68ft 

84ft 

34ft 

45% 

5% 

43% 

»ft 

9ft 

83% 

Sift 

29 

42ft 

40 

39% 

24 

5ft 

74 


26% 26ft 


Oct 

13 


09 

10 


PAMf _ 

SK8* 

PMpitfti 


. M 
PoOM 
PoSEftQ 


Ktol 

H|18Hu 

B o cKwamwt 
Royal Own 
Siw ru y t 
Sara Lea 

are me 

Setroare* 
Soon Piper 
Seagram 
Saarvftfc* 
SadTnnl 


57% S71T 
81ft 21ft 
70% 79% 
10ft 10% 
89% Bft 
95 Kft 
71% 71% 
39ft 39% 
62 82% 


39% 

99% 

6B% 

83% 

28% 

33% 


imSSdhbk 




Sun Comp 
Taiadyna 


Ttow 
Texas E Cor 
Tmtefcrtt 
TaxaxUaft 
Textron 
TrevkaCor 
TRW toe 
UAL Inc 
UrrievarNtf 
UnCarOkM 
UnPreCor 

UM Brenda 

uSGGore 

inaTachnal 
USX Core 
Unocal 
Jan water 
WmtoUnM 




wugw 


Xerox Core 
Zareto 


00% 

41%. 

53ft 

52 

82% 

19ft 

32V 

44% 

38% 

90% 

310% 

42V 

91% 

29% 

112 % 

33% 

58% 

a* 

57% 

210 

s* 

39 

39% 

40% 

37% 

23% 

44ft 

54ft 

UBK 

55% 

36ft 

65ft 

* 1 % 

54% 

aoft 


39% 

90% 

58% 

S' 

S' 

80% 

41% 

53% 

51ft 

83 
19% 

.m 

Ik 

44% 

37 

54% 

312% 

41% 

S* 

ft2V 

33% 

98ft 

44% 

,92ft 

■57% 

911 

20 % 

5B% 

3S» 

40 

41% 

27ft 

-91 

45 

94% 

103% 

- 65% 
35% 

84 
41ft 
53X 
20 % 






CANADIAN PRICES 


AMbi 

AlonAfean 

AigomaSM 

Can Pacific 

Comnco 

ConBadnl 

HkrfSKtCan 

HdanSMto 


08 

In Poe 
Ryl TnMtGO 
G eno rem 

Seal Co 
ThmanN'A' 
Verity Coro 
WMT6ram 
. WCT 

auteS tinSS 


25% 25% 
42% -42% 
14% 14ft 
16% 16% 
13% 13% 
24ft 24ft 
26% 28% 
2>ft 24% 
32% 32% 
45% 4&% 
41% 41% 
30 30 

83% 83% 
21% 21% 
28% 28% 
268 258 
38 38 

13% «ft 


FOREIGN EXCHANGES 


STERLING SPOT AND FORWARD RATES 


ssarsr 


N York 1.4230-1.4475 
Montreal 1.9860-1 9960 
Ams'damS 1961-32315 
Brussel 58.71-59.37 


Cpnpen 10.6610- 10.8992 


li%-1%pram 

20-15premg 

2%-1%pd 


1.0*29-1.0524 
Frankhjrt 2^273-2^92 
Lisbon 20712-20930 

Maond 187 63-189.*3 

M8an 1957 10-1979.60 
Oslo 103962-104506 
Pans 9259M.3668 
SfKWro 976*5-9 7908 
Tcacyo 220.01-22237 
Vienna 19.85-20 00 
Zuncn 2J096-2J370 


October 14 
1.4360-1.4370 
1.9932-19900 
3^052-37095 
5895-69.06 
10.68*6-10.0992 2% 

1.0438-1 0448 45-75At 

ZS364-2B405 

206.44-209 JO 

188.1 1-188.38 
196298196888 
10.4382-10.4506 
92942-94107 

fi. 7754-97894 

221.08-22145 

19^6-1898 
2319823237 


0.65-061 Diem 1 J5-1 80pram 
0*9-0 JOprem i34-i.t9prem 


4%-4%grem 


54-*Sprn 

5%-4%prem 


1%-1 ftprem 
46-1 15db 


2prem> 

3%-3%< 


ids 


iviftpram 

2%-lftpram 

1%-lftprem 


io-0%prem 
IKpram 


1VII 


r4%prem 
121-19MS 
4%-4%mn 
t9 0-3*0c H 
64-1260* 

2prem-ldla 

BVIOfttM 

4%-3%pnm 

6«-5ftorom 

3%-3ftprem 

26-23%prem 

4ft-3\p»wn 


Stotfingfariex co m pere d ■toi t>75 wee apt 87^ «to/awnge 87^-67 J). 


OTHER STERLING RATES 


DOLLAR SPOT RATES 


Argentina ausirar 

Australia OOtar 

Bahrein drar . 


1 5511-15614 

22382-22*03 


BrezH cruzado* . 


05380-0.5*20 


1877-1889 Ausmte - 


Cyprus pored 0.7200-0 7300 

manq mama - 89530-88930 

Greece di a en ma .... 189.90- 191 90 

Hong Kong dolar __ — 11.1953-11 2CM 

treks rupee — - ■■ 18181830 

trap dinar DM . 

Kutvad dinar KD 0.41604)4^0 


Canada 


Sweden . 


New Zealand doter 2842^2.85® 

Saixfl Araree nyai — 53520-5.3920 
Singapore ooltar 3.1151-3.1188 

South A tnca rand 320*6-32214 

UAEamam 5241082810 

UoyOS Bank 

ftu terete 


. 15355-154.00 



iBankHORXandEvtai 


MONEY MARKET 
AND GOLD 


The markets aided on t flat 
yield curve, far from oouriaced 
that 11 per cot base rates are 
high eaoogh to restore con- 
fidence in sterling arid take the 
pressures off the interest rate 
structure. Most people be- 


lieved that at 12 per cent they 
might have been able to envis- 
age the next move as down- 
ward. At 1 1 per cent they were 
still looking upward. There 
was plenty of activity, how- 
ever during the morning. 


BaacRatas% 

Cteamg Banks 11 
Finance House 10 


Dbcaum Marital Loan % 
9 Low 2 


Ov u r reg m Hwfc 1 
Weok&aa9% 


0(Oscoure%) 
Selfing 

2nmdi 10% 2mntn 10% 

Smnui 10% 3mnto 10% 


3*1* (Discount %) 

10V 10% 2mndi I0 r3 i«-10 > M 


T mntti 

3mntn iO'*«-io*t« 6mnm 10%-I0ft 


Trade BOta (Dlaoountft) 
immn 11 % 2 mntti iv* 

3mmh il’u emnth 11% 


(%| 

Orerreret open 8ft dtose 2 
1 weak Tlft-10% 6mnth11%-11% 
1 mmh 11%-11K 9mnttt 11%-11% 
Snwtt 11ft-11% 12mtti 11%-T1% 


Local Auttndty Dapnita (%) 

2 days 8% 7 flays a% 

1 mntti 10 3mnth 10% 

6 mntti 10% 12mtti 10% 


Local 

1 mntti 


AuBtorite Bonds f%) 

i 11-70% 2 mntti 


2 mntti 11-10% 
3 mntn 11-10% 6 mntti 11-10% 


9 mntti 11-IOft 12mtfi IMOft 


Staring COsK) 
Immn 11%-11 
6 mntti 11%-11 


3 mntti ll^ia-11 
l2mtti ll»wl1 




1 mntti 550-5J& 
6 mntn 550-875 


3 mntti 590-5.75 
12ratti 555890 


EURO MONEY DEPOSITS % 


7 days 5''i«-S% 
3 mntti 5%-5% 
Oeutsdastak 
7 days 4ria4»ii 
3 mntti <%-4% 


7 days 8ft-7ft 
3 mntti 9%-9 
SMtas Franc 
7 days 1%-1% 

3 mntti 4' '*ii 
Van 

7 days 4V-4K 
3 mntti S’wri'tta 


1 mntti 
6 mntti 
an 

1 mntti 
8 mntti 
cal 
1 mntti 
6 mntn 
cai 

1 mntfi 
6 mntti 
can 

1 mntti 
6 mntn 


8ft -6% 

S“ia-“« 

5-4 

4%-4% 

4V4% 

S-8 

B l *i*- a ia 

8%-9% 

2-1 

3%-3% 

4',^an» 

5%-4% 

5-4% 


GOLD 


GottS42925-429.75 

Krugerrand- (per eokit 

1^00^320(5^0023850) 

lim^iyso^nxso-Ti ss > 

Platinum 

S 578,00 (£40280 ) 

"Exouoes VAT 


ECGD 


Fixed Rata Starting Export Finance 
Scneme IV Average reference no tor 
rarest perm Saotemoer 2 1986 to 
Octooer 7. 1936 mousaw 10J555 par 
can. 


LONDON TRADED OPTIONS 



Series 

Oct 

Jan 

JSL 

Oct 

Pula 

Jan 

_*£L 

Ailed Lyons 

300 

15 

28 

40 

3 

10 

15 

rai3) 

330 

2 

13 

23 

20 

25 

30 


380 

1 

4 

12 

50 

55 

60 

BP 

600. 

70 

98 

115 

1 

8 

14 


650 

25 

58 

78 

5 

23 

37 


700 

3 

28 

43 

35 

50 

66 

Cons Gold 

550 

117 

135 

155 

1 

10 

12 

D*9J 

600 

70 

952 

117 

1% 

20 

25 


650 

30 

80 

82 

10 

35 

42 

Counauias 

2E0 

28 

37 

48 

1 

4 

7 

C286J 

£80 

10 

25 

38 

3 

IS 

16 


300 

3 

18 

28 

15 

22 

25 


830 

% 

11 

’ — - 

43 

45 


Com Union 

260 

31 

41 

50 

2 

4 

7 

(*289) 

280 

13 

21 

37 

3 

10 

13 


300 

3 

16 

23 

14 

17 

21 

11- • H.,,» 

300 

77 

45 

B? 

1% 

15 

15 

f3Z7) 

32S 

9 

33 

40 

10 

25 

32 


350 

1% 

16 

24 

30 

37 

42 


375 

1 

5 


55 

55 


DtttBera 

600 

113 




1 


__ 

C698) 

650 

63 

_ 

__ 

7 





700 

20 

— 

— 

15 

— 

— 

GEC 

180 

13 

24 

30 

2 

8 

11 

H70) 

180 

1% 

12 

18 

13 

14 

20 


200 

% 

3% 

8 

32 

32 

34 

&and Met 

382 

68 




% 




C44SJ 

390 

— 

76 

87 


3 



420 

32 

55 

67 

2 

13- 

18 


*60 

8 

30 

43 

17 

27 

35 

K3- 

950 

155 

180 

195 

2 

6 


nioz) 

1000 

104 

137 

15? 

? 

13 

20 


1050 

fib 

972 

112 

3 

7* 

35 


1100 

Ifi 

58 

80 

15 

44 

55 

Land Sac 

300 

18 

26 

33 

2 

7 


f314) 

330 

1% 

11 

19 

19 

21 

■ jMI | 


380 

» 

4 

11 

40 

48 

49 

Merits SSpen 

180 

14 

23 

30 

1 



P93 ) 

200 

2 

12 

?1 

9 

14 

18 


220 

% 

B 

13 

28 

31 

33 

Shea Trans 

850 

S3 

887 

117 

3 



r»8) 


EJ 

60 

8? 

7 

30 

45 



2 

28 

47 

45 

68 

84 


260 

21 

3? 

39 

2 



rZ77) 

280 

b 

18 

27 

5 

18 

23 


300 

2 

9 

17 

21 

27 

34 

TSB 

80 

6 

13 

16 

2 



ro*) 

90 

1% 

8 11% 

8 11% 

14 



% 

4 

7 

17 

18 

20 


Serins 

Dec 

Me 

Jun 

Dec 

Mar 

Jiai 

Dootfam 

360 

58 

68 





T4085 


33 

48 

63 

10 

20 



* W 

18 

34 

43 

■^1 

35 

45 


4CT 

T 

18 


60 

n 


Boots 

200 

38 

49 

55 " 

1% 



f231) 


22 

34 

El 

6 

12 




mm 


27 

18 

19 

25 

BTR 

280 

27 

40 

47 

7 



(*293) 

300 

307 

13 

28 

35 

20 

m 

28 

Bass 

850 

75 

on 

95 

s 



(*705) 

700 

40 

53 

60 

25 

40 



750 

17 

28 

38 

60 

65 

B0 

BtueCMa 

a~l 

48 

60 

72 

15 



(*S«) 

800 

20 

37 

45 

ri 

45 

53 


CTO 

10 

20 


82 

82 


'Do Beers 

650 

r~i 

160 


If) 



(*755) 

700 

ss 

135 

155 

25 

rm 

60 


750 

70 

115 

130 

SO 

60 



800 

4b 

85 


80 

90 


Dixons 

300 

48 

58 





(■338) 

330 

26 

32 

48 

12 

15 



360 

13 

20 

32 

30 

3? 

39 

GKN 

El 

24 

34 

45 

5 



ran 

260 

12 

23 

33 

17 

21 

24 


280 

& 

15 

23 

33 

35 

39 


■KlxlslA 

2 

b 

— 

52 

50 


Glaxo 

900 

72 

110 

140 

30 

50 


(■930) 

9SO 

44 

85 

110 

57 

72 



1000 

27 

fib 

85 

93 

1IW 

115 


1050 


4fi 

— 

i» 

135 


Hewon 

ISO 

35 

41 





(*193) 

180 

18% 

25 

31 

5 

9 



200 

8% 

16 

20 

15 

18 

21 

OctatM 

14. 1986 

Total contacts 28984. 

CMta20a 




- 

tettm 



Puts 




Dec 

Mac 

Jun 

Dk 

Mar 

JM 

Jam*- 

rsfe) 

500 

45 

65 

80 

22 


35 

550 

18 

3b 

52 

45 

so 

5b 

. 600 

9 

20 

— 

Ki 

85 

— 

Thorn 0ft 

420 

50 

82 

77 

3 

13 

20 

r«4) 

480 

25 

37 

55 

20 

27 

34 

500 

10 

m3 

35 

52 

57 

84 


. ' 550 

3 

10 


100 

102 

— 

Tesco 

• '330 

83 



1 




3 60 

SS 

62 


4 

7 

M 

390 

2/ 

42 

55 

in 

17 

22 


420 

15 

25 

32 

20 

27 

30 



in 

ra 

HI 

Nov 

Fvto MW 

Brit Aero 

420 

55- 

70 

83 

2 

12 

15 

(*468) 

480 

23 

43 

60 

15 

23 

a 


500 

10 

28 

43 

40 

47 

50 

BATtnds 

380 

88 

102 

_ 

% 

1% 


(-*«) 

390 

58 

74 

82 

1% 

7- 

8 


420 

33 

50 

80 

8 

IS 

-20 


480; 

14 

25 

35 

30 

32 

37 

Barclays 

480 

20 

45 

57 

15 

18- 

23 

(* 4«Z) 

500 

« 

27 

37 

42 

-45 

47 


550 

2 

10 

18 

90 

90 

a 

Brit Telecom 

180 

13 

21 

27 

5 

11 

13 

P8S) 

200 

4 

10 

18 

18 

23 

24 


220 

1% 

4% 

11 

38 

37 

38 

Cadbury Scnwpps 160 

38 

44 

46 

2 

5 

7 

P9Z) 

180 

21 

28 

33 

4 

8 

14 


200 

10 

18 

22 

15 

18 

21 

Gukmess 

300 

23 

32 

45 

5 

11 

17 

C31B). 

330 

8 

17 

25 

23 

a 

30 

CTO 

3 

7 

12 

50 

52 

53 

Impanel Gr 
(*385) 

300 

88 

_ 


1 



_ 

330 

58 

_ 


1% 


are- 


380 

30 

— 

— 

« 

ram 

— 

Ladbroke 

330 

20 

37 

45 

6 

11 

13 

(*343) 

380 

9 

17 

wn 

25 

27 

32 


390 

3 

12 

15 

50 

53 

57 

LASMO 

110 

17 

25 

30 

4 

12 

14 

pzoj 

120 

10 

18 

2? 

9 

18 

a 


130 

6 

12 

17 

15 

20 

a 

Midland Bonk 


Si 

7? 

n 

T 

1? 

17 

CS37) 

550 

23 

40 

50 

a 

32 

37 


600 

7 

17 

25 

87 

87 

72 

P40 

460 

55 

70 



1% 

5 

_ 

(*508) 

||§^K>ViV 

25 

Kj] 

60 

10 

18 

27 


550 

4 

18 

28 

43 

48 

53 


800 

1 






■Racal 

160 

12 

n 

28 

wn 

14 

- 18 

neo) 

180 

4 

12 

16 

78 

& 

-38 


200 

1% 

4% 

10 

40 

41 

44 

RTZ 

600 

El 

m 

rm 

8 

17 

27 

C682) 

880 

47 

70 

87 

20 

40 

47 


700 

20 

45 

55 

40 

6 

97 


• 750 

9 

mmm 


72 

mm 

— 

Vaal Reefs 

70 

16%" 


3 

S 

6% 

(*83) 

80 

9 14% 

18% 

5% 

9 10% 


90 

4 

9% 

18 

10 

14% 

■MM 


Sariw 

Nov 

Iter 

Jua 

tew 

Iter 

Jaa 

LOrtrtW 

200 

37 

45 

48 

2 

"""4 

10 

f232) 

218 

22 



5 

4toP 

mm 


2SB 

13 



14 

mmm 

mm 


240 


19 

24 


22 

29 


255 

8 



29 

— 

— 


K55I 

H 

C3 

HI 

HI 

n 


Tr 11 ft% 1991 

100 

2% 

cn 

n 

wm 

m 


TICK) 

102 

1’ia 

i% 

2% 

ih 

2 1 *- 

2 t m 


104 

% 

i% 

1% 


8ft 

JIL 


106 

‘“in 

6 

5% 

i% 

"» 

«** 

1 Xiuoj 

108 

2** 

4 

»it 


9K 

I'M 


110 

1% 

3'n 


. 5 

»!• 


112 

I'm 

24* 

3% 

4ft 

H 

7*1* 


114 

•m 

1% 

2ft 

6% 

7ft 

8% 


116 

** 

1*.» 

y* 

8ft 

9»w 

10. 


Oct MOV 

Dec 

Jaa 

Oct 

New 

Dte 

ten 

pT-SE 1523 

75 33 



4 

a 


_ 


(*1592) 155 § a 

1 CTO 22 43 

1625 10 33 

16S0 4 23 

1875 3 is 

1790 28 


90 107 
75 88 

82 73 

47 — 

37 ~ 

25 — 

17- — 


10 15 20 35 

17 25 33 jf 

25 37 48 55 

« U » “ 

63 65 70 - 

aa so n 

113 115 '118 — 


14.1W. e-aan. 


\ 


/ 


- \V- 


13700-13730 

2 1696-2.1708 

2.8200-2.8220 


0.64134) 6*20 


1 13880-1.38® 

6.8050-6.8100 


7 2625-73675 


7.4400-7.4450 

teaaKtenww 19785-1.9775 

Swnariand Z, 1 8i85-i 6i7S 

Netnanwas 2^3*5-2.2355 

Franoe ; 8.47300.4780 










































29 





ISSUED BY MORGAN GHENFl 




o&V\nJ 




"w<v 




The Channel Tunnel rs to be funded by private enterprise and will provide a vital link in Europe’s communications in the 21st Century Roll on 1993 



















191 152 Ml Sacur* Hn ttl 
ra ss Mr W6 

MS 131 Agpiitive IBB 

gs «s xrr- s 

355 M3 AHMCMn 313 

ilia no Amman iis 

K0 4*3 AW 533 

«J M Anoc Enaror » 

233 105 ASO MB 

129 122 Ala* EMmM 127 

06 61 Auonavc *3 

70 67 BBS Daagn 66 

2B IBS BPP * 

as «a arson# «o 

123 68 BaOHM nm*od H 

21 12 BamaR * tam M 

S3 31 BanmaCmp* 42 

XT-i 7*i Bartalay * Kay 14*. 

Si 26 Bm S roBp 36 

2« 13« P an ia lay Op 213 

M 18 tZLZHiSl. » 

44 381 B0d Vi 

135 M Bmncn art* 108 . 

235 MB Butt* Toy* 23S 

160 133 Borland 136 

27 IB en .wnmt 2D 

21ffl 85 Mot 91 

200 125 um 200 

130 75 Bmaonla Sec 121 

JS® IBS 6- BJoodatOCk 161 

59 90 Br MM SB 

59 49 Brood Si SO 

59 48 Broad Si 50 

358 178 ttoomu o u nt 283 

185 115 Brown (Cftarta) 180 

^ anSss. ^ 

103 73 CCA BdalH 90 

no 125 CML Moo 145 

38 5*> CPS Como 6'. 

42 25 CPU Comp 30 

195 130 CVD 14S 

320 86 CWMDMnO* S3 

69 82 Camomai 05 

163 11 Canned Btram hr 180 

351 213 CanHTV 358 

Z £ §£&?5op. Z 

133 12S Cnokaa Man inf 

18 6 1 : Cham Mrtwta 7*i 

253 120 QtaaMoW 223 

17 81 War »*J 

40 25 cromauo 3i 

«H 475 Otptalon 7% 580 

115 70 OrcapiM .71 

173 152 g*rt* Htxwar UJ, 

28 n Ciogu Qou M'r 

55 25 CmTOB HdOI 42 

113 17 CoTOad Ba£ : Hla 103 

95 S3 Cobra Emaratt 61 

130 21 Cdna 

10B 21 Ctfowi tao M 

175 110 Comp rhancW 150 

S3 30 RsMBon K 

130 74 OBHriann 120 

80 38 Con Tam hw 43 

343 208 Conti Meroaaaro 278 

MB as Comm ** 

M3 S3 WM * 

415 308 C rm m h om 338 

78 48 Crsorook » 

m 96 Can*** i» 

138 75 CWBB Lodge 83 

in in cmaMon LM* i» 

103 58 CtomTVPIbM a 

115 75 Chas lU 

J3 «l DBCWl « 

183 116 DOT 171 

140 73 DJ Sac Mam 115 

81 03 Don IS 

216 HO Oawaa pn 

84 05 Dm 6 Boms 78 

29 20 Do Bran tAndre) B* 1 * 

145 133 DIMM » 

57 40 Dime 47 

138 105 Dancers 1« 

ns 70 Pot m M* » 

186 68 DaMir wamn n 

235 130 DkMt 

So 3*5 ftuek 

24<i IB's ttmon J6V 

58 38 Eada 34 

'$ '°i iSS8 c B - ,<Ww 5 

«i “ lEcTioa* *§ 

384 3*4 Bdrtdua Rom A 384 

148 100 Baemn Houaa 123 

100 61 BactromeomJ* *8 

33 34 Ernas 84 

16 7 Baw ta lmwcd Rod J§ 

215 Iffl EQUpd »5 

111 103 Bn i ttvwroodon MS 

310 188 « s? 

248 W FKBGp »• 


2.1 D 17 133 
12.8 73 7* 

4j0 69 106 

13 32 .. 
12b 32 .. 
SjO 12 154 
42 2J1BJ 
112b 6.1 8-1 

34 32 1X4 

22 12 142 

14 224 32 

• .. 187 


32 42132 
32 22 23JJ 
200 321413 
3.1 22142 

.. .. 142 

Of 22 207 
10 402 .. 
52 22337 
a 14 


12 2.1 U 

32 £2 207 


3.1 £1272 

. .. 52 

12 12 232 

7.1 a 102 282 
04 22 162 
37 32130 
22 £7 132 
7.4 22232 
07a 12 M2 
72 72 14 
22 34 172 
52 27232 

12 12122 
.. 42 2 
1.7 12 M2 
£1 18 £4 

14 12 122 
42 £5 22.1 

32 42 182 
04 12122 

57 42 
22 62 M 
28 £5130 
54 82 31 
107aK7 42 
72 30122 
02 14 238 
08 82127 
£5 42137 

21 £8 308 
04 t.1 SOI 
32 37 ill 
. . a . . 972 
82 22 177 
42 40 16.1 

22 £9 114 

14 117' 54 
7.1 32 112 
04 Ol 112 




166 • 

12 -M 
arm 86 - 

70+2 
“adi 230 ar+17 

J 2Zb .. 

358 +w 
iaa 
8 

targ too e+s 
Hu nn e+a 
a -i 
295 
82 
380 
55 

73 +3 


123 e+3 

85 B-B 

no *+s 

80 -3 

188 44 

IB +1 
115 
283 

133 • .. 
62 a -3 
M 

26 

170 


IBS 410 

40 

415 4.10 

157 . 43 

186 48 

200 

Gp 106 -4 

CMM 114 

130 

44 • 

I 8*J 
70 

161 a . 
3*0 a-2v 
B'r t 
i -*» 

pa J| 4-1 

no 

74 +1 

IS 
145 
50 

MM MS 46 


62 32112 
07 £1 174 
33 0232.1 
72 44 152 
.. a .. 03 

60 02123 
6.1b 32 114 
22 42 82 
47 12 162 
22 26172 
M2 47192 
17 U 8.1 
14b 12 132 

32 60 77 
4.1 62 £1 

52 62130 

.. .. 202 
32 37127 
32 £6212 
22 34 172 
80 72 82 
32 £1 162 

£1 si .. 
02 £5222 
10JS £1 7.1 
£7 42 62 
14 14312 


42 27 2*4 
94 12142 

42 32 87 
44 54192 
Z3Z -. £fl 
SO 172 12 
36. £1 160 
72 22132 
62 52182 
37 42117 
1.7 26160 
22 06 63.1 
97 34 62 
M 45176 
32 02302 
32 22232 
32 £1362 
72 40106 

.. I . i 

20 10 106 
32 34 M2 

£1 42 212 

. . . . 74 

32 SO 64 

43 27 130 
62 32 1£1 

£5 

07 

,0 122 . 

&0 62 04 

42 £0108 
12 £0 54 
34 £3 152 


106 71 

38*i in 


MS in Tod 
m ran 

*65 270 


TO -* 
60 • 
w 

IBS 

in -a 

118 46 

£ : 

Si 

s •* 

n +2 

IS 5 

ZZ'j ->J 
» « .. 
no -a 

** a. 45 

330 4) .. 

1ST 

117 +1 

1 W 

161 -2 
80 
310 
178 

9> • . 

HI ... 

an *2 

00 

43 

■46 

n +3 
2 **3 
*5 *410 

Z -* 

B5 « .. 

73 +2 

Mg o-a 

103 • . 

SS -« 

a * ■ 

» • . 

& : +t 

gf *'* 

IB • , 

6*7 _>. 

r : 

i 

SB 

& 

& *1 

ro -a 

53 -3 


60 17 192 
22 10 642 
62 72102 

42 20 277 
32 12 302 
02 12 267 
67 44152 
72 32112 

01 01 194 
32 32 132 
17 44 112 

43 30 04 

• ..44 

£6 2215.1 
37 92104 
--a . . 62 
40 44132 
47 72 107 
60 32 262 
29b U» 
-- ■■ 402 

42 00102 
.. 35.7 
3L1 12 20.1 
42 20242 

£8 12 05 
24 £1 212 
£3 £2 102 

02 32 272 
77 912 00 
42 12 412 
£1 12 179 
£1 04 282 

71 64142 
32 12 212 

32 4.11M 

4.1 01 £7 
4.7 3727.1 
12 42 252 
02 84 172 

72 12S22 
12 £1 104 

182 03 02 
04 74123 
ZOO 42 .. 
42 43 0.1 
200 59 . - 
84 09H.1 

12 47 152 
£3 17 62 
aa ai 02 
04 25112 
57b 021£6 
32 U2U 

306 

13 72142 
27 07611 

1.1 22B00 
7.9 14H4 
32 2317.0 
37 04 104 


WO 84 

07 12 42 


COMMODITIES 


LONDON CQUMODflY 

EXCHOHISE 

G W Joynaon and Co rapoft 
SUGAR (Ron C-Camimw) 

roe 

133.&-335 
1474-47.0 
1524 - 51.8 
1S745W 
1612 - 61.0 


wot 

GAS OK. 

Nov 

Doc 

Jan 

Feb 

March 

5= 
a— 


_ 118.00-1775 
_ 121.75-21.50 
~ 125^5-25.00 
_ 127. 75-27 JD 

- 124JXM100 

- 124.00-2390 

- 135.00-15.00 
_ 140.00-1590 

- 145JKMSJW 


AUHHWUM 

^ofiorSw! S 2 I 0 S 3 I 0 


VoL 

1275 

COFfg 

Itkw 



— 2165-160 

March 

— 2120-115 

May 

- 

— 2110-105 

— ■ 2120095 


Nov 

— 2140090 


IWTEfl NATIONAL 
PETROLEUM EXCHANGE 
Supplied via Commodity 
Markat SeracBS LB 
HEAVY RIEL OU. 


Unofficial ptkm 
Offldal TBaowr tjm 
Prica toC par matrictonan 

Slwki pane* par troy ounce 
RuMf Waif SCo. Ud-npon 
COPPB1 GRADE A 

Ctth 91&50-919J50 

Thraa Mentha . 944JXW4420 

Vol 5400 

Tone - Staadar 

STANDARD CATHODES 

Cash 895.00-888.00 

Three Months . 921 .00-323.00 

Vd 200 

Tone Quiet 

LEAD 

Cash 311.00-312.00 

Tima Months 305.00-306.00 

Wol ??50 

Tone Saraty Steady 

ZINC STANDARD 

Cash 595.00-605 20 

Vd NH 

Tone Idle 

ZMCMGH GRADE 


"“ssags 00 ' 

**WBB«atn adkftteam 

■Bmm^nujfcHDon 

SS^-BMappartoM 


Shw a ro^do wn 9.8 %, m . 

SflnM. town i£9 %. me. 

P*B.7928pH.19) 

LONDON MEAT FUTURES 
EXCHANGE 

Live Pig Contract p. par Ma 
Month Open f>**e 
0« Unq. 102.70 

Nov Unq. 10350 

Feb Unq. 98^0 

Apr# Unq. 98,00 

Unq. 97.00 
Aug Unq. — 


Pig Meet vd -,0 V ° k ° 

uwKjggn™^ 

Live Ca«a Contact 
P-parUM 


urn 

Unq . 

102.0 

Vofcl 

LONDON GRAIN FUniHES 


Epartonna 


•onth 

lid . ... 

nmoar 

Ctoae 

§ 2 ^ 

Qosa 

DV 

DM 

10730 

108.60 


11320 11 £50 









































THE TIMES WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 15 1986 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


'IKS 'our 


diili wumsm or a Share nr rh* w£a! 

“Jin pnTv monn mv i ir * ,u ~ ,wta ' 

ornie 

your curd available baV5 


STOCK EXCHANGE PRICES 


Base-rate retreat 


ACCOUNT DAYS: Dealings 


began Monday. Dealings end October 24. §Contango day October 27. Settlement day November 3. 
§Forward bargains are permitted on two previous business days. 


crwifC'WC' 

— \ §cld ■ — 

0 TnmV««fn|imUBM 1 

DAILY DIVIDEND 

£ 8,000 

Claims required for : 
+52 points 

Claimants should ring 0254-53272. 


k. Cnpiany 

g__jj_fiyrrarU Njy 

■ *j lignum 

I j [ fricv, ~~ 

■ - s | IS) ~*" 

| H KiMh-jin fiui% 

| T | Tivius 

I'Hf'KKt 
| u l Mwcnkim 
| ijj Ollkv Ekci MartT 
I >M FfOfimw 

I 1-1 Billlvn Shipli-y 
| t. l | Helical Bar — 

In) ibl " 

I ia CASE 
[ijL-Prop Hhl^ 

I 17[ Davy 

j 181 Johnson "**" 

I n| Wuxi < ArUiurl ~ 

I Jt'l Gronc km 
| 21} CrysSbip 
Ij:| MEPC " ~‘ 
I 23| Cjp & Couniics 
1 -4) Pembnd Ind 
I 351 -Mcvandra Wwqr 
I Allied Irish 
I 37| Cashcr (SI 
| JS1 Lnprt ~~~ 

124 Bam Wjikcr 
I .V*J -\ikim Brm 
P,r Bbck Arrow ~~~ 
I 3j| Bdhavcn 
P U) Sak- TiliKy 
| 34| Lon Inll 
| 351 Vutlshta- Chcro 
| 3ti| Whaiman Reeve 
I ,U1 Meyer Ini 
| 3&1 Nai Ami Bi. 

I 3*4 May A Ha«dl ~ 

I 4Q) TSL Thermal 
41 1 L'lWtall 
[ 42\ Hardanfjr ~~~ 
4.1j Bjre 

| 441 Fwnrti (Ttionasl 
I %> lames SifspapcrTGi 


Cwap M 

. jwto, Dwnwi 
. l^diamab S-Z 
Fnipenv 

j Tc\Ulc% 

I jridiwmah L-R 
Kiuariab S-Z 
fapcr.Priin.4dv 
Thcmicals.Phg 
InduMriaK L-R 
Properly 

t Ekmncals | 

Etecincals | 

Pimmy | 

Breweries 

Qearical? 

Property 

Property 

rBank^Pisgumt ( 

I faper.PnnL4d\ I 

TcuUa, 

Indua rials 4-D 
Brewcno 
Industrials S-Z 
Industrial}, L-R 
Ctonnak.Pte. 
IrKlustnals S-Z 

Banks, Dbcnuni { 

Industnab S-Z 
Industrials L-R " 
Property 

Birweries " 
I Industrials E-K " 
bail) Total ' 


Please be sure to take account 
of any minus signs 

■MMUMDKSMBMHMH 

Weekly Dividend 

Please make a noic of vour daily loials 
for the weekly dividend of £8.000 in 
Saturday's newspaper. 


BRITISH FUNDS 


1966 

an low Stock 


SHORTS (Under Five 

99'* 94'. Exril 2'i% 1996 
103 “S'.-Endt 13'*% 1957 
100% 83% Tf«as C10'«% 1987 
9ft aZ.Eid* 3V% 1987 
101 95% Each 10':% 1987 

90'* 93V Fund fV 1989-87 
101 . 95% Tiaas 10% 1987 
97V (U'.Treas 3Pii 1S87 
10*V 9*'tT<em t*. WBJ 
PF, SSVTnua f%*-.1«HJ8 
1M'« 93vE*0 10V% lfl» 
102V 94 ’.I'M* C9%% 1988 
94V 66 : Trms 3% 197868 
102% 32-VTfout !■,*.. 1985 
107*. 93'. Trans 11’ff. 1989 
1BSV 9S': r lM3 If VS 1909 
1MV 93'iEjca 10% 190 
111V M'.euil I0 A 1989 
Wi 94 t*sh 11% 1989 
93-. 84': Trass S% 135669 
103V 53V Tram C9 .-% 1989 
92 62"* Tims 3% ISOS 

ii4'*i03'*Tiaas -43% 1998 
86'. TftVExeh 2'/V1990 
iaav «'.£x« 11% 1990 

US'* 100 Excn T2'1% 1990 
69 V 79VTraaa 3% 1990 
100V 38 * Tims 8'*% 1987-90 
106 . 92'»Tit*s 10% 1990 
112'* 99 Traas 11V% 1981 
94'. 8< ’.-Find 5V% 1967-91 
1 10V 97'.E«ft 11% 1991 

06'- 78': iraos 3% 1991 


ML Qroaa 
on* Raft 


Years! 

99'* 

100 'r . 

S' 

99V 

3** 

86V 

101 • 

•- 

98 -V 
91% 

sse-% 

( 00 % 

::: 

ioo.-e-v 

MV 


ItKV -v 
BO'- 

99 » -V 
103V 
save 
B3’.- -> 
9ft%e-': 
101 '» 

87% 

99V e-v 
80V • 


i?i ,?s 

. so 10565 
106 11018 
9J 11084 
33 ena 
96 11060 
JM 11616 
10-7 11J3B 
103 11 ’16 
102 1010B 
116 11216 


FIVE TO FIFTEEN 



YEARS 

106V 


97*. 

104V 
109% -S 
95V •-% 
106’* -V 
KV -H 
112 -V 
116V -% 
lOP. -V 
in e-v 
90%#-** 
io*v 

73’.#-% 
9S% -V 
109 V#-V 
115% -V 
90 -V 
122%#-’. 
II? 1 .#-*. 
79 

94 a-* 

112 % 

96% -I 

B7V 

123 #-■- 
7SV#-'i 
92% 

127V -V 
!0&V#+S'« 
92 -I 

86 
114V 
88 V - . 
,9SV -V 
93% - > 
117’. -I 


OVER FIFTEEN YEARS 

ms M'.Canv IJ-JW ig. 

124'. 103'* £*e»! ’S! 

109V 90 TiflOS 9 **• aE 
112’: 93'* Tran 10% 2003 9SV 

139V 116'. Tiaas 13V% 2000-03 119V 
123'. t03 - »Trena 1 1 '-■*• 2001-0* 10SV 
11?'* 82'. Tiaas lff% 200* 95-* 1 

«■ 48V Fund 3’A 1999-04 S', 

108-V StP.Cww 9|>% 2004 91V I 

IDS'- TO'. Con. 9’i%M05 91 .1 

UTS M'.&ceh 10'.-% 2005 100'. 

134'. 113V Traas 12'.% 2003-06 114’: 
95 « 79'. Tiaas 2032-06 ® - 

107 . 65 -Conv 9V% M06 94 -1 

127V’04V Tiaas 11 <*• P003-07 108'* 

«U'. 83'. Traas 8’^* 100? MV 

143* t:s .T inas I3’j% 2»M» igv 
79 Tiaas G't »■ 

72‘- 57': tfiKn S'.-% 2008-12. M - 
93 V T-ees 7V% 2012-15 _78'; 
i* I13-. £ .if 12% 2015 -.7 1 1N- 
UNDATED 

46'., 38'. ConrjB 4% *£ 

J2 3i',iv Ln 3’:% 

57 . 44 -Cora, S':’- i,.’ 

34 p MVTtMua 3% 3U . 

Mi N-.ConK*,2’.% « 

Sff-.. 34 . Trois a',% ■ 


INDEX -LINKED 

i73 1 14 '.Trans IL 2% 

lot’* 9& .- Ti«t. a. r» 

122 lOBVlrWU. IL 2% 
107- » 9SsTrra lL2; % 
i0?-. 93'-TraoslL2V% 
HO'.- 96'. Traas IL 2% 
lC*‘; W. Tims 12':** 
111 . •?? Trar-' H2 1 *. 
»!’» 79 V Trans (L2'.'% 
I0?v ST'. Trass 
9#v 93’- Tiaas 1L2:** 
lOO P6’ Traas K2 : V 


126 11157 
106 11121 
iaa 11130 
11.7 11203 
123 11259 

105 10990 
116 11 148 

7.1 9.063 

123 11284 

124 11 163 
11 B 11272 
122 11322 
10.0 10806 
116 11640 

4.1 7646 
107 11.105 

11.7 11 197 
12.1 11906 
1DJ) 10739 
124 11-345 
116 HIS? 
36 

106 11026 
116 11.158 
109 II 058 
100 10629 
122 11372 

06 1Q4U 
tO-5 10653 
121 H2B6 
116 11675 

103 1071b 
113 11065 

10.7 10918 
10.7 10912 
116 11060 

10681 

105 10733 

104 10680 
116 11006 


105 10886 
MO HObO 
ta« mew 
105 '0-608 
no host 
108 I07B2 
10^ 10S77 

56 9126 

103 10582 
IDO 10565 

105 105*4 

106 10 712 

as 'DM? 

100 10 508 
10-9 10 714 
108 10OS3 

110 wee 

96 10 276 
BO 9972 
qj 10 148 

104 >0373 


IME »»'■ +•■ 

IJ 40 1* 

1956 lift'* 

2ltf1 10PV * . 
7003 M •+ % 
JODd 1 C 2 * ♦■* 
2009 wy#4l> 
ami ico • *•% 

2013 8 ft'* * ■' 

2016 »J *;• 

aoift a M;* * * 

XX 92’r •+’» 


21 5632 

ZZ 3 180 
2-4 3647 

3.1 3882 
11 3 858 

27 J133 

22 3657 

32 3.577 

3 2 3514 
32 3473 
27 3479 
32 3413 


banks discount HP 


Had iron 
AftStoCtWf iHanryl 
AlA NSW ? 

. BanUmaiRM 
Bank 01 kawo 
Ban. Laum l»au* 
Bara Lain LK 
Bam 0> SeoDand 
Bai Ways 
Banttram 
Brawn Shpiay 
CM 1 6M» 

Canws 

* cnaw Mopnanan 

r CVKtre 

c am Bum Wd#* 

. CUinpwi’JLIlt 

. asm 

E3>M) £ G*1 
F4B ten Fnancp 
CatiBid Net 
Cuimss f«i 
whbp: 

HU &»-wel 
Hk ^JIW B 
.tempi iLflnWOl 
Kino ft Suspot 
kkwiwn Banami 

Limw 
Lo*. 5501 

LUllOrfV Ml 

00 B*« A 
sscyinf , 
uenjan umiW 
Not *V"» E 1 * 
n-M vvm 

piionun 

Sn» 


** 

.1 150 61 

»2 17 0 96 

• 17 ft7 11.2 

9 -2 20.7 4.7 bft 

281 61 67 

• 23 64 MS, 

*<t 139 28 24 7 

*5 289 

29 6.1 112 
139 69 
.'. 206 01 

34 49 11-3 

-»Vp ca 01 

: +JV 200 43 . 

19 4 4 279 


23 

-3 102,11 

189 
- . 23 

17 7 
*2 1Z5 


•2 08 74 

371 89 129 
1,5 121 32 

43 

276 54 M 
r« S3 90 
> 1S5P •»> 107 
06 10 02 


tan ®g“ va 

*VjftLuw Cimuan, P|<e Oi Qf peno % P|f 

8 sv =*“ 2* 143 43 LB 

au 41! £'* • 164 21 129 

Sa 613 D " 1 +17 484 6J3 9L5 

578 d SU 79879 


1966 

»QN Low Cbcipany 


Gras 

dw YU 

FT*r Cn-pB oance % P/E 


1986 

ttgh Low Cawony 


Gram 

On TVS 

Pnc# Cnqc pence *• P/E 


1935 

0*1 LOW COrnpMy 


JT*. OV wau Fargo 
3W 220 mn&usi 


13 *1 7.1 54 H4 

g? 143 43 U 

O'* • 164 2.1 119 

774 +17 484 8L0 99 

573 +5 529 73 673 

£77 e-v 

2S 7.7 291S9 


BREWERIES 


313 

todsoatom 
B raw ruMmne^ 256 
BuMys ng 

awrjtfl TS7 




taoD Dbd iso 

UMjgTNnapwn m 

SA Barms ?15 

Sc« ft Now 187 

Vtux w 

Whfflmefl 'A' 2B1 

WMCraeO M y ?£ 

MOwlwSWl « D 538 

Vaung 'A' 285 


-2 HE 
+10 21J 
+3 12 

•+2 A8 
+10 2090 
-1 4.1 

79 
114 
.. VA 
-2 17 

+2- 70 

«S 89 
m3 
259 
29 
U 

-3 10 

+2 22 
#1 

-12 „ 

-1 109 

+0 184 

413 11.1 
+17 11.1 
+6 f 06 
+3 127 

104 3 


BUILDINGS AND ROADS 


193 100 Abbey 
2ffl as Atwdaan Canar 
297 213 Aewc 
74 52 /Urrtfla 

716 125 Auwooda 
550 331 BPS IWumtt 

tsi& z&azr* 
41 4B isar 1 ^ 

83 62 Sec Bros 
10'*875 BkxAlera 
728 sse a uTSoe 


171 

-a 


Sft 1X0 

206 

• .. 

11ft 

262 

-2 

184 

6014ft 





ft15 


7.1 

33 140 

445 

-6 

1X0 


4tS 

+0 

102 

2ft 100 

138 

ms 

lift 

84 1X9 

25 


.. • 

.. 00 


91 6] & Dtwtomg 81 +2 49 13 149 

a ifi Bnawi tr&aaon av -v .. S29 

76 37 EkownlM 72 39 S3 389 

1® B* Bryn 105 -1 133 69 10-2 

27 7 Sornaft ft Hatam 8 -V ..09 

158 150 CUmned Rctay iso U 11 .. 

12s BS CaDMni-Roacttisbs im . -1 49 aa .. 

131 80 Cm* Grp ia +1 39 29 192 

590 449 COUB0 498 #-12 2SO 69 9-2 

436 298 CounsysUe 415 -5 15 20112 

IBS 124 craudi {Dmk] 154 • 89 8J Tl2 

124 84 Dow lObOTOB} 107 -1 89 69 15.1 

137 72 Dougtei (RM) 11B 32b ZB 232 

110 g Er*. 108 • 59 49 20.1 

93 75 Feb 85 25 2S 119 

71 5« Do 'A 64 25 39 97 

172 51 feaamtM Hn IOC • 50 *2 m2 

70 54 mn Op 88 # Su4 82199 

94 80 GUdord 90 • U 7.7 14.4 

136 106 Gfcta A Qmdy ora 138 29 19 37.7 

385 25* Ocwson tMJ> Sffl -3 79 23 12.0 

143 68 HAT 140 SA 39103 

313 56 KalalBv 313 +8 .. .. 817 

256 196 HwxJnrecb 213 *5 100 4.7 14.1 

79 42 Hmrtait-Skan 63 #-1 26 49 11.1 

24* 144 HefMOOd VMecns 1TB -2 10.1 57 113 

643 428 Higgi S H* 585 #-10 20.1 3 A 169 

44 2S 1 .' Howira 9U 42 »-T 29 49 148 

196 IX (Buck Jonaaen 18* 8-6 7.1 39139 

480 2® Jams (Aft Sons 430 e-10 149 13 589 

466 296 Latt g UJ 360 e-10 107 39 101 

464 288 Do a' 380 «-B 107 39 101 


%n 


196 126 Ltagnat ft South 
325 178 Mandera 


151 98 May S Htmt 141 

448 304 UcAMkie (Mfradl »3 

304 228 ktSrt* ft S 2£ 

272 171 Mm rat 2a 

40 23 uSSrOUnlttl * 0 

154 KB Monk (A) 15* 

444 306 MoattRl Ooknj 382 

sa 798 Naeenhe BIS 

213 183 WoO M BfH BHsfc 198 

245 115 Pmamon 218 

110 78 Pnoana Ttatw 80 

385 285 ftxiwu 350 

888 440 RMC 824 

482 340 Ftodhnd 378 

323 188 RubaraU 236 

191 138V Rugby CraM 153 

142 87 afpeftFUMr 134 

84 70 8man tn a 

51fi 342 TMmac 410 

346 236 1 1 Tuytor WDtxtrzm 273 

175 136 Tlbay Group 16 b 

436 sa Tnnts * AmoB 4is 

TOl 75 Trant 87 

•185 13S TirrHI T73 

xsr* £ 

95 50 Wcntnotm p| 82 

204 172 VMB BHks 178 

e& 57 Waoran »oa sa 

155 41 UVte*i» 148 

m 3 WiM 


184 

•-6 

7.1 

as 

430 

• -ID 

Mft 

13 

380 

•—10 

UL7 

30 

380 

•-0 

107 

30 

85 

r . . 

5ft 

6L6 

S3 

-ft 

05 

104 

383 

-3 

10ft 

27 

164 

-ft 

74 

40 

311 

• 

120 

4.1 

100 V 


04 

40 

186 


7ft 

40 

141 

+3 

01 

0.1 


18,1 49129 

4.1 19 782 

U 16122 
14 85 .. 
03 89209 
207 57 TOS 
157 19 ms 

03 47(48 

890 42 89 

.. ..39 

IBS 59 79 
209 33 108 
185 44 119 
129 44 10.1 

04 6.1 179 
35 29 T09 
690 89 167 

139 34 172 
127 4712.1 
&40 59 129 
125 39 189 
19 19604 
10.0 69 30.7 
159 4J11S 
t04 SB 164 
14 1J M 
69 SB 127 
19 19 M9 
0.7 05 17.1 
52 19 109 

59 81 17-5 


CHEMICALS. PLASTICS 


AKZD N/v Beraar 

£44% 


400 

ao .. 

Abed Oxford* 

223 

-3 

1ft 

1ft 234 

Amarahaoi 

*38 

+3 

1X0 

23 227 

Anchor CfWRtoel 

210 

-3 

XI 

2612ft 

BTP 

135 


64 

47 16ft 

Boyer DM50 

2104V 


700 

07 .. 


107 

-1 

10ft 

86 1X1 


141 

•+1 

6tt*7 1B2 

Br BratoX 

2090 


141 


5«™bW 


« . 

01 

4ft 2X1 

coram 

Crwaa aos 

DO A' 

8S5 

182 

150 


10ft 

Oft 

60 

4JI Sft 
4.1 102 
44 94 


21V 

•-V 

1ft 

47 72- 

Crala 

IM 

• . 

too 

X5 160 

Do Dkt 

129 

*+i 

M 

.. 134 

Bb 6 EwmW 

108 

42101 


116 

+8 

4.7 

4.1 1X5 

Foseco+BQMp 

227 

IftS 

67 9ft 

Hatamml «J— ra> 

172 

400 

♦% 

7.1 

21ft 

4.1 as 
00 103 

KoacftoDMSO 

S3'. 




HoR Lloyd 
toracnam tad 


*11 

978 • 

115 

I" » 

s r* 

257 +8 

47 

220 • 

138- 43 


82 89149 
489 44129 
126 34 159 
SA 47189 
09 .. .. 

26 19 219 
37 39 129 

37 27179 

” " 54.7 

114 52 147 

43 XI 125 


CINEMAS AND TV 


aO T76 AntftaTU-A- 
52 27 Oramptae 
2*0 178 HTV fov 
410 263 LWT Lbdgs 
XO 168 S<W TV 
273 148 TVS HfV 
«6 31 T3H 

ZB* 223 Thames TV 
196 168’a TV-AU 
148 104 UbMT TV 
140 144 Yfetat*S TV 


240 +2 139 45 152 

46 +1 29 64 69 

193 • 121 62 69 

410 219 62 189 

33S 159 47 119 

238 143 69 11 J 

40 • 29 69 99 


IBS -10 04 

W3 #-2 as 

147 +2 


-10 64 35 .. 

-2 ftS 52 54 


DRAPERY AND STORES 


177 

•a- a» -1 
130 - -9 

678" 


Browi (K) 

Btrtxi 274 

Cants* ‘A 124 

CWkat 80 

Chaxft 415 

Cera Wyafe 456 
ctnbmed En0Bb Zip 
Coim ITVmJ A 1 131 
210 DAKS SKon A 280 
88 Dawmei IU1 78 

216 Obcnseip 338 

346 Di4MI 566 

73 ebb ft Bdoeran «2 
585 Bya (Wknotedora BOO 
134 En**e Srares 178 

104 EM* _ _ 226 

x Ej*oaa» CWhes 103 

105 F*W AtlOOii T70 

51 Ford 62 

183 feamemr 193 

310 Fraamra 4» 

50 Gant SR 58 

SB Gofefcrag(A) 14S 
172 Ganamms Qp 20* 
830 GUS £M% 

721 DO A 385 

190 HtnOamny 208 
24V Hetata Of London 28 

za HoM 39 

HE House Of Larew f53 

74 Jams (tmouj 8ft 

24 IXH* Pnas 40 

LCP 136 

148 Cbenor w 

L«ny 700 

Uncrafi KSgouf 3*5 
Marks ft Spencsr 158 
MKUM 305 
MbCb BUS 500 

NeH 238 

Owartt) 325 

Perm* 79 

Pmoy fwhaoj 112 
Ratnere (J umirai 22B 
Read (Airag 330 
Do A 153 

SftUSsraa SO 

Son iis>4 

W* T 

ssusu * M 

S taratwwo 90S 


sks? i J 

Ward Whits 330 

W«blB 103 

Mem* 101 

W uu raonn 605 


as sa 22 s 

25 14 282 

X8 49129 
X3 25289 

ao 04 857 

14 29469 
16 .1 XI 284 

08 25 11B 
32 26 99 
XT 59109 

12.1 22 18.7 

173 391X8 
104 59 1S3 
67 XI 97 
86 39 112 

12 1.7 185 

49 U 24.0 
79 14 1X1 
XS 49 10.1 

136 25 232 
69 89 174 

09 2910.1 

15 3 75 

5.7 341X6 

83 49 
109 25 

14 24 

57 39 
107 52 
309 21 
309 XI 
06 82 

29 U 
11 79 
129 79 

30 S3 

1.1 29 

84 47 

10 25 

11.1 12 

117 44 

59 ZB 
62 29 
84 1.7 
U 25 
1X1 49 
1.1 14 

55 49 
49 19 

79 24 

86 59 


235 ace 248 

6* HSR 10 

lift BW 122 

103 SMaad 135 

378 B otahoipa 545 

177V Bi Tatoecra 186 

76 Bdmi Bouari Kart 96 

s 

277 CaHsftMMm 327 

133 Carandgt Bk 218 

178 CAP Op 188 

37 QkMt 40 

M9 Do7V% CPF 206 

21 Cefce ft# 126 

203 Curacao 318 

250 Cray Bact .VS 

■m GmMtt TOO 

48 DdtSact 59 

K7 nmi ro 153 

- 29 QMUSt 29 

20 DO A 26 

3E2 Oenrao 316 

37 Dowaag ft Mk *2 

120 DiftUar 130 

360 BKmxrapooaott 400 

46 SadronB Macti 5* 

42 B ocra te flaaara si 

237 EfflKUBHhB 273 

255 OaiAtaua 270 

147 Famal 3*r3 158 

82 FtanaO 100 

3* fmrartTscn <3 

156 GEC 170 

90 Groaranor 725 


24 14 32.1 
X7 29 179 
39e 22 


ELECTRICALS 


M ISO AH 0BC gb m 

ZX> 120 Atnamenc 

IS? 36 AlUtrad 1W #-2 

89 43 Aprcot Computare 58 

W 63 Alton M _ . 

300 205 Aflame Comp ^25 #-J 

68 « AbCd FnWIjr M 

17": 4 Aimoewtc 16V 

220 VO Auto Sac 188 #-3 


326 • 143 44 186 

2S XI 08 239 

124 e-2 09 04 139 


050 OB 99 
3*2 

*1 19 79 
21.7 


22S K SJgro* 6 Ccwtol23S 

175 JoaesStraed 257 

SS Korn Z75 

220 lae n a klgm* n 238 

12* Lotaca 200 

270 uTaa j» 


51V Ueao BS 
80 McroFbeus 


160 PE to mitai a nta 186 
IB Ptaoom 23 

114 Pntka Fks sw* rr20 
13 pr*tas Laraea N/v run 
ISO Paco 237 

no 00 -A' Ltd wxtao ue 

mv jSTo Rg mv 

118 namac 136 

22 CimK Autonwdoo 50 
MO FtocsJ Bact ISO 

445 Scbotoa {QM B95 
30V Scold dSSoo 36 

sb arc 154 

1*2 Stans M 1BD 

78 Sywwa Dctagnm SO 

12V luK £17% 

170 Tatapbona Rantas ins 


J7* Thom EH 
rro Tiwps.ffW) 

SZ5 TuM£n 

206 US 
170 umacti 


•-ft 1X7 89149 

-8 25 3.1 59 

-15 1X1 19 189 
-6 107 59 108 

-2 596 52 80 

.. 0.1 07 ffi/l 

4ft 08 09 80 
•17 86 XI 179 

#.. 106 49 Hi 
XI 1.1 2U 

-4 .... ns 

39 XI 1X8 
24 09 tSM 
•-J 59 19 MS 

+4 6* 39 12.1 

-ft 49 79 09. 

• .. It U 

.. 19 56 06 

19 87 69 
U 09219 
#.. 91.591ft# 

u uu 

-S 89 '22 184 

.. to .17716 

-2 49 U 149 

• .. BJt U 152 

86 29 149 

-6 XB 29159 

-a 24 24 T89 

+1 19 23 1X0 

-8 81 99109 

39 44109 
+9 17 27 69 

-S 1.0 CA .. 

.. 1X1 MU. 

.. 17.1B 82 574 

• .. 179 79 U. 

• 14 0.7 209. 

-a 154 45 1X5 - 

#.. 14 87234 

• -8 AS 29 169 

07a 091X0 


0.1 02 308 

09 OJ 659 

200 79 95 

79b 97 1Z0 

29 05 SS 
4J 24 .. 
07b ao 114 
575 49 .. 

82 15 122 
22 54 -79 
72 491X1 

XI 24 187 

.. .. 219 

AS 27 149 
329 59 119 

07 19 XO 
XI 14 US 
89 49289 

07 09189 


206 US S3* 

170 LkWacti ITS 

OS utd Laasrn 133 

SIB Uld SetanMb MB 

120 VG raWfuniMiW 437 

225 Vtan MS 

so Men Cage* on 70 

75 wh/bronn Bad ao 

130 Wtamraa Fktng 2 a 

88 Mflgtol Otaay} 163 


FINANCE AND LAND 


1B4 128 AAkan Hubb 181 

178V 71 ’i flwnlinnata 133 

V SSa*™ ^ 

2S3 IM Ctabw 233 

siv 17 EqSTT&ao 23' 

TBS 132 frory ft Skna 133 

10* 153 UatoOs 106 

73 62 NaTtameLom* 73 

95 76 DO ML £80 

148 114 Nanmartat 12s 

223 196 Itanptoaon (Mr 198 


ASDA4A 
WptaoQrtaks 
A me 
AHFbod 


2M #-2 19 01 .. 

143 12 22 80 

133 • .. 8S 52 .. 

215 r+A 

£20 #.. Ill 09 803 

233 • .. 57 24388 


19 A4 279 
69 AS 169 
+1 88b *J 209 

19 29 .. 
+2 600 NU .. 


BirtifanJ (6 ft Pf) 


Hater (Ata« 

Ftetl LCM8 


1 193 *+3 

173 -2 

2SBI • .. 
208 #-ft 
160 
2U 

m2 « 


A6 29179 
29 l(U 500 

11.1 04 184 
87 29 119 
59 4J314 

17.1 XS 1X7 
184 47 79 

.. . *. 2X6. 

HI -Aft XI 
X7 5X1X0 
XI 16 179 
17 39179 

74 67319 
07 IX 159 
20 22 HL7 

57 4J 2X5 

58 5X 05 
1LO 44 1A3 
119 59119 


ntrds 166 

Htodowa HUgi 216 S-ft 


J) 

EW 

sarsoW 

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wirafln 6 Ita a r e ak 
Part Fboda 


ML3 47 179 

S 17 2SJ 
57 158 
19 19 179 
59 29179 
22 16 22.4 

47 29 149 
47 221X0 
46 XI XI 
38 22216 


TaraTitai 

Htaaon 8 PMto 


179 SS 179 
44 IS 207 

79 69366 

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27 49259 

114 40 M9 

89 64-162 

80 39129 
U 32T7-0 

180 45 11.1 
7S 19 257 
49 XI 199 

3X1 67 IV* 

.. .. 60 

AS XI 2X0 
129 491X6 
118b 66 127 

67 uma 


HOTELS AND CATERERS 


15B 33 Fftandk Hotato 138 .. 19 07 879 

«M 3ZB talOWC 446 -10 1X6 XO 150 

288 208 Kmreby Braokn 234 • .. 24 1.1 119 

391 312 Lamrota 30 e-5 189 49 18ft 

5® 447 Lon Part Hate* 52a #.. 149 27159 

100 78' 1 M«*s Chartaa BB XI 24 142 

105 67 pm* Of W He*#* 86 XI 24 159 


PHrtA Of W Herat* B6 
IV Quasm Mora 72 
I Sraoy Morals A' 548 


INDUSTRIALS 

A-D 


230 +3 

172 • 

123 

5 BB »-2 

70 

215 #*7 


191 

270 

305 *02 


21 24 142 
XI 24155 
27 39 169 
50 14 117 

19 29 180 

79 62 159 


Atom** WWr S36 


Asn ft Lacay 

fS!% Eng 8% 

Aiatas 
Anon Rubber 
AgWiro Maas 

BgT OW 


BlfTOw Hepburn 

Bom Tdnepca 


81 SB 
, 510 185 
S3 37V 
375 2S3 
88 40 

283 135 
455 383 
55 63 

388 277’/ 
332 237 
202 MS 
28V 16 
423 260 
310 218 
2QE 128 
174 112 
495 180 
57 40 

303 ISO 
32 M 
2(1 139 
70 <7 

227 150 
443 318 


SO 19 Bentw 
265 223 Berated <SSW) 
ms 85 Bsmtonta 
136 100 Bunk 
562 214 Bssraeta 
B20 310 gwwood 
335 220 B*by (J) 

205 140 BaUto 

123 76 BCtanCJ} 

153 84V Bn# Outtoait 
200 105 O tancp ham Mn 
17* 13* Back Arrow 
I 208 142 Stock (Paw) 

81 M a a draood Hedge 

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353 2 a Boerara 
22 ' . 10V Bomtor toe 
130 16 OrnlheiXt Gib 


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Orator Oma 
Cfraivkig 
CMWH 
GMaty Kra 
CtatofCtomrai 
Ctatton 6on 
Cohan W 
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CamtstaM Tech 
Conc a nrae 
Cora Saonray 

cm 

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Cweor (F> 


Dratos ft Mat A' 

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300 

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180 »-l 

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39 89 1X7 

2X76 as as 

1SB727 .. 
107 5ft T2J 
XS 62 66 
67b 37 19.1 

17.1 42 179 

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9S6 84 9.1 
XI 59 279 
■Jn 191X7 
&6 29319 
06 49 1X7 
34 19 359 

59 44 12S 
XI 59 119 
XB X0 109 

7.1 XI 94 
21 1.1 189 
14 29 7.7 
29b 09 206 
99 291X7 

179 5ft 147 
10.1 44 1X1 


179 79 119 
19 15 99 
XI 49 342 
79 AS 142 
09 142*7 
7.1 XO 18 
74 351X5 
14 07 .. 
11.1 45 109 
17D 65 94 

79 591X6 


as. a 

8 .1 

GUDutfl 277 

Bissau 2*0 

Bwro-Ajtaereon 76 r-2 


capara hxj <2 • 

Capa tad 72 

Carrie Esg 47S 

caraga 96 

Gatoason 31 

Oanal ft Sflaar 5 + v 


19 

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198 -1 

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206 

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70 

273 4ft 
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310 

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283 

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313 248 Eastern Prod 305 aft 

221 158 Euro 176 

277 W BS 388 

43V 29V OW 38 • 

tea lozv Q«o 135 

33V 17% Bectrokj* (At) BT £31V 
M4 52 Hk* « 75 

28% IP. EratarT’ £22 

381 262 Eiami OHea Oar »r -ft 

28% T*V EHCSKK (U# -B- E»’| 

IM 13* esantHMi 183 

177V 118 eucpsao ftodaa 116 -1 

M3 112 Do 5% Prt 138 -2 

342 158 Etwad 216 • .. 

214 124 Enwa 16* m-4 

423 812 BS 303 

55 22 Frton 44 

42 29 Paeon Male tad 32 . 

143 108 Fenner (3% 139 -1 

75 49 FBa ktaira 40 

950 408 Heme 636 -2 

V 36 Ftawfcm 69 

04 M FlaxaSoOW 88 

68 28 Fob# 3* *1 

123 81 Fora* 88 +1 

41V Z7V R£aa 6on N/V 32V • .. 
in 197 r o dra gd ftHanwy 178 -2 

87 48 Franco (Ttaana*) 53 +3 

131 84 GB tat 02 

S S 238 OKU SI ra+1 

0 280 GR 300 

118 80 GertanBW 32 

158 os Guroew fin 

ISO 111 Gtowa 122 

IT* 756V Oaxo 330 -10 


-■ a .. 64 

64 38109 
X6 791X1 
50 53 165 
164 69 139 
2X7 67 IK 

79 XD 179 
. . S . . 192 

65 27 SO 
109 72 92 

1&4 61 

71 s< 1X4 

59 591X7 
12 14 23ft 

119 2.8 129 
29 4S 2X6 
49 54 tax 
I4S X7139 
X6 59 155 

S 47 119 
54 119 
37* 23 .. 
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28 1.1259 
1X0 791X9 

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149 63 97 
69 52 74 
1X7 XT li t 

« 6B 67 

4ft 14J 
104 5ft 87 
06 32 21 J 

79 26 139 
74 84 129 
7.1 39 167 

79 72 1X1 
XI . . 

64 60149 

64 84 1X6 


149 47 7.7 
W.7 61 116 

■9 X7I49 
27 7.1 17ft 

790 59 139 


S S 238 QKN SI ra+1 

0 200 GR 300 

118 80 QtUlBt 32 

158 os Onroaw fin 

ISO 111 Gtowa 122 

IT* 756V Oaxo 330 -10 

344 IM G*Md 270 

50a 250 Gotog K+P 290 

A s ssr*** SS *3 

180 153 Gonna 177 +1 

03 58 V Hat# ProcHton 78 

232 13* Hta EM ZOO • . . 

182 122 Kid 0(0 12* 

285 175 Hate TB3 +3 

290 230 Hakm 245 ^ 

48 23 V Hsapson tad 45 

m 2D Hatanex 40 -3 

201 mi traraai r02 

105 145 DO K CM/ nso 

119 98 Dosvnn 115 

127V115% DO 10% £125'* +% 

260 133 Itamraaara 256 -4 

275 IS Hams (Phdp) 255 
823 421 Hawkar Sktdatoy 438 -4 

SS S? STS— TA 

s ^ ^sr°~ is % 

105 85 **«*(# 1*7 ms 

108 122 (Wval Job 135 
91 82 ttaUfroa 82 -3 

1« H M Lloyd 93 • 

207 148 Hopteim 280 -4 

120 86 I k radaw m -1 

320 234 HoDttagAaaoe 301 
115 88 HUg aoup 108 -2 

873 207 V HAdrai VMraspm 362 
Ml 118 IM 15* #-1 

3is iao laeam ito • .. 

205 3*5 Jidtrane Bdrane 250 
166 96V -rarana Utah 103 

815 473 Jdnon Claenara 520 

2*3 ia Johnson Mattay 216 -ft 

44V 22V Jofaacn ft fB 32V 
345 238 Jdtaaara 310 +8 

MO 68 JOnaa ft n »raa n 102 #.. 

132 87 JounJan (Thonwaj na +3 
29 21 Ml ea aiuj 23 

38 25 Kdon 81 #+V 


88 22 UM 
156V 118 Lara 
323 m 3rd 
75 42 Lawtex 

,TU (Mr 

86 64 LkBMd 
73 53 LkJJta 0=HJ 

35 23 Lpdavfn 
! 240 178 Loo lid toed 
M5 BS Do Did 
■3 MV Lon ft Mho 
238 188 Lor til 
265 159 V low ft Bgoa 
<23 308 MLHdB* 

119 6* MS W 

48 91 MY M atte 


W 

78V +V 


teo 121 Me nta ra ra 
79 <3 irariatton (P6W) 
288 185 McKtataeto 
130 7B Ugsll 
710 485 Man d raiar B» 

2 S SST-'"” 
A a \sr&r*» 

is* 128 mm# Ckraaaa 
91 £ Uatatrax 

784 4S Mtahaa Com 

198 ira IMa 
318 ?T2 Uorgan Ouckra 
*2 20V H a yi a r d 
21 B 135 NarfM 
*1 29 Nrawnao torn 
153 92 rkww TcataS 
133 86 Nod* ft Land 

B6 33 Horan 
2*9 188 Monra 
SI i as once Bact Maeh 
4*8 2*7 Ptrfcar Knod 'A* 

HJ 9V Pwrt*1 JT 
603 393 Paaroon 
38 11 PMC 
143 88 Madam 
87* 332 Psgtw+ummay 
620 MO Pandwrdtad 
M 775 Pttata+as 
*83 311 pamton 
98 SI RMflcConsff 
385 i* Ponato 
33 £16 Rnar C2 h*mri 
3M 238 Powa* Ddfryn 
164 92 PresMdrHtoga 

W 119 RHP 
158 ia Radtort uraat 
589 421 Rv* Org 
23 115 Ramoma Skn* 

138 S3 FUBOtaa (Gl Brtajaj 
900 605 Rackta ■ QBfeasn 
2*5 ns n a j raam om 
<53 200 Read EacuOm 
283 162’* Reed tat 
173 02 na t i on 
91 48 Ranoto 

IS 86 Rastsior 
S20 345 Raura* 

40V 21 Rworws 
00 110 Merita Edo 
SO 53 Rclarfl (L/icxJ 
58 19 RfchaRtocn west 

152 33 Robertson Ra* 

361 151 Robtaaon (Tbomaa} 
SS 30 RocfcWM* 

150 105 DnW 
148 103 fib 'A' 

3 OV RraapUht 
162 116 Ream 
no 63 RusaatA) 


38 17 81 

« IS 

£ *.srr w 

144 IBS Scon Qmntani 
IBS 120 sera Hwtaira 
17D J* Saw ft n obar u en 
164 122 Socurtaor 
154 106 Do ’A' 

184 99 Saewta Ser* 

w** 

i« iCG 
SBO 783 Sam 
57 32 NatMl 
303 100 Sttop&g 
MB 8SV St* Hundred 
500 388 3ta«tay 

132 93 Smto) ft ftopbtw 
41 30 Snenwratrafli 

SB 226 Safer tad 

KB 00 Sag Raima* 

108 *9 Sar GOmp 
BIO 3*5 Sutaf 


6 * +1 

71 +1 

108 # .. 
166 +1 
143 • .. 

72 • ., 

54V S'! 

102 -1 
>05 • 

303 +3 

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Ml -2 

S3 • 

MB -1 
116 #+3 

SO 


11.1 63 1X0 

81 14 „ 

06 03148 

6ft 5ft 66 
7.1 XI . . 
67 X6 lift 
8ft MHO 
tO 61 16.1 
.. • .. 87ft 
XI 66 6ft 

7.1 65 20.1 

Sft 108 14ft 
64 1X363 
1ft 1ft .. 
66 64 6ft 
03 09 .. 

XI 7.1 lift 
20 8ft 75 

1X5 7.1 1X1 

4.1 72 .. 
64 8.1 lift 

17ft 7.1 64 
10ft 33 83 
6ft 64 8ft 
XI XI XI 
4.7 Sft 13ft 
167 1ft 25ft 
12ft 4ft 1X5 
1X5 X1 11.1 
Sft 43 14ft 
10ft 60 1X8 

Sft S3 16ft 
1X3 63 9.4 
64 6ft 93 
143 741X1 
24 1ft 27ft 
1ft 3ft 1X4 

5J| XD 121 
000 48 .. 

02 7.1 .. 

0 0ft .. 
IBftb 3ft 173 
138 6812ft 
207 4ft 9.7 
27 25 84 
64 3ft 307 
IQS 5316ft 

61 67 1BL0 

4ft 25 165 
.. .. 35ft 

43n 62 273 

62 63145 
107 3ft 11.0 
56 68 72 

114 3ft 03 
00 XI XI 

7ft XI 12ft 
XI 18218 

X6 84 1X4 

804 Sft -Ml 
X6 1ft 146 
. . . . 16ft 

lift XB 1X1 
X5 64 Bft 
XS 44155 
14 XI 7ft 
1ft 64 214 

ass 

214 XI 2X1 
66 4517ft 


Oft XI 9ft 
39 3423ft 
93 48 17 
2J 4ft Bft 
XS 52 68 
38 23 260 
aft 6i 5ft 

54 7ft 7ft 
1ft 7ft tft 

148 6# lift 

74 8413ft 

68 28 1X1 
750 29165 
114b 2ft 165 
29 3ft 09 
Iftb 4813ft . 

Sft 2817ft 
2ft Aft XI 
Wft 63 109 

55 52 10 

66 15 261 

43 Bft 7ft 
25 SB 35 
5ft S3 as 

XB 61 .. 

9J 67 21.4 
35 45122 
XT 1121X5 
Sft 6411.7 
113 XI 95 
12ft 48 109 
Ol 03 ISO 
100 7.1 50 
1.4 48 500 

103 70 123 

1.0 03 374 

14 25 588 
1X3 69 105 
1X1 63 7ft 

17.1 45 106 


90 67 185 

285 47 130 
20 05 2*3 

88 07 223 
1X3 48123 
4.1 53 1X5 

103 48112 
29 09400 

21ft BO 107 
1X1 1121X7 

64 4.1 lift 

3ft 27 210 
2X5 44 1X1 
74 43 125 

1ft 1ft 34 
219 11 167 
29 1ft 112 
64 151X5 

88 48133 
29 60 07 

64 541X8 
64 1.1 300 

14 4.1 1IO 

46 34 109 
50 60 98 
. . a . . 2X0 
3ft X8 no 

44ft 

.. ..too 

S X7 74 

83 12 
61 65 9.7 
25 84360 


BB 66 ftonoM 
210 136 SMtaftXnb 

22* 163 sngtsn 
248 150 Sum 
161 90 Sm* Pseflc 'A' 
43 12 Syranora 
221 186 Sj*od* 

587 349 T? 

195 US TMT 
2S0 60 TSL Tbanml 
535 320 Tam 
89 V 33 TSksda Cham 
8% S Tabriz 

SS 6* Teles 
170 118 Tm Htaos 
116 81 TWro Ida 
281 m Utaarara T4» 
336 203 Tcmmrno 

is us iisatfia 

cG zoo Tnraccra*™ 
18E 124 Tmport DW 
22 9% TnowoOd 

ao SB mraia 
144 78 Tdptoa 
2*1 76 Timer 6 NBM6 

139 75 Untaot# 


26 


2fta 8ft 6 l5 

205 

• +7 

100 

4ft 120 

SO 

• . 

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20 706 

75 


17 

4ft 101 

23R 

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08 

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-1 

4.7 

3ft 142 

140 

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108 


40 

2ft 180 

126 


1.4 

1.1 334 

in 


14 

1.1 2L1 

iso 


2ft 

2ft 207 

<7 


Zb 

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122 


as 

32 6ft 

118 


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27132 

56 

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14 

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02 82 

96. 

441 


200 

8ft 113 
0717ft 

05% 




113 

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3ft 

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36 

340 

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1.1 34ft 
261X7 

178 


6ft 

4ft 105 

182 

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BS 

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7ft 

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85 

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510 

+5 

200 

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428 

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19ft 

45100 

90 


3ft 

4321ft 

235 


17.1 

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70 


60 

123 7ft 

138 

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208 

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216 

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168 B-l 

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158 +£ 

83 *7 

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120 -7 

115 -1 

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309 -2 

281 *1 

220 +1 

180 #-i 

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£8 *4 

138 

174 #+l 


145 62 160 
ZOO 45148 

is 43 45 
1X6 381X4 

68 

44 XS 66 
64 63 108 

XI 27 126 


1X9 67 7ft 

0.7 62TOS 
63 62 155 
335 

0.1 0*610 
2ft XI 14.7 
107 XI 67 
13 17 184 


19 'a 13% 
98% 56V 
298 212 
540 293 
130 162 
185 120 
20*V1S*'f 

163 136 
205 116 
10 1£l 
2*5 156 
66': 29 
M4 69 
>96 in 
see 239 
154 SS 
231 174 
56V 14'; 
110 » 
110 78 
3BS 210 
13* 82 

283 177 
MB 1S5 
740 395 
180 120 
596 428 
Bf 56 
46 26 
SI 43V 
as 58 
178 MO 


«dm 

wear Prodwa 

Verne 

Votawagrai 

wsa. 

VIS. 

Warn Rwanda 
Wagon to 
HtofearfCMfl 


Crap 

_ _ c* 1VS 

Prof Cn »> pmu pie 

£18% SXS 2 ft 178 

or.- -Ta 

2*8 *1 75 £9137 

MO • 30ft 53 110 
11C 71 6ft 68 

137 25 1.7 23ft 


-23 44 

12.1 

XI 

1-1 19 

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43 145 

P-1 4ft 
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45 

79 

1.5 3ft 
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M3b 

P-l 90 

+5 200 . 

i .. ax 

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*5 36 


19?S 

mjr> u « CV-rafjfl, 


Fin- Ch Jr phk»- 


wmmera e I ta 
Wfttvn Eng 
Toung (H) 


INSURANCE 


226 *77 AbbwldP 
a 22 £»* Ain 

360 55a 1 . Abenr Vara 
^ 23 Am Gan 
<05 223 BrctatacK 
917 797 Bntsmc 
336 226 Caa Uarai 
301 223 Eowiy 4 Law 
3S2 19* FA1 
954 iTJi Gan Aeodem 
85* T20 QBE 
708 427 HsafllCE 
348 267 Heap Rotation 
2B8 222 LegS 4 Geo 
22* 173 Landrai 8 Man 
**3 257 Lon Lint taw 
86% 28’* Marsh 6 McleP 
265 220 tan* 

348 223 PWS 
16% 12 Paarl 
»<2 716 Pi u aantel 

415 321 SeogmcK Gp 


927 772 Sun L4S 
550 120 Trade Manmty 
4M 384 W4b Faoar 

kiwuiuiuu Trusts 


191 

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£25 


TOO 

40 

2781 

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170 

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23 200 

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447 

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261 

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199 

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349 

72 73 

342 

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137 

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196 

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220 

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257 

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114 

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330 

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782 

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368 

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204 

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360 

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40 172 

481 

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410 

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■77 

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193 

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2.7 70 

479 

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120 

2ft 227 


r on Pag* 30 


M4 90 
220 12B 
16* 96 
61 St 
Z25 150 
410 325 
82 V <9 
■1 80 
128 S3 
131 94 

wa 37 
160 137 
169 IX 
391 278 
403 320 

A A 

360 MS 
1«3 119 
74 »1 

185 CBV 


LEISURE 

Ban A WA 'A' 125 • 

Boaser 6 HawUS ITS 
tan Mir 18* *4 

Canaan ei #43 

Dm d t im 

FMUtm 368 • 

GRA 54 

noffuuop cmn dd 
M onism naval 1Z2 

tot Laraea 116 

Jutant s HUga 49 • . 

Lea tad 186 • 

Maaetaaiw 150 

naaraarana 311 

Raabv Usetul <01 

Rsejr Lamas 47 

Sngi Hobday* ISl 

Sarnuabon Gp 148 

Stantn Leisure M2 

Tooenrtam Hots 


100 60 8ft 

.. ..3X2 

7ft 43 142 
1.4 2ft ffcJ 
60 43 10ft 
Sft 2ft 109 
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s* til? 

18 371X1 
3 ft 24 M3 

iii 3ft isft 
161 40 16ft 

. * 232 

66 50 11 1 

it 23 as 

46 32 . 

. . • . . 125 
7.1 3ft 107 


MINING 


E Rand Goto 
E Rwa Prop 
FBCone 
PS Dev 
Geevor Tta 

Graeaf 

G»Uk*ng 

GFSA 

gm Kagood 

Gopwg 


13V 3V Ang Aerar Co# 
11% 530 Ang Am 
03 31 Am Gold 

50 33 AMT 

40 22 AlMoaaal 

41 22 fib' A' 

1S6 120 AwHltall 
425 238 B^voora 
166 80 Brratae 

21V 9% Burma 

366 Szfl CRA 
89 39 cap Boyd 
062 409 Cat* Gatatakto 
563 31* Da Been 
2*8 105 OeeBoeal 
9V 4'. DoorotORtata 
18% 7 Drtokmrata 
B V, Dnbei 
290 160 E OtDOB 


205 129 

206 85 
390 200 

SH Z'. 

W 4% 

£13 83 
75 17 
8% 4'* 
10V 6 
10% 5% 
713 313 
S3 35 

148 85 

375 165 
158 91 

9% 4% 
400 175 
B7V 47V 
12V 5% 
BV 2*a 
ISO 65 
13% 6% 
473 170 
157 5* 

23 15 

123 00 
6* 14V 
26 5V 
8% 4V 


5% 2V HAM 
M2 73 im Broken HB 
70 25V NBlKUtart 
84’. 10% Orange Tree 
128 65 Reamg Tin 
305 2D* Petaitemiil 
25 6% Rand UtoaaUd 

445 170 Rsid kfcnea Prop 
7SV 16 RmdfMMH 
376 225 Rentson 
781 511 RIZ 
BV 4V Rustattmrg 
HJV 5% 81 Helena 
168 88 SA Land 
31 141, Souftwaat 

556 273 satoneta 
138 70 Sorvjal Bee 

138 73 Tronoh 
509 300 Unoel 
B2V 31V Vast Raeto 
950 233 Vanrarapos 
138 SO Vtoktonww! 

X 35 VagaS 
17 10V Wanda Coeary 

038 288 Watran 
313 128 Wmam Aram 
30% 15 WB M W ' I Deep 
£19 114 W asran Mnrg 
208 108 Wes Rand Cons 
280 U WhraCnm 
17% 7 V Mtakato 
56 20 VW Kigel 

16V 10% ZtaiSId Copper 
71 26 Zwidpra 


ktotaysrah Itang 
Msait E*P 


£4% ... 57-1 

£10% 540 Sft 

£54 440 63 

£55 M'i 771 49 

£33 -3 M2 aft 

S -3 142 O 

.. 47ft 3X6 

STD +10 7X0 214 

135 .. 2X0 19ft 

Sp ta * r 

S # -10 35 0 Sft 1X1 

+1 1X0 XS 

206 *6 4ft 1ft 

IB'. -'a S2ft 11.1 

niv i26 109 

Il3 +80 120 2ft . 

203 • . 00 Sft 14.1 

193 . . 14ft 72 . 

338 0+5 260 SS 


-'* 6X0 &3 

+% 870 BA 

.. 460 50 

+5 . . 

20ft 526 

54ft 2X4 
SA 37 32ft 
(£6 7.6 
17ft 4ft 
r -V 345 4ft 
. 8X0 xa 

0 ■ 40ft 7.0 
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115 XB 


+% .. .. 

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. ( . 2X0 XI 

+ 'a ! 

+10 .. 0 .. 

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♦1 12ft 42 79 
-’* 561 XO 

+11 

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28ft 34 5X4 
♦V 125 1X8 
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MOTORS AND AIRCRAFT 


231 81 AC 

351 138 AE 
20V 7 A teJuraJ w i 
163 75 V Apptoywd 
1<l 70 V Amatrorn 

53V 3*V BSG 

Bkraat Bros 
3M 135 Brraital (C» 

60S 42i Br Aerospace 
151 BO Br Car AucSOOa 
273 i» Caftym 
215 79 Cow* m 

133 99 Dawn (Godkay) 

241 172 Dowry 
115 38 ERF 

3S7 2S3 FB Onp 
213 125 tad Mow 
98 68 Gataa (Frank G) 

2 90 211 Ganaru Motor 
100 51 Gtanfiecl Lawrence 

114 68 Hairarafc 

E08 373 Honda Mctor 
583 336 Jaguar 
142 72 jaw rrn 

126 SS Kw*-^n 
«C 289 La* 

205 80 WOW 
653 470 Lucas 
Ml 111 Parry gp _ 

91 68 PtoibnstGS) 

HE 51 Ota* (HJ) 

71 3 Roara 

77 <3 Supra 
110 SS Watafaad 
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225 

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XI &4 80 
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64 5.4 1X8 

64 34 Bft 

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14 SJO 130 
43 62 288 
1/C 1ft 116 


NEWSPAPERS AND 
PUBUSHERS 


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419 258 
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Pearson 2co 736 

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250 56 363 

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138 Bwtvomj 
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153 Bitall 
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TEXTILES 


573 200’: 
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THE TIMES WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 1 5 1986 


UNIVERSITY OF LONDON/1 



A SPECIAL REPORT 


- A touch of class 


from the Clyde 
to the Seine 


At a time of major 
change, London 
University, with 
its 50 colleges, 
celebrates its 
150th anniversary 


London University is vast All its 
SO colleges and institutions cannot 
even be found on the capital’s A-Z 
street guide. It needs a map of the 
Home Counties to encompass 
them geographically. 

They can be found near Wind- 
sor in the west and Stepney in the 
east, from beyond Potters Bar in 
the north to Ashford in the south. 

Even that map does not suffice 
for there are institutions on the 
Clyde and on the banks of the 
Seine. 

With 40,000 internal and 24,000 
external students, it is the largest 
university in the country. 

Il is renowned not only for its 
scholarship and pursuit of aca- 
demic excellence in the human- 
ities and the social sciences, in 
medicine and law, science and 
technology, but also in its research 
work. 

Its disciplines and resources 
range from the esoteric, such as 
astrophysics, to the practical prob- 
lem. pioneered by the Royal 
Veterinary College, of using car- 
bon fibre to replace tendons in 
racehorses. 

Medicine, the physical and bio- 
logical sciences, mathematics and 
computing, engineering, together 
with other subjects of direct 
vocational relevance, constitute 
about 75 per cent of the 
university's subjects for full-time 
students. 

In financial terms. 82 percent of 
its departmental expenditure is for 
medical, scientific and vocational 
work, but claims on the overall 
budget are not to be Judged as 
yardsticks of importance. 

The university lays much store 
on its pursuit of academic ex- 
cellence in the smaller humanities 
departments, carrying out teach- 


ing and research, of. great im- 
portance and making “a 
contribution to national life out of 
proportion to their costs". 

It is celebrating its 150th 
anniversary at a time of dramatic 
change and challenge brought 
about by the demands of society 
and the imposition of economic 
constraints not contemplated a 
decade ago. 

The university is a federation of 
decentralized autonomous col- 
leges, schools and institutions, 
best described in a naval meta- 
phor conjured up by its vice- 
chancellor. Lord Flowers, a 
nuclear physicist who has sat on 
royal commissions and a leading 
academician. 

“The head of each college and 
school is Lhe captain of his ship 
and I suppose 1 am the Admiral of 
the Feet,” he said of bis role 
which is different from that of 
most vice-chancellors. He has no 
powers of hire or fire of senior 
academic staff; that is for the 
boards of governors of each 
college and school. 

But that does not mean he is just 
a figurehead. As vice-chancellor 
he sees himself as the local 
chairman of the University Grants 
Committee distributing, with his 


Lord Fowers said that the 
-university is building on the 
achievements of the process of 
rationalization by developing the 
individual strengths of the institu^ 
lions which make up his “fleet”. 
The objective has been that they 
should complement, rather than 
duplicate, each other in their 
teaching and research, both m 
what is done and how ft is done. 

The federation, with its mani- 
fold disciplines of teaching and 
research, can now be refined 
broadly into four categories. 


First, there are the multi-faculty 
lieges such as University Cot- 


colleges such as University Col- 
lege. King's. Queen Mary in the 
Mile End Road (the “University 


of the East End’T and Royal 
Holloway and Bedford New Col- 


Developing the 
individual strengths 
of the institutions 


colleagues in the University 
Court, the annual funds handed 
down in a lump sum to the 
university and. through the sen- 
ate. maintaining and improving 
academic standards. 

Since 1981. the university has 
been going through a vigorous 
restructuring programme to take 
account of radically changed fund- 
ing. Like most other universities, 
London has suffered something 
like a 30 per cent cut in real terms 
during the past decade. 

It has meant a two-fold process 
of rationalization: the transfer of 
many of the small departments 
and concomitant changes within 
institutions, and amalgamations 
of some of the mini-faculty 
schools. 


Holloway and Bedford New Col- 
lege, the result of an amal- 
gamation last 'year and based ax 
Egham in Surrey. 

Mosl of these operate m a wide 
variety of undergraduate and post- 
graduate studies, but others, such 
as the London School of Econom- 
ics and Political Science and die 
Imperial College of Science and 
Technology, concentrate on their 
own specialized disciplines. 

Second, there are specialized 
colleges such as the School of 
Oriental and African Studies, the 
School of Pharmacy, the Institute 
of Archaeology and the Institute of 
Education, which, is Britain's larg- 
est graduate school for teachers. 

Third, there are the medical and 
denial schools. London Univer- 
sity trains one in every three 
doctors and an even higher 
proportion of dentists. Some of 
the medical schools are integral 
parts of multi-faculty colleges, 
others are individual chartered 
institutions. 

Guy's and St Thomas's hospital 
medical schools, together with the 
Royal Dental School merged to 
become the United Medical and 
Dental Schools or. as it is known 
internally among the academics, 
“Southwark United**. 












[•• - t,t~. V - 


The vice-chancellor of the University of London, Lord Flowers, left with the portrait of the first vice-chancellor, Sir John Wil- 
liam Lubbock. Top, the Senate House in Bloomsbury and, above. Royal Holloway and Bedford New College. Top right. Cordon 

Square, Bloomsbury, and the Middlesex Hospital 


Fourth, there are the senate 
institutes such as the Warburg 
Institute, concerned with lhe his- 
tory of the classical tradition, the 
Institute of Advanced Legal Stud- 
ies and the Courtauld Institute of 
Art. 

But London University also has 


the capacity and resources, built 
up over the years, to make an 
extraordinarily wide provision for 
continuing education, whether it 
is through its External System, the 
Department of Extra-mural Stud- 
ies or Birkbeck College, a unique 
institution in the history of adult 
education, providing leaching in 
the evenings for those in fun-time 
employment 

Or. as another example, through 
Goldsmiths' College which re- 
ceives its grants direct from the 
Department of Education and 
Science for courses in the arts, 
education, music and science, but 
may well, if current talks succeed, 
become an integral part of the 
university. 

London University, with its 
long history of being at the 
forefront of continuing education, 
has just appointed Professor 
Dorothy Wedderbum as pro-vice- 
chancellor to study how best its 
resources can be used to provide, 
in the words of Lord Fowers, “a 
whole package in the way of 
objectives and funding" 


Continuing education has al- 
ways had its own special problem 
over funding because, as Professor 
Brian Groombndge, director of 
the extra-mural department which 
provides more than 750 courses a 
year, puts it. there is the “sinister 
sy llogism that if ft is ‘continuing* 
then the financial resources will be 
there. It is not like that at air. 

But the demand for continuing 
eduation is intensifying to meet 
the requirements of a more com- 
plex technological society, said 
Lord Fowers. 

“People in industry and com- 
merce need constant updating — 
and by that I don't mean giving an 
employer a short u me on so that 
the equivalent of a micro-chip can 
be inserted in him — in order that 
they can keep pace with the 
changes developing around them 
and consequently be able to make 
a greater contribution.” 

He mentions, as an illustration, 
the rapid development of fibre- 
optic technology which will trans- 
form communications in less than 
a decade. It is something on which 


the university is rolling forward 
frontiers with the development of 
Livenet. an audio- visual system 
which will link five colleges and 
allow inter-active communication 
across London and joint participa- 
tion in seminars, courses and 
tutorials. 

Its potential for the develop- 


A long history 
of being at 
lhe forefront 


facilities at its computer centre. 

The research programmes ax the 
university constitutes a significant 
proportion of Britain's total re- 
search work. It carries out 28 per 
cent of UK research funded by 
grants and contracts. 

In some areas the university’s 
contribution is extremely high: in 
clinical medicine as much as S3 
per cent of university research; in 
engineering 22 per cent; and in 
computer sciences another 22 per 
cent. 


menu if not the transformation, of 
education is inestimable. 

Throughout the university there 
is a deep consciousness of its 
national responsibihics. This is 
inevitable when it provides 1 2 per 
cent of Bntish full-time under- 
graduates and 20 per cent of 
postgraduate places. 

There is also a high proportion 
of research work in most fields, 
together with specialized services, 
including national computing 


Although federal in its structure^., 
the university encourages inter-* 
disciplinary, not simply inter- 
collegiate. co-operation with 
specialists in most fields, being 
available to form joint research 
teams within the framework ot the 
university. 


Groups of scientists in micro- 
electronics are involving special- 
ists in electronic engineering, 
phvsics. chemistry, mathematics 
and linguistics. Biotechnology re- 
quires the skills of biologists. 

CAncinwd on next page 


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Dr. John Cherry’ lectures in classical 
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Since standard typewriters and word- 
processing systems aren't able to produce the 
icons and letters of either modem or andent 
Greece, twice as mudi work was required. 

As Dc Cherry explains, "I bad lo write aD the 
Greek pans of my notes, business letters and 
research papers by hand. Then a secretary 


6dd project in Greece, together with colleagues 
from unireraiies in the USA and Greece. - 


This inwhes collecting 
large amounts of data frooLp 
various archaeological 
sites, and recording - 
it in notebooks. £ 

The information is - 
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composed with foe help of advanced page- 
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mil on foe Apple LaserWriter" as 
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This method wiB not only 
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His Apple Marirtosh* has oow mad% 
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and modem Greek fonts, including 

Myeenaean Linear BscriptThe Macintosh ~ 
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Roman characters can be mixed _ 
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DtCheny says this system allow ttim 
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A typical entry would describe a 
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I and transform them into graphical 
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Dc Cherry makes quite extensive 
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As Dc Cherry says of 
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* i 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 15 1986 





Trust Alice to help out 
with the scientists 


Science and industry have an 
ambivalent relationship i n 
Britain. Industry wants 
academia’s ideas and its prod- 

*** is slow 
to adopt them. 

JSPV* i }° of stories 

about American companies 
{caving their British compet- 
n 9ff ^Hd'ng. prevaricating, 
while they rush in with money 
and contracts to capitalize on 
new ideas. 

say the critics. 


. — - — «»u« a project 

has reached at least prototype 
stage and preferably well 
beyond. 

Scientists can be stand- 
offish when industry does 
come on to the campus. The 
money it brings is welcome, 
but there is a fear that if 
industry becomes too in- 
volved in a particular project 
the universities may find their 
science and technology pro- 
grammes being driven by the 
short-term needs of industry. 

But both sides are learning. 
The Science for Industry Ex- 
hibition, which forms part ot 
London University’s 1 5Gtb 
anniversary, tries to show how 
the two are cooperating to 
develop major new products, 
services and techniques. 

The relationships vary — 
sometimes industry will have 
funded the research, some- 
times it will be the customer 
or potential customer. 

The exhibition, at Imperial 
College in South Kensington, 
contains some remarkable 
work. 

• Alice. Not a lady but an 
acronym, behind which lies a 
remarkable device that could 
give Britain a major advan- 
tage in the race for the so- 
called fifth generation 
computers — ‘intelligent" mar- 
chines that will be able to 
process knowledge and 
information rather than just 
crunch numbers. 

The letters stand for Ap- 
plicative Language Idealized 
Computing Engine and the 
machine, developed by Im- 
perial College's Dr John 
Darlington, embodies a new 
way of thinking about 
computers. 

Until now computers have 
worked sequentially, the 
instructions in the program 
being canted out one at a 
time. That is alright as fer as it 
goes, but there are physical 
limits to how fast a computer 


can operate and we are near 
the limits with our present 
machines. 

So. bearing in mind that the 
ptwer of a computer is in part 
a function of its speed, where 
do we go now? 

Dr Darlington and his team 
realized that if the problem 
could be divided between a 
series of processors operating 
in parallel then the speed 
limitation would go. 

The trick with Alice is that 


sore can dip into a **pooP of 
work, take out a small packet 
of work, then, when that part 
of the work has been done, 
return it to the pool. 

• X-ray microscopy. The 

microscopes most or us use 
are based on visible light. One 
step up from that, and used for 
sophisticated scientific work, 
is the electron microscope 
which sends a beam of elec- 
trons rather than a beam of 
light through the specimens 
being examined. 

Electron microscopes are 
remarkable, but they have 
their limitations. Beams of 
electrons are scattered easily, 
for example, by watery 
environments. So they are not 
much use for examining such 
things as living cells. 

To overcome such prob- 
lems, scientists have been 

Astonishment at 
the spin-off 
from their work 

developing X-ray micro- 
scopes. Because of the rel- 
atively high penetration of soft 
X-rays through living ma- 
terial. it should be possible 
using the X-ray microscope to 
look directly at phenomena 
like dividing cells and cell 
replication. 

Two basic dements are 
needed for the X-ray micro- 
scope. First, a source of high 
intensity soft X-rays of high 
brightness. Last month, sci- 
entists from King's College 
collaborated with researchers 
at the Science and Engineering 
Research Council’s Daresbuiy 
laboratory, Warrington, to key 
an X-ray microscope into the 
only source in Britain capable 
of providing that 
This is the synchrotron, a 
type of particle accelerator 
that is still rare. 

The other essential dement 




FOCUS 


UNIVERSITY OF LONDON/2- 


is a means of focussing the X- 
rays. You focus light with glass 
lenses. Bui a glass lens has two 
problems for soft X-rays. 

First, the X-rays have in- 
sufficient penetration to get 
through. Second, even if they 
did get through, the bending 
properties of the lens would be 
insufficient for the X-rays to 
be focussed 

So a different principle has 
to be used and it is in this that 






i; n , •‘• 'jr- 


.rypo J , . f — > • - 

- '** ^ - 






“-N 




‘particularly successful. They 
have devised a means of 
building a focussing element 
using evaporated gold which 
uses the principle of diffrac- 
tion 10 focus the X-ray beam. 

This new type of micro- 
scope will fill the gap between 
the optica] and the electrical 
microscope. 

The light microscope can be 
used to examine living ma- 
terial but its sensitivity to 
specimen detail is relatively 
poor. The electron microscope 
can look much more closely at 
such detail but the specimens 
used are in a vacuum and 
therefore dead. 

The X-ray microscope will 
provide a good intermediate 
possibility — an opportunity 
to look at living materials with 
a resolution which is 10 times 
better than that given by the 
best optical microscope. 

ft is expected to be an 
m valuable tool in cell and 
molecular biology and to be 
taken up rapidly in materials 
science and polymer science. 

• Artificial bones. What do 
you do if bones need to be 
replaced? Normally the solu- 
tion is to use metal — like the 
stainless steel in artificial hip 
joints. But the bone in our 
bodies is constantly renewing 
itself in response to the forces 
we apply in everyday life, 
when we walk, for instance. 

Introducing a metal implant 
reduces the force felt by the 
bones beside it and in time 
bone will disappear from the 
body. This leads to a loosening 
of the imp.EanL 

To try to overcome this 
problem scientists at Queen 
Mary College have devised a 
composite material made of 
polyethylene and hydroxyapa- 
tite (one of the constituents of 
natural bone) which is much 
closer in its properties to that 
of the natural tissue. 


■ 



The result is a much more 
stable combination of natural 
bone and implanL 

• Super-tough surfaces. The 
surface properties of almost 
any solid material can be 
changed using an unusual 
technique known as ion im- 
plantation. Ions of a particular 
chemical species are injected 
into the surface. 

They are imbedded and 
thereby strengthen the atomic 
matrix of the material. This 
makes the surface banter, 
more wear-resistant and often ! 
more corrosion-resistant. 

Researchers in the Depart- | 
ment of Mechanical Engineer- . 
ing at King’s College are 
examining how the technique I 
can be used to improve en- 
gineering components. 

• Technology transfer. Sci- 
entists and engineers 
specializing in one area are 
sometimes astonished at the 
spin-off from their work. 

A particularly notable 
example of technology trans- 
fer is the work of the Eastman 
Dental Hospital where 
researchers are studying the 
use of carbon fibre reinforced 
carbon (the material used in 
Concorde’s brakes) for total 
root replacement in dental 
surgery. 

Malcolm Brown 


:! ; .i 


A touch 
of class 

Continued from previous page 

chemical engineers, physicists 
and others. 

The Faculty of Medicine, 
embracing medicine, den- 
tistry. veterinary studies and 
pharmacy, is an unrivalled 
centre of excellence for both 
basic and applied research. It 
constitutes the most im- 
portant research base in Brit- 
ain and has few rivals 
internationally. 

Now the schools and in- 
stitutes within the faculty are 
collaborating in 400 projects. 

The whole is unified 
through the central machinery 
of court and senate, councils 
and boards. These are the 
bodies which bring together 
teachers and students, college 
heads and graduates from 
every pan of the federation 
and serve as its democratic 
“government”. 

It is through this machinery 
that the university's un- 
matched talents are used to 
the best advantage of learning 
in educational cultural and 
industrial life, nationally and 
internationally. 

Michael Hatfield 


-*<• 












Hi-tech support: Dr Richard Field, the director of the Computer Centre 

Chipping in on hi-tech 


When microcomputer sy stems were introduced 
some years ago to provide a general service in 
universities, the demise of the huge mainframe 
computer was predicted. The prediction has 
proved very wrong. 

Since it was first set dp in 1968, the work of 
the London University Computer Centre has 
continued to grow. Its capacity became so 
saturated with work that a new Cray computer 
has been installed, and its Amdahl is being 
replaced by another model of the same make 
which is six times more powerful. 

Dr Richard Field, the centre’s director, said 
the department is handling one million jobs a 
year, the longest perhaps fasting an hour. 

Although die Cray is the more specialized 
system, it is used in a variety of disciplines 
from ail over Britain. The Amdahl with its 
extensive range of software, is used primarily 
in the university. 

More than 40 London University sites are 
connected to the centre by a variety of terminal 
arrangements. It is also linked to most other 
major university computer centres and to the 
Rutherford Appleton Laboratories via Na- 
tional Packet Switched Data Networks. 

The centre, which has a staff of 140, was 
established to provide a service for education 
and research. Although H is used by most 
universities in Britain, the major portion of its 
resources is allocated to 13 universities in the 
south of England as well as the schools and in- 
stitutions of London University. 

High-quality graphical output can be ob- 
tained mi 16mm and 35mm film in both 
monochrome and colour using a Drcomed 


system which is especially suited to the- 
se iteration of accurate diagrams, colour slides 
and animated film sequences. 

Large print files can be produced on 
microfiche and a Knrzweil intelligent-input* 
system is available for translating, printed, 
material into computer-processable form. : 

The centre provides technical and software - 
support services. They* include a program 
advisory service for users, a variety of courses ■ 
on the I'LCC services, and the support of a' 
wide variety of compilers, applications and 1 
graphics software. 

Dr Field said there is increasing pressure on 
the centre to provide more services of every 1 
kind. While further hardware resources can be 
bought and installed, it is the demand for more 
advice, packages, further courses and im- 
proved network facilities that are sometimes 
difficult to provide. 

Such services require manpower and the _ 
possibility of enlarging amplification within ‘ 
the fixed number complement of staff is 
minimal, he said. It is a problem which has . 
been exacerbated by the increasingly clear 
evidence of the shortfall in university salaries,- 
compared with those in the computing 
industry. 

Recruiting staff has been a problem, 
particularly in key areas such as teleoommuiu- i 
cations, IBM operating systems and compiler 
support, but Dr Field is confident the centre 
will be able to meet the growing demands on its 
resources. 

MH 


Well be helping die Unive] nsity stay in touch 

for another century and a halt 




»N 


London University now boasts nearly 
3,000 BBC Micro’s and 32 bit workstations. 

A far cry from the quill pens and 
carrier pigeons used to communicate in 1836. 

There’s no doubt we’ve made up for 
lost time. 

Econet local area networks are allow- 
ing college departments and whole universities 
to exchange information and data. 

Many of our joint projects have had 
practical applications. 

Wye College in Kent, has been using 
Acorn computers to examine strategies for 
land use in response to agricultural over 


production and we have been working closely 
with Barts Hospital to develop computer- 
aided learning systems for medical students 
and nurses. 

Most exciting of all, London, with the 
help of Acorn Econet X25 Gateway (a col- 
laborative venture with QMC) , is now in touch 
with other centres of learning around the 
world via the National Joint Academic and 
Research Network (JANET) and other X25 . 
networks in the UK, Europe and America. 

If the past five years have seen deve- 
lopments such as these, the next 150 will be 
rewarding indeed. 




The choice of experience? 


I .'« i mfiulrr. I id_ h+S V, mu r Li-l Ruud. Ijnhrnlp- * B.~i Rl’IJ.Irlrph'in- n 1 ‘ I 21 -H| | 






34 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 15 1986 


J 


Further information: 


INSTITUTE OF EDUCATION 

UNIVERSITY Of LONDON 

The Institute is a leading centre for research and advanced studies in education. Its 
international reputation attracts students and scholars from all parts of the worfd. 

Research aid leaching 

The quality, range and innovative character of die Institute's research 
are recognized as outstanding and are reflected in the grants it receives 
from a variety of funding bodies. The Institute's range of courses in educa- 
tional studies includes: 

• initial teacher education for graduates 

• in-service courses for teachers, with a variety of advanced diplomas, 
the BEd degree for serving teachers, short and special courses 

• Master's degrees: MA, MSc. MEd 

• Research degrees: MPhil. PhD 

• international summer school 

Conference and Arts Centre facil it i e s 

The Institute's location in central London makes it a popular venue for 
conferences and other events. Its facilities include: - • - 

• the University of London Logan Hail (capacity 9331 

• other halls and well -equipped meeting rooms 

• catering 

• space for arts and other exhibitions 

• hall of residence for vacation conference accommodation 


IIIHHIIII CM CO UCIMfli i 
of London, 

to Bedford Way, 
loodon WCiB ML 

(tetephooc OHM 1800) 




Utuvasiry ofLoodon 


Roya! Postgraduate Medical School 


at Hammersmith Hospital 

RPMS is the only mulfrdisdpliriary postgraduate medical school in the 
United Kingdom. It is a leading centre for medical research and 
education and is one of only two university medical institutions rated 
by the University Grants Ccmxaxittee as outstanding across the whole 
field of its research activities. 

Less than half of the School's finances now come from Government 
sources, our research in particular depends on alternative funding. 
Founded in the austere years of the 1930's RPMS has little endowment 
donations and legacies will enable us to maintain the scale and quality 
of our research. 

In just over 50 years, amongst many other achievements it was: 

• The birthplace of open heart surgery, 

• The home of the first linear accelerator used in the 
tre atm e nt of cancer. 

• The first in Britain to use the artificial kidney and a 
pioneer in kidney transplantation, 

• A leading centre of develo pm e n t in the care and 
treatment of premature babies. 

Our Jubilee Appeal concentrates on the support of our continuing 
RESEARCH in these four areas of heart disease, cancer, trans- 
plantation (particularly kidney and bone-marrow) and the care of 
the new-bom child, and on support of our TEACHING role. 

WE NEED FINANCIAL HELP TO 
MAINTAIN OUR RECORD OF SUCCESS 

For further information please contact John Williams at our 
Jubilee Appeal Office, RPMS, Du Cane Road, London W12 OHS 
Tel: 01-740 3245 or send donations to the same address. 

Charity exempt from registration. 


UNIVERSITY COLLEGE 
L0ND0N-REP0RT 1986 

Discovery of a major 
Egyptian Tomb. 

Satellite experiments 
on Halley’s Comet. 

Rapid progress in creating 
a new joint Medical School 

Front Quadrangle 
completed after 159 years. 

Overseas students from 
more than 100 countries. 


The capital city also hus I he 
best of the country 's facilities in 
terms of libraries and oilier 
resources 

UCL h. is buill a ropul. it'on and 
structure Ih d rjsvos it l tho 
si. tlus of a un.vei.-wlv Vviih.n 
Lonrjk in University 


This college has done 
extremely weli during the year 
A lew of its many achievements 
are shown above 

One of its key advantages «s 
in the number of those m 
professional practice who 
contribute to the teaching 

w:;m 

: 

. .. - : 


• \ t • • \ i 

UNIVERSITY COLLEGE LONDON (inwcrb'IrfutLomiunWCIl UBI 



UNIVERSITY OF 
LONDON/3 


f( FOCUS D 



sv 


: London; Professor Dorothy WedderW i, Pro rise- chancellor and Principal of**,* 
, f^inc^al of Qoeen Mary College; DrD^vid llamas, De^ /. zz 

London 1 T . . 


Industrial links nulled in £lft0ttt 


■’* Pi 

..-3 


London University is not an 
ivory tower of long-hair 
academics. as one senior 
administrator pul it, but an 
institution which has to live 
hand-in-glove with industry 
and commerce. 

This is not only for the 
essentia] monetary benefits it 
brings, but for the cross- 
fertilizaiion of skills and re- 
sources it provides. 

In hard cash terms, the 
university's funding through 
research grants, contracts and 
commercial enterprises, fells 
not fer short of £100 million. 
It can range from astrophysics 
to planting a plate in a 
racehorse's leg. 

Its schools and institutes 
have manifold links with in- 
dustry and commerce. The 
latest annual figure for re- 
search council grants and 
contracts was £33 million, and 
from industry and commerce, 
local authorities and other 
services £40 million. 

Bui there is also the work 
undertaken by the medical 
schools, for example, the 
School of Oriental and Asian 
Studies, and the London 
School of Economics. 

Some of the colleges and 
schools have been involved in 
imaginative and long-term 
enterprises with outside 
companies. 

Imperial College, for in- 
stance, has been closely in- 
volved with ICL and Plessey 
in the development of an 
advanced fifth -gene rati on 
computer, the prototype now 
housed in the college building 
across the road from the 
British Science Museum. 

The colleges and institu- 


tions dealing with medical 
sciences have established, 
over many years, collabo- 
rative ventures with research 
■ councils, companies and 
organizations leading to grants 
covering medicine, dentistry, 
veterinary studies and 
pharmacy. 

In the biological sciences, a 
university-wide profile of bio- 
technology research has been 
created which is expected to 
lead to increased collabora- 
tion in this area. 

Imperial College and the 
London School of Hygiene 

Exploiting the 
market potential 


and Tropical Medicine are co- 
operating with the University 
of Nijmegen, the Netherlands, 
in the investigation of trans- 
mission block vaccines for the 
malarial parasite, pias- 
m odium —a project funded by 
the Medical Research Coun- 
cil, the World Health 
Organization, the Wellcome 
Trust and the Hoffman La 
Roche company. 

In the physical sciences, the 
university provides high-cost 
specialist facilities. Nuclear 
magnetic resonance equip- 
ment based at Queen Mary 
and the nuclear reactor man- 
aged by Imperial at Silwood 
Park are used by many other 
science and medical 
departments. 

There is a major project to 
develop remote-sending and 
digital-mapping techniques. 
Work between King's and the 
Royal Holloway and Bedford 


New College on the prepara-' 
lion of eteclrically-active or- 
ganic materials, funded by a 
CASE award and, IUbrd, has 
fed to developments which ate 
now protected by two separate 
patents. 

At the' university's Centre 
for Marine Technology, a 
study is being made into the 
dynamic responses of flexible 
offshore structures used in the' 
oil industry, a project funded 
by the Science ana Engineer- 
ing Research Council, the 
Department of Trade and 
Industry, and industry. 

A project aimed at improv- 
ing speech synthesis technol- 
ogy is being undertaken by 
Imperial University College,' 
Leeds University, and GEO 
and Plessey. 

The Middlesex Hospital 
Medical School has an on- 
going collaborative arrange- 
ment with the Wellcome 
Foundation and is working on 
the Aids virus. 

Teachers of geography, at 
the London School of 
Economics, King's and 
University College are 
participating in a joint re- 
search programme in applied 
geomorphology, an inno- 
vative review - of landslide 
hazard in Britain, for the 
Department of the 
Environment 

Macro-economic modelling 
in an international context is 
being undertaken by siafl 
from the London Business 
School, Birkbeck College and 
Queen Mary with funding 
from the Treasury and the 
Science and Engineering Re- 
search Council. 

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f on the 
butside 

JVfiw the university's ex- 
ternal system announced the 
rcsilw of this year’s law 
ex ^™ ,I *f5*on it encompassed 
nearly 4,000 students from 52 
“ untn « across 20 Ume 
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the external system, which is 
as -old as the university, pro- 
VK f gs London University de- 
gees. The disciplines vary 
tnyn economics and manage- 
ment to art and languages, 
from divinity and education 
to agriculture and music. 

U has been agreed to in- 
troduce areas covering health 
studies, mathematics and 
computer sciences. A further 
area of study, in engineering, 
Kjbemg considered for the 
1990s. 

TOere are 24.000 external 
students, mostly undergrad- 
uates, divided equally be- 
tween domestic and overseas, 
the hitter world-wide but with 
particular concentrations in 
West Africa and the Far East. 

The most important 
characteristic of the external 
system is the flexibility it gives 
todh e students, fleeing them 
from the constraints of a 
regular “paced" pattern of 
study undertaken in a particu- 
(allocation at a certain age. 

Undergraduate external stu- 
dents are offered guidance 
dicing their studies, including 
subject guides, related papers 
onC their syllabuses, informal 
tutorial assessment and short 
courses offered by the univer- 
sity or by the extra-mural 
departments of other 
universities. 

Reaching out to students is 
an* ever-unfolding process 
with the external system soon 
to embark on a set of new 
ventures. One of them will be 
the opportunity for external 
students to receive lectures on 
taped cassettes. 

<Vs part of its programme to 
extend links with the external 
academic world, industry and 
commerce, the university is in 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 15 1986 


35 


(( FOCUS % 


UNIVERSITY OF 
LONDON/4 



contact with, so for. 70 poly- 
technics and further education 
colleges about the possibility 
of providing teaching courses 
of study. 

Sam Crooks, secretary for 
external-services, said the aim 
was to create a nation-wide 
network of colleges which 
would co-operate with the 
university's committee for ex- 
ternal students in providing 
continuing education. 

"in essence the model 
would be that London would 
provide 'core* training ma- 


Umversity of Loudon Union 


authorities and public institu- 
tions. and in association whh 
education and cultural groups* 
sees itself as one of the prime 
links between the university 
and tiie community. 

Professor Brian 

Groombridge. the 

department's director for 10 
years, said: “it is a simple 
truth worth uttering that 
nearly all the department's 
students are Londoners. 

“The rest of the university 
recruits students from all over 
the world, certainly from all 


‘Our courses combine liberality of 
style with vocational relevance’ 


teriaJ for use throughout the 
country, in p ar tners h ip whh 
participating colleges who 
would provide local .tutorial 
support designed for anal) 
firms in their area.” he said. 

The university is already 
one of the major national 
providers of continuing 
education, with 35,000 in- 
dividuals benefiting from 
university teaching as part- 
time. extra-mural and 
continuing education 
students. 

The extra-mural .depart- 
ment, which provides more 
than 7S0 courses in co-opera- 
tion with lopal education 


over Britain. And. whether or 
not they think of themselves 
as ‘Londoners', the depart- 
ment indudes men and 
women who live and work, or 
are unemployed, here. 

“In the last decade this 
regional public’s use of the 
department has seen more 
than 200,000 enrolments.'' 

London extra-mural stu- 
dents commonly go on to 
Open University degree 
courses with two general 
credit exemptions or to post- 
graduate work in other 
institutions. 

Professor Groombridge 
said: “One of the virtues of 


our courses is that they com- 
bine liberality of style and 
content with vocational 
relevance." 

The department not only 
co-operates whh other educa- 
tion bodies, but there are also 
growing ties with the external 
system. 

Mr Crooks said: “The extra- 
mural department is designing 
an access course which is 
intended both to offer an 
alternative to A level as a 
route of entry into the external 
system, and also to enhance 
learning skills and to prepare 
students for subsequent study 
in the external mode. 

“It is possible that this 
course, leading to an extra- 
mural certificate of the 
University of London, could 
also be offered nationally - 
once more through a network 
of colleges.” 

Professor Groombridge said ' 
that the extent to which extra- 
mural students characteris- 
tically work at university level 
is not always appreciated. The 
diplomas and certificates to 
which many extra-mural 
courses lead are designed, 
validated and examined by 
the university. Much of the 
non-award bearing work, be 
said, is of a similar quality. 

MH 


Students join the 
fight for survival 


Today’s students are an al- 
together more serious bunch 
than their predecessors, 
according to conventional wis- 
dom. They are preoccupied 
with career prospects and are 
rather short oajoietlerhre. 

But this is not the view of 
Jane Cannon, this year's 
president of the University of 
London Union, the Malet 
Sheet “chib”, to which all 
45,000 students belong. 

“I would say they're mure 
realistic titan they were a few 
years back. Perhaps they've 
realized they can't change the 
world,” she said. And they are 
not simply after degrees so 
that they can get jobs. 

“1 think the university is 
still seen as a way to educate 
yoarself for life as weD as 
work,” said Miss Cannon. 

“This is why we are so 
worried about the supposed 
shift from arts to' science; tire 
feet that, speaking as an 
engineer, people seem to be 
putting all the resources to- 
wards engineering at the ex- 
pense of the other subjects 


which they no longer seem to 
see as usefeL 

“If not the opinion of the 
university', which hopefully it 
never will become, it is the 
opinion of government and 
outriders that it's only foe 
science and engineering 
courses that have any wtvth at 
alL so they're the only ones 
that deserve to be protected.” 

One of foe beauties of the 
university, she believes, is that 
there are a lot of small colleges 
and departments which are in 
many cases world specialists 
in their studies. 

“If the cutbacks continue 
there's a danger that some of 
these small institutes frill go to 
the walk and they're virtually 
irreplaceable." 

On this subject, far from foe 
students and the university 
establishment being at logger- 
heads, there has been a 
considerable unanimity 

“It's been all of us fi ghting 
together to save our 
university,” said Miss Can- 
non. “It's got that serious.” 

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i¥ 


36 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 15 1986 


§ 

3 


UNIVERSITY OF LONDON/5 


(( FOCI JS i) 


Tracking down the killer diseases 


London University is a medi- 
cal powerhouse probably 
without parallel anywhere in 
the world. One in every five of 
the 40.000 or so students is 
studying medicine and 
London accounts for half of all 
UK postgraduates in medicine 
and dentisuy. 

The medical students and 
post-graduate researchers are 
spread among an enormous 
clutch of hospitals, institutes 
and. laboratories whose facil- 
ities range from the first rate 
to" the' Dickensian. 

The life- blood of the pro- 
fession is research. Some, like 
cancer research or the in- 
vestigation of Aids, is very 
high profile, the media having 
an insatiable appetite lor sto- 
ries about them. 

Most goes on quietly with- 
out fanfare. Yet in almost 
every school or institute in- 
triguing medical detective 
work .is being done. 

• The sc avenge r s . In bis play 
The Doctor’s Dilemma, 
George Bernard Shaw puts 
into the mouth of one of his 
characters. Sir Ralph Bloom- 
field Bennington, a phrase 
which has found its way into 
almost every dictionary of 
literary quotations: '‘Stimu- 
late the phagocytes." 

“There is at bottom, 1 " says 
Shaw's physician, “only one 
scientific treatment 
all diseases and that is to 


stimulate the phagocytes. 
Drugs are a delusion." 

Shaw was. as usual, 
overplaying his hand, but the 
quotation did reflect what was 
then a current pre-occupation 
at St Mary’s Hospital, where 
an acquaintance of Shaw. Sir 
AJmroth Wright, was a power 
in the land as Professor of 
Bacteriology. 

He had begun to realize the 
importance .of certain sub- 
stances in the blood in helping 
the immune system to scav- 
enge bacteria, a process known 

by the technical name 
phagocytosis. 

Nearly 80 years on, Shaw's 
words are coming to life again 
at St Mary's where researchers 
are using some of Wright’s 
ideas to develop a new ap- 
proach to the treatment of 
serious infections. 

The researchers have been 
looking at the breakdown of 

Major discovery 
insemledementia 

the scavenging mechanism in 
severe surgical infections, 
such as peritonitis, and trying 
to find ways to reverse that 
failure. 

One promising method be- 
ing investigated is the use of 
an antibody called Core 
Glycolipid. 

The St Mary's team has 


The university 
is a medical 
powerhouse. 
Malcolm Brown 
examines its 
intriguing research 

shown that this antibody ap- 
pears to reverse the depression 
of the immune system and 
improve removal of bacteria 
from the bloodstream. 

Their hypothesis, for which 
evidence seems to be growing, 
is that Core Glycolipid is 
acting as what AJmroth 
Wright called an opsonin, 
something in the blood serum 
that makes the invading bac- 
teria more attractive to the 
scavenging system. 

Antibiotics destroy or in- 
hibit the growth of bacteria. 
This alternative route is to 
take a depressed immune 
system and pul some fight 
back into it 

The antibody sticks to the 
bacteria and indicates that it is 
ready to be picked up by the 
immune system. 

It is as though the bacteria 
and the antibody together 
were shouting to the immune 
system: “Here we are, come 


and get us" — in short, 
stimulating the phagocytes. 

• The scourge. Alizheimers 
disease, or senile dementia, 
can devastate the elderly. 
Memory goes, there is a 
progressive degeneration of 
personality and intelligence 
seems to deteriorate. 

Experts reckon there are at 
least 750.000 sufferers in Brit- 
ain and that the numbers will 
grow rapidly. 

Researchers at the institute 
of Neurology, led by Dr David 
Bowen, reader in Neurochem- 
istry, have . made major 
discoveries about the role of 
defects in the brain's chemical 
messengers in the disease. 

The team has concentrated 
particularly on a compound 
called acetylcholine, a chemi- 
cal substance secreted at the 
end of nerve fibres which 
helps to transmit nervous 
impulses. 

They have shown that pa- 
tients with Altzheimers have 
less of this substance in their 
brain than normal persons. 

For example, if content of 
acetylcholine is plotted 
against memory loss in in- 
dividual patients there is an 
inverse relationship — so the 
less acetylcholine in the cere- 
bral cortex, the grey matter, 
the greater the memory loss. 

The work at the institute 
has attracted world-wide 
attention and earlier this year 


the Swedish drugs company 
Asira. which has a particular 
interest in senile dementia, 
put up £135 million to help to 
establish a neuroscience re- 
search centre which will op- 
erate alongside the Institute's 
Department of Neuro- 
chemistry. 

• The killer. Many millions 
of pounds and countless man- 
hours have been devoted to 
trying to contain malaria, but 
it remains the most serious 
human parasitic disease 
known. 

About 200 million people 
suffer from chronic infection 
and every year the same 
number acquire malaria. 

A mill ion people, mostly 
the very young, die of it every 
year in Africa alone. Exports 
say that almost half the 
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■ Researchers at the London 
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cal Medicine, are tackling the 
problem from three angles. 

One group is 4 developing 
simple technological. barriers, 
such as mosquito nets impreg- 
nated with lethal doses of 
insecticides. A second ap- 
proach is io break the cycle of 
malarial infection. 

The mosquito infects man, 
then another mosquito taking 
a blood meal from the infected 
man is itself infected and in 
turn passes on the disease. ■ 

Vaccines now being worked 
on, it is hoped, will help to 
break that cycle at the man-to- 
rn osquho stage, so that the 
“second" mosquito in the 
cycle does not become 
infected. 

Work on this so-called 
transmission-blocking vac- 
cine is‘ being done in 
collaboration with scientists at 
Imperial College and at 
Holland's Nijmegen 
University. 

A third team is evaluating 
promising new antimalarials, 
drugs which are effective 
against malarial parasites. 
This is increasingly necessary 
because many mosquitoes are 
now resistant to many of the 
common drugs used in the 
fight against malaria, like 
Chloroquine. 

Preparations, like the Chi- 
nese plant derivative 
Quinghaosu, which are new to 
the West, are being examined. 


A top of class rating 
for young engineers 


Professor Eric Ash can teU 
you exactly what kind of rating 
Loodoe gets as a place to train 
engineers, or at least he can for 
the two inst itu tions in the 
university with which he has 
been most intimately involved 
— U nive r sit y College, where 
he was Professor of Electronic 
and Electrical 
and die Imperial 
Science and .Techno! 
whose rector he has 
just a year. 

When the University 
Graids Committee went round 
the universities earlier this 
year judging their research. 
University College and Im- 
perial came away with high 
marks. A0 engineering depart- 
ment, save one, m each 
were rated “ont- 


Aeronantics, the biggest 
award the Japanese company 
has made to an ontside re- 
search organization. 

Unstrial money is ranch 
needed. Government fending 
cats have hurt the 
universities.Professor . Ash 
said one of the difficulties in 
talking about the financing of 
his college is that it is a 
cumulative problem. 

“The gaps that we see are 
not this year's 4 per cent cut, 
which is what Imperial Col- 
lege has sustained. It's really 
the erosion of funding which 
has taken place over the last 
dozen years a- so. 


Professor Ash, one of the 
most dhtingnisfaed engineers 
in Britain, minks tint applied 
science departments have to 
perform at two levels in a 
university. 

First, they have to pash 
back the frontiers of- knowl- 
edge. Second, they have to 
de m onstrat e that the work 
they are doing is applicable 
and the only way yon can, 
demonstrate that, said the 
professor, is by getting it 
applied. 

So the interplay between 
engineering departments and 
iaiastry fa crucial in assessing 
an institution's worth. On that 
measure also London does 
very wefl. 

Imperial for instance, has 
more Ahey contracts (con- 
tracts for tiie Government- 
backed information 
technology programme) than 
any other nuiversity in the 
country. 

Imperial has become — and 
was even before Professor Ash 
took ova- - a byword for 
industrial collaboration. 

It takes many forms: re- 
search binds, contract work, 
hardware. For example, IBM 
has given foe college a com- 
puter system worth £2 mill in n 
and Honda put up £700,600 
for a state-of-the-art wind 
tunnel in the Department of 



It is my 
responsibility to 
make sure our 
facilities are 
world-class 9 

Professor Eric Ash 

“If yon ask how modi 
additional industrial ontside 
income we need to stay finan- 
cially viable, just, the answer 
is it's a modest amomrt, an 
extra million a year would set 
ns right I think. Bat what tire 
place actually needs, is an 
extra income of something like 
£10 million a year ftom 
industry. 


“We’re . com peting with 
Stanford, MIT, Novosibirsk, 
yon name it; and iris beco m ing 
increasingly difficult to sus- 
tain our cutting edge in the' 
face of the opposition." 

That problem of 
underfunding by government 
is paralleled by another —.the 
way industry underpays en- 
ghweis. Professor Ash thinks 
ft may be dafficnlt to -raise 
engineers pay. across the 
board, bat then that is not 
really what needs be done 
anyway. 

Talent is not divided in an 
egalitarian way and industry 
should recognize that by pay- 
ing the “stars" what they are 
worth. 

He worries deeply about the 
way. foe brightest and tire best, 
undervalued hi this country, 
are drifting towards America. 

Few scientists or engineers 
go purely for the money, he 
said, . so at university level be 
thinks his duty is dear if be is 
to stop dire outflow. 

“It's the combination of 
money and better facilities, 
dial's foe real core. So I regard 
ft as my responsibility to do 
everything in my power to 
make sure the facilities we 
have here are world class. The 
moment we have to say that 
we've failed on that fa the' 
beginning of the end." 

Professor Ash has probably 
got about seven years ahead of 
him as rector. Pressed on his 
ambitious he comes up with 
three. First, a doubling of the 
college's interaction with in-^ 
dustry “without compromising 
on doing work at foe ialgJsest . 
possible academic leveL I want 
interaction with industry mil 
those themes where we are 
genuinely breaking .new, 
ground." 

Second, be wants to baOd 
more bridges between the, 
engineering department and 
other activities at ImperiaL 

Finally, he wants to doable 
tire number of women in the .. 
college. “We have about 18. 
pm- cent By the time I leave 1 ’ 
want to see no fewer than 36 
per cent.” 

MB 


.to 


THE 

SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 
KHflVERSfTY OF LONDON 

TjmleadsE* UK School of 
Pharmacy offers undergraduate 
comm leading id Honours 
degree* in PHARMACY 
(RPbann) and in TOXICOLOGY 
with PHARMACOLOGY (RSc). 

E xcd ka research opp o r tonhua 
crin in Himii ffi fl i f * * dwuiiiy ij 
and B i o clwiuimy, Pharmacology, 
Turionlnp, Prenmc eota , 
Pbamuceutkai Microbiology, 


Science, ud P ha r mf fr wrnrw y lead- 
ing to the M PM and PhD degrees 
of the Umvenky of Loudon. 

KBs detail* from The Bcghnr 
The School of Iteaacy 
29-39 Bkanewidt Sqnaro 
London WON 1AX 


J. 



The Middlesex Hospital and Medical School 
Research Fond Appeal 

Patrons The Duke of Northumberland, KG. GCVO, TD, PC, FRSThe Lord Cobbold, KG, 
GCVO, PC, DL ' 

'In 1835, Mari; 100 yeas after the foundation of The Mhfcflescx Hospital as a small budding in Windmill Street, Tbc Middlesex 
Hospital Medical School was founded. 1985 masked the ISOih Anmrenary of this foundation aid the School cat look back with 
pride on its record over a period during wfakfa some 7,500 students have qualified at Ike School and gone into practice hi das and 
lent other cowries of the world. ... 

The School sees this a Bn opportunity to commemorate its past and id take a mrior step towards the future by estsbbshnat Tbc 
Middlesex Hospital and Medical School General Charitable Trust. 

Research a the Medial School and Hospital already «*n a wide raone of topics, but four maior anas have been identified for 
triad) haxfing is sought, randy Mean and Wood Vend Disease. Antonin and Rheumatism, Hormonal Diseases and Canon, and 
Primary Health Care. 

To enable of to continue our wort in these vital anas, we need yocr generous support which will help to etnore that The 
Middlesex ooc tomes ro make the vial contrib u t i on to me d i c a l research as it has done m the first 150 years. With the ovation in 
1987 of the new Unhrershy College and Middlesex School of Medicine we expect rtori contribution to be even greater. 

How Ton can Help 

tMr aims arc am broous amt pro g r amm e whose pnrposeis to extend the frontiers of ncdkal faowterige row necessarily be so. The 
Trim is seeking contributions from at many people and sources as poanUe. 

A gift or cor u mcmontion may be associated with a specific project, and the Appeal Director would be very glad to daenn and 
advise on tbe most suitable way of record in g such gencnniiy. 

Whita a contribution made under deed of cov enant is also a highly beneficial way of giving {we am recover the ax bum the 
Inland Revenue}, off gifts arc we l come and no anonot woaM ever be considered coo small. 

Cheques should be made payable to the Trust. 

If you would lake any further information about the Appeal, phase contact: 

IP. Gould. Appeal Direcror 

Tbc Middlesex Hospital and Medical School Research Appeal 

Anr CoBcge, Charlotte Street 

Loudon WfP IUX. Td: (01) 636 8333 Ext 3407. 


v; 


i “ 


YOUR NEXT OCCASION 



> H. Melakan 

mrtba’ Ctfogo 

New Cron London 
SE14 BHW 

01-892 7171 max. 2279 
Mr. P. w. Page 
Hafts Manager 
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Queen ftw Co H eac 
98-110 Htgn Road 
Sooth Woodford London 
E18 

01-504 8282 

1 Jant Dawson 

Confarance and Potaomd Officer 
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Sum Place RagaoTs Path London 
NW1 «SA 
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ft Technology 


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01*405 7686 


i > 

x 

4 ! 

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5 fri 


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V 







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at the LSE 


V tv* 
HI! 

Jo 

r#*i ktJ* 


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■ «■ 5 T~ ; 


<■. 


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I^ga! action: Rosalyn Higgins, Professor of 

Professor Versatility 


London University’s law 
schools sometimes seem like a 
. kindergarten for media stars. 
Si lan Kennedy, Professor of 
• Medical Law and Ethics at 
King's College, perhaps took 
■ the process to its logical 
1 conclusion in 1980 when he 
became the BBC’s Reith Lec- 
turer, the pinnacle of public 
service broadcasting. 

Michael Zander. Professor 
of Law at the London School 
of Economics and legal 
correspondent of The Guard- 
ian. has made a second career 
out of explaining to the lay- 
man the intricacies (and 
v sometimes the idiocies) of the 
law. 

More recently, a new fat* 
has begun to appear on our 
^ TV screens when, as increas- 
- ingly seems to be the’ case, 
matters of great international 
moment are in the balance. 

Rosalyn Higgins, a col- 
league of Mr Zander at LSE 
where she is Professor of 
International Law, has been 
seen most recently talking 
about the American bombing 
of Libya (she thought it was 
' hard to say that act was lawful 
under current international 
law) and the extradition to 
Belgium of the British soccer 
fans allegedly involved in the 
tragic Heysel stadium in- 
cidents. (She thought there 
were grounds for the extra- 
dition applications to be made 
lawfully.) 

Professor Higgins is a 
remarkable woman. “My full- 


time work is at the 
university," she said, explain- 
ing that her work as a QC in 
the Middle Temple involves 
"early mornings, evenings and 
weekends". 

She has also managed to 
become almost a fixture at the 
BBC External Services where 
she is regularly called in for 
overseas broadcasts. 

The fact that the LSE, 
BBC's Bush House, the Law 
Courts and the Temple, are all 
within the same square mile 
makes it a congenial life. 

But it is the university that 
is • at the centre of it and 
Professor Higgins, a Cam- 

Plenty of room 
for specialists 

bridge graduate, thinks there 
is nowhere, not even Ox- 
bridge, to touch iL 

Not the least of the attract 
tions is that the sheer size of 
London University means 
there is an awful lot of law 
going on in it and, therefore, 
plenty of room for specialists 
to pursue their interests. 

"There is an enormous 
potential pool of graduate 
students which, in turn, allows 
for an enormous range of 
courses so you can do very 
specialist work. This is not 
minimalist teaching." 

There is a downside. The 
size of the university and the 
number of separate institu- 


tions which may be involved 
in leaching a subject means 
that decision making -at the 
federal university involves 
discussions with other 
colleges. 

"There are long lead times 
in all sorts of things we need to 
do," said Professor Higgins. 
"Putting on a new course 
might take two years." 

Another negative aspect is 
that, inevitably, exam proce- 
dures are cumbersome, 
particularly at graduate levcL 

Each teacher of a particular 
subject is likely to construct 
his or her own course within 
the overall university regula- 
tions, so the same subject may 
be approached in a number of 
different but each equally 
valid, ways. 

But to test that knowledge 
the university, through its 
teachers, must draw up a 
single university exam. That is 
not easy and the marking is 
extremely time consuming. 

"I do find that uncomfort- 
ably large parts of my year are 
spent in university marking." 
she said. But she wouldn't 
change it ■ . 

“You're where the action 
is." Zipping in and out of the 
Law Courts, popping down to 
the Foreign Office to compare 
notes with their experts, drop- 
ping into the BBC.. "Pro- 
fessional ly Fm certainly where 
I want to be." 

MB 


Link up 
and 
learn 

Within a year it will be 
possible for London 
University’s five non-medical 
schools to share each other's 
cbnrses, seminars, demonstra- 
tions and tutorials without the 
staff and students having to 
leave their buildings. - 
The development is a 
remarkable interactive video 
and data network using fibre 
optics, computers and tele- 
vision screens. 

Television cameras win be 
controlled orally, not man- 
ually, and the person speaking 
wfll appear on screen. 

When Uvenet comes into 
operation at London — initial 
experiments start next year — 
individuals and groups on two 
or more sites will be aMe to 

link op to produce distributed 

tutorials, seminars, lectures 
and, conferences. Research 
teams on different sites work- 
ing on related problems wffl be 
able to exchange views and 
information without the need 
to travel and meet 
It w!D ah be done by 
transmitting voices, pictures 
and data down a fibre-optic 
cable the thickness of a strand 
of hair. 

Because the system is fully 
inte r a c tiv e, speakers will be 
aMe to question and be ques- 
tioned by their audiences. It 
wfli mean learning m 
techniques. 

Richard Beckwith, the 
project manager, said it will be 
difficult only in that it is 
unfamiliar and wSQ be less 


demanding than, say, driving a 
car. 

The five colleges to be 
linked initially are Imperial, 
King's, Queen Mary, Royal 
Houoway and Bedford New 
College and University Col- 
lege, together with the com- 
puter centre and foe audio- 
visual centre in the Senate 
Hbnse at Malet Street 

In general, the most 
satisfactory system for group 
viewing and discussion of re- 
mote video is by projection 
television. But as well as the 
incoming picture selector and 
the network control computer, 
there may be other input 
devices such as a camera for 
slides. 

The new generation of cheap 
cameras are so sensitive that 
normal room lighting is more 
than sufficient 

MH 



The Courtauld Institute of Art 
is moving to Somerset House 

£3.2 million has been raised so far; £1.8 million more 
is needed to save the historic North Block, to rehouse 
this world famous Institute and reopen to the public 
The Fine Rooms as the new Cour tauld Institute 
Galleries where it will be possible to display 85% of 
’ their Unique Collections instead of 33% as at present. | 

Further details from: The Trust Office 
Courtauld Institute of Art Fund 
20 Portmau Square, London W1H OBE 
Telephone 01-935 9292 

Wc‘ gratefully acknowledge the generous support of 
The Arthur Anderson & Co. Foundation in this project. 


BEST 

WISHES 


THE WELLCOME TRUST 
1936-1986 

The Wellcome Trust congratu- 
lates the University of London 
on its 150th Anniversary. 

The Trust's association with the 
University of London has been 
a happy one during the past fifty 
years through its provision of 
support for research in the bio- 
medical sciences and the history 
of medicine in many of the con- 
stituent colleges and medical 
schools of the University. 

The Tirust looks forward to 
continuing these close links in 
the future. 


1 PARK SQUARE WEST, LONDON NW1 4LJ 


to the University of London 
on its 150th anniversary 



SDN ALLIANCE 

INSURANCE GROUP 

OfORKMUTlNC; PHOTNIX AfiSTfBAMi: 

1 Bartholomew Lane 
London EC2N 2 AB 
Telephone: 01 -588 2345 




The University’s 
bookshop 
is now Europe’s 
finest bookstore. 



DILLONS 

THE BOOK 5 TO , E 

It’s our birthday too, but we’re only 50. 
To celebrate, weVe modernised Dillons 
and enormously expanded our stock. 
So now our interests in the University are 
not just academic 

82 Gower St, Bloomrisury WC1. Tel: 01-636 1577 

A Arm, Company 


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Brains for 


The University of London is Britain’s largest 
university, and one of the most research- 
oriented. 

Industry, commerce and the public sector 
all use our research and consultancy 
services extensively. We eamt 
£120 million last year from this work. 



Advanced research is being undertaken in 
every major branch of science, engineering 
and technology, medicine, dentistry and 
pharmacy. Our reputation in the arts, 
humanities and social sciences (especially law 
and economics) is no less outstanding. 


The range of services on 
offer is vast: from art 
conservation or intensive 
Arabic courses for 
businessmen and 
diplomats, to 
veterinary science; 
from the study of the 
earth’s core to 
outer space. 


Geahgr— , 


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Bkdrual QnginecirvTa — 
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jn&Hndbdn 

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If we’re not already working 
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Office, 
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° Af»c^ Malet Street, 

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ptewraphy 

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PROPERTY BUYERS’ GUIDE 


OVERSEAS PROPERTIES 


APARTMENTS FROM £33,000 
VILLAS FROM £60,000 








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A little overan hour's drive east of 
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S THE RIGHT AREA.. -Just 30 minutes from 
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8 3 


OSBORNES Solicitors have 
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you to the 4 




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HALT. TUSCANY 


PORTUGAL, 

ALGAHVE 


6 bed Fanntause E115J0Q.00 j 
2 bed VUa wtb pool £6540000 


6 bed Farmhouse 
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£115,00000 i 


[SWTZERLMD. 

HOKTREAOX 


4 bed luxury flat wflh 
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1.3m SFr. 


OSBORNES 


93 Parkway, London NW1 

01-485 8811 


iaiM3"ium Costa del Azahar. 3 

We are an established Spanish registered ewtntw n gpncy with 
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For colour brochure write of ~ 
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Caortney Horae, Station Approach, jk>. - 
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Telephone: 0784 65656. Telex: 837013. 


or ntoratmi on tk cost* iubki «o piomm 

SUNDAY 19 OCTOBER 1986 12-8 pjn. 

THE HOLIDAY INN, 7 ALTYSEROAD, 
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& THE HEATHROW AMBASSADOR HOTEL, 
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Tbvnexstai 01-549 4251 

Pa nUu rWuure. f7I- 177 London fond. Klti rarmi uimn1 hBmt*.Smm yKTltBA 


feSBS 


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A gotte n psretSse 

LAESCALA 




SAT0&6T Qciobcr 

SUNDAY 


A gourmets detgbt 
Exaerttve rang* of hroti qual- 
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rnmoit usages by the sea on 

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ftjr fid Inform at ion. colour 
brochures mi deals of our 
regular inspectio n vests, cafl 

""ISrciiard 

ESTATES 

ISLE OF WIGHT 
T* (0383)528208 
Sowing Green Lane. Orohvd 
St. Newport Law. PO30 1 JZ 


SECURE OK BASE 
FOR SALE. 

Superb apartment -ideal 
overseas home owner. 30 
mmsGarrack.1 how 
Heathrow. 

Detads - telephone 
(08926)64815. 





51 Itat StiML MBrfOW. Bods. SL7 21S. 


Buy direct A save money 

Vlas, bungalows, townhouses, apartments 


We offer value for money in prime positions 
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CaB for brochures and bother informat i on : 

INTERVENTAS ESPANA SJL 

Group Caja Territorial de Madrid, 145 Oxford Street, London W1. 
Tel: 01-434 0484 <24 lire ans w ering s er v ice ) 


COSTA DEL SOL 

Resale property list 
Phone: 

Paradise Property 
Company. 

01-551 4277. 


RALEARICS 


PUERTO BANDS/ 
MARBELLA 


MALLORCA 


COUNTRY PROPERTIES 


inemdUH reM Luxuriously 
tanned 2 becfctxm apat- 
mant £68 uOOOl or wotlkl 
consider a Londoiapinment 
in part exchange. 

Ca Act Ideal Homes. 
014854444. 


SURREY 


PORLEY £365. 


GIHLDFOBD AREA 

Easy a cces s London. 
Adaptable famtiy house 
to termiand setting dose 
to vitege. 17C origins. 
ia acres. 5 beds. 3 rec. 
2 baths. Cl H. dbie ga- 
rage. Good outbukfings. 


SUSSEX 


HOVE, S8SSEX 


YORKSHIRE 


NR BRIGHTON. 


Tel: 0483 234002 



Sea iron fW. mrfooteig te 
tea. 3 Iwh. bathm/staMer, 
tange. tetany, flood idi/ break- 
fast rra, GCH. garden. 

39358 U L 

JWIT HNK BMit 
MBITS, 115 CKURCU MAIL 
HOVt 

ra:gz73)ZKin 


mtvmiu.r dcmho s 
tmtraoracd e waw r&a.ooo 
ono. Commute BR York 35 
mins. Dttiib rtn* OT51 74019. 


NEW HOMES 


COSTA BLA8CA, JAYEA 

l b | *Wt 3 bubaom rib ri 
two. s ecluded g rourts. Sbamr- 
100 m. bdUiuuui. fwvjg room 8 
mra. 10 mutes samiy beach. 2 
mnutss' wallc terns cfch & svwn- 
rrang port BiA 4 years ago. Ftdy 
lunstnL £38,000 for quefc sale. 
JLP1U4, 34. Ship Street, 
Brigk&s, BUI 1AD. 

Tek SZ73 24378/ 24419. 


Tie most desirable seaside 
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priva te patting, ta add Won 
there are two pods, set in 


there are two pods, set in 
magnificent landscaped 


Crown Marine the ideal Invest- 
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Efeaaw debdxd radomrao txdm- 
sm pn*He mee n Wea Wey 
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cemnt immg. 


CHIDDW0F0LD. 


WWTBE8DS 
0273 585117. 


WATES ESTATE A6BICY 
81-868 8275 


Lovely country 
residence set in 96 
beautiful acres. 

£ 33 5408. 

Ring Carolyn on 
GidaMfg 6122. (T). 


HENFIELD 

West Sussex. 


rouiw W«l suwx, P/B 
2nd Floor 9 bed Hat. Caragr. 
MhmiM-s from beach. Sfa views. 
C42.950. Trt. 0203 778494 
ftUflCCI 


, SURREY, 

bsaairiforoccB- 

comeneot for 


COSTA BLANCA 


saort shops 8 M25/M23. 4 
beds. 2 tufts ft en sriej, 3 Ige 


Tuo bBMMb MM taosv boosts an 
ex one al HsMd Catnvo coneaeo 
«ta tun Sam fine mk. 


bate It en arte), 3 Ige 
Htten. idSty m. 
l (Wean « acre bnd- 
gdn. f/H. £210750. 




las OR Bosrt I mete. M.I 

IDwroqteJUreea tag Roam 3^4 1 


COBHAM CENTRE 

Nrnver & exceOent shops. 2 mb 
M25. 1 tide A3. <« br u 
Heathrow, Garrick A ftriwy. 

; Sore deL 3 beds. 2 roeps, 2 
we s, tafcftra Ale snk. wooden 
ffcs 90T seduded hedged rear 
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Sde garden, apple UC& Boss 
lage pange Id ertensta. Needs | 


deooratnm Rave wcam bouse 
wsbno. Mot sea soon. 

Often amort ESQjOOO. 

ton HW Hr Hartla 
0932 67534 


HORSELL 

W fWok i ng 

Company Cbaknm's Inwa r drte 
ultra raxfera ar conritmed de- 
tacbed tumikM. Open Ptau. 3 drt 
beds. 2 baEmn (I an sate). Rt- 
van road, ftfy tumhlwL acre. 
VSry sedudea 

£240680 

WB sen oa furari i rd 

Tel: 04882-71340 


Ganfens Pnca £147 JOB art E16QOQO 

Apply: St Jctre tteagte Tel: 
(0273) 493622 


sown P P8 W3UUUL Magntn- 
cvnl \wws of RIiohIi Bay ana 
WrninV Head. SrvUah «otti lover 
cmd ptan arctniecturalty de- 
■90O«lr>ou»cln ‘-.■acre Sdoobte 
beds. Z very sMCMug recno. din- 
mg room, fined an. bath, store 
roam, cotered baieony. 1600 
MJ. IT. C75JOOO. <0792> 20S167 


3»B Hd Wert, dated 
(88833) 2251. 


t bad apart; shared poof £9425 
2 bed ante stared pooff17.T87 
1 bed manorwfie £13,125 
Reffdar low cost mspedton fBgtas. 
All proprttes query conseucad. 
Near sea. slaps, etc. 

FEW A PNUJPS 
8 tM n Head . Hhten. Grots 

Tel: B22B23 2667 (24fen) 


town 

(atone 

C/* 


Max Neil & Co 
118 Kensington Church St. , 
Lorekm W8 4KL Tel (W) 221 
2000 


WSKY MCATR Hwts. 6 Luxu- 
ry swJow new flaa in 1 xxr 
wnuded gro wut L 3 bnh. 2 
baiM. From Only £90.000. 
PibW devetopracM & loca- 
tron. Ideal Homes 0923 36794 


BURWASH WEALD. 


■1^ .Ti 

RI,.. r j. r .u.i.iuu. 


SHOWDOMU. Sgadous 6 bed. 8 
bautas. modem Camtry imat. 
approx 1 acne. Outbne ptatninm 
mmeoi re$rtenaal/mmn9 1 
ho me £iss.ooa Oeutts irom 
(0248)600221 


SOUTH OF ENGLAND 




I RETIRE IN m&WTY] 



MALLORCA 
THE GOLF 
APARTMENTS 

tepwN M Merer Ap&. 


■ Andwage Ctt’s 
natiare nt, bats aod heafeh 



WETSWOOE Near si Crorgn 
HllH. 3 Dcd roomed serai de- 
Lnhod bouse, doie to all 
jnnnU«.WaUilM 30 ml 03. 2 
reception room, targe ^rden. 
™i4eur Iooom. fufl qas con- . 
tral hoaUna. Rwtmt £72380 1 
Tel 09323 4SI36 ctcnlnin and i 
>vNKcnbiiH) agmb) 


CROWBOROUGH - 
UWQUE APARTMENT 


(8 Ml preapMS ad tea. 2 
roc TOw , 2 dawk beds, large 
h*i W£d Ssby WWd rot e*r 


COUINMMUIt Convened lodge : 
with maomocent stews. 5 bed- , 
room. 3 bathroomo. preuy 2 I 
acre <urdm Including pad- : 
docks. KaUlas and I 
outbuild) D9S. Freehold 

C27SJ300 Tchi0306> 71 1946 


vm Astaum Forest Gas CH, 
security phone, roaur maua 
team TunUdys Wan 15 
ms. GXMCk 30 irirs. 

Heathrow 1 tor. £84 BOB. 

Td 08828 84816. 


IXATKOtMCAO 5 MINS M29. In 
• nriifiiip part of Leathertwad. 
1960*1 ScWCIKd Tudor style 
house, on high wuund. Lronmr 
master bedroom/ dressing 
room/ en suite Dattoroom. 3 tur- 
User Drdroonn. an wuh otulKv 
fitted wardrobes. 2nd bam 
room. eiegmH kranae. dmtng 
loom. sludv. rtoafeioam. 
strowuc Mirim. 9» central 
heaUn9. 9ua||*y cansert 

throaiigodL douWegrape. ra- 

iun>«irdm £194.950 for carry 
•air Phone (03721 374Q94 


WALTON- 1 nda SnilcmrBRL 28 
nuns Wioo. S/c rams. 2 
bedims, mod Mtehen OU appU- 
jiwsi nxuires & 1111109, incl- i 
garaw. tmnwnUale 86 yn LH. 1 
£61.750 <09321 246486 Eves. 


KEYMER 


In merside location mma 10 
minute, drive o» mo County 
town at Carmarthen. Property 
romprtses of 8 bedroomed nert- 
dence. a range of indttwul 
oulhuttdtos and 21 acres of 
meadow pasrure. Additional 
and aeauaoie U reauired. 
LLeweUyn Huuurfkeys. 0267 
237 812 

BYH ESTUARY 3 beorm bunga- 
low with spl e ndi d slews. 
SUuated m (hup! count; ysrte 
near Talybonc Dyfed. Large 
Garden. £39.500 ParD c o U ra 
from JObn WaUdns 8 Co. 
109701 612464 

MUL1TV Wes wales cottage near 
M4. s beds, sinmg room. KKrtt- 
m. bainroam. CH. wood store, 
garaen. panoranuc rural slews. 
freehold £26000 0792 

■MOOR (Gwynedd L 1973 large 
drCactied CB7.500 (Neqodabie 
re SH9/A3J 0248088270 


to Ore gradsus summdings of a 
new Errgfon Courtyard cot&ge or 
BaL specrfly des^ad tor pmacy 
and Bidependence n old age. Tre- 
(fitiool actrtBctau Attractive 
attngs. Modsn tatties in aB 
coeaoes art flats, mth 244nw 
warden sence. And onr t5Bye» 
leases protect jmr capital loo. 
From 2794X10. Dewo. Berts. 
Nwtfate, Somerset Ftfl Cstris 

KKMS 

4LT. Tel: 01-937 4511. 


aaMOELLA Luxury 2 bed. 2 bain 
apartment S«uated on Rio 
Rrah Gou Course. Olympic we 
port. Terms courts. Under- 
ground oarage. telephone, 
security Panoramic slews. 
Beauuruay ftu rasbe d. £59.000 
Please phone: C770&409138 


M m—ijEium red 
letting sendee Mthn the 
world fanBus Bendriat 


■AJORCA. Puerto Poaensa. Spa- 
cious tuny m oderoq e d 
apartmenL 3 beds. 2 bam. (1 en 
uitri. fined kdctien. thing ira 
Seafront postton m beaudfid 
area- £99.0QOeno 030822987 
Days or 0308 8SS26 Eves 


Teneoi smrerang paoL gen 
dub and cnaa Nn aa l centre. I 


* Priees from £35/100 te 
£75.000. 


«WSE BIRTHS 


For test efficient pers onal 

service finding home$ in the 
South West, contact 


SOnWWH. Superb ce ra r jl 
! kocauoti nisi abose old god 
nrone- Four dooHe beds, each - 
with b athroom. Large private 
garden wnh swimming pool. 
Cl 80.000 ooo Trt Mrs Ed- 
wards OK 01892 3260. 


53 Upper Brook St., 
London W1Y IPG. 
TkL (01) 629-0883 


UGNTWATnt Very CMncttMntfir 
• Mealed for eonuiwbop. close to 
M3 Superb mod Oorgtan syte 


CHUKT Mr Famium. Grade n 
Mill hour with mill pool and 
race app 3 acres. 6/6 beds. 3 
rings 3 baths, kitchen, out 
build mm A 3 car garage. A&om 
C 32S.000 T#l. 0428 714322 


8 miles Brighton. 1*6 mb 
Gatwick Airport. 20 mins, 
exquisite IS limbered period 
bouse in glorious waf set- 
ting. Often invited for the 
freehold region £185.000. 
Gifford Dana & fanners. 


WILTSHIRE 


P80PE8TYSEARCR 


3 High Street Ditthti&g. 
Teh 07918 3344. 


WEEKEND RrtreaL Oialko Val- 
te». douched period cottage. 3 
bed*, part CH. ganlen. parking. 
£87.000 aftera accepted for ear - 

ly roraMon. Trt 0722 
742909/21876. 


the prafesional 

rekxabon congtsny. 

0884-259381 

0884-257946 


WMfmML SU( WB Small 
bouse on the ramparta Cl 7^00 
ite«. 01 377 9262/0587 


MAHON, 

MENORCA 


tAA B i fl L w 2 bed house m 
- urban ealion. 3 patios. 2 baths. 
£59.000 01-730 1981 


UBwyannment4d«AfB 

beds. 3 bathrooms 1 en 
suite, large modem fcttchen, 
dining area, long (Swing 


room, separate tram room. 
2 balconies, fine view of 
labour. Fully funtishad 
£70.000: unfurnished 
£65.000. Cotoured brocfwe 


detached home In prefro*«» 
rotate Hating prttale Uriu- « 
backtno onto woods. 4 beds- 2 
batl». 3 reept. te^e «J/ WW W- 
cIMKrm- drtacMp UguMf ^ 
rage » acre ton ~,^ 000 
r/h Batniwi iO ZTOJ 76I2& 


WOKWC Lge mod 4 dble bed de- 
larhrd Itw with granny annex. 
DMe ter. raroori. S faring sect 
odn with moOTUig Waterloo 2B 
man cio7.ooa Bvllert 41619. 


C19&00O WOfcUlV 


OLD Mlimoise In Rulher vaBtt. 
end of bridle paD>. 18 atm A 
barns. Recently featured on 
T V cw&OOO and Jacobean 
stable Cameroon merfeakiDg 
lake In ground, at Manor 
lunne wailed garden. 
£109.000 Foresee*. Broadoak. 
Healhfieid. T Suss ex. 04362 
6505 


THATCHED COTTAGE w«i pan- 
oramic \ iew^ 7 miles M4 U16). 
2 beds, tee gdn. gge/pkg. Very 
pel 'Jb- Good order Otters on 
£600000793 SS3661 
4 BEBBOOHKD cottage property 
with sroao garden on the 
Church Green in Burbage. 0.1. ft 

£7000010 6721 810757 
TWO snw 17th C collage on 
Somerset border £35000 T 
HOSKINS; 730 9937 


PROPERTY TO LET 
COUNTRY 


wmnu EL PARASO new 3 
bed house, beautdul newt. ; 
CliaOOO 01 730 1981 


WANTED On long lease Urge 
™=urv teta* /terror. ousc 


poucrsershire / HerMorrHilte 
L Tel 0480 31 148 (day> 


NO TIME TO SEA1KHT OoMaci 
Annchalr Home HunUng. 01- 
323 0660 


ISLAND A brauttfnl tumgafcm- 
in Reykalatut. 4 Bedroom*. 2 
reerpuan rooms, luxury bath- 
room*, sauna and swimming 
pool Freehold £170000 
Wanted pan-mcnanw tor 
house ih England. Trt. Oi 663 
7 28S. Ask for John Adams. 

MAHflOJLA beautiful tllla. Two 
beds. Two raerps. Pool and gar- 
dens £35000. Trt: 0789 
293111 


Tet 0252 722 251. 


CANARY ISLANDS 


PROPERTY ALSO 
APPEARS ON PAGES 
18 , 19 , 20 & 21 


MWmN G DEAN Nr Brighton 
Drtarned bungalow. 3 beds. 2 
bains, lounge, dining hMI. pm 
knmm. injury room gas CH. 
double gwM. garage. SW 
garden, good family home 
IS7JOO Tel 0273 34064 
•rAcningsi 


TYWYN 

Rhoslefain i 

19 miles from Dolgellau, and 10 miles from Aberdauey j 

Luge 7 bed 3 storey Welsh stone bouse of immense 


HOVE Adelaide Creseni. Beauu 
fui period house, ma imn 
Complete vacant psiMHon. 20 
rooms on 5 floors Own car 
purfdng A garden SrtlaUe liars 
or namerinraroe C207.GQ0 
f/hoM no Offero <02731 736363 


character. Available for 5 months rent, highest impeccable ! 

references wu^it. Rent based on fifiOpjnacL j 
Fatten, Camtnan Rowe, H«h Stretf, Tywyn, Gwymrid. j 
0K54J 710537 


COSTA DEL SOL/WtZA Apian 
nserm and villas for sale (ram 
C20000IO C2 mHhon. York Es- 
Uta. 81/82 Criwford SL 
London W1 oi 734 0535 
HR CAHMA. Large beaCti pent 
house. 3 due beds, large 
K«fl»gp. 2 baths, fully funustied 
F/H C28.O0O Ter lor colour 

photos <07451 S25M 


MKAFLORE5/ MARBELLA. He 
sales diauable CorpudyraWr 
sating on mi AHoSoteAgenb 
lor lirvun tllla dpirtopmein a 
large SNnnh n-safr agmey 
; Fuengiroia OI 4do 2481 tTJ 


AMA HB . UI MU' A COUNTRY 
OJIO. S Tencnte. Apartmcstts 
4 villas iron CIS. 960. IO rams 
from me airport, excellent facd- 
ilm le bench tenm*6owfa 
ndtng-2 goU courses and much 
more Tel. i?4 hrji or 021^43 
7 025 or Ol 938 2616 
rtMHira SOUTH The I de- 
v rtoprarnts an San njigurt Galt 
Course mrrfpolung sea. or su 
pert properties be hurl Konrad, 
adiacml la new Uanna. nr Las 
Amenras Trt Gran Sol Proper 
lies >07721 25987 i24 hni 
AWP* member Free brochwr 
CANARY ISLANDS Cngthh bull 
der oilers land and raosirurlion 
on the beauuiul Ha dr La Pal- 
ma: ire oral ban Aparudo 41 
Tazararte renerlle. Caoarias 


\ 


SPAIN 





Oh 2S HMiilmi Gaakv tapoa. 

•fctn ^ew Q534 - 33S23 Or 3224 or wnfe fO 
Q4«|pnpi l GM-L MARKcViriC IIP 
feSeanttauB t?-i9Seaw»R» S Hewr Jnev Ctene- Isdto 



, .-iw' 1 e 


V- . -- 






Man UA Broker 

A 


J t =sS 

r> -tMjLi 


mOMCtfTE 
JIM 6 LES REAR 
MOJACAR 

cosn MjsnviMiOL v*n a 

CRN0MM8 9M8> tWK 1-ltiH 




TENERIFE 


iFRUMd, fteffl £n.qB 

VMM fe) 


Fv the l»B3t ssiedion of IfiBas and Apartineflls on ttvs 

beautiful island contact 

THE OVERSEAS PROPERTY CENTRE 

t^speriafegn advising on Whote-awo as^ 

TeiMwnoship anti most ™ 

idol property tor you fr®n ow 2L500 no* on offer in 

-Americas - Critttanos - SUmcio 

BegettftomoigoperianreaPdfuUovwsoasreoresantttai-lfistt 

our shoNroom or for doteib anda bredws ring now on 
061*941 7022 or 061-960 5497 (24 brs) 

THE OVERSEAS PROPEBTY CENTRE 

The Downs. AKrindan WA14 2QD 


soutmampt6n 

soeioe 

or tataphorMR 
<0703) SS8910 


COSTA KL SOL 

AMAB 


PROPERTY FROM 

£13,000 


CMalmKMSol * 

Houses. Bungalows, BuslnessA Coiwnwoal proportias. tenfl 
Ouuatopnrt. 


Regdar inspsetion visits. aiJactwa mortgage A bnmvadiag*** 

Lloyd M ich — i Own— LM- 


H yqo know a conpmy «f- 
teBta cherts i sapflft 

setection tf Wfas. 
Bars & Con wre rere i Pm>- 
orties (ram £20,000 1 
upwards on the Costa dal 
Sol wtb free ttflbtt to pv- 
daseis. a rep tffef in 
Spain. English speaking 
Directors who crenge 
mortgages & take cam ol 
ah tenoHes of padre*. 
That tfns an exoaflent tf- 
tar-stts sendee A ratty 



-u - - 




; \ r,v v: 


looks after its cfente,jDD 

would eoreiv use it that 


FREEPOST 
Fore Street Totnes 
Devon T09 5BR 
Tet 0803 866163 


would sandy use it 1 
company is Fletchers- 
Ring os on (08 
5515*1 <2* Hr*) 


“1CANPESSONALIY 
RECOMMEND EL 
BcnANKtr 

‘Tt&'BmWamtl.dataSBmaC 1 


FRANCE 


OfU 

M^UMDd!TSL 


abcMtftd 

TmewM |n 


AoaiaeetstnmSI&aOmeB 
Hade BkWe Nonas tnmSIBOD 

i sejBrasmftw* 


Contact JLM 

W9 raiwhrmW M. 


E H waWP be M M h— ett efc 


mypennaneahQOje. 

taateBtocteBe-WL- 

BWofecranOSl-2369306 


anatr 

Tet nsz earn 


ICNIlunC La Matenza. New sw- 
dm m. View over Atlantic M 
Teidr. 32 mi m. In When A b atti- 
raam raraplrte. D Mark i&OOO 
or eautvaleM n other currency. 
Similar HI S2MO-D Marie 
23.000 or rtdvalm Trt. 
<01034221 331846 oiler 9pm 


CYPRUS 


CtUUNONDC 3nl n rtudlo. 40 mod 
com. Mrterb view MR bloor ide-. 
at vkierv USaOQO (r 0244. 
□204 319074 

LOWS VAUJCVi GrisK QPPOrtu- 
niy far Work ropNOi 

onpeenolion Sumb comer 
Wei for period beamed 

buwttnnx mio fOuneen wu-von- 
lamed unds. upc mow ond 
Mmanoa. now lawn: tmw- 



JMSTBNJUi 

Bag— setorb- 1st te ML don 
HAod & tjcefienr saops. Salt con- 
y.v.1 2 i*ic recce, fatten, bate, 
imcaiy. Steps da— Ip pm— ran 
Lso 33 yn. Senice ctargs DR. 
1500 per nun. Sat been — 
Ca v prwffl brae. Pnce ID iaeL 
funten. et DR. 200000. 

Bill 0683 628112 
far Befalls. 


CYPRUS. A variety or aiUiU eet 
dengned vtw* for sale S el e cted 
Mea. In la: Peter GeargUKtes. 
Prop* Fin Ltd. PO Box 1907. 
Ummm. Trt: 081 7CT79S. 
CYFRUS. Property oroWetnr? Ex 
Hung or contemplating 
Essential advice SAE. Reply K 
BOX C92. 


MOM Freehold, bole AornH 
Taylor * Tester. 3 King Sheet. 
Caw CruotewL WSx. ri>342> 
24478 


MARBELLA RESALE 

Specafets fw vBas. 


apartments, towntnusas. . 


woman long readme Franc*. I 


FRANCE 


roam, has srumn attrartne 
laramouM. m beoutaui coua 
irrade lag tee m Teuton* 
airport . WeuM wbct\ik aMcr- 
auons. Tel: Iter 107831 852748 



ROUSSILLON. \enr large ctwrac 
Irr house, ouirl tWage. foOtbOh 
Pl'rMN9.«UHlnM.CMMT 
Mi potential. C56.000- Trt 
0925 776919 

FRANCE - AH rrgkmi ntnoa- 
rfwKviUX Irnm CIOOOO n 
itanre .-nadablr. Brochure. 
V dioirt Ud 01-485 3T35- 


01-351 3668. 


SWITZERLAND 


DORDOGNE/ LOT 
SPECIALISTS: 


GENERAL 


tatt pKteti wopentes n 
tad tonqttty. 

annaisati ni 2 


ANDORRA 


*aooHa«MRiiCttffe 


IMEHRM between MoMr CrtW 
and Kalian fronocr ■ chomaog 
' Art Gallery for sale wiih 
| eoulpoed kiKhcnene and show- 
er. ExceHenl location in old 
I Menton near beach aod mtau- 
I ranis. Pnce: F 700.000. SWCk 
| available U rcgulrcd. Write: 
[ von Wrttrten. 69 Pom de 


Buy dred burn tutor aSNfts 
fForo B O JOtt. F ait 
wagM ttth iwfa sHw e t. 


France. 0650Q Menton 
Caravan or Tel. 57 27 8& 


On Moon Pngs LM. 
5 MmhMb RhA 
Laodn W11 4NW. 
Tel 01-221 6843. 


■uk « raw, t 

mtiwMvK 

RmhRiNRi«R|iH 

SMHtoMUH 

WVAC5JL. 

Pn*»IIMlMet-PHal 


UKUEta fPertgordi 2 year 
aid rout level house. 2 bed 
rooms- Lounge 6m by 4m. 
Mtehen/dmer. Lower noor. can 
be convened iMostwuo. Owner 
leaving France and ntutno oe- 
low cart. Tel. 0103355531311. 


PORTUGAL 


ptete range at arogertte* Ihrtvce 
60 snakr/Mnsir rewrt*. Eir 
Verbtrr. vuian. Lake Lucerae. 
Bernese Oberund etc. Contain 
Hilary Scon Property. «2 up- 
per Rtchmond Hoad West. 
London SWld TcL 01-870 
6585 


ITTWHZ l kra centre. Apart- 
menL modem, fully emdpped. 8 
bestrooms. 2 tulconys. oarage. 
View sea. into- Noa beaches. 
£87.600. Trt.EvaA WVndsOl 
422 1 688 


BELLA ASSOCIATES 

The name for property 
in Algarve. 

Extensive choice of trad, fame 
for emvennu. brapy wflas. n- 
V B Sf ments and advice. Our futy 
tNttwd. EnQteb i Ptetugne 


MESHARE 


PARK Centre 16. Newly 
modernised comfmtabie studio 
flat, ftdly furnished for unfor- 
ntihcdl Knctwnene. shower. 
W.G El 20 4700 freehold. Reply 
to BOX F72 

OUTERS M FRANCS WhteSrtCC- 
non of restoence*. visa, etc 
Free catalogu e on leoucrt. ElV. 
MarchaBd de Stem.- B.P . 78 
33027 Bordeaux Ooex France 


team amt too. Contact Jean an* 
evenra on 0706 67S32 or Ben* 


CALK COSTA BLANCA. Rare 
chance to antiore trcehoM 
"nmeshare rebate* m nodular 
Mod. at Nrpa rales- Mob 
tram JanSnL 5 Lyston Gar- 
dens. Uston. Sudbury. SaKOHc. 
TM 0787 73672 


timeshakeux 


P1IONE for o-sarh of THE bcocto- 
side dmetopweni on the 
Aloarve. Apartments from 
£25600 with leaseback, vufcw 
from £4SJOOa (002068) 288. 


LANQBMJE Umesnare wanted. 
Week 30 or 32. i or a tod- 
rooms. T« 0783 298537 
nnungv 


RENTALS 


HOUSES MID FLATS THROUGH 
OUT THE DOCKLANDS AREA 

WsSfDEHTIAL LETTTK8 DEPARTMENT 
TBL- 0101-790 9560 


MASKEL1S; 


/AITIO Have OBauWuey furnished or 

U| I 1C 


m 


houses and fiats for long tots 
m Chelsea. Kensington and 
Wbrtjteuon areas. 


nmD 1 ” 8 * 2 BV946 9447 
IL/I I RJ (CHBSEA) (WMBIBOiq 


gw Eacgns 

jrarpH strst sun Prom. «- 
ftritsted base on 3 He rate 2 
tens ted rocBR. l tfft tetem.2 
wtorms. sOap ira. dong nn. 
pood tauten, garage- and aydan. 
ggLgwLf JN CO W. £600 par 
BRWCOTT NVEHIE SMS HUM. 
awroij dscoraad raatsnnefc 
S“o swu roan, botany. 
taM double betera. 2 totems, 
m. coassnaiury. 

Wttto >S nmA ' 
London SW3 2HP 
Tetephooto BIvSSI 221*. 


Property Management Services Ltd. 


SDOTff KBSHffinm 

. s* 7 

A stunning Ket^ngton C<X- 
nwrty furmsteJ aid 
grated to an excellent 
a&mrt. 2 Bearoroa. m 
^2 Bm Refitted 
KflCfat £4Difa( negotiable, 
225 I97i 


I PALACE PROPares! 


^ to ^ B d proiann uninrayihw 

rw«?raS”' B ” 


AVA&JUBLE 

Tel: 01-488 8926 


retomnr wu ns. twdy m ■ 
sr* ntte ton tegB mutfaMQ 
noonra aw tsnw Grata? 
tftfc beds. 2 bxs. li .ld.GB 
CH/CHWK5p« 
lumwiomcx 

BHOWI 


IADBR0KE grove 

W11 


Britfn, modem fad floor 1 U 
m flood anver- 
1 Bedroom, 1 Battem. 
raw laehBn. Swrious 
Reception Jtoom. Aflrac&vWy 
furnished and decorated 
throughout Sl40pw. 727 

JQJ 


ooreoi srosT wn. Men «► 
nal nas cfle DO 3 Do. nraiy « 
Oseu Larpt nap'may thorn 
betenaiBte » ttoaran. 1 1 It 
Uwg rra totem. Cm CN/CHN 
E39Tbu Cssoriy 

Fttucoomci 

IHM7M 


.. MAYFAK. wt 

4te floor imbbss btt W 
ntt W S p ntoaBe 2 ooutHebpfe 
21 tofts. 1/2 insmn rooms, MM 
_ff*.P «-3lai a inss,E450 

P* n» AMte no* tor tara M 

Sttarai al teteo sm one ba>- 
morows. n rtcendy Ktetaated 

Bvraj ns 

fang tel. 


Profrisora A oh.it 
nrouirr rials i. houw* 
Irom Qclebcr/Nopcator From 
J "J ** 5 to 1 jrar Briiannia 
R-stdcm m Lrtlmgs 938 3755 
MuqCAN BANK urgently re- 
niurn luxury 

Chrtico. KnJShbwS^SSS: 

areas. OOO cioOoBw 
tonito EiUte Agrats 581 5i36 
HNOOK BHT1H to to lytw. ,« 
JJr FIM Rin/On ra, i dbte 

Ml 1 vlurty M| Piof rough. 

™ ste4 , " , c,ao TH 01 


« M«V. 01382 alitor 
hflrin « the Park RrarntS 
Bark olflc,- 01 386 98SSL^ 


AVAILABLE ■■taWTB.v *, 
torralikim pa.au hcoui. nwj. 

oi eiio? in 


CHUCA.Smtoi 8L8MCL Ncwtir 
tested lal floor (lot. cn.atoc. 
Ki ocamctp tnr Co tel oto- 
•*«»« months amt 
m » mg. AvaaMfe now. Trt 
TTarv or Rowna Ol 6292791 
Mnn Fn no oarats ctl 

umanr wawm tomns 

ptort od 4* w Htghgto VU- 

to 9r H uy touago. tat sHchen. 
* tob. 8 trains, eoraer- Tt* 
Oumu- ronwthmra. Avnfl raw 
prnod enw b mns. C50O.W 
"*9 Pndvrti A Om 340 7000 

*w*w ww»« sirorth iflm ccp. 
mn 8 Bedroom period ceuntnr • 
town ‘j or anon*. Fulty r*- 
‘tot'd * renovated TasteMn>' 
toraemro a dMtrottd. 
£400nw Trt Amulrt LM Wor- 
•toiro 21356) 

ALrtMrs an mtrnnttns. con- 
rtanllv diamng vvMtwn of 
tuts A ttaon 
cioopw-ob sooyw Bniitom # 
"ton. Kromm A central 
London 033 3822 -. .• 

HOUJUO PK. Cdrtvratrtvt Me 
Oh' Ftewm 2 -m Hrt 
o^aoktno 9dm. Dote roc * bale. 
SS.JK-, m*ri «•, irt» rflm- 
CH/C HW met OtWOWR* 
Prowl* SrtTvtec* 996 *176 . 



*4, UFI 



1 •• - 


Vz.teW*' » 


BELGRAVIA 


k:»TVv ; f'?.a 


NlKBI.!. il 


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M \ \ V.: \U 


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■ter"' * ’ 

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rentals 


Quraishi 
Constantine 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 15 1986 


- 

£175 pw P“ 

HIUUEBa. ^1®° pw 


SErasS^*- 

tomy. PwSfbnbSjSt " #H| lBr Bma " 

*175 pur 


•'Bi SSj jaat SaB IfflgKias 

***&&*** 


£150 pw 

ugaggSSB— v 
j£05rBttyaa 

£325 pw 

P®* w.toitotod SSSSSX'^SSt 


£270 pw 

^ **■*. M b fiat tar KflML 

P#OP&p7FS IN MANY OTHE R AREAS ALSO MAILABLE 


27j^ar!s Court Rd, SW5. 01-244 7353 




LA CREME DE LA CREME 


ST JOHNS WOOD, NWS - CISC pa 

1 Bad. recap, n wtOMh. pgrtdng. 

SWISS COTTAGE, NW3 - £300 pw 
Ruffit twn mwmoota aoafl now In M condL En 
•Ma lor monof. 


HAMPSTEAD. NWS • <200 pw 
Larga Rh on 2nd Boor In ok location an 
lovely views. 

2 bafib. ig recap. « wt, b«h. np we. porfong. 

ST JOHNS WOOD, NW8 - GS50 pw 
Newly BWUretN how* m prime Rscatwo 
doo* to fill amenoaa. 
i B&H. 2 recaps. hWy « W, 3 oatfa. garden. 


fgggi ^^ KU , 3m . 9 



ADMINISTRATOR MUSIC 

Total reaponslbfihy tor an offca attnini &uau on wttfi 
this sucoKCfatf, independent motf label. Duties 
include car Beet mstxances, personnel admlntstra- 
tion and aB general Tioos o ka ep mg'. A varied role 

for someone with at laasi 3 years office manege- 
ment experience. Based in Norm west London. 
Age 30-45. Typing 50+. 

SPONSORSHIP! £9,250 

Organise high-flying soda] occ asi ons such as 
Wimbtodon and Ascot as PA to the sponsorship 
end P.R. Director of this tortious name company. 

22+ - "only *rf ««mina, top sKffls 

eom Social awareness. Good 

JL grooming/educetion. Young soaatxe 
JKwC inehr team. Only 25% secratartaL 


FURNISHED RENTALS 

EATON PLACE SWI SCARSDALE PLACE W8 


AlLnUivc ap artmeni m Befeava with wdl ExocScot 7th floor flu with stunning views 
propo nroeco rooms; jhawmg room, dining reception room, khdwn/breafcfea room, 
room. Kitthca/bresk&si room, mam bed- main bedroom sane, 2nd doable bedroom 
room write. 2 rather double bedrooms. 2nd and bathroom, balcony, car mi* mg ™rp 
bathroom, study and separate WC. sad porter. 

Prom £650 per week From £475 per week 

A SELECTION FfiOM OUR REGISTER 


6 Arlington Street, London SW1A 1RB 


01-493 8222 



EXECUTIVE HOMES TO LET 
IN PRIME LONDON LOCATIONS 

r Personal help in setecting from over 500 prestigious 

Studios $150 per week to five bedroom 
Ambassadors residences up to $3000 per week. 
Booktet - Guidance Notes for Tenants' available on request. 

ScJo NwWoodNw" 586 3088 b. 


pr^j JOHN D WOOD cV CO 



harpenoen 


(Lantor 25 raws. Si Pmns 85 
■ms. dosa M1/M25) 

A ongnficent deeded resnlBnce 
at dwaestr & «aksy « mnw 
raadanf inau Endy me* 
xtoto to On Qty 6 gd idwev 
Fad gas di 5 bHfrns. 2 Mnms. 
slwr. 3 reap runs. tatty mt dta 
ggs. Beanbftt Undscaped gdre. 
And begnmng NovemMr lor op 
to 2 years m £1 .500 pen nc. 
SALVESENS 
ItofMIto N6B2J) arat 


BBimiMUD GBMSt SW7 Pretty, new 1 bad Rat a avert) newly 
converted pered Dudibng Recap) wfltxmngra taJnn«iti lUmacre. 
dWebecrm t Mhmi Loratynta Amt now Ira no W a CZDOpw neg 
msam GHS. SWF bgitt mo mgra ? bedroom -mra Lgiecepim 
dnng area, u Ale and oopa beareom. end natiroom. And m lor a 
re tt-xi ft 75 pw 

GOTH TOMB, wu Huge newly done Id fl ft* ? Ate bedrooms. ncrot 
web oeng aea taKhen. Afl mams Banroom. A tnrmxi a £200 pw 

IhWtm KW SVF Pen fumtiHd 3 bed mewi house ?dbtoad 
1 angle bedroom, recepi web dtang area. Mdao end Banvoom (untti 
Jxuza) Garage. Avert oowleraiaagcoMai rental ot EU5 pw. 



01-589 8 ~! 22~| 

T ^ ; M 77 



BRUCE 


BRUNSWICK GARDENS, W8 

AdeSgNhd 1 Bedroom fbt Bathrm, Ftod Kit Sffing ftn, 
1st floor waft-up. £2G0pw. 

BENBOW ROAD, W6 

Chanting 3 Bedroom flat 2 Bahrms. Sithng Boom with 
doors into walled garden. FuUy fitted ft, E 200 pw. 

CADOGAN STREET. SW3 

Family House. Large lO/Breakfast Room. DMng Room 
Drawing Room. 4 Bedrms. 2 Bathrms. Sturfy/5lii Bedroom. 
.Ctoatooom. Attractive Swdens. £750pw nag. 


JAr.-Er. MOUSE. 12 * F.NSiNCTON'SCUAe?*:. 


| Marsh & Parsons 


LAMBTON PLACE W11. 

UNFURNISHED Newly converted maisonette bum to a 
very hapi standard. FiMy fltted modem kit with aa ma- 
orares. 2 tJbte beds, study, bed 3. spacious recap, 2 

01-221 3335 

BRUNSWICK CARDENS W8. 

SUPEAB First floor Res wham has been recently ratir- 
tehod to ■ Iwh standard. Due recap with balcony, wed 
fat ed a n. hath, dble bed. Available now for Long Co Lots 
at £250 pJW. 

01-937 6091/9622 


BELGRAVIA 

Bolebec House. Luxurious executive ser- 
vice apartments available in prestige 
block. Fitted out to highest standard to 
include colour TV, video etc. 
Service includes business centre, 24 hour 
porterage, maid service, underground 
parking. 

'Studio and 1 bedroom currently available 
from £325 p.w (min 90 days). 

Tel: 01 235 2549 (Office hoars). (T) 





' CHESTERTONS 1 

^ — R ESIIJENTI A L — ^ ' j 



- ADMIN/PA 
TO £111188 

Flut Street EWotanyBbcMD 
work pwtnArty in me adnans- 
iihnii area ot a Newsoaoer 
6co«p. so gooo constuncabom 
sms som + anaflMy DdM 
wrtb mens re inev batxwa It 
you are 22 + ad ntms&d 
plrese eaH Roy Stockton 
01 734 8466 

STOCKTON ASSOC 
29 BmftHnm St. MfL 


TT'TT'K^q-irqTTI 


£10,000 + REG 

Required to hep run offee d 
smafl fnenfly taw firm n 
WC2. Bootence essential re 
a dMHy b> wore inw pres- 
sure. Sparest) an aUnreage 
Twl 01 831 2741 
No Agencies 



E ni na R ol c it W n w tl eq u l w i 

OFFICE MANAGERESS! 

WP OPERATOR! - LITIGATION SECRETARY! 

(penmid e*ay ngmee) 

ah most Rm eqmntt. m> Mb a anpaM sfary. pla 4 meks MAHyi 
Pirese cared Soe BaAe ter mm orefc/m ei ww 

01-967 9323 

HOSTETTLER A HAMMETT 


SUPER SECRETARIES 


TWO TAIfTAySINS GARDEN FLATS 


AD mcarerty ftnad'and famished. Two bedrooms, two bathroom s 
Bid modem kitchen. Lnrae raoep bo n roam wrtth fiont rod roar 
hefcorees- Separate rooTgaroans and GARAGES to each flat. 
AvatauB lor gtx months, corapeny ML EflDO pw. 

. rtm i Mispho n s HstwMBs <w 01-Z36 73— 

ro« VCVflNG TODAY. 

a Hottflngs Ltd on OHM 0M0. 


MARBLE ARCH W1 

Large luxury l double bedroom apartment in. 
prestigious block. Newly Decorated and 
liinu&bed throughout. Rentals 3 monihs/1 year. 
£250 p-w fully me. 

GRAHAM PROPERTIES 

01 637 4782 



PORT STREET SWI Newly n>- 
turbohed unhareshed flsL 2 
beds. 2 baths, large double 
recap, mod tab £400 p.w. 
ETON PLACE SWI Newly tur- 
rushed flat 2 beds, 2 baths, 
good sued recap. M. £650 
p.w. 


ALBERT PLAGE W> Pretty 
house m os du ssc. 3 beds. 2 
baths, recap, ktvotnlng room 
£500 p.w. 

ROSARY GABORS SW7 

Modem first floor (ML 1 bed 
bath, recap, mod Ml £225 p.w. 


ORR-EWING ASSOCIATES 
01-581 8025 


OIL SECRETARY 
FROM n^oo+ 

A Indus iMcraaiioaf Oil 
Company lequrcs an effi- 
cient secretary in titer 
London office to watt in ns 
refined products depattmoiL 
AppbanB mist be able to 
esc a word processor and 
possen shodltand and gco- 
enl secretarial skills. An 
intoes in world affliis 
woeld be a dcfiniir advan- 
tage. bin is not csscntiaL For 
ihe ngbt caadtrtaie. ibis va- 
cancy can lead to good 
opportunities for personal 
development and future 


PRIORY MANAGEMENT OF 
KEW GREEN 

Offers Selection from Current List 

HYDE PARK SWT Lux 2 bed. apt Md 00a. nmpm 

KEW GREEN Spacious « beds, part tufll. *S5f m 

BARONS COURT W14 5 beds + granny BaL C395p» 

RICHMOND CENTRAI. 4 bad Ms totonhse. ^5pw 

KEW GARDENS 3 bed flat £18%* 

01-940 4555 


12 HERTFORD Slim. 
MAYFA0LW1 

Wan ndHsan w amoMe tar 
opcimg d Hemoms **■«■* can 
MW a sdocKM ol fcmry Stude 1 
A2 Bed areremns sanreto 6 Oyi 
pw 24 im> ponareR- 



wm**r 

•MIC 


to * 




ir ^ 


*** . 




m~'** * 



SHOO. Bupwtt audio ore mwan 
moetc-ro Work. Pc*rkine^ pw 
Pyr a Pannm "»d6 2930 


OHUUhparnnrwrtlmMI- 
nd i douMr- brdrwmm not 
USO pm TN. Ol 829 *470 
loiiHi-t 01 '87B soar* memo) 


WWMBtXDON Supnti luxury 
unulnwnl. 2 Due. 2 WW. FS, 
MliiM-n. waUi/dm Snarwus 
nwunUHMxi mulirrr iront/rrar 
nuitnr. Or Oov w rom 
imn/iHIW W Ol 879 0801 

ri iiiiiwjv 

njuteaCMi rHumonrd i w 
ILM Co M mrtudme 
(SlUvrum ticopw. TtHOI 
530 4881 

BArmssA ?2"L 

Niw. I utiy iwnoorel n w^dwr 
tmK. 1 wares g_t»N |> ». CjfWP- 
realty uttiwn 
nMiW Irt TH flBS I99T. 

CHELSEA. NPWly «>"' rT ^ fl P*? J 
sonrUr. WrtWftllKl f ^ 
nrtfv 2 

C250m* Ob ire 060882 S» 
FULHAM. Lwra Si- ** “S 0 **' 

Pk. Emrehmi iam» 

brtk ,tm* nrrf . ,*•«. 9*^ 

CH CT96 pw RAN 731 3 o3d 
MULCT ST, WU *Go Wi 3 beds, 
igr rrrrb. ? bath*. k« 95 * Co-. 
CS25 6W iwshiity ng"; wjw 
dnr. ravKH Row 01 wl 
clapham coaaaaoN f 

bntioom nrwly hnjJW 
drew.xrel tire. 2^ “**55L 
(.l^po rer 1 TatOl o77 2re» 
iKXn.iv 11 .WB A jiwr G pm 

MAYFAJH mw FEW- Thr 
mow luxunouk are*/ raawi 
l/b bras best pore* °» 

9612 ill 

an. superb maaern bouse hjoJJJ 1 
rt Mew* 3 bed . 2 Bau1 _C c $^S 1 
hH. poruiai- £3TB rt «■ 0‘ 109 
2007. 'TV 

AN MH ACUU ITC Hmtgrtrad 
GCN. COI TV. 286 0000 

0379481 TheaunWirf teirmem 

Hit win* uwUino wsi rental 
wanenm m muipre tw™ 1 
Lnudoii rersix ClW^OOftiw. 
AmtACnvELT (urnnnea WM 
a .im prd a imr. rh* 1 16 
KHvr- Rvret. lumum. ClSO pw. 
IN OL 22S 3677 
ATTRACTIVE SW 3b«liw* Cdn 
CH Phone. Ctosr ltrar flgg 
pu ftreual Guide 0» bBu 66K* 

a west mo nre ”2"” 

Lra 19 rre saWLM own* 
UMHr Ol 402 T30I 
WKMHJBMN* 3 era. ran l*«* 
All mod rnnttjm, S? 
prm Telr947 S6-8/W>4<to*2- 

COUUUXM WOOO*- , ™ ?!?“ 
nil Lux 4 bnd. g 
res. h-. een-^ LJgy - 
nmrftom (»Ti 



MAYFAIR 

(Owtes S!) 

anbassadorW residence. B bodrma. 3 reoap. * bath 
f quartan. Al amaniuas mdudlng 2 treuphone Unas. 
Avadabto nov. 

£1,200 pw 
Tel: 01-723 7631 


SYDNEY STREET SW3 

FiiHy fomabed patio garden Bat. 2 bedrooms, 2 
bathro oms, sitting room, rjwijwg hull , kitchen. 
Independent CH and CHW. Company Let 
Minimum 3 Mon th * . i ! Wfl p.w. 

Tel: CM MALTBY 01 351 7475 


ACCESS TO 

houses, flats, bedsits, 
shares 

in all areas by calling 

Rental Guide 
01-686 6552 


AVAaJUOX MOW Luxury ores * 
hreor* £200 - O jOOO pw. Tet 

bunm cat Si 36. 





MUTWWK msi MS Sony bat flov 2 bad BiL 1 nesRnn. bafli. larai 
Man/dro rah rnat ana. wrong £135 pw. 

MmSDS BMWGB MS taBBCDOtt 4 DOd tana, houn. doofala raouan. 



MJUDA VALE, W9 

Brand new fbt superbly 
eoupped. 2 Beds. Lae 
Recap. Fitted Kit Bah 
TceTCH. TV. Video. Stereo 
'etc. 3/9 month Company 
let omy. £245 pw neg. 

Cartton Estates 
723 9612. 


OaCNANTWC I am century cot- 
tage no hounr mrtraond 
Crren. a nraraonu. 5 mtnuu-s 
09M0. Ciaopw. Co W. OL 940 
2979. 


F W SAFF (Mrewnui Sar- 
\ic«&> Ud rtw» reop*rth» tot 
CrimL South and Weal Lon- 
don ' Areas for waume 
dUPBcmt, ire Ol 321 8838. 


BAIIuSU PARK Chremlne HLBW |TfS|i Lib rud. AnUOUP 
Irejwum Lary lounee. ««T. 
dm"* ro om, d br era. _ uadi, ml 
knmen. i Dam. z wrs. amo leL q. ta ram nw Tel. Ol 431 
case pw aeg 01-223 SGO& 


■E s orrs hsr many super 
brand new interior denrewd 2 
bed 1M door 01. CIB Opw. 
Gavin Conner 381 8732. 


121 Hotaxf Part Ave,W11 

MEWS HOUSE, SO Hxton 
Maw rtwTOBiWHl 1 p aU 1 068 
Bam. (tap. Open ptti FF Hr 
ran Bnsauzst Bu. Btonom. Ga- 
ngs £160pw Smtts-1 wv. 
CO/Ws. 

ISLINGTON. Ni Large W a onai 
House ■ wo nw road «MW 
sbwl 2 Dtw Bawoms Rscep- 
eon Open pan Ff IW. InniBiwi B 
a wry tegh swaard Gdn £20Qn> 

I ytS CO fel 

01-229 9986 


ramme. mot OMtumna - 

Surrey Elraanttv appointed 
nouse, nvret-eoupped and Fur- 
mead Tine bedrooms, four 
balhroontk i three ensutoeL three 
■crentHn rooms, very urp 
DIM fciletara/breakfasl room 
and umuy room Sri m a «*» 
rerecMd t ktv garden. Easy 
■mess to A3. M2S. and MLS 
Auiuw now For 6/9 mocuns 
« Cl 260 ner calender moan. 
Properly Sere, ices Hwemm 
LUL Tet 104281 81241. 


Ba Vree CUIUM. Kndngwv 
w& DetigMul roach lour m 
prevaur courtyard, e a n m eed 
beams. MeMy of durMrr. 3 
bed*. 2 bam rl en sutte t. draw 
ing room onto terrace, ammo 
room. K Ut. £800 pw Please 
comart Suzanne - Cmway ai 
SauMMH 1 Ueadnaua on 881 
3023. 


ST. JOHNS WOOD KFW8. SUperto 
newly moaemned in to let 
LWtomuned or FurrOsned 2 
double beds. Large lounge. 
Fully ntied K « a Cn rente 
cloakroom. Parking. 5 nans 
tube ft shoos. Co let. 
C226/C260 pw Tel. Ol £04 
3348 no aoents. 


WtoBUDOIL LiMrty mod has 
ONpitM a 3 baonm. 2 baths. 2 
rrams.MUttn.ggE.gdR.EMS 
P-8. 

SWI. Qanatao Nfon Apt B MM 
ted S tan DM Dedrm. aw, 
good W C Mh. £175 pj*. 

W. HAMPSTEAD. 2 beam apL 
Moo tA My «8 han vtP tratat. 
Lgewrad now. npe> tt. Ml. 
M. gw £175 pv. 

HARLEY ST. Pmoyskalo U ta 
eaarten tattn. £95 pa 

01-499 5334 


TME UMM/SHOUT LET sneCOft 
Ms we rvave a urgr selectooo ot 
luxury 1/ 2/ 3/ 4 Bedroom 
note, with maid eervree interior 

designed ft cemraay Mcwd. 
AvolMMe Now can connaugM 
Properties. Ol 727 3060 . 


There is a competitive salary 
staring from £7.500, over- 
nme, 4 weeks holiday. Baja, 
pernios scheme and free 
hutches. 

Please contact • 

.Miss SMEW an 2357MB 
lor spg B c ari as hsm. 


EXECUTIVE SECRETARY /PA 
£10800 + Ob. Benefits We 
need a brkSN tndhTdual sretang 
tab Invotvemreu ft career proa- 
peels with WP or SH/TVP 
cbm*. The post- Involves work- 
ing In a SvetF mtemabonal 
emiromnent a a a Mnig a young 
Marketing Vice PfTMdrnf. Von 
wtn be Uateng wuh European ft 
Newyomft bpsra in our prrsU 
pna W End European HQ 
Language! or IBM. WANG PC 
tWFiia knowledge useful, 
caottadata Ol 488. 4011 


SHORTHAND/ 

AUDIO 

SECRETARY 

Smafl. (Handy propany 
company, amort, modam 
PiccactRy office isgenUy 
require presantabto. wnfe- 
Bpokan vorsatfls saoBtvy. 

2/3 yre experience VHP an 
advantage Vanod duties. 
Saiaty ra/tOO + haaohcare . 
+ bonus. Please phone 

Beverley Rees 
01-734 5043 


LEGAL c£9,500. 

Meal nopo mri ty to rank for 2 
mug renms n a mtand atw- 
rannwnl Stmutmng work Mth 
hgn rewnts ta tee ngM person 
Linsy office* near Hyde Parti 

Telephone 
Miss Westmacott 
on 01-402 3453. 






SHI Lovety patio (lot bi cobbNd 
Men Atirarlivo ft UgM 
RmpAfiMT leading to prrtiy 
nauo. New FT ku. Obie Bed. 
Bath Utility Urn. ' £2O0ow. 
COOUS B28 8251. 


BARGAM - WS Bright sunny flat 
with Carnal- ft Balcony S Bed. 
Rerep. KftSB rueptaon. 
£27Spw me. Cobban A Ooetee 
580 5481. 



P W OP EHTT NO */M c&soo pUn 
free travel PiaUggu Wl ra 
with knrty olhces and 4 very 
friendly beey otinmphere seeks 
■ bngnt Up marker ok/PA. The 
pontoon involves plenty of 
atom and ctienl Hawn and 
you win occasstonatly gccom- 
panv your bom when he 
surveys proemm. Appurants 
mum be well organised and awe 
to trar wi c 20 ■» good 
speduig and typing eroenuat. 
Call kale 01 B3i 7372 
KINCSLAND PERS CONS. 


SCC /PA WITH or wflhoui shore 
band C9.000 ♦ Presogwus City 
Co seeks a Ocnjhi wcflcduraKd 
Serrreary to become an tmrgra] 
phi of there young hard work- 
ing ntanageiMni consultancy 
dtvfeoon Ttb* will Be an enjoy 
able and rewarding Mb for 
someone who » a cwnpetaM 
oroamMr hat good typuig shun 
and ihe abduy to romcnurucaie 
weft « an levels Cab Kale Ol 
831 7372 KINOSLANO F*£RS 
CONS. 


FALL MALL Cutoery Regimes 
secretary/ m e ii oon a i. Good 
typing siandords and rempte 
boowepmo skips needed. Gal- 
lery Ungaro. SO Pad MatL 
SWI. Tel 930 1645. 


MACAZNRI CO. PA (O MO. 
90/80. Voung. ambitious, so- 
ctaMe company. £ 10.000 + 
review. Can Natal tot TED Agy 
Ol 736 9857. 



fl PU WAM Bt-UMual src/iMdg 
am Translations- esdubtudos 
and travel) £8300 234- Link 
I angirage Anns Ol B46 9745 




BOOR Keeper requtrra to tot* 
■Her routone amounts tor snvdi 
company in swa 8 hours per 
weekat CApre hour Tel Luan- 
da on 607 3QCO 


PART-TIME n re w n—Tf Ui 
SWI tbermarv/AMream lor 
Director, small company trad 
Ing internalMnaBy Hours and 
renutneraiion.oy arrangement 
PleaMFil surroundinga Good 
shorutand. typing, rettn and 
secretarial sklUyrnerUial Loral 
person prvftrra. Aonfy m wm- 
■ng Mease, in first instance io. 
Omnmunt tmrammiB Ltd.. 
AspnaHc House, Peiacc Street. 
London Swie ehs- 


PARTTIMC Qualified Afco u ntant 
reouired ftu small luanagentreil 
ronsutunrv in WG2 Hours and 
remunerhon by arrangcmenl 
Max. 18 firs p w Pteooe Apply 
hn wnling »o Pronw Lid. Mu 
von WuWmi, 7 hmimm Strest. 
wiv BAS. 

A*mqilE5 PART TUK pereon 
rrauwep to work - n 

Kmanmndoe dm With cates 

and general dunce Wnll) Map 
Kemr. 54 8f-auchamp Pure 
SW3. 

FART TMK Secretary for 
kniQflKOoage nmjtt CP. 
Salary and houn by a rr a nge- 
tneuL TH. 01 584 7980. 



the C3va» mean's cutty 
off a pfrseniBUan speech on nH 
lyprwnler . . then flop into the 
sauna . bask in the sManun . 
pun >oui 5 weeks hoiinay ... 

aqc ta*f Then red new. oi- 

493 5787 Gordon Vain 

Consul) ants. 

CONFERENCE Organisers- Scire- 
lore- nanm u*«idi. SorresafuJ 
market revearm romoany m 
Wl wm nota confer encev in 
Europe need an outgoing confi- 
dent a rrrtary to amsi and 
oroamw mrer Inrty young re 
wurm team Lob of phone 
• wore,, travel apt's, ptuvser sup 
port ino sno. 60+ typ. & WPi. 
'A' imefc. Sm«r e» Age 
20> Sal. C9JXXL Bmr rail 
4576052. HObMone, tK. con*. 


■OWN WT Young wcrNary 
win nrd an the sutnuialing m- 
gredRSils of a career 
opportunity working tn Urn toy. 
Marketing Service Office of 
pronunenl Kmghtsbnoqe Co 
Will M snores sponsardups 
PR advertising and nchibmora. 
Good shorUvana /typing and 
general organising plus travel 
arrangements Around £9.600 
pn Fringe bens. Joyce Gunen 
Ol 589 88017/0010 )RfC Const 

FA/SCC TO PEER CLIO.BOO A 
young PA n tort le am this 
wetEknown peer imotveO tn a 
wme range ot business activities 
retaung lo Ihe enierMicuneaW 
fMd Carrying ow a varied and 
brvotvtng Function, you will oe 
pong rap m a role which win 
open career doors. Skills 
100/50 wpm Synergy, the re- 
rrtuimeiu consultancy. O! 637 
9633 

PA TO CMKF EXEC r£ 11.000 A 
young but fopntsliraled Pa H 
son to asm the Chief Exec d 
lira wed known rompany Car- 
rvmg out a fwx-tioa involving 
coRMoerabie orgomsabon and 
lou ol wwt level baaon you 
wdl need to be fleklMe ana veil 
motivated Typing ol BO wpm 
rra'd Mi own use Synergy the 
rerrudment consultancy. Ol 
657 9633 

RCCEmoraST 20's for new re- 
notion area ol dettgmrui 
Kmgiuaondgetnl CO widbrlo- 
ral eojnl of busy office 
wetconung and dtrerung un- 
ion home and abroad Simple 
swum pew lelex and lax Sur- 
rounded by young tram 
managing campaign and mar 
vremg programmes c £ 8^00 
fringe bens Joyrr CMness 01 
589 8807/0010 iRec Cans). 

MEOSCAL secretary turn nmr foe 
Harley SI Surgeon Audio typ 
tng eWenuai Shorthand and 
nursmo experience an advan- 
tage Must have good telephone 


sense You ww oe wuiaifl an es- 
taomhed team m im dost 
surroundings. Salary negona- 
bte Phone for talervlew Ol aga 
5769 

NO SNORTNAND - Troni-desk 1 
seerrearv reouired toy otd-esiab- 
lisnrd rnardy nr Wesumretet 
Abbey Suo+f wo r k in g envi r on- 
mem combining high tmerere 
content with coMmuous variety 
and peOM e-contact Some work 
expmenre and good typing re- 
durded Age 20+ Pw-aic 
Wfp hone 01 4M 6787 Gordon 
Yaws GomdUnts. 

PA TO a«l met 5.000 Career de 
vrtopmcni sine keynote of this 
unusual dosi ban as you assnt 
. the Managing Direc to r of this 
rese a rch orm toted company, 
you will be Invorv rd n ill » 
pert, ol business armlty and 
wa| be g am mg Ihe exp io carry 

mi an eser role Skills 90/60 
wpm synergy Ihe recruitment 
ronsuoanry. 01 657 9633 


Then take Hus oppociunlty M 
dm tamata drinks ro looking 
alter then Uk oorrauon You 
nerd accurate typing 'some fig 
urrsi oref ui IBM sysirm 36 
■wig rrem-irami wetl oraaiused 

around MV supei voting crowd 

cC9 000 plus excellent fringe 
benefits Joyce Cuinrss Ol 689 
B8O7/O0IO <Rrr Cons). 

ADVEJmSOfG K> £8500 I no 
UKxinano i a voting PA m sort 
bv Dus loading agency to be- 
rame involved in handling 
am accounts wuhtn tons 
newly rr ruled DOSitoOh you will 
have me opp to develop you 
own role T vpsng al 56' wpm 
red'd Synergy me recrwtmem 
ramuiunry Ol 637 9535. 

BMJNOUAL SECRET ART. Use 
your flurni Frenrn/Gennan 
working at senior Imel tn the 
Capital market Dept ol a lend 
mg Merchant- Bank. Speeds 
lOO/toO Salary to £11000 phis 
evenem banking benefit, in 
riixbnq mortgage subudy 
rinme Appouilmcnb Lid. Ol 
256 7261 iRW Coiki 

A HOOD BET!? 1 k C 10.000 See 
man io MD of propeny 
tbvraon of ma»r wi insure 
group, uyfudum horse racing 
Iniereui 90+ uwrDuna and 
good phone manner Cau 377 
BoOO iQlVl M 439 7001 ‘West 
Em» Stcnn awes pll» 
The secretarial Oomulianto- 

CERMAN Senior PA/Sec with 
Banking exp. good German + 
rusty eng SH 28+ d j.ooo 
pfusprru Bovre Bilingual 236 
5601 icmp Agy) 


RECEPTIONIST 
PLUS 
£9000 neg. 

Thw mBurtuval matkeung on- 

nwtol rum [tan) iv uvkiag a 

Kcw-pmimu +fra Ins I hr wcofc 
» hrrennr futtv involved m 
rampan) areivlm. You rafl 
have the opp in o»na unh 
ptreeci admix and so ranch 
mure. Typ *, 31 45 »pn rcq’d. 

SYNERGY 

the recniiimcni roosulUDcy 

111-437 9533 


AIWNP. tn* not n r ce wr tty shore 
hand reaum-u as PA weretary 
to 2 chrertom ot corporaie fl 
nance advoere m torauWul 
penthouse m ECO £9600 + 
neg + profit Wore Cbf 577 
8600 iCMyl or 439 7001 reveal 
End) SECRETARIES PLUS 
The Secretarial Cnnauitanta 

MM US TOUR RFAY1 Architects 
/property Areevraon tun-up 
ctmvMnm need Office Mana- 
gnr/serrrtary la take rnargr 
Fmi class typing and snore 
hand, some boot, keeping ran 
Wiener Salary nrca £10.000 
pa Ring Clare Henmscey 937- 
£600 rmutune poasmte. 

SECRETARY /PA reguPM for 
Soenre Orenoc ol the Bntbh 
Nulrliian roundmlon Some 
S/H. WP WIBs arsireMte drain- 
ing available) Small friendly 
office learn r£7BOO, season 
hrfcet loan Conucl the BNT. IS 
Betwavr Squwr. London 
SV/1X BPS Tel: OX 236 4904 


breaking info PR Ideal position 
with raiment rareei prospects 
Mini have good typing weeds 
Salary G 6 -SOO ♦ good package 
Comart Amanda oc Ortaviu at 
BJ Crawfords tRcr OOMI 01 
936 9692 

FRENCH /Cerman See lb inti 
Iraoer o( Oiv commodHy ro 
Bnght arbrulale wr wtUi good 
skMb vo new Deal with L to 
rope r dents Soto 2 nd Mbbcr 
£ 8 . 800 + Marrow ElPP Agy 
i the language roeciM Ms) Ol 636 
1487 

NO SNORTNANO £ 1 1,000 

vnau holding ro in Sovan K«t 
onolofi seeks sec to 2 dReclors 
Varied rrworaiur rale Good 
sun» typing rroumird Age 
24 + Please let 01 493 4466 
ksrrvwraihn AdvW ft 
Selection. 

ftPAMSH/ltBlian wreurv la In 
trraafmnai Qty Bank working 
In the Marketing Southern tu 
rape area SH /Typing m 
engbin Age 20 2 & Immedune 
mortgage lubsnty £ 9.600 Te) 
430 1661/2053 Oulne Soap 
son A pots 

THAT** UR £ 7,790 » lending 
consume* no«ls body seek* 
Kf/aaim Very uteresltng 
work i-onienj Young lively 
crowd Lxrenem benefits Good 
typing, no lhorthand Please 
rail 01 493 4466 Merry 

weather Advtb a Gelecfton. 
OERMN BWnguol See tS/H or 
audio inefuil Mr Q eiug Manag 
er Exp m Oermany put pure 
good org a ni s at i on abUttm and 
head for Figures £9 OOO 
Morrow Qnp Agy tide language 
wrMiresi Ol 636 1487 - 
MAYFARt Serretartal and flung 
work OenerN asostanre PrtHs 
amy suu mid 20 s Experience 
required Dynanur. anise of 
fire Good salary and benefm 
Ring Ol 629 2731 Ask Mr 
L C. 

MED 4 C AL audio wfAeng in fa 
supei group prarHce ■ WB area 
Bubbly Persons* ly Age 20-36 
TOP salary + tvr, and proa 
TH Mn Hutmtnson. Jeeves 
l Lid Agy i £64 4343 or 828 
2053 

AMTKMJC 5 tn bunglon) ftrm 
required KJ run shoo type deal 
rormpomtanre. bougiu FMgera 
and aeata in shop £8000 
Joyce Oumera Ol £89 
8807/0010 i Rer Coos] 

MO SHORTHAND. Capable audio 
sev to ran smalt turn ot survey 
on In new Kraraabnoge 
offices Com English and wp 
re# essential Good salary 01 
SB 9 9292 


nredWr audio/ pa lot targe prop 
my division in WCx To 
WJ98 Woodhouse Rrc Com 

Ol 404 4646 

DIRECTORS Secretary rrtetufly 
market nrerarrh agency. EC1 
CHivhu CT29& excHIml typing 
moling audio no shorthand 
Luo catxo can oi 863 iw 

FRENCH Bi Hntpiu typtu fa Re 
wren lean di wb Suomi 
typuig tor tap nrefentabon of 
reruns wm wp train 
W.OOO+ Link Appts BOB 9743 


9AM - 3PM 

PivwnBliiBPA/SgcrMarvr*- 
quwM ro asMt 2 CorporoH 
FmpncB Expcutwgs (t mats I 
lanwig) di smafl hntury Mgylav 
office Boafcagpmg.jhorttwiid 
anaiypngedtotrttelphiSHdfl- 
ngnoss to ustst m HB gspgcts 
ol ntmung tea offloa Mamed 
MypretaiWL sainy 
nugowM. 
Noagents. 


td 01 409 3185 |£ 


KEWUNSTON Estate Agent, re- T 
qinre lerrefarv Good flwrt * 
hand and typing W/P adva*- ? 
tagr TeL Regal Estates 60S (• 
7121 ^ 

WHY MOT TRY PotygMO who J 
may mi nave a « hnguM past * 
lb will yaw experience and lot- .\ 
guagr auahfmMMin, PotreM> 
Aaenrv 01 247 5242 n, 

SECRET ARMS tar ArrhHert, ft ,9. 
Degagnse, Permonnn ft irauib- s, 
rare pauiMM- AMSA Saecvunl ^ 
RiT Con* 01 »S4 0592 2 

HMM PASHNRt £8^000 wperh T 
opening in me Wen End NO m ^ 

. tnn leading Man ion cnam As 
part of a small person net Mm “ 
you wdl help » organise Irani "* 
tng. recruit men l and general *» 
won Benefits inrtude large a 
discounts on clothes Short- ft 
hand/lypinq and some « 
exprnenre rrguretrd Age 16 «. 

22 P hase let Ol 409 1232 The * 
Wprt Shop 




NEMFWnNIIT. Money Market 
mi BurMnarv This dynamic 
•■rgr L S rompany needs a su- 
pert reception al with Monarch 
swurhboard r sn eetence. pteaty 
« tow to suy bi toed Ss hoars 
•re it am to 7 pm mo tyoum 
required but ignt sdn AbOUy 
and a ronfidml lefephone maty 
ner essenlud. £6500. 

graadraeotBondSoecs-O.. 


ATOR 

A Friendly firm in Fulham 
needs a residential negoti- 
ator Experience essential. 
In return we offer an ex-; 
cellent salary package 
plus cai/aliowance. 

Ring 

John HoUjogsworth 
on 01-736 6406 


SALES EXECUTIVE- 
PUBLISHING 

We are looking for a leksales person wbo will create 

a systematic mailshot programme and wiD attend to -, 
the Follow up admin work in our busy sales and 
marketing department. Yon should be able to type, 
have a pleasant voice and manner and if possible 
have knowledge of languages. 

You will serve ihe two companies In our Group 
both publishing news tetters on raw materials. 

IF you are interested, and would like further details, 
please call Renee Landaw on 01 278 0414 






















































40 


m 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 15 1986 


LA CREME DE LA CREME 




Secretarial 

Vacancies 

LACSAB is the Local Government 
Employers' organisation (tearing with 
pay and conditions of service, indus- 
trial relations and manpower issues 
for over 214 million employees 
throughout the country. 

Vacancies exist for a senior secretary 
(ref.SI), salary in the range £9,786- 
£10,908 (inclusive of London weight- 
ing) and a secretary (ref.S2), salary in 
the range £8,7Q6 tE 9,786 (inc.). The 
senior secretarial post will invofve-a.... 
high degree of confidential work and 
requires a person of considerable ex- 
perience. Both posts will include audio 
work and shorthand would be helpful 
but not essential, also word process- 
ing but training will be given if nec- 
essary. LV’s and generous holidays. 

Bel grave Square is convenient for 
Victoria and Hyde Park Comer Tube 
Stations. Application forms and fur- 
ther details can be obtained by tele- 
phoning 01-235 6081 (quoting ref- 
erence). Completed application forms 
to be returned by 24 October 1986. 

||a Local Authorities CdncStionSof 
lH! Service Advisory Board 



(setting up 


£ 12,00 




you will need to have initiative to work on your 
own projects, as well as organising las hectic 

I diary, arranging meetings throughout Europe 
and dealing with his correspondence and sec- 
retarial work. European languages a definite 


J 100/60. Age to 26. | 

I PteasecaffustoranmterviewuntU6.30pm. I 


BRITISH ASSOCIATION Krftt 

OF PROFESSIONAL UQMIS 

HAIRDRESSING EMPLOYERS 

SECRETARY 
c. £9,500 

BAPHE represents the large hairdressing chains 
in the UK and is also a national managing agent 
for the Youth Training Scheme. 

An experienced shorthand secretary is now 
sought lor the association. In addition to the 
requisite secretarial skills, applicants should be 
able to present a good image for the association 
on the telephone and in person. 

Typed applications which demonstrate how your 
career experience and qualifications meet the 
requirements of the post should be sent to: 

Chief Executive 
BAPHE 

la Barbon Close 
Great Ormond Street 
LONDON WC1N 3JX 



i 


FTiTimM 


M7!T+|T r ^VT^HiTTTiTi 







A 




BILINGUAL SECRETARY 

FRENCH/ENGLISH 

required by 

New Jewellery Boutique 
opening in Bond Street 
Salary: £8.500 pa 
+ BUPA + pension 
Please send CV to: 

EBEL, 

Suite B, 4th Floor, 

Liberty House, 

222 Regent Street, 

London. Wl 



We are a leading London-based Company, part of 
a National Group, specialising in large-scale new 
and refurbishment building work for important 
High Street and Investment Clients. 

SECRETARY 
to Managing Director 

Ties is not a job for the inexperienced and, whilst 
age is not important a mature and flexible 
approach is essential. 

Your stalls mil include:- ■ 

- usual secretarial abilities including shorthand 

- accurate, well organised, business like 
manner 

- professional approach in dealing with people 
at all levels 

- good communicator, initiative and self 
motivation. 

We are transferring into new offices, adjacent to 
our existing location, with nearby tube and main- 
line stations. 

Salary is negotiable, benefits are those expected 
of a major employer. 


Write to Mr D R Leggefl, Managing Director, 
WMshter Construction United. 69/71 Newing- 
ton Causeway, London SE1 6BD or telephone for 
an application form to Group Personnel Depart- 
ment (0622) 50061. 


PA TO CHAIRWOMAN 

We are market-leaders in the design, manufacture and 


and White 


1 Li !■ 1 1 : : ; j n i‘ . 1 1 i i : : :, I- I+J 


and accessories 

You wta be involved at a high level assisting and sup- 
porting our Chairwoman in a variety of fields, as well as 
providing a ssistance to our Press and Pubfic Relations' 
office. Excellent administration and communication 
skills are neccassary. 

Salary negotiable with (blowing addition^ benefits: 4 
weeks hoGday, incentive scheme, staff purchase 
scheme, STL. etc. 


tame, staff purchase 


In the first instance phase write inducting your CV to:- 

Mtos R Ctucas. DMknera GuBd, 6 Relay Rd, London 
W12 75J. or telephone 01 743 6322 ext 144 for an 
epp fi c a Uo n form. 


fommi mg 

CHAMPAGNE £10,000 

The UK subsidiary of this famous French drinks com- 
pany is looking for an efficient secretary with style to 
tain their smaf team. You wil need the soda! pease to 
wise at all levels, the atfGty to use your initiative and 
to hold the fort in the bosses' absense. Own office. 
Sk*s 100/60 needed and French useful. 

CONFERENCE PA £8,500 

This is an ideal job for someone who needs a chal- 
lenge, variety and the chance to get out of secretarial 
work eventtnfy. The drector or this top conference 
organisers expects you to be able to socialise with 
his clients, help with speech writing, and take short- 
hand in taxis, on trains. Skills 100/55. 

ptaMMeptare: 01-499 8070 A 
L 45 Old Bond Street London W.1. M 


I v : • i ii.la.niffrcKraf 


to tt* Director at Mai taking's 


job kmction. 


Aged 21+ you wflt hove excellent typing, shorthand and 
communication skins wtfi tie experience to match the se- 
niority of this position. 

In return, we offer a highly competitive salary and benefits 
package. Please telephone or write to: 

Melanie Symes, 
Personnel Officer, 
Burger King UK Limited, 

20 Kew Road, 
Richmond, 

Surrey TW9 2NA. 

Tel: 01-940 6046 


WOULD YOU LIKE TO WORK 
FOR A YOUNG, 

FAST MOVING 
SPORTS MANAGEMENT 

COMPANY? 

Ifso IMG. tbe Mark McCormack Organisation, possibly 
relocating to riverside office* u Kew Bridge, has vacancies lor 
xximries svnh proven skilh and good presentation for 
following divisions: 

LEGAL 

-OFFICE ADMIN/PERSONNEL 
TV SALES 
BROADCASTING 

Knowledge of WP useful. I mmedaic start. 

Please call or send C. V. whh salary rcq airein an loc 




14-15 Fii 


W1H9PL 


mmnmm. 



f DIRECTORS’ SECRET ARIES 


Top Jobs for Top People 

rA i teii I I .T A M TS tt4iN 9 

rapansibliiY. nnil 

ARCHITECTS ifiUjAlQQ 

Ow niiM the ii S t Century is their business - cjmn wta iM o ypg ix A 

PR executive io liaise with the media and help w«fh pfOnKHtunai enifRKl 

investment managers .. 

A young tram of Investment Managers m the CityttBcdaS^Seer^.to 
the one hand you need a penchant for 

system and on the other the personality for PR w arrange client tocher* 



ADVBTTiSING 


A bsr rang Sec/W is needed 
tor a InemSy efficient Advertising 
DepL or a Drpe msagnus As- 
vawsog Agen cy. FuB 
xiwtwroent wtmn ftc convaiy. 
a poo d SH speed ess . toe oi 
dent mot All, txgmse me em gs 
& cotemnces. son out as atom, 
aid corres p ondenc e . 

01-481 2345 



\\ \ IKU 


A sperb opportunty has areen 
bi a tape construction company 
as Sec/FA to tte M.D. Good 
Si/Tfli swefa ess. plus foe aM- 
rty to Base wth too ttentee and 
take nmnes of meetings. Vanety 
and matamenf mdm tte com- 
pany. good perks and bomss. 

81-481 2345 


01-629 9323 



SECRETARY MAYFAIR 

Exciting new venture is looking for a well educafed Secretary to a sast in to* 
running of our smaB luxury office. Personality, style and gacraww AxpAOAnce 
are oi equal im portance. May suit recent college leaver. Salary negotiable plug 
benefits. 

Telephone Julia on 
01-409 2424. 


Bright & Bubbly 

fo £10,000 

Come in from the cold * This amazing company 
offers swimming pool, solarium, squash courts 
etc along with an enviable range of free 
benefits. The job is pretty exceptional too. 
Masses of overseas liaison, involvement and 
action as co-ordinating sec to a marketing 
team. Plenty of poise, polish, confidence and 
personality required. Sulk 90/50. Age 22-28. 
Please call 01 -493 4466. 

MERRYWEAJHER ADVERTISING & SELECTION 


01-5849033 

T.M. INTERNATIONAL 
SECRETARIAL 
RECRUITMENT 




01-5848931 

50 HANS CRESCENT 
KNiGHTSBRlDGE 
LONDON S.W1 


[AMERICAN BANK EC2 £16,000, 

1 Our clients, an expanding very successful investment bank with offices in the City I 
I and West End, are looking for 3 dynamic secretaries to assist their young team. { 

j Average age in company 25! You must be hard working, energetic, well presented-! 
I and fun! Languages useful but not essential. ‘A’ level education required.! 
I 90/60. Age 21-24. 

] Please callus for an interview until 6.30pm. 


PROFESSIONAL P.A. 
c.jC15,000 + Banking Bens 

*?e are looking for a totally professional and continued P.A. to work at 
top level within a leading investment bank. A senior director, who bas 
recently joined the overall financial management area, needs foil sup- 
port in all aspects of bis work; his PA. must have superb organisational 
skills, be used to working on their own initiative and have the ability to 
take pressure in their stride. The ideal candidate will be well educated 
with impeccable secretarial skills (100/60), backed up by the tact and 
diplomacy gained through several years senior-level City experience. 
Age range late 20’s - 30’s. Please telephone 588 3535. 

Crone Corkill 


RECRUITMENT CONSULTANTS 


// INTERESTED IN Ns 
f PERSONNEL? ' 
£12,000 

J oin this leading shipping and cruise line as secre- 
tary to a senior executive responsible for personnel. 
ITiis poo tion is 70% administrative and excellent 
prospects are envisaged. Suprb sumptuous offices and 
lunch. English ‘A* level and 100/50 skills 

needed. 

YOUNG SECRETARY AGE 22+ 
£10,500 + overtime 

J oin this leading Wl firm of international manage- 
m ent consultants and you can expect to earn 
mfo overtime a ratary of £12fi00 per annum. You 
sbouki iurc a stable career history and 60 worn audio 
ability. Beautiful offices, exceptional friendly atmo- 
sphere and training given on the latest WP. Please 
telephone 01>240 353L 



Elizabeth Hunt 

(teauimentConsulonts 

18 (kosveoar Street London Wl 



PERSONNEL 
SECRETARY/ ASSISTANT 

I am hul.iiiF luf a bnpbi. lapuhlr ftnamcl .Srcrccrv/Aisraan KI JWM 
■* * *S i b»*. burtPttvjnnrl IkpanmrM- ami tfcpuiiw ihinqg 

nnahwifcr bum ihruflior. Tlkr jNhi) lo mvi under (VTOuA: and uuihntil 
vipenruna air ibnrfcifc nwirnal nauhlin I aodidatn mini ihu be 

pn^nuaNr. »rfl ymlvo. bnrafmd Mcpbooc manner and muss ibe 

atnhii lucimmimairai all le*rb with unoaddimim 
tprtiiaMt VHajM lx- opal tinuxvn 1MJ. br »dl oJaaird am] numetaur. 
amt bnr 'I f k-trl pana m Eflglnli and Malta, linnd sbmltuid and 
r'Pnlj ahu ncnlrd (SU/MU ^1 lead Umr ,can 

sn nrunili Minimi sualun fipmnre b mpmL iwtimMK in a nmunnrl 
«n ntuolnuiraimna. Eipi-ncmr oTromnuirmnl penoand 
»ubU be I dnhnci jdvanapr. Noo^ohArn ><nl> 

I tan hIIt a ofan oTptflnn pj phn pond mm and caadHmm. of 
I'tiipInjiiK.K 

mb ■ nuAtet "Wrtrr wit* afiJi, mf to dor O' Mr 

Ms D Wilcox 
Personnd Officer 

Independent TeJevisioo Publications Limited 
247 Tottenham Court Road London W1P OAU 


INTERVIEWER £15,000> 

We mpy the reputation of being one of Londons top, 
saretarial consultancies with a prestigious cfient port- 
foBo wRhai the world of Music, Design, Fashion 
Advertising. PA and Entertainment. We are currently 
seeking a consultant, preferably with recruitment experi- 
ence or a su ccessful background in sales/marketing or 
personnel to join our small but dynamic 
*® Bn - NKJh basic salary plus excellent profit 
“9" share (no targets). Ap 25+. Call Mary 

^ S 81 W 493 1184 (evenTn 9 s 


NEVER HIGH AND DRY 
£11,500 

Do you enjoy a busy, fast-moving, international 
atmosphere? If so the U.K. Marketing Director of this 
famous spirits company in SW1 needs you. For someone 
who thrives on pressure, can organise meetings and travel 
arrangements and provide a highly efficient secretarial 
service, this is a rewarding job. Skills 80+/60 wpm, audio 
and WP. French helpful. Excellent educational background 
and smart presentation essential. Age 23-28. Please 
telephone 434 4512. 

Crone Corkill 


RECRUITMENT CONSULTANTS 


Why 

MacBlain Nash? 

• immediate uwk 

• Competitive rates and a holiday pau 
scheme throughout the winter 

• The pick of tfie best assignments in London 


Telephone Liz Barrntt today 
for the latest assignments 
on 01-4390601. 




Macbiain 


Ten^poarary 

oecretaiies 


ADMIN TRAINING 

Develop your admin skills as Secreiary/Office Admin- 
istrator with a leading Merchant Bank. The Information 
Technology Dept needs you to contributs your own 
ideas to the running of the Dept and to define your own 
role. You will liaise with staff and suppliers, iron out 
problems and carry out staff admin for the Dept 10050. 
22+. c£ 1 0,000 + morL sub. 



SOIHEBYS 

FOUNDED 1744 

(ending auction home requires enthusiastic and 
vse/l-orgmised secretaries with excellent skills (min 
100/00) to •work m expert departments. Word 
processing experience an advantage. Salary range 
£7j00-£8J00pl 
Please send your c.a to: 

Sotheby’s Personnel Department 
M/35 New Bond Street, 

London WIA 2AA. 




Recruitment 

10 New Bond St, London Wl 
v 01-493 1184 


Electric News 

to £9,500 ++ 

Take a short raj straight to the top. This is a 
sucoesslul, high-flying company — sellitu; 
newsworthy; high-value iulbnnation owr tfo-wms 

S r r,d ', Vuur M see in Gertrnd 
Munufier s office takes, you tu the eenliv aft him* in 
this very dynamic ■ enviranmem. Great job. Superb 
wreer .-jiep. Exrciiem benefit Skills lUO oO. Aw 
Plea .se call 01-409 1232. ^ 

Ik-rTulruirtii OniMikani-1 mimai 




YOUNG PA 

Become (ess of 


-4 il, 




£8,000+ BRISTOL 


SECRETARY/PA 

Busy Systems House. You 
must be mature and vwy 
adaptable, haw exceOent 
quahBcations and experience 
and anjoy worfong under 
pressure, mtareeted? 
CaH Kateoii 


EARLY RISER FOR HIGH FLYER 


(fcw mrann wsn a wry sense humour anti 








Finesse ci 


RECRUITMENT CONSULTAMtq 


mm 


*S n af | n tire bosses 

100/60 Mmmutralive support Ago 23 pks wtti 
Ta ™AS: SECRETARIES • hookings naltefcto. 

262 ^ 

SEC ” E .'»WV RECEPTIONIST 1 1 

£8,250 negotiable * ‘ 

Call Miss Richmond 242 4321 






























THE TIMES WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 1 5 1986 



fir r 




coJISSl 0 become an umbrella term 

2? « * VBnsrtv * r0les ‘ ^ a'nsady have found that 
everTrr^r V ^ enorrnou s» y within any one company but 
50 hetween companies. Which means planning 
' Y /' nGxt career move can be difficult. 

• . ^^^owever, Ef you are a bright, capable secretary who can 

At Renault Fr ®nch we could help you make the right choice, 

secretari^^fi^ ^ experienced 

development WP a- *■ ^ l ^^ tev€j Vo n esjobsheutol encourage career 
wherever you 1/00 ^ ,nvolved * Naming new skills 

As partnf Essent,ally - adding more strings to your bow. 

Vour>9, Bv * ly team, you could assist the following people. 

General Manager 

RenauirAr ( ?^I SOna !^f iStant than 3 Secretary, youll be working for 
computers is nrJfH* ui ' e 3 knowled0e ^ accounting procedures and ■ 
and be abi a. +• h rab e ' appf ' car rt5 must have good communication skills 
be fluerJin o "? ttl |3eop,e ** al1 Probably in your late 2Q’s you'll 

oe nuent m French, discrete and tactful. 

After Sales Director 

t>= r ^ fter Sales Director is responsible for ensuring that once a Renault 
nr-rir. * ho^sht the owner enjoys the best after sales service. To 

™ ™ sen,or 'eve' voull need a minimum of 2 years experience 
_ ® with senior management, be a good organiser and enjoy dealing 

w«n our customers. Your duties will indude taking minutes at after sales 
ings. making travel arrangements, organising meetings and 
rormulat^g corresponded^ ^ French. There will be tots Of contact’ with 
ea office in Paris which means good spoken French is important. 

Marketing Director 

Providing secretarial support to the Director responsible for Renault's 
imaginative and very specific marketing strategy, you'll also be involved in 
tine translating of work. Which means liaising with our Paris office on behalf 
of the non-French speaking members of our department. You'D aion deal 
wrth our advertising agency and become involved in new model launches. 
Grand Prix. motor shows and other promotions. Applicants must have a 
strong ability to organise meetings and make travel arrangements. 

Finance 

Assisting our 3 senior managers, you'll be involved in a variety of 
secretarial and admin, tasks. The environment is hectic and you'll need 
previous experience in a busy office as well as a good working knowledge 
of French. With a good standard of education, you must be familiar with 
financial practices and able to type figures. You'll probably be in your early 
20‘s. 

Along with good typing and shorthand skills, all secretaries must be able 
to speak and write in French. Obviously a higher degree of fluency will be 
required for more senior roles. 

We offer excellent salaries and company benefits, including preferential 
car leasing and purchase scheme, good holidays and a subsidised 
restaurant. 

So if you're ready to play a connecting link 
in an international environment, call 
Debbie Osborne on 01 -993 2932 (No agencies). 


'ftenaytt UtC Uxft. 

&S£m8£; 






SECRETARY 

circa £9,500 
per annum 

An opportunity has arisen for an experienced 
secretary to join the Secretari a t of an Insur- 
ance Group with head offices in the City. 
The successful applicant will be required to 
provide a full secretarial service for the Group 
Secretariat including the typing and circular 
ton of board minutes, the preparation and 
typing of documentation in relation to Prop- 
erty. Licensing and Administration and a 
number of other administrative tasks. 

In addition to shorthand and audio typing 
skills applicants should be experienced in the 
use of a word processor. Whilst age in itself 
is not a criterion, to have gained toe appropri- 
ate experience candidates wlH be at least 21 
years of age. 

The salary will around £9,500 per annum and 
other benefits include non contributory pen- 
sion and life assurance. BUPA, staff 
mortgage subsidy and luncheon vouchers. 

Reply in writing with full CV to 
BOX D90. 


KING’S COLLEGE 
LONDON (KQ Q 
University of London 

SECRETARY 
Physics Department 

SECRETARY required to join with four others 
to provide secretarial services to the academic 
staff of a University Physics Departmen t. The 
work is varied and involves general depart- 
mental administration, some word processing, 
technical typing, travel arrangements, etc. Good 
typing skills are required, training in word pro- 
cessing will be provided if needed. 

Salary within the range (Grade 3): £7,278 - 
£8 632 per annum inclusive. Hours: 9 JO ajn. - 
5.30 p.m. (9.30 a.m. to 5.00 p.m. in vacations). 
Four weeks' annual leave plus extra days at 
Christmas and Easter. 

Applications in writing, together with the names 
of two referees, to the Assistant PtoonKl Offi- 
cer, King’s College London (KQO, Norfolk 
Building. Strand, London, WC2R 2LS. 


TOP TEMPORARIES 

The demand for temporaries. wHb good 
secretarial /word processing skins tor either 
snort or tong term assignments, is on at 
Hodge Recruitment 

Our clients include conference Mrim* 
Advertising. PR, Computers and Banking in 
both West End and City locations. 

For an honest appraisal of what w© can offer 
you. please telephone: 

629 8663 



SPECIAL EVENTS 
£8,500-£1G,000 

Join this presiwous company and Imp promote ja 
luniy commodity. Lose wth tne press, grganss 


receptions and 
special evens, i 
shRs e s«w m 


ae wth tne press, grgansa 
aeons and act as hostess at 
secrnsnl comera but 100/55 


STAFF MATTERS 
£10,500 

World famous company seeks PA for European Strif 
Manager. Your own protects wfll include arranging 
courses for senior management and produchg basic 
statistics and mormauon on &arong causes. ExtaL 
tera benefits indude 6 weeks hois and resaratt. 
100/55 stahs needed. 

Please cad Debbie Bwtavfcb, Ann Me*. Jw» 
Octane m Shoe H ktar d w e. Enty/UtrappoMl 



PA TO FINANCE DIRECTOR/COMPANY 
SECRETARY - SURREY 

P1RA is the rational research centre tor paper, priming, ptfofish- 
«ng and pacngng industries. Tin finance director /company 
secretary seeks a PA of fugti cafibra, passkey a graduate. 
To succeed In this post, you wtl be numerate and laghly 
Iterate: Able to gather ted analyse background ramrod to 
ensure die FD is eftaawty bnerad on au occasions. You wffl 
organise the necessary paoenuark systems, plan wnstaute and 
provide seasonal services. You must (eve good organisational 
and interpersonal state and welcome a heavy workload. You 
should be awe to transcribe from ape and snonfsnd: your mm 
PC wiH be provided as wed as pan-ome secretarial support as 
reoubed. Sawy wdloe by negotiation and the location is at 
Leanertiead. 

Send CV and request for aoofca&on form to: 

Fay Sharp, Finance Mwctor/Conopany Secretary 
P«RA 

Randalls Road, tmthertiMd. Sumy, KT22 THU 
TWeptano 0372 376181 


tfjQrV AT OUR 
NEW OFFICES IN 

54 SOUTH MOLTON STREET 

(1st Floor) 

TODAY AT 12-3 pjil 
FOR A CHEESE AND 
WINE PARTY 


IF YOU ARE LOOKING FOR STAFF 
COME IN AND MEET US. 

WE ARE HERE 
TO HELP YOU. 


imi 


••• employment 


Bi-Lingua! Secretary 

ENGLISH/ GERMAN MHtham, Surrey 

This is an opportunity to make good use of your linguistic 
ability, as well as your secretarial skills, in an expanding and 
successful company. 

Working within our Service Department, you will be 
involved in the full range of secretarial duties. In addition, 
you will need to liaise extensively with the German man* 
ufacturers of the print and print origination equipment 
which we sell and service. 

Good shorthand and typing skills are essential. 

Salaries are negotiable and conditions of employment are 
excellent. 

Please write with full details or telephone for an application 
form to the Personnel Manager, Pershke Price Service 
Organisation Ltd.. Dover House, 141 Morden Road, 
Mitcham, Surrey CR4 4XB. Tel: 01 -648 7090. 

ii H — n pershke 

I E=) d, PRICE SERVICE 

F~ 1 ORGANISATION ■ 

U L - - f I LIMITED L ~ - ~ 



FLOATING MEDICAL SECRETARIES 
CIRCA £8,600 

Required far confidential secretarial positions aged 30+ . 

Thete is a high percentage of audio medical secretarial work. Accuracy, initiative and a 

Oiwvf 0 1 hqwiMM w mi «m» nrn»l rpiat. p ra^ 


4 weeks holidays 
BUPA 

£1 a d«y luncheon vouchers 
Season betel loan 
EXceltem wyezaonuaaon scheme 

Written applications with CVs should be ant by Friday 31st October 1986 fio> 
Ifias Bfaina Fryer, Administrative Assistant, Medics] Defence Union, 

S Devonshire Place, lowfcw WLN 2JBA. 


Long Term 
Temp 

we have an mdefinfee temporary as* 
tognment for a versatile PA to assist 
a Project Manager wrtfitn a major 
commurecaaons company in the ad* 
nsmstranon of recantment. tramng 
courses and the co-ordination of con- 
tracts with external suppliers. 
Excatant typing. Wordstar WP and ex- 
perience m using daiaDese essemmL 
Age: 23-31 


PA/ ADMIN 


•T»T; 


CE10.000 >«w. 

PA adminisuauw with excdlon 
secrotanal skills noted to look after 
delightful skills needed to look after 
delightful team of mathematicians, 
geologists et a who deal with top 
chews in the oil world. You will be 
sympathetic and hardworking, wed 
presented with a good telephone 
manner. There is a career job here 
fix the right person. 30+ non- 
smoker please: Superb offices S 
minutes Hendon Central. 


TEMPS WITH 
LANGUAGES 

Gan you communicate effect- 
ively in one or more 
European language? 

Our interesting, professional 
clients need temps with excel- 
lent languages and secretarial 

skilly. 

Please call if you would like to 
find out more about using 
those skills to your advantage. 



International Secretaries 


CELEBRITIES 

SECRETARY 

£9,000 

ExDftrwrcsd watt P*»- 

Eetma Sh See reqwnM ro 

kxM after me "start" m 
ms busy tneadcai 
agency. Lots at organ*- 
izanon. arra nging appont- 
ments. feirang wen 
:C0W>nb«s ana rooty ~nm- 
. nmg tne SPOtT. Sutier > 
bosses. - rnencSy and exca- 
*tg environment ■ excewnt 
Bonus system. 1st class 
seoetanw and organoa- 
tnnai shWs essential. 

01-930 8207 


-491 7100 


-491 7100 


PA/SECRETARY 

KNIGHTSBRJCDGE 

Managing Director of leading firm of Investment Advi- 
sors needs experienced, tend working and enthusiastic 
P A/Secretary (27 to «0> wnb excellent audio stalls (and 
ideally sborthaadl. Musi hare pleasant personality and 
be able to look after and organise turn and bis office: 
Therefore initiative and abtBty to work unsupernsed 
(and often wrier pressure) required. 

Offices 100 yards from Harrods. Fbr the right person, 
salary will be more than you're earning now. Write 
today (with telephone number if possible) describing 
the jobs you've had, what you're tike and ibc salary you 
expect, to: 

RJ. TEMPLE ESQ. 

43 Radnor Walk, London SW3 4BP 


TIP TOP 


SECRETARY 


Leading newspaper group seeks top 
notch secretary with first class 
organisational skills, to join 
promotions team. 

The work schedule is strictly for busy 
bees only - but it's interesting and 
varied ! Your strengths as an 
organiser will be needed across a 
range of activities, including 
promotional games, competitions, 
sponsorship and publicity events. 

Accurate, fast typing and good 
shorthand essential, with a friendly 
personality and helpful telephone 
manner. The right secretary for tftis 
team will probably be aged 23-30. 

Salary circa £10,000. 

For more details, call 

Kim West ( 01 ) 837396O. 


Whisky Galore 

£ 8,000 

Lots of initiative and the abiliiy to work 
tmsupeivised are bey qualities for this 
world trader Wxriring dosefy with two 
dynamic m anag ers you will help to co- 


and PR for an internationally renowned 
brand. Confident shorthand/ typing is 
essential, as is team spirit and a bright, 
bubbly approach. Age 19+ . For further 
details please telephone 01-493 5787. 


GORDON-YATES 


Remacmem Gonsutan* 


VALENTINO 

REQUIRED MANAGER AND 
EXPERIENCED SALES 
ASSISTANT FOR THE MENS 
DEPARTMENT 

REQUIRED EXPERIENCED 
SALES ASSISTANT FOR THE 
LADIES DEPT 

REQUIRED ADMINISTRATIVE 
MANAGER / ACCOUNTANCY 
KNOWLEDGE 

Please send full CV to; 

Personnel Manager at, 
Valentino, 

174, Sloane St, 
London SW1. 


Sheer Creativity 

£9,500+ benefits 

Super opening for a very special type, as 
rock-steady ‘right hand’ to the brilliant 
young Head of TV Advertising at this 
top-name agency High-flying, go-getting 
and creative, this is TV at its most 
exciting. Al Its heart you wiH act and react 
(pickly delegating as necessary to two 
lively College Leaver juniors. Reasonable 
shorthand/ typing requested. Age 22+. 
Please telephone 01-493 5787. 


GORDON-YATES 



Rcer mm t ni Cbnwlnmi 


UNVXERSTTY COLLEGE LONDON 
Department of Pbotograometry and Surveying 

ALVEY IMAGE 
PROCESSING PROJECT 
PROJECT INFORMATION 
ASSISTANT (PART-TIME) 

Tomk aonriafF fiw dap> i*r week wilb espericnce Wrefly 
in ona or more ol cb« foflowm* areas: word-pipcessmg. fimn* 
rial manngcmtnt and cmnnL project pfamninX and 
mfomaaon on Marimoab nnd/or SUN nrock- 

nanous. typing. Salary seals £8432 - £9164 me. pro ana. 
AnpbcaQQM. me. fufi cm. and oarnn and addresses of 2 


jo EHiott & Judi Hutton 

HODGE 


RECRUITMENT 


BUSINESS HELICOPTER company 

requires persm t# fffl a **! P osiU “» 

wt» can Show 

Bay operguons. and wouW W® ’ 

piaasa wme » us aandtog u current c.v. Satey £8.500- 
riO.OOO aaa. 


COMPANION/ 
LADY IN WAITING 

Required immediately for a Royal Princess 
in Saudi Arabia. Must be well educated, 
mature, sophisticated and efficient. 
Conversational French desirable. Free 
accommodation and transport. Involves 
extensive international travel. 

C. V with recent photograph to 

112a Harley Street, WIN 1AF 


ADMIN SECRETARY 
1 INTERIOR DESIGN -CHELSEA 

A Iml rur onanlwr wbo Em warfcBd in a rtrwtured envi- 
nntnMi A can bnna a maltb of experienre and nrdar ta> that 
Mirmrful & erowiiu Inicnw De4o A DwcoraLine Cn. Aw 
r ii with MU/ fili and hat mneoliy persnaality liwi can cape 
wiih innr lewprtaawnuil Call Lana Jeflcw on 4Ut-IGIi. 
f MIUDLCTON 4EFFBMH BBC LTD 

Middleton Jeffers 


reftreoL toe La Kelly. Personnel Oeoaraneot. Unimreity 

CoJto London, Gower Street. Leudoa WClE 6BT. Owiag 
dau;3l October 1988, Informal ewunrias toe Dr Peter MuUer 
(TcctuncaJ Prefect Managerj Tat 01-380 7227 or JANET 
jmmflctQu k afcu cU a 


PR OPPOHTUWTTES TO £9JN» 

Wb hns b ssfocMwi ol ailsnBSting secretarial openfogs tn 
Londons top PR ConsuttancHK. W fOu Hks mo sound Of a 
career m PR ana nave ea months plus wonting experi- 
ence toon tots is an excatent stareng port. 

SQII0R SECRETARY ADVERTKING £10.006 

bwounng secretarial role tor Senior Marketing ana New 

(FILM GROUP) £9.300 

trnerestrig position for a bngw secretary to work tor a 
Ctent Duataor. S/H and a ineiy poreonafity. 

tttttttt 14 Smrtli MoQm Skeel 
Loadn W1 
408 1556 

H e ouiln io S Constants 


CHAMPAGNE PR 

GRADUATE COLLEGE LEAVER 

Marueflnn* opportunity for well educated secretary vritb 
80/S0 to work ai Greco Park for witl Public Rcbrtiooa 

Co where yoo wiD jolt involved and tPr pmperis will be 

ttmulnriy rpocL parucularty if you look nice, speak well 
and are tea m tet (in. 

Cafl Shan on 408-li31 

Middleton Jeffers 


SILENCE IN COURT 
to £12,500 

r eal experience would be a (treat awei but a rood 
4 Ku<rsK«ial background would alto be Taw an aemtuy 
(o the Mentor partner of duo teadine Ena of uKernanonaJ 
lawyer*. Hr w very damme and uen to defcyate to hie 
Pa. YouV have war own ufTite and aria eqjuy ■ busy 
■afonnal aUmwphere. 1IU/6D skffla needed. 

MOVE INTO BANKING 
to £11,000 

H err'* your chance to join a hading int er national City 
bank no banlunR ex perience needed, just pond 
cMamarrial experience. You'D be recnuni tu a newly 

K anted ami ve»v pleatam eenenw mortoae wbndy. 
(fit* mdudr hunua and gatamn mnrt gmee aohnety. An 

3iiy needed. 


Rrnefiu mdudr hunur and generous mnnpo 
imunut penmoaility. inti/HD aJalk and WP t 
Art 224. Plea* tdcjfoime 01-240 3S51. 


Elizabeth Hunt 

ReauSmonJOansutenis 

23 CoSege ^ loodoo EC4 


|^|0 Z2ZZ 

Young companies need Zippy young Estaw Agents 
teoltege toavsrs with an SW7 mod PA with zap, bu- 
geye on the future. You are mour and interest to zoom 
tsmart bright, aware and into property excatent typ- 
tftavo good sac skis. ing wid audto ass. 

To £9.000 Salary c. £8300 


Susan Beck 0^-584^6242 


TWO SENIOR LEGAL PA/SECRETARIES 
(WORD, PROCESSING ESSENTIAL) 

Fbr two Partners in small Finn of SoEcbors deafing with 
Property. Company and Srepptng/c t xnmer cBl Doga- 
Port. New City Offices near Liverpool Street/Moorgaie 

types. 

Salaries Negotiable. 

Tet 01 247 0004 - Rsf: Lizzie. 

NO AGENCIES. 


Advertising 


A Director ol a major advertising 
agency is looking tor a pa. wan an 
extrovert personality and excel lent 
sn/typmg/WP stubs who win taka a 
keen interest n rws work and assist 
twn by basing wnn many European 
Offices, organising mwraationaf meet- 
ings. travel, conferences, etc. 
Limitless long-term opporxunAes. 




OIL BARONS 
£10,000 

i n t e rn a t i on al OB Co need 
Sac 22+ to work tor 0*- 
reetor In London HO. 
Accurate soeeos 90/50. 
Must be mature in out- 
look as ton is veal 
position wRttin Co. 
Plenty of tfll katson m h 
branenes sround tna 
wond. Excellent bene- 
fits. Luncn allowance. 
Health insurance. 
01-930 B207 



EXECUTIVE PA 
£10,000 NEG 

Prestigious position lor 
a Charman's SH/SEC/ 
PA of toe highest can- 
bra. Must be we* 
spoken, smartly pre- 
sented. discreet and 
have good adrren skids. 
Lots ol Moon involved, 
very demanding post- 
hem as wifl be working 
on conhoentwi projects. 

01-930 8207 


THE NATIONAL HOSPITALS FOR 
NERVOUS DISEASES 
QUEEN SQUARE LONDON WC1N 3BC 

SECRETARY TO 
THE CHARITY DIRECTOR 
AND PROJECT MANAGER 

Rebuilding of this internationally renowned hospital 
is a major challenge for the project team and charity 
involved. The secretary to the Chi my Director and 
Projeci Manager will be an integral part of the team 
that will bring about the building which wiD serve the 
country into the 2 1 st century. 

The National Hospitals is a world leader in treatment 
of Muhipie Sclerosis. Epilepsy, Strokes and other 
diseases of the nervous system. 

The job requires lots of initiative, organisational 
ability, ndminjstratrvte skills as well as knowledge of 
word processing (or willingness to leant}. You should 
also have shorthand or audio skills and the ability to 
prepare concise minutes and reports. 

This is a satisfying fob in an interesting environment. 
Salary will be between £7689 and £%95 per annum. 
Send CV. to The Persand Department at the above 
address or ring 61-837-2645 aad quote reference 
amber 2. 

Oosiag date 24th October 1986. 


GENERAL MEDICAL COUNCIL 
London W.1 

AUDIO SECRETARY 

A mature, well educated secretary is required for a 
senior member of the council's staff 

The successful applicant will have first class qualifica- 
tions and several years' experience at secretarial level 
Word processor experience useful, but we will train. 
Much of the work is confidential and a high standard 
of accuracy and presentation is essential together with 
a flexible araiude to a variety of duties. 

Excellent salary according to age and experience. 
Those interested should contact Mrs. MulhoIIand Ol 
580 7642 to ducuss the vacancy further. 

No Agesda. 


Fast-Tracking 

£9,000+ 

Ride success all the way in this raega- 
company, where skyward careers happen 
fast Their Creati ve Di rector is brilliant, 
debonair, utterly charming - and in need 
of a very bright PA. Immersed totafl)- in 
creative TV advertising, design and pro- 
motion you will enjoy a central role and 
prospects of early advance into production 
work. Shorthand, super typing and lively 
approach requested. Please call DI-i93 5787. 


GORDON-YATES 


ItHnitnueni Cffxulmt* 


AMBITIOUS? 

Ideal opportunity for a poised and articulate 
PA./Sec. wanting to move on to a non-sec. 
role when the time is right Working for the 
Chief Executive of a prestigious advertising 
agency in WC2 you'll provide full secretarial 
support (SO/55), have responsibility for 3 other 
secs, liaise with clients and help with presenta- 
tions and parties on a regular basis. Sound &v. 
+ ‘A s. Age 24-28. Sal to £9.500 + excellent 
bonus & good package. Please call: 

437 6032 






f CfiROLME WHO 1 

1 TEMPS! TEMPS! TEMPS! 

EARNING £11,000 pa? 

An experienced secretary with WP siuBs wttfwi the Carofine 
King team can expect to earn in excess of me aune wnne 
eofoyng a variety or aastatiment s hi all areas of Lonaon. we 
atso nave a great oemamf for excellent snonharu), audio and 
cony ski Us. Hease taepnone Brentu Stewart tor an immediate 
appointment. 

k 46 Old Bond Street, W1 i 

^ 01-4998070 J 

























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EXECUTIVE CREME 


Our 


SECRETARIES 
ARE AN IMPORTANT PART . 
OF OUR TEAM 


At 3i we are firm believers in the grass being greener on 
the ocher side and we go our of our way to make it so - 
especially for secretaries who may be looking for the . 
opportunity to advance their careers. 

. . We are an expanding, successful company providing 
venture capital to companies of all types and sizes. 

We have several interesting opportunities in our London 
office. You could provide secretarial support to a small team of 
3 executives in one of Oar Investment Departments or work as 
Secretary to an investment Director. 

An we ask is that you’re enthusiastic, flexible and 
professional with a good ‘O’ level or ‘A* level education or 
equivalent, excellent secretarial skills and W.P. experience is 
desirable. 

In return we can offer you a rery green field- with an 
outstanding benefits package: salaries from 29, 000-210, 500-pa 
depending on the job, concessionary mortgage facilities, non- 
contributory pension and free medical health insurance, 
season tidceCjloan. And excellent prospects for progress. 

Ifyou are interested in being parr of a 
young, frkntfly, professional organisation 
then please write enclosing a comprehensive ■ 

CV to Ann Goldie, Investors in Industry pic, 

91 Waterloo Road, London SE1 8XP (adjacent 
to Waterloo Station/Tube), or telephone for 
an application form on 01-928 7822. 


CHIEF EXECUTIVE £11,000 

You have some Shorthand, director level 
experience and good organisational skins 
as PA to the chief executive of an engineer- 
ing company in SW1. 

PUBLISHING £10,000 

PA to Managing Director of major publish- 
ing house in - Covent Garden area. 
Shorthand ptos WP skrtte and good English 
needed. Age mkJ 20‘s phis. 


HIGH FUER £12,000 neg 

This team wffl be major force after Big 
Bang and you as secretary/admln assistant 
to the young American anti very dynamic 
dSrector wB enjoy a fui and busy life. Train- 
ing given on the PC; Good education, 
shorthand + WP required. Mortgage sub- 
sidy. free lunch, etc. 

EARLY 20’S to £10,000 

You are 20-26, and have 1-2 years City 
e x perience and O level education. You wffi 
work primarily for the chief executive of 

this EC2 investment company and are pre- 
pared to help out within the team. 


Cay 377 8600 UfetEnd 43» /OOl 


T HE CREATIVE USE OF MONEY. 


Secretaries Plus 

I TheSecretarkiConsukants] 


THAMES TELEVISION PLC — BI-LINGUAL SECRETARIES 

FRANKFURT — PARIS — MADRID 


Thames Television is looking for experienced Bi-Hngual secretaries m their Airtime 
Sales Offices, to be opened in Frankfurt, Paris and Madna. 


The successful applicants, will act as Personal Assistant t a 

each case and apart from the normal range of secretanaJduties will beexF»CTedio^» 

a high degree ofMIaftv* in fulfilling an important OHiidinm 

There will be extensive contacts With Advertisers in each country and the successful 

applicants will be expected to undertake appropnate desk researen. 


This represents an excellent opportunity to join the largest of the ITV Companies at an 
important time in its development in the European market. 

aii applications 


Thames is an equal opportunities employer and we welcome 
regardless of sex, ethnic origin and marital status. 

If you are interested in one of these positions, please write for an application form 
indicating which office you are interested in, to:— 

Liz Marshall, 

Personnel Officer, 

Thames Television PLC, 
149 Tottenham Court Road, 

TELEVISION London W1P9LL 





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CREATIVE £14,000 + bonus 


A* 


MEDIA- FINANCE -ADVERTiaNG- SALES -E^RSONNEL- MEDIA -fINANCE 
2 


rn 

2 

> 


Z 

Z 

a 

> 

c 


Merchant Banking 

package c £ 15,000 


Ed 

z 

i 


H 

55 

Z 

a 


major and famous merchant bank needs an assistant for too of 
xX their senior managers in Corporate Finance. 

The position requires you to have substantial mitiaave and good 
secretarial skills, although the job’s secretarial content is quite Ion. 


z 


in 

> 


The main focus of the jab is on client liaison. Fluency in German 
or a Scandinavian language would be an advantage. 


47 Now Bond Street. London. W1Y9HA. 
01-4938824 


icxpamg «km 

WB W) HP 


VENTURE CAPITAL 

£ 12,000 

" 


Em i .___ 

Age 25 - 31 


that htn i 


mtof 


£14,000 

, Onaar shM mb M HI oft HP wd fast stab (tifyOX 
rwy MM maag wf *mr noting a m ImI m Up 

pmoed meat. Bwd B3. 


RUN OFFICE ALONE 

£10,000 

Var saa* Th* tssoanoa to rn sofa, mi bsl SttePtam rapines, 
aortetao Boss mtu MB a MA. WClT 


m 

in 


3 

30 

ss 

z 


Age 25-30. 


HAZELL- STATON 


8 Golden Some, London WL 
i 01-439 602L 


Ml 


IFL 


RECRUITMENT CONSULTANTS 


This company’s client list reads like 
the Who’s Who of outstanding 
design. 

As PA to the Managing Director you 
will organise his entire business and 
social life: arranging meetings, itin- 
eraries, travel and client entertaining. 
Shorthand is useful but the volume of 
secretarial work is limited. Poise, 


presentation and personality will be 
important factors for this very stylish 
company. 

Skills: 90/60 Age: 25-35 


RECEIIITMINT 5GARRICKS ™ EET 


Adminis trative Assistant 


An opening currently exists for an Administrative 
Assistant in a newly formed Transactions Services Group. 

The Services Group will assist in the orderly execution c* 
Investment Banking Transactions. 

Basic requirements are proficiency on a word processor or 
personal computer, an excellent telephone manner and an 
organised approach to your work. The ability to work under 
pressure and as part of a team is essential. _ 

Tb find out more about this vacancy, please write with 
career details, iTwinding your current salary level and daytime 
telephone number (if possible) to: Barbara Jenkins, 
Recruitment Manager, Merrill Lynch Europe Limited. 

3 Newgate Street, London ECVA 7 DA.. 



Merrill Lynch 


h 




it 


1 


MEDIA -FINANCE- ADVERTISING -SALES -PERSONNEL -MEDIA- FB4ANCE 


Wb are tin market leader is our firitf in Earope. Ufa denim, produce aid sell ataman and 
UPVC systems lor windows, dons, conservatories, structonl glazing and curtain waftag. 


We are seeking a 

BI-LINGUAL PA/SECBETARY 


wite a vraridng knowledge of Goman to work in our busy sales office in Homd Hempstead. 
Duties ndudo s e cwteMsepportfurtlte CM Executive. ctose-ttson wM ourJtad ufficsiri 
West Germany, erith our Saks Mangos in the field and with customers and ac&tacts, 
maintenance of penorari records and some technical transl a t in g. 

Please appfr h writeig wtti c.v. tec • 


Mr H-Q Lokowand, 
8CHUECO IRC, 
Times Houma, 
178 Marlowe*. 
Hemal Hempstead 
HR1 IBB 


£ 10,000 

la at BJ Cre wfe ida (me «■) 935 9S9Z 



CITY 


to £12,000 


Dae to internal promotion a bright young 
seaetaiyfPA is needed to join this small sp e ci ali s t 
dc paitiue nt of a big city trading c o ny a uy. The wot! is 
closely connected l» the ILE.C. and would ideally snit 
someone who has basic numeracy and some French. 
The ideal candidate shook] poises sound secretarial 
ddBs bat ham the ambition to develop the job within 
the next 18 months. GnduaoeTA* lend cafibre. Speeds 
100/60 + WP. 


95 


Han Wf. 01-493 7789 



n » m 


C0VENT GARDEN 
Y TEL 01831 1220 




FIRST CLASS 
SECRETARY/PA 

c£1 0,000 PA 
+ SMALL CAR 


My 


Westminster firm erf 


young vwh 
yesheto! Quite 


ComuHants 


sfanpty you need to be very good 
in shorthand end typing. Position 


need to 

skffis 

offers great kwotvemenL 

Cal John Grata on 01 222 1816 



RECRUTTMENT CONSULTANTS 

HIGHLY ORGAHISEB PA/SECRETARY 


Top level Pfl/Sec riqukad for legal $£#& with this most sue- 
>wfm a barivound in legal 


cessM advertising agenqr- Someone i 
or petsonnei a defnte advaidage. Hst have very last abd 
aoctnte typing and a positive attitude where word processors 
are concerned. Writing in a one to one situation, corid possibly 
suit someone more mature returning to work. 


PA to MD 
of Top West End 
Fashion Company 


most be able lo speak and have a work i n g knowledge 
of both French and German. Many opportunities to 
travel and to be able to work with oar many diems. 


Typing, telex and knowledge of micro computer etc. 
Good salary according to experience. 4 weeks paid 
holiday and dothing benefits. 


haliday and dothing 

Phone 01 631 0908 Miss Leach. 
All cnqmries dealt n confidence. 


TOP NOTCH 
AUDIO SECRETARY 
REQUIRED 


We are an expandbig W2 Ann of solicitors and our Senior Partner Is daspecttiiy 
seeking an efficient audo secretary. 

In addMon to usual secretarial skflte Qe good typing speeds, telex, ate), we roqukw 
somebody with common sense, who can work under pressure at times, who ban 
toe aMHy to deal wflfi dents on the telephone, end who can generally organise our 
Senior Partner. We operate a Wang WP system, so WP Imowledge a esserrfW. 
hi return for the above skilb, we can offer you a salary of £ 10,000 pA (6 (norths 
review). 4 weeks hofiday,yearty bona, season ticket loan. LV.'s and toe chance to 
join our Ively team. 

In te rested? Then why not plane for frnmad to te a ppointme n t. 01-2299161 ref: MC. 


£1 

*1 

A 

A 

*1 

'I 

M 

4 


M 

.* 

A 


JustifviiH 


. •« 


■t. V 



FISH 
OUT OF 
WATER 


ACDMtkADVBntSNG 


Tl* BWT^Job opportunities in PR ana 
advertising up to £9,000 


The HOOK^Secretarial skills (80/60) and 
at least one years experience 


The UHE—491 8775 (Ask for Gill) 


Recnatment Consultant 


PUBLIC REUTI0US. 


is an outing and growing industry smd many blunted 

secretarie s have already grown with it 


The se creta ria l rate in PR has a lot to offer. 


TOTAL INVOLVEMENT - GENUINE RESPONSSIUTY - 
VASSETY - CONSTANT CONTACT WITH PRESS AND 
CLIENTS - YOUNG. INFORMAL COLLEAGUES - REAL 
OPPORTUNITY TO LEARN AND PROGRESS. 


To find out more and to (fiscuss 12 interesting PR 
avafiabie now phone me. Melanie Lang. 


01631 154TRec-Com' 


Price ^ Oomesm 

ARartneriLkl 


«* ■ " — «.-■ - mn.lL — ■ — ■ 

myai nsouRB 01 BfiBss aiciics 

PA 


Our Oeputy Secretary, -who is reawnslbte lor the 
internal a hn re t ra tio n for the institute, which in- 


cludes, financial management, development of 
offices resources and equipment, staffing policies 
and union negotiation, requres a personal assistant 


and requires tact, initiative and an eye for detail. 
Applicants should be educated to ‘A’ level stan- 


dard. with good audio and wp skais. and should have 
at least 33 years relevant experience. 


_ is ‘£9^24 and benefits include 25 
plus 1 week & Christmas, and £1.50 


per day LVs. 

For further inform a tion, please telephone: 


The Pe n o mw I Officer on 
01-588 5533 ext 4126. 
hwffleto of Brtfisb Arcttteds, 
P o rt ! rad Ptacs, Londoa W1. 


pirectors Secretary! 

Calm in a Storm 

£ 12,000 


succesriul o3 co mpa ny based m Sc. 
James’s rranires an afl rtwndcr bd ran the office 
and provide fain) wirh finx dass sexennial 
back-up. 

Previous senior levd experience is required, wkh 
a ’sleeves roBed up 1 , alert approach. 


rive immediacy of an nnenuoottd ( 
environnleat, and will know how Co keep a cool 
head whilst oopng with a wide variety or 
responsibffines, ana reacting to priorities as they 


Age indicator 25-30. Speeds 90/60. 

Please telephone 01 -437 1564 


MacBlain 


8c Associates Ltd 
01-4371564 

Re a nimientC onsaitauu 130 Regent Street, 
London WIR.5FE 


BW ESTwar r 
■ARXETtiK 
te to El 5,880 


An excatem opportenky for 
a graduate to mon nto in- 
vestment marfeeten white 
using secretarial sMOs. You 
wfll be based in my smart 
West-End offices and pro- 
vide hi support 'ks the 
kwesment Manager wtde he 
s m London aid abroad. 
This wfil not suit anyone 
atari of comp utes or of 
warring alone. Skis 60 fjp- 
mg. Wi>. 
essential Age 


01-499 0092 

Senior 

Secretaries 



RESIDENTIAL 

PROPERTY 

£ 11,000 

As a readt of tatenri pram 
lion a pntstigriKs firm of 
rasrienthl estate Agents, is 
-taohtag for a confident and 
flaxhte personal assistant to 
work wim a wmfl tarn within 
Ifmir CMsea Office. 

H» jto involvtt handting the 
adnmisWm of the dqnrt- 
menL incfefeg some foum 
work, and pmuini a secre- 
tarial setvica for the team, but 
also offers consriwahte 
scope for invalHnnnt botii 
willi dents and properties. 
YOu stated be wtel spoken, 
wih e wel tewt pre se ntation 
and be knkinp for a derang- 
ing job with a friendly 
compary. 

State: 80/60 4- Audo 
Age: 23-28 

Vest M Office 
825 8008 


ASSSStAJOSSSS^R 


£14,000 

PA to newly a ppointed Ghtef ExaeuUva, CTyriodcbro- 
kars. Financial/ City experience essential togettrer with 
excflSent presentation and ooqwriance at senior lavai. 
Skflte 100/7D Age 25-35 

ADMINISTRATOR £11,500 
+ MORTGAGE SUB 


Iniamatioaai City Bank is recruiting an admntateator to 
'lanagarln 


act as a s sistant to tha Manager bi their syncOcafionx 
area. Banking experience erito secretarial sfcflte asaan- 
flat vtah the capuNUn to hold down a highly motivated 
a dmini s tr ati ve role. Age 25-30. 

Twl 4» 1981/9993 


Dulcie Simpson 


ADooinlmenTs Ltd 


Qwounc wnQ 


WE ARE STAYING 
LATE TONIGHT..... 

lor those of you v*o find it hard to get to us in norma! hours. 
We hamfie both City aid West End compa nte g wtnh 
from advertising and PR to storatarokkig and 
r you are a highly qualified senior secretay. 


PersHHHel BeglnfllBss 

£8^50-£9,000 fa tally 20’S, 


In WC3 TbwWrVWnd. SeeJPA. iqr conwwmc* ivcnMng ad- 
verting and nwrttadng h$i taws. Total Involvement, ten of 
vaitMy as part otmnaa. young but pMCaaskmal town aanye under 
prasRn. Soy tiuotey ongm. aw n ta mp e re d and good on M 
" and type TOwpm (wp p r ai arred) and llieyl pay you up K> 
to Start your para o nnal career. 


phone. i 
OlOOO i 


ta.a tap MW la Urngta lr. InvotvM staff recruft- matV 
mere and paregmel .dept edflite of stafl at M UKUy 


levels. « eodai adMitaLPotee. 
s«n* 0 «c» «*p. ®w|*n typttg (no wp^ 
Rbig 


on 01-734 7282 

MiiyOiBMeRBCitetiMBtlJkL35Fkxad%.laMloa.WIV1PB. 


just steting off or wanting to temp, please call n ig> to 7priL 
46 OLD BOND S l KEET , W1 

81-4998870 

IfMBOUCIWtEQKTMMLWTOIIfTIQnS 




ROD'S SECRETARY to £9.500 
- St Johns Wood. 


l sec to ad as seaway to IS) red 2 Directors of 

joitini 

el tare esrenuk WP 


For drills ptease ring SHm Eaglml. 
McCall Eaotead A Asxscates 
3884. 


GERMAN: Executive Secretary with German oF 
mother longue standard and excellent English 
(both shorthands) for post which is half secre- 
tariaL half liaison - cum-adminisuativc. A 
civilisdd. mtorestrng job for a civilised. weB edu- 
cated person with considerable experience. 
£11.000 plus. 

MAL DU PAYS? If yon are going home to 
Paris, are very numerate and have financial ex- 
perience. we are looking for someone who would 
enjoy an administrative role in siockbroking. 
Plenty of contact with the UK. necessitating exceL 
tent English. Good salary. 

FRENCH; BRUSSELS Could be your des- 
tination if you join an organisation currently near 
Heathrow, which may well move to Belgium next 
year. French needs lo be of mother tongue level 
and the job involves iranstaihig, word pro ces s ing 
and secretarial duties. Around £11.000. 


22 


018363794 

London WC2H0HR 


■■DRAKE 

PERSONNEL 

COMMERCIAL 
CHALUERGE 
£18*800+ - 


Don't miss this a j t cH n i 
opportunity 10 to PA to a 
team of 3 dynamic Exocu- 
twe Solicitors. Bocomo 
nrtwd In a tesrinaun 
sate at tha logal world. 


Th* position is very 


and BWarestira 
«mUi cfloms at rei lewis. U 
you have good audo. 
rusty Sfli. c o ran a reire tam 
experience and WWW a 
DwPBngo, con 




PA. with a 
difference 
£11^00 


1 




ttangiig Dfrecw 
eanpmy sanWM 
dudiy is looUng 


a aticiiifl Da madia in- 
looldBfl mi dpknaU; 


,TW» SIM position In «Mch 
you win be usiaa your (hodbity 
and Motiva lo omiop ttos can- 
tral rote. Plwifaas senior level 
npsnvst ts ossonU prehreUy 
n a senice company, together 
tetb te rateunty to handii peo- 
ple reft contManc o and tad 
Your or pa fe eB ottal Ms WH bs 
essenW to imptamant mw sys- 
ws, no tbs offiea. supmse 
staff and above afl aa as a ton 
PA 

100/60 Age; 25-35 


West E«l Office 
629 9686 

A&SaA&gin&gR 


Churchill Clinic. 

80 Lambeth Road, London SEl 7PW 


Outpatient 
Nurse Managerl 


Meal position for a candidate with both nursing 
and secretarial qualifications to manage the out-' 
patient department. Work includes supporting tie 
Magnetic Resonance Imaging ami X-ray Depart- 
ments. consulting rooms and treatment rooms. 
Salary £11.200 pa. 

For further details telephone 
Kale Dragtas. 81-928 5633 Ext 228. 


S 


LEGAL SECRETARY 
tnm WC1 

orionB for tee Conwyana 
n» In UMB Cdy bandrSDii 
MS.evenopperemltyto! 




‘WPwwta m tefZMfary 


TTk C 0K Oi tot I 


Lane 

Hoi' 


based te on 

I branch. 1st Hotor. 31-33 
bora. WC1 

CaB mw oa 485 8893 


SENIOR SEC 
STH KOI 
UP TO £11^00 

+ penes 


OtwioBsly at ttos story Ihs is 
a senor responaUt poatan. 
Run tee office of research 
company to S. Kan. wigBiale 

axmmOtaw lor torn- 
•tor ptos hdl back-up 90 / 60 . 
Ouie an ss'-maACI lot 5 
WEBffi HOLS. STL MED + 
LIFE ASS. PENS0N. » +. 
Rmg Maggie on Of 434 0030 


SECRETARY/PA 
£ 11,000 
POSS MORE 


A wato pra to M tood PA rate 
lor jjroiBMonal Iffl/Cttainran 
in Onfaea. You can use 
mflatwetottoabdol 
iw Has to totegtee. . 
teo office and tee staff, 
travel rivoKed aid other ooo- 
fiderttal duties which we 
cannot mention horn to find 
out more eta Kelly 01 434 
0030. fte 24 - 40. 


CMLNBrS 
tssnnu. APPEAL 


Wt n tataig lor a np Itol ftavnl 
teTOf IKM.M Wll (HtM 
Bwbwm Bk nag B aM dotmew tfh 
PM) tor inlvreatfamllv inatmed 
dMnns KXate emu Lwwi 
Ita sea m>dB * mw tm ter 
*W»J MA IBM WW W 0> 0» 
IpBiiMoawtep mrea awnraiiMaior- 
taM. hqh pwtte. negnl ««tal im V» 
[KiUDnnaM tenter a eneol tekas 
memto or a saa oowtj km. agUv 


vwe met tv b 


""ffi 


Dfrecter, 


latar Sfeari. 
London Wt 
01-935 6501 


CHAIRMAN’S 

SECRETARY 

(SHORTHAND) 


Repaired for mtt tnemfiy 
bnestoori management com- 


ffl assist wih afl business and 
personal correspondence. 


shorthan d 100 wpm. wsra pra- 
nssstg ssperiMca preferred, i 


£ 10,00 0 

benefits. 


pa' plus other 


tea CV is 


DRAKE 




Bee Con 


EXECVTWE 

PA 

£19-121 


A smpttius office saR (West 
London toaSonj and a anash- 
ng boa not a bnmfy 
amorned. tegMy artcuMe M 
«to a lomy smte an anrac- 
m Yow nuert 

Fiencn. seoeanai expertise - 
WO/a + W ■ wfl anew you 
10 ion tes raft- rational' 
paradwn go who nNognae 
tear tee best oriy enrioy tee 
best Age 2535 wd toaay 
protessanaL COMM U confi- 
dence Km RusseB on 


629 4343 


BmaM 

Bonw 


OUT AND ABOUT 

£ 11,000 


Assisting, the charming young Direc to r of this 
anall property development company off Berkley 
Square you will be attending site meetings regu- 
larly, co-ordinating and producing brochures on 
the developments and provide a full secretarial 
back-up. No shorthand, some audio and accurate 
typin g (60+ ) necessary. Sound office experience, 

good presentation and outgoing personality 

rial. Age 25-35. Please ring 434 4512. 


Crone CoHcill 

RECRUITMENT CONSULTA NTS 


■ill 




» ‘Sms fm 


*1 

.It 


general appointments 




A WINNING PERSONALITY 

. . . could earn you £12.000 in your first year plus 
an excellent training. €7.000 {negotiable ' 
regulated earnings scheme). e3riyMaf£fferrl&ff 
opponunms and the backing of a £4 b&ton ■ 

international group IfvouhavadfivQ. mioatve 
good communicative skri/s. n’s an exceHmr 
career move -rate it. Phone fordetails 


-Oil . 

. 4 

yfl' 

4" 

'.17. 

lid 

I?' 


■■rfP. 

-.fir 



PBGONNB- 


PAs, SECRETARIES 

Ak Yu LibHu Far A doHesge? 


VteitangasinriofapraMssiiiBltoaniyouvdRaaaitsliraCa- 
mg amnim man nfiMfud catodwtans m the toy to 


^^Nym^mijraksltanr. ttitve oa daraateng 


jsnMtemnBqntoYbureanu- 
■e on stfw you a reranjog row wow tar tatianenbon. 
Y«w ability u cunnwnae cftectendy a to terete « will as a 


sound tonMtedga te otera systems wii provide you wft > 
owjie rapomiray id dewlap and oragress m ou d| 


... . ... _ dynamic 

If toa sorts mtensong tonacr Mm Hand! or Frame 
Carey ■ lt-229 fiu 


I 1 M DRAKE DSireRNiflJIONAL GROUP 


PERSONAL 

ASSISTANT 


Salary circa £15,000 


pcrson ®*Perie<KB m the prop- 
my and/or tn^rg moots, to work as personal asriaanun 
Hnan “ Praetor. The company provides mcr- 
ctent bankmg services and (his depanmem ywit. in 
prtweny retated transact nxaiRd corporate finance activities. 

2gS*S!i T" t for project co- 

ardmtiQQ and neporong io die Directors, 

p teaK tawitact Rriitiiy Robertson at 
Robert Fraser & Partners 
29 Abienwrle Street. Lnodon. W|X 3FA 
Telephone 01-493 32(1 


Slrttith company, manu- 
la^jrer of HaWresaing 
and Cosmetics' Goods 
since 1948, needsfor 
Croat Britain 


DEALER 


Ttaraqidrod person must 
*We^«perfance In 

totafleu, should be able to 

deefcato hbnsaH to tty to 
fob tosk. and my*t have 
«wnd ftwical records, 
"rite to; Aruah C / 
LraaOdad. 10. 05024 Qar- 
“S™ 1 (Bprinfc attaching 
curriculum vitae (com* 

(wata is now operating. 




TRAINEE 

BROKER 


A vacancy has niton 
for a trainee Broker. 
Tha successful appli- 
cant wiB be aged a4+ r 
of smart appearance 
and ambitus. Excel- 
lent prospects offend-' 
Oerid CommB 
81-499 8288 


LEGAL 

APPOINTMENTS 


nKirm ramtrt lAdmmd - 
• fram CJ.OTO _ •*- 

i Va.»y> ( Antttn «. TOrtner* 

01000-^171. -i. : - 


\ 


/ 










**S H-, 4 * 


»* 


* ! f 


Law Report October 15 1986 

Writ regains priority along 
w$LL estored judgment 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 15 1986 




LAW/SPORT 


43 






Me* 


> «CW 

twnr»- 

ic?m I. 
i 

Nfctn v\ 


Bankers Trust Co v Gabdaii 

justice Kerr. Lord 
Just« Parker and Lord Jimke 
BaJcombc ^ 

(Judgment given October 14] 

A crcdhor’ s successful appeal 
which rctorcd the ©rigireffigr 
ment also restored the wntSf 
ften .faaas issued pursuant £ 
that judgment. Moreover, Ure 

S‘SS?^3 , S red -5L lhede « v «v 

of thatWTit survived over other 
writs delivered in respect of tS 

? ame duri, « *e interveHh 

jWgpcnod. 

ft 1 The Coun of Appeal so held 
Gatadan and Abdul Rahim 

Galadwt, and held that the 

plainoflft wm issued pursuant 



Greater 
Chase Man- 



tiVP ASSIST 


mi 


*.**«..- 

- 

r • 


Uic goods was sven by the first 
defendants wife and in the 
ordinary course the next step 
wo uldhave been the issue of 5 
s««Hrs interpleader summons, 

Un May 19, before the issue of 
any such summons, the Chase 
Manhattan Bank obtained hide- 
mem against the first defendant 
in a sum exceeding USSll 
million and pursuant to that 
judgment obtained on May 22 a 
y* 11 fieri facias against the 
first defendant's g fwt c 

That writ was not, however, 
then delivered to the sheriff for 
execution, since Chase Man- 
hattan were aware that the 
plaintiffs had delivered their 
writ to (he sheriff for execution 
against the first defendant, and 
were advised that it was unlikely 
that there would be any surplus 
after the execution of the 
plaintiffs' writ which would 
have priority. 

However, the situation was 
changed by the order of Mr 
Justice Webster and the 
plaintiffs’ solicitors informed 
the sheriffs office accordingly. 

On June 1 0 Chase Manhattan 
having learned of Mr Justice 
Webster’s order, delivered their 
writ to die sheriff and the sheriff 
attempted unsuccessfully to exe- 
cute it. 

On June 25 the first 
defendant’s wife having main- 
tained her claim to the s 
intended to be seized, the si 


fc • . 

vKi 

: 


fill Lynch 


NOTCH 
ECRETARY 
WIRED 


London by the 

tauan Bank. 

M r Timothy Chariton for the 
ufls; Mr Peter Irvin for the 
e Manhattan Bank: Mr 
Thomas Shields for the Sheriff 
of Greater London. 

LORD JUSTICE PARKER 
said that on July 7. 1986 their 
lordships allowed the ptaintifls’ 
fppeal from a judgment of Mr 
Justice Webster who on June 6. 

,ssued 80 interpleader sum- 
lire against the first defendant mons. 

onApn! 4. 1986 be set aside. When their Lordships re- 
stored the judgment of April 4 
die plaintiffs notified the 
sheriffs office on July 8 of that 
decision and requested the sher- 
iff to retake possession forth- 
with and to give them priority 
over Chase Manhattan 
The sheriff refused to do so 
contending that the plaintiffs 
would have to issue a fresh writ 
and that their priority would 
date from the time such writ was 
delivered for execution. 

The plaintiffs now sought to 
regain or maintain the priority 
which they would admittedly 
have had, had their judgment 
not been erroneously set askte. 




IMP- 


Their Lordships restored the 
judgment of April 4 which was 
for more than USS6.5 million. 
Pursuant to that judgment the 
plaintiffs issued a writ of fieri 
facias on April 9 and it was 
delivered to the sheriff to be 
executed at 4.30pm that ««m<» 
day. 

It was noteworthy that section 
138 of the Supreme Court Act 
1981 provided that a writ of ‘fieri 
facias against goods issued from 
the High Court bound the 
property in the goods of the 
"^execution debtor as from the 
,Aime when the writ was deliv- 
ered to the sheriff for execution 
and not from the tune when the 
sheriff obtained possession 
under the writ. 

On May 9 the sheriff obtained 
walking possession of the goods 
at the first defendant's residence 
and made an inventory of the 
them. 

Thereafter notice of claim to 


That application was resisted by 
Chase Manhattan. 

There was authority which 
showed that the effect of the 
withdrawal of possession pursu- 
ant to an erroneous order must 
be dealt with as a matter of 
practice and not law and that the 
court should ensure that a party 


did not suffer by reason of an 
erroneous decision of a lower 
court. 

Where a sh er iff withdrew 
fr°ra possession pursuant to an 
erroneous order of the court, 
there was no need when the 
order was set aside for the 
judgment creditor to start again 
and issue a fresh wriL 
. Where, as here, temporary 
invalidity was in no way due to 
Uie fruit or voluntary action or 
inaction of the creditor but to 
the erroneous derision of the 
court, the court should try to 
ensure that when the matter was 
put right the creditor did not 
lose the benefit of what he had 
done under what had been held 
fo be, throughout, a valid judg- 
ment. 

The plaintiffs' writ bad been 
issued pursuant to a judgti 
which had been restored. The 
issue of the writ was therefore 
entirely valid. 

. There was no need for the 
issue of a second writ and the 
priority originally acquired by 
the delivery of the writ must 
survive or be restored unless 
some special reason was shown 
for removing iL 
Where the judgmentjpursuam 
to which a writ of fieri facias had 
been issued was set aside, it was 
the duty of the creditor so to 
inform the sheriff. 

Once so informed the sheriff | 
could not proceed with the 
execution unless and until the 
judgment was restored and he 
had been notified of that fret. 

If in the interim period he had 
had any dealings with the goods 
or their proceeds which would 
have been wrongful as against 
the creditor had the judgment 
not been set aside, he was not to 
be liable to the creditor in 
respect of such dealings. 

If the creditor whose judg- 
ment had been set aside gave 
notice to the sheriff that the 
order to be set aside was under 
appeal and thereafter the sheriff 
received for execution another 
writ m respect of the same 
goods, be should not proceed 
beyond possession without 
applying to the court for direc- 
tions and raving notice to both 
creditors of such' application. 

Lord Justice Kerr delivered a 
concurring judgment and Lord 
Justice BaJ combe agreed. 

Solicitors: Rowe & Maw. 
Allen & Overy; Burcheli & 
Ruston. 


The national game is paying the price of outdated thinking 

Why football can no longer ignore 
the lore of diminishing returns 




Justifying sting of libel 




- ? VCWKtl>«t4*« 



(tt-SATOn 

HOK'OAGE 



Outpatient 

lurse 


1 ■ 

A* •-•••••'■ 

* >- 


Khashnggi r TPC Magazines 
Ltd and Another 
Before Sir John Donaldson, 
Master of the Rolls and Lord 
Justice Slade 

(Judgment given October 10] 
The rule that an injuntkm to 
restrain publication of a libel 
j-ould not be granted in a case 
*2 herc the defendant intended to 
rely on the defence of justifies 
Lion extended to a case where 
the publication it was sought to 
restrain contained several 
allegations which had a com- 
mon sting and the defendant 
intended to justify the common 
sting, rather than the specific 
allegation complained at 
The Court of Appeal, allowing 
an appeal by the defendants, 

I PC Magazines Ltd and Bridget 
Rowe, from a decision of Sr 
Neil Lawson given earlier on the 
same day. discharged an injunc- 
tion granted by the Court of 
Appeal (Sir John Donaldson. 
Master of the Rolls and Lord 
Justice Croom Johnson) on 
October 7 on the application of 
the plaintiff, Mrs Soraya 
Khashoggi, to restrain the first 
defendants from further 
publication and distribution of 
the issue of Woman’s Own 
i% f , R elated October 1 1, 1986. 

1 III !»**■' Mr Geoffrey Shaw for IPC 
- Magazines; Mr Roger Buckley, 
QC, and Mr Richard Rampton 
for Mrs Kha shoggi. 

THE MASTER OF THE 
ROLLS said that the dispute 
had begun with an application 
to Mr Justice Saville for an ex 
•tone injunction restraining fur- 
Jtct publication of an article in 
he issue of Woman's Own 
led October 1 1 which, read as 
whole, was capable of carrying 
meaning that the plaintiff 
vas a lady of considerable 
exual enthusiasm. It was not 
he first time that sort of 
vl legation had been made 
igainsl her. . 

In the previous week s issue 
here had been a trader which 



had causedi 
touch with the first 
I and explain that she objected. 

Thai had led toa letter written 
by their legal manager stating 
that they would not be publish- 
ing anything that they could not 
justify- That was important 
because under the rule tn Bon- 
nard v Perrvman ([1891] 2 Ch 
269) no injunction could be. 
granted if. the defendant in- 
tended to justify. 

On an application to Mr 
Justice Saville for an injunction 
it had been said by the defen- 
dants that it was too late because 
all copies had been distributed. 
On appeal, his Lordship, sitting 
with Lord Justice Croom- John- 
son, had taken the view that that 
had been too simplistic, because 
the reason why there had been 
no action taken earlier was the 
form of the defendants’ letter. 
The injunction had been 
granted. 

The defendants had now ap- 
plied for the injunction to be 
discharged. Their reason was 
two-fold, first a remarkable lack 
of candour on the part of the 
plaintiff and second the discov- 
ery that the defendants had a full 
defence. 

. Nothing his Lordship said 
should be thought to derogate 
from the duty ofcandour, but as 
a result of the letter from the 
defendants* legal manager, 
which prevented any proceed- 
ings until after pubticabon. time 
was of the essence and it was 
unrealistic to complain of a lack 
ofcandour in the circumstances. 
The appeal turned on the po- 
sition now reached in terms of 
justification. 

Bonnard v Perryman was the 
classic authority, uv the present 
instance the defendants did not 
say that they could prove the 
frets alleged in the paragraph 
complained of but they said 
that they were not limited to 
those frets in seeking to justify 
libel. 


Mr Buckley said that the rule 
in Bonnard v Perryman applied 
in the simple or classic case of 
justification and that it had no 
extension beyond that. 

Mr Shaw said ihar, 

Polly Peck (Holdings)' ptc v 
Trdford ((1986] 2 WLR 845), 
the sting of the article was 
promiscuity in general, and it 
would be- very difficult for the 
plaintiff to make any complaint 
about the allegation in issue 
which could not be made about 
other allegations. The defen- 
dants would be able to produce 
evidence to justify the sting of 
the article. % 

It was not for the court to 
decide whether that was true; ft 
was clearly a jury point. The 
court had to apply the Bonnard v 
Perryman principle even if ft 
had never been applied to the 
Polly Peck defence before. 

There was a much wider 
principle which applied- The 
injunctive process could only be 
invoked in defence of a right, 
and if the Polly Peck defence 
were to succeed there would 
have been no right to protect. 
There was no reason why that 
should be 'applied only to jus- 
tification in its primary mean- 
ing. 

Mr Buckley said that the 
principle i n American 
Cyanamid Co v Elhicon Ltd 
((1975] AC 396) should apply. 
That was not right, but even ifit 
had been the plaintiff would not 
have succeeded because the 
balance would have come down 
in favour of allowing publica- 
tion. 

The injunction should be 
discharged, but in doing so it 
should be made clear that the 
court was not saying that the 
plaintiff had not been entitled to 
the injunction she had obtained 
up until that time. 

Lord Justice Slade agreed. 

Solicitors: William Charles 
Docker; Peter Carter-Ruck & 
Partners. 


By NeO Harding 

League football is steadily losing 
supporters, prestige, and reputation. 
It is also losing money. • 

Does that really matter? Is football 
an industry, like food retailing or 
electronics, or is ft a means of 
providing some fun, excitement, and 
relief from the pressures of life, 
whatever the economic cost? In other 
words, is the football club to be run as 
a business, with all that it means, or is 
ft to be run as the fief of a few rich 
men, generally local people, who see 
it as an instrument of their power? 

Twenty years ago such a question 
would have been irrelevant. England 
had just woirthe World Cup, football * 
was still considered the most glorious 
of the nation’s games and there 
seemed no possible dichotomy be- 
tween football as business and foot- 
ball as sport. Since then. English 
football has declined in popularity 
and in reputation, both at home ana 
abroad. 

While English clubs once domi- 
nated European cup competitions, 
they are now banned because of the 
trail of destruction, havoc and trag- 
edy left by theft supporters. This ban 
is both a loss to the development of 
the game and a serious economic 
problem for the major clubs who 
depend on European competition for 
money and glamour. 

The Business Ratio Report, Foot- 
ball Clubs, 1st Edition * which we at 
ICC compiled, covers the accounting 
periods 1982-83 to 1984-85. it tells 
the story of English and Scottish clubs 
(though they are not banned from 
Europe) just before the 1985 Euro- 
pean Cup final disaster at Brussels 
opened up the foil extent of football's 
can of worms: endemic violence, 
dilapidated grounds and, above alL 
neglect of the product that is meant to 
make the whole thing happen. 

As Ken Friar, managing directin' of 
Arsenal, puts it: "Football is the 
oddest of industries. It sells one 
product and has 92 outlets for it 

A ritual part of 
Saturday life 

(there are 92 clubs in the League). In 
any other business, if not all 92 
outlets were doing well, there would 
be some talk of dosing some of them 
down. But in football, aD 92 outlets 
claim an eqnal right to survive.” 

Like Wolverhampton Wanderers, 
Swansea City and Middlesbrough, 
survive they da though largely 
through the generosity of local 
businessmen who come to the rescue 
at the last moment, investing large 
sums of money in the vague hope of 
some form of return. 

This return, on the evidence of our 
report, is more likely to come in the' 
glory or performance of the team on 
the pitch, than in the returns of 
money. For the last 20 years, football 
as an industry has been descending 
into the sort of maiginality that has 
latterly afflicted other products of 
Victorian society. The industry 
would be almost unrecognizable by 
those who patronized it in the Forties 
and Fifties. 

The 1950-51 season was the high 
noon of post-war football. Forty 
million people attended League 
games. There was no televised soccer 
— indeed, only 334,000 television sets 
— and little more than two million 
cars to suggest other diversions. As 
the Chester Committee reported in 
1982: The bulk of home spectators 
lived near the ground.” Football, 
work and home formed a neatly 
symmetrical pattern, 

A large number of people worked 
on Saturday mornings and football 
matches started at 2pm in those pre- 
floodlight days. A Saturday match, 
therefore, rounded off the day rather 



Putting the decline into perspective 

Our report looked at all 92 dobs in 
the Football League, comparing and 
ranking their activities on 26 mea- 
sures of financial performance. 

Over the period from 1982-83 to 


1984-85 profit margins, return on 
capital and return on assets rose, bet 
in each case the first-year figure was 
negative, and only in the case of 
return on capital was the final year 
figure positive. Profit margins im- 


proved from mitras 153 per cent to 
minus 13 per cent; return on assets 
from minus 10 par cent to mums 1.2 
percent, and retrau on capital from 
minus 83 per con to 2.4 per cent. 

The table lists performance by pre- 
tax profit margin — an approximate 
guide to the financial management of 
a season. The figure in brackets is 
the total of sales for the season — 
tickets, players, assets, etc. 


Top ten 


% 

1384-5 


% 

1962-3 


Bottom ten 


% 

1984-5 


% 

1982-3 


erstfc 


WiW 


Newrastie 


SbeflHW 

Abadan 

Lmrpool 



-CU(ttJ!7a) 
-S2J (nurafe*) 
-M*ku52a> 
-3&2(£D-3t7ia) 
-&6 (£0.783™ ) 
-31.9 (flU29») 
-47 J ti&TUa) -96.7 U&209m) 
-44.7 (£1.3 1 4a) 6A(£lJ3fra) 

-CUb (£0. 188a) -51.5 (£<U0Z») 
-41.5 C£9 -337m) -15.1 (OJASm) 


Bank) 

Prestos 

MusficW 

Coventry 

Wnrin 

ScBBttvp 



» Wofrerbampton and Swansea had not returned accounts for tie 1984-5 year at the 
. time of publication of the report. 


well. So much was this ritual pan of 
Saturday life that many supporters 
went to their local stadium even on 
alternate Saturdays when the first 
team was playipg away.' Away travel 
was almost unknown and the home 
supporters happily watched the re- 
serve team play. 

In the early sixties, the advent of 
motorways, making for ease of 
communications, the general rise in 
prosperity and the five-day week, 
enabling supporters to travel long 
distances to watch their first team, 
started the growth of what Mrs 
Thatcher, after the Brussels tragedy, 
called pernicious “away support”. 
Many attribute the hooligan problem 
to this development, and this season 
Luton, scene of many a battle 
between home and away supporters, 
have banned all away supporters (and. 
been banned themselves from the 
Littlewoods Cup for their trouble). 

Such changes have been little 
appreciated by the football dubs. 
They have behaved like the corner 
shops who, threatened by the arrival 


of the supermarkets, continue - to 
believe they can run a viable service 
only to find that most of the 
customers have deserted them. 

Spectators have been deserting 
football in vast numbers. It remains 
the single most important sport in 
this country, but people have more 
options than just to go to a football 
match. They might sit and watch 
television or. as is happening more 
and more, they might wish to play 
football themselves. We live in the 
age of participatory sports, the mara- 
thon, the fun run. the Sports Aid run, 
where people would rather do things 
themselves than just stand and look 
at others performing for their 
entertainment. 

If football is to remain a viable 
entertainment, it must first become a 
viable business. It is here that the 
finances of the dubs matter so much. . 
Ninety-two League dubs a ft selling a 
product with a declining market share 
cannot all make money. Most of them 
don't but do not appear to care about 
it This is because football clubs are 
the last great-bastions of feudalism. 


Nobody who has ever been to a 
football match can be unaware of this. 
With few exceptions, such as Shef- 
field Wednesday, football dubs are in 
decaying inner-city areas. Most do 
not attract the local population that 
live round the dub, many of whom 
are migrants from other countries 
with little interest in the game. Thus 
the Saturday ritual sees what, in 
effect, is the opposite of the American 
bussing prosperous whites driving to 
run-down areas to watch their 
favourite team. 

This would not matter if the dubs 
recognized it and catered for iL But 
the dubs have changed little or 
nothing since the days when most of 
the supporters came from the 
surrounding streets and would not 
have dreamt of taking the car to 
football — in any case, most would 
not have had a car. The dubs still 
display the “upstairs, downstairs” 
attitude, where the dub directors 

Rollers and sit’h^amfonabte boxes, 
while most supporters have to make 
do with pretty foul and cramped 
conditions on the terraces and in the 
grandstands. 

Even before Justice Popplewel! 
suggested ground improvements in 
the wake of the 1985 Bradford fire, ft 
was obvious that if football dubs 
were to become viable businesses, 
they should attend to this “upstairs, 
downstairs” world- They should be- 
come leisure centres where 
customers* needs were looked after 
with the son of attention and detail 
expected from a modem place of 
entertainment. 

The problem has been, and still is, 
that not many football directors and 
chairmen see it that way. Many of 
them have invested money in their 
local dub not because they saw it as a 
business from which they expected 
returns but as: (a) a way of making 
their mark in the local community 
and (b) fulfilling a log-felt ambition to 
own theft local dub. 

A good many directors and chair- 
men are local boys made good: in 
their youth, they may have been 

The solution must 
lie in fewer clubs 

soaked to the skin standing on the 
terraces supporting the dub and 

Investment in a footbaiwfub is not 
like any other investment The man 
• who may make hard business de- 
cisions every day of his life becomes, 
once at the head of a football club, a 
fen who wants nothing more than to 
see his dub win and is willing to 
spend money, and lots of it to do so. 

To -convince such people that 
football must also be a business, ifit is 
to survive as an entertainment is 
difficult. For they know that if they 
run out. of money, along will come 
another fen with dreams and money 
to try to keep the whole thing going. 

Eventually, the solution must lie in 
. fewer- clubs,, with two or three clubs 
: r willing to -share resources and multi- 
purpose stadiums that cater to the 
diverse needs of the modem 
spectator. 

Already this is beginning to hap- 
pen, though more through necessity 
than by design. Crystal Palace and 
Charlton share a ground; so do Bristol . 
Rovers and Bath City. 

Football dubs may survive by 
careful house-keeping, but the sheer 
economics of the sporting and leisure 
industry is against them and unless 
they change — and change radically — 
they may find that the world around 
them has changed far too much for 
them to be a successful part of ft. 
*FootbaU Clubs, 1st Edition, is pub- 
lished by ICC Business Ratios, 28-J2 
Banner Street, London EC1Y 8QE 
Price £137. 


TENNIS: RECORD ENTRY FOR 1987 DAVIS CUP COMPETITION 


Britain’s hopes as 
thin as Mexico air 

By Rex Bellamy, Tennis Correspondent 


i— 

■K* 1 ‘ 


Damages for pay-cut breach 



t VOW* 









0*r 

t*=- 

T-Jr 

8 *. ' 


ligby v Ferodo Ltd 
leforc Lord Justice May. Lord 
u slice Woolf and Sir Rouaieyn 
'umming-Brucc 
ludgment given October 10] 
The action of an employee in 
ither accepting or not accepting 
unilateral notice of wage 
iduciions by his employers asa 
;pudiatory breach of his con- 
act of employment was inde- 
am to the construction of the 
mployers* conduct as 
iiaiory or otherwise, and 

ie fro or tbe employee's non- 

rceptance of the reductions 
Mikf not give the employers’ 
nice the status of a lawful 
rminaiion of the contract on 

ie notice. „ , . . . 

The Court of Appeal so held 
dismissing an appeal by Uie 
nptoyers. Ferodo Lid, against 
e judgment of Mr Justt? 6 
znall on January 29. 1986 m 
licit he awarded damages to 
■ assessed to the employee, 
any Rigby, for breach of 
ntract. 

.Mr Giles WinratfrSaul, 
y d Mr John Hand for 

■ i plovers; Mr Michael 
■ TShaw. QC and Mr Timothy 
. Dutton for the employee. 

! LORD JUSTICE MAY said 
ii the employee had been 
iployed as a lathe operator 
,ce 1 964 by the employers at 
. emarfon. By 1982 the 

ci was determinable by ine 
•ployerson 1 2 weeks’ notice. 

~ .ptoyers issued written notice 

■ all their employees at the 
y ol* wage reductions. The 

ployec's union did not agree 
.he wage cuts, and on October 
‘ 1982 required payment or 
balance between the reduced 


wages and ibe pre-reduction 


£ 


In Guruon v Richmond upon 
Thames London Borough Coun- 
cil <{19811 1 Ch 448) the court 

held by a majority that contracts 

of employment were no excep- 
tion to the general rule that 
repudiation of a contract re- 
quired acceptance by the inno- 
cent party. 

Counsel for tbe employers 
submitted that that case was 
derided on tbe basis that the 
dismissal of tbe employee had 
been a nullity. 

He argued that here tbe notice 
to reduce wages was not a 
nullity, but was a clear notice by. 
the employers that reductions in 
wages were to occur, and that 
even if Mr Justice OgnaB had 
rightly decided that the reduc- 
' lion in wages did not detentiinc 
the contract of employment 
when promulgated because, al- 
though it was a repudiate ry 
breach. It had not been accepted 
by the employee, nevertheless it 
ought te be construed as a 12- 
week notice to determine bis 
contract of employment, since it 
was an unequivocal statement 
by the employers that they were 
unable te continue with the 
contract of employment under 
the old terms. 

The difficulty with that argu- 
ment was that it amounted to 
the employers asserting that the 
law should construe an unlawful 
notice as a lawful one. and that 
words which would constitute a 
repudiaiory breach, if accepted 
as such by the employee, fell to 
be construed as a lawful ter- 
mination on due notice if not so 
accepted- 

The employers' notice to re- 
duce wages on September is, 
1982 was a breach of the 


employee's c o n tr act of employ- 
ment which was not accepted. 
Therefore the contract contin- 
ued in existence. Tbe employers 
in breach of the terms of the 
contract underpaid the em- 
ployee. He was accordingly 
entitled to damages. 

The employers sought to limit 
damages to the extern of the 
period of notice due under the 
contract Although there was a 
general principle that an inno- 
cent party’s damages were lim- 
ited to the period within which 

the party in breach could law- 
fully have terminated the con- 
tract. that principle had no 
application here. 

The frets of this case bad not 
been before the courts, save in 
Burden -Corns v Hertfordshire 
County Council ((19841 IRLR 
91). There Mr Justice Kenneth 
Jones readied a conclusion 
similar to that of Mr Justice 
Ognall in this case. Thar conclu- 
sion was correct and the appeal 
should be dismissed. 

Lord Justice Woolf and Sti- 
ff oualeyn Cumming- Bruce 
agreed. 

Solicitors: Addkshaw, Sons &. 
Latham. Manchester. Lawford 
aco- 

Correctioii 

In R v Doncaster MBC. Ex 
parte Brafm {The Times Octo- 
ber ll. 1986) a misplaced 
comma in the seventeenth para- 1 
3ph of our summary of Mrj 


Britain will be away to Mex- 
ico, almost certainly on shale 
(day), ra the first round of next 
year's Davis Cup competition, 
the world team championship, 
which is organized by the Inter- 
national Tennis Federation and 
sponsored by Japan’s NEC 
Corporation. Tbe draw is bad 
news for Britain, because the 
Mexicans (Francisco Made! and 
Leonardo Lavalle win probably 
play singles) are more at ease on 
shale and also more at ease 
when running about at 6,000 
feet. Moreover, Mexico will be 
supported by a crowd whose 
conduct can be excessively 
partisan: by angfo-saxon stan- 
dards anyway. The tie will be 


WORLD GROUP DRAW (bene i 

Gni* 1Mb v Swtfac France r Saadi 
Kork Ruskom i UaM Stale; Spafa * 
WcstGemur.lfltii » Aramtw; Caefcn- 
dovakia v hraefc Merita r ] 


Aastrafii v Yagsdiria. 


Britan 


played from March 13 to 15 and 
this will be the first time Britain 
and Mexico have met. 

“This will be a formidable 
task", predicted Paul Hutchins, 
the national team manager after 
the draw had been made yes- 
terday al the Kensington Hilton. 
"Not so much because of the 
Mexican players, but because we 
shall be moving from indoor 
competition io clay at a high 
altitude". 

Hutchins is also aware that, in 
Mexico City this year. West 
Germany were beaten outdoors ■ 
and the United States badly 
mauled indoors — and both 
visiting learns had ample cause 
io wonder what they had done 


Sustice McCullough's judgment or said, if anything, to offend the 
changed the intended meaning. Mexican public. There may. 
The sentence should have however, be a ray ofhope In tiw? 


read: "It followed that in so % 
as the public did not have use as 
of right before, such rights came 
into existence in l926.os a result 
of section 193. . . 


fra that the Mexicans were not 
quite good enough to beat a 
United States team by no means 
renowned for their expertise on 

shale. 


There is more bad news for 
Britain in that, should they fail 
to beat the odds in Mexico, their 
next assignment would probably 
be another away tie on shale, in 
Yugoslavia in October. The 
losers of such a tie would be 
relegated to tbe 1988 zonal 
qualifying competition. Yugo- 
slavia. notably Slobadan 
Zivojinovic. had the cheek to 
beat Britain on grass at East- 
bourne in 1984. 

These things go in cycles. 
Britain are not good enough to 
have more than a precarious 
foothold io tbe 16-strong “first 
division". Since September 
1983 they have had tbe hick to 
play eight consecutive home 
ties, all of them on grass or 
indoors. It is unfortunate that 
Britain need that kind of luck. 
Their last tie on shale was in 
1982. when they beat a 
commonplace Spanish team in' 
Barcelona. 

There has been 2 record entry 
of 72 nations for the 1987 
competition: 16 in the “first 
division" (officially, the world 
group) and the rest in the 
European. African, American 
and Eastern zonal qualifying 
groups. Every year four nations 
are relegated from the world 
group and replaced by quali- 
fiers. The total prize-money in 
1987 will be $1,229,200, about 
£820.000. 

As the competing nations 
could not agree about the dates 
fgr this year's final between 
Australia and Sweden at Mel- 
bourne (the Swedes are heavily 
committed io the Albert Hall 
doubles, from December 10 to 
14/. the ITF have had to make 
the derision for them: and have 
gone for the once- traditional 
Australian dates. December 26 
to 28. Boxing Day may seem an 
odd time to begin a Davis Cup 
final — but it will be summer in 
MdbcjMme. 



Slobodan Zivojinovic: Triumph over Britain 


TODAY’S FIXTURES 


FOOTBALL 
Kkk-ati 730 urns sated 
European Championship 
Group Four. 

England v Northern Ireland (7.45) ... 
RepuhBc Of Ireland v Scotland (330) 
Third (fivision 

Chester vG*nghsm 


FA CUT: TOid quoting round raptor 
wfimbomevTottOn. 

GM VAUXHAU. CONFBtBtCE: Chaten- 
ham v Stafford: WeBta v Bsmet 
MULTIPART LEAGUE: Burton v 
Oswestry: Rhyl * Marine; South Liverpool 

V Caernarfon; Worksop v Horwlcft. 
SOUTHERN LEAGUE: Btt Mtoar Cue 
first nxm£ Cambridge City V Dunstable: 
Fsrehem r vrstertoovRe: King’s Lynn v 
... ... . — -- --- Leicester 


riskm north: Tring v Wohnrton. 
CENTRAL LEAGUE (7 JO unless stated)- 
first dhrMatn Aston VBb * Newcastle: 
Manchester City v Btasfcbum .{645). 
Second eWUMte Barnsley » Rotherham: 
Bolton v Blackpool; Darspgton v West 
Bromrtef) AfflWn (730ti Grimsby » Wigan; 
Port Vale v Stoke. 

FOOTBALL COMBINATION: Brighton tr 
Swtndon (2-OX Crystal Palace V Norwich: 
Oxford United v Fulham. 

OREAT MILLS WESTERN LEAGUE: CUR 
WeHhoton v Bktoford 


FOOIBAU; RAF m VmxriaU-Opel League 
XI (RAF Uxbndga) 

rugby union 

THORN EM COUNTY CHAMWONSNIP: 
Cumtota v Durham (at Aspatda. 7.0): 
HampsMre v Herttordaiira (at US Part£ 
moutti. 3J& Kern v Eastern Counties at 
Asteans. 7.30); Lancashire * Cheshire (5 
port, 7.15): Northumberland v Yoriotaa 
(a! Percy Park. 7J):S«rey v Wriaasexlat 

CLUB MATCHES: AbertriJgry v Newport 
I7.u>. Bridgend v Swansea J7.ta 'CSin- 
braigelinivws^i/BedlpreK.OWaouc^ 
?0); Uwe* v Lahwer 
(7.0k Plymouth V Exaer Urywarsfly (7.30), 

RUGBY LEAGUE 

TOUR MATCH: Hufl Kingston Rovers' V 
AiAtrabns. 

STONES' BITTER , CHAMPKMSMP; 
wanes V Casfeftxu 730. 

OTHER SPORT 

BASKETBALL: Cfctsberg League: first 
towlon (GLQk Team PolyceU Wbgston « 
Hemal and wettond Royals; Leicester 
Riders v Calcfefdato Explorers; Solent 
Stare V Happy Eater Bwcmofl Pratos. 
BOWL&Iiwg^wctorta insurance 

gj^UfriflLMfes Classic (Stoke 

HOCHEV: World Cup (HMudetA. 
-SNOOKEre Holroster world doubles 
championship, preliminary rounds 
(RonUby Forum. Stockport). 


SPEEDWAY 

A Mauger 
force for 
the Danes 

■ By Keitb Macklm 

Ivan Mauger.. six times world 
champion, is still a major force 
in the sport, and the eminence 
grise behind this season's trium- 
phant march to trophy after 
trophy by the Dane Hans 
Nielsen. 

For years Nielsen has trailed 
in the slipstream and cinders of 
his Danish colleague and rival 
Erik Gundersen, and it was 
predicted that he would finish 
behind Gundersen m the world 
individual championship for the 
third successive year. It is now 
history that Nielsen beat 
Gundersen and others to wtit 
this year's title in Poland, and 
last weekend be added to his 
haul of several trophies since his 
Katowice triumph by. winning 
the British League Riders’ Tro- 
phy at Belle Vue. 

The New Zealander Mauger 
must rake much of the credit For 
the transformation of Nielsen 
from bridesmaid to bride. After 
the Commonwealth round of 
the world championship at 
Bradford he offered his services 
as pits adviser to Nielsen, and 
the Dane's acceptance of this 
offer was one of the wisest 
moves he has made 
. ■ Mauger's achievements as an 
adviser and counsel must not 
obscure the continuing achieve- 
ments in that sphere of another 
eat world champion. Ole 
Isen. Tbe Dane learnt the' 
tricks of the trade from Mauger, 
his team mate, and tbe. two. ’of. 
them played Cox and Box with' 
the major championships in the 
sixties and seventies. When 
Olsen retired from riding in 
1983 he took over -the 
oiganisation of Danish speed- 
way and off the conveyor belt 
have come Gundersen. 
Pedersen, Knudsen. Jorgensen, 
Ravi) and Petersen, who have 
dominated team, pairs. long 
orack and individual champiotvr 
i ships for the Iasi two years. 





=■***»££ 


SPORT 


By Mandarin 
(Michael Phillips) 

. While conceding that mak- 
ing excuses for beaten horses 
cm often prove expensive. I 
do reel that, following that 




THE TIMES TUESDAY OCTOBER 7 1986 

RACING: PULBQRQUGH TEAM CAN EXTEND WINNING RUN WITH TWO-YEAR-OLD DOUBLE AT NEWCASTLE 

Fu Lu Shou ready to recoup losses Battalion Cel 

reto-il' 1 u feWiwrivwEV.'vv': tivurMUir • * ■■■ - axe. •- c.-.v. o.-.m .y •<•* "> IIM I 


'« ■sk£'*W!i® 1:>: >< tf.-vwiwiaKMK 1 .:* 




h *i&vxsssfsssfii y x 


costly failure in the Colgate 
Junior Nursery at Hamilton 
eight days ago. Fn Lu Shoo 
should be backed to retrieve 
losses in the Brightelmstone 
Nursery at Brighton today. 
2 nd he is my. nap. . 

After being beaten 
inreequaners of a length by 
Lindsay Chamock on ^Rivers 
Secret. Fu Lu Shou's jockey. 
Tyrone Williams, had a tale of 
woe 10 tell his trainer. Patrick 
Haslam. 

This was ratified later by- 
ex per ie need race readers 
present who reported that Fu 
Lu Shou lost a good position 
early on when he had to be 
snatched up to avoid some 
scrimmaging. 

Williams rightly gave him 
plenty of time to recover and 
get balanced again but when 
he did produce him with what 
looked like a winning run two 
furlongs from home he was 
again hampered badly. 

Getting full marks for 
perseverence. he then 
switched to the outside or a 
biggish field but the winning 
post came just too soon. And 
unlucky was the unanimous 
verdicL 



» vs* 


Ichnnsa, seen here beating Skean at Doncaster, carries her penalty in today's Newcastle University Turf Club Stakes 


Faced by only six opponents 
this afternoon, it will be 
surprising if he does not enjoy 
a better run this time. For one 
by the sprinter Codswalk Fu 
Lu Shou stays remarkably 
well. This can be attributed to 
the influence of his dam. the 
Reliance mare Periliance. who 
had some useful form over a 
mile and a half in France. So 
today's distance of a mile will 
pose no problem for Fu Lu 
Shou. who might well be 
described as a winner without 
a penalty. 

Otherwise at Brighton it 
should pay to back Choritzo 
(2.15) and Inshad (4.15) to 
win their respective races 
although their prices are un- 
likely to be particularly 
appeaiing. However, coupled 
in a double to win the two 
divisions of the EBFSompting 


Maiden Stakes they should 
pay better. 

Following three successive 
seconds. Choritzo deserves 
better luck in the first di- 


vision. She was clearly up 
against it when faced by 


against it when faced by 
Scimitarra at Goodwood a 
w eek ago. 

Inshad, a 180.000 guineas 
yearling by Indian King, ran 
well enough in the race won by 
Greencastle Hill at Goodwood 
last month to suggest that she 
has the other division ax her 
mercy. 

Following his great triumph 
in Paris on Sunday with 
Dancing Brave Guy Harwood 
is again casting his net far 
afield. This should take in two 
prizes at Newcastle this after- 
noon. thanks to the efforts of 
Greville Starkey on Zarbyev 
(2. 1 5) and Old Maestro (4.4S). 

Zarbyev. mv selection for 


the EBF Polwanh Maiden 
Slakes, has been placed at 
.Ascot and Newmarket al- 
ready. His opposition this 
afternoon docs not appear to 
amount to much. Likewise. 
Old Maestro has a favourite's 
chance of winning the EBF 
Princess Maiden Slakes 
following that narrow defeat 
by Failiq at Brighton. 

Steve Cauthen will also be 
at Gosfonh Park this after- 
noon and I envisage him 
landing a double on Indian 
Orator (3.45) and Bolero 


Magic (4.15). I particularly 
like the chance of the latter 


like the chance of the latter 
who was finishing like a 
express train at Yarmouth last 
time when beaten only half a 
length by Saker. 

At Wolverhampton Peter's 
Blue, who like my nap has 
graduated from sellers to nurs- 
eries. looks poised to win his 


fourth prize in a row in the 
Staffordshire Nursery - 
Later in the afternoon I 
fancy Michaer Dickinson's 
chance of winning another 
race for Robert Sangster. this 
time with Fairy Gold. 

My selection, who will be 
ridden by Brent Thompson, is 
a beautifully bred filly by 
Golden Fleece out of the dam 
of their promising young stal- 
lion What a Guest and In- 
fantry. who has excelled racing 
in the United States 
Fairy Gold shaped like a 
stayer when I saw her finish 
fourth first time out in the race 
won by Brave Dancer at 
Salisbury. So a mile and a 
furlong, the distance of today’s 
race, should prove no 
problem. 


Equine centre 
for Ireland 


through a voluntary- levy on 
Irish bloodstock sales. 


Blinkered first time 


BRIGHTON: 2-45 Tna Rosa 
WOLVERHAMPTON: 4.0 Tjuj-Woog. 


BRIGHTON 


3.1S BRK5HTHELMSTONE NURSERY HANDICAP (2-Y-O: £2,641: 1m) (7 runners) 


By Mandarin 


Selections 


2.15 Choritzo. 

2.45 On To Glory. 

3.15 FU LU SHOU (nap). 

3.45 Touch The Sail. 

4.15 Inshad. 

4.45 Storm House. 


By Our Newmarket 
Correspondent 

2. 1 5 Choritzo. 

2.45 Minus Man. 
3.15. Fu Lu Shou, 

3.45 Touch The Sail. 

4.15 Inshad. 

4.45 — 


3 (6) 0100 STATE BALLET (V) (O Back) I Bahfing 9-7 JHatfew 94B-1 

6 17) 314004 MOWN PRESS f&SF) (Ottsrdawn Associates Ltd) D Atoutiwot 8-12 JRbH 9010-1 

7 (3) 430 BE CHEERFUL ft Waterman) J Winter 8-7 PHoMum 98FS-4 

8 IS) 400404 SAY YOU W1LLJG Noble) P Matun 04 M Robot* 9612-1 

9 (1) 020133 PARXLANOS BftiF [D Hatcfi) M Haynes 8-4- pCook *99 3-1 

11 |4) 0012 FU LU SHOU (BF) (M Tong) P Haslam B-2 TWWfen 96 4-1 

14 12) 001 VISION OF WONDER (C Cjrauf) M Usher 7-13 CRuWrp) 96 8-1 


Speedtwd (8-12) at Rsdcar (71. £2371, Arm. Sept 26. 11 ran). BE CHEERFUL’* best eflort (8-11) 31 3rd to 
Lashing (8- 1 1 ) at Yarmouth 61 mfln. £1 375. good to firm. July 1 . 9 ran). She has been ofl the course since July. 
SAY YOU W1LL(94) 21 4th to Psfefece (9-7) at Leicester (71, 1940. good. Aug 18, 17 ran). PAMOANDS BELLE 
[8-6) 1 --il 3rd to Otore Malle (8-5) at Sandown (7m if, £2532. good to firm. Sept 23. 7 ran). FU LU SHOU a 
Haydock (81) sellHVTWinner. fated to find a run whan (8-1) *il 2nd to Rivera Secret (7-8) at Harttfton (8t. £1459. 
good to rum. Sept 29. 14 ran). 

Selection: FU LU SHOU 


3.45 STEYNING SELLING HANDICAP (3-Y-O: £888: 7f) (11 runners) 


Guide to our in-line racecard 

103 1121 0-0432 TTMESFORM (COBF) (Mrs J Ryley) B HaH 9100 ...I... 


LOVE AT LAST (W Hastmcs-Bass) W Hastings-Bass 9-7 R Una* (3) 

THE UTE (S) (R Bastran) Mrss L Bower = .- — TWMwna 


TREMENDOUS JET (D.BF) 


B West (4) 


M Madgwck 9-2 ..... .... E Guest (3) 95 6-1 


Racecard number. Draw m brackets. .Sn-bg^e 
form. Horse s name [B-Mnkera. V-wsor. H-bood. 
E-eveshreW. C-couree winner. D-chsonce winner. 
CCFcoursa and distance winner. BF-beawi 


favounte in latest race. Owner m brackets. Traner. 
Age and weigh!. Rider plus any alowance. The 
Times Private Han dca peer's rating. Apprommare 
starting price. 


17 (3) 0-04204 


MISS HICKS ifp Rshar) M Ryan W — PRebbywn 89 92 

WINSONG MELODY (E Goodwin) P Ctmdel 9-0 PCoek 97 10-1 

DORADE (AO) (O Mtes Potato |un) D Money 8-1 3— B House S 94 8-1 

GOLDEN STRAW (B) (Mas M Gower) Mrs C Reevay 8-13 . — — JRrid — — 

HEAVENLY CAROL (KCuxMUPCundea 8-12 — C Rutter (3) 

SEQUESTRATION (A Rchards) C Austin 8-4 A Clark 

MKS VENEZUELA (Mrs S Popovich) B Stevens 8-3 RF« 95 — 

TOUCH THE SAIL (J BJackbarow) M Tomptans 7-13 W Woods (3) *99 — 


DORADE (1M)) (OMtes Potato |un)D Money 6-1 3 

GOLDEN STRAW (B) (Mas M Gower) Mrs C Reavey 8-13 . 


Going: firm Draw: 5f-6f low numbers best 

2.15 EBF SOMPTING MAIDEN STAKES (Div 1: 2-Y-O: £1 .031: 6f) (8 runners) 

Ion 9-0. PCoofc 71 — 

Z (b) DEGH«EHAi£|5 5gunes)MTompwns9-0. W Woods (3) — 16-T 

3 (61 04300 LAZWI (B) ( Hamden AJ Maktowri) C Benstead 9-0 B Rouse — 10-1 

5 ID 000 SPtiZAWTJMrcC Reed) Pat Mitchell 9U C Ratter (3) 67 — 

6 (7) 00 BRAZILL1AN PRINCESS (Roldvata Ltd) P Keflewey 8-1 1 T w a rns S3 4-1 

7 12) 222 CHORITZO (C Wright) R J Wiliams 8-1 1 J Reid *99 FI-2 

8 (3) 00 GOOONK3HT MASTER (A Russel) A Moore 911 M Wigham 

10 (4) 00 SALMAS (Mil, D VeasoylJ Winter 8-) 1. PRotmon 62 7-t 


Yarmouth (71. good. Sept 1 7). Earlier |B-5| beaten a head by Cooper Raring Nad (8-1) at Ayr (61. £943. good to 
tirm. July 25. 9 ran) 

Selection: TREMBIOOUS JET 


4.15 EBF SOMPTING MAIDEN STAKES (Div II: 2-Y-O: £1,109: 6f) (5 runners) 

2 (11 3000 MALAC19 LADJMrs D Smai) Rai Mtchefl 90 PBradwea — B-1 

3 1 3) 003000 STARS IN MOTION (Mrs G Ward) D Artwtnnai 90 J Reid 74 14-1 

5 (2) 0 AUNT FRANCES (D Pram) J Winter B- It B Rouse 82 198 

0 14) 00 DEEP RAPTURES (Hesmonds Stud) DLamg 8-11.. 8 Procter — 5-1 

8 15) 03 INSHAD (BF) (Hamdan Ai MaWoum) A Stewart 8-1 1 —. — — H Roberts • 99 F5-4 


of 6 to Sizzling Melody (8-H) at Royal Ascot (51. Group 3. £20086. firm. June 19). CHORITZO (6-1 1)6> 2nd to w bwowto ewKH 

SojnrtafTa (6-1 T)at Goodwood (St. 0431 . good. Sept 29. 23 rani, with GOOONKSHT MASTER 18-1 itunpiaced. FORM AU*T FRANCES (8-H) beaten 10M by Abhaaj(B-ll)at Lmgfwldffil. E1337, good. Sept 16. 13 
SA UNAS 1 8-11 MKi&ih to Veryan Bay (8-11) aai UngheM (51. E1268. good. Sept 16. 11 ran). rWIIIVf ^ inshad {S6j 31 M of 9 to Greencastle HiB (8-8) at Goodwood (6f. 2236ftgood7Sept 12) 

Selection: CHORITZO e ‘ "*■ 


Selection: INSHAD 


2-45 SALTDEAN 


3 (10) 21304)4 
5 (11) 041000 


7 (4) 038040 
14 (7) 000140 


15 p) 0-00020 

16 (8) 210432 


HANDICAP (£2,617: 1m 2f) (13 runners) 

FIRE BAY (RCD) (A Thompkms) P Haynes 5-96 

LEONHJAS (CD) IG Ward) DAiouthnot 8-9-3.. . 
SALLOOM (CO) IB Doodyj W Ha5irff.-a.is3 4-9-?. .. 
SINGING BOY (G Eden) A ttde 5-8-13. - . ... 


18 (6) B30O21 

19 (5) 00-0001 


26 (?) 400000 
31 (1) 000130 


32 (9) 00/000-0 
34 (13) 304231 
36 (12) 090000 


SALLOOM (CO) |B Doodir) W Hastfigs-Bass 4-92.. 

SINGING BOY (G Eden) A rtde 5-913. - . .... 

NASKRACKEH (8F) (B Hearse) G Harwood 3-912 .... 
FOOT PATROL (Q (Mss L Evnnsl P CundeU 98-1 1 _ 

ON TO GLORY m) (J Barber) J Duntop 3-910. ... 

TRUE WEIGHT (DIIMrs J Cundy) M M<WpwK* 4-99.. 

COSMIC FUGHT (E Peate) M Usher 392 

WtLLBE WILLBE (Mrs C Brnum) C Brmam 97-12 

FRENCH EMPtROR (O (J Ffttch-Heyes) J Ffrtch-Heyes 


7 Wtfbams 94 191 

J Rod 93 12-1 


ft Lines (3) —141 

. MFmzard 96 — 


FRENCH EMPEROR (Cl (J Ffitdi-Heyes) J Ffrtch-Heyes 4-7-12 0 Gteon — — 

INWS MAN (CJ3) (Vrhitbng Caneno&taa Ud) W Hcfiden 97-10 R Mwse (S) »99 91 
TINA ROSA (V) (S Wmgfietd Digby) D O'Donnell 3-7-7 — 


. A Clark 93 4-1 
C Rutter (3) 97 5-1 

B Reuse 94 F9? 
. E Guest (3) 93 91 

. M Wigtown — — 
MRODMi 95 — 
OGAnon — — 
R Morse (S) »99 91 


4.45 SOUTHDOWN STAKES (Amateurs: £1.648: 1m 4f) (8 runners) 

l M1 groooi HEIGHT OF SUMUBU DIR Cnachley) D ArbudWrt 5-1 1-11 M Armyti 

3 14) 200033 WILD GOffiEH (V.O) (A Rosw 0 Oughton 4-11-6 G Webster 

J (7) 0000/0-0 CAU90L0N IG Mnchefi) Pat MdchifiJ 12-11-3 EKfeione 

5 (3) 00/000-0 HNSOHRE (K Higson) A Moore 7-11-3 S Cowley (5) — 

e (5) 00/0004- HAWSER ID YftSsiM MaogwKk 4-11-0 D Madmrick 

I {6} 322393 STORM HOUSE (Mrs N Mnrs) K Brassay 4-1 1-0 T Thomson Jones SB F7-4 

8 (8) 960 KAUMPONG IA BumhamfP BuBer 4-10-11 ABurSam® — ~ 

10 (2i 00 OUR HERO (OetttJey Wood Racing Ltd) J Dunlop 3-10-9 RHutcMnsan «S9 11-4 


FORM GSO ^Jweg».o»er HyaWn (912) m h cRp at Beverley (1m 4f. E1882. 

I vrr Iin firm Sept 24. 13 rani. WILD GINGER last ran. hera. 6 weeks ago when 4*i 3n3 to (8-13) io 
Tempest Tossed I9l3)(lm 4f. £2061. firm. Aug 28. B ran). STORM HOUSE (95)had been off the trade tor a 

year pior to 61 Bam 3rd to Farm Club (97)tim2f SOyds. 0204. goodto firni. Sept22. 12 ran). CHIR TORO has, 

Bean 6m o! !2 m2 Nottingham maidens tlm 2f). larady (90) when i mi behind Bananas (96) (El 372. good. 


Aug 12. 12 rar) 
SefaKhon: STOI 


FORM BOY Dehmd Iasi tune. Earlier (951 beat Npoto (9-0] Hat Pontnfracr (St. £2582. good to 

* vlltTt firm. Aug 6. 8 ran). Last season 3rd to Super Top at Nomngham. showmg he stays the trip 


STORM HOUSE 


' ft m. Aug 6. 8 ran). Last season 3rd to Super Tnp at NonmWwni. showng he stays the trip 

NASKRACKER rtf the course s«xa early August. His best effort when (98) a 2nd to Blenders Choee (9-0) at 

Folkestone m July <1m 41. 0303. good to firm. 13 ran). FOOT PATROL 19131 2hl 2nd to Marsh Hamer 1941 
here Earter (8-0) course and distance 3rd to Hawaiian Palm (910) (£2847. firm. Sept 17. 14 ran), with fire 
BAY, winne r of th is race last year under 9st Sfc. was a away 4th (91 ». LEON RMS (97) 41 tuck 6tn and 
FRENCH EHPEROfl (7-7) behmd. ON TO GLORY [8-61 came late and last to beat Tom Forrester |9 2 ) li at 
Folkestone with LEONIDAS |981 2 ' .-) away 5th tlm 2t. £1779. firm. Sep! 9. 1 5 ran) TRUE WEIGHTS wins have 
Oath come m Amateurs races: last wne(1 1 -i| beatmg Irish Hero (12-0) II at Ftaestone I f m 2f . £1 14S. good lo 
firm. July 15. 15 rani. MMI1S MAN (91) beat Hamper (961 a neck at Goodwood last week (1m 2f App'ce. 


Course specialists 


£2526. good. Sepi 30. 22 ram. 
Selection: NASXHACXEK 


45. good (0 
i 2f App'ce. 


G Harwood 
P KtHte-uay 
Vi H-Bass 
K Brassey 


TRAINERS 

Wftnners Runners Per ceni 
32 132 24 2 

13 68 19 I 

6 3J 17.6 

8 S 14 5 


T Williams 
P COOk 
B Rouse 


JOCKEYS 

Wmners Runners Per cent 
12 TO 152 

23 200 11.5 

33 387 15 


l Oi^v qualifiers i 


(Only qualifiers) 


NEWCASTLE 


RADIO NEWCASTLE HANDICAP (£2.663: 1m md) (20) 


320300 MOORES METAL (CO) i Mooes LM) R Hobnshead 9910 ACuAane(7) 

00200U ARISTOCRAT VELVET (D| (D Wosskow) J Elfiemgton 4-910.... S Cauthefl 


Selections 


000030 BELLA 8ANUS (C.D) (R Stephen son) iv a Stopnenson 4-g-i .. M Hbxfley (3) 

022202 O I OYSTON (CD) (J Berry) J Berry 1999 JC«roa<7) 

913300 SAND-DOLLAR (BF) |G Waters) M Prescott 399 . - . GDuffloU 

090000 SHARP SHOT (D) (Wndltower Holdings) J Dunlop 599 W Carson 

030113 210 PEPPINO (C.D.BF) rC Lloyd-Jones) C Ltoyd-Jenes 598 Jube Bowfcsr pi 

031000 HEAVENLY HOOFER (D) iJ Biancn) Denys Smth 397 LChamocfi 

ooarau VERBARHM ICOt (Mrs J Ramsoem Mrs J Ramsden 696 . NON-RUNNER 
244144 SHARON'S ROYALE (0) iW Bjrcri) R Whitaker 396 . ..... K Bradshaw (S) 

303430 HENRY'S VENTURE (D Chapman) D Chapman 4-94.. . A Proud 

000000 SINGLE HAND (Q (Miss D Chnon) D Chapman 692 J CoBagban (7) 

100000 KAMAR^SS (M Brma-nj M Brmam 4-8-1 .... . K Darley 

012120 OUAUTAIRESS (V.CD) (Ouoktair Enoneermcr) K Stone 4-84) - . P Burke (7) 

33300 NORTON WARHKJH iMaj J Urtevl MH Easterby 37-12 M Wood 

04900 NEW BARfCT |R Moody) Mrs J Ramsden 4-7-11 .... Abtgafi Rtchards (7) 

000002 BAXTER GATE iMm J Pavnel J Payne 37-10 - . - A Macfcay 

400210 ROSSETT (DJ3F) (T Craqi T Crag 7-7-9 - JQimfS) 

00-000 ROCK SALT iPLewrSlV: Pearce 4-7^ M Fry 

920040 GOOD N SHARP >a Ouffietdi G Calvert 5-7-7 J Lowe 


Bv Mandarin 


2.15 Zacbycv. 

2.45 Datallia. 

3.15 Qualiiaircss. 
3-45 Indian Orator. 

4.15 Bolero Magic. 

4.45 Old Maestro. 


By Our Neivmarkei 
Correspondent 
2.(5 Schmulzig. 

2.45 Nozcl 

3.15 Sand-Dollar. 

3.45 — 

4. 1 5 Be Jero Magic. 

4.45 Dollar Seeker. 


Bv Michael Seely 

2.15 ZARBYEV (nap). 4.15 Bolero Magic. 4.45 Old Maestro. 
The Times Private Handicapper's lop rating: 4.15 BOLERO MAGIC 


in onnamj nn omram a-B-i .... _ _ . . _ . . 

S (V.CD) (Quanta it Encmeermg) K Stone * 
ffliOH iMaj j urdBV) M H Eastertjy 37-12 
r (R Moody) Mrs JRamsaen 4-7-11 


- KBn,d M 


K Darfcy 

(-90 _ . P Burke (7) 

M Wood 

Abtgafi Rtchaids(7) 


A Macfcay S3 a-i 

I Quinn (5) 94 7-1 

.... MFry — — 


Going: firm 


Draw: no significant advantage 


1 (4) 

6 PS) 

7 (10) 
10 (?) 
11 ( 12 ) 
15 (I-*) 
23 (1) 

25 1 5) 

26 (ID 

27 (7) 
JO (3) 
at ta 

34 (J31i. 
36 (6k« 

39 (9) 


00 ALVECOTE MAGIC (^) (0 Cotfans) C Trader 90 .. 
DANENSIAN (Hippotfiomo Rac^xj) M W Fasterhy 90 

000 OANSE ARABE (Mrs D Braper) A Jarws 90 

0000 FIEDOIE ASHTON (E) ILord Hanmgton) D Moriey 90 

GROSSEN (Lord Motthenst M Camacho 90 

0 KEWTtNTS LAO tKenton Utiboesl Junmv Ftagerald 90.. 

0 SCHMUIZtG (V 2uco) L Curnani <»0 . . 

0 SPRUCE BABY tfl Enwunenn) S Norton 90 

00 THE MAJN MAN (A Richards) C Bntlam 9-0 

00 7RY.MY BRAIB1V (BF) lA Oorej B HRs 90. 

WKJ.RAINE|MraiHaire)TBarron90. . 

32 ZARBYEV (BFJO Brody) G Harwood 9H .. . 
CUSHJNA (Mrs A Chapmani M Prescott 9)1 . 


00 HAPPY HARRIET iMtsSBrootriWgrsey 8-11 
MAROUETER1E iC Gokfing) J W Watrs 91 1 


161 003100 NOZETfN PtuUpSlW Jarvis 9-1. . 

(41 030022 BLACK DIAMOND (A Sotfin) A Jarm 90. 

!•» 424110 CAPRICORN BLUE JV.D) (P Asaoilhi Jcnmv FiBgwold 90 

In '010432 NAP MAJESTICA (D BomaHI M Camacho 90 
000000 TAXI MAN (Mrs O Stoewi K Stone 8-12 
IS) 300 DAVALUA (Lord Fa»hOv«fil U Mortev &-11 

320000 OPriMtSM FLAMED (C Webiier) Mrs J Ramsden 910 


. .. . M Bocfi 

80 12-7 

. HHWierO) 

54-1 

DMfcftote 

— . 

. . . R Guest 



DOorato«(7) 

— ■ 

. — — 

14-1 

RCschnw 

■7 <-l 

.. J Lowe 

91 12-1 

WCtraon 

84 10-1 

. . . G Cauihen 

98 5-1 

... M Fry 

— 16-1 

G Start ey 

• 99 F5~ 

G Outfield 

14-1 

C Dwyer 

— — 

N Connorton 

14-! 

runners) 

G Start ev 

-.J 

. . J Lowe 

85 4-1 

S Cauthen 

91 ?-2 

□ NKtaoUa 

98F6-2 

Mftrcfi 

83 12-1 

R Codwane 

• 99 91 

MBeecraft 

— 191 


3.4S HEATHFIELD HANDICAP (3-Y-O: £2.264: 2m) (7 runners) 

2 ‘7\ 313440 INDIAN ORATOR (5ne*fi Monammeffj B Hifls 97 

7 M, 004 MSHAm PALACE (Dirvi Stud LaiJ Dunlop 912 .. 

8 »2I 0002 COMAZANT ADduOa) G Harwood 6-1 1. . 

10 iol 003041 MMBLE NATIVE iBADWhlS Norton 99. 

16 lit 044304 LAKISTE (R Sangsieri .» \v Wans 8-0 

17 'S. 003403 GRATIFY. ELMefPVValwvn 7 12 

:e .4* 330202 DENALTO (A Crawford) Denys Smith 7-10 - 


.. S Cauthen 

W Carson 
. ... G Starkey 

J Lowe 

N Connorton 
N Howe 


MFty *99 12-t 


4.15 NEWCASTLE UNIVERSITY TURF CLUB STAKES (3-Y-O: £1.450: 1m If) (6 
runners! 


41 ICHNUSA |f."rs M La n O> J Dun-jp 9-4 . . 

20-0001 SHINING SKIN iMa*-jun «i Mahtoumi P v.-aiwvn 94 
22 BOLERO MAGIC |BF)iMSami3isin.3titHC«*» 90 


09000 LATRIGG LODGE (HccMey P*g C Smnti Udi N Bycroft 96 !. .. L Cfw 
0 NO IDEA (Mrs V f/oorevi -.1 H Eosiarhv n-0 u 

000000 MUSICAL AJD it Cra-.ji T C-a-J 9-1 T A Mi 


W Carson 97 2-1 
N Howe 84 5-2 
. S Cauthen • 99 F6-4 
LCfiomodk — 33-1 
U Bach — 14-1 
A Macfcay » 331 


Abdulla’s 

charge 


Celebrating in 
style with 
Dancing Brave 


GreriUe Starkey was back m 
the Dancing Brave cokrats erf 
Khated Abdulla when be 
partnered die 13-8 hioorite 
VigliottD in die Doaniagton 
Stakes at Bath yesterday, bait it 
proved another aafortmate 
experience. 

The colt did wt joap eff too 
well in the big field, and was WeD 
behind as they nu into the king 
turn at the bottom of the covse. 
He got a 'good raa an the nafl, 
®#jssg a ietoC grand, bat then 
fanmd his nay stopped in the 
straight and lad to be switched. 

Although flying at the finish, 
he only managed to reach So nth 
place, just under two lengths 
behind Battalion, who street the 
front inside the Baal furlong and 
stayed this extended mile well to 
win by a length. 

Battalion, trained by John 
Dunlop, was yet another winner 
for the in-form Brent Tho msen , 
whose contract with. Barry HQls 
finishes this season. Thomson is 
not sore yet whether hell be 
riding in Britain next year or in 
the southern hemisphere. He 
said: “Fve got to malcea decision 
soon, probably within the next 
fortnight. There are a couple of 
people I’ve pit to speak to.** 

Battalion, who was 
TlMHBsaa's 58th winner this 
season, is expected to develop 
■ into a very nsefol mile and a half 
campaigner for the Dunlop sta- 
ble next year. 


It was business as usual at 
Pulborough- yesterday as 
Coombelands Racing Stables 
a waned the return or Dancing 
Brave from, his record-breaking 
win in Sunday's Prix de P Air de 
Triomphe. . 

Guy Harwood had already 
flown -to- Dublin to scan the 
potential stars for I9S8 that will 
be on. offer at Goff's invitational 


By Michael Seely 

usual at combined with the stamina 
day as necessary to win over a mile ana 
Stables a half and that they must never 
Dancing foil to gfw>c their raining, 
breaking Using these standards, as a 


yearling sales today- 
Geoff Lawson, the. trainer’s 
brother-in-law and assistant 
trainer, had gone racing at Bath 
as . the stable attempts to beat 
Henry Cecil in the race for the 
first trainer to saddle 100 win- 
ners in 1986. 

* In their absence Chris 
Kinane, another stalwart of this 


powerful team,, was. holding the 
fort- “Dancing Brave . arrived 
back at tea-time,** be said- “He 


Gerard as a versatile and consis- 
tent colt of the highest possible 
calibre. , , 

And if you go back further 
and take Tantieme. Rrtxtt and 

Sea Bird II into consideration. 
Dancing Brave must beassesed 
as one of the eight best colts to 
have raced in Europe since the 
Second World War. 

The words versatile and 
consistent are ail important. 
Vaguely Noble, Rheingofd and 
Alleged were also impressive 
winners of the Arc. And m uk 


A £2. 2m equine centre at 
County Kildare, dedicated to 
aiding and improving Ireland's 
horse industry, was opened 
yesterday by the country’s min- 
ister for sport. Mr Sean Barrett, 
(Our Irish Racing Correspon- 
dent writes) . 

The bloodstock segment of 
(he industry represents a £500m 
business, which directly em- 
ploys more than 12.000 people 
and indirectly another 12.000. 
has provided the lion's share of 
the funding for the new centre 


Irish bloodstock sales. 

The board of governors is 
chaired by Paddy McGrath and 
includes both past and present 
senior stewards of the Turf 
Gub. Denis McCarthy and Lord 
Hemphill. The centre has lab- 
oratories for both diagnosive 
and research. 


Starkey had better leek in the 
following event, the Morris 
Dancer Handicap, when be 
farced a dead-heat on 
Harwood's 6-5 favourite, Elbnry v 
Park, with a 20-1 chance. Super 
Punk. 

Starkey claimed an outright 

victory lor the Pnlboroogh star 
Me when El Conquistador ended 
a frustrating run of three consec- 
utive seconds by beating 
Tigerwood by half a length in 
the Westmorland Handicap. 

El Conquistador is a son of the 

1978 Derby- winner .Shirley 
Heights, out or a half-sister to 
Mountam Lodge and this was 
his first-ever success. 

• Ladbrokes have reduced 
Sneak Preview’s Tote 
Cesa rewitch odds from 25-1 to 
14-1 folio whig the six-year-old's 
Wolverhampton victory yes- 
terday. Bannerol is 10-1 joint 
favourite (from 14-1) with Floyd 
and Pactolus. 


came back by road -and boat via ' 
Dover.” ••••.•■ 

Kinane said: “We’ll remem- 
ber yesterday, an our. lives. The 
sight of all tbose riassrc winners 
spread across the track was 
fantastic. As soon as be was past 
the post, I rushed down to the 
local off licence to buy four 
crates of champagne and all the 
beer Lha l I could get imom year. 
We then had quite a party on the 
lawn." 

Sunday licensing laws must 
have gone temporarily by the 
board in leafy Sussex m sym- 
pathy with the epoch-making, 
events in Paris. £ 

Dancing Brave will now be 
prepared for an attempt to 
repeat Pebbles’s 1985 victory for 
Britain m ibe $2m one and a 
half mile event oh turf at Santa 
Anita on November I. when 
Sonic Lady and Double 
Schwarz, Sunday's Prix de 
I'Abbaye winner, wDI be other 
home-trained contenders for the 
world’s most valuable day's 
racing. 

Khaied Abdulla's champion 
will travel to California with his 
reputation boosted sky-high af- 
ter Study's win. So with Par 
Eddery's accolade as "the best 
horse T have ever ridden" still 
ringing in our ovef-exched ears, 
now is the time for an attempted - 
evaluation of his merit 

The criteria by which great 
horses have always been judged 
are that they must possess 
sufficient speed for a mile. 


12 years Grundy, Troy. 
Sbsrgsr. Golden Fleece and Slip 
Anchor have been outstanding 
winners of the Derby- But with 
the possible exception of 


as much speed over a mile as 
Dancing Brave. 


What made last Sunday's 
ictorv unkiue was its style. 


victory unique was its' style. 
Never ra living memory has a 
horse coroe from so for back to 
overwhelm so many winners of 
group one races. It was certainly 
the highest calibre field for an . 
Arc since Sea Bird II beat 
.Diatonic II and Reliance in 
1965, 

Those who bought shares in 
Dancing Brave when he was 
syndicated for £ 1 4m must now 

their shrewd ness^ The value of 
the grandson of the prepotent 
Northern Dancer has certain 
soared overnight. But talk of. 
him now being worth' as ranch 
as £30m is pie in the sky. 

The value of stallion shares 
has fallen in the past three years 
and is now more in line to what 
prices yearlings can command 

The average at last week's 
Highflyer sale declined for the 
third year running from its 1984 
peak of 92,520 guineas to 77,636 
guineas. It will, therefore, be 
interesting to see if this week’s 
Goffs sales are able to reverse 
the worldwide trend ■ for the 
third consecutive year, as their 
1985 average showed a slight 
increase over the 1984 figure of 
35.472 Irish punts. 


WOLVERHAMPTON 


Selections 

By Mandarin 

2.0 Nabras. 2.30 Mitala Maria- 3.0 Peter's Blue. 
3.30 Fairy Gold. 4.0 Cieofe. 4.30 Jacqiu Joy. 

By Our Newmarket Correspondent 
2.0 Nabras. 230 G G Magic. 3.0 Blazing High. 
3.30 Ivory Fields. 4.0 lyamski. 4.30 Bonny Light. 


&30 EBF BUSHBURY MAIDEN FILLIES STAKES 

(2-Y-O: £1.132: 1m If) (\ 1) 

2 0 AUMWH Thomson Ams'9t1 A Many 1 

• 3 0 APFEALMGDWCe<MJarra9tt. TLn>9 

7 0 DGXA ROB8UM Pipe 8-11 SWtertiS 

8 4 FMHY GOLD MW Dichsison 8-11 BTbonacpS 

9 03 IVOHVmDSM Starts 911 WRSmtan T! 

11 M LAGTA J Dontop 911 O fitter 2 

12 MfSSPENGUMWHSStiflgfrfiUs911 H Wv7 

16 0 SCATma> SHOWERS OBsmrtii 911 AMcGtoM 4 

. 18 TRBAL PAGEANT IMoOishb 911 GMeMoIO 

19 0 TRIVIA PWafiwn 911 PorfEdtinyC 

20 0 VEST7U. FLAME (Balding 911 Ttwsl 


9-4 ivory Fitts. 3-1 Fairy Goto, 91 Appaafiqg Dancer, 
Scattered Stiowws, 91 Jthstal Ramu, KMLagta. 12-1 others. 


Going: film (good to firm on Gtrafgbt course) 

Draw: 5f, high numbers best 

2.0 EBF BUSHBURY MAIDEN FILUES STAKES 

(2-Y-O: 21 ,145: 1 m If) (14 runners) 

3 (M 

4 oo 


10 BOSCOBEL OAK FILLIES HANDICAP (3-Y-O: 
£2,166: 7I)(17) . 



■PHttNatHI 
HG Safer 17 
WRSwrtww4 


7-4 Nabras. 3-1 

Detach DefighL 91 ( 


s Pride. 5-1 La Vie &i Rose. 9! 
>-Bas. 191 Russian Lullaby. 


1 1031 CLE0FE(D)L 

2 0000 IVORY 
• 3 3W lYAHSHW 

8 1600 CORRALS JOY J 

9 010 PE1HFrmfinGBaUng94 J WW — J 7 

12 0136 T7U-WONG (B&) M Pipe S-t SWttwerthS 

13 2000 FESTIVITY DArtwtfmot 9-0 G Carter 16 

14 0020 CANAPMN GUEST H Candy 9-0 WNmmJ 

15 0024 NATUA P Makin 913 : TCWrelO 

16 0000 8U1YB3E KINGDOM fl Hcttshuad 9T3_ S Pafix 14 

19 OMO CELESTIAL DRIVER Hanoi 8-41 AMcGfcmett 

22 0040 MAOBIOraB-LE MAGMA S Norton 8-8 M His 13 

23 00W AITCHAWOUBEETOUT Barron 69 : Tttafi 

73 2340 AtMABHJJNA(BF) G Wragg 8-6 — RMfel 

28 0081 BROADHURST Qfl J Eftiimon 96(6«x) . A Moray 2 

30 0010 HAYWAMIVJLfiiF) B HMi 94 BTtafeon9 

31 0023 SKELTON (DlMWEasMtay 69 Rau(Eddoyt2 


Z30 FINAL FLING SELLING STAKES (3-Y-O: 
£893: 1m 6f 110yd) (9) 

1 0421 GG MAGIC DMofey 92 A Moray 7 


4-1 Oeofe. 91- Natt. 91 (yamsW,91 SheOan. Tta Wong. 
191 Canadian Quest. 12-i Petray. Haywtt. 14-1 othora. 


2 4301 LffiAKATY (C) M McCouft 9T3 

3 CHARIOTS OF FIRE D Tuchar 911 ADJcfcs(7)4 

5 0024 REDALLY WWtartwi 911 : — 2 

7 0000 TWER GATE R HoUtoshsad 911 PDa4too(7)1 

10 4004 GORLAMNGO A Ja>nes66 —6 

11 IOVE YOU ROSY Mrs GRewMyM —3 

13 0230 MITALA MARIA A Stawart 98. WRSwMibrS 

18 -002 TTRANMSE B McMahon 66 

94 Mitala Maria, 7-2 G G Magic. 92 Tyrannise, 7-1 
Lrsakaty. 91 RwJaRy, 191 others. 


.. A Moray 7 
RWamfenS 
, ADicta(7)« 

Pftiitoo(7) t 


430 AUTUMN HANDICAP (3-Y-O: £1^83: Sf) (15) 


2 0012 BONNY LIGHT 

3 930 HNGSRHGO 

4 OMO MRALAIASSI 
6 3041 COME TO THE 


QRStea*ar97 AfihonRs(q7 

enteyM JWtatl 

l) B Mrffetwn 913 JHMo{5)12 

ALL R Hannon 6-11 (7ax) 

BThooson* 

C Bansttt 9i0_ W R Srtntaat 11 


3.0 STAFFORDSHIRE NURSERY HANDICAP 

(2-Y-O: £1.965: 51) (11) 

4 034U 



7 ooio MUHTARn«mcBenstBad9iO— WRMutaat-n 

8 004t MERRYMOUES M McCDuR 68 RMmkanl 

9 0000 ARDENT PARTlB»RHoWar»7 SOaramfi 

10 0204 STMeO© 00*097 — s ; Tim 13 

11 4000 BRDGEOF GOLDP)TBanxn9S MCarMe.10 

. « 4234 NAGBI L Banatt 91 PH«mi4 

16 40W - LEFT RKfiff (D) Mra N MKaulay 66 RHBil5 

18 0000 SKYLHyEn Mre C Reawy 7-13— GDfcMt « 

(9 20W NOimBSl LAD mil Hod 7-13 NAfemfi 

22 00» TAMALWUS TO H CoAiwdga 7-9 BCttttyS 

23 0212 JACOUIJOY CT K (wry78_ GBardrai (7)2 

73 Bonny LigM, 9-2 Cana To The Ban. Mesrvmotoa. s-1 ' 

Muhtaris. 91 LrtfffighL Ttenaipais, 191 Nogsro. 12-1 others. 


p warn 14 
— RHfeal5 
-GDttMM 
. NAOanfi 


11-4 Peter's Btoe. 4-1 Absolution. 91 Stivers Ere, 7-1 
Nason's Song. 91 Blazing High. 191 Oi Your Princess. 


Course specialists 

TRAINERS: J HMtey 5 winners train 20 -runners, 264%; j 
Dunlop 11 from 51. 21.6%: S Norton 6lrom 38. 21iRb:M 9totdft 
10 tom 49, ZMSfc (only 4 quaafiere). 

JOCKEYS: T Quinn 11 winners Irani 66 rides. 16J%: W R 
Swinbum 11 frotn>. 15^%(octfy 2quaHiere)- 


DEVON & EXETER 


Selections 

By Mandarin 

2.0 Royal Rehearsal. 2.30 Five Quarters. 

3.0 Allied Newcastle. 3.30 Coral Harbour. 

4.0 Leading ArtiSL 4.30Turcy Boy. 

Going: firm 


2.0 SCOTS P INE NOVICE HURDLE (£494: 2m If) 
(7 runners) 






2 064 

3 0-W 

4 POOS 

8 
7 

9 309 
13 

5-2 Mao About Ya. 91 Royal Rehearsal. 9-2 
lY-2 Needwood Leader, 8-1 Grtdan Triangle. 12-1 Cc 


2.30 SITKA SPRUCE NOVICE SELLING HURDLE 

(3-Y-O: £385: 2m If) (6) 

t 104 ANGEL DRUMMER A Ingham 199 KCapten(7) 


04 ANGQ. DRUMMER A Ingham 199. 

0 CROWN COLONY Mrs A Kraft 197- 
F0 fiJRFtZYCALWVWlams 197..—,.. 


3-0 DEVON FUELS DUCHY OF CORNWALL CUP 
HANDICAP CHASE (£3,798: 2m 6f) (5) 

-2--1F1 ALUED NBVCASTLED Bsworth 911-7 ; C Brawl 

3 640 R1MMMG COMMSfrffFJR Hodgw 1S-1WL JVlSE 
9 -KW AFRICAN STAR R Roa9197 ^^ 

11 2232 THE-FLOORLAYER J Befcar 9197 Lltawjm 

72 MP TOWN SPECIAL D R Tucker 7-1 97 I SMriMM 

- . AOttl Newcaata, 92 The Ftooriayer. 7-2 Afrfcai s m. 

91 Running Comment, 20-1 Town Special. 

3.30 HAPPY EATER FAMLY RESTAURANT 
HANDICAP HURDLE (£1,710: 2m II) (fi) fW, T ni 

2 920 TIGHT TURN (CtLBFIfl Hon T-n-7 . t 

3 1« B^-LTWEST RHoSns9l 1-6 „ H FffcrSj 

S .-081 CORALHARSOUR ftSTwarflte 4-19)2 geO 

? ss aBsss^ss^'BsS 

71 /W) BRULOWAY Frsiwr 1 
9-4 Coral Hartjour. 114 San Carlos, 9-2 p— ^ 
11-2 Rying Officer, 7-1 Tight Turn. 191 Btfdtoma* 

4.0 DEVONAW . RADIO CHALLBIGE CUP 
HANDICAP CHASE (£1.662: 

3 -344 LEND9IG ARTISTfCl Nfittiee 17-11-7 PSetMlM^ 

I £ 

j SS 


3 re MR RZVC AL W W Htoins 197.. — PHtaraeoBlTI 

a NELSONSUPERYANXEE P Hastsm 197 5 Kdghfev 

7 03 RVE QUAR TERS LCotiaffl 162 PfaS 

10 030 REPETITIVE M Pipe 10-2 PScndnm 

9-4 Repfetiw. 11-4 Five Quaners. 4 -t Angel Dnnnmer. 
-1 Nelson Suparyankea. 14-1 Crown Colony. J91 Mr FLncaL 


.B fPn- HOafcHtHutN L Cotirefl 8-190 GeoraeKnjaM 

5-4 Lading Artist 92 CaWo Harnta, 4-1 RW 
91 Lerey DU3L1A-1 RoMbergen, **""■ 


Superyanhee. 74-1 Crown Colony. 791 bVHrycaL 

Course specialists 



AM SOOTS PME NOVICE HURDLE (Dw IP: £497- 
2m 1 ft (8) - . . 

1 91 CHRCQTS SUPPER 
5 -204 MBDUN TMtANG M 

8 p-a TUBCY SOYA tnghwn 5 - 10 - 

9 0 TYRO PRINCE R CurM 4-1 0-12 

70 P00- CAROLINE RANGER R ttodgas9197 

12 940 LAOYKBXANEmNGfeSra4-1o!7 

13 BOM MBS SWCLAB T PRoaars 9197 -j-L 

14 09 UMCORH6RED JD Roberts S-IP-7 - 

_ . S-2CtirHt y>jaigper. 11-4 Lady-KMane, 4-7 Mto- 
91 Uneomerad.91ToTey Boy. 191 MfcJdtin TTvw^ 


Costly Pelf disappoints behind Another Guest 


Course specialists 

EHS JOCKEYS 


: PRINCESS MAIDEN STAKES (2-Y-O: £3.1 34: Ira md) (13 runners) 

004 ANGEL CITY (C Humfitii j Dunlop 9-0 . . . wcwton 


Pelf, who cost £lJ&m guineas as a yearling, 
proved just as disappointing when tried over the 
minimum distance at Wohorhamptna yesterday 
as she had done over six furl o ngs on foarpreyions 
occasions. 




Cftanvooei 
H Csol 

j Ountap 

B.Wtfc 


TRAINEHS 

Utfiima^! Hurttiers Per cent 


9 

23 

39.1 

It 

30 

36.7 

12 

34 

35 3 

12 

5J 

22.2 


(Only qoafiJicrs) 


S r«r. 

Winners 

15 

flunno-s 

45 

Per COT 
32 7 

•1 • 1; 

G StdtHey 

5 

34 

250 

' •4* 

M&rcli ‘ 

29 

205 

To 4 

23 

GDuft'tt 

13 

nr 

fl 1 

24 

N Gcinnonon 

12 

it' 

10 3 

2: .’i 

L Cnamocii 

14 

146 

S.5 

3J i)0i 


004 ANGflLCITY iC MumC'Tiri) J Dumao90 . 

BAVARDAGE iC Bume) N Bvnoh 90 

w bo«afortune-,M''.'.j Hoy,aroi0 Money 90. . 

0032 DOLLAR SEEKER (BF) (T K a, or 90.. . 

0000 GOLDEN TREE iMrj P fcnqi j Et-iermaon 9-0 

0 JAZZ DANCER iM's D &aiieri a Jar-.i? 9-0 
0040 JJ JIMMY .J 5 J iran'e, Lrj. J.t H Easreitv 9-0 . 

02 OLD MAESTRO (BF) iSK^i.r JJanaimwer u Horocoo 9-0 
000 REEF OF GOLD fCob: M L^'nost C Bn"tain 9-0 

03 SNAAN iStvyrn MORammegi H Cecil &-0 

0 STRAY NO MORE ftlr, j aanwer*i T Barron 90 

0 STRONG SEA U Hexumi u h taswftv id .. 

DAFFODIL iLaoy Mairlonaic*Bu;narjn) m Prescott 9il " 


. cower 
R Guest 
R Cochrane 
. K Darley 
D Niche*! 
... MBvch 

- G Starkey 

. . JLtWN* 

- S Cauthen 
. M Fry 


• SO 3 -1 
93 12-1 
« 7-2 


K Hodgson 
GDuflidd 


Sheikh Mohammed’s filly, 7-4 hrauntt for the 
first division of the Dediey Maiden Stakes, 
chased Sriterpan for the first three furlongs, after 
which (he pair weakened and Another Guest and 
Wantage Park took command. 

Another Guest, with (he advantage of a ran oyer 
her rival, quickly gained die upper hand to heat . 

■ Mick Ryan's newcomer a length’ and « half. 
Another Guest who cost only 6.000 guineas, was 
a 20-1 shot, aad her success under the apprentice 


Sheather's horses have only struck form m 

W * ««**■ — 1 .1- fe» wnT^Tta 

winpexs.tiirs season. lores he who laraaehed 
Cochrane, the new. first Jockey for Laca CumW 
on his career, andSheafo^ Is bopWhe^^ 

lU cm. Onnhc - ^ =»» tfo 


the same for Shonhs.’ • 810 

Petros Seventy, ak' aB-the-wgy wjiner « 

RiTvprlpv loci mABflh. me ILi 


Beverley last omtfu w 6-4 Ctvourita Cnr Jr 
Serfgetev NHrs«y S^^ Handirep. ^ g 

Maikmorlirf nill iftart L w t fifliu Zr™ _ 


Newmarket col* again led from start fo ftSLi, 7? 
the bands of Tyrone Williams. IUM *» 





p I: 

t 

1*4 • 


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tf ; 








I £ jl* 

■s?', I (• 'T 

- 3 ‘ L* 

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■' ; ' :a>. 
■:*■-. >.V 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 15 1986 




n r*1f If a . «J Lr A 1 1 A W V> JL v/l^l .Jiv 1,/ J 

sden basks in reflected glory as hockey strikes a blow for the amateurs 

unknowns in an unknown world 


SPORT 


45 


CRICKET: STEWART PUTS THE HEAT ON IN PRACTICE 


Simon 

Barnes 


I 


**.1 'V- 


*> 

/**> 


hS* 


■*.. . 

SlKWL. 

Ma«. 
.- * 

+r V 

>* i : 




Mfi s 


► t- »i 


S*i •.. - 4 .. 

*»« 

* BH.. 

*'*•«? 

J •- 


Ifa* : •• 

k 

• *• 
■**• —- 

S'. ■? j- 


\v 


“os; a dull place on the wav tn 
■ somewhere else: 6s normal^ S 
arrive on the border; ofwjilesden £ 
! mhaveyour spirit, compnKdy 
towered. But at the moment. Wilies- 
. 1 i) e ° id<:n C0lullr y of mythic 

■,.^ leE, !8 1 ‘ s h hockey team, ninth in 

, ; , the previous World Cup, haw mS 
won -hmugh rodresenri-finais of toe 

' ' ¥W m ? n I or *e first limeever 
Tire bunch o f playen that malmSi 

-..«■■ ’rf„^ , jfj5 d 1 .«iuad are having the 

pmcofuieir hves. There are even two 

.■•*. 1 • pcopic In the English team that your 
averse sporting enSTSS 
T . ..■ <* .Jiame instantly - Sean Karlv the 

*" ^ Taylor, the 

masked Mtchelm man in goaL These 
two are almost stars, and indri team is 
h «mo?t taken seriously. For hockey, 
this is nothing short of a miracfe! 

/TO “® even . appearing regularly on 
television; the stunningly gritty 
match against the Netherlands went 
• m °u ^ f,-?® on Monday night, 

, * clashing with a Channel Four rar£ 
What Can I Do With 

A Male Nude? 

This is one of England’s greatest 
S^ er .2‘$J, evements «" said the coach, 
David Whittaker. “This could be the 
take-off point for English hockey " 
said the World Cup board chair man . 

J r Phil Appleyard. 

Perhaps so. In a way, though, one 
almost hopes not The small-tini en ess 
of the game, the utter ordinariness 
even of ns stars, is a cheering thing af- 
ter the other World Cup held this 
year. The great pleasures of Willesden 
make one cheer not just for hockey, 
bat-for the entire panoply of amateur 
sport - 

One cheers for the unknown gym- 
teachers of the nation who work all 
day and then flog themselves into the 
ground every evening in pursuit of 
their dreams — the rowers and fencers 
and netball internationals, the canoe- 
ists and marksmen and weigh differs. 
There are three teachers in the 
England hockey squad. 

“The kids at school can’t believe 
I’m an international sportsman " 
Taylor said. “They come up to me 
and say. ’how can you teach and be an 
international sportsman? 1 There is 
only one answer, isn’t there? With 
great difficulty." 




*>** 


***T_ 





Busy England 
show they 
mean business 


Butts and 
Harper 
round off 


Brisbane — England's cricket- 
ers were put through another 
three hours of toil under the 
Brisbane sun on day three of 
their acclimatization (the Press 
Association reports). And 
though their work lacked some 
of the previous day's sparkle, 
the impression that they mean 
business in Australia, is holding 
good. 

As temper ature s stayed in the 
nineties. Mickey Stewart, the 
assistant manager, concentrated 
on fielding practice. "Getting 
used to being knackered in the 
sun is just as important as 
spending time in the nets,” he 
said. “It was a slog day." 

Although all 16 players spent 
some time at the nets, En gland 
were hampered because two 
local bowlers fluted to arrive at 


Headingfay 16 months ago, but 
was never a serious candidate 
for this lour. Even so. Cowans 
was happy to accept Stewart’s 
invitation and said after 
performing admirably in the 
nets: “I’m only too happy to 
help. After alL it is useful for me 
aswelL" 

England will not name their 
12 for Saturday's opening fix- 
ture against Queensland Coun- 
try until after they have 
inspected the pitch at Bumaburg 
the day before. All I6playersare 
in contention, although the odds 
look marginally against Allan 
Lamb being selected. The 
Northamptonshire batsman had 
an exploratory operation on his 
knee a month before the party 
left home, having collided with 

an advertisement hoarding dur- 


wm 


the Brisbane school they are - - . . -i 

using for practice sessions. One "S. «* of ** onfrd» inter- 
num who did add some extra qauona * s a ® unsl ^ zleaia 
fire power, however, was Nor- 


man. Cowans. England's dis- 
carded fast bowler who recently 
arrived in Australia to play dub 
cricket. 

The 25-year-old Middlesex 
player made his last England 
appearance against Australia at 


and. 

Although Lamb has played 
full part in the practices to date, 
Stewan and the physiotherapist. 
Laurie Brown, have been careful 
not to push him too hard. “Well 
see how he goes over the next 
couple of days before making a 
decision," Stewan said. 


Quetta (Reuter) - The West 
Indians took just 15 minutes 
yesterday to claim the three 
wickets they needed to win the 
first match of their seven -week 
tour of Pakistan, as they beat a 
Baluchistan Governor’s XI at 
the Ayub Stadium by an innings 
and 89 runs. 

The Governor's XI added 
only 20 more runs to their 
overnight 89 for seven and were 
all out for 109. Of the three 
wickets to fall. Butts claimed 
those of Asif BaJuch and Azeem 
Hafeez. both fix nought. Then 
Harper finished the match by 
having Habib Baluch leg-before 
for four. 

Harper's match figures of 

seven for 48 and his innings of 

77, the top score of the game, 
brought him the man of the 
match award. The West Indians 
now go to Peshawar for the first 
of five one-day internationals 
on Friday. 

SCORES: Babcttttan Governor's » 131 
(R A Harper tour lor 28. C G Butts tour tor 
ni and 109 M H Gray lour tar aft West 
(ft A Karaer 77. C G Butts S7 


(329. 

notout.E)u 


_ 77. CG 
(Or 103}. 


England may find keeping 
up with Jones is tough 


From Richard Streeton, Bombay 


Spirit and skffl: Batchelor, the England winger (left), in determined mood (Photograph: Hugh Roottedge) 

against the Netherlands, used to be a administrators, sports goods sales- 
policeman, but he left the force to get men and many others, make up so 
more time for hockey. Now he is a much of the great ranks of British 


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I ay lor, undoubtedly a star in 
Donnington Road, Willes- 
den, would be unrecognized 
if he moved as for away as, 
say, Uffington Road on the 
for side of the stadium. *Tve been the 
world number one goalkeeper in the 
assessment of the writers since 1978 
and in Pakistan. I’m Ian Botham. 
Every tittle Tv/ilk' out tin Hie street. 
I’m surrounded. But if I go out to post 
a; letter in East Grinstead, I'm no 
one,'” be raid. 

Kerly is a transport manager. 
Imran Sherwani, the dashing winger 
who scored England's vital goal 


newsagent And a star, if his cus- 
tomers but knew it. 

A star in a whizring, hi-tech game. 
International hockey is played on 
plastic grass, and the trail runs away 
from you like a bar of soap in the 
shower. “West Indian bowlers bowl 
at you from 22 yards at 90-odd mph,” 
Taylor said. "In modern hockey the 
forwards hit the ball at you from 16 
yards minimum, and at 160 mph. 
You don't get a lot of reaction time. 
And the bail is just as hard" 

The surface is hi-tech, and the 
goalkeeper’s monstrous equipment 
must match it. This is a position only 
a lunatic would play in, but Taylor, 
comfortably domestic in East 
‘Grinstead, seems guite sane to the 
casual glance. He is just one of the 
legion of school teachers who, along 
with bank clerks, sports centre 


amateur sponspeople. 

These are people with ordinary 
houses and ordinarily horrible mort- 
gages. With pretty wives or handsome 
husbands, 2.4 children, and an ‘A to 
B' motor car, one which is, in truth, 
slightly under-powered for all the 
travelling they must do to and from 
their training centres. They are quite 
ordinary, too, in that they have a 
dream that goes beyond their suburbs 
and their jobs. 

I bey get up at dawn to go and 
'train, they drive for hours in _ 
the dark to reach distant 
places for team gatherings, 
they leave, normally with 
some reluctance, their loving famili es 
to spend weekends training and 
weeks touring. In the process, one or 
two get to the top, and suddenly and 



briefly, their sport catches the atten- 
tion of the world outside. It gives all 
of us uncommitted millions a few 
moments of great excitement and 
pleasure. 

The legion of unknown amateurs 
deserve our praise. If giving us 
pleasure is not their prime aim, it is 
certainly a by-product in which we all 
reveL The unknown men in the 
England hockey squad. Grimley, 
Cliff, Shaw (teacher, bank clerk, 
sports goods sales manager) and the -j 
rest, along with all the unsung 
amateurs in every sport, deserve a 
song of their own. The song, in- 
cidentally, has already been written; 
Kipling is good at t hing s tike 

“Let us now praise famous men. 

Men of tittle showing. 

For their work continueth. 

And their work oontinuelh. 

Broad and deep continueth. 

Great beyond their knowing." - 


RUGBY UNION 


Orrell players well to 
fore in county game 

By David Hands, Rugby Correspondent 


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England may feel they have 
limited resources at full backr 
Lancasture do not since they 
have chosen Simon Langford, 
• Orrcn’s full back and captain, at 
centre for this evening's county 
championship game against 
Cheshire at Orrell. The county, 
of course, have the' option of 
choosing Kevin O'Brien. 
Broughton Park's Irish cap. at 
full back. 

There are nine Orrell players 
in the Lancashire team among 
them Sammy Southern, the 
prop who leads the side.He 
missed his dub's game against 
Moseley last weekend with an 
ankle injury but should be fit to 
lead a team inducting only one 
other international. Steve 
Bain bridge, at lock. 

Bainbridge has missed the last 
two domestic international sea- 
sons as a consequence of having 
been sent off in dub games. 
That particular stricture no 
longer applies in England but 
Bainbridge. 30 earlier this 
month, has become a more 
' discerning player as a result. 

He formed a new second-row 
pairing with Nigel Redman 
against Japan on Saturday, with 
Redman having to pack in - for 
him - the unfamiliar position on 
the left-hand side .of the 
scru m. In the continued absence, 
for differing reasons, of Maurice 
Coldough and Wade Dooley, it 
is a good opportunity fbr 
Redman and Bainbridge to 
establish themselves. 

Mike Parker, of Preston 
Grasshoppers, having played in 
Lancashire's B side earlier this 
' season, gets his opportunity at 
flanker against Cheshire and 
Nick Welfare, of Liverpool/Si 

Planning for a 
league in west 

The south-west. English 
rugby's largest division, includ- 
ing eight counties from 
Buckinghamshire to Cornwall, 
have completed the organiza- 
tion for the introduction or a 

league next season. 

John Garland, the division^ 
secretary, saidr It was all 
completed with virtually no 
dissent, and if a particular club 
feels it has been put in the wronS 
league it can prove its point by 
gaining promotion. 

One dub not involved in the 
league system is Exeter Univer- 
sity. They were not able to 
auarantee playing on all the 
fixed Saturdays the union had 
earmarked for league pm» 
Garland said: “ Each dub tn 
ihe south west was sent a pro 
orma with a number of quM- 
:ions. We had replies from 75 
xr cent of the clubs, with 60 per 
rent in favour of joining the 
eagucs.” 


Helens, comes in to the centre 
fbr the first time. 

Yorkshire will take the field 
against Northumberland at 
Percy Park with an unfamiliar 
back division: no Andrew, no 
Melville, nor Barley or Under- 
wood, internationals all. But 
Mike Harrison remains on the 
wing and it is hoped that 
Underwood will be available fbr 
future county championship 
matches. 

Cambria play Durham at 
Aspatria in the third of the. 
northern group matches in the 
championship, sponsored by 
Thorn EMI. while in the south, 
Kent Last season's beaten final- 
ists. open against Easters Comi- 
ties on ' the Askeans 
ground. They do so with a new 
captain. Rick Sellers, the 
Blackheath prop who teaches at 
WhiigifL He takes over from the 
now retired Rick Bodenhara 
who. like another retired former 
Kent captain. Graham Walters, 
is now involved in selection and 
coaching for the county. 

There are three New Zealand- 
ers in Kent’s pack, McRae at 
lock and the ChevaJ brothers, 
Rob and Steve, in the back row, 
all of whom play for Askeans. 

Middlesex will be without 
Simon Smith, the Wasps wing, 
who pulled a muscle on Sat- 
urday. but otherwise look to 
have a well balanced side 
against Surrey at Imber Court 

Middlesex have two of the 
scrum halves who may interest 
London's divisional selectors 
this season. John CullerKwho 
plays) and Floyd Steadman, of 
Saracens, who is on the bench. 
Surrey 

Injury forces 
Morrow out 

Ulster will be at fall 


with the exception of num 
eight David Morrow, for the 
opening inter-provincial match 
against Munster in Cork on 
Saturday week, (George Ace 
writes). Morrow, back in action 
last weekend after a three week 
absence with an injured shoul- 
der, sustained a leg injury which 
kepi him out of his dub's 
Boston Cup game fast night 
The selectors have opted for a 
back row reshuffle with Mat- 
thews 

at number eight and Duncan 
and Carr on the flanks. Ander- 
son takes upa second row spot 
Rogers is omitted and Brady is 
recalled at scrum half 
TEAM; P Rainey (Baflymena): r 
iL Dtiwtahnsnsnone. 
(MFC). K Crown 
I Bram (Maura). H Brady 
P MBar (SaBymenaj. J 
IMaKnaL J McCoy (Bangor). W 
Duncan (Malone), w Anderson 
(Dingannon). C Morrison (Malone). N 
CWT(An»). p M a nnw a (Wanoarefs). 


rariam). J 
Twortanst 


RUGBY LEAGUE 

Australian 
wealth of 
top talent 

By Keith Macklin 

The strength in depth of the 
Australian squad is emphasised 
by their team selection for 
tonight's second game of the 
tour at Craven Park against 
Hall Kingston Rovers. Only two 
of the squad. Miles and David- 
son, were in the party which 
played at Wigan in the 26-18 
victory in the opening game on 
Sunday, yet there are 10 inter- 
nationals in the side, fnefoding 
familiar names in English rugby 
league such as Meninga, 
Dowling, Bella and Fangmack. 

Although Rovers have won 
their last two games they have 
made a poor start to the season. 
Their defence has been so brittle 
hi early championship games 
that the fast-nuning Austra- 
lians should secure their second 
consecutive win tutighL 

Players in full strip and 
carrying a ball will cake part in 
three remarkable professional 
sprint races as enrtoin-raisers 
for the three Great Britain 
Australia international m atc h es . 
Ten of the fastest players in the 
game will compete in heats at 
Old Trafford and EUand Road, 
with the final staged before the 
third international at Wigan. 

There win be a £1,000 first 
prize for the event, which is 
sponsored by Whitbread Trophy 
Bitter, and it will be described as 
an " inter na ti onal Invitation 
sprint”. The players wOl i 
from one goalline to the other, 
and the winner wifl be the first to 
touch down correctly over the 
try-tine. 

The players for the heat at 
Old Trafford on October. 25 are 
the New Zealand centre, Mark 
Elia (St Helens), the Great 
Britain winger, Barry Ledger (St 
Helens), the Moroccan-born 
winger, Hussein M’Barki (Old- 
ham), and Ok Great Britain 
Under-21 players, Le$ Quirk 
(Barrow), and Mark Forster 
(Warrington). Taking part at 
EMand Road oo November 8 will 
be the Australian international 
winger, Kerry ffoosteod (Hall 
Kingston Rovers), the Wales 
and Great Britain winger, Phil 
Ford (Bradford Northern), the 
contender for a place in the 
Australian international side, 
Andrew Ettingshausen (Leeds), 
the Featberstooe Rovers half- 
back. Graham Steadman, and 
the Castleford winger, David 
Plange. Obviously, none of the 
players chosen for the inter- 
national matches can be 
considered- 

AUSTRALIA Iv Hull KR tDrtghft G 
Betcrar. D Slwarer. G Mies, M Merinos. 

C Morwier, T Lame. D Hester, M Bella. B 
Qes (captain), 6 Dewing, S Fofcas. P 
Dunn, P Langtnack. Reserves: G Alexan- 
der, L Davwsoa 


GOLF 


A welcome lift for the 
Laura and Lotta show 


By John Hennessy 

Laura Davies did more than is more likely to 
win the British women's open ' ‘ 


championship at Royal Birkdale 
on Sunday. She lifted British 
women's professional golf on to 
a distinctly higher plane, just as 
the Curtis Cup team bad raised 
the reputation of our amateurs 
with their resounding win in the 
United States during the 
summer. 

For the Women's Pro- 
fessional Goff Association it was 
an important breakthrough that, 
for the fust time, the challenge 
from across the pond was 
repulsed, and by the convincing 
maxgin of four strokes. No 
longer can they expect to send 
over a token force and steal our 
premier prize with impunity. 

“It was a trig thrill". Miss 
Davies said yesterday a 1 Stoke 
Poges as she awaited her ordeal 
on the long driving range againw 
a crop of male opponents in the 
Laing Wham Champagne Chal- 
lenge. “And nice to hear myself* 
described cm the radio yesterday 
as the British women's open 
champion. Every golfer dreams 
of winning her own country’s 
title". 

Miss Davies attributes her 
success to her iron play. Her 
length is such that she used the 
driver on only two holes at 
Birkdale and often throttled 
back to a two-iron. But right 
through the bag she struck the 
ball brilliantly to the greens. Her 
lee shot to the 18th pm her in 
the rough where, she knew, “I 
still needed one more good one. 

1 took a six-iron from 192 yards 
out and reached the front of the 
green with a bit of a flyer. I 
didn't remember any more — 
except that I had six putts for 
it." She used only two as she 
signed off in the grand manner 
with a final birdie. 

The one flaw in her game is an 
uncertainty over putting tech- 
nique. She has employed a 
reverse grip, left hand below the 
right, since the United States 
open in July (when she finished 
a commendable eleventh). But 
doubts have crept in since then 
and she now tends to adopt the 
grip that feels comfortable fbr 
each stroke. At the moment she 


is more UMeiy to favour the 
reverse grip for long putts and 
the orthodox for short ones. 

Her caddie. Tim Clark, also 
gets a fair share of praise. "He 
stopped me from doing any- 
thing silly", she says, “Without 
stifling my natural attacking 
game". They seem perfectly to 
complement each other, she all 
sunny ca m araderie and he casu- 
ally devoid of any obvious 
emotion. He regarded the last 
day at Birkdale as "A good day 
at the office”. 

A fortunate by-product of 
Miss Davies’s victory is that it 
has given the final sages of the 
WPGA tour an unexpected 
fillip. Without ter £9,000 first 
prize at Birkdale Lotta 
Neumann, a talented young 
Swede, would already have won 
the Ring A Brymer order of 
merit and, with it, a further 
£5,000 to add to the £36.394 she 
has already accumulated. 

Now her lead over Miss 
Davies has been whittled down 
to £3,044 and the fast two 
tournaments, the Laing from 
today until Saturday ana the La 
Manga Club Spanish Open next 
week, both offer a first prize of 
£3,750. Miss Davies feels that 
Miss Neumann’s consistency 
will offer her few loopholes. 
Certainly the Swede has an 
impressive record, having only 
once fallen below eighth place 
(fast Sunday) in' 14 72rbole 
tournaments. 

Even so the comparative 
performances of the two players 
offer a fascinating sub-plot to 
ihe Laing Classic. Whoever 
wins, the Laura and Lotta Show 
has a flavour of its own. Both 
'are expected to try for their 
American players' card next 
year. 

Miss Davies beat two Walker 
Cup players. Peter McEvoy and 
Michael Lunt in the long driv- 
ing contest, but her 282 yards 
fell three yards short of the best I 
drive of Kim Thomas, the Stoke j 
Poges professional 
order OF MERto i, t Neumann [ 
tSwe), S3&384; 2. L Dantes E335SO; 3. G 
Stewart £24.610: 4, M Thomson. £24£S7; J 
5, P Conley (US). 123,753; 6, C Dbnah 
(AustraSa), £21.849; 7, D Dowfol 
£21,081; 8, PGrtce-WWoakw, £20823:1. 

A NicncHaB £20£83; 10. 0 Raid, £20,142. 


In the years ahead Dean 
Jones's arrival as an estab- 
lished, mature Test match bats- 
man, can be seen as the most 
significant bonus of Australia's 
tom of India which finishes with 
the third Test, starting here 
today. 

His switch from the thickly 
populated ranks of those consid- 
ered brilliant, but erratic, 
stemmed from the gutsy 210 he 
made in the tied Test at Madras 
while struggling against Alness. 
Jones now seems certain to fill 
Che crucial No 3 position for 
Australia for many years and he 
is also a candidate to sncceed 
Alias Border as captain. 

Three times Jones has had to 
dig deep into his resources to 
reverse career setbacks, which 
could have proved too maefa for a 
person of lesser fibre. A 
chequered start for his state, 
Victoria, cost him his place after 
be was taken to West ladies 
with Kim Hughes's team in 
1983-84 and bad a patchy tunr. 

Again he fought back and was 
the shock omission from the 
1985 tour to England, after 
finishing second in the national 
averages (68.10), jwtrfjng an 
a g gr e ss ive 243 against Weston 
Australia. 

By now Jones was no longer 
the brash hKfiridnaJ he admits to 
having been when be started in 
first class cricket. At the wicket, 
too, be began to »!>—■—«» the 
riskier hooking and cutting, 
which sometimes brought his 
downfall without impairing his 
powerful, front-footed driving. 
There was iron in Ms soul and 
though far from prolific last 
season, the selectors liked his 
detennmed approach. In April 
^Jones was picked for India while 
on honeymoon m Tahiti. 

Jones is generous to several 
former Test players, who helped 
transform his style and think- 
ing. fan Red path and Keith 
Stackpole, Victoria's coaches, 
alike as batsmen only in being 
right-handed, were the first to 
make hi® a more "responsible 
pfayer.” 

"I fastened to both, realized 
certain li mi ta ti ons had to be . 
accepted and worked out what 
was best for me," be said. Bob 
Simpson's main contribatioo, as 
the Austra li an team coach, has 
been to teach Jones how to relax 
on the big occasions and to 
eliminate mistakes. 

"Keep the tension out of your 
hands. Loosen the grip on the 
bat," was the constant theme 
sent out to ti» middle at 
Madras, where Jones played an 
innings that win rank with the 
most dramatic and heroic ever 
He batted more than 500 
minutes, making a series of 
brilliant strokes, the longer he 
there, despite cetmdess 
stragg le s against beat exhans- 



Jones: deep resources 

thm, vomiting and stomach 
cramps. Jones has been ■naM* 
to eat properly before the match. 

After his inning s he was taken 
to hospital completely de- 
hydrated, treated by three doc- 
tors and put on a saline drip. “I 
have always worried about the 
tension that must come to a Test 
batsman when he reaches the 
nineties. When it happened to 
me, 1 was too busy concentrating 
on staying upright, existing from 
one drinks break, or interval, to 
the next. I also wanted to show 
how wrong they had been not to 
take me to England." 

Jones, tall, sfim and erect at 
the wkket. reminds many on- 
lookers of Brian Booth or Paul 
Sheahau, among Australian 
batsmen of the past 20 years, 
though at Ms best be is far more 
flamboyant than either. TV tied 
Test, incidentally, made Jones 
mnqne among the world's 
cricketers, as it was his third 
representative tied game. Jones 
was in the Australian side that 


tied a one-day international with 
West ladies in 1983-84 and 
played in Victoria's tie with the 
New Zealanders in 1982-83. 

In 1981 Jones resigned his job 
and paid his own way to England 
to play for Ahnfts, near Wake- 
field, In the Central Yorkshire 
League. The experience im- 
proved Ms game and helped him 
develop as a person. "Yon 
mature quickly when you have to 
fend for yooneUL I promise d 
them I would be back in 1985 as 
a Test player. Now it will have to 
wait until oar 1989 tour." 

He met Geoffrey Boycott and 
joined the legions who have been 
enlisted to bowl at the great 
man. "I got him out twice at 
H ending! ry hi the nets. II was 
quite extraordinary — Boycott 
said: ‘What am I doing wro ng. * 
He genuinely wanted to know. It 
taught me what a perfectionist a 
top processional has to be and 
that yon never stop (earning.” 

As Victoria's vice-captain, 
Jones led the stale, in Ray 
Bright'S absence, to their three 
victories last year. He revels in 
physical fitness and is consid- 
ered the fastest runner between 
wickets in Australian cricket. 

England have already felt the 
power of Jones's bat when he hit 
a rapid 78 not out to help 
Australia win by seven wickets 
in a one-day game at Meibome 
under tights a 1984-8$. "I hod a 
tremendous straggle with Ed- 
monds and held my own in die 
■sledging’ too. He is a great 
bowler and we will be cros si ng 
swords again." 

He finds tennis a relaxing way 
to keep his eye and wrist hi trim. 
“1 am an indifferent goffer. My 
wife Jane has a handicap of 
eight and always beats me. That 
is ao good for my ego." Jones is 
nothing if not competitive as 
England cooM shortly find out. 


India refuse to gamble 


From Richard Streeton 
India came close to gambling 
on the fag-spin of Laxman 
S i varamakrish nan when the 
selectors were divided about the 
team to play Australia in today's 
third Test match in Bombay. 

Two of the five selectors wanted 
to include the man with the 
longest name in cricket and 
omit Yadav. the off-spinner. 

Hamimant Singh, the chair- 
man of selectors, vetoed the 
plan, however, and pointed out 
that the leg-spinner bowled few 
googiies. He felt there was no 
reason to believe that the 
Australians were unable to han- 
dle orthodox leg breaks which 
might prove expensive. 

Unless there is any eleventh 
hour change oF mind, therefore. 


India's only alteration from the 
side which played in the second 
Test, will be More returning to 
keep wicket, in place of PhnaiL 
Binny is standing by in n w 
Chelan Shamm, the fast bowler, 
has any recurrence of recent 
back trouble. 

What little grass there was on 
the brown coloured pitch has 
been shaved off and the Austra- 
lians, knowing that the pitch wfll 
Him, have definitely included 
Bright, their left-arm spinner, as 
well as Matthews. They are also 
leaning towards playing Gilbert, 
rather than McDermott, as 
Reid's new ball partner. Zoehrer 
has recovered from a stomach 
upset and will keep wicket if he 
has no further problems. 


Toya project not just child’s play 


The Sports Council has given 
the green light to Toya, the 
research project into the effects 
of intensive training on young 
athletes, without having re- 
solved the question of the 1 5 per 
cent private sponsorship for the 
£800,000 scheme requested by 
Richard Tracey, the Sports 
Minister. 

The decision has been taken 
by John Wheatley, director gen- 
eral of the Sports Council in 
Older to prevent any further 
delays to the project which was 
originally planned to start ear- 
lier this year. 


By Nicolas Soantes 

. “As far as we are concerned, it 
is all systems go," a Sports 
Council spokesman said. 

"The Institute of Child 
Health which is to conduct the 
research project will be able to 
start shortly, and in the mean- 
time we will continue to look for 
funds." 

Toya will monitor both the 
psychological and physical ef- 
fect of serious athletic training 
among eight to I6-year-okls 
over a six-year period. 

The project will be looking 
specifically at tennis, swim- 
ming, soccer and gymnastics 


and its conclusions are expected 
to show some of the dangers of 
overtraining. 

But although it will not 
publish its final report until 
1993. an interim report will 
probably be issued after the 
initial stage of consulting hun- 
dreds of children taking part in 
the scheme. 

This report will show some of 
the differences that exist be- 
tween ordinary children and 
those who are training seriously, 
and is likely to be available 
around the Lime of the 1988 
Olympics. 


DRIVING THE SHOW CARS 

Our Motor Show Special puts you behind the wfteei of every significant new car Ute 
the jaguar XJ6, the BMW 7-series, the Maserati Bi-turbo, Rover BOO, Audi 80, Nissan 
Surer/ and vauxhall canton. Don't miss oirfull colour driving reports— plus 
how to get there, stand-by-stand guide, what to look fbr ... everything 
fOr the visitor and the next best thing for those 
unable to make the trip to the N£.c 




BOXING 


Not easy for Willis 


Tony Willis, of Liverpool, the 
British lightweight champion, 
outpointed Billy Buchanan, of 
Dundee, over 10 rounds at 
Dulwich Baths. London last 
night but he was made to work 
hard. Willis was not at his 
sharpest and Buchanan took 
every opportunity to embarrass 
the champion. 

Willis'S produced occasional 



touches of extra class, particu- 
larly in the middle rounds, but 
the contest was half over before 
WiUis managed to break up 
Buchanan's rhythm. 

• John Coyle, of Birmingham, 
will referee the British and 
European middleweight title 
bout between Hero! Graham 
and Mark Kaylor. at Wembley 
Arena'on November 4. 


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YACHTING 


New Zealanders on the 
crest of a wave after 


victory over Crusader 


From Barry Pickthall, Fremantle 


Chris Dickson and his crew, 
sailing New Zealand's ‘plastic- 
fantastic’, were riding high last 
night after chalking up their 
ninth win in a row yesterday 
in the opening rounds of the 
America's Cup challenge trials 
— this time at the expense of 
Britain's White Crusader. 

The New Zealanders, who 
lost a man overboard while 
changing a genoa before the 
start, were in a remorseless 
mood, parrying Harold 
Cudmore hard during the pre- 
start donnish before drawing 
■away on almost every leg to 
gain a morale-sapping four 
minute victory over the Brit- 
ish boat It was the widest 
margin of defeat so far for 
Crusader which, before yes- 
terday, had lost only to Amer- 
ica 11 and Stars and Stripes, 
underlining the current speed 
supremacy of the glass fibre 
New Zealand boat and the 
technological gap the British 
have to close between now 
and December if they are to 
challenge successfully for the 
Cup. 

Racing in 12 to 16 knots 
winds — conditions in which 
we are told Crusader performs 
at her best — Cudmore soon 
found himself being out- 
tacked and out-gunned by his 
New Zealand opponent. “I 


realised that we were losing 
out in the tacks so decided to 
break away on a long port tack 
and hope for a break there,” 
Cudmore said later. For much 
of that first beat, the ploy 
appeared to pay, for though 
the starboard side of the 
course has been favoured 
most during this series, 
Cudmore and his crew gained 
appreciably during the initial 
stages from a concaWe lift in 
the wind- 

But 300 yards from the first 
mark, hopes turned to honor 
aboard Crusader when the 
wind suddenly pushed their 
bows 25 degrees off the buoy, 
forcing llk.m to tack and cross 
behind the jubilant New Zea- 
landers. From that point on, 
Dickson had the race in bis 
pocket Rounding the mark: 
49sec ahead of the British 
boat he and bis crew steadily 
extended their lead to 59sec at 
the leeward mark; lmin 43sec 
on the following windward 
leg; 2 min on the two reaches, 
and lmin 2sec by the next 
weather mark, before drawing 
out a further 26sec on the final 
spinnaker run and 32sec more 
on the beat to the finish line. 

The New Zealanders could 
not have underlined their own 
superiority, or the need for 
urgent changes to be made to 


Weighty protests 


White Crusader, in a more 
convincing manner. 

In the other matches yes- 
terday, Courageous IV with- 
drew 11 minutes before the 
start of her race against Stare 
and Stripes when her boom 
broke, and Amina had to be 
towed off the course after her 
mainsheet snapped on the first 
leg, a spinnaker blew out on 
the second, and her steering 
packed up on the seventh leg 
in their one-sided match 
against Canada IL 

The New York YCs chal- 
lenger, America H, gained her 
seventh success at the expense 
of the Buddy Mdges-skip- 
pered Heart of America which 
went down by a four minute 
margin, and Rod Davis, 
Eagle’s Californian skipper, 
was served up a one and a half 
minute defeat at the hands of 
his Italia pupils he had taught 
to sail 12 metre yachts two 
years ago. 

The biggest upset, however, 
came out of the protest room 
much later in the day when 
Marc Root's mammoth 17 
minute leki over brother Yves 
in the all-French race between 
French Kiss and Challenge 
France was overturned after 
the Kiss crew were found 
guilty of baulking Challenge 
during the pre-start 
manoeuvres. 


YESTERDAY’S RESULTS 


Fremantle - Demis Owner's 
Stan and Stripes syndicate have 
rekindled the controversy 
smroradiag Chris Dickson's 
all-conquering glass fibre 12 

metre. New Zealand IV, by 
releasing an mwrigafd letter 
yesterday, sent to all chal- 
teagers, caffiag fin- an immet&ate 
meeting to discuss the legality of 
the boat (Barry Pickthall 
writes). Later, Matin Burnham, 
president of dm Stars and 
Stripes campaign, riahfd that 
10 of the 13 challenge syndicates 
were supportive towards their 
call for core samples to be taken 
from the New Zealand yacht to 
check that its weight distribu- 
tion matched the regulations 


certificate. Only two 

know what is involved 

boat, Uoyds and ns. There is no 
way in the world that we wfll 
reveal our technology,'’ Fay 
said. 

It is a stand su pp orted by 
Lloyds, whose members are also 
offended that their indepe nd ent 
integrity should be in goesttas. 
“No other yacht has been sur- 
veyed so thoroughly in the 
history of the Society. We me 
entirely satisfied that the New 
Zealand boat’s weight and 
w eigh t distribution meets oar 
requirements,* 1 Ben 


H— t h Canada B KC2 ( Can), 3h r 22nan 
0. retrod. 


28sec, bt Azzurra tIO (It). . 

Haet 2: ChaBange France (Ft) bt Rraneh 


Kiss F7 (Fr). (faquallfled- 
: America ft tJ 


J US4S (USV 32056. bt 

Heart of America US51 fife). 32*02. 


3:1753. bt Cotfapaous US2B 
retired. 

HmIS: New Zealand KZ7JNZ). 3:15:18, bt 
tfflsts Crusader K24 (GB). 3:19:18. Win- 
ning margin: 4^X>. 

TABLE 


New Zeeland IV 
Stars & Stipes _ 
America II 


and nail cra ft 


laid down by Lloyds. 

A Fay, chairman of the 


Michael 
New Zealand challenge, is 
understandably aggrieved at any 
suggestions that measures 
should make a colander oat of 
his boat. “There is a question of 
principle here. A certificate is a 


veyorfor. 

said yesterday. 

Unless a meeting is held today 
among the challengers, the Stars 
& Stripes syndicate kola set to 
issue h formal protest to the race 
■ wnirinfB when Conner meets 
Dickson on the America's Cisp 
course in their first head to head 
match tomorrow. 


Won LOW 

8 0 

7 1 

7 1 

WMM Crusader 6 3 

Ranch Kiss 5 3 

Canada D _ 5 4 

Bate S 3 

USA 4 4 

EaOO - 4 4 

Heart of Anwrica 2 7 

Azzwralfl 1 8 

CttaKmga France 0 8 

Courageous IV 0 8 


TODAY'S RACES 
Heart of America v Courageous IV; USA v 
(tafia; Challenge France v Azzurra: New 
Zealand v Eagfe; America B v Ranch Kbs: 
Stars and Straws v Canada A 


CYCLING 


Tour route delights LeMond 


From John WDcockson 
Paris 


A week later, after a transfer 


Therogning Tour de France 


ing i< 

champion, Greg LeMond, de- 


clared himself satisfied with the 
route of next year’s Tour which 
was presented* at a press con- 
ference yesterday. The 25 year 
old American * told 
joumalistsTthe race next .year 
suits me perfectly. It looks even 
tougher than this year's, and the 
time trials should suit me better 
than the other riders." 

The race opens with a four- 
mile prologue time trial in West 
Berlin, the city which is celebrat- 
ing its 750th anniversary and is 
paying the Tour de France 
organizers almost £lm to host 
the stan of the race. 


to West Germany and the first 
of the 21 French stages in 
Strasbourg, the second time trial 
in the Loire Valley is 51-miles 
long, the longest for more than a 
quarter ofa century in the Tour. 


TTietAim Mg i Baffin (Magn 
time trial] 4 iroles. Jttjr 3 Hoad Race 83 
odes and team time trial 25 mass. My 4 A 
transfer hum Barfci to West Germany 
Mg 5 Town X to Suasboura dttanca 
unknown. JMyi 6 Strasbourg WEptoal 1 07 
rates. July 7 Epinal w Troyes 1Z4 rates. 


Jttjr BTroyes to StQusnmvgn- Y v n in gs 


The third race against the 
clock, which follows two 
particularly difficult mountain 
stages in the Pyrenees and a rest 


1 mtes. Jttjr 9 Orleans to Harare 156 
rates. <My 10 Ssumur to Futuroscope 
(time trial) 51 rates. Mg ii Potters to 
Chaimfi " 


154 mtea Mg 12 Brfve to 
tty 13 Bayonne to 


day at Avignon, is 22-miles long 
“1 finish on top of the 


and will 
feared Mont Venioux. 


Four stages through the Alps, 
monitoring the 1984 route pre- 
cedes the final time trial, which 
the Tour race director Felix 
Levitan described as particu- 
larly billy. 


Bordeaux 131 mtos- Mg 
Rau 137 rates. Jdy 14 Phi to Luz^Arriktan 
95 rates. Mg » Turbos to Btaanac 80 
miles. Jaiy wHagnac to MUaulm mtes. 
Jtty 17 Mtou to Awspon M3 rales. Jtty 
18 rest dev. Mg 19 Catpomras to Mont 
Ventoux (fine trial] 22 mtes. My a 
Vslress to Vteed-dulans 116 mtes. July 
21 VBIsid-cIs-Lans to Atoa DHubz 119 
rates. Jtty 22 Bong dDisans to La 
Piagne 115 mtes. 

Moraine 118 mtes. 


Genavois to Oten 132 mtes. 
time trial 20 mtes. 


23 Lr Regno to 

24 St JuKuon- 


112 miles. 


.July 28 


to Parts 


FOR THE RECORD 


AMERICAN FOOTBALL 


GOLF 


TENNIS 


NORTH AMEMCA: WL Cmaraa Bengsts 
St. Pmkwgn Steelers 22. 


MNffS NORTON: 


AMERICAN CONFERENCE 
Eastern Divi- 
sion W L T PF PA 

New York Jo» S 1 0 156 133 

New England Parts* 3 3 0 162 112 

Mnmt£unms 2 4 o 153 190 

Buffalo Bib 1 5 0 110 135 

mmnapotaCoBs 0 8 0 55 IS 


Holmes (Keney) ot a Dow < fS »*0 Rocntmd), 4 
[ PllfkJ H K Heyward 


SYDNEY: 

to 


|Uj®e.'wortn).J 
Avon) WP Bus 
O BUMman (Trer 
Haq. 4 end 2; P 


i (Oxley ft . 

at 20 th tua: t 

» pong's Nonon). 4 ami 
Staffs) bt L Hirer 


Freeman (US) bt T Nelson (US). 64W. 


Seoond manta P Carter ta B Lsirasi 


7-8. M; W Masur bt S ftrtong. I 



Layenoecker fLI^bt PUcNanrea.6-1, 6-3; B 


A Ooft (GB) m J[ Ounef GB ^ 


Control Divi- 
sion W L T PF PA 

Oevotind Brewna 4 z 0 138 ig 

Onorenate Benges 4 2 0 1*5 IK 

Pittsburgh Stock** 1 5 0 85 173 

Houston Otors 1 5 0 100 119 


Mnshafl(HlflVafey) m22na.DbixiMJoy HR) 
bt K Bckens (unatll. 3 and 2 S Wahanson 


j DI D ftk'-IT (Coxraoor), 1 UP. G 
(Rose mi M OSow (mgestre 
Park). 3 tan 2: T RastaH umattl ot S Benenoge 

— M up: P Weaver (Coventry) ot J 
■ - 2 W 1; M ’ 


Maasoorp [SAX 5-1. 6-3. 

‘ Gaiww HnB nm 
B (GB). 3-6. 6-4. 6-4: A 
. ... _ « E KraplISwitt). 7-6. 

S3; P Shmer (USum A Tamewvan (Hmci M. 
62; A MouNon (US) bt A M Caodan (Q ,s-» . fr 

TOKYO: Japan Open: MM* slnglas, bat 
IjJS unless stswQ: J Gran) bt G 


Denon. 6-4. 83: J Lapdto bt H McOed. Sfi 


Western Divi- 
sion W L T PF PA 


Denver Brancoa 6 0 0 179 101 

Seattle Seahawks 4 2 0 146 88 

Kansas City CMete 3 3 0 112 111 

Los Angolas Ratten 3 3 0 106 102 

San Diego Chargers 15 0 118 1S9 


mson(K-byMuxfoo), 

(Onymn Para) bt R 

Adams KtotiOgi. 3 wtt t; D Thorp (Gum 

fctecF»fe^^tapr^Pwg^2 and 1. 


6-3. 6-4: J Canter WOO Sweb(W<». fr3. 38. 

3-6. 6*1. 6-3: S 


6-1: D Livingston bl R Nnon. 

VaSuOBvanJh'Dt 


1 . 8 - 


NATIONAL CONFERENCE 
Eastern Divi- 
sion W L T PF PA 

New York Gums 5 1 0 130 73 

Washington HedsMns 5 i 0 120 97 

Dates Cowboys 4 2 0 172 114 

PMadeftm Eagles 2 4 0 84 142 

StlousCaraSMis iso 78 129 


r ins unless iran-fit- i. 
Norman 5653.296, 2, e 
3. A 80*1^6677: 4, 0 PON 45tf066: 5. H 
Sutton 42531 B: 6. P Stowan *06.723; 7. B 
1 372.091. 8. C Peeta 371.628. g. 

7.138: 1CLT Kite 35JJ.693; 11. F 

J.1 15c 12. JSntMar 338.731: 1&D 

TewsO 31CL28S: 14. C Pawn 302578: IS. L 


MS Tomato (Japan). 6- 1 

4; J Saan U J Be®iy. M.82. M Tausan (Don) 
bt C Campbell (GB). 64. B-t; M Dans bt B 
Darin (TtZfM. 7-ft LStWanWWL Bourne. 6- 
(VUG), 88. 8-2: P 
‘ - 7.83. 
4^.8- 


3, 7-5: M Angar bt C Zjph (WGL 6-3, 8- 
Moraku (Wt3 « H Ftaabora (&waL6-7. 
6-2: JOatiaon (Swe)bt V Wd08i(lfe>. 4- 
2. 6-1.0 OomeAy bl J Ptdi. 6^. 6-2. K 
bt B Scnuitt. *6. 6-1. 8-1: B Paora 


bt R 


MSI 


MOB 2B&373; 18..R Fjog^jffS34B:. 17. T 


Watson 275338:1 a. MHuben 266.688; 19. M 
WWW 257ratt: 20. D Hararaono 253.902. 
Leading Brttate 55. S Lyle 143.415; 110. K 
Brown 71.414. 


n*eta (Can).3-6, &3. 6-*; T vStskon W M 

7-6. Wo wen- a sbales. flat mute M Yanagl 
(Japan) H B Nagotun. 6-4. 6-2: A Sanctez 
I Spain) bt C Fernando*. 54, 2-6, 6-2: G 
Fmnwm M S Mascarm. 63. 8-7, 64k B 
Fulco (Arg) W M Paz 


Prams (AUS) MY 
wsan-Pea i 


bt A i 


Dhri- 


Central 

skin W L T PF PA 

ctveego Bears 6 0 0 16G 67 

Wnnesota Twms 4 2 0 ra 84 

DentMUOnS 3 3 □ 106 116 

Tamm Bay Bug's i 5 0 100 153 

Omen Bay Packers 


SMOaiar, 67, 62: 13i: L Thompson. 6 
” ttbot SSL 65; 138; R 


133s K Knot Si. 67. M HttbOt 1 
Wrft R T am^on. » BfcT ^u^9| 


Cue® (WGj n L Antonopota. 6-3. 4-6. 6-4, N 
Dus (BT2IW0 Gansu. 646 


0 8 0 74 177 


Wadsworth. 69. 65; P Axvigar. 67. 87 : B 

Murphy 66. e& 13Si P BUOrmar. 64. II; S 
Ingranan. 68. 67: M Ron. 89. 66. British 


Western Divi- 
sion W L T PF PA 


Ingranam. . . 

sc ore s: 13ft K Brawn 87. 72: 1*1: P 
Ooswtws 72. 69. 

BANCHORY: Rm 


M Ii I 6-1: L W 

b< Mumdoois(Owel.6'i..6-4.-H Keteor 



AtbmaFWeons 5 1 0 150 108 

CSi SwAnR ams 4 2 0 118 ire 

San Ranosco Oars 4 2 0 W 97 

NewOWansSasits 2 4 0 91 115 


tttts OaMMBip 
any. 223; Blon 


Academy, 

Goraon s CnOaga. 


tWtti (Bancj^yy). ROMFORD: 2*i: South- 
end. 25a Coopik S Company and CoOom 


BOWLS 


lUNCt^TER: LmipmI IV fcltioa hJAWfCa 
SupeiMMfcPinl raujitfiOMiean (Rwwjim 
H Cuts Bpsmcft) 7-4, 7-3; R Crow Shaw 
JOwfeitD Bryant (Awn) 7-6. 14r. J Mua 

'SStSStB^^ 


i Academy. 231: R«Cwl 
Beat H fci d u a fc 65: A 
lOMFOKt: 2*1: S 
Company and O 
(Essex). 235: Bucttwral Htgri County. Beet 
tafflvttoafc 74: P Fanrara tCoopefa). BEAU 
251: Ptoan (TeHordl 258: 
Veaey (Sunon Cokthnid). Bast 
7: J Toolwy (WestwnM. State). 


sHSukovajtobiLMcNrtl 

epttxwwarcptt 

DeobNH tealr GTOt and G Sabuira (Argj bi L 
Mcwa and A Mouten (US) 1-6. 64, 6-1. 

ATP RwaaN ' t i . I Laras (Czt 2 . m Wiraoer 
ISwa). 3. B Becker (WG). 4. SOberg (Swei. 5. 
H Leaxne (Pry, 6. Y Noon _ 


if. 




Mayotte (USK 16. A Jarryd 
)n(Swe);l8.M 


ICE HOCKEY 


re*TTuau»(g 1 20. K Curran (US). 
RANKMCS: 1. M NavraWon 


Jtt»(Aig); 


W1TA 


NORTH AHSRICA: NHL: Vtamtigion CapOS 
7. New York Rangers 6 (sotfi Mormsl 
Canadtans 8. Minnesota Monti Scars 4: 
Oubdoc NOrttaues 7. Vancouver Canucks 1 


51.3*5.184. 2. CLtoydj JS). S833755: 

I. S346J87D; 7 . C KphdeJGbch 


Sokova (Cz). 
9*901418; 5. P 
MaiKMova (C*. 
gvG),S3ii.4a9.8.G 




5*43860; I 


FOOTBALL 


MOTOR RALLYING 


COMBWATTOteQuonn*. Park Rangers i, 

S IBUBIBL.V 

^H TOOL El^ue WmtdHtaierate iatea r 
2. SMCMo Unoad 4; Su noariBnLl.J ^ig- 


steoQpg s. (Second 


SAN RBSOc 

,I9U 

t. JKankkunen and J Puranen (Fin). Peugeot 
205 T-16. 200^36: 2. M Al$n and L KMmald 


(Arm J208J36; 
Tumnul(Autt. S1B4J93: KTm Maleeva 
(BttL te77Jll: IL K Jottei (US). 9175839; 
12TZ Garrison (USL S173.421; 13. K RtaKU 
(US). SK2£15. 14. E Bum (US. 9134.726. 
15. L MCMU (US). 9129^06; lO Temeswari 
(Hug. S128W. 17. R Rabat* isaj. 
9105272: 18.8_Bunge(WG). 91 0OS*Z 1S.R 
Phelps (US). 


(Fin). Utwa Date. 54. at itte: 3. M Btaxnn 


Smqto (B. Lancia Deoa. 16: 4. D 
Cerrato and G Cam (itL Lancn Deaa. 44; 5 . B 
Saby and F Paucnte (Frl. Peugeot. 1:20. 


TENPINBOWUNG 


l. Hayes 0. . 

cPWieaTtaWJBl. _ 
wuircnn UEAGU6 M jN f y 
CttemsfardO. WbQfllotd 1 .C^. 6 .Bns^ 
4. Duttey ft M«r Green 1; Worcester 1 . 

W^CCoPO- LEAGUE: P remi er ttW- 
D ttwcn ft A, 

Mona Aocepterce Cwt ftrtwywg rouwc 


RUGBY FIVES 


jesters Of UCSOB. 11480 tadreouttscor- 
era: (Jesters mmes tlrafr Gnffibv m awry 
bt Heron and Nytes. 15-12. 16-1*. Brewt 
mtt WWner test » Morion end AHwwon. IS- 
IS. 15-13; Gntets ano Quarry bt Mononand 
Atknson. 15-8. 153; Davenport ano Warner 
lost » Heron ana Njtas. n-lft 15-12 


COPENHAGEN: WaM Cap 

Mara 1. P NapamucenoCPtiafppkno). 1 iSft 2. 
S Yabuta {Jam. 1-576. 3. kTSarawrirrite]. 
1.675.4. KnaMa ai Kubatp (Qatar). l.E7ftS.P 
Lpsn K»4 1.629: B. B Bauratnler (WG), 
1.626. 7. K HaYM (Dem, 1806; 8. L Hogg 
(Aus). 1-602; 9. J Estevez (SpL 1.601: lO 
Scannd (Bn). 1JS1. Women: 1. A Hagre 
(9we). 1-270; 2. 1 GastteK (ttt 1.106; 3. M 
Yun (Hong Kong), i.isaj 4. V ParkerjUS). 
1191 3. T Atssatte (NOD. 1.189. ft G Bauer 


mjml , — .TAL LEAGUE: Cqx 

^ ^w^ u^te1St l &4ttenbaatti Select 

TCjjJnpBRAHSnON ikSMOMAL: Northamp- 

OnERNMCK; MBtropoGtan flotoftArmy 
2 


YACHTING 


(WG). 1.172: 7. BWaiuanabe(PML 1.1G2.8.T 
□arvri (Eng). 1.1 61. 9. S Sudw m ynng (Tire). 


1.140t 


(Eo®. 1.161. 9. SL.... 
10. b FVorti (Mek), 1 .123. 


The sure aararaoMiup tt , . 
424 YbcMk 1. Luoer(ACareeit;2. Dw Jay (J 
PNbnwK ft J«y (T WKWreBa 4. Tiger 0 


BOXING 


ano S Ancst* lYJAk ft T Sananon. 


DULWICH: Lr ^t vr i fl K (10 routtst: T UOkS 

Mlaicmnr ~ 


(UerpoeQ M e aicMnu (Omiett. pn. 


Sponsorship, orgmization and finding the right horses are keys to success for new ^ouag riders 

Leng leaves rivals at a canter 


!b 


JENNY MACAJRTHUR re- 
views a three-day event season 
dominated by Virginia Leng 
and notable for ike emergence 
of Anne-Marie Taylor as a star 
<cg the future 

In the uncertain world of 
three-day eventing, where, as 
Mark Phillips and Luanda 
Green would readily testify, 
one's fortunes can change over- 
night, Virginia Log's donrina- 
tiOD af the sport this year has set 
new standards. 

She has won three major 
three-day events on three dif- 
ferent horses — the world 
championships m May on Price- 
less, Sngblty last month on 
Morphy Himself and the Polish 
dniptehqe a rortnfght later 
on Night Cap. Last weekend she 
completed her season by being 
the highest placed Briton - 
fourth — at the Liras d* Angers 
three-day event in France, where 
she rode Master Craftsman , a 
six-year-old who had new com- 
peted in a three-day event 
before. 

Mrs Lens'S mother. Heather, 
said after Night Cap's win in 
Poland that the most rewarding 
part of the year's success was 

that it showed their system 
worked and they conM umt i nuc 
with confidence along the same 
lines. It hi a system not easily 
copied. Grooms aside it involves 
fonr people, Ginny, Mrs 
Holgate, the team manager . Pat 
Manning, Ginny ’s dressage 
trainer, and Dot Wfifis, who 
came to live with the H©iga£es 
four years ago aad whose role, as 
Mis Leng points out, is so afl- 
embracmg it is not easy to 

Dot does all the Itmgeing of 
the horses to loosen them up 
before Mis Leng gets on. pro-. 

vidro endless moral support, and 
has such a meticulous eye tor 
detail that Mrs Leng, often in 
London during the week with 
her hnshandv f^^ush. has no 
worry about lea ring the horses 
because she wfll spot anything 


No system, however, is fool- 
proof if there are not the right 
horses to work on in the first 
place. Mrs Hotgate has a 
tremendous eye for a horse — 
Ginny is devdoping one too — 
and they know very qmckly 
whether a yoang horse is worth 
going on with or not. Thus they 
can retire her top horse. Price- 
less, at the age of 13 to go 
hunting secure u the knowledge 
that Morphy Himself, aged 
eight, and now Master Crafts- 
man, aged six, have already 



Riding hi g h; Anne-Marie Taylor (right) and with Bolebec 


shown themselves to be potential 
replacements. 

Iflcindi Green, a areal ad- 
mirer of the Ho (gates’ skill at 
bringing on young horses, finds 
choosing the horse one of the 
most iiiSiraii Sbc riiinfa 
that because, quite early in her 
career, she had ridden a lot of 
different horses round Bargjbley 

ninl BaWniintnw ^hp had lupi n tn 

there was always a key 
to any horse — h was jnst a 

wiflw of finding it- “1 th in It in 

the past I spent too long with 
horses that jnst hadn't got the 
star quality in the first placed 

Mrs Green is c urrentl y work- 
ing on Count de Bolebec, a IB- 
year-old gelding who she feels 
has got the potential. He was 
poshed on rather too quickly 


when Mrs Green’s two other 
advanced horses, Willy B and 
Brass Monkey, were injured and 
she had to rely on him for 


UCJ- 

„ Mrs Green's fortunes 
appear temporarily on the wane 
those of Anne-Marie Taylor are 
doing the opposite. Miss Taylor, 
aged 22, was a successful junior 
and young rider and then made 
light of the transitioa into senior 
competition when she came fifth 
indhidnally on Jnstm Thyme in 
the world championships. She 
followed diis np by winning the 
Chatsworth three-day event on 
Mrs Shirley Martar's nine-year- 
old Bolebec Miler, a horse who 
had new competed in an ad- 
vanced three-day event before. 

Miss Taylor also saw the 


j foil, the third horse 

lulled in horse trials in less than 
two months. . 

Miss Taylor's set-up, like that 
of Mary Thomson, another ris- 
ing star, is very different from 
Mrs Leng's. She has a support- 
ive family bid is very much a 
one-man band. She and her 
business partner Chris Hope 
rent eight boxes from Fergie 
Graham's yard near Banbury. 
Two of the horses in the yard are 
owned by heir commercial spon- 
sor, Schroder Life Assurance, 
bat the others are owned by Mrs 

Marter and Mr and Mrs 
Charles Stratton, who pay Mbs 


Taylor a livery - f« for keeptag 
their horses. The arrangement 
now gives Miss Taylor a secure 
base to work from. 

Sponsorship can make alt Ac 
difference to a yoang event 
rider's progress, as Mary Thom- 
son would testify. She has had a 
harder strugnie than most tn (he 
top. taking tn liveries to make 
ends meet. - 


FOOTBALL 


Speedie hoping for 
Liverpool interest 


Six weeks 


Chelsea have decided that 
David Speedie, their Scottish 
international, can leave Stam- 
ford Bridge after the most 
troubled six months of bis 
career. 


Speedie, dropped from the 
Scotland World Cup squad for 
Mexico this summer at the last 
moment, thenmadean undiplo- 
matic attack against the decision 
and when Kenny Dalglish drop- 
ped out, the Bay forward was 
not considered as a replacement 
Last week Speedie was dropped 
by John Hollins, the Chelsea 
manager, for the Litdewoods 
Cup tie with York and not 
recalled for the League game 
with West Ham on Saturday. 

That convinced Speedie his 
future lay in moving and he now 
hopes Liverpool will increase 
their interest in him, especially 
as the fee Chelsea may require 
for his services may scare off 
most of the other leading dubs. 


avoid their annual fimdmsion 
decline after an encouraging 
start, have signed Dean Emer- 
son. the Rotherham midfield 
player in a deal worth £100,000 
after exchanging Andy Wil- 
liams, the midfield player, and 
Gareth Edwards, a forward, plus 
cash of around £40,000. 

“Emerson is a player for the 
future," said Geprge Curtis, the 
Coventry manager. “We've 
watched him since the start of 
the season, but it was his form 
against us in the Iitxlewoods 
Cup that made up our minds. 
Several dubs were interested in 
him, so we took die plunge." 


struggle 
for Galvin 


• Norwich City will complete 
the £100,000 signing of Bryan 
Gunn, the Scottish under-21 
international goalkeeper, from 
Aberdeen today. The move, set 
up two months ago, was delayed 


through injuries at Prrtodrie, but 
’ Gunn ma 


now 


may move. 


• Oxford United expect to com- 
pleu the signing of Billy While- 
hurst, the Newcastle forward 
who was placed on transfer after 
making obscene gestures to the 
& James's Park crowd after be 
was substituted last week. 


• Alan Mayes, who cost Chelsea 
£200,000 from Swindon six 
years ago, was transferred from 
Carlisle to Blackpool for £5.000 


yesterday. Mayes has already 
scored fivt 


Oxford and Newcastle i 
a fee yesterday of £175,000. 
equalling the Oxford dub record 
paid for Dave Leworthy from 
Tottenham Hotspur last season. 
Whitehurst later discussed per- 
sonal terms with Oxford, who 
hope to include him in then- 
team at An field on Saturday. 


.ive goals for Blackpool 

this season, during a month's 
loan when the thud division 
dub have moved to second spot. 


The Tottenham _ Hotspur 
winger, Tony Galvin, had a 
piece of cartilage removed from 
his injured knee on Monday 
evening. The Tottenham man- 
ager, David Pleat, said: “Al- 
though it is unfair to put any 
time limit on his comeback, he 
is likely to be ready in around 
six weeks." 

Brighton's former Tottenham 
defender, Gary O'Reilly, who 
has missed the last eight 
matches with a severe hamstring 
injury, is to seek advice from 
one of Europe’s leading special- 
ists. O'Reilly is expected to 
spend two weeks at Richard 
Smith's Amsterdam clinic 
where the Brighton captain, 
Danny Wilson, was successfully 
treated for a similar injury at the 
start of the season. 

• Only four directors will run 
Peterborough United in the 
future and the dub's chairman, 
Steve Kendrick, has announced 
a package of measures which be 
hopes will ensure the survival of 
the struggling fourth division 
club. Earner this week the four 
other directors who had made 
up the board resigned. 


WUd card 


• Southend United have agreed 
to pay £20,000 for Martin Ling, 
the Swindon wing, and yes- 
terday the player discussed per- 
sonal terras with the fourth 
division dub. 


confusion 


Coventry Gty, anxious to 


• Preston North End signed 
Steve Taylor, of Rochdale, for 
£20,000 yesterday. 


End of an era as Boniek 
is left out in the cold 


Warsaw (Reuter) — Boniek, 
Poland’s outstanding player of 
the past decade, has been 
dropped for today's opening 


European Championship 


qualifying match against 
Greece. Only one foreign-based 
player, Smolarek. of Eintrachi 

Frankfurt, has been Included in 
the side by Wojciecfa Lazarek, 
the new manager, who has 
Started afresh after the team's 
poor showing in the Mexico 
World Cup finals. 

Boniek. who plays for Roma 
in the Italian league, said yes- 
terday that he does not expect to 
play again for Poland, as 
Lazarek has pledged he will not 
pick players who cannot train 
with the squad for at least a 
week before every match. 
Smolarek, scorer of Poland’s 


manager, said be was dropping 
the Bayern Munich player for 
“unacceptable criticism" of Van 
Der Elst, whom he blamed for a 
defensive error which led to the 
Republic of Ireland's equalizer 
in the 2-2 draw in the first 
European qualifying match last 
month. Van Der Elst, struggling 
to find his form, has also been 
left out. 


only World Cup goal, was 
inclu ’ 


uded at the last moment 
after Dziekanowski dropped out 
with an injured ankle. 


• GRAZ: Austria, still smarting 
from their 4-0 defeat by Roma- 
nia last month, hope to revive 
their hopes of a place in the 
finals when they play Albania 
here today (Reuter reports). 
Austria's defeat in their opening 
Group One match gave Bnanko 
Eisner, the manager, a record of 
only two wins in 10 matches 
during two years in charge. 
Undeterred, he has called for a 
fighting display from his team 
and has included seven new 
players in the squad. 


• BRNO: Czechoslovakia, still 
seeking a team to emulate their 
1976 European Championship- 
winning side, will field only two 
players with more than two caps 


when they open their campaign 
Jnst Fmf 


against Finland today for a place 
in the 1988 finals (Reuter re- 
ports). After a decade without 
notable success, the Czecho- 
slovaks have turned to youth 
with Josef Masopust, the man- 
ager. putting his frnth in an 
inexperienced, but attacking 
side. 


• LUXEMBOURG: Jean-Ma- 
rie Pfeff. the Belgian goalkeeper, 
has been dropped from the side 
to play Luxembourg today . . . 
for speaking out of turn (Renter 
reports). Guy Thys. the team 


• HANOVER: Franz 
Beckenbauer, the West German 
manager, has put the accent on 
youth as he begins to rebuild his 
national team with a friendly 
today against Spain (Reuter 
reports). Because of retirements 
and injuries, only three of the 
team which playea in the World 
Cup final against Argentina - 
Schumacher. Berth old and 
Manhaeus — are available, and 
Beckenbauer has picked a side 
with eight players aged 25 or 
under. By contrast. Miguel Mu- 
noz. Spain’s manager, has been 
able to keep faiih- with the 
players who performed so well 
in Mexico before felling to 
Belgium on penalties in the 
quarter-finals. 


Rio de Janeiro (AP) — Confu- 
sion and uncertainty marked the 
stan of the seoond round of the 
Brazilian national champion- 
ship over the weekend, with 
nobody really sure which teams 
were still in the tournament 

Several dubs have threatened 
legal action against the Brazilian 
Football Confederation to guar- 
antee their participation in the 
second round. And top teams 
such as Vasco da Gama and 
Poruiguesa faced elimination. 
According to regulations, the 
top 24 dubs in the first round 
were to qualify, along with four 
wild-card teams and four teams 
from the second division. 

The confusion began when 
modest Jomville, technically 
eliminated, was awarded a point 
it bad lost to Sergipe after it was 
found that a Sergipe player had 
used an illegal dnig during their 
game. The extra point gave 
Joinville a wild-card berth but 
bumped Vasco da Gama of Rio, 
one of the traditional powers of 
Brazilian footbalL Vasco, who 
bad a dismal first round and 
qualified by the skin of its teeth, 
said they would go to court to 
stop the tournament if they were 
eliminated. 

Octavio Pinto Guimaraes, 
confederation president, then 
used a legal technicality to 
disqualify Poruiguesa of Sao 
Paulo, which was among the top 
finishers in the first round, and 
open a berth for Vasco. 
Ponuguesa went to court and 

S t a restraining order to stay in 
; tournament. 

The three teams insist they 
havequalifred and will take pan 
in the second round. Mean- 
while. the confederation report- 
edly was considering increasing 
the number of qualifying teams 
from 32 to 36, which would let 
all three in. A decision was 
expected this week. 

In opening games over the 
weekend, modest Treze ofCam- 
pina Grande upset powerful 
Samos 1-0 to lead Group L In 
other games. Sao Paulo defeated 
Ponte Praia of Campinas 2-0 
and America or Rio beat cross- 
town rival Bangu 1-0. Joinvilfe. 
and Palmeiras of Sao Paulo did 
not play. 


■} 


HOCKEY 


‘England 9 qualify for 
Champions Trophy 




virtue of 
BS129A reaching the 
semi finals of 
the World 
Cup tour- 
nament at 
Willesden have qualified for the 
Champions Trophy tournament 
to be held next June in Amster- 


By Sydney Frisian 

England by also under the name of Great 


Britain. * 

The technical committee olS 


dam. The International Hockey 
ecided 


the FIH will mm in Brussels on 
October 23 when the teams 
chosen to play in the Cham- 
pions Trophy are expected to be 
announced. Although Pakistan 
have not qualified for the event, 
moves are afoot in the FIH to 


Federation (FIH) had deck 
last year that the first six teams 
from Willesden will contest the 
event. 

This is a qualifying tournament 
for the 1988 Olympic Games in 
Seoul and Phil Appleyard, the 
President of the Hockey Associ- 
ation (controllers of the game in 
England) said yesterday that in 
pursuance of the association's 
initiative it will be Great Britain 
and not England who will play 
in Amsterdam provided the 
FIH approve. 

Appleyard added that the FIH 
had never accepted England's 
record as sufiideni for Olympic 
qualification nor would the 
associations of Scotland and 
Wales accept such a format. 

In order to clear all obstacles 
he said that the best policy to 
ensure qualification for Seoul 
was to play as Great Britain. 

England, regardless of where 
they finish in the sixth World 
Cup. will contest the seventh 
World Cup at Lahore in 1990. 
for which they have qualified. 


Simon Barnes on 
England) page 45 


include them on special 
grounds. These are: that they are 
the Olympic champions; they 
won the bronze medal at the Iasi 
Champions Trophy tournament 
at Karachi and that the 
qualification for the Champions 
Trophy should not be decided 
on one tournament alone. 


TABLES 


QHMpAffintt) 


England 
Somsi Union 
Netherlands 
Argentina 
Pakistan 
New Zealand 

Group B 


P W 
5 4 


F A 
9 4 
6 1 
5 2 
5 7 
8 13 
5 11 


Pb 


■■tv. . 


Australia 

W Germany 

Poland 

India 

Span 

Canada 


L F A 
020 4 
0»4 

1 6 5 
3 5 11 

2 4 12 

3 2 12 


Pt> 

7 


« Not mooting yesterday 's games be- 
twaan Canada and Span and flustrata 
and Poland. 


India’s best yields a 
draw, but all too late 


WestGeimany 

India 


By Sydney Friskin 

India produced their best 
performance, all too late, to hold 
the powerful West Germans to a 
draw in their last Group A 
match of the World Cup tour- 
nament at Willesden yesterday . 
The Germans remained un- 
beaten with two victories and 
three drawn games. 

India took play deep into tire 
German half with many well- 
timed flicks and pushes and the 
artistry of Shahid and Thoiba 
Singh put the German defence 
in difficulty. 

The Germans panicked when 
Fried put a hand in the way of 
Shahid's shot from the left of the 


circle to concede a penalty 
linuie. it 


stroke in the seventh minute. .. 
was well convened by Carvalho 
to give India the lead. 

The Germans forced a short 
comer in the 21st minute and 
the scramble which followed 
Fischer's shot from the lop of 
the circle enabled Dopp to score 
and redress the balance. The 
Germans however were unlucky 
a couple of minutes later when a 
shot by Dopp found the post. 


The tempo of the game quick- 
ened as India persevered with 
their attacks to force a comer 
from which a shot by Vinca 
Kumar was smothered by the 
German goalkeeper. An un- 
availing solo run by Dopp for 
the Germans ended in an even 
first' half. 

The match tilled in favour of 
West Germany six minutes after 
the interval when Fischer con- 
verted a short comer with a 
well-placed shot. A counter 
attack by the Indians however 
brought them the equaliser two 
minutes later when Shahid 
gained possession as ihc ball ran 
loose at a long comer. 

With one minute remaining 
the Indians forced a short comer 
from which ihe goalkeeper 
saved well off Pargat Singh- The 
Germans had altogether seven 
short comers to 1 ndia*s four and 
they had 13 shots at BP" 
compared to India's nine. 

WEST GERMANY; C SchHwWW;' p 
Ftscfter.D Bmwman, V Fried. £f 
Omar. U Hanel T Rack. A ." 
BWw. H Dom I 
INDIA: R Rawii F 


IE 


1? 




MSowtya^Hw ^ J 


Garvaina 

SMgft. B Subramm. I ... 

Umpires: A Ransud (ftvttil 

(England). 



BOWLS 




A scare from Wales 


‘•t. : 


Willie Wood. Scotland's top 
bowler, was given a scare by 
Martin Jenkins, a young Welsh- 
man. before snatching a 7-4. 6-7. 
7-3 victory in the Liverpool 
Victoria Insurance £34.000 In- 
door Supertoowl first round, in 
Manchester yesterday. 

Wood, from Gifford, East 
Lothian, a Commonwealth 
Games and world champion- 
ship medal winner has suffered 
two successive semi-final 
Superbowl defeats, and he was 


-forced to fight-ail-JhewttJth 
laboratory tcdinkiao 
Tydfil. 



thyr Tydfil. Jenkins 1 . 
opening set 7-4. after . ... 

1-4 lead, but battled back s 
cool second set p cifufm anctfifo 
hold off Wood at W 
squared the match at oho set an*' 
Wood started tlw deciding** 
powerfully, with three shots. ** 
the first end. Although Jenj^nf. 
recovered to 3-4 Wood edged 
away to earn a second round 
meeting with Terry Sullivan. _ 


f 


/ 









-^!>0 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 15 1986 

TELEVISION AND RADIO 


Edited by Peter Dear 
and Peter Davalle 



S^ltfan dark horse is now running well 

the BID (BBC! TU. O 


• THEBID(BBCI qi« t-u 
Birmingham's siiing^e 

?aS.n« G ? me L® rc cu *rently 8 2 io 
1 agamsi, seconding (q » leading 

^faSouriS d,n | 
(six months) 






l CHOICE ) 

vole. The International Olympic. 
Committee makes its decision in 
Switzerland on Friday, and this 



late entry dark m0DTns > ^ ^ 00 ™*Y, and this 

has documenury follows tfie B ir- 

TOde S H® “d effort fro" the start (in 

SSL that i""™* Con- March •«, right up I0 lhe ^ 
hlsTon' k.J" J cny hicks the lobbying m Lausanne. 

mata rivL™ a Th? flm r 0n!S *« E HIND THE BAMBOO 
promotions team, fronted by 1 ™ how^S? !S, BC2 -. 8 - 0s F m )' shows 
mer minister of snort rvSL R ^. China has faced up to 

Howell, is concentrating heaWlv S£!S? mon from Hcn& Kong ’ s 
on meticulous planning Md ih™ ^ pr ?^ an,mes; waft *™8 
provision of excellent facilities w “S™, 1 * *] ,egal popular on the 
athletes and spectatoreTheir bid 5! ,l £ lld B 80 1 P unese broadcast- 
has “poientia! forj^ving theeames 2LS*£5* teck «« 
back to the athletes" aftwflS 22^ fe ? lIy S* 0 "* saccharine 
“giantism" of Los An JET P°P Parades and even a variation 

COmiDBnigtnp o„_ An ^£-^ ?y® on Emmerdale Farm, in which a 


commentator Ron WekJjm, emmerdale Farm, in which a 
They, are handicapped hvSH h^I community bewails the loss 
. factors football hrSlSniLT^S old collective form spirit 

Handswonh note M^Britab* SSS I ® F i5? cl t!!? oadvertis - 
stand on South Afti^ JSS2!? _ m f' and ,t s ^ rd to believe that 1 5 


— uuu UIJU2U1 V 

stand on South African sanctions, 
; which has alienated the African 


ago, Chinese television o£ 
only an endless repetition of 


the same three revolutionary films 
and eight operas. 

• TRAVELLERS IN TIME 
(BBC2. 7.35pm). In 1924, a Zep- 
pelin appeared in the skies over 
New York; having flown the 5.000 
miles from Germany, non-stop, in 
Si hours; a world record, and all 
the more remarkable because the 
Allies had actually banned the 
manufacture of the hated Zep- 
pelins after the First World War I. 
As always with this series, a 
fascinating archive film. ■ 

• THE LIFE AND LOVES OF 
A SHE DEVIL (BBC2. 9.25). The 
wonderfully wierd serial from Fay 
Weldon's novel really gets into its 
stride in this second episode. 
Following her husband’s defection 
with a dainty romantic novelist, 
the giantess Ruth (a mesmerizing 
performance from Julie 
T Wallace) assumes the first of her 
many disguises on the road to 
revenge. 


• ROCK SCORPION (Radio 4. 
3.00pmX is a neat little Afternoon 
Play by Sheila Hodgson, set on 
Gibraltar at the end of Spain’s 17- 
year blockade of the rock. Good- 
natured, naive Jim Yales (Andrew 
Burt) derides to many widowed 
barmaid Doris (Charlotte Mitch- 
ell), but is his long-vanished wife 
still alive and well and living in 
Spain? 

Anne Campbell 
Dixon 

• Peter Davalle writes: Before 
forsaking all viewing and listening 
and settling down to a two-week 
holiday, let me add my Choice to 
Anne Campbell Dixon’s; the Mas- 
senet opera Wertfeer (Channel 4, 
9.00pm), Yves Allegret's 1953 
film Les Orgneflleux (BBC2, 
3.45pm), and the Stockholm 
Sinfonietta concert, live from this 
year's Swansea Festival (Radio 3, 

■ 7.30pm) 





Claire Bloom as Emily Dickinson: The Belle of Amherst an ITV, at 10J33ain 



BBC1 


BBC 2 


m 


»«f t i- 





Brian Capras and Natalie Forbes as the 


a Natalie Forbes as the young married couple in the first of 
a new series erf Foil House (TTV, 830pm) 


*r *•**=-• ■ 


■t *»-»-*•• 

amwrr - - 
Ms- • 




land qualify 
mpit‘ii^ Tri 


&P0 Ceefax AM. News headRnea. 
weather, and sport 

B-50 Breakfast Time with Debbie 
Greenwood and Guy 
Michel more in London and 
Frank Bough in Shanghai 
where, at approximately 840 
the Queen begins a walkabout 
in the bazaar. Sue Lawley 
describes the occasion. 
Weather at 625, 725, 825 and 
825; regional news, weather 
and traffic at 6. 57, 727, 737 
and 827; nationaJ and 
intemationai news at 7.00, 

7.30, 8 4X), 8.30 and 930; sport 
at 7.20 and 820; and a review 
of the morning newspapers at 
8.37. 

930 Ceefax 10.30 Play School 
presented by Sarah Long, with 
guest Stuart Bradley. (r)T030 


describe the Queen's 
walkabout in the Shanghai 
bazaar; and her visits to a Tea 
House and the Mandarin's 
Garden. 

74)0 WogaiL Esther Rantzen, 
keeping the seat warm this 
week for Terry, introduces 
Fiona Richmond, a six-year old 
piano playing progidy, Marty 
RandeH arid, via sateffite from 
Los Angeles, Jane Fonda. 
Music is provided by Red Box. 

7.35 The Muppet Show with guest 
Julie Andrews who goes on a 
musical tour of Switzerland 
accompanied by a selection of 
yodeilmg Moppets. 


worries about the effect on 


■tir* ■■ 

•% K.“. -'**!> 
***••' - 

fe > - 

*» t. • • 

4 


; " 

n-- * • ~ 
** *• 


1.00 News After Noon with Richard 
Whitmore and Sue Carpenter, 
indudes news headlines with 
subtitles 1-25 Regional news. 
The weather details come from 
Michael Fish. 1.30 Bertha. A 
See-Saw programme toe the 
very young, narrated by Roy 
Kin near with Sheila Walker. (0 
1.45 Ceefax 322 Regional 
news 

335 Totbe. Adventures of a doll. 
AID The Adventures of 
Buflwhikle and Rocky. 
Episode six. 0)4.15 HeathcBff 
and Co. Cartoon series about 
an aUey cat 435 Hartbeat A 
new approach to the at of 
making pictures. With Tony 
Hart and Joanna Kirk. 

54X) John Craven’s Newsraund 
5.05 Eureka. A lighthearted 
look at the 'inveritkjfV of 
everyday things. Including, in 
this compilation edition, me 

dtsc^rrtroduced byFSuf** 
McDowell, (r) 

5.35 London Plus presented by 
John Stapleton, Linda MnbheB 
and Caroline Righton. 

54)0 News with Nicholas WHchelt 
and Philip Hayton. Weather. 

6.35 The Queen in China. Sue 
Lawley and Mark Brayne 


Colby Enterprises of Jason's 
impending divorce. Is it time for 
her to play her trump card? 
Meanwhile, the Machiavellian 
Sable makes her way to 
Athens.(Ceefax) 

830 Points of View. Barry Took 
selects a tow missives froro.the 
BBC's postbag. 

94)0 News with John Humphrys and 
Andre* HarveyrRegiorral 
news and weather. 

935 The Bid. A documentary, made 
over the course of one year. - 
; following the efforts of The 
people, led by the. former 
Minster erf Sport, Denis 
HoweV, who have been 
lobbying for Birmingham to be 
the host city for the 1992 
Olympic- Games. Presented by 
Ron Pickering, (see Choice) 


Steve Rider. Football: 

Wentoley betweenEngiand ** 
and Northen Ireland; and news 
of the game in Dublin between 
the Repubic of Ireland and 
Scotland. Tony Gubba reports 
from Lausanne on the latest 
news of Birmingham’s bid for 
the 1992 Olympic Games; 
news of the Men's World Cup 
Hockey tournament; and of toe 


Hockey tournament; and of 
Rugby League game betwe 
Huff KR ana the Austrefian 
tourists. 

12.00 Weather. 


SlOO Ceefax. 

9.15 Daytime cm TVm Muriel Gray 
visits a Perthshire farm 9.35 
Ceefax IOlOO For four- and 
five-year olds 10.15 Science: 
paper 1038 Why observation 
is a vital part of a scientist’s Oto 
11.00 Words and pictures. For 

11.40 

Basic French language skills. 

124)2 Matos: trigonometry 1Z2S 
Civilian jobs supporting the 
police force 12A8 Life kn Spain 
. 1.10 Advice on projecting a 
good image at an interview 
1.38 A small country field 
during the four seasons 24)0 
Thinkabout Z15 Sheeiagh 
Gilbey and Paul Cola 
investigate television. 

2^5 Ceefax. 

3A5 Rhm Les OrgnaStoux* (1953) 
starring Gerard Phflipe and 
Mich^e Morgan. Atmospheric 
drama, set in Mexico, about a 
young French tourist who is 
widowed and stranded in a 
small village when her husband 
succumbs to a fever. She 
becomes intrigued with a 
French doctor who is having a 
battle with tin bottle. Based on 
a Jean-Paul Sartre novel and 
directed by Yves Allegret 
(English subtitles) 

5.25 News summary with subtitles. 
Weather. 

5J0 Motor Show 88. The second of 
two visits to the National 
Exhibition Centre in the 
company of Mike Smith and 

Jenni Murray. 

6.00 FSm: Ride Lonesome (1959) 
starring Randolph Scott and 
Karen Steele. Sneriff-tumed- 
bounty hunter, Ben Brigade, 
hits the trail on the tail of the 
killer of his wife. With Lee Van 
Cleef and James Cobum. 
Directed by Budd Boetticher. 

7.10 The Selfish Giant An 

animated version of an Oscar 
Wilde fairy tale, (r) 

735 Tnweten in Time: Across the 
World by Zappefin. The story 
of how. m 1&4. a 660ft airship 
was built, tested and flown 
non-stop from Germany to toe 
United States ^see Choree) 

8.05 Behind the Bamboo Scresn. 

The second and tost 
programme about the 
television industry in China. 

fcar% 

9.00 M*A*S*H. An influenza bug 

■ lays tow all but Hawkeyecrf the 
operating staff, (r) 

925 The Life and Loves of a She 
Devrf. Episode two of the four 
part drama and Ruth adopts 
the first of her efisguises - that 
of a geriatric nurse -in order to 
make the acquaintance of 
■Mary's mother. (Ceefax) (see 

UL20 The Trouble With Sax. Part 
two in toe series of eight 
dealing with sexual problems, 
Peter Barrett, a Nottingham 
GP, explains how attending a 
course at the Institute of 


T 


ITV/ LON DON 




CHANNEL 4 


9.25 Thames news heedBnes. 

9-30 For Schools: maths -toe 
number five* 9.42 Children's 
fantasies about a strange 
house occupied by a lonety old 
lady 9.59 Junior maths: mirrors 
10.16 Chemistry: 
spectrophotometry 10J3 The 
second part of the one-woman 
drama. The BeHe of Amherst, 
starring Claire Bloom 114)0 
History -the Great Depression 
11 32 Music that is prevalent in 
everyday life 1 1.39 A group of 
children visit the mKtary riding 
school m Saumur. 

124» The Giddy Game Show. (r| 
1Z10 Our Backyard, (r) 

1230 Treasure Islantte. Robert 

Ersldne unearths skulktogmry 
in th8 archaeological wood and 
examines the laws of Treasure 
Trove which are patently 
inadequate to ensure that, 
treasures do not dsappear 
into private hands, fr) 

14)0 News at One with John Suchet 
1.20 Thames news. 

1-30 SuperbowL The Liverpool 
Victoria Insurance Suparbowl, 
introduced tw EHon WSteby 
from Granacn's Stage One 
Arena, Manchester. Z30 
• Dinfaig in France. Pierre 
Salinger samples French fare. 

34)0 Take the High Road. Drama 
serial set on the Scottish 
highland estate of G lends rroch 
325 Thanes news headlines 
330 Sons and Daughtars. 
Episode 437. 

44)0 Thomas the Tank Engine 
Friends, narrated by Rtngo 
Starr 4.10 The Trap Door. 
Animated adventures sat in a 
spooky castle 420 T-Bsg 
Strikes Again 445 Hokf TTghft 
with Erasure and The 
Woodentops. 

5.15 In the Land of the E mp erors. 
Leonard Parfdn descries the 
Queen's walkabout in the 
Shanghai bazaar; and her visit 
to a tea-house h the middle of 
an ornamental lake. 

545 News with Alastair Stewart 
64)0 Thames news. 

625 Help] Viv Taylor Gee and Equal 


Opportunities, 

6-35 Crossroads. Barry has a hard 
time of saying his final 
farewells to Sue. 

74)0 TMs Is Your Life. Beware of 
strange man carrying big red 
book as Eamonn Andrews 
begins another series of potted 

biographies of the famous or 
unsung. 

730 Coronation Street. The result 
of the Recorder's bingo 
contest is announced. (Oracle) 

8.00 Pass the Buck. Quiz game tor 
couples, presented by George 
Layton. 

BJJO FuU House. The first of a new 

series of the comedy about 
two fU-matched couples 
sharing a house and a 
mortgage. Starring 
Christopher StrauK, Sabina 
Franklyn. Natalie Forbes and 
Brian Capron. (Oracle) 

9.00 Car Ware - toe 1986 Motor 
Show. Philip Tibenham reports 
on the world-wide battle 
between car manufacturers 
producing too many cars for 
too few customers. 

104)0 News at Ten with Alastair 
Stewart and Sandy Gan. 
Weather followed by Thames 
news headlines. 

1030 SuperbowL Further coverage 
of the Liverpool Victoria 
Insurance SuperbowL 

1225 Night Thoughts. 


TV-AM 


6.15 Good Homing Britain 

presented by Anne Diamond 
and Richard Keys. News with 
Gordon Honeycombs at 620, 
74)0, 720, 84X), 820 and 9.00; 
financial news at 625; sport at 
640 and 7.40; exercises at 
625 and 9.17; cartoon at 725; 
pop music at 725; video report 
at 925; and toe Queen's 
walkabout in the Shanghai 
bazaar at approximately 845L 
The After Nine guests indude 
Helen Gurley-Brown; and there 
is an Item on how a zinc 
deficiency in one's diet can 
lead to problems. 


wnei uAwiwinwirM wiv u* i, . _ - 17 - — . 


patients with sexual probtams. 
10-50 NewsmghL 11 25 Weather. 


:K . 

! S < 


bin fli* 111 ' 


Having a mother and stepfather 
who were never around meant Judy 
was left to look after her younger 
brothers and sisters. 

On the rare occasions that her 
parents were at home they paid her no 
attention. 

Judy’s response was to steal from 
shops and vandalise cars. 

The NSPCC, on hearing of her 
situation, recognised this as an 
extreme case of neglect- She was sub- 
sequently taken into care with her 
brothers and sisters. 

This tragic situation was not an 
isolated case. 

There are thousands of children 
suffering from neglect and mistreat- 
ment that the NSPCC help. But only 
with your assistance. 



220 FBm: Buck Privates* (1941) 
starring Bud Abbott and Lou 
Costello as two friends who 
join a queue and unwittingly 
enlist In the Army. Director by 
Arthur Lubin. 

44)0 Mavis on 4 Maws Nicholson, 
in the first of a Wednesday 
series, Our Public Servants, 
investigates the role of social 
security workers. 

430 Countdown. Yesterday's 
winner is challenged by Colin 
Bevan of Worcester. 

54)0 Hogan’s Heroes*. Vintage 
comedy drama series, popular 
in the early Sixties, about a 
group of resourceful Allied 
pnsoners-of-war incarcerated 
mStaJag13. 

520 The Abbott and CosteBo 
Show* Lou fans for a beautiful 
girl but must buy a house 
before her parents win allow 
them to marry. 

6.00 Famfiy Ties. Domestic comedy 
series about a family of which 
the parents are toe swingers 
and their children toe 
conservatives. 

620 In Time of War 1939 -1945. 
This third series of ten 
programmes based on archive 
film from the, news magazine, 
March of Time, begins with the 
story of how the cameramen 
were given facilities from the 
RAF that were not available to 
British camera crews. (Oracle) 

720 Channel 4 News with Peter 
Sissons and Nicholas Owen. 

7JSO Comment from Paddy 

Ashdown, the MP for Yeovil, 
and Liberal Party spokesman 
on Trade and Industry. 
Weather. 

84)0 Talking to Writers. Hemwona 
Lae in conversation with 
Nadine Gordlmer. (Oracle) 

820 Diverse Reports: I Laughed 
and Had a Baby. Sarah 
Aspmall. expecting her first 
baby in January, argues that 
the natural birtn lobby on one 
side and toe hi-tech campon 
the other are too busy arguing 
amongst themselves to notice 
the reality of hospital maternity 
care. 

94)0 Werther. A ffim interpretation 
of Massenet's romantic opera 
by the Czech director Petr 
WekjL starring the Czech tenor 
Peter Dvorsky and German 
mezzosoprano Brigitte 
Fassbaender. When Werther 
falls in love with Charlotte she 
is unable to respond as she 
feels she has to fulfill her 
mother's wish by marrying 
Albert a more suitable suitor. 
Filmed in Prague, with the 
Symphony Orchestra of 
Prague, conducted by Libor 
Pesek. 

1025 Fane La Vie a L*Envere* (1 964) 
starring Charles Danner and 
Anna Gaylor. A fumy but 
sympathetic story of a man 
going mad. Jacques, a dark in 
an estate agents, living with a 


modeL arrives home aarty one 
day and suddenly discovers 
theioysofsoHtude. Directed 
by Alain Jessua. Ends at 1225. 




im 

: ' 




530am Acktan John 74» Mfta 
Smith's Breakfast Show 920 
Simon Bates find, at 1140 
interview with Bob Geldof) 1220 
Newsbeet (Frank Patrictoa) 

1245 Gary Davies 34»Stava 
Wright 520 Newsbeat (Frank 
Patodga) 545 Bruno Brookes pncL 
at 620, Top 30 album chart) 

720 Tom Robinson 1020-1230 
John PeeL VHF Stereos Radio* 

1 6 400am As Radio 2 320pm 

Davkf HamBton 54)5 John Dtmn 
730 As Radio 2 720 FoBc on 2 820 
Another fXgance Indulgence 
930 Listen to the Band 925 Sports 
Desk 1030 Aa Radio 1 1230- 
400am As Radio 2. 





On median wave. Stereo on . VHF 
News on the hour. Sports 
Desks 125pm, 222, 322, 422, 
535, 622,845 (mf OfVy), 935 
400am Cofin Berry 540 Ray 
Moore 720 Derek Jameson 920 


movement No 2: Rugby), 
Sousa (La reine dele 
mer). 830 News 
84)5 Concert (contd): 

Alessandro Metenl (the 
cantata AH’armL pension, 
with Judith Nelson, 
soprano; Scarlatti (Sonatas 
in A minor, Kk 532, and A 
major, Kk 533), Zappa - 
(Outside now again), 

Reger (Suite in A mmor, Op 
103a, with Hans Mate. 
vioBn). 930 News 
94)5 This Week's Composer 
Handel. Sinfonia In B flat 
and Flute Sonata in D 
(L'Ecote d'Orph6e), Dbcft 



On tanq wave, (s) Stereo on VHF 
535 Shipping. 630 News Briefing; 
Weather; 6.10 Farming. 


Eight years old 
is already 
mother to five 


and Judy 
the 

children. 


Ken Bruce 1 14)0 Jimmy Young 
13Spm David Jacobs 24)0 Gloria 
Hunniford 330 International 
Soccer Special. 5-15 John Dunn 
(joining VHF) 730 Foflc on 2 
(con ti nuing on VHF only) 730 
international Soccer Special. 

920 Listen to the Band 925 Sports 
Desk 1030 Can l take that 
Again? 10.15 The Flying Pickets 
1020 The Sevan Ages? 

Florence Desmond)' 11430 Brian 
Matthew 120m Richard Ctegg 

34XM4M A Littte Night Muskx 


Baroque Ensemble, and 
Stockholm Bach Choir, with 
HiJSevi Martinperto, 
soprano) 

1030 Shostakovich: BerfinPO 
funder Karajan). 

Symphony No 10 

1025 \noBo arm piano redtafc 
Roman Node) and 
Gordon Back. Mozart 
(Sonata in G major, K 
301), Schumann (Fantasy in 
C major. Op 131, arr 


WORLD SERVICE 




A donation of £15.48 can protect 
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